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Full text of "Biographical and reminiscent history of Richland, Clay and Marion counties, Illinois"

I B RARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 



. -37 



\i\\W HRTWIM1 SHRYtt 



(Hliiil LBIMwIWl IPf IT 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



AND 



REMINISCENT HISTORY 



OF 



HIGHLAND, CLAY -MARION COUNTIES 

ILLINOIS 



ILLUSTRATED 



B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY, Publishers 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 
1909 



'. :0- : 



PREFACE, 



All life and achievement is evolution; present wisdom comes frorh past 
experience, and present commercial prosperity has come only from past exer- 
tion and suffering. The deeds and motives of the men that have gone before 
have been instrumental in shaping the destinies of later communities and 
states. The development of a new country was at once a task and a privilege. 
It required great courage, sacrifice and privation. Compare the present con- 
ditions of the residents of Richland, Clay and Marion counties, Illinois, with 
what they were one hundred years ago. From a trackless wilderness and 
virgin prairie they have come to be centers of prosperity and civilization, with 
millions of wealth, systems of intersecting railways, grand educational in- 
stitutions, marvelous industries and immense agricultural productions. Can 
any thinking person be insensible to the fascination of the study which dis- 
closes the incentives, hopes, aspirations and efforts of the early pioneers who 
so strongly laid the foundation upon which has been reared the magnificent 
prosperity of later days ? To perpetuate the story of these people and to trace 
and record the social, political and industrial progress of the community from 
its first inception is the function of the local historian. A sincere purpose 
to preserve facts and personal memoirs that are deserving of preservation, 
and which unite the present to the past is the motive for the present publication. 
The work has been in the hands of able writers, who have, after much patient 
*7. study and research, produced here the most complete biographical memoirs of 
Richland, Clay and Marion counties, Illinois ever offered to the public. Es- 
pecially valuable and interesting are the sketches of representative citizens of 
< these counties whose records deserve perpetuation because of their worth, ef- 
^> fort and accomplishment. The publishers desire to extend their thanks to 
(ti these gentlemen who have so faithfully labored to this end. Thanks are also 
j__^ clue to the citizens of Richland, Clay and Marion counties for the uniform 
57 kindness with which they have regarded this undertaking, and for their many 
^ services rendered in the gaining- of necessary information. 

In placing the "Biographical and Reminiscent History of Richland, Clay 
and Marion Counties, Illinois." before the citizens, the publishers can con- 
scientiously claim that they have carried out the plan as outlined in the pros- 
pectus. Every biographical sketch in the work has been submitted to the 
U yd party interested, for correction, and therefore any error of fact, if there be 
-^ any, is solely due to the person for whom the sketch was prepared. Confident 
-) that our efforts to please will fully meet the approbation of the public, we are. 

Respectfully, 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



NDEX 



Allen, Hon. James Cameron 


84 


Chapman, Robert H 


481 


Fritchey, Theo. Augustus.. 


147 


Anderson, Truman B 


589 


Church, St. James Lutheran 


465 


Fyfe, George S 


519 


Andrews, Sevmour 


533 


Church, St. Joseph's Cath- 




Fyke, John J 


255 


Arnold, James W 


223 


olic, of Olney, 111 


504 


Gaft'ner, Daniel 


I'.ni 


Bachmann, Adam H 


273 


Clark, Thomas J 


117 


Garner, E. P 


;'.1'2 


Bar of Southern Illinois Six- 




Cloud, Silas 


279 


Gassman, Henry 


98 


ty-five Years Ago 


446 


Combs, Lewis 


392 


Genoway, Daniel C 


i:< 7 


Barnes, A. C 


564 


Coan, William E 


500 


Gerber, Lydia Phillips 


327 


Baughman, Edmund C 


154 


Conant, John B 


96 


Goodale, W. B 


586 


Bauer, F. H 


598 


Conant, W. S 


136 


Goodenough, Wilbur Adino. 


120 


Bateman, John A 


91 


Cope, Allen 


304 


Goss, Joseph 


377 


Bates, Francis M 


577 


Copple, Eli 


569 


Graham, Samuel H 


411 


Bayler, David 


290 


Copple, Elmer E 


568 


Graham, Samuel D 


139 


Beck, Daniel 


.3553 


Copple, Jacob 


549 


Grav, John H 


:;n:; 


Beck, John 


401 


Copple, Samuel G 


406 


Gray, William H 


416 


Blankinship, Charles E 


492 


Cox, George 


115 


Green, Jonathan A 


r.i'7 


Boatman, Catherine 


407 


Cunningham, Charles S 


343 


Hardman, Thomas A 


IM; 


Boggs, Franklin Gilbert 


360 


Cunningham Family 


235 


Hargrave, Thomas M 


n;s 


Bonney, Judge John R 


362 


Dace, James M 


328 


Hauser, John T 


387 


Bostwick, Landon M 


320 


Davis, C. R 


486 


Hasler, Christian 


10S 


Bothwell, Henry C 


306 


Davis, John L 


562 


Hartley, William A 


675 


Bower, Hon. William 


219 


Dean Charles 


429 


Haynie D D 


44 


Bower, John 


474 


Delzell. James H 


261 


Heap, Benjamin F 


484 


Boynton, Frank A 


78 


Dew, Charles F 


552 


Heaver, George J 


2!)S 


Bledsoe, E. Louis 


276 


Dillman, William H 


41 


Hedrick, Edwin 


873 


Bradford, Frank 


259 


Donovan, John F. 


99 


Heltman, Philip ..' 


196 


Branch, Levi 


599 


Doser, George Washington . 


437 


Henry, John O 


477 


Breeze, Jacob D 


566 


Downey, Geo. W 


545 


Hershberger, David 


linn 


Breeze, Sidney 


574 


Drapar, William L 


174 


Hester, David M 


843 


Brigham, Robert O 


192 


Dwight, Samuel L 


535 


Hi'ggins, Bryant 


20 


Brinkerhoff, Prof. J. H. G. 


524 


Eagan, Gustin L 


532 


Hiltibidal, George W 


:',](: 


Brockman, John C 


49S 


Early Lawyers 


426 


Hodges, Isham E 


312 


Bronson, Horace 


579 


Eddings, John F 


189 


Holstlaw, Daniel S 


IM 


Brown, Douglas C 


537 


Eighth Illinois Infantry, 




Holstlaw D W 


590 


Brubaker Edgar F 


365 




419 


Holstlaw Richard J 


ii;n 


Brubaker, Eli 


205 


Embser. Jerome N 


463 


Holt, Charles H. ..'..'.'.'.... 


48 


Brubaker, Jacob 


188 


Engle Joseph A 


341 


Hord Henry 


18V 


Brims, Fr. John H 


558 


Evans, H. D 


54 


Holt, Luther 


:::'.! 


Bryan, Family 


231 


Erwin, Crawford S 


66 


Holt, Samuel Marion 


2111; 


Bryan J. E 


244 


Eyer Jacob 


404 


Hopkins Charles W 


339 


Bryan, Hon. William J 


17 


Farquhar, Aaron B 


263 


Horrall, Kenneth D 


202 


Buenger, Rev. John 


95 


Farthing, William H 


253 


Howell. James F 


80 


Bundy, Charles E 


291 


Feltman, Carlos A 


62 


Huddleson, Charles S 


588 


Bundy, William F 


336 


Finch Family 


211 


Hudelson, William H 


860 


Bundy, William Kell 


64 


Finch, Solomon T 


226 


Huff, Nathaniel G 


ISO 


Burgener, Jacob 


329 


Fisher, Alex. W 


516 


Huggins, Earl C 


LOS 


Hurt, Charles V 


606 


Foster, Hon. Martin D 


501 


Hull, Hon. Charles E 


32 


Butler, George 


382 


Foster, Henry C 


525 


Hunter, James 


543 


Castle, J. E . 


169 


Fowler ( Brothers) 


567 


Hyatt, James F 


ITS 


C.imnboll. Georee W. .. 


432 


French. John R. . . 


217 


Idleman. G. A. 


93 



Ingram, William C 
Irwin, Walter C 
James, O. A 
Jennings, Charles E. . . 


... 131 

... 28 
... 71 
... 51V 
513 


Morris, Ira C 
Morrison, George D 
Morrison, Col. Napoleon B 
Neal, Thomas B 
Newman William D 


. . 512 
.. 137 
.. 571 
. . 319 
604 


Shriner, Hon. Harvey W... 
Simcox, George B 
Simer, Rev. William J. ... 
Singer, Judith M 
Skipworth J W 


126 

402 


Jennings, Z. C 
Johnson, William T 
Jolly, John F 


... 208 
... 472 
... 134 
482 


Norfleet, Benj. F 
Olney in Its Infancy .... 
Olney Sanitarium 


.. 332 
. . 423 
.. 149 
159 


Smith, Benj. M 
Smith, John 
Snively & Montgomery 


.,?r 


Jones, J. T 
Jones, Samuel W 
Joy, Thomas L 
Joy, Verne E 
Kagy, Levi Monroe . . . 


. .. 69 
... 221 
. .. 540 
... 580 
... 237 
191 


Pace, H. T 
Palmer, Charles E 
Parkinson, Joseph C. ... 
Patton, Thomas A 
Peak, Joseph S 
Peddicord A M 


, . 42 
. . 469 
. . 368 
. . 224 
.. 294 
176 


Snuffin, Stephen 
Songer, A. W 
Spring, Henry 
Stratton, George W 
Stiindiford, George Washing- 


4:11 

lor, 
443 


Keith, L. B 
Kelchner, Henry F 
Kell, Charles T 
Kermicle, John Taylor . 


. . . 285 
. .. 520 
... 128 
... 459 


Peddicord, Andrew M. .. 
Peirce, John A 
Pllaum, John W 
Phillips, Samuel F 


. . 506 
. . 435 

. . 474 
, . 240 


Stanford, Samuel A 
Stonecipher, Judge John S.. 
Storment, William T 
Storer, Ben. W 


101 

Hi.-, 
144 


Kimberlin, James Henry 
Kinkade James M 


. .. 110 

478 


Porter, Albert G 


. . 530 


Telford, J. D 


27U 




467 




389 




508 


Knight, J. F 
Knoph, Aden 
Kocher Joseph 
Lacey, Winfield S 
Lane, Thomas M 
Larimer, John W 
Leseman, William H. . . . 
Lewis, James B 
Lewis, Richard 
Livesay, Alfred 
Loomis, Frank 


... 542 
. . . 494 
. .. 413 
. .. 386 
. . . 594 
. . . 281 
. .. 430 
... 56 
. . . 178 
. . . 548 
... 295 
510 


Purceil, Francis M 
Pullen, Burden 
Purdue, James F 
Quayle, J. R 
Rainey, George S 
Rapp, Michael E 
Ratcliff, James M 
Ratcliff, Thomas 
Reed, Lewis H 
Reinhardt, Julius 
Reminiscent Sketch 
Rhodes Henry L 


. . 201 
. . 596 

!! 73 
. . 152 
. . 246 
, . 487 
, . 490 
. . 559 
.. 561 
. . 419 
556 


Tolliver, Judge A. N 
Trenary, G. H 
Tufts, C. D 
Tully, Joseph E 
Umfleet, Harrison 
Utterbeck, Jeter C 
Van Alman, William 
Vawter, John H 
Walker, Joseph H 
Watldns, Bartlett Y 
Walton, Joseph W 
Walton Orville T 


Nil 

,-,3!l 

ir.'l 
23 
835 

497 
471 

811 


McBride H S 


410 


Richardson Edward 


283 




76 


McCawley, John I 


... 309 
D 87 


Richardson, James R 


. 307 
396 


Watts, Edwin L 
Wells George C 


588 

\,\ i 


McGahey, George A 
McKnight, Roy H 
McLaughlin, Joseph K. . 


. . . 190 
. . . 297 
. .. 299 
529 


Robb, Francis M 
Robinson, Elbridge 
Rodgers, Benj. F 


, . 528 
. 476 

. . 272 
586 


Welton, Edwin L 
West, Charles H 
Wham, Henderson B 
Wham William 


rut; 
118 
325 
265 


McQuin, Robert T 
Madden, George 
Martin Benj E Sr 


. .. 26 
. . . 451 
29 


Rogers, Frank A 
Rogers, Tilmon J 


. 60 
.. 521 
551 


Wieland, Caleb F 
Wilkinson, William T 
Williams Augustine Robert 


11 1 

17 


Martin, Gen. James S. . 
Martin, John C 
Martin, John E 


. .. 267 

'.'.'. 262 
126 


Rose, Albert M 
Rose, Wiley 
Rowland, Elbert 


. 345 

,. 438 
. 51 
489 


Williams, John P 
Williams, T. W 
Wilson, Hon. Edward S. . . 
Wilson George C 


881 
54 

1C.7 

no 


Martin, William J 
Matthews, Leander C. . . . 
Maxey, Bennett M 
May, Harvey D 
Meagher, Thomas F 
Merritt. Hon. Thos. E. 
Merz, Wilfred W 
Michaels. M. W 
Miller, Franklin P 
Mills, Israel 
Morton, James S 


.-. . 197 
. .. 148 
. . . 104 
... 204 
. . . 601 
. .. 347 
... 121 
... 292 
. .. 581 
. . . 314 
... 485 


Sanders, Charles C 
Sayre, Perry 
Schwartz Brothers 
Schilt, Fred W 
Schultz. John M 
See, Henry William, Sr. . . 
Seller, Frederick 
Seiler, John 
Seymour, Mary A 
Shanafelt, Andrew 
Shook, Samuel 


. 256 
. 390 

.. 248 
. 354 
,. 351 
. 395 
.. 456 
. 356 
. 461 
. 357 
,. 555 


Wilson, William Gilham . . . 
Wilson, Lucian O 
Wilson, Richard 
Wilson, Samuel C 
Wilson, William Henry . . . 
Woods, John 
Woodward, H. N 
Woodard, W. R 
Wolgamott, George 
Xander, John P 
Young, William J 


112 
583 
468 

1X2 
i';'n:i 
:,--, 

;!i7 
I." 



JO 




HON. W. J. BRYAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN. 
BY PROF. J. H. G. BRINKERHOFF. 

William Jennings Bryan, son of Silas L. 
Bryan (see biography) and Mariah Eliza- 
beth (Jennings) Bryan, was born in Salem, 
Illinois, March 19, 1860. As a boy he was 
not different from other healthy, hearty 
American boys, fond of play and fond of 
good things to eat, but rather given to seri- 
ous sport than to mischief^* Among his earli- 
est ambition was the desire to become a min- 
ister, but in early youth that desire was lost 
in the ambition to become a lawyer like his 
father and as that ambition seemed to be 
permanent his training was directed to that 
end. ~) When William was six years old the 
family moved to a large farm just outside 
of the corporate limits of Salem, and here 
he studied, played and worked until ten 
years old, his mother, a remarkably strong- 
minded, clear-headed, Christian woman, be- 
ing his teacher, his guide and task-master, 
his work being such chores as fall to the lot 
of boys in well regulated, prosperous farm 
homes. ^At the age of ten years he entered 
the Salem public school, which he attended 
five years, but was not particularly bright in 
his studies^) his examinations show thor- 



oughness rather than brilliancy, but his in- 
terest in the literary and debating societies 
was early developed and remained while he 
attended the school and still abides, as is 
shown by the Bryan oratorical contest held 
annually in this school, and for which Mr. 
Bryan provides a first and second prize of 
ten and five dollars respectively. 

In 1872 his father made the race for Con- 
gress, and William, then twelve years of 
age, became much interested in the cam- 
paign, and from that time on he cherished 
the thought of some day being a public man 
and a leader of the people. 

At the age of fourteen he united with the 
Cumberland Presbyterian church at Salem. 
While at Jacksonville he took membership 
with the First Presbyterian church, and 
upon his removal to Lincoln, Nebraska, he 
placed his letter with the First Presbyte- 
rian church of that place, and where his 
membership still remains. 

At fifteen years of age he entered the pre- 
paratory department of Illinois College, at 
Jacksonville, and for eight years was a stu- 
dent in that college, spending only his vaca- 
tions at home. (^Mr. Bryan while at college 
was not a great admirer of athletic sports, 
but took a mild interest in base ball and foot 
ball, and was rather an enthusiastic runner 



i8 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



and jumper, and in a contest open to stu- 
dents and alumni, three years after his grad- 
uation, he won the medal for the broad 
standing jump, twelve feet and four inches 
being the distance covered.) 
f While at the preparatory school the first 
year he entered a prize contest and de- 
claimed Patrick Henry's great speech, and 
ranked near the fooyThe second year he de- 
claimed "The Palmetto and the Pine," and 
stood third. The next year as a freshman 
he tried for a prize in Latin prose and di- 
vided the second prize with a competitor. 
The same year he gained second prize in 
declamation. In his sophomore year he 
took first prize with an essay, and in his jun- 
ior year first prize in oration and was there- 
by made representative of his college in the 
intercollegiate oratorical contest at Gales- 
burg, in 1880, where he received the second 
prize of fifty dollars. That great orator, Gen. 
John C. Black, was one of the judges and 
marked him one hundred on delivery. At 
the close of his college life in 1881, Mr. 
Bryan stood at the head of his class and de- 
livered the valedictory. This much is given 
for the encouragement of young men, show- 
ing that improvement only comes with ef- 
fort, and to persevere, though the first at- 
tempt finds you near the foot. 

In the fall of 1881 Mr. Bryan entered 
Union Law College at Chicago, and spent 
much of his time in the law office of Lyman 
Trumbull. After graduation he returned 
to Salem for a short time, and won his fee 
in the county court of Marion county. 

July 4, 1883, Mr. Bryan began the prac- 



tice of law in Jacksonville, Illinois ; he had 
desk room in the office of Brown & Kirby, 
and now came the real test, waiting for busi- 
ness. The first six months were trying and 
he was forced to draw upon his father's es- 
tate for small advances, and at one time he 
seriously thought of seeking new fields, but 
the beginning of the year 1884 brought 
clients more frequently, and he felt encour- 
aged to stay in Jacksonville, and now feeling 
that he could see success, on October i, 
1884, he was married to Miss Mary Baird, 
of Perry, Illinois. 

In the summer of 1887 business called 
Mr. Bryan to the West, and he spent one 
Sunday with a classmate, A. R. Talbot, who 
was located in Lincoln, Nebraska. So greatly 
was he impressed with the opportunities of 
the growing capital of the state that he re- 
turned to Illinois full of enthusiasm for the 
city of Lincoln, and perfected plans for re- 
moval thither. In October, 1887, a partner- 
ship was formed with Mr. Talbot, and 
during the next three years a paying prac- 
tice resulted. 

As soon as Mr. Bryan settled in Lincoln 
he identified himself actively with the Demo- 
cratic party, of which he had been a mem- 
ber in Illinois, and to the principles of which 
his whole being was bound, and made his first 
political speech at Seward, in the spring of 
1888. Soon after he was sent as a delegate 
to the state convention, and in the canvass 
of the First Congressional District he made 
many speeches in favor of J. Sterling Mor- 
ton, and also spoke in thirty-four counties 
in favor of the state ticket. Mr. Morton 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



was defeated by thirty-four hundred, as the 
district was strongly Republican. In 1890 
there was but little hope for the Democrats 
in the First District, and Mr. Bryan was 
nominated without opposition. W. J. Con- 
nell was the Republican nominee. A chal- 
lenge to conduct the canvass by a series of 
joint debates was issued by Mr. Bryan and 
accepted by Mr. Connell, and at the close 
Mr. Bryan won by a plurality of six thou- 
sand, seven hundred and thirteen. Mr. 
Bryan was elected to Congress again from 
a new district which had been formed when 
the state was re-apportioned in 1891. The 
Republican state ticket carried the district 
by six thousand, five hundred, but Mr. 
Bryan was elected by one hundred and forty 
plurality. During the four years he was in 
Congress, he was very active, taking part in 
every important debate and speaking many 
times. He declined to run again for Con- 
gress but later permitted his nomination for 
the Senate, but the Republicans carried the 
state and Thurston was chosen Senator. 

The Democratic National Convention 
convened at Chicago July 4, 1896, and for 
four days a battle of giants ensued over the 
monetary plank in the platform. Speeches 
were made for and against the free silver 
coinage plank by such men of master minds 
and national reputations before the conven- 
tion as Senator Tillman, Senator Jones, 
Senator Hill, Senator Vilas, ex-Governor 
Russell. Senator Tillman favored the ma- 
jority report of the committee, which fa- 
vored the free coinage; all the rest opposed. 
The debate was closed by Mr. Bryan in 



support of the majority report in a speech 
which rang so true and was such a master 
piece of oratory that the convention was 
swept off its feet and brought to Mr. Bryan 
the nomination for the Presidency on the 
fifth ballot on Friday, July loth. After a 
most remarkable campaign he was defeated 
by William McKinley being elected. 

Four years later Mr. Bryan, greater in 
defeat than other men in success, was again 
the choice of the Democratic party for the 
Presidency, and again suffered defeat, Mr. 
McKinley being re-elected. In 1904 the 
Democratic party nominated Alton B. Par- 
ker, of New York, for President, and he 
led the party to the most crushing defeat 
ever suffered by any party since the days of 
John Ouincy Adams. 

In 1908 the Democratic party again nom- 
inated Mr. Bryan, and the Republican party 
William H. Taft and again the decision was 
against the former. Thrice defeated yet 
with each defeat growing greater, ad- 
vocating great principles which he sees his 
political opponents adopt, he stands today 
the greatest living American. 

When in 1906 and 1907 he took a trip 
around the world, he was received every- 
where with such ovations as are seldom ac- 
corded to any, and were never before to a 
private citizen, and his welcome home in the 
city of New York was a demonstration of 
love and respect from Americans to an 
American that has never been equalled in 
the history of the nation. Mr. Bryan may 
never be President, but he has made an 
impress on the nation for good that can 



ilOC.KAPHICAL AND KK M I .\ ISCKNT HISTORY OF 



never be effaced and from his life the peo- 
ples of the world have received an uplift 
that will be felt to bless generations yet un- 
born. In his life of moral purity, in his sin- 
cere Christianity, and in his addresses on 
the duties and responsibilities of life he has 
given a new impulse to many a youth for 
better things and if his work closed now 
the one address "The Prince of Peace," will 
stand a monument, more enduring than 
chiseled marble or moulded brass, standing 
forever as it must in the higher aims, purer 
thoughts, nobler impulses and grander lives 
of the men and women of the America of 
the future. 



BRYANT HIGGINS. 

The family of our subject has been known 
in Richland county since the pioneer pe- 
riod, and, without invidious comparison, it 
can with propriety be said that no other 
name is better known or more highly es- 
teemed in Richland county. Honored and 
respected by all, there is today no man in 
the county who occupies a more enviable 
position in the estimation of the public, not 
alone by the success he has achieved, but 
also for the commendable and straightfor- 
ward policies which he has ever pursued and 
the blameless life he has lived. He has led a 
life of noble endeavor, a life not devoid of 
hardship and failure, but withal successful 
and happy and one that is calculated to ben- 
efit any locality, therefore those who know 
Mr. Higgins are glad to accord him the re- 



spect due him, and in his old age he has the 
cheer of loyal friends and the thought that 
his life has been lived in a manner that has 
resulted in no evil or harm to anyone. 

Bryant Higgins, an account of whose in- 
teresting reminiscences of the early days 
appears in this work, and who has been one 
of the leading business and public men in 
Richland county, who is now living in hon- 
orable retirement, enjoying a well earned 
respite, was born in Edwards county, Illi- 
nois, September 28, 1838. George Hig- 
gins, grandfather of the subject, was a na- 
tive of Connecticut, whose father, Willis 
Higgins, was born in Ireland, and was a 
follower of Cromwell. When that great 
leader went down in defeat, Willis Higgins 
soon afterward emigrated to America, lo- 
cating at Hartford, Connecticut, where he 
passed the remainder of his life. He used 
the prefix "O" to his name, O'Higgins. He 
was a military man most of his life, belong- 
ing to the English army. George Higgins. 
grandfather of our subject, was born in 
Hartford, Connecticut, and became a tan- 
ner, which profession he followed for a 
number of years. He came to Illinois in 
1803 with his family, settling where is now 
Friendsville, Wabash county, then known as 
Edwards county, which included nearly one- 
third of the state. All was then wilderness 
west of the Alleghany Mountains. He was 
among the . early pioneers of this state. 
Many hardships were endured on his trip 
overland. He took up land, cleared and 
improved farms. He was a typical pioneer 
of sterling traits. George Higgins was a 



ICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



RICH LA 

Her. liavi 



r Revolutionary soldit 
iment of Connecticut infantry. 



'ing been in a reg- 
The sub- 

\ ject has a pair of spectacles which his 
grandfather wore from Dorchester Heights 
to Yorktown. It is a relic which he prizes 
very highly. A well one hundred and fifty 
feet deep was dug at Friendsville in those 
days when it was inside of what was then 
Fort Barney, and George and Ransom Hig- 
gins, the latter the subject's father, helped 
dig the same. It is still in use. George 
Higgins died there at an advanced age. Our 
subject's father, Ransom Higgins, was born 
in Hartford, Connecticut, where he was 
reared, and in this state he married Ann 
Bullard, a native of South Carolina. In 1800 
Ransom Higgins made the long trip over- 
land on horseback from Hartford to Vin- 
cennes. Indiana. It was a trip of inspec- 
tion to the vicinity of what is now Friends- 
ville for the purpose of finding a place for 
settlement of a colony which came in 1803, 
already referred to. He returned to Con- 
necticut in 1 80 1 and accompanied the colony 
west two years later. He was a millwright 
and probably built the first mill in this lo- 
cality in 1805 on the Embarass river. It 
was driven by water power. It was located 
where Billet Station now stands on the Big 
Four Railway, the mill having been built for 
a Mr. Brown. The father of our subject is 
described as a very humane man. He was 
a man of great physical endurance, six feet 
and four inches in height and weighed two 
hundred and seventy pounds. About the 
time he built the mill referred to he found 
an Indian in the woods with a broken leg. 



whom he carried to shelter and nursed. 
Soon after this the Indian warned him that 
Brown and his family would be killed. Mr. 
Higgins urged them to leave the mill and 
seek shelter, but they refused and were soon 
afterward killed. Mr. Higgins was after- 
wards known to the Indians as "Big Medi- 
cine Man." He was Justice of the Peace 
for many years, being among the first in the 
territory. He was also Overseer of the 
Poor. He was a man of great bravery and 
courage and made a gallant soldier in the 
War of 1812, and also in the Black Hawk 
war, and enlisted for the Mexican war, but 
was later sent home. He was at the battle 
of Tippecanoe. His death occurred in 1850 
in Edwards county, at the age of sixty-eight 
years. His faithful life companion, a woman 
of many fine traits, passed to her rest in Ol- 
ney at the age of seventy-nine years. They 
were the parents of eight children, all de- 
ceased except the subject of this sketch, who 
was the youngest of the family. 

Bryant Higgins, our subject, was reared 
amid pioneer scenes on a farm. He attend- 
ed subscription and public schools, also had 
private tutors, and made good use of his 
opportunity, such as it was in those early 
days, to secure a fairly good education. He 
studied civil engineering and surveying un- 
der a Mr. Sloan, making rapid progress in 
this line of work, which he followed with 
gratifying results for many years. He lo- 
cated in Richland county in 1851, and has 
since resided here. He did much of the 
'early surveying in Richland county and has 
seen the same develop from the wilderness 



mOGRAIMIICAL AXD REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



to its present high position among the sis- 
ter counties of this great commonwealth, al- 
ways doing his just share in the work of 
progress. 

Mr. Higgins was one of the loyal sons of 
the Union who was glad to offer his services 
under the old flag when the dark days of 
rebellion came, having been among the ear- 
liest to enlist in April, 1861, in Company D, 
Eighth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, his enlistment having been for three 
months. The subject and John Lynch were 
instrumental in organizing Company D, 
which was the first company organized and 
mustered from Richland county. After his 
first term of enlistment had expired he en- 
listed in Company G, Twenty-sixth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, in which he served in a 
most gallant manner until the close of the 
war, having been mustered out at Moscow, 
Tennessee, in 1865. During his service he 
was in the siege of Corinth and the battles 
there, also fought at luka. Farmington, the 
siege of Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, the 
siege of Atlanta. He was wounded at Far- 
mington, Mississippi, May 9, 1862, having 
been hit in the right elbow by a piece of 
shell. He was examined for promotion 
twice and was on General Loomis' staff, but 
was not commissioned, being orderly ser- 
geant. Nineteen years after the war closed 
he was presented with a badge made at 
Meriden, Connecticut. It was given to Mr. 
Higgins by Gen. John Mason Loomis, who 
had it made in recognition of services ren- 
dered by the subject. The arrangement of 
the badge commemorates the Thirteenth, 



Fifteenth, Seventeenth and Twentieth Army 
Corps, the subject having been a member of 
the Fifteenth, John A. Logan's Corps, which 
was never defeated, and was never set 
against a town it did not capture. The old 
cartridge box of forty rounds became the 
badge of the Fifteenth Army Corps. 

After the war Mr. Higgins returned 
home, having married in 1862 while on a 
trip to Springfield, Illinois, on military busi- 
ness. He took up surveying and civil en- 
gineering and did much work settling old 
disputed business. In 1892 he was elected 
County Surveyor, being the only Republican 
on the ticket elected in a Democratic coun- 
ty, which fact proved his great popularity 
in his locality. He has lived in Olney many 
years and has taken an active interest in the 
welfare of the community. In the spring of 
1907 he was elected a member of the City 
Council, being the sixth year as a member 
of the same. He also served one term as 
City Surveyor. He now lives retired in a 
beautiful and comfortable home, modern 
and nicely furnished. 

The wife of Mr. Higgins was Sarah E. 
Marney before her marriage, the daughter 
of Robert and Sarah E. (Morris) Marney, 
pioneers of Richland county, where Mrs. 
Higgins was born. Her father was a na- 
tive of Scotland and her mother was born 
in Kentucky. The Morris family were great 
slave owners, bringing them to Illinois, and 
later freed them here. Colonel Morris, 
grandfather of Mrs. Higgins, also her father, 
Robert Marney, were in the War of 1812 
and were in the battle of Tippecanoe, Col- 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



onel Morris being wounded there. Robert 
Marney was the first Probate Judge of 
Richland county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Higgins are the parents of 
five children, four boys and one girl, two of 
whom are living. Their oldest son. Lew 
K., is in the employ of the Wells Fargo Ex- 
press Company at Oakland, California, 
James, the youngest son, is fireman on the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad; Edward died 
in infancy ; Mary died at the age of sixteen 
years ; Robert was killed in a railroad wreck 
in Arizona when thirty years old, having 
been conductor on the Santa Fe Railroad. 

Mr. Higgins has been a keen and alert 
man of affairs, and long a man of power in 
his community. Over half a century has 
passed since he came to this county and his 
name is inscribed high on the roll of honored 
pioneers. 



JETER C. UTTERBACK. 

Prominent among the leading journalists 
of southern Illinois is the well known and 
highly esteemed gentleman whose name fur- 
nishes the caption of this article. As editor 
and proprietor of one of the influential pa- 
pers in his part of the state he has been a 
forceful factor in moulding sentiment in his 
community and directing thought along 
those lines which make for the enlighten- 
ment of the public and the highest good of 
his fellow men. 

Jeter C. Utterback is a native of Jasper 
county, Illinois, where his birth occurred on 
the 8th day of August, 1873. His father, 



B. C. W. Utterback, a Kentuckian by birth, 
was the son of Thomas Utterback, who was 
also a native of the Blue Grass state, and a 
member of one of the oldest pioneer families 
of Grayson county. In an early day Thomas 
Utterback became prominent in the affairs 
of his county and stood high in the confi- 
dence and esteem of his fellow citizens. In 
1836 he migrated to Illinois and settled in 
the northwestern part of Richland county, 
where he also became a local leader and a 
man of wide influence. He was a farmer by 
occupation, and in due time accumulated a 
large and valuable estate in the county of 
Richland, in which he spent the remainder 
of his days, dying a number of years ago, 
deeply lamented by the large circle of friends 
and acquaintances who had learned to prize 
him for his sterling worth. 

B. C. W. Utterback was reared to matu- 
rity in Richland county, and, like his father, 
followed agricultural pursuits for a liveli- 
hood. In the early seventies he disposed of 
his interests in the county of Richland and 
removed to Jasper county, where he contin- 
ued farming and stock raising until 1878, 
when heturned his land over to other hands 
and took up his residence in Newton, where 
he is now living a life of honorable retire- 
ment. Nancy Ann Hinman, who became the 
wife of B. C. W. Utterback in January, 1856, 
was born in Bartholomew county, Indiana, 
where her father, Titus Hinman, a native of 
Ohio, settled in an early day. She bore her 
husband ten children, seven of whom sur- 
vive, namely : Eva, wife of George E. Hut- 
son, of Dundas, Illinois; Thomas H., As- 
sistant State Librarian, who lives in the 



i:io<;KApmcAi, AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



city of Springfield ; Hester, now Mrs. T. C. 
Chamberlin, of Newton; Charles C. resides 
in Salem; Albert L., of Caney, Kansas, 
where he holds the position of postmaster; 
M. T., of Newton, and Jeter C., whose name 
introduces this sketch. 

Jeter C. Utterback spent his early life in 
the town of Newton, grew up under the 
sturdy and invigorating discipline of an ex- 
cellent home environment and while still a 
lad laid his plans for the future with the 
object of becoming something more than a 
mere passive agent in the world of affairs. 
In due time he entered the schools of his 
native place and after attending the same 
until completing the prescribed course of 
study, in 1889 began learning the printer's 
trade in the office of the Newton Mentor, 
where he made rapid progress and soon 
became quite proficient, besides obtaining a 
practical knowledge of other branches of the 
profession. After mastering the trade he 
worked for a short time in Webb City, Mis- 
souri, and then accepted a position in the 
office of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, where 
he continued until 1891, when he came to 
Salem, Illinois, and entered the employ of 
Mrs. Belle C. Johnson, editress and man- 
ager of The Republican, with whom he 
continued until affecting a co-partnership 
with his brother, T. H. Utterback, for the 
purchase of a paper four years later. 

The Republican under the joint manage- 
ment of the Utterback brothers, continued 
to make its periodical visits about one year, 
when the plant passed into the hands of G. 
C. Harner, the subject going to the town 
of Carrollton, where he followed his chosen 



calling until his return to Salem in 1896, 
when he again became interested in The Re- 
publican, buying the paper that year from 
his brother, who in the meantime had suc- 
ceeded Mr. Harner as editor and proprietor. 
On becoming sole proprietor of The Repub- 
lican Mr. Utterback infused new life into 
the paper and it was not long until its influ- 
ence began to be felt throughout the county, 
not only as an able political organ, but as a 
clean, dignified and popular family paper, 
through the columns of which appeared all 
the latest news, also much of the best liter- 
ature of the day, to say nothing of the 
numerous productions from the pens of local 
writers. Since assuming control he has 
enlarged the paper as well as added to its 
interest and popularity besides purchasing 
new machinery, presses and other appliances 
and thoroughly equipping the office until the 
plant is now one of the most valuable of the 
kind in Marion county, and in all that con- 
stitutes a live up-to-date sheet The Repub- 
lican compares favorably with any other lo- 
cal paper in the southern part of the state. 
Mechanically it is a model of the printer's 
art, and politically is staunchly and uncom- 
promisingly Republican, being the official 
party organ of Marion county, while its in- 
fluence in directing and controlling current 
thought in relation to the leading questions 
and issues of the day has brought it promi- 
nently to the notice of party leaders through- 
out the state. 

As an editorial writer, Mr. Utterback is 
clear, forceful, elegant, at times trenchant, 
and in discussing the leading questions be- 
fore the people he is a courteous but fearless 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



and formidable antagonist. On all matters 
of public policy he occupies no neutral 
ground, but fearlessly and honestly advo- 
cates what he considers to be for the best 
interest of the people and regardless of con- 
sequences. In addition to its prominence 
and influence as a party organ, Mr. Utter- 
back has endeavored to make his paper 
answer the purpose of an educational factor 
and such it has indeed become, as its con- 
tents, both political and general, tend to 
improve the mind and cultivate the taste 
rather than appeal to passion and prejudice, 
after the manner of too many local sheets. 

In recognition of valuable political ser- 
vices as well as by reason of his fitness for 
the position, Mr. Utterback in February, 
1907, was appointed by President Roosevelt, 
postmaster of Salem, the duties of which 
responsible position he has discharged with 
commendable fidelity, proving an able, cour- 
teous and truly obliging public official. At 
the time of his appointment the office was 
in the third class with a salary of $1,700 
per year, but since then the business has in- 
creased to such an extent that it is now a 
second class office with fair prospects of 
advancing. 

Since the establishment of a post-office 
at Salem many years ago, no young man 
was appointed postmaster until the honor 
fell to Mr. Utterback, and to say that he has 
been praiseworthy of the trust and dis- 
charged the duties as ably and faithfully as 
any of his numerous predecessors is to state 
a fact of which all are cognizant, and which 
all, irrespective of political alignment, most 
cheerfully concede. The high esteem in 



which he is held as an editor, public servant 
and enterprising citizen, indicate the pos- 
session of sterling manly qualities and a 
character above reproach, and that he is 
destined to fill a still larger place in the pub- 
lic gaze and win brighter honor with the 
passing of years, is the belief of his friends 
and fellow citizens, based, they say, on the 
able and conscientious manner in which he 
has fulfilled every trust thus far confided to 
him. Mr. Utterback, although a young man, 
has achieved success such as few attain in 
a much longer career, and the hope the peo- 
ple of Salem and Marion county entertain 
for his future seems fully justified and well 
founded. 

Mr. Utterback is a splendid type of the 
intelligent, broadminded American of today, 
and personally as well as through the me- 
dium of the press he is doing much to foster 
the material development and intellectual 
growth of his city and county, besides exer- 
cising an active and potential influence in 
elevating the moral sentiment of the com- 
munity. He holds membership with the 
Pythian Lodge of Salem, and has labored 
earnestly to make the organization answer 
the purposes which the founders had in 
view, exemplifying in his daily life and con- 
duct the beautiful principles and sublime 
precepts upon which the order is based. He 
is a believer in revealed religion, and while 
subscribing to the Methodist faith is not 
narrow in his views, having faith in the 
mission of all churches and to the extent of 
his ability assisting the different organiza- 
tions of his city, although devoutly loyal 
to the one with which identified. 



HIOGKAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Mr. Utterback owns one of the most beau- 
tiful and attractive homes in Salem, which 
is a favorite resort of the best social circle 
of the city, and within its walls reigns an 
air of genuine hospitality which sweetens 
the welcome extended to every guest that 
crosses the threshold. The presiding spirit 
of this attractive domicile is a lady of intel- 
ligence and gracious presence who presides 
over the family circle with becoming grace 
and dignity, and whose popularity is only 
bounded by the limits of her acquaintance. 
The maiden name of this estimable woman 
was Charlotte B. Merritt, and the ceremony 
by which it was changed to the one she now 
so worthily bears as the wife and helpmeet 
of the subject was solemnized on the 2nd 
day of November, 1898. Mrs. Utterback 
is the daughter of Hon. T. E. Merritt, of 
Salem, ex-Senator from Marion county, and 
a man of influence and high standing both 
politically and socially. Mr. and Mrs. Ut- 
terback have one child, a son, Tom C., who 
was born October 17, 1901, and for whose 
future his fond parents entertain many ar- 
dent hopes. 



ROBERT T. McQUIN. 

In the pursuit of his business career Mr. 
McQuin has displayed unfaltering devotion 
to the principles he has learned to cherish 
and his honesty and integrity have earned 
him a place among the representative and 
staunchest citizens of Marion county, Illi- 
nois. 



Robert T. McQuin was born in Johnson 
county, Indiana, October 16, 1853, the son 
of William I. McQuin, a native of Kentucky 
who went to Indiana when a young man. 
He was a carpenter by trade. He moved 
from Indiana soon after our subject was 
born, locating at Oconee, Shelby county, Il- 
linois, where he lived for three or four years. 
Then he moved to Salem, Illinois, in July, 
1859. The first work he did here was on 
the Park Hotel, which was built in that year 
by Amos Clark and which was known then 
as the Clark House. William I. McQuin 
continued to live in Salem, where he was 
regarded as a man of integrity and influ- 
ence, until his death in October, 1899. The 
mother of the subject of this sketch was 
known in her maidenhood as Mary E. Stur- 
geon, who was a native of Kentucky and a 
woman of many estimable traits. Her moth- 
er lived to reach the remarkable age of nine- 
ty-seven years. One of her brothers was a 
policeman in St. Louis, Missouri. She died 
in April, 1908, in Denison, Texas, where 
she was living with her son, Edwin S. Mc- 
Quin. 

The father and mother of the subject 
were the parents of nine children, five of 
whom are living. Their names in order of 
birth follow: Tarlton, deceased; William F., 
deceased; Robert T., our subject; James S., 
who is living at New Castle, Indiana, and 
is secretary and treasurer of the Hoosier 
Kitchen Cabinet Company, which is doing 
an extensive business all over the world; 
Sarah E., deceased; Agnes, deceased; Ed- 
win S., living at Denison, Tex., being a con- 
ductor on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



-'7 



Railroad Company's lines: John T., a car- 
penter, living in St. Louis; May lives with 
her brother in Denison, Texas. 

These children all received every advan- 
tage possible by their parents, who tried to 
raise them in a wholesome home atmosphere, 
setting worthy ideals before them at all 
times. 

Robert T. McOuin, our subject, lived with 
his father until he was twenty-five years old. 
assisting with the work about the place and 
attending the public schools of Salem, in 
which he diligently applied himself, and re- 
ceived a fairly good education. When twen- 
ty years old he began working as a harness 
maker and two years later commenced the 
shoemaker's trade, following this with much 
success until 1881, when he launched into 
the shoe business for himself, having con- 
tinued the same ever since with satisfactory 
results, building up a large and extensive 
trade by reason of his honest business prin- 
ciples and his uniform courtesy to custom- 
ers. His trade extends to all parts of the 
county and his store is well known to all 
the citizens of Salem and surrounding towns 
for his patrons have learned that he handles 
the best grade of footwear in the market and 
always gives good value. He augmented his 
business in 1889 by adding a complete stock 
of harness and by doing a general line of re- 
pair work. He now handles a full line of 
harness and similar materials. He manufac- 
tures most all of his heavy harness and some 
buggy harness, being recognized as the lead- 
ing dealer in this line in Marion county. 

Mr. McQuin was happily married to Jen- 



nie Slack, October 16, 1879, the refined and 
accomplished daughter of Frederick W. 
Slack, who lived in Salem at that time. Her 
family were natives of Kentucky. It was 
rather singular that this family moved from 
Kentucky to Oconee, Illinois, and then to 
Salem simultaneously with the McQuin fam- 
ily ; however the last move was made a few 
years after the McQuin family came to Sa- 
lem. Two children have been born to the 
subject and wife, namely : Maud, who is the 
wife of Dwight W. Larimer, in the abstract 
business in Salem ; Ralph is the second child 
and a student of the Salem public schools. 

Mr. McOuin has been twice honored by 
being elected City Council of Salem. He 
is associated with his brother-in-law, \Y. S. 
Slack, in the monument business in Salem, 
which is also a thriving business, the firm 
name being R. T. McQuin & Company. 

Our subject is a Modern Woodman in his 
fraternal relations and he belongs to the 
Presbyterian church, having been a consist- 
ent member of the same for a period of thir- 
ty-four years in 1908. Mrs. McQuin also 
subscribes to this faith. Our subject has 
been a deacon in the church and is now a 
ruling elder. 

Mr. McQuin has ever been known as a 
loyal citizen and has done his share in aid- 
ing the march of progress and development 
in this county, and during his residence in 
Salem his characteristics have won for him 
recognition as a man of upright dealing and 
by his many virtues he has won the respect 
and esteem of his fellow citizens. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



WALTER C. IRWIN. 

One of the progressive and well known 
business men of Salem, Marion county, Illi- 
nois, is the subject of this sketch, who has 
spent his life in this vicinity, a life that has 
been very active and useful, for he has not 
lost sight of the fact that it is every man's 
duty to aid in the upbuilding of his county 
in all lines of development while he is ad- 
vancing his own interests, and because of the 
fact that he has ever taken an interest in 
the public weal, has led an honorable and 
consistent career, being at present one of the 
best known druggists of the county, the pub- 
lishers of this work are glad to give him 
proper representation here. 

Walter C. Irwin, of the Salem Drug Com- 
pany, was born in luka, this county, in Oc- 
tober, 1866, the son of Dr. J. A. Irwin, a 
native of Johnson county, Missouri, who 
came to luka at the close of the war, having 
been a surgeon in the Confederate army un- 
der General Price's command. He was at 
the battle of Wilson's Creek, near Spring- 
field, Missouri, and also the battle of Pea 
Ridge, Arkansas, in addition to many other 
smaller engagements. He successfully prac- 
ticed his profession from 1865 to 1905, and 
is now living at St. Augustine, Florida, 
where he went in 1905 on account of his 
health. 

The mother of the subject was Mary 
Dubbs, a native of Pennsylvania, who came 
to Illinois in 1865. She was a woman of 
many praiseworthy traits and passed to her 
rest in 1894 at luka. Four children were 



born to the parents of our subject, named in 
order of birth as follows : \Valter,subject of 
this sketch; Byrdie, the wife of Charles A. 
Bainum, cashier of the First National Bank 
at Bicknell, Indiana ; J. Max is practicing 
medicine at St. Augustine, Florida; Maggie 
Alice died in 1880. 

Walter Irwin was reared at luka, where 
he attended the common schools, later tak- 
ing a course in Lincoln University at Lin- 
coln, Illinois, which he attended for two 
years, making a brilliant record as a student. 
After this he attended the Business Univer- 
sity at Lincoln for one year, having grad- 
uated from the same. He then returned to 
luka and was engaged in general merchan- 
dising and the drug business until 1894, 
when he came to Salem and embarked in 
the drug business. While at luka he was 
postmaster under Cleveland and resigned to 
come to Salem, and his father was appointed 
postmaster in his place. Our subject has 
been in Salem ever since, with the exception 
of two years spent as a traveling salesman, 
when he resided in Bloomington, this state. 

The Salem Drug Company was organized 
August 26, 1907. Prior to that time Mr. 
Irwin owned the store, having established it 
in 1904, and with the exception of the two 
years noted he has been continuously identi- 
fied with it, building up an excellent trade 
with the people of Salem and the entire coun- 
ty, as the result of his unusual knowledge of 
this line of business and his courteous and 
impartial treatment of cutsomers. 

Mr. Irwin was married in 1892 to Maggie 
Stevenson, who was born in Stevenson 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



township, this county, the accomplished 
daughter of Samuel E. Stevenson, now de- 
ceased, for whom the township was named. 
lie was a prominent citizen of the county for 
many years. 

One son, a bright and interesting lad, has 
added cheer and comfort to the home of our 
subject, who bears the name of Eugene E., 
and whose date of birth occurred November 
5, 1893, while the family was residing at 
luka. 

Mr. Invin has prospered as a result of his 
well directed energies and has considerable 
business interests besides his drug store, 
among which may be mentioned a half inter- 
est in the Fibernie Sweep Clean Company, 
manufacturers of a preparation for cleaning 
floors, carpets, etc., the main office being lo- 
cated at Salem with branches in Springfield, 
Missouri ; Memphis, Tennessee, and Fort 
Smith, Arkansas. The business of this con- 
cern is growing at a rapid stride. Mr. Ir- 
win is a stockholder and director in the Sa- 
lem National Bank. He is also proprietor 
of the White Foam Company, which manu- 
factures a preparation for cleaning fabrics 
without rubbing and which at present prom- 
ises to become in immense demand. Our 
subject is also a stockholder and director in 
the Oleite Manufacturing Company, of St. 
Louis, which manufactures leather dress- 
ings. 

Mr. Irwin has served in a most acceptable 
manner as a member of the Salem Board of 
Education. In his fraternal relations he is 
a Mason, a member of the Knights of Py- 
thias, the American Home Circle, Ben Hur 



and the Eastern Star, and Mr. and Mrs. Ir- 
win are members of the Presbyterian church. 
They live in a modern, comfortable and 
nicely furnished home, which is presided 
over with rare grace and dignity by Mrs. 
Irwin, who often acts as hostess to 
numerous admiring friends, and every- 
one who crosses its threshold is made 
partaker of the good will and hos- 
pitality that is always unstintingly dis- 
pensed here, and because of their genuine 
worth, integrity, uprightness and pleasing 
manners no couple in Marion county en- 
joy to a fuller extent the esteem and friend- 
ship of all classes than our subject and wife. 



BENJAMIN E. MARTIN, SR. 

It is safe to venture the assertion that no 
one attains eminence in business or any pro- 
fession without passing through a period of 
more or less unremitting toil, of disappoint- 
ments and struggles. He who has brought 
his business to a successful issue through 
years of work and has established it upon 
a substantial basis, and yet retains the ap- 
pearance of youth, who has in his step the 
elasticity of younger days and shows little 
trace of worry or care that too often lag the 
footsteps of the direction of large affairs, 
must be a man possessed of enviable char- 
acteristics. Such is a brief word picture of 
the worthy gentleman whose name forms the 
caption of this sketch, as he now appears, 
after a long, active and prosperous business 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



career, the peer of any of his contemporaries 
in all that enters into the make-up of the suc- 
cessful man of affairs or that constitutes a 
leader in important business enterprises. 
Therefore, by reason of the fact that Mr. 
Martin has attained worthy prestige as a 
business man, and also because he was one 
of the patriotic sons of the North who went 
forth on many a hard fought battlefield to 
defend the flag in the days of the Rebellion, 
and also because of his life of honor, it is 
eminently fitting that he be given just rep- 
resentation in a work of the province as- 
signed to the one at hand. 

B. E. Martin was born in what was for- 
merly Estillville. now Gate City. Virginia, 
February 27, 1845. the son of John S. Mar- 
tin, also a native of Virginia and the repre- 
sentative of a fine old Southern family. The 
father of the subject was Clerk of the Court 
in his home county for a period of twenty- 
four years. He moved to Illinois in 1846 
and entered government land near Alma, the 
land that Alma now stands on. He laid out 
the town of Alma and there went into the 
mercantile business, in which he remained 
until the breaking out of the Civil war. He 
died in that town in 1866. He was a man 
of unusual business ability and became well 
known in his community. The mother of 
the subject was Nancy Brownlow, a native 
of Virginia. She dide shortly after she 
moved to Illinois. She is remembered as a 
woman of gracious personality. Seven chil- 
dren were born to the parents of our subject, 
four sons and three daughters, named in 01- 
der of birth as follows : Eliza, deceased ; Mrs. 



Nancy Bradford, of Greenville, Illinois, 
.Emily, deceased; Robert; Mrs. Kate Ben- 
nett, of Greenville, Illinois; Thompson G., 
of Salem; B. E., our subject, being the 
youngest. The father of these children was 
married three times, his first wife being Ma- 
linda Morrison, of Estillville, Virginia, to 
whom three children were born, two dying 
in infancy, the one surviving becoming Col. 
James S. Martin, now deceased, who lived 
to be eighty years of age, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this volume. The sec- 
ond wife was the mother of the subject of 
this sketch ; the third wife was Jane See, to 
whom one child was born, who died in the 
Philippine Islands. 

B. E. Martin, Sr., was reared in Alma, 
this state, remaining there until he was six- 
teen years of age, attending the local school. 
When only sixteen years old he could not re- 
press the patriotic feeling that prompted him 
to shoulder arms in defense of the nation's 
integrity, consequently on July 25, 1861, he 
enlisted in the Fortieth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry. He was in many skirmishes and en- 
gagements, having fought in the great bat- 
tle of Shiloh, where his regiment lost two 
hundred and forty-seven men in the two 
days' fight, and he was in several small en- 
gagements as they advanced on Corinth. 
His brother, Thomas G.. was in every en- 
gagement and skirmish in which this regi- 
ment was involved, never being sick a day. 
and never missing a roll call. He enlisted 
in 1 86 1 and at the expiration of his term of 
three years re-enlisted as a veteran and 
served until the close of the war. Our sub- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



ject had three brothers and one half-brother 
in the army. 

After his career in the army Mr. Martin 
went into the drug business at Greenville, 
Illinois. He later went to Olathe, Johnson 
county, Kansas, where he engaged in the 
same line of business from 1867 to 1869; 
then he returned to Marion county, Illinois, 
and resumed the drug business here, in 
which he remained a short time. Selling 
out his stock of drugs, he began selling 
agricultural implements, adding the lumber 
business in connection with his brother. He 
made a success of all the lines in his vari- 
ous locations. In 1877 he established his 
present business, that of wholesale seeds, in 
which he has quite an extensive trade, hav- 
ing become known as the leading seed man 
in this locality, consequently his trade ex- 
tends to all parts of the country. He uses 
the most modern and highly improved ma- 
chinery for cleaning seeds. 

Our subject was united in marriage in 
November, 1866, to Florida Cunningham, 
who was born and reared in Salem, the 
daughter of John Cunningham, then a mer- 
chant of Salem. He was a man of honest 
principle and influence in his community. 

Eight children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife, one of whom died in infancy, 
the others are now living in 1908. They 
are: Mary, the wife of Charles T. Austin, 
of Indianapolis; B. E., Jr., who is engaged 
in the general mercantile business in Salem ; 
Bertha is the wife of John Gibson, living in 
Manila, Philippine Islands; Nancy is living 
in Salem; John C. is cashier of the Salem 
National Bank ; Edith and Gena. 



The subject has achieved success in an 
eminent degree owing to his well directed 
energy and honesty and persistency. He is 
a stockholder and director of the Salem Na- 
itonal Bank. He owns a modern, comfort- 
able and nicely furnished residence. 

Mr. Martin has served as Supervisor of 
Salem township. He discharged the duties 
of this office with his usual business alacrity 
and foresight. He is a Democrat and has 
always been active in politics. In his fra- 
ternal relations he affiliates with the Ma- 
sons. He also belongs to the Grand Army 
of the Republic, and is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, also the Gid- 
eons. He is an honorary member of the 
Woodmen, and he is well and favorably 
known in lodge circles, business life and 
social relations, being regarded as one of 
the most trustworthy and substantial citi- 
zens of Salem and Marion county. 

Before closing this review it would not be 
amiss to quote the following paragraph 
which appeared in a Salem paper some time 
since under the caption, "A Remarkable 
Record" : 

"There resides in this city four brothers 
who have a record which is remarkable and 
doubtless without a parallel among their 
fellow countrymen. They were all soldiers 
in the Civil war; two enlisting in the Forti- 
eth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in 
1 86 1, and the other two in the One Hundred 
and Eleventh Regiment of this state in 1862. 
They participated in every battle in which 
their respective regiments were engaged. 
were never in a hospital, and none of them 
ever received the slightest wound, notwith- 



3 2 



niOGKAI'HICAL AND KK.MIXISCKXT HISTORY OF 



standing they were in the thickest of fights 
where thousands were slain or wounded. At 
the battle of Shiloh nearly three hundred 
of the Fortieth Regiment were killed or 
wounded, but 'Tom' and 'Ben' were among 
those who came out without a scratch. 
These four brothers with the remarkable 
record are James S., Thomas, Robert and 
Benjamin E. Martin, honorable, substantial 
citizens of Salem." 



HON. CHARLES E. HULL. 

One of the notable men of his day and 
generation, who has gained success and rec- 
ognition for himself and at the same time 
honored his county and state by distin- 
guished services in important trusts, is 
Hon. Charles E. Hull, of Salem, who 
holds worthy prestige among the leading 
business men of Southern Illinois. Distinct- 
ively a man of affairs whose broad and liber- 
al ideas command respect, he has long filled a 
conspicuous place in the public eye, and as 
a leader in many important civic enterprises 
as well as a notable figure in the political 
arena of his day, he has contributed much 
to the welfare of his fellow men and at- 
tained distinction in a field of endeavor 
where sound erudition, mature judgment 
and talents of a high order are required. 
Aside from his honorable standing in pri- 
vate and public life, there is further pro- 
priety in according him representation in 
the work, for he is a native son of Marion 



county, which has been the scene of the 
greater part of his life's earnest labors, his 
home being in the beautiful and attractive 
little city of Salem, where he it at present 
the head of a large and important business 
enterprise, and where he also commands the 
esteem and confidence of all classes and con- 
ditions of the populace. 

Mr. Hull belongs to an old and highly 
esteemed family that figured in the early 
history of Kentucky, to which state his 
great-grandparent, John Hull, emigrated 
from New Jersey in 1788. Here Samuel 
Hull was born in 1806. About the year 1815 
the Hulls disposed of their interests in the 
South and migrated to Illinois, settling at 
Grand Prairie, Clinton county, where John 
Hull died in 1833. Before his death he sent 
his son, Samuel, into what is now the county 
of Marion to a place near the site of Wal- 
nut Hill, where he, in 1823, at the age of 
seventeen, attended the first school ever 
taught in the county. At this time Marion 
was created from Jefferson county and the 
young man remained here, marrying in 1831 
Lucy, the daughter of Mark Tully, the 
founder of Salem. He was made Recorder 
in 1833, which office he held until 1837, 
when he was made Sheriff, filling the latter 
position by successive re-elections six terms, 
the most of the time without opposition. 
Later in 1849 he was further honored by 
being elected County Judge, this being un- 
der the old law which provided for two As- 
sociate Judges, but Mr. Hull's knowledge of 
law together with his fitness for the position 
enabled him to discharge his judicial func- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COTNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



33 



tions without much assistance from the hon- 
orable gentleman who occupied the bench 
with him. He proved an able and judicious 
judge, and during his incumbency of four 
years transacted a great deal of business and 
rendered a number of important decisions, 
but few of which suffered reversal at the 
hands of higher tribunals. Shortly after re- 
tiring from the bench he was appointed by 
President Pierce postmaster of Salem, and 
four years later he was reappointed by 
President Buchanan, holding the position 
during the latter's administration, and in 
this, as in the other offices with which he 
was honored, proving a capable and popu- 
lar public servant. 

Samuel Hull was a pronounced Demo- 
crat and influential member of the party un- 
till the breaking out of the Rebellion, when 
he became a Republican and a great admirer 
of President Lincoln, whom he supported in 
the election of 1860, and for whom he ever 
afterward entertained feeling of the most 
profound regard. He was a prominent fig- 
ure in the affairs of Marion county for over 
eighty years, during which period he be- 
came widely and favorably known, 
and his influence was always on the side of 
right as he saw and understood the right. 
During his later years he lived a life of hon- 
orable retirement at his beautiful rural home 
near Salem, having purchased the land 
from the Government shortly after coming 
to Marion county, building with his own 
hands in 1831 a double log house, which still 
stands the oldest building in Marion 
county. This sterling citizen and faithful 
3 



official lived to a good purpose and his mem- 
ory is cherished as a sacred heritage not 
only by his immediate family and friends, 
but by the entire community, all with whom 
he was accustomed to mingle, feeling his 
death as a personal loss. He reached a 
ripe and contented old age and it is a fact 
worthy of note that he and his faithful wife 
and helpmeet died the same night after a 
mutually happy and prosperous wedded ex- 
perience of fifty-nine years. Samuel Hull 
and wife were held in high esteem by near- 
ly every citizen of Marion county, their cir- 
cle of friends and acquaintances being large 
and their names familiar sounds in almost 
every household in both city and country. 
He served in the Black Hawk war, besides 
participating in many other exciting strug- 
gles during the pioneer period, as he was a 
leader among his fellow men and always 
stood for law and order, sometimes, too, at 
his personal risk. The land which he en- 
tered and improved and on which he spent 
the greater part of his life is now owned by 
his grandson, Charles E. Hull. This piece 
of land, now within the city limits of Sa- 
lem, has the unique distinction of the few- 
est transfers, it having been transferred by 
purchase from Samuel direct to Charles. 

Erasmus Hull, son of the aforementioned 
Samuel and father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born August 31, 1832, in Ma- 
rion county, Illinois, and spent his entire 
life near the place of his birth, having for 
many years been identified with the town 
of Salem, and a leader in its business and 
financial interests. He was a merchant and 



34 



I!I()C,KAIM!ICAI. AXI) KKM I \ ISCKNT HISTORY OF 



banker and in addition to achieving marked 
success in those capacities he was also an 
enterprising man of affairs, public spirited 
in all the term implies and wielded a strong 
influence in behalf of all measures and 
movements having for their object the ma- 
terial advancement of the community and 
the social and moral welfare of the people. 
A leading spirit in the organization of the 
Salem Bank, in 1869, and one of the orig- 
inal stockholders, he was a member of the 
board of directors from that time until his 
death, and to his mature judgment, sound 
business ability and familiarity with finan- 
cial matters were largely due the continued 
growth and signal success of the institu- 
tion. He was also interested in the Ma- 
rion County Loan and Trust Company, the 
predecessor of the bank, and always kept in 
close touch with the finances of the state 
and nation as well as with general business 
affairs, on all of which he was well in- 
formed and on not a few was considered an 
authority. 

Mr. Hull was the first Supervisor of Sa- 
lem township, also Chairman of the County 
Board for a -number of years, besides serv- 
ing a long time as School Director. In 
these different capacities he discharged his 
official duties faithfully and effectively, tak- 
ing a leading part in educational matters 
and using his influence in every laudable 
way to promote the prosperity of the com- 
munity and the happiness of the people: In 
addition to his mercantile and financial busi- 
ness he was quite prominently interested in 
the manufacture of flour and lumber, be- 



ginning to operate a mill in 1853, and con- 
tinuing the business with encouraging sue* 
cess as long as he lived. He also conducted 
a large packing house in Salem before the 
days of trusts and combines and built up an 
important and far-reaching industry, buying 
nearly all the hogs in the adjacent country 
and shipping his meats to the leading mar- 
kets, where they commanded good prices. 
He was a man of brain and of practical 
ideas, combined with solid judgment, wise 
foresight and he seldom failed in any of his 
undertakings. In politics he was an un- 
swerving Democrat, and an influential 
worker for the success of his party and its 
candidates, though not a partisan in the 
sense of aspiring for office. He discharged 
his duties of citizenship in the spirit becom- 
ing the progressive and broad minded Amer- 
ican of the day in which he lived, while the 
deep interest he manifested in his own lo- 
cality made him a leader in all laudable en- 
terprises for its advancement. His career, 
which was strenuous, eminently honorable 
and fraught with great good to his fellow 
men and to the world, terminated with his 
lamented death on the i6th day of June, 
1896, in his sixty-fourth year; his taking 
off, like that of his father, being keenly felt 
and widely mourned in the town where he 
had so long and creditably lived, and where 
his success had been achieved. 

Before her marriage Mrs. Erasmus Hull 
was Dicy Finley. Her father, Rev. William 
Finley, a well known and remarkably suc- 
cessful minister of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian church, came to Marion county in an 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



early day and for many years labored zeal- 
ously to disseminate the truths of religion 
among the people and win souls to the 
higher life. During the years of his activ- 
ity, he traveled extensively throughout 
Southern Illinois, preaching and organizing 
churches, and it is said that the majority of 
Cumberland Presbyterian societies in the 
central and southern portions of the state 
were established by him, while others and 
weak congregations were strengthened and 
placed upon solid footing through his ef- 
forts. Mrs. Hull bore her husband three 
children and departed this life on May 16, 
1903, beloved and respected by all with 
whom she came in contact. Of her family 
one of the children died in infancy, Mrs. 
Mary Bradford being the second in order 
of birth, and Charles E. Hull, of Salem, the 
subject of this review, the youngest of the 
number. 

On his father's maternal side the subject 
dates his family history to the earliest set- 
tlement of Illinois, his great-grandfather, 
Mark Tully, migrating to what is now Ma- 
rion county, while the feet of savages still 
pressed the soil and settling near the site of 
Salem, where there was no vestage of civili- 
zation within a radius of eight or ten miles, 
his rude cabin having been the first human 
habitation where the thriving seat of justice 
now stands. He moved here from Indiana 
and entered a tract of land from which in 
due time he cleared and developed a farm, 
and later when the county of Marion was set 
off and organized, he donated ground for 
the seat of justice, which was surveyed and 



platted in 1823, and to which he gave the 
name of Salem. In honor of the town in 
the Hoosier state from which he came. He 
took an active part in the county organiza- 
tion, was its first Sheriff and held a number 
of offices from time to time, and to him be- 
longs the credit of keeping the first tavern 
in Salem, which appears to have been quite 
well patronized, while the town was being 
settled and for eighty years thereafter, being 
kept after his death by a daughter. He also 
erected a mill, the first in Salem, which was 
highly prized by the pioneers for many 
miles around, although a primitive affair 
equipped with the simplest kind of machin- 
ery, and originally operated by means of a 
sweep. Later it was somewhat improved 
and operated by horses or oxen in what was 
called a tread, but after the lapse of several 
years the original structure was remodeled, 
a large addition built, and new and im- 
proved machinery' installed, and steam 
power introduced, this being the first mill in 
the county to be run by steam. Mr. Tully 
was a true type of the sturdy, strong willed 
pioneer of his day. He was energetic, pub- 
lic-spirited, distinctively a man of affairs, 
and to him as much perhaps as to any other, 
is the town of Salem indebted for the im- 
petus which added so materially to its 
growth and prosperity. As a leader among 
the pioneers of his time, he did a work that 
few could accomplish and wielded an influ- 
ence which had a decided effect in establish- 
ing the social status of the community upon 
a high moral plane. After a long and useful 
career he was called from the scenes of his 



BIOC.RAl'HTCAL AX1) RKM1XISCF.XT HISTORY OF 



earthly struggles and triumphs in the year 
1867, leaving a number of descendants, 
some of whom still live in Marion county, 
and are among the substantial and respected 
people of the communities in which they re- 
side. 

Hon. Charles E. Hull was born Novem- 
ber 7, 1862, in Salem, and spent his early 
years like the majority of town lads, assist- 
ing his parents where his services were re- 
quired, and during certain months pursuing 
his studies in the public schools. While a 
mere child, he evinced a decided taste for 
books and his progress in his studies was so 
rapid that he completed the high school 
course and was graduated at the early age 
of fourteen, standing among the best stu- 
dents in the class of 1877. Actuated by a 
laudable desire to add to his scholastic 
knowledge he subsequently entered the 
Southern Illinois Normal University, at 
Carbondale, where he took the full classical 
course, which he finished in three years, one 
year less than the prescribed time, graduat- 
ing in 1880 with the class honors. 

Shortly after receiving his degree from 
the above institution Mr. Hull engaged in 
merchandising at Salem, continued to the 
present time a business established by Sam- 
uel and Erasmus Hull, in 1853, and since 
that time his life has been very closely iden- 
tified with the business interests and general 
prosperity of the town, in addition to which 
he has conducted several mercantile estab- 
lishments at other points and become a 
prominent figure in the public life of Marion 



county, and the state at large. Possessing 
sound sense, well balanced judgment, and a 
natural aptitude for business, his mercantile 
experience soon passed the experimental 
stage and within a comparatively brief pe- 
riod he built up a large and lucrative patron- 
age, and became one of the best known and 
most popular merchants of the town. Ad- 
vancing with rapid strides and outstripping 
all of his competitors, he was soon induced 
to project his business enterprises into other 
parts, accordingly, as already indicated, he 
established stores in various towns and vil- 
lages of the county, and at one time had 
five of these establishments in successful op- 
eration in addition to his large general 
mercantile house in Salem, all of .which 
proved successful and in due season made 
him one of the financially solid and reliable 
men of Marion county. After some years 
he closed out two of his stores but he still 
retains the other three, two in Salem and 
one in Kinmundy, and enjoys a well merited 
reputation as one of the most enterprising 
and successful business men in the southern 
part of the state. 

In addition to his large mercantile inter- 
ests Mr. Hull is connected with other im- 
portant business enterprises, having been a 
director of the Salem bank since 1895, and 
cashier of the institution during the years 
1906-7, and in 1889 he organized the Salem 
Creamery, which he operated for a period of 
fifteen years, during which time he did an 
extensive and lucrative business, using as 
high as twenty thousand pounds of milk per 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



day, and making a brand of butter for which 
there was always a great demand. By rea- 
son of indifference on the part of the farm- 
ers in the matter of supplying milk, Mr. 
Hull disposed of the creamery at the expira- 
tion of the period indicated, the better to de- 
vote his attention to his other interests, 
which have become important and far reach- 
ing in their influence, adding much to the 
material prosperity of the city and to his 
fame as a leading spirit in business circles. 
Among the various enterprises of which he 
is the head, is the Salem Brick Mill, which, 
under the firm name of Hull & Draper, has 
become one of the successful industrial con- 
cerns of the place, also the Hull Telephone 
System, established in 1898, and of which 
he is sole proprietor. This important and 
much valued enterprise, one of the best of 
the kind in Illinois, extends to all parts of 
Marion county, connecting all the towns and 
villages and numerous private residences, 
besides having connection in the adjoining 
counties, thus bringing Salem in close touch 
with all the leading cities of the state and 
nation, and proving of inestimable value to 
the people as well as to the business interests 
of the various points on the line. Under the 
personal management of Mr. Hull, who has 
operated the plant ever since it was estab- 
lished, the system has been brought to a 
degree of efficiency second to no other. 

Since the year 1894, Mr. Hull has owned 
The Salem Herald Advocate, the oldest 
newspaper in Marion county, the history of 
which dates from 1853. The paper origin- 
ally was established by John W. Merritt, 



and since the above year has been the best 
patronized and most successful sheet in Ma- 
rion county, and one of the most influential 
in Southern Illinois, being the official organ 
of the local Democracy, and a power in the 
political affairs of this part of the state. Un- 
der the management of Mr. Hull it has 
steadily grown in public favor, and now has 
a large and continually increasing subscrip- 
tion list, a liberal advertising patronage, and 
with an office well equipped with the latest 
machinery and devices used in the art pre- 
servative, and its columns teeming with the 
news of the day as well as with able discus- 
sions of the leading questions and issues 
upon which men and parties are divided, it 
promises to continue in the future as it has 
been in the past, a strong influence in politi- 
cal affairs and a power in moulding and di- 
recting opinion on matters of general in- 
terest to the people. 

Aside from the various enterprises enu- 
merated, Mr. Hull for a number of years 
was quite extensively interested in the San- 
doval Coal and Mining Company, of which 
he was general manager until disposing of 
his shares in the concern, and he is now and 
long has been one of the largest holders of 
real estate in Marion county, being an en- 
terprising and up-to-date agriculturist. In 
the midst of his numerous and pressing du- 
ties, he finds time to devote to other than 
his individual affairs, being interested in the 
community and its advancement and in all 
worthy enterprises for the good of his fel- 
low men. Ever since arriving at the years 
of manhood he has been a leading factor in 



BIOGKAIMIICAl. AND RKM I N ISC K XT HISTORY OF 



public matters, and in a material way has 
been untiring in his efforts to promote the 
prosperity of Salem and Marion county, tak- 
ing an active interest in all movements and 
measures with this object in view besides in- 
augurating and carrying to successful issue 
many enterprises which have tended greatly 
to the general welfare of the community. In 
political matters and kindred subjects he has 
not only been interested but has risen to the 
position of leader. He has been a life-long 
Democrat, and since his twenty-first year 
has exercised a strong influence in the polit- 
ical affairs of Marion county, and became 
widely and favorably known in party circles 
throughout the state, a prominent figure in 
local, district and state conventions, he has 
borne a leading part in making platforms, 
formulating policies ; as a campaigner, he is 
a judicious adviser in the councils of his 
party, a successful worker in the ranks, and 
to him as much if not more than to any 
other man in Marion county, is the party in- 
debted for its success in a number of ani- 
mated and exciting political contests. 

In 1896 Mr. Hull was elected to repre- 
sent the Forty-second Senatorial District, 
composed of the counties of Clay, Washing- 
ton, Marion and Clinton, in the Upper 
House of the State Legislature, in the cam- 
paign of which memorable year he ran far in 
advance in his home town of any other can- 
didate on the Democratic ticket, receiving 
more votes than were polled for William 
Jennings Bryan, the popular head of the na- 
tional ticket, and the idol of Democracy. 
Mr. Hull's career in the General Assembly 



was eminently honorable, and he took high 
rank as an industrious and useful member, 
who spared no effort in behalf of his con- 
stituents, besides laboring earnestly and 
faithfully for the general good of his state. 
In 1904 he was renominated by his party, 
and in the ensuing election his Republican 
competitor withdrew from the race, it being 
evident that he would be overwhelmingly de- 
feated. The district that year was com- 
posed of the counties of Marion, Clay, Clin- 
ton and Effingham. In the senate he be- 
came the minority leader, and in addition 
to serving on a number of important com- 
mittees, took an active part in the general 
deliberations of the chamber, participating 
in the discussions and debates, and to him 
belongs the credit of leading in the fight for 
a direct primary, also of being the only mi- 
nority leader who ever succeeded in holding 
his party together on minority legislation. 
Mr. Hull's senatorial experience is replete 
with duty ably and faithfully performed, 
and such was the interest he manifested for 
his district that he won the confidence and 
good will of the people irrespective of po- 
litical alignment, all of whom speak in 
praise of his honorable course and the broad 
enlightenment spirit which he displayed 
throughout his legislative career. As already 
stated he is a familiar figure in the conven- 
tions of his party, both local and state, and 
for a period of twenty-eight years he has 
not missed attending a Democratic national 
convention. 

For several years Mr. Hull owned and 
occupied the place where Mr. Bryan was 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



39 



born, but after the campaign of 1896 he sold 
it to Mr. Bryan, between whom and himself 
the warmest friendship has ever prevailed. 
The two were classmates when they at- 
tended high school, since which time they 
have labored for each other's interests, and 
as stated above, their attachment is stronger 
and more enduring than the ordinary ties 
by which friends are bound together. Mr. 
Hull has served the people of his city as 
School Director, and for a period of two 
years he was president of the Inter-State In- 
dependent Telephone Association, besides 
being for a number of years a member of 
the executive committee. He also served for 
a series of years on the executive commit- 
tee for the operators on the scale of agree- 
ment, with the United Mine Workers of 
America, a position of great responsibility 
and delicacy, as is indicated by the fact of 
his having devoted one hundred and twelve 
days in one year to the settlement of wage 
scales and of disputes between the contend- 
ing parties, besides having been called upon 
repeatedly to adjust differences and har- 
monize conflicting interests, which arose 
from time to time, between the two organi- 
zations. 

The domestic chapter in the life of Mr. 
Hull dates from May 10, 1883, when he 
was happily married to Miss Lulu Ham- 
mond, the accomplished and popular daugh- 
ter of Hon. J. E. W. Hammond, the 
latter a prominent merchant and influential 
politician of Marion county, Illinois, who 
served in the Legislature, on the County 
Board of Supervisors, and for many years 



was one of the public spirited men and rep- 
resentative citizens of Salem. On her 
mother's side Mrs. Hull traces to the Lov- 
ells and Hensleys, who were among the 
earliest settlers of Marion county, as is men- 
tioned elsewhere in this volume. Senator 
Hull's beautiful and attractive home on 
North Broadway, the finest and most de- 
sirable private dwelling in the city, is 
brightened and rendered doubly attractive 
by the presence of two intelligent and in- 
teresting daughters, namely: Lovell, born 
January 8, 1888, and Louise, whose birth 
occurred on the 3ist day of May, 1897, 
these with their parents constituting a happy 
and almost ideal domestic circle. 

Senator Hull's fraternal association rep- 
resents the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks', the Knights of Pythias, Inde- 
pendent Order of Red Men, and the Modern 
Woodmen, in all of which he has been an 
active and influential worker, besides being 
honored with important official positions 
from time to time. In the midst of his 
many strenuous duties as a business man 
and public servant, the Senator has not neg- 
lected the higher obligations which man 
owes to his Maker, nor been unmindful of 
the claims of the Christian religion to 
which deep and absorbing subject he has 
devoted much profound study and investi- 
gation, and in the light of which he has 
been led into the straight and narrow way 
which leads to a higher state of being here, 
and to eternal felicity beyond death's mys- 
tic stream. Subscribing to no human 
creeds or man-made doctrines, he takes the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Holy Scriptures alone for his rule of faith 
and practice, and as an humble and consist- 
ent member of the Christian, or Disciple, 
church, demonstrates by his daily life the 
beauty and value of the faith which he pro- 
fesses. He has been identified with the re- 
ligious body since his young manhood, and 
for more than twenty years has been the able 
and popular superintendent of the Sunday 
school, besides filling other official stations. 
Mrs. Hull is also a faithful and devout 
Christian, an active member of the church, 
and deeply interested in all lines of good 
work under the auspices of the same. Since 
her fourteenth year she has been the accom- 
plished organist of the congregation in Sa- 
lem, as well as an efficient and enthusiastic 
teacher in the Sunday school. Senator Hull 
is a liberal contributor to benevolent enter- 
prises, and it was through his initiation and 
influence that the present handsome temple 
of worship used by the Christian church, 
was erected, his contributions to the build- 
ing fund being twenty-five dollars for every 
one hundred dollars contributed by the con- 
gregation. In addition to his munificence 
already noted, the Senator has given largely 
to various worthy objects of which the 
world knows nothing, in this way exempli- 
fying the spirit of the Master, by not letting 
the left hand know what the right hand 
doeth, or in other words, doing good 
in secret in the name of the Father who 
hath promised to reward such actions 
openly. 

Senator Hull is a splendid specimen of 
well rounded, symmetrically developed, vi- 



rile manhood, with a commanding presence 
and a strong personality, being six feet in 
height, weighing two hundred and thirty- 
four pounds, and moving among his fellows 
as one born to leadership. He is a notice- 
able figure in any crowd or assemblage, and 
never fails to attract attention, not only by 
his powerful physique, but by the amiable 
qualities of mind and heart, which show in 
his face, and always make his presence pleas- 
ing to all beholders. He has directed his 
life along lines which could not fail to ef- 
fect favorably the physical as well as the 
mental man, having from his youth been 
singularly free from thoughts which lower 
and degrade self-respect, and from those in- 
siduous habits which pollute the body and 
debase the soul, and which today are prov- 
ing the destruction of so many young men 
of whom better things have been expected. 
Mr. Hull is a total abstainer in all the term 
implies, having never tasted, much less taken 
a drink of any kind of intoxicants, nor used 
tobacco in any of its forms; neither has he 
ever taken the name of God in vain. He is 
pleasing and companionable, a favorite in 
the social circle, and a hale and hearty spirit, 
whose presence inspires good humor, and 
who believes in legitimate sports and pas- 
times and in the idea that fret and worry 
are among the greatest enemies of happi- 
ness. With duties that would crush the ordi- 
nary man, he has his labors so systematized 
that he experiences little or no inconveni- 
ence in doing them. He believes in rest and 
recreation and is an advocate of vacations, 
and he invariably takes one every summer, 



HIGHLAND. CLAY AND MARION CO1/XTIES, ILLINOIS. 



but not in the manner that many do, by 
locking his office and hieing away to the 
seaside, lake or forest, to spend the season 
in tiresome sports. His vacations, which 
are always enjoyable, are spent in the hay- 
field, where he finds the recreation condu- 
cive to good health and a contented mind. 

Personally Mr. Hull is a gentleman of 
unblemished reputation, and the strictest in- 
tegrity and his private character and im- 
portant trusts have always been above re- 
proach. He is a vigorous as well as an 
independent thinker, a wide reader, and he 
has the courage of his convictions upon all 
subjects which he investigates. He is also 
strikingly original and fearless, prosecutes 
his researches after his own peculiar fash- 
ion, and cares little for conventionalism or 
for the sanctity attaching to person or place 
by reason of artificial distinction, tradition 
or the accident of birth. He is essentially 
cosmopolitan in his ideas, a man of the peo- 
ple in all the term implies, and in the best 
sense of the word a representative type of 
that strong American manhood, which 
commands and retains respect by reason of 
inherent merit, sound sense and correct con- 
duct. He has so impressed his individuality 
upon his community as to win the confidence 
and esteem of his fellow-citizens and be- 
come a strong and influential power in lead- 
ing them to high and noble things. 
Measured by the accepted standard of ex- 
cellence, his career, though strenuous, has 
been eminently honorable and useful, and 
his life fraught with great good to his fel- 
lows and to the world. 



WILLIAM H. DILLMAN. 

William H. Dillman, the well known 
president of the Clay County State Bank at 
Louisville, Illinois, was born in Oskaloosa 
township, on the family homestead, where 
he grew to manhood. The date of his birth 
was July 14, 1867. He is the son of Louis 
Dillman, a native of Kentucky, who came 
to Illinois when fourteen years old and set- 
tled in Oskaloosa township on a farm, 
where he lived for many years. He is now 
retired, making his home in Louisville. He 
was formerly president of the State Bank 
and is well known in the county as a man 
of much ability. Vachel Dillman, grand- 
father of the subject, was also a native of 
Kentucky, who came to this state at an 
early day and developed a good farm. The 
subject's mother was Harriett B. Smith, 
whose people were natives of Tennessee, 
where she was born. She is still living. 
Eleven children were born to the subject's 
parents, namely: Dr. Asa E., of Steuben, 
Wisconsin; Mrs. Mary E. Graham, of Os- 
kaloosa township; Mrs. Sarah E. Burdick, 
of Oskaloosa township; William H., our 
subject; Dr. J. V., at Ingraham, Illinois; 
Lillie M., now deceased; Mrs. Ida Steeley, 
a i Louisville, this county ; Mrs. Delia Mont- 
gomery, also of Louisville; Dora, deceased; 
Polly Ann, deceased; Henry, deceased. 

William H. Dillman was united in mar- 
riage in 1898 to Cora P. Brown, the refined 
r.nd accomplished daughter of P. P. Brown, 
of Louisville, Illinois, and two children have 
been born to this union, namely : Howard B. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND KK.M IN ISCKNT HISTORY OF 



and Robert V., ten and five years old re- 
spectively at this writing, 1908, both bright 
and interesting lads. 

Mr. Dillman acquired a good common 
school education, and after spending three 
years at the State Normal, at the Union 
Christian College of Merom, Indiana, and 
at the Orchard City College at Flora, Illi- 
nois, where he graduated with honors, Mr. 
Dillman entered the law office of Hagle & 
Shriner in that city, and in 1896 was ad- 
mitted to the bar, since which time he has 
been ranked as one of the leading lawyers of 
Clay county, and has built up an excellent 
business, practicing in all the courts in this 
and adjoining counties with great success. 

When Judge Farmer, now one of the Su- 
preme Judges of the state of Illinois, was on 
the bench of this, the Forty-second Senato- 
rial District, he selected Mr. Dillman as the 
Master in Chancery of this county. Later 
on, upon the death of William H. Hudelson, 
Mr. Dillman, by the terms of the will, was 
made the executor, the will conveying to 
him in trust for twenty years money and 
property representing over two hundred 
thousand dollars. No better testimony of 
confidence in a man's integrity has ever 
been paid to a citizen of this county. Mr. 
Dillman was Master in Chancery for six 
years. The directors of the Clay County 
State Bank elected him president of that 
institution in the summer of 1908. 

He was the Democratic nominee for Rep- 
resentative from this district in 1908, but 
was defeated. He has always been a stanch 
Democrat and has taken an active part in 



his county's affairs. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, the Home 
Circle. Both Mr. and Mrs. Dillman are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. Dillman, busy with the management 
of the bank, which he gives the most care- 
ful attention and which is regarded as one 
of the solidest banks of the southern part 
of the state, finds insufficient time to carry on 
his law practice, although it is not entirely 
abandoned. Mr. Dillman throughout his ca- 
reer has been very active, progressive and de- 
termined, carrying forward in successful 
completion whatever he has undertaken in a 
business way. Mr. Dillman attributes a 
very large measure of his success to his 
many and faithful friends. He is clearly 
entitled to be classed among the leading citi- 
zens of Clay county a man whose strong 
individuality is the strength of integrity, vir- 
tue and deep human sympathy and no one 
has more friends than he throughout the 
district. 



H. T. PACE. 

A happy combination of characteristics is 
possessed by the honorable gentleman of 
whom the biographer now essays to write. 
for he has shown during his long residence 
in Salem, Marion county, Illinois, that he is 
a man of rare business acumen, foresight and 
sagacity, at the same time possessing lauda- 
ble traits of character such as integrity, in- 
dustry, sobriety and kindliness; these, com- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



bined with his public spirit and model home 
life, have resulted in winning for Mr. Pace 
the unqualified esteem of all who know him. 

H. T. Pace was born one and one-half 
miles south of Salem on a farm, February 
3, 1850, and, believing that better opportu- 
nities awaited him right here at home, he 
early decided to cast his lot with his own 
people rather than seek uncertain success in 
other fields, and, judging from the pro- 
nounced success which has attended his sub-- 
sequent efforts, one must conclude that he 
made a wise decision. 

The subject's father was George W. Pace, 
a native of Kentucky, who came to Jefferson 
county, Illinois, when a young man, but 
soon after locating here he moved to Marion 
county, where he engaged in farming, later 
in the furniture business, having spent many 
years in this; he also learned the tailor's 
trade and conducted a tailor shop for a time 
soon after coming here. He was a man of 
considerable force and influence, honest, 
hard working and hospitable, who spared no 
pains in rearing his family in the best pos- 
sible manner, always holding out high ideals 
and lofty aims. He was noted as a great 
story teller as well as a kindly, neighborly 
man. He was born December 18, 1806, and 
passed to his rest June i, 1867. He was one 
of the oldest pioneers of Marion county, be- 
ing one of the best known and most beloved 
men in the county and familiarly called "Un- 
cle George." 

The mother of the subject, whose birth oc- 
curred oh the same day of the month as that 
of her husband, December i8th, in the year 



1808, was known in her maidenhood as Ta- 
bithia J. Rogers, a native of Tennessee, the 
representative of a fine old Southern fam- 
ily, and she "crossed over the mystic river" 
to join her worthy life companion on the 
other shore February 26, 1881, at the age 
of seventy-three years, after closing a serene 
and beautiful life of the noblest Christian at- 
tributes and wholesome influence. One of 
the most commendable traits in our subject 
was his devotion to his mother, with whom 
he lived until her death, joyfully administer- 
ing to her every want and sacrificing much 
in his own life that she might be comfortable 
and happy. Nine children were born to the 
parents of the subject, only three of whom 
are living at this writing, 1908. The living 
are: O. H. Pace, of Mount Vernon, Illinois, 
at the age of sixty-eight years; Mrs. O. E. 
Tryner, living at Long Beach, California, at 
the age of sixty years; H. T., our subject. 
The parents of the subject were married 
May 13. 1830. 

H. T. Pace remained under his parental 
roof-tree during the lifetime of his parents. 
He attended the common schools in Salem, 
where he diligently applied himself and re- 
ceived a good education. However, thirst- 
ing for more knowledge, he attended college 
at Jacksonville, Illinois, for a short time. The 
stage having allurements and he having nat- 
ural talents as a comedian, he traveled for 
three years with some of the best companies 
on the road as a black-face comedian, win- 
ning wide notoriety through this medium. 

Tiring of the stage, he went to Denver in 
1880, where he clerked for a while in a jew- 



44 



I!IO<;i<AI'IIICAI. A.VI) KKMIMSCKXT HISTOUY OF 



lry store, later worked as a Pullman con- 
ductor between Denver and Leadville over 
the South Park Railroad. In 1884 Mr. Pace 
came back to Salem and has remained here 
ever since prospering in whatever he has un- 
dertaken. 

The harmonious domestic life of the sub- 
ject dates from 1884, when he was united 
in marriage with Alice H. Andrews, the ac- 
complished and popular daughter of Samuel 
Andrews, who sacrificed his life for his 
country, having met death in the Union lines 
while fighting in defense of the flag. At the 
time of their marriage Mr. Pace was sup- 
posed to be on his death bed from a sudden 
and serious illness. The married life of this 
couple has been a most ideal one and has re- 
sulted in the birth of seven children, five of 
whom are living. Their names follow: 
Claude S., of Salem, engine foreman at the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois shops; Erne 
Jenella, Lynn Harvey, Ned R., Gladys D., 
Lowell died in infancy, as did also the last 
child, Mona. 

After his marriage Mr. Pace went into 
the piano business, which he has since con- 
ducted for twenty-five years, the greatest 
success attending his efforts, his house being 
known throughout Marion county, and his 
trade extending many miles in every direc- 
tion, as a result of his skill in managing this 
line and his uniform fairness and courteous- 
ness to customers. His piano parlor is one 
of the popular business houses of Salem. Mr. 
Pace keeps a modern and up-to-date line of 
musical instruments, talking machines and 
similar goods. 



Fraternally Mr. Pace is a member of the 
Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Woodmen and the Eastern Star, being the 
Worthy Patron in the latter order. 

Mr. Pace is now the only member of this 
worthy family in Marion county, and he is 
one of the oldest native bom residents of 
Salem. Among his interesting collection of 
relics and curios is an old clock which his 
father and mother bought when they first 
went to housekeeping. 

In all the relations of life our subject has 
been found worthy of the trust imposed in 
him, being a man of rare business ability, 
force of character and possessing praise- 
worthy qualities of head and heart which. 
make him popular with all whom he meets, 
and he is today regarded by all classes as be- 
ing one of the staunchest, most upright and 
representative citizens of Marion county. 



D. D. HAYN1E. 

For the high rank of her bench and bar 
Illinois has always been distinguished, and 
it is gratifying to note that in no section of 
the commonwealth has the standard been 
lowered in any epoch of its history. To the 
subject of this review, who is at the time of 
this writing, 1908, the popular and influen- 
tial Clerk of the Circuit Court at Salem, 
Marion county, we may refer with propriety 
and satisfaction as being one of the able and 
representative members of the legal profes- 
sion of the state. He prepared himself most 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



45 



carefully for the work of his exacting pro- 
fession and has ever been ambitious and 
self-reliant, gaining success and securing his 
technical training through his own deter- 
mination and well directed efforts. He not 
only stands high in his profession but is a 
potent factor in local politics, his advice 
being often relied upon in the selection of 
candidates for county offices and he has led 
such a career, one upon which not the 
shadow or suspicion of evil rests, that his 
counsel is often sought and heeded in im- 
portant movements in the county, with grati- 
fying results. 

D. D. Haynie was born in Marion county, 
Illinois, November 22, 1848. His father 
was William D. Haynie, a native of 
Norfolk, Virginia, where he was born 
August 29, 1798. He came with his mother 
to Winchester, Tennessee, when he was ten 
years old, and remained there until - he 
reached young manhood. He was a soldier 
in the War of 1812, having performed gal- 
lant service in the same, after which he re- 
turned to Kentucky, settling near Hopkins- 
ville, where he married Elizabeth B. Frost, 
and where he lived for several years, finally 
in 1832 moving to Salem, Illinois, bringing 
three slaves with them, which they later lib- 
erated. They lived in Salem, developing 
the primitive conditions which they found, 
for many years, rearing eleven children, 
namely: Abner F., deceased, having died 
in 1850; General Isham N., who died in 
1868, having been adjutant general at the 
time of his death, formerly colonel of the 
Forty-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; 



William M., died in 1855 ; Rebecca was the 
wife of James Marshall, who moved to 
Texas and died there about 1857; George 
W., quartermaster of the Forty-eighth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Regiment, who died in 1891, 
when seventy years old; Mary and John B., 
both died in infancy ; Elizabeth is the widow 
of Hon. B. B. Smith, who was one of 
the first and best lawyers in southern Illi- 
nois, and who died in 1884, his widow now 
residing at Mount Vernon, Washington : 
Martha J., now deceased, was the wife of 
Dr. Thomas Williams, of Jacksonville, Flor- 
ida, dying in Philadelphia in 1906; Sarah 
C. is the wife of L. L. Adams, of Spokane, 
Washington; D. D., our subject, was the 
youngest of the family. 

Our subject made his home with his 
father until he died in 1870, the subject's 
mother surviving until 1884. They were 
people of excellent qualities of mind and 
heart, and spared no pains in giving their 
children every advantage possible, and the 
wholesome home influence in which they 
were reared is reflected in the characters of 
the subject and the other children. 

D. D. Haynie attended the common 
schools when a boy, making rapid progress. 
Being ambitious and thirsting for all the 
book learning possible, he entered the State 
Normal at Bloomington, Illinois, after a 
course in which he made an excellent record, 
he returned home and clerked, but believing 
that his true life path lay along the higher 
lines of the legal profession, he begun the 
study of law and was admitted to the Salem 
bar in 1871. His success was instantaneous 



4 6 



lilOCKAI'IUCAL AND REMINISCENT JIISTOKV OF 



and he soon built up a good practice. His 
unusual attributes soon attracted attention 
and he was appointed clerk in the Pension 
Agency located in Salem, which position he 
held with much credit for a period of six 
years. He then devoted some of his time to 
farming with gratifying results, at the same 
time continuing his law practice which had 
by this time been built up to a very large 
practice. He has continued with great suc- 
cess ever since he first began practice in 
1885. During this time he has served his 
county and city in many official capacities. 
He was twice elected president of the City 
Board of Education, and afterward was a 
member of the same for two terms ; during 
his connection with the same the educational 
interests of the city were greatly strength- 
ened. He was elected Police Magistrate in 
1904 and elected Circuit Clerk as a Repub- 
lican and is serving in this capacity in 1908, 
making one of the best clerks the court has 
ever had. In all his political and official 
career, not the least dissatisfaction has 
arisen over the manner in which he has 
handled the affairs entrusted to him, and he 
has by this consistent record gained a host 
of admiring friends throughout the county. 

Mr. Haynie's happy and harmonious do- 
mestic life dates from August 26, 1875, 
when he was united in marriage with Emma 
J. McMackin, the accomplished and cultured 
daughter of W. E. McMackin, who was 
lieutenant-colonel of Grant's Twenty-first 
Illinois Regiment, and a well known and 
influential man in his community. 

One bright and winsome daughter was 



born to the subject and wife, who was given 
the name of May E., and who is now the 
wife of William W. Morrow, of Oklahoma 
City. The subject's wife was called to her 
rest January 21, 1878, and he was married 
the second time, this wife being in her 
maidenhood, Maggie Bobbitt, daughter of 
Joseph J. Bobbitt, who was a soldier in the 
Eighth Kentucky Regiment. She proved a 
worthy helpmeet and to this union the fol- 
lowing interesting children were born: 
Edith M., now living in Spokane, Washing- 
ton; Donald C., of Salem, Illinois, is clerk 
for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Rail- 
way Company. The subject's wife died in 
April 1890. The subject then married Rose 
M. Haley, the daughter of Rev. J. L. Haley, 
a well known Cumberland Presbyterian 
minister, the date of the wedding falling 
on July 14, 1891. No children have been 
born to this union which has been a most 
harmonious one. 

Fraternally the subject has been a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows for thirty-seven years, having occupied 
the chairs of the same, and he has been a 
member of the Masonic Fraternity since 
1879, a chapter member. 

The subject in his political activity had 
occasion to become intimately acquainted 
with Governor Oglesby, Gen. John A. Lo- 
gan, Col. Robert G. Ingersoll, Governor 
Tanner and most of the noted men of the 
state. 

Mr. Haynie delights to recall reminis- 
cences of his great grandfather on his 
father's side, who was named Donald Camp- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



bell, who migrated from Scotland to Nor- 
folk, Virginia, where he bought up all the 
land between what was, then Norfolk and 
the wharf, which is now known as Campbell 
wharf. Mr. Campbell died in February, 
1795. Mr. Haynie has in his possession a 
copy of Campbell's will executed February 
2, 1795. Donald Campbell's father was 
Archibald Campbell, who survived his son 
and died in 1802. There are many descen- 
dants of the Campbell family living today 
in Philadelphia and Virginia. 



AUGUSTIN ROBERT WILLIAMS. 

By reason of numerous rare innate quali- 
ties, together with his pleasing personal 
qualities, together with his pleasing personal 
address, his honesty of purpose and his 
loyalty to his native community, Mr. Wil- 
liams has reached a conspicuous round in 
the ladder of success in his chosen field of 
endeavor and justly merits the high esteem 
in which he is held by all who know him. 

A. R. Williams, the popular and well 
known teller of the Salem" State Bank, 
Salem, Illinois, is a native of Marion county, 
having first seen the light of day in the city 
of Salem on December 15, 1875, the son of 
Rowland H. Williams, a native of New 
York City, who was born near Delaney 
street. He early decided to leave the con- 
gested metropolis and seek his fortune in 
the freer and less trammeled West, and 
consequently in casting about for an oppor- 
tunity to properly get his initial start in the 
business world he decided to try Ohio and 



soon set out for Columbus and finally lo- 
cated near that city, then in about 1870 he 
came to Salem, Illinois, where he elected to 
remain, being impressed with the superior 
prospects of the place. He was proprietor of 
the Salem Marble Works for a number of 
years and at the time of his death, which oc- 
curred on December 10, 1890, he was post- 
master of Salem, this important appoint- 
ment having been made in recognition of 
his valuable services and his unflagging 
loyalty to the principles of the party then 
in power. He also showed his loyalty to 
the Union by enlisting in the Eighty-fifth 
Ohio Volunteer Regiment, serving with 
credit throughout the war between the 
states. 

The grandfather of the subject on the 
paternal side of the house was Robert Wil- 
liams, a native of Wales, he and his good 
wife having settled in New York and later 
coming to Ohio. His wife, late in life, came 
to Salem where she died. The grandmother 
of the subject on his maternal side was a 
native of Tennessee. She, too, died in 
Salem where she had lived only a few years, 
having been called to her eternal sleep 
shortly after the war. 

The mother of the subject was known in 
her maidenhood as Margaret Keeney, a na- 
tive of near old Foxville, Illinois, this 
county, the daughter of A. W. Keeney, who 
moved from Indiana to Marion county 
where he settled on a farm, but moved to 
Salem during the Civil war. He had a son 
killed in the battle of Shiloh and this caused 
him to desert the old farm homestead and 
move to Salem. He was associated with 



4 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Seth Andrews in the Salem Milling Com- 
pany of Salem for many years. The last few 
years of his life he lived in retirement. He 
passed away July 2, 1890. The mother of 
the subject, a woman of many praise- 
worthy traits, is still living in 1908. 

Three children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Rowland H. Williams, one having died 
'in infancy. Frank L. Williams, the living 
brother of the subject, was born in Salem 
May 25, 1881, and is a well known con- 
tractor. 

A. R. Williams, our subject, spent his 
boyhood in Salem attending the local 
schools, having graduated from the Salem 
high school in 1893, after making a splen- 
did record for scholarship. Mr. Williams 
was with Cutler & Hays in the mercantile 
business, during which time he added very 
much to the prestige of the firm and won 
scores of customers from all over the county 
by reason of his courteous treatment and 
conscientious work, and the fact that his ser- 
vices were so long continued by this firm 
is a criterion that they were eminently satis- 
factory in every particular. Desiring to bet- 
ter fit himself for a business career which 
he soon determined should be his life's chief 
aim, he entered Brown's Business College 
at Centralia, from which he graduated with 
distinction in 1906. 

The unusual ability of Mr. Williams was 
soon known to the business people of Salem 
and when the State Bank became in need 
of an efficient and reliable teller, no one 
worthier of the place could be found than 
our subject, consequently he was en- 



treated to accept this important post, which 
he did on December 26, 1906, after resign- 
ing his position with Cutler and Hays, 
much to their regret, for they well knew 
that they would have much difficulty in fill- 
ing the place of such a valuable man. 

Mr. Williams has shown rare business 
ability in handling his new position and has 
given entire satisfaction to his employers 
from the first, having become known as one 
of the most trusted and thoroughly efficient 
bank tellers in this part of the state. 

A. R. Williams was married to Miss 
Olive M. Peters, of Sandoval, Illinois, 
October 25, 1908. She is a daughter of D. 
M. and Lydia (Neff) Peters. Fraternally 
Mr. Williams is a member of the ancient 
and honorable order of Masons, a member 
of Cyrene Commandery No. 23, Knights 
Templar, of Centralia, also a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Salem; he is also a member of the Wood- 
men and the Modern American Fraternal 
Order. 

Mr. Williams is strong in his religious 
convictions, being a faithful member of the 
Presbvterian church. 



CHARLES H. HOLT. 

The biographical annals of Marion Coun- 
ty, Illinois, would be incomplete were there 
failure to make specific mention of the hon- 
orable gentleman, whose name introduces 
this review, who is one of the county's 




CHARLES H. HOLT. 



Of rwr 



UCHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



49 



ablest and rnpst distinguished native sons, 
for he had the sagacity early in youth to 
see that better opportunities waited for him 
right here on his native heath than other- 
where, consequently his life labors have 
been confined to this. locality rather than in 
distant and precarious fields, and judging 
from the eminent success he has here at- 
tained he was fortunate in coming to this 
decision to remain at home. Judge Holt 
has been prominently identified with the in- 
dustrial, material and civic progress of the 
community, having ever stood for loyal and 
public-spirited citizenship, having been a 
potent factor in bringing about the wonder- 
ful development in this favored section, con- 
tributing his influence and energy in the 
transformation which has made this one of 
the leading counties of the state, with its 
highly cultivated farms, thriving towns and 
villages, its school-houses, churches and all 
other evidences of progress and culture, and 
he is today not only one of the leading attor- 
neys and among the most highly honered 
citizens of Salem, the beautiful and thriving 
county seat, but is recognized as one of the 
foremost men at the bar in the state. In all 
the relations of life he has been faithful to all 
the trusts reposed in him, performing his 
duty conscientiously and with due regard 
for the welfare of others often at the sacri- 
fice of his own best interests and pleasures. 
Charles H. Holt was born near Vernon, 
Marion county, Illinois, October i, 1868, the 
only child of William H. Holt, and Sarah 
(Parsons) Holt, the former a native of 
Union county, and the latter a native of the 
4 



state of Ohio. They were married in Ma- 
rion county. The mother of the subject was 
called to her rest in November, 1892. Wil- 
liam H. Holt is living in 1908, and making 
his home with the subject in Salem. The 
father was a soldier is the One Hundred 
and Eleventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
having enlisted under Col. James S. 
Martin, who afterward became a general. 
Mr. Holt served gallantly for three years, 
or until his enlistment expired, his princi- 
pal services being with Sherman on his 
march to the sea, and his campaigns around 
Atlanta. William H. Holt has been a use- 
ful and industrious man, scrupulously honest 
and he yet exercises considerable influence 
in his community. He and his worthy life 
companion spared no pains in giving their 
son, our subject, every possible advantage 
and encouragement to make the most of life. 
and many of his sterling attributes and 
noble traits of character may be traced to 
the wholesome home influence and uplifting 
environment in which he was reared. Henry 
Holt, grandfather of the subject, was one 
of the first settlers of Marion county, having 
come here from Tennessee, and participated 
in organizing the county and many of the 
county offices were indebted to his sound 
judgment for their early development. He 
was a public-spirited man and did an incal- 
culable amount of good in furthering the 
interests of his community. Like many of 
the hardy pioneers of those early times, he 
possessed many sterling qualities and won 
the admiration of all who knew him. 
Charles H. Holt, our subject, attended 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND RKM IN JSCKNT HISTORY OK 



the country schools during the winter 
months while living on his father's farm 
and later the Salem high school, from which 
he graduated in the class of 1889. Being 
an ambitious lad from the first he applied 
himself most assiduously and outstripped 
many of the less courageous plodders of his 
day, making excellent grades. After leaving 
the high school he engaged in teaching with 
marked success for one year, then, thirsting 
for more knowledge, he entered Northwest- 
ern University at Chicago, taking a prepara- 
tory course the first year. Believing that 
his true life work lay along legal lines, he 
spent three years in a law office in Chicago 
and then located at Kinmundy, this county, 
and while living here, where his success was 
instantaneous, he became popular with his 
party, which nominated him for the respon- 
sible position of county judge, and he was 
subsequently elected by a handsome majority 
in 1898, serving two terms with entire sat- 
isfaction to his constituents and all con- 
cerned and in such a manner as to reflect 
great credit upon his ability, manifesting 
from the first that he had unmistakable judi- 
cial talent and a profound knowledge of 
law in its variegated phases. 

In 1904 Judge Holt removed to Salem 
and at the expiration of his term of office 
resumed the practice of law, with a well 
equipped and pleasant suite of rooms in the 
Stonecipher building. He has one of the 
largest and best selected libraries to be found 
in Southern Illinois. Not only does the 
Judge keep posted on all the late judicial de- 
cisions and court rulings, but he is a well 



read man on scientific, literary and current 
topics, so that his conversation is at once 
animated and learned. 

The Judge is a strong and influential ad- 
vocate of the principles embodied in the 
Democratic party and is well fortified in his 
convictions, always ready to lend his influ- 
ence and time to the furtherance of his par- 
ty's interests and assist in placing the best 
men obtainable in the county offices. He 
has served as chairman of the Democratic 
Central Committee of Marion county, dur- 
ing which time he displayed rare acumen 
and sagacity in the management of the par- 
ty's affairs. 

Although Mr. Holt's extensive legal prac- 
tice occupied the major part of his time, he 
has considerable business interests which he 
manages with uniform success. He is a 
stockholder in the Salem National Bank, 
and also in the Farmers' and Merchants' 
Bank of St. Peter, Illinois. 

Judge Holt's happy and harmonious do- 
mestic life dates from 1897, when he was 
united in marriage to Frances W. Fox, the 
accomplished and cultured daughter of Dr. 
Jesse D. Fox, of Kindmundy, this county. 
Doctor Fox was one of the county's most 
noted physicians and best known citizens, 
who died about 1881. The following chil- 
dren have blessed the home of the subject 
with their cheer and sunshine: Dorothy F.. 
who was born in May, 1898; Ward P., born 
in October, 1900; Frances S., who was born 
in October, 1904; Charlotte, whose date of 
birth occurred September 29, 1906. These 
children are all bright and winsome, giving 



RICH LAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



promise of successful future careers. The 
Holt home is a model one, the residence 
being modern, commodious, well furnished 
and invaded with the most wholesome at- 
mosphere. 

Our subject in his fraternal relations is 
affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, 
having occupied the chairs in both. He is 
truly a strong and prominent character, and 
owing to his individual personal traits, 
which are highly commendable, his past 
record, which is unmarred by a shadow, his 
pleasing address, kindly disposition, upright- 
ness and public spirit, the future augurs still 
greater honors for the subject, for he has 
gained the undivided esteem and confidence 
of his fellow citizens throughout Marion 
and adjoining counties, and such a worthy 
character is seldom left alone by the public 
when services of a high order are constantly 
being sought. 



HON. ELBERT ROWLAND. M. D. 

Prominent in the professional life of Ol- 
ney, Richland county, pre-eminently distin- 
guished for carrying to completion impor- 
tant public enterprises and enjoying 
marked prestige in many things far 
beyond the limits of the community 
honored by his citizenship, the subject 
of this sketch stands out a clear 
and conspicuous figure among the success- 
ful men of a part of the great Prairie state 



noted throughout the commonwealth for its 
high order of intelligence and business and 
professional talent. Characterized by breadth 
of wisdom and strong individuality, his 
achievements but represent the utilization of 
innate talents in directing efforts along lines 
in which mature judgment, rare discrimina- 
tion, and a resourcefulness that hesitates at 
no opposing circumstances, pave the way 
and ultimately lead to great achievements. 
It is not the intention of the biographer to 
give in this connection a detailed history of 
the subject's life, but rather to note incident- 
ally his connection with various public offices 
and his long and worthy practice of medi- 
cine, and to show the marked influence he 
has wielded in advancing the material in- 
terests of Richland county and in promoting 
the general welfare of its populace. 

Dr. Elbert Rowland was born in New 
York City, April 28, 1832, the son of Town- 
send and Eliza (Sands) Rowland, natives 
of Long Island, where they were reared 
and married. The subject's father learned 
the tailor's trade and conducted a tailor 
shop in the city of New York for a number 
of years. In 1840 he came to Richland 
county and entered two hundred and forty 
acres of land in Bonpas township. It was 
wild and in the wilderness, there being but 
few settlers there at that time. He erected 
a log cabin and began to make a home. 
There was plenty of wild game of all kinds 
in the forests round about, and the wolves, 
foxes and other animals gave some trouble. 
The early settlers of those days had many 
exciting fox chases. The family lived in 



lilOGRArillCAL AND KKMIN1SCKXT HISTORY OF 



a log cabin for a number of years. They 
improved a good farm in due course of time. 
The father of the subject died in Olney at 
the advanced age of eighty-four years in 
1896, his life companion having preceded 
him to the silent land in 1876, at the age 
of sixty-four years. They were the parents 
of ten children, all of whom grew to ma- 
turity, eight of the number living at this 
writing (1908), the subject of this sketch 
being the eldest of the family. He was only 
seven years old when he r^me to what is 
now Richland county, where he was reared 
on a farm in Bonpas township. There were a 
few subscription schools at that time, which 
our subject attended during the winter 
months for a few terms. As usual, the old- 
est of the children worked hard to help sup- 
port the family, such was the lot of El- 
bert Rowland. When sixteen years old he 
went to Lancaster, Wabash county, where 
he became clerk in a general store where he 
continued for three years. He then bought 
an interest in a traveling daguerreotype gal- 
lery and visited various sections of southern 
Illinois, finally selling his interest after ar- 
riving in Olney. In 1855 he went to Law- 
rence county and began the study of medi- 
cine under Dr. J. L. Flanders, who lived 
on a farm, and who was at that time one of 
the leading physicians and surgeons in 
Southern Illinois. He studied two years and 
in 1857 went to New York and entered the 
New York Medical College, from which he 
graduated in chemistry in 1858, and in med- 
icine in 1859, having made a brilliant rec- 
ord in that institution. 



After leaving school, the subject prac- 
ticed in the hospitals of New York for a 
year. When the Civil war began, he deemed 
it his duty to do something for his coun- 
try and he applied for an appointment and 
was commissioned first assistant surgeon of 
the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New 
York Volunteer Infantry with the rank of 
captain, serving three years. He remained 
with this regiment, was present in all the 
engagement in which it participated ex- 
cept one, having then been absent on a ten 
days' leave to go home. Among the impor- 
tant battles in which he participated were 
Gettysburg, Bascom Bridge, siege of 
Charleston, etc. He was active in field 
work and escaped with one slight wound in 
the hand. 

After the war he returned to Illinois and 
located at Noble, where he engaged in gen- 
eral practice and soon built up a lucrative 
business, continuing here until 1880, when 
he located at Olney and continued practice 
with his usual great success until 1905, when 
he retired and has since been leading a 
quiet life. 

In politics he is a Democrat and for many 
years was quite active and prominent in the 
affairs of his party. He was elected chair- 
man of the Democratic Central Committee 
of Richland county in 1865, and so well did 
he manage its affairs that he was annually 
re-elected for nineteen consecutive years and 
has been a member of the same for thirty- 
five years. During this time he served as 
chairman of the Executive Committee for 
two terms, and Literarv Committee for two 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



terms. He served as chairman of the Con- 
gressional Committee one term, and was 
chairman of the Senatorial and Legislative 
Committees for two terms. He has been 
delegate to the county, state, legislative, dis- 
trict and national conventions and chairman 
of various committees. He was regarded 
as one of the "wheel-horses" of the Demo- 
cratic party in this locality for many years 
and he wielded a powerful influence in its 
councils. In 1882 he was a candidate for 
nomination as representative from the Forty- 
fourth District. There were four candidates 
and in the convention he received the entire 
vcte on the first ballot. His election fol- 
lowed by a majority of one thousand two 
hundred and ninety-six in a district which 
at that time was about six hundred Repub- 
lican. This shows his great popularity with 
the masses, and his splendid work in that 
body showed the wisdom of his constituents 
in their selection. He has always taken 
an active interest in whatever tended to pro- 
mote the general interest of his community. 
When a resident of Noble he was a member 
of the school board for seventeen years, dur- 
ing which time the schools of that place 
were built up to excellent proportions, hav- 
ing been president of the board of trustees 
for two terms and one term as treasurer. HP 
was appointed health officer of Olney in 
1882 and served in a most efficient manner 
for seventeen years. He served as president 
of the Board of United States Pension Ex- 
aminers for ten years, and as president of 
the Richland County Board of Charities for 
seven years. He was a member of the Board 



of Censors in Evansville Hospital Medical 
College for three years. In all these capaci- 
ties he gave the greatest satisfaction and 
always looked after such business with the 
same care as if it had been his own. 

