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Full text of "Biographical review of Hancock County, Illinois : containing biographical and genealogical sketches of many of the prominent citizens of to-day and also of the past"

LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



920.077343 
B521 



I.H.S. 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 






OF 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

CONTAINING 
BIOGRAPHICAL and GENEALOGICAL SKETCHES of 

MANY OF THE PROMINENT CITIZENS OF 
TO-DAY AND ALSO OF THE PAST 



"Biography is the only true history." EMERSON 



CHICAGO 

HOBART PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1907 



"The history of a nation is best told in the lives of 
its people." MACAULAY. 




PREFACE 



The present age is happily awake to the duty of writing its own records, 
setting down what is best worth remembering in the lives of the busy toilers of 
today, noting, not in vain glory, but with an honest pride and a sense of fitness, 
tilings worthy of emulation, that thus the good men do may live after them. 
The accounts here rendered are not buried talents, but of used ability and op- 
portunity. The conquests recited are of mind over matter, of cheerful labor 
directed by thought, of honest, earnest endeavor which subdues the earth in the 
divinely appointed way. "The great lesson of biography," it is said, "is to show 
what man can be and do at his best." A noble life put fairly on record, acts like an 
inspiration, and no more interesting or instructive matter could be presented to an 
intelligent public. 

In this volume will be found the record of many whose lives are worthy the 
imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, 
\by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others with 
limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and 
women, with an influence extended throughout the length and breadth of the land. 
It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as states- 
n, and whose names have become famous. It tells of 'those in every 
walk of life who have striven to succeed, and tells how success has usually 
crowned their efforts. It tells also of those who, not seeking the applause of the 
world, have pursued the even tenor of their way. content to have it said of them, 
as Christ said of a woman performing a deed of mercy, "They have done what 
they could." It tells how many, in the pride and strength of young manhood, 
left all, and at their country's call went forth valiantly "to do or to die," and how 
through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the 
land. 

Coming generations will appreciate this volume, and preserve it as a sacred 

^ treasure, from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into 

^ public record, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great care has been 

_ taken in the compilation of the work, and every opportunity possible given to 

j those represented to insure correctness in what has been written ; and the pub- 

r lishers flatter themselves that they give to their readers a work with few errors 

O^of consequence. 

Yours Respectfully. 

HOBART PUBLISHING COMPANY. 
=> January, 190?. 




.- 



"A people that take no pride in the noble achievements of remote 

ancestors will not achieve anytliing worthy to be remembered 

with pride bv remote generations." MACAULAY. 



IONITII JO 

3K1 JO 

Auvuan 






BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 

OF 

HANCOCK COUNTY 



CHARLES HAY, M. D. 

For forty-three years Dr. Charles Hay 
was a resident of Illinois and though 
more than two decades have been added 
to the cycle of the centuries since he 
passed away, his name is revered and his 
memory cherished by all who knew him. 
It was not alone his skill in his profes- 
sion, although he was an able medical 
practitioner of his day, his scholarly at- 
tainments nor the success he achieved, 
which gained for him the place which he 
occupied in the regard of his friends, but 
rather his sterling traits of character, his 
kindly spirit, his deference for the opinion 
of others, his loyalty to all that was right 
and just in man's relations with his fel- 
lowmen and his fidelity to high ideals. 

The life record of Dr. Hay began on 
the 7th of February, 1801, in Fayette 
county, Kentucky. In the paternal line 
the family is of Scotch lineage, the ances- 
try being traced back to John Hay, who 
with his four sons emigrated from the 
Rhenish Palatinate to America about the 
middle of the eighteenth century. This 
John Hay was the son of a Scotish soldier 



who left his own country about fifty years 
before and attached himself to the army 
of the elector Palatine. Following the 
arrival in the new world the brothers sep- 
arated and John Hay, the eldest, became 
a resident of York, Pennsylvania, where, 
prospering in business affairs, he accumu- 
lated considerable property. He was also 
influential in public life and served as 
one of the magistrates of Pennsylvania 
during colonial days. Interested in the 
grave questions which elicited public at- 
tention prior to the Revolutionary war 
and advocating the cause of liberty, he 
filled several important offices in the or- 
ganization of the patriot forces prepara- 
tory to the Revolution and when war 
was inaugurated he joined the military 
forces and won promotion to the rank 
of colonel. Following the establishment 
of the republic he represented York 
county in the assembly. Another brother, 
Adam Hay, who, like his brother John, 
had received military training in Europe, 
became a resident of Berkeley county, Vir- 
ginia, and also served with some distinc- 
tion in the Revolutionary war. He was 
a friend and associate of Washington and 



12 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IElf 



one of the earliest recollections of his son, 
the late John Hay of Springfield, Illinois, 
was of meeting General Washington on 
a country road and hearing him greet 
Adam Hay as an old comrade, at the 
same time bestowing a friendly pat on 
the head of the young lad. 

It was this John Hay who became the 
father of Dr. Charles Hay of Warsaw. 
His birth occurred February 13, 1779. 
His youth was passed in his parents' 
home, but the discipline of the household 
was somewhat stern and arbitrary, owing 
perhaps to the military training, as a 
German soldier, of the father. As he 
approached manhood John Hay was un- 
willing to endure the inflexible rules laid 
down by the father and resolved to estab- 
lish a home and seek a fortune for him- 
self elsewhere. This plan he announced 
to his father and although there was a 
lack of sympathy to some extent between 
them, that there was 110 positive breach 
is indicated by the fact that he was pro- 
vided with money sufficient to enable him 
to take up a good piece of land in Fayette 
county, Kentucky, to which place he made 
his way. In early manhood he married 
Jemima Coulter and they became the 
parents of fourteen children, all of whom 
reached maturity. Three of the sons, 
Charles, Joseph and Theodore Hay, be- 
came physicians, while another son, Mil- 
ton Hay, for many years occupied a most 
distinguished position at the Illinois bar. 
In his business affairs in Fayette county. 
John Hay, the father, met with gratify- 
ing success and for thirty years continued 
a resident of that locality, but feeling that 
the influence of slavery was detrimental 
he determined to take his family to a 



region which was free from that objec- 
tion and when fifty-five years of age re- 
moved to Sangamon county, Illinois, ac- 
companied by all his children save his 
eldest son, Dr. Charles Hay, who had 
already begun the practice of medicine in 
Indiana. 

It was the intention of John Hay to 
engage in the manufacture of cotton 
goods in Illinois and he brought with him 
from Kentucky the machinery and appli- 
ances necessary for the conduct of such 
an industry, but the business proved un- 
profitable and he soon concentrated his 
efforts upon other interests. He dealt to 
a greater or less extent in land and his 
speculations and investments in this re- 
gard brought to him a good financial re- 
turn. He was the first man to sign a 
in the public square of Springfield. In 
promissory note to the state bank which 
secured the erection of the old state house 
matters relating to the general welfare 
he was deeply interested and his co-opera- 
tion could be counted upon to further 
plans and measures for the public good. 
His name became a synonym for integrity 
and honor in business affairs as well as 
in private life and his record was at all 
times in harmony with his professions as 
a member of the Baptist church, in the 
work of which he took an active and help- 
ful part. The contemporary biographer 
has said, "His long white hair, his com- 
pact and powerful form, were for many 
years a noticeable sight in the streets of 
the town. He was a devoted friend of 
Lincoln and the death of the president 
affected him profoundly. He was then 
in failing health and for several days 
after the assassination he could not dis- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



miss the subject from his thoughts. He 
forgot his ninety years and often said, 
'If I had been in the box with him, that 
should not have happened.' He sat at 
the window to watch the funeral cortege 
which bore the martyred ruler 'to his 
grave and then went to his own rest, May 
20, 1865, in the ninety-first year of his 
age." 

Dr. Charles Hay, the eldest son of John 
Hay, spent his childhood and youth in 
Kentucky upon the old plantation which 
his father there developed. He was pro- 
vided with the best educational privileges 
that the state afforded and his aptitude in 
his studies was ever a marvel to his teach- 
ers, who it is said could hardly be con- 
vinced that he was not playing a practical 
joke upon them when they saw him learn- 
ing his alphabet one day and reading 
with facility a fortnight later. He quick- 
ly mastered the branches of learning 
taught in the common schools, after 
which he continued his studies in a clas- 
sical school at Lexington, where he made 
the same easy progress in Latin and 
Greek. He never allowed his knowledge 
of those tongues to lapse with the passing 
of the years and the assistance which he 
rendered to his children in the reading of 
Homer and Virgil later made for them 
an intellectual pastime of what otherwise 
would perhaps have been a dreaded 
school task. He , was always a man of 
scholarly tastes and habits, his reading 
covering a wide range and his assimila- 
tion of knowledge being such as to render 
him a pleasing and entertaining com- 
panion of men of widest thought and 
culture. His choice of the practice of 
medicine as a life work was followed 



by preliminary reading under the direc- 
tion of Dr. William H. Richardson and 
later of Dr. Dudley and others who were 
prominent in the medical fraternity in 
Kentucky at that day. His collegiate 
training was received in the medical de- 
partment of Transylvania University, the 
most important institution of learning in 
the west and when his graduation won 
him the degree of M. D. he located for 
practice in Salem, Indiana, where for ten 
years he followed his profession with uni- 
form success. 

It was during his residence in Salem 
that Dr. Hay was married in October, 
1831 to Miss Helen Leonard. She was a 
daughter of the Rev. David A. Leonard, 
of Bristol, Rhode Island, whose erudition 
and oratorical power won him wide fame 
at the beginning of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. He was a graduate of Brown Uni- 
versity of the class of 1/93 and was class 
poet. Entering upon the active work of 
the ministry, he became pastor of the 
First Baptist church in Gold street in 
New York city and in 1817 removed to 
the west, purchasing a large tract of land 
on the Ohio river. His death occurred 
two years later. He had wedded Mary 
Pierce and to them had been born thirteen 
children. Among this number was a 
daughter, Evelyn, who became the wife 
of John Hay Farnham, whose acquaint- 
ance Dr. Hay formed during his resi- 
dence in Salem and this brought to him 
the acquaintance of Helen Leonard, 
whom he afterward made his wife. 
Other members of the Leonard family 
were: Charlotte, who married William 
P. Thomasson, who represented the 
Louisville district of Kentucky in con- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gress ; Sarah, the wife of Governor David 
Meriwether, who was a prominent rival 
of Mr. Thomasson as leaders in the whig 
and democratic parties of Kentucky ; and 
Cornelia, the wife of William N. Grover, 
afterward United States district attorney 
for Missouri. 

Following their marriage Dr. and Mrs. 
Ha}' established their home in Salem, 
Indiana, and the young physician soon 
won a large practice, his position in pub- 
lic regard being fully established through 
the energy and devotion with which he 
combatted an epidemic of cholera in 1833, 
which carried off both Mr. and Mrs. 
Farnham. For weeks together Dr. Hay 
took little time for either sleep or food, 
but gave his attention untiringly to the 
work of checking the ravages of the dread 
disease. From that time forward he en- 
joyed a large and lucrative practice in 
Salem and became recognized moreover 
as one of the local leaders in the whig 
party and was induced to become the 
editor of a weekly whig paper in Salem, 
which he conducted for several years, 
making it one of the strongest organs 
of that political organization in Indiana. 
His kindness of heart brought him into 
financial ruin through securities which 
he signed for friends and with the hope 
of retrieving his lost possessions he re- 
moved frorrv Salem to Warsaw, Illinois, 
in 1841. Until death claimed him he 
continued an honored resident of this 
city, his life being actuated by honorable 
and benevolent principles and filled with 
good deeds. His professional capability 
was soon recognized and brought him a 
large and important practice. Warsaw 
at that time was situated in what was 



largely a pioneer district and the practice 
of a physician was in consequence fraught 
with many hardships incident to the long 
rides which it was necessary to take 
through the hot summer sun or the win- 
ter's cold in order to administer to the 
needs of patients far removed from his 
home. He was engaged in practice here 
during one of the most notable epochs in 
the history of this city. From the east had 
come a colony of people known as Mor- 
mons. Their belief in and practice of po- 
lygamy was so distasteful to the residents 
. of Hancock county that they arose in their 
wrath to drive the new sect out of the dis- 
trict and a bitter warfare arose between 
the Mormon people and their opponents. 
The roads were infested with bands of 
lawless persons on both sides, a large 
number of houses were burned and many 
persons shot from the ambush of the 
woods. Dr. Hay's friends, fearing for 
his life, urged him to give up his country 
practice, but this he refused to do, merely 
purchasing a faster horse and continuing 
his work on either side of the hostile 
lines. He was often stopped but never 
otherwise molested, although he was 
known to be inflexibly opposed to the 
Mormon people and practices. However, 
he stood for justice and right and was 
ever found on the side of law and order 
and protested vigorously but ineffectually 
against the march to Nauvoo which re- 
sulted in the death of Joseph and Hiram 
Smith, brothers, who were prophet lead- 
ers among the Mormons. 

In his practice Dr. Hay met with suc- 
cess. He was a student of any subject 
or theory which seemed to bear upon his 
professional work and eagerly embraced 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



every advanced idea that he helieved 
would promote his efficiency and enable 
him to give more capable service to his 
fellowmen in checking the ravages of 
disease and restoring health. A broad 
humanitarian spirit was ever the basis of 
his professional work and yet he was not 
without that laudable ambition for achiev- 
ing success, that he might provide well 
for his family, and as his financial re- 
sources increased he from time to time 
made judicious investments in real estate 
which added to his prosperity. His farms, 
however, did not bring him the profit 
which would have accrued to many men 
who look upon the proposition only from 
the business standpoint. It is said that 
Dr. Hay regarded his tenants somewhat 
as if they were his children or his wards 
and he looked first to their interests rather 
than to the financial benefits that he 
might receive from their labors. How- 
ever, the normal man always has appre- 
ciation for nature and Dr. Hay greatly 
enjoyed riding out to his farms and 
watching the growth of the crops. His 
was a well-rounded nature. He never 
concentrated his energies and efforts so 
closely upon one line of thought or ac- 
tion as to become abnormally developed. 
The study of nature, his professional ser- 
vice, his deep interest in his fellowmen, 
shared with his books in his attention. 
He passed many of his most pleasant 
hours in communion with the strong and 
cultured minds of the past, the essay, his- 
tory and natural science being the prin- 
cipal themes which claimed his attention. 
The welfare and progress of his adopted 
city was ever a matter of deep and intense 
interest to him and he was particularly 



helpful along lines of intellectual prog- 
ress and advancement. The public- 
school system received his most earnest 
endorsement and he co-operated to the 
full extent of his powers in the work of 
upholding the standard of education and 
introducing improved methods of instruc- 
tion. The school teachers recognized 
that they had no stancher friend in all 
Warsaw than Dr. Hay and a word of en- 
couragement and appreciation was to 
them often an inspiration that enabled 
them to put forth further effective effort 
for the public schools. He was instru- 
mental in establishing a free public library 
in Warsaw and was for many years pres- 
ident of the library board. He held a 
prominent place in all the associations for 
the improvement of agriculture, horticul- 
ture and other important interests of the 
county and in local religious and chari- 
table organizations. His endorsement of 
such movements was not that of words 
alone, for he was an active co-operant in 
all plans for public progress and im- 
provement and considered no task too 
unimportant to claim his best efforts if it 
proved a factor in the result for which 
they were striving. 

As the years passed there were added 
to the family of Dr. and Mrs. Hay six 
children, of whom the eldest, Edward 
Leonard, died in infancy. Leonard Au- 
gustus Hay, the second son, retired army 
officer, died in Warsaw, November 12, 
1904. Mary Pierce is the widow of 
Major Austin Coleman Woolfolk, A. Q. 
M., United States army and afterward 
a circuit judge in Minnesota. John Hay 
rose to national prominence, his last pub- 
lic work being as secretary of state under 



i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



President Roosevelt. Charles Edward, 
captain of the Third Cavalry, United 
States army, and afterward twice elected 
mayor of Springfield, Illinois, it the only 
surviving son. Helen became the wife 
of Harwood Otis Whitney and died in 
1873. The death of this daughter came 
to Dr. and Mrs. Hay as their greatest 
bereavement. "Her bright, .sunny tem- 
per, her witty and original conversation, 
her devotion to those she loved and her 
absolute unselfishness, qualities which 
she seemed to derive with her name from 
her mother, made her the idol of her 
home." The lives of Dr. and Mrs. Hay 
were bound up in their children and. as 
Dr. Hay expressed it, no personal dis- 
tinction for himself could bring him the 
joy that could come to him through the 
intelligence, honor and thrift of his chil- 
dren. No personal sacrifice on the part 
of the parents was considered too great 
if it would promote the welfare of their 
sons and daughters. They felt that no 
economy must be practiced for their edu- 
cation and there was always means of 
providing teachers and books of the best 
within reach. They lived to see them at- 
tain positions of honor and distinction 
and the sons attributed to their early 
parental training much of their success 
in later life. In the spring of 1879. Mrs. 
Hay met with a serious accident, so that 
for many weeks it was thought that she 
could not recover and she was unable to 
walk afterward. During these days of 
trial Dr. Hay waited upon her with un- 
tiring patience and heroic endurance and 
following her convalescence became more 
than ever her inseparable companion. 
They celebrated their golden wedding in 



October, 1881, having terminated fifty 
years of a marriage relation which in 
every respect reached the ideal. It was 
not long after this that Dr. Hay recog- 
nized that because of heart disease his 
own end was near. He never spoke of 
the matter except to his physician, Dr. 
Hunt, and he charged him strictly never 
to mention it, for he did not wish to bring 
one feeling of alarm or danger to his 
wife, his children or his grandchildren, 
in whom his life was wrapped up. He 
passed peacefully away September 18, 
1884. "He walked serenely down to the 
gates of death with nothing of the in- 
difference of the stoic but with the cheer- 
ful resignation of a philosopher and the 
loving self-sacrifice of a Christian hus- 
band and father bearing the burdens of 
others-." He had attained the age of 
eighty-three years. Resolutions of re- 
spect were passed by the library board 
and by the cemetery board, of both of 
which he was a member and perhaps no 
better estimate of his life work and of 
his character can be given than by quoting 
fromthelocal papers of Warsaw, for in that 
city where he had so long made his home 
his life record was as an open book. "He 
soon acquired a competency by judicious 
investments and by his practice, from 
which he retired several years ago, to 
enjoy the leisure he had so well earned. 
Even in his peaceful and honored age, 
however, he was no idler. He preserved 
to his latest days the studious and schol- 
arly habits of his youth. He read with 
avidity everything of interest which ap- 
peared, especially in the line of science 
and history. He took the greatest in- 
terest in state and municipal affairs, and 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



was active in every enterprise which 
promised to advance the cause of educa- 
tion and enlightenment. As in his early 
manhood he was never too busy to help 
his own children in their Greek and Latin 
lessons, so in his latest days he was never 
so indolent as to refuse his assistance to 
any scheme to extend to the people those 
benefits of sound learning which had been 
of so much advantage and pleasure to 
himself." Another publication said, 
"The Doctor was of the highest stamp of 
manhood upright in all his dealings ; un- 
swerving in the discharge of what he be- 
lieved to be his duty ; kind, generous, and 
charitable with all men; a lover of man- 
kind, and ever thoughtful of their wel- 
fare; strong in his convictions of the 
right, and true to their teachings. He 
was a nobleman in the true sense of the 
word." "In his chosen profession of 
medicine he was an acknowledged mas- 
ter; and in his devotion to his profession 
he had but few equals. He was courte- 
ous, kind, and considerate in his inter- 
course with those of like profession. In 
his friendship he was ardent and faith- 
ful. So long as a man was worthy, he 
remained his friend." The funeral ser- 
vices were conducted at his home by the 
Rev. John G. Rankin, who in his remarks 
said, "There has been much, especially 
in his, latter years, to make life desirable. 
Having, by his diligence and frugality 
in the noonday of life, acquired a com- 
petency, which enabled him to free his 
mind from all anxiety; living among 
friends and neighbors with whom he had 
been associated for more than forty years ; 
honored and loved by the entire commu- 
nity in which he had so long lived (for 



Dr. Hay had no enemies) ; permitted to 
see all his children occupying honored 
and useful positions in life; and, perhaps, 
above all, receiving from his children, in 
their frequent visits to the home of their 
childhood, such love and honor and 
thoughtful and tender care as but too few 
parents receive ; surely there was much in 
such surroundings to make life desirable, 
yet, as he expressed it to a friend, he had 
been living for years as a "minute man." 
He had done life's work day by day, as 
it was presented to his hand, and he 
stood ready to answer the Master's call 
any minute." A minute analization of 
the life of Dr. Hay, however, would cer- 
tainly bring forth the fact that with all 
his love of learning, with all of his de- 
votion to the public welfare, with all of 
his scientific knowledge and medical skill, 
his deepest interest centered in his family. 
The ties of home were to him sacred. 
He found his greatest happiness in the 
companionship of his wife, who survived 
him until the i8th of February, 1893, 
when she, too, passed away. 



CHARLES SAVAGE SHIPMAN. 

Charles Savage Shipman, assistant 
cashier of the First National Bank at 
Dallas City, and well known in financial 
circles in this part of the county, was born 
August II, 1845, i n Yonkers, New York. 
His parents were Ralph and Marilla 
(Wells) Shipman, both natives of New 
Britain, Connecticut. Colonel Lee, the 



i8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



great-grandfather of Mr. Shipman, was a 
soldier of the Revolutionary war, and 
the family was represented by several sol- 
diers in the Civil war, so that the military 
record is a most creditable one. While 
living in Connecticut Mr. Shipman was 
owner of a brass foundry, and following 
his removal to Yonkers, New York, he 
there engaged in the conduct of a paper 
box factory. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Presbyterian church, and 
he served as one of its deacons from early 
manhood up to the time of his death. He 
died in December, 1876. while his wife 
passed away in 1879, and both were laid 
to rest in the cemetery in Yonkers, New 
York. In their family were five children, 
of whom two died in early childhood. 
Julius married Miss Mary Clark, made 
his home in Yonkers, New York, and 
died in 1875. His widow is still living 
at the very venerable age of ninety years. 
He was twenty years older than the sub- 
ject of this review. He left four children : 
Mrs. Fannie Wilson, of Brooklyn, New 
York; Mrs. Isabella Williams, of Yonk- 
ers, New York; and Walter and Albert 
Shipman. Ann and Jane Shipman, 
daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Ship- 
man, died in childhood. Anna E., the 
only surviving daughter of the family, 
makes her home in New Britain, Connec- 
icut. 

Charles S. Shipman, the only surviv- 
ing son, was educated in the public and 
high schools of his native city and in a 
military academy at Yonkers. New York. 
His school life being over he assisted 
his father in the box factory in that city 
until his removal to the west in 1871. in 
which vear he arrived in Hancock countv. 



Illinois. He spent the succeeding two 
years upon a farm, and in 1873 returned 
to New York, where he conducted his fa- 
ther's business until 1882, when he re- 
moved to Dallas City, Illinois. Here he 
became a clerk and a salesman in the lum- 
beryard of his father-in-law, H. F. Black, 
with whom he continued for five years, 
when he embarked in business on his own 
account, and was numbered among the 
successful dry goods merchants of Dallas 
City for eight years. In 1902 he became 
bookkeeper and assistant cashier in the 
First National Bank of Dallas City, and 
is still acting in that capacity, being well 
known in financial circles here, while 
throughout the years of his residence here 
he has made a most creditable record as 
an enterprising business man. 

On the 2gth of June, 1876, Mr. Ship- 
man was married to Miss Catherine Farn- 
waldt Black, a daughter of Henry Farn- 
waldt Black, who for many years was a 
prominent lumber merchant of Dallas 
City but is now deceased. Mrs. Shipman 
was born June 14, 1857, in Grand Rapids, 
Wisconsin, was educated in Rockford 
Seminary, at Rockford, Illinois, and was 
married in Dallas City on the 29th of 
June, 1876. By this union there have 
been born three children. . Ralph Wells, 
bom August 18, 1878, attended the pub- 
lic schools of Dallas City, was graduated 
from the high school and pursued a course 
of study at Fort Madison, Iowa. He mar- 
ried Miss Letitia Nelson, of Nauvoo, Illi- 
nois, and now lives at Media. Illinois, 
where he is superintendent of a. lumber- 
yard for the firm of Black and Loomis. 
Mary Black Shipman, born August 2, 
1884, is a senior in Hardin College, in 



MAX COCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



Mexico, Missouri, and was graduated 
from the musical conservatory in connec- 
tion with that school in April. 1906. 
Anna Celia, born October 15, 1887, at- 
tended the same school with her sister for 
three years, when she became ill with 
typhoid fever. Her sister then brought 
her home and she died in Fort Madison 
Hospital, in December, 1905. She was 
buried the same day as her uncle, B. F. 
Black, from his late home, and was laid 
to rest in Dallas City cemetery. She was 
a beautiful, amiable and accomplished 
young lady and was greatly beloved by 
all. She held membership in the Congre- 
gational church and took an active part 
in church and Sunday-school work. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shipman reside in the 
old Black home at the corner of Fourth 
and Oak streets, which was built by her 
father forty-eight years ago, and Mr. 
Shipman also has a farm at Pontoosuc. 
Illinois, and pasture lands in Henderson 
county, together with a house which he 
rents in Dallas City. His political sup- 
port is given to the republican party and 
he is recognized as a prominent factor in 
local political circles. In 1886 he was 
elected mayor of Dallas City and is now 
serving as alderman from the second 
ward. He is a prominent and valued 
member of the Masonic fraternity and of 
the Woodman camp, and he and his wife 
are devoted members of the Congrega- 
toinal church, in which he is serving as 
deacon, while since 1889 he has been su- 
perintendent of the Sunday-school. His 
wife has been president of the Ladies So- 
ciety of the church and was organist and 
choir leader for years but has recently 
retired from this work. She belongs to 



a chapter of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, and is an intelligent, cul- 
tured lady. Mr. Shipman is a capable 
business man and a respected citizen, of 
genial disposition and a fund of wit and 
humor, and the home of this couple is 
the center of many delightful social 
gatherings. 



PROF. WILLIAM K. HILL, A. M. 

William K. Hill, professor of chemis- 
try and biology at Carthage College, was 
born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, 
December u, 1857, and is descended from 
an ancestry that was established in east- 
ern Pennsylvania at an early epoch in its 
development, the progenitor of the fam- 
ily in America having come from Eng- 
land. John Hill, the grandfather, re- 
moved to Armstrong county, Pennsylva- 
nia, and built the first school-house in the 
south half of the county. He employed 
a man to teach his children and invited 
the neighbors to send their children and 
enjoy the benefits of instruction. In the 
midst of the wilderness he carved out a 
home and his labors were of a character 
that contributed in marked degree to the 
material improvement of the community. 
He also built the first grist mill in his 
part of the county and he co-operated 
in many movements for the general wel- 
fare. He married a Miss Ament and their 
son, Salem Hill, father of our subject, 
was born in Armstrong county, where 
he was reared and educated. He followed 
both milling and farming and spent his 



20 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEU' 



entire life in that locality. In early man- 
hood he wedded Miss Esther Kuhns, also 
a native of Armstrong county, where they 
continued to reside until called to their 
final rest. In their family were seven 
children. The parents were devoted and 
active members of the Lutheran church, 
in which Mr. Hill served as an officer. 
His wife was a granddaughter of Father 
Michael Steck, the first Lutheran minis- 
ter in Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, at which time the county boundaries 
comprised nearly the entire western por- 
tion of the state. His daughter Esther 
married David Kuhns and they became 
the parents of Mrs. Hill. Salem Hill de- 
parted this life about ten years ago, but 
Mrs. Hill is still living upon the old 
homestead. 

William K. Hill is the second in order 
of birth in the family. After attending 
the district schools he continued his stud- 
ies in Pennsylvania College, at Gettys- 
burg, and was there graduated in the class 
of 1879 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, while later the Master of Arts de- 
gree was conferred upon him by his alma 
mater. Following his graduation he en- 
tered upon a course of study in Gettys- 
burg Theological Seminary of the Lu- 
theran church, of which he is an alumnus 
of the class of 1884. 

In the fall of that year Professor Hill 
came to Carthage to accept the chair of 
science at Carthage College, with which 
he was continuously identified until 1893, 
when he resigned his position and for eight 
years thereafter was superintendent of the 
public schools of the city of Carthage. 
During that period the work of the schools 
were rapidly developed and improved, 



Professor Hill maintaining a high stand- 
ard of proficiency in all his work and in- 
spiring his teachers and the pupils with 
much of his own zeal and interest in the 
work. The attendance at the high school 
increased threefold during that period and 
there was a marked improvement mani- 
fested in all departments of public educa- 
tion in this city. In 1901 Professor Hill 
was re-elected to his old position in the 
college and since that time has filled the 
chair of chemistry and biology. His spe- 
cial work has been along the line of and 
study of biology of fresh water algae but 
his life work has been that of teaching. 
As an educator he has won high rank, im- 
parting knowledge in clear, concise man- 
ner, which fails not to make a strong im- 
pression upon the minds of his pupils. He 
has also become known in business cir- 
cles in Carthage, where for a number of 
years he has been director of the National 
Bank. 

Professor Hill was married December 
21, 1887, to Miss Kate Griffith, a daugh- 
ter of Dr. A. J. Griffith and a graduate of 
Carthage College. To them have been 
born ten children, nine of whom are yet 
living, namely : Esther Margaret, Wil- 
liam Griffith, Katharine, Robert Mc- 
Claughry, Lewis Rowland, Ralph March- 
and, Constance, Edward Llewellyn and 
Imogen. Professor and Mrs. Hill are 
members of the Lutheran church, in the 
work of which they take a very active 
and helpful part. Professor Hill has 
served as elder for many years and has 
done all in his power to advance the 
work of the church and extend its in- 
fluence. His political views are in ac- 
cord with the republican principles but 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



21 



he has never been an aspirant for office. 
He has a beautiful home on Wabash ave- 
nue, where his well filled library and 
other attractive furnishings indicate the 
wealth of refinement and culture to be 
found there. Throughout his entire pro- 
fessional career he has remained in Car- 
thage and his strong intellectuality and 
broad, scholarly . attainments have made 
him a leader in its educational progress. 



GEORGE WALKER BARR. 

George Walker Barr, a retired farmer 
of Dallas City, is one of the few residents 
of America who can claim the distinction 
of being the grandson of a Revolution- 
ary hero. The ancestry of the family 
can be traced back to the year 1607, when 
a representative of the name settled at 
Jamestown, Virginia, among the first per- 
manent residents of the new world. 
Adam Barr, grandfather of our subject, 
was a native of the Old Dominion and 
served throughout the Revolutionary war 
as a teamster. He was with the immedi- 
ate command of General Washington for 
seven years and underwent the various 
hardships and privations which were he- 
roically borne by the soldiers who fought 
for independence, marching at various 
times when his footprints were marked 
by blood. George W. Barr of this review 
can well remember when at the age of 
ten years he dropped corn after his grand- 
father Barr, who was then ninety-five 
years of age. Adam Barr was married 



in Baltimore, Maryland, and subsequent- 
ly removed to Kentucky, where he lived 
for many years. In his family were thir- 
teen children, of whom four sons fought 
in the famous battle of New Orleans un- 
der the command of General Andrew 
Jackson and two of the number never re- 
turned, giving their lives in defense of 
their country in the second war with Eng- 
land. 

Elias Barr, son of Adam Barr, was 
born in Breckinridge county, Kentucky, 
December 8, 1807, and after arriving at 
years of maturity was married to Sallie 
A. Beauchamp, whose birth occurred in 
Hardin county, Kentucky, December 4, 
1808. She was a daughter of Jerry B. 
Beauchamp, who was descended from the 
French nobility. His parents went to 
England at the time of the emigration of 
the Huguenots because of the religious 
persecution in their own country and 
Jerry Beauchamp and his two brothers 
were born in England. He was a lawyer, 
scholar, statesman and aristocrat one of 
the most distinguished residents of Ken- 
tucky at an early day. He served for 
eighteen years in the Kentucky senate, 
leaving the impress of his individuality 
upon the laws which were enacted at that 
early period and aiding in shaping the pol- 
icy of the state. He was a typical Ken- 
tucky gentlemen, a man of fine presence, 
standing six feet, four inches, in height. 
At one time he owned over ten thousand 
acres of land in Kentucky. He kept open 
house and delighted in the sports which 
were always enjoyed by the southern gen- 
tlemen. He kept fine racing horses and 
a pack of greyhounds and participated in 
many of the big hunts of the time. He 



22 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



also owned a large number of slaves and 
on one day before the war he liberated 
sixty-three of his bondspeople. Some- 
thing of the prodigality of the hospitality 
of his home may be indicated by the fact 
that a whole ox was roasted at the wed- 
ding of his daughter Sallie to Elias Barr. 
He lived to a very advanced age and when 
he passed away Kentucky lost one of its 
distinguished, representative and typical 
citizens a man of the old regime who 
represented the aristocracy of the south. 
The year 1859 witnessed the removal 
of Mr. and Mrs. Elias Barr from Kentucy 
to Hancock county, Illinois. The father 
engaged in farming and stock raising on 
section one. Rock Creek township, owning 
over four hundred acres in Hancock 
county, and there carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuits up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1875. He was a 
democrat in his political views and both 
he and his wife held membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he 
also served as class leader. When he came 
to Illinois he owned over one thousand 
acres of good Kentucky land and also 
some of the finest horses in the United 
States. He was a man of enterprise, suc- 
cessful in his undertakings, and his wife 
was of great assistance to him, being- 
trained to the work of the household as 
was the custom in those days. She spun 
and wove and capably managed the house- 
hold affairs and there are several pieces 
of table linen in the family of George W. 
Barr which were woven by her. Elias Barr 
passed away on the i8th of July, 1875, 
his wife surviving for a number of years, 
or until the ist of May, 1892, when she 
also departed this life. In their family 



were twelve children : Daniel Thomas, 
who was born in 1831 and died in 1846; 
Newell Robinson, who was born in 1834 
and died in 1892; Elmira A., who was 
born in 1836 and is the wife of John Hur- 
dle, living near Disco, Illinois; Mary E., 
who was born in 1838 and is the widow 
of Thomas L. Ray, of Dallas township; 
Bluford B., who was born in 1840 and 
died in 1898; Kitty Ann, who was born 
March 5, 1842, married Sylvester T. Tur- 
ney, and died in 1886; George Walker, of 
this review; Sarah E., who was born in 
1846 and is the widow of David Wright, 
her home being near Disco ; John Adam, 
who was born in 1848 and is a successful 
physician of Fountain Green, Illinois; 
Martha Jane, who was born in 1850 and 
is the wife of M. Bross, of Prescott, Iowa ; 
Franklin P., who was born in 1852 and 
is living in Clarinda, Iowa; and Amanda 
M., who was born in 1856 and is the 
wife of Daniel Showers, of Fresno, Cali- 
fornia. 

George W. Barr was born in Breckin- 
ridge county, Kentucky, February 25, 
1844, and in his boyhood days accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to 
Hancock county. He pursued his edu- 
cation in the district schools of this county 
and in Mount Vernon, Illinois, and re- 
mained with his father until twenty-five 
years of age, assisting in the cultivation 
and improvement of the home farm. Am- 
bitious to have a farm of his own and 
enter upon an independent business ca- 
reer, in 1868 he purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Dallas town- 
ship. To this he afterward added as his 
financial resources increased until he 
owned two hundred and twenty-five acres 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



of good land in that township, on which 
he made many modern improvements, 
converting the place into a splendidly im- 
proved property. There he lived for a 
third of a century, or until 1902, when he 
retired from fanning and purchased a 
beautiful home and two lots on Third 
street in Dallas City, where he is now liv- 
ing, surrounded by many of life's com- 
forts. 

On the 2Oth of April, 1869, was cele- 
brated the marriage of Mr. Barr and Miss 
Mary E. Dean, who was born in Clinton 
county, Ohio, October 3, 1848, a daugh- 
ter of William B. and Margaret A. (Ran- 
kin) Dean. The mother was born in 
Brown county, Ohio, in 1807 and the 
father's birth occurred in Ireland in 1806. 
Crossing the Atlantic, he arrived at New 
York at the age of fifteen years after a 
voyage of three months. He traveled for 
some time and afterward became a farmer 
of Henderson county, Illinois, where he 
settled in 1853. In his family were seven 
children : Bartley R., who died in Ar- 
kansas in 1906; William L., living near 
Disco, Illinois; Albert and Alfred, twins, 
the former a resident of Chico, Califor- 
nia, and the latter of Eldon, lewa ; Mary 
E., now Mrs. Barr; Arthur, of Dallas 
City ; and Charles Edward Franklin, who 
died in May, 1869. The father was reared 
in the Roman Catholic church and the 
mother died in the same faith. Mrs. Barr 
was educated in the South Hill school in 
Burlington, Iowa. By her marriage she 
became the mother of three children : Ettie 
E., born January 25, 1870, was married 
May 12, 1897, to Elmer V. Royse, of 
Aledo, and they have two children, George 
Frederick and Cleo Ray; Robert A., a 

2 



sketch of whom appears on another page 
of this book, is the second of the family ; 
and Mary Ottilia, born August 4, 1885, 
is a graduate of the Dallas City high 
school in the class of 1905. In 1901-2 
she- attended St. Mary's Academy at 
Xauvoo, Illinois, and is a skilled musician, 
now at home with her parents. 

Mr. Barr is a democrat in his political 
faith, voting for the state and national 
candidates of the party, but at local elec- 
tions casts an independent ballot. He has 
held some township offices, including that 
of road commissioner, and he has been 
school director, while his wife has also 
acted in that capacity for three years. 
They attend the services of the Christian 
church, of which Mrs. Barr is a member. 
She is a lady of very genial and cheerful 
disposition and their friends in the com- 
munity are almost co-extensive with the 
circle of their acquaintances. Mr. Barr 
is a man whose success is attributable to 
his industry and business integrity and 
through careful management in an active 
career, through diligence and persever- 
ance he has acquired a handsome compe- 
tence that now enables him to enjoy life 
without recourse to further labor. His 
son is operating the home farm and the 
family is one of which the parents have 
every reason to be proud. 



FRANKLIN C. LITTLE. 

Franklin C. Little, starting out in life 
with forty acres of land, is now the owner 
of a valuable farming property of four 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



hundred acres and the increase in his 
realty possessions is an indication of the 
industry and enterprise which have char- 
acterized his life and made him one of 
the men of affluence in Pontoosuc town- 
ship. His success enables him to enjoy 
the comforts and some of the luxuries of 
life in the evening of his days for Mr. 
Little is now seventy-seven years of age. 
He was born in Green county, Ohio, De- 
cember 12, 1829. He had an uncle, Da- 
vid Little, who served in the war of 1812, 
serving as a guard at Sacketts Harbor. 
His parents, Martin and Sarah (Ritnour) 
Little, were both born in the vicinity of 
Winchester, Virginia, the former in 1794 
and the latter in 1 796. After some years' 
residence in Ohio they came to Hancock 
county, arriving on the 25th of April, 
1847. They settled in Appanoose town- 
ship but after a brief sojourn there the 
father purchased land in Pontoosuc town- 
ship from a Mormon elder of the name 
of Fullmer and lived in a little log cabin 
for a few years, when he made better im- 
provements, owning four hundred acres, 
having paid high for those times, paying 
as high as $5.25 per acre, in order to get 
good title. He aided in the pioneer de- 
velopment and upbuilding of the county 
and was identified with its farming inter- 
ests until his death in 1854. His wife 
long survived him and in 1882 was laid 
by his side in Pontoosuc cemetery. They 
had seven children : Lorenzo, who lives 
in Pontoosuc township; D. A., of the 
same township; Catherine, the widow of 
Archibald Jackson, of Nauvoo; Sarah, the 
wife of Charles Rogers, of Nebraska ; Mil- 
lie, deceased ; F. C. ; and Jane, the wife 
of Adam Coffman, of Pontoosuc. 



Franklin C. Little largely acquired his 
education in Ohio and for one term at- 
tended school in this state, whither he 
came with his parents when a youth of 
seventeen. At the age of nineteen, in 
1849, ne was married to Miss Nancy Mc- 
Cauley, who was born in New York state 
in 1829, a daughter of Major and Polly 
McCauley, both New York people but 
formerly of Ireland. Her father was 
a distant relative of MacCauley, the Eng- 
lish historian. Mr. and Mrs. McCauley 
came to Illinois at a very early day, set- 
tling in Hancock county in 1832, and he 
participated in the Mormon war of 1844, 
while with many other events of the 
early days, which have become historic, 
he was also associated. Of his family 
of ten children six are now living : Elea- 
nor, the wife of Isaac London, of Pay- 
son, Illinois ; Lydia, the widow of Je- 
rome Langdon, and a resident of Payson ; 
Henry and Robert, both of Kansas; Su- 
san, wife of John Schwartz, of Nebraska; 
and John, also of Nebraska. Three sons, 
William, Henry and Robert, all served 
for three years in the Union army in 
the Civil war. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Lit- 
tle's father gave him forty acres of prai- 
rie land in Pontoosuc township and, lo- 
cating thereon in 1849, he built a house 
and has made all the improvements of 
every kind upon the farm, the boundary 
of which he has also extended from time 
to time. He owns altogether four hun- 
dred acres in Pontoosuc township and 
although well advanced in years is still 
actively engaged in general farming and 
stock raising. This has been his life 
work. Ambitious to succeed he has put 



HANCOCK- COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



forth earnest, unremitting effort, guided 
by sound judgment, and his prosperity 
has resulted. 

In 1877 Mr. Little lost his wife, who 
died on the I4th of June of that year and 
was laid to rest in Pontoosuc cemetery. 
She was a devoted member of the Meth- 
odist church and a consistent Christian 
woman. Of their ten children, six are 
living: Martin, a resident of Pontoosuc 
township, has four sons, Muriel, Franklin, 
Lee and Harry; Melissa, the wife of 
James Lamb, of Pontoosuc township, by 
whom she has seven children Edith. 
Delmer, George, John, Daisy, Millie and 
William; Arthur, a resident farmer of 
Pontoosuc township, who married Lizzie 
Avis and has three children Jessie, Leola 
and Gladys ; Mary, wife of Hiram Long- 
shie. of Pontoosuc township, and the 
mother of two children, Edward and Min- 
nie; Samuel, of the same township, who 
married Emma Cress and has three chil- 
dren Claude, Nora and Nellie; Anna, 
the wife of Henry Byler, of Durham 
township, has one child and by a former 
marriage has three children, Mabel, Otis 
and Irene Hamilton (all Hamiltons) ; 
Flora, wife of Robert Alston, of Hamil- 
ton, Illinois, by whom she has three chil- 
dren Flossie, Frankie and Grace; and 
Frank G., who married Grace Mitchell, of 
Dallas City, and has one child, Donald 
Ray. 

On the 23d of January, 1884, Mr. Lit- 
tle was again married, his second union 
being with Miss Emma A. North, who 
was born in Springfield, Illinois, in 1853. 
a daughter of Alfred A. and America A. 
(Miner) Xorth, both coming from Ohio 
and settling in Sangamon county.' this 



state, when the eldest sister of Mrs. Lit- 
tle was only two years old. Mr. North 
served for three years in the Civil war 
as a member of Company A, Tenth Illi- 
nois Cavalry, and was mustered out as 
brevet major. Of his five children four 
are living: Kate, the widow of Samuel 
Lamb, of Pontoosuc township; Mrs. Lit- 
tle; Milfred, of Galveston, Texas; and 
Alfred A., living in Springfield. 

Mr. Little is a stalwart republican who 
has given unswerving support to the party 
since its organization and has served as 
supervisor, school director and assessor. 
He belongs to the United Brethren church 
and is a man worthy of the respect so 
uniformly accorded him wherever he is 
known. He has lived in this county for 
almost sixty years and events which to 
others are matters of history are to him 
matters of personal observation and ex- 
perience. Pioneer life in Hancock county 
in all its phases was familiar to him and 
he has taken justifiable pride in what has 
been accomplished in the county in the 
passing years. 



JAMES BABCOCK. 

James Babcock, a leading business man 
of Durham township engaged in general 
farming and also representing the finan- 
cial interests of the community, as vice 
president of the Farmers Exchange Bank 
of Dallas City, was born Novmber 2, 
1849, in the township where he still makes 
his home. His father, Samuel Babcock, 



26 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was a native of New York, born in 1810, 
and as a child of a few years he was taken 
with his parents who settled on the Miami 
Bottoms near Cincinnati and there he 
grew to maturity being reared to the oc- 
cupation of farming. In 1835 he became 
a resident of Henderson county, Illinois. 
There he lived in a log house in true pio- 
neer style for a number of years, there 
being but few settlers there. He learned 
and followed the carpenter's trade and 
he also operated a water mill there until 
his removal to Hancock county, having 
purchased a farm in Durham township. 
He served as a soldier in the Mormon war 
and was identified with many events 
which now find place upon the historic 
annals of this part of the state. He was 
married in Henderson county in early 
manhood to Miss Nancy Logan, a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Logan. She was born in 
Indiana in 1825, and as a child was 
brought here. For many years they 
traveled life's journey happily together. 
The death of the father occurred Octo- 
ber 7, 1886, while his wife survived until 
January 18, 1902, and both were laid to 
rest in a cemetery in Henderson county, 
Illinois. Of their family of ten children 
five are now living: Susan, the wife of 
Arthur Gates, of Welkin, Minnesota; 
Euphama,the wife of Lee Shaw, of Dallas 
City ; James, of this review ; Anna, the 
wife of Ami Huffman, of Clyde, Mis- 
souri ; and Florence, the wife of James 
Farren, of Durham township, living on 
the old homestead of her parents. 

James Babcock is indebted to the dis- 
trict schools of Hancock county for the 
early educational privileges he enjoyed. 
He afterward spent two winters as a 



student in Bryant & Stratton's Business 
College at Burlington, Iowa, and he re- 
mained upon the old homestead until 
twenty-eight years of age, assisting in 
the farm work in its various departments 
and thus gaining thorough familiarity 
with the best methods of cultivating the 
fields. 

On the nth of September, 1877, Mr. 
Babcock was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Rice, who was born in Stark county, 
Ohio, May 12, 1855, a daughter of 
Henry and Elizabeth Rice, who are men- 
tioned on another page of this work. For 
three years following their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Babcock lived upon the present 
site of Stronghurst and subsequently 
spent nine years upon the old homestead 
farm of his father. In March. 1889, he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of good land on section n, Durham 
township, and in 1896 he erected his 
present modern residence, which is one 
of the finest and most beautiful homes in 
the township. All other improvements 
upon the place are in keeping and alto- 
gether his is a model farm property, 
equipped with the various conveniences 
and accessories that are known to modern 
farming in the twentieth century. His 
fields are under a high state of cultivation 
and annually return to him good crops 
and he likewise owns twenty acres of 
timber land upon the old home place. On 
the 5th of July, 1904, he was elected vice 
president of the Farmers State Exchange 
Bank of Dallas City and has since been 
connected with the institution in that ca- 
pacity. He was one of the organizers of 
the bank and was elected one of the di- 
rectors at its first meeting, and has been 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



27 



the only vice president who has served. 
His son Rolla has been cashier from the 
first and in fact obtained the subscriptions 
for stock. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Babcock 
has been blessed with three children : 
Frank, who was born in Stronghurst in 
1878, died at the age of five years. Rolla, 
born in this county in 1880, attended the 
Gem City Business College at Quincy, 
Illinois, and is now cashier in the Farm- 
ers State Exchange Bank in Dallas City. 
He married Nellie Quinton. Ina, born 
in Durham township February 9, 1887, 
attended the Nauvoo Academy for two 
years and is now at home with her 
parents. 

Mr. Babcock votes with the democracy 
but has never been an aspirant for office, 
preferring to concentrate his energies 
upon his business affairs, which, capably 
controlled, are bringing to him a gratify- 
ing measure of success, and investigation 
into his history shows that the methods 
he has ever followed are in strict con- 
formity to a high standard of business 
ethics. 



DANIEL T. RAY. 

Daniel T. Ray, living near Colusa, is 
an extensive land owner and enterpris- 
ing citizen and as one of the representa- 
tive men of Hancock county well deserves 
mention in this volume. He was born in 
Breckinridge county, Kentucky, in 1859, 
a son of Thomas L. and Mary (Barr) 



Ray. John Barr, an uncle of Mrs. Mary 
(Barr) Ray and her grandfather in the 
maternal line were soldiers of the Revolu- 
tionary war. 

Thomas L. Ray was born in Breckin- 
ridge county, Kentucky, in 1827 and was 
a farmer by occupation. He was mar- 
ried in his native state to Miss Mary Barr, 
whose birth occurred in Breckinridge 
county in 1838. They came to Hancock 
county, Illinois, in 1865 and settled near 
Dallas City, while subsequently they re- 
moved to Pilot Grove township. In 1880 
they took up their abode in Dallas town- 
ship, where Mr. Ray purchased eighty 
acres of land on section 36. This farm 
was improved and as time passed he ex- 
tended its boundaries and added other im- 
provements, making this a well developed 
property which returned to him a good 
income for the care and labor which he 
bestowed upon it. His study of the po- 
litical issues and questions of the day led 
him to give his support to the democracy 
and his fellow townsmen, recognizing his 
worth and ability, called him to various 
local offices. He held membership in the 
Baptist church, to which his widow also 
belongs, and his life was characterized 
by his religious faith. In the family were 
six children, of whom four are now liv- 
ing: Daniel T. ; Sarah E., who is at 
home with her mother; Emma E., the 
wife of George Boyer, of Fort Madison, 
Iowa; and George W., also at home. 
One daughter, Mary J., died at the age 
of two years; and Anna F., the youngest 
of the family, died in July, 1890, at the 
age of fourteen years while visiting her 
sister in Fort Madison, Iowa. That was 
the year of the father's death. He was 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



well advanced in years and suffered from 
paralysis, but the daughter was carried 
away in the bloom of youth and died 
when absent from her mother's home. 
Her death came as an almost unbearable 
blow to the family, who in one year were 
bereft of husband and father, daughter 
and sister. 

Daniel Ray, whose name introduces 
this record, was educated in the district 
schools of Dallas township and to some 
extent in Pilot Grove township. He re- 
mained with his father upon the home 
farm until the latter's death and then took 
charge of the property for his mother. 
He is still manager of the farm, which is 
carefully conducted by him, his business 
ability and enterprise enabling him to 
make it a source of profit. In his youth 
he became thoroughly familiar with the 
best methods of carrying on farm work 
and in later years he has not only superin- 
tended his agricultural interests but has 
also made judicious investments in land 
and is now the owner of considerable 
valuable farm property, owning one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Xorth Dakota. 
He has followed in his father's political 
footsteps and votes with the democracy. 
He has served as road commissioner and 
as a member of the school board and he 
withplds his support from no movement 
or measure that is calculated to prove 
of general good. In his social relations 
he is a Woodman. Almost his entire 
life has been passed in this county, for in 
early boyhood he was brought to Illinois 
by his parents and in the intervening years 
he has made a record which is most com- 
mendable both in his business relations 
and private life. He is an honest, up- 



right, energetic man, who stands high 
in the community and in his business life 
he is making a creditable record and is 
highly respected by all. 



A. W. O'HARRA. 

Apollos W. O'Harra needs no intro- 
duction to the readers of this volume, for 
few men have a wider acquaintance in 
Hancock county, by reason of his pro- 
fessional and business connections and his 
activity in support of many plans and 
movements for the public good. While 
undoubtedly he is not without that honor- 
able ambition which is so powerful and 
useful an incentive to activity in public 
affairs he has even regarded the pursuits 
of private life as being in themselves 
abundantly worthy of his best efforts and 
by the faithful and conscientious per- 
formance of each day's duty as it has 
come to him he has found inspiration and 
encouragement for the labors of the suc- 
ceeding day. He has thus won public 
confidence and his ability in the line of his 
chosen profession has given him pres- 
tige at a bar which has claimed many 
notable members. 

Mr. O'Harra was born on a farm near 
Camp Point in Adams county, Illinois, 
February 22, 1857, his parents being Jef- 
ferson and Pauline (Robertson) O'Harra. 
The father was a native of Indiana, born 
June 4. 1833, and the mother's birth oc- 
curred in Adams county, Illinois, May 9, 
1838. Jefferson O'Harra devoted his at- 



HANCOCK COUNTY. ILLINOIS. 



29 



tention to general agricultural pursuits 
until 1866 and at the age of fifteen years 
he went to Adams county, Illinois. In 
1860 he removed to Hancock county, 
where he engaged in the tilling of the soil 
until 1866, when he moved to Bentley 
and became proprietor of a general store 
which he conducted for thirty-twci.years^ 
In 1899 he removed to Carthage, thinking . ; 
to retire from active business life, but 
indolence and idleness are utterly foreign 
to his nature and he could not content 
himself without some occupation, so that 
for the past five years he has acted as 
manager of the mortgage department in 
the office of his son, A. W. O'Harra. He 
votes with the democracy and has served 
as township supervisor and as a member 
of the school board, but is without polit- 
ical ambitions. A member of the Odd 
Fellows Society, he has passed all of the 
chairs in the local lodge and has several 
times been representative to the grand 
lodge. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist church and he has 
held most of the church offices. They re- 
side in Carthage and are greatly esteemed 
in the city which is their home. Unto 
them were born five sons and four daugh- 
ters, of whom six are now living, namely : 
A. W., of this review: Dr. William G. 
O'Harra, a practicing physician of Chi- 
cago; Mary E., the wife of George E. 
Burner, a farmer residing in Rock Creek 
township ; Professor C. C. O'Harra, pro- 
fessor of geology and mineralogy in the 
state school of mines at Rapid City, South 
Dakota ; Rev. M. L. O'Harra, a Methodist 
minister, who is now pastor of the Col- 
lege church at Abingdon, Illinois ; and 
Ira J., a successful lawyer at Macomb. 



A. W. O'Harra was a student in Car- 
thage College and afterward engaged in 
teaching for four years in the public 
schools of Bentley, Illinois. He took up 
the study of law in the office under the 
direction of the firm of Draper & Sco- 
field in Carthage and was admitted to the 
bar January 5, 1880. He began the prac- 
' tice of law alone with an office on the 
\^est side of the public square and after 
two years admitted Frank H. Graves, now 
a' Reading attorney of Spokane, Wash- 
ington, to a partnership. They were as- 
sociated for two years, or until Mr. 
Graves' removal from the city, when Mr. 
O'Harra entered into partnership with C. 
J. and T. J. Scofield, brothers, a rela- 
tionship which was maintained for a few 
months, when the former was elected cir- 
cuit judge. T. J. Scofield and Mr 
O'Harra continued in practice together 
for seventeen years, the firm originally be- 
ing Scofield, O'Harra & Scofield and later 
O'Harra & Scofield. In 1891 they ad- 
mitted William H. Hartzell to a partner- 
ship and he continued with the firm until 
1896. In 1890 O'Harra & Scofield 
opened a law office in Quincy, Illinois, the 
latter removing to that city to look after 
the business there and after a year Colonel 
W. W. Berry became a member of the 
firm, the partnership thus continuing un- 
til the death of Colonel Berry. All this 
time Mr. O'Harra continued his residence 
in Carthage, having charge of the office 
here. On the ist of January, 1897, W. 
H. Hartzell retired from the firm in this 
city and during the fall of the same year 
Judge C. J. Scofield, having retired from 
the bench, again became a partner and 
the old firm style of Scofield, O'Harra & 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Scofield was resumed, the connection be- 
ing continued until the ist of March, 
1899, when it was dissolved. Judge Sco- 
field still practices in Carthage, while T. 
J. Scofield is one of the prominent law- 
yers of Chicago. Mr. O'Harra practices 
in all of the courts and is now located in 
an office on Main street, where he has one 
of the finest law libraries of the city. It 
is the theory of the law that the counsel 
who practice are to aid the court in the 
administration of justice and this Mr. 
O'Harra has endeavored to do. He is 
careful to conform his practice to a high 
standard of professional ethics and never 
seeks to lead the court astray in a mat- 
ter of fact or law, nor does he endeavor 
to withhold from it a knowledge of any 
fact appearing in the record. He treats 
the court with the studied courtesy which 
is its due and indulges in no malicious 
criticism because it arrives at a conclu- 
sion, in the decision of a case, different 
from that which he hoped to hear. Calm 
dignified, self-controlled, free from pas- 
sion or prejudice, he gives to his client 
the service of great talent, unwearied in- 
dustry and broad learning, but he never 
forgets that there are certain things due 
to the court, to his own self-respect and 
above all to justice and a righteous ad- 
ministration of the law which neither the 
zeal of an advocate nor the pleasure of 
success permits him to disregard. He has 
achieved distinction as an able lawyer 
of his district and he deserves it. 

In connection with his law office Mr. 
O'Harra maintains a money loaning de- 
partment, making loans on farms and 
thus placing about five hundred thousand 
dollars per year. He is moreover a di- 



rector in the Hancock County National 
Bank, a director in the State Bank of Au- 
gusta, and has been a director of the Car- 
thage Building & Loan Association since 
its organization in May, 1885. He is 
likewise a director in the Carthage Elec- 
tric Light & Power Company and a di- 
rector in the Plumb Brothers Brick & Tile 
Company and several other industrial cor- 
porations. He has made judicious invest- 
ments in real estate, owning some unim- 
proved property in Carthage together witli 
the Shoreham Hotel and his own resi- 
dence. He likewise has farms in Hancock 
county and has thus placed his money in 
the safest of all investments real estate. 
His strict integrity, business conservatism 
and judgment have always been so uni- 
versally recognized that he has enjoyed 
public confidence to an enviable degree 
and naturally this has brought him a lu- 
crative clientage. 

Aside from what he has done for the 
city through the line of his business and 
professional activity Mr. O'Harra has 
given many hours to public service and 
Carthage has benefited by his efforts in 
her behalf. He has always been a stanch 
democrat and for four years, from 1886 
until 1890, served as mayor of the city, 
giving a public spirited and businesslike 
administration. He was also president of 
the school board for a number of years 
and for fifteen years has been a member 
of the board of trustees of Carthage Col- 
lege. His co-operation can be counted 
upon for every measure and movement 
that promises to advance the general wel- 
fare and while working toward high 
ideals he uses practical methods. 

On the 1 4th of October, 1880, Mr. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



O'Harra was married to Miss Eliza J. 
Burner, who was born in Hancock county, 
October 25, 1856, and is a daughter of 
Isaac S. and Jane A. (Lionberger) Bur- 
ner, both of whom were natives of Page 
county, Virginia, the former born March 
21, 1817, and the latter April 21, 1820. 
Mr. Burner was a farmer by occupation 
and in 1837 came to Hancock' county, 
traveling all the way on horseback. He 
settled in Harmony township and rented 
a log cabin, in which he lived for a few 
years, when he purchased land and built 
a log cabin, living in true pioneer style 
upon the frontier of the ever receding 
west and aiding in changing its pioneer 
conditions into those of an advanced and 
enlightened civilization. He voted with 
the democracy and held several local of- 
fices and was recognized as a local party 
leader, his influence carrying weight in 
the councils of the party. Both he and 
his wife were consistent members of the 
Baptist church, in which he served as dea- 
con. He lived upon farms in Harmony 
township for fifty years and died sudden- 
ly November 3, 1886, at the home of Dr. 
Carlton, to whom he had gone for med- 
ical attendance. He was invited by Dr. 
Carlton, an old-time friend, to remain to 
dinner and passed away at the table. His 
wife survived until October 31, 1890. 
and both He buried in Harmony ceme- 
tery. In their family were ten children, 
of whom seven are yet living, as fol- 
lows: Amanda E.. the widow of Samuel 
F. Ramsey, of Harmony township; Am- 
brose C.. and George S., of the same 
township; Fannie A., the wife of Henry 
Harter, of Sabetha. Kansas; Alice B., the 
wife of Philip L. Dailey, living on the 



old home place in Harmony township; 
Eliza J., now Mrs. O'Harra; and Olive, 
who resides with her sister, Mrs. O'Harra. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. O'Harra have been 
bom five children, all born in Carthage, 
but the eldest died in infancy. Clifton 
Junius, born May 23, 1884, was gradu- 
ated from the high school of Carthage in 
1902, completed the course in Carthage 
College in 1906 and intends to become a 
member of the bar. Edith May, born 
May 22, 1886, is a graduate of the acad- 
emy, a preparatory department of Car- 
thage College, and is now a senior in 
the more advanced institution. Gladys 
June, born June 8, 1890, is a junior in 
the high school. Roswell Burner, born 
March 30, 1892, is a student in the Car- 
thage High Schools. In 1892, Mr. 
O'Harra built an elegant residence at the 
corner of Main and Washington streets. 
He is a man of domestic tastes, devoted to 
his family and finding his greatest hap- 
piness at his own fireside. He has, more- 
over, great reverence for aged people and 
the most thorough respect for all things 
which tend to uplift mankind and develop 
an upright character. His home is noted 
for its gracious and almost limitless hos- 
pitaltiy, Mrs. O'Harra taking great pleas- 
ure with him in the entertainment of their 
many friends. Mr. O'Harra is an Odd 
Fellow, has passed all of the chairs in 
the local lodge and has several times 
been representative to the grand lodge. 
His wife has also filled all of the offices 
in the Rebekah lodge and has for several 
years been its representative to the Re- 
bekah assembly. She is treasurer of the 
Woman's Club of Carthage, president of 
the Public Library Association and for 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV I Ell' 



several years was president of the Floral 
Guild. Mr. O'Harra started in life with 
limited means, teaching school in order 
to provide the funds necessary to enable 
him to study law and at the time of their 
marriage he and his wife had but very 
limited possessions. He purchased his 
first law library with borrowed money and 
he has inherited nothing, but has accu- 
mulated all by his industry, supplemented 
by ambition and the development of his 
native powers and talents. It is true that 
his chief life work has been that of a 
remarkably successful lawyer but the 
range of his activities and the scope of 
his influence have reached far beyond this 
special field. He belongs to that class 
of men who wield a power which is all 
the more potent from the fact that it is 
moral rather than political and is exer- 
cised for the public weal rather than for 
personal ends. 



EDWARD CHERRILL. 

Edward Cherrill, president of the Ex- 
change Bank at Carthage, was born in 
London, England, June 17, 1838, a son 
of Adolphus and Elizabeth (Wood) 
Cherrill, who were likewise natives of 
London, born in 1808 and 1813 respect- 
ively. The father came to America in 
1838, bringing with him his wife and 
two children, first locating in Jackson- 
ville, Illinois. They had spent six weeks 
on the water as passengers on an old-time 
sailing vessel. He had been brought up 



in a silk warehouse, where were employed 
fifty-two young men known as Bradbury's 
Pack, and while living in England ac- 
quired a classical education as a prepara- 
tion for a profession. He moreover pos- 
sessed considerable artistic skill and when 
a young man and even later in life did 
creditable work painting in water colors. 
He was always a great reader and a man 
of scholarly attainments, and he likewise 
enjoyed outdoor life. He was married on 
the 1 5th of December, 1835, in St. 
George's church, in Hanover Square, 
London, to Miss Elizabeth Wood, who 
had spent her girlhood days in that city, 
had acquired her education in the schools 
there, and had been received into the 
Episcopal church at an early age. Two 
children were born unto them ere they 
emigrated to America. On coming to 
Hancock county in 1842 they built a house 
on a farm near Augusta, where they lived 
for several years in true pioneer style. 
In 1847, they removed to Carthage, 
Mr. Cherrill turning his attention to mer- 
chandising, which he followed in partner- 
ship with Mr. Sholl for many years. 
He was thus closely associated with the 
business development of the city. With 
events that marked the history of the 
city and county he was closely associated, 
taking an active part in the Mormon war 
and in other incidents of those early 
times. His political allegiance was given 
to the democracy and he served one term 
as county treasurer of Hancock county. 
His life was made up of good deeds and 
he left to his family a record of which 
his children and grandchildrn have every 
reason to be proud. His character was 
such as commanded the respect of the 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



33 



entire community. He recognized and 
called forth the good in others and in his 
own life displayed those sterling traits 
which work for good citizenship. He 
passed away in 1877, and was laid to rest 
in the Carthage cemetery. Mrs. Cherrill 
is still living in Carthage, at the advanced 
age of ninety-two and possesses her men- 
tal and physical faculties to a remarkable 
degree and has looked after her own 
household and other affairs until the past 
year. While devoted to her family she 
has always found time to perform many 
acts of kindness and charity and is great- 
ly beloved by her own children and the 
entire community. She is a most enter- 
taining and companionable lady, relating 
many interesting reminiscences of pioneer 
life and of the early days in Hancock 
county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cherrill were the parents 
of six children. Emily became the wife 
of Francis M. Corby, and for some time 
they lived in Chicago but both are now 
deceased. At one time Mr. Corby was 
county clerk of Hancock county. Ed- 
ward is the second of the family. Mary 
became the wife of Dr. J. K. Bonde, of 
Carthage, but both are now deceased, the 
Doctor having passed away in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Rose C. is the deceased wife 
of H. E. Griswold, of Atlantic, Iowa, 
Ellen married Colonel James B. Cahill, 
who was lieutenant colonel of the Six- 
teenth Illinois Infantry. They were at 
one time residents of Carthage but both 
are now deceased. The Colonel was in- 
ternal revenue collector at Warsaw and 
Ouincy, acting as collector for the district 
in the latter place. A. N. Cherrill makes 
his home in Carthage. Grace Amelia 



died when a young lady, of malarial fever 
which she contracted' on a camping trip 
in Missouri. 

Edward Cherrill was educated in the 
subscription schools of Hancock county. 
He lived in Carthage but owing to the 
pioneer condition of the country and the 
fact that the public-school system had 
not yet been organized, he was sent to a 
country school called Hickory Flat, 
where, however, he was under the in- 
struction of a very competent teacher. 
Soon after leaving school he received the 
appointment as deputy county clerk under 
Claiborne Winston, and subsequently he 
attended Illinois College and the State 
University of Indiana. After leaving 
college he went to St. Louis, Missouri, 
where he was employed in the counting 
house of Doan, King & Company and 
afterwards with J. W. Booth & Sons 
until 1864, when he returned to Carthage. 
Here he became identified with banking 
interests of the city as cashier of the 
Hancock National Bank, which position 
he occupied for ten years. The bank 
was originally established by his brother- 
in-law, Mr. Corby and Mr. Ferris. At 
a later date Mr. Cherrill was cashier of 
the Union Bank in Quincy for three 
years but in 1876 returned to Carthage, 
where, in connection with his father-in- 
law, Jacob Sholl, he established the bank- 
ing house of Cherrill, Sholl & Company, 
known as the Exchange Bank of Carth- 
age. The house remains virtually the 
same although Mr. Sholl is now de- 
ceased. A. N. Cherrill, a brother of our 
subject, entered the institution soon after 
it was established and is still connected 
with it, Edward Cherrill being now presi- 



34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW' 



dent of the institution. Throughout 
periods of general financial stress or gen- 
eral prosperity this bank has continued 
on the even tenor of its way with an un- 
assailable reputation, following a safe, 
conservative policy which has inspired 
public confidence and secured a liberal 
patronage. 

On the loth of June, 1869, Mr. Cherrill 
was married to Miss Susan Agnes Sholl, 
who was born in Winchester, Ohio. Her 
father, Jacob Sholl, was a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and her mother, Mrs. Maria 
Sholl, of Ohio. In the year 1854 he 
came to Carthage and was engaged in 
merchandising before he became identi- 
fied with the banking interests. His po- 
litical allegiance was given to the repub- 
lican party but he was without aspiration 
for office. In the family were four chil- 
dren, three of whom are now living: 
Alexander, who was a captain in the One 
Hundred and .Eighteenth Illinois Regi- 
ment in the Civil war and is now residing 
in Quincy, Illinois ; Jacob Mack, of Carth- 
age, who is a National bank examiner; 
Mrs. Cherrill. One brother, David 
Sholl, who was the third of the family, 
was killed in a skirmish at Thompson's 
Hill during the Civil war. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Sholl have passed away and 
their graves were made in Moss Ridge 
cemetery. 

In 1882 Mr. Cherrill built a pretty 
home on Madison street and he also owns 
other property in the city. Unto him 
and his wife have been born six children. 
Lawrence C, the eldest, is a resident of 
Chicago. Ellen Maria is the wife of 
Charles C. Merrill, formerly of Carthage, 
who is now passenger agent of the New 



York Central Lines, with headquarters 
at Kansas City, Missouri. Edward K., 
living in New York city, is assistant cash- 
ier of the Merchants Exchange National 
Bank. He was graduated from the high 
school and Carthage College, and during 
the periods of vacation spent much of his 
time in his father's bank, where he gained 
the ground work of the business. Lucy 
Sholl is the wife of Dr. Marsh, of War- 
saw, and has two children, John and 
Susan. Katherine has attended the pub- 
lic schools of Carthage and also Carthage 
College, and is now at home with her 
parents. Elizabeth G. is yet in school. 
The daughters of Mr. Cherrill are con- 
nected with the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, through William Mack, 
great-grandfather of Mrs. Cherrill. De- 
void of ostentation or display in his home 
life or business affairs, Mr. Cherrill has 
won his way to a position of prominence 
in financial circles in this part of the state. 
In politics a democrat he has never sought 
public office but is content to remain a 
private citizen. 



FRANCIS ORREN PERSHING, M. D. 

Although 'Dr. Pershing has resided in 
Dallas City for only about a year he was 
not a stranger in the town when he lo- 
cated here, and he has already made a 
creditable place for himself in profes- 
sional circles. He was born in Durham 
township, Hancock county, November 3, 
1867, his parents being W r esley K. and 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



35 



Ruth A. (Gather) Pershing. Both par- 
ents were natives of Pennsylvania, the 
father having been born in Westmore- 
land county, and the mother in Greene 
county. The paternal and maternal 
grandparents of our subject settled in 
Hancock county in the early '405, and 
were identified with the pioneer develop- 
ment and progress of this part of the 
I state. Wesley K. Pershing is a farmer 
by occupation, and for over a half cen- 
tury lived in this county. He purchased 
government land, cleared a portion of it 
and built thereon a log cabin. As the 
years advanced he. continued the work of 
progress and improvement, his labors be- 
ing interrupted, however, by the Civil 
war, for at the time of the inauguration 
of hostilities between the north and the 
south he espoused the Union cause and 
became a member of Company I, Six- 
teenth Illinois infantry. He served for 
four years, participated in the seige of 
Vicksburg, went with Sherman on his 
memorable march to the sea and also 
took part in the grand review in Wash- 
ington at the close of the war. While in 
Georgia he was wounded, being shot 
through the throat and for a time was 
in the hospital. His political allegiance 
has ever been given to the republican 
party and its principles, and both he and 
his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He served for many 
years as superintendent in different Sun- 
day-schools in various parts of the county, 
filling that position for a period in Burn- 
side. Both he and his wife now reside 
in Oklahoma. In their family were four 
children, three of whom are now living: 
Dr. Pershing, of this review; Royal S., 



a dentist practicing in Canada ; and Stella 
R., who has been a teacher of Marshall 
county, Illinois, and is now with her par- 
ents in Oklahoma, being engaged as a 
teacher in an Oklahoma seminary. 

Dr. Pershing attended the schools of 
Durham township, of Dallas City and of. 
Burnside, and later pursued a business 
course in Hedding College, at Abingdon, 
Illinois, from which institution he was 
graduated. He prepared for his profes- 
sion as a student in Keokuk Medical 
College, from which he was graduated in 
the class of 1893, and he later took post- 
graduate work in the Chicago Polyclinic 
College, in 1902. From 1893 until 1896 
inclusive he practiced medicine at Hamill, 
Iowa, and then located for practice in 
Burnside, where he remained for a year. 
On the expiration of that period he re- 
moved to Whitefield, Illinois, where he 
continued for six years and later spent 
three years in active practice at Tiskilwa. 
In January, 1906, he located in Dallas 
City, and now has a nice suite of rooms 
on Oak and Fifth streets, supplied with 
all modern appliances that are of aid to 
the physician in his effort to diagnose a 
case, check the ravages of disease and re- 
store health. He is a physician and sur- 
geon in general practice and yet makes 
somewhat of a specialty of diseases of the 
nose and throat. He has all the latest im- 
proved instruments needed in his profes- 
sion and his well equipped office shows 
that he is thoroughly familiar with 
modern methods of practice. 

