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Bioorapbical IRcvicw 



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THIS VOLUME CONTAINS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF 



LEADING CITIZENS OF 



OXFORD AND FRANKLIN 



COUNTIES 



MAINE 



"Biography is the home aspect of history" 



BOSTON 

Biographical Review Publishing Company 
1897 






yf Y ^'ya> 



PREFACE 



IN all thi> wide cartli theiv i'n nothiiiL;- else so interestini; and ini|)i)rlaiit as himian 
life; and the liistorx' of iiulixidiKd lives is recognized a>, at its best, one of the 

most attractive and \aluahle forms of literature. It hehoox'es e\ery generation 
to write its own records, to leave behind its own memorials. l he present \olume of 
local bio^'raphies, carefnlh' prejiared fmm materials jui-nished 1)_\' the patrons of the 
work, is issued bv the publishers in the confident hope that it will pvowi satisfactory 
as the fulfilment of promise and a work of ])ermanent \-alue. These paL!;es treat of 
earnest toiler^ of to-dav and of _\-esterday, workers with hand and brain, who have 
been ku'^elv instrumental in the industrial, social, and |)olitical de\elo|)ment ol 
Oxford and I'"ranklin Counties — men and women who, taking lite in "earnest," 
ha\'e made "footprints on the sands of time." The conquests here recited are of 
mind o\er matter and circumstance. 

To preserve the memorv of local worthies, as well as of national celebrities, is 
to foster home ties, local attachments, and patriotism, and to encourage ^ood citizen- 
ship. I'urthermore, to borrow the words of an eminent speaker, " W hale\er fame 
"■reat achievements ma\- bestow, whatever honors the world mav ,L;i\'e, it is ever the 
most cherished hope of every seeker after fame and fortune to be kindl}- ivmembered 
and lovinglv honored on the spot which gave him l)irth." 

niO(;kAriiicAi, Rk\ikw I'Liii.isuiNc Comi'.v.w. 

FEliRlARV, lSy7. 




HERRICK C. DAVIS. 



BIOSRAPHIGAL. 




ON. HERRICK C. DAVIS, 

..^ , ^ _ attorney at-law and Judge vi 
<^^M I ^ the Municipal Court of Nor- 
way, Oxford County, Me., 
was born in tlie neighboring 
town of \Voodstoci<, on, No- 
vember 5, 1833, a son of Ben- 
jamin and Ruhamah (Chase) 
Davis, and is a representative 
of the third generation of his 
famih' in this vicinity. 
His p.iternal grandfather, Aaron Davis, 
came from Salem, Mass., to Poland, Me., 
Androscoggin County, and there bought and 
cleared a tract of land, but subsequently re- 
moved to Woodstock, where he was one of the 
most energetic and progressive men of his day 
and the owner of four hundred acres. He had 
previously served as a private during the Rev- 
olutionary War. His wife was Thankful, a 
daughter of Stephen Strout, a farmer who 
lived and died in Penobscot County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Aaron Davis had eleven children — Han- 
nah, Aaron, Thankful, Sally, Polly, Phftbe, 
Benjamin, Eliphalet, Eliza,' Nehemiah, and 
Julia. Grandfather Davis lived to the age of 
eighty-two, but his wife died younger. 

Benjamin Davis, son of Aaron, was an ex- 
tensive land-owner in Woodstock, and cleared 
his own farm. In pcditics he was at first a 
Democrat, but he affiliated with tlie Repidili- 
cans after the formation of that party. He was 
prominent in town affairs, efficiently serving 
in different offices, including that of Select- 
man. He married Ruhamah Chase, daughter 
of the Rev. Stephen Chase, a Baptist minister 
who was the first Town Clerk of Woodstock, 
and they became the parents of ten children, 
namely: Richard L., who died at the age of 
nine years; limeline: Herrick C. : Benjamin; 



.Stephen; Ruhamah; Xehemiah; Cyrus; 
I'lmma J. ; and Henry. The ]iarents gave their 
spiritual influence and material aid to the 
Methodist l{piscopal churcli. 

Herrick C. Davis, aftoi' obtaining his com- 
mon-school education in Woodstock, pursued 
a course of study in some of the higher 
branches of learning at the Norway Liberal 
Institute. He then placed himself in the 
ranks of the world's toilers with hand and 
brain, working for some consiilerable time at 
the carpenter's trade, meanwhile keeping his 
intellectual powers in a state of healthful 
activity by teaching school for ten winter 
terms. He subsequently read law with (ien- 
eral J. J. Perry, of Oxford, and, after his ad- 
mission to the bar of Androscoggin County in 
1862, began jiractice at Bryant's Pond. 
While in that place, where he bought a fine 
residence, he su])plied the Grand Trunk Rail- 
road with wood. Ten years later, being 
elected Registrar of Probate for Oxford 
County, he closed his successful legal business 
and career in Bryant's Pond, and took up his 
residence at Paris Hill. Having filled the 
office of Registrar creditably for twenty con- 
secutive years, in January, IiSqs, Mr. Davis 
was appointed Judge of the Municipal Court, 
and removed to Norway. Wherever he has 
lived, Mr. Davis has shown himself a public- 
spirited citizen. He here takes an active in- 
terest in town affairs, as formerly in Paris, 
being a desirable acquisition. 

In politics Judge Davis is a stanch Republi- 
can ; and while a resident of Woodstock he 
held various town an<I county offices, serving 
as Assessor, Overseer of the Poor, a member 
of the School Board, and Selectman, simul- 
taneously, for several years. Mr. Davis was 
also Town Treasurer, and in 1864 he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



elected Representative to the State legislature. 
During the late war he acted as paymaster for 
the government, settling the claims of soldiers, 
widows, and orphans. Fraternally, he is a 
member of the Jefferson Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. ; Past Grand Master of Mount Mica 
Lodge, No. 17, Independent Order of Odd 
I'"ello\vs; and also Past Chief Patriarch of the 
W'ildey Encampment of Norway. 

The maiden name of his wife, to whom he 
was married nn December i, 1850, was Lucy 
M. Felt. Her father was Jeremiah l'\dt, a 
resident of Woodstock, Mc. Mr. and Mrs, 
Davis have two children — Samuel V. and Car- 
rie. The son resides in South Paris, and the 
daughter is at home with her parents. 




ILLIAM C. CHAPMAN is one of 
the representative farmers of O.Nford 
County, owning a fine estate of a 
thousand acres and a beautiful home at the 
foot of the mountain, facing the Androscoggin 
Rivei', in the town of (iilead. He was born in 
Newry, this county, November 13, 1S42, a 
son of Granville and Eliza (Chapman) Chap- 
man. Granville Chapman, who was a son of 
George W. and Polly (Greenwood) Chapman, 
both natives of this county, was born in (iilead 
and reared on a farm, receiving a common- 
school education. When a young man he was 
engaged for some time as clerk in Portland, 
but he devoted the greater part of his life to 
the pursuit of agriculture in Gilead and 
Newry. A stanch Republican, he took an 
active and intelligent part in town affairs, and 
served as Selectman both in Gilead and 
Newry. He died at the age of eighty-one. 
Mrs. Granville Chapman was born in the town 
of Pethel, this county, being a daughter of 
Timothy Chapman. She lived to be fourscore 
years of age. She and her husband were the 
jxirents of eight children, two of whom are 
living: William C. ; and Agustus F. , a mem- 
ber of the firm of T. A. Chapman & Co., of 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

William C. Chapman accpiired his education 
in the common schools of Gilead and at Bethel 
Academy. He has never been away from the 
homestead for any length of time; for he 
learned the secrets of agricultural success 



when a boy, and, inheiiting the farm «n his 
father's death, has continued to develoj) its 
resources. His broad acres include fertile 
meadows and wide' stretches of upland pasture, 
and he raises bountiful crops and a large 
amount ot live stock. His house and barn are 
among the best in O.xford County, and his 
whole domain bears the stamj) of affluence and 
thrift. In 1.S71 Mr. Chajiman was united in 
marriage with Martha, daughter of Alger Bald- 
win, of North Stratford, and si.x children have 
blessed their union — Hannibal H., a student 
at Colby College ; Alger 11, who died at the 
age of nineteen; Marion K. , who is attending 
Smith College, NorthamiJton, Mass. ; and 
Granville, Cecil F., and Christie, children at 
home. In [jolitics Mr. Chajiman is, like his 
father, a Republican. He is well 'known 
throughout this section, ami is \er\' |)0])nlar 
socially. His family are members of the Con- 
gregational church. 




H.XRLES M. RICHARDS, an es- 
teemed resident of Jay, Franklin 
County, e.\tensi\'ely engaged in 
farming and fruit growing, was born 
in Temple, Me., January 23, 1834, son . of 
Moses A. and Judith (North) Richards. Both 
his parents were natives of Temjile. His pater- 
nal grandfather, Mitchell Richards, who was a 
Revolutionary soldier and ]iarticipated in the 
battle of Bunker Hill, leaving Massachusetts, 
his native State, became an early settler in Tem- 
ple, where the rest of his life was passed upon a 
farm cleared by him from the wilderness. 

Moses A. Richards resided upon the home- 
stead farm until he was fifty years old. He 
then went to East Templeton, Mass., and there 
resided unti.1 his death in March, 1894. By 
his wife, Judith, he became- the father of ten 
children, of whom five are living. These are: 
Charles M., the subject of this sketch; Lovell 
A., who resides in California; Leonard M., 
now of Fort Fairfield, Me.; Daniel F. , who 
resides in Worcester County, Massachusetts; 
and Georgiana, the wife of Wilbur Potter, of 
the same county and State. The others were : 
Eunice, Ora, Noah, Alvin, and one child who 
died in infancy. The mother died in Worces- 
ter County, Massachusetts, in 1S63. 



IJIOGRAl'lllCAL RKVIKW 



Charles M. Richards attended the common 
schools of Temple. At the age of fifteen he 
began life for himself as a farm assistant. 
After following that occupation for four years 
in Temple, Farniington, Me., and Wilton, 
N. n., he went to Templeton, Mass., where he 
was employed in a chaii' factor}' for several 
years. In 1866 he returned to Maine, and, 
settling in Wilton, resided there for two years. 
He then moved to his present farm in jay, 
formerly known as the Bass place, where he 
has since carried on general farming and fruit 
growing with remarkable success. His prop- 
erty, which is desirably located, consists of 
sixty acres of fertile land, well adapted to the 
raising of staple products and fruits. 

On August 19, 1855, Mr. Richards wedded 
b'rances D. Dillingham. She was born 
March i, 1836, in Temple, daughter of Reu- 
ben and Mary L. (Clough) Dillingham, natives 
respectively of Fairfield and Alna, this State. 
Reuben Dillingham subsequently became a 
prosperous farmer of Temjile, and there with 
his wife resided for the rest of his life. Mr. 
and Mrs. Richards have had three children, 
namely: Ola, born December 4, 1861, who 
married l''rank B. Small, and resides at the 
homestead; Nellie F.., who died at the age of 
six years; and another child who died in in- 
fancy. In politics Mr. Richards holds him- 
self independent of parties. His natural abil- 
ity and industrious habits have placed him in 
a comfortable position, and his many com- 
mendable cpialities are duly appreciated by 
all w'ho know him. 




IDWARIJ W. PENLEY, a wealthy 
farmer of Greenwood township, was 
born December 12, 1845, in Paris, 
this county. His great-grandfather, Joseph 
Penley, who came from England, was the 
founder of the family. The grandfather, Jo- 
seph (second), removed from Auburn, Me., to 
Paris, this county, and was there engaged in 
farming during his remaining years. 

James F. Penley, the father of Edward W., 
was born and reared in the town of Paris. He 
was a farmer by occupation, and had a good 
homestead,' situated about three miles from 
the villaiie of South Paris, where he carried 



on mixcil husbaiulry until his death, Novem- 
ber 25, 188S. He married Loduska Swan, a 
native of Paris, who died in 1879, leaving six 
children, as follows: Edward W., the subject 
of this sketch; John L. , a farmer, living in 
Paris township; Charles R., also residing in 
Paris, who married Jennie Iloldcn: Lucotta, 
who is the wife of Eilwin Chase, of I.ynn, 
Mass.; Almon J., who marricil I'^stelle Chase, 
and owns and occupies the okl homestead in 
Paris; and Luella, the wife of A. L. Dyer, of 
Lynn, Mass. 

Edwartl W. Penley received his elementary 
education in the common schools of Paris and 
the academy at South Paris. With the excep- 
tion of a year or two spent as a brakeman on 
the Grand Trunk Railroad, running from 
Portland, M-e., to Island Pond, Mr. Penley 
has followed agricultural pursuits on the farm 
where he now lives, and has been closely 
identifietl with the highest interests of his 
adopted town. He is the possessor of seven 
hundred acres of land, much of it in high 
cultivation. Besides carrying on general 
farming he raises some stock, and keeps a 
dairy of twelve or more cows. He is a thor- 
ough-going farmer, skilled in all branches of 
agriculture, and has met -with the success due 
to a man of his energy and ability. He is 
very prominent in local affairs, and is at the 
present time serving as Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen, of which he has been a member 
for eight years Politically, he is a true-blue 
Republican, faithful to the interests of his 
party, which has this year, 1896, elected him 
to the State legislature. Socially, Mr. Penley 
is a member of the West Paris Lodge, No. 15, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of West 
Paris; of the Daughters of Rebecca Lodge, 
No. 42, of the same place; and of the grange 
at Norway. 

Mr. Penley was married December 20, 
1868, to Miss Abbie Richardson. She was 
born October 30, 1854, in Greenwood town- 
ship, on the farm of her parents, William and 
Hannah (Barrows) Richardson, both natives 
of Oxford County, born respectively in Green- 
wood and Albany. Mr. and Mrs. Penley are 
the parents of twelve children, of whom the 
following is recorded: Vina R., born October 
31, 1870, died October 8, 1873: Angle E., 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born April 30, 1S72, is a teacher in the ])ub- 
lic scliools; Hannah R.. born May 24, 1874, 
died May 6, 1875; Walter E., born April 29, 
1876, assists his father on the farm; Lula M., 
born I'ebruary 15, 1878, also teaches in the 
]>ublic schools; Lester H. was born January 
I, iS8o; Frederick R., August 20, 18S1; 
Alice, July 21, 18S3; Blanche, March 22, 
1885: Joseph Irving, September 8, 1886; 
Leona Belle, July 20, 1888: and Marion, 
June I 8, 1895. 

/^Filbert WARDWELL, chairman of 
y '*) I the Board of Selectmen of Albany, 
Me., was first elected to that office 
in 1862, and has been honored with re-election 
at intervals several times since. He was born 
in this town, August 11, 1828, the son of 
Colonel Isaac and Mary (Adley) Wardwell. 

Colonel Isaac Wardwell was born in Otis- 
field, Me., and was engaged in farming in 
that town in his youth, leaving there at the 
age of twenty-one to locate in Albany. Here 
he took up a tract of unimproved land in the 
southern part of the town, and, clearing a 
farm, improved and developed it into a valua- 
ble homestead, following the pursuit of agri- 
cuItLue until his death, January 24, 1837. 
He was one of the leading men of the place in 
his day, an officer in the State militia and a 
member of the Albany Board of Selectmen. 
His wife died in 1869, at the advanced age of 
eighty si.v. She was the mother of ten chil- 
dren, of whom only the two youngest-born are 
living. These are: Charles A., who married 
Miss Abbie Witham, and resides with his wife 
in Biddeford, Me. ; and Gilbert, the subject 
of the present sketch. The departed are the 
following: Mary, who was the wife of Luther 
Bisbec; Dorcas P., wife of Hiram Stone, who 
also has passed away; Betsey F. , who was 
twice married, her first husband being Abner 
Holt, her second Perley French ; Sallie, who 
was the wife of the Rev. Marcus Wight; Isaac, 
who married Miss Sarah King, now deceased ; 
Jacob, whose wife, Martha Lovejoy, survives 
him, living with one of her daughters in Mas- 
sachusetts ; Emmeline, who was the wife of 
Dr. Stejihen Coburn ; and Harriet, who died 
in infancy. 



Gilbert Wardwell was left fatherless when 
he wa.s' eight years of age. He received a 
common-school education, helping about the 
farm between school times until he was si.\- 
teen ; and then he began to wcjrk for wages as 
a farm hand. He was employed in this way 
for several years, spending one year in Lancas- 
ter, Mass. ; and he also taught during the win- 
ter terms, taking charge of schools in Milan, 
N.H., and North Norway and Albany, Me. 
About 1 85 1 he settled on the farm where he 
now resides; and in 1862, answering his coun- 
try's call, he left his pleasant home and en- 
listed in the Federal army. He was enrolled 
as a private, September 10, 1862, in Company 
C, Twenty-third Regiment, Maine \'olunteers, 
under Colonel W. W. \'irgin antl Captain 
C. H. I'rince, which, during the greater part 
of its ten months' period of service, was nn 
picket duty along the Potomac River, guarding 
the fords. The thrilling experience of e.xiKis- 
ure to the fire of lurking Confederates is re- 
called by the poet's lines: 

'• All quiet along the Potomac to-night. 
E.xcept now and then a stray picket 
Is shot, as he walks on his beat to and fro. 
By a ririeman hid in the thicket.'" 

Unscathed at the end of his term of enlist- 
ment, Mr. Wardwell received his discharge at 
Portland, Me., July 15, 1863, and again took 
up the work of agriculture. He has a well- 
improved farm of one hundred and thirtv-five 
acres, and has been very successful in his 
chosen work. Mr. Wardwell is a memljer of 
Round MoLintain firange of Albanv. 

On Ma\- II, 1851, he was married to Rhnda 
Jane, daughter of Jacob and Betsey Robbins. 
She was born in North Yarmouth, Me., May 
26, 1826. Her mother died when she was a 
child; and her father, who was a farmer, took 
the little girl to Guilford, Me., remaining a 
few years and then returning to North ^■ar- 
mouth. He died at the home of his son-in- 
law. Mrs. Wardwell died June 10, 1888. 
She was the mother of five children, namely: 
Isaac and Jacob, twins; Nellie Augusta; Am- 
brose; and luigene A. Isaac Wardwell has 
been twice married, his first wife being Lilla 
G. Flint, and his second, Frances H. Brown. 
Jacob died at the age of twenty-two, leaving 



BIOGRAPHICAT. RF.VIEW 



■3 



a widow, Martlia I.. Morrill, who is now 
living with her third husband in Ik'thcl, Mc. 
Nellie Augusta died at the age of twenty-six; 
Ambrose is engaged in the manufacture of 
jiaper boxes at Maltville, Conn. ; and Eugene 
A. is an instrument tuner in a large organ 
manufactory in Derby, Conn. 

Mr. W'ardwell has voted the Democratic 
ticket since he was qualified to exercise the 
right of suffrage. He was elected Chairman 
of the Albany l^oard of Selectmen in 1862, 
1864, 1865, 1869, 1870, 1 87 1, 1872, 1875, 
1877, 1878, 1881, and again in 1896; and he 
served as Town Treasurer two vears. 




ILLIAM HENRY McDONALD, 
one of the best-known hotel men in 
the State, jiroprietor of the Stoddard 
House, 1^'armington, and Secretary of the Ho- 
tel Proprietors' Association of Maine, was 
born in North Windham, Me., May i, 1845, 
son of Thomas W. and Hannah P. (Proctor) 
McDonald. Mr. ^McDonald is of Scottish 
ancestry. 

His granilfather, James McDonald, who ])os- 
sessed many of the characteristic traits and 
preserved the traditions of his nationality, 
served as a soldier in the Continental army 
during the Revolutionary War. He was dur- 
ing his life a farmer, a merchant, and a hotel- 
keeper in North Windham, where he owned a 
good farm; and being an able business man of 
progressive tendencies he amassed a comfort- 
able fortune. Though not an asjiirant for 
public ofifice, he was one of the most jirominent 
and influential men of his day, and was highly 
respected as an honorable, upright, and high- 
minded citizen. He married Rachel Webb, 
and reared a family of eight children; namely, 
Edward, Seth, Eli, James, Abner, Thomas W., 
Sally, and Jane. 

Thomas W. McDonald, the sixth child, 
being the youngest son, remained at iiome 
with his parents, and after his father's retire- 
ment from business took charge of the farm 
and hotel property. Succeeding to the posses- 
sion of the estate by purchasing the interests 
of the other heirs, he conducted the hotel, and 
did a large livery business for many years. 
Later in life he bought the rival hotel, which 



he closed up; and after that he kept the only 
public house in North Windham until 1871, 
when he sold the projierty and retired to his 
farm, where he died of [ineumonia at the age 
of sixty-seven years. He was a genial, kind- 
hearted man, especially well adapted by nature 
to welcome and entertain the travelling public, 
with whom he was a great favorite; and he 
was equally popular with his fellow-townsmen. 
In local public affairs he was a jirominent 
figure, serving with marked ability as a mem- 
ber of the Hoard of Selectmen. He was a 
Republican in politics from the formation of 
that party until his death, and in liis religious 
views was a Free Will ]5aptist. His wife, 
who was before marriage Hannah Proctor, and 
was a daughter of William Proctor, of New 
Gloucester,, Me., became the mother of four 
children, as follows: J-'lora J.; l.ucinda E. ; 
William Henry, the subject of this sketch; 
and Abbie L. Mrs. Hannah P. McDonald died 
at the age of fifty-seven years. 

William Henry McDonald was educated in 
the ccjmmon schools of his native town and at 
the Pridgton High School. /\fter the comi)le- 
tion of his studies he taught school for a time; 
but, as he was needed at home to assist his 
father in managing the hotel, he resided in 
North Windham until the property was sold, 
when he secured a position as night clerk at 
the St. Julian Hotel in Portland. Being soon 
advanced to the jiosition of second clerk and 
later to that of head clerk, he remained at the 
St. Julian for three years, and then went to the 
Preble House, where he acted as chief clerk 
for the succeeding seven years. I'or the next 
eight years he was jiroijrietoi- and manager of 
the United States Hotel, Portland, which he 
conducted in such a liberal and satisfactory 
manner as to become one of the best-known 
and most popular landlords in Maine, a fact 
which was amply attested by the numerous 
commercial men and other travellers who 
made the United States their headquarters 
while in Portland; and the high reputation 
he acquired there was sufficient to ensure 
his future success wherever he might choose 
to locate. 

After leaving the United States Hotel, Mr. 
McDonald was clerk at the Ottawa House on 
Cushing's Island for one season, the following 



14 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



siniimcr acting in the same capacity at tlie 
Fisi< House, Old Orchard Beach; and in 1.S88, 
cciminf; to I'armington, he leased the Willows, 
which had previously been a large private 
boarding-school. Remodelling the interior 
and putting in modern conveniences, he fur- 
nished it throughout, and conducted it success- 
fully for five years as a summer hotel. On 
May 8, 1893, Mr. McDonald leased the Stod- 
dard House at 20 Broadway. This centrally 
located hotel he has completely refitted and re- 
furnished, introducing modern conveniences in 
the way of heating, bath, and other accommo- 
dations; and his thirty-eight well-ventilated 
rooms are occupied the year round. Con- 
nected with the Stoddard is a first-class livery 
stable, which affords commercial men the 
means of reaching those of their customers who 
are not accessible by rail; and the great po]ni- 
larity of Proprietor McDonald causes many of 
them to make his house their centre of opera- 
tions while in this coimt}'. 

Mr. McDonald wedded lunnia Davis, daugh- 
ter of Lemuel and Abbie I. (Larrabee) Davis, 
the former of whom was a shoemaker by 
trade; and both were natives of Limington, 
Me. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald have been the 
parents of six children, as follows: Frank S. , 
who was born January i, 1874; Edith, who 
died in infancy, March 18, 1877; Howard, 
who was born May 22, 187S; George, who was 
horn April 19, 1891 ; Philip H., who was born 
October 29, 1883; and Arthur L., whn was 
horn January i i, 1885. 

In the various fraternal orders to which he 
belongs Mr. McDonald is a general favorite, 
being a member of Ancient Landmark Lodge, 
No. 17, A. F. & A. M., of Portland; Har- 
mony Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of the same city; and Bramhall Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, of which he is Fast Chan- 
cellor, and has occupied the other important 
chairs. He is a member of the Grand Lodge 
of Maine, and since residing in Farmington 
has served as District Deputy. For the past 
eleven years he has acted as Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Hotel Proprietors' Association 
of Maine.' Politically, he supports the Repub- 
lican party, and in his religious views is a 
L'uitarian. Mrs. IMcDonald is a Congrega- 
tit)nalist. 



WILLIAM W. WATSON, a bo.x man- 
ufacturer and mill owner of Water- 
ford, was born in this place, Febru- 
ary 2, 1 84 1, son of Samuel S. and Harriet A. 
(Anthoine) Watson, the former of Waterford, 
the latter of Windham, Me. His grandfather, 
Ebenezer Watson, who was also born in 
Waterford, and spent his life in this town, 
followed the occupation of farmer. 

Samuel S. Watson learned the shoemaker's . 
trade in his youth, and followed it for a while; 
but in the later years of his life he devoted 
his energies to general farming. He resided 
in the eastern part of the town, and was for 
many years a well-known figure there, living 
to the advanced age of eighty-two. His death 
occurred in 1886, and that of his wife in 1878. 
Their children were: George L., who died in 
October, 1895; William W., the subject of 
this sketch; Mary Louisa, now residing in 
Worcester, Mass. ; Lucy E., the wife of 
Churchill Leary, of Shelburne, N.H.; John 
N., residing in Worcester, who married Miss 
Tammy Griffin; Charlotte Elizabeth, the wife 
of Louis Holden, of Otisfield, Me.; James 
N., living in Worcester, who married Miss 
Emily Leary; and Charles W'. , a resident of 
Westbrook, Me. 

William W. Watson attended a common 
school until he was fourteen years of age. 
After that he was first employed in a bucket 
factory in South Waterford. He had spent 
six years here when, on October 16, 1861, he 
enlisted for service in the Civil War in 
Company G, Twelfth Maine Volunteers, under 
Colonel Chapley and Captain M. M. Robin- 
son. In the course of the three years he 
spent in the army he participated in the siege 
of Port Hudson, in the battle of Winchester, 
and in several skirmishes. At Ship Island 
he received a permanent injury, on account of 
which he is now in receipt of a pension from 
the government. Receiving his discharge at 
Portland, December 8, 1S64, he returned to 
Waterford, and shortly after purchased the 
saw-mill which he is now operating. He 
manufactures spool strips and a variety of 
pine boxes, including those used for packing 
salt, the most of which he ships to Boston, 
Mass. Ho has invented tw'o labor-saving ma- 
chines, whicli have proved great successes. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'S 



They are a box edger and a device for cutting 
box boards. Besides attending to his mill 
business Mr. Watson is engaged in general 
fanning to some extent. He has had some 
reverses in business, but on the whole he has 
been successful. 

Mr. Watson was married in April, 1868, to 
Marietta Hamlin, a native of South Water- 
ford, born in 185 1, daughter of George K. 
Hamlin, who was a farmer. Mr. Hamlin and 
his wife are buried in Waterford. Mr. and 
Mrs. Watson have two children — Edith May 
and Harry W. The daughter, born 1874, who 
is a graduate of Douglass Seminary, and later 
attended the North Bridgton Academy, has 
taught school, and is now resting at home; 
Harry W. was born in 1879, and is a graduate 
of North Bridgton Academy. When Mr. 
Watson was first qualified to vote he joined 
the Democratic party. He subsequently be- 
came a Republican. Though he was never an 
office-seeker, he was appointed Postmaster of 
Waterford village, under President Harrison, 
and served efficiently for four years. He is a 
member of Harry Rust Post, No. 54, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Norway village; of 
No. 133, A. F. & A. M., of Waterford City; 
and of Oxford Lodge, No. 61, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of North Waterford. 
Mr. and Mrs. Watson attend the Universal ist 
church in South Waterford. 



tion 



-OHN HENRY MILLETT, widely and 
favorably known as one of the substan- 
tial farmers of Oxford County, is pros- 
perously engaged in his cho.sen occupa- 
in the town of Norway, where his birth 
occurred April 4, 1825. His parents, Colonel 
John and Abigail (Parsons) Millett, were both 
lifelong residents of Norway. The former 
died here, June 3, 1875, aged eighty-four year.s, 
and the latter August 29, 1865, in the seventy- 
second year of her age. 

Colonel Millett, who was a representative of 
the fifth generation in descent from the emigrant 
ancestor, Thomas Millett, an early settler in 
Massachusetts, received his military title dur- 
ing the War of 1812, although he never took 
part in any of the battles, his regiment going 
only as far as Portland. He was by occuijation 



a farmer and dmver. He and his wife had a 
family of eight children. The eldest, a daugh- 
ter Dorothy, married Thomas Cousins, of Po- 
land, Me. ; and both she and her husband are 
now dead. Martha, who died in 1852, was the 
wife of Otis True, of Norway; and Abigail is 
the wife of E. C. Jackson, a farmer living in 
Norway. John Henry is the special subject of 
this sketch. Jonathan Sawyci', the next son, 
died in California. The sixth cliild, Mary 
W. P., who died some time since, was the wife 
of A. F. Jackson of this town. Isaac P. and 
Joel, who were twins, are deceased. 

John Henry Millett, the firstborn son, is 
the only one of the four now li\ing. He re- 
mained a member of the parental household 
throughout his childhood and youth and during 
a short ]3eriod of his early manhood. (lold 
being discovered in California in h'ebruary, 
1848, he shared in the excitement that fol- 
lowed, and with his brothers staitcd for that 
"El Dorado of the West," going directly to 
Sacramento, where he tried mining for two 
years. Not being very successful in his search 
for the jirecious metal, he retLUMied to Norway 
and engaged in farming, convinced that "there 
was no place like home." After his marriage 
he bought the farm he now occupies, and 
which by his persistent efforts has become in 
point of improvements and equipments one of 
the finest in the town. Pie owns about five 
hundred acres of land; and with the assistance 
of his sons he carries on general farming, and 
is also engaged in stock raising and dairying. 
A part of the cream is sold in the village of 
West Paris, while in the home dairy Mrs. 
Millett makes butter and cheese. 

Mr. Millett was married November 25, 
1858, to Miss Sarah Elizabeth Rice, who was 
born December 6, 1S27, in Waterford, this 
county, where her grandfather, I^ben Rice, 
Sr. , was a pioneer settler. Her parents were 
I^ben Rice, Jr., a lifelong resident of Water- 
ford, and his wife, P^lizabeth P'rye, who was a 
native of P^yeburg, Oxford County. During 
the first sixteen years of their wedded life Mr. 
and Mrs. Millett became the parents of six 
children. • With two of these little ones they 
were soon called to part, namely: Harry, born 
May 16, 1865, who died at the age of nine 
months; antl I'rances Allen, born December 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



II, 1867, who died July 19, 1X68. The four 
who grew to maturity and are now living were 
well-educated, completing their studies in the 
high school. The following is a hrief record: 
Mary A., born in i860, is her mother's helper 
at home; Jonathan S. . horn August 15, 1862, 
and John Henry, Jr., horn March 25, 1869, 
assist their father in the care of the farm; 
and -Sarah Elizabeth, born September 22, 
1872, is engaged in teaching in the town of 
Norway. 

Mrs. Millett is a communicant of the C\)n- 
gregational church. Mr. Millett and all his 
famil\- are members of the Norway Grange, 
Patrons of Husbandry. A Democrat in politi- 
cal affiliation, he cast his first Presidential vote 
in 1852 for the Democratic nominee, Franklin 
Pierce, who received the election. 




FRAN'CIS GOULD PUTLKR, 

tor many years one of P'armington's 
most noted citizens and enterprising 
business men, died at his residence 
in this town, December 6, 1891. He was 
born in Farmington, March 3, 181 1, son of 
Francis and Mary (Blackstone) Butler, and 
w'as a great-grandson of Benjamin Butler, a 
native of Martha's \'ineyard, who made his 
home at lulgartown in the eastern jiart of the 
island. 

There his son, Ephraim, Mr. Butler's grand- 
father, was born, December g, 1758. F^phraim 
Butler began to follow the sea in his youth, 
shi|)ping before the mast. After a time, find- 
ing that his education was not sufficient to in- 
sure promotion, he returned home, and applied 
himself to study, pursuing a thorough course 
in mathematics and navigation. Upon its 
completion he became mate of a whale-ship 
under Captain Trowbridge, later serving in the 
Continental forces, both naval and land, in the 
Revolutionary War. After the close of the 
struggle for independence he acted as a pilot 
along the coast of Massachusetts and Maine; 
but, having drawn a tract of wild land situated 
in the town of New Vineyard in the District of 
Maine, he decided to settle there. He began 
the task of clearing it off in 1792, taking up 
his residence with his family in Sandy River 
townshiii, from which place they remo\'ed the 



following year to their new home in the wil- 
derness. He improved his grant into a good 
farm, and, selling the property in 1801, set- 
tled in Farmington, where he resided until his 
death, which took place April 3, 1832. He 
married Lovie Sherman Lease, who was born 
in 1759, and they reared a family of seven 
children; namcl)', Jeremiah, Francis, Oliver, 
Betsey, Lovie, Abigail, and \\'illiam. Mrs. 
Lovie S. Butler died in 1843. 

F'rancis Butler, the second of the four sons, 
who has already been mentioned as the father 
of P'rancis Gould, was born in New \'ineyard. 
Me., October 12, 1782. Possessed of an en- 
ergetic nature, he began life for himself when 
a mere lad ; and for several years he resided 
with hi's Uncle Josejih in Portland. Upon his 
return to Farmington he engaged in mercantile 
pursuits, carrying on a general store in F"air- 
banks \'illage from 1827 to 1832; and, besides 
owning and operating mills and cultivating 
several farms, he was extensively engaged in 
buying cattle for the Brighton market. He 
was one of the most stirring and successful 
business men of his day; and in public affairs 
he displayed the same activity and tact which 
characterized his private business operations, 
serving as a member of the Board of Select- 
men from 1829 to 1834, Town Treasurer in 
1835, and as Representative to the legislature 
in 1823. He died January i, 1845. For his 
first wife he married Mary Blpckstone, who 
died in 1823, aged thirty-seven year,s, leaving 
two children, namely: P'rancis Gould, the 
subject of this sketch ; and Mary Jane, born 
August 29, 1822, who married Deacon R. Cut- 
ler, and died within a year or two, the mother 
of a son, who did not long survive. l^y his 
union with Rebecca Knowlton, his second 
wife, h'rancis Butler had three children, 
namely: Caroline E., who was born March 28, 
1828; Hiram A., who was born August 29, 
1831 ; and Margaret J., who was born March 
10, 1836. 

F"rancis Gould Butler, the eldest son of 
Francis Butler, acquired his education in the 
common schools and at the P"armington Acad- 
emy. While still a youth he was for a time 
employed as a clerk in the store at P'armington 
P"alls; and as he grew older he became of val- 
uable assistance to his father, whose business 




'im. iJaiu\ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



19 



enterprises were widely scattered. l''()r a slu)rt 
time he engaged in mercantile pursuits in Bos- 
ton ; but, not finding indoor occupation congen- 
ial, he returned to Farmington, and availed 
himself of the advantages of his practical 
knowledge of surve3ing to busy himself in 
the open air. Aside from being employed by 
residents of this town and its vicinity to settle 
disputed boundary lines, he was commissioned 
as a land surveyor by the State ; and nearly 
if not quite all the government hinds in this 
part of the county were located and set off 
either by him personally or under his di- 
rection. 

The exceedingly able and business-like 
manner in which be settled his father's estate 
won fi)i- him a high reputation as a financier; 
and his fellow-townsmen, seeing in him a man 
abundantly qualified to administer public 
affairs, secured his valuable services by elect- 
ing him to the Board of Selectmen and to the 
post of Town Treasurer, also to other local 
offices. He was a member of the legislature 
in 1S54, and on account of the illness of the 
sjieaker was chosen Speaker//?; tciu., a posi- 
tion which he ably filled for nearly the entire 
session; and in 1S56, which was the last year 
in which the Democratic party was in the ma- 
jority in Maine, he was a member of the State 
.Senate. Mr. Butler also served as Clerk of 
Courts, as High Sheriff of I'ranklin County, 
and for many years was a delegate to the local 
and State conventions of his party. He was 
an accomplished parliamentarian and a skilful 
presiding officer, having the ability to state 
clearly and conci.sely the question for debate; 
and the forcible arguments be used in sustain- 
ing a point which he had undertaken to cham- 
pion were the means of weakening his oppo- 
nents and winning many votes to the sup]3ort 
of his cause. 

He was instrumental in securing the incor- 
])oration of Franklin County, thus making 
Farmington a shire town; and he also worked 
diligently and subscribed generously toward 
bringing the town into connection with the 
railroad system of the State. In 1859 he was 
chosen a Trustee of the Franklin Academy, 
being a member of the last board of govern- 
ment of that institution ; and he rendered val- 
uable aid in bringing about the measures 



whereliy it was bantled over to the .State in 
return for the establishment here of the first 
Normal School in Maine. In 1X61 he became 
President of the Sandy River National Bank, 
being also appointed Treasurer of the County 
Savings Bank; and he not onlv handled 
the affairs of these institutions with prudence 
and -sagacity, [ilacing them ujion a firm 
basis, but his private operaticms were alwa3's 
of such a nature as to prove beneficial to the 
general business interests of the town. 

Deeply interested in the growtli ami devel- 
opment of Farmington, looking upon its ad- 
vancement as a [lart of the histor)- of Maine, 
in 1882 Mr. Butler began the task of com- 
piling a biographical and genealogical history 
of the town, which he completed in 1885. 
This work, U'hich contains si.\ hundred and 
eighty-three pages of valuable records, dating 
from 1776 and relating to the early explora- 
tions and settlements, family histor)-, early 
military o]ierations, church annals, mechanical 
industries, railroads, and other matters of deep 
concern to the residents here, is profusely 
illustrated and had a large circulation in this 
locality. It is now especially prized by those 
fortunate enough to possess a co]n', as the re- 
maining one thousand volumes of the issue 
were destroyed by the conflagration which oc- 
curred here in 18S6. The Butler homestead 
was also swept away by that disastrous fire, 
but was immediately replaced by a more mod- 
ern and commodious residence, which is with- 
out doubt one of the finest in the coimt)'. Mr. 
Butler led a regular and exceedingly tem|)erate 
life, his health remaining good up to the ill- 
ness which resulted fatally. He died as be- 
fore mentioned, leaving an honorable record 
as a legacy to his posterity, his untiring laliors 
in behalf of the general community forming a 
bright s]iot in the history of the town be loved 
so well. 

On July 23, 1842, Francis CkjuUI Butler 
was united in marriage with Julia Wendell, 
who survives him. She was born in b'arming- 
ton, July 20, 181 5, daughter of Thomas and- 
Flizabeth (b^aton) Wendell, the former of 
whom was in his day one of the energetic 
farmers and prominent residents of this town. 
Thomas Wendell was born in Marblehead, 
Mass., July 13, 1770, and was a son of Thomas 



20 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



WemlL'll, Sr. , of that town. In 17S6, at the 
age nf sixteen years, young Wendell, who had 
Ijreviously followed tlie sea as a cabin boy, 
came to Farmington, where he learned the 
carpenter's trade; and in early manhood he 
bought a tract of wild land, which he cleared 
into a good farm, thus establishing a com- 
fortable home f(jr his family. Jlis upright, 
manh' principles, earnest piety, and strict 
adherence to habits of temperance caused him 
to lead a most exemplary life. He died of old 
age, November ig, 1862. He served as Se- 
lectman during the years I So- and 1808; and, 
when the academy was built, he not only 
assisted in its erection, but subscribed liber- 
ally toward its endowment. In religious 
\'iews a Congregationalist, he was one of the 
princi|xil promoters of that church in this 
town; and he acted as clerk of the parish for 
many years, or until his death. He married 
]'"lizabeth Eaton, and had a family of eleven 
children, of whom Mrs. Julia 15utler is the 
only survivor. Mrs. ISutler has been the 
mother of four children, as follows: Mary 
I'llizabeth, who was born May f), 1S43, and 
died May 21, 1S58; Julia Page, who was born 
December i, 1S47, and died September 11, 
1 851; Apphia -Stanley, who was born A]3ril 
II, 1851, and died October i, i860; and 
Carrie Frances, who was born April 30, 1855, 
married Charles F. Thwing, President of 
Adeibert College, Cleveland, Ohio, and has 
three children — Mary \'k, b'rances 1!., and 
Apphia. 

Mrs. l?utler, who enjo\s unusually good 
healtii for one of her years, has been a leading 
spirit in religious w-ork in this community, 
iiaxing throughout her active life assisted the 
various societies connected with the Congrega- 
tional church, both b)- liberal contributions 
and personal services. Her deeds of kindness 
and unostentatious charity have endeared this 
estimable woman to the hearts i<i hei' many 
friends antl acquaintances. 



'OHX C. GERRV, for some time a 
member of the State legislature, a cus- 
tom-house official, and Dejuity Sheriff 
of O.xford and Cumberland Counties, 
was loiiir an esteemed and influential citizen of 



South Waterford, Me., where his widow and 
daughter are still socially prominent. He was 
born in Waterford, November 25, 1808, the 
son of Peter and Polly (Cutler) Gerry. His 
father was a native of Harvard, Mass., his 
mother of Sudbury, Mass. 

Nathaniel Gerry, father of Peter, spent his 
life in the old Bay State, his birthplace being 
Stoneham, and his place of residence for many 
years the pretty country town of Harvard. 
Peter Gerry, who was born in 1776, settled in 
the south-west [lart of Waterford in 1797. He 
devoted much of his time to agricultural 
labors, but worketl also at his trade of shoe- 
making. An intelligent man who took an 
active interest in public affairs, he was elected 
to the State legislature and served for four 
terms. He died June 16, 1847, having sur- 
vived his wife, who breathed her last on 
March 16, 1830, seventeen years. Their five 
children, who have since joined them in the 
world beyond, were: Mary; John C. , afore- 
named; Roland H. ; Abbie; and Pllbridge. 

John C. Gerry was reared on a farm, and in 
the years of his mature manhood followed the 
pursuit of agriculture on an extensive scale. 
He was also interested in trade, and for thiee 
years was a member of the firm of Gerry & 
Turner, marble dealers, of Portland, Me. In 
politics he took an active ]5art, voting the 
Democratic ticket; and his ability and ster- 
ling character won the respect and confidence 
of his fellows, who elected him to a number 
of offices. He was Town Treasurer of Water- 
ford eight years, was Deputy .Sheriff of ()xford 
and Cumberland Counties for one or more 
terms, occupied a seat in the legislature in 
185 I, and was in the customhouse four \ears. 
In the latter part of his life, his health being 
pool-, he retired from business and public 
affairs, living quietly in the village of Water- 
ford until his death, November 19, 1887. Mr. 
Gerry was well known in Oxford and Cumber- 
land Counties, and had a host of friends. 

He was married March 15, 1847, to Nancy 
W. Sawin, daughter of William and Elizabeth 
(Temple) Sawin. She was born in Waterford, 
November 30, 1S19. Her jxirents were na- 
tives of Sudbury, Mass. They lived for a 
while after they were married at Waterford 
[•"lat. Me., Mr. Sawin being driver and. agent 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the stage-coach iimniiii^" hctween WatcrlOrd 
Flat and Portlancl. About 1824 he removed 
to Freeport, Me., where he was stage agent 
until 1S42; and after retiring from business he 
lived with his daughter in Waterford until his 
death on September 8 of that year. Mrs. 
Sawin died at the home of her daughter in 
1S49. She was the nmther of thirteen chil- 
dren, only two uf whom are now living, 
namely: Jane, who resides in Hyde Park, 
Mass. ; and Nancy W., Mrs. Gerry. The 
others were: Iktsey, Phcebe, William, Julia, 
Harriet, Lyman, Jabez, Mary A., Mary A. 
(second), Lydia, and one who died in infancy. 
Seven children blessed the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gerry, the record being as follows: John 
Melville, who lived but three years; Mary 
Elizabeth, wife of C. C. Briggs, a resident of 
Pittsburg, Pa., employed in the iron and steel 
works; Josephine, residing with her mother 
on the homestead in Waterford; Anna Sin- 
clair, wife of John Haynes, a music dealer 
living in Mount \'ernon, N. Y. ; Helen, who 
died at the age of thirty; Roland, in Pittsburg, 
Pa. ; and John Cutler, who lived but ten years. 
The children who grew up were well educated, 
attending Bridgton Academy and taking high- 
school courses. Mrs. and Miss Gerry exer- 
cise a graceful hospitality at their pleasant 
home in South Waterford villase. 




lUGENE NELSON, a retired manufact- 
urer of Waterfortl, now engaged to 
some extent in market gardening, 
belongs to one of the oldest families in New 
P^ngland. The son of Chaplin and Emily 
(Hicks) Nelson, he was born in Waterford, 
April 9, 1849. He is descended from Thomas 
and Joan Nelson, Thomas being the ancestor 
of the Nelsons in Maine, New Hampshire, 
and the northern part of Massachusetts. 
Thomas Nelson was one of the tvventy-seven 
friends that emigrated with the Rev. Ezekiel 
Rogers from Rowley, Yorkshire, England, in 
December, 1638. In the spring of 1639 this 
party settled on land situated between Ipswich 
and Newbury, Mass., subsequently known as 
"Mr. Rogers's Plantation," but named Rowley 
by the General Court in the following Septem- 
ber. Thomas Nelson, who was one of the 



able men of his time, was made a freeman 
May 23, 1639, was Deputy to the General 
Court in 1640 and 1641, and in 1643 was 
chosen chairman of a committee to make a 
survey of the town, and lay out and register 
house lots. In October, 1644, he was author- 
ized to join persons in marriage within the 
limits of Rowley. In January, 1644, the 
town granted to him thirty-six acres in the 
"Mill Field," ten acres of which were de- 
signed to encourage him to build mills. Eu- 
gene Nelson's grandparents, Moses and Hitta 
(Pingrec) Nelson, were the first of the family 
in Waterford, to which they came from 
Rowley, and where Moses devoted the last 
years of his life to agriculture. 

Chaplin Nelson was born in Waterford, and 
was employed there in his youth as a sur- 
veyor. He was later engaged in the sale of 
general merchandise in the village of Water- 
ford. His death occurred at the age of thirty- 
five. His wife, a native of Westbrook, Me., 
who was afterward married to D. W. Noble, 
of Waterford (also deceased), died in 1881. 
By her first marriage she had four children, 
namely: Georgia A., born February 16, 1846, 
the wife of Cyrus .S. Tucker, of Norway: 
Llewellyn K., born June 23, 1847, a book- 
keeper in Leadville, Col.; Eugene, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Charles W. , born Sep- 
tember 21, 1850, a resident of New York 
City, and engaged in the railroad business. 

Eugene Nelson received a good education, 
attending the common schools near his home 
and Bridgton Academy. At the age of nine- 
teen he obtained employment as clerk in the 
office of the water department at Boston, 
Mass., where he remained a year. Returning 
then to his native place, he was engaged in 
the manufacture of woodenware in Waterford 
City for two years. Subsequently in the 
village he developed a large business in gen- 
eral manufacturing, and became one of the 
prominent men in the place. He retired from 
active business some time ago. It was, how- 
ever, impossible for a man of his disposition 
to remain entirely unoccupied, so he turned 
his attention to market gardening, in which 
he has since found recreation and some profit. 
In October, 1871, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lottie M. Stanwood, who was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



horn in l^oston, Mass., February 2, 1853. 
I Icr parents, who are living on the Stanvvood 
homestead in Waterford, are Albert and 
Matilda (Morse) Stanvvood, the former a na- 
tive of Nevvburyport, Mass., and the latter of 
Waterford. They have five children, namely: 
Albert E., born November 10, 1S73, now in 
Britlgton, Me.; Edward C, liorn June i, 
1875, in Portland, Me.; ICthel M., born May 
I, 1877; Bertha S., jjorn July 28, 1883; and 
Charles M., born January 13, 1887. The 
three last named reside with their parents. 
Mr. Nelson takes an active interest in poli- 
tics, voting the Democratic ticket. He has 
served on the Township Committee for a num- 
ber of years, and has held the office of Super- 
visor of Schools three years. He is well 
known and highly esteemed in the vicinity of 
his home. 




k.ASTUS T. AHBOTT, of I-armington, 
I'^ranklin County, Me., who was for- 
merly identified with the saw-mill 
business in this section of the State, and is 
now a successful agriculturist, was born in 
Milan, N. H., October 17, 1849, son of hh-as- 
tus I. and Eydia (Eckley) Abbott. His pater- 
nal grandfather was Luther Abbott, a resident 
of Lancaster, N.H. ; and that town was his 
father's birthplace. 

luastus I. Abbott in early manhood learned 
the wheelwright's trade, in which he became 
exceedingly proficient, and was known as one of 
the best workmen in this locality. Settling 
in Milton riantation in this count)-, he engaged 
in iiperating saw-mills, also owning some valu- 
able farming lands, which he carried on with 
])rosperous results. Later, from Milton he 
moved to Rumford T'alls, Oxford County, 
where he is now residing, and is the proprietor 
of saw-mills. He is an active and very capa- 
i)le business man, whose enterprising spirit 
has been jirodiictive of excellent financial 
results; and he is to-day among the most useful 
and progressive citizens of Oxford County. 

ICrastus T. Abbott, to whom was given his 
father's name with a distinctive midille initial, 
ac(|uired the princiiial part of his education in 
the schools of Oxford County; anil when his 
studies were finished he besran work with his 



father, first as a wheelwright and later as a 
mill-man. ]5eing a natural mechanic, he took 
up the business of filing and fitting saws, in 
which he became an expert, and continued thus 
employed for several years, being frequently 
called to different localities for the jjurpose of 
jnitting in order and adjusting mill saws. In 
conipany with his father he bought a small 
farm in Franklin Plantation; and, after remod- 
elling the buildings and otherwise improving 
the property, he sold it and purchased the 
J. Butterfield farm of one hundred acres, situ- 
ated in P"armington, where he has since 
resided. 

Mr. Abbott's first wife, Josephine Wayman, 
daughter of Thomas Wayman, of I'eru, Me., 
died at the age of- twenty-one, leaving one 
child — Alva ¥.., who died when he was four- 
teen years old. His second wife, Edith, 
daughter of Robert Townsend, of Oxford, died 
at the age of nineteen; and he subsequently 
married Mrs. Lottie Decker Butterfield, his 
]5resent wife, then the widow of the late 
Luther W Butterfield, who was a son of John 
ISutterfield. Her first husband died April 21, 
1879, aged twenty-nine years, leaving one 
daughter — Florentine J. Butterfield, who was 
born September 28, 1876. Mrs. Abbi)tt is a 
daughter of Joshua and Rachel (Bishoj)) 
Decker and grand-daughter of Joshua and 
Fanny (Piper) Decker, of La Grange, Penob- 
scot County, Me. The grandfather was a 
prosperous farmer and large land -owner of that 
town, and both he and his wife lived to reach 
a good old age. Joshua Decker, the younger, 
Mrs. Abbott's father, who was born in La 
(jrange, servetl as a jirivate in Company P", 
lughth Regiment, Maine Volunteers, for 
three years during the war of the Rebellion. 
He died at the age of fifty-two. His wife, 
who survives him and is now seventy-seven 
years old, has been the mother of nine chil- 
dren, three of whom died voung. The 
living are: Horace; Elbridge; Loren ; Al- 
freda ; Lewellyn ; and Lottie, who is now Mrs. 
Abbott. Mr. and Mrs. Abbott have an 
adopted daugliter, Gertrude May, who was born 
March 30, 1S94. 

In politics Mr. Abbott is an active supporter 
of the Republican party, and during his resi- 
dence in Oxford County he served as a member 



BIOGRAI'IIICAL RKVIEW 



23 



of the ]5oard of Selectmen of the town in whieh 
he lived. He is prominently connected with 
Franklin Lodge, No. 58, Independent Order 
of Odd FeIlow.s, in which he ha.s filled mo.st of 
the important chairs. Mr. Ahbott and his 
wife attend public worship at the Haptist 
church. 




'AMUKL B. WATERMAN, a 

worthy and representative citizen 
of O.xford, O.xford County, Me., 
was born in Turner, Androscoggin 
County, on April i, 1826, the son of (iuy H. 
and I'^sther (Brown) Waterman. His father 
was a native of the town of Greene, not far 
from Turner; and his mother was born in 
Oxford. 

Guy B. Waterman spent the most of his 
active life in Turner and O.xford as a hard- 
working farmer, but his last few years were 
passed in the town of Durham. At one time 
he owned land that he cultivated in the town 
of Turner, and later on he leased land. He 
married Esther Brown, and five children were 
born to them, namely: I-.sther E., now the 
wife of Mr. Freeman Greenough, and living 
with her husband in the city of Portland, Me. ; 
Samuel B. , of whose life further particulars are 
to follow; and Ruth, Eucinda, and Lizzie, all 
deceased. Mr. Guy B. Waterman was a Uni- 
versalist in religious belief and first a Whig 
and then a Republican in politics. Tie died 
at the age of seventy-five years. 

Samuel B. Waterman grew to maturity in 
the town of Oxford, where he received his edu- 
cation in the public schools. Starting in life 
for himself, he first engaged in farm work, but 
■ soon left that occupation to become a travel- 
ling salesman. Lie continued on the road for 
fifteen years, part of the time being engaged 
in selling powder for Hubbard & Marble. In 
1854, moved by the desire to settle down, 
establish a home, and enjoy its comforts, he 
bought the farm where he now resides. Here 
he has lived ever since, leading the quiet life 
of a farmer. 

He was married in 1853 to Miss Sarah A. 
Millett, the daughter of Edmund C. and Sally 
(Greenlief) Millett. Mrs. Waterman was 
born on July 29, 1834. Her father was a 



Androscoggin 



leading farmer of Miuol, 
County, where he was one of the most promi- 
nent citizens. He lix'cd there all his life, 
and died there at the ripe old age of eighty- 
eight years, his wife being fi\e years younger 
at her death. They were both members of the 
Baptist church. Mr. Millctl was a stanch 
Republican in ])olitics. He and his wife 
were the parents of eight children, of whom 
seven are now living, namel\': William G., 
a farmer of Minot; Sarah A., Mrs. Waterman; 
Mrs. Harriett E. Spurr; Mrs. Abnetla I'". 
Burroughs; Mrs. Emma I''. V'arnev ; Miss 
Ella J. Milfctt; and Mrs. Mary E. Carr. 
The one that died was a girl, h'rances Ellen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Waterman have two sons — 
(.'barles J'", ami b'red .S. Their only daughter 
died in iiif;rncy. Charles V.. Waterman was 
born in (Ixford, March 2, 1859. He is a 
newspaper man, and is one ot the owners of 
the Mechanic Falls J.i;ii;iT. He married 
Miss Clara ¥.. Garland. l-"red S. Waterman, 
who was borji in O.xford, September 13, 1864, 
is unmarried, and lives at home with his father 
and mother, and helps with the farm duties. 

Mr. Wateinian has made many improve- 
ments on his place during the torty years and 
more of his occupanc)'. He has now a fine 
farm of one hundred acres, the homestead be- 
sides outlying land, with convenient buildings, 
all in good repair, and the whole jiresenting 
a thriftful appearance indicative of careful 
industry and sagacious management. Mi'. 
Waterman and his wife are energetic and stir- 
ring people, and all they possess and enjoy 
they have their own hands and brains to thank 
for. They are as well liked as they are well 
known. They are liberal in religious views, 
and attend the Universal ist church. In poli- 
tics Mr. Waterman is a strong Keiiublican. 
He has been a .Selectman of the town for two 
years, and has also held several minor offices, 
proofs of the confidence and fi iendship of his 
fellow- townsmen. 



,HARLES M. MILLl'lR, a well to-do 
farmer of Wilton, l'"ranklin County, 
Me., and a representative of an old 
family of this town, was born in 
Wilton, October 6, 1850, son of David and 




24 



IJlOGRAl'llICAL REVIEW 



Abigail (Johnson) Miller. His grandparents 
were David and Betsey (Pierce) Miller, who 
came from Fall River, Mass., to Wilton, and 
settled on the John Miller place. An account 
of the family, which is of early Colonial ori- 
gin, will be found in a sketch of Gilbert 
Miller. 

David Miller, the N'ounger, son of the ]jio- 
neer, was born in ^\'ilton on July lo, 1815. 
As a means of earning a livelihood and sup- 
porting his family, he devoted his energies, 
and with success, to general farming. When 
somewhat past middle age, he bought the 
David Macumber farm, where he resided for 
thirty-one years. He died May 10, 1893. 
Iksides attending to his farm work, he was 
pr(jminent in public affairs, serving as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen and as Ta.x Col- 
lector for several terms, also as a County Com- 
missioner; and in politics he acted with the 
Republican party. His first wife, Abigail 
Johnson, who was a daughter of Charles John- 
son, of Harpswell, became the mother of seven 
children, namely: Hattie; Charles M., the 
subject of this sketch; William H. J. ; Jennie 
l*". ; Isaac ; Frederick M. ; and Mary L. Mrs. 
j\bigail Miller died at the age of thirty-six 
years. Da\'id Miller married for his second 
wife Sybil Talbot. 

Charles M. Miller began his education in 
the public schools, and finished his course of 
study at the Wilton Academy. At the age of 
twenty he started in life for himself as a rail- 
road lirakeman in Massachusetts; and a year 
later he entered the service of the old Metro- 
])i)litan Street Railway Company of l^oston as 
a conductor, remaining in their employ for 
three years. Returning to Wilton, he was for 
the next seven years engaged in farming with 
his father; and he then bought the property of 
one hundred acres known as the Colonel Har- 
pus farm, which he now owns. He has greatly 
increased the productiveness of the land, 
which is now ca]iable of yielding large and ex- 
cellent crops, and during the present year he 
has erected a new stable and carriage house. 
He keeps a herd of twelve Jersey cows for 
dairy purposes, and aside from carrying on this 
farm he has since the death of his father taken 
entire charge of the homestead property. 

(.)n April 13, 1874, Mr. Miller married 



Lucinda Rich, daughter of Josiah and Lucy 
(Baker) Rich, of Wellfleet, Mas.s. Mr. Rich 
followed the sea until his retirement, and he 
died at the age of fifty-nine years. His wife, 
who lived to be sixty-nine, was the mother of 
five children, namely: Theodore; Zerua ; 
Sarah J.; Lucinda, who is now Mrs. Miller; 
and Ftta. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have two 
children: Leita J., who was born IVLirch 10, 
1878; and Alice M., who was born A]3ril 8, 
1 88 1, both now attending the \\'ilton 
Academy. 

In politics Mr. Miller is a Republican. 
He is connected with Williamson Lodge, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and with the 
Foresters; and in his religious views he is 
liberal. 




LONZO FELT, a well-known resident 
of Bryant's Pond, in the town of 
Woodstock, Oxford County, Me., is 
a native of this place, born Septem- 
ber II, 1833, a son of Jeremiah and P'liza 
(Perkins) Felt. His father came here in the 
year 1816, and took hold of the farm on which 
his son now resides, and which then consisted 
of about one hundred acres. He lived here for 
the remainder of his life, dying April 30, 1879, 
at the age of eighty-two years. His wife died 
in 1875, 3t the age of seventy-seven. They 
had ten children, of whom five still survive, 
namely: Lucy M., wife of Judge H. C. 
Davis, of Norway, Me. ; Mehitabel, the 
w^dow of John Hathaw-ay, of Woodstock; 
Mary P., who is the wife of Consider Farrar, 
of W'oodstock ; Sibyl ]., who married S. L. 
Russ, who was a Selectman of the town of 
Woodstock for a period of fifteen years ; and 
Alonzo. 

Alonzo I'elt has spent his life up to the 
present time on the old homestead which was 
also the scene of his birth. He received his 
education in the public schools of Woodstock. 
Subsec|uently devoting his attention to agri- 
culture, he has worked hard and prospered 
accordingly. He has increased the size of 
his farm to three hundred and fifty acres, more 
than three times its origii>al extent. He has 
also made many improvements, adding new 
buildings ami [iractically rebuilding the old 



BIOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



ones. It is one of the most lieaiitilul pieces 
of property in this section, heing finely situ- 
ated on a hill. 

Mr. Felt was married December 14, 1864, 
to Emily J. Bryant, a daughter of Dustin 
Bryant, of Greenwood. lie has two children 
— Archie D., born June 8, 1876, is now a 
student at Hebron Academy, having previ- 
ously passed through the common schools and 
high school ; Lena May, born September 6, 
1872, educated in Norway, Me., resides at 
home and follows the occupation of a teacher 
in the schools of her native town. Mr. Felt 
is a stanch Republican politically, and relig- 
iously is a member of the Society of Friends. 
He belongs to West Paris Lodge, No. 15, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of 
Franklin Grange, No. 124, of Bryant's Pond. 




"ENRV W. COY, one of the most 
prominent farmers and business men 
of Oxford, Oxford County, Me., 
was born in the neighboring town 
of Minot, Cumberland County, on March 22, 
1838, son of Nathan and Julia Ann (Buck) 
Coy. 

Nathan Coy was born in Minot, April 14, 
1793; and his wife was born in the town of 
Norway, Me., December 29, 181 1. He 
learned the blacksmith's trade during an 
apprenticeship of seven years in Norway vil- 
lage; and he subsequently followed his trade 
in connection with farming, spending nearly 
all his active life in his native town. He 
was a hard-working man always, and made 
what he had by continuous toil. He died at 
the age of fifty-six years, being drowned while 
trying to save a boy's life, thus nobly risking 
and, as it proved, sacrificing his own in the 
attempt. He held liberal views in religion, 
and in politics he was a Democrat. His wife, 
who was an earnest member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, outlived him many years, 
attaining the age of eighty-four. They were 
the parents of six children, four of whom are 
now alive, namely: Henry W., whose name 
stands at the beginning of this sketch; Oliver 
B. , also a farmer of Oxford; Helen, unmar- 
ried, residing in the town of Oxford; and 
Nathan, a passenger conductor on the Grand 



Trunk Railroad, who married Marion Ross, 
and makes his home in (lorham, N.ll. The 
two other children were: Clementine, who 
died at the age of twenty years; and Hattie, 
who married l'"red Cushman, and tlietl at the 
age of thirty years. 

Henry W. Coy, the first mentioned of the 
three sons, came to Oxford at an early age, 
and was here educated in the pulilic schools, 
and has since devoted himself to agriculture. 
.Starting with a small farm of sixty-five 
acres, he engaged in general husbandry and 
stock raising, also dealing in wood and lum- 
ber; and by dint of tireless industry and good 
business faculty he has accumulated a hand- 
some property, being the owner of twn hun- 
dred and sixty-six acres of land with substan- 
tial and convenient buildings. 

He was married in the year 1S70, on the 
last day of October, to Eliza Wight, a native 
of Gilead, Me., and the daughter of Caleb 
and Fanny L. (Burbank) Wight. She was 
born on December 4, 1840. Her father and 
mother were natives of Gilead, Mr. Wight 
being a good and successful farmer, and was 
a Republican in politics. He died at the age 
of eighty-four years. His wife died at the 
age of sixty-nine. Both belonged to the 
Methodist Episcopal church. They were the 
parents of nine children, all of whom are now- 
living — Eliza, Mark, Diana, p]li, \'esta, 
Caleb, Mina, Thomas, and John. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coy in the first fourteen years 
of their married life became the ixuents of 
five children, of whom three are now living, 
namely: Mildred W., who was born on Au- 
gust 31, 1871, and is now the wife of Daniel 
Barnes, of Andover, Me., a trader; Howard O. , 
who was born August 26, 1880; and Mary B., 
born May 10, 1884. Emily Coy, who was 
born on July 11, 1872, died in .Seiitember of 
the same year; and Fanny, who was born 
August 27, 1876, died on March 11, 1879. 

Mrs. Coy belongs to the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and her husband is liberal in 
religion. In politics Mr. Coy is a Republi- 
can. He has served as a -Selectman for three 
years, also as one of the School Committee 
for the same period of time, being still a mem- 
ber of the Board. He has been eminently 
successful in life, and is one of the best estab- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lishcd men in a business wav of the whole 
county. He is a great dairyman, as well as 
a general farmer, owning and running one of 
the largest dairies in the town. 




^^-yjl.AS K. KING, President of the 
S. K. King Company of Welch- 

^^ — ' \'ille, Oxford Count}', was born in 
Skowhegan, Somerset County, Me., 
March 14, 1847, son of John A. and Hannah 
(Howley) King. His father, who was a mer- 
chant, died when fiutv-five years old, his wife 
surviving to the age of sixty-five. She was 
the mother of two children, of whom Silas 
K. only reached maturit}-. 

.Silas K. King grew to manhood in Cumber- 
land and Oxford Counties, Maine, and was 
educated in the common schools. In 1867 he 
started as a merchant upon a small scale, 
opening a store at Welchville; and the busi- 
ness has since expanded into its present large 
proportions. In i S96 the .S. ]i. King Com- 
pany was organized and incorporated with Mr. 
King as its President; George L. Wilder, 
Vice-President; and Roscoe F. .Staples, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. The company, which 
has among its stockholders several Portland 
and Auburn merchants, deals extensively in 
general merchandise, including drj' and fancy 
goods, furniture, hardware, agricultural tools, 
groceries, meats, boots, shoes, rubbers, and, 
in fact, everything from a cradle to a casket. 
The concern has wide-awake men at its head, 
and its methods are thoroughly indicative of 
New England enterprise. Air. King is highly 
respected both as a merchant and as a private 
citizen. He was married Januar\' 23, 1879, 
to Florence S. Holmes. 

He is a Repulilican in politics, and from 
i(S83 to 1889 was Postmaster here. He is 
connected with the Masonic Lodge at Me- 
chanic Falls, and is liberal in his religious 
views. 



kAI.PIl .S. FRKKMAN, a retired 
farmer spending the closing years of 
his long and busy life at his pleas- 
ant homestead in the town of Nor- 
way, Oxford County, was jjorn December 17, 




1S17, in Minot, Me. He comes of substantial 
Mas,sachusetts stock, his grandfather, Chandler 
Freeman, having been a native of Duxbury, 
Plymouth County, that State. He was a 
farmer by occupation, and, when a young man, 
came to Maine, locating in the town of Minot, 
where during the remainder of his life he 
was numbered among the prominent citizens. 
He was an active worker in religious circles, 
and for many years was Deacon of the Minot 
Congregational Church. 

Samuel Freeman, son of Chandler and father 
of Ralph S., was a native of Minot, where he 
spent his early years. Later on he worked for 
a time in the eastern part of the State; but 
subsequently removed to Hebron, this county, 
where he was successfully engaged as a tiller 
of the soil until his death. His wife, Eliza- 
beth Bradford, also a native of Minot, bore 
him ten children, briefly mentioned as follows: 
Jonathan Bradford died at the age of twenty- 
one years; Samuel lived until seventy-nine 
years old; Tristram died in Portland, Mich., 
in April, 1895; Ralph S. is the direct subject 
of this sketch; John S. was accidentally 
drowned in Massachusetts; Mary B. married 
William Berce, of Auburn, Me., and neither 
is now living; TZlizabeth died in infancy; 
Edward P. died in California; Chandler died 
in Colorado; and Joseph is now residing in 
Atkin.son, N.H. These children, with the 
exception of Chandler, who was a college 
graduate, acquired their education in the dis- 
trict schools of their native State. 

Ralph S. Freeman, whose personal history 
is now to be outlined, lived beneath the ]«- 
rental roof-tree until attaining man's estate, 
when he started in life for himself, having in 
the next few years a varied experience and 
seeing much of oui- country. Going first to 
Massachusetts, he worked for two years in a 
boot and shoe factory in North Bridgewater, 
now known as Brockton, at bottoming boots. 
He next went South, he and his brother Tris- 
tram being hired by a business firm to sell a 
new kind of oil-cloth. After spending a week 
in Georgia, Mr. P'reeman went to South Caro- 
lina, where he travelled six months, visiting 
nearly every district in that State. Then 
taking a team he drove across the country to 
the town of Portland, Mich., where he had a 




RALPH S. FREEMAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



brother living, for whom he worked at carpen- 
tering the succeeding three years. Going 
thence to Ohio, Mr. Freeman located on the 
Miami River, near Dayton, and, building an 
elevator for storing corn for the distiller}-, 
stayed there four months. He then resumed 
bis trade of a carpenter, working at it two 
months in Cleveland and then in Detroit, 
Mich., where he assisted in erecting several 
houses. Continuing to reside in Detroit for a 
while longer, he worked at steamboat building 
in the shipyard for a time, and was afterward 
employed in the vicinity of the Lakes, between 
Buffalo and Cleveland and in Canada above 
Montreal for several years. 

Being there taken sick so that he could not 
work for one winter, Mr. I-'reeman returned 
to Maine; and for three years he had the man- 
agement of the parental farm in Hebron. 
During this period he was married, and for a 
time thereafter he was engaged in farming in 
that town. .Subsequently purchasing a farm 
on Brighton Hill, he built a house and re- 
mained there a year. He then bought the 
well-known Glover farm in Hebron, abt)Ut a 
mile from the academy, which he occujned 
about a year before selling it. Mr. b'reeman 
then came to Norway, and in September of that 
year, 1853, bought the old Crockett farm, for- 
merly owned by his father-in-law. He has 
since made this his home, carrying on general 
farming and working somewhat at his trade. 
In the mean time he has spent two years or 
more from home, having rented his farm one 
year while he worked at his trade on the He- 
bron chapel; and from November, icS6i, until 
the following April he was in Cuba, where 
he worked in repairing railroad bridges. Be- 
sides his well-improved farm of one hundred 
and thirty-five acres, Mr. Freeman owns other 
land in Oxford County, making a goodly es- 
tate accumulated by his untiring industry. 
He is now enjoying the fruits of his many 
years of successful activity, having given up 
the management of his valuable farm to his 
son, Charles E. 

Mr. Freeman was married December 31, 
1849, to Miss Sarah Crockett, who was born 
on the present homestead, April g, 1821, a 
daughter of the late Joshua and Judith (Pike) 
Crockett, lifelong residents of Norway. Mr. 



antl Mrs. I'reeman have four chikhen; namely, 
Harriet ('. , .Sarah Alice, Charles I-]. , and 
Henry H. Harriet C, born October 17, 
1850, is the widow of Isaac Merrill, and now 
lives with her parents. Sarah A., born Janu- 
ary 18, 1854, is the wife of Clarence R. Mer- 
rill, who is engaged in the grain, lime, and 
cement business in Manchester, N. H. Charles 
Iv, born August 19, 1857, now having charge 
of the homestead, is a man of jirominence in 
the town, anil in 1892 served as .Selectman. 
He was married November 13, 1886, ,to Miss 
Ada Merrill, daughter of George Merrill, a 
millwright in Norway. She died July 19, 
1895, leaving three children — Lucy C, 
Ralph M., and Sarah Alice. Henry H.' Free- 
man, born May 9, 1862, married Lena S. 
Buck, and is now living in Manchester, N. H., 
engaged in the same business that his brother- 
in-law is. Politically, Mr. Ral[)h -S. P'reeman 
is a stanch Republican in ])olitics, as is his 
son, Charles F. Socially, he is one of the 
charter members of the Norway Grange; and, 
religiously, both he and his estimable wife are 
members of the Univcrsalist Church of Norway. 




ALTER !•;. HOLMES, one of the 
foremost residents of ().\ford, Me., 
his native place, is a graduate of 
Bowdoin College and a teacher by profession, 
but now devotes himself chiefly to town affairs 
and official duties. He was born on July 31, 
1846, son of Ebenezer R. antl Louisa Abigail 
Fuller (Rawson) Holmes, and is a worthy 
representative of one of the oldest families of 
this vicinity. 

His paternal grandfather, James Holmes, 
w^as born at Plymouth, Mass., on August 8, 
1759. In early manhood seeking a new home 
in the deep woods of Maine, he became one of 
the first settlers of O.xford, buying up a tract 
of wild land, clearing it, and living thereon 
all the rest of his life. He left his mark in 
this section — that of an honest, strong, hard- 
working man and a true patriot, he having 
served as a brave young soldier in the Ameri- 
can Revolution. His wife, Jerusha Rawsmi, 
who was born in -Sutton, Mass., on October 13, 
1769, was the daughter of Ebenezer Rawson, 
a worthy farmer of that town. James and Je- 



3° 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA'IEW 



rusha (Rawson) Holmes were the parents of 
nine children, eight sons and one daughter, of 
whom but one is now alive, the daughter. 
They were: James S. ; Salmon; Cyrus; Job; 
]{benezer R. and Eleazer A., who were twins; 
Jcrusha; John S. ; and Freeland. Jerusha 
Holmes married a Mr. Rawson, and lives in 
]5rooklyn, N.Y. James Holmes died in (Ox- 
ford on April 13, 1827. His wife died on 
June 12, 1848, in the same town, when nearly 
eighty years of age. 

Ebenezer R. Holmes, the fifth son, as here 
recorded, was born at O.xford on January 9, 
in the year 1802. He grew to manhood on 
the old farm in the town of his birth. He 
had always intended to study the ]irofession 
of the law; but, as his father and mother be- 
came less and less able to take the proper care 
of the farm, and his brothers and sister were 
away from home, he considered it his duty to 
remain there. -So he ended by giving up his 
life to farming. By means of hard labor and 
sagacious management he was able to bring 
the old farm up to the standard of the best 
in the whole county. He took great interest 
in the breeding of fine cattle, in which pur- 
suit he was very successful, making a spe- 
cialty of Herefords. He was one of the first 
farmers in the State to deal in full-blooded 
cattle. His farm consisted of about three 
hundred acres, and was considered one of the 
best in the town. 

In religious faith Mr. Ebenezer R. Holmes 
was a liberal. His political views were those 
of the Republican party, with which he was 
connected from the date of its formation. He 
held office as Selectman for a number of 
years, and was Chairman of the Board for a 
great part of that time. He was also the 
Town Agent, and he served as a Representa- 
tive to the State legislature in 1850. He 
always took an active part in any movement 
that was going on tending toward the improve- 
ment in any way of his town or toward the 
weal of his fellow-citizens. 

He married Louisa Abigail Fuller Rawson, 
who was born in Paris, Me., on February 5, 
1807. They became the parents of five chil- 
dren, of whom four are now living, namely: 
Louise S., born on February ig, 1838, and 
Lyman R., born July 14, 1840, both residing 



at the old homestead in O.xford; Walter E., 
the date of whose birth is mentioned above, 
and a sketch of whose career begins with the 
next paragraph; and Florence S., born De- 
cember 10, 185 1, who married S. E. King, 
a merchant, and resides in Oxford village. 
George F. , the second son, born November 5, 
1844, graduated from Bowdoin College in 
1866, and was a lawyer of Portland. He 
died on March 6, 1892. Ebenezer R. Holmes 
died on I-'ehruary 19, 1S90. His wife sur- 
vives him, and lives at her home in Oxford, 
now at the advanced age of nearly ninety years. 

Walter E. Holmes acquired his elementary 
education in the public schools of Oxford, 
fitted for college at Hebron Academy and at 
the Edward Little Institute in Auburn, Me., 
and entering ]5owdoin pursued the full course, 
and was graduated in 1S70. P'or a number of 
years thereafter he devoted himself to teach- 
ing. He was at one time for the period of 
two years an instructor in a business college 
of Oshkosh, Wis. ; and after that he came 
back to the old home farm in (Jxford. Soon 
he removed to Welchville, and went into trade 
for a few years. His health, however, began 
to fail him; and he was obliged to give up 
such active business and take to something 
more quiet and less wearing in its effects. 
He has served as Selectman for one term, as 
Town Treasurer for three years, as Collector 
for four years, as Supervisor of Schools two 
years; and he is now in his second term as 
Notary Public. 

He was married on May i, iSSi, to I-llba A. 
Potter, who was born in Oxford on January 
II, 1S61, daughter of William and Mary E. 
(Starbird) Potter, of the same town. Mr. and 
Mrs. Holmes have two children: Mabel J., 
who was born at Oxford on March 14, 1883; 
and George E. R., who was also born at Ox- 
ford, January 21, 1888. Mr. Holmes and his 
wife are earnest and active members of the 
Congregational church at Oxford village. 
They are widely known and enjoy the respect 
and good-will of a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances, Mr. Holmes being a gentleman 
of scholarly attainments and an interesting 
conversationalist. In political affiliation he 
is a strong Republican, as his father was 
before him. He is also a member of the 



BIOGRAl'incAL RF.VIKW 



A. I-". & A. M, Paris Lodge, No. 94. at 
South Paris, Me. 




)N. ANDREW S. IIAPGUUD, a 
popular citizen of Waterford, O.xford 
County, Me., now serving as a Rep- 
resentative in the State legislature, 
was born here November 11, 1841, son of 
Thomas and Jane (McWain) Hapgood. His 
grandfather, Hezekiah Hapgood, was the first 
of the family to come to Waterford. They 
settled on a farm north-east of Waterford l'"lat 
and there made his home until on account of 
advanced years he gave up active work and 
went to live with one of his sons in Fryeburg, 
remaining there until his death. 
' Thomas Hapgood, son of Hezekiah, was 
born and brought up in Waterford. He be- 
came a farmer and trader; and after his mar- 
riage he followed agricultural jnu'suits in his 
native town until 1845, when, removing to 
Gorham, N. H., he there engaged in trading 
and in farming, and also managed a grist-mill. 
v\bout three and one-half years later he re- 
turned to Waterford, and here devoted himself 
to farming for a like period. He next mi- 
crated to Brasher Falls, N. Y., where he car- 

■ - • 1 

ried on a saw and grist mill tor eighteen 
months, after which he went to Bangor, 
Franklin County, N.Y., and again engaged in 
trade for about six months. Going from there 
to Brandon, in the same county, in northern 
New York, he resumed his early occupation of 
farming, to which he gave his attention for 
two year-s, and then came back to Waterford 
and conducted the saw and grist mill business 
until his death, which occurred in December, 
1864. Mrs. Jane McWain Hapgood, his wife, 
who was born in Putney, Vt. , died in 1859. 
Thev were the parents of five children — 
David T., who died in 1883 ; Laure Jane, who 
died at five years of age; Lura A., wife of 
Sylvanus W. Cobb, now residing in Durango, 
Col. ; Andrew S. ; Charles Henry, whose 
death occurred in 1866. Those who grew to 
maturity were given a common-school and 
academic education. 

In 1862, at twenty-one years of age, Andrew 
S. Hapgood, whose youth had been passed in 
the different places where his parents had 



made their home, went to Mendocino County, 
California, and engaged in the saw-mil! busi- 
ness, which he followed for two years. He 
then went to Idaho Territory for a change, 
and was employed there in mining for a year 
and a half, after which lie returned to Water- 
ford and took charge of the old Hapgood Mills, 
his father having died. Some time after he 
sold the grist-mill, but still comhicts the saw- 
mill, and is doing a successful business, his 
attention being chiefly given to his mill, al- 
though he also owns forty acres of farming 
land. On May _5, 1861, he was mustered into 
the United States service; but during the 
three months that he was out his company was 
not called into active service, and he took no 
part in any engagement. 

On July 7, 1870, Mr. Hajigood was married 
to Miss Irene Willard, of W'aterford. She 
was born December 14, 1845, a daughter of 
P^ben M. and Hannah (Barker) Willard, her 
father having been a native of Waterford, and 
her mother of Lovell, in the same county. 
Mr. Willard was successfully engaged in 
farming here throughout his life. Mrs. Irene 
W. Hapgood died P'ebruary 12, 1S95; and Mr. 
Hapgood was again married August 9, 1896, 
to Lavinia G. Willard, of North Newry, Me. 

Mr. Hapgood has always voted the Republi- 
can ticket. He was elected a member of the 
State legislature in 1894, and is now (1896) 
serving in his second year. He has been 
for several years Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen in Waterford. P'raternally, Mr. 
Hapgood is connected with No. 132, A. F. 
& A. M., of Waterford; Oxford Podge, No. 
30, Independent Order of Odd P'ellows, of 
North Waterford ; Harry Rust Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Norway, Me. ; 
Oriental R. A. Chapter, of Bridgton, Me. ; 
and Portland Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plars, No. 2. 



-f^TON. ALBION P. BONNFY is a rep- 
L^-l resentative of one of the old and 

ji g I respected families of Buckfield, in 

^•"^ the eastern part of Oxford County, 
Me., that have followed the jiursuit of agri- 
culture for generations. In early manhood he 
had a number of years' successful experience 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in school teaching, but has since devoted him- 
self to his hereditary occupation and to the 
public service. He was born on the farm 
where he now lives, which has been in the 
family for more than a century. May 22, 1826, 
a son of James and Bethany (Keen) Honney. 

His great-grandfather was James Bonney, of 
I'embrcjke, Plymouth County, Mass. ; and his 
grandfather, who also bore the name of James 
Honney, was born in that town in 1764. This 
second James l^onney purchased the homestead 
in ]?uckfield in 1789. At that time most of 
the land in this vicinity was unredeemed from 
the wilderness, was covered with heavy tim 
ber, and abounded in wild game. Mr. l^on- 
ney's home was one of the first in the locality. 
His first claim was one hundred acres, Snd he 
afterward added to it until his property em- 
braced over three innuhed acres. He died in 
l-iuckfield at the age (jf seventy-two. His 
wife, Sally Glover, who was a native of Pem- 
broke, Mass., also attained a ripe age. Two 
of their children attained maturity — James, 
the tiiirij of the name; and .Sally, who died at 
the age of thirt)'-three. 

James Bonney, son of James, second, ami 
Sally (Glover) Bonney, succeeded his father 
as owner of the homestead, and devoted his 
days to the pursuit of agriculture. He was 
a man of strong character and good physical 
development, and held the rank of Colonel in 
the old State militia. Active in public affairs, 
he was identified in the latter part of his life 
with the Republican party; and he served 
the town in different offices, holding that of 
Selectman for a number of years. He died 
at sixty-four years of age, and his wife lived 
to be si.xty-seven. She was a daughter of 
Lemuel Keen, a Revolutionary soldier. P^ive 
children were born to Colonel and Mrs. James 
Bonney, namely : Albion P. ; Sarah ¥.. , widow 
of Daniel B. Bonney, of Buckfield ; and Bet- 
sey B. , Josiah K., and Andrew J., deceased. 

Albion P. Bonney, already introduced as 
the subject of this biographical sketch, ac- 
quired his education in his native town, com- 
pleting his course of study in the high school. 
In early life he taught school some forty terms, 
at the same time managing the home farm, 
which eventually became his by inheritance. 
This farm now covers two hundred acres, and 



much of it is devoted to general cro|is. As a 
farmer Mr. Bonney has been very successful, 
his judgment being good, his methods pro- 
gressive, and his industry unfailing. 

He was married in May, i S48, to Miss 
Mar'y A. Irish, who died in 1862, leaving 
three children, one son and two daughteis. 
Two of these are living, namely: Frank J., 
a dentist of Auburn, Me., who has one daugh- 
ter, Ella M. ; and limma P., wife of Herbert 
E. Bonney, of Bath, Me., who has three chil- 
dren — Mary A., Albion P., and Mildred. 
The other daughter, Ella 1"., wife of William 
S. Thorne, died childless. In 1863 Mr. Bon- 
ney married Mrs. Ellen T. (Teague) .Shaw, 
widow of Wilson Shaw. By this union be 
had one child — Nellie L., wife of P'red W. 
Keen, of Aubiu'n, Me., and mother of one 
daughter, Plazel B. The second Mrs. Bonney 
died in March, 1865; and on June 3, 1866, 
Mr. Bonney contracted a third marriage with 
Miss Abbie Tuell, a native of Sumner, Me. 
He has no children by this union. 

Mr. Bonney has been a Rejniblican since 
the formation of the party; and he attended 
the first Republican convention held in Paris, 
Oxford County. He has been on the Board of 
Selectmen many years, and has served as 
Town Treasurer and in minor offices; and in 
1885-86 he represented Buckfield in the State 
Senate. As an Odd I'ellow he is a memlDer 
of Nezinscott Lodge, No. 104, of Buckfield. 
In religious matters he is liberal. One of the 
(dd citizens of the town, he is a well-known 
figure in J^uckfield, and is one whose opinion 
is considered valuable in matters of public 
import. 




RANK P. TVLI^R, an enterprising 
farmer and li\'e-stock dealer of New 
Sharon, P^ranklin County, Me., was 
born in this town, January 30, 1865, son of 
Zebulon and Julia (Rigg) Tyler. 

Zebulon Tyler, who formerly resided in 
Chesterville, moved in 1852, with his family, 
household effects, and live stock, to New 
Sharon, where he purchased the Isaac Ames 
place, consisting of one hundred and fifteen 
acres. He made various improvements upon 
the farm, set out an orchard of one hundred 



BIOGRAPHICAI, REVIEW 



33 



fiuit-trccs, and was a successful general 
farmer. As he advanced in pros[)erity he 
added fifty acres of land to his original jjin- 
chase ; and he continued actively engaged until 
his death, which took place, from heart 
disease, in August, 1892, while he was at work 
in the field. A highly respected and useful 
citi/.en, he supported the Repuhlican ])arty in 
politics, and was a Methodist in his religious 
helief. Mis wife, Julia, whom he married 
March 8, 1849, was a daughter of S. T. Rigg, 
a blacksmith of New .Sharon. She became 
the mother of eight children, namely: Lew- 
eilyn S. ; George H. ; Sarah ]•:. ; Addie Min- 
nette; liliza A.; Joseph A.; Frank 1'., the 
subject of this sketch ; and Hattie Z. 

Frank P. Tyler was educated in the cnmmon 
schools of New Sharon and Farmington. At 
the age of twenty-one he became his father's 
hired assistant upon the home farm. He sub- 
sequently succeeded to the ownership of the 
property, and has since conducted it with 
energy and success. He has also a wide repu- 
tation as a dealer in live .stock, which business 
is a source of considerable profit to him; and 
this together with his farm occupies his entire 
time and attention. In politics he \otes with 
the Republican party, and his religious opin- 
ions are broad and liberal. 



ISAAC P. BEARCE, one of the largest 
fruit growers of Hebron, ().\ford County, 
Me., and a veteran of the Civil War, 
was born upon the farm he now owns and 
occupies, March 30, i S44, son of Sylvanus 
R. and Ann O. (Barrows) Bearce. Gideon 
Bearce, his paternal grandfather, was an early 
settler and prosperous farmer of Hebron. He 
li\ed to an advanced age, and accumulated 
considerable property, owning at the time of 
his death three good farms. 

Sylvanus R. Bearce, son of Gideon, was 
born in Hebron in 1804. Having been reared 
to agricultural pursuits, he settled upon the 
farm where his son, Isaac P., now resides; 
and for quite a long period he was one of the 
stirring and successful men of this locality. 
He died at the homestead in October, 1891, 
having passed the last years of his life in re- 
tirement. In politics he was a Republican, 



and in his religious faith he was of the liberal 
type of Christians. His first wife, whose 
maiden name was Olive I'ackard, liore him 
four children; and his second wife, Ann O. 
Barrows, who was born in this county in 1825, 
became the mother of si.\ children, making a 
family of ten. Of these, seven are now 
living, namely: Caroline, who is the widow 
of liliphalet Bray, late of Ivist O.xford ; Irene 
B. , wife of Lewis Clark, of Chelsea, Mass. ; 
Isaac P., the subject of this .sketch; \'ictoria, 
who is now- the widow of Reuel Barrows, and 
resides in Chelsea, Mass. ; .Sylvanus, a jjros- 
perous farmer of Hebron village, who was born 
in 1849; Alice, wife of Wallace Cushman, of 
Auburn, Me. ; and W. Scott, who resides with 
his brother at the homestead. The others 
were: Olive,- who died in 1862, aged twenty- 
two years; Maria; and Albert W., who died 
aged twenty-five years. Mrs. Ann < ). Barrows 
Bearce died May i, 1890. 

Isaac P. Bearce, whose ])ersonal history is 
now in order, jiassed his childhooil and later 
youth as a member of the parental iKJUsehold, 
obtaining his education in the town schools 
and the Hebron Academy. He assisted his 
father in carrying on the farm until July 16, 
1862, when he enlisted as a prixate in Com- 
pany E, Sixteenth Regiment, Maine Volun- 
teers; and after the battle of Antietam he was 
sent to the hospital in Washington, D. C. , 
.suffering from the effects of long continued 
e.xposure. Being honorably discharged from 
the service in the succeeding Decend)er, he 
returned home and remained here until 1866, 
when he went to Black Hawk City, Col., 
where for a short time he was engaged in 
mining. Again returning to Hebron, he took 
charge of the home farm, thenceforward caring 
for his iiarents during their declining years, 
and subsequently continuing his residence 
here permanently. .Since succeeding to the 
ownership of the property, which originally 
contained one hundred acres, he has added to 
it by purchasing an adjoining tract; and now, 
owning about one hundred and forty acres, he 
makes a specialty of raising apples, pears, 
plums, together with currants, gooseberries, 
and other small fruits, having twenty acres 
devoted to this profitable industry. 

On January i, 1873, Mr. Bearce was mar- 



34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ried to Miss Ella F. Marshall, who was born 
in Hebron, April i6, 1S48, daughter of Will- 
iam T. and Mary E. (Packard) Marshall. 
William T. Marshall was formerly a prosper- 
ous farmer and stone mason of this town, and 
is now residing in Auburn, Me. His wife 
died at the age of fifty-nine years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rearce have a family of four daughters, 
namely: Agnes M., who was born April 9, 
1874; Lizzie M., who was born May 19, 
1878; Mabel C. , who was born July 17, 1880; 
and Cordelia E. , who was born February 11, 
18S3. 

Mr. Bearce is a charter member of Hebron 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, with which his 
wife also is connected ; and he is a comrade of 
A. A. Dwinal Post, No. 3, Grand Army of 
the Republic, of Mechanic Falls. Industri- 
ous and capable, a successful general farmer 
and horticulturist and a worthy citizen, he is 
highly esteemed by his fellow-townspeople. 
In politics he acts with the Republican party; 
and both he and Mr.s. l^earce attend the Bap- 
tist church, to the support of which they are 
generous contributors. 




LBERT THOMPSON, a partially dis- 
abled veteran of the Civil War, who 
is now engaged in the peaceful pur- 
suit of husbandry in Farmington, 
Franklin County, Me., was born in Norridge- 
wock, this State, March 19, 1839, son of Silas 
and Maria (Hussey) Thompson. His grand- 
father, Asaph Thompson, ]\I.D., son of Silas 
Thompson, first, and Sybil Pease Thompson, 
came from Halifa.x, N.S., and, settling in 
Maine, became a noted physician in his day. 
He had a large and profitable practice, which 
he attended on horseback, and continued active 
until his death, which took place at middle 
age. He married Polly Wood, who died at 
the age of fifty-five years; and her children 
were: Adasa, Silas, Mary, Persus, and Asa. 

Silas Thompson, the second of the name, 
son of Dr. Asaph Thompson, inherited the 
Norridgewock homestead, and was there en- 
gaged in general farming until his death, 
which took place at the early age of thirty- 
four years. He voted with the Democratic 
party in politics, and he was liberal in his re- 



ligious views. His wife, Maria Hussey, a 
daughter of James Hussey, was born in Water- 
ville, Me., August 17, 181 3. She became 
the mother of two children — Albert and 
Louise. Mrs. Maria H. Thompson is still 
living, and resides with her son, whose per- 
sonal history is here briefly outlined, as fol- 
lows : 

Albert Thompson acquired a practical edu- 
cation in his early years, and after his father 
died he remained at the homestead with his 
mother until they sold the property. Remov- 
ing to Farmington, they purchased the elder 
Joe Russell place of one hundred acres, built 
a new house, rebuilt the barns, and increased 
the productiveness of the soil. P2nlisting as 
a private in Company L, First Maine Cavalry, 
on October 17, 1861, Mr. Thompson was 
mustered into service on November i of the 
same year; and, re-enlisting on December 28, 
1863, he was promoted to the rank of Ser- 
geant. In an engagement fought at St. 
Mary's Church he received a severe wound in 
the right shoulder, which has caused him 
more or less trouble ever since, preventing 
him from attempting any very laborious em- 
ployment. He was honorably discharged and 
mustered out, after having served three years 
and nine months, and returned directly to his 
home in Maine. He now receives a pension 
from the government. 

By his union with his first wife, who was 
before marriage Ellen Butterfield, and was a 
daughter of Isaac Butterfield, Mr. Thompson 
had one son, Frank. His second wife, Ella 
J. Stevens, daughter of Paul Stevens, of Oak- 
land, Me., died at the age of thirty-nine 
years, leaving two children, namely: Arthur, 
who was born March 18, 1S84; and Edna L., 
who *was born August 16. 1S91. Politically, 
Mr. Thompson is inclined to favor the Demo- 
cratic party. On religious subjects his views 
are liberal. 



ISAAC ROUNDS, M.D., the leading 
physician, as well as the oldest, in 
Paris, the shire town of O.xford County, 
Me., was born in Danville, now the 
.southern part of Auburn, Me., September 1 r, 
1S42, son of Nathaniel and Susan A. (l.ibby) 




N. DAYTON BOLSTER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



37 



J'ldLinds. His grandfather, Joseph Koiinds, 
]5robably a native of Buxton, Me., after resid- 
ing for a time in Gray, Cumberland County, 
settled in Danville, where he died at an 
age between sixty-five and sixty-seven years. 
He was a farmer in good circumstances. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Nancy Small, 
died in i S64, at the age of eighty-eight years. 
Their children were : Nathaniel, Joseph, l^liza, 
Leonard, Ora, Margaret, Cushman, and James. 

Nathaniel Rounds, who was born in the 
town of Gray in ALiy, 1803, followed farming 
as his chief occupation, and also undertook 
occasional orders for stone work. He eventu- 
ally removed to Danville, where he purchased 
land, on which he resided until his death, 
which took place in March, i8<S4, at the age 
of eighty-one years. He was twice married. 
His first wife, Pauline Pciley, of Gray, died 
in early womanhood, leaving three children — 
Samuel P., William H., and Charles 11 By 
his second mariiage he was united to Susan A. 
Libby. Her father was Deacon David Libby, 
a prosperous farmer of Poland, Me., Andro- 
scoggin County, and the son of James Libby, 
who served his country as a private in the 
Revolutionary War. The death of Mrs. Susan 
A. Libby Rounds occurred in i<S53, when she 
was forty-four years old. She was the mother 
of seven children; namely, David L. , Joseph, 
Isaac, Pauline P., Huldah K., Aha L., and 
Cyrus, the last of whom died young. 

Isaac Rounds received his early education in 
the Danville schools, and pursued his aca- 
demic course at the Ldward Little Institute and 
Maine State Seminary. On-July 17, 1862, 
he enlisted in Com|)any D, Seventeenth Reg- 
iment, Maine X'ohmteers, for service in the 
Civil War, and subsequentl)^ fought in the 
battles of P'redericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Locust Grove, the Wilderness, the 
winter's siege of Petersburg, and Little 
Sailor's Creek. In the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, on May 6, 1864, he received a fracture of 
the skull; and afterward, April 6, 1865, he 
was wounded at Little Sailor's Creek. He 
was the first descendant of his mother's grand- 
father, James Libby, to shed his blood for his 
country. On receiving his discharge, June 7, 
1865, he returned home and resumed his school 
work. Later he began reading medicine, and 



in 1873 he was graduated from the medical 
department of ]5ow(ioin College. He com- 
menced practice in Lewiston ; but in the fall 
of the same year he came to South Paris, 
where by his professional skill, sujjplemented 
by many admirable traits of character, he has 
since securely established himself in the confi- 
dence and esteem of the community. Having 
earned the reputation of a successfid practi- 
tioner, he has built up a practice corresjiond- 
ingly large and lucrative. On October 4, 
1874, he was united in matrimony with Lydia 
A. Haskell, daughter of Jasper and .Sally V. 
(Thurston) Haskell, the father a native and 
a farmer of Danville. Dr. and Mrs. Rounds 
have two children, namely: Susan L., born 
August 25, 1875, now an assistant teacher in 
the Paris High School; and l^'rank W. , born 
November 23, 1882, still attending school. 
Dr. Rounds can always be counted on for aid 
in enterprises designed for the benefit (jf the 
town. He helped to build the Independent 
Order of Odd P'ellows Block by purchasing a 
share of the stock issued for that purpose. He 
has also materially aided in establishing the 
Paris Manufacturing Company, which has been 
of so much advantage to the town. The etlu- 
cational interests of the town have likewise 
received much attention from him, as he at 
one time rendered good service as School 
Agent, and was a member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years. He is a charter mem- 
ber of Mount Mica Lodge and Aurora Lncamp- 
ment, Indejiendent Order of Odd l'"ellows, all 
the chairs of which he has successively filled; 
and of the William Kimball Post, \d. 148, 
Grand Army of the Republic, holding at pres- 
ent the rank of Past Commander. The family 
residence, as well as the Doctor's office, is at 
2 Main Street, a handsome dwelling, with its 
beautiful lawn and tasteful carriage house, 
erected by the Doctor in 1886. 



1^1 DAYTON ]50LSrP:R, principal of 
the firm N. D. Bolster & Co. of 




South Paris, Me., is one of the 
leading business men of Oxford 
County. He was born in Rumford, Me., May 
22, 1850, son of Otis C. and Maria (Virgin) 
Bolster, anil is a direct descendant of Isaac 



38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Bolster, a native of England, who settled in 
Uxbridge, Mass., in 1732, and was the founder 
of the family in this countr)'. 

His son, also named Isaac, who was born 
April 28, 1737, served as a private in some of 
the Colonial wars, and subsequently fought in 
the Revolution. He was one of the minute- 
men who marched to Concord on April 19, 
1775. Later in the contest he was a Lieuten- 
ant in the company of Captain John Putnam, 
under command of Colonel E. Learned ; and 
still later he was commissioned Captain. He 
was one of the original settlers of the town of 
Hebron, this county. In 1784 he moved to 
Paris, where he died in 1825, at the age of 
eighty-eight years. His wife, Mary Dwin- 
nell, whom he married July 24, 1761, in Sut- 
ton, Mass., died August 4, 18 14. Their chil- 
dren were: Hepsibah, Abraham, Isaac, Jr., 
David, and Solomon. He took for a second 
wife late in life a Miss Cary, of Turner, Me., 
but had no children by this union. 

Isaac Bolster, Jr., who was born at Sutton, 
Mass., May 12, 1769, was the grandfather of 
N. D. Bolster. He settled on a part of a 
large tract of land taken up by his father, 
built a house with barns, and started a store, 
which he carried on until his death in July, 
1835, ^t the age of si.xty-si.x years. His wife, 
Hannah Cushman Bolster, daughter of Gideon 
Cushman, born April 16, 1777, bore him ten 
children; namely, Alvan, Isaac, Gideon, Otis 
C. , William, Hannah, Lyman, Louisa, Levi, 
and Ruth. 

Otis C. Bolster, the fourth son as here 
named, who was born in Paris, Me., Septem- 
ber 25, 1 80 1, when fifteen years old went to 
work for his uncle, Francis Cushman, at Rimi- 
ford, remaining until his majority. Shortly 
after he opened a store in that town, and con- 
ducted it successfully until November, 1836, 
when it was accidentally blown up, his little 
son, then eight years old, being killed by the 
explosion. The disaster was supposed to 
have been caused by his son and another boy, 
while playing with fire on the top of a keg 
of gunpowder. Mr. Bolster rebuilt the store, 
and resumed business. On October 23, 1852, 
his residence was destroyed by fire. After 
this he removed to Paris, bought the old brick 
store on Market Square, and there engaged in 



the same business until his death on Novem- 
ber 9, 1 87 1, at the age of seventy years. He 
was highly esteemed for his genial traits and 
strict integrity. He was twice married. His 
first marriage, on October 28, 1827, united 
him with Dolly B. Keyes, who was born in 
1806, daughter of Francis Keyes. She died 
in 1840, having borne him four children — 
Horatio A., Henrietta L., Mellen E., and 
Freeland K. His second marriage, performed 
May 14, 1 84 1, was contracted with Maria 
C. L. V^irgin, daughter of Peter C. Virgin, of 
Rumford. She died May 19, 1887, having 
borne him five children, namely: William 
H.; Dolly M. ; Norris Dayton, the special 
subject of this sketch, to be further mentioned 
in the next paragraph; Sarah V.; and Mari- 
etta. 

N. Dayton Bolster, having received his cle- 
mentar)' education in the primary and gram- 
mar schools of his native town, subsequently 
completed the course of the Paris High 
School, where he was graduated. Thereupon 
he entered his father's store as clerk, and con- 
tinued to serve in that capacity until his 
father's death. Succeeding then to the pro- 
prietorship of the store, he conducted it with 
success for five years, when he sold the build- 
ing to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
After this he took charge of the grange store, 
subsequently buying the stock and building, 
and carrying on the business on his own ac- 
count, in company with C. A. Robertson. At 
the end of two years he bought Mr. Robert- 
son's interest, and thereafter for thirteen 
years he managed the business alone. In 
1893 he took E. N. Haskell into a partner- 
ship, which has lasted since. The establish- 
ment has been much altered since it first came 
into Mr. Bolster's possession, and it is now 
the largest general store in the county. It is, 
however, none too large for the business trans- 
acted there, which has grown to dimensions 
unsurpassed in any other part of the county. 
Two floors and a basement are entirely occu- 
pied. Everything in general demand is kept 
in stock. Besides the usual goods compre- 
hended under the head of groceries, there are 
sold crockery, paints and oils, hardware, boots 
and shoes, carpets, and other things too nu- 
merous to mention. Only a man possessed 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



39 



of a genius ior business can conduct such a 
place. 

Mr. Bolster was married to Mis.s Ada May 
Morton, daughter of John J. and Hannah 
(Morse) Morton, of South I'aris, on October 
25, 1883, and has become the father of four 
children, namely: Elsie M., boin December 
I, 1886; Morton v., born July 4, 1888; Ruth 
M., born April 18, 1S93; and Philip C, born 
April 17, 1895. Mr. liolster has always 
shown himself warmly interested in the wel- 
fare of the town, generally taking a prominent 
part in most enterprises designed to advance 
it, and holding considerable stock in the man- 
ufacturing firms of Paris. He and his wife 
are attendants of the Congregational church in 
Paris, where he is serving as clerk. He was 
Town Treasurer from 1877 to 1894, and he is 
Past Grand and Noble Grand of Mount Mica 
Lodge, No. 17, and Aurora Encampment, No. 
23, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The 
family occupy the residence, 2 High Street, 
which has been Mr. Bolster's property for 
some time. 



-OHN D. JENNINGS, a prosperous 
farmer and real estate owner of New 
Sharon, in the southern part of Frank- 
lin County, Maine, was born in the ad- 
joining town of Farmington, April 12, 1827, 
son of Asa and Betsey (Rotch) Jennings. 
His grandfather was Eliphalet Jennings, an 
Englishman who enlisted in the Continental 
army in 1775, and served seven years in the 
Revolutionary War. Receiving a land war- 
rant for one hundred and sixty acres, he set- 
tled in Farmington soon after the close of 
hostilities, and, clearing a good farm, resided 
there for the rest of his life. His wife's 
name was ISetsey, and she reared a family of 
five children, as follows: Rufus; Asa; I^liph- 
alet; David; and Reuben, who served as 
Captain of a company in a regiment of infantry 
during the Civil War. 

Asa Jennings, the second son of Eli]:)halet, 
was born and reared to manhood at the home- 
stead in Farmington. In 1828, the year after 
the birth of his son, the subject of the present 
sketch, he moved to a farm of seventy-five 
acres at Week's Mills, New Sharon, where he 



was engaged in tilling the soil for the rest of 
his life. He died here in 1843. His wife, 
Betsey Rotch, became the mother of eight 
children; namely, William R., George W., 
Frank S., John D., Lydia, Adeline, Mary, 
and Olive. 

John D. Jennings was one of the four sons 
born to his parents. He jiassed his boyhooti 
in attemling the common schools of VVeek's 
Mills antl learning to work on the home farm, 
also enjoying, no doubt, the various healthful 
sports and pastimes dear to the heart and 
strengthening to the muscles of the coinitry- 
bred youth. I'rom the time he was okl 
enough to take up the work of life in good 
earnest until he was twenty-six years old he 
was employed on neighboring farms. He 
then joined the general rush for the gold fields 
of California which began in 1849. Staking 
off a claim in Matalon Gulch, he engaged for 
a time in mining on his own account, later 
working for a mining company; and, after 
staying on the Pacific Ct)ast for four years, 
he came back to New Sharon. The following- 
year he again set out for California; but, 
changing his mind on reaching New York 
City, he once more returned to New Sharon, 
where he has since remained. Resuming his 
former occupation of tilling the soil and rais- 
ing stock, he applied himself energetically to 
business, and by steadily pursuing a policy of 
thrift and progress has accumulated a good 
estate, owning besides his homestead an ad- 
joining farm of one hundred and sixty acres, • 
two other farms in this town, and some |)ro]i- 
erty in ChesterviUe. He keeps a flock of two 
hundred and twenty-five sheep, seven standard- 
bred cows, and has an orchard of five hundred 
grafted fruit-trees. 

On January i, 1859, Mr. Jennings married 
for his first wife, Hannah M. C. Thomas, who 
died April 25, 1862; and on July 22. 1863, 
he was united in marriage with Ellen I-". Cut- 
ler, daughter of Josiah Cutler, of Strong, Me. 
By this union there are seven children, as fol- 
lows: Alice, who was born January 7, 1864; 
Nellie, who was born January 24, 1865; 
George H., who was born December 10, 1866; 
John William, who was born March 21, 
1869: Asa A., who was born January 6, 1871 ; 
Bessie, who was born .September 28, 1873: and 



40 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mary K. , wlio was born July 30, 187X. I'olit- 
icall)', Mr. Jennings is a Democrat; and he 
attends the Methodist I^piscojjal churcli. 




iICMMOND ISROTIIKRS, Edward F. 
and Henry L. , who carry on large 
saw and grist mills in Oxford vil- 
lage. Me., are enterprising and alert 
young business men; and tlieir energetic ef- 
forts to maintain and still further develop the 
industrial rest)urces of this town are greatly 
appreciated by the general community. .Since 
the establishment of their business enter[)rise 
in I S90 they have remodelled and enlarged 
the mills, putting in new machinery, and now 
have a full and complete equipment for both 
the grain milling department and the manu- 
facture of lumber and building materials of 
every description. 

Edward 1'. and Henry L. Richmond are the 
sons of Albion K. and Harriet (Whitney) 
Richmond. The father was born in Jay, 
Franklin County, Me., in 1834. Having 
learned the mason's trade when a young man, 
Mr. Albion K. Richmond has for many years 
been a well-known and reliable contractor and 
builder, and aside from his regular calling has 
gained a wide reputation as a manufacturer of 
Richmond's patent derricks. He has been a 
stirring and successful business man of South 
Boston, Mass., where he still resides, when not 
occupying his summer home in ().\ford, and 
still retains his customary energy and acti\'ity. 
In politics he acts with the Ivepublican party, 
and he is liberal in his religious views. He 
and his wife, Harriet Whitney, who was born 
in Charlestown, Mass., in 183S, have five 
sons, as follows: Warren A., who was born in 
O.xford, Me., in 1859; Henry L. and Ed- 
ward F., the subjects of this sketch; I. Tracy, 
who was born in South I-ioston in 1873; and 
Carl D. , will) was born in South Boston in 
1881. 

Henry L. Richnmnd, one of the proprietors 
of the aforesaid mills, was born in C).\ford, 
Me., in 1861. He acquired a good practical 
education, and in young manhood exhibited a 
natural aptitude for business pursuits, which 
was the foundation of the sterling aljility he 
has displayed in placing the firm of Richmond 



lirothers ujion its present secure footing, giv- 
ing them a deserved [jrominence in business 
circles here. He is connected with a lodge of 
Odd Fellows in South 13oston. 

Edward F. Richmond was born in Oxford, 
August 20, 1864. Having acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools of South Boston, 
he learned the mason's trade under his father's 
direction, and followed it steadily for a num- 
ber of years. In 1890, as already noted, he 
engaged in business with his brother, Heniy 
L. Richmond, establishing in Oxford the fiim 
which has since conducted a large and profit- 
able business, and to whose success he has in 
a great measure contributeil. In politics he is 
a Republican; and in religion he belongs to 
the liberal type of Christians, he and his 
wife attending the Universalist church. 

He was married on September 14, 1895, to 
Louisa Robinson, daughter of the late Joseph 
and Frances A. (Lewis) Robinson. Her 
father, who was the founder and President (jf 
the Robinson Manufacturing Company of Ox- 
ford, Me., was born in Yorkshire, England, 
May 9, 1 81 2, son of James and Mary (Aspin) 
Robinson. He was one of a family of six 
chiUlren, the others being: James; George; 
I{lizabeth; Rachel; and Mary, now Mrs. 
Wood, of Lawrence, Mass., who is the only 
survivor. Joseph Robinson learned the dyer's 
trade of his father, and after becoming an ex- 
[lert in his calling and filling a responsible 
position in a large concern in England until 
1849 he emigrated to the United States. 
First settling at Ballardvale, Mass., he had 
charge of dye works theie for several years, 
later filling positions in the same capacity at 
Rochester," Wolfboro, and Milton Mills, N.H. 

Coming to Oxford in 1858, he, in company 
with John Hall, engaged in manufacturing. 
A short time later he bought his partner's 
interest; and in 1862, associating himself with 
H. J. and ]■". O. Libby, he established and in- 
corporated the Robinson Manufacturing Com- 
]iany. From a small beginning tjie concern 
ad\'anced steadily through his business al}ility 
and careful management to its present large 
proportions and excellent business standing. 
The entire jjlant and equipment was erected 
and supplied under his sujiervision. The 
main building, which is a four-stoi\' brick 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



41 



structure, contains sixty-seven looms, employ- 
ing an average of one hundred and fifty men 
the year round. Their output, which consists 
of dress goods, suitings, and repellents, is sold 
all over the United States. 

The great amount of energy Mr. Rohinsun 
displayed as president of the corporation, to- 
gether with the deep interest he took in all 
matters relating to the improvement of the 
village and the general welfare of the commu- 
nity, gained for him the sincere respect and 
genuine admiration of his fellow-townsmen; 
and his death, which took place March 6, 
1895, was regretted by all. In politics he 
supported the Republican ]iart\-. In his relig- 
ious views he was a Congregationalist, and he 
was a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

In 1833, while still residing in England, 
Mr. Robinson was united in marriage to Fran- 
ces A. Lewis, who was born in Yorkshire, No- 
vember 16, 1 8 14. She became the mother of 
six children, as follows: Mrs. Mary I'arrott, 
of Oxford ; Mrs. Frances Andrews, of Port- 
land ; Louisa, Mrs. Richmond; Mrs. .Salina 
Carr, John li, antl Albert Vl. Robinson, all 
of Oxford. Mrs. Frances A. Ri)binsi)ii died 
November 9, 1S90. 

The Robinson Manufacturing Company- is 
still doing an extensive business upon the 
lines so admirably mapped out and adhered to 
by its founder. Its present official force con- 
sists of J. B. Robinson, President ; !■". A. 
Libby, Treasurer; and A. K. Rol^inson, 
Asent. 




|ZRA MARSHALL, of Hebron, Me., a 
self-made man, starting in the world 
with five dollars, has accumulated a 
valuable property and won the respect that 
honest success always brings. He was born 
in Hebron, September 24, 182S. His parents 
were Aaron and Bethan}- (Hum pus) Marshall, 
the former also a native of Hebron. 

His pa.ternal grandfather, David Marshall, 
was one of the pioneer settlers of Oxford 
County. He served for some time in the 
Revolutionary War, participating in the battle 
of Bunker Hill; and it is supposed that he 
located in Bethel, Me., about 1781. His 
first wife lived but a short time after marriage. 



His second wife, whose maiden name was 
Lucy Mason, accompanied him in his quest for 
a home in the wilderness, meeting the vicissi- 
tudes of pioneer life with courage and endur- 
ance. With a young family the couple trav- 
elled to Bethel, the wife making her way on 
snowshoes with a child in her arms, the hus- 
band also carrying a child and at the same 
time drawing a small hand-sled on which weie 
the cooking utensils. He had jjurchased four 
hundred acres of land in Bethel, and there he 
built a log house and lulled late and early 
clearing his farm; while his wife was no less 
busy than he, [lerforming the manifold duties 
of a country housekeeper and family nn ther 
in those pioneer days. 

At the time (if the fanmus Bethel raid, about 
1782, when fhe Indians descended on the little 
settlement, iJavid Marshall and his family 
spent the night in the woods, hidden by a 
large log. In the morning, as soon as he was 
sure that the savages were gone, he returned 
to the house, packed up what loose things he 
could carry, and started for New Gloucester, 
where he expected to find a ])lace of security. 
Mrs. Marshall was not well ; and the horrors 
of the Indian raid had affected her so that she 
was taken seriously ill, and they were oliliged 
to stop on the way, finding refuge in a settler's 
house, she being the first white woman that 
ever visited the town of Paris, Me. As soon 
as she was able to proceed, they resumed their 
journey. At New Gloucester they made a 
short stay; and then Mr. Marshall inirchased 
a piece of land in Minot, where they lived for 
a while. His next move was to a farm near 
Mechanic Falls, which he thought was State 
land; but it belonged to the Little family, and 
a lawsuit fcjl lowed, in which Mr. Marshall 
was beaten. Once more ciimpelled to move, 
he settled near where his grandson, Moses 
Marshall, is now living; and there his days 
were ended in peace and prosperity. He 
owned in Hebron one hunilred acres of land 
and the mill i)rivilege; and, building a grist- 
mill, he conducted a thriving business. 

Mr. David Marshall was a man of unusual 
energy and determination, as will have been 
seen, and allowed no difficulties to turn him 
aside from the way to success. He died on 
his Hebron farm at the age of seventy-seven. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



II is wife, notwithstanding all the hardships 
and anxieties of her life, lived to be seventy- 
two. They had a family of eleven children: 
David; Asahel ; Lucy; Walter; John; 
Moses; Aaron; Nathan; Miriam; Theresa, 
who died yoimc; ; and a child who died in 
infancy. 

Aaron Marshall, the seventh-born, spent his 
life in Hebron, on the farm now owned by his 
son Ezra. He was an industrious and ener- 
getic man, and as a farmer was \ery success- 
ful. In politics he was originally a Whig 
and later a Republican. He died at the age 
of seventv-three, his wife having been called 
to rest in her fifty-ninth year. Mr. and Mrs. 
Aaron Marshall were members of the Baptist 
church. Seven children were born to them, 
as follows: Silas S. , who died at the age of 
twenty-one years; Sarah H. (deceased), wife 
of Charles Cobb, Esq., of Poland, Me.; Will- 
iam T. , a stone cutter, now retired, residing 
in Auburn, Me. ; Alden B., a retired carpen- 
ter in Newton, Mass.; Cordelia B. , wife of 
Hiram Everett, of Hebron Corners; Ezra, of 
Hebron; and Horace B. , a Baptist clergyman 
in Amherst, N. H. 

Ezra Marshall, the subject of this sketch, 
acquired his education in the common schools 
(jf Hebron. At the age of eighteen, with 
scarcely five dollars in his pocket, he started 
to make his own way in the world, going to 
Massachusetts, where he worked for three 
years as a farm hand. He then returned to 
his native town, and at the age of twenty-five 
he took charge of the family homestead. 
With characteristic perseverance and industry 
he developed the home farm, materially in- 
creasing its value, and in course of time 
bought more land, so that now the homestead 
covers three hundred acres, besides which he 
owns other real estate. He is one of the most 
e.xtensive farmers in Hebron, and in fruit cult- 
ure especially he has achieved marked suc- 
cess. Though Baldwins are his sta[)le orchard 
product, he has thirty different kinds of apples 
and a variety of small fruit. His buildings 
also rank among the best in the town. 

On October 2, 1856, Mr. Marshall was 
united in marriage with Eliza M., daughter of 
Joseph and Miriam (Marshall) Irish. She 
was born in Hebron, March 2, 1S27. I""ive 



children have brightened the home of Mi', anil 
Mrs. Marshall — Persis, who died Ajiril 29, 
1890, wife of Sherman Merrill and mother of 
four children — Alice 'M., Grace, Alma M., 
and Ered S. ; Alma H., who did not live to 
be four years old; Charles A., born October 
28, 1861, a farmer, unmarried, who li\es with 
his parent.s ; Adelaide I., born January 9, 
1864, who is the wife of Llewellyn Keene, 
a farmer of Hebron, and is the mother of four 
children— Delia M., Mary I., Nellie M., and 
Ezra AL ; and Fred H., born July 24, 1S67, 
who married Miss Abbie L. 15. Hibbs, and is 
a farmer, living with his father. 

Mr. Marshall votes the Republican ticket. 
He is a member of l-^vening Star Lodge, 
No. 147, A. F. & A. M., of Buckfield. In 
religious matters b<_)th lie and his wife are 
liberal. 



Y^TON. JARVIS C. MARBLE, who is 
L^-l now' spending the closing years of a 
Jis I ^o^g '"'"^1 bu.sy life in retirement at 

^^"^ his beautiful home in Paris Hill, 
O.xford County, was a conspicuous factor of the 
mercantile and manufacturing circles of this 
locality for more than half a century. A son 
of Nathan and Mehitable (Ereeland) Marble, 
he was born on Bethel Hill, in the town of 
Bethel, Me., May 24, 1821. 

His father was born June 29, 1778, in .Sut- 
ton, Mass., that town being also the native 
place of his mother, whose birth occiuTed 
September 10, 1780. Nathan Marble and his 
wife settled in the town of Bethel soon after 
their marriage ; and there the former was em- 
ployed as a farmer, harness-maker, and saddler 
until his death, which occurred at a compara- 
tively earl)- age, November 6, 1826. He 
stood in a foremost position among the stirring 
and progressive citizens of the comitv, and for 
many years was Captain of a comjjany of the 
State militia. Of his union with Miss I-'ree- 
land eleven children were born, the following 
being their names and respective dates of 
birth: James P., November 25, iSoo; Ste- 
phen >}., December 25, 1802; Palmer M., 
November 12, 1805; Nathan M., March 5, 
1S08; Mehitable M., May 9, 18 10; Ereeland, 
November 12, 181 2; Elizabeth B. , July 24, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



43 



1815; Franklin, October 37, iSi8; JarvisC, 
May 24, 1821; Nancy J., August 22, I1S24; 
James K., May 8, 1827. After the death of 
her husband the mother, who lived until April 
25, 1S74, became the wife of ]^lijah Burbank. 
She was a member of the Congregational 
church, of which the father, who was liberal 
in his religi(!us belief, was a regular attend- 
ant. In politics he was a stanch Democrat. 

Jarxis (.'., the ninth child, whose career is 
here to be traced, attended the common schools 
of Bethel until eleven years of age, when he 
was obliged to give up his studies and com- 
mence life for himself. He first worked for 
a year as a clerk in the store of L. C. Crocker, 
of ]>uckfield, receiving for his services his 
board and clothing. Going thence to Portland, 
he worked a while for a Mr. Capen, who, in 
addition to his board and clothing, paid him a 
small compensation in money. Mr. Marble 
subsetjuently became a clerk in the establish- 
ment of L. C. Carter, of New York Cit\', who 
received him as a member of his family, 
giving him board and clothes, and sui^plying 
him with a liberal amount of money for other 
expenses. Here he acquired a thorough 
knowledge of the mercantile business as it was 
conducted in those days, his initiatory experi- 
ence with Mr. Carter being of inestimable 
value to him in after years. Early in 1842, a 
few months prior to his marriage, Mr. Marble 
came to Oxford County, locating first in the 
village of Paris, where he and his wife subse- 
quently lived three years before coming to 
their present estate, which at his ad\'ent was 
in its original wildness. 

Mr. Marble began clearing and imi)roving 
his land, in the work succeeding so well that 
he has now one of the finest and most attrac- 
ti\'e homesteads in this section of the State. 
The first two years of his residence in Paris he 
worked as a clerk for Hiram Hubbard, whom 
he subsequently bought out; and fur a few 
3'ears thereafter he was engaged in mercantile 
business on his own account. In addition to 
his store in Paris he jnit in a stock of general 
merchandise at North l^uckfield, and for some 
time conducted the two stores, having a lucra- 
tive trade. With sagacious foresight Mr. 
Marble at length bought out .Sweat & Co. 's 
powder factory, which he managed in connec- 



tit)n with his other business. Disjiosing of 
his stores, he afterward confined his attention 
to the manufacture of powder, erecting a 
second mill at Platteville, Wis., and another 
at Camden, Me. ; and during the war he sup- 
plied the government with a large amount of 
high grades and othei- powder. After the 
close of the great confiict he movetl his powder 
works to Canada, where he received the con- 
tract for supplying the Canadian government 
and the Hudson Bay Company with powder. 
In his manufacturing business he was very suc- 
cessful, running for a time four factories, in 
which he employed a large force of men. 

In 1885 he disposed of his jiowder, confin- 
ing his attention to the bark business which 
he had previously established; and since 
giving that up he has lived retired. He has 
accumulated a go(jd property, and besides his 
own handsome dwelling has erected two fine 
residences for his children, who live near him. 
Politically, Mr. Marble is an earnest and lo\al 
member of the Republican party, and takes an 
active interest in town and county affairs. He 
was a member of the State legislature in i860, 
and for three subsequent \'ears; and for two 
years he was County Treasurer. Religiously, 
both he and his wife are strong Universalists, 
being among the leading members of that 
church, anil contributing liberall}' toward its 
suj^port. 

On Octol)er 24, 1842, Mr. Marble was mar- 
ried to Mary R. Hubbard, who was born at 
Paris Hill, Me., November 25, 1821, a daugh- 
ter of Russell and Eunice (Stowell) Hubbard. 
Her grandfather, General Levi Hubbard, was 
born, reared, and married in Worcester, Mass. 
He and his bride, Mary Hcmenway, then but 
fourteen years of age, came directly t(j Paris, 
and here began housekeeping in a log cabin, 
which was situated in a small clearing made 
in the dense wilderness. Over their heavily 
timbered land bears, deer, and wolves roamed 
at will; and the Indians were in strong evi- 
dence. General Hubbard cleared and im- 
proved a good homestead, and became one of 
the foremost men of this vicinity, serving in 
various town offices, and in the years from 
1812 until I 814 inclusive as a member of Con- 
gress. He was liberal iti his religious belief 
and a valued member of the Universalist 



44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



church. Jlis wife nindc during her mnrried 
life five trips on horseback tt) Worcester, her 
early home. The}' had two children, namely: 
Oliver, who was killed when a young man by 
the falling of a tree; and liussell, Mrs. 
Marble's father. General Hubbard died in 
1.S36, and his wife in 1844. 