The happy domestic life of the subject be- 
gan January 23, 1862, when he married Kate 
Mallary, a native of New York City, the 
daughter of Sherland and Judah (Elliott) 
Mallary, natives of Connecticut. The father 
was in the real estate and rental agency 
business and died there of cholera. His wife 
survived a number of years and died at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Rowland, at Xo- 
ble, this state. 

Five children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife, four of whom are living, as 
follows: Kate Elbertine, the wife of I. A. 
Phillips, of Waterbury, Connecticut; The- 
ressa, the wife of E. E. Edwards, of Olney; 
Charles Townsend, a druggist, of Streator, 
Illinois: Elbert M., an attorney and Master 
in Chancery, owner and editor of The Olney 
Times. These children received good educa- 
tions and are all well situated in reference 
to this world's affairs. 

In his fraternal relations the subject is a 
member of the Masonic order at Olney, also 
the Grand Army of the Republic, having 
served as surgeon of the latter for many 
years. 

It is doubtful if any citizen of this part of 
the state has achieved more honorable men- 
tion or occupied a more conspicuous place 
before the public than he whose name ap- 
pears at the head of these paragraphs. 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



H. D. EVANS. 



H. D. Evans was bom in Marion county, 
this state, September 30, 1866, the son of O. 
F. Evans, Police Magistrate, and a native of 
this county. The mother of Mr. Evans was 
Lucy J. Tingle, a native of Kentucky, who 
came here in 1850. The subject's parents 
are still living in 1908. They became the 
parents of nine children, four sons and five 
daughters. 

H. D. Evans attended school in Salem, re- 
maining under his parental roof until he was 
twenty-two years old. He then went to To- 
peka, Kansas, in 1888, and learned the car- 
penter's trade, at which he worked twelve or 
fourteen years, remaining in Topeka three 
years. He finally returned to Salem and 
worked at his trade for two years, when he 
went near Terre Haute and continued at 
this trade, and was there married to Nannie 
Haddock, the daughter of William Mad- 
dock, of Atherton, Indiana, on March 7, 
1894. Two interesting and winsome chil- 
dren have been born to the subject and wife, 
as follows: Gladys Marie, whose date of 
birth occurred June 24, 1895, and Gretchen 
Irene, who first saw the light of day on Au- 
gust 19, 1899. 

After his marriage Mr. Evans came to 
Salem. Moving on a farm, he remained 
there one and one-half years, when he moved 
to Salem and engaged in contracting and the 
lumber business for four years, after which 
he went on the road for two and one-half 
years, selling paints and varnishes. He is 
now a member of the drug firm of Evans & 



Harmon, which owns stores at luka, Illinois, 
and Moorhouse, Missouri. 

Mr. Evans is a wide awake, energetic 
business man of sound judgment and mod- 
ern business principles, and he has always 
succeeded at whatever he undertook. He 
faithfully served the city of Salem as Alder- 
man several years ago. He is a Mason, a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, and both 
he and his wife are members of the Chris- 
tian church, and are well and favorably 
known to a host of friends in this commun- 
ity. 



T. W. WILLIAMS. 

Among the strong and influential citizens 
of Marion county, the record of whose lives 
have become an essential part of the history 
of the section, the gentleman whose name 
appears above occupies a prominent place, 
and for many years has exerted a beneficial 
influence in the community in which he re- 
sides. 

T. W. Williams, the well known Justice 
of the Peace at Salem, Illinois, was born in 
Silver Springs, Wilson county, Tennessee, 
May 22, 1837, the son of W. G. Williams, 
a man of sterling worth and influence, who 
was born and reared at Silver Springs. He 
came to Illinois in 1845, locating in the 
northern part of Marion county which is 
now embraced in Kinmundy township, 
where he developed a farm, making a com- 
fortable home and a good living during his 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND. MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



55 



residence there. Thomas Williams, father 
of W. G. Williams and grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, came to Illinois with 
the family in 1845. He was a North Caro- 
linian by birth and a fine type of the true 
Southern gentleman. He followed farming 
all his life. He died in Kinmundy. W. G. 
Williams died in 1904, at the advanced age 
of eighty-seven years. The mother of the 
subject was Mary Morning, a native of old 
Virginia and a woman of many estimable 
traits. She passed to her rest in 1852. Mr. 
and Mrs. W. G. Williams were the parents 
of nine children as follows: Elizabeth, 
widow of R. G. Williams, who now lives in 
Foster township, Marion county; T. W., 
our subject; Othnial, who is living at 
Raleigh, Saline county, Illinois, was a 
soldier in the Civil war; Joseph died while 
in the Union army; G. H. also died in 
the Union army; George M. was killed 
while in the Federal ranks; Henry N. also 
died in the Union army; Carroll died in in- 
fancy; Mary Jane is the wife of John Car- 
man, living at Kinmundy, this county. 

The subject's father married the second 
time, his last wife being Martha Boczkie- 
wicz, and by this union five children were 
born as follows : Piety Smith, now de- 
ceased, who lived in Hamilton county, Illi- 
nois; W. G., Jr., who is living in Hamilton 
county; F. O., who is also a resident of 
Hamilton county ; John V., is a Baptist min- 
ister, living at Galitia, Saline county, Illi- 
nois; Priscilla died at the age of ten years. 

T. W. Williams, our subject, was raised 
on the farm and attended the common 



schools where he diligently applied himself 
and received a fairly good education. After 
he reached maturity he bought and sold live 
stock, making this business a success from 
the start, having much natural ability as a 
trader. He lived on the farm for twenty- 
five years. He also made a marked success 
later dealing in live stock and grain, becom- 
ing widely known not only as a man of 
unusual industry but also of scrupulous 
honesty. 

Having taken a lively interest in politics 
and becoming well known throughout the 
county he was sought out by his political 
friends for positions of public trust, having 
first served as Deputy Sheriff in 1890 of Ma- 
riorr county for a period of two years, with 
the greatest satisfaction to all concerned and 
reflecting much credit upon his innate ability 
as an official. In 1893 he became Deputy 
Circuit Clerk, in which capacity he ably 
served for five years. Mr. Williams was 
postmaster at Kinmundy, Illinois, in 1885, 
during Cleveland's first administration. He 
had previously been living on his farm, but 
he then moved to Kinmundy and from that 
town to Salem in 1900 for the purpose of 
assuming the duties of Deputy Sheriff. In 
all of his official career not the shadow of 
suspicion of wrong has rested upon him, and 
he has given uniform satisfaction to all con- 
cerned in whatever place he has filled. He 
was the Democratic nominee for Sheriff in 
1894, but was defeated by a Republican can- 
didate. 

Mr. Williams' early life was devoted very 
largely to school teaching, having won a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



lasting reputation throughout Marion 
county as an able instructor and his services 
were always in great demand. He followed 
this line of work from the time he was 
twenty-one until he was forty years old, 
having taught not only in Marion but also 
Hamilton and Saline counties. He has 
given his time to the duties of the office of 
.Justice of the Peace, to which he was elected 
in 1900. -He is also engaged in the hotel 
business, being the present proprietor of the 
Williams House, which he has managed for 
ten years. Owing to the courteous treat- 
ment and excellent accommodations which 
the traveling public finds at this house, it 
has a liberal patronage and has become well 
known to those finding it convenient to stop 
at a well kept hostelry. 

The domestic life of Mr. Williams began 
when he was united in marriage with Juliet 
Boczkiewicz on March 27, 1859. She was 
a representative of a highly respected and 
well known family of this county. By this 
union the following interesting children 
have been born: Henrietta, the wife of 
George M. Hargrove, of Fayette county, Il- 
linois ; Annetta, deceased ; Alfe, the wife of 
W. W. Newis, of Salem; W. W., of Cen- 
tralia, this state; Walter, of Ashland, Cass 
county, Illinois; T. S., of Salem. 

These children have received good edu- 
cations and careful home training which is 
clearly reflected in their lives. 

Mrs. Williams was called to her rest in 
1 88 1, and Mr. Williams was married again 
in 1884 to Nannie L. Williams, a daughter 
of T. C. Williams, of Kinmundy, a well 



known family of that place. There have 
been no children by this union. 

Fraternally Mr. Williams is affiliated 
with the Masonic order, having belonged to 
this lodge since he was twenty-five years 
old. He is a member of the Baptist church, 
and judging from his sober, upright, well 
ordered daily life one would conclude that 
he believes in carrying out the sublime pre- 
cepts and doctrines embraced in both the 
lodge and the church to which he belongs. 
Mr. Williams is a man of striking personal- 
ity, portly with a proper poise of dignity to 
his military bearing which makes him a con- 
spicuous figure wherever he goes. He is a 
pleasant man to meet, always kind, affable, 
well mannered and congenial; these com- 
mendable traits coupled with his industry 
and genuine worth make him a favorite in 
Marion county and wherever he is known, 
and lie justly merits the high esteem of 
which he is the recipient. 



JAMES B. LEWIS. 

Few men in Marion county occupy as 
prominent position in public and political 
affairs as the well known and deservedly 
popular gentleman whose name introduces 
this article. His has indeed been a busy and 
successful life and the record is eminently 
worthy of perusal by the student who would 
learn the intrinsic essence of individuality 
and its influence in moulding opinion and 
giving character and stability to a commu- 
nity. 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION* COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



57 



James B. Lewis, editor and publisher of 
The Marion County Democrat, and one of 
the leading journalists of southern Illinois, 
is a native of Nicholas county, Kentucky, 
where his birth occurred on the I4th day of 
November, 1852. His father, O. M. Lewis, 
who was born and reared to manhood in the 
state of New York, migrated about 1835 to 
Ohio where he spent the ensuing ten years, 
and at the expiration of that time removed 
to Kentucky where he made his home until 
his death in the year 1862. O. M. Lewis 
was a man of fine mind and superior intel- 
lectual atainments, having enjoyed excellent 
educational advantages in his native state, 
graduating when a young man from Alfred 
Center College. After finishing his educa- 
tion he engaged in teaching, which profes- 
sion he followed with marked success in 
Carlisle and Maysville, Kentucky, until the 
breaking out of the war with Mexico, when 
he resigned his position and entering the 
army served throughout that struggle while 
still in his minority. Later when the na- 
tional sky became overcast with the ominous 
clouds of approaching Civil war he was 
among the first men of Nicholas county to 
tender his services to the national govern- 
ment, enlisting in 1861 in Company H, 
Eighteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, 
in which he soon rose to the position of cap- 
tain, and as such served with a brilliant 
record until August, 1862, when he was 
killed while bravely leading his men in the 
battle of Richmond, Kentucky. This was 
one of the bloodiest of the war, the Eight- 
eenth Kentucky, a veteran regiment, losing 



two-thirds of its men, while the losses of 
several other regiments were almost if not 
quite as great. Mr. Lewis is said to have 
been the most popular man in his regiment, 
and was almost idolized by his own com- 
pany, during his entire period of service. 
The Grand Army Post at Carlisle, Ken- 
tucky, where he enlisted, is called the 
O. M. Lewis Post in his honor. Although 
a man of scholarly tastes and habits, and for 
many years devoted to his books and studies 
he inherited the martial instinct also being 
descended from fighting stock on the ma- 
ternal side, his mother having been a Law- 
ton, a relative of the late General Lawton, 
one of America's most distinguished heroes, 
who lost his life in the Philippines. O. M. 
Lewis was born on August 30, 1824, mar- 
ried in 1850 to Elizabeth Mann, of Nicholas 
county, Kentucky, and became the father of 
eight children, only three now survive, 
namely : Mrs. Louisa L. Davidson, of Pa- 
toka, Illinois, James B., of this review and 
Mrs. Anna J. Burns who lives in Fresno, 
California. In September following her 
husband's death, 1863, Mrs. Lewis, with her 
three children, moved to Marion county, Il- 
linois, and located about two miles east of 
Patoka, on a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres which had been purchased by Mr. 
Lewis some years previously. In 1865 she 
became the wife of George Binnion, of Mar- 
ion county, who was also a soldier during 
the war of the Rebellion and the son of 
Francis Binnion, the second marriage result- 
ing in the birth of two sons, Daniel H., and 
Frank. At the time of his death, which 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXI) RKM 1 X ISCKXT HISTORY OF 



occurred in the month of July, 1907, at the 
remarkable age of one hundred and seven 
years, Francis Binnion was the oldest man 
in Marion county, if not in the state. 

James B. Lewis spent his childhood in the 
state of his birth, and when eleven years old 
was brought by his mother to Marion 
county, Illinois, with the subsequent history 
and progress of which his life has been very 
closely interwoven. At the proper age he 
entered the public schools of Patoka, where 
he pursued his studies until completing the 
common and high school branches, the 
training thus received was in Milton, Wis- 
consin, where he earned an honorable record 
as a close and painstaking student. On quit- 
ting college he turned his attention to teach- 
ing, but after devoting several years to this 
field of work and finding it not altogether to 
his liking he discontinued it and took up the 
study of medicine. After a course of read- 
ing under the direction of competent local 
talent he entered the Eclectic Medical Insti- 
tute at Cincinnati, where he continued his 
studies and researches until receiving his de- 
gree in the year 1878, following which he 
opened an office in Patoka and in due time 
built up an extensive practice which proved 
as successful financially as professionally, 
and which earned for him an honorable 
reputation among the leading physicians and 
surgeons of Marion and neighboring coun- 
ties. 

Dr. Lewis brought to his chosen calling 
a mind well disciplined by intellectual and 
professional training, and it was not long 
until his practice took a very wide range, 



embracing not only the town and a large 
area of adjacent country, but not infre- 
quently were his services sought at other and 
remote points for treatment of difficult and 
critical cases in which a high degree of ef- 
ficiency and skill were required. He con- 
tinued his professional business with encour- 
aging success until the fall of 1884 when he 
was elected Clerk of the Marion Circuit 
Court, and the better to attend to his official 
functions here moved within a short time to 
Salem where he has since resided. Doctor 
Lewis discharged the duties of the clerkship 
with credit to himself and to the satisfac- 
tion of the people, and during his incum- 
bency of four years won the esteem and 
confidence of all who had business to trans- 
act in his office, proving a most capable, ju- 
dicious and obliging public servant. In 
February, 1889, shortly after the expiration 
of his official term he established "The Mar- 
ion County Democrat," which he has since 
conducted, and which under his able busi- 
ness and editorial management is now one 
of the best and most influential local papers 
in the southern part of the state, in many 
respects comparing favorably with the more 
pretentious sheets of the larger metropolitan 
centers. The political creed of The Demo- 
crat is indicated by its title, and as a party 
organ it has had much to do in moulding 
opinion, formulating policies and directing 
public affairs, the doctor being an elegant 
and forceful writer, a courteous but fearless 
antagonist and in discussing the leading 
questions and issues of the day he wields a 
trenchant pen and makes his influence felt 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



59 



not only on these but on all other matters 
which the enterprising journalist is supposed 
to bring to the attention of the public. 

The Democrat office is well equipped with 
the latest modern machinery and appliances 
for first class work in the art preservative, 
and in its mechanical make up the paper is 
fully abreast of the times, all that constitutes 
a first class newspaper being systematically 
arranged and a model of neatness and typo- 
graphical art. Aside from its political phase 
it is designed to vibrate with the public pulse 
and in addition to the news of the day, its 
columns teem with much of the best current 
literature and it has also became the medium 
through which the productions of a number 
of rising local writers are given publicity. 

In brief The Democrat is a clean and dig- 
nified and interesting family paper as well 
as a popular and influential political organ, 
and its steady growth in public favor be- 
speaks for it a future of still greater prom- 
ise and usefulness. Not only as an editorial 
moulder of opinion does Mr. Lewis make 
his influence felt in directing the affairs of 
his town and county, but as an enterprising 
public spirited citizen, with the welfare of 
the community at heart, he has ever been 
interested in whatever makes for the benefit 
of his fellow men, encouraging to the extent 
of his ability all worthy measures and takes 
the lead in movements having for their ob- 
ject the social, intellectual and moral ad- 
vancement of those with whom he mingles. 

On the 1 2th day of September, 1877, Mr. 
Lewis was united in the bonds of wedlock 



with Mona I. Quoyle, daughter of Capt. T. 
H. and Rebecca Quoyle, of Salem, the mar- 
riage being blessed with six children, four 
of whom are living, the other two dying in 
infancy. Anna L., the oldest of the family, 
is the wife of E. H. Barenfauger, a con- 
tractor of Salem. Orin M., the second in 
order of birth is associated with his father 
in The Democrat office and has achieved 
honorable repute as an enterprising and 
capable newspaper man. Before entering 
the field of journalism he served four years 
in the United States navy, having 
visited nearly every country of the old 
and new world, and completely encircled 
the globe while with the squadron under the 
command of Robley D. Evans or "Fighting 
Bob," one of the most distinguished admir- 
als of his time. Thomas O., the second son, 
is a locomotive fireman at the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois yards in Salem, while Owen 
W., the youngest of the number is also con- 
nected with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
Railway, holding the position of store 
keeper at Salem. In his fraternal relations 
Mr. Lewis is a Mason and an Odd Fellow, 
belonging to the lodges of those organiza- 
tions in Salem and manifesting a lively in- 
terest in their deliberations. While not 
actively engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession he is fully abreast of the times on all 
matters relating to medical science, being a 
close and diligent student and an untiring 
investigator, and by keeping in touch with 
the trend of modern thought maintains not 
only his interest in the healing art, but the 



6o 



lUOGKAlMIICAL AND KKMIXLSCEXT HISTORY OF 



honorable position to which he attained 
while devoting his entire time and attention 
to the ills of suffering humanity. 

During the entire period of his residence 
in Salem as a physician, public official, edi- 
tor, as the center of his family circle and 
as a citizen he has made good his title to 
the honored name inherited from his 
ancestors, besides adding to its luster by a 
strict adherence to duty in every relation to 
which he has been called. 



FRANK A. ROGERS. 

In touching upon the life history of 
the subject of this sketch the writer aims 
to avoid fulsome encomium and extrava- 
gant praise, yet he desires to hold up 
for consideration those facts , which have 
shown the distinction of a true, useful and 
honorable life a life characterized by per- 
severance, energy, broad charity and well 
defined purpose. To do this will be but to 
reiterate the dictum pronounced upon Mr. 
Rogers by the people who have known him 
so long and well. 

Frank A. Rogers, the present popular 
County Treasurer of Marion county, was 
born in Omega, this county, April i, 1871, 
and while still a young man has left the in- 
delible imprint of his strong personality 
upon the locality where he has spent his 
life. The father of the subject was William 
A. Rogers, a native of Tennessee, who came 
to this county in 1854. He was engaged all 



his life in agricultural pursuits, and he was a 
man of great influence in his community, 
and was Supervisor of his township for fif- 
teen years, also Justice of the Peace for 
twenty years, and he was chairman of the 
County Board at the time of his death, Feb- 
ruary 24, 1891. The subject's mother was 
Rebecca Chapman in her maidenhood. She 
was born in Omega township, this county, 
November 25, 1846, and is still living in 
1908 on the old homestead. She is a woman 
of refinement and gracious personality 
which has won hosts of friends. To Mr. 
and Mrs. William A. Rogers the following 
children were born : Leva, who died in 
infancy; the second in order of birth was 
our subject; Luther A., living at Welling- 
ton, Kansas; Giles N., of luka, Illinois; 
Danael C, deceased; Leo Delbert, of Poca- 
hontas, Iowa ; Paul, of Omega township. 

The subject's father was twice married. 
His first wife was Minerva Jane Craig. 

Frank A. Rogers lived at home until he 
was twenty-one years old, assisting with the 
work about the farm until he had acquired 
sufficient education to begin teaching. Be- 
ing an ambitious lad he always applied him- 
self diligently to his text-books and conse- 
quently outstripped most of the common 
plodders that made up the roll of contem- 
poraneous school-fellows in his neighbor- 
hood, and he has since greatly added to his 
early foundation in educational matters by 
coming in contact with the world and by sys- 
tematic home study. But few men are to be 
met with in the state of Illinois who are any 
better informed on current topics of a gen- 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



6r 



eral nature than Mr. Rogers, for he has al- 
ways been a close student of the trend of 
events, politically, scientifically and in other 
leading issues. He followed teaching for a 
period of seventeen years in Marion county, 
during which time he established an envied 
reputation as an instructor and his services 
were in great demand. He was not only 
popular for his superior text-book learning, 
but his kind and pleasing personality, his 
peculiar insight in the characters of his pu- 
pils, which made it easy for him to control 
and properly direct each pupil, made him 
popular with all classes of people. 

Mr. Rogers always took a deep interest in 
political movements, being a stanch advo- 
cate of the principles and policies of the 
Democratic party, with which he has been 
affiliated from the time of attaining his ma- 
jority, and he has ever lent his aid in fur- 
thering the party's cause and is well forti- 
fied in his political convictions, while he is 
essentially public-spirited and progressive. 
Being animated with the laudable ambition 
for political preferment and his general 
popularity having been long ago well estab- 
lished, it is not strange that his fellow citi- 
zens singled him out for offices of public 
trust, and he held the office of Supervisor of 
Omega township for two terms. He was also 
chairman of the County Board and County 
Board of Review in 1903. He was nomi- 
nated for County Treasurer on the Demo- 
cratic ticket August 4, 1906, by a majority 
of eight hundred and was easily elected over 
a strong opponent the following November, 
and is serving the duties of the office with 



great credit to himself and to the entire 
satisfaction of all concerned, not only his 
constituents but members of other parties 
as well, being generally regarded as one 
of the best officials the county has ever had, 
especially in the Treasurer's office. The 
subject has made his home in Salem since 
December, following the election. 

The subject's happy and harmonious do- 
mestic life dates from September 25, 1892, 
when he was united in marriage to Lillie M. 
Kagy, who was born April 7, 1875, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William B. Kagy, 
a well known, highly respected and influ- 
ential family of Marion county. Mrs. 
Rogers is a highly cultured and accom- 
plished tady of pleasing manner and many 
commendable attributes of mind and heart 
and she presides over their comfortable and 
cozy home with grace and dignity and she is 
popular among the best class of Marion 
county's estimable women. 

The following bright and interesting chil- 
dren have come into the home of our subject 
and wife, thereby adding cheer and sunshine 
to the family circle: Herschell, born June 
28, 1894; Hazel, born October 5, 1897; Ver- 
non V., born April 15, 1902, surviving only 
till October 4th, the same year ; Rolla, who 
was born August 5, 1904. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers are consistent mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
They are both held in high esteem for their 
friendly manners, wholesome domestic life 
and upright public lives which have resulted 
in winning and retaining the friendship of 
all who know them. 



IHOC.KAPIIICAL AND RK.MIX ISCKXT HISTORY OF 



CARLOS A. FELTMAN, M. D. 

He whose name initiates this paragraph is 
a representative of one of the old and 
honored families of Marion county, Illinois, 
where he has lived from the time of his 
birth and where he has gained personal 
prestige and success in one of the most noble 
and exacting of all vocations to which a man 
may devote himself, being engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Salem and con- 
trolling a large business as physician and 
surgeon, while he has gained precedence by 
reason of his devotion to his profession and 
his marked ability as an exponent of ad- 
vanced and practical medical science, at the 
same time establishing a record of honor. 

Dr. Carlos A. Feltman was born in 
Salem, Illinois, September u, 1856, the son 
of Charles Feltman, a man of much sterling 
worth and influence in his community who 
was born in Strausburg, Germany, and was 
one of the earliest German settlers in Marion 
county, Illinois. He was a successful baker 
for many years and later was engaged in 
the mercantile business at which he was 
equally successful, having built up an ex- 
cellent trade with the surrounding country 
districts. He spent nearly his entire life in 
Salem and passed to his reward in 1875. 
The subject's mother, who was a woman of 
many admirable attributes, was known in 
her maidenhood as Mary Appel. She was 
born in Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany, 
and she passed to her rest in 1888. The 
parents of the subject were married in St. 
Louis, Missouri. They received a fairly 



good education and were people of refine- 
ment and high character, having reared their 
children, of whom there were eight in num- 
ber, in a wholesome atmosphere which 
modified and deeply influenced their subse- 
quent careers. Following are the names of 
their children : Emil, deceased ; Ellen, who 
married R. E. Fletcher and who died in 
Grand Junction, Colorado; H. C., deceased, 
was a prominent attorney at law and was 
grand scribe of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at the time of his death ; Wil- 
liam W. is deceased; the next in order of 
birth was Carlos A., our subject; Lenora, 
deceased; C. E., who is with the Eli Walker 
Dry Goods Company, of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; R. B., who is in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Grand Junction, Colorado. 

Doctor Feltman remained a member of 
the home circle until he reached manhood, 
having attended the common schools in 
Salem until he finished the prescribed course. 
Being a diligent student he made excellent 
grades and received a good education. He 
went into newspaper work, believing that 
journalism offered peculiar attractions. He 
worked as a printer for three years. In the 
meantime he felt that his calling was in 
another direction, the more praiseworthy 
art of medicine, consequently he began 
studying during spare moments and finally 
entered the- Louisville Medical College at 
Louisville, Kentucky, where he remained 
one term, after which he attended the 
Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, 
from which he graduated with high honor 
in 1882 in the same class with Dr. M. D. 



R1CHLAND, CLAY AXU MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



Foster, the present Congressman from this 
district. Our subject showed from the time 
he first entered medical college that he had 
a peculiar aptitude and unusual talents for 
this line of endeavor and his subsequent life, 
which has been remarkably successful, 
shows that he would have made a grave 
mistake had he adopted any other profes- 
sion as a life work. 

Doctor Feltman returned to his native 
community after graduation, beginning 
practice at Salem. His success was in- 
stantaneous and his ability became so gen- 
erally known that he was selcted to the im- 
portant post of United States Indian Physi- 
cian at Fort Apache, Arizona, during Presi- 
dent Cleveland's first administration. He 
was eminently successful in this new field, 
but he finally desired to return to his native 
state, and in 1888 began practice at Beards- 
town, Illinois, which he carried on with the 
greatest success for a period of fourteen 
years, building up a very large practice and 
becoming City Health Officer, also a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education. He was 
also Secretary of the Pension Board under 
Cleveland's second administration, also Cor- 
oner of Cass county from 1896 to 1900; 
later County Physician of Cass county. Af- 
ter filling all these positions to the entire 
satisfaction of all concerned, showing pro- 
nounced innate executive ability as well as 
superior medical skill, in 1900, greatly to 
the regret of his large patronage, Doctor 
Feltman moved away from Beardstown, lo- 
cating at his old home, in Salem. Useless 
to say that his practice was large from the 



first, for he had long ago firmly established 
a reputation here. He is a member of the 
Board of Education at Salem, and is County 
Physician. He was nominated by his party 
for Coroner in 1908 and his nomination was 
regarded by not only the Democrats, but 
members of other party affiliations as well, 
to be a most fortunate on. He was elected 
at the ensuing election by a large majority 
over his opponent. 

The domestic life of Doctor Feltman 
dates from January i, 1888, when he was 
happily married at Salem to Mayme E. 
Fulks, the refined and accomplished daugh- 
ter of T. Charles Fulks. She received a 
fairly good educational training and is a 
representative of a well known and influ- 
ential family. 

Two interesting children, who, in their 
youth, give promise of successful and happy 
future careers, have added cheer and sun- 
shine to the cozy home of Doctor and Mrs. 
Feltman. Their names are Blanche and 
Mabel, nineteen and seventeen years old, 
respectively, in 1908. They are both apt 
students and of winsome personalities. 

Fraternally our subject is a member of 
the Masonic Order, the Woodmen and the 
Independent Order of Foresters, and his 
daily life would indicate that he believes in 
carrying out the sublime precepts of each. 
He is a strict Presbyterian in religious faith. 
However, he is not a member of any church, 
although all his family subscribes to the 
church in Salem. 

Doctor Feltman is of a public-spirited na- 
ture, genial personality, uprightness of prin- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCKNT HISTORY OF 



ciple and habits of industry. He is re- 
garded by the people of Marion county as 
one of their ablest and most eminent 
citizens. 



WILLIAM KELL BUNDY. 

The life of the early settlers in any com- 
munity has ever contained much to interest 
and entertain us. There is something ro- 
mantic about the ruggedness of their lives 
and the uncertainties they had to face which 
holds a fascination for us today. The family 
of the subject of this sketch were among the 
earliest inhabitants of the county in which 
they lived, and the hardworking lives they 
lived were much more eventful than the life 
of the average farmer of today. 

William K. Bundy was born in section 
No. i, Centralia township, Marion county, 
Illinois, on May 4, 1827, and was the son of 
Frederick and Mary Bundy. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Wilson, was bom 
in North Carolina, coming from the region 
of the famous Blue Ridge Mountains. Fred- 
erick Bundy was the son of Jonathan 
Bundy, of Tennessee, who came to Marion 
county, Illinois, as early as 1825 or 1826, 
settling near Walnut Hill, where he soon 
afterward died. His wife belonged to a well 
known family of Tennessee named Dorcas. 
They had four children, all sons Robert, 
John and William, who settled in the vicin- 
ity of Walnut Hill, and the father of the 
subject of our sketch, Frederick Bundy, who 
settled in section No. i, Centralia township. 



Frederick Bundy's father-in-law, John 
Wilson, married in his native state of North 
Carolina. He was a farmer who on becom- 
ing attacked with the western fever, went 
westward to Illinois. There he settled north- 
east of Salem. On the death of his first 
wife he married a widow named Jones. 
Their married years must have been happy 
ones, for upon a third matrimonial venture 
he espoused another widow named Kelley. 
After a long and active life he died on the 
farm. The children by his first wife num- 
bered seven. In regular order they were: 
Mary, Nancy, Jane, Margaret, Samuel, 
Dorrington, and Sylvester. Mary, the eld- 
est daughter, was the mother of the subject 
of our sketch. The children born to John 
Wilson's second wife numbered three. 

Frederick Bundy, living in a different 
period from ours, had no chance to go to 
school. His education had to be self-ob- 
tained. He did not fail to sieze the oppor- 
tunities which came his way, and so became 
a remarkably well informed man. At the 
time the family came to Illinois the journey 
was made in, the old time cumberous team 
wagons. The family of the mother of our 
sketch also arrived by means of the same 
mode of travel. 

Centralia township at the time Frederick 
Bundy settled there in 1826, was as yet in 
its original wild state. As may be supposed, 
wild game and beasts of prey of many varie- 
ties abounded there, particularly wolves. 
He remembered the howls and blood-cur- 
dling "ki-yiings" of the timber-wolves, to 
which he lay awake listening on many a 




WILLIAM BUNDY. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



night inside of the rough log-cabin which he 
had built with his own hands. In time he 
cleared the land and erected for himself a 
suitable home, and otherwise much im- 
proved the property which embraced four 
hundred acres. For years he carried on an 
active farming business and raised consid- 
erable amount of stock. Frederick Bundy 
was politically a staunch Democrat, and in 
those days he had to go over to Salem at 
election times to record his vote. In reli- 
gious life he was a member of the Christian 
church. His wife died in February, 1848, 
and the demise of the inseparable companion 
of his life's journey was a great loss. He 
died in the fall of 1849, having, however, 
married secondly Elizabeth Walker, and 
leaving a son by that marriage. He had 
eight children by his first wife, the eldest 
of which was the subject of this sketch, 
William K. The others were: Alexander, 
who married first Margaret Breeze, and 
afterwards another member of that family, 
and who is a farmer in Washington ; Nancy 
Jane, deceased, first married James Harper, 
and afterwards Reuben Alderson; Dorcas 
married Sydney Harmon, both of whom 
are dead; Jeanette, who married, also died; 
John joined the One Hundred and Eleventh 
Regiment, Company H, at the outbreak of 
the Civil war and died while in the service 
of his country ; Robert was also in the Civil 
war, enlisting in Jefferson county, Illinois, 
and died of small pox during his term of 
service; Sallie, another daughter, married 
Thomas J. Hollowell and lives in Washing- 
ton with her husband. 



The life of William Kell Bundy, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, has been an adventurous 
one. In early life he received the limited 
education afforded at the only available local 
institutions of learning the subscription 
schools. He remained at home doing nec- 
essary work on the farm until 1847, when at 
that martial period he enlisted in Company 
C, No. i, United States army for the Mexi- 
can war. His military career began by his 
being sent to Alton, Illinois, and later to 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and later par- 
ticipated in the march across the desert to 
Santa Fe. He was on the march sixty days, 
which was a tedious one. Later he took 
part in the advance upon old Albuquerque, 
the Mexican capital. Here he remained 
until 1848, where he did guard duty, and 
finally marched back. On his return he re- 
mained with his father superintending the 
old homestead until the latter's death, at 
which time he bought forty acres of it, on 
which he lived for fifteen years. In 1863 
he changed to his present abode in section 
No. 6, Raccoon township. At different times 
the area of his land increased until he had at 
one time three hundred and fifty acres; the 
greater part of which he has since divided 
among his children. All the improvements 
on the place have been the fruits of his 
labor and supervision. He has principally 
raised stock on the farm, cattle, horses, 
sheep and hogs, and has also evinced an 
interest in the fancy and finer breeds. 

William K. Bundy married first Eliza- 
beth, the daughter of Isaac and Sarah Mc- 
Clelland. Isaac was an early settler in Ma- 



66 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



rion county, Illinois, near Walnut Hill. He 
followed the occupation of farmer and stock 
dealer. On the death of his first wife, Mr. 
Bundy married a second time on October 
20, 1887, Mildred Annie Gaines, of Sumner 
county, near Nashville, Tennessee. She was 
the daughter of Henry Gaines. Her mother's 
own name was Marian Bradley, of Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. They came to Marion 
county, Illinois, in 1850, and settled in Ste- 
venson township. There Henry Gaines and 
his wife farmed during the remainder of 
their lives. He died in 1850, and his wife 
in 1856. They had eight children, of which 
Mildred Annie, the second wife of William 
K. Bundy, was the seventh. Of the others, 
Hazel married C. Tracy; P. D. is a farmer 
in Stevenson township ; Josephine, the third, 
is dead; Martha is also dead; Henrietta E., 
the widow of Sidney Charlton, lives in Odin 
township; Agnes is still on the farmstead 
and is single; Z. T. lives in Jefferson 
county. The second marriage of William 
K. Bundy has given him the following chil- 
dren, seven in number. Mary Rebecca, the 
wife of John French; Sarah Jane, who is 
Mrs. Robinson, living at Sedalia, Washing- 
ton; Elizabeth, who married John Lament, 
since deceased, lives in Oklahoma; Joseph- 
ine, who married George West, of Odin 
township; Isaac M., who is a farmer in Rac- 
coon township married Sarah Johnson; 
Fred, who lives at home and is unmarried, 
went through the Spanish-American war as 
a member of Company G, Third Regiment 
U. S. another child, Catherine died young. 
Though now in his eighty-second year, 
William Kell Bundy possesses a mind of un- 



usual transparency. He is still well able to 
review in detail the memories and exploits 
of a long and varied career. 

In politics the subject of our sketch is a 
life-long follower of the Democracy. His 
first vote for a presidential candidate was 
recorded years ago when it went to James 
K. Polk, who figured in an eventful election. 
In religion he is a member of the Christian 
church, in the interests of which he has ever 
been active. He is now in the mellow period 
of a long life which has always been at the 
service of home and country. He has ful- 
filled the duties of a long life; he is sur- 
rounded by an affectionate circle of sons and 
daughters; he has the friendship and good 
wishes of a host of friends. Is not this as 
much as any of us can hope for in the even- 
ing of life. 



CRAWFORD S. ERWIN. 

No man in Clay county occupies a more 
enviable position in civic and business af- 
fairs than the subject of this sketch, who is 
the well known and popular ex-Circuit 
Clerk of the county, not alone on account 
of the success he has achieved, but also on 
account of the honorable, straightforward 
business policy he has ever followed both in 
public and private life. He possesses un- 
tiring energy, is quick of perception, forms 
his plans readily and executes them with 
alacrity so that. he stands today one of the 
leading representatives of a county widely 
known for its men of force and business 
acumen. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



<v 



Crawford S. Erwin was born in Hoosier 
township, Clay county, October 9, 1866, the 
son of David, the son of William Erwin, 
a native of Indiana, who was a cabinet 
maker by trade, having come from Indiana 
to Illinois in an early day and engaged in 
the cabinet making business, also in farm- 
ing. He was called to his rest August 7, 
1866, six weeks before our subject was born. 
William Erwin, the subject's grandfather, 
was one of the pioneers of Clay county, hav- 
ing come to America from Scotland, his na- 
tive country, when a young man. He was 
the first person buried in the old Hoosier 
cemetery in Hoosier township. The mother 
of the subject was known in her maiden- 
hood as Eliza A. Fitzgerald, whose people 
were originally from Scotland. She passed 
to her rest in Hoosier township in the spring 
of 1890. Five children were born to the 
subject's parents as follows: Mayberry P., 
living in Henrietta, Texas; David S., liv- 
ing in Clay county, Illinois ; Joseph, in Hen- 
rietta, Texas; W. G., who is also a resi- 
dent of Clay county; Crawford S.. the sub- 
ject. 

Mr. Erwin spent his early life on the 
farm, attending the country schools during 
the winter months, and assisting with the 
work at home in the summer. He was left 
to be reared by a widowed mother, who was 
too poor to aid in her son's education, and 
thus our subject was compelled to begin his 
fight with the world early in life practically 
unaided and the admirable way he has suc- 
ceeded in the face of seemingly insurmount- 
able obstacles, deserves the commendation 
of all. When he was nine vears old, the 



family moved to Texas, where they remained 
four years. During this time the children 
were deprived of the advantages of a good 
school. Desiring to return to the Illinois 
home, the family made the trip overland in 
a wagon, a distance of twelve hundred miles, 
in the fall and winter of 1880, having 
reached Hoosier township shortly after 
Christmas, during the coldest weather that 
the country had known for years. Craw- 
ford S. at once entered school at Center* 
under the Rev. John F. Harmon, now sta- 
tioned in East St. Louis. Three terms of 
school were attended here by our subject. 
He was an excellent student, for he had now 
reached young manhood and he realized 
that if he succeeded in life, he would be 
compelled to prepare himself for some of 
the professions or commercial life, for he 
was physically unfit to follow the hard-work- 
ing life of a farmer. He was enabled to 
gratify his ambition to become an educated 
man by working out on the farm during 
the summer months, and with the money 
he thus secured he entered the Northern In- 
diana Normal School at Valparaiso, Indi- 
ana, in which institution he made a splendid 
record for scholarship. 

He decided to become a teacher and be- 
fore he was eighteen years old had secured 
his first certificate and had taught his first 
school, which was a pronounced success. 
His services were then in great demand for 
the ensuing ten years which he devoted to 
teaching in Clay county, becoming generally 
known as an able educator. Most of that 
time he taught in only two school districts, 



68 



HHX1RAPIIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



meanwhile devoting the summer months to 
farming. 

About this time Mr. Envin secured the 
appointment of government mail weigher on 
the Vandalia line, which position he filled 
so satisfactorily that he was within two 
years thereafter re-appointed government 
mail weigher on the main line of the Balti- 
more & Ohio Southwestern Railroad, op- 
erating between Cincinnati and St. Louis. 
His official reports quickly enabled the com- 
pany to see his ability in this line and he 
was placed part of his time in the office of 
the chief clerk to assist in the examination 
of the reports sent in by his fellow-officers. 

Mr. Erwin was called home in 1894 to 
fill the position of Deputy County Clerk, 
the duties of which he discharged in such a 
creditable manner that he became candidate 
for the office of Circuit Court Clerk in 1896, 
and was elected, on the Republican ticket, 
and discharged his duties to the entire sat- 
isfaction of all concerned and was re-elected 
in 1900, and again in 1904, his term having 
expired December 7, 1908. It is the con- 
census of opinion that he has been the best 
Circuit Clerk the county has ever had. 

The official and private life of Mr. Er- 
win has ever been an open book to all. for 
it has been led along conservative lines, 
honest and without blemish, lacking the 
faintest shadow or suspicion of evil. His 
donations to charitable purposes and to his 
needy neighbors and fellow citizens since 
his residence in Louisville have amounted to 
several hundred dollars. He has always 
been ready to assist in aiding any worthy 
cause. It has been his custom for a number 



of years at Christmas time to gather to- 
gether provisions, and quietly boxing 
them up himself and employing a teamster 
to deliver the same to the unfortunate and 
needy in his community. So unostentatious 
has this charity been bestowed that the do- 
nor is known to but few of his beneficiaries 
to this day. 

Mr. Erwin was united in marriage De- 
cember 12, 1886, to Sarah Belle Conley, 
daughter of W. A. Conley, of Hoosier town- 
ship. She was born and reared in Clay 
county, and is a woman of beautiful per- 
sonal attributes. The following children 
have been born of this union : May, whose 
age in 1908 is twenty years; Jennie is 
eighteen years old; Wilbur Esta is fifteen 
years old; Crawford Leslie is eleven; Le- 
land is seven and Kenneth is four. 

Upon his retirement from office, Mr. Er- 
win entered the real estate and abstract busi- 
ness in December, 1908. He is thoroughly 
familiar with abstracting, having followed 
this while in office. He also owns a farm 
in Louisville township, and one in Bible 
Grove township, and also a half interest in a 
farm in Hoosier township, and another 
tract of land in Arkansas. He is also in- 
terested in stock raising and stock trading. 

Mr. Erwin's land is well improved and 
ranks well with any in the county, and he al- 
ways keeps a good grade of stock. He is inter- 
ested in the concrete business, manufactur- 
ing concrete blocks and other forms of con- 
crete work, the firm name being Clark & 
Erwin. 

Our subject is Public Administrator of 
Clay county. In his fraternal relations he 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



belongs to the Masonic Order, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and the 
Knights of Pythias. He was secretary of 
the local Masonic lodge, at Louisville, No. 
196, for ten consecutive years. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and has always been a loyal Republican, 
born and bred in the principles of that party,- 
but the most partisan Democrat was ever 
treated with the same courtesy by him as 
the most pronounced Republican. During 
his term in office Mr. Erwin has never been 
too busy to accommodate anyone seeking in- 
formation on any subject whether pertaining 
to the matters of the office of Circuit Clerk 
or legal advice on any foreign subject, and 
no one ever went away from him wrongly 
advised, or feeling that what he had obtained 
had been grudgingly given. Hundreds of 
people in Clay county, having no regular 
attorney to attend to their legal business, 
and wishing an agreement, a contract, or 
an affidavit drawn up, have found our sub- 
ject ever willing to assist as best he could. 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin have a beautiful 
home, where hospitality and good cheer are 
ever unstintingly dispersed to their many 
friends and admirers. 



J. T. JONES, M. D. 

The physician who would succeed in his 
profession must possess many qualities of 
head and heart not included in the curricu- 
lum of the schools and colleges he may 



have attended. In analyzing the career of 
the successful practitioner of the healing 
art it will invariably be found true that a 
broad-minded sympathy with the sick and 
suffering and an honest, earnest desire to 
aid his afflicted fellow men have gone hand 
in hand with skill and able judgment. The 
gentleman to whom this brief tribute is 
given fortunately embodies these necessary 
qualifications in a marked degree and by 
energy and application to his professional 
duties is building up an enviable reputation 
and drawing to himself a large and re- 
munerative practice, being recognized as one 
of the leading physicians of this locality and 
a man of honor and integrity at all times. 

Dr. J. T. Jones was born in Foster town- 
ship, Marion county, Illinois, August 26, 
1 86 1, and "his sober wishes never learned 
to stray," consequently he has preferred to 
remain on his native prairie rather than seek 
uncertain fortunes elsewhere. His father is 
Eli W. Jones, a native of the same township 
and county. Grandfather James Jones was 
an early pioneer of Marion county and a 
man of many sterling qualities which have 
outcropped in our subject to a marked de- 
gree. He was a Southerner of the finest 
type. His residence was used in an early 
day for the purpose of holding church ser- 
vices, he being an active and ardent Metho- 
dist. He is living at this writing, 1908, in 
Foster township on a fine farm where he 
has become influential and widely known. 
He was Circuit Clerk from 1872 to 1876. 
He makes his home at present in Vernon. 
He was a soldier in Company H, Twenty- 



I'.IOGKAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



sixth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and he served through the war, having 
marched with Sherman to the sea and lost 
a leg in the final battle at Bentonville, North 
Carolina, the last battle fought by Sherman. 
He was in many hard fought battles of the 
Army of the Tennessee, being in the Fif- 
teenth Army Corps, and in all he took part 
in about thirty engagements. After the 
war he returned to his farm. The maiden 
name of the mother of the subject was 
Mary Ryman, a native of Pennsylvania. 
Her father was Dr. J. R. Ryman, who was 
an early Methodist minister, later becoming 
a physician. He came to Marion county 
when a young man, and was at one time 
Circuit Clerk of the county and also School 
Commissioner, being one of the founders 
of the Western Christian Advocate at St. 
Louis, Missouri. He died about 1877. 
The mother of the subject is living at this 
writing. Three children were born to these 
parents, our subject being the only one now 
living. The subject's maternal grandmother 
was Martha Dickens, a daughter of Samuel 
Dickens, a pioneer Baptist minister. 

Doctor Jones spent his boyhood on his 
father's farm, attending the country 
schools at Fosterburg, and when the family 
came to Salem in 1872 he attended school in 
in Salem in 1872 he attended school in 
Salem from 1872 to 1878, graduating from 
the high school here in 1878 with high 
honor. After leaving school he clerked one 
year in a store at Vernon, but believing that 
his true calling lay along medical lines 
rather than the mercantile, he began the 



study of medicine, making rapid progress 
from the first. He entered the St. Louis 
Medical College in 1880 from which he 
graduated in March, 1884, having made a 
brilliant record for scholarship. He lo- 
cated first at Warsaw, Missouri, practicing 
there with eminent success until 1889, when, 
much to the regret of his many friends and 
patients, he left that town and came to Ver- 
non, Illinois, where he remained, building up 
a lucrative practice, until 1907, in which 
year he came to Salem, having moved his 
family here a year previous. Doctor Jones 
took a post-graduate" course in the medical 
department of the University of St. Louis in 
1906. He has been very successful in his 
practice in Marion county, having a large 
business at present and he is often called to 
other localities on serious and important 
cases where his superior medical advice is 
sought by local practitioners whose skill has 
been baffled, and his counsels are always 
followed by gratifying results. 

The domestic life of our subject dates 
from April 25, 1891, when he was united 
in marriage with Carrie E. Bennett, who 
was born and reared in Salem, the accom- 
plished and refined daughter of J. J. Ben- 
nett, an early pioneer of Marion county and 
was the first president of the Salem Na- 
tional Bank, which position he held until 
within a few years of his death. Mary 
Oglesby was the maiden name of the sub- 
ject's mother, who was the first girl baby 
born in Salem. Her great-grandfather, 
Mark Tully, entered land on which the city 
of Salem is built. He gave the site where 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



7 ' 



the court house stands. This -family was 
one of the best known in the early history 
of the county. 

Our subject and wife have two children, a 
bright boy and a winsome girl, the former, 
Don Paul, having been born January 28, 
1892, and the latter, Nellie, was born May 
22, 1895. 

Doctor Jones has been thrifty and has 
accumulated a fair competence as a result 
of his well directed energies. He owns a 
valuable and highly improved farm in Fos- 
ter township, and has numerous real estate 
holdings in Marion county. He is a member 
of the county, state and national medical 
associations, and he belongs to the Masonic 
Fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Woodmen, the Sons of Vet- 
erans and the Yeomen. 

The home of Dr. and Mrs. Jones is 
modern, cozy, nicely furnished and is pre- 
sided over with rare grace and dignity by 
the latter who is often hostess to warm 
friends who hold her in high esteem. This 
worthy couple is regarded by all classes as 
meriting the confidence and regard which 
are unqualifiedly proffered to them. 



O. A. JAMES. 

The subject of this sketch is not the 
example of a man whom the inscrutable 
caprice of fortune or fate has suddenly 
placed in a conspicuous position in the busi- 
ness world but he has attained to the same 



through careful preparation during long 
years of toil and endeavor, for he realized 
early in his career that success comes to 
the deserving, and that to be deserving, one 
must be industrious and persistent, so he 
forged ahead, surmounting obstacles that 
would have daunted and diverted the course 
of less courageous spirits. 

O. A. James, the popular and efficient 
assistant cashier of the Salem State Bank, 
who has, while yet a young man, left the 
indelible imprint of his personality upon 
the people with whom he has come in con- 
tact, was born in Salem, Illinois, in 1879. 

He is the son of Joshua L. James, a native 
of Middle Tennessee and the representative 
of a fine old Southern family. He came to Il- 
linois in 1853, settling in Williamson county, 
where he lived for twenty-five years, having 
been reasonably prosperous during that time 
and becoming known as a hard worker and 
a man of the best habits. He then came to 
Marion county, settling near Alma, where 
he also remained a quarter of a century, de- 
veloping a good farm and making a com- 
fortable living by reason of his habits of 
industry and economy. Desiring to spend 
the remaining years of his life in the city 
and enjoy a respite from his arduous agri- 
cultural pursuits, Mr. James moved to 
Salem in 1902 and he has since made his 
home here. 

The grandfather of the subject on his 
paternal side was John Wesley James, a 
native of Tennessee, and an excellent farmer 
who passed to his rest about 1893 after a 
long and honorable life. His death occurred 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



in Williamson county, this state, where he 
spent the major part of his life. 

Joseph L. Wnorowski, the subject's 
grandfather on his mother's side, was born 
in Russia and received his education in the 
city of Moscow. He came to America when 
thirty years old, finally settling in Salem, 
Illinois, where he spent his remaining years, 
dying about 1890. 

The subject's mother was known in her 
maidenhood as Sophia E. Wnorowski, who 
was born and reared in Salem where she 
received a common school education and 
developed many praiseworthy character- 
istics. She is living at this writing (1908). 
Six children were born to the parents of the 
subject, five of whom are still living, 
named in order of birth as fol- 
lows : Mrs. Florence Brasel, of Cartter, Illi- 
nois; O. A., our subject; Mrs. Berdie E. 
Stroment, living in Salem, this county ; Guy 
L., of Wooden, Iowa; Mrs. Jesse Brasel, 
living at Terre Haute, Indiana. 

These children all received a good com- 
mon schooling and were reared in a home 
of the most wholesome atmosphere, conse- 
quently they have developed characters of a 
very commendable type. 

Our subject attended the common 
schools of Salem, from which he gradu- 
ated in 1897. But being amibitious for 
more learning and to become a teacher, he 
later attended the Carbondale State Normal 
School for some time. Not yet satisfied he 
entered Austin College at Effingham; then 
took a course in the Eastern State Normal 
at Charleston, thus gaining a splendid edu- 



cation, for he made a brilliant record for 
scholarship in all these institutions. 

After leaving school he began teaching, 
which he followed in a most successful and 
praiseworthy manner for a period of five 
years, having taught three years in Marion 
county public schools, one year as principal 
at Central City, Illinois, and one year as 
principal of the high school at Kinmundy, 
in all of which he showed that he not only 
had acquired a great fund of serviceable 
knowledge which he had a penchant for 
readily and clearly dispensing, but that he 
possessed the other necessary prerequisites 
of head and heart to make a first class and 
a high grade educator, and his reputation 
had overspread the bounds of Marion 
county, causing his services to be in great 
demand, when, much to the regret of pupils 
and school boards he gave up his teaching 
and accepted the position as assistant post- 
master at Salem the duties of which he at- 
tended to in a most able manner for a period 
of two years, when he resigned to become 
Deputy Circuit Clerk, having been appointed 
for a period of four years, and here he 
again displayed his great innate ability as 
a careful and painstaking business man by 
handling the duties devolving upon this po- 
sition with all dispatch and alacrity and in 
a most satisfactory manner to all concerned, 
when after a year in this office he tendered 
his resignation to become assistant cashier in 
the Salem State Bank, which very respon- 
sible and envied position had been proffered 
by the heads of that institution after they 
had carefully considered the names of many 



RICH LAND, CLAY AND MARIOX COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



73 



young and talented business men for the 
place, believing that Mr. James was the 
best qualified to handle the work in this con- 
nection, and the praiseworthy manner and 
wonderful technical skill he has displayed in 
this responsible position since taking up the 
duties of the same, shows that the man- 
agers of this institution were wise in their 
decision and selection. Mr. James is still 
thus connected with the Salem State Bank 
and has given entire satisfaction and in- 
creased the popularity and prestige of this 
already popular and sound institution. 

Mr. James is a member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and the Wood- 
men, in his fraternal relations, and he is a 
faithful and consistent member of the Chris- 
tian church. He is known to be scrupu- 
lously honest, courteous and a gentleman of 
the highest address and honor and owing to 
the fact that our subject is yet quite a young 
man and has achieved such a place of honor 
and trust the future augurs great things 
for him. 



J. R. QUAYLE. 

The subject has always sought to in- 
culcate in the minds of the young the higher 
things of life, the beauties of mind and soul 
known only to those who are willing to de- 
vote themselves to a career of self-sacrifice, 
hospitality, persistency and uprightness, and 
during the long years of his professional 
life Mr. Quayle succeeded in carrying out 



the principles in his daily life that he sought 
to impress upon others. 

J. R. Quayle was born in Peoria county, 
Illinois, December 5, 1859, the son of Rob- 
ert Quayle, a native of the Isle of Man, a 
full blooded Manxman. He was an influ- 
ential and high minded man, whose sterling 
traits are somewhat reflected in the life of 
his son, our subject. He migrated to 
America about 1856, locating first in Henry 
county, Illinois, where he farmed. After 
living there for a short time he moved to 
Peoria county, later to Marion county in 
January, 1866. He was a hard worker and 
made a success of whatever he undertook. 
He was called from his labors in Septem- 
ber, 1879, while living in Marion county. 
He was a great Bible student and he read 
and talked the Manx language fluently. 
James Quayle, grandfather of the subject, 
was born, reared and spent his entire life 
on the Isle of Man, and his death occurred 
there. His wife was a Miss Harrison, who 
reached the remarkable age of ninety-six 
years. 

The mother of the subject was Ellen 
(Corlett) Quayle, also a native of the Isle 
of Man, where she, too, was reared, and 
where she married Robert Quayle. She 
was a woman of many estimable traits, hav- 
ing led a wholesome life and in her old age 
was the recipient of many kindnesses at the 
hands of her many friends and neighbors. 

She made her home on the old homestead 
near Vernon, Marion county, until her 
death, September 6, 1908, where the Quayle 



I'.IOC.KAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



family moved 'in 1866. This family con- 
sisted of the following children, named in 
order of their birth: Elizabeth, who died 
in 1880; J. R., our subject; Anna, the wife 
of Nathan Roberts, of Patoka, this county; 
Thomas E., who lives in section 12, this 
county, on a farm; James C, also a farmer 
in Patoka township, Marion county; Kate, 
who is the wife of J. C. Bates, of Patoka 
township ; Mollie, who makes her home with 
her mother ; Mona, the wife of G. I. Arnold, 
of Foster township, Marion county. 

These children are all comfortably situ- 
ated in life and received good common 
school education. They are all highly re- 
spected and lead such well regulated lives as 
their parents outlined for them in their 
childhood. 

J. R. Ouayle, our subject, attended the 
country schools east of Vernon until 1880, 
working at intervals on his father's farm. 
He was always a close student and made the 
most of his opportunities. After complet- 
ing the course in the common schools he 
was not satisfied with the knowledge he had 
gained and entered school in the University 
at Valparaiso, Indiana, taking the teachers' 
course, also a commercial course. He made 
a brilliant record at this institution for 
scholarship and good deportment. 

Believing that teaching was his proper 
field of activity Mr. Quayle began his first 
school in 1878 and he taught the major part 
of the time up to 1906 with the greatest 
success attending his efforts, during which 
time he became widely known not only in 
Marion but adjoining counties as an able 
instructor and his services were in great de- 



mand. He was not only well grounded in 
the text-books employed in the schools 
where he taught but his pleasing personality 
made him popular with his pupils, the vari- 
ous phases of whose natures he seemed to 
understand and sympathize with, so that he 
inspired each one to do his best in the work 
at hand, and many of his pupils have since 
won distinction in various lines of endeavor, 
all freely admitting that their success was 
due in a large measure to the training and 
influence of Mr. Quayle. The teaching of 
our subject was confined to Marion county 
with the exception of two years which were 
spent in Fayette county, where he also be- 
came popular. 

Mr. Quayle has been twice married. His 
first wedding occurred January 8, 1889, to 
Lyda E. Livesay, the accomplished daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Livesay, a well 
known family of Patoka township, Marion 
county, and to this union four children were 
born as follows : Guy, born in 1891, died at 
the age of seven years; Gladys E., born in 
1892; Fanny, now deceased, who was born 
in 1897; Roberta, who was born in 1900. 

The subject's first wife was called to her 
rest in June, 1906, and Mr. Quayle was 
married December 15, 1907, to Ida M. 
Quails, daughter of Alfred Quails. She is 
a member of an influential family of Salem 
and was born and reared there. 

Mr. Quayle has been an influential factor 
in politics in his county, always assisting in 
placing the best local men available in the 
county offices and his support can always 
be depended upon in furthering any worthy 
movement looking to the better interest of 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



75 



the community and county. In 1883, 1888 
and 1889 he was Tax Collector of Patoka 
township, having been easily elected to this 
office and performed the duties of it in a 
most satisfactory manner. He was chosen 
by his friends to the responsible position of 
Supervisor in 1901 and 1902 and elected 
County Clerk on the Democratic ticket in 
1906, and is now, 1908, serving his first 
term. He is said to be one of the ablest men 
in this office that the county has ever had, 
being careful and painstaking as well as 
congenial and friendly so that all his con- 
stituents are very highly pleased with his 
record. They predict that he will become a 
very potent factor in local politics in the 
near future. 

Mr. Quayle is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Eastern Star, the Rebekahs 
and the Woodmen. He takes a great deal 
of interest in lodge work and his daily life 
would indicate that he believes in carrying 
out the noble precepts of these commendable 
orders. 

Mr. Quayle is not only a public-spirited 
and honorable man in his official and busi- 
ness life, but he leads a most wholesome 
home life and sets a worthy example for his 
children and others, delighting in the higher 
ideals of life as embraced in educational, 
civic and religious matters. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and no people in Marion 
county are the recipients of higher respect 
and genuine esteem from their many friends 
than they. 



HENRY WARREN. 

Prominent among the energetic, far- 
sighted and successful business men of 
Marion county, Illinois, is the subject of this 
sketch, whose life history most happily il- 
lustrates what may be attained by faithful 
and continued effort in carrying out an hon- 
est purpose. Integrity, activity and energy 
have been the crowning points in his career 
and have led to desirable and creditable suc- 
cess. His connection with banking institu- 
tions and various lines of business has been 
of decided advantage to the entire com- 
munity, promoting its welfare along various 
lines in no uncertain manner, while at the 
same. time he has made an untarnished rec- 
ord and unspotted reputation as a business 
man. 

Henry Warren, the widely known bank 
president and gallant Civil war veteran of 
Kinmundy, Marion county, Illinois, was 
born in this county in 1845, the son of Asa 
Warren and his mother's maiden name was 
Sina Howell. Grandfather Howell was sup- 
posed to have come from Virginia, settling 
with the pioneers in Marion county, Illinois, 
in a very early day, and spending his life 
on a farm doing much for the upbuilding 
of the community. He entered land from 
the government on which he spent the re- 
mainder of his life and on which he reared 
his family. He lived to be more than 
eighty years of age. He was a member of 
the old Hardshell Baptist church, as was 
also his wife. . One of the first log churches 
built in this community was erected on his 



I:K><;KAPHICAL AND RKMIXISCKXT HISTORY OF 



farm, of which he was one of the principal 
supporters. The major portion of his 
neighbors were Indians when he first came 
to this county, and the woods and prairies 
teemed with wild game of nearly all species 
and varieties. There were but few settle- 
ments in the county at that time. The 
green flies were so thick and aggressive that 
people could not cross the prairies in the 
day time during part of the year. He man- 
aged this farm until his death which then 
fell to his heirs. All of the second genera- 
tion of Howells have passed on to their 
rest. 

Asa Warren, father of our subject, came 
from Tennessee to Illinois when a young 
man and entered land from the government. 
He sold out in time and moved to Texas 
where he died when fifty-five years of age, 
being survived by four children, three of 
whom were boys. He was a man of much 
influence, integrity and force of character. 
He was a gallant soldier in the Mexican 
war, having served until peace was declared 
after which he returned to Illinois. He fol- 
lowed farming all his life. Both he and his 
wife belonged to the old school Baptists. 
The subject's mother was called to her rest 
at about the age of forty years. She was 
a kindly and good woman in every respect. 

Henry Warren, our subject, was reared in 
Marion county, Illinois, having attended the 
common and district schools, part of the 
time in old log school-houses with their 
primitive furnishings. He worked most of 
the year on his father's farm during his 
school days. He was about twelve years old 



when he accompanied his father to Texas, 
and he returned from the Lone Star state to 
Illinois one year after his father's death, 
the home place in Texas having been sold. 
Then our subject worked out as a farm 
hand, sometimes receiving only eight dol- 
lars a month, continuing as a farm hand for 
twelve years. He then rented land for two 
years. Then he married and bought eighty 
acres of land which he improved and made 
into a good farm on which he lived for about 
thirty-eight years, which were prosperous, 
in the main, and during which he laid up a 
competency for the future. From time to 
time he added to his original eighty until 
he finally had eight hundred acres, all of 
which was in cultivation and kept in a high 
state of improvement and efficiency. He 
drained this large tract of land and securely 
fenced it with wood and wire. Substantial 
and modern buildings, a large dwelling, 
two barns and other out buildings were 
erected, and the place, which Mr. Warren 
still owns, is one of Marion county's model 
farms. While he still looks after the farm 
he keeps it rented. When our subject gave 
his personal attention to this place it was 
in somewhat better condition and he devoted 
him time largely to grass and stock. 

Mr. Warren moved to Kinmundy in 1896 
and one year later opened under the most 
favorable auspices what is known as the 
Warren Banking Company's establishment, 
which met with instantaneous success and 
is today regarded as one of the most sub- 
stantial and safest institutions of its kind 
in this part of the state. He is president 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



77 



of the same, having filled this position with 
much credit to his ability and the satisfac- 
tion of the many patrons of the bank since 
its establishment. His son, Henry L., who 
was made cashier at the organization of 
the concern, is still ably attending to these 
duties. Mr. Warren owns the substantial 
building in which the business of the firm 
is conducted. He also owns a large, com- 
fortable, modern and elegantly furnished 
dwelling house besides other buildings on 
the same street where he lives in Kinmundy. 
He deserves much credit for the wealth he 
has amassed partly because of the fact that 
he started life empty handed and has made 
it unaided, and partly because he has not a 
single dishonest dollar in his possession, hav- 
ing always been scrupulously honest in his 
dealings with his fellow men. During the 
last panic and bank depression his was the 
only bank that kept open in the county. 

Mr. Warren was first married in 1867 to 
Mary C. Nichols, a native of this county, 
the accomplished daughter of Robert 
Nichols, and to this union the following 
children were born : William, born October 
6, 1868, now a farmer and minister in Jef- 
ferson county, Illinois, to whom two chil- 
dren were born; Harry L., born September 
i, 1871, is living in Kinmundy associated 
with his father in the banking business, and 
who is married and the father of one child ; 
Charley W., born March 21, 1874, is as- 
sistant cashier in the bank, being married 
and the father of one child, Lowel F., born 
October 27, 1897. 

Mr. Warren's first wife passed to her rest 



in 1903, and the subject was again married 
in 1906, his last wife being Ida Shriver, 
a native of Marion county and the daughter 
of William Schriver, who was a native of 
Ohio. One child has been born to this 
union, May Margaret, whose date of birth 
fell on January 14, 1908. 

Mr. Warren was one of the patriotic de- 
fenders of the flag during the dark days of 
the sixties when the fierce fires of rebellion 
were undermining the pillars of our national 
government, and he enlisted in Company E, 
One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, in which he served with 
credit and distinction to the close of the war 
and was honorably discharged. He draws 
a disability pension of twelve dollars. One 
brother, Larkin A. Warren, was also a sol- 
dier, having been a member of Sixth Mis- 
souri Cavalry. He died at New Orleans 
while in the army, after having served out 
his first enlistment of three years, and it 
was toward the close of the struggle when 
he was attacked by a disease while in line 
of duty from which he did not recover. 

Our subject is a loyal Republican and in 
religious affiliations is a liberal subscriber 
and supporter of the Presbyterian church. 
Mr. Warren's methods are progressive and 
he is quick to adopt new ideas which he be- 
lieves will prove of practical value in his 
work. Indolence and idleness are entirely 
foreign to his nature and owing to his close 
application to his business and his honorable 
methods he has won prosperity that is richly 
merited, while he enjoys the friendship and 
esteem of the people of Marion county. 



IHOC.KAPHICAL AXI) REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



FRANK A. BOYNTON. 

Through struggles to triumph seems to 
be the maxim which holds sway for the ma- 
jority of our citizens and, though it is un- 
deniably true that many a one falls ex- 
hausted in the conflict, a few by their in- 
herent force of character and strong men- 
tality rise above their environments and all 
which seems to hinder them until they 
reach the plane of affluence. It is not the 
weaklings that accomplish worthy ends in 
the face of opposition but those with nerve 
and initiative whose motto is, "He never 
fails who never gives up," and with this 
terse aphorism ever in view, emblazoned on 
the pillar of clouds, as it were, before them, 
they forge ahead until the sunny summits 
of life are reached and they can breath a 
breath of the purer air that inspires the 
souls of men in respite. Such has been the 
history of Frank A. Boynton and in his life 
record many useful lessons may be gained. 

Mr. Boynton was born four miles east of 
Salem in Stevenson township, April 18, 
1 86 1, the son of John Boynton, a native of 
Haverhill, Scioto county, Ohio, who came to 
Illinois about 1859, settling on the farm on 
which his widow now resides. John Boyn- 
ton was a prosperous and influential farmer 
all his life. He ably served as school di- 
rector of Stevenson township for many 
years, and after a very successful and useful 
life he passed away in 1900. 

The grandfather of the subject on his pa- 
ternal side was Asa Boynton, who was a 



native of Haverhill, Massachusetts, who mi- 
grated to Ohio in an early day and settled 
on the French "grant" in Ohio, and the 
place where he settled was named Haverhill, 
after the Massachusetts town from whence 
he came. He was, like many of the early 
pioneers, a man of sterling qualities, brave 
and a hard worker. 

The subject's mother was Eliza Copen- 
hagen, born near Ironton, Ohio, on the land 
where the town is situated. Her people 
came from Virginia, having been among 
the fine old Southern families who migrated 
from that state to Ohio in the early days. 
She has made her home on the old home- 
stead in Stevenson township from that time 
to the present day, and there she is held in 
highest esteem by a host of acquaintances 
and friends. Eight children were born to 
Mr. and .Mrs. John Boynton, six of whom 
are living at this writing (1908). Their 
names are: Asa died when fourteen years 
old; Frank, our subject; Elmer, of Salem, 
Illinois ; Lucy who passed to her rest in 
1905; Loren K., of Ruleville, Mississippi; 
John Ellis, who lives with his mother in 
Stevenson township; Delmont, who lives in 
Stevenson township on a farm joining the 
parental homestead ; Ida, who lives with her 
mother. 

Frank A. Boynton, our subject, spent his 
boyhood under the parental roof and re- 
ceived his primary education in the Bru- 
baker school in Stevenson township. He 
worked on the farm during his young man- 
hood and he has ahvavs been identified with 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



79 



farming interests ; he now owns a fine farm, 
highly improved and very productive, lo- 
cated in the northern part of Stevenson 
township. It consists of over five hundred 
acres, and no more choice land is to be 
found in this locality. He went to Wheeler, 
Jasper county, Illinois, in 1891, and was a 
storekeeper and gauger there where he re- 
mained for two years, making a success of 
his enterprise, but he returned to his farm 
in Stevenson township and in about 1903 
came to Salem and is now engaged in the 
real estate and loan business with offices in 
L. M. Kagy's law office. He helped organ- 
ize the Salem State Bank of which he is a 
heavy stockholder and director. He operated 
a threshing machine for twelve years with 
great success in Stevenson township, and he 
has been a stock shipper the greater part of 
his life. 

Thus we see that Mr. Boynton has been 
a very busy man, and also one that had 
unusual executive ability else he could not 
have carried to successful issue so many ex- 
tensive enterprises. 

Our subject was married in 1892 to Anna 
Stevenson, daughter of Samuel E. Steven- 
son, a well known family of Stevenson 
township. One winsome child was born to 
this union, Gladys. At the time of his mar- 
riage Mr. Boynton was living on his farm. 
His first wife was called to her rest Febru- 
ary 1 6, 1897, ar >d our subject was again 
married May 17, 1906, his last wife being 
Ethel Stevenson. No children have been 
born to this union. Mrs. Boynton presides 
over their modern, commodious, beautiful 



and elegantly furnished home on South 
Broadway with rare grace and dignity, and 
she is frequently hostess to numerous ad- 
miring friends of the family. 

Possessing the executive skill and pleas- 
ing personality that our subject does, it is 
not surprising that his friends should have 
singled him out for political preferment, 
consequently he has been honored with nu- 
merous local offices, all of which he has ably 
and creditably filled to the entire satisfac- 
tion of all concerned. He has served as 
Clerk of Stevenson township and later 
served two terms as Supervisor of that town- 
ship. He is now city Alderman from the 
Second ward of Salem. Useless to say our 
subject is a loyal Republican, and he was at 
one time the nominee of his party for Sher- 
iff, and at another time for Treasurer, but 
was defeated. He, however, made a most ex- 
cellent race, being defeated by only a few 
votes, although the county is strongly Demo- 
cratic. He is, indeed, a public-spirited citizen 
and witholds his co-operation from no move- 
ment which is intended to promote public 
improvement. What he has achieved in life 
proves the force of his character and illus- 
trates his steadfastness of purpose. He is 
now one of the men of affluence and his 
advancement to a position of credit and 
honor in the business circles of Marion 
county is the direct outcome of his own 
persistent and worthy labors, and it would 
be hard to find a more popular or congenial 
gentleman in this section of the state than 
Mr. Boynton. 



8o 



riOC.KAPIIICAL AND REMIX ISCKXT HISTORY OF 



JAMES F. HOWELL. 

Examine into the life records of the self- 
made men and it will always be found that 
indefatigable industry forms the basis of 
their success. True there are other elements 
that enter in perseverance of purpose and 
keen discrimination which enable one to 
recognize business opportunities, but the 
foundation of all achievement is earnest, per- 
sistest labor. This fact was recognized at 
the outset of his career by the worthy gen- 
tleman whose name forms the caption of this 
article and he did not seek to gain any short 
or wondrous method to the goal of prosper- 
ity. He began, however, to work earnestly 
and diligently in order to advance himself 
in the business world, at the same time do- 
ing what he could for the welfare of the 
community at large, and as a result of his 
habits of industry, public spirit, courteous 
demeanor and honorable career he enjoys 
the esteem and admiration of a host of 
friends in Marion county, where he has long 
maintained his home and where he is known 
as one of the representative citizens of the 
great state of Illinois. 

James F. Howell was born in Marion 
county, this state, March 25, 1840, and he 
has elected to spend his entire life on his na- 
tive heath, believing that better opportuni- 
ties were to be found at home than in other 
and distant fields of endeavor. He is the 
son of Jackson D. and Agnes (Gray) How- 
ell. Grandfather Howell came to Illinois 
from Tennessee in 1825, settling in this 
county, having taken up land from the gov- 
ernment, eighty acres at the time of his com- 



ing. He afterward bought one hundred and 
twenty acres more from the government, a 
part of which was timbered and a part was 
on the prairie. He cleared the timber land, 
this being the part he first purchased, clear- 
ing and farming the timbered land first. 
There were not any settlements on the prai- 
rie at that time, all the settlements there 
were then being in the timbered lands. The 
first Monday in May each year was wolf 
day. All the settlers gathered on that day 
and made a general drive, often taking large 
numbers of prairie wolves. There were also 
large numbers of deer at that time and our 
subject has helped kill as many as forty or 
fifty at one time. Grandfather Howell lived 
on the land he secured from the government 
during the rest of his life, being known as 
one of the strongest characters of those 
pioneer times. He reached the age of 
eighty-five years, his wife having been called 
to rest at the age of fifty. There were ten 
children in this family, all of whom lived to 
maturity and reared families of their own. 
The subject's grandfather was the fifth in 
order of birth. Two of these children lived 
to be over eighty years of age. The others 
lived to be about seventy. 

The subject's father obtained what little 
education he could in the district schools of 
this county; however, there was but little op- 
portunity for schooling at that time. He 
worked on his father's farm until after he 
reached maturity, then he pre-empted land, 
and lived on it, finally owning three hundred 
and sixty acres, mostly prairie land, on 
which he carried on general farming. He 
made his home on this land during the rest 



RICHLAND. CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



8l 



of his life, owning it at the time of his death. 
He died while on the road home from Cali- 
fornia. His remains were brought to Kin- 
mundy and laid to rest. He was a man of 
fine personal traits and exercised much in- 
fluence in the upbuilding of his community. 
There were ten children in this family, six 
of whom lived to maturity. Mr. Howell's 
first wife was called to her rest at the age of 
forty-one, and he was again married. To 
this union two children were born, one liv- 
ing, in 1908. The mother of the subject was 
born in Tennessee and was brought to Illi- 
nois by her parents when about six years 
old. 

James F. Howell, our subject, was born 
about one and one-half miles from where 
he now lives. The home he owns and oc- 
cupies is the fourth one in which he has 
lived since leaving his father's old home- 
stead. Our subject now owns twenty-six 
acres of the original purchase by his father 
from the government. He has always de- 
voted his time to agricultural pursuits, own- 
ing at this writing one hundred and six 
acres of as good farming land as may be 
found in the county, being kept in a high 
state of productiveness, general farming be- 
ing carried on in a manner that stamps the 
subject as one of the foremost farmers in 
this locality. 

Mr. Howell was married in 1858 to Isabel 
J. Robb, who was born in the township 
where she has always lived, being a repre- 
sentative of a well known and highly re- 
spected people. Her people came from Ten- 
nessee, being among the earliest settlers in 
6 



this county. Mrs. Howell was called to her 
reward February 3, 1907, at the age of 
sixty-six years, after a harmonious and 
beautiful Christian life. 

The children born to this union are named 
in order of birth as follows: Arminda H., 
born June 18, 1859, is the wife of H. A. 
Brown, and the mother of eight children: 
Reufinia E., born February 24, 1861, is the 
wife of Benjamin Garrett and the mother of 
five children; Leander, born April 24, 1863, 
who became the father of four children, is 
deceased ; Ida M. and Nettie, twins, were 
born September 23, 1866, the latter dying 
when four years old, the former becoming 
the wife of G. C. Warner; Charles H., born 
January 24, 1869, is married and has three 
children : Samuel E., born January 12, 1871, 
is married and has one child; Ellis M., born 
January 12, 1875, is married; Eva M., born 
November 14, 1877, became the wife of 
Lloyd Perrill and is the mother of two chil- 
dren : James E., born August 5, 1880, is 
married and has one child. He now lives 
in Roumania, in the employ of the Standard 
Oil Company. 

The subject has been twice married, hav- 
ing been united in the bonds of wedlock with 
his second wife February 20, 1908, his last 
wife being Martha Anglin, a native of this 
county, her people having come from Ten- 
nessee in 1839. The maternal grandfather 
of the subject's wife came from Ireland and 
her father's people from Scotland, first set- 
tling in Alabama, later moving to Tennessee 
and then to Illinois, where they spent the 
remainder of their lives. 



82 



MIOGKAIMIICAI. AM) KKM I N ISCKNT HISTORY (IK 



Minerva Howell, an aunt of the subject 
by marriage, was born in Tennessee in 1829. 
Her people were from old Virginia, who lat- 
er came to Illinois when she was one year 
old, her father settling in Marion county, 
later moving to Williamson county, Illinois, 
where he died when about seventy years old. 
Mrs. Howell remarried. She became the 
mother of eleven children, four of whom 
lived to maturity, two of them living in 
1908. Her husband died at the age of 
seventy-six. He was also born in Tennes- 
see. 

James F. Howell is a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and in his political relations 
he affiliates with the Democratic party. The 
subject's first wife was a member of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian church. 

In matters pertaining to the welfare of his 
township, county and state, Mr. Howell is 
deeply interested, and his efforts in behalf of 
the general progress have been far-reaching 
and beneficial. His name is indelibly asso- 
ciated with progress in the county of his 
birth, and among those in whose midst he 
has always lived he is held in the highest 
esteem by reason of an upright life and of 
fidelity to principles which in every land and 
clime command respect. 



BENJAMIN M. SMITH. 

In studying the interesting life histories of 
manv of the better class of men, and the 



ones of unquestioned merit and honor, it 
will be found that they have been compelled, 
very largely, to map out their own career 
and furnish their own motive force in scal- 
ing the heights of success, and it is such a 
one that the biographer is pleased to write 
in the paragraphs that follow. 

Benjamin M. Smith, the well known 
cashier of the Salem State Bank, was born 
in Central City, Illinois, December n, 1877, 
the son of Samuel J. Smith, a native of St. 
Clair county, Illinois, and a gentleman of 
many sterling traits who became a man of 
considerable influence in his community, 
some of whose commendable characteristics 
are inherited by his son, our subject. Samuel 
J. Smith came to Marion county when a 
young man and was engaged in the milling 
business of which he made pronounced suc- 
cess, having been in the county several years 
when the Civil war began, and he continued 
in this business during the progress of the 
Rebellion. He took much interest in public 
affairs. He was County Treasurer and 
County Clerk for twenty years and Deputy 
County Treasurer for four years. During 
his long official record he conducted the af- 
fairs that were entrusted to him in a manner 
that reflected great credit upon his ability 
and in a way that elicited much favorable 
comment but no criticism from his con- 
temporaries and constituents. He was 
called to his rest April 5, 1906, after an emi- 
nently successful and useful life. 

The subject's grandfather, Benjamin J. 
Smith, who was a native of the old Pine 
Tree state (Maine), is remembered as a 
man of unusual fortitude and courage, hav- 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



ing been a composite of the usual elements 
that go into the makeup of pioneers. He 
came west in early life and was one of the 
first settlers of St. Clair county, Illinois, of 
which county he was at one time Sheriff, 
one of the best, in fact, that the county ever 
had. He was an active business man all his 
life, having been in the commission busi- 
ness in Chicago for a number of years, 
where he became well known in the business 
circles of the city in those days. He was 
born in 1801, and after a remarkably active 
career, reaching a venerable age, passed to 
the silent land when in his ninetieth year. 

The mother of the subject was in her 
maidenhood Mary E. Martin, who was born 
in Ohio on a farm near Wellsville. She is 
in many respects a remarkable character, 
benign, affable and her influence has always 
been wholesome and uplifting, so that even 
in the golden evening of her life she is a 
blessing to those with whom she comes in 
contact. She is the mother of three chil- 
dren, namely: Irene, who died in infancy; 
Irma, a woman of fine traits; and Benja- 
min M., our subject. 

Thus after a resume of the subject's 
worthy ancestors we are not surprised that 
he has achieved unusual distinction in his 
community, and to him the future evidently 
has much of good in store. 

Benjamin M. Smith attended school in 
Salem, graduating from the high school 
where he had made a splendid record for 
scholarship and deportment. Feeling that 
he was destined for a business career, and 
following in the footsteps of his father and 



grandfather, he early began preparations to 
enter the industrial field, and in order to 
prepare himself more thoroughly took a 
course in the Bryant & Stratton Business 
College at St. Louis, Missouri, standing in 
the front rank of his class when he gradu- 
ated in 1900. Mr. Smith has been actively 
engaged in business since he was sixteen 
years old and he showed at that early age 
that he was destined to the highest success. 
He seems to be best fitted to the manage- 
ment of banking institutions, although he 
turns everything into success that he under- 
takes. He has been cashier of banks for 
seven years in 1908. He was cashier of 
the Haymond State Bank, now the First 
National Bank at Kinmundy, Illinois, for 
two years, during which time the business of 
this institution greatly increased. Then he 
came to Salem and became associated with 
the Salem State Bank of which he is a 
stockholder and director and one of the or- 
ganizers, in fact, one of the moving spirits 
of the institution. Mr. Smith was also a 
director in the bank at Kinmundy and is 
still a stockholder in the same. Both these 
institutions recognize his unusual industrial 
ability and peculiar aptitude for managing 
the affairs of a banking concern and the of- 
ficials are not reluctant to give him all due 
credit for the great work he has done in 
placing these banks on a firm foundation and 
making them among the solid and well 
known institutions of their kind in this part 
of the state. 

Fraternally Mr. Smith belongs to the 
Masonic Order, Knights Templar; also the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen and the 
Eagles, and one would judge from his con- 
sistent daily life that he believes in carrying 
out the sublime principles and doctrines of 
these worthy orders. In politics our subject 
is a loyal Democrat, but he has not found 
time to take an active part in political af- 
fairs. However, he believes in placing the 
best men possible in local offices and his 
support can always be depended upon in 
the advancement of any cause looking to 
the development and betterment of his com- 
munity and county. 

Mr. Smith has preferred single blessed- 
ness and has never assumed the responsi- 
bilities of the married state. 

Our subject is a very strong character in 
every respect and although he is yet quite a 
young man he has shown by his past excel- 
lent and praiseworthy record that he is a 
man of unusual industrial ability and the 
future will doubtless be replete with honors 
and success for him. 



HON. JAMES CAMERON ALLEN. 

An enumeration of the representative 
citizens of Richland county who have won 
recognition and success for themselves and 
at the same time have conferred honor up- 
on the community would be decidedly in- 
complete were there failure to make men- 
tion of the popular gentleman whose name 
initiates this review, who has long held 



worthy prestige in legal and political circles, 
and has always been distinctively a man of 
affairs, but is now living retired. He wields 
a wide influence among those with whom 
his lot has been cast, ever having the af- 
fairs of his county at heart and doing what 
he could to aid in its development. 

James Cameron Allen was born in Shel- 
by county, Kentucky, January 29, 1822, the 
son of Benjamin and Margaret (Youel) 
Allen, natives of Augusta county, Virginia, 
the former of Irish and the latter of Scotch 
descent. Grandfather John Allen was born 
in Ireland on the famous Shannon river, 
and when about twenty years old he came 
to America alone and settled in Xew Jersey, 
where he married and later moved to Rock- 
bridge county, Virginia, and engaged in 
farming, where he lived and died. Grand- 
father William Youel, was born in Scotland 
and came to America when young, located 
in Augusta county, Virginia, on a farm and 
became an extensive stock raiser for that 
time. He served in the Revolutionary war, 
being slightly wounded at the battle of 
Cowpens. After the British army had been 
driven away, he picked up a large powder 
horn, which had been used by an English 
soldier. It was given to one of his sons, 
and became a valuable historical relic. Our 
subject used the same when a boy, while 
squirrel hunting. Grandfather Youel died 
in Virginia, at an advanced age, after rear- 
ing a large family. The father of our sub- 
ject was a farmer and when young learned 
the trade of cycle maker. He kept a set of 
blacksmith tools as long as he lived. Short- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



ly after his marriage he emigrated to Shelby 
county, Kentucky, having made the trip on 
horseback, carrying all his earthly posses- 
sions on one pack horse. This was in 1803, 
when the country was covered with primeval 
woods and overrun by Indians. In 1830 he 
came to Parke county, Indiana, and located 
on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
having bought part of the land from the 
man who had entered it and which had on 
it a small cabin and a few acres which had 
been cleared. He improved the place and 
developed a good farm, which he later sold 
and retired. He died in Parke county, in 
1849, his wife having died in 1832. They 
were people of much sterling worth, typical 
pioneers. To them were born ten children, 
of whom our subject was the seventh in 
order of birth, all now deceased except the 
subject and one sister, Elvina, who is living 
in West Liberty, Iowa. 

The subject was eight years old when the 
family came to Indiana. He remained at 
home until he was eighteen years old, help- 
ing clear the farm and assisting in the work 
about the place, in the meantime attending 
the country subscription schools during the 
winter months. When eighteen years old 
he went to Rockville, Indiana, and entered 
the County Seminary, from which he grad- 
uated three years later, having carefully ap- 
plied himself and making a splendid rec- 
ord. Being out of money at that time, he 
returned home and rented his father's farm 
for one season, having realized two hundred 
and eighty dollars as his share. With this 
he went to Rockville and began the study 



of law, in which he made rapid progress, 
and was licensed to practice two years later, 
in 1843. He located at Sullivan, Indiana, 
then the new county-seat, but was a small 
village in the woods. Here he practiced 
with much success attending his efforts until 
1847. He held the office of Prosecuting At- 
torney for one term of two years, and was 
one of the leading young attorneys 6f that lo- 
cality. He then located at Palestine, Illinois, 
where he followed his profession for a period 
of twenty-nine years, becoming known as one 
of the ablest attorneys in the county, and 
having a very extensive clientele. He then 
located in Olney, in November, 1876, and 
he has since lived at this place, having built 
up a very large practice. He retired in 1907. 

While living in Crawford county, Illinois, 
he was elected to the Lower House of the 
Legislature in 1850, on the Democratic 
ticket and served with great credit. Such 
a splendid record did he make that he was 
nominated and triumphantly elected two 
years later to Congress from his district, at 
that time, the Fifth district, and was re- 
elected in 1854, serving two terms, making 
his influence felt in that body where his 
counsel was always respectfully listened to, 
and often followed with gratifying results. 
During his first term the Kansas and Ne- 
braska fight was up. During the second 
term the defeat for slavery for Kansas was 
accomplished. His voice was heard in the 
debates of those strenuous times. 

In 1856 Mr. Allen was not a candidate 
for re-election, but he became Clerk of the 
House during that session of Congress. In 



86 



nilXIK.UMlICAL AXI) UKM IN1SCKNT HISTORY OF 



March, 1860, he came home and in that year 
was the Democratic candidate for Governor 
of Illinois, against Yates. He made a 
splendid race and the election showed that 
he was a popular man throughout the state, 
notwithstanding his defeat. In April, 1861, 
he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court, 
and in the fall of 1863 resigned as Judge to 
accept tne place of Congressman-at-large, 
to which he had been elected in 1862. He 
was a candidate for re-election, but was 
defeated by Samuel Moulton. During his 
terms in Congress he witnessed stirring 
times for it was while the Civil war was 
in progress. 

Returning home Mr. Allen practiced law 
until 1873, when he was re-elected Judge 
of the Circuit Court, and after the passage 
of the law establishing appellate courts, he 
was appointed by the Supreme Court as Ap- 
pellate Judge, occupying both positions un- 
til 1879. He then engaged in practice until 
his retirement in 1907, having liked the 
practice better than being on the bench. He 
has been United States Commissioner since 
1896, for Southern and Eastern Illinois. 

The happy and harmonious domestic life 
of our subject began January 22, 1845, 
when he was married to Ellen Kitchell, a 
native of Palestine, Illinois, the representa- 
tive of an influential family of that place. 
To this union three children were born, who 
died in infancy. The subject's first wife 
was called to her rest in 1853 and in 1857 
he married Julia Kitchell, cousin of his first 
wife, by whom seven children were born, 
namely : Harry, who was court reporter for 



five years, is deceased; Frances is the wife 
of John T. Ratcliff, of Olney; Caroline is 
living at home keeping house for her father ; 
James H. resides in Robinson, Illinois; 
Frederick W. is deceased; William Y. is 
living at home; Margaret is also a member 
of the home circle. The second wife of our 
subject, a woman of many beautiful at- 
tributes, passed away in 1901. Mr. Allen 
has long been a pillar in the Presbyterian 
church, having been the ruling elder in the 
same since 1850. 

Thus standing out distinctly as one of 
the central figures of the judiciary of the 
great commonwealth of Illinois is the name 
of Hon. James Cameron Allen. Long 
prominent in legal circles and equally prom- 
inent in public matters beyond the confines 
of his own jurisdiction, with a reputation 
in one of the most exacting professions that 
has won him a name for distinguished ser- 
vices second' to none of his contemporaries, 
there is today no more prominent or honored 
figure in the southern part of the state which 
he has long dignified with his citizenship. 
Achieving success in the courts at an age 
when most young men are just entering up- 
on the 'formative period of their lives, wear- 
ing the judicial ermine with becoming dig- 
nity and bringing to every case submitted 
to him a clearness of perception and ready 
power of analysis characteristic of the 
learned jurist, his name and work for half 
a century have been allied with legal insti- 
tutions, public enterprises and political in- 
terests of the state in such a way as to earn 
him recognition as one 'of the distinguished 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



citizens in a community noted for the high 
order of its legal talent. A high purpose 
and an unconquerable will, vigorous men- 
tal powers, diligent study and devotion to 
duty are some of the means by which he 
has made himself eminently useful. He is 
honored and esteemed by all who know him 
for his life of honor and usefulness, his in- 
tegrity, kindness and genial manners and 
the good he has accomplished for his state 
cannot be adequately expressed. 



JOHN C. MARTIN. 

The subject of this sketch is a native son 
of Marion county, Illinois, and a represen- 
tative of one of its sterling and honored 
families. He is known as a young man of 
fine intellectuality and marked business 
acumen. He is cashier of the Salem Na- 
tional Bank, one of the most substantial in- 
stitutions of its kind in this part of the 
state. 

John C. Martin was born in Salem April 
29, 1880, the son of B. E. Martin, Sr., a 
sketch of whom appears upon another page 
of this volume. 

Our subject attended the schools of Salem 
in his early youth where he applied himself 
in a most assiduous manner, having made 
excellent records for scholarship and general 
deportment, and as a result of his well ap- 
plied time to his text-books he received a 
good education which has subsequently been 
broadened and deepened by contact with the 
world and systematic home study. After 



finishing the prescribed course in the home 
schools he spent two years at Jacksonville, 
Illinois, one year at the Jacksonville College, 
and one at Brown's Business College, hav- 
ing stood high in his classes in each. 

At the early age of twenty-eight years, a 
period when most men are just launching 
into a career or tentatively investigating the 
world that lies before them in order to test 
their potential powers, Mr. Martin had al- 
ready shown that he is a man of marked ex- 
ecutive and business ability. He assumed 
the responsible and exacting position of 
cashier of the Salem National Bank in April 
1907, whose duties he is faithfully perform- 
ing to the entire satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. He is a stockholder in this institu- 
tion, which is popular with all classes of 
business men in Salem and throughout Mar- 
ion county, where it has long maintained a 
firm reputation for soundness owing to its 
careful management and the unquestioned 
integrity and scrupulously honest characters 
of the gentlemen who have it under control. 

Fraternally Mr. Martin is a loyal mem- 
ber of the Masonic Order, the Woodmen and 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles. The daily 
life of the subject would indicate that he 
believes in carrying out the noble precepts 
of these praiseworthy orders. 



HON. HARVEY D. McCOLLUM. 

Clay county figures as one of the most 
attractive, progressive and prosperous divi- 
sions of the southern part of Illinois, justly 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND RKM I X ISCEXT HISTORY OF 



claiming a high order of citizenship and a 
spirit of enterprise which is certain to con- 
serve consecutive development and marked 
advancement in the material upbuilding of 
this section. The county has been and is 
signally favored in the class of men who 
have controlled its affairs in official capacity, 
and in this connection the subject of this re- 
view demands representation, as he is serv- 
ing the locality faithfully and well in a po- 
sition of distinct trust and responsibility, be- 
ing the Representative in the State Legisla- 
ture, having been elected to the Lower House 
in the fall of 1908, among the youngest 
members of that body ; but while the young- 
est, he is far from the least important. On 
the contrary he is an active, vigilant and 
potent factor in that honored body. He 
has achieved 'a brilliant record at the bar, 
while yet a young man, and to such as he the 
future augurs much in the way of success 
and honor. 

Harvey D. McCollum was born in Louis- 
ville, Clay county, Illinois, March 13, 1879, 
and he early decided to try his fortune with 
his own people, rather than seek uncertain 
fortune in other fields, as so many of his 
early companions have done. He is the son 
of James C. McCollum, also a native of Clay 
county, now residing in Louisville, retired, 
being one of the founders of the Farmers' 
and Merchants' Bank of Louisville, and who 
is now one of its directors. James C. McCol- 
lum, grandfather of the subject, was a na- 
tive of Kentucky, and the subject's great- 
grandfather, Alexander McCollum, was one 
of the six men killed at the battle of New 



Orleans in the War of 1812, this battle hav- 
ing been fought in 1815, and his name is 
mentioned in President Roosevelt's history 
of naval battles. Members of the McCollum 
family were among the early settlers of Clay 
county and they have been prominently iden- 
tified with its history ever since the pioneer 
days, having always taken a leading part in 
the development of the community in every 
way. Robert McCollum, uncle of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, has lived in this county 
for a period of seventy-five years, is one of 
the oldest living pioneers of the county. 

The mother of the subject, a woman of 
many beautiful attributes, was known in 
her maidenhood as Fanny Long, a daughter 
of Darling Long, an old settler of Clay 
county. She is still living. To Mr. and 
Mrs. J. C. McCollum four children were 
bom, our subject being the only survivor. 

Our subject was reared in Louisville 
where he attended the high school from 
which he graduated, having gained a good 
common school education, for he was ambi- 
tious and applied himself in a very careful 
manner to his studies, outstripping may of 
the less ardent plodders. Not being satis- 
fied with what learning he had acquired up 
to this point, he attended the University of 
Illinois, taking the literary and law courses, 
in which institution he remained for six 
years, graduating in 1901, after making a 
splendid record for scholarship. 

After completing his course in the univer- 
sity, Mr. McCollum returned home and at 
once began the practice of law, his success 
being instantaneous. He at once attracted 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



the attention of the political leaders of the 
county, and he was the nominee of the Dem- 
ocratic party for County Judge in 1902, and 
while he headed his ticket, was defeated; 
however, the splendid race he made gave 
proof of his high standing with the people 
of Clay county and forecasted future victo- 
ries. He formed a law partnership that year 
with A. M. Rose, which continued until Mr. 
Rose was elected to the circuit bench. 

Mr. McCollum was appointed Master in 
Chancery for two terms, serving with much 
credit and satisfaction from 1904 until 1908. 
He is at this writing practicing law with 
John W. Thomason, having formed a part- 
nership, which still exists, in January, 1907. 
It is generally regarded as one of the strong- 
est law firms in this or adjoining counties, 
and their office is always a busy place, their 
many clients coming from all over the dis- 
trict. As already stated, our subject made a 
successful race for the Legislature during 
the last election (1908), which event caused 
general satisfaction throughout the county, 
not only from friends, but members of other 
parties, for everyone recognized Mr. McCol- 
lum's ability and fidelity to duty, therefore 
they know their interests will be carefully 
guarded by him. 

Mr. McCollum is unmarried. In his fra- 
ternal relations he is a member of the Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks No. 
926, at Olney, the Knights of Pythias, the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Woodmen, and Masonic Order at Louisville. 

Mr. McCollum is not a man who courts 
publicity, yet it must be a pleasure to him, as 



is quite natural, to know how well he stands 
with his fellow citizens throughout this dis- 
trict. The public is seldom mistaken in its 
estimation of a man, and had Mr. McCollum 
not been most worthy he could not have 
gained the high position he now holds in 
public and social life. Having long main- 
tained the same without any abatement of 
his popularity, his standing in the county is 
perhaps now in excess of what it has ever 
been. He has, by his own persistent and 
praiseworthy efforts, won for himself a name 
whose luster the future years shall only aug- 
ment. 



G. H. TRENARY. 

The enterprise of the subject has been 
crowned by success, as the result of rightly 
applied principles which never fail in their 
ultimate effect when coupled with integrity, 
uprightness and a congenial disposition, as 
they have been done in the present instance, 
judging from the high standing of Mr. Tre- 
nary among his fellow citizens whose un- 
divided esteem he has justly won and re- 
tained. 

G. H. Trenary, the influential and popu- 
lar superintendent of the Chicago & East- 
ern Illinois Railroad Company, with offices 
at Salem, Illinois, was born February 9, 
1867, at Lafayette, Indiana, the son of Ran- 
dolph B. Trenary, a native of Ohio who 
came to Indiana when a boy. He was a lo- 
comotive engineer, having run an engine 



ilOCKAIMIICAL AND KKM I X ISCKXT HISTORY OF 



during the Civil war and he followed this 
profession all his life, becoming one of the 
best known railroad men in his community. 
He died in February, 1904, at Stone Bluff, 
Indiana. The mother of the subject was 
known in her maidenhood as Mollie Nor- 
duft, a native of Williamsport, Indiana, and 
the representative of a well known and 
highly respected family there. She passed 
to her rest in 1873. They were the parents 
of four children, three boys and one girl, 
namely: Charles W., of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri; G. H., the subject of this sketch; 
Evendar H., who died in 1888; Elizabeth, 
the wife of Charles Mallett, of Stone Bluff, 
Indiana. 

Our subject attended the common schools 
at Urbana, Illinois, leaving school when in 
the eighth grade for the purpose of begin- 
ning the study of telegraphy at Urbana. 
Becoming an exeprt at this exacting profes- 
sion he followed it together with that of 
agent at various stations for thirteen years 
with great satisfaction to his employers who 
regarded him as one of the most efficient 
and reliable men in this line of work in 
their employ. He spent four years at Og- 
den, Illinois; one year at Urbana, one year 
at Waynetown, Indiana ; one year at Cham- 
paign, Illinois ; two years at LeRoy, Illinois ; 
three years at Veedersburg, Indiana; one 
year at Hoopestown, Illinois. From 1896 
to 1899 he was chief clerk to the general 
superintendent of the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois Railroad Company at Chicago. For 
five years our subject held the responsible 
position of superintendent at Brazil, In- 



diana, from 1899 to 1904, since which time 
he has been superintendent of the Illinois 
division of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
road, with headquarters at Salem. The 
offices of this road were located here in De- 
cember, 1906, having been removed from 
St. Elmo, this state. This road employs 
about five hundred people in all departments. 
The local offices occupy the entire third 
floor of the Salem State Bank building and 
is the busiest place in Salem. Mr. Trenary's 
private office is also on this floor. Every- 
thing is under a splendid system. 

Mr. Trenary has jurisdiction over all 
transportation, a very responsible position, 
indeed, and one that not only requires a 
superior talent along executive lines, but a 
clear brain, sound judgment and steady hab- 
its, but he has performed his duties so well 
that the company deems his services indis- 
pensable. This road has a departmental di- 
vision system. 

Our subject 1 was happily married in De- 
cember, 1884, to Beulah R. Glascock, the 
refined and accomplished daughter of H. J. 
Glascock, an influential and highly respected 
citizen of Ogden, Illinois. 

The commodious, modern, cheerful and 
model home of the subject and wife has 
been blessed through the birth of the six 
children whose names and dates of birth 
follow in consecutive order: G. W., born 
April 12, 1886, lives in Salem; Nell, born 
December 30, 1887; Genevieve F., born 
March i, 1893 ; Robert F., born October 22, 
1895; H. Kenneth, born January 29, 1901; 
Randolph Bryant, born January 26, 1904. 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



These children have received every care 
and attention, been given good educations 
and each gives promise of bright and suc- 
cessful futures, exemplifying in their daily 
lives what a wholesome home environment 
and careful parental training can do in de- 
veloping well rounded and highly cultivated 
minds and bodies. 

Mr. Trenary moved his family to Salem 
in December, 1906. He has been honored 
by being chosen alderman for the city of 
Salem. Although a loyal Republican and 
well fortified in his political beliefs and anx- 
ious to see the triumph of his party's prin- 
ciples, Mr. Trenary has never aspired to 
positions of public trust at the hands of his 
fellow voters. However, his support can al- 
ways be depended upon in the advancement 
of all movements looking to the public weal 
in his community whether educational, 
moral or civic. 

In his fraternal relations, the subject is a 
member of the Masonic Order and the Mod- 
ern Woodmen, and one would soon conclude 
by a knowledge of his consistent and gen- 
tlemanly daily life that he believed in carry- 
ing out the sublime precepts of these 
commendable organizations. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Trenary are members of the Christian 
church. They are pleasant people to meet, 
and their cozy home is often the mecca for 
numerous admiring friends who seek the 
cheerfulness and hospitality so freely and 
unstintingly dispensed here. No better or 
more popular people are to be found in Mar- 
ion county and they justly deserve the high 
esteem in which they are held. 



JOHN A. BATEMAN. 

There is much in the life record of the 
subject of this sketch worthy of commenda- 
tion and admiration, and his public career 
is especially notable. Like many other 
brainy, energetic young men who have left 
their impress upon the magnificent develop- 
ment of this part of the great Prairie state, 
he did not wait for a specially brilliant open- 
ing. Indeed, he could not wait, for his 
natural industry would not have permitted 
him to do so. In his early youth he gave 
evidence of the possession of traits of char- 
acter which have made his life exceptionally 
successful and he is today admittedly one of 
Clay county's foremost and best known 
citizens. 

John A. Bateman was born in Richlancl 
county, Illinois, September 20, 1863, the 
son of Thomas Bateman, who was a native 
of Queenstown, Ireland, where a sister, 
aunt of our subject, still resides. He came 
to America when ' he was eighteen years old, 
first settling in Ohio, near Cincinnati, where 
he lived about three years, after which he 
came to Richland county, Illinois, locating 
on a farm, having lived in 'Richland county 
two years, when he moved near Sailor 
Springs, Clay county, where he lived until 
his death, June 24, 1879. He was a man 
of much sterling worth and many of his 
praiseworthy traits seem to have been in- 
herited by our subject. Grandfather 
Michael Bateman was a native of Ireland, 
where he lived and died. Our subject's 
mother was Mary A. Mitchell, whose people 



r.lOOR.M'll ICAI. \NI> RKMIMSCKNT HISTORY OK 



were natives of North Carolina. She was 
born near Bedford, Indiana, and is still liv- 
ing at Sailor Springs, Clay county, Illinois. 
She is a fine old lady of beautiful Christian 
character. 

The following children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Bateman: Lucinda Jane 
died in infancy; John A., the subject of 
this sketch; William, deceased; Charles, a 
well-to-do farmer at Sailor Springs, this 
county; Susanna, deceased; George P., liv- 
ing at Sailor Springs; Abraham, deceased; 
Robert, deceased. 

Mr. Bateman spent his early life on the 
farm and received his primary education 
in the schools of Sailor Springs. He later 
attended Hayward College at Fairfield, Il- 
linois, for two or three terms. He also at- 
tended the Teachers' Normal of Clay coun- 
ty, having made a splendid record for schol- 
arship in all these institutions. Not being 
contented to leave school before he received 
a high education, he borrowed money of old 
Uncle Jim McKinney, and attended the 
Mitchell College, at Mitchell, Indiana, com- 
pleting the course. 

His father dying when he was fifteen 
years old, Mr. Bateman became the head 
and support of the family, and although the 
struggle was hard, it merely tended to de- 
velop the sterner side of his nature and 
spurred him to achievements that he other- 
wise would never have known. After 
leaving school he taught for five years in 
the country with great success, becoming 
known as one of the leading educators of 
the county and his services were in great 



demand. After his experience in teaching 
he went into the real estate and insurance 
business at Sailor Springs, also buying and 
shipping wool and grain. He also opened 
the first furniture store in that town and 
while there he was elected the first Mayor of 
the town, having become one of the leading 
men of the community and who did a great 
deal for the town's development. This was 
in 1893. He remained there for ten years, 
making a success of whatever business he 
engaged in. 

In 1898 Mr. Bateman was elected Coun- 
ty Clerk on the Republican ticket, living at 
the time in Sailor Springs. On June 22, 
1899, he moved to Louisville. He was 
elected to this office by twenty-four major- 
ity. He was counted out, but was finally 
seated by the Supreme Court. He was re- 
nominated in 1902, and re-elected by a ma- 
jority of three hundred and fifteen. Having 
made such a splendid record he was re- 
nominated in 1906 and re-elected by a ma- 
jority of four hundred and twenty-seven in 
the face of a strong fight. The Democratic 
party took their regular nominee off the 
ticket and placed the strongest man they 
could in the race against him. He is now 
(1908) serving his third term, and is re- 
garded by everyone concerned as an excep- 
tionally good officer, being careful and 
painstaking, courteous to all and giving his 
attention to the duties of the same with the 
same keen discernment that characterizes 
his own business affairs: in fact, he is said 
by his many friends to be the best County 
Clerk Clav ever had. 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



93 



Mr. and Mrs. Bateman are the parents of 
four children, namely : Dolores, who at this 
writing is fifteen years old; Chloe Irene is 
twelve years old; Mark Hanna is deceased, 
having died October 6, 1908; the fourth 
child died in infancy. 

Mr. Bateman was very much attached to 
his baby son. Mark Hanna. whose untimely 
death at the age of nearly eleven years great- 
ly grieved him. The little boy was the pride 
of his father's heart and upon him he lav- 
ished his affection and care of an indulgent 
lather. 

Fraternally Mr. Bateman is a member of 
the Masonic Order, the Knights of Pythias, 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; 
also the Modern Woodmen, Ben Hur, the 
American Home Circle and the Rebekahs. 
He is a member of the Christian church and 
a liberal supporter of the same. 

Our subject is a purely self-made man, 
winning success by overcoming many ob- 
stacles, and he deserves the high esteem in 
which he is universally held, and is one of 
Clay county's most popular men, claiming 
a legion of friends in all parts of the county 
and throughout this district. He has a 
modern and elegantly furnished home, a 
good driving horse and many other con- 
veniences. His home place consists of five 
acres. Mr. Bateman enjoys the fullest 
measure of public confidence, because of the 
honorable business methods he has ever fol- 
lowed, and he is one of the most successful, 
prominent and honored men in this portion 
of Illinois. 



G. A. IDLEMAN. 

The subject of this sketch is one of 
those men who have met with success along 
the line of his chosen calling and he is today 
one of the prosperous and respected mer- 
chants of Salem, Marion county, where he 
conducts a modern and attractive store, hav- 
ing built up an extensive and lucrative busi- 
ness by reason of his peculiar adaptability 
for this line of work, his honesty of business 
principles and his courteous and kind treat- 
ment of customers whom he numbers by the 
scores. 

G. A. Idleman was born in Marion 
county, Ohio, in 1844, the son of Jacob J. 
Idleman, a native of Virginia, who moved 
with his parents to Ohio when he was a 
small boy. He devoted his life principally 
to agricultural pursuits, but he also devoted 
much time and labor along a higher plane 
of action, that of Methodist minister, becom- 
ing known as an able expounder of the Gos- 
pel and a man of good deeds wherever he 
went. He engaged in ministerial work for 
forty years, having worked hard on his 
farm during the week and preached on Sun- 
day, and to show that he was an extraor- 
dinarily sincere men and desirous to do good 
for the sake of being true to the higher life 
as outlined by the lowly Nazarene, he never 
accepted a cent for his ministrial labors in 
all those forty years, merely preaching for 
the love of the work and the good he could 
do, which was an incalculable amount. He 
was called to his reward by the Good Shep- 



94 



moCKAI'HICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



herd whom he had so faithfully followed, in 
1887, while living on his farm in Marion 
county, Illinois, where he moved in 1865, 
settling two miles south of Salem where he 
resided the remainder of his life. 

The grandfather of the subject was Jacob 
Idleman, also a native of Virginia, and also 
a farmer who was known as a man of in- 
tegrity and many sterling qualities. He 
reached the advanced age of eighty years, 
dying in Marion county, Ohio, where he had 
removed in an early day when the country 
was wild and unsettled. The subject's 
mother was Hannah Jones, whose people 
came from Pennsylvania. Her people lived 
to be very old, her mother having reached 
the remarkable age of ninety years. The 
subject's mother, a woman of gracious per- 
sonal qualities, is still living in 1908, on the 
old farm homestead south of Salem at the 
still more remarkable age of ninety-four 
years. 

Ten children constituted the family of the 
parents of our subject, four having died in 
infancy and two having passed away after 
reaching maturity. Those living are : G. 
A., our subject; Samantha, the widow of E. 
W. Thompson, of Columbus, Ohio; Mrs. 
Gallic M. Kell, the widow of William Kell, 
living in Salem ; Mrs. Belle Sipes, who lives 
on a farm near Omega, Illinois. 

G. A. Idleman, our subject, spent his boy- 
hood days in Marion county, Ohio, where he 
received a common school education and 
where he remained until he was twenty years 
old, having assisted with the farm work 
while going to school. He came to Salem, 



Illinois, in 1865 with his parents, and has 
continued to make this his home. He farmed 
until he was thirty years old, thereby getting 
a good start in life. Since that time he has 
been engaged from time to time in various 
lines of business. He has been in the mer- 
cantile business here for a period of twenty- 
five years, most of the time in business for 
himself, but part of the time he was asso- 
ciated in business with others. He has been 
engaged in the grocery business for the past 
eight years, since 1900, and which he still 
conducts, having built up an excellent and 
lucrative trade as the result of courteous 
treatment to customers and his expert 
knowledge of the mercantile business, hav- 
ing always made this line of work pay, not 
only yielding him a comfortable living, but 
enabling him to gradually increase his busi- 
ness and at the same time lay up an ample 
competency for his old age. His customers 
are not confined to Salem and vicinity, but 
he is well known throughout Marion county, 
having always given his customers entire 
satisfaction as to the quality of goods he 
handles and to price, consequently he seldom 
loses a customer. Mr. Idleman built his 
present store building on First South street, 
which is one of the neatest and most sub- 
stantial stores in Salem. 

Mr. Idleman was united in marriage in 
1870 to Mattie Clark, the representative of 
one of Salem's well known families. To 
this union one child has been born, Mrs. 
Lydia M. Hubbs, of Chicago. The subject 
was married again May 14, 1902, to Agnes 
Ray, the daughter of Riley Rose. She was 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



95 



born and reared in Salem. They have no 
children. Their home is a commodious 
and nicely furnished one in the most de- 
sirable residence district of Salem, and is 
frequently the gathering place for numerous 
friends of the family. 

Our subject has served his community in 
a most efficient and commendable manner as 
assessor of Salem township, having been 
the first Republican assessor ever elected in 
this township. In his fraternal relations he 
belongs to the Red Men, of Odin, Illinois. 
Both he and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Our subject 
has ever taken an active interest in the wel- 
fare of the community and gives an earnest 
support to every movement for the public 
welfare. A man of fine personal traits, he 
is highly regarded by all who know him, 
and he is counted one of Salem's most pro- 
gressive and worthy business men. 



REV. JOHN BUENGER. 

The mission of a great soul -m this world 
is one that is calculated to inspire a multi- 
tude of others to better and grander things, 
and its subsequent influence cannot be meas- 
ured in meets and bounds, for it affects the 
lives of those with whom it comes in con- 
tact, broading and enriching them for all 
time to come. He who spends his life inter- 
pretating the Divine Word has one of the 
greatest missions to perform vouchsafed to 
man. The subject of this sketch is one of 



that number and worthily wears the honor 
in proper meekness and reserve. 

Rev. John Buenger, minister of the Ger- 
man Lutheran church in luka township, 
Marion county, was born at Burg, near 
Magdeburg, Germany, April 17, 1869, the 
son of Otto and Antonie (Ruehlmaun) 
Buenger, both natives of Germany, having 
spent their lives in that country. The sub- 
ject's father, who was a minister, is de- 
ceased. He did a great work in the Evan- 
gelical church in Germany. The mother of 
our subject is still living in the fatherland. 
They were the parents of eight children, 
namely: Max, Werner, Sophia, Emil; 
Adolph and John, our subject, are twins; 
Eliza. and Erich, who is also a minister. He 
and the subject are the only ones who ever 
came to America. The above named chil- 
dren are all living. 

The early education of Rev. John 
Buenger was obtained in Germany. He 
came to America in 1891 and attended Con- 
cordia College at St. Louis, Missouri, for 
two years. He then went to Madison 
county, Texas, in 1893, where he took 
charge of a church. He remained in Texas 
for ten years. He had very difficult charges 
in Madison, Fayette and Fannin counties, 
that state, but he did much good there in 
strengthening the congregations of his dif- 
ferent charges. In 1903 he came to his 
present pastorate in Marion county, Illinois, 
the German Lutheran Trinity church. He 
has done a great work here, having com- 
pleted in 1908 a beautiful and substantial 
church edifice, costing two thousand seven 



LIOGKAPHICAL AND RKM IX ISCKXT HISTORY OF 



hundred dollars. He also conducts the pa- 
rochial school near the church, ably assisted 
by his wife, whom he married in 1894, her 
maiden name having been Louisa Franke, 
who was born in Barmen, Germany, the 
daughter of Henry and Jane Menkhoff, both 
of whom died in Germany. Henry Menk- 
hoff was a teacher in the old country. 