On the 29th of March, 1893, Dr. Per- 
shing was married to Miss Winifred L. 
Bray, of La Harpe, who was born and 
reared in that place, and is a daughter of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Thomas and Emma (Leavitt) Bray. 
Her father came from Wales and settled 
first in Ohio but at an early day they re- 
moved to La Harpe, where he located in 
the '405. His wife is a native of Maine, 
and her people arrived in Hancock county 
. before the Bray family was established 
here. Mr. Bray was a tinner and hard- 
ware merchant for some years but at the 
time of his death, in 1894, was engaged 
in the undertaking business. He served 
as a soldier of the Civil war for two 
years. His widow still survives and 
makes her home in La Harpe. She be- 
longs to the Congregational church, 
while Mr. Bray held membership in the 
Episcopal church. They were the par- 
ents of a son and two daughters : Edwin 
M. Bray, proprietor of a general store 
at Towne, Texas, a suburb of El Paso, 
where he makes his home; Anna, the wife 
of J. V. Place, of La Harpe; and 
Mrs. Pershing. John and Joseph Bray, 
two of the brothers of Thomas Bray, 
were killed in the Civil war and some of 
Mrs. Pershing's relatives on the Leavitt 
side were in the Revolutionary war, so 
that she is eligible to membership with 
the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

Unto Dr. and Mrs. Pershing has been 
born one son, Francis Orville, who was 
born in Hamill, Lee County, Iowa, May 
14, 1895, and is attending the public 
school of, Dallas City. They are tem- 
porarily living on Oak street but Dr. Per- 
shing expects soon to build or buy a resi- 
dence here. He belongs to Dallas City 
Lodge A. F. & A. M. No. 145 and Odd 
Fellows lodges and to the Modern Wood- 
men camp as well as the Knights of Pyth- 



ias and he votes with the republican party 
but does not care for office, preferring to 
give his time and energies to his profes- 
sional duties, and in the line of his chosen 
calling he has won a reputation which 
many an older practitioner might well 
envy. 

Dr. Pershing is a member of the Han- 
cock County Medical Society, the Illinois 
State Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association. 



JOHN I. HEISLER. 

John I. Heisler, ex-postmaster of Dal- 
las and now in general business, was 
born in Hancock county, May 28, 1853, 
a son of George and Mary (Housewert) 
Heisler. The father was born in Ohio 
in 1814, while the mother's birth occurred 
in Pennsylvania in 1823. He was a farm- 
er by occupation and in 1835 came to 
Hancock county, settling in Dallas. His 
brother, William Heisler, had come to 
the county in 1832 the year of the Black 
Hawk war. George Heisler was suc- 
cessfully engaged in farming until his 
death, clearing away the timber in or- 
der to build a log cabin, in which he lived 
in true pioneer style until he was able 
to make modern improvements. He 
served in the war against the Mormons 
at Nauvoo in 1844, carrying the flag, and 
was associated with other early historic 
events. He now lies buried in a ceme- 
tery in Durham township. His widow 
still survives and is a member of the Chris- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



37 



tian church. In their family were seven 
children, of whom three are living: John 
I.; George F., of Dallas City; and Me- 
lissa, the wife of Edward Avis, living 
near Colusa, Illinois. 

John I. Heisler largely acquired his 
education in the district schools but also 
spent two years as a student in Carthage 
College. He remained with his mother 
upon the home farm until he had attained 
his majority and then purchased land 
in Dallas township upon which he en- 
gaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing for fifteen years, meeting with suc- 
cess in his, undertakings. He then de- 
voted ten years to the poultry business, 
being one of the early fanciers of the 
county, introducing the first thorough- 
bred fowls of different varieties and win- 
ning over 5,000 prizes at various fairs 
during the time he was in the business. 
He was then appointed by President Mc- 
Kinley to the position of postmaster at 
Dallas and after serving for three years 
was reappointed, his incumbency in the 
office covering altogether seven years and 
three months and giving general satisfac- 
tion to the public by reason of the prompt 
and efficient manner in which he dis- 
charged his duties. During this time the 
first rural route was inaugurated and the 
office became a presidential office. He 
was city alderman for four years, tax 
collector of Dallas township for two years 
and township supervisor for two years, 
and as a public official he bears an unas- 
sailable record. 

On Christmas clay of 1876 Mr. Heisler 
was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca 
Salsbury, a native of Kirksville, Missouri, 
and a daughter of Christopher and Eliz- 



abeth Salsbury. Mrs. Heisler was born 
in Missouri and died in this county No- 
vember 19, 1901, her remains being in- 
terred in Durham township. She was a 
member of the Christian church, was a 
good wife, kind mother and friend to 
all, and her many excellent traits of char- 
acter won her the esteem of those with 
whom she came in contact. She left one 
daughter, Malinda, now the wife of Fred 
J. Dickson, of Dallas City, by whom she 
has two children, Leo and Ethel. On the 
24th of January, 1906, Mr. Heisler was 
married to Mrs. Ellen Elizabeth (Toof) 
Dean, who was born in Durham town- 
ship, Hancock county, July 9, 1852, a 
daughter of B. L. and Mary A. (Ather- 
ton) Toof. Her maternal grandfather 
built the first log cabin in Dallas and it 
is now a part of the residence of the late 
B. F. Black on Oak and Front streets. 
This place was his farm and there were 
then still many Indians in the locality, 
while wild deer and other kinds of wild 
game could be had in abundance. In the 
log house which he erected Mr. Atherton 
died. 

B. L. Toof, father of Mrs. Heisler, was 
born in Vermont, February 29, 1820, and 
died March 27, 1885. His wife, who 
was born in Ohio, July 24. 1823, died 
September 7, 1877, and both lie buried 
in Dallas cemetery. He came to Hancock 
county when a small boy and to Dallas 
in 1850 and followed farming until his 
death. He voted with the republican 
party and held various township offices. 
He was a charter member of the Masonic 
fraternity, in which he passed all the 
chairs, and he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Congregational church at Dal- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



las. They had seven children, all liv- 
ing: Henry A., who was born Septem- 
ber 15, 1843, an d was a soldier of the 
Civil war, is- now living in Aurora, Ne- 
braska; Daniel L., born March 22. 1850, 
in Iowa, also resides in Aurora, Ne- 
braska ; Ella E., born July 9, 1852, is now 
Mrs. Heisler; John Wilson, born Decem- 
ber 15, 1854, is a resident of Santa Cruz 
county, California; M. Jane, born in Dal- 
las City, October 20, 1859, is the wife of 
William Ramsay; Mary Catherine, born 
February 15, 1863, is the wife of William 
Phipps, of Braham, Oklahoma. 

By her former marriage Mrs. Heisler 
had three children. William B. Dean, 
born in Henderson county, November 24, 
1869, when seventeen years of age be- 
came connected with the Sierra Lumber 
Company, of Chico, California, of which 
he is now the manager. He is one of the 
foremost business men of that place, well 
known from New York to California, and 
his weekly payroll amounts to two thou- 
sand dollars. He married Miss Lulu Wa- 
dams, of Chico, who died when her sec- 
ond child, Vera A., was fourteen days 
old, also leaving another daughter, Lolita 
R. Mrs. Dean was buried in Chico cem- 
etery and after living a widower for nine 
years with his mother, who cared for his 
two children, William B. Dean was mar- 
ried, in June, 1903, to Bertha Fish, a 
prominent teacher of California. Nellie 
Dean, born in Durham township, April 
25, 1873, is the wife of Harry Moir, as- 
sistant cashier and head bookkeeper in 
the Butte County Bank at Chico, Cali- 
fornia. Dr. J. Wilson Dean, born in Dur- 
ham township, Hancock county. May 10, 
1875, was graduated from the St. Louis 



Medical College and began practice when 
twenty-one years of age. He is a suc- 
cessful physician and surgeon now of 
Pond, Missouri, frequently called in con- 
sultation on important cases, and he makes 
a specialty of diseases of the eye and ear. 
He married Miss Viola Huttenman, who 
was born August 7, 1879, and they live 
in Pond, Missouri. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Heisler are descend- 
ed from highly respected pioneer families 
of Hancock county. They played together 
when little children and later attended the 
same school and social gatherings and 
then each married. Miss Toof becoming 
Mrs. Dean and later spending much time 
in California. On a visit to her old home 
and friends in Hancock county in 1905 
she again renewed the acquaintance and 
friendship with her former playmate and 
in course of time they were married at the 
home of her son in Pond, Missouri. It 
was with delight that Mrs. Heisler's old 
friends, neighbors and relatives of this 
county welcomed her back. She is a 
member of the Eastern Star, in which she 
has been warden and chaplain and she 
also belongs to the Woman's Relief Corps 
and for many years was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church but is now a 
member of the Christian church with her 
husband. 

Mr. Heisler built a pretty home in Dal- 
las in 1906 and he also owns eighty acres 
of improved land in Dallas township, 
where he is again devoting considerable 
time and energy to the poultry business, 
in which he is well versed. He is mana- 
ger and secretary of the Dallas Creamery 
Company and is president of the Hancock 
County Poultry Association. Outside of 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS: 



39 



the eighty acres of land which he inherit- 
ed from his father, he is entirely a self- 
made man, and his energy and honesty 
constitute the basis of his success. He 
stands high in the community, respected 
by all, and both Mr. and Mrs. Heisler 
number their friends by the score. 



LUKE M. VAUGHN. 

Luke M. Vaughn, who follows the oc- 
cupation of farming in Durham township, 
was torn in Carman, Illinois, October 15, 
1870, a son of Mathew and Mary (Mars- 
den) Vaughn, who were natives of Eng- 
land and came to America in early life. 
Mr. Vaughn first resided in Ohio and 
subsequently removed to Henderson coun- 
ty, Illinois, where he purchased a farm, 
while his last years were spent as a re- 
tired agriculturist in Burlington, Iowa, 
where he died on the 22d of February, 
1905. Mrs. Vaughn had departed this 
life twenty-eight years before. They were 
the parents of eleven children, of whom 
nine are living, namely : Catherine, the 
wife of Thomas Dickson, of Henderson 
county, Illinois ; George, who is living in 
Carman, this state ; Arthur, who is located 
near Lomax; Alice, the wife of John 
Johnson, of Osceola, Nebraska ; Miles, liv- 
ing in Nebraska City ; James, of Lomax ; 
Mark, of Lomax ; Luke, of this review, 
who is a twin brother of Mark ; and 
Manford, who is living in Carman. 

In taking up the personal history of 
Luke Vaughn we present to our readers 
3 



the record of one who is widely and fa- 
vorably known in Durham township. He 
was educated in the public schools and 
was reared to agricultural life, remaining 
upon his father's farm to the age of 
twenty-four years, when he was married 
and started out in life on his own ac- 
count. It was on the 5th of December, 
1894. that he wedded Miss Leona Git- 
tings, who was born near Disco, Illinois, 
in 1876, a daughter of- Austin and Ellen 
(Inghram) Gittings, the former a native 
of Texas and the latter of Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Gittings was brought to Hancock 
county by his parents when only six 
years of age and is now a farmer of Mis- 
souri. In his family were fifteen chil- 
dren, namely: A. J. and Emmet, both 
residents of Disco; Minnie, the wife of 
Wesley Scott, of Dallas City ; Clyde, who 
is living near Carman; Mrs. Vaughn; 
Ena, the wife of Orville Pence, living near 
Dallas; Hettie, the wife of Archibald 
Vaughan, of Carman ; Weaver, of Disco ; 
Robert, of Lomax ; Edward, also of 
Disco ; Annie, deceased ; Luella, the wife 
of John Hayden, of Disco ; Bertha, Ollie 
and Jessie, at home; and one died in in- 
fancy. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn 
has been blessed with three children : 
Clarence L., born in Henderson county, 
Illinois, in 1895 ; Ferrill L., born March 
3, 1897; and Floyd V., November 16, 
1900. Following their marriage the par- 
ents lived upon a farm near Lomax for 
two years and subsequently spent three 
years near Dallas. In 1900 Mr. Vaughn 
purchased one hundred and ten acres of 
land in Durham township, upon which he 
has erected a beautiful residence, com- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



modious barns and other outbuildings and 
has improved here a splendid farm, 
equipped with all modern accessories and 
conveniences. He also owns eighty acres 
of good land in Durham township below 
his home place. He carries on general 
agricultural pursuits and in the cultiva- 
tion of his fields employs practical and 
progressive methods, resulting in annual 
gatherings of good crops. He is a re- 
publican but without aspiration for of- 
fice. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Woodmen, while his wife is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church. He never 
received any assistance through inherit- 
ance or aid of influential friends but has 
lived a life of industry and frugality and 
through the united efforts of himself and 
wife there are now many comforts to be 
enjoyed in the Vaughn home. There hos- 
pitality also reigns supreme and the fam- 
ily have many friends in this community. 



GEORGE M. CUMMINGS. 

George M. Cummings, a well-to-do 
farmer of Dallas township, was born in 
Blooming Grove, Lycoming county, 
Pennsylvania, September 8, 1853, a son 
of George and Elizabeth (Keyport) Cum- 
mings. The father's birth occurred in 
New York in 1802. In early manhood he 
learned and followed the trade of a black- 
smith and tool maker. At the age of 
eighteen years he went to Pennsylvania 
and in that state was for a long period 
engaged in general farming. In 1879 he 



came to Hancock county, Illinois, where 
he lived. retired until his death, which oc- 
curred about a year later. His wife had 
passed away in 1876, at the age of sixty- 
four years. She was born near the cap- 
ital of Switzerland and came to America 
when only three years of age with her 
parents. George Cummings, Sr., was a 
republican in his political views and his 
fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth 
and ability, called him to fill various town- 
ship offices. In the family were ten chil- 
dren, of whom five are now living: Har- 
riet C, the widow of William G. Edwards 
and a resident of St. Louis, Missouri ; 
Mrs. Sarah Porter, a widow living in 
Erie, Pennsylvania ; Louisa, the wife of 
Norman Strieby, of Burlington, Kansas; 
George M., of this review; and W. W., 
who is living in Los Angeles, California. 

George M. Cummings was educated in 
the public schools of his native county 
and gave assistance to his father in the 
farm work until twenty-three years of 
age. In the spring of 1878, when he came 
to Illinois, he began working as a farm 
hand by the month and was employed by 
John Dietrick, of Pontoosuc township. 
The next summer he rented a farm in Se- 
nora township and started out in life on 
his own account. He has always carried 
on general agricultural pursuits and for 
a number of years has been accounted one 
of the representative agriculturists of Dal- 
las township. 

On the loth of February, 1880, Mr. 
Cummings was united in marriage to 
Miss Ellen M. Dietrich, who was born 
in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, Jan- 
uary i, 1857, a daughter of Joseph F. and 
Sarah (Benner) Deitrich. The mother 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



died when Mrs. Cummings was a child 
two years old. The father, who was a 
farmer by occupation, long survived. He 
came to Hancock county in 1863 and 
passed away in Dallas township in 1901. 
Both he and his wife were natives of 
Pennsylvania and in this county they won 
many friends. The political allegiance of 
Mr. Deitrich was given to the democracy 
and he held a number of important local 
offices. Both he and his wife belonged to 
the Lutheran church, in which he served 
as a deacon. He was twice married and 
by his first wife had five children, of 
whom three are now living: Mary, the 
wife qf L. H. Foresman, of Dallas City; 
Mrs. Cummings ; and Hetty, the wife of 
W. W. Cummings, of California. By his 
second marriage Mr. Deitrich had thir- 
teen children, of whom six are now liv- 
ing: Etta P., the wife of James Paulus 
and residing in Colusa, Illinois; ^Myra, 
the wife of Warren Jacobs, of Missouri ; 
\Yilliam M., of Dallas township; Su- 
sanna, who is living with her mother on 
the home place in Dallas township; and 
Grover C. and John Wesley, also with 
their mother. 

Following his marriage Mr. Cummings 
brought his young wife to a farm of 
eighty acres on section 14, Dallas town- 
ship, which she had inherited from her 
mother. There was a little old house 
upon the place and in this they began their 
domestic life. From time to time as 
his financial resources have increased Mr. 
Cummings has added to the property and 
now has a valuable tract of one hundred 
and sixty acres on sections II and 14, 
Dallas township. Here he has built a 
beautiful modern residence, also good 



barns and other substantial outbuildings 
and added many modern equipments and 
improvements. The farm is altogether a 
valuable property and although he is now 
leaving the more active work to his sons 
he still gives supervision to his place. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cummings have 
been born nine children, all born on the 
farm where they now reside, and seven of 
the number are living, as follows : Homer 
D., who is a locomotive fireman and re- 
sides in Chicago; Joseph M., at home; 
Mark T., who is in the Farmers State 
Exchange Bank at Dallas City, of which 
Mr. Cummings is a director, and was one 
of the original organizers of the bank, 
which is now doing a successful business ; 
Laura, Clara, Kate and Charles, all under 
the parental roof. 

Mr. Cummings gives his political al- 
legiance to the republican party and has 
served as supervisor for two years, while 
for twenty consecutive years he has been 
a school director. The cause of educa- 
tion indeed finds in him a warm and help- 
ful friend, his labors being very effective 
in behalf of the schools. Fraternally he 
is a member of Dallas City Lodge No. 
235, A. F. & A. M., and has served as 
worshipful master of his lodge and has 
represented his lodge in the grand lodge. 
He is also a member of Dallas chapter 
No. in, R. A. M., and has filled the 
office of high priest and attended the 
grand chapter at a number of meetings, 
Which fact indicates his high position 
in the regard of the brethren of the craft. 
He and his wife are members of the Chris- 
tian church, in which he is an elder. His 
ability, energy and economy, together 
with the assistance of his estimable wife. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



who has indeed been a helpmate to him. 
constitute the secret of his success. He 
now owns an excellent farm in Dallas 
township and enjoys the respect and es- 
teem of the entire community. 



. D. H. MILLER. 

D. H. Miller, manager for the Alexan- 
der Lumber Company of Carthage, is a 
native son of Illinois, his birth having oc- 
curred in Adams county in 1856, his par- 
ents being Jacob and Nancy (Chandler) 
Miller. The father was born in Ger- 
many, October 12, 1828, and the mother 
in Adams county, Illinois. She died dur- 
ing the infancy of their son, D. H. Miller. 
The father was only thirteen months old 
when brought to the United States by his 
parents, who settled in Pennsylvania. The 
voyage was made in one of the old-time 
sailing vessels and they landed at New 
York. Jacob Miller was reared to the oc- 
cupation of fanning, which he followed 
as a life work and in 1845 he took up his 
abode in Adams county, Illinois, where he 
resided until 1864, when he removed to 
Hancock county, Illinois, here carrying on 
general agricultural pursuits until his 
death, which occurred January 21, 1905. 
He had therefore long survived his wife. 
In their family were five children, of 
whom two died in infancy, the others be- 
ing: D. H., of this review; Melissa, the 
wife of J. Cook, of Oberlin, Decatur coun- 
ty, Kansas; and Alfred, who is living in 
Seattle, Washington. The mother, Mrs. 



Jacob Miller, had three brothers who were 
soldiers of the Civil war, John, William 
and George Chandler. The first named 
was killed in the service and William re- 
mained with the army for about four 
years. The grandmother of our subject 
in the maternal line was about ninety-two 
years of age when she passed away and 
the grandmother in the paternal line was 
ninety-four years of age, while her hus- 
band reached the age of ninety-two years. 

D. H. Miller was educated at \Yest 
Point, Illinois, and is a graduate of the 
Gem City Business College at Ouincy. 
After leaving school he followed farming 
for five or six years in Hancock county 
and for two years was engaged in teach- 
ing school in this county. Eventually he 
entered the employ of the firm of Dickin- 
son & Bartlett at Hamilton, Illinois, whom 
he represented as general manager for six 
years. For several years he did a general 
contracting business on his own account 
and in 1898 he assumed charge of the 
business of the Alexander Lumber Com- 
pany of Carthage, which responsible po- 
sition he yet occupies and under his guid- 
ance the business has developed and is 
being conducted along profitable lines. 

On the ist of January, 1.878, occurred 
the marriage of Mr. Miller and Miss Jane 
I. Hart, who was born in Adams county 
and is a daughter of William T. and Fan- 
nie (Wigle) Hart, who came to Illinois 
at an early day, the mother making her 
way to this state from Pennsylvania. She 
is now living at West Point, Illinois, 
where Mr. Hart passed away in 1896. In 
their family were eleven children, of 
whom nine are yet living : Isaac, who re- 
sides at Bowen, Illinois; Hattie H.. who 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



43 



is the widow of Jake Shaffer and lives at 
West Point, Iowa ; Margaret, the wife 
of G. \Y. Wolfe, of West Point : Mark, 
residing at Ellensburg, Washington ; 
Clarence, of West Point ; Ollie. who is 
with her mother ; Eva, the wife of Wil- 
liam Nutt. of West Point; May E., the 
widow of Mathew Finley, of West Point; 
and Arch, who is also living at that place. 
Mr. Hart, the father of this family, was 
originally a Dunkard but afterward be- 
came a member of the Christian church 
and at his death his remains were in- 
terred in the cemetery at West Point, Illi- 
nois. His widow is a devoted member of 
the Christian church. 

Mrs. Miller and her daughter Ruby 
are eligible to membership in the society 
of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution, as John Wigle, an uncle of her 
mother, fought in the Revolutionary war. 
Her father's brother, John Hart, was a 
soldier of the Civil war. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Miller have been born three children : 
Roy G., the eldest, born in Hancock coun- 
ty, is a graduate of the Gem City Busi- 
ness College of Quincy, Illinois, and now 
lives in Orville, Ohio, where he is em- 
ployed by the Robert Hixon Lumber 
Company. Ruby B. is attending the city 
schools of Carthage and is her father's 
assistant in bookkeeping in the office. 
Jake L. is employed in the office of the 
Alexander Lumber Company. In his 
fraternal relations Mr. Miller is a Mason 
and also belongs to the Odd Fellows 
Society, in which he has passed all of 
the chairs. His political allegiance is 
given to the republican party, but he has 
never sought or desired office. Both he 
and his wife are faithful and consistent 



members of the Christian church and they 
are now occupying a nice home on Cherry 
street in the western part of the city, 
which Mr. Miller erected in 1895. He 
holds a responsible position of trust and 
stands high in the community, in the 
lodge, in his church, in business circles 
and among his friends. He is a well in- 
formed man and a typical American citi- 
zen, rejoicing in the general progress and 
keeping in touch with the trend of mod- 
ern advancement and successful accom- 
plishment. 



JOHN S. SHIPTON. 

Nature seems to have intended that 
man in more advanced years should en- 
joy a season of rest. In youth he possess- 
es great zeal and energy which in manhood 
becomes tempered by judgment and deter- 
mination and if his qualities are well ex- 
ercised they bring him success, so that 
when evening of life comes he can put 
aside the more arduous duties and rest in 
enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil. 
Such has been the life of Mr. Shipton, 
who for many years was closely associ- 
ated with agricultural interests in this 
part of the state but is now living re- 
tired in Carthage, occupying a pleasant 
and attractive home supplied with many 
of the comforts of life. 

"How blessed is he who crowns in shades 

like these 
A youth of labor with an age of ease." 



44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEIl' 



Mr. Shipton was born in Beavertown, 
Pennsylvania, August 16, 1831, his par- 
ents being John and Elizabeth (Swengel) 
Shipton. His paternal grandparents 
came from England to America during 
the period of the Revolutionary war and, 
deserting the British army, the grandfa- 
ther became a defender of the cause of 
American liberty. The parents of our 
subject were born in Union county, now 
Snyder county, Pennsylvania, as were the 
grandmother's people in the maternal line, 
some of the Swengel family being vic- 
tims of the Wyoming massacre of 1778. 
a monument to the victims having recent- 
ly been erected at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsyl- 
vania. Thomas Shipton, the grandfather 
of our subject, was the first circuit judge 
of Northumberland county, Pennsylva- 
nia, which then embraced Union. Lycom- 
ing and other counties in that section of 
Pennsylvania. John Shipton, the father, 
learned the blacksmith's trade in the Key- 
stone state and during the latter part of 
the war of 1812 he worked at the gun- 
smith's trade at Carlysle Barracks, Penn- 
sylvania, making guns and war accoutre- 
ments, but after the close of the war re- 
turned to his more peaceful occupation 
and afterward engaged in farming there 
to some extent. His last days, however, 
were spent in honorable retirement from 
labor and he died about thirty-four years 
ago when seventy-nine years of age, while 
his wife passed away about ten years ago. 
He was independent in politics and was 
always on the winning side at presidential 
elections, never losing a vote by support- 
ing a candidate who was unsuccessful 
His wife held membership in the Lutheran 
church. In their family were ten chil- 



dren, of whom four are now living : Ma- 
ria, the widow of Daniel Trester, of Over- 
ton, Ohio ; John S. ; Henry, of Delavan, 
Illinois; and Eliza, the wife of Charles 
Rigle, residing at Beavertown, Pennsyl- 
vania. The parents were both buried in 
the cemetery at Beavertown, the mother 
being eighty-eight years of age. 

John S. Shipton was educated in the 
common schools of Pennsylvania but his 
attendance was of short duration. Schools 
at that time were largely conducted on 
the subscription plan. He afterward 
learned the carpenter's trade in the Key- 
stone state and followed that pursuit and 
cabinet making until 1857, when he re- 
moved westward to 'Kansas, where he con- 
tinued in the same line of business until 
1 86 1. He afterward devoted nineteen 
years to farming in Tazewell county, Illi- 
nois, and in the early spring of 1881 set- 
tled on a farm in Hancock county, where 
he carefully and successfully tilled the soil 
and harvested good crops until the ist 
of December, 1898, when he retired from 
the farm and took up his abode in Car- 
thage. He still owns the farm property, 
consisting of two hundred and sixty acres, 
together with a pretty residence on Adams 
and Buchanan streets, Carthage, where 
he is now living. 

On the Qth of October, 1864, Mr. Ship- 
ton was married to Miss Elizabeth Jane 
Hummel, who was born in Miflin county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1838, a daughter of John 
and Hannah (Shawver) Hummel, also 
natives of the Keystone state. Her pa- 
ternal grandfather was a soldier of the 
war of 1812 and held official rank, carry- 
ing a sword which Mrs. Shipton has seen. 
Her brother, George Hummel, was a sol- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



45 



clier of the Civil war, enlisting from Illi- 
nois and serving for three years. John 
Hummel, father of Mrs. Shipton, was a 
farmer and in 1854 became a resident of 
Lewistown, Illinois, but was not long per- 
mitted to enjoy his new home, his death 
occurring about a month later. His wife 
long survived him, passing away in 
March, 1899, on ' v lacking a few months 
of being one hundred years of age, her 
birth having occurred in 1799. She passed 
away in Webster county, Iowa, but her 
grave was made in the cemetery at Lewis- 
town, Illinois, where her husband had 
been laid to rest many years before. They 
had eight children, of whom four are liv- 
ing : Lydia, the eldest, is the wife of 
Thomas Ellsworth, of Table Grove, Illi- 
nois, who came to Carthage with a com- 
pany of volunteers from Fulton county, 
Illinois, during the Mormon troubles and 
camped near the city, being in camp there 
when Joseph and Hiram Smith, the Mor- 
mon prophets, were shot in the old jail. 
Catherine, the second member of the 
Hummel family, is the wife of David Dep- 
ler, of Webster county. Iowa. George 
is living in Webster City, Iowa. Mrs. 
Shipton is the youngest member of the 
family and by her marriage has become 
the mother of five children, all of whom 
were born in Tazewell county, Illinois, 
while four are yet living. Luther H., the 
eldest, educated in the public schools of 
Carthage, in early manhood purchased a 
grocery stock and is engaged in business 
at the corner of Jackson and Main streets 
as a dealer in staple and fancy groceries 
and queensware. His father is interested 
with him in the ownership of the store, 
which is on' a most advantageous corner 



of the business center of the city and their 
trade is extensive and profitable. Luther 
Shipton belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity and is a republican, while his 
religious faith is indicated by his mem- 
bership in the Methodist church. He was 
married February i, 1893, to Miss Sadie 
Deitrick, a native of Pennsylvania and 
a daughter of John and Harriet (Kime) 
Deitrick, who were also natives of the 
Keystone state, whence they removed to 
a farm in Illinois. Both are deceased and 
were laid to rest in a cemetery of Dal- 
las City. Their daughter, Sadie, became 
Mrs. Luther Shipton and passed away 
February 10, 1900, at the age of thirty- 
two years, her remains being interred in 
Carthage cemetery. She was an estima- 
ble lady, whose death was deeply deplored 
by her many friends. She left two chil- 
dren, Loveta and Lloyd, aged respect- 
ively eleven and eight years. They are 
now attending school and with their fa- 
ther they reside with his parents at the 
corner of Adams and Buchanan streets. 
Aurelia, the second member of the family 
of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Shipton, is the 
wife of Jesse G. Waggoner, of Centralia, 
Missouri, and they have four children : 
George, Lizzie, Laone arid Ida, all of 
whom are attending school, three being 
students in Carthage College. Elizabeth 
Shipton is the wife of E. S. Martin, of 
Carthage, and has two children : Aurelia 
S. and John Robert Martin. Carrie is 
the wife of Samuel Wingert, of Prairie 
township, Hancock county, and has three 
children : Violet, John LeRoy and Sam- 
uel Wingert. 

Mr. Shipton is numbered among the 
men whom fortune has favored not from 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



caprice but in reward for earnest, per- 
sistent and honorable labor. In early life 
he worked many days for sixty-two and 
a half cents per day, later was paid a dol- 
lar and a quarter. He paid a dollar and 
a half for his board per week and pro- 
vided for his other expenses. As the years 
advanced he saved from his earnings until 
he was enabled to purchase a farm and 
he made all of the improvements upon 
his Tazewell county property and added 
many improvements to his farm in Han- 
cock county. He is still a strong, sturdy 
man, working in his garden and raising 
bees and though he is practically retired 
he yet manages to keep busy most of the 
time. During the summer of 1906 he 
made a beautifully carved and planned 
Hymn board for the Lutheran church, 
which contains upward of 150 different 
kinds of wood gathered by himself. His 
leisure is largely devoted to reading and 
he is well informed on all the questions 
and interests of the day. He has kept 
a diary of the weather and also the date 
of small fruit blossoming for many years 
and it is now a valuable record. He pos- 
sesses a remarkable memory and in spirit 
and interest seems yet in his prime. Both 
he and his wife still enjoy good health 
and are among the most esteemed citizens 
of Carthage, having many friends here. 
His name is honored by reason of what 
he has accomplished and the methods 
which hav wrought his success. He is 
interested in all that pertains to the mate- 
rial, intellectual or moral progress of his 
community and his support of beneficial 
public measures is never of a lukewarm 
character, but is of the kind that is strong 
and steadfast. 



THOMAS I. WALKER. 

Thomas I. Walker, a retired farmer 
who, left an orphan in his youth and thus 
early thrown upon his own resources, has 
gained the success which crowns persist- 
ent and well directed effort, was born in 
Todd county. Kentucky, August 20, 1843, 
his parents being T. I. and Eliza (Wag- 
goner) Walker. The parents died when 
their son was but a young lad. They were 
natives of Kentucky and the father fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming. In their 
family were eight children, of whom five 
are now living : James, Garnett and Wil- 
liam, all of Kentucky; T. I., of this re- 
view ; and Luda, the wife of W. O. Clark, 
of McDonough county, Illinois. Two of 
the brothers were soldiers of the Con- 
federate army in the Civil war, St. Clair 
being killed in the first battle of Shiloh. 
while James, the -eldest brother, served 
for four years with the southern troops. 

T. I. Walker was brought to Carthage 
when about four years of age and lived 
with relatives until nine years old, attend- 
ing the public schools during that period. 
He then went to live with his eldest sis- 
ter, who had been married in the mean- 
time and with her he remained until his 
own marriage. It was in 1867 that he 
wedded Miss Mary E. Atchison, who was 
born in this county October 3, 1845, a 
daughter of John and Margaret (Gallo- 
way) Atchison. The father was born in 
Ireland and came to America at an early 
day and was here married to Miss Gallo- 
way, whose birth occurred in Hancock 
county. He was a blacksmith by trade 
but followed fanning in this state and 
both he and his wife passed away many 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



47 



years ago. Mr. Atchison was a member 
of the Christian church at the time of 
his death and was an exceedingly quiet 
man, of retiring nature, but he possessed 
a kindly and generous spirit and was re- 
spected by all. Unto him and his wife 
was born but one child, Mrs. Walker. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Walker began their domestic life 
on a farm in Harmony township, where 
they lived for two years and then removed 
to another farm in St. Marys township, 
on which they resided for thirty-six years. 
Both places were improved and were 
brought under higher cultivation by the 
enterprise and labors of Mr. Walker, who 
for many years was accounted one of the 
leading, practical and progressive agricul- 
turists of this part of the state. He care- 
fully tilled his fields and thereby annu- 
ally harvested good crops. He also raised 
good grades of stock and he placed sub- 
stantial buildings upon his farm, together 
with all of the modern improvements. He 
added to his farm from time to time until 
it now contains about four hundred acres. 
In July, 1905, he removed to Carthage, 
where he purchased a pretty new home on 
North Adams street. He still retains pos- 
session of his farm, however, and also 
owns other land in the county. 

At the time of the Civil war Mr. Wal- 
ker, responding to the call of the Union 
enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty- 
eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
was with his regiment for about a year 
and participated in a few light skirmishes. 
For many years he gave his political alle- 
giance to the republican party, but is now 
a strong prohibitionist. He has served as 
school director and path master, but has 



accepted no other offices, preferring to 
leave office holding to others. 

As the years passed by eight children 
were added to the family circle, all yet 
living and all natives of Hancock county. 
Homer, born June 22, 1868. and now re- 
siding on the farm on which his father 
settled at an early day, married Nellie 
White and has four children : Marian, 
Wendell, James and Lucile. Stella, bom 
October 3, 1870, on the anniversary of 
her mother's birth, is now the wife of J. 
B. Johnson, a stock feeder residing in 
Carthage. Atchison, bom June 7, 1873, 
and living on a farm in Hancock county, 
married Alberta Cloud and has two chil- 
dren : Aurelia and Harold. Gerald, born 
May 24, 1876, is in Montana. Geraldine, 
twin sister of Gerald, is the wife of J. E. 
Garnett, of Oklahoma and has two chil- 
dren. Pauline and Walker L. Maud, born 
January 14, 1879, is the wife of Don 
Cloud, a farmer of Nebraska and has one 
child, Don Cleophas. T. Orville, born 
May 24, 1882, married Josephine Engle 
and lives on a farm in Hancock county. 
Hilda, born May 8, 1885, acts as her 
father's housekeeper and is attending 
Carthage College. The children have all 
been provided with excellent educational 
privileges and have attended various col- 
leges in the state of Illinois. 

In 1904, Mr. and Mrs. Walker attended 
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. 
Louis, Missouri, and had a most pleasant 
trip there and in the winter of 1904-5, 
with their youngest daughter, they went 
to California and had just got comfort- 
ably settled there when Mrs. Walker be- 
came ill with a cancerous trouble which 
had never been manifest before. After a 



BIOGRAPHICAL RE J 'I Ell' 



very brief illness of three weeks she passed 
away February I, 1905. She was a lov- 
ing wife, a fond mother, a dutiful daugh- 
ter and a kind friend and her many ex- 
cellent traits of character won her the con- 
fidence and love of all who knew her. 
Her remains were brought back to Han- 
cock county for interment and she was 
laid to rest February 7, 1905. Many 
years will have passed, however, before 
she is forgotten or before her influence 
ceases to be felt by those who knew her. 
She was a devoted member of the Meth- 
odist church and her life exemplified her 
Christian faith. Mr. Walker also belongs 
to the same church, in which he has held 
several offices. 

Early denied the parental care which 
most boys receive with its attendant priv- 
ileges and careful guidance, Mr. Walker 
has, though dependent upon his own re- 
sources, not only worked his way upward 
to success but has also developed a char- 
acter which makes him one of the honored 
and respected citizens of Carthage and his 
example proves what may be accom- 
plished when one has determination and 
energy qualities which may be cultivated 
by all. 



ALEXANDER WELLINGTON BAS- 
COW. 

A. W. Boscow, one of the oldest gro- 
cery merchants of Carthage whose busi- 
ness integrity and activity stand as un- 
questioned facts in his career and make 
him a citizen of worth who is accorded 



respect and honor, was born on the Isle 
of Man off the coast of England in 1840. 
His paternal grandfather, Nicholas Bos- 
cow, served in the war against the French 
in the early part of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, being under command of the Duke 
of Wellington in the engagements against 
Napoleon Bonaparte. The gun which he 
carried is now in possession of A. W. 
Boscow and is very highly prized. Nich- 
olas Boscow, Jr., father of our subject, 
was born in England and was there mar- 
ried to Miss Alice Newell, a native of the 
same country. He was a merchant and 
shipper of wheat, owning his own vessel 
which made trips between Peel anl Liver- 
pool. He came to America by way of 
New Orleans in an old-time sailing vessel 
in 1842; being about three months and 
two weeks on the water. He bought land 
near Warsaw, Illinois, having made his 
way northward to Hancock county and 
after remaining there for a year or more 
went to Buffalo, New York, to investigate 
property interests and business prospects 
there. He soon became ill, however, and 
died in that city. He held membership 
in the Church of England, to which his 
wife also belonged. She continued to live 
for some years on a farm with her chil- 
dren but spent her last days in the home 
of her son, A. W. Boscow, from whom 
she received a most devoted filial care, 
attention and love. He also took great 
pride in his mother, for she was a most 
remarkable old lady and she died at his 
home in the spring of 1894, her remains 
being interred in Moss Ridge cemetery. 
She was ninety-six years of age, her death 
occurring very suddenly. Only once did 
she complain of feeling a little dizzy. 



H.iXCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



49 



Early in the morning, however, she ex- 
pressed a desire to see the Rev. Hyde, a 
beloved preacher of Carthage, who came 
and offered up a touching and befitting 
prayer in behalf of this dear old lady and 
in closing said : "May this dear soul have 
an abundant and happy entrance into the 
joy of her Lord," and as he said Amen, 
the life of this good woman went out as 
though her soul were carried onward 
upon the spirit of prayer. She had been a 
faithful friend, a kind neighbor and a 
most devoted and loving mother and she 
was a general favorite among her many 
acquaintances. Her children who lived 
were five in number, seven having died 
before her death : George, a merchant liv- 
ing at Oakland, California; John H., a 
land dealer of Garnett, Kansas ; Peter, a 
farmer of Hillsboro, Oregon ; Mrs. Alice 
Deatley, living at Base Line, Missouri, 
and A. W. of this review. The son John 
was drafted twice for service in the Civil 
war but both times sent substitutes, the 
first time paying seven hundred and fifty 
dollars and the last time nine hundred 
dollars. 

A. W. Boscow acquired his early edu- 
cation in Breckenridge, Illinois, and 
worked upon his mother's farm until he 
had attained his majority. He then went 
to the gold mines of California and Ore- 
gon, spending much of his time for four- 
teen years in the latter state in search of 
the precious metal. Following his return 
to Illinois he located in Warsaw, where he 
conducted a general grocery store for sev- 
en years and in 1886 removed to Carth- 
age, where he was engaged in the grocery 
business on Main street for twenty years. 
He has a large trade and with one excep- 



tion is the oldest grocery merchant in the 
city in years of continuous connection 
with the trade. His business methods are 
unassailable, being characterized by 
promptness and integrity and many of his 
early patrons- have remained with him 
throughout the passing years, showing 
that he has their confidence and trust. 

In 1874 Mr. Boscow was married to 
Miss Clara Spillman, a native of Illinois 
and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. 
Spillman, natives of Virginia who came to 
Illinois at an early day. Her father was a 
carpenter and lived in Warsaw, Illinois, 
Hancock county, for a number of years 
but both he and his wife are now deceased 
and their four children have now all 
passed away. Mrs. Boscow died in 1887 
and is buried in Moss Ridge cemetery. 
She was a devoted Christion woman and 
a member of the Episcopal church. By 
this marriage there were three children, 
but only one is now living, Anna R. Bos- 
cow, who is now the wife of Frederick 
Reynolds, of Seattle, Washington. 

In 1890 A. W. Boscow was married to 
Miss Louisa Scott, of Carthage, who was 
born in Warsaw, Illinois, and was a 
daughter of Major John and Louisa 
(Frazier) Scott. Her father was born in 
North Carolina in 1801 and her mother 
in Kentucky, January 8, 1816. Mr. 
Scott was a Mason and for some years 
meetings of the lodge were held in his 
home. For a long period he was a lead- 
ing merchant of Warsaw, conducting a 
successful business there until his death 
on the 3Oth of April, 1865. His wife long 
survived him, passing away in August, 
1900, when she was laid to rest by his 
side in Warsaw cemetery. Only two of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



their children are now living: John F. 
Scott, who is assistant county treasurer 
and makes his home in Carthage; and 
Mary, the wife of George Rogers, of 
Warsaw, Illinois. Mrs. Louisa Boscow 
died in 1897 and was buried in Moss 
Ridge cemetery. In 1898 Mr. Boscow 
was married to Mrs. Frances E. Dickey 
Cherry, the widow of Edward Cherry. 
She was born in Illinois and has one son 
by her first marriage, Edward Cherry, 
who is now living in Pecos valley, Mex- 
ico. Mr. Boscow lives in a beautiful home 
in the east part of the city on Main street, 
having erected the residence about eight 
years ago. His wife also owns some 
property here. His has been a creditable 
business record in which he has allowed 
no obstacle to deter him in his advance 
toward the goal of success. He has re- 
garded every difficulty as a stimulus for 
renewed effort and closer application 'and 
in these ways he has achieved what he 
has undertaken and is now one of the 
leading merchants of the city who, 
through his persistency and determina- 
tion, has secured many of the comforts 
of life. Matters of municipal and local 
pride are of deep interest to him and he 
co-operates in many measures which have 
direct bearing upon the upbuilding and 
welfare of the city. He is a man full 
worthy of the respect of those with whom 
he has come in contact and his friends 
are almost as numerically strong as his 
acquaintances. He and his worthy wife 
full well merit all the good things of this 
life and of the life to come, which should 
be the reward of all those who live an 
upright life. They are held in the highest 
esteem bv their manv friends. 



EZEKIEL RUCKER. 

Ezekiel Rucker is a retired farmer liv- 
ing at the corner of Scofield and Locust 
streets in Carthage and although about 
eighty years of age he keeps his home 
place in a most neat and attractive condi- 
tion. He was born in Crittenden, Grant 
county, Kentucky, in 1827, his parents be- 
ing Morning and Julia (Reese) Rucker, 
both of whom were natives of Virginia. 
The father dealt extensively in horses, 
which he shipped to the New Orleans 
market. At an early day he removed to 
Kentucky, where he continued in active 
business but both he and his wife passed 
away many years ago, their remains being 
interred in an Illinois cemetery. Mr. 
Rucker was a democrat in his political 
views, and his wife was a member of the 
Methodist church. In their family were 
seven children. 

E. Rucker of this review is now the 
only surviving member of the family, and 
in the year 1837, when a youth of ten 
summers, he accompanied his parents on 
their removal from Kentucky to Schuyler 
county, Illinois. There he acquired his 
education in one of the old-time subscrip- 
tion schools, the building being a little 
log structure with puncheon floor, slab 
seats and mud and stick chimney. There 
were no nails used in its construction, 
even in making the roof and the little 
room was poorly lighted. The methods 
of instruction were very primitive, too, 
but he succeeded in learning the common 
branches of learning and afterward took 
up the cooper's trade in Schuyler county. 
Later he engaged in farming there on his 
own account until 1864, when he sold his 



H AX COCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



property and removed to Hancock county, 
settling in Cartilage township on a farm 
of two hundred and twenty acres of arable 
and productive land. He then carried on 
general farming and stock-raising until 
1884, when he retired from active busi- 
ness life. Up to this time he had kept his 
fields under a very high state of cultiva- 
tion and added many modern improve- 
ments to his property and had carried on 
the work of development until his farm 
was one of the best in this part of the 
state. As the years passed, through the 
sale of his crops he added annually to his 
income and possessing a comfortable com- 
petence, removed to the city of Carthage, 
building a dwelling at the corner of Sco- 
field and Locust streets. 

As a companion and helpmate for life's 
journey Mr. Rucker chose in early man- 
hood Miss Pauline De Lashmutt, to 
whom he was married February 29, 1849. 
She was born in North Carolina in 1826, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John De 
Lashmutt, who located in .Rushville, 
Schuyler county, Illinois, prior to 1837, 
being among the early settlers of that 
county, where the father followed farm- 
ing as a means of livelihood. When 
called to their final rest he and his wife 
were buried in Schuyler county. In their 
family were seven children, the surviving 
members being Ananias, Thomas, Wil- 
liam and Frank, all of whom are residents 
of Kansas; and Mrs. Rucker. Thomas 
De Lashmutt was a soldier of the Six- 
teenth Volunteer Infantry throughout the 
Civil war and was under command of 
General Sherman. Mr. and Mrs. Rucker 
have never had any children of their own 
but out of the goodness of their hearts 



have reared two, Adaline and Brown. The 
latter is the wife of George Elliott, a resi- 
dent of Missouri, and has seven children. 
The former became the wife of Thomas 
Metcalf and is now in California. She 
separated from her first husband and she 
has since married Mr. Burlell. She has 
three children, Willie, Arthur and Stella. 
Mr. Rucker is a democrat and has 
served as school director and as road su- 
pervisor but has never been very active in 
politics, preferring that others shall hold 
office. He was one of the early members 
of the Masonic lodge in Hancock county 
and at all times has been true to the teach- 
ings of the craft. Although nearly eighty 
years of age he is very active. He is a 
man of quiet disposition but has been a 
great reader and is an intelligent gentle- 
man, well informed on current events. 
His success has been acquired entirely 
through his own efforts and he is now 
in comfortable circumstances. He and his 
wife have been married for more than 
fifty-seven years a remarkable fact 
and they enjoy the respect of friends and 
neighbors in large measure. Mr. Rucker 
receives the veneration and esteem which 
should always be accorded one advanced 
in years, whose life has been worthily 
spent. 



JAMES E. MORRISON. 

James E. Morrison, engaged in general 
farming and stock-raising near Hamilton, 
has been assistant state veterinary sur- 
geon since 1890 and is widely known by 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

4T IIDRAMA PU/IUOKinu 



5 2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



reason of his official service and his ac- 
tivity in his private business affairs. He 
was born in Madison county, Ohio, March 
31, 1844, and represents one of the old 
families of Pennsylvania, in which state 
his grandfather, Ross Morrison, was 
born. William R. Morrison, father of 
our subject, was likewise a native of the 
Keystone state and having arrived at 
years of maturity was married at Plains 
City, Union county, Ohio, to Miss Relief 
C. Hager, a native of Vermont and a 
daughter of Amos Hager, also of that 
state. Mr. and Mrs. William R. Morri- 
son began their domestic life upon a farm 
near Plains City, Ohio, where they re- 
sided until October, 1850, and then started 
for Illinois, making the journey by 
wagon. They were nearly four weeks 
upon the road to Hamilton and they spent 
the winter in a log cabin about two and 
a half miles south of this city. In the 
spring of 1851 they removed to a rented 
place Hn Wythe township, where they 
lived for four years, at the end of which 
time Mr. Morrison bought one hundred 
acres of land on section 34, Montebello 
township. It was unimproved save that a 
small shanty had been built thereon. It 
was not fenced, however, and he fenced it, 
dug wells, built barns and generally im- 
proved the place, making it a good farm, 
while the fields responded readily to the 
care and labor he bestowed upon them. 
His attention was devoted to general agri- 
cultural pursuits up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in August. 1889. 
while his wife passed away in 1899. In 
their family was a daughter, Mollie, who 
is now the wife of John A. Price. 

James E. Morrison, the elder of the two 



children of his father's family, was a little 
lad of six summers when the trip was 
made across the country from Ohio to 
Illinois. He attended the common 
schools of Montebello township and in 
the summer months worked in the fields, 
sharing in all of the labors that fall to the 
lot of the agriculturist. He was eighteen 
years of age when on the i2th of Au- 
gust, 1862. he responded to his country'? 
call for aid, enlisting as a member of 
Company C, One Hundred and Eight- 
eenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The 
regiment was assigned to the Army of 
the Mississippi and he was in all of its 
battles with the exception of that of 
Thompson's Hill on the 1st of May, 1863. 
He sustained several gun-shot wounds, 
but would remain in the hospital only 
long enough to have his wounds heal. 
On the 2 ist of August, 1865, he received 
an honorable discharge and with a cred- 
itable military record returned to his 
home. He then resumed farming upon 
his father's place and having assisted the 
veterinary surgeon of the army, he has 
" since practiced the profession in connec- 
tion with the occupation of farming and 
since the year 1900 has been assistant 
state veterinary surgeon. In 1874 he 
bought fifty acres of the home farm, 
whereon he erected a house and barn and 
he has since added to the property until 
he now has one hundred acres, while his 
wife also owns one hundred acres. He 
carries on general farming and stock- 
raising, keeping horses, cattle and hogs, 
and in the development of the fields he 
uses the latest improved machinery and 
annually harvests good crops. 

On the 1 5th of April, 1875, Mr. Mor- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



53 



rison was married to Miss Lydia Dar- 
nell, who was born in Warsaw, Illinois, 
February 26, 1856, and attended the com- 
mon schools. Her parents were Caleb 
and Mary (Tremble) Darnell, both of 
whom were natives of Kentucky and at 
an early day became residents of Warsaw. 
Illinois. In the family were the following 
children: Bertha, who died in infancy; 
Mamie ; Nellie, the wife of Harry Den- 
nis, of Hamilton and the mother of one 
daughter; Arthur, Fred, William, Ray, 
Elta and Gwendolyn, all at home. Mr. 
Morrison casts his ballot for the men and 
measures of the Republican party and has 
filled a number of offices, serving twice 
as collector and also in the positions of 
constable and school director. He has at- 
tained high rank in Masonry, belonging 
to the blue lodge, chapter, council and 
commandery, his affiliation being with 
the commander}- at Keokuk. He is a 
member of the Christian church and the 
principles which have permeated his life 
are those which work for good citizenship 
and for intellectual and moral progress. 



HON. O. F. BERRY. 

Hon. O. F. Berry was born at Table 
Grove, McDonough county, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1852. He is a son of Lee 
Berry, a native of Virginia, who, com- 
ing to Illinois, settled upon a farm in 
McDonough county, where he resided un- 
til his death. By his first marriage he 
had two children, but the younger of 
these, John Berry, was killed while serv- 



ing in the navy in the Civil war. The 
elder. Charles L. Berry, who served in 
the One Hundred and Eighteenth Illi- 
nois Mounted Infantry until the close of 
the Civil war, is now a contractor of 
Wichita, Kansas. After losing his first 
wife he married Martha McConnell, a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania. O. F. Berry is the 
elder son of the second marriage and his 
brother, M. P. Berry, is equally well 
known in Carthage as a lawyer and bank- 
er. The father died in 1858 and the 
mother in 1860, their remains being in- 
terred at Table Grove, Illinois. 

O. F. Berry was educated in the com- 
mon schools in Fountain Green town- 
ship, Hancock county, and in early life 
and until he was twenty-one years of age 
he. worked by the month as a farm hand. 
After his marriage he purchased a small 
farm and lived upon it one year. In 1875 
he came to Carthage and took up the 
study of law in the office of Mack & 
Baircl. attorneys of this city. Following 
his admission to the bar he immediately 
formed a partnership with Judge Thomas 
C. Sharp, now deceased, and later the 
firm became Sharp & Berry Brothers. 
He has practiced continuously in all the 
courts of Hancock county from that time 
to the present and has conducted impor- 
tant litigation in the federal and state 
courts with gratifying success, winning 
well earned fame and distinction. He 
believes in the maxim, "There is no ex- 
cellence without labor," and follows it 
closely. About six years ago his brother, 
M. P. Bern-, retired from the firm and O. 
F. Berry is practicing as the senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Berry, McCrary & 
Kellv. 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His attention, however, has not been 
confined exclusively to his legal interests, 
for in 1903 he joined his brother, M. P. 
Berry, in establishing and opening the 
Dime Savings Bank, of which he is presi- 
dent and M. P. Bery is cashier. He is also 
president and general manager of the 
Mississippi Valley Telephone Companj* 
and was a trustee and attorney for Car- 
thage College for fifteen or sixteen years. 
His political history has become a mat- 
ter of state record. He was chairman of 
the republican state convention in 1896 
and 1906. He was the first mayor of 
Carthage, serving for three terms, from 
1888 until 1894, and is again the chief 
executive of the city at this writing, in 
1906. In 1888 he was elected to the 
state senate, wherein he served continu- 
ously until 1900 and then, after an in- 
terval of two years, was elected to fill a 
vacancy and re-elected in 1904. He is 
president pro tem. of the senate, was act- 
ing governor from August 27th to Sep- 
tember 4, 1906, and isone of the recog- 
nized political leaders of the state. It will 
be observed that his turn of mind is emi- 
nently judicial and free from the bias of 
animosity. Strong and positive in his re- 
publicanism, his party fealty is not 
grounded on partisan prejudice and he 
enjoys the respect and confidence of all 
his associates, irrespective of party. Of 
the great issues which divide the two po- 
litical organizations, with their roots ex- 
tending down to the very bed rock of the 
foundations of the republic, he has the 
true statesman's grasp. Well grounded 
in the political maxims of the schools, he 
has also studied the lessons of actual life, 
arriving at his conclusions as a result of 



what may be called his post-graduate 
studies in the school of affairs. He was 
general attorney for the insurance de- 
partment of the state under Governor 
Tanner's administration. He was special 
attorney of the Lake Front cases in Chi- 
cago for Attorney General Hamlin and 
chairman of the special committee of the 
senate in 1897 to investigate Chicago po- 
lice management and justice courts. He 
was likewise chairman of the senate com- 
mittee to investigate the Globe Savings 
Bank and the treasurer of the university 
school fund under Governor Altgeld's ad- 
ministration. At the present writing he 
is receiver of the Peoria National Bank. 

On the 5th of March, 1873, Senator 
Berry was married to Miss Anna R. Barr, 
of Fountain Green, who was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1850, a daughter of Da- 
vid and Jane (Barr) Barr. Her father 
was a mechanic, who prior to the Civil 
war removed to Iowa and about 18(35 
came to Illinois. He enlisted in Iowa 
as a member of the Union army and 
served throughout the period of hostili- 
ties. He followed his trade in Illinois 
until his death in 1870 and his wife 
passed away in Carthage in 1902. They 
were faithful members of the United 
Presbyterian church. They had five chil- 
dren, of whom four daughters are living : 
Elizabeth, who is the widow of John S. 
Duffy and resides in Carthage; Mary A., 
who is the widow of William T. Camp- 
bell and lives in this city; Nannie J., of 
Carthage; and Laura, the wife of Wil- 
liam T. Duffy, of Waverly, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Berry became the par- 
ents of five children, one born in Fountain 
Green and four in Carthage. Of this 



f/AXCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



55 



number three died in infancy, while two 
lived to be fourteen years of age and all 
are buried in Moss Ridge cemetery. They 
now have an adopted daughter, Lenore, 
who at the age of twelve years is attend- 
ing the high school of Carthage. In 1897 
Mr. Berry built his beautiful modem res- 
idence on Walnut street. He also owns 
much other property in the city and 
county. He himself built eleven of the 
new houses that were erected in Carthage 
in 1905 and he has built and sold alto- 
gether thirty homes. In connection with 
his other interests the firm of which he 
is a member is conducting a real estate 
business. Mr. Berry is a Royal Arch 
Mason and is also connected with the 
Knights of Pythias, Woodmen and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. He 
and his wife are members of the Presby- 
terian church and he was chairman of 
the building committee at the time of the 
erection of the two new churches that 
have been built in the last five years, the 
former one having been destroyed by fire. 
He has been again and again chosen trus- 
tee of the church and has long served as 
superintednent of the Sunday-school. He 
takes a most active and helpful part in 
church work, contributing generously of 
his means to its support and giving free- 
ly of bis time and attention to further its 
development and extend the scope of its 
activities. He is frequently called upon 
to make addresses to the Men's League 
and his labors have been of direct and im- 
mediate serviceableness in the church 
work. His wife has been treasurer of the 
missionary society for many years. She 
also belongs to the Woman's Club and 
to the society of the Daughters of ihe 
4 



American Revolution. He has been pros- 
perous in his business affairs, yet there 
is no man in Carthage who respects 
wealth for wealth's sake as little as he 
does. His means, however, have enabled 
him to be a generous contributor to many 
charities and good works and he never 
fails to lend a helping hand when solic- 
ited to do so. He belongs to that public- 
spirited, useful and helpful type of men 
whose ambitions and desires are centered 
and directed in those channels through 
which flow the greatest and most perma- 
nent good to the greatest number. He 
is naturally of a quiet and retiring dis- 
position and has not been an active seeker 
for the glamor of publicity, but his rare 
aptitude and ability in achieving results 
make him constantly sought and often 
bring him into a prominence from which 
he would naturally shrink were less de- 
sirable ends in view. 



HENRY C. BYLER. 

Henry C. Byler, a representative 
farmer of Durham, his native township, 
was born August 30, 1855, his parents 
being David and Matilda Catherine (Cun- 
ningham) Byler. The father, a native of 
Tennessee, was a son of John and Sarah 
(Hayworth) Byler and was born Novem- 
ber 6, 1819. His life record covered more 
than the psalmist's allotted span of three 
score years and ten, as he passed away 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



on the 2d of April, 1894, when in the sev- 
enty-fifth year of his age. He lived a suc- 
cessful farmer in Adams county, Illinois, 
from 1836 until 1851. In the spring of 
1851 he purchased the homestead at Dur- 
ham Centre now occupied by his widow 
and removed to Hancock county, where 
he resided until his demise. The place 
comprises one hundred and sixty acres of 
land on section 9, Durham township. 
Prospering in his undertakings, so that 
his financial resources increased, he 
bought more land from time to time until 
he became the owner of twelve hundred 
acres of as fine land as can be fouqd in 
Illinois. He thus won a place among the 
substantial residents of the state and his 
life record was indeed commendable, as 
his success came as the legitimate result 
of carefully directed effort and honorable 
dealing. For over thirty-one years he 
was a member in good standing of Dallas 
City lodge No. 235, A. F. & A. M., and 
filled nearly all of its offices. His early 
political support was given the republican 
party but he afterward joined the ranks 
of the democracy. For more than a half 
century he was a member of the old school 
Baptist church, which he joined in Adams 
county in 1840. He held all of the lead- 
ing offices in the church and he donated a 
part of his home farm as a church site and 
erected thereon a 'nice frame structure to 
be used as a house of worship by the Bap- 
tist denomination. This was in 1881 and 
the building is still put to its original use. 
He was very liberal, the poor and needy 
finding in him a warm friend, while in 
many other ways he displayed his gen- 
erosity. His fellow townsmen gave evi- 
dence of their appreciation of his worth 



and ability by electing him to many posi 1 
tions of public trust. For over fourteen 
years he served as county supervisor. 
For the long period of thirty years he 
held the office of justice of the peace and 
for twenty-eight years was township 
treasurer. He was ever faithful to the 
trust reposed in him and his long contin- 
uance in office indicated the implicit con- 
fidence given him by those who knew him. 
He was a man honored and respected by 
all and was most highly esteemed where 
he was best known. His wife, Matilda C. 
Byler, died April 12, 1857, and was 
buried in Durham cemetery, the subject 
of this review being at that time only two 
years of age. She was his second wife and 
there were born to this union four chil- 
dren, of whom Henry C., is the youngest. 
The others are : Gracie Jane, who became 
the wife of Calvin Stiles and died in La 
Harpe in September, 1899; and Joseph 
and George W., both deceased. 

Henry C. Byler, the only surviving 
member of this family, was educated in 
the district schools of Durham township 
and remained at home until twenty-one 
years of age ; after which he engaged in 
farming on his own account on his 
father's land for nine years. He was mar- 
ried at the age of twenty-one to Miss Em- 
ma J. Toof, who was born in Durham 
township, October 20, 1859, a daughter 
of Benjamin and Mary (Atherton) Toof. 
The father was born in Franklin county, 
Vermont, February 29, 1820, and the 
mother in Ohio, July 24, 1823. Her 
death occurred in 1877. At an early day 
they became residents of Hancock county, 
settling on a farm, and in their family 
were seven children : Henry, living in Ne- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



57 



braska : Ella, the wife of John Heisler. 
who is represented elsewhere in this 
work ; Daniel, of Nebraska ; Emma J., 
now Mrs. Ramsay, of Dallas City; John 
\Y.. of California; Kate, the wife of Wil- 
liam Phipps, of Oklahoma; and Clara, the 
wife of David Shain, of California. 

After living in Durham Centre on his 
father's farm for nine years Mr. Byler re- 
ceived' as a gift from his father one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of good land on sec- 
tion 33, Durham township. There was a 
house upon this place, which he has since 
improved, making it a comfortable mod- 
ern residence. He has also added many 
other equipments and improvements to 
the farm and he has now a valuable prop- 
erty of one hundred and forty acres which 
is under a high state of cultivation. At 
one time, following his second marriage, 
he engaged in the hardware business in 
Dallas City for two years. 

On the 1 3th day of July, 1899, Mr. By- 
ler was married to Mrs. Anna E. Hamil- 
ton, who was born in Pontoosuc town- 
ship, June 16, 1867, and is a daughter of 
F. C. and Nancy (McAuley) Little, the 
former a native of Ohio and the latter of 
New York. Both came to Illinois in 1829 
and they were nineteen years of age at the 
time of their marriage. Mr. Little was a 
farmer by occupation, thus providing for 
the support of his family. In his political 
views he was an earnest republican and 
held a number of township offices. His 
wife died at the old home in Pontoosuc 
township in 1877 and the father is still 
living upon that place. In their family 
were eleven children, of whom eight yet 
survice. namely: Melissa, the wife of J. 
A. Lamb, of Pontoosuc township ; Martin 



L., living in the same township; Arthur 
and Samuel I., who are resident farmers 
of that township; Mary, the wife of H. 
H. Longshie, of Pontoosuc township; 
Mrs. Byler; Flora, the wife of Robert 
Alston, living near Hamilton, Illinois; 
and Frank G., of Dallas City. In early 
womanhood Anna E. Little gave her hand 
in marriage to Thomas B. Hamilton, who 
was born in McDonough county, Illinois, 
in 1864, a son 'of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Hamilton, of Blandinsville, both of whom 
are now deceased. Their only child was 
Thomas B. Hamilton, a most respected 
and .worthy citizen of Hancock county, 
who died in 1897 and was buried in Pon- 
toosuc township. He left three children 
who are now living with Mr. and Mrs. 
Byler, namely: Mabel G., born July 18. 
1888; Otis F., born August 16, 1890; 
and Anna Irene, March 7, 1894. Mr. and 
Mrs. Byler are now the parents of one 
child, Velna G., born July 7, 1903. By 
his first marriage Mr. Byler had four 
children. Frank L., the eldest, born Sep- 
tember 24, 1878, and now living in Dur- 
ham township, married Miss Georgiana 
B. Lamb and they have three children. 
Vera, Naysee and an infant son. Ressa 
V. Byler, who attended the high school 
of Dallas City and is a graduate of the 
high school of Aurora, Nebraska, of the 
class of 1902, makes her home in Ne- 
braska but is now engaged in teaching in 
the high school of Dallas City. Joseph 
L, born September 30, 1887, died May 
4, 1891. Versel, born July 5, 1894, is a 
student in Dallas City high school. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Byler hold membership in 
the Baptist church and he is a member of 
Burnside Lodge 385, A. F. & A. M. of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



Burnside. He also belongs to the Mod- 
em Woodmen camp, while his political 
allegiance is given to the democracy. He 
has never been a politician in the sense of 
office seeking, preferring to devote his 
time and energies to his business affairs. 
He is recognized in the community as a 
good neighbor and as an enterprising in- 
dustrious man, who has made a creditable 
record in his business life and who en- 
joys the respect and esteem of many 
friends. 



JACOB REISELT. 

Jacob Reiselt, whose position in public 
regard and affection is indicated by the 
fact that to his many friends he is known 
as Uncle Jake, resides on a farm in Dur 
ham township near La Harpe and is 
classed with the prominent and repre- 
sentative residents of the community. He 
was born in Germany, March i, 1829. 
His parents, Jacob and Anna (Sponer) 
Reiselt, were also natives of that coun- 
try and in the year 1842 came to America, 
landing at New York, after a voyage of 
thirty-nine days made on the ship Oneida, 
They settled in Franklin county, Ohio, 
near Columbus, taking up their abode 
upon a farm there in the month of August. 
Six mofiths later the father purchased a 
farm of forty-two acres in Hamilton 
township, Franklin county, where he car- 
ried on farming for many years or 
throughout his remaining days, his death 
occurring in October, 1885. His wife 
survived until 1890 and was then laid to 



rest by his side in Walnut Hill church 
cemetery in Ohio. Mr. Reiselt had served 
for six years in the German army in his 
native country. Emigrating to America 
he became a loyal son of his adopted coun- 
try and as the years passed by his care- 
fully conducted business interests brought 
to him a gratifying measure of success. 
Unto him and his wife were born seven 
sons and five daughters and of their fam- 
ily four sons and three daughters are yet 
living, namely : Henry, living in Oakland, 
Ohio; Waltham, of Columbus, Ohio; 
Jacob, of this review; Lewis, of Nebras- 
ka; Bina, the wife of Charles Kale, of 
Columbus, Ohio; Elizabeth, the wife of 
John Gates, also of Columbus ; and Mary, 
the wife of John Claud, living near Ohio's 
capital city. 

Jacob Reiselt at the usual age entered 
the public schools of his native country 
and there pursued his studies until four-; 
teen years of age, when he accompanied 
his parents on their voyage to the new 
world. He remained at home until seven- 
teen years of age and then started out in 
life on his own account, working by the 
month as a farm hand for Jeremiah Clark, 
near Columbus, Ohio, with whom he re- 
mained for ten years a fact which is 
indicative of his capable service and the 
trust reposed in him by his employer. 
He was married December 18, 1852, to 
Miss Elizabeth Wetherington, who was 
born near Columbus. Ohio, in 1824, a 
daughter of William and Maggie (Hel- 
scher) Wetherington, natives of Virginia 
and Pennsylvania respectively. They 
went to Ohio at an early day and there 
Mr. Wetherington engaged in teaching 
school and in farming. He served as a 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



59 



ioldier of the war of 1812, holding the 
ank of captain, and in the community 
vhere he lived was recognized as a prom- 
nent and influential citizen. In his fam- 
ly were ten children but only two are 
low living: Rebecca, the wife of Lewis 
rlartzell, of La Harpe; and Sarah, who 
esides with her sister. The parents died 
ind were buried in Ohio. 

Following his marriage Mr. Reiselt 
nirchased one hundred acres of good 
: ann land in Ohio, where he remained 
until after the close of the war and then 
:ame to Illinois, locating in Durham 
ownship on the 5th of March, 1866. He 
mrchased one hundred and twenty acres 
>f improved land on section 23 and he 
las since carried on farm work. He has 
argely remodeled and improved the 
louse, has built fences, planted orchards 
ind has from time to time added to his 
ilace until he now has one hundred and 
-ixty acres, one of die best farms in the- 
ownship. He has carried on general ag- 
icultural pursuits and in his business af- 
airs has prospered owing to his capable 
nanagement and well-directed energy. 

In 1899 Mr. Reiselt was called upon to 
nourn the loss of his wife, who passed 
ivvay on the ist of May of that year at 
he age of seventy-four and was laid to 
est in La Harpe cemetery. Both Mr. 
ind Mrs. Reiselt as well as their parents 
vere reared in the faith of the Lutheran 
rhurch. to which they always adhered. 
Mrs. Reiselt was a devoted wife and 
nother and kind neighbor and possessed 
nany excellent traits of heart and mind 
vhich endeared her to all with whom she 
.vas associated. She left five children. 
:wo sons and three daughters, all born 



in Franklin county, Ohio. Henry, the 
eldest, born in 1853, married Rose Ketch- 
am, of Elvaston, Hancock county, Illi- 
nois, and they have seven children: Mel- 
vin, Ivy, Sherman, Mabel, Myrtle, Hazel, 
and an infant son. William, born in 
1855, married Arrissa Smith and lives 
near La Crosse. Effie. born in 1857, is 
at home with her father. Mary, born in 
1 86 1, is the wife of Sherman Broadfield. 
of Durham township, and has two chil- 
dren, Bonneth and Ogle. Margrettie. 
born in 1865, is at home. 

Mr. Reiselt has lived a life of diligence 
and industry and has now a valuable farm 
property as the result of his well-directed 
labor. He has a natural spring upon his 
farm better than any windmill, over 
which he has built his milk house, and he 
keeps from thirty to thirty-five good 
milch cows, thus conducting quite an ex- 
tensive dairy business. In Ohio his home 
was a log cabin and for forty-two years 
he has resided continuously upon his pres- 
ent farm in Hancock county. Every- 
thing about the place is kept in good con- 
dition and indicates his careful super- 
vision and capable management. In pol- 
itics he is a democrat and has held a 
number of township offices, the duties of 
which he ever discharged with prompt- 
ness and fidelity. He was road super- 
visor for six years, school trustee for 
t\venty-seven years and path master for 
twelve years. Although he has now 
passed the seventy-seventh milestone on 
life's journey he is still very active and 
possesses a wonderful memory, while in 
the community no man stands higher in 
the general regard than does Uncle Jake 
Reiselt. 



6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



LEWIS MARTIN MYERS. 

Lewis M. Myers is a general stockman, 
feeding and raising high bred horses and 
cattle upon a farm in Pontoosuc township 
and his business qualifications and un- 
abating energy argue well for a success- 
ful future. He was born in the township 
where he still resides, May 16, 1872, and 
is the ninth in order of birth in a family 
of fifteen children whose parents are 
Charles H. and Anna (Dustman) Myers, 
both of whom are natives of Germany, 
the father having been born July 2, 1836, 
and the mother in October, 1844. C. H. 
Myers was a lad of seven years when 
brought to the United States and for 
forty-two years has lived in Hancock 
county, his home being continuously in or 
near Pontoosuc township. He married 
Anna Dustman 'near Burlington, Iowa, 
who was a maiden of eleven summers when 
she crossed the Atlantic. She is a daugh- 
ter of Henry Dustman, who for many 
years lived near Burlington as a farmer 
and later in life was a fruit grower and 
gardener south of the city. She is a sister 
of Henry Dustman, whose family history 
is in the Biographical Review of Des 
Moines County, Iowa. Their children are : 
Mary, the wife of J. S. Massie, of Pon- 
toosuc township ; Harman, living at West 
Point, Iowa; Emma, at Port Arthur, 
Texas ; William, deceased ; Martha, the 
wife of William Pomeroy, of Alveston, 
Illinois; Elizabeth, at home; Lena, the 
wife of George W. Jones, of Rock Creek 
township ; Anna, the wife of Fred Smith, 
a rice farmer of Port Arthur, Texas; L. 
M., of this review; Henry, of Washing- 
ton ; Charles, of Rock Creek township ; 



Fredric, who is with our subject ; Virgie, 
at home; Hugh, living in Dallas town- 
ship; and Fay, who is with her parents. 

Having attended the district school 
near his father's farm Lewis M. Myers 
afterward spent one term as a student in 
Elliott Business College, at Burlington, 
Iowa, in 1892, and following his return 
home assisted in the work of the fields un- 
til twenty-one years of age. Subsequently 
he operated one of his father's farms for 
several years, thus starting out in life on 
his own account. 

On the i6th of October, 1895, was cel- 
ebrated the marriage of L. M. Myers and 
Miss Nancy Rice, who was born in Fay- 
ette county, Pennsylvania, December 23, 
1868, a daughter of Samuel and Cather- 
ine (Spears) Rice, likewise natives of the 
Keystone state and now residents of Dur- 
ham township, this county, aged respect- 
ively seventy-four and sixty-three years. 
Of their five children four are now living : 
Alice, the wife of Grant Schultz. of Dur- 
ham township; Mrs. Myers; Charles, a 
farmer of Durham township; and Mrs. 
Barbara Doss, of Durham township. One 
daughter, Ada, died when five years of 
age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Myers now live on one 
of his father's farms, and in December, 
1904, he purchased eighty acres of land 
across the road from his home on section 
22, Pontoosuc township. He tills the soil 
and also raises and feeds horses and cattle, 
and his stock-raising interests are a most 
important branch of his business. For 
about nine years Mr. Myers has been one 
of the leading horse breeders in this part 
of the county, being particularly inter- 
ested in Percheron horses, and now has 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



61 



at the head of his stud, Caesar (No. 
54038) his French Register Number, 
his American Register Number being 

. 40523. He was imported from France in 
' 1904, at the age of two years, and has been 
owned by Mr. Myers since November 
i, 1904. Besides being highly bred he 
is a fine individual, weighing over 
2. too at four years. He also has a 
large number of fine mares and raises 
a high bred stock himself. He also 
has had full blood Chester hogs and 
Angus cattle but devotes his time now 
to his horses and cattle feeding. He was 

I one of the organizers of Camp Creek 
Prospecting Co. that is locating the coal 
in this section, Mr. Myers having gone 
through a three-foot vein of good coal in 
drilling his well. He is one of the di- 
rectors of the company, which intend to 
develop the mine. His success is entirely 
attributable to his own efforts and the as- 
sistance of his estimable wife. Careful of 
expenditures, managing his property ably 

. and with keen foresight, he has made con- 
siderable progress on the high way of suc- 
cess and will continue on that road until 
he reaches the goal of prosperity. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Myers has 
been blessed with three children and the 
family circle yet remains unbroken by the 
hand of death. Their thre sons are: Mil- 
lard Rice, born October 30, 1896 ; Charles 
Byard, February 16, 1899; and Paul 
Lewis, August 28, 1900. Mrs. Myers 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church 
but for convenience Mr. and Mrs. Myers 
attend the United Brethren church. He 
is a democrat in his political views and 
has been school director for six years and 
has also filled the office of township col- 
T 



lector. At all times he manifests a public- 
spirited interest in the general welfare and 
upbuilding and is an intelligent an re- 
spected citizen whose well-spent life is 
indicated by the fact that many of his best 
friends are those who have known him 
longest. 