Russell Hubbard was born in Paris, I\Ie., 
and here siient his life, d_\ing l-'ebruary 15, 
1856. His wife was also a lifelong resident 
of this town. She bore him five children, as 
follows: Columbia, born November 18, 1S09; 
Hiram, born September 28, 181 1; Oliver, 
born November 19, 1813; IJaniel S., born 
October 17, 1816; and Mary R., now Mrs. 
Marble, the latter and her brother Hiram 
being the only ones. living. Mr. and Mrs. 
Marble have had four children, the following 
being their record: Mar}- H., born February 
10, 1844, married Dr. A. S. Thayer, of Port- 
laml, and died December 5, 1875; Elmer H., 
who was born November 9, 1846, and died 
November 8, 1893, married Ella Smith, and 
was for some time connected with his father 
in the powder business; Lizzie H., born 
March 23, 1849, is the wife of Orlando A. 
Thayer, of Paris; and Fannie F., born Febru- 
ary 3, 1S54, is the wife of Jolin Pierce, a 
jeweller in South Paris, but living with Mr. 
and Mrs. Marble. :Mr. and Mrs. Marble have 
si.v grandchildren and one great-grandchild. 




JDWIN 15. HATCH, a retired farmer of 
Chester\ille, Me., and a veteran of the 
■■"^ Civil War, who is now serving as 
Postmaster, was born in Wilton, Franklin 
County, Me., September 19, 1838, son of 
Joseph and Zoa (Keyes) Hatch. His paternal 
grandfather was Cyrus Hatch, a native of 
Martha's Vineyard, who, when a young man, 
settled in Wilton as a pioneer. He bought 
one hundred acres of wild land, a portion of 
which he cleared for agricultural purposes; 
and he resided there for the rest of his life. 
He married, and reared a family of four 
children; namely, Cyrus, Joseph, John, and 
Zoa, each of whom lived to be eighty years 
old and over. 

Joseph Hatch, the second son, was born in 
Wilton, and was a lifelong resident of that 



town. He was an honest, hard-working 
farmer and a worthy citizen, who gaineil the 
respect and esteem of his neighbors and fel- 
low-townsmen. He died October 16, 1888, 
aged eighty-four years and ten months. In 
politics he was a Republican and in his relig- 
ious views a Methodist. His wife, who was 
before marriage Zoa Keyes, was a native of 
Wilton. .She became the mother of five chil- 
dren, three of whom are living, namely: 
Charles B. , who is residing at the homestead; 
B. Frank; and PLdwin B., the subject of this 
sketch, who is the youngest son. The others 
were: Hiram M. and Mary E. Mrs. Zoa K. 
Hatch passed away from earth at the age of 
fifty-two years and nine months, 

Edwin B. Hatch duiing his boyhood and 
youth remained at home assisting on the farm 
and attending the town schools, and at the age 
of twenty he pursued a course of study for one 
term at the Maine State Seminary in Lewis- 
ton. I'or a short time after that he was em- 
ployed as a farm assistant by Squire Hill, who 
lived in the vicinity of Great Falls, N.H. ; 
and from there he went to Bedford, Mass., 
where he remained for si.\ months. He then 
went to Boston, and shipped on board a fish- 
ing-smack for a season's cruise; and in the 
following year, 1861, he made a voyage to 
PLngland and Ireland as a sailor on board a 
merchant vessel. In 1862 Mr. Hatch enlisted 
as a private in the I'irst Massachusetts Com- 
pany (Governor Andrew's) of Sharpshooters, 
with which he went to the front, and took ])art 
in the battle of Fredericksburg and all other 
engagements fou""ht bv the Second Army 
Corps until June 2, 1864, when he was taken 
prisoner at Pleasant Ridge, Va. He was first 
confined in Libby Prison, later being sent <"o 
Pemberton, after which he was repeatedly 
moved from one place to another, being im- 
])risoned successively at Andersonville, Milan, 
Savannah, Thomasville, Selma, Ala., and 
Danville, Va., where he was held until 
paroled on June 3, 1865. After his discharge 
from the service he followed various occupa- 
tions in Boston and Wilton, Me., until 1874, 
when he bought a farm of one hundred and 
thirty acres in Chesterville, where he has 
since resided. As an industrious general 
farmer he has succeeded in accumulatiufr con- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



45 



siclcrable property. He continued to till the 
soil diligently until 1891, when he sold his 
farm and bought his present homestead, con- 
sisting of a comfortable residence and five 
acres of land. He also owns a valuable tract 
of woodland in this town and an interest in 
the homestead farm in Wilton. 

I\Ir. Hatch and Velora 11. White, dau.^liter 
of R. White, were married on November 25, 
1X74, and enjoyed a wedded life of nearly 
twenty years. Mrs. Hatch died September 
2/' 1 8931 leaving no children. 

In politics Mr. Hatch is a Democrat; and 
in September, 1893, he was appointed Post- 
master at Chesterville, which position he 
still holds. His war record is an honorable 
one; and, as a stirring, progressive, and use- 
ful citizen, he is widely known and highly re- 
si)ected. Mr. Hatch attends the Methodist 
EpiscojDal church. It is worthy of note that 
eleven representatives of the Hatch kindred 
served in the Rebellion, and returned to their 
homes; and of these seven are still livimr. 




XJV/UAAAM V. CALDWI-:LL, a suc- 
fs\l cessful farmer and respected citizen 
of the town of O.xford, Me., was 
born April 28, 1840, on the ancestral farm on 
which he now lives. His great-grandfather, 
John Caldwell, settled on the estate when this 
portion of Maine was wild and almost unpopu- 
lated, and those who dared to encroach upon 
the hitherto undis|)uted d(jmain of the deer, 
heaver, bear, and wolf that abounded in the 
Maine forests had to endure the ]iri\-alions of 
pioneer life and accustom themselves to con- 
stant dangers. Quite a number of Massachu- 
setts people received grants of land in the 
District of Maine as rewards for military ser- 
\ices in the Colonial wars, and the sturdy sol- 
diery and their sons were quite equal to cope 
with the vicissitudes of frontier life. John 
Caldwell, like most of the settlers of his day, 
was thrifty as well as brave, and planted a pos- 
terity here which is still marked by the same 
traits of character possessed by their ancestors. 

He left a son, who bore the name of Will- 
iam, born October 11, 1775, who grew up to 
be a stirring and industrious farmer, passing 
his entire life on the Oxford farm. He mar- 



ried Nancy Woodward, May 2, 1799. Miss 
Woodward was born January 27, 1781, and 
was therefore a bride at eighteen years of age. 
William Caldwell was a member of the Meth- 
odist church, and was successively identifieil 
with the Whigs and the Republicans in politi- 
cal affiliation. He died on November 19, 
1862, aged eighty-seven years, and was fol- 
lowed four years later by his faiihlnl wife, 
who passed away June 30, iS(]f). 'I'hcv were 
the [larents (if four children, namely: Zenas, 
born March 31, 1800; Leonard, born January 
30, 1803; Merritt, born November 29, 1806; 
and Nancy, born April 5, 1809. 

Leonard Caldwell, the second son of Will- 
iam, followed in the steps of the two jirevious 
generations and became a practical farmer. 
As the toilsome years went on, his means 
increased until, besides being the i)r(iprict(ir of 
the old Caldwell homestead, he was the owner 
of much additional property. At his death he 
left an estate of three hundred acres of land, 
improved by cultivation and many new build- 
ings, among them the substantial dwelling, 
which was one of the best in its time and is 
still a comfortable and attractive residence. 

Leonard Caldwell married Miss Hannah 
Farrington, May 29, 1831. Six children 
were the fruit of this union, namely: Emily 
C, born May 28, 1833, who died Januarv 13, 
1855; Leonard A., born October 14, 1834, 
who was a soldier in the Federal ranks during 
the late Civil War, aiul died while in service, 
on June 17, 1863; I'llen C. . born January 11, 
1836, who became the wile (it fames ( ). 
Thompson, and now lives in Virginia, where 
Mr. Thompson edits a paper called the Mouii- 
iain Eclio; Zenas M., born August 5, 18^7, 
who died August 16, 1839; William F. , born 
as before mentioned, April 28, 1840; and 
Annah E. , born February 21, 1848, who mar- 
ried Dr. George Kejsoc, and resides in Hloom- 
ington. 111., where she practises the same pro- 
fession followed by her husband. 

William F. Caldwell is now the only sur- 
vivor of the three sons. He passed his youth 
in his native locality, receiving his education 
in the schools of O.xford and Hebron. After 
leaving school he, with hereditary instinct, 
turned his attention to agricultural ])ursuits, 
in which he is still actively engaged. He 



46 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



iKiw owns and carries on an excellent farm of 
two hundred and thirty-five acres, and is ac- 
coimted one of the best farmers of Oxford. 
February i8, 1862, was the date of his mar- 
riage with Miss Mehitable D. Winship, a na- 
tive of ()tisfield, where siie was born February 
23, i.S'40. 

Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell ha\e had se\en chil- 
dren, namely: luiiily .A., born January 30, 
1864, who died January 10, 1878; Adelbert 
I-"., born Ma)- 8, 1.S67, now engaged in teach- 
ing; Minnie B., born October 18, 1868; 
Annie C, born July 19, 1871 ; Willie L., 
born December 24, 1874; Guy H., born No- 
vember 24, 1880, who died February 27, 
18S5; and Cornelia K., born March 30,^1884. 

Mr. Caldwell and his wife are allied in a 
common religious faith, both being members 
of the Methodist E]iiscopal Church of Oxford, 
in which Mr. Caldwell has always been an 
active worker. He is a stanch Republican 
in political fellowship, and has held, besides 
various minor offices, that of Selectman. He 
has also been active in promoting educa- 
tional progress in his town and county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Caldwell are prominent members of 
society in their town, and their charming 
home is a hospitable rentlez\-ous for their large 
circle of friends. 



bfKANK VV. OSBORNE, one of the 
p^ most enterprising and progressive 
though one of the youngest farmers of 
Farmington, Me., was born in Marshfield, 
Mass., Sei)tember 22, 1864. He is the son of 
George T. and VVilhelmina (Wilson) Osborne, 
both of Marshfield. George T. Osborne was a 
shoemaker Ijy trade, and at the time of the 
war he was one of the large contingent of 
New England "knights of the last," who 
fought under the banners of the Union. He 
served a year in the Forty-third Regiment, 
Massachusetts Volunteers, and returned home 
with a shattered constitution, d)'ing at the age 
of twenty-nine. He left a widow and two 
children — Eleanor W. and Frank W. Mrs. 
George T. Osborne, who is now fifty-one years 
of age, is living with her son. 

Frank \V. Osborne left home at the age of 
eighteen to battle with the worki and make his 



fortune. Of strong constitution and progres- 
sive nature, he adopted the pursuit with 
which he was most familiar, agriculture; and, 
saving his earnings, he began to invest in real 
estate. In company with Ira Blanchard he 
bought the Johnson farm, an estate of one 
hundred and fourteen acres in Farmington; 
and the partners remodelled the buildings, and 
engaged in general farming with such enter- 
prise that they achieved marked success. In 
1891 Mr. Osborne purchased Mr. Blanchard's 
interest, and became sole proprietor; and the 
business continues to prosper under his able 
management. Besides attending to the cult- 
ure of garden produce and general crops he has 
a fine dairy of twelve handsome Jerseys. He 
is a typical New Englander, pushing and 
thrifty; and his success has won the admira- 
tion and respect of his townsmen. In politics 
he is independent, in religious matters liberal. 




ACCHEUS A. DYER, a successful 
farmer and sterling citizen of New 
Sharon, Franklin Count)^ Me., was 
born in this town, June 2, 1819. 
He comes of an English family of ancient 
and honorable name, his direct ancestor. Sir 
James Dyer, having been Speaker of the House 
of Commons and Chief Justice of the Court of 
Common Fleas in the year 151 i. Mr. Dyer's 
grandfather came from Truro, Cajse Cod, to 
New Sharon, about one hundred years ago, and 
took up a tract of wild land of a hundred acres 
in extent. Clearing ten acres and building a 
log house during the first year, he moved his 
family into their new home the ensuing winter. 
The original tract of land owned by this first 
representative of the name in this State is now 
known as the farm of Benjamin C. Roby. 
Here the Cape Cod emigrant lived to a re- 
markable old age, dyijig, in the home he had 
fashioned so long ago, in his ninety-second 
year. His wife also lived to a green old age, 
for both came of hardy Ca]ie Cod stock. 
They were the parents of ten children — Reu- 
ben; Christopher; (iideon B. ; James; Henry; 
John; Nathaniel; Hannah; one who died in 
infancy; and a daughter (whose name cannot 
now be ascertained), who mariied Cajitain 
Small, of Truro, Mass. Christopher, the 




% 



<^ ii 



ZACCHEUS A. DYER. 



l!IO(a<Al'III(AL REVIEW 



49 



second-born son, became a man of prominence, 
holding the office of Town Clerk for forty- 
three years. 

Gideon B. Dyer, father of" Zaccheus A., was 
born on Cape Cod and was but eight years old 
when his father moved from Massachusetts to 
Maine. On coming of age he bought a tract 
of one hundred acres of land, which is now 
known as tiie Hamlin place. Extending the 
boundaries of his estate, later on, by the addi- 
tional purchase of two hundred and twenty-five 
acres, he became one of the most successful 
farmers of the locality. He faithfully dis- 
charged all the duties of citizen.ship both in 
peace and war, serving as a private during the 
War of 1812, and receiving a land warrant for 
his services in that short but lively struggle 
with (ireat Britain. He was Town Treasurer 
for some years. Religiously, he was con- 
nected by membership with the Free Baptist 
Church. On July 7, i.SiS, he wedded Mahala 
Sleeper, of Loudon, N.ll., who was born in 
1797, and died in 1857. .Si.x children were 
born to them — Zaccheus A., Mahala S. , Bar- 
low, Abigail -S. , Hannah A., and Samuel .S. 

Zaccheus A. Dyer, the special subject of 
this memoir, was educated in the common 
schools and at the Higii School of New 
Sharon. He remained under the parental roof 
until he had reached his twenty-sixth year, 
when he bought fifty acres of land and began 
his career as a farmer. By careful manage- 
ment and judicious investment he increased 
both the extent and value of his property until 
it now includes three hundred and twenty-five 
acres of well-cultivated land. In 1852 he 
built a new dwelling-house on his estate, 
which he still occupies. Besides holding 
many minor offices, Mr. Dyer has most ca- 
pably filled several positions of trust and 
honor, among them that of Deputy Sheriff, in 
which he served from i860 to 1870, and Sher- 
iff, holding the latter office from 1870 to 1876. 
He was a member of the legislature of 1878 
and 1879, representing the people of New 
Sharon with intelligence and fidelity. He has 
also served as Selectman of the town for one 
term. He is a Republican in political affilia- 
tion, and a Free Baptist in religious faith. 

March 23, 1843, was the date of his mar- 
riage with Miss Emily K. Cram, who w^as born 



in 1827, a daughter of (ieneral \'arnum Cram. 
F^ive children were the result of this union : 
Francette A., born August 27, 1845, died 
February 3, 1846; Augustus E., born June 
23, 1847, married Miss ICmilv Pottle, and is 
now the foreman of a shoe factory in Manches- 
ter, N.H. ; Roland H., born September 23, 
1S50, married, is a merchant antl hotel jirojiri- 
etor in South Dakota; Milton H. , born Octo- 
ber 7, 1852, died Sei)tembcr 30, 1880; War- 
ren C, born .September 21, 1855, manied 
Miss Churchill, and is now a jirominent man 
in Boulder, Boulder Count}', Col., where he 
holds the important and somewhat dangerous 
office of Sheriff. Mrs. I'jnily Cram Dyer 
died in i860, at the age of thirty-three years. 
(^n April 30, 1861, Mr. Dyer formed a second 
marriage with Miss Mary H. (lillman. This 
lady, who was born in 1820, was the daughter 
of Samuel Ciillman. She died in 1892, leav- 
ing no children. Two years later, June 23, 
1894, Mr. Dyer was again married. The 
present Mrs. Dyer was a Miss Affie Collins in 
her maidenhood, a daughter of John Collins 
of Starks. She was born in 1824, and was a 
widow when married to Mr. Dyer, her first 
husband having been Mr. Benjamin Bradford. 
Mr. Dyer is a member of the Masonic (Jrder, 
belonging to I<"ranklin Lodge, No. 123, A. !•". 
& A. M., in which he has filled all the chairs 
except that of Master. His eldest son is also 
a Mason, having attained the thirty-second de- 
gree in that ancient society. 




I-:V. STEPHEN D. RICHARDSON, 
a well-known clerg)man of Oxford 

is V County, whose home is in Hebron, 
and who is Secretary of the Hebron 
Academy Board of Trustees, of which he has 
been a member some twenty-one years, is a 
native of this town. He was born May 24, 
1S25, son of Adam and Margaret (Crooker) 
Richardson. 

Adam Richardson was born in Pembroke, 
Mass., May 24, 1781. A blacksmith by 
trade, he was also a com])etent farmer, and 
was a very industrious man. He died in 
Buckfield, December 28, 1843, survived by 
his wife Margaret, who was born in Buckfield 
in 1783, and was called to rest at the age of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



seventy-four. They were the parents of ten 
children, namely: Susan, born February 7, 
iiSo6, who died in 1864; Margaret, born Feb- 
ruary 3 1, icSo.S, now a resident of Otisfield, 
Cumberland County, Me. ; Winslow, born Oc- 
tober I, 1810, who died in 1886; Adam, born 
July 18, 1812, who died in 1887; Rosella, 
l)orn March 22, 1815, who died in 1867; Pa- 
tience C. , born August 22, 1817, now residing 
in West Minot, Me. ; Mary F. , b(Jrn January 
I, 1820, who died in 1889; Lemuel C. , born 
August 23, 1822, who died in 1854; Stephen 
D., the subject of this sketch; and Rachel C, 
born September 16, 1827, now residing in 
West Minot, Me. The first four were natives 
of Hartford, Me., and the last six were natives 
of Hebron. Mr. Adam Richardson was a 
Whig in political preference. In religious 
matters he was liberal. 

Stephen D. was next to the youngest-born of 
the parental household. He grew to manhood 
in Hebron, and here received his early educa- 
tion, fitting for college at Hebron Academy, 
where he was assistant teacher in 1851 and 
1S52. He spent five years in Lawrence, 
Mass., employed as clerk in the Boston & 
Maine car shops, and then entered on his 
ministerial work after about six months' 
study of theology with the Rev. C. Parker. 
His first pastorate was at Manchester. Me., 
where he had charge of the Baptist church for 
ten years; and the fi\-e years following he was 
at Fayette Corner. In 1875 he was installed 
as pastor of the Bai)tist church in Hebron, 
which was under his able direction for twelve 
years ; and later he was pastor at Tenant's Har- 
bor, Me., three years. On account of his wife's 
feeble health he was then compelled to retire 
from active pastoral work, though supplying 
pulpits at intervals. Since living in Hebron 
he has supplied the church at Ikickfield for 
a year, the one in East Sumner for four years, 
also, in connection, the church at West .Sum- 
ner two and a half years, besides supplying 
for short periods churches in the surrounding 
towns. As a pastor he has been very popular 
and successful ; and he is still a very busy 
man, active in ministerial work, and perform- 
ing many important duties as Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees of Hebron Academy. 

This institution, which has been recently 



endowed and made a fitting-school for Colby 
College, with the addition of a handsome new 
building, Sturtevant Hall, is one of the best 
schools of the kind in the State, the tuition 
fees being very reasonable, considering the 
advantages offered. An able corps of teachers 
give instruction in Greek and Latin, moral 
science, history, Fnglish language and liter- 
ature and Biblical literature, the natural and 
physical sciences, mathematics and book-keep- 
ing, elocution, music, painting, and jienman- 
ship; and a fine gymnasium, heated by steam, 
supplied with baths, and furnished with all 
necessary gymnastic apparatus, helps to de- 
velop the bodily strength and elasticity re- 
quired to keep pace with mental growth. 
Circulars containing full information in regard 
to the academy are in charge of the Principal, 
William E. Sargent, A.M., and the Secretary, 
the Rev. S. D. Richardson. 

On April 15, 1855, Mr. Richardson was 
united in marriage with Miss Lizzie J. Mar- 
shall, who was born in Hebron, June 4, 1832, 
a daughter of Moses and Ruth (Whittemore) 
Marshall (both deceased). Mr. Mar.shall, 
who was born in Bethel, Me., was a mill- 
wright. Mrs. Richardson died in Hebron, 
June 29, 1894, after a long period of invalid- 
ism, leaving one son, Albert Marshall Rich- 
ardson. He was born in Manchester, Me., 
P'ebruary 28, 1863, fitted for college at 
Hebron Academy, and was graduated at Colby 
University in 1886. Though qualified to 
teach, and having had two years' exj)erience as 
an instructor in Wayland Seminary, Washing- 
ton, D.C., his taste is for mechanical work; 
and he has given some attention to the ma- 
chinist's trade. He returned to Hebron at 
the time of his mother's death, and has since 
made his home in this town. At present he 
is employed in Dr. Marshall & Dunham's 
splint manufactory in Portland, Me. In poli- 
tics a Republican, he has been elected to a 
number of town offices, and, having served for 
two years as School Supervisor, is now Town 
Clerk and Treasurer. He married Rosa, 
daughter of H. A. Cushman, of Hebron, and 
has two children — Norman C, born in 
Waterville, April 12, 1892; and Albert M., 
born in Hebron, July 27, i8g6. 

The Rev. Stephen D. Richardson has long 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA'IIAV 



lieen prdinincnt among the Republicans of 
his district. In 1869 he represented the town 
of Manchester, Me., in the State legislature; 
and he has been School Supervisor for twenty- 
three years, filling that office in different 
towns. He is now the stated sui)pl\- and act- 
ing pastor of the Baiitist church in Peru, Ox- 
ford County. 

To the entl of his life he will d(iubtless re- 
call among his most vivid remembrances his 
e.xperiences while at the front during the war 
of the Rebellion, when he rendered valuable 
services to his country and the cause of hu- 
manity as a delegate of the Christian Commis- 
sion, assigned to duty in the Shenandoah \'al- 
ley, \'irginia. He was for several weeks at 
Harper's Ferry, but most of the time at Win- 
chester, then the headquarters of the Middle 
Division, Veteran Corps, under General Sheri- 
dan, followed by General Hancock. He w^as 
there when the war closed, in charge of the 
Commission rooms, and was in Washington at 
the time of President Lincoln's funeral. 



ISAAC A. I). BLAKi:, ^LD., of Wil- 
ton, a well-known physician of the ho- 
UKijpathic school and a veteran of the 
Civil War, was horn in Lisbon, i\Ie. , 
December 24, 1833, son of Zebulon and .Sarah 
A. (Durgin) Blake. His grandfather, John 
Blake, was an Englishman w'ho emigrated to 
America in Colonial times, and served as a 
soldier in the Continental Army during the 
Revolutionary War. After the close of the 
war John Blake settled upon a tract of wild 
land in Maine, where he cleared a good farm, 
and thereafter resided upon it until his death, 
which occurred when he was eighty years old. 
He married Mercy Dean, and she lived to 
reach the advanced age of ninety-four years. 
Her children \yere — John, Sally, William, 
Polly, Zebulon, and Susan. ^ 

Zebulon Blake, Dr. Blake's father, who w^as 
also a native of IJsbon, followed agriculture 
during the active period of his life. In 1S35 
he moved to Detroit, Me., where he tilled the 
soil of a good farm until his retirement from 
active labor. Selling his property in Detroit, 
he removed to Penobscot County, where he 
lived till 187J. Lie then moved to Wilton. 



Here he spent the rest of his life, and he died 
at the age of ninety-one years. His wife, 
Sarah, bore him ten children, of whom John 
W. died in infancy, and three others before 
I'eaching maturit}'. The rest were — Abbie, 
Lliram W. , Isaac A. D. , Jane, Nellie, and 
John W. (second). The mother lived to be 
eightv-four \'ears old. 

Isaac A. I). IMake acquired his early educa- 
tion in the schfiols of Detroit, Me. He sub- 
sequently attended the Hampden Academy 
and the East Maine C'onfercnce Seminary at 
]?ucks]iort. Me. After stud)ing medicine with 
Dr. Hamilton of Hartland, he attended the 
Homctopathic College at Cleveland, Ohio, 
during the year 1858-59, and the Pennsyl- 
vania Medical I'niversity during that of 1860- 
61. He gradliated from the latter institution 
in 1861, and began the practice nf his profes- 
sion in Philaiiclphia. A short time after leav- 
ing college he enlisted for service in the Civil 
War, being commissioned .Second Sergeant of 
Companv D, Twenty-ninth Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania- X'olunteer Infantry, with which he 
served as Sergeant and Lieutenant until his 
discharge on April 8, 1864. He afterward 
re-entered the army as .Surgeon of the Seventy- 
third Regiment, Pennsylvania \'olunteers, and 
served until the close of the war. During the 
interval that elapsed between his first discharge 
and his re- enlistment, he practised medicine in 
O.xford, Pa., After the war he located in 
North Carmel, Me., where he had a large prac- 
tice f(n- three years. On account of his wife's 
health he then moved to Lakewood, Ocean 
County, N.J., where he resided until 1880. 
Returning to Maine in that year he located in 
Wilton, where he has since practised with suc- 
cess. For some years he was able to with- 
stand the fatigue and exposure of a country 
physician's practice; but the long rides, to- 
gether with his increasing w-eight, acting on 
a constitution weakened by four years' expos- 
ure in the war, finally caused sjiinal and heart 
troubles. These infirmities compelled him to 
give up his outside patients, and confine him- 
self to his office practice. Soon after estab- 
lishing himself here he bought the Dunn home- 
stead on Main Street. This he has since re- 
modelled into a handsome residence in which 
his office is located. He is still the regular 



5-' 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



jihysician of many prominent families in 
W ilton. 

In 1864 iJr. ]5iake was united in marriage 
to Mary H. Hill, of Philadelphia. She is a 
daughter of James Hill, an Englishman, and 
a shoemaker by trade. Dr. and Mrs. ]^lake 
have had four children, as follows: Florine, 
who died before reaching maturity; another 
child who died in infancy; Alfred C. ; and 
Louisa. Alfred C. graduated from the Wil- 
ton Academy in 1891, and entered Colby Uni- 
versity, class of 1895. His failing eyesight 
compelled him to leave at the end of one year. 
He has since been engaged in teaching, and 
is now Principal of the High School at Vance- 
boro. Louisa is now the wife of the Rev. 
Charles H. Williams, a Baptist minister, and 
has one son, Charles Spurgeon. In politics 
Ur. Blake is an Independent Republican. He 
is connected with Williamson Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is 
Secretary. Both he and Mrs. Blake are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



TT^HARLES W. FLINT, a retired farmer 
I V^ of .Sweden, Oxford County, Me., and 
^^is^^ a veteran of the Civil War, was 
born upon the farm he now owns and 
occupies, August 7, 1 S26, son of Xathaniel and 
Rebecca (Ingalls) Mint. Mr. Flint's parents 
were both natives of Bridgton, Me., his pa- 
ternal grandfather, James P'lint, w^ho was born 
in Reading, North Parish, now North Read- 
ing, Mass., having come to Maine and settled 
upon a farm in that town in 1776. He was 
a son of Captain John Flint, grandson of Eb- 
enezer, and great-grandson of George and 
Elizabeth (Putnam) PMint, all residents of the 
North Parish of Reading. George I'lint, 
known as Sergeant P'lint, w^as the second son 
of Thomas PTint. who settled in Salem, Mass., 
before 1650. (See P'lint Genealogy.) 

Nathaniel I'lint, son of James, resided in 
Bridgton until after his marriage, when he 
moved to Sweden and settled upon a tract of 
wild land. P'or some time he occupied a log 
house, but after clearing off a large part of his 
land he erected a set of frame buildings. He 
continued to reside here until his death, 
which took place in 1875. His wife, who 



was before marriage Rebecca Ingalls, became 
the mother of eight children, seven sons and 
one daughter, as follows: Rebecca, who mar- 
ried Jonathan Whitney; Nathaniel; Reuben 
I.; John; Benjamin; Charles W. ; Samuel; 
and Marshall — of whom the only survivor is 
Charles W., the subject of this sketch. Mrs. 
Rebecca Ingalls P'lint died in June, 1870. 

Charles W. Flint received a common-school 
education in his boyhood, and had the addi- 
tional advantage of one term at the high 
school. He resided at home assisting his 
father upon the farm until he was twenty-one 
years old, when he married and settled upon 
a piece of agricultural property in the south- 
east part of this town. Six years later he re- 
turned to the homestead; and, after caring for 
his parents during the rest of their lives, he 
inherited the estate. Mr. P'lint's life, how- 
ever, has not all been spent in the peaceful 
pursuits of husbandry. Responding to Presi- 
dent Lincoln's call for troops to defend the 
imperilled Pinion, on September 29, 1862, he 
enlisted as a private in Company B, Twenty- 
third Maine Volunteer Infantry. The regi- 
ment was commanded by Colonel Virgin ; and 
Company B, which w-as originally commanded 
by Captain Little, w-as afterward led by Cap- 
tain WinthrofD C. Plall. They were assigned 
to do general duty in the vicinity of the Po- 
tomac River, where Mr. P'lint's health became 
permanently injured through long-continued 
exposure; and after his discharge in Portland, 
July 5, 1S63, he returned to Sweden, where 
he resumed farming. He has improved the 
farm by clearing off considerable woodland, 
thus adding to its tillage area ; and in connec- 
tion with general farming he has conducted 
lumbering operations during the winter sea- 
sons. He now owns, besides the home farm of 
one hundred and twenty-five acres, a tract of 
fifty acres, situated in another part of the 
town, together with considerable wikl land. 
Since his retirement from active labor the 
farm has been managed by his son. 

Mr. Flint has been twice married. His 
first wife, whom he wedded P'ebruary 3, 1848, 
was before marriage Sarah ¥. Stearns. She 
was born in Lovell, Me., May 2, 1826, daugh- 
ter of General Solomon and Sarah (Heald) 
Stearns, the former of whom was a prosperous 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



53 



fanner of that town. She ilied July 2, 1S53, 
leaving three children, namely: Charles F., 
who was born January 9, 1849, married Jennie 
Harmon, of Bridgton, and now lives in West 
Sterling, Mass. ; Solomon S. , who was born 
August 13, 1850, married Emma Hubbard, of 
Worcester, Mass., and now resides in that 
city; and Benjamin W., who was born Decem- 
ber 14, 1851, married Mrs. Abby Weeks, and 
is now residing in Chatham, N. H. 

On May 20, 1855, Mr. Flint married his 
present wife, whose maiden name was Jane M. 
Bennett. She was born in Freedom, N.H., 
March 24, 1836, daughter of William and 
Charlotte (Bennett) Ik-nnett. Her father, 
who was a native of Bridgton, was a house 
carpenter, and followed his trade in Freedom, 
Sweden, and l?ridgton. He died in his native 
town. His wife, who was born in Freedom, 
N.H., spent her last days in Massachusetts. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Flint have been born thir- 
teen children, of whom a brief record may 
here be given, as follows: Nathaniel F. was 
born May 8, 1857, and died December 15, 
1858; Sarah J. was born October 5, 1858, and 
is the wife of J. Frank l^ryant, of West 
Bridgton; William M. was born June 7, i860, 
married Nellie Pike, and resides in Sweden; 
John B. was born February 19, 1862, is a 
prominent young man of the town, and has 
always resided at the homestead; George A. 
was born July 14, 1864, married Ada Dawes, 
and now lives in Harrison, Me. ; Marshall I. 
was born November 12, 1865, and died .Sep- 
tember 29, 1872; Eben I. was born June 23, 
1867, and is now living at home; Lilly M. 
was born September 6, 1869, and is the wife 
of Wilbur D. Moulton, of this town ; Joseph 
was born April 30, 1S71, and died October 8, 
1875; I{liza A. was born December 3, 1873, 
and is living at home; Royal N. was born 
June 12, 1877; Alfonzo F. and Alonzo J., 
twins, who were born September 12, 1878, 
are residing at home. 

In politics Mr. Flint is a Republican. Ik- 
sides holding some of the minor town offices, 
he has ably served as a member of the Board 
of Selectmen for several terms, was Super- 
visor for a number of years, and has been a 
member of the School Board. He is con- 
nected with Cumberland Lodge, Independent 



Order of Odd I-'ellows, of Bridgton, and was 
formerly connected with the grange in this 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Flint are members of 
the Free Baptist church. 



MADISON LUDDI'lN, one of Can- 
ton's successful farmers, and well 
kiinwn thiciughout tiiis section as a 
skillnl musician, was born upon the 
farm he now owns and nccuiiies, November 
20, 1S45, son of Jacob and Jane C. (Wilson) 
Ludden. 

Mr. Ludden's granilfathci', Jacob I.utldcn, 
first, was an early settler in Turner; but in 
1817 he moved from that town to Canton, 
where he settled upon a small farm located 
near the Di.vfield line. He worked at black- 
smithing and farming here for many years, 
and also took a [jrominent part in public af- 
fairs, serving in the House of Rei)resentatives 
when the Maine legislature met in I'oitland. 
He died in 1837, aged si.xty years. In poli- 
tics Grandfather Ludden was a Democrat, and 
in his religious views he was a Universalist. 
His wife, Lydia Soule, lived to reach a good 
old age. She was the mother of eleven chil- 
dren, namely : John ; Temperance ; Aaron, who 
died at the age of fourteen ' years ; Lydia; 
Jacob; Daniel; Luther; I-"lora ; Phcebe ; Pere- 
grine; and Manderville T. 

Jacob Ludden, sec(.)nd, the fifth child, was 
born in Turner, January 14, 1814. In young 
manhood he learned the blacksmith's trade, 
which was his principal occupation through 
life; and after his marriage he settled upon the 
old Wilson farm in Canton. A man of con- 
siderable energy and ability, he took a ileei) 
interest in educational affairs. He dietl June 
20, 1886. In politics he was a Democrat, 
and in religion a believer in the doctrine of 
universal salvation. His wife, Jane C. Wil- 
son, whom he married in 1834, was born upon 
the farm where her son now resides, August 
10, 1820, daughter of Goin and Sally (Cool- 
idge) Wilson. Goin Wilson was a native of 
Poland, and was a Democrat in politics. 
Settling in this town, he cleared from the wil- 
derness what has since been known as the 
Goin Wilson homestead. Both he and his 
wife, Sallv Cot)lidge, who was born in Canton, 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lived to reach the age of eighty years. Mrs. 
Jane C. Wilson Ludden survives her hu.sband, 
and resides at the homestead with her son, 
J. Madison, the subject of this sketch, who is 
the only one of her children living. The 
others were: Gowen W. , who died December 
3.S, 1868; Sarah J., who became the wife of 
W. J. Nalley, and died November 27, 1891 ; 
and Linus C. , who died August 17, 1863. 

J. Madison Ludden was educated in the 
town schools and grew to manhood upon his 
present farm in Canton. He has given his 
attention to various occupations, but chiefly 
to general farming and blacksmithing. His 
property, which he inherited from his mother, 
consists of about one hundred and twenty-five 
acres of fertile land. P'or the past twenty-five 
years he has been a member of Towle's Or- 
chestra, in which he plays the clarionet; and 
his musical ability has been not only a source 
of pleasure, but very profitable to him. 

By his first wife, Flora L. Kidder, whom he 
w^edded on July 4, i86g, Mr. Ludden had one 
daughter — Electa L., who died at the age of 
nearly three years. Mrs. Mora L. Ludden 
died June 7, 1886; and on August 29, 1887, 
Mr. Ludden married for his second wife Mrs. 
Nellie A. Caswell, who was born in Liver- 
more, August 16, 1850, daughter of Amasa 
Phillips. There are no children by this mar- 
riage. By her union with her first husband, 
Albert Caswell, Mr.s. Ludden has two daugh- 
ters: Mabel R., wife of Fred C. Berry; and 
Nellie A. Mr. Ludden's nephew, Charles 
L. Small, resides with him. A worthy rep- 
resentative of one of the early settlers here, 
Mr. Ludden enjoys the esteem and good will 
of all. In politics he is a Democrat, and has 
served as a Selectman and in other town 
offices. He is a member of Canton (irange, 
Patrons of Husbandry; and he and Mrs. Lud- 
den attend the L'niver.salist church. 



jjrosperous 
butcher of 



(-(jifESSE Y. SIMMONS, a 
fanner and commission 
I'armington, Franklin County, was 
born in Kingfield, this county, Decem- 
ber 16, 1839. 1^6 is a son of Daniel and 
Beulah (Winter) Simmons, and a grandson of 
Muses and Betsev Simmons. Moses Simmons, 



who was a hard-working farmer, settled at an 
early date on a farm in Kingfield, and there 
reared a family in comparative comfort. He 
lived about seventy years, and his wife lived 
seventy-five. 

Daniel Simmons was born April 8, 1812. 
Having inherited one-half of the home farm 
in Kingfield, he erected on it a set of build- 
ings, and afterwards lived there until 1854. 
In that year he sold the property and moved to 
New Portland, Me., purchasing there one hun- 
dred and forty acres of land. On this property 
he has made many improvements. He subse- 
quently purchased other land in the north part 
of the town. In the w'inter of 1896 he sawed 
and chopped for the stove si.xteen cords of 
wood, finishing on his eighty-fourth birthday. 
At this writing he has a patch of corn planted, 
to which he is giving especial care. He has 
been a Republican since the formation of the 
party, and he -served as Selectmen of New 
Portland for a number of years. In religious 
belief he is a Universalist. His wife died in 
1886, at the age of si.xty-eight. Their chil- 
dren were — Betsey W., born Ajiril 16, 1838; 
Jesse v., the subject of this sketch; Moses, 
born December 29, 1843; John W. , born 
April 21, 1846; I^lmer W., born October 31, 
1849; Lettice, who lived but three years; Or- 
lando, born December 24, 1853; Orrin W., 
born September 12, 1856; and Alice K., born 
March 14, 1861. 

Jesse \'. Simmons acquired his education 
in the jniblic schools. While yet a mere lad 
he began to earn his living as a clerk in a gro- 
cery and provision store in Lewiston, Me. 
After some years he had saved enough from 
his wages to purchase the homestead in New- 
Portland. After carrying on general farming 
here for ten years, he sold the place and once 
more engaged as clerk. Some time after, he 
purchased the place of J. Landers in Farming- 
ton, and in 18S8 he erected a slaughter-house. 
He has been employed occasionally in Farm- 
ington also as clerk; but his principal occupa- 
tion is butchering stock and sending to the 
city markets for the farmers. He has a good 
farm, where he raises some general crops. 

On July 5, 1875, Mr. Simmons was united 
in marriage with Lydia M., daughter of Wins- 
low and Mary (Small) Small. Her father 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



SS 



was a son of David Small, a farmer of ^Au- 
burn, Me., who settled in Gray, this county, 
where he died at the age of seventy. David 
Small's wife lived to be about fourscore, and 
her children were — Winslow, Charlotte, Cyn- 
thia, Nancy, and Margaret. Winslow Small 
was born in the town of (iray, and reared to 
agricultural pursuit.s. In his earl)- manhood 
he was engaged in teaming, but he eventually 
bought the homestead. /After managing this 
for some time, he sold it antl purchased a large 
farm in the town of Rennford, Oxford County, 
which was his home in his last years. He 
died July i, 1885, aged seventy-nine years, 
and his wife passed away in her seventy-sixth 
year. Their children were — Nathaniel, Mras- 
tus, Andrew, John, David, Hannah, Lorena, 
Thomas, Lydia, Mary, and Royal. In ])olitics 
Mr. Simmons is a Republican; in religious 
belief, a Universal i.st. Mrs. Simmons is a 
member of the Free Will ]5aptist church. 




ARON O. CORB]{TT, who is success- 
fidly tilling the soil of a productive 
farm in Paris, O.xford County, was 
born in Farmington, Me., August 
26, 1856, son of Moses and Funice (Tarbox) 
Corbett. 

Moses Corbett, who was born in .Strong, 
Franklin County, Me., was a farmer and a 
useful citizen of his town. Strong and ener- 
getic, he was well adapted to his calling, 
which he followed until his death, which took 
place when he was sixty-seven years old. His 
wife, luniice, who was a native of Limington, 
Me., became the mother of three children — 
Aaron O. ; (icorgietta, wife of William Foster, 
of Paris; and Bertha J., wife of Lester M. 
Turner, of Huckfield, Me. Mrs. Moses Cor- 
bett still survives, and resides with her daugh- 
ter in Buckfield. 

Aaron O. Corbett grew to manhood in 
P'armington and Hebron, Me. ; and his educa- 
tion was acquired in the district schools. 
When a young man he engaged in shoemaking, 
which occupation he followed in Auburn, Me., 
for eight years. He then bought a farm of 
sixty acres in Hebron, which he carried on 
for a time; but in 1878 he sold it, and, corn- 
ing to Paris, purchased his present farm of 



two hundred acres. He is one of the rising 
and progressive agriculturists of this section, 
having been successful from the start. He 
devotes his attention to general farming and 
dairying, besides raising a large annual crop 
of hay. November 29, 1875, Mr. Coriiett 
married Nancy D. Verrill, of Minot, Me., 
daughter of George and Nancy (Da\'is) \'er- 
rill. Mrs. Corbett's [jaients weie natives of 
Minot, where her father was a prosperous 
farmer. Neither is now living. Mr. and 
Mrs. Corbett have had seven children, as fol- 
lows: Julia M., Fred H., Isabella M., Grace 
E., Howard K., Millard L., and George W. 
The last named died at the age of five years. 
Mr. Corbett is indejiendent in politics and 
liberal in his religious views. Mrs. Corbett 
attends the Methodist lijiiscopal church. 



B 



AVID G. PRIDE, of Waterford 
township, is a good representative 
^J of the sturdy, thriving agricult- 
urists of Oxford County. He was 
born November 23, 1824, on the farm where 
he now resides, son of Josiah and Sophia 
(Fairbanks) Pride. His paternal grandfather, 
Benjamin Pride, was a pioneer of Waterford, 
whither he came, accompanied by his son 
Nathaniel, from Cumberland County. ■ On 
his arrival here, Benjamin Ijought some land, 
and on it established the first saw-mills seen 
in this vicinity. From that time until his 
death, in 1832, he was engaged in farming 
and manufacturing lumber. 

Josiah Pride, born in Falmouth, Me., was 
reared in this town. After his marriage with 
Miss Sophia Fairbanks, a native of Berlin, 
Mass., he settled on the homestead now owned 
and occupied by his son, David G., and in 
its improvement was busily engaged until his 
demise, January 3, i860. His wife, who dieil 
March 27, 1858, bore him five children, of 
whom the following is recorded: Edwin F., 
formerly a mason at Naples, Me., was born 
August 18, 1820, and died October 14, i88g; 
Charles F., born June 14, 1822, died Septem- 
ber 3, 1822; David G. is the subject of this 
sketch; Sophia A., born July 2, 1832, married 
Leander G. Stone, and lived in Waterford 
until her death, March 12, 1872; and William 



S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



VV., born June 7, 1S37, married Rachel Hall, 
and now lives in Norway, this county. 

David G. Pride received his early education 
in the district schools. Beginning while still 
very young, he assisted his father in clearing 
and improving the home farm. Including the 
ancestral homestead to which he succeeded, he 
is now the owner of three hundred acres of 
land. He has managed his property with 
ability, carrying on general farming, dairy- 
ing, and stock raising. In politics he is a 
stanch Democrat, and he is one of the most 
highly esteemed residents of the county. He 
served as Selectman of Waterford in 1883 and 
1884. 

On May 19, 1852, Mr. Pride married Miss 
Martha Marston, who was born May 28, 1833, 
in the adjoining town of Norway. She is a 
daughter of Hrackett and Sarah (Hall) Mars- 
ton, natives of Falmouth, Me., who became 
residents of Norway, where they owned a farm. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Pride are: 
Charles A., born May 30, 1853, who married 
Rose A. Marston, of Albany, this county, and 
is now a farmer of Norway village: Clarence 
H., born July 9, 1857, who married Lillian 
Johnson, assists his father in the management 
of the farm, and has been Chairman of the 
Waterford Board of Selectmen for the past five 
years: Lizzie B. , born November i, i860, 
who is the wife of Horace Mixer, of Norway 
village; Grace M., born June 15, 1865, who 
lives with her parents; Frank D. , born July 
24, 1 87 1, who died March 12, 1872; and D. 
Loring, horn May 10, 1874, who also lives at 
home. 




[(7)^l"0RACE L. STANLEY, who owns 
and cultivates one of the best farms 
in Chesterville, I-'ranklin County, 
was born in this town, March 14, 
1857. He is a son of George W. and Mary 
D. (Jewell) Stanley, and is a descendant of 
an early settler of Winthrop, Me., his great- 
grandfather, Aden Stanley, who fought for 
American Independence at Lexington, Bunker 
Hill, and elsewhere, having been one of the 
first to locate in that town. Aden Stanley was 
a carriage-maker Ijy trade, as were all of his 
sons. He lived to the advanced age of ninety- 



two years. His son, Lemuel, the next in 
line to the subject of this sketch, was both a 
native and a lifelong resident of Winthrop. 
Besides carriage-making he was engaged in 
farming. He was an upright, conscientious 
man, thrifty and industrious, and was a promi- 
nent figure in the community in which he 
lived. In his religious opinions he was a 
Congregationalist. He married Mehitable 
Gilman, a native of Norridgewock, Me. 

George W. Stanley, father of Horace L., 
was born in Winthrop, October 28, 181 5. In 
early manhood he learned the carriage-maker's 
trade. .Shortly after his marriage he moved to 
Norridgewock, where he conducted business 
for ten years; and then, in 183-2, he came to 
Chesterville. Purchasing a lot in the \illage 
he built a large shop, and, engaging in the 
manufactiu-ing of carriages, did a flourishing 
business until 1S65, when he retired from that 
enterprise and bought the farm of one hundred 
acres which is now owned by his son. In 
1876 he erected a new residence, fashioned 
somewhat after the Queen Anne style, and 
subsequently used the old house for a shop. 
He carried on general farming very success- 
fully until his death, which took place August 
9, 1890. He was a man of good business abil- 
ity and of great personal worth. He took a 
lively interest in public affairs, and as one of 
the leading citizens of the town he was highly 
respected. Originally a Whig, he entered the 
ranks of the Republican party at its formation. 
In his religious affiliations he was a Free Will 
Baptist. His wife, Mary D., whom he mar- 
ried May 4, 1842, was a daughter of Robert 
and Nicy (Grover) Jewell. Her father was a 
native of Fox Island, Me., and a son of James 
Jewell, who came from England. Robert 
Jewell, who was twice married, became the 
father of twelve children, and Mr. Stanley's 
mother was the second daughter by his second 
union. Mr. and Mrs. George W. Stanley be- 
came the parents of ten children, as follows: 
Cyrus A., born in 1S43; Allen F., born in 
1844, died in 1863, while serving in the army; 
Mary F., born in 1S46; Sarah E., born in 
1848; Annette, born in 1850, died in infancy, 
all the foregoing being born in Norridgewock; 
George E., born in 1852; Addie J., born in 
1854; Horace L., whose nativity is clsewliere 




t^ 



^» 




GEORGE W. STANLEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



59 



given; Lizzie S. , born in 1859; and Mdwarci 
R., born in 1863, the last five being natives of 
Chesterville. A portrait of the father of this 
worthy family is presented in connection with 
this article. 

Horace L. Stanley acqnired the elementary 
branches of his education in the common 
schools, and completed his studies at the 
Maine Wesleyan Seminary at Kents Hill. At 
the age of nineteen he began his independent 
career, finding work as a farm assistant, and 
was thus employed until attaining his major- 
ity. P'roni that time until he was twenty-five 
he assisted in carrying on the home farm. He 
then went to Boston, where he remained si.\ 
months, at the end of which time he was called 
home on account of serious injuries sustained 
by his father as the result of being thrown 
from his carriage. He has since resided here, 
taking charge of the homestead and having 
cared for his father during his last days. In 
1893 he received from his mother a full title 
to the property, including the stock, imple- 
ments, and machinery. This farm not only 
occupies a beautiful location, but is one of the 
most fertile and productive in this section. It 
includes a fine orchard of grafted fruit trees, 
and is fully sujsplied with all modern improve- 
ments. At present there are upon the place 
five splendid Jersey cows and three fine horses. 
As an energetic and thoroughly practical 
farmer Mr. Stanley is a distinct .success. 
Having advanced rapidly to a position of prom- 
inence among his fellow-townsmen he is re- 
garded by them with respect and esteem. In 
politics he acts with the Republican party, and 
his religious opinions are broad and liberal. 



jUFrANK L. WATSON, a successful 
1^ farmer and prominent resident of 
Hiram, O.xford County, Me., was born 
upon the farm he now owns and cultivates, in 
this town, March 28, 1837, son of Walter F. 
and Ruth (Hubbard) Watson. Mr. Watson's 
farm was cleared from the wilderness by his 
great-grandfather, who came to Hiram in 

1779. John Watson, Mr. Watson's grand- 
father, .son of the pioneer, was born here in 

1780, and died here in 1863, having resided 
upon the homestead property during his entire 



life. His wife, whose niaiilen name was Abi- 
gail l'"oss, died in Hiram in 1870. She was 
the mother of si.xteen children, of whom the 
only survivor is Seviah, the youngest, now the 
wife of Chauncy R. Berry, of Deering, Me. 

Walter V. Watson, son of John Watson, was 
born at the homestead in Hiram; and, with the 
exception of five years spent in the mining 
districts of California, he resided here and 
tilled the soil throughout the active jiericd of 
his life. He died July 4, 1880. His wife, 
formerly Ruth Hubbard, a native of Berwick, 
Me., was the mother of four children, as fol- 
lows: Francis, who died at the age of two 
years; I""rank L., the subject of this sketch; 
Zilpha, wife of Charles W. Deering, a pros- 
perous farmer of Gorham, Me. ; and Arabella, 
wife of Fdwin Woodman, a machinist of Bid- 
deford, Me. Mrs. Ruth H. Watson, surviving 
her husband but a short time, died in October, 
1880. 

Frank L. Watson acL|uired his elementary 
education in the common schools, and pursued 
a more advanced course of study at the Lim- 
ington Academy. At the age of si.xteen he 
left home and went to Biddeforil, Me., where 
he was emidoyed ujion a farm for two years; 
and he then returned to Hiram. He took 
charge of the home farm during the last three 
years of his father's absence in California, and 
has since continued to manage the property. 
He owns one hundred acres of desirable laiul, 
which is well adapted to the raising of staple 
jjroducts, such as hay, corn, and potatoes; and 
he ships a great deal of milk to Portland. He 
also does quite a large business as a dealer in 
mowing machines and agricultural implements. 

In May, 1856, Mr. Watson married Char- 
lotte Evans, a native of this town. Her par- 
ents, Oliver and Mary (Locke) Fvans, who 
were prosperous farming people of Hiram, are 
no longer living. Mr. and Mrs. Watson have 
had si.x children, namely: Cora, who was born 
September 16, 1857, married Cieorge R. Clem- 
ens, of Hiram, and died at the age of thirty- 
seven years; Mary E. , whose birthday was the 
Fourth of July, a year or two later, and who is 
now the wife of Charles 1-". Wakefield, a 
farmer in California; Charles W. , who was 
born February 26, 1865, and died October 9 
of the same year; Charles Walter, who was 



6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born Octcibcr i, 1867, and diecl in July, i8<S4; 
John F., who was born September 25, 1869, 
and is assisting iiis father in carrying on the 
farm; and Eunice B., who was born October 
23, 1 87 1, and died February 21, 1892. 

A Democrat in politics, Mr. Watson has 
been [iromineiitly active in local jniblic 
affairs, having served as Chairman of the 
Hoard of Selectmen, Town Treasurer, and Col- 
lector for several years. He was made a 
Mason in 1865 in Mount Moriah Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., of 13enmark, Me. As a citizen of 
worth and abilit)', he is highly esteemeil by 
his fellow-townsmen. 



\ ^ I farmer of New Sh? 
^— ^ this town, October 



/ fjTTT R 1 1 A M B A K V. R, a prosperous 

iaron,\vas born in 
13, I 81 5, son of 
i'llisha and Lydia (Winslow) Baker. Mr. 
Baker's grandfather, I'rince Baker, who was 
horn in 1742, moved with his father from 
Damariscotta, Lincoln County, to New Sharon 
when he was a young man. With three others 
Prince Baker bought the township, which, 
when sold, realized but twelve cents per acre. 
He died in Mercer, Somerset County, in 1829, 
at the age of eighty-seven years. 

Elisha leaker, Mr. Baker's father, was born 
in iJamariscotta, January 31, 1777. His boy- 
hood was passed upon his father's farm, and he 
acquired his education in the common schools 
of New Sharon. When a young man he 
bought a farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 
situated on the Sandy River Road, and con- 
ducted it for several years. He finally tradeil 
it to his father for the present homestead, 
where he resided until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1 86 1, at the age of eighty-five years. 
In politics he was a Republican, and in his 
religious belief he was a Free Will Baptist. 
During the War of 181 2 he reported for ser- 
\ice at Hallowell, where he was detained 
but a short time. He afterward received 
from the government a warrant for one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land. His wife, 
Lydia Winslow, who spent her childhood on 
the coast of Maine, near Boothbay Harbor, 
at a later date came to Industry with her 
father. .She had ten children: namely. Ex- 
perience, Nicholas W., Betsey, Sumner, Abel, 



Russell, Gorham, Gardner, and two others who 
died in infancy. 

Gorham Baker acquired a common -school 
education. Upon reaching his majority he 
began to work as an assistant upon the home- 
stead farm. Since succeeding to the property 
he has made various improvements, increasing 
the acreage by the purchase of more land, 
which now amounts to one hundred and sixty- 
six acres. On December r8, 1839, Mr. liaker 
wedded Harriet Stowers, daughter of John 
Stowers, of I'armington, this county. She 
has had seven children — Katherine K., F'lisha 
G. , Benjamin F., Mary E., John M., Amos 
L. , and Hattie F. Katherine E. , born in 1841, 
married Jason Lufkin, of Champlain, Minn., 
and has had two children, namely: Edwin B., 
now deceased, who was born July 5, 1869; 
and F'rank B., who was born March 27, 1871.. 
Elisha G. , born in 1842, served three years 
in the Sixteenth Regiment, Maine Infantry, 
during the Civil War, anti is now a blacksmith 
in the village of New Sharon. Benjamin !•". 
was born in 1844. Mary E. and John M., 
twins, were born in 1849. The latter died in 
infancy. Amos L. was born in 185 i. Hattie 
F., born in 1858, is now the widow of the late 
Theodore T. Prince, and resides at the home- 
stead. She has three children, namely: 
Blanche E., who was Ijorn March 26, 1S80; 
Nina M., who was born May 25, 1884; and 
Mildred T., born January 3, 1894. Mr. Bakeii 
is highly respectetl by his neighbors, and is 
regarded as one of the most successful farmers 
of this locality. 

KRANCIS MARION NOBLE, a prac- 
tical and progressive farmer at Noble's 
Corner, Norway, Me., was born in this 
town, March 31, 1845. His paternal grand- 
father, Nathan Noble, second, born near Port- 
land in 1761, was a son of Nathan, first, a 
native of New Milford, Conn. Grandfather 
Noble and his wife, Hannah Hobbs, reared a 
large number of children, among them being 
Nathan, Jr., the father of the subject of this 
sketch. 

Nathan Noble, Jr., was engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits in North Norway for several 
years, but later opened a store of general mer- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



61 



cliandise at what is now known as Noble's 
Corner, the place having been named in his 
honor. After continuing in mercantile busi- 
ness for some years, he sokl out his store and 
resumed farming, in which he was engaged 
until his demise, March 31, 1883. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Mary Jordan, was 
born in Otisfield, Cumberland County, Me., 
and dieii I''ebruary 16, 1890, in the town of 
Niu'way. They had ten children, eiglit of 
whom are now deceaseil, namely: Isannali C. , 
who married in 1843 Uriah Holt Upton; Cor- 
delia D., who niarrietl Simon Hukins; Eliza- 
beth A., who was the wife of the late Moses 
Harmon; Gilbert, who died at the age of 
twenty-one years; Aurelius C, who married 
Elizabeth McAllister; Caroline, who married 
Nathaniel G. Frost, of Oxford village; Martha 
J., who died in 1888; and Mary Ellen. The 
survivors are: William H. and Francis Mar- 
ion. William H. Noble, now living with his 
brother, married the late Julia Boothby. He 
served bravely in the late Rebellion, being 
a member of Company G, One Hundred and 
Tenth Maine Volunteer Infantry, and later of 
Company G, Twenty-ninth Maine Volunteer 
Infantry, and at the battle of Cedar Creek lost 
his right arm, for which injur\" he now re- 
ceives a pension. 

Francis Marion Noble, whose course in 
life is now to be briefly set forth, was the 
Jenth and youngest child of his j^arents. 
When but a stripling of si.xteen years, he en- 
listed in his country's service, joining Com- 
]iany G, Fourteenth Maine V'olunteer Infantry, 
under Captain Cheney and Colonel Nickerson. 
He was mustered in at Augusta, Me., when he 
went to Ship Island, and then to New Orleans, 
going from there to Baton Rouge, where they 
met a body of Confederate troops, under com- 
mand of Colonel Breckinridge, with whom 
they had a pitched battle, August 5, 1862. 
In the summer of 1863 he was engaged in the 
siege of Port Hudson, La. Crossing the 
country to Petersburg, Va., the regiment was 
with Sheridan's forces in the Shenandoah \'al- 
ley, where they remained three months, taking 
an active part in various engagements. While 
there Mr. Noble received a serious gunshot 
wound, which necessitated his being taken 
to the McClellan Hospital in Philadelphia. 



Five months later he rejoinetl his regiment at 
Savannah, Ga., where he was stationed until 
the close of the war. He was not in any 
battle after the one at Winchester, where he 
was wounded. On August 25, 1865, he re- 
ceived his discharge at Darien Ridge, Geor- 
gia. On being mustered out of service, Mr. 
Noble returned to his native place, and soon 
afterward bought his present farm, consisting 
of one hundred and eighty acres, on which he 
has faithfully labored. I'"ortune has smiled 
on his undertakings, his estate being finely 
improved, and much of the land under cultiva- 
tion. He carries on the various branches of 
general agriculture, paying some attention to 
dairying, and being quite an extensive stock- 
raiser. 

On SepteuTber 17, 186S, Mr. Noble married 
Miss Myra Pike Hall, who was born March 4, 
1850, in Norway,- daughter of William and 
Mary I'. (Towne) H.ill, both natives of this 
town, the father being a well-known farmer. 
He died in 1856. Mrs. Hall died on Novem- 
ber 12, 185S. Mr. and Mrs. Noble have five 
children, as follows: Frank G., born July 25, 
1869; Fred H., born March 23, 1873; Nathan 
A., born October 28, 1876; Willie M., born 
June 12, 1 886; and Lona E., born February 
7, 1888. Frank G. Noble, now a farmei- in 
Norway, married Emma L. Symonds, and they 
have one child, Dora Frances; and Fred H. 
Noble, also a Norway farmer, married Chris 
B. Tubbs, and has one child, a daughter, Ca- 
lista Marion. 

In politics Mr. Noble is a steatlfast Repub- 
lican, and takes an intelligent antl active part 
in town affairs. F"rom 1883 until 1886 he 
was a member of the Board of Selectmen, and 
he has also served the community in minor 
official capacities. He is a member of the 
Norway Grange, Patrons of Husbandry: and 
of the Henry Rust Post, No. 54, Grand Army 
of the Republic, of Norway. Mr. Noble and 
his family attend the Congregational church. 




EORGI<: HENRY BILLINGS, a re- 
tired jeweller, who has a very pleas- 
ant home in South Waterford vil- 
lage, O.xford County, Me., was born in Water- 
ford, May 26, 1837, the only son of George 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



C. and Rebecca (Whitcomb) Billings. 11 is 
father was born in Waterford, his mother in 
Sweden, Me. His paternal grandfather was 
Daniel Billings, a Massachusetts man, who 
settled in Waterford. George C. Billings 
was a carpenter, and followed his trade in 
his native town. He died in Lowell, Mass., 
in June, 1841 ; and his wife passed away in 
1847. They had but two children — George 
Henry, of South Waterforil ; and Sarah E., 
born May 26, 1839, now the wife of Charles 
Gibbs, an ice dealer of Bridgton Centre, Me. 
George Henry Billings, the subject of this 
sketch, received a limited common-school 
education, being left fatherless at the tender 
age of four years and motherless before he 
entered his teens. When only si.\ years of 
age he was put out to work on a farm in ()tis- 
field, where he remained until nineteen. The 
two years ensuing he was employed as clerk 
in a store in Waterford City; and he then re- 
turned to farm work, which he followed until 
the second year of the Civil War. July 17, 
1S63, he enlisted in Company F, Ninth Maine 
Regiment, under Colonel Granger and Captain 
Barrows; and he was two years in active mili- 
tary service, participating in the siege of 
Fort Fisher, the battle of the Wilderness, and 
the protracted siege of Petersburg. Although 
the rebel bullets touched him not, he suffered 
severely from the physical strain caused by 
forced marches and camping in malarial dis- 
tricts in Virginia and North and South Caro- 
lina; and when his term of service was ended 
his health was very nearly destroyed. He was 
discharged at Raleigh, N.C., in August, 1865, 
and after his return to his native place was in 
ill health for three years, unable to do any 
kind of work. After that he learned the jew- 
eller's trade, in following which he has had a 
variety of experiences. He was in the employ 
of William H. Nevers for several years, then 
managed a store of his own in Harrison vil- 
lage. Me., for two or three years. The ten 
years that followed he worked at his trade in 
a ]iawnship in Boston, Mass.; and, if he were 
gifted with the pen of a Dickens, he would 
have many strange stories to relate concerning 
the pieces of jewelry that received new leases 
of life from his deft fingers. His ne.\t field 
of labo.' was in Aldrich, Minn., where he was 



also employed in a general store, and was 
Postmaster four years. From Aldrich he re- 
turned to Boston, remaining two years, and 
finally settled in Waterford City, Me. Though 
at present practically retired, he still works a 
little at his trade He has never fully recov- 
ered his health, and is now in receipt of a 
pension from the government on account of 
his military service. 

Mr. Billings was married December 22, 
1892, to Mrs. Lillie K. Plummer Horr, who 
was born in Brighton, Mass., November 6, 
185 1. Her parents, Charles and Laura 
(Smith) Plummer, moved to Waterford when 
she was an infant. Her father was a native of 
this town, and was engaged here for years in 
the pursuit of agriculture. He died in Febru- 
ary, 1895. Her mother, a native of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., is living in Cornish, Me., with 
two of her daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Plummer 
had seven children — Nellie and Nettie (de- 
ceased); Lillie E., Mrs. Billings; Annie, 
with her mother in Cornish; Augusta, Post- 
mistress of Waterford City, widow of Charles 
Young, Jr.; Nellie, also living with her 
mother; and Susia, wife of Percy Bailey, a 
clerk in a store in Harrison village. Me. 
Mrs. Billings's first husband was Freeman F. 
Horr, a native of Waterford, the son of Daniel 
Horr. He died April 30, 1889, leaving one 
child, Loise Plummer Horr, who is the wife 
of M. M. Grimes, Postmaster at West Med- 
ford, Mass. 

Mr. Billings votes the Democratic ticket. 
While in Aldrich, Minn., he served as Town 
Clerk, Assessor, and Justice of the Peace. 
He is a meriiber of Bridgton Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Bridgton, Me. ; 
and he and his wife belong to Bear Mountain 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, of Waterford. 




IVERETT A. CHANDLER, a stirring and 
capable young business man, who has 
recently settled in Wilton, Me., on 
the farm which he bought of his father about 
three years ago, is rapidly making for himself 
a record as one of the most successful farmers 
of this town. He was born in Perkins Planta- 
tion, Franklin County, December 25, 1861, 
son of Augustus M. and Martlia (Richards) 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



63 



Chandler, and is a descendant of Culonial an- 
cestry, who were early ])ioneers in develiiiiing 
the agricultural resources of the State of New 
Hampshire. Later generations of the family 
have heen likewise em])loyed in the I'ine Tree 
State. 

Mr. Chandler's great-grandparents — I^ben 
and Damaris (Howe) Chandler, the former of 
wlioni was born in Wilton, N. H. — remo\'ed 
l)revious to 1830 to the town of Temple, in 
this county, where Eben Chandler constructed 
a log house upon a tract of wild land. He 
cleared and improved a good farm, upon which 
he realized a comfortable prosperity as the re- 
sult of his energy and perseverance, and both 
he and his w^fe lived to reach an advanced age. 
Their children were — Ebenezer, Luke, John 
P., James, Flummer, Rodney, and Eliza. 

Luke Chandler, the second son of L]ben, and 
the next in this line, was born in Wilton, 
N.H. Coming to Tem])]e in 1S32 he bought 
and cleared a tract of unim])roved land located 
in the neighborhood of his father's farm; but 
after tilling the soil with energy and success 
for forty years, he sold the farm in Temple, in 
order to pass his last days in his native State, 
and, returning thither, purchased a homestead 
which he occupied for the rest of his life. 
He died at the age of seventy-four years. He 
married Rebecca Melendy, who lived to be 
eighty-three years old, and was the mother of 
twelve children, namely: Luke V. ; Augustus 
M. ; Abigail, Perham ; George P.; Melvina 
and Elvira, twins; Rebecca J.; Sumner 15., 
B. Laforest ; Augusta; and Adah. 

Augustus M. Chandler, second of the twelve, 
was born in Wilton, N.IL, I""ebruary 16, 1830, 
and grew to manhood in Temple, Me. Pos- 
sessing an unusual amount of energy and am- 
bition in his youth, he had previous to attain- 
ing his majority bought and begun improve- 
ments upon a tract of wild land in Perkins 
Plantation, where he erected a house, and 
cleared a considerable space for tillage pur- 
poses. He cultivated this farm for twenty- 
eight years, at the expiration of which time he 
sold the property, and, removing to Wilton, 
Me., bought the Harwood farm, which he im- 
proved by remodelling the buildings and other- 
wise enhanced its value. In 1893 he sold the 
property to his son, Everett A., and purchased j 



for a residence the !•'. I'aine house on Depot 
Street, where he is now enjoying the rest and 
freedom from care to which his long and use- 
ful period of activity so justly entitles him. 
Although the effects of a laborious life have 
in a measure impaired his physical condition, 
he is otherwise bright and active, and still 
occupies a prominent position among the lead- 
ing residents of this town. He has rendered 
his share of service in town affairs, and is held 
in hearty respect and esteem by his fellow-cit- 
izens. In politics he is a Republican. He is 
a member of the Methodist Plpiscopal church, 
and is connected with Williamson Lodge, No. 
20, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His 
first wife, Martha Richards, died at the age of 
thirty-six years, leaving five children, namely: 
Calista R. ;■ M. Rebecca ; PIverett A., the 
subject of this sketch; lillsworth R. ; ;nid 
Charles V. For his second wife he married 
Mrs. PLlvira Russell, born Tuck, daughter of 
James Tuck, of Farmington, Me. 

I^lverett A. Chandler in his early years at- 
tended the district schools and the Wilton 
Academy, acquiring a good practical education. 
At the age of twenty he went to Nashua, 
N. H., where he was employed in a sash and 
blind factory for three years, and he then be- 
came interested in a livery business there. 
Trading this a short time later for a milk 
route, he leased a dairy farm, and for the suc- 
ceeding three years retailed an average of two 
hundred quarts of milk per day, a part of 
which was ]irodiiced upon his farm and the re- 
mainder was bought of his neighbois. Selling 
out his milk business he went to lioston, 
w'here he was for some time engaged in trade, 
and he later gave his attention to the brass 
polishing business, which he carried on with 
success for seven years employing several 
hand.s. In 1893 he bought his father's farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres in Wilton, 
P"ranklin County, Me., together with the old 
town house and lot which he now uses for stor- 
age purposes, and, removing to Wilton in 
1895, he began the work of imjiroving and cul- 
tivating his farm. Thus far during the pres- 
ent year, 1896, in addition to the usual work 
of planting and harvesting, he has erected a 
new stable and carriage house, also raised his 
barn and built on an addition. His dairy is 



64 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



])robal)l\' unsuriMssed in this vicinity, as he 
keeps twenty head of fine Jersey cattle. 

On .April 30, i8go, Mr. Chandler was mar- 
ried to Nellie M. Howes, daughter of William 
and Dora (Tarcher) Howes, the former of 
whom is a retired farmer. Mrs. Chandler has 
six briithers; namely, Herbert M., John C, 
William H., .Maurice J., Charles E., and 
Harry M. Howes; and two sisters, Gertrude 
L. and ]\Iaud S. Howes. Mr. and Mrs. 
Chandler have two children, as follows: Clyde 
Roy, who was born August 16, 1892; and 
Madeline Marie, who was born September 4, 
1895. Politically, Mr. Chandler acts with the 
Republican party. He is cimnected with the 
Patrons of Husbandry, and both he and Mrs. 
Chandler are members oi the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 




ILLIAM W. WHITMARSH, pro- 
prietor of the Elm House, Norway, 
w-as born here. May 27, 1835, son 
of John and Charlotte (Stevens) Whitmarsh 
and grandson of Ebenezer and Mary (Hum- 
phrey) Whitmarsh. Ebenezer Whitmarsh, a 
native of Bridgewater, Mass., was among the 
first to settle in the town of Norway, purchas- 
ing a tract of new land, which he cleared and 
brought into a good state of cultivation. He 
followed farming throughout the active years 
of his life. To him and his wife, Mary 
(Humphrey) Whitmarsh, there were born two 
sons and three daughters; namely, Betsey, 
John, Thomas, I'olly, and Lydia. 

John Whitmarsh, the eldest son of Eben- 
ezer, was born in Norway, August 20, 1793. 
He learned the trade of carpenter, which, with 
farming, he followed until he reached middle 
age. He then went to North Norway and 
opened a jewelry store. After conducting 
this for a short time he came in 1856 to Nor- 
way, and built a store on the site of the pres- 
ent Opera House Block. Here he carried on 
a very successful business in jewelry and sil- 
verware for over a score of years, retiring 
from active business at the end of that time. 
He bought the Bacon house on Cottage Street, 
wdiich has since beea known as the Whitmarsh 
stand. He served for a time as Selectman of 
the town and in a number of minor offices, 



' and he was a communicant of the Congrega- 
tional church. The following children were 
born to him and his wife, Charlotte: Martha 
S., Olive H., William W., and \'ictoria A. 
He died on January 2, 1880. 

William W. Whitmarsh was the only son 
of his parents. He was educated in the Nor- 
way schools. After leaving school he worked 
at carpentr}' until 1S61. Enlisting May 27 
of that year in Company G, First Maine Regi- 
ment, he was made Sergeant of the company. 
On October 4 following he was created Sec- 
ond Eieutenant of Company G, Tenth Maine 
Regiment; and seventeen days later he was 
advanced to the rank of 1^'irst Lieutenant. 
On May 8, 1863, he was discharged with the 
regiment. He re-enlisted December 16, 1863, 
in the Twenty-ninth Maine Regiment, receiv- 
ing the Captaincy of Company G, and served 
imtil March 3, 1866, when he resigned. Soon 
after returning home Mr. Whitmarsh pur- 
chased the Eim House, which has borne that 
name since its doors were first thrown open to 
the public in 1846. He has remodelled it, 
built an addition,^and refurnished it, so that 
at the present time there are twenty-four 
finely arranged sleeping-rooms, fitted up in a 
homelike manner, with every convenience for 
the comfort of the traveller or boarder. Mr. 
Whitmarsh has the reputation of being one 
of the most obliging and entertaining land- 
lords in the county, and of keeping a first-class 
house. 

Plans for the advancement or improvement 
of the town of Norway have always interested 
Mr. Whitmarsh. He was one of the pro- 
moters and is a stockholder and Director of 
the corporation that erected and own Norway 
Opera House. He is also financially inter- 
ested in the Norway water works, of which 
he has been Treasurer and superintendent. 
For eight years he held the office of Town 
Clerk, in 1885-86 he was a Representative to 
the lower house of the State legislature, and 
during the past ten years he has been one of 
the County Commissioners. His political 
principles are those of the Rej^ublican party. 
He is Past Grand of Norway Lodge, No. 16, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Past 
Chief Patriarch of Wildey Encampment, No. 
21, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and a 



BICXJRAI'IIICAL REVIEW 



6S 



comrade of Harry Rust Post, No. 54, Grand 
Army of the Republic, in all the offices of 
which he has served. 

On September 22, 1868, Mr. VVhitmarsh 
was joined in marriage with Miss Martlia C. 
]51akc, who was born August 29, 1846, in 
15ethel, Me., daughter of Jonathan and Eliza- 
beth (Crockett) Blake. Her father was a 
l)rosperous farmer. Of the three children that 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Whitmarsh, 
Lizzie C, the first-born, whose birth occurred 
November 9, 1872, is living. She is now the 
wife of M. \V. Sampson, of Norwa}'. Charles, 
born May 20, 1878, died June 10, 1878. The 
third child died in infancy. 




UGUSTUS N. FRENCH, M.D., of 
Norway, is a successful and jjopular 
physician. He was born here, June 
21, 1845, son of Washington and 
Mary (Henley) French. His great-grand- 
father, James French, a native of Andover, 
Mass., came from there to Norway in 1798, 
and took up a tract of new land, on which he 
built a log liouse. In his early days James 
French engaged in teaching, and also worked 
at carpentry. He married Miss Abigail 
F"letcher, who bore him nine children; 
namely, James, Jacob, Abigail, Esther, 
.Sarah, Charles, George, Alice, and Clar- 
issa. Ill jiolitics he was a Democrat, in his 
religious belief a Methodist. He was over 
ninety years of age at his death. His son, 
James French, Jr., who was born December 
19, 1785, inherited the homestead, and be- 
came a large land-owner and farmer. He 
and his wife, Annis (Whitney) French, lived 
to a good age. They were the parents of ten 
children — George, James, Washington, Perley, 
Martha, John A., Martha A., Moses O., Will- 
iam P., and Moses. All lived to marry; and 
it may be mentioned that the eight sons at 
tended their father's funeral, when it was ob- 
served that time had silvered their heads. 
The father was a Democrat and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Washington F'rench, who was born in 
Norway, May 16, 181 3, purchased a farm in 
North Norway, where he resided until 1847. 
He then removed to Albany, Me,, and pur- 



chased a farm of four hundred acres, and was 
extensively cngagetl in farming and lumbering 
up to the time of his death, March 10, 1887. 
His wife, Mary Henley French, born Febru- 
ary 13, 1823, died in March, 1875. She was 
a daughter of Jeremiah ami Mary (Blanchard) 
Henley. It is a matter of family history that 
her father was brought to Norway in an ox 
cart about a century ago, when only eighteen 
months old. She bore her husband seven 
children — Harriett R., George W., Augustus 
N., Mercy K., Gilber H., M. Kstella, and 
Edwin I^. The father was a member of the 
Congregational church, and in politics he was 
a Republican. 

When but two years old, Augustus N. 
French removed with his parents to Albany, 
Me., so that his early education was obtained 
in the Albany schools. He subsequently at- 
tended the Norway Liberal Institute, which 
was at tliat time in charge of Professor George 
F. Leonard. After leaving the institute lie 
engaged in teaching school for si.\ years. He 
then began the study of medicine with A. M. 
Peables, M.D., of Auburn, Me., who at that 
time had an office in Norway. He also at- 
tended the Maine Medical College, from 
which he was graduated in June, 1871. In 
September of that year he located at Lovell, 
Me., succeeding Dr. J. L. Bennett. Having 
practised there for fourteen years, in the 
course of which he acquired a large patronage, 
he came to Norway in August, 18S5. Here 
he has been still more successful. He pur- 
chased the Dr. Pike place, which was burned 
in 1894. Since then he has erected a three- 
story, seventeen-rooin house, fitted up in 
modern style, and lighted by electricitx'. 

On New Year's Day, 1874, Dr. French was 
married to Miss Malinda Bassett, a daughter 
of Joseph Bassett. .She died in October, 
1876, leaving one child, Liitie Ma\-, who was 
born December 27, 1875, and has since gradu- 
ated from Colby Lhiiversity. Dr. French 
afterward entered a second marriage, con- 
tracted with Miss Nellie E. Fox, a liaughter 
of Edward l^^j.x. They have one child living, 
Eva M., born February 2, 1884. Addie M. 
died at the age of seven 3'ears. Dr. French is 
a Democrat. He served as Supervisor of 
.Schools for three years. He is well known 



66 



BlOGRAl'llRAL KKVIKW 



in Masonic circles, being a Past Master of 
Mount Tirnu Lodge, A. F. & A. M.: a mem- 
ber of Oriental Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 
of Oxford Council, Ro\'al and Select Masons; 
and of Lewiston Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plars. He has also affiliation with Lewiston 
Lodge of Perfection, Auburn Council of 
Princes of Jerusalem, Chapter of Rose Croix, 
and ALaine Consistory, thirty-second. He is 
Past Grand and Noble Commander of Reiser 
Valley Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and has filled the different chairs in 
Pennesseewassee Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
and in Norway Commandery, United Order of 
the Golden Cross. 




'SA W. DUTTON, Justice of the 
Peace, one of New Sharon's most 
respected citzens, occupies a pleas- 
ant residence at Four Corners, 
situated on elevated ground overlooking the 
town. He was born in New Sharon, which 
lies in the south-eastern part of Franklin 
County, Maine, on February 25, 1833, a son 
of Asa and Lucy (Spaulding) Button. 

His father, Asa Dutton, was born in Anson, 
Somerset County, on February 25, 1797, and 
was an infant when his parents moved to 
Starks, a few miles south, where, as he grew 
up, he attended the common schools. At an 
early age he went to Norridgewock, and en- 
gaged in harness-making and farming, being 
employed there by Squire Danforth. Pur- 
chasing a tract of one hundred acres in New 
Sharon shortly before his marriage, and mov- 
ing on to it very soon after that event, he 
built a house and barns, and cultivated quite 
a large portion of the land, conducting his 
harness-making business at the same time, for 
he was a man of great energy. He was in 
political affiliation a Whig and afterwards a 
Republican, and in his religious faith a Con- 
gregational ist. 

He was married to Miss Lucy Spaulding, 
of Norridgewock, on March 25, 1821, and in 
the ensuing nineteen years they became the 
parents of eight children, namely: Lucy S., 
born January 19, 1822, and now the widow of 
Cephas C. Buck, of Strong, and residing in 
New Sharon; Sarah W., born November 18, 



1823, who died June 15, 1875: Asenath 11, 
born September 26, 1825, living at the old 
homestead in New Sharon; Annette B., born 
May 17, 1828, who died August 24, 1873; 
Sophia, born March 28, 1830, who died May 
16, 1855; Frances M., born September 4, 
1838, who died September 23, 1861 : and 
George, born March 23, 1840, who married 
Miss Lida Hill, of Charlestown, W.Va., and 
is now a resident of Allegheny City, Pa. 

The father's namesake, Asa W. Dutton, 
spent his boyhood on the home farm, and 
was educated in the common and high schools 
of New Sharon. At twenty years of age he 
found employment on the Atlantic & St. 
Lawrence Railroad, now known as the Grand 
Trunk Line. For a season he remained in 
its employment as a section hand, returning 
then to New Sharon, and securing work dur- 
ing the winter in the harness shop of Josiah 
Flint. In the following spring he went to 
Cape Elizabeth, where he worked in the steam 
saw-mills of the Speare Brothers until the 
autumn, when he again returned to his home, 
going to Mercer some time later. In Mercer 
he plied his old trade of harness-making, re- 
maining there until spring, when he removed 
to Haverhill, Mass., and was employed by 
Bodfish & Dickey in a steam saw-mill. In 
the fall he went back to New Sharon, where 
he formed a partnership with Horace N. 
Plummer in the harness-making business. In 
the following year his connection was dis- 
solved, Mr. Dutton being subsequently em- 
ployed by Mr. Plummer for a year. 

He now took up a branch of his trade, that 
of carriage trimming, of which he made an 
immediate success. So well did he do his 
work that he soon had the largest trade in this 
line in this section of the State of Maine. 
For a quarter of a century he carried on this 
lucrative business, increasing his finances 
each year. In 1866 Mr. Dutton bought a 
farm of one hundred and fifty acres, to which 
he moved. He lived there only two years, 
however, as he sold the property at an ad- 
vance, the investment having been a wise 
one. In the fall of 1868 he purchased his 
present residence at the "Four Corners," as it 
is called. 

He was united in marriage with Miss Mary 








ASA W. DUTTON. 



lUOC.RAI'lllCAL REVIKW 



J. Lancaster, a ilaughter of Thomas Lancaster, 
of New Sharon, on the 2i.st of December, 
1858. Mr. and Mrs. Dutton have one child, 
a daughter, Winnie F., born March 6, 1863, 
in New Sharon. Miss Dutton was graduated 
from Maine Wesleyan Seminary and Female 
College in 1883, with the degree of Bach- 
elors of Arts, having taken a full college 
course, and three years later she received the 
degree of Master of Arts. Since the comple- 
tion of her education she has spent most of 
her time at home with her parents, though fin- 
several terms she has taught in the district 
schools. 

Mr. Dutton now holds the office of Justice 
of the Peace, and does a general law business, 
mostly in the Probate Courts. He was Town 
Treasurer one year, and was Chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen in i8go and 1893. He is 
a Congregationalist in religious belief, and is 
a strong Republican in political convictions. 
He has won for himself the esteem and respect 
of all who know him and his measure of wordly 
success is due to his industry and ability. 




RANCIS H. HOLDKN, who, after 
a number of years' experience in 
Western farming, is now extensively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in Farm- 
ington, Franklin County, Me., was born 
in Lunenburg, Mass., March 26, 1826, son of 
William Warren and Sophia (Adams) Holden. 
Mr. Holden's father was a native of Shirley, 
Mass. He was born December 9, 1797, and 
learned the carpenter's trade in young man- 
hood. Later removing with his family to 
Weld, Franklin County, Me., he bought a 
farm, and carried it on in connection with his 
trade until his death, which took place April 
II, 1862. He was an able mechanic, a suc- 
cessful farmer, and a useful citizen. In his 
last years he acted with the Republican party 
in politics, and in his religious views he was 
a Methodist. His wife, formerly Sophia 
Adams, who was born in Massachusetts, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1798, became the mother of four 
children, as follows: Elbridge P., who was 
born November 3, 1821 ; Francis H., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; William Milo, who was 
born March 3, 1834: and Sophia E. , who was 



born April 22, 1842. Mrs. Soiihia Atlams 
Holden died February 22, 1868. 

Francis H. Holden was the second-born son 
of his parents. He acquired in his youth a 
common-school education, and for some time 
in early manhood he followed the sea, engaged 
in the coasting trade. He was also emplo)'etl 
in the factories of Massachusetts, and worked 
at the carpenter's tratle with his father, always 
being able to earn a good living at whatever 
he undertook, and giving [)eifect satisfaction 
to his employers. He accompanied his par- 
ents to Weld, and, buying a farm of eighty 
acres in that town, occupied himself with its 
management for five years, at the exjjiration 
of which time he sold the property, and, re- 
moving to Temple, continued to till the soil 
there for the same length of time. He then 
migrated to Kossuth County, Iowa, where he 
bought one hundred and si.xty acres of land, 
and carried on general farming with good re- 
sults until the present vear, 1896, when he 
returned Ivist. Shortly after the arrival of 
the family in Maine, Mrs. Holden purchased 
the Ahnon Dyer farm of two hundred and 
eighty-five acres, which is one of the best lo- 
cated and most elesirable estates in the town of 
Farmington, and here they are already en- 
gaged in conducting various branches of farm- 
ing industry with their accustomed energy and 
success. 

Mr. HoUien and Rebecca Ivxdes, daughter 
of Joseph and Hannah (Staples) Fades, were 
married on November 15, 1854. Her father 
was born in Stoddard, N.H., -September 10, 
1783, and her mother was born in Durham, 
N. H., March 2i<, 1786. Joseph Fades was 
one of the early setters and progressive farmers 
of Temple. He and his wife reared a family 
of seven children, as follows: Hannah B., who 
was born June 27, 1813; Joseph J., who was 
born June 23, 181 5; Gideon, who was born 
October 22, 1818, and died August 31, 1819; 
Elizabeth, who was born August 22, 1820; 
Mary, who was born November 26, 1822; 
Catherine, who was born February i, 1S25: 
and Rebecca, now Mrs. Holden, who was born 
August 28, 1826. Mr. and Mrs. Holden have 
four children, namely: Charles H., who was 
born January 28, 1856, and Matilda F. , who 
was born A]iril 9, 1858, both of whom are 



7° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



living at home; Josepli E., wlio was born De- 
cember 30, 1861, and also resides witli his 
parents; and Elizabeth S., who was born Oc- 
tober 21, 1865, and is now the wife of Frank 
Rizner, a prosperous agriculturist of Farm- 
ington. 

In politics Mr. Holden is a Republican, and 
in his religious views favors the Free Will 
Baptist church. Mrs. Holden is a Congrega- 
tionalist. 



-AMES L. CHASE, of Paris, a good 
representative of the younger genera- 
tion of agriculturists in the county, 
was born in Portland, this State, June 
II, 1861, son of William and Ellen (Eaton) 
Chase. Timothy Chase, his paternal grand- 
father, who was a native of Falmouth, Me., 
became a pioneer settler of Oxford County. 
He came here from Yarmouth, and, after 
working at the mason's trade for several years, 
returned to Portland. Thirty years after, he 
again came to Paris, where he subsequently 
died at the age of seventy-five. His first 
wife, Eucy (Porter) Chase, who was born in 
Falmouth, died in Portland, at the age of fifty 
years. His second marriage was contracted 
with Eucy Chase Doble. He reared the fol- 
lowing children, all by his first wife: Sewall, 
Mary Ann, Susan N., Hannah, lulward, Will- 
iam, Anna P., and Granville N. Susan N. 
and Edward are living, the latter a resident 
of Portland. 

William Cliasc was born in Paris, Novem- 
ber I, 1820. He was reared and educated in 
Portland, and was afterward one of its most 
substantial business men. He was an exten- 
sive importer of sugar and molasses for thirty 
years. In 1870, retiring from commercial 
life, he returned to Paris, and here purchased 
the old Hanibal estate. Here he lived until 
his death, March 12, 1876, caused by an acci- 
dent, in which he was run over by cars, and 
lost both his legs. He was held in high esti- 
mation as an honorable, straightforward busi- 
ness man and a loyal citizen. In politics he 
was a Republican. He was a member of the 
Congregational church, toward the support of 
which he was a generous contributor. His 
connection with fraternal organizations was 



limited to membership in the Ortier.of Odd 
Fellows. His wife, Ellen, a daughter of 
George and Elizabeth (Trowbridge) Eaton, 
was born July i, 1820, in Portland, where the 
marriage was performed November 2, 1843. 
They became the parents of ten children, two 
of whom are now living, namely: Edwin A., 
born in Portland, now a real estate dealer in 
Dedham, Mass. ; and James L., the subject of 
this sketch. 

James E. Chase was educated in the schools 
of Portland and Paris Hill. Since his early 
manhood he has devoted his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits. In addition to other prop- 
erty he has a fine farm of sixty acres, beauti- 
f Lilly located, and commanding an excellent 
view of the White Mountains. He carries on 
general farming, hay and apples being his 
principal crops, and is .somewhat engaged in 
dairying, keeping from ten to twelve head of 
full-blooded Jerseys. His house is a popular 
resort for boarders from the city during the 
summer season. Each year the applications 
to him for rooms far exceed the number of 
guests that he can accommodate. He enter- 
tains his hoarders in a most genial and gener- 
ous manner, making the house so pleasant for 
them that all are glad to come again. One 
family has spent fifteen ■ consecutive summe'rs 
with him. 

Mr. Chase was married January 17, 1883, 
to Anna P. Rawson, a daughter of Job H. and 
the late Mary E. (Garland) Rawson. Mr. 
Rawson, born in Paris, September 30, 1833, 
was for thirty years the proprietor of the stage 
line running to South Paris, and was for many 
years in a mercantile business. He is now 
living in the village of Paris, where he is ac- 
tively engaged as a veterinary surgeon, and in 
preparing the medicines, ointments, etc., 
used in connection with his business. Mrs. 
Rawson, who died in Paris, January 5, 1887, 
was born April 8, 1829, in Pyron, this county. 
They had five other children; namely, Samuel 
H., Fanny, Nellie H., Charles, and Hiram J. 
After the death of his first wife Mr. Rawson 
married Mrs. Martha Weeks, of Paris. In 
politics he is a Democrat and in religion a 
Universalist. Mr. and Mrs. Chase have three 
children — William H., born March 20, 1887; 
Eouisa E., born December 11, 1889; and 



BIOGRA P M 1 ( • A L R EV I FAV 



7' 



Susie T., Ixjrn August 7, 1890. Three otliers 
are deceased, namely: Mary K. ; and two that 
died in infancy. Mr. Chase is an earnest 
supporter of the Republican party. Both he 
and his wife are liberal in their religious 
beliefs. 



■OllX Y. WOOD, a wealthy farmer and 
fruit grower in the town of Buckfield, 
was born August 16, 1842, in Hart- 
ford, this county, son of Charles and 
Sarah (Thurlow) Wood, respectively natives 
of Gorham and Hartford. His grandfather, 
Charles Wood, Sr., was one of the early set- 
tlers of Gorham, whence he afterward re- 
moved to Hartford, dying in the latter place 
at a good age. Four of Grandfather Wood's 
children grew to maturity, but all have now 
passed away. Charles Wood, Jr., the young- 
est son, was a good, jjractical farmer, and 
spent the active years of his life in Hartford. 
He died at the home of his son in Ruckficld, 
aged eighty-six years; and his wife died aged 
about fifty years. They were members of the 
Free Will Baptist church at Federal Corners. 
In politics he was first a Whig and later a 
Republican. They had a family of seven 
children, four sons and three daughters. The 
daughters and one son are living, namely: 
Mary, the widow of Nathan Sampson, and 
now a resident of Aroostook County; Ruth T., 
who married William Woodbury, and resides 
in Turner, Me. ; Amanda M., the widow of 
John S. Drake, of Auburn, Me.; and John Y., 
the subject of this sketch. The deceased chil- 
dren were: Albion, Charles V., and George 
H. George H. served as a soldier in the 
Civil War, and was accidentally killed while 
on his way home. 

John Y. Wood, the youngest child, grew to 
manhood in Hartford, receiving his education 
in the common schools of that town. In 1864 
he enlisted in the Thirty-second Maine Regi- 
ment, Company E, under Captain Keyes, and 
was in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsyl- 
vania, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg. He 
served until the close of the war, receiving an 
honorable discharge in July, 1865. He then 
returned to his native town, and up to 1879 
was engaged in carrying on the old homestead 



farm. On lea\-ing there, he moved to his 
present farm in Buckfield, containing two hun- 
dred and sixty-two acres, where he is engaged 
in general farming, fruit growing, and dairy- 
ing. He has about ten acres planted with 
fruit, inchuling apples, plums, and cherries; 
and in his dairy he keeps from thirty to thirty- 
five head of full-blooded and grade Jerseys. 
The rich meadow lands, well filled barns and 
storehouses, together with the neatly kept 
buildings and surroundings, all give evidence 
of intelligent management and unstinted 
labor. 

In October, 1865, Mr. Wocjil married AI- 
mira S. Young, who was born in Hartford, 
daughter of Joseph Young. Three children 
were born to them, as follows: George V., 
Herbert H., alid one who died in infancy. By 
his second marriage, contracted with Mary 
Phillips, there came four children — Edwin J., 
Forrest P., Mary li., and May. May died at 
the age of eight years. In his religious views 
Mr. Wood is liberal. He is a Republican in 
politics, and has membership in Nezinscott 
Lodge, No. 104, Independent Order of Odd 
F"ellows, of Buckfield; and in Turner Grange, 
of Turner, Me. 




|OSCOE F. STAPLES, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the .S. K. King Com- 
pany, Town Treasurer and Post- 
master of Oxford, was born in this 
town, January 19, 1859, son of John G. and 
Sophia (Woodsum) Staples. His father, who 
was born in Oxford in 18 18, during his active 
life was an energetic and industrious farmer. 
His mother, a native of Falmouth, Me., born 
in 1822, died at the age of fifty-three years. 
Of her nine children, Roscoe F., the subject 
of this sketch, is the only one living. 

Roscoe F. Staples acquired his education 
in the district schools and at the Oxford High 
School. Having completed his studies in 
1873, he entered the store of Silas E. King as 
an employee. For nearly twenty-five years 
he was in Mr. King's employ, rising to the 
post of confidential clerk, and gaining the 
confidence of his employer by his business 
ability and integrity. When the S. ¥.. King 
Company was formed in 189(1. he was ap- 



72 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pointed the Secretary and Treasurer of the 
corporation, Mr. King being made President 
and George L. Wilder \'ice-President. The 
S. E. King Company, which includes among 
its stockholders several wholesale merchants 
of Auburn and Portland, conducts a large 
general store. Mr. Staples"s long connection 
with the business enables him to fill his re- 
sponsible position with ability. The com- 
pany deals in merchandise of nearly every de- 
scription, having ample facilities for supply- 
ing promptly such articles as are not in their 
stock. The establishment is divided into de- 
jjartm-^nts, which include groceries, hardware, 
dry goods, farming implements, flour, grain, 
and feed. The purpose of the management is 
to supply every article necessary for domestic, 
agricultural, and mechanical use. 

On January 27, 1879, ^^^- Staples was 
united in marriage to Mattie L. Everett, who 
was born November 30, 1858, in Casco, Me., 
daughter of Henry R. and Sarah E. Everett. 
He has one son, P'verett C, who was born 
March 29, 1880. In public affairs Mr. 
Staples is very prominent. He was for one 
year a member of the Board of Selectmen. 
He is serving his fourth term as Town Clerk, 
his third year as Town Treasurer, and he has 
been Postmaster and Justice of the Peace for 
the past seven years. His political princi- 
ples are Republican. He is a niemi^er of the 
Masonic fraternity, being connected with the 
Blue Lodge at Mechanic h'alls. He has also 
affiliation with Golden Rule Lodge, No. 7^, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Lewis- 
ton ; Pennesseewassee Lodge, No. 18, Knights 
of Pythias, of Norway, Me. ; and Maple 
Lodge, No. 180, New England Order of Pro- 
tection, at Welchville. In their religious 
belief I\Ir. and Mrs. Stajiles are Baptists. 




ILLIAM I. SARGENT, a prosper- 
ous farmer of Madrid, Franklin 
County, Me., and a descendant of 
one of the pioneer settlers, was born in this 
town, June 6, 1839, son of Isaac and Hannah 
(Davenport) Sargent. Mr. Sargent is of Eng- 
lish descent. His grandfather, John Sargent, 
who was a native of New Hampshire, came to 
Maine when a young man, and lived upon the 



coast for some time before coming to Madrid, 
where he was one of the first to take up land. 
He cleared a farm, and resided here until his 
death, which took place when he was seventy- 
three years old. He reared a family of four 
children, none of whom are living. 

I.^aac Sargent was a son of John Sargent. 
He was born in Damariscotta, Me., and came 
to Madrid with his parents at the age of 
four years. Having grown to maturity, he 
followed agricultural pursuits during the ac- 
tive period of his life, and was well and favor- 
ably known as an able, industrious farmer, and 
a worthy, upright man. He lived to be 
seventy-four years old. In politics he was a 
Democrat, but never interested himself in 
public affairs, beyond casting his vote. His 
wife, who was before marriage Hannah Daven- 
port, became the mother of four children, all 
of whom are living in Madrid, namelv: Jo- 
seph D. ; John; William I., the subject of 
this sketch; and Sybil A. 

William I. Sargent was educated in Madrid, 
and at an early age began to assist in carrying 
on the home farm. Eventually succeeding to 
its ownership, he has given his attention to 
the cultivation of general farm produce, in- 
cluding wheat and herd's grass seed, and the 
raising of excellent cattle and sheep. His 
property, which consists of one humlred and 
forty-three acres, is reganled as one of the 
best located and most productive farms in 
Madrid. 

Mr. Sargent and his wife, Vesta Lufkin, of 
this town with whom he was united in mar- 
riage on March 2, 1S62, ha\e reared a family 
of nine children, as follows: George E. , born 
December 28, 1863, who is married and lives 
in Madrid; Herman O. , also of Madrid, who 
on November 29, 1894, married Ora B. Will- 
iams; Charles A., who married Grace V.. 
Davis on January 16, 1895, and resides in 
Fitchburg, Mass. ; Samuel J., who on Novem- 
ber 13, 1892, was united in marriage with 
Gertrude E. Monroe; Ada, wife of S. Gross, 
of Jay, Me. ; and Mary E. , William I., Anna 
B. , and Nettie A., all living at the parental 
home. In politics Mr. Sargent is a Demo- 
crat; and he has rendered able service to the 
town as Highw^ay Surveyor. The family at- 
tend the P"ree Will Baptist church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



73 



George K. Sargent, oldest son of William 
I. Sargent, was born in Madrid, December 
28, 1863. He attended school in Madrid, 
Phillips, and Rangeley, and, since completing 
his studies, has given his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits at the homestead. On Sep- 
tember 19, 1887, he was married to Dora B. 
Welts, of Madrid, who has become the mother 
of two children, namely: Carl E., aged nine; 
and Harold E. , aged five years. In politics 
he votes with the Democratic party. He has 
served upon the School Board four years and 
uijon the Board of Health for three terms. He 
is an active and progressive farmer and one of 
the leading young men of Aladrid. 




A M U E L A. B U M P U S, an es- 
teemed resident and farmer of the 
town of Paris, was born in this 
]ilace. May 2, 1828, a son of Na- 
thaniel and Elizabeth (Warren) Bumpus. His 
paternal grandfather, Morris Bumpus, was 
iDorn and reared to man's estate in Taunton, 
Mass. After the close of the Revolution, in 
which Morris Bumpus was an active partici- 
pant, he settled in the town of Hebron, this 
county, becoming thereby one of its earliest 
pioneers. The district was then in its origi- 
nal wildness. Game of all kinds was abund- 
ant, and the Indians far outnumbered the 
white settlers. The nearest market and mill 
were thirty miles distant. In going to the 
latter, the round trip was made on foot by a 
trail marked by blazed trees; and the grist 
was carried on the back. Grandfather Bumpus 
cleared a good farm from the wilderness, and 
lived here until his death, at the age of 
eighty-five years. His wife, Huldah, attained 
the same venerable age. They had nine chil- 
dren, seven of whom reached maturity; 
namely — Morris, Nathaniel, Samuel, Jesse, 
Daniel, Martha, and Eliza. 

Nathaniel Bumpus was the second son born 
to his parents. He learned the blacksmith's 
trade when a young man, and afterward fol- 
lowed it in conjunction with farming. Re- 
moving from Hebron, the place of his nativ- 
ity, to Paris, he settled in the south-eastern 
part of the town, and purchased a farm, which 
he managed successfully for many years. 



Here both he and his wife tlied, in the eighty- 
sixth year of their respective ages. He was 
a Democrat in politics antl in religion a sin- 
cere Universalist. His wife, who was a na- 
tive of Buckfield, Me., bore him nine chil- 
dren, of whom si.\ are dead; namely, Morris, 
A.xel, lithel W., N. Grecnleaf, John, and 
Jane. The survivors are: Phcebe, the widow 
of Orra Hall, of South Paris; Huldah, the 
wife of Erastus Cummings, of West Paris; 
and Samuel A., the subject of this sketch. 

Samuel A. Bumpus was educated in the 
common schools of Paris and at the Hebron 
Academy. At the age <>f twenty years he 
went to Massachusetts, where he spent the 
succeeding five years in a woollen-mill. 
During the ne.xt si.x years he was engaged in 
the same occupation at South Paris. In all 
he was employed eleven years in the mills, 
having served for eight years of the time in 
the capacity of foreman. By eccmomical man- 
agement he saved much of his earnings, and 
in 1859 he bought the farm where he now 
resides. His first purchase of one hundred 
and forty acres of land has been increased to 
two hiuidred acres, and has been much en- 
hanced in value by improvements. He pays 
especial attention to fruit growing, his vines 
and orchards yielding a large supply of fruits 
that grow in this northern climate. His 
taste for this branch of industry may have 
been inherited from his grandfather, who 
planted on his wild land in Hebron the first 
orchard seen in that town. Mr, Iknnpus is 
a member of the Paris Lodge, No. 44, Patrons 
of Husbandry. In politics he is not a party 
man, but votes for the best men and measures. 
Both he and his wife are Universalists. 

Mr. Bumpus was married November 16, 
1854, to Julia A. Harriman, who was born 
January iS, 1834, in Litchfield, Me Her 
father, Levi Harriman, after spending his 
entire life in Litchfield on the farm where he 
was born, died January 21, 1855, aged sixty- 
one years. He was one of the most respected 
farmers of the place and an active member of 
the Whig party. His wife, in maidenhood 
Mary Hale, who was born in Richmond, Saga- 
dahoc County, in 1S07, and died June 16, 
1882, had eight children, three of whom are 
now living. These are: Julia A., now Mrs. 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Bunipus; Mrs. Luclla AI. Googin, of Litch- 
field; and George VV. Harriman, of Brighton, 
Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Bumpus have three chil- 
th"L-n, namely: Ella E., born August 21, 1S56, 
who is now the widow of Edgar A. Tapley, 
and with her two children — Herbert W. and 
Edgar A. — lives at Quincy, Mass. ; George 
F., born F"ebruary 11, 1858, who was married 
December 29, 1885, to Georgia .Stewart, and 
now lives in Brighton, Mass. ; and Carrie L., 
born March 25, 1867, who lives with her 
parents. 



/^TeORGE BERRY, who has spent his 
\ '*) I long and useful life of nearly four- 
score years in the town of Paris, has 
been actively identified with the agricultural 
interests of 0.\ford County, and has materially 
assisted in maintaining its reputation as a 
superior farming region. He was born May 
25, 18 1 8, in the town where he now resides, 
son of William and Deborah (Drake) Berry. 

William Berry was born April 16, 1783, 
and, when a young man, settled in Paris, Me., 
coming here when the country was new, find- 
ing his way by means of marked trees. With 
the energy and vigor of the true pioneer he 
felled the trees from a portion of the timbered 
land that he bought, uprooted the sod, and 
was thereafter successfully employed in till- 
ing the soil, living here .until his death, 
March i, 1848. Deborah Drake was born 
January 30, 1786, and died in Paris, Decem- 
ber 6, 1857. Both she and her husband were 
Baptists in religion; and in politics he was 
at first a Democrat, but in his later years he 
affiliated with the Republicans. They had 
the following children : Scillman, Harvey, 
Mary, George, Sarah, William, Olive, Elveci, 
and Zeri. Mary, George, and Zeri are the 
only ones now living. 

George ]5erry, here numbered as the fourth 
child of his parents, was reared and educated 
in Paris, obtaining in his early years a fair, 
common-school education and a practical 
knowledge of agriculture. He began earning 
his own living when but a youth, for several 
years working for the neighboring farmers, 
who at first paid him for his services twelve 
ilollars per month. By prudence and economy 



he was enableil to save a portion of his wages 
each season, in the course of time having a 
sufficient sum to warrant him in buying a 
farm, on which he was engaged in his chosen 
occupation for many years. In 1874 he sold 
that property, and purchased his father's 
homestead. He now owns about one hundred 
acres of choice land, on which he has made 
the more valuable of the improvements. A 
self-made man, having steadily climbed the 
hill of success by his own industrious efforts, 
Mr. Berry is now numbered among the well- 
to-do farmers of this vicinity, owning other 
i-eal estate besides his well-appointed farm. 

Mr. Berry has been twice married. His 
first wife, whose maiden name was Melissa 
Buck, died in 1847, having borne him two 
children, namely: Cynthia, wife of Addison 
Abbott, of North Paris; and a child that died 
in infancy. On January 7, 1850, Mr. Berry 
married Mary Hannah Marshall, who was 
born in this town, April 9, 1831. Her father, 
Nathan Marshall, was a son of David Mar- 
shall, who emigrated from Scotland to 
America in Colonial days. David Marshall 
married Mary Mason, and settled first on land 
in Bethel, Me., but was compelled to leave 
that place on account of trouble with the 
Indians. His wife was the first white woman 
to spend a night in the town of Paris. Re- 
moving to Hebron, he became identified with 
the leading business interests of the town, 
building saw-mills, a grist and shingle mill, 
and a carding machine. He served in the 
Revolutionary War, and was at the battle of 
Bunker Hill. He assisted in building the 
Baptist meeting-house of Hebron, he and his 
wife being among the original members of the 
church. Each lived to the age of fourscore 
years. They had twelve children, nine of 
whom grew to maturity; namely, David, Wal- 
ter, Miriam, Lucy, John, Nathan, Asahel, 
Aaron, and Moses. 

Nathan Marshall, the fourth son as here 
mentioned, Mrs. Berry's father, was born in 
Hebron, January 16, 1795. In his early man- 
hood he was interested in milling with his 
father. In 181 8 he came to Paris, and, pur- 
chasing the farm now owned and occupied by 
his son, Samuel D. Marshall, was thencefor- 
ward engaged as a farmer and blacksmith 




*8ll -^aiUh. 



^.)r 




JOHN A. ROBERTS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



77 



until his ilcatii, at the age of sixty-eight years. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Zilpha 
Dunham, lived to the age of seventy-six 
years. Mr. Marsiiall was a stanch abolition- 
ist, and he was a Deacon of the Free Will 
Baptist church; while his wife was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. They 
had five children, two of whom are living — 
Samuel D. and Mrs. Berry. The others are: 
Nathan I.., Eleazer D., and Hiram D. 

Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Berry ten 
ciiildren have been born, as follows: Nathan 
L., who is deceased; Eleazer, also deceased; 
George W. ; Frederick L. ; Frank E. ; Edwin 
R.; Ella Z. ; Hiram M. ; Jennie E., who 
died in i8S6, aged eighteen years; and Clara. 
In politics Mr. Berry has always been identi- 
fied with the Republican party since its forma- 
tion. Both he and his wife are active mem- 
bers of the Free Will Baptist church. Mr. 
Berry is not connected with any of the social 
organizations of this locality, but Mrs. Berry 
is a member of the West Paris Grange. 




rrs^l"ON. JOHN A. ROBERTS, of Nor- 
way, Me., State Senator, recently 
elected, is a gentleman of liberal 
education, a lawyer by profession, 
also a practical farmer, and has had much ex- 
]5erience in the conduct of local public affairs 
and in the leadership of social organizations. 
He was born in Gardiner, Me., on September 
lO, 1S52, son of John M. and Mary E. 
(Potter) Roberts. His paternal grandfather 
was Simon Roberts, who settled in Water- 
boro. Me. He was a successful farmer; and 
he also followed the trade of carpenter and 
joiner, accumulating quite a large property. 
He lived to be seventy-three years of age, but 
his wife died at the age of sixty-nine. Their 
children were: May, Esther, John M., Syl- 
vester, Abigail, lilmira, and Betsy. 

John M. Roberts, the father, afore-men- 
tioned, was a native of Waterboro, born on 
June 25, 1828. For some time in his youth 
and early manhood he worked in a saw-mill, 
eventually running a mill until his marriage, 
when he bought a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Andover, Me. He built a new 
house, remodellina; the barn: and he and his 



worthy helpmeet are tliere living at this day 
in the enjoyment of good health. They have 
had four children — one who died an infant; 
John A.; Arthur M.; and Augustus F., de- 
ceased. Mr. John M. RoJDerts is a man of 
prominence in the Republican party antl in 
the Congregational church. 

At the age of eighteen, after being gradu- 
ated from the high school, John A. Roberts, 
the special subject of the present sketch, en- 
tered the Oxford Normal Institute at South 
Paris, Me., and fitted for college, matriculat- 
ing at Bowiloin College in 1873. He was 
graduated in 1877. During his college 
course and for several terms thereafter Mr. 
Roberts taught school, subsequently reatling 
law with M. T. Ludden, of Lewiston. Being 
admitted to "the bar of Oxford County in the 
fall of 1878, he began practice in Mechanic 
Falls; but a year later, his health having 
failed, he was obliged to seek life in the open 
air. In 1880 Mr. Roberts bought the Henry 
Pike place on the west side of Norway Lake. 
Here he still lives and manages the farm, 
though since 1890 he has been employed as 
book-keeper in the oiifice of C. B. Cummings 
& Sons. The estate is beautiful for situation, 
and the buildings have been remodelled and 
improved until it is a model country home. 

Politically a Republican, Mr. Roberts has 
shown marked ability in the management of 
town affairs, officiating as attorney for two 
years, as President of the public library, and 
as superintendent of schools. In 1893 and 
1894 he was a Representative to the State 
legislature, and in the autumn of 1896 was 
elected .State Senator, a merited honor, as he 
is untloubtedly well qualified for a seat in the 
upper house. Fraternally, he is promi- 
nently connected with the order of Patrons of 
Husbandry, having been Master of Norway 
Grange for six years, being now Master also 
of the county grange, and Overseer of the 
State grange, elected in December, 1893, and 
re-elected in 1895. In 1893 he was elected 
President of the Oxford County Agricultural 
Society, and in 1895 he was re-elected to this 
important post. 

On August 24, 1 88 1, Mr. Roberts was 
united in marriage with Miss Carrie Pike, a 
daughter of Henry and Sarah E. (P^orbes) 



78 



. BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Pike and a member cif one of the leading 
families in the town. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts 
have one child, Thaddeus B., who was born on 
November 20, 1884, and is now a promising 
lad of twelve vears. 



Me. 



-O.SEPH W. MINI'S, of West Farm- 
ington, the proprietor and manager of 
one iif the largest department stores in 
Franklin County, was bom in Hartford, 
March 6, 1850. He is a son of Hiram 
H. and Fanny (Woodsome) Hines, a grandson 
of Hollingsworth and Ruth (Hall) Hines, and 
a great-grandson of Richard and Abigail (Jen- 
kins) Hines. The children of his great-grand- 
parents were — Hollingsworth, John, Thad- 
deus, Polly, Abigail, Chitman, Prudy, and 
Richard. Hollingsworth Hines was born in 
Buckfield, ^le. , August 12, 1781 ; and his wife 
was born in the same place, P^ebruary 17, 
1788. Their children were — Enoch, Barnum, 
Hiram H., I'hrebe, Calista, Mary, Joseph, 
Sarah, P'mily, Clara, Zilpha, and Plnoch H. 

Hiram H. Hines, a native of Bu.xton, Me., 
was a man of large stature. During his early 
manhood he taught school in winter, working 
at farming in the summer. Having saved a 
considerable part of his earnings, he in time 
was able to purchase a farm in Hartford. Soon 
after he started a store, which he managed for 
eighteen years. He then sold his Plartford 
property, purchased a large farm in Buckfield, 
and carried it on for fifteen years, conducting 
a store for a part of this period also. At the 
end of that time he retired from active work; 
and, selling his farm, he purchased a home in 
Lewiston, Me., where he quietly jjassed his 
declining years, dying at the age of seventy- 
seven. He was an active Republican. While 
living in Hartford he was elected to the State 
legislature, and ser\-ed the town as Selectman 
and Treasurer. His wife met her death in 
1867, the result of falling down stairs, being- 
then sixty years old. Both were members of 
the P'ree Will Bajitist church. They had 
eight children, of whom two died in infancy. 
The others were — Rufus, Nancy, Catherine, 
Washington B., Joseph W. , and Calista E. 

Joseph W. Hines received a good practical 
education in the schools of Buckfield, at He- 



bron Academy, and at Bates Commercial Col- 
lege at Auburn, Me. He was subsequently 
emjjloyed as clerk in his father's store until 
March, 1876, when he formed a partnership 
with A. ¥. Gammond ; and the)' purchased the 
stock in trade of 1{. Searles, and started in 
business in the building at West Farmington, 
of which a lease was taken. The venture 
proving very successful, they afterward bought 
the building. In 1882 he purchased his part- 
ner's interest; and, before the railroad was 
l)uilt through the northern part of the county, 
he had probably the most extensive produce 
trade in this section. When the railroad 
changed the conditions of traffic, he met the 
change with a new line of goods to suit. He 
now has a large and varied stock, comprising 
groceries, dry goods, crockery, ready-made 
clothing, boots and shoes, paints and oils — in 
fact, everything found in a general store. He 
occupies two buildings for the sale of his 
goods, besides large storehouses. His trade 
has increased greatly since he started, and he 
has been obliged to enlarge the original 
building. 

On December 25, 1877, Mr. Hines was 
united in marriage with Miss Emma H. 
Dodge, daughter of Andrew and Jessie Dodge, 
of West F"armington. Three children have 
blessed his union — Hiram P^arl, Ralph G., 
and Joseph W. In politics Mr. Hines is a 
Rejiublican. He is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, and belongs to Maine Lodge, P"ranklin 
Chapter, the council, and P'armington Com- 
mandery. On religious subjects he holds lib- 
era! views. He has a handsome residence on 
Water Street, which was formerl)- known as the 
Ira Russell place. The house has been re- 
modelled since it came into his possession. 




(^7X ^'^^^^^ CASWELL, a prosperous gen- 
eral farmer of Waterford, now serving 
as Third Selectman, is a native of 
Winthrop, Me., born July 14, 1828. 
Richard Caswell, his father, was born in 
Mansfield, Mass., April 27, 1792, son of 
Bowden Caswell, who was engaged in farm- 
ing in Mansfield until his latter days, which 
were spent with his son in Winthrop, Me. 
Richard carried on farming in Winthro|) up 



BIOGRAPHKWI, RF.VIEW 



79 



t(j 1840, at which time he rcmiivcd to Mercer, 
Me., and was there engaged in farming until 
his death on July 20, 1858. Ho married 
Miss Sarah Hodges, who, born in Norton, 
Mass., March i, 1794, died August 3, 1865. 
They were the parents of seven children, 
namely: George, born April 25, 1820, who 
died June 11, 1889; Almon, born April 28, 
1S22, who died November 12, 1892; Har- 
riett, born April 9, 1S24, now the wife of 
Stephen Messer, of Madison, Me., who died 
August 5, 1896; Charlotte, born April 17, 
1826, who died February 13, 1847; Albert, 
the subject of this sketch; Edward, born July 
9, 1 83 1, living in Lynn, Mass., who married 
Miss Nancy L. Sanford, now deceased; Susan 
H., born March 23, 1835, who died Septem- 
ber 16, 1868. 

Albert Caswell receivetl his education in 
the common schools of Mercer, Me. At the 
age of twenty-one he went to Belgrade, Ken- 
nebec County, to accept the position of station 
agent on the Maine Central Railroad, which 
he afterward held for nineteen years, giving 
the utmost satisfaction. In 1872 he went to 
Lewiston, Me., where he remained for four 
years, conducting a shoe business. From 
Lewiston in 1876 he came to VVaterford, and 
settled on his present farm in the southern 
part of the town. He now owns about sev- 
enty-five acres of land, which he devotes to 
general farming and dairying. 

On July 10, 1854, while in Belgrade, Mr. 
Caswell was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary F. Swan, of Conway, N.H., where her 
birth occurred May 8, 1831. She died March 
18, 1864, leaving five children, two sons and 
three daughters. These were: Ellen IVL, 
born October 6, 1855, who is now the wife of 
B. F. Yeaton, of Stark, Me. ; Charles Dud- 
ley, born March 8, 1857, who married Miss 
Fannie Dyer, and is now living in Holbrook, 
Mass. ; Alice Josephine, born February 27, 
1859, who died February 6, 1883; Albert 
Danforth, born June 10, i860, who married 
Miss Mary E. Varney, and is now living in 
Lebanon, Me. ; and Mary Swan, born January 
8, 1862, who married George Yeaton, and 
lives in Ik'lgrade, Me. On November 6, 
1864, Mr. Caswell was married a second time 
to Miss Mary P. Swan, of Waterford, who was 



born November 3, 1836, daughter of Thomas 
and Eliza (Sanderson) Swan. Her father was 
born in Waterford September 11, 1810, and 
followed farming here throughout the active 
years of his life. He also engaged in the 
stone cutter's trade, and superintended the 
building of the roads in Oxford County. He 
ilied April 15, 1896, aged eighty-five years. 
Mrs. Swan, who was born in Sweden, Me., 
and became a resident of Waterford while 
young, died January 6, 1878. Mrs. Caswell's 
children are: Byron Sanderson and Fannie 
Eliza. The son, born Sejitember 24, 1865, 
married Miss Sadie Low, of New Bedfiud, 
Mass., and is now living in Boston, Mass. He 
is an electrician of that city. l<"annie Eliza, 
born October 7, 1866, conducts a dressmaking 
shop in Harrison village, and makes her home 
with her parents. 

The citizens of VVaterford have shown their 
appreciation of Mr. Caswell's sterling charac- 
ter and ability by electing him to various po- 
sitions of trust and responsibility. He now 
holds the office of Third .Selectman, to which 
he was elected in March, 1896. Li 1867 and 
1868 he represented Belgrade in the .State 
legislature. His political ]")rinciples are 
Democratic. He is a member of Relief 
Lodge, No. 108, A. F. & A. M., in Belgrade; 
and of Oakland Chapter, Royal y\rch Masons, 
of Oakland, Me. 




TEl'HEN D. flUTCHINSON, a 
venerable antl valued resitleiit of 
■' ' Paris, bearing with ease antl dig- 
nity his burden of fourscore and 
four years, has the distinction of being tlie 
oldest man actively engageil in business in 
Oxford County. He was born -September 25, 
181 2, in the neighboring town of Hebron, 
son of Stephen and Asenath (Gilbert) Hutch- 
inson, both natives of the State, born res|iec- 
tively in Gorham and Leeds. His grand- 
father, a native of Massachusetts, served in 
the French and Indian War, and afterward 
went to Nova Scotia, where he lived for a 
time. Returning to the States, Grandfather 
Hutchinson settled in Gorham, Cumberland 
County, purchasing a tract of timber land, 
from which he cleared a homestead. lie 



8o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



labored with the courage and perseverance 
characteristic of the sturdy pioneer, and also 
served as local preacher of the Free Will 
Baptist denomination. His children were: 
Josepli, Lydia, Samuel, Stephen, Betsey, 
Daniel, Henry, John, and Rebecca. 

Stephen Hutchinson was a farmer through- 
out his life. When a young man he came 
from Gorham to this county, first locating in 
Hebron and afterward in Buckfield, where 
he died at the age of seventy years. He was 
an unswerving Democrat in politics. At first 
his religious faith was that of the Free Will 
Baptists, of whose church at Hebron he was 
a member; but later he became a Universal- 
ist, and belonged to that denomination at the 
time of his death. He was Selectman for 
many years, and also filled less important 
oflices.' His first wife, Asenath (Gilbert) 
Hutchinson, died at the age of forty-six 
years, leaving six children — Stephen D., 
Chandler, Horace, Mark, Albion P., and Bet- 
sey. Betsey died in infancy. Of the num- 
ber, Stephen D. and Albion P. are the only 
survivors. After the death of his first wife 
the father married Jeanette Alden, daughter 
of Benjamin Alden, a Quaker. By this mar- 
riage there were four children — Jeanette, 
Angusta, Vesta, and Aseneth. Of these the 
eldest and youngest are living. 

Stephen D. Hutchinson grew to man's estate 
in Buckfield, obtaining his education in the 
district school, and at home evenings by the 
light of pitch pine knots. He first worked at 
harvesting for one William Loring, receiving 
a third of a dollar per day for his labor. In 
1835 Mr. Hutchinson entered into a partner- 
ship with H. H. Hutchinson, Jr., with whom 
he conducted a mercantile business in Buck- 
field for five years. In 1840 he leased a farm 
in the same town, and for a few years carried 
on general farming. At the same time he 
added to his income by taking boarders in 
the summer season and teaching school dur- 
ing the winter terms. In 1845, having been 
elected Registrar of Deeds of O.xford County, 
he removed to Paris, the county seat, and for 
eleven years retained that ofifice. He next 
embarked in mercantile business at Paris Hill 
with Frank Bates, with whom he was asso- 
ciated two years. In 1S60 he established his 



present store, which he has since successfully 
conducted, building up a good local trade. 
Mr. Hutchinson was married in June, 1835, 
to Mary Atkinson, who, born in Alinot, Me., 
September 17, 1808, died at Paris Hill, July 
18, 1874. She bore him five children — Mary 
Annette, John R., Winfield S., George W., 
and Kate W. John R., who was born April 
II, 1840, died March 2, 1896. Mr. Hutchin- 
son has witnessed many changes throughout 
this locality, and has contributed his full 
share as a good citizen toward the development 
of his native county. While living at Buck- 
field he served as Town Clerk and as a member 
of the School Committee. He is a firm ad- 
herent of the Democratic party. 



C\RLFS A. .Axn GEORGE W. 
A'HIBLEY are well-known and ex- 
ceedingly prosperous business men 
of East Wilton, Franklin County, 
Me., the former of the mercantile firm of 
Whibley & Brown, and the latter an exten- 
sive manufacturer of tinware ami a dealer in 
stoves, hardware, paints, and oils. These 
successful merchants are «ons of the late 
George and Julia A. (Morrison) Whibley. 

George Whibley, their father, who was for 
some years engaged in trade here, was born in 
London, England, August 2, i8ig. When a 
young man he emigrated to the United States 
with the view of obtaining a livelihood in a 
country where the opportunities for acquiring 
wealth were more equally distributed than in 
the Old World. After his arrival on these 
shores he served an apprenticeship at the car- 
penter's trade, upon the completion of which 
he began work as a journeyman in Skowhegan, 
Somerset County, Me. Having no friends or 
relatives in this country, he was obliged to 
make his way wholly through his own ability 
and perseverance, which he eventually suc- 
ceeded in accomplishing by a strict adherence 
to principles of honesty and the faithful dis- 
charge of his duties as a workman; and when 
he had thoroughly mastered the trade in every 
detail he became ambitious to advance. Es- 
tablishing himself in Skowhegan as a con- 
tractor and builder, he soon had a large and 
profitable business under his control; and dur- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



8i 



ing his residence in tliat tnwn he erected man}' 
of the principal buildings standing there 
to-day. As he advanced in years he grew stout 
of figure, which prevented him from climbing, 
as required in the work of construction ; and, 
being obliged upon this account to relinquish 
the pursuit of his calling, he settled in Madi- 
son, where he was engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness until i860. In that year, removing to 
East Wilton, he bought of John Perley the 
building now owned and occiqiied as a place of 
business by his son, Charles A. ; and ]nitting 
in a full stock of goods he conducted iluring 
his remaining days the largest general store in 
this section. His death took place July 21, 
1879. His wife, Julia A. Morrison, who was 
born December i, 181 5, was a daughter of 
Mary and John Morrison, of Farmington. She 
became the mother of four children, as follows: 
Elizabeth, who was born November iS, 1846, 
and died September 13, 1866; George \V. and 
Charles A., who are the subjects of this 
sketch ; and Amerilla, who was born May 8, 
1857, and died September 30 of the same year. 
Mrs. Julia A. Morrison Whibley died Novem- 
ber 13, 1895, at the age of eighty years. 

Charles A. Whibley was born in Skowhe- 
gan, Me., November 3, 1852. After finishing 
his education he began working as a clerk in 
the store, remaining in chat capacity until his 
father's death, when he purchased the business, 
which he carried on alone for about si.xteen 
years. In 1.895 he formed a ])artnership with 
E. B. Brown, his present business associate. 
The firm of Whibley & Brown carry the 
largest stock of general merchandise, including 
groceries, grain, feed, crockery, and other 
wares, to be found in this section. 