Six children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife as follows: Ruth, Gertrude, 
Hans, Antonett, Frieda and Paul. Our 
subject is well liked by his congregation and 
by everyone who has had the fortune to 
know him. He is an earnest and able ex- 
pounder of the Gospel. 



JOHN B. CONANT. 

This venerable pioneer and representative 
agriculturist of Kinmundy township, Ma- 
rion county, Illinois, has lived on the farm 
which is now his home practically all his life, 
and thus he has witnessed and taken part in 
the development of this section of the state 
from a sylvan wild to its present status as 
an opulent agricultural and industrial com- 
munity. He early began to contribute to the 
work of clearing and improving the land of 
its primitive forests, later assisted in estab- 
lishing schools and better public improve- 
ments and facilities, while his course has 
been so directed as to retain for him the un- 
qualified approval and esteem of the com- 
munity in which he has so long made his 
home, until today he is regarded as one of 
the most substantial and influential citizens 



of the township, deserving of the greatest 
credit from the fact that he began life un- 
aided and without the tender guidance of 
parents, being compelled to go it alone from 
early childhood, but such stern discipline, 
somewhat unpleasant and regrettable, was 
not without its value, for it fostered in the 
lad an independent spirit and gave him that 
fortitude and courage that has made for sub- 
sequent success. 

John B. Conant is a native of this county, 
having been born here February 17, 1839, 
the son of Airs Conant, who came to Mas- 
sachusetts from England, there being three 
brothers of the Conant family on the ship, 
one of whom settled in Baltimore, another 
in the North and one, Airs Conant, went to 
Georgia and joined the United States army 
for the purpose of taking part in the War of 
1812, having fought faithfully throughout 
the struggle, being wounded in the hand. 
After the war he returned to Georgia, where 
he settled, and married Polly Pepper, to 
which union eleven children were born, John 
B. Conant being the youngest son. Airs Co- 
nant and wife moved to Marion county, Il- 
linois in an early day while the country was 
still a wilderness. He partly improved sev- 
en different farms, selling each and moved 
to Missouri, pre-empting all the land he had 
from the government. All the members of 
this pioneer family have passed away with 
the exception of our subject. 

The father of our subject also taught 
school in Marion county, having been hired 
to teach a subscription school four miles 
from home, the first term lasting three 




MR. AND MRS. J. B. CONANT. 



THE 



1 INOIS. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 



months, the second term being of the same 
duration; however, he taught only one 
month on the second term, when he stopped 
to put out a crop of corn. He worked too 
hard and drank too much water while over- 
heated, which caused his death in less than 
a week, leaving a large famaily to struggle 
with the wilderness and the clearing of a 
new country. The mother of our subject 
also passed away one week after her hus- 
band's death, leaving John B., then eight 
years old, to live with his older brother, Wil- 
liam, with whom he remained until he was 
fourteen years old, at which time he chose 
his own guardian, Mark Cole, who cared 
for our subject in a manly and fatherly man- 
ner and procured a land warrant for him, 
but the land was afterward sold for the lack 
of payment of one hundred dollars. 

Our subject's early education was limited 
to the district schools, his first school having 
been taught by his father, but he is well ed- 
ucated and he has always been a most suc- 
cessful farmer, beginning life with nothing, 
as before stated, he wisely applied his energy 
and managed his affairs with that foresight 
and discrimination that always brings suc- 
cess, and his farm properly consists of sev- 
en hundred acres of as fine land as is to be 
found in this locality. However, it has been 
divided up and apportioned among his chil- 
dren, there now being (1908) one hundred 
and ninety-three acres in the home place, 
which are kept in a high state of cultiva- 
tion and well improved, showing that a man 
of thrift and excellent executive ability has 
had the management of it. He lives in a 



modern, substantial and very comfortable 
dwelling, surrounded by convenient out- 
buildings, and everything denotes prosperity 
about the place. 

Our subject was united in marriage to 
Mary Atkins on April n, 1861, the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. John Atkins, natives of 
Georgia and Tennessee, respectively, and to 
this union the following children have been 
born, named in order of birth : Fannie, who 
married Isem Lansford and had four chil- 
dren, one of whom is living; Ayers married 
Maggie Door and has four children, all liv- 
ing ; Polly married Noble Neeper and is the 
mother of eight children, all living ; Mar- 
garette married Guy Neeper and has one liv- 
ing child ; Eli married Vinda Owens and has 
six living children; Ida married Mel Gray 
and has three living children, one having 
died; Martha married Francis Reese and 
has one child; May, Emmet, Hulda and 
Ruhe are all deceased; Ira is married to 
Hattie Hoovey and has one child. 

Politically Mr. Conant is a Democrat and 
he has been School Director in his township, 
also Road Overseer. In religious matters he 
subscribes to the Cumberland Presbyterian 
faith, although he was reared a Methodist, 
to which creed his father adhered. 

Our subject is at this writing sixty-nine 
years old and is well preserved, being in 
fairly good health. As the architect of his 
own fortunes he has builded wisely and well 
and the success that crowns his efforts is 
well merited. He is broad-minded, liberal, 
progressive, public spirited and is well 
known and highly respected in the commu- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND RKM 1XISCKXT HISTORY OF 



nity which has been his home for so many 
years and where he has done so much faith- 
ful work, which has resulted in good not 
only to himself and family, but also to his 
neighbors and the community at large. 



HENRY GASSMANN. 

Among the progressive and enterprising 
business men of Olney, Illinois, who have 
achieved a definite measure of success in 
their line and have at the same time as- 
sisted materially in the upbuilding and de- 
velopment of their section of the county, is 
Henry Gassmann, who is deserving of men- 
tion in a work of the province assigned to 
the one at hand along with the other lead- 
ing citizens of Richland county, because he 
has led a life that is highly commendable in 
every respect. 

Henry Gassmann, the well known whole- 
sale ice cream manufacturer and dealer in 
soda fountain supplies, was born in New 
Albany, Indiana, April 22, 1868, the son 
of Lewis and Caroline (Spangler) Gass- 
mann, natives of Germany, who came to the 
United States when young and after their 
marriage in New York state they located 
at New Albany. During the Civil war they 
worked in a bakery and after its close began 
in a bakery business, which they continued 
successfully until 1878, when they came to 
Olney, where they established a similar en- 
terprise, carrying on the same in a most 
gratifying manner until the death of the 



subject's mother August 2, 1895, the father 
surviving until December 21, 1902, the for- 
mer at the age of fifty-two and the latter 
when sixty-eight years old. They were the 
parents of five children, three boys and two 
girls, the subject being the third in order of 
birth. These children received every atten- 
tion by their parents, who were regarded as 
people of the best grade in every respect. 

Henry Gassmann was reared in Olney, 
after his tenth year, having received a fairly 
good education in the common schools. 
When twelve years old he went to work in 
a bakery conducted by his father and learned 
the trade. When nineteen years old he start- 
ed out for himself and worked at his trade 
for three years at various places in Colorado 
and New Mexico. Returning to Olney he 
entered the employ of his father, continuing 
until the death of the latter, having in the 
meantime acquired an interest in the busi- 
ness and made himself very proficient in this 
profession. On October 31, 1902, their es- 
tablishment was destroyed by fire and the 
loss was most severe since no insurance 
was carried. This misfortune was followed 
in December, of the same year, by the death 
of the subject's father. Mr. Gassmann then 
purchased such interests as remained from 
the other heirs and, nothing daunted, he 
started in a small way in the confectionery 
and ice cream business, which he built up 
by patient toil and careful management to 
large proportions and became prosperous.- 
In the meantime he had built up an exten- 
sive wholesale trade in ice cream and in 
August, 1906. disposed of his retail inter- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



ests. In the winter following Mr. Gassmann 
built his present handsome, modern and con- 
venient brick structure, thirty-four by sev- 
enty-two feet and equipped the same with all 
the necessary appliances of latest design, 
purchasing all the up-to-date machinery 
necessary in the manufacture of ice cream 
on a large scale, having a capacity of one 
thousand gallons a day. He has long sup- 
plied a heavy trade within one hundred 
miles of Olney, and new territory is con- 
stantly being added, his ice cream being 
eagerly sought after, owing to its high 
grade. 

Mr. Gassmann started a few years ago 
with nothing and he now is prosperous, be- 
ing regarded by the people of Olney as a 
good, hustling, all-round busines man. He 
also does an extensive wholesale business in 
soda water supplies in the way of syrups, 
crushed fruits, etc. 

Mr. Gassmann was united in marriage on 
November 7, 1894, with Carrie B. Goudy. 
a native of Claremont township, Richland 
county, the daughter .of John Goudy. of Ol- 
ney, who for many years was a prosperous 
farmer in Claremont township. Two sons 
have been born to the subject and wife; 
Zean G., born in 1896, and Louis H., who 
is ten years old in 1908. 

In politics our subject is a Republican, 
and in his fraternal relations is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
at Olney. 

Mrs. Gassmann is a woman of refined 
tastes and a worthy representative of her 
noble parents, Mr. and Mrs. John S. and 



Mary E. (Dayton) Goudy, the former a 
native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsyl- 
vania. They were married in Ohio and 
came to Richland county, Illinois, in 1865. 
The present solid prosperity of Mr. Gass- 
mann is due entirely to his own efforts, di- 
rected along honorable channels, and today 
he enjoys an enviable standing among the 
leading men of his community and the fact 
that many of his warmest friends are those 
who have known him longest is proof that 
his life has been straightforward and honest. 



JOHN F. DONOVAN. 

The gentleman to a review of whose life 
and characteristics the reader's attention is 
herewith respectfully invited, is among the 
most progressive professional men of Mar- 
ion county, Illinois, who by energy and cor- 
rect methods has not only achieved success 
for himself, but has also contributed in a 
very material way to the commercial, indus- 
trial, civic and moral advancement of his 
place of residence. In the course of an 
honorable career he has established himself 
in a liberally remunerative enterprise and 
won the confidence and esteem of his fellow 
citizens. 

John F. Donovan was born in New York 
City November i, 1847, the son f William 
and Mary Donovan. The lineage of this 
family, as the name implies, is traced to 
Ireland, the father of the subject having 
been born there. He was a longshoreman, 
and was called from his earthly labors when 



P.10GKAIMIICAL AXI) KK.M I . \ISCK.\T HISTORY OF 



our subject was young. The mother of the 
subject was also born in the Emerald Isle, 
and passed away comparatively young in 
life. They were Roman Catholics and peo- 
ple of sterling qualities and fine traits. They 
became the parents of two children. 

John F. Donovan, our subject, was placed 
in the Juvenile Asylum in New York City, 
where he remained for about five years, or 
until he was twelve years old. He was then 
bound to a farmer in Randolph county, Illi- 
nois. After remaining in his new home for 
about eighteen months he took a leave of 
absence and never returned. 

In 1862 our subject, feeling that he could 
not conscientiously stand idly by and see the 
nation in the throes of rebellion, enlisted in 
1862 in Company I, One Hundred and 
Tenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in which 
he served for six months, when, greatly to 
his regret, it became necessary to drop his 
name from the company's roll on account of 
physical disability ; but he later re-enlisted in 
Company C, Fifty-sixth Illinois Infantry, at 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, and served with dis- 
tinction until the close of the war, taking 
part in many hot engagements and famous 
battles. He was honorably discharged. His 
regiment was sent to Little Rock, Arkansas, 
after the grand review at Washington, and 
was finally mustered out at Springfield, Illi- 
nois, in August, 1865. 

After his career in the army Mr. Donovan 
came to Centralia, Marion county, Illinois, 
where he remained for about six years, then 
came to Kinmundy, where he has since re- 
sided. He was always a close observer and 



a diligent student, and early in life decided 
that the law should be his profession, con- 
sequently he began the study of the same 
and was admitted to the bar in 1874, since 
which time he has devoted himself almost 
exclusively to the practice of law, winning a 
great reputation throughout this and adjoin- 
ing counties as a learned, able and careful 
exponent of this profession, never erring in 
his cool calculating manner in drawing or 
presenting a case, whether criminal or civil, 
and he is also known as an orator of no 
mean ability. His success was instantane- 
ous and his office has always been filled with 
clients. 

Our subject was appointed postmaster of 
Kinmundy, first in 1877, having served in a 
most acceptable manner for eight years and 
was removed by President Cleveland. He 
was re-appointed in 1902 and is still ably 
serving in that capacity. He has been mayor 
of Kinmundy at different times for fifteen 
years. He was instrumental in organizing 
the Marion County Grand Army of the Re- 
public, being at the head of the Reunion As- 
sociation. He has served as inspector 
general of Illinois on the national staff, also 
on the department staff, also chief mustering 
officer for Illinois. Mr. Donovan was presi- 
dent of the Southern Illinois Emigration 
and Improvement Association, also officer 
of the day of the Southern Illinois Reunion 
Association. He has held various offices in 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Donovan was united in marriage No- 
vember 3, 1880, to Ellen King, a native of 
Marion county, the daughter of John B. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



and Rebecca J. (Evans) King, a highly re- 
spected and influential family whose people 
were from Ohio. Her father was a soldier 
in the Civil war, from Illinois, having been 
a member of Company A, Eighty-eighth 
Chicago Board of Trade Regiment, in which 
he served throughout the war. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donovan have no children. 

In his fraternal relations our subject is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, having 
filled all the chairs in the local lodges, and 
he has been representative of these lodges in 
the grand lodges. 

Mrs. Donovan is a member of the Presby- 
terian church. 

Mr. Donovan is a man of distinct and 
forceful individuality, of marked sagacity, 
of indomitable enterprise, and always up- 
right in his dealings with his fellow men, 
loyal and faithful to every trust imposed in 
him, public-spirited, and in manners courte- 
ous and kindly, easily approachable. His 
career has ever been such as to warrant the 
trust and confidence of the business world, 
and his activity in industrial, professional 
and civic lines and financial circles forms no 
unimportant chapter in the history of Mar- 
ion county. 



SAMUEL A. STANFORD. 

The subject of this biographical review is 
one of the eminent men of Clay county, both 
in business and civic affairs, whose indom- 
itable courage, persistent and aggressive ef- 



forts and his excellent management have 
brought to him the prosperity which is to- 
day his. He has ever stood ready to do 
what he could in pushing forward the wheels 
of progress and advancing commercial pros- 
perity in this vicinity and his career, both 
public and private, has been one worthy of 
the high esteem and praise which those who 
know him so freely accord. 

Samuel A. Stanford, the popular County 
Treasurer of Clay county, was born in Stan- 
ford township, this county, October 25, 
1867, and, unlike many of his contempora- 
ries who sought precarious fortune in other 
fields, he has been contented to remain at 
home. He is the son of Oren \Y. Stanford, 
who was also a native of Stanford township, 
having lived all his life on a farm there. He 
was a member of Company A, Ninety-eighth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served about 
two years in the Civil war. He died when 
our subject was twelve years old, in Janu- 
ary, 1879. Samuel A. Stanford, the sub- 
ject's grandfather, was of Scotch-Irish 
stock, having migrated from his homestead 
reservation in Pennsylvania to Illinois, when 
a young man, being one of the first settlers 
in Clay county, having located on a farm 
in Stanford township, which he purchased 
from the government on which he lived until 
his death in January 1879. The subject's 
mother was known in her maidenhood as 
Mary Michaels, whose people were natives 
cf Indiana. She is at this writing living in 
Flora. The parents of the subject were 
always known to be people of much sterling 
worth. Their family consisted of the fol- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



lowing children : Mrs. Emma Dunmoyer, 
of Flora, this county ; Samuel A.., our sub- 
ject; John and James are twins, the former 
living in Piedmont, Missouri, and the latter 
in Flora, this state; Mrs. Bertha Thomas, 
of Flora ; Mary died in infancy ; Charley O. 
lives in Odin, Illinois, where he is in the 
mercantile business. 

Mr. Stanford spent his boyhood days on 
a farm, where he attended the country 
schools, later attending the high school at 
Flora, but at the death of his father he gave 
up schooling and went to work on the farm. 
In 1892 he engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness in Flora, which was a success from the 
first. His was a grocery business and the 
manufacture of cigars and tobacco, having 
been thus engaged for about thirteen years, 
his business having constantly grown until 
he had an extensive trade throughout this 
locality. Then he sold out for the purpose 
of making the race for County Treasurer 
in 1906, on the Republican ticket, to which 
office he was duly elected and is at this 
writing, 1908, very creditably serving, with 
entire satisfaction to everyone concerned, 
being regarded by members of both parties 
as one of the best county officials Clay coun- 
ty ever had. He has a thorough knowledge 
of the affairs of the office and is courteous 
and obliging to everyone with whom he 
deals, thereby rendering himself popular 
with all classes. 

Mr. Stanford was united in marriage 
November 25, 1890, to Opha Dedrick, 
daughter of Perry Dedrick, of Loogootee, 
Indiana, and to this union have been born 



eight children, namely: Eulalie, Hallie, Or- 
ren Perry; Samuel A,, the fourth child is 
deceased; Robert Leland, Lester, William 
and Edwin. These children are receiving 
good educations and careful home training 
and they all give promise of successful ca- 
reers. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Stanford is 
a member of the Masonic Order at Louis- 
ville; the Knights of Pythias at Flora, and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Flora; also the Woodmen at Louisville, and 
the Eastern Star at Louisville. He is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church and Mrs. Stan- 
ford is also a faithful attendant of the same. 

Mr. Stanford is a staunch Republican in 
politics, and since moving to Louisville, De- 
cember 26, 1906, he has taken much interest 
in the development of the town and is re- 
garded as one of the representative citizens 
of the place. He is unswerving in his al- 
legiance to what he believes is right, and 
upholds his honest convictions at the sacri- 
fice, if need be, of every other interest. 
Everything calculated to advance the in- 
terests of Clay county, whether materially 
or otherwise, receives his support and hearty 
co-operation. 



EARL C. HUGGINS. 

Coupled with Mr. Huggins' innate ability 
as an attorney, his unusual clearness of per- 
ception, analytical tact and soundness of 
theory is his courteous manners, persistency 




E. C. MUGGINS. 



Of THE 

ttlNOIS. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



I0 3 



and unswerving integrity, rendering him 
one of the strong young attorneys of 
this locality and one of the successful prac- 
titioners of this county, and to him the fu- 
ture is particularly bright owing to his nat- 
ural ability and past splendid record. 

Earl C. Huggins, whose law and insur- 
ance office is located in Kinmundy, Illinois, 
was' born in Marion county, this state, Sep- 
tember 9, 1877, and, unlike many of his 
early companions and contemporaries, who 
sought precarious fortunes in other fields, 
most of them finding merely the will-o'-the- 
wisp of success, Mr. Huggins preferred to 
remain on his native heath, believing that 
greater things awaited him right here at 
home than could be found otherwhere, and, 
judging from the success which has attended 
his efforts, such a decision was a most for- 
tunate one not only for himself, but also for 
the people of this vicinity. He is the son of 
Steven D. and Lena (Crundwell) Huggins, 
well known and influential family for many 
years in this county. Grandfather Huggins 
was a Kentuckian, having come to Illinois, 
settling in this county on a farm which he 
purchased, and on which he remained dur- 
ing the rest of his life, dying here at the age 
of seventy-five years. His widow, a grand 
old lady of beautiful Christian character, is 
still living in 1908, at the advanced age of 
ninety years. She is a faithful member of 
the Presbyterian church. 

Stephen Huggins, father of the subject, 
was born in Marion county, this state, at- 
tending the public schools here, working on 
his father's farm until he became of age, 



when he was married, after which he farmed 
for a time with much success, then moved to 
Kinmundy and followed teaming, later en- 
gaging in the coal mining business in this 
vicinity, being still interested in mining. 
His residence is in Kinmundy. 

Mrs. Lena Huggins, mother of our sub- 
ject, was brought to America from England 
when a child, and her people eventually set- 
tled at Salem, this county, where her parents 
died when she was young. She attended the 
public schools in Salem, where she remained 
until the age of sixteen. After the death of 
her parents she was taken into the family of 
Wily Cunningham, who was a soldier, hav- 
ing been killed in battle during the Civil 
war. After the death of Mr. Cunningham 
his widow married again, her second hus- 
band having been Mr. Samuel Jones. They 
moved to Stevenson township, Marion 
county, where our subject's mother re- 
mained until her marriage. 

The following children have been bom to 
the subject's parents: Roy, whose date 
of birth occurred March 21, 1876, is a pain- 
ter by trade, living at Granite City, Madi- 
son county, Illinois; and Earl C., our 
subject. 

Earl C. Huggins received his early edu- 
cation in Kinmundy, graduating from the 
high school here in 1897, after making a 
brilliant record for scholarship. Following 
this he clerked in the post-office for one 
year, then he acted as clerk in a grocery 
store for a period of one year, being an effi- 
cient clerk in both, but believing that his 
true calling lay along more worthy planes, 



io 4 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



he began the study of law under Judge C. 
H. Holt, at that time a resident of Kin- 
mundy, being County Judge at the time. He 
made rapid progress in his studies and en- 
tered the Illinois Wesleyan University, Col- 
lege of Law, from which he graduated high 
in his class in 1903, having won a record as 
one of the ablest pupils that ever passed 
through this well known institution. After 
leaving the law school, Mr. Huggins formed 
a partnership with his former instructor, 
Judge Holt, the partnership being a particu- 
larly strong one, and continuing in a most 
successful manner until August, 1904, when 
the judge moved to Salem, the county seat. 
Since that time our subject has continued 
the practice of law with his office in Kin- 
mundy, but the volume of business has been 
very large for one man to handle. However, 
Mr. Huggins has ably dispensed with it all 
and is keeping his usual large number of 
clients, his business extending well over 
Marion county and invading surrounding 
counties, being general in its nature. He is 
known as a very careful and conscientious 
worker. 

Although Mr. Huggins does not aspire 
to positions of official preferment, he is at 
present serving very efficiently as city attor- 
ney of Kinmundy, being in his second term. 
In politics he is a loyal Republican, and his 
influence can always be depended upon in 
placing the best men in the county offices 
and in support of all movements looking to 
the development of the community at large, 
whether political, educational or moral. 

Fraternally our subject is affiliated with 



the Masonic Order and the Knights of Pyth- 
ias, .having filled the chairs in the latter, and 
one would judge from a study of his daily 
life that he advocates the sublime principles 
of these praiseworthy orders. 



BENNETT M. MAXEY. 

The efforts of the subject of this sketch 
have proven of the greatest value to his fel- 
low citizens as well as to himself. He has 
shaped his career along worthy lines, and 
they have been discerningly directed along 
well defined channels of endeavor. He is a 
m!an of distinct and forceful individuality, 
of marked sagacity, of undaunted enterprise, 
and in manner he is genial, courteous and 
easily approached. His career has ever been 
such as to warrant the trust and confidence 
of the business world and his activity in in- 
dustrial, commercial and financial circles, 
forms no unimportant chapter in the history 
of Clay county. 

Bennett M. Maxey, publisher of the Flora 
Journal, was born in Johnsonville, Wayne 
county, Illinois, November 25, 1856, the son 
of Joshua C. Maxey, a native of Jefferson 
county, this state, where he spent the greater 
part of his life on a farm. He was a ser- 
geant in Company I, Forty-eighth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, and took part in the bat- 
tles of Pittsburg Landing, siege of Vicks- 
burg and other noted battles. He was killed 
while in service at Louisville, Kentucky, 
near the close of the war. He was regard- 
ed by his comrades as a brave and gallant 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



105 



soldier. Bennett Maxey, the subject's pa- 
ternal grandfather, was one of the original 
settlers of Jefferson county, where he de- 
voted his life to farming, and lived to an 
advanced age. Our subject is a descendant 
of a prominent pioneer family of Jefferson 
county. The subject's mother was Elvira 
A. Galbraith, whose people were early set- 
tlers of Wayne county. She passed to her 
rest in 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Joshua C. Max- 
ey were the parents of five children, three of 
whom are living at this writing. They are 
Bennett M., Mrs. Belle Sanders, of Du 
Quoin, Illinois, and Mrs. Mattie Vickrey, 
of Missoula, Montana. 

Mrs. Maxey was educated in the common 
schools of Johnsonville, Wayne county, and 
in Xenia. Clay county. He also attended 
school in Valparaiso, Indiana, having 
graduated from that institution in 1880, 
completing the teacher's course. After leav- 
ing the university he taught school for five 
years. In 1881 he engaged in the drug 
business at Xenia which he conducted until 
1887, when he sold out and went to Cali- 
fornia, where he remained for four years, 
engaged in the real estate business and 
ranching. He returned to Clay county in 
1889 and located in Flora, where he has 
since resided. He was associated with J. 
L. Black in the real estate and insurance 
business until 1898, in which year he 
launched in the mercantile business in 
which he engaged until 1904, when he 
bought The Southern Illinois Journal, the 
leading local paper of Flora, which he has 
continued to manage up to this writing 
with increasing success. 



Mr. Maxey has other interests of various 
natures, being interested financially in sev- 
eral local enterprises. He has served as 
City Alderman, during which time he looked 
well to the city's development in every way 
possible. 

Mr. Maxey was united in marriage in 
1880, to Rosa Tully, of Xenia, a native of 
Clay county. No children have been born 
to this union. 

In his fraternal relations, our subject is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Masonic Fraternity and the 
Order of Eastern Star. Both he and Mrs. 
Maxey are members of the Methodist 
church. In politics he is a Republican and 
always loyal to its policies. His paper is an 
important factor in local political affairs. It 
is on a good footing and the plant is well 
equipped and modern, having a cylinder 
press and gas power. Mr. Maxey owns the 
building in which the plant is located, and 
he also owns his residence property. He 
deserves a great deal of credit for what he 
has accomplished, for his success in the va- 
rious lines of business he has followed has 
been won in the face of obstacles and by his 
unaided efforts. 



A. W. SONGER. 

Our subject possesses untiring energy, is 
quick of perception, forms his plans readily 
and is determined in their execution; his 
close application to business and his excel- 
lent management have brought to him the 



niOGKAPHICAL AX1) KKM IX ISCK.Vf HISTORY OF 



high degree of prosperity which is today 
his. Mr. Songer was one of the brave sons 
of the North who offered his services and 
his life, if need be, in the suppression of the 
great rebellion during the dark days of the 
sixties, which render it fitting that he should 
be given conspicuous notice in the present 
historical work. 

A. W. Songer, the well known and popu- 
lar president of the First National Bank of 
Kinmundy, Illinois, was born in Clay 
county, this state, November 2, 1832, the 
son of Frederick and Jane (Helms) Songer, 
a sterling pioneer family of that locality. 
Grandfather Songer was a native of Vir- 
ginia, a fine old southern gentleman. He 
devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, 
eventually moving to Indiana where he 
spent the balance of his days. His marriage 
occurred in Virginia and most of his family 
were born there. He was called from his 
earthly career when about sixty years old. 
He was a Lutheran in his religious affilia- 
tions. Eight children were born to this 
family, one of them having become a soldier 
in the Black Hawk war. Grandmother 
Songer, a woman of many strong attributes, 
survived her husband until she reached the 
advanced age of eighty years. Grandfather 
Helms was also a native of Virginia, who 
moved to Louisville, Kentucky, and from 
there to Tennessee, where he worked at his 
trade of blacksmith. Charles, one of his 
sons, moved to Indiana, where he spent the 
remainder of his life, having lived many 
years near Indianapolis. The balance of 
the family were early settlers in Illinois and 



from here scattered to the western states, 
principally to Nebraska and Texas. One of 
them was a soldier in the Black Hawk war 
and another fought in the Mexican war. 
The Songer family, represented by the 
great-grandmother of our subject, was 
from Germany. The great-great-grand- 
father of the subject died in Germany, his 
widow coming to America shortly after his 
death, one of her children dying on the 
ocean on the way over. She settled in 
Virginia. 

The father of the subject remained in 
Virginia until he was about twenty-two 
years old. He received only such education 
as the public schools afforded at that early 
day. However, he became a well informed 
man. He was a carpenter and builder of 
considerable note. He lived for some time 
in Indiana, where he was married, later 
moving to Illinois about 1821, settling in 
Clay county, where he remained until 1835, 
when he moved to Marion county, entering 
about two hundred acres of land from the 
government which he transformed into a 
fine farm through his habits of industry and 
skill as an agriculturist, living on this until 
1872, in which year he moved to Kinmundy, 
where he died at the age of seventy-three 
years, owning an excellent farm which he 
left as an estate. He became a man of 
considerable influence in his community. 
He was an active and loyal member of the 
Methodist church as was also his wife. 
He was a Justice of the Peace for a num- 
ber of years. For a time he owned and 
successfully operated a saw and grist mill. 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



There were ten children in this family, 
seven of whom lived to maturity. A brother 
of our subject, Samuel T., was a soldier in 
the Civil war, a member of Company G, 
Twenty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
having served for three years, engaging in 
all the campaigns and battles of his regi- 
ment up to the date of his discharge which 
was at the termination of his enlistment. 
He is living in 1908 and is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, in which he 
takes a just pride. William F., brother of 
the subject, was also a soldier, having per- 
formed conspicuous service in the Mexican 
war. He was at one time State Representa- 
tive in Oregon, in which state he still re- 
sides as also does Samuel T., another 
brother of the subject, living at Ashland. 

A. W. Songer, our subject, received his 
early education in the common schools of 
Illinois. Being a diligent student and am- 
bitious from the start he has become well 
educated. He remained on the home farm 
assisting his father with the work about the 
place during the months that he was not in 
school until he was twenty-one years old. 
Learning the carpenter's trade, he followed 
this for three years, then in 1861, when he 
felt his patriotic zeal inspired as the result 
of our national integrity being at stake 
when the fierce fires of rebellion were rag- 
ing in the Southland, he enlisted in Company 
G, Twenty-first Illinois Volunteer Regi- 
ment, having been mustered in as second 
lieutenant and was soon promoted to first 
lieutenant and consequently served as an 
officer of that regiment for four years and 



five days when he was honorably discharged 
at the close of the war in 1865, after having 
taking a conspicuous part in the follow- 
ing engagements: Perryville, Kentucky; 
Stone River, Tennessee; Chickamaugua, 
having been captured at this battle and was 
taken to Libby prison, where he remained 
three months, when he was sent to prison 
at Macon, Georgia, later to Charleston, 
South Carolina, thence to Columbia, South 
Carolina, then to Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina, where he was exchanged, after having 
been a prisoner seventeen months and eight 
days, and thirty days thereafter he was mus- 
tered out of the service at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. 

After the war Mr. Songer returned to his 
home in Illinois and worked at his trade for 
a time. He then came to Kinmundy and 
entered into the milling business in which he 
continued with the most gratifying results 
until 1907, becoming known throughout the 
locality as one of the leading men in this 
line of business. He sold his mill and de- 
voted his attention to the banking business, 
in which he has been eminently successful. 
He had been connected with the State Bank 
of Kinmundy for some time, becoming 
president of the same. It was consolidated 
with the First National Bank, becoming the 
First National on August 26, 1906, the date 
of the consolidation, since which time Mr. 
Songer has been president. This is one of 
the solidest and most popular institutions 
of its kind in this part of the state and its 
prestige was greatly strengthened when Mr. 
Songer became its head for the public at 



108 



I'.HHIKAl'IIICAL AM) RKMIXISCF.XT HISTORY OF 



once realized that their funds would be en- 
tirely safe in his hands owing to his con- 
servatism, coupled with his peculiar business 
sagacity, and since then the business of the 
First National has grown steadily. 

The domestic life of our subject dates 
from 1868, when he was united in marriage 
with Margaret C. Nelm, of Cairo, Illinois, 
the daughter of Norflett and Lydia (Dick- 
ens) Nelm. Her paternal ancestor, Dick- 
ens, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
which rendered the wife of our subject 
eligible to the Order of Sons and Daughters 
of the American Revolution. The grand- 
father of the subject's wife was a Bap- 
tist minister. Her father was a soldier in 
the Black Hawk war. One of her brothers, 
N. B. Nelm, was a soldier in the Civil war, 
having served until the close of the war. 

Three children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife as follows: Mary E., born 
December 25, 1871, is the wife of J. T. 
Brown, of Marion county; Frederick is 
married and living in Kinmundy. Neither 
of them have children of their own. The 
third child of the subject and wife died in 
infancy. 

Mrs. Songer was called to her rest Sep- 
tember 9, 1907, after a most happy and har- 
monious married life and one that was 
beautified by Christian character and many 
kind and charitable deeds which made her 
beloved by all who knew her. She was a 
loyal member of the Methodist church, and 
a member of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, of which order Mary E. 
(Songer) Brown was also a member. 



Mr. Songer, as might be expected, is a 
consistent member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, Post 255, known as the Hix 
Post. He is now commander of the same. 
In politics he is a Republican and is well 
grounded in his political beliefs, his influ- 
ence always being felt for the good of his 
party and in support of the best men pos- 
sible for local offices. He has never aspired 
to positions of trust and emolument at the 
hands of his fellow voters. However, he has 
been Alderman of the city of Kinmundy 
several times. His efforts have proven of 
the greatest benefit to his fellow men of 
Marion county as well as to himself. 



CHRISTIAN HASLER. 

It is a well authenticated fact that suc- 
cess comes not as the caprice of chance, but 
as the legitimate result of well applied en- 
ergy, unflagging determination and perse- 
verance in a course of action once decided 
upon by the individual. Only those who 
diligently seek the goddess Fortuna, find 
her she never was known to smile upon 
the idler and the dreamer. The subject of 
this sketch clearly understood this fact early 
in life when he was casting about for a le- 
gitimate and promising line to follow, and 
in tracing his life history it is plainly seen 
that the prosperity he enjoys has been won 
by commendable qualities, and it is also his 
personal worth which has gained for him 
the good standing among his fellow citizens 
of Richland countv. 



HIGHLAND. CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



109 



Christian Hasler, the well known harness 
and saddle manufacturer, and dealer in 
hides, fertilizers, etc., of Olney, Illinois, is a 
citizen of the United States by adoption 
only, being one of that thrifty class from 
the little Republic of Switzerland, who has 
done so much toward promoting our insti- 
tutions, for he was born in the Canton of 
Berne, September 20, 1845, the son of Peter 
and Margaret (Von Alman) Hasler, also 
natives of that place. The father was a 
small farmer and gardener and died when 
the subject was a child. The Von Almans 
were also farmers. The mother came to 
the United States and brought a family of 
five children with her, having come direct 
to Olney, Illinois, in 1857. She passed to 
her rest here in 1865. Our subject was 
twelve years old when he came to Olney. 
He worked on a farm in the summer and 
attended school in the winter. He had lim- 
ited opportunities to attend school, but he 
gained a fairly good foundation for an edu- 
cation which he has since added to by home 
study and contact with the business world. 

Mr. Hasler early decided to learn the har- 
ness business and in the fall of 1863 he was 
apprenticed to a harness maker at Clare-* 
mont, where he worked faithfully until the 
spring of 1865, when he felt it his duty to 
no longer repress the feeling that he should 
stand by the Union in its hour of sore trial, 
consequently he enlisted in Company E, One 
Hundred and Fifty-fifth Regiment Illinois 
Volunteers, and served until the close of the 
war in a most gallant manner, having been 
mustered out at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 
in September, 1865. He did duty at Nash- 



ville, Tullahoma, and Murfreeboro, having 
been on guard duty the major part of the 
time on the railroads. 

After the war Mr. Hasler returned to 
Claremcnt township, and finished learning 
his trade, and in 1867, he opened a harness 
shop in Olney, which he has conducted con- 
tinuously since that time. It is among the 
oldest established businesses in Olney, and 
the oldest in this line in the county. It has 
become generally known throughout the lo- 
cality and his trade has been lively from 
the first, numbering his customers by the 
hundreds all over the county. He has not 
only made a comfortable living from his 
shop from year to year, but has been en- 
abled to lay by a competency for his old age. 

Mr. Hasler was united in marriage in 
1869 to Susan Bohren. a native of Berne, 
Switzerland, who came to the United States 
with her father, Christian Bohren, when six 
years old. locating in Olney. Her father 
was a carpenter and died here. Her mother 
died in Switzerland and Mr. Bohren remar- 
ried in the United States. Xine children 
have been born to the subject and wfe, three 
of whom died in infancy. Those living are : 
Sue ; Robert, who is in the harness business 
in Vandalia ; Laura, the wife of E. S. Hoog, 
who resides in Chicago; Rosilla; Ellen is 
the wife of J. W. Mayhood, of Chicago: 
Charles Edward. 

Mr. Hasler always handles a good grade 
of material and the work he turns out is high- 
class. He has a carefully selected stock and 
never loses a customer as a result of handling 
inferior goods or unfair treatment. 

In politics our subject is a Bryan Demo- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



crat. He served as Supervisor on the County 
Beard for two terms, from the third ward, 
which is strongly Republican ; this fact shows 
that the subject is popular and well liked in 
his own neghborhood. He was the only Dem- 
ocrat ever elected from that ward to that po- 
sition. In his fraternal relations he is a 
member of the Masonic Blue Lodge and 
Chapter, also the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He and his wife are members 
of the German Reformed church and no 
members of that congregation stand higher 
in general favor than they, for they are re- 
garded as scrupulously honest, kind and wor- 
thy citizens in every respect, numbering their 
friends by the score. 



JAMES HENRY KIMBERLIN. 

Upon the roll of representative citizens 
and prominent and influential business men 
of Marion county consistently appears the 
name which initiates this paragraph. He 
has been a resident of Salem for many years, 
during which time he has gradually won his 
way into the affections of the people, for 
he possesses those sterling qualities of char- 
acter which commend themselves to persons 
of intelligence and the highest morality, so 
it is no cause for wonder that he has 
achieved so high a position in the general 
estimation of all who have come in touch 
with him. For many years he was a pro- 
fessional man, gaining wide popularity in 
this manner, but he is now rendering effici- 
ent service at the Salem post-office. 



James Henry Kimberlin was born in 
Richland county, Illinois, January 18, 1860, 
the son of W. O. Kimberlin, a native of In- 
diana, having been born February 2. 1826, 
near Scottsburg, Scott county. He left In- 
diana and came to Richland county, Illinois, 
in 1856, settling on a farm where he be- 
came known as one of the progressive agri- 
culturists of that community and made a 
comfortable living until the year 1884, 
when he was called from his earthly labors 
by the "grim reaper". His widow, who was 
Hannah E. Reed, born near Salem, Wash- 
ington county, Indiana, October 31, 1825, 
a woman of many praiseworthy traits, is 
living on the old homestead there at this 
writing (1908), being eighty-three years 
old, yet able to do her own house work. 
Her long life has been one of self-sacrifice 
for the good of her family and others so that 
now in her serene old age she can look back 
over the years without cause for regret. The 
father of our subject was a soldier in the 
Union ranks during the great Civil war, 
having been a member of Company F, 
Forty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
was with Grant at Vicksburg and was in 
many other important battles. He was in 
the hospital service for some time, also did 
general duty at New Orleans, having re- 
mained in the service up to January 12, 
1866, when he was discharged at Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana, and arrived home Febru- 
ary 2d, following which was his fortieth 
birthday. He had two brothers killed in 
battle during this war. Their names were 
Daniel and Jacob. Another brother, Isaac 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



M., went through the service in the Seventh 
and Eleventh Missouri Volunteer Infantry, 
having been a member of Company G. Dr. 
H. L. Kimberlin, another brother of the 
subject's father, who is now living at 
Mitchell, Indiana, was a Government Re- 
porter on Governor Morton's staff. 

The paternal grandfather of the subject 
was Jacob Kimberlin, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, who came to Indiana when a young 
man. He devoted his life to farming and 
died about 1871. He was well known about 
Greenfield, where he operated a foil gate, 
subsequent to the war. The subject's ma- 
ternal grandfather was Joseph Reed, of 
Scotch-English ancestry. 

Eight children were born to the parents 
of the subject, only two of whom are now 
living. George W., the subject's only living 
brother, is living at Noble, Richland county, 
with his mother on the old farm. Among 
the papers held by the Kimberlins is the 
original land grant by the government for 
their old homestead made to Joseph Reed 
and signed by President Franklin Pierce. 

James Henry Kimberlin, our subject, 
spent his boyhood on the parental farm in 
Richland county where he performed his 
part of the work about the place from year 
to year after he reached the age when he 
could be of valuable service to his father. 
He attended the neighboring schools in the 
meantime where he applied himself in a 
manner which insured a good education. 
After leaving school and working at vari- 
ous minor employments for several years 
he finally accepted a position as commercial 



traveler which he followed with marked 
success for three and one-half years, giving 
entire satisfaction to his employers, when, 
much to their regret he was compelled to 
tender his resignation on account of tem- 
porary ill health. After this our subject 
took up the study of ophthalmology, which 
he decided should be his life work, conse- 
quently he made rapid progress in this work, 
having attended the Northern Illinois Col- 
lege of Ophthalmology at Chicago, from 
which institution he graduated with high 
honors with the degree of Fellow of Optics 
in 1892. He at once began practice and 
his success was instantaneous, having prac- 
ticed at Olney, Shelbyville and Salem, hav- 
ing established his business in the last named 
city in 1900, since which time he has been a 
resident of this city. His work in this line 
was always considered first class and he 
achieved wide popularity in the same. 

Mr. Kimberlin was, however, induced to 
give up his profession to become deputy 
post-master of this city, which position he is 
filling to the entire satisfaction of all con- 
cerned, showing that he has rare executive 
as well professional ability. 

Mr. Kimberlin was united in marriage to 
Eva Myers, November 19, 1903, the daugh- 
ter of the late Theodore Myers, of luka, Illi- 
nois, and the accomplished representative of 
a well known family. One child, a bright 
and interesting lad, bearing the name of 
James Henry Kimberlin, Jr., was born to 
the subject and wife May 4, 1905. 

Mrs. Kimberlin is one of a family of five 
children. One child died after reaching ma- 



lilOCKAPIIlCAL AND RK.M IXISCKXT HISTORY OK 



turity. Theodore Myers was a farmer, and 
was a soldier in the Civil war. 

In his political affiliations our subject is a 
strong Republican, and he is a well informed 
man on political and all current questions. 
He is a Protestant in his religious belief. He 
is recognized as a man of sterling integrity 
and of strong convictions as to all matters 
affecting the best interests of the community 
and is always found on the right side of 
every moral issue. 



WILLIAM GILLHAM WILSON. 

The subject of this sketch occupies today 
a prominent position in the professional 
world of Marion and adjoining counties and 
he deserves all the more credit for this from 
the fact that he started out in life practically 
empty handed, therefore has been the archi - 
tect of his own fortunes, relying almost sole- 
ly upon his own resources for the start 
which lie had and for the success which he 
has achieved. In an analyzation of his char- 
acter we find many elements worthy of com- 
mendation and emulation. He did not seek 
for fortune's favors, but set out to win them 
by honest work, and the success which ever 
crowns earnest, honest toil is today his, and 
he easily stands in the front rank of attor- 
neys in this locality, which has long been 
noted for its high legal talent, and while yet 
a young man, vigorous and in the zenith of 
his mental and physical powers, he is rap- 
idly winning his way to a position of much 
credit and significance in the great common- 
wealth which he can claim as his native land , 



and while winning his way gradually up 
the steeps to individual success he has not 
neglected his duties to his fellow citizens, 
but has benefited very materially the com- 
munity is which he lives in many ways, 
thereby winning and retaining the well mer- 
ited esteem of all classes. 

William G. Wilson was born in Madison 
county, Illinois, in 1872, the son of John C. 
and Elizabeth (Gillham) Wilson. The Wil- 
son family has long been prominent and in- 
fluential in that part of the state. Grand- 
father John Wilson was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, but came to Pike county, Ohio, set- 
tling on a farm, later coming to Marion 
county, Illinois, in 1846, taking up one thou- 
sand and eight hundred acres of land on the 
prairie, which he developed until it became 
very valuable, still holding it at the time of 
his death, which occurred when he had 
reached the advanced age of eighty-nine. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. John Wilson were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. The 
latter is supposed to have come from Ken- 
tucky. They were the parents of a large 
family. Mr. Wilson was Justice of the 
Peace for some time. 

John C. Wilson, father of the subject, was 
born in Pike county, Ohio, and there re- 
ceived his early education in a log school- 
house of pioneer days. Leaving the Buck- 
eye state he came to Illinois, settling in Ma- 
rion county in 1852, entering land from the 
government. He had about seven hundred 
acres of good prairie land, which he devel- 
oped into a valuable farm and which is now 
known as the John C. Wilson farm. Here 
our subject's father lived until his death, 



LIBRARY 
Of THE 

UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



which occurred at the age of seventy-seven 
years. He was a man of many sterling traits 
of character and bore an excellent reputa- 
tion. Both he and his faithful life companion 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Grandfather Gillham came from the At- 
lantic coast country and settled in Madison 
county, Illinois, during the earliest epoch of 
the pioneer days, before the state was ad- 
mitted to the Union, and when wild beasts 
and red men roamed the hills and prairies. 
He remained there until his death. In that 
locality the subject's mother was reared and 
was married there in the early sixties. She 
came to Marion county. The father was 
twice married, the name of his first wife 
being Hults. Eight children were born to 
this union. She passed to her rest in the 
fifties. The subject's mother was John C. 
Wilson's second wife, who bore him seven 
children, four of whom lived to maturity. 
The mother is living in 1908, at the age of 
seventy-four years. She is a woman of many 
fine personal traits and beautiful Christian 
character. 

William G. Wilson, our subject, first at- 
tended the district schools in Marion coun- 
ty, working on his father's farm in the mean- 
time. Being ambitious and a diligent stu- 
dent, he received a good common school ed- 
ucation. Leaving the public schools when 
nineteen years old he entered Austin College 
at Effingham, Illinois, where he made a bril- 
liant record for scholarship, standing high 
in his class. 

After leaving school he taught school for 



five years, devoting five years also to teach- 
ing in Champaign county, this state, where 
he became widely known as an able instruc- 
tor and where his services were in great de- 
mand. But, believing that his true life work 
lay along other channels, he began the study 
of law with Schaefer & Rhodes, of Cham- 
paign, under whose instruction he made 
rapid progress. He was then admitted to 
practice at Mt. Vernon, Illinois. Mr. Wil- 
son then began practice at Kinmundy, be- 
ing remarkably successful from the first, and 
it was plain to be seen that an attorney of 
unusual sagacity and innate ability had risen 
to command the attention of that part of the 
state. He has remained in practice at this 
place since that time with the most gratify- 
ing results, having frequently been called to 
other localities on important cases. He is 
cool and calculating, never erring in his le- 
gal proceedings, whether handling a civil or 
criminal suit, and he stands high in the esti- 
mation not only of the public but the legal 
profession throughout this part of Illinois. 

Mr. Wilson was happily married April 7, 
1896, to Mollie Poole, a native of this 
county and the representative of a prominent 
and influential family, being the daughter of 
Abraham and Martha (Malone) Poole. Mr. 
Poole was born and reared in Marion coun- 
ty. He was a soldier in the Civil war, being 
a member of the One Hundred and Eleventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, receiving an 
honorable discharge after serving for three 
years. 

Four bright and interesting children have 
been born to our subject and wife as fol- 



IHOCUAPIIICAL AND RKM 1 X ISCK.XT HISTORY OF 



lows : Basil, born August 7, 1897, who is at- 
tending the public schools in 1908; Russell 
was born October 22, 1899; Ruth was born 
June 14, 1904; Byron first saw the light 
January u, 1906. 

The beautiful and nicely furnished 
home of the subject is presided over with 
rare grace and dignity by Mrs. Wilson, a 
woman of many commendable attributes, 
who delights in giving her children every 
care and attention. 

Fraternally our subject is affiliated with 
the Masonic Order and the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, having passed through 
the chairs of the latter lodge. In politics he 
is a loyal Republican, and he at one time per- 
formed the duties of Police Magistrate, with 
much credit to himself and with much satis- 
faction to all concerned. He was also Tax 
Collector. 

Mr. Wilson belongs to the class of citi- 
zens whose lives do not show any meteoric 
effects, but who by their support of the mor- 
al, political and social status for the general 
good, promote the real welfare of their re- 
spective communities and are therefore de- 
serving of honorable mention on the pages 
of history. 



CALEB F. WIELAND. 

The prominence of the subject of this 
sketch in connection with the industrial and 
civic affairs of Richland county is such that 
he is recognized as one of the leading busi- 
ness men and influential citizens of this lo- 



cality, being identified with enterprises of 
wide scope and importance, and being 
known as a progressive and public spirited 
citizen. The apparent ease with which he 
has mounted to his present commanding po- 
sition in the commercial world, marks him 
as the possessor of talents beyond the ma- 
jority of his brethren, and, being a close and 
critical student of men and affairs, he ex- 
periences no difficulty in sustaining the high 
reputation which his business talents and 
marked success have earned for him. 

Caleb F. Wieland, a member of the hard- 
ware firm of Jolly, Wieland & Richardson, 
one of the best known and extensive firms 
of this nature in Southern Illinois, was born 
in Muscatine, Iowa, June 25, 1858, the son 
of Frederick and Mary (Eberhart) Wie- 
land, natives of Canton Berne, Switzerland, 
where they were reared and married, soon 
afterward coming to the United States, lo- 
cating in Muscatine. The subject's father 
worked there for many years, then moved 
to Jefferson City, Missouri. He enlisted in 
a Missouri regiment in the Union army, and 
served for more than three years until the 
close of the war. He saw much active ser- 
vice and was in numerous engagements, but 
was not wounded. After the war he re- 
turned to Jefferson City, Missouri, and in 
1866, came to Olney, Illinois, where he lived 
until his death in 1873, at the age of fifty 
years. His wife survived him several years, 
dying in 1896, at the age of sixty-five. They 
were people of much sterling worth and 
highly honored wherever they lived. They 
were the parents of six children, four of 



RICHLAN'D, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



whom grew to maturity, the subject being 
the oldest in order of birth. 

Caleb F. Wieland was a boy when he 
came to Olney, where he was reared and 
where he received a limited education, hav- 
ing been obliged to go to work when young 
and help support the family. He was am- 
bitious and fought against every obstacle 
and early in life decided to take up the 
hardware business, consequently when sev- 
enteen years old he entered the hardware 
store of William Rhode as clerk in the same 
building where he is now interested, and he 
has continued in this line ever since at the 
same location, having been with different 
firms until the present firm was organized 
in 1904, when he became a partner. They 
carry a stock of about twenty thousand dol- 
lars, consisting of all kinds of hardware, 
carefully selected and they also do an exten- 
sive plumbing, heating, tinware and galvan- 
ized iron work, their trade extending to all 
parts of the county and is always on the in- 
crease, having been built up to its present 
large proportions very largely through the 
efforts of our subject. The firm occupies 
a substantial and convenient building twen- 
ty-two by one hundred and eighty-five feet, 
three stories in height. The entire building 
is occupied. It is one of the largest and 
most successful lines of business in the 
county. 

Mr. Wieland was united in mar- 
riage in 1888 to Lulu St. John, a native 
of Olney, who was born, reared and married 
in the same house, the affable and genial 
daughter of M. M. and Mira Louise 



(Cralle) St. John, who were among the pio- 
neers of Richland county, and people of 
many praiseworthy traits. 

Five children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife, namely: Esther Alean, Ber- 
nice May, Gerald Hazen, Mary Louise, 
Frank Clifford, all bright and interesting 
with promise of successful futures. 

In politics Mr. Wieland is a loyal Re- 
publican. He very ably and creditably 
served as Alderman for one term of two 
years, from the second ward. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wieland have earned and 
occupy a position of high regard in their 
community, being numbered among the 
most prominent citizens of Olney and whose 
efforts are always directed toward the moral, 
social and material uplifting of society 



GEORGE COX. 

In the field of political life, teaching and 
the railroad business in Marion county, Illi- 
nois, the subject of this sketch has won dis- 
tinction, and today is numbered among the 
leading, influential and honored citizens of 
Salem. He has figured prominently in pub- 
lic affairs, ever lending his influence in the 
development of all worthy causes looking to 
the development of the locality at large, be- 
ing an advocate of progressive measures. 
He is now filling the position of Deputy 
County Clerk and the promptness and 
fidelity with which he discharges his duties 
have won for him the favorable criticism of 



u6 



BIOCK. \P1IIC.\L AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



leading representatives of both political 
parties. 

George Cox was born in Parke county, 
Indiana, July n, 1848, and came to luka, 
Illinois, September 4, 1868. His father was 
Alfred Cox, a native of Ohio, who migrated 
to Indiana when a very small boy. Joshua 
Cox, grandfather of George Cox, was a na- 
tive of Hamilton county, Ohio, who mi- 
grated to Indiana at a very early date and 
entered land when the United States land 
office was at Vincennes, he being compelled 
to go to Vincennes to make his payments, 
making the trip on horseback, and it was his 
custom to camp and hunt on the way. 
Grandfather Cox was a farmer -of great 
ability for those early times. His widow 
survived him several years. George W. 
Overpeck, grandfather of the subject on 
his mother's side, was born in Pennsylvania. 
His father and mother having died in early 
life he drifted to Hamilton county, Ohio, 
and died in the spring of 1867, having been 
survived several years by his widow. They 
spent their lives on a farm. 

The father of the subject is now a resi- 
dent of Illinois and makes his home among 
his children here and at Shattuc, this state. 
The mother of the subject was known in her 
maidenhood as Mary Overpeck, a native of 
Ohio. She passed to her rest in April, 1902, 
at Shattuc, Illinois, at the home of her 
daughter. Both the father and the mother 
of our subject were the oldest representa- 
tives of their respective families. Following 
children were born to them, seven of whom 
are living at this writing, 1908, named in 



order of birth as follows : George, our sub- 
ject; Mary Jane, wife of P. B. Anderson, 
of Shattuc, Illinois ; Sally Ann, wife of H. 
C. Brown, of Vandalia, Illinois; John, of 
Clinton county, near Huey, Illinois; 
Amanda, deceased ; Perry, of luka township, 
this county; Warner, of Decatur, Illinois; 
Eva, deceased; Julia is the wife of Milton 
Andrews, of Ouray, Colorado; Libby is de- 
ceased as are also the last two children born 
to this couple. 

George Cox was reared on the parental 
farm in Parke county, Indiana, and attended 
the common schools there, also the graded 
schools by working mornings and evenings 
to pay his tuition, as his parents were poor 
and could not defray the expenses of an edu- 
cation for our subject, but he was possessed 
of an indomitable will and forged ahead 
despite obstacles winning definite success in 
after life as a result of his energy and per- 
sistency. After completing the course of 
study laid down in the graded schools he at- 
tended school at Rockville for a time, after 
which he taught school with great success 
for several years, becoming known as one 
of the able educators of the county and his 
services were in great demand. He con- 
tinued teaching until his health failed. He 
then went to railroading, locating in luka 
September 4, 1868, as indicated before. He 
attended school that winter at Xenia, Illi- 
nois, passing the examination for teacher's 
license. He then took a course in the Wa- 
bash Commercial College at Vincennes, In- 
diana, after which he returned to railroading 
first as brakeman, then a freight conductor, 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



117 



later as passenger conductor on the old Ohio 
& Mississippi Railroad, now the Baltimore 
& Ohio, Southwestern Railroad. During 
all these years of railroad service he would 
at times return to teaching school in both 
Indiana and Illinois. In 1880 our subject 
moved on a farm in luka township and for 
twenty-one consecutive years taught school 
during the winter months, farming the re- 
mainder of the year. He made a success of 
whatever he undertook whether it was farm- 
ing, teaching or railroading. In the latter 
he won the confidence of his employers who 
regarded him as one of their most valuable 
employes. 

In April, 1908, Mr. Cox became Deputy 
County Clerk, which position he is holding 
with much credit to his innate ability and 
to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. 

When teaching school our subject was 
principal of the luka schools. He was of- 
fered many important positions as a teacher 
but declined as he desired to teach near 
home and live at home. 

Mr. Cox was united in marriage in 1879 
to Mary E. Young, the talented and accom- 
plished daughter of W. J. Young, of luka 
township, one of the pioneers of Marion 
county. Mr. Young was an influential citi- 
zen and served as a lieutenant during the 
Civil war. 

One child was born to the subject and 
wife who died in infancy. 

Mr. Cox still owns a valuable farm of 
eighty acres in which he takes a great inter- 
est, having improved it up to a high stand- 
ard of Marion county's valuable farms, it 



ranking with the best of them. It is located 
four and one-half miles southeast of luka. 
An excellent residence and several substan- 
tial out buildings stand on the place. 

Mr. Cox has been a candidate for County 
Superintendent of Schools at different times 
but was defeated by a few votes. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. In his fraternal re- 
lations he is affiliated with the Masons at 
luka and is an honorary member of the 
Modern Woodmen. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Cox are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church and both belong to the Eastern 
Star. 



THOMAS J. CLARK. 

The subject of this biographical review 
is eminently deserving of mention in a com- 
pilation as is the nature of this one, owing 
to the fact that his has been an active life, 
fruitful of good results and among his 
friends and acquaintances he has ever held 
an honorable position. 

Thomas J. Clark, publisher of The Clay 
County Democrat and one of the men of 
influence in this part of the great Prairie 
state, was born in Hancock county, Indiana, 
August 4, 1853, the son of Aruna Clark, 
who was a native of Sevier county, Tennes- 
see, and who came to Indiana when twenty 
years old, settling in Rush county. He was 
a carpenter and a minister, thus emulating 
the life of the lowly Nazarene. He removed 
to Shelby county, Illinois, in 1860, and in 
1865 moved to Effingham county, this state, 



n8 



I'.IOCRAl'UICAI. AND RKMIMSCKXT HISTORY OF 



where he resided until his death in March, 
1884. The Clark family originated in Ten- 
nessee. The subject's mother, who died in 
1882, was Charlotte Furman. Her mother 
was a native of Scotland and her father of 
Pennsylvania, of German descent. Mr. and 
Mrs. Aruna Clark were the parents of six 
children, two of whom died in infancy. 
They are, Jonathan E., of Chattanooga, 
Tennessee; Sarah Arnold, of Tucumcari, 
New Mexico; Mrs. Jennie Wood, of Beech- 
er City, Illinois; Thomas J., the subject. 

Thomas J. Clark spent his early life in 
Efnngham county, this state, receiving a 
limited education in the country schools 
there, and later attended the city schools of 
Effingham. After his school days he learned 
the blacksmith trade at which he worked 
for eight years. He then clerked in a gen- 
eral store for two or three years, after which 
he went to railroading, which he followed 
up to February, 1908, having given his em- 
ployers entire satisfaction in that line of 
work. In July, 1908, Mr. Clark bought 
the Clay County Democrat, which he now 
conducts in a manner that shows him to be 
a moulder of public opinion, his paper being 
a power for good in Clay county. He has 
a good plant, well equipped and his paper 
is well edited and the mechanical appearance 
of each issue shows that this part of the 
work is well looked after. Since assuming 
charge of the plant the circulation of The 
Democrat has increased as well as has the 
advertising. 

Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Mary 
Lilley, December 20, 1876. She was born 



and reared in Fayette county, Illinois, and to 
this union four children have been born; 
William Edwin, who is married and is living 
at Clarkson, Washington; Mrs. Gertrude 
Roseberry, of Pana, Illinois; Mrs. Caroline 
Myers, of East St. Louis; Don, a linotype 
operator, living in East St. Louis. 

Our subject served one term as school di- 
rector at Beecher City, Illinois, and was 
City Clerk of Flora, for a part of one term, 
having been appointed to fill a vacancy. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Clark be- 
longs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Modern Woodmen. In politics he is a loyal 
Democrat. He is thoroughly interested in 
the affairs of his party and does what he 
can in furthering the policies of the same. 



CHARLES H. WEST. 

The early pioneers of Marion county, 
Illinois, have about all "crossed the great 
divide." Year by year their numbers have 
continued to diminish, until of the hundreds 
who settled here in the twenties and thirties 
only a few of them remain. There are, how- 
ever, many men and women now living in 
the county, who, though coming here in 
what might be properly termed the second 
period after the pioneers, have borne well 
their part in making this a prosperous re- 
gion. They are no less worthy of praise in 
the part they bore in the labors and priva- 
tions of this early period than are their par- 



ot 'U.INOIS. 




WEST HOME. 
Kinmundy, Illinois. 




C. H. WEST. 



LWMY 
Of THP 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



ents. Among these is the subject of this 
sketch, who has spent the major part of his 
mature years in the county where he has 
become widely known and where his labors 
have benefited alike himself and the commu- 
nity at large. 

Charles H. West was born in Delaware 
county, Indiana, October 27, 1845, the son 
of George and Elizabeth (Brammer) West. 

The father of the subject left Pennsyl- 
vania when a young man, and settled in 
Delaware county, Indiana, and came to Illi- 
nois in 1865, in Jo Daviess county and in 
1869 came to Marion county where he re- 
mained the balance of his life, having 
reached the advanced age of eighty-three 
years, after a life of hard work in agri- 
cultural pursuits. The subject's mother, a 
woman of many fine qualities and a worthy 
companion of her noble husband, lived to 
be seventy-three years old, and was in her 
religious belief a member of the old school 
Baptists. There were seven children in this 
family, six living to maturity. Samuel, the 
oldest brother of the subject, was a soldier 
from Indiana in the Union lines and was 
killed at Marietta, Georgia, where he was 
buried. A brother of the father of our sub- 
ject had a son, John T. West, who was also 
a soldier in the Civil war, having been in 
a Pennsylvania regiment. 

Charles H. West, our subject, came with 
his father to Marion county in 1869. He 
attended the public schools in Delaware 
county, Indiana, where he worked on his 
father's farm during the summer season, 



having remained a member of the family 
circle until he was thirty-one years of age. 
He then leased his father's farm in this 
county for a number of years, and after his 
father returned to Illinois he purchased 
the same which he has managed with 
the greatest success for a period of twenty- 
five years, developing it into one of the lead- 
ing farms of the community and gathering 
from its fertile fields from year to year 
bounteous harvests. 

Mr. West owns at this writing, 1908, 
twelve and one-half acres in Kinmundy in 
one section of the city and also a ten-acre 
orchard in another section of the city, also 
forty acres one-half mile east of the town, 
containing a fine orchard, all well located 
and good land. He also has excellent prop- 
erty in the central part of the town, and 
fifty acres of horticultural land, which is 
very valuable owing to the large and choice 
varieties of trees on it. This property 
claims much of his attention since Mr. West 
delights in horticultural work, being well 
versed in its various phases. He owns a 
modern, large, nicely furnished and alto- 
gether one of the most desirable residences 
in Kinmundy or vicinity. All this he has 
made himself practically unaided as a result 
of his genuine business sagacity, persistency 
and honesty. 

Mr. West was united in marriage in 1877 
to Rose N. Dillon, a native of Marion 
county, whose father was from Kentucky ; 
her mother's people being from Ohio. 
Three children have been born to this union, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



named in order of birth as follows : Harry 
T., who was born in 1878, is married and 
has two children ; Maud L. is the wife of 
A. G. Porter and the mother of one child; 
the third child died in infancy. 

Mr. West is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias and their auxiliaries. In politics he 
is a Republican and is an Alderman in the 
City Council of Kinmundy, which position 
he fills with great credit. 

In township and county affairs Mr. West 
takes an active interest and when his judg- 
ment approves of any measure that is ad- 
vanced he is not hesitant in giving his ap- 
proval and active aid. In many ways he has 
given his time and service for the general 
good. He has a wide acquaintance and the 
favorable judgment the public passed upon 
him in the early days of his residence here 
has been in no degree set aside or modified 
as the years have gone by. 



WILBUR ADINO GOODENOUGH. 

In the history of Clay county, as applying 
to the milling industry, the name of Wilbur 
A. Goodenough occupies a conspicuous 
place, for through a number of years he has 
been one of the representative lumber deal- 
ers in this locality, progressive, enterprising 
and persevering. Such qualities always win 
success, sooner or later, and to the subject 
they have brought a satisfactory reward for 
his well directed efforts, and while he has 



benefited himself and community in a mate- 
rial way, he has also been an influential fac- 
tor in the educational, political and moral 
uplift of the community favored by his resi- 
dence. 

Wilbur Adino Goodenough was born in 
Jefferson county, New York, May 26, 1857, 
the son of Morris M. Goodenough, who was 
a native of Northern New York. Adino 
Goodenough, the great-grandfather of the 
subject, was a native of Scotland, who came 
to America with Lord Howe. He passed 
the winter with Washington at Valley 
Forge as one of his captains, having enlist- 
ed three times in the Revolutionary war. 
The third time he walked from Vermont to 
Boston to enlist. He spent his last days at 
Watertown, Jefferson county. New York, 
dying there in his eighty-seventh year. Most 
of his life while in America, was spent in 
Vermont. The subject's grandfather, John 
Banister Goodenough, a native of New 
York, died in 1864, at the age of eighty-two 
years. He devoted his life to farming. 
The subject's father was also a farmer, and, 
like his ancestors, was a man of influence 
in his community. He died at the age of 
seventy-two years in Jefferson county, New 
York, in 1899. 

The mother of the subject was Caroline 
Griswold, also a native of northern New 
York, where she lived all her life and where 
she ended her earthly labors in 1895, at the 
age of sixty-two years. Twelve children 
were born to the subject's parents, eight of 
wh<;m are living, in 1908, namely: Charles, 
Estella, Wilbur, Albert, Caroline, Ward, 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



Eaton, Morris, Emma, Belle, Mollie and 
Grace. 

Mr. Goodenough spent his boyhood days 
in Watertown, New York, where he attend- 
ed school and received a good education. 
He went from there to Copenhagen, New 
York, where he learned the trade of miller, 
after which he went to Ogdensburg, that 
state, where he worked for fifteen years 
with much success attending his efforts. In 
1894 he came to Louisville and bought the 
Louisville Roller Mills, which burned down 
October 25, 1897. The plant was rebuilt 
the fall of 1898. His brother, Albert, has 
been associated with him in all his business. 
They have an extensive trade and carry on 
a growing industry, their customers coming 
from all parts of this locality, both in the 
flour and lumber business. 

Mr. Goodenough was united in marriage 
February 22, 1883, to Luella Stanford, of 
Lowville, Lewis county, New York, the rep- 
resentative of a well known family there, 
and to this union two children have been 
born: Luella, born April 15, 1894, and 
Stanford, born December 17, 1898. 

Our subject is a director in the Farmers' 
and Merchants' Bank of Louisville. In 
his fraternal relations he is a member of the 
Masons, the Chapter and Knights Templar. 
In politics he is a Republican and both he 
and Mrs. Goodenough are members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Goodenough is one of the substantial 
citizens of Clay county. He has persevered 
in the pursuit of a persistent purpose and 
gained a most satisfactory reward. His life 



is exemplary in many respects, and he has 
ever supported those interests which have 
for their object the welfare of the commu- 
nity and the benefit of humanity. 



WILFRED W. MERZ. 

The career of the subject of this review 
has been varied and interesting, and the his- 
tory of Marion county will be more interest- 
ing if a record of his activities and achieve- 
ments are given prominence, and a tribute 
to his worth and high character as a business 
man, a public-spirited and enterprising, 
broad-minded citizen, for although he is yet 
a young man he has shown by his persist- 
ency and eminently worthy career what can 
be accomplished by the young man who has 
thrift, energy, tact, force of character and 
honesty of purpose, and representing as he 
does one of the best and most highly es- 
teemed families of the country, whose an- 
cestors did so much in the pioneer days to 
prepare the country for the enjoyment and 
success of succeeding generations, Mr. Merz 
is peculiarly entitled to proper mention in 
this work along with other leading and hon- 
orable citizens of Marion county. 

Wilfred W. Merz, the popular and effi- 
cient agent of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
Railroad Company, also of the Wells, Fargo 
& Company Express, at Salem, Marion 
county, was born at this place February 13, 
1872, being the eldest child of Nicholas 
Merz, who is a member of the Council of Al- 



AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



dermen of the city of Salem, and an influen- 
tial and highly respected citizen who has 
lived in Salem practically all his life. Nicho- 
las Merz's parents were born in Germany 
and migrated to America in early life, and 
soon established comfortable homes in the 
new world and lived to a ripe old age. 

The mother of our subject was known in 
her maidenhood as Elizabeth A. Smith. She 
was born at Decatur, Illinois, and died at 
Huey, Illinois. 

Sarah S. Ritchie, the maternal grand- 
mother of our subject, is a native of Giles 
county, Virginia, born March 22, 1828, and 
at present resides near Shattuc, Illinois, in 
her eightieth year. Her first husband was 
John H. Smith, who was born September 
i, 1831, at Chillicothe, Ohio, and died at 
Metropolis, Illinois, October 2, 1888. He 
was the father of nine children (the mother 
of our subject being the eldest), only one of 
whom is living, John Lewis Smith, of Car- 
lyle, Illinois. 

Nicholas Merz by his first wife is the 
father of five children, of whom four are liv- 
ing in 1908, and whose births occurred in 
the following order: Wilfred W., our sub- 
ject; Nellie, the wife of Richard Ellington, 
of St. Louis; John L. , living in Chicago; 
Nona died in Chicago, July 8, 1905 ; Orval 
Nicholas living in Salem, Illinois. To Nicho- 
las Merz and his second wife one child was 
born, Mabel, who is living with her parents 
in Salem. 

These children received a fairly good 
education and are comfortably located, each 
giving promise of successful careers. 



Wilfred W. Merz was reared in Salem, 
having attended the city schools where he 
applied himself in a most assiduous manner, 
outstripping many less ambitious plodders 
until he graduated from the high school as 
salutarian with the class of 1900, having 
made an excellent record for scholarship. 

After leaving school Mr. Merz farmed on 
his father's place for two years, making 
agriculture a success. He then left the farm 
and accepted a clerkship with the mercantile 
firm of Cutler & Hays in Salem in whose 
employ he remained for one and one-half 
years, giving entire satisfaction as a sales- 
man and by reason of his adaptability for 
this line of work and his courteous treat- 
ment of customers did much to increase the 
firm's popularity and trade. 

In 1893 Mr. Merz entered the railroad 
business with the Baltimore & Ohio, and was 
assistant agent at Salem during 1893 an ^ 
1894. On January 16, 1895, he was ap- 
pointed agent for the Chicago, Paducah & 
Memphis Railroad Company at Kell, Illi- 
nois. This road later passed into the control 
of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois in 1907, 
and after about eight months of acceptable 
service at Kell, Mr. Merz was promoted to 
the position of agent at Salem for the Chi- 
cago & Eastern Illinois road, and he has 
since been their faithful employe at this im- 
portant post, with the exception of five 
months as agent at Tuscola, Illinois, from 
January to June, 1904, and as assistant cash- 
ier of the Salem State Bank from October, 
1904, to October, 1905, which position he 
held with honor and resigned the same to 



RICHLAND. CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



re-enter the railroad service. He is regarded 
by the company as one of the most conscien- 
tious and reliable agents in their service. 
Since the division was established at Salem 
in 1905, this office has become one of the 
most important along the company's line. 

Mr. Merz was happily married August 
24, 1897, to Nettie Kell, daughter of J. M. 
Kell and wife, a well known family of old 
Foxville. Mrs. Merz is a representative of 
one of the oldest families of Marion county, 
and one of a family 'of nine children, seven 
of whom are yet living, Maudie and Robert 
dying in infancy. Her father and mother 
are still living at the time of this 
writing, the mother being one of ten 
sisters all of whom, are! living in 1908, 
a most remarkable record. Her father, 
John M. Kell, was a soldier in the Union 
ranks during the war between the states 
and was one of a family of twelve children, 
one of his brothers being killed in the last 
skirmish of the Civil war after a service of 
three years. Mrs. Merz's grandfather, on 
her maternal side, was Robert Wham, a 
well-to-do pioneer of Marion county who 
rendered distinguished services as a soldier 
in the Mexican war. He had a brother, 
French L., who died in Andersonville 
prison. Mr. Wham passed away January 
10, 1905, at a very old age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Merz are the parents of 
three bright and interesting children who 
have added cheer to the cozy, modern and 
nicely furnished home which is so graciously 
presided over with rare dignity and grace 
by the subject's wife, the names of their chil- 



dren being as follows: Robert W., born 
July 6, 1898; Helen Louise, born February 
6, 1900; Gladys Roberta, born June 6, 1902. 
The fact that the birth of these children all 
occurred on the sixth of the month is a 
singular coincidence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Merz own their own beauti- 
ful home on East Main street. Both are 
members of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church, and are known as among the best 
members of the congregation with which 
they have always been popular. The subject 
has spent his entire life in Salem where he 
is well and favorably known, having gained 
and retained undivided respect of all as a 
result of his sober, industrious and honor- 
able career. He is always to be found on the 
right side of all questions looking to the 
betterment of his community and may well 
be said to represent Marion county's best 
citizenship in every particular. 



SNIVELY & MONTGOMERY, 
LIVERYMEN. 

Though no land is richer in opportunities 
or offers greater advantages to its citizens 
than America, success is not to be attained 
through desire, but must be persistently 
sought. In this country "labor is king," 
and the man who resolutely sets to work to 
accomplish a given purpose is certain of 
success if he has but the qualities of perse- 
verance, untiring energy and practical com- 
mon sense. William A. Montgomery, the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



well known liveryman of Olney, Illinois, 
through his diligence and persistent efforts, 
has attained definite success and has won 
the respect of all who know him through 
his fair dealing with the public. 

William A. Montgomery was born in Ol- 
ney, Richland county, October 22, 1860, the 
son of Thomas and Sarah (Brillhart) Mont- 
gomery, natives of Virginia and Pennsyl- 
vania, respectively, who came to Richland 
county in an early day. Thomas came with 
his parents when a small boy. The fam- 
ily entered land in Edwards county, where 
Thomas was reared, assisting with the work 
of improving a farm in the wilderness. 
When only sixteen years old, he began car- 
rying the mail from Fair-field to Mt. Car- 
mel, and he had charge of the route from 
Olney to Grayville, for years. He also op- 
erated a stage. He later became a pros- 
perous farmer in Richland county. 

The Brillharts were pioneers in Richland 
county and became influential in their com- 
munity. The parents of the subject of this 
sketch died in Richland county, the father 
at the age of seventy-eight and the mother 
when sixty-eight years old. They were 
people of many sterling and praiseworthy 
traits, and were hard workers all their lives. 

William A. Montgomery was reared on a 
farm in Edwards county, and received his 
education in the country schools of Edwards 
and Richland counties. He remained at 
home during the lifetime of his parents, 
working on the farm until the spring of 
1903, when he came to Olney and engaged 
in the livery business, which he is still con- 



ducting with great success, giving the pub- 
lic entire satisfaction and handling an ex- 
cellent grade of horses and vehicles. The 
firm is known as Snively & Montgomery. 
They began business in their present loca- 
tion in 1906, building a modern and con- 
venient brick barn which was completed in 
June of that year. The building is sixty- 
eight by one hundred and ten feet and is 
one of the most complete and best equipped 
in Olney or any of the surrounding towns. 
They keep an average of twenty head of 
driving stock, also a considerable number 
of boarding stock. 

In politics Mr. Montgomery is a Demo- 
crat and a member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, No. 926, of Olney. 

Edmund C. Snively, partner of Mr. Mont- 
gomery, was born in Madison township, 
Richland county, and what has been said 
of the former regarding untiring persistence 
and application to business is equally ap- 
plicable to him, and they make a strong 
combination in their special line. The date 
of Mr. Snively's birth was December 26, 
1872. He is the son of Amos B. and Sa- 
rah E. (Parker) Snively, residents of Mad- 
ison township. Mr. Snively was reared on 
a farm and was educated in the country 
schools and at the Southern Normal at Car- 
bondale for one year. He received a good 
education for he applied himself well to his 
books and successfully taught school for one 
term. He worked on a farm, in a saw-mill 
and operated a threshing machine for sev- 
eral seasons. In 1904 he came to Olney, 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AM) MARION COl'XTIES, ILLINOIS. 



125 



and became a member of Snively & Mont- 
gomery, and has continued in the same ever 
since. 

Mr. Snively was united in marriage on 
June 12, 1907, to Laura D. Yelch, a native 
of Olney township, the daughter of Daniel 
and Margaret (Swallen) Yelch, the former 
now deceased and the latter is a resident of 
Olney. In politics Mr. Snively is a Demo- 
crat, and in his fraternal relations he be- 
longs to the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
of Olney. 

Fair dealing has been the watchword of 
this firm and as a result they have built up 
an extensive patronage, which is still grow- 
ing. Both Messrs. Snively and Montgom- 
ery are regarded as among the substantial 
citizens of Olney, and are well spoken of 
by all who know them. 



GEORGE B. SIMCOX. 

The subject stands as the exponent of one 
of the extensive noteworthy enterprises 
of the city, where he maintains a real 
estate business, which is pre-eminent in the 
honorable bearing and careful methods em- 
ployed, and in the discriminating delicacy of 
treatment which the nature of the business 
renders expedient, and he has thus retained 
as his own the respect and confidence of the 
community, even as has his noble father, the 
latter having likewise assumed a position of 
priority in the business and social life of 



Marion county, where he still resides at an 
advanced age. 

George B. Simcox was born in Kentucky 
in 1864, the son of W. K. Simcox, now 
living at Patoka, Illinois, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, who migrated from the old Key- 
stone state to Illinois in 1866, locating at 
Patoka, where he has since resided. He was 
in the mercantile business of which he made 
a success, but he is now living retired, hav- 
ing reached the advanced age of eighty- 
three, and his good wife that of 
seventy-eight. They are held in high esteem 
in their neighborhood where their latter 
years have been so honorably and happily 
spent. Twelve children were born to them, 
seven of whom are still living. They are : 
Anna M., the widow of Dr. T. N. Livesay, 
and she makes her home near Patoka ; Rob- 
ert A., of Patoka; John L., also of Patoka; 
Bettie, the wife of Dr. W. W. Murfin, of 
Patoka; Mary A., the wife of A. T. Eaglin, 
of Henton, Oklahoma; Joseph W., of Pa- 
toka; George B., whose name appears at the 
head of this review. 

Mr. Simcox spent his boyhood in Patoka, 
Illinois, where he received a common school 
education, having applied himself closely to 
his books. When about eighteen years old 
he went to railroading and was subsequently 
in the employ of various roads. Longing 
for more varied experiences than could be 
gained at home, he went to the Southwest 
and his rise in the railroad business was 
rapid there owing to his natural ability, 
carefulness and personal address, conse- 
quently he soon became conductor on the 



126 



ItKiK APHICAL A XI) REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Mexican National Railroad in Old Mexico, 
holding this responsible position to the satis- 
faction of the superior officials when only 
twenty-one years old. 

After following the railroad business for 
ten years he returned to Salem, Illinois, in 
1895, and has been in Marion county ever 
since. He first launched in the mercantile 
business in Patoka, where he was doing 
nicely and building up an excellent trade, 
when he lost heavily by fire after two years 
in this line. Then he went into the real 
estate and newspaper business at Patoka, in 
which he made a success and became known 
as the moulder of public thought and opin- 
ion. Being thus able and popular with his 
fellow voters, he was soon slated for local 
political offices, and held every township 
office in that township. He was appointed 
Deputy Sheriff in 1902 and served with 
great credit for a period of four years. In- 
deed, all his duties in an official capacity 
were attended to with the greatest alacrity 
and good judgment. He was nominated by 
the Democrats in 1906 as a candidate for 
sheriff, but was defeated. 

In 1906 Mr. Simcox went into the hard- 
ware business in Salem, in which he re- 
mained for eight months, when he sold out 
to C. W. Vensell, and since then he has 
been interested in the real estate business, 
making a specialty of city lots and booming 
special sales, and his efforts have been 
crowned with gratifying success, for he has 
the confidence of the public and conducts 
his business along safe and conservative 
lines. 



Mr. Simcox was united in marriage May 
24, 1896, to Florence Wasem, of Patoka, 
the cultured and refined daughter of Jacob 
E. Wasem, a well known citizen of Patoka. 
Two bright and interesting children have 
been born to this union, namely: Maude 
Ellen, whose date of birth occurred August 
13, 1897, and Minnie May, who was born 
November 24, 1903. 

Our subject in his fraternal relations be- 
longs to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks at Centralia Lodge No. 493 ; 
also the Marion Lodge No. 525, Knights of 
Pythias; also the Modern Woodmen of 
America No. 761, of Patoka. He also be- 
longs to the Order of Railway Telegraphers. 

Our subject has always taken a great in- 
terest in political matters and public affairs, 
and he was chairman of the Democratic 
Central Committee during two campaigns, 
and he is now a member of the County Ex- 
ecutive Democratic Committee of Marion 
county. In public office he has been found 
most loyal to the public good, and in his 
business affairs he is ever straight-forward 
and trustworthy. 



ROBERT MARTIN. 

It is signally consonant that in this work 
be incorporated at least a brief resume of 
the life and labors of Mr. Martin, who has 
long been one of the influential citizens of 
Marion county, and through whose loyal 
efforts the city of Salem and surrounding 



RICH I. AM), CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



127 



locality have reaped lasting benefits, for his 
exceptional administrative capacity has been 
directed along lines calculated to be for the 
general good. A man of forceful individu- 
ality and marked initiative power, he has 
been well equipped for leadership, while his 
probity of character and his genial personal- 
ity have gained for him uniform esteem and 
friendship in the city where he has so long 
made his home, and of which he is regarded 
by all classes as one of its most distinguished 
citizens in connection with the business 
world. 

Robert Martin was born in Estilville, now 
known as Gate City, Scott county, Virginia, 
April n, 1839, the son of John S. Martin, 
also a native of Virginia, and a man of rec- 
ognized ability, being the representative of 
a fine old Southern family, noted for its 
high ideals and unqualified hospitality, his 
ancestry being Scotch-Irish. John S. Mar- 
tin was County Clerk for a period of twenty 
years or more, and he held many other 
county offices, including a judgeship, and he 
won universal praise for the able manner in 
which he discharged his every duty to the 
public. He was called from his earthly 
labors in 1865 while living at Alma, this 
county. The mother of the subject was a 
Stewart before her marriage, a woman of 
rare mental equipoise and culture; she 
passed to her rest soon after the family 
came to Illinois in 1846. 

Our subject spent his early boyhood on 
his parental farm at Alma, having been only 
five years old when the family came here. 
He attended school at Alma and Salem. He 



also attended the Southern Illinois Female 
College at Salem, which institution ceased 
to exist soon after the war. He gained a 
liberal education which has stood him in 
such good hand during his long and emi- 
nently active and successful business career. 

Our subject was one of those loyal sons 
of the North, who, when the tocsin of war 
sounded calling loyal sons to defend the 
old flag, offered his services, enlisting in 
Company A, One Hundred and Eleventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, one of the fa- 
mous regiments of the state, which was or- 
ganized at Salem. Mr. Martin was then 
twenty-one years old. The company left 
Salem and went to Columbus, Kentucky, 
and from there to Paducah, that state, later 
to Pulaski, Tennessee, and from there 
marched to Chattanooga, where it united 
with Sherman's army and remained with the 
same through its historic march to the sea, 
and also its strenuous campaigns, having 
participated in the battles at Atlanta and 
many other notable engagements. After re- 
maining with him until the close of the war, 
he took part in the grand review at Wash- 
ington City, after a very commendable ser- 
vice of three years. He was mustered out 
at Springfield, Illinois, where he came soon 
after the review in Washington. 

After his career in the army, Mr. Martin 
launched in the grocery business at Salem, 
in which he remained for one year, when he 
sold out and went into the more lucrative 
grain and lumber business, in which he has 
been engaged for a period of forty-one years 
during which time an enormous volume of 



128 



nor.KAl'lIICAL AXI) KKM IN ISC KXT HISTORY OF 



business has passed through his hands, and 
he has become widely known as one of the 
leading men in these lines in Southern Illi- 
nois, being recognized by the leading dealers 
throughout this and adjoining states as well 
as remote parts of the country as a man of 
the highest business integrity and acumen. 
He is still conducting a large lumber yard, 
and carries on a very extensive and thriving 
business, numbering his customers by the 
thousands, not only from Salem and vicin- 
ity, but throughout the county and to remote 
parts of the country. He owns a beautiful, 
modern and well furnished residence in one 
of the most desirable portions of Salem. 

Our subject was happily married in 1867 
to Alice Scott, a native of Vincennes, In- 
diana, a woman of affable personality and 
rare refinement, the daughter of a highly 
respected and influential family. Three 
children have been born to this union, one 
of whom has passed away. They are: 
Mabel Dora, the wife of W. H. Parsons, of 
Salem; C. C. Martin, of Salem, and John 
Lewis Martin, formerly of Salem, now de- 
ceased. 

These children received every possible at- 
tention from their parents, being given good 
educations and careful home training. 

Mr. Martin assisted in the organization 
and became one of the first directors and 
stockholders in the Salem State Bank. He 
is also a director of the Salem Building and 
Loan Association, and his sound judgment 
and able advice is always carefully weighed 
by the other members of these organizations 
in their deliberations, for Mr. Martin has a 
reputation among local business men for 



remarkable foresight into all business propo- 
sitions. Having always been interested in 
educational affairs, he served as a member 
and also as president of the School Board 
of Salem for several years, but he is not at 
present connected with the board, but during 
the time that he was the schools of Salem 
were greatly strengthened. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Martin is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Woodmen. He has been a faithful and 
consistent member of the Methodist church 
since he was thirteen years old. 



CHARLES T. KELL. 

This enterprising farmer and representa- 
tive citizen is a native of Marion county, Illi- 
nois, and belongs to one of the old and high- 
ly esteemed pioneer families of Haines town- 
ship, where his parents, Thomas and Mary 
(Luke) Kell, settled in an early day and bore 
an active and influential part in the devel- 
opment and growth of the community (see 
sketch of William Kell). Charles T. was 
born a short distance west of the village of 
Kell, September 18, 1854, from which date 
to the present time his life has been very 
closely identified with Haines township, and 
as stated above, he now holds worthy pres- 
tige among the leading agriculturists and 
public spirited men of the section of country 
honored by his citizenship. 

Reared in close touch with nature in the 
healthful outdoor life of the farm, he earlv 
acquired a vigorous physique and an inde- 
pendence of mind characteristic of the sturdy 




MR AND MRS. C. T. KELL. 



Of THE 

UNIVERSITY w ILLINOIS, 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



I2 9 



son of the soil, and while still quite young 
he became familiar with the varied duties of 
agriculture and learned to appreciate the 
honor and dignity which belong to those who 
earn their bread by the sweat of the brow. 
At the proper age he entered the schools of 
the neighborhood, which he attended at in- 
tervals until acquiring a practical knowledge 
of the subjects taught, the meanwhile assist- 
ing his father on the family homestead and 
contributing his full share to its cultivation, 

After remaining with his parents until at- 
taining his majority, Charles T. entered into 
partnership with his brother, John M. Kell. 
by purchasing a half interest in a saw and 
grist mill at Foxville, and during the ensu- 
ing ten years devoted his attention to the 
manufacture of flour and lumber, meeting 
with encouraging success in the enterprise 
and becoming widely known as a wide- 
awake and thoroughly honorable and reli- 
able business man. Disposing of his interest 
in the mill at the expiration of the period in- 
dicated, he located on his present home farm 
in Haines township, adjoining the town of 
Kell on the south, having previously become 
the possessor of another tract consisting of 
one hundred and twenty acres in another 
part of the same township, both of which 
places he has brought to a high state of cul- 
tivation and otherwise improved. At the 
time the railroad was constructed he sold 
twenty acres, which is now a part of the 
village of Kell. 

As a farmer, Mr. Kell easily ranks with 
the most enterprising and successful men of 
his calling in Marion county, being progres- 
9 



sive in his methods and using the latest mod- 
ern implements and machinery and by judi- 
cious rotation of crops he seldom fails to 
realize abundant returns from the time and 
labor devoted to his fields. He also pays 
considerable attention to the raising of live 
stock, which he finds quite profitable, and his 
domestic animals, including horses, mules, 
cattle, sheep and hogs, are among the finest 
breeds obtainable, and from their sale no 
small share of his liberal income is derived. 

Mr. Kell has not been sparing of his 
means in the matter of improvement, and the 
beautifying and rendering attractive his 
home, the large two-story house with its 
many modern conveniences, being among 
the most desirable country residences in the 
township, while his commodious barn, out- 
buildings, wells, fences and other evidences 
of prosperity compare favorably with the 
best in his part of the country. He keeps 
in close touch with the advancement in agri- 
cultural science, and fully abreast of the 
times in reducing the same to practical tests, 
being progressive in all the term implies, 
and believes in the latest and most approved 
methods of modern farming. 

In his political faith Mr. Kell is a Repub- 
lican, and while interested in the success of 
his party, he has never been a politician, 
much less an office seeker or aspirant for 
leadership. In religion he subscribes to the 
Missionary Baptist creed, and for a number 
of years his name has adorned the records 
of that church, having held the office of dea- 
con five years in the local congregation, to 
which himself and entire family belong, be- 



1 3 o 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



sides being otherwise interested in religious 
and benevolent work. He is superintendent 
of the Sunday school which he attends, has 
long been an influential leader in this depart- 
ment of religious endeavor, and with his 
wife has been instrumental in arousing an in- 
terest among the young people of the neigh- 
borhood and leading not a few of them to 
the higher life. 

Mr. Kell was married in the year 1881 to 
Rebecca C. Purdue, of Haines township, 
daughter of Richard and Caroline (Har- 
mon) Purdue, early settlers of Marion coun- 
ty and among the highly respected people of 
their locality (see history of the Purdue 
family). Mr. and Mrs. Kell have four chil- 
dren, the oldest of whom, a daughter by the 
name of Iva May, is the wife of R. A. Jef- 
fries, of Haines township, and the mother of 
one child, Trevor Jeffries. The other chil- 
dren, two daughters and one son, are still 
under the parental roof, their names in order 
of birth being as follows: Myrtle, Ellis and 
Ethel. Mr. Kell has taken great interest in 
the rearing and educating of his children 
and they in turn have responded to his every 
effort in their behalf. The children all re- 
ceived liberal educational advantages in the 
public schools and also at Ewing Baptist 
College at Ewing, 111. Ethel graduated at 
the age of seventeen from that institution in 
instrumental music. The family is one of 
the best known and most highly esteemed in 
the county and the name which is an old and 
honorable one has long been synonymous 
for noble manhood and womanhood and a 
high order of citizenship. 



HENRY HORD. 

Aside from his connections with the civic 
affairs of Clay county, the subject of this 
sketch has long been an influential factor in 
the general business and industrial interests 
of the county during his entire life, which 
has been spent here, everything calculated 
to advance the community, materially or 
otherwise, receiving his support and hearty 
co-operation. He is unwavering in his al- 
legiance to what he believes is right, and 
upholds his honest convictions at the sacri- 
fice, if necessary, of every other interest. 
Conscientious in the discharge of his duties 
of citizenship, he is a valued member of the 
body politic, and his aim has ever been to 
shape his life according to the highest stand- 
ard of excellence, therefore he has won the 
esteem and confidence of all who know him. 

Henry Hord, the popular Sheriff of Clay 
county, is a native of the same, having been 
born in Blair township, December 8, 1863, 
the son of Thomas B. Hord, who was a na- 
tive of Indiana, and who came to Illinois 
when a boy, being one of the early settlers 
of Clay county, locating in Blair township, 
where he now lives and is a prosperous 
farmer, well known in his township. "Judge" 
George Hord, grandfather of the subject, 
was also a native of Indiana and a man of 
considerable influence in his community. 

The subject's mother was known in her 
maidenhood as Alice Beal, whose people 
came from Tennessee. She passed to her 
rest when our subject was two years old. 
Two children were born to the parents of 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



our subject, the other child dying in in- 
fancy. They gave their son all the advan- 
tages possible, wholesome home environ- 
ment and a fairly good education, and he 
owes much of his subsequent success to his 
solicitous parents. He was reared on a farm 
where he laid the foundations for a hardy 
manhood, for he devoted the summer 
months to work in the fields and attended 
school in the winter in his native township, 
which was the only schooling he had ; but 
he made good use of his time. After leav- 
ing school he continued farm work on the 
home place until he married when he went 
to farming for himself in Blair township. 

Mr. Hord was united in the bonds of 
wedlock with Percilla Eytchison, the daugh- 
ter of J. W. and Charity A. Eytchison, a 
well known family of Blair township, the 
date of the wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Hord 
being October 18, 1884, and to this union 
nine children have been born, named in or- 
der of birth as follows: Jesse, deceased, 
having died when about thirteen years old; 
Lillie, William, Mimmie, Roy. Elbridge. Rol- 
la, Everett, the youngest child died in in- 
fancy. 

In 1906 Mr. Hord was elected Sheriff of 
Clay county, on the Republican ticket, and 
he is now serving his term of four years in 
a manner that elicits praise from everyone 
having occasion to know of his work, for he 
is discharging his duties in a most con- 
scientious and able manner, and generally 
regarded as the best Sheriff the county has 
ever had. Previously Mr. Hord had faith- 
fully served Blair township as Supervisor 



and Assessor. He owns a good farm in 
Blair township, which he rents. In his fra- 
ternal relations he is a Mason. 

Mrs. Hord died of typhoid fever Sep- 
tember 1 8, 1906, between the time Mr. Hord 
was nominated and elected Sheriff. Our 
subject was married a second time, his last 
wife being Miss Dora Manifold, a daughter 
of Reverend Manifold, now deceased. Mrs. 
Hord formerly resided in St. Louis, and 
she taught school in Clay county for five 
years. 

In his career Mr. Hord has seen the gath- 
ering clouds that threatened disaster, but 
his rich inheritance of energy and pluck has 
enabled him to turn defeats into victory and 
promised failures into success. He enjoys 
in the fullest measure the public confidence, 
because of the honorable methods he has 
ever followed, and is one of the prominent 
and honored men of Clay county. 



WILLIAM C. INGRAM. 

Standing in an eminent position among 
the industrial representatives of Marion 
county is the subject of this sketch, who 
is recognized as one of Kinmundy's lead- 
ing citizens, having for many years been 
interested in the local flouring mill the repu- 
tation of which has spread all over this lo- 
cality as a result of his able management. 
In this regard he is controlling an exten- 
sive and important industry, for the product 
of his mill is large and the annual shipment 



1 3 2 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



of flour made to the city markets bring in 
return a very desirable income to the stock- 
holders of the company. His success has 
been won entirely along old and time-tried 
maxims, such as "honesty is the best policy" 
and "there is no excellence without labor." 

William C. Ingram was born in Indiana 
in 1848, the son of Samuel and Minerva A. 
(Powers) Ingram. Grandfather Ingram is 
supposed to have been born in Kentucky and 
moved to Warrick county, Indiana, where 
he engaged in farming and where he spent 
the balance of his days in honest and use- 
ful toil ; there raising his family and passing 
from his labors into the great beyond, after 
reaching a very advanced age. His faithful 
life companion also lived to an advanced 
age. They reared a large family, all but one 
of whom lived to be men and women and 
reared families of their own. A number of 
their sons were gallant infantrymen in the 
Union ranks during the war between the 
states. The Ingram lineage is from Eng- 
land, and were early settlers in Kentucky, 
having come there in the brave days of 
Daniel Boone when the principal tasks of 
the pioneers were the clearing of the pri- 
meval forests and the banishment of the 
wary red men. 

Samuel Ingram, the father of the subject, 
was reared in Indiana, and was almost 
wholly without educational advantages. His 
date of birth is recorded as 1824, conse- 
quently his boyhood was during a time when 
schools had scarcely been established in the 
Hoosier state. He devoted his life to agri- 
cultural pursuits of which he made a suc- 



cess being a hard worker. He left Indiana 
in 1854 and moved to Edwards county, 
Illinois, but came on to Marion county, land- 
ing here April 6, 1857, ar >d bought a farm 
on which he remained and greatly improved, 
living there in comfort until 1866, when he 
moved to Kinmundy, still working his farm ; 
continuing this for ten years when he sold 
out and retired from active work. He is 
still hale and active at this writing (1908), 
having attained the ripe age of eighty-four. 
As a result of his well spent life his old 
age is happy, for it is free from want and 
worry and pervaded with no unpleasant 
memories or regrets and compunctions over 
a misspent past, for his life has been one 
of honor and industry, most worthily lived. 
There were eight children in his family, six 
of whom are now living and have families 
of their own. The mother of the subject, 
a woman of beautiful Christian character, 
passed to her rest at the age of seventy- 
eight years. This fine old couple were al- 
ways devout Methodists. 

The great-grandfather 'Powers of the 
subject spent most of his life in Indiana, 
living to an old age. He was a Democrat 
and a Baptist. Grandmother Powers died 
in middle age. One of Mrs. Ingram's 
brothers, John Powers, was a soldier in the 
Civil war. 

William C. Ingram, our subject, was 
brought to Illinois by his parents when six 
years old and to Marion county three years 
later, having been placed at once in the pub- 
lic schools here where he received his edu- 
cation, and in other similar schools of 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



133 



this state. He worked on his father's farm 
and for others as a farm hand until he was 
twenty-one years old, when he rented a farm 
and worked it on his own account for two 
years, making a good start in this way. He 
then purchased a farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres in this county on which he re- 
mained for a few years when he went to 
carpentry and farming, later purchasing 
a saw mill which he successfully operated for 
twenty-five years, which he recently sold. 
He has also owned two other saw mills, and 
has been known as one of the leading mill 
men of this locality for many years Some 
time ago he came to Kinmundy and pur- 
chased an interest in the Songer flouring mill 
which has been in operation for forty years, 
the subject now owning forty shares in this 
mill and is a director in the same, which has 
a wide reputation for the excellency of its 
products, customers not only coming in per- 
son from all parts of the county, but many 
orders are constantly pouring in from ad- 
joining counties and distant cities. The sub- 
ject's son is also a part owner in the mill. 
He also owns and controls thirty shares 
of the capital stock. 

Our subject has also been a merchant, 
and owing to his honesty in business, his 
natural ability and his discriminating fore- 
sight, he has always made a success at what- 
ever he undertook, so that today he is re- 
garded as one of the financially substantial 
men of the county, every dollar in his pos- 
session having been honestly earned by hard 
work. 

Mr. Ingram was united in marriage in 



1869 to Mary R. Gray, a native of this 
county, daughter of James H, and Susanna 
Jane (Hannah) Gray. They were from 
Tennessee and lived on a farm. Her father 
was president of the Farmers & Merchants 
Bank of Kinmundy at the time of his death, 
which occurred at the age of seventy-seven 
years. In their family were ten children, 
seven of whom lived to maturity, but were 
short-lived people. 

Six children were born to the subject and 
wife as follows: Jane who was born in 
1871, died when two and one-half years old; 
Charles H., who was born in 1874, is now 
living in Oklahoma and is the father of six 
children : Nellie A., who was born in 1876, 
is the wife of M. E. Huston, who lives at 
Maroa, Illinois, and is the mother of one 
child; Isaac D. was born in 1879 and is now 
associated with his father in the mill, is mar- 
ried and has three children ; Robert L., who 
was bom in 1880, is living in the state of 
Washington, is married and has one child; 
William G., born in 1882, died at the age of 
twenty-one years. 

The subject's first wife passed away in 
1883. She was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, South. Mr. Ingram was 
married a second time, the date of his last 
wedding occurring in 1888. Nancy I. Gray 
(nee Booth), who was then the mother of 
two children, was his second choice. W. H. 
Gray, a sketch of whose life appears in this 
work, is her son. Her other child is dead. 
There has been no issue by the subject's last 
union. Mr. Ingram is a member of the Ma- 
sonic Fraternity and he attends the Metho- 



134 



UOGKAl'HICAL AND KK M I X 1SCF.XT HISTORY OF 



dist church, of which his wife is a faithful 
member. In politics he supports the Re- 
publican ticket and he takes a keen interest 
in public affairs, though he has no ambition 
for the honors or emoluments of public of- 
fice, preferring to give his attention to his 
own business affairs. 



JOHN F. JOLLY. 

The most elaborate history is necessarily 
an abridgement, the historian being com- 
pelled to select his facts and material from 
a multitude of details. In every life of 
honor and usefulness there is no dearth of 
incident, and yet in summing up the career 
of any man the writer needs touch only 
those salient points which give the keynote 
of the character, but eliminating much that 
is superfluous. Thus in giving the life rec- 
ord of the gentleman whose name initiates 
this sketch sufficient will be said to show 
that he is one of the enterprising and pro- 
gressive citizens of Richland county, being 
a well known horticulturist and hardware 
merchant. 

John F. Jolly was born at Grayville, 
White county, Illinois, December 2, 1850, 
the son of John B. and Elizabeth (Ferri- 
man) Jolly, the former a native of Edwards 
county, of English parents, and the latter 
of Jamaica, who came with her parents to 
Edwards county when a child, settling in 
Albion. Stephen Jolly, grandfather of our 
subject, emigrated to America from Eng- 



land, locating at Albion, Edwards county, 
this state, where he died soon after the birth 
of J. B. Jolly, who is now eighty-four years 
old and the oldest resident at Grayville, hav- 
ing removed to the latter place about 1847, 
where he engaged in merchandising for 
many years. He accumulated a comfortable 
competency and is now retired. His wife 
passed away in 1851. The subject is the 
only child of his parents, his mother having 
died when he was an infant. He was reared 
in Grayville, having been educated in the 
public schools there, also went to school at 
Normal, Illinois. He became deputy post- 
master at Grayville, which position he held 
for about four years, when he engaged in 
the mercantile business under the firm name 
of Jolly, Spring & Hollister, for about four 
years. Soon afterward, in 1877, he came 
to Olney and engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness under the firm name of Prunty & Jolly, 
in which business he has continued success- 
fully ever since. A few years later the firm 
name became J. B. & J. F. Jolly. In 1904 
the present firm organized as Jolly, Wie- 
land & Richardson. These two men had been 
with Mr. Jolly as clerks for many years, the 
former as manager of the store and the latter 
as manager of the manufacturing depart- 
ment of plumbing, tinning and heating. The 
change was due to the impairment of Mr. 
Jolly's health. 

They carry an extensive line of hardware, 
stoves, tinware and in fact a complete and 
carefully selected stock of such things at all 
times, and they carry on a very extensive 
trade throughout the county. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



135 



Mr. Jolly was united in marriage in 1880, 
to Mary Morrison, a native of Olney, the 
daughter of George D. and Kate (Snyder) 
Morrison, the former a native of Ohio and 
the latter of Lawrence county, Illinois. The 
Morrisons were originally from Virginia, 
and the Snyders of Kentucky. The mother 
resides with her daughter, Mrs. Jolly, in Ol- 
ney. The father died in 1873, at the age 
of forty-one years. One daughter has been 
born to our subject and wife, George Eliza- 
beth, who was educated at Olney in the 
high school and at Wellesley College. She 
is a winsome and talented young lady and 
popular in whatever society she enters. 

Mr. Jolly is an active Republican. He 
was chairman of the County Central Com- 
mittee for twelve years, and was Mayor of 
Olney from 1895 to J 896, during which 
time he did many things that will be of per- 
manent benefit to the town, leaving more 
money in the treasury at the expiration of 
his term than ever had been and has been 
since. His was a most excellent business 
administration. 

In his fraternal relations he belongs to 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. Mrs. Jolly is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and is president of 
the Ladies' Guild, which has raised more 
money than any similar organization, being 
largely responsible for the erection of the 
new church building. 

In 1889, owing to poor health, Mr. Jolly 
went to California and after many months 
returned to his home much improved. When 
he came back to Olney it was with the in- 



tention of quitting the confinement of the 
store and engaging in outdoor pursuits, and 
he accordingly became interested in horti- 
culture, and in the spring of 1890, planted 
the second commercial orchard in Richland 
county of eighty acres adjoining Olney. 
Since then he has bought adjoining tracts 
and planted additional acreage until now he 
owns two hundred acres of fine fruit land, 
set a well selected variety of trees, nearly 
all of which are bearing. He has been very 
active along these lines and is one of the best 
posted and well known horticulturists in 
Southern Illinois. His work and practical 
experience and demonstrations, have con- 
tributed much to the interest taken by others 
in bringing Richland county to the front 
as one of the leading fruit sections in this 
part of the state, and he now has one of the 
finest and best kept orchards in the state, 
from which in 1902 from one hundred acres 
he sold the apple crop for ten thousand dol- 
lars, it having produced ten thousand bar- 
rels. He employs modern methods in his 
horticultural work, and his farm buildings 
and equipment are of the latest and most up- 
to-date in this section of the state. The 
spraying plant is without doubt the most 
complete in Southern Illinois, if net in the 
state. He has tanks for manufacturing 
spray, and the cooking of the same for four 
thousand gallons capacity, the cooking be- 
ing done by steam, and gasoline engines for 
power in spraying. Being enthusiastic in 
horticulture, it naturally follows that he is 
a student and active in societies of this na- 
ture. For the past ten years he has been 



: 3 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



president of the Richland County Horticul- 
tural Society, which was organized about 
1888, although its greatest and best work 
has been accomplished of late years. He 
has also been a member of the Illinois Hor- 
ticultural Society, and for more than seven 
years a member of its advisory committee, 
which has been of great benefit to horticul- 
tural interests of Richland county. The 
state makes appropriations for experimental 
work in various parts of Illinois and the 
money is judiciously expended by the advis- 
ory committee at such points wherein their 
judgment the best results can be obtained. 
Mr. Jolly is a public-spirited man, always 
ready to do what he can in furthering the 
interests of the county, and he is regarded 
by all as one of the county's most useful 
citizens, and numbers his friends by the 
scores. 



W. S. CONANT. 

Marion county, Illinois, is characterized 
by her full share of the honored and faith- 
ful element who have done so much for the 
development and upbuilding of the state and 
the establishment of the institutions of civ- 
ilization in this fertile and well favored sec- 
tion. Among these worthy native sons the 
name of the subject of this sketch is 
properly installed. 

W. S. Conant was born in this county, 
September 22, 1854, the son of William R., 
and Fannie (Swift) Conant. Grandfather 
Conant was a native of Massachusetts, who 
moved from that state to Georgia and then 



to Illinois, settling in Marion county, com- 
ing here in an early day and being the first 
school teacher in the county. He entered 
land here and farmed for some time, having 
passed to his rest about 1840, at the age of 
about fifty years. His wife died within one 
week of her husband. Grandfather Swift 
was a native of Tennessee, who moved to 
this county about 1830, entering land here 
which he developed into a farm and where 
he reared his family. He died a short dis- 
tance from where he first located, having 
moved to the former place, his death occur- 
ring about 1870, when he was about sev- 
enty years old. His widow survived him 
about ten years. She was a Presbyterian. 
There were five children in this family, all 
of them living to maturity. 

The father of the subject was born in 
Georgia and came to Illinois with his par- 
ents when he was but a boy. His father 
being a teacher, he received some education, 
but the father of the subject was a hard- 
working man and did not take time to prop- 
erly improve his education. He was always 
a farmer. He entered land which he later 
added to by purchase until he had a valu- 
able farm of two hundred acres, which he 
left at his death. The mother of the sub- 
ject died when she was two years old, in 
1856, his father having died at the age of 
forty. He was a Democrat in political be- 
lief.' 

W. S. Conant. our subject, had the ad- 
vantage of a common school education, and 
having applied himself in a diligent manner 
he became fairly well educated, not leaving 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



137 



the school room until he was nineteen years 
old. He worked on his father's farm until 
he was twenty, when he went to work on his 
own account. He farmed with his brother- 
in-law, then rented a farm and so continued 
for four years. He then bought a farm in 
1 88 1 of three hundred and twenty acres. 
It was unimproved prairie land, but the sub- 
ject devoted seven years of hard work on 
the place and developed a fine and well im- 
proved farm. He still owns this place. He 
then bought a residence property, and in 
time sold that and purchased the farm 
where he has since resided, which consists 
of twenty-four acres on which there is a 
modern and substantial residence together 
with convenient out-buildings. The subject 
carries on general farming in a most suc- 
cessful manner, skillfully rotating his crops 
so as to keep the soil in good productive 
condition. He also devoted much time to 
stock-raising, being a good judge of all 
kinds of live stock, especially cattle and 
horses. He frequently feeds for the mar- 
ket, but is now selling his stock for other 
purposes. He raises a good class of horses. 
For six years he engaged in buying and sel- 
ling live stock in connection with his farm- 
ing and made this business a success in 
every particular. 

Our subject was united in marriage in 
November, 1877, to Agnes I. Morgan, 
daughter of J. B. and Martha (Doolen) 
Morgan, who came to this county at an 
early day. There were two of the Doolen 
brothers who went through the Civil war, 
and are living in 1908. 



Six children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife, as follows : Martha, born in 
1880, who died in infancy; Gracie; Flor- 
ence, who was born in 1881, died when 
three years old ; William, who was born 
September 22, 1885, died when six years 
old; George, who was born July 8, 1887, 
is a farmer, married and has one child; 
Clarence C. was born July 14, 1894; Lewis 
was born in 1897, is single and living at 
home. 

The subject is a member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, in his fraternal 
relations, and also a Modern Woodman, be- 
longing also to the Royal Neighbors, having 
filled all the chairs in an able manner in 
the Woodmen. In his religious affiliations 
he subscribes to the Methodist Episcopal 
church, South, as does also his wife. Mr. 
Conant is a loyal Democrat although he 
does not find much time to devote to polit- 
ical matters. 



GEORGE D. MORRISON. 

The biographer is glad to herein set forth 
the salient facts in the eminently successful 
and honorable career of the well remem- 
bered and highly esteemed citizen of Rich- 
land county whose name appears above, the 
last chapter in whose life record has been 
closed by the hand of death, and the seal 
set thereon forever, but whose influence still 
pervades the lives of those with whom he 
came in contact. For many years he was 
closelv identified with the industrial develop- 



138 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



ment of the county, and aided in every way 
possible in promoting the general good of 
the community. 

George D. Morrison was born at Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, April i, 1832, the son of George 
W. and Rebecca (Potter) Morrison, the for- 
mer a native of Loudoun county, Virginia, 
the latter of Maryland. During his earlier 
years, the subject's father was a freighter, 
keeping numerous teams and transporting 
merchandise from Boston and other Eastern 
markets to the interior before the days of 
railroads. He was a soldier in the War of 
1812, and was severely wounded, suffering 
from the wound for a number of years, ren- 
dering finally the amputation of his limb a 
necessity. After his marriage he moved to 
Ohio and for several years engaged in the 
hotel business. Later he came to Richland 
county, and died in Olney when about 
eighty years of age, his wife having died a 
few months previous at a ripe old age. They 
were the parents of twelve children. Four of 
their sons were soldiers in the Civil war, 
and five of their sons were ministers of the 
Gospel. One of their sons started east from 
Ohio in the early days with a load of sup- 
plies but was never heard from afterwards. 
The six horse team and wagon of supplies 
all mysteriously disappeared in the wilder- 
ness. Foul play by bandits or the Indians 
was suspected. Our subject was the ninth 
in order of birth. He was reared in Ohio 
where he received a good common school 
education, and after removing to Illinois at- 
tended an advanced school at Evanston, Il- 
linois. He became clerk in a store. About 
1855 he came to Olney and followed clerk- 



ing for a time. He later established a dry 
goods store just before the outbreak of the 
Civil war. His health beginning to fail he 
sold out and served one term as Circuit 
Clerk of Richland county, giving entire sat- 
isfaction in this capacity. He was elected 
County Treasurer and died during his in- 
cumbency of this office in 1873, at the age of 
forty-one years. He was married in 1860 
to Kate Snyder, a native of Lawrence 
county, Illinois, the daughter of John and 
Clarissa (Spencer) Snyder. They were na- 
tives of Kentucky, where they were reared 
and where they were married, and in an 
early day emigrated to Lawrence county, 
Illinois. Soon afterward in 1838, they 
came to what is now Richland county, and 
located on a farm in Claremont township, for 
years known as Hickory Point. This farm 
was entered from the government by the 
father of John Snyder, who was among the 
first' settlers of what is now Richland 
county. Samuel Snyder was the subject's 
grandfather. He was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, was reared in Kentucky and moved 
from Rockport, Indiana, to Illinois. One of 
his sons, Maurice B. Snyder, was Circuit 
Clerk after the organization of Richland 
county, for a number of years. Grandfather 
Spencer was a native of Virginia, and he 
moved to Kentucky in an early day. Both 
the subject's grandfathers served in the War 
of 1812. Three of grandfather Spencer's 
sons were in the War of 1812, also in the 
Black Hawk war. Spencer county, Indiana, 
was named in honor of this family. 