COLONEL BENJAMIN F. MARSH. 

By the consensus of public .opinion in 
the state and nation in the death of Colo- 
nel Benjamin Franklin Marsh, Illinois 
lost one of her greatest sons. He was 
nine times chosen to represent his district 
in congress and his career at all times was 
characterized by a steady progress in mil- 
itary, political and professional circles. 
The simplicity of his life, the breadth of 
his vision, the loftiness of his purpose, 
the extent of the work that he accom- 
plished in legislative halls, all combined 
to win for him the respect, honor and 
gratitude of his fellowmen. The meas- 
ure of his ability and personal worth is 
perhaps best indicated by the fact that he 
numbered his warmest friends among the 
most distinguished statesmen of the 
country. 

JBenjamin Franklin Marsh was more- 
over a native son of Illinois, his birth 
having occurred in Wythe township, 
Hancock county, November 19, 1835, 
and the house in which he first opened 
his eyes to the light of day is still stand- 
ing. Moreover the portion of the farm 
on which the building is located is still 
owned by the family. His boyhood days 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



were fraught with the vicissitudes, ex- 
periences and environments of pioneer 
life and he early became familiar with 
all of the labor incident to the develop- 
ment and improvement of a farm. His 
education was acquired in private 
schools. He was for a brief period a 
student in Palmyra, Missouri, and the 
indignities which he there saw heaped 
upon the colored youth fired his sense of 
justice and left upon him an indelible 
impression which bore fruit in the service 
which he gave for the Union and for 
liberty during the dark days of the Civil 
War. He continued his education by 
four years' study in Jubilee College un- 
der Bishop Chase and there was awak- 
ened in him that keen appreciation for 
right and justice which was ever a dom- 
inant element in his career. He com- 
pleted the work of the junior year in 
college and then took up the study of 
law under the direction of his brother. 
Judge J. W. Marsh (now deceased), with 
whom he was subsequently associated in 
the practice of his profession subsequent 
to his admission to the bar in 1860. It 
was a momentous period in the history of 
Illinois and the nation, the country hav- 
ing become aroused over the slavery 
question and the threats of secession and 
it may well be imagined that the young 
man took a keen interest in nil of the 
great events of that time. Political ques- 
tions were, the dominant theme of inter- 
est where men collected together and 
Colonel Marsh entered heart and soul 
into the political movements, taking a 
firm stand in support of the new Repub- 
lican party even at a time when it was 
unpopular to do so. In the year of his 



admission to the bar he accepted the Re- 
publican nomination for state's attorney 
in a district comprising Adams and Han- 
cock counties, which was then strongly 
democratic. He canvassed both coun- 
ties, his successful opponent being the 
late Calvin A. Warren, then a distin- 
guished lawyer of Western Illinois. In 
his home city. Warsaw. Colonel Marsh 
was more fortunate in his candidacy and 
served for a period as city clerk and 
also represented Warsaw on the board of 
supervisors from 1867 until 1869. In 
the latter year he was nominated for 
membership in the state constitutional 
convention of 1870. but his republican 
proclivities occasioned his defeat in a 
strongly democratic district. 

In the meantime Colonel Marsh had 
devoted four years of his life to active 
military service. He had watched with 
keen interest the progress of events in 
the south and all the patriotism of his 
nature was aroused by the firing upon of 
Fort Sumter and the attempt to disrupt 
the Union. When war was proclaimed 
he raised a company of cavalry and. go- 
ing to Springfield, tendered its sen-ices to 
Governor Yates, but as cavalry was not 
included in President Lincoln's call the 
company was not accepted. On his way 
home from the state capital Colonel 
Marsh found the Sixteenth Illinois Regi- 
ment rendezvoused at Quincy and imme- 
diately enlisted as a private, but was soon 
afterward chosen quartermaster. When 
with the regiment at Monroe Station. 
Missouri, he received a telegram from 
Governor Yates on the 4th of July, 1861. 
saying that his cavalry company would 
be accepted. Returning at once to War- 



HANCOCK COUNTY. ILLINOIS. 



sa\v. Colonel Marsh recruited the com- 
pany and in August, with his men. pro- 
ceeded to Springfield, where the command 
was mustered in as Company G of the 
Second Illinois Cavalry. Mr. Marsh was 
chosen captain in August, 1861, and pro- 
motions came to him from time to time 
in recognition of gallant and meritorious 
service. He was commissioned major 
August 30, 1862. lieutenant colonel May 
3. 1864, colonel August 29, 1865, and 
served continuously until January, 1866, 
having campaigned in every seceding 
state except Virginia and the two Caro- 
linas. Four times he was wounded by 
gun shot and he carried some of the lead 
to his grave. Those who served under 
him tell that he was a fearless and bril- 
liant officer, never faltering in the per- 
formance of any duty and inspiring his 
men by his own valor and loyalty. Per- 
haps one of the most notable examples 
of his innate personal courage was his 
refusal to obey his superior officer at 
Holly Springs when the latter surren- 
dered. Colonel Marsh and his command 
cutting their way through the rebel lines. 
He never ceased to feel a deep interest 
in the military organizations of the coun- 
try and had a warm feeling of friendship 
for his comrades in arms. 

When the preservation of the Union 
had become an assured fact and his aid 
was no longer needed at the front Colonel 
Marsh returned to Warsaw and resumed 
the practice of law. continuing an active 
and able member of the bar until his elec- 
tion to congress in 1876. From that 
time forward his attention was given al- 
most exclusively to important public serv- 
ice and he left the impress of his individ- 



uality upon national legislation. He had 
in 1866 been the nominee for the candi- 
dacy of the Republican party in his dis- 
trict for congress and again in 1872 and 
the fatal illness of his wife terminated 
in death on the day of the republican 
convention in the latter year, so that 
Colonel Marsh was unable to attend. In 
1876, having secured the nomination. 
Colonel Marsh entered into the campaign 
with the same determination and loyal 
spirit that ever characterized him in 
everything that he undertook. In the 
convention each county of the district 
except Mercer had a candidate and 
Colonel Marsh secured the nomination 
on the twenty-fifth ballot. He was not 
only elected in that year but again in 1878 
and 1880. his services during his first 
term being of such a beneficial nature that 
the party rallied to his support as the 
standard bearer in the two succeeding 
elections. Then came a factional fight 
in the party and he retired from office 
on the close of his third term, March 3, 
1883. He was in 1892 strongly recom- 
mended by many of his friends for the 
candidate for governor. In the same year, 
however, others urged him to again be- 
come a candidate for congress. He care- 
fully studied the situation and was on the 
eve of refusal, but the influence of rec- 
ognized party leaders who knew his 
strength prevailed upon him and he was 
once more nominated and elected, at that 
time serving, through re-election, for four 
consecutive terms. In 1900 he was de- 
feated, but in 1902 was again elected to 
congress and once more in 1904, so that 
he was serving as a member of the house 
at the time of his death. In the latter 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



campaigns the state of his health pre- 
vented him from active participation, but 
each election showed good returns in sup- 
port of Colonel Marsh, who was thus nine 
times called to represent his district in the 
council chambers of the nation. During 
the interval of ten years he was out of 
congress he served for four years on the 
Illinois Railroad and Warehouse Commis- 
sion through appointment in 1889 from 
Governor Oglesby. His political service 
is a matter of history. Congressional 
records give indication of his support or 
opposition to various measures which 
came up, and it was a well-known fact 
that he could never be coerced into any 
political position, that neither fear nor 
favor could win his allegiance to a meas- 
ure that he believed would prove detri- 
mental or cause him to oppose a move- 
ment that he thought would prove bene- 
ficial to his state or country at large. He 
did important work in the committee 
rooms, being closely connected with many 
measures of constructive legislation, and 
he made a number of notable addresses 
on the floor of the house. As has been 
said, "But, after all, the services of the 
most valuable, most effective members of 
congress is unwritten history. It can be 
known only to him who has the open 
sesame to the devious ways by which leg- 
islation is shaped and enacted at Wash- 
ington. That Colonel Marsh was here 
a power is "now recognized, and that he 
will be missed, especially by this portion 
of the nation, is fully appreciated." 

The home life of Colonel Marsh was 
largely ideal. He was married August 
6, 1861, to Miss Josephine Miller, who 
died July 31, 1872. Of their five chil- 



dren two are living : Miss Bertha Marsh, 
of Warsaw, and C. Carroll Marsh, of 
Warsaw. Two of the children, Cara P. 
and Josephine, died in infancy, while 
Arthur W. died a number of years ago 
after reaching adult age. On the ist of 
January, 1881, Colonel Marsh was mar- 
ried to Miss Jane E. Coolbaugh, of Chi- 
cago, who died on the i8th of March, 
1905. There were also five children by 
this marriage, of whom Robert Miller 
and James C. died in infancy, while those 
still living are William C., Richard O. 
and Benjamin F. Marsh, , Jr. Colonel 
Marsh was able to leave his family in 
excellent financial circumstances, for in 
his business undertakings he had pros- 
pered. After his retirement from con- 
gress in 1883 he devoted his attention 
largely to his farm southeast of Warsaw, 
and gradually added to his possessions 
situated in Warsaw, Wilcox and Wythe 
townshnps. The normal man always en- 
joys nature and Colonel Marsh was of 
this class. He found great delight in 
superintending his agricultural interests, 
in watching the growth of his crops and 
in bringing his land up to a high state 
of cultivation. Colonel Marsh passed 
away June 2, 1905, at his home in War- 
saw, after an illness which extended over 
several 'months, although at times his 
health was greatly improved. The fu- 
neral was one of the most notable that 
has ever been held in Illinois, special 
trains being run over the different rail- 
road and trolley lines in order to bring 
the large concourse of people who gath- 
ered to pay their last tribute of respect 
to one whom they had known and hon- 
ored. From congress came Senator 



HAXCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



Shelby M. Cullom and Representatives 
George W. Prince, of Galesburg; Joseph 
V. Graff, of Peoria; Philip .Knopf, of 
Chicago; Henry T. Rainey, of Carroll- 
ton; William W. Wilson, of Chicago; 
Zeno J. Rives, of Litchfield; and Charles 
McGavin, also of Chicago, who acted as 
honorary pall-bearers, while the active 
pall-bearers were the same that Colonel 
Marsh had chosen to serve at his wife's 
funeral just eleven weeks earlier. 

It is. difficult to analyze the character of 
such a man because of the variety of his 
service and the extent of his influence 
and work. He was a conservative man 
and must be regarded as a statesman, al- 
ways striving to build up for the benefit 
of the people and to insure a continuous 
national progress, believing that nations, 
like men, cannot stand still but must go 
forward or backward. He became con- 
spicuous as a public officer who was al- 
ways at his post of duty and always at 
work. No man ever represented a dis- 
trict in Illinois in congress who was more 
faithful to the trust reposed in him by the 
people. His mental characteristics were 
of that solid and practical rather than of 
the ostentatious and brilliant order. He 
was essential!}' strong in intellect and ca- 
pable of reaching safe, reasonable and 
prudent conclusions. In the long and 
crowded line of illustrious men of whom 
Illinois is justly proud, the public life of 
few others has extended over as long a 
period as his, and certainly the life of 
none has been more varied in service, 
more constant in honor, more fearless in 
conduct or more stainless in reputation. 
Perhaps no better testimonial of his char- 
acter and public service can be given than 



in the words of one of his old-time 
friends and associates, who said, "The 
morning following the memorable Gar- 
field memorial exercises in the house of 
representatives, Alexander H. Stephens, 
that pigmy in stature and giant in intel- 
lect, moving in his wheeled chair over the 
arena in front of the speaker's desk, while 
indulging a musing, sparkling, laudatory 
criticism of Elaine's eloquent address, 
turned to the writer, with that peculiar 
graciousness which won young men to 
him, and said : "And yet, after all, while 
the genius of the forum kindles enthusi- 
asm and moves one to effort, we should 
remember that in public affairs the well- 
balanced, forceful, persistent worker, 
with courageous determination and unas- 
sailable integrity, is the master hand in 
shaping the weal of a nation. Of such 
material is your congressman, Colonel 
Marsh." 

"Had the distinguished ex- Vice-Presi- 
dent of the southern confederacy known 
his subject even more intimately he could 
not have measured Colonel Marsh's 
character more accurately nor have 
weighed his abilities more correctly. 
Through all his public service his in- 
tegrity was never questioned for a mo- 
ment, and his entire career, from youth 
up, was marked by courageous determi- 
nation. It was with him when only out 
of his teens he braved a pistol's muzzle 
and a mob's fury to sever the rope of 
would-be lynchers; it was with him at 
Holly Springs when he defied his cow- 
ardly superior officer, refused to sur- 
render, and with a remnant of the Sec- 
ond Illinois Cavalry cut his way through 
the enemy's lines. Further, it was with 



66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEll' 



him in the capacity of a representative 
of the people whenever and wherever 
duty pointed the way. as it was with 
him in private life. He had his sorrows, 
he had his afflictions ; but he concealed 
the bruise of the rod and the scar of the 
scourge with the veil of his indomitable 
will. 

"His was a rugged character. Molded 
amid the privations of pioneer life and 
developed in the stirring scenes of the 
past half century, it became well-rounded 
as the shadows lengthened. There was 
no pretense about him. no dissimulation 
in his make-up. He was frank of 
speech, unassuming in manner, hospita- 
ble but unostentatious. He had a sym- 
pathetic interest in his fellowman. but it 
was a wholesome sympathy, not misled 
by sickly sentiment on the one hand nor 
awed by arrogance on the other. Loyal 
in his friendship, he was not bitter in 
his enmities, and never took advantage 
of power to punish a foe. That he was 
charitable there are many, many, to at- 
test, but he never jingled the coin of 
charity, being of those who hold that the 
left hand should not know what the right 
hand doeth. As a politician, Colonel 
Marsh was keen, astute, far-sighted. He 
was an adept in marshalling his forces. 
But he eschewed the baser arts and never 
resorted to trades or cabals or the de- 
moralizing agencies only too common to 
the field of politics. 

"As a public man. he aspired to be a 
worker, a doer: and the sequel proves 
that he did not strive in vain. He did 
not affect the ornate as a speaker nor did 
he dawdle in debate, but when he spoke 
it was briefly and to the point. He was 



exceptionally familiar with all public 
questions, and in close touch with the 
powers that shape them, equipping him 
well for his work, and with his strong 
personality, making results possible. He 
had the respect and admiration of his 
colleagues and enjoyed in a peculiar de- 
gree the confidence of the late President 
McKinley and that of President Roose- 
velt and stood close to the heads of the 
departments. It was in council, in com- 
mittee, he was strongest, and those who 
are most familiar with his achievements 
know that his impress is on national leg- 
islation. But his life work is o'er. He 
has passed to the unknown realm whither 
man's pilgrimage tends. The good he 
has done will not be interred with his 
bones. It will live after him ; and while 
his ashes sleep in Oakland, under the 
silent watch of the 'untroubled sentries 
of the shadowy night; his memory will 
endure, long to be cherished as that of 
one who served his day and generation 
well and faithfully." 



EDMOXD PARKER DEXTOX. 

Edmond Parker Denton, who, since 
1898 has made his home in Hamilton, 
but for many years was extensively and 
successfully engaged in stock-raising in 
Hancock county, as proprietor of the 
Catalpa Grove stock farm, was bom in 
Bath county, Kentucky, April 2, 1832. 
his parents being Reuben and Jane 
(Perkins) Denton. the former born near 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



67 



the Holstein river in Tennessee, and the 
latter in Bath county, Kentucky. His 
paternal grandparents, Abraham and 
Sarah (Hunt) Denton, were natives of 
Tennessee, while the maternal grand- 
parents, Edmond and Elizabeth (Van 
Landingham) Perkins, were natives of 
Bath and Fleming counties, Kentucky, 
respectively. The parents were married 
in Fleming county, where the father died 
in 1862, while the mother passed away in 
1868. Their son, Edmond P. Denton, 
was the third in order of birth in a fam- 
ily of five children, of whom one daugh- 
ter, Matilda, died at the age of four 
years, while Abraham T., who was born 
in 1830, died in Missouri, in February, 
1904. The other brother, Oliver B., re- 
sides in Fleming county, Kentucky, while 
Allen H., born in 1840, died at the age of 
thirteen years. 

Edmond P. Denton spent the days of 
his boyhood and youth in his native state, 
being reared to the occupation of farm- 
ing, and on the 8th of March, 1854, 
when a young man of twenty-two years, 
he left Kentucky and removed to Co- 
lumbus, Illinois, where he spent the suc- 
ceeding year. He then came to Hancock 
county, settling in Wythe township, 
where he secured a tract of land which 
had been fenced and cultivated. He be- 
gan the further improvement of the 
place, which he called the Catalpa Grove 
stock farm and here he was extensively 
engaged in raising Wilkes horses, always 
making a specialty of this breed. When 
his son. Henry attained his majority he 
was admitted to a partnership and the 
business of raising and breeding fine 
stock was conducted under the firm stvle 



of Denton & Son. Mr. Denton became 
known as one of the most prominent 
stockmen in this part of the state, raising 
some very fine animals upon his place, 
which sold for high prices. He is an 
excellent ' judge of horse flesh and has 
owned some splendid specimens of the 
noble steed. As a breeder and stock- 
raiser he met with excellent success and 
continued in active business until 1898, 
when he retired from his farm and re- 
moved to Hamilton, where he has since 
made his home. 

On the 1 5th of December, 1853, Mr. 
Denton was united in marriage to Miss 
Jemima Ellen Whitney, who was born in 
Bath county, Kentucky, December 29, 
1845, a daughter of Elijah K. and 
Julanie (Jones) Whitney, the former a 
native of Ohio and the latter of Bath 
county, Kentucky. Mrs. Denton was 
educated in Kentucky and spent her girl- 
hood days in her parents' home. By her 
marriage she became the mother of the 
following named : Charles A., who is 
circuit judge of Bates county, Missouri ; 
Julania Jane, the wife of Charles Cole, 
a liveryman of Omaha, Nebraska; Mar- 
garet B., the wife of J. T. Guy, who is 
proprietor of Hotel Hamilton, at Hamil- 
ton, Illinois; Henry K., who is in the 
livery business in Hamilton; Sarah E., 
the wife of R. R. Wallace, cashier of the 
State Bank at Hamilton ; Edmond Grant, 
a farmer, whose home is two miles north 
of Hamilton; Albert C, a groceryman of 
Hamilton, and is also a mail carrier on 
the rural route ; and Jemima Ellen, the 
wife of Harry Rentchler, employed as 
salesman for Bolls Brothers, of Chicago, 
Illinois. Mrs. Denton passed away July 



68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



10, 1889, and was buried in Oakwood 
cemetery at Hamilton, Illinois. She was 
an estimable lady, who had been a faith- 
ful companion and helpmate to her hus- 
band on life's journey. Her loss was 
deeply regretted by many friends as well 
as her immediate family. Mr. Denton 
now boards with his daughter at Hotel 
Hamilton. He is a republican in his 
political views and served as supervisor 
of Wythe township for three terms, 
while for one term he was collector. He 
was appointed postmaster of Hamilton 
on the ist of June, 1899, anc l ' ias h a d 
three appointments to that office, the last 
coming from President Roosevelt on the 
ist of March, 1905, so that the incum- 
bency will continue until 1909. He is 
a capable official, giving a public-spirited 
administration in the affairs of the office. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, and in his life 
exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the 
craft. In business, in political circles 
and in social life he has always been 
known as a man worthy of the public es- 
teem and confidence and the circle of his 
friends is a very extensive one. 



LORENZO D. LITTLE. 

Lorenzo D. Little is one of the most 
venerable citizens of Hancock county, 
yet the years rest lightly upon him and 
he appears to be a much younger man 
than the records state, for he is still ac- 
tive in business life, managing his farm- 
ing interests in Pontoosuc township and 



maintaining a deep interest in current 
events and matters of general progress. 
His has been a useful and honorable ca- 
reer. He was born in Hampshire county, 
Virginia, in 1821, and is a representative 
of an old family that was founded in 
America in colonial days. His uncle, 
David Little, was one of the Revolution- 
ary heroes who won independence for the 
nation and when the country again be- 
came engaged in war with Great Britain, 
in 1812, he once more fought for Amer- 
ican rights. Martha and Sarah (Rit- 
nour) Little, parents of our subject, were 
likewise natives of the Old Dominion, 
born near Winchester in 1794 and in 
1796, respectively. In the '205 they 
became residents of Greene county, Ohio, 
and on the 25th of April, 1847, arrived' 
in Hancock county, settling in Ap- 
panoose township. Soon, however, the 
father purchased land from a Mormon 
elder, Fullmer, and the family were in- 
stalled in a log cabin in Pontoosuc town- 
ship, where they experienced the usual' 
hardships, privations and pleasures of 
pioneer life, the father following farm- 
ing there until his death in 1854. He 
was long survived by his wife, who died 
in 1882. 

L.D. Little, accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Ohio in 1827, was educ- 
cated in that state and there lived for 
twenty years, and at the time of the re- 
moval of the family to Illinois, in 1847, 
he also came to Hancock county, taking 
up his abode in Pontoosuc township, 
where he purchased forty acres of land 
and began the development of a new 
farm, performing all the arduous labor 
connected with such a task. In later 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



69 



years he purchased another forty-acre 
tract on section 20, and throughout his 
residence here has carried on general 
farming and stock-raising, his prosper- 
ity coming as the legitimate and well- 
merited result of his own labor. 

Mr. Little was married July 15, 1849, 
to Miss Hester A. Tull, who was born 
in Maryland, February 25, i827,a daugh- 
ter of John R. and Nancy (Langford) 
Tull. The father, who was born in 
Maryland, in March. 1807, died in 1898, 
while the mother, whose -birth occurred 
in the same state and in the same year, 
died in August, 1882. They were mem- 
bers of the Methodist church and many 
good qualities endeared them to their 
family and friends. Of their nine chil- 
dren only three are now living: Mrs. 
Little; Elizabeth, the wife of Daniel A. 
Little, of Pontoosuc township; and 
Sarah, the wife of Isaac Grove, of Pay- 
son, Adams county, Illinois. Mr. and 
Mrs. Little became parents of three chil- 
dren who have passed away and three 
who still survive. Naomi became the 
wife of Marion Jacobs, who died in Ar- 
kansas in 1904, leaving six children: 
Rosa, the wife of Arthur Jacobs, of 
Mena, Arkansas, by whom she has three 
children, Evelyn, Lorenzo and Clara ; 
Joseph Jacobs, who married Zelpha 
Choate, of Arkansas; Ella, wife of John 
McKinstry, of Texas ; Orley, living in 
Arkansas ; and Lorenzo and Clarence 
Jacobs, also of that state. John Little 
married Flora Wilcox and resides in 
Pontoosuc township. Joseph Little, of 
Pontoosuc township, married Louisa 
Cress, and has four children : Emma P., 
wife of Frank Perkins, of Pontocsuc 



township; Lester, Guy and Walter. Ar- 
melda Little is the wife of Benjamin Ri- 
ter, of Pontoosuc township, and has 
three children: Arthur L., Goldie M., 
and Lizzie E., Harry C. Riter died at the 
age of ten months. One child of the fam- 
ily died in early infancy. Elizabeth Lit- 
tle, who was the first bom, died at the age 
of four months and twenty-three days. 

Mr. Little is a republican and has 
served as road supervisor and as a mem- 
ber of the school board. His wife is a 
member of the Methodist church. They 
have traveled life's journey together as 
man and wife for fifty-seven years, and 
are a much-esteemed couple of Pontoo- 
suc township. They yet enjoy good 
health and are active, bearing the burden 
of the years lightly. While they have 
had sorrows and hardships, they have 
yet had many pleasures and successes. 



HENRY RICE. 

Henry Rice, whose well developed 
farm is one of the attractive features in 
the landscape in Durham township, 
was born in Fayette county, Pennsylva- 
nia, June 15, 1827, and the nearly eighty 
years of his well-spent life have made 
him a most respected and honored man. 
His parents were Samuel and Fannie 
(Strickler) Rice, likewise natives of Fay- 
ette county, Pennsylvania, the former 
born in 1804 and the latter in 1802. 
Samuel Rice was also a farmer bv oc- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEll' 



cupation and was a local preacher in the 
River Brethren denomination in Penn- 
sylvania. He remained in the Keystone 
state until his later years, when he came 
to Illinois and lived with his children, 
passing away in Henderson county, De- 
cember 19. 1885. His wife died No- 
vember 30, 1870, and was laid to rest in 
Ohio, while his grave was made in Dur- 
ham cemetery. They were the parents 
of eleven children : Nancy and Christian, 
deceased ; Henry, of this review ; John 
and Fannie, who have passed away ; 
Samuel, of Durham township; George, 
deceased ; Lydia, the wife of John 
Hershey, of Ohio ; Rebecca, who died in 
April, 1906: and Mary and Cyrus, also 
deceased. 

Henry Rice was educated in the dis- 
trict schools of Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania, but his opportunities in that direc- 
tion were somewhat limited. The little 
"temple of learning" in which he pursued 
his studies, ,was a log structure with 
puncheon floor and slab seats. He re- 
mained with his father until about the 
time he attained his majority and was 
then married, in 1848, to Miss Elizabeth 
Stoner, who indeed proved a faithful 
companion and helpmate to him on life's < 
journey. She was born in Blair county, 
Pennsylvania, in September, 1826, a 
daughter of Jacob and Barbara (Bosler) 
Stoner, natives of eastern Pennsylvania, 
in which state the father followed farm- 
ing. In the Stoner family were nine 
children : Abraham, now living in Des 
Moines, Iowa ; Mary, deceased ; Mrs. 
Rice; Ann and David, who are residents 
of Pennsylvania: Joseph and Rebecca, 
who have passed away; Susan, living in 



northern Illinois; and Sarah, deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rice began their domes- 
tic life in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, 
where they lived for six years and then 
removed to Stark county, Ohio, where 
they spent four years on a farm. On the 
expiration of that period they located in 
Adams county, Illinois, and after a year 
and a half came, in the fall of 1859, to 
Hancock county, settling in Durham 
township, where Mr. Rice purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land on 
section 10. Improvements had already 
been made upon the place, and in 1871 
he erected an elegant residence, whije in 
1868 he built a commodious barn. He 
also put up a windwill and built good 
sheds and other outbuildings for the 
shelter of grain and stock, together with 
fences which divide the place into fields 
of convenient size. It is today one of 
the finest farms in Durham township, 
and comprises one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, Mr. Rice having sold two 
hundred and forty acres. However, he 
still owns three hundred and twenty 
acres of farm land in Lee county, Iowa. 
He has always raised stock and has car- 
ried on general farming. Although now 
well advanced in years he still gives per- 
sonal supervision to the place, which, 
under his capable management, is kept 
under a high state of cultivation, the 
rich and productive fields annually re- 
turning to him gratifying harvests. Mr. 
Rice is also a director of the Farmers 
State Bank of Dallas. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rice, as the years 
went by, were born ten children, three 
in Pennsylvania, two in Ohio and the 
others upon the home farm, in this county. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



The family record is as follows : Fan- 
nie Ann, deceased; Jacob, of Nebraska, 
who married Miss Luella Lydic and has 
five children, Nellie, Elizabeth, Laura, 
Jay and Dean ; Samuel, also of Nebras- 
ka, who married Miss Jennie Boyle, and 
died leaving three children, Lena, Stew- 
art and Harry; Mary, the wife of James 
Babcock, of Durham township, by whom 
she had three children, Frank, deceased, 
Rolla and Ina; Le Roy, who has passed 
away ; Clara, the wife of John Smith, of 
Iowa, by whom she has nine children, 
Bessie. Grace, Laura, Maggie, Lawrence, 
Ina, Helen, Beulah and Ruth ; Laura, 
who is with her father ; Jenora. deceased ; 
Clark, of Pontoosuc township, who mar- 
ried Miss Minnie Bradfield and had three 
children/ Bertha, deceased, Charles, and 
Eulah, who has also passed away; and 
Etta, at home with her father. The 
children have been provided with liberal 
educational privileges, the sons all at- 
tending city schools, some in Burlington, 
in Denmark and in Keokuk, Iowa. 

In the early days of their married 
life Mr. and Mrs. Rice had to undergo 
many hardships and privations, but as 
the years passed prosperity attended 
their labors and Mr. Rice is now in very 
comfortable financial circumstances. In 
addition to his farm property he is a 
stockholder in the Farmers Exchange 
Bank of Dallas City, as are his two 
daughters who are at home. In 1902 
they were called upon to mourn the loss 
of wife and mother, who passed away 
on the 7th of November of that year and 
was laid to rest in Durham cemetery, 
her death being deeply regretted by 
many friends as well as her immediate 
5 



family. She was indeed a loving wife 
and mother, her interests centering in 
her own household. She did everything 
in her power to promote the welfare and- 
happiness of her family and she extended 
a most gracious and cordial hospitality 
to her many friends. Her many excel- 
lent traits of character won her the es- 
teem and love of all with whom she came 
in contact. In his political affiliation 
Mr. Rice is a democrat and at one time 
served as school director but has never 
sought or desired office. His success is 
attributable entirely to his own labors. 
He is of a modest and retiring disposi- 
tion but the consensus of public opinion 
is that he deserves prominent mention 
among "the representative men of the 
county. He is a representative of one 
of the oldest families of the township 
and is one whose life record is indeed 
worthy of emulation and of admiration. 



ZIMRI WHITE. 

Zimri White is a retired farmer and 
veteran of the Civil war, living in Ham- 
ilton. He was born in Coatsburg, Adams 
county, Illinois, September 22, 1839, and 
is a son of John and Drusilla (Lasley) 
White, natives of Virginia and South 
Carolina respectively. His paternal 
grandfather, William White, was a na- 
tive of Scotland and the maternal grand- 
father was John Lasley, of South Caro- 
lina. In the year 1822 John White went 
to Springfield, Illinois, with his mother. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He was then a lad of ten years, his birth 
having occurred in 1812. The father 
had died in the south and the widowed 
mother afterward removed to this state, 
where John White learned the plasterer's 
trade. He worked in Springfield for 
some time, after which he removed to 
Adams county, Illinois, where he was 
married in 1838. He then rented land 
for a few years, after which he removed 
to Hancock county and purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of prairie land, 
for which he paid three hundred and 
fifty dollars and which is now worth six- 
teen thousand dollars. He also bought 
thirty acres of timber land. The prairie 
tract was all wild and uncultivated, but 
he built thereon good houses, barns and 
other improvements. He also fenced 
the land and broke the wild prairie, trans- 
forming it into richly developed fields. 
It was the period of pioneer progress in 
Hancock county and it was no unusual 
thing to see timber wolves, while deer 
were quite numerous and turkeys and 
other lesser game could he had in abund- 
ance. In fact evidences of frontier life 
were many, but they gave - way before 
the inroads of an advancing civilization. 
John White continued to reside upon the 
farm which he purchased until 1897, 
when he went to live with a son upon a 
farm, and in 1899 he took up his abode 
in the home of his son, Zimri, with whom 
he continued until his death, which oc- 
curred on the 22d of August, 1903. His 
wife had passed away in 1891, when 
seventy-one years of age. In the family 
were ten sons, of whom six are yet 
living. 

Zimri White, the eldest of the father's 



family, worked upon the home farm un- 
til twenty-one years of age, during which 
period he gained practical knowledge of 
the best methods of tilling the soil, while 
in the public schools he acquired his edu- 
cation. Almost his entire life has been 
passed in Hancock county. After at- 
taining his majority he engaged in the 
operation of rented land for a year, but 
at the end of that time put aside all per- 
sonal considerations in order to aid his 
country, enlisting on the I3th of August, 
1862, as a member of Company H, One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Infan- 
try. The regiment went to Camp But- 
ler, remaining there for a few months 
and afterward was attached to the Army 
of the Mississippi. At the battle of Fort 
Hudson Mr. White had a horse shot 
from under him. He was with his regi- 
ment during the entire period of the war 
save for three months spent in the hos- 
pital at Jefferson Barracks and at Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana. Returning to the 
home place, he bought eighty acres on 
section 9. Wythe township, where he 
built a house of five rooms but has since 
made an addition thereto. He carried 
on general farming and stock-raising un- 
til 1894, when, on account of ill health, 
he removed to the Oakwood addition to 
Hamilton, where he bought six fine lots 
in one tract, improved with a commodi- 
ous and pleasant residence. He does 
general gardening on his lots and his 
place is one of the most sightly in all the 
Oakwood addition. He finds it impossi- 
ble to entirely put aside business cares 
and thus his time and energies are given 
to the cultivation of vegetables. 

On the 25th of December, 1865, Mr. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



73 



White was united in marriage to Miss 
Hannah E. Daw, who was born in Bear 
Creek township, Hancock county, a 
daughter of Edward and Eliza (Gra- 
ham) Daw, the former a native of Eng- 
land. There was one son born of that 
marriage, John Edward White, whose 
birth occurred October 4, 1866. The 
wife and mother died on the 2gth of the 
same month and on the 2ist of Novem- 
ber, 1867, Mr. White was again married, 
his second union being with Harriet 
Eliza Smith, who was born in Wythe 
township. Hancock county, May 22, 
1848, her parents being William A. and 
Sarah (Smart) Smith, the former born 
in Alabama in 1821 and the latter in 
Macoupin county, Illinois. Her paternal 
grandparents were James and Elizabeth 
(Owens) Smith and the former was a 
son of a Revolutionary soldier. In the 
year 1831 William A. Smith came to 
Hancock county, Illinois, and served as 
a soldier at the time of the Mormon 
war. He married near Plymouth, Illi- 
nois, and lived upon a farm in Wythe 
township up to the time of his death, 
which occurred on the 29th of November, 
1864. His wife long survived him, pass- 
ing away on Christmas day of 1894. In 
their family were two sons and five 
: daughters, all of whom are yet living. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. White have been 
born the following named : William 
Smith, who was born April 24. 1869, 
and is living on his father's farm in 
Wythe township; Myrtle Jane, who was 
born May n. 1872, and married Orville 
French, of Quincy, Illinois; Ira Elmer, 
who was born April 20, 1876, and re- 
sides at Glenn's Ferry, Idaho ; Ida Alice, 



twin sister of Ira and the wife of Burt 
Barnaby, of Wythe township; Bertha 
Drusilla, who was born February 14, 
1879, and is the wife of Lester Barr, of 
Downer's Grove, Illinois ; and Sarah 
Helen, who was born November 18, 
1889, and died March 12, 1891. 

Mr. White of this review is a member 
of the Baptist church, active and influ- 
ential in its work, and for many years He 
was superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
Since 1881 he has served as deacon in the 
church. In his political affiliation he is 
a prohibitionist, the cause of temperance 
having long found in him a stalwart 
champion. He has served as highway 
commissioner and as constable and school 
director in Wythe township and the du- 
ties of these various positions were dis- 
charged with promptness and capability. 
He likewise belongs to the Grand Army 
of the Republic and thus maintains pleas- 
ant relations with his old army com- 
rades. An analyzation of his life record 
will show that he has been faithful in 
citizenship, straightforward in business, 
trustworthy in friendship and devoted to 
the ties of home and family, and thus 
his many excellent characteristics make 
him well worthy the regard in which he 
is uniformly held. 



JOSIAH RITCHEY. 

Josiah Ritchey is a retired farmer re- 
siding at the corner of Clark and Wash- 
ington streets, Carthage. He is accorded 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the respect and confidence of his fellow- 
men not alone because of the success 
which he has achieved, making him one 
of the men of affluence in this -city but 
also by reason of the honorable, straight- 
forward business methods he has ever 
followed and also owing to the princi- 
ples of conduct which have shaped his 
daily life. An analyza'tion of his career 
shows that his religious faith has been 
a strong motive influence in all that he 
has done and he stands for that higher 
type of manhood which not only repre- 
sents justice but tempers justice with 
mercy and which recognizes man's obli- 
gation to his fellowman and his Maker. 
A native of Tennessee he was born in 
Monroe county, in 1830, his parents be- 
ing John and Catherine (Dougherty) 
Ritchey. Josiah Dougherty, the great- 
grandfather of our subject, was a soldier 
of the war of 1812, and his son, Henry 
Dougherty, was a soldier of the Mexican 
war. The parents were natives of Ten- 
nessee, the former born in Hawkins 
county January 19, 1801, and the latter 
in Jefferson county on the 2ist of May, 
1804. The father was a farmer by oc- 
cupation, and after living for a number 
of years in Tennessee came to Illinois in 
1853, settling first in Adams county. The 
following year he removed to a farm in 
Hancock county, Illinois, and at first 
lived -in -a log cabin, the family living 
upon the old home property in Dallas 
township. Later, however, he sold out 
and bought an improved farm in Dur- 
ham township, on which stood a com- 
fortable brick residence and other equip- 
ments. He devoted his time and ener- 
gies to general farming and stock-raising 



and yet found opportunity to promote 
public progress through co-operation in 
many movements for the general good 
and by efficient service in public office. 
He held a number of local political posi- 
tions and was also a member of the 
school board. He voted with the de- 
mocracy, of which he was a stalwart 
supporter and both he and his wife were 
members of the Baptist church, while 
living in Tennessee, but following the 
removal to Illinois Mr. Ritchey joined 
the United Brethren church. He died 
in Durham township in 1876, at the age 
of seventy-five years, while his wife 
passed away in 1888, at the age of 
eighty-four years and eight months, both 
being buried in Durham township. Their 
marriage had been celebrated on the I5th j 
of March. 1822, and they became the : 
parents of twelve children, all of whom 
were born in Tennessee and have now 
passed away, with the exception of Mar- 
garet and Josiah. The former, born 
March 15, 1825, is the widow of James 
Kelley, and resides with a daughter in 
Colusa, Illinois. Those who have passed 
away are: Nancy J., who was born No- 
vember 19, 1823 ; Alexander H., born 
July i, 1826; Sarah M., May 7, 1828; 
Samuel L., July 4, 1832 ; John, February 
n, 1834; Martin B., January 7, 1837; 
Isaac S., July 27, 1839; Elizabeth, Feb- 
ruary 7, 1841; James K., November 12, 
1842; and Louisa Catherine, January 28, 

1845- 

Josiah Ritchey largely acquired his 

education in the schools of Tennessee, 
but also continued his studies through 
one winter in Hancock county, Illinois. 
He spent the days of his boyhood and 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



75 



youth in his parents' home and remained 
with them until twenty-three years of 
age. when, on the I2th of January, 1854. 
he was married near Blandinsville, Illi- 
nois, to Miss Amanda F. Knowles, who 
was born in Delaware, January 27, 1835. 
and is a daughter of Rev. Phillip and 
Xancy (Hill) Knowles, who were also 
natives of Delaware. The father was 
a minister of the United Brethren church 
and after coming to this state resided for 
a time in Jacksonville, after which he 
removed to McDonough county and sub- 
sequently to Henderson county, while 
later he had several charges in Hancock 
county, Illinois. He was thus closely as- 
sociated with the moral development of 
this portion of the state, his influence be- 
ing of no restricted order, as he labored 
untiringly for the spread of the gospel. 
He departed this life in Missouri in 1888, 
while his wife had previously passed 
away. In their family were eight chil- 
dren, of whom four are now living: 
Thomas, a resident of Oregon ; William, 
in Florida; Elizabeth, the wife of Man- 
love Dawson, of Peoria ; and Kinzie. of 
Nebraska. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ritchey were 
born nine children, all natives of Han- 
cock county, and seven of the number 
are still living. Hiram C., born Decem- 
ber 15, 1854, married Belle Lamb and 
had two children, Earl H. and Perle W.. 
twins, born August 10, 1877. Their 
mother died when they were only eleven 
months old and they were reared by 
their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Josiah 
Ritchey. Both are now married. Perle 
wedded Pearle Callopy, lives in Canton, 
Illinois, and has three children, Ursa. 



Hiram Edward and Verne Lagrue. 
Earl married Luella Brown, lives in Can- 
ton and has two children, Lowell and 
Grace. After losing his first wife Hiram 
Ritchey wedded Mrs. Mary McClain, the 
widow of Dr. McClain, and after her 
death he married Mrs. Ella Ball, the 
widow of Dr. Ball. The only child of 
the third marriage is deceased. Hiram 
Ritchey is now a resident of Canton, Illi- 
nois. Philip W. Ritchey, the second 
member of the father's family, was born 
July 7, 1857, married Angeline Howard 
and lives in Dallas City, Illinois. They 
had two children, the living daughter, 
Eva, being now at home with her parents. 
John M. Ritchey, born March 22, 1859, 
died in 1877. Sarah L., born April 30, 
1861, is the wife of William Styles, of 
Laurens, Iowa, and they had nine chil- 
dren, of whom six are living: Bert, who 
is married and lives in Fulton county, 
Illinois, and has .four children ; James, 
who is married and lives in Fulton 
county, and has one child ; Josiah Goldie ; 
and Fay and an infant. Margaret 
Ritchey, the fifth member of the family 
of Josiah Ritchey, was born September 
14, 1863, is the wife of Henry W. Wal- 
ter, of Dallas City, Illinois, by whom 
she has one daughter. May, now Mrs. 
Muller, of Dallas City, and the mother of 
two children. Catherine M. Ritchey, 
born August 14, 1865, is the wife of 
Lucius Atwater, of Missouri, and, has 
eight children living, Cleveland, Bertha, 
Orilla, Amanda Belle, Lotus, Lecil, 
Josiah Ritchey and Joseph. James H. 
Ritchey, the seventh member of the fam- 
ily, was born October 5, 1868, and lives 
in Canton, Illinois. He married Mrs. 



7 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Dora Gates and has four children, Elsie, 
Charles, James and Edith. Lucinda M., 
born March 9, 1873, became the wife of 
Frank O'Neil, and died in Graceville, 
Minnesota', February 19, 1903, leaving 
four children : Roy, of Durham town- 
ship ; Josiah Royse, living with an aunt 
in La Harpe; Ernest Ritchey and Edith 
Elizabeth, twins, who are with their 
grandparents; Dora B., born September 
27, 1875, is the wife of Fred McKim, a 
resident of Disco, Illinois. 

At the time of their marriage Josiah 
and Amanda (Knowles) Ritchey began 
their domestic life in Dallas township, 
where they resided for two years and 
then removed to Durham township, set- 
tling on a partially improved farm, on 
which Mr. Ritchey made many modern 
improvements, there carrying on general 
farming and stock-raising with good suc- 
cess. In 1883 he was called upon to 
mourn the loss of his wife, who died 
upon the old homestead farm in Dur- 
ham township. She was a lady of many 
excellent traits of character and was 
held in warm regard by all who knew 
her. Mr. Ritchey continued to reside 
upon the farm until 1899, when he re- 
moved to Carthage, purchasing a beau- 
tiful home at No. 706 Washington street 
at the extreme end of the street. He 
was drafted for service in the Civil war 
but sent a substitute, and throughout the 
passing years carried on farm labor with 
excellent results, the annual sale of his ' 
crops and stock bringing to him a good 
income that eventually enabled him to 
put aside further cares and live retired. 

On the 20th of November, 1889, Mr. 
Ritchey was again married, his second 



union being with Miss Isabelle Curry, 
who was born in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, November 20, 1838, a 
daughter of Matthew and Jane (Curry) 
Curry, who though of the same name 
were not relatives, the former being a 
native of Ireland, and the latter of Penn- 
sylvania. Matthew Curry came to 
America when fourteen years of age and 
made his way to Hancock county, Illi- 
nois, in 1852, settling upon a farm here. 
He was a republican in his political 
views and both he and his wife were 
of the old Covenanter faith and became 
members of the United Presbyterian 
church, with which they were affiliated 
at the time of their deaths. The father 
passed away in 1874, and the mother 
survived until 1891, when she was laid 
by his side in the cemetery in Fountain 
Green township. He had farmed in 
Hancock township for a number of years 
and was accounted one of the enterpris- 
ing agriculturists and reliable business 
men of the community. In their fam- 
ily were six children, five of whom are 
living, namely : Mrs. Isabelle Ritchey ; 
Adam, who resides upon the old home 
farm near Webster, Illinois; Eliza Jane, 
the wife of James Marshall, who is living 
in Carthage township, near Webster; 
Margaret, the wife of Andrew Baxter, of 
Atchison county, Kansas; and Samuel, 
who is living in Hancock township, this 
county. One brother, Adam Curry, en- 
listed in the Tenth Missouri Infantry, and 
afterward re-enlisted in the One Hundred 
and Eighteenth Illinois Infantry, serving 
throughout the war. He was with 
Sherman on the celebrated march to the 
sea and was shot at the battle of Corinth, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



77 



still carrying the ball in his shoulder. 
Thomas. Isaac, William and Jacob 
Knowles, brothers of Mr. Ritchey's first 
wife, were also soldiers of the One Hun- 
dred and Eighteenth Illinois Infantry. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ritchey have reared two 
grandchildren, living to see them married 
and comfortably situated in life, and are 
now rearing two more grandchildren. 
He and his first wife were members of 
the United Brethren church but now he 
is a member of the Presbyterian church, 
to which his second wife belongs and in 
which he has served as an elder for five 
years. They take a very active and 
earnest part in church work and are sin- 
cere Christian people, doing everything 
in their power to advance the cause of 
Christianity. Mr. Ritchey was for many 
years an advocate of the democracy but 
now casts an independent ballot, sup- 
porting the candidate whom he regards 
as the best man. He has held a num- 
ber of township offices and at all times 
has been loyal in citizenship, doing what 
he could for the welfare and progress of 
the community. He is a self-made 
man, conscientious and reliable. Start- 
ing out in life empty-handed, his deter- 
mination and energy have been the sali- 
ent points in his career, enabling him to 
acquire a good living and lay something 
by for a rainy day. Both he and his wife 
are held in the highest esteem, Mrs. 
Ritchey being a lovely Christian char- 
acter, and their interest and activity in 
church work has done much for the cause 
in this community. Now living retired 
from business Mr. Ritchey is enjoying a 
rest which is richly merited and he 
stands high in public regard. 



JONATHAN C. WILLEY. 

Jonathan C. Willey, who became a 
resident of Hancock county at an early 
day, now resides upon his farm on sec- 
tion 10, Carthage township, where he 
owns and cultivates eighty acres. He 
was born in Dickson county, Tennessee, 
on the I4th of September, 1837, and be- 
came a resident of Illinois when about 
ten years of age, accompanying his 
parents, John F, and Millie (Morrison) 
Willey, on their removal to Bond county, 
this state. The father was born in Hali- 
fax county, North Carolina, while the 
mother's birth occurred in Tennessee. 
With his parents he went to the latter 
state when about two years old and was 
there reared to manhood and married. 
All of the children of the family were 
born in Tennessee and the parents re- 
sided there until about 1847, when they 
came to this state, settling in Bond 
county, where they remained for five or 
six years. They afterward went to 
Menard county, Illinois, and thence to 
Mason county, remaining for only a 
brief period in each county. In 1854 
they came to Hancock county and Mr. 
Willey cast in his lot with the early set- 
tlers who were depending upon agricul- 
tural interests for a living. He subse- 
quently conducted his farming interests 
up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred in Carthage township upon the 
place now owned by his son Jonathan, 
when he was seventy-six years of age. 
His political allegiance was given to the 
democracy but he never sought or de- 
sired office. He was a prosperous and 
progressive man who owned large prop- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



erty interests in Tennessee. The place 
of his interment is in Fountain Green 
cemetery, where he was laid to rest fol- 
lowing his death, on the i2th of March, 
1887. His wife survived him for about 
four years and died March 14, 1891. Of 
their five children only three are now 
living, as follows : Mary Catherine, the 
wife of John Dennison, of Hamilton, 
Illinois; Elizabeth, the wife of Elias 
Lister, of Tulare, California ; and Jon- 
athan C. 

The fourth in order of birth in his 
father's family, Jonathan C. Willey, was 
reared under the parental roof, accom- 
panying his parents on their removals 
to various localities. He largely ob- 
tained his education in Tennessee and 
after coming to Hancock county he as- 
sisted his father upon the home farm 
as a young man. There he remained 
to the age of twenty-three years, when 
he started out in life on his own account, 
renting a farm in Fountain Green town- 
ship, where he remained for a number of 
years. During that period he lived care- 
fully and economically and thereby he 
accumulated the capital sufficient to en- 
able him to purchase his present farm, 
whereon he has since resided. The place 
was but partially improved but he has 
continued its cultivation and develop- 
ment until he now has a model farm, his 
attention being given to general farm- 
ing and - stock-raising. His business 
methods are such as bear close investi- 
gation and scrutiny and his enterprise 
has been a salient feature in his success. 

On the 2d of April, 1862, was cele- 
brated the marriage of Mr. Willey and 
Miss Cynthia Wright, a daughter of 
Hickerson and Cynthia (Donoho) 



Wright. Mrs. Willey was born in Foun- 
tain Green township, September 30, 1840, 
and pursued her education in the schools 
of Fountain Green, Pontoosuc and Web- 
ster townships, remaining at home until 
her marriage. She has become the 
mother of five children, three sons and 
two daughters. Sterling Price, born in 
Fountain Green township, November 30, 
1862, died at the age of three years and 
one month, and was there laid to rest. 
Linnie is now the wife of Charles E. 
Griswold, a carpenter and contractor of 
Chicago. Her first husband was Steph- 
en D. Aldridge, who was a farmer of 
Fountain Green township, and by their 
marriage there was one son, Carroll D., 
who was born August 12, 1895, and now 
makes his home with his grandparents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Willey. Jennie Florence 
is the wife of Alfred B. Miller, of De- 
Witt, Missouri, where he follows farm- 
ing. They have had seven children : 
Ethel, now the wife of George Seabold, 
by whom she has one child ; Roy, Harry, 
Bessie, Ross, and Dixie; and one, the 
sixth in order of birth, who is deceased. 
Patrick H., the fourth member of the 
Willey family, is a farmer residing in 
Peabody, Kansas, and married Margaret 
Yetter, a daughter of Samuel R. Yetter. 
They had four children, Alma May, 
Bertha A., Frank and Mabel, but the 
first named is deceased. Jesse W., a 
railroad bridge builder living in Chicago, 
married Miss Minnie Oglvie, a daughter 
of James and Millie Oglvie, of Carthage 
township, and they have two children. 
Mabel and Helen. All of the children of 
the Willey family were born in Hancock 
county. 

Mr. Willey gives evidence of his po- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



79 



litical faith on election day by casting a 
ballot for the men and measures of de- 
mocracy. He has held the office of 
school director for the past thirty years 
and is interested in intellectual progress 
and development in his community. Af- 
fairs relating to general improvement 
also claim his attention and co-operation 
and he has done his full share in the work 
of public improvement during the half 
century or more in which he has lived in 
Hancock county where he has been fully 
appreciated. 



ROBERT M. KIMBROUGH. 

Death often removes a citizen whom a 
community feels it can ill afford to lose. 
The news of the death of Robert M. 
Kimbrough was received with deep and 
wide-spread regret in his township and 
throughout Hancock county wherever he 
was known, for he had lived a life of 
uprightness and honor. He was no mere 
negative factor in the community but a 
citizen of exemplary rectitude of char- 
acter, who was active and energetic in 
his business life and loyal in his support 
of all the measures and movements which 
he deemed would prove of benefit in ad- 
vancing public progress and upbuilding. 
His life record began in Carthage town- 
ship on the 2Oth of April, 1844, and he 
continuously remained a resident of that 
locality. His education was acquired in 
the common schools near his father's 



home and he assisted in the work of the 
farm when not busy with his text-books. 
He was a son of William and Martha 
(Cauthorn) Kimbrough, both of whom 
were natives of Kentucky, whence they 
came to Illinois at an early day, settling 
in Hancock county. The father pur- 
chased land in Carthage township and 
there made a home for himself and fam- 
ily, devoting his time and energies to 
general agricultural pursuits and stock- 
raising. As the years passed he con- 
verted his land into productive fields and 
continued their cultivation until his 
death. His wife had passed away 
several years before. 

Under the parental roof Robert M. 
Kimgrough spent the days of his boy- 
hood and continued to reside upon the 
home farm as a young man, although to 
some extent he worked upon neighboring 
farms. He was about sixteen years of 
age when he began earning his own liv- 
ing in that way and was thus employed 
up to the time of his marriage, which was 
celebrated on the igth of January, 1871, 
Miss Almeda A. Bryant becoming his 
wife. The young couple began their 
domestic life upon a farm which Mrs. 
Kimbrough had inherited from her 
father and it was situated on section i, 
Harmony township. The place com- 
prises one hundred and sixty acres of 
land there together with thirty-seven 
acres in Carthage township. As the years 
passed by Mr. Kimbrough continued the 
work of cultivating and improving the 
fields and adding to the farm many 
modern equipments in harmony with pro- 
gressive ideas of agricultural develop- 
ment. Upon the destruction of the old 



8o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



home by fire in 1902 he erected a large 
two-story frame dwelling with all mod- 
ern conveniences, which is one of the 
attractive farm residences of this part of 
the county. He cultivated his fields 
successfully, annually harvesting large 
crops, and he was also well known as a 
capable and prosperous stock raiser, 
keeping on hand high grades of cattle, 
horses and hogs, making a specialty, 
however, of Durham cattle. He used 
the latest improved machinery to facili- 
tate the work of the fields and as the 
years passed by he converted the place 
into one of the model farms of the 
county. 

It was upon this place that Mrs. Kim- 
brough was born and reared, her natal 
day being April 19, 1847. Her parents 
were Ambrose and Susanna (Reed) 
Bryant, both of whom were natives of 
Virginia, whence they came to Illinois 
at an early day, settling in Harmony 
township, Hancock county, when it was 
still a frontier region. Mr. Bryant pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of 
land on section I and although the tract 
was wild and unimproved when it came 
into his possession, he soon converted it 
into productive fields, continuing the cul- 
tivation of the place until his death. He 
was born March 5, 1810, and passed 
away July 25, 1876, in the faith of the 
Primitive Baptist church, of which he 
had long been a devoted member. In his 
political views he was a democrat. He 
had for several years survived his wife, 
who was born November 26, 1807, and 
died February 23, 1864. Their remains 
now rest side by side in Holland ceme- 
tery in St. Mary's township. 



The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Kim- 
brough was blessed with three children, 
two of whom are living: Dennis B., 
born January n, 1872, was educated in 
Harmony township and now operates 
the old home farm. Flora S.. born on 
the home place December 19, 1874, is the 
wife of Lawrence D. Lane, who was 
born in Carthage township, Hancock ] 
county, and is a son of Thomas Lane, 
now a resident of the city of Carthage, i 
Mr. and Mrs. Lane reside with her 
mother, Mrs. Kimbrough, on the old 
farm, and to them have been born three ] 
children, of whom two are living : Hazel 
Fern, born March 4. 1894; and Oliver, j 
December 2, 1896. They lost their 
younger daughter, Neva Pearl, who was ] 
born May 31, 1904, and died June 9, 
1905. These children were all born in 
Carthage township. Leo R. Kimbrough, 
the youngest member of the family, was 
born November 13, 1880, and died Feb- 
ruary I, 1905, after an operation for ap- 
pendicitis. He was a young man of 
genuine personal worth, much loved by 
his family and a large circle of friends. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kimbrough also reared a 
niece, Emma Thompson, who was born 
January 27, 1872, in Hancock county. 
Her parents were Robert and Isabelle 
Thompson, residents of Adams county, 
the latter being a sister of Mr. Kim- 
brough. They died when their daugh- 
ter was about seven years of age, when 
she became a member of the Kimbrough 
household, in which she remained until 
her marriage on the 2gth of November, 
1893, to William Reuck, a resident 
farmer of Hancock county. Two chil- 
dren grace this union : William Clay, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



81 



born September 28, 1894; and Edna 
May, born November 29, 1899. 

Throughout his entire life Robert M. 
Kimbrough carried on general farming 
and his death occurred upon the old 
homestead March 8. 1905. when he was 
sixty years of age. He had, however, 
been in poor health for a number of 
years. He was a supporter of the Bap- 
tist church and was an ardent adherent 
of the democratic party. He held the 
office of assessor of Harmony township 
for two terms and was also school di- 
rector for some years. Although he 
never united with any church he was a 
firm believer in the Primitive Baptist doc- 
trine and lived a Christian life. In his 
last illness he suffered intensely but never 
a murmur escaped his lips. He was a 
good neighbor and a kind and indulgent 
husband and father, and he 'was always 
ready and willing to do his part. He 
possessed an adaptable nature which en- 
abled him to mingle freely and easily 
with young and old and all enjoyed his 
company. Hospitality reigned supreme 
in his home and his friends were ever 
cordially welcome. He possessed a 
genial, kindly disposition and many ster- 
ling traits of character, and all who knew 
him esteemed him highly. His entire 
life had been passed in Hancock county 
and he was a most worthy pioneer settler, 
taking a deep interest in what was ac- 
complished in the line of improvement 
and progress and doing all in his power 
to further the public good, and through- 
out his entire life he was actuated by hon- 
orable principles and manly purposes, and 
i? well worthy of representation in this 
volume. 



THADDEUS J. ELLEFRITZ. 

Thaddeus J. Ellefritz, who carries on 
general agricultural pursuits in Carth- 
age township, is a native son of Hancock 
county, having been born in Pilot Grove 
township, on the igth of April. 1869. 
His parents were Solomon A. and Mary 
A. (Botts) Ellefritz. The father's 
birth occurred in Virginia and there he 
resided until he attained his majority, 
after which he removed to Illinois, set- 
tling in Pilot Grove township, Hancock 
county. There he purchased a tract of 
land of one hundred and sixty acres, 
which he transformed into a good farm, 
making a home for himself and family. 
He lived there for a number of years, 
after which he removed to another farm 
of one hundred acres in the same town- 
ship, residing thereon until about two 
years prior to his death, when he pur- 
chased a third farm property in the same 
township, comprising one hundred and 
eighty acres. He lived thereon until his 
demise and as his financial resources in- 
creased he added more and more largely 
to his land holdings until at his death he 
was the owner of eight hundred acres, 
nearly all of which was improved land. 
He died in 1893, at the age of sixty-four 
years. Throughout his life he carried 
on general farming and stock-raising 
and was very prosperous, yet he did not 
selfishly hoard his wealth but gave to the 
support of the Methodist church and to 
many movements for the general good. 
In early manhood he wedded Mrs. Mary 
A. Coak, nee Botts, who was the widow 
of Henry Coak. She was born in St. 
Mary's township, Henry county, and is 



82 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 






still living, her home being in Carthage. 
She was the mother of seven children: 
Eugenie, the wife of L. C. Miller, of 
Carthage; Thaddeus J., of this review; 
Howard, residing in Carthage; Carlos, 
whose home is in Burnside, Illinois ; 
Bristow; Mary, deceased; and Alma, 
died in infancy. 

Thaddeus J. Ellefritz acquired his edu- 
cation in the common schools of his na- 
tive township and as a young man 
worked upon his father's farm. Later 
he began farming on his own account on 
one of the properties belonging to his 
father, the place comprising one hundred 
acres of land in Pilot Grove township. 
The mother who received all of the prop- 
erty at the time of her husband's death 
deeded our subject the one hundred acres 
near Burnside on which he had resided. 
He remained thereon until five years ago, 
when he sold that property and purchased 
a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Missouri. He lived there for only ten 
months, however, when he sold out and 
returned to Hancock county, where he 
purchased his present farm of one hun- 
dred and thirty-six acres in Carthage 
township. The entire tract is under a 
high state of cultivation and he has made 
additional improvements, including the 
planting of a fine orchard. Here he car- 
ries on general fanning and stock-rais- 
ing in addition to .the cultivation of fruit 
and he annually raises high grades of 
cattle, horses and hogs. Everything 
about his place is kept in excellent condi- 
tion and the neat and thrifty appearance 
of his farm is proof of his progressive 
spirit and practical methods. 

On April 6, 1892. Mr. Ellefritz w.-is 



married to Miss Fannie M. Pearce, who 
was born in Maryland, and came to Illi- 
nois when five years of age with her 
parents, Thomas and Sophia (Dailey) 
Pearce. Both the father and mother 
were natives of Maryland, and on com- 
ing to Illinois settled in Bowen. The 
father was a farmer by occupation and 
followed that pursuit throughout his ac- 
tive business life. He now resides in 
Burnside but his wife passed away thir- 
teen years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Ellefritz 
have become the parents of three chil- 
dren, Pernie M., Ray T. and Cleo C. 
All of the children were born in Pilot 
Grove township. 

Mr. Ellefritz is a republican but with- 
out aspiration for office, preferring to 
leave the strife of office-holding to oth- 
ers, yet doing all in his power to promote 
general improvement and progress. The 
family attend and support the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Elle- 
fritz is a member. He is successful in 
his farming operations and his carefully 
directed labors have been the means of 
securing a valuable property, which is 
highly cultivated and constitutes one of 
the fine farms of Carthage township. 



HOMER DAVENPORT BROWN. 

Homer Davenport Brown, who for 
many years was the owner of Brown's 
nursery at Hamilton, was born in 
Quincy, Illinois, March 9, 1846, and is 
a son of Homer Brown, who was born 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



Lunenburg, Massachusetts, in 1811. 
is father was overseer of the poor in 
Massachusetts for many years and 
Homer Brown, Sr., was reared upon the 
county farm. He married Miss Hannah 
Chandler Safford, who was born in New 
Ipswich, New Hampshire, in 1811. The 
maternal grandparents of our subject 
started from the east to Quincy, Illi- 
nois, and the grandfather died upon the 
road. His wife, however, continued on 
the way to Quincy with her family, where 
she spent her remaining days. She had 
three children. In the year 1832, Homer 
Brown, Sr., went to Keokuk, Iowa, 
where he engaged in business as a 
painter and painted the first sign made 
in Keokuk. He did work throughout 
this vicinity of the country and was for 
some time in Quincy, where h'e was mar- 
ried. He lived at different times in 
Hancock and Adams counties and located 
permanently where Hamilton now is. 
In fact he was one of the founders of 
the town. He purchased in 1857 what 
is now known as Wild Cat Springs, 
which property he improved and owned 
until his death. He was quite promi- 
nent, leaving the impress of his individ- 
uality upon public thought and action and 
upon the development and substantial im- 
provement of this part of the state. He 
died September 29, 1876, while his wife 
survived him for a number of years, 
passing away in Quincy, May 14, 1890. 
In the family were two sons, the elder 
being Horace Safford, who was born in 
Carthage in 1837. He was identified 
with work on the rapids of the Missis- 
sipppi river. He attended some of the 
finest schools of the country and enlisted 



in the United States navy, being engaged 
in government work at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. He now resides in Quincy and 
is a contractor for improvements made 
by the government. He married Eliza 
Brown, by whom there is one child, 
Catherine H. Brown. His wife died 
and he afterward married Jennie Elder, 
by whom he had one child, who died at 
the age of nine years. He makes his 
home in Quincy and does important 
government work. 

Homer Davenport Brown, whose name 
introduces this review, remained with his 
parents until he attained his majority, 
when he further improved the land 
where the Wild Cat Springs are located 
and where the Chautauqua assembly is 
held, which he still owns. 

On the 26th of October, 1869, Mr. 
Brown was united in marriage to Miss 
Alice Harvey, who was born in St. Cath- 
erine's, Ontario, and attended the com- 
mon schools and an academy there. She 
is a daughter of Samuel and Lucy Sophia 
(Parsons) Harvey and was their only 
child who lived to mature years. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Brown have been born two 
children: Nellie L., born June 16, 1871; 
and Harvey Homer, born November 25, 
1876. Mr. Brown is well known in 
Hamilton as an enterprising business 
man, alert and energetic, making the 
most of his opportunities and conducting 
a business along modern lines. He is 
winning gratifying success and occupies 
an enviable position in business circles 
there. He casts an independent ballot, 
having no strong political preferences but 
voting for the man whom he thinks best 
qualified to fill the offices. He has served 



BIOGRAPHICAL REJ-'IEU' 



fo,r two terms as alderman of the third 
ward and proved a capable official, sup- 
porting each measure that was intro- 
duced that he believed would prove bene- 
ficial to the town and at the same time 
opposing as strongly those measures 
which he believed might prove detri- 
mental to the welfare of the city. 



ISAAC N. HOBART. 

Isaac N. Hobart, a native of Hancock 
county, and a man of whom the county 
may well be proud, resides on his large 
and well-improved farm on section 6 of 
Hancock township. Mr. Hobart is the 
owner of three hundred acres of fine 
farming land, part of which lies in Han- 
cock township and part in Carthage 
township. 

Isaac N. Hobart was born in Foun- 
tain Green township, Hancock county, 
Illinois, on 'January 10, 1834. and was 
the son of Norman and Ura Eaton (Hol- 
liday) Hobart, the father being a native 
of Essex, New York, his birth occurring 
December 29, 1810. Norman Hobart 
came to Illinois in 1833. locating in 
Rushville, where he lived until his mar- 
riage to Miss Holliday, after which he 
came to Hancock county, where he lo- 
cated in Fountain Green township, re- 
maining but one year, and then removed 
to Carthage township. Mr. Hobart 
purchased a farm in Carthage township 
on which he made his home part of the 
time, and partly in Carthage, where he 



owned a carding machine. Later he 
bought the old grist mill on Crooked 
creek, which he rebuilt, making a steam 
flouring mill of it, also adding a saw mill 
which he operated for a number of years. 
He then moved the mill to Carthage, op- 
erating it as a grist mill, then purchased 
a farm of eighty acres, one mile from 
Carthage, which he farmed until his 
death, December 13, 1878. He was a 
devoted member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, for many years being a 
local preacher in that church. 

He was a public-spirited man and 
gave his support to the Republican party, 
though he was never an aspirant for of- 
fice. Norman Hobart was a prosperous 
man of his day and was an important 
factor in the building up of the com- 
munity in which he lived. He assisted 
in building the first wagon road from 
Fountain Green to Carthage. His re- 
mains were laid to rest in the Carthage 
cemetery. His wife was a native of 
Kentucky and came to Illinois at an early 
day. She was the daughter of Moses 
and Celia (Skirvin) Holliday, both na- 
tives of Kentucky. Mr. Holliday was a 
hatter by trade. Both parents were 
buried in Hancock county. 

This worthy couple were the parents 
of fourteen children, only two of whom 
are now living, our subject being the 
oldest in point of birth. 

Isaac N. Hobart was educated in the 
common schools of the township in which 
he lived, in the old log school houses of 
that day, and also in a school that was 
held in the old brick church in Carthage 
township, near what is now Elm Tree 
post-office. The school was taught by 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



Squire R. Davis and was a subscription 
school. When about sixteen years of 
age he went to work in the grist and 
saw mill of his father and continued at 
this for eleven years. 

On the 3 ist day of January, 1861, oc- 
curred the marriage of Isaac N. Hobart 
and Mary E. Duffy, of Hancock county, 
which union was blessed with eleven 
children, all of whom are now living. 
This large family of children are all mar- 
ried and have homes and interesting fam- 
ilies of their own, of whom Mr. and Mrs. 
Hobart are justly proud. Mary Emily, 
widow of Joseph Kuntz, has four chil- 
dren : Mary L., Leo, Harley, and 
Garret H., and resides in Missouri : 

Carrie Luella, wife of Samuel Sowers, 
a farmer in Nebraska, has six children : 
Jessie B., wife of Lee Julian, also a 
farmer in Nebraska, and parents of two 
children : Gladys and Clayton L. ; Mary 
W., Blanche, Floyd, Buby C., and 
Garret; 

Joseph N., resides in Hancock town- 
ship, farming part of the home farm, 
married Eva Wright, and has one child, 
Ray; 

Dennis W., resides in Missouri on a 
farm owned by his father, married Katie 
Murtland, and has three children : 
Glenn, Joseph, and Dennis W. ; 

Eva Elizabeth, married John McCon- 
nell, a farmer in Fountain Green town- 
ship, and has six children: Beulah E., 
Evelyn H., Margaruite, Frances, Bernice 
and Anna M. ; each of whom is a credit 
to the parents. 

Lillie Estella. wife of Morris Yutter, 
a farmer of Fountain Green township, 
and has seven children : Lewis N., 



Alma E., Jennings B., Harry, Ross M., 
Mabel and Fay Hobart; 

Matilda E., wife of John Herron, a 
farmer of Nebraska, and has four chil- 
dren : John Newton, Erma G., Charles 
and Joseph Bernard; 

Ura Amanda, wife of Wayman Mills, 
a farmer and saw-mill owner of Carth- 
age township, and has three children : 
Mary E., deceased, Dennis W., and 
Myrtle ; 

Isaac N., resides on part of the home 
place, which he farms, married Mary 
Hasten and has two children : Gladys 
M., and Ivan ; 

Ethel B., wife of William E. Koontz, 
a farmer in Hancock township, has three 
children : Forrest U., Franklin Clay, 
and Fern ; 

Mabel Grace, widow of Gerald Mos- 
ley, who died in Colorado, where he had 
gone for his health, his death occurring 
September 20, 1905. Mrs. Mosley has 
one child, Herman Harold, born June 
7. 1904. 

All of the children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hobart were born in Hancock township. 
Hancock county. Mr. Hobart is a large 
landowner, part of his property lying in 
Hancock county, and part in Missouri. 
He has made many improvements on his 
farms, and keeps his buildings in the very 
best of repair. For many years he has 
engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising. His wife was the daughter of 
Anthony and Mary Matilda (Spangler) 
Duffy, early residents 'of Hancock coun- 
ty, the mother being called from earth 
in July, 1872, and the father in Septem- 
ber. 1884, after having mourned the death 
of his companion about twelve years. 



86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV IE}}' 



Mr. and Mrs. Hobart have lasting 
monuments in the well-kept properties 
which they have accumulated, and are 
surrounded by many happy families of 
their children. 

Mr. Hobart has used his progressive- 
ness and good judgment to the better- 
ment of the community in which he 
makes his home, as well as for the ad- 
vancement of his own welfare, and is a 
man whose counsel is asked and heeded 
by his contemporaries. 



LEVERETT WELLINGTON BUELL. 

Leverett W. Buell, formerly identified 
with farming interests and later en- 
gaged in the hotel business in Dallas, is 
now living retired. Centuries ago the 
Greek philosopher uttered the words of 
wisdom, "Earn thy reward : the gods 
give naught to sloth," and this truth has 
been manifest in all the ages. Mr. Buell 
is one who has justly earned all that he 
possesses and a life of activity is now 
crowned with an honorable rest. A na- 
tive of Connecticut, he was born in 
Killingsworth, Middlesex county, Febru- 
ary 22, 1840, a son of William and 
Louisa (Chatfield) Buell, who were like- 
wise natives of that place. The father 
was a farmer by occupation, and enlisted 
in the war of .1812 but was not called 
out for active service. He filled the of- 
fices of justice of the peace and road com- 
missioner and gave his political support 
to the democracy. He held membership 
in the Methodist church, while his wife 
belonged to the Presbyterian church and 



both died in the place of their nativity. 
They had five children, of whom four 
are now living: Leverett W., Cornelia, \ 
the wife of Joseph H. Beal, a Methodist 
minister living in Portland, Maine ; Jen- 
nie, now Mrs. Snow, of New Haven, 
Connecticut; and Celestra, wife of Dar- 
well Stone, of Guilford, Connecticut. 

L. W. Buell was educated in Killings- 
worth, Connecticut, and engaged in 
farming with his father until 1864, when 
he engaged in butchering and the meat 
business for 'five years. His marriage 
occurred in 1865, Miss Celestine E. 
Parmelee becoming his wife. She was 
bom in Killingsworth, a daughter of 
Orin S. and Phoebe (Lynes) Parmelee, 
both of whom died in Connecticut, the 
mother being killed in a runaway acci- 
dent. In their family were nine chil- 
dren, of whom three are living. Mrs. 
Buell died April 21, 1879, and was buried 
in Durham township, Hancock county. 
She had two children, one of whom died 
in infancy, while Frank W. was killed 
by a traction engine in Carthage town- 
ship, March 24, 1905. He was a most 
highly respected and worthy young man, 
and his death came as a great blow to his 
father. He had married Emma Heiler, 
who still lives in Carthage township, and 
they had three children -Ethel, Chesley 
and El wood. On the 2ist of September, 
1 88 1, Mr. Buell married Mrs. Mary J. 
Potter, nee Robinson, whose parents live 
on a farm in Kansas. They had seven 
children : William and John, who are 
residents of Colusa, , Illinois, and were 
soldiers of the Civil war; Martha and 
Elizabeth, both of Kansas; and Percival, 
of Oklahoma, who served in the Philip- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



pine war. Mrs. Buell is the other mem- 
ber of the family. She lost her first hus- 
band in 1869. There were four children 
by that marriage, the eldest of which died 
in infancy, the others being: Louisa, the 
eldest, is the wife of Lemuel Wells, of 
Pontoosuc, Illinois, by whom she has five 
children : Sarah, the wife of Cleo Price, 
of Dallas, and the mother of one child, 
and Jesse, Imogen, Mariette and Helen, 
all at home; Charlotte Potter is the wife 
of Albert Thai-inert, a traveling man for 
a Burlington hardware store, now living 
in Red Oak, Iowa. Warren Potter, who 
is living in North Chillicothe, Illinois, 
married Emma Snyder, of Burlington. 
They have four children : Harry LeRoy, 
Marie, Clifford and Allen. 