Charles A. Whibley wedded Rose E. Brown, 
daughter of Almon H. and Sylvia (Gould) 
Brown. By his honorable business methods 
Mr. C. A. Whibley has gained the confidence 
of his numerous patrons, and has attained 
merited success. Besides his mercantile in- 
terests he owns one-half of the late Fred Gor- 
don farm. He is a member of Williamson 
Lodge, Independent Oi'der of Odd Fellows, is 
independent in politics and liberal in his. relig- 
ious views. 

George W. Whibley, the elder of the two 
brothers, was born in East Madison, Me., De- 



cember j8, 1X48. He accpiired betimes a 
good practical education, and while still in his 
youth began to learn the carpenter's trade. 
Not liking that craft, howe\er, he relinquished 
it and learned the trade of a tinsmith; and 
after working as a journeyman for ten years he 
bought the .Macomber place in this town, 
where he fittetl up a small shop. Manufactui- 
ing tinware during the winter, he travelled 
through the countr\' with a jiedler's team, 
selling" it in the summer season. Two years 
later be rented the luastman store, which he 
stocked with a full line of stoves, general hard- 
ware, paints, oils, and \'arious other articles of 
merchandise, in which he has a good trade. 
Aside from this he manufactures tin pails and 
pans, keejaing a team upon the road ; and he 
also is engaged in setting up furnaces and con- 
ducting a general plumbing and roofing busi- 
ness. 

George W. Whibley married Elzoda Ma- 
comber, daughter of David and Hannah G. 
(Allen) Macomber, highly reputable and well- 
to-do farming peo]:)le of this town. Two chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Whil>- 
ley, namely: Clai'cnce M., who died at the 
age of si.x montlis; and (ieorge M., whose 
birth occurred on (Jctober 13, 1881. 




|^y^:RSIAN V. EVERETT, of Hebron, 
' ' a veteran of the Civil War, now en- 
gaged in general farming antl fruit 
growing, was born in Hebron, July 
5, 1847, son of Hiram M. I':verett. Mr. 
I'Lverett is a descendant of John I'^verett, a 
Frenchman by birth, who accompanied Gen- 
eral Lafayette to America, and served during 
the Revolutionary War in the Continental 
army, losing an arm in the struggle. John 
Everett afterward settled among the pioneers 
of Norway, Me., where he died at an advanced 
age. His wife, who was probably the first 
school teacher in Norway, reared three chil- 
dren — John, Su.sannah, and Peter. Peter 
Everett, the grandfather of Persian V., was 
born in Norway, and was for many years a 
prosperous farmer of that town. His last days 
were passed in Poland, Me., where he died at 
the age of seventy-four years. He married 
Charlotte Parkhurst, who reached the age of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sixty-three years, and had eleven children, 
five of whom are living. 

Hiram Millett Everett was born in Norway, 
November 2, 1818. While still young he 
learned the cooper's traile, which he followed 
during the winter season until he was twenty- 
six years old, spending the summer season at 
farm labor. With his savings he then bought 
his father's property in Norway. Afterward 
he resided for short intervals in Poland, East 
Hebron, and Minot Corners. He learned the 
trade of a shoemaker in the last-named place, 
and subsequently worked at it in Hebron, 
where also, having bought a farm, he culti- 
vated it until his death in April, 1893. In 
politics he was a Republican, and he held for 
several years the offices of Constable and Col- 
lector. In religious faith he was a Baptist. 
Of his four children the only survivor is Per- 
sian \'., the subject of this sketch. The 
others were: Anna Delphina, Justin, and 
Anna Bethany. The mother is still living, 
and resides in Hebron. 

Persian \'. Everett passed his boyhood in 
Hebron. At the age of seventeen, while 
attending the academy, he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company A, Thirtieth Regiment, 
Maine Volunteers, with which he served dur- 
ing the last years of the Rebellion. After he 
was honorably discharged in 1865, he resumed 
his studies at the academy for a time, and 
then engaged as a general storekeeper in 
Hebron. At the end of three years he sold 
his business; and, after working in a shoe 
factory for six and a half years, he went to 
Auburn, Me., where he engaged in the same 
business. In 1879 he moved his family to his 
present farm. He spent about fourteen years 
in Auburn, after which he returned to Hebron, 
where he has since resided permanently. As 
a general farmer he has been quite prosperous. 
He now owns one hundred and fifty acres of 
fertile land, which he devotes to tiairying and 
fruit growing, while he makes a specialty of 
breeding fine horses. 

On February 19, 1868, Mr. Everett wedded 
Ella H. Haskell, of Paris, Me., daughter of 
Joel and Margaret D. Haskell. i\Irs. Everett 
lias had four children, as follows: Minnie, 
who married O. W. Fernald, resides in Ber- 
lin, N. H., and has one daughter, Marion P.; 



Ernest L., who died at the age of two years; 
Charles H. and Margaret L. , who both re- 
side with their parents. In politics Mr. 
Everett is a Republican. He is a comrade of 
Post No. 3, Grand Army of the Republic, of 
Mechanic Falls. Both he and Mrs. Everett 
attend the Baptist church, of which she is 
a member. 



■JiYOSKJ'H TREFETHEN, one of Wilton's 
able farmers and a well-known citizen, 
was born on Monhegan Island, Me., 
September 22, 1833, son of Henry and 
Ann (Baxter) Trefethen. The family is of 
French origin, and descends from early set- 
tlers upon the coast of Maine, who were mostly 
seafaring men and fishermen. 

Mr. Trefethen's father was reared a fisher- 
man, and in early manhood he engaged in fit- 
ting out vessels for the cod-fishing banks. He 
later became the owner of several vessels, and, 
erecting a fish-house on ]\Ionhegan Island, 
where he received, cured, and prepared the 
fish for market, conducted a very profitable 
business for many years. His death occurred 
at the age of eighty. He was three times mar- 
ried, and by his union with .Ann liaxter, his 
third wife, had three children, of whom the 
first-born, a daughter, died in infancy. The 
others were: Joseph, the subject of this 
sketch ; and Abraham Baxter. Mr. Tref- 
ethen's mother married for her second hus- 
band George Eegrow, and, removing to Wil- 
ton, died here at the age of about seventy 
years. 

Joseph Trefethen, the elder of her two sons, 
was reared and educated in Wilton. In young 
manhood he bought a farm of one hundred and 
thirty acres, which he improved; but after oc- 
cupying it for some time he exchanged it for 
a smaller piece of property located nearer the 
village. This farm he has also improved, 
increasing its productiveness, and making va- 
rious alterations in the buildings; and in con- 
nection with tilling the soil he has worked at 
the carpenter's trade to some extent. 

On March 12, 1854, Mr. Trefethen was 
united in marriage with Susan B. Webster, 
who was born in Wilton, June 29, 1831, 
daughter of Thomas E. and Lois (Scales) 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIKW 



83 



Webster. Mrs. Trefethen's father was a 
native of VVeare, N. H. He settled in Wilton 
when a young man and became one of the most 
energetic and progressive farmers of his day. 
The present Webster homestead, which is one 
of the best estates in town, was cleared and 
improved by him. He was a man of much 
political prominence and social worth. He 
died in 1.S70, aged sixty-three years ; and his 
wife died at the age of fifty-four years. .She 
was the mother of six children, namely: -Susan 
B. , who is now Mrs. Trefethen ; Annie M. ; 
Henry, who is a leading farmer of this town, 
and occupies the homestead; \'olina M. ; \'a- 
nander; and Octavia C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Trefethen have six children, 
as follows: Henry E., Professor of Languages 
at the Maine Wesleyan Seminary, Kent's Hill, 
who was born June 10, 1855, married Alice 
Porter, and has six children — Evangeline, 
Henry P., M. Louise, Webster, Ruth, and an 
infant; ImccI E., a resident of Wilton, who 
was born March 19, 1857, married Addie M. 
Bump, and has seven children — LaviniaA., 
Verner A., Harry J., Miriam E., Leon 15. , 
Lawrence W., and Irene E. ; PLlla S. , who was 
born November 7, 1858; Annie, who was 
born March 22, 1861, and is now the widow 
of C. L. Snow, who died in i8g6; William J., 
M.D., a graduate of the Baltimore Medical 
School, who was born October 20, iH6(\ mar- 
ried Sarah Smith, and is now a practising 
physician of New Portland, Me. ; and Mel- 
vina, who was born January 12, 1871, married 
Herbert J. I'.llsworth, and has two children — 
Vivian and Jennie. 

In politics Mr. Trefethen is a Republican, 
and in his religious views he is liberal. He 
is a member of Williamson Lodge, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd P\dlows, and of the en- 
campment. 




^HARLES T. MELLEN, who was a 
lifelong resident of the town of Paris, 
was born at Paris Hill, November 
20, 1820, son of Alanson and Mary 
(Bisco) Mellen. Alanson Mellen was born in 
Hopkinton, Mass. In his early manhood he 
removed to this town, where he was engaged 
in mercantile ])ursuits many years. He sub- 



sequently made his home on Paris Hill, where 
he died December 9, 1851. I*'or more than 
thirty consecutive years he was Registrar of 
Deeds, and he was Town Clerk for a long 
term of office. In religion he was very lib- 
eral, while in politics he was a stanch Demo- 
crat. His wife, Mary, who spent her life in 
this town, and died March 12, 1826, had six 
children, as follows: Leonard, born in 181:;, 
who died in 1843; Jonas B., born in 1814, 
who died in 1824: Eunice E. , born in 1816, 
who died in 1893; Mary M., born in 1818, who 
died in 1844; Charles T. , the subject of this 
brief sketch; and George L., born in 1823, 
who is the only one now living. 

Charles T. Mellen grew to man's estate in 
his native town, acquiring his education in 
the public schools. He worked with his 
father in the Registry of Deeds for several 
seasons, and was subsequently Postmaster at 
Paris for several years. In politics he was an 
active member of the Democratic party and 
in his religious views was liberal. 

Mr. Mellen was married June 7, 1855, to 
Lucretia Jackson, who was born in the village 
of Paris, September 29, 1S24, daughter of 
Joseph and Lucretia (Brett) Jackson. Her 
paternal grandfather, Lemuel Jackson, was the 
first person to settle and erect a house on Paris 
Hill. He cleared a good homestead, on which 
he and his wife, previously Miss Willis, spent 
their last days in the ]ieaceful occupations of 
farm life. Joseph Jackson, who was also a 
farmer by occupation, after his marriage 
bought the farm where his son's widow, Mrs. 
Hiram Jackson, now lives. Here he and his 
wife spent the rest of their lives, he dying at 
the age of fifty-five years, and she at the ven- 
erable age of eighty-six. He was liberal in 
his religious belief, while she was a member 
of the Baptist church. They had four chil- 
dren — Eliza, Hiram, Lucretia, and Isabelle. 
Lucretia, now Mrs. Mellen, is the only sur- 
vivor. Mr. and Mrs. Mellen have had two 
children — Charles J. and Mary I. Charles 
J., born p-ebruary 20, 1857, was engaged in 
teaching until his accidental death by drown- 
ing while skating, December 17, 1881. 
Marv L, born May 2, i860, has always lived 
at home. She was employed in the Registry 
of Deeds for thirteen years, but is now Post- 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



mistress at Paris, which ajipointment she re- 
ceived in November, 1S93. The father died 
February 21, 1893. A man of sterling, up- 
right character, he was highly esteemed 
throughout the district. Mrs. Mellen and her 
daughter attend the Universalist chtirch. 



4^ 9 ^■» 




^/T I'l''^^'-*-'^ S. BEAN. — Striking in- 
stances of individual enterprise set- 
ting in motion wide circles of in- 
dustrial life are found here and 
there in the State of Maine. The town of 
West liethel, Me., largely owes its present 
[irosperity to Mr. A. S. Bean, a self-made 
man, who has developed the lumber industry 
here to colossal proportions, established a 
large and prosperous general store, stimulated 
the building interest by erecting cottages for 
his employees, and increased the attractions of 
the place as a summer resort by buikling a 
tirst-class hotel, beautifulh- situated. Be- 
sides these local interests Mr. Bean is con- 
nected with financial enterprises in other parts 
of the State, and what he touches seems 
always to succeed. He was born in Bethel, 
January iS, 1846, and is a son of the late 
Daniel F. and Polly P. (White) Bean. 

The Ik'ans are one of the old established 
families of New England. Daniel F. Bean, 
who was a native of Bethel, spent his entire 
life in this town, attaining the advanced age 
of eighty-four years. He was a well-to-do 
farmer, and dealt largely in cattle. His wife, 
who was born in Gilead, this county, died at 
the age of seventy-five. • Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
F. Bean were members of the Congregational 
church. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, namely: Roy, who died at the age of 
fifty; Emily J., who was called to rest in her 
thirty-si.xth year; A. S., the subject of this 
sketch; P'annie E., wife of Thomas B. Mor- 
rill, of Charlestown, Mass. ; Susie E., wife of 
Fred W. Perkins, of Worcester, Mass. ; and 
Daniel F. 

A. S. Bean accjuired a common-school edu- 
cation in his native town. He displayed 
some ability as a financier in his youth, man- 
aging quite a business in eggs and poultry; 
and when he was twenty-one years old he en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits in West Bethel. 



After trying this a year he went to California, 
but six months' residence in that State de- 
cided him that he could do better at home. 
Returning, he jnu-chased the store in West 
Bethel which is now under his charge, and 
which under his able management has aggre- 
gate sales of over fifty thousand dollars a year. 
He owns twenty thousand acres of timber land 
in this vicinity, on which are seven mills, 
four run by steam, three by water. Of these 
five are birch-mills and manufacture spool 
stock, and two are saw-mills. He sells quan- 
tities of timber from his land for outside 
manufacture, cutting in one winter four mill- 
ion feet, two million of which he shipped to 
Scotland, and eight thousand cords of pulp 
wood for the Rumford Falls mills. He has 
lately shipped five million feet of spool stock 
to Scotland. He owns mills in different parts 
of this county, and has an interest in a bobbin- 
mill in Shelburne, N.H. Mr. Bean has a 
large number of men in his enii^lo}'; and the 
cottages which he has built, uniformly 
painted, make a very pretty village at West 
Bethel. About three miles away is a charm- 
ing little pond at the foot of Pine Mountain, 
and here Mr. Bean has made such improve- 
ments as have developed the place into a beau- 
tiful summer resort. He owns several large 
farms, including three hundred acres of grass 
land, from which he annually cuts hundreds 
of tons of hay; and he has the best farmer's 
barn in Oxford County. 

Mr. Bean was married November 14, 1871, 
to Miss Lucinda Mason, of Gilead, this 
county, daughter of Moses and Martha 
(Walker) Mason. It is a notable fact that 
the wife's influence has much to do with mak- 
ing or marring a man's career. Mrs. Bean is 
always alive to her husband's best interests, 
and her intelligent co-operation smooths the 
road to success. 

In politics Mr. Bean favors the Republican 
side. He has been Postmaster of West Bethel 
for twenty years, holding his office under both 
Republican and Democratic administrations. 
Though not a church member, he is in sym- 
pathy with religious enterprises, to which he 
liberally contributes. There has never been 
a church in West Bethel, the efforts, made 
]3rincipall_\' b\- some devoted Christian women, 



\ 



>- 




ALPHEUS S. BEAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to raise funds to build one having been unsuc- 
cessful; but the need of a house of worship 
will soon be met, for Mr. Bean is erecting a 
substantial edifice, which he intends to pre- 
sent when finished to the struggling little so- 
ciety. One of the wealthiest men in the 
county, he does not hoard the jiroperty which 
he has worked hard to accumulate, but contrib- 
utes freely toward all worthy enter[5rises; 
and his large-heartedness and fine social qual- 
ities have drawn to him manv friends. 




ILLIAM M. GREENE, who until 
1 892 had been an esteemed farmer 
of Norway township for more than 
twoscore years, was born February 11, i<Si9, 
in Portland, Me., son of Captain William M. 
and Hannah R. (Gould) Greene, both natives 
of Cumberland County. His father was for 
many years captain of a vessel, but he eventu- 
ally settled in Portland, where both he and 
his wife spent their closing years. 

Mr. Greene was bred and educated in Port- 
land, and was there employed for some years 
as a clerk in a grocery store. Inheriting his 
father's love for the sea, he subsequently 
became master of a vessel. He was engaged 
in seafaring for more than thirty years, during 
which he visited many parts of the globe. He 
was shipwrecked twice, the last time in De- 
cember, 1S48, when he lost "everything." 
Not discouraged by this misfortune, however, 
he continued in his calling until 1850, some 
two years after his marriage. Mr. Greene 
then came to Oxford County, locating in 
North Norway. Here he purchased land, 
erected a row of buildings, and was afterward 
engaged in tilling the soil and working at 
the carpenter's trade for five years. Moving 
in 1855 to the western part of the town, he 
bought a farm, on which he lived for twenty- 
two years, successfully engaged in agricult- 
ure. Selling out there, he bought the pres- 
ent home farm occupied by his widow and her 
son, and here lived until his death, which 
occurred July 21, 1892. This farm is located 
near the centre of the town, and contains 
forty-two acres of land, well suited for grazing 
and dairy purposes. Mr. Greene was a stanch 
adherent of the Republican ])arty. He was 



a member of the Congregational church at Nor- 
way Centre, to which his widow still belongs. 
On August 27, 1848, Mr. Greene was mar- 
ried to Miss Abiah L., born in Norway, Jan- 
uary 26, 1829, daughter of Edmund and 
Annie P. (Lovejoy) l-'rost. Her parents 
were esteemed farming peojjle of Norway, 
where they spent their last years. Her 
mother came here from Andover, Mass., 
where she was born and educated. Mr. 
Greene's children are: I'^rank 'P., born No- 
vember 14, 1849, who married Mary A. 
Parker, of Waterford, this county, and is now 
a carpenter in Norway; Herbert W., born 
June 15, 1855, who married Alfretta Keith, 
and is now engaged in the grocery business 
at Boston, Mass. ; lulmond V. C, born May 
22, 1859; and-I'LIfannah, born April 25, 1S68, 
now living at home, who is a trained nurse. 
Edmond F. C. Greene has had charge of the 
home property for some years, his father's 
health having been jjoor a long time before 
his demise. He carries on general farming, 
paying a good deal of attention to his dairy. 
He sells cream throughout the county, and 
likewise deals largely in stock. In politics 
he is a Republican, and has held several of 
the minor offices of the townshi]^. He is a 
member of the grange at Norway village, and 
is an active worker in the Second Congrega- 
tional Church. On the maternal side he is 
descended from a Revolutionary hero, his 
mother's grandfathei', Jacob Frost, who re- 
ceived a bullet wound in the hip at one of the 
battles in that famous struggle, and was after- 
ward pensioned. 



^OHN STE\'ENS, one of the worthy and 
respected residents of the tcnvn of 
Paris, where he has lived for nearly 
thirty years, was born January 22, 
1818, in China, Kennebec County, son of 
Daniel and Almira (Stevens) Stevens. His 
grandfather, Thomas Stevens, served three 
years in the Revolutionary army, participating 
in the battles at Brandywine, Monmouth, and 
other engagements. Thomas subsequently 
removed to this county, locating at Paris, 
where for the rest of his life he worked at 
the carpenter's trade and at farming. 



8<S 



ISIOCJRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



Daniel Stevens, a son of Thomas, was 
born in Worcester, Mass., where his father 
was then living. He came with his parents 
to Paris, where he resided in his early life. 
After receiving; a j^eneral education he studied 
me.liciuc, and in due time began the practice 
(if it. Shortly after he settled in China, Me., 
which was then in its infanc)', and was there 
engaged in his profession until his death, at 
the age of si.xty years, having been successful 
and popular as a physician. He was a public- 
sjiirited and patriotic citizen, and served in 
the War of 1812. A man of jirominence in 
his adopted town, he was a Selectman and 
Trustee of the Academy. He was an active 
member of the Baptist church, in which he 
frequently preached. His first wife, Almira, 
who was born in Paris, died in China, aged 
thirty-two years. She was a daughter of Cyp- 
rian Stevens, a pioneer physician of Paris, 
and one of its prominent early settlers. His 
second wife, whose maiden name was Sally 
Stimpson, lived to the age of forty-two years. 
Daniel Stevens became the father of seven 
children by his first marriage and of five 
more by his second. (3f the whole number 
two are living, namely: John, the subject of 
this sketch; and Thomas, a ranchman of 
California. Of the others, four reached ma- 
turity; namelv, -Stowell, Harriet, Mar\-, and 
Jane. 

John Stevens remained under the jiarental 
roof-tree until nineteen years of age. He then 
went to Old Town, Penobscot County, where 
he obtained employment at cutting logs in 
winter and working in a saw-mill when not 
otherwise engaged, his compensation being 
ten dollars a month. He subsequently worked 
for other people for twenty-five years before 
settling in life for himself. Being prudent 
and economical, he accumulated some money, 
with which in 1863 he bought fifty acres of 
land in China, where he carried on mi.xed 
husbandry four years. Coming then to Paris, 
he purchased his present farm, containing sev- 
enty-five acres of land. Here he has made 
many of the improvements, and has since 
carried on general farming and fruit growing 
with marked success, of recent years hiring 
most of the manual work done. 

Mr. Stevens was married in November, 



1866, to Mrs. Sarah (Buck) Merrill, who was 
born in Norway, this county, December 18, 
1824. She is a daughter of Jared M. and 
Sally (Stevens) Buck. By a [srevious mar- 
riage, contracted with Charles Merrill, who 
died, she had one child, Charles D. Merrill, 
v/ho died at the age of twenty-two years. The 
•only child born to Mr. and Mrs. Stevens was 
a girl, Sarah L. , who lived but seven years. 
In politics Mr. Stevens is a stanch Republi- 
can, while regarding religious matters he 
holds liberal views. He has served his fel- 
low-townsmen in several of the minor offices 
of his district, and is a member of the South 
Paris Grange. 




UGKNE M. DUDLEY, the enterprising 
and popular proprietor of the Lake 
House at Waterford Plat, was born 
in Bridgton, this State, June i, 1854. He 
is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Earle) Dud- 
ley, both natives of Maine, the former born 
in Waterford, the latter in Plymouth. Joseph 
Dudley lived in his native town until after 
his marriage with Elizabeth Earle, when he 
established a home in Bridgton. He was a 
competent farmer, and was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits in Bridgton up to the time of 
his death, August 20, 1876. His wife passed 
away in September, 1890. They had seven 
children, namely: Ada, the wife of Sumner 
Spurr, now of Otisfield, Me. ; Eugene M., 
the subject of this sketch; Mary, in North 
Bridgton ; Walter and Albert, residents of 
Harrison, Me.; Nellie, now deceased; and 
P'red, residing in Hollis, N.ll. 

Eugene M. Dudley received a common- 
school education in his native town. At the 
age of fourteen he obtained employment as a 
weaver in a woollen-mill of Bridgton. Sub- 
sequently he set about learning the tinsmith's 
trade in Cornish, Me.; but, after six months 
of his apprenticeship had expired, he took a 
position in a harness shop, where he continued 
employed about three years. He then opened 
a harness shop of his own in Harrison, Me., 
where he conducted a successful business for 
ten years, accumulating sufficient money to 
start in hotel keeping. He did this by pur- 
chasing the Lake House, an old and famous 



BIOGRAl'IIICAL REVIEW 



89 



hostelry. Since then he has made many im- 
provements in the building and surroundings, 
developing the place into a model summer 
hotel. While it is open all the year round, 
its most prosperous season is the vacation 
time. Mr. Dudley has a good livery in con- 
nection with the hotel. He also owns a farm 
of seventy-five acres, one of the best estates 
in the locality. An alert and enterprising- 
man, one who does well whatever he under- 
takes, he also seems to have the enviable 
faculty of making and keeping friends. 
Under his management the Lake House has 
attained a remarkable degree of prosperity, 
and his fame as a host has spread through 
Oxford and Cumberland Counties. 

Mr. Dudley was married February 14, 
1882, to Judith C, daughter of Edwin Jack- 
son, a farmer now living in North Bridgton, 
Me. Mrs. Jackson died some time since. 
Mrs. Dudley, who is a native of Springfield, 
Me., has two children — Guy E., born March 
II, i8iS6; and Annie L., born October 6, 
1889. In pcditics Mr. Dudley is a stanch 
Democrat. He belongs to. one social organ- 
ization, the Independent Order of Odd Fc]- 
lows, being a member of Ossipee Lodge, No. 
54, of Cornish, Me. He is one of the self- 
made men of 0.\ford County, having won his 
way from a hard-working boyhood to a matu- 
rity of established prosperity. 



)/lLLIAM A. BOYINGTON, a well- 
i! known and resjiected resident of 
New Sharon, Franklin County, was 
born in Stark, Me., November 30, 1828, son 
of John S. and Jane (Witham) Boyington. 
His grandfather was William Boyington, a 
native of Wiscasset, Lincoln County, from 
which place he removed to New .Sharon abt)ut 
the year 17S0, being one of the first three 
settlers of the place. Here the grandfather 
bought about one hundred and si.xty acres of 
land, built a log cabin, and cleared a patch of 
about ten acres, wliich he forthwith proceeded 
to cultivate. His children were: Jeremiah, 
William, Joshua, John .S. , Benjamin, Re- 
becca, Susan, Sally, and Martha. 

John S. Boyington was born in New .Sharon 
in 1 80 1, and was educated at the common 



schools of the town. ^\t a maturer age he 
learned the trade of barn building, and this 
he carried on tor a numbei" of years in connec- 
tion with larming. When twenty-four years 
old he went to Stark, antl there bought a farm. 
I'his he sold in 1837, and mo\-ed back to his 
native town of New .Sharon, where he pur- 
chased annther farm of sixty acres in extent. 
Here he was engaged in general farming for 
the rest of his life, which closed in 1855, 
when he was fifty-foLU' years old. 

He was joinetl in matrimony with Jane 
Witham, a daughter of Jesse Witham, of Fair- 
field, Me., and by her became the father of 
eight children, six of whom are living. They 
were — Jesse, William A., Samuel, Leonard, 
Elizabeth, I\Iary J., Perluma, and R. Frances. 

William A." J5oyington spent bis early boy- 
hood on his father's farm in -Starks, and re- 
ceived his early education in the same town. 
He went with his father to New .Sharon in 
1837, and attended school there until he was 
eighteen years of age. 15eginning then, he 
worked with his father on the home farm until 
he attained his majority- After this he was 
employed on adjoining farms and in logging- 
camps until he was twenty-four. After his 
marriage he took the farm of Almond Saunders 
for a year, at the end of which he moved with 
his wife to Lewiston. Here he worked for 
another year, hauling wood on contract from 
the forest with his own oxen. During his 
second sunimer at Lewiston he hel]3ed to haul 
the stone with which the new coint-housc and 
jail of the town were built. A short while 
after he returned to New Sharoi-i, where he 
bought a farm of forty-five acres, which he 
successfully conducted for five \'ears. Then 
he sold it, and bought the place where he now 
lives. He tore down all the old barns that 
stood ujion this property, and built more com- 
modious ones. He also made considerable 
impro\'ements in the residence, including the 
flagging of his cellars and laying pipes from 
his well into the house. The place is now 
one of the finest and most modern estates in 
this part of the county. He has carried 01-1 
general farming for many years. Owing to the 
fact that he has removed all rocks and stones 
from the land, the farm is easily worked. Pie 
owns eight head of handsome cattle and a large 



9° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



flock of sheep, fie also moves and builds 
barns, a business at which he is an expeit, and 
which brings him a good income. 

(_)n November 30, 1853, his twenty-fifth 
birthday, Mr. l^oyington married Miss Ada- 
line .S. Gordon, daughter of Ithiel Gordon, a 
farmer of New .Sharon. Like his father he is 
a Republican in politics. His religious faith 
is that of the Free Will Baptists. He has 
been a notoriously hard-working man all his 
life, and all his success is due solely to his 
own efforts. 




SA PACKARD, a well-known farmer 
and carpenter, residing in Greenwood 
township, was born here, June 19, 
1830, son of Asa Packard, Sr., and 
FLleanor (Bradbury) Packard. His paternal 
grandfather, James Packard, who came from 
Bridgewater, Mass., was the first of the family 
to settle in this locality. After carrying on 
farming here for a few years. Grandfather 
Packard removed to the adjoining town of 
Norway, where he spent his last days. 

Asa Packard, Sr., was born and reared in 
Oxford County. In his younger days he 
worked at the shoemaker's trade, but afterward 
turned his attention to agriculture, buying 
the farm on which his son Asa now lives. 
He subsequently moved to Harrison, Cumber- 
land County, where he died June 17, 1870. 
His wife, in maidenhood Eleanor Bradbury, 
who was a native of Norway, died in 1857. 
She bore him ten children, namely: James, 
who died in infancy; Malinda, who died at 
the age of seventy years; James (second), now 
engaged in farming in Norway; Nathaniel 
Morrill, who died at the age of twenty-three 
years; Charles, also deceased; Amos, an 
attorney-at-law, who resides in Baltimore, 
Md. ; Asa and Eleanor, twins, the former 
being the subject of this sketch, and the 
latter the wife of Henry Porter, of Norway 
township; George, who lives in Bridgton, 
Me. ; and Henry C, w-ho is a resident of 
Harrison, this State. 

Asa Packard acquired his education in the 
common schools of his native town. In his 
early manhood he worked as a farm laborer 
in Paris township. Going thence to Hing- 



ham, Mass., he was employed with his father 
for a time in that village. Soon after his re- 
turn to Greenwood he married and settled on a 
farm, where for ten years he was successfully 
engaged in agriculture. He then bought his 
present estate, containing one hundred acres 
of land. It lies in Norway and Greenwood 
townships, the residence being within the 
limits of Greenwood. Mr. Packard carries on 
general farming and dairying, and is some- 
what interested in poultr)' raising. He 
learned the carpenter's trade when a young 
man, and has worked at it more or less 
during his life. In 1878 he built his jiresent 
comfortable and convenient dwelling. Polit- 
ically, he is a strong advocate of Democratic 
])rinciples. He belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd P'ellow^s of West Paris and to 
the Patrons of Husbandry of Norway. 

Mr Packard was married I'ebruary 27, 
1855, to Miss Sarah E. Doughty, who was 
born March 25, 1835, in Greenwood township. 
Her parents. Major Charles and Jemima 
(Young) Doughty, were lifelong residents of 
this town, where they were engaged in farm- 
ing. Mr. and Mrs. Packard have four chil- 
dren; namely, Frank .S., Emma, Dora A., 
and Edward D. Frank S., born April 21, 
1857, married Lizzie Fogg, of Norway, and 
they live on the home farm; Emma, born 
March 7, 1859, is the wife of P'rank H. Hill, 
a barber in West Paris, and has one child, 
Dora Irene; Dora A., born No\-ember 16, 
1 86 1, died at the age of eighteen years; and 
Edward D., born February 27, 1863, married 
Elvesa D. Curtis, and they also, with their 
little son, Elmer D., live on the home farm. 




TOWNE, who has been 
closely identified with the agricult- 
ural interests of Norway township 
throughout the greater part of his 
acti\e life, was born February 17, 1829, on 
the farm where he now resides. His father, 
Daniel Towne, was a son of Peter Towne, 
who was a farmer and a lifelong resident of 
Andover, Mass. During the Revolutionary 
War Peter Towne was a teamster in the army, 
and received a serious injury while serving 
in that ca]mcity. 



BlOGRAPil IC AL KKVl K\V 



91 



Daniel Townc was born and eilucatcd in 
Andovcr, from which place he came to Ox- 
ford County in 1808. lie settled in the 
northern part of Norway township, where he 
cleared and improved a homestead, worked at 
the blacksmith's trade, and lived here until 
his death in 1859. He married Susan Gur- 
ney, a native of Minard, Me., who, having 
survived him a few years, died in l'"ebruary, 
1865. Their eight children were: Daniel G., 
who was a successful physician of Lowell, 
Mass., and died in Lovell, Me.; I^'annie, who 
is the widow of P. D. Judkins, and lives at 
Newtonville, Mass.; Abiah, who is the widow 
of Louis Frost, and resides in Lowell, Mass. ; 
Honor P., who married JoLd W. Chadbourn, 
of Waterford, Me., both now deceased; Jona- 
than G., who married Abbie Crockett, also 
both deceased; Ksliburn !'., now a resident of 
Mississippi, who married the late Caroline 
Dresser, of Lovell, this county; Rollin, the 
subject of this sketch; and Andrew Jackson, 
who died at the age of ten years. 

Rollin Towne acquired his education in the 
district schools of Norway, and on the home 
farm obtained a practical knowledge of agri- 
culture. On attaining his majority he went 
to Milford, Mass., where he worked at farming 
for a year. His services being needed at 
home, he returned there; and from that time 
until the death of his parents he cared for 
them, at the same time conducting the farm. 
He has since assumed possession of the home- 
stead property, which contains seventy acres 
of land, and is in a fine condition, owing to 
his diligent and persevering efforts. Mr. 
Towne did much of the manual labor himself, 
working early and late, until 1880, since when 
rheumatism has obliged him to depend largely 
upon hired help. He has been a stanch Re- 
publican since casting his first Presidential 
vote for Franklin Pierce in 1852. He has 
never been an office-seeker, but has served in 
several of the less important town, offices, 
l^oth he and his wife attend the Congrega- 
tional church near their home. 

On September 26, 1852, Mr. Towne mar- 
ried Miss Nancy J. Hayes, who was born Jane 
7, 1830, in Poland, Me., which was also the 
birthplace of her parents, Isaac and Martha 
(Swett) Hayes. After working for many 



years at the carpenter's trade in Poland, where 
he resided until '1864, Mr. Hayes purchased 
a farm in Greenwood towushij), and lived there 
for ten years. Coming then to Norway, he 
was engaged in general farming for some time. 
Subsequently he removed to Lewiston, this 
State, and there lived with a daughter until 
his demise in 1884. He had surviveil his 
wife, who passed away in 18S0. Mr. and 
Mrs. Towne have si.\ children, namel)-: 
Charles H., who married Lillian Bai'stow, and 
is overseer of the Bates Mills at Lewiston; 
George R.. who died at the age of twenty- 
four years; Carrie I., who is the wife of Sam- 
uel J. Caldwell, the manager of a large stable 
at South Boston, Mass. ; Fannie !•'., the wife 
of Horace G. Dinsmore, an enterprising- 
farmer of Norway township; William P""rank, 
who married Nellie Merrill, of Gardiner, Me., 
and is now running a milk wagon in Arling- 
ton, Mass. ; and Emma E., the vvife of Gilbert 
LJpton, of Tulare, Cal., where he has a large 
ranch. 



^^HARLES E. PERKINS, an enter- 
I kJ prising young farmer of New Sharon, 
V^lj, was horn at the family homestead 

in this town, July 16, 1866, son of 
Samuel F. and Annette (.Smith) Perkins. His 
grandfather, .Samuel Perkins, who was a native 
of Woolwich, Me., came here from that town 
and bought the land now owned by his grand- 
son. This property Samuel cleared and im- 
proved into a good farm, which he cultivated 
with industry during the rest of his active 
period. His last days were spent in this town, 
where he died in i86g, aged sevent}'-nine 
years. 

.Samuel V. Perkins, who was born in Wool- 
wich, June I, 1825, accomjianied his parents 
to New Sharon, being then fifteen years old. 
Beginning at the age of seventeen, he assisted 
on the farm until 1862. In that year he en- 
listed as a private in the Twenty-eighth Regi- 
ment, Maine Volunteer Infantry, and after- 
ward served one year in the Civil War. After 
returning to civil life he resumed his former 
occupation. At his father's death he suc- 
ceeded to the homestead, and conducted it 
prosperously until a year previous to his death, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



when he sold it to his son and retired from 
active labor. He tiled I'ebniary 27, 1S89, 
aged sixty-four years. In politics he acted 
with the Reimblican party, while his religious 
beliefs were those nf a liberal. His wife, 
Annette, whom he married December 21, 
1863, was born in New Sharon, June ti, 1836, 
daughter of William and Mary (Dyer) Smith, 
both natives of this town. She became the 
mother of three children, as follows: Mary 
C, born October 11, 1864, who married Cory- 
don Bailey, of Industry, and has three children 
— Charles, Leon, and Clarence; Charles E., 
the subject of this sketch; and Lura M., born 
August 25, 1873, who married Frank M. Teb- 
betts, of Norway, Me., and has one son, Ray. 
Mr. Perkins's mother is still living, and re- 
sides with her son at the homestead. 

Charles K. Perkins was educated in the 
schools of New Sharon, and was reared to farm 
life. He has always resided at the homestead, 
which he now owns, having purchased it from 
his father, as already stated. The farm is 
well located, and takes rank among the most 
productive in this part of the county. Besides 
raising the usual crops, he cultivates an or- 
chard containing seven hundred grafted fruit- 
trees, and keeps a large flock of coarse-wool 
sheej), four head of cattle, and three excellent 
horses. Since taking possession of the prop- 
erty he has improved the buildings and much 
increased the fertility of the soil. Progressive 
and enterprising, he is constantl}' alert to avail 
himself of all opportunities for advancement. 
In politics Mr. Perkins takes an indei)endent 
course. He is regarded as one of the rising 
young men of this town. 




|HESLP:Y H. FERNALD, of Albany, 
Oxford County, Me., is one of the 
representative citizens of the town, 
who by toiling industriously from 
early boyhood has attained prosperity and po- 
sition. He was born in Lincoln, Mc. , March 
18, 1833, the son of George VV. and Mary 
(Kneelanil) Fernald. 

George W. Fernald, who was a native of 
Lincoln, Me., and in early manhood was there 
engaged in farming, removed from Lincoln 
to Albany when his son, Chesley H., was 



about five years old, settling on a farm in the 
southern part of the town. At the time of 
the Civil War he left his pleasant home and 
family for the disease-breeding fields of the 
South; and he )iever greeted his wife and 
children again, for he was taken ill in the 
army and ilied. His wife breathed her last 
in Albany, Me. Seven children were born 
to this couple, namely: Chesley H., whose 
name a]5]3ears at the head of the present 
sketch ; Nancy Jane, widow of Clark C. 
White in Raymond, N.H. ; Oliver N., who is 
in the shoe business in Danvers, Mass. ; 
George W., a dentist, in Bethel Hill village. 
Me. ; Julia E., who was born April 9, 1850, 
and died December 3, 1867; Hersey E., an 
engineer in PennsyLania; and an unnamed 
child, who died in infancy. 

Chesley H. Fernald in his boyhood re- 
ceived a limited conmion-school education. 
He helped about the home farm in early man- 
hood, and remained in his native town until 
1876, when he went to Milton, N.IL, staying 
there three years, engaged in making shook; 
and he was subsequently in Ebensburg, Pa., 
seven months, engaged in the same intlustry. 
He then returned to Albany, where he has 
since resided; and in 1880 he erected a saw- 
mill near his home, forming a partnership 
with Parker N. Flint. The firm makes a 
specialty of spool lumber, and has a growing, 
prosperous business. Mr. Fernald is exten- 
sivelv engaged in farming, owning some five 
hundred acres of land, much of which is 
highly improved, and also raising live stock. 
A hard-working and persevering man, he has 
added to his property little by little until he 
has become one of the foremost manufacturers 
and real estate owners in the town of Albany. 

He was married on November 22, 1855, to 
Elizabeth J. Meader, of Stoneham, this county, 
the daughter of George P. and Martha (Cross) 
Meader. George P. Meader, who was a Mas- 
sachusetts man, settled in Stoneham at an early 
day, and was there engaged for years in the 
pursuit of agriculture. He died in 1S93, and 
his wife also has passed to the world beyond. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fernald have two children — 
Alton, the elder, born October 12, 1859, who 
lives with his father, married Miss Lydia Mar- 
shall; Nellie A., born in September, 1862, is 




CHESLEY H. FERNALD. 



BIOGRAPHICAI> REVIEW 



95 



the wife of Parker N. Flint, Mr. l''ernaUrs 
business partner. Mr. Fernald is a Republi- 
can, and though he is not an office-seeker, he 
served as Third Selectman of Albany one year. 
He is a member of Oxford Lodge, No. 6i, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of North 
Waterfortl. 




FIVER P. FARRINGTON, a well- 
known horse dealer of Oxford County 
and an influential citizen of the town 
of Greenw^ood, was born September 
1 6, 1851, in Andover, Me., son of Samuel 
F'arrington, Jr. His grandfather, .Samuel 
P'arrington, Sr., who was born and reared to 
man's estate in Stow, this county, subse- 
quently became a resident of Andover, where 
he cleared and improved a homestead, living 
there until his demise. Grandfather Farring- 
ton's wife, whose maiden name was Dresser, 
had four children; namely, Matilda, Hannah, 
Abigail, and Samuel, Jr. Hannah became 
the wife of Lorenzo Hanson, of Andover. 

Samuel Farrington, Jr., who died in 1862, 
was a native of Andover, where he owned a 
farm for many years. P'rom childhood he had 
a strong tendency toward religious work, and 
for many years travelled throughout his native 
State as a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
denomination, preaching in the country towns. 
He married Susanna Coffin, a native of Milan, 
N.H. She survived him, and is now the wife 
of John Abbott, a retired farmer of Bethel, 
this county. Her children by Samuel Far- 
rington are: Jennie, the wife of Calvin San- 
born, of Bethel, Me. ; Oliver P., the subject 
of this sketch; Abbie, the wife of Gilbert 
Coffin, living at Locke's Mills, this county; 
Charles, a resident of Brockton, Mass. ; and, 
Earl P., a farmer, living at Greenwood, who 
married Mabel Herrick. By her second mar- 
riage she has one child, Morton T. Abbott. 
Oliver P. Farrington attended school until 
eleven years old, when, his father dying, he 
began to fight life's battles by himself. Until 
seventeen years old he worked on neighboring 
farms, and then went to Locke's Mills, where 
he obtained a position in the spool factory, 
and for ten years or thereabout was engaged 
in turning spools. He has continued his resi- 



lience at this place, but has since been en- 
gagetl in horse dealing and general farming. 
He owns a fine farm of one hundred and forty 
acres in Bethel townshii), where he raises 
many horses of the Patchen stock. In his 
speculations, which have been very successful, 
he deals in all breeds. A lover of horses and 
well acquainted with their characteristics, he 
has little trouble in breaking and training 
them, developing their good qualities, ami 
controlling their refractory tendencies. 

Mr. Farrington was married August 18, 
1878, to Miss Alice M. Crooker, who was 
born in Bethel, this county. She is a daugh- 
ter of Washington anil Serena (Bartlett) 
Crooker, lifelong members of the farming 
community of Bethel. In politics Mr. P"ar- 
rington active-ly supports the principles of the 
Democratic party. He has served acceptably 
in many of the local offices, including that of 
Collector, which he held for three years. He 
is now a member of the Board of Selectmen. 



'^OHN O. STAPLES, one of the prosper- 
ous general farmers of Temple, I'rank- 
lin County, was born April 6, 1827, 
ujion the farm in this town now occu- 
pied by his brother, Gideon K. Staples, son 
of Gideon and Sarah (Oakes) Staples. His 
grandparents, Gideon and Susannah (Staples) 
Staples, who originally resided in Dover, 
N.H., moved from there to Maine, first set- 
tling in North Berwick, and later removing to 
Temple. The township was l)ut thinh' settled 
when they arrived here. They settled upon 
the hill where their grandson, Gideon K. , now 
resides; and there Grandfather Staples cleared 
a good farm from the wilderness. He died 
here aged seventy years. His wife lived to 
the age of ninety-eight. Their children were: 
Susannah, Nathaniel, Gideon, Susannah (sec- 
ond), Susannah (third), Betsey, Gideon 
(second), Hannah, William, George, Daniel, 
and Joanna. 

Gideon Staples, Mr. Staples' s father, was 
born in Dover, N.H., December i, 1785. 
When a young man he bought and cleared 
one hundred and sixty acres of land adjoining 
his father's property, and also worked at the 
carpenter's trade. His land was originally 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



covered with pine and spruce timber. He 
took advantage of the fact by building a small 
saw-mill on the creek near by, and manufact- 
uring from this timber the material for a 
frame house, which is still standing. He 
tilled the soil successfully for many years. 
When not needed at home it was his halnt to 
go to tlie coast towns and engage in the work 
of a ship-carpenter. His last job at the car- 
|K'nter"s trade was the construction of the 
frame of the house now occupied by his son, 
Gideon K. His death occurred here in No- 
vember, 187.2. His wife, Sarah, who was a 
daughter of John Oakes, became the mother of 
seven children; namely, Hannah B. , Mary 
M. , Gideon K., Sarah 1'., Eleanor, Jotham S. , 
and John O. She died January 19, 1877. 
Hoth parents were members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

John O. Staples acquired his education in 
the district school. When old enough to be 
of use he began to assist upon the farm. He 
resided at home until he was thirty-one years 
old, and then bought the Lock farm of one 
hundred and si.xty acres, where he has since 
lived. l^eginning improvements soon after 
taking possession of the property, he set out 
an orchard of three hundred trees, the most of 
which were grafted, rebuilt the barn and 
other out-buildings, and in 1869 erected his 
present residence. He has been quite suc- 
cessful in raising abundant crops of an excel- 
lent quality. 

On November 29, 1858, Mr. Staples wedded 
Cordelia Cook, who was born in Madrid, Me., 
daughter of Nathaniel and Matilda (Doyen) 
Cook, the former of whom was a carjjenter and 
a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Sta]jles have had 
three children, as follows: William, who died 
in infancy: Eva C, born February 26, 1865, 
who married Henry C. Norton, and has one 
daughter, Blanche I., whose birth occurred 
September 10, 1889; and Blanche E., who 
died at the age of si.xteen years. Both parents 
are members of the Congregational church. 
In politics Mr. Staples is a Republican.- He 
served the town as a Selectman for six years 
and as head of the School Committee for 
eleven years. He takes a warm interest in all 
matters relating to the general good of the 
community. 



■s^OSHUA C. HEALD, who, in com- 
pany with his brother, conducts a saw- 
mill and block manufactory at North 
Buckfield, was born in Buckfield, 
March 24, 1830, son of Washington and 
Eliza (Allen) Heald. His grandfather, Ben- 
jamin Heald, who was a native of Massachu- 
setts, served in the Revolutionary War when 
he was seventeen or eighteen years old. Ben- 
jamin moved from Carlisle, Mass., to Sumner, 
this county, of which place he was a pioneer. 
He tilled the soil of a good farm with in- 
dustry for many years, was one of the first 
saw-mill operatives in Sumner, and died there 
in 1842 at a good old age. The maiden 
name of his wife was Rebecca Spaulding. 

Washington Heald was born in Sumner in 
1803. In young manhood he began to work 
in the mills in his native town. In the course 
of time he became an expert mill man, and 
subsequently, in 1835-36,- having settled in 
Buckfield, he built the saw and grist mills at 
North Buckfield. A stirring, energetic busi- 
ness man, who did much toward developing 
the industrial resources of this locality, he 
carried on a thriving business until his death, 
which occurred when he was seventy-four 
years old. He was a Democrat in politics, 
and held the appointment of Postmaster here 
for several years. His wife, I'-liza, who was 
born in Plymouth, Mass., became the mother 
of nine children, six of whom are living; 
namely, George W., Joshua C, Caroline D.. 
Benjamin F., William P., and Enos D. The 
others were: Betsey, Rebecca, and Eliza Jane. 
The mother reached the age of eighty-three 
years. Both parents attended the Universal- 
ist church. 

Joshua C. Heald was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, and grew to manhood in Buck- 
field. When a mere boy he began working in 
the mills with his father, acquiring a general 
knowledge of every part of the trade. At the 
present time he is one of the best all-round 
mill men and one of the finest wood turners 
in this section of the State. He and his 
brother, Benjamin F. Heald, succeeded to the 
ownership of the mill property, which they 
now carry on, making a specialty of producing 
blocks of a superior quality, and doing an ex- 
tensive general saw-mill business. On Octo- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



97 



ber 22, 1854, I\Ir. Healtl wedded Olynthia 
A. Swallow, wiio was born in Buckfield, No- 
vember 12, 1S35, daughter of Larnard and 
Drusilla (Keen) Swallow. Mr. Swallow was 
an industrious farmer of Buckfield, which was 
his native place: and he died at the age of 
fifty-four years. His wife, who was born in 
Sumner, lived to be eighty-two years old. 
Mr. and Mrs. Heald have had si.x children, 
as follows: Fred E., born July 25, 1855, who 
is married, lives in North Buckfield, and has 
one daughter, Nellie M., born September 25, 
1895; Clinton .S., born June 10, 1858, who 
died November 19, 1862; Anna R., who, 
born May 18, 1861, died October 1, 1S91, 
having married C. A. Bonney, of West Sum- 
ner, b)' whom she had one daughter, M. Eliza- 
beth, born August 24, 1887; Preston C, born 
December 19, 1864, who is a miller at North 
Buckfield; Harry M., born December 14, 
1870, who is now a student of the Maine 
Medical School at Pirunswick; and Isa Maud, 
born July 5, 1873, who is an accomplished 
teacher and musician, and resides at home. 
In politics Mr. Heald is a Democrat, and 
has served with ability as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen for one term. The saw- 
mill and block factory conducted by him and 
his brother constitute the leading industry in 
this vicinity. He is counted among the prom- 
inent and representative residents. ]5oth he 
and Mrs. Heald are Universalists. 



-QHN W. BENNETT, one of the larg- 
est lumber dealers in the State of 
Maine, present Postmaster at Gilead, 
O.xford County, his place of residence, 
has carved his fortune with his own hands; 
and his career strikingly illustrates what may 
be accomplished by persevering and honorable 
ambition. He was born in Portsmouth, N.H., 
March 28, 1847, and is a son of Stephen and 
Sarah A. (Berry) Bennett. 

Stephen Bennett, his father, was born in 
Stanstead, Canada, but was reared and edu- 
cated in Wakefield, N.H. In early manhood 
he settled in Portsmouth, opening a carriage 
shop, which he operated for a great many 
years, winning fair success. In 1863 he re- 
moved to Jefferson, N.H., where for some time 



he was engaged in carriage work and also in 
farming; and in 1881 he jnirchased a farm in 
Gilead, Me., on which he is now living, hav- 
ing attained the advanced age of eighty-two 
years. In politics he is a stanch Republican. 
His wife, who was born in Milton, N.H., is 
an esteemed member of the Methodist- Epis- 
copal church in Gilead. l~ive of the seven 
sons born to Mr. and Mrs. Bennett dietl 
young. Of the living, John W. is the 
younger. The other, Albert, is a farmer in 
Gilead. 

John W. Bennett acquired the greater part 
of his education in the common schools of 
Portsmouth. He started to earn a livelihood 
when nineteen years of age, and worked for a 
few years in a starch factory. In 1872 he set- 
tled in Gilea'd, and engaged in the lumber 
business, establishing the nucleus of his pres- 
ent colossal trade. Two years later he opened 
the general store which is still operated in 
his name, and which is now one of the largest 
and best-equipped stores of the kind in this 
section. He now owns two thousand acres of 
land in Gilead, a part of which is undei' culti- 
vation and part grass lanil, about one hundred 
and fifty acres in New Hampshire, large tracts 
of pine timber in Alabama, and has mining 
interests near Helena, Mont. He buys and 
sells a great deal of pulp timber, logs, cord 
wood, and hemlock bark, and owns four saw- 
mills in this county and New Hampshire. 
He makes a specialty of spool stock, shipping- 
great quantities to Bowling, Scotland, and is 
one of the largest handlers of that kind of 
lumber in the State, buying a great deal from 
other manufacturers. He also manufactm-es 
hard-wood shook for sugar hogsheads, which 
he ships to the West Indies. 

On August 10, 1886, Mr. Bennett was mar- 
ried to Miss Laura J. Nuttnall, of Manistee, 
Mich. One daughter has blessed this union, 
Mildred E. As one of the trustees of the 
large estate of his wife's father in Michigan, 
Mr. Bennett has cares in addition to those of 
his own business interests, which he manages 
with equal efificiency and promptitude. 

A Republican in politics, he served two 
years as Treasurer of Gilead, but has de- 
clined to serve again in public office, his busi- 
ness requiring all his attention. As a Mason 



98 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he belongs to Blazing Star Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M., of Rumford, Me.; and as an Odd 
Fellow he is a member of Mount Abram 
Lodge of Bethel, Me. 




ILLIAM S. SEWELL, a lumber 
dealer and bridge builder of Keith's 
Mills, Franklin County, was born 
in Chesterville, June 5, 1824, son of Oliver 
and Betsey (Sylvester) Sewell. The Sewell 
family is of Puritan origin. Its founder, who 
was Mayor of Coventry, England, came to this 
country at an early date in the Colonial 
period. The descent comes from him, through 
his son Henry, John, Nicholas, and Henry, to 
the Rev. Jothani .Sewell, grandfather of Will- 
iam S. Sewell. 

The Rev. Jotham Sewell, born in York, 
Me., January 1, 1760, was at an early age 
thrown upon his own resources. Although he 
learned the mason's trade, he was desirous of 
entering the ministry, and saved his earnings 
in order to defray the expenses of his educa- 
tion for that calling. He attained his wish, 
and was ordained an evangelist, January iS, 
1800. His labors were begun in Chesterville, 
Me., and were afterward continued in various 
Congregational churches in New England and 
the Southern States. Returning finally to 
Maine, he settled upon Locke Hill, in the 
town of Chesterville, where he bought a tract 
of land mostly in a wild state. He was suc- 
cessful in converting this into a good farm, 
and subsequently erected upon it a set of sub- 
stantial frame buildings. The rest of his ac- 
tive period was passed in the avocations of an 
industrious farmer, and he died at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-one years. In ]iolitics 
he supported the Whigs. His wife, who 
reached the age of sevent}', gave birth to 
twelve children; namely, Oliver, Nathan, 
Jotham, Henry, Jennie, Julia, .Sarah, Mary, 
Otis, Rachel, Betsey, and David. 

Oliver Sewell was born in Chesterville, 
July 10, 1788. He acquired a good educa- 
tion, became a land surveyor and a general 
conveyancer and writer of deeds, which occu- 
pations he followed for several years. He also 
worked for some time at the carpenter's trade. 
Later in life he bought a farm of seventy acres 



in his native town, and thereafter conducted it 
with success until his death, which occurred 
May 29, 1861. He was one of the most 
prominent citizens of Chesterville in his day. 
The town enjoyetl the benefit of his services 
as Selectman for twelve years. He was also 
Town Clerk for a time, and he represented his 
district in the legislature, hi politics he fol- 
lowed the majority of the old Whig element 
into the ranks of the Republican party at its 
formation. He was a member of the Congre- 
gational church, and acted as a Deacon for 
many years. His wife, Betsey, who was born 
in 1788, bore him si.\ children; namely, Har- 
riet G. , Eliza J., Maria, George O., Calvin 
D., and William .S. 

William S. Sewell was educated in the town 
schools. He remained with his parents at the 
homestead until his majority. After serving 
an apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade, he 
has followed it as a journeyman more or less, 
in connection with other lines of business. 
Some time ago, with funds saved from his 
earnings, he bought an interest in a mill. 
He has been engaged in repairing mills and 
in bridge building. He has built several 
well-known bridges in this part of the county, 
including the Red Bridge in Farmington, two 
at Fairbanks, and one at Russell's Mills. 
For some time past he has given his attention 
to the lumber business, keeping in his yards 
at Keith's Mills a good supply of all kinds of 
manufactured stock for building purposes. In 
1857 he erected his present comfortable resi- 
dence and spacious barns. 

On January 14, 1858, Mr. Sewell wedded 
Augusta P. Allen, daughter of Reuben and 
Joanna (Harris) Allen. Mrs. Sewell's grand- 
father, William Allen, who was a native of 
Massachusetts, and served as a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War, settled at Poland .Springs, 
Me., where he reclaimed a farm from the 
wilderness. He was an extensive farmer and 
a progressive citizen, and he lived to be 
eighty-seven years old. He married Peggy 
Woodworth, who was seventy-five years of age 
when she died. Their children were: John, 
Reuben, Zadock, William, Peggy, and Mary. 
Reuben Allen, Mrs. Sewell's father, born in 
Poland Springs, inherited the homestead con- 
taining one hundred and twentv-five acres. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



99 



and became a prosperous general faiiner. In 
politics he was a Whig. In his religious con- 
victions he was a Congregationalist, and he 
died at the age of fifty-five years. He mar- 
ried Joanna Harris, and reared, besi'dcs Mrs. 
Sewell, six other children; namely, Charles 
G., John H., Mandana, Sarah W., Samuel C, 
and Abbie A. The mother lived to be 
seventy-three years old. Mr. and Mrs. 
SewelTs children are: Cora M., a music 
teacher, who resides at home; and Nettie, 
who is also engaged in teaching. Mr. Sew- 
ell's political sympathies are given to the Re- 
publican party, and he takes a liberal view 
of religion. He has been one of the most 
stirring and energetic business men in this 
locality. 



KEWIS M. MANN, the proprietor of the 
wood-working mills at Paris and West 
^ Milton, was born in Jaffrey, N.H., 
December 6, 1848, son of Tulwin 
and Caroline M. (Sibley) Mann. Edwin 
Mann, who was born in Troy, N. H., Septem- 
ber 20, 1S20, was for some years the owner of 
the Mountain House in Jaffrey, N.II. He- 
sides conducting this establishment he was 
also engaged in farming and manufacturing. 
After a time he retired from the hotel busi- 
ness, and gave his exclusive attention to his 
manufacturing enterprise in Troy, whithei' he 
removed with his family. He was acciden- 
tally drowned at his mills in 1S56, leaving a 
widow and four children. Enterprise and 
business ability were his distinguishing char- 
acteristics. In politics he supported the 
Whig party. His wife, Caroline, who was 
born in Troy, September 3, 1827, had four 
children, namely: Melissa, the wife of John 
Beals, of Leominster, Mass.; Lewis M., the 
subject of this sketch: Ella C, who is now 
the widow of William F. Reed, and resides 
in Somerville, Mass. ; and Walter E., who 
died at the age of thirty-nine. 

The subject of this sketch, Lewis M. Mann, 
acquired his education in the schools of Troy. 
Since young manhood he has been identified 
with his present business. He began by mak- 
ing pail handles by contract in Troy. He 
entered upon his first business venture in 



1870 at Norway, Me., by engaging in the 
manufacturing of pail handles and clothes- 
pins, which he carried on for two years. 
Then, moving to Snow's l'"alls, tliis county, 
he continued the enterprise there for two years 
more, after which he removed to West Paris, 
this county. In 1S80 he again changed his 
location, going this time to Milton I'lantation, 
where, in company with his bi'other, the late 
Walter IC. Mann, he carried on jjusincss until 
1892. He then re-established his business in 
West Paris, and since his brother's tieath in 
1894 he has conducted manufactories in both 
places. Besides his specialties, clothes-pins 
and pail handles, he turns out other wooden 
articles. In 1895 thirteen hunclred cords of 
white and yellow birch and poplar were used 
in the production of boxes alone; and his two 
mills, which employ thirty hands, finished and 
shipped an output of twenty thousand dollars' 
worth of goods during the same year. The 
mills are equipped with the latest imjiroved 
machinery. That in the West Paris plant 
includes apparatus of his own invention. A 
progressive and energetic business man, he is 
much esteemed by the residents of Paris. 

On November 19, 1872, Mr. Mann was 
united in marriage to Mary A. Towne, who 
was born in Norway, Me., in 1847. S'"'^ died 
March 31, 1893, leaving two sons, namely: 
Arthur L., who is now attending Bryant & 
Stratton's Business College; and lidwin J., 
who is a student of the Slate college at Orono, 
Me. Both in society and business circles Mr. 
Mann is very ])opular. In being a self-made 
man his success in life is particularly merito- 
rious. He is a Republican in politics, is con- 
nected with the lodge of Odd Fellows in West 
Paris, and attends the Universalist church, 
as did his late wife. The family occupies a 
ver}' pleasant residence in West Paris. 



/§Yo 



FORGE W. THOMAS, a successful 
\ '*) I farmer of Oxford, was born in He- 
bron. Me., June 12, 1S32, son of 
George W. and Margaret A. (Blankenberg) 
Thomas. The family descends from Colonial 
ancestry. Holmes Thomas, the grandfather 
of George W., was born in Plymouth, Mass., 
June 12, 1755. He served as a soldier in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Continental army during the Revolutionary 
War, afterward receiving a pension in recog- 
nition of .his services. About the year 1788 
he settled upon one hundred and sixty acres 
of vviUl land situated in the south-east part of 
Oxfiird, which was then in the township of 
Hebron. Having cleared a farm, he culti- 
vated the land and made shoes until 18 12. 
He then sold his property and moved to Dix- 
field, Me., where he cleared and improved 
another farm from the wilderness. He spent 
his last years at the home of his son, George 
\V. Thomas, Sr., where he died March 26, 
1856. I le was a sturdy and industrious man, 
who attained prosperity through hard work; 
and he was a Deacon of the Baptist church. 
On July 10, 1777, he married Susannah 
Churchill, who was born January 19, 1758. 
She reared eleven of her twelve children, 
none of whom are living, and died September 
ig, 1839. 

George W. Thomas, Sr., was born in Ox- 
ford, April 20, 1801. I-"ollowing the occupa- 
tion of farmer, he spent the most of his life 
in Kast Oxford, where he owned a good farm 
of eighty acres, lie was widely and favorably 
known throughout this locality as one of its 
most prominent and useful residents; and his 
death, which took place August 17, 1876, was 
the cause of general regret. In politics he 
was originally a supporter of the Whigs; but 
he joined the Republican party at its forma- 
tion, and adhered to its principles throughout 
the rest of his life. In religious belief he 
was a Baptist, and for many years was an ac- 
tive member of that church. His wife, Mar- 
garet, who was born in Portland, Me., March 
15, 1808, became the mother of ten children, 
all of whom are living. They are: George 
W., the subject of this sketch; Simeon P., 
who was born November 6, 1S33; Cyrus, who 
was born April 20, 1835; William W., who 
was born June 4, 1838; Helen M., who was 
born December 28, 1840; Mary C. and Robert 
C, twins, who were born I'ebruary 10, 1S43; 
John 1-"., who was born Juni; 24, 1845; Ade- 
laide C, who was born September 6, 1847; 
and Lenora, who was born September 20, 
1851. The mother died January 14, 1886. 

George W. Thomas attended the district 
schools of his native town. When seventeen 



years old he began earning his living by work- 
ing in a stone quarry for his uncle, William 
Thomas, receiving fifteen dollars per month 
for his services. From 1 849 to 1870 he fol- 
lowed various occupations in Massachusetts 
and elsewhere, his last employment, previous 
to his return to Maine, having been that of 
ship calker. At this he worked all along the 
coast from Portsmouth, X.H., to Brooklyn, 
N.Y. Having saved a considerable portion 
of his earnings, he in 1872 bought his present 
farm in Oxford. He has one hundred acres 
of well-improved land, desirably located and 
exceedingly fertile. Here he carries on gen- 
eral farming, keeps several cows, and sells 
milk and cream to good advantage. 

On November i, 1858, Mr. Thomas was 
united in marriage to Abbic P. Thayer, his 
first wife, who was born in Oxford, June 17, 
1838. She died October 22, 1863, leaving 
one son, Elmer I^. The latter, who was born 
July 8, 1S61, married Minnie Wormwell, and 
is now clerk at Swett's Hotel in Portland. 
Mr. Thomas's present wife, Nancy S. 
(Dresser) Thomas, whom he wedded Octo- 
ber 9, 1876, was born in Stoneham, Me., Jan- 
uary 4, 1835. She has had one child, Abbie 
M., who, born January 4, 1878, died January 
28, 1896. Mr. Thomas is connected with the 
Masonic fraternity, being a member of South 
Paris Lodge, No. 92. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. An able and progressive farmer, 
he is held in high regard by the cnmiuunit\'. 




LI COOK, formerly a well-to-do farmer 
of New Sharon, was a native of Bruns- 
wick, Me., where he was born in the 
year [810. His father, Eli Cook, Sr., served 
for eight years and eight months in the Con- 
tinental army, directly under General Wash- 
iilgton, and was wounded several times. Set- 
tling at Brunswick immediately after the war, 
Eli, Sr. , resided there until he reached middle 
age. He then moved to a farm of one hundred 
and thirt}'-five acres in the town of New 
.Sharon, where he passed the rest of his life. 

Eli Cook, Jr., was a youth when he accom- 
panied his parents to New Sharon. He was 
reared to agricidtural pursuits, and subsequently 
began life for himself when a young man. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



liulustriuus and cnt;ri;etic, he was able b\' fann- 
ing to accumulate a cunsidei'able amount of 
j)ropei"ty before his death on December 22, 
1 89 1, at the age of eighty-one year.s. He was 
highly respected, and served with ability as 
Road Surveyor for a number of years. 

In February, 1838, he was united in mar- 
riage with Margaret J. Johnson, who survives 
him. -She was born in Harpswell, Me., on 
April 14, 1818, daughter of Cajitain Isaac antl 
Ik'tsey (Nichols) Johnson. Her grandfather, 
also named Isaac, who was a sailor and was 
lost at sea, left a family of five chiUlren, 
among whom were Margaret and Jane. Cap- 
tain Isaac Johnson was born in Harpswell, and 
in early life began to follow the sea. Becom- 
ing a capable ship-master while still a young 
man, he was engaged in the West India trade, 
in which he realized a good fortune. He 
owned the ship in which he sailed, together 
with the large farm in Harpswell, which was 
carried on by hired assistants. He died at the 
age of thirty years. His wife, Betsey Nichols, 
w'hom he married in 1S17, became the mother 
of two children, namely: Margaret J., who is 
now Mrs. Cook; ami Harlow, who died young. 

After the settlement of the estate, follow- 
ing upon her father's death, Mrs. Cook re- 
moved with her mother from Harpswell to 
Portland, where she was educated. .She first 
met Mr. Cook while upon one of her visits to 
her aunt, Lucy Lake. She has had eight chil- 
dren — Isadore, Adeliza, Alphonso B. , Ella 
H., Scott F., Howard C, Addie O. , and p:tta 
J. Isadore successively became the wife of 
Charles O. Lortl, of \Vashington, D. C. , and 
lulwin M. Truell. FHla H. Cook married for 
her first husband Henry VV. Richardson, and 
for her second Wallace W. Campbell, of Fo.\- 
croft, i\Ie., and had five children. Addie O. 
became the wife of Albert S. U]iham, a pros- 
perous agriculturist of Farmington. Etta J., 
born May 7, 1858, at the homestead, where she 
is now residing, married on July 3, 1879, 
F'rank Collins, of this town, wlio is carrying on 
the farm successfully. Mr. and Mrs. Collins 
have two children, namely: Bertha M., who 
was born November 8, 1880; and Olan T. , 
who w-as born July 4, 1895. Mrs. Cook re- 
sides at the homestead, and is widely known 
and respected throughout this district. She 



has a large circle of friends, who, knowing her 
worth and many admirable ([ualities, entertain 
for her a sincere affection. 




XRV JOHNSON BANGS, one of 
le most enteiprising and successful 
tradesmen of Norway, O.xford 
Count)-, Me., a leading dealer in 
groceries and provisions, was born in Wayne, 
in this State, on (October 20, 1869, son of Rob- 
ert and Sarah (iilson (Jdhnson) Bangs. The 
paternal grandfather nf Mr. Bangs was Syl\'a- 
nus Bangs, born in JUixtun un June 17, 1780. 
He married Ann;i Fogg, who was ten years 
younger than himself, having been born in 1790. 

Their son, Roljert Bangs, w^^s boiii in 
Wales, Me., <)n April 15, 1827. He learned, 
when he had arrived at an age of maturity, the 
trade of blacksmithing, which he carried on in 
his native town for some time. In cnnnection 
with this he aisii learned the art nf building 
wagons, by which he maile quite a good deal 
of money. After some little time he sold out 
and moved to Wayne, wheie he worked at 
making shovel handles for ;i number of x'ears. 
Then he came to Norway, wheie he finalh' 
settled, carrying (jn his old business (jf black- 
smithing in the heart of the village, in 
Crooke's shoj:), until his health gave way under 
the stress of hard work. He purchased a home 
on Water Street, and also built a tenement- 
house there. 

On October 7, 1853, he married Mrs. .Sarah 
Johnson, the widnw nf a ])idniinent citizen, 
and the daughter ot Homan Gilson, of Wayne. 
Three children were the result nf this mai'- 
riage — Jutlson, born March 16, 1856; Sumner, 
born September 22, 1859; ami Henry Jolinson, 
born October 20, 1869. Robert Bangs was a 
Republican in i)r)litical principles, and in re- 
ligious faith a Baptist. He was a very hard- 
working, earnest man, and thoroughly deserved 
the measure of success that he attained. He 
died in the year 1893. His wife followed him 
two years later, at the age of si.\ty-nine years. 

Henry Johnson Bangs, the latest-born nf 
their three sons, received his early education 
in the public schools of Norway, and then went 
as a boy clerk into the grocer's store that 
he now owns and runs. At that time it was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in the pcjssessiiin of and managed by I'. H. 
Noyes, who shortly after sold out to A. C. 
Green. Both of his employers found the 
young clerk faithful almost to a fault, a first- 
class salesman, and alwaj's ready and anxious 
to do what was required of him. He stayed 
on with Mr. Green, ofificiating as his clerk 
until 1 891, when he bought out his employer, 
and immediately enlarged his ])lace. He ac- 
tjuiied the stores adjoining on each side and 
reconstructed them, fitting them up in the best 
possible manner for his own business. The 
one on the south side of his old shop he rents. 
In the Frost Corner store on the north side he 
has made extensive improvements. Mr. Bangs 
has so extended his patronage with the sensible 
increasing of his stock in trade and the added 
facilities for the better advantage of his cus- 
tomers that he now keeps two clerks to assist 
him, and also has found it necessary to get a 
delivery wagon. He carries an excellent line 
of groceries, provisions, antl crockery. 

He is undoubtedly one of the most alert, 
active, and cajKible young business men in 
the county, and has earned all his prosperity 
with the labor of his own hands and brain. 
His integrity is unquestioned. Mr. Bangs and 
Miss Minnie C. Dean, the daughter of Ro- 
manzo Dean, of Buckficld, Me., were married 
on January i, 1890. They have two children 
— Mildred, born May 7, 1S91; and Helen 
Vaun, born July 13, 1894. 

Mr. Bangs is a Republican in politics, and 
takes a genuine interest in the important issues 
of the day, being always willing and anxious 
as a citizen to do the best he can to promote 
the common weal. He was elected Town 
Treasurer in March, 1896. He is a member 
of the local lodge of Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and is a communicant of the 
Baptist church. He and his wife are promi- 
nent, not only as church people, but also as 
factors in the social circles of Norway. 



-|^1':NJAMIN TUCKI'R, a prominent 
''^N. agriculturist and extensive land- 
\\^ J holder of Oxford County,' Maine, 
proprietor of Norway Lake Milk 
Farm, was born March 11, 1831, in Buckfield, 
only a few miles from his present jilace of resi- 



dence. He comes of Massachusetts ancestry, 
his paternal grandfather, Benjamin Tucker, 
first, having been born and bred in Canton, 
Norfolk County, in that State. I*"rom there he 
came to the town of Norway, Me., about the 
year 1800. He was a harness-maker by trade, 
and, having opened a shop in the village, con- 
tinued in business until his demise. 

15enjamin Tucker, second, son of the first 
Benjamin, worked at harness-making in his 
early years, and eventually succeeded to the 
entire business of his father, which he contin- 
ued at the old stand throughout his years of 
activity. He married Miss Sarah Millett, a 
native of Norway, and the following children 
were born to them : Benjamin, third, the spe- 
cial subject of this sketch ; Melissa, who died 
in 1866; William, a harness-maker in Marl- 
boro, Mass. ; Angel ia, widow of the late James 
M. Favor, living in Norway village ; Cyrus S., 
who is engaged in harness-making in Norway 
village, and of whom a brief sketch may be 
found elsewhere in this volume; Henry, a har- 
ness-maker and dealer in carriages in Logans- 
port, Ind. ; and Mary Alice, widow of Frank 
Oxnard, of Norway village. The father died 
in 1876, and the mother has also deijarted this 
life. 

Ikmjamin Tucker, the third of the name, 
acquired his education in his native town, con- 
cluding his school life at the village academy. 
Naturally energetic and ambitious, he was 
habitu.ally employed in his later youth at some 
profitable labor; and for seven years after at- 
taining his majority he was engaged in freight- 
ing between Norway and South Paris. Soon 
after his marriage Mr. Tucker bought a farm 
in the neighboring town of Waterford, where 
he carried on general husbandry for fifteen 
years or more. In 1875 he returned to Nor- 
way, and here bought his present homestead 
property, which is beautifully located near Nor- 
way Lake. This estate contains about two hun- 
dred and thirty-five acres of land, and in addi- 
tion Mr. Tucker owns six hundred acres of land 
in Waterford and seventy-five acres in the town 
of Oxford. He carries on general farming, 
but makes dairying his specialty, keeping on 
an average forty milch cows and selling milk 
daily to regular customers in Norway village. 
Politically, Mr. Tucker is a stanch Republi- 





\ 



BENJAMIN TUCKER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'°5 



can, actively working for the best interests of 
his paity. While living in Watcrford he 
served as Selectman two years, and he has held 
the same office in Norway one year. Frater- 
nally, 'he is a member of Oxford Lodge, A. V. 
& A. M., No. iS, of Norway, and of the 
grange. Patrons of Lliisbandry, of Norway vil- 
lage. Of Hear Mountain Grange of Watcrford, 
instituted in 1874, of which he was a charter 
member, he was elected tirst Master; and he 
has kept his membership in tlie order ever 
since. Religiously, he and his wife may he 
classed as liberal Christians, attending the 
Universalist church. 

On December i, 1858, Mr. Tucker married 
Miss LLannah E. Merrill, who w-as born in 
Gray, Me., on November 15, 1S35, a daughter 
of James IL and Mary (Bodge) Merrill, both 
natives of Gorham, Me. Mr. Merrill was an 
overseer in a woollen-mill in Gorham for man)' 
years, and was also during the course of his 
life connected with mills in different parts 
of the State. He finally established himself 
in mercantile business in Norway \-illage, 
where both he and his wife spent their closing 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker have si.\ chil- 
dren — Fannie M., Frank L., Arthur, Ada U., 
Alton B., and Wilbur M. The two elder 
children and the youngest two are at home. 
Arthur Tucker, a can-maker by trade and the 
manager of a corn-canning factory at Strong, 
Me., married Miss Effie Marston. Ada LL, 
now living in New York City, is the wife of 
Edwin Stiles, a F'ree Baptist missionary, who 
is devoting himself to his work in India. 
Alton B. Tucker is an insurance airent. 



YgTlRAM RAMSDELL, of Farmington, 
l-^-| one of the oldest and most extensive 

|ls I ch-y-goods dealers in Franklin 
' County, was born in this town, 
February 12, 1829, son of Abner and Hannah 
(Corbett) Ramsdell. Mr. RamsdelFs great- 
grandfather, Kichard Ramsdell, was a resident 
of Truro, Mass. ; and his grandfather, Abner 
Ramsdell, was born in Truro in 1758. About 
the year 1796 the grandfather came to Farm- 
ington, and purchased the Church Brainard 
River lot. No. 38, on the east side, which is 
now owned by Mr. Manter. He died Septem- 



ber 4, 1S02. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Jerusha Collins, survived him many years, 
and died in 1857, at the age of eighty-three. 
Their ten children were severally named: 
Richard, Rcliecca, Jerusha, Abner, John, 
Benjamin, WilHam, James, Sarah, and 
Joanna. 

Abner Ramsdell, the father of Hiram, who 
was born in Truro, November 17, 1795, was 
brought to I'armington by his parents when 
an infant. In early manhootl he settled at the 
homestead, where for many years he was suc- 
cessfully engaged iji the manufacture of brick. 
He finally retired from that business, and 
moved to Farmington village. Here he built 
a house, in which he dwelt for the rest of his 
life, and died April 22, 1884. He was an 
able, energetic, and exceedingly prosperous 
business man and a worthy, upright citizen, 
who gained the respect and esteem of his fel- 
low-townsmen. His wife, Hannah (Corbett) 
Ramsdell, whom he married February 15, 
1819, was a daughter of John Corbett, of this 
town. She became the mother of eight chil- 
dren; namely, Cyrus C, Angeline, Sylvester, 
Hiram, Abner C. , John C. , Joel W. , and 
.Sarah H. She had attained an advanced age 
at her death. 

At the age of thirteen Hiram Ramsdell went 
to live with his brother-in-law, I'eter P. Tuffs, 
with whom he remained until he was twenty- 
one years old. He obtained his education in 
the district school and at the Farmington 
Academy. During the two years succeeding 
the com]3letion of his studies he was engaged 
in teaching school and assisting his brother 
Cyrus in brick-making and farming. He then 
went to Columbus, Ohio, and was employed 
there as an assistant in an asylum until failing 
health caused him to seek some out-door occu- 
pation. With this object he went to Jasper 
County, Iowa, where he took up a large tract of 
land, and was engaged in farming and school 
teaching for seven years. In that time he 
erected a good set of buildings upon his farm. 
After regaining his health he decided to re- 
turn once more to his native State. There- 
upon he sold his property, and came back to 
Farmington. In 1863 he and W. H. Hutchin- 
son bought a half-interest each in the old 
Cutler store, and together conducted it for si.x 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years, whcti his associate sold out to iTim. 
At a later tlate he admitted H. H. Rice as a 
partner, but after some years became again 
the sole proprietor. Since 1876 he has occu- 
jjied iiis present store in Belcher Block, hav- 
ing two entrances, one on Main Street and the 
other on Broatlway. l^he establishment em- 
braces probably the largest amount of. floor 
space used in similar enterprises in this 
county. It is heavily stocked with a varied 
line of dry goods, including cloaks and dresses. 
Ranisdell's Dry-goods Store is widely known 
throughout a broad district, with Farming;- 
ton for its centre, as a reliable and satis- 
factory place to deal with. By closely adher- 
ing to the rule of showing courtesy and an 
accommodating spirit to all, and seeking his 
profit by quick sales, the proprietor has 
amassed a handsome fortune. He has also 
dealt in real estate quite extensively. 

On May 28, 1867, Mr. Ramsdell wedded 
Sarah C. Boardman, daughter of Melzer and 
Sarah (Da\^is) Boardman. Mrs. Ramsdell, 
from her own choice and a natural aptitude 
toward business pursuits, ably assisted her hus- 
band in his business. She is an accomplished 
saleswoman and a general favorite with cus- 
tomers. Their residence, which is situated at 
the corner of High Street and Broadway, is a 
fine brick structure built by Cyrus C. Rams- 
dell in 1858. Since it came into his posses- 
sion, Mr. Ramsdell has remodelled the house; 
and he has otherwise improved the estate by 
purchasing and beautifying the adjoining 
land. He has also dealt in real estate quite 
extensively, and his many profitable transac- 
tions have brought him into prominence as 
one of the most wealthy and influential capi- 
talists here. Politically, he is a firm believer 
in Republican princii)les, supporting that 
party with vigor. Both he and Mm. Ramsdell 
attend the Congregational church. 




iHARLES B. ATVVOOD, a leading 
merchant and prominent resident of 
^ Buckfield, Me., in the south-eastern 

part of O.xford County, was born in 
this town, April 8, 1825, son of Nathan and 
Ruth H. (Rogers) Atwood. The family is an 
old and highly reputable one in these parts, 



Mr. Atwood's father, who was born in Liver- 
more, Me., in the adjoining county of Andro- 
scoggin, in May, 1800, having become a stir- 
ring and successful business man of Buckfield. 

Commencing life for himself at an early age 
as clerk in a general store carried on Ijy 
Deacon Barrell in Livcrmore, Nathan Atwood 
came to Buckfield when he was twenty-one 
years old, and for a short time was employed 
in the same capacity by a Mr. Phelps. In 
company with Zadoc Long he ne.xt went into 
business for himself, later conducting the 
store alone; and, finally selling out, he was 
engaged in the cutting and sale of wood for 
fuel purposes, until his buildings were de- 
stroyed by fire. Once more entering mercan- 
tile business, he continued in trade for some 
time, or until his retirement. He died in 
Buckfield at the comparatively early age of 
forty years. He acquired a wide reputation as 
an able and upright business man and a 
worthy citizen. He supported the Demo- 
cratic party in politics, and in his religious 
views he was a LTniversalist. His wife, Ruth 
H. Rogers, who was born in Berwick, Me., 
May 17, 1797, became the mother of five chil- 
dren, of whom the only survivor is Charles B. , 
the subject of this sketch. His sister, Helen 
M., was the mother of George M. Atwood, 
one of the proprietors of the Oxford Dcdio- 
crat. Mrs. Ruth H. Atwood li\-ed to reach 
the age of eighty-seven years. 

Charles B. Atwood resided at home and at- 
tended school until he was in his twelfth year, 
when he shipped as a cabin boy on board the 
whaling-vessel "Columbia," commanded by 
Captain Thomas R. Hussey. The "Colum- 
bia," which was fitted for a two years' cruise, 
sailed from New York, September 26, 1836, 
and on December 25, 1838, was wrecked on 
the coast of Chile, both ship and cargo becom- 
ing a total loss. Happily rescued from the 
fury of the waves, young Atwood was on Jan- 
uary 3, 1839, placed on board of the ship 
" Kdward Ouesnell," of Fall River, which 
was homeward bound ; but, strange to say, on 
May 9 of the same year that ship and cargo 
met a similar fate six miles west of Mon- 
tague, L.I., eleven of the twenty-three souls 
on board being drowned. Reaching home on 
June 26, 1839, after passing through a series 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of disasters quite sufficient, one would tliink, 
to deaden his ardor for sea life, he remainetl 
on shore until 1841, when he shipi)ed as a 
harpooner 011 the bark "Minerva," of New 
Bedford, Captain Horton, for a whaling; voy- 
age in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Re- 
turniui;' after a successful cruise of twenty 
months, he next made a voyage to the west 
coast of South America on board the brig 
"Samos," of Salem, Mass., Captain Horton; 
and, after coming back with a cargo of giuino, 
he went to Africa and up the Congo River 
with Captain Wood on another Salem bark, 
the "Seamen," which returnetl alter a voyage 
of eight and one-half months'. His last voy- 
age was as second mate of the bark "T. O. 
Brown," Captain Horton, bound from Port- 
land, Me., to Cienfuegos, Cuba. Arriving in 
Philadelphia in 1846, the cruise having been 
a prosperous one, he relinquished a seafaring 
life. Returning to Buckfiekl, he on Septem- 
ber 5 of that year engaged with a partner in 
mercantile business, later carrying on trade 
alone until 185 i, when he went to California, 
vk'here, however, he did not long sojourn. 
From the time of his leaving the Pacific Coast 
till 1884, with the e.\ce]3tion of about eight 
months, in which he was engaged in business 
in Chicago, he conducted mercantile enter- 
prises in Portland and Auburn, spending five 
years in each city. Since 1884 he has carried 
on a successful business at his present stand 
in Buckficld, being now in partnershij) with 
his son, under the firm name of C. B. .Atwood 
& Co. They have a large and well-stocked 
general store, which receives a most liberal 
patronage from the people of this town and 
the out-lying districts. 

On August 20, 1847, .Mr. Atwood was 
united in marriage with Juiiily I). Irish, who 
was born in Buckfiekl, June 27, 1827, daugh- 
ter of Joshua Irish. Six children have been 
born to them, namely : Horace, Charles, and 
Harold, who are no longer living; Sarah E., 
wife of John H. Moore, of Buckfiekl; Fred 
H., a member of the firm of F. H. Atwood & 
Co., grocers and provision dealers of Rumford 
Falls, Me. ; and Edwin F. , who is in company 
with his father. 

Energetic, capable, and accommodating, 
Mr. Atwood is highly esteemed and respected 



by his fellow-townsmen; and his success in 
business is the just reward for honest dealing. 
Socially, he is very popular with a large circle 
of friends and acquaintances; and he is a 
charter member of livening Star Lodge, A. ¥. 
& A. M., ot this town. In politics he acts 
with the Republican party, and both he and 
Mrs. Atwood attend the Universal ist church. 



f^^TKORGE B. RICP:, a prominent citi- 
V ;5T zen of Waterford, Me., and a mem- 
^— -^ her of one of the first families of the 
town — first in standing as well as in point ot 
settlement — was born in Waterford. October 
30, 1 841. His parents were Eber, Jr., and 
Pllizabeth (Frye) Rice. His paternal grand- 
father, liber 'Rice, who was born in North- 
boro, Mass., was one of the ])i(ineer settlers 
of Waterford, making a clearing in the wil- 
derness and developing a homestead. He 
worked early and late to improve the property, 
undergoing all the hardships of frontier life, 
and carrying his corn and rye ten miles to the 
mill to be ground. He was one of the wealth- 
iest and ablest men of the town, a justice of 
the Peace, and was known as Squire Rice. 
He died in 1853. His wife, Rebecca, was a 
native of Massachusetts. Five children were 
reared by this couple; namely, Betsey, Eber, 
Jr., Rachel, Samuel, and Sophia, all of whom 
have passed to the world beyond. Betsey was 
the wife of Asa Foote, Rachel, who always 
made her home in the house where she was 
born in 1794, was a teacher in her youth, and 
was widely known and esteemed. .She was a 
lady of more than ordinary intelligence, and 
toward the close of her long life no one was 
better known in this part of Oxford County 
than "Aunt Rachel Rice." She lived through 
the changes of over a century, passing away 
January 24, 18035. 

Her brother, Eber Rice, Jr.. was likewise a 
native and lifelong resident of Waterford, and 
from the time of his marriage until his death, 
which occurred on the 23d of December, 1863, 
was engaged in farming near the homestead. 
He was survived by his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Frye Rice, a native of Fryeburg, this county, 
who passed away on March 13, 1880. She 
was the mother of nine children, namelv: 



io8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lohn I'., born Decembc-r 14, 1S24, a farmer 
and spool manufacturer of Waterford village, 
who married Miss Mary Ann Irish; Sarah F., 
born June 26, 1826, who died September 19, 
1827; Sarah E., born December 6, 1827, wife 
of John Henry Millett, of Norway, Me.; 
Harriet 1,., born December 14, 1829, now 
living in Albany, iVIe., widow of Joseph L. 
Rand; William R., born March 29, 1832, a 
resident of Albany; Mary A., born April 12, 
1834, who died September 12, 1834; Isaac 
F., born July 12, 1S35, who died March i, 
1838; Charles H., born August 26, 1837, who 
married Elizabeth Green, and js living on the 
homestead in Waterford; and George B., the 
subject of this sketch. 

George B. Rice in his boyhood received a 
common-school education, remaining in his 
native town until twenty-one years of age. 
In 1862 he went to Boston, Mass., where his 
first position was as coachman in a private 
family. He was engaged in that capacity for 
a year and a half, during the year following" 
was employed as conductor on the Metropoli- 
tan Street Railroad, Boston, and the two years 
ensuing was driver for the Adams E.xpress 
Company. About 1869 he returned to his na- 
tive town, settling on the old Rice farm, where 
he is now living. This is a fine estate of 
about a hundred acres, all improved; and Mr. 
Rice has achieved marked success as a farmer. 
He has a number of cows, and manages a 
small dairy business. 

Mr. Rice was married October 15, 1868, to 
Harriet E. Marsh, of Boston, who was born 
December 14, 1843, the daughter of Rufus C. 
and Sarah (Choate) Marsh. Rufus C. Marsh 
was a well-known citizen of Boston, where he 
was superintendent of hacks and carriages for 
over thirty years. He died in that city, July 
4, 1883. His wife is now living with a son 
in Waltham, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Rice have 
five children, as follows: Mary E. , born Sep- 
tember 8, 1869, wife of Llewellyn Millett, of 
Waterford; Rufus, born May 30, 1871, now 
in Windsor, \'t. ; Lillian G. , born May 21, 
1873, wife of George W. Kneeland, a mill man 
of Newry, Me. ; Vernon W. , born May 7, 
1875, employed in a mill in Shelburne, N. H. ; 
and Florence E. , born July 29, 1877, who has 
not yet left the shelter of the parental roof. 



Mr. Rice votes the Republican ticket. He 
and his wife are active members of the Con- 
gregational church in North Waterford vil- 
lage, of whose Sunday-school he was superin- 
tendent for eight years. He is an industrious 
and law-abiding citizen, and has the regard of 
all who kncjw him. 



irx AVID W. BRESSON, an industri- 
I J ous and highly respected resident of' 
^J^Sy I'armington, was born July 5, 1828, 
in East Strong, now West New 
Vineyard, Me., son of James and Elizabeth 
(Hall) Bresson. His grandfather, James 
Bresson, who was a native of Ireland, emi- 
grated to America, and settled at Martha's 
\'ineyard, Massachusetts, where for a time 
he followed agricultural pursuits. Grand- 
father Bresson subsequently moved to West 
New Vineyard, and there partially cleared a 
new farm. He spent his declining years with 
his children, living to the age of seventy. 
His wife, in maidenhood a Miss W'eston, 
who was born in Ireland, died in 1820, aged 
thirty-eight years, carried off by the epi- 
demic known as "cold fever" that then pre- 
vailed in Maine. She and her husband reared 
seven children; namely, James, Beter, Thurs- 
ton, Hiram, Leonard, William, and Betsey. 

James Bresson, Mr. Bresson's father, 
bought the homestead. Finding, after giving 
a fair trial, that it was not what he wanted, he 
sold it again, and purchased a tract of one 
hundred and fifteen acres of land, which was 
covered with heavy timber. This farm, which 
is now owned by IC. Mosher, he cleared and 
improved into a state of cultivation, and 
erected on it a good set of buildings. In 
1837 he sold it, and moved to a farm in New 
Sharon, where he resided two years, after 
which he returned and bought the Butler 
place, located one mile from the village. He 
sold that property in 1854, and went to 
Strong, from which place he moved to a farm 
near Franklin Bridge. In this last place he 
continued occupied in farming until old age 
compelled him to retire. In politics he was 
in his early days a Democrat, but later became 
a Republican. His religious belief was the 
Methodist creed. His first wife, Elizabeth, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



who was born March 2^, 1787, died November 
8, 1856, leaving five children, namely: Rachel 
F. , who was born July 16, 1812; Mary H., 
who was born October 27, 18 14; Harvey T. , 
who was born June 9, 1S20; I'riscilla B., who 
was born January 26, 1824: and David \V., the 
subject of this sketch. The father's second 
marriage was contracted with Rhoda Harding. 

After acquiring a good practical education, 
David W. Presson was engaged in agriculture 
in this locality until 1854. In company with 
a party composed of M. Homer, M. Leak, N. 
Bean, and others, he then went to Eureka, 
Cal., and engaged in mining. In 1861 he re- 
turned East, and, settling in Farmington, 
bought the Church propert)-, comprising a 
pleasant residence and a corner lot on Cottage 
Street, and has lived there since. He is now 
well established in the business of painting 
and paper-hanging, at which he does a large 
amount of work annually, employing a great 
deal of help. Still strong and vigorous, 
he has not been obliged to remain indoors two 
days in succession for fifty years. His politi- 
cal principles are Democratic, while in relig- 
ious belief he is a Unitarian. 

On February 27, 1859, Mr. Presson wedded 
Dorris Pettengill Hillman, who was born Feb- 
ruary 18, 1833, daughter of Alexander and 
Thankful (Pettingill) Hillman. Mrs. Bres- 
son's grandfather, Uriel Hillman, with his 
family, moved in 1807 from Tisbury, Mass., 
to Farmington, where he was a prosperous 
farmer. Her father, a native of Tisbury, 
born February 4, 1804, was one of the largest 
and most progressive agriculturists of this 
county. Her mother, who was born in 1805, 
died in 1851, leaving six other children; 
namely, Uriah, Abel, Isaiah, Gilbert, Alex- 
ander, and Elizabeth A. 

Mr. and Mrs. Presson have had four chil- 
dren, namely: Mary Pllizabeth, born February 
10, i860, who died June 9, 1868; Lillie 
Belle, born September 4, i86i, who died 
March 14, 1862; George McLellan, born 
August 4, 1864, now proprietor of a flourish- 
ing jew^elry store in Farmington, who married 
Genevieve Huston, and has two children — 
Dorris M. and Cora P. ; and Alexander Hill- 
man, born January 16, 1873, who is now an 
assistant in his brother's store. 




HARLES H. GEORGE, a leading 
resident of the town of Hebron, Ox- 
ford County, Me., and a veteran of 
the Civil War, was born in Plym- 
outh, X.ll., September 3, 1834, son of 
William and Mary (Darling) George. His 
grandfather. King George, was an early settler 
in Plymouth, where he owned and cultivated 
for many years a good farm. He died there 
at the age of about eighty-seven. In his re- 
ligious belief he was a Congregational ist, and 
in politics he supported the Whig party. The 
maiden name of his two wives was Eaton, he 
having married sisters. He reared four sons; 
namely, Asa, David, Eaton, and William, 
afore-mentioned as the father of Mr. George, 
of Hebron. 

William George was a native of Plymouth, 
and there grew to manhood. Having a natural 
genius for mechanical pursuits, he became 
very skilful in general handicraft. The 
greater part of his industrious life was jiassed 
in his native town: and he was well known 
and highly respected as a worthy, upright 
citizen. His wife, Mary Darling, who was 
born in Campton, N.H., became the mother of 
nine children, namely: Daniel, the first-born, 
who died in infancy; William; Washington; 
Asa K. ; Charles H.; Daniel E. ; Mary E. : 
Martha A. ; and Joseph P. 

William George married Harriet Thayer, a 
native of Oxford County, Maine, and died No- 
vember 16, 1849, leaving one daughter, Wil- 
hemina. Washington George died in 1859, 
aged twenty-nine years. Asa K., who resides 
in Rumney, N.H., and is reporter for the Plym- 
outh Record, married Abbie Mansfield; but 
she and her five children are no longer living. 
Daniel E. George was born March 26, 1837, 
and is now residing in Natick, Mass. In 
1 861 he enlisted in Company D, First Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers, with which 
he served during the Rebellion, taking part in 
many of the most important battles from the 
first Bull Run fight to the time of his dis- 
charge in 1864. He is now an express mes- 
senger on the Boston & Albany Railroad. 
In politics he is a Republican; and he has 
been Commander of Wadsworth Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, No. 63, of Natick, 
Mass. He was married September 19, 1857, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to Adeline Rockvvood, who was born in Sher- 
born, Mass., March 3, 1837, and has had 
three children, namely: Hattie E. ; Emma 
]\I. : and Leonard F., who died at the age of 
eighteen months. Mary E. George first mar- 
ried Henry Dakin, by whom she had one 
daughter, Geddie. She afterward became 
Mrs. Woodward, and is now a widow, residing 
in Natick, Mass. Her daughter, Geddie O., 
is now Mrs. George Howe. Martha A. George 
married Frank P. Simonds, a caterer of 
Chicago, 111., and has had two children, of 
whom the survivor is named George. Joseph 
P. George, a carpenter of Pasadena, Cal., 
married Clara Cushman, a native of Auburn, 
Me., who has departed this life. She was the 
mother of five children, namely: Minnie; 
Herbert; Fred; Edna; and Frank, who is no 
longer living. Mrs. Mary D. George lived to 
reach the age of sixty years. 

Charles H. George, the fifth son, is the 
special subject of this biography. He was 
educated in the schools of Plymouth, and at 
an early age began life for himself. Going 
to Massachusetts, he resided successively in 
Boston and Natick, and was engaged in the 
express business and shoemaking until i860, 
when he removed to Hebron, Me., which has 
since been his place of residence. In August, 
1862, he enlisted as a private in Company E, 
Sixteenth Maine \'olunteers, and, going to 
the front with his regiment, was in active ser- 
vice until, having lost the use of his right arm 
at the battle of l-^edericksburg, he was honor- 
ably discharged in February, 1863. Return- 
ing to Hebron, he engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, and has steadily advanced in pros- 
perity, owning at the present time a valuable 
farming estate, consisting of one hundred and 
eighty acres, lying within the limits of Ox- 
ford, Paris, and Hebron, on which he has 
made various improvements, including the 
erection of new buildings. Besides giving his 
attention to general husbandry, he takes care 
of an orchard embracing eight acres of choice 
apples and smaller fruits, the shipment of 
which is the source of considerable profit; and 
he also runs a well-equipped dairy. In pub- 
lic affairs he has for many years been one of 
the leading spirits in the town, having served 
with abilitv as a member of the Board of Se- 



lectmen for three years, as Constable for some 
time, and as Collector and Deputy Sheriff for 
ten years. He is a Republican in politics. 

On November 25, 1854, Mr. George was 
married to Ruth A. Gurne}', who was born in 
Minot, Me., December 6, 1S38, daughter of 
Samuel and Lucy Gurney, of that town. 
Mrs. George has been the mother of five chil- 
dren, as follows: Arthur E., who was born 
March 13, i860, is married, and carries on 
mercantile business and farming in Hebron; 
Herman E., who was born March 8, 1865, 
married Alida Graves, and is now a carjienter 
of this town; Nettie P'rances, who was born 
October 30, 1868, and died January 24, 1870; 
Minnie B., who was born January 7, 1879, 
and Gertie M., who was born December 13, 
1 88 1, both of whom are residing at home. 

In business and in fraternal circles Mr. 
George is both prominent and popular. He 
is at the present time Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Patrons of Husbandry Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company, with which he has been 
connected for thirteen years; is a member of 
South Paris Lodge, No. 92, .A. F. & A. M. ; 
and is a comrade of W. K. Kimball Post, No. 
94, Grand Army of the Republic, of South 
Paris. For thirteen years he has been Master 
of Hebron Grange, No. 43, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, with which his wife is also connected; 
and IVIrs. George is a member of the Baptist 
church. 




ALTER NICHOLS, a retired busi- 
ness man and highly esteemed resi- 
dent of F"armington, was born in 
Searsport, Me., December 14, 18 12, son of 
James and Nancy (Fowler) Nichols. His 
great-grandfather, who wvts a native of Ire- 
land, settled in Londonderrv, N. H., among 
the early pioneers, and cleared a farm, which 
was located upon the site of the present vil- 
lage. James Nichols, the grandfather of 
Walter, was born in Londonderry in 1733. 
He inherited the homestead, and followed gen- 
eral farming during the active period of his 
life. He was a man of unusual physical 
strength and one of the most energetic and suc- 
cessful farmers of his day. He died in 1S18, 
at Searsport, Me. His first wife, in maiden- 



1^ I OG R A P i 1 1 C A L R F: V I EW 



hood Dinah Woodhur}', tlicd leaving six chil- 
dren — William, David, Annie, James, Wood- 
burn, and Thomas. His second wife, Hannah 
Cadwell before marriage, bore him seven chil- 
dren — Alexander, Samuel, Hannah, Dinah, 
Nancy, Mary, and Margaret. 

James Nichols, Mr. Nichols's father, also a 
native of Londonderry, born March 3, 1766, 
settled in Searsport when a young man, bought 
a farm of one hundred acres, and was there- 
after profitably engaged in its culti\'ation 
until stricken with typhoid fever, which 
caused his death in 1833. He possesseil the 
characteristics of the early pioneers, and was 
in consequence able to make progress in the 
face of difficulties that would conquer weaker 
men. In politics he united with the Whig 
party, and he was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. His wife, Nancy, became 
the mother of ten children, who were: Will- 
iam, James, Nancy, Jane, Abigail, Wood- 
burn, Rufus, Walter, John l-"., and Betsey A. 
She attained the age of sixty-six years before 
her death. 

In the district school Walter Nichols made 
the most of his opportunities for obtaining an 
education. Afterward by his personal efforts 
he became proficient in some of the higher 
branches. In young manhood he engaged in 
teaching, and successfully followed that pro- 
fession for ten winters. In that time he had 
charge of some of the schools most difficult to 
manage in his locality. Having learned the 
house carpenter's trade, he worked at it in 
the summer season, holding the position of 
foreman for ten years, when on account of 
failing health he was obliged to abstain from 
laborious occupation. By this time he had 
accumulated some capital, which he invested 
advantageously in Western lands. In 1868 
he and Mr. Morrell bought a half interest each 
in the water-power privilege of Farmington 
Falls, and engaged in the manufacture of 
spools. A short time after, he sold his inter- 
est in the factory and removed to Farmington 
village. His residence having been burned 
in the fire of 1886, he bought the Captain 
Chi Ids house on Main Street, and remodelled 
and enlarged it, making of it the commodious 
and fine-a])pearing dwelling that has since 
been his home. In Farmington for a consid- 



erable period after his arrival he was [irofitably 
employed as a surveyor of land. He retired 
from that business in favor of the more active 
aspirants of a younger generation. 

In 1.S50 Mr. Nichols wedded Rosina 
Witham, a daughter of John A. Witham, of 
Starks, Me. Mrs. Nichols has had three 
children, namely: Elaora, who is the wife of 
J. M. S. Hunter, editor of the I'^armington 
Chiviiicli\ and has one daughter, Mabel E. ; 
Albion, who died at the age of six years; and 
John W. , a practising physician of this town. 
In jiolitics Mr. Nichols is a firm supporter of 
the Republican party, with which he has been 
united since its formation. His religious 
faith is that of the Adventists. He is re- 
garded by his fellow-townsmen as one of the 
most able and successful business men and 
financiers in this part of the State; and the 
prosperity which has resulted from his busy 
life of industry and toil is amply merited. 

John W. Nichols, M.D., was born in Sears- 
port, August 4, 1859. He fitted for his col- 
legiate course at Wendell Institute, and, after 
graduating from Bowdoin College with the 
class of 1881, was for a short time employed 
by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company in 
Minneapolis, Minn. Deciding to adopt the 
medical profession, he subsequently pursued a 
thorough course of instruction at the Maine 
Medical School in Brunswick, from which he 
graduated in 1887. Excluding two years 
spent in Montpelier, \'t., he has since prac- 
tised continuously in Farmington. On June 
7, 1892, he was united in marriage with 
Bertha E. Johnson, daughter of George W. 
Johnson, of Industry, Me. He is a Republi- 
can in politics. He has served with ability 
as superintendent of public schools in this 
town, and he is a member of the Maine State 
Medical Association. As a physician he is 
held in high esteem by the entire community; 
and, socially, both he and Mrs. Nichols are 
very popular. 



(JOSHUA JONES McAllister, late 

an enterprising farmer of Stoneham, 
Oxford County, Me., who died on the 
1 2th of October of the present year 
(1896), was born in Lovell, an adjoining town 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the same county, June 6, 1849. He was a 
son of Josiah H. and Nancy (McKeen) McAl- 
lister, and was the eighth in a family of eleven 
children. The father, who was a native of 
Lovell, passed there all his days in pursuit of 
the honored vocation of farming, being also 
employed somewhat as a mechanic. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Nancy McKeen, was 
born in Stoneham, Me. She died in 1858, 
and he in 1868, having survived her about 
a decade. 

J. Jones McAllister remained at the old 
homestead until he was about eighteen years of 
age, when, on the death of his father, he went 
to work as a farm hand in Bethel, Me. He sub- 
sequently continued that form of employment 
on various farms in Bethel for four years, 
after which he returned to Lovell, and worked 
in a saw-mill until his marriage in 1878. 
He then took up his residence at Stoneham, 
and, having purchased the old McAllister saw- 
mill, he was occupied for four years in the 
manufacture of staves and spool stock. Re- 
moving his mill to Albany, Me., he engaged 
in business there for ten years, and then 
moved it back to Stoneham, where he estab- 
lished the mill permanently. From that time 
on he gave his attention to husbandry and 
milling, sawing shooks and spool stock for 
the firm of l^Uiot & Bartlett, of Lynchville, 
Me. At the time of his departure Mr. Mc- 
Allister owned a farm of three hundred acres, 
besides almost a thousand acres of wild land. 

On October 13, 1878, Mr. McAllister mar- 
ried Miss Nettie A. Bartlett, a native of 
Stoneham, where she was born January 9, 
1859, to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Bartlett. Her 
father was a farmer of that place, but now re- 
sides at Naples, Me. The union of Mr. and 
Mrs. McAllister was blessed in the birth of 
seven children, as follows: Clinton B., Albert 
J., Clarice, Harold Leroy, Ella May, Lynn 
A., and Lyde Dell, the last two being twins. 

Mr. McAllister affiliated with the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, being a member 
of Kezar Valley Lodge, No. 66, of Lovell. 
Politically, he was found in the ranks of the 
Republican party. In religious faith and fel- 
lowship he was connected with the Congrega- 
tional Church of Stoneham, of which his wife, 
who survives him, remains a valued member. 




Mr. McAllister was always a hard-working 
man, and his diligent efforts were crowned 
with a gratifying degree of success. Well 
known throughout the community, he com- 
manded the respect and confidence of all. He 
has left his children the inheritance of a good 
name. 



ENRY D. HAMMOND, one of the 
foremost of the younger agricultu- 

.9 I rists of the town of Paris, Me., is 

prominently identified with the 
business, educational, and social interests of 
this section of Oxford County. A son of 
Henry E. and Adaline M. (Chase) Hammond, 
he was born June 7, 1857, in the house where 
he now resides. This homestead was re- 
deemed from the forest by his great-grand- 
father, Benjamin Hammond, Jr., who came to 
Paris from New Gloucester, Me., at an early 
day, when settlers were few and far between, 
and the woods that surrounded the log house 
which he erected in a small clearing were 
filled with wild animals. He was the eldest 
son of Benjamin Hammond, Sr. , a soldier in 
the Revolution, who accjuired more than a 
local reputation as a hunter and Indian scout. 
After residing here a few years, the pioneer 
replaced the log house, which was the 
birthplace of his three elder chiklren, by the 
present substantial residence. liight children 
were born to him and his wife, Rebecca 
Smith Hammond; namely, Rebecca, Esther, 
Benjamin (third), Moses, Sally, I^zra, Olive, 
and Bela, all of whom, with the exception of 
one, married and reared families. 

Ezra Hammond, born May 21, 1796, who 
was the sixth child and third son, was the 
next in line to own the homestead. He was 
an industrious and progressive farmer and a 
worthy citizen. With the exception of four 
years in which he resided in Andover, Mass., 
in order to educate his children, he here spent 
his entire life. He died March 22, 1863. 
Ezra Hammond was a Democrat in politics, 
and in religion both he and his wife were 
Baptists. Her maiden name was Betsey 
Towne. She was born in Albany, Me., in 
1806, and died in March, 1876. The record 
of their three children is thus given: George 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



113 



v., bum June 16, 1825, lives in Paris; Henry 
E. was born September 12, 1827; and Will- 
iam G., born May 4, 1830, lives at Paris 
Hill. 

Henry E. Hammond was the second son of 
Ezra. He acquired his education in the dis- 
trict schools of Paris and at Phillips Academy 
in Andover, iVIass. During his early man- 
hood he taught school nine winter terms, and 
from the age of twenty-one years until the 
present day has had charge of the home farm. 
He has worked with untiring energy in con- 
tinuing the improvements begun by his father 
and grandfather, and has watched with gratifi- 
cation its gradual development into one of the 
finest and most productive pieces of farming 
property in this vicinity. At the same time 
he has not been unmindful of the interests of 
the public, having served his fellow-citizens 
with ability and fidelity in the office of Ti)wn 
Clerk fifteen years, as Selectman two years, 
as Representative to the State legislature in 
1870 and 1 87 1, as Trial Justice, and as Crier 
of the Court thirty years; and he is now 
Deputy Sheriff of Oxford County. Although 
fast approaching the milestone marking his 
seventieth year, his mental vigor is unim- 
paired, and his usefulness unabated. He was 
at one time President of the Oxford County 
Agricultural Society, and is now a Trustee of 
the South Paris Savings Bank. In politics 
he is a Republican, and he is an attendant of 
the Baptist church. 

The imion of Henry K. Hammond with 
Adaline M. Chase, who was born in the neigh- 
boring town of Sunmer, May i, 1831, was 
solemnized September 7, 1851. They have 
four children living, namely: Addie I., born 
July 7, 1852, who is the wife of J. A. Kim- 
ball, of Boston, and has one child, Henry S. ; 
Alice K., born March 24, 1854, who lives in 
Paris; Henry D., the special subject of this 
sketch; Lizzie P., born November 24, 1861, 
now the wife of Erederic V.. Shorey, of Gor- 
liam, N.H., having two children — P"rances 
H. and Stanley K. Their fifth and youngest 
child, named Charlie, born May 27, 1871, 
died September 13 of the same year. 

Henry D. Hammond completed his educa- 
tion at the Oxford County Normal Institute at 
South Paris, being there fitted for a teacher; 



and for ten years he was engaged in that pro- 
fession. Continuing his residence on the 
Hammond homestead, he now assists his 
father in its management. They have two 
hundred and sixty-five acres of land, on which 
they carry on general farming on an extensive 
scale after progressive modern methods; and 
they occupy a deservedly high position among 
the leading farmers of the county. Politi- 
cally a stanch Republican, Mr. Hammond 
has filled most acceptably the office of Select- 
man for six years, having been Chairman of 
the Board two years ; and one year he was 
superintendent of the School Committee. He 
is H member of Hamlin Lodge, No. 31, 
Knights of Pythias, of South Paris; of Paris 
Grange, No. 44.; and is Vice-President of the 
Oxford County Agricultural Society. He is 
likewise \'ice-President and a Trustee of the 
Paris Hill Academy. 

Mr. Hammond was first married on Septem- 
ber 15, 1885, to Ella L. Dudley, who died 
July 26, 1886. On August 29, 1887, he mar- 
ried her sister, E. Gertrude Dudley, who was 
born in Paris, August 29, 1867, a daughter of 
J. Smith and Lydia H. (Stearns) Dudley. 
Mr. Dudley was born in Woodstock, May 8, 
1827, and died in Paris in February, 1883. 
Mrs. Lydia H. Dudley was born in Paris, 
June 2, 1835, a daughter of William and 
Joanna (Porter) Stearns. After the death of 
her first husband Mrs. Dudley married Jairus 
Keith Hammond, who died February i, 1892. 
A sketch of his life will be found on another 
page of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Hammond 
have no children. Both are liberal in their 
religious belief. 



ISAAC H. BERRY, Chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen of Denmark, Oxford 
County, was born here, January 12, 
1857, son of Isaac and Emily (Fuller) 
Berry. Mr. Berry's grandfather, Henry 
Berry, who was a native of Middleton, Mass., 
born October 3, 1779, settled upon a tract of 
wild land in Denmark, and cleared the farm 
now owned by his grandson. He afterward 
resided there until his death, which occurred 
November 11, 1836. By his wife, .Sally 
(Jewett) Berry, he became the father of four- 



114 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



teen children; namely, Mial, Catherine, 
Henry, Elias, Isaac, Joseph, Ruth, Lorenzo, 
Patience J., Sarah S., Ann Bixby, Mial (sec- 
ond), Aaron R., and Amos S., none of them 
now living. The mother died June i, 1852. 

Isaac lierry was born in Denmark, Septem- 
ber 6, 1803. In June, 1836, he took charge 
of his father's farm, and subsequently suc- 
ceeded to its possession. He resided all his 
lifetime at the homestead. In addition to 
conducting the farm he surveyed timber, and 
engaged quite extensively in lumbering. He 
was quite prosperous both as a farmer and a 
business man; and he died August 26, 1880, 
leaving the reputation of an upright and 
worthy citizen. His wife, Kmily, born in 
Hampton, Conn., January 15, 1813, became 
the mother of eight children, as follows: 
Laura, who was born October 12, 1836, and 
died April 22, 1848; Mial, who was born Jan- 
uary 8, 1840, and died September 19, 1855; 
Jared F., of this town, who was born Septem- 
ber 21, 1842, married Lydia Bucknell, and 
has two children — Bertha M. and Mary 
Helen; Mary A., who was born January 12, 
1845, married James A. Head, of Denmark, 
and has four children — Gertrude J., Eva 
Maud, Owen Berry, and PLthel M. ; William 
W., depot masterat Perley's Mills, born May 
9, 1S48, who married Nettie S. Lord, whose 
birth occurred in September, 1873, and has 
one daughter, Nettie M.; Lorenzo, who was 
born July 7, 1851, and died August 7, 1858; 
John P. P., who was born December 13, 1854, 
and died August 7, 185S; and Isaac H., the 
subject of this sketch. The mother, now 
eighty-three years old, is a member of the 
Congregational church, and resides with 
Isaac H. 

Isaac H. Berry acquired a common-school 
education. His early manhood was spent 
working upon the neighboring farms and in 
the lumber-mills. After his marriage he took 
charge of the homestead farm which he now 
owns. While he does considerable logging 
during the winter season, he devotes the 
greater part of his time to agriculture. The 
farm contains one hundred and forty acres of 
well-located land, and produces large crops of 
hay, corn, and potatoes. On it is a fine 
orchard having several choice varieties of 



apple-trees. The proprietor also owns six 
hundred acres of land located in Cumberland 
and Oxford Counties. 

On October 15, 1874, Mr. Berry wedded 
Mary A. Lord, a native of Fryeburg, Me., 
who was born December 14, 1856, daughter of 
William and Mary A. (Potter) Lord. Mr. 
Lord, who was born in Alfred, Me., moved 
after his marriage to Lovell, Me., and then 
to Denmark, where he now resides with his 
daughters. His wife, now deceased, was a 
native of Bridgton, Me. Mr. and Mrs. Berry 
have two children, namely: Emily Fuller, 
who was born October 25, 1875, and is now 
a teacher; and Mary A., born August 16, 
1879, who was engaged in educational work 
for some time, and who on November 8, i8g6, 
married Irving K. Ingalls, of this town. 

Mr. Berry takes an active interest in politi- 
cal affairs. He has been a member of the 
Board of Selectmen for the past ten years, and 
he is at the present time Chairman of that 
body. The Republican Town Committee also 
avails of his services as Chairman. He is a 
member of Mount Moriah Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M., of Denmark; of Denmark Lodge; the 
encampment at Bridgton, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows; and of Hiram Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias. An able and progressive 
business man and one who takes an earnest 
interest in the general welfare, he is highly 
regarded in the community. 



/pTKORGE G. WHITMAN, an exten- 
\ I^^T sive farmer of Sumner, Oxford 
County, and a veteran of the Civil 
War, was born in Woodstock, Me., May 13, 
1S41, son of Zeri B. and Mary (Dale) Whit- 
man. Joshua Whitman, his great-grand- 
father, was one of the first settlers of Buck- 
field, this county. Jacob Whitman, a son of 
Joshua and grandfather of George G., was a 
native of that town, an "industrious farmer, 
and a well-known local preacher of the Calvin- 
ist Baptist doctrine in his day. He died in 
Hebron, at the advanced age of ninety years. 
Zeri B. Whitman was a native of Woodstock, 
born in August, 1807. He learned the car- 
penter's trade, which he followed in connec- 
tion with farming during his active period. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IIS 



He moved from Woodstock to Hebron, where 
he subsequently died at the age of fifty-seven 
years. He was an active member of the Cal- 
vinist Baptist church and a teacher in the 
Sunday-school for a long period. In his later 
years he gave his political support to the Re- 
publican party. His wife, Mary, who was 
born in Norway, Me., May 3, 181 1, became 
the mother of nine children, two of whom are 
living. These are: Frank M., a lawyer of 
Haverhill, Mass. ; and George G. , the sub- 
ject of this sketch. Mr. Whitman's mother 
lived to the advanced age of eighty-three 
years. 

George G. Whitman grew to manhood in 
Hebron, and accpiired his education at the 
academy in that town. On October 7, 1861, 
he enlisted as a private in Company K, Fifth 
Regiment, Maine Volunteers, under Captain 
H. T. Buckman, of Mechanic Falls. During 
his three years of active service in the Civil 
War he participated in the second battle of 
Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Antietam, Fred- 
ericksburg, Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, and 
Winchester, and was honorably discharged in 
1864. After hi.s return from the army he was 
encratred as a contractor in the shoe manufact- 
uring business at Haverhill, Mass., for eight 
years, when, his health becoming poor, he 
bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
in Paris, Me., where until 1885 he followed 
the more healthful employment of tilling the 
soil. In i88g he moved to Sumner, where he 
now owns two hundred and seventy acres of 
desirable land, constituting one of the largest 
farms in this vicinity. Here he carries on 
general farming and dairying, and keeps from 
si.\ to ten full-blooded and graded Jersey cows. 
He has made various improvements upon the 
land and buildings, which are in iirst-class 
condition; and his energy is fast bringing him 
to the front rank among the well-to-do agri- 
culturists of the neighborhood. 

On November 15, 1872, Mr. Whitman 
wedded Amanda E. Hill, who was born in 
Conway, N.H., daughter of Wentworth and 
Asenath Hill. The only child of the union, 
Fred A., was born in- Paris, February 18, 
1882, and is now attending Hebron .'\cademy. 
In politics Mr. Whitman is a Republican. 
He is connected with South Paris Grange, 



Patrons of Husbandry, and is a comrade of 
William K. Kimbalf Post, No. 148, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of South Paris. Both 
he and Mrs. Whitman are libeial in their re- 
ligious views. 




DELBERT ELROV DEAN, a promi- 
nent and influential farmer of Paris, 
Oxford County, was born April 25, 
1S54, in the neighboring township 
of Peru, son of Edmund Sylvester and Hannah 
(Brown) Dean. His great-grandfather was 
one of the very earliest settlers of Paris. His 
grandfather, Edmund Dean, wh(j was born 
here, and was a Democrat in politics, married 
Esther A. Allen, a native of Hartford. Both 
the grandparents lived a full century, were 
liberal in their religious creed, and active 
members of the Universalist church. 

lulmund Sylvester Dean, also a native of 
Paris, born February 5, 1820, was here reared 
and educated. Arriving at the years of ma- 
turity, he started for Boston, where he worked 
at the carpenter's trade nearly ten years. Re- 
turning then to his native county, he there 
carried on general farming for three years. 
After this he purchased a farm in Peru, where 
he remained until 1856, when he again be- 
came a resident of Paris. While living in 
Buckfield, he married Hannah Brown, of 
Turner, Me., where her birth occurred Febru- 
ary 6, 1830. ]5oth are now living in South 
Paris, retired from active work. They have 
six children — Nellie E., Adelbert P2., Palmer, 
Georgia A., Albert E. , and Isa B. 

Adelbert Elroy Dean was but two years of 
age when his parents brought him to Paris. 
He received his education in the schools of 
this town and at the Oxford County Normal 
Institute. During the first ten years of his 
business life Mr. Dean worked in the shoe 
factory of B. F. Spinney & Co., of Norway, 
Me., being "second hand" in the stock de- 
partment. Receiving a fair compensation for 
his labor, he was able to save enough of his 
earnings to buy and stock his present farm in 
1892. The estate contains one hundred and 
sixty acres. Besides general farming Mr. 
Dean ia engaged in dairying, keeping graded 
Jersey cattle. By his energy, ability, and 



if, 



BIOGRAPHICAL' REVIEW 



push he has won a prominent position among 
the agriculturists of this section of the county. 
In religion he is a Universalist and in poli- 
tics an unswerving Democrat. He was Super- 
visor of Schools in Paris from 1886 until 
1888. An esteemed member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, he belongs to 
Norway Lodge, No. 16, Wildey Encampment, 
No. 21, and Wildey Canton, No. 8, of Norway. 
He has also affiliation with the Paris Grange, 
No. 44, Patrons of Husbandry. 

On F"ebruary 22, 1881, Mr. Dean married 
Mary A. Hussey, daughter of Samuel A. 
Hussey, prominently identified with the social 
and official life of Waterford, Me., where he 
resides. Mr. and Mrs. Dean have three chil- 
dren, namely: Arthur E., born June 21, 
1883; Henry A., born August 27, 1888; and 
Myrtle, born June 13, 1895. 



^Crr)/lLLIAM MORRI 
Yfe\/ ington's retired 
*^ '^ was for many ye 



LISON, one of Farm- 
business men, who 
j'ears identified with 
the lumber manufacturing industry of this lo- 
cality, was born upon the site of his present 
residence, October 8, 1821, son of John and 
Sarah (Tufts) Morrison. The Morrison fam- 
ily, which is of Scotch-Irish stock, descends 
from Robert Morrison, a native of London- 
derry, Ireland, who emigrated to America 
during the Colonial jjeriod, and settled at 
Bridgewater, Mass., where he followed the 
trade of a general mechanic. His son, Will- 
iam, Mr. Morrison's great-grandfather, mar- 
ried Sarah Montgomery, by whom he became 
the father of four sons — William, Robert, 
John, and James. 

William Morrison, Mr. Morrison's grand- 
father, who was a blacksmith by trade, resided 
for a time in Middleboro, Mass. From there 
he came to the District of Maine in 1805, 
making a settlement in Farmington, wher'e he 
bought two hundred acres of the Sewell tract. 
Here he cleared a farm, erected a large house, 
spent the remainder of his life occupied in 
farming and working at his trade, and died at 
the age of seventy-seven years. He was a 
man of great physical strength and energy. 
He took a broad and liberal view of religious 
subjects, while in politics he supported the 



Whig party. In 1772 he married Hannah 
Benson, with whom he reared a family of 
seven children — Robert, William, John, 
Sally, Betsey," Hannah, and Jane. The 
mother, who attended the Baptist church, 
reached the age of seventy-seven years. 

John Morrison, who was born in Massachu- 
setts, March 3, 1784, assisted his father in 
clearing and improving the farm. He subse- 
quently inherited the property; and he became 
very prosperous as a general farmer and lum- 
berman, owning a half-interest in the saw- 
mills at North Chesterville, then one of the 
principal industries in this locality. He was 
a member of the Board of Selectmen for the 
years 1821 and 1822, and he served with abil- 
ity in other town offices. He maintained a 
lively interest in public affairs and in the in- 
dustrial development of the town until his 
death, which occurred in 1857. He was a 
Universalist in his religious belief, and he 
contributed generously to relieve the necessi- 
ties of the poor and needy. His wife, Sarah, 
who was a daughter of Francis Tufts, Jr., 
became by him the mother of seven children; 
namely, Sarah, John B. , William, Hannah, 
Robert M., Benjamin F. , and Elizabeth C. 
She died in 1852, aged fifty-five years. 