John Snyder, father of Mrs. Morrison, 
was a farmer during his lifetime and im- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



139 



proved a fine farm in Claremont township, 
where he died at the age of fifty-seven years 
in 1861. His wife survived several years 
and died at the home of her daughter at 
Poplar Bluff, Missouri, at the advanced age 
of eighty-three years. She was the mother 
of five children, four of whom are still liv- 
ing. Her only son, John Snyder, was a sol- 
dier in the Civil war, having enlisted as soon 
as old enough, in the Seventh Illinois Cav- 
alry. He was in many engagements, and 
his health was impaired while in the service. 
He now lives in Douglas county, Missouri. 
Mrs. Morrison is the mother of three 
children ; Mary, the wife of J. F. Jolly, of 
Olney; Mattie, wife of J. L. Clevlen, of 
Poplar Bluff, Missouri; Kate, the wife of 
E. A. Powers, of Olney. Mrs. Morrison 
makes her home with her children, spending 
most of her time in Olney. She is one of 
the oldest residents of the county now living. 
Her life has been one of the usual hardship 
and pleasure, of victory and defeat, but lived 
in such a manner as to result in no harm to 
others, as was also that of her worthy hus- 
band, both being faultless in honor, fearless 
in conduct and stainless in reputation, com- 
manding the uniform regard and esteem of 
their many friends. 



SAMUEL D. GRAHAM. 

The enterprising citizen whose name 
heads this article needs no introduction to 
the people of Marion county. He has been 



for some time prominently identified with 
the financial and industrial interests of the 
community where he resides and always 
manifesting an active interest in the pub- 
lic welfare. His long life has been a most 
active and useful one in every respect, and 
has resulted in the accumulation of an 
ample competence for his closing years as 
well as in much good to his fellow men and 
the community at large, where he has many 
warm friends. 

Samuel D. Graham was born in Rush 
county, Indiana, in April, 1836, the son of 
Hezekiah and Sarah (Smith) Graham. 
Grandfather Graham was born in Scotland 
and came to Pennsylvania in the seven- 
teenth century. Both he and his brother, 
Isaac, came from Scotland and both fought 
in the Revolutionary war. Grandfather 
was a captain and he had his eyes burned by 
the explosion of a gun in the hands of one 
of his own soldiers and eventually lost his 
eyesight from the effects of it, having been 
blind for twenty years before his death. He 
never drew his pension although it was al- 
lowed. It is in the hands of the govern- 
ment yet. He was about eighty years old 
when he died, leaving eight children living 
out of a family of nine, all of whom lived 
to maturity, five of whom moved to Ohio, 
where they made homes and reared families 
and where they died. Grandfather was dea- 
con in the Baptist church for forty years, 
and he and Grandmother Graham were 
Baptists and always lived the Christian life. 

Grandfather Smith was a native of Penn- 
sylvania, who moved from there to Butler 



HKICKAI'IIICAI. AM) UK M I ,\ 1SC1CNT HISTORY OF 



county, Ohio, after the death of his first 
wife. He and our subject's father were 
married by the same minister and with the 
same ceremony. In Grandfather Smith's 
family there were seven children, who lived 
to maturity. The youngest daughter by 
this marriage, Rebecca McClelland, was the 
mother of Gen. George B. McClelland. 
There was no issue from the second mar- 
riage. Grandfather Smith lived to be well 
advanced in years. After his remains had 
been buried twelve years, they were taken 
up for removal and it was found that his 
body was petrified. Grandfather Smith was 
a Revolutionary soldier and one of his sons- 
in-law, Oren Davis, was with him as a sol- 
dier, and his son, Charles was in the Black 
Hawk war. 

The father of the subject left Pennsyl- 
vania when twenty years old. He did not 
have early school advantages, but in time 
became educated and a well read man 
through his own persistent efforts, being 
particularly well informed on historical mat- 
ters and events. He settled in Butler 
county, Ohio, buying timbered land which 
he cleared and developed into a good farm, 
living there for about twelve years, when he 
moved to Rush county, Indiana, in 1831, 
remaining there until his death, which oc- 
curred at the age of seventy-two years, his 
date of birth having occurred on August 6, 
1799. His wife was born in October, 1800. 
He was twice married, his first wife being 
the mother of our subject. She died at the 
age of thirty-seven years, having given 
birth to eleven children, seven of whom 



lived to maturity. The father was married 
again, there being born to the last union 
ten children, all of whom lived to maturity. 
The father and mother were Baptists. The 
former spent his entire life on a farm, 
leaving a farm and a goodly share of money 
to his heirs, and also left land in Iowa, all 
of which shows that he was a thrifty and 
prudent man of affairs. 

Hezekiah Graham, father of the subject, 
in addition to his own family of eighteen 
children took four orphan boys and one 
girl and kept them until they reached ma- 
turity and in addition to these he was al- 
ways hunting and finding homes for other 
orphan children, and his own smoke-house 
and granary were always open to the poor 
and needy. He believed with the great 
philosopher, Henry Drummond, that "The 
greatest thing a man can do for his 
Heavenly Father is to be kind to some of 
His children." 

Samuel D. Graham, our subject, had but 
little opportunity to attend school, having 
spent altogether less than six months in the 
school room. He worked on his father's 
farm until he was twenty-six years old, then 
hired out as a farm hand for ten years, dur- 
ing which time he saved his earnings and 
bought a farm in Fayette county, Indiana. 
He lived there for ten years, then sold out 
and bought another farm in Union county, 
Indiana, and sold this at the end of two 
years, when he moved to Illinois, settling 
in Marion county, buying a farm of one 
hundred and eighty-five acres of improved 
land, near Kinmundy in 1882. In 1903 he 



RICIILAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



bought his splendid modern residence and 
two acres of ground in Kinmundy, where 
he has since resided. He sold his 
farm here and bought a farm in 
Butler county, Missouri, consisting of one 
hundred and sixty acres of improved bottom 
land on which his son resides and success- 
fully manages. Since coming to Kinmundy 
our subject has lived in peaceful and hon- 
orable retirement, conscious of a well spent 
life, which has been a very active one and 
has resulted in success in an eminent 
degree. He always benefited himself in 
his land deals and was an unusually good 
farmer, keeping his farms well improved 
and in a high state of cultivation. 

Our subject was married in 1870 to Mrs. 
Rhoda E. Prichard, nee Patterson, a native 
of Union county, Indiana. Her father, 
Alexander Patterson, was born December 
7, 1815, and came to Ohio when fifteen 
years of age, later to Union county, Indiana, 
where his father had purchased an eighty- 
acre farm. He lived and died on that farm. 
Mrs. Graham became the mother of three 
children by her first marriage, all of whom 
are deceased. One of the oldest brothers, 
James M. Patterson, was a soldier during 
the Civil war from Indiana, and was killed 
at Winchester, Virginia, in the battle of 
September 19, 1864. Her people were of 
Scotch-German descent. Her grandparents 
on her father's side were married Septem- 
ber 6, 1798. Grandfather Patterson was 
born April 14, 1769, and Grandmother Pat- 
terson was born July 29, 1776. 

The following children have been born 



to Mr. and Mrs. Graham: Harvey McClel- 
land, born August 23, 1871, was accident- 
ally killed in 1904; William H., was born 
in 1873, is living on a farm in Missouri, is 
married, but has no children living: Tillie 
Alma, who was born December 15, 1878, 
died January 28, 1879; Katie L., born May 
6, 1880, is the wife of Melvin Hamilton, 
and is living in Indiana. They have two 
children living. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Graham are active 
members of the Baptist church. Our sub- 
ject is a loyal Democrat, but seldom takes 
much interest in political affairs, however, 
his support is always for the good of the 
community in all questions. 

Our subject has been a great reader, hav- 
ing read the Bible through not less than six 
or seven times, besides scores of other good 
books and much pure literary matter. He 
relates that he has been acquainted with 
not less than five hundred of the Grahams 
and that he never knew or heard of 
one of them who ever used intoxicants of 
any kind or character, and but few of them 
who ever used tobacco., and about one-half 
of them are church people. 



ERASTUS D. TELFORD. 

Only those who come in personal con- 
tact with the gentleman whose name appears 
above, the popular and well known City At- 
torney of Salem, Illinois, can understand 
how thoroughly nature and training, habits 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL AM) REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



of thought and action, have enabled him to 
accomplish his life work and made him a fit 
representative of the enterprising class of 
professional people to which he belongs. He 
is a fine .type of the sturdy, conscientious 
American of today a man who unites a 
high order of ability with courage, pa- 
triotism, clean morality and sound common 
.sense, doing thoroughly and well the work 
that he finds to do and asking praise of no 
man for the performance of what he con- 
ceives to be his simple duty. 

Erastus D. Tel ford was born in Raccoon 
township, Marion county, April 23, 1874. 
J. D. Telford, whose life history is embod- 
ied in another part of this volume, who has 
long been a well known and influential char- 
acter about Salem, is the father of our sub- 
ject. Samuel G. Telford, who lives in 
Haines township, and who was born in 1827 
in this county, and who is still making his 
home two and one-half miles west of where 
he was born, is the subject's grandfather. 
His great-grandfather was James Telford, 
a native of South Carolina, who settled in 
Marion county in 1822, died in 1856. Our 
subject's father was the first Republican 
Sheriff of Marion county, having been 
elected in 1882. The mother of the subject 
was known in her maidenhood as Ann 
Wyatt, a native of Tennessee and the rep- 
resentative of a fine old southern family. 
Her father sold all his possessions in that 
state and came to Illinois in 1860, settling 
on the farm now owned by J. D. Telford, 
father of the subject of this sketch, to whom 
and his worthy and faithful life companion 



seven children were born, all living at this 
writing, named in order of birth as follows : 
Dr. A. T., of Olney, Illinois; Erastus D., 
our subject; Ula, of the United States Life 
Saving Station of Chicago ; Omer, who lives 
on a farm three miles west of Salem; Oran 
is living at .home; Erma, who is still a 
member of the family circle; J. D., Jr. 
These children were reared in a wholesome 
home atmosphere and were given every ad- 
vantage possible by their parents. 

E. D. Telford has lived in Salem for 
twenty-six years, or since his father moved 
here. He worked on the parental farm un- 
til he was twenty-one years old, where he 
received valuable training in the out door 
life of the country, not the least advantage 
of which was the acquisition of a robust con- 
stitution which is a necessary prerequisite 
for the battle of life in any field of endeavor. 
He attended the public schools in his neigh- 
borhood and later graduated in 1890 from 
the Salem high schools where he made a 
splendid record, for our subject early de- 
termined to secure a good education and fit 
himself as best he possibly could for life's 
ardent duties. 

After leaving school he decided to teach 
and consequently followed this line of work 
with marked success for a few years, during 
which time he became widely known 
throughout the county as an able instructor. 
But not being satisfied with the education 
he already possessed, and with the routine 
and somewhat obscure work of the teacher, 
he gave up his work and entered McKen- 
dree College, a denominational school at 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



143 



Lebanon, Illinois, from which institution he 
graduated with high honors in 1897, with 
the degree Bachelor of Science. Having 
decided to make the profession of law his 
life work, Mr. Telford in the fall of 1898 
went to Washington City and entered the 
law department of Georgetown University, 
where he made a brilliant record and from 
which institution he graduated in 1900. In 
the meantime he had been appointed to a po- 
sition in the United States Treasury depart- 
ment, his unusual talents having attracted 
the attention of authorities in this depart- 
ment. Mr. Telford remained in the Treas- 
ury department, where he gave the greatest 
satisfaction to the higher officials and where 
his work was very creditably and faithfully 
performed until April i, 1906, when he re- 
signed and returned to Salem, Illinois, for 
the purpose of engaging in the practice of 
law, and, useless to say that his success was 
instantaneous, and he at once had a large 
clientele, his office being sought by clients 
with a wide range of cases, and his fame 
soon overspread Marion county, extending 
to other fields, consequently he was fre- 
quently called to other localities on import- 
ant cases and his cool, careful, determined 
manner in presenting his arguments before 
a jury seldom failed in bringing a verdict in 
his favor. 

Mr. Telford was soon slated for political 
preferment, leaders in his party being quick 
to detect unusual ability as a public official 
in him, consequently in April, 1907, he was 
elected City Attorney of Salem, which posi- 
tion he now very creditably fills to the satis- 
faction of the entire community. At the 



primaries in August, 1908, he was nomi- 
nated by the Republicans for State Attorney 
for Marion county. 

Mr. Telford's domestic life dates from 
November i, 1900, when he was united in 
marriage with Coral M. Wright, the accom- 
plished daughter of William Wright, a well 
known and influential citizen of Lincoln, 
Nebraska. The following bright and inter- 
esting children have come into the cozy and 
pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. Telford, 
bringing additional sunshine: Elbridge 
Wright Telford, whose day of birth oc- 
curred September 29, 1901 ; Dorothy Mar- 
garet, who first saw the light of day on 
August 1 8, 1905. 

Mr. Telford has been a careful business 
man as well as a successful attorney, and he 
has accumulated rapidly, now being a stock- 
holder in the Salem National Bank, also the 
Salem Building and Loan Association. He 
is the owner of a modern, substantial and 
beautiful residence on North Broadway. 

In his fraternal relations, our subject is a 
member of the ancient and honorable order 
of Masons, the Blue Lodge and the Royal 
Arch Chapter; also a Modern Woodman. 
And both he and his wife are consistent and 
faithful members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. Mr. Telford is one of the sub- 
stantial and popular men of Marion county, 
and his home which is presided over with 
rare grace and dignity by Mrs. Telford, is 
the center of a genial hospitality. He is 
liberal in his support of all religious and 
charitable movements, and no one takes a 
greater pride in the progress of his commu- 
nity. 



144 



'.lor.K.MMIICAl. A\l> KKMIXISCKNT HISTORY OF 



\VILLIAM T. STORMENT. 

The gentleman whose name introduces 
this sketch is one of the leading farmers and 
fruit growers of Marion county, and also 
enjoys the distinction of being a representa- 
tive of two of the old and highly esteemed 
pioneer families of the township in which he 
lives. John Stormenit, his grandfather, 
a South Carolinian by birth, moved to 
Marion county about the year 1838, 
and purchased a large tract of govern- 
ment land, principally in what is now Haines 
township, the patents for which bearing the 
signature of President Van Buren are now 
in the possession of the subject of this re- 
view. John Storment became a prosperous ^ 
farmer and representative citizen and 
wielded a strong influence among the early 
settlers of Haines township, having been a 
man of great force of character and deter- 
mination of purpose. He did much to pro- 
mote the interests of agriculture and will 
long be remembered as one of the sterling 
yeomen to whose labors and influence the 
present flourishing condition of Haines 
township is largely due. 

William K. Storment, son of John Stor- 
ment and father of William T., was a native 
of Marion county and for many years one 
of the progressive farmers and enterprising- 
citizens of the township of Haines. He, too, 
was public spirited and a natural leader 
among his fellow men, stood high in the es- 
teem of all with whom he came into contact 
and belonged to that large and eminently re- 
spectable class who in a quiet but forceful 



way do so much for the material progress 
of the country and give moral tone to the 
body politic. At the breaking out of the late 
Civil war he enlisted in the One Hundred 
and Eleventh Illinois Infantry and devoted 
three of the best years of his life to the serv- 
ice of his country, participating in all the 
campaigns and battles in which his regiment 
was engaged and earning an honorable rec- 
ord as a brave and gallant defender of the 
Union. 

When a young man William K. Stormem 
married Miss Martha I. Wham, of Marion 
county, and in due time became the father 
of five children, namely: Elmer (deceased: 
Minnie (deceased); John R., a farmer and 
fruit grower of Mississippi ; William T., of 
this review, and one that died in infancy. 
The parents of these children were esteemed 
members of the United Presbyterian church 
and spared no pains to impress upon their 
young minds and hearts the principles of re- 
ligion and the beauty and value of a living 
Christian faith. William K. Storment was 
not only an influential man in the affairs of 
his church, but was also a local politician of 
considerable note, having been one of the 
leading Republicans of his township, though 
never a partisan, much less a seeker after 
the honors and emoluments of public office. 
He died some years ago on the home farm 
in Haines township, lamented by all who 
knew him, leaving to his descendants the 
memory of an honored name, which they 
value as a priceless heritage. Mrs. Storment 
is the daughter of William Wham, one of 
the early settlers of Marion county and an 




RESIDENCE OF W. T. STORMENT, 



OF WE ti|t .. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



145 



influential factor of the pioneer period. She 
is still living and enjoys the acquaintance of 
a large circle of friends, who hold her in the 
highest personal regard. 

William T. Storment, to a brief review of 
whose career the following lines are de- 
voted, was born in Haines township on the 
farm one mile north of Kell, which he now 
owns and occupies, September 10, 1867. 
Like the majority of country lads, he was 
reared to habits of industry, early became 
familiar with the various duties of farm life 
and in the public schools, which he attended 
at intervals during his minority, received his 
educational training. Manifesting a decided 
taste for mechanical pursuits while still 
young, he turned his abilities in this direc- 
tion to practical use by learning carpentry, at 
which he acquired more than ordinary pro- 
ficiency and which he followed for some 
years in his own and neighboring localities, 
a number of residences and other edifices 
bearing witness to his ability and skill as a 
builder. After a time, however, he discon- 
tinued his trade and purchasing the home 
farm, has since given his attention to agri- 
culture and fruit growing, meeting with 
most encouraging success and achieving 
much more than local repute as a progres- 
sive and up-to-date tiller of the soil. In the 
meantime he has made many valuable im- 
provements on the place, remodeling the 
house and converting it into a first class mod- 
ern dwelling with all the latest conveniences, 
including among others a heating plant that 
adds greatly to the comfort of the home, be- 
sides lessening in no small degree the ex- 
10 



pense of providing fuel. The barn, which is 
one of the largest and most conveniently ar- 
ranged buildings of the kind in the neigh- 
borhood, is a model of architectural and 
mechanical skill, while all the other improve- 
ments are in keeping therewith, the farm 
consisting of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres of highly improved land, being one of 
the most valuable as well as one of the most 
desirable places of its area in Marion county. 
Mr. Storment takes a pardonable pride in 
his home and has spared neither pains nor 
expense in making it beautiful and attractive 
and it is now conceded to be one of the fin- % 
est country seats not only in Marion county, 
but in the southern part of the state. Be- 
lieving this section of Illinois to possess the 
necessary characteristics for successful fruit 
growing, Mr. Storment some years ago 
planted a part of his farm in choice apple, 
pear and peach trees, the results in due time 
more than realizing his highest expectations. 
Encouraged by the success of the venture, 
he continued planting from time to time, un- 
til he now has one hundred and ten acres in 
fruit, the income from which far surpasses 
what he ever received from the raising of 
grain. He makes horticulture not only his 
chief business, but pursues it with the en- 
thusiasm and delight of a pastime. He de- 
votes much time to the study of the subject, 
reduces his researches to practical tests, and 
in this way has made the business very re- 
munerative. By employing scientific meth- 
ods, such as proper fertilizing, spraying, 
pruning, etc., he never fails to realize abun- 
dant crops of the finest fruits raised in this 



i 4 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



part of the state, and that, too, when other 
orchards fail entirely or at least bear but a 
scanty supply and of a poor and inferior 
quality. Among the improvements of which 
he makes use is a portable gas engine for the 
purpose of spraying, the value of which in 
the saving of time as well as of insuring full 
yields is many hundred fold in excess of the 
amount the contrivance cost. 

Mr. Storment is not only the leading hor- 
ticulturist in Marion county, but as a farm- 
er he also occupies a place in the front rank. 
making use of modern implements and ma- 
,chinery and employing only the most ap- 
proved methods in the cultivation of the soil. 
He is essentially progressive in his ideas, be- 
lieves that satisfactory results can only be ob- 
tained from the exercise of sound judgment 
and wise discretion and possessing the abil- 
ity to foresee with remarkable accuracy the 
future outcome of present action, he is sel- 
dom if ever disappointed in any of his plans 
or undertakings. A man of strong charac- 
ter and inflexible integrity, he stands high 
as a citizen, takes an active interest in pub- 
lic matters both general and local and all 
measures and enterprises for the material 
progress of the country and the social and 
moral advancement of the people are sure to 
enlist his hearty co-operation and support. 
His political views are in harmony with the 
principles and traditions of the Republican 
party, and while firm in his convictions and 
earnest and fearless in maintaining the 
soundness of his opinions, he cannot be 
called a partisan, nor has he ever disturbed 
the even tenor of his life by aspiring to of- 



fice or leadership. He is first of all a credit- 
able representative of the ancient and hon- 
orable calling of agriculture and as such he 
ranks among the most enterprising and suc- 
cessful men in the state, this, with the simple 
title of citizen, being sufficient to make him 
contented with his lot, as well as an example 
to his fellow men in correct living. 

The domestic life of Mr. Storment dates 
from 1892, in which year he was united in 
marriage with Esta Davis, of Marion coun- 
ty, daughter of Bloom P. and Mariah (Al- 
bert) Davis, both natives of Illinois, the fa- 
ther of Jefferson county, the mother of the 
county of Marion. Mr. and Mrs. Storment 
are esteemed members of the United Presby- 
terian church, belonging to what is known as 
the Romine Prairie congregation and active 
in all lines of religious and charitable work 
under the auspices of the same. Socially they 
are numbered among the best people of the 
community in which they reside and their 
popularity is limited only by the circle of 
their acquaintance. The Davis family, to 
which Mrs. Storment belongs, has long oc- 
cupied a conspicuous place in the confidence 
and respect of the people of Marion county 
and its reputation for honorable manhood 
and womanhood is second to that of no oth- 
er family in this part of the state. For many 
years the name has been identified with the 
Christian church of Marion and neighboring 
counties, Mr. Davis and his wife having 
been prominent members of that body and 
influential in religious work in their own and 
other localities. Mrs. Storment is the oldest 
of a family of four children, three sisters and 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



a brother, namely: Maggie, who married 
Ernest Kell, of Marion county ; Anderson, 
who lives on the home farm, and Minnie, 
who is unmarried and also a member of the 
home circle. 



JUDGE THEODORE AUGUSTUS 
FRITCHEY. 

When it is stated that the subject of this 
sketch has served as postmaster of Olney for 
three terms, or since 1897, the significance 
is so patent that nothing further need be 
said as indicating the confidence and 
esteem in which he is held by the 
people of Richland county. As an 
able official and representative and popu- 
lar citizen, we are pleased to record in this 
work a sketch of the life of Mr. Fritchey, who 
is one of the best known men in the county, 
and who for many years was among the 
most prominent members of the bar and 
bench in this locality, and who, during his 
long residence here has done so much for 
the material, civic, educational and moral 
advancement of the county, ever having its 
interests at heart and losing no opportunity 
to help others in the work of progress 
while advancing his own interests. 

Theodore Augustus Fritchey was born in 
Montgomery county, Ohio, near Dayton, 
April 24, 1855, the son of Benjamin and Eliz- 
abeth (McQueeny) Fritchey, natives of 
Pennsylvania where they were reared and 
where they married, later moving to Mont- 
gomery county, Ohio, locating in Baltimore, 



where the father engaged in merchandising. 
In 1870 he came to Olney where he continued 
in the mercantile busines until his death in 
1876, at the age of seventy years. His worthy 
life companion passed to her rest in 1900, at 
the age of seventy-five years. They were 
people of many praiseworthy traits and hon- 
orable at all times. They were the parents 
of eight children, all deceased except the sub- 
ject of this sketch and one daughter, Mrs. 
J. I. Moutray, of Kokomo, Indiana, the sub- 
ject having been the fifth in order of birth. 
He was reared in Ohio and Illinois, receiving 
a public school education. He was an ambi- 
tious lad and when twenty years old began 
the study of law with Wilson and Hutchin- 
son, for years the leading law firm of South- 
ern Illinois. He made rapid progress and 
was admitted to the bar in 1879. He then 
formed a partnership with Judge J. C. Allen, 
which continued until 1907. They did ar. 
immmense business, the combination being 
one of peculiar power and their clients came 
from all parts of the county and surrounding 
counties, it being generally recognized as one 
of the best firms in the locality. The subject 
became prosperous through his successful 
practice and since the date mentioned ha= 
been practically retired, having given up all 
legal practice, preferring to devote all his 
time to the post-office and his business inter- 
ests in Richland and adjoining counties. He 
has large interests in oil. 

In his political relations our subject is a 
Republican, always loyal to his party's prin- 
ciples and always active. When he was 
twenty-one years old he was elected City 



i 4 8 



I'.IOCKAPHICAL AND RKM I X ISfKXT HISTORY OF 



Clerk by a majority of one, and he so faith- 
fully did his work that he was re-electe'J to 
serve four years in all. In 1881 he was 
elected City Attorney for one term of two 
years. Then for two terms of four years as 
County Judge. He made a splendid record 
both as City Attorney and as Judge, dispos- 
ing of many important cases in a manner that 
stamped him as an able and learned jurist and 
well versed in the law. In 1897 he was ap- 
pointed postmaster of Olney by President 
McKinley and is now (1909) serving his 
third term with entire satisfaction. 

Judge Fritchey's happy domestic life be- 
gan in 1889, when he was united in mar- 
riage with Mary Eliza Bucher, a native of 
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, the daughter of 
John E. and Mary E. (Eby) Bucher, also na- 
tives of Pennsylvania. They moved to Ohio, 
where her father became the head of graded 
and high schools and where he died. Mrs. 
Bucher lives with her daughter, wife of our 
subject. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fritchey are the parents of 
two children, both giving promise of suc- 
cessful futures, and who are receiving every 
care and attention from their fond parents. 
They bear the names Paul B. and Theodore 
A., Jr. 

In his fraternal relations Judge Fritchey 
belongs to the ancient and honored Masonic 
Order, Knights Templar, also the Shrine. 
He is a charter member of Olney lodge No. 
926, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. Mr. and Mrs. Fritchey are faithful 
and consistent members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. They have a beautiful 



home in which is a fine library of choice 
volumes, where the judge spends many hours 
in reading and reflection, and they are known 
as people of kindness, integrity and culture. 

Judge Fritchey stands admittedly in the 
front ranks of Richland county's distin- 
guished citizens, possessing a thorough 
knowledge of law and keeping in close touch 
with the trend of modern thought. He has 
ever maintained his high standing, never de- 
scending beneath the dignity of his profes- 
sion nor compromising his usefulness by 
countenancing any but legitimate practice. 



LEANDER C. MATTHEWS. 

The subject has spent his entire life in this 
county and he has always had deeply at 
heart the well-being and improvement of the 
county, using his influence whenever pos- 
sible for the promotion of enterprises cal- 
culated to be of lasting benefit to his fellow 
men, besides taking a leading part in all 
movements for the advancement of the com- 
munity along social, intellectual and moral 
lines. 

Leander C. Matthews was born South of 
Salem, in the edge of Jefferson county, May 
25, 1848, the son of Andrew J. and Hulda 
(Swafford) Matthews, natives of Tennessee 
and Illinois, respectively, and both repre- 
sentatives of honorable and well known 
families in their own communities. 

Our subject remained under his parental 
roof until he reached man's estate and at- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



149 



tended the district schools in his native com- 
munity and in Centralia, where he applied 
himself in a careful manner and received a 
good education. 

Mr. Matthews early decided to devote his 
life to a business career and he has bent 
every effort to this end with gratifying re- 
sults. 

He commenced a general business in 1883 
at Fairman, Marion county, Illinois, where 
he remained ten years with much success at- 
tending his efforts. He is at this writing 
engaged in the hay, grain and implement 
business in Kinmundy, this county, and is 
conducting a thriving business, his trade 
extending to all parts of the county and 
penetrating to adjoining counties, in 
fact he is one of the best known 
dealers in these lines in this part of the state 
and the able manner in which he conducts 
his business and his courteous treatment 
with those with whom he deals insure him 
a liberal income from year to year. 

Mr. Matthews was united in marriage Oc- 
tober 8, 1873, to S. Elizabeth Lydick, who 
was born near Odin, this county, December 
24, 1854, the refined and affable daughter 
of Isaac and Sarah (Sugg) Lydick, a well 
known family of that locality. 

The following family has been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Matthews: Lillian, Baby, 
Hallie, Hulda, Carl. They have all gone to 
their rest except Hulda, who is the wife of 
Albert C. Dunlap, of Champaign, Illinois. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Matthews is 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Kinmundy, also of the Knights 



of Pythias of this place. In politics he is a 
loyal Democrat and takes a vital interest in 
his party's affairs, however, he has never 
aspired to positions of public trust. Both 
he and his wife are members of the Chris- 
tian church, and our subject is regarded as 
one of the substantial church workers of 
Kinmundy, and he has long taken an active 
part in all religious affairs. He is a man 
of large public spirit and enterprise, and per- 
sonally is of the genial and sunny type, 
pleasant to meet and makes friends readily. 
He likes a good story and enjoys a good 
joke, and because of these qualities of com- 
mendation and genuine worth Mr. Mat- 
thews has won a host of warm friends which 
he retains, being popular with all classes in 
his community where he maintains a home 
that is comfortable, substantial and pleasant 
in all its appointments and which is regarded 
as a place of generous hospitality and good 
cheer. 



THE OLNEY SANITARIUM. 

One of the important institutions of Rich- 
land county, Illinois, in fact, one of the best 
known in the southern part of the state, is 
the Olney Sanitarium. Its phenomenal 
growth in a short time from a modest begin- 
ning to a prominent place, has been due to 
the untiring efforts and extraordinary surgi- 
cal and business ability of the founder, Dr. 
George T. Weber. Fourteen years ago, 1894, 
he had just received his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine and had begun practice as a young 



AX1) KKMIX1SCKXT HISTORY OF 



man without means ; however, he was always 
ambitious and an assiduous worker and made 
a good record in school, and it was predicted 
by his instructors and friends that the future 
held great things in store for him. His first 
practice was in the village of Ingraham, Clay 
county, near his birthplace, where he re- 
mained for four years with growing popular- 
ity and success, during which time his work 
in surgery and special cases had attracted 
more than ordinary attention and had sug- 
gested to him the necessity and desirability 
of a central point, where patients could be 
cared for better than at their hofnes. Accord- 
ingly in 1898 he came to Olney and purchased 
the old Arlington hotel building, a three- 
story brick structure which was duly remod- 
eled and equipped for hospital purposes. 

The hospital was thrown open for the re- 
ception of patients in the fall of 1898 and 
from the first the success of the undertaking 
was assured. It soon became necessary to em- 
ploy assistants and in due time Doctor Ziliak 
became a partner. During the years 1900 
and 1901, a three-story addition, which now 
constitutes the main part of the structure, was 
erected, making possible the care of twenty- 
four additional patients in as many rooms. 
In the latter part of 1905, a brother of the 
founder, F. J. Weber, who had recently 
graduated from a medical college, bought the 
interest of Doctor Ziliak, since which time the 
business has been owned and conducted by 
Webers. In 1907, another brother, J. C. 
Weber, also a physician and surgeon, be- 
came interested in the sanitarium, also two 
sisters, Catherine and Philomena Weber, 



both of whom are graduated and very pro- 
ficient nurses. A stock company was accord- 
ingly formed and incorporated March 5, 
1907, with a capital stock of forty thousand 
dollars and the following officers were elected 
which continue to serve at this writing: 
George T. Weber, president; Frank J. 
Weber, secretary and treasurer. The stock- 
holders include the above and Joseph C. r 
Catherine and Philomena Weber. 

No institution of a similar nature ever had 
a more rapid growth and it is today regarded 
as one of the best in the state. The busi- 
ness of the sanitarium is devoted principally 
to surgical and special cases, also chronic 
cases and some mild forms of nervous dis- 
eases. Hundreds of operations are annually 
performed here and are uniformly successful. 

The Olney Sanitarium is a three-story 
brick structure, with a basement underneath 
the entire building with accommodations for 
thirty-six patients. It is operated at the 
limit of its capacity all the time and plans are 
being considered for further enlarging the 
building, the numerous application of pa- 
tients all over the country rendering more 
room a necessity. The basement is used for a 
drug department, storage purposes and the. 
keeping of fruits, vegetables, etc. The first 
floor is devoted to reception rooms, offices, 
consultation rooms, dining room and kitchen, 
rooms and verandas for canvalescents, etc. 
The upper floors are devoted to wards for 
patients. The operating room is on the sec- 
ond floor. It is sixteen by sixteen feet and 
contains everything in modern equipment 
usually found in institutions of like character. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



Fourteen trained nurses are employed con- 
tinually and six ether employes are constantly 
in the building, helping in various ways. Dr. 
Frank J. Weber is the house physician and 
Miss Catherine Weber is the superintendent. 

George T. Weber, M. D., was born in In- 
graham, Clay county, Illinois, September 10, 
1868, the son of Benedict and Regina (Scha- 
fer) Weber, the former a native of Germany, 
who came to the United States when twenty- 
six years old, and the latter was born in Gib- 
son county, Indiana, of German parents. 
They were married in Indiana and in 1865 
settfld in Jasper county, near Ingraham. His 
father was a carpenter and farmer. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was reared on a farm in 
his native township. He received a common 
school education there and an academic 
training at Princeton, Indiana, from which 
institution he graduated, having taught 
school in the meantime to get money for a 
higher education. His parents were poor 
and reared a large family, there being nine 
children in number, of whom our subject is 
the oldest son living. He entered Washing- 
ton University at St. Louis in 1891, taking a 
medical course and graduating in 1894. He 
located in his home town and practiced for 
four years, his success having been instanta- 
neous, especially in surgical cases. He came 
to Olney in 1898, having purchased a build- 
ing here and he had some equipment before 
moving. 

Dr. George T. Weber's domestic life began 
November 28. 1894, when he married Eliza- 
beth Hausner, daughter of Joseph and Ger- 
trude (Nix) Hausner, former residents of 



Clay county, a well known and influential 
family there for many years. Mr. Hausner, 
who was a cabinet maker, is deceased, as is 
also his wife. The subject and wife are the 
parents of nine children, namely : Gertrude, 
Helen, Pauline ; George, Jr., was killed in an 
accident by colliding with a horse and buggy 
in 1907, having been knocked from a wheel 
and receiving a fracture to the skull ; Ber- 
nard, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, George, sec- 
ond junior. 

In politics our subject is a Democrat, but 
is not active. However, he takes an interest 
in whatever relates to the development of 
his community. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and the Knights of Columbus. He and his 
family are faithful followers of the Catholic 
church. He is a member of the American 
Medical Association, the Illinois State Medi- 
cal Society, the Southern Illinois State Medi- 
cal Society, the Richland County Medical 
Society, being influential and prominent in 
all. He is a very progressive man, is a stu- 
dent at all times and devotes his entire time to 
his profession. In 1907 he took a post-gradu- 
ate course at the Post-Graduate School in 
Chicago, giving special attention to surgery. 

Joseph Cornelius Weber, M. D., was born 
in Jasper county, Illinois, October i, 1875, 
and was reared on the farm, receiving his ed- 
ucation in the public schools, the high school 
at Ingraham and Austin College, Effingham, 
Illinois. In the fall of 1896 he entered the 
Missouri Medical College at St. Louis, from 
which he graduated in 1899. He ranked 
high in his class and was successful from the 



152 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



first. He practiced one year at Newton in the 
place of Doctor Crawley, whose health was 
impaired. During the following seven years 
he was at Clay City, Clay county. He then 
came to Olney and joined his brother in the 
fall of 1907, becoming a stockholder in the 
Sanitarium corporation, as already intimated. 

The married life of Dr. Joseph C. Weber 
began in 1900 when he was united in the 
bonds of matrimony with Zula Kepp, a native 
of Ingraham, Illinois, the daughter of Corne- 
lius and Mary (Pew) Kepp, natives of Clay 
county, the former having died there in 1906. 
Two children have blessed the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. J. C. Weber, Paul and Frank. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
also a member of the American Medical As- 
sociation, the Illinois State Medical Associa- 
tion, the Southern Illinois Medical Associa- 
tion, the Richland and Clay county Medical 
societies. 

Frank J. Weber, M. D., was born on a 
farm in Jasper county, Illinois, July 23, 1878, 
where he was reared. He attended the com- 
mon schools at Ingraham, also Austin Col- 
lege at Effingham. He entered \Vashington 
University at St. Louis in 1900, having grad- 
uated with honor from the medical depart- 
ment in 1904. He located in Clay City and 
was there engaged in practice with his broth- 
er, Dr. J. C. Weber, for seven months, after 
which he came to Olney and purchased Doc- 
tor Ziliak's interest in the sanitarium and 
joined his brother. Dr. George T., in the work. 
When the corporation was formed he became 
the secretary and treasurer, as already stated, 



and the resident physician. He is a member 
of the Richland County Medical Society, the 
Illinois State Medical Society and the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. He was united in 
marriage, May 29, 1908, to Gertrude Loftin, 
a native of Spencer, Indiana, and the daugh- 
ter of J. C. and lola (Hoover) Loftin, now 
residents of Marion, Indiana. Dr. Frank J. 
Weber is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, No. 926. and in 
politics he is a Democrat. Like his brothers 
he is a man of many commendable character- 
istics and they all make friends easily. 



GEORGE S. RAINEY, M. D. 

Good intellectual training, thorough pro- 
fessional knowledge and the possession and 
utilization of the qualities and attributes es- 
sential to success, have made the subject of 
this review eminent in his chosen calling, 
and he stands today among the enterprising 
and successful physicians in a community 
noted for its high order of medical talent, 
while at the same time he has won the con- 
fidence and esteem of the people of Marion 
and adjoining counties for his upright life 
and genial disposition. 

Dr. George S. Rainey was born in Salem, 
Illinois, May 18, 1849, and he is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rainey, 
Scotch-Irish people of the best ancestry as 
far back as it can be traced. The father was 
a Kentuckian, who came to Illinois as early 
as 1832, settling in Marion county on a farm 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



153 



which he transformed from a practically 
wild tract to a highly improved and produc- 
tive farm. When the doctor was two years 
old, his father moved on a farm near Wal- 
nut Hill, Marion county. He was a man of 
many sterling qualities, like those of most 
pioneers, and he became a man of consider- 
able influence in this- county, being known 
as an honest and worthy citizen in every 
respect. He was called from his earthly 
labors in 1868. The subject's mother, a 
woman of praiseworthy character, was 
known in her maidenhood as Margaret 
Cunningham, and was also a native of Ken- 
tucky; her father, a man of unusual forti- 
tude and sterling character, moved to Illi- 
nois in 1824. Seven children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Rainey died in infancy. Their 
other children are: Dr. J. K. Rainey, the 
oldest child, died in Florida; Matthew was 
a surgeon in the One Hundred and Eleventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry in the Union 
Army, and was the first soldier from Marion 
county to fall in the Civil war, having lost 
his life at the battle of Bellmont while a 
member of the Twenty-second Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry; Dr. A. H. Rainey, of Cen- 
tralia, Illinois. 

Our subject was a mere lad during the 
war between the states, but he felt it his 
duty to sever home ties and offer his services 
in defense of the flag, consequently he en- 
listed in the Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry when he lacked two months of 
being sixteen years old, but his bravery and 
gallantry were equal to that of the oldest 
veteran in the regiment. He served in the 



campaign around Petersburg, Richmond, 
and was at the surrender of Lee at Appa- 
mattox, thus being in some of the bloodiest 
engagements of the war. After receiving 
an honorable discharge he returned home 
and assisted his father with the farm work, 
attending the neighboring schools, complet- 
ing the high school course at Salem, stand- 
ing in the front rank of his class, for he 
was a diligent student and made the best use 
possible of his time. Believing that his tal- 
ents lay along medical lines he began study- 
ing for a career as a physician. He 
graduated in medicine in 1875 at the Louis- 
ville Medical College. He at once began 
practice in Salem, his success being instan- 
taneous, and he has been here ever since, 
having always had a very large practice in 
this vicinity and throughout the county. 

Dr. Rainey has taken a post-graduate 
course in the New York Polyclinic Institute 
of Physicians and Surgeons, having spent 
the winter of 1888 in the school just men- 
tioned. Dr. Rainey has also taken special 
courses in medical colleges in St. Louis and 
Chicago, consequently he is today and has 
been for many years at the head of his pro- 
fession, being so recognized by the eminent 
practitioners of medicine in other parts of 
Illinois. He has also been connected with 
the Baltimore & Ohio and Chicago & East- 
ern Illinois railroads as surgeon ever since 
he has been in practice. 

The subject has been a member of the 
United States Pension Board of Salem for 
twenty-five years. The doctor is at all 
times patriotic and ever ready to serve his 



154 



KIC.K.U'HICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



country, consequently when the war with 
Spain broke out he offered his services and 
was commissioned a surgeon in the United 
States army, but the war terminated before 
he saw active service. 

Doctor Rainey's happy and tranquil do- 
mestic life dates from 1878, when he was 
married to May McMackin, the cultured 
and accomplished daughter of Col. W. 
E. McMackin of the Twenty-first Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. Colonel McMackin 
was for many years one of the best known 
and most influential men in his community. 

To doctor and Mrs. Rainey one son has 
been born, Warren R., who, in 1908, is a 
student in the medical department of the 
Northwestern University at Chicago, where 
he is making an excellent record. 

Doctor Rainey is the owner of a large and 
fine fruit farm which is very valuable, and 
he takes a great interest in it and horticul- 
tural subjects, devoting considerable time 
to the culture of fine fruits. He has been in 
general practice ever since his graduation, 
and as indicated above, not only stands high 
in his immediate community but also with 
his fellow practitioners at large, being a 
member of the County, State and National 
Medical Association, also of the American 
Railway Surgeons of America. 

Fraternally he is a loyal member of the 
Masonic Order and carries out its sublime 
doctrines in his relations with his fellow 
men. He is a Presbyterian in his religious 
faith, and in politics he is a stanch advocate 
of the principles and policies of the Repub- 
lican party, with which he has always been 



affiliated. Though never animated with 
ambition for political preferment he has ever 
lent his aid in furthering the party cause, 
and is well fortified in his political convic- 
tions, while he is at all times public-spirited 
to an extent of loyalty. 



EDMUND C. BAUGHMAN. 

Agriculture has been the true source of 
man's dominion on earth ever since the pri- 
mal existence of labor, and has been the piv- 
otal industry that has controlled for the 
most part all the fields of action to which his 
intelligence and energy have been devoted. 
Among this sturdy element of Richland 
county whose labors have profited alike 
themselves and the community in which 
they live, is the gentleman whose name ap- 
pears at the head of this sketch. . 

Edmund C. Baughman, a well known 
farmer and stockman of Olney, was born in 
Coshocton county, Ohio, December 27, 
1837, the son of Jacob and Matilda M. 
(Houser) Baughman, the former having 
been, born near Baltimore, Maryland, and 
the latter on the Potomac river, Virginia. 
Grandfather Baughman was a native of 
Maryland and was a contractor in Balti- 
more for many years, where he also carried 
an extensive factory for those times in the 
manufacture of sash and doors, blinds, etc. 
In an early day in the history of Coshocton 
county he went there and entered land, hav- 
ing crossed the Alleghany mountains on 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARIOX COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



155 



horseback, and had bear meat and wild 
honey on the trip. However, he did not live 
in Ohio but died in Baltimore, where his 
wife also died. Jacob Baughman was reared 
on a farm near Baltimore, and when young 
went to Coshocton county, Ohio, where he 
bought land and erected a hewn log cabin 
in the heavy timber, in which there was all 
kinds of wild game, deer, wild turkey, bear, 
etc. He married in Coshocton county, his 
wife having come to the county from Vir- 
ginia with her parents who were pioneers. 
They cleared and improved the land, and 
there they lived and died. He was a mem- 
ber of the state militia but was never called 
upon to serve in any war. He died of pneu- 
monia at the age of sixty-eight years, and 
his wife survived for several years, dying at 
the advanced age of ninety-two. Eight 
children were born to them, six of whom 
are living. Two sons served in the Civil 
war, George and Zenos, the latter with 
Sherman's army, both serving until the close 
of the war, receiving honorable discharges. 
Zenos suffered from sunstroke from which 
he never fully recovered. The subject, who 
was the fourth child in order of birth, was 
reared on the old homestead in his native 
county and received a good education, first 
in the country schools, later at the academy 
in West Bedford, Ohio. He remained at 
home until he was twenty years old, assist- 
ing with the farm work, finally going to In- 
diana, where he taught school for awhile, 
but in the spring of 1860 he came to Rich- 
land county, bringing all the earthly pos- 
sessions he had a team, wagon, a shepherd 



dog, a trunk and less than one hundred dol- 
lars in money, having driven the entire dis- 
tance. After reaching here he located on 
one hundred and twenty acres of land given 
him by his father in Madison township, 
which had previously been entered by his 
father, on which he went to work and im- 
proved it, making an excellent farm, build- 
ing a house, barn, etc. 

Our subject was a good manager and was- 
successful. After he married he purchased 
six hundred acres in Wayne county, on 
which he lived for a time, later moving to 
Olney, where he has recently built a beauti- 
ful home, up-to-date in every detail. For 
many years he has been extensively engaged 
in stock raising, being an excellent judge of 
stock and always keeping many good varie- 
ties. He is a man of great energy and a 
hard worker, possessing excellent judgment, 
conservative in his business transactions. He 
deserves a great deal of credit for what he 
has accomplished, for he started with only 
one hundred and twenty acres of raw land 
and has gradually increased his holdings 
until he now owns four thousand acres of 
valuable land in the Yazoo Valley, Missis- 
sippi, also three thousand acres of timber 
land, together with lands in Texas and the 
old homestead in Ohio, which he bought 
from the heirs. 

In 1890 Mr. Baughman organized the 
bank at Tuscola, Illinois, under the name 
Baughman, Orr & Company, with a capital 
stock of thirty-five thousand dollars, which 
was successful from the first, and has con- 
tinued with increasing prestige ever since,. 



156 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



the stock having been increased, it being one 
of the soundest institutions in this part of 
the state. One of the subject's sons is look- 
ing after his interests. In 1902 he disposed 
of his interest in the bank to his partners. 
Mr. Baughman is still very active but does 
not handle stock on a very extensive scale at 
present, which proved to l>e so profitable 
during his earlier business career, making a 
fortune, being easily the richest man in 
Richland county, and not a dishonest dollar 
has passed through his hands. 

Mr. Baughman was married March 28, 
1 86 1, to Gabriella Reeder, who was born in 
Cincinnati, the daughter of Elijah and Lu- 
cinda (Smith) Reeder, who were born near 
Dayton, Ohio, and who came to Richland 
county in the fall of 1853, settling on a farm 
in Madison township. In 1871 they moved 
to Kansas, later to Missouri, and died in 
Harrison, Arkansas. 

Our subject and wife are the parents of 
eight children who grew to maturity and are 
still living, as follows: Edmund J. resides 
in Duncan, Mississippi, where he owns a 
plantation and also manages that of his 
father, and is a very successful business 
man; Lucinda married James Wilson, who 
resides on a farm in Wayne county, where 
she died in 1900; Lottie married J. M. Wi- 
nans, a groceryman of Olney; Harry C. re- 
sides in Greenville, Mississippi, where he 
owns and operates an extensive plantation ; 
William R. resides in Southwestern Texas, 
being engaged in farming and the land busi- 
ness; Ola married George H. Bainum, who 
died in Independence, Missouri, in 1904, 



leaving one daughter, Ella M., who lives 
with the subject and wife; Frank graduated 
from the Olney schools in 1901, then spent 
three years at the University of Illinois, at 
Champaign, having stood at the head of his 
class in chemistry and making an excellent 
record as a student. During certain experi- 
mental work he was poisoned by gases from 
which he died in February, 1907. Carl R., 
the subject's youngest child, resides at Rich- 
land, Washington, where he is engaged in 
the fruit industry. These children are in- 
dustrious and well situated in reference to 
this world's affairs. 

Mr. Baughman is a Republican, but he is 
not a politician, not having time to devote 
much attention to the affairs of his party. 

He was appointed by Governor John P. 
Altgeld one of the trustees of the State Nor- 
mal University at Carbondale, having been 
on the financial and building committees. He 
served as Supervisor of Richland county for 
one term, during which time bonds were re- 
funded to the amount of two hundred thou- 
sand dollars, which redeemed the bonds over 
which there had been litigaton to the amount 
of more than three hundred thousand dol- 
lars. 

Mr. and Mrs. Baughman are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church at Olney, 
and liberal subscribers to the same, Mr. 
Baughman having been one of the principal 
supporters of the new church building recent- 
ly erected, which would be a credit to cities 
much larger than Olney. 

In business matters Mr. Baughman is 
prompt, energetic, trustworthy. He has a 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 



157 



good fund of that quality too often lacking 
in the business world common sense. 
Since starting out in life for himself he has 
been self-reliant and progressive. It is all 
attributable to the splendid qualities of head 
and heart of which he is possessed, and 
which he has most judiciously exercised. 
And because of his honest and active career 
no resident in Richland county is more de- 
serving of honorable mention in this vol- 
ume. 



WILLIAM JASPER YOUNG. 

The subject of this biographical review 
is among the pioneer farmers of luka town- 
ship, Marion county, where he has long 
maintained his home, being one of the na- 
tive sons of the county who have done so 
much to develop Marion in all her phases 
until she ranks with the leading counties 
of the great Prairie state, and now in the 
golden evening of his life this venerable 
citizen is enjoying the fruits of a well spent 
life and the esteem of a wide circle of 
friends. . 

William Jasper Young was born in Mar- 
ion county, Illinois, June 21, 1826, in Cen- 
tralia township, the son of Edward and 
Sarah C. (Duncan) Young, the former a 
native of Virginia and the latter of Ten- 
nessee. Edward Young grew up in Vir- 
ginia, and when he reached maturity he 
moved to Kentucky, later came to Indiana 
and prior to 1826 settled in Marion county, 
Illinois. He was a plasterer and bricklayer, 



and he made his home in several different 
places after coming to Illinois, among them 
being Alton, St. Louis, Belleville, Centralia 
and Salem. Later in life he settled on the 
farm. Edward Young was born June 8, 
1803, and died June 9, 1876. He was a sol- 
dier in the Black Hawk war. He was, 
early in life, a Democrat, and he cut down 
the first Whig pole ever erected in Salem. 
However, he later became a Republican. 
These children were bom to Edward Young 
and wife, as follows: Lysander Franklin, 
William Jasper, our subject; Julia Ann, de- 
ceased; Letta Jane, deceased; James, de- 
ceased; Harriet, deceased; Edward, living 
in Minnesota ; Sarah also lives in Minnesota. 

Sarah C. Duncan, mother of the subject, 
was born July 22, 1808, and died November 
9, 1886. She was a woman of many beau- 
tiful traits of character. 

The subject of this sketch worked on his 
father's farm from the time he was old 
enough to work, and he has followed farm- 
ing all his life. In 1852 he came to his 
present farm in luka township, Marion 
county, having bought a part of it from the 
government or state. At that time the for- 
ests abounded in much wild game, such as 
deer, wolves, wild turkey. He has seen 
many a herd of deer from his cabin door. 
He cleared up the land and now has a model 
farm and modern farm buildings, all well 
kept, and his home is nicely and comfort- 
ably furnished. A glance over his well 
tilled and well fenced fields is sufficient to 
show that he is a man of thrift and rare 
soundness of judgment. He has in all about 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



three hundred acres, but he now rents out 
the land and is practically retired. He han- 
dles some good stock of various varieties. 

April 13, 1847, Mr. Young was united 
in marriage with Sarah J. Songer, who was 
born in Washington county, Indiana, Au- 
gust 7, 1828, the daughter of Frederick and 
Jane (Helm) Songer, natives of Virginia, 
but they came to Washington county, In- 
diana, when -young and married there, and 
in 1828 came to Clay county, Illinois, where 
they lived for a time. In 1835 they came 
to Marion county, settling in Omega town- 
ship, where they farmed and where they 
died. They were members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. 

Eleven children have been born to the 
subject and wife, namely: Amanda Elmira 
died in childhood; Marcus D. married 
Sarah Bobbett and they have two children. 
Franklin and Ada; Mary E. is the wife of 
George Cox, of Salem, Illinois; Emily El- 
vina is the wife of William Robinson, a 
farmer living in luka township, and she is 
the mother of two children, Ernest Roy and 
Flo; Eliza Alice, deceased, was the wife of 
Perry Cox and she left two children, Wil- 
liam Jasper and George; Jennie is the wife 
of Grant Bumgarner, who lives in Texas; 
Douglas married Irena Buffington and they 
have two children, Charles and Ruth ; Paul 
married Martha Criffield; Fred married 
Elva Wooden and they have three children, 
Pearl, Winafred and Verl ; the tenth and 
eleventh children of the subject died un- 
named. 

Our subject has three great-grandchil- 



dren. He and his good wife are now both 
more than eighty years old and are remark- 
ably bright and active people for their years 
and considering the long years of hard work 
they both have done. Their happy, pros- 
perous and harmonious wedded life extends 
over sixty years of time and they have cele- 
brated their golden wedding anniversary. 
They are among the highly respected and 
prominent citizens of the county and greatly 
admired and beloved by everyone who 
knows them. Our subject is a loyal Demo- 
crat. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church at luka. They 
have always contributed liberally to church 
work, also have helped out school work and 
all kinds of public enterprises. Fraternally 
Mr. Young has belonged to the Masons 
since 1863. 

Mr. Young was one of the brave and 
patriotic supporters of the Union who of- 
fered his services and his life in its 
defense during the War of the Re- 
bellion, having enlisted in Company 
E, One Hundred and Eleventh Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry, August 8, 1862, 
and served in a most gallant manner until 
the close of the war. He was mustered in 
at Salem, Illinois, and mustered out in 
Washington, District of Columbia, and dis- 
charged at Springfield, Illinois. He was in 
the Second Brigade, Second Division, Fif- 
teenth Army Corps, under General John A. 
Logan. He first did post duty at Columbus, 
Ohio, awhile, and then, in 1864, joined 
Sherman in his campaign about Atlanta, 
and was in the first battle of Resaca and in 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



159 



the last battle of Shiloh. He also fought at 
Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain and Atlanta; in 
fact, he was in all the fighting around At- 
lanta. The last hard fight he was in was at 
Atlanta, Georgia. He was taken prisoner 
in front of Atlanta July 22, 1864, and after 
being transferred to various prisons in the 
South for a period of seven months, was 
finally paroled and later exchanged at Wil- 
mington, North Carolina. 

Mr. Young has always been a man of in- 
dustry and he has honestly made what he 
has, having been a hard worker and a good 
manager. He has led a life of which no one 
might be ashamed in any way, for it has 
been one of sobriety and filled with good 
deeds. 



HIRAM ORR. 

Now that the summertime of life has 
ended and the autumn winds of old age 
have come, the subject of this review can 
look backward over a career that has been 
well spent, resulting in good to those whom 
it touched and has brought comfort to him- 
self. 

Hiram Orr was born in Licking county, 
Ohio, December 16, 1828, the son of Zach- 
ariah and Mary (Dusthimer) Orr, early 
settlers of the Buckeye state, where it is 
snpposed they were born. Zachariah was a 
farmer, a Democrat, and a member of the 
Baptist church. He passed away in Lick- 
ing county, Ohio, in 1891, his wife having 
died there at an earlier date. Six children 



were born to them, namely: Robert, living 
in Licking county, - Ohio ; Hiram, our sub- 
ject; Sarah, deceased; John, who is living 
in Kansas, a retired farmer; Cyrus, de- 
ceased; Eliza, also deceased. Zachariah 
was married a second time. When he died 
he had accumulated quite a competency, 
having been a very successful farmer. 

Our subject remained at his parental 
home, assisting with the work about the 
place and attending the old pioneer schools 
in cabins with puncheon floors and seats 
and windows where greased paper was used 
for panes, until he was twenty-one years 
old. He has since added very much to the 
rudiments of education he gained there by 
systematic home reading and study, and 
close observation. When of age Mr. Orr 
decided to devote his life work to farming 
and consequently bought a farm in his na- 
tive county, having managed it in a most 
successful manner until October i, 1868. 
when he moved to Marion county, Illinois, 
believing that still greater advantages ex- 
isted here on the less crowded western 
prairies than in the East and where land 
was much cheaper, having sold his Ohio 
farm at good figures. 

Mr. Orr purchased two hundred and sev- 
enty-four acres of land in Stevenson town- 
ship on which he continuously lived, bring- 
ing it up to a high state of improvement, in 
fact, making it one of the "show" farms of 
this locality, the fields being well fenced 
and well drained and kept in first class pro- 
ductive condition through the careful rota- 
tion of crops and the application of home 



i6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



fertilizers, and on this place may always be 
found large numbers of all kinds of live 
stock of the best grade, Mr. Orr having 
ever taken a great interest in stock of vari- 
ous kinds. A modern, substantial and nice- 
ly furnished residence is owned by Mr. Orr 
and good bams and outbuildings in gen- 
eral are found about the place. Mr. Orr at 
present rents most of his land, but still over- 
sees it, keeping it up to the high standard 
of former years. 

In 1849 our subject was united in mar- 
riage with Mary Basom, who was born in 
Perry county, Ohio, about 1830, the 
daughter of Joshua and Elizabeth Emery, 
natives of New England. Three children 
were born to this union, namely: Frances, 
who is the wife of Peter M. Mechling, a 
farmer living in Perry county, Ohio. They 
are the paraits of four children, namely: 
Hiram Orvil, Bertha, Frank and Fred, the 
last two twins; Martha, the second child of 
our subject, is the wife of Marion Tolliver 
Stevenson, who is living in Alma township, 
Marion county, this state, and are the par- 
ents of these children, Edgar, Mabel, Orin, 
Roy, Edna, Claud and Lloyd. Edith, the 
subject's third child, is the wife of John P. 
Brubaker, who is also living in Alma town- 
ship, being the mother of two children, Ha- 
zel and Ada. 

These children received all the home 
training possible and were given good edu- 
cations, each being .well situated in life. 

Mr. Orr is a staunch Democrat in his 
political affiliation, although he has never 



taken a very active part in public affairs. 
He ably filled the position of School Director 
and his support is always to be depended 
upon in any issue having for its object 
the betterment of the community in any 
way. The subject and wife are kind, hos- 
pitable and good natured, making all who 
enter their home feel like they were among 
friends. 



RICHARD J. HOLSTLAW. 

Among the best known and highly re- 
spected families of Marion county is found 
the one bearing the name that forms the 
caption of this article. Richard J. Holstlaw 
was born in this county on the 3d of April, 
1837. He still lives on the farm where he 
was born and during this span of life he has 
witnessed most wonderful changes in the 
progress and development of the country. 

Mr. Holstlaw is descended from those 
hardy pioneers that crossed the mountains 
into Kentucky and Tennessee, blazing the 
way through the wilderness, opening up for 
colonization and occupancy the rich hunting 
grounds south of the Ohio. This tide of 
immigrants gradually worked its way 
westward and northward, crossing the Ohio 
into Indiana and Illinois and blending here 
with the settlers coming from Pennsylvania, 
New York and New England. 

Our subject's father, Daniel S. Holstlaw, 
was born near Glasgow, Kentucky, in 1813, 
toward the close of the second war with 




R. J. HOLSTLAW. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



161 



England. The treaty at the conclusion of 
this war stimulated the westward movement 
and when Daniel was eight years old he 
came to Paoli, Indiana, with his parents. 
His mother, Ruth (Middleton) Holstlaw, 
a native of Tennessee, was the eleventh of 
fourteen children and came to Marion 
county, Illinois, in 1833. At the age of 
nineteen years, Daniel Holstlaw left the 
Hoosier state and immigrated to Marion 
county, Illinois. Here he entered a claim and 
also purchased some land, paying seven 
dollars per acre. At this time the country 
was still in its primitive state, and the six 
children, of whom our subject was the sec- 
ond, became quite familiar with early day 
methods of getting along. 

Among other things that Mr. Holstlaw 
relates are his school experiences. The ex- 
pense of paying for an instructor was met 
on the subscription plan, and all the neigh- 
bors joined in to obtain the privilege of a 
schooling for their children. Wild game of 
all kinds still abounded in the forests and 
furnished part of the food for the settlers. 
One morning Mr. Holstlaw counted thirty- 
seven deer after a night when the prairie 
was on fire, when they could be seen clearly 
to say nothing of other game, so abundant 
then, but so rarely seen now. When we re- 
flect over to the fact that such a span of 
years has witnessed so great a contrast be- 
tween the present conditions and those of 
that day, it seems almost a fiction. Yet one 
needs but to ponder over the wonderful 
changes of the last decade to convince him 
ii 



that we are even now already in the shadow 
of what will come tomorrow. While now 
the traction engine pulls the series of break- 
ing plows rapidly through the sod, Mr. 
Holstlaw recalls the time when he followed 
the four yoke of patient oxen that com- 
posedly drew through the virgin soil the 
hand-made plow of hickory wood. Today 
the hay-loader puts the sweet-scented prod- 
uct of the meadow on the wagon and at the 
driver's feet, while then the dogwood fork, 
whittled by hand, was the only tool avail- 
able. Fur and hides were hauled to St. 
Louis, seventy-five miles away, and court 
was held in a log structure at the county 
seat of Salem. 

We shall now turn our attention to the 
domestic relations of our subject. In 1863 
he was joined in marriage to Mary (Gag- 
ger) Barry. This union, though happy, was 
destined to be brief, for ere long the young 
wife was called hence, followed soon after 
by her infant child. On July 18, 1869, 
Mr. Holstlaw took as his second wife Ra- 
chel Barry, this union resulting in the birth 
of the following children: Effie I., who 
became the wife of Louis Barksdale; the 
son is Forrest D., the second daughter of the 
family, Carrie A., has become the wife of 
Walter K. Shook. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Holstlaw 
has adhered to the Democratic party, and 
he is a devoted member of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian church. He and his wife are 
well known in the entire community as ex- 
emplary and worthy citizens. 



1 62 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



HENRY SPRING. 

This biographical memoir has to do with 
a character of unusual force and eminence, 
for Henry Spring, whose life chapter has 
been closed by the fate that awaits us all, 
was for a long lapse of years one of the 
prominent citizens of Richland county, hav- 
ing come to this section in pioneer times, 
and he assisted in every way possible in 
bringing- about the transformation of the 
county from the wild condition found by the 
first settlers to its later day progress and 
improvement. While he carried on a special 
line of business in such a manner as to gain 
a comfortable competence for himself, he 
also belonged to that class of representative 
citizens who promote the public welfare 
while advancing individual success. There 
were in him sterling traits which com- 
manded uniform confidence and regard, and 
his memory is today honored by all who 
knew him, and is enshrined in the hearts of 
his many friends. 

Henry Spring was born near Sheffield, 
England, December 2, 1806, the son of 
Thomas and Margaret (Bishop) Spring, 
also natives of England. Thomas Spring 
was a professional landscape gardener. He 
was the father of five sons, namely : Sidney, 
Archibald, Henry, John and George. The 
family emigrated to America in 1819, the 
father dying in Pennsylvania on the over- 
land trip to Illinois. The mother and chil- 
dren located on a farm in Edwards county, 
near Albion, this state. Henry and John 
remained on the farm during the lifetime 



of their mother. Henry Spring, our sub- 
ject, was thirteen years old when he came 
to Illinois, and where he received most of 
his education in the subscription schools. 
However, he began his education in England. 
The mother was highly educated and taught 
at home. Henry was in business a short 
time near Evansville, Indiana, later return- 
ing to Edwards county, where he married 
in January, 1842. He came to Olney and 
was the second merchant to engage in busi- 
ness. His store was located in a small room 
belonging to T. W. Lilley, being a part of his 
residence. He was a typical pioneer and had 
a country stock of goods which he bought 
on credit, which proved to be the foundation 
of a later fortune. In the fall of 1842 he 
built a frame building at the corner of Main 
and Fair streets, with living rooms in the 
rear. About 1855 he sold out to P. P. 
Bower. In 1856 he built a brick building at 
the southwest corner of Main and Boone 
streets, and about 1859 again engaged in 
the merchandise business. The ground on 
which the building stands was bought from 
the government by T. W. Lilley, transferred 
to John Allen and then to the subject of this 
sketch, and is still owned by his family. In 
1848 he built a two-story frame building for 
a residence at the southeast corner of Main 
and Fair streets, which was very pretentious 
for those days. In 1866 he retired from the 
mercantile business and in the store build- 
ing now owned by his sons, plans for the 
organization of the First National Bank 
were consummated in December, 1865, he 
being one of the instigators and the leading 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



i6 3 



spirit in the enterprise, and Mr. Spring was 
made its first president, which position he 
held with great credit to his ability for a pe- 
riod of twenty years, with the exception of 
one year. In the same store room in 1883 
plans were formulated for the organization 
of the Olney National Bank, and our sub- 
ject having severed his connection with the 
First National Bank, became president and 
principal stockholder of the new bank, re- 
maining at the head of the same for six 
years. He became known as a man of the 
strictest integrity, his word being as good 
as his bond, and those dealing with him 
were required as much. His life was de- 
voted to his family, for he avoided society, 
not caring for any public display, and he be- 
longed to no secret orders and was affiliated 
with no church, neither had he any political 
aspirations except to vote the Republican 
ticket, having originally been a Whig. He 
was a very successful business man, being 
conservative, careful and exercised various 
English traits of character, and he accumu- 
lated an honest fortune. He was a patriotic 
man and served in the Black Hawk war. 

After a long, honorable and successful 
career, Henry Spring was called from his 
labors August 20, 1890, being nearly 
eighty-four years old, having been active 
and in possession of all his faculties up to 
within a few years prior to his death. He 
was a man of great strength and vitality in 
his prime. 

Henry Spring was united in mariage De- 
cember 31, 1841, to Caroline Russell 
Mount, a native of Nantuckett Island, the 



daughter of Freeman Marshall and Mary 
Ann (Russell) Mount, natives of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Twelve children were born to the subject 
and wife, four of whom died in infancy. 
The eight living children are as follows : 
Mary, who was the first white child born in 
what is now the town of Olney, having been 
born November 22, 1842; she married 
Thomas W. Scott, who was in partnership 
with her father in 1865. He is now Attor- 
ney General of Illinois. Florence is the 
second living child, and is the wife of John 
H. Senseman, cashier of the Olney bank; 
Edward M., is a business man in Olney; 
Caroline M. is living at home; Elizabeth is 
the wife of Medford Powell, of Olney; 
Laura is a member of the family circle; 
Harry B. is in business in Olney; Kate L. 
is the wife of Doctor Watkins, of Olney. 

Mrs. Spring, a woman of gracious per- 
sonality, survived her husband until June 
20, 1904, when she passed to her rest, being 
past eighty-three years of age. 

Edward M. Spring, son of our subject, 
was born in Olney, Illinois, July 30, 1852, 
being reared in Olney, where he received 
his education in the public schools. He also 
attended Asbury College, now DePauw 
University, but he did not graduate from 
that institution, however, he made a splen- 
did record for scholarship. When eighteen 
years of age he went to Kansas, where he 
spent two years. In 1872 he engaged in the 
seed and produce business, and has success- 
fully continued in the same ever since, be- 
ing in the store room formerly built and oc- 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



cupied by his father. James G. Hollister 
was his partner for sixteen years, and in 
1888 the firm became Spring Brothers, 
which is still the name of the firm. A very 
large business has been built up and a good 
trade is carried on throughout this locality. 
Edward M. Spring was united in mar- 
riage December 25, 1873, to Kate Radens- 
croft, a native of New Albany, Indiana, the 
daughter of William E. and Anna C. (Jack- 
son) Radenscroft, formerly of England, 
who came to Philadelphia. The father of 
the subject's wife was formerly a Methodist 
minister. Both are now deceased. Two 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Spring: Lawrence E.. who lives 
in Owensboro, Kentucky, in the milling 
business ; Ethel is living at home. She was 
educated at Olney and in Indianapolis, and 
received a musical education in Cincinnati 
and Chicago, becoming a proficient musi- 
cian. She is at this writing (1909) super- 
visor of music in the public schools of Ol- 
ney. Mr. Spring is a Republican but not a 
politician. He served one term as Alder- 
man. He is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Modern 
Woodmen and the Knights of Pythias. He 
has a beautiful home and there is a large 
oak tree in his yard under which John A. 
Logan made his first speech in behalf of the 
Republican party, October 12, 1866, as a 
candidate for Congressman at large. At 
that time the place of residence of the sub- 
ject was a part of the splendid grove adjoin- 
ing the village of Olney, where picnics and 
rallies were held. 



Harry Bishop Spring, son of Henry 
Spring, our subject, was born in Olney, Il- 
linois, where he was reared and where he 
received his education in the public schools. 
He was also a student of the University of 
Illinois at Champaign. He obtained a good 
education, and after leaving school spent six 
or seven years in the South and West, being 
on the coast for some time. After return- 
ing to Olney he engaged in the seed and pro- 
duce business in 1888, with his brother, un- 
der the firm name of Spring Brothers. 

Harry B. Spring was united in marriage 
June 17, 1890, to Victoria Eckenrode, a na- 
tive of Sumner, Illinois, the daughter of 
Sylvester J. and Mary Eckenrode, a former 
business man of Olney. One daughter was 
bom, a winsome little girl named Marjorie. 
Mrs. Spring was called to her rest January 
4, 1905. Harry Spring is a Republican in 
politics, and is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

The family of our subject has long been 
recognized as leaders in industrial affairs in 
Richland county, being people of the high- 
est integrity and worth, for when Henry 
Spring passed away he left his family the 
priceless heritage of an untarnished name, 
to the county the value of good citizenship, 
and to the young an example well worthy of 
emulation. Public opinion in passing judg- 
ment upon his life work, classed him with 
the men of honor and worth, and with the 
pioneers of Richland county his name is for- 
ever inscribed, shinging out with peculiar 
luster. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



JUDGE JOHN S. STONECIPHER. 

No history of Marion county could be 
consistent with itself were there failure to 
make specific mention of the honored pio- 
neer family of which the subject of this 
sketch is a worthy scion, and no better or 
more significant evidence as to the long 
identification of the name with the annals of 
this section of the state can be offered than 
implied in the simple statement that the rec- 
ord of this interesting and representative 
family has been one of highest honor for a 
period of sixty-five years to the time of this 
writing. The subject has passed his entire 
life in Marion county, and has ably upheld 
the high prestige of the honored name which 
he bears. He is one of the prominent and 
influential representatives of the legal and 
industrial world of the county, and it is with 
much satisfaction that we offer in this work 
a review of his genealogical and personal 
history. 

Judge John S. Stonecipher, like scores of 
our best citizens in every line of endeavor, 
was born on a farm, the old homestead be- 
ing located about ten miles southeast of 
Salem, his birth occurring on July 7, 1868. 
His father was Samuel Stonecipher, a Ten- 
nesseean who came to Marion county, Illi- 
nois, about 1843, having successfully fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits and became a 
man of considerable influence in his com- 
munity. He here erected a primitive dwell- 
ing which was the family domicile for a 
number of years. The tales of the pioneer 
days have been often told, and it is needless 



to here recapitulate the same, for privations, 
vicissitudes and strenuous labors of the early 
settlers have been so recorded as to make 
special mention superfluous, though it is well 
in such connection to refer to those who 
lived and labored so earnestly in laying the 
foundation for the opulent prosperity which 
marks this favored section of the state at 
the present time. Samuel Stonecipher was 
called from his earthly labors in 1898, while 
living on a farm in Haines township, two 
and one-half miles east of old Foxville. The 
mother of our subject was Susan (Ross) 
Stonecipher, also a native of Tennessee who 
passed to her rest when Judge Stonecipher 
was one and one-half years old. Eight chil- 
dren were born to the union of Samuel and 
Susan Stonecipher, four of whom are living 
in 1908. These are, besides the subject of 
this sketch, Alexander, a farmer in Haines 
township, Marion county; Joseph C, a far- 
mer in southeastern Kansas; M. C, a Pres- 
byterian minister at Troy Grove, Illinois. 
Samuel Stonecipher, father of the subject, 
was three times married. His first wife was 
a Miss Henderson ; the second a Miss Ross, 
mother of the subject; and the third was 
Mary Chance, who died three months after 
her husband's death. 

Grandfather Stonecipher reached almost 
the unprecedented age of one hundred and 
ten years. He was reared in Knox county, 
Tennessee. 

Judge Stonecipher was reared on the 
parental farm, and after attending the 
country schools he entered Ewing College 
in Franklin county, Illinois, where he made 



1 66 



RIOGUAPHICAL AM) KKM I MSCKXT HISTORY OF 



a brilliant record for both scholarship and 
deportment, taking a two years' general 
course. He then attended the Southern Illi- 
nois Normal School for two years, and be- 
gan teaching school, which he continued for 
three successful terms, but believing that his 
true life work lay in another channel he be- 
gan reading law with Judge John B. Kagy, 
of Salem. After reading law for one year 
he attended the Valparaiso University, law 
department, for one year, in which he made 
rapid progress. He was admitted to the 
bar at Salem in 1891 and began practice 
soon afterward. His success was instanta- 
neous, and his friends were not mistaken in 
their prediction that the future held many 
honors in store for him. He was early in 
life singled out for political preferment and 
served as Deputy Sheriff from 1889 to 1890, 
while reading law. He has ably served two 
terms as City Attorney of Salem, and was 
Master in Chancery for four years, from 
1896 to 1900, having first been appointed 
by Judge Burroughs, and later by Judge 
Dwight. In 1906 our subject had attained 
such general popularity in the legal world 
that he was elected Judge of Marion county 
on the Democratic ticket in which capacity 
he is still serving in 1908, with entire satis- 
faction to his constituents and all concerned. 
He was chairman of the Democratic County 
Central Committee at the time of his elec- 
tion to the judgeship. He was selected as 
alternate to the Democratic national conven- 
tion held in St. Louis in 1904. Having 
become so well known in the political arena 
of his native community the judge will 



doubtless be honored by many other offices 
of public trust by his party in the future. 

Judge Stonecipher has been equally suc- 
cessful in industrial affairs, being something 
of a wizard in organizing, promoting and 
carrying to successful issues various lines of 
business, and it is due to his clear brain, 
well grounded judgment and indomitable 
energy that many of Marion county's suc- 
cessful industrial institutions owe their ex- 
istence. At present he is vice-president of 
the Salem State Bank, president of the 
Salem Box Company, the leading manufac- 
turing enterprise of Salem; he is also trus- 
tee of the Sandoval Coal and Mining Com- 
pany, now bankrupt, a large and important 
trusteeship. He is also a stockholder in the 
Salem National Bank and a director of the 
Salem Building and Loan Association. He 
was chairman of the building committee that 
built the new Methodist Episcopal church 
in Salem, one of the finest in Illinois, and it 
was largely due to his energy and keen busi- 
ness sagacity that this handsome structure, 
which will ever be a monument to his mem- 
ory as well as a pride and splendid adver- 
tisement to the city of Salem, assumed 
definite form. 

Fraternally Judge Stonecipher is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Woodmen. He has occupied the chairs in 
the Odd Fellows, and his daily life would 
indicate that he believes in carrying out the 
noble precepts advocated by these praise- 
worthy orders. 

Judge Stonecipher's domestic life dates 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



:6 7 



from August 17, 1904, when he was hap- 
pily married to Amy Bachman, the refined 
and cultured daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
H. Bachman, the latter the well known and 
influential president of the Salem National 
Bank. Mrs. Stonecipher received a good 
education, having applied herself diligently 
to her educational work and the success of 
her worthy life companion is due in no small 
measure to the encouragement and sympa- 
thy of this most estimable woman, who pre- 
sides over her model and harmonious 
household with grace and dignity. 

Two bright and interesting children have 
blessed the home of Mr. and Mrs. Stone- 
cipher with cheer and sunshine. They are: 
Frank G., born July 8, 1905, and Maude 
Louise, born July 24, 1907. 

Judge Stonecipher has been very success- 
ful in both his business and political life. He 
is regarded as a man of exceptional sound- 
ness of judgment, and when his name is 
connected with any business institution the 
public knows that the same is sound and 
does not hesitate to place its funds at his 
disposal, whether it be in a banking institu- 
tion or manufacturing enterprise. 



HON. EDWARD S. WILSON. 

It will invariably be found, if an examina- 
tion be made into the life records of self- 
made men, that untiring industry forms the 
basis of their success. It is true that many 
other elements enter in, such as fortitude, 



perseverance, keen discernment and honesty 
of purpose which enables one to recognize 
business opportunities, but the foundation 
cf all worthy achievements in earnest, per- 
sistent labor. The gentlemen whose name 
forms the caption of this article recognized 
this fact early in life and did not seek to 
gain any short or magical method to the goal 
cf prosperity. On the contrary, he began 
to work earnestly and diligently in order to 
advance himself along laudable lines and 
from a humble beginning he has become one 
of the prominent men of the great Prairie 
state. As a lawyer, Hon. Edward S. Wilson 
had few equals in Southern Illinois for up- 
wards of half a century. He was for years a 
leading member of the bar in Olney and is one 
of the old and highly esteemed citizens of this 
place, now living in quiet retirement, enjoy- 
ing the respite due a long and strenuous ca- 
reer. Finding him in a retrospective and rem- 
iniscent mood we quote from an interview 
with this distinguished character as follows : 
"My grandfather, James Wilson, migrated 
frcm Hardy county, Virginia, to South Bend, 
Indiana, in the year 1813, and the next year 
removed to Palestine, Crawford county, Illi- 
nois, bringing with him a numerous family 
of sons and daughters, among them my fa- 
ther, Isaac N. Wilson, who was born July 21, 
1804. On October 13, 1829, he married 
Hannah H. Decken, who was born December 
13, 1810, at the town of Vincennes, Indiana, 
to which place her father moved from Rom- 
ney, Virginia, in 1808 or 1809, from whence 
he soon moved to a farm three miles north of 
Palestine. There were nine boys and two 



1 68 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



daughters born to my father and mother. 
Three of us still survive. I was born June 
2 5- J ^39- I was educated in the common 
schools of Palestine, and was always of a 
reading rather than of a studious disposi- 
tion. Any book of history or romance could 
attract my attention from more serious study. 
So my mind is a hotch-potch of useless lum- 
ber. I know a great amount of 'worthless 
things and nothing well. 

"I can distinctly remember the pioneer 
days of Illinois when the flax and cotton with 
which we were largely clothed were raised 
by the farmers of Crawford county, which 
were spun and woven by the mothers and 
daughters of the farmers who were entirely 
from the Southern States, Virginia, North 
and South Carolina, Kentucky and Tennes- 
see. The wheels of the wagons consisted of 
sections sawn off a log, usually a sycamore. 
Oxen were more common than horses. 

"The principal amusements in those days 
were bear basting, horse racing, and last, but 
not least, fist fighting. Residents of the 
county would gather at Palestine every Sat- 
urday and most of them would fill up on 
old Monongahela whisky and by noon the 
fighting would begin. I have seen sixty 
fights in progress at one time. When the 
fight was over there was no malice nor de- 
sire for revenge, and the victor was the best 
man until at a later date the fight could be 
repeated, if the conquered was not satisfied, 
when frequently the outcome was reversed. 
I was eighteen years of age before I saw a 
railroad or a train of cars. 

"When about eighteen years old I began 
the study of law in the office of James C. Al- 



len, of Palestine, then a member of Con- 
gress from the Tenth District from Illinois. 
I was admitted to the bar in 1861, and com- 
menced the practice of law at Robinson, 
Crawford county, Illinois. In 1864, I re- 
move to Olney, Richland county, where I still 
reside. I practiced in the courts of this and 
adjoining counties until 1890, at which time 
I was nominated by the Democratic party for 
State Treasurer and was elected to that of- 
fice. For many years my hearing had been 
defective and it grew worse, and after retir- 
ing from the office of State Treasurer I never 
resumed practice on account of my hearing. 
Since that time I have lived the life of a 
farmer and man of leisure, reading much, but 
only for entertainment. I have pursued no 
settled line, but have read everything from 
theology to the flimsiest romance, but I have 
spent more time on history than any other 
line and would be a good historian if I had 
been a student instead of a mere reader. 

"On June 17. 1867, I married Ann C. 
Rowland, daughter of Townsend and Eliza 
S. Rowland, of Olney, Illinois. To us have 
been born four sons, three living, and one 
daughter, who died leaving one son. One 
son died in infancy. My wife is still living, 
and divides with me the burden of reading all 
the latest works, historical and fiction." 

Agriculture, horticulture and stock raising 
have occupied Mr. Wilson's attention of late 
years. He owns about one thousand acres of 
valuable land in Richland county, a part of 
which is devoted to the propagation of fruit 
for commercial purposes. Part of the farm 
is in the city limits of Olney where he has a 
modern and commodious residence, sur- 



HIGHLAND. CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 



169 



round by beautiful grounds, extensive and 
carefully kept. His home is one of the most 
pretentious in the county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilson are widely known for their hospital- 
ity and their home is often the gathering 
place for their numerous friends and admir- 
ers where good cheer is always to be found. 
For a number of years Mr. Wilson paid con- 
siderable attention to the breeding of Clydes- 
dale horses and Shetland ponies, and he pro- 
duced some fine specimens which were prize 
winners at state fairs. The subject was large- 
ly instrumental in securing the state fair for 
Olney for two years, 1887 and 1888. Mr. 
\Vilson is the founder and principal stock- 
holder of the ice plant at Olney. where large 
quantities of artificial ice are manufactured, 
in connection with a cold storage, packing in- 
dustry, etc. 

Mr. Wilson has always been a staunch 
Democrat and active politically. He has al- 
ways been interested in whatever tended tc 
promote the interests of his city and county. 
For twenty years he was Master in Chan- 
cery. Because of his public-spirit, his hon- 
esty of purpose, genuine worth and congenial 
disposition, no man is better or more favor 
ably known in Southern Illinois than he. 



J. E. CASTLE. 

Those who belong to the respectable mid- 
dle classes of society, being early taught the 
necessity of relying upon their own exer- 
tions, will be more apt to acquire that 
information and those business habits which 
alone can fit them for the discharge of life's 



duties, and, indeed, it has long been a no- 
ticeable fact that our great men in nearly 
all walks of life in America spring from 
this class. The subject of this sketch, whose 
life history we herewith delineate is a worthy 
representative of the class from which the 
true noblemen of the Republic spring. 

J. E. Castle was born in Gallipolis, Ohio, 
in 1845, the son of George W. Castle, also 
a native of the Buckeye state, where he was 
born in Zanesville in that conspicuous year 
in American history, 1812. He came to 
Illinois with his family in 1861, settling at 
Salem. By profession he was a contractor 
and builder, but he was in the drug business 
while in Salem, and was also interested in 
farming, however, he did some contracting 
here, and in all made a success, for he was 
a man of much business ability. While a 
resident of Ohio he was for some time a 
Justice of the Peace, having always taken 
considerable interest in political and public 
affairs. He was called from his earthly la- 
bors in 1872 after an active and useful life. 

George Washington Castle was the sub- 
ject's grandfather, of Irish ancestry. He 
was loyal to the American government and 
was a captain of a company in the War of 
1812, having met his death while gallantly 
leading a battalion of volunteers at Fort 
Erie in 1812, the same year the father of 
our subject was born, as already indicated. 
The original Castle family is related to the 
Newtons, a prominent and influential family 
of Cincinnati, Ohio. Grandfather Castle's 
family consisted of three children, two sons 
and one daughter. 

The mother of our subject was known in 



BIOC.RAI'IIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



her maidenhood as Eliza Bing, a native of 
Gallia county, Ohio, her people being natives 
of the Buckeye state. She was a woman of 
many praiseworthy traits, and she was 
united in marriage with George W. Castle 
about 1832. She was called to her rest in 
1858 while living at Gallipolis, Ohio. Six 
children constituted the family of this 
couple, of whom our subject is the only sur- 
vivor. The names of these children follow 
in order of their birth: Dr. W. H., who 
died in St. Louis in 1882; Captain George 
E., who died in Salem, Illinois, in 1887; 
Eva M., who died at Tonti, Marion county, 
June 30, 1903 ; Dr. Charles E., who died at 
Great Bend, Kansas, in 1897; John E. died 
at Gallipolis, Ohio, in 1859, when eight 
years old; J. E., our subject, was the fourth 
in order of birth. 

J. E. Castle spent his boyhood in Gal- 
lipolis, Ohio, where he attended the public 
schools and received in part a good educa- 
tion, for he was always an ambitious lad and 
applied himself in a commendable manner to 
his text-books. He came to Salem, Illinois, 
in 1 86 1, and in the spring of 1862, immedi- 
ately after the battle of Shiloh, he enlisted 
in the Union army, believing that it was the 
duty of loyal citizens of the Republic to 
sever home ties and do what they could in 
saving the nation's integrity. He was in 
the Fifteenth Army Corps under John A. 
Logan, with General James Stewart Martin 
in Company H, One Hundred and Eleventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, having been 
sergeant of the company of which his 
brother, George E. Castle, was captain. He 



served with distinction in this regiment, the 
operations of which is given in detail in the 
sketch of General Martin in this work, until 
the close of the war, and he passed in the 
grand review in Washington City before 
the President and all the generals of the 
army. He brought home a Confederate 
flag. 

On June 27, 1864, the subject was in the 
battle of Kenesaw Mountain when the whole 
of Sherman's army charged the forces of 
General Johnson entrenched on the moun- 
tain. 

He took part in two months of continuous 
fighting about Atlanta, July 22 and 28, 
1864, being memorable dates in that city's 
history. On the first mentioned date, Gen- 
eral McPherson was killed and on this date, 
General James S. Martin, of Salem, was 
made a brigadier general. On July 28th 
was fought a desperate battle lasting all day, 
on which day General Martin's line received 
seven terrific charges and never moved a 
foot. On August 3d another hard battle 
was fought in the siege of Atlanta, when 
Sherman's army escaped from Hood. 

On August 3 ist the subject was in the 
capture of Atlanta, after which he went with 
Sherman on his march to the sea. On De- 
cember 1 4th, following the battle at Fort 
McAllister was fought and captured by 
Hazen's division, which meant virtually the 
capture of Savannah, as Johnson then evacu- 
ated this place. The army then went on to 
Hitton Head, South Carolina, and then Co- 
lumbia, Couth Carolina, was captured. At 
Fort McAllister our subject and his brother 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



171 



captured a Confederate flag and many other 
relics which they brought home. 

After his career in the army Mr. Castle 
returned to Salem and took a course in the 
high school, after which he went to Wes- 
leyan University at Delaware, Ohio, taking 
a three years' course in the sciences and 
making a brilliant record in the same. Upon 
his return to Salem he went into the hard- 
ware business in which he remained until 
1878, building up an excellent trade in the 
meantime. He then traveled for ten years 
for the Champion Harvesting Machine 
Company, giving entire satisfaction to this 
company, the patronage of which he caused 
to be greatly increased. Then, much to the 
regret of his employers, he severed his con- 
nection with the Champion people and en- 
gaged with his brother, Captain George E. 
Castle, in the cattle business in Southwest 
Kansas, which enterprise was continued 
with the most gratifying results up to the 
time of the latter's death. Since then our 
subject has been farming. He has an excel- 
lent farm property which is kept in a high 
state of improvement, and which yields a 
comfortable income from year to year 
through the skillful management of the sub- 
ject. On this farm is to be found an ex- 
cellent orchard of thirty acres, Mr. Castle 
having been an enthusiastic horticulturist 
for several years. He has a substantial 
dwelling house and many convenient out 
buildings on his farm which he oversees, but 
does not live on. 

The domestic life of Mr. Castle dates 
from 1897 when he was united in marriage 



with Arabella Whittaker, the refined and 
affable daughter of R. H. Whittaker. The 
parents of Mrs. Castle were both born in 
Ireland. They came to Salem, Illinois, in 
1852, the father of our subject's wife hav- 
ing been one of the civil engineers that sur- 
veyed the route for the Baltimore & Ohio 
Southwestern Railroad, at that time known 
as the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad. R. H. 
Whittaker passed away in June, 1889, at 
Salem, his life companion having preceded 
him to the silent land in 1881. 

The subject's wife was the only child of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Whittaker. She is a 
highly accomplished woman, well educated 
and talented. She is an able and noted 
teacher of both music and painting, being 
the only art teacher in Salem. She is re- 
garded by every one who has seen her work 
as being a finished and accomplished artist 
and she has a beautiful studio in connection 
with her home. She reveres the memory of 
her parents and likes to tell of the happy 
days when R. H. Whittaker was station 
agent for the Baltimore & Ohio Southwest- 
ern road at Salem, which position he held 
for several years. He was also fuel agent 
for many years and had a wide acquaint- 
ance among railroad men. He quit railroad 
business several years before he died, and 
engaged in the lumber business in Salem, 
which he was engaged in at the time of his 
death. 

Mr. and Mrs. Castle have no children. 

Mr. Castle is a member of the ancient and 
honorable order of Masons, also the Knights 
Templar and the Grand Army of the Re- 



UIOCKAPIIICAL AXI) KEM I MSCKXT HISTORY OF 



public. And Mr. and Mrs. Castle are both 
ardent members of the Episcopal church. 
Our subject was a member of the building 
committee that erected the handsome new 
edifice in Salem, and he takes a special in- 
terest in all the affairs of this church. 

In the modern, substantial and beautiful 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Castle which stands 
on Whittaker street in Salem, is to be found 
many curios and relics, especially of the 
Civil war. The beautiful art treasures of 
Mrs. Castle are numerous, the walls being 
hung with many excellent pictures, the han- 
diwork of Mrs. Castle, and their elegantly 
furnished home is regarded as a place where 
hospitality is always unstintingly dispensed. 



JAMES. F. HYATT. 

"Through struggle to triumph" seems to 
be the maxim which holds sway for the ma- 
jority of our citizens, and, though it is un- 
doubtedly true that many fall exhausted in 
the conflict, a few by their inherent force of 
character and strong mentality, rise above 
their environment! and all which seems to 
hinder them, until they reach the plane of 
affluence toward which their face was set 
through the long years of struggle that must 
necessarily precede any accomplishment of 
great magnitude. Such has been the history 
of Mr. Hyatt, proprietor of the well known 
Linden Lawn Dairy, and in his life record 
many useful lessons may be gleaned. 

James F. Hyatt was bom in Versailles. 
Indiana, January 7, 1855, the son of Hiram 
and Bythynia (Alley) Hyatt, the former a 



native of Indiana, and the latter of Ken- 
tucky. The subject's father was a stockman 
and farmer, and for many years carried on 
a stock business on an extensive scale near 
Versailles, having died in Clay City. Indi- 
ana, in 1905. His widow, a woman of many 
praiseworthy traits, like those of her hus- 
band, is still living at this writing (1908). 
They were the parents of five children who 
grew to maturity, and who reside in Indi- 
ana, with the exception of the subject, who 
is the eldest of the family. He was reared 
in his native county where he received a 
common school education, having attended 
the Quaker Academy for two years at But- 
lerville, Indiana. He decided to become ac- 
quainted with the manufacture of woolen 
goods, and accordingly early in life went to 
work in a woolen mill, also worked in a flour 
mill owned by his father, where he remained 
for several years. When twenty years old 
he went to what is now Clay City, Indiana, 
it being a railroad terminus before a post- 
office was established. A coal mine had been 
developed there. He secured employment 
with the coal company as weigh boss, later 
in a clerical capacity, having given the com- 
pany entire satisfaction in this work. In 
1878 he started a small merchandise busi- 
ness which was successful from the first, and 
also became interested in coal mining, brick 
manufacturing, milling and various enter- 
prises which he carried on with his usual 
successful methods, and operated stores in 
a number of different places, in fact, he pur- 
chased large stocks of goods in various east- 
ern cities, shipping the same to different 
states and closing them out. His advance- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



173 



ment was rapid and most successful. In 
1894 to 1896 he sold all his interests in In- 
diana, having previously got possession of 
large tracts of land in Arkansas, establish- 
ing a colony in northeastern Arkansas, and 
has been instrumental in locating many fami- 
lies from the northern and eastern states on 
the same. He still carries on this business 
with gratifying results. He went to Chicago 
to live, where he resided until coming to Ol- 
ne\ in 1900. 

At the time he came to Olney he pur- 
chased the Linden Lawn Dairy, which he 
has since managed in a most successful 
manner, having made many improvements, 
increasing the capacity of the dairy, enlarg- 
ing the barns, improving the fertility of the 
land, and in many ways making it one of 
the model dairies of the state. He has one 
hundred head of dairy stock. There is a 
great demand for all that his dairy produces 
in Olney, where all his dairy products are 
readily disposed of. This business was orig- 
inally established by the Linden Lawn 
Fanning Company, - a corporation organized 
or promoted by C. S. Mace, now deceased. 
Mr. Mace conceived the idea of forming a 
corporation for carrying on farming and 
dairying on an extensive scale, with the idea 
of also making it a co-operative institution. 
All employes invested twenty-five per cent, of 
wages in stock and received pro rata of pro- 
fits of the business. It grew to extensive 
proportions, consisting of farming, horticul- 
ture, dairying and stock raising. Modern 
buildings and equipment were provided. At 
the time of the death of Mr. Mace, the pro- 
moter, in 1900, the stockholders decided to 



close the corporation and sell the property. 
Accordingly in September of that year, 
James F. Hyatt, our subject, purchased the 
same and has since carried on the work on 
a paying basis, assisted by his wife, who is 
actively connected with the management. 
The dairy has eighty stalls for milch cows, 
besides large sheds in close proximity. There 
is a silo with four hundred tons capacity, 
which was one of the first built in this 
county. Linden Lawn consists of one hun- 
dred and sixty-three acres, all inside the 
corporate limits of Olney. Land on part of 
three sides is platted and partly improved. 
The land is in a high state of fertility. Six- 
ty-five acres are in bearing order in fine con- 
dition. The dwelling is of pressed brick, 
stone trimmings, slate roof, is commodious, 
convenient, and has all modern conveniences 
and appliances, large verandas, stone, brick 
and concrete walks, large well, beautifully 
shaded lawn. The building occupies elevated 
ground, giving a splendid view of the city. 
The barn is metal roofed and has every 
modern equipment for furnishing high 
grade, sanitary milk. The barn has steam 
and electric power, electric lights, running 
water, concrete floors, and is in every way 
up-to-date. The dairy herd is mostly full 
blood Jersey. In fact, this is without doubt 
one of the very finest farms in Illinois, and 
one would be compelled to search long and 
far to surpass it in any state. 

Mr. Hyatt was united in marriage in 
1888 to Iva Grim, a native of Coal City. In- 
diana, the daughter of Henry and Charity 
(Gray) Grim, natives of Ohio, both now de- 
ceased. The father of Mrs. Hyatt was a 



174 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXI) REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



farmer and merchant, a civil engineer and 
surveyor, and a pioneer of Coal City. One 
son, Frederick, a lad of much business pro- 
mise, now seventeen years old, has been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Hyatt. 

In 1902 Mr. Hyatt purchased the opera 
house block, a three-story brick structure. 
He remodeled the interior and converted the 
top floors into a modern opera house, refur- 
nished and entirely overhauled the same. 
The interior decorations and arrangements 
compare favorably with the smaller opera 
houses in the large cities. This splendid, 
safe and comfortable play-house is greatly 
appreciated by the citizens of this commu- 
nity and much credit is given the owner for 
its establishment. 

In his political relations Mr. Hyatt is a 
Republican. He is a member of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge 
No. 926, at Olney. He is president of the 
Business Men's Association of Olney. Mrs. 
Hyatt is a member of the Christian church. 

James F. Hyatt is a thoroughly practical 
business man, which fact, coupled with his 
undoubted ability as an organizer and pro- 
moter, contains the secret of the success of 
the institution of which he is the head. 



WILLIAM L. DRAPAR. 

Mr. Drapar has for many years been an 
honored resident of Marion county, whose 
interests he has ever had at heart, and who 
has, while advancing his own welfare done 



much toward promulgating the civic, in- 
dustrial and moral tone of the vicinity. His 
career has been one of hard work and in- 
tegrity, consequently he is deserving of the 
respect in which he is held by everyone. 

William L. Drapar was bom in Fayette 
county, Illinois, October 29, 1850, the son 
of John B. Drapar, a native of Tennessee, 
who came to Illinois when a mere lad, in 
the days when the inhabitants wore buck- 
skin breeches and when the forests abounded 
in wild game and the hills and prairies were 
overrun by the red men. Grandfather Dra- 
par was also a native of Tennessee, who 
brought his son, father of our subject, to 
this state, settling in Fayette county. Grand- 
father was a well known lawyer in his day 
and served as Judge of Lafayette county. 
Vandalia, the county seat, was then the 
state capital. Judge Drapar, like most pio- 
neer men, was the father of a large family, 
he and his faithful life companion becoming 
the parents of fifteen children, three pairs 
of twins. He was a Jeffersonian Democrat 
and a soldier in the Mexican war. He sub- 
sequently moved to Salem where he was 
called from his earthly labors at the age of 
fifty-six years, and he was buried at Xenia, 
Clay county. 

John B. Drapar moved to Salem in 1856. 
He was 1 a blacksmith of extraordinary skill, 
and for some time drove a stage-coach on 
the old Vandalia line. He enlisted in the 
Union army during the Civil war, but never 
saw service. He died about 1896. 

The mother of the subject of this sketch 
was known in her maidenhood as Jeanette 



RICH LAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



175 



Abel, who was born in Bowling Green, 
Kentucky, the representative of a South- 
ern family of honorable repute. The 
date of her birth occurred February 16, 
1828, and she was summoned to join the 
"choir invisible" in 1904, while living at 
the home of our subject in Salem and she 
is buried in the cemetery here. The follow- 
ing children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
John B. Drapar: Margaret, widow of Eli- 
sha Ledgerwood, who is living in the state 
of Washington; William L., our subject; 
Edwin, who died when four years old; an 
infant girl, deceased. 

William L. Drapar, the subject of this 
sketch, was reared in Salem where he re- 
ceived the customary common school edu- 
cation. At an early age he assisted his 
father in a blacksmith shop. When twenty- 
one he was thrown on his own resources, but 
being a youth of indomitable energy and 
courage, he went to work with a will and 
has prospered all his subsequent life. He 
went into the milling business in 1872 at 
Salem and has been thus engaged since that 
time, becoming known as one of the leading 
milling men in this part of the state, having 
been eminently successful in this enterprise 
from the first. He worked for E. Hull, 
father of Senator C. E. Hull, for eighteen 
years. Since January, 1890, he has been 
associated with Senator Hull in business, op- 
erating the Salem Brick Mill, the style of 
the firm being Hull & Drapar. The present 
building which this firm occupies was 
erected in 1860, but has since been remod- 
eled into a modem and substantial build- 



ing. They do a general milling business 
and their products are known not only 
throughout Marion county where they have 
a very extensive trade, but all over this 
part of the state and to remote sections of 
this and other states. 

Mr. Drapar was united in marriage first 
in 1872 with Sarah J. Fair, whose parents 
died when she was two years old and she 
was reared by a family named Castle who 
came to Salem from Ohio at the close of 
the war. She was a woman of many com- 
mendable traits of character, and to this 
union the following interesting family was 
born: Ira and Louie, twins, born July u, 
1874. The first named is living in Holden- 
ville, Oklahoma, where he is Assistant 
Cashier of the Second National Bank. He 
is also City Recorder of Holdenville. He is 
a graduate of the Salem high school in 
which he made a splendid record, and he 
is also a graduate of the Flora Business 
College. For three years he was manager 
of a large lumber company in Oklahoma 
in which state he is very popular. Louie 
lives in Chicago where he has a responsible 
position with the Santa Fe Railroad Com- 
pany, which regards him as one of their 
most faithful and trusted employes. Leslie, 
the third child, was born July 28, 1878. 
He is also a graduate of the Salem high 
school. He is now living in New Mexico 
in the employ of the Harvey Dining Service 
Company. He has been a dining car con- 
ductor for years. He had the distinction of 
serving for one year as superintendent of 
the dining service at Yale University. He 



, 7 r, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



is an expert at this line of business and 
has gained wide notoriety among the peo- 
ple of this business. George, the fourth 
child, was born November 12, 1882. He 
holds the responsible position as cashier 
and bookkeeper of the Sherman House in 
Chicago. Babel, the winsome and accom- 
plished daughter of the subject and wife, 
was born March 5, 1890, and she is yet a 
member of the family circle, keeping house 
for her father. 

Mrs. Drapar passed to her eternal rest 
on August 15, 1894, after a useful and 
beautiful life. Mr. Drapar was again mar- 
ried on June 14, 1899, to Isabel Bell, daugh- 
ter of Philo Bell, of Sumner, Illinois. Mr. 
Bell was a stage driver on the old Vin- 
cennes & St. Louis line before the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad was built. This wife died 
without issue May 3, 1907, of a paralytic 
stroke. She was a woman of strong char- 
acter and had many faithful friends. 

Mr. Drapar has always taken consider- 
able interest in political affairs. He served 
as City Alderman for six years in a most 
creditable manner. He was school director 
for five years, during which time the local 
schools felt a great impetus. He was tax 
collector for one year, refusing to serve 
longer, much to the regret of every one con- 
cerned. 

Fraternally, Mr. Drapar has been a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows since 1874, occupying all the chairs, 
both Subordinate and Encampment. He 
has attended the Grand Lodges regularly 
for twenty-two years. He met with the 



Sovereign Grand Lodge at St. Louis several 
years ago. Mr. Drapar has been a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church since a boy. 
He belongs to that class of citizens who 
by their support of the moral, political and 
social status for the general good, promote 
the real welfare of their respective commu- 
nities. 



A. M. PEDDICORD. 

It is interesting to study the life record 
of such a man as the gentleman whose 
name appears above owing to the fact that 
he began life under no favorable auspicies 
and has had to battle his own way through 
the world, but he has succeeded remarkably 
well and has shown how a man can "go 
it alone" when once his face is set in the 
right direction and he has the courage of his 
convictions. Therefore, for this and many 
other reasons, not the least of which is the 
fact that he is one of the brave veterans of 
the great war of the Rebellion, efficiently 
serving his country during its dark days, 
we take pleasure in giving him a place in 
this work. 

A. M. Peddicord was born in Bracken 
county, Kentucky, June 4, 1841, and he was 
about fourteen years old when he came to 
Marion county, Illinois, and spent most of 
the time since then in Carrigan township. 
He is the son of Nelson and Rebecca Peddi- 
cord, the subject's parents having been 
cousins. The father died when the subject 
was very young and he has but little recol- 




A. M. PEDDICORD. 



Of THE 
UNIVERSITY < ILLINOIS. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COfNTIKS. ILLINOIS. 



177 



lection of him. The subject's mother was 
born in Mason county, Kentucky, and died 
about fifteen years ago. There were six 
children in the family of Nelson Peddicord 
and wife, namely: Emanuel J., who first 
married Hester Lawrence, and they became 
the parents of three children ; his second wife 
was Sallie Hooker and they became the par- 
ents of five or six children ; Emanuel's third 
wife was Nancy Roberts ; A. E., the second 
child of Nelson and Rebecca Peddicord, 
served in the Union army in the One Hun- 
dred and Eleventh Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, having remained single, and he died 
soon after the close of the war ; F. M. mar- 
ried a Miss Faggin and they are the parents 
of five children ; A. M., our subject, was the 
fourth child in order of birth ; Sarah M. 
was twice married; Priscilla died when 
young. 

The subject of this sketch was compelled 
to make his own way after he was four- 
teen years old and he has succeeded admir- 
ably well. When he reached maturity he 
was married to Eliza Britt in August, 1869, 
in Marion county. She was the daughter of 
Samuel and Abigail (Roderick) Britt. Her 
parents lived in Pennsylvania, Ohio and In- 
diana and finally settled in Marion county, 
Illinois, and they died here. Mr. Britt was 
a farmer. The subject's wife was the ninth 
of a family of ten children. 

The following children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. A. M. Peddicord: Francis M., 
who is forty-one years old in 1908, married 
Mary E. Foltz and they are the parents of 
seven children; Mary E. died when four- 
12 



teen months old; Sarah E., who is now thir- 
ty-nine years, married Thomas P. Walker, 
and they have three children living and 
two dead. 

As already intimated Mr. Peddicord was 
a soldier in the Union army during the Civil 
war, having enlisted in Company K, Thirty- 
first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, on August 
10, 1 86 1, under the command of Gen. John 
A. Logan. He served in a most gallant 
manner for a period of four years. He was 
taken prisoner on the march to the sea at 
Meridian, Mississippi. He was in the bat- 
tle of Fort Donelson, was in the siege of 
Vicksburg and Champion's Hill. He was 
in Andersonville prison for a period of six 
months, later being moved to Florence. He 
contracted the scurvy while in prison, hav- 
ing been in prison when peace was declared. 

Our subject has an excellent farm con- 
sisting of two hundred and sixty acres of 
valuable land in section 34, seventy-seven 
acres of which are in timber. The subject 
has made most of the improvements of his 
farm which now holds high rank with 
Marion county's best farms. It shows good 
management and is well stocked. He has 
a comfortable residence which is well fur- 
nished. 

Mr. Peddicord was Road Commissioner 
for two terms and gave entire satisfaction. 
He is a loyal Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. 
Peddicord are faithful members of the Bap- 
tist church. Our subject deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished, for 
he had little chance to attend school in his 
youth. The only school-house in his com- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



munity was built of logs, and the terms of 
school were very short. But he has been a 
hard worker and has succeeded despite early 
disadvantages, until today he is one of the 
county's most representative agriculturists 
and has many friends throughout the 
same. 



RICHARD LEWIS. 

Energy, sound judgment and persistency 
of effort, properly applied, will always win 
the goal sought in the sphere of human en- 
deavor, no matter what the environment may 
be or what obstacles are met with, for they 
who are endowed with such characteristics, 
make stepping-stones of their adversities to 
higher things. These reflections are sug- 
gested by the career of Mr. Lewis, who has 
forged his way to the front ranks, and stands 
today among the representative men of Rich- 
land county. 

Richard Lewis, the well known proprietor 
of the Metropole Hotel in Olney, Illinois, was 
born in Breckenridge county, Kentucky, Au- 
gust 17, 1844, the son of Thomas and Sa- 
rah (Mattingly) Lewis, the former having 
been born near Harper's Ferry, Virginia, and 
the latter in Kentucky. The father was 
reared in his native state and came to Ken- 
tucky with his parents when young, where he 
married and became a farmer. James Mat- 
tingly, grandfather of the subject, was a 
planter and a slave owner in Kentucky where 
he lived and died. Thomas Lewis removed 
to Illinois with his family in 1846 and set- 



tled at Pond Grove, near St. Marie, Jasper 
county. Soon afterward he changed his place 
of residence to another part of Jasper county. 
He was one of the pioneers of that section 
and improved a good farm, consisting of one 
hundred and twenty acres six miles south 
of Newton, which in late years he gave to 
his youngest son. He died at the home of the 
subject in Olney in 1883, at the age of sev- 
enty-three years. His wife had previously 
died at the age of sixty-three years. Their 
family consisted of six children, three boys 
and three girls, two of the youngest daugh- 
ters being deceased. The subject is the fifth 
in order of birth. He was two years old when 
the family located in Jasper county. His par- 
ents being poor, his early education was very 
limited on account of his having to work 
hard to help support the family, working on 
the farm early and late. There were only 
a few schools in the county which was new 
at that time, so he was enabled to attend 
school only about six months; later he did a 
great deal of home reading and by practical 
experience became generally educated and is 
today a well informed man. 

During his youth the family was so poor, 
according to our subject, that it took all their 
money at one time to buy one hoe, which was 
turned over to an older brother, William, 
for use. He, however, was not satisfied to do 
all the work and made a wooden hoe which 
he insisted on our subject using to help. Dick 
says he accordingly put in many days of 
hard work with a wooden hoe. which has 
probably been the experience of but few peo- 
ple now living in Illinois. The family lived 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



179 



in a log house for a number of years without 
windows, but the father finally sawed out a 
small place for one window, in which they 
lived until the house was destroyed by fire. 
The nearest neighbor was three miles away. 
\Yild game of all kinds was plentiful, includ- 
ing deer, bear, wild turkey, and wolves were 
numerous and sometimes troublesome. The 
father was compelled to get up at night many 
times for the purpose of driving them out 
of the dooryard and away from the sheep and 
hogs. The father was a shoemaker and made 
all the shoes and boots for the family. Rich- 
ard was allowed one pair of shoes per year, 
being compelled to go barefoot from early 
spring until snow fell in the late fall. 

Mr. Lewis was one of the supporters of 
the national government during the trouble 
in the sixties, having enlisted in 1861, but 
not being old enough and being opposed by 
his family, he did not go to the front. He 
then took charge of the home place and for a 
few years was very successful. He sold hogs 
at Olney during the war for twelve dollars 
per one hundred pounds. In 1865 he en- 
listed in Company B, One Hundred and 
Fifty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and 
immediately went into the field. He was first 
sent to Louisville and then to Nashville, also 
to Tullahoma, Tennessee, returning to Mur- 
freesboro, where he remained until he was 
mustered out. After the war he came back 
home and located on a farm of forty acres, 
which he had bought with two wagon-loads 
of hogs prior to enlisting. In the mean- 
time his father bought forty acres more with 
the money the subject had sent him. mak- 



ing him eighty acres in all, with which to 
start life. In 1866 and 1867 he raised crops 
of wheat and sold wheat the latter year for 
two dollars per bushel. On one occasion he 
took thirty bushels to Olney for which he re- 
ceived sixty dollars. Meeting an' old com- 
rade, Jim Clark, son of "Old Sam Clark," 
after the war, the young men repaired to a 
place for social refreshment and being looked 
upon by the proprietor of the place as young 
and unsophisticated, were induced to try their 
luck at a game. It was the subject's lucky 
day and he made fifteen dollars very easily. 
It became a puzzle to his father how the son 
could come home with so much money for 
thirty bushels of wheat. During those days 
Mr. Lewis was on his way to the polls at St. 
Marie to vote and passed a place where a 
young lady was breaking flax with a flail and 
casually made the remark, "That is the girl 
for me." He did not know her, but after- 
ward met her quite unexpectedly and it is a 
coincidence worth recording here that she is 
his wife today. 

After the marriage of Mr. Lewis he con- 
tinued on the farm and was prosperous for 
several years, buying more land until he had 
a splendid place, consisting of one hundred 
and twenty acres. He was ambitious to get 
ahead and bought a threshing machine out- 
fit, going in debt on his credit, which was 
unquestioned. The panic of 1873 came on 
and it was impossible to get money, so he 
lost all. After he had turned over all his 
property except a homestead interest which 
he traded for two houses and lots in Olney, 
he found judgment still hanging over him. 



i8o 



IJKHiRAPIlICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



He paid one judgment of six hundred dol- 
lars by disposing of one house and lot and 
went to work at whatever he could find to 
do for several years. 

In September, 1897, he bought a hotel 
business opposite the Illinois Central depot in 
Olney, which he conducted for about a year. 
He then conducted a similar business on 
West Main street for two years, after which 
he took charge of the old Commercial House, 
\vhich he christened the New Olney House, 
and conducted the same for three years. He 
then sold out and leased the Metropole ho- 
tel, which he soon after sold. After a trip 
to St. Louis he returned to Olney and again 
engaged in the hotel business on West Main 
street for about a year. Selling out, he again 
took charge of the Metropole hotel, which 
he has since conducted successfully. It is 
the leading hotel in this part of the country 
and would be a credit to larger cities, being 
carefully conducted and managed in such a 
manner as to constantly gain prestige with 
the traveling public. It is a three-story brick 
structure, modern in every detail, with thirty- 
six rooms, electric lights, steam heat, hot and 
cold water, and all other equipment that can 
be found in an up-to-date hotel. Its cuisine 
is excellent and courteous treatment is al- 
ways accorded guests, so that the place is 
popular with the traveling public. Its genia! 
and pleasant proprietor is familiarly known 
as "Old Dick Lewis." 