Mr. Buell came west in 1869 in No- 
vember, engaged in farming in Durham 
township until 1886, when on account 
of his health he retired to Dallas, pur- 
chasing a home on Front street, after 
spending two years as proprietor of the 
Riverside Hotel, of Dallas, which was 
destroyed by fire in 1890. He then 
bought his present home and he also 
owns a vacant lot in Kerby's first ad- 
dition. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Buell has been 
born a son, William Henry, who was 
born in Senora township, July 30, 1885, 
and is at home. For four years he has 
worked as a painter in Burg's factory. 
Mr. and Mrs. Buell are also rearing her 
niece, Verda Robinson, whose mother 
died when she was a little girl. She was 
born in November, 1894. In his po- 
litical views Mr. Buell is a democrat and 
has served as town clerk and a commis- 
sioner of highways of Durham township. 
6 



He is a member of Dallas City Lodge 
No. 235 A. F. & A. M. of which he is 
past master, also a member of Dallas 
Chapter No. in, of which he has been 
tyler for many years. A Methodist in 
religious faith and -an active worker in 
the church, he was Sunday-school super- 
intendent and secretary for thirteen years 
and sexton of the church for many years, 
while for three years he was also sexton 
of the Congregational church. His wife 
is a member of the Christian church, 
Mr. Buell is an intelligent man, of kind 
and generous disposition and of quiet 
manner. His wife, too, possesses many 
sterling traits of character and in the 
community where they reside they are 
accorded the approval of public opinion. 



BARZILLAI ROBINSON. 

Barzillai Robinson, a retired farmer 
living in Hamilton, was born in Mus- 
kingum county, Ohio, June 23, 1830, 
and is a representative of one of the 
old southern families. His paternal 
grandfather, Israel Robinson, was born 
in Virginia and married a Miss Hedge. 
They were early settlers of Ohio, remov- 
ing to that state when the Indians were 
more numerous than the white men. 
They aided in reclaiming the region from 
the domain of the savages and converting 
it into uses of civilization and there they 
resided until called to their final rest. 
Their son, Silas Robinson, was born in 
Wellsburg, West Virginia, in 1798, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was a descendant of Sarah Pierce, who 
came to America in the Mayflower, land- 
ing at Plymouth. After arriving at years 
of maturity, Silas Robinson was married 
to Miss Polly Warne, who was born in 
Muskingum county, Ohio, in 1802, and 
was a daughter of Abram and Elizabeth 
(Pierce) Warne, both of whom were 
natives of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Polly 
Robinson was a descendant of James 
Pierce and the name Pierce was retained 
in the family through many generations. 
The maternal grandparents of our sub- 
ject removed to Ohio about the same 
time the Robinson family was founded 
there and they, too, lived in that locality 
until called to the home beyond. Silas 
Robinson and Polly Warne were married 
in Ohio, where he owned and operated 
a quarter section of land and also con- 
ducted a gristmill in connection with his 
farm. In 1852 he started westward 
with his family, consisting of wife, three 
sons and one daughter, driving through 
in a wagon. They were two weeks upon 
the way from their Ohio home to Wythe 
township, Hancock county. Here Mr. 
Robinson purchased a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of unimproved 
prairie land. They lived in a little log 
cabin until the following fall, when a 
neighbor returned to his old Ohio home 
and the Robinsons then occupied his two- 
story frame house. A few months after- 
ward, however, this house was destroyed 
by fire, but as soon as possible Mr. Rob- 
inson erected a frame house on his own 
farm. He began the work of fencing the 
fields and breaking the land and as the 
years passed by he improved his farm 
until he made it a splendidly developed 



property. He was an energetic, enter- 
prising man and was well known as one 
of the leading farmers of his community. 
His death occurred in 1894, while his 
wife passed away in 1866. 

Mr. Robinson of this review was the 
third in order of birth in a family of 
three sons and a daughter. The days of 
his boyhood and youth were passed in the 
usual manner of farm lads, no event of 
special importance occurring to vary the 
routine of that life in his boyhood days. 
His father had accumulated considerable 
land and afterward divided it among his 
children, Mr. Robinson securing one 
hundred and twenty acres of the old 
home place. There was a log cabin upon 
this tract, into which he removed after 
his marriage, which event occurred on 
the 3 ist of December, 1863, the lady of 
his choice being Miss Priscilla Callison, 
who was born in Illinois. She died in 
1866 and in October, 1873, Mr. Robinson 
was again married, his second union be- 
ing with Mrs. Mollie E. (Chapman) 
Hill, a widow, who was born in Ohio 
and was a daughter of Nathaniel and 
Mary (Frazee) Chapman. Unto this 
marriage three children have been born : 
Mary Chapman, who is now teaching 
school in Hamilton; Wayland B., who 
occupies the home farm; and Jessie M. 
at home. 

Following his first marriage Mr. Rob- 
inson began general farming and also 
raising and feeding horses, cattle and 
hogs. He was thus actively engaged for 
many years and kept adding to his land 
until he was the owner of two hundred 
acres, constituting a valuable property 
on sections 7 and 8, Wythe township. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



89 



He worked energetically and persistently 
year after year, gathering good crops 
and realizing good returns from his 
stock. At length after many years of 
active and successful connection with 
farming and stock-raising interests he re- 
tired to private life and in May, 1903, 
removed to Hamilton, where he pur- 
chased a residence which he now occupies 
with his two daughters, his wife having 
died in April, 1883. He has recently 
sold his farm to his son Wayland. In 
earh- manhood he engaged in teaching 
schools for a year before leaving Ohio 
and for three terms after coming to Han- 
cock county, but otherwise he has always 
made farming his life work and is now 
enjoying a well-earned rest. He is 
known as a man of thorough reliability 
and enterprise and enjoys the respect of 
those with whom he has corrte in contact. 
He has lived in the county for more than 
a half century and has therefore wit- 
nessed much of its growth and develop- 
ment. Without special advantages in his 
youth, he has worked his way steadily 
upward to success. He attended school 
only during the winter months when a 
boy, but has acquired through practical 
experience and observation a good busi- 
ness education. In his religious faith he 
is a Presbyterian and in his political 
views a republican. He has served as 
school trustee and assessor of Wythe 
township and at all times has been in- 
terested in movements for the general 
good. His services for the public have 
always been rendered with a view to the 
public good and from the standpoint of 
a patriotic citizen, none too many of which 
are to be found in this great country. 



WILLIAM T. DYE. 

The farming interests of Carthage 
township find a worthy representative in 
William T. Dye, who is living on section 
9, where he owns one hundred and 
twenty acres of good land. He is a na- 
tive of Brown county, Ohio, born Sep- 
tember 5, 1855, an d when only seven 
months old was brought to Illinois by his 
parents, who settled in Rock River town- 
ship, Hancock county, where the father 
purchased and improved a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres. He is a son of 
Wilson and Anna (Wall) Dye. both of 
whom were natives of Brown county, 
Ohio. The father engaged in farming 
there and followed the same pursuit sub- 
sequent to his removal to this state. Pur- 
chasing land in Rock River township he 
continued to make his home thereon un- 
til his death, which occurred when he 
was thirty-eight years of age. He was 
a member of the Presbyterian church and 
a democrat in his political views, and 
throughout an active life he manifested 
sterling traits of character which won 
him the respect and confidence of his fel- 
lowmen. He was also one of the pros- 
perous and progressive residents of his 
community and in addition to his farm- 
ing interests he engaged in business as 
a bridge contractor and constructed sev- 
eral bridges near Warsaw, Hancock 
county. It was while building one of 
these bridges that he caught cold and 
pneumonia resulted, being terminated by 
death when his son William was but four 
years of age. His grave was made in the 
Carthage cemetery. His widow survived 
him for about six years and was married 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to James Thompson. She died at or near 
Bentley, this state. By the first marriage 
there were four children, of whom Wil- 
liam T. was the third in order of birth. 
Only two are now living-, his sister being 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. L. Harper, who re- 
sides in Carthage, Hancock county, 
Illinois. 

William T. Dye was educated in the 
common schools of Carthage, his mother 
having sold the farm and removed to that 
city in his boyhood days. He remained 
with her until her death, and at the early 
age of eleven years started out to fight 
life's battles unaided. He engaged in 
farm work by the month on various 
farmstof the county, being thus employed 
until his marriage, which occurred on the 
5th of October, 1876, the wedding be- 
ing celebrated in Carthage. The lady of 
his choice was Miss Hortense Yetter, a 
daughter of William and Mary (Long) 
Yetter. Her father was one of the early 
settlers of this county, coming here from 
Ohio, his native state. He engaged in 
farming throughout his active business 
life with the exception of the period 
spent in the Civil war, in which he served 
for nearly four years. He is now living 
a retired life, making his home in the 
city of Carthage. Mrs. Dye was born 
in Hancock county, Illinois, pursued her 
education in the public schools and re- 
mained at home until her marriage. This 
union has been blessed with four children 
and the family circle yet remains un- 
broken by the hand of death. All were 
born in Carthage. Joseph E., the eldest, 
resides on the home place and assists his 
father in its cultivation and improve- 
ment. He married Miss Ollie Van Dyke, 



and they have one child, William Fran- 
cis. Frank L., the second son, residing 
in Springfield. Illinois, is an employe of 
one of the interurban railroads. He 
married Esta Reed and they have two 
children, Leland H. and Ruth I. Ro- 
wena May is the wife of Frank G. 
Wright, a resident farmer of Carthage 
township, and has one child, Goldie 
Mae. Homer W., a student in the Carth- 
age high school is yet with his parents. 
For sixteen years after his marriage 
Mr. Dye operated rented land in Carth- 
age township, and in 1888 purchased 
his present farm, on which he has since 
resided. He put all of the present im- 
provements upon the place, supplanting 
the old house with a good substantial 
frame dwelling, also erecting commodi- 
ous barns and other outbuildings. He 
has the entire farm under cultivation and 
annually gathers rich harvests. In addi- 
tion to the tilling of the soil he also en- 
gages in the raising of stock and his 
business interests are capably managed 
and bring to him a good return. His 
life has been one of untiring activity, 
crowned with a gratifying measure of 
success, yet he has found time to devote 
to public interests. In politics he is a 
democrat and has held the office of high- 
way commissioner for eight years and is 
still filling the position. He, with his 
wife, is a member of the Presbyterian 
church ; he is also a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity of Carthage, the Modern 
Woodmen camp and the Illinois Bank- 
ers, a local fraternal and insurance or- 
ganization of this state. Viewed in a 
personal light Mr. Dye is a strong man, 
strong in his honor and good name, in 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



9 1 



his business capacity and in his accom- 
plishments. Starting out when only 
eleven years of age with no assistance 
from influential friends or through in- 
heritance, he owes all that he possesses 
to his own labors and as the architect 
of his fortunes has builded wisely and 
well. 



CAMILLE P. DADANT. 

Camille P. Dadant, president of the 
National Beekeepers Association and the 
vice president of the State Bank of Ham- 
ilton, is justly accorded a place among 
the prominent and representative busi- 
ness men of Hancock county. In fact 
few residents of the county have such a 
wide acquaintance as Mr. Dadant, who 
is known by reason of his manufacturing 
interests not only throughout America 
but in foreign lands as well. It has been 
said that the name of Dadant is a fa- 
miliar one wherever bee culture is carried 
on. The enterprise of which he is now 
the head, has reached extensive propor- 
tions and in its control he displays 
splendid business ability, executive force, 
keen foresight and capable management. 

A native of Langres, France, he was 
born on the 6th of April- 1851, and in 
both the paternal and maternal lines rep- 
resents old French families. His paternal 
great-grandfather was a locksmith of 
France. His grandfather. Dr. Francois 
Dadant, engaged in the practice of med- 
icine and surgery in his native country 
throughout his entire life and was there 
married to Justine Jayet. Their son. 



Charles Dadant, was born amid the 
golden hills of Burgundy at Vaux-Sous- 
Aubigny, France, on the 22cl of May, 
1817, and his education was completed 
by a collegiate course at Langres. 
While in his native country he wedded 
Gabrielle Parisot in 1847, ner parents 
being Pierre and Louise (Guillemot) 
Parisot. 

Charles Dadant was engaged in the 
operation of a tannery in his native coun- 
try, but devoted the greater part of his 
attention to merchandising until the ven- 
ture proved unprofitable, when, closing 
out his affairs in France, he sought a 
home in the new world, hoping to re- 
trieve his fortunes in this country, nor 
was he destined to meet disappointment 
in this respect. On the contrary he en- 
tered upon a business career that proved 
eminently successful and gained him 
world-wide reputation in connection with 
his chosen line of endeavor. He came at 
once to Illinois and settled on a farm 
about two miles from Hamilton in Han- 
cock county. He had planned to devote 
his attention to the cultivation of grapes, 
with which business he had become fa- 
miliar in his youth in France, but at the 
same time he began the raising of bees 
and the latter proved so profitable that 
he concentrated his energies more and 
more largely upon this business, which 
he also developed along ramifying lines 
until he was recognized as one of the 
most prominent and extensive bee cul- 
turists not only in America but also in 
the world. Perhaps there are others who 
have produced as great an amount of 
honey in a single season, but there was 
no one who equalled him in the extent 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV IE}}' 



of his comb foundation manufacture or in 
the importation of bees. The occupation 
proved both genial and profitable and 
yielded marvelous results. In 1873 he 
made a trip to Italy to import bees from 
that country to the United States on a 
large scale. He made a close study of 
the best methods of shipping bees, selling 
the Italian queen bees at ten dollars each 
or a colony for twenty dollars. In 1869, 
his son. Camille P. Dadant, whose name 
introduces this review, was admitted to 
a partnership and from that time for- 
ward until the father's death they were 
closely associated in their business rela- 
tions and interests and the account of the 
father's work for the development of 
their enterprise is also the account of the 
son's labors. In 1878 they began the 
manufacture of comb foundation, intend- 
ing the product only for their own use, 
as they were extensive .bee keepers. The 
first year they manufactured five hun- 
dred pounds. Others, however, sought 
to become purchasers and this led them 
to increase their output to two thousand 
pounds the second year and six thousand 
pounds the third year and the increase 
has been continued at a proportionate or 
even greater rate until in the year end- 
ing July i, 1904, they had manufactured 
one hundred and fifteen thousand 
pounds, thus giving them leadership 
among the manufacturers of comb foun- 
dation not only in America but in the 
world. A visit to the factory shows that 
it is equipped with every device neces- 
sary for the successful conduct of the 
work, the greatest care is taken in every 
department toward securing perfection 
and the absolutely perfect comb founda- 



tion secures a most extensive and profit- 
able sale. 

Mr. Dadant's business consisted not 
only in the comb manufacture and the 
production of honey, the latter reaching 
way up into the thousands of pounds 
annually, but he also did much for bee 
culture throughout the world through 
the articles contributed to the leading bee 
journals of America and foreign lands 
as well. It is a noticeable fact in his 
history that when he came to the United 
States at the age of forty-six years he 
was unable to speak the English lan- 
guage, but the strength of purpose and 
will shown by him is indicated by the 
fact that he at once subscribed to the 
New York Tribune and denied himself 
any French papers or books so that he 
should be compelled to acquaint himself 
with the English tongue, using freely a 
dictionary for this purpose, Within 
three years he had acquired a mastery 
of English sufficient to enable him to' 
write articles for the American Bee 
Journal, then published in Washington, 
D. C. He wielded a pen of still greater 
power when writing in his native lan- 
guage and it was due to his efforts 
through his published articles that the 
movable frame hive is today so much in 
use among French-speaking people, the 
Dadant and the Dadant-Blatt hives being 
among the most common in France. In 
1886 he revised and republished the book 
of Langstroth on the Honey Bee, which 
has been styled the "classic in bee cul- 
ture." This work was published almost 
simultaneously in America, France and 
Russia. The three latest editions were 
printed at Keokuk, Iowa, near his home. 






HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



93 



His teachings spread over the world and 
there is not a civilized country where his 
name is unknown to progressive bee 
keepers. In 1874 he published a small 
book, Petit Cours d'Apiculteur Pratique, 
in the French language. His attention 
was given to the business of raising bees, 
producing honey and manufacturing 
the comb foundation up to the time of 
his death, which occurred in 1902, when 
he was in his eighty-fifth year. His busi- 
ness integrity was unassailable. He was 
never known to take advantage of the 
necessities of his fellowmen in any trade 
transaction but was a soul of honor and 
straightforward dealing in all business 
affairs. He was moreover a man of 
kindly purpose, of generous spirit and 
genial disposition and made friends of 
all with whom he came in contact. He 
possessed a most cheerful disposition 
and those who have had the pleasure of 
an acquaintance with him in his own 
home will testify to his genial and cordial 
spirit. He possessed, too, much of the 
spirit of the philanthropist, taking the 
most kindly interest in those whom he 
employed. He encouraged all of his 
French workmen to have homes of their 
own and allowed them certain times in 
which to cultivate their vines and work 
their ground. Ideal relations existed 
in the home. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Dadant 
were born two daughters and a son : 
Mary ; Mrs. E. J. Baxter, of Nauvoo ; 
and C. P. Dadant, whose name intro- 
duces this record. 

The last named was a youth of twelve 
years when he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to America. From 
this time forward his youth was passed 



at the old homestead near Hamilton and 
at the age of twenty-four years he was 
admitted to a partnership by his father 
and the firm style of Dadant & Son has 
since been well known among the bee 
culturists of America and foreign lands. 
He now keeps about two hundred and fifty 
hives of bees and sold one hundred thou- 
sand pounds of foundation for honey comb 
in the year 1905. One of his buildings, 
constructed of iron and then painted, con- 
tains only beeswax and holds something 
like twenty thousand pounds. It is 
usually kept full, for it is the purpose of 
the firm to have on hand always a large 
supply of the only suitable material for 
making their excellent comb foundation. 
The bulk of the foundation made by the 
firm is the Weed process, which refers 
to the method of sheeting the wax be- 
fore milling it. The largest crop of 
honey for one year was forty-five thou- 
sand pounds, from which they realized 
twenty-eight hundred dollars net of all 
expenses. They use the Dadant hive, 
which is of their own invention and 
manufacture and they believe in having 
large hives and big colonies and thus 
have practically no swarms of bees. 
After the death of his father Mr. Dadant 
of this review admitted his sons, Louis 
C. and Henry C., to a partnership and 
thus the firm style of Dadant & Sons was 
maintained. Mr. Dadant has also ex- 
tended his business interests to other 
lines, being one of the organizers of the 
State Bank of Hamilton, of which he is 
the vice president. He was also one of 
the promoters of the water power of the 
Mississippi river for building a dam 
across the river from Keokuk to Hamil- 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ton. The company formed for this pur- 
pose is composed of twenty-five mem- 
bers and Mr. Dadant became one of the 
executive committee of three, his asso- 
ciates being William Logan and A. E. 
Johnstone, of Keokuk. A man of re- 
sourceful business ability, keen enterprise 
and sound judgment, he carries forward 
to successful completion whatever he un- 
dertakes and has developed a business at 
Hamilton which has become one of the 
important productive enterprises of his 
county. 

On the ist of November, 1875, Mr. 
Dadant was married to Miss Mary Mari- 
nelli, who was born in St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. August 9, 1854, and was a daugh- 
ter of Luigi Marinelli, a pioneer of the 
French Icarian community that settled in 
Nauvoo in 1848. His wife was Fran- 
coise Marinelli and their daughter, Mrs. 
Dadant, attended the common schools of 
Saint Clair county, Illinois. She shares 
with her husband in extending a warm- 
hearted, attractive and gracious hospi- 
tality to their many friends. They have 
a beautiful riew home, a substantial brick 
residence, which was completed in 1904. 
From the rear is had a splendid view of 
the Mississippi river as it flows south- 
ward for nearly fourteen miles and across 
the river stands the city of Keokuk. In 
addition to this Mr. Dadant owns other 
property interests in and about Hamil- 
ton. Unto" him and his wife have been 
born three sons and four daughters, 
namely : Louisa, the wife of Leon 
Saugier, of Hamilton : Valentine M., 
who attended the University of Illinois 
and is president of the Hamilton library, 
an organization which was formed sev- 



eral years ago and of which the town is 
justly proud, Louis C., who married 
Eza Miller and lives near the main 
factory of the firm, being associated with 
his father in business; Henry C., who is 
also a partner and resides at home ; 
Maurice G., who is a student in the Illi- 
nois State University at Champaign ; 
Clemence and Harrietta, who are at 
home. 

In his political views Mr. Dadant is a 
republican and has served as school trus- 
tee of Montebelle township, but other- 
wise has neither sought nor held public 
office. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Naturally, however, his attention is 
chiefly directed to his business interests, 
which are now of a varied and extensive 
nature and are a source of gratifying 
profit. The name of Dadant & Son has 
ever been synonoymous with honorable 
dealing and success has come as the mer- 
ited reward of business integrity, enter- 
prise and diligence. Uniformly courteous 
and considerate of others, he at the same 
time possesses a force of character that 
everywhere commands respect and accom- 
plishes results and is today accounted 
one of the most honored and respected 
citizens of Hancock county. 



ROBERT A. BARR. 

Robert A. Barr, a fanner living near 
Colusa, whose success in life is attribut- 
able entirely to his own efforts, was 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



95 



born February 13, 1871, upon the old 
family homestead in Dallas township, 
his parents being George W. and Mary 
E. (Dean) Barr. , The father was born 
in Breckinridge county, Kentucky, near 
Louisville, in 1844, while the mother's 
birth occurred in Ohio in 1848. He be- 
came a resident of Dallas township on 
the 2d of April, 1859, and is still the 
owner of the farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres on which his son, Robert A., 
now resides. Unto him and his wife 
were born three children: Etta E., now 
the wife of Elmer Royse, of Aledo, Illi- 
nois ; Robert A. ; and Mary Otellia, who 
is living with her parents in Dallas City, 
the father having retired from active 
farm life to enjoy a rest which he has 
truly earned and richly deserves. 

Robert A. Barr began his education in 
the district schools of Dallas township 
and continued his studies in Carthage 
College, where he remained for two 
years. Through the period of his youth 
and after attaining his majority he re- 
mained with his parents on the old home- 
stead, living with them until thirty-one 
years of age and during the latter part of 
that period practically carrying on the 
work of the home farm. On the 26th 
of February, 1902, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ethel Elizabeth Massie. 
who was bom in Fountain Green town- 
ship. Hancock county, August 13, 1882, 
a daughter of John S. and Mary E. 
(Myers) Massie. The father was born 
in Rock Creek township, this county, Oc- 
tober 24, 1855, and the mother's birth 
occurred in Iowa, October 21, 1859. She 
was four or five years of age when 
brought by her parents to Hancock 



county. Mr. and Mrs. Massie are well 
krjown residents of Pontoosuc township 
and in the control of his business inter- 
ests the father has become well-to-do 
and is accounted a representative agricul- 
turist of his community. Unto him and 
his wife have been born eight children : 
Ethel E., Stuart M., living in Montana; 
Goldy V., deceased ; Grover C. ; Fern 
F. : Cheryl Beatrice ; Ralph Emerson ; 
and Ruby Marie. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Ban- 
rented his father's farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres on section 36, Dallas 
township, which is one of the best farms 
in Hancock county, and he has since 
given his time and energies to its further 
cultivation and improvement. He has 
brought the fields under a high state of 
cultivation and is regarded as one of the 
model fanners of the community. As the 
years have passed the home has been 
blessed with the presence of three chil- 
dren : Homer Dysinger, born Decem- 
ber 17, 1902; Emmet Cleophas, July 6, 
1904; and Ada Cheryl, December 15, 
1905. All were born in the house in 
which their father's birth occurred and 
they constitute a most interesting family. 

In his political views Mr. Barr is a 
democrat and has served as constable for 
two terms but has never been a politician 
in the sense of office-seeking, as he has 
preferred to devote his time and energies 
to his business interests. He had no 
money when he was married and started 
out in life on his own account, but 
through his economy, energy and un- 
faltering industry and the assistance of 
his estimable wife, who has indeed been 
a helpmate to him, he has accumulated 



9 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a considerable share of this world's goods 
and is accounted one of the leading and 
representative farmers of his community. 
He is well read, keeping informed on all 
matters of general interest as well as the 
political questions of the day and is a 
man of genial, jovial disposition, who 
has many warm friends. He belongs to 
the Modern Woodmen lodge of Colusa 
and for three years has been clerk and 
holds a certificate of efficiency from the 
Court of Honor. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Christian church and 
Mr. Barr is a man of domestic taste, 
thoroughly devoted to his family, their 
welfare and happiness. 



CHARLES E. CLARK. 

Charles E. Clark, a retired farmer liv- 
ing in Dallas City, was born March 10, 
1868, in the city which is still his home, 
and is a son of William J. and Abigail 
(Ellis) Clark. The father was born in 
Sangamon county, Illinois, October 16, 
1837, and the mother in Vevay, Switzer- 
land county, Indiana, May 25, 1836. She 
became a resident of Hancock county in 
1841, and William J. Clark was only 
about six years of age when he accom- 
panied his parents to this county, where 
they were married February 27, 1859. 
Both were representatives of honored old 
pioneer families of this portion of the 
state. The maternal and paternal grand- 
parents settled here in an early day and 
for some years lived in log cabins, spend- 



ing their days in true pioneer style amid 
the environments of frontier life. The 
father of our subject cleared and devel- 
oped several farms which he sold at a 
good advance, and as the years passed by 
he successfully carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuits. He died October 10, 
1870, his widow surviving until July 23, 
1905, and both were laid to rest in Har- 
ris cemetery, in Dallas township. Mr. 
Clark was a soldier of the Civil war, en- 
listing as a member of Company F, Fif- 
tieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which 
he joined near the close of hostilities. 
He was with the company" that responded 
to a call for the protection of Chicago 
and thus served until mustered out. He 
stanchly advocated republican principles 
and was a faithful member of the Chris- 
tian church. They had three children but 
the two daughters died in early child- 
hood. 

Charles E. Clark, the only surviving 
member of the family, was educated in 
the common schools of Dallas City and 
at the age of twelve years went to the 
country with his mother, settling upon a 
farm in Durham township where he lived 
until 1899. He was then married to Mrs. 
Martha Ackerson, widow of George Ack- 
erson, who in her maidenhood bore the 
name of Martha E. Howard. She was 
born in Adams county, Illinois, in 1851, 
a daughter of Henry and Mary Ann 
Howard, the former born April 23, 1825, 
and the latter February 18, 1827. Mr. 
Howard was a native of Dayton, Ohio, 
and his wife of Indiana. He devoted 
his life to general agricultural pursuits 
and when eighteen years of age became 
a resident of Crawford countv, Illinois. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



97 



where he resided for seven years, then re- 
moving to Adams county where he re- 
sided until about 1857 when he came to 
Dallas township, where he made his home 
for many years until the time of his death. 
In politics he was a democrat and having 
removed to Hancock county in 1857, he 
served for nineteen years as township 
treasurer here. His wife died May 7, 
1885, and his death occurred on the 17* 
of March, 1898, both being laid to rest in 
Harris cemetery. They had ten chil- 
dren, of whom four are now living: Mrs. 
Martha E. Clark; Mary Ann, the wife of 
William Robinson, of Dallas township; 
Charlotte, the wife of Edward Gill, of 
Dallas township; and Angelina, the wife 
of Philip Ritchey, of Dallas township. 

After a year's residence in the south 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Clark located in 
Dallas City, Hancock county, he owning 
a farm of eighty acres in Durham town- 
ship. Mrs. Clark also owns eighty acres 
in Dallas township. He was a successful 
farmer and stock-raiser. He and his wife 
occupy a beautiful home at the corner of 
Front and Pine streets which Mrs. Clark 
purchased from her father's estate in 
1899. Since then Mr. Clark has retired, 
having rented the farm but he still over- 
sees it. 

In his political views Mr. Clark has al- 
ways been a strong republican but with- 
out aspiration for office. Both he and his 
wife are devoted members of the Chris- 
tian church, in which he has been a deacOn 
for a number of years, and in the work 
of the church they take an active and help- 
ful interest. Of a studious nature, very 
fond of books, he reads broadly, thinks 
deeply and is an intelligent man. Both 



he and his estimable wife have the warm 
regard of many friends, she being a lady 
of pleasing address, presiding with gra- 
cious hospitality over her home. They 
are now surrounded by all the comforts 
that go to make life worth living, occu- 
pying an attractive and pleasant home in 
Dallas City. 



S. E. HARNEST. 

S. E. Harnest, a retired farmer living 
in Carthage, was born in Champaign 
county, Ohio, March 8, 1835, his parents 
being John and Anna (Spitler) Harnest, 
the former born September 20, 1797, 
and the latter April 3, 1809, their birth- 
place being Upshire county, Virginia. 
The paternal grandfather was a soldier of 
the Revolutionary war, valiantly aiding in 
the struggle for independence. The an- 
cestral history of the family was one of 
which the descendants have every reason 
to be proud, for the men have displayed 
activity and honor in business and fidelity 
in all life's relations, while the women 
have been marked by the true womanly 
traits of character which command the 
highest respect. The paternal grand- 
parents, John and Anna Harnest, were 
charter members of the Myrtle Tree Bap- 
tist church in Champaign county, Ohio. 
This church was organized April 24, 
1830, by Elder William Fuson, the first 
meeting being held on the first Sunday 
in April, 1830. It was estimated that one 
thousand people were in attendance on 



9 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



this occasion, every section of the county 
being represented. The name of the 
church was chosen because of the follow- 
ing circumstance. A short time before 
the organization, the wife of Elder Fuson 
had a dream that she had read the first 
chapter on Zachariah before retiring for 
the night and meditated on the beauty of 
the myrtle tree, and in her dream she saw 
the tree in the lovely valley, beholding it 
in all its glory. The dream so impressed 
her that at her request the church was 
called the Myrtle Tree church. Its orig- 
inal members were George Pine, Bryant 
Moody, John Hamest, James Pine, Wil- 
liam Fuson, Phebe Moody, Ann Harnest, 
Sarah Pine, Sarah Pine, Sr., Deidamia 
Fuson, Lucy Comer and Elizabeth Whit- 
more. All of the above have entered into 
the church triumphant. Eight of the 
number received their letters of dismissal 
from the Symm's Creek Baptist church in 
Lawrence county, Ohio, in order to at- 
tend the newly-organized Myrtle Tree 
church, while the remaining five had for- 
merly beep members of the Nettle Creek 
church. John Harnest. the grandfather 
of S. E. Harnest, was the first baptismal 
candidate. He had served as a soldier 
of the Revolutionary war in connection 
with the father of Elder Fuson and he 
was the first person buried in the ceme- 
tery of the new church, his death occur- 
ring on the roth of September, 1830. John 
Harnest, Jr.. was elected clerk and John 
Harnest, Sr., deacon of the church. A 
house of worship was erected shortly after 
the organization of the church on land 
purchased of Samuel Kite, the consider- 
ation for the property being a calico 
dress for Mrs. Kite. Elder Fuson con- 



tinued pastor there until September 25, 
1841, when old age compelled him to 
resign. 

John Harnest, father of our subject, 
was a native of Virginia, later moved to 
Ohio and removed from that state to 
Hancock county, Illinois, in 1838. He 
found a pioneer district and at once be- 
gan to clear the land and built a log cabin. 
Every evidence of frontier life was here 
to be seai, and he killed many deer, tur- 
keys and wolves in those early days. The 
homes of the settlers were widely scat- 
tered and many of the now thriving towns 
and villages had not yet been founded. 
Through a long period he carried on ag- 
ricultural pursuits and bore an active and 
helpful part in the work of public prog- 
ress, aiding in laying broad and deep the 
foundation for the present upbuilding and 
progress of the county. In politics he was 
a democrat and for many years served as 
school director. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Missionary Baptist 
church, taking an active and helpful part 
in its work and for a number of years he 
served as one of its deacons. In the fam- 
ily were twelve children, three of whom 
survive : Daniel S., who is living in Ar- 
kansas; S. E., of this review; and Mary 
J., the widow of Palestine Wright, of 
Carthage. The father died November i, 
1864, and his remains were interred in the 
Ray graveyard. The mother long sur- 
vived him, departing this life in June, 
1896. 

S. E. Harnest attended the district 
schools of Carthage township and re- 
mained upon his father's farm until twen- 
ty-six years of age. assisting in the ardu- 
ous task of developing new land and shar- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



99 



ing with the family in the hardships and 
privations incident to life on the frontier. 
In the early days of the family's residence 
here the winters were very severe. They 
were visited by many blizzards and the 
father had settled in the timber that it 
might afford protection for the stock and 
also furnish an abundant supply of fire- 
wood. When the farmers commenced to 
improve the prairie land for the first time 
after it had been vacated by the red race 
he fitted up a team of oxen with five or 
six yoke and started his eldest son, D. S. 
Harnest and his son Samuel E. of this 
review to breaking prairie land with a 
large plow, which would turn a 26-inch 
furrow. They thus engaged in breaking 
prairie for a number of years, sharpening 
their plows at the blacksmith shop on 
Saturdays, using a small anvil and heavy 
hammer to draw out the shear with the 
use of several sharp files would run a 
week at a time. The anvil which was 
then used is still in possession of S. E. 
Harnest of this review, who has broken 
hundreds of acres of land and while thus 
engaged has encountered numerous large 
rattlesnakes. The whip lashes were made 
of buckskin, which were dressed by his 
father and the stocks were of hickory or 
ironwood. As it was necessary for them 
to clear off this land the mother made the 
sons buckskin trousers . as she thought 
they were stronger and would better 
stand the wear and tear of such a life. 
The elder brother, D. S. Harnest, was in 
the Mormon war, which resulted in the 
shooting of Hiram and Joseph Smith in 
1844. John A. Harnest, a second brother 
who went through to California with ox 
team, died in 1853. 



On the 2 ist of February, 1861, S. E. 
Harnest married Miss Matilda Ann Wal- 
ton, who was born in St. Mary's town- 
ship, Hancock county, April 6, 1841, a 
daughter of Frederick M. and Emily 
(Rice) Walton. The father was born in 
Mason county, Kentucky, January n, 
1809, and the mother's birth occurred in 
Boone county, Kentucky, January 10. 
1811. They were married January 31, 
1831, and became very early settlers of 
Hancock county, arriving in 1835, at 
which time they took up their abode in 
St. Mary's township, residing continu- 
ously upon one farm until 1880, when 
Mr. Walton died. His first home was a 
little log cabin, in which he lived until 
1840, when he employed John Harper, 
who made mortar brick and was also a 
bricklayer, to build him a house. Mrs. 
Harnest was the first child in the county 
born in a brick house. Mr. Walton was 
a republican in his political views after the 
organization of the party and served as 
highway commissioner and was school 
director for many years. He supported 
every feasible plan for the benefit of the 
community and co-operated in many 
movements that were of direct benefit to 
this part of the state. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Missionary 
Baptist church. In their family were 
eight children but only three are now liv- 
ing: John, a resident of Plymouth, Illi- 
nois; Mrs. Harnest, of Carthage; and 
Simon M., who lives upon the old home- 
stead farm. The father passed away 
April 10, 1880, and the mother on the 
8th of November, 1904, their remains 
being interred in Plymouth cemetery. 
In his business affairs Mr. Walton pros- 



100 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pered and he gave to each of his children 
about two hundred acres of good land. 

His widow resided upon the old home- 
stead from 1835 until 1902, covering a 
period of sixty-seven years and there 
spent her remaining days (except about 
two years she spent in Carthage), with 
her daughter, Mrs. Harnest. She was 
one of the charter members of the Bap- 
tist church of St. Mary's township, or- 
ganized in 1837, and outlived all of the 
other original members, exemplifying 
each day her faith and Christian belief. 
She was also the last survivor of the or- 
ganizers of the Plymouth Baptist church 
and she had many warm friends who ad- 
mired her greatly for her Christian vir- 
tues and good qualities of heart and mind. 

For the first three years after their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Harnest lived on 
a farm near Plymouth but their home 
there was destroyed by fire and they after- 
ward bought a farm in Carthage town- 
ship, where they resided for twenty-seven 
years. They had a comfortable home 
which they improved with porches, etc. 
He also built two new barns and out- 
buildings for the shelter of grain and 
stock. The farm lay on sections 24 and 
25 and comprised two hundred and forty 
acres of rich and productive land, which 
is still in his possession. For many years 
Mr. Harnest carefully cultivated the 
fields, developed the property and won 
success in, his undertakings as an agri- 
culturist and feeding stock, but in 1891 
moved to Carthage, building a pretty 
home on No. 611 Main street, adjoining 
the Baptist church. He has since lived 
retired in the enjoyment of a well-earned 
rest, his labor in former years having 



brought to him a competence sufficient to 
supply him with the necessities and com- 
forts of life together with some of its 
luxuries. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Harnest have been 
born three children, of whom two are now 
living, the oldest two having been born 
near Plymouth and the other in Carthage 
township. Mary Emily, born January 
2, 1862, became the wife of F. M. Cutler, 
who now lives in Carthage. She died 
May 13, 1895, in the triumphs of a living 
faith, leaving a son, Fred Francis, who 
died April 22, 1900, at the age of sev- 
enteen years. He was a good Christian 
youth and was a great comfort to his 
grandparents. John Walton Harnest, 
born August 4, 1863, married Olive Rob- 
ertson, and is a stock dealer living in 
Carthage. He has one child, Forest I. 
Frederick Eldridge Harnest, born March 
19, 1869, lives in Quincy, where he con- 
ducts a livery stable. He had the mis- 
fortune to have his barn destroyed by fire 
January 18, 1906, but has since purchased 
another livery barn and is again in busi- 
ness. He married Miss Bertie M. Wright 
. and has three children, Pauline, Waldo 
W. and Mary Marguerite. 

Mr. Harnest is largely a self-made man 
and owing to his economy and energy in 
former years is now very comfortably 
situated in his old age. He has always 
been a very methodical man and since his 
marriage has kept a daily diary of events 
and incidents. Mrs. Harnest is a lady of 
very retentive memory and intelligence 
and her good qualities have won her many 
friends with whom she spends many pleas- 
ant hours in social conversation on sub- 
jects which give enjoyment to all. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



101 



OSCAR HUBBARD BURR. 

Oscar Hubbard Burr, who is the owner 
of valuable farming property in Dur- 
ham township, consisting of two hundred 
and forty acres in the home farm and also 
twenty acres on another section, was born 
in that township February 4, 1858, his 
parents being Edward and Julia (Wil- 
cox) Burr, both of whom were natives 
of Connecticut. The father was born De- 
cember 24, 1814, and the mother on the 
1 3th of July, 1817. When he came to 
Hancock county in 1839 from his native 
state he traveled with a party of sixteen, 
who made the journey with two small 
wagons and were six weeks upon the way, 
crossing the swamps and mountains and 
suffering many privations and hardships, 
as they journeyed on after the primitive 
manner of travel of those . days. Here 
Mr. Burr began life in true pioneer style, 
living in a log house for some time. The 
family had no table and scarcely any table 
cutlery for a number of years. Various 
wild animals roamed over his land and 
many evidences of pioneer life were to be 
seen. In 1852 he built the main part of 
the house in which his son, O. H. Burr, 
now resides, and from time to time he 
added to his possessions until at his death 
he was very comfortably situated and was 
known as an enterprising and respected 
citizen of his community. He died June 
II, 1895, while his wife passed away July 
18. 1862, their remains being interred in 
Durham cemetery. Both were devoted 
members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and his political views accorded 
with the principles of the Republican party. 
An old-fashioned teapot which he brought 



to Illinois in 1839 is now in possession 
of his son, O. H. Burr, and is a much 
prized relic. In the family were seven 
children : Jonathan E., who was born 
August n, 1837, and lives in Cowley 
county, Kansas ; Julia C., who was born 
November n, 1838, and is the wife of 
William H. Avis, of Des Moines, Iowa ; 
Esther A., who was born June 3, 1841, 
and is the wife of Harvey H. Pershin, of 
Portland, Oregon; Orpha D., who was 
born February 14, 1845, and is the wife 
of S. E. Harkness, of southern Nebraska ; 
Emily C., who was born April 15, 1850, 
and is the wife of D. L. Toof, of Aurora, 
Nebraska; Demmis V., who was born 
December 14, 1854, and became the wife 
of Edwin Burr, her death occurring in 
Hancock county, Illinois, March 30, 1881, 
while Mr. Burr resides in Nebraska ; and 
O. H., who was born in Durham town- 
ship, February 4, 1858. 

The last named was educated in the 
district schools of his native township 
and remained with his parents until in 
his twenty-first year, when he was mar- 
ried and started out in life on his own 
account. It was on the 2Oth of October, 
1878, that he wedded Miss Mahala I. 
Potter, who was born in Durham town- 
ship, Hancock county, June 28, 1859, 
one of the ten children of Warren and 
Mahala (Collins) Potter. Her father, 
who was born in Pennsylvania, August 
9, 1813, followed the occupation of 
farming as a life work and after living 
for some time in Adams county, Illinois, 
removed in 1858 to Hancock county and 
took up his abode in a log cabin, living in 
true pioneer style. As the years passed 
he improved his farm and at a later date 



102 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



added modern equipments. He died Jan- 
nary 23, 1883, and his wife, who was 
born in Indiana, October 3, 1821, passed 
away March 2, 1899, at the age of sev- 
enty-seven years and was laid to rest by 
his side in Union cemetery. Six of their 
children are yet living: Rebecca E., the 
wife of James Potter, of Macomb, Illi- 
nois; Cynthia J., the wife of R. T. H. 
Bartlett. of Dallas City ; Mary Erne, the 
wife of W. O. Stout, of Thayer, Oregon 
county, Missouri; Olive E., the wife of 
C. F. Bross, of Colusa; Mahala I., now 
Mrs. Burr; and Josephine, the wife of 
George Arnt, of Beatrice, Nebraska, while 
Allen Potter was killed by a runaway in 
California, and Weaver Potter died in 
Missouri. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Burr began their domestic life in a house 
on the place where he now lives. After 
a year they removed to his father's house. 
Throughout the intervening years Mr. 
Burr has carried on general agricultural 
pursuits and is now engaged in cultivat- 
ing two hundred and forty acres of land 
in Durham township. He has improved 
the house, built barns and sheds, while 
one of the barns upon the place was 
erected by his father in 1861. He has 
brought the fields under a high state of 
cultivation and everything about the farm 
indicates his careful supervision and pro- 
gressive methods. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Burr has 
been blessed twith four children, all born 
in the house which was their father's 
birthplace. Oscar H., Jr., the eldest, born 
July 14, 1882, married Catherine Kloss- 
ing, of Durham township, and they have 
a son, Ralph Joseph Oscar Burr. Bessie 



C., bom October 18, 1888, is at home; 
Mamie, born July 8, 1891, died two days 
later; Hazel C., born March 18, 1893, is 
with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Burr are 
members of the Free Methodist church 
and take an active interest in its work, 
living the lives of earnest Christian peo- 
ple. He votes with the prohibition party, 
which. indicates his views on the temper- 
ance question, and he is a school director, 
standing at all times for intellectual and 
moral progress and giving his endorse- 
ment to every measure which he believes 
will uplift humanity. 



JOHN A. FLETCHER. 

John A. Fletcher, living retired in 
Carthage, was born in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, May 22, 1838, and his 
parents, Elisha and Elizabeth (Lane) 
Fletcher, were also natives of that county, 
where the father lived and died, follow- 
ing the occupation of- farming as a life 
work. His political allegiance was given 
to the Republican party and he served as 
tax collector. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Methodist church, but 
both have passed away, their remains be- 
ing interred in Ohio. 

Of their family of five children John 
A. Fletcher is the only one now living. 
He was educated in the district schools 
of Ohio, the little "temple of learning" 
being a log building with puncheon floor, 
and small windows, slab seats and an im- 
mense fireplace. He remained upon the 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



103 



home farm with his parents until his mar- 
riage. It was on the I3th of January, 
.1858, that he wedded Miss Elizabeth 
Palmer, who was born June 9, 1840, in 
Muskingum county, Ohio, a daughter of 
Frederick and Sarah (Butler) Palmer, 
the former a native of the state of New 
York and the latter of Muskingum 
county. Mr. Palmer was a farmer by 
occupation . and was killed in Ohio in 
April, 1844, by a log falling upon him. 
He was at that time serving as road su- 
pervisor. The mother was a member of 
the old primitive Baptist church. In the 
family were three children by the first 
marriage, but only two are now living, 
Mrs. Fletcher and Augusta, the latter the 
widow of Mr. King, who is living in 
Kansas City, Kansas. The mother later 
married Abner Lane. They left two liv- 
ing children. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Fletcher lived upon a farm in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, until after the outbreak of 
the Civil war, when Mr. Fletcher, in re- 
sponse to his country's need, enlisted as 
a member of Company D, Sixteenth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. He was afterward 
transferred to Company I of the invalid 
corps and was promoted to the rank of 
first sergeant. He served for three years 
and one month and was honorably dis- 
charged in October, 1864. At Camp 
Dennison, Ohio, in the first year of the 
war, he had an attack of typhoid fever, 
being ill in the hospital there for a long 
time and as a result his left side was 
paralyzed and has always remained so. 
He participated in the battles of Mills 
Springs and Cumberland, where he was 
wounded in the leg by the explosion of 
7 



a shell, which also cut off the stock of 
his gun. He was likewise in the battles 
of Tazewell, Tennessee, Cumberland Gap 
and Vicksburg, where he was stripped of 
his clothing by the rebels and lay for two 
days and nights in the rain. He likewise 
participated in the engagements at 
Thompson's Hill and McKenzie Bend. 
His regiment was the Sixteenth Ohio In- 
fantry and Company D was commanded 
by Captain Milton Mills, while the first 
lieutenant was Thomas Hedge and the 
second lieutenant William Dorsey. All 
were from Dresden, Ohio. He was a 
brave soldier and made a great sacrifice 
for his country, but he did it cheerfully 
and willingly and no one displays a more 
patriotic spirit than does Mr. Fletcher, 
who is always interested in the welfare 
of his country and her progress. His 
eldest and his youngest brothers, Spencer 
and Joshua Fletcher respectively, were 
also soldiers of the Civil war. Joshua 
died from the effects of injury sustained 
at Cumberland Gap and was buried there. 
Spencer was wounded at Vicksburg and 
died at Milliken's Bend. They, too, were 
soldiers of the Sixteenth Ohio Regiment 
and Henry Fletcher, a cousin, was with 
the three brothers in this regiment, while 
George Fletcher, an uncle, was in the 
Seventy-eighth Ohio Regiment. Charles 
and Henry Tatham, cousins of Mrs. 
Fletcher, were likewise soldiers of the 
Sixteenth Ohio and Charles H. Butler, 
another cousin, was a soldier of Company 
D, Twelfth Illinois Infantry and was hon- 
orably discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, 
in 1865. 

After his return from the war Mr. 
Fletcher located upon a farm in Licking 



IO4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



county. Ohio, and in 1869 came to Illi- 
nois. About 1871 or 1872 he located 
upon a farm of ninety acres in Carthage 
township, and for many years thereafter 
was devoted to general agricultural pur- 
suits, conducting his business interests 
with good ability. He has now been re- 
tired for twelve years, has made his home 
in the city of Carthage since February, 
1903, and is in poor health. He possesses, 
however, a cheerful nature and most 
kindly disposition and bears his sufferings 
uncomplainingly. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Fletcher have been born eight children, 
four of whom were born in Ohio and the 
others in Carthage township. Francis L.. 
the eldest, married Miranda J. Kim- 
brough, has a son, Charles, and lives in 
Carthage. Sarah L. died in infancy. Al- 
feretta May is the wife of Willis Ervin, 
a resident of Carthage township, and has 
six children: Edward, Ethel. George. 
Genevieve, Hazel and Harry. Of these 
children Edward Ervin married Bernice 
Reed, resides in West Point, Iowa, and 
has a son, Frederick. Ethel Ervin is the 
wife of Frank Briley, lives in Carthage 
member of the family, married Miss Cora 
township, and has a little son, Thomas 
Briley. Joshua E. Fletcher, the fourth 
Linn and resides at Carthage. Abner P. 
Fletcher owns a farm near West Point, 
Iowa, married Miss Martha Conn and 
has five daughters: Ada, Georgie, Lena. 
Alice and Blanche. Mina A., is the wife 
of Perry D. Myers, of Pilot Grove town- 
ship, and has f our ''children : Ray, Hurl, 
Florence and Ernest. Knox B. Fletcher 
wedded Miss Mary B. Connoughton, re- 
sides in Carthage, and has a daughter, 
Lola D. Winnifred is the wife of Fred 



Craig, of Hannibal, Missouri. He en- 
listed in the Twentieth Infantry of the 
regular army and was transferred to the 
Fifth Regiment, being stationed at San- 
tiago during the Spanish-American war. 
He was in Cuba for eight months, enlist- 
ing at Keokuk, Iowa, in 1900. He was 
absent for a year in active service but now 
resides in Hannibal. 

In politics Mr. Fletcher is a stalwart 
republican, having given unfaltering alle- 
giance to the party since attaining his 
majority. He has been actively interested 
in the cause of education and has done 
effective service in behalf of the public 
schools of Carthage during many years' 
service on the school board, of which he 
has acted as clerk, while for twelve years 
he was its president. He is a charter 
member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America of Carthage, also belongs to the 
Grand Army of the Republic and is a 
member of the Presbyterian church, to 
which his wife and some of his children 
also belong. He owns the comfortable 
home on Locust street where he has lived 
since coming to the city. He has been an 
enterprising, self-made man, whose suc- 
cess is due entirely to his own labors and 
efforts. Handicapped by ill health, he has 
nevertheless worked resolutely and ear- 
nestly year after year and has accumulated 
a comfortable competence. In his family 
he has been a devoted husband and father 
and in his illness his wife and daughter. 
Mrs. Craig, put forth every effort to as- 
suage his suffering. His life has prac- 
tically been a sacrifice to his country. 
Wherever known he is held in high es- 
teem, for he possesses those traits of 
character which win friendship, confi- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



dence and regard and his many friends 
will be glad to receive this record of his 
life. 



HENRY JENKINS. 

Henry Jenkins is one of the early 
settlers of Hancock county, who through 
many years has been an interested wit- 
ness of the changes that have occurred 
and the progress that has been made as 
the county has emerged from pioneer 
conditions and taken on all of the evi- 
dences and improvements of an advanced 
civilization. He now makes his home in 
Carthage, and owns a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Carthage town- 
ship, that under his care and development 
has been transformed into a highly im- 
proved and productive property. He was 
born in Roan county, Tennessee, on the 
1 7th of September, 1838, and there re- 
sided until twelve years of age. when he 
came to Illinois in 1851 with his parents, 
John and Sarah (Rayborn) Jenkins. The 
father was born in Virginia, representing 
one of the old southern families, and 
throughout his active life he carried on 
farming. Upon coming to Hancock 
county he settled in Rock Creek township, 
where he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, making his home thereon 
until 1862. He then removed to Har- 
mony township, trading his original farm 
for a tract of land in Harmony township, 
of two hundred and twenty acres which 
was partially improved. He gave his time 
and energies to its further development 



for some years and then bought another 
place in Harmony township, after which 
he sold the other farm, residing upon the 
last purchased property for many years. 
Eventually, however, he went to Bentley, 
where he lived with one of his daughters 
until he was called to his final rest, passing 
away at the very advanced age of ninety- 
one years. He was a member of the 
Primitive Baptist church and a man of 
earnest Christian faith and character. 
His political support was given to the de- 
mocracy. In his business affairs he pros- 
pered and though he only had seventy- 
five dollars in money when he came to 
Illinois, lie succeeded in rearing a large 
family, providing for them a comfortable 
living and acquiring a competency for his 
last years. His remains were interred in 
Harmony township cemetery. His wife, 
who was born in Tennessee, grew to 
womanhood there. She was also a mem- 
ber of the Primitive Baptist church, and 
died about six years prior to her husband's 
demise, her grave being also made in 
Harmony township cemetery. Unto this 
worthy couple were born thirteen children, 
seven of whom are living. 

Henry Jenkins remained upon the 
home farm until twenty-five years of age, 
no event of special importance occurring 
to vary the routine of farm life for him 
in his youth, his attention being divided 
between the work of the schoolroom, the 
duties of the fields and the pleasures of 
the playground. He was then married 
but continued to reside upon a part of the 
old homestead property for a few years, 
after which he removed to Missouri, 
where he resided for three years, engaged 
in farming during that time. He then 



io6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



returned to Hancock county, Illinois, 
where he remained for five years in Har- 
mony township. On the expiration of 
that period he took up his abode in Knox 
county, Missouri, where he spent nine 
years, when he again came to Hancock 
county and purchased his present farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Carthage 
township. Here he has lived continuous- 
ly, until recently. He bought the farm 
sixteen years ago and has placed thereon 
many improvements, securing the best ma- 
chinery for the development of the fields, 
adding many modern equipments and ac- 
cessories. He has a good frame dwelling 
and other buildings upon his place and 
devoted his time and energies to general 
farming and stock-raising, having good 
grades of stock. In September, 1906, Mr. 
Jenkins bought a residence on Scofield 
street, Carthage, and in October moved 
with his family to the city in order to 
give his sons better educational advan- 
tages. 

At the age of twenty-five years Mr. 
Jenkins was married to Miss Family V. 
Mauk, who was born in Virginia and re- 
moved to Hancock county, Illinois, with 
her parents when a small child. Her 
father, Abram Mauk, came to this county 
in 1851, and followed the occupation of 
farming in Harmony township, where he 
lived until his death, which occurred when 
he was about fifty-five years of age. His 
wife died in Virginia. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Jenkins have been born thirteen chil- 
dren, nine of whom are living : Robert, a 
farmer residing at home ; Ada, the wife of 
Robert E. Granger, a resident farmer of 
Hancock township, by whom she had 
seven children : Charles, May, Sarah, 
Clara and Roy, who are living, and two 



who died in infancy; John, a teamster of 
La Harpe, Kansas, who married Cora 
Willis; Sarah, the wife of Homer Rig- 
gens, a farmer residing in Hancock town- 
ship, by whom she has one daughter, 
Anna; Ollie, at home; Anna, married 
Jesse Ruddle, of Oak Grove, and has 
two sons, Leland H. and Roy T. ; Lu- 
cinda Belle, who died at the age of twen- 
ty-four years; Harvey, Edward and 
Thomas, all at home; one who died at 
the age of eight years, while three died in 
infancy. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins are mem- 
bers of the Primitive Baptist church, and 
he votes with the democracy, but has 
never cared for public office, his time and 
attention being fully occupied with his 
business interests, which have been care- 
full}' managed, and though his life has 
not been exempt from the difficulties and 
obstacles which usually come to all in a 
business career, he has overcome all these 
by determination and energy and is now 
the possessor of a valuable farm prop- 
erty which yields him a good income. He 
has also seen many improvements made 
in Hancock county during the long years 
of his residence here, and has done his 
full share in the work of citizenship, 
standing for progress and improvements 
along all those lines which are of direct 
and immediate serviceableness in the pro- 
motion of material, intellectual, social 
and moral progress. 

Mr. Jenkins and his family richly de- 
serve the high esteem in which they are 
held by their many friends in the com- 
munity where "they have so long resided. 
and they are well worthy of representation 
in the Biographical Review of Hancock 
County. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



107 



VERRIEUS R. FAUGHT. 

Verrieus R. Faught, for many years 
identified with general agricultural pur- 
suits and now doing business as a gar- 
dener at Hamilton, was born in New 
Madrid, Missouri, April i, 1843. His 
parents were Sanford and Caroline 
(Seavers) Faught, the former a native 
of Frankfort, Kentucky, and the latter of 
Baden, Germany. The mother was 
brought from Germany to Pennsylvania 
during her infancy. Her mother died 
when the daughter was quite young and 
she afterward lived with her father until 
her marriage, which was celebrated in 
Evansville, Indiana. Sanford Faught 
had been reared in Kentucky and in early 
manhood was married there. Two sons 
were born of the first marriage, but his 
wife and children all died in Kentucky. 
Following his marriage to Caroline 
Seavers he lived in New Madrid, Mis- 
souri, for a few months and afterward re- 
moved to Evansville, Indiana, -and then 
to Keokuk, Iowa, where he worked at 
his trade of house building, making his 
home there from 1849 until 1853. In the 
latter year, with his family, he took up 
his abode in what is now the western part 
of Hamilton, and purchased forty acres 
of land, which at that time was covered 
with a dense growth of timber. He 
cleared a portion of this and built a 
frame house, bringing the lumber across 
the river in a skiff. From the door of 
his house he could frequently see deer 
and wild turkeys. As the town of Ham- 
ilton grew he subdivided his land and sold 
it off in town lots. He was one of the 
promoters of the movements to secure the 



first ferry to Keokuk and one of the in- 
fluential men of the town, a fact which is 
indicated in that the early name of the 
town was Faughtsburg, but after a few 
years it was changed to Hamilton. He 
measured off the first town lot in Hamil- 
ton with a tape line and from the earliest 
inception of the village until his death 
was closely identified with its growth and 
progress. He died March 24, 1856, and 
his wife, long surviving him, remained 
an esteemed resident of Hamilton until 
called to her final home on the 2/th of 
June, 1903. The name of Sanford 
Faught, however, is inseparably inter- 
woven with the history of Hamilton and 
he will always be honored as one of its 
founders. 

Verrieus R. Faught, the eldest in a 
family of two sons and four daughters, 
of whom two of the daughters and the 
brother of our subject are now deceased, 
spent his boyhood days in Hamilton, his 
parents removing to Hancock county 
when he was but a young lad. He pur- 
sued his education in the public schools 
and also attended a commercial college 
at Davenport, Iowa. He has watched the 
growth and development of Hamilton 
from a wilderness to a thriving city and 
has been a co-operant factor in many pro- 
gressive public movements. He assisted 
his parents on the home farm until the 
ist of September; 1862, when he enlisted 
for active service in the Civil war as a 
member of Company D, Seventy-eighth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was in 
the Fourteenth Army Corps in the Army 
of the Cumberland and participated in 
the Atlanta campiagn, the battle of Chick- 
amauga and many other important en- 



io8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gagements and in the celebrated march to 
the sea under General Sherman. He 
fought in the battles of Jonesboro, 
Georgia, September i, 1864; Kingston, 
Tennessee; Chattanooga, November 25, 
1863; Lookout Mountain; Atlanta. Sep- 
tember i, 1864; Savannah, Georgia; 
Evansboro, North Carolina ; Rome and 
Resaca, Georgia ; Kennesaw Mountain, 
June 27, 1864; and Bentonville, North 
Carolina, March 19, 1865. He was mus- 
tered out of service at Washington, D. 
C., on the 2d of June, 1865, after almost 
three years of active duty in the south, 
and he proved his loyalty and bravery on 
various battlefields and under many of 
the arduous conditions which war brings. 

Returning to Hamilton, Mr. Faught 
turned his attention to general agricul- 
tural pursuits after spending a few months 
at St. Joseph, Missouri. He has followed 
farming throughout his entire life and for 
many years was a prosperous agricultur- 
ist but has now put aside the more ardu- 
ous duties of the farm and has given his 
attention to gardening, in which he is 
doing a big business. He bought six 
lots in the Oakwood addition to Ham- 
ilton, where he has his residence and in 
the fall of 1904 he added three more lots. 
He has a good trade in garden products, 
placing upon the market many of the 
finest vegetables produced in this section 
of the country. 

On the 2d of March, 1881, Mr. Faught 
was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
Frances Nelson, who was born in Peoria, 
Illinois, November 8, 1859, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Ouincy, Illi- 
nois, and of Keokuk, Iowa. She also 
studied to be a nurse in the training 



school in connection with the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk. 
Her father, John S. Nelson, was born in 
Beardstown, Illinois, and married Phebe 
J. Turner, whose birth occurred in Cler- 
mont county, Ohio, October 21, 1841, 
while his natal day was January 22, 1829. 
In their family were nine children, four 
sons and five daughters. Mrs. Nelson, 
removing to the middle west, made the 
journey over the Ohio, Mississippi and 
Illinois rivers to Peoria in 1844 and since 
that time has made her home in Peoria 
and Hamilton, living in the latter city 
since 1870. She now makes her home 
with Mr. and Mrs. Faught. By this mar- 
riage have been born a son and daugh- 
ter: Emmett Sanford. born April 9, 
1882, is now living in Peoria, Illinois. 
Almeda May, born June 16, 1885', is the 
wife of John Seavers residing in San 
Francisco, California, a machinist on the 
battleships in the navy yard. 

Since his return from the war Mr. 
Faught has resided continuously in Ham- 
ilton and is one of the oldest citizens here, 
having been brought to the county in pio- 
neer times when a young lad. He is a 
member of the Freewill Baptist church, 
gives his political allegiance to the Repub- 
lican party and is a valued representative 
of the Grand Army Post. 



JUDGE THOMAS COKE SHARP. 

Judge Thomas Coke Sharp, deceased, 
left the impress of his individuality upon 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



109 



Hancock county as journalist, lawyer, 
county judge, a member of the state con- 
stitutional convention of 1848, a leader 
in the movement against the Mormons 
and as advocate of railroad projects. Any 
one of these things would entitle him to 
mention among the representative citizens 
of this part of the state, while his com- 
bined labor made him a distinguished 
man, recognized as a leader of public 
thought and action. 

Judge Sharp was born September 25, 
1818. at Mount Holly, Xew Jersey. His 
father, Rev. Solomon Sharp, was born 
on the eastern shore of Maryland and was 
a noted pioneer Methodist minister of the 
Philadelphia conference. His mother was 
a member of the well known and promi- 
nent Budd family, of Pemberton, Burling- 
ton county, New Jersey. In his pastoral 
work Rev. Sharp was stationed at differ- 
ent times at Trenton, Xew Jersey, Phila- 
delphia, Wilmington, Delaware, and was 
also connected with the Salem circuit of 
'New Jersey, the Christiana circuit of Del- 
aware, the Smyrna and the Dover circuits, 
after which he entered upon superannu- 
ated relations .with the church, his death 
occurring within a short time. 

Thomas Coke Sharp, after attending 
the common schools, entered Dickinson 
College at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 1835. 
and in 1837 became a student in the law 
school conducted by Judge Reed, of Car- 
lisle. He supported himself during the 
last eighteen months of his law course by 
teaching in the male high school, of which 
he took charge when twenty years of age. 
He was also teacher of mathematics for 
six months in Dickinson College in the ab- 
sence of one of the professors. Following 



his graduation from Judge Reed's school 
he was in April, 1840, matriculated in the 
Cumberland Law School. In September 
of the same year he came west and opened 
a law office in Warsaw, Illinois, which he 
successfully maintained until 1865, when 
he located in Carthage, where he resided 
until his death. 

While in Warsaw, Judge Sharp's hear- 
ing became impaired, so that he gave up 
the practice of law for a few years or un- 
til 1858. He practiced for but a year in 
Warsaw, after which he became one of 
the proprietors of the Western World, his 
partner in the enterprise being James 
Gamble. The paper was published as 
a whig organ, but Mr. Sharp soon placed 
it upon a neutral political basis, for he 
was an advocate of Jacksonian democ- 
racy. In 1841 the name of the paper 
was changed to the Warsaw Signal. Al- 
though the two partners worked hard and 
faithfully they realized in 1842 that they 
could not raise the debt on the establish- 
ment and the paper passed again into the 
hands of its first proprietor, D. N. White. 

It was in the same year, on the 6th of 
September, 1842, that Judge Sharp was 
married to Mrs. Hannah G. \Vilcox, the 
widow of John R. Wilcox, one of the 
original proprietors of the town site of 
Warsaw. She was a most highly es- 
teemed lady, enjoying the warm regard 
of all who knew her. She had six chil- 
dren, one born of her first marriage and 
five of her marriage to Judge Sharp, but 
only two of the number are now living : 
Charles G., who resides in Shadron, Mis- 
souri ; and W. O. Sharp, who is repre- 
sented elsewhere in this work. The wife 
and mother passed away October 3, 1879. 



110 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



About the time the Warsaw Signal 
suspended Judge Sharp decided to try 
farming, but soon realized that nature 
had never intended him for a tiller of the 
soil and he made arrangements to again 
resume the publication of the Warsaw- 
Signal in 1844. He soon became widely 
known as a journalist whose articles of 
attack against the Mormons awakened 
wide-spread attention and aroused public 
opinion. The sect turned out upon him 
its vengeance and wrath and called him 
"Old Tom Sharp." His editorials in the 
Signal were extensively copied into other 
papers throughout the country. He was 
a forceful writer, earnest and fluent, and 
was unsparing in his attacks of the prin- 
ciples upon which the Mormon church 
was founded. Many reading these ar- 
ticles formed the opinion that Judge 
Sharp was a most aggre3sive man, full of 
the fighting spirit, but on the contrary 
he was most mild-mannered, of kindly 
nature and rather inclined to the conserva- 
tive in his opinions and judgments. It 
was only when he was aroused by some- 
thing that he believed to be wrong that 
he assumed the attitude of the antagonist 
and then he was unfaltering in support 
of whatever cause or course he believed 
to be right. In 1844, Joseph and Hiram 
Smith, the two prophets and leaders of the 
Mormon church, were killed and Judge 
Sharp, through the Signal, vindicated the 
anti-Mormons. Several attempts were 
made to indict him as one of the leaders 
in the assassination, but to no avail. He 
continued at the head of the Warsaw 
Signal until the fall of 1846 and in the 
Mormon war which followed the trouble 
between the orthodox Christians and the 



followers of Smith he acted as an aide to 
General Singleton, who first had com- 
mand of the anti-Mormon troops, and 
after his retirement Judge Sharp occupied 
the same position on the staff of General 
Brockman. In the battle of Nauvoo he 
was sent with others to make a feint on 
the Mormon battery on the right, while 
the general at the head of the main force 
made a flank movement on the left. The 
feint executed, Judge Sharp, with his 
command, joined the main force and con- 
veyed the orders that brought the first 
regiment into the fight, and in person led 
the second regiment up to the support of 
the exposed artillery, during which move- 
ment several of the men were wounded. 
After the Mormons had been driven 
from the country Judge Sharp turned the 
Signal over to Thomas Gregg, and as his 
health had become impaired through the 
strain and hard work in the office he 
sought recuperation in outdoor interests. 
In the spring of 1847 he was elected a 
member of the constitutional convention 
with four others from Hancock county 
and assisted in framing the organic law 
of the state, which was adopted as the 
state constitution by a vote of the people 
in 1848. In 1851 he was elected justice 
of the peace of Warsaw and in 1853 was 
chosen the first mayor of that city, which 
office he occupied for three consecutive 
terms and was again elected in 1858 and 
1859, giving to the city a public-spirited 
administration, characterized by the ut- 
most devotion to the public welfare along 
lines of material improvement and intel- 
lectual, legal and political progress. For 
fifteen months during the early '503 he 
also published a paper, neutral in politics, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



in 



for the advancement of railroad projects 
and in this way contributed much to the 
upbuilding of the state. It has been said 
that railroads are the means of draining a 
new country of savagery and all acknowl- 
edge that rapid transportation is one of 
the chief elements in opening up a new 
district to commercialism and industrial- 
ism. 

During the Mormon war Judge Sharp 
ceased to be a partisan democrat and in 
1854, upon its organization, joined the 
Republican party, which he ardently and 
zealously supported from that time until 
his death. In 1856 he was nominated by 
the republicans of the then fifth district 
as a candidate for congress. He knew 
this to be an empty honor because of the 
strength of the democracy in his section 
of the state, but nevertheless made a 
strong canvass through the district, de- 
livering speeches in every county in sup- 
port of the principles which he upheld. 
In 1864 he began the publication of the 
Warsaw New Era at the request of the 
Union League of Hancock county, and 
conducted it for a year at that place, when 
leaders in public opinion desired that the 
paper be moved to Carthage because of 
more central location. In 1865 therefore 
the Carthage Gazette was established by 
F. E. Fowler. In the fall of the same 
year Judge Sharp was nominated by the 
republicans for the position of county 
judge and on being elected removed his 
family to the county seat. He held the 
office for four years and the court records 
show him to have been one of the ablest 
judges that have sat upon the bench. He 
was repeatedly renominated but the dem- 
ocrats had regained their ascendency and 



republican victories have since been few 
in Hancock county. On retiring from the 
bench he formed a partnership with H. 
W. Draper, with whom he continued in 
the practice of law for three years, and 
in December, 1869, when Mr. Fowler re- 
ceived a government appointment, Judge 
Sharp was urged to assume editorial con- 
trol of the Carthage Gazette, which he 
did, expecting, however, to remain con- 
nected with that paper for only a brief 
period. His old interest in journalistic 
work, however, being revived, he pur- 
chased the office in 1870 and continued 
as proprietor of the Carthage Gazette 
until he turned it over to his son, W. O. 
Sharp, the present editor. In this period 
he had also continued in the practice of 
law and for many years was at the head 
of the law firm of Sharp & Berry 
Brothers. He remained in active life for 
many years and was widely known 
throughout the state as a journalist and 
as a leader in political circles. He also 
attained high rank at the bar and in citi- 
zenship stood for all that is progressive, 
for all that is opposed to misrule and for 
all that looks to the welfare of the coun- 
try before the aggrandizement of self. 
His efforts were again and again of direct 
and immediate serviceableness to the 
county. He continued active in the news- 
paper field and at the bar until 1891, when 
he was stricken with paralysis. He lived 
for three years thereafter, passing away 
April 9, 1894, at the advanced age of sev- 
enty-five years, his remains being interred 
in Moss Ridge cemetery. It is an impor- 
tant public duty to honor and perpetuate 
as far as is possible the memory of an 
eminent citizen, one who by his blame- 



I 12 



BIOGRAPHICAL REJ'IEU' 



less and honorable life and distinguished 
career reflected credit upon his city and 
his state. No man in Hancock county 
was ever more respected, more fully en- 
joyed the confidence of the people or de- 
served in larger measure such respect and 
confidence. In his lifetime the people of 
his city and county, recognizing his merit, 
rejoiced in his advancement and in the 
honors to which he attained and since his 
death they have cherished his memory. 



MARTIN CONRAD ECHBOHM. 

The financial and commercial history 
of Hancock county would be very incom- 
plete and very unsatisfactory without a 
personal and somewhat extended mention 
of those whose lives are interwoven so 
closely with its industrial and manufac- 
turing development and with its public 
interests. When a man or a select number 
of men have set in motion the machinery 
of business which materializes into a thou- 
sand forms of practical utility, or where 
they have carved out a fortune or a name 
from the common possibilities, open for 
competition to all, there is a public desire 
to know the results and the circumstances 
by which such results have been achieved. 

The subject of this sketch finds a 
proper place in the history of those men 
of business and enterprise in Hancock 
county, whose force of character, whose 
sterling integrity, whose fortitude amid 
discouragements, whose good sense in 
the management of complicated affairs 



and marked success in establishing and 
controlling industrial and commercial in- 
terests have contributed in an eminent 
degree to the development of the re- 
sources of this part of the state. His 
career has not been helped by accident, 
or luck, or wealth, or family, or power- 
ful friends. He is in the broadest sense 
of the term a self-made man, being both 
the architect and builder of his own for- 
tunes. 

Mr. Echbohm was born in Leebeck, 
Germany, March 13, 1851, and there at- 
tended a public school until thirteen years 
of age, when he came to America on an 
old sailing vessel, which, after a voyage 
of thirteen weeks, dropped anchor in the 
harbor of New Orleans. He made the 
trip in company with his parents and 
from that city the family proceeded north- 
ward to Warsaw, Illinois, where Mr. 
Echbohm has since lived. His father was 
a ship carpenter in the old country and 
after coming to the United States em- 
barked in the grain business, in which he 
continued until his death, passing away 
in 1876, when sixty-two years of age. 
He was married in his native country to 
Miss Mary Woldebrand, who survived 
him until 1891, and died at the age of 
seventy-two years, when she was laid to 
rest by his side in Warsaw cemetery. 
They were the parents of three children : 
A'lartin C. ; Charles, who died at the age 
of twenty-one years ; and Rickey, the wife 
of Captain Frank Meyers, of Warsaw. 