William Morrison acquired his education in 
the town schools, and subsequently learned 
the trade of a blacksmith. He inherited 
thirty acres of the homestead property and 
the old family residence that stood on it. In 
1848 he replaced the residence with a more 
modern and spacious dwelling. In the same 
year he bought an interest in the North Ches- 
terville mills, and engaged in the manufacture 
of lumber. The enterprise was profitable to 
him and beneficial to the work-people of this 
locality. He displayed excellent business 
ability, and' gained in his dealings the reputa- 
tion of an honorable and upright man. His 
prosperity continued unabated throughout his 
long period of activity. Since his retirement 
he has passed his time pleasantly at his farm, 
which he enlarged some years since by the 
purchase of adjoining land. He still superin- 
tends his farm, is remarkably well preserved 
and healthy for one of his years, and is a most 
entertaining conversationalist. He attends 
the L^niversalist church, and is a member of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"7 



Franklin Lodge, No. 5.S, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

On December 12, 1S48, Mr. Morrison 
wedded Mrs. Esther H. Woodworth, who was 
born January 3, 18 18, daughter of Stephen 
and Esther (Harris) Allen. She died July 
13, 1862, leaving two sons, as follows: Will- 
iam H., born November 4, 1850; and Joseph 
A., born October 10, 1S52. William H. 
Morrison, who completed his classical course 
at Tufts College in 1875, graduated from the 
Divinity School connected with that institu- 
tion in 1S78, and is now a Universalist minis- 
ter in Manchester, N.H., married Alice N. 
Bickford, and has two children — Grace and 
Harry. Joseph A. Morrison, who is now a 
jeweller in I'ittsfield, Me., married Anna 
Ney, and has three children — Elmer J., 
Esther, and Robert W. 



.HANDLER GARLAND, Deputy 
-^ Sheriff, and a popular resident of 
Paris, Oxford County, was born on 
Paris Hill, November i, 1850, son 
of John L. and Clara (Rawson) Garland, and 
grandson of John L. Garland, Sr. His father 
grew to manhood in Andover and Rumford, this 
county, acquiring his education in the com- 
mon schools of these towns. When a young 
man he came to Paris, purchased a farm, and 
by his industry and upright dealings became 
a successful agriculturist, and earned the re- 
spect of his townsmen. He was a Republican 
in politics, and filled a number of the minor 
town ofifices. He died on March 15, 1893. 
His wife, Clara, now living with her son, 
bore him four children, two sons and two 
daughters. These were: William E., who 
died at the age of seventeen years; Clara E. , 
who is the wife of Charles E. Waterman, the 
editor of the Mechanic Falls Ledi^cr ; Chand- 
ler, the subject of this sketch; and Mrs. Belle 
M. Merrill. 

After acquiring his education, which was 
completed at the South Paris Normal School, 
Chandler Garland entered the printing-office 
of the O.xford Democrat, and there spent three 
years. The business proving uncongenial to 
his tastes, he then abandoned it; and, in com- 
pany with S. U. Hawkes, under the firm name 



of Hawkes & Garland, he started a mercantile 
business at Paris, and continued it for six 
years with good success. Mr. Garland then 
removed to Cambridge, Mass., and openetl a 
grocery store. This he sold out after two 
years, and came to South Paris as book-keeper 
for the Paris Manufacturing Company. He 
was with this firmsi.x years, when the state of 
his health obliged him to seek outdoor em- 
ployment. In 1888 he was appointed Deputy 
Sheriff, in which capacity he received charge 
of the county jail, then, together with the 
court-house, located at Paris Hill. In addi- 
tion to these duties he also discharged those 
of Ta.x Collector and Constable for six years. 
He has been in charge of the new court-house 
and jail at South Paris since they were 
erected, proving himself by his able and care- 
ful management the right man for the place. 

On May 20, 1876, Mr. Garland was united 
in marriage with Miss P"lora E. Whitternore, 
daughter of Albion A. and Sophia (Cole) 
Whittemore. Her father is a well-known 
blacksmith and farmer of Paris. Mr. and 
Mrs. Garland have three daughters, namely: 
Minnie J., born September 29, 1878; Alice 
M., born April 14, 1881; and Mabel S., born 
February 18, 1883, who died May 25, 1884. 
Mr. Garland adheres to the Republican prin- 
ciples in which he was reared. He also con- 
tinues in the religious faith of his father, 
being, like him, a communciant of the Baptist 
church. He is a member of Mount Mica 
Lodge, No. 17, Independent Order of Odd 
P'ellows, of South Paris. 




HARLES EDWIN DVICR, keeper of 
the jail and janitor of the Franklin 
County court-house at Farmington, 
was born in New Sharon, Me., No- 
vember 5, [850, son of Dr. Parmenas and 
Hannah W. (Baker) Dyer. Dr. Dyer was 
born May 20, 1822, in Corinna, Penobscot 
County. Ambitious to attain a useful posi- 
tion in life, he eventually accomplished his 
aim through his own personal exertions. By 
observing the most rigid economy he managed 
to complete his preparatory education. Then 
he studied medicine with Dr. Hill, of 
Augusta, and graduated from the Maine Med- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ical School at Brunswick in 1846, having paid 
his expenses with the earnings derived from 
such work as he was able to obtain. The 
first five years of his professional life were 
passed in New Sharon. He then moved to 
Lewiston, where for a time he was engaged in 
editing a newspaper published in Auburn, on 
the opposite side of the river. After the 
office with its contents was destroyed by fire, 
he removed to Leavenworth, Kan., where for 
the succeeding six years he practised medicine 
and surgery, and acted as a government agent 
in looking up farming lands. In 1861 he re- 
turned East, and, settling in F'armington, 
successfully followed iiis [profession until his 
death, which occurred in 1891. His reputa- 
tion was that of a skilful and reliable practi- 
tioner. He is remembered by his numerous 
patients in this locality, who were benefited 
by his careful treatment. In ]3olitics he was 
a Democrat, and in religious belief he was a 
Unitarian. His wife, whom he wedded in 
1847, is a daughter of Colonel D. J. Baker, 
of New Sharon. Her children were: Charles 
E., the subject of this sketch; and Frank, 
who married Josie Farrington, and resides in 
Livermore Falls. She still survives her hus- 
band. 

Charles Edwin Dyer acquired the principal 
part of his education in the schools of I-'arm- 
ington. After completing his studies he 
began life for himself as a workman in a 
tannery. At a later date lie became a clerk in 
a grocery store. Afterward going to Auburn, 
he was for a time employed as clerk in a 
hotel. Returning to this town subsequently, 
he resumed clerking in a grocery store, where 
he continued engaged until September 15, 
1890. He was then appointed keeper of the 
jail. Supreme Court messenger, and janitor of 
the Franklin County court-house, positions 
which he has since filled satisfactorily. The 
county jail, a securely built structure, erected 
in 1887, is carefully kept with a due regard 
for the health of the inmates, among whom 
best of order is maintained. The court-house, 
which was built in 1885, under the direction 
of Messrs. F. \V. Patterson, J. Chick, and 
Samuel K. Wellman, County Commissioners, 
also shows evidence of the care and attention 
it receives at .Mr. Dyer's hands. 



On January 22, 18S7, Mr. Dyer was united 
in marriage to Ella L. Perkins, daughter of 
Orrin Perkins, of Carthage, Me. He is an 
Odd Fellow of high standing, being Past 
Grand of P^ranklin Lodge, No. 58, and Past 
Chief Patriarch of the Sandy River Encamp- 
ment, No. 9. In politics he is a Republican. 
He attends the Baptist church, of which he 
has acted as usher for the past twelve years. 



/STeORGE H. EASTMAN, an enter- 
\ '*) I prising and prosperous farmer and a 
prominent citizen of Lovell, Oxford 
County, Me., was born in this municipality, 
March 9, 1850, his parents being Isaac and 
Katherine (Page) Eastman. 

His father was a son of Phineas Eastman, 
an agriculturist of Lovell, and was one of a 
family of nine children. Isaac Eastman after 
his marriage settled in the southern part of the 
tow-n of Lovell, where he carried on farming, 
and also engaged in Numbering, until his de- 
cease. He married Miss Katherine Page, a 
native of Burlington, Me. ; and they became 
the parents of four children — George H., 
Mellen, Alva, and H. Walter. Mellen East- 
man married Miss Nellie M. Gerry, and they 
now reside with his mother on the old home- 
stead at South Lovell. Alva wedded Miss 
Alice Eastman; and they now make their 
home at St. Cloud, Minn. He is a promi- 
nent man of that city, and is the editor ami 
proprietor of the St. Cloud Journal Pirss. 
H. Walter Eastman still resides in his native 
town, and is engaged in general farming. 
Mr. Isaac Eastman passed away in December, 
1895. 

George H. Eastman grew to manhood on 
the paternal estate, obtaining his education in 
the common schools of Lovell and in the 
Bethel and Fryeburg Academy. At the age of 
twenty-one he began to teach ; and for about 
six years he had charge of the district scliooLs 
in Lovell, North Waterford, and Fryeburg. 
During that time he married; and soon after 
he assumed charge of the homestead of his 
father-in-law, which was known as the 
Pottle farm. On this estate, now embrac- 
ing about two hundred and twenty-five acres, 
which he has very much improved during his 




HARLAN P. DENNISON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



proprietorship, he is successfully engaged in 
general agricultural [nirsuits, devoting less at- 
tention, however, to stock raising and dairy- 
ing than to the cultivation of the land. 

On November 14, 1874, Mr. Eastman mar- 
rietl Miss Lizzie M. Pottle, a native of Lovell 
and one of the five children of the Rev. John 
S. and Mrs. Nancy II. (Hamblen) Pottle, to 
whom she was born May 17, 1851. Mr. 
Pottle was a native of Stratham, N.H., and 
his wife of Limington, Me. Prior to his 
marriage he removed to Stoneham, Me., where 
he resided about four years, changing his 
home then to Lovell, settling on a farm near 
the centre of that town. He conducted hus- 
bandry thereon until 1850, when he located on 
the estate now occupied by his son-in-law, 
Mr. Eastman, and on which he resided until 
his decease. The Rev. John S. Pottle and his 
wife became the jxirents of five children, 
namely: Albanes M.; Lizzie M., now Mrs. 
Eastman; P"rancina; Lydia H. ; and Carrie 
M. Albanes M. Pottle, who still resides in 
Lovell, and is engaged in farming and teach- 
ing, married for his first wife Miss Nellie H. 
Heald, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abel 
Heald, of Lovell, and after her death wedded 
Miss Mary Heald, a native of Lovell ; Francina 
Pottle is now the wife of C. Adelbert Heath, 
who is a dealer in dry goods at Brayton, la. ; 
Lydia lives at Lovell as the wife of Henry W. 
Palmer, who prosecutes there farming and car- 
pentering and also the blacksmith trade; 
Carrie is now Mrs. Ezra Heald, whose hus- 
band is a farmer of Stow, Me. Mr. Pottle de- 
parted this life on January 10, i8g2. His 
wife still survives, residing with her daughter, 
Mrs. Eastman. 

Mr. Eastman is one of the most influential 
citizens of Lovell, though he has never been a 
solicitor for public ofifice. He takes a leading 
part in town and county enterprises, and is an 
earnest advocate of every wise project looking 
to the welfare and advancement of the com- 
munity. For two years he officiated as Super- 
visor in Lovell. Mr. Eastman is in affiliation 
with Kezar Valley Lodge, No. 66, of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, located in 
Lovell. His political views bring him into 
fellowship with the Republican party, to 
which he has always given his allegiance. 



Both he and his wife are members of the 
Christian Church of Lovell Centre. Mr. 
Eastman is of a genial disposition, and he 
commands the respect and confidence of a 
broad circle of acquaintances. 



r^TARLAN P. DENNISON, of South 
r^\ Paris, Me., the Treasurer of the 

|ls I Paris Manufacturing Company, is 

one of those men who have made 
American enterprise proverbial throughout the 
world. He is a native of Freeport, IVIe., born 
April 10, 1849, son of Joseph and Caroline 
(Blackstone) Dennison. Joseph Dennison 
was a leading farmer of P"reeport, where he 
died in 1862, when fifty-eight years old. His 
wife, Caroline, bore him five children, of 
whom one died in infancy. The others, who 
all attained maturity, were: Hannah, Ann J., 
Harlan, and Lucilla. The mother lived until 
I 89 1, reaching the age of seventy-two years. 

Harlan P. Dennison, left fatherless at the 
age of thirteen, was then obliged to aid in 
maintaining the family by going to work in a 
shoe factory. Possessed of a natural aptitude 
for any mechanical labor requiring skill, he 
learned the trade quickly, and was soon earn- 
ing wages that caused him to be looked to as 
the chief support of his mother and sisters. 
Subsequently, becoming expert in the work of 
all the departments, he demanded and ob- 
tained the highest remuneration paid. When 
thirty years old he joined the firm of Denni- 
son & Lamont, manufacturers of boots and 
shoes in Freeport. Shortly after he bought 
out his partner, and conducted the establish- 
ment alone for a brief period. Then he took 
R. A. Lewis into partnership, the business 
being carried on for four years under the name 
of Dennison & Lewis. Again he became 
sole proprietor by purchasing his partner's in- 
terest; and in the ensuing years he made 
shoes, principally ladies' hand-turned shoes, 
at the rate of thirty-five thousand pairs per 
year. In 1891 he came to South Paris to 
settle, as e.xecutor, the estate of his father-in- 
law, who had recently died. This work 
brought him into relations with the Paris 
Manufacturing Company, of which the father- 
in-law had been a shareholder at his death to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the amount of eighty-four thousand dollars, 
and finally led him to abandon the manufact- 
ure of shoes and invest largely in that com- 
pany's stock. At the same time he took up 
his residence in South Paris. In the follow- 
ing year he was elected Trustee of the com- 
pany, and thenceforth he became more and 
more identified with its interests. 

The business of the company was first 
started in 1S70 at Paris Hill, under the man- 
agement of H. F. Morton and G. B. Crocker, 
with capital raised by the people of the town. 
In 1883 a new and more commodious building 
was erected in South Paris, and the plant re- 
moved hither. Two years after it was de- 
stroyed by an accidental fire, but no time was 
lost in rebuilding. The structure covers an 
area of thirty-nine thousand square feet, has a 
height varying from one to two and a half 
stories, and is furnishetl with the best and 
most improved machinery, all of which is 
operated by steam-power. In tlie large store- 
house adjoining and in several others in the 
village the manufactured goods are kept in 
readiness for shipping. Over two hundred 
hands are employed, including a number of 
the best mechanics in special departments. 
The articles made here are hand-carts, car- 
riages, sleds, sleighs, desks, chairs, step- 
ladders, and so forth, for which the timber is 
bought in the log, and afterward cut and kiln- 
dried on the premises. It is claimed that no 
other factory in the country produces these 
goods in such large quantities or of so high a 
quality. The company supplies an extensive 
territory, within which it fears no competi- 
tors. Every year for some time past it has 
been obliged to run the factory for a season at 
night as well as day to keep even with its 
orders. 

In 1872, October 2, Mr. Dennison was 
united in matrimony with Miss Esther Gush- 
ing, daughter of Gharles and Martha (Brewer) 
Gushing. Mr. Gushing, who was a native of 
Freeport, in his youth learned the trade of 
carpenter and joiner, which he followed for a 
number of years. Subsequently he became 
associated with the firm of Briggs, Gushing 
& Means, of Ereeport, with whom he built 
several noted vessels, including the "Nor- 
wegian,'" "Oasis," "John De Ca.ster." "Gen- 



eral Eairchilds," and the "Wilna." He con- 
tinued in the ship-building business until 
1885, when he retired from active occupation. 
He first became interested in the Paris Manu- 
facturing Gompany in 1878. Afterward he 
continued to buy shares until he was the larg- 
est stockholder of the company. He died in 
1892, aged seventy-two years. Mr. Dennison 
and his wife have three children, namely: H. 
Walter, born June 27, 1874; Gharles P. and 
Martha E. (twins), born September 18, 1878. 
H. Walter Dennison married Madge Stuart, 
and is the book-keeper of the Paris Manufact- 
uring Gompany. Both parents are members 
of the Baptist church. When a resident of 
Freeport, Mr. Dennison was Selectman of the 
town for a time. He is Ghancellor Gom- 
mander, Hamlin Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
and Treasurer of the local Board of Trade. 




EZEKIAH G. MASON, an e.x- 
soldier of the Army of the Republic, 
who at the close of the war with 
the South gladly exchanged rifle and 
cartridge-box for plough-share and spade, and 
was thereafter for a number of years actively 
engaged in farming in the town of Mason, is 
now virtually retired from active pursuits. 
He was born here, March 2S, 1835, his parents 
being Artemas and Betsey (Bartlett) Mason. 

Artemas Mason was a native of Gilead, O.x- 
ford Gounty, and spent the early years of his 
life on a farm in that town. Goming to 
Mason when a young man, he purchased a 
farm, on which he spent the remainder of his 
life. Naturally energetic and industrious, by 
careful management he was able not only to 
support his family in comfort, but to lay by 
for the days of enforced idleness. From the 
formation of the Republican party he was one 
of its stanch supporters. He served as Select- 
man of Mason several years. His wife, whose 
maiden name was ]?etsey Bartlett, was born 
in Gumberland Gounty, Maine. P'or her first 
husband she married Hezekiah Grover, who 
died leaving her with two children — Amos 
A., residing in Norway; and Mehitabel J., 
wife of E. G. Wheeler. Three children were 
born of her union with Mr. Artemas Mason, 
of whom Minerva Ann died at twentv-eiirht 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



123 



years of age, and Francis at seventeen, the 
only survivor being Hezekiah G., of this 
sketch. Artemas Mason died at eighty-three 
years of age, and Mrs. Mason in middle life. 
Both were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Hezekiah G. Mason lived at home until 
some time after the outbreak of the Civil 
War. In 1863 he enlisted in the Seventh 
Maine Battery, with which he went out as a 
private, and was gone about two years, most 
of the time being spent in Virginia, the seat 
of many of the severest battles of the war. 
Among those in which he participated were 
the battle of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, 
Petersburg, and Spottsylvania, besides many 
smaller engagements. At Petersburg he was 
wounded in the left hand, and for two months 
he was in the hospital at Washington. At 
the close of the war Mr. Mason returned home, 
and engaged in agriculture on the farm where 
he has since resided. He has, however, re- 
cently sold the farm to his son-in-law, Ernest 
Morrill: but he continues to live here, having 
laid by ample means for all his requirements. 

On January 2, 1861, Mr. Mason was married 
to Miss Susanna Watson, of Norway. She 
died January 20, 1879, leaving three children, 
namely: Luella, wife of Rufus Morrill, of 
Norway Lake, Me.; Willard H.; and 15etsey 
B., the wife of Ernest Morrill. The Republi- 
can party has in Mr. Mason a loyal supporter. 
He is a member of Pleasant Valley Grange of 
West Bethel and of G. Brown Post, No. 84, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of Bethel. 




JDWIN SAWYER, an ex-member of the 
Maine legislature, now living in retire- 
ment at West Farmington, was born 
July 5, 1 83 1, in Temple, this county, son of 
Nathaniel and Polly (Richards) Sawyer. Mr. 
Sawyer's father, who was a native of Hancock, 
N.H., resided there until he was eleven years 
old, when he accompanied Thomas Russell 
to Temple, and worked for him as a farm as- 
sistant for ten years. He then entered the 
employ of Benjamin Abbott, with whom he 
remained for the same length of time. After 
that he purchased a tract of land that included 
three small clearings, and engaged in farming 



on his own account. In time, ijy perseverance 
and hard work, he became the owner of three 
hundred acres of fertile land, most of which 
was cleared for tillage purposes. Through his 
unabated toil and the assistance of his sons he 
accumulated a competency sufficient to insure 
a comfortable subsistence for his declining 
years. He passed his last days in retirement, 
and died at the age of eighty-five years. Be- 
sides an unusual amount of energy he pos- 
sessed extraordinary physical strength. He 
has left a monument of his industry in a stone 
wall sixteen feet broad and five feet high, 
which still stands upon the farm. His kind 
and agreeable disposition, besides endearing 
him to his family, made him a general favorite 
with his neighbors. In politics he supported 
the Democratic party, while his religious 
views were liberal. His wife, Polly, who was 
a daughter of Mitchell Richards, bore Iiim 
nine children; namely, Mary, Pamelia, Leon- 
ard, Albion K., Abiel, Sophia A., Dennis, 
Edwin, and Phirilla. All of them attained 
maturity, and several are still living. The 
mother died at the age of seventy years. 

Edwin .Sawyer was educated in the town 
schools. At an early age he began to assist 
his father in carrying on the farm. He re- 
sided with his parents until he reached the 
age of twenty-seven years, when he bought a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in his na- 
tive town. Here he entered upon the life of 
an independent farmer with a spirit of deter- 
mination that foreshadowed the success he has 
achieved. He set out a fine orchard, com- 
pletely remodelled the buildings, and made 
other improvements which greatly added to 
the convenience, as well as to the value, of 
his property. For many years he was con- 
sidered one of the ablest and most successful 
agriculturists in the town of Temple. In poli- 
tics he is an active supporter of the Republi- 
can party, and his prominence in public 
affairs has been the means of creating for him 
an extended acquaintanceship throughout this 
section of the county. For ten years he 
served as a member of the Board of Select- 
men. He was Town Treasurer for eight 
years; and he represented his district with 
marked ability in the legislature during the 
years 1879 ^"^ 1880. 



124 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



On March 27, 1S59, ^^^- Sawyer wedded 
Aphia J., daughter of Warren and Lucy 
Voter, who represented an old and progressive 
family of Farmington. Mrs. Sawyer, who iias 
in a great measure contributed to her hus- 
band's advancement, is the mother of four 
children, as follows: George E , born January 
16, i860, who died June 3, 1865; Persia E., 
born September 3, 1861, who is now the wife 
of Charles R. Hall, an extensive farmer and 
stock dealer of Wilton, and has two children 
— Edwin S. and Orie L. ; Ernest G., born 
February 17, 1867, who died July 18, 1873; 
and Bernice E., born May 20, 1876, who is 
now the wife of Charles B. Goodwin, of 
Livermore F~alls. Retiring from active labor 
in 1896, Mr. Sawyer sold his property to Mrs. 
Harriet F. Cony, and moved to West Farm- 
ington, where he bought the Greenwood stand, 
one of the best and most desirably located 
residences in the village. Here he is passing 
his time in comparative leisure after a busy 
and successful career. He has always pos- 
sessed a robust constitution; and, with the ex- 
ception of rheumatism, contracted through hard 
work, he enjoys good health, and is as active 
as a much younger man. 




"ENRV W. PARK, a prosperous mer- 
chant in the village of Mexico, Ox- 
ford County, Me., is widely and 
favorably known in these parts, 
having long been prominent, not only as a 
successful business man, but as a political 
leader in the Republican ranks and as one of 
the town officers. He was born in Dixfield, 
the town adjoining Mexico on the east, on 
March 13, 1834, son of Isaac and Emeline 
(Smith) Park. 

Isaac Park was born at the residence of his 
parents, near the corner of Franklin Street, 
Boston, Mass. After attending school in 
that city until he was fourteen years of age, 
he went to Newton, Mass., to learn the trade 
of carpenter. Going with his employer soon 
after to Paris, Me., he there remained until 
the completion of his apprenticeship, when he 
removed to Dixfield, to work at his trade. 
He served as Captain of the old .State militia, 
and officiated for nearly twenty years as 



Sheriff, being subsequently a member of the 
legislature. In politics he attained honor 
and distinction in the ranks of the Demo- 
cratic party. Captain Park was a public-spir- 
ited citizen and a man of liberal views, being 
in religion a Universalist. His busy career 
was ended by death at the age of fifty-seven. 
His wife, Emeline, who shared his cheerful 
religious faith, was a daughter of John Smith, 
of Readfield, Kennebec County, Me. She 
died at the home of her son, Henry W. Park, 
on January 28, 1878, at the age of seventy-two 
years. 

Henry W. Park was the eldest of the three 
children born to his parents. He spent his 
early life at home, attending the common 
school and later the high school in the vil- 
lage until the age of fifteen, and during the 
next three years being employed in his father's 
general merchandise store in Carthage, Frank- 
lin County, Me. When he was eighteen he 
went to Boston, there serving four years as 
salesman in a clothing house. After his 
father died he returned to Dixfield, and 
worked at the carpenter's trade till 1859, -when 
he came to Mexico, and rented a farm. The 
following year he moved to Mexico Corner, 
where he now resides. In March, 1S61, Mr. 
Park purchased the store that he now- owns, 
continuing in trade until the early part of 
1S64, when he sold out and went to Washing- 
ton, D.C. , where he served as clerk of the 
Ordnance Department until the close of the 
war. Returning to Mexico in July, 1865, he 
bought back his old store at the corner, and 
revived his trade, which is now (1896) in a 
flourishing condition. 

In politics Mr. Park is a decided Republi- 
can, ever alive to party interests. His high 
standing in the estimation of his fellow-citi; 
zens is shown by his frequent election to 
important offices. He has served as Crier of 
the Courts four years, Selectman of Mexico 
three years. Town Treasurer twenty-five con- 
secutive years, and in 1875 he was Represent- 
ative to the State legislature. He has been 
for twenty-one years a member of Blazing Star 
Lodge, No. 30,' A. F. & A. M., of Rumford 
Falls; and he is a charter member of Tuscan 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd F"ellows, of 
Dixfield, which he named at the time of its 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



organization. Besides being a store-keeper, 
Mr. Park is an active temperance worker and 
an able correspondent of the local papers. It 
is hardly needful to add that he has an exten- 
sive acquaintance and a large circle of excel- 
lent friends. 

Mr. Park has been three times married. 
His first wife, I':ilen R. Phelps, of Dixfield, 
with whom he was united in June, 1857, died 
in August, 1X62, leaving two children — Al- 
bert Dexter, who is now Register of Probate 
for Oxford County: and Henrietta, who mar- 
ried John ]'.. Richards, and resides here. His 
second wife, formerly Miss Ellen C. Reed, of 
this place, whom he wedded on July 3, 1865, 
died in January, 1875, leaving one son, Ellery 
C, who became a lawyer in Bethel, Me. The 
maiden name of his present wife, to whom he 
was married in August, 1875, ^^''^s i*2nna L. 
Gleason. F"our children have been born to 
them, namely: Helena O. and Lucy E., both 
of whom are teachers; and Henry \V. , Jr., 
and Eva Grace, who are still at home. .Mrs. 
Park is a native of Mexico, Me. 



-ERE H. WINSLOW, a retired farmer 
and cattle dealer of South Paris, Oxford 
County, Me., was born in the town of 
Paris, January 18, 1823, son of Jacob 
and Betsey (Pratt) Winslow. Mr. Winslovv's 
father was a native of Fryeburg, Me., where 
lie was brought up in the family of a Mr. 
Hutchins; and in young manhood he settled 
upon a tract of unimproved land in Paris. He 
cleared a portion of his property into a good 
farm, which he cultivated during the rest of 
his active period. His wife died in 1869; 
and he spent his last days at the home of his 
son, Luther P., where he died in 1877, aged 
eightytruine years. He was an energetic, 
hard-working man: and he was highly re- 
spected as a worthy citizen. In politics he 
was originally a Democrat, later supporting 
the Republican party. He was an attendant 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. His 
wife, Betsey I'ratt, was a daughter of Luther 
Pratt, who came from Middleboro, Mass., to 
Paris, and was among the most enterprising 
and progressive of the early settlers of this 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Winslow had 



three children, namely: Luther P.; Albert; 
and Jere H., subject of this sketch, who was 
the youngest-born. 

Jere H. Winslow resided at home until he 
was nineteen years old, when he went to Mas- 
sachusetts, and engaged in farming and team- 
ing. Being a strong and capable man, he re- 
ceived good wages wherever he worked, always 
giving satisfaction, remaining in one place 
until a better one presented itself; and by 
carefully saving his earnings he at length 
amassed a sufficient sum to make a start in 
life for himself. His father being already 
well advanced in years, Mr. Winslow re- 
turned to his native town to care for his par- 
ents, and here engaged in farming on his own 
account. He advanced rapidly in prosperity, 
from time to time adding more land to his 
possessions; and he improved the homestead 
farm by rebuilding the house and erecting two 
new barns. Dealing in cattle was his prin- 
cipal pursuit for many years; and in that 
business he realized financial success, buying 
good stock, and selling it on time to farmers 
in this vicinity. He has also carried on lum- 
bering operations to some extent with profit- 
able results, and, being naturally of a stirring 
and energetic disposition, has never lost an 
opportunity to advance his material interests. 
Besides his original estate he bought two other 
farms. 

In 1877, selling his farms in Paris, with 
the intention of retiring permanently from ac- 
tive labor, he bought the Samuel Deering 
place, situated on High Street in .South Paris; 
and he has since enlarged and remodelled the 
buildings, and otherwise improved this prop- 
erty. He has erected two houses upon his 
large lot here for investment purposes, one 
double and the other a single tenement, which 
yield him a good income. His early-ac- 
quired habits of activity preventing him even 
now from being idle, he still keeps bu.sy at 
some useful employment. During the past 
winter, 1895 and 1896, he sawed and pre- 
pared seventeen cords of wood, "just to pass 
away the time," as he expresses it. It is 
scarcely needful to say that he enjoys good 
health. He has considerable capital invested 
in financial enterprises, has been a Director of 
the Paris Savings Bank and a Trustee of the 



126 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Oxford County Fair, and is well known as one 
of the substantial residents of this section. 

On May i, 1853, Mr. VVinslow was united 
in marriage with Lucetta M. Swan, a daugh- 
ter of William, Jr., and Hannah (Locke) 
Swan. Mrs. Winslow's father was born in 
Paris, May 18, 1792, and, when a young man, 
settled upon a farm in Woodstock. He finally 
returned to his native town, where he long 
continued to till the soil. His death took 
place at the advanced age of ninety-one 
years. He was held in high esteem by his 
fellow-townsmen as an active, intelligent, and 
progressive citizen. He married Hannah 
Locke; and their children were: Lodiska, 
Urania, Lucetta E., William R., Leander S., 
Lucetta ]\L, and Hannah E. The mother 
died at the age of si.xty-one years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winslow have had three chil- 
dren, as follows: Ella J., who was born Feb- 
ruary 10, 1856, married Franklin Burbank, 
an architect and builder, and has one son, 
Frank W., born March 6, 1886; Lizzie A., 
who was born July 19, 1859: and Nellie, who 
was born February i, 1867, and died July 1, 
1889. 

As a man of good judgment in financial 
matters and of recognized integrity, Mr. Wins- 
low commands the esteem and confidence of 
his fellow-townspeople; and he has been 
employed to settle several estates. In poli- 
tics he has always been a Republican since 
the formation of the party, and both he and 
his wife are Methodists in their religious 
views. 




lAI'TAIN SILAS D. PERHAM, of 
Farmington, Me., a progressive and 
prosperous farmer, was born at his 
present home, August 6, 1814, the 
son of Silas and Hannah (Jennings) Perham. 
He is of the fifth generation of his family in 
this country, the first having jjeen represented 
by John Perham, an Englishman, who settled 
in Chelmsford, Mass., and whose son, John, 
Jr., was Captain Perham's great-grandfather. 

The next in line, Lemuel Perham, fourth 
son of John, Jr., was born near Dunstable, 
Mass., in 1727. He served in the French 
and Indian War and the RevoUrtionarv War 



while living in Massachusetts; and shortly 
after the close of the Revolution he accom- 
panied his son Silas to Farmington, where he 
died in 1795. His wife's name was Mary 
Butterfield. .Silas Perham, Captain Perham's 
father, was born in Dunstable, Mass., P"ebru- 
ary 10, 1770. In the spring of 1787, when 
only seventeen years of age, he took up lot 
No. 24 in the township of Farmington, the 
site of Captain Perham's present home, made 
a clearing, built a log house, and planted a 
crop. The following winter he returned to 
Massachusetts for the rest of the family ; and 
the father, mother, and children made the 
long journey hither on a sled, with one pair 
of oxen and a horse. They were twenty-three 
days on the way, stopping in woods to cook 
their simjjle meals, which, perchance, w-ere 
often augmented by a fresh-caught fish or 
some wild game. There were few roads, and 
the route was mostly traced by blazed trees. 
We can imagine the pride of the youthful 
pioneer as the little caravan drew up at last 
before his log cabin, and gazed with delight 
on what he had accomplished, and the sense of 
restful ownership with which they slept that 
night under the primitive roof. Father and 
son were soon busily at work, felling the 
heavy hemlock, maple, and beech, some of 
which they burned to enrich the ground; and 
before long they had one of the best farms in 
the township. Silas Perham was a carpenter 
by trade, and in course of time he erected 
frame buildings in place of the early log 
house and barn. He was a man of large, 
strong frame, and was a tireless worker. P'or 
some years he was connected with the militia, 
and commanded the North Company of Infan- 
try. In politics he was a Democrat, in relig- 
ious belief a Free Will Baptist. He died at 
the age of seventy-four. His wife, who was a 
daughter of Eliphalet Jennings, of I-^arming- 
ton, died at the age of fifty-one. They had 
two children — John F., born April 11, 1808, 
who died in California in 1880 ; and Silas 
D., of P'armington, now to be further men- 
tioned. 

Silas D. Perham received a good education 
in his childhood and youth, attending the 
public schools and Farmington Academy. 
He remained on the home farm, and proceeded 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



with the work of its development, clearing the 
land from which his father had cut the timber, 
and evolving valuable pasture and tillage from 
rough fields. He set out a fine orchard; and 
he also purchased more lanil, so that his estate 
now includes two hundred acres. In 1865 he 
built a large house, and he has also erected a 
fine barn. Probably no man in Farmington 
has labored harder or longer than Captain 
Perham ; and \'et in his eighty-second year he 
is straight as an arrow, and is still at work. 

He was married February 2, 1837, to Mary 
Ann, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Hobbs, of 
Industry, Me. P'ive children blessed this 
union, namely: Hannah, born January 20, 
[838, whose filial love and devotion have kept 
her in the home of her infancy, caring for her 
father and mother in their declining years; 
Joseph H., born October 17, 1842, who mar- 
ried Miss Mary S. Norton, and is a prosperous 
citizen, owning a farm in this town; Geor- 
giana, who lived but two years; Silas A., who 
died in infancy; and Silas F., born July 11, 
1850. Mrs. Mary A. Perham died May 13, 
1874, aged si.xty years. In early life Captain 
Perham was a Democrat ; but when the Re- 
publican party was formed he was one of the 
delegates to the convention at Strong, and 
since that time he has supported the Republi- 
can platform. In religious belief he is a I'ree 
Will Baptist. 




L15I0N P. MARSH, a former business 
man of Di.xfield, now retired, was 
burn here, August 8, 1823, son of 
David and Asenath (Parks) Marsh. 
The first ancestor of the family in America 
was John Marsh, who emigrated from England 
in 1634, and settled in Massachusetts. He 
followed the trade of a wool-carder or weaver, 
and died November 16, 1673. In 1635 he 
married Susanna Skelton, and with her subse- 
quently reared a family of eleven children. 
Andrew Marsh, grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Sutton, Mass., June 
2, 1769. He was an early settler of Dixfield, 
where, after clearing a farm, he spent the rest 
of his life occupied in its cultivation. On 
April 9, 178S, he married Rebecca Stone, of 
whose children by him there were reared John, 



Nancy, David, Joshua, and Lawson, none of 
whom are living. 

David Marsh, Mr. Marsh's father, also a 
native of Sutton, born May 19, 1792, was 
quite young when his parents mo\ed to Dix- 
field. In early manhood he engaged in log- 
ging to some extent, and was also a teamster. 
He eventually turned his attention to farming, 
which he followed with energy and success 
for the rest of his active period; and he died 
February 27, 1867. He was liberal in his 
views of religious matters, and in politics 
he supported the Republican party in the 
latter part nf his life. His wife, Asenath, 
who was born April 19, 1796, bore him six 
sons and six daughters, all of whom grew to 
maturity. Five are living; namely, Albion 
P., Liva L., Mattie L., Annette, and Ma- 
tilda. The others were: Andrew, Caleb, 
Leonora, Pauline, David M. , Jerome, and 
Chestina. The mother died in September, 
1882. 

Albion P. Marsh was educateil in the dis- 
trict schools, and resided at home until he 
was twenty-one years old. He then went to 
Rhode Island, where he was for a time em- 
ployed at a chemical manufactory. From 
there he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and was 
there similar!)- engaged with his brother, 
David M.. for ten years. I<"ailing health 
caused him to relinquish that occupation ; and, 
returning to his native State, he became a 
dealer in country produce in Weld. Having 
done a large and successful business at this for 
several years, he retired, and has since resided 
in Dixfiekl. 

Mr. Marsh has been three times mai'ried. 
His present wife, in maidenhood Matilda D. 
Newton, whom he wedded in 1S70, is a daugh- 
ter of Burleigh and Sarah Newton, of this 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Marsh have had five 
children — Norman D., Chestina, Harry B., 
LutieM. , and Owen. The last-named lived 
but one year. In politics Mr. Marsh is a free 
coinage Democrat. He has been quite promi- 
nent in local affairs, having taken a deep inter- 
est in educational matters, and having served 
the town as Collector. He is a member of 
King Hiram Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; and his 
social relations are of the pleasantest char- 
acter. The family occupies one of the hand- 



t28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



somest residences in the village, and its mem- 
bers are respected as worthy representatives of 
one of the old and reputable families. 




'RED A. PORTER, Sheriff of Oxford 
County, who resides upon a large farm 
in Runiford Falls, was born in Rox- 
bury, Me., December 30, 1850, son of Will- 
iam V. and Eliza M. (Taylor) Porter. His 
grandfather, F"rancis Porter, was an early set- 
tler of Roxbury, where he owned a good farm 
reclaimed by him from the wilderness, and re- 
sided for the rest of his life. William V. 
Porter, a native of Roxbury, was reared in 
that place. In young manhood he went to 
Boston, and was there employed as clerk in a 
store for a few years. He afterward returned 
to his native town, and followed agriculture 
successfully until his death, which happened 
when he was fifty-eight years old. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and he served for many 
years as a member of the Board of Selectmen 
in Roxbury. His wife, Eliza, who was also 
born in Roxbury, still active and well pre- 
served at the age of eighty years, resides in 
Rumford I'alls. 

Fred A. Porter in his boyhood attended the 
common and high schools of his neighbor- 
hood. In young manhood he went to Wis- 
consin, where he worked upon a farm for a 
year. He then returned East, and, settling 
in Chelsea, Mass., was there employed as a 
clerk in a dry-goods store for nine years. On 
account of poor health he relinquished mer- 
cantile occupations, and, returning to Oxford 
County, bought his present farm of five hun- 
dred and fifty acres in this town, where he 
has since resided. He carried on general 
farming and lumbering until 1S92, when he 
was appointed Deputy Sheriff. Since that 
time he has devoted his attention to his public 
duties. He was one of the first to clear land 
upon the site of the present thriving settle- 
ment of Rumford P'alls; and his property, 
which adjoins the village, is now quite valu- 
able. 

On April 22, 1S77, Mr. Porter wedded 
Mary E. Green, of Rumford, and now has two 
sons — Fred A., Jr., and Charles N. In pol- 
itics Mr. Porter is a stanch Republican and a 



leading spirit in the politics of this locality. 
He was for seven years a member of the Board 
of Selectmen, and he has been Tax Collector 
of the town. His appointment to the office of 
Deputy Sheriff was made when the town was 
incorporated, and he served in that capacity 
until elected High Sheriff of the county. In 
this responsible position he has shown a thor- 
ough com])etence, and has given full satisfac- 
tion. He is the present -Secretary of Blazing 
Star Lodge, No. 30, A. F. & A. M. ; a mem- 
ber of Rumford Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
of this town; Noble Grand of Penacook 
Lodge, No. 130, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows: and a member of Metalluc Lodge, 
No. 99, Knights of Pythias. His prominence 
in public affairs has gained for him a large ac- 
quaintanceship and much popularity through- 
out the county. 



M 



AGGETT BROTHERS, ALBERT 
AND WASHINGTON L., enter- 
prising general merchants and 
prominent citizens of Strong, are 
natives of New Vineyard, in P"ranklin County. 
Albert was born June 13, 1827, and Washing- 
ton L. was born May 6, 1835. Their parents 
were Captain Plamentin and Hannah (Snow) 
Daggett, the former of whom was born in In- 
dustry, Me., May 5, 1795, and the latter in 
New Vineyard, September 12, 1799. 

Peter Daggett, the father of Plamentin Dag- 
gett, was a native of Martha's \'ineyard, 
Mass., where he was born January 17, 1770. 
He located at New Vineyard in 1793, being 
the first member of the Daggett family to 
settle in this county. Five years later he 
moved to Industry, where he settled upon what 
is now known as the Lowell strip farm, and 
erected the first frame residence in the town. 
A well-to-do farmer, he died at his home in 
Industry on November 5, 1833. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Damaris Luce, died 
August 3, 1810. 

Their son, Plamentin Daggett, served as a 
soldier in the War of 1812, and in young 
manhood settled in New Vineyard, where he 
cleared and improved a farm. He followed 
agricultural pursuits in connection with the 
carpenter's trade, and became identified with 



HIOGRAPHICAL RF.VIKW 



1:9 



the early growth and develoj^ment of the town 
and its political affairs. He held various 
town offices, to which he was first elected by 
the Democratic party. He later cast one of 
tiie first votes in his town in favor of the Free 
Soil party, and he was a member of the con- 
vention which met in .Strong for the purpose 
of organizing the Republican party in this lo- 
cality. He was prominent in the early State 
militia, in which he served for several years 
as a commissioned officer; and as Commander 
of the New Vineyard Light Infantry the 
name of Captain Plamentin Daggett was long 
a familiar one in connection with the military 
affairs of Franklin Count)-. In 1.S62 he re- 
moved to .Strong; and he died in this town, 
March 28, 1866. In his religious belief he 
was a Methodist. 

His wife, Hannah Snow, who was a woman 
of unusual ability and force of character, be- 
came the mother of six children, as follows: 
Fzekiel Snow, who was born February 7, 
1833, and died February 25, 1858: Plamentin, 
Jr., who was born May 3, 1825, marrietl 
Nancy T. Vining, of Strong, and died Decem- 
ber 12, 1884; Albert, of the firm of Daggett 
Hrothers, of Strong: Oliver Cromwell, who 
was born April 20, 1830, and died April 3, 
1847; Washington L., also of the firm of 
Daggett Brothers; and Hannah Snow, who 
was born January 14, 1839, and is the wife of 
George \V. Luce, a retired jeweller of Colum- 
bus, Ohio. Mrs. Hannah Snow Daggett died 
in 1862. 

Albert Daggett, senior member of the firm 
of Daggett I^rothers, acc[uired his education in 
the common schools of his native town and the 
high schools in this county. When a young 
man he taught school for a time, and then set- 
tled upon a piece of agricultural property in 
Farmington. In 1863 he removed to .Strong; 
and in the following year he went to Mari- 
|iosa County, California, and from there to 
Nevada. After spending a year and a half in 
the mining district he returned to Strong, and, 
in company with his brother, engaged in gen- 
eral mercantile business. His business abil- 
ity has been fully demonstrated; and aside 
from this he possesses a natural genius for 
mechanics, which he has recently turned to 
good account by inventing a machine known 



as the Daggett road rake. His model, which 
was patented on January 28, 1896, is con- 
structed for the purpose of cleaning streets 
and roads and removing loose obstructions. 
It is shaped like a snow-plough, but has 
spring steel teeth, and is i)elieved to be the 
best and most feasible machine of its kind yet 
inventeil. 

For his first wife Albert Daggett weddetl 
Sarah M. Porter, of Strong, who died May 3, 
1886. By this union there were three chil- 
dren — Willie, who died at the age of two 
years; Minnie W. and another child, both of 
whom died in infancy. His present wife was 
before marriage Ada Eldora Pottle. She was 
born in Freeman, Me., December 23, 1853, 
daughter of the late Jeremiah Pottle, a pros- 
perous farmer of Strong and formerly a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen and many years 
Town Treasurer. Mr. Daggett is a Republi- 
can in politics, and he and Mrs. Daggett are 
active members of the Methodist lilpiscopal 
church. 

Washington L. Daggett attended the com- 
mon schools of New Vineyard, where he ac- 
quired a good knowledge of the elementary 
branches of learning. He later attended the 
Maine Wesleyan Seminary at Kent's Hill, 
where he pursued more advanced studies; and 
for eight years thereafter he was engaged in 
teaching school. During the Civil War he 
was drafted for service, and, being ordered to 
the paymaster's department, served in that 
ofifice in Portland for some nine months. He 
then taught school in Strong for one winter, 
after which he entered a mercantile establish- 
ment as a clerk; and a year later he. in com- 
pany with his brother, bought out the business, 
thus establishing the firm of Daggett Brothers. 
In 1886 their store was destroyed by fire; but 
a portion of the stock was saved, and, moving 
into their present building, they have since 
continued to do a large and profitable busi- 
ness. They carry a varied line of groceries 
and dry goods; and, as the\' are widely and 
favorably known as honorable, upright men 
and reliable merchants, they have a numerous 
and steady patronage. 

On September 20, 1868, Washington L. 
Daggett was united in marriage with Reliance 
C. Dickey. She was born in Avon, Me., Oc- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tober zj^ 1841, daughter of the late John 
Dickey, of that town, and a niece of the well- 
known Major Dickey, of Fort Kent. 

In politics Mr. Daggett acts with tiie Re- 
publican party. He was a Representative to 
the legislature in 1870, and for nine years he 
served with ability as Town Clerk. He is 
one of the best-known and most active mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church here, 
and has also acquired a high reputation 
throughout the State for his interest and 
efficiency in church and Sunday-school work. 
He is probably the oldest Sunday-school 
superintendent in Maine at the present time, 
is a leading spirit in the State department of 
church work, and has been President of the 
Franklin County Sunday-school Association 
for over ten years. For three years he has 
served as County Secretary of the Maine 
State Sunday-school Association, during which 
time he was accorded high honor for having 
furnished the model annual report. He is a 
forcible speaker, and in response to urgent in- 
vitations has lectured upon Sunday-school 
work before county and State societies and 
other important gatherings, and, aside from 
his personal efforts in the churches of Strong, 
has rendered much valuable aid to the work 
throuiihout the State. 



(5 1 HOMAS J. WHITEHEAD, who has 
* I been an important factor in advancing 
-^ the agricultural and educational inter- 
ests of the town of Paris, is a native of the 
town, having been born October 17, 18 16, 
son of John Whitehead, on the farm where he 
now lives. His father was born and bred in 
Woodbridge, N.J., whence in his early man- 
hood he came to Oxford County, seeking for 
a desirable locality in which to settle. Se- 
lecting the town of Paris, he purchased the 
present Whitehead homestead, where w-ith his 
family he lived for a number of years in true 
pioneer style, depending upon the scanty pro- 
ductions of the soil and the wild game of the 
district for the maintenance of all. He 
cleared a portion of his one hundred and fifty 
acres, and engaged in general farming. He 
also kept a public house in Paris for twenty 
years, and was known as a genial host. He 



married Mary Lovell, of Mansfield, Mass., by 
whom he became the father of three children, 
namely: Nancy, who is the widow of Henry 
R. Weber, of Paris; Thomas J., the subject 
of this sketch; and Mrs. Mary Ann Haskell, 
now deceased. Both parents died on the old 
homestead, the father passing away at the age 
of seventy-three years, and the mother at the 
age of seventy-five years. Both were liberal 
in religion. In politics he was a Whig. 

Thomas J. Whitehead was educated in the 
schools of Paris and at the Norway High 
School. Afterward he followed the profession 
of teacher in this vicinity for thirty terms, 
and at one time served as superintendent of 
schools. Subsequently for about thirty years 
he devoted a portion of his time to canvassing 
the country, with considerable success, as 
agent for different firms, dealing in nursery 
goods or lightning rods. The old homestead 
is now owned by Mr. Whitehead and his 
sister, Mrs. Weber. Mr. Whitehead has a 
good farm of eighty acres, a part of which he 
devotes to fruit raising, his orchard being very 
productive. In 1876 he invented and patented 
a cooking range, which he subsequently sold 
to good advantage. In the settlement of a dis- 
pute between the towns of Paris and Norway 
regarding a cemetery located between the two 
places, Mr. Whitehead, associated with Judge 
Woodbury, of Bethel, obtained a decision in 
favor of Paris. 

Mr. Whitehead was married April 5, 1848, 
to Caroline B. Jordan, who was born in 
Albany, Me., December ^5, 1.S19. She was 
one of the eleven children, noted for their 
musical talent, born to Timothy and Mercy 
(Pike) Jordan. Of Mr. Whitehead's five chil- 
dren, four have died; namely, Eugene, M. 
Caroline, Herman M. , and Mary E. Gran- 
ville M. Whitehead, the only living child, 
born November 17, 1861, resides with his 
parents, assisting in the managemeiTt of the 
homestead, and also working in the Norway 
shoe factory. His first wife, formerly Sadie 
Stiles, died in 1893, leaving one child, Alton 
Eugene, born August 30, 1891. On June 15, 
1895, he entered a second marriage, contracted 
with Sadie M. Chase, who was born April g, 
1876, at Milton Plantation, Me., daughter of 
Charles and Clarissa (Godwin) Chase, both 




V/ILLIAM BEAIJ. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



133 



of whom arc iu)\v residents of South Paris. 
In politics Mr. Whitehead is a Populist, while 
both he and his wife accept the teachings of 
Spiritualism. They have the distinction of 
being one of the oldest couples in this local- 
ity, and are held in high esteem throughout 
the community. 




ILLIAM C. BP:AN, a progressive 
farmer and one of the leading 
young men of Hiram, O.xford 
County, was born in Denmark, Me., October 
5, 1863, son of William and Sarah Jane 
(Warren) Bean. Mr. Bean's paternal grand- 
parents were Abraham and Hannah (Burley) 
Bean, residents of York County, Maine. 

William Bean, the father, whose portrait 
accompanies this biographical sketch, was 
born in HoUis, Me., May 11, 1805. In 1835 
he settled upon the Joshua Osgood farm in the 
town of Denmark, where he engaged in farm- 
ing and lumbering during the rest of his ac- 
tive period. He died April 21, 1894. A 
man of intelligence, energy, and public spirit, 
he took a leading part in town affairs; and he 
represented his district in the legislature 
three terms. His first wife was Sarah F. 
Blunt, who was born in Kennebunkport, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1808, and died January 10, 1862. 
She was the mother of four children, namely: 
George R., who died in Denmark, January 30, 
1896; Ellen S. ; Jane N.; and Frances Au- 
gusta. William Bean wedded for his second 
wife Sarah Jane Warren, who was born in 
Epping, N.ll., October 15, 1829, and who 
became the nrnther of two children, namely: 
William C, the subject of this sketch; and 
Charles R., who was born November 15, 
1871, and now resides with his brother. Mrs. 
Sarah J. Warren Bean died February 19, 
1889. 

William C. Bean was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Denmark, and resided at home 
until becoming of age. In 1884 he came to 
Hiram, settling upon the Morris Clark farm 
of one hundred and thirty-seven acres, where 
he still resides; and since taking possession 
of the property he has greatly enhanced its 
value by making numerous improvements. 
He devotes his time to general farming, corn, 



hay, and potatoes being his [jrincipal prod- 
ucts; and he raises some excellent cattle for 
his own use. 

On October 6, 1884, Mr. Bean was united 
in marriage with Victoria L. Allen. She was 
born in Denmark, Me., August 9, 1859, 
daughter of Hosea and Mary Jane (Hartford) 
Allen. Her father was a prosperous farmer of 
Denmark, his native town, where he died, July 
13, 1892; and her mother, who was a native of 
Hiram, is now residing in Denmark. 

In politics Mr. Bean acts with the Republi- 
can party. He takes an interest in the gen- 
eral welfare of the comnuniity, being ever 
ready to aid in town improvements; and as a 
leader among the young men of this locality 
he is very popular. He is an Odd Fellow 
and a member of Denmark Lodge, No. 49. 




AMUEL F. PERKINS, formerly a 
prosperous farmer of New Sharon, 
P'ranklin County, who died at his 
home in this town, P\"bruary 27, 
was born in Woolwich, Me., June 1, 
1825, son of Samuel Ford and Sarah (Carter) 
Perkins. The father, who was a native of 
Woolwich, moved to New .Sharon about 1840, 
and, purchasing a tract of land, founded the 
Perkins estate here. He died in 1869, at the 
age of seventy-five years. 

Samuel F. Perkins (second) attended the 
schools of Woolwich and New Sharon until he 
was seventeen years old, when he began work 
on the home farm. In 1862 he enlisted in 
the Twenty-eighth Regiment of Maine Infan- 
try, with which he served one year in the 
Civil War. Returning home, he resumed work 
upon the homestead farm, which he carried on 
with prosperous results until one year pre- 
vious to his death, when he sold the 'property 
to his son, Charles E. Mr. Perkins was a 
Republican in politics, liberal in his religious 
views, and was a highly respected citizen. 
He died, as above stated, at the age of sixty- 
four years. On December 21, 1863, he 
wedded Annette Smith, of New Sharon. She 
was born January 11. 1836, daughter of Will- 
iam and Mary (Dyer) Smith. Mrs. Perkins 
has had three children — Mary C, Charles E., 
and Lura M. Mary C, who was born Octo- 



'34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



her II, 1864, married Corydon Bailey, of In- 
dustry, and has three children — Charles H., 
born August 3, i,S88; Leon A., born March 
15, 1.S90; and Clarence E., born in 189J. 
Charles E. Perkins, who was born July 16, 
1866, now owns and resides upon the home- 
stead farm. Lura M., w'ho was born August 
25, 1873, married Frank M. Tebbetts, of Nor- 
way, Me., and has one child, Ray, who was 
born December 15, 1895. Mrs. Perkins is an 
active, intelligent, and highly respected lady, 
one who fully merits the esteem in which she 
is held by her numerous friends and acquaint- 
ances. 



T^HARLES B. CUMMINGS, of the 
I Ky well-known manufacturing firm of 
^^js C. B. Cummings & Sons, of Nor- 

way, Oxford County, Me., was born 
here on December 18, 1834. His parents 
were Stephen and Fanny (Whitney) Cum- 
mings. 

His paternal grandfather, Dr. Stephen 
Cummings, a native of Andover, Mass., son 
of Jonathan Cummings, was a prominent phy 
sician and surgeon, first in Waterford, Me., 
and later in the city of Portlantl. He died in 
1854, a little past fourscore years of age. He 
and his wife, Eleanor Hale, were the parents 
of si.x children — Nathan, Sarah, Sumner, 
Stephen (second), John M., and Fitz Henry. 
The first three were natives of Waterford, the 
last three of Portland. Sarah Cummings, 
born in 1798, became the wife of Charles 
Bradley. John M. Cummings, M.D., was 
the only one of the sons who adopted the 
father's profession. 

Stephen Cummings, the second of the name 
in direct line and the father of the subject of 
this biographical sketch, was born in Portland 
in 1803. When he attained his majority, his 
father. Dr. Cummings, gave him one hundred 
and fifty acres of uncultivated land in the 
northern part of Norway, which he cleared and 
sold, afterward buying the same number of 
acres in Bethel, a neighboring town in the 
county, where he was a resident for twenty- 
five years. Later he sold that farm also, and, 
buying a house in Norway village, retired 
from active business. A Democrat in poli- 



tics, he was actively interested in party meas- 
ures until the close of his life. Stephen 
Cummings married Fanny, a daughter of Will- 
iam C. Whitney; and their union was blessed 
by seven children — William C. W., Sumner, 
Frances E., Stephen H., Charles B., John M., 
and Harriet. The father died of apople.xy on 
April II, 1863, at sixty years of age; and the 
mother lived to the age of seventy, her death 
occurring on January 10, 1873. 

Charles B. Cummings, the fourth of the five 
brothers in this family, received his education 
in Bethel, but in 1854 returned with his par- 
ents to Norway, where without means, but 
with plenty of energy, grit, and application, 
he has pushed his way from the smallest be- 
ginnings to his present commercial prosperity. 
He was for some time in the employ of his 
maternal grandfather, William C. Whitney, 
and later learned the trade of cabinet-maker, 
beginning business for himself in a small shed 
adjoining Squire Whitman's stable, where he 
manufactured the furniture with which he 
went to housekeeping, also making by hand 
articles of furniture, which he sold to the 
neighbors. Step by step, by industry, frugal- 
ity, and jjerseverance, Mr. Cummings was 
enabled to enlarge his business until he at- 
tained prominence in various industries. In 
1 86 1 he moved his workshop to a small room 
in the Hathaway Block, keeping house in the 
tenement over the store. Here his trade in- 
creased steadily, so that in 1865, in order to 
meet its requirements, he erected the commo- 
dious building now occupied by his son ant! 
successor to that branch of the business. 

Previous to his retirement therefrom, in 
1877, he had embarked in various enterprises, 
including the manufacture of clothes-pins on 
a large scale at Steep Falls, besides furniture. 
He carries on saw-mills at the head of the vil- 
lage, manufacturing long and short lumber, 
and also utilizes the same water privilege for 
grist-mills. Below, on the site of the old 
foundry, he has erected a commodious struct- 
ure, the lower part of which is used for the 
manufacture of short lumber, boxes, and 
staves. The second story is used for the ex- 
tensive manufacture of shoe findings, and in 
this department alone Mr. Cummings employs 
from sixty to seventy skilled operatives, l-'roni 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



35 



twenty to twenty-five men are usually needed 
in the lumber department, and for manufactur- 
ing and storage he uses twenty-five buildings. 
Although Mr. Cummings owns large tracts 
of growing timber in this town, Oxford, Paris, 
and Greenwood, he purchases large quantities 
of lumber on the stump to supply his various 
mills and factories. He is extensively inter- 
ested in real estate, being the owner of many 
valuable building lots and water privileges in 
the village limits. In 1894 Mr. Cummings 
was burned out; but such was his ability to 
overcome difficulties that in thirty days he 
was again on his commercial feet, doing busi- 
ness with several men. As fast as possible 
he rebuilt, putting in an eighty-horse-power 
boiler, heating several blocks three stories 
high from his plant. He also built a large 
grist-mill and grain house, sixty-four by one 
hundred feet, at the railway station, so that 
freight cars can be run in and emptied. 

In January, 1861, he was united in marriage 
with Frances E. , daughter of Moses and Ex- 
perience (Powers) Staples, of Bethel. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cummings have six representa- 
tives to the family name and fortune, who will 
have to make tall strides in the march of life 
if they keep pace with their father's speed on 
the commercial highway. These children are: 
Charles S. , who was born on January 26, 1862, 
and married Ella H. Haskell, she being now 
deceased; Stephen B., born April 27, 1863, 
who married Mattie M. Jordan on February 
12, 1887, and has one child, Ruth; Frederick 
H., born September 24, 1865, who is a dry- 
goods clerk; George I., born March 30, 1869; 
Edwin S., born October 7, 1873; and P"anny 
W., who was born on May 19, 1878. Four of 
the five sons, or all except Frederick, are asso- 
ciated with their father in business. Mr. 
Cummings owns and occupies with his family 
one of the finest dwellings in Norway. In 
politics he is a Republican, and in religion he 
holds to the liberal form of faith. 



LBERT H. ADAMS, a progressive 
and successful farmer, who owns and 
conducts a model dairy farm in 
Wilton, Franklin County, Me., was 
born in this town, September 6, 1857, son of 




Elbridge G. and Abby H. (Thomas) Adams. 
His great -grandparents were Moses and 
Martha (Kinney) Adams; and his grandpar- 
ents were John and Phebe (Chase) Adams, of 
Wilton. 

Elbridge G. Adams, Mr. Adams's father, 
was a native of Wilton, where he grew to man- 
hood as a farmer. At the age of thirty years 
he bought his father's farm, which he carried 
on for three years; and then, selling the prop- 
erty, he removed to a farm in the town of Jay, 
where he resided for some length of time. In 
1 88 1 he purchased the estate where his son 
now resides, and erected new buildings to re- 
place those which were burned. In connec- 
tion with agricultural pursuits he engaged in 
the corn and apple canning business, building 
a factory with a capacity for packing one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand cans per year. Retir- 
ing from business two years later, having 
accumulated a comfortable competency as the 
result of his labor, he passed the remainder of 
his days upon his farm in the town of Jay, 
where he died at the age of sixty-two years. 
His industrious and ambitious nature had 
prompted him to work far beyond his physical 
ability, thereby undermining his constitution; 
and this was the direct cause of his death. 
In politics he supported the Republican party, 
and in his religious views he was a Universal- 
ist. His wife, who was before marriage Abby 
H. Thomas, was a daughter of Spencer 
Thomas. .She became the mother of seven 
children, namely: Albert H., the subject of 
this sketch; Loreda M. ; Clara, who died in 
infancy; Henry J. ; Cora, who did not live to 
grow up; Gideon C. ; and l^^ed L. Mrs. 
Abby H. Adams is still living, and is now 
seventy-two years old. 

Albert H. Adams was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and at the Wilton Academy. His 
boyhood and youth were passed upon the home 
farm, acquiring practical knowledge and ex- 
perience that has been of great value to him 
in his chosen occupation. At the age of 
twenty-five he entered into partnership with 
his father in the canning business, the firm 
having bought of George P3astman a piece of 
land near East Wilton, upon which they 
erected a large factory ; and for two years they 
packed upon an extensive scale the E. G. 



'36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Adams brand of apples and sweet corn, which 
acquired a high reputation in the metropolitan 
markets. Two years later he purchased from 
his father the farm of one hundred acres 
where he now resides, to which he has since 
devoted his attention; and, as the property 
lies within a valley, thus making it exceed- 
ingly well adapted for dairy purposes, he 
makes a specialty of this branch of agricult- 
ure. He cuts from seventy-five to eighty tons 
of hay annually, has excellent pasturing facili- 
ties, keeps twenty-one head of high-bred 
Jersey stock, which is said to be the finest 
herd of dairy cows in town, and he owns si.\ 
horses. Mr. Adams has also been engaged in 
selling the McCormick mowing machine. In 
politics he acts with the Republican party. 
In religious views he is a stanch Universalist. 
He is connected officially with Williamson 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
is likewise a member of the Foresters and 
the Patrons of Husbandry, and is recognized 
as one of the leading farmers and enterprising 
citizens of Wilton. 

Mr. Adams married Persis Adams, daughter 
of John W'. and Dorcas (Adams) Adams, rep- 
resentatives of entirely different families. 
Mrs. Albert H. Adams is a descendant of 
Elisha Adams, an early resident of Bethel, 
Me., who moved from that town to a farm in 
Temple, where he passed the rest of his life. 
His children were: Elias, John, Silas, Persis, 
Polly, Uorcas, and Loren. Loren Adams, 
Mrs. Adams's paternal grandfather, was born 
in Bethel, February i8, 1803. He bought 
his first real estate in Wilton when a young 
man, later removing to the farm where his 
son John W. now resides; and this property, 
which was formerly owned by John Ditson, he 
improved by erecting new buildings through- 
out, increasing the fertility of the land, and 
setting out a large orchard, making it one of 
the best farms in this section. He married 
for his first wife Ruth Libby, who was born 
in 1799, daughter of Abraham Libby, and by 
this union he had two children; namely, John 
W. and Mary. Mrs. Ruth L. Adams died in 
1837, and for his second wife Loren Adams 
wedded Eliza Adkins. He died February 6, 
1892. 

John W. Adams, Mrs. Adams"s father, was 



born in Wilton, March 5, 1835. He resided 
at home, assisting his father in carrying on 
the farm, later taking charge of the property, 
which he now owns. He has a fine dairy, and 
may be considered a model farmer. On Janu- 
ary I, 1857, he married for his first wife 
Ellen, adopted daughter of J. C. Phillips, of 
Wilton. She died at the age of eighteen, 
leaving a daughter, Ellen, who was born De- 
cember 20, 1859, and married Leroy Brown. 
On January 2-]^ 1861, John W. Adams wedded 
for his second wife Dorcas, daughter of 
Jephthah Adams; and she died at the age of 
sixty-four years, leaving three children, as 
follows: Charles W., who was born April 20, 
1863, and resides at home; Persis, who is now 
Mrs. Albert H. Adams; and Charlena R., 
who was born May 29, 1874, and is now en- 
gaged in teaching. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Adams have four 
children, namely: Bernard L., born October 
2, 1886; Jennie M., born November 6, 1889; 
Vera L. , born January 13, 1892; Merle R., 
born July 4, 1894. 




ENRY SAWTN, Second Selectman of 
Waterford, Oxford County, Me., has 
been active in the town government 
for nearly twenty years. He was 
born in Waterford, May 13, 1837, the son of 
Thomas and Sallie (Johnson) Sawin, the for- 
mer a native of old Marlboro, Mass., the latter 
of Waterford, Me. 

His grandfather, General Benjamin Sawin, 
who came from Marlboro, was the first of the 
Sawins to locate in Oxford County. Maine. 
About 1805 he settled in what is now known 
as Lynchville, in the town of Albany, where 
he managed a saw-mill some three years, mov- 
ing then to Waterford. He cleared the farm 
on which his grandson is now living, and de- 
voted the rest of his life to the pursuit of 
agriculture, dying in Waterford, February 9, 
181 7, at the age of sixty-eight years. 

Thomas, second son of General Benjamin 
and Martha (Howe) Sawin, succeeded his 
father as manager of the home farm in Water- 
ford, and took a prominent part in town affairs, 
serving on the Board of Selectmen for many 
years. He died May 29, 1870. His wife 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



137 



siirviveil him a little more than eight years, 
passing away October 19, 1878. They were 
the parents of the following children: Mi- 
randa, born October iS, 1825, who was the 
wife of Captain Moses Rand, and is now de- 
ceased ; Lewis H. (deceased), born August 
16, 1827, who married Lydia Abbott, of 
Albany, now a resident of her native town; 
George, born May 29, 1830, who died at the 
age of five years; Sarah Ann, deceased, born 
August 18, 1833, wife of James Miller, who 
is now in the West; Thomas Hubbard, born 
November 27, 1835, a retired trader, living in 
the village of Xorway, Me., who married 
Lizzie Sampson; and Henry, the subject of 
this sketch. 

Henry Sawin received a common-school 
education, and, while acquiring a knowledge 
of the rudiments of learning, was also becom- 
ing accustomed to farm labor. He was en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits in Norway, 
Me., for a year, and with that exception has 
spent the time since 1859 on his present valu- 
able farm near North Waterford village. 
With an estate of seventy acres of land, he is 
engaged in general husbandry, dairying, and 
stock raising, and has made many improve- 
ments on his property. He is one of the lead- 
ing farmers of the locality, and is agent in 
Waterford for the McCormick mowers. 

Mr. Sawin was married October 12, 1859, 
to Maria C. Upton, who was born in Albany, 
Me., and grew to womanhood in Norway, this 
State. .She was the daughter of Micah and 
Ruth (Abbott) Upton, formerly respected 
members of the farming community of Albany, 
both of whom have departed this life. Mrs. 
Maria C. Upton Sawin died February 26, 
1883. She was the mother of four children, 
namely: Etta A., born .September 8, i860, 
who died May 20, 1895, the wife of George 
Cummings, a farmer in Albany; Lillian J., 
born October 13, 1864, who died ALirch 22, 
1865; Harry T., born February 13, 1867, who 
was married May 5, 1896, to Cora Bean, of 
Albany, Me., and now lives in Windsor, Vt. ; 
Agnes E. , born November 28, 1871, who re- 
sides with her father on the homestead. Mr. 
Sawin w-as married September 22, 1895, to 
Mrs. Rowena J. Bird Holt, of Bethel, Me., 
the daughter of Lyman and Eliza (Young) 



Bird. This lady was born July 6, 1843. Her 
father was a farmer of Bethel, and later of 
Paris, Me., where he died. Her first hus- 
band, Arthur U. Holt, a farmer of Bethel, 
died August 21, 1893, leaving four children 
— Etta Mabel, wife of Eugene C. Holt, of 
Hanover, Me. ; Llewellyn B., residing in 
Andover, Me., who married Miss Adeline 
Proctor; Winona L. , wife of ]5urton Patter- 
son, of Hanover, Me.; and Herman li., who 
is with his mother and step-father on the 
Sawin homestead. 

Mr. Sawin has long been prominent among 
the Democrats of Waterford. He was first 
elected to the office of Second Selectman in 
1878, and his efficiency as a member of the 
town governm,ent is such that he has been re- 
elected several times. He belongs to Oxford 
Lodge, No. 61, Independent Order of Odd 
F"ellows, of North Waterford; also to liver- 
green Lodge, No. I 5, Daughters of Rebecca, 
of the same place; and he is a very popular 
member of society. Mrs. Sawin is an es- 
teemed member of the Ba]5tist Clnirch of 
Bethel, Me. 




kATIO WOODBURY, M.D., a 
aiccessful physician of South Paris, 
Oxford County, was born in Dan- 
ville, Me., July 12, 1852, son of 
William and Hannah (Sturgis) Woodbury. 
His paternal grandfather. True Woodbury, who 
was a native of Cape Elizabeth, this State, in 
eai^ly life settled upon Vine Hill in Danville. 
A farmer by occupation, the grandfather be- 
came a prominent man in that town, and re- 
sided there for the rest of his life. Both he 
and his wife lived to be over eighty years old. 
William Woodbury, Dr. Woodbury's father, 
was born in Danville, Me., in March, 1795. 
■He adopted agriculture as his life occupation, 
and purchased a farm in his native town. 
Subsequently he became the proprietor of a 
store, which he also carried on for some thirty 
years. His last years were spent in retire- 
ment, and he died in 1864. A stanch Demo- 
crat, he took a leading part in local politics. 
He was a member of the Board of Selectmen 
for ten years and Town Treasurer for twenty- 
three years. His religious belief was that 



138 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the Universalists. By his wife, Hannah 
(Sturgis) Woodbury, he became the father of 
four children — George William, Nathaniel, 
Adelaide, and Horatio. The mother died in 
1S76. 

Horatio Woodbury acquired his elementary 
education in the schools of Danville and at 
the Auburn High School, graduating from the 
latter in 1872. He afterward entered Bates 
College at Lewiston, Me., where he graduated 
with the class of 1876. He taught school for 
the next three years, and then began the study 
of medicine with Dr. Isaac Rounds, of South 
Paris. Later he entered the Maine Medical 
School, and, after pursuing the usual course 
of study, took his degree at Brunswick. In 
1882 he began practice at Wiscassett, Lincoln 
County; but a short time after, desiring a 
wider field, he came to South Paris, locating 
at 5 Market Square, where he was welcomed 
by many old friends of his student days. Be- 
ginning practice here under such favoring cir- 
cumstances, he was soon able to give ample 
proof of his skill and professional knowledge. 
He now enjoys a wide patronage as a physi- 
cian, and at the same time he occupies a 
prominent place among the leading men of the 
town. While he is a Republican in politics, 
his interest in public affairs is broad, and not 
narrowed by mere party exigency. He is in- 
terested in educational matters, and he helps 
all practical measures and movements designed 
for the moral and physical welfare of the com- 
munity. He has served his fellow-townsmen 
for six years as School Committeeman and 
for two years as Secretary of the Board of 
Health. He is connected with Androscoggin 
Lodge, No. 24, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, at Auburn; with Hamlin- Lodge, No. 31, 
Knights of Pythias, at South Paris; with the 
order of the Golden Cross, and the New Eng- 
land Order of Protection; and at present he is 
Secretary of Paris Lodge, No. 94, A. F. & 
A. M., and a member of its Board of Trustees. 



TEPHEN CHARLES, manufacturer 
of monuments, headstones, and all 
kinds of marble and granite work, 
whose place of business is in North 
Frveburg, O.xford County, Me., was born in 




Lovell, Me., April 10, 1838, son of Stephen 
and Sarah (Bemis) Charles. 

The family is an old and highly respected 
one in Oxford County ; and John Charles, grand- 
father of the special subject of this sketch, 
was a jiioneer farmer of Lovell. John Charles 
was born in P"ryeburg, in April, 1772, and 
died in Lovell, March 17, 1831. He married, 
in P'ryeburg, Hannah Carlton, who was born 
in 1777, and died January 22, 1869. They 
had eleven children, as follows: Stejjhen, first, 
who married Sarah Bemis; John, who married 
Charlotte Chandler, of Lovell ; Isaac, who 
married Sarah Knight, of Sweden, Me. ; Caleb, 
who married Sally Charles, of Lovell; Carl- 
ton, who married Betsy Kilgore, of Lovell; 
Jonathan, who married Rovvena Bannister, of 
New York; Warren, who married Abbie Page; 
Seth, who married Hannah Andrews, of 
Lovell ; Hannah, who married James Merrill, 
of Lovell ; Ruth, who married Elbridge G. 
Kimball, of Lovell; and James, who married 
a lady in New York. 

Stephen Charles, first, son of John ami 
father of the present .Stephen, was born in 
Lovell, June 7, 1 7t)8. He was a farmer, and 
he also carried on the lumbering business for 
twenty winters. He resided in Lovell till 
1847, when he removed to Fryeburg, where 
he was prosperously engaged in farming until 
his death, which occurred on September 5, 
1855. His wife, Sarah liemis, was l^orn in 
P'ryeburg, October 26, 1798, daughter of 
Thaddeus Bemis, an early speculator in real 
estate and an extensive agriculturist of this 
town. Mr. Bemis was born in Billerica, 
Mass., in 1760, and died in Fryeburg, Me., in 
1843. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. His wife, Judith Day, was born in 
P'ryeburg in 1767, the first female child born 
in this town. She died here in 1S43. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Bemis were: Han- 
nah, who married John Swain; Betsy, who 
married Amos Andrews; Joseph, who married 
Mehitabel Kilgore; Thaddeus, who married 
Nabby PZastman ; Amos, who married a Miss 
Whiting; Mary, who married Issachar An- 
drews; Sarah, who married Stephen Charles; 
Benjamin, who married Esther Webb; Judith, 
who married Mason Hastings; and Isaac, un- 
married. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



139 



Stephen and Sarah (Beniis) Charles were the 
parents of eight children, as follows: Albion,, 
who was born June 30, 1820, and died Septem- 
ber 4, 1824; Alsina, who was born July 13, 
1823, and is now the widow of IClbridge Evans, 
late of Stow, Me. ; Judith 15., who was born 
August 25, 1825, married Lorenzo Walker, of 
P'ryeburg, and died September 13, 1855; 
Sarah, who was born December 10, 1827, and 
is now the wife of Joseph Pitman, a surve}'or 
and farmer of Bartlett, N.H. ; Ursula, who 
was born March 8, 1831, and died March 20, 
1834; Diana, who was born January 12, 1835, 
married Randall Hastings, of P'ryeburg, and 
died March 4, 1883; Stephen, the subject of 
this sketch; and Lyman R., who was born 
August 6, 1840, married for his first wife Joan 
M. Putnam, daughter of G. W. M. Putnam, 
of Bartlett, N.H., and married second Orra 
Drew, of Richmond, Me., and is now a car- 
penter of P>yeburg. Mrs. Sarah B. Charles 
lived to reach the advanced age of nearly 
ninet_\'-two years, and died June 4, i S90. .She 
and her husband were members of the Meth- 
odist PLpiscopal church. 

Six of these children were living when the 
parents removed with their family to p'ryeburg, 
Stej)hen, the younger of the two sons, being 
then a lad of nine }'ears. hi the public schools 
he obtained a knowledge of the common luig- 
lish branches, and at home he was trained 
to habits of useful industry. As his father 
began to feel the infirmities of age, he grad- 
ually relieved him from all cares in the man- 
agement of the farm. Succeeding eventually 
t(i the possession of the homestead, Mr. 
Charles resided there until 1866, when he 
engaged in the marble-cutting business in P^ye- 
burg, where he has since carried on a profit- 
able enterprise. He employs two skilled as- 
sistants, besides working at the bench himself; 
and he receives many orders from different 
parts of this county, as well as from some of 
the adjacent towns in Xew Hampshire. He 
also owns and cultivates a valuable farm. 

Though frequently tendered the nomination 
for important offices, Mr. Charles, who is a 
firm supporter of the Republican party, has 
invariably declined the honor of candidacy. 
He has always made it a point to attend 
strictly to business; and, as he travels through 



the county a great deal, he is widely and fa- 
vorably known by the leading residents, who 
regard him as an honorable, upright, and pio- 
gressive citizen. 




1-AVIS B. ANDREWS, a member of 
the firm Noyes & Andrews of Norway, 
was born in Otisfield, Me., January 
23, 1856, son of Solomon L. and 
Sarah (P'rost) Andrews. His grandfather, 
Samuel Andrews, was a native of VViscasset, 
Lincoln Count)-, born J'"ebruarv 8, 1771. 
When a young man Samuel came to Norwa)', 
and settled on P'rost Hill, v.'here he jnirchased 
a good farm and was successfully engaged in 
agriculture during the remainder of his life. 
He married Miss Eunice P'rost, of Gorhani, 
Me., and by her became the father of nine 
sons and a daughter, respectively named — 
John, David, Samuel, Asa, Molly, Nathaniel, 
Robert, Solomon L. , Moses D. , and P^benezer. 

Solomon L. Andrews, who was born in Nor- 
way, August 17, 1 82 1, and reared to a farm 
life, chose farming for his life occupation. 
He first purchased a place in Harrison, anil 
later owned and lived on one in ()tisfield. Me. 
In addition to his farming he followed to some 
extent the business of a drover. He married 
for his first wife Miss Sarah P'rost. She died 
aged thirty-three years, having given birth to 
two sons and two daughters; namely, Lucy J., 
Isabelle, Bertrand M., and Lewis 1^. Isabelle 
and Bertrand M. are deceased. The maiden 
name of Mr. Andrews's second wife was Nancy 
W. I'rost. 

When si.xteen years of age, Lewis B. An- 
drews, the youngest child of his parents, 
began his business career as a commercial 
traveller, and followed that occupation until 
1876. Then he commenced clerking for S. B. 
Locke & Co., who conducted a general store at 
West Paris. 'Pwo and a half years later he 
purchased the business of Locke & Co., and, 
with A. J. Curts, under the firm name of An- 
drews & Curts, carried it on for five years, 
l^uying out his partner at the end of that time, 
Mr. Andrews conducted the store alone for two 
and one-half years. After this he sold out to 
Mr. Curts, and embarked in the manufacture 
of chairs, establishing the Pioneer Chair Com- 



140 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pany, which did an extensive business for three 
years, giving employment to fifty hands. Mr. 
Andrews next went to Lynn, Mass., and en- 
gaged in the manufacture of shoe machinery, 
becoming a member of the firm of C. P. Stan- 
bourn & Co. At the end of a year he sold his 
interest and returned to Norway, where, in 
company with F. H. Noyes, he opened a dry- 
goods store, and the present firm of Noyes & 
Andrews was established. In iiS94 the firm 
bought the blue store and added to its stock 
gentlemen's fiu'nishings and a custom depart- 
ment. They are now among the largest deal- 
ers in this part of the State, employing from 
eight to ten clerks. 

On June 17, 1S91, Mr. Andrews was mar- 
ried to Miss Clara C. Cole. In politics he 
is a Republican, in religious belief a Uni- 
tarian. His name is enrolled with the follow- 
ing fraternal organizations: Granite Lodge, No 
8],, A. 1'. & A. M., in which he is a Past 
Master; Union Chapter of Norway, Royal 
Arch Masons; St. Auburn Commandery, 
Knights Templars, of Portland; and Norway 
Lodge, No. 16, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 




"ORATIO STEARNS, a model farmer, 
who has a valuable farm and a very 

1^9 I pleasant residence at Lovell's Pond, 

was born in the town of Lovell, Ox- 
fortl County, Me., July 25, 1829. His father 
and mother, David and .Sarah (Andrews) 
Stearns, were small children when they came 
to this town with their respective parents from 
Billerica, Middlesex County, Mass., not far 
from IJoston. 

John Stearns, father of David, was the first 
of the Stearns family to locate in Lovell, 
where he was one of the pioneer settlers. He 
devoted the latter part of his life to clearing 
and cultivating a farm in this town. David 
Stearns here grew to manhood, and spent his 
life engaged in the pursuit of agriculture. He 
died about 1856, his wife surviving till 1861. 
They weii' the parents of eleven children, 
three of whom died in infancy. Of the others 
the following is recorded: Stephen (deceased) 
married Miss Mary Russell, and after her 
death Miss Mary Gordon (deceased), of Lovell, 



a daughter of Dr. John Gordon. Caleb died 
in 1861; and his wife, formerly Miss Eliza 
Russell, of Lovell, is now living in Lovell 
Centre. Mary was the wife of Abel Heald, of 
Lovell (both deceased). Timothy died at the 
age of twenty-three. Mehitable is the wife of 
Samuel Gilkey, a carpenter of Portland, Me. 
Henrietta and Harriet were twins. The for- 
mer, now deceased, married Thomas Tibbetts, 
who lives in Groveton, N.H. Harriet mar- 
ried Abel Heald, and is now a widow living in 
Lovell. Horatio is the subject of this sketch. 

Horatio Stearns in his early years received 
a limited common-school education. He re- 
mained with his parents, caring for them in 
their old age, and after their dejjarture only 
left home in answer to the call for the defence 
of the Union. In September, 1862, he en- 
listed in Company H, Twenty-third Maine 
Regiment, under command of Captain Noyes. 
Fortune shielded him from the rigors of war; 
for his regiment was stationed for a while 
in Washington, and then placed on guard 
dutv along the Potomac. Here a soldier on 
picket dropped occasionally, picked off by 
the bullet of a rebel in ambush ; Init the regi- 
ment engaged in no serious battle. Mr. 
Stearns received his discharge at Portland, 
Me., July 15, 1863, and returned home. 
Selling the parental farm at Lovell Centre, to 
the ownership of which he had succeeded, he 
purchased a farm in Colebrook, N.H., where 
he lived some four years. He then sold that 
estate and bought the farm on which he now 
resides, which was known as the Caleb .Stearns 
place, Caleb Stearns being his brother. Mr. 
Stearns owns some three hundretl acres of land, 
and is engaged in general husbandry. He has 
a small dairy and raises some stock. His 
homestead is beautifully situated, and he takes 
pride in keeping the place in such condition 
that it delights the eye of the traveller. 

In April, 1863, he was married to Sarah, 
daughter of Samuel and Sarah Brackett. Her 
father was a farmer of Colebrook, N.H. Mrs. 
Stearns was born in Hillsborough. She died 
in January, 1S72, leaving three children. The 
eldest, George, who was born April 18, 1866, 
is principal of the high school in Rumford, 
Me., and is one of the prominent men of the 
town, having served as P'irst Selectman and 



BIOGRAPHICAL R?:VIEVV 



141 



held (ither jniblic offices of trust. lie married 
Miss Mertie A. Butters, of Stoneliam, Mc., 
and has one child, Luzetta. The second son, 
Herbert, was born October 17, 1S6.S. The 
third, I'^red, who was born October 21, 1869, 
lives with his father, who is practically retired 
from acti\-e work, leaving to him the nianai;e- 
nient of the farm. He was married in -Septem- 
ber, 1894, to Miss Dais)' Hall, of Lovcll, Me., 
a daughter of Isaac and Samantha Hall. Mr. 
Hall also is a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Stearns have one child, -S.uah I?., born Mai'di 
26, 1896. Mr. Horatio .Stearns is a stanch 
Republican. He is an active worker in the 
Congregational church, of which he has long 
been a mcniljer. His son I'"rcd belongs to the 
Sons of V'eterans of Lox'ell Centre. 




ORACE I?. I'Rl'.SCOTT, a well- 
known antl much ix'spected resident 
of New Sharon, was born here, on 
the paternal homestead, September 
2, 1S12, son of Samuel and l<31iza (Ala^-hew) 
Prescott. Mr. Prescott's grandfather, Samuel 
Prescott, lived in New .Sharon until about ten 
years before his death. lie then mo\ed to 
Hallovvell, Me., where he died. On Febru- 
ary 8, 1 78 I, he married Miss I5etsey Whittier, 
whose children by him were: Ik-njamin, Sam- 
uel, Betsey, Mary, Nancy, Warren antl Clarry. 
He was a Revolutionary soldier, and he after- 
ward received a pension from the government 
for valuable servcies rendered in the war. 
At one time he was a resilient of F'l'ping, 
N.H., where his son Samuel was born. He 
afterward moved with his family to Winthrop, 
Me,, and a short time later to New .Slianm, 
where in 1806 he and his son Samuel bnught 
the present homestead. He was a strong l)e- 
liever in democracy, and carried his belief 
into his politics. His religion was that of 
the Baptist church. 

Samuel Prescott, the father of Horace B., 
received his later education in the schools of 
the town. Me subsequently became a school 
teacher, and was Town Clerk and Selectman 
for a number of years. On October 7, iSio, 
he was married to Eliza Mayhew, a daughter 
of Hebron Mayhew, of Martha's Vineyard, 
Mass. They had eight idiildren; namely. 



Theodore, Horace B. , Irving M., Calvin S., 
Samuel 1)., Gnstavus (]., lilizabeth C, and 
George 1'.. The onl_\' survivors are the subject 
ot this sketch anil Gnstavus G. The latter has 
been for the last forty years a resident of lios- 
ton, Mass., where he is engaged in the milli- 
ner}' business. 

Horace H. Prescott received his education at 
the public schools of his native town and at 
P'armington Academy. At the age of eighteen 
years he engaged in school teaching, which he 
altei'ward continued for twelve years. He 
then went into the lumber business in .Somer- 
set and Piscataquis Counties, and followed it 
for about ten years. On ( )et(iber 18, i8j;8, he 
was married to Cortlelia Johnson, a daughter 
of Robert Johnson, of North Yarmouth, Cum- 
berland County. They had five children — 
Caroline E., Henrietta C, Ellen A., Alice 
A., and I.issie May. l^jlen A., who is the 
only one living, married George McEaughlin, 
and has two children, namely: Horace P., 
born Novi'uiber 9, 1879; and Alice May, burn 
January i, 1883. Mrs. Prescott dietl SeiUem- 
ber f>, 1894. 

Mr. Prescott is a Reiiublican in his jioliti- 
cal belief, and belongs to the Congregational 
church. He has been a Justice of the Peace 
for forty years and Judge of Probate for nine 
years. He was elected to the State legislature 
in 1850, and was a member of the Council in 
1863, and again in 1869. He now carries on 
general farming and stumpage. His fine farm 
of three hundred and ten acres originally con- 
tained but one hundred and twenty-five. Like 
his father, he has a fondness for cattle; but, 
unlike him, he is not a dealer in them. How- 
ever, he owns a number of fine Jersey cows 
and some handsome horses. 



U.STIN IC. McINTIRP:, a retired lum- 
berman and cattle dealer of Waterford, 
O.xford County, Me., was born in North 
Reading, Mass., July 22, 1837, son of 
Richard G. and" |-'anny (Cross) McLitire. 
Hezekiah Mclntire, Mr. Mclntire's grand- 
father, who was a native of North Reading, 
removed thence to Norway, Me., where he 
settled upon a farm, and resided there for the 
rest of his life. 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



The family is evidently of Scottish origin. 
There is a tradition that the Highland clan of 
Maclntyre was descended from the MacDon- 
alds. Sullivan's "History of the District of 
Maine," published in 1795, records the fact 
that, at the time of the Civil War in England 
in the middle of the preceding century, Oliver 
Cromwell defeated the troops from Scotland 
who fought for King Charles I. in the north of 
Kngland, and, taking them prisoners, after- 
ward sent them to America, the " Donalds and 
M'lntires" being among those thus trans- 
ported. They settled in Maine, in what be- 
came the second parish of York, and was called 
Scotland. Rufus M'Intire, a descendant, was 
a member of Congress. One Philip Mclntire 
— whether of that branch of the family or not 
is unknown to the present writer — was doubt- 
less the progenitor of all of this name in Read- 
ing, Mass., where he settled at an early date 
in the North Precinct. The "History of 
Reading" mentions a son, Philip, born in 
1666; John, in 1679; David, in 168S; and 
others. His posterity intermarried with the 
Haywards, Flints, and other prominent fam- 
ilies of that vicinity. They seem to have in- 
herited an unusual share of martial and pa- 
triotic spirit, as si.\ of the name from the old 
town of Reading are recorded as having served 
in the l-'rencii ami Indian wars, 1745, 1759, 
and 1760, seven in the Revolution, and four- 
teen from North Reading fought under the 
stars and stripes in the War of the Rebellion. 
Richard G. Mclntire, father of Mr. Mcln- 
tire of Waterford, Me., was born in North 
Reading, where in his youth he learned the 
shoemaker's trade, which was his principal 
occupation through life. He resided for a 
while in Norway, Me., but eventually returned 
to his native town in Massachusetts, where he 
followed his trade for many years. Becoming 
interested in the reform movements of the day, 
he connected himself with a temperance society 
in North Reading. His religious faith was of 
the liberal type, and led him to attend the 
Universalist church. He died at his home in 
North Reading. June 30, 1879, survived a few 
years by his second wife, now deceased, who 
had no children. His first wife, Fanny Cross, 
a native of Pelham, N.H., died in 1845. She 
was the mother of four children, as follows: 



George, who is no longer living: Justin K., 
the subject of this sketch; Fanny, who died at 
the age of seven years ; and Maria, who is the 
widow of John Washburn, and resides in 
Boston. 

Justin E. Mclntire acquired in his boyhood 
but a limited common-school education, as he 
practically began to support himself at the age 
of seven years. For some three years the little 
lad did such work as he was able to do upon 
farms in Norway ; and he then learned the 
shoemaker's trade, which he followed for four 
years. After his marriage he settled upon a 
farm in the neighborhood of his present prop- 
erty. Later he went into the meat business, 
opening a shop in Harrison and running a cart 
ujion the road. He was thus employed for 
about three years, at the expiration of which 
he bought his present farm, and, continuing in 
the meat trade, also followed farming for about 
sixteen years. He then engaged in buying 
cattle, which he shipped to Brighton, Mass., 
and was for five or six years in partnership 
with Newell A. Trafton. The firm of Mcln- 
tire, Trafton & Co. then began to deal in pulp 
wood, which they shipped to Cumberland 
Mills, a business which proved exceedingly 
profitable; and, after remaining at the head of 
this firm for ten years he withdrew from active 
business pursuit.s, and has since lived practi- 
cally in retirement. He owns five hundred 
acres of land situated in Waterford and Nor- 
way, and, as a means of passing his leisure 
time, busies himself by cultivating a small 
farm. 

As a self-made man who started in life with- 
out capital and with only his own energy and 
ability to depend upon, Mr. Mclntire stands at 
the head of an honorable class in this locality; 
and his successful career is well worthy of 
a much more extended account. As a wortliy, 
upright, and conscientious citizen he is held 
in the highest repute by the farmers and busi- 
ness men of Oxford County, among whom he 
has a large circle of friends and acquaintances. 
He is connected with Oxford Lodge, No. 61, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of North 
Waterford. In politics he supports the Demo- 
cratic party, and for two years he served with 
ability as a member of the Board of Selectmen. 

On October 24, 1857, Mr. Mclntire was 




JAMES MORRISON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



145 



married to Amanda Johnson, who was born in 
Norway, Sci)tcmber 17, 1S34, daughter of Ira 
and Mary (Towne) Johnson, the former of 
whom is a retired business man of Norway. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mclntire have two children, 
namely: Leslie K., who was born September 
5. 1858, married J{dith R. Sawin, and resides 
ill W'aterford ; and J^ertrand (i. , who was born 
October 27, 1S66, married Alice Sawin, and 
resides with his parents. The sons married 
sisters, whose father, Thomas H. Sawin, was 
formerly a prosperous farmer of W'aterford. 
Messrs. Leslie K. and Eertrand G. Mclntire 
are well-known cattle buyers, who carr\- nii a 
large and profitable business in this county. 




"ON. JAMES MORRISON.— James 
lorrison was born in Madrid, Frank- 
lin County, Me., March 14, 1841. 
His father was Captain James 
Morrison, who was born in Candia, N.H., 
F"ebruary 10, 18 14, and was a descendant of 
that numerous Scotch-Irish clan of Morrisons 
a part of whom migrated from the north of 
Ireland, and settled in Massachusetts and 
New Hampshire in the latter part of the 
seventeenth and early part of the eighteenth 
centuries. The immigrant ancestor of this 
branch of the Morrison clan was Daniel Morri- 
son, who lived in Newbury, Mass., in 1690. 
His descendants afterward lived in Candia, 
Kpping, TiJton, and Sanbornton, N.H., and 
in Palermo and Madrid, Me. The wife of 
Captain James Morrison and the mother of the 
subject of this sketch was Mary Leach Doten, 
born in 15uckfield, Oxford County, Me.. May 
13, 1807. 

Reared on the frontier of North-western 
Maine, without wealth to aid or experience to 
guide, James Morrison from his youth was 
largely dependent upon his own resources for 
any advancement beyond the sphere of ordinary 
back-woods life. When he was six years of 
age his parents moved into the town of 
Phillips: and most of the time from then until 
he was twenty-one was spent in the laborious 
work of the farm and mill, with the usual 
limited privilege of attending the country dis- 
trict school. Always desiring something be- 
yond this, he would save up the earnings from 



odd jobs, and occasionally attend a term at the 
village high school. No seminary was within 
reach, no college opened wide its doors; and 
the larger i)art of his educational capital was 
acquired, unaided and alone, by "Inirning the 
midnight oil." 

Surmounting difficulties which would have 
discouraged many, he became a very successful 
teacher, and was thus engaged at the breaking 
out of the war of the Rebellion. At twenty- 
two he enlisted in the Second Regiment, 
Maine Cavalry, and served in the Department 
of the Gulf. He was at New Orleans, 
Thibodeau.x, and Brashear City, La., I'ine 
Barren Creek and Milton, P'la., Pollard, Ala., 
and the taking of Mobile, and was with the 
cavalry detachment that led the Sixteenth 
Army Corps ujj through Alabama, and occu- 
pied the city of Montgomery. 

Honorably discharged after the close of the 
war, he came home, resumed the occupation of 
teacher, and began the study of law. He was 
admitted to the Franklin County bar in Se])- 
tember, 1869, was superintending School 
Committee, and (uie of the Selectmen of 
Phillips for about twelve years, represented 
the Phillips district in the legislature of 
1877, was elected Senator from F"ranklin 
County in 1878 and 1879, serving one term as 
Chairman of the Committee on Legal Affairs 
and one term on the Judiciary. He was ap- 
pointed Judge of Probate for Franklin County 
by Governor Robie in 1883 to fill a vacancy, 
elected for four years in 1884, re-elected for 
another term in 1SS8, again in 1892. and 
again in 1896. The close of this la.st term 
will make seventeen years' continuous service 
as Judge. He continued in the active prac- 
tice of law for about five years after admission 
to the bar: but failing health, the result of 
malarious fever contracted in the South, com- 
pelled him to partially abandon office life and 
practice. Preferring to be a live farmer 
rather than a dead lawyer, he has in late years 
devoted his energies to agriculture, only occa- 
sionally taking an important case at law. l^y 
pluck, economy, and perseverance he has suc- 
ceeded where many others have failed, and 
has become one of Franklin County's promi- 
nent stock raisers. He is also interested to 
quite an extent in timber lands. 



146 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEVV 



A thorough Republican from ;\Ir. Lincoln's 
time, Judge Morrison has labored incessantly 
to uphold the principles of his early and only 
political faith. He served six years on the 
Republican State Committee, and has since 
done considerable work in the field and on the 
stump. A total abstainer, he is a radical 
temperance advocate, practises what he 
preaches, and believes in the Maine law. 

On March 14, 1871, he married Miss 
Louisa 11. Chick, of Madrid. She was born 
at said ALidrid, December 14, 1S50. The 
result of this union is three children, namely: 
two girls, Grace Winnifred, born January 25, 
1872; Cassandra Mary, born September 20, 
1880; and a boy, born August 10, 1884, in 
the midst of the political campaign of that 
year, and named for James G. Blaine. 



f^-"' 



EMUEL W. JACKSON, who died at 
his home in I'aris, Oxford County, 
J ^_U ^ Me., May 25, 1S85, is well remem- 
bered by the inhabitants of the town 
as a prosperous farmer and a man of sterling 
integrity. He was born April i, 1818, and 
was a son of Lemuel and Nancy (Foster) Jack- 
son. His father was born in Paris, March 17, 
1784, and his mother in Newry, Me., May 5, 
1792. 

Mr. Jackson's great-grandfather, who also 
bore the nanie of Lemuel, was among the first 
settlers of Paris, here taking up his abode in 
1782, when he was somewhat advanced in 
years, and had accumulated quite a little 
fortune for those times, being a successful 
man of business. He had previously bought 
several entire proprietary rights in this terri- 
tory, "No. 4," as it was known, paying for 
the land in cash: and he brought with him a 
considerable sum of money, fourteen hundred 
dollars in silver, representing a much larger 
amount in the depreciated currency of the day. 
He was a great help in the new settlement. 
Making subsequent purchases, he became the 
largest landholder in the town, owning more 
than one-eighth of the entire acreage, includ- 
ing the whole site of South Paris, where he 
erected the first mill in 1793. The first log 
house was also built by him. His influence 
was almost unbounded: and he may be said to 



have been the father of the town, being in so 
many respects the foremost citizen. He was 
one of the seven members of the Baptist 
church in Middleboro, Mass., who received 
letters of dismissal to join the church in 
Paris, Me. He married Jemima Sampson, 
daughter of Seth and Ruth (Barrows) Samp- 
son, of Plympton, Mass. 

Their son, Lemuel Jackson, second, the 
grandfather of Lemuel W., was a hard-work- 
ing and successful farmer. He spent his life 
in Paris, where he died April 12, 1S16. The 
first frame house erected in town was built by 
him in 1789. He married for his first wife 
Susanna Hammond, and by this union had five 
children — Lemuel, Jr., the third of the 
name; Sylvanus; Benjamin; Charity; and 
Jacob. 

Lemuel Jackson, third, the father of the 
special subject of this biographical notice 
was a man of good business abilities. He 
was engaged in general farming throughout his 
life here in Paris. His wife, Mrs. Nancy 
Foster Jackson, bore him seven children — ■ 
Charity N., Harriet S., Lemuel W., Ezekiel 
C, Hannah F., Vesta H., and Abner F., the 
three now living being Ezekiel, Hannah, and 
Abner. Mr. Lemuel Jackson, third, died in 
September, 1830; and Mrs. Jackson was mar- 
ried a second time to Thomas Frost, of Bethel. 
She died in i86o. In religious views the 
early representatives of the Jackson family 
were Baptists, and in politics they were Dem- 
ocratic. 

Lemuel W. Jackson, whose name appears at 
the beginning of this sketch, was the third 
child and eldest son born to his parents. He 
grew to manhood in Paris, and was educated 
in the -schools of this town. When only 
twelve years old he "began to work out, and 
from that time on he practically supported 
himself, attending school only in the winter 
months. He devoted his attention to general 
farming, at which he was successful : and in 
time he acquired a good property. In 1873 
he purchased the farm to which he removed 
three and a half years later, and from that 
time forward during the remaining years of 
his earthly life he was engaged in its cultiva- 
tion. His death, at the age of si.xty-seven 
years anil two months, was mourned by many 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



147 



outside his immediate circle. As one of the 
old residents of the town, an honest, upright 
man, he was widely known, and was honored 
and respected by all. In religion he was a 
i\Iethodist, and for over forty years he was a 
member of the South Paris church. Politi- 
cally, he was a Republican, and a strong ad- 
vocate of the temperance cause. The Jackson 
homestead is now owned by his widow, who 
leases it. 

Mr. Jackson was first married on March 26, 
1840, to Miss Hannah B. Lunt, a daughter of 
John Lunt, of Woodstock. She was born in 
March, 1813, and died July 29, 1868, aged 
fifty-five years. Five children were the fruit 
of their union, namely: Asaph K., born April 
1.5, 1S41, now living in South Paris; Lewis 
I.., born February 25, 1843, residing in Gor- 
ham, N.H.; liliza J., born September 24, 
1845, who died March 2S, 1868; Lemuel W., 
Jr., and Alice J., twins, born May 18, 1851, 
the latter of whom died August 23, i860, and 
the former on August 3, 1894. On Xovem- 
ber 18, 1869, Mr. Jackson was joined in mat- 
rimony with Miss Evelina A. Hackett, who 
was born in Minot, Me., October 28, 1827, 
daughter of William and Hannah N. (Brad- 
bury) Hackett. 

Mr. Hackett was born in Minot, Me., Sep- 
tember 5, 1792, and his wife in Bowdoinham, 
Me., June 23, 1795. He was a stirring, ener- 
getic man, and engaged in farming and lum- 
bering in Minot throughout his life. P'ive of 
their nine children are living, namely: Jacob 
M. Hackett, a lumberman in Augusta, Wis.; 
Lucius W., a general business man of Au- 
burn, Me ; lidvvin A., a farmer on the old 
home place in Minot; .Samuel W., residing in 
Biddeford, and engaged in the threefoTd occu- 
pation of a cooper, carpenter, and farmer; and 
Evelina A., Mrs. Jackson. The departed are: 
Horatio N., who died in 1838, at twenty years 
of age; Charles M. F., who died in 1838, at 
eight years of age; F" ranees M. S., who died 
in 1856 at twenty-four; and Flora R., who 
died in 1867 at thirty. Mr. Hackett died at 
his home in Minot, Me., November 18, 1871, 
survived by his wife, who died October 28, 
1873. They were Universalists in religion, 
and in politics he was a Jeffersonian Demo- 
crat. In early womanhood, after completing 



her course of stuily in the high schocd, Mrs. 
Jackson taught school for a time. Later she 
engaged in the millinery business, which she 
followed successfully in Biddeford for two and 
one-half years and in South Paris for fifteen 
years. 




REICMAN ANDREWS, a successful 
agriculturist and a prominent citizen of 
Lovell, Oxford County, Me., was born 
in this town, September 3, 1845, son of Thad- 
deus B. and Hannah E. (Farnum) Andrews. 
He is a representative of one of the old fami- 
lies of this vicinity, his ancestors having been 
among the original settlers of Lovell. They 
were so numero.us at one time that there was a 
school in the district where Mr. Andrews now 
resides, which comprised a teacher and fort}- 
scholars, all of whom were of blood relation- 
ship, and most of them actual members of the 
Andrews famil}'. 

The paternal grandfather, Mr. P'reeman An- 
drews, was Issacher, who was born in Lovell, 
November 23, 1788, and here spent his life in 
general agricultural pursuits. He and his 
wife, Mary D. Bemis, a native of Fryeburg, 
Me., became the parents of five children, 
namely: Jacob, who was born September 23, 
1815, and whose decease occurred December 
II, 1852; Thaddeus B., born April 11, 1818; 
Sallie, who was born April i, 1820; Thomas 
H., born February 22, 1824; and Mason H., 
born April 17, 1832. Mr. Issacher Andrews 
passed away December 2, 1870, at his home in 
Lovell, at the venerable age of eighty-two 
years, having survived his wife very many 
years, she having departed this life October 
14, 1847. 

Thaddeus B. Andrews was their second son. 
Having grown to manhood, he settled first on 
a farm in the eastern part of Lovell; but he 
subsequently removed to the estate now occu- 
pied by his son Freeman, and here engaged in 
husbandry during the remainder of his life. 
He wedded Mrs. Hannah E. Farnum Durgin, 
a native of Hiram, O.xford County, Me. She 
was the widow of William Durgin, who had 
lived only a short time after his marriage. 
As the wife of Mr. Andrews she became the 
mother of si.x children, namely: William 



I4S 



BIOCRArmCAL REVIEW 



Henry, who died in infancy; Freeman, of 
whom further mention is to be made; Mary, 
who still lives in Lovell, the wife of A. S. 
Kendall, a farmer and mason; Caroline, who 
is now the wife of A. D. Rowe, a husbandman 
of Lovell; Saraband Hannah, who both tlied 
in infancy. Mr. Thaddeus B. Andrews tlied 
on May 25, 1868, at the age of fifty years, one 
month, fourteen days, and his wife on April 
8, 1891, aged seventy-one years, one month, 
and six days. 

Freeman, growing to manhood as an only 
son, was early called to help his father in the 
lighter labors of the farm, and for that reason 
obtained but a limited education in the dis- 
trict schools. He remained at home until the 
attainment of his majority, when he worked 
out for two months. Longer than that he 
could not well be spared. He accordingly re- 
turned, and assumed the management of the 
homestead, caring for his parents until their 
decease; and here he has ever since followed 
general farming. The farm now consists of 
about eighty acres, a part of which he devotes 
to the cultivation of garden vegetables and a 
part to stock raising and dairying. Mr. An- 
drews also owns one hundred and fifteen acres 
of wild land in the same township. 

He was first married on November 25, 
1880, to Miss Fannie Durgin, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Durgin, of Hiram, Me., to 
whom she was born in Porter, November 26, 
1852. Mr. Durgin was a farmer of that town. 
Both he and his wife are now deceased. On 
February 9, 1882, Mr. Andrews was called 
upon to mourn the loss of his first wife; and 
on December 3, i8gi, he wedded Mrs. Susia 
Bemis Brackett, widow of Dennis Brackett, 
late of Lovell, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Bemis, both of whom are still living. 
Her father is a farmer of .Stow, O.xford 
County, where she was born November 26, 
1855. By her first husband, who died about a 
dozen years after their marriage, she had three 
children, namely: Nelson B., born March 30, 
1875, now deceased; Bert W., born January 
4, 1879, 'i"'^' who now resides with the subject 
of this sketch; and James R., who was born 
June 12, 1880, and who now makes his home 
at the same place. The second marriage of 
Mr. Andrews has been blessed in the birth of 



one child, a daughter, Isabelle by name, who 
was born November 2, 1892. 

Mr. Andrews is one of the prominent citi- 
zens of Lovell; and, though he is not an as|5i- 
rant for social or political distinction, he has 
served his fellows in several minor puiilic po- 
sitions. In national politics he has always 
been affiliated with the Republican party, of 
the principles advocated by which he is a 
vigorous supporter. Mrs. Andrews is a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church of Lovell village. 
Mr. Andrews has ever been an enterprising, 
industrious man; and his efforts have been 
crowned by a gratifying degree of success. 
He enjoys a very numerous acquaintance, and 
commands the respect and trust of all. 




HARLES D. HILL, M.D., of Bethel, 
Me., is an eminent and popular phy- 
sician, connected with the leading 
medical societies of the day. He 
was born in F"ryeburg, Oxford County, Me., 
March 19, 1855, a son of Cyrus K. and Char- 
lotte S. Hill, and comes of an old family, dat- 
ing back to Colonial days in New England. 

Cyrus K. Hill was born in Limerick, York 
County, Me., and, with the exception of the 
four years in which he served as a Union 
soldier in the late Civil War, passed his life 
in that place. He was a ]5ainter, and, besides 
working at his trade, followed the pursuit of 
agriculture for a number of years. He died 
at the age of sixty-nine. His wife, whose 
family name was Hill, but who, so far as 
known, was not of his kin, was born in Chat- 
ham, N.H. She lived to be seventy years of 
age. 

Through his mother Dr. Hill traces his 
ancestry back to Peter Hill, planter, who 
came from Plymouth, lingland, in 1633, and 
settled on Richmond Island, belonging to 
Cape Elizabeth. In 1644 he removed to 
Winter Harbor (Biddeford Pool), and in 164S 
he was a member of the court of Lygonia. 
His death occurred in 1697. Many of his de- 
scendants figured conspicuously in the early 
history of Saco and Biddeford, Me. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cyrus K. Hill were members of the Con- 
gregational church. They reared two sons — 
Erastus G. and Charles D. The elder is a 



lilOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



149 



real estate lirnker, residing in l-iradfonl 
County, Florida. 

Charles D. Hill, the younger son, acquired 
his early education in the common schools and 
Limerick Academy. He worked at book- 
keeping three years, and then took up the 
study of medicine with Dr. S. C). Clark, of 
Limerick. In 1880 he was graduated at the 
Medical School of Maine in Brunswick, Me. 
Hefore entering on private practice Dr. Hill 
had some valuable hospital experience, serv- 
ing, for eight months prior to his graduation, 
as steward in the United States Marine Hos- 
pital service, port of Portland, and subse- 
quently one year as house surgeon in the 
Maine General Hospital at Portland. In Sep- 
tember, 1881, he opened an office in Bethel; 
and since that time his practice has yearly in- 
creased. He has been surgeon for the Grand 
Trunk Railroad for a nuniljer of years. 

Dr. Hill is a Fellow of the Maine Academy 
of Medicine, a member of the Maine Medical 
Association, charter President of the O.xford 
County Medical Association, and a member of 
the American Medical Association, and of the 
National Association of Railway Surgeons. 
He is interested in politics as a Republican, 
and was one of the original members of the 
.South Paris LInited States E.xamining Pension 
Board, with which he was connected three 
years, the establishment of a Democratic ad- 
ministration ending his term of service. Dr. 
Hill is Chairman of the Bethel Board of 
Health. As a Ma.son he belongs to Bethel 
Lodge, No. 97; and he is an Odd Fellow and 
a Knight of Pythias. He is a very popular 
member of the community, his fine social 
c|ualities, as well as his professional excel- 
lence, attracting all with whom he comes in 
contact. Dr. Hill is unmarried. 




iKMUEL GURNEY, of Hebron, Oxford 
County, an extensi\-e farmer and fruit 
grower and a manufacturer of evap- 
orated apple and maple syrup, was 
born in West Minot, Me., March 16, 1826, 
son of Samuel and Lucy (Bryant) Gurney. 
Samuel Gurney was a native of Bridgewater, 
Mass., who in young manhood settled in West 
Minot, where he was engaged in farming upon 



shares for several years. His last days were 
sjient in Hebron, where he died at the age of 
seventy-six years. He was an upright, indus- 
trious farmer and a worthy citizen. He acted 
with the Whig ])arty in politics, and he was 
draftetl for service in the Aroostook War. His 
wife, Lucy, who was a native <>i Hebron, bore 
him eight children, five of whom are living, 
namel}' : Eunice C, the wife of W. W. Hardy, 
of Paris ; Ruth, the wife of Charles H. George ; 
Israel R. and Augustus D., who are residing 
in Natick, Mas.s. ; and Lemuel, the subject of 
this sketch. The others were: Pamice, 
Charles, and Ansel. The mother was about 
seventy-five years old when she died. Both 
parents were members of the Baptist church. 
Lemuel Gurn,ey passed his youth in Minot, 
where in the district school he received his 
elementary education. He subsequently at- 
tended the Hebron Academy for one term. 
I'or a time during his young manhood he 
was engaged in farming. At a later date 
he went to Natick, Mass., and was there em- 
ployed for several years in a large shoe manu- 
factory conducted by Henry Wilson, who at 
one time was a candidate of the P>ee Soil 
Party for the office of Vice-President of the 
United States. In 1846 Mr. Gurney returned 
to Maine, and, settling in Hebron, bought a 
farm of eighty acres, which forms a part of his 
present property. Since then he has added to 
his acreage by the purchase of more land, own- 
ing at the present time some one hundrefl and 
sixty-five acres. On it he erected his present 
residence with other buildings, and has other- 
wise greatly improved the property. His 
large fruit orchard, which he has brought into 
a fine condition, contains some excellent speci- 
mens of apple-trees, including some samples 
of grafting, besides forty different varieties of 
plums and small fruits. He is quite an exten- 
sive manufacturer of evaporated apple, which 
finds a ready .sale in the home markets, and 
makes a specialty of producing cider and vine- 
gar of a superior quality, which are in great 
demand. In addition he markets from three 
to five hundred barrels of fancy grafted apples 
annually. Upon his premises are excellent 
facilities for the manufacture of maple sugar 
and syrup, which he produces in large quan- 
tities. These, together with his fruits and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



their products, have taken several preniiunis at 
the Maine State and Oxford County fairs. 

On August 14, 1S53, Mr. Gurney wedded 
for his first wife Calista C. Barrows, of He- 
bron. She died in 1881, aged forty-six years, 
three months, and twenty-three days, leaving 
no children. On Januar\- 19, 1892, he mar- 
ried for his second wife Mrs. Lovina J. Has- 
kell. She was born in Poland, Me., January 
3, 1844, daughter of Nathaniel and Keziah 
(Hardy) Haskell. By her previous marriage 
with Freeman B. Haskell, who died February 
10, 1879, she has two children, namely: Mary 
E., wife of C. D. Herrick, of Greenwood, this 
county; and f^dith L. , the wife of F. .S. Pike, 
of Hebron. Mr. (iurney has an adopted son, 
Fred E., who was born in Lewiston, Me., in 
November, 1866. He is now married, and re- 
sides in this town. Both Mr. and Mrs. Gur- 
ney attend and liberally support the Baptist 
church. In politics Mr. Gurney has acted 
with the Republican party since its formation. 
He is connected with Hebron Grange, No. 43, 
Patrons of Husbandry; and he has been Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of both the Hebron and 
State Granges. His business reputation is 
high and widely extended, and he has fully 
earned the success he now enjoys. 



-OSEPH KEITH, a well-known wool- 
carder and formerly the Postmaster of 
North Chesterville, was born in this 
town, February 6, 1829, son of Joseph 
and Betsey (Cornforth) Keith. His grand- 
father, Adam Keith, who was a native of 
Middleboro, Mass., married Sally Morrison, 
also a native of Massachusetts. Her father, 
William Morrison, who settled in Maine in 
1805, was the original possessor of the home- 
stead in Farmington, this county, now occu- 
pied by Mrs. J. B. Morrison. 

Joseph Keith, Sr., resided with his parents 
until he reached manhood, at which period he 
applied himself to learn the trade of a wool- 
carder and cloth -dresser. In 1S12 he went to 
Unity, Waldo County, where he remained for 
six years. Returning in 181 8, he settled at 
the Keith homestead in Chesterville. Here 
he erected a house and other buildings, placed 
the land in a good state of cultivation, and 



followed his trade as well as general farming 
throughout the rest of his active period. He 
died in 1869, aged seventy-three years. He 
was a prominent figure in public affairs, serv- 
ing as Selectman and Town Treasurer for 
many years. He was also the first Postmaster 
at Keith's Mills, a position which he held as 
long as his age permitted him to serve. In 
politics he was a Whig, in religious belief a 
Universalist. His wife, Betsey, whom he 
married in' 1820, bore him four children; 
namely, Harriet, Leonard, Betsey, and Jo- 
seph. She died in 1872. 

Joseph Keith was educated in the common 
schools of Chesterville and at the Farmington 
Academy. While still a 3outh he began to 
learn the trade of a wool-carder with his 
father, and, becoming an expert workman, 
has followed it to the present day. The old 
mill, which was destroyed by fire in October, 
1884, was rebuilt in the following year, and 
thoroughly equipped with modern machinery. 
The present carding machine has a capacity of 
one thousand pounds of wool per week. 
Favoring the Republican party, Mr. Keith 
takes no active part in politics. For forty- 
two years he was identified with the post-office 
here as Assistant and Postmaster. 

On January 18, 1854, Mr. Keith weddeti 
Mercy B. Gale, a daughter of William R. 
Gale, of Palmyra, Me., who died when Mrs. 
Keith was a child. Her mother afterward be- 
came the wife of A. P. Haskell, of Chester- 
ville. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Keith have 
reared five children, namely: William G., 
born December 22, 1855: Linton J., born 
March 17, 1857; Irving E., born September 
28, 1858; Leonard S., born February 7, 1862; 
and Alvin H., born March 20, 1865. Will- 
iam G. Keith, who is now a member of the 
firm of Keith & Hiscock, hardware dealers of 
East Brookfield, Mass., married for his second 
wife Mildred Fay, daughter of Warren D. 
Fay, of that town. Linton J. Keith, who car- 
ries on the home farm, married Laura Good- 
rich, daughter of David Goodrich, of Chester- 
ville, and has seven children : namely, Georgie, 
Harriet A., Betsey B., Pldith M., Marion G., 
Mildred, and Cony. Irving E. Keith, who 
learned the tailor's trade, and became a well- 
known salesman of Augusta, Me., is now trav- 



BrOGRArinCAT, rf,vie\v 



15' 



elling in the West. Alvin H. Keith, who 
was for four years station a<;ent on the l^os- 
ton & Albany Railroad at Ware, Mass., and 
is now connected with large plumbing con- 
cerns in Manchester, N.H., married Emma 
Martin, a daughter of Emerson Martin, of 
Manchester. 

Leonard S. Keith, who is a prominent busi- 
ness man and a civil engineer of Chesterville, 
received his education in the town schools and 
at the W^ilton Academ)'. At the age of eigh- 
teen he went to East Brookfield, Mass., and 
there worked at the tinner's trade for two 
years. Returning then to Chesterville, he 
took uj) the study of civil engineering, and 
subsequently entered upon that business. 
His first work as a surveyor was upon J. W. 
Morse's farm in Jay, Me. Since that time 
he has surveyed land in Maine, Massachu- 
setts, and Florida, having remained in the 
last-named State for a season. He now man- 
ufactures carriage lifters and all kinds of wood 
work, runs the carding and grist mills here, 
and does custom sawing and planing at the 
saw-mills. The present mills were erected by 
him in place of the old ones which were de- 
stroyed by fire in 1884; and in 1893 he built 
a fine residence upon the site of the former 
one, which was occupied by Jonas Davis, 
while he was the grist miller at Keith's Mills. 
On February 16, 1893, Leonard S. Keith 
married Cora G. Fellows, of Fayette, Me., a 
daughter of Eugene Fellows, whose great- 
grandfather was one of the first settlers of 
Chester\'ille. She has one daughter, Geneva 
R., who was born June 16, 1895. 




ANA O. COOLIDGK, Deputy Sher- 
iff and the proprietor of a thriving 
livery business in Jay, was born in 
Livermore, Me., (October 12, 1852, 
son of Elisha and Celia B. (Bradford) Cool- 
idge, both natives of Livermore. His great- 
grandfather and giandfather, Thomas and Dan- 
iel Coolidge, who were natives of Watertown, 
Mass., settled in Livermore in the early part 
of the present century, and resided there for 
the rest of their lives. 

Elisha Coolidge was born and reared u]50n a 
farm. From 1856 to 1859 he was engaged in 



the provision business in Augusta, Me. ; but 
his principal occupation was farming, which 
he prosperously followed in Livermore. He 
was highly respected, and he took an active 
interest in the progress and development of 
the town. Lie died June 29, i8g6. His wife, 
Celia B. Bradford, became the mother of eight 
children, as follows; ALirtha C, now residing 
in Sioux Falls, .S. Dak., the widow of Joseph 
M. Merserve, who died in 1861 ; Charles, a 
resident of Jay, who married Angle M. Nick- 
erson, now deceased; Lizzie, who died at the 
age of twelve years; Edward, who died in in- 
fancy; Caroline M., now living in Ja\-, tlie 
widow of E. .S. Kyes, who died in Washing- 
ton, D.C., in 1888; Hiram 15., a prosperous 
agriculturist of Farmingtt)n, who married 
Emma C. Lela'nd ; Dana O. , the subject of 
this sketch; and I'rank W., who is married 
and resides in Pcjrtland, Me. Mr. Coolidge's 
mother died in March, 1891. 

The school days of Dana O. Coolidge ended 
with a course at Westbrook -Seminary. At 
the age of twenty-two he went to Boston, 
where he became a salesman in the cigar and 
tobacco trade, and remained there for seven 
years. Li the spring of 1883 he returned to 
his native State, and, settling upon a farm in 
North Ja\', was engaged in general farming 
there for ten years. In 1893 he moved to 
North Jay village, where he established him- 
self in the lix'cry business, to which he has 
since devoted his attention. He keejis at an 
average fourteen good driving horses, with first- 
class equipments. In adtlitioii to furnishing 
the public with excellent turnouts, he buys 
and sells good horses at every favorable oppor- 
tunity. 

Mr. Coolidge has been twice married. The 
first ceremony took jilace June 30, 1880, while 
he was residing in Boston. By it he was 
wedded to Ada C. Nickerson, daughter of the 
late Ensign Nickerson, of Cotuit, Mass., who 
died in Jay, March 10, 18S7. His second 
marriage was contracted July 3, 1891, with 
lulith Idella Bean, daughter of George H. and 
Augusta (Jk'an) IV'an, the former of whom is 
a well-known livery man and hotel-keeper at 
Jay Bridge. Mr. and Mrs. Coolidge have two 
children — Cordana E. and Georgia May. Mr. 
Coolidge was a Selectman of Jay in 1885, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



has acted as Deputy Sheriff for the past four 
years. He supports the Republican party, and 
is a charter member of I'>anklin Lodge, No. 
94, Knights of Pythias, of North Jay, and at- 
tends the Uni versa! ist church. 



'AM1-:S 'SI. FARRLS, who occupies the 
ohl Farris homestead in Hebron, and 
is one of the most able and successful 
farmers in this town, was born where 
he now resides, January 26, 1837, son of Jo- 
seph G. and Basha (Irish) Farris. The home- 
stead was originally settled by his great-grand- 
father, James Farris, who cleared a portion of 
the property, and spent the rest of his life 
there among the early settlers, prosperously 
engaged in farming. His grandfather, also 
named James, who was born upon the farm, 
inherited the property, and cultivated it during 
the active period of his life. He also did a 
large business in cutting timber by contract. 
He was a prominent man in Oxford County, 
which he served in the capacity of High Sher- 
iff. His death occurred when he was forty- 
four \'ears old. He married Margaret Monk, 
who attained the age of eighty years, and had 
nine children. Of the latter, the father of 
James M. F"arris was the sec(jnd-born. 

Joseph G. Farris came into the world at the 
homestead, and was a lifelong resident of He- 
bron. He succeeded to the ownership of the 
farm, which he carried on successfully for 
many years, keeping the soil in a fertile con- 
dition. He also had a very profitable business 
as stone contractor, supplying a great deal of 
material for public works. He continued in 
active occu])ation until his death, which oc- 
curred \\;hen he was si.xty-three years old. In 
politics he was a Republican, and he was a 
member of the Baptist church. His wife, 
Basha, a native of Buckfield, Me., had si.v 
children, as follows; Olive, Saphronia, and 
Ellen, all now deceased ; Ale.xander, who is a 
carpenter and resides in Minot, ^le. ; Wash- 
ington, whci lives in Boston, and is also a car- 
penter; and James M., the youngest, and the 
subject of this sketch. The mother died at 
the age of forty-four years. 

James M. Farris was educated in the district 
schools. In young manhood he became an op- 



erative in a shoe manufactory, and continued 
in that occupation for eleven years. After 
his father's death he bought the homestead 
property, on which since 1874 he has carried 
on general farming very successfully. His 
improvements, which include a new set of 
buildings, have made the property one of the 
most desirable farms in this section. Besides 
the seventy-five acres comprising the original 
estate, he owns some outlying land. On Sep- 
tember 6, 1858, Mr. Farris wedded Eliza Ann 
Peterson, who was born in Oxford, this 
county, June 14, 1841, daughter of Andrew- 
Peterson, of that town. Mr. and Mrs. Farris 
have three children, as follows: Fred. J., a 
resident of Minot, who is married and has two 
children — namely, Ida M. and Charles; Adel- 
bert L. , of Auburn, Me., who is married and 
has one son, Roy; and Ada E., the wife of 
B. M. Pratt, of Oxford, having tw'o sons — 
namely, Harold M. and Adelbert S. 

None of the many progressive farmers of this 
vicinity are regarded with more respect than 
Mr. F"arris. In politics he acts with the Re- 
publican party, while both he and Mrs. l-"arris 
are liberal in their religious views. 




ENRV FOBES, who has been success- 
fully engaged as a tiller of the soil 
during the larger jjart of his active 
life, was born ^Iay 8, 1831, in 
Paris, Oxford County, Me., on the homestead 
which he now occupies. His grandfather, 
Daniel Fobes, was born in 1742, in Bridge- 
water, Mass., and was a great-great-grandson 
of John Fobes, who was one of the original 
proprietors of that town. 