Mr. Lewis was married December 26, 
1867, to Sarah Anderson, a native of near 
Madison, Indiana, the daughter of Felix and 
Martha (Underwood) Anderson, both of 



whom died in Jasper county, Illinois. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis are the parents of eight chil- 
dren, two of whom are living. Anna is the 
wife of Victor Bolmar, who resides in Mat- 
toon, Illinois; May is the other daughter. 

In politics Mr. Lewis was formerly a Dem- 
ocrat, but in later years he has voted the 
Republican ticket. He is a member of the 
Eli Boyer Post, No. 92, Grand Army of the 
Republic. He has held many positions in 
the same, being at present quartermaster. 
He is also a member of Olney Lodge, No. 
926, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He and his family are members of the 
Catholic church. 



NATHANIEL G. HUFF. 

The subject of this sketch has long 
been identified with the progress and ad- 
vancement of this favored section of the 
great Prairie state, where he has maintained 
his home for more than the Psalmist's al- 
lotted three score years, having been born 
within her borders, having spent his long; 
active and useful life here and where he 
has attained gratifying success in connection 
with the development of its resources, being 
one of the representative farmers and stock 
growers in Stevenson township and having 
one of the most productive landed estates in 
this part of the county. 

Nathaniel G. Huff was born in Stevenson 
township, this county, February 6, 1841, the 
son of William H., Sr., and Mary A. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



181 



(Crane) Huff, the former a native of Vir- 
ginia and the latter of Kentucky. The sub- 
ject's grandfather was Samuel Huff, also 
a native of Virginia who later removed to 
Tennessee and finally came to Marion 
county, Illinois, settling among the pioneers 
on government land on what is now Rac- 
coon township. He later moved to Haines 
township, where he cleared land and made 
a comfortable home, spending the rest of 
his days there. Leonard Huff was the 
great-grandfather of the subject. He was 
born in Germany and came to America in a 
very early day, settling in Pennsylvania 
where he spent his life and where he died. 
Mary A. Crane, our subject's mother, was 
the daughter of William Crane, who was a 
native of Virginia, having lived and died in 
Kentucky. William Huff, father of our 
subject, was raised in Tennessee and spent 
several years in Mississippi and Alabama. 
About April 22, 1840, he came to Marion 
county, Illinois, where he married and 
where he purchased four hundred acres of 
wild land in what is now Stevenson town- 
ship, spending the remainder of his useful 
and very busy life here, dying March 10, 
1863. His widow, a much beloved old lady 
of fine Christian character, is still living. 
William Huff was regarded as a successful 
farmer. He joined the Christian church 
sometime prior to his death. He was twice 
married, his first wife having been Nancy 
Dukes, whom he married in Mississippi. 
She died leaving one child, William H., Jr. 
He married Mary Crane April 22, 1840. 
Eleven children were born to this union, 



namely: Nathaniel G., our subject; Benja- 
min F., deceased; Andrew J., deceased; 
James K. and George M. Dallis, twins, are 
both living; Joshua is living in this state 
at Jacksonville; Marj J. is the wife of Wil- 
liam Brasel; Henderson P. lives in Steven- 
son township ; Harriet C. is the wife of Wil- 
liam Porter Gaston; Virginia is the wife of 
John B. Brasel ; Steven A. is deceased. 

The subject of this sketch spent his youth 
on his father's farm, having remained under 
the parental roof-tree until he reached man- 
hood. He was educated in the old subscrip- 
tion schools and having applied himself in a 
diligent manner received a fairly good edu- 
cation. His father gave him a piece of land 
in this township which he at once set about 
improving, but which he sold in 1868 and 
bought his present fine farm of one hun- 
dred and seventy-eight acres, which lies in 
section 30, Stevenson township, and section 
25, Salem township. It was almost all in 
the woods when he took possession of it, 
but he has been a hard worker and has im- 
proved the place up to its present high state 
of efficiency, having been enabled from year 
to year to reap bounteous harvests from the 
same through his skillful manipulation of 
crops. He did most of the work in con- 
nection with his place himself, and also on 
his buildings, having an excellent and well 
furnished house and a good barn. Every 
thing about the place shows thrift and pros- 
perity and his farm is regarded as one of 
the most desirable in Stevenson township. 

Our subject's first marriage was in 1862 
to Julia A. Hill, a native of Marion county, 



[82 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



and eight children were born to this union, 
namely: Thomas, who lives in Stevenson 
township, married Orela Cutchin; Viola is 
living at Jacksonville, Illinois ; William mar- 
ried Frankie Evans and resides in Salem 
township; Seymour, who is living in Salem 
township, married Elizabeth Guth ; Mary A. 
is deceased ; Laura is single and resides in 
Jacksonville; Osceola, who is living in 
Flora, this state, married Maggie Babb ; Au- 
gustus L. married May Stone and lives in 
Eureka, Illinois, being a minister of the 
Christian church. 

The subject's second marriage was 
solemnized November 8, 1885, to Martha 
E. Mercer, a native of Marion county and 
the daughter of Silas and Rebecca Mercer, 
early settlers in Marion county. The sub- 
ject has sixteen grandchildren and five chil- 
dren dead. He has two great-grandchil- 
dren. The subject and wife are members of 
the Christian church at old Mt. Maria, the 
first church organized in Marion county. 
The subject is a Jeffersonian Democrat, but 
is not a Bryan Democrat, believing that the 
old school democracy is preferable to the 
new. He filled the office of Justice of the 
Peace in a most able manner for a period 
of eighteen years. 

Mr. Huff has in his possession an old 
squirrel rifle over one hundred years old 
which belonged to his father. It has killed 
over one hundred deer and bear. He also 
has the old powder-horn and shot pouch 
which his father carried. Mr. Huff has a 
note made in. payment for a clock which 
was given him by his father-in-law. He 



also still has the clock. He has among other 
relics of the past a spinning-wheel and a 
Southern dagger, which was discovered in 
a layer of cane. 



SAMUEL C. WILSON. 

The dominating spirit of self-help is what 
has conserved the distinctive business suc- 
cess and prestige of the gentleman whose 
career we now take under consideration, 
who stands at the head of one of the leading 
industrial enterprises of Richland county, 
where from modest inception, he has built 
up one of the leading flouring mills in this 
part of the state, controlling a trade which 
ramifies throughout a wide area of country, 
and having the high reputation which is 
ever significant of personal integrity and 
honorable methods. 

Samuel C. Wilson, of S. C. Wilson & 
Company, proprietors of the Butler Street 
Flour Mills at Olney, Illinois, was born near 
Maryville, Tennessee, March 17, 1844, the 
son of Joseph and Ann (Gault) Wilson, na- 
tives of Virginia, where they were reared. 
They married after coming to Tennessee. 
The subject's father was a farmer and a 
man of influence in his community. In 
April, 1852, the family moved to Crawford 
county, Illinois, where they settled on a 
farm. The same year Mr. Wilson bought a 
farm in Denver township, Richland county, 
which was developed into valuable property. 
Joseph Wilson died at the age of sixty-nine 



KICIILAND, CLAY AND MARIOX COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



years, his wife having passed away at the 
age of fifty-four years. Mr. Wilson was 
twice married. Eight children were bom 
of the first union and two of the second, 
the subject of this sketch being the youngest 
of the first marriage. 

Samuel C. Wilson came with his parents 
to Richland county in 1852. He was reared 
on a farm, and his education in those early 
days was very limited, but by home reading 
and study he gained a fairly good founda- 
tion for later learning, which he has received 
by contact with the world and general study. 
He remained under his parental roof until he 
was twenty-two years old, at which time he 
inherited a part of the old homestead, which 
he conducted in a very successful manner 
until 1876, having in the meantime bought 
additional land. He has been prosperous 
owing to his conservative methods, his care- 
ful business principles. He at one time 
owned six hundred and fory acres. In 1876 
our subject came to Olney and bought a mill, 
the main part of the present building having 
been erected in 1861. When he purchased 
this property it was of the old burr system, 
with a capacity of fifty barrels per day. 
Since then the progress of the business has 
been constant, reaching its present propor- 
tions, large building and modern equipment, 
consisting of fourteen sets of rollers, with 
a capacity of two hundred barrels per day. 
Mr. Wilson has been very prosperous and 
he does a general milling business, handling 
large quantities of flour and feed. He manu- 
factures the famous brand known as "Our 
Daily Bread" ; this special grade of flour 



having long ago become known throughout 
this locality, and it took first premium at 
the state fair at Springfield, Illinois, 1908. 

The firm consists of Samuel C. Wilson 
and John C. Page, under the name of S. C. 
Wilson & Company, and they employ con- 
siderable help, are always busy, and con- 
stantly adding new territory to their list. 

The domestic life of Mr. Wilson dates 
from October, 1865, when he was first mar- 
ried to Emily J. Welty, a native of Hills- 
boro, Ohio, the daughter of Isaac and Mary 
A. (Barker) Welty, natives of Ohio. Seven 
children were born to the subject and wife, 
all of whom are now living, namely : Mary 
A., Martha A., Isaac N., William E., 
Charles F., Edwin O., and Thomas C. Mrs. 
Wilson passed to her rest March 3, 1901. 
and the subject married Jennie (Bradshaw) 
Lough, a native of Wayne county, Illinois. 

Mr. Wilson in his political relations is a 
Democrat, having long been active in his 
party's affairs. In 1890 he was elected 
Treasurer of Richland county, and ably 
served one term of four years. In 1899 he 
was elected Mayor of Olney, serving one 
term of two years, being the first anti-saloon 
candidate ever eleced Mayor of this city. 
His administration' was regarded by the 
community as one of the best the town ever 
had and numerous improvements were in- 
augurated. After their license had expired 
all saloons were closed during the remain- 
der of his administration. In the spring of 
1908 Mr. Wilson was elected a member of 
the City Council. In his fraternal relations 
he is a member of the Masons and the 



1 8 4 



nior.KAI'JUCAI. AND K K M I MSCKXT HISTORY OF 



Knight Templars. In religious matters he 
is a faithful attendant of the Presbyterian 
church, being one of the oldest elders in the 
church. 

Mr. Wilson is a man of marked business 
enterprise and capability, and he carries for- 
ward to successful completion whatever he 
undertakes. The subject has long been an 
important factor in business circles and his 
popularity is well deserved, as in him are 
embraced the characteristics of an unabat- 
ing energy, unbending integrity and indus- 
try that never flags. 



DANIEL S. HOLSTLAW. 

It is with a degree of satisfaction that the 
biographer has an opportunity at this junc- 
ture to write the following biographical 
memoir of the well remembered citizen, 
whose name appears above, now deceased, 
who was for many years prominent in the 
affairs of Marion county, .for the readers of 
this book will doubtless gain inspiration 
from perusing these paragraphs to lead 
more industrious, kindlier and worthier 
lives, seeing what the life of the subject ac- 
complished not only individually but gen- 
erically, affecting the whole community in 
an uplifting manner. He came to this sec- 
tion of the state in pioneer times and he 
assisted in bringing about the transforma- 
tion of the county in the wild condition in 
which it was found at the time of his ar- 
rival to its later-day progress and improve- 
ment. 



. Daniel S. Holstlaw was born in Barren 
county, Kentucky, November 15, 1813, the 
son of Richard and Mary (Smith) Hoist- 
law, the former a native of Virginia, who 
came in an early day to Indiana, settling 
in Orange county and later came to Marion 
county, Illinois, in 1830. Richard Holtslaw 
took up government land and set about 
making a farm of his holdings with very 
flattering prospects ahead of him, but his 
life was brought to a close August 18, 1834, 
at the age of forty-six years. Mary, his wife, 
continued to live on the farm where she 
reared the children and made a comfortable 
living, being a woman of many sterling 
traits and of indomitable courage. Their 
children were eight in number, seven of 
whom grew to maturity and named in order 
of birth as follows: Henry E., Daniel S., our 
subject; Lucinda, John Andrew, Elizabeth 
Ann, Malinda H., and Richard V. All of 
these children have now joined their parents 
in the eternal sleep of the just. 

Daniel S. Holstlaw was sixteen years of 
age when he came to Illinois and located in 
what is now known as Stevenson township, 
where he spent the remainder of his long, 
busy and useful life, having been called to 
his reward by the Shepherd who giveth his 
beloved sleep, on December 2, 1905, con- 
scious of the fact that his life had not been 
lived in vain; that he had fought a good 
fight and kept the faith, as did the great 
Apostle, Saint Paul, in the days of our 
Saviour, and that there was laid up for him 
a reward in the Father's house which was 
not made with hands. 



KICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



Mr. Holstlaw upon coming to this county 
bought a claim, having that rare foresight 
and sagacity that penetrated into the future 
years, bringing them within his horoscope, 
and which enabled him to see the great pos- 
sibilities that lie ahead. This first pur- 
chase was added to from time to time until 
he owned a large tract of land, which, un- 
der his able management was developed into 
one of the best, most productive and most 
highly improved farms in this locality. He 
was a hard worker, and, believing that it 
was his duty as well as his privilege to eat 
his bread by the sweat of his brow, never 
ignored any task that he found awaiting 
disposition at his hands. He split the rails 
that fenced his land and also put up a log 
house, and, infact, did the usual work of the 
pioneer. But having prospered by reason 
of his indomitable energy and good man- 
agement he was soon enabled to erect a 
more substantial nine room house, which 
was comfortable, cozy and well arranged, 
and in which the family now resides. 

The subject was a faithful member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church and a lib- 
eral supporter of the same ; he and his 
worthy life companion both having pro- 
fessed religion the same night at a camp 
meeting held on Tennessee Prairie. In 1862, 
when the local Methodist church with 
which they were affiliated was divided up- 
on the question which precipitated the 
Civil war this intensely religious couple 
united with the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church in which the subject remained an ac- 
tive and faithful member until his death. 



Our subject was a staunch Democrat and 
took considerable interest in political af- 
fairs, having had the interest of his commu- 
nity at heart and lending his support at all 
times to whatever proposition that present- 
ed itself looking to the betterment of the 
community whether in a political, educa- 
tional, religious or moral sense. He was 
school director at one time and materially 
aided the local public school through his 
advice, counsel and influence. 

Mr. Holstlaw was united in marriage 
with Ruth W. Middleton on June 9, 1836. 
She was a native of what later became 
Campbell county, Tennessee, and the rep- 
resentative of an influential old family, 
the .date of her birth falling on Janu- 
ary 23, 1819, the daughter of Wil- 
liam and Sarah J. (Harris) Middleton, 
the former a native of Virginia and the 
latter of South Carolina. After their mar- 
riage they moved to Tennessee and in 1831 
came to Marion county. Illinois, locating 
three miles east of luka, in what is now 
luka township. They were sterling pio- 
neers and made a most comfortable living 
in the new country where they became 
known as honest, hard-working people. 
Their family consisted of fourteen children, 
named in order of birth, as follows: 
Thomas L., Lydia P., Harvey, William H., 
Elizabeth, John B., Joel, Martha, Jane, Sa- 
rah, James A., Josephus W., Ruth W., the 
wife of our subject; Lucy and Dicy E. 

Mr. Middleton was a local preacher in 
the Methodist Episcopal church, having be- 
come well known as an able expounder of 



1 86 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



the Gospel and doing a vast amount of good 
in his work here. His wife was also a 
faithful worker in this church. 

To our subject and wife eleven children 
were bom, six sons and five daughters, 
named in order of birth as follows : Richard 
J., who was first married to Mary A. Jag- 
ger, and later to Rachel Berry; John H., 
who married Lucy Downing; Thomas, who 
married Aleatha E. Kite; Hattie, who is 
living at home; Mary is also a member of 
the home circle at this writing, 1908; 
Sarah became the wife of Omer Squibb; 
Daniel W., married Clara Stevenson; Joel 
W., married Lucretia Stevenson; Ruth 
Emma is the wife of Daniel Crayton Ste- 
venson; Marion C. married Lelian Bru- 
baker; Martha A. is single and living at 
home; the last two children named are 
twins. 

The widow of our subject, a gracious old 
lady of beautiful Christian character and 
praiseworthy attributes, is living on the old 
homestead, being idolized by her children, 
and much admired and loved by a host of 
friends. Many are the homes in the sur- 
rounding country where she has nursed the 
sick and brought sunshine and happiness. 
She takes a great interest in the lives of her 
children, her eighteen grandchildren and 
eighteen great-grandchildren. On the old 
home place, which is still well kept and in 
an excellent productive state, live three of 
the daughters with their beloved mother, 
the family being well known in Stevenson 
township and highly respected by all. In 
this home are to be found many old and in- 



teresting relics of the pioneer days, such as 
spinning wheels and machines for spinning 
flax, and many similar things. 



THOMAS A. HARDMAN. 

When the business interests of a town or 
city are in the hands of worthy, capable and 
enterprising men, an important step has been 
taken toward the growth and development of 
the place. Had her merchants, men of busi- 
ness in general, been less worthy, capable 
and enterprising than they were, Chicago 
would lack much of being the city that it 
is today. Cities, like persons, have a dis- 
tinct individuality. One may be sluggish, 
plodding, shiftless, while its neighbor only a 
few miles distant, may be alert, energetic, 
progressive. It is the inhabitants who give 
character to a town or city ; if they are drones 
the place can not disclose either development 
or progress. To the merchants, contractors 
and business men in general, most of the 
credit is due for the desirable condition of 
affairs in Olney, Illinois, today, and among 
this class none hold a more worthy place nor 
has done more for the advancement of the 
city than the subject of this sketch. 

Thomas A. Hardman, the well known con- 
tractor, of Olney, Richland county, was 
born near Manchester, England, July 14, 
1847, the son of Alfred and Elizabeth 
(Bishop) Hardman. the former a native of 
England and the latter of Scotland. The 
subject's father was a machinist. Both he 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



i8 7 



and his wife died when our subject was a 
child. When eight years old Thomas A. 
Hardman was brought to the United States 
by an aunt, who located in Franklin county, 
Indiana. He had a limited chance to attend 
school only a few months during the win- 
ter. He was bound out to a farmer when 
twelve years old and when sixteen ran away 
and started in life for himself. He worked 
on a farm during the summer months and 
went to school in the winter. When eighteen 
years old he began teaching, having ac- 
quired a good education by close application 
to his studies. He taught in the winter and 
worked on a farm in the summer. He also 
attended school at Lebanon, Ohio, having 
saved money enough to defray his expenses 
there, finally securing a liberal education. 

When tewenty-four years old Mr. Hard- 
man was elected county Surveyor of Frank- 
lin county, Indiana, his certificate being 
signed by Governor Hendricks. He served 
in a most faithful and capable manner for 
nearly two years when he resigned to accept 
a position with the Smith Bridge Company, 
of Toledo, Ohio, with whom he remained 
two years as engineer. He proved to be an 
excellent office man and all his time was de- 
voted to draughting. But the confinement 
was too much for him and he resigned on 
account of failing health. He returned to 
Franklin county, Indiana, and was appointed 
by the County Commissioners as County 
Engineer to look after bridge work at a time 
when many bridges were being built, several 
costing from twenty-five thousand to forty- 
thousand dollars. \Vhile engaged in this 



work he began contracting, his first work of 
this nature being for the county over which 
and southern Indiana, he built many bridges. 
Then he began railroad work and in 1883 
built eighteen bridges on one railroad, most 
of them being in the Southern States. His 
bridges were considered of the most modern 
and careful construction, always satisfactory 
in every detail. He continued that line of 
work until 1890, when he came to Olney and 
since which time he has been engaged in con- 
tracting water works plants and engineering 
and improvement work in general. For a 
number of years he has done engineer work 
for the city of Olney, particularly the street 
grades. He has put in the majority of the 
sewer systems. 

Mr. Hardman's work extends all over Illi- 
nois and into adjoining states; also to the 
Southern States. He built the water works 
at Olney which are high grade in every re- 
spect and would be a credit to any city. He 
has built the water works for many of the 
towns and cities of this state and Indiana. He 
has been uniformly successful and his name 
has gone all over the country, synonymous 
with high class work in this line of contract- 
ing. He constructs everything of good ma- 
terial and is scrupulously honest in all his 
business transactions, so that the results of 
his contracting are always satisfactory to 
all concerned. 

Mr. Hardman was united in marriage in 
1876 to Julia St. John, a native of Frank- 
lin county, Indiana, daughter of D. H. and 
Kate (Lefforge) St. John, natives of Frank- 
lin county, Indiana, and at present residents 



1 88 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



of Olney. Three children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Hardman, namely : Catherine, 
the wife of J. Q. Davis, a grocer of Olney; 
Thomas Thornley. who is living at home ; 
the eldest, Alfred, was killed while on a va- 
cation to visit his father in South Carolina, 
at the age of thirteen years. 

In his fraternal relations our subject is a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks at Olney; and in politics he is a 
Democrat. He is a man of fine personality, 
and in every respect merits the high regard 
of his fellow citizens which they freely ac- 
cord wherever he is known. 



JACOB BRUBAKER. 

It is not the intention of the biographer 
to give in this connection a detailed history 
of the subject's life, but rather to note inci- 
dentally his connection with the various 
enterprises with which his name has been 
linked and to show the marked influence he 
wielded in advancing the interests of Ste- 
venson township, Marion county. 

Jacob Brubaker was born in Fairfield 
county, Ohio, in 1825, the son of Abraham 
Brubaker, a native of the Buckeye state as 
was also his wife who was known in her 
maidenhood as Elizabeth Myers. They 
came to Marion county, Illinois, in 1842 
and took up government land and remained 
here the balance of their lives. Abraham 
was a man of influence in his community. 
He passed away March 10, 1854, and his 
faithful life companion joined him Febru- 



ary 3, 1867. The number of children born 
to them was six. 

Jacob Brubaker, our subject, came to Illi- 
nois with his parents when he was sixteen 
years of age and received his education in 
the pioneer schools where the advantages 
were very limited and the terms lasted only 
a few months out of each year, but he ap- 
plied himself as best he could and laid the 
foundation for a good mental development 
which he later received by home reading and 
personal observation. 

Mr. Brubaker was united in marriage to 
Jane Davis, who was born in Virginia. 
She was taken to Pennsylvania when two 
years of age and reared there, later coming 
to Illinois when she had reached maturity, 
remaining in this state until her earthly la- 
bors closed in 1895. She was a good 
woman, kind and gentle of disposition, and 
in her religious affiliations was a member 
of the Presbyterian church. Ten children 
were born to Jacob and Jane Brubaker, 
named in order of their birth as follows: 
Clifford, who lives in Stevenson township 
on a farm ; Lillie is the wife of M. C. Hoist- 
law, a farmer of Stevenson township; Ella 
is single; John is a fanner living in Alma 
township, this county; Walter, who was 
born February 7, 1864, lives on a farm in 
Stevenson township. He was reared on a 
farm and in 1887 went to Colorado, but 
returned to this county and married Laura 
Rodgers, a native of Marion county. He 
has one hundred and forty acres of good 
land and he is regarded as an excellent 
farmer and neighbor. He is the father of 
one child, Blanche. Frank is the name of 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



i8 9 



the sixth child of our subject, who is liv- 
ing on a farm in Stevenson township; Anna 
is the wife of Charles Craig, a farmer on 
the old Brubaker homestead; Herman is a 
farmer in luka township; the ninth and 
tenth child died in infancy. 

Jacob Brubaker, after an eminently use- 
ful and active life, passed to his rest on June 
30, 1908, lamented by a host of friends who 
regarded him as one of the leading men of 
the community and who will greatly miss 
him. In politics he was a Democrat and 
he served as school director of Stevenson 
township. He was known as a loyal citizen 
and a good man. 



JOHN F. EDDIXGS. 

The climate, soil and general conditions 
prevalent in southern Illinois are well 
adapted to the purposes of general farming 
and stock raising. One of the men who has 
shown by their success that they were mas- 
ters of the art of farming in luka town- 
ship, Marion county, is the subject of this 
biography. However, he is at present en- 
gaged in other business, having given up 
his former life work. 

John F. Eddings was born in luka town- 
ship, Marion county, Illinois, Feburary 22, 
1844, the son of James B. and Rhoda Ann 
(West) Eddings, both natives of North 
Carolina. They emigrated to Kentucky 
and Tennessee when very young, arriving 
in the latter state in 1842. They later 
came to Marion county, Illinois, and set- 



tled in luka township, where they remained 
a short time and then returned to Tennes- 
see, but returned to Marion county in 1855, 
settling again in luka township, where they 
remained during the rest of their lives on a 
farm. The death of the subject's father oc- 
curred February 28, 1901, and his wife 
died January 19, 1902. The former was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and after the Civil war he voted the Re- 
publican ticket. He was justice of the 
peace for two terms. There were nine 
children in the family of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Eddings, namely: Nancy, who lives 
in luka, is the wife of William Nicks ; John 
F., our subject, was second in order of 
birth; Mary E., deceased, was the wife of 
L. L. Jones; Minerva H. is the wife of 
William Milburn, living in luka; James T. 
is a fanner living in luka township; Jesse 
J. lives in St. Louis; Martha Ann is the 
wife of William Morgan, living in Alma; 
William L. is deceased; Sarah, step- 
daughter of the subject's father, is de- 
ceased. 

John F. Eddings was reared on the home 
farm and educated in the common schools 
of the county, remaining under the pa- 
rental roof until he was seventeen years of 
age, when he showed his patriotism by en- 
listing in Company I, Fortieth Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry, serving four years in a 
most gallant manner. So efficient was his 
service that he was promoted to corporal, 
and then to first lieutenant. He served 
with Sherman's army, having been in all 
his campaigns, with the exception of 
when he was wounded at Shiloh, hav- 



190 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



ing been shot through the shoulder 
in that great battle. His throat was 
also pierced by a bullet. He remained 
in the general hospital for one and one-half 
months, after which he received a furlough 
home of from forty to fifty days at the ex- 
piration of which he rejoined his regiment 
and served until the end of the war. After 
his return from the army, he fanned a 
while. Selling out, he came to luka and 
engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business, also as pension attorney which he 
has since been following with marked suc- 
cess. 

Mr. Eddings is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, Picket Post, hav- 
ing been commander, adjutant and quarter- 
master of the same. 

Fraternally he is a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, having 
passed all the chairs and he has attended the 
grand lodge four times. He has been sec- 
retary of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, lodge No. 694, for eighteen years. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Useless to add that in politics Mr. Ed- 
dings is a loyal Republican. He is in 1908 
Supervisor of luka township, having been 
first appointed in December, 1903, to fill out 
an expired term, taking the place made va- 
cant by the death of William Gray. Mr. 
Eddings was elected in 1907 for a period 
of two years. Our subject has long been 
interested in public affairs and always did 
his part in furthering the interests of his 
community in any way he could. 



GEORGE A. McGAHEY. 

The life of the subject of this review has 
been such as to bear aloft the high standard 
which has been maintained by his father, 
who was one of the early residents' of this 
section of the Prairie state, and whose life 
was signally noble, upright and useful, one 
over which falls no shadow of wrong in 
thought, word or deed. Such was the type 
of men who laid the foundation and aided 
in the development of this state, and to their 
memories will ever be paid a tribute of rev- 
erence and gratitude by those who have 
profited by their well-directed endeavors and 
appreciated the lessons of their lives. 

George A. McGahey, one of the leading 
grocers of Olney, Illinois, was born in this 
city, October 28, 1868, and decided to direct 
his life work along channels here, rather 
than seek uncertain advantages in other 
fields. He is the son of David Herman and 
Sarah E. (Swaim) McGahey, the former 
having been born near Palestine, Illinois, 
and the latter in Hamilton county, Ohio. 
The mother moved with her parents to Illi- 
nois when thirteen years old, settling near 
Olney on a farm in Richland county, where 
she grew to maturity. The father of the 
subject lived in Jasper county for a number 
of years, where he improved a farm. He 
later moved to Richland county where he 
married and bought a farm in Preston 
township, being among the early settlers 
here. About 1862 he moved to Olney where 
he lived until his death in 1897, at the age 
of sixtv-two vears. His wife, a woman of 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



beautiful Chrisian faith, survives, living in 
Olney. They were the parents of two chil- 
dren, George A., our subject, and a sister, 
Mrs. E. W. Reef, of Carbondale, the for- 
mer being the older. He was reared in Ol- 
ney, where he attended the public schools, 
graduating from the high school, having 
received a good practical education. He 
was assistant postmaster under J. C. Allen 
for some time, after which he went on the 
road selling wholesale groceries for a Cin- 
cinnati house, having been clerk in a grocery 
store for four years, during which time he 
thoroughly mastered this line of business, 
which he decided to make a life work. He 
was on the road for two years. In 1897 he 
purchased an interest in a grocery store in 
Olney under the firm name of Winans & 
McGahey, which firm successfully continued 
for three years. In 1900 our subject es- 
tablished his present grocery store, one of 
the largest in Olney or this locality any- 
where. It occupies a space of eighteen by 
one hundred and seven feet, and a complete 
line of staple and fancy groceries is carried. 
A liberal trade has been built up within the 
city and surrounding country, and his cus- 
tomers are on the increase owing to the fair 
and courteous treatment that is accorded to 
all who visit this neat and well kept store. 

Mr. McGahey has never assumed the re- 
sponsibilities of the married state, but lives 
at home with his mother and administers to 
her comfort. 

In politics Mr. McGahey is a Democrat, 
having long taken an active part in the af- 
fairs of his party, being a member of local 
Democratic committees, etc. He is a director 



in the Business Men's Association of Olney, 
which has done much to promote the inter- 
ests of Olney. He was one of the founders 
of the same, and has been one of its leading 
advocates. In his fraternal relations he is 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

In all the relations of life Mr. McGahey 
has proved signally true to every trust. He 
possesses a social nature and by his genial 
and kindly attitude to those about him, has 
won the respect and confidence of everyone. 
He has been very successful, being known 
as an able and careful business man and one 
whose integrity of purpose is beyond ques- 
tion. 



SHANNON KAGY. 

The memory of the worthy subject of this 
memorial biography is revered by a host of 
friends and acquaintances among whom he 
labored, having spent his energies through 
a long life of strenuous endeavor to make 
the most of his opportunities as well as to 
assist as best he could his neighbors to im- 
prove their condition. 

Shannon Kagy was born in Marion 
county, Illinois, May 26, 1844, and he was 
called from his earthly labors in 1889, after 
a life of usefulness and success in even- 
particular. He was the son of Christian 
and Anna (Hite) Kagy, natives of Ohio, 
and early settlers in Marion county. Il- 
linois. 

The subject was reared on his father's 
farm in Omega township, and was edu- 
cated in the common schools of Marion 



192 



riOGIIAPIIICAI. AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



county. He married Anna E. Brubaker, 
born in Stevenson township, this county. 
daughter of Eli and Ann (Warner) Bru- 
baker. Mr. and Mrs. Kagy were the par- 
ents of five children, namely : Myrtle, single 
and living at home, is one of the popular 
teachers of Marion county; Corwin, who 
lives in Oregon, married Pearl Crippen ; 
Clark lives in Salem, this county, and mar- 
ried Quette Leckrone, and has two children, 
Donald and Harvey; Frank married Nellie 
Boring, living in New Mexico and they 
have one child, Fay ; Ellis married Ora Dru- 
endike. He is a farmer and has two chil- 
dren, Keith and Rex. 

After his marriage our subject moved to 
Nebraska, where he remained for three 
years, then returned to Marion county and 
went to farming in 1882, on the place where 
his widow is still living in Stevenson town- 
ship, three miles east of Salem. Our sub- 
ject remained on this place until his death. 
He was a most excellent farmer and always 
managed his fields to best advantage, reap- 
ing rich harvests from year to year, making 
a comfortable living and laying by an 
ample competence for his family. He 
raised good stock and the buildings on his 
place were comfortable and convenient. 

Mr. Kagy was one of the patriotic sons 
of the great Prairie state who offered their 
lives on the field of battle to save the 
Union, having enlisted in Company K, One 
Hundred and Eleventh Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry and served three years. He saw 
much hard service, but was never wounded 
nor taken prisoner. 



Mr. Kagy was a loyal Democrat and 
held some of the minor public offices of 
Stevenson township. He was a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and was 
a faithful member of the Presbyterian 
church. He was regarded by everyone as a 
good man, honest and upright at all times 
and always interested in the welfare of his 
community, lending what aid he could in its 
development at all times. 

Mrs. Kagy, the widow of our subject, 
lives on the home farm with her daughter. 
She manages the entire farm with skill and 
profit, being a women of rare business abil- 
ity and force of character. She understands 
the proper rotation of crops so as to get the 
best harvests and the maintenance of the 
soil to its original fertility. She also under- 
stands the proper handling of live stock. 
Her farm is regarded as one of the best 
in Stevenson township. The buildings are 
modern, and always kept in good order. 
She is held in high esteem by her neighbors 
and many friends for her many admirable 
traits of character and her kind heart and 
cheerful disposition, being a pleasant woman 
to meet, as is also her daughter. 



ROBERT O. BRIGHAM. 

No business man of Centralia is regarded 
with higher favor than is the subject of this 
sketch, who, while looking to his own in- 
terests does not neglect to discharge his 
duties in fostering the upbuilding of the 
community in general. 




CENTRALIA ENVELOPE CO. 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



193 



Robert O. Brigham, manager of the Cen- 
tralia Envelope Company, was born in 
Clinton, New York, May 23, 1861, the 
son of Lewis and Sophia (Johnson) Brig- 
ham, the former having been born in Ver- 
non Center, New York, December 4, 1820. 
His parents were of English extraction on 
both sides of the house. Lewis E. Brigham 
was a contractor and carpenter, and was 
educated in the public schools of his native 
state. The subject's parents reared a fam- 
ily consisting of eight sons and one daugh- 
ter, Robert O., our subject, being the sev- 
enth in order of birth. The subject's father 
died in Clinton, New York, February 22, 
1907, at the age of eighty-seven years. His 
wife was born in that city April 29, 1825. 
She was educated in the common schools 
in her native community. The parents of 
the subject were married in 1843 in the state 
of New York. The mother of our subject, 
an elderly woman of beautiful Christian 
character, is still living in Clinton, New 
York. 

Robert O. Brigham received his early ed- 
ucation in Clinton, New York, in the public 
schools. He quit school when fifteen years 
of age and went to Boston to learn the ma- 
chinist's trade. Here he took advantage of 
the Boston night schools and applied him- 
self with his accustomed vigor to technical 
drafting and the necessary commercial 
branches. He served his apprenticeship 
with the National Sewing Machine Com- 
pany, for which he worked for ten years, at 
the end of which time he was called to take 
charge of the Whitmore Sewing Machine 
13 



Company, in the employ of which he contin- 
ued for one year ; the then went to Los An- 
geles, California, then to Denver, Colorado, 
and worked for W. E. Scott, machinery com- 
pany, having charge of the model and re- 
pair work, after which he worked for the 
J. C. Teller Envelope Opener Company, of 
Denver, Colorado. 

Robert O. Brigham invented an attach- 
ment to an envelope machine for placing a 
string in the envelope and then formed a 
company to put such an envelope on the 
market. The manufacture was continued 
with much success until 1896, when he and 
two other men bought the interest of the 
former manager, forming the Western En- 
velope and Box Company. They continued 
for one year in Denver, but finding that 
they were too far west for the successful 
working of such a plant, they moved to 
Omaha, Nebraska, remaining there one 
year, after which they moved to Centralia, 
Illinois. 

After operating the plant for eight years 
in Centralia, it was reorganized and called 
the Illinois Envelope Company, and moved 
to Kalamazoo, Michigan. After one year's 
residence in Kalamazoo, Mr. Brigham re- 
signed his position with the Illinois En- 
velope Company and returned to Centralia 
and helped to organize a new envelope 
company with only Centralia capital. This 
company is known as the Centralia Envelope 
Company, and is capitalized for one hun- 
dred thousand dollars, fully paid in. This 
company is now only two years old and is 
doing a thriving business. Its capacity at 



i 9 4 



JIIOGKAPIIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



the beginning was one and one-quarter mil- 
lion envelopes every ten hours, and has been 
increased to one and one-half million per 
day. The order for the machinery for the 
plant was the largest ever given at one time 
for a like enterprise. 

The view accompanying this article is of 
thirty of the latest improved envelope ma- 
chines in the plant of the Centralia En- 
velope Company mill. These machines are 
marvels of ingenuity. The paper is cut to 
the proper size and shape, then taken to 
these machines in which they are gummed, 
folded, dried and counted at the rate of one 
hundred to one hundred and thirty per 
minute, according to size. The picture 
shows only the envelope machines. There 
is also a large printing department equipped 
with latest improved printing machinery 
and all the necessary equipment that goes 
to make a complete printing establish- 
ment, cutting department, box department, 
case department, handfold department, ma- 
chine shop, in fact, everything that goes 
to make up a complete envelope mill. 

The capacity of the mill, as already 
stated, is one and one-half million envelopes 
every ten hours, making it one of the largest 
in the United States, and one of the lead- 
ing industries of Southern Illinois. Its goods 
are known far and wide for their high 
quality. 

This mill is owned and controlled by 
Centralia capital. Its directors are com- 
posed of the following well known busi- 
ness men : C. C. Davis, Ferdinand Kohl. Jr., 
Harry Warner, F. F. Noleman, Jacob 



Erbes, Ed Cornell, J. G. Goetsch, R. O. 
Brigham, W. E. O'Melveny. Officers: C. 
C. Davis, president; F. Kohl, Jr., vice pres- 
ident; H. M. Warner, secretary: Harry 
Kohl, treasurer; R. O. Brigham, general 
manager. 

Our subject is particularly well fitted to 
be manager of such a gigantic and success- 
ful enterprise. His native constructive abil- 
ity for technical mechanics and intricate ma- 
chinery has eminently fitted him in this 
special line. His economic foresight of 
proper management, good machines, good 
workmen, good material all contribute to 
the success of the company. 

All the machinery in the plant is modern, 
up-to-date in every respect, and high grade 
work is turned out rapidly. Our subject 
has had. a wide experience in the manage- 
ment of such concerns. He is the originator 
and inventor of many of the improvements 
to be found in the present highly developed 
envelope machine. This company under his 
superior management now operates thirty 
envelope machines, ten printing presses and 
ten box machines. The factory also has a 
complete machine shop and repair depart- 
ment, also a complete case department. The 
buildings are two stories high, built of brick 
and frame. The main building is two hun- 
dred feet long and fifty feet wide. The 
shipping and stock room is one hundred and 
thirty-five by eighty-five feet. A switch 
from the main track of the Illinois Central 
Railroad runs to the door of the big ship- 
ping room, all under cover of spacious 
sheds. The Illinois Southern tracks also 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



run into the sheds of the shipping depart- 
ment. The machines of the plant are run 
and the buildings are lighted and heated by 
a one hundred and sixty-horse power steam 
plant and a sixty horse power engine. A 
four hundred light dynamo furnishes the 
lighting of the great plant. Eighty girls 
and twenty-five men and boys are constant- 
ly employed to operate the plant, the daily 
capacity of which is one million and five 
hundred thousand envelopes. 

This new but successful enterprising 
company was started by thirty-five of the 
business men of Centralia, and it is owned 
by Centralia people, being capitalized at 
one hundred thousand dollars, which was 
raised in a very short time. The capacity 
of each machine runs from sixty-five to sev- 
enty-five thousand each ten hours. It is an 
interesting plant in every detail and one of 
the rapidly growing large industrial con- 
cerns of Southern Illinois. 

Robert O. Brigham was married to Min- 
nie G. McDonald, the accomplished daugh- 
ter of James and Rebecca (Nicholson) Mc- 
Donald, a well known family of Quincy, 
Illinois, to which family there were four 
children, Minnie being the youngest. To 
our subject and wife one daughter was 
born, who passed away when eighteen years 
old. 

Our subject is a member of Centralia 
lodges, Knights of Pythias and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. He 
served as a member of the school board for 
one term. In politics he is a Republican, 
and he was reared a Baptist, but he at pres- 



ent worships with the Christian Scientists, 
and is president of the Church Board of 
Centralia. His beautiful home just west of 
the Public Library is nicely furnished, be- 
ing also well filled with choicest books of 
an excellent variety, also a large number of 
beautiful oil paintings by his sister and 
daughter. He is a genial gentleman of 
good habits and modest demeanor. 



PHILIP HELTMAN. 

An honorable retirement from labor in 
which to enjoy the fruits of former toil and 
the enjoyment which life can offer, is the 
fitting reward of a useful and active career, 
in which one, through keen discernment, in- 
defatigable labor and honorable methods 
advanced steadily toward the goal of pros- 
perity. Such, briefly stated, is the record 
of Philip Heltman, who is now living re- 
tired in Olney, Richland county, and 
through his long connection with agricul- 
tural interests he not only carefully con- 
ducted his farm, but so managed its affairs 
that he acquired thereby a position among 
the substantial residents of the community. 
Moreover he is entitled to representation in 
this volume because he was one of the sons 
of the Northland who stood by the flag dur- 
ig the days of the rebellion. He came to 
this county over a half century ago, and 
from those early times down to the present 
day he has been an interested witness of its 
development, taking a just pride in what he 
has accomplished and the high rank the 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND KKM I X 1SCKXT HISTORY OF 



county has among her sister counties of the 
great Prairie state. 

Philip Heltman was born in Clermont 
county, Ohio, December 6, 1834, the son of 
John and Elizabeth (Weaver) Heltman, na- 
tives of Pennsylvania, of German parentage. 
John Heltman grew up in the old Keystone 
state and married there. In 1809 he emi- 
grated with his wife and two children to 
Cincinnati, Ohio, going down the Ohio 
river in skiffs. He was a distiller and came 
to Ohio for the purpose of following that 
business. This was in an early day, and he 
was obliged to take refuge in a fort in the 
Miami valley more than once on account of 
the Indians. He later located on a farm 
which is now located in Clermont county, 
Ohio, near the Hamilton county line, where 
he died at the age of sixty-eight years, his 
wife having previously passed away in 1840. 
Our subject is the youngest of fourteen chil- 
dren and the only one living at this writing. 
He was about fifteen years of age when his 
father died. He then went to live with an 
older brother and was reared on a farm in 
Clermont county, where he attended pub- 
lic school in the winer in an old log school- 
house, and one term in a frame, but he ap- 
plied himself and laid a good foundation for 
an education which has later been added to 
by home reading and a contact with the 
world of men. 

In February, 1857, Mr. Heltman came to 
Richland county, Illinois, and soon after- 
ward bought over four hundred acres of 
raw land in Denver township, on which two 
log cabins had been built. He at once began 



work on the place and in time made exten- 
sive and radical improvements. 

When the war between the states broke 
out, our subject was not long making up his 
mind to offer his services in behalf of the 
nation, consequently he enlisted in June, 
1 86 1, in Company D, Eleventh Missouri 
Volunteer Infantry, and after a faithful ser- 
vice was mustered out in Memphis, Tennes- 
see, in August, 1864, and was paid off in 
St. Louis. His regiment was assigned to 
the Mississippi, and opened up the same, 
raising the blockade on Island No. 10. He 
soon afterward went to Tiptonville by 
transport, where his regiment took about 
five thousand prisoners. Later Mr. Heltman 
was in the siege of Corinth, his regiment 
forming the left wing of the army in the 
fighting there. It was later sent against 
Bragg and Price at luka, where the Confed- 
erates were defeated. Then came the en- 
gagements at Raymond, Mississippi, the 
Siege of Vicksburg, and during the latter 
part of the siege this regiment was in front. 
After the surrender there, the regiment went 
to Jackson, Mississippi, -and captured that 
place, the subject having charge of the pro- 
vost guard the first night at Jackson, when 
the city was taken. It then returned to 
Vicksburg and soon afterward went up the 
Red river to Alexandria. After the Red 
river expedition, it was sent to Memphis 
where it was mustered out, and from which 
place our subject went home. 

After the war Mr. Heltman engaged in 
farming and stock raising for many years, 
making a success in these lines, for he was 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



197 



a man of good judgment in buying and sell- 
ing stock, and a most careful farmer, be- 
sides a hard worker. He improved a good 
farm in Denver township, which he still 
owns, consisting of seven hundred and 
twenty acres, of very productive soil, having 
been so carefully ad skillfully tilled that the 
land is just as strong today as when he took 
possession of it. It is well fenced, has an 
excellent dwelling and outbuildings on it, in 
fact, everything about the place shows that 
a man of thrift and energy has had its man- 
agement in hand. 

In October, 1874, Mr. Heltman located 
in Olney, owning one hundred and twenty 
acres of valuable land just outside the city 
limits and eight acres within the city limits, 
on which he lives. He has a beautiful resi- 
dence where the many friends of the family 
often gather and always find good cheer and 
hospitality unstintingly dispersed. All this 
Mr. Heltman has made unaided, and in a 
most honorable manner, therefore he de- 
serves the great credit he is given by his 
friends who are limited only by the circle of 
his acquaintance. 

Mr. Heltman's married life began in 
1854 when he was united in the bonds of 
wedlock with Laura E. Smith, a native of 
Clermont county, Ohio, the daughter of Or- 
rin Smith. Four children have blessed the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Heltman, namely: 
Georgiana, the wife of William J. Eichin, 
of Olney. Illinois ; Cora is the second child ; 
Mamie is residing in Arvada, a suburb of 
Denver, Colorado; Hattie is the wife of 
Benjamin Holscher. of Linton. Indiana. 



In politics our subject was a Republican 
all his life up to 1896, since which time he 
has voted the Democratic ticket, except in 
1904, when he voted the Prohibition ticket. 
He says he is a Lincoln Republican or a 
Bryan Democrat one and the same thing 
and he has always taken an active interest 
in politics. He has served several terms on 
the Board of County Supervisors from 
Denver and Olney townships. He is a mem- 
ber of the Protestant Methodist church, as 
is also his noble wife. His children are 
members of the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Heltman won definite success in life 
because he persevered in the pursuit of a 
worthy purpose, gaining thereby a most sat- 
isfactory reward. His life is exemplary in 
every respect, and he has always supported 
those interests which are calculated to uplift 
and benefit humanity, while his own moral 
worth is deserving of the highest commen- 
dation. 



WILLIAM J. MARTIN. 

A list of Marion county's prominent fami- 
lies would certainly be incomplete were there 
failure to make specific mention of the well 
known farmer and representative citizen, 
and his relatives, whose name introduces 
this sketch, for his life has been one of use- 
fulness and honor, resulting in good to 
everyone with whom he has had dealings 
whether in business or social life. 

William J. Martin was born in Gibson 
county, Tennessee, January 15, 1859, the 



i 9 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



son of Caleb and Martha J. (McHaney) 
Martin, the latter a native of middle Ten- 
nessee and the former of South Carolina. 
Jacob Martin, the subject's paternal grand- 
father, came to Tennessee from South Caro- 
lina in an early day and farmed there until 
his death. The parents of the subject mar- 
ried in Tennessee. Martha McHaney was 
the daughter of William McHaney, a native 
of Tennessee. She first married David 
Young, who died and left two children, 
Frances, the wife of Atlas Hammond. The 
second child died in infancy. Caleb Martin 
first married Miss Susan Batie, who died 
leaving the following children : Jacob, 
George, Amos, America, Jane, Parthene, 
Martha and Mary Susan. 

The parents of our subject married in 
Tennessee and in November, 1862, settled in 
Salem township, Marion county, Illinois. 
Caleb Martin was a strong Union man and 
left the South on account of the war. His 
wife, a noble old lady, is still living with 
her son, our subject. The subject's father 
farmed in Marion county, Illinois, until his 
death, July 1 1, 1888. He and his wife were 
members of the Christian church. He was 
a strong Republican. Six children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Martin, as fol- 
lows: William J., our subject; Monroe, 
Houston, Benjamin Van Buren, John A. 
Logan, Sarah Ida. 

Our subject was about three years old 
when the family came to Illinois. They 
made the trip from Tennessee with ox teams 
and camped out on the way, having all ox 
teams with the exception of one team of 



horses. William J. Martin was reared on 
his father's farm and educated in the com- 
mon district schools of this county. On 
his farm now stands the little old school 
house in which he was educated. He pur- 
chased it and moved it on this place, which 
he now uses for a store house and granary. 
It was built about 1850. Mr. Martin re- 
mained at home and worked on the farm 
until he was twenty-five years old. This 
was in 1884, in which year his happy and 
harmonious domestic life began, having then 
married Elizabeth Hershberger, who was 
born in Crawford county, Ohio, the daugh- 
ter of Henry and Catherine (Snavely) 
Hershberger. (For a full history of this 
family the reader is directed to the sketch 
of David Hershberger in this work.) 

Four children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife, namely: Minnie, born Oc- 
tober 3, 1886, is a member of the home 
circle; Claude was born in April, 1888, and 
died in January, 1895; William Franklin 
was born December 26, 1890, and died 
January 16, 1891 ; Nellie Zada, born August 
14, 1892, is at home attending school. 

Mr. Martin's highly improved and pro- 
ductive farm consists of one hundred and 
sixty acres. He has a beautiful country 
home, substantial, comfortable and nicely 
furnished, and a good barn and other con- 
venient out buildings, everything about the 
place showing thrift, good management and 
industry. He keeps an excellent grade of 
cattle and other live stock, and is regarded 
as a good judge of stock and one of the 
leading farmers of Salem township. His 



RICHLAND. CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



199 



hogs are of good breed and he raises some 
fine horses. Mr. Martin also owns two hun- 
dred acres of his father's old farm in this 
township, which he keeps well improved and 
the soil in good productive condition. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin are members of the 
Christian church at Young's chapel. Mr. 
Martin is a trustee in the church and a 
liberal subscriber to the same. In politics 
he is a Republican. In the social and pri- 
vate walks of life no man bears a more 
enviable reputation for sterling worth. In 
short, Mr. Martin is an honorable, upright 
citizen, belonging to the somewhat rare class 
that direct and control public sentiment 
without pushing himself forward and with- 
out incurring the ill will of those with 
whom they come in contact and leave the 
impress of their strong personality indelibly 
stamped upon the community, winning the 
friendship of all classes. 



DAXIEL GAFFXER. 

The honored subject of this sketch is now 
living in retirement in Olney, Illinois, en- 
joying the respite due the closing of a long 
and useful business career. He has been 
prominently identified with industrial move- 
ments of no mean scope and importance and 
the name which he bears has stood for pro- 
gressiveness and large enterprise ever since 
the pioneer days in this section of the state, 
while he is a scion of an old family of Swit- 
zerland, being numbered among that ele- 



ment of foreigners in this country who have 
greatly benefited America by their pres- 
ence. So important have been the business 
and industrial undertakings with which he 
had been connected, and so high is the confi- 
dence and esteem in which he is held in Rich- 
land county, that it is imperative that he be 
accorded recognition in a publication like 
the present volume. 

Daniel Gafrner was born in Interlacken, 
Switzerland, July 7. 1831, the son of Daniel 
and Elizabeth (Gerber) Gaffner, also na- 
tives of Switzerland where they lived and 
died. The subject's father was a farmer in 
the mountains of that country and was sev- 
enty-eight years old when he died, his wife 
having died at the age of seventy-five. The 
family of Gaffner was originally French, one 
branch passing to Switzerland many years 
ago. The father of the subject was in the 
military service of his country for some time. 
Grandfather Gerber was of Swiss birth and 
parentage, but took part in a number of bat- 
tles under Xapoleon. A remarkable fact is 
that the subject remembers the funeral of his 
grandfather who died in 1833, when the sub- 
ject was a trine over two years old. Seven 
children were born to the parents of the sub- 
ject, five of whom grew to maturity. Daniel 
being the fourth in order of birth. Three 
members of the family came to the United 
States. 

Our subject was reared in his native land 
on a farm and there developed that sturdy 
manhood and sterling character that have 
made for his later success in new environ- 
ments. He received a common school educa- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



non. He left home when sixteen years old 
and was apprenticed to a shoemaker, at 
which trade he worked in several parts of 
Switzerland. When twenty-three years old 
he came to the United States, landing in New 
York and went direct to La Porte, Indiana, 
where he arrived without money. His father 
was reluctant to have him come to America, 
but after consenting gave him money enough 
to pay his passage. He at once began work 
at his trade in LaPorte, but soon afterward 
went to Highland, Illinois, where he worked 
for three years, being regarded as a high 
grade workman by his employers. In 1858 
he came to Olney and resumed working at his 
trade, but at the end of two years he went to 
Edwards county on account of failing health, 
having traded property in Olney for a two- 
hundred-acre farm. Two years later he sold 
the same for two thousand two hundred and 
fifty dollars, besides realizing about one thou- 
sand dollars from his personal property. 
Thus we see how our subject prospered from 
the first in his adopted country. His next 
move was to Albion, where he worked at his 
trade for three years, having been in partner- 
ship one year in a shoe shop and store. He 
had bought property in Albion which he 
traded for property in Olney, then taking up 
his permanent residence in the latter town 
where he has since resided continuously, hav- 
ing carried on business here in a most suc- 
cessful manner for many years. He first 
opened a shoe store and later was engaged 
in wholesale and retail hide and leather busi- 
ness, gradually accumulating property. In 
1882 he built a three-storv brick business 



block on Main street, twenty by eighty-five 
feet with a good basement, in addition to 
a large warehouse. It is one of the 
most pretentious blocks in Olney, modern, 
substantial and convenient. He also owns an- 
other brick block two stories in height, twenty 
by one hundred and eighty-five feet, located 
on Main street. He also owns a valuable 
building, thirty by one hundred and eighty 
feet, on Vaile avenue, together with two 
stores on Railroad street, besides valuable 
residence property. He is one of the stock- 
holders of the First National Bank and for 
some years was one of its directors. 

Mr. Gafifner was first married in 1852 to 
Susanna Schneiter, a native of Switzerland, 
who came to the United States with her fa- 
ther, her mother having died in Switzerland. 
To the subject and his first wife six chil- 
dren were born, four of whom are living, as 
follows : Robert, a druggist in Olney ; Tell, 
Charles and Walter, all reside in Seattle, 
Washington. They are all young men of 
much business ability. Their father gave 
each one ten thousand dollars to start them 
in life. 

Mrs. Gaffner passed to her rest in August, 
1898, and the subject subsequently married 
Mrs. Fannie (Suardet) Emerson, who was 
born in De Vand, Switzerland, of French- 
Huguenot descent, who came to the United 
States with a brother, who soon afterward 
went to California during the gold excite- 
ment and subsequently died there. 

Mr. Gaffner is a Republican in politics, but 
he has never aspired to public office and he is 
not a partisan, believing in men rather than 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



201 



measures. His first presidential vote was for 
Stephen A. Douglas. Mr. Gaffner was reared 
in the German Reformed church. His wife 
is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

This review of Mr. Gaffer's life history is 
necessarily general in its character. To enter 
fully into the interesting details of his ca- 
reer would require a much larger space than 
possible in this volume. Sufficient, however, 
has been stated to show that he is entitled 
to a place in the front ranks of successful men 
who have engaged in industries in Richland 
county. He, by his pluck, energy and enter- 
prise, controlled by correct principles and 
founded upon unswerving honor, has at- 
tained to a position meriting the respect and 
admiration of his fellow citizens which they 
gladly give. 



FRANCIS M. PURCELL. 

The subject is a representative business 
man and citizen of Marion county, man- 
aging one of the largest lumber establish- 
ments in the county, the well known firm 
being F. M. Purcell & Company, doing 
business at Kell. Our subject was born in 
Wilson county, Tennessee, July 2, 1843, 
the son of Hiram and Parthena (Williams) 
Purcell, natives of Tennessee, and a fine old 
Southern family. Hiram was a prosperous 
fanner and lived and died in Tennessee. 
He and his faithful life companion were 
members of the Missionary Baptist church. 
The subject's father was a gallant soldier 



in the Seminole Indian war in Florida. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Purcell five children 
were bom, namely: Lavina, Ella; Frances 
M.. our subject; L. B. and Hiram. 

The subject's father first married a Miss 
Jones and they became the parents of two 
children, Eliza and Henry. 

Our subject grew up in Tennessee on a 
farm. He remained in that state on a farm 
until he was twenty-seven years old. In 
1870 he came to Jefferson county, Illinois, 
and engaged in farming, also the lumber 
business, making a success of each. In the 
fall of 1904, he came to Kell, Illinois, 
where he is now located and where he has 
built up an extensive business by means of 
his industry, his careful methods and fair 
treatment of customers. He is in partner- 
ship with Omer V. Cummings in the lum- 
ber business. They supply a large scope of 
country with lumber and all kinds of build- 
ing material as well as much hardware. 
They also handle paints, cement, lime, nails, 
in fact, everything that a builder uses in a 
house, barn or other structure. They al- 
ways handle a good line of material and 
their prices are always right, according to 
the statement of many of their customers. 
They have extensive sheds and their office 
is a nice place and is always a busy place. 

Our subject's happy domestic life began 
in 1866, when he was united in marriage 
with America Penuel, who was born in 
Tennessee, the daughter of Frederick and 
Lucinda (Jennings) Penuel, natives of that 
state. 

Eight children have been born to the sub- 



lilOC.RAPHICAL AXI) REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



ject and wife as follows: Amanda, the wife 
of W. W. Hay, who lives in Jefferson 
county, this state ; Samuel married Dora Ri- 
ley and they live in Carrier Mills, Illinois; 
Lucinda is the wife of George Snyder. liv- 
ing in Jefferson county, Illinois ; Robert 
married Anna McCormick, and they also 
live in Jefferson county; Otis J. married 
Tosie Hawkins ; William Edgar is single ; 
Nora is the wife of Adolphus Caldwell, also 
of Jefferson county; Fred is single. 

Mr. and Mrs. Purcell are members of 
the Missionary Baptist church. The former 
is a loyal Democrat. He very ably served 
for six years as Supervisor of Rome town- 
ship, Jefferson county, this state. He was 
chairman of the Board of Supervisors for 
one year. He takes considerable interest in 
political matters and his advice is often 
sought in the local affairs of his county. 
In his fraternal relations he is a member of 
the Masonic Order, the .Knights Templar. 

Mr. Purcell owns a valuable and well 
improved farm, near Kell, on which he 
lives, having a modern, substantial and nice- 
ly furnished dwelling, an excellent barn and 
convenient out-buildings. He is a very 
busy man, for he successfully conducts the 
affairs of his lumber establishment in town 
and at the same time superintends the work 
on the place, being an excellent judge of live 
stock of all kinds, and he is regarded as one 
of the leading business men of Haines 
township. He deserves much credit for 
what he has accomplished, having started 
in life under none too favorable circum- 
stances, but he has been a hard worker and 



a good manager and success has attended 
his efforts from the first. He is a gentle- 
man of pleasing demeanor, easily ap- 
proached, and while not an aspirant for 
high political favors, he has done much in 
a quiet way, as already intimated, to pro- 
mote the good of the community where he 
lives. He occupies a commendable stand- 
ing among his fellow citizens and has a 
large circle of friends who have learned to 
esteem him for his industry and many- 
manly qualities. 



KENNETH D. HORRALL. 

Kenneth D. Horrall, the well known 
hardware merchant of Olney, Illinois, 
which business he established in 1856, and 
which he has conducted continuously ever 
since in a most successful manner, his busi- 
ness having steadily grown from a modest 
beginning until now it is one of large pro- 
portions. He carries a stock of about fif- 
teen thousand dollars, often reaching twenty 
thousand dollars, his store room being twen- 
ty by one hundred and sixty-five feet, and 
two floors, and one hundred feet on three 
floors. In 1866 he erected his present brick 
block. His is the oldest business in Olney, 
and the oldest hardware business in Rich- 
land county. His business is known all over 
the county, and his customers come from all 
sections of this locality. 

Kenneth D. Horrall was born near Wash- 
ington, Daviess county. Indiana, June 9, 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



203 



1838, the son of John and Rebecca (John- 
son) Horrall, the former a native of Vir- 
ginia and the latter of Illinois. They were 
among the early settlers of this section of the 
state, being sterling pioneers and people of 
force of character. The father of the sub- 
ject served in the wars under General Har- 
rison and took part in the battle of Tippe- 
caoe. He devoted his life to farming and 
died in Daviess county. Indiana, at the age 
of fifty-two years. His wife survived him 
for several years and passed to rest while 
living in Richland county, Illinois, at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-five years. Our sub- 
ject was the youngest of seven children, 
only two of whom are living at this writing. 

Mr. Horrall was reared in his native state 
and was educated in the country schools, 
where he applied himself in such a manner 
as to gain an education despite lack of op- 
portunities. When he was fourteen years 
old he came to Olney and entered the hard- 
ware store of John Banks in order to learn 
the tinner's trade, at which he worked suc- 
cessfully for about fifteen years. In 1856 he 
began business for himself in a small way, 
having a stock of about three hundred dol- 
lars. He built up his business to its present 
proportions by years of hard' work and 
close application to business, and by his fair 
treatment of customers. 

In politics our subject is a Republican, 
but he has never been active in his party's 
affairs. However, he served very faithfully 
for two years as a member of the City 
Council. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, having held about all the 



offices in the same and he has been one of 
the main pillars of this church. 

Mr. Horrall's domestic relations began 
in 1858 when he was married to Sarah J. 
Baird, a native of Olney, Illinois, and the- 
daughter of Asa and Lucy (Tanner) Baird, 
natives of Vermont, who were among the 
pioneers of Richland county, where they 
spent their active and useful lives, and where 
they died. Asa Baird was a contractor and 
he built a large part of the national road 
to Vincennes. At one time he was one of 
the officials of the county. His death oc- 
curred in 1849. His wife was a relative of 
ex-Governor Tanner. 

The subject and his wife are the parents 
of seven children, namely: Adelbert, 
George Lewis, Charles Asa: Carrie, de- 
ceased ; Edward Eugene, Walter Lewis and 
Henry Cliff. Adelbert. Charles and Walter 
assist their father in the management of his 
large store. Adelbert is bookkeeper, having 
graduated in a business college in Buffalo, 
Xew York. George is a tinner by trade and 
he manages a farm two miles north of Ol- 
ney, which is owned by himself and father. 
It is a valuable farm, well improved and 
highly cultivated. Charles also learned the 
tinner's trade and also telegraphy. Edward 
is a druggist and owns and operates a drug 
store at Decatur, Illinois. Henry Cliff is 
engaged in the hardware business at Bridge- 
port, Illinois. These children have all re- 
ceived good educations and are well estab- 
lished in life. 

No man in Richland county is better or 
more favorably known than Mr. Horrall. 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Because of his public spirit, his honesty in 
all his dealings with his fellow men, his gen- 
erous and kindly nature, he has won and re- 
tained a host of warm personal friends 
throughout this locality. 



HARVEY D. MAY. 

By a life of persistent and well applied 
industry led along the most honorable lines, 
the gentleman whose name appears above 
has justly earned the right to be repre- 
sented in a work of the character of the 
one at hand, along with the other men of 
Marion county who have made their in- 
fluence felt in their respective communities. 

Harvey D. May, the present popular 
Trustee of Haines township and a well 
known dealer in harness, saddlery and hard- 
ware in the town of Kell, Illinois, was born 
in Raccoon township, Marion county, Oc- 
tober 12, 1879, and while yet a young man 
he has shown what properly applied energy 
and a business mind can do toward wrench- 
ing success from seeming insurmountable 
obstacles. He is the son of Jesse H. and 
Mary (Williams) May, the former a native 
of Kentucky and the latter of Tennessee. 
Anderson May, the subject's grandfather, 
was also a native of Kentucky and was one 
of the early settlers in Marion county, Illi- 
nois, having settled in Raccoon township. 
Jesse H. May, who has devoted his life to 
farming and is still living in that township, 
is a highly respected citizen. Three chil- 



dren were born to the parents of our subject, 
Amos is a farmer in Raccoon township; 
Laura, who is deceased, was the wife of 
Orvil Prater, and they were the parents of 
two children, Etha and Henry, who are still 
living; Harvey D., our subject, was the 
second child. 

Our subject was reared on a farm where 
he assisted with the work about the place. 
He attended school in Raccoon township, 
having applied himself in such a manner 
as to gain the foundation for a good edu- 
cation. Deciding early in life that he de- 
sired to be a harness maker and dealer, Mr. 
May learned the harnessmaker's trade and 
became quite a proficient workman early in 
life, and he finally opened a shop in 
Kell, this county, establishing his present 
business, in which he was successful from 
the first and which has steadily grown, his 
business now extending through a wide 
scope of country on every hand, owing to 
the fair dealing he gives his customers and 
the intimate knowledge he has of the har- 
ness business. He does a general repair 
business and is always very busy. His shop 
is equipped with all the latest appliances and 
improvements known to the harnessmaker's 
art and his work is all of a high grade. 

Mr. May's domestic life was begun in 
1903, when he was united in marriage with 
Ava Williams, who was born in Jefferson 
county, Illinois, and is the daughter of N. A. 
and Jane (Rice) Williams. Mrs. May was 
called from her earthly labors January 14, 
1908. She was a member of the Baptist 
church. She was a woman of many esti- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



205 



mable traits of character, a good wife and 
was beloved by all her neighbors. 

Mr. May is a member of Romine Lodge 
No. 663, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He has represented this lodge at the 
Grand Lodge on two different occasions, 
and has passed all the chairs in the local 
lodge. Our subject is a loyal Republican 
and has taken considerable interest in his 
party's affairs. He was elected Trustee of 
Haines township in the spring of 1908. He 
is regarded as an energetic, honest and in- 
fluential citizen, enjoying the respect of all 
who know him. 



ELI BRUBAKER. 

The man who has made a success of life 
and won the honor and esteem of his fel- 
low citizens deserves more than passing 
notice. Such is the record, briefly stated, 
of the gentleman whose name heads this 
review, the record he left behind being one 
of honor in every respect, for a more 
whole-souled and popular man never lived 
in Stevenson township where he long main- 
tained his home and where he labored for 
the general good of the community, and, 
although his life work has been closed by 
the good angel, who has set the seal on the 
record of his life history, his influence still 
permeates the lives of those who knew him 
best and loved him for his fortitude, fidel- 
ity, honor and industry. 

Eli Brubaker was born in Fairfield 



county, Ohio, December n, 1819, and he 
was called from his earthly labors in 1907, 
after a long and eminently useful and suc- 
cessful life. He was the son of Abraham and 
Elizabeth (Myers) Brubaker, and was 
reared on his father's farm in Ohio, where 
he assisted with the work about the place un- 
til he reached manhood, attending the com- 
mon schools in the neighborhood until he 
received a fairly good education, such as the 
old pioneer schools of those times afforded. 
The school house which he attended had 
puncheon seats and greased paper was used 
for window panes. For a full history of 
the Brubaker family the reader is referred 
to the sketch of Noah Brubaker, which ap- 
pears in another part of this volume. 

The subject of this sketch came to Ma- 
rion county, Illinois, in 1843, and settled 
among the pioneers on new land in Steven- 
son township, where, by dint of hard work, 
he made a home and developed a good 
farm. The old Brubaker homestead is to- 
day one of the best farms in Stevenson 
township. Eli Brubaker was a hard worker 
and an excellent farmer, and he made a 
comfortable living. 

Our subject was first married to Mary 
Ann Warner January 20, 1842, daughter 
of William Warner, an early settler of Ma- 
rion county, Illinois. She was born in 
Lancaster county, Ohio. She passed to her 
rest in 1872. She was the mother of 
eleven children, namely : Isaac, who lives in 
luka, this state ; Christina, deceased ; Annie, 
E., widow of Shannon Kagy, lives in Ste- 
venson township; William is a prosperous 



206 



IIIOGKAPIIICAL AND KKM I MSfKXT HISTORY OF 



farmer in Stevenson township; Edgar and 
Edward are twins; Logan is a farmer, liv- 
ing in Stevenson township; Mary Jane is 
the eighth child; the ninth, tenth and elev- 
enth child died in infancy. 

On February 4, 1875, the subject married 
a second time, his last wife being Emma 
Squibb, who was born in Ohio county, In- 
diana, the daughter of George Y. and Mary 
Ann (Harpham) Squibb, natives of Indi- 
ana, who moved to Stevenson township, 
Marion county, Illinois, where the mother 
is still living, the father having died soon 
after coming to this county. Mrs. Bru- 
baker is living on the old homestead in 
Stevenson township, which she manages 
successfully. 

Our subject was a member of the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian church and a liberal 
supporter of the same. He was a good 
everyday Christian, always strictly honest in 
his dealings with his fellow men, a good 
neighbor, father and husband. In politics 
he was a Democrat, but never held office. 
The different members of his family are well 
settled in life and are highly respected in 
their respective communities. They reflect 
great credit upon their parents, who gave 
them every advantage possible, and no 
doubt they will ever uphold the honor of 
the family name which is one of the high- 
est integrity. 

The subject of this sketch was a member 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian church and 
was ordained elder in this church in 1847. 
He was superintendent of the Sunday school 
at Brubaker chapel for the long period of 



over forty-two years, after which he was 
elected honorary superintendent for life. He 
was a leader in church work for many years 
and was foremost in promoting everything 
which makes for the betterment of human- 
ity. It was largely due to his efforts that 
the new and modern church edifice was 
erected and dedicated June 20, 1896, which 
he christened New Bethel, he not only do- 
nating the land, consisting of four acres for 
the manse, but also gave freely of his ser- 
vices and money to the building fund. 

Mr. Brubaker gave each of his children 
a farm. 



SAMUEL MARION HOLT. 

The subject of this review, who, though 
past the meridian of life many years, is still 
in the same physical and mental vigor that 
have characterized his earlier years of en- 
deavor and he is almost as capable in bear- 
ing his part in the concerns of his neighbor- 
hood as he was in former days. 

Samuel Marion Holt is a native of Ma- 
rion county, having been born in Foster 
township, June 25, 1845, the son of John F. 
Holt, who was born in Georgia in 1806, and 
came to Marion county, Illinois, when a 
young man, where he took up government 
land in Foster township, settling on North 
Fork creek among the pioneers, there being 
then only four families here, the first settlers 
of this creek being Isaac Agan, Hardy Fos- 
ter, John F. Holt and Moses Garrett. The 
subject's grandfather was Harmon Holt, 



KICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



207 



who was born in Georgia and came to Ma- 
rion county, Illinois, where he died at a 
ripe old age. He was of Irish descent. Har- 
mon Holt's wife was named Ibby Holt, 
whom he married in Georgia. The maiden 
name of the subject's mother was Elizabeth 
Jones, who was born in the state of Dela- 
ware, and who came with her parents to St. 
Clair county, Illinois, when five years old. 
Eleven children were born to the subject's 
parents, five of whom are living. They are : 
Martha, Henry, Mary, Matilda. Harmon. 
Salina, Samuel M., Sally, John D., Hardy 
F. (twins) and Isabelle. 

The Indians made a treaty with the gov- 
ernment to hunt in the new country which 
was still partly a wilderness after his par- 
ents had come. Our subject spent his early 
life on his father's farm and attended the 
common schools, such as they were in those 
early days. When he reached maturity he 
married, on July 21, 1864, Susan F. Atkins, 
who was born in Marion county, July 16, 
1847, tne daughter of John Atkins, who 
was born in Franklin county, Tennessee. He 
moved to Alabama with his parents when a 
boy. He was about thirty years of age 
when he came to Illinois and took up gov- 
ernment land. He was the father of four 
children, an equal number of boys and girls. 
He spent the remainder of his life here, with 
the exception of the last fifteen years, dying 
at the age of seventy-three years, in Texas, 
where he had gone fifteen years previous. 

Our subject is the father of seven chil- 
dren, named in order of birth as follows: 
Mary M., who married Eli M. Arnold, liv- 



ing in Shawnee, Oklahoma, and who are the 
parents of five children; Margaret E., who 
married Oscar Chance, of Salem, Illinois, 
and who is the mother of six children; 
Emma F., who married James A. Arnold, 
living in Fort Worth, Texas, and the mother 
of two children; Rhoda A., who mar- 
ried Ed. Jones, of Salem, Illinois, and who 
is the mother of two children; John A. was 
married to Maud Davis, December 13, 1908, 
and lives at home: the sixth child was an 
infant, who died unnamed : Lulu B., the 
youngest child, is the wife of Will Harkey, 
who lives in Fayette county, near St. Peter, 
this state, and she is the mother of one son. 

Our subject is the owner of a fine landed 
estate in Kinmundy township, consisting of 
three hundred and eighty-five acres, of well 
improved land, which he has successfully 
managed until it is one of the most valuable 
farms in the township, being under a high 
state of improvement and the 1 fields well 
fenced and well drained. Much good stock 
of various kinds is to be seen in the sub- 
ject's barns and fields, and he always keeps 
good horses, cattle and hogs. He has an ele- 
gant and comfortable dwelling which is 
nicely furnished and is surrounded by a 
beautiful yard and convenient out-buildings, 
in fact, the entire place has an air of evident 
thrift and prosperity. 

Our subject is a Democrat in his political 
affiliations and he has long taken an active 
part in his party's affairs. His wife is a 
devout Christian and a faithful mother, be- 
ing a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mr. Holt is not a member of the 



208 



ilOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



church and does not hold to any Orthodox 
creed, yet he is a believer in good citizen- 
ship, honesty and fair dealing and is highly 
respected for his good citizenship. The 
different members of the family are well 
settled in life and highly esteemed in their 
respective communities. They reflect great 
credit upon their parents and no doubt will 
ever uphold the honor of the family name, 
which thus far has not been dimmed by the 
commission of a single unworthy act. 



Z. C. JENNINGS. 

The life history of the subject of this 
sketch goes back to the pioneer days, since 
which Mr. Jennings has been a very potent 
factor in the affairs of Marion county, in 
which he is regarded as a foremost citizen 
in every respect, therefore, for many rea- 
sons, it is deemed entirely consistent to give 
him conspicuous mention in this volume. 

Z. C. Jennings was bom February 14, 
1838, in Marion county, Illinois. Israel Jen- 
nings, the subject's grandfather, was a na- 
tive of Maryland and when he reached young 
manhood went to the state of Kentucky and 
while at Marysville married Mary Waters 
in 1808. In 1818 he came to Marion county, 
Illinois, and settled six miles southeast of 
Centralia, being among the very first set- 
tlers there, having Indians as his neighbors, 
and the dense woods abounded in an abun- 
dance of wild game. He was one of the 
squatters at Walnut Hill until 1827. This 



section was then a part of Jefferson county. 
It was here that Mr. Jennings entered land, 
which he developed and where he died in 
1860. His first wife passed away in 1844 
and he married a second time, his last wife 
being Lear Sterling, of Centralia, this 
county. There were no children by his sec- 
ond wife. The following are the names 
of the children by his first wife: Israel, 
Jr., who married a Miss Davidson, was the 
father of eleven children; Charles W., the 
subject's father; William W. left home in 
1847 an d went to Wisconsin. He was in the 
mining, mercantile and grain business, in 
which he made a fortune. In 1853 he went 
to California and engaged in gold mining, 
but on account of failing health and trou- 
ble with his eyes, came back to Marion 
county where he remained for several years, 
at one time engaging in railroad contract- 
ing in northern Missouri. In i86t he en- 
listed in the Union army and served during 
the war, after which he settled in Marion 
county and in 1875 he went to Austin 
county, Texas, where he lived until 1890, 
when he came to Alvin, Illinois, and built 
a modern home, having become prosperous. 
He first married Margaret Noleman. The 
date of his death was 1904. He was highly 
respected by all. Aftn, the third child of 
the subject's grandfather, married Rufus 
McElwain. a farmer in Centralia township, 
who later lived at Salem, this county. Mary, 
the fourth child, who was known as "Aunt 
Polly," married a Mr. White. They lived 
near Walnut Hill where he conducted a tan- 
yard. John, the fifth child, died when he 




MR. AND MRS. Z. JENNINGS. 



RICH LAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



209 



reached maturity. The sixth child died 
when young. In Marion county, in the 
early days, no citizen was more' prominent 
than Israel Jennings, who was one of the 
largest land owners of the county. He was 
a faithful member of the Methodist church, 
and a good Democrat. In 1827 he was 
elected a member of the Legislature when 
Vandalia was the capital of the state. He 
was a member of the house contemporane- 
ous with Peter Cartwright. He was post- 
master at Walnut Hill, Illinois, for many 
years, beginning in 1834. He was a slave- 
holder and owned the only male slave ever 
held in this county. He came here before 
there were any steam railroads, but during 
his life he noted wonderful changes, being 
instrumental in bringing about much of the 
progress of the county. He opened a store 
and gave dry goods and groceries in ex- 
change for produce which he hauled to St. 
Louis by wagon, bringing back supplies. At 
the time of his coming to this county he 
had two daughters who had reached ma- 
turity. They were taken sick while he was 
away in Shawneetown on one of his usual 
trips and one of them died. There was no 
lumber in the community, so a white-oak 
tree was cut and a coffin hewn from it, in 
which to bury the young lady, whose grave 
is on the old place he owned. He was 
known to be a very eccentric man, and ten 
years before his death he bought a metallic 
coffin, which he kept in the house until his 
death, and he was buried in it, dying April 
20, 1872. His wife died April 3, 1885. 
Charles W. Jennings, the subject's father, 
H 



was born in Kentucky, and he came to Ma- 
rion county, Illinois, with his parents, set- 
tling one-half mile from his father, where 
he made a home, and became owner of nine 
hundred acres of land. He married Mariah 
Davidson, a native of Kentucky, and the fol- 
lowing children were born to them: Sarah, 
deceased, married Capt. R. D. Noleman, 
who is also deceased ; Josephus W., deceased, 
was born October 29, 1827, lived on the old 
place and was educated in the district 
schools. He was a merchant at Walnut 
Hill, Illinois, until 1856, when he moved to 
a farm one-half mile west of that place, 
where he died November 20, 1890. He 
married Amanda Couch, who was bom 
January 8, 1834, the daughter of Milton and 
Mary (Beard) Couch. They were the par- 
ents of the following children : Edgar, 
Frank, Mary, Lizzie and Nancy. Harriett, 
the third child, married B. F. Marshall, who 
lived at Salem, Illinois. They are both de- 
ceased. Maria E. married Silas Bryan, who 
was county Judge, and lived at Salem, Illi- 
nois; Z. C., the subject of this biographical 
sketch, was the fifth in order of birth. Nan- 
cy married James Davenport, who is de- 
ceased. She is living at Salem, this county. 
America married William C. Stites. Both 
are now deceased. Docia married Alram 
Van Antwerp, who is deceased. She is 
living in St. Louis, Missouri. 

The subject's father was a man of excel- 
lent business ability and a good manager, 
he having become wealthy. He was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
in politics was a Democrat. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Z. C. Jennings, the subject of this sketch, 
grew to manhood on the old home place and 
was educated in the home schools and the 
high schools at Salem and Centralia. When 
twenty-two years old he married Mary J. 
Baldridge, daughter of James C. Baldridge, 
of North Carolina, and Margaret (Rainey) 
Baldridge, a native of Kentucky. At the 
age of nine years, James C. Baldridge came 
to Marion county with his parents. Dorn- 
ton and Mary (Boggs) Baldridge, who set- 
tled near Walnut Hill, Illinois. James Bal- 
dridge and wife died in Jefferson county, 
Illinois. He married a second time, his last 
wife being Tabitha, the widow of Isaac 
Casey. 

The subject started on the place where he 
now lives to make a home. He first owned 
forty acres of land, but being progressive 
he added to it from time to time until he 
now owns a fine farm of four hundred and 
twelve acres, which is in a high state of 
cultivation and one of the best stock farms 
in the county. He has raised some high- 
grade horses and cattle and has made all 
the improvements on the place himself, be- 
ing regarded as one of the foremost agri- 
culturists of the county, holding high rank 
among the stockmen of this locality. 

Six children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife, as follows: Dr. Dwight was 
born September i, 1860, and he graduated 
at the St. Louis Medical College in 1890, 
having previously attended the Carbondale 
Normal School, and he read medicine with 
Dr. Richardson, of Centralia, Illinois. He 
took up his practice at 4101 Washington 



avenue, St. Louis, where he has since been 
residing and has built up a large practice. 
He married Cora Locy, of Carlyle, Illinois, 
and three children were born to this union, 
Beatrice, Dorothy and Dwight L. Charles 
Emmett, the subject's second child, was 
born January 4, 1862. He is a farmer at 
Mosco, Washington, also a dealer in stock 
and grain. He married Angeline S. Creed, 
of Centralia township, and they have one 
son, Fred Allen. Maggie D., the subject's 
third child, was born December 17, 1863. 
and married Lewis E. Thomas, of Centralia, 
Illinois. He is a carpenter in the employ of 
the Illinois Central Railroad. Their only 
son, Charles, is deceased. Samuel R., who 
was born December 24, 1865, has always 
been a farmer and lived at home. Maria, 
who was born January 22, 1871, died in 
August the same year; Harriett G., who 
was born October 7, 1873, married E. M. 
Jones, of St. Louis. He is traveling freight 
agent for the Southern Railroad. They have 
three children, namely : Leona, Dwight and 
Grace. 

The subject of this sketch lived at home 
until 1859, and was in the lumber business 
with his father for awhile, then he located 
on his present place. During the past few 
years he has devoted a great deal of his at- 
tention to raising fruit. For two years he 
successfully manufactured crates and berry 
boxes at Walnut Hill, Illinois. 

Mr. Jennings has always taken a great 
deal of interest in politics. He ably filled 
the office of Supervisor for four years and 
other minor offices in the Democratic party, 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and a well read man on all leading topics. 
He has a substantial, beautiful and well 
furnished home, presided over by a most 
estimable helpmeet, his wife being a woman 
of culture and refinement. Our subject is 
an uncle of Hon. William Jennings Bryan. 
He is well and favorably known throughout 
the county, being regarded by all classes 
as a man of force of character, stability, in- 
dustry and honesty. 



FINCH FAMILY HISTORY. 

Sir Heneage Finch was the first Earl of 
Nottingham, England (1682), and was 
Lord Chancellor of England. He was de- 
scended from an old family, many of whose 
numbers had attained a high eminence in 
the legal profession; and he was the oldest 
son of Sir Heneage Finch, the Recorder of 
London. He was born in Kent, December 
23, 1621, educated at Westminster and be- 
came a member of the Inner Temple, 1638; 
he was admitted to the bar in 1645, and be- 
came one of the leading members thereof, 
being called the "English Cicero". He was 
chosen a member of the Convention Parlia- 
ment in 1660, and shortly afterward ap- 
pointed Solicitor-General, and in 1675 Lord 
Chancellor. In 1660 he was also created a 
baronet, and in 1670 he was made Attorney 
General. He died in Great Queen Street, 
Lincoln Inn Fields, December 18, 1682, and 
was buried in Ravenstone in Bucks. He was 
spoken of as the father of equity, and was 



the originator of the Statutes of Frauds, 
which are accepted in America and Eng- 
land as universal law and justice. He also 
published some of the speeches in the trials 
of the Judges of King Charles I, in 1660, 
and later emulated himself with other publi- 
cations appertaining to the execution of 
King Charles I, but was not their author. 

Sir Daniel Finch was the second Earl of 
Nottingham, and the son of Sir Heneage 
Finch, was born in 1647, and died January 
i, 1730. He entered Parliament in 1679. 
and was one of the privy counsellors who in 
1685 signed the order for the proclamation 
of the Duke of York, but kept away from 
the court during the reign of James the II. 
After the abdication of James II, he was one 
of the leaders of the party who were favor- 
able to the establishment of the Regency. 
He declined the office of Lord-Chancellor 
under the reign of William and Mary, but 
accepted that of Secretary of State, and 
filled that position until December, 1693, 
and he also held the same office under Queen 
Anne in 1702, and retired in 1704. On the 
accession of George the First he was made 
President of the Council and withdrew from 
office in January, 1716; on the 9th day of 
September, 1729, he succeeded to the Earl- 
dom of Winchelsea and died on the ist day 
of January, 1730. 

Sir John Finch was a son of Sir Daniel 
Finch, the second Earl of Nottingham, was 
counsel to the Crown under George II, in 
the early part of his reign, and for his strong 
liberal views, and the active interest he took 
in espousing the cause of liberalism he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



by King George the Second, banished from 
the realm, and coming to America, landed 
at the port of Boston, and married some- 
where in the eastern part of Massachusetts, 
and after a time emigrated to New York, 
and founded what is taken to be the North- 
em branch of the Finch family. To Sir 
John Finch, the banished counsellor of the 
court of King George the Second, were bom 
two sons, whose names were respectively, 
Isaac F. Finch and John Finch ; Isaac Finch 
and John Finch left their homes in the State 
of New York and settled in Wyoming Val- 
ley in Pennsylvania, sometime previous to 
the Revolutionary war ; they engaged in the 
milling business in an extensive way; and 
when the Revolutionary war broke out they 
were each at the head of a large family. 

Isaac Finch enlisted in the Revolutionary 
war, and John remained at home to look af- 
ter the families of his brother Isaac and his 
own, and also their property ; they were then 
living in Wyoming Valley, at Fort Forty. 
Isaac Finch was killed in the battle of the 
Wyoming Massacre, July 3, 1778, and John 
and his entire family were massacred at the 
same time. Unto Isaac Finch and Amy 
Finch, his wife, were born five sons and five 
daughters, and the names of these children 
were: Isaac, Moses, John, Enos, Amy, Re- 
becca, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary and Solomon. 
On the 4th day of July, 1778, Amy Finch, the 
widow of Isaac Finch, with the aid of faith- 
ful servants, loaded her household effects into 
a wagon drawn by a pair of oxen, and with 
all the children, excepting Isaac Finch and 
Amy Finch, who were then visiting in Mas- 
sachusetts, prepared to fly from the recent 



scene of the bloody carnival. As the wagon 
was about to pull out with the household 
goods and children, a number of Indians see- 
ing one of the servants standing by the 
wagon, with savage yells and flourishing 
tomahawks rushed upon him and with their 
tomahawks dashed out his brains, bespatter- 
ing with blood and brains the five-months- 
old baby of the deceased Isaac Finch and his 
widow, who was lying upon the bed-clothing 
in the wagon. The name of this five-months- 
old baby was Solomon Finch, the last born. 
The widow of Isaac Finch, together with 
these children, then took their departure 
from the scene of the massacre and after 
many days of tedious, tiresome and danger- 
ous travel, made their way through swamp 
and wilderness for some three hundred miles 
to Genesee county, New York, where they 
were finally given shelter, food and clothing, 
and abided until they were joined by the son 
and daughter who had gone on the visit to 
Massachusetts. They finally built them a 
house of logs and remained in this settle- 
ment for some years, and until the children 
were grown and married. 

It seems that all the children of Isaac and 
Amy Finch were married in this part of 
New York, except Solomon, who again re- 
turned to the scene of the battle where his 
father and other relatives had met their death, 
and there married a Sarah Gardner, whose 
father owned the battlefield on which had 
been fought the bloody battle of Wyoming, 
and here he was married, and soon afterward 
returned to Genesee county, New York, and 
joined his relatives. He was married on the 
1 3th day of March, 1804. 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



213 



Solomon Finch was born on the 3ist day 
of January, 1778, married to Sarah Gard- 
ner on the 1 3th day of March, 1804, and 
died on Elm Creek farm, Clay county, Illi- 
nois, in June, 1851, at the age of seventy- 
three ; and to this union were born Rebecca, 
Mary, James Gardner, Almena, Solomon, 
Tomkins and Amos Farm Finch, Rebecca 
Finch was born January 5, 1805, in the 
Wyoming Valley, in Pennsylvania, married 
to George Shirts in Indiana, November 
29, 1821, and to this union were born Wil- 
liam Shirts, February 12, 1823, who died 
in 1885 ; Augustus Finch Shirts, Novem- 
ber 26, 1824; Mary E. Shirts, July 26, 
1826; Angeline Shirts, November 26, 
1828; Sarah Shirts, November 29, 1830, 
and Hiram G. Shirts, July 15, 1834; 
in May, 1842, after the death of George 
Shirts, Rebecca Finch Shirts was married 
to Jay Ridgeway, to whom was born Solo- 
mon Ridgeway. Rebecca Finch Shifts died 
in 1873. 

Mary Finch, born January 24, 1807, in 
Genesee county, New York, and was mar- 
ried to Hiram Finch, son of John Finch, 
who was the son of Isaac Finch, Novem- 
ber 28, 1829, and to this union was born 
one son, Henry Clay Finch; Mary Finch 
died December 29, 1839. 

James Gardner Finch was born Octo- 
ber 1 6, 1809, in Rochester, New York, and 
was married to Sarah Woodborn, November 
28, 1833, settled in Clay county, in Novem- 
ber, 1839, and to this union was born one 
son, Francis M. Finch, April 29, 1837, wno 
died in Andersonville prison, July 27, 1864. 
After the death of Sarah Woodburn Finch. 



James Gardner Finch married Mary Ann 
Purdom on the 2ist day of July, 1839, and 
to this union were born Walton H. Finch, 
October 13, 1840, and he died in Pamona, 
California in 1894, leaving a large family. 
Cynthia C. Finch was born February 24, 
1845; John C. Finch, born January 23, 
1847; George W. Finch, born June 21, 
1849, and died in Harper county, Kansas, 
in 1896, leaving a large family; Henry 
Clay Finch, born October i, 1852; Charles 
Sumner Finch, born July 24, 1856; Flor- 
ence Evaline Finch (Kelly), born March 
24, 1858; Almena Finch, born in the 
State of New York, January 13, 1812, 
married to Stephen Knolton, afterwards to 
Benjamin Creus, and later to Gabriel Man- 
ly, the latter to whom she bore one daugh- 
ter, Emma Manly, July 28, 1832; Emma 
Manly married A. J. Hurlock in 1862, and 
after his death she again married John 
Ryan, in Kansas, 1876. 

Emily Finch was born to Solomon and 
Sarah Finch, May 12. 1816. and died Oc- 
tober 13, 1871. 

Augustus H. Finch was born to Solomon 
and Sarah Finch September i, 1818, and 
died November 12, 1820. 

Solomon Tompkins Finch was born to 
Solomon and Sarah Gardner Finch in 
Hamilton county, in the state of Indiana, 
on the 2 ist day of November, 1820, 
and in February, 1847, he moved with his 
parents to Clay county, Illinois, where his 
mother, Sarah Gardner Finch, died June, 
1847, and on the 22d day of July, 1847, he 
was joined in marriage with Bethsheba 
Long, who was born April 15, 1831, and 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



who was the second daughter of Rosamond 
and Hanna Stanford Long, and to this union 
were born Rebecca Margaret Finch in April, 
1852, and who died with premature con- 
sumption in March, 1868. Mary Elizabeth 
Finch, who was born in Flora, Clay county, 
Illinois, on the 25th day of September, 
1854 (being the first child born in the city 
of Flora), and Solomon Tompkins Finch on 
the 23d day of February, 1857, in the town 
of Flora, Illinois. On the I4th day of 
April, 1857, Solomon T. Finch died, leav- 
ing surviving him Bethsheba Long Finch, 
his widow, and the three children, viz : Re- 
becca Margaret, Mary Elizabeth and Solo- 
mon Tompkins Finch. Solomon Tompkins 
Finch, son of Solomon Finch and Sarah 
Gardner Finch, was the first business man 
in Flora, Clay county, Illinois, having em- 
barked there into business with one George 
Harter, under the firm name of Finch & 
Harter, which continued until his death. In 
1870 Bethsheba Long Finch on the I5th 
day of February was married to John Re- 
sen Finch, who was a son of Aaron, and 
grandson of John Finch, who was a brother 
of Moses and Solomon Finch. To this 
union was born one child, Martha Luella 
Finch, on the 7th day of February, 1871, 
and on the i6th day of July, 1871, Beth- 
sheba Long Finch departed this life. 

Amos Farm Finch was married to Lou- 
isa Griffith August 10, 1852, and to this 
union was born one son, Hiram Clayton 
Finch, on the nth day of May, 1854, and 
after the death of Louisa Griffith Finch, 
Amos Farm Finch married Sarah Eliza- 



beth Davis on the 5th day of December, 
1860, and to this union were born Rosa 
Belle Finch, August 21, 1861 ; Henry Ern- 
est Finch, August 28, 1868; he married 
Sarah E. Sibler; Clarence A. Finch, Febru- 
ary 6, 1872, married Lulu Morrean on No- 
vember 17, 1895, an( l Maggie Elizabeth 
Finch, November 3, 1875. 

Mary Elizabeth Finch was on the 3d day 
of February, 1876, married to John Minor 
Cunningham, whose father was an early 
settler in Clay county, Illinois, and to this 
union were born three children, viz : Fre- 
mont Cunningham, born on the 29th day of 
November, 1876, and died six years later. 
Nelle Cunningham was born September 19, 
1878, and was married to Jerry J. Bow- 
man, October 22, 1902. Max Finch Cun- 
ningham was born April 14, 1883. 

Solomon Tompkins Finch was on the 
28th day of May, 1884, married to Lillie Es- 
tella Pearce, the youngest daughter of Fred- 
erick and Martha Ingrahm Pearce. The 
father, Frederick Pearce having been born 
in Leeds, England, came to this country 
with his father when he was but twelve 
years of age ; first settled in Western Penn- 
sylvania, and afterward moved to the city 
of Pittsburg. When at the age of man- 
hood he married Martha Ingrahm, and in 
1858, moved with his family, which con- 
sisted of his wife and two children at that 
time, to Ingrahm Prairie, Clay county, Il- 
linois; engaged in the milling business, and 
was among the first settlers of Flora. After 
his removal to Flora, Illinois, his youngest 
daughter. Lillie Estella Pearce, was born on 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



2I 5 



the 1 3th of January, 1862. To the mar- 
riage of Solomon Tompkins Finch and Lil- 
lie Estella Pearce were born two sons ; Earle 
D. Finch, born in the city of Flora on the 
I4th day of March. 1865; and Rollae D. 
Finch was bom in the city of Flora on the 
7th clay of September, 1887. 

Solomon Tompkins Finch, after taking a 
preparatory course at Loxa College, entered 
the Michigan University, from which col- 
lege he graduated in the law department, in 
1879, and after being admitted to the bar of 
Illinois commenced the law practice in 
Flora, Clay county, Illinois, the home of his 
birth. 

Hiram Clayton Finch, after graduating 
in medicine, entered into the practice, and 
in 1882 moved to Iowa, continuing the 
practice and on the 6th day of October, 
1882. was married to Ausis Oliva Mat- 
thews in Jasper county, Iowa, and to them 
was born one daughter, Ethel Finch, on the 
2Qth day of December, 1884. 

Moses Finch, son of Isaac and Amy 
Finch, was born in the Wyoming Valley, 
April 15, 1771, and was married to Sarah 
Beanon in 1789, and to them were born 
eleven sons ; their names were : Isaac, Kin- 
ney, Charles, Beanon, Abraham Wheeler, 
Benoni Wheeler, Moses, Archibald Wheel- 
er, James Beanon, Nathaniel, Walter and 
John. Sarah, the mother of the above sons, 
died in Indiana, June 17, 1831. The sons 
all grew to manhood. Moses Finch, after 
the death of Sarah, his wife, married Alan- 
da Grange, a widow with three sons and 
two daughters. To Moses Finch and Man- 



da Grange Finch were born two daughters, 
Florilla and Rebecca. Rebecca married in 

1860, and she and her husband died in 

1 86 1. Florilla married a Doctor Graydon. 
of Southport, Indiana. 

To John Finch, son of Isaac Finch and 
wife, were born three sons, viz ; Jubal, John 
and Cyrus. The mother of these children 
died, after which John Finch married 
again, and by his second marriage he begot 
four daughters, viz : Sarah, who married a 
Dr. Amos Palmer; Elizabeth, who married 
a man by the name of Davidson ; Margaret, 
who never married, and Laura, who mar- 
ried a man by the name of Meak. After 
the death of the mother of these children, 
John Finch married the third time, and 
unto this marriage were born, Hiram C. 
Finch, John Finch, Fabious M. Finch, who 
was a prominent lawyer and judge in In- 
dianapolis, Indiana, and lived to an ad- 
vanced age. Rebecca, who married James 
Holl ; Angeline, who married a man by the 
name of Williams, Cynthia married Dr. Na- 
thaniel Mall, and Horatio Finch studied 
law, and afterwards died in San Francisco, 
California. 

Hiram C. Finch was married to Mary 
Finch, on the 28th day of November, 1829, 
and to this union was born one son, Henry 
Clay Finch. Mary Finch died December 
29, 1839. and after her death, Hiram G. 
Finch married his second wife, and to this 
union were born Frank, Allice, who was 
married to John Connor, and Horatio 
Finch. The name of the second wife of Hi- 
ram G. Finch was Mariah Passwatter. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Fabious M. Finch was married in 
1810 to Mariah Allen, and to this union 
were born John A. Finch and Alice 
Finch. John A. Finch, after having 
studied law, made a specialty of the 
insurance law, and being associated with 
his father in the law practice under the 
firm name of Finch & Finch, became one of 
the first insurance lawyers in the United 
States, and compiled what is known in the 
law practice as Finch's Insurance Reports. 
John A. Finch died suddenly in Minneapo- 
lis, Minnesota, while on business in that 
city. 

Fabious M. Finch soon followed the 
death of his most honored son, and left 
surviving his widow and Alice Finch, a 
most estimable and accomplished daughter, 
unmarried. Aaron Finch was married in 
Indiana, 1823, to Mary Waddell, and after- 
wards moved to Clay county, Illinois, and 
settled on a farm eight miles southeast of 
Flora, Illinois. To Aaron Finch and his 
wife were born : James Austin Finch 
and John Resen Finch ; also a daugh- 
ter, Laura. Aaron Finch died in the 
early fifties. James Austin Finch was 
joined in wedlock with Mary P. Grif- 
fith and studied medicine and died 
in the early sixties. To this union 
was born one son, James Austin Finch, 
Mary P. Finch died in 1898. James Austin 
Finch was married to Florence Brissanden, 
studied law, became well up in his profes- 
sion, and was elected to the office of 
Prosecuting Attorney of Clay county in 
1876, and afterwards located in Olney, Il- 



linois, where he died in the summer of 
1 88 1. To this union of James Austin 
and Florence Brissanden Finch were born 
four children, viz: Mary, William, Laura 
and James Austin. 

John Resen Finch was born in Indiana, 
moved to Clay county, Illinois, with his 
father, arid settled on the farm with his 
father. He first married Sarah Schooley, 
and to this marriage were born one daugh- 
ter and one son, viz: Mary Matilda and 
William Fabious Finch. After the death of 
his first wife he married Rachel Schooley, a 
sister of his first wife, and to this union 
were born one son and one daughter, viz: 
Aaron and Amy Finch. After the death of 
Rachel, the second wife of John Resen 
Finch, he then married Bethsheba Long 
Finch, and to this union was born one 
daughter, viz : Martha Louella Finch. After 
the death of Bethsheba Long Finch, John 
Resen Finch then married one Sarah War- 
math, and departed this life in 1879, having 
continued to reside on the farm upon which 
he and his father located upon moving to 
Clay county, Illinois. 

Augustus Finch Shirts, who was born to 
George Shirts and Rebecca Finch Shirts, 
was born November 26, 1824, married to 
Nancy Barnhill, and to this union were born 
three children, viz: George Shirts, Mary 
Shirts, who married a man by the name of 
Baker, and Elbert Shirts. Augustus Finch 
Shirts studied law. settled at Noblesville, 
Indiana, became very prominent as a law- 
yer, and as a politician, also became noted 
as the author of the history of Hamilton 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



217 



county, Indiana, and retired from the law- 
practice in 1900. 

George Shirts, son of Augustus Finch 
Shirts, studied law, graduated at the law 
department of the University of Michigan, 
in 1876, entered the law practice at Nobles- 
ville, Indiana, became eminent as a corpora- 
tion lawyer, and in 1903, was selected by 
the Governor of the state of Indiana, as 
one of the Codifying Commission, and se- 
lected by that body as their clerk. 

In the early spring of 1814, Amos Farm, 
John, Moses and Solomon Finch, together 
with their families, went in wagons from 
Genesee county. New York, to Olean Point, 
New York, a point on the tributary of the 
Ohio river, and building a flat-boat there, 
they floated down the river to the Ohio riv- 
er, and thence down the Ohio river to North 
Bend, Ohio, the present site of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and after landing there, Solomon T. 
Finch took service under Gen. William H. 
Harrison (Old Tippecanoe), and after the 
war was over still remained with him for a 
time as superintendent of his plantations, 
the old log cabins that were famous during 
the campaign of Gen. William H. Harrison 
as a candidate for President. Enoch Finch 
settled somewhere in the eastern part of 
Ohio, and Moses and John went to Brook- 
ville, Indiana, engaged to some extent in 
the milling business there, and afterward 
went to Connersville, and were there joined 
by Solomon Finch. Soon afterward Moses 
went to Michigan, and died there at an ad- 
vanced age. 

In April, 1819, Solomon Finch and his 



family and part of the family of John 
Finch, moved from Connersville to Hamil- 
ton county, Indiana, and settled on what 
was then known as Horse Shoe prairie, 
about two miles from the present site of 
Noblesville, Indiana, the county seat of 
Hamilton county, and they were followed 
in the following September by John Finch, 
and the remainder of his family. John 
Finch lived to a ripe old age, and as shown 
many were his sons and daughters. He 
died in Hamilton county, Indiana. 

The compiler of these accounts, including 
deaths, births, marriages and events, has 
relied upon statistics furnished him by old 
members of the family in its various 
brandies, and on the war records fur- 
nished him from the department at Wash- 
ington, and on letters from the Lord Mayor 
of Nottingham, England, and on the true 
historical data as furnished by reliable au- 
thors. He has compiled this short history 
not for any compensation, but because he 
has felt that it ought to have been done by 
some member of the family, but up to this 
time, they have all been too busy a lot of 
Finchs to give it their attention. 



JOHN R. FRENCH. 

The subject is the obliging and well 
known hotel proprietor, insurance and real 
estate dealer of Kell, Haines township, 
Marion county, who has spent his life with- 
in the borders of the same, having been 



nior.KAI'HICAL AXD REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



identified with the growth and taken no 
small part in the same. He was born Au- 
gust 4, 1861, the son of Gilbert W. and 
Louisa (O'Bryant) French. John R. 
French's father, a native of Tennessee, 
came to Marion county, Illinois, in 1835. 
He was a native of Tennessee and the son 
of John P. and (Hartman) French. 
John P. French was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, who moved to Tennessee in an early 
day and in 1835 came to Marion county, 
Illinois, locating in Tonti township, where 
he devoted his life to farming, having died 
in the town of Alma. The subject's grand- 
father was a soldier in the War of 1812. 
Gilbert French and his first wife were the 
parents of four children, namely : Angie, the 
wife of Mathew Organ; Louisa, who was 
the wife of J. N. Jones, is deceased; John 
R., the subject of this sketch; Amanda is 
the wife of J. W. Ross, of Centralia, this 
county. The subject's father married Mary 
Howard, and three children were born to 
this union, Thomas, living in Kinmundy, 
this county; Harry B., of Odin, Illinois; 
Rachel is the wife of E. W. Wilson, of 
Alma, Illinois. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on 
a farm near Alma and was educated in the 
common schools. After farming for a 
while, he learned the plasterer's and brick 
layer's trade. In 1891 he clerked in a store 
at Alma, this county, and in 1894 he en- 
tered business in a general store in Alma 
which he successfully conducted for a peri- 
od of eight years, when he sold out aud 
went back to farming, which he followed 



for a while, then he moved to Newton, Il- 
linois, and bought a furniture factory and a 
restaurant, ice cream parlor and bakery, all 
of which he conducted with great success- 
until in May, 1907, when he came to Kell 
and bought the hotel here, which he 
has since conducted in such an able manner 
that it has become known to the traveling 
public as a comfortable and well conducted 
hostelry, where no pains are spared to make 
guests feel at home and comfortable. He 
has built up a good business which is con- 
stantly growing. He also finds time to do 
considerable business in insurance and real 
estate. 

Mr. French was united in marriage in 
December, 1886, to Etta Sweet, who was 
born in Alma township, the daughter of 
Samuel and Sarah (Carnes) Sweet, a well 
known family of their community. 

The subject and his wife are the parents 
of the following children: Edward is 
single and living at home and is engaged in 
the restaurant and bakery business. He has 
a modern and fully equipped bakery and 
does an extensive business, shipping bread 
to many outside towns ; Cora, the second 
child, is living at home; Bessie is the wife 
of Wesley Howard; Gladys, who is living 
at home attending school; Clara is living 
at home; Clifford is a baby at this writing, 
(1908.) 

Mr. French is a Democrat. He has ably 
served as Justice of the Peace for eight 
years in Alma township and he was School 
Treasurer for four terms of two years each. 
In 1892 he made the race for the nomina- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



2I 9 



tion on the Democratic ticket for County 
Clerk, but was defeated, however, the re- 
sults showed that our subject was a popu- 
lar man in the convention. Mr. French 
helped incorporate the village of Alma. He 
was also a member of the first board that 
organized the Building and Loan Associa- 
tion at Alma, Illinois. Our subject is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, being a charter member at Alma. His 
son, Edward, is also a member of the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America at Kell. Mr. 
French is known to be a man of strictly 
honest business principles, industrious, 
pleasant and agreeable, making both friends 
and visitors feel at home. 



HON. WILLIAM BOWER. 

It is both gratifying and profitable to en- 
ter record concerning such a man as he 
whose name appears at the head of this life 
record, and in the following outline suffi- 
cient will be said to indicate the forceful in- 
dividuality, initiative power and sterling 
character, which have had such a decided in- 
fluence in making their possessor a leader in 
enterprises requiring the highest order of 
business talent, and to gain for him wide 
publicity among those who shape and direct 
policies of more than ordinary consequence. 

William Bower, the well known druggist 
of Olney, Illinois, was born May 21, 1842, 
the second child of Philip P. and Mary 
(Dundore) Bower, the former a native of 



Germany, and the latter of Pennsylvania. 
The father was bom in Hesse-Darmstadt in 
1804, and when twenty years old emigrated 
to the United States and lived in Pennsyl- 
vania, first settling in Philadelphia in 1840. 
His first wife died in the old Keystone state 
and he married the subject's mother, a na- 
tive of Lancaster, and the daughter of Philip 
Dundore, of German descent. Philip Bower 
moved to Jeromeville, Ohio, and in the 
spring of 1840 came to Olney, Illinois. He 
worked at the cabinet maker's trade for sev- 
eral years, and also engaged in merchandis- 
ing and farming. His death occurred in the 
fall of 1873, at the age of sixty-nine years. 
William Bower, our subject, is a member 
of a family of six children, born to Philip P. 
Bower by his second wife, being the second 
white male child born in what is now the 
city of Olney. The mother of the subject 
was called to her rest in 1856. Our subject 
attended school at the old log school-house 
of Olney, having finished his education at 
the Olney Seminary, where he applied him- 
self in such a careful manner that he re- 
ceived a good education. He began to make 
his own way in the world soon after his 
mother's death, leaving his parental fireside 
at that time. Beginning life as a teacher, 
he taught a six months' term at Macksburg 
and afterward two terms in Olney, making 
a success in this line, but not feeling that 
this should be his life work, he began learn- 
ing the trade of marble cutter and later en- 
gaged to learn the trade of watch maker, 
having worked a few months at each, but he 
never finished either. He then engaged with 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



K. D. Horrall, then as now, a hardware 
merchant in Olney. He was to receive three 
dollars per month for the first year, four 
dollars per month during the second year, 
and an increase of one dollar each month 
for the third year, also board and lodging. 
After remaining at this for a period of two 
years, Mr. Bower could not restrain the pa- 
triotic fervor he felt when the War of the 
Rebellion began, consequently he enlisted in 
the spring of 1861 in Company D, Eighth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel 
Oglesby, afterward Governor of Illinois. 
After serving his enlistment of three 
months, proving to be a very capable sol- 
dier, he returned home and taught school, 
working at night at the tinner's trade. In 
the spring of 1863 he engaged to Charles 
Schultz as sutler clerk. While thus em- 
ployed he was captured by General Whee- 
ler's forces, shortly after the battle of Chat- 
tanooga, but after being held prisoner for a 
few days, was paroled and sent north. 

In October. 1863, Mr. Bower bought a 
stock of tinware and stoves and carried on 
a business in Olney until the following De- 
cember, when he sold out and bought a half 
interest in the drug store of Dr. E. W. 
Ridgway. Fifteen months later he pur- 
chased his partner's interest and has since 
conducted the business alone, now being the 
oldest druggist in point of years of continu- 
ous trade in Richland county. He was suc- 
cessful in this line from the first and his 
business has gradually increased until he has 
quite an extensive trade throughout this lo- 
cality. Mr. Bower is the second oldest busi- 



ness man in years of uninterrupted dealing 
in Olney. He has been actively identified 
with the Illinois Pharmaceutical Association 
for many years, having served as its first 
vice president and chairman of the commit- 
tee on legislation during the period when the 
Illinois pharmaceutical law was first en- 
acted. On November 29, 1864, Mr. Bower 
was married to Sarah E. Ridgway, a repre- 
sentative of a well known family. Her father 
having been the late Dr. E. W. Ridgway. 
She was born in Mansfield, Ohio. Four 
children have been born to the subject and 
wife, as follows : Catella, now the wife of 
M. E. Sebree, now superintendent of the 
Indiana Southern Railroad Company ; Ernst 
Zeledon, who is in the store with his father, 
also owner and manager of the "Bower 
Knoll Stock Farm", the home of "John G. 
Carlyle" and other high bred horses ; Emma 
died at the age of four years and Nina when 
two years old. The children of Mr. Bower 
have received good educations and are cul- 
tured and popular. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bower are members of the 
New, or Swedenborgian church. In politics 
our subject is a Democrat. He served as 
Alderman from the second ward in Olney 
in the early seventies, and was elected by a 
large majority from the forty- fourth dis- 
trict as representative to the Thirty-first Il- 
linois General Assembly, where he served as 
a member of the Committee on Education, 
Printing and Militia. He was the author 
of some important measures and proved a 
most industrious and useful member, show- 
ing that he was thoroughly alive to the in- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



terests of his constituents and he succeeded 
in making his influence felt in that body, 
gaining the admiration of all concerned for 
his clear and logical counsel. Mr. Bower 
was elected Mayor of the city of Olney in 
the spring of 1901, serving one term during 
which the city's interests were carefully con- 
served and many new policies inaugurated 
that will be of lasting benefit to the commu- 
ity. During the two years in which he served 
as Mayor, among the more important things 
accomplished for the public good was the 
building of the reservoir, costing over six 
thousand dollars, the city building remod- 
eled, the Bower Park established and over 
four thousand dollars expended for water 
pipes, and there was an unusual activity in 
all departments of the city, while the debts 
of the city were not increased, but on the 
contrary, were somewhat reduced. During 
Mr. Bower's term an epidemic of smallpox 
was wiped out at a cost of over fifteen hun- 
dred dollars. 

Socially Mr. Bower is a Royal Arch Ma- 
son, also belongs to the Richland Lodge 
No. 1 80, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and he is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Bower has one of the most extensive 
drug stores in this part of the state, carrying 
a very carefully selected stock ranging from 
twelve thousand to fifteen thousand dollars, 
consisting of all kinds of drugs, physicians' 
supplies, books, paints, wall paper. He oc- 
cupies his own building, a substantial two- 
story stone structure, twety-five by one hun- 
dred and sixty-five feet, running from Main 



to Market streets, and lie also has a very 
pleasant home. 

In all the relations of life our subject has 
proven true to the trusts imposed upon him, 
and because of his past honorable record, 
his public-spirit, his genial disposition and 
his honesty of purpose, he is held in high es- 
teem bv all who know him. 



SAMUEL W. JONES. 

The honored subject of this sketch is a 
representative of one of the sterling pioneer 
families of Marion county and is personally 
identified with the industrial interests of 
this section of the state where he has spent 
his life, being the owner of a fine farming 
property in Kinmundy township. 

Samuel W. Jones was born in Marion 
county, Illinois, September 15, 1858, and 
he has preferred to spend his entire life 
within the borders of the same, where he 
believed he would have better advantages 
among the people where the Jones family 
had long been noted for their industry and 
honesty, than he would have in other coun- 
ties of this or any other state of our great 
Union. He is the son of Jackson C. and 
Margaret (Whiteside) Jones. A history of 
the subject's father and mother and their 
ancestry will be found under the head of 
James R. Jones, whose sketch appears in 
another part of this volume. 