Mr. Echbohm well remembers the in- 
cidents of the voyage to the United 
States and the condition of things that 
confronted the family upon their arrival 
in Hancock county in 1864. His educa- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



tion completed, he entered upon a com- 
mercial career in the hay and grain busi- 
ness in connection with his father. This 
partnership was maintained until the 
father's death, and Mr. Echbohm was 
then alone in business for fifteen years 
thereafter. On the expiration of that 
period he retired from the hay and grain 
trade and became a merchant of Warsaw, 
since which time he has conducted a hard- 
ware and implement business. The en- 
terprise, of which he is now proprietor, 
was established by Fred and Henry Dross 
in Warsaw, about 1881, and was contin- 
ued by that firm until 1898, when the 
partnership was dissolved and the busi- 
ness divided. In the meantime Mr. Ech- 
bohm had become interested in the busi- 
ness and upon the dissolution of the part- 
nership he purchased a new stock of im- 
plements and groceries and has since car- 
ried on business alone under his own 
name, dealing in hardware, implements 
and groceries. He carries a large and 
carefully selected stock suited to the 
varied tastes and needs of the general 
public and has a liberal patronage, which 
has been given him in recognition of his 
honorable business methods and reason- 
able prices. He is a man of resourceful 
ability and has not confined his attention 
alone to one line but has extended his 
efforts into other fields of activity and 
commercial progress and prosperity have 
been stimulated by his energy and keen 
discrimination. In 1886 he organized 
the Warsaw Pickle Company, capitalized 
for twenty-five thousand dollars and still 
in successful operation. At the beginning 
he became general manager and has since 
acted in that office. The plant has a ca- 



pacity of sixty thousand bushels a year. 
In 1901 a.tomato canning- plant was added 
and the annual output of canned tomatoes 
is about twenty thousand cases. The 
works are situated in the village of War- 
saw and the company is officered by the 
following gentlemen : William Ballenger, 
president ; F. C. Haslup, secretary and 
treasurer; and Mr. Echbohm, general 
manager. The last named was also or- 
ganizer of a cold storage business, which 
is conducted in connection with the pickle 
works and which has a capacity of two 
hundred thousand cases of eggs. This 
enterprise is one of the leading business 
concerns of the village, furnishing an ex- 
cellent market for local products and the 
quality of its output finds a ready sale on 
-the market. 

Had Mr. Echbohm done nothing for 
his city outside of business interests he 
would be entitled to representation among 
its leading men. He has, however, la- 
bored untiringly and effectively toward 
promoting its welfare in other ways and 
his fellow townsmen, recognizing his 
worth and devotion to the public good 
have frequently honored him with office. 
He has served as alderman of Warsaw 
for several terms and in 1901 was elected 
mayor, giving a practical and business- 
like administration that led to his re-elec- 
tion in 1902, again in 1904, and once 
more in 1905, so that he is now serving 
for the fourth term in that capacity. 

On the 1 4th of October, 1873, Martin 
C. Echbohm was married to Miss Mary 
Schafer, a daugther of John and Eliza- 
beth Schafer. They have become the 
parents of a son and daughter. The for- 
mer, Henry, died at the age of twenty- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



one years. Clara is now the wife of 
Charles Lockart, a resident of St. Paul, 
Minnesota. The parents are members of 
the Lutheran church, and Mr. Echbohm 
became a member of the Odd Fellows 
society in Warsaw, in which he has passed 
all of the chairs. Mr. and Mrs. Echbohm 
are prominent socially and the hospitality 
of their own home is greatly enjoyed by 
their many friends. In the prosperity of 
the city of his residence he has been an 
invaluable factor, no man having done 
more toward upbuilding the city of War- 
saw than he, while his public spirit and 
his progressive ideas have been of ines- 
timable worth to the community, while 
to public enterprises and other efforts look- 
ing toward the advancement of his fellow 
citizens he contributes with an open hand 
and is the prime mover in most of them. 



PARKHURST WARD CUTLER. 

Parkhurst Ward Cutler resides on sec- 
tion 14, Carthage township, where he has 
a farm of four hundred acres - of well 
improved land. He is a native of Fulton 
county, Illinois, born February 27, 1848. 
and came to Hancock county in 1853 
with his parents, Nathan and Hannah 
Ward Cutler. His early education was 
acquired in the common schools of Han- 
cock county beginning in the old sub- 
scription school. The father, a native of 
New York, was born at Holland, Erie 
county, near Buffalo, and there resided 
until nineteen years of age, when he re- 



moved to Fulton county, Illinois, where 
he lived with his parents until after his 
marriage. He continued to reside in that 
county until 1853, the year of his arrival 
in Hancock county, where he engaged in 
general farming. He also purchased a 
tract of land in Fulton county, which he 
sold upon locating in Pilot Grove town- 
ship, where he also bought a farm of one 
hundred and fifty acres. A year later, 
however, he disposed of that property and 
removed to Carthage township, purchas- 
ing one hundred and seventy-three acres 
of good land on section 28. This he at 
once began to cultivate and improve, mak- 
ing it his home until his death and suc- 
cessfully carrying on general farming 
and stock-raising. He kept high grades 
of cattle, hogs and horses and both 
branches of his business proved profitable. 
His life was in harmony with his pro- 
fessions as a member of the Baptist 
church. He took a most active and help- 
ful interest in its work and served as 
deacon for many years, acting in that 
capacity at the time of his death, which 
occurred December 26, 1897, when he 
was seventy-eight years of age, his birth 
having occurred on the loth of August, 
1819. He was laid to rest in Moss Ridge 
cemetery at Carthage, and thus passed 
away a citizen whom to know was to re- 
spect and honor. His early political alle- 
giance was given to the democracy, but 
a few years prior to his death he joined 
the ranks of the Prohibition party and 
was an active worked for its principles, 
believing firmly in the cause of temper- 
ance. Upon the democratic ticket he 
was elected to the office of supervisor for 
two terms and he was a member of the 




PARKHURST W. CUTLER 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



school board for a number of years. In- 
tellectual and moral progress and all 
those interests which tend to uplift man- 
kind elicited his attention, approval and 
active support. His wife was born in 
Pennsylvania, and in her childhood days 
\vas taken to Fulton county, Illinois, by 
hei parents. Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Ward. 
There she was reared and educated, living 
at home until her marriage. She passed 
away May, 1886, some years prior to the 
death of her husband and her interment 
was also in Moss Ridge cemetery, at 
Carthage. Of the seven children of that 
union three are yet living. Francis M., 
having died August I, 1906. The others 
in childhood. 

Parkhurst W. Cutler, whose name in- 
troduces this review, attended school in 
Carthage township and assisted in the 
work of the home farm through the period 
of his boyhood and youth, remaining at 
home until his marriage, save for the time 
which- he spent as a student in Central 
College, at Pella, Iowa. His education 
completed, he started out in life for him- 
self, working in partnership with his 
father for one year and then purchasing 
one hundred and twenty acres of land on 
section 28, Carthage township. This was 
improved when it came into his possession 
and he made his home thereon for about 
a quarter of a century, carrying on gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising. He then 
purchased his present farm in Carthage 
township, where he has lived for the past 
ten years. He has erected all of the build- 
ings here and has a model farm property, 
his land being divided into fields of con- 
venient size by well kept fences and cul- 
tivated with the aid of the latest improved 



machinery. Mr. Cutler is probably the 
most extensive stock feeder in Carthage 
township, usually shipping two hundred 
fat cattle per year. He also was the first 
man in Carthage township to introduce 
thoroughbred Hereford cattle which he 
has handled extensively since 1886. He 
now has about one hundred head of reg- 
istered cattle, and has at the head of his 
herd a fine registered bull. He also has 
had imported animals. He was the owner 
of Britton, a son of Ancient Britton, the 
Chicago World's fair champion, while he 
was also a brother of the champion cow 
at the St. Louis exposition. He weighed 
2,600 pounds. The majority of his herd 
now being descended from him. It is the 
largest herd in this county. He has been 
a successful exhibitor at different fairs. 

On the 27111 of February, 1871, Mr. 
Cutler was married to Miss Fannie G. 
Barker, a daughter of Judge Francis A. 
and Catherine (Barker) Barker. The 
father's birth occurred near Poughkeepsi'e, 
in Dutchess county, New York, April 2, 
1798, and in his nineteenth year he went 
to West Virginia, where he engaged in 
he removed to Morgan county, Ohio, 
teachmg for about two years. In 1820 
where he was married in 1827, and in Oc- 
tober, 1844, he went to Iowa, settling on 
section 14, Gold township, Marion county, 
where he took up land from the govern- 
ment. Not a furrow had been turned nor 
an improvement made thereon but he at 
once began its cultivation. In 1846 he 
was elected probate judge of Marion 
county and was re-elected to the same of- 
fice in 1847, proving a capable officer. In 
1863, owing, to his advanced age and fail- 
ing health, he disposed of the estate he had 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



,-iccumulated through years of toil and 
hardship and spent his remaining days in 
the city of Knoxville, dying at his resi- 
dence there, January 17, 1871, at the age 
of seventy-three years. He was the first 
probate judge of Marion county and also 
held at one time the position of clerk of 
the house of representatives of Iowa, 
while for two terms he was warden of 
the Iowa state prison. At an early epoch 
in the development of that state he was 
one of its most prominent, influential and 
best known citizens and his influence in 
behalf of public progress was far-reach- 
ing and beneficial. 

Mrs. Cutler was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Clay township, Marion 
county, Iowa, and in Central University, 
at Pella, Iowa, from which institution 
she was graduated, while at the present 
time she is a member of its board of 
directors. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cutler 
have been born two sons, Nathan B. and 
Ward A., both born in Carthage town- 
ship. The elder now resides on section 
28, Carthage township, which was the 
farm on which his grandfather first set- 
tled on coming to this county. He mar- 
ried Daisy Corbin, and they haVe one 
daughter. Veta. 

Mr. Cutler exercised his right of 
franchise in support of the men and 
measures of democracy until 1884, when 
he became a prohibitionist and has ever 
since voted~ that ticket, for he is a stal- 
wart champion of the cause of temperance 
and believes it to be one of the dominant 
issues of the country. He was nominated 
by his party for the office of member of 
the State Board of Equalization and has 
been nominated for various county offices. 



He is chairman of the county committee 
and a member of the senatorial commit- 
tee. He has also been a director of the 
Harmony Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany for fifteen years. He holds mem- 
bership in the Baptist church and has lived 
an upright, honorable life characterized 
by devotion to all that tends to uplift 
humanity and promote moral progress. 



ROBERT P. STEWART. 

Robert P. Stewart, who during the long 
years of his residence in Elvaston, be- 
came known as an honored man of gen- 
uine, personal worth, was born March 4. 
1830, in Butler county, Ohio. His parents 
were James T. and Susanna (Finney) 
Stewart. The father, a native of Harri- 
son county, Pennsylvania, was born in 
1793, while the mother's birth occurred 
near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 3. 
1792. When a youth of eleven years 
James T. Stewart accompanied his par- 
ents on their removal to Illinois, settling 
in Montebello township, Hancock county, 
where he engaged in fanning until his 
death, which occurred September 17, 
1864. His wife survived him until the 
3d of May, 1870. Both were members 
of the United Presbyterian church. In 
their family were nine children, three of 
whom are now living : Sarah and Mary 
Jane, who are residing with their sister- 
in-law. Mrs. Stewart; and John F., who 
resides in Boulder, Colorado. 

Robert P. Stewart spent the days of his 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



117 



boyhood and youth in his native county. 
No event of special importance occurred 
to vary the routine of farm life for him 
in his youth. When a young man of 
about twenty-seven years he came west 
witli his parents and as stated, the family 
home was established in Montebello town- 
ship, where the father purchased a farm, 
the family living in Oakwood while a 
dwelling was being built on the farm. 
Soon after the home was completed Rob- 
ert Stewart returned to Ohio and on the 
evening of March 9, 1859, he was married 
to Miss Martha Holmes, a daughter of. 
John and Hannah (Bigger) Holmes, of 
whom her father was a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and her mother of Kentucky. 
Following their marriage they removed to 
Ohio, settling near Dayton, where the 
father followed the occupation of farm- 
ing. He died in his eighty-sixth year, 
while his wife passed away in the seventy- 
first year of her age. In their family were 
eight children. Mr. Stewart brought his 
bride back to Hancock county and began 
housekeeping on the farm a few miles 
southwest of Elvaston, where they lived 
continuously until 1901, when they built 
their home in the village and retired from 
the farm, planning to enjoy life in ease 
during their remaining days. His parents 
lived for only a brief period after they 
came to Illinois and from that time on 
Mr. Stewart was owner of the farm which 
he carefully cultivated and improved, 
adding to it modern equipments and 
placing his fields under a high state of 
cultivation. While living upon the farm 
one son came to bless their union but was 
spared to them for a little less than two 
years. The kindness of their hearts, how- 



ever, prompted them to care for three 
children, to whom they gave a parent's 
love and devotion. These were Ernest 
and Georgia Allison (the latter now de- 
ceased), and Nelson Wells, who lived to 
young manhood and for the benefit of his 
health afterward went to the western 
country. The anticipated improvement 
did not follow, however, and about 1902 
he returned to the home of his foster 
parents, living but a few days after his 
arrival, thus in early manhood passed 
away a life which gave so much promise 
for the future. 

While Mr. Stewart was a farmer by oc- 
cupation he also possessed milch mechan- 
ical ingenuity and to a greater or less ex- 
tent followed the carpenter's trade. His 
ability in this direction enabled him to 
keep everything about his place in excel- 
lent condition and the buildings and fences 
were always in a state of good repair. In 
matters of citizenship he was loyal and 
progressive. During the latter part of the 
Civil war he responded to the country's 
call for aid and enlisted in the Union 
Army but after a few months the war 
ended and he was engaged in no battle. 
Every movement for the benefit of his 
township and county received his en- 
dorsement and to a large measure his co- 
operation and he always stood as an ad- 
vocate of all that is right, true and just. 
In his youth he became a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and he and his wife 
and his two sisters were charter mem- 
bers of the Elvaston Presbyterian church, 
in which Mr. Stewart served as an elder 
for many years, while in the various 
church activities he took a helpful part. 
His life was permeated by his Christian 



n8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



faith and he made it his daily endeavor 
to follow closely the teachings of his 
church, so that he lived an exemplary 
Christian life. He was considerate in his 
judgments of men, kindly in action and 
generous in disposition and was de- 
voted to his family, doing everything in 
his power for the welfare and happiness 
of his wife and the two sisters residing 
with them. He was last seen in public 
in attendance at Sunday services of his 
church on the 8th of January, 1905. He 
had always been a rugged man, enjoying 
excellent health and that morning seemed 
in his usual good health, but soon after 
his return 'home he became ill and in a 
half hour had passed away. The news of 
his death was a shock in Elvaston, Ham- 
ilton and throughout the county wher- 
ever he was known. He had lived a life 
of usefulness and activity, in which there 
were no sensational chapters but the 
record was that of a man who had always 
done his duty to himself, his family and 
his country. 



LEWIS L. NEWTON. 

Lewis L. Newton, engaged in general 
farming in Pontoosuc township, was 
born in Vinton county, Ohio, July 24, 
1860, a son of Hiram H. and Hannah 
(Harper) Newton, who were likewise 
natives of that county, the former born 
February 10, 1836, and the latter De- 
cember 15, 1839. They are now resi- 
dents of Pontoosuc township. Their fam- 
ily numbers seven children, who survive, 
the first born son having died in infancy. 



Lewis L., Mrs. Laura A. Alston, D. L., 
Mrs. Ella S. Deewall, Mrs. Anna F. 
Kidson, Mrs. C. Blanche Booz and R. 
H. Newton. 

After acquiring his preliminary educa- 
tion in the district schools of Pontoosuc i 
township, Lewis L. Newton became a 
student in Carthage College and, return- 
ing to the home farm, he remained until 
twenty-one years of age, when he started 
out upon an independent business career. 
He has always followed the occupation 
of farming and now has a good place, 
which he has tiled and placed under a 
high state of cultivation. He uses the 
latest improved agricultural implements 
to facilitate the work of the farm. 

On the loth of May, 1882, Mr. New- 
ton was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
B. Lamb, who was born in Pontoosuc 
township, May 10, 1861, a daughter of 
Samuel and Sarah (Baker) Lamb. Her 
father was born. in Virginia, March 10, 
1824, and her mother was a native of 
Adams county, Illinois, her birth occur- 
ring about 1840. He was a farmer by 
occupation and in 1855 settled upon a 
farm in Pontoosuc township, Hancock 
county, where he lived until his death, 
March 17, 1893. For some years he had 
survived hie wife who died in 1878 and 
their remains rest side by side in Pleasant 
Hill cemetery, Pontoosuc township. They 
were the parents of nine children, of 
whom seven are living: Delilah M., the 
wife of George Carlisle, of Rock Creek 
township; Charles R., living in Clements, 
Minnesota; Mrs. Newton; Mary E., the 
wife of Samuel Wright, of Lamar, Colo- 
rado; Addie M., the wife of Orville Pit- 
tarn, of Pilot Grove township; Frank B.. 






HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



119 



a resident farmer of Pontoosuc township, 
and Hugh L., who is also a farmer of the 
same township. Air. Lamb married for 
his second wife Kate C. North, and to 
them was born one child, George, who 
now resides on the home place with his 
mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Newton have continu- 
ously resided in the township in which 
they began their domestic life and their 
home has been blessed with four children : 
Minnie R., Leslie M., who was graduated 
from a military school at Booneville, Mis- 
souri, May 30, 1906; Madge E., and 
Hiram F. They attend and support the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which the 
wife and daughters are members. 



HENRY CLAY HANSON. 

Henry Clay Hanson, a prosperous and 
enterprising farmer of Montebello town- 
ship, was born in this county on Novem- 
ber 4, 1849, and is the son of David and 
Anna Maria (Sullivan) Hanson, both 
natives of Ohio, the father being the 
son of Daniel and Barbara (Broombach) 
Hanson, also natives of the Buckeye state. 

The parents of our sketch were married 
in Ohio, and drove with a team to the new 
west, and settled in Montebello township 
in 1847, renting a farm for a few years 
and then buying the N. \Y. quarter of 
section 3 of this township, which at that 
time was unimproved prairie land. He 
first built a frame house, and then broke 
up what land he could and as rapidly as 



he could with the few facilities at his dis- 
posal. Progress was very slow as the 
country was very new and his means lim- 
ited. He moved on this place in 1854, 
where he made his home until 1890, when 
he retired and moved to Hamilton, Illi- 
nois, remaining there until called to his 
final resting place on May 22, 1901. 

His wife preceded him to her long 
home, passing away from her earthly 
home on January 18, 1888. To this union 
were born four children : Daniel, of 
Cloud county, Kansas ; Sullivan, of Ham- 
ilton, Illinois; Sarah, wife of Owen 
Dickerhoof, of Belleville, Kansas; and 
Henry, the subject of this sketch. 

Henry received his education in the 
school of district No. 132, and remained 
with his parents until his twenty-fifth 
year, when, on the first day of October, 
1874, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Georgiana Benner, of Sonora township. 
Miss Benner was born on October 7, 
1853, the daughter of George and Emily 
(Bradley) Benner, natives of Ohio. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Hanson made their home on a portion of 
the home place, renting the land until the 
father's death, when the estate was di- 
vided among the children, Henry being 
given the home place of one hundred and 
sixty acres. The farm was well im- 
proved with hedge fences and buildings, 
there being two residences, the main house 
being a story and a half high, with seven 
rooms, and supplied with water piped 
from a deep well. He has one windmill 
and four wells, one being one hundred 
and ninety-eight feet in depth. His horse- 
barn is twenty-four by thirty feet with a 
shed ten by thirty feet. The land lays 



120 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in such a way that tiling is not necessary. 
Mr. Hanson carries on general farm- 
ing, and the well kept farm and general 
conditions bear silent testimony to his 
ability in this his chosen occcupation. 

To his marriage with Miss Benner, 
were born six children, five of whom are 
still living : Edna B., born May 24, 1877, 
at home; Leslie, August 23, 1879, died 
October 22, 1903; Adella G., born April 
8, 1 88 1, at home; Winnie M., born May 
21, 1883, resides at Hamilton, Illinois; 
Jesse Ray, born February 23, 1886; 
and Archie Clay, born April 17, 1888. 
Mrs. Hanson was called from this life on 
April 21, 1888, and her remains were laid 
to rest in the Oak Grove cemetery, in 
Sonora township. 

On May 24, 1892, Mr. Hanson was 
united in marriage to Miss Ella Clemen- 
tine Black, who was born in Sonora 
township and was the daughter of George 
and Helen (Bumpus) Black. To this 
union were born three children, only one 
of whom is now living. Vina Gertrude, 
born October 29, 1893; Barbara Helen, 
born September 22, 1896, died August 3, 
1897; Celia Rachel, born April 18, 1900, 
died July 23, 1900. 

Mrs. Hanson has been dead for several 
years, being taken away July 7, 1900, and 
her remains lie in the Oak Grove ceme- 
tery. 

Mr. Hanson has gone through many 
trials, the hand of death bringing grief 
and sorrow to his home many times, but 
he goes bravely on, and with the help of 
his children he has made a comfortable 
and happy home. He is a member of the 
Democratic party, but does not have any 
political aspirations, being content to use 



his vote in the way that he judges bene- 
ficial to the people and his party. He is 
a member of the Christian church of 
Golden Point, and is an honest, industri- 
ous man, gaining and keeping the respect 
of his friends and neighbors. 



RALPH ELLISON. 

Ralph Ellison, one of the prosperous 
and enterprising farmers of Prairie town- 
ship, owns and operates one hundred and 
seventy-four acres of rich land upon 
which he has placed many improvements, 
transforming it into a model farm prop- 
erty. He was one of the early settlers 
of Hancock county and has been contin- 
ously connected with its agricultural in- 
terests, giving his time and energies at 
the present time to the development of 
his farm, which is conveniently and 
pleasantly located, adjoining the village 
limits of Elvaston. A native of England, 
he was born in Yorkshire on the 23d of 
December, 1840, and when' only a year 
old was brought to the United States by 
his parents, Matthew and Jane (Willson) 
Ellison, both of whom were natives of 
Yorkshire. The father worked in a 
factory during his residence in England, 
and upon coming to the United States 
settled in Hancock county, Illinois, where 
he purchased a quarter section of land in 
Rock Creek township. There he made a 
home for himself and family, and resided 
until his death, which occurred at the age 
of seventv-six years. The mother also 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



121 



died there and was seventy-eight years of 
age at the time of her demise. They were 
faithful members of the Presbyterian 
church and enjoyed the unqualified esteem 
of those with whom they came in con- 
tact. The father engaged in general 
farming throughout the period of his res- 
idence in this county, or until his life's 
labors were ended in death and both he 
and his wife were laid to rest in Rock 
Creek township. In their family were 
eight children, of whom Ralph is the 
youngest child. He has two surviving 
sisters, Margaret, the wife of John Stev- 
enson, a resident fanner of Rock Creek 
township, and Mary, the widow of 
Dwight Whitcomb, who is living in 
Adrian. 

Mr. Ellison of this review was reared 
upon the old homestead farm in Rock 
Creek township, and acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools, while during 
the periods of vacation he assisted in the 
work of the fields, and after putting aside 
his text-books gave his entire attention to 
work upon his father's farm until twenty- 
three years of age, save that for a brief 
period he devoted his energies to the 
blacksmith's trade, which he learned and 
followed for a short time and then aban- 
doned it. Leaving home at the age of 
twenty-three, he purchased a quarter sec- 
tion of raw land on section 17. Rock 
Creek township, and with characteristic 
energy began to cultivate and improve 
this tract, on which he erected good build- 
ings. He here engaged in general fann- 
ing and stock-raising for twenty-seven 
years and then sold the property, at which 
time he purchased a farm of eighty acres 
in Prairie township, where he resided for 



a year. He then sold that place to his 
son, George, and invested in one hundred 
and seventy-four acres of land, consti- 
tuting his present farm in Prairie town- 
ship. Here he has resided continously 
since and the many excellent improve- 
ments he has placed upon the property 
have made it a model farm. He has mod- 
ern farm machinery, good buildings, high 
grades of stock and richly cultivated 
fields, and altogether the property is a 
valuable one. He likewise owns a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres at Edna, 
Labette county, Kansas. 

Mr. Ellison was married December 31, 
1862, to Miss Edith Evans, who was born 
in Adams county, Illinois, a daughter of 
Bales and Elizabeth (Pevehouse) Evans, 
both of whom are now deceased. The 
father was a farmer and became one of 
the early settlers of Adams county, Illi- 
nois. Mrs. Ellison died at their home 
in Prairie township, February 4, 1904. 
She was a consistent member of the Pres- 
byterian church, a devoted wife, a kind 
and loving mother and a faithful friend, 
and her death was deeply regretted by all 
who knew her. Her remains were in- 
terred in Carthage cemetery. By her mar- 
riage she had become the mother of four 
children, all of whom are yet living, and 
all were born in Hancock county. Jennie 
is the wife of Albert Schenk, a resident 
farmer of Labette county, Kansas, and 
has four children. Clifford and Emory, 
born in Hancock county ; Myrtle and Grace 
were born in Labette county, Kansas. 
Emma married Milton Karr, October 1 1 . 
1906, a resident farmer of Elvaston. 
George is a farmer of Prairie township, 
where he owns eighty acres of land, which 



122 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



he purchased from his father. He wedded 
Mary J. Davis, a daughter of Amos 
Davis, of Appanoose township. They 
have two sons, Earl and Ray. Lillian 
is the wife of Jean McGinnes, proprietor 
of a grocery store and meat market at 
Elvaston, Illinois. 

Mr. Ellison votes with the Republican 
party and has held several township of- 
fices. He has seen many improvements 
made in Hancock county, and in fact has 
witnessed almost its entire development 
from a wil'd prairie section to one of high 
cultivation, the farms of this locality be- 
ing among- the best to be found in this 
great agricultural state. He has done his 
full share toward making the county 
what it is today and has ever stood for 
good citizenship, for progress and for 
advancement, and in his private business 
interests he has displayed sterling purpose 
and close application which have resulted 
in the acquirement of valuable property. 



CYRUS MANLEY HEWITT. 

Cyrus M. Hewitt is engaged in general 
farming and stock-raising on section 9, 
Pontoosuc township, where he has resided 
since 1885 and where he owns one hun- 
dred and ten acres of land that, owing to 
the care and labor bestowed upon it, is 
now rich and productive. It was in this 
township, September 6, 1851, that he first 
opened his eyes to the light of day, his 
parents being Charles W. and Ann (Alex- 
ander) Hewitt. The father was a native 



of Vermont and the mother of New York 
and the latter was 'a daughter of one of 
the heroes of the Revolutionary war. 
Charles W. Hewitt followed the occupa- 
tion of farming as a life work and came 
to Hancock county, Illinois, in 1839, set- 
tling in Pontoosuc township, where he 
entered land from the government and 
amid pioneer conditions began the devel- 
opment of a farm. Subsequently he re- 
moved to La Harpe township and con- 
tinued actively in farming until his life's 
labors were terminated by death in 1894. 
His wife survived him until 1898. They 
were the parents of eight children, of 
whom five are now living : Viola, the wife 
of W. B. Kirkpatrick, of Macomb, Illi- 
nois ; Louisa, the wife of Rufus Bennett, 
of La Harpe; C. M. ; Ellen and lola, also 
of La Harpe. * 

In the schools of La Harpe township 
Cyrus M. Hewitt acquired his education 
and upon the home farm remained to the 
age of twenty years, when he began 
working by the month and so continued 
until his marriage, March 21, 1883, to 
Miss Eary Ettny Cranshaw, who was born 
in Henderson county, Illinois, in 1839, a 
daughter of Isaac and Mary (Coffman) 
Cranshaw, natives of Georgia and Ken- 
tucky respectively. Coming to Illinois at 
a very early day, her father settled in the 
southwestern part of the state. He took 
part in the Mormon war in 1844, whereby 
the Mormons were driven from the state 
and he was connected with other early 
events which left their impress upon the 
historic annals of the state. His political 
support was given the democracy. Both 
he and his wife died in McDonough 
county, Illinois. In their family were 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



123 



eleven children, five yet living: Mrs. 
Elizabeth Wise, a widow, living in Ore- 
gon ; Mrs. Hewitt ; Isaac, a resident of 
Kansas ; Mary, the widow of James Dun- 
can, and a resident of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri ; Franklin, of Stronghurst. Illinois. 
One son, Boone Cranshaw, was a soldier 
of the Civil war and died in the hospital 
from the effects of the hardships of mili- 
tary life. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hewitt began their do- 
mestic life in Henderson county, Illinois, 
where they lived for two years, and then 
removed to the Alexander place in Pon- 
toosuc township. In 1885 he purchased 
his present farm of one hundred and ten 
acres on section 9, erected a house, built 
a barn and other outbuildings and has 
generally improved the farm. Here he 
tills the soil and raises stock, leading a 
busy and useful life. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Hewitt has been born a daughter, Lola, 
whose birth occurred in Pontoosuc town- 
ship in 1885, and who is still with her 
parents. At the time of her marriage to 
our subject Mrs. Hewitt was the widow 
of John Duncan, of McDonough county, 
Illinois. He was born in that county in 
1841, a son of Joseph and Catherine 
(Wasson) Duncan, both deceased. In 
their family were four children, all living 
with the exception of John, the others be- 
ing: Mrs. Elizabeth Hunt, a widow, liv- 
ing in Kansas ; Lydia, the wife of John 
M. Huston, of McDonough county ; and 
Caroline, the wife of Henry Curry, of 
Henderson county. John Duncan died in 
1882, his remains being interred in Mc- 
Donough county. He left five children : 
Dora, the eldest, is the wife of W. T. 
Kirkpatrick, of Oklahoma, and has six 



children : George, John, Robert, Law- 
rence, Lulu and Olive ; Addie is the wife of 
Luther Van Osdale, of Henderson county, 
Illinois, and has four children : Ethel, 
John, Roy and Gladys; Lawrence, living 
in Kansas, married Maude Kidson and 
has three children : Vallie, Dewey and 
Opal ; Vema is the wife of William Koll, 
of Dallas City, Illinois, and has a daugh- 
ter, Maxine ; and Royce, of Blandinsville, 
Illinois, married Florence Sullivan and 
has a daughter, Edna May. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hewitt are devoted mem- 
bers of the Christian church, of which he 
is one of the trustees, and upon the demo- 
cratic ticket, of which he is a supporter, 
he has been elected commissioner. Mrs. 
Hewitt, a lady of natural culture and re- 
finement and of most gracious manner, 
possesses superior literary taste and has 
written many poems of much more than 
ordinary merit. In 1905 she had a volume 
of her best poems published and sold to 
aid the missionary cause of her church. 
They had a ready sale and the volume is 
much prized by all who possess a copy. 
Both Mr.. and Mrs. Hewitt stand high in 
public regard. It has been due to his 
business enterprise and sound judgment 
that he has won a place among the sub- 
stantial residents of his county, for he 
started out in. life empty-handed and his 
possessions are the visible proof of his 
enterprise and keen discernment in all 
matters relating to the management and 
improvement of the farm. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hewitt both stand high in the estimation 
of all who have had the pleasure of mak- 
ing their acquaintance, and with whom 
they have been associated in the walks 
of life. 



124 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



EDWIN P. ROWE. 

Edwin P. Rowe, one of the oldest 
salesmen in the city of Carthage, was 
bom in 1851, at Dallas City, Hancock 
county. His paternal grandfather, Mor- 
ris Rowe, was a soldier of the war of 
1812 and of the Mexican war. His 
parents were Miles and Eliza Jane (Bean) 
Rowe, the former born in New York, in 
1821, and the latter in Virginia, in 1826. 
Miles Rowe came to Illinois at an early 
period in its settlement and for a num- 
ber of years when a young man drove a 
stage between Carthage and Warsaw, 
while for many years afterward he was 
proprietor of the Hit or Miss Hotel, in 
Dallas City. Then for fifteen or twenty 
years he was employed in the lumber of- 
fice of H. F. Black, and is now gatekeeper 
on the Santa Fe road at Dallas City, oc- 
cupying this position although eighty-five 
years of age. In politics he is a demo- 
crat. His wife, who was a member of 
the Methodist church, died in 1902, and 
is buried in Dallas City, Illinois. They 
had six children, of whom five are now 
living: William H., a resident of St. 
Louis; Oscar E., deceased; Edwin P.; 
Stella, the wife of John Roth, of Dallas 
City. Illinois : Mary, the wife of Fred 
Grippe, living in Joliet, Illinois ; and 
Morris, of Dallas City. 

Edwin P. Rowe was educated in the 
public schools of his native place "and 
afterward was employed for a number of 
years in a grocery store there. Later he 
had charge as manager of a dry goods 
store in Dallas City, and in 1885 he re- 
moved to Carthage, where he has been 
head salesman of the Quinby Clothing 



Store since that time, covering a period of 
more than twenty years. 

On the 23d of April, 1876, Mr. Rowe 
was married to Miss Minnie P. Graff, 
who was born in Burlington. Iowa, in 
September. 1855, a daughter of Ferdi- 
nand and Louisa M. (Becker) Graff. Her 
father was born in Berlin, Germany, and 
at the age of twenty years emigrated to 
America, settling in Iowa but now lives 
in Hancock county, Illinois, where he fol- 
lows farming. His wife, who was born 
in Berlin, came to the L'nited States when 
only five years of age. Both were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. In the fam- 
ily were ten children, nine of whom still 
survive: John H., a resident of Musca- 
tine, Iowa: Minnie P., now the wife of 
Mr. Rowe; Clara M., the wife of C. R. 
Thull, of Dallas City ; Eda, who died in 
infancy; Emma, the wife of F. A. Scrip- 
fer, of Sigourney, Iowa; George F., who 
lives on the old home farm near Dallas 
City ; John, a druggist, of Des Moines, 
Iowa : Bertha, the wife of H. Hagebeack, 
of Davenport, Iowa : Etta, the wife of 
Hershall Trenthart, of Niota, Hancock 
county : and Flora, at home. These chil- 
dren were born of two marriages, for the 
mother of Mrs. Rowe died when the 
(laughter was only six years of age. and 
for his second wife the father chose Miss 
Anna Mayer, there being six children 
born of the second marriage. Both he 
and his second wife are living, their home 
being in Pontoosuc township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rowe had four children, 
two born in Dallas City and two in Car- 
thage, namely : Walter E., who was born 
in February, 1877, and is at home; Wil- 
ford F.. who was born in 1879, married 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



125 



Miss Lenore Kelley and lives in Chicago, 
where he is employed in the Live Stock 
National Bank. He was in the Philippine 
war, enlisting in 1899 in the Thirtieth 
Regiment under Colonel Gardner. He 
was a member of the Thirtieth Regimental 
Band, was first corporal, was afterward 
promoted to the rank of sergeant and re- 
ceived an honorable discharge in 1901. 
He was in early youth employed in sev- 
eral stores in Carthage and afterward be- 
came messenger at the Drovers Bank in 
Chicago, while later he was employed in 
the money department of the Adams Ex- 
press Company in that city. Later he was 
promoted to bookkeeper at a salary of 
fifty-five dollars a month in the Live Stock 
Bank, of Chicago, and he has a fine record 
for a young man of his years, when 
viewed from both a military and business 
standpoint. Since entering the bank he 
has won promotion and he is in a position 
where he handles millions of dollars a 
day. Mabel Grace, the third member of 
the family, was a graduate of the high 
school and became a fine piano and violin 
player as well as vocalist. She died in 
1888. Irma Pauline died in 1900. 

In his political views Mr. Rowe is an 
earnest democrat and fraternally is con- 
nected with the Modern Woodmen and 
with the Court of Honor, while his wife 
belongs to the' latter and also to the Order 
of the Eastern Star, in which she is a past 
matron. Both are faithful members of 
the Presbyterian church and Mr. Rowe 
was a member of the building committee 
at the time of the erection of the present 
house of worship. He built his present 
home at the corner of Marion and Davis 
streets and has erected several houses in 



Carthage but has sold them all. He 
owns, however, one or two vacant lots in 
the city. He is a man whose indefatigable 
enterprise and indomitable purpose have 
constituted the basis of his success and 
though he started out in life on his own 
responsibility at an early age he has 
through his energy, ambition and deter- 
mination accumulated the means whereby 
he has given his children good educa- 
tional advantages and provided them with 
many of the comforts of life. Mrs. Rowe 
presides with pleasing hospitality over 
their home and their friends in Carthage 
are numbered by the score. 



GEORGE W. PAYNE. 

George W. Payne, an architect of 
Carthage, whose business extends into 
various other counties and states, is a 
son of Alfred F. and Elizabeth (Wil- 
liams) Payne, and was born near St. 
Charles, Missouri, November 4, 1845. 
His father was a native of Fauquier 
county, Virginia, while the mother's birth 
occurred near St. Louis, Missouri. She 
was a daughter of Thomas Williams, a 

- - 

soldier of the war of 1812. Alfred F. 
Payne was a civil engineer, who pursued 
his education in the college in St. Louis. 
He afterward turned his attention to 
harness-making, later followed the occu- 
pation of farming and subsequently en- 
gaged in the lumber business, thus follow- 
ing various pursuits. He died in 1869 
and his remains were interred in Bowen 



126 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cemetery in Hancock county, while his 
wife, who survived him for a number of 
years, was laid to rest in Carthage cem- 
etery. In their family were ten children, 
of whom five are living. 

George \V. Payne was largely educated 
in the schools of Brown county, Illinois. 
When a young lad he ran away from 
home to go to the war but his army life 
was very brief, lasting for only a few 
weeks, at the end of which time his 
parents learned of his whereabouts and 
he was returned home, for he was too 
youthful for military service. In early 
life he learned the carpenter's trade, which 
he followed from 1868 until 1887 in 
Hancock county. He became a resident 
of Carthage in 1870 and was actively 
identified with its building operations for 
seventeen years thereafter, since which 
time he has given his attention to his pres- 
ent profession that of an architect. In 
this he is associated with his son, Edgar 
A., and they are the only architects in the 
county. They have done some publishing 
and they send plans to almost every state 
in the union. Their office is on Main 
street and their business is now extensive 
and of an important character, their plans 
being equal to any sent out by the various 
architects in this part of the state. They 
have made plans for churches, oppra 
houses, business blocks, residences and 
schools and have planned all of the 
churches in Carthage. In fact many of 
the fine structures of this city stand as 
monuments to their skill and ability in the 
line of their chosen profession. 

Mr. Payne was married in 1871 to Miss 
Emma Carsey, of Hancock county, Illi- 
nois, who was born in Missouri. Her 



father was a shoemaker and removed 
from Missouri to this city but is now re- 
siding in Texas. In his family were 
eight or nine children. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Payne have been born two children, 
both of whom are natives of Carthage. 
The elder, Edgar A., married Miss Kittie 
Linn and is connected with his father in 
business. He pursued a course of study 
in Carthage College. The daughter, 
Bertha A., is now the wife of C. A. 
Garard, of Carthage, and has two chil- 
dren, Earl A. and Ruth A. The parents 
are devoted members of the Lutheran 
Evangelical church and reside on Wash- 
ington street, near Main, where Mr. 
Payne erected a fine residence. In his 
political views he is a democrat. 

He stands high among all classes of 
men and is an energetic, progressive and 
upright citizen, who well merits the con- 
fidence and esteem which are uniformly 
extended to him. His residence in 
Carthage covers a period of thirty-six 
years and through his entire life he has 
been actuated by honorable principles and 
manly purposes. 



LYMAN W. WATT. 

Lyman W. Watt, an influential busi- 
ness man of the village of Elvaston, 
where he is engaged in the coal trade, 
was here born on the I2th of May, 1868. 
His father, Alexander Watt, was a native 
of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, born Feb- 
ruary 4, 1821, and in that city he resided 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



127 



until twenty-eight years of age, when he 
came to Illinois, settling first in Durham 
township, Hancock county, where he en- 
gaged in farming. He rented a farm 
there for some years, after which he went 
to Wythe township, where he owned and 
operated a farm of eighty acres, making 
his home thereon until 1863. That year 
witnessed his removal to Dallas and he 
filled a position as clerk in one of the 
stores at that place. In 1866 he came to 
Elvaston and with the capital he had ac- 
quired through his own labor, economy 
and careful management he established 
himself in a general mercantile business 
and was for years a prominent factor in 
commercial circles here, continuing in the 
store until 1900, when he sold out and 
retired to private life. He was also 
largely engaged in the coal trade and his 
son, Lyman, subsequently became his suc- 
cessor in this business. The father like- 
wise shipped and handled large quantities 
of grain and hay and his business inter- 
ests were extensive, making him one of 
the leading representatives of commercial 
life in Elvaston. He realized that "There 
is no excellence without labor" and his 
unfaltering diligence and determined pur- 
pose proved the basis of a very gratifying 
success. He married for his first wife 
Miss Sarah McDonald, who died in 1863. 
His second wife bore the maiden name 
of Fannie C. Wilcox and was a native 
of Connecticut, born in the town of Had- 
dam, March II, 1836. This marriage 
was celebrated November 29, 1866. Mrs. 
Watt is still living and resides with her 
son, Lyman W. Six children were born 
of the second marriage, two of whom are 
now living, the younger son being Her- 



man, who resides in Burlington, Iowa, 
and is connected with the Prudential In- 
surance Company. 

Alexander Watt was a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, who exemplified in his 
life the beneficent spirit of the craft. 
He voted with the Republican party and 
as even- true American citizen should 
do, felt a deep interest in political ques- 
tions and issues. He was supervisor of 
Prairie township for several terms and 
whether in office or out of it was thor- 
oughly trustworthy and commanded the 
esteem of all who knew him. His death 
occurred at his home in Elvaston on the 
27th of July, 1901, when he had reached 
the age of eighty years, five months and 
twenty-three days. He was a prosperous 
and progressive man of his day and had 
the confidence of all who knew him. His 
circle of friends was extensive, a result 
that was attributable to his genial disposi- 
tion, kindly manner and deference to the 
opinions of others. He erected a home 
which is now occupied by his widow and 
son a large and substantial frame dwell- 
ing and was also the owner of several 
other buildings in the village. 

Mrs. Alexander Watt was a daughter 
of Lyman and Emily (Hubbard) Wilcox, 
both of whom were natives of Middlesex, 
Connecticut, whence they came to Illinois 
in 1839, when their daughter was but 
three years of age. They settled in Han- 
cock county, where Mr. Wilcox followed 
farming on North prairie but after a short 
time he removed to Durham township. 
He was one of the committee appointed 
to name that township and gave to it the 
name of Durham. He purchased a farm 
there and carried on the work of cultiva- 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW' 



tion and improvement up to the time of 
his death, which occurred when he was 
about seventy-nine years of age, for lie 
was born in 1795 and he passed away in 
1874. He held membership in the Meth- 
odist church and his entire life was 
guided by honorable principles and lofty 
motives. He was one of the worthy, 
pioneer residents of the county, traveling 
westward in true pioneer style. The party 
consisted of sixteen people, all of whom 
located in Hancock county. They were 
six weeks upon the way from Connecticut 
to Illinois, making the journey in wagons. 
Mrs. Wilcox died in 1868. In the family 
were eight children, fpur of whom are 
now living, namely : Mrs. Emily Pershin 
and Mrs. Clara Spencer, both of Durham 
township ; Wilbur, who is living in Peoria, 
Illinois; and Mrs. Watt, who makes her 
home with her son in Elvaston. 

In the public schools of the village Ly- 
man W. Watt acquired his education and 
after putting aside his text-books entered 
his father's store in 1887. He was ad- 
mitted to a partnership under the firm 
name of A. Watt & Son and continued 
in the store until March, 1900, when they 
sold the business, having up to that time 
carried a large line of general merchan- 
dise and enjoyed an extensive patronage. 
At that date the father retired from ac- 
tive business, while Lyman W. Watt con- 
centrated his energies upon the coal trade, 
with which he has since been connected. 
He has a large business in this line and 
is numbered among the leading represen- 
tatives of trade interests in his native 
town. 

In his political views Mr. Watt is an 
earnest republican but without aspiration 



for office. He belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen camp, No. 3155, of Elvaston, 
in which he has held a number of offices. 
His entire life has here been passed, so 
that his life history is well known to his 
fellow townsmen and that he enjoys the 
good will and confidence of all is an in-' 
dication that his has been an honorable 
and straightforward career. In the man- 
agement of his business interests he dis- 
plays keen discernment and arrives quickly 
at correct conclusions. 



SAMUEL GORDON. 

Samuel Gordon, deceased, was actively 
connected with agricultural pursuits in 
Hancock county for many years and the 
place which he occupied in public regard 
well entitles him to representation in this 
volume. He was born in Peterboro, New 
Hampshire, May 3, 1825, a son of John 
and Elizabeth (Smith) Gordon, who were 
also natives of Peterboro. The paternal 
grandparents were Samuel and Eleanor 
(Mitchell) Gordon, natives of Scotland. 
John and Elizabeth (Smith) Gordon, 
leaving New Hampshire, traveled by 
stage to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, thence 
down the Ohio and up the Mississippi 
river, landing just opposite Montebello in 
1831. They were accompanied by their 
two sons, Samuel being the younger. The 
father died soon afterward, but in the 
meantime had in 1839 purchased land 
which he secured under a tax title where 
Hamilton is now located. His wife sur- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLIXOIS. 



129 



vivecl him, passing away about 1845. The 
land which they owned covered nearly the 
entire site of Hamilton as it is today and 
Air. Gordon assisted in laying out the 
city. 

Samuel Gordon of this review spent the 
days of his boyhood and youth in his 
parents' home and acquired a fair com- 
mon school education. He remained with 
his parents until they were called from 
this life and being the only heir came 
I into possession of the old home property. 
On the 3d of April, 1851, he married Miss 
IVrmelia A. Alvord, who was born in 
Warren county, Pennsylvania, August 3, 
1832. a daughter of Rev. Samuel and 
Ursula (Smith) Alvord. She was only 
thirteen years of age when brought to 
Hancock county, where she was reared 
by her parents, remaining at home until 
her marriage, when she went to a home of 
her own. She came to this county in 
1845. Mr. Gordon had one hundred and 
sixty acres of land on which a log cabin 
had been built. In later years he erected 
the finest brick residence in this part of 
the country, containing twelve rooms with 
a large cellar under one half of the house. 
In this home, surrounded by the comforts 
and many of the luxuries of life, he spent 
his remaining days, passing away on the 
6th of October, 1901. He had for more 
than a decade survived his wife, whose 
death occurred September 25, 1890. This 
worthy couple were the parents of the 
following named : Eleanor Elizabeth 
Gordon, living in Des Moines. Iowa, is a 
minister of the Unitarian church. John 
A. Gordon is engaged in the book busi- 
ness in Hamilton. Alice and Agnes are 
living at the old home in Hamilton. 



Robert Smith Gordon is station agent on 
the Wabash and on the Toledo, Peoria 
& Warsaw railroads at Hamilton. Mabel 
has been a teacher in the schools of Ham- 
ilton since 1894. In August, 1862, Mr. 
Gordon responded to his country's call 
for troops, enlisting as a member of 
Company C, One Hundred and Eight- 
eenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
was on continuous duty for three years 
and eight months and participated in the 
battles of Chickasaw Bluffs, Arkansas 
Post, Thompson's Hill, Champion Hills, 
Black River, the siege of Vicksburg, 
Grand Coteau Bayou and Port Hudson. 
He was a brave and loyal soldier, always 
found at his duty whether on the firing 
line or the lonely picket line. He became 
a member of Black Hawk lodge, No. 238, 
A. F. & A. M., on the ist of September, 
1857, and served as senior warden for 
one year and as junior warden for two 
years. He was also secretary for six 
years and treasurer for twenty-two years. 
His political allegiance was given to the 
Republican party and he held the office 
of town and city clerk and police magis- 
trate, city treasurer and councilman. No 
public trust reposed in him was ever be- 
trayed in the slightest degree, for he was 
a brave and loyal soldier, always faith- 
ful to his duty and prompt in the dis- 
charge of any task that devolved upon 
him, bringing to. his work in civic life 
the same loyalty and fidelity that char- 
acterized his military service. Mr. Gor- 
don was a representative of one of the 
oldest pioneer families of the county and 
was a resident of this part of the state 
for more than .the allotted psalmist's span 
of three score years and ten. He watched 



130 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



its growth and development from the 
time when it was reclaimed from a fron- 
tier district until his eyes were closed in 
death and was a co-operant factor in many 
measures for the general good. 



SAMUEL R. YETTER. 

Samuel R. Yetter, one of the early 
settlers of Hancock county, Illinois, now 
residing on his farm in Carthage town- 
ship, has watched the development of the 
county as it has emerged from pioneer 
conditions, when the land was unculti- 
vated, the timber uncut and the streams 
unbridged to the present era of progress 
and development when none of the ad- 
vantages and improvements known to the 
older east are lacking. Mr. Yetter has 
now reached the eighty-second milestone 
on life's journey, having been born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, on the 
4th of August, 1824. He is a son of Wil- 
liam and Lydia (Rock) Yetter. The 
father, also a native of Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, was of German parentage 
and was reared to manhood in his native 
state. He became a mechanic, learning 
and following the locksmith's trade, his 
attention being devoted thereto during the 
period of his residence in Pennsylvania. 
He was married in that state to Miss . 
Lydia Rock, and thinking to enjoy better 
business opportunities in the new but 
growing west, came to Illinois in 1837. 
his destination being Hancock county. He 
settled in Carthage township, then moved 



to Fountain Green township, but after two 
years returned to Carthage township. 
Here William Yetter turned his attention 
to the occupation of farming, in which he 
continued throughout the remainder of 
his active business life. In his political 
views he was a democrat and held various 
township offices, including that of county 
treasurer and assessor, the duties of the 
two offices being combined in one at that 
time. On the expiration of his term he 
was elected to the office of justice of the 
peace, in which capacity he served con- 
tinuously until his death, his decisions be- 
ing strictly fair and impartial. He was a 
member of the Methodist church, to which 
his wife also belonged, and he took an 
active, earnest and helpful part in the 
church work for many years, serving as 
superintendent of the Sunday-school, and 
doing all in his power to promote the 
cause of Christianity here. He is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity and was the 
first representative of the order to pass 
away in Hancock county, his remains be- 
ing laid to rest with Masonic honors. He 
died in 1853, at the a R e f fifty-three years 
and was buried in Franklin cemetery in 
Carthage township. His widow long 
survived him and died in 1892, at the very 
venerable age of ninety-two years. She 
was also a native of Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, and there lived until after 
her marriage, or until the removal of the 
family to Illinois. She was likewise a 
devoted member of the Methodist church 
and at her death was laid to rest by the 
side of her husband in Franklin cemetery. 
In the family of this worthy couple were 
eight children, four of whom are now 
living. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



Samuel R. Yetter spent the first thir- 
teen years of his life in the place of his 
nativity, and in 1837 came with his 
parents to Hancock county, Illinois, living 
in Fountain Green township for two years 
and since that time in Carthage township. 
He remained upon the home place until 
about twenty-four years of age. His edu- 
cation was acquired at Columbia, Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, and when 
he permanently left the parental roof he 
rented a farm which he cultivated for a 
number of years, or until he purchased 
his present place, then about two hundred 
acres. This he has improved, making it 
his home continuously through many 
years. He set out many of the trees here 
and a large number of them have now 
been growing here for more than a half 
century. Through a long period he tilled 
the soil, carefully sowing the seed and" 
harvesting the crops as the years went by. 
He usually had a good return for his 
labor in the shape of bounteous harvests 
and he continued actively in farm work 
until a number of years ago, when he sold 
a part of his land and is now living re- 
tired in the enjoyment of a rest which he 
has truly earned and richly deserves. 

Mr. Yetter has been married twice. In 
1848 he wedded Miss Marilla Goodrich, 
a daughter of Messech and Rebecca Good- 
rich, who were early settlers of Hancock 
county, Illinois, where they lived and died. 
By this marriage there were three chil- 
dren, of whom William and Marilla died 
in infancy, while Laura is now the widow 
of Lewis R. Tull, and a resident of 
Berkeley, California. She has one daugh- 
ter, Etta. Mrs. Yetter died at the com- 
paratively early age of twenty-five years, 



and was laid to rest in Franklin ceme- 
tery in Carthage township. For his sec- 
ond wife Mr. Yetter chose Miss Hester 
A. Halbert, who was born in Lewis 
county, Kentucky, and came to Illinois 
with her widowed mother in 1850. She 
is a daughter of Stephen and Priscilla 
(Watkins) Halbert, both of whom were 
natives of Maryland, whence they re- 
moved to Kentucky at an early day. The 
father died in that state in 1848 and was 
there buried, and the mother afterward 
came to Hancock county, Illinois, where 
she passed away at the age of eighty-one 
years, her remains being interred in 
Franklin cemetery in Carthage township. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Yetter have been 
born ten children, four sons and six 
daughters, of whom six are now living. 
Mary is the wife of Richard White, sex- 
ton of Moss Ridge cemetery in Carthage, 
and they have three children, Florence, 
Ruth and Myrtle. Clara is the deceased 
wife of William Sowers, a farmer resid- 
ing in Kansas. She died while on a visit 
at the home of her parents, leaving three 
children, Mabel, Hester and Charles. 
The elder daughter, Mabel, is now the 
wife of Walter Moot and resides near 
Lucas, Kansas, and they have one son, 
William. John Yetter, the third member 
of the father's family, resides in Carthage, 
Illinois, where he is a teamster. He 
wedded Mary B. Swain, and they have 
two living sons, Frank and Ferris, and 
lost one son, David, who died at the age 
of two months. Charles S. Yetter, a rail- 
road conductor of the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy road, residing at Beards- 
town, Illinois, married Pearl Johnson, and 
has two living children, Howard and 



132 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



George, and two deceased, Pearl and 
Guy. Alice Yetter became the wife of 
Alfred M. McKee. a grocer of Carthage, 
and they have three children, Earl, Ray 
and Helen. Alaggie is the wife of P. H. 
Willey, a farmer of Peabody, Kansas, and 
they have three living children. Bertha, 
Frank and Mabel, and lost one, who died 
unnamed in infancy. Frank Yetter, who 
was in the United States Navy and served 
in the Philippine war, died at Wilbur, 
Washington, when twenty-four years of 
age. Ralph is at home. Fidelia died at 
the age of six years. Nora died at the 
age of one year and sixteen days. All 
of the children were born in Carthage 
township and were educated here, and 
Alice, Clara and Laura all taught school 
prior to their marriage. 

Mr. Yetter is a member of the Carthage 
Methodist church and belongs to Han- 
cock lodge. No. 20, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. He votes with the Re- 
publican party and has held some of the 
township offices, serving as justice of the 
peace, highway commissioner and con- 
stable. He has seen many of the changes 
that have occurred and the improvements 
that have been made in Hancock county. 
Almost seventy years have come and gone 
since he arrived here, at which time al- 
most the entire district was a wild prairie, 
which he has seen converted into richly 
cultivated farms with here and there thriv.- 
ing towns and villages and progressive 
cities. Deer and other wild game were 
killed in this part of the state and only a 
few settlements had been made, the trav- 
eler finding it possible to ride for miles 
over the country in almost any direction 
without coming to a fence or habitation 



to impede his progress. The work of 
transforming the wild district into one 
of rich fertility and improvement has been 
an arduous task. Mr. Yetter, however, 
bore his full share in this work and has 
performed an important part in making 
the county what it is today one of the 
richest farming districts of western Illi- 
nois. He certainly deserves extended 
and prominent mention in this volume as 
a leading and honored agriculturist, and 
one whose life has at all times been 
worthy of emulation, being charterized 
by fidelity to principle and by unfaltering 
allegiance to the rules of honorable and 
manly conduct. Now in the evening of 
life he receives the veneration and respect 
which should ever be accorded those who 
have advanced far on life's journey and 
who are able to look back over the past 
without regret and forward to the future 
without fear. 



FRANK W. WALKER. 

Frank W. Walker is the owner of the 
finest farm home and stock barns in Han- 
cock county and is one of the most exten- 
sive landholders of this part of the state, 
having fourteen thousand acres under 
fence. In the control of his business in- 
terests he displays excellent ability and 
keen discrimination, and his prosperity 
has resulted from judicious management 
as well as carefully directed industry. 
One of Hancock county's native sons he 
was born in \Yalker township, on the 28th 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



133 



of March, 1858, and now resides on sec- 
tion 32, Prairie township, where his home 
farm comprises one hundred and sixty 
acres of very rich and productive land. 
His parents were Henry M. and Sophronia 
(Rankin) Walker, hoth of whom were 
natives of Kentucky, whence they came 
to Illinois at an early day, settling in 
\Ya1ker township, Hancock county, which 
was named in honor of his grandfather, 
George Walker, who was one of the 
earliest pioneers of the township. After 
working on the farm during the week he 
would preach Sundays, being the first 
Baptist minister in the vicinity. The 
father purchased land and made a home, 
residing upon his farm for twenty-five 
years, during which period his attention 
was given to the tilling of the soil and to 
the raising of stock. He owned one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in that town- 
ship and he afterward removed to Prairie 
township, purchasing a farm upon sec- 
tion 27. This farm contained three hun- 
dred and twenty acres, which was then 
unimproved, and on which he made all the 
improvements. It continued to be his 
home place until his death, which occurred 
when he had reached the advanced age of 
seventy-nine years. In addition to this 
property he owned enough to make his 
landed possessions ten hundred and sixty 
acres in Hancock county, all of which is 
now improved. He brought a large part 
of this property under cultivation during 
his life time and was a man of marked 
energy and diligence, whose life activity 
resulted in the acquirement of a measure 
of prosperity, making him one of the lead- 
ing citizens of his county. He was one 
of the first men in the county to give 



thought to better stock, having had regis- 
tered shorthorn cattle, not only bringing 
his own stock up to a fine grade but being 
the means of improving the stock in the 
whole community. His political views ac- 
corded with the principles of democracy 
and he was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. His wife passed away 
about two years prior to his demise, when 
she was seventy years of age. Of their 
family of seven children four are still liv- 
ing. Both parents lie buried in the El- 
vaston cemetery and when they were 
called from this life many friends 
mourned their loss. Mr. Walker was one 
of the argonauts who went to California 
in search of the golden fleece in 1849. 
He there engaged in mining and was quite 
successful in his operations, accumulating 
a comfortable fortune during his residence 
of three years on the Pacific coast. He 
died while visiting in California, on the 
1 4th of February, 1906. 

At the usual age Frank W. Walker 
began his education in the common 
schools and afterward attended Carthage 
College. He assisted upon the home place 
as a young man and has always remained 
upon the farm. When twenty-two years 
old he purchased the one hundred and 
sixty acres on which he now resides, and 
has erected here all of the modern build- 
ings, including an attractive and pleas- 
ant frame residence, which is one of the 
largest and finest country homes in the 
county. He also has commodious and 
substantial barns, one barn sixty by sixty- 
four with twenty-four foot ports'is one of 
the finest, if not the finest, barn in the 
county, it being elegantly and attractively 
planned and finished and is a model barn 



134 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



both for conveiience and beauty, and 
altogether his is a model place, in which 
none of the accessories of a modern farm 
are lacking. It is known as the Shadow 
Brook stock farm and Mr. Walker de- 
votes his attention to the raising of high- 
bred stock, making a specialty of short- 
horn cattle and Hambletonian horses, hav- 
ing a large number of each upon his place. 
He raises for sale purposes and has been 
engaged in this business for twenty-six 
years. He now owns a fine Hambletonian 
stallion, Elcho, and he is also the owner 
of the bull, Duke of Iron Hill, a regis- 
tered shorthorn, both of which are used 
for breeding purposes. In addition to his 
home farm Mr. Walker has always con- 
ducted the old homestead farm compris- 
ing three hundred and twenty acres and 
located one mile east. He is an extensive 
feeder, shipping about one hundred and 
fifty head of fat stock per year of his own 
production and in addition to this Mr. 
Walker buys and ships many carloads of 
stock annually to the Chicago market. He 
is also the owner of about fourteen thou- 
sand acres of land in Colorado, all under 
fence, which he has used for stock-raising 
and the growing of wheat. Everything 
about his home place is kept in most per- 
fect order and repair, showing his pro- 
gressive spirit and his careful supervision. 
Mr. Walker was married on the loth of 
November, 1881, to Miss Helen M. Jack- 
son, a daughter of Peter Jackson, of 
Prairie township, who was an early set- 
tler of Hancock county. He followed 
farming for a number of years but is now 
living retired. Mrs. Walker, like her hus- 
band, obtained her early education in the 
district schools and was afterward a 



student in Carthage College. This mar- 
riage has been blessed with six children, 
of whom five are living: Claude C., of 
Prairie township, residing upon the old 
homestead of his grandfather, married 
Yetta Thomas, a daughter of Henry 
Thomas. Clyde H. assists in the oper- 
ation of the home farm. Flossie M., 
Blossom J. and Ruth, are all at home ; and 
Onlin died at the age of eight years. All 
were born upon the home property and 
have been provided with excellent educa- 
tional privileges. 

Mr. Walker is a democrat without po- 
litical aspiration and he keeps well in- 
formed on the questions and issues of the 
day. Mr. and Mrs. Walker are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and he 
is interested in those measures and move- 
ments which tend to advance the material, 
intellectual and moral progress of the 
community. The number of his friends 
is almost co-extensive with the circle of 
his acquaintance, for he has always lived 
in Hancock county and his history has 
been such as would bear close investiga- 
tion and scrutiny, for at all times he has 
lived honorable with due regard to his 
obligations to his fellowmen and with 
conscientious regard for his duties of 
citizenship. 



JAMES HENRY CLARK. 

James Henry Clark, who is engaged in 
farming and also carries on stock-raising 
extensively in Dallas township, was born 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



135 



in Brown county, Illinois, May 30, 1863, 
a son of Nathaniel H. and Jane (Wells) 
Clark. The father's birth occurred in the 
state of New York in 1835 and the mother 
was born in Ohio in the same year. He 
was a farmer by occupation and at an 
early day came to Illinois, settling in 
Brown county, while subsequently he be- 
came a resident of Schuyler county. He 
was killed on the railroad- near Clayton, 
October 7, 1902, and his widow still re- 
sides in that county. In their family were 
eight children : George, living in Brown 
county, Illinois ; Maggie, the wife of 
George Laughlin, who resides in Black- 
bird, Missouri; James H., of this review; 
Lydia, the wife of Henry Lawson, of 
Fountain Green ; Fannie, the wife of Al- 
lan Groscloud; Dora, the wife of James 
Younglove, of Schuyler county ; Charles, 
who is living upon the home farm in 
Schuyler county; and Jesse, of Dallas 
City. 

James Henry Clark attended the public 
schools of Schuyler county but his educa- 
tional privileges were somewhat limited, 
as his aid was needed in the operation of 
the home farm. He remained with his 
parents until nineteen years of age and 
was afterward employed for one season by 
the month as a farm hand. In January, 
1884, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Bowker, who was born in Schuy- 
ler county, Illinois, in 1865, a daughter 
of Catherine and Frank Bowker, natives 
of New York, and of Scotland county, 
Missouri, respectively. The father be- 
came a farmer, first of Schuyler county 
and afterward of Hancock county, Illi- 
nois, and subsequently removed to Mis- 
souri and thence to Kansas, but is now liv- 
9 



ing retired in Dallas City. He owned 
land in each place in which he lived and 
is now in comfortable circumstances. 
L'nto him and his wife were born eight 
children and the family circle yet remains 
unbroken by the hand of death. The 
record is as follows : Minnie, now Mrs. 
Clark ; Nettie, who in early life engaged in 
teaching school and is now the wife of 
Sydney Callison, of Boston, Missouri; 
Roger, of Hancock county ; Kittie, the 
wife of Ernest Rose worn, of Barton 
county, Missouri ; Maud, the wife of Wal- 
ter Lionberger, of Scotland county, Mis- 
souri; Inez Bowker, who is a successful 
teacher; George, who is living in Dallas 
City ; and Mabel, who is a graduate of the 
high school of Dallas City and lives with 
her parents. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. Clark 
and his young wife began their domestic 
life upon a rented farm in Schuyler 
county, where they lived for one year. In 
1 885 they came to Hancock county, where 
they have since resided, making their home 
in Dallas and Durham townships. Mr. 
Clark has been extensively engaged in the 
live stock business and this is still a fruit- 
ful source of income to him. In 1904 he 
purchased ninety-seven acres of good land 
on section 14, Dallas township, and has 
since made extensive improvements in the 
home. He has also erected two good 
barns, one thirty-two by forty feet and the 
other fifty- four by sixty-six feet. He now 
has one of the best improved farms of the 
township, equipped with modern conveni- 
ences and accessories, and he has been one 
of the heavy stock feeders of the county. 
His business interests are carefully con- 
ducted and his labors are bringing to him 



136 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV IE}]' 



a gratifying measure of success, while his 
straightforward dealings in all of his 
transactions have gained for him the trust 
of his fellowmen. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Clark has 
been blessed with four children, all born 
in Hancock county : Ethel and Ray, 
aged respectively twenty and eighteen 
years : Katherine and Annice, both in 
school. In his political views Mr. Clark 
is an inflexible democrat and has held 
various township offices, including that 
of assessor of Durham township. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason and a Woodman 
and both he and his wife are connected 
witli the Royal Neighbors. Without pe- 
cuniary assistance at the outset of his 
career he has made steady progress and 
in his home is surrounded by many of 
the comforts of life. He and his wife 
occupy an enviable position in the re- 
gard of friends and neighbors and are 
accounted worthy and leading citizens of 
Dallas township. 



SAMUEL S. CHAPMAN. 

Samuel S. Chapman, owning and op- 
erating a valuable farm in Prairie town- 
ship, is a native of Scott county, Illinois, 
born May 11, 1851. He has, however, 
resided in Hancock county since 1857. 
when, at the age of six years, he came 
to this part of the state with his parents, 
Wesley and Elizabeth (Haynie) Chap- 
man. The father was born in Maryland, 
near Cumberland, March 24, 1825, and 



lived in his native state until ten years 
of age, when, in 1835, he came to Illi- 
nois and for many years thereafter was 
a resident of Scott county. After attain- 
ing his majority he engaged in farming 
on his own account and followed that 
occupation throughout his active business 
career. Upon his removal from Scott 
county to Hancock county in 1857, he 
purchased a farm of eighty acres in 
Prairie township, to which he afterward 
added from time to time as his financial 
resources increased until within its bound- 
aries were comprised two hundred and 
eighty acres. He had in all four hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land, all in 
Prairie township. It is upon this tract 
that Samuel S. Chapman now resides." 
The father placed many modern improve- 
ments upon the .property, including the 
erection of a large brick residence in 1869. 
He also built a good barn and other out- 
buildings for the shelter of grain and 
stock. It was in 1862 that he took up 
his abode upon this place, where he en- 
gaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing with signal success until 1890, when 
he sold the farm to his son, Samuel S., 
and removed to Carthage, where he lived 
for ten years, or until the death of his 
wife, since which time he has made his 
home with his children. He is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church at Carthage, 
and his life has been permeated by his 
religious faith. In his political affilia- 
tions he is a republican and has held some 
of the minor offices of the township. His 
wife, who was born in Kentucky, came 
to Illinois in 1829, when two years of 
age. She was a member of the Christian 
church, took a very active part in its work 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



137 



and did all in her power for the exten- 
sion of its influence and the promotion 
of the cause. On the I4th of November, 
1900, she was called to her final rest and 
her remains were interred in Carthage 
cemetery. By her marriage she became 
the mother of eleven children, eight of 
whom are still living. 

Samuel S. Chapman of this review re- 
mained upon the old home farm until 
1876, and during that period acquired a 
good common school education which 
was supplemented by a three years' course 
at the Agricultural College of the State 
University at Urbana, while in the sum- 
mer months he was trained to the work 
'of the fields, becoming familiar with all 
departments of farm labor and thus gain- 
ing that practical experience which en- 
abled him to carefully and successfully 
conduct his own business affairs when he 
started out in life for himself. On the 
7th of September, 1876, he was united 
in marriage to Miss Nancy C. Jackson, 
a daughter of Peter Jackson, one of the 
early settlers of Hancock county, who 
arrive here in 1852, and has now been 
a resident of the locality for fifty-four 
years. He made his home in Carthage 
until the death of his wife about two 
years ago and is now living with his 
children. 

Following his marriage Mr. Chapman 
purchased eighty acres of land in Prairie 
township north of Elvaston. This was 
improved and he continued the further 
cultivation of the fields until about eight- 
een years ago, when he purchased the old 
home place of his father and has resided 
upon it continuously since. He has one 
hundred and fifty acres of the old home- 



stead and the farm is well cultivated, giv- 
ing every evidence in its neat and thrifty 
appearance of the careful supervision and 
practical methods of the owner, whose 
labors have been attended with a gratify- 
ing measure of success. As the years 
have gone by the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Chapman has been blessed with four chil- 
dren but the oldest died in infancy. The 
others are John Hurst, who was educated 
in Carthage and is now a Junior at Hed- 
ding College, in Abingdon, Illinois, and 
now resides upon the home farm ; Irene, 
a senior in Hedding College; and Myrna 
May, who is now attending the high 
school in Carthage. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Chapman are faithful members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
they take an active and helpful interest. 
He has served as one of the trustees and- 
also steward o.f the church, and for many 
years he has been a stanch prohibitionist, 
a fact which indicates his attitude on the 
temperance question. Indeed his life has 
been guided by honorable principles and 
has exemplified manly conduct such as 
commands respect and esteem everywhere. 
He has stood for temperance, for justice, 
for truth and uprightness, and he favors 
every movement that tends to promote 
progressive citizenship or uplift his 
fellowmen. 



PETER JACKSON. 

Peter Jackson was born in Ross county, 
Ohio, on August 27, 1826, and lived there 



133 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



until 1852, when he came to Hancock 
county, Illinois, in November, coming by 
wagon, and located in Wythe township, in 
the spring of 1852, and there he pur- 
chased land and lived till 1866, engaged 
in fanning and stock-raising. In 1866 he 
bought a farm in Prairie township and 
there he lived as a farmer and stock-raiser 
'until 1895, when he rented his farm and 
moved to Carthage, where he led a retired 
life until 1904, when his wife died and 
since then he has lived with his children. 

He married Angeline Hanson who was 
born in Pickaway county, Ohio, May 12, 
1828, and lived there until her marriage 
in 1847. 1 J^Si sne came west with her 
husband. She was educated in Pickaway 
county, Ohio. She died April 5, 1904. She 
was the mother of seven children, all 
daughters, six of whom are living : Sarah 
R.,wife of Francis W. McClellan, of Win- 
field, Kansas; Barbara H., widow of 
George B. Comstock, of Omaha, Nebras- 
ka; Mary M., widow of John G. Harris. 
She resides in Oak Park, Cook county, Il- 
linois. She has three children who were 
born in Hancock county. Nancy C., wife 
of Samuel S. Chapman (see sketch of Mr. 
Chapman) ; Matilda J., wife of Lot B. 
Clark (see sketch) ; Annie E. died in in- 
fancy; Helen M., wife of Frank W. 
Walker (see sketch of Frank W. 
Walker). 

The wife -of Mr. Jackson is buried at 
Carthage cemetery. They were a very 
worthy couple, who were always held in 
the highest esteem by all who knew them. 
Mr. Jackson, who is still living, has at the 
present writing passed the eightieth mile- 
stone of life's journey and still possesses 
a very retentive memory. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN CONNOR. 

Benjamin Franklin Connor was born in 
Rome, Perry county, Indiana, in 1832, 
a son of John and Annie (Maine) Con- 
nor. The father was born in New Lynch- 
burg. Virginia, and removed to Bullitt 
county, Kentucky, in his boyhood days. 
In 1813, when a young man he became 
a resident of Rome, Indiana, and there he 
spent his remaining days and reared his 
family. He was a man worthy all trust 
and esteem, for he lived an upright, 
honorable life. Unto him and his wife 
were born ten children, all born within 
a quarter of a mile of the place where he 
built his first cabin upon taking up his 
abode in Perry county when it was a 
pioneer district. His death occurred in 
1862, and his wife passed away about 
1847 or 1848. She was a faithful and 
devoted wife and mother, and put forth 
every effort in her power to promote the 
welfare and happiness of her family. 

Benjamin F. Connor is now the only 
surviving member of the family. He was 
fifteen or sixteen years of age at the time 
of his mother's demise, and for some time 
thereafter he remained with a sister. He 
learned the trade of a tanner and currier 
at Rome, Indiana, where he worked for 
eight years, and in 1857 he removed to 
Clark county, Missouri, where he resided 
until August, 1 86 1. At that date he came 
to Warsaw. He had engaged in mer- 
chandising in Missouri, and following his 
removal to this city he continued business 
as a cooper for some years. Subsequently 
he traveled for eighteen years as represen- 
tative of a portrait house of Chicago, tak- 
ing orders for the enlargement of por- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



139 



traits. In this he was very successful and 
wherever he went he made many warm 
friends by reason of his genial manner, 
his unfailing courtesy and the many ster- 
ling traits of his character which are 
easily recognized, for such qualities al- 
ways leave their impress upon the indi- 
vidual. For twelve years, however, he 
has lived retired in the enjoyment of a 
well earned rest. 

Mr. Connor enlisted for service in the 
Civil war and was in the battle of Athens, 
Missouri. He remained in the service for 
five months, engaged in drilling most of 
that time. It was subsequent to his return 
from the war that he brought his family 
to Warsaw in August, 1861. His po- 
litical allegiance has always been given to 
the democracy but he has never aspired 
to office. He is one of the oldest Masons 
in the state and is an exemplary represen- 
tative of the craft. 