In 1802 the grandfather removed with his 
family to Maine, settling in Oxford Comity. 
He bought one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in what was then the new town of Paris; and, 
with the assistance of his children, he cleared 
quite a large tract, placing it in a state of cul- 
tivation. An industrious, law--abiding. God- 
fearing man, he won for himself a leading po- 
sition among the citizens of the place. In 
politics he was a representative Democrat and 
in religion a Baptist, serving for many years 
as Deacon of the first church of that denomina- 
tion established in Paris. His wife, whose 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



153 



maiden iiamu was Hannah Standish, was a 
direct descendant in the fourth generation of 
Miles Standish, the stalwart Captain of Plym- 
outh. They had the following children : 
Azariah ; Daniel; Sarah; Amasa; Seth ; Han- 
nah; I.uin, a soldier in the War of 1812, who 
died while imprisoned at Halifax. \. S. ; 
Heza ; Mehitable; and Hillings. Daniel 
P'obes lived until he was about seventy-three 
years old, and his widow attained the vener- 
able age of ninct3'-two years. 

Billings Fobes was the youngest of the 
family. He was born August 7, 1792, in 
Bridgewater, Mass., but from the age of ten 
years lived at the present homestead, continu- 
ing throughout his life in the occupation to 
which he was reared. Among the substantial 
improvements that he made on the farm are 
numbered the present dwelling-house and 
other farm buildings. He carried on advan- 
tageously the various branches of general agri- 
culture. In politics he was a Republican, and 
in religion a Baptist. He was actively inter- 
ested in military matters, being for a number 
of years Commander of the Rifle Company of 
the Paris militia. His death occurred in 
1 866, at the age of seventy-three years. Cap- 
tain Billings Fobes was twice married. His 
first wife, before marriage Harriet Stevens, 
was a native of Paris. She died on the home- 
stead at the early age of thirty-five years, leav- 
ing an only child, Henry, the special subject 
of this sketch. The father subsequently mar- 
ried Paulina Robinson, also of this town, who 
lived to the age of seventy-seven years. 

Henry Fobes grew to manhood in his native 
town. He was educated in the public schools; 
and he learned to work on his father's farm, 
which eventually came into his possession by 
inheritance. He has one hundred acres of 
land, and carries on the various branches of 
his industry with signal success, reaping large 
crops of hay, potatoes, ctnn, and other farm 
products, and in addition supporting a small 
dairy and raising considerable fruit. Brought 
up, as it were. Republican, Mr. Fobes has 
never swerved from party allegiance. He is 
connected with two fraternal orders, namely: 
Mount Mica Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of South Paris; and Paris Grange, 
Patrons of llusbantirv. He is a religious man 



and is an active member and Deacon of the 
Congregational church, both he and his wife 
having united with it many years ago. 

On November 4, 1S57, Mr. Fobes married 
Frances P. Webster, who was born January 3, 
1831, in Freeport, Me., a daughter of Captain 
Ik'njamin Webster, of that town. She died 
January 8, 1896, leaving three children, as 
follows: Hattie S., the wife of A. W. Pratt, 
formerly a sea captain, but now superintendent 
of the electric railway at Orange, N.J., who 
has four children — Harland A., Henry V., 
Margaret, and Ruth; Annie B. , who is the 
wife of Walter H. Swett, a manufacturer of 
tin cans at South Paris, and has one child, 
Eva F. ; and Eunice W., a teacher. 



-rp)TENRY D. PARKl'IR, a prominent 
L^J farmer of Jay, was born in this town, 

|l s I July 2, 1847, son (if Henry and 

— ■ Nancy (Tuck) Parker. His great- 
grandfather was Jonathan Parker, who moved 
from Ro.xbury, Mass., to Jay; and he resided 
here until his death. His grandfather, Scar- 
borough Parker, who was bcun .September 3, 
1767, in Roxbury, Mass., and settled in Jay in 
1789, owned a farm in the south-east part of 
the town, where he resided until his tleath on 
May 13, 1 8 14. Scarborough Parker married 
Hannah Coding, and by her became the father 
of ten children, as follows: Hannah, who was 
born May 27, 1796; Susannah, born August 
27, 1797, who died in 1889; Joel, born March 
10, 1799; Henry, born May 8, 1801; Jona- 
than, born August i, 1802; Abigail, born 
April 14, 1804, who died November 10, 1857; 
Cyrus, born August 17, 1805, who died Sep- 
tember 24, 1892; Rhoda, born June 6, 1808, 
who died in August, 1889; Harriet, born May 
24, iSiO; and Amos, born October 20, 181 i. 
Henry Parker was born in Jay. In early 
manhood he cleared and improved the farm 
now owned by his son, Henry D. An indus- 
trious and successful farmer and a worthy citi- 
zen, he had the sincere good will of his neigh- 
bors, and died I'ebruary 18, 1872. His first 
wife, Nancy (Tuck) Parker, who was a native 
of F"ayette, Me., died January 14, 1859. The 
only child of that union is Henry D. , the sub- 
jcct of this sketch. For his secontl wife lie 



154 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wedded Mrs. Patience (Sylvester) Harrington, 
of Durham, Me., now deceased, who was then 
the widow of the Rev. James Harrington. 

Henry D. Parker acquired a common-school 
education in Jay, and resided at home until he 
was twenty-one years old. He then went to 
Lynn, Mass., where he was subsequently em- 
ployed in a planing-mill for three years. At 
the end of that time he returned to Jay, and 
settled at the homestead. Since then he has 
given his attention to general agriculture, 
owning a farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 
which he has greatly improved, and .shipping 
the fruit of his large orchard to Boston. He 
is also interested in the Livermore Falls Trust 
and Banking Company, of which he is a Di- 
rector. 

On June 22, 1881, Mr. Parker was united 
in marriage with Clara Grinnell. She was 
born in Exeter, Me., May 19, 1851, daughter 
of William and Mahala (Irish) Grinnell, who 
were natives respectively of Exeter and Union, 
Me. William Grinnell resided upon a farm 
in E.xeter until his death, March 19, 1876. 
His wife's death hajipened March 23, 1895. 
Mr. and Mrs. Parker have one son, Howard 
H., who was born September 19, 1S89. A 
Reiniblican in politics, Mr. Parker takes an 
active interest in public affairs, but has never 
aspired to office. He is a member of Oriental 
Star Lodge, No. 21, A. F. & A. M., of Liver- 
more Falls. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist P^piscopal church. 




jHARLES M. DORR, whose widow, 
Mrs. Charlotte Morse Dorr, a native 
of Waterford, owns and occupies a 
very pleasant residence in South 
Waterford village, Me., was at one time 
prominent in the lumbering industry in the 
Pine Tree State. He was born in Boston, 
Mass., June 2, 1799, the son of Captain Will- 
iam and Lucinda (Da\'is) Dorr, both of that 
city. 

Captain William Dorr, who was master of a 
vessel, and spent much of his life on the high 
seas, always made his home in Boston; and 
he died there in 1845. His wife had gone 
before him, passing away in 1843. They were 
the parents of seven children — of whom the 



youngest only is now living — namely: Caleb: 
William; Charles M., the subject of this 
sketch; Lucinda; Elizabeth; James; and 
Sarah, who resides in Ro.xbury, Mass., the 
widow of Edwin Lemist. 

Charles M. Dorr was educated in Boston, 
remaining with his parents until the time of 
his first marriage, when he went to Dorchester 
to live. After a residence of some years in 
that place he removed to Bradley, Me., and 
engaged in the lumber business. This was in 
the early forties, when there was not so much 
competition in that line of industry as at the 
present day, and when timber coulcl almost be 
had for the cutting; and Mr. Dorr accumu- 
lated a fortune within the space of a quarter 
of a century. 

In 1865 he became a resident of Milford, 
Me., retiring from active business ; and in- that 
town he died, June 9, 1866. He was an ener- 
getic, capable, and persevering man, never 
shirking a task, no matter how heavy; and he 
won the respect and confidence of all with 
whom he came in contact. In politics he was 
a Republican. 

Mr. Dorr was married in Dorchester to 
Miss Ann Morse, of Dedham, Mass., who 
died in 1844 in Bradley, Me. By this union 
he had si.x children — Albert H. (deceased); 
Caleb Davis, a lumberman in Minneapolis, 
Minn.; Ann, wife of Symond J. Murphy, of 
Detroit, Mich.; Sarah E., widow of William 
Garland, residing with her sister in Detroit; 
William, of Milford, Me., who married Miss 
Lena Doe; and Temple E., who married Miss 
Malvina Eddy, and lives in East Saginaw, 
Mich. On August 18, 1845, the year follow- 
ing the death of his first wife, Mr. Dorr was 
married in Bradley, Me., to Miss Charlotte 
Morse, of Waterford, Me. She was born July 
21, i8t6, the daughter of Jonathan and Chloe 
(Willard) Morse. Her parents were born in 
Massachusetts, the father in Stow, the mother 
in Harvard. They removed to Waterford in 
the early part of this century; and Mr. Morse 
was here prosperously engaged in farming for 
a number of years, and he was also a drover. 
He died in Waterford in 1833, the year fol- 
lowing the death of his wife. They were the 
parents of tweh'e children, all but three of 
whom died in infancy. Of these three, tlie 



./^"^ 







CHARLES M^ DORR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



57 



eldest is Mrs. Dorr. The second, Augustus 
G. , died in 1864; and the third, Sarah, who 
was the wife of Dr. Z. Jodon, died July 9, 
1884. 

After her husband's death Mrs. Dorr went 
West, and was in Michigan, Minnesota, and 
Ohio for two years, visiting her step-children. 
Returning to Milford, Me., she resided there 
a year, and then came to her native jjlace to 
spend her declining years amid the scenes 
familiar to her childhood. Although Mrs. 
Dorr has passed the eightieth milestone in 
life's journey, she does not seem old; and her 
friends are sanguine that she will spend many 
succeeding seasons in her beautiful home. 
She is a member of the Congregational church 
in Waterford. 




LVIN W. JUDKINS, a successful 
blacksmith and carriage builder of 
West Farmington, was born No- 
vember 29, 1856, in Carthage, Me., 
son of Willard and Malissa (Mitchell) Jud- 
kins. His grandfather, Phillip Judkins, who 
was one of the first settlers in Carthage, mar- 
ried Rachel White, and died at the age of 
seventy-five, leaving seven children. His 
widow's death occurred in September, 1896, 
at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. 
Their children were: Orrin, A.saph, Willard, 
Irena, Eastman, Benjamin, and Mercey A. 
Asaph was killed in the late war. 

Willard Judkins learned shoemaking in 
early life, and subsequently worked at it for a 
while in .Stoughton, Mass. Not liking the 
trade, he then turned his hand to carpenter- 
ing. Some time after, a part of his father's 
farm became his by inheritance; and he re- 
turned home to take charge of it. He built 
some new buildings on the property, and he 
carried on general farming until his death in 
1876. He was a Republican in politics. He 
represented the town for a time in the State 
legislature, and served it acceptably as Select- 
man. In religious belief he was an Ad- 
ventist. His wife, a daughter of Joshua 
Mitchell, of Carthage, bore him si.x children. 
Preston died young. The survi\-ors are: 
Alvin W., Everrett P., Orrin S. , Morris T., 
and Evander C. The mother is also living. 



Alvin \V. Judkins was educated in his na- 
tive town. Upon arriving at maturity, he 
bought his father's farm and cultivated it for 
a period of four years. Selling it then, he 
went to West Farmington, and took charge 
of the Elm Hotel, which he ran for a short 
time. After this he conducted a boarding- 
house for a spell, during which he learned the 
blacksmith's trade. He subsequently worked 
at this craft for two years in West Farming- 
ton, and then moved to Madison, Me., where 
he rented a blacksmith's shop, and started in 
business for himself. Some time after, he 
bought a shop, which, on finding it unsuit- 
able for his pur]iose, he sold. Then, in part- 
nership with Mr. H. H. Steward, he bought 
some land, built a first-class shop and house 
on it, and was" there prosperously engaged at 
his trade until 1893. In that year he disposed 
of his share in the business, came back to 
West P'armington, and bought a half-interest 
in the Whitney blacksmith sho]x Here he 
has since carried on general blacksmith work 
and carriage ironing with much success, em- 
ploying skilled workmen to assist him. He 
also deals in wagons and in carriages. Some 
time ago he purchased the fine old residence 
on Water Street known as the Ed Greenwooti 
estate, and has much improved it since. 

Mr. Judkins was married September 17, 
1880, to Miss Flora B. Hutchinson, a daugh- 
ter of Reuben and Isabel (Pratt) Hutchinson, 
highly respected farming people. Their four 
children are: P'lorence H., born November 
II, 1 881; La Forrest E. , born March 10, 
18S3; Gertrude B. , born June 19, 1S89; and 
Lucy W., born September 4, 1895. Like his 
father, Mr. Judkins is a Republican, and in 
religion an Adventist. He is also a member 
of Euclid Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Madison, 
and of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. 




HARLES E. WILSON, M.D., an 
esteemed physician of p;ast Hiram 
village, O.xford County, was born 
in Limerick, Me., September 9, 
1853, son of Jonathan and ElizalDeth (Cole) 
Wilson. The family, which is of Scotch 
origin, descends from Gowen Wilson, its 



158 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



founder in America. Moses Wilson, Dr. 
Wilson's grandfather, who was a native of 
Kittery, Me., settled upon a farm in Parsons- 
field, Me., previous to 1800, and some years 
later removed to Cornish, Me., where he re- 
sided for the rest of his life. 

Jonathan Wilson, who was a native of I'ar- 
sonsfield, was twelve years of age when he 
moved with his parents to Cornish. In young 
manhood he settled in Limington, Me. At a 
later date he went to Limerick, and subse- 
quently to Sweden, this county, where he 
died Septemi)er 3, 1890. His wife, Eliza- 
beth, who was a native of Cornish, had nine 
children, as follows: Harriet, born April 2, 
1837, who died November 6, 1858; John, 
born December 25, 1838, who died June 26, 
1896; Fanny N., born April 22, 1840, who 
died March 5, 1875: Moses B., born April 2, 
1842, who died March 16, 1864; George F"., 
born July 15, 1844, who died March 14, 1882: 
Sarah E., born July 28, 1846, who died April 
19, 1847; Sarah E. (second), born May 12, 
1848, who died February 9, 1888; Daniel W., 
born August 11, 1850, who died October 18, 
1862; and Charles E., the subject of this 
sketch. Her death occurred on January i, 
1892. 

Charles E. Wilson received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools. He subse- 
quently attended the North Bridgton Academy 
and Gray's Business College, for a time; and 
then he fitted for Bowdoin College at the Nor- 
way Institute, where he graduated as class 
orator. After teaching school in Norway, 
Waterford, Sweden, and Lovell for eighteen 
terms, he entered Bowdoin College Medical 
School, from which he graduated with the 
class of 1885. Upon receiving his diploma, 
he entered upon his profession at Kineo, Me. 
In the following November he located in East 
Hiram, where he has since resided. During 
the winter of 1894-95 he took a post-graduate 
course at the Post-graduate Medical College of 
New York City. His practice e.xtends over a 
wide circuit, including several towns in 0.\- 
ford and Cumberland Counties. The duties 
of Secretary of the Board of Health and of a 
member of the Board of United States E.xam- 
iners in pension cases are also discharged by 
him. He has been a member of the Maine 



Medical Association since 1886, and is also 
connected with the Maine Academy of Medi- 
cine and Sciences. 

On June 16, 1885, Dr. Wilson was united 
in marriage with Frances Ella Chadbourne, 
daughter of Francis S. Chadbourne, a promi- 
nent resident of Oxford, who died in 1893. 
They have one son, Charlie Louville, who was 
born November 10, 1886. A Democrat in 
politics, the Doctor is too much occupied 
with his professional duties to take a promi- 
nent part in public affairs. At present he is 
rendering valuable service to the town as a 
member of the School Board, and he was Su- 
pervisor of Schools during six years of his 
residence in Hiram. He is connected with 
the Masonic fraternity, being a member of 
Mount Tire'm Lodge, No. 132, of Hiram; of 
Aurora Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Cor- 
nish. He has also membership in Hiram 
Lodge, No. 16, Knights of Pythias. Dr. and 
Mrs. Wilson attend the Congregational church, 
and occupy an important social position in the 
community. 




RASTUS W. UEhlRlNG, a native of 
Denmark, Oxford County, represents 
an old county family. He was born 
September 11, 18 19, upon the farm he now 
owns and occujjies, son of Robert and Rhoda 
(Whittemore) Deering. Mr. Deering's father, 
who was a native of .Saco, Me., born October 
22, 1789, came in 1808 to Denmark, where 
he settled upon the farm which has since been 
the homestead of the family. He continued 
to till the soil with success during the rest of 
his active period, and died June 3, 1864. His 
wife, Rhoda, who was born in Hebron, Me., 
Jul\- 2, 17S8, became the mother of seven 
children, of whom two are living, namely: 
Erastus W., the subject of this sketch; and 
Sarah Jane, who married Myron H. Mansfield, 
and is now residing in Nebraska. The others 
were: Deborah W. , Robert, Jairus M., Mary 
J., and luuiice Eliza. Deborah W. died at 
the age of seventeen, and Mary J. and Eunice 
Eliza also died before reaching maturity. The 
mother died August 28, 1854. 

Erastus W. Deering acquiretl a common- 
school education, and was reared to farm life 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'59 



at tlie homestead. Some time after his mar- 
riage he went to McLean County, Illinois, 
where he was engaged in farming for a year. 
Returning then to Denmark he has .since given 
hi.s attention to carrying on the home farm, 
which he inherited at his father's death. The 
property consists of two hundred acres of 
desirable land, the tillage portion of which is 
in a good .state of cultivation. His ])rinci- 
pal crops have been hay, corn, and potatoes. 
He has been exceedingly active and industri- 
ous, making the most advantageous use of his 
opportunities for advancement. Some time 
since he practically retired from labor, leaving 
the management of the farm to his son. 

On March 23, 1843, Mr. Deering wedded 
Joann I. Jewett, who was born in Denmark, 
daughter of Daniel and Lydia Jewett, the for- 
mer a thrifty farmer of this town. Born of the 
marriage were four children, namely: Annie 
H., who is the wife of Nathaniel Wiggin.s, of 
Baldwin, Me. ; Jairus M., who died at the age 
of si.xteen ; Alice A., who is now a teacher in 
the ])ublic schools of Chicago; and Arthur M., 
whose birth occurred Augu.st 18, 1857, and 
who is now in charge of the home farm. Ar- 
thur M. married Mary S. Lowell, daughter of 
Daniel Lowell, late of this town, and has five 
children; namely, Jennie E. , Arthur L. , Wal- 
ter P., Helen I., and Ralph O. His mother 
died February 11, i860; and on October 11 of 
the same year his father married for his second 
wife Mary A. Jordan, who was born in Den- 
mark, August 30, 1829, daughter of Mial and 
Mehitable Jordan, former residents of this 
town, both now decea.sed. In politics Mr. 
Deering is a Republican. He has voted with 
his party since its formation, but has never 
aspired to public office. He is, however, 
deeply interested in all matters relative to the 
general welfare of the town, and is well in- 
formed regarding the principal questions of 
the day. Mrs. Deering is a member of the 
Methodist church. 




ILLIAM AUGUSTUS MANNING, 
manager of the Elliott & Bartlett 
spool-mills of North Waterford, 
O.xford County, was born in Eaton, N.H., 
December 12, 1850, son of Dr. William A. 



and Nancy (Atkinson) Manning. Dr. Will- 
iam A. Manning, who was a native of Ipswich, 
Mass., entered on the study of medicine in 
his native town, finishing his professional 
training in Philadelphia. He began practice 
in Dover, N.H. Subsequently he pursued his 
profession in Springvale, Me., South lk>rwick, 
Me., and Eaton, N.H.; in Stoneham, this 
county, where he remained several years; and 
in Weld, Me., for two years. His death oc- 
curred March 26, 1876, in Weld. He was 
married in Eaton, N.H., to Miss Atkinson, a 
native of that town, who is now living in 
F:aton with her sister. They had five chil- 
dren, namely: William A., the subject of this 
sketch; Allegra, in I-:ilsworth, Me.; John F., 
a practising physician in F:ilsworth, Me., who 
married Miss Maude Saunders; Ida H., de- 
ceased, who was the wife of Dr. Charles M. 
Coolidge, a physician of North Waterford; 
and Hattie, who lived but three summers. 

William A. Manning received a common- 
school education, supplemented by one term 
at the Bridgton (Me.) Academy. He left 
home when about twenty years of age, going 
to Albany, Me., whore he worked in the tim- 
ber some two months. He then obtained em- 
ployment in a saw-mill in Milton, N.H., re- 
maining four months. The three months 
following he was employed in a saw-mill in 
Stoneham, this county. In 1S72 he entered 
the employ of Elliott & Bartlett, whose favor 
and confidence he won by his industry and 
the conscientious discharge of his duties.' He 
has now been manager and overseer of the mill 
for nearly a quarter of a century. The Elliott 
& Bartlett spool-mill, located at Lynchville, 
about a mile north of the village'tif North 
Waterford, is one of the largest and most 
prosperous concerns in this part of the county. 
Mr. Manning is also engaged to some extent 
in farming, and owns some real estate near 
North Waterford village. 

He was married June 13, 1881, while on 
a visit to Pittsfield, Pa., to Miss Lizzie M. 
Bartlett, of that town. She was born at 
Stoneham, Me. .January 17, i860, daughter of 
Enoch M. and Mary (Ayers) Bartlett, both 
natives of Maine, born respectively in Newry 
and Stoneham. Mr. Bartlett, wiio is a farmer, 
living in Naples, Me,, has been three times 



i6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married. Mis first wife died at Pittsfield, 
Pa., June 24, 18S3. His second marriage was 
contracted with iVIrs. Sarah Gray, of Thomas- 
boro, 111., and his third with Mrs. Sophia 
Leavitt, of Naples, Me., who is still living. 
Mr. Manning has four children, all natives of 
North Waterford, namely: Fonti E., born 
July 15, 1882; Robert L., born January 21, 
1885; Mary A., born August 12, 1888; and 
Arthur B., born July 4, 1891. Mr. Manning 
votes the Republican ticket. He is a member 
of Oxford Lodge, No. 61, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of North Waterford village. 
Keeping on friendly terms with all conditions 
of men, "Gus Manning" is one of the most 
popular men of the town. 




LRION K. I'. JONI'lS, of Jay, Frank- 
lin County, was born here, March 2, 
1829, son of Hiram and Betsey 
(Tuck) Jones, both natives of Fay- 
ette, Me. His grandfather, Captain Sylvester 
Jones, a native of Taunton, Mass., who was a 
ship-master at one time, settled upon a farm 
in Fayette, and resided there for the rest of 
his life. Hiram Jones came to Jay in 1826. 
He purchased a farm here, which he cultivated 
industriously during the rest of his active 
period, and died about the year 1870. His 
wife, Betsey, became the mother of seven chil- 
dren, namely: Mary A., who is still residing 
at the homestead in Jay; Albion K. P., the 
subject of this sketch; Harriet, who is now 
the widow of Otis Richardson, and lives in 
Livermore Falls; Albert V., who married 
Jane Gordon, and occupies the old homestead; 
William B., who is no longer living: Ann 
Elizabeth, who married John Peterson, and 
now resides in California; and Charles H., 
Ann Elizabeth's twin brother, who died in 
the Civil War. The mother reached the age of 
eighty years before she died. 

Albion K. P. Jones was educated in the 
common schools of Jay, and resided at home 
until he was nineteen years old. He then 
went to Lowell, Mass., where he remained for 
three years employed as a watchman. In 
June, 185 1, he joined a party bound for the 
mines in California, and with them, on the 
28th of the month, left New York City for 



the Isthmus. On arriving there they crossed 
to Panama in a log boat; and, after waiting in 
that city seven days for a vessel, they started 
on the voyage up the coast, which occupied 
seventeen days, and arrived at San Francisco 
on August 6. Mr. Jones went to the diggings 
in Northern California, and there obtained 
employment in a mine at seven dollars per 
day. He lived in a hut made of brush, board- 
ing himself at seven dollars per week; and his 
sojourn there was productive of good financial 
results. After making considerable money he 
finally left the mines, and engaged in agri- 
culture upon a farm in Suisun Valley for two 
years. He then returned to Jay, and bought 
the farm where he now resides. He owns two 
hundred and forty acres of fertile land, which 
he has brought to a good state of cultivation, 
and much enhanced in value by erecting new 
and substantial buildings. 

On January 10, 1854, Mr. Jones was first 
united in marriage with P2mily Bigelow, who 
was born in Corinna, Me., daughter of John 
Bigelow. She died November 10, 1863, leav- 
ing two children, namely: F"annie, now the 
wife of Albert Wing, of Fayette, Me.; and 
Emma J., who is the widow of Bradford F. 
Parker, and resides at the Parker homestead, 
having two children — Horace A. and Brad- 
ford S. By a second marriage on April 4, 
1866, Mr. Jones was wedded to Mrs. Mary E. 
(Reynolds) Porter. She was born in Belfast, 
Me., November 25, 1830, daughter of William 
and Mehitable (Trundy) Reynolds, now de- 
ceased, who were prosperous farming people 
of that town. In politics Mr Jones acts with 
the Republican party. Both he and Mrs. 
Jones are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. They have the warm esteem and 
good will of their neighbors. 



-OHN WESTON, of Fryeburg, an exten- 
sive dealer in live stock and one of the 
largest timber land owners in Oxford 
County, was born in Fryeburg, January 
13, 1834, son of FZdward and Rachel (Ward) 
Weston. Edward Weston was a native of 
Lincoln, Mass., came to P'ryeburg in March, 
1800, and settled upon the farm where his son 
John now resides. He was a farmer and a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i6i 



cattle drover ; and for many years he carried 
the United States mail from Fryeburg to Port- 
land. In his day he figured prominently in 
public affairs, and was Deputy Sheriff for sev- 
eral years. He died April 3, 1853. His first 
wife, in maidenhood Jane Webster, of Conway, 
\. H., who died in 1829, bore him five chil- 
dren — Ann, James, Charles, lulward, and 
John, none of whom are living. I^y his second 
marriage he was wedded to Rachel Ward, a 
native of Concord, X. H. Her father, Jona- 
than Ward, came to p'ryeburg when she was 
si.\ months old, and resided here for the rest of 
his life. -She became the mother of four chil- 
dren, as follows: John, the subject of this 
sketch; (ieorge Ward, who was an extensive 
cattle dealer in South America, where he has 
since died; Jane W. , who resides at the home- 
stead in this town; and Edward Payson, who 
married Frances Hunt, and is a general mer- 
chant in Fryeburg. She survived her husband 
nearly forty years, and resided at the home- 
stead until her death, which occurred January 
3, 1892, at the advanced age of ninety-two 
years. 

John Weston acquired his education at the 
Fryeburg Academy. After his father's death 
he began life for himself, first working in the 
lumber camp.s, and later employed in handling 
stone. Being a great admirer of live stock, he 
naturally drifted into that business, commenc- 
ing in a small way by shipping to the cattle 
markets. Since then he has become one of the 
largest dealers in this county. He is also 
extensively interested in lumbering, and owns 
over four thousand acres of timber land. This 
property is located as follows: five hundred 
acres in F'ryeburg; five hundred in F>yeburg 
and ]5rownfield townships; three hundred in 
Mason; one thou.sand in Conway, N. H. ; thir- 
teen hundred in Madison and Iiaton, N. H. ; 
three hundred in Bartlett, N. H. ; two hundred 
in Freedom, N.H. ; and other tracts in Maine 
and New Hampshire. His homestead jirop- 
erty contains one hundred acres of excellent 
tillage land with a substantial residence, and 
occupies a pleasant location near the village of 
F"ryeburg. 

On January 13, 1859, Mr. Weston was 
united in marriage to Abbie F. Glines. She 
was born in Eaton, N. H., daughter of Thomas 



Glines, now deceased, forn"ierly a prosperous 
farmer of that town. She became the mother 
of five children, as follows: l^dward, born Oc- 
tober 23, 1859, who married Sadie Gordon, a\ 
native of Canada, and is now in the grain busi- 
ness in ]>"ryeburg; James Herbert, born No- 
vember 3, 1 861, who died at the age of two 
years; Mary, born P'ebruary 9, 1866, residing ~ 
at home; Susan, born March 12, 1868, who is 
now a teacher in the public schools of this 
town; and George Ward, born Se])tember 3, 
1870, also residing at home. Mrs. Weston 
died May 28, 1895. In politics Mr. Weston is 
a Republican, and, though actively interested 
in all measures calculated to secure the party's 
success, he has never sought public office. 
Highly esteemed by the community, he exer- 
cises a wide influence in all public niatter.s. 
He and his daughters are members of the New 
Jerusalem Church of Fryeburg. 




LBERT GUY HOWARD, M.D., a 
popular and successful physician and 
surgeon of P'armington, Me., was 
born in the town of Rangeley, 
J-'ranklin County, October 20, 1846, the son of 
(iuy C. and Mahala (Howland) Howard. 

Guy C. Howard was born in the town of 
Phillips, Me., and reared to farm life. His 
first independent venture was the purcha.se of a 
farm in his native town, which he tilled for a 
few years; and then selling it he engaged in 
trade and manufacturing, purchasing a store at 
Bragg's Corners and also the potash-mills. 
He subsequently moved to the town of 
Rangeley, where he bought one hundred and 
sixty acres of heavily timbered land near 
Quimby Pond and erected a log house. After 
clearing most of the land in the pioneer fash- 
ion, he sold it at an advantage and purchased 
some property in the town of Phillips. There 
he remained but a short time, next purchasing 
a farm in the town of Weld. In 1864 he sold 
his farm and bought a house in the village of 
■^Veld, retiring from active business. In 1879 
his home was broken by the death of his wife; 
and, selling his effects, he went to live with 
his daughter in Lynn, Mass., where he died at 
the age of eighty years. He had been a man 
of remarkable physical vigor, and at the time 



I 62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of his death there was not a gray hair in his 
head. Mr. (iiiv C. Howard was a Democrat 
in his early manhood, but after the formation 
of the Kejjublican party he transferred his 
allegiance to that. In religious belief he was 
a Baptist. His wife, who was a daughter of 
l^riggs S. Howland, died in 1879, at the age 
of sixty-nine. Mr. and Mrs. Guy C. Howard 
were the parents of the following children: 
James G. ; Briggs H. ; Abigail, who died 
young; William B. ; Frank S. ; Helena M. ; 
Delia R. ; Albert Guy; and Mary E. 

Albert (iuy Howard, the youngest son and 
the special subject of this biography, spent his 
boyhood years in acquiring his education in 
the public schools. After leaving the high 
school he learned the trade of harness-making; 
and then opening a shoj) he carried on the busi- 
ness some ten years, at the same time studying 
medicine under the tuition of Dr. J. J. Lin- 
scott, of Farmington, and Dr. .S. P. Warner, 
of Portland. He subsequently took a practical 
course at the Medical Institute of Vermont, 
graduating in 1881. In July of the same year 
he began to practice at New Sharon, Me., 
where he remained two years, and he ne.xt 
settled at Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County; 
but, the salt air not agreeing with him, he re- 
moved to Kingfield, where he established 
himself, August 16, 1883. There he soon 
had a large practice, the frequency of accidents 
in the woods among the lumber camps and 
mills keejiing him busy as a surgeon and phy- 
sician ; and his skill and success soon gave 
him a favorable reputation. On May 7, 1891, 
he moved to Farmington ; and although there 
were a number of old established physicians 
here, he soon won his way to favor, as his prac- 
tical experience in surgery especially made his 
presence desirable in cases of emergency. He 
has a large jiractice in Farmington and vicin- 
ity, and is often called in consultation long 
distances away. His residence and office are 
at 22 High Street. 

Dr. Howard and Miss ]{lla L. W'ilkins, 
daughter of Abial and Elizabeth (Howe) Wil- 
kins, of Wilton, Me., were married on April 
30, 1870, and now have three children. It was 
to give these children better educational advan- 
tages that he removed to I'armington. The 
eldest, Guy C, who was born December 29, 



1873, and is at present a Junior in Bowdoin 
College, has taught sixty-four weeks as first 
assistant of the Farmington High School; the 
next, Maud E. , who was born January 16, 
1875, is a graduate of the State Normal School 
at Farmington in the class of 1S94, and is now 
teaching in Groveland, Mass. ; and the young- 
est, Ethel L. , born December 12, 1879, is in 
the classical department of the I'armington 
High School, fitting for college. In politics 
Dr. Howard favors the Republican party. 



OHN C. PIKE, formerly a resident of 
Waterford, where he will be long re- 
membered as a man of sterling worth 
and character and a prominent agri- 
culturist, was born here, September 28, 1827. 
He was a son of John and Hannah (Prince) 
Pike, respectively natives of Waterford and 
Massachusetts. Grandfather Pike was the 
first of the name to settle in this town. 

John Pike, who w^as engaged in farming 
here throughout the most of his lifetime, was 
one of the leading agriculturists of the town. 
He subsequently removed to Sweden, Me., 
where his busy life closed. His first wife, 
Hannah (Prince) Pike, died December 21, 
1833; and he afterward married Miss Esther 
Richardson, of Sweden, who was born May 
10, 1804. The fruit of his first marriage was 
four children, namely: Mary A., deceased, 
born April 8, 1825; John C. , the subject of 
this sketch ; Susan Augusta, born July 29, 
1829, and Hannah M., born December 21, 
1833, who died September 27, 1844. By his 
second wife he had: Elias, born June 28, 
1837, who died December 28, 1862; Alvin, 
born April 28, 1841, now living in Sweden; 
and Gilman, born February 11, 1S45, who 
died December 17, 1862. 

When seventeen years of age John C. Pike 
left home, and went to California and to other 
points in the W^est, where for several years, 
until 1858, he was engaged in mining and 
loggin<r- After his marriage he settled on 
the farm now occupied by his widow, and was 
there successfully engaged in general farming 
until his death, which occurred December 6, 
1 89 1, at the age of sixty-four years. The 
farm, which is now carried on bv one of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sons, contains about three hundred acres of 
productive land. It came to its present 
owners in a high condition. 

On June 28, 1854, Mr. I'ike was married to 
Miss Eliza A. VVilliard, who was born in 
Waterford, August 16, 1821, daughter of 
Louis and Mary (Plaisted) Williard. Mr. 
and Mrs. Williard were respectively natives 
of Harvard, Mass., and Gorham, Me. When 
Mr. Williard came to Waterford, he settled on 
the farm where his daughter, Mrs. I'ike, now 
lives. She has had two sons and a daughter, 
namely: Sarah M., born July 7, 1855, now 
the wife of Henry Wentworth, of W'aterford ; 
Bion H., born March 18, 1858, who married 
Miss Edith Nevers, and is living near the old 
homestead; and Ernest L. , born November 
24, 1859, who resides on the homestead farm 
with his mother, and is successfully engaged 
in general farming, lumbering, and stock busi- 
ness. The latter is now one of the leading 
men of the town, a member of the grange at 
Waterford, and a stanch Republican, having 
always voted with that party. 



/©jTo 



EORGE A. VIRGIN, a lumber man- 
\ •) I ufacturer of Hanover village, Oxford 
County, was born here, November 
15, 1851, son of Jonathan A. and Nancy K. 
(Elliott) Virgin. When a young man Rufus 
Virgin, the father of Jonathan A., came to 
this county from Concord, N. H., and settled 
in Rumford Falls. Jonathan A. was born at 
Rumford Falls, and there spent his earlv 
years, receiving his education in the common 
schools. He began his business career as 
manager of a grist-mill at Rumford Falls. 
About the year 1844 he came to Hanover, and 
purchased the old grist-mill and rebuilt it. 
At a later date he bought the old saw-mill and 
refitted it. He ran both successfully, and 
carried on a successful business until about 
1874, when he bought the old woollen-mill. 
This he tore down, and erected the mill now 
owned by his son. After renting it one year 
he sold out. In i S92 he again bought the 
woollen-mill, and, in company with his son, 
altered it into a sawmill. He died Septem- 
ber I, 1893, at the age of seventy-six years. 
In politics he was an adherent of the Republi- 



can party. His opinion on matters pertaining 
to the public welfare was much valued, and 
for several years he served as Treasurer of the 
town of Hanover. Although not a member of 
any church, he rendered material assistance 
in the erection of the Universalist church at 
Rumford Point. Nancy K. (Elliott) V'irgin, 
his wife, who was born in Livermore, Me., 
died at the age of forty-five years, leaving two 
sons — George A. and Rufus J. R. J. \'irgin 
resides now at South Bethel, this county, 
where he is engaged in manufacturing lumlier. 

After attending the schools here in Han- 
over, George A. Virgin took a supplementary 
course at Gould's Academy in Bethel and at 
Hebron Academy. After attaining his legal 
majority, he rented his father's saw-mill for 
a few years, 'and then bought it. He leased 
the grist-mill some time later, and thereafter 
conducted the two together until 1892. Since 
his father's death he has purchased the new 
saw-mill here in Hanover village, where he 
carries on quite an extensive business in gen- 
eral lumber and box manufacturing. 

On May 30, 1874, Mr. Virgin was united 
in marriage with Miss Emma G. Brown, who 
died January 26, 1887, leaving two children 
— George Lee and Dwight M. Both are now 
employed with their father in the mill. In 
politics Mr. Virgin is a Republican. He is 
a member of Blazing Star Lodge, No. 30, 
of F. & A. M., at Rumford Centre; and of 
Oxford Bear Lodge. No. 54, Knights of Pyth- 
ias, of Hanover. 



LIAS H. MORSE, one of the most pro- 
gressive farmers of Jay, Franklin 
County, was born .September 7, 
1830, upon the farm he now owns and culti- 
vates, son of John and Sally (Monroe) Morse. 
Nathan Morse, his grandfather, an English- 
man by birth, after following the sea as mas- 
ter of a vessel in his younger days, settled 
upon a farm in Weld, Me., still owned by a 
member of the family, and resided there for 
the rest of his life. John Morse, who was 
born in Weld, settled at the age of eighteen 
in Jay upon the farm where his son, Elias H., 
now resides, and spent the remainder of his 
active period occupied in its cultivation. He 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



died February 18, 1872. His wife, Sally, who 
was a daughter of Abel Monroe, a prosperous 
farmer "f Livermore, Androscoggin County, 
bore him six children, as follows: Sally and 
Julia M., who are no longer living; Martha 
M., the wife of Dr. Bartlett, of East Dixfield; 
IClias, also deceased; Elias H., the subject of 
this sketch; and Melvina C. , who died Novem- 
ber 6, 1842. The mother's death occurred on 
February 23, 1879. 

Elias H. Morse was educated in the common 
schools of Jay, and has always resided at the 
homestead. He succeeded to the property, 
which is now a well-improved farm of two hun- 
dred acres. Besides the usual farm products, 
he makes a specialty of raising fruit. His 
prosperity has been achieved by good sense, 
industry, and perseverance. On October • 8, 
1857, Mr. Morse was first united in marriage 
with Ann Coolage Phinney, who was born in 
Jay, September 21, 1S38, daughter of Deacon 
Jonas and I-:iiza (Lampkin) Phinney, late of 
this town. She died May 28, 1885, leaving 
four children, as follows: Mary Eliza, born 
August 19, 1858, who married Wilbur Eibby, 
and resides in North Falmouth, Me. ; Jona- 
than Everett, born January 3, 1864, who mar- 
-ried Carrie Bolster, and resides in Lynn, 
Mass. ; Carrie P., born January 13, 1867, who 
is now the wife of Stillman B. Harlow, of East 
Di.xfield, this county; and I'.rnest Clifford, 
born December 8, 1S77, who resides at the 
homestead. On April 2, 1890, Mr. Morse 
wedded Mrs. Eleanor (True) Ramsdell, widow 
of Augustus Ramsdell. She was born in Phil- 
lips, Me., January 31, 1S43, daughter of the 
late Captain John True, formerly a well-known 
and highly respected citizen of that town. 
Mr. Morse is numbered among the stanch Re- 
publicans of Jay, having upheld the principles 
of that party since reaching his majority. He 
has a]wa\-s given his close attention to his 
farm, and is held in high estimation by his 
neisrhbors and fellow-townsmen. 



LBION EMERY BRADBURY, (me 

)f the largest real estate owners and 
most prominent residents of the town 
of Canton, O.xford County, Me., was 
born in l-Jyron, Me., in the .same county, on 




March 8, 1822, son of Thomas and Dolly 
(Morse) Bradbury. He comes of old Colonial 
stock, being a worthy representative of the 
family founded in America by Thomas Brad- 
bur)', who emigrated from England in 1634, 
and, settling in the District of Maine, became 
the possessor of a large tract of land. Some 
of his descendants were men of note during the 
Colonial period. 

i\Ir. Albion liradbury's grandfather, Daniel 
Bradbury, who was a native of Buxton. Me., 
and was a Quaker, settled in early manhood in 
Athens, Me., of which town he was a pioneer 
farmer and one who made good progress. An 
upright man and a highly respected citizen, he 
labored diligently and without selfish motives 
to secure the development of the town. He 
died in Athens at the age of eighty-six years. 
He reared a family of fourteen children, of 
whom Thomas, Mr. Bradbury's father, was the 
second -born. 

Thomas Bradbury grew to manhood upon a 
farm in tiie town of Buxton, his native place. 
He early displayed a capacity for both agri- 
cultural and business pursuits, and aside from 
tilling the soil he became a very prominent 
cattle dealer. He made his home in Byron for 
a time; but on March 25, 1828, he settled in 
Canton upon the farm where his son now re- 
sides. He was very successful both as a 
farmer and a business man, becoming one of 
the wealthiest men of this town ; and he re- 
sided here until his death, which took place 
October 15, 1S57, at the age of sixty-six years. 
In politics he was originally a Whig, but 
joined the Republican movement at its forma- 
tion, and was one of the first supporters of that 
party in this section. His wife, Dolly Morse, 
who was a native of Concord, N. H., became 
the mother of four children, two of whom are 
living, namely: Albion E., the subject of this 
sketch; and Fannie, who is the wife of Amos 
Childs and resides in Canton. The others 
were: Cynthia, who died April 29, 1857, aged 
thirty-two years; and Charles D. Bradbury, 
M.D., a successful physician, who died in 
1893, aged sixty-one years. Mrs. Dolly M. 
Bradbury lived to reach the age of eighty- 
seven years, and died November 4, 1882. 
Both she and her husband were Universalists 
in their religious belief. 




ALBION E. BRADBURY. 



I'.IOCRAI 



KAI 



RFA'IKW 



167 



Albion iMiiery Hradhury accompanied his 
jiarents to Canton when l)Ut six years of age. 
He was educated ])aitly in the public schools 
of this town, including; the high school, and 
partly under the direction of a private tutor. 
Having grown to manhood he .still continued 
to live with his father and mother, and for 
some time previous to his father's death he had 
entire charge of the business affairs of the es- 
tate. He now carries on general farming at 
the old homestead, of which he has come into 
possession, and where he has been a resident 
for nearly si.\ty-nine years. His agricultural 
operations are not necessarily on a very lim- 
ited scale, as he is the owner of over five hun- 
dred acres of valuable land. Mr. l^radbury 
has, however, not confined himself to labor 
in the fields, but has travelled extensively 
through the United .States, visiting all notable 
points of interest to an intelligent sightseer; 
and he is well-informed in regard to the 
natural resources and the industries of this 
country. Mr. Bradbury is unmarried. In 
])olitics he acts with the Re])ublican party, but 
has never aspired to public office. In his re- 
ligious views he is a Universalist. 




OX. SAML'EL P. CUSHMAN, one 
of the town fathers of Hebron, Me., 
born March 16, 1829, on the farm 
which is now his home, is a son of 
Ansel and Eliza (Pratt) Cushman. His grand- 
father, Caleb Cushman, an active and indus- 
trious farmer in his lifetime, was one of the 
early settlers of Hebron. Caleb died on the 
homestead at an advanced age. His family 
consisted of nine children, five daughters and 
four sons, all of whom have long since passed 
away. Ansel Cushman spent his life on his 
father's farm, and was one of the representa- 
tive farmers of the town. In politics he was 
originally a Whig. Upon the formation of 
the Republican party he gave his adhesion to 
its principles. He was a member of the Bap- 
tist church in Hebron. His death occurred 
in his eighty-third year, and that of his wife 
at the age of eighty-two. Six children were 
born to them, namely: Nancy, the widow of 
the late Lauren A. Bumpus: Henry M., 
deceased; Samuel P., the subject of this 



sketch; Horatio A., a resident of Hebron; 
Charlotte P., the wife of Jacob M. Drew, of 
Auburn; Maria I'".., now in l.os Angeles, 
Cal., the widow of Henry Kicker, who died in 
the late war. 

-Samuel P. Cushman grew to manhootl in 
Hebron, acquiring an education in the com- 
mon schools and the academy. After leaving 
the academy he taught school for a short time, 
and then turned liis attention to agriculture on 
the home farm. This property covers some 
eighty acres of land, and has neat and sub- 
stantial buildings, which Mr. Cushman him- 
self erected. 

Mr. Cushman was married Sejjtember 5, 
1856, to Mary B. Cushman, daughter of Major 
Albert and - Ro.setta H. ^Curtis) Cushman. 
She was born in Hebron, September 7, 1833. 
She has borne her husband three sons— Fred- 
erick VV., Hartley F. , and Albion K. P. 
The eldest, who was born December i, 1858, 
acquired a good education, studying at Hebron 
Academy. I-'or some time he has given his 
attention to carpentry and general farming in 
his native town, where he owns a farm of one 
hundred acres. He is a member of Hebron 
Grange, No. 43, Patrons of Husbandry, of 
Hebron. In politics he is a Rei)ublican, in 
religious belief a liberal. He was married 
February 4, 1891, to lulith L., daughter of 
Zibeon L. Packard, and has two children — 
Dwight P. and Fdellc. His wife is a member 
of the Baptist church. Hartley !•". Cushman, 
born July 24, 1864, who is in trade in Auburn, 
Me., married Miss Lillian E. Thomas. Al- 
bion K. P. Cushman, born February 11, 1870, 
who is as yet unmarried, and lives with his 
parents, follows the pursuit of agriculture. 
Mr. Samuel P. Cushman, who is a Republi- 
can, has been elected several times to the 
Hebron Board of Selectmen, and has served 
for a number of years as Chairman of the 
Board. He was Town Clerk and Treasurer 
for ten years, having previously filled minor 
offices. He has been a Justice of the Peace 
for many yeans, and in 1874 he represented 
the district in the State legislature. He is a 
member of Evening Star Lodge, No. 147, 
A. F. & A. M., of Buckfield, and is very 
prominent in social circles. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Cushman are members of Hebron 



ir,s 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA'IEW 



Grange, No. 43, Patrons of Husbandry, of 
Hebron. They are also members of the Bap- 
tist church at Hebron. 




LFRED A. OAKES, a member of the 
Board of Selectmen of Chesterville, 
Franklin County, Me., was born at 
the Oakes homestead, where he now 
resides, April 16, 1851, son of David and 
Marinda (Arnold) Oakes. Mr. Oakes is a de- 
scendant of a Revolutionary patriot, his great- 
grandfather, John Oakes, having been among 
the minute-men who took part in the battles 
of Le.xington and Bunker Hill, and died from 
the effects of exposure some three months after 
the last-named struggle. 

The wife of John Oakes married for her 
second husband Jonathan Knowlton, a native 
of Massachusetts, whom she met while he was 
on one of his trips to Maine, which he made 
by packet from Salem, being five months on 
his last voyage from that place to Hallowell. 
In 1780 Mr. and Mrs. Knowlton settled upon 
a tract of new land in F"armington. John 
Oakes, Jr., who was born in Massachusetts in 
1770, son of the first-named John, accom- 
panied his mother and step-father to Farming- 
ton, being, it is said, the first white boy 
brought by any settler to that town. Shortly 
afterward he removed to New \'ineyard : and 
he eventually settled upon one hundred and 
sixty acres of wild land, which he improved 
into a good farm. He resided there for a few 
years, and then removed to Chesterville, 
where he bought of his brother Eben and John 
Corbett the farm of three hundred and twenty- 
five acres, which has since been known as the 
Oakes homestead. A hard-working, thrifty 
farmer, he survived the vicissitudes of a 
I)ioneer's life, and lived to see the locality 
become a thriving agricultural district. He 
died at the homestead in Chesterville, Sep- 
tember 7, 1839, aged sixty-nine years. In 
politics he acted with the Democratic party. 
He was widely and favorably known through- 
out this section as Deacon John Oakes, from 
his official connection with the Baptist 
church. He married Wealthy Crapo, a native 
of Massachusetts, who was born in 1771, and 
they reared a family of eight children; 



namely. Wealthy, John, Mary, David, Jere, 
and Elkanah, who were born in New Vine- 
yard ; and Frances and Weighty, who were 
born in Chesterville. Grandmother Oakes 
lived to be eighty-three years old, dying May 
8, 1854. 

David Oakes, Mr. Oakes's father, was born 
April 13, 1802, and was the second son. His 
boyhood and youth were spent at the home- 
stead, acquiring a practical knowledge of farm 
work and attending the district school; and 
at the age of twenty-one he became his 
father's hired help. On the death of his 
father he and his brother John inherited the 
homestead, which they carried on together till 
1854, when he bought his brother's interest; 
and John went to Minnesota, where he died 
ten years later. Continuing to improve the 
property, David Oakes became a prosperous 
general farmer and stock raiser; and, as he 
was especially partial to good-blooded ani- 
mals, he always kept the best of horses and 
oxen. The active period of his life was spent 
in toiling industry. He died October 21, 
1879, aged seventy-seven years. In politics 
he was in his last years a Republican, and on 
religious matters he held broad and liberal 
views. His wife, Marinda Arnold, whom he 
married in 1833, was a daughter of John Ar- 
nold, of Augusta. They reared four children, 
namely: David, who died at the age of twenty; 
Augusta, who is living at the present time; 
Alfred A., the subject of this sketch; and 
John. The mother died April 5, 1855, aged 
forty-two years. 

Alfred A. Oakes was educated in the town 
schools of Chesterville, and resided at home 
until he was twenty-one years old, when he 
went to Foxboro, RIass., where he was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of straw hats for 
three years. He then returned to the home- 
stead, a third of which he inherited : and, hav- 
ing purchased the interests of the other heirs, 
he has since carried on the farm with energy 
and success. He deals largely in stock, 
keeps sixteen Durham and Guernsey cows, 
sending his milk and cream to the Turner 
creamery at Auburn ; and for some years he 
was quite an extensive breeder of Durham 
cattle for the market. 

On October 17, 1875, Mr. Oakes wedded 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFAM K\V 



169 



for his first wife Georgia A. Goodrich, daugh- 
ter of David Goodrich, of Wilton. She died 
March 17, 1879; and in 1885 he was united 
to his ]iresent wife, who was before marriage 
Brendena L. Russell, being a daughter of 
Charles A. Russell, of Temple. By this 
union there have been four children, namely: 
Arthur A., who was born May 5. 1886; Ralph 
G., who was born November 28, 1887: Percy 
B., who was born October 14, i8go, and died 
April 19, 1891 : and P'annie V... who was born 
February 25, 1892. 

In politics Mr. Oakes is an active supporter 
of the Republican party, and his natural abil- 
ity has placed him in a position of promi- 
nence in public affairs. Besides serving in 
the various minor town offices he was a mem- 
ber of the l^oard of Selectmen during the 
years 1881, 1882, and 1883, and has served in 
the same capacity for the past three years. 
He is highly esteemed by his fellow-townsmen 
both as an agreeable, kind-hearted neighbor 
and as an able and faithful public official. 



^mo 



1:0RGP: LEVITT MELLEX, a re- 
\ [>) I tired resident of Paris, Me., who 
^— -^ was for many years identified with 
the Oxford Doiiocrat^ was born at Paris Hill, 
January 28, 1823, son of Alanson and I\Iary 
(Bisco) Mellen. Mr. Mellen's father, who 
was a native of Hopkinton, Mass., came to 
Paris at an early date in the town's history, 
as agent for the Bemis family, who were at 
that time the owners of a large estate in this 
county. 

Alanson Mellen was an exceedingly able 
and upright business man. He took a promi- 
nent part in developing the natural resources 
of Paris, it being through his instrumentality 
that the great possibilities of this town as an 
agricultural centre were brought to the notice 
of investors and farmers. Soon after his 
settlement here he became connected with 
public affairs, and his valuable ofificial ser- 
vices extended through a period of many 
years. For several years he was Town Clerk, 
and for thirty-five or thirty-six years he was 
the Registrar of Deeds of Oxford County, 
being the second man to fill that position. 
He was also County Treasurer for a number of 



terms. A man of advanced ideas, he labored 
diligently and effectively in securing the 
growth and prosperity of this section of the 
State, his active endeavors for the general 
good of the community being maintained 
until his death. He entertained broad and 
liberal views upon religious subjects; and, 
politicall}', he was an earnest and influential 
supporter of the Democratic party, in which 
he figured as a recognized leader in this county. 
Alanson Mellen died at his home in Paris Hill, 
December g, 185 1. He and his wife, Mary 
Bisco, whom he survived some twenty-five 
years, were the parents of six children, as fol- 
lows: Leonard, who was born January 20, 
181 3; Jonas 1^., who was born December 7, 
1 8 14; Eunice- P"., who was born October 17, 
1816; Mary M., who was born November 1, 
1818; Charles T., who was born November 
20, 1820: and George Levitt, whose birth is 
mentioned above. Mrs. Mary B. Mellen died 
March 12, 1826. 

George Levitt Mellen, the fourth son, who 
is the subject of this sketch, acquired his early 
education in the district schools of his neigh- 
borhood, antl advanced in knowledge and men- 
tal discijiline by attending the Yarmouth and 
Bridgton Academies. After completing his 
studies he served an apprenticeshi]^ at the 
jirinter's trade in the office of the Oxfonl 
Democrat^ later being engaged at various 
places, including Lowell and Boston, Mass. 
While residing in the New England metropo- 
lis, he, in company with Mr. C. A. Putnam, 
purchased in 1849 a literary newspaper, called 
the Boston M/isctmi, which they conducted for 
a short time, and then sold. Returning to 
Paris, Mr. Mellen early in 1850 bought a 
half-interest in the Oxford Dcinocral^ the 
office and publishing-room of which had been 
destroyed by fire in December, 1849. Re- 
establishing that journal upon a firm running 
basis, Mr. Mellen, in company with George 
W. Millett, carried it on until October, 1850, 
when he with others purchased Mr. Millett's 
interest in the enterprise. The Dcjiiocrat 
continued to flourish under his management, 
with Mr. Emery, of Portland, as editor, until 
after the election of Franklin Pierce as Presi- 
dent of the United States in 1852, when Mr. 
Mellen sold his interest in the paper, and re- 



lyo 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tired permanently from journalistic enter- 
prises. 

Soon after President Pierce took his seat, 
Mr. Mellen was appointed United States 
mail agent between Portland and Waterville, 
later having his route extended to Bangor 
upon the completion of the Maine Central 
Railway to that city: and he continued in the 
postal service until the change in the federal 
administration which accompanied the elec- 
tion of Abraham Lincoln in i860. He was 
subsequently appointed freight and ticket 
agent and depot master of the Portland & 
Rochester Railroad at Portland, in which po- 
sition he continued a few years. In 1868 he 
formed a partnership with G. G. Waterhouse 
for the purpose of opening and carrying on the 
Dewitt House in Lewiston, which was at that 
time one of the largest and best appointed 
hotels in Maine. He was connected vvith the 
Dewitt House for about si.\ years, at the ex- 
piration of which time he withdrew; and after 
spending two years in Pensacola, Fla., he en- 
gaged with Mr. Burgess in the lumber business. 
Since retiring from active business pursuits, 
about the year 1878, he has resided in Paris. 
On July 5, 1852, Mr. Mellen married 
Nancy Norris Wing. She was born in 
Wayne, Me., February 19, 1821, daughter of 
James and Nancy (Norris) Wing. Her 
father was born in Wayne, September 9, 
1792; and his wife was born May 24, 1794. 
James Wing was a prosperous farmer and 
prominent resident of Wayne, being an up- 
right, conscientious man, possessing intellect- 
ual ability of a high order. He represented 
the district which included Wayne and Leeds 
in the Maine legislature during the years 
1840 and 1 84 1. The date of his death was 
March 20, 1864, he having survived his wife, 
who died November 24, 1836. Of their six 
children four are living, namely: James M., 
a resident of Wayne; Orrin, residing in Har- 
vard, Mass. ; Eliza Seaver, wife of John R. 
Miller, of Concord, N.H.: and Frances 
Charlotte, whose home is in Paris. The 
others were Mrs. Sally Wing Burgess, who 
died September 2, 1874; and Nancy Norris, 
who became Mrs. George L. Mellen, and died 
November 8, 1890, leaving no children. 

In his younger days Mr. Mellen was promi- 



nently identified with local politics, which 
made him an eligible candidate for public 
office; and he served as Town Clerk in Paris, 
and was Postmaster for two terms at different 
times. Although he has not coveted political 
notoriety, he has been a firm supporter of the 
Democratic party since attaining his majority. 
In his religious belief he is a Universalist. 
He has had a long and successful career as a 
business man, and is now enjoying a well- 
earned period of rest and recreation at his 
pleasant home in Paris, where he is regarded 
by his fellow-townsmen with the utmost re- 
sjject and esteem. 




OLOMON S. HALL, who died at 
his homestead in Waterford, Oxford 
County, Me., January 8, 1896, was 
identified with the agricultural in- 
terests of this vicinity for nearly three dec- 
ades, having removed here in 1868 from the 
neighboring town of Norway, where he was 
born June 10, 1821. He was the eldest son 
of Jonathan Hall, and was a grandson of 
Jedediah Hall, a lifelong resident of Fal- 
mouth, Me. 

Jonathan Hall, after arriving at man's es- 
tate, left his native place and came to Oxford 
County to engage in agricultural pursuits. 
Buying land in the western part of Norway, 
he labored with tireless energy to clear a 
homestead, meeting with such success that 
before his death, whose date was April 30, 
1842, he had a well-improved farm. His 
wife, Mary Smith, whom he had married after 
settling in Norway, survived him a few years, 
passing away January 18, 1845. They had 
seven children, as follows: Emeline Maria, 
who was born December 12, 181 8, and died in 
March, 1887, the wife of Daniel Pierce; Solo- 
mon S. , the special subject of this brief bio- 
graphical sketch; Aaron Oliver, born P'ebru- 
ary 8, 1.8.23, who died August i, 1824; Oliver 
A., who was born March 28, 1825, and mar- 
ried Clara A. Stanley, who has lived in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., since his death, which occurred 
February 6, 1890; Albert Edwin, born March 
29, 1827, who died July 29, 1827; Helen, 
born June 3, 182S, who died the following 
day; and Albert Edwin, the second, who was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



171 



born July 31, iSjg, and died Nov'cniljer 2S of 
the same year. 

Solomon S. Hall, the first-born son, grew 
to maturity, and was educated in Norway, this 
county, and subsequently was there engaged 
in shoemaking and market gardening for a 
number of years. lie resided in the village 
of his native town until October, 1868, when 
he purchased the old McWain farm in Water- 
ford, where he engaged in general farming, 
dairying, and raising garden produce until 
liis decease, by good management realizing a 
handsome yearly income from his well tilled 
fields. Politically, Mr. Hall was a steadfast 
ReiHiblican, true to the interests of his party; 
and, religiously, he and his wife were es- 
teemed members of the Universalist church 
of Norway. 

Mr. Hall was three times married. His 
first wife, formerly Miss Ruth B. Smith, died 
leaving no issue. His second wife, Emily A. 
Warren, was born April 22, 1834, and died 
August 29, 1861. His third wife, Olivia G. 
Warren, a sister of his second wife, was born 
September 16, 1836, antl died in June, 1894. 
He had three children by his second marriage, 
namely: Mary, born March 6, 1854, nt)w the 
wife of G. H. Shedd, M.D., a prominent phy- 
sician of North Conway, N.H., and mother of 
one child, George Harold, born November i, 
1882; Julia, born October 2, 1856, who died 
December 24, 1S91 ; and Lizzie li., born Au- 
gust 26, 1859, who lives with her brother on 
the old homestead. This brother, Sidney S. 
Hall, boi'n June 21, 1866, was the only child 
of the third marriage of Mr. Hall. He is one 
of the leading young men of Waterford, and 
with his sister now owns the old farm of two 
iiuntlred and thirty- three acres. They are 
carrying on the various branches of agricult- 
ural industry with unquestioned success, keep- 
ing some stock, but making a specialty of 
raising and marketing garden truck and fruit. 



-OHN MINOT SOULE HUNTER, 
the well-known editor of the Farming- 
ton Chronicle, of Farmington, Me., was 
born in this town on the 14th of De- 
cember, 1846, the son of Thomas and Sarah C. 
(Soule) Hunter. 



The lluijter family is of .Scotch descent, 
and settled in Sandy River Valley in 1767- 
James Hunter, the grandfather of the editor, 
was born in Bristol, Me. Later he removed 
to the town of Strong, where he finally set- 
tled, taking up a large tract of new land, 
clearing it and building upon it. Mr. Hunter 
was of a very strong constitution, and lived 
to a ripe old age. His wife, Rachel Dodge, 
was equal!)' vigorous. Her death at the age 
of eighty-three years was caused by an acci- 
dent. .She was about to step from her car- 
riage at the door of her church, when the 
horse, startled by the ringing of the church 
bell, ran away, and she was thrown out and 
fatally injured. 

Their son Thomas, the editor's father, was 
born on the joth of April, 1807, in the town 
of Strong. Arriving at a matmx' age, he 
began to earn his living by teaching school ; 
but preferring a more active life, and being 
possessed of considerable mechanical ingenu- 
ity, he gave up this profession, and devoted 
his time to various trades. Diligent and 
versatile, as a blacksmith, stone cutter, car- 
penter, millwright, and house joiner, he was 
a skilled workman. He became a "boss" 
builder in Farmington in a few years; and 
several houses which he built are still stand- 
ing to-day, witnesses of his skill and thor- 
oughness. At one time he trtok a contract, 
and erected a large sugar-mill, which was 
taken to Hawaii, Sandwich Islands. He 
'framed the mill in Farmington, and got it all 
ready to set up, then transported it by teams 
to Hallowell, where it was loaded on a sail- 
ing-vessel, and thence carried to its destina- 
tion. Mr. Hunter went with the mill, and 
set it up on its arrival there, and ran it for 
one year. At the expiration of the term of 
his contract he returned to P\armington, and 
followed his trade of a master builder until 
his death. 

He married Sarah C, the daughter of Zach- 
ariah .Soule, anil by this union he became the 
father of si.x children — James T., who died 
in infancy; Marcia S. ; Julia -S. ; Susan C.; 
John Minot Soule, of whom this short biogra- 
phy is written; and James T. Mr. Thomas 
Plunter was a stanch Re]jublican in his poli- 
tics, and in religious belief followed the doc- 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



trincs of the Congregational church, of which 
both himself and wife were active and consist- 
ent members. 

John Minot Soule Hunter received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native 
town and at Farmington Academy. He early 
in life entered upon a business career, becom- 
ing a clerk in Farmington and at a later 
date in Bath and i-n Boston. He continued 
thus engaged until September 15, 1867, when 
he enterecf the Chronicle office in Farmington, 
in order to learn the printer's trade and the 
profession of a journalist. .Shortly after this 
he temporarily left the office of the Chronicle, 
having been appointed Deputy to Andrew C. 
Phillips, Esq. (then editor of the paper), who 
was appointed United States Consul at Fort 
Erie, Ontario. Later he resigned, and re- 
turned to the Chronicle, where he became fore- 
man of the office under editor A. H. S. Davis; 
and, upon the sale of the Chronicle by the 
latter to Captain C. W. Keyes, Mr. Hunter 
became foreman and general assistant, occu- 
pying those positions several years, or until 
June 20, 1S77, when he removed to Portland, 
where he became foreman of the Portland 
Daily Press composing-room and Liter tele- 
graph editor of the same paper. 

In June, 1886, Mr. Hunter resigned his 
position on the Portland Press, and returned 
to Farmington, having bought one-half of his 
old paper, the Farmington Chronicle, and 
leased the other half, of Captain Keyes. F"our 
months later- in the great fire of October 22, 
1886 — the office and its fine machinery were 
completely destroyed. The paper was, how- 
ever, published regularly every week, the pub- 
lishers of the Lewiston Journal generously 
volunteering to print and send the papers to 
Mr. Hunter, which they did for two weeks. 
In the meantime he had a new office and 
outfit prei^arcd, and in a little while the paper 
was on its feet again. The Farmington 
Chronicle is now in the fifty-seventh year of 
its existence, has a circulation of about three 
thousand copies, and is universally admitted 
to be not only the largest but the best paper 
in the county: and it ranks among the leading 
weekly papers of Maine. The Chronicle al- 
ways has been and still is the organ of the 
Republican party in Franklin County, though 



many of its firm friends and patrons are found 
in all the parties. It is, perhaps, needless to 
say Mr. Hunter is a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Hunter was married on the 14th of De- 
cember, 1874, to Miss Eldora Nichols, the 
daughter of Walter Nichols, of Searsport, 
Waldo County, Me. They have had three 
children — John Walter, Mabel E., and 
Charles W. Keyes; but only the daughter is 
living, their two sons having died in infancy. 

Mr. Hunter is a very popular man, not only 
in his native town, but wherever he is known. 
His friends and acquaintances are many, both 
in the social and business world; and all 
speak of him in the pleasantest manner. He 
is a member of numerous societies and frater- 
nities, among them being the following: Past 
Master, Maine Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & 
A. M.; Franklin Chapter, No. 44, Royal 
Arch Masons; Jephthah Council, No. 17, 
Royal and Select Masters; Pilgrim Command- 
ery. No. 19, Knights Templars; Kora Tem- 
ple, N. M. Shrine; Maine Consistory, An- 
cient and Accepted Scottish Rite; P. N. G., 
Franklin Lodge, No. 58, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows; also P. C. P., Sandy River 
Encampment, No. 9, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is also one of the incor- 
porators of the P'ranklin County Savings Bank; 
a Trustee of the Public Library, as well as 
Secretary of the Library Association; and in 
1894 he was appointed by Governor H. B. 
Cleaves a Trustee of the Soldiers" Orphans' 
Home in Bath, Me. 




RTHUR E. MORRISON, Trial Jus- 
tice of Rumford F'alls and an enter- 
prising real estate dealer, was born 
in Rollinsford, N.H., January 27, 
1862, son of John W. and Abbie (Gates) 
Morrison. The father, a native of Alton, 
N.H., was reared upon a farm in that town. 
He is now a successful stone contractor of 
South Berwick, Me., an able, conscientious, 
and progressive man ; and he enjoys the respect 
of all with whom he has dealings. His wife 
was born in Groveland, N.H., and she is the 
mother of five children, as follows: George 
E., who is in the marble and granite business 
in Saco, Me. ; Arthur E., the subject of this 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'73 



sketch; John H., a business man of South 
Berwick; Nancy, the wife of George \V. Tib- 
betts, of South Berwick; and Mary Etta, who 
resides at home. Both parents are members 
of the Baptist church, of which the father is a 
Deacon. 

Arthur E. Morrison began his education in 
the common schools of South Berwick. At 
the age of twelve years he commenced to work 
in a store, devoting to his duties therein his 
mornings and evenings and the summer vaca- 
tion. With his earnings here he paid his, 
tuition at the Berwick Academy, from which 
he graduated in 1882. In the autumn of that 
year he went to liiddeford, Me., where he se- 
cured a position as clerk in a dry-goods store. 
A year later the firm for which he worked es- 
tablished at Norway, Me., a branch store, of 
which he was appointed manager; and he re- 
mained in that capacity four years. He then 
went to Dover, N.H., where he clerked for a 
year; and in the spring of 1888 he opened an 
insurance agency in Sanford, Me., remaining 
in that town two years. Having sold out his 
business there, he returned to Norway, and 
was employed by I'reeland Howe in the in- 
surance business. In 1892 this firm estab- 
lished a branch office in Rumford Falls, erect- 
ing the first business block on Congress 
■Street, which is now the principal thorough- 
fare of the town. Under Mr. Morrison's able 
management the business has been placed 
upon a firm and profitable basis. Since tak- 
ing up his residence here he has been identi- 
fied with the business develoiiment of the 
town; and his ability and sound judgment 
have been instrumental in forwarding several 
important enterprises, which are of much ben- 
efit to the general community. He was one of 
the organizers of the Rumford F"alls Publish- 
ing Company, of which he is a Director, was 
a principal mover in the formation of the Vil- 
lage Corporation, and is an incorporator and 
Director of the Rumford Falls Building and 
Loan Association. 

On March 10, 1885, Judge Morrison was 
united in marriage to Fannie Robertina 
Howe, daughter of Freeland Howe, of Nor- 
way. They have now two sons — Robley 
Howe and Freeland John. In politics Judge 
Morrison is a Republican. lie was appointed 




Trial Justice here in 1892, being the first to 
hokl that office in Rumford Falls. He is 
connected with O.xford Lodge, No. i S, A. F. 
& A. M., of Norway; and with I'enacook 
Lodge, No. 130, Independent Order of Odtl 
Fellows, of this town. Both he and Mrs. 
Morrison are zealous workers in the Univer- 
salist church. The Judge is a progressive and 
active business man. His courteous and 
affable manners have made him popular, and 
he has already laid the foundation of a suc- 
cessful career. 



ARROLL E. PROCTOR, M.D., the 
only physician in the town t)f Weld, 
l-'ranklin County, was born in Can- 
ton, Me., July 20, 1858, son of the 
Rev. Roscoe A. and lietsey R. (Smith) 
Proctor. On the father's side he is of Eng- 
lish descent, and on the mother's side he is 
of Scotch origin. The Proctor family was 
founded in America by two brothers who came 
from England and settled either in Salem or 
Merrimac, N. H. One of the brothers was 
the great-great-grandfather of Dr. Proctor. 
The grandfather, Uriah A. Pmctor, was born 
in Merrimac, July 18, 1791. In early man- 
hood, leaving Bethel, Me., he descended the 
Androscoggin River upon a raft, and settled 
at Jay Bend, where he engaged in farming. 
He served as a soldier in the War of 18 12. 
In January, 1813, he was married in Jay by 
Seth Carpenter to Abigail Fenno, who was 
born in Bethel, Me., August 18, 1791. He 
was a prominent man in his day in Canton, 
and was a member of the Baptist church. His 
children were: Mary F. , Rebecca B., Emcline 
B., Oliver F. , Charles A., Uriah A., Abi- 
gail, Abigail (second), Anna L. , Uriah (sec- 
ond), and Roscoe A. Abigail (first) died in 
infancy. 

Roscoe A. Proctor was born in Hartford, 
Oxford County, Me., November 10, 1833. 
He became a clergyman, and preached in Can- 
ton and Sumner, Me., for some time. He 
was subsequently called to Rangeley, Franklin 
County, where he remained eleven years. 
His last years were passed in Weld as pastor 
of the Free Will Baptist church; and he died 
December 2, 1891. He was a Republican in 



'74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



politics, and was quite prominent in public 
affairs. His wife, Betsey, whom he married 
in Canton, July 20, I.S52, was born in Liver- 
more, Me., in 1834. She was a daughter of 
Jesse and Betsey A. (Knowles) Smith, the 
former of whom was born at Moose Hill, Liv- 
ermore. Me., in 1800. Jesse Smith was a son 
of Deacon Jesse Smith, who was born in 1764, 
and died at Moose Hill, Livermore, Me., No- 
vember 18, 1843. Deacon Smith's wife, Bet- 
sey A., was born in 1767, and died at Canton, 
Me., aged seventy-one years. Roscoe A. and 
Betsey R. (Smith) Proctor vvere the parents of 
two children, namely: Carroll E. , the subject 
of this sketch; and Gerry A., a merchant who 
lives in Rangeley. The mother died in Weld, 
June 7, 1896. 

Carroll E. Proctor acquired his early educa- 
tion in the common schools of Canton and at 
the Hebron Academy. He began the study of 
medicine with Dr. Yates, of West Paris, and 
subsequently entered Dartmouth College Med- 
ical School, from which he graduated with the 
class of 1880. He entered upon his profes- 
sion at Weld, where he has since resided. 
He is the only medical practitioner here, and 
attends patients over a territory within a 
radius of twelve miles. On Pebruary 14, 
1876, Dr. Proctor was united in marriage to 
Martha E. Bradeen, daughter of Theodore 
Bradeen, of Wilton, Me. Mrs. Proctor has 
had four children, three of whom are living, 
namely: Roscoe G. , aged nineteen, who is 
fitting for college; Eva B., aged seventeen, 
who is also attending school : and Bessie, 
aged si.\ years. In politics Dr. Proctor is a 
Republican, and has been superintendent of 
schools for the past three years. He is 
iiighly respected both socially and profession- 
;iliy, is connected with Mystic Tie Lodge, 
No". 154, A. E. & A. M., of Weld, and is a 
member of the Free Will Baptist church. 




'AMUEI, B. LOCKE, wholesale and 
retail dealer in flour, grain, and 
feed at West Paris, Me., where he 
is accounted one of the most stir- 
ring and enterprising citizens, was born at 
Locke's Mills in the adjoining town of Green- 
wood, April 18, 1840. He is the third in 



direct line to bear the name Samuel B. His 
grandfather, Samuel Barron Locke, first, set- 
tled in Bethel, Me., about 1796. He mar- 
ried Hannah Russell, of P'ryeburg, and was 
the father of nine children who grew to matu- 
rity, five sons — John, Luther, Samuel B. (sec- 
ond), James, and Charles Russell — and four 
daughters. All have now passed away. 
Grandfather Locke was a communicant of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and a Whig in 
political affiliation. 

Samuel Barron Locke, second, the father of 
the special subject of this sketch, was born in 
Bethel in 1801. He was a self-made man. 
A millwright by trade, he became a mill- 
owner; and he also followed farming to some 
extent. He settled at Locke's Mills about 
the year 1839. Many of the mills for miles 
around were built by him, the one now con- 
ducted by his son having been erected in 
1857. During the last years of his life, 
which were spent in West Paris, where he 
settled about the year i860, he carried on a 
large milling business. His death took place 
in 1870. In politics he was a Republican, in 
religion he was liberal. His wife, Mrs. 
Lucetta Edgerly Locke, who was born in 
Bu.xton, Me., in 1S06, died June i, 1888, 
aged eighty-two years. Their six children 
are all living, namely: Mary Ellen, wife of 
C. M. Morgan, of Portland; John Locke, a 
trader, residing in Fryeburg, Me.; Charles 
R. Locke, a mill-owner and lumber manufact- 
urer at North Chatham, N.H.; Frank I^ocke, 
a millwright in Fryeburg; George W., resid- 
ing in Norway, Me. ; and .Samuel B., third, 
of\Vest Paris.' 

Until sixteen years of age Samuel B. 
Locke, third, now to be further mentioned, 
lived at Locke's Mills. His education was 
completed at Gould's Academy in Bethel. 
He first went to work as a clerk for his 
brother John, whom he afterward bought out ; 
and he was then in trade here for seventeen 
years, keeping a general store. After dispos- 
ing of that he removed to Norway, Me., 
where he went into company with W. H. 
Whitcomb, and carried on quite a large mer- 
cantile business. Two years later, in 1885, 
he sold out. and returning to West Paris took 
up the milling business. He owned the mills 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tor a number of years. He does custom ,i;riii(l- 
ing-, besides keeping feed, fiour, grain, and fer- 
tilizers for sale at both wholesale and retail. 

Mr. Locke was first married in June, 1865, 
to Miss Linnie H. Piummer, who died in 
1868; and second, in 1.S75, to Miss Elva K. 
Libby, who was born in Standish, Me. By 
the first marriage there were no children. By 
the second there are three children, a son 
and two daughters. They are: Linnie E., born 
March 2, 1876; Mary L. , born September 6, 
1882; and Samuel B., born October 2, 1885. 

Mr. Locke was elected on the Republican 
ticket as a Representative to the lower house 
of the State legislature for the term of 1874- 
75, and served very creditably. He has also 
served as Selectman of the town one term. 
He is President of the Oxford County Loan 
Association, and is a member of Granite 
Lodge, No. 182, A. F. & A. M., at West 
Paris; L.ewiston Commandery, No. 6, 
Knights Templars; and of West Paris Lodge, 
No. 15, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
at West Paris. His wife is a member of the 
Universalist church. Mr. and Mrs. Locke 
have a pleasant, attractive home, and are es- 
teemed members of society. 




FORGE M. ATWOOD, of Paris, 
senior member of the firm of Atwood 
& Forbes, publishers of the Oxford 
DcDiocrat, was born in I^uckfield, Oxford 
County, Me., October 6, iSdo. His parents 
were William H. and fielen M. Atwood; and 
it appears that they were ambitious for their 
son, giving him the best educational advan- 
tages within their reach. 

After assimilating the benefits to be derived 
from the public schools and Hebron Academy, 
he entered the Law School of Columbia Col- 
lege, New York, having determined to adopt 
the legal profession as his life work. With 
this end in view he also read law under the di- 
rection of Messrs. Bisbee & Hersey, both well- 
known lawyers, and was admitted to the Ox- 
ford bar in October, 1885. 

Very shortly afterward he purchased a half- 
interest in the Oxford Democrat, associating 
himself in this enterprise with Arthur \\. 
Forbes, of Paris, Me., under the firm name of 



.Atwood & P'orbes. Messrs. Atwood & P'orbes 
have been more than ordinarily successful a.s 
journalists and editors, and since they moved 
their office to the Billings Block in South 
Paris, have enjoyed increased facilities in their 
special line of journalism. This change was 
made November i, 1S95 ; and they now occupy 
the handsomest newspaper ofiice in the State 
of Maine. 

Mr. Atwood has not confined himself en- 
tirely to editorial work since his residence in 
his present home, but has been actively inter- 
ested in business and educational affairs, and 
has filled a number of important ofifices as a 
result of his energetic efforts in behalf of the 
community's welfare. He was elected County 
Treasurer of Oxford County in iSSS, and was 
re-elected iji 1890, 1892, 1894, and again in 
1896. He is also President of the Trustees of 
Paris Hill Academy and Chairman of its 
Executive Committee, Trustee of the South 
Paris Savings Bank, and a member of the 
Paris School Board. In 1894 Mr. Atwood and 
Mr. John Pierce, of Paris, constructed the 
Paris-Norway and Buckfield telephone lines 
and exchanges, under the name of the Paris 
Electric Comjjany, and now own and operate 
them. 

Mr. Atwocid was married to Miss Anna Har- 
low, a daughter of the Hon. lilbridge G. Har- 
low, of Dlxfield, April 5, 1S86. Two chil- 
dren were born to bless this union: William 
Fl , who.se birth date was January 9, i.SSS; and 
Raymond L. , who made his advent Mav 8, 
1895. A successful business career, a jiromi- 
nent and honored place in the regard of his 
fellow-citizens, and a happy home life leave 
little to be desired by the senior member of 
the editorial firm of Atwood & I-'orbes ; while 
both gentlemen may justly feel that they, 
through the organ of their paper, have been, 
and are, able to accomplish much for the com- 
munity whose best interests they ad\'ocate and 
support. 



RTHUR F:. FORBES, of Paris, Me., 
the junior member of the firm of At- 
wood & Forbes, was born near Paris 
Hill, May 30, 1862, son of F^lbridge 
and Angel ine (Thayer) I'orbes. His father 




176 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was at cine time a printer, but afterward be- 
came a farmer in Paris. Mr. Forbes learned 
tile printer's art in the Oxford Di-inocrat office, 
working up to the position of foreman and 
afterward proprietor of the paper. He was 
edLicated in the public schools and at St. 
Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y. After 
finishing his education He became engaged in 
editorial work, and has been active in behalf 
of the Diinocrat' s interests. Although an 
unmarried man, Mr. l'\irbes is influential in 
social as well as business circles, and is a 
favorite in I'aris, where he has served with 
credit upon the School Board. He is also 
prominently identified with the Universalist 
denominatiiin, and is a highly respected citizen. 



(s^()H.\ JANETT MORTON, an es- 
teemed resident of South Paris, Me., 
his birthplace, and conductor and 
freight agent of the Grand Trimk Rail- 
road between South Paris and Norway, Me., 
was bom on October 20, 1830, son of Richard 
and Hannah (Perry) Morton. His father, who 
is supposed to have been a native of Raymond, 
Cumberlanil County, came to South Paris from 
(^tisfield, in that county, two brothers, Joseph 
and Lbenezer, accompanying him. 

A good mechanic, Richard Morton engaged 
in the manufacture of ploughs. At first, in 
deference to the popular belief that iron 
]iloughs were easily broken, he made wooden 
ploughs furnished with steel points, the mould- 
boards being of wood plated with thin strips of 
sheet iron. Later he substituted a cast-iron 
mould-boartl. The first plough used on many 
of the farms of this county was the handiwork 
of Richard Morton. After having carried on 
this industry alone for a considerable time, he 
entered into partnership with Hersey Brothers, 
who were engaged in the same manufacture, 
he taking into his special charge the woodwork 
department. He continued occupied in this 
way until his health failed, when he retired 
from active employment, taking up his resi- 
dence on a farm previously purchased by him. 
Here he died "September 28, 1861, at the age 
of si.xty-seven years. His wife, who was a 
daughter of James Perry, survived him until 
Januar}- 24, 18^17, when she died at the age of 



si.xty - seven years. Their children were — 
P"reeman C, James P., Angeline, Richard L., 
Ann M., John J., Newell J., and Horace J. 
The father was a member and class leader of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Li his ear- 
lier years his political opinions were Demo- 
cratic; but, when the Republican party was 
formed, he joined it, and thenceforth sup- 
ported that party. 

John Janett Morton, whose name occupies 
the sixth place in this list, was reared and 
educated in South Paris. After leaving school 
he went to Roxbury, Mass., where he was em- 
ployed three years, at first learning the busi- 
ness of manufacturing cut nails, and then 
working at that calling. Subsequently he 
worked for his brother, Ereeman C. Morton, 
who was a contractor and builder, until 1850. 
Then he joined the crowd of gold-seekers at 
that time going to California. Near Aca- 
pulco, Mexico, the steamshiii "North Amer- 
ica," on which he had embarked, was wrecked 
on a sand-bank. The disaster caused a deten- 
tion of six weeks, and obliged him finally to 
ride to the next port on a mule, the distance 
being eighty miles. Here he took ship 
again; but before reaching his destination a 
further delay was occasioned b)* the breaking 
down of the engine, so that he was one hun- 
dred days upon the journey. On arriving in 
Sacramento, he engaged in carpenter's work 
for a short time; and then he went mining, 
visiting several places. Not liking his ex- 
]ierience in this occupation, he at length gave 
it up and returned home. -Soon after he was 
appointed freight agent of the Atlantic & St. 
Lawrence Railroad, now known as the Grand 
Trunk Railroad. In 18S3, when the road con- 
necting South Paris with Norway was built, he 
received the further appointment of conductor 
of the trains running upon this branch. In 
both capacities he has given entire satisfaction, 
alike to his employers and the public at large. 
On November 11, 1856, he was united in 
matrimony with Hannah B. Morse, a daughter 
of Nathan, Jr., and Mary (Crockett) Morse. 
Her father and mother were natives of Maine, 
born respectively in Lewiston and Danville, 
in the year 1788. The parents of Nathan 
Morse, Jr., were Nathan and Sarah (Bacon) 
Morse, natives of Dedham, Mass., who settled 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'77 



in Lcwistciii. Their son, Nathan, Jr., removed 
to Danville, where he was a prosperous farmer. 
When advanced in years he bought a home in 
Norway, and there dwelt in retirement until 
his death, which occurred in 1871, at the age 
of eighty-three years. His wife died in iS6g, 
having borne hirji twelve children. Of these 
nine attained maturity; namely, Joseph, Sally, 
Judith, lidwin, Jennie, I.ucinda, Benjamin 
I". , Julia, and Hannah B. Both parents were 
members of the Baptist church. In jjolitics 
the father was at first a Whig and subsequently 
a Republican. 

Mr. Morton and his wife have had four chil- 
dren, as follows: Ada May, born May 1, 1858; 
Ralph W. , born October 28, 1859, who died 
March 7, 1887; Harry R., born October 2^,, 
1861; and Helen T., born January 17, 1869. 
Ada May is now the wife of N. Dayton Bol- 
ster, the leading merchant of South Paris, and 
has four children — Elsie M., Morton \'. , 
Ruth M., and Philip C. Harry R., who con- 
ducts the night-lunch car at Auburn, Me., 
married Mina Daicy, and has one child, 
named Grace. Helen T. is the wife of George 
Hargrave, of Portland. In politics Mr. Mor- 
ton supports the Republican party. During 
the entire period of his emiiloyment in the ser- 
vice of the Grand Trunk Railroad Company 
he has lost but six months on account of sick- 
ness. He and Mrs. Morton reside at 29 Pleas- 
ant .Street, in a house erected by him on a lot 
purchased in i860. Few men of the town are 
so well known and esteemed as Mr. Morton. 



/^To 



P:0RGK R. BEAN, who was a well- 
\ •) I to-do farmer and a prominent resi- 
dent of Denmark, O.xford County, 
was born in Mollis, Me., July 3, 1834, son of 
William and Sarah F. (Blunt) Bean. The 
family was founded by John Bean, an emigrant 
from Scotland, who settled in lixeter, N.H., 
antecedent to the year 1660. Mr. Bean's 
grandparents were Abraham and Hannah 
(Burley) Bean, both residents of York County. 
Giles 13urley, the founder of the Burley fam- 
ily, came from luigland and settled in Ipswich 
in 1648. 

William Bean, born May 1 1, 1805, in Water- 
boro, York Countv, having been reared a 



farmer, in 1835 settled in JJcinnark, where he 
bought a large tract of land known as the 
Joshua Osgood farm. Dealing extensively in 
lumber, he resided here until his death, which 
occurred April 21, 1894. His religious be- 
lief was that of the L'niversalists. For many 
years he figured prominently in public affairs, 
having represented his district in the legislat- 
ure for three terms. He was twice married. 
PI is first wife, Sarah V., who was born J-'ebru- 
ary 2, i8o8, in Kennebunkport, Me., and died 
January 10, 1862, had four children, as fol- 
lows: George R., the subject of this sketch; 
Ellen S. , born December 13, 1838, who is 
now the wife of R. G. True, a prosperous 
farmer of Hiram, Me. ; JaneM., born Septem- 
ber 12, 1 84 1, who successively married Al- 
mond Perry and George P. Hoyt, of Baldwin, 
Me., and is now a widow residing in Old Oi- 
chard, Me. ; and Frances A., born September 
8, 1849, who is now the wife of the Rev. 
S. R. H. Biggs, a preacher and publisher of 
Lincoln, Mass. The father entered a second 
marriage, contracted with Sarah J. Warren, 
who was born in Effingham, N. H., October 
15, 1827. She died P'ebruary 19, 1889, leav- 
ing two children, namely: William C, born 
October 5, 1863, who married Lucy V. Allen, 
and is now engaged in agricultural pursuits in 
Hiram, Me. ; and Charles R., born November 
15, 1871, who resides with his brother in 
Hiram. 

After receiving his education in the schools 
of Paris Hill and Waterville, George R. 15ean 
taught school in Denmark for eight years. 
Throughout the rest of his life he was prosper- 
ously engaged in general farming at the home- 
stead. A great admirer of good cattle, he also 
bred stock extensively. He died at his home, 
January 30, iSg6, aged nearly sixty-two year.s. 
The estate left by him comjirises the home- 
stead jjroper, containing two hundred and 
thirty acres; twelve hundred acres of outlying 
land; and the Red Mill in Hiram, erected by 
him in 1895. In politics he was an active 
supijorter of the Republican party, by which 
he was elected to the offices of Supervisor and 
Collector. He was prominent in all move- 
ments conducive to the general good, and was 
highly respected by the community. 

On September 26, i860, the late Mr. Be:ui 



178 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was united in marriage with Sarah M. Jordan, 
of Portland, Me., who, born June 13, 1836, 
came to reside in Denmark when she was five 
years old. Her parents, William M. and 
Almira 1'. (Harmon) Jordan, now deceased, 
were both natives of Maine, born respectively., 
ill Gray and 15iddeford. Mrs. Jordan passed 
some years of her life in Brownfieki, Me. Mr. 
and ^Irs. Bean have had five children, as fol- 
lows: Jennie, born February 23, 1863, who 
marrieil K. W. Hosworth, the ]iresent proprie- 
tor of the \\cil Mill in Hiram, and has one 
daughter, Ik-thesda I., born December 13, 
1893; Anna Maud, born July 6, 1865, who is 
now the wife of Fernando W. Witham, of 
Denmark Corner; Fred Roy, born December 
30, 1867, who resides at home; Mildred May, 
born February i, 1870, who died December 
II, 1894; and Mahlon, born August 24, 1872, 
who died March 14, 1S73. The father was a 
member of Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 53, 
A. F. & A. M. The farm is now carried on 
by Fred Roy Ik-an, an intelligent and ]Uo- 
gressive young man. He raises horses and 
cattle, runs a dairy, and sells a large amount 
of cream. Mrs. }?ean is a member of the 
Universalist church. Her many admirable 
(|ualities endear her to a wide circle of friends 
and acquaintances.. 




l.APTAIN WILLIAM TRUE, a re- 
tired carpenter of Farniington, Me., 
formerly a commissioned officer in 
the .State militia, is one of the most 
venerable and highh' respected citizens of this 
town. He was born in Temple, Franklin 
County, Me., June 10, 1S15, son of William 
and Hannah Abbott (Russell) True. He is 
a descendent of the Yarmouth Trues, a promi- 
nent Cumberland County family, who settled 
there at an early date in Colonial history. 

Zebulon True, Captain True's grandfather, 
son of William True, was born in Yarmouth, 
Me., May 21, 17^)5 ; and when a young man he 
resided for some time in Augusta. He served 
as a private in the Continental Army during 
the latter part of the Revolutionary War; and 
in 1791 he settled upon lot No. 18 in Farni- 
ington, which was then an almost unbroken 
wilderness, but few white men living here at 



the time. A few years later he sold his 
Farmington property; and in 1799 he bought 
another tract of wild land in the town of 
Temple, where he cleared a good farm, being 
one of the pioneer agriculturists of that local- 
ity. He died February 4, 1830. His wife, 
formerly Martha Kennedy, who was born in 
Ireland, October 26, 1770, became the mother 
of twelve children; namely, William, Betsey, 
Zebulon, Martha, Polly, Sally, James K., Jo- 
siah L. , John, Thomas, Ro.xaillany, and 
Jacob B. Captain True's grandmother died 
February 9, 1858. 

William True, son of Zebulon and Martha 
True, was born in Farmington, Me., April 12, 
1789. Upon reaching manhood he cleared a 
farm situated upon Porter's Hill, later selling 
and clearing a part of another tract containing 
one hundred and sixty acres, making two farms 
which were reclaimed by him from a wild 
state. From this it appears that he was a 
strong, able-bodied, exceedingly energetic 
man, capable of much physical endurance and 
hard work. He also followed the carpenter's 
trade in connection with his other labors; and 
he was one of the most successful among the 
early settlers of Temple, where he lived to be- 
come an octogenarian. He died at the home 
of his son. May 9, 1869. In politics he was 
a Democrat, and in his religious views a Con- 
gregational ist ; and by his industrious and ex- 
emplary life he gained the respect and esteem 
of his neighbors and fellow-townsrnen. He 
married for his first wMfe Hannah Abbott Rus- 
sell, who was born May 4, 1794, daughter of 
Thomas and Phebe (Abbott) Russell. She 
died March 16, 1838, leaving se\'en children, 
as follows: Sumner, who was born October 6, 
1 813; William, the subject of this sketch; 
Hannah A., born May 22, 1817; Julian, born 
March 7, 1824; Octavia, born Februar\' 4, 
1828; Marilla, born June 14, 1832; and 
Philip, born October 5, 1835. Captain True's 
father married for his second wife Elizabeth P. 
Haskell, who lived to reach the age of eighty- 
one years, and died in 1880, and whose only 
daughter, Octavia, was born December 3, 1839. 

William True, the subject of this sketch, 
attended school in his boyhood; and when old 
enough he began to learn the carpenter's trade, 
working with his father. At the age of 



p^^ii^ 




WILLIAM TRUE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



iSi 



twenty-four he settled in rhilli[)s, where he 
bought a farm which he carried on in connec- 
tion with his trade for tour years. At the ex- 
piration of that time he sold his property, and, 
moving to Worcester, Mass., worked as a jour- 
neyman carpenter in that city for three years, 
when his health failed. l-'or the next seven 
years he kcjjt a public house, for four years 
managing a hotel on the west side of the river, 
and for the succeeding three years being pro- 
prietor of the Blue Mountain House, which 
stood upon the site now occupied by the ]jres- 
ent Farmington Exchange. Retiring from the 
hotel business, he bought the Butler home- 
stead, which was the oldest residence in the 
village, and, having remodelled it and placed 
it in a substantial condition, has since resided 
here. He continued to follow his trade with 
energy and prosperity for several years, but 
has now jiractically retired from regular labor, 
although he is able at his advanced years to 
spend considerable time at his bench daily. 

On March 29, 1839, Captain True wedded 
Mary S. Smith, who was born in Farmington, 
December 19, 181 5, daughter of Samuel and 
Mary (Sprague) Smith. Mrs. True died July 
24, 1886, leaving no children. 

While residing in Temjjle, Captain True 
was prominent in the State militia, and re- 
ceived his commission, the title of which he 
has since borne. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. For the past thirty years he has had 
charge of the house of worship of the Old 
.South Congregational Church, of which he is 
an active member. He enjoys good health ; 
and there is not a citizen here who is more 
widely and favorably known than this venerable 
octogenarian, or more entitled to the respect 
and veneration which is extended to him by 
the entire community. 




lAL I'RANCISCO BRADBURY, 
M.D., a brilliant young physician of 
\r^ ) Norway, Me., son of one of the most 
eminent medical and surgical practi- 
tioners in Oxford County, was born in Spring- 
field, Me., February 5, 1861. He is a son of 
Dr. Osgood N. and Ellen R. (Scribner) Brad- 
bury. Dr. ]5radbury's immigrant ancestor, 
from whom he is eighth in descent, was 



Thomas l^radbury, who was bajitizetl at Wickcn 
Bonant, Essex County, England, on February 
28, 1610-1 1, and in 1634 appeared in Agamen- 
ticus (now York, Me.) as agent of the projiri- 
etor. Sir F"erdinando Gorges. 

Thomas Bradbury afterward settled in the 
town of .Salisbury, Mass., and married Mary 
Perkin.s, of Ipswich, who was' coinicted <if 
witchcraft, but escaped execution. Thomas, 
the immigrant, and his wife, Mary, had a son 
William, who was a land-owner in Salisbur)-. 
William Bradbury married Rebecca Maverick 
(i/C(- Wheelwright), and their son Jacob mar- 
ried Elizabeth .Stockman. Moses, the son of 
the couple last named, settled in North \'ar- 
mouth. Me., and later remo\'ed to New 
Gloucester. He married Abigail I'ogg ; and 
his fourth child and second son, l^enjamin, 
located in 1777 in the town of Minot, An- 
droscoggin County, on ]5radbury Hill. He 
married Eleanor P'ellows; and his descentlants 
are found in Oxford, Androscoggin, and Frank- 
lin Counties. 

Benjamin's son Josei_)h, who settled first in 
New Gloucester, in 1790 moved to Minot, in 
1794 to Poland, and in 1S07 to Norway, locat- 
ing to the south-west of Pike Hill, where he 
purchased- one hundred and five acres of land 
of Joshua Smith. This land he cleared for 
farming purposes, in the mean time working 
as a carpenter when opportunity offered. He 
was interested in political matters, voting with 
the Whigs, and in religious progress serving 
as Deacon of the Congregational church for a 
number of years. He died April 4, 1836, at 
the age of sixty-eight years. His wife, Tab- 
itha Cotton before marriage, died in 1845. 
Their children were: Charles A., .Sophia, 
Ruth, Eleanor, Betsey, Jacob, Nathan A., 
Moses, and Nathaniel M. 

Jacob Bradbury, last named, who was tlic 
grandfather of Dr. B. F. Bradbury, was born 
June 25, 1799. He inherited the homestead, 
and, as a farmer, took a leading place in the 
community; while as a schoolmaster he had a 
long and successful record, teaching thirty- 
three winters — twenty-seven winters in suc- 
cession. He died in Norway, August 2, 1880. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Sally K. 
Ripley, was a daughter of Uriah Ripley, of 
Paris, Oxford County, Me. She died October 



iSj 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



30, 1880. The children of this couple were 
— Sabiiia E. , Matilda A., Nathan O. , Osgood 
\.. Ilcnry A. M., Harriet N., Sarah A., liii- 
])hcniia J., Jacob F., Nellie F., James G. B., 
and Ida K. 

Osgood Nathan Bradbury, son of Jacob and 
Sally K. Bradbury, was born in Norway, Octo- 
ber 28, 1828. He finished his preliminary 
studies at the Norway Liberal Institute, and 
when he was eighteen years old took charge of 
the high school of Springfield, Me. In 1852 
he entered the counting-room of S. W. Pope 
& Co., of East Machias, as clerk, and in 1856 
went to California and into the mines. He 
soon after located in .San Francisco, where he 
was in business until Juh', i860. On his 
return to the East he took up the study of 
medicine under Dr. P. C. Jones, of Spring- 
field, Me. ; and after completing the curricu- 
lum of the Maine Medical School, where he 
was graduated June 4, 1864, he entered the 
Cony Lhiited States Military Hospital at Au- 
gusta as executive officer and assistant sur- 
geon. In January, 1866, he was made sur- 
geon-in-charge, and was in office until the 
hospital was abolished. During the ensuing 
years, until 1873, Dr. Osgood N. Bradbury 
conducted a successful practice as physici?ln and 
surgeon at Sjiringfield, Me. ; and in that year 
he moved to Norway, where he has since been 
an active factor in all progressive movements. 

While a resident of Springfield, Dr. Brad- 
bury, the elder, was elected to the House of 
Representatives, entering on his duties in 
1863 ; and the two years following he was Sen- 
ator from Penobscot County. He was a mem- 
ber of the Committee on f^ducation for three 
years, and also served on other important com- 
mittees; and in 1864 he was Chairman of the 
joint sjjecial Committee on the Death Penalty, 
which fountl the state of popular feeling such 
that public hearings were held during every 
week of the legislative session. Dr. Bradbury 
has been a Mason for more than forty years, 
is Past Master, and has taken all the degrees 
fif the York rite; and as an Odd Fellow he is 
a charter member of Norway Lodge and of 
W'ildey iMicampment, and has presided over 
the deliberations of the lodge and encamp- 
ment. He has been United States Examining 
Surgeon for pensions thirteen years. 



In 1886 he commenced the publication in 
the Norway Weekly Advertiser of a series of 
recollections; and he has broadened the scope 
of his writing until it has embr.aced a careful 
and extremely valuable compilation of the his- 
tory of all the early settlers, extending down to 
the youngest descendant. Dr. Osgood N. 
Bradbury was married June 13, 1852, to Miss 
Ellen R. Scribner, who was born in Spring- 
field, Me., Jul\- 10, 1832. Three children 
blessed their union: Nellie R., who died in 
infancy; Bial F., the subject of this sketch; 
and Guy, who was born March 24, 1872, and 
died May 17, 1876. 

Bial F. Bradbury was graduated at the Nor- 
way High .School, and first took up the study 
of medicine with his father. He continued 
his studies in the Maine Medical School at 
Brunswick, and later in Atlanta, Ga., where 
his father, whose health was failing, spent a 
year, and two years in South Carolina (1881- 
84), with beneficial results. The young man 
was graduated at the .Southern Medical Col- 
lege of Atlanta, highest in his class, taking the 
first prize, seventy-five dollars in gold. This 
was in 1882; and in the spring of that year 
he began practice in Norway, Me. Though he 
had taken the polyclinic course in Atlanta, he 
did not consider his preparatory studies fin- 
ished; and in 1885 he pursued an advanced 
course in the Post-graduate Medical College of 
New York City. Since then Dr. B. F. Brad- 
bury has been gradually taking his father's 
place, having practised in conjunction with 
him at first; and he is already one of the most 
successful physicians and surgeons in the 
count}'. In 1S85 he was appointed Assistant 
Surgeon and First Lieutenant of the First 
Regiment, National Guard of Maine; in 1894 
he was promoted to the rank of Captain; antl 
in April, 1896, to that of Major and Surgeon. 

Dr. B. Y. Bradbury was married March 22, 
1882, to Mabel F., daughter of Dr. George P. 
Jones, of Norway. He has no children. In 
politics he is a Democrat. The young Doctor 
is a member of the Town Board of Health, and 
actively interested in all projects for the im- 
provement of the town. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason ; Master of Oxford Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., of Norway; has taken all 
the degrees of the York rite; is a member of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Kora Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Lewis- 
tdii ; and as an Odd Fellow he is Medical 
Director of the Odd Fellows Graded Relief 
Association, and a Knight of Pythias, in which 
he holds the rank of Colonel and Assistant 
Surgeon-general in the Uniform Rank, Maine 
Brigade. In the town of Norway no man is 
more ]iopnlar than Dr. Rial I', l^railbury. 




ILLIAM K. COOPER, an esteemed 
agriculturist of Paris, was born 
here, December ig, 1855, on the 
farm where he now resides. His father, Will- 
iam Cooper, was also born on this homestead; 
and his grandfather, Benjamin Cooper, was 
one of the early settlers of the town. Benja- 
min Cooper came to Paris when it was but a 
mere hamlet. Buying one hundred acres of 
land, he cleared a homestead for himself. A 
skilful carpenter, he also assisted largely in 
the building up of the place, remaining here 
until his death at a good old age. He was a 
man of upright principles, a stanch Democrat 
in politics, and a firm believer in the Univer- 
salist religion. To him and his wife, Susan 
Cooper, si.x children were born, of whom but 
one, Mrs. Miranda Cole, of Paris Hill, is now 
living. The others were — Harriet, John, 
Hannah, .Sarah, and William. 

William Cooper, the youngest member of 
his father's family, succeeded to the home 
farm, where he was busily engaged in farming 
for many years. He spent the last few years 
of his life in retirement at Paris Hill, and 
died there aged seventy-eight years. He mar- 
ried Charity Kyle, who was born and reared in 
the adjacent town of Peru. She survived him, 
and is now occupying their Paris Hill home. 
They had nine children, of whom two, Charles 
and Albert, have joined the silent majority. 
Those living are — Luella, Rowena, Herbert, 
Frederick, William E., Charles, and Delia. 
In politics the father was an unswerving Dem- 
ocrat and in religion a faithful Universal ist. 
William F. Cooper grew to manhood on the 
old homestead, obtaining his education in the 
district schools, and assisting in the care of 
the farm. The homestead is now his property. 
It is one of the best cared for farms in this part 
of the county. It contains one hundred acres of 



land, which yield abundant crops of hay, corn, 
potatoes, and grain. Inheriting those traits 
of character that distinguislied his ancestors, 
Mr. Cooper has won the regard of the com- 
munity. In politics he is a thorough Demo- 
crat. On December 26, i.S.S'5, Mr. Cooper 
married Miss Cora K. Tucker, who was born 
October 2, 1862, in Buckfield, Me., daughter 
of Lsaac and the late I^sther Tucker. Her 
father, a farmer by occupation, still resides in 
Buckfield. 



^HINFAS WHITTIER, a prominent 
v«^ resident of Chesterville, extensively 
£> engaged in fruit growing, was born 
December i, 1823, at the old Whit- 
tier homestea'd in this town, son of Peter and 
Deborah (Gordon) WHiittier. Mr. Whittier's 
great-grandfather, Thomas Whitticr, whose 
father was also named Thomas, resided in New 
Hampshire. Phineas Whittier, the grand- 
father, who was a native of that State, came 
to Chesterville among the very earliest set- 
tlers, and acquired a tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres of wild land. He lived in a log 
house until he had cleared and improved his 
farm. Then he erected a frame dwell inc, 
which he occupied until his death in 1828, at 
the age of fifty years. His wife, in maiden- 
hood Mehitable I'rench, who survived him 
some forty years, died at the age of eighty. 
Her children were: Josiah, hjioch, Peter, 
Mehitable, and Lucretia. 

Peter Whittier was born at the homestead in 
Chesterville about the year 1800. He passed 
his boyhood assisting upon the farm and at- 
tending the common school. .Succeeding to 
the property after his father's death, he suc- 
cessfully carried on general farming fluring 
the rest of his life. The old house built h)- 
his father was destroyed by fire in 1845, and 
in the following year he erected a new resi- 
dence. All of his seventy years of life was 
pas.sed upon the homestead. His wife, Deb- 
orah, whom he married in 1822, became the 
mother of the following children, namely: 
Phineas, the subject of this sketch; Newell 
G., who married Harriet Tilton ; Charles, who 
died during the Civil War; Daniel, who mar- 
ried Caroline Dyke; Josiah, who died in m- 



i84 



BIOGRAPHICAI. RKVIEVV 



fancy; Eleanor G. , who married W. H. Wan- 
ning; Waty E. , who became Mrs. Butterfield, 
and died in 1884; and Hattie, now deceased, 
who became the wife of David Thompson. 
Mr. Whittier's mother died in 1867. Mrs. 
David Thompson inherited the homestead; and 
it is now owned b\' her son, Charles H. 
Thomi)son. 

I'hineas Whittier obtained his education in 
the town schools of Chesterville and at the 
Earmington Academy. At the age of twenty- 
one he bought ninety acres of pasture land, 
now a part of his ]iresent farm. On this he 
erected a frame house, which is still standing, 
and began life for himself. Here he was 
steadily engaged in general farming until 
1S54, when he went to I-"oxboro, Mass. After 
sjiending about three years in that town, em- 
ployed at Carpenter's bonnet factory, he re- 
turned to the farm, which he has since carried 
on with unusual success. His estate now con- 
tains about three hundred and fifteen acres, 
including tillage, orchard, pasture, and wood 
land. His orchard, covering an area of eighty 
acres, has si.x thousand trees, which annually 
yield two thousand barrels of apples, chiefly 
Baldwins. Eor the past twenty years he has 
shipped all of his number one fruit to Hall & 
Cole, Eaneuil Hall Market, Boston. He dis- 
poses of surplus fruit by evajjorating and can- 
ning, for which he has ample facilities upon 
his premises. His evaporator has a capacity 
of forty bushels per day. Any further surplus- 
age is utilized to make vinegar. Mr. Whit- 
tier has a large storehouse, whose lower floor 
has space for three thousand barrels, while the 
upper floor will hold five thou.sand empty bar- 
rels. Upon the site of the old barn built by 
him in 1848 he has erected a large modern 
structure, having storage for seventy-five tons 
of hay and stabling for five horses, si.x cows, 
and one hundred and fifty sheep. 

On August 31, 1848, Mr. Whittier wedded 
Sarah Maddncks, daughter of Richard and 
Esther (Knowlton) Maddocks. Mr. Maddocks 
was a native of Chesterville and a son of 
Richard Maddocks; and his wife was a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Knowlton, of Earmington. Mr. 
and Mr.s. Whittier have three children, as 
follows: Emma Vodisa, born March 8, 185 1, 
who married Joel Maddocks, and resides in 



Eo.xboro, Mass. ; Grace, born November 6, 
1858, who married Erank H. Rollins, resides 
upon a part of her father's farm, ..nd has three 
children — Dean W., Kenneth '.., and Ruth; 
and Sarah I., born October 13, 1862, who 
married Chester Greenwood, of Earmington, 
and has four children — Lester, Donald W. , 
Vodisa, and Clinton. In politics Mr. Whit- 
tier acts with the Republican party. Eor a 
number of years he has served on the ]?oard of 
Selectmen and the School Committee. In his 
religious views he is liberal. His good health 
must be largely due to the fact that he has not 
tasted a dro]) of intoxicating liquor in his 
lifetime. 



^^Y^HN J. PIKE is a prosperous dairy 
farmer of Eryeburg, Me., where he wa.s 
born on February 17, 1833, son of 
Elder John and Hannah (Hubbard) 
Pike. Mr. Pike's father was a native of Cor- 
nish, York County, Me. He came to Erye- 
burg in 1819, and, settling upon the farm 
where his son now resides, became widely 
and favorably known as a Free Will Baptist 
preacher. He was first commissioned a Jus- 
tice of the Peace in 1821 ; and, being for many 
years the only resident of the town having the 
authority to witness and legalize civil acts, he 
attended to all such matters, and also sol- 
emnized marriage. Elder Pike died in No- 
vember, 1877. He and his wife, Hannah 
Hubbard, a native of Limington, Me., were 
the parents of six children, as follows: Lydia 
H., who was born in July, 1822, and died in 
August, 1823; Lydia H., second, who was 
born in 1825, and died in Wisconsin in 1893; 
Hannah T. , born in 1827, now the wife of 
Stephen Gowen, of Biddeford, Me. ; Dollie 
M., who was born in 1829, and died on April 
ir, 1883; John J., aforementioned; and an- 
other child who died in infancy. Mrs. Han- 
nah H. Pike died in 1881. 

It was the fifth-born child that was named 
for the father, and, now well ad\'anced in man- 
hood's years and achievements, is the direct 
subject of this biographical notice. John J. 
Pike in his early years acquired a common- 
school education, and after finishing his 
studies he began to work ujmu his father's 



BIOGRAl'HlLAL REXIKW 



iSj 



farm. He took charge of the property previ- 
ous to his father's death, and eventually suc- 
ceeded to the ownership of the homestead, 
which consists of two hundred acres. Mr. 
Pike is still actively engaged in general farm- 
ing, his princ'.nal products consisting of hay, 
corn, ant! potatjes; and he ]iays special atten- 
tion to his dairy, keeping thirty cows and mak- 
ing a hue quality of butter, which fiiuls a 
ready sale in Boston and Lynn, Mass. 

In 1857 Mr. Pike wedded for his first wife 
Mary J. Wiley, of Fryeburg, daughter of 
tlnoch W. and Miranda Wiley, the former of 
whom is no longer living, and his w'ife is re- 
siding in Fryeburg. By this union there were 
*■ six children, namely: John W. ; Hannah H., 
W'ife of P^rank Howe, of l^oston, and Miranda 
J., her twin sister, who married J. G. .Sever- 
ance, of Lowell, Mass.; pjioch W., who is 
living at home; Minnie IVP , who resides in 
Lowell, Mass. ; and Winnie .S., her twin 
brother, who is no longer living. Mr. Pike's 
first wife died in 1SS3 ; and he married for his 
second wife. May 20, 1885, Mrs. I'rancena B. 
(Benton) Wiley, widow of .Sullivan J. Wiley, 
late of this town. 

In politics Mr. Pike is a Kepublican, and 
though not an (3tfice-seeker he has ably filled 
some of the town offices. He takes an active 
interest in political afTaiis, and has never 
missed a national. State, or local election 
since becoming a voter. He is connected with 
I'ryeburg Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and Pequaket Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias. He enjoys the independent life of a 
farmer,' and is regarded with the highest re- 
spect by his fellow-townsmen. 




iDWIN N. HASKP:LL, of South Paris, 
^ a member of the firm of N. D. Bolster 
& Co., dealers in general merchan- 
dise and groceries, who do as large a retail 
business as any similar firm in (^.xford County, 
was born here on July 25, 1862, son of 
Ezekiel W. and Harriet (Rideout) Haskell. 

Peter Haskell, father of I^zekiel W. , was 
born in New Gloucester, Me., and spent his 
life in that town. He owned a farm of many 
acres, and was an industrious and progressive 
agriculturist. He married for his first wife 



Sail)' Pulsifer, by whom he had two sons and 
a daughter; namely, Jacob W. , I^zekiel W., 
and Mary P. lie marrietl foi- his second wife 
Betsey Hawes, by whom he had two sons 
Charles P. and 'I'liomas H. The grandparents 
were conimunicants of the Congregational 
church. 

Plzekiel W. llaskcll, the second son. was 
born in New (ilouccstcr on July ,^, 1831. .\t 
twenty-seven years of age, in 1858, he came tn 
.South Paris and went to work for the Grand 
'Prunk Railroad. A few )'ears later he jnu'- 
chased a wood-sawing machine, with which he 
prepared fuel for use on the railroad, cm]ilov- 
ing several men; and he carried un this busi- 
ness very successfully until 1)\' the introduc- 
tion of coal engines the demanil for the wood 
was cut off. - He ne.xt engaged in teaming and 
trucking for the Paris flouring-mill, owning 
several ilranght-horses. He was carrying on 
this business at the time of his death, July 5, 
1871. His wife, Mrs. Harriet Rideout Has- 
kell, survived hini fourteen years, dying in 
1885. I^oth were earnest, devoted Christians 
and communicants of the Congregational 
church. Their honie was at 7 Main Street, 
the residence jareviously owned by Abijah 
Hall. A son and two daughters were the fruit 
of their union, naniel)' : l{mma Whitman, born 
April 18, i860; lulwin Nelson, liorn July 25, 
1S62; and Plattie Lufkin, born December 2^, 
; S64. 

When eighteen years of age lulwin Nelson 
Haskell left school and went to work as a clerk 
for N. Dayton Bolster, continuing in that ]>o- 
sition for fourteen years, during which time he 
gained a practical and thorough knowledge of 
the business. He was then, in i8c)3, received 
into partnership by Mr. Bolster. They have 
a large trade, eniploying several clerks and 
delivery wagons; and in South Paris the name 
of N. Dayton Bolster & Co. stands for straight- 
forward business transactions. Mr. Haskell 
and his sisters owii the old homestead, upon 
which they have made numerous general im- 
provements. He is a nieniber of the Congre- 
gational church, and is connected with the 
following fraternal organizations: Mount Mica 
Lodge, No. 17, Independent Order of Odd 
P'ellows; Hamlin Lodge, No. 31, Knights of 
Pythias — both of South Paris. 



iS6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




:ACHARIAH NORTON, a retired 
railroad conductor of Farmington, 
I'ranklin County, and a veteran of 
the Civil War, was born in Phillips, 
this county. Me., June 20, 1843, son of Zebu- 
Ion and Abigail (Hartford) Norton. Mr. 
Norton is a descendant of Zachariah Norton, a 
native of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, 
who served as a Captain in the Revolutionary 
War, and settled in Farmington at an early date 
in the history of the town, where the records 
show that he was ta.xed for a house and lot in 
1798. Zachariah bought a farm located upon 
what is now known as Norton I-'lats, became 
one of the progressive men of this locality, 
and contributed generously toward building 
the Centre Meeting-house in 1803. He was 
active in public affairs of both the town and 
county, serving as Town Treasurer in 1805 
and as Representative to the legislature in 
1807. Later in life he sold his property here, 
and, moving to Madison, Me., took up a 
squatter's claim and became one of the leading 
citizens of that town. Both he and his wife 
lived to an advanced age. Their children 
were: Dehave, Peter, Zebulon, Abigail, Han- 
nah, Marshall, Elihu, and Abraham. 

Zebulon Norton accompanied his father to 
I'armington. As it was intended that he 
should enter the legal profession, he was given 
a good education. After studying law for a 
time, he concluded that his chances for success 
in life lay in another direction; and, turning 
his attention to agricultural pursuits, he 
bought the homestead here: The good judg- 
ment and industry with which he subsequently 
managed this property soon placed him among 
the most prosperous residents of the j^lace. 
He was one of the number who contributed 
five thousand dollars for the establishment of 
the p-armington Academy. He displayed his 
patriotism by enrolling himself as a private 
and serving in the War of 1813. After his 
return to civil life he sold his property and 
moved to the northern part of the town, then 
to Industry, and still later to Phillips, this 
county. The rest of his active period was 
jiassed in Phillijos, prosperously engaged in 
farming and extensive lumber operations; and 
he died at the advanced age of ninety-si.x years. 
His first wife, whose maiden name was Louisa 



Pratt, was cut off in young womanhood, leav- 
ing four daughters — Louisa, Hannah, Huldah, 
and Lydia. His second wife, in maidenhood 
Abigail Hartford, bore him nine children; 
namely, Daniel L. ," Joshua H., Abigail, 
Charlotte, Ichabod, Zachariah (first, now de- 
ceased), Mary, Caroline, and Zachariah (the 
subject of this sketch). She lived to the age 
of seventy-si.x years. 

Zachariah Norton passed his boyhood in at- 
tending the town schools of Phillips. After- 
ward he was for some time engaged in assisting 
his father. On .September 11, 1862, he en- 
listed as a private in Company D, Twenty- 
eighth Regiment, Maine Volunteers, for nine 
months' service, and subsequently took part in 
the siege and capture of Port Hudson. When 
discharged he returned home, and bought one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, which in- 
cluded a part of his father's propert)'. This he 
sold later in order to purchase a farm of two 
hundred acres in the town of Freeman. After 
making some improvements he sold the latter 
property also, and then removed to New Vine- 
yard, Me. Here he bought another farm of 
one hundred and fifteen acres, and resided on 
it for five years. Abandoning agricultural life 
after this, he went to L\nn, Mass., where he 
entered the employ of the I^astern Railroad 
Company as a switchman in their yards. 
From this position he rajiidly rose in the reg- 
ular line of promotion to that of conductor, 
which he held until i88ci. He then resigned, 
and once more took up his residence in New 
Vineyard. In iSgohc moved to P'armington, 
where he bought the Melvin Tufts place, a 
handsome residence on Main Street, also a 
village farm of forty acres, together with two 
tenement-houses. Although he gives his per- 
sonal attention to his property, he has practi- 
cally retired from active business pursuits. 

On September 11, 1864, Mr. Norton wedded 
Orianna, daughter of Thomas and Harriet 
(Libby) Taylor. Mr. Taylor, who in his 
early life was a farmer, afterward became a 
resident of Boston, where he died at the age of 
forty-eight. Harriet died at the age of thirty- 
five, having been the mother of four other chil- 
dren ; namely, Washington L., Philena, Ros- 
coe, and Charles. 

Her surviving husband subsequently con- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



,87 



traded a second marriage with Maryfone 
Stevens, who bore him one child, True T. 
Mr. and Mrs. Norton have two sons, as fol- 
lows: La Forest W. , who was born June 4, 
1.S69; and Arthur R., who was born June 24, 
1880. Politicall}-, Mr. Norton acts with the 
Republican party. He is highly esteemed 
both in business and social circles here, and 
is popular among the veterans of the (irand 
Army of the Republic. A fact worthy of note, 
and one which he may look upon with pride, 
is that representatives of three generations of 
the Norton family have assisted in the defence 
of their country in the three jjrincipal military 
struggles fought and won by the United States. 



JRA JOHNSON, a successful lumberman, 
stock dealer, and general farmer of Nor- 
way, O.xford County, and one of the 
most prominent business men of this 
town, was born at the Johnson homestead in 
the north-east part of Waterford, where he 
now resides, December 3, 1S38, son of Ira, 
Sr., and Mary (Townc) Johnson. 

The first of the family to settle in Maine 
was his grandfather, Asa Johnson, a native of 
Massachusetts, who served three years as a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War. He was 
one of the pioneer farmers of Waterford, 
whither he came in 1786, and remained a resi- 
dent for the rest of his life. He married 
Hannah Horr, a daughter of Philip and Han- 
nah (Harrington) Horr, and reared a family 
of nine children, as follows: Clarissa, who is 
said to have been the first white child born in 
Waterford; Hannah; Asa, Jr.; Lucy; Ira, 
Sr. ; Sally; Elijah; Mary; and Leonisia. 
Of these none are now living, though all grew 
to maturity, and were married. 

Ira Johnson, Sr.. second son of Asa (ohn- 
son, was born in Waterford in 1796, and was 
reared to agricultural pursuits. When a 
young man he bought the farm which is now 
owned by his son Ira, and he cultivated the 
land with profitable results for many years. 
He was an able and industrious farmer and a 
prominent citizen, who gained the respect and 
good will of his neighbors and fellow-towns- 
men. He resided at the homestead until his 
death, which took place December 27, 1878. 



His wife, Mary Towne, whom he married 
November 20, 1828, was born in Albany, Me., 
February 14, 1809, daughter of Samuel and 
Lydia (Ilolt) Towne, both of whom were na- 
tives of Andover, Mass. Samuel Towne set- 
tled in Albany, this State, among the early 
pioneers, and became a prosperous farmer and 
a leading citizen of that place, where he was 
elected to serve in various town offices. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Johnson, Sr., had a family 
of eight children, as follows: Augustus, who 
died at the age of fourteen months; Lydia 
Merriam, now deceased, who married for her 
first husband Frederick Fuller, and for her 
second Samuel Hersey; Amanda, wife of 
Justin E. Mclntire, of Waterford, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in the present vol- 
ume; Ira, tlie subject of this sketch; An- 
toinette, wife of David L. Merrill, of North 
Bridgton, Me. ; Jerome A., who married 
Fanny M. Bancroft, and is engaged in farming 
in Waterford; Harriet H., wife of W. S. 
Merrill, an energetic farmer of Norway; and 
George Hersey, who married Sarah E. Upton, 
neither of whom is living. Mr. Johnson's 
mother, who is now eighty-seven years old, 
resides with him. 

Ira Johnson grew to manhood in Waterford, 
and at the age of eighteen he engaged in fell- 
ing trees, working for si,\ weeks; and his 
wages were used to pay for one half-term of 
school. He afterward attended the Waterford 
High School for one term, and then began 
work for his father at one hundred dollars 
per year, with which he made the first pay- 
ment toward the purchase of the homestead 
property. He continued to improve the farm, 
which he paid for by his own industry and 
toil; and he has always resided upon it. Be- 
sides conducting general farming with energy 
ami success, in company with Justin VI. Mc- 
lntire he engaged in stock dealing, lumber- 
ing, and the manufacture of pulp wood, in 
which they carried on a large and profitable 
business here for several years. Mr. Johnson 
has now practically retired from active pur- 
suits, but still devotes considerable attention 
to his agricultural interests, owning in all 
about one thousand acres of land. 

On December 3, 1859, Mr. Johnson married 
Melissa J. Merrill, who was born in Norway, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



August 30, 1840. She is a daughter of John 
and Jane (Dickey) Merrill, the former of 
whom was born in Andover, Mass. ; and his 
wife also was a native of that State. Coming 
to O.xford County, Maine, John Merrill first 
settled on a farm in Norway, afterward remov- 
ing to Albany; and he finally took up his resi- 
dence in Norway village, where his last days 
were passed. He died in April, 1875; and 
his wife died February 2"/ , 1S39. Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson have three children, as follows: 
Lillian, who was born May 28, 1864, and is 
now the wife of Clarence W. I'ride, a promi- 
nent resident of VVaterford and Chairman of 
the Board oi Selectmen of that town; Virgil 
Howard, who was born June 29, 1867, married 
Sophronia B. Kimball, of North Bridgton, 
Me., and is now residing with his parents; 
and Eva Mabel, who was born December 11, 
1870, and is now the wife of Harry L. 
Hutchins, a successful merchant of North 
Fryeburg, Me. 