Our subject received his early education 
in the district schools where he applied him- 



lilOGU.U'HICAL AX1) REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



self in a diligent manner to his books and 
received a fairly good education, having fed 
a large herd of his father's cattle in the 
meantime. He left school at the age of 
nineteen and began farming, which enter- 
prise he has since been identified with and 
which he has made a great success, being 
recognized today as one of the leading ag- 
riculturists of his community. He has pros- 
pered until he has become the owner of a 
valuable farm consisting of one hundred 
and thirty-five acres. His land is under a 
high state of cultivation and the soil has 
been kept in a very good condition through 
proper management until excellent crops 
are reaped from it year by year, the sub- 
ject being thus enabled to make a comfort- 
able living and also lay by something for 
the future. He has a good income also 
from his stock, being especially interested in 
the raising of Poland China hogs and 
Shropshire sheep, both being noted for their 
excellent quality, for Mr. Jones certainly 
understands the successful handling of 
stock. He has a nice, modern and com- 
fortable dwelling and a large number of 
good outbuildings, in fact everything about 
his place shows excellent management and 
prosperity. 

Our subject was united in marriage Sep- 
tember 20, 1877, to Hannah Atkins, who 
was born in Foster township, Marion coun- 
ty, December 24, 1861, the daughter, of 
Nathan Atkins, who was born August 28, 
1817, in Alabama. He came to Illinois 
when a young man and took up govern- 
ment land, cleared a farm which he contin- 



ued to work the rest of his life and on which 
he reared a family of twelve children, eight 
boys and four girls, five of whom are still 
living. Their names are James, Moses, John, 
Thomas, Barbara, Margaret, George, all 
deceased: Joseph, Richard, Hannah, Eliza- 
beth and Catherine, all living. Nathan At- 
kins has long since passed to his rest. He 
married Mary Garrett, the daughter of 
Moses and Hannah Garrett, pioneers of this 
county. 

Our subject and wife are the parents of 
three living children and one child that is 
dead. Their names are, Charles W., Wil- 
liam O., deceased; Bessie C, and Mary J. 
Charles W. J'ones married Susie Pearson, 
and they have one son, named Carroll G. 
William Pearson, the father of Charles W. 
Jones's wife, was born in Marion county. 
Her. mother's name was Emiline Anglin, 
who was also born in this county. William 
Pearson was the father of six children, two 
boys and four girls. Mrs. Hannah Jones 
was educated in the country schools of this 
county where she diligently applied herself 
until she was sixteen years of age when she 
was married to our subject who was nine- 
teen. She is a good housewife and mother, 
of a cheerful disposition and is beloved by 
all who know her for her many beautiful 
traits of character. 

Our subject, while not a member of any 
church, is a believer of the principles of 
Christianity and good government. He is 
a stanch Democrat and his support can al- 
ways be depended upon when any measure 
looking to the public good are at issue. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



223 



JAMES W. ARNOLD. 

The subject of this sketch is a citizen of 
Foster township, Marion county, and he is 
so loyal to what he considers his duty that 
no personal consideration will deter him 
from its accomplishment. It is such worthy 
citizens as Mr. Arnold who have made this 
county the productive and prosperous region 
that it is today. 

James W. Arnold was born in section 9, 
Foster township, February 14, 1847, the son 
of John Wesley Arnold, who was born in 
Alabama, he the son of John Arnold, of 
Georgia. He married Elizabeth Webb and 
they came to Illinois, settling near Charles- 
ton in 1825, where they remained for one 
year, when they went back to Alabama. 
Twelve years later they located near Leba- 
non, Illinois, where they remained until 
1844, when they moved to Foster township, 
Marion county, buying land there. Later 
they went to Ellis county, Texas, where Mr. 
Arnold died in 1887, at the age of eighty- 
seven years. His wife died in Foster town- 
ship, this county. Mr. Arnold was a farmer 
and also owned a mill. The following chil- 
dren were born to them : William ; Nancy, 
of Cairo, Illinois ; John W., Joseph ; Adeline, 
who is living in Missouri ; Margaret, Esther, 
Ivey, living in Oklahoma; James A., Felix, 
Nathan of Texas; Fletcher was killed at 
Atlanta, Georgia, during the Civil war. 

John Wesley Arnold married Nancy 
Jones, of Foster township, Marion county, 
the daughter of James and Laura Jones. 
He settled in section 9, Foster township, 



where he secured- wild land and made a 
home. He was always a farmer and stock 
raiser and owned five hundred acres of good 
land. He was active in politics, being a Re- 
publican, and was at one time Supervisor of 
Foster township. He was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He was born 
in 1820 and his death occurred in 1889. His 
wife was born in 1827 and died in February, 
1905. Seven children were born to them 
as follows: James W., our subject; Mary 
E., who married Alexander Mussey, living 
near Vernon, Illinois; John I. is living re- 
tired in Foster township; Elizabeth married 
John Doolen, living at Kinmundy, this 
county; Joseph T. lives at Kinmundy; Eli 
M. is in the oil business at Shawnee, Okla- 
homa; Rosie E. married Isom W. Doolen, 
living at Vernon, this county. 

James W. Arnold, our subject, attended 
the home schools. He remained a member 
of the family circle until his marriage, No- 
vember 1 8, 1869, to Permelia J. Robb, who 
was born in Kinmundy township, the 
daughter of Samuel and Agnes Pruitt, who 
were pioneers of this county and who died 
here. The following children have been 
born to the subject and wife : Cyrus Elmer, 
a farmer in Foster township, who married 
Ann Green and who has one child, Gladys; 
Samuel W., living in section 3, Foster 
township, was married first to Jennie Green, 
and his second wife was Isabelle Nichols. 
He had two children by his first wife, Doris 
and Dale, and two children by his second 
wife, Thelma and an infant born in 1908. 
Lola Etta is the name of the subject's third 



22 4 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXI1 RKM I XISCKXT HISTORY OF 



child, who is the wife of Cyrus Green, of 
Foster township, and the mother of four 
children, Glen, Lovell, Anna and Russell; 
Orin M., graduate of the Business College 
of Dixon, Illinois, married Laura Garrett, 
of Foster township, is farming and they 
have two children, Florence and Harold D. 
The subject's children were educated in the 
home schools, receiving careful mental train- 
ing, and they all give much promise of suc- 
cessful futures. 

After Mr. Arnold's marriage he lived on 
the old home place for two years when he 
bought the place where he now lives, con- 
sisting of one hundred and eighty-three 
acres. He at one time owned considerably 
more but gave it to his children. Besides 
his farming Mr. Arnold successfully oper- 
ated a saw mill for a while. He also 
managed a store at Lester, Illinois, for two 
years and was also successful in this venture. 
He was postmaster of that town, giving en- 
tire satisfaction to all concerned. He made 
all the improvements of his farm which now 
ranks among the best in Marion county. 
He has a most excellent and valuable apple 
and peach orchard, consisting of forty acres, 
also of small fruits. He carries on general 
farming and stock raising. He is active in 
politics, being a Republican, and he has 
filled all the township offices. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
his fraternal relations he is a Mason, the 
Blue Lodge, No. 398, at Kinmundy, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Arnold is well known through- 
out Marion county for his industry and his 
honesty in dealing with his fellow men. 



THOMAS A. PATTON. 

For various reasons the subject of this 
sketch is deemed eligible for specific men- 
tion in this volume, not the least of which 
is the fact that he was one of the brave 
"boys in blue" who offered his services in 
defense of his country during the dark days 
of the sixties. His life has been one of hon- 
est endeavor and filled with good deeds 
throughout, and now in its golden evening 
he is enjoying a respite in his serene home 
in Centralia township, Marion county. 

Thomas A. Patton was born in Mt. Ver- 
non township, Jefferson county, Illinois, De- 
cember 8, 1837, the son of Austin and Ange- 
line (Thorne) Patton, the former a well 
known physician, both natives of Virginia, 
of which state William Patton, the subject's 
grandfather, was also a native. Austin 
Patton grew up in Virginia, receiving only 
a limited education, but he was ambitious 
and became self-educated, reading medicine 
with Dr. Frost, of Jefferson county, Illinois, 
beginning practice at Walnut Hill, where he 
located about 1830. He secured a farm of 
three hundred acres, but devoted most of 
his time to his practice, which was always 
large. He became widely known, and is re- 
membered as a very jolly man, resulting in 
his winning hosts of friends. Although a 
good Democrat, he never held office. His 
death occurred in 1896. His first wife died 
December 24, 1837, and he was married a 
second time to Ann Bateman, a native of 
Jefferson county, Illinois. She is now liv- 
ing at Walnut Hill. Austin Patton and 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



225 



wife were the parents of three children, 
namely : William, deceased ; Mary, also de- 
ceased; Thomas A., our subject. Nine 
children were born to Austin Patton and 
his second wife, as follows : James L., de- 
ceased, was a farmer at Walnut Hill; Li- 
vona J., deceased; Lewis J. is a farmer, liv- 
ing at Newton county, Kansas; Joseph T. 
is a farmer in Harvey county, Kansas; 
Iduma A., deceased : George B. is a farmer, 
living in Jefferson county, Illinois; Carula, 
who first married Bell Talbott and then 
Frank Gore, of Walnut Hill; Ila C, who 
married Willa Copple, of Centralia town- 
ship ; Omer P. is farming on part of the old 
homestead in Centralia township. He mar- 
ried Helen Telford. 

Our subject had only a limited chance 
to attend school, having studied in a sub- 
scription school for a time. Living at home 
until he was twenty-three years old, he then 
started in business for himself in Centralia 
township, section 36, and farmed there with 
great success for seven years, when he 
bought a farm in Raccoon township, con- 
sisting of forty acres of new and unim- 
proved land on which he remained for four 
years, then selling it and renting near Wal- 
nut Hill in Jefferson county. In 1881 he 
bought one hundred and fifty acres in Rome 
township, Jefferson county, which he 
worked with most gratifying results until 
he retired in 1902, when he sold out and 
moved to Walnut Hill, having since lived 
retired. 

Mr. Patton was first united in mar- 
riage in 1861, to Alena Smith, of Walnut 



Hill, and she passed to her rest May 19, 
1901. He married again, his second wife 
being Augusta Maltimore, whom he married 
October 5, 1905. She was the widow of 
Christopher H. Maltimore, of Ohio, and 
she was the daughter of Benjamin F.Nelms, 
who married Nancy Bailey, the former was 
of Virginia and the latter of Kentucky. 
Benjamin Nelms was the son of Jerry 
Nelms, a native of Virginia. His father 
was also a Virginian. The first of the fam- 
ily to come to Illinois was Jerry's wife, 
Mary A. He died in St. Genevieve, Mis- 
souri, and his wife, in 1854, came to Marion 
county, Illinois, and located on a farm near 
Walnut Hill, where she died, in 1897. He 
now lives at Decatur, Illinois. Mrs. Pat- 
ton had one daughter, Mary L., by her first 
marriage. 

Five children were born to the subject 
by his first wife, namely: William L., who 
is living in Centralia township on a farm, 
and who married Cordelia Snow; Zina D. 
married Alta Kell, and is living on a farm 
in Jefferson county, Illinois; May married 
Oscar Breeze, of Jefferson county; Mary 
married Edward Watts, of Centralia, Illi- 
nois ; Frank L. is a stationary engineer in 
the mines, now located in North Dakota. 

Our subject has always been a farmer, 
and being interested in public affairs, he has 
been entrusted with various local offices. 
He was Highway Commissioner at one time 
and School Director for twenty years. He 
has always voted the Republican ticket, hav- 
ing cast his first ballot for Abraham Lin- 
coln in 1860. Fraternally he is a member 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
having 1 been identified with lodge NQ. 710, 
at Walnut Hill for the past thirty-five years. 
Our subject enlisted August 12, 1862, in 
Company H. Eightieth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, at Centralia, under Colonel Allen. 
He was sent to Louisville, and later to Per- 
ryville, Kentucky, being in the battle there, 
October 8, 1862. He was in the battle of 
Stone River, also at Knoxville, and at Chat- 
tanooga in the spring of 1863. He was 
picked out of a division of men to go on an 
expedition into Georgia. At Rome the 
whole number of men on this expedition, 
consisting of fifteen thousand, were cap- 
tured and sent to Belle Isle Prison, where 
they were held for fifteen days and paroled. 
They went to Camp Chase, Ohio, where they 
remained for ten days, when they were sent 
to St. Louis, Missouri, where they remained 
fifteen days. On July 4, 1863, they reor- 
ganized and went to Nashville, Tennessee. 
They opened up the valley leading to Look- 
out Mountain, and after remaining there 
for about forty days, they went to Mission- 
ary Ridge and engaged in the battle there, 
also at Lookout Mountain, after which they 
went into winter quarters in Chattanooga. 
The subject contracted rheumatism and 
could not go on the Atlanta campaign, con- 
sequently he was transferred to the veteran 
reserve and was detailed to the hospital 
steamer for Washington City, District of 
Columbia, and was sent to City Point, Vir- 
ginia, to look after the sick and wounded of 
Grant's army. Part of the time the sub- 
ject was located in Washington City, New 



York, Annapolis, Fortress Monroe, Vir- 
ginia, having served in this capacity until 
the close of the war, and was discharged 
June 15, 1865, at Washington City. He re- 
ceived two scalp wounds and was shot 
through the hat once. These wounds have 
troubled him a great deal since the war. 

Mr. Patton is a good scholar, is well 
posted on current topics and is a fine con- 
versationalist. He is held in high esteem 
by the people of Marion county for his life 
of industry, his honesty and friendly man- 
ners. 



SOLOMON T. FINCH. 

One of the men who has stamped the im- 
press of his strong individuality upon the 
minds of the people of Clay county in a man- 
ner as to render him one of the conspicu- 
ous characters of this locality, is the sub- 
ject of this sketch, one of the prominent at- 
torneys of the southern part of the common- 
wealth of Illinois. Faithfulness to duty and 
a strict adherence to a fixed purpose, which 
always do more to advance a man's inter- 
ests than wealth or advantageous circum- 
stances, have been dominating factors in his 
life, which has been replete with honor and 
success worthily attained. 

Solomon T. Finch was born in Flora, 
Clay county. February 23. 1857, the son 
of Solomon T. Finch, who was born in 
Indiana, and who came to Illinois in 
1849, settling in Clay county. He was 
the first merchant in Flora, and was influ- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



227 



ential in the affairs of the pioneer days of 
this community. He was in business here 
until his death in 1857. The subject's pa- 
ternal grandfather was also named Solo- 
mon. He was a native of New York, 
having removed from the Empire state to 
Southern Indiana, and was superintendent 
of the log cabin display in General Har- 
rison's campaign in 1832. He came to Il- 
linois with his father in 1849. His death 
occurred in 1851. The subject's mother 
was Bathsheba Long, who was a native of 
Virginia. She passed to her rest in 1872. 
She was a representative of a fine old 
southern family. Three children were born 
to the subject's parents, namely: Rebecca 
was born in 1852, and died when fifteen 
years old; Mary is the wife of J. M. Cun- 
ningham, of Flora, she having been the first 
child born in Flora, the date of her birth 
being 1854; Solomon T., the subject of 
this sketch, is the youngest child. The 
father of the subject moved to Flora in 
1853, ar >d engaged in the dry goods busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Finch received his preliminary 
schooling in the common schools of Flora. 
He attended Loxa College in Coles county, 
this state. Desiring a higher education, he 
entered the University of Michigan in 1876, 
from which he graduated in 1879, from the 
law department, having made a brilliant 
record in the same. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1880, and has been engaged in 
practice ever since. He removed to Spring- 
field in 1900, where he practiced for five 
vears with his usual success, but he moved 



back to Flora in 1905, much to the satisfac- 
tion of his many clients and friends in Clay 
county. 

Mr. Finch was united in marriage May 
28, 1884, to Lillie E. Pearce, daughter of 
Frederick Pearce, who was born in Eng- 
land, having emigrated to the United States 
in 1858, when he was twenty years old. 
Lillie E. Pearce was born in Flora within 
one block of where Mr. Finch was born. 
Two sons have been born to the subject and 
wife, Earl D., who is associated with his 
father, is a graduate of the Springfield 
high school and also a graduate of the law 
department of the State University ; Rollae 
D. also graduated from the Springfield 
high school, and is in 1908 a student in the 
medical department of Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis. They are both bright 
young men, who give promise of brilliant 
careers. 

Mr. Finch was nominated by the Demo- 
cratic party for County Judge in 1898, but 
was defeated, however, by only one vote, 
although the county was largely Repub- 
lican. He was also his party's nominee for 
State's Attorney in 1908, but went down 
in defeat with the rest of the ticket. He 
is engaged in the law and abstract busi- 
ness and his office is always a busy place. 

In his fraternal relations he belongs to 
the Blue Lodge, Royal Arch and Knights 
Templar Masons. He organized and was 
the first chancellor commander of the 
Knights of Pythias in Flora. He also be- 
longs to the Woodmen. He is a loyal 
Democrat. He belongs to the Presbyterian 



BJOr.KAl'HICAL AM) KKM I X 1SCK XT HISTORY OF 



church. Mrs. Finch and their youngest son 
are members of the Methodist church. 

Mr. Finch has seen many changes in 
Clay county during his lifetime. Progress 
has been made, doing away with the old 
landmarks and substituting in their places 
all the evidences of advanced civilization, 
and in all matters pertaining to the general 
good and improvement he has been deeply 
interested, nor has he withheld his aid when 
it has been solicited for the advancement 
of any public measure of worth, but on the 
contrary he has often been the instigator of 
movements that have resulted in permanent 
good to the community honored by his 
residence. He is a highly respected citizen, 
held in uniform regard by those who have 
known him through long years. 



JAMES F. PURDUE. 

The subject was born in Montgomery 
county, Tennessee, March i, 1833, the son 
of Jarrut and Rebecca (Farmer) Purdue, 
the former a native of Georgia, and the lat- 
ter of North Carolina. They went to Ten- 
nessee when young and married there, and 
removed to Illinois in 1838, settling in what 
is now Haines township, where they took 
up government land. They made the trip 
from Tennessee in ox carts. When they 
settled here among the pioneers there was 
much wild game. They developed a good 
farm and worked hard. They died on the 
place, after becoming the parents of eight 
children: Margaret, Mary, Richard, Wil- 



liam C., John W., Jacob H., James F., our 
subject, and Andrew V. Jarrut Purdue 
was a Democrat. His wife was a member 
of the Baptist church. 

Our subject was six years of age when 
he came with his parents to Marion county, 
Illinois. He was educated in the common 
schools of the early days, and he has spent 
the balance of his life here, having re- 
mained at home until he reached manhood. 
He was married the first time in 1855, to- 
Louisa Brasel, a native of Tennessee, and 
three children were bom to them: Nancy 
Jane, who is living in Haines township, is 
the wife of Zach Brasel; Joseph H. is a 
farmer living in Haines township ; John R. is 
also a farmer living in Haines township. 
The subject's second mariage was in 1867, 
his second wife being Loretta Price, a na- 
tive of Ohio, to whom one child has been 
born, Louisa, now the wife of Harry Alvis, 
of East St. Louis. 

The third marriage of the subject was 
to Vilinda Murphy, the ceremony having 
been performed in 1876. To this last mar- 
riage two children were born, Tence and 
Harry. 

Mr. Purdue is a Democrat in his political 
relations. He has devoted his life to farm- 
ing and has been very successful. He is 
now living retired, having moved to his 
neat, comfortable and pleasant home in Kell 
in September, 1908. He is well known 
throughout the county, being a member of 
old and prominent families of this region 
in which he himself was one of the earliest 
pioneers. 



RICH LAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



22 9 



HARVEY F. PIXLEY. 

The able and popular president of the First 
National Bank of Flora, Illinois, is most con- 
sistently accorded recognition in a work of 
the province assigned to the one at hand, 
since it has to do with the representative citi- 
zens of Clay county, of which number he 
unquestionably is a worthy member and has 
long played well his part in the development 
of the interests of this locality. 

Harvey F. Pixley was born in Ingraham, 
Clay county, November 25, 1869, the son 
of Osman Pixley, who was a native of New 
York, having settled in Edwards county in 
1852. The subject's father was a merchant 
and for many years was the president of the 
First National Bank of Flora. He was a 
prominent man in this community, and was 
Representative in the Legislature in 1871 and 
1872, representing this district, having been 
elected on the Republican ticket. He was 
for many years a leading and influential citi- 
zen here. He was postmaster of Ingraham 
for the long period of forty years. He re- 
ceived a request from Postmaster General 
Wanamaker for his photo to be used at the 
Chicago World's Fair. He was the fourth 
oldest postmaster in point of service in the 
United States. After an active and useful 
life he was called to his rest April 7, 1903. 
Asa Pixley, the subject's grandfather, was 
a native of Vermont, but he removed to 
Western New York and finally settled near 
West Salem, Edwards county, Illinois, about 
1830, being among the pioneers. He was 
born March 26. 1805, and died February 9. 



1883. The Pixley family is of Puritan stock. 
The mother of the subject was Frances 
Wood, a native of near Allendale, Wa- 
bash county, this state, where she was born 
June 29, 1832. She was a woman of beau- 
tiful attributes, and she passed to her rest 
May 16, 1907. Nine children were born to 
the parents of our subject, Harvey F. being 
the seventh in order of birth. Four girls and 
one boy are deceased. Dewitt C. is living 
in Orange, California, a prominent business 
man of that place, is married and has five 
children: Arthur H.. who lives in Chicago, 
is a member of the Board of Trade and is as- 
sociated with Ware & Leland. The subject's 
mother was a member of a large family, con- 
sisting of nine children. Her father was 
Spencer Wood, who was born near New 
Haven, Vermont, February 14, 1788, and 
died December 5. 1846. Her mother was 
Matilda Flower, who was born in Hardins- 
burg, Kentucky, March 19, 1791, and died 
March 12, 1855, the mother being the last 
surviving member of the family. Mr. Pixley's 
father's mother was Amanda Ingraham. The 
township of Pixley was named after Mr. 
Pixley's father, and the town of Ingraham 
was named after Mr. Pixley's grandmother, 
who was born February 22, 1806, and died 
September 26, 1844. Her parents are buried 
in Ingraham cemetery. Philo Ingraham, her 
father, was born June 28, 1768, and died 
April 21, 1842. Her mother was Arvilla 
Barney, born September 12. 1782, and died 
September 19, 1854. They are supposed to 
be the first white people buried in Clay 
county. 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



. Harvey F. Pixley, our subject, spent his 
life up to 1899 in Ingraham. After receiving 
a common school education there he attended 
Eureka College, in which institution he spent 
two years, making an excellent record. Then 
he began work in his father's store, having 
remained there for twelve years, assisting 
to build up an excellent trade. In August, 
1899, he came to Flora and began work in 
the First National Bank, becoming its cash- 
ier January i, 1900, serving four years. He 
was then elected vice president of the in- 
stitution, serving four years in this capacity, 
and was made president of the bank at the 
January, 1909, meeting of the board of direc- 
tors. He has done much to increase the 
prestige of this bank and place it on a solid 
foundation so that it is today recognized as 
one of the soundest in Southern Illinois. 

Mr. Pixley is treasurer of the Breese- 
Trenton Mining Company, which operates 
three coal mines at Breese, Beckemeyer and 
Trenton. He is also treasurer of the Ebner 
Ice & Cold Storage Company, operating four 
plants, one at Vincennes, Seymour and 
Washington, Indiana, and one at Flora, Illi- 
nois. He is also a director and large stock- 
holder in both the above named companies. 
Mr. Pixley also has an interest in the Flora 
Canning Company, and is also a stockholder 
and one of the organizers of the Flora Tele- 
phone Company ; also interested as a stock- 
holder in two wholesale houses in St. Louis. 
He was one of the executors of the late Gen. 
Lewis B. Parsons, of Flora, having left an 
estate of one hundred thousand dollars with 
a will. 

Mr. Pixley was married on October 22, 



189., to Gallic Cisel, daughter of John Cisel, 
of Allendale, Wabash county, Illinois. She 
was born on the adjoining farm to where Mr. 
Pixley's mother was reared. To this union 
one son has been born, December 10, 1892. 
He is a bright lad and is attending the West- 
ern Military Academy at Upper Alton, Illi- 
nois. 

In his fraternal relations our subject is a 
member of the Blue Lodge, No. 204, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and Royal Arch Chap- 
ter No. 154. He is a member of the Order 
of Eastern Star, as is also Mrs. Pixley. They 
are members of the Christian church, the sub- 
ject being a member of the official board. He 
was also a member of the building commit- 
tee that erected the new church, a splendid 
edifice that would be a credit to a much 
larger city. Mr. Pixley is one of the trus- 
tees of the Carnegie library of which he is 
treasurer. He has been trustee of the same 
since it was built and he was a member of 
the building committee. He was at one time 
president of the school board. He is now a 
member and one of the directors of the Flora 
Mutual Building, Loan and Homestead As- 
sociation. In politics he is a Republican. 

Something of the subject's ability as a 
financier may be gained from the statement 
that when he became associated with the First 
National Bank there was a surplus of only 
twelve thousand dollars; it is now twenty- 
five thousand. The undivided profits were 
less than one thousand dollars. They are 
now over sixteen thousand. The dividends 
are now five per cent., payable semi-an- 
nually. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pixley have one of the finest 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 



231 



homes in the county, modern, and is presided 
over with rare dignity by Mrs. Pixley, who 
is a woman of refinement. 

Mr. Pixley has always taken a great inter- 
est in the advancement and prosperity of 
Clay county and endorses every movement 
which he believes will prove a benefit to hu- 
manity. He is a sociable gentleman and is 
held in the highest regard by all who know 
him. His achievements represent the result 
of honest endeavor along lines where ma- 
ture judgment has opened the way. He 
possesses a weight of character, a native sa- 
gacity, a discriminating judgment and a 
fidelity of purpose that command the re- 
spect, if not the approval, of all with whom 
he is associated. He takes first rank among 
the prominent men of this locality and is a 
leader in financial, business, educational, so- 
cial and civic affairs. 



THE BRYAN FAMILY. 
(By Mrs. Anna Torrence.) 

In giving the genealogy of the Bryan 
family, who have long been considered 
among the most noted and highly esteemed 
of Marion county, Illinois, there are some 
characteristics which the reader will at once 
note as being particularly strong and 
plainly marked throughout the entire line- 
age. First, as a family whose veracity is 
never questioned ; second, they are noted for 
being strictly honest in every detail of social, 



political and business life; third, those who 
are Christians are very devoted, believing 
emphatically in a prayer hearing and prayer 
answering God, believing that He guides 
man in every right act of life. The pub- 
lishers of this work are glad to be able to 
give their readers an insight into the life 
records of this remarkable family and can 
state with all authenticity that the sketches 
contained herein are to be relied upon. 

William Bryan, the great-grandfather of 
Hon. William J. Bryan, was born in Eng- 
land and was married there, having come to 
America before the Revolutionary war, set- 
tling in Culpeper county, Virginia. Five 
children were born to them, namely : James, 
John, Aquilla, Francis and Elizabeth. 
James moved to Barren county, Kentucky. 
Aquilla went to Ohio. One of the girls mar- 
ried a man named Baldwin. Nothing fur- 
ther is known of these families at present. 

John Bryan, the second son and grand- 
father of Hon. William J. Bryan, was born 
in 1790. In 1807 he married Nancy Lillard, 
a representative of one of the finest old 
southern families of Virginia, and she is re- 
membered as a very refined and cultured 
woman, endowed with more than ordinary 
intelligence. In 1828 they moved to Cobal 
county, Virginia, and lived there two years. 
From there they moved to Mason county, 
Virginia, where they lived and passed to 
their rest and where they lie buried. To 
them ten children were born. The oldest, 
William W., was born in 1808. He mar- 
ried Emily Smith and about 1838 moved to 
Lincoln county, Missouri, near Troy. They 



IJIOCKAIMIIfAI. AXI) REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



were the parents of four children, namely: 
William Hamilton, John J., Gallic and Vir- 
ginia. William W r . Bryan reached an old 
age and died a few years ago, his wife fol- 
lowing him to the other shore only a few 
months later. William H. Bryan is an 
honored and respected citizen of Troy, Mis- 
souri, and he has a nice Christian family. 
Gallic and Virginia are noble Christian 
women. John J. is deceased. John J. 
Bryan, Sr., died in early manhood. Howard 
died in infancy. Jane, the eldest daughter, 
married Joseph Cheney, a wealthy hat man- 
ufacturer of Gallipolis, Ohio. She was left 
a widow with six small children whom she 
reared to be useful women and men. Their 
names were : Robert, Mary, Russell, Linna, 
Harriet and Emma. She spent the last few 
years of her life at various places, wherever 
she preferred to stay, spending seven years 
with the family of Judge Silas L. Bryan. 
The last three years of her life she lived 
with Mrs. Mollie Webster, one of her nieces, 
whom she comforted in her early widow- 
hood. She was the idolized aunt around 
whom all the nieces and nephews clustered, 
who regarded her as an earthly saint. She 
was never heard to utter an unkind word 
against any of God's creations. The night 
she was called from earth she praised God 
aloud with every shortening breath. 

Nancy Bryan married George Baltzell 
and moved to Walnut Hill, Illinois, where 
she died. Two sons were born to them, 
Silas L. and Russell B. Both are active 
business men, the former living at Ham- 
mond, Louisiana, and the latter at Cen- 



tralia, Illinois. Nancy is described as a 
very handsome woman, refined and cul- 
tured. To her early training, motherly care 
and prayers, Judge Silas L. Bryan owed 
much of his success in life. 

Martha Bryan married Homer Smith, of 
Gallipolis, Ohio, and moved to Illinois. 
She was left a widow with two small girls, 
Jane and Mary. She was called from earth 
before the girls were grown. Jane made 
her home with Russell Bryan and Mary 
with Judge Bryan's family. Jane was a suc- 
cessful school teacher for several years. The 
mother was a very devoted Christian and 
always had family prayers and is today a 
sainted mother. The youngest daughter, 
Mary, now Mrs. Mollie Webster, has been 
a widow several years. She manages a 
large farm very successfully, and she is a 
great temperance and church worker. She 
has been county president of the White 
Ribbon Army for a number of years and is 
also treasurer of the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union in the Twenty-first Con- 
gressional District of Illinois. It was she 
who taught Hon. William J. Bryan his little 
infant prayers. She taught and trained him 
in his first boyhood speeches. When he was 
in Salem once visiting his old home they re- 
viewed some of the scenes and incidents of 
their interesting childhood days. 

Dr. Robert Bryan was killed in a steam- 
boat explosion. 

Silas L. Bryan, father of Hon. William 
J. Bryan, was born in Culpeper Court 
House, Virginia, in 1822. He came to Illi- 
nois in 1842, where he lived, died and was 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



233 



buried. He worked on a farm at nine dollars 
a month, saving his money to defray his ex- 
penses at McKendree College. During the 
winter while at college he would chop wood 
on Saturdays to help pay expenses. Many of 
his colleagues made fun of him, but in after 
years many of them, came to borrow money 
of him and to seek his legal advice. He was 
a man of sterling qualities, the kind that 
always make for success when rightly and 
persistently applied. He was a very devout 
Christian, always had family prayers, and 
he promised the Lord if He would prosper 
him to get through college he would pray 
three times a day the rest of his life. This 
promise he faithfully kept, praying morn- 
ing and evening at his home, and at 
noon wherever he happened to be. He 
would drop on his knees and ask God's 
blessings. He was a member of the Marion 
county bar for a period of thirty years, a 
member of the State Senate for eight years, 
and for twelve years was Circuit Judge of 
this judicial district. He was a member of 
the convention that framed the present state 
constitution of Illinois. He was a man of 
unusual tact, shrewdness, soundness of 
judgment and force of character, and it was 
from him that Hon. William J. Bryan in- 
herited his gift of oratory and his brilliant 
intellect. He imbued the boy with lofty 
ideals and taught him by example and pre- 
cept how to make a grand and noble man. 
Silas L. Bryan married Mariah Elizabeth 
Jennings, a woman of many praiseworthy 
traits and a devoted Christian wife and 
mother. She gave the best part of her life 



to the care of her family. She was truly "a 
mother in Israel." To this union were born 
nine children, namely: John H., Virginia, 
William J., Russell, Harry, Frances, 
Charles, Nancy and Mary. John and Vir- 
ginia died within six weeks of each other 
when young. William J. was born March 
17, 1860. He was taught at home until ten 
years of age, after which he attended the 
public schools for five years, during which 
time he gave evidence of being a most pre- 
cocious child and one to whom the future 
augured great things. He afterward at- 
tended college at Jacksonville, Illinois, 
where he made a brilliant record for both 
scholarship and deportment. He then 
studied law in Chicago in the office of Ly- 
man Trumbull, making rapid progress from 
the first. He was admitted to the bar and 
successfully practiced for some time, finally 
entering the political arena, since which 
time his career has been too meteoric to need 
reviewing here, since his record is well 
known to all, and is given in detail in an- 
other part of this volume. Russell Bryan 
died in early manhood. Frances has a nice 
comfortable home in Shaw, Mississippi, and 
is a jolly, whole-souled woman, loved by 
everyone. Charles is a very successful busi- 
ness man in Lincoln, Nebraska. Nancy is 
a quiet, refined and modest girl. She was 
at one time William J.'s private secretary. 
Mary, the youngest of the family, became a 
successful school teacher. She has winning 
ways and is a great favorite. Russell 
Bryan, the youngest brother of Judge 
Bryan, came to Salem in 1841. He was 



334 



BlOGKAl'HICAL AND KEM IXISCKXT HISTORY OF 



familiarly known to all as "Uncle Russ," 
being well known throughout the county. 
He was endowed with a wonderful memory. 
Often when dates or records of events 
seemed obscure he was referred to, and sel- 
dom failed to give the correct names, dates 
or places desired. He had stock scales in Sa- 
lem for thirty years, or since 1878, and his 
weights were never questioned. He never 
went in debt for anything, and he never had 
a law suit, and as a result of his upright 
life he was honored and respected by all who 
knew him. He married Amanda L. Tully, 
who was always a very bright and active 
woman, a fine financier and business woman 
of unusual ability and acumen. Twelve 
children have been born to this union as 
follows : Anna E., Alice J., John E., Lewis 
O., Andrew R., Mark T., Silas L., Rosa A. 
The ninth in order of birth died in infancy. 
Minnie M. was next in order ; then Emma 
A. and Adis M. Anna chose the teacher's 
profession when quite young. She success- 
fully taught for twenty-four years, and after 
she became a widow and had reached the 
meridian of life attended one of the state 
normals and graduated therefrom, since 
which time she taught in a normal train- 
ing school in Chicago and later in Salem. 
Alice J. is a very domestic woman, and her's 
is one of the coziest homes in Salem. She 
is a natural artist and at one time was quite 
a cultured singer. John E. is a prosperous 
lawyer in Salem. He was a school teacher 
for many years, and has served as Master 
in Chancery for eight years. He is noted 
for his honor and integrity. (A fuller 



sketch of John E. Bryan appears elsewhere 
in this volume.) Lewis O. is a lawyer at Van 
Buren, Arkansas, and is quite wealthy. He 
is noted for his true philanthropy and is the 
poor man's friend. Andrew R. lives in 
Salem and is highly esteemed by all who 
know 'him. Mark T. died when six years 
old. Silas L. died in infancy. Rosa A. 
lives a mile from Van Buren, Arkansas, on 
a fine fruit farm. She is a woman of thrift 
and has a bright, interesting family. Min- 
nie M. is a resident of Indianapolis. Emma 
A. resides in Centralia, this county. Adis 
M. is in the real estate business at Van 
Buren, Arkansas, and has become noted as 
a politician. 

Elizabeth Bryan, the judge's youngest 
sister, married George Baltzell, and they 
live at Deer Ridge, St. Louis county, Mis- 
souri. She is the mother of the following 
children, namely: Anna, Albert, Florence, 
Edwin. The last named died while in col- 
lege. They are influential and highly re- 
spected in their community. 

Thus it is no wonder that this family 
should become so useful and influential and 
should be leaders of society in its various 
phases, when we consider how they have 
kept the even tenor of their way, how they 
were reared in "the fear and admonition of 
the Lord," and how they have kept the 
faith of their worthy ancestors, maintaining 
in all the relations of life that strict in- 
tegrity and loyalty of principle to lofty 
ideals and honorable records in private, 
commercial, professional and public life. 
The influence for good to humanity and 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



235 



the amelioration of the human race of such 
a noble family is too far-reaching and in- 
scrutable to be measured or contemplated 
with any degree of accuracy. Truly such 
characters are as "a shining light which 
grows more and more unto the perfect day," 
purifying, refining, strengthening and en- 
couraging the wayworn traveler on life's 
rugged steeps, teaching the less courageous 
that he who would ascend to the heights 
of life where the purer atmosphere that in- 
spires the souls of men may be breathed, 
must be true, loyal, ambitious, energetic, 
honorable and of indomitable energy 



THE CUNNINGHAM FAMILY. 

The name of Cunningham has long been 
an honored one in Clay county, Illinois, 
where for several generations have lived most 
worthy representatives of the family, who 
were, and are, always to be found associated 
with every movement which promised an 
addition to the community's wealth and ma- 
terial advancement. Especially is this true 
of the late John M. Cunningham, for many 
years a valued and honored citizen of Flora, 
and his son, Charles S., the prominent busi- 
ness man and present head of the city govern- 
ment. The family is of Scotch origin and 
descends from an old and honored one of Vir- 
ginia, where was born Benjamin F. Cun- 
ningham, who, when a young man, made 
his way westward and settled in Clay county, 
becoming one of its earliest pioneers. He 



first located in the southern part of the county 
along Cottonwood creek and there engaged 
in the milling industry. His equipment was 
crude and his labor arduous, but by sturdy 
industry he succeeded. Later he came to 
Flora and engaged in the banking business 
under the firm name of the Cunningham and 
Harter Savings Bank. It was one of the 
pioneer institutions of the locality. This 
business he conducted with much ability un- 
til withn a year of his death which occurred 
in 1876. He possessed many rare and excel- 
lent traits of character, and abounding in- 
dustry and was much honored and es- 
teemed. Among his children was John M. 

John Minor Cunningham was born near 
Flora, March 24, 1844, and was there 
reared and grew to manhood. He acquired 
such an education as the community afforded 
which was broadened in later life by reading, 
association, contact and native intelligence. 
He was associated with his father for some 
time in various enterprises, finally embark- 
ing in the jewelry business which he con- 
ducted profitably for many years. He was 
directly and indirectly connected with vari- 
ous other enterprises, ever putting his shoul- 
der to the wheel of progress, and was deeply 
interested in the growth and advancement 
of his native county, and in all that per- 
tained to its welfare. 

Mr. Cunningham first married on January 
i, 1866, Jennie E. Hawkins, whose early 
death occurred on September 24, 1874. To 
this yqion three children were born, one of 
whom died in infancy. Those living are 
Charles S., and Clyde L., the latter a resident 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



of Julesburg, Colorado. The mother of 
these, whose death was sincerely mourned, 
was of Scotch ancestry, her mother and 
grandmother having emigrated from Scot- 
land. 

On February 3, 1876, Mr. Cunningham 
again married, the lady being Mary Eliza- 
beth Finch, a direct descendant of Sir Hene- 
age Finch, who was born in Kent, England, 
in 1621, and whose eldest son, Heneage, was 
first Earl of Nottingham and was Lord 
Chancellor of England. Mrs. Cunningham 
was born September 25, 1854, and was the 
first white child born in Flora. To this 
marriage there came children as follows: 
Fremont, who died in infancy; Nelle, born 
September 29, 1875, and married Jerry J. 
Bowman, October 22, 1902, and Max F., 
born April 14, 1883. 

Mr. Cunningham was a member of Flora 
Lodge No. 204, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Order of the Eastern Star No. 105, 
Royal Arch Chapter No. 154, and of Grand 
Commandery No. 14, Knights Templar. He 
was much attached to these orders and highly 
prized the associations there enjoyed. He 
attended the Knights Templar conclaves at 
Boston, Louisville and Denver. At his death 
the funeral auspices were conducted by Gorin 
Commandery No. 14, of Olney. He and his 
wife were for many years regular attend- 
ants and liberal contributors of the First 
Presbyterian church of Flora and of whose 
board of trustees he was an honored mem- 
ber. At the death of Mr. Cunningham. 
which occurred suddenly and unexpectedly 
March 13, 1906. fitting and appropriate reso- 



lutions were adopted by the various commer- 
cial, religious and fraternal units with which 
he was connected, and from these we quote 
the following: "From among us there has 
been taken a loving husband, a kind and in- 
dulgent father, a faithful friend, a genial 
companion, a successful business man and 
honored citizen and one whose place can 
not be filled." 

At a special meeting of the directors of 
the Flora National Bank, of which he was 
a director from January, 1893, to his death, 
suitable resolutions were drawn and spread 
upon the minutes. In part these resolutions 
said : "His counsels were always wise and 
at all meetings he took a prominent part. We 
feel our great loss and will miss the sound 
advice which he was ever ready and compe- 
tent to give, and his good judgment in all 
matters pertaining to the bank." Resolutions 
of like character were adopted by the Ma- 
sonic and other bodies. 

Of Mr. Cunningham on eld friend has 
written: "A grand life indeed was that of 
John Minor Cunningham, a life set to the 
Golden Rule, to kind acts and ways, helpful 
at needed times, a friend to his fellowman, 
assisting, if it were a loss to him, aiding, if 
the sacrifice fell on him, and in an active 
business career covering many years he was 
ever fair and just in his dealings. He was 
associated with Flora from its infant state, 
aided in its growth, assisted in the introduc- 
tion of its schools, churches and public itu 
stitutions. He was foremost in establishing 
business in Flora, co-operating with the best 
interests of the city 'and its rural districts. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



237 



daring and bold in the advocacy of social 
order, sober living, good government and 
fair and honest transactions of business." 

Charles S. Cunningham, son of John M., 
was born in Flora, March 27, 1870, and, like 
his father, has lived there all of his life. He 
attended the public schools, afterwards en- 
tering the jewelry store of his father. He 
long ago mastered every detail of the busi- 
ness and conducts perhaps the leading estab- 
lishment in that line of trade in Southern 
Illinois. 

Mr. Cunningham married in 1890, Eva L.. 
daughter of John Jackson, of Allegan, Michi- 
gan. To this union two sons have been 
born, Rexford J., and Charles J. He has 
figured somewhat conspicuously in the politi- 
cal affairs of Flora and was first elected City 
Treasurer, in which capacity he served two 
years; he was then Alderman for two years 
and in the spring of 1907 he was elected 
Mayor of Flora and has given the city an 
economical, efficient and thoroughly moral 
administration, taking the same care and 
interest in public affairs as he does in those 
of purely personal nature. Mr. Cunning- 
ham, it may be here stated, has not sought 
for or accepted office because of the honor 
that might be attached thereto, but has been 
actuated solely by a desire to lend the best 
efforts that is in him toward the maintenance 
of law and order and the growth and ad- 
vancement of the city and its commercial, 
moral and material worth. He has been es- 
pecially vigorous in the enforcement of lo- 
cal option laws and is earnestly advocating a 
system of water and other municipal advan- 



tages. Aside from his official duties and his 
personal affairs, Mr. Cunningham is also 
prominently connected with various other 
enterprises, being a director and vice-presi- 
dent of the First National Bank of Flora, a 
director of the Breese-Trenton Coal and 
Mining Company and of the Friend Tele- 
phone company of Flora. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics ; fraternally he is a member 
of the Flora Lodge No. 204, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, of the Knights of 
Pythias, and of the Ben-Hur lodge. He is 
a member of the Illinois State Historical So- 
ciety of Springfield, and both he and Mrs. 
Cunningham are members of the Methodist 
church of Flora. Mr. Cunningham appears 
entirely capable of emulating the example of 
his worthy progenitors and is closely follow- 
ing in their footsteps. He possesses an un- 
blemished character, a strict integrity, an in- 
telligent appreciation of his responsibilities 
and a faculty of accomplishment. He fully 
realizes that these traits of character have 
described through the blood of his ancestry 
and to whatever heights he may be destined 
to ascend, his most valued possession, his 
greatest pride shall ever be that priceless her- 
itage of his forefathers an honored name. 



LEVI MONROE KAGY. 

In the collection of material for the bio- 
graphical department of this publication 
there has been a constant aim to use a wise 
discrimination in regard to the selection of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



subjects and to exclude none worthy of rep- 
resentation within its pages. Here will be 
found mention of worthy citizens of all vo- 
cations, and at this juncture we are per- 
mitted to offer a resume of the career of one 
of the substantial and highly esteemed, in 
fact, one of the leaders of the industrial 
world of this section of the state, where he 
has long maintained his home and where he 
has attained a high degree of success in his 
chosen field of labor and enterprise. 

Levi Monroe Kagy, the popular and well 
known president of the Salem State Bank, 
of Salem, Marion county, Illinois, was born 
near Tiffin, Senaca county, Ohio, December 
15, 1855, the son of David Kagy, also a 
native of Seneca county, who came to 
Marion county, Illinois, in the year 1859. 
He devoted his life to agricultural pursuits 
which he made successful and at the time 
became a man of much influence in his com- 
munity and well known as a scrupulously 
honest and public-spirited citizen. He was 
called from his earthly labors February 8, 
1887, after a very active and useful life. 
The mother of the subject was known in 
her maidenhood as Sarah Milley. She is a 
woman of many estimable traits and is the 
recipient of the admiration and esteem of a 
large coterie of friends and acquaintances 
in the vicinity where she is still living in 
1908 on the old homestead where she and 
her worthy life companion settled nearly a 
half century ago. To Mr. and Mrs. David 
Kagy were born only two children, Alice A. 
a woman of fine attributes, who is making 
her home with her mother; and Levi Mon- 



roe, our subject. The parents spared 
no pains in giving these children every pos- 
sible care and advantage and the wholesome 
environment of their home life is clearly re- 
flected in the lives of the subject and his 
sister. 

Our subject lived on the parental farm 
until he was twenty-five years old and as- 
sisted his father with the farm work, giving 
him all his earnings up to the time of his 
maturity, and it was while thus engaged in 
the free outdoor life of the farm that he 
acquired many qualities of mind and body 
that have assisted very materially in his sub- 
sequent success in life. He attended the 
neighborhood schools where he applied him- 
self in a most assiduous manner, outstrip- 
ping many of his classmates, and therefore 
gained a broad and deep mental foundation 
which has since been greatly developed by 
systematic home study and contact with the 
world. After receiving what education he 
could in the home schools Mr. Kagy taught 
several terms of school in a most praise- 
worthy manner, teaching in the winter 
months and farming in the summer, having 
possesed not only a clear and well defined 
text-book training, but also the tact to deal 
with his pupils in a manner to gain the best 
results, at the same time winning their good 
will and lasting friendship. 

After reaching young manhood, Mr. 
Kagy decided that his true life work lay 
along a different course than that of farm- 
ing and school teaching, so he accordingly 
began to save his earnings in order to de- 
fray the expense of a course in Union Col- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



239 



lege of Law at Chicago, now the North- 
western University, and he graduated from 
that institution with high honors on June 
14, 1883, after having made a brilliant rec- 
ord in the same for scholarship and de- 
portment. 

He at once began practice at Salem, 
where his success was instantaneous, and 
with the exception of one year spent on the 
farm after his father's death, he has been 
in Salem ever since where he is now recog- 
nized as one of the most potent factors in 
her civic, industrial and social life. Mr. 
Kagy practices with uniform success in 
county, state and federal courts, and his ser- 
vices are in constant demand in cases re- 
quiring superior ingenuity and apt ability. 
His untiring energy, indefatigable research 
and persistency have made him successful 
where less courageous characters would 
have quailed and been submerged. 

Something of the subject's peculiar and 
unquestioned executive ability is shown 
from the fact that he was one of the princi- 
pal organizers in 1903 of the Salem State 
Bank, one of the most substantial, popular 
and sound institutions of its kind in south- 
ern and central Illinois. Mr. Kagy is presi- 
dent of the same, the duties of which he 
performs in a manner to gain the unqualified 
confidence of the public, and the citizens of 
Salem and Marion county do not hesitate to 
place their funds at his disposal, knowing 
that they could not be trusted to safer and 
more conservative hands. He is also stock- 
holder in the First National Bank of Kin- 
mundy, Illinois. He also helped organize 



the Haymond State Bank of Kinmundy, and 
afterwards was instrumental in merging this 
institution with the First National Bank of 
that city. Mr. Kagy was appointed Master 
in Chancery of Marion county in 1889, and 
afterwards twice re-appointed. He has 
served as president of the Salem School 
Board and declined re-election. In all these 
public capacities he displayed unusual 
adroitness in handling the affairs entrusted 
to him. 

Mr. Kagy's happy and harmonious do- 
mestic life dates from May 18, 1887, when 
he was united in marriage to Alice Larimer, 
the youngest daughter of the late Smith 
Larimer, an ex-Treasurer of Marion county, 
an influential and highly respected citizen. 
Mrs. Kagy is a cultured and highly accom- 
plished woman of many estimable attributes 
and possessing a gracious and pleasing per- 
sonality which makes her popular among a 
wide circle of friends and acquaintances, 
and she presides over the modern, cozy, 
elegantly furnished and beautifully appoint- 
ed home of the subject and family with 
modest grace and dignity. Into this model 
home two bright and interesting children 
add sunshine and cheerfulness. They are: 
John Larimer, who was born February 22, 
1888, now a student, in 1908, in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, where he is making a 
splendid record; and Leigh Monroe, who 
was born March 15, 1901 ; a girl died in in- 
fancy. 

In 1898, during the Spanish- American 
war, Mr. Kagy was active in organizing a 
company, and was elected captain of the 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



same ; after much drilling it was ready to go 
to the front. Later Mr. Kagy was appointed 
by Gov. John B. Tanner, major of Pitten- 
ger's Provisional Regiment. Although it 
was fully ready to go to the front it was not 
called upon to do so. 

Levi M. Kagy was one of the twenty-two 
men who subscribed twenty-two thousand 
dollars in order to induce the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois Railroad shops to locate in 
Salem. The public-spirited and energetic 
disposition of the citizens of this progressive 
city can be ascertained by the statement that 
this sum was raised in one night. Mr. Kagy 
was in San Francisco at the time, but his 
friends volunteered to vouch for him for 
eleven hundred dollars, and he promptly 
paid the full amount upon his return home. 
Mr. Kagy always practiced law alone until 
January, 1907, when he took E. B. Van- 
dervort, of Portsmouth, Ohio, as an as- 
sociate. They have a splendid and well 
equipped suite of rooms in the Kagy Build- 
ing. Mr. Kagy, although interested in many 
industrial enterprises, gives his time almost 
exclusively to his law practice which is very 
large and which requires the major part of 
his time. 

Fraternally our subject is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen. He 
has occupied the chairs in the local Odd Fel- 
lows lodge, and is one of the trustees of 
the I. O. O. F. Old Folks' Home of Illinois, 
of Mattoon, Illinois. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kagy and their oldest son 
are members of the Presbyterian church. 



In politics he is a stanch advocate of the 
principles and policies of the Democratic 
party, with which he has been affiliated from 
the time of attaining his majority, and he 
has ever lent his aid in furthering his party's 
cause, being well fortified in his political 
convictions, while he is essentially public- 
spirited and progressive. In all the rela- 
tions of life he has been found faithful to 
every trust confided in him and because of 
his genuine worth, splendid physique, 
courteous manners and genial disposition 
he has won and retains the warm regard 
of all with whom he associates. 



SAMUEL F. PHILLIPS. 

Among the members of the many families 
of early settlers who have forged to the 
front in the realm of public life and in their 
daily avocations in Marion county, Illinois, 
few indeed, have reached a higher standing 
than the subject of this sketch, whose long 
life has ever been associated with the prog- 
ress of the county, especially in the township 
where he resides. 

Samuel F. Phillips was born October 20, 
1829, in the vicinity of Clarksville, Mont- 
gomery county, Tennessee. His fatherjona- 
than Phillips, came of a well known family 
in the state where he resided, and his moth- 
er's maiden name was Sarah Fowler, who 
came of a family equally well connected. 
Jonathan Phillips' father was Samuel Phil- 
lips, who, together with his wife. Nancy 




MRS. XAXCY. PHILLIPS. 




S. F. PHILIPS. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



241 



(Crow) Phillips, born in Virginia, were 
among the earliest settlers in Tennessee. The 
elder Phillips was a hardy and industrious 
farmer and he and his wife lived a long life 
on their farm in Davidson county, Tennes- 
see, where they reared a family of eight 
children; four sons and four daughters. 
The sons were David, Thomas, George and 
Jonathan, the father of Samuel F. 

Jonathan Phillips spent the early part of 
his life on his father's farm, and he re- 
ceived a limited education in the common 
schools in the neighborhood of his home. 
When he had reached manhood he married 
and in 1831 he and his wife drove in the an- 
tiquated vehicles of the period across the 
long stretches of country, starting from 
Montgomery county, Tennessee, finally 
landing and settled in section i, Centralia 
township, Marion county, Illinois. At this 
time he obtained one hundred and sixty 
acres of government land at one dollar and 
twenty-five cents per acre, which farm he 
added to at different times until he had six 
hundred acres, becoming a farmer of more 
than average industry and he succeeded in 
improving and changing the appearance of 
the property. Though well known and 
widely respected in the locality, he never 
aspired for public patronage. In politics 
he was first a Whig and on the disappear- 
ance of the older party became a Democrat. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian 
brotherhood in religious life and a sturdy 
upholder of that belief. As a man and an 
active farmer, he was well known and 
16 



widely esteemed. The date of his birth was 
in the year 1799, and his death occurred 
on April 2, 1856. His wife was born July 
20, 1806, and died July 10, 1893. Her 
father, William Fowler, lived in Montgom- 
ery county, Tennessee, where he died. He 
had married a Miss Fyke and their union 
brought forth four children, two sons and 
two daughters, namely: Drury, Richard, 
Sarah, the mother of the subject of our 
sketch, and Mary. 

Jonathan Phillips and his wife reared six 
children, James George Washington, died 
1856, was a farmer, married Margaret 
Sugg, and lived at home until his death. 
Another was Samuel F., the subject of this 
sketch. William, who married Rebecca Al- 
len, was a farmer in Centralia township 
where he died in 1859. Joseph R. died 
April 2, 1862. Nancy married Isaac Phil- 
lips and lived at Cobden, Illinois. She, as 
well as her husband, is dead. John P., a 
farmer in Centralia township, married three 
times: first, Vitula Cazy; second, Martha 
Norfolk ; and third, Ida Johnson. 

As a boy, Samuel F. Phillips had little 
chance to go to school. However, he attend- 
ed the local subscription schools at infre- 
quent intervals. The circumstances of his 
youthful schooling did not affect him in after 
life, for he was always of an observant and 
intelligent turn of mind and in this way as- 
similated much useful information. He 
was of much assistance to his father in im- 
proving the paternal residence, and he re- 
mained there in a useful capacity until his 



242 



inoGKAPHICAL AXIJ REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



thirtieth year. In 1859 in Davidson county, 
Tennessee, he married the daughter of 
Thomas and Eliza (Chadwell) Phillips, of 
the same county and name, his wife's first 
name being Nancy Jane. This Phillips fam- 
ily had come to Marion county, Illinois, set- 
tling there in section 12, Centralia township, 
in 1852. The father spent his life on the farm 
in his new surroundings where he died; 
his wife died in Odin, Illinois. The children 
of the marriage were : Nancy Jane, the wife 
of Samuel F. Phillips, the subject of this 
sketch; Martha E., who married Noah 
Wooters, both deceased ; Mary K., who was 
the wife of James Stroup, both of whom 
are dead ; Minerva T., the wife of Dr. J. J. 
Fyke, of Odin; Sarah B., the wife of W. 
D. Farthing, attorney-at-law, at Odin; 
George died young, at home; William H., 
druggist at luka, Illinois, lives in Centralia 
township. He married Frances Summer- 
ville; Samuel D., druggist at Odin, married 
Jessie Lester; John G. married Laura John- 
son, and lives in Oklahoma. 

Samuel F. Phillips and his wife lead a 
happy domestic life and have had nine chil- 
dren. His sons and daughters are mostly 
all married and are important factors in the 
life of the community. William W. is 1 a 
farmer in Centralia township and is married 
to Malissa Rial. Sarah E. married John 
H. McGuire, engineer on the Illinois Central 
Railroad at Centralia ; they have two chil- 
dren, Tressa and Erma. Etta, the widow 
of G. W. S. Bell, lives near Centralia. 
Patra married John F. Guymon, of Cen- 
tralia, and they have one daughter, Beulah. 



Martha B. is the wife of Charley Whit- 
church, of Centralia township, and the moth- 
er of three children, Carl, Boyd and Harry. 
Allie married W. B. Carr, of Raccoon town- 
ship. Alphia married Joseph L. Hill, of 
Ewing, Illinois. Samuel T. married Nora 
Sutherland, of Centralia township, and has 
two children, Hazel, born October 17, 1905, 
and Samuel Howard, born March 7, 1907. 
Samuel T. is a farmer in Centralia township. 
George Robert, another son, who is at home 
working with his father, is unmarried. 

In the year 1860, Samuel F. Phillips lo- 
cated on his present property. Since then 
he has striven to enhance the value of the 
land. It consists of two hundred and fifty 
acres. He principally engages in stock 
raising and does a general farming business. 

Samuel F. Phillips is a member of the 
Missionary Baptist church and is influen- 
tial in church advancement matters. In 
politics he gives his support to the Demo- 
cratic party. The first time he exercised his 
right to vote he recorded it for Granville 
Pierce. 

The subject of this sketch has received 
fitting public recognition. His record as Jus- 
tice of the Peace is of forty-four years' 
standing, and he has been a Notary Public 
for fourteen years. He has been associated 
with the Board of Trustees of Centralia 
township for twenty years. For sixteen 
years he has been Township Assessor. 
He is also a member of the board 
of township high school. He is still 
in harness, his seventy-nine years weigh 
but lightly upon him, and it is the wish 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



243 



of a large circle of friends that he be 
long spared to his affectionate family, and 
to the people of his township for whom he 
has worked so diligently. 



CHARLES S. CUNNINGHAM. 

The subject of this sketch occupies a 
prominent place in the esteem of the people 
of Flora and Clay county, and is universal- 
ly respected and as a business man fair 
dealing is his watchward in all his trans- 
actions. He is optimistic, looking on the 
bright side of life and never complains at 
the rough places in the road, knowing that 
life is a battle in which no victories are 
won by the slothful, but that the prize is to 
the vigilant and the strong of heart. 

Charles S. Cunningham, the present pop- 
ular Mayor of Flora, Illinois, was born in 
this city, March 27, 1870, the son of John 
M. Cunningham, who was a native of Clay 
county. He was the founder of the jewelry 
business now conducted by our subject, 
which he carried on successfully until 1896, 
when our subject bought the business. In 
March of that year John M. Cunningham 
was called from his earthly labors. B. F. 
Cunningham, grandfather of the subject, 
was a native of Virginia, who came to Clay 
county when a young man and was one of 
the first settlers, having first located in the 
southern part of Clay county, called Cotton- 
\vood creek, and there engaged in the mill- 
ing business. Later he came to Flora and 



established the Cunningham & Harter Sav- 
ings Bank, which he conducted until about 
1875. He died in 1876. The Cunningham 
family is of Scotch origin. The mother of 
the subject was Jennie Hawkins, whose 
people were also of Scotch descent, her 
mother and grandmother having emigrated 
from that country. Mrs. John M. Cun- 
ningham passed to her rest about 1875. 
Three children constituted this family, one 
of whom died in infancy; the subject's 
brother, Clyde L. Cunningham, lives in 
Julesburg, Colorado. 

Charles S. Cunningham has spent all of 
his life in Flora, where he attended the pub- 
lic schools and received a good education. 
He went to work when eighteen years old 
in his father's jewelry store, and has been 
identified with the same ever since. He 
long ago mastered every detail of the busi- 
ness and is one of the leading jewelers of 
this part of the state, having a mod- 
ern and nicely furnished store, and an ex- 
cellent and carefully selected stock. 

Mr. Cunningham was united in marriage 
in 1890 to Eva L. Jackson, the daughter 
of John Jackson, of Allegan, Michigan, and 
to this union two sons have been born. Rex- 
ford J. and Charles J., whose ages at this 
writing are fifteen and twelve, respectively. 
They are attending school and making ex- 
cellent progress in their studies. 

Mr. Cunningham has figured somewhat 
conspicuously in the political affairs of 
Flora, and was first elected City Treasurer 
in which capacity he ably served for two 
vears. He was then Alderman for two 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



years, and in the spring of 1907, he was 
elected Mayor of Flora, and he has given 
the city a very economical administration, 
managing its affairs with as much care as 
he does his individual business. He has 
been vigorous in his fight against illegal 
liquor selling, the saloons having been voted 
out when he was elected. In many ways 
he has benefited the community in a last- 
ing and material way. At the present time 
plans and specifications are making for a 
system of water works, and Mayor Cun- 
ningham is very much interested in secur- 
ing this for the city. 

The subject has won definite success in 
the financial world through his close appli- 
cation to business and his honorable meth- 
ods. He is a director and vice-president in 
the First National Bank, also a director in 
the Breese-Trenton Coal Mining Company, 
the head offices of the company being in 
St. Louis. He is also a director in the 
Friend Telephone Company, of Flora. 
Fraterally he is a member of the Flora 
Lodge No. 204, of Masons, also the Ben 
Hur and the Knights of Pythias. He is a 
member of the Methodist church as is also 
Mrs. Cunningham. Mayor Cunningham is 
a member of the Illinois State Historical 
Society of Springfield, and in politics he is 
a Republican, always taking an active in- 
terest in his party's affairs. His fearless- 
ness in the discharge of his duties and his 
appreciation of the responsibilities that de- 
volve upon him are such as to make him a 
most acceptable incumbent of the Mayor's 
office, and his worth is widelv acknowl- 



edged, while his record as a business man 
has been so honorable that he has gained 
the confidence and trust of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact. 



J. E. BRYAN. 

The gentleman whose name heads this 
sketch has long enjoyed prestige as a lead- 
ing citizen of the community in which he 
resides, and as an official against whose 
record no word of suspicion was ever uttered 
he has been for years an important factor 
in the history of Marion county, Illinois. 
His prominence in the community is the di- 
rect and legitimate result of genuine merit 
and ability, and in every relation, whether 
in the humble sphere of private citizenship, 
or as a trusted public official, his many ex- 
cellencies of character and the able and im- 
partial manner in which he discharged his 
every duty won for him an enviable repu- 
tation as an enterprising and representative 
self-made man. He was for some time a 
prominent figure at the local bar, but desir- 
ing the more prosaic routine of the abstrac- 
ter, he abandoned the legal profession and 
has for many years successfully conducted 
an abstract office in Salem, being known 
throughout the county in this line of work. 

J. E. Bryan was born two and one-half 
miles north of Salem, July 4, 1851, the son 
of A. R. Bryan, a native of Virginia and a 
fine old southern gentleman, who came to 
Illinois when a boy. He was a tanner by 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



245 



trade and after a busy, successful and hon- 
orable career passed to his rest in 1901. He 
lived first at Shawneetown, then at Mt. 
Vernon, later at Walnut Hill, then at Salem, 
where he spent the balance of his life. The 
mother of the subject was Amanda Tully, 
whose people came from Tennessee and were 
among the first settlers in Marion county, 
having come here when the prairies were 
overrun by red men and wild beasts, but 
they were people of sterling qualities and 
surmounted every obstacle, winning a com- 
fortable home as a result of their habits of 
industry and economy. The maternal 
grandfather of the subject was the first 
Sheriff of Marion county. This family con- 
sisted of twelve children, nine of whom are 
living in 1908, namely: Mrs. Anna Tor- 
rence, who resides on the old homestead, 
where the mother of the subject was born, 
in Salem; Mrs. Alice J. Kite, who is also 
living at the old homestead in Salem; J. E., 
our subject ; Lewis O., living in Van Buren, 
Arkansas; Andrew R., of Salem; Mrs. Rosa 
Kagy, living in Arkansas; Mrs. Minnie 
Fisher, of Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. 
Emma Shepherd, of Centralia, Illinois; Ad- 
is, living at Van Buren, Arkansas. The 
mother of the subject, who was a woman 
of many praiseworthy traits, passed to her 
rest several years ago. Mr. Bryan's father, 
A. R. Bryan, was a brother of Silas Bryan, 
father of W. J. Bryan. 

J. E. Bryan was reared in Salem, and he 
preferred to risk his fortunes in his native 
community rather than see uncertain success 
in other fields, consequently he has spent his 



life right here at home. He attended the 
common schools at Salem, applying himself 
most diligently to his text books and at 
the age of twenty began to read law, making 
rapid progress from the first, and in 1876 
he was admitted to practice, his success be- 
ing instantaneous and he soon became 
widely known as an able practitioner in all 
the local courts; but after twenty years of 
arduous work at the bar, during which time 
he built up an extensive business and won 
the unqualified confidence and esteem of a 
large clientele and of his brothers in the 
legal profession, he abandoned the law and 
opened an abstract office in Salem since 
since which time he has devoted his time 
and attention to this business with gratify- 
ing success as indicated above. In his fra- 
ternal relations Mr. Bryan is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Bryan was married in 1876 to Jo- 
sephine W. Pace, a native of Salem and the 
accomplished representative of an old and 
highly respected family. No children have 
been bom to this union. 

Something of the confidence which the 
people of Salem repose in our subject will 
be gained when we learn that he has been 
School Treasurer of Salem township for 
over thirty years at the time of this writing, 
1908. He has devoted much attention to 
the development of the local public school 
system with the result that much has been 
accomplished toward making the Salem 
schools equal to any in the country. Mr. 
Bryan was also Master in Chancery for 
Marion county for a period of eight years, 



2 4 6 



B10CKAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OE 



which responsible position he filled with 
great credit to himself and to the entire 
satisfaction to all concerned. In business he 
has always been successful and is at present 
one of the stockholders of the Salem State 
Bank, He has ever had the welfare of his 
community at heart and has always been 
found willing to devote his time to any 
movement looking to the development of the 
public weal, and as a result of his genuine 
worth, his pleasing demeanor, integrity of 
principal and honesty of purpose, he is to- 
day recognized as one of Marion county's 
foremost citizens. 



MICHAEL E. RAPP. 

Michael E. Rapp was born in Wurtenburg, 
Germany, April 3, 1843, the son of Leon- 
hart and Margaret (Eberhardt) Rapp, both 
natives of Germany, where they were mar- 
ried and where they lived on a farm until 
1853, when they emigrated to the United 
States, having come across the Atlantic in 
a sailing vessel, the voyage requiring fifty 
days. They did not encounter many storms 
on the way, but the slow passage was caused 
by the absence of winds. They landed in 
New York, where they remained a few days 
when they went to Buffalo, touching at Al- 
bany, Philadelphia and other points on the 
way, having been three days making the 
trip. The parents of the subject settled at 
Buffalo and remained there until their death, 
the father dying about 1891, at the age of 



nearly seventy-five years, having been sur- 
vived by his widow for about two years, she 
dying in 1893, having reached the age of 
seventy-five. Both are buried in the city 
cemetery there. They were the parents of five 
children, only two of whom grew to ma- 
turity, three having died in childhood, the 
subject being the oldest in order of birth. He 
remained with his parents until he was about 
twelve years of age, when he came to Ohio 
to live with an uncle who was engaged in 
the smelting business where he remained for 
nearly two years, when he came to Indiana, 
and later returned to Buffalo, New York, 
where he undertook to learn the brass fin- 
ishing business, but he remained at this for 
only about two years, when hard times caused 
the shop to practically close down. The 
subject then went back to Indiana, working 
on a farm in Vanderburg county by the 
month until the war broke out, when he en- 
listed and on August 18, 1862, was mustered 
into service at Indianapolis, Company E. 
Thirty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
under the command of Captain Eslinger. 
The subject was at once sent south and im- 
mediately marched to the front, joining the 
regiment just after the battle of Shiloh. 
From that time on he was in all the engage-' 
ments of his regiment, but was never cap- 
tured or wounded, however, he had many 
"close calls" from both. Some of the prin- 
cipal battles in which he fought in a most 
gallant manner, according to his comrades, 
were: Stone River, Liberty Gap, Chicka- 
mauga. Missionary Ridge. The regiment 
was later sent to Knoxville to re-enforce 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



247 



Burnside, where they remained during the 
winter of 1863 and 1864, having suffered 
greatly from cold weather and exposure, 
and lack of clothing. In the following 
summer the subject took part in every en- 
gagement from Tunnel Hill to Atlanta, 
Georgia, and endured many great hard- 
ships and privations. He was mustered 
out of service at the close of the war, June 
25, 1865, having been honorably discharged. 
Mr. Rapp then returned to Indiana and on 
November 24, 1868, was united in marriage 
with Catherine Frye, in Evansville. She was 
born in Posey county, Indiana, December 24, 
1848, the daughter of Michael and Charlotte 
( Stauff) Frye, both natives of Wurtenburg, 
Germany, where they married. They came 
to the United States about 1840, landing in 
New York, but soon came on to Indiana, set- 
tling in Posey county on a farm in the midst 
of the wilderness where they experienced 
many hardships in clearing the land and de- 
veloping a home for themselves and family. 
They remained there the rest of their lives, 
their home having been in Parker township. 
The mother of Mrs. Rapp died in August, 
1850, at the age of thirty-two years, the 
father having survived several years, later 
remarrying. They were the parents of six 
children, four of whom grew to maturity, 
Mrs. Rapp being the youngest of the number. 
Mr. Frye's death occurred February 16. 
1 86 1, at the age of fifty-one years. He was 
buried in the St. Peter cemetery and his wife 
in the Methodist cemetery of the old Brick 
church, Parker township. Mrs. Rapp re- 
mained at home with her parents until her 



father's death when the home was broken up 
and she went to work out for herself, which 
she continued to do until her marriage with 
the subject. Her education was obtained in 
the German schools of Posey county, but she 
never learned to read or write English, for 
she was not permitted to attend school long 
in those early days. The same was true with 
our subject who attended school for a time 
in Germany before he came to the United 
States. He also went to school a short time 
in Buffalo, New York, learning to read and 
write German, but received only a meagre 
English education. 

When our subject and his wife were mar- 
ried they lived in Evansville, where Mr. Rapp 
worked as a stationary engineer until he 
moved to Illinois in March, 1876, when 
they settled in Richland county, in Denver 
township, near the Clay county line on a 
farm where they lived for about two years, 
when they moved to the place where they 
now live. 

Ten children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Rapp, nine of whom have grown to 
maturity, one having died in childhood. They 
are: George M., Edward Frederick, de- 
ceased ; Michael, deceased ; John Henry, Car- 
oline, Catherine, Daniel W., Margaret, Eve 
Charlotte and Mary E. George M., who mar- 
ried Celia Ruppert, resides on a farm in Den- 
ver township. Catherine is the wife of Wal- 
ter Coffee, residing in Stonington, Christian 
county, Illinois. The other children are all 
single and make their home with their par- 
ents on the farm. 

Mr. Rapp has served on the County Board 



2 4 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



as Supervisor in Denver township for two 
years, and an unexpired term of Township 
Clerk, also served as School Trustee for a 
period of nine years. His son held the office 
of Township Clerk at the time of his death. 
Mr. Rapp has always been a Republican. He 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
Public. Mr. and Mrs. Rapp and some of 
their children are members of the Methodist 
church in Denver township, having long 
taken an active part in church work, the sub- 
ject having been a steward in the church 
for several years, which office he now very 
creditably holds. 



THE SCHWARTZ BROTHERS. 

Eminent business talent is composed of a 
combination of high mental and moral at- 
tributes ; although these are essential, there 
must be sound judgment, breadth of capa- 
city and rapidity of thought, justice and 
firmness, the foresight to perceive the course 
of the drifting tides of business and the 
will and ability to control them. The sub- 
jects of this review afford a striking exem- 
plification of this talent, in a very high order 
of development and of such character as to 
gain them worthy prestige in business cir- 
cles and positions of commanding influence. 

The Schwartz brothers, Joseph and 
Frank, are not only twins but their lives 
and interests have been so closely inter- 
woven, their purposes and ideals so nearly 
identical and their achievements of such 



similar character that the history of one is 
practically the history of both. 

As the name indicates the Schwartz fam- 
ily is of German origin, the subject's father, 
Bernard Schwartz, having been a native of 
Luxemburg, where his ancestors had lived 
for many generations. When a young man 
Bernard Schwartz came to the United 
States and located at Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts, where he worked for some years 
at the tailor's trade and where in due time 
he married Christina Lacroix, who was also 
of German birth. Disposing of his inter- 
ests in Massachusetts in 1855 he moved to 
Salem, Illinois, where he opened a shop and 
conducted a very successful tailoring busi- 
ness for a number of years, the meanwhile 
by judicious investments and careful man- 
agement becoming the possessor of a large 
amount of valuable property in various 
parts of Marion county, and earning the 
reputation of an enterprising and praise- 
worthy citizen. From 1868 until his death 
in the year 1906 Bernard Schwartz lived a 
life of honorable retirement, but kept in 
close touch with business matters, amassed 
considerable wealth and for a number of 
years was classed with the financially solid 
and reliable men of Salem. He was a fine 
type, of the successful German-American, 
possessed to a marked degree of the ster- 
ling qualities for which his nationality is 
distinguished, did much to promote the ma- 
terial interests of his adopted city and his 
death was deeply lamented by all who knew 
him. Bernard and Christina Schwartz 
were earnest and devout Catholics in their 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



249 



religious belief and trained their children in 
the faith of the Holy Mother church, to the 
teaching of which they have been ever true 
and loyal. Their oldest child, a daughter, 
by the name of Flora, is the wife of Mi- 
chael Berens, and lives in Salem ; the twins, 
Frank and Joseph being the next in order of 
birth; Christine died when four years of 
age and Bernard, the youngest of the famv- 
ily, a young man of fine business ability and 
high social standing, departed this life on 
the 1 5th day of January, 1907. Like his 
older brothers, Bernard Schwartz pos- 
sessed much more than ordinary powers of 
mind and had reached an important and in- 
fluential position in the business world, 
when his brilliant and promising career was 
untimely terminated by the stern hand of 
death. He was a graduate of the Salem 
high school with the honors of his class, 
after which he took a pharmaceutical course 
in which he became especially proficient and 
for a number of years served on the State 
Board of Pharmacy, to which position he 
was first appointed by Governor Tanner, 
and later by Governor Yates and had not 
death intervened he doubtless could have 
held the place indefinitely as Governor De- 
neen signified his intention of reappointing 
him a short time prior to his demise. 

Joseph and Frank Schwartz, to a brief re- 
view of whose career the reader's attention 
is here respectfully invited, were born on 
August agth, of the year 1859, in Salem, 
and spent their childhood and youth in their 
native town. As indicated in a preceding 
paragraph their lives having been passed 



under similar circumstances were in most 
respects strikingly similar, nevertheless to a 
better understanding of the purposes and 
ambitions of each it is deemed proper to 
give their early lives separately. 

Joseph Schwartz was reared under ex- 
cellent home influences and during his 
youth received from his parents a thorough 
instruction in the basic principles of moral- 
ity and correct conduct so that while a mere 
lad he became so imbued with these princi- 
ples as to make them a rule by which his sub- 
sequent life should be governed. At the prop- 
er age he entered the public schools of Sa- 
lem and in due time completed the pre- 
scribed course of study graduating from 
the high school with the class of 1877. Ac- 
tuated by a laudable desire for a more thor- 
ough scholastic training he subsequently 
became a student of the State University at 
Champaign, where he prosecuted his studies 
and researches until 1881 when he was 
graduated with an honorable record, im- 
mediately after which he engaged in the 
drug business with his brother Frank, their 
place of business being the store room on 
the site originally occupied by the house in 
which he was born. 

By diligent attention and successful man- 
agement the Schwartz brothers soon built 
up a large and lucrative patronage and it 
was not long until they led the drug busi- 
ness in Salem, their establishment being the 
largest and most popular of the kind not 
only in the city but in the county. From 
the beginning the enterprise prospered be- 
yond their highest expectations and proved 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



the source of an ample income which being 
judiciously invested in due time placed them 
on the high road to fortune. 

Frank Schwartz, like his brother, spent 
his early life pretty much after the manner 
of the majority of town lads but unlike 
many was not permitted to eat of the bread 
of idleness, during the formative period of 
his character when fancy paints with glow- 
ing colors the future and holds out to the 
unwary those pleasures which have no sub- 
stantial foundation and which if identified 
invariably terminate in regret and remorse. 
Under the guidance of his parents he grew 
up to the full stature of well rounded man- 
hood with a proper conception of life and 
its duties and responsibilities and with the 
idea ever paramount that all true success 
and advancement must depend upon con- 
secutive toil and endeavor. After obtaining 
a good practical education in the public 
schools of Salem, he entered at the age of 
sixteen the drug store of D. K. Green & 
Son, where he clerked for a period of four 
years, during which time he devoted his at- 
tention very carefully to the business with 
the object in view of ultimately engaging 
in the trade upon his own responsibility. At 
the expiration of the time indicated he pur- 
chased an interest in the establishment, 
which during the following year was con- 
ducted under the name of Green & 
Schwartz; his brother, Joseph, then bought 
Mr. Green's interest and under the firm 
name of Schwartz Brothers, the business 
grew rapidly in magnitude and importance 
and, as already stated, soon became the 
leading establishment of the kind in Salem, 



and proved to be the source from which no 
small part of their subsequent fortune grew. 
Meanwhile the Schwartz Brothers turned 
their attention to various other lines of 
business becoming largely interested in real 
estate, agriculture and horticulture, which 
with other enterprises of an industrial and 
financial nature paved the way to the high 
position they now hold in business circles, 
and gave them much more than local re- 
pute as capable, judicious and eminently 
honorable business men. Without follow- 
ing in detail the different lines of enterprise 
to which the Schwartz brothers have given 
attention, suffice it to state that all of their 
undertakings have been prosperous and they 
are today not only the leading business men 
of their own city and county, but occupy a 
conspicuous place among the leaders of in- 
dustry in the southern part of the state. In 
1907 they disposed of their drug house, 
since which time they have not been active- 
ly identified with any particular enterprise, 
devoting their attention to their large prop- 
erty interests and other investments, being 
heavy stockholders in the Salem State Bank 
and owning extensive tracts of real estate 
in Marion and other counties, including one 
fruit farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
two and a fourth miles southeast of Salem, 
another consisting of eight hundred acres 
within a reasonable distance of the county 
seat, besides being associated with Mr. 
Rogers in the fruit evaporating business, 
under the firm name of Rogers & Schwartz 
Brothers, they do an immense and far- 
reaching business. They are also mem- 
bers of the real estate firm of Telford & 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



251 



Schwartz, which with loans and insurance, 
constitutes the most successful business of 
the kind in the city. They own the 
Schwartz Block, one of the largest and most 
valuable properties in Salem, and as mem- 
bers of the firm of Rainey & Schwartz, own 
Rainey Lake, also a large pear orchard 
which adds much to their liberal and con- 
stantly growing income. In addition to the 
interests enumerated the Schwartz broth- 
ers have many other valuable holdings in 
both city and country, including the busi- 
ness block occupied by the Sweeney & 
Company's drug stock, a large lot at the 
rear of the State Bank, also quite a num- 
ber of private dwellings in various parts of 
the town to say nothing of a vast amount of 
valuable personal property and bank ac- 
counts, comparing favorably in bulk with 
those of any other depositor in the county. 

Under the name of Schwartz Brothers, 
by which the firm has always been known, 
Joseph and Frank Schwartz have filled a 
prominent place in the business affairs of 
Salem and Marion county, and from the be- 
ginning their careers present a series of 
continued successes which have placed them 
among the most progressive men of their 
day and generation in southern Illinois and 
earned them state wide reputation in busi- 
ness and financial circles. 

They are politicians of the Democratic 
school and alive to all that concerns the 
best interest of their party. Religiously they 
are loyal to the tenets of the Roman Catho- 
lic church in which they were reared and 
for which they have the most profound love 



and regard contributing liberally to its ma-, 
terial support and by their daily lives ex- 
emplifying the beauty and value of the 
principles and doctrines upon which it is 
based. 

Joseph Schwartz was married in the year 
1886 to Clara Rose, of Salem, daughter of 
Gordon Rose, an engineer on the Baltimore 
& Ohio road, and a most excellent and 
praiseworthy citizen. The pledges of this 
union are two bright and interesting daugh- 
ters, namely : Helen, born in 1893, and Chris- 
tine, whose birth occurred in the year 1905. 
The domestic life of Frank Schwartz dates 
from the 8th day of July, 1896, at which 
time he was united in the holy bonds of 
wedlock at Indianapolis, Indiana, with An- 
nie Trimpe, of that city, a union terminated 
by the death of the wife on Thanksgiving 
day, 1903, after bearing her husband two 
children, Mattie Christine and Emma Ger- 
trude, born in 1897 and 1901, respectively. 
On September 19, 1907, Mr. Schwartz 
chose a second wife and companion in the 
person of Mrs. Fannie Simpson, of Salem, 
a lady of many estimable qualities, who 
presides over his household with grace and 
dignity and who is deeply concerned in all 
of his undertakings making his interests her 
own and contributing not a little to his suc- 
cess. Fraternally Joseph Schwartz is iden- 
tified with the ancient and honorable Ma- 
sonic brotherhood and also holds member- 
ship with the Orders of Woodmen and Ben 
Hur, in all of which he is an active and in- 
fluential worker, which may also be record- 
ed of his brother, Frank. 



252 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



HON. HARVEY W. SHRINER. 

Mr. Shriner stands admittedly among the 
leaders of the legal profession in Southern 
Illinois, where he has long been practicing 
in all the courts, often handling some of 
the most important cases on the various 
dockets. Being courteous, genial, well in- 
formed, alert and enterprising, he is rec- 
ognized as one of the representative men of 
Clay county a man who is a power in his 
community. 

Harvey W. Shriner was born in Vinton 
county, Ohio, October 25, 1861, the son of 
Silas Shriner, also a native of Ohio. He 
was a farmer and came to Clay county, Il- 
linois, in October, 1864, remaining here un- 
til his death in June, 1906. His grand- 
father was Francis Shriner, a native of 
Pennsylvania, who afterward removed to 
Ohio. He also devoted his life to agricul- 
tural pursuits. The subject's mother was 
Susan Luse, whose people were from Ohio. 
She is living in Flora, and is a woman of 
gracious personality. Six children were 
born to the subject's parents, five of whom 
are living. They are : Ibbie. deceased ; 
Mrs. Louisa Frame, of Chicago; Harvey 
W., the subject; Albert G.. of Springfield, 
Illinois ; Mrs. Ida McGregor, of Flora : 
Pearl V., who is living on the old home 
farm, five miles northeast of Flora. 

Mr. Shriner received his primary educa- 
tion in the Flora public schools, and then 
attended business college at Carmi, Illinois. 
Then he attended the National University 



at Lebanon, Ohio, making a splendid rec- 
ord for scholarship. He taught school for 
six winters in Clay county. He made his 
way through school. Believing that the 
legal profession was best suited to his tastes, 
he began the study of law and was admitted 
to the bar in February, 1887. In June fol- 
lowing he formed a partnership with D. C. 
Hagle, a prominent lawyer. This partner- 
ship proved' to be a very strong one and 
lasted up to the death of Mr. Hagle in 
1897, since which time the subject has been 
practicing alone. He was successful from 
the first and his practice has steadily in- 
creased until he Is now a very busy man. He 
has a well equipped law library, which is 
kept stocked with the latest legal books and 
decisions. He was elected State's Attorney 
of Clay county, in 1888, on the Republican 
ticket. And he was re-elected in 1872 and 
in 1892, having faithfully performed the 
duties of this office. He was again elected 
in 1896. He has been a member of the 
Board of Education for several terms and 
also Supervisor of his township. In 1904 
Mr. Shriner made the race and was tri- 
umphantly elected to the Legislature, serv- 
ing one term in a manner that proved the 
wisdom of his constituents in selecting him 
for their representative. He voted for and 
was one of the original advocates of local 
option. A conclusive proof of his popular- 
ity is the fact that he ran ahead of his ticket 
when elected to the Legislature. 

In November, 1905, Mr. Shriner was ap- 
pointed Deputy Revenue Collector for Di- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



253 



vision No. 4, of the Thirteenth District of 
Illinois, which he has very creditably held 
to the present time. 

Mr. Shriner was happily married in Sep- 
tember, ; 1885, to Emma Critchlow, of 
Louisville, Clay county, the representative 
of an influential family of that place. To 
this union three sons were born: Austin D., 
Carlton C. and Silas. Mrs. Shriner was 
called to her rest in January, 1896. After- 
wards the subject was married again, his 
last wife being Frances Higginson, of 
Flora, and to this union one winsome 
daughter, Mabel, has been born. 

Mr. Shriner owns a valuable and well 
improved farm in Standford township, this 
county, five miles northeast of Flora, in 
which he takes much interest. He is a good 
judge of stock, and some good breeds may 
be found on his place. Fraternally he be- 
longs to the Masons and the Woodmen. 

Mr. Shriner takes an abiding interest in 
local affairs and labors for the welfare of 
the county, looking beyond the exigencies 
of the moment to the possibilities of the fu- 
ture, working not alone for what will bene- 
fit his fellow citizens today, but also for 
what will be of advantage at a later time. 
He is a man of distinct and forceful in- 
dividuality, as is evidenced by the fact that 
he started out in life on his own account, 
without money or influential friends to aid 
him. He looked at life, however, from a 
practical standpoint and placed his de- 
pendence upon elements that are sure win- 
ners in the race for success persistent pur- 
pose, indefatigable industry and unabating- 
energy. 



WILLIAM H. FARTHING. 

The subject has long been recognized as 
one of Marion county's foremost business 
men, holding high rank among the finan- 
ciers of the community in which he lives and 
whose interests he has ever had at heart and 
which he has ever striven to promote in 
whatever laudable manner that presented it- 
self. The life of Mr. Farthing has been led 
along high planes and has been true to 
every trust that has been reposed in him. 

William H. Farthing, the well known 
banker of Odin, Marion county, Illinois, 
was born in Odin, February 2, 1869, and 
not being lured away by the wanderlust 
that caused so many of his contemporaries 
to leave the old hearth stone he has pre- 
ferred to live here. He is the son of 
George and Susan (Michaels) Farthing, 
natives of the state of Mississippi, 
Grandfather Farthing was from Kentucky, 
having come to Marion county, Illinois, in 
the fifties and settled in this vicinity where 
he worked a farm, and where he spent the 
remainder of his days having died in the 
seventies. Both he and his wife were Bap- 
tists. They were the parents of five chil- 
dren. 

The father of our subject was born in 
Logan county, Kentucky, and received his 
education in the Blue Grass state. He de- 
voted his life to farming and railroading, 
and was about sixty years old at the time 
of his death. He left a widow and six 
children. The subject's mother is living at 
the age of fifty-three. Our subject was the 
second child in order of birth. He received 



254 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



his education in the public schools of Odin, 
but was obliged to leave school at the age 
of twelve years, when he commenced clerk- 
ing in a store in which he continued for ten 
years, in the meantime developing into an 
excellent salesman. Being economical, he 
was enabled at the end of that time to pur- 
chase one-half interest in the store from his 
savings. He continued in this store for an- 
other period of ten years, during which time 
the trade of the firm rapidly increasd, cus- 
tomers coming from all parts of the county, 
because of the reputation of the firm for 
fairness and courteous treatment had ex- 
tended to all localities roundabout. Mr. 
Farthing finally sold his interest in the store. 
He then handled real estate and other lines 
for two years with gratifying success. Then 
he purchased the bank at Odin, which had 
been started some time previous. Under 
Mr. Farthing's management it was soon 
placed on an excellent basis and it was pat- 
ronized by the local people and by the farm- 
ers in that locality, for Mr. Farthing's name 
gave the bank a sound prestige, for every- 
one knew that their funds would be entirely 
safe entrusted to him, owing to his natural 
ability as a financier and his reputation for 
honesty in all his business dealings. The 
bank is still under his management, he be- 
ing the sole owner. This bank was first 
opened for business in May, 1905. 

Our subject was first married on Novem- 
ber 15, 1893, to Effie Sugg, a native of 
Odin. Four children were born to this 
union, one of whom is living, Ira J. F., 
whose date of birth occurred August 17, 



1898. The subject's first wife was called to 
her rest April 12, 1901, and Mr. Farthing 
was again married on September 12, 1906, 
to Ida A. Kell, of this county, the daugh- 
ter of James and Martha (McWham) Kell, 
natives of this county. Joseph McWham 
is paymaster at the present time in the 
United States Army. The grandfather, 
Robert McWham, was a soldier in the Civil 
war in the One Hundred and Fifty-Third 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in which he 
served about two years and was honorably 
discharged at the close of the war. Our 
subject has one child by his last wife, Mar- 
tha, who was born September 7, 1907. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Farthing is 
a member of the Masonic Blue lodge, the 
Chapter, the Knights Templar, also the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and the 
Woodmen and Eastern Star. He has 
passed all the chairs in the Blue lodge and 
the Odd Fellows. He has been a delegate 
to the grand lodge of the state of Illinois. 
Mrs. Farthing is a member of the Presby- 
terian church. Mr. Farthing is a Demo- 
crat in his political relations and has al- 
ways been interested in his party's welfare, 
giving his time and influence to the work of 
his party in the county. He was elected 
and served in a most creditable manner as 
City Clerk, Alderman and was also presi- 
dent of the Town Board and is at this writ- 
ing Treasurer of the city of Odin. He has 
long been noted throughout the county for 
his honesty, integrity and fair dealing, and 
his interest in all movements tending to pro- 
mote the county's welfare in any manner 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



255 



possible, and as a result of his sterling worth 
his integrity and his pleasing manner, he is 
held in high regard by all classes and has 
hosts of friends. 



JOHN J. FYKE, M. D. 

One of the representative members of the 
medical fraternity in Marion county is the 
subject of this sketch, who is engaged in 
practice in Odin, and who holds high rank 
in his profession, while his ability and cour- 
tesy have won him the confidence and es- 
teem of all who know him. 

Dr. Fyke is a successful, self-made man. 
Peculiar honor attaches to that individual, 
who, beginning the great struggle of life 
alone and unaided, gradually overcomes un- 
favorable environment, gaining at last the 
g'oal of success by the force of his own in- 
dividuality. Such is the record, briefly 
stated, of this popular citizen of Odin, Il- 
linois, to a synopsis of whose life and char- 
acter the following paragraphs are devoted. 

Dr. John J. Fyke was bom in Marion 
county in 1842, the son of Joshua A. and 
Margaret (Wilson) Fyke, the latter being 
the first female white child born in the coun- 
ty, a distinction of which anyone might be 
justly proud. The date of her birth was in 
1822, and in 1908 she is still living, being 
in possession of her full faculties. It is in- 
teresting to hear her tell of the great 
development she has seen here since the 
early pioneer days wonderful, indeed, the 



most wonderful progress in the history of 
the world, having been made during the 
lapse of her long life. Her people came to 
Illinois from North Carolina, in 1818, and 
settled among the earliest pioneers in this 
locality. They took up government land, 
and developed excellent farms. Her parents 
reared their children here and died here at 
advanced ages. There were three boys and 
three girls in this family. Grandfather 
Fyke was reared in North Carolina and 
moved to Tennessee, where he spent the 
balance of his days. 

The father of the subject was born in 
1812, an historic year in our national his- 
tory. His father was a farmer and lived to 
an advanced age, having reared a large fam- 
ily. His wife also lived to be very old. The 
father of our subject came to this county in 
1839. His early educational advantages 
were limited, but he was a great reader and 
finally became well informed. He was a 
Methodist and an exhorter. He made polit- 
ical speeches, and was a loyal Democrat. 
He was Justice of the Peace for thirty 
years. His family consisted of twelve chil- 
dren, five boys and one girl having lived to 
maturity. Two brothers of the subject liv- 
ing in Kansas City, Missouri, are practicing 
attorneys. 

The early education of the subject of this 
sketch was obtained in the common schools 
of this county and one year in McKendree 
College, Lebanon, Illinois. He then com- 
menced reading medicine under the direc- 
tion of Doctor Davenport, of Salem, where 
he continued for three years, making a 



2 5 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



splendid record for scholarship. During 
this time he attended medical college, part 
of the time at Chicago and the balance at 
St. Louis, making splendid records at both 
places. He commenced practice in 1866, 
having located in Odin, where he has con- 
tinued practice ever since. He was success- 
ful from the start and his patients are now 
so numerous that he can hardly find time to 
do anything outside of his regular work. 

Doctor Fyke was united in marriage in 
1867 to Minerva Phillipps, a native of Ten- 
nessee, the daughter of Thomas and Eliza 
(Chadwell) Phillipps. They were natives of 
Tennessee, having moved to Marion county, 
Illinois, in 1855. They settled on a farm 
here where they spent the remainder of 
their lives and where they died, both having 
lived to an old age, having reared a family 
of eight children. 

Three children, all boys, have been born 
to our subject and wife, namely: Edgar E., 
who was born in 1868, who is now a prac- 
ticing physician, and the father of three 
children, all girls. The second and third 
children of Dr. Fyke and wife were twins, 
Thomas Emmett and Josiah Harley, who 
were born in 1872. They are both living 
on a farm near Odin. 

Our subject in his fraternal relations is a 
Mason, having passed all the chairs in the 
local lodge. He is a trustee of the Metho- 
dist church, of which both he and his wife 
are faithful members and liberal supporters. 
The doctor is a loyal Democrat. He is a 
member and president of the pension board. 
Dr. Fyke is one of the well known men in 



Marion county, where his long and success- 
ful career has been spent, and has a pleas- 
ant and well furnished home in Odin. 



CHARLES C. SANDERS. 

The subject has seen the development of 
Marion county from an obscure wild prairie 
district to one of the leading counties- of 
the state, and he has done his full share in 
promoting the industrial and civic affairs of 
the county, ranking today among her best 
known and most highly honored citizens. 

Charles C. Sanders was born in Centralia 
township, Marion county, December 21, 
1848, the son of Robert and Nancy (Cop- 
pie) Sanders, both natives of Indiana. The 
father came to this county a single man in 
an early day and married here. He was al- 
ways a farmer and blacksmith, having 
bought a farm in Centralia township which 
he sold and went to Missouri, where he re- 
mained a short time, then came back to 
Centralia township and bought another 
farm on which he lived until his death in 
1855. His wife died in 1854. They were 
the parents of six children, namely: Cath- 
erine, deceased; Charles C., our subject; 
John, deceased; Samuel, Robert and the 
youngest child was a boy. The subject's 
parents died when he was small and he went 
to live with John Thomas for three years in 
Centralia township, also three years with 
John McClelland, who was his guardian 
until 1865. 

When seventeen years old our subject 



RICH LAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



257 



went to enlist in the Union army as a sub- 
stitute, but his uncle prevented him from en- 
listing. He then went to work out at 
different places, until he was nineteen years 
old. On December 28, 1867, he married 
Martha Jane Hudlow, who was born De- 
cember ii, 1849, m Jefferson county, Illi- 
nois, the daughter of James and Roxanna 
(Hildibiddle) Hudlow. James Hudlow 
died in 1849. His widow then married 
Alexander Garren; her third husband was 
John Sprouse, and her fourth husband was 
George Birge. She died in 1898. Mrs. San- 
ders had one sister who married Thomas 
Groves. She lived in Indiana. 

After his marriage the subject lived on 
his father!s place for a time, then he traded 
for his present farm in section 25, Centralia 
township, where he has one hundred and 
twenty acres. It had only a few improve- 
ments on it when he took charge, but being 
a hard worker he developed a good home 
and a fine farm, about half of the place now 
being cleared, on which highly productive 
land he raises corn, hay, apples, peaches, 
pears and much small fruit, and he also 
raises some good horses, hogs and cattle, 
and carries on a general farming business 
with great success, being a good manager. 
He has always been a farmer, but he found 
time to operate a threshing machine for 
twenty-seven years and did a thriving busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Sanders is a Democrat and he has 
held minor offices, having served on the 
school board. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. 



The subject and wife are the parents of 
six children, namely: Robert C., a farmer 
in Clinton county, this state, married Addie 
J. Cameron and they have five children, 
namely : Fred, Dwight, Claude, Melinda and 
Menzo. Mary Etta, the second child of the 
subject, married Elmer Satterfield, of Rac- 
coon township, and they have the following 
children : Frank, Bert, Clara, James, Sarah 
and Ottie. Nancy, the subject's third child, 
married Edgar Morrison, lives at Odin, Il- 
linois, and has three children, Jessie, Charlie 
and Mary. Lillie, who married George 
Day, lives at Odin, Illinois, and has one 
daughter, Pearl ; Edgar is a farmer in Rac- 
coon township, this county, who married 
Delle Martin, and they have two children, 
Ruby and Floyd; Dicey May is living at 
home. 

Our subject is a well known man in this 
county where he has many friends and bears 
an exemplary reputation. 



DANIEL C. GENOWAY. 

The people of Denver township, Rich- 
land county, Illinois, point to Daniel C. 
Genoway as one of their most valued citi- 
zens, admiring him for his high moral 
character, for his life among them for more 
than a half century may well be likened 
unto an open book. That they place implicit 
confidence in him is evidenced by the fact 
that they have elected him to several town- 
ship offices, the duties of which he dis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



charged with credit. He made his advent 
into the world in the pioneer days, and 
spent his boyhood days upon the farm. 

Mr. Genoway was born in Clermont 
county, Ohio, September 7, 1831, and in 
his early "teens" left the farm to become an 
apprentice to a carpenter. He also learned 
the cooper's trade, but did not work at it 
for a great length of time. The father of 
the subject was Joseph Genoway. His 
mother's maiden name was Rebecca Crum- 
baugh, born in Ohio in 1799. The paternal 
grandfather of the subject, Joseph. Geno- 
way. came from his native France, as one 
of General LaFayette's soldiers to aid the 
America colonists in the Revolutionary 
war. Liking the country, he remained here 
becoming a citizen of the young republic, 
and finally settling in Connecticut. Mr. 
Genoway's maternal grandfather. Jacob 
Crumbaugh, emigrated from Germany to 
this country, settling in Kentucky, and a 
few years later was married to Mary Baker, 
of Maryland, whose ancestors were from 
Germany. 

The subject came to what is now Denver 
township, Richland county, in 1855, and 
worked industriously at his trade, building 
many dwellings and bams. He and Philip 
Heltman, well known in this locality, were 
engaged in building a barn in Jasper county 
during the days of the Civil war, when a 
recruiting officer happened to pass, and de- 
scending from the roof Mr. Heltman en- 
listed on the spot. Mr. Genoway was mar- 
ried to Ruth McGuire in January, 1861. 
Their children were Charles Vanlanding- 



ham, bom October 27, 1862; Peter Elmer, 
born February n, 1865. The first named 
was educated for the medical profession, 
and after some local practice being anxious 
to advance, studied medicine in New York 
City, Vienna, Austria and Rome. He is 
now an eminent physician in Spokane, 
Washington. He has a wife and three chil- 
dren. Peter Elmer was educated at Olney, 
and is now a professional teacher. He 
holds a high official position in the Ben Hur 
fraternity. He married Miss Eva McLain, 
and has two children. Some time after the 
birth of these children the wife of the sub- 
ject died, and on March 7, 1869, he es- 
poused Martha Washburn. His second 
wife was born in Denver township, Febru- 
ary 22, 1851, and was the daughter of Hen- 
ry and Eleanor (Gard) Washburn. Her pa- 
ternal grandparents were Willis and Nan- 
cy (Allender) Washburn, born respective- 
ly in 1799 and 1801. Her uncle, Joseph 
Washburn, was a soldier in Wilders' fa- 
mous brigade, as was her uncle, James 
Washburn. who died in the army hospital 
at New Albany, Indiana. Her ancestors 
were generally members of the Baptist 
faith. The subject and his wife had six chil- 
dren : Harry E. was born February 9, 1870. 
He has traveled extensively, but is now at 
home with his parents ; Rebecca E., born 
November n, 1871, died the same year; 
John H., born March 5, 1873, married to 
Florence Watts in 1894, and lives near Fred- 
ricktown, Missouri, being a miner: Lemuel 
T., born September 6, 1874. served in the 
Spanish war and died October 19, 1904; 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



Lillie M., born February 2, 1877, now the 
wife of Clifton O. Walker, of Piatt county, 
with three children, Fern, Martha and Del- 
bert; George Andrew Louis, born Novem- 
ber 7, 1883, married December 24, 1905, to 
Bertha Cook, was in the regular army as 
telegrapher in Alaska for three years, and 
received from the government one hundred 
and sixty acres of land near Wendt, South 
Dakota, where he is now operator and ex- 
press agent, and where he owns in addition 
to government land a tract of equal size 
which he purchased. 

The father of the wife of the subject, 
Henry R. Washburn, is still an active man 
at the age of eighty-three years, and lives 
in Piatt county, Illinois. He was twice 
married and the fruit of each union was 
nine children. When he first came to Il- 
linois he worked for fifty cents a day, and 
through his own efforts acquired a farm of 
two hundred acres. Mr. and Mrs. Geno- 
way are known as very charitable people, 
and they are now raising two little girls, 
who were left homeless, Frances Steward 
and Cora Cagel. The former was taken into 
the home when eleven years old, and the 
latter when two years old. 



FRANK BRADFORD. 

The subject of this review enjoyed dis- 
tinctive prestige among the enterprising 
men of Marion county, having fought his 
way onward and upward to a prominent 



position in industrial circles and in every 
relation of life his voice and influence were 
on the side of right as he saw and under- 
stood the right. He was always interested 
in every enterprise for the general welfare 
of the community and liberally supported 
every movement calculated to benefit his fel- 
low men; and although the last chapter in 
his life drama has been brought to a close 
and he has been called to a higher sphere 
of action, his influence is still felt for good 
in his community and he is greatly missed 
by hosts of friends and acquaintances. 

Frank Bradford was born in Weymouth, 
Medina county, Ohio, August 10, 1852, 
where he spent his boyhood days and at- 
tended the common schools. About 1865 he 
came with his father, George Bradford, and 
family to Flora, Illinois, where the father 
conducted the old Buckeye House and where 
Frank engaged successfully in farming and 
trading until 1879, in which year he was 
happily married to Mary E. Hull, the only 
daughter of the late Erasmus Hull, and to 
this union a son and a daughter were born, 
the former having died in infancy ; the latter 
is now Mrs. Roland C. Brinkerhoff. Of 
Mr. Bradford's own family but two sisters 
survive in 1908, namely: Mrs. Minnie 
Bettis, of Arkansas, and Rose Lebus, of 
Ardmore, Oklahoma. Mrs. Bradford, a 
woman of many fine traits, is living in Salem 
in the cozy, substantial and well furnished 
Bradford residence. Frank Bradford was 
a descendant of the ninth generation of 
Gen. William Bradford, of Revolutionary 
fame. George Bradford, father of our sub- 



200 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



ject, was born in Rowley, Essex county, 
Massachusetts, and he was called to his rest 
while living in Arkansas. The mother of 
the subject was known in her maidenhood 
as Abalinda Russell, who was born in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, April 10, 1823, and she 
was called to her reward while living in 
Flora, Illinois, February 27, 1872, at the 
age of forty-eight years. The subject's 
parents were of the best blood and reputa- 
tion and were much admired in whatever 
community they lived for their honest and 
hard-working lives. 

When but a mere lad Mr. Bradford united 
vvith the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Flora, Illinois. He was received into the 
Methodist church in Salem by letter on De- 
cember 12, 1879, under the pastorate of Rev. 
Fred L. Thompson and he remained in that 
faith, an ardent supporter of the church un- 
til his death. 

Soon after his marriage, Mr. Bradford 
located in Salem and entered upon a long 
and honorable business career of which all 
speak with words of praise. Being of a 
jolly disposition and having a kind word 
for everyone, he commanded, perhaps, the 
largest patronage of any single salesman in 
the community. His scrupulously honest 
methods and his natural ability also at- 
tracted scores of customers. He first en- 
tered the mercantile establishment of Hull 
and Morris. In 1880, Mr. Hull having 
purchased the interest of Mr. Morris and 
also the interest of Scott Muggy in the firm 
of Atkin & Muggy, the two stocks were 
combined under the firm name of Hull & 



Atkin, and Mr. Bradford took a position 
with this firm which soon became E. Hull 
& Son, . changing later to the Hull Dry 
Goods Company and then to C. E. Hull. 
Mr. Bradford remained through all these 
changes, having been regarded as indispens- 
able to the firm's business, until he went as 
manager for the firm to Kinmundy, where 
he remained for a short time building up the 
trade in a very substantial way, and later 
he was manager for Hammond & Hull in 
Salem. While conducting the latter busi- 
ness Mr. Bradford suffered an attack of ner- 
vous prostration and was very sick for a 
time. Both for recreation and as a means, 
of regaining his health he began managing 
his farm, spending only an occasional day 
in the store; but improvement was not so 
rapid as was expected for the long and 
strenuous life in the commercial world had 
undermined his health so extensively that 
rapid improvement and even recuperation 
could not be expected, consequently on Wed- 
nesday night, February 6, 1907, when he 
was planning to attend a meeting of the 
Pythian Sisters in company with his wife, 
about 5 130 o'clock in the afternoon, he was 
seized with an attack of apoplexy while at 
his home. This soon developed into paraly- 
sis of the left side which soon became com- 
plete. He remained in an unconscious state 
until 6 150 the following morning, when the 
white winged messenger came. The funeral 
services were conducted at the residence 
Saturday afternoon following, by Rev. J. 
G. Tucker, of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and interment was made in the 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



26l 



family lot in East Lawn Cemetery. The 
floral offerings were beautiful and elaborate 
from the many friends of the deceased and 
also from the Knights of Pythias and Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows lodges, the 
Pythian Sisters and the Rebekahs, of which 
orders either he or Mrs. Bradford had been 
consistent members. And the great throng 
of sorrowing friends and acquaintances that 
came to pay a last tribute to their much 
loved friend attested as fully as was possible 
the love and high esteem in which Mr. 
Bradford was held by every one who knew 
him. Public-spirited and liberal he was 
ever in the forefront of all plans for im- 
provement and the betterment of Salem and 
his sudden calling away was a distinct loss 
to the entire community, for his life had 
been industrious, scrupulously honest and 
kind. 



JAMES HARVEY DELZELL. 

James H. Delzell is justly proud of the 
fact that his ancestors were among those 
hardy pioneers who endured with great for- 
titude the numerous perils and hardships 
that beset men and women who sought 
homes in the wilderness of the new republic 
in its earlier days. Mr. Delzell is one of 
the striking figures in Denver township, 
Richlancl county, Illinois, not only from a 
physical, but a mental standpoint. He is a 
man who has seen much of the world, and 
has kept in touch with human events. He 
ranks among the heaviest land owners in 



the township, and such possessions as he 
holds he has accumulated through the prac- 
tice of honest and straightforward business 
methods. 

The subject is the son of John N. Delzell, 
and was bom in Tennessee August 13, 
1845. His father, who was born December 
29, 1818, in Blount county, died December 
12, 1903. He was educated in a college at 
Marysville, Tennessee, and after leaving 
that institution became a teacher, and later 
engaged in mercantile business. He re- 
moved to Denver township in 1861 with 
his family and team, and with eighty-four 
dollars in his pocket. Through his indus- 
try he eventually accumulated farm land 
amounting to four hundred acres, a large 
portion of which he cleared for cultivation. 
The grandfather of the subject. Robert Del- 
zell, came to Denver township in 1853, and 
died there. He was born about 1788, and 
was a soldier in the War of 1812. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Dorcas Da- 
vis, was of Scotch ancestry, and her father 
served as a soldier during the Revolution- 
ary war. The subject had five brothers and 
two sisters. Daniel, bom July 5, 1847. was 
educated for the ministry, while John, 
whose birth occurred September 9, 1849, 
became a teacher, and was for many years 
Clerk of Olney, Illinois. Both of these 
brothers were educated at McKendree Col- 
lege, Lebanon, Illinois, and both are now 
dead. William H. was born April 27, 1852, 
and is now a resident of Wichita, Kansas, 
having retired from active life. Charles 
was born October 27. 1855, and died in 



262 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



early manhood. The birth of Alice (Del- 
zell) Adams occurred February 28, 1858, 
while Laura (Delzell) Mitchell was born No- 
vember 24, 1860. The date of George's 
birth was August 24, 1868, ad he lives at 
Newton, Illinois. 

The subject married Martha Lowe March 
24, 1868, and their children were D. W. 
and Mrs. Ora (Delzell) Hoel. The former 
was married to Teressa Tippett, and they 
have six children, Mattie, Howard, Grace, 
lister, Edna and Mabel. Mrs. Hoel, daugh- 
ter of the subject, is the mother of three 
children. The subject has been married 
four times, his second wife having been 
Emma Monroe, his third Nancy Adeline 
Hardin. His present wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary Jackson, was born Novem- 
ber 22, 1854, and married May 10, 1877. 
Their children are: John, born March i, 
1 88 1, a merchant at Palestine, Illinois; Mrs. 
Sadie Dauwalder, born November 27, 1882; 
Mrs. Dora Seessengood, born July 26, 
1884; Elsie, born September 21, 1888; Ed- 
ward, born October 26, 1890; Myrtle, born 
May 6, 1893; Raymond, October 31, 1895. 

The father of Mrs. Delzell, Cornelius 
Jackson, died April i, 1894, aged sixty 
years. The subject of this sketch is the 
owner of two hundred and twenty acres of 
well improved land, and has been one of 
the most active agriculturists in this com- 
munity, combining the cultivation of the 
soil with stock raising and shipping. The 
family of which he is a member has al- 
ways preserved an honorable name, and is 
highly esteemed in this county. Mr. Delzell 



was made a Mason in 1866. He has strong 
religious convictions, and is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church of long 
standing. 



JOHN E. MARTIN. 

John E. Martin has spent his entire life 
in Salem, Illinois, having been born here 
December 24, 1857, the son of Gen. James 
S. Martin. His mother was known in her 
maidenhood as Jane Elston, of English 
ancestry. The parents of the subject were 
married in Salem. To them were born seven 
children, three of whom are living, namely : 
John E., our subject; Luther, living in 
Salem; and Mrs. Grace M. Webster, also of 
Salem. They all received the most care- 
ful training possible by their parents and 
were given good common school educations. 
The subject's father, whose life history is 
given in detail on another page of this 
work, passed away in 1907, after a long and 
busy career, and the mother of the subject, 
who was a woman of beautiful attributes, 
was called home in 1889. 

John E. Martin, our subject, spent his 
boyhood in Salem, where he attended the 
common schools, making a splendid record 
in the same. He later attended the Claverack 
(New York) Military School, and a 
private school at Kennett Square, Penn- 
sylvania, which was later moved to Media, 
that state. He also went to school at Boon- 
ville, Missouri, to the Kemper Family 
school. In both of the latter he made rapid 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



progress and came out well fitted for life's 
duties. After leaving school Mr. Martin 
launched in the dry goods business in Salem 
in which he continued with marked success 
attending his efforts for a number of years, 
finally moving his store to Sandoval, Illi- 
nois, where he also remained for several 
years, building up an excellent trade by rea- 
son of his minute knowledge of this line 
of business and his courteous treatment of 
customers, always giving them value re- 
ceived. In 1888 our subject assisted his 
father, who was State Chairman of the Re- 
publican State Committee, in the clerical 
work, and after the campaign he accepted 
a position with J. B. Farwell Company at 
Chicago, as salesman, and he remained with 
this firm for five or six years, giving entire 
satisfaction in his work. He came back to 
Salem about 1890 for the purpose of ac- 
cepting a position with the Salem Na- 
tional Bank which he has been connected 
with since that time, giving the managers 
of this institution entire satisfaction and 
handling his position in such a way as to 
increase the prestige of the bank and reflect 
much credit upon his innate ability. He 
has prospered by reason of his executive 
ability and modern business methods until 
he has accumulated considerable property, 
owning at this time valuable farming lands. 
He is also a stockholder in the Salem Na- 
tional Bank. 