On the 1 6th of April, 1855, Mr. Con- 
nor was married to Miss Eliza Lamb, 
who was also a native of Perry county, 
Indiana, born February 18, 1830, and a 
daughter of Solomon and Elizabeth 
(Shepherd) Lamb. Her parents were 
married May 26, 1811. Her father was 
born in New York, July 21, 1780, while 
his wife's birth occurred in the south, 
January 13, 1791. He was a farmer by 
occupation and for twenty-seven years 
resided in Perry county, Indiana, where 
he took an active and influential part in 
pubjic affairs. He was chosen the first 
circuit clerk of the county, and for twen- 
ty-six years held that office. No higher 
testimonial of his capability and fidelity 
could be given than the fact that he was 
so long retained as the incumbent in that 



office. He was faithful to every trust 
reposed in him and his life was always 
guided by manly principles and character- 
ized by honorable conduct. He died Feb- 
ruary 5, 1848, and his wife on the 28th 
of October, 1855, both being laid to rest 
on the old homestead farm in Indiana, on 
which he settled about 1810. This was a 
valuable farming property, situated on the 
bank of the Ohio river. At the time of 
his demise he was serving as one of the 
commissioners of the county and he 
passed away in the faith of the Baptist 
church, of which he was a most consistent 
and devoted member. In the family were 
eight children but all have passed away. 
Mr. and Mrs. Connor traveled life's 
journey together as man and wife for 
about twenty-three years and were then 
separated by the death of Mrs. Connor, 
who passed away January 28, 1878, and 
Was laid to rest in the Warsaw cemetery. 
She was a member of the Methodist 
church and a lady whose many good traits 
of heart and mind endeared her to all who 
knew her. To her family she was a most 
devoted and faithful wife and mother and 
she was equally loyal in her friendships. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Connor were born 
four children. Ella was born in Rome, 
Perry county, Indiana, January 12, 1856. 
She was graduated from the Warsaw 
public schools and taught several years. 
December 31, 1878, she was married to 
Dr. C. L. Ferris, of Fountain Green, Illi- 
nois, the oldest son of Dr. L. T. and 
Helen Ferris, who are old residents of 
the county. Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Ferris 
have two daughters, Helen and Ruth, and 
are living in Carthage, Illinois. Helen 
is a graduate of Carthage College, a 



140 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'lEU' 



teacher, and is principal of the High 
School at Mt. Carroll, Illinois. Ruth is a 
senior in Carthage College. Isabella 
Sacket, the second daughter, was born 
at Luray, Clark county, Missouri, July 
29, 1857, was graduated from the public 
schools of Warsaw, and afterward en- 
gaged in teaching in this city up to the 
time of her marriage to John B. Worthen, 
who was born in Warsaw, February 4, 
1855. He is the youngest son of Prof. 
A. H. and Sarah B. Worthen. Both of 
his parents were old settlers of Warsaw, 
while the father was state geologist for 
twenty years. Mr. Worthen is an en- 
terprising grocer and business man of 
Warsaw, where he has always lived. Mr. 
and Mrs. Worthen were married August 
21, 1882, and to them six children were 
born, as follows : Ella Eugenia, born 
October 26, 1883. She graduated from 
the Warsaw public school and the State 
University at Urbana, Illinois, was prin- 
cipal of the high school at Arcola, Illi- 
nois, and is an instructor in mathematics 
at the State University at Lincoln, Ne- 
braska. James C- Worthen, who was 
born October 16, 1885, died February i, 
1887; Jeannette Lamb, who was born 
July 13, 1887, and is now a senior in 
the State University at Urbana, from 
which she will graduate in 1907; Evelyn 
Marie, who was born August 18, 1890, 
and is a sophomore in the Warsaw high 
school ; Helen Eunice, who was born Oc- 
tober n, 1892, and is in her second year 
in the high school ; and John Connor, born 
February 13, 1899. J. T. M. Connor, the 
third member of the family of Benjamin 
F. Connor, is now living in Chicago, 
where he is auditor for the Clay-Robinson 



Company, live stock commission mer- 
chants. He was married in Kansas City, 
Missouri, December 13, 1885, to Eunice 
Mason, and they have one child, Ella 
Belle, who was born November 13, 1886, 
and is a graduate of the Denver (Colo- 
rado) school. Frank H. Connor, born 
Mary 27, 1865, is a live stock commis- 
sion merchant of Chicago, being a mem- 
ber of the firm of Clay, Robinson & 
Co. He was married June 20, 1894, to 
Evelyn L. Hill, and has had three children. 
The twin boys, born June 16, 1897, both 
died at the age of fifteen months, Ron- 
noc Hill was born August 8, 1903. Both 
of Mr. Connor's sons were graduates of 
the Warsaw public schools. 

Wlien Mrs. Connor died the children 
were all single and remained with their 
father until they were married and had 
homes of their own. Mrs. Worthen was 
the second one married and Mr. Connor 
has since made his home with her and 
her husband. Mr. Worthen has built a 
beautiful modern residence on the river 
bluff, situated on Van Buren and First 
streets in the part of Warsaw called Fort 
Edward. This is a beautiful home known 
as Nehtrow. Here Mr. Connor is most 
pleasantly situated. He is largely a self- 
made man, having had few advantages 
in his youth but his business enterprise 
and diligence enabled him to make steady 
advancement in his business career. 
Wherever he went he made friends by 
reason of his genial and kindly disposi- 
tion. He is a man of good judgment and 
warm impulses and wherever he is known 
he is held in highest esteem, while the cir- 
cle of his friends is almost co-extensive 
With the circle of his acquaintance. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS: 



141 



WILLIAM JACKSON ASH. 

William Jackson Ash is one of the ven- 
erable citizens of Hamilton, receiving the 
respect and honor which should be ac- 
corded to one of his years and whose life 
has been worthily spent. He is now 
eighty-one years of age, having been born 
in McMinn county, Tennessee, on the 6th 
of June, 1825, his parents being Hugh 
Brown Ash and Nancy (Jones) Ash, 
natives of South Carolina and Tennessee 
respectively. His paternal grandparents 
were Robert and Esther Ash, the former 
a native of South Carolina and the latter 
of Ireland. The maternal grandfather, 
Thomas Jones, was a native of Tennessee, 
and in that state married Miss Beckham. 
Robert Ash, leaving his native country, 
crossed the Atlantic and became a resi- 
dent of South Carolina, whe'fe he followed 
the occupation of farming for a number 
of years and then removed to eastern Ten- 
nessee, where he and his wife spent their 
remaining days. It was in that state that 
Hugh Brown Ash and Nancy Jones were 
united in marriage and there they lived 
for a number of years upon a farm. He 
was injured one day while stacking fodder 
and soon afterward died. His wife mar- 
ried again nine years later, her second 
union being with Edwin Pedegrew, who 
at one time owned famous gold mines in 
Georgia. They were married in Alabama, 
to which state the mother of our subject 
removed and about ten years later they 
went to Dent county, Missouri, where 
they spent their remaining days. 

William Jackson was the eldest of three 
sons and three daughters, all of whom 
are now deceased with the exception of 



one brother who is residing in Carrollton, 
Carroll county, Arkansas. By the second 
marriage there were two daughters and 
two sons, of whom one son is now living 
in Dent county, Missouri. 

William J. Ash was twelve years of age 
when he went with his mother to Chero- 
kee county, Alabama. She there took up 
one hundred and sixty acres of land and 
in 1839 was married a second time. It 
was then that the subject of this review 
started out in life to make his own way in 
the world. He began learning the trade 
of a tanner and leather finisher. He was 
also the owner of three colts, two cows 
and several hogs, which he gave to his 
mother in exchange for homespun cloth- 
ing. He continued to work at his trade 
until 1846, in which year Benjamin 
White, who ten years before had removed 
to Adams county, Illinois, returned to 
Tennessee on a visit and about a month 
later took three Tennessee lads with him 
to Adams county. He paid their fare and 
they worked for him two years for ten 
dollars a month. Mr. Ash had an uncle 
living in Adams county and after leaving 
Mr. White's employ he began operating 
his uncle's farm on shares, being thus en- 
gaged for a year. In 1848 he returned to 
Tennessee and Alabama in company with 
his uncle, driving across the country with 
teams. The uncle soon again came to 
Illinois, but Mr. Ash remained in his na- 
tive state until after his marriage, which 
important event in his life was celebrated 
on the 2/th of February, 1 849, the lady of 
his choice being Miss Eliza Ann Culpep- 
per, who was born in McMinn county, 
Tennessee, August 14, 1828, a daughter 
of Joel and Ann Elizabeth (Tyler) Cul- 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pepper, both of whom were natives of 
South Carolina. The former was a son 
of John Culpepper and the latter a daugh- 
ter of John Tyler. 

On the 28th of March, 1849, Mr - Ash 
with his bride started by wagon for 
Adams county, where they arrived on the 
22d of April, after spending almost a 
month upon the road. They remained in 
that county for one season and Mr. Ash 
engaged in the cultivation of a tract of 
land. He tried to raise a crop of corn but 
the worms took it and he sowed his land 
to buckwheat, raising an enormous crop, 
furnishing large supplies to the city of 
Quincy of buckwheat flour, which he had 
ground at Fletcher's Mills in Hancock 
county. In the fall of 1849 he and his 
wife removed to Wythe township, this 
county, where they lived in a log house 
with puncheon floor and fireplace with 
stick and clay chimney. There was but 
one room in the cabin. The following 
season he purchased forty acres of 
prairie about a mile north of where he 
lived, fenced his land with rails and 
raised corn, which was planted on the 
newly broken sod. The following year 
he broke more land and also purchased 
forty acres additional. He also cultivated 
the eighty acres and rented some land, 
adding to his place from time to time un- 
til he was the owner of three hundred 
and forty acres in Wythe township, which 
had been improved as well as any place 
in the township at that time. As the 
years passed he added further improve- 
ments to his property and made it a 
splendidly developed farm. He had two 
large barns, one thirty by eighty feet, 
which he afterward used for sheltering 



his cattle. He kept from twenty to thirty 
cows and conducted a dairy for ten years. 
Thus year by year he continued active 
in business, winning success by his close 
application and strong determination. He 
was never idle and indolence is utterly 
foreign to his nature. He has led a busy 
and useful life and as the years have 
gone by has won the success which al- 
ways crowns earnest effort. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ash have been born 
the following named : Sarah Mulvina, 
the wife of W. H. King, who is acting 
as janitor of the public schools at Hamil- 
ton ; Mary Adeline, the wife of Frederick 
Shrifer, a mail-carrier at Hamilton ; Joel 
Brown, of Hamilton; Louisa Ann; 
Amanda Jane, the wife of J. E. Ernst, 
who owns the old homestead farm ; Alice 
Alma, the wife of Charles F. Binderwald, 
of Montrosej Iowa; and Narcissa Eliza- 
beth, the wife of D. William Wolfe, a 
resident of Hamilton. 

On the 8th of March, 1897, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ash removed from the home farm 
to Hamilton, where he purchased a fine 
residence on Broadway. Since that time 
he has lived retired. He rented his land 
for three years and then sold it. He is 
one of the organizers and stockholders of 
the Peoples State Bank, of Hamilton, and 
also of the West Point State Bank, and 
thus his money has been placed in insti- 
tutions where it is bringing a good finan- 
cial return. He has justly earned the rest 
which he is now enjoying, for his life has 
been characterized by unflagging dili- 
gence and also by unfaltering honesty in 
all business transactions. Wherever 
known he has won high esteem and more- 
over he is one of the honored pioneer set- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



143 



tiers of the county, whose efforts have 
been a potent element in promoting prog- 
ress and improvement in this section of 
the state as the county has emerged from 
its pioneer conditions. 



AHIMAAZ PUNTENNEY. 

Ahimaaz Puntenney, the owner of a 
well improved and valuable farm in Mon- 
tebello township, where he is engaged in 
general agricultural pursuits and m rais- 
ing high grade horses, cattle and hogs, 
is a native son of Adams county, Ohio, 
where he was bom February 10, 1833. 
He is a son of John and Arminta 
(Wright) Puntenney, both of whom were 
natives of Adams county, Ohio. The 
paternal grandparents were George Hol- 
linsworth and Margaret (Hamilton) 
Puntenney, the former a native of New 
England and the latter of Ireland. The 
grandfather was a soldier of the Revolu- 
tionary war. In order to join the army 
in the manner he wished he had to be an 
immune from small pox. He had never 
suffered from the disease, but his uncle 
and aunt, with whom he was living, were 
attending a case of small pox and he 
thought this his opportunity to become 
afflicted with the disease. His relatives 
wished to prevent it and they put the 
clothing which they had worn while at- 
tending the small pox case into a hollow 
tree. There George Puntenney found 
them, took them out, wore them and be- 
came ill with small pox. Thereby he was 



permitted to join the army and he fought 
valiently for American liberty. Later he 
was granted a pension, but he would not 
accept it, having given his aid freely for 
the cause which he espoused. Subse- 
quently he became a resident of Adams 
county, Ohio, where he died in 1852, at 
the very venerable age of ninety-six years. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject 
was a native of Virginia, while his wife 
was bom in Ireland, whence she came to 
America when about seven years of age. 
They were married in Adams county, 
Ohio, the family having located there at 
a very early day. 

The marriage of John Puntenney and 
Arminta Wright was celebrated in Adams 
county, Ohio, where he settled upon a 
farm, there following general agricultural 
pursuits until his death, which occurred 
in April, 1864, when he was sixty-nine 
years of age. 

When Ahimaaz Puntenney was only 
two years old he went to live with his 
maternal grandfather in the northern part 
of Adams county and in 1846 all the fam- 
ily removed to Lee county, Iowa. In 
company with an uncle and J. W. Dry- 
den, Mr. Puntenney of this review drove 
across the country from the Buckeye state 
to their destination, being upon the road 
from the i8th of September until the 2Oth 
of October. His grandfather settled on a 
farm in Lee county, where he died in 
1848. Following his death Mr. Pun- 
tenney continued to make his home there 
with his uncle until about 1855, when he 
bought forty acres of land on the east 
line of Montebello township and in 1861 
sold that property, subsequently investing 
in eighty acres on section 23, constituting 



144 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'lE}}' 



the east half of the southeast quarter. He 
had about fifteen acres broken, but there 
were no fences or buildings on the place. 
In 1862 he built a frame house of three 
rooms and built a half mile of fence on 
the west side of the farm. He continued 
the further development and improvement 
of the place until February, 1864, when 
he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty- 
sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
left his wife and two small children, who 
went to Lee county, Iowa, to her mother's 
home, while Mr. Puntenney went to the 
front to aid in the defense of the Union. 
His regiment was consolidated with New 
York and Indiana troops and did guard 
duty near Chattanooga on the Chicka- 
mauga river. They were in different 
places in the south doing guard duty, and 
Mr. Puntenney continued at the front 
until honorably discharged on the I5th of 
September, 1865. He had remained with 
his command for a year and a half and 
had always been loyal to his duty, faith- 
fully discharging every task that was as- 
signed him in connection with his military 
service. 

Following his return home. Mr. Pun- 
tenney began making further improve- 
ments upon his place and in 1880 he pur- 
chased the east half of the southeast quar- 
ter, so that he was owner of the entire 
quarter section. In 1878 he built a large 
hay barn, which he remodeled in 1905. 
He also erected an addition to the house 
in 1890 and now has a good farm prop- 
erty which is enclosed largely with wire 
fence. He has as fine a prairie farm as 
can be found in the township and in 
connection with the tilling of the soil he 
is engaged in raising Shire draft horses, 



good cattle and Poland China hogs. His 
business interests are carefully directed 
and his labors have brought to him a 
very gratifying measure of success. 

On the 26th of February, 1861, Mr. 
Puntenney was united in marriage to 
Miss Isabelle Kerr, who was born in 
Pennsylania and during her infancy was 
brought to Illinois by her parents, Alex- 
ander Kerr and Isabelle Dunham, who 
located at Peoria. Both her father and 
mother were natives of Scotland and 
after a brief residence in Peoria they re- 
moved to Lee county, Iowa. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Puntenney have been born two 
sons and two daughters : John Alex- 
ander, who owns a ranch near Moscow, 
Idaho; Iowa B., who is the widow of 
Samuel Marshall and resides with her 
father; Nettie K., the wife of James Mc- 
Gaw, of Prairie township, this county; 
and William L., who conducts the home 
place. 

In his religious views Mr. Puntenney 
is a Presbyterian and since 1880 has been 
elder of the church of that denomination 
at Elvaston. He exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the Republican party and he be- 
longs to Russell post, Grand Army of the 
Republic, of Hamilton, of which he is 
senior vice commander. In all duties of 
citizenship he is as loyal to his country 
as when he followed the old flag upon 
battlefields of the south. In his business 
affairs he is reliable, working earnestly 
and persistently for the achievement of 
success and is now the owner of one of 
the excellent farm properties of Monte- 
bello township, where he is pleasantly sit- 
uated and has a comfortable home. 



HAXCOCK COUXTY, ILLINOIS. 



145 



JACOB C. BALSLEY. 

Jacob C. Balsley, filling the position of 
township assessor, his home being in 
Dallas City, was born in Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, November 28, 1839, his 
parents being William and Elizabeth 
(Longenecker) Balsley. who were like- 
wise natives of the Keystone state, the 
former having been born in Dauphin 
county, and the latter in Cumberland 
county. The father engaged in the coal 
trade and milling on the Monongahela 
in Pennsylvania for a number of years, 
and was a member of the state militia 
in Pennsylvania. In 1854 he came to 
Illinois, devoting his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits and merchandising 
in Scott county. In 1869, however, he 
removed to Dallas township, Hancock 
county, where he engaged in horticultural 
business, being one of the early men to 
raise berries and small fruits here until 
his death, which occurred May 17, 1898, 
his remains being interred in Dallas City 
cemetery. At the time of his demise he 
was a member of the Christian church, 
and at one time was an Odd Fellow. The 
mother of our subject still survives him 
and is a hale and hearty lady of eighty- 
nine years, now living in Scott county. 
In their family were nine children, of 
whom seven are yet living, namely : 
Jacob C. ; George W., a department clerk- 
in Washington, D. C. ; Theodosia, the 
widow of George W. Ebey, living at 
Winchester, Illinois; Miriam, the widow 
of A. C. Dean and a resident of Gales - 
burg, this state; John W., also living in 
Winchester; Frances, the wife of James 
A. Warren, a prominent lawyer of Win- 



chester ; and Sarah, the widow of John 
Kirkpatrick, living in Winchester. Of 
this number John W. Balsley was a mem- 
ber of the Sixty-first Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry and took part in several engage- 
ments, including the battle of Shiloh. He 
served three years and then veteraned or 
re-enlisted, after which he was captured 
and sent to Andersonville prison, where 
he was held until paroled at the close of 
the war. George W. Balsley, another 
brother, was also a member of the Sixty- 
eighth Illinois Infantry, serving for three 
months. 

Jacob C. Balsley was a youth of fifteen 
years when in company with his parents 
he removed from Pennsylvania to Illinois. 
He continued his studies in the schools of 
Winchester. In 1861 he responded to the 
country's call for .aid but because he was 
under size his services were rejected, and 
he turned his attention to the teacher's 
profession, teaching in the country district 
schools for several terms and also one 
term in the city school. During this time 
he also read law for a time in the office 
of Knapp & Case. In 1863 he left home 
to enter the government service on the 
Mississippi river and went upon a govern- 
ment transport for three months, but re- 
turning home in September on account of 
physical disability. 

Subsequently Mr. Balsley entered the 
postoffice at Winchester in 1863 and acted 
as deputy postmaster there for three 
years, and in 1866 and 1867 he was em- 
ployed as a clerk in a drug store. . He 
spent the succeeding seven years in the 
office of G. W. Martin, then county clerk 
at Winchester, as his deputy. He after- 
ward entered the postoffice again for two 



146 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years and he was the first to receive the 
news of President Lincoln's assassination 
and was in the postoffice at the time of 
President Garfield's death. Later he 
again engaged in teaching school in the 
county of Scott and in 1891 he came to 
Hancock county, settling in Dallas City, 
being engaged with his father in the hor- 
ticultural business until the time of the 
latter's death. 

On the 24th of July, 1898, Mr. Balsley 
was married to Mrs. Elizabeth P. Price, 
who was born in Adams county, Illinois. 
Her father was of Gentian birth, while 
her mother was a native of Covington, 
Kentucky. The mother is still living in 
Dallas City but the father, A. Padburg, 
who was a cooper by trade, has departed 
this life. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Padburg were nine children, seven of 
whom are yet living, as follows : Mrs. 
Balsley of this review; May, the wife of 
Alston Giddings, near La Harpe, Illinois : 
Ella, the widow of William Giddings and 
who lives on a farm near Burnside, Illi- 
nois ; John, who is engaged in the practice 
of medicine at Francis, Indian Territory; 
Charles, living in Dallas City; Alfred, a 
student of medicine of Dallas City; and 
Leah, the wife of Charles Hinckley, of 
Dallas City. Mrs. Padburg is a member 
of the Methodist church and Mr. Pad- 
burg was a pioneer Mason. He came to 
Hancock county in early life, being but 
ten years 6f age when he crossed the At- 
lantic to America. His eldest daughter, 
Elizabeth, was married in 1878 to Frank 
Frice, a native of Galena, Illinois, who 
was a brick molder by trade and spent 
much of his time in Nauvoo, Illinois. He 
died August n, 1894, and was buried in 



Dallas City, Illinois. In the family were 
two children, of whom one is now living, 
Frankie Myrtle, born in Dallas City, July 
17, 1880, died April 4, 1895, and was 
buried by the side of her father. Cleo A. 
Frice, born in Dallas City March 3, 1886, 
married Miss Sarah Wells, and is a clerk 
in a grocery store in Dallas City. They 
have one child, Genevieve, who was born 
in Dallas City June 30, 1905. Cleo Frice 
and his family live with Mr. and Mrs. 
Balsley. 

Following his father's death Mr. Bals- 
ley remained upon the old home place, 
which he inherited, from 1898 until 1902. 
In the latter year he entered the postoffice 
at Dallas City as assistant, there contin- 
uing until 1905 and since that time he has 
been employed as clerk in the Black & 
Loomis lumber office. He is now serving 
as assessor of his township. He has al- 
ways been a republican and has firm faith 
in the principles of the party and their 
ultimate supremacy. His wife is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church and with her 
he attends its services. They reside in a 
pretty home on Oak street and Mrs. Bals- 
ley takes a very active part in church 
work, serving as one of the teachers of 
the Sunday-school and doing all in her 
power to advance the various church ac- 
tivities. Mr. Balsley is regarded as a 
trustworthy citizen who discharges every 
duty devolving upon him in prompt and 
conscientious manner. He is a careful 
and painstaking man and both he and his 
wife stand high in the community where 
they have made many friends and are 
held in the highest esteem by all with 
whom they come in contact, either in s >- 
cial or business relations. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



WILLIAM L. KIMBROUGH. 

William L. Kimbrough was born in 

I Carthage township, where lie is now en- 
gaged in farming. His natal day was 

[ October 27. 1853, and his birthplace was 
four miles east of the city of Carthage 

I and about a quarter of a mile north. 

: His parents were William R. and Eliza- 
beth (Dale) Kimbrough, extended men- 

I tion of whom is made elsewhere in this 
volume. In the common schools of his 
township the subject of this review ac- 
quired his education. In the summer 
months he aided in the work of the fields, 
early becoming familiar with the task 

i of plowing, planting and harvesting. He 
remained upon the home place until 
twenty-two years of age and then, leaving 
the parental roof, started out in life on 
his own account by working as a farm 
hand at a salary of twenty dollars per 
month. He was thus employed for some 
time in the vicinity of La Harpe and on 
his -marriage, December 28, 1874, he 
rented a farm in Carthage township, 
which he cultivated for a year. He after- 
ward spent a year upon a rented farm in 
Henderson county, Illinois, after which 
he returned to Carthage township. An- 
other year passed and he then went to 
Nevada, working in the silver mines at 
Austin and later at Leadville, Colorado, 
for two years. When he again came to 
Illinois he was employed at farm labor 
by the month in Henderson county for 
four years and with the capital he ac- 
quired through his economy and industry 
he then purchased eighty acres of land 
on section 33, Carthage township, for 
which he paid twenty-five hundred dol- 



lars. Taking up his abode thereon he 
made it his home for ten years and he 
still owns the place, which, however, is 
now being operated by his son. When 
a decade had passed he rented a farm 
from F.' M. Cutler, which he operated 
for five years and then purchased the 
present home farm of eighty acres on sec- 
tion 22, Carthage township, which was 
well improved. He also ow r ns forty 
acres which he purchased from his father 
on section 1 1 of the same township and all 
of his land is under a high state of culti- 
vation. His home is on section 22, where 
he has a fine modern residence and other 
good buildings in keeping with the model 
farm of the twentieth century. His time 
is devoted to the cultivation of the cereals 
best adapted to soil and climate and also 
to stock raising and both branches of his 
business are proving profitable. 

On the 28th of December, 1874, Mr. 
Kimbrough was- married to Miss Mary 
A. Butler, who was born in Monroe, 
Green county, Wisconsin, April 26, 1857. 
Her parents were Jesse and Elizabeth 
(Tatham) Butler. Her father was born 
in Zanesville, Ohio, April 13, 1826, a son 
of Henry and Charity Butler, who re- 
moved to the Buckeye state from Mary- 
land. Jesse Butler was reared in Ohio 
and on the nth of March, 1847, he 
married Elizabeth Tatham, also a native 
of Zanesville. About 1856 they removed 
to Wisconsin, settling at Monroe, Green 
county, where they lived upon a farm 
until the autumn of 1864, Mr. Butler de- 
voting his time and .energies to general 
agricultural pursuits and sheep raising. 
When eight years had passed he removed 
with his family to a farm near La Harpe, 



148 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEIl" 



Illinois, where he lived for about thirty 
years, becoming one of the best known 
and most enterprising agriculturists of 
that locality. On selling his property he 
took up his abode near Blencoe, Iowa, 
where he lived for two years, when on 
account of failing health he returned to 
Illinois, making his home with his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Kimbrough, until his death, 
which occurred on the 3Oth of October, 
1896, when he had reached the age of sev- 
enty years, six months and seventeen days. 
His widow still survives him and is now 
living in Ellsworth, Iowa, with her 
youngest daughter at the age of seventy- 
seven years. Mr. Butler was a man of 
genuine personal worth. While residing 
in Wisconsin he announced his faith in 
the Christian religion and ever lived a 
life in harmony with his professions. He 
was honest at all times, reliable in his busi- 
ness transactions and faithful in his 
friendships. Unto him and his wife were 
born eight children, five of whom are 
living, namely : Sylvester, of Holton, 
Kansas; William L., of Stronghurst, Illi- 
nois; Arthur V., of Monmouth, Illinois; 
Mrs. Clara Van Zandt, of Roseville, Illi- 
nois; Mrs. Charity Mesecher. of Blencoe, 
Iowa ; and Mrs. Kimbrough. 

The last named was the fourth in order 
of birth in the family and was educated 
in the schools of La Harpe, the academy 
at that place and in the Normal course at 
Carthage Cbllege. She engaged in teach- 
ing for seven years in the schools of Han- 
cock and Henderson counties and was 
widely recognized as a capable educator. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Kimbrough have been 
born three children, of whom one, Jesse, 
died in infancy. Clarence, born July 9, 



1 8/6, resides upon his father's home farm 
one section 33, Carthage township. He 
was educated in Carthage and married 
Miss Leah Coultas, who was born at 
Winchester, Scott county, Illinois. They 
have one child, Lottie.' The youngest 
member of the Kimbrough family is 
Arno, who was born December 17, 1891. 
Mr. Kimbrough exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the Republican party but has never 
been a politician in the sense of office 
seeking. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kimbrough 
are members of the Baptist church and 
are interested in all that pertains to the 
material, intellectual and moral progress 
of their community. Mr. Kimbrough has 
passed almost his entire life in Hancock 
county, so that his record is well known 
to his fellow citizens and in his life his- 
tory there is much that is commendable 
and worthy of emulation. 



WILLIAM R. KIMBROUGH. 

William R. Kimbrough. one of the 
early settlers of Hancock county, residing 
on his farm of eighty acres on section 1 1 , 
Carthage township, is a native of Ken- 
tucky, born in Todd county, January 24. 
1830. He is a son of William and Susan 
(Wyatt) Kimbrough, natives of Virginia, 
whence they removed to Kentucky at an 
early day. The father engaged in farm- 
ing in Todd county until 1834. when he 
brought his family to Hancock count}'. 
Illinois, settling in Carthage township, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



where he purchased a farm of forty acres 
east of the city of Carthage. He built 
there a log cabin and began the develop- 
ment of the property. He lived there 
for some years and afterward sold the 
farm, removing to a larger farm which 
he rented. A number of years later he 
took up his abode in Carthage, where he 
lived retired, his death occurring there 
when he was eighty-six years of age. He 
was a member of the Baptist church and 
a democrat in political views. A public 
spirited man, he was an advocate of all 
that tended to improve and advance the 
community interests. He was also a 
prosperous and progressive resident of the 
county in his day and he was uniformly 
respected. At the time of the war of 
1812 he espoused the cause of his country 
and served throughout the period of hos- 
tilities. His widow, who was also a con- 
sistent member of the Baptist church, sur- 
vived him for a number of years and in 
their family were fourteen children, who 
grew to maturity, but William R. is the 
only one now living. Both parents lie 
buried in Seckman cemetery in Carthage 
township. 

William R. Kimbrough obtained his 
education in a log schoolhouse, walking 
six miles over the prairie to school. As a 
young man he assisted his father upon the 
home farm, remaining there until about 
sixteen years of age, when he began work- 
ing by the month as a farm hand in Carth- 
age township. In 1853 he crossed the 
plains to California, attracted by the gold 
excitement there, journeying with horses 
and ox teams, the party numbering six 
men who had three teams. They were 
about five and a half months in making 



the trip and Mr. Kimbrough remained 
in California for two years, his wife and 
two children spending that time in Han- 
cock county. As he was in limited finan- 
cial circumstances upon his arrival he be- 
gan operating a threshing machine at five 
dollars per day. He was thus employed 
during the fall, after which he drove cattle 
across the country to the market and was 
thus engaged until he returned to Illinois. 
He had made his way to California with 
the idea of mining but he did not spend 
a day in the mines, being well satisfied 
with the work which came to him and the 
money which he obtained thereby. Fol- 
lowing his return to Illinois in 1855 he 
bought a farm southeast of Carthage in 
Carthage township, comprising sixty 
acres. Upon this he made his home for 
twelve years, tilling the soil and raising 
stock, after which he sold the place and 
purchased his present farm on section n, 
Carthage township. He has made his 
home in this county for seventy-three 
years and is one of its honored pioneer 
residents. He put all of the improve- 
ments upon his present farm, erecting a 
large and substantial two-story frame 
dwelling and also good barns and other 
outbuildings, so that he now has a model 
farm property. 

In July, 1847, Mr. Kimbrough was 
married to Miss Elizabeth Dale, who was 
born in Woodfor.d county, Kentucky, a 
daughter of Lunsford and Fanny (Bos- 
ton) Dale, natives of Woodford county, 
whence they came to Illinois, settling in 
Morgan county. After some time they 
came to Hancock county in 1846 and 
located in Carthage township, where Mr. 
Dale engaged in farming until his death. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He and his wife and one daughter died 
the same week of fever. They were sup- 
porters of the Baptist church. Mrs. 
Kimbrough was fourteen years of age at 
the time she was left an orphan, after 
which she lived with an uncle until her 
marriage in 1847. She was born June 
27, 1830, and is now seventy-six years of 
age. She holds membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and is a most 
estimable lady. 

Nine children have been born unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Kimbrough. James, who for 
many years has been a railroad conductor 
and resides in Denver, Colorado, married 
Nora White and their children are James, 
Frank and Corene. William L. is repr 
resented elsewhere in this work. Sarah 
Frances is the wife of Jefferson Koontz. a 
son of John and Malinda (Smart) 
Koontz, who were early settlers of this 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Koontz own ninety 
acres adjoining her father's farm. She 
was first married to James Briley. who 
after farming several years in Henderson 
county removed to this county and fol- 
lowed farming in Carthage township. 
He died about seven years after their mar- 
riage, leaving two sons and two daugh- 
ters : Frank, a farmer of Carthage town- 
ship, who married Ethel Ervin and has 
one child, Thomas; Thomas, a resident 
farmer of Iowa, who wedded Nellie Clay- 
worth and has a daughter, Beulah : Esta, 
the deceased" wife of Ralph Sowers : and 
Elizabeth, the wife of Luther Earls, of 
Carthage, by whom she has two chil- 
dren. Joy and Blossom. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Koontz have been born five chil- 
dren, three of whom are living : Fannie, 
the wife of Wadsworth Earls, by whom 



she has two daughters, Helen and Lois 
Frances; Ross, at school; and Abba M. 
Marinda Kimbrough. the fourth of the 
family, is the wife of Roy Fletcher, of 
Carthage, and had two children, 
Charles and Blanche, the latter deceased. 
Julia Kimbrough is the widow of 
Thomas Ervin, who was a farmer 
and stock buyer of Carthage town- 
ship, and she has four children, Bruce, 
Irene, Tressler and Thomas. George, a 
railroad fireman on Colorado & South- 
ern, of Denver, Colorado, married Clara 
Swadley. Nellie Ann is the wife of 
Henry Fleshman, proprietor of a restau- 
rant at Hannibal, Missouri. By her 
former marriage to John Rucker, who 
was a farmer of Carthage township, she 
had two children, Chloris and Rollin. 
Thomas married Birdie Pennock and died 
at the age of thirty-one years, leaving 
three children, Velna, Shirley and Harlev, 
who are living with their mother in 
Carthage. 

Mr. Kimbrough is a democrat in poli- 
tics but has never cared for office. He 
has seen many changes and improvements 
made in the county which in his boyhood 
days was a vast wild prairie, over which 
roamed herds of deer and other wild 
animals. He has seen the raw and un- 
broken prairie land transformed into rich 
fertile farms and has done his full share 
to make the county what it is today one 
of the richest and most productive farm- 
ing districts of this great state. His life 
has been a busy one, yet he has found 
time to travel extensively throughout the 
country and acquaint himself with his na- 
tive land. He has just returned from a 
visit to his old Kentucky home which 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



he left in childhood. Through persistent 
effort and industry he has won" success 
and has carefully reared his family, so 
that they have become prominent and 
influential members of society. 



J. E. LOOP. 

J. E. Loop, proprietor of a meat market 
and also identified with the control of 
municipal affairs as a member of the 
board of city aldermen in Carthage, was 
born in Hancock county, in 1858. his 
parents being Simon and Rebecca 
(Schenck) Loop. The father was born 
in Virginia and the mother in Ohio. In 
the year 1851, or 1852 Simon Loop, who 
was a butcher by trade, removed to Han- 
cock county and spent his remaining days 
in Carthage, where he resided for thirty 
years or more, passing away in March, 
1882, while his wife died in 1896 and was 
laid by his side in Carthage cemetery. 
He voted with the Republican party but 
had no desire for office. His religious 
faith was that of the Methodist church, 
while his wife belonged to the Presby- 
terian church. In their family were seven 
children, of "whom four are now living: 
Mary, the wife of Samuel Camp, who re- 
sides in Carthage ; Jennie, the wife of Wil- 
liam Ward, of Adrian, Illinois; J. E., of 
this review ; and James M., of this county. 
Joseph, John and William Loop, uncles 
of our subject, were soldiers of the Civil 
war, enlisting from Ohio as defenders of 
the L'nion. 
10 



Reared under the parental roof J. E. 
Loop acquired his education in the public 
schools of Carthage and then entered his 
father's meat market, where he worked 
for three years, acquiring a good, prac- 
tical knowledge of the business. He was 
afterward employed by other butchers 
until 1895, when, ambitious to engage in 
business on his own account he opened a 
meat market, which he is still conducting 
on Jefferson street. For a year or more 
he was a partner of John Bertschi but is 
now alone in business and has a well 
equipped market well supplied with the 
latest improved machinery for the care of 
the meats. He keeps a high grade of 
goods, for his patronage is constantly 
growing. He also owns a small pasture 
and a slaughter house. 

In 1893 Mr. Loop was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sarah J. Van Winkle, who 
was born in Denver. Hancock county, 
Illinois, a daughter of John and Catherine 
(Shupman) Van Winkle. The parents 
reside at West Point, Hancock county, 
Illinois, and Mr. Van W r inkle is a farmer. 
Of their family of five children four sur- 
vive, as follows: Patience, the wife of 
H. L. Price, of Carthage: Mrs. Loop; 
Alice, the wife of Marion Mathews, living 
in Augusta, Hancock county ; and Frank, 
who lives in Hamilton, this county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Loop have four children, all 
born in Carthage township: Lloyd F., 
Lola B., Lionel, James and Mary P., all 
attending school. The parents hold mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian church and 
take an active and helpful part in its 
work. Their home is in the northwest 
part of the city. Mr. Loop is a repub- 
lican and for the past two years has 



152 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



efficiently served as alderman. Frater- 
nally, he is connected with the Knights of 
Pythias and Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is entirely a self-made man, 
who without family or pecuniary advan- 
tages to aid him at the outset of his ca- 
reer has battled earnestly and energetical- 
ly. Modest in demeanor and in his de- 
mands for public office, his friends, how- 
ever, recognize his genuine worth and he 
has a wide and favorable acquaintance 
throughout the city and county and a 
good trade in Carthage. 



CHARLES B. LOFTON. 

The students of history cannot carry 
his investigations far into the annals of 
Hancock county without learning of the 
close, honorable and extended connection 
of the Lofton family with the movements, 
measures and business interests which 
have promoted the growth and develop- 
ment of this part of the state. The 
grandparents of Charles B. Lofton 
arrived in the '403 and Franklin Lofton, 
an uncle of our subject, participated in the 
Mormon war of 1844. He afterward 
went to California at the time of the gold 
excitement in that state, taking with him 
ten or twelve men and a number of ox 
teams. The grandfather was an active 
factor in the early development of this 
county, aiding in reclaiming the wild land 
for the uses of civilization. He died 
many years ago and was long survived 
bv his wife, who bore the maiden name 



of Elizabeth Seals. After her husband's 
death she went to live with her son, Jef- 
ferson Lofton, in whose home she died at 
the very advanced age of one hundred and 
two years and fourteen days, being the 
oldest woman in the county at that time. 

Jefferson Lofton, father of our subject, 
was born in Washington county, Indiana, 
in 1821 and was thus reared upon the 
frontier, early becoming familiar with all 
the hardships and experiences incident to 
pioneer life. He removed to Hancock 
county in 1848, settling upon a tract of 
land of one hundred and sixty acres on 
section 26, Dallas township. There was 
only one house between his home and 
Carthage at that time and only three 
dwellings in Dallas City. The work of 
improvement and progress seemed scarce- 
ly begun and the most far sighted could 
not have dreamed of the rapid changes 
which were soon to take place and make 
this district one of the leading counties 
of a great commonwealth in which are 
found all of the evidences of an advanced 
civilization, together with the varied busi- 
ness interests that denote material 
progress and prosperity. Settling upon 
his farm, he cleared the land for the erec- 
tion of a home and then continued in the 
work of improvement until he had de- 
veloped a splendid property. His political 
allegiance was given to the democracy and 
he was prominent and influential in com- 
munity affairs, holding a number of local 
offices. He married Miss Elizabeth 
Richardson for his first wife. They be- 
came the parents of ten children, of whom 
six are now living: Lavina, the wife of 
Ferdinand Victor, of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri ; Paulina, the wife of Jonah Gather, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



153 



of Dallas City; Amanda, the wife of 
Joseph Marshall, of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri ; John, of Dallas City ; Franklin, 
who came to Hancock county in 1840; 
and Henry, who is living in Missouri. 
After losing his first wife in 1855 Mr. 
Lofton was married in 1861 to Miss 
Sarah Merrill, who was born in Adams 
county, Illinois, in 1841 and whose father 
was a farmer of Hancock county. There 
were twelve children in the Merrill family 
but only two are now living, namely: 
Mrs. Lofton ; and Mrs. Julia Hibbard, 
who resides in Adams county, this state. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lofton were born 
seven children, of whom three yet survive : 
Rose is the wife of Fred Lavine, of Dallas 
township, by whom she has two children, 
Laveta and Lawrence; Manford, who 
lives in Dallas township, and has two 
children, Eldon and Beulah ; and Charles 
B., of this review. Iva Lofton, the eldest 
child of the second marriage, became the 
wife of Mark Bailey and died May 23, 
1905, in Chase county, Nebraska, leaving 
seven children : Clara, Alta, Edna, Rose, 
Velma, Gladys, Lafayette and George 
Harlan. The father died April 6, 1901, 
and was buried in the family cemetery on 
his own farm but the mother is still living. 
Charles B. Lofton has always lived 
upon the old homestead farm where he 
was born and now manages the place for 
his mother. He was reared to the occu- 
pation of farming and his practical ex- 
perience in youth enabled him to carry on 
the work with success when he assumed 
the management of the property. He has 
his fields under a high state of cultivation 
and everything about the place is kept in 
excellent condition. By his own efforts, 



energy and honesty he has added many 
comforts to the home place and has made 
it a valuable farm property. He is a 
well read man, keeping in touch with the 
general interests of the clay and in manner 
he is genial and jovial, having many 
warm friends. His political allegiance 
is given to the democracy and he has 
served as supervisor of his township. 

July 31, 1906, Mr. Lofton married Lola 
G. High, of Fergusville, West Virginia. 
She was born February 6, 1885, a daugh- 
ter of John and Sarah (Hoffman) High. 
The father was a merchant at Fergusville, 
West Virginia, where he still lives. The 
grandfather, Warner P. High, was one 
of the oldest residents of Fergusville and 
was a farmer by occupation, a republican 
in politics as is also the father. Miss 
High was reared at Fergusville and edu- 
cated in the schools and continued to re- 
side in that place until the time of her 
marriage. 



JACOB G. LUNG. 

Jacob G. Lung is numbered among the 
self-made men of Hancock county, who, 
starting out in life without any special 
family or pecuniary advantages, has 
worked his way steadily upward, battling 
earnestly and energetically and coming 
off victor in the strife. He was born in 
Germany April 6, 1859, a son of Got- 
lieb and Kate (Say) Lung. The parents 
were also natives of the fatherland and 
were married there October 10, 1858. 
They came to America when the subject 



154 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of this review was only about a year old, 
landing at New York, whence they made 
their way to Ohio, where for some time 
the father was employed as a day laborer. 
He was born June 9, 1831, and passed 
away in Ohio, while his wife, who was 
born October 25, 1832, still survives him 
and is now living in Dallas City. In their 
family were three children : Christina 
D., the wife of Fred Maurer, of Dallas 
City ; Jacob G. ; and George, who died 
at the age of eight months. 

Jacob G. Lung was educated in the 
public schools of Dallas City, having been 
brought by his parents to this county 
when a young lad. He remained with 
his mother until after he had attained his 
majority and as a companion and help- 
mate for life's journey he chose Miss 
Louisa Meunzenmeier. to whom he was 
married on the 5th of April, 1885. She 
was born in Eslingen, Germany, in 1862, 
a daughter of Gotlieb and Margaret 
Maurer Muenzenmeier. who were like- 
wise natives of Germany, the former born 
September 4, 1820, and the latter July 
17, 1817. They came to America in 1882 
and settled in Dallas, where Mr. Meunzen- 
meier engaged in business as a gardener. 
His wife died in 1897 and he passed away 
in March, 1903, their graves being made 
in Dallas cemetery. They were members 
of the German Methodist Episcopal 
church, to which the parents of Mr. Lung 
also belonged. In the Meunzenmeier 
family were four children : William, 
now living in Germany ; Gotlieb, of Dallas 
City ; Christian, who resides in Burling- 
ton, Iowa ; and Mrs. Lung. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Lung lived for several years upon a rented 



farm in Durham township and in 1888 he 
purchased seventy-eight acres of land in 
the same township, upon which he erected 
a house, making that farm his home for 
nineteen years. He carried on general 
agricultural pursuits and stock raising 
and he brought his fields under a high 
state of cultivation. In November, 1902, 
be bought two hundred and ten acres of 
land on section i, Dallas township, where 
he now resides, and he has here a pretty 
two-story frame residence. He has since 
built a granary, a hen house and fences 
and has added other modern improve- 
ments to his farm. He still owns his 
first farm, a part of which he now rents. 
In his business life he has displayed un- 
faltering energy and laudable ambition 
and has thus worked his way upward to 
success. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lung have been 
born five children, four in Durham town- 
ship and one in Dallas township. These 
are: Laura, who was born August 17, 
1886; Walter, May 17, 1888; Mark, May 
25, 1890; Edith, February 29, 1896: and 
Victor, February 6, 1902. The parents 
are members of the German Methodist 
Episcopal church, in the work of which 
they take a very active and helpful part, 
Mr. Lung serving as one of the church 
trustees and also as a teacher in the Sun- 
day-school. He votes with the Republi- 
can party and has filled the office of 
school director, the cause of education 
finding in him a warm and stalwart friend. 
Starting out in life empty handed, he has 
through his perseverance and diligence 
made steady progress toward the goal of 
prosperity and today he is surrounded 
by many of the comforts of life, secured 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



155 



entirely through his own efforts. Both 
he and his wife command and enjoy the 
respect and esteem of the entire com- 
munity. He bears an unassailable repu- 
tation for straightforward dealing in his 
business affairs and that he has been most 
diligent is indicated by his present valu- 
able farming possessions. 



LEWIS SACK. 

Lewis Sack, deceased, was a veteran of 
the Civil war and a well known agri- 
culturist of Rocky Run township. When 
one has passed from the scene of earthly 
activities it is common to review the life 
record, note its salient characteristics and 
draw lessons therefrom recording the fail- 
ures or successes. In the record of Lewis 
Sack there is found much that is com- 
mendable and worthy of emulation, and 
to his family he left not only a comfort- 
able competence but also an untarnished 
name, which comes to them as a priceless 
heritage. A native of St. Charles county. 
Missouri, he was born in 1840, and ac- 
companied his parents on their removal 
to Hancock county, the family home 
being established in Rocky Run township, 
where for some years the father followed 
the occupation of farming. Both he and 
his wife are now deceased. In their 
family were eight children, six of whom 
are living : Jacob, a resident of Warsaw ; 
John, of California ; Charles, who resides 
in Missouri ; William, of Rocky Run : 
Louisa, the wife of Jacob Bradshaw, of 



Burlington, Iowa ; and Delia, the widow 
of Henry Herzog, late of Tioga, Illinois. 

Lewis Sack is the second in order of 
birth in this family and he began his 
education in the public schools of St. 
Louis, Missouri, while later he continued 
his studies in Rocky Run township. To 
his father he gave the benefit of his ser- 
vices upon the home farm until after the 
inauguration of the Civil war, when his 
patriotic spirit was aroused and with loyal 
impulse he responded to the country's 
call, joining the boys in blue of Company 
H, One Hundred and Eighteenth Regi- 
ment of Illinois Infantry. He was in 
the army for four years, during which 
time he endured all the hardships, ex- 
periences and privations meted out to the 
soldier, and participated in many impor- 
tant engagements which led up to the 
final results of the war. 

When hostilities had ceased and the 
country no longer needed his aid Mr. 
Sack returned to his home and resumed 
farming. In 1869 he was married to 
Miss Anna Eliza Weston, a native of Illi- 
nois. They traveled life's journey to- 
gether for about seventeen years, and 
Mrs. Sack then passed away in 1886. Of 
their five children four are still living: 
Lillian, the wife of John Brenner, of 
Iowa: Bertha, the wife of John Snyder, 
of Quincy : Bertram, a twin of Bertha, 
and Pearl, the wife of Harry Keith, of 
Missouri, and Rhoda, now deceased. 

In March, 1888. Mr. Sack was again 
married, his second union being with Mrs. 
Elizabeth Shaffner, who was born in Ger- 
many in 1851, a daughter of George and 
Louisa (Trautvetter) Mathes. Her par- 
ents were natives of Germany and in her 



156 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV I EH' 



childhood came to America. They were 
residents of Kentucky in early life and 
thence removed to Warsaw, Illinois, 
where Mrs. Mathes died twenty-nine 
years ago. Mr. Mathes, however, is still 
living in Rocky Run township at the age 
of eighty years. In his family were eight 
children, six of whom survive : George, 
who is living with Mrs. Sack; Fred, of 
Warsaw; Rudolph, who resides in Rocky 
Run township ; Mrs. Sack ; Henry, who is 
with his father in Rocky Run township; 
and Minnie, the wife of Frank Shair, also 
on the old homestead with the father. 
Mrs. Sack was fir'st married in 1871, be- 
coming the wife of Jacob Shafrner, who 
was born in Switzerland. His parents 
both died in Germany. Coming to the 
new world he was known for some years 
as a thrifty farmer of Wilcox township 
and he died there in 1886, leaving one 
son. George J., of Rocky Run township 
who married Miss Cora Gillham and has 
two children. By her second marriage 
Mrs. Sack had two children, twins, Bessie 
May and Jessie Pay. The former is at 
home but the latter died January 25. 
1904, at the age of fourteen years, and 
was buried in W r arsaw cemetery. She 
died suddenly although she had long been 
an invalid and during her illness had dis- 
played a most sweet and lovable disposi- 
tion, being a most patient sufferer, greatly 
missed by all. 

Mr. Sack was the owner of one hundred 
and twenty acres of land in Rocky Run 
township, whereon he built a comfortable 
residence and one of the best barns in that 
part of the county. He also put up other 
good outbuildings and developed an ex- 
cellent farm property, which is now in 



possession of his widow. He was a re- 
publican in politics and always stood 
loyally by the party which was the de- 
fense of the union at the time of the Civil 
war and which has always been a party 
of reform, progress and improvement. 
An industrious man, frugal and careful, 
he thus made a start in life and in later 
years was enabled to enjoy more of life's 
comforts and luxuries. In his business 
affairs he was thoroughly reliable and 
was never known to take advantage of 
the necessities of his fellowmen in any 
trade transaction. He was regarded as a 
kind friend, a good neighbor and loyal 
citizen, and thus his death was the occa- 
sion of deep and wide spread regret, when, 
on the 27th of November, 1900, he was 
called to his final rest, his remains being 
interred in Rocky Run township. Mrs. 
Sack still survives her husband and re- 
sides upon the farm but rents the land, 
from which she derives a good income, 
and she is comfortably situated in life. 



R. E. GILLHAM. 

R. E. Gillham, one of the substantial 
farmers of Wilcox township, and a native 
son of the county, was born in Rocky Run 
township, January 13, 1855, and is a son 
of John and Ann (Woodworth) Gillham. 
The father was born in Kentucky in 1832, 
and the mother was a native of Missouri. 
When a young boy he came to Hancock 
county, settling in Walker township, and 
throughout the greater part of his life he 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



157 



followed the occupation of farming. He 
spent six years in California, where he en- 
gaged in general agricultural pursuits and 
also worked in the gold mines. He then 
returned to his old home in Hancock 
county and was identified with its agri- 
cultural interests up to the time of his 
demise which occurred in June, 1888. His 
wife passed away in January, 1890, and 
both were laid to rest in \Yarsaw ceme- 
tery. Of their five children four yet sur- 
vive, namely: R. E., of this review; 
James, of Texas ; Lemuel, also in Texas ; 
and Dr. Charles W. Gillham, of Warsaw, 
Illinois. 

The early educational privileges of R. 
E. Gillham were obtained in the district 
schools of Rocky Run township, and were 
supplemented by a course of study in the 
Warsaw high school. Nothing occurred 
to vary for him the routine of farm life in 
his boyhood days, and the practical train- 
ing which he received in the work of the 
fields proved of the utmost value when he 
started out in life on his own account. 
He was married January 14, 1875, to 
Miss Anna M. Pell, who was born in 
Michigan, August. 13, 1855, an d is a 
daughter of John and Sarah Ann ( South- 
well) Pell, both of whom were natives 
of England. The mother, born Septem- 
ber 21, 1835, was educated in London, 
and when eighteen years of age crossed 
the Atlantic to the new world. Mr. Pell, 
who chose farming as a life work, fol- 
lowed that pursuit for many years in 
Lewis county, Missouri, where he passed 
away, after which his widow became the 
wife of Jacob Sack, who is still living in 
Warsaw. Mrs. Sack, however, departed 
this life. February 23, 1902. By her first 



marriage she had three children, two of 
whom survive, namely: Mrs. Gillham; 
Halsey Pell, of Warsaw ; by second mar- 
riage there are W,illiam Sack, also 
of Warsaw; and Emma, the wife 
of Thomas Daugherty, of Warsaw. 
Robert Southwell, an uncle of Mrs. 
Gillham on the maternal side, was a 
soldier of the Civil war, enlisting from 
Canton, Missouri, when he was eighteen 
years of age to drive a team. He was 
advanced to the position of clerk and 
served throughout the war. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Gillham has 
been blessed with three children, all of 
whom were born on the homestead farm 
and the family circle yet remains un- 
broken by the hand of death. Cora E., 
the eldest, born November i, 1875, is the 
wife of George Schaffner living in Rocky 
Run township; and they have two chil- 
dren, Carl Merle and Mary Jeannette. 
Mary A., born May 24, 1882, is with her 
sister. Herschel Edwin, born July 2, 
1892, is now a student in the Warsaw 
high school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gillham began their do- 
mestic life upon his father's farm, where 
they resided until about fourteen years 
ago, when the father died and Mr. Gill- 
ham then purchased his present place on 
section 28, Wilcox township, comprising 
one hundred and eighty acres of rich and 
productive land, on which he is still living. 
He carries on the work of tilling the soil 
after most progressive modern methods 
and each step in his business career has 
been a forward one. He likewise raises 
stock and good grades of horses ; cattle 
and hogs will be seen in his feed lots 
and pastures. In the midst of a busy 



158 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



life he has found time and opportunity 
to keep well informed on political ques- 
tions and issues of the day, and he gives 
his allegiance to the democracy. He has 
served as school director, as highway 
commissioner and as trustee of the 
schools. In his business career he has 
made a record such as any man might 
be proud to flessess. for it is characterized 
by sterling horie'sty and unfaltering fidelity 
to a high s'taivefard of btisiness ethics. He 
started at the bottom round of the ladder 
of life and has steadily climbed upward. 
Personally he is a large hearted man, 
genial in disposition and kindly in manner 
and both he and his wife are esteemed by 
many friends throughout the township. 



SAMUEL R. JONES. 

Samuel R. Jones, whose home is pleas- 
antly and conveniently located on sections 
23 and 24, Carthage township, has one 
hundred and sixty acres of land that is 
well improved and in its conduct he dis- 
plays thorough and practical knowledge 
of the best methods of tilling the soil. A 
native of Indiana, he was born in Putnam 
county, January i, 1840. and there spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth, living 
upon the home farm of his parents. Carter 
T. and Eliza (Roberts) Jones. Both 
were natives of Kentucky and in early 
life became residents of Indiana. Sub- 
sequent to their marriage they resided in 
Putnam county, where Carter T. Jones 
engaged in farming for a number of years. 



Later he returned to Kentucky, locating 
in Shelby county, where he remained for 
four years, when he came to Illinois, tak- 
ing up his abode in Sonora township, 
Hancock county, where the father pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres. This he improved, making it his 
home until his death, which occurred 
when he had reached the age of seventy- 
two years. He was a member of the 
Methodist church and was actuated by 
high and lofty purposes and manly prin- 
ciples. His political support was given 
to the democracy but he had no aspira- 
tion for office. His wife died in Indiana 
at the age of forty-five years and he later 
married Miss Mary Gilmore in Putnam 
county, Indiana. She died in Chicago at 
the home of her daughter in 1904. Of 
the six children by the first marriage only 
two are living, Samuel R. and William 
R., of Oklahoma. By the second mar- 
riage four are living, one son having died 
in childhood. Those living are James 
A., of Oakwood, Robert, of Washington, 
Myra, now Mrs. Jeolidon, of Chicago, 
and Frank, of Kansas. 

Samuel R. Jones obtained his education 
in the common schools of Putnam county 
and as a young man assisted in the work 
of the home farm, remaining under the 
parental roof until 1863, which year wit- 
nessed his arrival in Illinois. He first 
settled in Fulton county, where he pur- 
chased a small farm, residing there for 
four years. He then removed to Cham- 
paign county. Illinois, where he lived for 
two years, and in 1869 he came to Han- 
cock county, purchasing eighty acres of 
land in Sonora township, which he farmed 
for some time. He sold this and bought 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



159 



a farm in Montebello township, compris- 
ing one hundred acres, on which he lived 
for five years. When he had again dis- 
posed of his property he purchased his 
present farm and has since lived thereon. 
It was only partially improved when it 
came into his possession and he has added 
many modern equipments and accessories. 
The fields are now well tilled and bring 
him bounteous harvests, while the build- 
ings are kept in an excellent state of re- 
pair. He has engaged in general farming 
and stock-raising all of his life and con- 
centrated his energies upon his business 
interests to the exclusion of active partici- 
pation in politics although he gives the 
support of his ballot to the men and meas- 
ures of democracy. 

Happy is his home life. Mr. Jones was 
married September /, 1861, to Miss Sarah 
Sublett, who was born in Putnam county. 
Indiana, and is a daughter of David and 
Mary (Marshall) Sublett. The father 
was born in Kentucky and at an early 
clay went to Indiana, taking up his abode 
in Putnam county, where he followed 
farming. That pursuit was his life work 
and through his devotion thereto he pro- 
vided a comfortable living for his family. 
He died in Indiana at the age of seventy 
years, while his wife passed away dur- 
ing the early girlhood of Mrs. Tones, who 
was one of a family of nine children. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Jones were born 
seven children. Ida May. the eldest, is 
the wife of William Crosby, a resident 
farmer of Sonora township. Hancock 
county, and they have . one daughter, 
Hattie, who is the wife of Joseph 
Shell, a farmer of Sonora township. 
Carter T.. the second in order of birth. 



follows farming in Spink county. 
South Dakota, wedded May Smith, and 
has three children, Robert, Floyd and 
Ethel. Sophia is the wife of John 
Sheets, also an agriculturist of Spink 
county. South Dakota, and they have 
one daughter, Madaline. Edward, who 
is engaged in farming in Spink 
county. South Dakota, wedded Amanda 
Maginn, and has two children, Paul Alex- 
ander and Opal. Albert is operating the 
home farm. Jennie is the wife of Harvey 
Goodrich, a resident farmer of Carthage 
township and they have a daughter, 
Helen. William died at the age of 
twenty-one years. AH of the children 
were born in Hancock county with the 
exception of Ida and Carter, who are na- 
tives of Fulton county. Mr. Jones has 
seen many improvements made in Han- 
cock county, which was just emerging 
from pioneer conditions when he took 
up his abode here. He has done his full 
share in making the county what it is 
today and though he has not sought to 
figure in public life he has made a record 
for good citizenship and for honesty in 
business that is indicative of sterling prin- 
ciples which are the motive power of his 
actions. 



HON. JOHN HAY. 

It is given to few men to so fully realize 
their ambitions as it was to Dr. Charles 
Hay, father of John Hay, the nobility 
of whose character is indicated in his 
words, when in writing to one of his sons 



i6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV I EH' 



upon his seventy-fifth birthday, he said, 
"I have never been conscious of but one 
ambition and that I have had all my days. 
I have always wished to found a family; 
I mean this of course not in any aristo- 
cratic, still less in any plutocratic sense, 
but I have hoped to leave behind me chil- 
dren and children's children and the 
greater the number the better I would be 
pleased with whom intelligence, honor 
and thrift would be matters of instinct 
and tradition. I would prefer a certainty 
of this in the future to any amount of 
personal distinction for myself, if the 
choice were left to me." 

From such a stock sprang John Hay, 
author, journalist and diplomat, and cer- 
tainly the father's ambition found reali- 
zation in the life of this honored son. 
The other members of the family, too, 
were a credit and honor to his name, but 
in this review we have to deal more en- 
tirely with the history of John Hay, who 
rose to distinction through the inherent 
force of character through the recog- 
nition of opportunity and to a greater 
extent, through the unfaltering de- 
votion to duty and to high ideals 
of citizenship which were ever recog- 
nized as among his most salient char- 
acteristics. He was born in Salem, 
Indiana, October 8, 1838, and was fortu- 
nate in that his youth and boyhood were 
passed amid the environments of a home 
of culture and refinement, his parents typi- 
fying the very best in manhood and 
womanhood. They realized the value of 
education and spared no effort or expense 
on their part to provide their sons and 
daughters with every advantage in this 
direction. He was but three years of age 



at the time of the removal of the family 
from Salem to Warsaw, Illinois, and he 
began his education in the "little brick" 
schoolhouse which still stands on Fourth 
street in Warsaw and until within recent 
years was yet in use for educational pur- 
poses. During his early school clays he 
was a diligent and studious boy, with a 
taste for languages and composition and 
versifying, and his sister. Mrs. Mary 
Woolfolk, who still lives in Warsaw said, 
"In his boyhood he had the habit of 
stringing words together into rhymes." 
He attended the little brick schoolhouse 
until he reached the age of thirteen, learn- 
ing literally all there was to learn from 
Mr. Holmes and his successors. He sup- 
plemented his studies in lessons of Greek 
and Latin from his father. At the age 
of thirteen he was sent to Pittsfield, Illi- 
nois, to attend a private school for a year 
and a half as a preparation for entrance 
at Brown University, and when fifteen 
years of age he became a student in that 
institution, where he passed his examina- 
tion in Greek and Latin so creditably that 
his examiner made special inquiry as to 
where he had received his preparation. 
He answered with great pride that his 
tutelage in ancient languages was from his 
father. His education, however, was not 
one continuous round of study but for 
various reasons suffered interruptions. 
Viewed from a financial standpoint per- 
haps John Hay might be termed a self- 
made man, for in his early youth his 
father was in somewhat limited financial 
circumstances, owning to the pecuniary 
assistance which he had given to his 
friends and which left him in a somewhat 
crippled financial condition. In his youth. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



161 



therefore, John Hay accepted a position as 
newspaper carrier for the Warsaw Sig- 
nal and his first literary productions, 
written when a boy, appeared in that 
paper, he being encouraged to do the 
work by its editor, the late Thomas Gray. 
Later, as before stated, he had the advan- 
tages of a course of study in Brown Uni- 
versity, .from which he was graduated 
in 1858, and there he was a general fa- 
vorite with class-mates and instructors, 
promising, studious, quiet and reserved, 
yet exceedingly loyal and steadfast in 
friendship. 

It was during his student days that he 
produced certain poems and writings 
which in later years made him a world- 
famed author, although it was not until 
several decades later that his innate mod- 
esty permitted him to give these writings 
to the public in published form. Mr. Hay 
was graduated from the university in 
1858 with high rank in scholarship. Dur- 
ing the period between his return from 
college and his .entrance into public life 
his friends perceived in him an undercur- 
rent of seriousness and religious enthu- 
siasm. He had been reared in the Baptist 
church but had leanings toward the Pres- 
byterian faith and he appeared to have 
entertained the idea of entering the minis- 
try. At the time when his family wished 
him to become a student of law he said 
to one of his intimates "They would spoil 
a second class preacher to make a third 
class lawyer out of me." However, he 
fell in with the plan of studying law but 
before beginning his studies he passed 
sometime at Pittsfield, Illinois, where 
John Nicolay had a newspaper office. At 
this time he made the acquaintance of 



General Clark E. Carr, who afterward 
served as minister to Denmark, and Gen- 
eral Carr gives an account of their first 
meeting in his recently published book, 
The Illini. Describing a visit to Pitts- 
field and his meeting with Mr. Hay, Gen- 
eral Carr writes : ''A bright, rose- faced 
young man arose and greeted us. I had 
never seen a young man or boy who 
charmed me as he did when he looked at 
me with his mischievous hazel eyes from 
under a wealth of dark brown hair." He 
had just completed writing something at 
the time the party entered the newspaper 
office." Mr. Carr continues, "We all 
joined in urging him to read what he 
had written and he did so. I can give 
only the substance of the editorial from 
memory but I doubt whether its author 
ever wrote a better one when editing the 
New York Tribune. 

John Hay took up the study of law in 
the office of his uncle. Milton Hay, one of 
the most distinguished attorneys that ever 
practiced at the bar of Illinois, and a law 
partner of Abraham Lincoln in his office 
at Springfield. Becoming a student in 
that office, Mr. Hay thus formed the ac- 
quaintance of the martyred president. 
The story of friendship has become a mat- 
ter of history. The young man was in- 
vited to continue his law studies in Mr. 
Lincoln's office and he entered heartily 
into the work of supporting the Illinois 
presidential candidate during the cam- 
paign of 1860. That his effective ser- 
vice was appreciated by Mr. Lincoln is 
shown by the fact that on going to 
Washington the president invited Mr. 
Hay to become assistant secretary to John 
G. Nicolay, and from that time forward 



1 62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REJ'IEU' 



he was the able assistant of Mr. Lincoln 
in important work having direct bearing 
upon the administration and the nation. 
He was entrusted with the bearing of 
messages too momentous to commit to 
paper. Although a warm admirer of 
President Lincoln, it was with a certain 
reluctance and regret that he had turned 
from law to enter politics, but the great 
leader of the Republican -party had 
recognized his discernment, his judg- 
ment, his tact and discretion, and realized 
that his services might prove of utmost 
value to him in Washington. He was 
constantly with Mr. Lincoln in close con- 
ference throughout the four years of his 
administration save for the brief period 
when he served, more as the president's 
personal representative, on the staffs of 
Generals Hunter and Gilmore and was 
brevetted lieutenant colonel therefor. 
Speaking of this period in the life of 
Mr. Hay, Grandon Nevins has written 
"No man in the president's official house- 
hold was more overworked than the 
young major. He slept when he could 
and ate when he had the chance, and 
when he was not at the front he lived at 
the White House always at the call of 
the president." 

Mr. Hay was but twenty-six years of 
age at the time of Mr. Lincoln's death 
but so thoroughly had he proved his 
worth that it was decided to retain him 
in the employ of the government and 
he was sent abroad first as secretary of the 
legation at Paris under Minister Bige- 
low, in which capacity he served from 
1865 until 1867, while during the suc- 
ceeding year he was charge d' affaires in 
Vienna and later secretary of legation 



at Madrid under Minister Sickles, where 
he served until 1870. 

About this time Mr. Hay gave proof 
of public-spirited citizenship and lofty 
patriotism in refusing a very advanta- 
geous offer from Horace Greeley then 
editor of the New York Tribune, saying 
that he did not think it proper to turn 
his work over to other hands until it was 
completed. When he again found him- 
self in his native country free to accept 
the proffered position extended by Mr. 
Greely he became editorial writer for the 
New York Tribune. In the meantime, 
however, he was for a few months con- 
nected with the Springfield ( Illinois) 
Journal, after which he succeeded Charles 
Dana as editor of the Republican at Chi- 
cago. For five years he was connected 
with the New York Tribune, where he 
demonstrated his right to rank with the 
leading journalists of the country and also 
as an author of considerable literary 
merits and ability. It was at this period 
in his career that he published the well 
known poems, Jim Bludso and Little 
Breeches, together with other verses 
which were given to the public under the 
title Pike County Ballads. His retire- 
ment from the Tribune was followed by 
his removal to Cleveland. Ohio, where he 
remained for some years, and he declined 
a most remunerative position offered him 
as editor in chief of the New York 
Herald, then published by James Gordon 
Bennett. He was again for a brief period, 
however, actively connected with journal- 
ism, having charge of the New York 
Tribune in 1881, during a brief absence 
of Whitelaw Reid in Europe. Much of 
his time during fifteen years was devoted 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



163 



to the compilation and writing, in collabo- 
ration with John G. Nicolay, of the vol- 
ume entitled. Abraham Lincoln, A His- 
tory, which is undoubtedly the most ex- 
haustive, most accurate and authentic bi- 
ography of the martyred president. As 
a financial venture it was a. brilliant suc- 
cess and moreover, it will always remain 
the one authoritative work of the life of 
Abraham Lincoln. The writings of Mr. 
Hay have embraced a wide field, as he 
was the author of various works, political 
and otherwise, and many attribute to him 
the authorship of a novel which appeared 
anonymously in 1893 under the title of 
The Bread Winners. His influence as 
a journalist is immeasurable. In this 
field of labor, however, he became recog- 
nized as one of the master minds of the 
nation, a man of great erudition and 
learning, of broad investigation and origi- 
nal thought. He never looked at great 
questions effecting national and interna- 
tional relations from a narrow, contracted 
or partisan standpoint. He viewed the 
whole subject broadly and the correctness 
of his conclusions, time has demonstrated 
and wisdom has acknowledged. 

From his retirement in Cleveland, Mr. 
Hay was called in 1879 to serve as as- 
sistant secretary of state under Evarts 
and continued in this office to the end of 
the administration. It was sixteen years 
later that lie was again in political office, 
having, in March, 1897. been appointed 
by President McKinley ambassador to 
England. His diplomatic service is a 
matter of history. Perhaps one secret 
of his success lay in the fact that he recog- 
nized while handling the affairs of in- 
ternational importance he had to treat 



with the individual and he displayed 
a courtesy and a deference for the 
opinions of others, while rigidly uphold- 
ing his own honest convictions and views, 
that won for him the warmest personal 
regard and esteem. He managed inter- 
national affairs during the Spanish-Amer- 
ican war with a delicacy and tact com- 
bined with force and discretion that 
gained for the United States the support 
of England, while England held in check 
the other powers of the world. The then 
Prince of Wales, now reigning sovereign 
in England, recognized his great ability 
and power and accorded him not only ad- 
miration but strong personal friendship. 
Near the close of the Spanish-American 
war he returned to this country and be- 
came secretary of state in the cabinet of 
President McKinley, in which position he 
was continued by President Roosevelt, 
thus serving when stricken by death. Al- 
though he secured the abrogation of the 
Clayton-Bulwer treaty brought about by 
reference of the most far-reaching ques- 
tion in the recent Venezuela dispute 
(priority in payment for a belligerent 
claimant) to the international court of 
The Hague and arranged for the peace- 
able adjustment of the Alaskan boundary 
question, he is known throughout the 
world principally for the breadth and 
foresight of his policy in Asia. His long 
experience in the diplomatic service 
coupled with his native abilities, his su- 
perior attainments and his wholesome hu- 
manity, of which he always possessed an 
abundant store, made him not only a val- 
uable man to the nation but to all the 
world. He achieved much for his coun- 
trv but more for all mankind and raised 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



diplomacy out of the slough of deceit and 
hypocrisy, placing it upon the high plane 
of sincerity, integrity and plain dealing 
and relegating to things obsolete and de- 
testable and precepts and maxims of Tal- 
leyrand, so long accepted as the essentials 
of the successful diplomat. 

There were other phases in the life 
record of John Hay that perhaps were 
not so well known. While in Europe in 
the early days of his legation service he 
mastered the French language, which he 
spoke with fluency, and he became a lin- 
guist of such superiority that one of the 
leading educational institutions of Amer- 
ica offered to him the chair of languages. 
He was always a man of studious habits 
and the breadth of his reading and the 
extent of his knowledge were marvelous 
but it was not these distinguishing char- 
acteristics alone which won for Air. Hay 
the position which he held in public re- 
gard. There has been perhaps no man 
in Washington or in diplomatic circles 
more greatly loved because of his per- 
sonal traits than John Hay. Nevins has 
said, "To know John Hay was to love 
him. His was one of those extremely 
sensitive natures, which, combined with 
firmness, go to make up the ideal man. 
Of all the ambassadors and ministers sta- 
tioned at Washington, not one, from the 
Japanese minister, Mr. Takahira. to Mr. 
Takahira's deadly political enemy, Count 
Cassini, but was on terms of intimate 
friendship with the American secretary, 
and it was not merely these foreign dip- 
lomats who were drawn irresistibly to- 
ward this magnetic man, his cabinet 
associates, his subordinates in the state 
department, his social acquaintances 



every one regarded him with deep affec- 
tion. No man in all Washington was the 
object of more general affection than was 
Mr. Hay." 

Reared in a home where all that is 
ideal in the family relation found ex- 
emplification, it was not surprising that 
John Hay, like his father, found his 
greatest source of pleasure at his own fire- 
side. He was married in 1874 to Miss 
Clara L. Stone, a daughter of Amasa 
Stone, a wealthy and prominent citizen 
of Cleveland, Ohio, and his reply "All 
through life," to the question of a friend 
on the night of his bachelor dinner : 
"How long is the honeymoon going to 
last, Hay ?" proved most true. The mar- 
riage was blessed with four children and 
those who knew Mr. Hay most intimately 
recognized the fact that his great sorrow 
over the death of his son, Adelbert, who 
was killed by falling from a window in 
New Haven on the eve of the Yale com- 
mencement, proved a blow from which 
he never recovered. He withdrew him- 
self from social life from that time sa- T e 
when it was demanded in his official 
capacity. He spent his evenings with 
Mrs. Hay, between whom there existed a 
most ideal companionship. His daugh- 
ter, Helen, is now the wife of Payne 
Whitney, while Alice is the wife of James 
W. Wadsworth, Jr., and it was to Mr. 
Hay a matter of great rejoicing that his 
daughters as he expressed it, "had been 
sought by two American princes of whose 
titles to nobility I am prouder than I 
would be of those that come from royal 
ancestry." For several months prior to 
his demise Secretary Hay was in ill health 
and sought relief through travel and med- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



ical attendants in Europe. He returned 
to Washington to take up again the active 
work of the business of his department 
and the discussion with the president of 
important pending questions. But the 
tide of life was ebbing fast away and at 
his summer home on Lake Sunapee, New 
Hampshire, his labors were brought to a 
close on the first of July, 1905. when he 
was in the sixty-seventh year of his age. 
Xo man in public life perhaps has had 
so few enemies. Even those opposed to 
him politically entertained for him the 
warmest personal regard and admiration. 
It is said that he never forgot a friend ; 
the playmates of his boyhood, the asso- 
ciates of his early manhood, those with 
whom he labored in diplomatic circles, 
in journalism, and in the department of 
state were alike remembered through all 
the years with their added responsibili- 
ties and honors. His life record finds 
embodiment in the words of Pope : 

"Statesman, yet friend to truth ; of soul 

sincere, 

In action faithful and in honor clear ; 
Who broke no promise, served no private 

end. 
Who gained no title and who lost no 

friend." 