As one of the most extensive farmers in this 
section, upright and straightforward in busi- 
ness dealings, in manners always courteous and 
kindly, Mr. Johnson is widely and favorably 
known. Visitors at the pleasant old home- 
stead, whether friends and neighbors, or chance 
acquaintances, receive a cordial welcome. 



'rank \V. CHICK, a young and cnter- 
])rising business man of Madrid, I'" rank- 
liu County, was born here, October 8, 
1862, son of Isaiah and Louisa (Moores) 
Chick. The founders oi the family, which is 
of Scotch origin, settled in Maine and New 
Hampshire. Isaiah Chick, the paternal 
grandfather of Frank W., was a native of 
Ossipee, N.H., whence he came to Madrid, 
where he resided for the rest of his life. In 
jiolitics he was a Whig. He reared a family 
of seven children, of whom the only survivors 
are: Nancy, the wife of M. Philbrick, of 
Houlton, Me. ; and Charles N. Chick, of 
Cadillac, Mich. 

Isaiah Chick was born in Ossipee, March 
30, 1820. When a young man he worked 
upon one of the first railroads built in Amer- 
ica. At a later date he moved to Madrid, and 
engaged in lumbering and trading. He also 



kept a store here for more than fifty years, 
conducted the hotel of Madrid for many years, 
and for a long time owned and operated a saw- 
mill, which was destroyed by fire on October 
30, 1883. He served either as a Selectman 
or Town Treasurer every year for nearly half 
a century, was a Justice of the Peace for up- 
ward of forty-two years, acted as Postmaster 
for twenty-five years, was County Commis- 
sioner for six years, and represented this dis- 
trict in the State legislature for two terms. 
In all these offices he acquitted himself with 
distinguished ability. He was an honorable, 
upright man, and had the highest respect of 
his townsmen. He was an esteemed member 
of the Independent Order of Odd P"ellows. 
In politics he was an earnest supporter of the 
Republican party from the time of its forma- 
tion, and was one of the very first to uphold 
its principles in this locality. His death 
occurred at his home in Mach'id, March 3, 
1894, when he was nearly seventy-four years 
old. His wife, Louisa, whom he married 
November 30, 185 1, was a native of Madrid. 
She became the mother of nine children, 
three of whom are living, namely: P'rank W., 
the subject of this sketch; Lura M., the wife 
of William Parlin, of Weld, Me.; and Alice 
M., who resides at the homestead. 

After attending the public school of Madrid 
for the usual period of time, P'rank W. Chick 
completed his studies with a business course 
at the Portland Commercial College. He 
then eneaiied in business with his father, and 
has since been identified with trade and the 
lumbering industry here. He has rebuilt the 
mill that was burned in 1883, and he is to-day 
one of the most prominent and active business 
men in this locality. He is a leading spirit 
in public affairs. He is the Secretary of the 
Republican Town Committee, is serving his 
second term as a member of the Board of Se- 
lectmen, and he ably discharges the duties of 
superintendent of schools. 



OHN SMALL, an active member of 
the farming community of Greenwood 
township, was born in the town of 
Lovell, this State, October 13, 1855, 
a son of Cyrus L. and Eunice Ann (Whit- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



189 



more) Small. Mis paternal grandfather, also 
John Small, who was a lifelong resident of 
Cumberland County, in his earlier life was a 
farmer in Raymond, and in his latter days was 
the proprietor of a saw and grist mill in the 
adjoining town of Casco. 

Cyrus L. Small was a native of Raymond, 
Cumberland County. While still a youth he 
went West, and spent three years in Madison, 
Wis. Returning then to his native State, he 
learned the blacksmith's trade, and worked at 
it afterward in Casco and Lovell for a year or 
two. He then bought a farm in Greenwood 
township, where for five years he carried on 
mixed husbandry, besides running a smithy. 
Disposing of that property, he bought the 
homestead now owned and occupied by his son 
John, and here devoted himself to general 
farming until his death, which occurred Sep- 
tember 14, 1883. His wife, who survived 
him ten years, died August 4, 1893, leaving 
five children, of whom the following is re- 
corded: Evangeline, born November 26, 1854, 
lives with her brothers on the old home farm; 
John is the subject of this sketch; Charlotte 
L., born August 6, 1864, is the wife of Fred- 
erick H. Webster, living in Farmington, Me. ; 
Cyrus Franklin, born May 5, 1857, is a car- 
penter, and resides at Minneapolis, Minn. ; 
and Charles W., born October 19, 1872, lives 
on the old homestead. 

John Small, until he was twenty years old, 
remained with his parents, attending the dis- 
trict school and helping about the farm. He 
then worked at farming in West Paris three 
months, after which he studied medicine with 
Dr. Yates, of that place, for fifteen months. 
Instead of continuing his medical studies, 
however, Mr. Small worked in a number of 
factories during the ne.xt few years. For six 
months each he was employed in a box factory 
in Norway village and in a rifle shop at Me- 
chanic F"alls, Androscoggin County. From 
the latter place he went to Paris Hill, this 
county, to work in a sled factory. A few 
months after he removed to Jackson's Cross- 
ing, accepting a position in a pulp-mill, where 
he remained three and a half years. The suc- 
ceeding year he was employed in tin-plating 
at Paris Hill, when his father's death obliged 
him to return to the old homestead in Green- 



wood, where he has since resiiletl. He has 
one hundred and fifty acres of land, which he 
successfully manages, carrying on the various 
branches of general agriculture with good 
financial results. 

Mr. Small married Miss h'annie A. Ayer, 
daughter of A. J. and Harriet M. Ayer, who 
are now living on their farm near Locke's 
Mills, this township. Mrs. Small is a native 
of Bethel, her birth having occurred here, 
June 29, i860. Mr. Small is a stanch adher- 
ent of the Republican party, and has served 
acceptably in several of the smaller town ofifices. 
He belongs to the Mount Mica Lodge, No. 
17, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
South Paris, and to the Golden Cross Lodge. 
Both he and his estimable wife are members 
of the Methodist I-lpiscopal church, in which 
they are active and valued workers. 



LISHA S. BISBEE, a large land-owner 
of .Sumner, Oxford Coimty, is a repre- 
sentative member of one of the oldest 
and best-known families in this vicinity. He 
was born on his [iresent farm in Sumner, 
April 15, 1830, and is a son of Elisha and 
P'anny (Bryant) liisbee. His grandfather, 
Elisha Bisbee, who was born in Massachu- 
setts, and served in the Revolution, after the 
close of the war settled in Sumner, where he 
cleared a farm. (For further particulars see 
sketch of Captain Lewis Bisbee.) PLlisha 
Bisbee was a blacksmith, mason, farmer — in 
fact, a man who could turn his hand to almost 
anything. He lived to be quite old, owned a 
good farm in the southern part of the town, 
and ranked among the leading agriculturists of 
the time. The maiden name of his wife was 
Mary Pettingill. 

Elisha Bisbee, the father of Elisha .S., was 
born and reared in Sumner. In early life he 
followed the shoemaker's trade. Later he 
settled on the farm now occupied by his son, 
and achieved marked success in the pursuit of 
agriculture. He gave his political support 
to the Republicans, and served acceptably as 
Selectman, Town Treasurer, and in other 
official cajjacities. He was a Baptist in relig- 
ious belief, and died at the age of eighty- 
nine. He was twice married. His first wife. 



igo 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Joanna ( Stint evant) Bisbcc, bore him three 
children, who have all passed away. His 
second wife, in maidenhood Fanny Bryant, 
was born in I'lympton, Mass., and died in 
Sumner. -She was the mother of nine chil- 
dren, six of whom are living, namely: Sabra 
W.. the wife of Orville Robinson, of Peru, 
Me.; Sophia (i., now residing in Sumner; 
Jane T., the widow of James W. McDonald, 
late of Peru, Me. ; Levi B., a resident of East 
Sumner; Elisha S., the subject of this sketch; 
and Hopestill R., now of Auburn, Me. 

Elisha .S. Bisbee, who is a lifelong resident 
of Sumner, has been very successfully en- 
gaged in general farming since his early 
years. His property, including the home- 
stead formerly occupied by his father, com- 
prises over two hundred acres of land. The 
present residence, which was erected by him- 
self, is one of the handsomest in the locality. 
Mr. Bisbee was married January 4, 1857, to 
Miss Martha J. Parsons, of Hartford, Me. 
She died April i, 1867, leaving three children 
— Lietta J., now the wife of William H. 
Barrows, of Paris, Me., and the mother of 
three children — Eva, Hattie, and Wilbur; 
Hattie E., the wife of P"remont Hollis, of 
Paris, and the mother of one son, Halley; and 
Hiram S., a resident of Sumner, who married 
Miss Anna E. Holmes. 




IRAM THAYER CUMMINGS, a 
successful and well-known farmer of 

I9 y the town of Paris, Oxford County, 
Me., was born April 30, 18 18, in 
Gray, Cumberland County, a son of Joseph, 
Jr., and Ruth (Thayer) Cummings. He is of 
Scottish descent, his great-grandfather having 
been born and reared in Scotland. 

Joseph Cummings, Sr., the grandfather of 
Hiram Thayer, was one of the very early set- 
tlers of Gray, having made his way there at a 
time when bears, deer, wolves, and other wild 
animals alone disputed the rights of the 
Indians to the larger part of the territory. 
He cleared a tract of land, improving a com- 
fortable homestead, but spent his closing 
years in Greenwood, this county, dying at the 
home of one of his sons at the ripe old age 
of ninety-si.v years. He served in the Revo- 



lutionary War, was a Federalist in politics, 
and in religion was a Congregationalist. To 
him and his wife, Patty Sargent, seven chil- 
dren were born; namely, William, Lucy, 
John, Benjamin, Mary, Isaac, and Joseph, Jr.. 
all of whom have passed from earth. 

Joseph Cummings, Jr., was born in the 
town of Gray, where he was prosperously en- 
gaged in farming during the first half of his 
busy life. In 1836 he removed to the village 
of Paris, establishing himself in the mercan- 
tile business, which he carried on several 
years, having an extensive trade. .Selling out 
his store, he resumed his former occupation in 
the town of Greenwood, living there to an ad- 
vanced age. He was a Republican in politics, 
and was a Universalist in his religious belief, 
but not a church member. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Ruth Thayer, was born in 
Oxford, Me., in 1799, and died in Greenwood 
in 1885. They had a family of eleven chil- 
dren; namely, Hiram Thayer, Tuckerbury, 
Nelson, Harriet, Christiana, Joseph, Roxanna, 
Orrie, Woodbury, Wellington, and Ruth. 
Of these, five are living — Hiram T., Rox- 
anna, Ruth, Joseph, and Woodbury. 

Hiram Thayer, the eldest-born, who is the 
special subject of this sketch, received his ed- 
ucation in the district schools of Gray and at 
Kent's Hill, where he pursued his studies two 
years. At the age of eighteen he came with 
his parents to Paris, and for a year thereafter 
worked at anything he could find to do, having 
no permanent employment. During the next 
few years he worked in woollen-mills in differ- 
ent places and in various capacities, being 
employed in South Paris, Locke's Mills, Ox- 
ford, and again in South Paris, the last time 
having charge of the finishing department. 
In 1851 Mr. Cummings severed his connection 
with the mills, and, after spending a year in 
travelling, secured a situation on the Atlantic 
& St. Lawrence Railroad, now the Grand 
Trunk, on which he was an engineer until 
1865. Locating then in Shelburne, N.H., he 
was there engaged in farming for about four- 
teen years. While a resident of Shelburne 
he was elected a delegate to the State Consti- 
tutional Convention in 1872, and he served in 
that capacity. In 1879 he removed to Paris, 
and settled on the farm he now occupies. 




JOHN WHITMAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'93 



]ieing a man of good judgment and practical 
ability, Mr. Cummings has his farm well im- 
proved, and his tillage land in a good state of 
cultivation. In politics he has been a Reinib- 
lican since the formation of the party. In 
religion he is a Methodist, and has served as 
superintendent of the Sunday-school. While 
in Shelburne he was active in town affairs, 
and for some years was .Selectman. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, belong- 
ing to Lodge No. 94 of .South Paris; and 
both he and his wife are members of the local 
grange. Patrons of Husbandry. 

Mr. Cummings on April 30, 1840, married 
I-^liza A. Cloutman, who was born in Paris, 
September 29, 1821, and died in this town, 
March 11, 1881. Six children were the fruit 
of this union, the following being their rec- 
ortl : Georgiana, born in South Paris, Novem- 
ber 22, 1841, is the wife of William E. 
Kellcy, of Hoston ; Wellington, born in South 
Paris in March, 1844, died in Julv, 1S93; 
Hannibal, born in Greenwood, April 20, 1846, 
is a railway engineer in Pennsylvania; Eliza 
M., born in South Paris, .September 2, 1849, 
died November 9, 1853; Mary I., born in 
South Paris in November, 1852, died Febru- 
ary 3, 1873: and Charles S. , born in Gorham, 
N.H., September 25, 1856, is pastor of the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Augusta, Me. 

On September 29, i88i, Mr. Cummings 
married Mrs. Mary A. Potter Ripley, widow 
of Orrison Ripley. .She was born May 21, 
1836, in Lee, Me., a daughter of Alexander 
and Mary (Ware) Potter. Mr. Potter, a suc- 
cessful farmer of Lee, was a native of Bow- 
doin, and lived to the age of sixty-eight years. 
His wife, a native of Topsham, this .State, 
lived to the advanced age of eighty-three 
years. They had a family of eight chil- 
dren, five of whom have passed to the life im- 
mortal ; namely, Betsey, Jane, Adaline A., 
John W., and James T. The three living 
are: Alexander, a resident of Belmont, N.Y.; 
Charles A., of Lee, Me.; and Mary A., now 
Mrs. Cummings. 

The nuptials of Mary A. Potter and Orrison 
Ripley were solemnized May 31, 1857. Mr. 
Ripley, a prosperous farmer during his active 
life, was born March 15, 1832. He enlisted 
in 1863 in Comiiany K, .Seventeenth Maine 



\'(dLuitecr Infantry, and with his coniraiies ac- 
tively participated in many of the important 
engagements of the war of the Rebellion, and 
at the battle of the Wilderness lost an arm. 
He died June 17, 1872, leaving a widow, now 
Mrs. Cummings, and one son, Wilson A., 
born Sepcember 21, 1858, who lives in Au- 
burn, Me. Another son, William B. Ripley, 
born November 24, 1868, died March 21, 
1870. 



OHN WHITMAN, formerly a farmer 
and real estate dealer of South Paris, 
Oxford County, Me., now living in re- 
tirement, was bom in Hebron, this 
county, December 22, 18 16, son of Calvin and 
Sally (Record) Whitman. With an ancestry 
extending back to the early days of the Colo- 
nial period, the family is entitled to be ranked 
among the oldest in New England. From 
Mitchell's " History of Bridgewater, Mass.," 
we learn that John Whitman, the immigrant 
progenitor, was the first Deacon of the church 
in Weymouth, Mass., where he was made a 
freeman in 1638, and where he died in 1692, 
at the age of ninety years. He was the father 
of four sons — Thomas, John, Abiah, and 
Zechariah — and five daughters. Thomas and 
John Whitman were among the early proprie- 
tors of Bridgewater; but Thomas is said to 
have been the only son of John Whitman, Sr., 
who settled in that town. Abiah Whitman, 
brother of Thomas, was the father of John 
Whitman, third, who lived one hundred and 
five years, and is alleged to have been a very 
strong and active man at the age of one hun- 
dred years. 

His son, Jacob, who was grandfather of the 
present John Whitman, was born in l-'.aston, 
Aroostook County, Me., November 28, 1753. 
The mother of Jacob was his father's third 
wife, and at the date of his birth his father 
was aged fourscore years. Grandfather Whit- 
man fought for independence in the Revolu- 
tionary War. In 1780 he became a resident 
of Buckfield, this county, locating close to 
the line of the town of Hebron. As yet the 
district had but few settlers, and the land was 
still in the condition of a wilderness. In 
consequence much of his labor was directed 



194 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



toward clearing a farm, and in due time he 
iiad two hundred acres under cultivation. A 
simple but eloquent memorial of his work is a 
large block of granite, which would need a 
derrick to put in place to-day, still to be seen 
in the remains of an old building. Assisted 
by his brothers, he placed it in the position it 
occupies, remarking that it would be there for 
several generations. He was much esteemed 
bv his neighbors, was a Deacon of the Con- 
gregational church, served the community in 
sundry public capacities, and died December 
29, 1842, in the ninetieth year of his age. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Abigail 
Packard, and who was born in 1756, died in 
1837. Of their children, eight reached ma- 
turity; namely, Luther, Jacob, Joseph, 
Calvin, Joshua, Rebecca, Abigail, and Win- 
chester. 

Calvin Whitman, the fourth son, was a na- 
tive of Buckfield, born May 5, 17S5. Reared 
on his father's farm, he made farming the oc- 
cupation of his life. After his marriage he 
bought one hundred acres of land in Hebron, 
took up his residence upon it, and spent the 
rest of his days in clearing and cultivating the 
soil. His religimis belief was that of the 
Universalist church. In politics he followed 
the fortunes of the Democratic party. At his 
death he was nearly eighty-two years old. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Sally 
Record, lived to the age of ninety-six years. 
They had seven children; namely, Hannah, C. 
Winchester, John, Remember, Jonathan, 
Jacob S., and Augustus. 

John Whitman remained under the parental 
roof-tree for the first twenty years of his life, 
acquiring the knowledge and practical experi- 
ence of agricultural operations that subse- 
quently enabled him to become an expert 
farmer. In 1837 he commenced to work for 
the farmers of the district at the wages of 
eleven dollars per month. At the time of his 
marriage he bought the old homestead, and 
there carried on farming until 1856. He 
then sold the property, ami ])urchased the 
Penley farm in the town of Paris, containing 
three hundred acres. Here, after erecting a 
new set of buildings, all of a first-class char- 
acter, he kept a large dairy of choice cows for 
several years. In 1885 he disposed of this 



farm, and purchased the llersey house, at the 
same time removing to South Paris. There- 
after he dealt considerably in real estate. 
Since his dwelling was remodelled and re- 
ceived the addition of a barn, his place has 
been one of the finest in the town. He also 
owns some desirable land adjoining the lot on 
which his residence stands, and keeps a few 
select cows. 

In November, 1844, Mr. Whitman was 
united in. matrimony with Miss Sarah De 
Albra Bumpus, daughter of Alden Bumpus, of 
Hebron. Their children are: Edwin J., born 
January 24, 1850, who married Miss Lizzie 
Green, and is in the wholesale commission 
business in Boston; E. Melvina, born June 
22, 1855, now the wife of Joseph Jones, a 
commercial traveller of South Paris, and 
mother of two children — Edwin S. and Philip 
Jones: Mary C, born April 13, 1857, who 
married J. H. Stuart, a publisher of maps and 
atlases in South Paris, and is the mother of 
four children — Herman H., William E., 
Grace M., and Leona D. ; and Laurin A., 
born August 12, 1864, who married Miss 
Mabel Murch, and is associated with his 
father. Mrs. Whitman died in 1895, at the 
age of seventy-one years. In religion Mr. 
Whitman professes the Baptist faith, while in 
politics he is a Republican. Although now 
in his eightieth year he enjoys remarkably 
iiood health. 




EV. ABIJAH R. CRANE, D.D., 
pastor of the Baptist church in He- 
bron, Oxford County, and Professor 
of Literature at the Hebron Acad- 
emy, was born in Wayne, Kennebec County, 
Me., and is now about sixty years of age. 
Abijah Crane (first), Dr. Crane's grandfather, 
who was a native of Dedham, Mass., joined 
the Continental army at the age of fourteen, 
and served all through the Revolutionary War. 
He settled in Eayette, Me., when twenty-one 
years old, becoming one of the pioneers and 
progressive farmers of that town, and resided 
there for the rest of his life. He was a Whig, 
very prominent in the community, and served 
with ability in various town offices. He was 
one of the founders of the Baptist church in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•95 



Fayette, and acteil as its Deacon foi- many 
years, and was warmly esteemed by his neigh- 
bors for his manly adherence to high prin- 
ciples. He reared a family of seven children, 
none of whom are living. 

Abijah Crane (second), Dr. Crane's father, 
was born in Fayette in 1792. When a young 
man he enlisted in the army for service in the 
War of 1812. Upon his return to civil life 
he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and con- 
ducted a good farm in Fayette for the rest of 
his active period. Originally a Whig, he 
later acted with the Republican party, and 
was a leading spirit in his locality. For 
many years he was identified with the town 
government. He served as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen for several terms, and he 
represented his district in the State legis- 
lature for one term. Like His father, he was 
Deacon of the Baptist church for a long 
period. At his death, which occurred in his 
ninety-second year, he was mourned as a 
worthy, upright citizen and a Christian 
gentleman. He married Harriet F'ifield, who 
was born in Fayette in 1801. She became 
the mother of nine children, six of whom are 
living; and she died in her ninety-third year. 
Abijah R. Crane acquired his early educa- 
tion in the schools of Fayette, and prepared 
for his collegiate course at the Waterville 
Academy, now the Coburn Classical Insti- 
tute. After graduating from Colby Univer- 
sity with the class of 1856, he was for a time 
engaged as a teacher at the liast Corinth 
Academy. At the same time- he was studying 
law with the Hon. George ICvans, with the 
result that he was admitted to the bar in 1858. 
However, giving ui) the idea of entering the 
legal profession, he turned his attention to 
theology, and spent three years at the Newton 
(IVIass.) Theological Seminary, from which he 
graduated in 1861. His first pastorate was 
in Hallowell, Me., where he occupied the 
pulpit of the Baptist church for thirteen years. 
Upon his retirement therefrom he became 
financial secretary of Colby University, which 
important position he held for two years. 
While so engaged, he raised the sum ■ of one 
hundred thousand dollars, which was given for 
educational work to the Coburn Classical Insti- 
tute and the Hebron and Ricker Academies. 



lie was SLdxsequently called to the pastorate of 
the Baptist church in East Winthrop, Me., 
where he labored for twelve years, at the same 
time having charge of the public schools 
there. In 1890 he accepted the pastorate of 
the Baptist church here, in which capacity he 
has since labored diligently and successfully. 
His influence among his congregation, and, 
indeed, outside of it, is becoming stronger 
every day. He is also Professor of Literature 
at the Hebron Academy, in which he is 
deeply interested. 

On November 3, i86j, Dr. Crane was 
united in marriage to Frances I\I. Derrick, 
of Waterville, Me. He has one daughter, 
Fanny, who is now the wife of Professor 
A. H. Brainard, of Augusta, Me. In politics 
he is a Republican, and he exercises a whole- 
some influence in public affairs. He was a 
member of the State legislature during the 
years 1879 and 1880. For the past twenty- 
five years he has been a member of the Board 
of Trustees of Colby University, which in 
1882 conferred upon him the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity. 




DWIN B. LUFKIN, of Weld, iManklin 
County, Me., Justice of the Peace, land 
surveyor and retired farmer, is a 
well-known veteran of the Civil War, having 
served as a private in the Federal ranks during 
the greater part of the conflict, and since its 
close having written a history of his regiment, 
the Thirteenth ' Maine Volunteers. He was 
born in the house where he now resides, .Sep- 
tember 26, 1 84 1, son of George W. and La- 
vinia H. (Sweet) Lufkin. 

The family is of F]nglish origin; and its 
founder in America was Thomas Lovekiii, who 
settled in Gloucester, Mass., in 1673. His 
son Benjamin was the father of Zebulon, Mr. 
Lufkin's great-grandfather. Zebulon Lufkin 
was born in Gloucester, and was a seafarinjr 
man. He resided there until the beginning 
of the Revolutionary War; and he then moved 
to Durham, Me., where he lived until 1785. 
His last days were passed in Freeport, Me. 
His children were: Zebulon, Jr.; Sarah, who 
married T. Wharf, of New Gloucester, Me. ; 
Jonathan ; Ruth, who married Andrew Adams, 



ig6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Durhnm : Aaron; Kbenezer; Joseph; Abi- 
gail, who nianieil H. Richardson, of Pownal ; 
Tk'njamin; Sanniul ; and Judith, who married 
T. Woodman, of Minot. Zebulon Lufi<in died 
October 31, 1S13, aged ninety-one years. 

Samuel Lufkin, Mr. Lufkin's grandfather, 
was born in Gloucester, Mass., and became 
a sea captain. He settled in Freeport, Me., 
in 1790, and made foreign voyages until 1812, 
when he engaged in the coasting trade. He 
continued to follow the sea until disabled by 
age. He died May 14, 1834, aged seventy 
years. His children were: l^.Nperience, who 
died in infancy; Samuel; Joshua; William 
P.; Benjamin; Charles; Klmira; George W. ; 
Eliza G. ; and John. 

George W. Lufkin, Mr. Lufkin's father, was 
born in Freeport, Me. In early life he was a 
fisherman; and after learning the blacksmith's 
trade he at the age of twenty-four settled in 
Weld, and followed that calling here until 
1859. He died December 2t,, 1884, at the 
age of seventy-five years. In politics he was 
originally a Democrat, but soon became a Free 
Soiler. He joined the Republican party at its 
organization. 

Mr. George W. Lufkin first married Mary 
J. Nichols, of Durham, who had two sons, 
namely: George W. , now residing in Lake 
Valley, N.M. ; and Samuel, a resident of 
Auburn, Me. His second wife, Lavinia H. 
Sweet, who was a native of Strong in this 
county, became the mother of three children, 
and of these two are living, namely: F^dvvin 
P., the subject of this sketch; and his sister, 
Abbie F. , who resides with him in Weld. 

Edwin 15. Lufkin was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Weld and at the Wilton High 
School. In 1 861 he enlisted as a private in 
Company V., Thirteenth Maine Regiment, 
under Captain Isaac F. Ouinby, of Westbrook. 
He was in several engagements during the Red 
River campaign, including Sabine Cross- 
roads, Pleasant Hill, and Cane River, and 
was mustered out January 6, 1865. He then 
engaged in farming at the homestead in Weld; 
but about five years later he changed his occu- 
pation, becoming an operator in the spool 
factory, in which he worked four years. Once 
more retinning to agricultural pursuits, he 
continued tn till the soil until 1S88, when 



failing health caused him to relinquish hard 
labor; and he has since lived in retirement. 

In politics Mr. Lufkin acts with the Repub- 
lican party. He has filled the office of Town 
Treasurer four years, and has served upon the 
School Board for three years. He is a man of 
literary tastes and abilities, and has contrib- 
uted numerous interesting articles to the Lew- 
\stnn /o//n/n/ und the Xa/ioiuil Tribune. He 
is a great reader, and has quite a large library 
of choice books, which enables him to pass his 
leisure hours both pleasantly and profitably. 
Mr. Lufkin has devoted much time to writing 
a history of his regiment, which is now in the 
hands of the publisher. He has been Com- 
mander of a Grand Army Post, also Master of 
a Masonic Lodge, and is a Knight Templar. 




LBRO R. JENNESS, of Fryeburg, 
O.xford County, the Secretary, Treas- 
urer, and Superintendent of the 
P'ryeburg Water Company, is one 
of the most prominent business men in the 
county. He is a native of Barton, Vt. , born 
P'ebruary 13, 1836, son of John and Susan 
(Twombly) Jenness, both also natives as well 
as lifelong residents of Barton. John Jenness, 
who was a prosperous farmer and a leading 
man in that place, died in 1849. His wife, 
having survived him nearly thirty years, died 
in 1S78. Their children were: Albro R., the 
subject of this sketch; Emeline, who is no 
longer living ; Austin T., now teaming in Bos- 
ton, who served all through the Civil War, 
first in the Twelfth Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteers, and later as Master of Wagons for 
the Fifth Army Corps; Adeline, who is now 
the widow of John Tripp, and lives at Barton 
Landing, Vt. ; Martha C, who is now the 
widow of Cheney Green, and resides in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. ; Richard PL, who is engaged in 
teaming in Boston ; and John, who is no longer 
living. 

Ali)ro R. Jenness acquired a limited educa- 
tion in the common schools of Barton. At the 
age of fifteen he went to Boston, Mass., where 
he was employed in the store of S. D. Warren 
& Co. for four year.s. Subsequently he gained 
a footing in the teaming business, which in 
those days was a very profitable occupation. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'07 



During the Civil War he had a LH)iitract with 
the United States government, employing a 
crew of twenty men and thirt}' horses at the 
Charjestown na\'y yard, h}- which he earned 
sixty thousand dollars yearly for himself and 
his men. At this time he was a leading hose- 
man in the Boston Fire Department, with 
which he was connected four years. He con- 
tinued to carry on a large and successful team- 
ing business in Boston until 1875, when, influ- 
enced by the favorable reports of its business 
possibilities, he came to I^'ryeburg, where he 
has since resided. His business enterjirises 
consisted principall}' of transactions in lumber 
and real estate, which were exceedingly jirofit- 
able to him, at the same time that they were 
beneficial to the town. These and his farm- 
ing were conducted with unusual abilit}' until 
some years ago, when he withdrew from them. 
In 1882 he constructed the water works, and 
he is now actively connected with that enter- 
prise in the capacities already mentioned. He 
is also Treasurer and a Trustee (if the well- 
known Fryeburg Academy. 

Mr. Jenness has been twice married, and 
now is a widower. He attends the New Jeru- 
salem Church. In politics he gives active 
support to the Republican party, and he is a 
firm believer in protection and sound money. 
He is well advanced in Masonr\-, and is a 
member of De Molay Commandery, Knights 
Templars, Btjston ; and he is connected with 
Pickwauket I.ntlge, Knights of Pythias, of 
Fryeburg. Althougli forced to start at the 
lowest round of the ladder, he has reached a 
secure footing in life, and is to-dav one of the 
substantial men of Frvebure- 




\1-;TFR N. HASKELL, a member of 
an old Maine family and one of the 
largest real estate owners in Oxford 
County, is extensively engaged in 
lumbering in the town of Waterford. He was 
born in Otisfield, Me., December i, 1822, the 
son of Captain Joseph and Jerusha (Moores) 
Haskell. His father was a native of Gorham, 
Me., his mother of Otisfield. 

Joseph Haskell was a son of John Haskell, 
a Revolutionary soldier, who was wounded 
three times while in the service. John Has- 



kell removed from Gorham, Me., to Knox, 
Me., where he died. Joseph Haskell went to 
Otisfield from Gorham, Me., in 1801, or near 
that date, being then about ten years old. Ik- 
rode on horseback behind his uncle, CJliver 
Pierce, and brought with him among other 
belongings a tin box containing five dollars 
in silver. The box being not quite full, the 
coins rattled about, making so much noise that 
his uncle made him dismount and fill the va- 
cant space with leaves. He resided in Otis- 
field about .seventy years, engaged, after reach- 
ing manhood, in farming and trading in cattle 
and horses. He was a Captain of the State 
militia, and he was often chosen Constable and 
Collector. Captain Haskell died in the vil- 
lage of Norway, May 2, 1876. His wife, 
Jerusha M(5ores Ha,skell, died there two years 
later. May 8, 1878. Her father, Major Jona- 
than Moores, the grandfather of Peter N. Has- 
kell, was a soldier of the Revolution. He 
subsequently removed from Groton, Mass., to 
Otisfield, Me., being one of the first settlers 
of the town. His wife. Relief Nutting 
Moores, made three trijis from ()tisfield to 
Groton on horseback. On the first trip she 
carried her one-year-old son, who would have 
been the first white child born in Otisfield had 
she not been taken with an ox team to Gray to 
stay during her confinement, owing to the lack 
of a woman to nurse her at home. Captain 
and Mrs. Joseph Haskell were the jiarents of 
six children — Rhoda, Jane, Susan, and Cyrus, 
all deceased; Mary Ann, widcnv of l^ben An- 
drews, residing in Concord, Mass. ; and Peter 
N., of Waterford, aforenamed. 

Peter N. Haskell's early educational advan- 
tages were limited to the common schools. 
He remained at home until twenty years of 
age, starting then for himself in the lumber 
business near Bangor, Me. Three years later 
he returned to the home farm; and about 1846 
he went to .South Waterford, where he lived on 
a farm some nine years. He then lemoved 
to another farm in Waterford, which was his 
home for twenty years; and while attending to 
its cultivation he was also engaged in jobbing, 
such as doing stone work and moving build- 
ings, being an expert in the latter business. 
His next removal was to his present home in 
East Waterford village. Here he purchased 



iqS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in 1870 the saw-mil I then known as the old 
Upton Mill, which under his management is 
the cenii-e of a large business. His property 
comprises some eight hundred acres of land, 
some of which is under cultivation ; but on ac- 
count of his advancing age he is not now ac- 
tively engaged in farming. 

Mr. Haskell was married August 5, 1846, 
to Mary Green, who was born in South Paris, 
Me., March 15, 1826, the daughter of Nathan- 
iel \V. and Polly (Willis) Green. Mr. Green 
belonged in Leicester, Mass., Mrs. Green in 
Paris, Me. He was a currier, tanner, and 
shoemaker; and he and his brother, Josiah 
("ireen, made the first sale boot in the State of 
Massachusetts, now so widely noted for its 
shoe trade. Mr. Green was for a number of 
years in the boot business. He and his wife 
died in Norway, this county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Haskell have twelve children : the eldest 
child, George A., died in the army; the ne.xt 
two children died in infancy; the third, Rose, 
is the wife of Sewell F. Millett, of Lisbon, 
Me. ; the fifth, Susan, lived but one year; and 
the sixth, Frank, died in 1880. Joseph P., 
born Sejitember 23, 1858, resides with his 
father, and is engaged in business. He is an 
experienced mill man, having had charge of 
mills in Newry and Kumford, Me. Clemen- 
tine D. is the wife of H. O. Rolfe, of Kum- 
ford, this county; Mary P^tta is the wife of 
George Towne, of Oxford, Me. f Georgia is the 
wife of E. H. Haggart, of South Paris, this 
county. Tlie eleventh child died in infancy. 
Pile twelfth, Andrew Johnson, resides in PZast 
Waterford village, where he is Postmaster, 
manages a general store, and is engaged in the 
cider business. He married Miss Delia P'lint. 

Mr. Haskell is a stanch Democrat. Though 
not a seeker for iniblic place, he has held a 
number of minor offices in the town. He is 
widely known in this section of the county and 
highly esteemed. 



KNDON W. COUSINS, an extensive 
lumber manufacturer of P'ryeburg, 
Oxford County, was born in Winne- 
conne, Wis., September 20, 1849, 
son of Richard and Cordelia P. (Nutter) 
Cousins. His grandfather, Enoch Cousins, a 




nati\'e of Porter, Me., having followed the 
sea ill his younger days, subsequently set- 
tled upon a farm in his native town, where he 
died at the age of ninety years. 

Richard Cousins was born in Porter. He 
learned the trade of a blacksmith, and after- 
ward followed that calling in Porter until 
1846. He then went to Wisconsin, and set- 
t-led upon a farm in Vineland. After spend- 
ing a short time there he removed to Winne- 
conne, where he resumed his trade, and resided 
until his death, which occurred in December, 
1894. He married Cordelia P. Nutter, a na- 
tive of Porter and a daughter of Charles 
Nutter, a prosperous farmer of that town. By 
her he became the father of si.x children, 
namely: Henry A., a successful farmer of 
Morris, Minn., who married Annie Shaver, 
and has four children; Hendon W., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Olive Jeannette, who mar- 
ried Daniel GafTner, a prosperous farmer of 
Winneconne, and has one son, Richard, for 
some years employeil by his uncle in Frye- 
burg; Noyes Jackson, an ice dealer in Winne- 
conne, who married Plattie Van Dyke, and 
has one son, Archie, born in 1S88; Mary 1{. , 
the wife of William Morenus, a farmer in 
Chadbourn, N.C. ; and Charles 1'^., who mar- 
ried Alice Purchase, a native of Prince lid- 
ward Island, and is now a member of the Port- 
land police force. The mother died October 
2, 1894. 

Hendon W. Cousins acquired his education 
in the common schools of Winneconne. When 
nineteen years old he came east to Raymond, 
N. H., where he was engaged in operating a 
saw-mill until 1875. He then came to P^ rye- 
burg, antl a short time later became a member 
of the firm of Shirley & Cousins, who carrieil 
on a saw-mill here. In 1888 he bought his 
present mills, the business of which has since 
steadily grown in importance. Here he man- 
ufactures all kinds of lumber for building pur- 
poses, beside shooks, spool stock, etc., which 
he ships to Portland, employing an average of 
fourteen men. He also does a large business 
as a dealer in corn, meal, Hour, and feed, 
coal, wood, and brick. 

Mr. Cousins has been three times married. 
His first marriage was contracted July 10, 
1873, with Mary A. Parker, of Cape Eliza- 



BIOGRAl'lllCAL REVIEW 



199 



beth, Me., who died July ig, 1S75. ]5y his 
second marriage, performed June 30, 1877, ho 
was united with Ella M. Heath, of Fryeburg, 
who died in December, 1882, leax'ing two 
children. These were: Mary E., born No- 
vember 25, 1S7S; and Ralph VV., who was 
born No\ember 3, 1881. Mr. Cousins's pres- 
ent wife, in niaiilenhood Eliza D. Osgood, 
whom he wedded October 20, iS8^, was born 
in Fryeburg, May 2, 1864. She is a daugh- 
ter of lilbridge G. and Emily M. (Osgood) 
Osgood, who were both natives of Fryeburg, 
born respectively on August 31, 1827, and 
March 18, 1830. Mrs. Osgood now resides 
with her daughter. Her husband died No- 
vember 8, i8go. Mrs. Cousins's paternal 
great-grandfather was Samuel Osgood. Her 
grandfather, Asa Osgood, who married Mary 
Hardy, was a well-known farmer and bridge 
builder in his day. Upon the maternal side 
her great-grandfather was James, known as 
"straight-haired Osgood," who married Abi- 
gail Evans, and for many years owned and 
conducted the old Oxford Hotel in this town. 
The maternal grandparents were James and 
Eliza (Lovejoy) Osgood, both of whom died 
in Fryeburg. Mrs. Cousins is a member of 
the Congregational church. 

In politics Mr. Cousins is a stanch sup- 
porter of the Republican party, though too 
much engrossed in business to desire or accept 
office. He is a Mason of Pythagorean Eodge, 
No. II, of this town. His present prosperity 
is entirely due to his personal energy and 
ability. 



-OHN A. RICHARD.S, M.D., the old- 
est and most successful medical practi- 
tioner in Farmington, Franklin County, 
Me., was born September 26, 1829, son 
of John and Mary (Thomas) Richards. His 
parents were then residing in the town of 
Strong, which was his birthplace. 

Dr. Richards's paternal grandfather, John 
Richards, Sr., at an early age began to follow 
the sea. He witnessed the burning of Fal- 
mouth, now Portland, during the Revolution- 
ary War, that event having occurred when he 
was sixteen years old; and later in life he be- 
came one of the early settlers of Durham, 



Me., where he owned a good farm, u[)on which 
he resided for the rest of his days. He was a 
progressive, industrious, antl successful farmer 
and a man of extraordinary physical jiowers, 
retaining his usual strength and activity until 
he was ninety-eight years old, when he be- 
came somewhat crippled from the effects of a 
fall. He continued to be otherwise vigorous 
and healthy, possessing iierfect contnd of his 
mental faculties to the last; and he lived to 
attain the unusually advanced age of one hun- 
dred years, eight months, and ten days. His 
wife al.so lived to reach a good old age. 
Their children were: John; Barzilla; Moses; 
and Ira, who is still living. 

John Richards, Dr. Richards's father, was 
born in Durham, Me., and in early manhood 
settled upOn a farm in Pliiliips, Franklin 
County. Selling his jjroperty a short time 
later, he removed to Strong, where he bought 
two hundred acres of wiUl land covered with 
heavy timber, cleared and improved a produc- 
tive farm, planted an orchaixl, and erected a 
good set of buildings. He was one of the 
sturdy pioneers whose persevering toil paved 
the way for the future development of the 
vast agricultural resources of this county; and 
he lived to see the work of progress attain an 
advanced and flourishing condition. He held 
several important town offices, supporting the 
Whig party in politics until the advent of the 
Republican movement, and subsequently act- 
ing with that party until his death, which 
took place when he was seventy-nine years 
old. His wife, who was before marriage 
Mary Thomas, was a native of Durham. .She 
became the mother of eight children, as fol- 
lows: Isaiah; James; Abbie M. ; Louise; 
John A., the subject of this sketch; P21iza; 
George; ami Elbridge. The children were 
carefully educated, being thus enabled to fill 
useful positions in life. Mrs. Mary T. Rich- 
ards lived to reach the age of sixty-five. Both 
parents attended the Congregational church. 

John A. Richards acquired his early educa- 
tion in the district schools; and, after complet- 
ing an academic course, he began the study 
of medicine with Dr. Edward Russell, of 
Strong and later of Lewiston. He graduated 
from the medical department of Bowdoin Col- 
lege with the class of 1854; and, returning to 



lilOGRAPHlCAL REVIEW 



Strong, he bought the practice of Dr. Russell, 
which he maintained and increased, and con- 
tinued to reside there for sixteen years. In 
i.Sjfi he moved to Farmington, where his prac- 
tice increased to such an extent as to necessi- 
tate his covering a very wide circuit. He 
act|uired and maintained an enviable reputa- 
tit)n for reliability and punctuality, but 
labored much beyond his strength. He con- 
tinued to attenil to his professional duties 
steadily and faithfully, without neglecting a 
single call, no matter how great was the dis- 
tance or how inclement the weather, until the 
present year, when bodily injuries of a more 
or less serious nature have caused him some 
annoyance in pursuing his daily routine of 
work. His practice in this town, although 
attended with severe labor and self-sacrifice, 
has been exceedingly successful, both profes- 
sionally and financially; and he occupies a 
position of high standing among his fellow- 
townsmen, by whom he is regarded as one of 
the most able physicians who ever practised in 
this locality. 

On June ii, 1S55, Dr. Richards was united 
in marriage with Sophronia Hillman, daughter 
of Gilbert R. and Mary (Pettingill) Hillman, 
of Farmington. Gilbert R. Hillman was born 
in Tisbury, Mass., on the island of Martha's 
Vineyard, March 16, 1802, and at the age of 
nineteen began to follow the sea. He became 
captain of a whale-ship; and after twenty-five 
years of seafaring life he relincjuished it to 
become one of the early pioneers of California, 
where he was for some time engaged in farm- 
ing and in transporting freight along the Sac- 
ramento River. He finally returned East, 
and settled upon a farm in the northern part 
of Farmington, where during the remainder 
of his active period he displayed energy and 
thrift, serving as a worthy example for others 
to follow. He married Mary, daughter of 
Abel and Doris (Davis) Pettingill, and reared 
eight children, namely: Robert; Sophronia, 
who is now Mrs. Richards; Marie; Margaret; 
Rebecca; Mary E. : Gilbert R., first, who is 
no longer living; and Gilbert R., second. 

Dr. and Mrs. Richards are the parents of 
four children, as follows: F'dward Russell, 
who was born June 27, 1857, and is now pub- 
lisher of the Wood River Xews-Mirror in 



Hailey, Idaho; Elmer Ellsworth, an account of 
whom will be found appended to this sketch; 
Effie May, who was born March 16, 1866, and 
is now an accomplished and successful music 
teacher; and Frank Morrison, who was born 
December 13, 1S68, and is now a taxidermist. 

In politics Dr. Richards is an earnest sup- 
porter of the Republican party; but his profes- 
sional duties have always prevented him from 
taking an active part in public affairs, and he 
has necessarily declined the nomination to 
various town and county offices. He was 
formerly connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and he is a member of 
the Unitarian church. He occupies a cen- 
trally located residence at 7 High Street, 
which he has remodelled, refitted, and other- 
wise improved. 

Elmer Ellsworth Richards, a leading attor- 
ney of Farmington and a prominent member 
of the Franklin County bar, son of Dr. Rich- 
ards, was born in Strong, August 24, i860. 
He was graduated from Bates College, Lewis- 
ton, in 1880. Deciding to adopt the legal 
profession, he studied law in the offices of 
J. B. Severy, Sr., and J. C. Holman, Esq., 
and later at the law school of Michigan Uni- 
versity. He has advanced rapidly in his 
profession, having a numerous clientage, and 
conducting a very successful general law busi- 
ness; and in 1884 he was elected Register of 
Probate for this county. 



^■•♦♦•»- 




ARSHALL SANDERSON, who,se 
death occurred February g, 187S, 
was for many years a conspicuous 
factor of the farming and indus- 
trial interests of Waterford, Oxford County, 
Me. He was a man of solid worth, and ]")os- 
sessed in a high degree those traits that com- 
mand respect in the business world and win 
the esteem and confidence of neighbors and 
associates. He was a son of Joseph .Sander- 
son, and was born July 10, 1821, in the town 
of Sweden, this county, joining Waterford. 

Joseph Sanderson, son of .Stephen .Sanderson 
and the father of Marshall, was born, reared, 
and married in Waterford, his union with Folly 
Bryant being the first marriage of native-born 
bride and groom solemnized in this town. 




f^^i- 



MARSHALL SANDERSON. 



BIOGRAl'IIICAL REVIEW 



203 



He settled in Sweden, where he was engaged 
as a farmer and mill operator during the larger 
part of his life, although he died in Dedham, 
Mass. His wife, who died in 1876, bore him 
five children, namely: Joseph, who married 
Mary French, of W'aterford, and was for sev- 
eral years Chief of Police in Cambridge, 
Mass., where both he and his wife died; Will- 
iam, a lumberman and farmer, who married 
Ruth Dresser, of Lovell, Me., both [massing 
their last years at Pomona, Cal. ; Marshall, 
who is the subject of this sketch; Charles, a 
speculator and farmer living in Massachusetts, 
who married Alnieda A. McW'ain ; and Mary 
J., now deceased, whose husband, Oliver 
Hapgood, was killed in the late Rebellion. 

Marshall Sanderson, who was the third 
child born to his ]iarents, obtained his educa- 
tion in the comnmn schools, and from his early 
years was engaged in industrial activities. 
]'"rom the time of his settlement in Waterford 
lie was numbered among the foremost agricult- 
urists and business men of the place, his mill- 
ing operations being as extensive and lucrative 
as his farming interests. He was a promi- 
nent memljer of the Democratic party, genu- 
inely interested in the welfare of his adopted 
town, which he served as Selectman several 
years. He was a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, belonging to a lodge of Waterford. 

Mr. Sanderson was married November 25, 
1S47, to Miss Angeline McWain, who was 
born in this town, April 13, 1829, a daughter 
of David and Laura (Willard) McWain, both 
natives of \ew Hampshire. Her father's 
birth occurred in 1784, and the mother's in 
1793. Mr. McWain removed from the Granite 
State to O.xford County, settling in the town 
of Waterford, where he was an extensive 
farmer and mill-owner, being at one time the 
proprietor of a section of land in this locality. 
Mr. McWain was twice married. His first 
\v\{e, Hannah Hailey, of New Hampshire, bore 
him four children — Jane, William, and two 
that died in infancy. l^y his union with Miss 
Laura Willard five children were born, as fol- 
lows : David, now living a retired life in New 
York, who has been twice married, his first 
wife having been Melissa Potter, and his sec- 
ond Mrs. Harriet Tracy, widow of Albert 
Tracy, of Lewiston, Me. ; Andrew, who died 



when young; Leavitt B. (deceased), who mar- 
ried Lorinda Gould, and was a farmer and 
mason in Milan, N. H. ; H. Angeline, who is 
now the widow of Mr. Sanderson, and resides 
at South Waterford; and Almeda A., now- 
deceased, who married Charles Sanderson, of 
Dedham, Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall .Sanderson had two 
children — Leroy and Josephine A. Leroy 
Sanderson, who is a prosjierous farmer and a 
prominent citizen of Waterford, married Miss 
P'lorence Shaw. Josephine A., who died 
June 8, 1884, was the wife of Robinson 
Hastings, a native of Bethel. 



rpTON. TIMOTHY JARXTS CART1{R, 
j-^-j iov .'Several years County Attorney of 
_\js I Oxford County, Maine, residing at 

— ' Paris Hill, and latei' a member of 
the Twenty-fifth Congress, was born August 
18, 1800, in the town of Bethel, Me., son of 
Dr. Timothy and P^rances (P'reeland) Carter. 
He was a descendant of the Rev. Thomas 
Carter, who was the first settled minister in 
Woburn, Mass. P'rom the history of that 
town we learn that Thomas Carter was born in 
England; was educated at St. John's College, 
Cambridge; came to America in 1635, being 
then a divinity student; lived for a time in 
Dedham, later in Watertown ; and a church, 
the First Congregational, having been gath- 
ered, "with much solemnity," in Wolmrn in 
August, 1642, he was ordained, and settled as 
its pastor on November 22, O. S. (or Decem- 
ber 2, N. S. ), of that year. He died in 1684, 
in the forty-second year of his ministry, sur- 
vived by his wife, Mary Daltoii, who died in 
1687. They had reared six children, inchifl- 
ing three sons, one of whom, named .Samuel, 
received a college education. 

Among the jiosterity of the Rev. Thomas 
Carter living in New lingland at the close of 
the century following his death, was Dr. Tim- 
othy Carter, above mentioned, born November 
29, 1760, who was the first of the family to 
.settle in Oxford County. He began the prac- 
tice of his profession in the town of Bethel in 
1798. He was very successful for many years, 
occupying a leading position among the promi- 
nent physicians of this county; and many 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



young men who .subsequent!)' acquired fame in 
their profession studied with him. He con- 
tinued his residence in Bethel until his death, 
February 25, 1S45, retaining to the last his 
active inHuence as physician, citizen, and 
counsellor. Dr. Carter was a strict Congre- 
gationalist in religion, and for manv years 
served as Deacon of the church. In [lolitics 
he was a Whig, and in his later years was a 
strong advocate of the temperance cause. 
For several years he was Justice of the Peace, 
and in this capacity much of the legal busi- 
ness of this county passed through his hands. 

Dr. Carter w-as twice married. His first 
wife, born September 4, 1771, was Frances, 
daughter of Dr. James Freeland, of Sutton, 
Mass. Her father was a surgeon in the Conti- 
nental arm\' in the Revolution, and subse- 
quently became a member of the Cincinnati 
Society. Mrs. Frances F. Carter died No- 
vember 14, 18 1 5, having borne her husband 
seven children, as follows: Lawson, born No- 
vember 20, 1793; Galen, born June 19, 1795; 
James F., born May 12, 1797; 1 imothy Jar- 
vis, the sjiecial subject of this sketch; Luther 
C, born February 25, 1805; Frances F., the 
only one now living, born September i, 1809, 
the widow of Robert A. Chapman, of Portland ; 
and Elias M., born September 10, iSii. Dr. 
Carter's second wife, Lydia, daughter of Theo- 
dore Russell, of Bethel, was the mother of 
three daughters and tw-o sons, namely : Lydia 
D., born March 22, 1S23; Sarah \V., born 
May 8, 1824; Abigail A., born April 9, 
1825; Theodore R. , born July 12, 1827; and 
l^enjamin, born July 4, 1832. Of these three 
are living — Mrs. Abigail A. Gould, of 
Worcester, Mass. ; and the two sons, both 
residents of Montclair, N.J. 

Timothy Jarvis Carter, Dr. Carter's fourth 
son, received his early education in some of 
the best schools of O.xford County. He pur- 
sued the study of law under Governor Enoch 
Lincoln at Paris Hill, and later at Judge 
Howe's Law School in Northampton, where 
he was graduated in 1824. Mr. Carter then 
entered the law office of F'essenden & DuBlois, 
and remained with them until his admission 
to the bar in February, 1827. Locating him- 
self first in Rumford, Me., he practised there 
for a year, then came to Paris, O.xford County, 



in 1829; and from that time until his death he 
was one of the most successful lawyers of this 
part of the State, standing high among hfs as- 
sociates. P^or several years Mr. Carter was 
County Attorney; and in 1836 he was elected 
a member of the Twenty-fifth Congress, in 
which he served two terms, dying while in 
Washington, D. C, March 14, 1838. In jjoI- 
itics he was a stanch Democrat, and he was 
liberal in his religious belfef. 

On September 11, 1828, Mr. Carter married 
Arabella Rawson, who was born in Paris, Ox- 
ford County, Me., February 22, 1807, and is 
still living in the house in which she first 
opened her eyes to the light of this world. 
Her father, Samuel Rawson, was born Septem- 
ber 4, 1771, in Sutton, Mass. ; and his wife, 
Polla, daughter of Dr. James Freeland, was 
born in Sutton, Mass., September 17, 1778. 
P^or further history of Mrs. Carter's ancestors 
see the "Rawson Genealogy and Memorial." 

The only child born to Mr. and Mrs. Carter 
was Samuel Rawson Carter, whose birth oc- 
curred June 22, 1829, in the house in which 
his widowed mother now lives. This house 
was built in 1789, and bought by Samuel 
Rawson in 1804. Samuel Rawson Carter was 
graduated at Union College, Schenectady, 
N. Y., in the class of 1852, and was admitted 
to the bar of Oxford County in 1854. He 
took an es[)ecial interest in having that bar sup- 
plied with a good law library, and was libra- 
rian and member of the bar as long as he lived. 
In politics he was a lifelong Democrat, firm 
and unchanging in principle, also an active 
supporter of every measure he thought would 
benefit the farming communit\- and his native 
town. He was for many years a communicant 
of the Lpijcopal church and always ready to 
give his best efforts to aid that church. He 
devoted much of his time to scientific pursuits, 
es])ecially to mineralogy and geology. He 
was one of the original owners of Mount Mica, 
noted for valuable tourmalines; and he left a 
valuable cabinet of Mount Mica minerals, also 
a large collection of other minerals and Indian 
relics. Samuel Rawson Carter was an asso- 
ciate member of the Boston and Portland So- 
cieties of Natural History and a correspond- 
ing member of the Academy of Natural Sci- 
ence in Philadelphia, and received diplomas 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



from biith of those societies. He was niairictl 
February 26, i<S57, to Julia, daughter of the 
Hon. ]{lijah L. and I{liza Choate Hamlin, 
resided in Paris, and dieil A])ril 24, 1893. 
His wife, Mrs. Julia Hamlin Carter, died 
August 12, 1S94. The}' had i)reviously been 
bereft of their son, a \'ery capable and promis- 
ing young man, whose brief record follows. 

Jarvis Livermore Carter, born I-"ebruar\- 11, 
1858, died August 4, 1892, only child of .Sam- 
uel Rawson and Julia Hamlin Carter. He 
was graduated at L'nion College, .Schenectatly, 
N. Y., and, having finished his education at 
Eastman's Business College, Poughkeepsie, 
N.Y. , afterward became connected as a ]iartner 
with the commercial and exporting house of 
W. l-:. Smith & Co. of New York City. He 
was an e.xjjert accountant, and managed in a 
most successful manner tlic finances of the 
firm, doing the business of a million dollars 
annually. He was a communicant of the 
Episcopal church and, like his father, a stable 
Democrat. June 12, 1883, he married Mary 
Blanche, onl\- child of Cullen E. and Eannie 
A. Carter, and aftei- his marriage resided in 
Brookh'n, .\. \'. Jar\'is Eivernn)re and Mary 
Blanche Carter were the |)arents of three chil- 
dren, namelv: Julia V., born .Se]itember 5, 
1884; Dorothea M., born April 8, 1887; and 
Jarvis Ereeland, born Jul\' 20, 1889, who died 
May 6, 1895. 

These two great-grand-daughters are the 
only living descendants of Timothy Jarvis and 
Arabella Rawson Carter. Mrs. Carter has 
preserved much interesting data lelating to 
the Rawson and Carter families. 

A woman of cultivated mind, well-read and 
thoughtful, notwithstanding that she is nearing 
the ninetieth milestone of life's journey, she 
retains the capacity of her earlier years and 
takes an active interest in passing events. 

Some choice spirits of earth happily grow 
not old, but, filled with childlike trust and 
broad human sympathy, pass as cheerily down 
the sunset slopes " as up the hills of morn. " 



/^^TTlbERT MILEER, Sheriff of Frank- 
V 5 I lin County, proprietor of the Wilton 
House, and one of the most promi- 
nent business men in this town, was born in 



Wilton, Octolx-r 20, 1826, son of David antl 
Ik'tsey (Pierce) Miller. The family is of 
early Colonial origin, its founder having, no 
doubt, emigrated from bjigland or Scotland; 
but his name, as well as the jjlace of his na- 
tivity and date of arrival in America, cannot 
now be ascertained. 

The first ancestor nf whom there is any 
authentic knowledge was Robert Miller, who 
resided in I''all River, Mass., where he fol- 
lowed ship-carpentering and farming. He was 
the father of seven children, including four 
sons — namely, John, Job, Robert, and David 
— all of whom were carpenters and farmers, and 
resided upon the Taunton River. David 
Miller, son of Robert and grandfather of Gil- 
bert Miller, settled upon a large farm in Fall 
River, which is now the property of his grand- 
son, another Gilbert Miller, a cousin of the 
subject of this sketch. David Miller served 
as a soldier in the French anil Indian War, 
and participated in the siege and capture of 
Uuebec under General Wolfe. He married 
Hannah Merrick, and reared a family of nine 
children; namely, John, Ebenezer, Job, Isaac 
M., Gilbert, David, Hannah. Abbv, and 
Polly. 

David Miller, son of David and Hannah 
(Merrick) Miller, was born in b'all River, 
February 22, 1787. While still young he 
shi])ped as a cabin boy, and, later becoming 
an able seaman, remained in the merchant 
service for fifteen years. Tiring of sea life, 
and not desiring to rear his sons in a locality 
where they were liable to become sailors, he 
visited his sister, Mrs. Maconiber, who was 
living in Wilton, Me., and, being favorably 
impressed with the country, decided to settle 
here. Purchasing the Gooclell farm of eighty 
acres, which he improved b)- I'emodelling the 
house and erecting a new barn, he continued to 
reside here until his death, which took place 
March 15, 1849. The property is now occli- 
pied by John Miller. Although for many 
years a sailor, he readily adapted himself to 
agricultural pursuits, developing a capacity 
for tilling the soil and raising stock which 
enabled him to attain a degree of prosperity 
equal to the majority of his neighbors who 
had been reared and trained to farm life; and 
he was esteemed and respected by the entire 



206 



BIOGRAnilCAL REVIEW 



communit}'. lie was a Whig in politics and 
lil:)eral in religious views. His wife, Betsey 
Pierce, whom he married June 20, 1813, was 
born in Somerset, Mass., August 26, 1794. 
She became the mother of eight children, 
namely: Julia A.; David; Eliza; Betsey; 
John; Gilbert, the subject of this sketch; 
James C. ; and Nathan R. Mrs. Betsey P. 
Miller possessed a remarkably strong constitu- 
tion, and lived to reach the advanced age of 
ninety-three years. 

Gilbert Miller, the third son as here enu- 
merated, and the special subject of this sketch, 
was educated in the schools of his native 
town, and resided with his parents until he 
was twenty-one years old. He then engaged 
in peddling confectionery, cigars, tobacco, and 
Yankee notions for E. J. Smith, later repre- 
senting J. Richards in the same line of trade: 
and after travelling through the country with 
a team for seven years, during which time he 
realized good financial results, he bought a 
farm of one hundred and fifty acres in the 
town of Temple. Selling this property a 
year later, he moved back to Wilton, where he 
purchased the M. Luffkin farm, upon which 
he resided from i<S57 to 1876. He remodelled 
the residence, and built a new stable; and, 
besides keeping well forward in the line of 
progress as a general farmer, he dealt largely 
in cattle, sheep, and horses, most of which he 
bought in the home market. Having pur- 
chased his present hotel jjroperty in 1873, he 
began to manage it in 1876, coming here 
with his family. Having sold his farm build- 
ings with five acres of land, he still retains 
the remainder of his farm, which he carries on 
in connection with the house. Since becom- 
ing proprietor of the Wilton House, he has 
made various improvements, including the en- 
largement of the building, which now contains 
eighteen light and well-furnished sleeping- 
rooms; and connected with it are a good stable 
for baiting purposes and a spacious hall for 
public use. He also owns a valuable farm of 
one hundred and fiftv acres in the town of fav, 
which he rents to good advantage; and, be- 
sides attending to a great amount of private 
business, he has been intrusted with the set- 
tlement of many estates, and has held various 
town offices. Mr. Miller served as Hiffh 



Sheriff eight years, as Deputy Sheriff eighteen 
years, and as Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men for twelve years, in all of which capaci- 
ties he established an honorable record as a 
capable and upright jnililic official. In poli- 
tics he has been a firm supporter of Republi- 
can principles ever since the formation of that 
party. 

In November, 1852, Mr. Miller married 
Martha A. Lord, his first wife, who was born 
in New Sharon, October 20, 1830. She died 
May 2, 1868, leaving seven children, as fol- 
lows: Erank G. , who was born September 3, 
1853, and died September 2, 1872; Ida M., 
who was born June 30, 1855, and married 
Lester P. Hiscock, a prosperous merchant of 
East Brookfield, Mass. ; Horace, who was born 
December i, 1856, and died at the age of 
twenty years; Clarence A., a successful livery 
stable keeper of Wilton, who was born Sep- 
tember 5, i860, married Emma Wilkins, and 
has two children — -N. Maud and Clifford G. ; 
Nathan R., who was born November 29, 1862, 
married Lillian Lake, and is now assisting his 
father in business; Carrie N. , who was born 
April II, 1864, and is now the wife of Milton 
Holmes; and Lydia E., who was born October 
I, 1865, and married P'red Young, an ener- 
getic miller of New Sharon. Mr. Miller's 
present wife was before marriage Nellie M. 
Woodbury. She is a daughter of the Rev. 
J. M. Woodbury. By this union there is one 
son, P'rank G. , who was born July 19, 1879. 

Mr. Miller is still engaged in attending to 
his business affairs, and goes about with the 
activity of a much younger man. He takes a 
liberal view of religious matters, and is a 
member of Williamson Lodge, No. 20, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd I'ellows. 




ILLIAiM EDWARD SAK(;i:NT. 
Principal of Hebron Academy, in 
O.xford County, was born in San- 
ford, York County, Me., on May 23, 1856. 

His father, the late Rev. Walter Taylor 
Sargent, was born in Methuen, Mass., in 
1809; and his mother, Mrs. Joan G. Quint 
Sargent, was born in Bowdoinham, Me., in 
1829. The Rev. Walter Taylor .Sargent was 
a well-known divine in his dav, his life being 




-•^f '«»■ 




WILLIAM E- SARGENT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKAV 



209 



devoted to preaching the gospel in many dif- 
ferent localities. He died at Freeport, Me., 
in 1886, his wife having gone before him in 
1885. They were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, eight of whom are yet living; namely, 
Mary Ellen, Maria Frances, Susan Jane, 
Sarah Elizabeth, Anna Louise, Emma Caro- 
line, William lulward, and Alice Crosby 
Sargent. 

An only son, William E. Sargent passed his 
boyhood in many different towns of Maine, 
as his father mo\ed from one place to another 
in attending to ministerial duties, princi|ially 
staying in the towns of Greene, Dexter, Rich- 
mond, and Freeport. Young Sargent received 
his early education in the public schools of the 
towns in which he resided, and prepared him- 
self for college under the supervision of the 
Re\-. j. J. Hulfinch, of Freepnit, who was a 
friend of his father. 

He entered ]5owdoin College in 1874, and 
was graduated in the class of 1S78. In April 
of that year he acce])ted the position of princi- 
pal of the high school of Topsham, which he 
lield for a period of two years, at the expira- 
tion of which time he went to Freeport, where 
he had charge of the high school until 1885, 
when he was called to Hebron Academy. 
Here he has remained ever since. 

What Professor Sargent has done for the 
academy in these years must be seen to he 
thoroughly understood and appreciated, but it 
might be well to say a few disinterested words 
on the subject. He has from the very first 
given his strict attention to building up 
the school in every desirable way. To-day 
Hebron Academy is universally acknowledged 
as one of the best fitting schools in all New 
England. Its high standing is in a great 
measure due to the utter devotion and strenu- 
ous labor that Professor Sargent has sjient 
upon the work for over a decade; and liberal 
support has been accorded the dear old .school 
by its numerous and generous friends, who 
were influenced by the stirring appeals and un- 
tiring efforts made by Professor Sargent in its 
behalf and by his example of devotion and self- 
sacrifice. 

William F.. Sargent was married on August 
20, 1S83, to Ella C. M. Hale, of My.stic, 
Conn. They have no children. Mr. and 



Mrs. Sargent are earnest as well as active 
members of the Baptist church. In ])olitics 
the Professor is a stanch Republican. He is 
a member of l-'reeport Lodge, No. 23, A. F. 
& A. M., at iMceport, Me., also a member of 
Harraseeket Lodge, No. 30, of the Knights of 
Pythias at Freeport, and of Pejepscot Lodge, 
No. 13, Inde|)endenl ( )rder of Odd P\'llowsat 
Brunswick. 

Hebion Academy was foiiiKkd in 1804 bv 
two God-fearing, strong-hearted men — lilder 
John Trip|i and Deacon William Harrows. 
John Tri])p perhaps was the more instrumental 
of the two in the actual conception and foun- 
dation of the schfjol. 

■ John Tripp was born in Dartmouth, now 
Fairhaven, on March 25, 1761, the son of 
Jesse Tripp. In his early y(aith even he 
began to show that he was destined to be a 
grave and serious man, deeply religious in 
thought and feeling. In 1774, before he was 
fourteen years of age, he vohmtarilv connected 
himself with the Second Pa|)tist Church of 
Middleboro, Mass. A short time later he 
went into the ranks of the Continental army, 
showing decisively that he could not only 
pray, but fight. He conducted himself 

throughout the \vai- with the greatest heroism 
and honor. 

In 1787, some time after the wai-, he re- 
ceived a license to ]:)reach the gospel. After 
twelve years o'f wandering from ]jlace to place, 
twelve years of exhausting work, both men- 
tally and ]ihysically, twelve years of earnest 
endeavor to do good, not one time and then 
another time, but all the t.ime — in fine, twelve 
years of the life of an old-fashioned Christian 
preacher, bringing the gospel on foot or on 
horseback through a sparsely populated coun- 
try, with long distances to traverse and no 
time to stay except to exhort and attemjDt to 
convert, he finally settled down in Hebron, 
arriving here on July 5, 1798. The journey 
from Portland was made with a horse and cart 
— John Tripp, his wife, and one child in 
arms on the liorse, and the rest of the children, 
with the household goods in the wagon. He 
settled on the farm where his descendants still 
live. He had married shortly after or during 
the war a lady of P'rench descent named Expe- 
rience Deland. She bore him ten children. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



all of whom are now dead. W'licn he came to 
Hebron the whole place was new and wild. 
There were no road.s, only narrow bridle paths. 
The woods were full of bear, deer, fo.xes, and 
other game. His first house was built of 
rough-hewn square logs. 

Always interested in educational matters 
and expecting to spend the rest of his life 
here, he with a friend. Deacon William Bar- 
rows, conceived a plan for instituting a school, 
as had been done long before in Plymouth, 
and as quaintly expressed there "for the better 
education of the youthe of the towne and the 
better employement of their time."' This 
scheme, planned by the two worthies in 1804, 
was carried into effect in the next year, 1805; 
and the first academy was erected. The first 
church, which was organized with a member- 
ship of thirteen persons on August 23, 1791, 
was finally established in a substantial build- 
ing in 1820. Of this church Elder Tripp was 
a devoted supporter. His wife died on May 
20. 1835. John Tripp himself died on Sep- 
tember 16, 1847, after a long and useful life. 
The school thu.s established for the benefit of 
the generations that were to follow him has 
done remarkably well in every way that he 
himself wouUl have desired. 

The academy itself is very advantageously 
situated on high land among the picturesque 
hills of Oxford County, Maine. All con- 
nected with the place, the scenery, the care 
exerted, the instruction, the amusement pro- 
vided, all tend to give the Hebron students, as 
their well-beloved principal says of them, 
"a spirit that identifies them wherever you 
find them. Thev have the qualities of strong, 
earnest men and women. They know how to 
use the shovel and hold the plough, know how 
to economize. " 

How the friends and benefactors of Hebron 
Academy feel toward the old institution, and 
what they do for it, as well as how their gifts 
are received and in what spirit, is also best 
shown by a few words from the address made 
by Professor Sargent on the dav the class of 
1896, composed of thirty strong-minded, ear- 
nest boys and girls, graduated. He says of 
the late Mr. Sturtevant, a dear friend of 
Hebron Academy, among other things (chief 
among these things being an expression of the 



great thanks and the just praise due Mr. Stur- 
tevant) : 'T went and saw him. Mr. Sturte- 
vant in his mild way told a story or two, just 
to collect his thoughts and get them down into 
a crystallized form. When he got down to 
business he said, 'I have made up my mind to 
gi\e you ten thousand dollars to start with.' 
But that was not all." And Professor Sargent 
goes on to tell how he had helped them in 
every way, how he had asked their plans, sug- 
gested, formed new ones, and done everything 
to help the school to raise all the money it 
needed for improvements. At length, owing 
to the generosity and efforts of Mr. Sturtevant, 
and the energy and devotion displayed by Pro- 
fessor Sargent, the requisite sum, and more 
than that, has been raised, a sum that no great 
university need be ashamed to accejjt as a gift 
— fifty thousand dollars. 

The academy, which is in truth what Pro- 
fessor Sargent has set forth in his modest but 
attractive circular, a splendidly endowed fit- 
ting school for Colby University, makes an 
ideal place for study. It was founded as we 
know "by praying patriots of the Revolution." 
Among the great names that have been in- 
scribed, in the youth of their distinguished 
bearers, on the roll of honor of the old acad- 
emy, are those of Hannibal Hamlin, John D. 
Long, ex-Governor of Massachusetts, William 
Pitt Fessenden, and Senator Plugene Hale. 
The academy offers- fine advantages in every 
line, three courses of studv, college, classi- 
cal, and pjiglish, together with year-in and 
year-out de]iartments in music and ]3ainting, 
and a fine gymnasium, being a few of them. 

Professor Sargent is known and admired as 
a most successful teacher; and his friends hope 
he will remain at the head of Hebron Acad- 
emy for many years to come, continuing, as 
he has always done, to increase the prosperity 
and renown of this ancient and revered insti- 
tution. 



■QHN WARD, senior member of the 
firm John Ward & Co., Fryeburg, 
Oxford County, manufacturers of and 
dealers in carriages and sleighs, was 
born in this town, August 26, 1838, son of 
Jonathan Hale and Harriet (Durgin) Ward. 



BIOGRAPIirCAT. REVIEW 



His grandfnthcr, Jonathan Ward, was a clock- 
maker by trade ; and many of the old and re- 
liable time-pieces now doing service in Frye- 
burg are the work of his hands. Jonathan 
married Rachel Abbott, a native of Conconl, 
N. H.; and both died in this town. 

Jonathan Hale Ward, who was born in Frye- 
burg, entered the lumber business in his early 
manhood, and subsequently became an exten- 
sive speculator in timber lands. He was also 
the proprietor of the Oxford Hotel in Frye- 
burg village for several years. Leaving the 
reputation of an able business man, he died in 
1 84 1, being then in the prime of life. The 
interment of his remains was the first made in 
the present town cemetery. His wife, Har- 
riet, was a native of Fryeburg and a daughter 
of Joshua Durgin, an early settler of this 
town. Her father, a native of Massachusetts, 
who was a tanner and currier, and followed 
those trades in connection with farming, 
passed his last days in F"r)eburg. Jonathan 
Hale Ward and his wife were the parents of 
four children, as follows: Fanny L. , who be- 
came the wife of James F". Webster, a pros- 
perous farmer of Conway, N. H., both now de- 
ceased; Henry D., who is a machinist by 
trade, and resides in Worcester, Mass. ; John, 
the subject of this sketch; and Harriet D., 
the wife of Henry Putnam, a well-to-do 
farmer of Worcester, Mass. The mother lived 
to the age of seventy-six years. 

John Ward was left fatherless when a mere 
child. At the age of eleven he went to Rridg- 
ton, Cumberland County, where he lived in 
the family of Henry Smith for four years. 
During the succeeding five years he resided 
with Augustus Carsley upon a farm in that 
town. His education was acquired in the 
common schools and at the Bridgton Academy. 
When at the age of twenty, he began to learn 
the carriage-maker's trade with William F. 
Perry, now the proprietor of a large factory in 
Bridgton. After remaining with Mr. Perry 
for six months he engaged with Thomas F. 
Mead, under whose direction he finished his 
apprenticeship. He then worked as a 
journeyman for Burnham & Mead in Bethel, 
Me., for two years. Coming to Fryeburg in 
i860, he, in company with his uncle, com- 
menced the manufacture of carriages under 



the firm nLune- of A. C. & John Ward. 
Three years later Thomas F. Mead bought an 
interest in the business, and the firm became 
known as Mead & Ward. A Hourishing trade 
was carried on for four years, and B. M. 
Glines then became a partner under the pres- 
ent title of John Ward & Co. This firm man- 
ufactures all kinds of carriages and other 
vehicles, carries a varied stock of carriages 
and sleighs of other manufacture, also does 
general repairing and mill work. 

In January, 1871, Mr. Wartl was united in 
marriage to Augusta L. Mead, who was born 
in North l?ridgton, daughter of Thomas H. 
Mead. Mr. Mead was a successful merchant, 
was very prominent in political affairs, and 
served as Treasurer of Cumberland County for 
several yean-s. Mr. and Mrs. Ward are the 
parents of two children, namely: Augustus 
H., who works in his father's factory, and is 
an able machinist; and Thomas Hale, who re- 
sides with his parents. In politics Mr. Ward 
is an earnest supporter of Republican prin- 
ciples, but has never aspired to prominence in 
public affairs. He has always applied him- 
self to his calling with industry, and as a re- 
sult has worked his way forward to his present 
business success. He has many friends both 
in business and social circles, and is a mem- 
ber of Pequaket Lodge, No. 34, Knights of 
Pvthias. 




LOXZO B. ADAMS, M.D., of Wil- 
ton, a member of the United States 
Board of Examiners in pension 
cases, a veteran of the Civil War, 
is one of the leading physicians and surgeons 
of Franklin County. He was born in Wilton, 
July 8, 1843, son of Charles K. aiul Julia A. 
(Miller) Adams. His grandparents were 
Moses and Martha (Kinney) Adams, the 
former of whom was a prosperous farmer and 
a well-known resident of Wilton in his day; 
and the paternal and maternal ancestry of Dr. 
Adams were representatives of highly repu- 
table families. 

Charles K. Adams, son of Moses and 
Martha Adams, continued to reside with his 
parents after attaining his majority, caring for 
them in their declining years, and finally sue- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ceeding to the ownership of the homestead of 
one hundred and fifty acres. He was success- 
ful both as a general farmer and a live stock 
dealer, buying large numbers of cattle and 
sheep, which he shipped and drove to Reading 
and Brighton. Able, industrious, and pro- 
gressive, he remodelled his residence, erected 
new barns, and made other notable improve- 
ments in his i)ro|ierty. Being stricken with 
tyi^hoid fever, from which he was unable to 
rally, he died at the age of fifty-four years. 
In public affairs he was prominent and in- 
fluential, having followed the majority of the 
Whig element into the ranks of the Republi- 
can party at its formation; and, as a member 
of the Board of Selectmen and as a Represent- 
ative to the legislature, he displayed such 
marked ability in sustaining and forwarding 
the principles of good government as to re- 
ceive the hearty commendation and approval 
of the voters in general, as well as his con- 
stituents. His wife, who was before marriage 
Julia A. Miller, became the mother of ten 
children, namely: Charles N.; Josephine: 
Alonzo B., the subject of this sketch; a child 
who died in infancy; Abbie; Madeline; 
Irandus: l{lla F. : another who died in in- 
fancy; and Frank \V. Mrs. Julia A. Ailams 
died of consumiJtion at the age of forty-si.x 
years. She and her husband attended the 
Free Will Baptist church, and were generous 
contributors toward its support. 

Alonzo B. Adams, the second son, the date 
of whose birth is given above, acquired his 
early education in the jiublic schools, where 
he labored diligently with the view of subse- 
quently pursuing the higher branches of 
study; but at the age of nineteen his patriot- 
ism overweighed his desire in this direction, 
and on August 4, 1862, he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company C, Sixteenth Regiment, 
Maine Volunteer Infantry, for service in the 
Civil War. On December 13 of the same 
year, while participating in the battle of 
Fredericksburg, he received a serious wound 
just above the left ankle, which made amputa- 
tion necessary; and, after passing through one 
operation at Alexandria, he was in 1865 
obliged to suffer the inconvenience of another 
amputation. When suflficiently recovered to 
resume his studies he entered the Maine 



Wesleyan Seminary at Kent's Hill, where he 
was graduated in 1866, and, after reading 
medicine with Dr. Russell, of Farmington, 
he matriculated at the Bowdoin College Med- 
ical School, where he was graduated with the 
class of i86g. Locating for practice in 
Strong, Me., he remained there three and one- 
half years, at the expiration of which time he 
returned to Wilton, where he bought the prac- 
tice of Dr. Peaslee, and has since resided 
here. As a skilful and reliable physician and 
surgeon, he has not only acquired a high repu- 
tation throughout the wide section included 
within his circuit, but he is frequently called 
to distant parts, either to personally treat diffi- 
cult cases or in consultation with other prac- 
titioners; and his professional success has 
been upward and onward from the commence- 
ment. Soon after his establishment in Wil- 
ton he bought the Hall residence on High 
Street, which he has greatly improved; and in 
1893 he erected upon the premises a hand- 
some office and operating-room, which is fur- 
nished and equipped with all modern conven- 
iences. 

On July 12, 1870, Dr. Adams was united in 
marriage with Mary C. Fletcher, daughter of 
David and Sarah (Stickney) Fletcher, of this 
town. Earl Adams, one of the two children 
born of this union, died at the age of twenty- 
one months ; and the other, Lynne F. Adams, 
who was born March 7, 1877, is now a student 
at Colby University. 

In the Masonic fraternity Dr. Adams is 
well advanced, being a Past Master of Wilton 
Lodge; a member of Franklin Chapter, 
Jephthah Council, Pilgrim Commandery, 
Knights Templars; and the Maine Consistory. 
He is Past Grand of Williamson Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and Past Chief 
Patriarch of the encampment; is connected 
with the Foresters and the Order of the 
Golden Cross; and as a comrade of the Grand 
Army of the Republic he has held all of the 
important offices of R. C. Woodman Post, No. 
18, has been Junior Vice-Commander and Sur- 
geon of the department, and a delegate to the 
national encampment. He holds an appoint- 
ment upon the Board of L^nited States Pension 
Examiners, and he acted in an important ca- 
pacity in the United States census enumera- 




JOHN M. STEVENS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2'S 



tion of 1870. In politics he acts with the 
Republican party, and he ably filled the office 
of Town Treasurer for three years. Dr. and 
Mrs. Adams are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



OHN M. STEVENS, one of the oldest 
practical farmers of Canton, 0.\ford 
CoLuity, i\Ie., who is about to retire 
from the toil of the fields, was born in 
this town, November 25, 1826, son of Aaron 
and Susan (Conant) Stevens. The farm upon 
which Mr. Stevens has spent his life up to the 
present time, the autumn of 1896, was cleared 
from the wilderness by his grandfather, Jere- 
miah Stevens; and it has been held bv the 
family until quite recently. 

Jeremiah Stevens was a native of Massachu- 
setts, and served in the Revolutionary War. 
In 1805 he came to Canton as a pioneer, and 
lived in a log house until he had cleared his 
farm and erected frame buildings. With un- 
abated energy he continuetl to till the soil 
until the time of his death, which took place 
when he was si.xty years old. Me was a Dem- 
ocrat in politics and a strict Baptist in his 
religious views. He was the father of si.x 
children, three sons and three daughters, of 
whom Aaron, Mr. J. Af. Stevens's father, was 
the youngest. None are now living. 

Aaron Stevens was born in Methuen, Mass. 
He was a small boy when he accompanied his 
parents to Canton, where he eventually suc- 
ceeded to the possession of the homestead. 
A strong, able-bodied man, he was an indus- 
trious farmer and a useful citizen. He died 
in 1880, at the age of eighty-two years. In 
politics he supported the Republican party dur- 
ing the later years of his life, and in his relig- 
ious belief he was a Universalist. He antl his 
wife, formerly Susan Conant, who was a na- 
tive of I5ridgewater, Mass., reared two chil- 
dren, namely: John M., the subject of this 
sketch ; and Susan, who is now Mrs. Stubbs, 
and resides in Canton. Mr. Stevens's mother 
lived to reach the age of eighty-four years, 
and died in 1885. 

An only son, John M. Stevens was educated 
in the district schools of Canton, and grew to 
manhood as a farmer. He has followed that 



occupation at tlie homestead, which he in- 
herited from his father, and has made a good 
record for himself as an energetic and exceed- 
ingly successful agriculturist. He has also 
dealt in stock and horses to a considerable ex- 
tent, and has accjuireil a high reputation 
throughout this section ftir his honesty and re- 
liability. With the intention of retiring from 
active labor, he has recently sold his landed 
property, consisting of over three hundred 
acres, to the Portland & Rumford Railroad 
Company; and the purchasers are to take pos- 
session as soon as he has harvested his crops. 

Mr. Stevens has never married. He is lib- 
eral in his ideas concerning religious matters, 
and in politics he acts with the Republican 
party. He is connected with the lodge of In- 
dependent 'Order of Odd F"el lows' in Canton, 
and is highly respected by the entire connini- 
nity as an upright, conscientious man ;uul a 
worthv citizen. 




HARLES P. BARTEETT, a wealthy 
farmer and influential citizen of Han- 
over, O.xford County, was born in 
this town, August 18, 1842, son of 
Stephen and Martha (Stearns) Bartlett. 
Peregrin Bartlett, the father of Stephen, was 
a native of Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 
whence he came to Oxford County, Maine, 
about the year 1793, accompanied by several 
of his brothers. He purchased about three 
hundred acres of land, and spent the re- 
mainder of his life in clearing and cultivating 
it. He died at si.xty-si.x years of age. His 
son, Stephen, who was born here, became a 
stirring, progressive farmer and stock raiser. 
In politics he was a Democrat, and he served 
in nearly all the town offices. He died at 
fifty-two years of age. His wife, Martha 
Stearns Bartlett, was a native of Bethel, this 
county, where she resided until her marriage. 
She died in Hanover when seventy-six years 
old, leaving three children — Sarah, widow of 
Charles Ivons, residing in Lowell, Mass. ; 
Charles P. ; and Solon, a physician in Lowell, 
Mass. 

Charles P. Bartlett was educated in the 
common schools. He has always resided on 
the old homestead faim, the one purchased by 



2l6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his graiultathcr in 1793, located near Newry 
on the ■An(h'oscoL;gin River. He also owns 
about twenty thousand acres of wild timber 
land, the greater part of which is in Oxford 
County. He is one of the leading lumbermen 
in the county, anil until recently was exten- 
sively engaged in stock raising. On April 
23, i8gi, Mr. Hartlett was married to Miss 
Martha E. Hartlett, of Hanover. They have 
two sons — Alton F. and Charles F. In poli- 
tics Mr. Bartlett is a Democrat, and, though 
declining office, exerts no small influence in 
local matters, his social position and natural 
ability qualifying him as a leader. 




iLINTON V. .STARBIRl), an exten- 
sive lumber manufacturer of the town 
of Strong, and Chairman of the 
Hoard of Selectmen, was born in 
Freeman, Me., August 14, 1868. He is a 
son of Amos IJ. and Mary J. (Gilkey; Star- 
bird, natives of P'reeman, now residing in 
Florida, and grandson of Moses Starbird, who 
moved to Freeman from Gorham, Me., and 
was a prosperous farmer through life. 

Amos D. Starbird was for several years en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and lumbering 
in the town of Freeman; but he removed later 
to Orange County, Florida, where he is now 
residing, and is identified with the lumber 
interests of that region. His wife, Mary J. 
Gilkey, is a daughter of Captain John Gilkey, 
who moved from Lisbon to this county when 
a young man, and became a well-to-do farmer 
in Freeman. Mr. and Mrs. Amos D. Starbird 
have had eight children, as follows: Edwin 
R., who wedded Mattie Thompson, and is now 
a photographer of Brunswick, Me. ; Albert 
W., who married Leola Weymouth, and is 
now a photographer in Florida; Rose I., wife 
(jf W. T. Hinds, a lumber operator and manu- 
facturer of Phillips, Me.; Clinton \'., of 
Strong, to be further mentioned in the next 
paragraph; Lionel F., who died at the age of 
twenty-three years: Austin C, who married 
Cora Love, and is now in the lumber business 
with his father in Florida; Adelbcrt M. and 
I'ercivilla L., both of whom are residing in 
I*"lorida, engaged in the lumber business. 

Clinton \'. Starbinl acquired his education 



in the common schools. At the age of twenty- 
one he went to Erie County, Pennsylvania, 
and worked in a grist-mill for a year. He 
then engaged in lumbering, and for the next 
three years contracted quite extensively for 
the cutting of timber. He next operated a 
saw-mill in l-'reeman, Me., where he contin- 
ued in business for four years; and then re- 
moving to Strong he built a mill, and engaged 
in the manufacturing of lumber. Since locat- 
ing here his business has developed into large 
proportions, requiring additions to his plant 
from time to time, in order to meet the in- 
creasing demand for his products; and aside 
from sawing all kinds of buikling material, 
including hard-wood flooring and shingles, he 
makes a specialty of manufacturing packing- 
cases, which are shipped in large quantities to 
Portland, Boston, and Providence, R.I. Al- 
though he has met with serious reverses, hav- 
ing passed through two disastrous fires, he has 
recovered the lost ground, and his business, 
to which he has steadily applied himself, is 
now in a most flourishing condition. In poli- 
tics he supports the Republican party. He 
was elected a Selectman in 1894, and is now 
Chairman of the Board. 

On June 23, 1886, Mr. Starbinl was united 
in marriage with Flora A. Kilkenney, of New 
Vineyard. She is a daughter of James and 
Ellen (Brackley) Kilkenney, ]3ros|ierous farm- 
ing people of New X'ineyard. Mr. and Mrs. 
Starbird have one son, Raymond A., who was 
born F"ebruary 26, iSgi. 

Mr. Starbird is Treasurer of Dax'is Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., of Strong, acts in the same 
capacity for Marathon Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, and is also a member of the Order of 
the Golden Cross. He occupies a [irominent 
place among the business men of Franklin 
County, and is universally respected and es- 
teemed. Mrs. Starbird is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



IRAM MILLETT EVERETT, for- 
merly a well-known and highly es- 
l9 I teemed resident of Hebron, who 

died at his home in this town in 
April, 1S93, was born in Norway, Me., No- 
vember 2, 1 81 8, son of Peter and Charlotte 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



■'7 



(Parkhurst) I-^vcictt. The late iMr. I^verett 
was of French descent. His grandfather, Peter 
Everett, a native of France, is said to have 
accompanied General Lafayette to America 
for the purpose of assisting the patriots in 
their struggle for independence; antl while 
serving in the Continental army he lost an 
arm. Deciding to become a citizen of the 
Republic which he had so gallantly assisted 
in founding, he settled in Norway, Me., of 
which town he was one of the earliest pioneers; 
and he died at a good old age. His wife, who 
was a widow Burn.s, a lady of much ability 
and intelligence, is said to have been the first 
woman teacher in Norway, teaching school in 
her own house before school-houses were built. 
She and her husband reared three children, 
namely: John; Susannah; and Peter, Jr. 

Peter Everett, Jr., Mr. Plverett's father, was 
born in Norway, and became a sturdy, indus- 
trious man and a worthy citizen. From Nor- 
■ way he moved to Poland, Me., where the last 
years of his life were passed; and he died there 
at the age of seventy-four years. He was ex- 
ceedingly prosperous, his natural ability caus- 
ing him to be successful in whatever he under- 
took; and he provided his large family with a 
comfortable home and a common-school educa- 
tion. In politics he was originally a Whig, 
but in his later years he voted with the Repub- 
lican party. His wife, Charlotte Parkhur.st, 
became the mother of eleven children, ten sons 
and one daughter; and of these five are living. 
Mr. Everett's mother lived to be si.xty-three 
years old. She was a member of the Methodist 
]{piscopal church. 

Hiram Millett I^verett passed his boyhood 
in Norway, and was educated in the di.strict 
schools. At the age of fourteen he began life 
for himself by learning the cooper's trade, 
which he followed during the winter season, 
working as a farm laborer in the summer; and 
he continued thus employed until he was 
twenty-six years old. Being of a prudent and 
economical turn of mind, he husbanded his 
earnings, and bought his father's estate in 
Norway, which, however, he held but a short 
time. In 1844 he married Cordelia Barrows 
Marshall, of Hebron. Selling his property in 
Norway, he bought a farm in East Hebron, 
and lived thereon for three years. From East 



Hebron he moved to Poland, where he resided 
for the succeeding three years, engaged in 
farming; and from Poland he removed to Minot 
Corner, and while living in that place he 
learned the shoemaker's trade. A little later 
he returned to Hebron, where he purchased a 
farm and followed agricultural pursuits in con- 
nection with shoemaking for the rest of his 
life, which terminated at the age of nearly 
seventy-five years. He left a widow, one son, 
and a daughter-in-law. Industrious and an 
able business man, possessing rare judgment 
in regard to the value of lands, he succeeded 
in accumulating a good estate, owning at one 
time over three hundred acres. In politics he 
supported the Republican party, by which he 
was for several years elected to the offices of 
Constable and Collector; and he attended the 
Baptist church, of which his wife is a member. 
Mrs. Cordelia B. Everett has had four chil- 
dren, as follows: Anna Delphina, who was 
born August 27, 1845, and died Ajjril 3, 1853; 
Persian V., who was born July 5, 1847; Jus- 
tin, who was born February 12, 1854, and 
died April 17, 1859; and Anna Bethany, who 
was born March 13, 1862, married Henry K. 
Stearns, of Paris, Me., and died June 19, 
1888, leaving one daughter, (Jra B. Persian 
V. Everett, the only survivor of Mrs. Everett's 
children, served as a private in the Thirtieth 
Regiment, Maine Veteran Volunteers, the last 
year of the Civil War, and is now a prosperous 
farmer in this town. He married Ella Has- 
kell, and has three children, namely: Minnie 
L. , who is now Mrs. P'ernald, and has one 
daughter, Marion Faye ; Charles H. ; and Mar- 
garet L. Mrs. Everett has four grandchildren 
and one great-grandchild. She still resides in 
Hebron, where she is well known and highly 
respected. 




VRUS P. P:AT0N, Superintendent of 
the Rumford Falls Light and Water 



Compan)-, was born in Rumford, 
Oxford County, Me., July 11, 1846. 
As a son of Osgood, Jr., and Bet.sy (Putnam) 
Eaton, it is evident that he is a descendant of 
early New England colonists, immigrants of 
the seventeenth century. Different branches 
of the Eaton family have been flourishing on 



2l8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tliese shores for more than two hundred and 
fifty years, and tlie same is true of the Put- 
nam s. 

Osgood Eaton, Sr. , who was a native of 
Concord, N.H., settled on what is known as 
Maton Hill, and was the first white settler in 
that locality. He was an officer in the old 
State militia. Osgood Eaton, Jr., son of the 
elder Osgood and father of Cyrus P. Eaton, 
was horn on the farm in Rumford which was 
his son's birthplace, and s]ient his life there 
until about fifty years old. Then, though past 
the age liinit for military duty, he enlisted in 
Company A, Twelfth Maine Regiment, for the 
defence of the Lhiion, and was enrolled among 
the musicians as drum-major. He was in 
Louisiana with General Putler's army, much 
of the time near New C)rleans, and died of 
swamp fever. He was a stanch Republican, 
deeply interested in local |iolitics, and was a 
prominent member of the Methodist P]piscopal 
church. His wife, who also is a native of 
Rumford, and is now a bright and active lady 
of fourscore, makes her home with her son, 
Cyrus P. She, too, is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, deeply interested in 
religious work. 

Cyrus P. Eaton acquired a fair education 
while still a member of the parental household, 
attending school and doubtless making himself 
useful on the farm until he was nineteen years 
of age. He then left home and went to Lewis- 
ton, Me., to learn the caipenter's trade, which 
he followed in that cit)' about six years. Re- 
turning then to his native town, he managed 
a carpenter and carriage shop until 1890. In 
that year he entered the employ of the Water 
I'ovver Company, for whom he worked two 
yeais at Rumford Falls, hax'ing charge of a 
number of men who were engaged in building 
ilams and in other constructive operations. 
The first saw-mill in the place was erected at 
this time, the lumber for the dams being sawed 
there, largely under Mr. Eaton's direction. 
This mill was owned by the Power Company. 
In the fall of 1X92 Mr. P2aton entered the em- 
ploy of the Light and Water Company, and 
assisted in buiUling their jjlant ; and since its 
completion he has acted as superintendent of 
the works. Fully qualified for his position, he 
lierforms his duties quicth' and efficiently, and 



enjo)'s the confidence and esteem of all with 
whom he comes in contact. Mr. Eaton owns 
a farm in the township and a residence in the 
village. 

He was married July 13, 1888, to Mary E., 
daughter of Otis Howe, of Rumford. She was 
born in this town December 24, 1850, and died 
July 16, 1893. She was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and trained her 
children to belief in its doctrines. She left 
one son and two daughters, namely : P'rederick 
O., clerk for the Light and Power Conii:)any, 
and Town Clerk of Rumford I'alls; and Eva 
M. and Sadie K., who are still with their 
father. 

Mr. Iiaton is a Republican and takes an 
active part in town matters. He is a member 
of Blazing Star Lodge, No. 99, A. F. &. 
A. M., of Rumford P\alls; Rumford Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, of the same place; Me- 
talluc Lodge, No. 99, Knights of l^ythias, of 
this town; and Wawanunka Tribe, No. 41, 
I. O. R. M. Though not a church member, 
he regularly attends the Methodist lipiscopal 
church and contributes to its support. 




INA HYDE GREENWOOD, a well- 
known citizen of Farmington, was 
born in Bethel, O.xford County, Me., 
.September 2 1, 1824, son of Nathan- 
iel and Huldah (Howe) (ireenwood. A car- 
penter by trade, Mr. Greenwood for a number 
of years was actively engaged as a contractor 
and builder. Also at one time he was in the 
corn-packing business, and more recently he 
has dealt somewhat in real estate. He is now 
practically li\ing in retirement. 

The family trace their lineage through quite 
a number of Colonial ancestors to Thomas 
Greenwood, probably a native of Wales, who 
was a land-owner in what is now ]5rookline, 
Mass., in 166S. In 1665 he was following the 
trade of a weaver in Boston, where he was 
made a freeman and united with the church in 
1681; and he served as Selectman, 'I'own 
Clerk, and Constable. He married Plannah, 
daughter of John Ward, a representative of an 
early Boston family of prominence, and she 
bore him two sons, namely: Thomas, who was 
one of the first graduates of Harvard College, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 19 



and became a minister in Rehobotli, Mass. ; 
and John, wIid became a leading citizen of 
Newton, Mass. The ne.xt in line was William 
Greenwood, who was horn October 14, i68g. 
On June 21, 1715, he married Abigail, daugh- 
ter of John Woodward, of Cambridge, and in 
1725 moved to Sherborn, Mass., where he 
became a land-owner. lie was an e.\tensi\e 
business man, serveil as Selectman, Town 
Clerk, Representative to the General Court, 
and a Deacon of the chiuxh in Sherborn, where 
he died about the year 1756. 

The descent continues through Joseph, his 
ninth son, who was born in Sherborn, June 10, 
1734, and learned both the carpenter's and 
weaver's trades. After residing in Sherborn 
and Holden, he moved to Dublin, N.H., 
where he attained to a high position among the 
citizens of that town, serving as Selectman, 
Town Clerk and Treasurer, Justice of the 
Peace, and as a Representative to the first Pro- 
vincial Congress of New Hampshire. In 
1793 he disposed of his property and business 
interests in Dublin, and removed to Bethel, 
Me., where he died December 27, 1825. He 
married Sarah, daughter of Josiah Greenwood, 
had three sons, only one of whom reached ma- 
turity; namely, Nathaniel, first, who was Z. H. 
Greenwood's grandfather. The others were: 
Ebenezer, who was born in 1759; and John, 
who was born in 1760. 

Nathaniel Greenwood, first, was born in 
I7r)i; and, settling in Bethel in 1793, lie re- 
sided there for many years, finally moving to 
Farmington, where he died November 7, 1846. 
On June 24, 1782, he married for his first 
wife, Mary, daughter of Moses and Lydia 
(Knapp) Mason. She died in Bethel in 1825; 
and in 1827 he wedded Mrs. Abigail Irving, 
of Paris, Me. He was the father of fourteen 
children, eleven by his first union and three by 
his second; and his three sons by his first 
marriage — namely, Ebenezer, Nathaniel, and 
Thaddeus — settled in Farmington. 

Nathaniel Greenwood, son of Nathaniel, 
first, and father of Z. H. Greenwood, was b6rn 
in Dublin, N. H., December 27, 1790. His 
younger days were passed in Bethel with his 
father. Although his opportunities for obtain- 
ing an education were limited, he succeeded 
in familiarizing himself with manv branches 



of stuil)' through his own efforts, and he be- 
came a thoroughly capable and well-iufdinied 
business man. \Vhile still in the prime of 
life he settled in I'"armington, where he bought 
the farm which is now owned by L. B. Manter, 
and, purchasing the saw-mills at I'"armington 
[•"alls, he carried im logging ojierations u|)on 
an extensive scale, placing large crews of men 
in the woods during the winter season; and he 
als(j engaged in the manufacture of hunber. 
He was the first to introduce the mariufact- 
ure of hogsheatl shooks in this localit)', a busi- 
ness which proved exceedingly remunerative; 
and his other enterprises were equally success- 
ful. His business ability was of the highest 
order, his foresight and judgment being recog- 
nized among his associates, who often sought 
his advice' in regard to their own affairs; and 
he was called u|5on by his fellow-townsmen to 
serve in various offices of public trust. He 
retained his customary energy and activity up 
to the time of his death, which took place 
April 15, 1867; and his loss was keenly felt 
by the business men of Farmington, who re- 
garded him with the highest respect ami es- 
teem. 

His wife, Huldah Howe, whom he mairied 
May II, 1815, was born in Maine on Ma\' 25, 
1796, daughter of Jacob and Betty (Foster) 
Howe. She became the mother of ten chil- 
dren, as follows : Julia, who was born March 14, 
1816; Mason K., who was born July 17, 181 8; 
Albert N., who was Ijorn August 14, 1820, 
and died P'ebruary 4, 1888; Zina Hyde, the 
subject of this sketch ; Alfred Alanson, who 
was born February 25, i8;?7; Marcia A., 
who was born March 28, 1829; Ihddah |aiie, 
who was born June 2", 183 1, and dietl March 
28, 1885; Alma E. , who was born May 11, 
1833; Charles M., who was born December 
31, 1834; and Charles, second, who was liorn 
P'ebruary 17, 1837. Mrs. Huldah H. Green- 
wood died at the home of her son, Zina H., in 
1S92. As an affectionate, self-sacrificing 
mother and a kind-hearted, sympathetic neigh- 
bor, her memory is dee|ily cherished liy her 
loving children and large circle of friends and 
acquaintances. 

Zina H. Greenwood, the fourth in the family 
group, now to be further mentioned, was edu- 
cated in the district schools. After completing 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his studies he servcil an apprenticeship at the 
carpenter's trade; and he was subsequently em- 
ployed as a journeyman in Augusta, Me., until 
1854, when he returned to Farmington and 
opened an office for the transaction of insur- 
ance business. As his health demanded out- 
of-door employment, he later bought the Jesse 
Butterfield farm, upon which he settled. En- 
gaging as a contractor, he built several large 
bridges in this county. After that, in com- 
pany with B. F. Morrill, George H. Stinch- 
field, and Z. A. Greenwood, he built the 
Sandy River corn-packing factory, which they 
carried on successfully vmtil 1892, and did 
a very extensive business in canning sweet 
corn, their goods commanding a ready sale in 
the metropolitan markets. In 1887 Mr. 
Greenwood bought nine acres of the Stewart 
farm on High Street, where he erected a hand- 
some residence and spacious barns. He has 
subdivided a portion of the land into building 
lots, some of which he has sold, and he still 
has some choice sites for sale to the right 
parties. He has followed his trade to some 
extent during the past few years, but may be 
said to have retired permanently from active 
business pursuits, his easy circumstances per- 
mitting him to enjoy a life of leisure. 

On November g, 1849, Mr. Greenwood 
wedded Emily M. Fellows, who was born in 
Athens, Me., June 11, 1829, daughter of Isaac 
and .Sarah (Bradbury) Fellows. Mr. and Mrs. 
(ireenwood are the parents of six children, as 
follows: Edward, who was born November 17, 
1850, married 1-lmma R. Dutton, and has 
cliarge of the Sandy River Railway shops at 
Phillips, Me. ; Albert Mellen, born P'ebruary 
2, 1853, who married Afifie M. Sanborn, and 
is now a jeweller in Phillips; Orville S., born 
July 14, 1855, who married Cora L. Prescott, 
and is now carrying on a hardware and plumb- 
ing business in Maiden, Mass., having three 
children, namely — Mildred F. , Phil P., and 
Fred A. ; Chester, born December 4, 1858, 
who married Isabel S. Whittier, and is en- 
gaged in the manufacture of ear protectors and 
is also a dealer in mill supplies in Farmingtoi), 
he and his wife having four children, namely 
— Lester C, Donald \V., Vodisa E., and Clin- 
ton; Lizzie A., born April 13, 1861, who 
graduated from the State Normal -School here 



and is now a teacher in Haverhill, Mass. ; and 
Emily, born June 28, 1863, who resides in 
Farmington. The last named young lady is 
extensively engaged in the cultivation of bed- 
ding plants, in which she has proved herself 
an expert. Her greenhouse, seventy-six by 
sixteen feet, built with the assistance of her 
father in 1887, is the only one of its kind in 
town. She is very successful in her business, 
and has raised as high as eight thousand 
tomato and five hundred celery plants in a 
season. 

In public affairs Mr. Greenwood has ren- 
dered his share of service to the town, having 
been a member of the Board of Selectmen 
during the years 1865-68, 1876, and 1877, his 
rare business ability being amply displayed in 
the discharge of his official duties. 



^ATHANIEL KNIGHT, formerly a 
well-known and highly respected resi- 

k9 V dent of Paris, was born August 10, 

1801, upon the farm which he car- 
ried on with prosperity for many years. His 
parents were Edmund and Dorothy (Haskell) 
Knight. The father was a native of Fal- 
mouth, Cumberland County, born May 18, 
1 767 ; and the mother was born at New- 
Gloucester in the same county. May 9, 1768. 

In the spring of 1799 Edmund Knight came 
to Paris, where he settled upon a large tract of 
wild land containing about two hundred acres. 
By the fall of the same year he had made a 
clearing and erected a house, which is still 
standing in a good state of preservation, when 
he brought his family to reside there. He 
was a sturdy, hard-working man, was possessed 
of the pioneer faculty of thriving under the 
most adverse circumstances, and he succeeded 
in establishing a comfortable home for himself 
and family. Besides attending to his farm he 
made ox carts and sleighs. He continued in 
active occupation until his death, which took 
place June 3, 1830, at the age of sixty-three 
years. His wife had died June 12, 1821. 
They were the parents of eight children, as 
follows: Dorcas, who was born December 11, 
1790; Dorothy, who w-as born September 16, 
1792; Hudson, who was born August 22, 
1794; Henry, who was born May 30, 1797; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Hannah, wlin was born May 19, 1799; Natlian- 
iel, the subject of this sketch ; Andrew, who 
was born October 3, 1803 ; and I<;iiza, who 
was born November 14, 1806. 

Nathaniel Knight grew to manhood ujion 
the farm, which was his home during his entire 
life. His education was acquired in the dis- 
trict schools. He was engaged in farming, 
the cooper's trade, and made violins and 
drums. The latter articles were sought for 
and highly prized by the neighboring residents. 
Temperate in his own habits, he was an ear- 
nest advocate of total abstinence. His relig- 
ious belief was that of the Methodist denomi- 
nation. In politics he was a Republican, 
having joined that party at its formation. He 
was nearly seventy-three years old when he 
died at the Knight homestead, June 16, 1874. 

On November 4, 1832, Mr. Knight wedded 
Martha Houghton, who was born in VVaterford, 
Me., September 4, 1805, daughter of Moses 
and Martha (Haskell) Houghton, early settlers 
of Norway, Me. She died July 12, 1891, 
having borne her husband three children, 
namely: Hudson, who was born July 31, 1834; 
Livonia, who was born December 13, 1835; 
and Horace, who was born May 11, 1838. 
Hudson, Horace, and Livonia Knight, all of 
whom are unmarried, occujiy the homestead 
farm, and form a very happy and contented 
family. The farm of one hundred and si.xty 
acres is conducted by the brothers, who make 
the best use of its fertile soil by ]5roducing 
large and superior crops. They enjoy the 
hearty good will of their neighbors, are liberal 
in their religious views, and in politics act 
with the Republican party. On September 
lo, 1862, Hudson Knight enlisted as a private 
in Company F", Twenty-third Regiment, Maine 
Volunteers, under Captain Horace Bolster, and 
served in the Civil War until honorably dis- 
charged, July 15, 1863. He is a comrade of 
Harry Rust Post, No. 54, Grand Army of the 
Republic, of Norway. 



:iBl':ON LEWIS PACKARD, who 
was a veteran of the Civil War and a 
prominent business man of Hebron 
in the early years of this decade, was 
born in Hebron, May 30, 1829, son of Captain 




Lewis and I^lizabeth (Webster) Packard. The 
family is of Puritan ancestr\'. Its founder, 
who emigrated from pjigland, landed at Plym- 
outh, Mass., in 1638. Reuben Packard, 
great grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
was a native of Massachusetts and a Revolu- 
tionary soldier. He settled as a pioneer in 
Hebron shortly after the struggle for indejien- 
dence, and made the first clearing upon the 
Packard homestead, which has since remained 
in the family's possession. He died in He- 
bron at a good old age. His .son, Ichabod, 
Mr. Packard's grandfather, was also an early 
settler here. At Ichabod's death the property 
passed into the hands of his son Lewis, the 
father of Zibeon Lewis. 

Captain Lewis Packard was born in Hebron, 
of which 'town he was a lifelong resident. 
Aside from his prominence as a large general 
farmer, he was active in the public affairs of 
the town, held various important offices, and 
was long identified with the early State 
militia. In ])olitics he supported the Whig 
party, and in his religious views was a Congre- 
gationalist. He died at the homestead in 
1853. His wife, whose name before marriage 
was Elizabeth Webster, became the mother 
of five children — P'lizabeth, Zibeon L., 
George, Hannah, and Charles. Of these the 
only survivor is George, who resides in Kan- 
sas. The mother died in 1879. 

Zibeon Lewis Packard acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools and at the Hebron 
Academy. After completing his studies lie 
taught school for several terms. During the 
Civil War he served as a private in the Thir- 
tieth Regiment, Maine \'olunteers. Ujion 
returning to ci\'il life he engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits. Succeeding^ in his turn to the 
ancestral property, he displayed unusual en- 
ergy and ability in its cultivation. By paying 
special attention to its extensive orchards, he 
became one of the leaders in the fruit-growing 
industry of Hebron. His capacity for business 
was of special value to the town in the admin-, 
istration of the public offices he filled. He 
served for a time successively as a member of 
the Board of Selectmen and the Supervisor of 
-Schools, and he was Town Collector and 
Treasurer for fourteen years. He took an 
active part in securing the erection of the He- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



broil Academy, of which he acted as a Trustee 
for nian\ years; and in his day was noted for 
his public spirit. He was connected with the 
Masonic Lodge of Buckfield ; was a member of 
Hebron Grange, Patrons of Husbandry; and a 
comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic 
post at Mechanic Falls. In religious belief he 
was a Baptist, and politically he acted with the 
Republican party. He took an earnest in- 
terest in the general welfare of the town and 
its institutions. His death, which occurred at 
the old Packard homestead, August ii, 1893, 
in his sixty-fifth year, was felt as a severe loss 
to the community. 

On February 10, i860, Mr. Packard was 
united in marriage to pollen A. Bearce, who 
was born in Hebron, March 2'], 1835, daugh- 
ter of Daniel Bearce, of this town. She died 
April 14, 1895, leaving four children, as fol- 
lows: Bertha Lenora Packard, who studied at 
the Hebron Academy, and has successfully 
taught school for several terms; Ida I{llen, 
the wife of Herbert T. Glover, of Hebron ; 
P'dith Lulu, who married Frederick W. Cush- 
man, and resides at the old homestead ; and 
Jennie Webster Packard, a successful teacher 
and an accomplished artist, who resides at 
Hebron \illage. 



/pTTT)] 



IDEON KING STAPLES, for many 
\ •) I years a prosperous farmer and large 
land-owner of Temple, now numbered 
with the silent majority, was born upon the 
farm near his late residence, July 13, 1813, 
and lived to pass the eighty-third anniversary 
of his birth. He was a son of Gideon and 
Sarah (Oakes) Staples, and grandson of Gid- 
eon, Sr., and Susannah (Staples) Staples, 
who removed from Dover, N.H., to North 
Berwick, Me., and later to Temple. Gideon 
Staples, Sr., bought two lots upon what is 
now known as the Baldwin Hill farm, where 
his grandson afterward lived. 

When he came here there were but six fam- 
ilies in the town, and the nearest trading-post 
and grist-mill was at Wilton, which was 
reached by the aid of a bridle path and marked 
trees. Leaving his familv with a settler 
named Samuel Briggs until he could provide 
an abode for them, the new-comer pitched a 



tent in the woods, which served as a shelter, 
while he cleared seven acres of land and built 
a cabin. Planting wheat and corn for his first 
crop, he continued to increase his clearing 
into a good farm, the site of his first abode 
being now occupied by a substantial residence, 
and surrounded by rich meadows and fruit- 
trees. He was a man of strong frame and 
robust con.stitution, capable of much hard 
work. He died at the age of seventy years. 
His wife, Susannah, lived to reach the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-eight years. Their chil- 
dren were: Susannah, Nathaniel, Gideon, 
Susannah (second), Susannah (third), Betsey, 
Gideon (second), Hannah, William, George, 
Daniel, and Joanna. 

Gideon Staples, son of Gideon and Su- 
sannah, was born in Dover, N.H., December 
I, 17S5. He was fourteen years old when his 
parents settled in Temple; and when a young 
man he bought one hundred and sixty acres of 
land adjoining his father's property, which he 
cleared and improved. There being a plenti- 
ful supply of heavy pine and spruce timber on 
his premises, he erected a small saw-mill on 
the creek, the outlet of what is now known as 
the Staples Pond, where he manufactured the 
material for building a frame house, which is 
-Still standing; and he cultivated a productive 
farm during the rest of his active period. In 
his younger days he worked at the carpenter's 
trade when not busy with his farm work, and 
for several winters he was employed as a ship- 
carpenter upon the coast. His last work at 
his trade was framing the house in which his 
son, Gideon K. Staples, lived; and he died 
at the home of his son in October, 1872. An 
able and industrious farmer and a good me- 
chanic, he also possessed a great deal of nat- 
ural ability in other directions; and in his 
eighty-sixth year he wrote a short sketch of 
his life, which furnishes the material for a 
portion of this article. His wife, Sarah 
Oakes, whom he married when he was twenty- 
three years old, she being ten days his senior, 
was a daughter of John Oakes. She became 
the mother of seven children; namely, Han- 
nah B., Mary M., Gideon K., Sarah P., 
Eleanor, Jonathan S., and John O. Mrs. 
Sarah O. Staples died January 19, 1877. The 
father was originally a Whig, later supporting 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVI F.W 



2-^3 



the Republican party in politics; antl both he 
and his wife were members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Gideon King Staples, who appears to have 
been the first-born of three sons, attended the 
common schools in his boyhood, and resided 
at home until reaching his majority. For the 
next four years he was employed in the neigh- 
borhood as a farm assistant; and he then 
bought fifty acres of his father's farm, which 
he ]Kud for by tilling the same and working 
for farmers in the vicinity. He subsequently 
l)Ought the Daniel .Staples farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres, and still later the rest 
of his father's property, making in all an es- 
tate of about three hundred acres. He cleared 
considerable wild land, improved what had 
already been cleared, set out an orchard of 
about two thousand apple-trees, mostly grafted 
fruit, kept cattle and sheep, and also engaged 
in lumbering to some extent. The new 
house, which he erected in 1855, being de- 
stroyed by fire in 1862, he immediately re- 
built both residence and barns, which are of a 
very substantial kind. 

On March 4, 1854, Mr. Staples was mar- 
ried to Fhilinda Norton, who was born Au- 
gust 6, 1828, daughter of George W. and 
Ruth (Rice) Norton. Mr. and Mrs. Staples 
became the parents of two sons, namely : 
Horace G., a prosperous farmer of Wilton, 
who was born October 27, 1855, married Ada 
Gleason, and has one son, l^ernard Gideon, 
aged four years; and George W., who was 
born July 2t„ 1857, married Effie A. Wilkins, 
and resides in Hartford, Conn. Mr. Gideon 
K. Staples died at his home in Temple, Octo- 
ber 7, 1896, of heart failure, after a brief 
illness. 

In local public affairs Mr. Staples was quite 
conspicuous. He served as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen three years and as Town 
Treasurer two years. He was a delegate and 
active member at the now famous convention 
at Strong, Me., at which the Republican party 
was organized, and he was ever after one of its 
stanch supporters. His progressive tendencies 
were further evidenced by the fact that he was 
a member of the Franklin Agricultural So- 
ciety and of the Maine State Pomological 
Society. His interest in religion was shown 



by his liberal contributions toward the sup- 
port of the Congregational chiuxh. 




EVi McAllister, a successful 

farmer and a prominent resident of 
Stonehum, Oxford County, was born 
in tliat town, November 20, 1832, 
a son of I':astman and I'hcebe (Parker) Mc- 
Allister. His father, who was the first one of 
the family to reside in Stoneham, at the age 
of twenty-one came here from Conway, N. H., 
his native town, and settled on a farm in the 
northern part of the township, where his son, 
the subject of this sketch, now lives. There 
Eastman reclaimed a tract of land, on which 
he was succes.sfu!ly engaged in general agri- 
culture during the remainder of his life. He 
married Miss Phcebe Parker, a native of 
Lovell, Me.; and they became the parents of 
three children — Levi, Hilton, and Mary liliz- 
abeth. Hilton, who was born October 1, 
1830, wedded Miss Ella McKeen, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lyman McKeen, of Lovell; 
and they now reside with his mother on the 
old McAllister homestead. Mary, born Janu- 
ary 24, 1 84 1, who became the wife of Henry 
C. Cobb, of Boston, Mass.. died July 2c;, 
1872. The father was counted among the 
prominent men of Stoneham; and he served in 
several public capacities, including that of 
Selectman. He died in January, 1894. His 
wife, now eighty-four years old, makes her 
home with her son, Hilton, at the old man- 
sion. 

Levi McAllister passed his youth at tlie pa- 
rental home, and, together with his brother 
and sister, enjoyed the educational advantages 
offered by the district schools of their native 
town. He helped his father in the work of 
the farm until he was twenty-five years old, 
when going to Boston, Mass.. he began life 
for himself by engaging in teaming. This 
occupation he abandoned .August 12, 1862, to 
enlist for service in the Civil War in Com- 
pany A of the P^ortieth Regiment of Massa- 
chusetts Infantry, under Lieutenant Colonel 
Joseph A. Dalton, of Salem, Mass., and Cap- 
tain J. T. Lervey. He subsequently partici- 
pated in the battle of Cold Harbor, and also 
in that of Olustee, Fla. At the latter eno-age- 



224 



BIOGRAPHICAL RtVIEW 



ment Mr. McAllister's regiment covered tlie 
retreat. Subsequently he was appointed train 
master, and had charge of the wagons for the 
entire length of the route. The regiment was 
engaged in several other conflicts. While at 
l-'oHy Island, South Carolina, Mr. McAllis- 
ter's arm sustained an injur)- from a wagon 
wheel, on account of which he now receives a 
pension. lie was discharged from the service 
at Richmond, V'a., June i6, i<S6s,and returned 
to Stonehani. I'or some time after he was 
employed on farms, and was also engaged in 
lumbering. In 1872 he purchased his present 
estate, known as the old Smith farm. He 
afterward worked as an engineer and night 
watchman in a shoe factory at Norway village. 
Me., for four years. E.xclusive of that j^eriod 
he has resided on the farm since it became his 
]jroperty. He now owns seventy acres of 
land, on which he has made all the improve- 
ments. He carries on general agriculture, 
and raises some stock. 

Mr. McAllister has taken a prominent part 
in local affairs. A number of town offices 
were filled by him — that of Township Treas- 
urer, which he held for several years; that of 
Selectman, in which he served for five or six 
years; and that of Town Clerk, the duties of 
which he efficiently discharged for one year. 
He belongs to the Masonic Order, being a 
member of Delta Lodge, No. 63, of Lovell 
village, and to the Knights of Pythias, in 
Hiawatha Lodge, No. 49, of East Stoneham. 
Politically, he has always maintained fellow- 
ship with the Republican party. He is essen- 
tially a self-made man, and he has the warm 
esteem of a wide circle of acquaintances. 




\C\)fALD() T. BROWN, one of the town 
fathers of Waterford, Me., belongs 
to an old New England family, 
being the great-grandson of a Revolutionary 
soldier. He was born in Waterford, October 
24, 1834, the son of Thaddeus, Jr., and Ase- 
nath (Nourse) Brown. His great-grandfather, 
Jabez Brown, was a Lieutenant in the French 
and Indian War and an Adjutant in the Rev- 
olution. He was one of the original surveyors 
of the town of Waterford, and Mr. Waldo T. 
Brown now has in his possession the chain 



used by him in 1773 in making the survey. 
His son, Thaddeus Brown, Sr., who was born 
in Harvard, Mass., also served in the Revolu- 
tionary War. He located in Waterford in 
1786, settling near Waldo T. Brown's present 
farm, where he purchased quite an extent of 
timbered land, and was extensively engaged 
in farming and lumbering. He died in 
W'aterford at an advanced age. He and his 
wife, formerly Miss Mary Pollard, of Harvard, 
Mass., were the parents of nine children — 
Daniel, Malbory, Jabez, Susan, Levi, Thad- 
deus, Jr., Mary, Mercy, and Sarah. These 
have all passed to the world beyond. 

Thaddeus Brown, Jr., was born September 
8, 1798. He was engaged in farming during 
the years of his manhood, and spent his long 
life in Waterford and vicinity, passing away 
October 15, 18S5. He was then eighty-seven 
years of age. His wife died March 13, 
1874. The younger Thaddeus, like his father, 
had a family of nine children, as follows: 
Theodore, deceased; Daniel, a prominent 
farmer of Waterford Flat, ex-Representative 
to the legislature. Justice of the Peace, and 
Town Treasurer, who married Miss Mary B. 
Stone; Mercy, wife of Scribner Chadbourne, 
residing in Vandalia, III.; John, who lived 
but three years; Mary, widow of Charles H. 
Hale, at Otter Creek, Wis.; Waldo T., the 
leading subject of this sketch; Ellen M., wife 
of Elbridge Stone, a farmer and blacksmith of 
Waterford; Myra A., wife of William H. 
Bailey, a merchant of Harrison village, Me.; 
and Nettie, who resides with her sister in 
Otter Creek, Wis. 

Waldo T. Brown acquired a fair education 
in public and private schools. His father was 
crippled and unable to do all the farm work; 
and he remained on the homestead in order to 
• help him, eventually succeeding him as man- 
ager of the farm. He is now the owner of 
about one hundred and seventy acres of well- 
improved farm land, and is prosperously en- 
gaged in general farming, lumbering, stock 
raising to some extent, and tlairying, making 
a specialty of cream. 

He was married June 10, 1869, to Margaret 
G. Plummer, of Waterford, who was born Au- 
gust 26, 1834, the daughter of Samuel and 
Jane (Kimball) Plummer. Her father, whose 



BIOGRAi'HlCAL REVIEW 



occupation was farming, was a nati\e of 
Waterford. He died February 19, 1864. 
His wife, Mrs. Brown's motlier, was born in 
I'ortland, Me., but removed to Waterford with 
her parents when she was eleven years of age. 
Mrs. Plummer outliveti her husband many 
years, passing away Mas' 25, 1888. Mr. and 
Mrs. Brown have one child, Louise 'Monroe, 
born May 14, 1S71, now teaching in the vil- 
lage of Waterford. 

Mr. Brown, who is a stanch Democrat, has 
been a member of the Board of Selectmen of 
Waterford for nine years, and has held minor 
iitfices in the town. He belongs to Mount 
Tire'm Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Xo. iy2, of 
Waterford. As a fanner he is energetic and 
ambitious. As a jjrominent citizen of Water- 
ford he is well known and highlv resjiected. 




[PHRALM H. SMITH, a respected resi- 
dent of New Sharon, was born here, 
May 2, 1852, on the old homestead 
where three generations of his forefathers have 
lived and died. His paternal grandparents, 
Ephraim and I\Iercy M. (Mayhew) .Smith, came 
to New .Sharon from Martha's Vineyard, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1805. The grandfather bought a 
farm in the locality, of about one hundred and 
twenty-five acres, cleared it, and built the large 
frame house in vvhich his grandson now lives. 
Of his thirteen children, now all deceased, 
Nehemiah was the next to the )'oungest. 

Nehemiah Smith was born in his father's 
house at New Sharon in 1806, and was edu- 
cated in the common school of the old town. 
He spent his life on this farm, and was here 
married to Miss Mary B. Hawes. They had 
eight children, of whom six are still living. 
These are: Mercy M., born in 1836; Helena, 
born in 1839; Harriette W., born in 1841 : 
M. Augusta, born in 1844; Albert, born in 
1846; and Ephraim, born May 2, 1852. The 
deceased were: Abbie W., who was born in 
iiS47; and Jarid, who died in infancy. The 
father, at first a Whig in politics, upon the 
dissolution of that party became a Republi- 
can. He was always an active politician, and 
did what he could to advance the interests of 
his party and to help the country. His relig- 
ious belief was that of a steadfast liberal. 



liphraim H. Smith was also educated in the 
common school of his native town. At the 
age of sixteen, by the death of his father he 
and his brother became the projjrietors of the 
old farm, on the condition that he would carry 
it on, taking care of his mother until her 
death. This e\-ent occurred on October 2, 
1S95. He bought a shoemaker's establish- 
ment in 1877, and from the man he hired to 
work in it learned how to make shoes. When 
he was twenty-six years of age he sold out his 
interest in the old homestead to his brother, 
and moved to New Sharon village, where he 
purchased a home, and resided for ten years. 
In 1888 he purchased the homestead from his 
brother, and has resided there since, carrying- 
on general farming and working at his trade 
of shoemaker. He has recently bought a 
large house with an acre of land, situated on 
the south shore of the Sandy River. 