Mr. Martin's domestic life dates from 
June 1 8, 1894, when he was united in mar- 
riage with Clara Merritt, the accomplished 
daughter of Hon. T. E. Merritt, an old and 
respected family of Salem. This union has 



been blessed by the birth of five children, 
two of whom are living and three deceased. 
Their names are: The first child died in 
infancy, unnamed ; James Stewart and Mar- 
garet Merritt, twins, are both deceased; 
Merritt Elston and Alice Jane are living, 
both bright and interesting children. 

Mr. Martin takes a great interest in 
church work, being a member of the Episco- 
pal church, to which his wife also belongs. 
He has been interested in helping build the 
new church on West Union street, which is 
one of the most attractive and subtsantial 
little churches in Salem. In politics Mr. 
Martin is a loyal Republican, always ready 
to lend a helping hand to promote the in- 
terests of his community whether along po- 
litical, educational, moral or religious lines. 
The home of the subject is nicely furnished, 
and presided over with rare grace and 
dignity by Mrs. Martin, who is often host- 
ess to numerous friends of this popular 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Martin are pleasant 
people to meet, always courteous and kind. 



AARON BUGHER FARQUHAR. 

Another of the representative farmers of 
Richlancl county is the subject of this sketch, 
who is the owner of a fine landed estate in 
sections 22 and 23, Denver township, and is 
carrying on the various departments of his 
enterprise with that discretion and diligence 
that insures success. 

Aaron B. Farquhar was torn in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1841, the 
son of William and Sarah (Moss) Farquhar. 



264 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



They were both natives of Washington coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, and were married in Fay- 
ette county, that state, living on a farm 
there the remainder of their lives, the father 
dying January 26, 1856, at the age of fifty- 
five years ; his wife survived him many years, 
dying about 1898, at the advanced age of 
eighty-five and was buried in Red Stone 
cemetery, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, 
while the remains of her husband rest in the 
Quaker- cemetery, near Fayette City, Penn- 
sylvania. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, five of whom grew to maturity, one 
dying in childhood, the subject of this sketch 
being the youngest in order of birth. 

Aaron B. Farquhar remained at home on 
the farm and attended the free schools there 
until about eighteen years of age, his father 
having died when he was about fifteen years 
of age, he remained on the place with his 
mother for three years after his father's 
death. In 1860 the subject came by rail to 
Illinois where he worked on a farm by the 
month in Knox county, near Galesburg. He 
left Knox county in 1861, returning to Penn- 
sylvania and began the study of dentistry and 
began practicing the same in Knox county, 
Illinois, in 1861, to which place he had re- 
turned from Pennsylvania. He was very 
successful in his practice and he remained in 
Knox county until 1862. In May of that 
year he went to California, where he prac- 
ticed his profession part of the time, also 
did some gold mining while there. In Octo- 
ber, 1863, he returned to his old home in 
Pennsylvania, where he remained that win- 
ter and on March 24, 1864. gave way to his 



patriotic feeling and enlisted his services in 
defense of his country, in Company H, Eight- 
eenth United States Infantry, under Cap- 
tain Mills, in which he served until October, 
1866, when he was transferred to Company 
C, Second Battalion, where he remained un- 
til he was mustered out of service, March 
24, 1867, at Fort Philip Kearney. Dakota. 
This was at the place of the Sioux Indian 
massacre, December 21, 1866. Eighty- four 
men were sent out to protect a wood train 
from the Indians and not a man returned 
alive, all having been killed and scalped, 
by the Indians, and had it not been that the 
subject was on guard duty at that time he 
would have been with the unfortunate sol- 
diers that fell a prey to the Sioux. During 
the Civil war Mr. Farquhar served gallantly 
in the battles of Resaca, Buzzard's Roost, 
Missionary Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Chickamauga and many others, comprising 
ten principal battles, from Missionary 
Ridge to Jonesboro, Georgia. He returned ' 
to Lookout Mountain and did picket duty 
during the winter of 1864. In March, 1865, 
he was detailed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
where he did recruiting service. He was 
also at Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and Chicago, on 
the same mission. In April, 1866, he again 
joined the regiment and moved to the Da- 
kotas, where he remained until mustered out. 
He returned to Pennsylvania where he re- 
mained one year after he had been mustered 
out, enjoying a rest after the many hard- 
ships of an army career. 

Mr. Farquhar then came to Illinois, first 
settling near Galesburg, where he had for- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



merly lived. He remained there for one year, 
then moved to Richland county and pur- 
chased the farm which he now owns in Den- 
ver township, consisting of two hundred and 
forty acres in this township and thirty-two 
acres just across the border in Noble town- 
ship. It was on February 14, 1870, that the 
subject came to this county, paying as high 
as twenty-five dollars per acre for some of 
this land. He has an excellent farm which 
he has greatly improved and he has good 
buildings on it; also keeps some good stock 
on the place. 

Mr. Farquhar was married January 18, 
1870, in Fayette City, Pennsylvania, to Ma- 
ria Eckard, who was born April i, 1839, m 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, the 
daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Rhine- 
hardt) Eckard, also natives of Pennsylvania, 
where they were married and where they 
lived all their lives, Mr. Eckard dying in 
1876, and his wife in 1888. Both are buried 
in the Fayette City cemetery, Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania. They were the parents of 
eight children, all of whom grew to maturity, 
only three of them now living, Mrs. Far- 
quhar being the fourth in order of birth. She 
remained with her parents at home until her 
marriage to the subject. Mr. and Mrs. Far- 
quhar are the parents of four children, three 
of whom grew to maturity, one having died 
in childhood, namely : Frank D., who mar- 
ried Ida Cope, resides in Olney, Illinois, 
where he is interested in the marble works. 
One child born to them, died in in- 
fancy. Following are their children : lola, 
who at this writing, 1909, is eleven years 
old : Alora, age eight ; Aaron, age seven ; 



John, age six; Ersula, age four; Ira Ennis, 
age one. Ennis M., the second child of the 
subject and wife, is single and is still a mem- 
ber of the home circle on the farm ; Dessie 
B. is the wife of Walter Hall, residing on a 
farm in Denver township. Mrs. Farquhar 
has been an invalid for the past three years, 
totally helpless. 

Our subject has held the office of Town- 
ship Trustee for twenty-one years in a very 
acceptable manner in this township. He is a 
very staunch Republican, although he never 
aspires for any political office. He voted 
first for Abraham Lincoln for his second 
term. The subject and his wife have always 
been active in church work, always attending 
the Methodist church, giving assist- 
ance to its work, both morally and finan- 
cially, although neither of them are members. 
The subject has held the office of trustee of 
the church for twenty years or more. 

The subject has been very successful finan- 
cially and now owns one of the modern and 
valuable farms of Denver township, also a 
very desirable home. He is now sixty-eight 
years old and his wife is two years his senior. 
They live as nearly a retired life as a farm 
will permit and they are both held in high 
esteem by their neighbors. 



WILLIAM WHAM. 

He of whom this sketch is written is a 
representative of one of the honored pioneer 
families of Marion county, Illinois, where 
he has passed practically his entire life, and 



266 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



he is one of the successful and prominent 
citizens of Cartter, where he is the leading 
merchant, being well known to the people of 
that vicinity as a man of clean business prin- 
ciples and public-spirited, having attained 
prosperity through his own well directed ef- 
forts. 

William Wham was born in this county 
in 1853, the son of William Wham, a na- 
tive of Tennessee, who came to Illinois 
when a young boy and settled in Marion 
county where he developed a good farm and 
always made a comfortable living. He was 
a charter member of the Masonic lodge, 
Xo. 130, at Salem. He became well known 
and influential. He passed to his rest in 
1893. The mother of the subject was Lou- 
isa Anna Rainey, a native of Hopkinsville, 
Kentucky, who came to Illinois, when elev- 
en years old. She was a woman of many 
praiseworthy traits. She died some six 
years prior to her husband's demise. 

Eight children were born to the parents 
of the subject, four of whom are living in 
1908. They are named in order of their 
birth as follows: Margaret is the widow of 
James Mount, of Kell, Illinois; Martha I., 
living at Cartter, is the widow of William 
K. Storment; H. B. owns a farm near Cart- 
ter, Illinois; William, our subject, who 
spent his boyhood on a farm near Cartter, 
working during the summer months, and 
attending the country schools the balance 
of the year. His early life was spent in 
farming, trading and dealing in stock, of 
which he made a success. After abandoning 
this he went into the mercantile business in 



1895 at Cartter, Illinois, and has been thus 
engaged since that time, having built up an 
excellent trade by reason of his courteous 
treatment of customers and his natural abil- 
ity. His store is known throughout this 
locality as the place where the best goods in 
the market can be obtained at reasonable 
prices, and his trade has constantly grown 
from year to year. Mr. Wham has pros- 
pered by reason of his well directed energy, 
and he has become the owner of the Park 
Hotel at Salem, the leading hostelry of that 
city, and he is also a director of the Salem 
National Bank. He also has a large inter- 
est in the Robinson oil fields in Crawford 
county. He was chairman of the building 
committee for the new building for the Sa- 
lem National Bank, which was erected in 
1908. He also has valuable farm lands. All 
this our subject has attained by reason of 
his own unaided efforts, and every dollar 
he possesses was obtained in an honest man- 
ner. 

Mr. Wham was united in marriage in 
1874 to Emma C. Adams, the refined and 
accomplished daughter of James Adams, of 
near Salem. Her father is a well known 
farmer. One child, born to the subject 
and wife, died in infancy. Mrs. Wham is 
postmistress at Cartter, which position she 
has creditably filled for the past fourteen 
years, having been appointed by Grover 
Cleveland and re-appointed by every Pres- 
ident since. She is a woman of rare execu- 
tive ability as well as many pleasing traits 
which renders her popular with all classes. 
Mrs. Wham's mother. Mrs. Paulina Adams. 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



26 7 



is living at Springfield, Illinois. The father 
of the subject's wife is deceased. They 
were both natives of Virginia and scions of 
well known old southern families. Mr. 
Wham's grandfather was also named Wil- 
liam Wham. He was a native of Ireland, 
and a man of sterling qualities. 

Our subject is a member of the Masonic 
Blue Lodge, Chapter at Salem., and the 
Commandery at Centralia. He is also a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Mr. and Mrs. Wham are mem- 
bers of the Christian church at Cartter, be- 
ing liberal subscribers to the same. Mr. 
Wham was Chairman of the Board of Su- 
pervisors of Marion county, having been 
elected as an independent and was a good 
official, having ably disposed of the duties 
of this important trust in a manner that re- 
flected much credit upon his ability. 



GEN. JAMES STEWART MARTIN. 

It is a great badge of honor to have the 
distinction of serving the government in the 
conflict with Mexico, assisting in the ardu- 
ous campaigns until the stars and stripes 
were unfurled on the citadel of the Monte- 
zuma, and also, less than two decades later 
to have been permitted to serve the na- 
tional Union in the four years of polemic 
struggle between the states. Among the 
conspicuous figures of these great inter- 
necine conflicts is the well remembered gen- 
tleman whose name forms the caption of 



this biographical memoir, who, although 
his life history has been closed by death, 
his influence continues to pervade the lives 
of those with whom he came in contact. 
He was always mindful of his duty to his 
fellow men and ready with word or deed to 
assist them in the struggle up life's steep 
path. No man in his day and generation 
in this locality exercised a greater influence 
for the civic, material and moral uplift of 
the community than General Martin, for his 
life was that of the patriot, the Christian 
gentleman, the true American nobleman. 

General James Stewart Martin was born 
August 19, 1826, in Estillville, now Gate 
City, Scott county, Virginia, the son of 
John S. and Malinda (Morrison) Martin, 
pioneers of that part of the Old Dominion 
state and a fine old Southern family of great 
influence in their day, his father having been 
a man of considerable political prominence 
and highly educated. He served as County 
Clerk, Circuit Clerk, and Master of Chan- 
cery for about twenty years. The mother 
of the subject, who was born in Sullivan 
county, Tennessee, was a woman of many 
commendable attributes, noted for her 
broad charity and high culture, and before 
she was called to her rest, in 1828, she 
emancipated her slaves. The subject's 
father moved to Illinois in 1844 and settled 
on a farm seven miles north of Salem, 
where his son, our subject, resided for a 
period of three years, assisting in develop- 
ing the farm from its primitive state into a 
highly productive place. 

James S. Martin, our subject, received his 



268 



HIOGKAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



education in the public schools of his native 
community in Virginia, making such notable 
progress and manifesting such a thirst for 
the higher learning that he was subsequently 
placed in Emery and Henry College, Wash- 
ington county, Virginia, where he made a 
brilliant record for scholarship. A lad of 
strong patriotism from his early youth 
which continued to increase with advancing 
years, he was glad to have an opportunity 
to enter the army during the Mexican war, 
having enlisted in Company C, First Regi- 
ment, Illinois Volunteers, in the spring of 
1847, and he made such an excellent soldier 
that he was made third sergeant of his com- 
pany. The regiment was mustered into ser- 
vice at Alton, then transported to Fort 
Leavenworth and marched across the plains 
to Santa Fe, New Mexico. He performed 
conspicuous service during the strenuous 
campaign against the Mexicans. After the 
war, while on the homeward trip, his com- 
pany nominated him for County Clerk of 
Marion county, and the people here ratified 
their action upon the arrival of the men at 
Salem. He was duly elected and in a most 
able and creditable manner discharged the 
duties of the same for a period of twelve 
years. He was also Master in Chancery for 
two terms, in which he also showed his su- 
perior ability in official capacity. Being an 
ambitious man he sought every means pos- 
sible to improve himself and to be of the 
greatest service to his fellow men, conse- 
quently while holding these offices he de- 
voted his spare moments to the study of law, 
and upon admittance to the bar, July 4, 



1 86 1, formed a partnership with B. F. 
Marshall and D. C. Jones and opened an of- 
fice in Salem. Owing to the great strength 
and prestige of this well known trio their 
legal business was heavy from the first and 
the reputation of the firm soon spread 
throughout this part of the state. 

In 1862, when the clouds of rebellion 
were the darkest and the lambent flames of 
discontented citizenship of the South were 
the most direful, our subject realized that 
every loyal son of the North should do what 
he could toward preserving the integrity of 
the Union, consequently he sought and ob- 
tained permission from Governor Yates to 
raise a regiment, with the result that the 
famous One Hundred and Eleventh was 
mustered, and Mr. Martin was selected as 
the man most worthy and able to command 
it, therefore he became colonel of the same. 
It was composed of seven companies from 
Marion county, one from Clay and one from 
Clinton county, the regiment comprising 
nine hundred and thirty men and officers, 
and it was mustered into service September 
1 8, 1862, and joined General Davies at Co- 
lumbus, Kentucky. Our subject served in 
the capacity of colonel all through the war, 
his services showing that he was a man of 
much military courage and genius, having 
from time to time led his men into the brunt 
of the fighting. During 1863 he was in 
command of the post at Columbus and later 
at Paducah, Kentucky. From there he went 
to Florence, Alabama, whither he was or- 
dered by General Sherman, and he later 
went into winter quarters at Pulaski, Ten- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



26 9 



nessee. From March 16, 1864, he served 
with the Sixteenth Army Corps, until the 
close of the struggle, having seen much 
hard service during that time, being with 
Sherman on his march to the sea and having 
led his regiment at the great battles of 
Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, 
Jonesboro, Fort McAllister and received 
the surrender of the commander of this fort. 
He was brevetted brigadier general in July, 
1864, and participated in the grand review 
in Washington City, and was mustered out 
in Springfield, Illinois, in June, 1865. 

After the war General Martin plunged 
into the active affairs of civil life and won 
signal distinction in the field of politics and 
business. He launched into banking in Sa- 
lem, building up the nucleus of a large for- 
tune through his wonderful executive abil- 
ity. Taking an interest in Republican poli- 
tics after the war he was elected County 
Judge in 1866, overwhelming a Democratic 
majority of six hundred. He was nominated 
for Congress in 1872 and was elected over 
Judge Silas L. Bryan, father of Hon. Wil- 
liam J. Bryan. He ably served one term 
in Washington. 

General Martin was appointed Commis- 
sioner of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary 
by Governor Cullom, September 4, 1879, 
which position he creditably served for four 
years. He served as a member of the Re- 
publican State Central Committee for a 
period of nearly twenty years, and was chair- 
man of the same during the canvass which 
elected Governor Fifer. He was a delegate 
to the National Convention in 1876, when 



he voted for the nomination of James G. 
Elaine for President. As might be expected 
he was an interested member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic and was honored in 
the same by being elected department com- 
mander of Illinois for two terms. He was 
largely instrumental in 1882 in organizing 
the Southern Illinois Soldiers and Sailors 
Reunion Association, of which he continu- 
ously served as commander. In all the offi- 
cial positions, General Martin conducted 
himself as a most able and worthy exponent 
of the country's good, and proved at all 
times to be an unselfish public servant of 
the most humanitarian and altruistic mo- 
tives and principles. 

The domestic life of our subject dates 
from 1852, when he was united in marriage 
with Jane Elston, of Salem, Illinois, to 
whom four children were born, three sur- 
viving. They are : Grace M., the wife of 
George O. Webster; Luther and John E. 
A complete history of the last child named 
is to be found on another page of this work. 
The subject's first wife passed to her rest 
in 1889, and in 1903 General Martin was 
married to Margaret Savage, of Ashland, 
Kentucky, who, with their daughter, Daisy, 
a cultured and refined lady, survive in 1908. 
Three brothers of the subject, Robert, Ben- 
jamin and Thomas, are also living in Salem. 

Thus after a most active, useful and ex- 
emplary life which the kind Heavenly 
Father greatly prolonged he passed to his 
rest, November 20, 1907. 

The city of Salem owes a great debt of 
gratitude to General Martin for he aided in 



2JO 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



many ways in its upbuilding and general 
development as he did also Marion county, 
where he was for many decades held in the 
highest esteem by all classes, for he was 
universally regarded as a hero both in war 
and in peace, one of the component parts of 
the nation's substantial pillars, and the rev- 
erence with which the citizens of this lo- 
cality cherish his memory will serve as a 
greater monument than marble shaft or 
bronze obelisk. He was truly a brave and 
good man whose life was a continued sacri- 
fice for others, a benefactor in the true sense 
of the term. His career was fraught with 
untold blessings to the world, and when in 
common with all things human his earthly 
course was ended and he was called to a 
higher plane of action, the memory of his 
noble deeds and honorable achievements 
continued to constitute a record to which 
each passing year will give additional luster. 



]. D. TELFORD. 

In such men as Mr. Telford there is pecu- 
liar satisfaction in offering their life his- 
tories justification for the compilation of 
works of this character not that their lives 
have been such as to gain them particularly 
wide notoriety or the admiring plaudits of 
men, but that they have been true to the 
trusts reposed in them, have shown such 
attributes of character as entitle them to 
the regard .of all. 

J. D. Telford was born in Marion county, 



Illinois, September 2, 1848. He is the 
son of Samuel G. Telford, a native of Jef- 
ferson county, Illinois. Grandfather James 
Telford, a native of South Carolina, came 
to Jefferson county as early as 1822, and 
moved to this county in 1836, when the 
father of the subject was nine years old, and 
like most of the sturdy pioneers of that early 
time, was compelled to undergo many pri- 
vations and do much hard work in estab- 
lishing a home, but being a man of sterling 
qualities and indomitable energy he con- 
quered the many obstacles that confronted 
him and led a useful and influential life as 
a farmer there, as did also his son, father of 
our subject, who seemed to inherit much of 
the older Telford's better traits, and, indeed, 
the family characteristics have come on 
down to our subject, who is carefully order- 
ing his life so as to carry out the early 
praiseworthy characteristics of his ances- 
tors. Samuel G. Telford spent his life on 
the farm, having lived on the same farm for 
sixty years. This was taken out of the new 
prairie land, but the wild soil was soon 
transformed into highly productive fields. 
He was a soldier in the Union army, having 
enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty- 
sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and ren- 
dered gallant service until the winter of 
1864. He is still living in 1908 near Cartter, 
Marion county. The mother of the subject 
was called to her rest in 1882. Her maiden 
name was Mary Baldridge. She was a na- 
tive of Illinois, but her people came from 
North Carolina. 

James Telford was an Abolitionist and 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



2 7 I 



was an historic character in his day, having 
played an important part in the famous un- 
derground railway when Illinois was ad- 
mitted as a free state in 1818. He came to 
this state because he was opposed to slavery. 
His wife's maiden name was Kell, and she 
was also a native of South Carolina. They 
were the parents of eight children, five of 
whom are living at this writing, the father 
of the subject being the only one of the boys 
living. 

Samuel G. Telford and wife were the 
parents of nine children, named in the order 
of their birth as follows: J. D., subject of 
this sketch; Joseph, of Alma township, 
Marion county; Margaret J., deceased; Eva, 
who is married and living in Ashville, 
North Carolina ; Alice, the wife of William 
Wyatt, of Durant, Oklahoma ; Kate, wife of 
Doctor Richardson, of Union City, Okla- 
homa ; George B., who is living in Kansas ; 
Arthur, a -farmer of Marion county ; Belle, 
who became Mrs. Arnold, is deceased. 

J. D. Telford, our subject, lived with his 
father until he was twenty-three years old, 
assisting with the work on the old home- 
stead and attending the country schools 
during the winter months. Having applied 
himself well to his text-books he became 
fairly well educated, and later has added to 
this by home reading and coming in contact 
with the world. The happy and harmonious 
domestic life of the subject dates from 
January 19, 1872, when he was united in 
marriage to Sarah A. Wyatt, the estimable 
daughter of John and Margaret Wyatt, a 
highly respected family of Marion county, 



natives of Tennessee, who came to Marion 
county in 1860. 

The following children have been born to 
the subject and wife, all of whom are well 
established in life and give promise of suc- 
cessful futures: Dr. A. T., who lives at 
Olney, Illinois; E. D., is an attorney at 
Salem, this county; Ula, is a stenographer 
in the Life Savings Station at Chicago; 
Omer F. is a farmer in Marion county; 
Oran is a member of the family circle at 
their home in Salem, as is also J. D., Jr. 
The Telford residence is modern and always 
cheerful. 

The subject is engaged in farming and 
real estate, largely interested in fruit grow- 
ing, at which he is highly competent, having 
long taken an abiding interest in horticul- 
ture. He has two large orchards containing 
six thousand and five hundred apple trees 
of excellent variety and quality. He de- 
votes much of his time to the care of his 
orchards, which are among the most valu- 
able in this part of the state, and useless to 
add that the financial returns from the sale 
of his fruit are usually quite satisfactory. 
Politically Mr. Telford is a stanch Repub- 
lican and having been actuated by a laudable 
desire for political preferment, his friends 
elected him to the important office of Sher- 
iff of Marion county, the duties of which he 
faithfully performed to the satisfaction of 
all concerned for a period of four years, 
having been elected in 1882 and serving 
until 1886. He is well grounded in his po- 
litical convictions, and always lends his 
aid in supporting his party's principles, en- 



272 



IUOGKAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



deavoring to place the best men possible in 
local offices. He is a well informed man, 
not only on political matters and current 
events, but he is well read on scientific, liter- 
ary and diverse subjects which make his 
conversation interesting as well as instruc- 
tive, and he is generally regarded as one of 
the substantial men of Marion county. 



BENJAMIN F. RODGERS, M. D. 

In giving the life record of the subject of 
this sketch the publishers of this work be- 
lieve that it will be an incentive to the 
young who may peruse it to lead nobler 
lives, have higher ambitions and accomplish 
more for their fellow men, for his life has 
always been led along a plane of high en- 
deavor, always cdnsistent with the truth in 
its higher forms and ever in keeping with 
honorable principles. He is the scion of 
pioneer ancestors of the most sterling qual- 
ities who did much in their day for the com- 
munities in which they lived, and Doctor 
Rodgers is a worthy descendant of his for- 
bears, thus for many reasons, not the least of 
which is the fact that he was one of the 
patriotic sons of the North, who, when the 
tocsin of war sounded, left his hearthstone 
and business to do what he could in saving 
the country from treason, the biographer is 
glad to give him just representation in this 
work. 

Dr. Benjamin F. Rodgers was born 
in York, Pennsylvania, in 1829, the son of 



Joseph D. and Mary (Hamilton) Rodgers. 
Grandfather Rodgers, who came to America 
in 1776, settling in Maryland, was a weaver 
by profession and a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary war. He lived to be ninety-four 
years old, and the grandmother of the sub- 
ject lived to her ninety-sixth year. They 
were the parents of a large family. 

The father of the subject, who was born 
in Maryland, moved to Pennsylvania when 
a boy, later to Ohio, where he spent the bal- 
ance of his days on a farm. There were 
eleven children in this family, six of whom 
lived to maturity. The subject's parents 
were Presbyterians and the father and moth- 
er both died at the age of sixty-four years. 

The subject of this sketch was nine years 
old when he moved to Ohio, where he re- 
ceived a fairly good education by attending 
the subscription schools of his community. 
He clerked in a store in Ohio for two years, 
then learned to be a shoemaker; but neither 
of these lines seemed to suit his tastes, be- 
lieving that he was capable of rendering a 
better service to humanity, consequently he 
began the study of medicine, in which he 
made rapid progress and he soon entered a 
medical college. After completing the pre- 
scribed course with honor, he began prac- 
tice in Ohio, and later located at Elizabeth- 
town, Kentucky, having soon gained a firm 
foothold. But believing that better oppor- 
tunities awaited him at Belleville, Illinois, he 
removed thereto in 1849, an d afterwards 
removed to Jacksonville, and at that place 
the doctor enlisted in September, 1861, in 
the Union, enlisted in September, 1861, in 




B. F. RODGERS. M. D. 



.*** 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



273 



the Second Illinois Light Artillery, and so 
efficient were his services that he was com- 
missioned captain of Company K. His rec- 
ord in the army is a most creditable one. He 
was at the battle of Fort Donelson, at Jack- 
son, Mississippi, and was in the siege of 
Vicksburg. Engraved on a monument erect- 
ed at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in honor of 
Company K, Second Illinois Light Artillery, 
are the words : 

"Battery K, Second Light Artillery, 

Capt. Benjamin Rodgers, 
"Fourth Division Sixteenth Corps. 
"Entered Campaign About May 20, 
1863. Served with the Division Dur- 
ing siege." 

He takes great pride in his military life 
and relates his battery was nearer the en- 
emy's works than any other battery of the 
siege, which occupied forty-two days. He 
was Chief of Artillery on the staff of Gen- 
eral Lauman, Gen. Crocker Gresham, 
Logan, and was Chief of Staff of General 
Ranson at Natchez. 

He was also in the southwestern cam- 
paign and the battles subsequent to that. He 
was mustered out at Memphis, Tennessee, 
December 31, 1864. After the close of the 
war Doctor Rodgers located in Patoka, 
where he has practiced his profession ever 
since. 

Doctor Rodgers was united in marriage 

on November 3, 1848, with Mary K. Chiell, 

daughter of Casper Chiell. He has four 

children living, also fourteen grandchildren, 

18 



and seven great-grandchildren. Mrs. Rod- 
gers was called from her earthly labors at 
the age of seventy-two years. 

In politics our subject is a loyal Repub- 
lican, and he has ever taken a great interest 
in public affairs, having made his influence 
felt for the good of his community in many 
ways and served in a most able manner as 
postmaster and also Mayor of Patoka; in 
fact, he might be called the father of this 
town. He is a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, and has been commander of 
the local post. In his fraternal relations he 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the 
lodge at Jacksonville, Illinois. No man in 
this part of Marion county is better or more 
favorably known than he, known for his 
professional skill, his public spirit, his integ- 
rity and kind heartedness. 



ADAM H. BACHMANN. 

The United States can boast of no better 
or more law-abiding class of citizens than 
the great number of German people who 
have found homes within her borders. 
Though holding dear and sacred the beloved 
mother country, they are none the less de- 
voted to the fair country of their adoption. 
Among this class is the subject of this 
sketch, who for a number of years has been 
one of the foremost citizens of Marion 
county, Illinois, where he has labored not 
only for his own advancement, but also for 
the good of the community, his efforts hav- 



274 



r.IOCK. UMIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



ing been amply repaid with abundant finan- 
cial success and the esteem of his fellow 
men. 

Adam H. Bachmann, the well known and 
popular president of the Salem National 
Bank, was born in Saxony, Germany, No- 
vember 28, 1845, the son of George Bach- 
mann, a man of sterling qualities, who was 
also a native of Germany, and who died 
there in 1860. The mother of the subject 
was known in her maidenhood as Mocklin 
Sputh, also of the Fatherland, who was 
called to her rest in 1866. Of the six chil- 
dren born to the elder Bachmann, there are 
living the following in 1908: Mrs. Lizzie 
Sputh and Ernest Bachmann, both of Ger- 
many, and the subject of this sketch. These 
children received every care and attention 
possible by their parents who were people of 
industry and uprightness. 

Adam H. Bachmann left Germany in 
March. 1866, landing in America the fol- 
lowing April, having barely attained his ma- 
jority. He had received eight years of 
schooling in his native land, receiving a 
fairly good education for he was an am- 
bitious lad and diligently applied himself to 
his school-books and this careful founda- 
tion has since been greatly strengthened and 
built up through his contact with the world 
and his habits of home reading, so that Mr. 
Bachmann's conversation is at once learned, 
interesting and instructive. Our subject lo- 
cated at Lebanon. Illinois, shortly after 
coming to the New World, where he 
worked as a cabinet maker. In the spring 
of 1868, he came to Salem, this state, and 



engaged in the furniture business with 
which he has since been identified, and 
which was a successful venture from .the 
first and by reason of the subject's careful 
attention to duty, his natural ability as a far- 
sighted and cautious business man, coupled 
with his kind and courteous treatment of 
customers, his trade has gradually grown 
all these years, his place of business being 
generally known as one of the safest, most 
reliable as well as up-to-date furniture estab- 
lishments in this locality. After building the 
business up to its present high state of effi- 
ciency, Mr. Bachmann turned it over to his 
two sons, Frank and Charley, both very able 
and progressive young men, who are con- 
ducting a modern and well stocked store, 
being numbered among the leading young 
business men of the county, to whom the fu- 
ture holds unbounded success and honor, 
since they are not only young men of sound 
business principles, but also of the finest 
personal traits. 

Mr. Bachmann was united in marriage 
November 15, 1868, to Mary Alkire, the 
representative of a highly respected and influ- 
ential family of Lebanon, Illinois, who was 
born in Pennsylvania. Eleven children have 
been born to the subject and wife, seven of 
whom are living at the time of this writing. 
1908, named in order of their birth, as fol- 
lows : Mrs. Lizzie Kolb, of Lebanon, Illinois ; 
Frank, of Salem, this county; Mrs. Amy 
Stonecipher, also of Salem ; Maud, living at 
home: Charley, Adam H., Jr.. and Paulina, 
all live with their parents in Salem. 

Mr. Bachmann deserves much credit for 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



275 



the well defined success he has attained since 
casting- his lot among Americans, partly be- 
cause he has been the architect of his own 
fortunes, beginning his business career ab- 
solutely empty-handed, and with no one to 
encourage or assist in any way, and partly 
because he has made his competency by hon- 
est, straight-forward business methods that 
no one can question. When he first landed 
on our shores he had a capital of only three 
cents and today he is the wealthiest man in 
Marion county. He had the insight, the 
rare sagacity and perceptive instinct to 
grasp situations as they arose and the splen- 
did business acumen to turn seemiing ob- 
stacles into ultimate sucess. Such men are 
born leaders in the financial world and they 
are not any too frequently met with. 

Mr. Bachmann is president of the Salem 
National Bank, president of the Farmers' 
and Merchants' Bank at St. Peter, Illinois; 
besides being an extensive land owner, hav- 
ing nine large farms in Marion county. 
They are all very valuable, well drained, se- 
curely fenced, the soil being highly produc- 
tive and the buildings on each modern and 
convenient. Besides these he has much other 
real estate. Also owns about as much prop- 
erty in East St. Louis as he has here. Mr. 
Bachmann has large property interests at 
Mattoon and Oakland, this state. His large 
real estate holdings and financial loans oc- 
cupy the major part of his time and atten- 
tion, however, he finds time to assist in for- 
warding any movement for the betterment 
of his community. In fact, he is a pioneer 
in the development and progress of Marion 



county. He came to Salem, when there was 
only one brick house here, but he had the 
sagacity to note the possibilities in the place 
and soon decided to cast his lot here with 
the result that he has benefited not only 
himself, but also the entire community, 
more, perhaps, than any other man has done 
or is likely to do in the years to come. In 
other words, the wonderful things that the 
future held seemed to be within Mr. Bach- 
mann's horoscope, and he began on the 
ground floor, developing with the country, 
which is wonderfully rich in resources and 
possibilities. While Mr. Bachmann has 
been too busy to devote much time to polit- 
ical matters, never having entertained an 
ambition for political preferment, he has 
ever assisted in any way he could the de- 
velopment of the community whether polit- 
ical, educational, moral or civic, and he did 
much in making the 1 city a clean and de- 
sirable place in which to live, principally 
while ably serving it as Alderman. In his 
fraternal relations our subject is a Mason. 

The Bachmann residence, which is one of 
the finest, most modern, substantial and 
beautiful in Salem, is elegantly furnished 
and a place where the many friends and ad- 
mirers of this popular family delight to 
gather, being presided over with rare grace 
and dignity by the subject's wife who is a 
charming hostess, congenial and talented. 

Mr. Bachmann is a pleasant man to meet, 
jovial, and at all times agreeable, never 
pompous or phlegmatic. His is a well 
rounded character, in which the different in- 
terests of life are given their due proportion 



2 7 6 



IIIOCKAPHICAL AND REM1 XISCKXT HISTORY OF 



of attention. One line of thought or work 
to the exclusion of all others produces an 
abnormal development and makes the in- 
dividual narrow in his views of life. Mr. 
Bachmann has never followed such a course 
for while giving his chief attention to his 
business, as do the majority of men, he 
finds time and opportunity to take an in- 
terest in matters pertaining to the progress 
and growth of his county, state and nation, 
and to mingle with hisi friends, enlarging 
the circle of his acquaintance and broaden- 
ing his mind through the interchange of 
thought with others. 



E. LOUIS BLEDSOE. 

The names of those men who have dis- 
tinguished themselves through the posses- 
sion of those qualities which daily contrib- 
ute to the success of private life and to the 
public stability and who have enjoyed the 
respect and confidence of those about them, 
should not be permitted to perish. Such a 
one is the subject of this review, one of the 
leading lumber dealers in Marion county. 

E. L. Bledsoe, president of the Bledsoe 
Lumber Company, of Salem, was born in 
Bradford, Indiana, in 1858. His father was 
William J. Bledsoe, a native of Tennessee, 
who came to Indiana when a young man. 
He was a United Brethren minister. Wil- 
liam J. Bledsoe was a soldier in the Union 
army during the Civil war, having been a 
member of the Thirty-seventh Iowa Volun- 



teer Infantry. He died in a hospital in St. 
Louis, Missouri, from illness contracted 
while in line of duty. Two sons, William 
J., Jr., and James W., were also in the army, 
having enlisted in Company H, Twenty- 
fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. They 
fought side by side in twenty-seven battles. 
Both re-enlisted after their time was up and 
served until the close of the war. James 
W. was wounded twice. Both 1 were with 
Sherman on his famous march to the sea. 
They are both living. The father died May 
5, 1867. 

The mother of the subject was Martha 
Ridgeway, a native of Chillicothe, Ohio, 
who married the subject's father in Franks- 
ville, Indiana. She was a woman of many- 
fine traits and was called to her rest in 1883 
while living at Rock Island, Illinois. The 
following children were born to this union : 
James W., of Rock Island; William J. Jr., 
also of Rock Island ; George B. died at Rock 
Island in 1906; J. P., of Davenport, Iowa; 
E. L., our subject; Frank A., of Rock Is- 
land; Mark S., of St. Louis; Mattie J., who 
is a physician located at Chickasha, Okla- 
homa. Our subject was taken to Iowa by 
his parents when about three years old. The 
family located at Washington, but most of 
the subject's boyhood was spent in Mar- 
shall. He received only a common school 
education, his course of study being inter- 
rupted by reason of the fact that his father 
frequently moved from town to town in car- 
rying on his ministerial work, but he is a 
well educated man, nevertheless, having- 
gained it first handed from the world. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



277 



Mr. Bledsoe has been twice married, first 
in 1876 to Minnie Dizotell, of Eldon, Iowa, 
the ceremony having been performed in that 
city. She was born in Canada. Her father 
was of French lineage and her mother was 
Irish. After bearing the subject one child, 
she was called to her rest in 1901 at St. 
Louis, Missouri. The child bom to this 
union is Truman C. Bledsoe, manager of 
the Bledsoe-McCreery Lumber Company, 
of St. Louis. He married Stella Farrell, of 
that city, and they are the parents of two 
children, Barbara Louis, and Truman C, 
Jr. The subject was married in 1903, his 
second wife being Lillie Mattox, of Terre 
Haute, Indiana. One son has blessed this 
union, Maurice William, who was bom on 
September 2, 1904. 

The following history of Mr. Bledsoe's 
railroad career, which forms the lengthiest 
and one of the most important chapters in 
his life history, is based on a sketch which 
the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway 
system issued in book form, containing a 
history of the road's representative em- 
ployes, which article shows the high regard 
this company had for Mr. Bledsoe. 

When only a lad of fifteen our subject 
began working as a water boy for Howell's 
corps of engineers in 1870. A survey was 
then being made from Washington, Iowa, 
to Princeton, Missouri, the line being an ex- 
tension of the Chicago and Southwestern 
Railway, which was later absorbed by the 
"Rock Island System." The lad was famil- 
iarly known as "Squire," which soubriquet 
has clung to him through life. He worked 



his way to more important positions in this 
corps, having remained with them until the 
survey was completed and the corps was 
disbanded at Princeton. Our subject then 
returned to Eldon, Iowa, to which point his 
mother had moved during his absence. In 
the fall of 1872 he determined to become a 
brakeman, to which idea his mother strong- 
ly protested, arguing that such a life was 
too hazardous for her son to undertake, but 
the son began his career as head brakeman 
on a very cold night the following winter, 
his duties being partly to watch for dangers 
ahead and to watch the lights on the ca- 
boose. The rear cars had broken loose on 
this particular occasion and were running 
down grade as if about to crash into the 
section of the train ahead. There were no 
air brakes on freight trains at that time, 
and the old square draw bar was danger- 
ous and hard to handle. It was up grade 
and down grade from Eldon to Washing- 
ton, but the boy stuck faithfully at his post 
and all came out well, and from that night 
of somewhat exciting initiation to the last 
one on which he pulled the brakes, he proved 
loyal to his trust, having laid off only about 
ten days during his entire service. Mr. 
Bledsoe was a model young man and soon 
all who formed his acquaintance learned to 
admire him. and up to this writing, 1908, 
not a drop of intoxicating liquor has ever 
touched his lips or a profane word ever 
passed them, and up to the time of the death 
of his first wife he had never used tobacco, 
but since that time he has been accustomed 
to smoke, having been greatly shocked at 



27 8 



P.IOGKAPIIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



her demise from which he has never fully 
regained his former vivacity. His word 
has always been as good as his note and he 
has been all his life an exemplary character, 
which is the result of careful teachings by 
a Christian mother. He has always been a 
modest and retiring man, unassuming and 
never in the least pompous or found seek- 
ing notoriety, according to the friends who 
know him best. He has always been cool 
and calculating and this fact has doubtless 
saved him accidents while in the railway 
service, however, death stared him in the 
face twice during his service on the road: 
once when he was assisting the fireman in 
taking coal at Perlee, Iowa, he was caught 
between the cob and the apron of the schute, 
but the engineer, Frank Hudler, prevented 
the accident. At Washington, Iowa, while 
making a coupling he was pressed into a 
very close place by the giving way of a draw 
bar, but the rear car received the impact and 
rebounded away preventing an accident. In 
due time Mr. Bledsoe was promoted for his 
faithful service and wore the badge of con- 
ductor. When he resigned it was after nine 
years of freight runs on the first Iowa di- 
vision of the southwestern branch of the 
Rock Island System, his resignation taking 
place in 1881, which was tendered for the 
purpose of retiring permanently from rail- 
road life, but he was induced to accept a po- 
sition on the St. Louis division of the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, with 
which he remained for three years, and then 
resigned to accept a position as sleeping car 
conductor for the Pullman Palace Car Com- 



pany. He remained with that company for 
four years, during the latter part of which 
he was inspector of all the company's cars 
entering St. Louis. He had the distinction 
of placing in the union station at St. Louis 
the first Pullman vestibuled train, it being 
under his personal inspection. He subse- 
quently resigned this position to accept an 
offer from the Huttig Sash & Door Com- 
pany, of St. Louis, and in 1900 he was trav- 
eling representative of this firm in southern 
Illinois. He remained with this firm for 
eighteen years, during which time he ren- 
dered them services of the most efficient type 
and was the cause of their business rapidly 
increasing. And during his long services 
with the above mentioned companies he was 
held in the highest esteem by his employers 
who placed in him implicit confidence and 
had unqualified faith in his ability and in- 
tegrity. 

Mr. Bledsoe came to Salem, this county, 
in 1904 and organized lumber companies 
here and at Sparta, Illinois, known as the 
Bledsoe Company, retail yards, wholesale; 
the Bledsoe-McCreery Lumber Company, 
being interested in all of them, and by reason 
of his knowledge of this line of business and 
his reputation for square dealing, coupled 
with his courteous manners, he has built up a 
very extensive business throughout this local- 
ity which is constantly growing. In his fra- 
ternal relations our subject is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias. He also belongs to 
a lumber dealers' association, the Con- 
catentated Order of Hoo-Hoo, and both 
Mr. and Mrs. Bledsoe are members of the 



RICH LAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



279 



Christian church, and they are among the 
popular and highly respected residents of 
Salem. 



SILAS CLOUD. 

Among the venerable and highly re- 
spected citizens of Denver township. Rich- 
land county, Illinois, who deserve special 
mention in a work of this character, is Silas 
Cloud, for his life has been one of consecu- 
tive and honest endeavor, resulting in good 
both to himself and family and those of his 
community, which he has seen develop 
through all its stages. 

Silas Cloud was born in Clinton county, 
Ohio, January 7, 1833, the son of Henry 
and Anna (Laymon) Cloud, the former a 
native of Ohio and the latter of North Car- 
olina. They were married in Ohio, settling 
on a farm in Clinton county soon after- 
ward, where they remained until the death 
of the subject's father, which occurred in 
1835, when Silas was two years old. Henry 
Cloud was not fifty years old when he died. 
He is buried in the old Masonic cemetery 
at Lynchburg, Ohio. His widow remained 
on the farm in Clinton county until about 
1850. The subject was then seventeen 
years of age. Mrs. Henry Cloud was re- 
married, her second husband being Chris- 
tian M. Foster, who was also a native of 
North Carolina. They both remained in 
Clinton county the remainder of their lives, 
the subject's mother dying first in 1880, 
when nearly seventy years of age. She is 



buried in the same cemetery with her first 
husband. Her second husband survived 
her about three years. No children were 
born to them. The subject's father and 
mother were the parents of seven children, 
all boys but one, all of whom grew to ma- 
turity, Silas being the sixth child in order of 
birth. 

Silas Cloud's early education was ob- 
tained in the common schools of Clinton 
county, Ohio, having first attended a select 
school and later a free school in the days 
when pupils sat on rude benches, which 
were usually too high for the feet to touch 
the floor. He did not get much education 
until after he became of age, then he fitted 
himself for a teacher which profession he 
followed with much success for a period of 
twenty-eight years. The subject remained 
at home with his mother until his marriage 
on October 26, 1860, to Mary E. Montgom- 
ery in Clinton county, Ohio, in which place 
she was born, November u, 1839, the 
daughter of William and Mary Ann (Ex- 
tel) Montgomery, both natives of New Jer- 
sey, the father of Irish descent. Mrs. 
Cloud's parents were married in New Jer- 
and moved to Ohio, buying a farm in Clin- 
ton county, upon which they lived the re- 
mainder of their lives, Mr. Montgomery 
dying -in 1867, at the age of seventy years, 
and Mrs. Montgomery survived until 1884, 
dying at the age of eighty-one years. Both 
are buried in the Masonic cemetery at 
Lynchburg, Ohio. They were the parents 
of twelve children, ten of whom grew to 
maturity, two having died in infancy, the 



280 



lUnCkAI'HICAI. AM) KK.M I \ ISC'IC \T IIISTOKV OK 



subject's wife was the eighth child in order 
of birth. Mrs. Cloud attended the common 
schools in Ohio. When she and the subject 
were married they rented a farm in Clinton 
county, Ohio, where they lived a few years, 
the subject farming during the summer 
months and teaching school in the winter. 
In September, 1863, they moved to Illinois, 
settling in Richland county, where they 
bought a sixty acre farm of unimproved 
land in Denver township, forty acres being 
on the prairie and twenty acres in timber. 
He at once erected a log house and other 
similar buildings, making rapid and exten- 
sive improvements and later buying an ad- 
joining farm of forty acres. They finally 
owned a substantial frame dwelling. Mr. 
Cloud taught school during the winter 
months in Richland county. In 1873 they 
sold their principal farm and moved to the 
eighty acres upon which they have since re- 
sided. It is now well improved and nearly 
all under cultivation. Mr. Cloud at one 
time owned one hundred acres of good land 
in Denver township, but he has since sold 
twenty acres of timber land, now owning 
eighty acres of improved land. He has 
never lived out of Denver township since 
coming to Richland county in 1863. Al- 
though both Mr. and Mrs. Cloud have seen 
may years of hardship and privation during 
their lives, their old age is comfortable and 
happy. They have always worked hard 
and have been successful. Mr. Cloud's 
record as a farmer is worthy of praise, but 
that of school teacher is especially worthy 
of commendation, for it covers a long 



stretch of time, twenty-eight years in Ohio 
and Illinois, and twenty-six years without 
missing a year. After he had taught two 
years he attended college in Lebanon, Ohio, 
for two years. He intended teaching for 
thirty years, but thought it advisable to give 
it up on account of trouble with his eyes. 
He won a wide reputation as an able edu- 
cator and his services were in great demand. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Cloud six children have 
been born, three of whom grew to maturity, 
only two of them now living. They are: 
Ida, deceased; John L., living; William 
Henry, deceased ; Thomas W., deceased ; 
Albert, deceased ; Wylie L., living. John is 
single and is living at home with his par- 
ents. Wylie, who is also single, is engaged 
in the laundry business in Chicago where he 
has lived for eight years. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Cloud be- 
longs to the Lynchburg lodge, No. 151, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, at Lynch- 
burg, Ohio, where he joined in 1855, in 
which order he has passed through all the 
chairs in the subordinate lodge. He has 
also been a member of various other secret 
orders, such as the Illinois Grange, and the 
Farmers' Mutual Benefit Association. In 
politics he is a Republican, and once ran for 
the office of County Treasurer on the Farm- 
ers' Mutual Benefit Association ticket in his 
county. He has been treasurer of the Com- 
mission of Highways for sixteen years in 
Denver township, which position he has 
very faithfully filled. He now holds the 
office of School Trustee, and he has been 
president of the School Board for nearly 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



28l 



thirty years. Mr. and Mrs. Cloud are 
members of the Methodist church at Marion 
chapel in Denver township. Mr. Cloud has 
been active in church work and in the duties 
of the same for many years, having been a 
member of the church for thirty years. He 
has been steward and recording steward for 
twenty-five years, having never missed but 
one meeting during that time. He has been 
superintendent of the Sunday school for the 
past fifteen years. He is now one of the 
trustees of Marion chapel, also trustee of 
the parsonage of the circuit. Mr. Cloud has 
now reached the age of seventy-six years, 
ad he has always been blessed with good 
health, now being hale and hearty for one 
of his age. His good life companion is now 
sixty-nine years old and she has not enjoyed 
her usual splendid health for the past few 
years. They are a fine old couple and ad- 
mired by all Denver township and sur- 
rounding country for their lives of whole- 
some influence and their kindness of heart, 
and for the great good they have accom- 
plished in material, educational and re- 
ligious work. 



JOHN W. LARIMER. 

The gentleman whose name forms the 
caption of this biographical review is now 
recognized as one of the leading organizers, 
promoters and all around business men and 
representative citizens of Marion county, 
Illinois, where he was born in what is now 



Stevenson township, May 14, 1852. John 
W. Larimer's father was Smith Larimer, 
a native of Ohio who came to Marion 
county, this state, about 1846. He devoted 
his life very largely to agricultural pur- 
suits. He was elected Treasurer and As- 
sessor of Marion county, serving twelve 
years with great satisfaction to his constitu- 
ents. He moved to Salem in 1858. He was 
a loyal Democrat and was elected to office 
on this ticket. The offices of Treasurer and 
Assessor were conducted as one at that 
time. Smith Larimer died in Salem in 1887, 
at the age of seventy-six years, after a use- 
ful and very active life. Robert Larimer, 
grandfather of the subject, was a native of 
Ireland who emigrated to America when a 
boy, devoting his life to the farm. He lived 
to be an old man. 

The mother of the subject was known in 
maidenhood as Sarah Brown, a native of 
Ohio, who traced her lineage to Scotland. 
She was a woman of fine traits of char- 
acter and she passed to her rest in 1861, 
when the subject of this sketch was nine 
years old. Mr. and Mrs. Smith Larimer 
were the parents of eight children, six of 
whom are living, namely: Andrew Jack- 
son, who was first lieutenant of Company H, 
One Hundred and Eleventh Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, which was mustered largely 
in Marion county, and this brave young 
officer met his death in the great battle of 
Atlanta, July 22, 1864; Wilson S. was a 
member of the same company, having gone 
through the war, dying in the spring of 
1888: Mrs. Sarah M. Kite, of St. Louis; 



282 



lUOC.RAIMIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Mrs. Xancy J. Moore, of Salem, Illinois; 
W. F., of Denver, Colorado; John W., our 
subject; Ann E. Irvin, also living in Den- 
ver ; and Mrs. Kagy, wife of L. M. Kagy, 
president of the Salem State Bank. 

John W. Larimer, our subject, was born 
on the farm, and when six years old moved 
with his parents to Salem where he attended 
school and when fourteen years old went 
into the court house with J. O. Chance, who 
was engaged in the abstract business and 
who afterward became Clerk of the Supreme 
Court of Illinois. Our subject began learn- 
ing the abstract business at this early age, 
and in 1870 he was appointed Deputy 
County Clerk for one year under J. O. 
Chance, who was then Clerk. Shortly af- 
terward Mr. Chance and Mr. Larimer 
formed a partnership in the abstract and 
real estate business, which partnership con- 
tinued for about four years, when Mr. 
Chance was elected Clerk of the Supreme 
Court, then Mr. Larimer continued the busi- 
ness himself up to the present time, becom- 
ing known as one of the ablest, most ac- 
curate and reliable abstracters in this part 
of the state and his office is always a busy 
place. 

Our subject was married May 6, 1871, to 
Rosa Andrews, daughter of Seth S. An- 
drews, now deceased, formerly a representa- 
tive citizen of Salem. Three bright and in- 
teresting children have been born to the sub- 
ject and wife as follows: Dwight W., who 
is associated with his father in the abstract 
business ; Sarah Louise and Kathryn. 

Mr. Larimer has ever taken an active part 



in politics and as a result of his innate 
ability and his loyalty to his party's prin- 
ciples he has been chosen to positions of 
public trust by his fellow voters, having 
been elected Town Clerk in 1877. He has 
also been City Clerk, and he represented 
the old third ward as Alderman, also was 
honored by one term as Mayor. He served 
as a member of the Board of Education for 
four years, and in 1896 he was a member of 
the State Board of Equalization, serving 
four years. This was an elective office and 
Mr. Larimer carried Marion county by over 
one thousand votes, which speaks for his 
popularity in his home county. He received 
ten more votes than William J. Bryan. He 
was Secretary and a member of the Board- of 
Directors of the Salem Building and Loan 
Association, having organized this associa- 
tion of which he has been secretary for 
twenty-five years in 1908, or ever since its 
organization. Our subject is also president 
of the Business Men's Association, and 
president of the Marion County Agricul- 
tural Board. Thus we see that our subject 
has the confidence and good will of the pub- 
lic who have entrusted him with these vari- 
ous positions of honor and trust, and that 
he has conscientiously and ably discharged 
his duties at all times goes without saying, 
in fact, no man in the county is more popu- 
lar than Mr. Larimer, who is regarded as 
one of the county's most valuable men and 
one of its foremost citizens. 

His business interests have been varied; 
he is one of the stockholders in the Salem 
State Bank. He is a prominent Mason, hav- 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



283 



ing been through all the offices in both the 
lodge and the chapter, being a Thirty-second 
degree member. He is also a member of the 
Knights Templar. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Larimer are members of the Presbyterian 
church. They reside at Walnut and Church 
streets in a beautiful modern home which 
they own. 



EDWARD RICHARDSON. 

Individual enterprise which is so justly 
the boast of the American people is strikingly 
exhibited in the career of the gentleman 
whose name forms the caption of this sketch. 
While transmitting to posterity the record of 
such a life, it is with the hope of instilling 
into the minds of those who come after the 
important lesson that honor and station are 
sure rewards of individual exertion. That 
the career of such a person besides being 
treasured in the hearts of relatives and 
friends, should have its public record also, is 
peculiarly proper because a knowledge of 
men whose substantial fame rests upon their 
attainments and character must exert a 
wholesome influence upon the rising gener- 
ation. The life of Mr. Richardson has in- 
deed been a busy and successful one and the 
record is eminently worthy of perusal by the 
student who would learn the intrinsic essence 
of individuality and its influence in mould- 
ing public opinion and giving character and 
stablity to a community. 

Edward Richardson, the well known edi- 
tor of the Olney Democrat, of which he is 
owner, also publisher of the Olney Review, 



both now popular, and one of the influential 
men of Richland county, Illinois, was born 
in Lawrence county, this state, October 7, 
1867, the son of Thomas H. and Eliza J. 
Richardson, the former a native of Kentucky 
and the latter of North Carolina, both repre- 
sentatives of old families of sterling char- 
acter. 

The early education of our subject was ob- 
tained in the public schools of Olney, where 
he carefully applied himself, evincing an ear- 
ly liking for literary studies and deciding 
when a mere boy to devote his life to news- 
paper work in some form. 

The business career proper of Mr. Rich- 
ardson began October 22, 1891, when he 
commenced the publication of the Olney 
Democrat with C. L. V. Tinker, who sold 
his interest to become city editor of the Vin- 
cennes Sun. Since that time, twelve years 
ago, Mr. Richardson has owned and edited 
the Democrat alone, building up the paper 
until it now has a wide circulation and its 
mechanical appearance shows that he has a 
modern plant, the office being one of the 
best equipped in this section of the state. 
The Olney Review was established by our 
subject early in 1908 and it has been a suc- 
cessful venture, supplying a long felt want in 
the field it seeks to serve. These papers have 
been especially noted for their strong sup- 
port of all moral questions and they have en- 
joyed the support of the best citizens. Aside 
from the political phase of these papers they 
are designed to vibrate with the public pulse 
and in addition to the news of the day, their 
columns teem with much of the best current 
literature and they are clean, dignified family 



I1IUCUAPHICAL AND RKM I MSCKNT HISTORY OF 



papers as well as popular and influential po- 
litical organs and their steady growth in 
public favor bespeak for them futures of 
still greater promise and usefulness under 
the able management of Mr. Richardson, 
who is not only an editorial moulder of pub- 
lic opinion, but he also makes his influence 
felt in directing the affairs of the county, be- 
ing an enterprising, public-spirited citizen 
with the affairs of his county at heart. 

Our subject was united in marriage with 
Hulda Strathmann, on February 9, 1898. 
The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 
Strathmann, who became Mrs. Richardson, 
was born in St. Louis, Missouri, January 17, 
1877. Her father is now deceased and her 
mother is now Mrs. Emma L. Busefink. The 
subject and wife are the parents of three 
children, namely: Paul, nine years old in 
1909; Martha and Mary, twins, who are 
five years old. 

Mr. Richardson is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and in his political 
relations he supports the Democratic party. 
He is a forceful factor in directing thought 
along those lines which make for the en- 
lightenment of the public and the highest 
good of his fellow men. 



JOHN H. VAWTER. 

Improvement and progress may well be 
said to form the keynote of the character of 
our subject, and he has not only been inter- 
ested in the work of advancement in indi- 



vidual affairs but his influence is felt in up- 
building the community, where he has al- 
ways resided. Mr. Vawter has been a very 
industrious man all his life, striving to keep 
abreast of the times in every respect, and 
as a result every mile post of the years he' 
has passed has found him farther advanced, 
more prosperous, more sedate and with a 
larger number of friends than the preceding. 
John H. Vawter was born in Salem, Illi- 
nois, in 1860. His father was Reuben T. 
Vawter, a native of Tennessee who came to 
Marion county about 1850, when he was yet 
a young man, settling in Salem, where he 
established a tailor shop, having always been 
a tailor by trade and a first class workman 
in this line. He lived here and met with 
worthy success until his death which oc- 
curred in 1862. The mother of the subject 
was known in her maidenhood as Eleanor 
M. Kimball, a native of Tennessee, who was 
a woman of many beautiful traits, who 
was called to her rest in 1903. Besides the 
subject of this sketch Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
T. Vawter were the parents of another child, 
A. K. Vawter, now living in Oklahoma, 
where he is known as a man of good char- 
acter and much business ability. The sub- 
ject's mother's second marriage occurred 
about 1867, to William Metcalf. John 
H. Vawter made a splendid record while 
attending the common schools in Sa- 
lem. After reaching maturity he went 
into the coal and teaming business, 
later entered the produce business, prosper- 
ing at each of these, but he decided that the 
hardware business was more to his liking 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



and consequently he entered this field in his 
home town in the spring- of 1901. His suc- 
cess was assured from the first, and his busi- 
ness has rapidly grown, making it necessary 
for him to gradually increase his stock, 
which he has done until at present he has one 
of the most complete and carefully selected 
hardware stocks in Marion county. He has 
been in his present location ever since he en- 
tered the business and he numbers his cus- 
tomers from all parts of the county, and 
owing to his courteous treatment and the 
excellent quality of goods he handles, to- 
gether with the fact that they are always 
sold at reasonable figures, his reputation has 
been firmly established and gained for him 
not only hundreds of loyal customers, but at 
the same time hosts of friends. 

Mr. Vawter was married in 1883, to 
Maggie T. Garner, the refined daughter of 
Albert C. Garner, a well known and highly 
respected family of Salem, and to this union 
four interesting children have been born, as 
follows : Lillian G., whose date of birth oc- 
curred in 1886; Hattie N., who was born in 
1889; Marietta's birth occurred in 1891; 
and Irene first saw the light of day in 1901. 

Mr. Vawter has always taken a conspicu- 
ous part in public affairs and as a result of 
his humanitarian impulses his fellow citi- 
zens have honored him by electing him 
Mayor of the City of Salem, which respon- 
sible office he at present (1908) holds, the 
duties of which he ably performs to the en- 
tire satisfaction of this vicinity, and 
during his administration he has done much 
for the betterment and material progress of 



the city, with the result that Salem is one 
of the cleanest, most inviting and well gov- 
erned cities in this part of the state. He 
also served faithfully for four years as Al- 
derman. 

Mr. Vawter is a staunch Democrat and 
well fortified in his political beliefs, being 
at all times ready to lend his support to the 
party's good, and his counsel is often sought 
and always heeded in local conventions and 
elections, for the public knows that Mr. 
Vawter always stands for the best man pos- 
sible in local offices, and whoever he places 
the stamp of approval on is sure to be ac- 
ceptable to the public at large. In his fra- 
ternal relations, he is a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen. Sa- 
lem is glad to number him as one of her 
leading merchants and among its representa- 
tive citizens. The record of his busines ca- 
reer might be summed up in the terse ex- 
pression that he is "above want and below 
envy." 



L. B. KEITH. 

It is not every man who succeeds in giv- 
ing his name to a town, but this distinction 
fell to Peter Keith, who emigrated from 
Pennsylvania during the first half of the 
last century and found his way to Noble 
county, Ohio. He there entered a section 
of land from the government and by hard 
work eventually whipped it into the condi- 
tion of a fairly productive farm. Gradual 



286 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



increase of population in the neighborhood 
led to the demand for a town, which was 
eventually established on Peter Keith's land 
and named in his honor. He continued to 
reside there until his death in 1865. He 
left a son, P. C. Keith, who was born on 
the Noble county homestead, became a mer- 
chant later in life and still resides in' the 
town which bears his family name. He 
married Susan Coffey, whose parents emi- 
grated from Scotland to America in 1826 
and settled near Caldwell, Ohio, where they 
spent the remainder of their days, the father 
dying in 1872, and his wife in 1876. Mr. 
and Mrs. P. C. Keith had ten children, 
whose births are thus recorded : Clara 
Frances, deceased; L. W., deceased; L. B. 
subject of this sketch; Mary Eliza Groves, 
of Caldwell, Ohio; Charles, of Keith. Ohio; 
Asa, of Waterford, Ohio ; Edward, of Gree- 
ley, Iowa; O. W., a merchant at Water- 
ford, Ohio; W. O., of Detroit, Michigan; 
Raymond C., of Phcenix, Arizona. 

L. B. Keith, who is number three in the 
above list, was born in Noble county, Ohio, 
October 12, 1862. He attended school at 
Keith, and in 1888 he removed to Illinois, 
locating at Reinard in the county of Wayne. 
He engaged at once in the mercantile busi- 
ness, which he prosecuted diligently until 
his removal to Flora in 1900. At this point 
he resumed in the same line and so con- 
tinued for two years. Being appointed 
City Marshal, he devoted two years of his 
time to the duties of this office and then 
accepted the position of lieutenant of police 
in the service of the Baltimore & Ohio 



Railroad. This he held for one year and in 
1904 engaged in the seed and implement 
business under the firm name of Borders & 
Keith. In politics he is a red hot Democrat 
and always at the front when a campaign 
is in progress. His fraternal relations are 
with the Odd Fellows, Rebekahs, Red Men, 
Modern Woodmen and Maccabees. 

In 1892 Mr. Keith married Miss Julia 
A. Neff, a native of Reinard, and they have 
three children; Harry, born in 1893, Marie 
born in 1896, and Eddie Fay, born in 1898. 
Mrs. Keith departed this life January 9, 
1907, and was mourned as a good wife and 
mother. 



JOSEPH A PRATHER. 

This venerable citizen of Raccoon town- 
ship, Marion county, has been a very active 
man in the development of this part of the 
Union, having spent his long life in this and 
her sister state on the east. He has seen the 
wonderful growth of the country from its 
wild prairies, dense forests, inhabited by 
red men and wild beasts to one of the rich- 
est and best countries in the world. 

Joseph A. Prather was born in Clark 
county, Indiana, January 31, 1824, the son 
of Sihon and Elizabeth (Williams) Prather, 
the former a native of North Carolina and 
the latter of Virginia. The subject's father 
grew up in the Tar Heel state and moved to 
Clark county, Indiana, where he lived on a 
farm and where he and his wife both died. 
He was a Democrat and held the office of 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



28; 



Justice of the Peace several years. He was 
a member of the Methodist church, well 
known and influential. They were the par- 
ents of the following children : Louisa, de- 
ceased; Samantha, deceased; Thomas, de- 
ceased; John, deceased; Joseph A., our sub- 
ject; William, deceased; Margaret lives in 
Clark county, Indiana. Several children 
died young. 

Joseph A. Prather, our subject, had few 
opportunities to become educated, however 
he attended subscription schools for a time 
and lived at home until he was twenty-one 
years of age, when he went to Floyd county. 
Indiana, and in 1844 married Sarah Ann 
Patrick, a native of Clark county, that state, 
where she was born December 3, 1827, the 
daughter of William and Nancy (Harris) 
Patrick, the former a native of North Caro- 
lina and the latter of Virginia. They lived 
and died in Clark county, Indiana, on a 
farm. There were twelve children in their 
family as follows : Jeremiah, Rebecca, John, 
Elizabeth, Mary, William, Solomon. James, 
Nancy, Lewis, Sarah Ann, and Eliza. They 
are all deceased except the wife of our sub- 
ject. Mr. and Mrs. Prather became the par- 
ents of nine children, three deceased, name- 
ly : Nancy, who married Roland Warren, 
lives in Centralia, Illinois, and is the mother 
of eight children : Margaret, who is now de- 
ceased, having died January 24, 1908, mar- 
ried Lewis Patton, having become the moth- 
er of ten children, one of whom is deceased ; 
John, who married Belle Oldfield. is a 
fanner and teamster at Centralia, and has 
for children: Eliza J.. who married Thomas 



Shaw, of Centralia township, is the mother 
of eight children; Emmons R., a farmer in 
Raccoon township, first married Mollie Gas- 
ton and later Lillie Blair, of Raccoon town- 
ship, having had four children by his first 
wife and two by the second ; Etha is the wife 
of Charles Bundy, of Raccoon township, a 
full sketch of whom appears in this work ; 
Orville, who is living on part of the old 
home place in Raccoon township, married, 
first Laura May, and his second wife was 
Annie Howard, had three children by each 
wife; William died at the age of seven 
years : George died when two years old. 

The subject has fifty-three grandchildren 
and thirty-four great-grandchildren. After 
his marriage our subject lived in Floyd 
county, Indiana, having come to Marion 
county, Illinois, in 1854. where he pur- 
chased two hundred and twenty acres of 
land in sections 29 and 32. He made all 
the improvements on the place, there having 
been but very little when he took charge, 
but being a good manager and a hard 
worker he soon developed a most excellent 
farm and established a comfortable home. 
He carries on general farming, raising all 
kinds of grain, fruit and stock and making a 
success of all that he undertakes. He is a 
Democrat in politics and has held some of 
the offices in Raccoon township, always 
taking much interest in the affairs of his 
township. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church at Walnut Hill. He 
has always been a hard working man and 
is still very well preserved for a man of his 
years, having a good business mind and able 



IIIOC.KAIMIK-AL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



to manage the many details of his fine farm 
with profit from year to year. He is a very 
well read man, keeping well posted on all 
current topics. As a result of his life of in- 
dustry, honesty and kindness he has scores 
of warm friends and if a single enemy he 
does not know it. Everybody in this part 
of Marion county knows "Uncle Joe" Pra- 
ther, as he is familiarly called and every- 
body respects him very highly. 



J. W. SKIPWORTH. 

This venerable and highly hnored citi- 
zen of Centralia is eminently entitled to con- 
spicuous mention in this history, owing to 
the fact that he might properly be called a 
pioneer of this section, having seen and par- 
ticipated in the development of the same 
from the early days and the life he has led 
is one of commendation and worthy of emu- 
lation by younger generations, for it has 
been led along lines of usefulness and integ- 
rity. 

J. W. Skipworth was born in Maury 
county, Tennessee, September 25, 1823, 
therefore he is at this writing in his eighty- 
sixth year, hale and hearty as a boy, active 
and in possession of all his faculties as if he 
were many years younger. His parents, 
Hosea and Cassander (Ward) Skipworth, 
were both natives of North Carolina, the 
former having been born in 1776. The pa- 
ternal grandfather of the subject, Nathan 
Skipworth, was in the American army at 
the time of the Revolutionary war for a pe- 



riod of six years. Our subject was present 
at his death. Eight children were born to 
the parents of the subject, four boys and 
an equal number of girls. J. W., the 
youngest of the number, is the only one liv- 
ing in 1908. 

Captain Ward, the father of our subject's 
mother, owned and operated a merchant 
sailing vessel on the Atlantic ocean from 
Wilmington, Delaware, to Liverpool , Eng- 
land. This was before the days of the Revo- 
lution. 

Hosea Skipworth, the subject's father left 
Tennessee and came to Illinois because he 
was opposed to slavery and the seceding of 
the Southern states from the Union. 

Our subject was five years old when his 
parents moved to Lebanon, Illinois, settling 
on a farm. Hosea Skipworth died at Leb- 
anon in 1832, his widow having survived 
until 1846, having died two miles south of 
Centralia, Marion county. Our subject's 
education was obtained at Centralia. He 
lived in that vicinity until he was sixty years 
old, when he moved to Centralia in 1873. 
He followed farming, trading and stock 
shipping. Our subject saw Centralia grow 
from a wilderness which abounded in 
wolves, deer, wild cats and some bear, when 
there were no houses except cabins in the 
woods, from one-half to three miles apart. 
The country round about was open prairie. 
Most of the residents of this community 
lived on wild meats during the winter, such 
as deer, prairie chicken, quail, wild turkey 
and squirrels. Often as many as one thou- 
sand prairie chickens were seen in one flock. 
Deer was more plentiful than cattle is now. 




J. W. SKIPWORTH. 



Of THE 

UNIVERSITY Of 1LLINOI. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



The wolves killed the sheep and pigs. The 
bridges were all built by the nieghbors, being 
constructed of heavy logs. 

The subject recalls the campaign of James 
K. Polk for President, when the wagons 
throughout the country were decorated with 
polk-berry stain and those taking part in 
the parades and rallies used polk-stalks for 
canes. The market post for all trade was 
sixty-five miles away, St. Louis. The hogs 
were fattened for the most part on wild 
nuts or mast. It was then the custom for 
several neighbors to place their hogs in one 
drove and drive them to St. Louis for mar- 
ket. Mr. Skipworth says that the amuse- 
ments in those days consisted principally in 
shooting-matches, dances or "hoedowns," 
also horse races. The first choice of a beef 
was its hide, tallow and horns; meat was 
the second choice. July 4th always called 
for a big barbecue of beeves, mutton or 
pork, cooked in large trenches. The Dec- 
laration of Independence was always read, 
the drum and fife were very popular and 
the orator of the day was in evidence. Dur- ' 
ing election times the candidates furnished 
kegs of whisky, which was poured into 
buckets, by which sat a tin cup, and each 
one helped himself. The bucket always 
bore the name of the candidate. Where the 
railroad yard is now located in Centralia 
our subject says, he once saw a thousand 
wild geese and as many ducks in the water. 
The swampy place was filled with cinders 
and made solid. 

It was 1835 when our subject came to 
Marion county, through which no railroad 
19 



was built until 1854. Coal mines were then 
unknown and government land and "squat- 
ter sovereignty" were the conditions prevail- 
ing here. Not one man in twenty owned his 
land. It was the cheaper not to own land, 
for then there were no taxes to pay. 
The first land sold for one dollar and twen- 
ty-five cents per acre, then two dollars and 
fifty cents per acre. When the Vandalia 
Railroad came through in 1852 the farmers 
bid in all their land; then came the specu- 
lators. This land now sells for one hun- 
dred dollars per acre. 

Mr. Skipworth was married to Martha 
Crabtree, daughter of William and Mary 
Crabtree, who lived in Jefferson county, lat- 
er moved to Southwest Missouri. They were 
the parents of four children, the subject's 
wife being next to the youngest in order of 
birth. The date of the subject's wedding 
was January 3, 1841. The subject's wife 
had three brothers in the Mexican war. Four 
children were born to our subject and his 
first wife, namely: Julian, deceased; John 
H., deceased; Ellen, living; Virenda, de- 
ceased. The first wife of the subject passed 
away April 4, 1854, and on May 29, 1855, 
Mr. Skipworth was married to Nellie Hos- 
kins. Eight children have been born to this 
union, namely : Louisa, who married Phillip 
Straus, living in Chicago ; Charles, who died 
in 1875; Rhoda married Edward Root, liv- 
ing in Chicago, and they are the parents of 
one son, Charles. The other five children 
of the subject and his last wife have all 
passed away. 

Mr. Skipworth ably served his commu- 



2 9 2 



1MOGKAIMIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



township, the former on August 9, 1838, the 
son of John, known as Jack, Bundy. The 
subject's father grew up and married in 
Raccoon township and lived there all his 
life. He was one of the prominent farmers 
and stockmen. He was a Republican, was 
Justice of the Peace and served in many 
minor township offices. He and his wife 
were members of the Christian church. He 
died July i, 1904, and she died January 30, 
1900. He was not only popular but high- 
ly esteemed. The subject of this sketch was 
their only child. 

George Bundy was one of the patriotic 
citizens of the Prairie state who responded 
to the call for volunteers to save the na- 
tion's integrity during the sixties, having 
enlisted in the Union army, August 12, 
1862, and served faithfully in Company H, 
Eightieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and 
he was mustered out June 19, 1865. He 
was a flag bearer. He met with an acci- 
dent while on duty in the service. While car- 
rying the flag, he caught his foot on a grape 
vine, fell and was very badly injured. After 
the war our subject returned to Raccoon 
township and being a hard worker he se- 
cured two hundred and thirty-nine acres in 
this township. He had only a common 
school education in the home schools. He 
has always lived on a part of the old home- 
stead. 

Our subject, Charles E. Bundy, was united 
in marriage October 29, 1885, to Effie Jane 
Prather, who was born in Raccoon town- 
ship, the daughter of Joseph Prather, a na- 
tive of Indiana. He was one of the old and 



favorably known residents of Raccoon town- 
ship. Eleven children have been born to- 
our subject and wife as follows: Sarah 
Gladys, Earl, Iva May, George Ashton, 
Carroll Ashton, Thomas Oren, John Guy; 
Lola Elizabeth; Ula Violet; Paul Sherman, 
and Charles Deward. 

Our subject has always been a man of 
industry and has made many valuable and 
lasting improvements on his place. He re- 
modeled his fine home in 1908, making it a 
very attractive, substantial and comfortable 
one. He has a most excellent and valuable 
orchard of forty acres. He carries on gen- 
eral farming and stock raising with that 
rare foresight that insures success. 

While Mr. Bundy is a loyal Republican, 
and anxious to see his county develop along 
all lines, he has never aspired for public 
office. He is a member of the Fanners' 
Union. He is known to be a man of thor- 
oughly honest principles, public-spirited and 
agreeable to all his neighbors and many- 
friends. 



M. W. MICHAELS. 

Mr. Michaels, of this review, is one of 
those strong, sturdy characters who has con- 
tributed largely to the material welfare of 
the community and township in which he re- 
sides, being a modern agriculturist and a 
business man of more than ordinary sagac- 
ity and foresight, and as a citizen public- 
spirited and progressive in all that the terms 
imply. For a number of years he has been 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



293 



an important factor in promoting the prog- 
ress of Marion county. 

M. W. Michaels was born near Sumner, 
Lawrence county, Illinois, May 19, 1861, 
the son of Samuel Michaels, a native of 
Pennsylvania, who was born in 1815, and 
came to Illinois when a young boy, before 
Chicago was known. He was a sturdy pio- 
neer and braved the dangers, inconveniences 
and obstacles of the early days, securing a 
wild piece of land which he transformed 
into a valuable and highly productive farm, 
devoting his entire life to agricultural pur- 
suits. He came to Marion county in 1880 
and was called from his earthly labors in 
Romine township, Illinois, in 1897. The 
mother of the subject was also a woman of 
the strongest mould and possessed the ster- 
ling qualities of the typical pioneer woman. 
Samuel Michaels was three times married 
and had a family of twenty children, eight- 
een of whom are living in 1908, a somewhat 
remarkable record. His first wife was a Ea- 
kas, who became the mother of six children, 
all now living, as follows: Mary A., wife of 
W. J. Jones, of luka, Illinois; Anna, the 
wife of Joseph Clevy. of Pomona, Kansas; 
Adline, the wife of Isaac Williams, of 
Browns, Illinois; Mrs. Lafe Jones, of Cal- 
houn, Illinois; Mrs. Martha Jones, of Sum- 
ner, Illinois; William' B. lives at Kremlin, 
Oklahoma. The second wife of Samuel 
Michaels was Mary A. Collins, daughter of 
William Collins, who was murdered near 
Lawrenceville, Illinois, in the seventies. The 
following children were born to this union : 
M. W., the subject of this sketch; Samuel, 
of Gettysburg, Washington; L. G., of 



Franklin, Alaska; C. J., of luka, Illinois; 
R. B., of Centralia, Illinois; W. N., of luka, 
Illinois ; Rose, widow of John Meadows, liv- 
ing in St. Louis, Missouri; Charlie, who is 
living in one of the Western states. The 
mother of these children passed to the other 
shore December 13, 1879. The third wife 
of the subject's father was Caroline Turner, 
a native of Illinois, who became the mother 
of the following children : Cora, wife of 
Charles Bryan, of luka, Illinois; Elizabeth, 
who was the wife of Charles Williams, is 
now deceased; Alvin, Ida and Minnie all 
live in Romine township ; Albert died in in- 
fancy. L. J. Michaels, brother of 'the sub- 
ject, has been in Alaska since about 1897, 
and has made a great success at placer min- 
ing, refusing fifty thousand dollars for his 
claims. 

The subject of this sketch lived with his 
father, assisting with the farm work and 
attending the neighboring schools in the 
winter, until he became a young man, when 
he went west, where he spent several years 
in the railroad business, gaining a fund of 
valuable experience and information. He 
finally returned home and married, Novem- 
ber 6, 1883, Maggie Taylor, daughter of 
P. A. Taylor. Both he and his wife were 
natives of Kentucky. Mr. Michaels went 
west again in 1887 with his family and 
worked from Colorado to New Mexico, but 
was in California most of the time. He re- 
turned to Illinois in 1897, and began farm- 
ing in Romine township. He made a signal 
success of farming, having improved a good 
tract of land and skillfully managed the 
same until he soon had not only a comfort- 



294 



1UOGKAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



able living, but quite a competency laid by. 
Mr. Michaels is a stockholder in the First 
National Bank at Salem, however, he de- 
votes his attention to farming interests 
principally and is known as one of the best 
and most painstaking agriculturists in the 
township and his farm shows unmistakably 
that a man of thrift and industry manages it. 

Mr. Michaels is a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, also the Woodmen, and 
both he and his wife are members of the 
Christian church. The subject and wife 
are the parents of two children, namely: 
Clarence, who was born July 18, 1885. He 
is a bright young man who gives prom- 
ise of a brilliant and successful future. The 
second child, Everett, died in infancy. 

Mr. Michaels has always taken consider- 
able interest in political matters and of re- 
cent years has been influential in local elec- 
tions, being well grounded and well read in 
his political opinions and on political sub- 
jects. Having a laudable ambition for offi- 
cial preferment, and being a popular man 
in his party, his Republican friends selected 
him for Sheriff, having been elected to this 
important office in 1906, by a big majority 
in a county nominally Democratic, which 
shows that he is regarded as a strong man 
in his community. He also served as a 
member of the County Board for two terms, 
representing his township. He has shown 
himself eminently capable in all the offices 
or positions of public or private trust that 
have been proffered, giving entire satisfac- 
tion to all his constituents and, in fact, every- 
one concerned. 



JOSEPH S. PEAK. 

The state of Maryland contributed her 
proportion of emigrants to form the army of 
pioneers who crossed the Alleghanies in the 
earlier part of the nineteenth century to grap- 
ple with the western wilderness. Among 
the number was Joseph Peak, whose birth oc- 
curred about the time of the Revolutionary 
war, and who, after marrying Lucy Leach, 
started on the perilous trip to the "Dark and 
Bloody Ground," south of the Ohio river. 
He does not seem to have been pleased with 
the opportunities offered by Kentucky, as we 
find him soon crossing over to the more con- 
genial soil of the Buckeye state. He settled 
in Butler county, then as now, one of the 
best sections of Ohio and made his living by 
farming until his death in 1835. He had 
eight children and among them William B. 
Peak, whose birth occurred on the Butler 
county homestead, September 25, 1812. He 
also followed the occupation of farming, but 
concluding late in life that the Illinois prai- 
ries offered better inducements, he removed 
to that state in August, 1864, and settled in 
Flora, where he engaged in business until his 
death, January 7, 1896. Aside from agricul- 
tural pursuits, he became a preacher of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and did much 
religious work during the active period of 
his life. He married Cynthia Planner, a 
native of Butler county, Ohio, who made 
him a faithful companion until her death 
in 1874. This worthy couple had eleven 
children, all but one of whom lived to ma- 
turity and eight are still living. Of 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



295 



these. Mrs. Angelina Chidester is a resident 
of Flora, Mrs. Mary Floyd is a resident of 
Dublin, Indiana. Rev. T. De Witt Peak is 
a citizen of Litchfield, Illinois. Mrs. Caro- 
line Major makes her home in Flora. Rev. 
R. F. Peak holds forth at Oakland, Califor- 
nia. Mrs. S. C. Manker is the sixth in order 
of birth. Mrs. C. E. Beckett resides at Cen- 
tralia, Illinois. Joseph S. Peak, the second in 
order of birth of the surviving children, was 
born in Butler county, Ohio, March 16, 1837. 
He accompanied his parents to Clay county 
during the latter part of the Civil war, after 
obtaining a fair common school education, 
partly in his native county and partly n Shel- 
by county, Indiana, where the family so- 
journed for a while. For many years after 
reaching Illinois, he combined farming and 
school teaching as a means of livelihood. In 
August, 1 86 1, he enlisted in Company D, 
Thirty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, with which he served nine months, 
being discharged on account of sickness. He 
farmed and taught school in Indiana before 
he came to Illinois, where he spent his time 
on a farm until the winter of 1893, when he 
removed to Flora, Illinois. In 1884 he was 
elected Surveyor of Clay county on the Re- 
publican ticket, in which office he served ac- 
ceptably for four years. In 1888 he obtained 
the nomination for the same office, but was 
defeated, at the polls. He tried again 
in 1894, and was triumphantly elected, 
but after serving his term, aban- 
doned politics for the real estate and gen- 
eral notary business. In 1896 he was elected 
Justice of the Peace and has continued to 



exercise the duties of that office by repeated 
re-elections. He had served in this capacity 
also while a resident of the country, previous 
to his removal to Flora. Mr. Peak is a hale 
and vigorous man for his age and possessed 
of a cheerfufl disposition, fortified by many 
of the sterling virtues. He has resided in or 
near Flora for forty-five years and is known 
to every one in the county. He is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and for 
five years was secretary of the International 
Sunday School Association. He is com- 
mander of the local post of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. On October 7, 1857, Mr. 
Peak Married Susan E. Lick, who was born 
and reared near the town of Hope in Barthol- 
omew county, Indiana. Their marriage re- 
lations have continued harmonious for over 
fifty-one years. Of their seven children, 
those living are Mrs. Addie Lewis, of Oma- 
ha, Nebraska ; Charles A. Peak, of the same 
city ; Mrs. Mary Chapman, also of Omaha ; 
W. B. Peak, Omaha ; E. E. Peak, of Detroit, 
Michigan; Miss Stella Peak, of Flora. 



FRANK LOOMIS. 

Among those men of Marion county, 
who by the mere force of their personality, 
have forged their way to the front ranks 
of that class of citizens who may justly be 
termed progressive, is the gentleman whose 
name heads this sketch, who has a fine farm 
in Tonti township, which he has taken a 
great interest in and which he has improved 



29 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



in a most systematic way until it is the equal 
of any in the vicinity where it is so admir- 
ably located. 

Frank Loomis was born in this township, 
March 20, 1865, the son of S. E. and Mar- 
garet (McMurray) Loomis, a highly re- 
spected family and for several generations 
well known in Marion county. S. E. 
Loomis was a native of Ohio, where he was 
bom October 12, 1841, and came with his 
parents to Marion county, Illinois, in 1846, 
and after a life of hard work in practically 
a new country, he passed to his rest in 1885. 
Almon Loomis, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, also came to this county from Ohio, 
settling on the farm where Frank Loomis 
now lives. He was one of the pioneers in 
this part of the county and reclaimed the 
farm in question from the wilderness. He 
is remembered as a hard worker and a good 
man in every respect. He passed to his rest 
in this township July 26, 1893. 

S. E. Loomis was married in Marion 
county, his wife having come to this country 
from Scotland, where she was born. Four 
children were born to this marriage. Three 
sons are now living, namely : Frank, our 
subject; Byron C, and Louis L. Frank 
Loomis was reared upon his father's farm 
in Tonti township and worked during the 
summer months on the farm, attending the 
district schools during the winter months 
until he had a fairly good common school 
education. He remained at home until he 
was twenty-one years old, and at the age 
of twenty-three was united in marriage with 
Ida M. Martin, the affable and congenial 



daughter of Caleb and Martha J. (Mc- 
Heney) Martin. Her father was born in 
North Carolina, and he moved to Tennessee, 
later coming to Marion county, Illinois. 
The mother of Mrs. Loomis was born in 
Tonti township, this county. Ida M. was 
the sixth child in order of birth in this fam- 
ily. She was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, where she applied her- 
self in such a manner as to become 
well educated. Two children were born 
to the subject and wife, namely: Glen 
M., born September 12, 1890, and Omer F., 
who was born April 23, 1895. They are 
both bright boys, and will, no doubt, make 
their mark in the world. Mr. Loomis is 
the owner of a farm consisting of one hun^ 
dred and twenty acres on which he carries 
on general fanning which yields him a com- 
fortable living from year to year and at the 
same time permits him to lay up a compe- 
tency for old age and to give his children 
every necessary advantage in launching 
them successfully in the battle of life. His 
fields are well tilled, the crops of heavy 
grain being rotated with clover so as to re- 
tain the strength of the soil. He has a 
comfortable and substantial residence which 
is well furnished and nicely kept. Many 
and convenient out buildings also stand on 
the place, and much good stock of various 
kinds is to be found in his fields and barns. 
In politics Mr. Loomis is a staunch Re- 
publican, but he does not take a very active 
part in party affairs, being contented to 
spend his time on his farm. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Ben Hur lodge, Odin, 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



297 



No. 226. Mrs. Loomis is also a member 
of this organization. He is regarded as one 
of the substantial and best citizens of Tonti 
township. 



ROY H. MCKNIGHT, M. D. 

The grandfather of this popular physi- 
cian was James A. McKnight, a native of 
Indiana, who became an early settler of Il- 
linois. He located at Ingraham, in the 
county of Clay, and prosecuted his trade as 
a miller, a business of much importance in 
a pioneer community. His death occurred 
in 1895, when he was quite advanced in 
years. He had been accompanied to Il- 
linois by his son, Frank, who was born in 
Indiana, learned his father's trade of mill- 
ing, and continued in this calling during the 
working period of his life, which ended at 
Ingraham, in 1894, at the comparatively 
early age of forty-seven years. Frank Mc- 
Knight was married in early manhood to 
Lou Shriner, a native of Ohio, who is 
still residing in Chicago. The chil- 
dren of this union, three in number, were: 
Roy H.. Rolla, now at Minnie, Arkansas, 
and Hazel, a resident of Chicago. 

Roy H. McKnight was born March 14, 
1 88 1, at Ingraham, Clay county, Illinois. Af- 
ter the usual elementary course in the district 
schools at home, he was graduated in 1899 
from the Jefferson high school in Chicago. 
In 1900. he matriculated in the medical de- 
partment of the Illinois University and spent 
three years in diligent prosecution of his 



studies. After leaving this institution, three 
additional years were spent at the Dearborn 
Medical College in Chicago, from which he 
was graduated in the class of 1906. After 
practicing a year in Chicago, Dr. McKnight 
opened an office in Clay City in the fall of 
1907 and since then has continued in busi- 
ness at that place. He had a lucrative prac- 
tice in the hospital at Englewood, but was 
forced to give this up and seek the country 
on account of ill health. The doctor's early 
career was at once a test of his ambitious 
determination and a guarantee of his success 
in life, as he early learned the valuable les- 
son of self-denial and saving. When his fa- 
ther died, he was thrown on his own re- 
sources at the tender age of thirteen. He 
bought a pair of overalls and a cap, took 
a freight train to Chicago and found employ- 
ment at four dollars per week. All but fifty 
cents of this went for board, but on this scant 
surplus he saved money. When by hard work 
and faithful service he was promoted to a 
stipend of four dollars and fifty cents a week, 
he was correspondingly happy. His first 
work was for the Thompson (bicycle) Man- 
ufacturing Company and his next job was 
with the Western Electric Company. His 
hard labor extended through seven years, at 
the end of which time he found himself in 
possession of the, to him, munificent remuner- 
ation of twenty-five dollars per week. In the 
seven years he saved four thousand dollars, 
every cent of which was spent in procuring 
his education as a physician. It is hardly 
necessary to add that the doctor is a pro- 
gressive young man, of boundless ambition 



2 9 8 



HIOC.KAPHICAL AND KK M I X ISC K NT HISTORY OF 



and possessing especial aptitude and ability. 
Dr. McKnight is a member of the American, 
Clay County and Cook (Chicago) County 
Medical societies. He is a Mason and holds 
membership in Union Park Lodge, No. 610, 
of that order in Chicago. 

In 1903, Dr. McKnight was married to 
Bertha May Hill, of Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, and they have one child, Mildred, 
born July i, 1904. The parents are mem- 
bers of the Christian church at Clay City. 



GEORGE J. HEAVER. 

The gentleman to whom the biographer 
now calls the reader's attention was not fa- 
vored by inherited wealth or the assistance 
of influential friends, but in spite of this, 
by perseverance, industry and a wise 
economy, he has attained a comfortable sta- 
tion in life, and is well and favorably known 
throughout Tonti and surrounding town- 
ships, Marion county, as a result of the in- 
dustrious life he has lived there for over 
a half century. 

George J. Heaver was born in Crawford 
county, Ohio, December 8, 1838, the son 
of George Jacob and Christena (Fritz) 
Heaver, both natives of Wertenburg, Ger- 
many. They married in the Fatherland 
where two children were born to them. 
Deciding that greater opportunties were to 
be found in the United States they landed 
at Sandusky, Ohio, July 3, 1838, and be- 
fore becoming hardly established in the new 



country the father died December I, 1838. 
His widow re-married in 1841, her second 
husband being Levi Kline, of Crawford 
county, Ohio, and in 1849 they emigrated to- 
Marion county, Illinois, locating west of 
Salem, where they lived until 1854, when 
Mr. Kline died, and his widow was again 
married, her third husband being George 
Kline; both are now deceased. 

The first marriage of Christena Fritz re- 
sulted in the birth of four children, two 
boys and two girls, all deceased but the sub- 
ject of this sketch. George J. Heaver re- 
mained at home under the parental roof-tree 
until he reached maturity. His educational 
advantages were very limited but he early 
acquired enough schooling to read and write, 
but being by nature an intelligent man, he 
has succeeded admirably well without tech- 
nical training. Our subject was one of 
those loyal sons of the North, who, when the 
fierce fires of rebellion were raging in the 
Southland, felt it his duty to forsake home 
ties and offer his services in behalf of the 
stars and stripes, consequently he enlisted in 
Company A, One Hundred and Eleventh Il- 
linois Volunteer Infantry, on August 12, 
1862, under Capt. Amos Clark, of Salem, Il- 
linois, and was in camp at that place. He 
was called to Camp Marshall where he re- 
mained until October 31, 1862, when his 
company was sent to Columbus, Kentucky, 
and was assigned to the Army of the Cum- 
berland, later taking part in the battle at Re- 
saca, Georgia, and the strenuous Atlanta 
campaign, also in Sherman's famous march 
to the sea. Our subject also came back with 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



299 



Sherman's army through the Carolinas to 
Washington City. He was mustered out 
here after rendering conspicuous and valu- 
able service, and returned to Springfield, 
Illinois, on June 6, 1865. He was wounded 
on May 13, 1864, which resulted in his be- 
ing absent from duty for some time. He 
rejoined his regiment at Rome, Georgia, af- 
ter he had recovered. After his career in the 
army our subject returned to Salem, this 
state, and engaged in farming. 

Mr. Heaver was united in marriage in 
1866 to Maggie Williams, of Salem, who 
was born in Ohio, February 13, 1838. She 
was a woman of many fine characteristics, 
and after a harmonious wedded life of 
twenty-six years she was called to her rest 
in the fall of 1902. Four children were 
born to our subject and wife as follows: 
George W. was born February 19, 1870; 
Louie C. was born September 29, 1874; 
William W. was born October i, 1869, died 
aged seven years; Charles W. was born in 
1879. 

Mr. Heaver was in Texas for a period of 
eight years where he made a financial suc- 
cess of his labors, but he returned to this 
county in 1885. He is now the owner of 
sixty-five acres of land in Tonti township 
which he farmed with the greatest results at- 
tending his efforts, for he understands well 
all the details of managing a farm success- 
fully. His fields are well fenced and cleanly 
kept. Most of the corn the place produces 
is fed on the farm to various kinds of stock. 
He has a nice and comfortable dwelling and 
plenty of good out buildings. His son, 



George W., and daughter, Louie C., live 
with him. 

In his social relations our subject is a 
member of the Salem Post, No. 202, Grand 
Army of the Republic, in which he takes 
a great interest, as might be expected. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian church, a 
regular attendant at the local gatherings of 
this denomination in which he has long 
taken a delight. In his political affiliations 
he is a loyal Democrat, and faithfully served 
the public as Commissioner of Highways 
and Road Supervisor. He is regarded by 
every one who knows him as a man of sound 
business principles, honest and kind. 



JOSEPH K. MCLAUGHLIN. 

Our subject is the present Supervisor of 
Raccoon township where no man is better 
known or is held in higher respect than he, 
for his life has been led along honorable 
lines and he has always had the interest of 
his county at heart. 

Joseph K. McLaughlin was born in Wal- 
nut Hill, Marion county, September 26. 
1850, the son of James and Ann E. (Lyons) 
McLaughlin, both natives of Ireland, where 
they married. They came to the United 
States in 1845 an d settled in Randolph 
county, Illinois, later came to Marion county 
and in 1848 settled near Walnut Hill, about 
1855 locating in Raccoon township. They 
were members of the Reformed Presbyterian 
church. The subject's father was a Repub- 



3 oo 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



lican. He and his wife were the parents of 
the following children: Ann Eliza, Eliza- 
beth, Nancy, Thomas J., Joseph K., our sub- 
ject; Annie E., Jane, James A. and Ann- 
ette E. The subject's father devoted his 
life to farming. He died February 7, 1878, 
at the age of sixty-two years, and his wife 
died February 14, 1908. 

The early education of the subject of this 
sketch was obtained in the home schools. In 
1 882 he bought his present farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres in Raccoon township. 
He carries on general farming and stock 
raising in a most successful manner, being a 
man of sound judgment and a hard worker. 
His farm is highly improved and very pro- 
ductive. He raises much good stock and his 
dwelling and other buildings are substantial 
and comfortable. 

Mr. McLaughlin was united in marriage 
in 1870 with Tirzah E. Morton, who was 
born in Raccoon township, the daughter of 
James and Mary Morton, a well known 
family in their neighborhood. Nine chil- 
dren have been born to the subject and wife : 
Charles, who married Dorothea Huff, has 
three children, Merlyn, Paul, Dorothea; 
James C. married Mora Bennett and they 
have two children, Bennett and Collin C. ; 
Harry married Kate White; Stella married 
Willis R. Burgess and they have two chil- 
dren, Buford and Nellie ; Hugh Archie mar- 
ried Lulu Kell; Joseph is a law student at 
Champaign, Illinois; John is a member of 
the family circle and is a teacher; Walter 
is also teaching and living at home ; Elma 
lives with her parents. These children are 
bright and have received good educations. 



Mrs. McLaughlin is a member of the 
Presbyterian church and a faithful attend- 
ant upon the same. Mr. McLaughlin is a 
Democrat and is serving his second term as 
Supervisor, giving his constituents entire 
satisfaction in this capacity. 



DAVID HERSHBERGER. 

The subject of this sketch was reared to 
the sturdy discipline of the homestead farm 
and during all the succeeding years of his 
life he has not wavered in his allegiance to 
the great basic art of agriculture. To the 
public schools he is indebted for the early 
educational privileges that were afforded 
him, and he duly availed himself of the 
same, while he has effectually broadened his 
knowledge through active association with 
men and affairs in practical business life. 
He has become the owner of a fine stock 
farm and devotes his attention to diversified 
agriculture with the discrimination, energy 
and constant watchfulness which inevitably 
make for definite success and prosperity. 
He has spent practically all of his life in 
Marion county. 

David Hershberger, living two miles west 
of Salem. Illinois, was born October 20, 
1865. in Crawford county, Ohio, the son of 
Henry and Catherine (Snavely) Hershber- 
ger, the former being a native of Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, where he was born 
February 14, 1824, and the latter of Leb- 
anon county, Pennsylvania, both having 
been reared in the Keystone state. They 
moved to Crawford county, Ohio, where 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



301 



they farmed for several years and then in 
1 866 moved to Marion county, Illinois, set- 
tling in Salem township where Henry 
bought a large tract of land, becoming the 
owner of about two thousand acres in Ma- 
rion county. He improved this land and -it 
became very valuable. He died August 29, 
1898. He is remembered as a thrifty 
farmer and a highly respected citizen. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Ger- 
man Baptist church, or Dunkards. Jacob 
Hershberger, grandfather of the subject, 
was also a native of Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, and the great-grandfather of the 
subject, Henry Hershberger, was also a 
native of that place. Henry, the father of 
the subject, and Catharine Snavely were 
married February 10, 1848. They were 
very active in the church and Henry was a 
preacher for many years, having done a 
great amount of good in his work. He was 
a Republican in politics. He and his wife 
were the parents of nine children, named in 
order of birth, as follows : Jacob, a promi- 
nent farmer in Marion county ; Samuel, de- 
ceased; Mary, widow of John Schanafelt; 
Elizabeth is the wife of W. J. Martin, a 
prominent farmer in Marion county; Anna 
is the wife of S. A. Schanafelt; Sarah is 
the wife of C. W. Courson. who lives in 
Marion county; John lives in Salem town- 
ship on a farm; Henry lives in Centralia, 
Illinois; David, our subject, is the youngest 
child. The mother of the subject passed 
to her rest April 14, 1906. 

The subject remained at home on his 
father's farm until he married. He was one 



year old when he came to Marion county, 
he was married December 31, 1888, 
to Lida Dickens, the daughter of Eli- 
jah and Elizabeth (Tate) Dickens, both 
natives of Tennessee, but pioneer settlers of 
Marion county, Illinois, both now deceased. 
The subject's wife was born in this county. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Hershberger six children 
have been born as follows: Leland, de- 
ceased; Walter E., Lottie M., Loren D., 
Henry R., and Wayne D. 

The subject and family are members of 
the German Baptist church in Salem town- 
ship, and the subject is a deacon in the 
church. He is a loyal Republican, having 
served his township as Highway Commis- 
sioner in a most acceptable manner. He 
lives on the old home farm, this together 
with his own farm constitutes two hundred 
and eighty acres. He is regarded as one 
of the leading farmers of Marion county, 
and always keeps excellent stock. He has 
a beautiful home which is elegantly fur- 
nished, and everything about the place is 
kept in first class order. 



MRS. JUDITH SINGER. 

Words of praise or periods of encomium 
could not clearly convey the personal char- 
acteristics of the noble woman of whom the 
biographer now essays to write in this con- 
nection, for only those who have had the 
good fortune to know her personally can 
see the true beauty of her character and in- 



3 02 



ISIOCKAPHICAL AND RE MIXISCKXT HISTORY OF 



dividual traits, which have been the resul- 
tant, very largely, of a long- life of devo- 
tion to duty, a life filled with good deeds 
to others and led along worthy planes. Mrs. 
Singer lives in Tonti township, Marion 
county, where she successfully manages a 
fine landed estate, exercising rare sagacity 
of foresight and business acumen, which 
always result in definite success, and as a 
result of her commendable characteristics 
she enjoys the friendship of a large circle 
of acquaintances in this community. 

Mrs. Judith Singer was bom in Berks 
county, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1838, the 
daughter of Peter and Lyda (Mildenber- 
ger) Beisel. The Beisel family came to 
America from Germany in an early day and 
settled in Pennsylvania, where they devel- 
oped farms and made comfortable homes. 
The parents of our subject always lived on 
a farm, and when her father died, Grand- 
father Beisel moved to Illinois, and the 
mother of the subject was married and came 
to Illinois in 1867, settling in Marion coun- 
ty. She was a good woman and her home 
life was calculated to foster right principles 
in her children. The father of the subject 
was a man of many sterling traits of charac- 
ter, always bearing a good name. 

Judith Beisel was given every advantage 
possible by her parents, and while her early 
educational training was not extensive, she 
applied herself in a diligent manner and has 
since been an avid reader of the best gen- 
eral literature with the result that she is an 
entertaining and instructive talker, especial- 
ly when she elucidates on the pioneer clays 



and the aftermath of commercial develop- 
ment of this section of the country. 

Our subject was married to Oscar Singer 
January 2, 1858, the ceremony having been 
performed in Northumberland county, Pen- 
sylvania. Mr. Singer was born in Germany 
on June 18, 1834. He was educated in the 
Fatherland, and came to the United States 
with his parents when eighteen years old, 
where he learned to be a mechanic of no 
mean ability. He worked at his trade in 
Centralia, Marion county, Illinois, being re- 
garded as one of the best men in the insti- 
tution where he was employed. He later 
moved to St. Louis, where he went into 
business on his own account, and in which 
city he was living when he was called from 
his earthly labors on November 20, 1882. 
His remains were interred in the cemetery 
at Salem, Illinois. He was a good business 
man, honest and industrious and made 
friends wherever he went. He was a public 
spirited man, being a loyal Republican in 
politics. 

Mrs. Singer purchased an eighty acre 
farm in Tonti township, Marion county, in 
1883, and moved thereto soon afterward, 
having resided there ever since. It is a splen- 
did place, well managed and highly im- 
proved in every respect, producing excellent 
crops from year to year and yielding a com- 
fortable income for the family. Mrs. 
Singer's home is one of the most attractive 
in the community. Good stock of various 
kinds and a fine variety of poultry are to be 
seen about the place. 

Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



303 



Singer. Two boys and three girls are living 
at this writing, namely : Ida is the wife of 
Will W. Langridge, who lives in Terre 
Haute, Indiana; Lillie is the wife of Lewis 
Parks, who lives on a farm; Ollie travels 
for an Indianapolis firm; Oscar married 
Maude Kline and lives on a farm; Rose L. 
is a bookkeeper at Salem, Illinois. All these 
children had careful training and all re- 
ceived a good common school education. 



JOHN H. GRAY. 

He to whom this sketch is dedicated is a 
member of one of the oldest and most hon- 
ored pioneer families of Marion county, Il- 
linois, and he has personally lived up to the 
full tension of the primitive days when was 
here initiated the march of civilization, so 
that there is particular interest attached to 
his career, while he stands today as one of 
the representative citizens of Tonti town- 
ship, for his life has been one of hard work 
which has resulted in the development of a 
good farm which he owns and which yields 
him a comfortable living. 

John H. Gray was born in this county 
January 14, 1839, anc ^ believing that he 
could succeed as well here as anywhere de- 
cided to stay in his native community where 
he would have the added advantage of home 
associations. He is the son of James and 
Mariah E. (Nichols) Gray. Both the Gray 
and Nichols families were born in Tennes- 
see, being of that hardy pioneer stock that 



invades new and unbroken countries and 
clears the wilderness, developing farms from 
the virgin land. It was for such purpose 
that they came to Illinois. The parents of 
the subject came to Marion county in their 
youth and were married here, having first 
settled in this locality during the Black 
Hawk war. James D. Gray, our subject's 
father, moved to Tonti township in 1851. He 
was a man of many sterling qualities, a good 
neighbor and citizen, and, as already inti- 
mated, was industrious and a hard worker. 
He was also a minister of the Methodist 
church for many years. His family con- 
sisted of nine children, three boys and one 
girl living at this writing, 1908, all fairly 
well situated in reference to this 'world's af- 
fairs. 

John H. Gray, our subject, received a lim- 
ited schooling in his native community. 
However, he applied himself well and did the 
best he could under the circumstances. He 
remained at home, working on his father's 
place until he reached maturity. He was 
united in marriage in 1860 to Susan Bal- 
lance, a member of a well known family. 
After a brief married life she passed to her 
rest in 1864. This union resulted in the 
birth of one child, which died in infancy. In 
1866 the subject was again married, his sec- 
ond wife being Rebecca A. Boring, who is 
still living, having proven to be a most faith- 
ful and worthy helpmeet and a woman of 
gentle disposition. She was born in 1848 
and attended the district schools in her 
maidenhood. 

Four children have been born to the sub- 



304 



IlIUGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



ject and wife, three girls and one boy, 
whose names follow : Susan E., Mattie E., 
Etta and William A. They have received 
what schooling that is available in their 
community and are all interesting children 
with every prospect for future success. 

Mr. Gray in his political affiliations is a 
loyal Democrat and has taken considerable 
interest in local political affairs, his support 
always being on the right side of all ques- 
tions affecting the public good. He has 
ably served as Highway Commissioner, 
giving entire satisfaction in this work, and 
he is known to all as a man of industry, 
honesty and integrity, thereby winning and 
retaining a large circle of friends. 



ALLEN COPE. 

For nearly half a century the subject of 
this review was a well known resident of 
Marion county. He was a man of many 
talents, having been a successful lawyer for 
several years prior to 1861, at which time 
he located upon a farm in Tonti township 
and turned his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits. He also became an enthusiastic stu- 
dent of horticulture and for many years was 
recognized as one of the leading authorities 
upon this subject in Southern Illinois, as well 
as a practical demonstrator of the same. He 
was one of the first citizens of Marion 
county to engage in the fruit business upon 
an extensive and systematic scale, develop- 
ing one of the largest and most successful 



fruit industries in the pioneer history of hor- 
ticultural pursuits in the county. 

Allen Cope was born near New Water- 
ford, Columbiana county, Ohio, August 4, 
1827, where he resided until 1845. For nine 
years he resided at Salem, Ohio, where he 
was engaged in a mercantile business. In 
1854 he came to Fairfield, Illinois, where 
he studied and practiced law with Judge 
Charles Beecher. 

Owing to ill health he retired from the 
law in 1860 and the following year located 
upon a farm in Tonti township, Marion 
county, where he developed one of the finest 
fruit farms in the county. It was here that 
he passed to his reward, October 24, 1907, 
at the age of eighty years. 

Mr. Cope's career as a horticulturist be- 
gan with his removal to Marion county. He 
planted forty acres of apples in the springs 
of 1861 and 1863, a very large area indeed 
for that period. It is worthy of note, too, 
in this connection that he was one of the 
first to plant largely of the Ben Davis vari- 
ety. This venture proved successful and as 
this orchard began to fail he planted again 
from time to time, and indeed his labors 
ceased only with the coming of his long 
rest. Mr. Cope was an active member of 
the State Horticultural Society and of its 
subordinate society, the Southern Illinois 
Horticultural Society. 

He was a member of the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, and was born and 
reared a Quaker. 

Originally a Whig in politics and a strong 
abolitionist, it was but natural that he should 




ALLEX COPE. 




SARAH A. COPE. 



.HOIS. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



305 



become a Republican upon the birth of that 
party, and for many years he was an ardent 
supporter of its principles and an active 
worker in the ranks. In late years, how- 
ever, he espoused the cause of Democracy, 
believing- that the latter party adhered more 
closely to the principles of Lincoln Repub- 
licanism. Having been a lawyer of more 
than ordinary ability and always a student 
and an observer^, Mr. Cope wielded no small 
amount of influence in his community and 
his opinions upon the leading questions of 
the day were always treated with great re- 
spect. He was a man of many sterling 
qualities, successful in business and influen- 
tial in his community, and was also known 
as a public spirited man of the most scrupu- 
lously honest type. 

Mr. Cope was united in marriage at Sa- 
lem April 16, 1856, with Miss Sarah A. 
Ray, who was born near London, Madison 
county, Ohio, June 30, 1834, Mrs. Cope be- 
ing a daughter of Jesse and Helen (Warner) 
Ray. The Ray family was of English de- 
scent, the grandparents on the Ray side be- 
ing natives of Virginia, who later settled in 
Madison county, Ohio. The Warners were 
of Scotch-Irish descent, the great-grandfa- 
ther of Mrs. Cope having been born in Dub- 
lin. 

Jesse Ray, the father of Mrs. Cope, wa3 
one of the well known and highly honored 
pioneers of Marion county, having secured 
land from the government near Salem and 
locating thereon in 1839. He entered seven 
hundred acres of land in Tonti township, the 
present Cope home being a portion of the 
20 



original grant. Mr. Ray developed and im- 
proved a good farm and became one of the 
largest and most successful farmers and 
stock growers in the county. He moved 
from the farm to Salem in order to give his 
children an education, where he operated a 
hotel and also engaged in merchandising, in 
the meantime carrying on farming opera- 
tions. He finally returned to the farm, where 
he died August 27, 1859. Mr. Ray was one 
of those patriotic sons who participated in 
the Mexicon war, having enlisted in 1847. 
He was with his regiment until the close of 
hostilities and experienced many hardships 
and privations in the long and tedious march 
across the desert to Santa Fe, New Mexico, 
and back again, every mile of which was 
covered on foot. He was a man of much 
sterling worth and influence in his commu- 
nity and accomplished much for the improve- 
ment and development of his section of the 
county. 

Mrs. Cope was five years old when she 
came with her parents to Marion county. 
She attended the country schools and later 
went to Salem with the family, where she 
received a liberal education, having applied 
herself in a most assiduous manner to her 
studies. After her marriage with Mr. Cope, 
as above indicated, she resided in Fairfield, 
this state, for a few years, where her hus- 
band was engaged in the successful practice 
of his profession. Since locating on the 
farm in Tonti township in 1861, Mrs. Cope 
has continued to make this place her home, 
where her children have also been reared. 
Their names are as follows: Laura Isbell and 



3 o6 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



Lenora are both deceased; Walter Lincoln 
and William Abraham were twins, the lat- 
ter dying in infancy. 

Walter L. Cope, the only surviving child, 
was born May 27, 1864. He received a 
common school education and also attended 
the University of Illinois at Champaign for 
three years. June 6, 1888, he was married 
to Miss Anna Vaughan, of Odin township, 
Marion county, and seven children have been 
born to them, as follows : Allen, Bessie, Lo- 
rin, Leila, Howard and Margaret, all of 
whom are living. One child, Raymond, 
died in infancy. Walter Cope is a member 
of the Masonic Order at Salem and his wife 
affiliates with the Order of the Eastern Star 
at that place. 

The Cope home is one of the finest coun- 
try houses in Marion county, being commo- 
dious, comfortable and having modern im- 
provements and conveniences. The house is 
heated with hot air. A system of water 
works has been installed, together with 
baths, etc. The furnishings are up-to-date 
and tastefully arranged, and this beautiful 
home is presided over with rare grace and 
dignity by the Mesdames Cope, who often 
show their unstinted hospitality in enter- 
taining their numerous friends. 



HENRY C. BOTHWELL. 

This family name was familiar among 
the early settlers of three states and its 
members figured both in Ohio and Illinois 



during the pioneer period. James Both- 
well, the founder, was a Pennsylvanian. 
who migrated into Ohio at an early day, 
settled on a farm purchased from the gov- 
ernment, reared a family and ended his 
earthly career about 1863. His son, James 
K. Bo'thwell, was torn in Vinton county, 
Ohio, near McArthur, during the first quar- 
ter of the nineteenth century and removed 
to Illinois in 1840, settling at old Maysville, 
then the county seat of Clay. He was a 
cabinet maker by trade, but afterward en- 
gaged in the mercantile business. In 1863, 
he removed his store to Clay City and con- 
tinued in business until 1887, when he re- 
tired to his farm of seventy acres, within 
the corporate limits of the town. At this 
homestead he passed peacefully away. May 
24. 1899, in the eighty-first year of his age. 
He married Mary A. Brissenden, who was 
born near Albion, in Edwards county, Il- 
linois, her parents being of English stock. 
She died July 16, 1898, at the age of sev- 
enty-seven years. This pioneer couple had 
seven children, of whom four are living, the 
complete list being as follows: Henry C., 
subject of this sketch; J. Homer, an attor- 
ney at Sedalia, Missouri ; Florence ; Camil- 
la, deceased, and William, who died when 
ten years old; James K., in the loan and in 
surance business at Seattle, Washington 
and Frank, deceased. 