HENRY W T EBER. 

Henry Weber, who for many years was 
an active, energetic and prosperous farm- 
er of Hancock county, spent the last year 



of his life in honorable retirement from 
labor in Carthage, passing away on the 
23d of October, 1905. As the day with 
its morning of hope and promise, its 
noontide of activity, its evening of ac- 
complished and successful effort, ending 
in the grateful rest and quiet of the night, 
so was the life of this man. Born in 
Appanoose township, Hancock county, on 
the 1 7th of September, 1858, he spent his 
entire life in this part of the state. His 
parents were Samuel and Rosa (Bertchi) 
Weber, both of whom were natives of 
Switzerland, coming to America about 
fifty years ago. The father, who was 
born in March, 1816, was a baker by 
trade, learning and following that pur- 
suit in his native country, but in Han- 
cock county he turned his attention to 
farming. He died about 1892, at the age 
'of seventy-six years, his .remains being 
interred in a cemetery in this county. 
Both he and his wife were devoted Chris- 
tian people, holding membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. After the 
father's death the mother remained upon 
the home farm with her children until 
they were all married and then went to 
Fort Madison, Iowa, to live with one of 
her daughters. Eleven children survive 
the father, namely : Rosa, the wife of 
Charles Buerich, of Manier. Illinois ; 
Fred, who is living in Denmark, Iowa ; 
Carrie and Will, twins, the later living 
near Nauvoo, while the former is the wife 
of David Seguin, of Fort Madison, Iowa ; 
Elizabeth, the wife of J. McKaig, of Fort 
Madison ; Mary, the wife of Alva Cowles, 
of Fort Madison; Henry of this review: 
Albert, of Headlin, Missouri ; Sophia, the 
wife of Herman Hess, of Neota, Illinois; 



1 66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and John and Edith, twins, the former 
a resident of Lebanon, Nebraska, while 
the latter is the wife of Reuben Hummel, 
of Nauvoo. 

Henry Weber of this review was edu- 
cated in the district schools of Nauvoo, 
Illinois, and remained upon his father's 
farm until he had attained his majority. 
On the 3d of January, 1884, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Sarah Luella Thomas, who 
was born in Sonora township, Hancock 
county, February 23, 1855, a daughter of 
Isaac T. and Louisa (Nichols) Thomas, 
both of whom were natives of Kentucky. 
The father was a farmer and took up 
his abode in Hancock county, Illinois, 
about fifty-three years ago, settling on a 
tract of land in Sonora township, where 
for many years he carried on general 
agricultural pursuits. His death occurred 
in 1899 and his remains were interred in ' 
that township. His widow, who is two 
years his junior, is living in Carthage.. 
Illinois. Mr. Thomas was a democrat 
in politics and served as school director 
and in other local offices. He belonged 
to the Christian church, of which he was 
a deacon and elder and he was widely 
known as a worthy citizen, faithful in 
friendship and loyal to his home ties. 
He was a large landowner, prospering 
in his business undertakings until he had 
six hundred acres of land at the time of 
his death. Mrs. Thomas also belongs to 
the Christian church. In the family of 
this worthy couple were nine children, of 
whom six are now living, namely : Lil- 
burn Thaddeus, who married Elizabeth 
Honce, of Elvaston ; Laura, a twin sister 
of Lilburn and now living with her 
mother ; William Henry, who died in Feb- 



ruary, 1904; Mrs. Sarah Luella Weber; 
Naomi Jane, who is with her mother: 
Martha Emily, the wife of Orville Honce, 
of Montebello township; James Harvey, 
also at home; George Milton, who died 
at the age of two and a half years ; and 
Purliett, now deceased. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Weber began their domestic life 
in Appanoose township, where they lived 
for a year and then removed to a farm in 
Montebello township, where they resided 
for five years. Later they spent a year 
and a half upon a farm west of Ferris, 
taking up their abode there in 1890 and 
making it their place of residence until 
1904. He remodeled the house, built a 
fine barn and all the necessary outbuild- 
ings for the shelter of grain and stock 
and was always very successful in his 
business affairs. He raised stock quite 
extensively and this branch of his business 
proved profitable. Coming to Carthage 
in November, 1904, he retired from active 
life on account of ill health, having had 
to leave his farm for two seasons pre- 
vious to this. He purchased a beautiful 
modern home on North Main street, 
where his widow now resides and there 
he spent his remaining days. He was 
in ill health for about four years prior 
to his death and was a great sufferer dur- 
ing the last year and a half. He died 
October 23, 1905, his remains being in- 
terred in Moss Ridge cemetery. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Weber were born 
but two children, both born in Hancock 
county, namely: Grace May, the wife of 
Frank Thornberg. who is living on her 
father's old farm near Ferris ; and Jessie 
Viola, the wife of Dr. Claude Thomas, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



167 



a practicing dentist of Keokuk, Iowa. 
They have one child, Lowell Weber 
Thomas. 

Mr. Weber started out in life empty 
handed, his possessions consisting at the 
age of twenty-one years of but one horse. 
He possessed instead good mental and 
physical activity and his energies and 
labor brought to him gratifying success, 
making him one of the substantial citizens 
of the community. He was never known 
to take advantage of the necessities of 
his fellowmen in any business transac- 
tion, but was straightforward and reliable 
in all his dealings and thus won the un- 
qualified confidence of those with whom 
he was associated. He was a devoted 
member of the Christian church, in which 
his wife still holds membership and for 
a number of years he served as deacon of 
the church at Ferris. In politics he was 
a stalwart democrat and filled the posi- 
tions of township trustee and road su- 
pervisor, while for several years he was a 
school director. A man of quiet and 
unokrusive nature and at all times un- 
ostentatious in his demeanor, his genuine 
personal worth nevertheless gained him 
the esteem and honor of all with whom he 
was associated. He was interested in 
the welfare of the community, was a good 
neighbor, a kind husband and loving 
father. His name was above reproach, 
for his religious belief permeated his 
everyday life and actions. His word 
was as good as any bond ever solemnized 
by signature or seal and he stood high 
in public estimation. He left behind an 
honored name and a memory that will 
long be cherished, not only by his im- 
mediate family but also by many who 
ii 



knew him. Mrs. Weber still resides in 
her beautiful home in Carthage and in 
addition owns the old home farm and 
forty acres of good land in Sonora 
township. 



EUGENE ADRIAN WALLACE. 

Eugene A. Wallace, one of the most 
enterprising and highly respected agricul- 
turists of Durham township, is a native 
of Missouri. He was born in Knox 
county February 20, 1874, of the mar- 
riage of James H. and Nancy L. (Lati- 
mer) Wallace. Both parents were natives 
of Kentucky and the mother is still living 
in Missouri but the father passed away 
in 1873. He was a minister of the Chris- 
tian church while living in Kentucky and 
his life was a potent influence for good in 
the various communities where he resided. 
In the family were four children : Ida 
E., the wife of Henry Childers, of Mem- 
phis, Missouri ; Mary, deceased ; Alvin 
E., of Chicago; and Eugene A., of this 
review. 

In the public schools of Missouri 
Eugene A. Wallace acquired his educa- 
tion. He remained upon the home farm 
until nearly twenty-one years of age, his 
time being largely occupied with the 
duties and labors of the fields. After 
arriving at man's estate he was married 
on the I2th of September, 1900. to Miss 
Martha Byler, who was born March 24, 
1871, in the house which is now her home. 
Her parents were Jacob and Martha 
(White) Byler. Her father was born 



1 68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in McMinn county, Tennessee, February 
23, 1830, and when but five years of age 
was brought to Illinois by his parents, who 
settled in Adams county. He was reared 
to the occupation of farming and at the 
age of twenty-four years came to Han- 
cock county, taking up his abode on a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres of 
prairie land in Durham township, which 
he cleared. Here he built an attractive 
residence which he yet occupies, together 
with Mr. and Mrs. Wallace. As the 
years passed his labors brought him a 
good financial return and, making further 
investment in property, he is now the 
owner of four hundred and forty acres 
of valuable land and his farm is one of 
the best in Durham township. He made 
many excellent improvements thereon and 
has long been known as an enterprising 
agriculturist and good citizen, as honest 
as the day is long. In his political views 
he is a stalwart democrat and he is a 
member of Dallas City Lodge, No. 235, 
also a member of Dallas Chapter, R. & S. 
M., as well as of the Council of Dallas 
City. All who know him esteem him 
for his genuine worth and he well de- 
serves mention among the representative 
men of Hancock county. In 1896 he 
was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, who died on the 4th of September 
of that year and was laid to rest in Union 
cemetery adjoining the home farm, which 
tract of land Mr. Byler deeded to the 
trustees for cemetery purposes. Unto 
this worthy couple were born nine chil- 
dren, of whom five are now living; Wil- 
liam H., who resides near Wheeling, Mis- 
souri ; Andrew J., of Dallas City; Laura, 
the wife of Adolph Herweg, a resident 



of Nebraska ; Sarah, the wife of Humbert 
Vass, of Durham township ; and Mrs. 
Wallace. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallace took up their abode upon her 
father's farm, for her mother had passed 
away and they took charge of the home 
and farm for the father. Mr. Wallace 
rents the land and he has made many 
improvements upon the property, which 
presents a splendid appearance, being one 
of the best farms of Durham township. 
Large and substantial outbuildings have 
been erected for the shelter of grain and 
stock and everything is in keeping with 
ideas of modern agricultural progress. 
He built a barn, sixty by seventy feet, 
for hay and cattle and also a hog house 
at an expense of three hundred dollars. 
This is one of the best in the county. 
Everything about the place is kept in neat 
and thrifty condition and Mr. Wallace 
is regarded as a most enterprising and 
successful farmer. 

Unto our subject and his wife have 
been born three children, but Beulah Vi- 
ola, the eldest, who was born December 
15, 1901, died September 13, 1902. 
Pearl Irene, born May I, 1903, and 
Herman Le Roy, born November 28. 
1905, are both living. All of the children 
were born in the same house where their 
mother's birth occurred. The parents 
are consistent and valued members of the 
Christian church and Mr. Wallace is con- 
nected with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, while his political allegiance is 
given to the democracy. He occupies 
an enviable position in agricultural circles 
and has made a creditable record. Mr. 
Bvler, the father of Mrs. Wallace, is a 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



169 



self-made man, who in an early day paid 
about five hundred dollars for his farm. 
Neither Mr. Byler nor Mr. Wallace ever 
inherited anything of any consequence 
and the success of both gentlemen is due 
to their own energy, perseyerance and 
capable management. They are highly 
esteemed in the community and both have 
a host of warm friends. Mr. Byler 
worked his way steadily upward from 
a humble financial position to one of 
affluence, being now recognized as a 
wealthy resident of the county, and Mr. 
Wallace is displaying the same sterling 
traits of character, which promise well 
for his future success. 



JACOB P. LA MONTE. 

The stock raising interests of Hancock 
county find a worthy representative in 
Jacob P. La Monte, who is engaged in 
raising black Galloway cattle, good horses 
and Duroc Jersey and Poland China 
hogs. His business interests are carefully 
conducted and he carries on general farm- 
ing in addition to his stock interests. Mr. 
La Monte has now passed the seventy- 
eighth milestone on life's journey, but yet 
gives active supervision to his business 
affairs. His birth occurred in Schoharie 
county, New York, in the town of Char- 
lotteville, October 15, 1827, and he is a 
representative of one of the old families 
of the Empire state. His paternal grand- 
parents were William and Jane (Stilwell) 
La Monte, who were born on Long Is- 



land. The grandfather was a represen- 
tative man, active and successful in busi- 
ness. He followed merchandising, also 
owned and operated a water mill and 
dealt in land. He also held various prom- 
inent official positions in the county in 
which he lived and was a very influential 
resident of his section of Long Island, 
where his death occurred. His wife be- 
longed to one of the most representative 
families of that island. Their son, 
Thomas W. La Monte, was born in New 
York and having arrived at years of ma- 
turity was married to Miss Elizabeth M. 
Payne, likewise a native of that state 
and a daughter of Jacob and Lucy 
(Austin) Payne, natives of New York 
and of New England respectively. The 
maternal grandfather was a farmer by 
occupation. He held membership in the 
Baptist church and was a strong temper- 
ance man and was recognized in his com- 
munity especially in those lines of activity 
resulting in intellectual and moral prog- 
ress. All of the grandparents of Mr. La 
Monte of this review, as well as his par- 
ents, lie buried at Charlotteville, New 
York. 

Jacob P. La Monte is the eldest in a 
family of six sons and seven daughters. 
His brother, George, who was engaged 
in paper manufacturing in New York, 
invented the safety banking paper and 
now has a large establishment in New 
York city. Four sons and three daugh- 
ters of the family are yet living. 

In the state of his nativity Mr. La 
Monte of this review spent his boyhood 
days and acquired a district-school educa- 
tion. He began teaching when only sev- 
enteen years of age and followed the pro- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REJ'IEU' 



fession for four years during the winter 
seasons and for one summer term. Sub- 
sequently he turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits upon the farm which he 
had purchased in the town of Davenport 
in Delaware county, New York, compris- 
ing two hundred and twenty-seven acres 
of land. There he carried on farming 
for some time, but at length traded his 
property and made a sale, for he had come 
to the west in 1854 and decided to locate 
in Montebello township, Hancock county, 
Illinois. Here he took up his abode in 
1855. He traded his property in the east 
for five buggies and one two horse car- 
riage and in the spring of 1856 all these 
were shipped to Keokuk, where he sold 
all of them with- the exception of one 
which he kept for several years for his 
own use and then disposed of it for more 
than he gave for it. On coming to Han- 
cock county he invested in one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Wythe town- 
ship which he afterward sold, but he has 
acquired more land from time to time 
in Montebello township until he has five 
hundred acres in all, the entire amount 
lying within the city limits of Hamilton. 
Upon his farm in Wythe township he had 
the best orchard in that part of the county 
and in 1875 he set out an orchard of 
apples and peaches, covering thirty acres. 
He carries on general farming and in ad- 
dition is quite extensively engaged in 
stock raising, making a specialty of 
horses, black Galloway cattle and Duroc 
Jersey and Poland China hogs. He is 
thoroughly familiar with the best methods 
of cultivating the soil and raising stock 
and his business interests have been so 
carefully conducted that although he 



started out in life empty handed he is now 
one of the substantial citizens of his 
adopted county. 

On the gth of March, 1848, Mr. La 
Monte was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Ruth Hinman, who was born in Delaware 
county, New York, and was educated in 
Cazenovia Seminary of that state. Her 
parents were Amos and Electa (Clark) 
Hinman, natives of New York, the 
former a son of Titus Hinman and the 
latter a daughter of David Clark, both 
of New York state. There was one child 
born unto Mr. and Mrs. La Monte, \\e\- 
lington, whose birth occurred in 1851 and 
who died in Hamilton in 1893. The wife 
and mother died about 1871 and in Jan- 
uary, 1877, Mr. La Monte married Ce- 
celia Wiggenton, who was born in La- 
Grange, Lewis county, Missouri, and was 
educated in a convent in St. Louis. She 
was one of the finest musicians in this 
part of the country. At the time of her 
marriage to M*r. La Monte she was a 
widow and had one son, Weston At- 
wood, who is now engaged in the lumber 
business in the city of Oklahoma. She 
died about fourteen years ago. 

Mr. La Monte exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the Republican party, but has 
never been a politician in the sense of 
office seeking. He has. however, held 
office in the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which he is a devoted and loyal mem- 
ber. He has acted as steward of the 
church and for about ten or fifteen years 
was superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
He has lived a life of uprightness and 
honor and therefore can look back over 
the past without regret. Few men of his 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



171 



years continue actively in business, but 
in spirit and interests he seems yet in 
his prime and possesses much of the vigor 
and enterprise of many a man of much 
younger years. 



WILLIAM A. BIDEAUX. 

William A. Bideaux, who is engaged in 
farming in Durham township, in which 
locality he was born in 1868, is a son of 
Francis and Catherine (Whistler) 
Bideaux and in the paternal line comes 
of Scotch ancestry. The father was born 
in Stark county, Ohio, December 26, 
1838, and was married on the 5th of Oc- 
tober, 1862, to Catherine Whistler. He 
was a carpenter by trade and took up 
his abode in Hancock county over a half 
century ago. For a long- period he was 
identified with building operations but in 
his later life he carried on farming, mak- 
ing his home in Durham township. There 
his death occurred on the gth of January, 
1895. He was an honest, upright man, 
possessing the confidence and trust of all 
who knew him. Conscious that death 
was approaching, he made his peace with 
God and bade adieu to friends and family. 
He was a loving husband, a good father 
and a kind hearted neighbor and he left 
behind an example that is in many re- 
spects well worthy of emulation. Mrs. 
Bideaux still survives her husband and 
is a resident of Rock Creek township. In 
the family were eight children : Delia, 
now the wife of Thomas Shaw, of Dallas 



township; Emma, the wife of William 
Worden, of Fort Madison, Iowa ; Wil- 
liam A., of this review; Frank, who is 
living in Utah ; Kate, the wife of Lemuel 
Bartlett, of Durham township ; Jacob and 
French, both of whom are residents of 
Dallas City; and Lina, who was the wife 
of Carl Mendenhall, of Colusa, and died 
in January, 1905, her remains being 
interred in Myers cemetery. There were 
two children of that marriage, Carl and 
Catherine, and they and their father now 
live with Mrs. Bideaux, mother of our 
subject. 

William A. Bideaux was educated in 
Durham township as a public-school 
student and assisted in the work of the 
home farm until after he had attained his 
majority. As a companion and help- 
mate for life's journey he chose Miss 
Henrietta Harris, whom he wedded Oc- 
tober 9, 1892. She was born in Durham 
township in 1874, a daughter of Eusebius 
and Rebecca (Avery) Harris, both of 
whom were natives of Illinois and now 
residents of Monmouth, this state. Man- 
ford Harris, the oldest brother of Euse- 
bius Harris, was a soldier of the Civil 
war and her grandfather Avery was in 
the war of 1844 when the Mormons were 
expelled from Hancock county. Eusebius 
Harris followed farming in Durham 
township, this county, until 1901, when 
he' practically retired from business life 
but now conducts a barber supply house 
in Monmouth. He has voted the re- 
publican ticket since the organization of 
the party and in this county was. recog- 
nized as a most worthy and respected citi- 
zen. Unto him and his wife were born 
four children: Cora, at home; Mrs. 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL REJ'IEJl' 



Bideaux ; Guy, who is living near Adrian, 
Illinois ; and Bertram, "of Monmouth. 

Mr. Bideaux spent the first two years 
of his married life as a farmer near 
Colusa and after a residence of several 
years upon various farms he located in 
Durham township in 1899 anc l ^ ias si nce 
made his home here. Unto Mr. nad Mrs. 
Bideaux have been born three children : 
Lawrence, who was born in Pilot Grove 
in 1893; Virgil, in Dallas township in 
1896; and Cecil, in Durham township in 
1899. 

Mr. Bideaux exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the Republican party. He and 
his wife have worked together persist- 
ently and energetically in order to make a 
start in life and gain a comfortable com- 
petence and the qualities which they have 
displayed are such as commend them to 
the confidence and good will of all with 
whom they have been brought in contact. 



GEORGE A. TRAUTVETTER. 

George A. Trautvetter is a retired 
farmer residing in Warsaw and he has 
valuable and extensive landed possessions, 
which are an indication of his well spent, 
active and honorable business life. He 
derives therefrom a handsome income 
that enables him now to put aside further 
business cares and to enjoy in quiet the 
fruits of his former toil. A native of 
Germany, he was born in Saxony on 
the 1 6th of August, 1842, a son of John 



George and Sophia Elizabeth (Derle) 
Trautvetter, who were likewise natives 
of Germany, whence they sailed for 
America in 1853, landing at Baltimore, 
Maryland, on the 3d of July, after forty- 
nine days spent upon the water as pas- 
sengers on one of the old-time sailing 
vessels. The father was a miller by 
trade, and making his way from the east 
into the interior of the country, he settled 
on section 3, Rocky Run township, Han- 
cock county, Illinois, where he resided 
continuously until June, 1870. He then 
returned to his native country for a visit 
and there died in the fall of 1871, his re- 
mains being interred at Rota, Germany. 
His wife, who was born in 1808, passed 
away in this county at the age of seventy- 
seven years and was buried in Tioga, 
Walker township, cemetery. Mr. Traut- 
vetter was seventy-one years of age at 
the time of his demise, his birth having 
occurred in 1 799. They were the parents 
of five children, of whom three are living : 
John M., a resident of Walker township; 
George A. ; and Theodore Frederick, who 
lives on section 3, Rocky Run township. 
George A. Trautvetter was a lad of 
about eleven years when he came with his 
parents to the new world and his educa- 
tion, which was begun in the fatherland, 
was continued in the schools of Rocky 
Run township, and of Warsaw. He re- 
mained upon the home farm until he had 
attained his majority, as did his two 
brothers, and he assisted in the farm 
work, early becoming familiar with the 
duties of field and meadow. In March, 
1865, however, he put aside all business 
and personal considerations and, respond- 
ing to the call of his adopted country for 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



173 



aid, he joined the Fourteenth Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and was attached to the 
army corps commanded by General Sher- 
man. He followed that intrepid leader 
during his last campaigns and was under 
his command in the grand .review in 
Washington. Mr. Trautvetter afterward 
went to Fort Leavenworth and was mus- 
tered out in Kansas, subsequent to which 
time he returned to Hancock county. 

In 1863 Mr. Trautvetter had learned 
the saddler's trade in Quincy, and for a 
time he followed that pursuit in Warsaw 
but subsequently he again took up his 
abode upon his father's farm, where he 
remained until the 26th of January, 1869. 
That was his wedding day. Miss Anna E. 
Shildman becoming his wife. She was 
born in Germany, January 23, 1848, and 
in 1858 came with her parents to Amer- 
ica. Her father was a carpenter by trade 
but after crossing the Atlantic turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits in 
Walker township, Hancock county. 
Later he lived in Rocky Run township for 
a time but his last days 'were spent in 
Walker township. In the family were 
five children, of whom three are living : 
Mrs. Trautvetter; Hannah, the wife of 
Theodore F. Trautvetter ; and Elizabeth, 
the wife of Henry Wemhaner, of 
Warsaw. 

Following his marriage Mr. Trautvet- 
ter of this review, in 1867, purchased the 
old home place from his father and there 
lived until March 9, 1906, when he pur- 
chased his present beautiful residence in 
Warsaw and took up his abode in the city. 
For many years he had carefully carried 
on general agricultural pursuits and ca- 
pably managed his business interests, and 



as the result of his enterprise, diligence 
and persistent effort, acquired a goodly 
measure of success. As the years passed 
he embraced his opportunities for judi- 
cious investments in land and now owns 
over six hundred acres, from which he 
derives a splendid income. 

On the loth of September, 1903, Mr. 
and Mrs. Trautvetter celebrated the fif- 
tieth anniversary of his residence upon 
the home farm, to which he had gone with 
his parents in 1853. He still owns the 
five acres, also another farm of one hun- 
home place of three hundred and forty- 
dred and ninety-five acres and a third 
one of ninety-five acres. His realty pos- 
sessions include tenement houses in War- 
saw beside his own residence. Unto him 
and his wife have been born six children, 
four of whom were born in .the home 
which he erected in 1874 to replace the 
log cabin which had been built by his 
father and which was destroyed by fire 
in May of that year. The family record 
is as follows: Theodore N., the eldest, 
born March 2, 1870, married Matilda 
Woolbrink, and lives in Warsaw. Eliza- 
beth, bom January 22, 1872, was married 
in 1890 to Fred Harold, a farmer living 
north of Hamilton; Anna Sophia, born 
September 9, 1874, was married in 1895 
to John Nagel, an agriculturist of Wythe 
township and they now have two chil- 
dren, Malinda . and George Truman 
Kolatzky Nagel. Henry Herman, born 
October 9, 1876, has since 1904 been liv- 
ing in Omaha, where he is running an 
electric car. Lillie Frances, born Sep- 
tember n, 1879, is the wife of Harry 
Elder, who resides two and a half miles 
north of Elderville, Illinois. William 



174 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Adolph, born August 29, 1882, is a grad- 
uate of the Gem City Business College 
of Quincy, of the class of 1905, and is 
now a student in the medical college at 
Valparaiso, Indiana. The children have 
all been given good educational privileges, 
and Theodore N. was also a graduate of 
the Gem City Business College, while 
later he attended a college in Omaha to 
learn shorthand, banking, etc. He is 
now in partnership with Mr. Sharp as a 
dealer in grain and stock at Warsaw. 
In his .political views Mr. Trautvetter 
is a stalwart republican and has been 
honored with several positions of public 
trust. He served for twelve years as 
school director, was for ten years levee 
commissioner and for three years high- 
way commissioner. He and his wife, 
who has indeed been a most faithful com- 
panion and helpmate to him on life's 
journey, are members of the Evangelical 
church. The many comforts which they 
are now able to enjoy in their home have 
been gained through their own labors 
and careful management. The business 
record of Mr. Trautvetter should serve 
as a source of inspiration and encourage- 
ment to others, showing what may be ac- 
complished by determined effort when 
guided by sound judgment and charac- 
terized by honorable dealing. 



ERASTUS A. HAZEN. 

Erastus A. Hazen is the owner of val- 
uable farming interests and in connection 



with the tilling of the soil engages in 
raising Poland China hogs, Shropshire 
sheep and cattle, displaying excellent busi- 
ness ability in the management of his 
farm and his stock. A native of Ohio, 
he was born in Trumbull county on the 
25th of January, 1843, and is a represen- 
tative of old New England families. His 
paternal grandfather, Nathaniel Hazen, 
was a native of Connecticut, while the 
father, James B. Hazen, was born in 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. The 
latter, having arrived at years of maturity, 
was married at Brookfield, Trumbull 
county, Ohio, to Miss Elizabeth Coon, 
who was born in Easton, Pennsylvania, 
and was a daughter of William and Cath- 
erine (De Forest) Coon, of New Jersey. 
Mr. Hazen was a cabinet maker and un- 
dertaker and resided in Brookfield, Ohio, 
until 1852, when he removed to Pike 
county, Illinois, where he engaged in 
business on his own account. There he 
remained for five years and in 1857 he 
came to Hancock county, Illinois, pur- 
chasing and trading his property in Pike 
county for sixty acres in Sonora town- 
ship. This was timber and prairie land, 
all unimproved. He turned the first fur- 
rows in the fields and began the task of 
cultivating a farm, whereon he lived until 
his death. His wife afterward sold the 
property and bought a farm in Montebello 
township, where her last days were 
passed. 

Erastus A. Hazen, the fourth in order 
of birth in a family of seven children, 
of whom four were daughters, was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Youngs- 
town, Ohio, was for five years a student 
at Perry, Pike county, Illinois, and con- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



tinued his studies in the district schools of 
Sonora township, Hancock county. He 
remained at home until eighteen years 
of age, when his patriotic spirit was 
aroused and he offered his services to the 
government, enlisting as a member of 
Company C, One Hundred and Eight- 
eenth Illinois Infantry. The regiment 
was assigned to the Army of the Missis- 
sippi and he participated in the attack 
at Chickasaw Bayou, where the Union 
troops were repulsed. He was afterward 
in the battle at Arkansas Post and sub- 
sequently went to Young's Point and to 
Vicksburg, where he engaged in digging 
the canal through a long stretch of wet 
land. The following spring the troops 
proceeded to Richmond, Louisiana, mak- 
ing their way to the Perkins plantation. 
Soon the battle of Grand Gulf followed, 
after which they proceeded to Bruins' 
Landing, crossing the river on gun boats. 
There they procured three days rations, 
which was all they received for eighteen 
days. On the succeeding day they 
fought the battle of Thompson's Hill or 
Port Gibson, and they were in numerous 
skirmishes. For two days they were at 
Raymond with Pemberton and they 
camped at Edwards depot. The follow- 
ing day they attacked the rebels at Black 
river bridge and captured the fortifica- 
tions. On the succeeding day they made 
a charge upon Vicksburg and invested the 
city. When two days had passed they 
returned and fortified Black river, at 
which point the regiment to which Mr. 
Hazen belonged was mounted and did 
cavalry duty from that time on. They 
were engaged in scouting and Mr. Hazen 
was in the second battle of Jackson, after 



which he returned to Vicksburg and later 
was transferred to the gulf department. 
At Grand Cateau Bayou they were at- 
tacked by the enemy and three hundred 
of the Union troops were taken prisoners,' 
but Mr. Hazen fortunately was not 
among the number. With the remainder 
of the command he returned to Vermil- 
lion, where a battle ensued and Captain. 
Arthur Marsh, who was commanding the 
regiment, was killed. The Union troops 
withdrew from the field and the rebels 
followed. After a time the Union forces 
turned upon their pursuers and sixty of 
the members of the Confederate army 
were captured. When the war was over 
Mr. Hazen received an honorable dis- 
charge at Baton Rogue, Louisiana, on 
the I3th of October, 1865, and returned 
to his old home. He was a brave and 
loyal soldier, displaying valor equal to 
that of many a veteran of twice his years. 
He experienced the usual hardships, pri- 
vations and dangers meted out to the sol- 
dier and his military record was alto- 
gether a very creditable one. 

After living with his parents for a year 
following the close of the war Mr. Hazen 
was married in the fall of 1866 to Miss 
Mary A. Layman, who was born in Dela- 
ware county Ohio, a daughter of Elias 
and Eva (Wolford) Layman, the former 
a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hazen have been born 
seven children, but Elsie, the fourth in 
order of birth, died in infancy. The 
others are : Almon L., who is a mail 
clerk on the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad, running from Chicago 
to Quincy, married Lulu Radcliff and 
lives in Quincy; Eldred E., residing in 



176 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Wythe township; Gissella, who married 
Clarence C. Outhier, of Okeene, Oklaho- 
ma; Ethie L., the wife of Delancey 
Higby, who resides on section 5, Monte- 
bello township; Eva O., and Zella, both 
at home. 

Following his marriage Mr. Hazen 
lived for one year in Montebello town- 
ship upon his father-in-law's place and 
then leased one hundred and sixty acres, 
constituting the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion 3, Montebello township. Six years 
later he removed to Clark county, Mis- 
souri, where he remained for a year and 
on returning to this township he bought 
eighty acres on section 4, which was im- 
proved. He has rebuilt the house, which 
now contains ten rooms and cellar. He 
has also added sheds to the barns and 
has made many other substantial improve- 
ments. Two years after making the first 
purchase he added forty acres to his farm 
and four years later sixty acres. Subse- 
quently with his son, Eldred E.. he 
bought eighty acres in Wythe township 
and he now owns one hundred and eighty 
acres of rich prairie land and ten acres of 
timber land, while his wife owns sixty 
acres of prairie and ten acres of timber. 
Mr. Hazen carries on general farming in 
addition to which he raises Poland China 
hogs. He also has on hand sixty head 
of Shropshire sheep and good cattle. 

In his political views Mr. Hazen is an 
earnest republican believing firmly in the 
principles of the party, yet never seeking 
office. He belongs to Russell post, No. 
86, G. A. R. ,at Hamilton, Illinois, which 
he joined on its organization, and he takes 
much pleasure in meeting with his old 
army comrades. When the grand review 



occurred in Washington in 1865 a banner 
swung across Pennslyvania avenue bore 
the words, "The only debt which our na- 
tion cannot pay is the national debt which 
she owes her soldiers" and each year 
emphasizes the truth of this remark as 
the number of the veterans is growing 
less and less and the feeling of gratitude 
increases. In times of peace Mr. Hazen 
has been equally loyal in citizenship and 
has ever been deeply and helpfully in- 
terested in community affairs, 



ZEBDIAH WARD. 

Zebdiah Ward, now deceased, was born 
in the state of New York, March 20, 
1816, and resided there until he reached 
early manhood. He afterward accompa- 
nied his parents on their removal to In- 
diana, where he lived for several years, 
subsequent to which time he came to Illi- 
nois, settling in Danville, Vermilion 
county. He was a wagon maker by trade 
and followed that pursuit after his arrival 
in this state. He removed from Vermil- 
ion to Hancock county, locating at Web- 
ster, where he resided for about fifteen 
years, continuing to work at his trade 
during that period. He next purchased 
the farm on which his widow now resides, 
making investment in this property in 
May, 1854. The farm comprises sixty 
acres of rich and productive land, which 
he improved, erecting thereon buildings 
and adding other modern equipments and 
accessories. Mr. Ward engaged in the 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



177 



tilling of the soil from that time forward 
until his death, and as the years passed 
he prospered in his undertakings. 

On the 1 3th of January, 1848, was 
celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ward and 
Miss Arzilla \Yright, a daughter of Hick- 
erson and Cynthia (Donnoho) Wright. 
The parents were both natives of Vir- 
ginia, whence they removed to Tennessee, 
and from that state came to Illinois in 
May, 1834, settling in Hancock county 
among its early residents. They lived 
one half mile north of Webster in Foun- 
tain Green township, where Mr. Wright 
entered land from the government and 
developed a farm, residing thereon until 
his death, which occurred when he had 
reached the venerable age of eighty-seven 
years. He was a democrat in his political 
views. His wife had passed away many 
years before. In the family are twelve 
children, seven of whom are living. 
The family record is as follows : Mrs. 
Ward is the eldest. Seabern A., born 
October 9, 1824, is a farmer re- 
siding in Fountain Green township. 
Sen eta D., born October 19, 1826, was a 
prominent fanner of the same township 
but is now deceased. Martha E., who 
was born September 14, 1828, has passed 
away. Patrick W., born August 28, 
1830, is also deceased. Bazil, born Au- 
gust 16, 1832, died at the age of sixteen 
years. Henry D., born July 27, 1834, is 
living in California. Thomas G., born 
May 9, 1836, has departed this life. 
Letha J., born March 14, 1838, Charles 
G., born June 21, 1840, and Cynthia A., 
born September 30, 1844, are all living. 
The youngest of the family died in 
infancv. 



Mrs. Ward was born in Smith county, 
Tennessee, September 24, 1822, and was 
nine years of age when her parents left 
that state and removed to Hopkins 
county, Kentucky, where they lived for 
three years. They then came to Illinois 
in May, 1834. She obtained her educa- 
tion in the early subscription schools of 
the county and remained at home until 
her marriage. She became the mother 
of three children, two of whom are liv- 
ing. Wright, the eldest, a farmer now 
residing in Arkansas, married Elizabeth 
Prior and they have one daughter, Cora, 
who is now the wife of Sanford Francis, 
by whom she has three children. Mark 
Ward, a farmer residing near Memphis, 
Missouri, wedded Letha A. Thurber and 
they have one daughter, Fay. Lorinda 
became the wife of Benton Alton and died 
at the age of forty-four years, leaving a 
daughter, Anna B. 

The death of Mr. Ward occurred Feb- 
ruary 26, 1895, when he was almost 
eighty years of age, and his remains were 
interred in Middle Creek cemetery. He 
voted with the democracy, held member- 
ship in the Christian church and was one 
of the progressive men of his day. His 
life period covered the greater, part of 
the ninteenth century during which time 
he witnessed many changes, including the 
building of the railroads, the introduc- 
tion of the telegraph and telephone 
and the reclamation of the wild lands 
of the west for the purposes of civiliza- 
tion. He did his full share in the work 
of public progress and improvement in 
this county and was known as one of its 
most prominent pioneer citizens. Mrs. 
Ward still survives her husband and lives 



i 7 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



upon the old farm homestead. She too, 
is a representative of one of the oldest 
families of the county and no history of 
this section of the state would be com- 
plete without mention of her. 



LEE SMITH. 

Lee Smith, of Colusa, a son of \Yilliam 
and Mary Ann (Drauch) Smith, was 
born in Pennslyvania April 7, 1863. His 
parents were also natives of the Keystone 
state and the father is a farmer living in 
Monroe county, Pennsylvania, at the age 
of sixty-three years. His wife died in 
1870. They were the parents of four 
children, of whom three are now living: 
Lee, of this review ; Anes, a resident 
of Tioga county, Pennsylvania ; and 
Ephraim, also living in Pennsylvania. 

Lee Smith was educated in the district, 
schools of his native state. When his 
mother died the children of the family 
went to live in various homes of the 
neighborhood and his early opportunities 
were accordingly 'somewhat limited. 
After his school days were over he 
worked by the month as a farm hand for 
about four years and was afterward em- 
ployed in the lumber regions of the north- 
ern part of the state for four years. On 
the 22d of July, 1890, he arrived in Co- 
lusa and through the succeeding year was 
employed by Henry Howard. 

On New Year's eve (December 31, 
1890) Mr. Smith was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Flora Wildrick, who was born 



in Ppntoosuc township, Hancock count}', 
September 14, 1864, a daughter of John 
and Mary (Littlefiar) Robinson. Her 
father was a native of New Jersey and 
her mother was born in Durham county, 
England, in 1822 and came to America 
in 1852. The year 1856 witnessed the 
arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson in 
Hancock count}', and the father began 
farming in Pontoosuc township, where 
he also purchased a mill, carrying on his 
dual occupation until his death, which 
occurred in 1873, when he was fifty-nine 
years of age. He was a democrat in 
politics and a worthy citizen, progressive 
in public affairs and reliable in business. 
Unto John and Mary Robinson were born 
two children, of whom Mrs. Smith is the 
surviving member of the family. Her 
mother \yas twice married and by her 
first husband, Peter Kelly, had four chil- 
dren, of whom two are living : Mary C., 
the wife of James Creswell, of Davenport, 
Iowa ; William, died at Davenport, Sep- 
tember i, 1906; and Michael R., of 
Adrian, Illinois. 

Flora Robinson, reared to womanhood 
in this county, gave her hand in marriage, 
in 1882, to Henry C. Wildrick, who was 
born in Dallas township on a farm of two 
hundred and' forty acres on section 35, 
which is now the property of Mrs. 
Smith and where she and her husband 
still reside. Mr. Wildrick was a son of 
George and Abigail (King) Wildrick, 
well known and representative farming 
people of their community. Henry C. 
Wildrick was a republican in his political 
faith and held a number of township 
offices, to which he was called by the vote 
of his fellow citizens, who recognized his 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



179 



worth and ability. He died September 
28. 1889, respected by all who knew him, 
and his remains were interred in Pleasant 
Hill cemetery. In his business affairs he 
was industrious and enterprising. He 
always lived upon the old home farm of 
the family, and in the care of his property 
displayed sound judgment and keen dis- 
crimination. Moreover he was thor- 
oughly reliable in all trade transactions 
and commanded the confidence and trust 
of all with whom he came in contact. He 
left two children, Roxie Merle and 
George Clayton, the latter, now nineteen 
years of age, at home. The daughter 
died February 19, 1906, at the age of 
twenty-three years, and her remains were 
laid to rest by the side of her father. She 
passed away after three weeks of the most 
intense suffering, occasioned by a clot of 
blood under the knee. All that money, 
professional skill and loving hands could 
do was in vain in staying the hand of the 
grim reaper and this beautiful young 
lady, the only daughter of Mrs. Smith, 
passed from this life. She was a most 
beautiful character, living a life in har- 
mony with the Christian spirit, and re- 
maining firm and steadfast in the faith 
of the church in which she held mem- 
bership. Hers was a happy disposition 
and sunshiny nature. She could readily 
adapt herself to any circumstance or con- 
dition and this trait made her beloved by 
all with whom she came in contact. On 
Saturday an operation was performed 
and on Monday afternoon she passed 
away, perfectly resigned and happy, bid- 
ding mother, father and brother goodby 
with undimmed eyes, and making all 
arrangements for her funeral, selecting 



the following friends to act as pall bear- 
ers : Maggie Bailey, Daisy Lamb, Hope 
Vass, Orpha H. Jamison, Virgie Owings, 
and Maude Jacobs. Six gentlemen acted 
as honary pall bearers : Roscoe Gracey, 
Fred Swanson, Bern Bass, Clarence Jen- 
nison, George Hubbard and Clark 
Jacobs. The funeral service was con- 
ducted by the Rev. J. B. King who paid 
a beautiful and deserved tribute to one 
who was so loved and faithful in her 
home, church, Sunday-school and social 
circles, where she is greatly missed. Rev. 
King said : "There is no death for such 
an experience as hers, and as it is the law 
of Nature that the fairest and worthiest 
forms of life shall most surely survive, 
so we feel that a life, so manifestly sprung 
from God, and nurtured by him as this, 
cannot die but still survives in a still high- 
er development in the beautiful paradise 
of God, by the power of divine right to 
be and live forever and by the pledge of 
the loving Saviour, who conquered 
through faith that we may have a right 
to the tree of life and enter in through 
the gates into the city." The death of 
Roxie Merle Wildrick cast a gloom 
throughout the entire community but her 
memory will long be cherished in the 
hearts of all who knew her and the re- 
membrance of her loving deeds, kind 
ways and many acts of thoughtfulness 
will be a blessing for years to come to 
her mother and the other members of the 
family. 

By the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith there has been born a son William 
Reine, born in Dallas township, Decem- 
ber 8, 1896, and now in school. The res- 
idence now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. 



i8o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Smith and their family was erected by 
her former husband, who made many im- 
provements upon the place, which he in- 
herited from his father. Mr. Smith con- 
tinues the work of development and cul- 
tivation along lines of modern agricul- 
tural progress and is an enterprising busi- 
ness man. His political allegiance is 
given the democracy and he is a mem- 
ber of the Hancock County Mutual In- 
surance Association and of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He was a mem- 
ber of the Dutch Reformed church in 
Pennsylvania. Mrs. Smith is an intelli- 
gent, cultured lady and in the community 
where they reside this worthy couple have 
many warm friends. 



MATTHEW MASON JOHNSON. 

Matthew Mason Johnson, deceased, 
was a stockman who, prospering in his 
undertakings, was accounted one of the 
enterprising business men of Carthage 
and his activity in public affairs made him 
a citizen of value, so that his death, which 
occurred on the 7th of April, .1906, was 
the occasion of deep and widespread re- 
gret among his many friends in Hancock 
county. He was born in Champaign 
county, Ohio, in 1843, his parents being 
John T. and Maria (Wright) Johnson. 
The grandfather, the great-grandfather 
and the great-great-grandfather, were all 
soldiers of the Revolutionary war and the 
same spirit of loyalty and military ardor 
was displayed by various cousins of our 



subject in the Civil war, while his brother, 
J. N. Johnson, was a soldier of the One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Infantry 
during the last year of the strife between 
the north and the south, being stationed 
most of the time at Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. 

John T. Johnson was born in Cham- 
paign county, Ohio, in 1813, and his wife 
was born about eight miles from St. 
Louis, Missouri, in 1818. He was a 
farmer by occupation and on coming to 
Hancock county, Illinois, in 1839, settled 
near St. Mary. He had to clear the land 
in order to have space enough on which 
to build a log cabin. He was the first 
man to move onto the prairie, for the pio- 
neers in those days always settled near the 
timber. As the years passed he improved 
his property, building a fine barn, good 
sheds and a modern residence. As the 
years passed he prospered, becoming one 
of the most extensive land owners of the 
county and when he died, in 1883. his 
possessions aggregated eighteen hundred 
acres of land now worth one hundred 
dollars per acre. His wife died in 1898 
and they sleep side by side in the cemetery 
at St. Mary. Mr. Johnson was a repub- 
lican who held various township offices, 
for his fellow citizens recognized his 
worth and ability and thus gave evidence 
of their confidence in him. They were 
believers in the Baptist faith and Mr. 
Johnson held various offices in the church. 
Their family numbered eight children, of 
whom five are yet living : Matthew M. ; 
Hiram B. and Joseph T., both residents 
of Plymouth, Illinois; J. N., who is living 
on the old family homestead ; and Aurilla, 
the wife of J. W. Botts, who resides upon 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



181 



the prairie farm which was originally 
owned by her parents. 

Matthew M. Johnson attended the pub- 
lic schools of St. Mary and was after- 
ward a student in Abingdon (Illinois) 
Hedding's College. Before attaining his 
majority he was married, in 1863, to Miss 
Mary Bacon, who was born in 1843 in 
McDonough county, Illinois, a daughter 
of Larkin and Honor (Durbin) Bacon. 
Her parents were of southern extraction, 
the father born in Tennessee and the 
mother in Kentucky. Mr. Bacon came to 
Illinois at a very early day, settling on a 
farm in McDonough county in 1834. It 
was wild and uncultivated land but he 
converted it into a productive farm and 
there he died in 1877, having for several 
years survived his wife, who passed away 
in February, 1864. Both were buried 
near Hill's Grove in McDonough county. 
Isaac Bacon, the paternal great-grand- 
father of Mrs. Johnson, was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier and Joseph Barnes Bacon, 
her grandfather, was a captain in a Ten- 
nessee regiment in the war of 1812. Her 
father was an unfaltering advocate of 
democracy, but though always loyal to 
the party, never aspired to public office. 
He and his wife held membership in the 
Methodist church, in which he served as 
steward, while for many years he was 
superintendent of the Sunday-school, fill- 
ing that office at the time of his death. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bacon had ten children, of 
whom eight reached adult age, while five 
still survive, namely : Mrs. Johnson ; 
Sarah, who is the widow of Judge Tunni- 
cliff, of Macomb. Illinois, and now re- 
sides at No. 6018 Jackson Park avenue. 
Chicago : Dr.. Joseph B. Bacon, a surgeon 



of St. Francis Hospital of Macomb, Illi- 
nois; James H. Bacon, president of the 
Pacific Coast Trust Company of San 
Francisco, California; and Harvey M. 
Bacon, vice president of the Pacific Coast 
Trust Company with offices at No. 708 
Market street, San Francisco. The father 
prospered in business and at his death left 
fourteen hundred and thirty-six acres of 
land. 

Mrs. Johnson was a student in Hed- 
ding College at Abingdon, Illinois, at 
the same time Mr. Johnson attended 
there. They had been reared within six 
miles of each other, but it was in their 
college days that their friendship ripened 
into love and' was followed by marriage. 
They began their domestic life on the old 
Deming farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, which was given Mr. Johnson by 
his father and which is still in possession 
of the family. There they resided for 
seventeen years, after which they spent 
two years in Hill's Grove, but later re- 
turned to St. Mary and purchased and im- 
proved another farm, whereon they re- 
sided until 1893. In that year they took 
up their abode in Carthage. Mr. Johnson 
purchasing a pretty home at the corner 
of Walnut and Washington streets. 
After his removal to the city he engaged 
in business as a stockman, buying and 
selling cattle on an extensive scale. He 
also belonged to the Cattle Exchange and 
his business interests were carefully con- 
ducted and netted him a very gratifying 
profit. 

Mr. Johnson was a soldier of the Civil 
war, enlisting in the Seventy-first Illinois 
Infantry. For a time he was in the hos- 
pital at Cairo. Although reared in the 



1 82 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



republican faith he was independent in his 
political views. He served as supervisor, 
school director and road trustee and 
several years ago acted as alderman of 
Carthage for two years. His name was 
on the membership rolls of the Masonic 
fraternity, the Modern Woodmen camp 
and the Grand Army Post, of all of which 
he was a worthy representative. His 
widow is one of the charter members and 
a director of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, belongs to the Woman's 
Relief Corps and to the Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson were devoted members of 
the Methodist church, in which he held 
all of the offices. Mrs. Johnson was a 
steward in the church for twelve years, 
or until she reared a son to take her place. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were born 
four children, of whom three are now liv- 
ing: Drenon M., born in Hancock 
county, July 4, 1864, is a farmer of this 
county. He married Miss Ella A. Can- 
non, of this county, December 28, 1887, 
and has a daughter, Ruth M. John 
Bacon, born March 4, 1866, in this 
county, is a stockman and cattle feeder, 
carrying on business near Carthage. He 
was married to Stella Walker, of this 
county, October 18, 1894. Damon J., 
born January n, 1872, is a real estate 
dealer of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He 
was graduated from the Northwestern 
University at Evanston, Illinois, in 1892, 
and on returning to Carthage read law 
with Berry Brothers and Judge Mack. 
In 1898, he enlisted for service in the 
Spanish-American war in the Fiftieth 
Iowa Infantry. He became a corporal 
and served for seven months. In 1899 



he enlisted in the Thirty-second United 
States Volunteers and went to the Philip- 
pines, where he remained for two years, 
being mustered out as sergeant, May 9, 
1901. He was wounded in the knee at 
the first battle of Angeles and was in- the 
hospital for a long time. Mr. Johnson 
was a representative of a prominent pio- 
neer family of Illinois, as is his wife. 
Their respective parents were in limited 
circumstances on coming to this state but 
by wise investment in land and carefully 
directed business affairs became wealthy. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had a wide 
acquaintance in Hancock county and were 
gladly received in those homes where in- 
telligence and culture are accepted as the 
passports into good society. When called 
to his final rest the funeral services were 
conducted at his home in Carthage by 
his pastor, Rev. Edwards, of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, assisted by Rev. 
Young, pastor of the Presbyterian church. 
At the conclusion of the services the re- 
mains, escorted by the Masonic lodge and 
Alexander Sympson post, G. A. R., were 
conveyed to Moss Ridge cemetery, the 
interment being made under the auspices 
of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Johnson 
was highly respected throughout the 
county, where he had a wide acquaintance 
and all who knew him gave him their 
friendship and regard. While taking an 
active part in politics and holding radical 
views on many of the questions of the day, 
he probably had as few political enemies 
as any man of equal political prominence. 
As a citizen he was public spirited and 
his co-operation could be counted upon 
for the betterment of conditions in mu- 
nicipal and county affairs. His life was 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



183 



upright and honorable, characterized by 
high moral principles and many admirable 
qualities, by a benevolent spirit and hu- 
manitarian disposition. All who knew 
him recognized his many good traits of 
character, but his best qualities were re- 
served for his own home and fireside, 
where he was a most devoted husband 
and father. 



OBITUARY. 

Matthew Mason Johnson, son of the 
late John T. and Maria Johnson, was 
born July 7, 1843, near Urbana, Ohio, 
and died April 7, 1906, aged sixty-two 
years and nine months. 

He came with his parents in infancy 
to a farm in St. Mary's township, Han- 
cock county, Illinois, where he resided 
until 1893, when he became a resident of 
Carthage, Illinois. 

He was married to Mary A. Bacon, 
of Hills Grove, McDonough county, Illi- 
nois, on October 27, 1863. To this union 
were born four sons : Drenon M. and 
John B., of this city; Damon J., of Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and George L., who 
died in infancy. The widow, three sons, 
one granddaughter, three brothers, Hi- 
ram, Joseph and Nelson, one sister, Mrs. 
Orilla Botts and many other relatives and 
friends mourn his departure. 

He was converted and united with 
the Methodist Episcopal church at St. 
Marys, Illinois, in the year 1871, of which 
church he remained a member until he 
transferred his membership to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church of Carthage. 

A few weeks before his death he ex- 
12 



pressed his belief that his time on earth 
was drawing to a close and that he was 
prepared to meet his God. While on a 
visit to the old neighborhood with his 
brothers and sister, he died very suddenly 
at the home of his brother, Nelson. 

He was a member of the Masonic lodge 
of Carthage, "Grand Army of the Re- 
public" and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

The funeral was held at the residence 
Monday at 2 p. m., conducted by Rev. 
Edwards, pastor of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, assisted by Rev. Young, 
pastor of the Presbyterian church. 

At the conclusion of the services the 
remains, escorted by the Masonic lodge 
and Alexander Sympson Post, G. A. R., 
of this city, were conveyed to Moss Ridge 
and placed in the vault, the last sad rites 
being conducted by the Masons. 

The floral offerings were very profuse 
and beautiful, noticeable among them be- 
ing a wheel with one felloe missing from 
the Stockman's club of this city of which 
deceased was an honored member. He 
carried $4,000 insurance, $2,000 in the 
Modern Woodmen of America and 
$2,000 in the Banker's Life of Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

Deceased was a man highly respected 
all over the county, throughout which he 
had a wide acquaintance and his friends 
were limited only by his acquaintances. 
While taking an active part in politics 
and was rather radical in his views, he 
had probably as few political enemies as 
any man of equal political prominence. 
As a citizen he was public-spirited and 
in speech and in deeds was always con- 
sistently in favor of any movement look- 



1 84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ing to the betterment of conditions in 
municipal or county affairs. 

He was a man of clean morals and 
possessed many admirable qualities, al- 
ways willing to lend a helping hand to 
those in need and as a husband and father 
was an example worthy of emulation, and 
the entire community mourns with the 
sorrowing fanlily in the loss sustained 
through his death. 



JOHN S. COCHRAN. 

John S. Cochran, editor and proprietor 
of the Hancock County Journal, which 
is the largest paper published in the 
county, has since 1894 been thus con- 
nected with the newspaper interests of 
Carthage, where he is also conducting a 
good job printing establishment. He is 
one of the native sons'of the county seat, 
born March 14, 1873, his parents being 
L. B. and Emily (Symonds) Cochran. 
The father was born in Kentucky in 1844 
and the mother's birth occurred in New 
Hampshire in 1846. At a very early day 
Mr. Cochran came to Hancock county 
and for a long period was identified with 
business interests in Carthage as a mer- 
chant. He enlisted in Company D of the 
Sixteenth Illinois Regiment in the Civil 
war and served throughout the period of 
hostilities, taking part in a number of im- 
portant engagements, the most sangui- 
nary of which was the battle of Mission- 
ary Ridge. For a time he was engaged 
in recruiting service in Hancock county. 
In his political affiliation Mr. Cochran has 



always been a stalwart republican and for 
twelve years served as postmaster of 
Carthage, beginning about 1870. Before 
their marriage both he and his wife were 
teachers in the first public school in 
Carthage and the building is still stand- 
ing on Wabash avenue and Fayette street. 
In his fraternal relations Mr. Cochran is 
a Mason and passed all of the chairs in 
the local lodge. His wife is a member of 
the Presbyterian church. Her parents 
were Rev. Frederick and Abbie Symonds, 
the former a minister of the gospel, while 
he and his family were among the found- 
ers of the Presbyterian church in Car- 
thage. In the family of Rev. Symonds 
were seven children, five of whom are 
now living : Sarah, the widow .of J. W. 
Hawley, of Holton, Kansas ; Edwin, who 
died in Chicago about a year ago, his 
family, however, still living in this 
county ; Mary, the widow of J. W. Haw- 
ley, who was congressman from the old 
fourteenth, or Rock Island, district of Illi- 
nois and was comptroller of currency at 
Washington during the Hayes adminis- 
tration. His widow is now living in 
Omaha, Nebraska. Emily S. is the wife 
of L. B. Cochran. Judge W. A. Symonds 
is living in Carthage. A. F. Symonds 
makes his home in Peabody, Kansas, and 
John died while serving in the Civil war 
as a member of the regiment commanded 
by Major McClaughrey. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. L. B. Cochran were born four chil- 
dren : Mary, the wife of Professor R. C. 
Crum, of Quincy, Illinois; Isabella, a 
popular teacher of Sioux City, Iowa ; 
Robert, who died in 1891, at the age of 
twenty years and was buried in Carthage 
cemetery; and John S., of this review. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



185 



At the usual age John S. Cochran 
entered the public schools and passed 
thnnigh successive grades until he com- 
pleted the high school course and after- 
ward studied in Carthage College. He 
was later associated in the newspaper 
business with his father for a year or so, 
they purchasing the Journal in 1892. In 
1894, Mr Cochran bought his father's 
interest and is still engaged in the publi- 
cation of the Hancock County Journal, 
which is a weekly paper and the largest 
published in the county, being the official 
organ of the Republican party. Its cir- 
culation exceeds that of any other news- 
paper and it is well worthy the public 
patronage, being conducted along modern 
lines of journalism. The office is on 
Wabash avenue and in connection with 
the department for the publication of the 
paper he also conducts a large job print- 
ing department and has a good patronage 
in this line. 

On the 28th of June, 1898, Mr. Coch- 
ran was united in marriage to Miss Emily 
M. Johnson, who was born in Omaha, 
Nebraska. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cochran 
has been born a little daughter, Sarah 
Evelyn, who was born in Carthage, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1902. 

In his political views Mr. Cochran is a 
republican and has been city clerk of 
Carthage. He has been greatly and 
actively interested in local and county 
politics and has continuously served on 
some committee in connection with the 
management of the party affairs. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Knights 
of Pythias and the Court of Honor. He 
has in Carthage erected several houses, 
all of which he has sold with the excep- 



tion of the last one, which he built at the 
corner of Locust street and Quincy road. 
He is an active, energetic man and is 
very prosperous for one of his years. 
His success moreover is attributable to his 
own labors and keen business discernment. 
He is a young man of strong intelligence, 
who has been a student of the signs of 
the times relating to business and polit- 
ical development and he stands for prog- 
ress and improvement atxall times. Both 
he and his wife are consistent and helpful 
members of the Presbyterian church. 



DR. BRIGGS JUDD FULLER. 

Briggs Judd Fuller, formerly identified 
with the dental profession of Hancock 
county but now living retired in Warsaw, 
is a native of Lee, Berkshire county, 
Massachusetts, his birth having there oc- 
curred on the 8th of December, 1843. His 
father, Albert Fuller, came to this county 
in 1856, and here spent his remaining 
days, his death having occurred February 
6, 1880. His widow", who bore the 
maiden name of Julia Judd, still survives 
and now makes her home with her son, 
Briggs J., in Warsaw. 

Dr. Fuller was a lad of twelve years 
when he accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Hancock county, and in the 
schools of Warsaw acquired his early 
education. In 1864 he enlisted for ser- 
vice in the army, joining a company which 
was organized at Warsaw and which was 
mustered in for service at Quincy. The 



1 86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



company was assigned to duty with the 
Army of the Tennessee and at once went 
to Memphis, where, in the first battle in 
which Dr. Fuller was engaged he was 
captured and taken as a prisoner of war 
to Cahaba, Alabama, to Castle Morgan 
prison, and then went to Vicksburg, 
where he was parolled and where he was 
granted a furlough and went to Spring- 
field, being there mustered out of service. 

Choosing the profession of dentistry 
as a life work, he entered the Missouri 
Dental College, at St. Louis, from which 
he was graduated in 1871 with the degree 
of D. D. S. He afterward pursued a 
course in the St. Louis Medical College. 
Following his graduation he returned to 
his home in this city, where he opened 
an office and successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession for a number 
of years in Warsaw, since which time 
he has lived retired, now making his 
home with his mother and' sister in this 
city. He has here formed a very wide 
acquaintance both professionally and so- 
cially and is highly esteemed, for he has 
ever been straightforward and honorable 
in every relation of life. 

A brother, Dr. Albert Homer Fuller, 
was also in the Civil war, and enlisted in 
1862, and served for three years. He 
resides in St. Louis, Missouri, where he 
is a practicing dentist. He was for many 
years Dean of Missouri Dental College 
of Washington University, at St. Louis, 
Missouri, but has now retired from the 
college. While connected with the col- 
lege his work was very satisfactory, not 
only to the faculty, but also to the stu- 
dents, many of whom have become 
distinguished. 



JAMES W. McKEE. 

James W. McKee, now living retired in 
Carthage, was born in Ohio, near Ripler, 
April 30, 1840. His father, James McKee ,1 
Sr., was born in McKeesport, Pennsylva-I 
nia, in 1777, and removed to Ohio when? 
about thirty-five years of age, after which 
he regularly visited his old home in Penn- j 
sylvania once a year, walking one way 
and riding horseback the other way. He j 
was an enterprising farmer and a diligent 
man, whose life was always characterized 
by integrity in all business transactions. I 
He served his country as a soldier in the I 
war of 1812 and his life at all times coii-1 
formed to a high standard of conduct. I 
He was married twice and there were 
ten children by the first marriage and 
nine by the second, while his second wife 
had five children by a prior marriage. 
One of the sons, Nathaniel McKee, was 
a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting in 
the Seventh Missouri Cavalry under , 
Captain Miller. 

James W. McKee spent the days of 
his boyhood and youth in Ohio, and at 
the age of seventeen years came to Illi- 
nois with his parents, settling on a farm 
in Carthage township, where he owned 
one hundred acres. He has followed 
general farming and stock-raising for 
many years, giving his attention to that 
calling until 1895, when he retired. He 
made good and substantial improvements 
upon his land, placing the fields under a 
high state of cultivation, adding modern 
improvements and using the latest im- 
proved machinery for plowing, planting 
and harvesting. As the years passed he 
prospered in his undertakings and in 1895 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



187 



; he removed to Carthage, where he built 
I a modern home on Schofield street and 
is now spending the evening of life in 
comfort, for in former years he acquired 
a competence sufficient to supply him with 
the necessities and many of the luxuries 
of life. October 13, 1859, Mr. McKee 
was married to Miss Margaret Weir, who 
was born in Washington county, Indiana, 
August 2i, 1840, a daughter of George 
Weir, who was a successful farmer. 
George Weir, one of the sons, was a sol- 
dier of the Civil war, enlisting in the 
One Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois In- 
fantry, and died while in service, becoming 
ill at Jefferson Barracks. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Weir have passed away. Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. McKee have become the par- 
ents of five children, who are now liv- 
ing. Ida is the wife of Edward Arm- 
strong, who occupies a position in the 
postoffice in Chicago, and they have three 
children, Ruth, Edna and Harry. Albert 
Nathaniel is proprietor of a grocery store 
in Carthage. Margaret is the wife of 
Emanuel Gildner, a wholesale clothing 
merchant of Chicago. Effie is the wife 
of Charles Peirson, of Chicago, and Maud 
is also in Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. McKee are loyal and 
consistent members of the Presbyterian 
church, in which he has served as an elder. 
They take a very active and helpful part 
in church work and Mrs. McKee has been 
president of the Ladies' Aid Society. 
They have a pleasant home in Carthage, 
and in addition to this property Mr. Mc- 
Kee owns a house, which he rents and 
also two large farms in the county, one 
in Carthage township and one in Hancock 
township, from which he derives a grati- 



fying income. In a review of his life it 
will be seen that he had no assistance 
when he started upon his business career 
but the spirit of self-help is the source of 
all genuine worth in the individual, and 
placing his reliance on the substantial 
qualities of industry and close application, 
Mr. McKee worked his way steadily up- 
ward until he reached the plane of afflu- 
ence. Industry and economy constitute a 
safe basis on which to build prosperity a 
fact which he early recognized and which 
he has utilized in his business career. His 
political allegiance is given to the Repub- 
lican party and he served as road com- 
missioner and as school director for a 
number of years. Both he and his wife 
are pleasant, genial people, interested in 
all that pertains to the welfare of their 
city and state and to the interests of 
mankind, and they number their friends 
in Carthage and Hancock county by the 
score. 



ALBERT NATHANIEL McKEE. 

Albert Nathaniel McKee, engaged in 
the grocery business in Carthage, was 
born in Hancock county, in 1864, a son 
of James W. and Margaret (Weir) Mc- 
Kee, who are represented elsewhere in 
this work. His education was acquired 
in the district schools and he entered upon 
his business career as proprietor of a res- 
taurant in Carthage, which he conducted 
for a year. He then accepted a position 
as fireman on the Chicago, Burlington & 
Ouincy Railroad, being thus employed for 



1 88 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



three years, after which he was a brake- 
man for a year on the Keokuk & Western 
Railroad. He next went to Quincy, Illi- 
nois, spending a year in the Electric 
Wheel Works, after which he returned to 
Carthage, where he devoted the succeed- 
ing year to looking after various prop- 
erties. Going to Chicago he operated a 
motor car of the Chicago City Railway 
Company for eight years, and on the expi- 
ration of that period he removed to Ren- 
nick, Missouri, where he devoted three 
years to farming. He next went to 
Moberly, Missouri, where he was em- 
ployed in a machine shop for about a year. 
In 1905 he returned to Carthage and pur- 
chaged the corner property on Schofield 
and Buchanan streets, opening the only 
grocery store in the northern part of the 
city. He has a well appointed store, car- 
rying a carefully selected line of staple 
and fancy groceries and also a well se- 
lected stock of muslins, prints, notions 
and novelties, it being a great convenience 
to the entire neighborhood to have such 
an establishment in their midst. 

On the 28th of August, 1889, Mr. Mc- 
Kee was married to Miss Alice Yetter, 
who was born September 21, 1867, in 
Carthage township, Hancock county, a 
daughter of S. R. and Hester (Halbert) 
Yetter. The father was born in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, in 1824, and 
the mother in Kentucky, in 1836. Mr. 
Yetter was "a farmer by occupation and 
was only twelve years of age when 
brought to Illinois, where he has devoted 
his life to agricultural pursuits. He still 
lives on his farm but is now practically 
living retired. His political allegiance is 
given to the Republican party and he has 



served as justice of the peace for many 
years, proving a fair and impartial of- 
ficer. Fraternally he is a Mason. In his 
family were ten children, of whom seven 
are now living, as follows : Laura, the 
wife of Lewis Tull, a resident of Berke- 
ley, California; Mary, the wife of Rich- 
ard White, of Carthage, who is men- 
tioned elesewhere in this volume; John 
C., of Carthage; Charles, who is living, 
in Beardstown, Illinois; Alice, now Mrs. 
McKee; Margaret, the wife of P. H. 
Willey, of Peabody, Kansas; and Ralph, 
at home. Mr. and Mrs. Yetter are de- 
voted members of the Methodist church 
and in his younger years he filled at 
different times all of the church offices. 
They are people of the highest respecta- 
bility, their upright, honorable lives hav- 
ing gained for them the esteem and con- 
fidence of all with whom they have been 
associated. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. McKee 
has been blessed with four children. 
Earl, who was born October 23, 1890, 
in Keokuk, Iowa, and is attending the 
high school ; Ray, who was born in Keo- 
kuk, in 1892; Helen, born in Chicago, in 
1895 ; and Harold, who was born in Chi- 
cago in 1896, and died in 1897, being 
laid to rest in Moss Ridge cemetery at 
Carthage. The three living children are 
all in school, the parents giving to them 
good educational privileges. Mr. and 
Mrs. McKee are faithful members of the 
Presbyterian church and he belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen camp and to the Chi- 
cago Mutual Aid, while his political al- 
legiance is given to the Republican party. 
He has depended upon his own resources 
from an early age and whatever success 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



189 



he has achieved has resulted from his 
perseverance, labor and ready adaptabil- 
ity. He has attained a creditable meas- 
ure of success for one of his years and 
is now proprietor of a good store, in 
which he is enjoying a large patronage. 
He is located on a very pretty corner 
which he has improved by the erection of 
a handsome and commodious modern 
residence on Schofield street adjoining the 
store and he contemplates building a new 
store building in the near future. He is 
courteous and accommodating and his 
business is constantly growing. He pos- 
sesses laudable ambition and energy and 
his wife has been of much assistance to 
him. 



FREDERICK W. MEYER. 

Frederick W. Meyer, who is living in 
Walker township, was born in Adams 
county, Illinois, January 18, 1856, and is 
of German lineage. His parents, Got- 
lieb and Henrietta Yetter (Homer) 
Meyer, were both natives of the father- 
land. The former, born in 1829, died in 
1895, but Mrs. Meyer is still living at the 
home in Adams county. He was a 
farmer, and in 1854 crossed the Atlantic 
to the new world, making the voyage in 
a sailing vessel, which was three weeks 
in reaching the American port. Unto 
him and his wife -were born eight chil- 
dren : Caroline, the wife of Gotlieb 
Roskamp, of Walker township; F. W., 
of this review ; Fredericka, the wife of 
Ernest Distlehorst, of Horton; Augusta. 



the wife of Henry Slitman, of Adams 
county, Illinois; Louisa, the wife of Ed 
Cook, of Mendon, this state; Emma, the 
wife of James Knox, of Adams county; 
Anna, at home; and Gotlieb, who for 
eight years was in the Philippine Islands, 
but is now in St. Louis, Missouri. 

F. W. Meyer pursued his education in 
the public schools of Quincy, Illinois, and 
at Fowler, this state. In his youth he 
largely assisted his father in the work of 
the home farm and eventually began earn- 
ing his living by working as a farm hand 
for two months in the employ of Mr. 
Buckeder. He was married in 1883 to 
Miss Minnie Althede, who was born in an 
old log house standing on the farm which 
is now the home of Mr. Meyer. Her 
natal year was 1860, and her parents were 
Gotlieb and Rickie (Hocker) Althede, 
both natives of Germany. Her father 
provided for his family by following 
farming and feeding stock in Walker 
township for many years but in early life 
he learned and followed the tailor's trade. 
He died in 1902, and his widow is now 
living at her daughter's, Mrs. Wiebrock, 
in Walker township. Mr., Althede served 
in the German army in his native country 
and was also a soldier of the Civil war 
in this country for eight months. In his 
family were six children who are yet liv- 
ing: Fred, who resides in Wythe town- 
ship; Mrs. Meyer; Henry and Gotlieb, 
who are farmers of Walker township; 
Mrs. Carrie Wiebrock, of Walker town- 
ship; and John, living in the same town- 
ship. 

About a year after his marriage Mr. 
Meyer purchased his present farm home 
of his father-in-law, and now has eighty 



190 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



acres on section 4, Walker township. He 
built his present residence in 1892, taking 
possession on the I4th of June. In 1888 
he built a good barn thirty-two by forty- 
four feet and has also put up other sub- 
stantial buildings on the place. He like- 
wise owns eighty-three acres of land near 
Hamilton, Illinois, which is improved, 
and sixty-two acres of pasture land in 
Bear Creek township, beside a store build- 
ing in Sutter which is occupied by Wil- 
liam Shipe, and two houses in Sutter 
which he rents. His attention is" mainly 
given to general agricultural pursuits and 
stock-raising, and upon his place he has 
a young orchard of six acres of peaches 
and apples, only about three years old. 
He is entirely a self-made man, who 
started out in life in limited circumstances. 
In his earlier years he practiced frugality 
and industry and as the result of his 
earnest labor he and his wife are now 
enabled to enjoy many of the comforts 
which go to make life worth living. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Meyer have been 
born eleven children, of whom nine sur- 
vive : Lydia, the wife of Charles Mur- 
ray, who lives on her father's farm near 
Hamilton, by whom she has two daugh- 
ters, Elise and Edna ; Carrie, the wife of 
Gotlieb Humke, of Wythe township; 
Alice, who is with her parents; George, 
eighteen years of age, at home; Bertha, 
Rosa. Sophia, Dora and Sadie, all yet 
under the parental roof. 

Mr. Meyer is a republican, inflexible 
in support of the principles of his party 
yet without aspiration for office. Both 
he and his wife are members of the Ger- 
man church and are intelligent, well re- 
spected citizens. He is now quite an ex- 



tensive landowner and all his property 
has been acquired through his own efforts. 
It is a record of which he has every reason 
to be proud and it shows what may be 
accomplished in this country where labor 
is unhampered by caste or class and 
where opportunity is open to all. 



FRED N. MILBY. 

Fred N. Milby, editor and proprietor 
of the Carthage Weekly Democrat, has 
made a notable success for one of his 
years, and in his career as a journalist 
has kept abreast with the modern prog- 
ress which has been manifest in late years 
in the newspaper field. He is a native 
son of Hancock county, having been born 
near Carthage, March 15, 1873, his par- 
ents being David W. and Catherine 
(Curry) Milby. The father was born in 
Delaware, July 12. 1831, and the 
mother's birth ocurred in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, March 13, 1834. Mr. Milby was 
a farmer by occupation and was brought 
to Illinois in his childhood days, settling 
with his parents at Rushville in Schuyler 
county, whence he came to Hancock 
county about thirty-five years ago. He 
died in Carthage, December 22, 1895, 
respected by all who knew him and his 
remains were interred in Moss Ridge 
cemetery. His political views were in 
harmony with the principles of democ- 
racy. His wife, a member of the Chris- 
tian church, is now living with her son 
Fred. They had a family of seven chil- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



191 



dren, all of whom yet survive, namely : 
Albert B., residing near Tulip, Missouri; 
Jennie, the wife of Perry Fancher, resid- 
ing in Carthage Missouri ; Laura, living 
with her mother; Thomas G., of Car- 
thage; Anna D., the wife of E. L. Yates, 
of Perkins, Oklahoma ; Fred M. ; and 
Carrie M., who is assisting her brother 
Fred in his office. Thomas J. Curry, a 
brother of Mrs. David W. Milby, was a 
soldier in the Civil war, serving through- 
out the period of hostilities as captain of 
Company C, One Hundred and Eight- 
eenth Volunteer Infantry. Two other 
brothers, James and Duncan Curry, were 
also members of the same regiment, so 
that the family was well represented in 
the army. 