On the 2d of June, 1878, he was married to 
Miss Elmira K. Brown, a daughter of Cyrus 
G. Brown, a worthy farmer of New Sharon. 
They have now. two children — C. Arthur, 
born July 21, 1883: and Clarence B,, born 
February 29, 1891. Mr. -Smith is Republi- 
can in his political belief, and belongs to the 
Congregational church. He has been a -Se- 
lectman of New Sharon for the past four 
years, and is widely known and respected. 



Wi 



LLIAM C. TOWLE, M.D., of 

Fryeburg, one of the oldest practi- 
oners in Oxford County and a 
veteran of the Civil War, was born here, June 
12. 1830, son of Dr. Ira and Sarah (Clement) 
Towle. Dr. Towle's father, a native of New- 
field, Me., was a prominent physician in his 
day. After completing his medical studies he 
practised for a time in Standish, Me., after 
which he moved to Brownfield, this county. 
In 1825 he came to Fryeburg, where he fol- 
lowed his profession for nearly fifty years, and 
died in 1872. He is still remembered here 
as an able physician and a worthy, upright 
man. His wife, Sarah, who was a native of 
Fryeburg, became the mother of ten children, 
as follows: Mary A., who is now the widow 
of the Rev. -Samuel Souther, and resides in 
Plainfield, N.J.; Abby, the widow of Chauncy 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Warren, late of Fryeburg; William C, the 
subject of this sketch; Jason Whitman, who 
married Emma Shaub, and is a prosperous 
farmer of West Fryeburg; John, who fought 
in the late war as a soldier in the Sixth Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers, and is now 
a proof-reader for the lioston /c/z/v/rt/; Harriet 
I,., the wife of Stewart Bradley, who is a 
prominent attorney of Chicago, 111.; James, 
who died at the age of thirteen years; and 
three others, who died in infancy. The 
mother died in 1875. 

William C. Towle acquired his early edu- 
cation at I'ryeburg Academy. In 1849 he 
went to California, where he was successfully 
engaged in mining for three years. Upon 
his return he entered the Maine Medical 
School, from which he graduated in 1855. 
He began the practice of his profession in 
Fryeburg, and was still here at the outbreak 
of 'the Rebellion. He entered the army as 
Assistant Surgeon of the Twenty-third Regi- 
ment, Maine Volunteer Infantry, for the 
period of nine months, and participated in the 
operations conducted by the Department of 
Potomac. His term of service having expired 
while at Harper's Ferry, he re-enlisted in 
the Twelfth Maine Regiment, with which he 
served in the Shenandoah Valley under Gen- 
eral Sheridan, and was present at the battles of 
Winchester and Cedar Creek. Having passed 
through the war without sustaining any injury, 
he was mustered out with his regiment at Au- 
gusta, Me., in March, 1866. He then re- 
sumed his practice in Fryeburg, where he has 
since continued. At the present time he is 
one of the oldest and most experienced physi- 
cians and surgeons in Oxford County, and his 
extensive practice keeps him constantly busy. 

In 1859 Dr. Towle was united in marriage 
to Ann E. Warren, of Fryeburg. She is a 
daughter of Isaiah Warren, now deceased, who 
was formerly a well-known merchant of this 
town. Dr. and Mrs. Towle have had three 
children, as follows: Annie Laurie, who died 
in 1879; Warren, born in 1861, who is now a 
successful lawyer of Boston and State Senator- 
elect for the Fifth Suffolk District of Massa- 
chusetts ; and Lucia, who is the wife of the 
Rev. S. T. Livingston, and resides in Will- 
iamstown, Mass. 



In politics Dr. Towle has been a Democrat 
since attaining his majority; but, owing to his 
inability to support the platform adopted by 
his party at Chicago in 1896, he voted the Re- 
publican ticket in the Presidential election of 
that year. He was County Coroner for eight 
years, has held other offices, and is an examin- 
ing surgeon in pension cases. He is con- 
nected with Pythagorean Lodge, Nt). 11, 
A. F. & A. M., and is a comrade of Grover 
Post, No. 126, Grand Army of the Republic, 
of Fryeburg. He occupies a handsome resi- 
dence on Portland Street, and his office is lo- 
cated near the post-office in the centre of the 
village. Both he and Mrs. Towle are mem- 
bers of the New Jerusalem church. 




town. 



AMUFL B. TWITCH FLL is one 
of the influential citizens of Bethel, 
Me., and a jirominent factor in the 
agricultural and financial life of the 
He was born on the farm which now 
constitutes his home, March 16, 1S29, the son 
of Thaddeus and Sukey B. (Barker) Twitchell. 
His grandfather, Ezra Twitchell, who was a 
pioneer of Bethel, was one of the leading men 
of the town, and was active in organizing the 
first Congregational church built here, of 
which he was Deacon a great many years. 

Thaddeus Twitchell, son of Ezra, was born 
in Dublin, N.H., and rcvred in Bethel, being 
an infant when his parents removed to this 
town. .A successful farmer, lie purchased the 
land on which his son is now living, and de- 
voted his life to its cultivation, dying at the 
age of seventy-two. He was a member of the 
old Whig party, and was one of the first aboli- 
tionists in this section. A man of pronounced 
ideas, with the courage of his convictions, he 
was also one of the first l""ree Soil voters in the 
town, onlv two others being associated with 
him. He was Colonel in the militia for a 
number of years. His wife, who was a native 
of Bethel, died here at the age of eighty-one. 
She was a member of the Congregational 
church. Five children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Thaddeus Twitchell, namely: Abigail, 
who died at the age of fifty, wife of Dr. R. G. 
Wiley, of Bethel; Roxanna, who passed away 
when about seventy-five years of age, wife of 




ANDREW J. LINSCOTT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL R E V I KAV 



229 



Alphin Twitchell; Mary E. , who was called 
to rest in her forty-first year, wife of the Rev. 
David Garland, of Bethel; Susanna R., wife 
of the Rev. J. K. .Mason, of Herndon, \'a. ; 
and Samuel H. , of J^ethel, whose personal his- 
tory brief!}- outlined is as follows. 

l'",qui])ped with a good education, having 
finished his schooling at Gould Academy, 
Bethel, Samuel B. Twitchell started on his life 
work betimes. Iking the onlv son he took 
charge of the home farm, and he was also in 
trade for a number of years in Bethel. In 
1867 he sold his store, and he has since de- 
voted his time chiefly to agriculture and the 
lumber business. Mis estate comprises about 
two hundred acres, and is charminglv located, 
part of it lying in what is called Mayville, a 
section of Bethel on the .Androscoggin River. 
Mr. Twitchell is Treasurer of the Bethel 
Dairy Company, President of the Bethel Sav- 
ings Bank, and Treasurer of Gould Academy. 
As a business man he is conservative and up- 
right, and has the confidence of the coniniunity. 

December 11, 1853, he was united in ma'r- 
liage with Malvina A., daughter of Timothy 
Chapman, one of the old citizens of Bethel 
Mrs. Twitchell was an active member of the 
Congregational church. She died February g, 
1888, leaving the following children: Marion 
B. , wife of Clarence W. Flobbs, of Worcester, 
Mass.; Susie 15., who keeps house for her 
father; and Florence E., also in the old home. 

Mr. Twitchell takes a lively interest in local 
politics, voting the Republican ticket. He 
has served as Selectman and as Town Agent, 
and was Ta.x Collector four years; and in 
1879-80 he had a seat in the State legislature. 
Though not a member of any church, he is 
always ready to contribute toward worthy 
enterprise.s, and believes in encouraging Chris- 
tian work. 




NDRKW J. LINSCOTT, a prominent 
farmer and fruit buyer of Jay, and a 
representative of a well-known fam- 
ily of Franklin County, was born 
here, November 18, 1845, son of Andrew and 
Tucy D. (Butterfield) Linscott. Andrew D. 
Linscott, his grandfather, who was a native of 
Chesterville, Me., born September 7, 1786, 



resided upon a farm in that town for some 
years, and then moved to ]^i\field, where he 
died September 4, 1838. He married Polly 
Chancy, who was born in Dunstable, Mass., 
February 18, 1781. and died in Jav, ]'"el)ruary 
16, 1861. She was the niothci- of nine chil- 
dren — ■ Newton, Andrew, Abigail, (ohn, 
Jacob, Josiah, Charles, Dorcas, and Daniel B. 
Newton died in July, 1895; Jacob and Josiah 
reside in Massachusetts, the latter in Boston; 
and Dorcas is the wife nf Da\icl Holt, ol 
I.yndeljoro, N.H. 

Andrew Linscott. Mr. Linscott's father, 
was born in Chesterville, August 10, 1810. 
In young manhood he went to Belfast, Me., 
where he worked at the ship carpenter's trade 
for a number, of years. Later he moved to 
Dixfield, and lived there se\-eral \'ears. He 
then settled upon a farm in Ja\', now owned 
by his son, Andrew J., and made it his home 
imtil his death, which happened A|iril 11, 
1863. Lie was a member of the Board of .Se- 
lectmen in Jay for a nmnber of years, served 
as County Commissioner for two years, and was 
a member of the legislature in 1857. His 
wife, Lucy, was liorn in Falmouth, Me., Sep- 
tember \2, 1810. Her father, Jonathan But- 
terfield, was born in Charlestown, Mas.s. , July 
-3' '773; 'Ticl her mother. Prudence (Free- 
man) Butterfield, was born in Boston, (nne 19, 
1 771. After their marriage they came to 
Maine, first settling in Lovell, where they re- 
sided until 1809; and then they moved to p'al- 
mouth.' Their last days were passed ujion the 
farm where their grandson, Andrew J. Lin- 
scott, now resides. The father died January 
21, 1863; and his wife, September 26, 1S55. 
Mrs. Andrew Linscott became the mother of 
si.\ children, namely: Lucy A., born Septem- 
ber 24, 1833, who married John N. P'oster, and 
died February 20, 1896; Mary C. , born July 
14, 1835, "'ho married Llarris Morse, and now 
resides upon a fruit farm in Tuttletowii, Cal. ; 
Phillii) F. , born February 12, 1838, who also 
resides in Tnttletown ; Daniel B. , born Se])- 
tember i, 1840, who died Ja]iuary 31, 1842; 
Andrew J., the subject of this .sketch; and 
Ellen A., born September 10, 1848, who died 
August 29, 1877. The mother is now eighty- 
six years old. 

Andrew J. Linscott attended the common 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



schools of his native town, and was reared to 
farm life. At the age of seventeen, owing to 
his father's death, he was obliged to take 
charge of the farm. With the exception of a 
year spent in Boston, employed as a street car 
conductor, he has constantly resided at the 
homestead. He now ciwns one hundred acres 
of excellent tillage land, which he devotes to 
general farming. He carries on a dairy, and 
raises hay and li\e stock; but his principal 
occupation is buying and shipping apples, in 
which he has served as the agent of a Boston 
house for the jjast twenty-five years. The 
extent of his business may be inferred from the 
fact that in one season he supplied the Boston 
market with twehe thousand barrels of apples. 
On April 13, 1870, Mv. Linscott was united 
in marriage to Hattie K. Miller, who was 
born in Wiltnn, Me., December 17, ICS4S, 
daughter of David and Abigail (Johnson) 
Miller, both now deceased. Mrs. Linscott's 
father was a prosperous farmer and a lifelong 
resident of Wilton. He served successively 
as Tax Collector and County Commissioner for 
some time, and was Selectman for nearly 
twenty years. His wife was a native of Harps- 
well, Me. Fannie A., the only child of Mr. 
and Mrs. Linscott, was born February 12, 
1S72, and is residing with her parents. Mr. 
Linscott takes an active interest in public 
affairs. lie has served with marked ability as 
a Selectman, and was Road Commissioner for 
three years. He always votes the Republican 
ticket. His jjortrait is presented witli this 
brief sketch of his life. 



'OB PRINCE, one of the early settlers of 
Buckfield, Me., where he located about 
1790, was born in Kingston, Mass., in 
1765, and died in 1831. He was a 
direct descendant of Fllder John Prince, of 
Hull, Mass., who had been a student at Ox- 
ford, but fled from the ])ersecution of Arch- 
bishop Laud in 1633. Job Prince was a Dea- 
con of the Baptist church, of which his wife, 
Hannah Bi'yant, was a member. He left nine 
children. 

Noah Prince, the fourth of these, was born 
in Buckfield, April 13, 1797, and lived on the 
old farm till 1865, when he removed to Buck- 



field village. He received only a common- 
school education, but was a man of unusual 
intelligence and force of character, and in re- 
ligion a Baptist. He was active in politics, 
and presided over the first convention held in 
Maine by the Republican party, of which he 
was always a stanch supporter. Besides hold- 
ing minor offices, he ser\cd as State Repre- 
sentati\'e and Senator, being President of the 
Senate in 1841. He died in Buckfield, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1872. By his wife, Sarah P'arrar, 
whom he married in 1826, he had six children 
— S. Louisa, Kimball N., Augusta M., Ar- 
delia H., Charles IL, and Mary R., <if whom 
all but the eldest are now- living. 

Kimball N. Prince was born in 1N2S. In 
1852 he went to New York City, where he was 
engaged in business for several years. In 
1 861 he entered the custom-house, filling im- 
portant jjositions, and while there undertook 
and perfected a system of accounts showing the 
liability of the collector of the port for duties 
on bonded merchandise. This had nex'er be- 
fore been thought practicable at so large a port 
as New York, where the balance of these 
accounts averages some tweiit\' million dollars 
every month. In 1889 he retired, and has 
since resided in Buckfield. Mr. Prince was 
married in 1854 to Miss Mary J. luiiery, who 
died in 1872, leaving one child, Leonard K., 
who is at the head of the Prince & Kinkel 
Iron Works of New York City. In 1874 he 
married Miss Sophie E. Dana, of New York. 
Both he and his wife are members of the I'res- 
byterian church. 

Charles H. Prince, who bears the title of 
Captain, having served with honor in the 
Twent)'-tlvird Maine Volunteers during the 
war, is engaged in manufacturing brushes in 
Buckfield, where he is Town Treasurer and 
superintendent of schools. While in the 
State of Georgia, where he lived for some 
time, he served as Congressman and Post- 
master of the city of Augusta, besides being 
a delegate to the Republican National Con\en- 
tions. Both he and his wife, FAUiice A. At- 
wood, are members of the Baptist church. 
They have had four children, of whom the 
surviving son, Henry C. Prince, is business 
manager of the Waterville Mail Publishing 
Company, of Waterville, Me. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^i 



/^TkORGE BURNHAM, who is one of 
\ •) I the old and highly esteemed members 
of the farming community of Gilead, 
has been an active ])olitical worker for the in- 
terest of the town at the State capitol. He 
was born Febniar}- 2, 1S16, on the farm 
where he now lives, a son of P. P. and Mary 
(Adams) Hurnham. P. P. Burnham, who was 
born in Bridgton, Ale., was one of the first 
settlers in this town. lie reclaimed from the 
wilderness the farm now occupied by his son, 
and devoted the rest of his life to its cultiva- 
tion. His wife died in Gilead. Having suc- 
ceeded to the farm, George Burnham has spent 
his entire life on it. In his management of 
it he displayed good judgment and the right 
amount of energ\-, and in other directions 
he gave frequent evidence of much ability. 
Though he is too feeble now to take an active 
part in work of any kind, the memory of what 
he has done will live long after he is gone. 
Always a stanch Republican, he has served in 
nearly all the town offices, discharging his 
duties ably and honestly. In 1856 he repre- 
sented the district in the .State legislature. 
At Augusta, as well as in his native town, he 
won the respect of his associates, presiding 
as Chairman of important committees. It was 
mainly through his influence that the appropri- 
ation to build the suspension bridge across the 
Androscoggin at Gilead was granted. While 
not a member of any church, he has always 
contributed liberally to worthy enterprises. 

Mr. Burnham married Miss P'lora Burbank, 
daughter of James and Susan (Ingalls) Bur- 
bank. She was born in (iilead, October 23, 
1823, and is now seventy-three years of age. 
An intelligent and amiable lady, she is as 
charming now as in her youth, and is beloved 
by all who know her. Bearing the weight of 
her years lightly, she rules with graceful dig- 
nity over the kingdom of her household. She 
has borne her husband nine children, namelv: 
Mellen P., who served as a soldier in the late 
war, and died at the age of forty-eight; James 
v., who assists his mother in managing the 
farm; Perley P., a merchant in Bridgton, Me. ; 
Charles A., a newspaper man, residing in Ber- 
lin, N.H. ; Mary E., the wife of Charles Gil- 
bert, of Canton, Me. ; George I., a farmer, 
whose home adjoins that of his parents; Mar- 




tha M., a teacher at Hcikeley Temjjle, Boston; 
Stella F., who died at the age of twenty two; 
and Fannie R., who lived but four years. 
While -Mr. Burnham's home is a very pleasant 
one, it necessru'ily bears the distincti\e marks 
of old age, as the land was broken by his 
father over a century ago. 



IRAM A. CONANT, of Buckfield, 
Me., has more than one claim on ]nib- 

.9 I lie interest. He is a lineal de- 

scendant of Roger Conant, who in 
1624 was left in charge of the Colony at Cape 
Ann, Massachusetts, which afterwaril under his 
leadership moved to Naumkeag, now Salem. 
He is a veteran of the war, in which he re- 
ceived a painful wound ; and he is a member 
of the Conant Family Band, a most uni(.|ue 
musical organization. Mr. Conant was born 
in Turner, Androscoggin County, Me., I'"ebru- 
ary 21, 1S45, a son of Everett O. and Eurania 
(Turner) Conant. 

Everett O. Conant, who was born in Bridge- 
water, Mass., April 2, 1809, spent a great part 
of his active life in Turner, Me., where he was 
prosperously engaged in agricultural pursuit.s. 
He was a member of the Baptist church, and 
politically he favored the Republican party. 
His death occurred in Turner, December 27, 
1868. He was survived more than twenty 
years by his wife, Eurania, who was born in 
Eivermore, Me., January 25, 1813, and died 
in August, 1892. Eight children com])leted 
the household circle of Mr. and Mrs. l-;verett 
Conant, namely: Sanford I{. , now a farmer of 
Buckfield, Me. ; Howard T., a fanner of 
Turner; Hiram A., the subject of this sketch; 
Edwin \V. , a carriage manufacturer of Cin- 
cinnati; Martha J., wife of John A. WoUmer, 
of Cincinnati; .Sylvia A., who died in May, 
1870; Mar)', who died in October, 1879; and 
.Sarah L. , who died in January, 1S70. 

Hiram A. Conant was reared and educated 
in the town of Turner. He started to provide 
for himself at the age of eighteen; and just 
before his nineteenth birthday, February 16, 
1864, he enlisted, being mustered in as a 
member of Company D, Thirty-second Maine 
Regiment, under Captain William R: Ham, 
of Eewiston. In active service somewhat 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Dvcr a \ear, he took part in the engagements at 
Weldon Knilroad and at J'oplar Grove Farm, 
being wounded at the last named battle. He 
was hunoiably diseharged June 2, 1S65; and, 
returning to Turner, he engaged in farming, 
lumbering, aii<l retailing wood. His first land 
]3urchase was in Tui'ner, where he lived fifteen 
years and owned at one time one hundred 
acres, which he eventually sold, moving to his 
])resent farm in 1S80. He now owns two hun- 
dred acres in Buckfielil, and is one of the most 
extensive farmers in the locality, his principal 
products being fruit and hay. He also has a 
choice dairy, owning from twenty ti: twenty- 
five head of full-blooded and grade Jerseys. 

In 1S66 Mr. Conant was married to ]<"lora 
Adkins, of Turner, daughter of Martin and 
Abigail Adkins. This union has been blessed 
by fourteen chiklren, who are all living, 
namely: Albert A., born September 6, 1866; 
Everett I'-., born October 24, 1867; Ellen A., 
August 14, 1S69; Hiram \V. , May 5, 1871 ; 
Walter G., October 5, 1S72; John W., July 
21, 1874; George I., January 29, 1876; S_\-lvia 
L., December 6, 1878; Harry L., Tanuary 11, 
1880; Ida M., June 12, 1881; Charles' K, 
.September 9, 1883; Sarah L. , Januar\- 21, 
1886; Elorence G. , October 8, 1887; and 
Lena E., January 13, 1890. Mr. Conant and 
eight of his sons compose the Conant Family 
Band, which is well known in the State. The 
leader and cornet player, Charles, w-ho is now 
twelve years of age, took an active part when 
he was only nine years old. The entire family 
are musical. 

Mr. Conant votes with the. Republican jiarty. 
He is a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge at 
Buckfield, and is Commander of Fessenden 
Post, No. 43, Grand Army of the Republic; 
and his entire family are members of Hebron 
Grange, No. 300, Patrons of Husbandry. Mr. 
and Mrs. Conant are communicants of the Bap- 
tist chuich at Turner. 




ENJAMIN ROSCOE KEYES, a 
carpenter and general farmer of 
Chesterville, was born in Grafton, 
O.xford County, January 8, 1848, 
son of Samson W. and Clarissa CButterfield) 
Kcycs. Wiien he was eight years old his 



father moved from Grafton to Woodstock, pur- 
chased seventy-five acres of land in the local- 
ity known as Hamlin Grant, and lived there 
for four years. The famil\- then went to 
Farmington, where the father had bought the 
Green farm, containing one hundred acres, 
situated on the line between Farmington and 
Wilton, in the northern section. F"our years 
later a third removal was made to Chester- 
ville, wdiere Samson W. Keyes had purchased 
the Lothrop farm of eighty acres, and where 
he still resides. 

Benjamin Roscoe Keyes obtained his educa- 
tion in the common schools of Grafton and at 
Wilton Academy. Upon reaching his majority 
he went to work in a tool factory at Fayette 
Mills, where he remained for three years. 
He then went to Brockton, Mass., and was en- 
gaged in carpentering with C. S. Johnson for 
the ne.xt two years. After spending another 
year in Cambridge and Somerville he returned 
to Chesterville, where, living at home, he con- 
tinued to follow his trade until 1880. He 
then bought his present farm of one hundred 
acres, formerly known as the Ricker place, 
where he has since resided, and successfully 
carried on general farming. 

On December 18, 1880, Mr. Keyes was 
united in marriage with Mary E. Hamilton, 
daughter of David M. and Matilda F. Hamil- 
ton. By this union there are two children, 
namely: Merle R., who was born July 12, 
1883: and Lester A., who was born April 26, 
1889. Mr. Keyes is active and energetic, both 
as a farmer and a carpenter. He is known 
throughout the county as a first-class mechanic. 




|ELLEN T. De SHON, a prosper- 
ous farmer and a well-known resi- 
dent of Peru, was born May i, 
1853, upon the farm he now owns 
and occupies, son of Charles V. and Janette 
L. (Mitchell) De Shon. The family is one of 
the oldest in Peru. Mr. De Shon's great- 
grandfather was one of its early settlers; and 
his grandfather, John De Shon, was a native 
and lifelong resident. John De Shon, who 
was an able farmer, did much toward develop- 
ing the agricultural resources of the locality, 
and lived to a ripe old age. 



RTOG RAPH T( ' AI. REV I E\V 



^5i 



Chark's F. Dc Shmi, also a native of Peru, 
became the owner of a good farm, containing 
one hundred and twenty-five acres, which he 
cultivated with energy and success. He was 
an influential man in the town, served with 
ability as a Selectman and in other offices, and 
dieil in 1892. Originally a Republican, he 
was itlentified with the ("ireenback party dur- 
ing its existence. His wife, Janette, who was 
a native of Ruckhekl, bore him nine children, 
six of whom are living; namely, Albert, Fiar- 
riet, Susan, Mellen T., Ida, Lillian, Matilda, 
Rosamond, and Mary. Ida married Albert B. 
Griffith, a prosperous farmer of this town. 
Mr. De Shon's mother still survives, and 
resides in Peru. 

Mellen T. De Shon was educatetl in the 
schools of Peru. He has always resided on 
the homestead. Succeeding to its possession 
after liis father's death, he has since con- 
ducted it with success. His buildings are 
well kept, and the fertility of his land enables 
him to raise large and superior crops. 

In 1876 Mr. De Shon first wedded Ada 
Marsh, who died in 1884, leaving two sons; 
namely, Wallace .S. and Ellis F. In 1890 he 
was united in marriage to his present wife, 
Mabel C. (Kidder) De Shon, a daughter of 
Philander Kidder, of Canton, Oxford County. 
Horn of this marriage were two daughters — 
Addie and Dot. Mr. De Shon is a Republi- 
can. He is highly respected by all who 
know him. Both he and Mrs. De Shon attend 
the Baptist church. The family residence 
occupies a delightful situation, overlooking 
the Androscoggin Ri\-er and surrounded by 
mountain scenery. 



WARREN BUTTERFIELD, who 
occupies a prominent place among the 
successful farmers of Wilton, Me., 
was born upon the farm which adjoins 
his present [jroperty, November 9, 1828, son 
of James and Dolly (Lyford) Butterfield. 

His grandfather, Isaac Butterfield, who 
served as a blacksmith and gunsmith in the 
Revolutionary War, removed from New Hamp- 
shire to Maine a few years after the declara- 
tion of peace, and bought a large tract of wild 
land in the town of Wilton. He cleared a 



portion of his purchase for tillage puiposes, 
and lived to reach a good old age. The 
maiden name of his wife was Ruth Fletcher. 

James Butterfield, son of Isaac, was born in 
Dunstable, now Nashua, N.H., March 17, 
1791, and serveti as a soldier in the War of 
1812. When a \outh he cleared a jiortion f)f 
the Gardner Chase farm, upon which lie 
erected a log house, and sowetl a crop of corn ; 
but his tlwelling and cnvw were bunu'(l, and he 
relinquished the further attempt to inii)rove 
that propert)-. lie then jiurchased of .Samson 
Keyes a farm of two hundred anil twenty acres 
which had been partially improved, and, hav- 
ing constructed a primitive dwelling, cleared 
more land for cultivation. He eventually be- 
came a well-to-do agriculturist, and erected a 
substantiaf set of buildings. His death look 
place here, October if), 1875. In p(ditics lie 
originally acted with the Whig party, but 
joined the Republican mo\ement at its forma- 
tion; and in his religious views he was a Uni- 
versalist. His wife, Dolly Lyford, who was 
born August 3, 1800, daughter of Nathaniel 
Lyford, became the mother of six children, 
namely: Samuel, born June 6, 1821, who died 
Octobers, 1842; Melinda, born PY'bruary 12, 
[824, who died August 12, 1825; Daniel, 
born January 7, 1825, who served as a private 
in Company C, Fifty-third Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, in the Civil War, and 
died at New Orleans, Januar\- 17. 1863; J. 
Warren, the subject of this sketch; I'"i-anklin, 
born August 25, 1829, and died (Jctober 25, 
1842; William Wallace Butterfield, a carpen- 
ter and millwright of Auburn, Me., who mar- 
ried April 4, 1S61, Melvina Wright, daughter 
of Reuben and Mary Wright, of North Jay, 
and has had three children, namely: Cora, 
born in October, 1862, who dietl in May, 
1863; Guy L., born October 18, 1863, now a 
millwright and saw-temperer of Auburn, Me., 
who married in August, 1894, ICthel Wagg; 
and Susan J., born in .September, 1865, who 
died in July, 1866. Mrs. Dolly Lyford 
Butterfield died December 2, 1884. She was 
a Baptist in her religious belief. 

J. Warren Butterfiekl was educated in the 
public schools of Wilton, and in young man- 
hood began to follow agricultural pursuits 
upon his own account. Settling upon a farm 



234 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ot one hundred and twenty acres, he made 
various improvements upon the land and 
buildings; but, after residing there for eight 
years, lie sold the property and bought the 
Carter farm of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres. Including a part of the farm formerly 
owned bv his grandfather, he now has two 
hundred and seventy-five acres. This prop- 
erty has steadily enhanced in value since 
coming into his possession, and its thrifty 
appearance shows the result of energetic and 
progressive management. He has transformed 
the roughly cleared land into cultivated fields, 
has erected a new barn, remodelled the house, 
has set out an orchard containing twenty-five 
hundred grafted trees, and with the assistance 
of his son has constructed a mile of smooth 
roadway in order to avoid driving over a long 
hill. He keeps a herd of twelve standard- 
bred cattle and a flock of sheep, and his crops 
of fruit and general farm products are always 
large and of the very best Cjuality. 

On June 2(S, 1855, Mr. Butterfield wedded 
Huldah B. Sears, who was born in Sackville, 
N.B., November 18, 1S35, daughter of Jere- 
miah and Mary (McFee) Sears. Mrs. Butter- 
field's father, who was a native of New York 
State, in early manhood settled in the Prov- 
ince of New Brunswick, where he became a 
prosperous farmer. He lived to be eighty- 
nine years old, and his wife died at the age of 
seventy-eight, having been the mother of eight 
children, namely: Huldah 1^., who is now 
Mrs. Butterfield; Cynthia J.: Abbie; Esther; 
Mary and Martha, twins; John; and Di.\on. 
^Ir. and Mrs. Butterfield have had si.x chil- 
dren, as follows: George Franklin, who was 
Ijorn March 24, 1857, and is now engaged in 
farming; I. Imogene, wlio was born June 14, 
1859, married Alonzo Huntington, of Canton 
Point, a blacksmith, and has four children — 
namely, Earl, James (who is no longer liv- 
ing), Blanche, and Fred \V. ; Siuirgeon \V., 
a carpenter and millwright, who was born 
June 10, 1 86 1, married Mary Goodwin, and 
has one son, Ralph W., born May 22, 1894: 
.M. R. Delia, who was born March 31, 1863, 
graduated from Farmington State Normal 
School, class of 1890, and died October 12, 
1S92; Carl R., who was born January 18, 
1S72, and is now a teacher and also engaged 



in agricultural pursuits; and James L. , who 
was born P\'iiruary 7, 1876, and died October 
23, 1876. 

Mr. Butterfield is Past Master of Franklin 
Grange, as is also his son, George F". ; and is 
connected with the Williamson Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, as are also his 
sons, George F., S. VV., and Carl R. He sup- 
ports the Republican party in politics, and his 
three sons are also Republicans. Both he and 
Mrs. Butterfield are members of the Baptist 
church. 



KREMONT S. VINING, a successful 
business man and an old resident of 
Phillips, is the senior member of the 
firm of Vining Brothers, retail dealers in 
meat, provision, and groceries in that place. 
He was born June i8, 1855, son of Seward P. 
and Martha C. (Thomas) Vining, natives re- 
spectively of Durham and Strong, Me. 

Benjamin Vining, his grandfather, who was 
an enterprising farmer of Durham, did the 
probate business of the town, and was often 
intrusted with the settlement of estates. In 
politics he was a Whig, and he lived to be 
about threescore years old. Of his fourteen 
children, Hiram Vining, of Weld, Me., is the 
onh' one living. Seward P. Vining was en- 
gaged in farming from his youth. His wife, 
Martha C, bore him twelve children, of whom 
ten are living. These are: Hattie K., the 
widow of Mark Harding, of Melrose, Mass. : 
Henry C, who resides in Haverhill, Mass.; 
Hannibal H., in Phillips; Albion M., in 
Manchester, N.H.; Ephraim B., in Strong, 
Me.; Martha J., the widow of K. K. Sawyer, 
of Phillips; Nelson E., also a resident of 
Phillips: Addie S., the wife of John Mc- 
Knight, of Boston, Mass.; 'Allie H., the wife 
of George O. Osgood, of Waltham, Mass. : 
and Fremont S., the subject of this sketch. 
The father died February 4, 1893, aged 
eighty-nine years. 

Fremont S. Vining obtained a good educa- 
tion in the common schools of Phillips and at 
Milton Academy. He taught school in the 
winter for five years after, while he spent the 
summers employed in the express business. 
Then entering the meat and provision trade, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



23s 



he has since conducted the store ul the I'liillips 
Meat and Grocery Company, which now eni- 
]iIoy three teams in delivery of their goods. 

On June 25, 1888, Mr. Vining married 
Ada F. Wilhird, a daughter of H. L. Wiliard, 
of Acton, .Mass. In politics Mr. Vining is a 
Republican. He served three years as Super- 
visor of Schools in Avon. 




ACA;/ILLIAM H. TRASK, a prosperous 
agriculturist of Peru, was l^orn June 
23, 1840, on the place where he 
now resides, son of Leonard and Eunice 
(Knight) Trask, natives respectively of LLirt- 
ford, Me., and Peru. Osmond Trask, his 
grandfather, was one of the first settlers in 
Hartford, where he died at an advanced age. 
About the year 1830 Leonard, a son of Os- 
mond, came to Peru, and settled on the farm 
now owned by William H. Trask. It was 
then principally wild land, but he cleared and 
improved a large part of it. His death oc- 



curred here on April 



1 86 1. His wife. 



Eunice, after surviving him over thirty years, 
died December 10, 1893. In religious faith 
he was a LTnivcrsalist, and in politics a Re- 
jjublican. Of his seven children, three are 
living, namely: William H., the subject of 
this sketch; Catherine li., the wife of Will- 
iam Ouimby, living in North Turner, Me. ; 
and Albion K. P. Trask, a resident of Peru. 
The others were: Susan H., Orville K., 
-Sarah 1-;., and Fanny H. 

During his early years William H. Trask 
attended the common schools of Peru. -Since 
that time he has given his attention to general 
farming. For some time he has owned the 
homestead farm, which contains about two 
hundred and forty acres of land, one of the 
largest estates in this district. Besides rais- 
ing the usual New England crops he rears 
some stock, and keeps a dairy of choice cows. 
In September, 1861, Mr. Trask enlisted in 
Company H, Tenth Regiment, Maine Volun- 
teer Infantry, under Captain C. -S. Emerson, 
of Auburn, Me., for service in the Civil War. 
He was in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 
August 9, 1862, in which the L^nion men 
were victorious. A wound received at Cedar 
Mountain disabled him for further service, 



and in 1863 he was lu)n()ral:)lv dischargeil. 
He is now an esteemed comrade of Hodge 
Post, Grand Army of the Republic, at Canton, 
Me. In politics he is a Republican, and has 
served on the Republican Town Committee. 
On March 6, 1882, Mr. Trask married Miss 
Flora E. Philbrick, who was born Ajiril 28, 
1852, in Ro.\bury, O.xford County, daughter 
of Charles H. and Mary K. (Fo.x) Philbrick, 
both also natives of Roxbury. Mr. Philbrick 
is one of the leading farmers of that town. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Trask are: 
Charles P., born in Peru, December 11, 
1882; and Bert L., born here November 13, 
1884. In religious faith Mr. Trask is a 
Universal ist, and his wife is a member of 
the P'ree Will Baptist church. Their home 
is very pleasantly located in the midst of 
beautiful lake and mountain scenerv. 




ILTON H. MERRIAM, a prosper- 
ous and progressive agriculturist of 
Norway township, was born Jan- 
uai)- 25, 1840, on the Merriam 
homestead, which he now owns and occupies, 
son of -Silas Merriam, Ji-. , and Mar)' (Coburn) 
Merriam. His grandfather, Silas Merriam, 
came to Norwa\- from Massachusetts in 1793. 
Silas Merriam was born July 3, 1769, in the 
town of Middleton, Mass., where he lived until 
his departure for Norway. Here he purchased 
a tract of heavily timbered land, from which 
he cleared and improved the homestead farm, 
and was afterward ens,ased in mixed husbaiichv 
until his death, which occurred August 14, 
1 S44. His wife, in maidenhood Hannah 
LJjjton, was born in Massachusetts, Jul)- 15, 
1779, and died in Norway, March 18, 1835. 
They had four children, namely: .Silas, Jr., 
born January 10, 1800, the father of Milton 
H. ; Andrew, born September 30, 1802, who 
died February 17, 1824; Amos, born February 
13, 1807, who married Jane Wentworth, of 
Greenwood township, now deceased, and died 
in 1883; and Noah, born November 21, 1810, 
who went to California many years ago, and 
has not since been heard from. 

Silas Merriam, Jr., who was ushered into 
the world on the Merriam homestead, inherited 
the paternal acres, and was there engaged in 



'-3^> 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gcncial farming throughout his life. He mar- 
ried Mary Coburn, who was jjorii in Green- 
wood townsliip, August 8, 1814. They had 
seven children, as follows: Andrew M., born 
May 14, 1S36, who died May 5, 1891 ; Olive 
S., liorn July 24, 1837, now the widow of the 
late John H. Hobbs, of Norway; Frederick 
R., born July 26, 1838, who now lives in the 
West; Milton H., the subject of this sketch; 
Alma E. , born January 22, 1842, who married 
Augustus Morton, of Freedom, N. H., and died 
June 30, 1873, leaving one child, Delia A., 
now residing in Norway village ; Granville R. , 
born March 21, 1843, who died I-'ebruary 11, 
1844; and Lawson L. R., born January 11, 
1849, now engaged in the produce and butcher- 
ing business in the village of Norway. 
Neither of the parents is now living, the father 
having died June 14, 1875, and the mother 
April 21, 1881. 

Milton M. ^^erriam was educated in his 
native town, attending the district schools and 
the village academy. After teaching school 
for several terms, he forsook that occujiation 
for farming. After the death of his parents he 
bought the interests in the homestead of the 
other heirs, and has since conducted it success- 
fully. The property contains two hundred 
acres of land. Me carries on general farming 
and dairying after the most approved methods. 
Mr. .Merriam affiliates with the Republican 
p. Illy ; and, while not ambitious of oflRcial dis- 
tinction, he has served the town in some of its 
minor ofificcs. He is a member of the grange 
at Norway village, and of the Golden Cross 
Lodge, Norwa\' Commander)'. Mrs. Merriam 
is a member of the Methodist E]iiscopal 
church. 

On January 16, 1894, Mr. Merriam was 
married to .Mrs. Lucelia A. (Andrews) Cum- 
mings, who was born in Woodstock, this 
county, January 21, 1848. Her jxarents, Jon- 
atlian and Lamelia (Durdiam) Andrew^s, re- 
s()cctively natives of Paris and Woodstock, are 
farming jieople, and reside on their homestead 
in I'aris. IVTrs. Merriam's first husband was 
iJaniel L. Cummings, who died March 23, 
1880, le.iving her with one cliild, Fthelyn 
A., who was born August 14, 1879. She 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
chinch. 




ILA.S IL NILE.S, a well-known 
merchant, farmer, and cattle dealer 
of Jay, and a member of the Maine 
legislature, was born here January 
15, 1845, "son of Varanes and Mehitable (Har- 
ris) Niles. Mr. Niles's grandfather, Jacob 
Niles, was a lifelong resident of Randolph, 
Mass. Grandmother Niles, after Jacob's 
death, married Nathaniel Jackson, of luiston, 
Mass., and came to reside in Jay in iSio. 

Varanes Niles was born in Randolph, De- 
cember 8, 1802. He accompanied his mother 
to Jay, and resided for the rest of his life upon 
the farm now owned by his children. 15esides 
carrying on the farm he dealt quite exten- 
sively in live stock and real estate. He died 
May' 18, 1878. His first wife, Mehitable, 
who was born in Greene, Me., September 10, 
1803, had nine children, as follows: Eunice 
A., who died October 31, 1895; Sullivan, who 
is a member of the firm of Niles Brothers, pork 
packers of ]^oston ; Harriet, who is now the 
widow of O. G. Kyes, and resides in North 
Jay; J. Harris, a member of the firm of Niles 
Brothers; Louville, who is with his brothers 
in Boston; ]{liza M., who resides at the home- 
stead; Silas H. (first), who died at the age of 
two years; Silas H. (second), the subject of this 
sketch; and luigene M., who is now a wliole- 
.sale and retail beef dealer at 27 l'"aneuil Hall 
Market, Boston. Mr. Niles's mother died July 
8, 1893, at the advanced age of ninety years. 

Silas H. Niles accpiired his education in the 
common schools of Jav, and the academies in 
Wilton antl Livcrmore, and the Edward Little 
Institute at Auburn. After leaving school he 
engaged in agriculture upon the homestead 
farm, where he has always resided. In 1868 
he entered a mercantile business at North Jay, 
as a member of the firm of Leiand & Niles. 
Five years later he bought his partner's inter- 
est in the store, which he has since conducted 
alone. He also does a large business as a 
buyer and shipper of fruit and cattle, which he 
markets in Boston. ( )n his farm of three hun- 
dred acres, which he has greatly improved, in 
addition to the usual crops he raises some ex- 
cellent stock. He is also a dealer in real 
estate, owning some valuable property in the 
neighboring towns. All his business interests 
are in a most fiourishing condition. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In |)olitics he is an active .sn])pi)iter (it the 
Republican party. Although averse to public 
office for lack of time to attend to its duties, 
he was prevailed upon to accept nomination for 
Kepresentati\'e to the legislature in ICS94, and 
was elected. Mr. Niles is unmarried. He 
and his sister, Miss Kliza M. Niles, continue 
to occupy the homestead. Both attend the 
L'niversalist church, in the work of whicii he 
takes an active interest. 




IIJJAAI 11. WllITCOAIB, of Nor- 
way, former!}' a merchant and real 
estate dealer, now retired, is a 
native of Ik^thel, Me. He was born April 24, 
1840, son of William A. and Mary A. (Har- 
ris) VVhitcomb. His grandfather, Abraham 
Whitcomb, who was born in Massachusetts in 
the year 1765, came from Harvard, in that 
.State, to West VVaterford, Me., and there took 
up a tract of 'wild land, which he cleared and 
converted into a productive farm. Abraham 
Whitcomb married Miss Sally Atherton, by 
whom he had fi\'e sons and three daughters; 
namely, Abraham, Isaac, Calvin, Polly, Sarah, 
Joel, \Villiam A., and Betsey. 

William A. Whitcomb, the seventh child and 
youngest son of his parents, was born in 18 16. 
His wife, Mary, was the only daughter of Caji- 
tain John Harris, of Bethel, formerly of \Vest- 
brook. Me. After his marriage he settled in 
Bethel, inuxhasing Hotel Bethel, at Bethel 
Hill, which he conducted until his death, at 
the age of twenty-seven years, a victim of con- 
sumption. He was survixed bv his wife and 
an only son, William Henry Whitcondj. In 
1S58 Willow Whitcomb was married to William 
Krost, a merchant and enterjirising business 
man of Norway, and the father of two children. 
These children found in her a loving mother, 
and in their father a wise counsellor. Mr. 
Frost was one of the founders of the Norway 
National Bank and later the President. In his 
own business, being careful and conservative, 
he acquired a comfortable fortune. Two chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Frost, but 
both died in childhood. She was si.xty-si.\ 
years old when she died, on March 14, 1882. 
William Henry Whitcomb, who was thir- 
teen vears old when he came with his mother 



to Norway, comjdeted in the schools of this 
town the education begun in Ikthel. On ar- 
riving at maidiood he, in com]xiny with Will- 
iam Frost, under the firm name of Whitcond) 
& Frost, started a small general store, which 
subsequently became one of the largest in the 
town. Upon Mr. h'rost's retirement fiom 
business Mr. Whitcondj took as a inntnei- 
I'". S. O.Miard. .Some years later he purchased 
Mr. (Jxnard's interest ami took in Thomas 
Smiley. Subsequently he disposed of his in- 
terest to his partner, and retired from mei- 
cantile life. His handsome residence, j. 
Main Street, was built Ijy Mr. Witherell, and 
with nearly all its contents was consumed in 
the destructive fire of i8c;3. On that occasion 
also he lost two stores and a tenement-house. 
He still, owns two single and two double 
houses. I'"ew, if an\-, have taken greater pride 
than he in the [jrogress of the town of Norway. 
He was active in the promotion and establish- 
ment of the Norway Water Works, in which he 
owns an interest; and he has held the office of 
President since the organization of the com- 
pany in 1887. He was also the largest stock- 
hcdder and the chief promoter in the enterprise 
of erecting the ( Jijera House Block. His in- 
vestments have not been confinetl to Norwa}', 
but i)rojects calculated to advance the town 
have always had the preference. 

In 1861 Mr. Whitcomb was married to Miss 
Ivah T. Hatch, a daughter of John and pjiima 
(Blowers) Hatch. Her father was born in 
New Gloucester, Me., whence in 1855 he came 
to Norway, and soon took his place among 
its most enterprising and [)rogressive fani)- 
ers. Mrs. Whitcomb, who was born ^August 
18, 1842, died September I, 18^5. She left 
one daughter, Lsabella, boiu July i~ , 1866, 
now residing with her father. Her son, Henry 
]•:., born June 24, 1S62, lived but a few 
months; and another daughter, Mary IC. , born 
October 5, 1864, died September 24, 1865. 
In politics Mr. Whitcomb has always been 
a stanch Democrat. A Republican district 
elected him in 1875 to the lower house of 
the State legislature. He has served the town 
as Selectman and Assessor for a number of 
years. He is a member of Oxford Lodge, 
No. 18, A. F. & A. M. ; of Mount Vernon 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, of Portland; of 



238 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



I'ortlaiiil ('(iminaiKlur)', Knights Templars; a 
charter member of Norway Lodge, No. 16; 
and belongs to VVildey Encampment, Inde- 
].)endcnt Ordei' of Odd l-"ello\vs. 



(s^YOSKTH E. CONANT, a prosperous and 
respected farmer of Peru, was born 
October 13, iS'47, on the farm that is 
still his home, son of Daniel L. and 
Mary A. (l-'rench) Conant. Joseph Conant, 
his paternal grandfather, came to Peru when 
the town had but few settlers, and here spent 
the remainder of his life, successfully engaged 
in general farming. He married Miss Lucinda 
Turf, by whom he became the father of nine 
children, six sons and three daughters, all of 
whom reached maturity. He died at the age 
of sixty-five years, and she at ninety-one. 

Daniel I,. Conant, who was a native of 
JSowdoinham, Me., born Se]5tember 25, 1807, 
spent his life on his farm. On coming of age 
he purchased it, paying the balance left due 
with his earnings from working out by the 
month on neighboring farms. A thorough 
farmer, he took jiride in his well-tilled fields. 
In religion he was a Universalist, and in ]ioli- 
tics a Republican. He died on July i, i8<S3, 
aged seventy-six years. On May 31, 1840, 
he married Mary A. P'rench, who was born 
A]iril 10, 181S, in Windham, Me. By her he 
became the father of four children, namely: 
Harriett A., born March 31, 1S41, who died 
April 17, 1869; Olive M., born January 25, 
1843, who is the wife of Hiram 1{. Stillman, 
of Peru; Josepli K. , the subject of this sketch; 
and William H., born June 6, 1849, who mar- 
ried (ieorgia Oldham, and is a tinsmith at 
Rumford l'"alls. The mother resides with her 
son, Joseph ¥.. 

After com|jleting his education, which was 
acquired in the schools of Peru, Joseph E. 
Conant followed the calling of teacher. He 
has since been engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. To-day he is the- owner of the home- 
stead farm, which he has increased to two 
hundred and seventeen acres. He carries on 
general farming and dairying with profit, keep- 
ing eleven high-grade Jersey cows. In relig- 
ious belief he is a Universalist, in political 
affiliation a Republican. 



On June 18, 1871, Mr. Conant married Miss 
P^mma J. Shea, who was born in Rath, Me., 
-September 6, 1853. Her parent.s, Nathan and 
.Susan Shea, now deceased, both attained the 
age of seventy-four years. Her father was 
a seafarer in early life, but his last years 
were spent in farming. Of his ten children, 
three are living. Mr. and Mrs. Conant have 
three children, namely: George H., born Jan- 
uary 13, 1874; Daniel H., born January 26, 
1879; and Daisy M., born July 30, 1890. All 
are living at home. 



AMES W. BUTTERFIELD, of Phil- 
lips, a Trial Justice of P'ranklin 
County for the past twenty-one year.'i 
and the Treasurer for some time of the 
Phillips Savings Bank, was born here, Novem- 
ber 7, 1828, son of Otis and Lovicy (Whitney) 
Butterfield. 'Phe Butterfield family is of Eng- 
lish origin. Mr. Butterfield's grandfatlier, 
Jesse Butterfield, a native oi Tyngsboro, 
Mass., and a farmer, joined the Continental 
army at the beginning of the Revolution, and 
served until after the surrender of Cornwallis 
at Yorktown, participating in the battle of 
Bunker Hill and being present at the surrender 
of I^urgoyne. In religious belief Jesse Butter- 
field was a Universalist. He died at F"arming- 
ton. Me., at the advanced age of ninety-three. 
Otis Butterfield," who was born in Farming- 
ton and there grew to maturity, came to Phil- 
lips in early manhood, and engaged in farming 
and worked at brick masonry. A member of 
the Democratic part), he was elected to a num- 
ber of offices, including those of Selectn)an, 
Assessor, and Overseer of the Poor. He was 
a member of the Free Will Bajitist church ; and 
he died October 26, 1874, aged seventy-foiu" 
years. His wife, a native of F"reeport, Me., 
to whom he was married in the town of Free- 
man, bore him five children. Of these, three 
are living — Cordelia L., Plenry M., and 
James W., all residents of Phillijjs. Of the 
others, Hiram, born September 28, 1S26, a 
man of strong character and jjleasing manners, 
was a public school teacher in Bangor for a 
number of years. He was prominent in Ma- 
sonic circles, and was Master of Blue Moun- 
tain Lodge, No. 67, of Phillips. At the time 



BIOGRAI'llICAL REVIEW 



V) 



of his death, wliich occurred in his thirt)-iiiiith 
year, he was Chairman of the ]-!oard of Select- 
men of this town. 

James W. Hutterfield was educated in his 
native town, finishing his studies at the high 
school. l''or twentv years after he left school 
he was engaged in agriculture in this town. 
He then abandoned that occupation in order to 
give mure attention to his other interests and 
to his public duties. lie has been for tweh'e 
years a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
l'hilli|)s Savings Bank, was the President in 
iS,S6 and 1887, and has been Treasurer since 
Se]itember, 1895. He was also a Director of 
the Union National Bank of this place for 
three years, and for the [last three years he has 
been Treasurer of the Phillips Village Corpora- 
tion. An esteemed member of the Republican 
party, he has held the office of Town Treasurer 
for eleven years; and he served as a member of 
the Maine Board of Agricidture in 18S3, 1884, 
and 1S85. 

Mr. Butterfield was married May 19, 1862, to 
Miss Mary Wright, daughter of Josiah Wright, 
of Phillips. Of the children that came of 
the union, a daughter, Eva L. , is living. She 
is the wife of Piildreth S. Staples, of Di.xfield, 
Me. Mr. Butterfield and his family attend the 
Free Will Baptist church. 




RLANDO H^ISH, the proprietor of a 
general store in Hartford, where he 
has conducted a successful business 
for many years, was born in this town, 
June 22, 1836, son of Edmund and Nancy 
(Ricker) Irish. Grandfather Tobias Ricker 
was a soldier in the Revolution, serving in 
Washington's body-guard. Edmund Irish, 
Sr. , the paternal grandfather, and a native of 
Gorham, Me., was one of the very first settlers 
in this town. He spent the remainder of his 
days here, engaged in farming and clearing his 
land. During the War of 181 2 he was in ac- 
tive service. When he died he was eighty- 
seven years of age. Bertha (Keen) Irish, his 
wife, lived to be eighty-one years old. They 
were the parents of five children. 

Edmund Irish, who was a native of Hart- 
ford, spent his life chiefly occupied in farm- 
ing. Respected for the success with which 



he managed his own affairs, his o|)inion was 
often sought in matters pertaining to the wel- 
fare of his town, and his services were availed 
of in the capacities of Selectman and Treasurer. 
In the old State militia he was a drummer, and 
served in the Aroostook War. He was a Uni- 
versalist in religious belief, and in politics he 
affiliated with the Republicans. He died in 
Hartford, eighty-seven years of age. His 
wife, Nancy, a native of Buckfield, Me., died 
at fifty-five. Of their five children Mary 
Ann, who was the wife of A. P. Bonnev, of 
Buckfield, died in i860, leaving three chil- 
dren. The others are: Melissa B. , the wife 
of George Wells, of South Weymouth, Mass. ; 
James Irish, residing in Hartford: Decatur 
Irish, on the old homestead in Hartford: and 
Orlando, the subject of this sketch. 

Orlando Irish spent his boyhood in his na- 
tive town, receixing his education in the com- 
mon schools. At nineteen he went to South 
P'ramingham, Mass., where he learned the 
trade of a hattei", and was in the employ of 
George Richardson & Brother thirteen yeai's. 
He then returned to Plartford, and in 1888, 
with his brother James, opened a general 
store, which, excluding an interval of three 
years, has been profitably conducted since. 
The stock comprises an excellent assortment 
of goods, which are sold at very reasonable 
prices. 

On h'ebruary 4, 1865, Mr. Irish was joined 
in marriage with Lizzie H. I'orbes, wdio was 
born in Buckfield, daughter of Jonah P'orbes. 
Two st)ns have been born to them, namely: 
lulgar C. Irish, who marrieil Lena M. Rob- 
bins, and is now a lumberman in Hartford; 
and Leon O. Irish, li\'ing at home. Mr. 
Irish is an adherent of the Republican party. 
He and Mrs. Irish are Universalists; and he 
is a member of Whitney Lodge, No. 167, 
A. E. & A. M.; also of the order of Good 
Templars. 



■^ATHANIEL HARDING, a well-known 
and prosperous resident of New 
Is V Sharon, Me., was born here on the 

29th of November, 1828, the son of 
Nehemiah and Abigail (Ames) Harding. He 
bears the name of his earliest ancestor in this 



240 



I5IOGKAPH1CAL REVIEW 



country, Xathanicl Harding, first, who came 
from England at an uncertain date, and settled 
in Massachusetts. 

ICphraim Harding, son of Nathaniel, first, 
was the father of Nathaniel, second, who was 
in the transport service tluring the Revolu- 
tionary War, and who came to New Sharon 
from Cape Cod in 1788, at the age of thirty- 
two years. W'ith him he brought his wife, 
Hannah, daughter of Lemuel Newcomb, of 
Wellfleet, Mass., and three children. His 
princi])al reason for migrating was to keep his 
sons from desiring to go to sea. They trav- 
elled by schooner to Hallowell, and from that 
point journeyed on foot to New Sharon, carry- 
ing what they could bring on their backs. 
Upon arriving at New Sharon they made their 
temporary home with Deacon Howes for the 
period of one year, Mr. Harding acquiring 
one hundred acres of wild land, which he 
cleared and built iqion during this time. His 
first house was a log cabin : but later he built 
a better house a little farther up the road, 
where the family lived, and where Mr. Hard- 
ing carried on general farming and worked at 
the trade of a cooper. He was a man of prom- 
inence among his fellow-citizens, and held 
several minor town offices. The date of his 
death was October 6, 1834. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nathaniel Harding, second, were the parents of 
nine children — Jemima, Richard, and Eliza- 
beth, all born in Truro, Cape Cod; Hannah; 
I'luebe: luinice, deceased; Nathaniel, Jr.; 
Nehemiah; and Eunice, second. 

Nehemiah Harding, who appears to have 
been the youngest son of his parents, was edu- 
cated at the district schools of his native town 
and at the l-'armington Academy. He com- 
menced teaching school as soon as he had 
completed his educational course and while 
he was yet in his teens, teaching quite a num- 
ber of terms until he was twenty-one, when he 
succeeded to the homestead, and took care of 
his parents for the rest of their lives. He 
married Abigail, the daughter of Noyes Ames, 
of Mercer. She was liorn in 1803, and died 
.September 29, 1872, at the age of si.\ty-nine 
years. Her husband died one year before she 
did, on December 30, 1871, at the age of 
seventy-five, he having been born in 1796. 
They were the parents of seven children. 



namely: Nathaniel, of whose life and ancestry 
this is a slight sketch; Hannah: Mary R. ; 
Phoebe A.; John L. ; Benjamin A. A.: and 
Caroline E. 

Nathaniel Harding, the first-born of the 
seven, obtained his education in the common 
schools of his native town of New Sharon, and 
at the age of sixteen went to Hallowell to 
work in a carpet factory, where he remained 
for four years, his first wages being only ten 
dollars a month. Coming back to New Sharon 
after this experience, he learned the trade of 
shoemaking, at which he worked for two years 
in this town, three years in Stark, and two 
years in Norridgewock. On his return 'to 
New Sharon after these last five years of 
absence, he bought out the shoe factory of 
John Trask, where he has carried on the man- 
ufacturing business ever since. 

When he first started in this business .Mr. 
Harding employed twelve hands. He was 
burned out in 1858, and went into the general 
merchandise business with George I'erkins in 
a store owned by Mr. Perkins. Here he car- 
ried on business for two years, until he could 
make good the losses he sustained by the fire. 
In 1862, however, after divitling the business 
profits with Mr. Perkins, he rebuilt his factory 
on the same old foundations, and employed 
fifteen hands. In 1886 he again enlargeil his 
factory by one-half, and took in David J. 
Jordan as his partner. He now employs 
thirty-five workmen. Mr. Harding built in 
1890 a large three-story building, which he 
rented to George H. Brown, a prominent coat 
manufacturer of New .Sharon, who still does 
business here. 

Mr. Harding never did confine his efforts to 
his shoe manufacturing alone, but has always 
been active in one or more different branches 
of business. During the year 1862 he was 
associated with Mr. Morrill in the general 
merchandise trade; and later he was with 
W. W. Norcross in the same business for a 
period of five years. 

He is known as one of the most progressive 
and energetic men in this jjart of the State, as 
well in the interests of his town and his 
fellow-citizens as in his own. 

At one time, in order to have plenty of 
water-power to run his factory with, he bought 




y . 




GEORGE W. CARROLL. 



BIOGRAI'llKA]. REVIEW 



243 



the Heard & Dyer mill, whieli he now rents 
out as a shingle-mill, retaining all his rights 
over the use of the water-power for purposes 
of manufacturing. He owns the finest river 
farm in this section of the State, and has re- 
paired the old and built improved new build- 
ings upon it, making it a beautiful as well as 
.1 lucrative country place. His step-son, John 
C'hilds, now resides on the farm. Mr. Hard- 
ing also owns the old homestead of his father, 
where he has set out an orchard of one thou- 
sand fine young grafted fruit-trees. He is 
likewise a large owner of real estate in Port- 
land, Me., where lie made his first purchase in 
1885, buying the double tenement-house at 
155 Congress Street. Later he bought three 
houses on Howard Street, also three houses on 
Congress Street; and close to the last house. 
No. 81, he owns a fine lot, where he is now 
building a large three-story tenement-house. 
Besides this amount of real estate in Portland, 
he owns quite a little more in connection with 
his partner, Mr. Jordan. 

Mr. Harding was married on the i8th of 
November, 1856, to Mrs. Naomi S. Childs, 
the widow of J. H. Childs, of New Norridge- 
wock — who died at the age of twenty-seven 
— and the daughter of William and Abigail 
(VVaugh) Hilton, of Anson. Her father was 
engaged in the meat business; and he served 
as Sheriff and also as Selectman, being one of 
the best known and most liked residents of 
the place. Mr. and Mrs. Hilton were the 
l)arents of ten children — Jonas; Kethsheba; 
Alden; Anson: Samantha .S. ; Calvin; James 
W. ; Lucy A.; Naomi S., now Mrs. Harding; 
and Sarah. Mr. Hilton died in 1S41 at the 
age of sixty-four. His wife died in 1862, at 
the age of seventy-seven. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harding have had one child, 
Lila I\L, who was born on the 2rst of Febru- 
ary, 1862, and who died in 1875. Mi's- Hard- 
ing has a son, John Child.s, born of her first 
marriage, who is one of the most prominent 
young men in the town. Notwithstanding 
Mr. Harding's wealth and his high social po- 
sition, he is a very modest man. He does 
not go into politics, and belongs to only 
one fraternal organization, being a member 
of Somerset Lodge, Royal Arch Masons, at 
Skowhegan, Me. 



/3)K()R(;h; \V. CARROLL, M.])., nf 
V ST Hrownfield, Me., though one of the 
youngest physicians in the locality, 
has already attained prominence, and added to 
the lustre of his alma iiia/ir, the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons in Hoston, Mass. 
Hc-' was born on Prince hldward Island. April 
7, 1 866, and is a son of Jnim and Christie 
(Cousins) Carroll, both of that place. John 
Carroll is in active business as a builder and 
carriage-maker. He and his wife have been 
blessed with a family of seven children, five 
of whom are now living, all well educated. 
They are: William, a carpenter residing in 
Portland, who married a Miss Brundige; 
Zena, wife of Arthur McDonald, of I'rince 
Kdward Island; George W., the subject of 
this sketch ;' John, a brakeman on the railroad; 
Ida, who is with her parents; Peter, the sixth 
child, died at the age of sixteen; and Minnie, 
the seventh, died at the age of seventeen. 

George W. Carroll left home at the age of 
fifteen, and went to live with an aunt in I'orl- 
land. Me. While there he worked in a (hug 
store for some time, and also studied medicine 
for two years: and he subsequently spent two 
years in Boston engaged as clerk in a drug 
store, and also employed in a hospital. In 
this way he became familiar with the character 
and use of drugs and medicines and the aspects 
of disease; and when he entered the College 
of I'hysicians and .Surgeons he had n valuable 
store of practical knowledge, which materially 
aided him in pursuing the college curriculum. 
Receiving his diploma on December 31, 1895. 
he soon had a large and lucrative practice, his 
success being something unusual. Dr. Carroll 
first located at Bryant's I'ond, Oxford County, 
and in 1895 purchased the home in 1-irown- 
field which he now occupies. He has a ri'- 
markably large practice in Brownfield and 
vicinity, and also carries a line of drugs and 
medicines. 

Dr. Carroll was married January 16, 1S94, 
to Miss Dollie Frost, of Bryant's Pond, 
daughter of Samuel and Alvira (Gallison) 
P^rost. Mr. P'rost, who is a veteran of the 
late war, has been for years engaged in farm- 
ing, and is now retired. Dr. Carroll is a 
stanch Republican in politics. He has an at- 
tractive personality, and has made many 



;44 



BIOGRAI'HRAI, REVIKW 



fiicntls ill this section. Mrs. Carroll is a 
member of tlie L^niversalist Church at Bryant's 
Toncl. 



'^ClLB^RIOri]-: G. WHKELKR, the owner 
1^ of a fine farm in the town of Bethel, 
""^^ I I "^ was born here, July 8, 1825, son of 
Joseph and Olive (Gat^e) Wheeler. Joseph 
Wheeler, Sr., grandfather of Elbridge G., 
born in Temple, N.H., in 1766, came from 
there to Bethel in 1793. His brother, Sam- 
uel, who came with him to this county, set- 
tling in Gilead, was a Revolutionary patriot. 
Joseph Wheeler was a native of Langdon, 
Sullivan County, N. H. When but four )'ears 
old he was brought to Bethel by his parents, 
and the remainder of his life was passed in 
this town. He engaged in farming with a 
fair degree of success, and up to within three 
weeks of the close of his long life of eighty- 
three years was able to attend to his usual 
avocations. In early life he was a Democrat 
or Whig, and supported the Republican party 
after its formation. His wife, who was born 
in Bethel, and spent her life here, died at the 
age of si.\ty-si.\ years. Her father, Daniel 
Gage, a native of Concord, N. H., enlisted for 
the Revolutionary W'ar at the age of sixteen, 
and served five years and nine months. He 
was advanced to the rank of Sergeant. Some 
time after, General Washington called him 
from the ranks, and publicly thanked and com- 
plimented him for his bravery in picking up a 
flag, whose bearer had been killed on the 
field, and carrying it during the remainder of 
the engagement. Soon after the close of the 
war he came to Bethel, purchased a farm, and 
was successfully engageil in farming through- 
out the rest of his life, which lasted eighty-si.\ 
years. Joseph Wheeler and his wife had nine 
children, all of whom except one attained ma- 
turity. 

Until he was nineteen years of age El- 
bridge G. Wheeler lived with his parents on 
the home farm, attending the district school 
for the usual period. On leaving home, he 
went to Abington, Mass., where he learned 
the shoemaker's trade, and subsequently 
worked at it for about seven years. He 
then returned to Bethel, and inirchased the 



farm that he now owns, flere he built a 
shoe shop, and thereafter, for about thirty 
years, both worked at his trade and carried on 
his farm. He has added to the original farm 
by the purchase of adjoining land, so that he 
now has about one hundred and si.xty acres. 
The property is conveniently located, being 
but a mile from West Bethel. Some years 
ago he abandoned shoemaking, and has since 
devoted his attention exclusively to agri- 
culture. 

Mr. Wheeler has been twice married. The 
first time was in 1S51, when he was united to 
Miss Melissa Grover, of Bethel. She died in 
1852, leaving one child, Ella M., now the 
wife of Ralph W. Bean, a resident of Little- 
ton, Col. The second mariage was contracted 
in 1858 with Miss Mehitable J. Grover, of 
Mason, Me. liorn of this union were a son 
and two daughters, namely: Minnie E., a high- 
school teacher in Edgartown, Mass: PTora 
Jane, a high-school teacher in Jefferson, 
N.H.; and Edward E., who died at the age of 
twenty-two years, when a student of Bates 
College. Mr. Wheeler, who is a Republican 
partisan, takes quite an active part in local 
political matters. He has served as Select- 
man for five or si.x years, on the School Com- 
mittee for two years, and he has been Justice 
of the Peace for twenty-one years. He is a 
member of Bethel Lodge, No. 96, A. F. & 
A. M. ; and of Pleasant Valley Grange at 
West Bethel. 




ION H. PIKE, a prosperous farmer 
and lumberman of Waterford, and a 
native of. this town, was born March 
18, 1858, son of John C. and Eli'za 
A. (Willard) Pike, both also natives of 
Waterford. His paternal grandparents, John 
and Esther (Richardson) Pike, born in Oxford 
County, were farming people of high repute. 
His maternal grandparents, Lewis and Mary 
(Plaisted) Willard, were born respectively in 
Harvard, Mass., and Gorham, Me. 

John C. Pike spent the greater part of his 
life in Waterford, engaged in farming and 
lumbering. In 1841 he went to California, 
and worked for aljout a year at mining, in 
which he was very successful: but he was 



BIOGRAI'HKAl. RK\MKW 



^45 



obliged to return East on account ol liis 
health, ami never fully recovered his former 
vigor. lie died December 6, icSgi, aged 
sixty-three years. In politics lie was always 
a firm Republican, and took mucii interest in 
town affairs. He was a member ot tlie 
grange and an active worker in its interests. 
The three children born to him and his wife 
are all living. They are: Sarah M., Wiuw 
H., and Ernest L. Sarah M., born Jul\' 7, 
1855, is the wife of Henry Wentworth, a mill 
man living in Waterford, and has five children 
— John, Carrie, Ered, Ernest, and lunma. 
Ernest L., born November 24, 1859, an enter- 
l^rising young farmer, carries on the old Pike 
homestead, is engaged in Inmbering with his 
brother, and conducts a manufacturing busi- 
ness in Waterford. 

Bion \l. I'ike was educated in the common 
schools and at Bridgton Academy. On ac- 
count of his father's health he remained at 
home, helping on the farm until March, 1890. 
He then came to his present place, which is 
known as the Daniel Green farm. Besides 
attending to his farm work, for the past eight 
years, in company with his brother, he has 
carried on lumbering quite e.xtensively in the 
northern part of Oxford County. Being a 
hard worker, and having a good deal of prac- 
tical sense, his undertakings have usLially 
terminated successfully. 

On September 22, 1889, Wr. Pike was mar- 
ried to Miss Edith Nevers, who was born 
March 30, 1865, daughter of Marshall and 
Mary E. (Sanders) Nevers. Mr. Nevers was 
born in Sweden, Me., June 14, 1825. His 
wife, also a native of Sweden, died in Norway, 
in 1879. He was farming in Sweden until 
1885, when, with his son, William H., he re- 
moved to Brown County, Nebraska. He re- 
turned some time ago, and is now living with 
Mr. Pike. On September 18, 1861, he en- 
listed at Sweden in Company B, Twenty-third 
Maine Volunteers, for a term of nine months, 
at the end of which he returned home. His 
health has since been greatly impaired by 
rheumatism, brought on by exposure while in 
the army. His other children were: Mary 
and Clara, deceased; William H., who mar- 
ried Miss Nellie M. Frye, and is now engaged 
in farming in Brown County, Nebraska; and 



Aramiiita, also deceased. .Mr. and Mrs. Pike 
have six children, all living, namely: Clay- 
ton, born December 15, [890; .Marion, born 
in 1891 : ArdelJ, born June 3, 1892; Augusta, 
born August 30. 1893; Nellie, born October 
3, 1894; and John Marshall, horn December 
10, 1895. In politics Mr. Pike is a loyal Re- 
publican. He is an esteemed member of Ox- 
ford Lodge, No. fji. Independent Oriler of 
Odd I-"ellows, of North Waterford. 



(5 I HOMAS CROSWELL. a former mer- 

' I chant of P'armington l'"alls, now living 
in retirement, was born in his present 
home, November 23, 1825. He is a son of 
Thomas and Mary (Gower) Croswell and a 
grandson of Andrew and .Sarah Croswell. 
His great-grandfather, the Re\'. .Andrew Cros- 
well, who graduateti at Harvard College in 
the class of 1728, was a noted Congrega- 
tional minister. 

Thomas Croswell, Sr., was a native of 
Plymouth, Mass., born April 8, 1791. U]5on 
the death of his father, being then about fif- 
teen years of age, he went to live with his 
brother .Samuel in Paris, Oxford County. 
Afterward he lived in Mercer, Me., where his 
brother Andrew was practising as a physician ; 
and there, after the close of the War of 18 12, 
he opened a store. In 18 16 he sold his stock 
in trade; and, renting a building in P'arming- 
ton Ealls, he conducted a successful mercan- 
tile business for two years. At the end (jf 
that time he purchased the Squire Morrill 
stand, where he had commenced business, and 
erected a store. Without the facilities which 
make things so easy for the merchant of to- 
day, and obliged to bring his goods from Au- 
gusta and Hallowell by wagon, he yet estab- 
lished a very large trade. Leaving an un- 
blemished reputation for probit)', he died in 
1879, aged eighty-eight years. His wife, who 
was a daughter of James Gower, of Industry, 
was about the same age at her death. They 
were the parents of nine chiklren — Mary G., 
Sarah P., Thomas, Andrew C, Susan G., 
James H. G., Micah .S., Elizabeth B. , and 
Hannah F. 

Thomas Croswell received his book learning 
in the public schools near his home and at 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



l-'armington Academy. At the same time he 
was acquiring a knowledge of business in his 
father's store, where he began to make himself 
useful when very young. He spent his vaca- 
tions in the store, and after he reached 
twenty-one he did most of the buying. In 
1866, with his brother Andrew C, he bought 
his father's interest. Under the new manage- 
ment the business went on increasing until it 
reached mammoth proportions. In 188S 
Thomas Croswell .sold his share to his brother, 
and retired from trade. His other interests, 
however, give him ample occupation for his 
time. He owns a valuable farm and a num- 
ber of tenement-houses, and lias dealt to some 
extent in lumber. 

On October 22, 1861, he was married to 
Harriet J. Taylor, who was born September 
10, 1830, in Danvers, Mass., daughter of John 
Taylor, of Farmington. Mr. Croswell has no 
children. He is active in politics as a Re- 
publican, and he occupied a seat in the legis- 
lature in 1872 and 1873. Roth Mr. and Mrs. 
Croswell are active in the Congregational 
church at I-"armington j-'alls, and contribute 
generously toward its su|5port. 



3^R.\ JUSTIN WARRINER, a young 
I and enterprising merchant of Fryeburg, 
J_ Me., was born in this town, March 
27, 1864, son of Chauncey and y\bbie 
Clement (Towle) Warriner. Justin Warriner, 
Mr. Warriner's grandfather, was a prosperous 
farmer of I'ryeburg in his day. 

Chauncey Warriner, Mr. Warriner's father, 
was born in Vershire, Yi. In young manhood 
he learned the trade of watchmaker and jew- 
eller. He carried on business in W'ashington, 
I). C, and in Philadelphia until, in 1862, he 
came to P'rveburg, where he resided for the 
rest of his life. He died February 6, 1S84. 
His wife, formerly Abbie C. Towle, who sui- 
vives him, was born in P^ryeburg, and is a 
daughter of Dr. Ira and .Sarah Clement Towle. 
P)r. Towle, a native of Newfield, Me. , was a 
well-known physician of P'ryeburg for nearly 
half a century. His wife was a native of this 
town. Mrs. Chauncey Warriner now resides 
with her son, Ira J. .She is the mother of 
three children, as follows: Mary, wife of 



Charles P". Lord, a jeweller in Windham, Me. ; 
lulson, who is a jeweller by trade, but is now 
teaching music in Seattle, Wash. ; and Ira J., 
the subject of this sketch. 

Ira J. Warriner was educated in the common 
schools and at the P'ryeburg Academy. With 
the exception of a year spent in Portland he 
has always made his home in P'ryeburg. In 
April, 1895, he formed a partnership with 
P'rank A. Hill for the purpose of carrying on 
the grocerv business and the manufacture of 
clothing. This firm continued in business 
until February, 1896, w^hen it was disscdved. 
Retaining possession of the store, Mr. Warri- 
ner has since conducted it alone. He occupies 
spacious and centrally located quarters, which 
are well stocked with a full line of staple 
goods, including groceries, provisions, and 
agricultural implements; and he has a large 
and constantly increasing patronage. 

In politics he is a Democrat, but has never 
aspired to public office. He is a member of 
Lodge No. 34, Knights of Pythias, and is con- 
nected with the Pilgrim Insurance Company. 
Mr. Warriner's mother is a member of the 
New Jerusalem church, whose cheerful system 
of religious faith is based on the teachings of 
iMiianuel Swedenborg. 



r^TON. DANIEL BROWN, wdio has 
l-^-l been Town Treasurer of Waterford, 
J_U I Me., for over twenty years, was 

— ' born in this town, January i, 1826, 
the son of Thaddeus, Jr., and Asenath 
(Nourse) Brown. 

His grandfather, who also was named Thad- 
deus Brown, was born in Harvard, Mass. He 
moved to Waterford, Me., in 1786, and, set- 
tling on a farm about a mile east of Waterford 
P'lat, engaged in farming and lumbering, be- 
coming in course of time one of the most ex- 
tensive dealers in land and lumber in that sec- 
tion. He married Mary Pollard, and a family 
of nine children grew up about him; namely, 
Daniel, Malbory, Jabez, Susan. Le\i, Thad- 
deus, Jr., Mary, Mercy, and Sarah. 

Thaddeus Brown, Jr.. the father abo\e 
named, was a native and lifelong resident of 
Waterford; and his wife also passed her days 
from birth to death in that town. They, too, 



lUOGRAPH ICAL R KV I K\V 



^47 



had nine children. Theodore, the eldest, who 
was born in 1824, and died in Watcrford in 
i<S6i, was a Captain in the State militia. He 
married Clara Bryant. Daniel, the second 
son, is the sid)ject of this article. Mercy, 
horn March 29, i82cS, is the wife of .Scribner 
Chadbonrne, a farmer, formerly of W'aterford, 
now of Vandal ia. 111. The third son, named 
John, died yonng. Mary is the widow of 
Charles H. Hale, late of Augusta, Wis., who 
died in February, i8g6, leaving one son, 
Charles. Waldo T. Brown is a prominent 
farmer of Waterford, a sketch of whom appears 
in this \olume. Ellen M. is the wife of EI- 
bridge Stone, a blacksmith and farmer of 
Waterford. Myra A. is the wife of W. H. 
Bailey, a clothing manufacturer now living in 
Harrison village, Me., and has two children. 
Angenette, who is unmarried, lives with her 
sister, Mrs. Mary Hale, in Augusta, Wis. 

Daniel Brown attended the common schools 
of his native town, laying up a store of knowl- 
edge which served as a foundation fur the 
superstructure of experience. He began to do 
farm chores when a boy, and as he grew older 
assumed heavier and more responsible duties. 
In 1851 he came to his present home in 
Waterford Flat, which was then owned by his 
Uncle Daniel, a retired trader. Mr. Brown 
has achieved marked success as a farmer. He 
now owns about two hundred acres of land in 
Waterford, which is available for tillage and 
pasturage; and his sleek anil well-kept cows 
produce a rich cream, for which he finds a 
ready market. 

Mr. Brown was married October 15, 1850, 
to Miss Mary Stone, who was born in Water- 
ford, December 31, 1830, the daughter of 
Alonzo and Sally (Watson) Stone. Her par- 
ents also were natives of Waterford. Her 
father, who was a farmer, died about 1869, 
and her mother in October, 1890. Six chil- 
dren were born to this couple, namely: Henry 
P., who died in 187 i ; Leander, a carpenter of 
Waterford Flat, who married Jane Warren; 
Mary, Mrs. Brown; Harriet, wife of James 
Sullivan, a machinist of Dorchester, Mass.; 
Charlotte M., living in Somerville, Ma.ss. ; 
and Lewis F., a baker in Somerville, who 
married Miss Sarah Chase. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown have two children. 



The elder, Florence Agnes, who was born 
January 31, 1852, is the widow of the Rev. 
Orlando A. Rounds, a clergyman of the Uni- 
versalist church, to whom she was married 
June 30, 1875. Mr. Rounds was iiorn in New 
York State, June 13, 1849. lie preached in 
Bridgton, Me., two years, in I'otsdam, N.Y., 
five years, and in Utica, N.Y., five years. 
He died at the age of thirty-eight, December 
27, 1887, leaving three children — Lawrence 
Rexford, born December 8, 1S76. a graduate 
of Bridgton (Me.) Academy: Mary I-'lorence, 
born October 25, 1S78, who is attending 
Douglas Seminary at Waterford Flat, Me.; 
and Marguerite, born June 15, 1S87, who died 
April 27, 1890. Mr. Bnnvn's second daugh- 
ter, Helen May, who was born January 6, 
1873, is a graduate of Douglas Seminary, 
Waterford, in the class of '892, and has 
taught school several terms in Norway and 
Waterford. 

Mr. Brown has \i)ted the Democratic ticket 
ever since attaining his majority. He is a 
Justice of the Peace, and has held many town 
offices, including that of Selectman, to which 
he was elected several times, and of Town 
Treasurer, in which capacity he has served for 
over twenty years. He was a member of the 
State legislature in 1886. His daughter, 
Mrs. Rounds, is Po.stmistress at Waterford. 
Mr. Brown is also prominent in local frater- 
nities, belonging to Lodge No. 132, A. F. & 
A. M., of Waterford; Keoka Chapter, No. 12, 
of the Eastern Star. He and his family at- 
tend the Universalist church. 




ENRY HERBERT RICE, .senior 
member of the firm Rice & Paine, 
Is I and a prominent dry-goods merchant 

of Farmington, was born in Strong, 
Me., Sei)tember 4, 185 1, son of Richard .S. 
and Susan (Lockhart) Rice. Richard Rice, 
the grandfather of Henry Herbert, was a na- 
tive of Scarboro, Me. He came to Farming- 
ton among the early settlers, bought two him- 
dred acres of new land, situated in the eastern 
part of the town, and besides clearing it 
brought it to a good state of cultivation. He 
died in his prime at the age of thirty-six 
years, and his farm is now owned by J. Par- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ham. lie married Hannah l-iates, a native of 
St. John, N.]->. , whose only child was Rich- 
ard S. 

Richard S. Rice was educated in the dis- 
trict schools and at the Farmington Academy, 
and after completing his studies he was for a 
time engaged in teaching school. He served 
an apprenticeshi[) to the tailor's trade; and, 
after carrying on business in Greene, New 
Portland, and Strong, he established him.sclf 
in Farmington, where he remained for four 
years. Removing then to Wilton, he was in 
business there for three years. At the end of 
that time he returned to this town, and, pur- 
chasing a residence on High Street, resided 
here until his death, which occurred when he 
was thirty-si.\ years old. He was a very ca- 
pable business man, and jjossessed a great 
amount of natural ability. For a time he 
served as Town Clerk, to which office he was 
elected by the Republican party. He was a 
Mason, being a member of Maine Lodge of 
Farmington. His wife, Susan, who survives 
him, residing with her son in this town, is a 
daughter of William Lockhart, a native of 
.Stuart town, County Tyrone, Ireland. She 
reared two children, namely: Abbie, who is 
the wife of j. H. Clifford, of Brooklyn, N.Y., 
and has two children — Charlotte S. and 
Hilda R. ; and Henry H., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Henry Herbert Rice acquiretl his education 
in the district schools, Kent's Hill Seminary, 
and in the Normal School at F^armington. 
After finishing his studies he entered mercan- 
tile pursuits as a clerk in H. Ramsdell's dry- 
goods store, where he remained until 1870. 
In that year he went to Florida, where he re- 
mained for some six months, occupied in 
school-teaching and the lumber business. Re- 
turning home in 1871, he bought a half-inter- 
est in the business carried on by Mr. Rams- 
dell, his former employer. This connection 
had lasted ten years when he sold his interest 
to his partner, and started on a visit to the 
Western States with a view of settling in 
one of them. He was not favorably impressed 
with the country, so he returned here, and 
opened a dry goods stock in the William Tar- 
box store. Main Street. Under his able direc- 
tion the business so increased that more space 



was soon needed. He now occupies the Dol- 
bier & Waugh Block, and the establishment is 
the largest of its kind in Franklin County. 
Besides dealing extensively in dry and fancy 
goods, he has a millinery and cloak department 
heavily stocked with seasonable articles and 
garments, which are exceedingly attractive to 
lady shop])crs. He also conducts a large 
branch store in .Madison, Me., where he em- 
]iloys four clerks, and does a flourishing busi- 
ness. In January, 1894, he admitted F"red G. 
Paine to partnership with him in the F'arming- 
ton store. The firm not only maintains its 
acquired prestige, but is constantly increasing 
its popularity and expanding its enterprise. 

On September 4, 1882, Mr. Rice wedded 
Ida M. Porter, daughter of William B. Porter, 
a mechanic of Elgin, Minn. Mrs. Rice is the 
mother of one daughter, Bertha M., who was 
born in 1884. Mr. Rice takes an active in- 
terest in the general progress of the town. 
He has been one of the principal [iromoters of 
the Farmington water works. In politics he 
is a Republican, and he served four years as a 
member of the School Board. He occupies a 
handsome residence on Main Street. Some 
time ago he bought the H. Stewart house on 
High Street, which he has since remodelled 
and enlarcred. 



)/lLLlAM B. LlBAROX, a prosper- 
J ous anil widely-known farmer of 
Lovell township, was born in 
Lovell, April 21, 1829. His parents were 
William and Joan (Jordan) I.rBaron. His 
father was a lineal descendant, in the fifth 
generation, of Dr. F'rancis LeBaron, a highly 
educated young F'renchman who was wrecked 
off the coast of Massachusetts in 1694, and 
who settled in Plymouth, where in the follow- 
ing year he married Mary, daughter of PaI- 
ward Wilder. Doctor LeBaron died in 1704, 
at the age of thirty-six years, having won a 
high reputation as a physician and surgeon of 
unusual skill. He left three sons — James, 
Lazarus, and F'rancis. 

William LeBaron was born in .South Paris, 
Me., and lived for a while in Albany, this 
.State. He moved to Lo\-ell when the jilace 
was a wilderness, and was the first settler on 



BIOGRAPHKWT, REVIEW 



■■•49 



tlic west side (if Kczar roiul. 1 ravel then was 
extremely difficult, for several years the set- 
tlers being obliged to swim their horses across 
the pond in order to reach the other side. Mr. 
William LeHaron was engaged- in farming in 
Lovell up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred on August lO, 1863, when he was sixt)-- 
seven years of age. He was twice married. 
II is first w'ife, Joan, the mother of his son 
William B., was the daughter of a Revolution- 
ary soldier, who was in the Continental army 
seven years. She was born in dray. Me., 
and reared in Albany, whither her father 
moved when she was a child. Mrs. Joan J. 
LeBaron died September 15, 1856, aged fifty- 
five years. .She was the mother of twelve chil- 
dren, namely: Lvman, James, and William, 
deceased ; Temperance, widow of Levi Parker, 
living in .South Waterboro village, York 
County; William B., the subject of this 
sketch; James, James (second), Ruth, Orrin 
B. , and Henrietta, deceased; Harriet, wife of 
John M. Marr, of Lewiston, Me. ; and Wales, 
deceased. The father's second wife was Mrs. 
Phebe Jordan Rand, his first wife's sister, and 
widow of Nathaniel Rand. She, too, has 
passed awa\'. 

William B. LeBaron was educated in the 
common schools of his native town. He re- 
mained on the home farm with his father and 
mother until 1856, when he went to Pennsyl- 
vania; and for two years and a half he was en- 
gaged in lumbering in Cambria County. Re- 
•turning then to Lovell he resumed his old 
place, and when his parents died succeeded to 
ownership of the homestead, where he now 
lives. Lngaging in general husbandry he 
raised snme stock, and kept a dairy, selling- 
cream, and in the course of time made many 
imjjrovements on the farm. He has worked 
hard to attain his present prosperity, shirking 
no task, howe\-er difficult, and is now enjoying 
the fruit of his industry, having recenth' ilis- 
posed of his land to his son, Mandel A. 

Mr. LeBaron was marrictl Jidy 2 i , 1855, to 
Miss Melissa Fox, a native of Ptjrter, this 
county, daughter of John and Clarinda (Stan- 
ley) l-"ox. Mr. Fox was born in Gilmanton, 
N.H., December 7, 1795. He settled in 



Lovell in 1848, and was engaged here in farm- 
ing up to the time of his death, May 6, 1859. 



Ilis wife was horn in Shaiileigii. Me., I'"ebruary 
4, 1809, and died in Lovell, January 29, 1873. 
Nine children have blessed the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. LeBaron : Charles I-'remont, boiii 
December 15, 1856, died in infancy; Roscoe 



A., born September 



i8c8, manied Miss 



Lucy B. McAllister, and lives near his father; 
Herbert A., born May 23, i860, married Miss 
Mabel Foss, of Turner, Me., and now resides 
at Rumford l-'alls, this State; Lincoln, born 
July 29, 1863, met his death by diowning in 
the State of Oregon, July 9, 1886; Mandel A.-, 
born P^ebruary 19, 1865, is with his parents; 
John F., born March 26, 1870, married Miss 
Carrie B. Grogan, of Pennsylvania, and is now- 
living in Rumford P'alls; Roy, born .Septem- 
ber 12, 1875, is attending school in Kumfoid 
Falls, tlus .State. Two younger children ilietl 
in infancy. Mr. LeBaron has voted the Re- 
publican ticket since he was first qualified to 
exercise the right of suffrage. ?Ie and his 
wife are members of the Congregational church 
at Lovell Centre. 




IDNEY T. BROWN, M.D., a 

graduate of the Medical .School of 
Maine, class of 1874, is a well- 
known physician of ]Jenmark, Ox- 
ford Count)-, where he holds the office of Town 
Clerk. He was born in Sebago, Me., August 
19, 1 84 1, son of William S. and Ada (Storer) 
Brown. Dr. Brown's grandfather, John B. 
Brown, who was a nati\-e of Baldwin, Me., 
settled u])ou a farm in .Sebago, where he be- 
caiiie jjrosperous as an agriculturist; and he 
dietl there in i 847. 

Williani S. Brown, Dr. Brdwn's father, was 
born in .Sebago. When a young man he 
adopted the occu]iatioii of a miller; but after 
following that business in his native town for 
a number of years he n-ioved to Corham, Me., 
where he engaged in tilling the snil, and re- 
sided there until his death. His wife, Ada 
-Storei-, w-ho was a native of .Sebago, became 
the n-idther of seven children, as follows: .Sid- 
ne)- T., the subject of this sketch; Harley G., 
who is married and li\-es in Mount Holly, 
N.J. ; Silas, who married lillen Rand, of 
Brownfield, and is carrying on a butchering 
business in coni-iection with farming in West 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Gorliam, Mf. ; Iixiiig ()., who died in iHiS-; 
John, who is no longer living; and Othello and 
Lewcllyn, who are carrying on the undertaking 
business in (iorham, Me. Mrs. Ada Storer 
Brown is now residing with her son in Gorham. 

Sidney T. Brown grew to manhood in Se- 
bago, acquiring his early education in the 
common schools. On September 29, 1862, he 
enlisted as a musician in Company K, Twenty- 
fifth Regiment, Maine Volunteers, under Colo- 
nel Franci.s Fessenden and Cajitain Asa C. 
Palmer, for service in the Civil War. Nine 
months later, on July i, 1863, he received his 
discharge; and on September 20, 1S64, he re- 
enlisted in the same capacity in Company C, 
Ninth Regiment, with which he served until 
the close of the war, being mustered out at 
Raleigh, N. C. , June 30, 1865. His jirofes- 
sional studies were begun at Denmark Corner, 
and continued at the medical school connected 
with Bowdoin College, where he was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1874. Since settling in 
Denmark in 1875, Dr. Brown has acquired a 
wide reputation as a skilful and reliable physi- 
cian, having built up an extensive and lucrative 
practice, which he still maintains in this and 
the adjoining towns. 

In 1877 Dr. Sidney T. ]?rown was united in 
marriage with Augusta Harriman, of Lovell, 
Me., daughter of Moses and Mar\- ((iile) Har- 
riman, late of that town. Politically, the 
Doctor is a Republican, and has abl\- filled the 
office of Town Clerk for the past eleven years. 
He is connected with the Masonic fraternity, 
being at the present time Master of Mount Mo- 
riah Lodge, No. 56, of Denmark ; and he is 
also a member of Denmark Lodge, No. 50, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Both 
])rofessionaIly and socially he occupies a prom- 
inent position among the leading residents of 
Denmark, and is spoken of by his fellow- 
townsmen with the highest regard. Mrs. 
Brown is a member of the Comrregational 
church. 



ALEB W. CILMORE, a succe.s.sful 
farmer of Industry and formerh- a 
member of the Board of Selectmen, 
was born in this town, August 29, 
1831, son of James and Rachel (Wade) Gil- 




more. Mr. Gilmore's parents were natives of 
Woolwich ; and his father was born October i 7, 
1798. Mr. Gilmore's paternal grandparents, 
William F. and Mary (Trout) Gilmore, re- 
sided in Woolwich, his grandfather being a 
civil engineer and a farmer. 

James Gilmore, Mr. Gilmore's father, who 
was the first of the family to settle in Indus- 
try, arrived in March, 1830. He bought the 
l^lisha Drew farm, which is now owned by his 
son, Caleb W. , and he resided here for the rest 
of his life. He died August 14, 1868. In 
1840 he was elected a member of the Board of 
Selectmen, to which body he was twice re- 
elected; and he was a Deacon of the Baptist 
church in Starks. He was twice married ; and 
his first wife, whom he wedded November 6, 
1823, was before marriage Lucy Wade. She 
was born in Woolwich, ]\Iay 21, 1795; and she 
died January 21, 1S27. By this union there 
were two children: Mary H., who was born 
February i, 1S25, and is now the widow of 
Amasa Works, who died August i, 1866; and 
Luc\' \\'ade, who was born January 21, 1827, 
married William B. Tibbetts, and died No- 
vember 12, 1867. On September i, 1828, 
James Gilmore married for his second wife 
Rachel Wade, his first wife's sister, and she 
became the mother of eight children, namely: 
David, who was born in 1829, and died 
October 29, 1S92, survived by his widow, ^Irs. 
Emma Gardner Gilmore, who resides in 
Sangerville, Me. ; Caleb W. , the subject of 
this sketch ; Hannah Preble, who was born 
August 5, 1833, and died April 13, 1857; 
Betsey Jane, who was born March 25, 1836, 
married Titcomb Collins, and died November 
25, 1866; Johanna Payson, who was born F"eb- 
ruary 29, 1839, and died I\Iarch 8, 1863 ; Will- 
iam James, who was born Jul\' 12, 1841, 
married Margaret Broderic, and is now a 
prosperous farmer of Industr)- ; Ahner Wade, 
who was born January 30, 1843, and died June 

7, 1850; and Bradford, who was born Januar)- 

8, 1S45, and died in 1862, while serving in 
the Civil W'ar. Mrs. Rachel Wade Gilmore 
died July 27, 1853. 

Caleb W. Gilmore, the second son born to 
his parents, James and Rachel Gilmore, ac- 
quired his education in the schools of his 
native town. At the age of nineteen he went 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



to sea, but al'uer remaining away lioni lionic 
tlirec ^ears he returned and took charge of the 
farm. He has since resided here with tlie ex- 
ception of a year spent in Starks, and owns 
l)esides the home farm of one hunched and 
twenty-two acres some valuable outlying land. 
He carries on general farming, making a spe- 
cialty of ]iroducing corn, hay, and ])Otatoes ; 
and he also raises shee]). 

On November 6, 1856, Mr. Gilmore wedded 
Nancy N. Manter. .She was born in Industry, 
November 25, 1831, daughter of William \V. 
and Betsey W. (Norton) Manter. Her par- 
ents, who were natives of this town, afterward 
engaged in farming in New Sharon. They are 
no longer living. Mrs. Gilmore died June i, 
1895, leaving no children. 

Politically, Mr. Gilmore aflfiliates with the 
Republican party. He has served with abil- 
ity as a .Selectman and as a member of the 
School Board. He has been an active and in- 
dustrious man, but of late his health is some- 
what impaired as the result of overwork ; and 
he emjiloys Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo L. Pomeroy 
to' assist u]ion the farm and manage his 
houseiiold. In his religious lielief he is a 
Baptist. 




RANKLIN PORTER, a well-to-do 
farmer of Paris, O.xford County, Me., 
was born here, October 18, 1829, son of 
John and iuuiice (Hicks) Porter. His father 
was born in Yarmouth, Cumberland County, 
Me., ( )ctober 7, 179.5, and his mother in the 
same place, September 27, 1790. The first 
representative of this branch of the Porter fam- 
ily in New Plngland was Richard Porter, who 
settled in Weymouth, Mass., in 1635. (A 
full account of the family may be found in the 
Porter Genealogy by the Hon. Joseph W. Por- 
ter, of Bangor. ) 

Nehemiah Porter, father of John, was born 
in Scituate, Mass., December 14, 1758; and 
his wife, Joanna Barber Porter, was a native of 
Gray, Me. They had thirteen children, and 
a'll grew to maturity; namely, Sylvanus, Su- 
sanna, Lucy, Lydia, Stephen, John, Charles, 
Benjamin, Joainia, Mary, Leonard, William 
Barber, and Rufus. None of the family now 
survive. Their father, who was a hard worker 



and successful fanner, died in \'arniouth at a 
good age. 

John Porter grew to manliood in \'armouth, 
where he learned the trade of a shoemaker. 
He was in the War of 1X12, and that year or 
the year following he came to Paris and set- 
tled on the farm where his son I'ranklin now 
lives. It was then co\'ered with timber, which 
he cut and sold to [jay foi- the land; and game 
was plentiful. Although he came here a |joor 
man and was obliged to buy his land on creilit, 
he was industrious and ac<|uired consideralile 
means. He was prominent in town affairs, and 
the Baptist church edifice on Paris Hill was 
erected by him. He dieil October 12, 1855; 
and his wife, Lunice Hicks Porter, died April 
II, 1886, at the venerable age oi ninety-five 
years, si.x months, and fourteen days. Her 
parents, Joseph and Eunice Hicks, both lived 
to a good age, her father dying November 4, 
1844, at ninety-seven years and four months; 
and her mother Novembei' 1 8, 1834, aged 
eighty-two years and four months. Mr. anti 
Mrs. John Porter were consistent members of 
the Baptist church. In |iolitics he was a 
Democrat. They had six chihh'en, as follows; 
Sylvanus, born March 31, 1817; Ezekiel L., 
born October 3, 1819, who died January 14, 
1869; John B., born August 12, 1821, who is 
living in Norwa\' and engaged in farming; 
Harriet, born August 20, 1823, now the wife 
of Solomon I. Millett, a fainier of Norway; 
Joseph H., born March 4, 1826, who is en- 
gaged in the real estate business in Wiscon- 
sin; and l''ranklin, who is the special subject 
of this biographical notice. 

P'ranklin Porter, the youngest child, grew to 
manhood on the old homestead. He was edu- 
cated in the district schools, and at twenty- 
one started out for himself as a farm laborer, 
receiving but a small compensation for his ser- 
vices. P"or two or three years thereafter he 
was engaged in construction work on the Grand 
Trunk Railroad and for one summer in Wy- 
oming County, New York State, on the Alton 
& Erie Railroad. He was next employed for 
a year as a truckman in the city of Boston. 
About the time of his father's death he re- 
turned to Paris, settled up his father's affairs, 
and purchased the old homestead, the place 
where he now resides, and where he is success- 



252 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



fullv engaged in general farming. He owns 
ail together about three hundred acres. On 
the home place are good buildings and a fine 
orchard set with apple and pear trees. He 
enjoys well-merited jjrosperit}', having ac- 
quired his ]irn|)ert\' by hard work and honest 
dealings. 

On September 15, 1S5CS, Mr. Porter was 
united in marriage with Miss Martha M. Mil- 
lett, who was born in Norwa_v, Me., March 31, 
1839, daughter of Nathan and Mercy (Samp- 
son) Millett. Her father, who was an enter- 
prising farmer, was born in Norway in Sep- 
tember, 1800; and her mother was born in the 
same place in September, 1804. Mr. and 
Mrs. Porter have four sons, all living: Francis 
E. Porter, born October 5, 1861, is engaged 
in farming with his father, married Miss Olive 
Walker, and has one child — Helen M., the 
only grandchild; Junot N. Porter, born May 
5, 1865, is a farmer in Eureka, Wis. ; Joseph 
H. Porter, born June 23, 1869, is employed on 
the electric railroad in Boston; and John A. 
Porter, born July 3, 1876, lives at the parental 
home. Only the eldest son is married. 

Mr. Porter is independent in politics. He 
was Selectman for three years, and has held 
other offices. Since 1862 he has been a mem- 
ber of Paris Lodge, No. 94, A. V. & A. M., 
at South I'aris; is a member of West Paris 
Lodge, No. 15, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; and he and his wife are charter 
members of the Patrons of Husbandry at South 
Paris and charter members also of the Rebecca 
Lodge at West Paris. Mrs. I'orter is a com- 
municant of the Baptist chiu-ch at Paris Hill. 
He is liberal in his relifiious views. 




lCA;/rLLIAM U. BRETT, of South 
Paris, O.xford County, Me., who has 
in his day been one of the hard- 
working, progressive farmers of this countv, 
but is now living in comparative retirement 
from business cares and the toil of the har- 
vest fields, was born in the town of Paris, 
November 9, 1822, son of Martin and Ruth 
(Durell) Brett. 

The first ancestor of the family of whom 
there is any mention in Colonial history was 
William Brett, a native of Kent, 1-Ingland, who 



emigrated to America about 1640, and first 
settled in Du.xbury, Mass. He became one of 
the original proprietors of the town of Bridge- 
water, Mass., where he was prominent in both 
church and town affairs, often filling the pul- 
pit in the absence of the regular minister; and 
he was frequently chosen to represent the town 
in the General Court of the colony. He died 
in 1681 ; and the descent continues through 
Nathaniel and Sarah (Hayward) Brett, Seth 
and Sarah (Alden) Brett, to Mr. Brett's great- 
grandparents, Simeon and Mehitable (Packard) 
Brett, the former of whom was the first ances- 
tor of the family to visit Maine. He came to 
O.xford County probably upon a prospecting 
tour, accompanied by his son, Amzi ; and the 
latter bought a tract of wild land situated 
about one mile from the ]iresent village of 
South Paris. 

Amzi Brett, Mr. Brett's grandfather, was 
born in Bridgewater, May 3, 1762; and while 
still a mere youth he served as a private in the 
Continental arm)- in the Revolutionary War, 
for which in his old age he received a pension. 
Some years after his marriage to I'hebe Pack- 
ard, which occurred in 1788, he settled in 
Paris, as previously mentioned ; and with the 
aid of his son Martin he built a small frame 
house and cleared and improved the land into 
a good farm, where he resided for the rest of 
his life. He died at the age of eighty, ha\ing 
survived his wife many years. His children 
were: Sophia, Martin, Charlotte, Ira, and 
Phebe. Mr. Amzi Brett was a member of the 
Congregational church. 

IMartin Brett, son of Amzi and Phebe, was 
born in Bridgewater, March 26, 1794. He 
assisted in clearing the homestead farm in 
Paris, having accompanied his parents here 
when a young man ; and, inheriting the prop- 
erty, he continued to till the soil until his 
death, which took place when he was seventy- 
two years old. His wife, whom he wedded 
January 13, 1819, was Ruth, daughter of David 
Durell. She became the mother of five chil- 
dren, as follows: Apphia; William D., the 
subject of this sketch; Sophia P. ; Mary Ann; 
and Henrv M., who served as a soldier in the 
Civil War, and died at the hospital in Wash- 
ington, January 16, 1864. Mrs. Ruth Durell 
Brett died at the atre of thirt\-threc vears. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



William D. I^ictt. the ilatc of whdsc birtli 
has been made kimwii to the reader, passed his 
childhood and \onth in his native town, attend- 
ing the public schools, where he acquired a 
practical knowledge of the ordinary branches 
of study; and he resided at home, assisting his 
father in carrying on the farm, imtil reaching 
the age of twenty years. He then worked for 
some time in the mills, carefully saving his 
earnings; and when he had accumulated a suffi- 
cient sum with which to start in life for him- 
self he bought the homestead property, erected 
a new set of buildings, and improved the farm 
generally. For many years he industriously 
applied his energy and ability to agricultural 
jnirsuits, which he conducted with exceedingly 
prosperous financial results until 1888, when 
he sold his property to a Mr. Churchill, with 
the intention of retiring permanently from ex- 
tensive labors. He bought the H. Richardson 
place in .South Paris, where he has since re- 
sided, owning a small farm adjoining; and, 
to avoid irksome leisure, as an\'thing like idle- 
ness is far from being congenial to his nature 
while he has strength to work, he cultivates 
the land. 

On May 7, 1855, Mr. I^rett was united in 
marriage with Ruth B., daughter of Jonas and 
Abigail (Bradbury) Hamilton. Jonas Hamil- 
ton was a native of North Yarmouth, Me., who 
settled in Paris in 1821,. and for many year.s 
drove a four-horse team engaged in hauling 
freight between that town and I'ortland, the 
customar\' charge being fifty cents jier hundred- 
weight. After the opening of the raihva)' he 
retired, and resided in Paris until his death, 
which took place when he was eighty-five 
ye;irs (del. His wife, who lived to be eight\'- 
two, dietl in 1870. She was the mother of six 
children, all of whom grew to maturity, as fol- 
lows : Rachel L. ; William; Phebe Ann; 
Ruth B., who is now Mrs. Brett; Jonas and 
Nancy, the last named being twins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brett have had three children, 
namely: Charles E., an express and freight 
teamster of this town, who was born April 3, 
1S56, married Jennie L. I5riggs, and has one 
child, Ava; Herman 1'., foreman in a shoe 
factory at Beverly, who was born November 
19, 1859, married Sarah Moody, and has one 
daughter, Georgia May; and Joseph W. , who 



was horn l'"ebruar\' 8, 1862, and dicti June 25, 
1865. 

In politics Mr. I^rett is a Republican, and 
has served the town well and faithfullv in some 
of the imi)ortant offices. in his religious f.iith 
he is a Congregationalist. 



T^APTAIN CKORGP: R. Pj-RXALD, 
I V-^ one of the most pron)inent business 
^^(s men and influential residents nf 

Wilton, an ex-.State Senator, a 
member of (jovernor Robie'.s Council in 1885 
and 1886, and a veteran of the Civil War, was 
born in South Levant, Penobscot Count)', Me., 
June 25, 1835, son of Robert and Roxanna 
(Buswell) P'ernald. Captain P^ernald is a de- 
scendant ol an old New Hampshire family, 
representatives of which resided in Loudon ; 
and his grandfathei', David P'einakl, who 
owned and cultivated a good farm in that town, 
died at about middle age. 

Robert P\'rnald, Captain i^'einald's father, 
was born in Loudon; and in \oung manhocnl 
he learned the tratle of a tanner. In earh' life 
he went to Penob.scot County, Maine, where 
for a time he owned and operated mills and a 
tannery at P'xeter ; and he later became propri- 
etor of a mill in South Levant. Besides carry- 
ing on these mills he bought large tracts of 
timber lanil, and was engaged in lumbering for 
several years, or until his death, which took 
place when he was fifty-five years old. In 
politics he su])portetl the Demociatic party, 
and in his religious views was a Methodist. 
His wife, Roxanna Buswell, survived him 
many years, attaining the age of eight}'-eight 
years, four months, and eight da}'s. His 
children were: Charles G. ; (jeorge R., the 
subject of this sketch ; Merritt C. ; and Mary. 

George R. P'ernald attended the common 
and high schools, and completed his .studies at 
the l-last Maine Conference .Seminary at Bucks- 
port. After finishing his education he re- 
turned home, and, taking charge of the home- 
stead farm, carried it on until August 21, 
1S62, when he enlisted for service in the Civil 
War, eointr to the front as .Second Lieutenant 
of Company V, Eighteenth Regiment, Heavy 
Artillery. (3n PY^bruary 28, 1863, he was 
promoted to the rank of P'irst Lieutenant, and 



!54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



on November ", i8(l4, was commissioned a 
Captain, and scrveil as sucii until the close of 
the war. During his h)ng and honorable term 
of service with the Eighteenth Maine, whose 
record occupies a prominent place in the his- 
tory of the l\ei)elli<in, lie |)artici]xited in many 
important battles, including Spottsylvania, 
Petersburg, North Anna Ki\-er, Cold Harbor, 
Sailor's Creek, and others, and tooi< an active 
part in the campaign whicli resulted in the 
surrender of (ieneral Lee at A|)pomattox Com t- 
house. At tiie battle of Petersburg he re- 
ceived a serious wound in tlie foot, from which 
he has never fully recovered. He was mus- 
tered out with iiis regiment in September, 
1865. 

Taking iiis father's mills after reaching 
home, and adding grist-mill facilities, he op- 
erated them for three years, when he sold the 
entire plant and removed to Wilton, where he 
has since found ample opportunities to display 
his energy and business ability to profitable ad- 
vantage. In 1886 he bought of Seth Bass the 
Wilton grist-mill, which he has improved by 
developing the water-power and putting in new 
machinery; and his full equipment is kejit 
constantly busy. Pie handles all kinds of 
grain and feed by the carload, whicli he grinds, 
and su]iplies to farmers and tlealers in Wilton 
and the adjacent towns; and he also does a 
great deal of custom grinding. In 1881 he 
bought and built upon the A. Mosman place, 
but later sold it, and, in compaii)' with 1\. C. 
Fuller, purchased a saw-mill, which they im- 
proved and operated for some time; and he 
then sold his interest to Mr. Holt. 

As a progressive citizen Captain P'ernald is 
always to be depended upon for his aid and 
inflLience in securing any desired public im- 
provement; and the Wilton P'ire Company, of 
which he is President, owes its existence and 
success largely to his energy and instrumental- 
ity. This movement was organized for the 
]uirpose of protecting the business centre of 
the town against fire; and a large sixty-horse- 
power pump has been placed at the Wilton 
grist-mill, where sufificient force is always 
available to supjily the water for extinguishing 
fires. 'Pile wisdom and success of the scheme 
was fully demonstrated in July, 1896, when 
the rijiparatus pmved its usefulness by putting 



out a fire which originated in the Masonic 
Building and threatened to destroy the entire 
central portion of the village. 

Captain I'ernald has been twice married. 
His first wife, Jane Blake, daughter of Zebu- 
Ion Blake, of Carmel, Me., died at the age of 
thirty-three years, leaving one son — Gardner, 
who married I'anny P'enderson. The son is 
now engaged in business with his father. 

Caiitain P"ernald's second wife, P^liza Wood- 
bury, daughter of James Woodbury, of Dover, 
Me., died in 1896, aged si.xty-three. 

Politicall}', Captain F"ernald is a Republi- 
can; and wliile residing in South Levant he 
was three times elected a member of the Board 
of Selectmen. He represented this district in 
the lower branch of the legislature during the 
years 1875 '"'''^l 18/6, was a member of the 
State Senate for the years 1S80 and 1881, and 
was appointed to serve in Governor Robie's 
Council in 1885 and 1886. In Masonry Cap- 
tain Fernald has advanced to the Royal Arch 
degree, being a member of the Blue Lodge of 
Wilton, and of the chapter in P'armington; 
and he is a comrade of the Grand Array of the 
Republic Post here in Wilton. As an enter- 
prising, [niblic-sjiirited citizen he ranks foie- 
most among the leading residents of this town ; 
and his zeal for the general welfare of the com- 
munity is heartily appreciated. Pie is an active 
member of the Methodist Plpiscopal church. 



OHN FON, Third Selectman of Lovell, 
Me., a veteran of the war of the Re- 
bellion, is one of the most extensive 
land-owners in Oxford Count}', and has 
achieved his present prosperity by persevering 
application to useful labor. He was born in 
Porter, Me., October 29, 1838, a son of John 
and Clarinda (Stanley) P^ox. 

John Fox, the father, was born in Gilman- 
ton, N.H., December 7, 1795, and lived there 
for a number of years. He subsequently re- 
moved to Porter, where he managed a grist- 
mill, and was engaged in general farming 
until 1848. In that year he settled in "the 
P'ox neighborhood'" in Lovell, where he fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits. Pie died May 6, 
1859: and his wife, who was horn in Shap- 
leigh. Me., I'"ebruary 4, I S09, died January 




MR. AND MRS. JOHN FOX. 



UOOR \PHICAL RF.VIEW 



257 



-9-' ^'^73- I'It-'V were the parents nl' ten chil- 
dren, namely: Sarah S., born Ma\- J,, 1S30, 
who (lieil September J4, 184S: Nathaniel, 
born I'ebruary 12, 1832, who died January 3, 
1S49; Melissa, who was born iMoveniber 28, 
1833, is now the wife of William Le Baron, 
and lives in Lovell near her brother John; 
Serena H., born October 18, 1836, who be- 
came the wife of Edward Wells, and died in 
September, i860; John, the subject of this 
sketch; Lewis, born November 22, 1841, now 
residing in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, 
and who married for his first wife Maria 
Stanley, and for his second iCllen Dale; 
Jane, born in Porter, I'ebruary 28, 1844, 
now the w^ife of Josiah D. Hatch, and resitl- 
ing on a farm near North Lovell; Ahiry, born 
I'ebruary 19, 1846, now the wife of Moses 
Harriman, of Berlin, N.H.; William S., 
born July 30, 1848, in Lovell, who married 
Miss Harriet McAllister, and resides in Nor- 
way, Me. : Nathaniel, the youngest, born May 
11, 1851, who married Miss Caroline An- 
drews, and resides o4i a farm in Lovell, near 
the old homestead. 

John Fox, who was the second son born to 
iiis parents, John and Clarinda Fox, acquired 
a good practical common-school education. 
His first journey from home was a long one, 
taken in the eventful year 1861, when so many 
stalwart sons of Maine bade farewell to home 
and kindred, a farewell that for some was 
final. Enlisting November 15 in Company 
E, Twelfth Maine Regiment, under Colonel 
George F. Shepley and Captain Enoch 
Knight, he was soon in active service, and 
before his term W'as finished had taken part 
in twent\-seven engagements, including the 
battle of Irish Bend, La., the siege of Port 
Hudson, the battle of Malvern Hill, \'a., and 
the battles of Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, 
and Winchester, and saw many of his com- 
rades fall around him. He received his dis- 
charge at Portland, Me., December 7, 1864, 
and, returning to Lovell, settled on the farm 
where he is now living. Since that time he 
has been prosperously engaged in general 
farming, and has managed a saw-mill, also 
working at .times at carpentry. He owns 
about five hundred and thirty acres, wild and 
im]3roved land. 



lie was married in iSfii to Marietta Horr, 
a native of Lovell, born June 30, 1842, daugh- 
ter of Josiah and Hannah C. (Heald) Horr. 
Mr. Horr was born in Waterford, Me., January 
29, 1804. He settled in Lovell at an. early 
date on the farm now occupied b\' Mr. J'"o\, 
which he cleared and developed; and he 
tlied here, December 29, 1877. His wife was 
born in Lovell, I^'ebruary 23, r8io, and died 
here April 22, 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Hurr 
were the parents often children, nameK : John 
1'., who was killetl October 19, 1864, in the 
battle of Cedar Creek; Josiah II., Iiorn ])e- 
cember 26, 1831, who dieil in .Septendjer, 
i860; Isaac P., born A[)ril 13, 1834, a resi- 
dent of Hudson, Mass., who married first Miss 
Phiebe Hill, of Denmark, Me., and seconil 
Miss Samantha Moore; Moses H., born April 
12, 1836, who died December 27, 1842; l{liza 
Ann, born July 20, 1839, who died March 23, 
1856; Lucy IL, born July 18, 1840, who died 
April 20, 1845; Marietta (Mrs. ['"ox); y\u- 
gusta Maria, born A])ril 4, 1844, who dieil 
July 17, 1846; Steward B., born P'ebniary 
28, 1846, a resident of Waterford, Vt., who 
married Miss Celia Church; and .Sarah .S., 
born May 30, 1848, now wife of Albra K. 
Lord, a farmer of Lovell. 

Mr. and Mrs. F"ox are the parents of seven 
children — Hannah C, born February i, 
1S62, who dieil April 22 of the same year; 
Josiah H., born December 19, 1867, now re- 
siding in Lovell, who married .Miss Martha 
A. Dyer; Charles II., born Ajiril 17, 1870, 
who died August 25, 1892; William .S., born 
July 19, 1872, a farmer living near Lovell 
Centre, wIjo marrietl Miss Corinna Lord: 
John Walter, born Januai\' 2, 1874, who 
married Miss Mabel (iray, of Lovell, and re- 
sides with his father; and Lewis Edwin, born 
February 10, 1S78, and Guy R., born June 3, 
1880, both at home with their [xirents. Mr. 
Fox's three sons, Josiah, William .S., and 
Walter, now attend to the business at the saw- 
mill. 

Mr. P"ox is a stanch Republican. Though 
he has never sought office he has served on 
the Town Board of Selectmen several years, 
and was elected Third Selectman in March, 
1896. He is a member of Parker Post, No. 
151, Grand y\rni)- of the Republic, at Lovell 



2S8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



Centre, also of the grange of Patrons of Hus- 
bandry at Fryeburg; and he and his wife are 
members of the Christian church at the 
Centre. 




JDWAKD !•:. WITT, one of the leading 
voung men of the town of Norway, Ox- 
ford County, was born (Jctober i, 
KS64, on the farm where he now resides with 
his widowed motlier and sisters. He is of 
Massachusetts ancestiy, iiis paternal grand- 
father, Benjamin Witt, having been born and 
bred in Lynn, Ksse.K County, that State, where 
he learned the blacksmith's trade. On coming 
to Oxford County, Maine, he settled in Nor- 
way, near Rustville, which was named for his 
uncle, Henry Rust, Esq. 

The grandfather was among the early set- 
tlers of this section of the comity, and the 
first to set up a smithy in Norway, where he 
subsequently worked at his trade and carried 
on general liushaiuh}- until his death, October 
28, 1842. He was four times married. His 
first wife, IV-tsey Parsons, bore him four chil- 
dren — John, Henry, Daniel, and Benjamin. 
To him and his second wife, Lucy Cobb, two 
children were born — Lucy and Betsey. His 
third wife, Hannah Parsons, died leaving him 
three children: Thomas, father of Edward E. ; 
William; and Abigail, all of whom have de- 
liarted this life. Of his union with Patty 
House, daughter of L. Hathaway, of Paris, 
this county, there were no chiUlren. 

Thomas Witt, son of Benjamin and Ilamiaii 
(Parsons) Witt, was born in Xorway, June .3, 
1808, and was here educated, attending the 
district school near his home and the village 
high school. At the age of fifteen years he 
entered the office of the Oxford Obsciver in the 
village, in order to learn the printer's trade, 
working there and in the Paris Hill printing- 
office se\-eral years. In 1830 he went to Bos- 
ton, where he was engaged on a daily paper for 
eight years. (ioing thence to Richmond, Va., 
he was on the staff of the Soiitlicni Cliiirclmiaii 
two years, when he returned to J-toston to take 
charge of the printing-office of the Cliristian 
h'rccDiau, a weekly jjaper jniblished in the 
interests of the Universalist denomination by 
the Rev. Sylvanus Cobb, father of .Syjyanus 



Cobb, Jr., the noted writer, and of the tal- 
ented artists, Cyrus and Darius Cobb. In 
1845 he returned to Norway, and, buying a 
farm, engaged in agricultural pursuits two 
years. Desiring to resume his earlier occupa- 
tion, he sold his land, and, moving into the 
village, bought the Norway Adi'ertiscr, which 
he published for two years. He then bought 
the farm now occupied by his widow and her 
children, and here, with the assistance of his 
son, lulward E. , carried on general farming 
until his death, October 20, 1884. He was a 
man of extensive acquaintance, winning and 
retaining friends wherever he went, few men 
of this locality having been better known or 
more popular. 

Thomas Witt and Rachel Porter were mar- 
ried on December g, 1845. Mrs. Witt was 
born P"ebruary 11, 1824, in the town of Paris, 
Oxford County, a daughter of Charles and Ra- 
chel (Hamilton) Porter, both natives of North 
Yarmouth, Me. Mr. Porter was a farmer by 
occupation; and after his marriage he settled 
in Paris, where both he and his wife spent 
their remaining days, his death occurring in 
his sixty-ninth year, and hers in her eighty- 
fourth year. Mr. and Mrs.. Thomas Witt had 
the following children: Mary Ellen, who died 
at the age of fortv-two years, being the wife of 
Hezekiah Brown; Charles Thomas, who mar- 
ried P^lla Hathaway, and is engaged in the 
milk business in Boston; p^lizabeth, living at 
Leominster, Mass., the widow of George W. 
P'oster; Sarah H., living with her mother and 
brother on the homestead; (ieorge H., a gro- 
cer in Dorchester, Mass., who married Mary 
T. Baker, of I'.ast Boston; Abbie L., also liv- 
ing on the home farm; Willie B., who died at 
the age of nine months; and lulward Iv, the 
special subject of this sketch. 

Edward I{. Witt, in common with his 
brothers and sisters, enjoyed in his early years 
excellent educational advantages. Being the 
youngest son he stayed at home after attaining 
his majority, to assist his father, who was in 
feeble health for some time; antl for the jnist 
twelve years he has had entire charge of the 
farm. He has one hundred acres of land, well 
improved, and much of it through his energetic 
efforts in an excellent state of cultivation. 
Here he and his mother ;nid sisters have an 



BIOGRA PI 1 IC AL REV I K\V 



-59 



attractive home, which is a hos]iital:)lu centre 
of social activity, its rooms ever heing o])en to 
receive their many friends. Mr. Witt is a 
standi l\epubiican in |)o]itics, in which lie 
takes an intelligent interest, and since i <S'94 
has been a meniher of the Hoard of Selectmen 
of Norway. He belongs to the grange of 
the I'ati'ons of Ihisbandry of Norway village. 
Mrs. Witt and her daughters are members of 
the Congregational church, whose house of 
worshij) is located near their home. 




(ctrfji.AS rowhiR.s ii.xRTi.irr'r, 

iM.L)., a venerable jjliysician of ICast 
Di.xfield, Me., now living in retire- 
ment at his home in this town, is 
widely known as one of the leading mathenia* 
ticians of the State. He was born in ]^etliel, 
O.xford County, Me., Februar\- 3, 1S17, son c)f 
Ebenezer and Lois (Powers) Rartlett. Dr. 
Bartlett's great-grandfather, an elder Ebenezer 
Bartlett, was a native of Newton, Mass., where 
the active period of his life was passed in till- 
ing the soil. He reared a family of six chil- 
dren, as follows: Enoch, Jonathan, Moses, 
Thaddeus, .Stephen, and Peregrine. 

Stephen Partlett, the fifth son, as the names 
are here recorded, was born in Newton, Mass. 
In young manhood he took up a tract of wild 
land located within the Androscoggin valley 
in the town of l^ethel. Me., and there cleared 
and improved a farm, upon which he erected a 
large two-story residence. He lived to reach 
the age of seventy years. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Dorcas Barbour, lived to be 
eighty years old. Their children were : Eben- 
ezer, F^lhanan, William, Heulah, James, Dor- 
cas, Sarah, and Sophia. 

Ebenezer ]5artlett, eldest son of .Stephen 
and Dorcas, was reared to agricultural pursuits 
in his native town. When a young man he 
bought a piece of unimproved land located 
near his father's property, and cleared a farm 
of one hundred and forty acres. In connection 
with carrying on his farm he ditl quite a jirofit- 
able business in getting out and finishing pump 
logs, a large number of which he disposed of 
to the inhabitants of Bethel and the adjacent 
towns. After a considerable period of toil- 
some acti\-ity, selling his property in Bethel 



he removeil to Hanover, Me., where he re- 
sided a few years, and then leturning to 
I^ethel bought another farm, which he culti- 
vated until his retirement. His last days were 
passed with his children; and he died in 1S51, 
aged si-\ty-nine \cais. His wife, who was 
before marriage Lois I'owei's, became the 
mother oi seven childicn, namclv : Joanna; 
Silas Powers, the subject of this sketch; 
Ste|iheii ; l'",henezci' N. ; Lusylvia; Artemas; 
and Warren. Mrs. Lois P. I'^artlctt lived to 
reach the age of se\ent}'. 

Silas Powers liartlett acipiired his early ed- 
ucation in the public schools and at the Bethel 
Academy. After completing his elementary 
studies he taught school for a time; and, hav- 
ing read a course of medicine with Dr. Thdmas 
Roberts, of" Rumford, he subset|ucntly entered 
the Maine Metlical School at ]?runswick, where 
he was graduated with the class of i H4 i . Lo- 
cating for practice in (iorham, N.H., he re- 
mained there two years; and in 1X45 he mmcd 
to East Di.xfield, where he succeedeil to the 
jiractice of Dr. Z. W. Bartlett. .S(Jon after his 
arrival he bought the .Samuel yXllcn property 
consisting of a residence and thirty-five acres 
of land, which he impro\e(l and beautified; and 
there he established his home and office. Dr. 
Bartlett is regarded as one of the best qualifieil 
and most experienced ]jhysicians and surgeons 
in this county, having enjoyed a large and suc- 
cessful practice until the feeble condition of 
his health prevented him from taking long 
rides. 

On March 17, 1X47, Di. Baitlett was united 
in marriage with Martha M. Morse, who was 
born February 15. 1S25, daughter of John and 
Sally Morse,' of 'jay, Me. Mrs. l^ar'tlett has 
had five children, as follows: I'lorus, who w'as 
horn I'^ebruary 7, i84(S, married Lydia E. 
Brown, who is no longer living, and he is now- 
engaged in mercantile pursuits; Julia M., who 
was born May 12, 1854, and died August 2<S, 
1886; Silas, an ice dealer of Lewiston, who 
was born January 29, 1S57, married Lucy 
Page, and has one daughter, Beulah ; Addie 
M., who was born Sejitemher 10, i S60, and 
died May 10, 1866; and Addie, who was born 
January 28, 1866, married J. K. Iliscock, of 
Wilton, and died August 24, 1895. 