Henry C. Bothwell, the oldest child, wa? 
born in old Maysville. April n. 1847. Ht 
was reared in Clay City, where he attended 
the local schools. During the years 1863- 
64, he was a student at McKendree College 



RICHLAXD, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



307 



in Lebanon, Illinois, afterwards attended 
Nelson's Commercial College at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and then accepted a clerkship in his 
father's store, folding this position and 
later as a partner, he spent the years from 
1865 to 1886 iii this line of business. In 
the year last mentioned he became a can- 
didate on the Republican ticket for Treas- 
urer of the county, and was elected. In 
1894 he was re-elected to the same office, 
and served during the four following years. 
After retiring he devoted some time .to the 
abstract business, continuing in this line 
until 1899, when he was made Chief Clerk 
of the Joliet Penitentiary, which position he 
held two and a half years. Returning to 
Clay City he formed a partnership undei 
the firm name of Bothwell & Gill, and this 
business engaged his attention until 1907, 
when he received the appointment of post 
master at Clay City. This was no new ex- 
perience, as he had previously served as 
postmaster for sixteen consecutive years, 
while in the mercantile business. Besides 
this, he had served as Tax Collector of Clay 
City township a number of times and was 
county collector for eight years. He was 
always popular and successful both in his 
business pursuits and official holdings, be- 
ing regarded as one of the prominent and 
influential men of the county. His fra- 
teral relations are extensive and conspicu- 
ous, especially in the Masonic Order. He 
is a member of Blue Lodge No. 488. at 
Clay City, Chapter at Flora, Commandery 
at Olney and the Shrine at Medina Temple 



in Chicago. He is also an Odd Fellow and 
a Woodman. 

In 1869 Mr. Bothwell married Mary C. 
Myers, who was born near Wilmington, 
Ohio. They lost four children in infancy, 
but have three living, to-wit: Lucy, E. L., 
who is practicing law at St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri, and Ada, a teacher in the Hillsboro 
(Illinois) high school. 



JAMES R. RICHARDSON. 

One of the sterling citizens of Marion 
county is he whose name initiates this para- 
graph, being engaged in farming in Tonti 
township. As a result of his industry, in- 
tegrity and genuine worth he is held in high 
esteem by the people of this vicinity, mainly 
as a result of his principal life work the 
noble profession of teaching. 

James R. Richardson, the son of John and 
Sarah A. (Chandler) Richardson, was born 
in Williamson county, Illinois, at Bolton, 
December 19, 1841. The Richardson fam- 
ily are of Irish descent. John Richardson 
was born in Licking county, Ohio, and he 
was eight years old when his parents died. 
He was reared by a family named Decker, 
a farmer at Groveport, Ohio. He received 
his educational training in the public schools 
in the Buckeye state, which was somewhat 
limited, owing to the primitive condition of 
the public schools of that early day. He 
was a man of no extraordinary ability but 
he was a hard worker and succeeded in 



3 o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



making a comfortable living. He came to 
Illinois about 1838, settling near Peoria, 
where he remained a few years. He moved 
to St. Clair county, Illinois, and thence to 
Williamson county and later he came to 
Marion county in 1853, buying a farm in 
Tonti township, where he lived until his 
death in March, 1856. 

The Chandler family came from Penn- 
sylvania. The father of Sarah A., our sub- 
ject's mother, came to Ohio and engaged 
in farming, but not on an extensive scale. 
The mother of the subject was educated in 
the public schools of Franklin county. She 
was a woman of many estimable qualities. 
Eleven children were born to this couple, 
ten girls and one boy. Sarah A. was mar- 
ried to John Richardson about 1838, and 
she passed to her rest in 1870. Mr. Rich- 
ardson was a large land owner in Marion 
county, this state, and he was regarded as 
a man of many sterling qualities. 

James R. Richardson, our subject, was 
the second child in a family of eight chil- 
dren. He remained under the parental roof 
tree until he was seventeen years old. He 
refleiy^d his education in the district schools 
and later at Salem. He was an ambitious 
lad from the start and outstripped most of 
his contemporaries. After finishing the 
public school course, he was not satisfied 
with the amount of text-book training he 
had received and consequently entered the 
State Normal School at Bloomington, Il- 
linois, where he made a splendid record for 
scholarship, and where he graduated in the 
class of 1871, with high honors. 



After leaving school Mr. Richardson at 
once began to teach, first in the county 
schools, having soon become principal, and 
he was principal in several places. Becoming 
known as an able instructor, his services 
were in great demand. He was principal 
of the schools at Woodson, Franklin, Stan- 
ford, Morton and Marseilles, all in Illinois, 
and he also taught a year in Kansas. He 
gave the greatest possible satisfaction as an 
instructor, being well grounded in the texts 
then included in the public school curricu- 
lums, and he was very popular with his pu- 
pils, owing to his friendliness and kindness. 
His teaching extended over a period of 
twenty-six years during which time his 
reputation extended not: only to adjoining 
counties but he attracted -the attention of 
the ablest educators of the state, receiving 
much laudable comment on his work in the 
school room. 

Mr. Richardson could not restrain the 
wave of patriotism that pervaded his whole 
being when, in the dark days of the sixties, 
our national integrity was threatened, and, 
believing that it was his duty to sever home 
ties, leave the school room and offer his ser- 
vices in defense of the flag, he accordingly 
enlisted in Company G, Twenty-first Il- 
linois Volunteer Infantry, and was in the 
regiment assigned to Grant's army during 
the first part of the war. He was in the 
great battle of Stone River and the still 
bloodier conflict of Chickamauga, and many 
other smaller engagements. He was taken 
prisoner at Chickamauga, and was in -prison 
at Richmond and Danville for six months. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



309 



He effected his escape, but was recaptured, 
and later exchanged. After performing 
gallant service for a period of three years, 
he returned home and entered the Univer- 
sity of Illinois in 1864, where he completed 
his education. 

Our subject's domestic life dates from 
December 25, 1876, when he was united in 
marriage with Sarah Martin Williams, a 
highly educated woman, a native of Cass 
county, Illinois, where she was born March 
10, 1856. She lived in Morgan county, this 
state until seventeen years old, when she en- 
tered the State University at Bloomington, 
and was a student there for several years, 
where she made a brilliant record for schol- 
arship. No children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Richardson. Mrs. Richardson is 
a faithful member of the Christian church 
in Salem. Our subject is a Prohibitionist 
in his political affiliations. 



JOHN I. McCAWLEY. 

Few men on the threshold of the anniver- 
sary of the eightieth year of their age pos- 
sess the remarkable energy and activity of 
the subject of this sketch, John I. McCaw- 
ley, who is ^nd has been for years, the lead- 
ing spirit in every big enterprise that has 
been launched in Clay county, Illinois. He 
is not only the wealthiest man in that 
county, but has the distinction of being the 
oldest native born citizen thereof. He is 



the son of parents who penetrated the un- 
broken wilderness of Illinois, when hidden 
dangers menaced their every step. In those 
early days the great forests of that state 
were filled with hostile Indians and fero- 
cious beasts. The subject experienced all of 
the hardships and privations that fell to the 
lot of the youth of those days, but he had 
inherited many of the rugged qualities of 
his courageous ancestors, and the great 
wealth that he possesses today is the reward 
of perseverance and industry. 

Mr. McCawley was born on the Little 
Wabash river, about two miles and a half 
from Clay City, Illinois, August 20, 1829, 
and has spent his entire life in Clay county. 
He is a son of John McCawley, a native of 
Kentucky, who came to Illinois in 1810. 
Soon after this pioneer had located in Clay 
county the Black Hawk war broke out, and 
he was warned by friendly Indians to leave 
the country, add realizing that to remain 
meant sure death he heeded the admonition. 
He started back to Kentucky with an escort 
of Indians who accompanied him as far as 
Vincennes, Indiana. In 1816, when peace 
had been restored he returned to Clay coun- 
ty, and remained there until his death, in 
1854. He was one of the first settlers in 
this section of Illinois, having been born 
in Jefferson county, Kentucky, December 
24, 1782. The grandfather of the subject 
was James McCawley, a native of Scotland, 
who afterwards moved to the north of Ire- 
land, where he married, and came to 
America, settling in Jefferson county. 



3 io 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



The mother of the subject was Martha 
Lacey, who was born in Jefferson county, 
Kentucky, February 4, 1791. She died Oc- 
tober 14, 1844. Her parents were of Irish 
extraction. 

Mr. McCawley remained upon his fa- 
ther's farm until he was twenty years of 
age, and then traveled about the country, 
spending three or four years in St. Louis, 
where he traded in stock. He finally en- 
gaged in the grocery business at Maysville, 
then the county seat of Clay county. He 
was thus engaged for fifteen years, having 
added dry goods to his stock, after starting. 
When the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, 
then the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, was 
finished, in 1856, he moved to Clay 
City, where he re-embarked in the mercan- 
tile business, and until 1898, he had one of 
the largest establishments in the city. It 
was at the close of that year that he retired 
from active business affairs, although his 
local interests are large and varied, and he 
gives them personal attention. 

On May 17, 1856, the subject was mar- 
ried to Maria L; Moore, who was born in 
Johnson county, Tennessee, February 9, 
1840. Seven children were the fruits of 
this union: Arthur H., born May 14, 1857, 
resides in Clay City; Sarah L., wife of 
John T. Baird, of Olney, Illinois, born De- 
cember 7, 1858; Martha Maria, wife of Dr. 
T. L. Leeds, of Michigan City, Indiana; 
Mina Julia, wife of Oscar W. Gill, of Chi- 
cago, born June 25, 1865; John G., born 
March 5, 1871, lives in St. Louis, in the 



commission business; Mary Eliza, wife of 
Richard S. Rowland, lawyer of Olney, Il- 
linois, born September 9, 1873; Lewis W., 
born February 24, 1871, died August 17, 
1905. 

Mr. McCawley is a director in the Olney 
Bank, of Olney, Illinois. He has much 
money invested in real estate, and owns sev- 
eral large and substantial business blocks in 
Clay City. At one time he was the owner 
of three thousand acres of land, but .he has 
disposed of the greater portion of this as it 
required too much of the time that he de- 
sired to devote to his other interests. His 
wealth is the result of his own thrift and 
enterprise. He was compelled to enter the 
battle of life at a very early age, receiving 
a limited education. The subject's father 
was blind for twenty years previous to his 
death, and dutiful son that he was, Mr. Mc- 
Cawley gave him the most tender attention. 
The subject belongs to both the Masons 
and Odd Fellows' lodges, and in politics is 
a Democrat. He was the candidate of his 
party for State Senator ten years ago, but the 
district being strongly Republican, was de- 
feated with the rest of the ticket. Mr. Mc- 
Cawley was the first Baltimore & Ohio 
ticket agent at Clay City. 

The subject is a man of commanding 
presence, intellectual features, with a kindly 
and genial disposition, and is held in high 
esteem by the people of Clay City, regard- 
less of class or condition. Few men have 
done as much toward the material progress 
of this community. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



JOSEPH WILLARD WALTON. M. D. 

Indiana was decidedly a wild and wooly 
territory when Joseph Willard Walton in- 
vaded her borders in search of work and a 
career. Born in North Carolina in 1801, he 
left his native state in early manhood to cast 
his fortune with struggling pioneers cf the 
West, lie was lucky in his location, as the 
county he chose was Washington and the 
land he settled was a part of the alluvial bot- 
toms which in later years gave fame to the 
White river valley. Land was cheap when 
this newcomer arrived from the South, and 
he was able to secure a full section, which at 
the present time is worth at least one hundred 
and fifty dollars an acre. It is the region of 
great corn crops, unsurpased in the produc- 
tion of fine melons, as well as all the cereals 
and varieties of fruit. The old pioneer pros- 
pered as a fanner for those days, but wealth 
was then out of the question for a tiller of the 
soil, owing to lack of market and transporta- 
tion facilities, which the prices of products 
as well as the land placed at a low level. This 
patriot survived until 1901, and had rounded 
out a full century of existence before the final 
summons. He left a son named Daniel R., 
who caught the roving fever in early man- 
hood and decided to move farther west. He 
formed a satisfactory location in Clay coun- 
ty, Illinois, where he farmed until his death, 
which occurred in Harter township, north 
of Xenia, in 1862. After reaching Illinois 
he met and married Ellen Golden, who 
though a native of the state, was of Indiana 
parentage. She survived her husband fifteen 



years and passed away in 1877. Their 'five 
children, all living, are Samuel, who resides 
on grandfather Golden's place, northwest ot 
Flora; Mrs. Maria Abel, of Santa Rosa, 
California ; Joseph W., subject of this sketch. 
Marlow Walton, of North Dakota; Thomas 
J. Walton, of Eagle Grove, Iowa. 

Joseph Willard Walton, third in order of 
birth in the above list of children, was born 
in Clay county, Illinois, July 5, 1869. As 
he was only seven years old when he lost his 
father, the struggle of this boy towards suc- 
cess was rendered unusually difficult. He 
was, however, a bright and courageous boy, 
obedient to his uncle, with whom he lived 
near Flora, and doing cheerfully the chores 
that fell to him, while also proving a diligent 
student in -the district schools. After the 
usual elementary course, he entered as a pupil 
in Orchard City College at Flora, and later 
took a course in Austin College at Effing- 
ham. For ten years subsequent to leaving col- 
lege,, he taught school in his native county. 
He had, however, always been ambitious to 
become a physician, and in 1902 entered the 
Medical Department of St. Louis Univer- 
sity, from which he was graduated in the 
class of May, 1906. On July, of the same 
year he hung out his shingle in Clay City and 
has since diligently prosecuted his profession. 
Dr. Walton belongs to the American, State 
and Clay County Medical societies and is 
the official examiner for the New York Life, 
Prudential, Springfield, Woodmen, Royal 
Neighbors and other insurance orders. His 
fraternal connections are with the Odd Fel- 
lows, Woodmen and Ben Hur societies. He 



I;KK;RAPIIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



has a commodious office well equipped with 
all the modern appliances suitable for his 
business. The doctor has made his own way 
from orphanage and poverty to a command- 
ing and prosperous condition in life. 

In 1893, Dr. Walton married Miss Josie 
Nash, a native of Clay county, and they have 
had three children, Violet Evelyn, Daph- 
ney Ruth, and Charles Willard, deceased. 
The parents are members of the Christian 
church. 



ISHAM E. HODGES. 

Among the sterling Tennesseans who 
have settled in Marion county since the pio- 
neer days, none have shown more worthy 
traits of character or been more active in 
the development of the county than the gen- 
tleman whose biography we herewith pre- 
sent. Mr. Hodges is the owner of a fine 
farm in Raccoon township which has been 
brought from a wild state to one of the 
best in the locality through his skillful 
management. 

Isham E. Hodges was born in Sumner 
county, Tennessee, July 30, 1840, the son 
of Marcus A. and Elizabeth (Marcum) 
Hodges, the former a native of Sumner 
county, Tennessee, where he grew up, made 
a farmer and where he died, and the latter a 
native of Abbyville Court House, Virginia, 
who died in Montgomery county, Tennessee. 
They were members of the Christian church. 
Our subject was their only child. His 
father married a second time, his last wife 



being Susan Hodges, of Sumner county, 
Tennessee. She is still living there on the 
old place. Nine children were born to the 
subject's father by his second union. He 
was a soldier in the Indian war in Florida in 
1836, being a prisoner of that struggle. 
Our subject's great-grandfathers on both 
sides served in the Revolutionary war, being 
in General Starke's and General Green's 
command. 

Isham E. Hodges had little opportunity to 
attend school. However, he obtained some 
education in subscription schools of the early 
days. He left home when seventeen years 
of age and came to Marion county, Illinois, 
where he worked out and carried the mail 
from Fairfield to Salem. He also farmed 
in Salem and Raccoon townships. On Oc- 
tober 31, 1865, choosing as a life partner 
Frances Hays, of Raccoon township, the 
daughter of Elijah M. Hays, whose sketch 
appears in full on another page of this work. 
Eleven children have been born, eight of 
whom are living: Effie, deceased, married 
Harvey England, who lives in St. Louis, 
Missouri. She was born August 23, 1866, 
and died August 8, 1883. Iva E., the sec- 
ond child, was born October 28, 1867, mar- 
ried Harvey Mercer; they live in Sadora, 
Arkansas, and are the parents of five chil- 
dren, Clinton, Sylvia, Stewart, Howard and 
Opal. Clara B., the third child, was born 
March n, 1869, died February 8, 1892, 
married Charles Anderson, of Chicago, Illi- 
nois; John D., who was born March 21, 
1873, first married Lucy White and second 
Lydia Kell, having had two children by his 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



313 



first wife, Clayton and Robert, and one child 
by his second wife, named Donald. He has 
been postal clerk for several years on the Chi- 
cago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. He was 
first on the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 
Railroad, his first run being between Mc- 
Leansboro and Shawneetown, Illinois. He 
runs between Marion and Villa Grove. Ralph 
Waldo, the fifth child, was born June 6, 
1874, and died October 25, 1875; Mark 
Ainsly was born January 2, 1877, married 
Indiana Stonecipher, and they have four 
children, Delta, Isham, Charles and Mary; 
Grace was born September 13, 1878, mar- 
ried Levi Bigham, a farmer in Raccoon 
township; Mabel J. was born August 28, 
1880, married Henry F. March, station 
agent at Cartter, Illinois, on the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois Railroad, and they are the 
parents of three children, Everett, Franklin 
and Marie ; Minnie Blanche, born September 
26, 1882, married Elisha Harmon, a car- 
penter of Raccoon township; Elaine E., born 
November 8, 1884, who married Clara 
Pitts, is a farmer in Raccoon township; 
Dwight E., born October 28, 1886, is an 
operator on the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad at Herrin, Illinois, married 
Xellie Dukes, and they have one child, Clara. 

The subject's children have been educated 
in the home schools, John D. and Iva went 
to Carbondale, and Elaine attended the agri- 
cultural department of the University of 
Missouri at Columbia. 

In 1865, after the subject of this sketch 
was married, he rented land in Raccoon 
township. After farming here for a while 



he went to Idaho, also the state of Wash- 
ington, also the Shoshone agency and the 
Red Cloud agency in Wyoming. He was 
in the West from 1869 to 1871. He was a 
clerk and did office work most of the time. 
After 1871 he worked in the United States 
Pension Agency at Salem, Illinois, under 
Gen. J. S. Martin, from March 4, 1872, to 
March 4, 1873, having given entire satisfac- 
tion in this capacity, after which he entered 
the railway mail service on the Baltimore & 
Ohio Southwestern Railroad and run be- 
tween Cincinnati and St. Louis for three 
years, when he was transferred to the Illinois 
Central Railroad, his run being between 
Cairo and Centralia for three years, and on 
the northern division from Centralia to Chi- 
cago until April 20, 1889. During this time 
he lived in Centralia, from 1878 to 1880. 
In 1869 he bought the farm he now lives 
on in Raccoon township. In 1880 he built 
his fine brick house and made all the other 
improvements on the place which is one 
of the choice farms of this locality. It con- 
sists of one hundred and forty acres in sec- 
tions 24 and 25, Raccoon township. One 
hundred and twenty-five acres are under 
a high state of cultivation. He has a very 
valuable orchard of one thousand apple 
trees, three hundred peach trees as well as 
pears, cherries and small fruits. He also 
raises much good stock, horses, mules and 
cattle and fine Chester White hogs. His 
farm is also well stocked with fine chickens, 
White Wyandotte and Rhode Island Red 
chickens. 

Mr. Hodges was one of the patriotic sons 



IMOCKAl'lllCAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



of the North who fought to preserve the 
Union during the dark days of the sixties, 
having enlisted July 4, 1861, in Company 
G, Twenty-second Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, under Capt. J. S. Jackson and Col. 
Henry Dougherty, having been mustered in 
at Casseyville, Illinois. He and his com- 
pany were sent to Birds Point, Missouri, 
and was in the engagement November 7, 
1861, at Belmont, Missouri. They joined 
General Pope and was at the surrender of 
Tiptonville, Tennessee, where they cap- 
tured about seven thousand prisoners. They 
then went down the Mississippi river to Ft. 
Pillow and after the battle of Ft. Donelson 
and Pittsburg Landing, they went up 
the Tennessee river and were at the siege of 
Corinth, and, after several skirmishes, 
marched to Nashville, Tennessee ; and oc- 
cupied that city until December 26, 1862. 
Our subject was in General Sheridan's di- 
vision, McCook's corps, General Rosecrans 
commanding. They were in the marches and 
battles from Nashville to Murphysboro, 
Tullahoma, Bridgeport, Alabama, and 
Chickamauga, Georgia, being wounded in 
the latter battle September 20, 1863, where 
he was shot in the thigh and sent to the field 
hospital at Crawfish Springs, where all the 
wounded men captured were paroled next 
day and sent to Nashville and Louisville, 
later to Quincy, Illinois, and then to Benton 
Barracks. Then the subject was on detail 
duty and in the commander's office until 
July i, 1864, and he was sent to Springfield, 
Illinois, and mustered out July 7, 1864. 
Mr. Hodges is a loyal Populist. He has 



been Supervisor of his township for two- 
years, has also been School Director and 
held minor offices. 



ISRAEL MILLS. 

The streams of emigration, pouring from 
Pennsylvania and Virginia in the pioneer 
period usually united in Ohio, the first of the 
western states to be reached. Marriages often 
resulted between the descendants of the 
northern and southern branches and the in- 
fusion of blood often produced fine types for 
future citizenship. We find this working out 
well in the Mills family which, on the fa- 
ther's side, came from the state of Pennsyl- 
vania, and on the mother's side boasted of 
origin in the Old Dominion state. It was far 
back in the nineteenth century that Thomas 
Mills, with his wife, Hannah, crossed the 
Alleghanies from one of the counties of 
Pennsylvania. To the same locality in Ohio 
where he settled came Hugh and Mary 
Downing from the western part of Virginia. 
Jonathan Mills, a son of the first mentioned 
couple, eventually found a wife in the 
person of Sarah Downing, both the con- 
tracting parties being natives of Ohio. 
The former, who was a farmer, passed 
away in the early seventies, but his 
wife survived until 1894, being eigh- 
ty-two years old at the time of her death. 
This couple became the parents of twelve 
children, the six still living being as follows : 
Hugh, a resident of Clay City township: 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



315 



Thomas, a resident of Oklahoma ; Israel, the 
subject of this sketch; James D., of Carroll 
county, Ohio ; Josephine Fry, of Tuscarawas 
county, Ohio; and William, of Tobacco 
Plains, Washington. 

Israel Mills, who was the sixth in this 
iarge family, was born in Tuscarawas coun- 
ty, Ohio, April 18, 1843. He assisted his 
father on the farm until June, 1862, when he 
enlisted in Company K, Eighty-seventh 
Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 
served until taken prisoner at Harper's Fer- 
ry in September of that year. Being speed- 
ily paroled and discharged on October 3rd, 
he took a rest until June 29, 1863, when he 
re-enlisted in Company B, One Hundred 
and Twenty-ninth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he served until the ex- 
piration of his term, March 5, 1864. For 
the third time, he took up his musket as a 
private in Company H, One Hundred and 
Seventy-Eighth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he served until the close 
of the war and was honorably discharged 
June 29, 1865. . In October of that year, he 
came to Clay City, where he has since re- 
sided for forty-three consecutive years. He 
settled at first one mile south of town and 
engaged in farming, paying particular at- 
tention to the breeding of stock, in which line 
he acquired a high reputation. With the ex- 
ception of seven years spent in merchandis- 
ing, Mr. Mills has devoted practically all his 
time to breeding, handling and dealing in 
stock, with a preference for the fine grades 
in all varieties. Though he has other and 
varied interests, his heart has been set upon 



and his attention always turned to the noble 
animals that have brought wealth and fame 
to Illinois. He is an extensive land owner, 
his possessions in this line lying in Clay City 
and Standford townships. At present he 
owns five hundred and seventy-five acres, 
though at one time he was proprietor of 
twice that amount. He is a thorough-going, 
practical and scientific farmer, well informed 
in everything relating to advanced agricul- 
ture, and an enthusiast in all movements to 
educate and improve conditions in the farm- 
ing industry. Appreciation of his qualifica- 
tions was shown by Governors Tanner, 
Yates and Deneen, when they appointed him 
delegate during six years to the B'armers' 
National Congress. He has held the position 
of director from his Congressional district 
for the State Farmers' Institute. He is an 
able and forceful speaker in the debates at 
county, state and national farmers' institutes. 
It may be said in short, that there is not i 
man in Clay county whose business judg- 
ment is more highly valued than that of 
Israel Mills. A man of the loftiest integrity 
and most benevolent impulses, he has been an 
honor and a treasure to his adopted county. 
Mr. Mills is president of the Clay City 
Banking Company, and for twenty years has 
held the same position with the Clay City 
Loan and Homestead Association. He is 
also president of the Opera House Company 
and president of the Clay County Farmers' 
Institute. He has been frequently honored 
with positions of trust in his township, serv- 
ing as a member of the board of supervisors, 
school trustees and as collector. He has 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



never desired office and never had a lawsuit 
during all the years of his active business 
life. He is a director of the Farmers' and 
Merchants' 'Bank at Louisville, Illinois. As 
president of the Clay City bank, he insisted 
during the panic of 1907, that all depositors 
should be paid on presentation of their 
checks. ' He is a Mason, and Eastern Star 
and a member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

September 10, 1867, Mr. Mills married 
Elizabeth L., daughter of Thomas and Din- 
iah E. (Whitman) Bogwell, very early set- 
tlers of Clay county. The children from 
this union were: Edna M., born July 2, 
1870, died April 2, 1905. Edna married 
Jabez Edwin Coggan, April 29, 1891. Ont 
son survives her, Kenneth M., born June 
23, 1896; James B., born October 22, 1881, 
married to Annettie Crackles December 28, 
1904. One child, a daughter, Ethel, was 
born to them December 5, 1906. Mrs. Mills 
is a member of the Christian church and the 
entire family enjoy the highest social consid- 
eration and popularity. 



GEORGE W. HILTIBIDAL. 

The subject of this biographical review 
has well earned the title to be addressed as 
one of the progressive, self-made men of 
Marion county, being the owner of a very 
valuable landed estate in Raccoon township, 
where his labors have benefited alike him- 
self and those with whom he has come in 
contact. 



George \V. Hiltibidal was born in Grand 
Prairie township, Jefferson county, Illinois, 
March 15, 1867, the son of George and 
Elizabeth Bradford, both natives of Indiana. 
They moved to Marion county, Illinois, and 
finally located in Raccoon township. After 
building a dwelling house and making ex- 
tensive improvements on his farm here he 
moved to Grand Prairie, Jefferson county, 
where he died in 1869, on a farm which he 
had improved, and where his wife also died 
in 1876. He was a strong Republican and 
he and his wife were members of the Chris- 
tian church. They were the parents of five 
children, namely: Mary is living in Wash- 
ington county, this state, having married 
Neil Kingsley ; Ella, who married Robert 
Birge, lives at Walnut Hill, this county ; 
John died young; Sarah, who married 
James Sprouse, lives in Jefferson county, 
Illinois; George William, our subject, was 
the youngest child. 

The subject's mother died when he was 
nine years old. He had not been to school 
up to that time. He then went to live with 
his uncle, George Bundy, in Raccoon town- 
ship, with whom he remained for eleven 
years. He then located on his present farm 
in Raccoon township, section 28, having 
secured forty-five acres known as the May 
place. It had an old log house and stable 
on it. The subject has been a hard worker 
and a good manager and he built his present 
fine substantial and modern home in 1907, 
and his excellent barn in 1906, and he has 
made all the extensive improvements on the 
place. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



317 



Mr: Hiltibidal was united in marriage 
April 5, 1888, to Josie Heyduck, the daugh- 
ter of Jacob and Phillimina Heyduck, na- 
tives of Germany, having lived in the River 
Rhine country. They came to America and 
secured wild land in Raccoon township, 
which they developed and on which they 
made a good home where they lived until 
1903, when Mr. Heyduck retired and moved 
to Centralia. The subject's wife was born 
in Raccoon township, this county. Mrs. 
Heyduck died in 1890. Ten children were 
born to them as follows: Lizzie, who lives 
in Decatur, Illinois ; Ricca is deceased ; Lucy 
is deceased; Kate lives at Odin, Illinois; 
Josie, wife of our subject ; John is deceased, 
Emma lives on the old place in Raccoon 
township ; Henry lives at Centralia ; Ben- 
nie lives in Centralia ; Laura also lives in 
Centralia. 

Five children have been bom to the sub- 
ject and wife as follows: George, Gracie, 
Esther, Bertha, Julius. The subject carries 
on a general farming business with great 
success. He is considered an excellent judge 
of live stock and raises some good horses. 
He has always been a farmer, but for many 
years has worked at the carpenter's trade. 
He has put up all his own buildings and 
done all his own work. He is regarded as 
an excellent carpenter and his services are 
frequently sought by those desiring to build. 

Our subject has faithfully served as a 
member of the local school board for six 
years. He is a Republican in his political 
affiliations. He is a member of the Farm- 
ers' Educational Co-Operative union at Bun- 



dyville, Illinois. He has gained his success 
not through the assistance of relatives or 
friends, but by his own efforts. 



JOHN PETER XANDER. 

Scientific methods of farming dissem- 
inated through the medium of the agricul- 
tural schools throughout the country have 
come- as a great blessing to those pursuing 
agricultural callings. Yet the farmers in 
our younger days had no such advantages. 
They had tc depend upon their own judg- 
ment, their own foresightedness, their own 
intuition, as it were, to overcome many a 
perplexing agricultural problem; Their 
success was more often than not almost phe- 
nomenal ; and we can pardon them if they 
look askance upon our newer methods. The 
subject of the present sketch began his 
farming career (on his own land) about the 
Civil war period, and his well cultivated 
land today shows that his efforts did not 
go unrewarded. 

John P. Xander, of Richland county, 
Claremont township, was born May 26, 
1833, in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania. He 
was the son of Joseph and Mary (Dorney) 
Xander, natives of that state, who in the 
year 1834, took a boat on the Ohio river 
from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, to Evans- 
ville, Indiana, enroute to Illinois. They 
brought with them on the boat their horses, 
wagons and all belongings. During the 
voyage one of the deck hands happened to 



I'.IOCUAPIIICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



throw one of their wagon wheels overboard 
and the voyage had to be interrupted to 
fish it but. They landed in Evansville, In- 
diana, April 28, 1834, when they crossed 
the Wabash river on the ferry boat and set 
forth on a journey by land settled in Wabash 
county, Illinois. Mrs. Xander's parents 
also came along at the same time and set- 
tled in Illinois. Grandfather Dorney took 
a farm there at that time and Joseph Xan- 
der and his wife went to live with them for 
several years. Later they took up eighty 
acres of government land, paying one dol- 
lar and twenty-five cents an acre for it in 
Wabash county, and on this place they con- 
tinued to live until their death. John P. 
Xander's mother died about five years be- 
fore his father. He remained with his par- 
ents assisting them on their farm until his 
twenty-sixth year when he started on his 
own account. At the age of thirty years he 
married Mary Betebenner on August 23, 
1863. He then rented a farm in Wabash 
county, where he remained about seven 
years, at the end of which period he bought 
a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in 
Claremont township, Richland county, and 
moved onto same where he remained for 
thirty years, again removing to the home 
he now occupies. His farm life was all the 
time marked with industriousness and his 
improvements did much to enhance the 
value of the land he settled on. He built 
every portion of the substantial house he 
now lives in. 

John P. Xander's wife was born Novem- 
ber 1 8, 1839, in Frederick county, Mary- 



land. She was the daughter of Geor 
and Lydia Betebenner, her mother's ov 
name being Everheart, who were natives 
Pennsylvania. She was the fourth of ni: 
children. Her parents came to Illinois 
the year 1856, coming by train over t 
early railroad, where they settled in W 
bash county, Mrs. Xander then being seve 
teen years of age. She remained with h 
parents on their farm until the time of h 
marriage. Her mother died at the age 
sixty and her father survived about fi 
years, dying at the age of eighty-five. Bo 
died on the farm they occupied and we 
buried in the Lutheran cemetery in W 
bash county, where the parents of Jol 
Xander are also interred. 

John P. Xander's married life has bei 
blessed with seven children, one of who 
died in infancy. In the order of birth h 
children are: Ida A., who is the wife < 
Peter Crum, and resides on her husbanc 
farm in German township; Furman, wl 
has married, and lives at home with his pa 
ents; William H. is married and resid 
near Altus, Oklahoma, on a farm. Ev 
the wife of George Bragunier. who residi 
in Emporia, Kansas. James E. is marri< 
and lives in Lincoln, Illinois. John H. 
single and resides in Ogden, Utah, whei 
he is employed by a large meat packin 
concern. 

At the time of the Civil war John 1 
Xander was drafted for service in 186 
having responded to the call to arms, bl 
upon arriving in Cairo, Illinois, he was r 
turned home on account of a sufficier 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



319 



number of soldiers having already been ob- 
tained. 

In his yonth and early life, John P. Xan- 
der attended the subscription schools in 
Wabash county, where he imbibed all the 
knowledge that institution could give him. 
His school days were at the period of the 
elementary spellers, first, second and third; 
and McGuffey's readers. Arithmetics were 
also in use in the log 1 school-house. The 
old hewn planks, pin supported, were the 
seats, and the desks along the wall were of 
the same quality. 

In politics the subject of this sketch is 
and has been a Democrat and a loyal sup- 
porter of W. J. Bryan. The first Presiden- 
tial candidate for whom he exercised his 
right as a voter was James Polk. In for- 
mer days he took a man's part in the poli- 
tics of the township and county. He was 
for three terms Township Assessor in 
Claremont township. 

John P. Xander, his wife and the mem- 
bers of his family, belong to the English 
Lutheran church. He has been very active 
himself in church circles, holding both the 
office of deacon and elder, and is a man 
looked up to by all of his co-religionists. 

The subject of this sketch is now living 
quietly upon his farm of eighty acres which 
through his industry and zeal has been 
brought to its present state of cultivation. 
His health, which has always been of a 
rugged character, has failed somewhat 
within the past year and he is consequently 
a sufferer to some extent. He has always 
"been unsparing in his hardworking efforts 



to irnprove his land, and as a result his 
labors have marked his frame. Aside from 
his ill health, his home life is extremely 
happy. 



THOMAS B. NEAL. 

The gentleman whose name heads this re- 
view is one of the leading farmers in his 
community in Marion county, and this 
volume would be incomplete were there fail- 
ure to make mention of him and the enter- 
prise with which he is identified. Tireless 
energy and honesty of purpose are the chief 
characteristics of the man. 

Thomas B. Neal, a native of Marion 
county, Illinois, was born October 31, 1830. 
the son of Thomas and Rossanna (Walters) 
Neal. The former came to this county from 
Kentucky about 1828 and located near 
Owens Hill where he spent the remainder of 
his life, having made a comfortable living 
from his farming pursuits, being a hard 
worker and a man of highest integrity. The 
Walters people were born in Georgia and 
came from that state to this county. The 
father and mother of our subject were mar- 
ried in Kentucky. 

Thomas B. Neal, our subject, was reared 
on a farm which he helped develop from 
the wild country into which the father had 
moved, but this was an industrious family 
and soon a good and productive farm was 
developed. His early schooling was some- 
what limited owing to the fact that it was 
necessary for him to work on the farm and 



320 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND KKM I X ISC H.\T HISTORY OF 



schools were of the most primitive type in 
those days, taught only a few months out 
of each year. Our subject showed his 
loyalty to the "old flag that has never 
touched the ground" during the forties 
when this country was in war with Mexico. 
Being unable to restrain his patriotism when 
he heard the call for troops to fight the 
descendants of the Montezumas, and he is 
today one of the few highly honored sur- 
vivors of that famous conflict in this coun- 
try, and it is indeed a privilege to meet and 
to show proper courtesy to such heroes. 
Mr. Neal enlisted in Company C, First Illi- 
nois Volunteer Regiment, and served with 
marked distinction in the same throughout 
the war. He is now remembered by his 
government with a pension of twenty dol- 
lars per month, as the result of his valor in 
this war. The only other living Mexican 
war veteran in Marion county besides our 
subject is William Bundy. 

After his experience in the army, Mr. 
Neal returned home and was married in 
1851 to Julia H. Chandler, whpse people 
were from Wilson county, Tennessee. To 
this union eight children were born, all de- 
ceased but four. Mr. Neal's first wife passed 
away May 2, 1898, and he was married 
again April 10, 1900, to Manda S. Cozad. 
No children have been born to this union. 
The names of the subject's children by his 
first wife follow: Alexander, deceased; 
John A., deceased; Etta, Delia, Rose A., de- 
ceased ; Cora, Charley and Ben, deceased. 

Our subject has six grandchildren and six 
great-grandchildren, of whom he is justly 



proud. Mr. Neal owns a fine farm of forty 
acres in Tonti township, which he has de- 
veloped to a high state and which has yield- 
ed him a comfortable living from year 
to year and enabled him to lay up a compe- 
tency for his old age. This place shows that 
a man of good judgment has had its man- 
agement in hand, and while he is now in the 
evening of life he is able to still successfully 
manage his affairs. He lives in section 9 
of Tonti township in a substantial farm 
house which is surrounded by convenient 
outbuildings, and his farm is properly 
stocked with various kinds of live stock and 
poultry. He delights to see the advance- 
ment of his community and county, and he 
formerly took an active part in the affairs 
of the Democratic party. 



LANDON M. BOSTWICK. 

It is always pleasant and profitable to 
contemplate the career of a man who has 
made a success of life and won the honor 
and respect of his fellow citizens. Such is 
the record, briefly stated, of the well known 
and progressive gentleman whose name 
forms the caption of this article, than whom 
a more whole-souled or popular man it 
would be difficult to find in the business cir- 
cles within the limits of Marion county, 
where he has long maintained his home and 
whose interests he has ever had at heart, for 
in all the relations of life he has proven true 
to every trust reposed in him and few cit- 
iens of the county are worthier of the high 




RESIDENCE OF L. M. BOSTWICK. 

Centralia, Illinois. 




L. M. BOSTWICK. 



Of THE 

0' 'LLINOIS. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



3 2I 



:steem which they enjoy than Mr. Bost- 
vick, who is known as one of the leading 
umbermen of this part of the state. 

The subject of this review is descended 
rom a long line of sturdy ancestors, the 
:arliest generations being easily traced to 
he settlement of the Bostwick family at 
stratford, Connecticut, prior to 1650. John 
3ostwick, the subject's great-great-great- 
>reat-grandfather, was born at Stratford, 
Connecticut, May 4, 1667, and he became 
deputy to the General Court of Connecticut, 
erving during twenty-one sessions, from 
September, 1725, to October, 1740, and he 
icrved in the army as lieutenant and major, 
fhe great-great-great-grandfather of the 
ubject, Ebenezer Bostwick, was born in 
693, and he was captain of the First Com- 
iany or train band, of Danbury, Connecti- 
ut, in October, 1743. Edmond Bostwick, 
he great-great-grandfather of our subject, 
vas born September 15, 1732, and died Feb- 
uary 2, 1826. The subject's great-grand- 
ather, Ebenezer Bostwick, was born June 
!2, 1753, and died March 16, 1840. He 
lad an excellent war record, like his an- 
estors, having been an orderly sergeant in 
he Revolutionary army and he was a pen- 
ioner until his death. This family remained 
ti the state of Connecticut through many 
generations and the subject's grandfather, 
Andrew Bostwick, was born at New Mil- 
ord, that state, November 3, 1778, but he 
nigrated to the West and died at Berrien 
springs, Michigan, October 21, 1838. The 
ather of our subject was a merchant at 
>Iiles, Michigan, his store having been the 
21 



first brick building in that town. At Pres- 
ident Lincoln's call for volunteers he en- 
listed as a private in Company E, Twelfth 
Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and he was 
made a prisoner of war at the battle of 
Shiloh and served nine months in Ander- 
sonville and Libby prisons. After his re- 
lease he received several promotions and 
finally was made captain of the company, 
serving as such in a very creditable manner 
until the close of the war. He died at Niles, 
Michigan, in the year 1876, when fifty-six 
years old, and was given a military and 
Masonic funeral, which was very largely 
attended. 

. Among the subject's ancestors on the ma- 
ternal side of the family was Rev. Peter 
Pruden, one of the founders of the colony 
at Milford, Connecticut, and in 1639 the 
founder of the First Church of Christ. 
When the two hundred and fiftieth anni- 
versary of Milford was celebrated, a memo- 
rial window was placed in the church in 
honor of his memory. There is also in the 
memorial bridge a stone in his memory, 
bearing the text of his first sermon, "The 
voice of one crying in the wilderness." Of 
him the noted Cotton Mather says, "His 
death was felt by the colony as the fall of 
a pillar which made the whole fabric to 
shake." Another distinguished ancestor of 
the subject's mother was Capt. Thomas 
Willets, the first Mayor of the city of New- 
York. 

Landon M. Bostwick, one of the fore- 
most business men of Centralia, Illinois, 
was born December i, 1862. He received 



3 22 



BIOGRAPHICAL AM) KI.M I X ISCKXT HISTORY OF 



his early education in the public schools and 
afterward was instructed in the higher 
branches by a private tutor, the course of 
study including some travel. The death of 
the subject's father made it necessary for 
him to give up study and seek means of 
self-support, which he found in the locomo- 
tive department of the Michigan Central 
Railroad, becoming an engineer at the early 
age of nineteen years. While serving in the 
capacity of fireman and engineer, he took 
a course in mechanical mathematics and 
draughting, and otherwise fitted himself for 
work other than locomotive engineering. 
At the age of twenty-four he designed and 
built the machinery plant at the Michigan 
State prison at Jackson, Michigan, which, 
at this writing, twenty-two years after com- 
pletion, is still in active service with prac- 
tically no alteration or change. 

After acting as manager of this plant for 
one year, Mr. Bostwick was offered, and 
accepted, a position as engineer on the 
Panama Canal, when it was owned by the 
French government, and was being con- 
structed by the famous French engineer De 
Lesseps;,but by a curious turn of fortune's 
wheel, Mr. Bostwick gave up the Panama 
Canal project, while enroute and also the 
mechanical line of business in which he had 
so successfully launched. At this time the 
South was just beginning to be called upon 
to take the place of the North in supplying 
lumber, and Mr. Bostwick grasped an op- 
portunity to become a lumberman, making 
his initial beginning in the backwoods of 
Howell county, Missouri. The pay was 
poor and the work was hard, but opportu- 



nity had knocked at the door and the sum- 
mons were willingly and gladly answered. 

After working up through every depart- 
ment to the position of manager and finally 
stockholder in some of the best mills of the 
South, he has no regrets over the humble 
beginning in the backwoods of Missouri. 

The Bostwick Lumber Company of Cen- 
teralia, Illinois, is a corporation of which our 
subject is president and the heaviest stock- 
holder. He knows the lumber business thor- 
oughly and always gives his customers a 
fair deal, consequently his trade, which has 
steadily grown, is now very extensive. 

Landon M. Bostwick was happily married 
February 3, 1892, to Frances Pease, a na- 
tive of Wilson, New York, the daughter of 
A. Douglas and Abigail Pease. One of her 
ancestors received a grant of land from 
King George, this family having been 
originally from England. The subject and 
wife are the parents of three children, name- 
ly: Willard D., born January 26, 1893, ar >d 
who is at this writing attending the public 
schools; Dorothy was born November 17, 
1900; the date of Allen L.'s birth is Oc- 
tober 1 8, 1903. They are interesting chil- 
dren and add much sunshine to the modern 
and pleasant home of the Bostwicks. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Bostwick 
is a member of the Masonic lodge at Cen- 
tralia, No. 201, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, Centralia Chapter No. 93; also 
Centralia Council No. 28, and Cyrene Com- 
mandery No. 23 ; he also belongs to the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
No. 493, and the United Commercial Trav- 
elers; the Modern Woodmen and the Hoo- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



323 



Hoo, the latter an organization of lumber- 
men, purely social, now consisting of nearly 
thirty thousand members. The mystic num- 
ber of this association is nine, every mem- 
ber having a number, and is fortunate if 
there is a nine in it. President Roosevelt's 
number is 9999. The Bostwick family for 
nlany generations have been members of 
the Episcopal church. Mr. Bostwick is now 
and for many years has been senior ward- 
en of St. John's Episcopal church at Cen- 
tralia. 

Our subject is a member of the Episcopal 
church as is also his estimable wife. In pol- 
itics Mr. Bostwick is a Republican, and 
while he has not been prominent in the af- 
fairs of his party, he has ever assisted in 
whatever way he could the furthering of 
good city government and the welfare of 
his community. He is now president of the 
Board of Education. 

Whatever of success has attended our 
subject's efforts has been entirely owing to 
his own endeavors, his energy, industry and 
natural ability. From small beginnings he 
has gradually attained a prominence in his 
county which entitles him to be regarded as 
one of its leading citizens. 



DANIEL BECK. 

The name Daniel Beck, of Claremont 
township, needs very little introduction to 
the people of Richland county for it is a name 
that has ever been associated with the mate- 



rial and spiritual progress of the community 
for an extended period. No aspersions can 
be made on any action of his during a pil- 
grimage of upwards of sixty-three years. He 
has been one of the original promoters of 
the establishment of St. James Lutheran 
church, and he has lent himself at all times 
to all movements for the betterment and ad- 
vancement of the people of the locality in 
which he resides. 

Daniel Beck was born in Olney township 
on the i gth of October, 1845, on what was 
known as the "Hooverler'' farm. He was 
the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Phillips) 
Beck, both natives of York county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in which county they were married. 
His parents at the time of their marriage 
soon moved to Ohio, where they lived for a 
few years in Stark county. In the year 1842 
they migrated overland in a one-horse wagon 
to Illinois, where they settled in Richland 
county and moved onto the "Hooverler" 
farm in Olney township, which they rented, 
living there for three years. In their family 
they reared Bessie Hooverler for six years, 
for which they received sixty dollars. With 
this money they entered forty acres of tim- 
ber land in German township, although they 
had intended to enter the land where the St. 
James Lutheran parsonage now stands in 
Claremont township. There was not a sin- 
gle effort at improvement made in the land 
they entered. They set to work and cleared 
enough space to build a log house, after 
which they started to clear the rest for farm- 
ing purposes, and bring it to perfection. 
Here, Daniel Beck's parents remained until 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



the time of their deaths. His mother died 
in April, 1872, having passed her sixtieth 
milestone. His father survived her several 
years, dying in April, 1882, at the age of 
eighty-four. Both are laid to rest in Goss 
cemetery, German township, which is about 
two miles from the spot in which they lived 
for so many years. They were the parents 
of ten children, seven of whom grew to ma- 
turity, three dying in infancy. Daniel, the 
subject of our present sketch, was the ninth 
in order of birth. He remained with his 
parents on the home farm until his marriage 
to Susan Ditch, which took place December 
24, 1867. His wife, who was born Decem- 
ber 25, 1851, in Stark county, Ohio, was the 
daughter of John and Catherine ( Boatman ) 
Ditch, her father being a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and her mother of Ohio, their mar- 
riage taking place in Ohio. Her parents 
came to Illinois in the spring of 1852, com- 
ing along down via the Ohio river to Evans- 
ville, Indiana, thence overland to Illinois, 
where they settled on a farm in Claremont 
township, Richland county, where her father 
bought forty acres, for which he paid two 
hundred and fifty dollars, and which con- 
sisted of unimproved land. He started in 
and built a log house for his family, and put 
the land into the shape of a farm. Here they 
lived until the death of her mother which 
occurred December 23, 1880, at the age of 
fifty-four years. Her father survived five 
years longer, dying January 16, 1885, at the 
age of sixty-six. Both were buried in Goss 
cemetery, German township. They were the 
parents of fourteen children, of whom half 



the number arrived at maturity ; seven dying 
in childhood. Mrs. Daniel Beck was the 
seventh in order of birth. 

For a year after their marriage Daniel 
Beck and his wife lived with his parents on 
the German township homestead. At the end 
of that time Daniel took a lease on ten acres 
in German township. This was all timber. 
He built a log house, a rather small one, and 
cleared the land, remaining there for four 
years. He then moved upon the farm he 
now occupies in section 28, Claremont town- 
ship. During his early days in Richland 
county, as is well known, deer and wild tur- 
keys were very numerous, and the many 
wolves which inhabited the timber made life 
precarious for the sheep. 

In his early days Daniel Beck met with 
some hardships and ill-luck which might 
have daunted a weaker man. Application and 
industriousness brought prosperity, however, 
and he has now a well kept farmstead. In 
order to build his house there he cut the tim- 
ber on his land, hauled it to the saw mill, and 
had it sawed into lumber, and hauled it back 
again, unaided. He employed his brother- 
in-law, John Ditch, to build the house. 

He and his wife have had six children. 
Four grew up and two died in early life. 
Sarah E. is the wife of Eli Sager in Clare- 
mont township; Rachael C. died at the age 
of fifteen ; Mary Matilda married Sam Cer- 
ber, deceased, and is now the wife of Adolph 
Scherer in German township; John Luther 
died aged eight years; Ira J. lives on a farm 
in Madison township ; and Emma Eunice 
died in infancy. Daniel Beck and his wife 



RICHLAND, CLAY AXD MARION* COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



325 



also reared three orphan children, two boys 
and one girl. One of the boys, Charles 
Smith, is now married and lives in California 
near Long Beach. Leslie Dickerson, the 
other boy, and Carrie Shaw, the girl, still 
live at home on the farm. They are receiv- 
ing a good education; Miss Shaw is a grad- 
uate of home schools and possesses three 
diplomas. 

Daniel Beck before he was quite five years 
old attended subscription school in Clare- 
mont township ; afterwards at a subscription 
school in German township ; and for another 
term in Claremont township with Ben Law- 
yer as teacher. He attended school off and 
on irregularly until his twenty-first year. The 
"three R's" were principally the studies en- 
gaged in, and considering the schooling of 
the day he received a very good education. 
The hewn pin-legged seats, without backs, 
were then in use, and wide planks set against 
the sides of the wall were the desks used to 
write on. 

In politics Daniel Beck is a Democrat, 
with a lasting admiration for both Stevenson 
(once Vice-President) and the silver-tongued 
William J. Bryan. He is, or at least has been, 
somewhat active in local affairs. He was 
once elected poundmaster, an office which he 
declined. He served several terms as a 
School Director in the school district of Hick- 
ory Point. He lives in section No. 28. He 
has never sat on a jury, and though he was 
summoned several times as a witness the 
few cases never came to trial. 

He and his wife and family have always 
been members and faithful workers of the 



St. James Lutheran church in Claremont. 
He is an elder of the church, having been 
chosen to fill a vacancy. He can lay the 
claim also, as before stated, to be one of the 
originators of the church, which is now in 
its third building, being at one time an old 
log structure. 

In everyday life, Daniel Beck is a man 
whose word is as good, if not better, than the 
bond of many. Honesty and integrity are 
no meaningless words with him and his 
records as a man and citizen are without 
blemish. 



HENDERSON BOYAKIN WHAM. 

A native of Haines township, Marion 
county, and having spent the sixty years 
of his life there, naturally the subject of 
this sketch is known to every man, woman 
and child in that section of the state. Mr. 
Wham has been very much in the public eye, 
in various capacities, having on more than 
one occasion been closely identified with 
the affairs of the township in an official way, 
and it may not be amiss to state, in this 
connection, that his constituents never had 
cause to regret the fact of having conferred 
upon him their suffrages. He is known as 
a devoutly religious man. 

Mr. Wham was born in Haines township 
March 25, 1848, being the offspring of Wil- 
liam and Louisa (Rainey) W r ham, the for- 
mer a native of Tennessee, while the latter 
was born in Kentucky. The grandfather of 
the subject was a native of Ireland, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



came to America shortly after the Revolu- 
tionary war, settling in South Carolina on 
a farm. Later he went to Tennessee, where 
he died, and the father and grandmother of 
Mr. Wham moved to Marion county, set- 
tling in Haines township, where later the 
former was married. The couple entered a 
farm of prairie and timber land in Haines 
township that was purchased from the gov- 
ernment. He broke the land and built upon 
it what was then considered a very com- 
modious dwelling. He was a very progres- 
sive man, and did much to develop the 
region. After improving his own land he 
did much work for his neighbors in the way 
of breaking the sod, using an ox team, and 
to him was also due the construction of 
many good roads. He was a Whig and 
later a Republican. His wife died in 1883, 
and he survived her ten years. He was born 
in 1817, and his helpmate in 1818. They 
were both devout members of the Presby- 
terian church for many years, but in later 
years became members of the Methodist 
denomination. There were born to the 
couple eight children, namely: Margaret 
Ann, widow of James M. Mount; Martha, 
widow of William K. Storment, living at 
Cartter, Illinois; Elizabeth, deceased, was 
the wife of John R. Morrison ; Minerva, de- 
ceased, was the wife of Thomas J. Holt; 
Jerusha, deceased, was the wife of Mathew 
M. Gaston; H. B., our subject; Mathew R., 
deceased, and William R., living at Cartter, 
Illinois. 

The early life of the subject was spent on 
a farm in Haines township. He attended 
the common schools and later the high 



school at Centralia, Illinois. In 1871 he 
married Nancy Jane Stonecipher, daughter 
of Joshua and Nancy A. (Hall) Stone- 
cipher, both being natives of Tennessee and 
early settlers of Marion county. The sub- 
ject and his wife had ten children, viz. : 
Prof. George D., a teacher of pedagogy in 
the State Normal School at Carbondale, 
who married Edith Page, of Olney, Illinois, 
and who is the father of one child, John 
Page Wham; Nellie Eunice, wife of T. E. 
Maulding, East St. Louis, has one child, 
Howard B. ; Phoebe, wife of E. P. Gaston, 
Centralia, Illinois, has one child, Helen, 
Edgar B., a successful merchant of Cartter, 
Illinois, married Anna Blair; Frederick, 
senior in law department of the University 
of Illinois at Champaign, Illinois; Charles, 
in school at Champaign, taking a literary 
course; Florence, at home; Benjamin in 
school at Carbondale, normal course; Wil- 
liam J., died in infancy; infant, unnamed, 
deceased. 

Joshua Stonecipher and wife, parents of 
Mrs. Wham, had fourteen children and 
they are all dead but five, Hiram, Phoebe, 
Mary, Curtis and Mrs. Wham. The Stone- 
cipher family is very highly respected in 
Marion county. William Wham, grand- 
father of the subject, was the father of eight 
children, Joseph, John, Benjamin, William, 
Isabella, Ann, Jane and Elizabeth. Mathew 
Rainey, the maternal grandfather of the 
subject, also had eight children, all of whom 
are dead. They were: Louisa Ann, Jeru- 
sia, Jane, Sarah, Patsey, William, Robert 
and Samuel. 

The subject has one of the most attractive 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



327 



farms in Haines township. He has con- 
structed a spacious dwelling and ample 
barns. He has been a stock raiser for many 
years, and handles the very best grade of 
horses, mules, cattle and sheep. Although 
he is a very busy man Mr. Wham has a 
great love for literature, and spends much 
time among his books. The subject began 
teaching school in 1867, and spent alto- 
gether twenty-five years as a pedagogue. 
He was a successful instructor and did 
much for the cause of education in Marion 
county, and particularly Haines township. 
He early became an enthusiastic champion 
of the State Normal School located at Car- 
bondale, and it is a matter of record that 
Marion county stands first in the state out- 
side of the county in which the school is lo- 
cated in the number of students attending 
that institution. It is also a fact, of which 
Mr. Wham may feel justly proud, that 
Haines township, where he taught for so 
many years, has furnished more students for 
the State Normal than any other township 
in Marion county. He is a Republican and 
has been Supervisor of Haines township 
twice, Town Clerk one term, besides serving 
as Assessor. As an evidence of his popu- 
larity it may be stated that Haines town- 
ship is Democratic normally, but Mr. 
Wham received an unusually large plurality. 
He has rarely been defeated for public 
office, but when he ran for County Treasurer 
in 1906 he was defeated by forty-two votes. 
Mr. Wham has been a Sunday school 
teacher and superintendent for a number of 
years, and has taken a great interest in 
church work. 



LYDIA PHILLIPS GERBER. 

Of the older residents of Claremont 
township there are few that are better 
known and more widely respected than the 
subject of this brief notice, who was born 
July 14, 1834, in Stark county, Ohio, the 
daughter of David and Sarah Phillips, her 
mother's name being Hosier and a native of 
Stark county. Her father was a Pennsyl- 
vanian and moved from there with his par- 
ents when almost at the age of manhood. 
His parents settled in Stark county, Ohio, 
where they lived for some years before 
coming to Illinois. About the year 1840, 
they moved and settled in Claremont town- 
ship, Richland county, one year before 
Richland county was surveyed. Lydia 
Phillips was then but six years of age. In 
Richland county her parents entered forty 
acres of unimproved land, the greater part 
of which was covered with timber. This 
land he (her father) bought from the gov- 
ernment at one dollar and twenty-five cents 
an acre. He started to clear and improve 
the land and built a crude log house of 
hewn logs. Industriously he kept adding 
to his property until he had two hundred 
acres at the time of his death. When two 
years in Illinois his parents left Ohio and 
made their home with the younger family, 
where they remained until their deaths, 
which took place when they were well on 
in the eighties. 

Lydia Phillips remained with her parents 
on their farm until her marriage to Wil- 
liam Gerber, which was celebrated on June 
20, 1856. She and her husband settled on 



I'.lor.KAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



forty acres of land in Claremont township, 
at a later period they bought more, making 
a total of one hundred acres. Here they 
remained in peaceful married life and work- 
ing hard until the death of William Gerber, 
which event occurred on January 3, 1896, 
when he had reached his sixty-sixth year. 
He was the son of Phillip and Susannah 
Gerber, his mother's name being Sager, 
both of them being natives of Pennsylvania, 
where William was born on February 24, 
1830. He moved with his parents to San- 
dusky, Ohio, then to Indiana, and later re- 
turning again to Ohio. Afterwards they 
moved to Illinois and settled in Richland 
county, where his parents died. They are 
buried in Claremont township cemetery. 

Lydia Phillips was the eldest of eight 
children born to her parents, all of whom 
grew to maturity. She herself was blessed 
with eight children. All of them grew to 
maturity, but four have since died. In the 
order of their birth, they are : Sarah Jane, 
Elizabeth, Matilda K., John P., George W., 
Levi D., Ellen and Henry. George is the 
only child who married. He and his wife 
live on the homestead with his mother and 
are the parents of four children, all of whom 
live. They are: Inez Myrtle, Charles Os- 
car, Grace A., and Francis W. 

Lydia Phillips Gerber attended in her 
early days the free schools in Claremont 
township near her home. The building was 
an old log house with a fireplace which was 
built of mud and sticks. The seats were 
four log slabs balanced upon four pegs 
which stood for legs. The books used were 



McGuffey's readers and the elementary 
speller and a few others which were the 
principal text-books of the time. Here she 
attended school for seventeen years and ob- 
tained a good share of information. 

Her husband during his life was a Demo- 
crat in politics. In religion she and her 
husband and the grandparents were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church in Claremont 
township. During her long life she has 
never omitted to give her church duties a 
proper share of attention. She has always 
been respected in the congregation to which 
she belongs. 



JAMES M. DACE. 

Among the representative business men 
of Marion county is the subject of this 
sketch, who is at present proprietor of a well 
known and flourishing restaurant in Odin, 
and who is carrying on his line of business 
with that enterprise and discretion which 
are sure to find their sequel in definite suc- 
cess. 

James M. Dace was born in Monroe City, 
Monroe county, Illinois, on April 18, 1861, 
but was educated in the public schools of 
this county, where he applied himself in a 
careful manner and received a good educa- 
tion. He later took a commercial course in 
the Bryant and Stratton Business College 
of St. Louis. After leaving school, our 
subject devoted himself to fanning, having 
while attending school worked on his fa- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



329 



ther's farm. This he followed with success 
attending his efforts until 1888, then he 
traveled for a period of seven years for the 
D. M. Osborn Company, successfully han- 
dling a line of agricultural implements, and 
obtaining a large amount of trade for them. 
In 1895 Mr. Dace gave up his position on 
the road and opened his present business in 
Odin, that of conducting a restaurant. His 
success was instantaneous, and he has since 
conducted the same with much satisfaction 
attending his efforts, his neat, well equipped 
and carefully managed restaurant being 
known far and wide to the transient visitors 
to Odin, as well as to numerous local pa- 
trons. Here is served the very best grade 
of materials that the market affords and all 
guests are accorded the kindest considera- 
tion and most courteous treatment, so that 
a customer is never lost, but all speak in 
praise of our subject's place of business, 
which would be a credit to any town, much 
less one the size of Odin. 

Mr. Dace has long taken considerable in 
terest in public affairs, his unusual talents 
having been recognized early by his many 
political friends, so that he was sought out 
for public office, with the result that he has 
been Supervisor of his township for the 
past twelve years which position he has 
held with great credit to himself and with 
satisfaction to all concerned. In politics 
he is a loyal Democrat. 

The married life of Mr. Dace dates from 
1884, when he was united in the bonds of 
wedlock with Lulu Charlton, a native of 
this county and a daughter of Sidney and 



Henrietta (Gaines) Charlton, natives of 
this county. The paternal grandfather ot 
our subject's wife came to this county in an 
early day, taking up twelve hundred acres 
of land, which he developed and on which 
he raised his family and where he died, hav- 
ing lived to an old age. His wife, who is 
still living, is very old. 

The subject and wife have no children 
living. Mrs. Dace belongs to the Christian 
church. Our subject in his fraternal rela- 
tions is a member of the ancient and honor- 
able order of Masons, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Woodmen, having filled 
many of the chairs in the latter. He at 
present holds offices in two of these lodges. 
He also belongs to the Red Men. Mr. Dace 
has always been known as a man of sound 
business principles, kind hearted, liberal and 
pleasant to all. 



JACOB BURGENER. 

It is almost unnecessary at this time to 
speak of the part played by European exiles 
in the upbuilding of this nation. They came 
here prior to the Revolution, the stream grew 
larger and more constant at its close, and 
they have still continued to come in large 
numbers. We have always plenty of room 
for them and they pay us back, and have 
paid us back, by their industrious and frugal 
lives and by their contributions to the pros- 
perity of our United States. 

The subject of this sketch comes of a mid 
European race the hardy Swiss mountain- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



eers. Jacob Burgener was born in the Can- 
ton of Bern, Switzerland, on June 3, 1845, 
the son of Jacob and Anna Burgener. His 
parents were both natives of Switzerland, 
where his father was born. In April of the 
year 1847 the subject of this sketch came 
with his parents to the United States, land- 
ing in New York harbor. The voyage across 
the vast stretches of the Atlantic ocean was a 
tedious one in those days and their trip in a 
sailing vessel was of forty-six days' duration 
having been beaten out of their course sev- 
eral times by storms; many hundred sharks 
followed at times in the wake of the ship; 
and many, of the emigrants died at sea, their 
bodies being sewed in a sack in lieu of a 
shroud and then thrown overboard to make 
food for the sharks. 

On their arrival in New York they set out 
for Richland county, Ohio, where they rent- 
ed a farm and remained for two or three 
years. In the year 1850 they migrated over- 
land in wagons from Ohio to Illinois, where 
they settled in Richland county, Preston 
township. Here they worked on the farm 
of an old inhabitant named Jacob Yoggy, 
and some few years later they entered eighty 
acres bought from the government at the 
current price of one dollar and a quarter an 
acre in Preston township, and later added 
forty acres. Eighty acres of this land was 
mostly prairie land, and forty acres con- 
tained timber, and there was not even a fence 
or a well on the property. Jacob Burgener 
began at once to improve his holding and 
built a log house with a long shed on the side 
running the full length of the house. In 



this shed the cows were kept and the noise of 
the cow-bells ringing every night sounded 
almost like alarm clocks to the family. A log 
stable was also built and fences were put up, 
and in this work the family were helped by 
an uncle, William Van Alman, who broke 
many an acre of the ground. At this time 
the subject of our sketch was nine or ten 
years old. His grandfather Burgener was 
also with them, having come from Switzer- 
land. He also settled in Preston township 
where he lived until his demise, being buried 
in the German Reform cemetery, Preston 
township, aged eighty years. 

Jacob Burgener was about fourteen or fif- 
teen years old when his mother died. She 
is buried in the German Reform cemetery 
in Preston township. Her mother and fa- 
ther were born in Switzerland, when mother 
died father came to the United States, 
and she had two brothers and three 
sisters who helped to swell the tide of emi- 
gration to the United States. Some time 
after his mother's death his father mar- 
ried again, his second wife's name being 
Margaret Stucchi. She died in the year 
1903 and is also buried in the German Re- 
form cemetery in Preston township. Jacob 
Burgener remained with his father on the 
farm until about twenty-two years of age. 
During his years on his father's farm rattle- 
snakes abounded there. Herds of wild deer, 
wolves and wild game were also in evidence, 
the wolves, especially, being so numerous 
and ferocious that they did not dare let the 
sheep out at night. 

At the age of twenty-two Jacob Burgener 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



331 



left his father's farm and went to work for 
some neighbors, obtaining a wage of about 
thirteen or fourteen dollars per month. In 
December, 1871, he married Anna Combs, 
who was born in Claremont county, Ohio. 
She was the daughter of Abner and Eliza- 
beth Combs, her mother's name being Eliza- 
beth Smizer, natives of Ohio, who came to 
Illinois and settled in Preston township in 
the year 1860, where they built a fine house 
and barn and spent about two thousand dol- 
lars in improvements upon their farm of over 
three hundred acres. Mrs. Burgener's fa- 
ther died in 1884 and her mother still sur- 
vives, living in Preston township at the age 
of ninety-two years. 

On his marriage Jacob Burgener settled 
on a farm of forty acres in Olney township, 
which his father-in-law had given him, and 
there he remained until his removal to his 
present farm of two hundred acres in Clare- 
mont township in the year 1881. While liv- 
ing in Olney township his wife died on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1878, in her thirty-first year, and 
was buried in Olney. Three children were 
born of the marriage, two boys and one girl, 
all of whom are now married and have fami- 
lies of their own. Their names are: Wil- 
liam A., Harry L., and Winona. William 
A. lives in Olney township on a one hundred 
and sixty acre farm. Harry L. lives in Clare- 
mont township on forty acres of fine im- 
proved land. Winona is the wife of Charles 
Elliott and lives in Montana. 

Jacob Burgener re-married on October 15, 
1 88 1, Sophia (Fritchle) Garber, widow of 
John Garber. She was born September 2, 



1845, in Olney township, Richland county, 
Illinois, being the daughter of Jacob and 
Lydia (Strathe) Fritchle. Her father was 
a native of Germany and her mother of 
Pennsylvania. They were married in Ohio 
and lived for some time near Canton, Ohio, 
afterwards, about the year 1839, coming to 
Richland county, Illinois, and settling on the 
farm on which they lived until their deaths. 
Her mother died in the year 1857 an< ^ ner 
father in 1899, at the age of eighty-one or 
eighty-two years. Both lie buried in the 
Lutheran cemetery in Claremont township, 
situated near where the old log church used 
to stand. By her first marriage the second 
Mrs. Burgener had four children, only one 
of whom is living. They were: Jake P., 
Daniel, Charles, all deceased, and Mary E., 
who is living and is married to William H. 
Haulterman, the owner of a splendid farm 
in Jasper county, Illinois. 

Jacob Burgener in his young days attend- 
ed about two winter terms at the free school 
in Preston township. His work at home on 
the farm interfered with his school attend- 
ance and he consequently did not receive 
much education. He was quick to learn, 
however, and became proficient in reading, 
writing, spelling, and some arithmetic. He 
has been active in the life of the township and 
county, is a Democrat in politics, and has 
served a term on the county grand jury at 
Olney. He and his wife and the members 
of their family all belong to the Lutheran 
church, his first wife being a Methodist. The 
Burgeners have always been known to take 
an active part in church affairs. 



332 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND RKM I MS( ' I-.NT HISTORY OF 



During his lengthy life Jacob Burgener 
has worked hard and prospered and as a re- 
sult has two hundred acres of fine farm land 
well improved. He is now past his sixty- 
second year, with his present wife the same 
age, and he enjoys fairly good health. He 
is an influential man in the township and well 
known and respected by his neighbors. 



BENJAMIN F. NORFLEET. 

This venerable and highly honored citi- 
zen of Raccoon township, represents that 
class of noble American citizens who spend 
their lives in the rural districts, the great 
producers, on whom the rest of the world 
depends, and his life has been so active and 
carefully lived that success has attended al- 
most his every effort. 

Benjamin F. Norfleet was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Tennessee, May 29, 1832, 
the son of Marmaduke and Malinda (Mc- 
Fadden) Norfleet, natives of Montgomery 
county. The subject's grandfather was 
James Norfleet, a native of North Carolina. 
He married in that state, but lived in Mont- 
gomery county, Tennessee, most of his life. 
He was a farmer and raised a good deal of 
fruit. He was noted for the fine apple and 
peach brandy which he made. He and his 
wife died in that county. They were the 
parents of three sons and four daughters. 
He was of Welsh descent. There were three 
brothers of the Norfleet family who came 
to America, namely: James, Marmaduke 
and Starkey. They settled in North Caro- 



lina. The subject's grandfather, David 
McFadden, was a native of Ireland. He 
married Elizabeth Elliott. He came to 
America shortly after they were married. 
He came first to this country and in six 
months sent for his wife. He settled in 
Montgomery county, Tennessee, on the Red 
river. He got six hundred and forty acres 
of government land. He cleared a great 
deal of the land and built a fine home on it. 
He was a farmer and a successful business 
man. They lived the rest of their lives in 
Montgomery county and reared a large 
family. The subject's father and mother 
were both born in Montgomery county, 
Tennessee. The former was educated in 
the home schools and was a self-learned 
man and became a good scholar. He was 
a carpenter and farmer. In 1855 he went 
to Stewart county, Tennessee, and bought 
a farm there. He was Justice of the Peace, 
was active in Democratic politics. He and 
his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mrs. Norfleet died in 
Stewart county, Tennessee. They were the 
parents of thirteen children, namely : Ben- 
jamin Franklin, our subject; David, a 
farmer in Stewart county, Tennessee; Hen- 
ry A., a farmer in Stewart county, Tennes- 
see; George, a farmer in the same county; 
Virginia, who lives in the same county; 
Josephine L. also lives in that county ; 
Mary Elizabeth became a resident of Wil- 
liamson county, Illinois, where she died. 
The rest of the children are all deceased. 

The subject of this sketch had only a lim- 
ited education, obtained in the subscription 
schools. He lived at home until he was 



RICHLAND. CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



333 



twenty-two years of age. He was united 
in marriage October 10, 1855, to Josephine 
Hamlett, of Montgomery county, Tennes- 
see, the daughter of James and Jane (At- 
kins) Hamlett, the former of North Caro- 
lina, and the latter of Montgomery county, 
Tennessee, to which county the former went 
when ten years of age. He was a carpen- 
ter and cabinet maker, and he and his wife 
lived in that county the rest of their lives. 
They were the parents of eight children, 
namely: James, deceased; Frank is a car- 
penter in Marshall, Texas; Mary Jane is 
deceased; the fourth child died in infancy; 
Jackson is deceased; Josephine, the sub- 
ject's wife; Maria, of Nashville, Tennes- 
see; Margaret, of Clarksville, Tennessee. 
Eleven children have been born to the 
subject and wife, one of whom is deceased, 
namely : Emma is the wife of F. G. Boggs, 
of Raccoon township, whose sketch appears 
in full on another page of this volume; 
Marmaduke, a farmer in Raccoon township, 
married Lucy Boggs ; Edgar, who is con- 
nected with "The Houston Post," at 
Houston, Texas, married Belle Clayburn; 
Ella died young; Jefferson, who married 
Minnie Brown, is a farmer at Springfield, 
Illinois; Dora, who married Ira Richard- 
son, lives at Muskogee, Oklahoma ; Thomas 
M., who is an engineer in a coal mine at 
Springfield, Illinois, married Hattie Few; 
Sidney, a carpenter living at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, married Nettie Stader; Beulah, the 
widow of William Stewart, lives at Centra- 
lia, Illinois; Benjamin F., Jr., who lives in 
Lexington, Kentucky, married a Miss Mc- 



Murphy. He is a well known professor in 
that city, being connected with a correspon- 
dence school there. Starkey, the youngest 
child, who married Ava Davis, is a farmer 
at Muskogee, Oklahoma. 

After our subject married he and his wife 
lived in Montgomery county, Tennessee, 
until 1865, when he went to Trenton, Ken- 
tucky, where he purchased a farm. He also 
worked at the carpenter's trade until 1870. 
He came to Marion county, Illinois, lo- 
cating in Raccoon township, on Tennessee 
Prairie, where he rented land for one year 
and bought eighty acres in section 22 and 
twenty acres in section 27, on which he 
built a house and lived there for twenty 
years, when he bought his present place of 
forty acres known as the Wesley Willis 
place in Raccoon township. He has worked 
at the carpenter's trade since he was sixteen 
years old, and, being thus naturally gifted, 
he became a very fine workman. He has 
worked at his trade with much success. He 
has been a most excellent farmer. He re- 
tired in 1905. He learned his trade from 
his father. A great deal of the time he pre- 
ferred to rent his land and follow carpentry. 

Mr. Norfleet has served as Highway 
Commissioner for five years, and two terms 
as school trustee; also two terms as director. 
He is a Democrat in his political relations. 
Mrs. Norfleet is a member of the Christian 
church and the subject is a member of the 
Free Will Baptist church. Members of the 
Norfleet family are well known in Marion 
county and they have a modern and nicely 
furnished home. 



334 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



LUTHER HOLT, M. D. 

Although but in the meridian of life the 
subject of this sketch has had wonderful 
success in alleviating the ills and sufferings 
of his fellow men, and in Haines township, 
Marion county, he is regarded as a credit 
to the noble profession in which he has been 
engaged for more than twenty years. His 
boyhood days were spent on a farm, but 
early in life he showed a desire to become a 
medical practitioner, and when his school 
days came to an end his parents decided that 
the longing of his heart should be realized. 

Dr. Holt was born in Haines township, 
May 14, 1862, the son of Charles Wesley 
and Violindia (Wilkins) Holt. The father 
of the subject first saw the light of day in 
West Virginia, November 20, 1834, and 
was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Jack- 
son) Holt, the latter a native of South Caro- 
lina. Joseph, after going South, where he 
was married, settled in Virginia, and final- 
ly removed to Tennessee, where he lived 
until 1837, when he decided that he could 
better his condition by moving further west, 
and as a result, emigrated to Marion coum 
ty, settling at Centralia. Later he took up 
his residence in Washington county, Il- 
linois, and remained there until the death 
of his wife, Elizabeth (Jackson) Holt, 
which occurred in 1847. After this sad 
event he went to Texas, and died there a 
few years later. The couple were survived 
by eleven children, Joseph, John, Eliza, 
Gordon W., Lee, Sarah J., Thomas J. 
Charles W., Nathaniel. Albert and Fletcher 
L. 



Charles W. Holt, father of the subject, 
has spent all of his life in Marion county, 
Illinois. He was only three years old when 
the family removed to the state, making the 
trip with an ox team and pack horses. 
When a young man he worked on farms, 
and was employed at times as a laborer on 
public improvements. He helped to grade 
the Illinois Central road when it was con-, 
structed, and this work was done with shov- 
els and wheel-barrows. Later he began 
farming for himself on forty acres in sec- 
tion 12, settling on his present farm in sec- 
tion 15, in 1865, which was almost an un- 
broken prairie at the time. This farm now 
consists of 220 acres of well tilled land. 

The mother of the subject is a native of 
Marion county, being the daughter of Ben- 
jamin and Cloanna (Brewer) Wilkins, the 
latter a native of Kentucky. Her parents 
were early settlers of Marion county, and 
are both dead. The father and mother of 
the subject are members of the Baptist 
church at Pleasant Grove. Mr. Holt is a 
Democrat and has served in the capacity of 
school director. In connection with the cul- 
tivation of his farm, he gives considerable 
attention to stock breeding, raising a high 
grade of mules, horses, cattle, sheep, hogs. 
Dr. Holt, the subject of this sketch, lives on 
the farm with his father and mothW, upon 
which is a building which is utilized by him 
as an office. He received a common school 
education, and in 1884 entered the St. 
Louis Medical College, and three years later 
graduated in medicine and surgery. He 
then returned to Illinois and began prac- 
ticing with Dr. A. P. Kell, at Fortville, but 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



335 



after a short time went to Xenia, Illinois, 
where for one year he practiced with T>r. 
Shirley. At the end of that interval he re- 
turned to his father's farm, and since then 
has conducted his practice from that place. 
In 1889 the subject was married to Josie 
Huff, who was born and raised in Haines 
township, and is the daughter of Thomas 
and Emma (Fulton) Huff. Seven children 
were born to the subject and his wife, six 
of whom survive. They are Hallie, Althia, 
Edna, Earl, Edgar, Ida and Roy. Althia 
is dead; Edna lives with her parents, and 
Hallie is a teacher in the Marion county 
schools. Dr. Holt is a member of the Ma- 
rion County Medical Society, and in politics 
he is a Democrat. He has served as School 
Director, and is a stockholder in a Salem 
bank. He has always taken a great interest 
in public affairs. 



WILLIAM VAN ALMAN. 

One of the owners of extensive farming 
interests in Richland county is the gentle- 
man whose name initiates this sketch, who 
resides in Preston township. His valuable 
property has been acquired through his own 
efforts his persistency of purpose and his 
determination, and the prosperity which is 
the legitimate reward of all earnest effort 
is today his. 

William Van Alman was born in 
Switzerland. July 5, 1828. the son of 
Christian and Anna (Milliman) Van Al- 



man, also natives of Switzerland, where 
they lived and died. The father of the sub- 
ject was a farmer and died when the latter 
was ten years old, and he was only three 
years old, when his mother died. They 
were the parents of seven children, four 
girls and three boys, William being the 
youngest. He was reared in his native land 
and received a common school education. 
When nineteen years old he went through 
the regular drill required of all able bodied 
young men. He had left home when six- 
teen, having secured the required passport 
to leave his native section of Switzerland. 
He worked on farms and at dairy work for 
several years. In the latter part of 1849 
in company with two older brothers and a 
cousin, he came to the United States in an 
old-fashioned sailing vessel, being fifty-four 
days making the ocean voyage, landing at 
New Orleans, where he says he saw his first 
"nigger." He came up the Mississippi and 
Ohio rivers to Louisville, Kentucky, where 
he arrived January i, 1850. He soon went 
to Ripley county, Indiana, where his cousin 
lived, and in the following March went to 
Mount Vernon, Illinois. That same spring 
he came to Richland county, and went to 
work on a farm for seven dollars per 
month. He saved his money which he add- 
ed to what he had when he came to the 
United States. In 1852 he entered one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in Preston 
township, eighty acres of prairie and eighty 
acres of bottom land. He at once built a 
log cabin and began improving his place, 
having bought a yoke of cattle and began 



336 



inOGKAPHICAL AXU REMIXISCEXT HISTORY OF 



breaking the prairie land, and being a hard 
worker, he was not long in making many 
changes on his farm. He bought more 
oxen and continued breaking land for his 
neighbors for ten years rover one thousand 
acres in all. He operated a threshing ma- 
chine for thirty years, wearing out six ma- 
chines during that time, and doing a large 
and prosperous business in this line. He 
became prosperous and at one time owned 
three hundred acres. He is at this writing 
the owner of two hundred and fifty acres. 

Olney was a hamlet of only a few houses 
mean wooden structures when Mr. Van 
Alman came here. William Van Alman 
was united in marriage October 7, 1862, 
to Elizabeth Mattingly, who was born in 
Jasper county, Illinois, the daughter of 
George and Elizabeth Mattingly. The sub- 
ject and wife are the parents of thirteen 
children, six of whom grew to maturity. 
They are, Matilda, Stephen, died when thir- 
ty-two years old ; Charles, Emma is the wife 
of William Lamkin, who lives in Louis- 
ville, Kentucky; Fred W. is a farmer in 
Preston township ; Louise is the wife of Ed. 
Williams, living on the old homestead. 

Politically Mr. Van Alman is a Demo- 
crat, having always supported the principals 
of that party. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the German Reformed church in 
Preston township. 

Mr. Van Alman was the first person to 
break the banks of the Ambrose river to 
cross with a wagon in this section. He was 
the first person to subscribe fifty dollars for 
the construction of a bridge across this 
stream, where a ferry used to be main- 



tained. He built the first ferry across the 
Ambrose river in the pioneer days; in fact, 
he built four ferries before a bridge was 
constructed. His name is associated with 
progress in the county of his adoption and 
among those in whose midst he has so long 
lived and labored, he is held in the highest 
esteem by reason of an upright life of fidel- 
ity to principles. 



WILLIAM F. BUNDY. 

Holding distinctive prestige among the 
enterprising citizens of Marion county, is 
William F. Bundy, whose record here briefly 
outlined, is that of a man who has been the 
architect of his own fortunes, a self-made 
man, who, by the exercise of talents with 
which nature endowed him, has successfully 
surmounted unfavorable environment and 
rose to the position he now occupies as one 
of the influential attorneys of the city hon- 
ored by his residence. He is a creditable 
representative of one of the old and highly 
esteemed pioneer families of southern Il- 
linois, and possesses many of the admirable 
qualities and characteristics of his sturdy 
ancestors who figured in the history of the 
early days in this section of the great 
Prairie state. Isaac Bundy, the subject's 
father, was born October 4, 1828, in Rac- 
coon township, this county, where he de- 
voted his manhood years to agricultural 
pursuits and became known as a most ex- 
emplary citizen, for many years a minister 
in the Methodist Episcopal church, always 
doing his full share in the promotion and 



RICHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



337 



growth of his part of the county. On June 
7, 1849, he was united in marriage with 
Amanda M. Richardson, after he had re- 
turned home from the Mexican war, in 
which he served with distinction, having en- 
listed in Colonel Newby's First Regiment, 
on June 8, 1847, and soon afterward began 
the long and arduous march from Kansas 
City, Missouri, to Albuquerque, New Mex- 
ico; after the close of hostilities, marching 
back over the same route. John A. Logan, 
afterwards a conspicuous general in the war 
between the states, was then a second lieu- 
tenant of Company H, of the famous First 
Regiment, which did such effective work in 
the land of the ancient Montezumas, in 
which regiment Mr. Bundy served until his 
honorable discharge on October 13, 1848, 
having been a member of Company C. This 
was usually referred to as the Illinois Foot 
Volunteer Regiment, in which General 
James S. Martin, whose sketch appears in 
this volume, was a private. Isaac Bundy 
was also in the Civil war, having enlisted 
as a private at Springfield, Illinois, Novem- 
ber 1 8, 1 86 1, remaining at Camp Butler, near 
that city for a time. He was appointed 
chaplain, October 7, 1862, and after serving 
faithfully until October 24, 1864, resigned 
on account of illness and returned home in 
Raccoon township, where he spent the re- 
mainder of his life, passing to his rest De- 
cember 13, 1899, his death having been 
deeply lamented by the people among whom 
he had so long lived and by whom he was 
held in such high esteem. 

Amanda M. (Richardson) Bundy, moth- 
22 



er of the subject, was the daughter of Rev. 
James I. Richardson, of the Methodist Eis- 
copal church, who came to this state in an 
early days, and for some time was presiding 
elder of the Southern Illinois Conference, 
of the above mentioned denomination, hav- 
ing been located at Salem, McLeansboro, 
Benton, Spring Garden, Central City and 
many other charges in the southern part of 
the state. Although his education was 
gained by the pine knot and tallow candle, 
with a short term in the common schools, 
he developed a strong mind, and this, coupled 
with an indomitable will, enabled him to sur- 
mount many obstacles and accomplish much 
good. He was a large man physically, hav- 
ing stood six feet two inches in height. Be- 
ing a strong Abolitionist, he took an active 
part in "underground railroad" work, as- 
sisting to free the negro from slavery when- 
ever an opportunity came. His talents at- 
tracted public attention wherever he went, 
and he was sought for positions of public 
trust and very ably served as a member of 
the sixteenth General Assembly, from Ma- 
rion county. Many of his associates in the 
House at that time later became noted in 
many walks of life. Reverend Richardson 
served in the Black Hawk war of 1832, hav- 
ing been a member of the Spy Battalion, 
Mounted Volunteers, under Capt. William 
Dobbins, which was mustered in June 17, 
1832, taking part in the battle of Kellogg's 
Grove, eight days later, June 25th, under 
eral Atkinson, in which engagement this 
company had fourteen horses killed, six 
wounded and three captured. The Spy Bat- 



338 



mnCKAl'IIlCAI, AXI) KKMIMSCKNT HISTORY OF 



talion, which was first organized in Marion 
county, May 4, 1832, was mustered out on 
August i6th, following. For his war rec- 
ord, his political service and his ministry, 
covering a period of over thirty years, Rev- 
erend Richardson was a noted character in 
Southern Illinois. 

The subject's paternal great-grandfather, 
Jonathan Bundy, was also a well known 
character in this part of the state in its earli- 
est pioneer period. He came from North 
Carolina in 1817, having made the trip over- 
land with his family, consisting of the fol- 
lowing sons: William, Robert, Frederick 
and John. William, who remained single 
all his life, was a soldier in the War of 1812, 
having fought at New Orleans, under Gen- 
eral Jackson. Robert and Frederick reared 
families, the descendants of whom still live 
in Marion county, among whom is Wil- 
liam K., the oldest son of Frederick Bundy. 
John Bundy's family consisted of five sons, 
namely: Isaac, Bailey, Alexander, George 
and Samuel. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Bundy, parents 
of our subject, the following children were 
born: Elizabeth Jane, who married Noah 
E. Barr, is living near Salem, Dent county, 
Missouri, their family consisting of four 
boys and three girls; Asbury and Samuel 
both died in infancy; Laura Alice married 
James N. Adams, and they are the parents 
of four boys and one girl, namely: Ernest 
J. Sanford, James O., Rollin and Maud, all 
living in Centralia, with the exception of 
James O., who is living in Idaho. William 
F., the subject of this sketch, was fifth in 
order of birth, having been born in Rac- 



coon township, Marion county, Illinois, 
June 8, 1858. He was educated in Southern 
Illinois Normal University, at Carbondale, 
Illinois, and decided to study law. He was 
married to Mary E. McNally, daughter of 
James J. and Sarah A. (Carter) McNally. 
Mr. McNally was born in Ireland, Septem- 
ber 8, 1836. After coming to America, he 
located in New York state, and when the 
Civil war broke out he enlisted in the Thir- 
ty-fifth New York Infantry and later in the 
Twentieth New York Cavalry. In the latter 
he became second lieutenant in Company E. 
Mrs. McNally was born in Constableville, 
Lewis county, New York, April 16, 1843. 
She married Me McNally September 21, 
1862. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William F. Bundy the 
following children have been born : Donald 
M. (deceased) ; Dorothy E., Sarah Pauline, 
and Margaret M. 

Politically Mr. Bundy is a Republican, 
and he has been called upon to serve in va- 
rious official capacities, among which was 
that of City Attorney, also City Clerk of 
Centralia, for several terms each. When he 
was young in the practice of his profession 
he represented the Forty-second District of 
Illinois in the General Assembly in the 
House of Representatives, both in the forty- 
second General Assembly (1901 to 1903), 
and in the forty-third General Assembly, 
(1903 to 1905). During the forty-second 
General Assembly he was chairman of the 
important committee of Senatorial Appoint- 
ment and he was also a member of the 
Steering Committee of the Republican 
party, and in the forty-third General As- 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



339 



sembly he was chairman of the Committee 
on Judicial Department and Practice. Mr. 
Bundy took a very active part in the Legis- 
lature while a member and won a record of 
which anyone might be justly proud. He 
was a member of the Republican State Cen- 
tral Committee for the Twenty-third Con- 
gressional District of Illinois from 1906 to 
1908. Under the appointment of the Gov- 
ernor, our subject is serving as one of the 
trustees of the Southern Illinois Normal 
University at Carbondale, his alma mater, 
having been appointed early in 1908. He 
has ever kept in touch with the interests of 
his city and county and is an ardent advo- 
acte and liberal patron of all worthy enter- 
prises, making for their advancement and 
prosperity. As a lawyer he is easily the peer 
of any of his professional brethren through- 
out the southern part of the state and the 
honorable distinction, already achieved at 
the bar is an earnest of the still wider sphere 
of usefulness that he is destined to fill, as 
he is yet in the prime of manhood and a 
close observer of the trend of the times and 
an intelligent student of the great questions 
and issues upon which the thought of the 
best minds of the world are centered. 



CHARLES W. HOPKINS. 

Charles W. Hopkins, retired hardware 
merchant of Clay City, Illinois, is well and 
favorably known at the present time as the 
owner of one of the "banner" farms, for- 



merly the property of his parents, of Clay 
county. For fifteen consecutive years Clay 
City was the scene of his successful en- 
deavors as a hardware merchant. He has 
not yet reached his fiftieth year, and while 
he has already "made good" as a citizen 
and a business man, many years of in- 
creased prosperity await him in his farming 
pursuits. 

The subject of our sketch was born in 
Mason county. West Virginia, on January 
12, 1860, and was the son of William and 
Adriana (Donnelly) Hopkins. Both par- 
ents were natives of old Virginia, and came 
of good stock. William Hopkins married 
in his native state, resided on a farm there, 
and was a member of the convention called 
to partition the state into the present di- 
visions of east and west. He ran boats on 
the Ohio and Mississippi rivers for thirty- 
five years. During that time he was cap- 
tain of "The Tigress," which General Grant 
pressed into service at Cairo, Illinois, dur- 
ing the progress of the Civil war. All 
through its meteoric career in the military 
service he remained its captain under com- 
mand of the gallant Grant. At Pittsburg 
Landing, Grant made his headquarters upon 
on the boat, and he and the elder Hopkins 
had many chats together. Later then ran 
the blockade at Vicksburg successfully, but 
when they had safely passed the last battery 
"The Tigress" sank, having been shot 
through the hull. At this time Captain 
Hopkins was home on a furlough, and ow- 
ing to the loss of his boat was discharged 
from the service. He then moved with his 



340 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



family to Illinois, and settled in Clay 
county, in the winter of 1865, having 
bought nearly one thousand acres of land. 
This he was easily able to do as at the time 
of his arrival in Illinois his capital amount- 
ed to something like seventy-five thousand 
dollars. He had previously sold a farm in 
Virginia for forty-three thousand dollars. 
The farm settled in Clay county is now the 
property of the subject of our sketch. In 
1883 William Hopkins retired from his 
farming activities and moved with his fam- 
ily to Flora, Illinois, where he afterwards 
died on July 25, 1887, aged sixty-nine 
years. William Hopkins married three 
times. Our subject was the youngest of 
three children, and his mother died when he 
was only three years of age. One of his 
brothers, Andrew, by name, is now dead. 
His father afterwards married Marian Kel- 
ly, who died in 1873. Later he espoused 
Kate Wilson, who still continues to survive 
him. His second marriage brought Wil- 
liam Hopkins three children, all of whom 
grew to maturity though only one is now 
living. His third marriage brought him 
one son, Frank, who lives with his mother 
in Evansville, Indiana. 

Charles W. Hopkins remained in the pa- 
rental home up to the time of his marriage 
which occurred on the I5th of March, 1883, 
with Mary E. Brissenden in Clay county, 
Illinois. For a number of years he lived 
on a farm near Clay City. In the spring 
of 1886, he and his wife removed to Fur- 
nas county, Nebraska, where he purchased 
a farm of three hundred and twenty 



acres. There they remained three years, 
when Mrs. Hopkins returned to Clay coun- 
ty, Illinois, on a visit. There she died on 
May 25, 1887, being buried in the Clay 
City cemetery. Our subject soon sold his 
Nebraska property and went back to live in 
Illinois in the fall of 1888. His marriage 
resulted in the birth of two girls, Adrianna, 
now the wife of Clayson Black, of Clay 
City, who is engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness, and Sarah A., who lives at the family 
residence. Shortly after his return to Il- 
linois, Charles W. Hopkins engaged in the 
hardware business in Clay City, continuing 
in the same for fifteen years to a day. De- 
cember 24, 1889, he married Mary Barnes, 
of Clay county, where she was born April 
i, 1 86 1. She was the daughter of Joseph 
and Ellen (Gardner) Barnes, natives of In- 
diana. They married in the Hoosier state 
and came to Illinois in 1857, settling in 
Clay county, where they remained until 
their deaths. Mrs. Barnes died December 
i, 1866, aged thirty-three years. Her hus- 
band married secondly Lou Chapman, a 
widow, but their married life was of short 
duration as she died within two years. Jo- 
seph Barnes died April 27, 1891, aged fifty- 
five years, and was buried in Xenia. His 
first wife was buried in Oskaloosa. They 
were the parents of five children, of whom 
two died in infancy, our subject's wife be- 
ing the third in order of birth. 

Charles W. Hopkins sold his hardware 
business on February 19, 1904, remained in 
Clay City until April 29, 1906, and then 
moved to the old homestead of his parents. 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



341 



where he now lives. He owns approximate- 
ly five hundred and seventeen acres of some 
of the best land in Clay county. His pres- 
ent married life has also been a happy one, 
three children having been born to him; 
two boys and a girl William B., Charles L. 
and Hazel all of whom live at home with 
their parents. 

Our subject has always been politically a 
Republican and has served as Supervisor, 
as member of the County Board in Clay 
county for two years, as President of the 
Town Board in Clay City for three terms. 
He is a member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America, Jefferson Lodge No. 1437, at 
Clay City. Mrs. Hopkins is a. member of 
the Methodist church in Clay City, and has 
always taken an active part in church af- 
fairs. 



JOSEPH A. ENGLE. 

The present Mayor of Claremont, Rich- 
land county, Joseph A. Engle, is a veteran 
of the Civil war. He was born December 
12, 1829, in Vigo county, Indiana, and was 
the son of John and Hannah Engle. His 
father was a native of the Blue Grass state, 
coming from Kentucky to Indiana with his 
parents in early life. There they settled 
upon a farm in Vigo county, where subse- 
quently the older couple died. John Engle 
at the time of his marriage bought a farm 
of eighty acres in Parke county in the same 
state. The newly married couple remained 
there but a short time, returning to Vigo 



county and purchasing a farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres. About this time 
Joseph A. Engle, the subject of our present 
sketch, was born. Later ninety-six acres 
adjoining land was added to the family 
property. Work upon the farm went on 
steadily with good results, and it became 
the permanent family residence. Here his 
father's death occurred in 1863, and his 
mother's the following year. At the time 
of his father's death he was in the army, 
but was home on wounded furlough when 
his mother's death took place. His parents 
are buried in Sulphur Springs Meeting- 
house cemetery, which is but a mile and a 
half from the farm where they died. Jo- 
seph worked manfully on the farm in early 
life and was of much assistance to his par- 
ents. In his youth the homestead was a log- 
cabin and the land was in a very raw state. 
He helped materially to change the existing 
condition of affairs. 

His mother was born on the loth of Jan- 
uary, 1812, and belonged to an old Indiana 
family. Up to the time of her marriage she 
lived with her parents on a farm on the 
banks of Deer creek in Perry county. Her 
father's death preceded her mother's by 
several years. During her married life she 
reared ten children, the oldest of which was 
Joseph. 

In his sixteenth year Joseph A. Engle 
was apprenticed to the blacksmith trade in 
Terre Haute. At the end of his term he 
opened shop for himself, where he contin- 
ued to work and prosper until the outbreak 
of the Civil war. His business as a black- 



342 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



smith necessitated the use of three furnaces 
and the help of several skilled assistants. 
Plows were manufactured in his establish- 
ment and numerous wagons and buggies 
were quipped. At this period of his life his 
marriage with Rhoda C. Howell took place 
in February, 1851. His wife was born in 
the state. Her father died when she was 
quite young; her mother, whose maiden 
name was Gookins, survived him for sev- 
eral years. 

His marriage resulted in a family of five 
children three boys and two girls. Four 
grew to maturity, one child dying at the 
age of two years, while its father was 
away on active military service. His wife 
closed a happy life at the age of sixty-six 
on June n, 1897. She is buried at Sod- 
dom cemetery. Her children's names are: 
Olive, John H., Samuel A., William and 
Mary, who died in infancy, as above record- 
ed. 

Joseph A. Engle in July, 1862, joined 
Company B, of the Eighty-fifth Regiment 
Indiana Volunteers, under Col. John P. 
Beard, in the western division of the army 
commanded by Sherman. His company 
moved to the front via Indianapolis, Cin- 
cinnati and Covington, his company first 
engaging the enemy at Thompson Station. 
Being unwell at this crucial period he did 
not participate, but his brother, who was 
also on the ground fought in the engage- 
ment. He was a flag bearer to the company 
and was captured, being immediately shipped 
to Libby prison, from which place he was 
later discharged on account of chronic sick- 



ness. Joseph's indisposition, however, was 
only temporary. He was destined to go 
through the thick of the struggle. He par- 
ticipated in nine of the fierce engagements 
which took place in the vicinity of Georgia. 
He fought at Buzzard's Roost, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864; at Burned Church on May 26, 
at Calfsville, May igth to the 22d; Gulp's 
House, June 22d; Dallas, also known as 
Burnt Hickory, May 25th to June 5th ; Dai- 
ton, May 9th and August I4th to i6th and 
October I3th; Lost Mountain, June Qth to 
30th; near Dalton, January 21, 1864; New 
Hope Church, May 25th to June 5th ; Battle 
of Resaca, May I3th to i6th; Peach Tree 
Creek, July 2Oth. In this last encounter 
he received a serious wound, a ball striking 
him on the head. After he had lain uncon- 
scious on the field for half an hour he was 
found and taken to a hospital. From there 
he was shortly afterwards invalided home, 
where he remained. He received his dis- 
charge at Indianapolis during the latter 
part of 1864. 

On recovering from his wound and the 
wear and tear of the terrible conflict, he 
moved with his family to Richland county, 
where he had some time before acquired 
one hundred and twenty acres. At the end 
of seventeen years of a peaceable farm life, 
he moved to Olney, where he engaged in 
the grocery business for a few years, when 
he once more moved to Claremont town- 
ship, where his wife died in 1897. Shortly 
afterwards he again sold his farm and 
moved into Claremont, where he purchased 
property. Here a second marriage took 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



343 



place on January 18, 1898, when he es- 
poused Laura Stevens, daughter of Edward 
and Melissa ( Shepherd) Stevens, natives of 
Illinois. She was born in Lawrence coun- 
ty, February 7, 1860. Her father was a 
Civil war veteran. Her mother still lives 
in Lawrence county with a young daughter. 
Her mother was born in 1835, an< ^ ner 
father in 1836. On the mother's side the 
grandfather of Mrs. Engle was the first 
white child born in Lawrence county. In 
after life this relative took an active part 
in the Black Hawk war. 

Joseph A. Engle's second matrimonial 
venture has proved to be as much a success 
as his first. He has been blessed with two 
more children, Joseph L., and Mary Jo- 
sephine, aged nine and six years respective- 
ly. 

In early life the subject of our sketch at- 
tended about three terms in the old sub- 
scription schools in Parke county, and after- 
wards attended for an equal period the 
schools at Sulphur Springs, Indiana. The 
old time elementary speller and Ray's arith- 
metic were then used ; blackboards were un- 
known; plain rough planks, propped with 
stout wooden "pins," were used as seats, 
and the high desks ranged along the sides 
of the room for the pupils to write upon. 

Joseph A. Engle's mind is still as vig- 
orous as ever, his health also, though not 
as robust as formerly, is still good. His 
public life has been a most popular one and 
he well maintains his place as Claremont's 
premier citizen. He is well and favorably 
known in fraternal and social circles. He 



was formerly a member of the Ancient Or- 
der of United Workmen, and is a member 
of the Grand Army Post at Olney, Illinois. 
Joseph A. Engle's public life began as a 
Ward Supervisor in the Third ward at Ol- 
ney, serving in that capacity for four years. 
The esteem in which he is regarded by his 
fellow citizens may be determined from the 
fact that he is now serving a third term as 
Mayor of Claremont. In politics he has 
been an active Republican from the days of 
the Civil war, and is a vigilant party 
worker. The first time he cast his vote at 
a Presidential election it went to Henry 
Clay, who was then running in the old 
regime as a Whig candidate. He and his 
wife are both active and devoted members of 
the Christian church. They are diligent 
church workers. 



DAVID M. HESTER. 

Among the men of Marion county who 
have appreciated present day opportunities 
and have profited by his ingenuity and per- 
sistency in the business world as a result of 
the favorable conditions existing in the 
great commonwealth of Illinois, is the sub- 
ject of this sketch, David M. Hester, who 
was born in Centralia township, this county, 
August 16, 1841, the son of Milton P. Hes- 
ter, of Clark County, Indiana, who married 
Christina Copple in 1840 in Centralia town- 
ship. Matthias Hester, the subject's grand- 
father, was born in Hanover, Germany, and 



344 



ISKHiKAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



came with his parents to America. He mar- 
ried a Susannah Huckleberry. He was a 
farmer and he and his wife lived and died 
in Clark county, Indiana. They were the 
parents of twelve children. Grandfather 
David Copple lived near Walnut Hill, Illi- 
nois, on a farm. The father of the subject 
came to Marion county, Illinois, in 1839 
when he was still single and settled near 
Centralia on a farm, remaining here until 
his death in 1905. His first wife died in 
1855 and he was again married, his second 
wife being Martha O. Johnson, of near Mt. 
Vernon. She died in 1890. He was noted 
as a great stock raiser. In politics he was 
a Republican, and was active in church 
work. He was also a promoter of the gen- 
eral good of the public. There were eight 
children born to him by his first union, 
namely: David M., our subject; Julia, de- 
ceased, who married Mark Young, who 
lived in Salem township; William A. is liv- 
ing on a farm near Mt. Vernon; John C. 
is a farmer near Jefferson, Kansas; Sarah 
E. married A. H. Young, of Centralia; 
Isaac is single and living on a farm in 
Centralia township ; Samuel M. is living on 
a farm in Clinton county, Illinois; Mary is 
single and living on the old place. Four 
children were born to Milton P. Hester by 
his second wife, namely : Ella is single and 
living in Centralia ; Albertus V. is farming 
near Dallas, Texas; Carrie married Mark 
Anthony, who is a lumber dealer in Streator, 
this state; Lillian, the fourth child, is the 
wife of George Cams, a locomotive engi- 
neer, living in Centralia. 



As already intimated the subject's father 
located on a farm which he secured from 
the government near Walnut Hill, Marion 
county, in 1839, securing from five hundred 
to eight hundred acres. Our subject lived 
at home attending the common schools in 
the winter months until he was twenty-one 
years of age. He then went to Kansas and 
located in the eastern part of that state, 
where he remained a short time. When the 
call for troops was issued to put down the 
rebellion he was one of the patriotic sons of 
the North who responded, having enlisted in 
November, 1861, in Company H, Ninth 
Kansas Cavalry, under General Blunt, re- 
maining in this branch of the service for two 
years. He was in many battles and skir- 
mishes in Arkansas and Missouri, being 
wounded in the left arm and shoulder at 
Cain Hill. He was laid up at the camp 
hospital for some time and came home on a 
furlough, but returned to the service, re- 
maining three years and three months, hav- 
ing re-joined his regiment at Duvalls Bluffs, 
Arkansas. He served in such a gallant man- 
ner that he became first lieutenant. After 
the war Mr. Hester returned to Kansas and 
resumed fanning for one year then he came 
back to Centralia. He had a farm in Kan- 
sas consisting of eighty acres. 

Our subject married Sarah A. Young, 
of Salem township, in 1867. She was the 
daughter of Matthew and Sarah (Ware) 
Young. Nine children have been born to 
the subject and wife, four of whom are de- 
ceased. Their names are: Ella, who mar- 
ried J. P. Rogers, of Salem township; Rose, 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



345 



who married William Gaines, of Stevenson 
township; Mathew married Pearl Hopkins 
and is living in Salem township ; William is 
living on a farm, having married Effie Mc- 
Coy; Daisy is living at home. These chil- 
dren received good educations at the home 
schools. Mr. Hester is considered one of 
the best farmers in his community, having 
made all the improvements on the excellent 
farm which he has owned for two score 
years. He successfully carries on general 
farming and raises some excellent stock of 
all kinds. He has about five hundred acres 
of excellent land all in Salem township. He 
is a loyal Republican, but has held no offices, 
being content to lend his influence in placing 
the best men available in the local offices, 
but prefers to manage his business affairs 
and keep out of politics as much as possible. 
He is a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, Chandler Post, at Salem. 
Both he and his wife attend the Christian 
church. They are both pleasant people and 
they have a comfortable home. 



JUDGE ALBERT M. ROSE. 

A member of one of the honored pioneer 
families of Clay county, the name Rose has 
long been closely associated with the history 
of this section of the state, and the subject 
of this review, like his father, is numbered 
among the worthy citizens of this locality. 
In business he has always been known to be 
straightforward and reliable, is patriotic in 



citizenship, and his social relations ever 
wholesome. He is esteemed for these com- 
mendable traits of character together with 
his cordial disposition and genuine worth, 
but his name stands out more prominently 
in connection with the bench and bar of 
Southern Illinois, where he has long been a 
prominent figure. 

Albert M. Rose, Judge of the Fourth Ju- 
dicial Circuit, was born in Bible Grove 
township, Clay county, September 26, 1862, 
the son of Drury Rose, a native of Grayson 
county, Kentucky, who came to Illinois in 
1856, settling first in Edwards county, then 
in a short time removed to Clay county. By 
trade a carpenter, but he always took an 
interest in local public affairs and very ably 
served his community as Justice of the 
Peace for a period of sixteen years. He 
moved from Bible Grove township to Clay 
City in 1891, where he lived until his death 
in 1897, closing a busy and useful career, 
mourned by a host of people to whom he 
was known as a kindly and honorable man. 
the paternal grandfather of the subject 
was also a native of Kentucky, who came 
to Illinois when a young man, settling in 
Clay county among the pioneer element, 
where he played well his part in the early 
struggles of the locality and established a 
good home amid primitive conditions. The 
mother of Judge Rose was known in her 
maidenhood as Caroline Ackison. whose 
people were from Pennsylvania. She was 
born in Illinois, spent her life here and 
passed to her rest in 1905, remembered by 
a wide circle of friends as a woman of many 



346 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



beautiful attributes of character. To Mr. 
and Mrs.. Drury Rose the following chil- 
dren were born : Mary Jane, wife of Henry 
Crum, of Bible Grove township; Albert M., 
the subject of this sketch; Rosa, wife of 
George Stang, of Watertown, Illinois; 
Ophelia, wife of Frederick Lyons, of Water- 
town, Illinois; Stephen H., also living in 
Watertown, where resides the next child, 
Addie, the wife of William Ausbrook; La- 
vina, Althea, wife of Godfrey Peterson. 
The ninth and tenth children are deceased. 
Thomas B., died in the Philippine Islands, 
while a soldier in the regular United States 
army in 1904. George died in infancy. 

Judge Rose spent his boyhood days on 
the farm, where he remained until twenty- 
one years of age, assisting with the work 
about the place and storing up the qualities 
of a sturdy manhood, successfully managing 
the farm while his father, who was a car- 
penter, as already intimated, worked at his 
trade. Not satisfied with a common 
schooling and actuated by a desire to fol- 
low the legal profession, Albert M. Rose 
entered Vincennes University from which 
institution he graduated in 1888, having 
made very creditable grades and estab- 
lished an excellent record for scholarship. 
After leaving college Mr. Rose turned his 
attention to teaching which he followed 
with much success until 1891, winning the 
hearty approbation of both pupils and pa- 
trons, studying law in the meantime, first 
under Barnes & Ramsey, attorneys of 
Louisville, in 1888, making rapid progress. 
He was admitted to the bar in August, 1890, 
at Mount Vernon, and began practice in the 



spring of 1891 in Louisville, where he has 
been practicing continuously ever since, his 
success having gradually increased until he 
now has a liberal patronage and has be- 
come one of the leading attorneys in the 
southern part of -the state. 

The local leaders of the Democratic 
party early noted his talents and general 
favor with the public and sought him for 
office, first serving as Trustee of Louisville 
for a period of six years, during which 
time he assisted in securing the installation 
of electric lights and water works, also se- 
cured sidewalks and in many ways rendered 
lasting good to the town. In November, 
1906, Mr. Rose was elected to fill a vacancy 
in the Fourth Judicial circuit, the term ex- 
piring in June, 1909. He has so ably and 
faithfully performed the duties of this re- 
sponsible position, that he is regarded by all 
concerned as one of the best jurists in the 
district, his decisions showing a trained and 
acute legal mind and a desire to be fair and 
unbiased in all cases, weighing carefully in 
the judicial balance all details of whatever 
case he has in hand, feeling the weight of 
his responsibility and ever desiring to dis- 
charge his' duties in a manner that meets 
the approval of his constituents. 

The domestic life of Judge Rose began 
December 28, 1892, when he was united in 
marriage with Lulu Branson, of Wayne 
City, Illinois, the talented daughter of Dr. 
J. M. Branson, a well known physician of 
that place. To this union one son, Robley 
Branson Rose, now a bright lad of fourteen 
years, has been born. 

In his fraternal relations the judge is a 



HIGHLAND, CLAY AND MARION COUNTIES, ILLINOIS. 



347 



member of the Masonic Brotherhood, also 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and in politics he affiliates with the Demo- 
cratic party, as intimated in a preceding 
paragraph. Mr. and Mrs. Rose are faith- 
ful members of the Christian church. 

The law office of our subject is always 
a busy place where numerous clients and 
friends of the judge gather, and it is 
equipped with one of the most extensive law 
libraries to be found in this locality. When 
he first began practice, he formed partner- 
ship with John A. Barnes in 1891, the firm 
being known as Barnes & Rose, but the for- 
mer left the firm in 1896, and the subject 
has had different partners since then. Yet 
in the prime of vigorous manhood and hav- 
ing accomplished so much that merits the 
praise of his fellow men and gained a firm 
standing in the affections of the people of 
this vicinity, the future to such a man as 
Judge Rose must necessarily be replete with 
honor and success. 



HON. THOMAS E. MERRITT. 

During the dark days of the Revolution, 
the colonies had no defender more loyal 
than Ebenezer Merritt, our subject's grand- 
father, who served with valor until captured 
by the British when he was placed in an old 
hulk of a ship in New York harbor. In 
after years he was wont to say that the 
sweetest morsel of food he ever tasted was 
a rotten Irish potato, which he found in his 
prison. 



The father of our subject, Hon. John W. 
Merritt, was born in the city of Albany, 
New York, July 4, 1806, and in his early 
youth evinced a very decided literary taste, 
contributing articles to many of the most 
prominent magazines of that day. Entering 
the practice of law, he built up a lucrative 
business in that line in connection with J. 
J. Brady. Meantime he also invested in 
real estate and so fortunate was he in his 
speculations that he became independent at 
a comparatively early period of life. How- 
ever, the crisis of 1837 destroyed the value 
of his investments and made him a poor 
man once more. Deciding to seek a home 
in the West, Mr. Merritt came to Illinois 
in 1840, and settling in St. Clair county es- 
tablished The Belleville Advocate, which he 
successfully conducted from the year 1848 
until 1851. Meantime he also superin- 
tended the management of his farm and con- 
tributed to eastern magazines and New York 
papers. He also wrote and published a 
novel called "Shubal Darton." Coming to 
Salem in 1851, he established The Advo- 
cate, of which he was proprietor and editor 
for many years. 

In 1 86 1 he was elected Assistant Secre- 
tary of the Constitutional Convention and 
in the following year became a member of 
the Legislature. 

The State Register at Springfield having 
lost its prestige, Mr. Merritt with his son, 
Edward L., assumed editorial charge of the 
paper in January, 1865, and attempted to 
place it upon a substantial footing. The 
enterprise though not prudent proved a sue- 



348 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND REMINISCENT HISTORY OF 



cess. For some years Mr. Merritt conducted 
its editorial columns with great ability and 
during a portion of that time supplied The 
St. Louis Republican with its Springfield 
correspondence. As an editor he justly at- 
tained celebrity throughout the country and 
was one of the most successful journalists 
of the day. His county may well feel proud 
of his life and labors. He was modest, un- 
assuming, never ambitious for worldly dis- 
tinction and preferring the success of his 
friends to his own. In politics he was an 
old-school Democrat and was one of the 
most influential workers in his party 
throughout the state. He was devoted to 
the doctrines of the Episcopal church and 
was a faithful member of that denomination. 
In disposition mild, he never used profanity 
and was also a man of temperate habits, 
never tasting intoxicating liquor through- 
out his life. He married