Dr. Bartlett is a Democrat in politics. He 



ibo 



LIOGRATHICAL KEVIKW 



has al\va}'s displayed a deep interest in educa- 
tional matters, and for a number of years he 
served as superintendent of schools. His 
wide reputation as a mathematician has been 
accpiircd by his success in soh'ing numerous 
difficult ]iroblems sent to him for solution, 
antl for the past fifty years he has furnished 
original jiroblems to the Maine Mathematical 
Almanac. Both he and Mrs. Bartlett are 
.sincerely esteemed and respected by a large 
circle of friends and acquaintances, as well as 
by the community in general. 



AIKFII-:i.D FARRAR, who is engaged 
in tilling the soil of a good farm in the 
town of Sumner, in the eastern part of 
Oxford County, and is one of the prosperous 
residents here, was born in Paris, the shire 
town of the county, October ig, 1S39, son of 
Hela and Lydia Farrar. An account of his 
parents will be found in a sketch of Harri- 
son F\arrar. which appears elsewhere in this 
work. 

]''airfiehl l'"arrar was educateil in the district 
schools of his native town, and w'as reared to 
farm life. Since becoming of age he has 
given his uiiiliv'idetl attention to agricidtural 
pursuits, in which by his industry and close 
application to every detail- he has attained 
marked success. He now owns seventy acres 
of as fertile land as can be found in this local- 
ity. On I'^ebruary iS, 1888, Mr. F'arrar mar- 
ried Dclma L. l?uck, who was born in l^uck- 
field, near b}', daughter of Henry M. and Ro^ 
setta J. (Doble) liuck, and a representative of 
the family for w'hom the town was named. 
Mr. and Mrs. F'arrar have no children. Mr. 
F'arrar is a Democrat in politics, and liberal in 
his religious views; and Mrs. F^arrar is a 
member of the Bajitist church. 

Henry Mellen Buck, Mrs. F'arrar's father, 
was born in Buckfield, September 10, \^y), 
sou of James and Lydia (Austin) l^uck, the 
former of whom was born in Buckfield ; and his 
wife was a native of Canton, Me. Mr. Buck's 
great-grandfather, Jonathan ]-iuck, is said to 
have been the first settler and founder of the 
town of Buckfield, which was originally called 
15ucktown. iM'om the then almost unbroken 
wilderness he cleared a farm, upon which he 



resided for the rest of his life. The jjroperty 
is now owned by Elmer Austin. 

Jonathan Buck, Jr., Mr. Buck's grandfather, 
who was classed as one of the leading agricult- 
urists of his day, was born upon his father's 
farm in ]?uckfield, and passed his whole life 
there, dying at the age of si.xty-seven years. 
He was a Democrat in politics and a Uni\'er- 
salist in his religious views. He was twice 
married, and reared a family of seven cliildren, 
most of whom fell victims to consumption 
before reaching middle age. 

James Buck, one of the seven, having a more 
vigorous constitution, lived to be eighty-four 
years old. He began life as a. farmer, but 
later engaged in trade at North Buckfield. 
The greater part of his life was spent in his 
native town ; but his latter days were passed in 
Paris, Me., this county. He was a well-known 
citizen, a man whose honorable character won 
for him the esteem and good-will of all with 
whom he came in contact; and his entire life 
was one' of useful acti\'ity. In his later years 
he acted with the Republican jjartv in politics. 
His wife, Lydia Austin, who lived to be fifty- 
eight years old, became the mother of seven 
children, as follows: Lorenzo J., Roscoe C, 
Mrs. Mary J. Stetson, and Austin, who are no 
longer living; Augustus \V. , who resides in 
Minnesota, -where he is engaged in carpenter- 
ing and farming; Henry Mellen ; and Hannah 
C, who is now the wife of Julius A. Record, 
and lives in .South l^aris, Me. Mr. Buck's par- 
ents were Universalists in their religious belief. 

Henry Mellen Buck, the date of whose birth 
is mentioned above, was educated in the town 
schools of Buckfield. When a young man he 
learned the tailor's trade; and he also became 
skilled in mechanical pursuits, first entering 
the employ of Morton & Bates at West Sum- 
ner, later engaging with the South Paris Man- 
ufacturing Company. F"or ten years he carried 
on his tailoring business more or less, in con- 
nection with his other industrial occujwtion. 
In 1879 he bought the home farm of seventy 
acres, which he continued to cultivate with un- 
usual activity and success till 1895, when he 
sold out to his son. In 1861 Mr. Buck mar- 
ried Rosetta J. Doble, who was born in Buck- 
field, and is a daughter of Solomon Doble, of 
that town. Mr. and Mrs. Buck have had ten 



BIOGKAl'lUCAL RKVIKW 



261 



children, live of wlioiii arc living, namely: 
Delma L. , whn is nciw Mrs. I'airticltl Farrar, 
of Sumner; LulicA., Mrs. Dammon ; Charles 
A. ; Myrtle H. ; and I'jiiogene. The ulhers 
were: Lorenzo, first; Lorenzo, second; (lai- 
field ; Percy A.; and Mary lunma. In addi- 
tion to the home farm Charles A. Muck has 
bought other real estate in this localit)', own- 
ing at the present time about one hundred and 
fifty acres in nil; and he de\'otes coiisitlerable 
attention to dairying. 

In ]iolitic.s Mr. Buck is a Kepublican, and, 
though not caring to hold office, is deeplv 
interested in the general welfare and imi^rove- 
ment of the comnumit}-. The family is a dis- 
tinguished one in this locality, and its repre- 
sentatives of the jiresent day are all filling 
useful positions in life. 




Al'TAIN WHJTAM K. BlCKl-ORD, 

pro]3rietor of the Beal's House, Nor- 
way, Me., and a veteran of the Ci\-il 
War, was born in Dresden, Me., 
November 8, 1S36, son of William, Jr., and 
Mehitabel (Hathorn) Bickford. 

William Bickford, Jr., like his son a na- 
tive of Dresden, Me., was born January 29, 
1794. Upon assuming the responsibilities of 
life he purchased a farm adjoining that owned 
by his father, William Bickford, Sr. : and 
there he spent the remainder of his days. He 
became a stirring, ]5rogressive citizen and 
successful farmer. During the War of iSu 
he served as a private. In ])olitics he was a 
Democrat, in religion a Methodist. He died 
December i, 1889. His wife, Mehitabel 
Hathorn liickford, born I'ebruary 9, 1800, 
died in August, 1S64. They were the ])arents 
of seven children, four sons and three daugh- 
ters, namely: Mary C, born March 4, 1825; 
Joseph T., born January 29, 1827; Maria 
I.. T., born November 5, 1829; Nathaniel 
H., born April 4. 1832; ]{liza A., born No- 
vember 7, 1S34: William Kendall, the date 
of whose birth is mentioned above, and whose 
personal sketch is to follow; and Frank W. , 
born April 16, 1841. 

When his school days were over, William 
Kendall Bickford, at sixteen years of age, 
went to Gardiner, Mc, as a clerk for Charles 



Stone, with whom he remaine'd a \ear. .After 
that he worked a short time in a ihy-goods 
store, and then learned the tailor's trade; but, 
not liking this occujiation, he went to Boston, 
where for two years he had a [losition as clerk 
in a shoe store. During the next two years he 
was clerk m the Maini' Hotel at Damariscotta, 
Me., which he subsecpu'iitly conducted for the 
owners for a time. \\c was next employed 
till 1862 as clerk at Knox Hotel, Thomaston, 
Me. l'2nlisting in l'om[)any I, Twentieth 
Maine Regiment, he served seven months as a 
private, was then commissioned as Second 
Lieutenant in Company H, and still later was 
made First Lieutenant. In 1864 he received 
a commission as Captain of Company ]•".. being 
Lieutenant in command of Comjiaii)- II: and 
he took part in the following battles: Antie- 
tam, Chancel lorsvi lie, Gettysburg, W^ilder- 
ness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, Weldon Rail- 
road, Peeble's Farm, Appomattox, \'a., I''ive 
l-'orks, and l-'redericksburg, besides numerous 
other engagements. He was wounded in the 
left breast by a piece of shell at Spottsyl- 
vania, and has never entirely recovered from 
his injury. His war record is a most credit- 
able and honorable one. and he h.as in his pos- 
session medals bestoweil in recognition of his 
bravery. 

On his return to Maine he purchased in 
company with ]■;. R. l-Tlis, who was afterward 
succeeded by Seth O. Henderson, the Barnum 
Eating-house at Portland, and conducted a 
very successful business up to July 4, 1866, 
when they were burned out in the big P(n-tland 
fire. Mr. Bickford then went to Hudson, 
Me., and bought tiie Hudson House. Two 
years later he sold out, and went into the h'al- 
mouth House, Portland, as clerk; and he sub- 
sequently held the position of head clerk at 
leading hotels in Rockland, Bangor, and 
Thomaston, Me. 

IMr. Bickford returned to Thomaston in Oc- 
tober, 1 87 1, and openetl the Georges Hotel, 
which he leased until the spring of 1877, 
when he moved down town and leasi-d the 
Knox House, where he remained until 1893, 
when he leased the Beal's Hotel in Norway, 
the largest and best equipped in Oxford 
County. This house has fifty finely furnished 
rooms, heated by steam and lighted by elec- 



BlOGRAl'lllCAL RKVIKW 



tricity. Its patronage has been large from 
the start, and its present proprietor is one of 
the ablest to be found in many miles" travel. 
He not only gives excellent satisfaction to his 
guests, but has won manv warm friends among 
the citizens of Norway. 

On November i, 1-S65, Captain Bickford 
was united in marriage with Miss luiima J. 
Henderson, daughter ui Seth O. and Octavia 
(Lovejoy) Henderson. She was born in 
Calais, Me., December 2, 1845. Her father, 
who was born at .St. George, September 14, 
1 8 19, son of Captain Robert and Eliza 
(O'Brian) Henderson, was a direct descend- 
ant of Captain Thomas Henderson, one of the 
first settlers of Upper St. Georges, and the 
commander of a garrison and block-house in 
the war of 1744. Captain and Mrs. Bickford 
have had four sons and five daughters, namely: 
William .S.. born in Portland, March 26, 
1866; l^lla L., who was born in East Bangor, 
June 27, 1868, and died May 19, 1869; Inez 
M., born in Thomaston, December 13, 1871, 
who died December 21, 1S72; Robert K., 
born in Thomaston, June 14, 1873, who is 
preparing for a dental course; Ross L., born 
in Thomaston, August 21, 1875, now a clerk 
at the Beal's House; Octavia H., born in 
Thomaston, August 12, 1877; Mary M., born 
in Thomaston, September 30, 1879; Grace, 
born in Thomaston, Eebruary 25, 1883; and 
Henry Kno.x, born in Thomaston, April 27, 

1889. William S. Bickford married I^uella 
May Jones, of Reading, Mass., in August, 

1890, engaged in the drug business until fail- 
ing health led him to seek other employment, 
and he is at the present time an express agent 
on the Boston & Maine Railroad, Eavvrence 
branch. 

In political affiliation Captain Bickford is a 
Democrat. He is a member of Orient Eodge, 
No. 15, A. F. & A. M., at Thomaston. Both 
he and his wife are communicants of the Epis- 
copal church. 



|11AREES E. GREEN, a prosperous 
farmer and an extensive fruit grower 
of Wilton, was born in the house 
he now occupies, June 20, 1859, 
son of Leonard F. and Mary A. (Earnum) 




Green. He is a descendant of Jonas Green, a 
resident of Dunstable, Mass.; and the family 
is, no doubt, of early Colonial origin, though 
but little authentic information can be ob- 
tained in regard to its original antecedents. 

The place and date of Jonas Green's brrth 
cannot with certainty be ascertained, but he is 
known to have lived in Dunstable; and the 
principal fact concerning him of which there 
is any record is that he was the father of 
nineteen children, among whom there were 
triplets. Their names and dates of birth are 
as follows: Betsey, February i, 1760; Na- 
thaniel, March 3, 1762; Jennison, March 31, 
1764; Eydia, October ig, 1765; Jonas, Jo- 
siah, and another child, who were born Octo- 
ber 5, 1767; Abigail, .September 5,. 1769; 
Rachel, July 12, 1771; Joshua, August 23, 
1776; Guy, August 23, 1778; Hannah, March 
I, 1780: Asa, January 31, 1782; Joshua, 
March 7, 1784; Hannah, second, F^ebruar)- 
19, 1786; Folly, September 2, 1788; David, 
May 6, 1791 ; Rebecca, April 26, 1793; and 
Nathaniel, second, July 10, 1795. 

Josiah Green, the sixth child above named, 
was born in Dunstable, Mass. Penetrating 
the wilderness of Maine when a young man, 
he became the first settler of Wilton. Erect- 
ing a log cabin upon the westerly side of Wil- 
ton Lake, he began the work of clearing the 
land; but before he had gained much headway 
his hut was burned, and he gave up the idea 
of locating there. Taking up a smaller tract 
near where his wife's parents had settled, he 
constructed another cabin, the foundation of 
which is still visible; and after clearing a 
good farm he erected a set of substantial frame 
buildings. He is said to have been the first 
settler here who attained success in agricult- 
ural pursuits beyond the ordinary pioneer; and 
he was the first to raise apples in this locality, 
his fruit becoming a great luxury in the neigh- 
borhood. He later set out cpiite a large 
orchard, and was an exceedingly energetic and 
thrifty farmer, considering the limited opjjor- 
tunities for advancement in his day. He dietl 
in 1814, survived by his wife, formerly Lydia 
Butterfield, who was born February 22, 1769, 
and died in 18 19. They were the parents of 
nine children, as follows: Polly, who was born 
January 22, 1795; Hannah, who was born Oc- 



HIOGRAI'HICAL REVIEW 



26: 



tobcr 6, 1796; Lydia, who was born July 15. 
1799; Josiah, who was born (3ctober 2-j , 
iSoi ; Asa, who was born I'cbruary 14, 1803; 
Jonas and Samuel, twins, who were born June 
6, 1805: Luther, who was born May 16, 1807; 
and Harrison, who was born July i, 18 13. 

Jonas Green, son of Josiah and Lydia 
(Buttertield) Green, was reared to farm life in 
Wilton, and became one of the stirring and 
progressive farmers of his day. His first wife, 
who was before marriage Hannah J. Farmer, 
was killed by lightning. She left two chil- 
dren, namely: Leonard I-"., who was born 
April 8, 1S28; and Martha K., who was born 
March 17, iSji. l"or his second wife he 
married Harriet Farmer, a sister of his first 
wife; and by this union there was one daugh- 
ter, Lydia IL, who was born March 12, 1850, 
and died in infancy. Jonas (ireen wedded for 
his. third wife Sarah Morrison, and his fourth 
wife was Margaret Orr. 

Leonard F. Green was an only son, and as 
such remained at home to assist his father in 
carrying on the farm. He eventually bought 
the homestead, upon which he erected new 
buildings; and he later purchased the property 
cleared and improved by his grandfather. He 
tille:l the soil with more than usual energy, 
possessing one of the most desirable pieces of 
agricultural property in town; and his activity 
continued until his death, which took place in 
October, 1884. His wife, Mary A. F'arnum, 
who was born May 5, 1833, became the 
mother of three children, as follows: George 
K., a successful agriculturist of Farmington, 
who was born December 8, 1855, married Cora 
H. Allen, daughter of William N. Allen, and 
has two children — Elsie M. and Edith; 
Charles L., the subject of this sketch; and 
Willie, who died at the age of nearly nine 
years. Mrs. Mary A. F'arnum Green li\'ed to 
reach the age of fifty-three years. 

Charles L. Green, the younger of the two 
sons who reached maturity, was educated in 
the public schools and at the Wilton Acad- 
emy. At the age of nineteen he commenced 
teaching school, and continued engaged in 
that profession for eight terms. Succeeding 
to the possession of the homestead after his 
father's death, he has since devoted his atten- 
tion to stock farming and fruit growing. He 



owns two hundred and sixty -five acres of land, 
including his father's farm and the property 
formerly owned by his great-grandfather, Jo- 
siah Green ; and he has the largest number of 
acres uniler cultivation of any farmer in town. 
He keeps ;i her<l of excellent cows and a large 
flock of sheep; and besides attending to his 
stock and the cultixation of his crops he has 
an orchard of three thousand grafted apple- 
trees, one thousand of which he set out him- 
self, the yield of 1896 being eight hundred 
barrels. 

On April 16, 1890, Mr. (ireen wedded Julia 
M. Adams, daughter of Charles N. and b'lora 
A. (Walker) Adams. Mrs. Green's father 
was born August 3, 1840, and is now engaged 
in the butchering business in Wilton. His 
wife, F'lora A., is a daughter of Jeremiah and 
Sally (Gould) Walker. They have had a fam- 
ily of five children, namely: Harry, who died 
young; llalcyone G. ; Herman C. ; Julia M., 
who is now Mrs. Charles G. Green; and 
Guy W. 

In jjolitics Mr. Green sujjports the Republi- 
can party; and, though not an aspirant for po- 
litical honor, he takes a keen interest in local 
public affairs, and has served with ability 
upon the .School Board. He is deservedly 
popular as one of the rising young men of this 
locality, and is rapidly attaining the position 
of prominence to which his energy and pro- 
gressive tendencies are sure to lead him. It 
is worthy of note that the Green homestead, 
which he now occupies, has never been out of 
the Green family from the time it was first 
settled by Josiah Green. It is now about one 
hundred vears since. 



(5 I I MOTH Y H. CHAPMAN, a farmer and 

' I dairyman of Bethel, resides on the farm 
-*- staked out by his grandfather in 1795. 
He was born April 29, 1S18, on this farm, 
son of Timothy and Betsey (Barker) Chap- 
man. His grandfather, Eliphaz Chapman, a 
native of Massachusetts, was a Congregational 
minister. Settling on this farm in 1795, 
Eliphaz soon took a leading part in town 
affairs. It was he who proposed that the 
place should be named Bethel when the town 
was organized. 



264 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Timothy Chapman, who was also born in 
Massachusetts, had reached his ninth year when 
his parents came to Bethel. His life from 
that early period was spent on the homestead, 
and he died there at the age of eighty-eight. 
He was a member of the Congregational 
church. In politics he was a Republican, but 
took no active part in public affairs. Mrs. 
Betsey (Barker) Chapman was born in Bethel, 
and died here when about thirty-five years 
old. She, too, was a member of the Congre- 
gational church. Of her seven children the 
subject of this sketch is the only one living. 
After her death her husband entered a second 
marriage, contracted with Miss Abigail Blan- 
chard, of Bethel. By this union he had one 
daughter, Hannah, who is now the wife of 
Charles A. Chapman, of Mankato, Minn. 

Timothy H. Chapman was bereft of his 
mother when but one year old. He obtained 
his education in the district school, and grew 
to a robust manhood among the scenes of farm 
life. When he was twenty-five years of age 
his father gave him forty acres of land for his 
own use. After living on this little planta- 
tion for a number of years he returned to the 
old homestead, which he inherited; and there 
he has since made his home. 

Mr. Chapman was married in Se]5tember, 
1S43, to Miss -Sarah Newell, of Bethel, who 
died in 1862, leaving five children. These 
were: Jianister N. , now a farmer, residing on 
the old homestead; Fannie, who died at the 
age of thirty-six; Hervey W. , a Presbyterian 
clergyman in Lakeport, Cal. ; Florence E., 
the wife of P. L. Watts, of Portland, Me. ; 
and Alice C, the wife of William Doring, of 
North Dakota. Mr. Chapman contracted a 
second marriage in 1863 with Mrs. Martha B. 
(Newell) Upton, widow of Tilden Upton. 
She had two children by her first marriage. 
By Mr. Chapman she has a daughter, Bessie 
K. . who is teaching in a college in North 
Dakota. A Republican in politics, Mr. 
Chapman is esteemed by both parties. He 
was on the Board of Selectmen two years; and 
he had been Ta.x Collector for fourteen years, 
when he resigned that office. The Bethel 
Grange counts him among its most prominent 
Patrons of Husbandry. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Con2;reg;ational church since he was 



a young man. He served the society in the 
capacity of Deacon for more than twenty years, 
and was superintendent of the .Second Congre- 
gational Church Sunday-school, on the north 
side of the river, for a while. 



f^TuN. HiLTcjN McAllister, of 

t^-l .Stoneham, Oxford County, is a 
II 9 I worthy representative of two of the 

^~"^ oldest and most respected families 
of the vicinity. The son of Eastman and 
Phoebe (Parker) McAllister, he was born in 
Stoneham, October i, 1834. His grandfather, 
Samuel McAllister, moved from Conway, 
N.H., to Lovell, this county, when Eastman 
was quite young, and settled on a farm, which 
he tilled for a number of years. .Subsequently 
Samuel moved to Stoneham, where he spent 
the remainder of his life. His wife, also a 
native of Conway, whose maiden name was 
Mary Ordway, after rearing with him twelve 
children, likewise died in Stoneham. 

Eastman McAllister was born in Conway, 
N.H. He became a resident of Stoneham 
when twenty -one years of age, and two or 
three years later settled on the farm now occu- 
pied by his son. An enterprising and indus- 
trious man, he was engaged in farming and 
lumbering almost up to the time of his death, 
which happened January 16, 1895. He was 
then fourscore and four years of age. His 
wife, to whom he was married when twenty- 
three years of age, was born in Lovell town- 
ship. May 15, 181 I, daughter of Joseph and 
Hannah M. (Ames) Parker. Her grandfather, 
the great-grandfather of Hilton McAllister, 
was James Parker, of Hanover, Mass., one of 
the early settlers of Fryeburg, this county, 
and a member of the intrepid band who fol- 
lowed the Indians from Fryeburg to Bethel on 
a memorable occasion. After spending the 
most of his life in Fryeburg he died in 
Lovell. Joseph Parker, the maternal grand- 
father, who was born in Fryeburg, after his 
marriage moved to Lovell, where he was en- 
gaged in farming for some time. In 1816 he 
came to Stoneham, Me , taking up his resi- 
dence on a farm in the northern part of the 
town. Some years later he went to East 
Stoneham village, where he spent his declin- 



HIOCRAlMliCAL RKVIKW 



3''>.S 



in<; years with his chikh'cii, and tiicci in 1S64. 
His wife, Mannah M. (Ames) Parker, was a 
native of Tam worth, N.H. Their daughter, 
Mrs. Eastman McAllister, is now living with 
her son Hilton. She is a remarkably intelli- 
gent lady, and, though eighty-five years of 
age, is well preserved and appears much 
younger. She is the mother of three children, 
namely: Levi, a farmer in East Stoneham: 
Hilton, the subject of this sketch; and Mary 
IC, deceased, who was the wife of Henry C. 
Cobb, now of Boston. 

Hilton McAllister acquired his earl\- eiluca- 
tion in the district school near his home in 
Stoneham. He remained on the homestead, 
helping his parents until about thirty years of 
age. Then he worked for seven months in a 
cotton-mill in Lowell, Mass., and for four 
months in a cotton-mill in Lawrence, Mass. 
He then returned home, and spent the follow- 
ing year in lumbering near Richardson Lake, 
Me. Eventually he took charge of the home- 
stead, wdiich, with the many imijrovements he 
has made, is now reckoned one of the most 
beautiful farms in the local it)-. His real es- 
tate contains about three hundred acres of 
land, much of it arable. He carries on farm- 
ing and dair)ing with success, and profitably 
employs his winters in lumbering. 

On January i, 1874, Mr. McAllister was 
married to Ella M., daughter of Lyman and 
Mary (Fellows) McKeen. She was born in 
Lovell, March 17, 1858. Her father, who was 
a farmer of Lovell, was one of the Maine vol- 
unteers who died in the late war. Her mother 
lives in North Lovell, and is now the wife of 
Stephen Coffin. Mr. and Mrs. McAllister 
have had two children. Their daughter, 
Abbie \\'., who was born November 6. 1874, 
died April 7, 1896. .Sidney H., their son, 
who was born August 23, 1876, is still shel- 
tered by the parental roof-tree. Mr. Mc- 
Allister is a Republican, and takes an active 
interest in politics. He has been Selectman 
of the town for a number of years, has served 
as Town Clerk and Town Treasurer, and he 
represented the district in the State legis- 
lature in 1S72. He is a Knight of Pythias, 
belonging to Hiawatha Lodge, No. 49. Both 
he and Mrs. McAllister are members of the 
Christian church at Lovell Centre. 



fERDEIL U. WIlllE, M.D., a rising 
young physician and surgeon with a 
large practice in East Di.xfield and 
the adjacent towns, was born in Wilton, Me., 
October 13, 1866, son of lames O. and Zerua 
E. (Walker) White. Dr. "White is a descend- 
ant of Rand White, who resided in Spencer, 
Mass., and was a millwright by tratle. 

Rand White's four sons, Deacon James, 
Darius, I-'rancis, and John, penetrated the 
wilderness of Maine, settling upon the tracts 
of wild land in Penobscot County, twenty-five 
miles north of Bangoi'; but Deacon James 
White, who w;is Dr. White's great-grandfather, 
later lemoved to Di.xfield, O.xford County, 
where he cleared and improved a large farm. 
He was one of the early settlers and progres- 
sive farmers of this localit)', whose efforts 
served to open the wa\' for its development as 
an agricultural region ; and he resided here 
until his death, which took place when he was 
fiftv-six \'ears old. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Nancy Kenney, lived to reach the 
age of seventy-six. Their children were: 
Drewry C, Rand, Tamar, Julia, Nelson, 
James, Nancy, Mary, Jane, and Ruby. 

James White, Dr. White's grandfather, son 
of Deacon James, was born near Blakesburg, 
Penobscot County, Me., October 31, 1806. 
He came to Oxford Count\' with his father; 
and at the age of twenty-one he bought a farm 
in Dixfield, upon which he made his start in 
life. Later in life he owned other farms, the 
largest being tlie Daniel Tucker farm of two 
hundred and fifty acres, ujion which he erected 
a large house and barn. Selling that propcrtv 
he purchased a smaller farm, still known as 
the White place, where he resided until retir- 
ing from active labor in 1 S89. Since that 
time he has made his home with his grandson, 
Dr. White: and, although fast approaching 
his ninetieth birthday, he is active, both phys- 
ically and mentally, and enjoys good health. 
In politics he has alwavs sup])orted the Demo- 
cratic party, and in his religious views is 
liberal. His wife, formerly Hannah Rich- 
mond, who was a daughter of Israel Richmond, 
died July 6, i88g, aged eighty-four years. 
Their children were: Drewry Cummings, .S. 
Lorenza, and James Oberon. 

James O. White, son of James anil Hannah 



266 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



White, was born in Dixfield, July 8, 1837. 
He completed his education at the high 
school in Canton, and before he was twenty 
years old he began to deal in live stock. Fol- 
lowing that business steadily, he became well 
known ajid exceedingly prosperous, and at a 
later day handled both native and Western 
cattle, which he shipped by the carload to the 
markets of Portland and other places. He 
was noted as an extensive buyer of native 
cattle, and he owned a great deal of pasturage 
land in different parts of the county. For 
three years he was engaged in general mer- 
cantile business in East Dixfield, having built 
the store which is now carried on by Mr. Ire- 
land ; and he owned the William Gould place 
on Wilton Street. He was a strictly honor- 
able and upright man, whose progressive ten- 
dencies and enterprising spirit were of great 
benefit to the community; and probably no 
business man in this section ever enjoyed 
greater popularity, or was more deserving of 
the sincere esteem in which he was held. 
Politically, he acted with the Democratic 
party, by which he was elected a member of 
the Board of Selectmen in 1879; and he repre- 
sented his district in the legislature. He was 
a member of W'illiamson Lodge, No. 20, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows; and in his 
religious belief he was a Universalist. 

James O. White died of appendicitis, July 
25, 1891. His wife, Zerua E. Walker, whom 
he wedded January 8, 1863, was born in Wil- 
ton, daughter of Moody and Zerua (Stone) 
Walker. Her grandparents, Osgood and Polly 
(Reed) Walker, who were natives of Massa- 
chusetts, settled in Wilton among the early 
pioneers, and resided there for the rest of their 
lives. They reared a family of eight chil- 
dren. Moody Walker was born in Wilton, 
May 24, 1 81 5. He owns a large and produc- 
tive farm located near East Dixfield, and is 
one of Wilton's most prominent farmers and 
highly esteemed citizens. He married first 
Zerua, daughter of Ephraim Stone, and she 
died at the age of thirty-three years, leaving 
two children, namely: Harrison; and Zerua, 
who became the wife of the late James O. 
White. By his second marriage, with Mrs. 
Mary H. Whiting Adams, Mr. Walker had 
one son, Samuel W. Mr. and Mrs. James O. 



White had four children, three of whom died 
in infancy; and the only one who lived to 
reach maturity is Verdeil O., the subject of 
this sketch. 

\'erdeil O. White began his education in 
the public schools, and, after completing the 
regular course of study at the Wilton Acad- 
emy in 1884, he entered Bowdoin College, 
where he was graduated in 1889. His profes- 
sional studies were pursued at Harvard Uni- 
versity Medical School, where he was gradu- 
ated in 1892. He immediately located for 
practice in East Dixfield, and has already es- 
tablished a high reputation as a skilful physi- 
cian and surgeon. In 1893 he was apijointed 
a member of the United States Board of Ex- 
aminers in pension cases for Franklin County. 
Politically, he is a Democrat. Aside from 
his professional attainments Dr. White is 
highly respected and esteemed for his many 
estimable personal qualities and for his abil- 
ity in other directions; and he has already 
laid the foundation of a useful and successful 
career. 




ILLIS W. WAITE, an enterprising 
merchant of Dixfield, Oxford 
County, Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, was born in this town, July 19, 
1859, son of Lorenzo and Sarah Waitc. His 
paternal grandfather was Isaac Waite; and the 
progenitors of the family, who were natives of 
Massachusetts, settled in Dixfield at an early 
date in the town's history. Lorenzo Waite 
was born in Dixfield, and was reared to agri- 
cultural pursuits. He was an able, energetic 
farmer and one of the stirring men of his 
locality, who availed himself of every oppor- 
tunity for advancement; and, as a result, he 
became prosperous and well-to-do. He scrx'ed 
in the Civil War as a private in Company C, 
Thirtieth Maine Regiment, Maine Volunteers; 
and after his return from the army he resumed 
farming in this tmvn. He died January 2, 
1876. In politics he was a Republican, and 
his religious views were liberal. His wife, 
who was before marriage .Sarah Newman, be- 
came the mother of three children : Harris N. , 
who died at the age of seventeen years; Willis 
W. ; and Leroy L., who resides in Livermore 



BIOGRAPHTCAI. REVIEW 



^6^ 



Falls, Ale. She died at the age of forty-two 
years. 

Willis W. Waite pas.sed his boyhood and 
youth in attending the common schools and 
assisting his father upon the farm. In early 
manhood he gave his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, and also to the live-stock business, 
which he followed successfully for several 
years. In 1894 he embarked in trade, and he 
has since met with an encouraging degree of 
success. He deals in meats, provisions, and 
groceries, of which he carries a full line; and 
his store is well patronized. In iS8g he was 
united in marriage to lulith Parlin, daughter 
of William Parlin; and she is the mother of 
one daughter, Sadie May. Politically, Mr. 
Waite is a Republican. He is now serving 
his third term as a member of the Board of 
Selectmen and his second term as Chairman 
of that body, and his valuable services to the 
town in this capacity are fully appreciated by 
the community. 




HALL for more than two- 
score N'cars was intimately associated 
with the agricultural interests of 
Norway. He was born May 4, 
181S, in Poland, Androscoggin County, son 
of Samuel and Betsey (Hall) Hall. Samuel 
Hall, born April 27, 1787, in Falmouth, 
Cumberland County, there married Miss Hall, 
who was born in the same town, October 22, 
1791. After their marriage they bought land 
in Poland, wdiere they lived until well ad 
vanced in years. Then they came to Norway, 
taking u\) their residence on the homestead 
now occupied by Mrs. Robert Hall. Here the 
father died on January 22, 1859, and the 
mother on August 30, 1873. They had seven 
children, as follows: Mar)', born January i, 
1 811; F:iizabeth W., born May 28, 1815; 
Sarah, born January 28, 181 7; Robert, the 
subject of this sketch ; Jeremiah, burn July 28, 
1821; Albion, born October 27, 1S25; and 
Cordelia, born July 26, 1827. Of these 
Robert is the only survivoi". Albion was a 
farmer in Norway. 

Robert Hall remained beneath the parental 
roof-tree until his marriage, by which time he 
had acquired a complete knowledge of farming. 



Soon after his marriage he bought a farm in 
Norway, and thereafter lived on it for fifteen 
years, successfully engaged in tilling the soil. 
He then came to the present homestead, which 
his father had jireviously bought, and here 
spent the rest of his life engaged in general 
farming anil tlairying. At his death, which 
occurred P'ebruary 9, 1S82, he owned about 
four hundred acres of kuul. Mr. Hall was a 
strong and earnest supporter of the jirinciples 
of the Democratic part)'. He was a member 
of the Norway Grange. He was held in high 
respect by his townsmen, whom he served as 
Highway Surveyor and in other iiffices. 

On December 3, 1843, .Mi', llall married 
Mary Marston, who was liurn in Norway, 
March 10, 1826, daughter of Brackett anil 
Sarah (ILall) Marston. Her parents, who 
removed to this town from i''almouth, their 
native place, were here engaged in farming. 
Having no offspring, Mr. and Mrs. Hall 
adopted Mrs. Hall's niece, Edith W. Marston, 
a daughter of Winslow B. Marston. She was 
born April 2, 1864, and is now the \\\ic of 
Virgil K. Dunn. Both live with Mrs. Hall, 
the husband having charge of the home farm. 
Mr. Dunn was born August 10, 1S64, in 
Greenwood, this county, a son of Charles Ed- 
ward and Rosanna (Pingree) Dunn, natives 
respectively of Poland and Norway. Mr. 
Dunn's parents now live on a farm in the 
northern part of Norway, whither they came 
from Poland. Mr. Dunn is enterjirising and 
industrious, and successfully carries on mixed 
husbandry, raises poultry, for which he has a 
large hennery, and pays sonie attention to 
dairying and stock raising. In politics he is 
a strong Prohibitionist, and he is a member of 
the Norway Grange. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Dunn are valued members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 




F. CONANT, of Temple, e.\-Sheriff of 
I. Franklin County and one of the largest 
and most successful agriculturists in 
this part of the State, was born in Temple, 
.September 25, 1836, son of Ephraim and V.W/.ix 
(Doble) Conant. 

Mr. Conant's grandfather, Ii!phraini Conant, 
Sr. , was in his \ouns:er davs a trader in the 



268 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



town of Templt; when it was first settled; and 
he later cleared and improved a farm from the 
wilderness. The forest abounded in game, 
which, with the trout antl other hsh that filled 
the streams, furnished food for the early 
settlers. In spite of the numerous difficulties 
and hardships oi the situation, the sturdy pio- 
neer cleared awa\' the forest, burned the 
stumps, and saw productive fields of wheat 
and hay take the place of the wilderness, as 
the result of his labor. He continued to in- 
crease his acreage by clearing more land, 
erected frame buildings, and after a long and 
successful period of activity retired. His 
last days were jwssed with his daughter in 
Strong, where he died at the age of ninety 
years; and his wife, whose maiden name was 
Joanna Staples, lived to be nearlv as old. 
Their children were: Ephraim, John G., 
James, Rebecca, I'amelia, Susan, Eliza, 
Sarah, Nancy, and Abigail. 

Ephraim Conant, eldest son of I']phraini, 
Sr. , was born in Temple in 1809; and in early 
manhood he set out for himself. Taking the 
advice of Scott Ellis, an extensive farmer and 
large land-owner of Temple, who lived to reach 
the advanced age of one hundred and three 
years, he bought of him one hundred and sixty 
acres of timbered land, situated just back of 
where his son now resides; and, after making 
a clearing and sowing a crop of wheat, he was 
able by hard w^irk and frugal living to pay 
for his purchase the first year, as Mr. Ellis 
had predicted. Continuing to advance in pros- 
]jerity, he cleared more land until he had 
eighty acres under culti\'ation ; and he in- 
creased his acreage by purchasing adjoining 
property, including the farm now owaied by his 
son, the buildings of which were erected by 
him, so that his real estate here amounted to 
four hundred acres. Selling this jiroperty to 
his son he bought a large farm in the town of 
Strong, where he resided for the rest of his 
life. He was one of the stirring men of his | 
day, who realized a comfortable fortune solely 
through his own energy and perseverance; and, 
being one of the most able citizens of the 
town, he held many of the important offices. 
He was an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church until the stand taken by that 
denomination ujion the anti slavery question 



forced him to withdraw; and then uniting with 
the Wesleyan Society he furnished liberal 
assistance in building a church edifice. His 
wife, who was before marriage Eliza Doble, 
became the mother of nine children, namely: 
Ephraim Erank, the subject of this sketch; 
Clinton, who died young; Israel H. ; John 
W. ; James H. ; Charles; Ella E. ; Sylvester 
G. ; and Willie, who did not live to reach 
maturity. Mrs. Eliza D. Conant died at the 
age of sixty-one years. 

Ephraim Erank Conant acquired a common- 
school education in his early years, and re- 
mained at home assisting his father in farming 
operations until his circumstances enabled him 
to purchase the property where he now resides. 
Starting with the firm determination to make 
his mark in life, he began by improving and 
still further extending the clearing made by 
his father, erecting new buildings, remodel- 
ling others; and he also engaged in lumbering. 
Having invested his surplus capital in real 
estate, he now owns eleven hundred and fifty 
acres, including a farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres in the adjoining town of Avon, 
which he carries on in connection with his 
homestead property. He has a large orchard 
of choice grafted fruit set out by himself, 
keeps twenty head of cattle, six horses, and 
two hundred sheep. His farms are carrieil on 
according to the best modern methods, with 
the view of obtaining the most profitable 
results; and by steadfastly adhering to his 
original purpose he has through perseverance 
and good judgment fully realized his ambition. 

On October 14, i860, Mr. E. E. Conant 
married Eliza A. Mitchell, daughter of 
Luther and Sarah (Staples) Mitchell, of 
Temple. Mrs. Conant's paternal grandpar- 
ents, Andrew and Susan (Weatherby) Mitch- 
ell, who were both natives of Lunenburg, 
Mass., became early settlers of Temple Mead- 
ows, and were very prosperous farming people. 
Luther Mitchell bought a farm of eighty acres 
near his father's property, and followed agri- 
cultural pursuits succes.sfully until his death, 
which took place when he was seventy-three 
years old. His wife, Sarah Staples, who was 
a daughter of Samuel Staples, lived to be 
seventy-six years old, and her children were: 
Eliza A., who became Mrs. Conant; Augustus; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



269 



and Melvin. Mr. and Mrs. Conant have one 
daughter — Maud C, who was born June 13, 
1864, and is now a book-keeper in Boston. 

Mr. Conant in politics is a Republican. 
For twelve years he served as Deputy Sheriff 
of Franklin County and for four years as High 
Sheriff. Though not a professor of any re- 
ligious belief, he attends both the Methodist 
and Baptist churches, and contributes liberally 
toward their support. He is the largest real 
estate owner in this section, and his bruad 
tracts of wild land are plentifully supplied with 
deer and other game. 



TT^HARLKS \V. RVKRSON, Chairman 
I ^yJ ,if the Board of Selectmen of Norway, 
\^Hs^ was born April 7, 1830, in Paris, 
this county, son of Cushman and 
Lavinia (Dunn) Ryerson. Among the earliest 
settlers of Maine was the Ryerson family, 
which located in the south-west part of the 
State. Luke Ryerson, grandfather of Charles 
\V. , was one of the twenty-four children borne 
to his father by his two wives. Grandfather 
Ryerson was born and reared in Portland, 
whence he removed tn Paris in pioneer days. 
He converted a tract of wild land -into a good 
homestead, and was there engaged both in 
tilling the soil and teaming during the rest of 
his life. His wife, Keziah (Cu.shman) Ryer- 
son, was born January 16, 1772, and died 
March 25, 1857. She bore him ten children, 
five boys and five girls, all of whom have 
passed away. 

Cushman Ryerson, father of Charles W., 
was a farmer. He spent his life on the Paris 
homestead where he was born. After succeed- 
ing to the paternal acres he cleared a large 
part of the land, lived to a good old age, and 
died May 25, 1862. He successively n)arried 
Lavinia and Eliza Dunn, both natives of Po- 
land, Me., and cousins. By his first union he 
became the father of four children, as follows: 
Julia A., born June 13, 1828, who died Sep- 
tember 7, 1847; Charles \V. , the subject of 
this sketch; Fessenden, born December 25, 
1831, who died August 12, 1847; and Alvin 
M., born June 23, 1834, who married Miss 
Carrie Barker, and is now engaged in the car- 
penter's trade at Auburn, this State. His 



second wife, whom he wedded IJecember 20, 
1S35, bore him two children, namely: Eliza 
L., born October 7, 1837, who died at the age 
of thirty years; and Gei}rge C, born May 26, 
1839. 

The education of Charles W. Ryerson was 
comjjleted at a high school. l'"or some years 
thereafter he worked on the home farm in 
Paris during the summer season, and taught 
school in the winter. After his marriage he 
devoted his entire time to agriculture, living 
for six or more years on a farm in his native 
town. At the end of that jieriod he disposed 
of this estate and removed with his family to 
Norway, where on November 2, 1865, he 
entered upon his present farm. In the man- 
agement of this property, which contains one 
hundred and .seventy- five acres of land, he has 
shown good judgment and has been very suc- 
cessful. He carries on general farnnng, and 
keeps a small dairy. Mr. Ryerson also owns 
a tract of land in Waterford township. As an 
adherent of the Reiuiblican party, he takes an 
active interest in politics. He has been one 
of the Selectmen of the town for si.x years, 
being now Chairman of the Board; and he has 
served on the School Board for three years. _ 
Also for three years he was I'resident of the 
Oxford County Agricultural Society, and he 
was Vice-President for one year. He was the 
first Master of both the Norway and Pomona 
Granges, serving four years in the latter posi- 
tion. He belongs to the Norway Lodge, No. 
16, Independent Order of Odd F'ellows, and to 
the Wildey Encampment. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Universalist church 
at Paris Hill. 

Mr. Ryerson was married May i, 1859, to 
Miss Susan R. Marston, who was born June 7, 
1835, in Norway, daughter of the late Brack- 
ett and Sarah (Hall) Marston. Mr. Marston, 
together with his wife, came here from Fal- 
mouth, their native town, bought the farm now- 
owned by Mr. Ryerson, and lived for a few 
years in a log house. This he subsequently 
"replaced by the dwelling the Ryersons now 
occupy, and spent his last years in it. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ryerson have two children, namely: 
Lizzie J., born May 22, 1862, who died Feb- 
ruary 27, 1865; and Lizzie C, born May 20, 
1866, the wife of John P. Howe, and living on 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA^EW 



tlie farm with her husband, whci assists in its 
management. Mr. and Mrs. Howe have had 
I'oLir children — Helen, Charles C, Ora, and 
Charles. Charles C. died when verv voimg-. 




|HARLI>:.S M. COOLIDGE, M.D., a 

popular jihysician of Waterfnrd, Me., 
was burn in Cantnii, this .State, 
September 25, 1S64. He is the 
son of Dr. Charles A. and Sarah Nancy (Fos- 
ter) Coolidge, and a grandson of John Cool- 
idge, originally from Livermore, Me., who 
settled in Canton at an early date and s|ient 
his life there, engaged in agriculture. 

Charles A. Coolidge was born in Canton, 
Me. I'or some time during his student days 
he taught school in the vicinity of his home; 
and after he received his medical degree he 
began to practice in Weld, Me. He was sub- 
sequently engaged in professional work in 
North Livermore, but later returned to his 
native town, where .he is now in active prac- 
tice. Mrs. Coolidge is a native of Weld, Me. 
She is the mother of three children : Martina 
Eliza, who died in infancy; Henry E., who 
.was at one time principal of the North Berwick 
High School, now a practising attorney at Lis- 
bon Falls, Me. ; and Charles M., who, as 
already noted, has adopted his father's calling. 
Henry E. Coolidge married Miss Josephine O. 
Dearborn, of Canton, Me. 

Charles M. Coolidge was graduated from the 
Nichols Latin School of Lewiston in the class 
of 1884 and from the medical department of 
Dartmouth College in the class of 1887. 
When ready to enter on his life work he 
iipened an office in North Waterford village, 
where he now resides, and in the short space 
of a decade has established an extensive prac- 
tice, his circuit embracing Waterford, Stone- 
liam, Albany, and Lovell. Dr. C. M. Cool- 
idge is widely known and highly esteemed, and 
though younger than many of his confreres has 
the confidence of all who know him. 

He was married February 21, 1886, to Miss 
Ida H. Manning, who was born in Eaton, 
X.H., September 24, i860, the daughter of 
Dr. William A. and Nancy (Atkinson) Man- 
ning. Dr. Manning, now deceased, was one 
ol the best known phvsicians of his day, 




practising in Eaton, N. H., and in Stone- 
ham, Me. His wife is now living in Eaton, 
N.H. Mr.s. Coolidge died March 14, 1895, 
leaving one child — Marion Allegra, born 
April 20, I 89 1. 

Dr. Coolidge is prominent among the Re- 
publicans of Waterford, and has held several 
offices of trust. He has served on the School 
Board three years, and is now^ Supeivisor of 
Schools. As a Mason he belongs to Mount 
Tire'm Lodge, No. 132, A. F. & A. M., of 
Waterford Flat; and as a Knight of Pythias 
he is a member of Hiawatha Lodge, No. 49, 
of Stoneham, I\Ie. 



APTAIN EDWARD M. ROBIN- 
SON, who is successfully engaged in 
the furniture and undertaking busi- 
ness in Phillips, his store being 3 
Beal Block, was born in South Sebec, Piscata- 
quis County, Me., October 21, 1S33, a son of 
Benjamin Franklin and Betsey C. (Russell) 
Robinson. Benjamin F. Robinson, who was 
a descendant of one of Scotland's sturdy sons, 
was born in Ellsworth, Me. ; and his wife, who 
was of Flnglish- origin, was born in Norridge- 
wock. Me. The family name was formerly 
Robinston, which has been changed to the 
more euphonious spelling of to-day. 

Jonathan Robinson, the father of Benjamin 
F., was a native of Vermont, whence he re- 
moved to Maine. During his years of active 
labor he followed the business of a mill- 
wright, besides carrying on the farm which he 
owned in Sebec. He was the father of seven 
children: but of that number only one re- 
mains, Paulina K., the widow of J. G. Jo_\', 
of Sebec, Me. Jonathan Robinson lived to 
the venerable age of ninety-six years. 

During the greater part of his years of toil 
Benjamin F. Robinson worked with his father 
as a millwright, but finally purchased a farm 
in Sebec, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. Of the eleven children born to him and 
his wife, Betsey, si.v are living, namely: 
Leonard R., in Bath; Edward M. : Ira, in 
Bath; Albert A., in California; Mary, the 
widow of W. Troy, in Willimantic; and 
Carrie, the wife of F. Wittum, of Gardiner, 
Me. Their father dieil in 1882, aged eighty- 




EDWARD M. ROBINSON and grand-daughter. FAYE R. HAINES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



two years, and their mother in I1S62, aged 
fifty-six years. 

lulward M. Robinson not only acquired a 
practical district-school education during his 
home life, but formed habits of industry, 
being required to perform such tasks as 
usually fall to the lot of the farmer's boy. 
When he reached the age of seventeen he went 
to Machias as an apprentice to his uncle, Dean 
S. Robinson, a millwright, with w'hom he re- 
mained four years. From about 1S54 to the 
beginning of the Civil War he was employed 
at his trade in different places in the Prov- 
inces and in Cherryfield and Levviston, being 
engaged on the Androscoggin mill in the last- 
named place when the first call was issued for 
volunteers to put down the Rebellion. He 
responded promptly by enlisting in Company 
E of the Fifth Maine Volunteers, of which 
Mark H. Duunell was Colonel, E^dwin Sawyer, 
of Lisbon Falls, being Captain of the com- 
pany. We are indebted to the May, 1.S96, 
issue of the Rtii/j^r/cy Lakes for the follow- 
ing account of his war service. April 2'j, 
1 861, less than two weeks after the fall of 
Sumter, saw him signing the enlistment 
papers as a member of Company E, Fifth 
Maine \'olunteers. The regiment was mus- 
tered in at Portland, Robinson being ap- 
pointed Third Sergeant in Company E. (The 
Captain says that no honor which has been 
conferred upon him since has ever given him 
the supreme satisfaction he felt at that time, 
and adds that he couldn't have felt prouder if 
he'd been made Brigadier-general.) August 
15, I ST) I, he was promoted to Second Lieuten- 
ant of Company E, for "meritorious conduct 
at the battle of Bull Run." In ALay, i<S62, 
he was promoted to First Lieutenant of Com- 
pany C; and in March, 1863, his unflagging 
bravery won him the Captainc}' of Company C. 

Now Company C was made up of dare-devil 
fellows, known as the " Saco roughs.'' The 
men had been unmanageable from the first, 
and weren't growing any better as time wore 
on. Several captains of this particular com- 
pany had one after another given up the task 
and gone home. The bluff old colonel of the 
regiment grew tired of appointing captains 
for Company C after a while, and finally said, 
'"Well, I'll appoint some one this time that 



I'll be d d if they'll drive home": anti he 

appointed Lieutenant Robinson. 

The first day he took conunand, there was a 
little episode which settled matters once and 
for all. Company C was doing picket duty in 
front of Richmond. As the column marched 
along the line the three last men dropped off 
at each post. The Captain toUl the men that, 
after the line was covered, they could shift 
around, so that comrades who messed together 
might be with each other, adding that he 
couldn't stop to sort them out then, with the 
rebel line popping at 'em from the other side 

of the river. It happened that Private , 

one of the ringleaders, was told off with two 
fellows from a different mess; and he flared up 
in an instant. He gave his rifle a fling toward 
the river,, declaring with an oath that he 
wouldn't submit to any such thir.g. Scarcely 
had the rifle struck the ground when he him- 
self was stretched senseless by a blow with 
the back of the Captain's sword. l-'or a time 
it looked as if he would die; but eventually he 
pulled through, and begged not to be court- 
martialled. "I won't court-martial you," said 
the Captain, "if you'll settle down and behave 
yourself. But remember this: I'm going to be 
Captain from now on. \'ou've been Captain 
long enough. " And, when he discovered that 
he'd found his master, he developed into a 
model soldier. 

May 3, 1863, at the battle of Fredericks- 
burg, Captain Robinson received three flesli 
wounds, but diil not leave the company. May 
10, 1864, at the Iwttle of Spottsylvania Court- 
house, he was shot through both legs, and w;is 
forced to go home. After remaining home 
eight months he raised a new company, which 
was mustered in at Augusta, and sent to the 
front to join the Nineteenth Corps. This 
corps was broken up, and his division sent 
South, entering Savannah just as Sherman 
was marching out. He was in Augusta, Ga., 
at the time Jeff Davis was hurried through the 
city in the night; "and it was well for Davis 
that our boys didn't know he was in the city," 
says the Captain. 

After the declaration of peace Captain 
Robinson was appointed Provost Marshal, 
administering the oath of amnesty to those 
who desired to iro into business attain, and 



274 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



aiding in many ways the war-stricken State. 
He was detailed, soon after liis appointment, 
to search out tlie hiding-place of a vast amount 
of Confederate specie, which had been spirited 
away from Richmond. The specie was found 
in tobacco boxes sealed with the letters 
■'C. S. A.," and amounted to fifteen million 
dollars. 

Fortunes were made in those after-the-war 
times in ways more rapid than honest, and 
the Captain had an opportunity which in the 
hands of a less honest person would have 
yielded mighty good returns. There was 
reason to believe that a • certain ex-rebel 
Major and paymaster had, locked up in his 
safe, certain Confederate property; and Cap- 
tain Robinson and one of his Lieutenants went 
down with a detail of men to see about it. 
The old Major told them that there was noth- 
ing contraband in the safe, and he would 
gladly open it for them but that the key was 
not there. "All right," said the Captain; 
"we'll have a team come up and carry the 
safe down to headquarters, where 1 guess 
they'll find a way to get into it."' The old 
rebel saw they meant business, so he called 
the Captain and the Lieutenant aside, and 
said, "There is fifteen thousand dollars in Con- 
federate gold and silver in that safe: and, if 
you fellows will say nothing about it, you can 
divide one-half of that pile between you." 
"Do it, Cap'n, do it!" exclaimed the Lieu- 
tenant. Hut the Captain wasn't the man to 
tarnish his record and break his oath to the 
government. .So the end of it was that the fif- 
teen thousand dollars went to headquarters. 
Following is a list of the battles in which he 
took part, which form a fitting close for this 
account of his military career: first Bull Run, 
Va., July 21, iSCu ; West f'oint, Va., May 6, 
1862; Gaines's Mill, Va., Jime 27, I1S62; 
Charles City Cross-roads, Va., June 29, 
1862; second Bull Run, Va., August 30, 
1862; South Mountain, Md., September 14, 
1862; Antietam, Md., September 17, 1862; 
first P'redericksburg, V'a., December 12, 1862; 
second Fredericksburg, Va. , May 2, 1863; 
Salem Heights, Va., May 4, 1863; Gettys- 
burg, Pa., July 3, 1863: Funkstown, Md., 
July 12, 1863: Rappahannock .Station, \'a., 



November 



I 86 : 



T,ocust Grove. Va., No- 



vember 2j, 1863, Mine Run, Va., November 
29, 1863; Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1863; 
Spottsylvania Court-house, Va., May 10, 
1864. 

His grandfather was one of six brothers who 
served in the Revolutionary War, and he him- 
self is one of six brothers who went to the 
front in 1861. Singularly enough, three of 
tlie earlier generation were killed in service, 
and but three of the later generation lived to 
come home at the close of the Rebellion. 

Captain Robinson was mustered out Febru- 
ary 16, 1866, and soon after the close of the 
war Vk'as granted a pension of ten dollars a 
month, which was subsequently increased to 
twenty and still later to twenty-four. The 
year following his return from the war he 
worked at his trade; but the wounds he had 
received caused him considerable trouble, and 
he gave up work as a millwright, and opened 
a furniture store in Anson village. He came 
to Phillips in 1872, and in company with his 
father-in-law, James M. Adams, purchased 
the Barden House, which they conducted for a 
year or so, and then soUl it to .Sam Farmer. 
He then secured work on the Beal I^lock, 
which was begun about that time. After that 
was completed he again took up the furniture 
business, to which he added undertaking, hir- 
ing a portion of the post-office building for the 
purpose, but six months later removing to his 
present quarters in the Beal IMock. On De- 
cember 8, 1859, Mr. Robinson married Miss 
Loreda M. Adams. They have one child, 
Ilda M., born September i, 1S60. 

Mr Robinson, like his father, has always 
been a stanch Republican. He cast his first 
Presidential vote for John C. I'remont. The 
only town office of importance in which he has 
served is that of Town Treasurer. He is one 
of the Directors of the Union National Bank, 
and has been for sixteen years a Trustee of 
the Phillips Savings Bank. In 1862 he be- 
came a member of Somerset Lodge, No. 34, 
A. F. & A. M., of Skowhegan, Me., but later 
took a dimit, and is now a member of the 
Blue Mountain Lodge, No. 67: Franklin 
Chapter, No. 19, of F"armington, Me.; Pil- 
grim Commandery, Knights Templars, No. 
19, of Farmington; Korah Temple, Noble 
Order of the Mystic Shrine, of Lewiston. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



275 



is also a member of Mount Saddleback Lodge, 
No. 92, Iiulependent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Phillips, and Chairman of its Board of Trus- 
tees; a member of the Loyal Legion, State of 
Maine; and of the Union Veteran League of 
Levviston; likewise of Cushman Post, No. 87, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of which he is 
the present Commander. He is an attendant 
of the Universalist church. 




jHARLES li. HOLT, a prominent 
member of the legal profession in 
Norway and a native of Fryeburg, 
Me., was born March 11, 1S35, son 
of Joseph and Mehitabel (Miller) Holt, and 
grandson of William and Esther (Frye) Holt. 
William Holt, a native of Massachusetts, 
served as a musician in the War of 18 12. He 
went to Fryeburg, and purchased a farm when 
that town was practically new, and continued 
to live there until his death, at the age of 
sixty years. His wife, P^sther (Frye) Holt, 
was a daughter of Simon I'rye, and a descend- 
ant of one of the pioneer families of P"ryeburg. 
She taught school in her younger days. Her 
children were: William H., John, Joseph, 
Thomas K., Mary, Esther, and Sophia. She 
lived to be seventy-seven years old. 

Joseph Holt was born November 25, 1808. 
He learned the trade of a tinsmith, and started 
in business for himself at P"ryeburg. Subse- 
quently, owing to the failing health of his 
parents, he sold out, assumed their debts, and 
cared for them until their death. In recom- 
pense for these sacrifices he received the 
homestead, which he afterward sold, and 
bought a saw-mill, grist-mill, and a farm at 
West Denmark. He also built a store there, 
and all together did a large business. After- 
ward he became the owner of three other 
farms. In politics he was a Democrat, and 
served the town as Selectman. His religion 
was Universalism, and he was a member of 
the Masonic fraternity. His wife, Mehitabel, 
whose birth occurred February 17, 1812, bore 
him seven sons and two daughters, of whom 
Frank B. , the youngest, died when two years 
old. The others, who are living, are: Charles 
E. , Joseph A., Jones B., Alvah M., L. Cor- 
delia, William H., Esther A., and John W. 



After attending the P'rycburg ami I^ridgton 
Academies, Charles I^. Holt read law with 
Major D. R. Hastings, of P'rycburg, and was 
admitted to the bar in March, 1861. He at 
once opened an office in Denmark, where he 
remained until 1873. Then he removed to 
Bethel, and four years later came to Norway. 
Here he entered into partnershij) with Alvah 
Black, one of the leading lawyers of O.xford 
County, with whom he was connected until 
Mr. Black's death in 1882. Beginning in Oc- 
tober of that year, he and A. .S. Kimball did 
business together for three years. Since then 
Mr. Holt has practised his profession alone. 
During his residence in Norway he has taken 
a very active i)art in the legal and financial 
affairs of the town: and his counsel is sought 
by a large clientage, who place implicit faith 
in his legal acumen. A man of studious 
habits, he has one of the largest and best se- 
lected law libraries in O.xford County. Dur- 
ing the Civil War Mr. Holt served as enlist- 
ing ofificer. In 1864 he was appointed, b)- 
General Rufus Ingalls, clerk of the Quarter- 
master Department at City Point, Va. He 
was among the first to favor the removal of the 
County Building from Paris Hill to South 
Paris. He is now one of the Board of Di- 
rectors in the Norway National Bank. Since 
coming to Norway he has purchased and fitteil 
up a fine house on Pleasant .Street, in which 
he now resides. 

On May 26, 1877, Mr. Plolt was united in 
marriage with Miss Lavina B. Ames, daugh- 
ter of Colonel Nathaniel and Roxanna L. 
Ames. Colonel Ames was born in Brown- 
field, Me. On starting in life for himself he 
purchased a new and practically uncultivated 
farm, on which he erected a log house. Latei', 
after clearing u|i a poi'tion of the land and get- 
ting a start, he erected a frame house and other 
necessary buildings. He was a Colonel in the 
State militia. At the time of his death he 
was sevent)'-four years old. His wife, who 
made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Holt, 
died June 19, i8g6, eighty-nine years of age. 
Colonel and Mrs. Ames had a son and three 
daughters; namely, Amanda M., Maria L. , 
Lavinia B., and Charles H. Mr. Holt is a 
member of the Democratic County Committee. 
While in Denmark he held the office of .Select- 



.76 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



linn, and he has served Norway in the same 
capacity since his arrival. He is an esteemed 
Mason, having membership in Mount Moriah 
Lodge, of Denmark; in L'nion Chapter, No. 
36, Royal Arch Masons; in Oxford Council, 
Royal and Select Masters, of Norway; and in 
Portland Commandery, Knights Templars. 




"IRAM P. KLLIOTT, of the firm of 
Elliott & Bartlett, spool manufact- 
urers of Lynchville, in the town of 
Albany, Oxford County, Me., was 
born in Salmon Falls, N.H., December 24, 
1833. His parents were Russell F. and Mary 
Jane (Whitehouse) Elliott. 

Russell 1'. fllliott was born in Salisbury, 
Mass., in March, 1812. For a number of 
years he was intimately connected with manu- 
facturing industries, at first as superintendent 
of a large woollen-mill at Salmon Falls, 
N.H., and later as superintendent of the 
Hosea Crane manufacturing plant at Ports- 
mouth, N.H., which had a large annual output 
of underwear and hosiery; and he was subse- 
quently for a long time conductor on what is 
now the Eastern Division of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad. The latter part of his life 
was spent in retirement at F'all River, Mass., 
where he died at the advanced age of eighty- 
two. His wife, a native of Salmon Falls, 
N.IL, died in May, 1 8go, at the age of 
eighty-one. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell V. Elliott had seven 
children, six of whom grew to maturity; 
namely, Anna A., Hiram P., luiiily Jane, 
George, Mary K. , and Celia. The sixth 
child, Celia, first, died in infancy. Anna A. 
IClliott, born in March, 1S31, married Colonel 
John I'. Emerson, a dry-goods merchant, who 
died in 1871. She is now living in Paw- 
tncket, R.L lunily Jane, born in October, 
1835, married P'erdinand Reed, and had three 
children. Mr. Reed and his family have all 
passed to the world beyonil, the mother and 
three children having died within thirteen 
months. George F^lliott is in the mill with 
his brother, and lives in North Waterford, 
Me. He married Ella C. York, and has one 
child, Wallace H. Mary K., born in June, 
1S37, is the wife of George W. Wnodcnck, a 



cook in Pawtucket, R. 1. Celia, born in 1842, 
is the wife of I'erdinantl Tisdale, a painter of 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

Hiram P. I^lliott, the elder of the two sons, 
was educated in the common schools of Ports- 
mouth, N.H. At the age of nineteen he 
began to learn the business of spool-making at 
Fall River, Mass., where he worked some five 
years; and the six years following he was em- 
ployed in the same way in Central Falls, R.I. 
He then took charge of the factory of J. K. 
Malley, of which he was foreman ten \ears; 
and he next started a small spool-mill of his 
own at East Stoneham, Me. A year later he 
removed to Lynchville, in the town of Albany, 
Me., and started the mill in which he is now 
interested, with Jonathan Bartlett as partner. 
This venture proved very successful; and the 
firm now has a large business, keeping a num- 
ber of men constantly employed. They man- 
ufacture spools for the noted Rhode Island 
thread firm of J. & P. Coats, and have a ca- 
pacity of four thousand gross or more a week. 
Mr. Elliott's business career has been marked 
by energy, application, and upright dealing. 
Starting without capital, he has built up a 
successful business, and is now enjoying the 
fruits of his labor, with the esteem of all 
with whom he is brought in c.^mtact. 

He was married November 5, 1861, to Pris- 
cilla Brownell, daughter of Edward and Re- 
becca (McCumber) Brownell. She was born 
September 5, 1844. ^-^'i^ child has blessed 
the union of Mr. and Mrs. Elliott, Mildred 
T. , born May 29, 1871, miw the wife of \V. H. 
Kilgore, who is. a merchant of North Water- 
ford, Me, and the Postmaster of that place. 

Mr. Elliott is prominent in local politics, 
favoring the Democratic side. He is an Odd 
Fellow in high standing, belonging to Oxford 
Lodge, No. iCii, of North Waterford, Me. 
Mrs. lilliott attends the Congregational 
Church of North Waterford. 



^m»m¥ 



HARLES G. SAWYER, one of Wil- 
ton's most highly respectetl citizens, 
whose empty sleeve attests more 
eloquently than words his service 
in defence of the L^nion, and recalls to memory 
the dark da\'s of the Rebellion, was burn at 




BIOGRAl'lllLAL REVIEW 



the foot of Moosehead Lake in the town of 
Greenville, Me., April 13, 1832, son of Isaac 
and Sarah (Hayford) Sawyer. Mr. Sawyer".s 
grandfather, Joel Sawyer, who was for many 
years a resident of .Saco, Me., died in that 
town at the age of eighty years. II is eliil- 
dren were: ffenry, Ephraitn, I'dlison, !''iMnk, 
Isaac, Mercy, and Ruth. 

Isaac Sawyer, Mr. Sawyer's father, was i)orn 
in Saco in February, 1798. In young man- 
hood he worked upon the river, and, saving 
his earnings, bought a homestead. Finding 
that he needed more land, ami not being able 
to purchase it near his native town on account 
of the sharp advance in prices, he decided to 
become a pioneer in the region about Moose- 
head Lake, where land was cheap and of good 
quality. Purchasing one-half of. a township 
near the foot of the lake at twenty-five cents 
per acre, he moved his family to Monson, 
fourteen miles distant, where they remained 
until he had provided a shelter for them in the 
wilderness. 

He subdivided his tract, selling a portion of 
it to other settlers, and, retaining the rest for 
himself, cleared and improved one hundred 
and sixty acres into a good farm. .The land 
proving exceedingly fertile, he till_ed the soil 
successfully, also engaging quite extensively in 
lumbering; and he later erected a good set of 
frame buildings. He was a man of powerful 
physique, and is known to have once carried 
upon his back and in his hands a half-barrel of 
flour, a small pig, and some [lackages of groce- 
ries several miles over a narrow path from 
the store to his home. In politics he was in 
his latter years a Republican, and he was a 
Methodist in his religious views. He lived 
to reach the advanced age of nearly ninety 
years. In his youth he enlisted for service in 
the War of 18 12; and while destroying the 
bridge at Plattsburg, N.Y., he sustained a 
severe injury which caused him more or less 
trouble in after life. His wife, who was be- 
fore marriage Sarah Hayford, became the 
mother of six children; namely, Sarah A., 
Mary J., Lewis, Maria, Charles G. , and 
Susan A., all of whom grew to maturity. 
Mrs. Sarah H. Sawyer lived to be seventy- 
nine years old. .She was a Congregationalist 
in her religious belief. 



Charles (i. .Sawyer, the filth child and the 
special subject of the present writing, ac- 
quired a i)ractical education, although the 
school facilities in the vicinit\' of his boy- 
hood's home were not of the best. When a 
young man he bought his father's homesteail 
[)roperty, which contained one hundred and 
sixty acres; and he carried it on for ten years, 
during which time he cleared forty acres more 
for tillage purposes, and erected a new dwell- 
ing in place of the old one which had been 
destroyed by fire. Selling his farm he moved 
to the city of Bangor, where for a short time 
he kept a restaurant, later engaging in the 
meat and provision business with j. P. 'ra)'lor 
until going into the army. In .September, 
1864, he enlisted as a ])rivate in Company L, 
Thirty-fir.st Maine Infantry, under CajJtain 
D. I). Brock: and he served until the close of 
the war. In the last charge in front of 
Petersburg, Ajjril 2, 1865, he received a gun- 
shot wound in the left ;irm, which completely 
shattered the bone, making anqnitation neces- 
sary; and after his discharge he returned to 
Bangor. 

When sufficiently recovereil to again engage 
in business pursuits, he ojiened a grocery 
store, which he carried on for two years; and 
on selling out he bought a farm of ninety 
acres, which he conductetl for five years. He 
then sold his farming property, and, removing 
to Wilton, engaged in the canning business, 
packing in a su[)erior manner green corn, 
apples, berries, beans, and lamb, employing 
in the busy season as many as one hundred 
hands. These goods ac([uired a wide reputa- 
tion in the metropolitan markets for the high 
standard of excellence which was maintained 
in their production, and for ten years he car- 
ried on a large and profitable business. In 
connection with that he established a general 
store, which he conducted upon the site of the 
present town hall: and he continued in trade 
until 18S3, when he sold out and retired from 
business. In 1880 he bought a tract of land 
situated upon an elevation near the foot of 
Wilton Lake, and erecting a large two-story 
house with mansard roof, together with a com- 
modious stable, graded and beautified the 
grounds, thus making a handsome and attrac- 
tive homestead. The location is healthful. 



• 78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



tlir surnuiiulings pleasant; and this estate, 
which is called "The Birches," taking its 
name from a beautiful grove of white birch- 
trees, affords an agreeable retreat for many 
city people, who avail themselves of its genial 
hospitality during the heated term. 

Mr. .Sawyer's first wife, formerly Huldah J. 
Delano, a daughter of John Delano, of Abbot, 
Me., died at the age of thirty-four years, leav- 
ing four children, as follows: Lelia K. , who 
was born January 6, 1857, was graduated at 
the Maine Wesleyan .Seminary at Kent's Hill, 
and is a teacher of French and German; 
Willanl E., who was born August 23, 1859; 
Ida M., who was born November 25, 1861, 
and is now the wife of R. W. Poor, Cashier 
of the Garfield National Bank of New York 
City; and Charles E. , who was born January 
7, 1864, and is now railroad station agent at 
Chisholme Mills, Me. By his present wife, 
Mrs. Pollen Blake Sawyer, daughter of Zebulon 
Blake, of Carmel, Me., Mr. .Sawyer has no 
children. In jiolitics Mr. .Sawyer supports 
the Republican party, and while residing in 
Bangor he served in the City Council and as 
Assistant Assessor. He is a comrade of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and he and 
Mrs. Sawyer are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Willard E. Sawyer, eldest son of Charles 
G. .Sawyer, and a prominent young business 
man of Wilton, was educated in the public 
schools of Bangor and at the Wilton Academy. 
In 1885 he opened a large store devoted to dry 
goods, groceries, crockery ware, agricultural 
implements, and other merchandise; but in 
Februar.y, 1886, his place of business was de- 
stroyed by fire. He erected another store, 
and in 1893 sold it to the town for a public 
building. In 1887 he bought the canning 
factory carried on by his father; and, after 
conducting it successfully until 1892, he with- 
drew from the business. He wedded Eillian 
Whittier, daughter of Daniel E. Whittier, of 
Chesterville, Me., and they have had five chil- 
dren, namely: Ralph E. , who was born May 
28, 1885; Earl W., who was born December 
17, 1886; Willard H., who was born in Sep- 
tember, 1889; Gladys, who died in infancy; 
and I'hilip D., who was born May 17, 1895. 

Willard V.. Sawyer ami his family occupy a 



handsome residence on Prospect .Street, which 
he erected in 1890. 




ARLTON H. WALKER, a promi- 
nent farmer of Fryeburg, Oxford 
County, Me., who carries on busi- 
ness to some e.vtent as a lumber 
manufacturer, was born in this town, April 
12, 1836, son of Colonel James and Susan 
(Colby) Walker. He is of substantial Eng- 
lish stock, and comes of long lines of worthy 
Colonial ancestry, the blood of Puritan and 
Pilgrim mingling in his veins. 

This branch of the Walker family is de- 
scended from Samuel Walker, born in Eng- 
land in 1595, who in early manhood crossed 
the Atlantic, and settled in the vicinity of 
Boston, Mass., his elder brother Richard, 
who accompanied him to these shores, locat- 
ing in York, Me. Samuel Walker, second, 
son of Samuel, first, was born in Reading, 
Mass., in 1643, ^"d became a resident of 
Woburn, Mass., where he was a Deacon of the 
church. His son Samuel, the third in direct 
line, born in Woburn in 1668, who also was a 
Deacon, .was the father of Captain Samuel 
Walker, who was born in 1694, and settled in 
Wilmington, Mass. Deacon Timothy Walker, 
son of Captain Walker, was born in Wilming- 
ton in 1732. He married, in 1758, P'unice 
Brewster, then twenty-eight years of age, 
daughter of Joseph Brewster, of Du.xbury, 
Mass., near Plymouth, her father being a 
grandson of Elder William Brewster, of the 
"Mayflower" company, who has been called 
the chief of the Pilgrims. 

James Walker, son of Timothy and liunice 
(Brewster) Walker, was born in Wilmington, 
Mass., January 3, 1772. He was married No- 
vember 20, 1794, to Anna Harnden, of Wil- 
mington, born August i, 1775. It is now 
nearly one hundred years since James WalkL-r 
came to Fryeburg, Me., accompanied by his 
wife and two children, and settled on the farm 
where his grandson, Carlton H., now resides. 
Grandfather Walker cleared and improved the 
property; and, although meeting with the 
usual disadvantages and drawbacks of a pio- 
neer, among which was the total destruction 
by fire of his first residence, he persevered, 



BIOdRAl'IirCAL RF.VIKW 



279 



and became a prosperous farmer. He was a 
man of more than ordinary intelligence, and 
possessing a considerable literary ability he 
wrote a history of the family. He died Octo- 
ber 1 8, 1<S52, survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Anna Harnden Walker, who attained the ad- 
vanced age of nearly ninety-one years, her 
fleath occurring March ,0, \^6G. They were 
the parents of eleven children, as follows: 
Anna, who was born November 3, 1795; I'^liz- 
abeth, who was born December I3, 1796; 
Sarah, who was born February 14, 1799, and 
dietl October 3, 1885; Colonel James, who 
was born March 3, 1801, and died July 16, 
1 891; Rebecca, who was born February 24, 
1804, and died April 15, 1826; Brewster, 
who was born January 26, 1806, and died No- 
vember I, 1807; Miranda, who was born De- 
cember 3, 1808, and died November 4, 1881; 
Samuel, who was born August 10, 181 i, and 
died August 29, 1863; Clarissa, who was born 
January 9, 1813; Henry, who was born July 
30, 1 8 16, and with his wife, Caroline F'rye, 
daughter of John Hancock Frye, is residing 
in this town: and Timothy, who was born 
March 3, 18 19, married Hannah Harnden, of 
Denmark, Me., and, now a widower, resides 
in Ouincv, Mass. 

James Walker, the younger, born in Frye- 
burg in the first year of the century, as already 
noted, later known as Colonel James Walker, 
at the age of twenty-one succeeded his father 
in the management of the farm. He was mar- 
ried on November 25, 1833, to Susan Colby, 
a native of Brownfield, Me., born November 
ig, 1803. .She was a daughter of Asa Colby, 
a pioneer farmer of Brownfield, who later re- 
moved to the adjoining town of Denmark, 
where he passed the rest of his life. Colonel 
Walker and his wife reared four children, 
namely: Rebecca, who was born August 21, 
1834, married John Seavey, of l^rownfield, and 
died January 16, 1862: Carlton H., the sul)- 
ject of this sketch; Granville, who was born 
December 16, 1837, and died December 31, 
1861 ; and Ann, who was born February 20, 
1840, and is now the wife of William H. Tar- 
box, an architect of Fryeburg. Mrs. Susan 
C. Walker died November 16, 1883. 

Carlton H. Walker, whose personal history 
we are now to trace from his boyhood, ac- 



quired his education in the common schools 
and at the Fryeburg Academy, lie remained 
at home assisting his father in carrying on the 
farm until he reached manhood; and he then 
went to l'"ryeburg village, where he was em- 
ployed as clerk in a general store for two 
years. Returning to the homestead he took 
charge of the farm, and eventually inheriting 
the jjroperty has since resided here. He owns 
one thousand acres of land, ;in(l his farm is 
exceedingly fertile and well im|)roved. In 
connection with agricultural ])ursuits he car- 
ries on a large saw and grist mill located near 
his residence, doing some business in manu- 
facturing lumber of all kinds. 

On May 2, 1863, Mr. Walker was united in 
marriage with Sarah F. Tarbo.v, who was born 
in Denmark, Me., January 28, 1841. She is 
a daughter of Dominicus G. and Sally (Paine) 
Tarbo.x, the former of whom was a native of 
Kennebunkport, and the latter of Standish, 
Me. Mrs. Walker's father was a clothier by 
trade, also a surveyor of lumber; and, settling 
in Denmark, he operated a clothing-mill in 
that town many years. He died January 22, 
1886. Mr. and Mrs. Walker "have three 
daughters, as follows: Flva D. , who was born 
June 2, 1867, and is now supervisor of draw- 
ing and teacher of manual training in schools 
in Bristol, Conn.; Susan M., who was born 
December 6, 1871, and is now a teacher of 
oratory at the North Bridgton Academy; and 
Sarah T. , who was born March 30, 1879, and is 
now attending the academy here in Fryeburg. 
The Misses Eva D. and Susan M. Walker are 
ladies of marked ability, and have acquired a 
notable reputation in educational work. 

In public affairs Mr. Walker has rendered 
efficient service to the town, having been 
Chairman of the Board of .Selectmen several 
years, and at various times the incumbent of 
other town offices. In politics he acts with 
the Republican party. He is acti\ely inter- 
ested in the Fryeburg Agricultural .Society, of 
which he has served as President and Secre- 
tary; and he is a leading spirit in all measures 
introduced for the general improvement of the 
town. He is a Master Mason and a member 
of Pythagorean Lodge, No. ii, of P'ryeburg. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walker and family attend the 
Congregational church. 



2So 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




'RANK A. HILI., clothing manufact- 
urer, one of the leading young men of 
Fryeburg, Oxford County, IVIe. , his 
nati\-c town, was born on August 14, 1866, son 
of Dr. Charles K. and Susan (Osgood) Hill. 
I [is grandfather, Captain Jonah Mill, who was 
born in Biddeford, Rlc. , June 3, 17S4, became 
a resident of Chatham, N.H., and was promi- 
nent in the early State militia. He married 
on April 27, 1807, Sall\' Stimson, \vho died 
March 4, 1840. 

Dr. Charles 1{. Hill was a native of Chat- 
ham and a graduate of Jkiwdoin Ctjllege. He 
first settled in North Fr_\eburg, from which 
[ilace he moved to ]5ridgton, Me., where he 
remained for some time; and he finally re- 
moved to Fryeburg, where he resided until his 
death, which took place April 16, 1884. An 
able i^hysician, he enjoyed a large practice in 
this vicinity; and he occupied a prominent 
position in the community. His first wife, 
whose maiden name was Marinda P. Wiggin, 
died in May, 1863. She left one son, Charles 
E., who was adopted by his aunt, and is now 
a successful practising physician of Newton 
Centre, Mass. He is known as Dr. Charles 
E. Fessenden. Dr. Charles E. Hill wedded 
for his second wife Susan O.sgood, of Fryeburg. 
She was a daughter of Caleb and Dolly 
(Wiley) Osgood, the former of whom was a 
native of Fryeburg, and the latter of North 
Fryeburg. Caleb Osgood was a blacksmith 
by trade. His last days were spent in Con- 
way, N. H. By this union there are two chil- 
dren: Frank A., the subject of this sketch; 
and Edwin Rav, who is now engaged in the 
meat and fish business at Fryeburg village. 

Frank A. Hill acquired his education in the 
common schools and at the Fryeburg Academy. 
At the age of eighteen he started in life as a 
clerk in the store of Charles T. Ladd, with 
whom he remained for three years; and he 
then engaged for some time in the corn-pack- 
ing business. He first entered the clothing 
business as an employee of J. I. Greenlaw, 
later filling a position with A. E. & F. 
Thompson, large manufacturers of this town, 
with whom he remained until 1895, when, in 
company with Ira Warriner, he bought out the 
above named firm. He continued the business 
in connection with a general stfire for a year, 



and at the expiration of that time he purchased 
his partner's interest in the manufacturing 
business, which he is now carrying on alone. 
He manufactures coats for the Rhodes Riplc)- 
Company of 72 Lincoln Street, Boston, and 
employs an average of eighteen hands. 

On A]iril 20, 1892, Mr. Hill was married 
to Dora A. ]5rickett, who was born in Stow, 
Me., May i, 1874, daughter of Gardner and 
Angeline (Emery) Brickett. Mrs. Hill's 
father was a native of Stow, where he was 
prosperously engaged in farming until his 
death, which took place in Fryeburg in Octo- 
ber, 1888. Her mother, who was born in 
Jackson, is still living, and resides with her. 

In politics Mr. Hill supports the Republi- 
can party. He is connected with Pythagorean 
Lodge, No. 1 1 , A. V. & A. M. ; l-'ryeburg 
Lodge, No. 49, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; and Pequaket Lodge, No. 34, 
Knights of Pythias. He takes an active in- 
terest in these organizations, and may be said 
to be a leading spirit in all important social 
events in Fryeburg. 



OSEPH C. CALDWELL, M.D., the 
oldest practising physician in Buck- 
field, O.xford County, was born in 
Topsham, \'t., December 3, 1842, a 
son of James and Nancy (Chamberlain) Cald- 
well. The Caldwell family is of Scotch 
origin. James Caldwell, whose birth oc- 
curred at sea, was an industrious farmer, and 
resided for the greater part of his life in Ver- 
mont. He took a deep interest in the politi- 
cal movements of his day, and belonged to the 
anti-slavery party. In religious belief he was 
a Presbyterian. He died at the age of fifty- 
five. Mr. Caldwell was twice married, and 
his second wife is now living in Topsham. 
He had seven children, four of whom are liv- 
ing. These are : Mary, the wife of Gustavus 
Tibbetts, of Neponset, 111. ; Joseph C, the 
subject of this sketch; James R., a resident of 
Vermont; and Eliza, the wife of James Lang, 
of Topsham, Vt. 

Joseph C. Caldwell grew to manhood in 
Topsham, obtaining his first knowledge of 
books in the schools of that town. After 
finishing his preliminary course of stud}', hav- 



BIOGRAI'HK AL RKVIFAV 



2S1 



ing l)(.'cn an industrious student, lie was aiale 
to take up the profession of teacher, which he 
foUowed successfully in his native State, 
Michigan, and Illinois. In his twenty-third 
year he bej;an the study of medicine, and sub- 
sequentlv i)ursued it at Howdoin College, from 
which he received his medical diploma in 
iiSjo. In the fall of that year he started in 
his profession at" Buckfield, and for over a 
quarter of a century has been here engaged in 
ministering to suffering humanity. Dr. Cald- 
well has a large practice, and iias the confi- 
dence and esteem of all who know him. Me 
is a member of the State Medical Societ)-. 

In December, 1870, he was united in mar- 
riage with Elizabeth, daughter of Nathaniel 
Stanwood, of Brunswick, Me She was born 
April 14, 1852, and died June 7, 1888. Of 
her children one, Wilbur, is deceased. The 
others — Josephine, Bessie M., and Wilbur C. 
— are still with their father. Dr. Caldwell 
is a member of the Republican party. He is 
a Mason in good standing, belonging to liven- 
ing Star Lodge, No. 180. In religious 
matters he is liberal. His wife was a mem- 
bei- of the Baptist church. 



-J^TANNIBAL G. BROWN, of the firm 
L^J Hannibal G. lirown & Son, manu- 

\[s I facturers of clapboards, lumber, and 

^—^ wooden bicycle rims, at West Paris, 
O.xford County, was born December 18, 1829, 
in Plymouth, Penobscot County, Me., son of 
John and lluldah (Gardner) Brown. His 
grandfather, Aaron Brown, was an earl\- set- 
tler of Wilton, Me., whence he subsequently 
removetl to Livermore, Me., and lived there 
for a number of years. Aaron Brown was an 
officer in the War of 1812, and had charge of 
a fort at Portland. The latter part of his life 
was spent at the home of his son James, in the 
town of Grafton. He lived se\-enty years : and 
his wife, whose maiden name was Hannah 
Thompson, also attained a good age. The 
latter bore him eight children, the youngest of 
whom, a daughter, Abigail, living in Port- 
land, is the only survivor. The others were: 
James, John, Reuben, Orrin, Larnard, Re- 
becca, and Arthur. 

John Brown was born in Wilton, Me. He 



was a skilful mechanic as well ,is a farmer, 
and followed his trade throughout the active 
years of his life. He lesided for a number of 
years in the towns of Liveiniore and Grafton; 
but his last years were s|)ent in West Paris, 
Me., and in Lrrol, Coos County, N.H. He 
died at the age of eighty-seven years. In 
politics he was a Republican from the forma- 
tion of the party. His wife, lluldah, who 
was born in Buckfield, Me., died in West 
Paris, aged seventv-si.\. He was a member 
of the Universalist church, and she of the 
15aptist. .Sew.n chiltlren were the fruit of 
their union, three of whom have |iasscd awa\. 
These were: John O. A., Orrin H., and Joanna. 
Orrin H.. who served in the P'irst Maine Cav- 
alry during the Civil War, died from the 
effects of confinement in l.ibby Prison. The 
others are: Hannibal G., the subject of this 
sketch; Aaron B.. a mechanic residing in 
Worcester, Mass., who served in the late war 
with Colonel .Shaw's Massachusetts regi- 
ment; Bartlett J., a pianoforte finisher, living 
in Hyde Park,' Mass.; and Miss Maria I-:. 
Brown, a milliner in Boston, Mass. 

Hannibal G. Brown received his rudimen- 
tary education in the schools of Livermore 
and Grafton, where his early years were 
passed. After coming to Paris, at the age of 
twenty, he attended the schools and academy 
here, and acquired a good business education. 
On starting out in life for himself he pos- 
sessed no cash capital, and for nine years fol- 
lowed various occupations. After a time he 
was able to start in farming for himself, lie 
l-Hirchased his first land in 1855, where the 
village of West Paris now stands. The fol- 
lowing year he took possession of this place, 
which has since been his home: and tliere he 
was actively engaged in farming np to i86c). 
During the first few years he was the only 
resident here in the locality. The present 
owners of lots in West Paris bought them for 
the most jxart from Mr. Brown. He has 
furthered the building up of the village by 
donating lands to induce manufacturers to lo- 
cate their plants here. In 1869 he engaged 
in manufacturing on his own account ; and four 
years later, in 1873,. his present mill was 
erected as a co-operative concern for manu- 
facturing chairs. In 1877 or 1878 Mr. Brown 



zSz 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



with others engaged in manufacturing lumber. 
This business he still continues with his son, 
turning out large quantities of lumber, making 
a specialty of clapboards, and planning to en- 
gage more largely in making wooden bicycle 
rims. They are the leaders in their line of 
manufacture at West Paris. 

On May 3, 1853, Mr. Brown was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary Pari in, who was 
born in Paris, September 25, 1S32, daughter 
of Robinson Parlin. Their children are: 
Edwin H., born May 26, 1856; and Jennie M., 
born July 10, 1870. Edwin H. Prown, who 
is in business with his father, married Miss 
Cora Judkins, by whom he has one son, 
Charles H. Brown. 

In town affairs the elder Mr. Brown has 
always been very active. For some time he 
has been Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. 
During war times he held the office of Assist- 
ant Assessor of Internal Revenue. Although 
rejected for active service in the field on ac- 
count of physical disability, he did good work, 
assisting in recruiting men for the service. 
He is one of the leading Republicans of Paris, 
and a zealous temperance worker. From 1853 
to 1875 he served as Justice of the Peace. He 
is a member of West Paris Lodge, No. 15, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of 
Home Commandery Lodge, No. 79, Order of 
the Golden Cross, both of West Paris. In 
religious belief he is a Universalist. 




SA (;. ST()WP:RS, a well-known resi- 
dent of New .Sharon, Me., was born 
here on July 12, 1836, son of Rich- 
ard and Susan D. (Follansbee) Stow- 
ers. His mother was a daughter of Joshua 
and Sarah Follansbee, and was the eldest of 
their five children. 

Richard .Stowers, the father of Asa G. 
Stowers, was born April 2. 1810. During his 
early years he lived in P'armington, his native 
town, and was educated in the common schools. 
Upon arriving at a maturer age he took up the 
trade of carpentering: and after carrying it on 
for some years there he went to Boston, where 
he worked at his calling for twelve years more. 
Later he came to New Sharon, and bought a 
farm of seventy-five acres. The house built 



b\' him in a handsome and substantial manner 
stands to-day, very little the worse for wear. 
Mr. Richard Stowers continued to work at his 
trade of carpenter, together with his. farming in 
his adopted place of residence, and was, quite 
naturally, a very busy man. When he went 
away from himie to do a job of carjjentering or 
to take a trip for some other purpose, he w(.>uld 
leave his son in charge of (he farm ; and thus 
the young man acquired considerable experi- 
ence in agricultural labors. 

In politics Mr. Richard .Stowers was a 
stanch Republican, and his religious views 
conformed to the tenets of the Congregational 
church. He had five brothers and sisters, of 
whom John, Samuel, and Eben, were older 
than himself, and his sisters, Sarah and Mary, 
younger. Not one of these is now alive. Mr. 
Richard -Stowers died at his son's farm in New 
Sharon village on February 24, 1879, at the 
age of sixty-eight. He and his wife, .Susan 
D. Follansbee, whom he married in 1835, 
were the parents of three children, namely: 
Asa G., the subject of this sketch; Augusta 
A., born May 6, 1839, who married J. V. 
Dyer, of racing fame, and died August i, 
1880: and Alifair, born October t, 1845, who 
died March 17, 1847. 

Asa G. Stowers spent his boyhood on the 
old farm in New Sharon, and was educated in 
the ])ublic schools, including the high school 
of the town. At the age of seventeen he went 
to California to engage in the mining busi- 
ness, and remained there until he was nearly 
twenty-one years of age, coming back to New 
Sharon just twelve days before attaining his 
majority. He attended school again for a 
short time, but soon grew restless and began 
to make preparations for a return to Califor- 
nia: but, as he was the only son, he was 
finally prevailed on by his mother to remain 
at home. Soon after, his father, selling the 
old homestead, bought another farm about one 
mile north of the village on the Industry road. 
Here he stayed for about si.\ years with his 
family. Again selling out he removed to New- 
Sharon village, where he became Ta.x Col- 
lector, and also filled several other minor 
offices. At this time his son, Asa G. Stowers, 
went to the northern part of the town of New- 
Sharon to live, buying a farm of one hundred 



BIOGRAPHIC \r KF.VIl'W 



and fort)' acres, where he settled down. 'I'liis 
was in 1864. A year later he .sold out and 
look up his habitation farther down the river 
on a new farm of aboLit one hundred and 
twenty-five acres in extent. After staying 
there for three _\-ears he sold that farm and 
bought the place now owned b)' Mr. 1.. A. 
(jreenleaf, in New Sharon village. It was 
on this [ilace that Mr. Stowers's father died. 

Mr. Stowers wa.s married on Se]itendier 3, 
1S62, to Miss L. Anna Hardy, the daughter 
of Arnold antl Lois C. (V'aughan) Hardy, of 
New Sharon. They have two children : Wal- 
ter L. , born .September <S. 1865; and Mabel 
.\.. born October 5, 1869. 

Walter L. Stowers spent his earl\' boyhood 
on his father's farm, getting his first education 
in the common schools of New Sharon, later 
attending the high school of the same ]ilace, 
ami later still studying at Farmington, Mon- 
mouth, and Lewiston. At the age of twentx'- 
four he went to Nebraska, where he taught 
school for the short period of six months. Di- 
rectly after this he went into the emplo}- of a 
large Nebraska nursery stock house, and re- 
mained identified with this company for a year 
and a half, travelling in the interests of the 
business over almost all the western part (jf 
the North American continent. He then be- 
came connected with the Fidelitv Building and 
Loan Association of Denver, Col., and has 
since remained with them, being now the man- 
ager of the field forces of the company. He 
was married June 12, 1895, to Miss ^hm^ie 
Coleman, of Aledo, 111. They have one 
child — Ralph Leslie, born May 14, 1896. 

Mabel A. Stowers, who is now the wife of 
Charles H. Gordon, of her nati\e town of New 
.Sharon, received her early education at the 
common and high schools of that place. After 
spending a season at Bar Harbor and one at 
Portland, Me., she went to Boston. Mass., antl 
learned dressmaking, a business which she 
carried on for about two years, or until she was 
married. 

Mr. Asa G. .Stowers is, as was his father 
before him, a good sound Republican in ]ioliti- 
eal faith; and his religious belief is also like 
his father's, that professed by the Congrega- 
tional church. His present little competence 
has been laboriously made by the exercise of 



that industry, patience, and earnestness lor 
which he is known and respected in the com- 
munity in which he lives, and by the cheerful 
co-operation and thrift of his faithful wife. 



(g>r .IL'DSON BLAKb:, Chairman of the 
4^ Board of Selectmen of Gilead, Me., 
yjl^V comes of two of the old families of 
— ' C)xtord County, which he worthily 
represents. A son of lJa\-id and Olive 
(Adams) Blake, he was horn May 10, 1856, 
on the farm where he now resides, once the 
homestead nf his maternal grandparents, 
David Blake, his father, was born in Bethel, 
this countv. and reared an<l educated there. 
He was a millwright, and followed his trade 
for a numbcM' of years, also working at farm- 
ing. In 1850 he moved to (iilead to the farm 
occupied by his wife's ]iarents, which he man- 
aged for tlu-m until they passed awav. The 
estate then became his wife's i)roi)erty, and 
Mr. and Mrs. David Blake spent the rest of 
their lives here. David Blake was actively 
interested in town affairs, voting always on 
the Republican side. Gifted with a good 
voice and a talent for music, he taught sing- 
ing-school here for some time: and he led the 
choir of the Bajitist church, of w'hich he w-as 
a member. He died August 8. 1856. 

His wife, Mrs. Olive Adams Blake, was 
born on this farm. Her parents, Isaac and 
Olive (Wight) Adams, were among the early 
settlers of Gilead. Mr. Adams was a promi- 
nent man in his day, a connoisseur in horse 
flesh; and he was particularly proud of the 
fact that he sold a horse to Daniel Webster. 
He liveil to an advanced age. Mrs. Olive 
Adams I-ilake died at the age of seventy-six. 
Like her husband she was an active member 
of the Baptist church. The following chil- 
dren were born to Mr. antl Mrs. L)avid Blake: 
Ellen i\r., wife of Boyle ChantUer, of Bethel: 
David Newtt)n, a farmer of liethel: Isaac A., 
the oldest locomotive engineer on the Maine 
Central Road, plying between Portland and 
Waterville; Lizzie H., wife of James Hodson, 
of Bethel; Eliphalet, an engineer on the 
Grand Trunk Railroad, whose home is at 
Islantl Pond, V' t. ; B. Frank. ]iart owner of the 
old homesteatl, on which he resides; A. Jud- 



.84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



son, the subject ot this sketch; and Lillian, 
unmarried, who is living with her brothers "on 
tile ancestral hoinestead. 

A. ludson Hlake has lived on this tarm 
since birth, and has naturally followeil in 
his father's footsteps. Besides attending to 
the farm work, which he shares with his 
brother Frank, he works in the winter season 
at carriage-making and blacksmithing, having 
a shop on his farm. lie is one of the promi- 
nent Republicans of this county, and has been 
Chairman of the town Reimblican Committee 
since he was twenty-one years of age. As a 
Selectman of the town he is now serving his 
third term, this being his first year as Chair- 
man; and he has been in office as a Justice of 
the Peace for ten years. Quiet and unassum- 
ing in manner. Mr. Rlake is recognized as a 
man of abilit\', and has won the regard and 
confidence of all who know him. He is un- 
married. 



md Mrs. lliggins were 



Methodist l'"piscopal 



/ I3)e(:)RGE ZOETII HIGGINS. M.U., 
VpT and his daughter, LELIA HIG- 

— GINS, M.D., practising physicians 
residing in the village of Strong, Me., are 
prominent members of their profession, and 
are favorably known throughout Franklin 
County. Dr. George Zoeth lliggins was 
born in E.xeter, Me., December 29, 1832, a 
son of the Hon. Ebenezer and Ruth (Smith) 
Higgins, both natives of Bucksport, this 
State. 

His jiarents in 1S14 settled on a tract of 
wild land near the village of E.xeter, Mr. 
Higgins builfling a log house. He worked 
industriously to improve his claim, and in 
course of time it became one of the handsom- 
est estates in the county. A man of strong 
character and good judgment, Ebenezer Hig- 
gins served as a Representative in the State 
legislature, and also as a .State Senator; and 
for si.xteen years he filled the office of Deputy 
Sheriff of Penobscot County. He was a mem- 
ber of the Board of the Underground Railroad 
at Exeter conteni|iorary with General Fesseii- 
den and Stephen Thatcher. He died in 1853. 
Mrs. Higgins was a very intelligent lady, 
such men as Colonel F. W. Hill, of Exeter, 
finding great pleasure in her friendship. She 



died in 1884, Mr, 
active in founding the 
Church of Exeter. 

They were the parents of se\en children. 
The eldest, Fllijah, who was a [jrominent citi- 
zen of Exeter, serving as Chairman of the 
Board of Education during the war, died in 
1S65: the second son, Jeremiah P., is a 
farmer in 1-lxeter, Me. ; the third, F^benezer 
A., who resided in Conneaut, Ohio, died at 
Exetci' in 1S86: the fourth child, Harriet, 
lives on the old homestead in Exeter; the 
fifth, Julia, who died in 1865, was the wife of 
Captain Cook, a wealthy ship-owner and 
President of the National Bank of Province- 
town, Mass., who also has passed away; the 
sixth child, Ruth P., who is the widow of 
James Grout, resides with a daughter in 
Somerville, Mass. ; the seventh and youngest 
is George Z. , the leading subject of the pres- 
ent sketch, whose personal history follows. 

George Zoeth Higgins acquired his general 
education in the Bucksport Seminary and in 
Phillips Academy at Andover, Mass., graduat- 
ing from the latter institution in 1855. Pur- 
suing his professional studies at the Maine 
Medical .School, he graduated in the class of 
1858, and completed his preliminary training 
with two terms at the Albany (N.Y.) Medical 
School. He began to practice in the town of 
Lubec, Me., and two years later removed to 
Pembroke, this State, where he remained until 
the fall of 1863. On October 28 of that year 
he enlisted as Assistant Surgeon in the Fif- 
teenth Regiment of Maine Volunteers; and 
nine months later he was promoted to the rank 
of Surgeon, and assignerl to garrison duty. 
He received his discharge at Castle Garden, 
N.Y., in July, 1866, and returned to his na- 
tive State a skilful surgeon, schooled in the 
trying exigencies of army life, and an exjjcri- 
enced physician, with perception sharpened by 
familiarity with disease. Settling in Lubec, 
he practised there until December, 1878, 
when he moved to .Strong, F'"ranklin County. 
Here he has a beautiful home, and is closelx' 
identified with the interests of the town. 
Within call of the citizens here for nearly two 
decades. Dr. Higgins has built up a large 
practice, and has many patients in the out- 
lying country. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA'IF.W 



He was marrifd July 4, 1858, to Miss Kate 
Ford Lamson, a native of Liibec, Me., born in 
1834, dauj^hter of John L.amson, a merchant of 
that town, and niece of Daniel S. l''ord, tlie 
millionaire proprietor of the Yoiit/i's Loiiipan- 
ioii. Mrs. Higgins's ])arents are both dead. 
She has borne the Doctor two children — ■ 
Lelia and Albert R. The latter, who was 
born in 1868, lived but four years and eight 
months. Miss Lelia lliggins is a graduate of 
the Woman's Medical College of Philadelphia, 
and gained her first experience in practical 
work at the Lying-in Charity Hospital. A 
remarkably intelligent lady, with a natural 
gift for her work, she has a very large prac- 
tice, and has won the confidence and love of 
all who have claimed her services. She is a 
member of the Maine Medical Association. 
Dr. Lelia Higgins resides with her parents. 

Dr. George Z. Higgins, who has been iden- 
tified with the Republican party since he first 
took an interest in politics, has held a number 
of im])ortant public offices. P'rom 1S72 to 
1878 he was a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the State Reform School ; and for eleven 
years he was a member of the Pension Hoard 
of PLxamining Surgeons for Franklin County, 
1892 being his last year of service. He is 
now a member of the School Board of Strong. 
A Mason in good standi'ng, he was the first 
Master of George F. Davis Lodge, No. 78, 
A. F. & A. M., holding his office five terms: 
and as a Grand Army man he had much to do 
with the organization of F.dmund B. Clayton 
Post, No. 134. of Strong, of which he was 
Cf)mmander two years. Dr. Higgins and 
and his wife are members of the Bajitist 
Church of Lubec. 




'VLVANLS B. KNOX, who is re- 
garded as one of the best farmers 
of North P'ryeburg, Oxford County, 
was born in Limerick, Me., July 7, 
1821, son of Samuel and Olive (Lord) Knox. 
His grandparents were Samuel and Polly 
(Kimball) Knox, the former a native of 
Dover, N.H., while the latter was born in 
Maine. 

Samuel Knox, the father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Cornish, Me. In 



earl\' manhood he took uj) the occiijiation of 
farmer in Limerick, Me. In 1821 he moved 
to Chatham, N.H., and there purchased a 
farm, which he conducted prosperously for the 
rest of his active period. He died in 1877, 
aged sevent\'-nine years. 11 is wife, Olive, 
who was horn in Parsonsfield, York County, 
Me., was a daughter of Thomas and Sarah 
Bradbury Lord, both natives of Parsonsfield. 
.She hail eight children, as follows: Alonzo, 
who was born in Maw 1819, anti died in 
1881 ; .Sylvanus B., the subject of this sketch; 
Sarah B. , who is now the widow of Samuel 
A. B. P'arrington. and is living in Nortii 
Fryeburg; Judith C, now deceased, who mar- 
ried Francis Lord, an extensive farmer and 
lumberman of this .State; Simeon 1'., who 
married Sarah Bickford, of .Stow, this county, 
and is now a carpenti'r of l'"armington. Me. ; 
Olive L., now deceased, whu in;iiried ( )sgood 
Watson, now engaged in market gardening at 
Natick, Mass.; Samuel, who is also married, 
and is a carpenter in Chicago, 111.; and Mary, 
who married Elmer Stevens, a locomotive en- 
gineer on the Grand Trunk Railroad, and re- 
sides in Gorham, N.H. The mother was 
eighty years old when she died in 1879. Both 
parents belonged to the Metiioilist denomina- 
tion. 

Sylvanus B. Knox acquired his education in 
the common schools, and grew to manhood 
upon his father's farm in Chatliam. He as- 
sisted in carrying on the homestead farm until 
he was thirty-one years old, when he came 
to Maine, and settled in .Stow. Here for 
twenty-three years he owned and cultivated a 
good farm. In 1875 he sold the property and 
removed to Ncu'th P'ryebiirg, where he has 
since resided. He is now the proprietoi- ol 
one of the best farms in this locality. ( )n it 
he raises the customary variety of crops, which 
are generally of a superior quality. To his 
natural energy and habits of industry must be 
largely attributed his success in life. 

On March 4, 1852, Mr. Knox was united in 
marriage to Mary Fl. Nutter, who was born in 
Porter, Me., August 24. 1834, daughter of 
Charles and Dorothy (Moulton) Nutter, both 
of whom were natives of that town. Mrs. 
Knox's father, who was for many years a 
prominent farmer of Porter, tor the last ten 



2 86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



years ol liis lile was engaged in mercantile 
business at Nortii l*"ryeburg, where he died 
Septeniber 14, 1X74. Mis wife's death oc- 
curred January 30, 1890. She was the mother 
of two chil(h-en. namely: Mary E., who is now 
Mrs. Knox; and Charles H., who was born 
October J2, 1841, and died October 2t,, 1858. 
Mr. antl Mrs. Knox have had four children, as 
follows: William .M, who was born November 
30, 1853, and died February 22, 1872; I'rank 
H., born December 29, 1857, a prosperous 
farmer of this town, who married Lizzie 
Chase, of Chatham, N. H., and has one son, 
Wendell H., who was born November 6, 1893: 
ICmnia (3., who was born June 26, 1865, and 
died April 30, 1887; and ()live L. , who was 
l:)orn May 14, 1877, and is residing at home. 
In politics Mr. Knox is a Republican. Al- 
though an earnest supporter of the principles 
of that party and a leading spirit in the local 
organization, he has never aspired to public 
office. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 




■1-:NRY H. HERSEY, one of the best 
known farmers of Sumner, Oxford 

1.15 I County, and an ex-member of the 

Maine legislature, was born De- 
cember 10, 1833, upon the farm where he now 
resides, son of Samuel and Polly (Bradbury) 
Hersey. His grandfather, James Hersey, who 
was a native of Massachusetts, and served as a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War, after the 
close of that struggle sold his property in the 
latter State, and, moving to Maine, became 
one of the earliest settlers in Minot. James 
engaged in agriculture on Hersey Hill, which 
takes its name from him. After residing 
there until the year 1800 he came to Sumner, 
where he spent the rest of his life, and died 
aged about eighty-four years. He married 
Althea Poole, who was born in Whitman, 
Mass., daughter of Deacon Poole. She was 
the mother of twelve children, and was over 
eighty when she died. 

.Samuel Hersey, a native of Minot, born 
May 14, 1786, came to Sumner witli his par- 
ents, and settled w'ith them upon a tract of 
new land. This pro[)erty had been made a 
good farm when it came inti.i his possession. 



Here he carried on general farming, and 
bought and sold cattle for many years. He 
became widely and favorably known through- 
out this section of the State as a drover, in 
which calling he transacted a larger business 
than any other person at that time. In 1855 
he deeded the farm to his son, Henrv A., re- 
tired from business, passed the rest of his life 
in ease and comfort at the homestead, and died 
November 19, 1867. In politics he followed 
the majority of the Whigs into the ranks of 
the Republican party. He occupied a |iosi- 
tion of influence in the community as an hon- 
orable, upright business man and a useful citi- 
zen. By his first wife, in maidenhood F^unice 
Bradbury, who was born June 9, 1788, he be- 
came the father of six children, two of whom 
are living. These are: Moses B. , who was 
born -September 26, 1816, residing in Lincoln, 
Penobscot County; and Jason, born September 
20, 1 81 8, who resides in Whitman, Mass. 
The others were: William R., Hiram. Sam- 
uel, and Julia. The mother died May 5, 
1830. The father's second wife, whose 
maiden name was Polly l^radbury, was borji 
July 5, 1792. She had two children, namely: 
Henry B. , the subject of this sketch; and 
Eunice M., born July 18, 1835, who married 
A. P. Andrews, of North Paris, Me., and died 
August 25, 1862. The mother died Novem- 
ber 15, 1859. Both parents were members of 
the Congregational church. 

Henry B. Hersey is indebted to the district 
school of Sumner for his early education. He 
was afterward for some time engaged in 
teaching school. This occupation he relin- 
quished to take charge of the home farm at the 
solicitation of his father, whose health was 
then failing. Receiving a deed of the home- 
stead in 1S55, he began a series of improve- 
ments, which included the erection of a new 
set of buildings. The farm, containing one 
hundred and sixty acres, is one of the most 
desirable pieces of property in town. On De- 
cember 10, 1855, Mr. Hersey wedded Betsey 
Jane Richardson, who was born in Sumner. 
June 18, 1836, daughter of Lyman and Mercy 
Richardson. Their children were: Louella 
J., born December 14, 1856; George H., born 
September 14, 185S; P'annyA., born Febru- 
ary 9, iSdi; and .'\lice A., born July 24, 




NATHAN G- MILLS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



289 



1864. I.ouella J. married I-'raiik L. Warren, 
of Hartford, Me., and has three chilth'en - 
Mary A., Hersey, and George L. George H., 
who is the inventor of improved steam and hot- 
water apparatus, married Laura E. Lynch, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and resides in Buckfield, 
Me., having seven children, namely: Herbert 
C, born January 30, 1883; Raymond A., 
born October 2, 1884; Grace Z. , born July 
17, 1887; Bessie W. , deceased, born Septem- 
ber 28, 1889; Henry E., born November 15, 
1890; George, born May 21, 1893; and Al- 
bert, born March 18, 1895. Fanny A., who 
attended Hebron Academy, is now a book- 
keeper in Auburn, Me. Alice A. is now the 
wife of Fred. A. Taylor, the steward of the 
VVestboro In.sane Asylum. 

Mr. Hersey was for many years a prominent 
figure in the public affairs of both the town 
and district. He was elected to all of the im- 
portant town offices, and in 1879 he repre- 
sented the district in the legislature. He is 
highly respected in Sumner, with whose agri- 
cultural interests he has been closely identified 
since 1851. ]5oth he and Mrs. Hersey are 
members of the Congregational church at East 
Sumner. 




k;\THAN G. MILLS, a prosperous 
farmer of Mason, Oxford County, Me., 
was born on the farm that he now 
owns, F'ebruary 20, 1824, son of 
Cyrus and Abiah (Bean) ' Mills. The father 
was liorn in Bethel, and the early years of his 
life were spent on a farm and in logging 
camps. Coming to Mason when a young man, 
he purchased the farm that his son now owns, 
and lived here for many years, finally selling 
the place to his son and returning to his 
native town, where he bought another farm. 
He died there at seventy-six years of age. In 
his younger days he was a Democrat, but he 
afterward adopted the principles of the Repub- 
lican party. He was an able public speaker, 
and took a prominent part in local affairs, 
serving several years as Selectman. He was 
a patriot soldier in the War of 18 12. Abiah 
Bean Mills was born in Bethel. She died 
August 14, 1846, at fifty-three years of age. 
Thirteen children, ten sons and three daugh- 



ters, were the fruit of her union with Cyrus 
Mills. 

Nathan Ci. Mills was one of the ten sons 
born to his ])arents. He lived at home dur- 
ing his minority, then went to North Hampton, 
N.H., and engaged in chopping cord wood at 
forty cents per cord, working at this occupa- 
tion fiu- five years. Having saved sufficient 
money he then returned to Mason, and [un- 
chasetl the old farm, which has since been his 
home. It contains about seventy-five acres of 
land, and is one of the most highly cultivated 
farms in this townshiii. In addition to this 
he owns about seven hundred acres of timber 
and pasture land. .'Xlthough now past seventy- 
two years of age he is still able to perform a 
full day's labor. Mr. Mills makes a specialty 
of dealijig in veal calves, handling as high as 
one hundred and thirty in a year. 

In September, 1849, Mr. Mills was joined 
in marriage with Mrs. Mary h^. (Gordon) 
Mills, the widow of his older brother, Daniel 
Mills. Six children have blessed this union, 
namely: Mary A., wife of Charles Dunham, a 
farmer of Bethel; Eudora M., wife of Moses 
M. Mason, of Gilead, Me. ; George E., a resi- 
dent of Dorchester, Mass.; Bessie Alida, liv- 
ing at the parental home; Ada, who died at 
nineteen years of age; and Nathan E., a car- 
penter in Lewiston, Me. 

Mr. Mills, who is a Democrat in politics, 
has served on the Board of Selectmen five 
years, also as Town Surveyor. He is a mem- 
ber of Mount Abram Lodge, No. 31, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of Bethel: 
and Pleasant Valley Grange, No. 136, Patrons 
of Husbandry. 



*-m»^^ 



•OSEPH S. HOUGHTON, a successful 
merchant of Weld, Franklin County, 
Me., and an ex-member of the Maine 
legislature, was born in this town, July 
9, 1S51, son of Daniel and .Sophia (Parlin) 
Houghton. His paternal grandfather, James 
Houghton, who was the fifth settler in the 
town of Weld, cleared a good farm, upon 
which he resided for the rest of his life; and 
he reared a large family of children. 

Daniel Houghton, Mr. Houghton's father, 
son of James, w-as born in Weld, January 3, 



290 



ftlOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



iSij, and was here a lifelong resident. He 
was prosperously engaged in tilling the soil 
during the active period of his life, and died 
)unc 17, 1856. His wife, who was before 
niarriage Sophia Pari in, became the mother of 
three children, namely: Morence B., wife of 
B. F. Mctcalf, of Auburn, Mc. : Joseph S., the 
subject of this sketch; and Josephine, wife of 
D. 15. Swett, of Weld. Daniel Houghton was 
a member of the Congregational church, and 
in politics he voted with the Whig party. 

After the death of Daniel Houghton, 
Sophia, his wife, married Vincent G. Parlin, 
a resident of Weld, by whom she had five chil- 
dren. Three of them died young, but two 
livcil to reach manhood; namely, George Otis 
and Abel Ezra. The former now resides at 
Rumford Falls, Me. Abel l^Lzra Parlin gradu- 
ated with honors at Maine Wesleyan Seminary, 
Kent's Hill, Me., after which he took a course 
of theology at Boston University. He was 
subsequently pastor of several churches in 
Maine and \ew Hampshire. He died at 
Paris, Me., in January, 1S95. 

Josejih S. Houghton was ed\icated in the 
common schools of his native town. After 
comjileting his studies he began work in a 
spool factory, where he remained for nineteen 
vears; and since April 1, i88g, he has been 
engaged in trade at his present location. He 
carries a varied line of merchandise, including 
di'y goods, groceries, provisions, and other 
wares, and has succeeded in establishing a 
large and profitable business. In politics he 
is a Republican, and takes a prominent part 
in jjublic affairs. He was Town Clerk thir- 
teen years, is now serving his third year as 
Town Treasurer; and while representing this 
district in the legislature, during the session 
of 1885 and 1886, he served on the Committee 
upon the Reform School. He was Postmaster 
here for four years; and as Assistant Post- 
master he now has charge of the office, which 
is located in his store. 

On October 4, 18S3. Mr. Houghton was 
united in matrimony with Lizzie -Staples, a 
native of Carthage, Me., and a cousin of the 
Hon. Eugene Hale, United States Senator 
from this State. Mr. and Mrs. Houghton 
have one child living, a daughter, Madge, 
aged eleven years. 



Mr. Houghton is a member of Mystic 
Lodge, No. 154, A. F. & A. M., of Weld. 
He was Master of the lodge for two years, 
served as Senior Deacon, Junior and Senior 
Warden, and is a member of the chapter. 
He has acted as a Justice of the Peace since 
1885. 



fHOMAS SWAN, for many years an es- 
teemed resident of Waterford, was born 
in this town, September 11, 1810, son 
of Dudley and .Sallie (Green) -Swan. His 
father was a farmer and a lifelong resident of 
Waterford. The subject of this sketch resided 
for many years on an eighty-acre farm just 
west of South Waterford. Bro'ught up to 
agriculture he became a practical farmer. Ik- 
was also a skilled road builder, and man)- of 
the best roads in Waterford were built under 
his supervision. Industrious and thrifty, he 
prospered; and, at his death, which occurred in 
this town, April 15, i S96, he left a fair prop- 
erty. Widely known, he was equally re- 
spected, and was chosen by his fellow-towns- 
men to serve them in various public capaci- 
ties, including that of Selectman. He was 
twice married, first to Miss Eliza .Sanderson, 
of Sweden, Me., who died June 6, 1878. 
Five children were the fruit of this union, 
namely: Mary E., wife of Albert Caswell, a 
farmer of Waterford, holding the office of .Se- 
lectman; Nancy O., who died in childhood; 
Charles, a ])hysician, resitling in Iowa; 
Thomas }]., an attorney in Atlantic City, la.; 
and John S., a farmer of Livingstone Countw 
California. For his second wife Mr. .Swan 
married Miss Charlotte H. Walker, who 
survives him, and who was born in Bethel, 
Me., April 12, 1832, daughter of Joseph C. 
and Lucinda (Hale) Walker. Her father was 
a native of Bethel, and her mother of Water- 
fonl. The former, who followed farming in 
Waterford for many years, died at the home of 
his daughter, Mrs. Swan. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walker had three children — Caroline M., 
who married D. B. Willis, a prominent specu- 
lator and merchant of Lewiston, Me. (both are 
now deceased) ; Charlotte H. ; and Columbia, 
who died in infancy. Mrs. Swan's mater- 
nal grandparents were Oliver and luiiiice 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



291 



(I'"lclcln'i) Ilalc. Oliver Hale was one of the 
jjioncer settlers of Oxford County, coming 
iiere when Waterford was a wilderness. He 
was a trader, and conducted a store on the spot 
where his grand-daughter, Mrs. Swan, now 
resides. He was also engaged quite exten- 
sively in farming, lie and his wife had eight 
children. 



-01 1\ 151.AXC11AR1), one of the best 
known farmers of Wilton, I'"ranklin 
County, Me., was born in this town, 
August I, 1 826, son of Cyrus and 
Hetscv (Floyd) Blanchard. His paternal 
grandfather, Timothy Blanchard, who was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War, and served 
at the Battles of Lexington and Bunker Hill, 
removed from Billerica, Mass., to Litchfield, 
where he resided for some years: and Iiis last 
days were passed with his son in Maine. He 
diet! at the age of eighty-four years. His 
children were: Timothy, Hannah, Cyrus, 
Rhoda, Reuel, Lorina, and Mary. 

Cyrus Blanchard, son of Timothy, journeyed 
from Massachusetts to Maine on foot : and 
deciding to settle in Wilton he here bought 
eighty acres of wild land. After clearing a 
small space and erecting a frame house twenty 
h\- twenty feet, he continued to improve the 
property until, as the result of his labor, he 
possessed a ])roductive farm, and his first 
abode was replaced by a large and more sub- 
stantial house, together with spacious barns 
and out-buildings. He enjoyed a comfortable 
l)rosperity as a general farmer, and resided in 
W'ilton until his death, which took place 
w^iien he was sixty-four years old. In his 
younger days he was a Whig, later uniting 
with the Republican party; and he was a mem- 
ber of the Free Will Baptist church. His 
first wife, whose maiden name was Chloe 
Welch, survived but a short time after mar- 
riage. She had one child, a daughter, Rhoda, 
who died young. His second wife, formerly 
Betsey Floyd, who was a daughter of Samuel 
Floycl, became the mother of two children, 
namely: Jessie; and John, the subject of this 
sketch. Mrs. Betsey F"loyd Blanchard lived 
to reach the age of seventy-five years. 

John Blanchard was the only son born to 



his ]iarents. As he grew to manhood in his 
native town he attended the public schools of 
Wilton when opjiortunity [lermitted, and as- 
sisted his father in the faini duties until be- 
coming of age. lie then bought sixty acres 
of partially impro\-ed kuul, adjoining his 
father's estate; but, after residing there for 
twelve years, during wdiich time he made vari- 
ous improvements, he s(dd that propert}', and 
purchased the J. Maconiber farm of one hun- 
dred and eight)' acres, where he has since 
lived. He has spent a great deal ol time in 
bringing his land uji to a high state of fei'til- 
ity, has set out an orchard, keeps some extia 
fine cattle and sheep, has remodelled his icsi- 
dence, and besides attending to his farm has 
been quite extensively engaged in lumbering. 

In 1853 Mr. Blanchard wedded I'.lizabeth 
Colburn, daughter of John and .Sarah Colbinn. 
He and his wife have three children, as 
follows: Chailes F. , a large farmer and stock 
dealer of Wilton, who was horn ( Jctober \C>, 
1S54, married Julia .Savage, Aud has three 
children — John 1-"., Minnie, and Jeannett; 
I' rank N., also a farmer and stock dealer, who 
was born November 17, 1863, mai'ried Lillian 
K. Adams, and lias had two children— Cala 
C, who died young, and Clifford, who was 
born December 8, 1894: and Annie May, who 
was born May 25, 1866, marrit'd William 
-Savage, and has two children — Linn .S., who 
was born Decembei' 17, 181J3, and Clinton 1^., 
who was born October 24, 1895. 

Although still vigorous and active, ,Mi'. 
Blanchard is now resting aftei- ;i long t-areer of 
useful activity, having given up the mure 
laborious duties of his fai'ni to his son-in-law, 
William .Savage, who resides with him. He 
has voted with tlie Re]iublican party ever since 
its formation, but has never aspired to public 
office. In his religious faith he is a Free 
Will Baptist. 




JIANDLFR BROTH FRS, who, under 
the firm name of G. A. Chandler & 
Co., conduct a large general store 
at West Sumner, Oxford County, 
Me., are natives of Sumner and sons of the 
late Hiram IV Chandler. Their father died 
October 31, 1888. Their mother. Mi-s. Lme- 



292 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



line Culnirn Chandler, is still living at the 
homestead. Their paternal grandfather, Reu- 
ben Chandler, who was a shoemaker by trade, 
was an early settler in Paris, this county, and 
in Minot, a few miles distant, but passerl the 
latter part of his life in Sumner, where he 
died at the age of fifty-six years. His wife, 
Abigail Harrows, lived to reach a good old 
age. 

Hirani B. Chandler, .son of Reuben, was 
born in Minot, Androscoggin County, Febru- 
ary 13, 1 8 14. He built his shops in Sumner, 
and followed the trades of a cooper and wheel- 
wright until about 1846, when he engaged in 
mercantile pursuits, establishing and conduct- 
ing for many years, or till his death, the busi- 
ness in West Sumner which is now carried on 
bv his sons. He was prominently identified 
with public affairs, serving as Postmaster and 
Town Treasurer for forty years. He was a 
Republican in politics, and for many years 
was an active member of the Universalist 
church. 

His wife, Emeline O. Coburn, whom he 
married November ig, 1S38, was born in 
Sumner, November 10, 18 19, daughter of 
Samuel Coburn. She became the mother of 
eight children. The eldest, Mary E., was 
ijorn December 16, 1839, married Kingman 
Gurney, and died August 6, 1862, leaving one 
daughter, Flora L. , who was born May 21, 
i860, and is now the wife of Elbridge S. 
Tuell, having two children — Mary E. and 
Emily. The second, Julia A., who was born 
June I, 1841, married Horace Gurney, and 
died November 22, 1864. The third, also a 
daughter, Victoria A., was born February 
7, 1843, and married William T. J^onney, of 
West Sumner. Her children are: Corry A., 
born September 23, 1864, who married Effie 
Abbott, and has one child, Elva E. ; Agnes 
I^., who was born May 23, 1871: and Will- 
iam A., born September 15, 1878. The fourth 
was Eliza (j. Chandler, who was born January 
5, 1846. and died May 26. 1870. Oscar G., the 
eldest son, a resident of West Sumner, who 
was born Julv 2, 1848, by bis first wife, I-HIa 
Whitman, had one child, Elton, born Novem- 
ber I, 1874, and by his second wife, Abbie 
Farrar, a son, Leslie, born February 2, 1879. 
Agnes E. Chandler, the si.xth child, was born 



January 17, 185 i, married the Rev. George E. 
Forbes, and died May 12, 1885, leaving one 
child, Murray E. The seventh and eighth 
born were George A. and Harold Chandler, 
the subjects of this sketch, now to be further 
mentioned. 

George A. Chandler, senior member of the 
firm, was born February 21, 1858. He ac- 
quired his education in the common and high 
schools, and after completing his studies he 
taught ten terms of school. He then engaged 
in the mercantile business, which since the 
death of his father he has managed as the ac- 
tive partner. This firm is now carrying a 
large and varied line of general merchandise, 
embracing unnumbered articles for domestic, 
agricultural, and mechanical use; and they not 
only have the most profitable trade in the vil- 
lage, but supply a numerous patronage from 
the adjacent towns. Mr. Chandler has served 
as Town Clerk for ten consecutive years, has 
been Postmaster for the past si.\ years, besides 
holding other town offices, and has served 
efficiently for three years as a member of the 
School l^oard, being deeply interested and 
well versed in educational matters. He is 
connected with the lodge of Odd Fellows at 
West Paris and with Pleasant Lake Lodge, 
No. 232, of Good Templars. George A. 
Chandler and Helen Tuell were united in 
marriage on October 12, 1879, and have two 
children — Linnie T. and H. Benjamin. 

Harold Chandler, junior member of the firm 
of G. A. Chandler & Co., and also engaged in 
the job ])rinting business, was born March 1. 
i868. After finishing his studies he entered 
hi