In the public schools of Carthage Fred 
X. Milby acquired his education and after- 
ward learned the printer's trade, which 
he followed in this city as an employe until 
1899, when he established a printing of- 
fice of his own in the Quinby Block on 
Jefferson street. He is also editor and 
proprietor of the Carthage Weekly Demo- 
crat, a paper which has a large circulation 
in the city and county. This is one of 
the strong democratic organs of the 
county and in connection with its publi- 
cation he also conducts a prosperous job- 
bing printing business, having an office 
well equipped for turning out first class 
work, so that a liberal patronage is ac- 
corded him. 

On the 29th of November, 1900, Mr. 
Milby was married to Miss Mabel G. 
Linn, who was born in West Point, Illi- 
nois in 1883, a daughter of George W. 
and Irene (Browning) Linn. Her father 
was a native of Adams county, Illinois, 



and the mother was also born in this 
state. Mr. Linn is a blacksmith by trade 
and followed that pursuit until his death, 
which occurred January 4, 1905. His 
wife had passed away in July, 1896, and 
they were buried near West Point, Illi- 
nois. His political allegiance was given 
to the Republican party. Mrs. Milby 
was the youngest of their family of four 
children, the others being George H., 
of Carthage; Cora G., the wife of Ed- 
ward Fletcher; and Nora. All are still 
residents of Carthage. Mr. Milby pur- 
chased a pretty home on Locust and 
Washington streets, where he now resides 
and unto him and his wife have been born 
two children, Katharine Irene and Ken- 
neth Richmond, the former born Decem- 
ber 22, 1901, and the latter June 10, 1905. 
Kenneth died March u, 1906. In con- 
nection with his home property Mr. Milby 
also owns several vacant lots in Carthage 
and a business house. The spirit of self- 
help is the source of all true worth in 
the individual and it has been the domi- 
nant factor in the life record of Mr. Milby 
who had no assistance as he entered upon 
the task of providing for his own support 
and making for himself a place in busi- 
ness circles. His upright life, his energy 
and the exercise of his native talents con- 
stitute the material from which he has 
builded his present prosperity and he has 
won a creditable place for one of his 
years, while his talents bespeak for him 
still greater achievements in the future. 
He takes a most active interest in public 
affairs and as a private citizen and 
through the columns of his paper as well, 
he labors effectively for the welfare of his 
city and county. He has always been a 



192 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



champion of the democracy and is con- 
nected with Knights of Pythias fraternity, 
exemplifying in his life its beneficent 
spirit. 

Mr. Milby has erected a fine business 
building on the east side of the square, 
and the second story is now the home of 
the Democrat, the first story being used 
as a store. 



WILLIAM A. SYMONDS. 

William A. Symonds, who is now serv- 
ing for the fifth term as justice of the 
peace in Carthage, is one of the represen- 
tative citizens of the county. Few men 
are more widely known in Carthage, for 
he has been an important factor in pro- 
fessional, political and church circles and 
his popularity is well deserved, as in him 
are embraced the characteristics of an 
unbending integrity, unabating energy 
and industry that never flags. He is public 
spirited and thoroughly interested in 
whatever tends to promote the moral, in- 
tellectual and material welfare of the 
county. 

A native of New Hampshire, William 
A. Symonds was born in Hillsborough 
county on the 3ist of October, 1844, his 
parents being Frederick W. and Abbie 
(Lawton) Symonds. The father was also 
bom in Hillsborough county and the 
mother's birth occurred in one of the 
eastern states. Coming to Illinois in 
1847, Frederick W. Symonds settled near 
Carthage and carried on general agricul- 
tural pursuits up to the time of his death. 



Both he and his wife passed way in 1853 
and were buried in the Carthage cemetery. 
In their family were seven children, of 
whom five are yet living. Two of the 
sons were soldiers of the Civil war. Ed- 
win K. enlisted for three years in the One 
Hundred and Nineteenth Illinois Infantry 
and continued with the army until the 
close of hostilities. He died a few yeavs 
ago. John L. Symonds, who was a mem- 
ber of the One Hundred and Eighteenth 
Illinois Infantry, became ill while in the 
service and died near Vicksburg. Wil- 
liam L. Rand, a cousin of Judge Symonds, 
was also a member of the One Hundred 
and Eighteenth Illinois Infantry and now 
lives in Carthage. Another relative, L. 
B. Cochran, a husband of Emily S. Sy- 
monds, served throughout the war in the 
Sixteenth Illinois Infantry and is now in 
Missouri. John B. Hawley, who married 
Mary F. Symonds, another sister, also 
served in an Illinois regiment and was a 
captain of his company. He took part 
in the battle of Fort Donelson and lost 
his health there on account of exposure 
and had to resign and practiced law at 
Rock Island, Illinois, and was elected 
congressman from that district. He 
served as assistant secretary of treasury 
under Sherman. An old shot gun which 
was used by an ancestor in the Revolu- 
tionary war is still in possession of the 
Symonds family. 

Judge Symonds of this review, being 
brought to Hancock county when only 
three years of age, was educated in the 
public schools of Carthage and also at- 
tended college in Jacksonville, Illinois, for 
a year. He afterward engaged in teach- 
ing school for several years in this county, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



193 



but in the fall of 1864 put aside his pro- 
fessional duties and personal interests in 
order to espouse the Union cause, enlist- 
ing when twenty years of age as a mem- 
ber of the One Hundred and Forty-sixth 
Infantry, with which he continued until 
peace was restored. He then returned 
to Carthage and again taught school, 
while later he devoted his summer months 
to farming and in the winter seasons con- 
tinued in the profession of teaching. In 
1869 he took up the study of law with 
David Mack as his preceptor, reading 
with him for two years and afterward 
practicing with him for a similar period. 
He then entered upon practice alone in 
Carthage, being city attorney for two 
years when the city abolished saloons, and 
followed his profession for several years, 
when on account of ill health he retired 
from active practice and turned his at- 
tention to farming, believing that the out- 
door life would prove beneficial. Grad- 
ually, however, he resumed his law work 
and throughout much of an active busi- 
ness career his attention has been given 
to the practice of law in probate court, 
but principally in settling of estates. 

In his political views Judge Symonds 
has always been a stanch republican, sup- 
porting the party since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. In 1874 he 
was chosen school clerk and continued 
in the office until his removal to the farm. 
Later he was again appointed to the same 
position and was treasurer of the school 
board for twelve or fifteen years, although 
his service was not consecutive. He is 
now filling for the fifth term the position 
of justice of the peace, so that his in- 
cumbency covers almost twenty years. 



For many years he has been public ad- 
ministrator of the county. He has also 
been notary public throughout his con- 
nection with the Hancock county bar and 
no public trust reposed in him has ever 
been betrayed in the slightest degree. In 
connection with his business affairs and 
official duties he has also been insurance 
agent for many years. 

- Mr. Symonds was married November 
26, 1878,10 Miss Mary Spangler, a daugh- 
ter of William M. and Sarah E. Span- 
gler, whose sketch is also in this review. 
Five sisters of the family are still living. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Symonds have been 
born seven children, all natives of Car- 
thage : The eldest, Abbie, died in infancy, 
the rest are: Frederick W., who was 
twenty-two years of age on the loth of 
January, 1906, is a graduate of the Car- 
thage high school and is now studying 
engineering under the direction of Scran- 
ton (Pennsylvania) Correspondence 
School. Emily Clare, also a high school 
graduate, is now assisting her father in 
his office. James S. is a high school 
student. Raymond H., Mary E. and John 
H., the youngest now nine years of age, 
are all in school. Mr. and Mrs. Symonds 
reside in the southwest part of the city 
and since purchasing his home he has 
remodeled both the exterior and interior 
and now has a very comfortable and at- 
tractive property. Mr. Symonds has 
been a Mason for many years, belonging 
to Hancock Lodge, No. 20, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons. He likewise 
holds membership relations with the 
Woodmen and with Alexander Post, No. 
455, Grand Army of the Republic, in 
which he has been adjutant for five or 



194 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



six years. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church, in 
which he acted as clerk for many years, 
while for ten or twelve years he has been 
a ruling elder, taking a most active part 
in church work and doing all in his power 
to promote its growth and extend its in- 
fluence. He is widely and favorably 
known throughout the county. The terms 
progress and patriotism might well be 
considered the key note of his character, 
for throughout his career he has labored 
for the improvement of every line of busi- 
ness or public interest with which he has 
been associated and at all times has been 
actuated by a fidelity to his country and 
her welfare. 



JOHN H. HORNEY. 

John H. Horney, who for many years 
was identified with agricultural pursuits 
in Hancock county but is now living re- 
tired, is numbered among the early set- 
tlers of this part of the state and has been 
an active factor not only in business circles 
but also in public life, several official 
duties having been bestowed upon him, 
the duties of which he has faithfully and 
promptly discharged. He is now serv- 
ing as rural mail carrier and he likewise 
proved his loyalty and his devotion to his 
country by active service in the Civil war. 
The years of his residence in Hancock 
county cover the period from 1851 to the 
present time. 

A native of \Yarren county, Illinois, 



Mr. Horney was born on the 3d of Au- 
gust, 1841, his parents being Lemuel and 
Cynthia (Brunton) Horney. The father 
was born in North Carolina in 1809 about 
thirty miles from Raleigh, the capital of 
that state. There he resided continuously 
until 1827, when, at the age of eighteen 
years, he became a resident of Schuyler 
county, Illinois, having made the journey 
to the west with his parents. He lived 
in that county for some years after his 
marriage and was there engaged in farm- 
ing. Later he removed to Warren 
county, Illinois, where, he carried on gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits and in 1851 he 
came with his family to Hancock county, 
settling on section 12, Wythe township. 
There he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, which he transformed into 
a good farm, making his home thereon 
until his death, which occurred in Au- 
gust, 1863, resulting from the kick of a 
mule. He was at that time fifty-four 
years of age. He had served in the 
Black Hawk war and was one of the pio- 
neers of the state, closely associated with 
its early development and progress. He 
shared in the hardships and privations in- 
cident to life on the frontier and as the 
years passed contributed to the develop- 
ment and upbuilding of the localities in 
which he lived. He was a devoted mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which he served as a trustee and class- 
leader for many years. He was also a 
prosperous and progressive citizen whose 
well directed business affairs brought to 
him a gratifying competence. His po- 
litical allegiance was given to the democ- 
racy and for a number of years he served 
as supervisor from that township. He 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



195 



also acted as justice of the peace for 
some time and during his residence in 
Warren co*nty, Illinois, he served as ma- 
jor in the state militia. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Cynthia A. 
Brunton, was born in Hamilton county, 
Ohio, and was also a Methodist in her re- 
ligious faith, taking an active and help- 
ful part in the work of the church. She 
survived her husband for many years 
her death ocurring in 1900, and her re- 
mains were then interred by the side of 
his grave in the cemetery at Basco, Illi- 
nois. In their family were nine children, 
four of whom are yet living but John H. 
Horney is the only one now residing in 
this state. 

Mr. Horney of this review was a lad 
of about ten years when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Hancock 
county. He began his education at the 
place of his birth and continued his studies 
in the public schools of Wythe township. 
After completing his own education he 
engaged in teaching in the district schools 
and in the village of Elvaston, success- 
fully following that profession for 
twenty-one years. He also carried on 
farming in Wythe township, having pur- 
chased a tract of land, adjoining the old 
homestead property. He resided thereon 
for a number of years and then went to 
North Dakota, where he spent nearly four 
years. On the expiration of that period 
he returned to Hancock county, making 
his home upon the farm belonging to his 
father-in-law in Wythe township. There 
he continued to reside until about five 
years ago and was accounted one o'f the 
enterprising agriculturists of the com- 
munity. Since 1901, however, he has 



resided in the village of Elvaston, having 
retired from farm life but indolence and 
idleness are utterly foreign to his nature 
and in order to have some occupation he 
became rural mail carrier on the only 
route out of Elvaston. He has also done 
considerable surveying for individuals and 
railroad companies and also for the drain- 
age committee and he acted as county 
surveyor for ten years, while living upon 
the farm. In his political views he is an 
earnest democrat and for some time held 
the office of president of the town board 
of Elvaston and was assessor of Prairie 
township for one term. No public trust 
reposed in him has ever been betrayed in 
the slightest degree and his efficiency and 
capability have long been recognized. 

Mr. Horney has always been a loyal 
and public-spirited citizen and his de- 
votion to his country was early manifest 
by his service in the Civil war, for when 
but twenty-one years of age he enlisted 
on the 1 2th of August, 1862, as a member 
of Company H, One Hundred and Eight- 
eenth Illinois Infantry, jvith which he 
served for about one year, when he was 
discharged at Black River Bridge, Mis- 
sissippi. He participated in the siege of 
Vicksburg and an engagement at Arkan- 
sas Post and was sergeant of his com- 
pany but illness compelled him to leave 
the army. He is now a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic and thus 
maintains pleasant relations with his old 
army comrades of the Civil war. 

Mr. Horney was married on the 3Oth 
of January, 1868, to Miss Clara E. Berry, 
a daughter of Joshua C. and Mary B. 
(Barker) Berry, the former a native of 
New Hampshire and the latter of Massa- 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




chusetts. They went to Ohio at an early 
day and in 1854 came to Hancock county, 
Illinois, settling in "\Yythe township, 
where the father followed fanning and 
surveying. His ability in the latter di- 
rection led to his election to the office of 
county surveyor for a number of terms. 
He died at the advanced age of eighty- 
two years, while his wife reached the ripe 
old age of eighty-six years. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Homey have been born five 
four of whom are now living. 

, residing in Elvaston, married 
f ft 

Miss Kafe>Daw and they have two chil- 
dren, Nellie F. and Frank D. ; Ettie A. is 
at home. Charles H. died at the age of 
three weeks. Eola is now the wife of 
J. Frank Cameron, of Elvaston, and has 
one child, Glenn. Jessie M., the young- 
est, is a student in the public schools. 
All of the children were born in \Yythe 
township. The parents are members of 
the Presbyterian church, in which Mr. 
Horney is serving as an elder. There are 
many chapters in his life history that are 
worthy of emulation, for he proved a 
brave and loyal soldier, has been equally 
faithful in citizenship in times of peace, 
has been straightforward in his business 
dealings and in public office has proved 
himself fully worthy of the trust of his 
fellowmen. 



CHARLES H. GARNETT, A. M., LL.B. 

Charles H. Garnett. one of the promi- 
nent lawyers of western Illinois, whose 



ability is indicated by his extensive client- 
age not only in Carthage but in other 
cities as well, was born in tolmar, Mc- 
Donough county, Illinois, January 12, 
1873, his parents being Robert K. and 
Annie E. (Hunter) Garnett. Robert K. 
Garnett was a grandson in the maternal 
line of Reuben Graves, who served as 
a soldier of the war of 1812. The ma- 
ternal grandparents of our subject came 
to America from the north of Ireland 
near Colerain when about twenty years 
of age. Robert K. Garnett was born at 
St. Marys, Hancock county, Illinois, Au- 
gust 4, 1844, and for many years has been 
a successful farmer in his native town- 
ship where now he owns a fine farm of two 
hundred and forty acres. He has served 
as justice of the peace for ten or twelve 
years and was also township collector, 
discharging his duties of his different of- 
fices with promptness and fidelity. His 
political allegiance is given to the democ- 
racy and he is recognized as a local leader 
in the party ranks as well as an influential 
factor in agricultural circles. He married 
Miss Annie E. Hunter, a daughter of 
James and Martha (Logan) Hunter, who 
was born in Catasauqua, Pennsylvania, 
October 19, 1845, and is also living. 
They have eight children : Mary V., the 
wife of J. Minor Botts, of St. Marys, 
Illinois; Lulu O., the wife of William G. 
Botts, of Carthage; Charles H.. of this 
review; Grace A., who is a graduate of 
the University of Illinois of the class of 
1901 and was for four years principal 
of the high school at Piano, Illinois, but 
is now teaching in the high school at 
Prescott, Arizona: Elmer L., who is a 
graduate of the Illinois University of the 




GLAUS ALBERS 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS 



197 



class of 1904 and the Northwestern Law- 
School of Chicago in 1906 and is now 
with his brother, Charles H. ; Percie E., 
a student in the State University at Cham- 
paign, Illinois; Robert E., who is also 
studying in that institution; and Harriet 
E., a student in the University of Illinois 
at Urbana, Illinois. 

Like the other members of the family 
Charles H. Garnett was afforded excellent 
educational privileges, supplementing his 
preliminary course by study in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Champaign, from 
which he was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in the class of 1896. 
He was elected to a fellowship in eco- 
nomics in the universtiy, holdng the same 
for one year. This fellowship is a scholar- 
ship, which enabled Mr. Garnett to teach 
at a salary of four hundred dollars per 
year and also pursue post-graduate work, 
at the end of which time he received the 
degree of Master of Arts. He afterward 
spent two years in the law department 
at Yale College, from which he was 
graduated in 1899 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and in December of the 
same year he was admitted to the Illinois 
bar. After spending the winter in Chi- 
cago he came to Carthage in April, 1900, 
and in November of the same year was 
elected state's attorney of Hancock 
county, which position he filled for the 
full term of four years. He is now one 
of the most successful lawyers of this city 
with a large clientele, connecting him with 
much important litigation. His political 
allegiance is given to the democracy and 
he was nominated for the second term 
but was defeated. In 1906 he was nomi- 
nated by the democratic senatorial con- 



vention to represent his district in the 
general assembly, subject to the general 
elections held in November. 

Mr. Garnett belongs to Hancock Lodge, 
No. 20, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, in which he is now junior warden; 
Bentley Lodge, No. 412, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; and Occidental 
Lodge, No. 388, Knights of Pythias, in 
which he is a past chancellor commander 
and also belongs to the Carthage Baptist 
church. His offices are located in the 
AIcMahan Building, where he occupies a 
nice suite of rooms. He is yet a young 
man but has attained prominence in his 
profession that many an older practitioner 
might well envy, and a growing business 
is indicative of the confidence reposed in 
him by the public. June 6, 1906, Mr. 
Garnett was married, his wife being 
Ermine Williams, of Fort Stockton, 
Texas, a daughter of Oscar YV. and Sarah 
(Wheat) Williams. He was an attorney, 
a graduate of Harvard Law School and 
for some years a judge of Pecos Bounty, 
Texas, while her grandfather. Jesse C. 
Williams, has been in business in Car- 
thage about a half century. Miss Wil- 
liams was- educated at Carthage College. 



CLAUS ALBERS. 

Claus Albers, numbered among War- 
saw's honored dead, was for many years 
a prominent citizen. As the day with 
its morning of hope and promise, its 
noontide of activity, its evening of com- 



198 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pleted and successful effort, ending in the 
grateful rest and quiet of the night, so was 
the life of this man, and when death 
claimed him a most useful, active and 
honorable career was ended, in which he 
had labored not alone for hfs own ad- 
vancement but had contributed in large 
measure to the upbuilding of the city. 

Claus Albers was born November 25, 
1817, in Hollenhof, Amt, Zeven. in the 
kingdom of Hanover, Germany, and was 
the eldest son of John Dietrich and Sophia 
Albers. He emigrated to America in 
1836, when a young man of nineteen years 
and became a resident of Ohio. He was 
married in Cincinnati, on the 5th of March, 
1839, to Miss Rebecca Knoop, who came 
to this country with her parents in 1838. 
She was born in Oldendorf, in the king- 
dom of Hanover, December 26, 1818. 

Following their marriage the young 
couple removed to St. Louis, Missouri, 
where Mr. Albers was engaged in the 
grocery business and subsequently they 
took up their abode upon a farm in Ben- 
ton county, Missouri, becoming pioneer 
residents of that locality. Mr. Albers de- 
voted his time and energies to general 
farming there for nearly eight years and 
while living there he and his wife joined 
the German Methodist church in 1844, 
having previously been members of the 
Lutheran church. Their home became a 
preaching place for Methodist ministers 
until a little society, consisting of about 
eight families, built a log church on Mr. 
Albers's farm. In 1847 he left Missouri, 
and with his family removed to Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin, and thence to Racine, re- 
maining only a few weeks in each place. 
He afterward came to Hancock countv, 



Illinois, settling in Xauvoo, after making 
the journey in a covered wagon drawn by 
an ox team. In Nauvoo he dealt in gen- 
eral merchandising and traded with the 
surviving Mormons, all of whom had not 
been expelled from the state. Their mag- 
nificent temple in Xauvoo was burned 
during Mr. Albers's residence there. In 
1851 he removed to Warsaw, where he 
again engaged in general merchandising 
for a brief period. In 1854, however, he 
built a flouring mill on the site of the 
present Grace Mills, having a capacity 
of two hundred barrels daily. In 1855 
this mill was destroyed by fire and he at 
once made preparation for rebuilding. 
The mill, which was called the Grace mill, 
was established in 1856 and had a capacity 
of from two hundred and fifty to three 
hundred barrels of flour per day. It was 
managed by Mr. Albers with the assist- 
ance of his sons and at times with differ- 
ent partners until 1883, when he retired 
from that business and took up the man- 
agement of his farm on Main street, to 
which he had devoted many leisure hours 
through a long period of years. He was 
pleased to term it the preserver of his 
health and he delighted to retire to this 
farm, watching the growth of the crops 
there and living near to nature's heart. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Albers were born 
seven children, who survive the parents : 
Henry, a resident and prominent busi- 
ness man of Los Angeles, California; 
Sophia, the wife of Dr. J. G. Van Marter, 
of Rome, Italy; Anna, the wife of Pro- 
fessor J. L. Kessler, of Warrenton, Mis- 
souri ; Anna Rebecca, the wife of William 
Zuppan ; Charles and William E., of War- 
saw : and Homer, of Boston. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



199 



The death of the father, Claus Albers, 
occurred January 23, 1892, when he was 
seventy-four years of age. A local jour- 
nal said of him : "In the death of Mr. 
Albers Warsaw lost a citizen who gave 
the best years of his life to an enterprise 
that contributed largely to the upbuilding 
of the city and made it for four decades 
the grain market for a large scope of ter- 
ritory. It lost a citizen who thus prac- 
tically demonstrated the vast benefit, a 
man of enterprise, energy and capacity 
. can be to a community when he so directs 
those attributes. It lost a citizen whose 
acquaintance was as wide as the commer- 
cial reach of the city made so by a long, 
active and useful life." His wife sur- 
vived him until July 9, 1896, and passed 
away at the age of seventy-seven years, 
six months and thirteen days. Mrs. Al- 
bers was a gentle, kindly woman, char- 
itable in her estimate of every one and of 
uniform affability in the treatment of all. 
She never spoke evil of any one, and 
always insisted that every person had his 
good side and redeeming qualities if one 
would only seek them. Even her re- 
proofs were so tempered with sweetness 
they left no sting of bitterness, and in 
all her life it is said she never gave way 
to temper. Patient in her consideration 
of others, self-sacrificing and thoughtful, 
her greatest ambition seemed to be to 
serve her family and her greatest fear 
that she might be a care or a burden. All 
who knew her are full of her praises and 
all mourn the loss of a good woman. 
They can well sympathize with the house- 
hold from which such a- light has gone 
out forever. 

Of their family Homer Albers has at- 

13 



tained national distinction. He was born 
in Warsaw, Illinois, February 28, 1863. 
He was educated in the public schools of 
Warsaw; at Central Wesleyan College 
Warrenton, Missouri, from which college 
he was graduated with a degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts in 1882. He then went to the 
Boston University Law School and was 
graduated Magna Cum Laude from this 
institution in 1885 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to 
the bar in the summer of 1885 in Boston; 
was associated in business before his ad- 
mission, and subsequently with George 
L. Huntress until 1888, when he became 
a partner with Mr. Huntress which part- 
nership has continued up to the present 
time. Soon after receiving his degree of 
Bachelor of Laws he was appointed an 
instructor in the Law School, continuing, 
however, his law practice. A few years 
later he was made a professor and ap- 
pointed a member of the faculty of the 
Boston University Law School, which po- 
sitions he continued to hold until 1902, 
when the increasing demands of his law 
practice made it necessary for him to cur- 
tail his other work. At the request of the 
university he consented to deliver a few 
lectures each year in order that they 
might retain his name in their list of 
lecturers. In 1900 Mr. Albers began a 
short course of lectures on Business Law 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, and has continued to the present time 
in the charge of this course in this famous 
institution. He has been offered profes- 
sorships in the Law Schools of University 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and at the 
Northwestern University, at Chicago, but 
declined, preferring the active practice of 



200 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



law. In 1899 Mr. Albers was by Gov- 
ernor Wolcott appointed a member of the 
Massachusetts State Ballot Law Commis- 
sion, and by reappointments from suc- 
cessive governors continued to hold this 
position until 1905. He was married 
June 26, 1889, to Minnie B. Martin, of 
Fredonia, New York. They reside in 
Brookline, a most attractive village near 
Boston. In 1903 he was by Governor 
Bates appointed a judge of the Massachu- 
setts superior court. In Massachusetts 
the judges are appointed by the governor 
for life, and an appointment to this bench 
had, up to the time of the selection of Mr. 
Albers for this position, been refused only 
once in the history of Massachusetts. The 
judges must, however, sit in different 
places throughout the state, and Mr. Al- 
bers was unwilling to have his happy 
home life interferrecl with, and therefore 
declined the proffered, unsolicited honor. 
In an interview published in the Boston 
Journal on September 15, 1903, his law 
partner, George L. Huntress, said : "At 
the time of Mr. Albers's appointment I 
was both glad and sorry. You know why 
I was glad. But I was sorry to lose such 
a man from the close association of the 
office and out of our business, which he 
has graced and honored, and to which 
he has given the best that is in him. Now 
I am both glad and sorry. I am sorry 
that he has been obliged to surrender what 
would have been an honor to him and 
what he would have honored to the full: 
a place upon the bench of this common- 
wealth. But I am glad he is going to stay 
with me." The Lowell Courier published 
the following : "Aside from the domestic 
considerations which compelled Mr. Al- 



bers to refuse the ermine, it is also true 
in all probability that a man of his calibre 
is making too great a financial sacrifice 
in accepting a judicial position. Our 
judges are better paid than the justices 
of a good many states, but their salaries 
are still far below what a good many 
lawyers can make in practice. We can 
only regret it as a grave error to refuse 
attractive salaries to the judiciary. It 
takes a large mind to make a good judge, 
and some states find that the large minds 
come high higher than they are willing 
to pay." The salary in Massachusetts 
is six thousand five hundred dollars, and 
five hundred dollars travel. Mr. Albers's 
practice is that of a business lawyer, 
commercial law, corporation law, equity 
cases including many trade mark cases. 
He has never been a candidate for any 
office and all appointments have come 
unsolicited. He is the personal attorney 
for Thomas W. Lawson in all his varied 
and intricate affairs, and he and Mr. 
Huntress have conducted the legal busi- 
ness of C. I. Hood & Company, the 
Wells & Richardson Company (Paine's 
Celery Compound) and other prominent 
individuals and corporations. Mr. Al- 
bers is a director in a number of corpora- 
tions including the Coastwise Transpor- 
tation Company, which owns and operates 
the largest sailing vessels in the world. 
Although he cannot be called a "club 
man," he is a member of the University 
Club, the Boston Art Club and the Com- 
monwealth Country Club, this being not 
the least among the many forms of recre- 
ation which he has of recuperation, which 
is so necessary to one leading so active 
a life. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, FLLINOIS. 201 

CHARLES ALBERS. WILLIAM EDWARD ALBERS. 



Charles Albers, now manager of the 
Warsaw Milling Company, was born in 
this city in 1857, and was educated in the 
public schools of Warsaw and Central 
Wesleyan College, Warrenton, Missouri, 
and the Iowa Wesleyan University, of 
Mt. Pleasant. Iowa. He received his 
business training under the direction of 
his father and has continuously been iden- 
tified with the milling interests of War- 
saw since that time. The business is now 
conducted under the firm name of The 
Warsaw Milling Company. As stated, the 
business was established in 1856 by the 
father of the present proprietors, and in 
1887 was incorporate! as a stock company 
and capitalized for fifty thousand dollars, 
with J. H. Finlay as president; C. E. 
Eymann, vice president ; W. E. Albers, 
secretary and treasurer; and Charles Al- 
bers, manager. The capacity of the plant 
is four hundred barrels per day. The 
mill has been in continuous operation for 
fifty years, and all of the time has been 
owned by the same family. It is now 
equipped with all modern improvements 
and the business is carefully and suc- 
cessfully conducted along modern lines. 

Charles Albers was married in 1904 to 
Miss Cecille Dory, a daughter of Victor 
Dory, and they have one child, Clarice 
Cecille. Mr. Albers became a Mason in 
1890 and has attained the Knight Templar 
degree of the York rite. He has never 
aspired to political honors, yet is never 
remiss in citizenship and gives stalwart 
support to many movements which are of 
direct benefit not only to the village, but 
also to the county and state. 



William Edward Albers was born in 
Illinois, July 7, 1859, and pursued his 
education in the public schools of War- 
saw and also in Illinois College, at Jack- 
sonville. Subsequently he went to Bloom- 
ington, Illinois, and later for a time op- 
erated a coal mine at Sidell, Illinois, where 
he remained for about three years. On 
the expiration, of that period he sold to 
the firm of Bishop & Springer, coal deal- 
ers of Keokuk. He has been associated 
with the milling business as secretary and 
treasurer since its incorporation in 1887, 
and while operating the mill he was large- 
ly interested in farming. He became a 
partner in the milling business in 1884 
and he and his brother Charles rebuilt the 
mill and have since conducted this busi- 
ness, which is one of the leading indus- 
trial enterprises of Warsaw. 

W. E. Albers was married October 12, 
1893, to Miss Mary Grace Robinson, a 
daughter of David A. and Laura (Chan- 
dler) Robinson, and they are prominent 
socially in Warsaw, where they have 
many warm friends. Politically Mr. Al- 
bers is a republican but without aspiration 
for office. He holds membership with 
the Presbyterian church, of which he has 
been a trustee for several years and he is 
active in support of all that tends to ad- 
vance material, intellectual and moral 
progress. 



LEWIS GOTLIEB ROSKAMP. 

Lewis Gotlieb Roskamp, deceased, who 
at one time was a successful general 



2O2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



farmer of Hancock county, was born in 
Quincy, Illinois, September 2, 1852. His 
parents, Philip and Hannah (Shassick) 
Roskamp, were natives of Germany and 
the family came to America about 1845 
or 1846, settling in St. Louis, Missouri. 
Philip Roskamp removed from Quincy, 
Illinois, to Hancock county when his son 
Lewis was only four or five years of age 
and located on a farm in Walker town- 
ship, where he reared his family and 
carried on general agricultural pursuits. 
His wife died in 1887, and he survived 
until 1891, when his grave was made by 
the side of hers in Tioga cemetery. 

Lewis G. Roskamp was educated in the 
public schools of Tioga and continued 
under the parental roof until he had at- 
tained his majority, when he was married 
and started out in life for himself. On 
the 5th of October, 1873, he wedded Miss 
Caroline Meyer, who was born in Adams 
county, Illinois, in 1855, a daughter of 
Gotlieb and Henrietta (Haner) Meyer, 
who were natives of Germany, the former 
born May 24, 1821, and the latter De- 
cember 29, 1829. Both came to Amer- 
ica in childhood, and Mrs. Meyer was 
eleven weeks on the voyage to the new 
world. In their family were eight chil- 
dren, namely: Mrs. Roskamp; Mrs. 
Rickie Distlehorst, deceased; William, of 
Walker township; Augusta, the wife of 
Henry Schlipman, of Adams county, Illi- 
nois; Emma, the wife of Ernest Distle- 
horst, of Adams county ; Louisa, the wife 
of Ed Cook, who is living near Mendon, 
Illinois ; Anna, who makes her home with 
her sister, Mrs. Cook; and Gotlieb, who 
is in St. Louis, Missouri. He was twenty- 
nine years of age on the 3Oth of May, 



1906. He has been a soldier in the 
Philippines for many years and is now 
in a St. Louis hospital. The mother of 
these children still survives and yet en- 
joys good health for one of her years. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Roskamp took up their abode in 
a log house on a farm just across the 
road from where she now lives, in Walker 
township. There they lived until 1881, 
when Mr. Roskamp erected an elegant 
residence, which is one of the best homes 
of the locality. In 1887 he built a fine 
barn sixty by forty feet and also erected 
sheds and other good outbuildings. His 
farm comprised two hundred and seventy 
acres on section 20, Walker township, and 
he placed his land under a high state of 
cultivation so that he annually gathered 
good crops and secured a gratifying year- 
ly income. His life was one of industry, 
and his laudable ambition and unfaltering 
perseverance were elements in his success. 
As the years passed by he prospered, so 
that he was able to secure a beautiful home 
and surrounded his family with many 
of the comforts of life. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Roskamp were born 
eleven children, all of whom were born on 
the old home place, namely : Anna, the 
wife of Gotlieb Heineke, of Walker town- 
ship, by whom she has two children, Alma 
and Bertha ; Fred, a farmer who married 
Anna Kiner, of Hamilton and has three 
children, Bertha, Hilda and Clara ; Lydia, 
the wife of William Kunz, of Walker 
township, and they have one child, Al- 
vina; John, who operates the home farm 
for his mother; Henry, who is seventeen 
years of age and is now in Oregon ; 
Walter, also at home ; Carl, thirteen years 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



203 



of age, Lawrence aged eleven, and Lena, 
nine years of age, also at home with their 
mother. 

Mr. Roskamp voted with the Repub- 
lican party but was never a politician in 
the sense of office seeking. He held mem- 
bership in the German Lutheran church, 
at Tioga, where he served as trustee for 
eight years, in the work of which he was 
deeply and helpfully interested. His 
death occurred August 17, 1899, and his 
remains were buried in the Tioga ceme- 
tery, where rests his two children. His 
widow is likewise a member of the church 
and still is on the old home farm, where 
she is rearing her children, who have 
been left in comfortable circumstances as 
the result of enterprise and business 
ability manifested by the husband and 
father through the years of his active con- 
nection with farming interests in this 
county. 



ALFRED QUICK. 

Alfred Quick, engaged in general 
farming in Wilcox township, was born in 
Rocky Run township in 1878. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, Alfred Quick, Sr., was 
born in 1814, in Kentucky, and in 1834, 
when twenty years of age, became a resi- 
dent of this county. He settled in Rocky 
Run township and was identified with its 
pioneer development and progress, aiding 
in laying broad and deep the foundation 
for the present upbuilding and improve- 
ment of this portion of the state. He 
married Miss Susan Hornbeck, who was 



born in Kentucky in 1809, and they be- 
came the parents of six children, of whom 
four are now living: Preston; Samuel, 
of Rocky Run township ; James, of Clark 
county, Missouri ; and Susan, the wife of 
James Shipe, of Warsaw. Preston Quick, 
father of our subject, was born in Ken- 
tucky in 1842, and came to Illinois in 
1848, at which time he took up his abode 
in Rocky Run township. He served for 
three and a half years as a soldier in the 
Civil war, belonging to the One Hundred 
and Eighteenth Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, and during a part of that time was 
under command of General Grant. Re- 
turning home, he resumed agricultural 
pursuits here and was for many years an 
enterprising farmer of this county but 
is now living retired, making his home 
with his children. He married Miss 
Elizabeth Shipe, who was born in Rocky 
Run township in 1848 and is of German 
descent. She died in 1895. Mr. Quick 
is a republican in his political affiliation 
and for years served as school director, 
the cause of education finding in him a 
warm and stalwart friend. In their 
family were four children, of whom three 
are now living, namely: Clara M., the 
wife of Thomas Williams, of Wythe 
township; Susan, the deceased wife of 
Lemuel Whitney; Sophronia, the wife of 
David Webster, who is operating the old 
Quick homestead in Rocky Run township ; 
and Alfred. 

In the public schools near his father's 
home, Alfred Quick was educated and 
during the periods of vacation he assisted 
in the farm work, giving his services to 
the benefit of his father until twenty-two 
years of age, when he left home and was 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL RE ] 'IE W 



married. It \vas on the gth of January, 
1900, that he wedded Miss Cleota Ewing, 
who was born in Tioga, Hancock county, 
Illinois, November 25, 1880, a daughter 
of Jackson and Minerva (Gray) Ewing. 
Her father was born in Kentucky. Oc- 
tober 28, 1837, and died September 19, 
1886. while the mother's birth occurred 
in this county on the i3th of Sqitember, 
1838. He followed the occupation of 
farming and on coming to Hancock 
county settled in Walker township, where 
he devoted his time to his chosen vocation 
and also carried on a general merchan- 
dise store at Tioga. His political sup- 
port was given to the democracy and he 
served in several township offices. In 
his family were three children, of whom 
two are living: lona, the wife of Frank 
Harrison, of Walker township ; and Mrs. 
Quick. Mr. Ewing departed this life in 
1886, and the mother still survives and is 
living in Tioga. 

Following his marriage Mr. Quick re- 
sided upon his father's farm for two years 
and later spent one year near Hamilton. 
In 1905 he purchased one hundred acres 
of land on section 21, Wilcox township, 
an improved farm, which he has since 
further developed and cultivated. The 
home has been blessed with one child, 
Fleta Minerva, who was born in Rocky 
Run township, January 20, 1903. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Quick have many friends 
in this locality and their many excellent 
traits of character are widely recognized 
by those with whom they come in contact. 
Mr. Quick is a republican, while frater- 
nally he is connected with the Woodmen 
camp. Energetic and active he is ac- 
counted one of the progressive young 



farmers of the community, who has al- 
ready done well in his business life and 
undoubtedly the future holds in store for 
him further success. 



CHARLES ALBERT WARNER, M.D. 

Dr. Charles Albert Warner is the oldest 
practicing physician in Hancock county. 
He arrived here in 1853 from Germany, 
having been born in the latter country 
on the 1 5th of September, 1830, the place 
of his nativity being Hesse Darmstadt. 
His early education was acquired in the 
public schools and the Gymnasium and 
College University of Giesen, from which 
he was graduated in the spring of 1852. 
He was a youth of twenty-three years 
when he arrived in Wisconsin, having 
made the voyage on an old sailing vessel, 
which was four weeks in crossing the 
Atlantic. He proceeded to St. Louis and 
having determined upon the practice ot 
medicine as a life work, he entered the 
St. Louis Medical College, where he pur- 
sued a regular course and was graduated 
after three years' study, two years of 
which was passed in that institution, then 
called Pope's College, while for one year 
he was a student in McDowell's College. 
Following his graduation from the St. 
Louis Medical College, he entered upon 
the active practice of his profession and 
remained in St. Louis until 1862, when 
he enlisted in the service of his country as 
assistant surgeon, being thus engaged 
until 1865. In that year he resigned 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS, 



20= 



after which lie was in charge of the 
I city hospital at Memphis, Tennessee, 
acting in that capacity until 1866. 
In that year he came direct to 
Warsaw, where he has continuously 
practiced to the present time, being now 
the oldest physician in years of continuous 
service in the county. He has been ac- 
corded a liberal patronage and has done 
a good business, which, as the years have 
passed, has steadily increased. He has 
always kept abreast with the progress 
made by the medical fraternity and is 
today a man of broad learning. He is 
medical examiner for various life insur- 
ance companies, including the Aetna, 
Northwestern, New York Mutual and the 
Metropolitan companies. Since coming 
to Warsaw he has remained at his present 
location at the corner of Main and Fourth 
streets. 

On the 27th of October, 1855; was 
celebrated the marriage of Dr. Warner 
and Miss Barbara Gerisch, a daughter of 
Christian Gerisch. Unto them were born 
two children. Frances and Fred, the 
former now the wife of Dr. Franz, of St. 
Louis. The wife and mother died De- 
cember 24, 1890, and in 1897, Dr. Warner 
was again married, his second union being 
with Mrs. Elizabeth Weigand. They 
now reside in Warsaw on East Main 
street, where the Doctor owns a valuable 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres 
devoted to general farming. In 1868 he 
was elected supervisor and held the office 
for a number of years. He has also been 
a member of the school board for about 
twenty years and his loyal and progressive 
citizenship is a well known factor in his 
life, having been manifest by the tangible 



aid which he has given to many move- 
ments for the public good. 



WESLEY CRAYTON BRIDGES. 

Wesley Crayton Bridges, general fore- 
man of the round house and shop for the 
Wabash, Toledo, Peoria & Western rail- 
roads at Hamilton, whose connection with 
railroad service has continued since 1862, 
was born in Carroll county. Tennessee, 
July 24, 1838. His father, William 
Alexander Bridges, was a native of Ten- 
nessee and a son of Willis Bridges, who 
was born in North Carolina and was a 
minister of the Primitive Baptist church, 
devoting forty-five years of his life to 
that holy calling. It was in Humphreys 
county, Tennessee, that \Villiam A. 
Bridges was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisa Neel Ridings, a native of that 
state and a daughter of Joel and Penelope 
(May) Ridings, both natives of North 
Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. William A. 
Bridges began their domestic life upon a 
farm in Carroll county, Tennessee, where 
he carried on general agricultural pur- 
suits until his death, which occurred on 
the 1 8th of January, 1844, when he w r as 
a comparatively young man. In the 
family were three children, of whom 
Wesley C. is the eldest. Joel Willis con- 
ducts the pumping station for the Toledo, 
Peoria & W r estern and Wabash railroads 
at Hamilton, while James Monroe, who 
served as a member of Company G. Sev- 
enth Missouri Cavalry, died April 2, 1862. 



2O6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Wesley Crayton Bridges spent his early 
youth in his native state and attended the 
subscription schools of Tennessee until 
fourteen years of age, when he started 
with his mother, brothers and stepfather, 
Jacob Hicks, for Missouri. He drove 
two yoke of oxen across the country, the 
family intending to locate in Missouri. 
Having reached the Mississippi river at 
Columbus, Kentucky, they were ferried 
across on a flat boat manned by two 
Frenchmen with sweep oars. After vis- 
iting Missouri, however, they recrossed 
the river into Illinios, making their way 
to St. Genevieve, where for the first time 
Mr. Bridges saw a cook stove. The 
second trip across the river was made on 
a flat boat pulled by hand. The family 
located in Jackson county, Illinois, and 
there Mr. Bridges continued his educa- 
tion. They remained in that county until 
December, 1854, but in the previous May 
the stepfather had died and the mother 
and her children started again upon the 
journey in the following December, 
traveling with ox teams until they reached 
Augusta, Hancock county. In this 
county Mr. Bridges also attended school 
to a limited extent, but worked mostly 
as a farm hand by the month until 1862, 
when he removed to Bowen, where a rail- 
road was being built called the Illinois & 
Southern Iowa Railroad. He was then 
employed at laying the track between 
Clayton and Carthage, working as a la- 
borer for eight months. On the expira- 
tion of that period he secured a position 
as fireman and so continued for three 
years and three months. On the 24th 
of July, 1867, he was promoted to the 
position of engineer and followed this 



until November i, 1883, when he was 
made general foreman of the round house 
and shop for the Wabash and for the 
Toledo, Peoria & Western railroads at 
Hamilton. Since he entered the railroad 
service he has never been reprimanded, 
laid off or discharged and has never been 
away from duty for a full month at a 
time. 

On the 1 4th of October, 1860, Mr. 
Bridges was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Ellen Harrison, who was born in 
Washington county, Indiana, January 25, 
1843, a daughter of William and Alice 
B. (Davis) Harrison, natives of Indiana. 
She had but one sister, Louisa Jane, who 
became the wife of J. M. Hughes, of Au- 
gusta, and died in 1878. Mrs. Harrison 
came to Hancock county in 1850 and 
died in Hamilton in 1901 after more than 
a half century's residence here. Mrs. 
Bridges pursued her education in this 
county and by her marriage became the 
mother of five children. Louisa Alice, 
born September i, 1861, is the wife of 
Robert Watson, of Hamilton. Martha 
Ellen, born January 23, 1863, is the wife 
of Elmer Dennis, of Hamilton. Laura 
Belle, born April i,' 1866, is the wife of 
Robert S. Gordon, station agent at Hamil- 
ton. Julia Viola, born April 6, 1870, 
is the wife of Guy Blakeslee, who is a 
brakesman on the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad and lives at Hannibal, 
Missouri. Abbie Ethel, born September 
6, 1876, is the wife of Hurley Moore, of 
Hamilton, who is a brakesman on the 
Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad. 

Mr. Bridges was one of the organizers 
of the Building and Loan Association, of 
Hamilton, Illinois, there being nine men 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



207 



who formed this company in November, 
1888. He was chosen its first president. 
He has always been interested in matters 
of public progress and improvement and 
has co-operated in many movements for 
the general good. His political allegiance 
is given to the Republican party and he 
has served as alderman of the city for two 
years and two terms as mayor. He has 
also been school director and for six years 
has been a member of the cemetery board. 
He belongs to Black Hawk Lodge, No. 
238, of the Masonic fraternity, the Royal 
Arch Chapter, to the council and to the 
Knight Templar Commandery. He is 
also connected with the Modern '\Yood- 
men of America and the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, while his religious 
allegiance is given to the Christian church, 
of which he is a charter member. His 
life has been an active and useful one and 
he has displayed many sterling 'traits of 
character which are well worthy of emu- 
lation. 

He is now serving his twenty-second 
year as treasurer of Tecumseh Royal Arch 
Chapter, No. 152, ancl has started on his 
forty-fifth year in railroad service, and 
twenty-fourth year as foreman of the 
round house and car department at Ham- 
ilton, Illinois. 



LUCIEN S. REID. 

Lucien S. Reid, whose co-operation can 
always be counted upon as a helpful factor 
in everything relating to the welfare of 



his city, is now editor and proprietor of 
the Dallas City Review, and has been a 
well known factor in journalistic circles 
in this part of the state for a number 
of years. He was born near Plymouth, 
in McDonough county, Illinois, Novem- 
ber 12, 1860, his parents being L. G. and 
Cyrena (Doyle) Reid. The father was 
born in Covington, Kentucky, in 1813, 
while the mother's birth occurred near 
Lexington, that state. L. G. Reid was 
a successful lawyer and about 1847 set ~ 
tied in McDonough county, Illinois, 
where he lived until 1891, when he re- 
moved to Morrill, Kansas. After a year 
he returned to Illinois, settling at Colches- 
ter, McDonough county, where he died 
in. the year 1895. He had for twenty 
years survived his wife, who passed away 
in 1875 and was laid to rest in the ceme- 
tery near Plymouth, while the grave of 
Mr. Reid was made in Colchester He 
was a democrat in his political views and 
served for two terms in the Illinois legis- 
lature as a representative from his district. 
He was township supervisor for twenty- 
two consecutive years and had the respect 
and unqualified confidence of his fellow 
townsmen, who recognized his worth and 
his loyalty to principle. Fraternally he 
was connected with the Masonic lodge. 
In the family were five children, of whom 
three are now living : Lucien S. ; Ed- 
ward, who resides at Redlands, Cali- 
fornia; and Harry L., who is in the em- 
ploy of the Santa Fe Railroad Company 
and lives at Mojave, California. After 
losing his first wife Mr. Reid was married, 
in 1878, to Miss Lucy E. Tandy, who 
resided near Fandon, McDonough county. 
Lucien S. Reid was a student in the 



208 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



high school at Plymouth, and afterward 
attended Knox College, at Galesburg, Illi- 
nois, subsequent to which time he learned 
the printer's trade, at which he first 
worked in Plymouth. He afterward 
went to Beatrice. Nebraska, subsequently 
to Omaha, Nebraska, completing his trade 
with the firm of Rand & McNally in 
Chicago, Illinois. In 1884 he was in 
Colchester, Illinois, and in August of that 
year purchased the Colchester Independ- 
ent from H. F. Stevens but after a week 
sold it to Van L. Hampton, with whom 
he remained until the following March, 
when he purchased the Blandinsville Re- 
publican, changing the name of the paper 
to the Blandinsville Review. He con- 
tinued its publication until September, 
1887, when he took the plant to Dallas 
City and established the Dallas City Re- 
view, which is the first paper that ever 
survived for six months in this place. 
He has now continued its publication here 
for almost twenty years and has made it 
a profitable investment. The Review is 
a weekly paper, independent in politics 
and has a large circulation throughout 
this and Henderson counties so that it is 
an excellent advertising medium. In the 
disastrous fire which swept over Dallas 
City on the igth of December, 1905, Mr. 
Reid lost heavily but in place of the old 
building on Oak street there has been 
erected a concrete monolithic building, 
twenty-five by fifty-two feet, two stories 
high, of pleasing architectural design. 
The lower floor will be devoted to office 
and editorial rooms, composing and press 
rooms, while the upper floor is designed 
and finished for his residence. He has 
installed modern methods, 'including a 



good cylinder press with power. It is 
one of the first buildings of this character 
in this part of Illinois. In connection 
with the publication of the paper Mr. Reid 
does all kinds of first class job printing 
and tablet work. The Review has always 
been very progressive and has been an 
influential factor in the upbuilding of 
Dallas, standing as the champion of 
every movement or measure calculated to 
prove of direct benefit to the city. His 
new office will be equipped with all 
modern machinery and in the management 
of his business Mr. Reid is thoroughly 
progressive and in fact has been the lead- 
er in the adoption of many new ideas that 
have been advanced in the world. He 
owned the first gasoline engine used for 
motive power in Dallas City and also 
owned the first gasoline launch in the 
town. He is practical in his ideas and 
successful in his undertakings, carrying 
forward to successful completion what- 
ever he begins. In connection with his 
other business interests he is a stockholder 
in the Farmers State Exchange Bank of 
which he was one of the organizers. 

On the 1 6th of January, 1887, Mr. 
Reid was united in marriage to Miss 
Fannie Roberts, who was born in Col- 
chester, Illinois, June 20, 1865. a daugh- 
ter of Edward and Susanna (Bayless) 
Roberts, the former a native of Wales, 
and the latter of England. Her father 
was engineer of the works of the Quincy 
Coal Company, at Colchester, Illinois, for 
a long period but both he and his wife 
have now passed away, and were laid to 
rest in the cemetery at Colchester. In 
their family were five children, of whom 
four are living : Lennie, the wife of John 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



209 



Jones, who resides in Cambridge, Ohio; 
Sarah, the wife of Thomas Moss, also 
of Cambridge; Mrs. Eliza Tandy, the 
widow of W. W. Tandy and a resident 
of Colchester; and Mrs. Reid. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Reid has been born a daugh- 
ter. Velna, who was born in Dallas City, 
March 14, 1892, and is now a student in 
the Dallas City high school. In addition 
to his business property Mr. Reid owns 
several vacant lots in Dallas City. In 
politics he is a democrat and in 1890 and 
1891 served as mayor of Dallas City, 
proving a capable executive officer, whose 
efforts in behalf of public progress were 
effective and far-reaching. He is a Ma- 
son and also a member of Hancock Lodge, 
No. 56, Knights of Pythias, of which he 
is the present chancellor, while his wife is 
a devoted member of the Congregational 
church. A man of strong convictions, he 
is practical in his ideas, yet determined in 
his course. He possesses a genial, social 
disposition, appreciative of the worth and 
work of others and has ready recogni- 
tion for all movements or enterprises of 
general benefit to the community. Both 
he and his wife have scores of warm 
friends, and during the years of their resi- 
dence in Dallas City have long occupied 
a prominent position in social circles 
here. 



HENRY GILLHAM. 

Henry Gillham is a worthy representa- 
tive of a prominent pioneer family of 
Hancock county and his own record has 



added lustre to an untarnished family 
name. He was born in Campbell county, 
Kentucky, January 3, 1827, and is a son 
of Robert and Elizabeth (Walker) Gill- 
ham, the former a native of the Blue 
Grass state, and the latter of Pennsyl- 
vania. Robert Gillham devoted his life 
to general agricultural pursuits, and on 
the nth of April, 1837, arrived at War- 
saw, Illinois. Soon afterward he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of 
land in Walker township, for which he 
paid the government price of one dollar 
and a quarter per acre. Not a furrow 
had been turned nor an improvement 
made upon the place and he built a little 
log cabin, in which he lived in true pio- 
neer style, enjoying much happiness there, 
at the same time sharing in the hardships 
and privations incident to the establish- 
ment of a home on the frontier. The 
plows of that day had wooden mold 
boards and the sickle and scythe were 
leading features of the farm machinery. 
Mr. Gillham of this review has driven 
ox teams before a plow turning a twenty- 
four inch furrow, and he has broken more 
land than any other man of the county, 
thus contributing in large measure toward 
the agricultural development and improve- 
ment of this part of the state. His father 
was a democrat in his political allegiance 
and in matters of citizenship relating to 
the community was progressive and en- 
terprising. He died and was buried in 
Missouri but the mother was laid to rest 
in Walker township. Of their family of 
eleven children five are yet living: 
Henry: America, the wife of Hiram 
Cobel, of California; Cynthia A., the wife 
of Jason Marsh, of California; Sarah E., 



2IO 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the wife of William Dooley, of Missouri ; 
and E. D. Gillham, of Warsaw. 

Henry Gillham, brought to Illinois 
when Hancock county was still a pioneer 
district, was educated in a little log build- 
ing in Walker township, where school was 
conducted on the subscription plan. His 
advantages were necessarily limited be- 
cause of the condition of the school sys- 
tem at that period. His training at farm 
labor, however, was not meager and he 
early took his place in the fields, working 
from early dawn until after sunset in 
order to open up a new farm on which the 
family had located and further continued 
its development. He remained with his 
parents until he had reached his majority. 

In October, 1849, was celebrated the 
marriage of Henry Gillham and Miss 
Mary Jane Ewing, who was born in 
Brown county, Ohio, September 8, 1828, 
a daughter of Jackson and Catherine 
(Turner) Ewing, who are mentioned 
elsewhere in this work in connection with 
the sketch of John P. Ewing. The young 
couple began their domestic life upon his 
father's farm in W r alker township, where 
they remained for three years and then 
removed to a farm of forty acres else- 
where in the township. Mr. Gillham 
purchased this property and resided there 
for eleven and a half years. In 1873 
he bought one hundred and forty-three 
acres of land on section 10, Walker town- 
ship, and has since made his home there- 
on. He has added to and improved the 
house until he now has a fine residence 
and he has also built a substantial barn 
and two good wood-houses. His atten- 
tion has been given to general farming 
and the years have brought him good 



crops, and as time has passed he has 
prospered. In addition to the home place 
he also owns fifty-five acres of good land 
on section 1 1 . Moreover, he and his es- 
timable wife have reared a family of ten 
children, of whom seven are now living : 
Mary Frances is at home with her parents. 
Melvina Angeline is the wife of John L. 
Brew, lives near Carthage and has three 
children ; Lewis Brew, who married Clara 
Van Valer and has one child, Hazel May ; 
Ida Brew, the wife of Edward Newman, 
who lives in Carthage and by whom she 
has two children, Lee and Lloyd ; and Eli 
Brew, who lives in Nebraska, is married 
and has one daughter, Elizabeth Pearl. 
Elizabeth A. Gillham, the third member 
of the family, is the widow of William 
Atkinson, and has one child, Arlie Ann. 
Sarah Gillham is the wife of Charles 
Thompson, of Chili township, and has 
three children ; Henry, who married Liz- 
zie Herbert, by whom he has one child. 
and lives in Colorado; Ira, who married 
Nellie Hill and lives near Bowen, Illinois; 
and Horace Elmer. Jane Gillham is the 
wife of William Henry Smith, living near 
Bowen, Illinois, and they have four chil- 
dren, Dee, Fannie, Nona and Niti Ellen. 
John Gillham married Tena Wenhamer, 
lives in Nebraska and has seven children, 
\Valter, Charles, George, Eddie, Jessie, 
Clara and Addie. Roscoe, who resides 
at West Point, Illinois, married Martha 
Rampley and has four children, Mabel, 
Lela, Vera and Harold. Ellen is the wife 
of Arthur Randall, of Nebraska, and has 
three children, Ruth L., Earl and Loy. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Gillham hold mem- 
bership in the Christian church in the 
work of which they are deeply interested, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



211 



while to its support they contribute gen- 
erously according to their means. Mr. 
Gillham is a democrat and served con- 
tinuously as school director from the age 
of twenty-one years until 1900, when he 
refused to fill the office longer. He is 
truly a self-made man, for, after paying 
the minister and for the license at the time 
of his marriage he had remaining only 
two dollars and a quarter. With this 
the young couple started out in life to- 
gether. They possessed stout hearts, 
however, and willing hands, and their 
ambition and united efforts have consti- 
tuted the secret of their success. They 
have done well as the years have passed 
by and now have many comforts in life. 
At the same time they have found oppor- 
tunity to do many kindnesses and to ex- 
tend hospitality to many friends. In the 
fifty-seven years of their married life no 
one has e\er been turned from their door 
hungry or empty-handed. Both represent 
prominent old families of the county but 
it is their sterling personal worth that has 
so closely endeared them to those with 
whom they have come in contact. 



JOEL WILLIS BRIDGES. 

Joel Willis Bridges, who has charge of 
the steam pump for the Toledo, Peoria & 
Western, the Wabash railroads at Hamil- 
ton, was born in Carroll county, Tennes- 
see, August 7, 1840, his parents being 
William A. and Louisa Neel (Riding) 
Bridges. He was the 'second of a family 



of three sons and in his early youth at- 
tended the subscription schools of Ten- 
nessee for a short time. He afterward 
accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Jackson county, Illinois, and two years 
later the family settled at Augusta, Han- 
cock county. This was in 1854. Mr. 
Bridges of this review started out to earn 
his own living when sixteen years of 
age, working by the month as a farm 
hand. He was employed at one place 
for three years and in 1869 he entered the 
railroad service in the round house at 
Hamilton, where he continued for a year. 
Later he worked on the farm and in 1870 
he secured the position of engine-wiper. 
Later he engaged in firing for three years 
and three months, at the end of which 
time he was appointed engineer, running 
an engine for about eighteen months. 
About that time his health failed and he 
went into the roundhouse as watchman. 
In 1 88 1 he was assigned the task of run- 
ning the steam engine for the Toledo, 
Peoria & Western and Wabash railroads 
at Hamilton and he has since acted in that 
capacity. He owns several houses and 
lots in Hamilton, having made judicious 
investment of his earnings in real estate 
and his property interests bring him a 
good return. 

On the 5th of January, 1868, Mr. 
Bridges was united in marriage to Miss 
Rebecca Ann Garwood, who was born 
in Jasper county, Illinois, a daughter of 
Thomas and Jane (Richards) Garwood. 
The father was a native of Ohio and the 
mother of Tennessee. Her death oc- 
curred March 2, 1905, and two children 
were left to mourn her loss : William 
Thomas, now an engineer on the Toledo, 



212 , 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



Peoria & Western Railroad, residing in 
Peoria, Illinois: and Lottie Charlotte, who 
is a stenographer and bookkeeper in the 
Parker Company department store of 
Hamilton and makes her home with her 
father. There were two other children : 
Charles Wesley, who died in September, 
1877, at the age of three years ; and James 
Elbert, who died December 6, 1894, at 
the age of twenty-three years. Mr. 
Bridges started out in life with very few 
advantages, educational or otherwise, but 
has made the most of his opportunities 
and has worked earnestly and energetical- 
ly and, as stated, he has made judicious 
use of his funds, thus becoming the owner 
of considerable desirable property in 
Hamilton. He has been a resident of 
Hancock county for a half century. He 
holds membership in the Christian church 
and gives his political allegiance to the 
democracy. He has served as school di- 
rector, as alderman from the first ward 
from 1896 until 1904 and has been again 
elected on his own platform, a fact which 
indicates that he has given able service 
as one of the "city fathers." Fraternally 
he is connected with Black Hawk Lodge, 
No. 238, of the Masons, having taken the 
degrees of the Blue lodge, chapter and of 
the Eastern Star. 



LOUIS LAMET. 

Louis Lamet, one of the able members 
of the Hancock county bar living in War- 
saw, who with comprehensive knowledge 



of the principles of jurisprudence to- 
gether with unfaltering devotion to his 
clients' interests, has gained a large prac- 
tice, was born December 28, 1874, in the 
city which is yet his home. His parents 
were Julian and Eloise (Sylvester) 
Lamet. At the usual age the son entered 
the public schools, passing through suc- 
cessive grades until he had completed the 
high school course. He afterward en- 
gaged in teaching in the district schools 
of the county for three winter terms and 
then ambitious for further intellectual 
training, he entered the University of Illi- 
nois and was graduated from the law de- 
partment on the 1 2th of June, 1901. 
About a year after he entered upon the 
practice of his chosen profession in 
Carthage but soon returned to his native 
town and entered into partnership with 
Mr. Plantz, an association which has since 
been maintained. The firm .occupy a 
prominent place at the Hancock county 
bar. In the trial of cases Mr. Lamet pre- 
pares his cause with great thoroughness 
and care and in the courtroom is found 
strong in argument, logical in his deduc- 
tions and correct in his application of the 
legal principles. 

On the loth of January, 1905. was 
celebrated the marriage of Louis Lamet 
and Miss Amice Magdalena Lemaire, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Le- 
maire. They now have one son, Leon. 
Politically Mr. Lamet is a democrat, firm 
in support of the party and thoroughly 
conversant with the issues which divide 
the two great national political organiza- 
tions. He was appointed to the office 
of city attorney in 1905 and is now acting 
in that capacity. In 1902 he became a 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



213 



member of the Modern Woodmen camp, 
in which he has held the office of con- 
sul. Prompted by laudable ambition he 
has made for himself a creditable name in 
legal circles and as a citizen is recognized 
as one who has given tangible support to 
many movements for the general good 
and whose influence for public progress 
is far-reaching and beneficial. 



MARCELLUS T. CHENOWETH. 

Marcellus T. Chenowethf who is en- 
gaged in merchandising at Hickory 
Ridge, is a native of Virginia, his birth 
having occurred near Beverley in Ran- 
dolph county, on October 3, 1842. His 
parents were A. W. and Hannah (Tag- 
gart) Chenoweth, the (former born in 
Randolph county and the latter in Monroe 
county, Virginia, the years of their na- 
tivity being 1819 and 1822 respectively. 
A. W. Chenow-eth was a carpenter by 
trade, and in the year 1852 removed with 
his family from the Old Dominion to 
Hancock county. Illinois, living for 
several years in Warsaw, after which he 
located in Walker township in 1857. At 
the time of the Civil war he joined the 
Seventh Missouri Cavalry and served 
until disabled in 1864. He participated 
in the battle of Lone Jack, Ozark Moun- 
tain and other engagements in that section 
of the country. The family numbered 
seven children, of whom three are now 
living: M. T. : Sarah, the wife of Alfred 
Lomax, of Warsaw, Illinois ; and Vir- 



ginia, the wife of John Rigg, of Spring- 
field, this state. The father died October 
31, 1865, and the mother in June, 1887, 
their remains being interred in Walker 
township. 

M. T. Chenoweth began his education 
at St. Marys, Virginia, afterward con- 
tinued his studies in Ohio, in Warsaw, 
Illinois and in Bloomfield. Iowa. He en- 
listed in 1864 in the Twenty-eighth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry as a member of 
Company E, and served until the 3ist of 
October, 1865, the day his father died. 
He was on active duty near the southern 
portion of the Mississippi river and was 
present at the capture of Mobile. He 
had an uncle, William Chenoweth, who 
was a soldier in the Confederate army in 
the Civil war, while his great-grand- 
father, John Chenoweth, was a soldier of 
the Revolution. Following his return 
home M. T. Chenoweth remained with 
his mother until after his sisters were 
married. 

In 1871 Mr. Chenoweth wedded Miss 
Mary Isabella Rankin, who was born in 
Adams county. Illinois, in 1844, a daugh- 
ter of James and Sarah (Laughlin) 
Rankin, natives of Kentucky, whence 
they came to Illinois in January, 1834. 
They lived in Adams county until 1848 
and then settled upon a farm in Walker 
township, Hancock county. The father 
died in 1864, and the mother, long sur- 
viving him, departed this life in 1898. 
Both were buried in Adams county. In 
their family were seven children but only 
two are living : William Rankin, a resi- 
dent of Breckenridge. Illinois : and Mrs. 
Chenoweth. 

Following his marriage Mr. Chenoweth 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



.located in Warsaw, where he worked at 
the carpenter's trade, which he had 
learned under the direction of his father. 
He was thus identified with building op- 
erations until 1884, when he removed to 
Breckenridge, where he purchased a store, 
becoming proprietor of the leading mer- 
cantile establishment of the village. He 
has bought two stores since locating here 
and has combined them. He now has 
a large and well equipped establishment, 
carrying a carefully selected line of gen- 
eral goods and he has secured a liberal 
patronage which is well merited. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Chenoweth was 
born a daughter, Claudia, who died at the 
age of nine years, and was buried in the 
family lot in Walker township. Her 
death was the greatest sorrow that has 
ever come to her parents. Mrs. Cheno- 
weth is a member of the Christian church 
and is an estimable lady. Mr. Cheno- 
weth, active in business and progressive in 
citizenship, is regarded as one of the 
valued residents of this part of the county. 
In politics he is a republican and for 
eighteen years he served as postmaster, 
or until the rural free delivery route was 
established. He owns three acres of land 
and lives in Hickory Ridge, and he has 
remodeled and repaired both his store and 
house and is now comfortably situated in 
life. An analyzation of his record shows 
that his prosperity is the legitimate out- 
come of earnest labor and persistent pur- 
pose and that he is entirely a self-made 
man. He is now conducting a good and 
paying business and all acknowledge that 
the success which he is enjoying is well 
merited, and all his friends are glad when 
Fortune favors him. 



HIRAM B. KINKADE. 

Hiram B. Kinkade, who follows 
farming near Hamilton, was born in St. 
Albans township, Hancock county, on the 
3d of February, 1858, and attended the 
district schools, while spending his boy- 
hood days under the parental roof. His 
paternal grandparents were George W. 
and Elizabeth (Trainer) Kinkade, both of 
whom were natives of Virginia. They 
became early settlers of Hancock county, 
but in the meantime had resided in 
Hardin county, Kentucky, where occurred 
the birth of Lorenzo D. Kinkade, father 
of our subject. He married Miss Harriet 
Stewart, whd was born in Wabash county, 
Indiana, a daughter of Cornelius and 
Sarah (Bullard) Stewart, who were like- 
wise pioneer residents of this county. 
The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo 
Kinkade was celebrated at the residence 
of his wife's father about 1840 and they 
afterward removed to St. Clair county, 
Illinois, and subsequently lived in Adams 
county, Illinois, for a time. At a later 
date they went to Missouri, taking up 
their abode near Kirksville and in 1856 
they came to Hancock county, Mr. Kink- 
ade purchasing forty acres of unimproved 
timber land. He cleared and cultivated 
the tract, making many modern improve- 
ments upon it. and there resided until 
1872, when he sold that place to his son. 
He afterward lived with his children up 
to the time of his death, which occurred 
January 16, 1879, when he was fifty-five 
years of age. His widow still survives 
and makes her home with her children in 
this county, and she is honored by all who 
know her. 



Hiram B. Kinkade was the seventh in 
order of birth in a family of six sons 
and five daughters. He was reared upon 
the old home farm and resided with his 
parents until his father's death, after 
which his mother lived with him until he 
reached the age of twenty-seven years. 
He began his business career upon rented 
farms in this locality and in 1896 he pur- 
chased eight acres of land in the Oak- 
wood addition to Hamilton. Upon this 
tract was a small brick house, which he 
has since rebuilt. He also has put up 
barns and a tenant house and has given 
much attention to horticultural pursuits, 
planting about sixty apple trees and the 
same number of peach trees. He also 
has pear and plum trees, grapes and other 
. fruit upon his place and is meeting with 
. excellent success in the raising of fruit, 
having thoroughly informed himself con- 
cerning the best methods of producing 
the various fruits, to which he gives his 
time and attention. 

On the 28th of December, 1886; Mr. 
Kinkade was married in Emporia, Kan- 
sas, to Miss Emma Samsel, who was born 
in Ogle county, Illinois, March 28, 1866. 
her parents being Ephraim and Tracy 
(Rohrer) Samsel, who were natives of 
Washington county, Maryland. Her 
grandparents were Jacob and Susan 
(Whip) Samsel, natives of Maryland, 
and John and Susan (Pofrenbarger) 
Rohrer. Her parents were members of 
the Christian church. 

In his political views Mr. Kinkade is 
a democrat and in 1903 and 1904 was a 
member of the city council of Hamilton. 
He belongs to Montebello lodge, No. 
697, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



215 



Active in business, he has made good use 
of his opportunities and is prospering in 
his undertakings, so that he is now one 
of the substantial citizens of the 
community. 



WILLIAM H. D. NOYES, AI. D. 

On the list of Hancock county's 
honored dead appears the name of Dr. 
William H. D. Noyes, who for many 
years was recognized as one of the prom- 
inent members of the medical profession 
in Carthage. His parents were Michael 
J. and Elitha (Tate) Noyes, the former 
a native of New Hampshire and the latter 
of Rock Castle county, Kentucky. Dr. 
Noyes was born in Bowling Green, Mis- 
souri, January 24, 1834, and was reared 
in Pittsfield, Illinois, to which city his 
parents removed in his early boyhood 
days, his father and mother spending the 
remainder of their lives there. In their 
family were twelve children, all of whom 
are now deceased, with the exception of 
John Noyes, who is still living in 
Pittsfield. 

Dr. Noyes acquired his preliminary 
education in the schools of Pittsfield and 
after completing the high school course 
entered Shurtleff College, at Upper Alton, 
Illinois. His literary education being 
finished he then prepared for his chosen 
profession by study in the Missouri Med- 
ical College, at St. Louis, from which he 
was a graduated in the class of 1861. In 
the same year, however, he put aside pro- 
fessional cares in order to aid his country 
then engaged in the Civil war, joining 



2l6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Company K of the Sixteenth Illinois In- 
fantry. He was with that command for 
only a few months, however, when he 
was transferred to the navy as assistant 
surgeon on the Bark Braziliera from the 
Brooklyn navyyard. Later he was trans- 
ferred to the steamer Southfield. also 
doing service on the Atlantic coast. This 
vessel proceeded southward to Norfolk, 
Virginia, and up the James river. Mrs. 
Noyes still has in her possession the letter 
from John G. Nicholay, private secretary 
to President Lincoln, transferring Dr. 
Noyes from the infantry to the navy. 
He had the rank of lieutenant and messed 
with the wardroom officers. In Decem- 
ber, 1862, on account of ill health he was 
at home for a short time and afterward 
went to St. Louis, where he did duty in 
the Fifth Street Hospital and later, on 
the hospital steamer "City of Memphis" 
on the Mississippi river, where he again 
acted as surgeon, remaining on duty until 
the latter part of 1863. 

Following his connection with the army 
Dr. Noyes practiced medicine for a year 
in Pittsfield and in 1864 removed to 
Carthage, where he continued in active 
practice until his demise. He was in ill 
health, however, for several years prior 
to his death and he passed away at Hot 
Springs, South Dakota on the i2th of 
June, 1894. He was long accounted one 
of the leading and able physicians of 
Carthage and for many years resided on 
Wabash avenue and Fayette street. He 
always kept well informed concerning the 
progress of his profession as advancement 
was made in efficiency and knowledge, 
and that his labors were attended with 
a high measure of success is indicated by 



the fact that a most liberal patronage was 
accorded him. 

Dr. Noyes was married in the fall of 
1863 to Miss Lizzie Lynde, of Griggsville, 
Illinois, in which city she was born. 
They had no children but adopted a 
daughter, who is now Mrs. D. G. Berry, 
of Carthage, Illinois, and has one child. 
Catherine. Mrs. Noyes died in July, 
1872 and her remains were interred in the 
cemetery at Griggsville, where she was 
visiting at the time of her death. Dr. 
Noyes afterward married Miss Laura 
Miller on the 271)1 of October, 1874. 
She was born in Huntsville, Pennsylvania, 
June 30, 1849, and was a daughter of 
Captain Thomas C. and Martha Mary 
(McCulloch) Miller. The ancestors of the 
Miller family came from Scotland, settling 
in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1720. 
Her great-great-grandfather was John 
Miller. He was a most prominent and 
influential man of his day and married 
Isabella Henry, a sister of the father of 
Patrick Henry, whose eloquence did so 
much in arousing the colonists to make the 
attempt to throw off the yoke of British 
oppression. Isabella Henry Miller died 
a few months before her husband and both 
. lie buried in the cemetery, which thirty 
years before he had dedicated to "ye 
congregation of the Presbyterian church" 
of Neshaminy. He was also a large land- 
owner in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. 
William Miller, Jr., great-grandfather of 
Mrs. Noyes, was a captain in the Revolu- 
tionary war, having the following record : 
Appointed ensign June 9, 1776, first 
lieutenant March 20, 1777, captain on 
February 2, 1778, and colonel April 17, 
1779, in the Seventh Pennsylvania Regu- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



217 



lars commanded by Captain William 
Irvine. He also commanded at the battle 
of Hackinsack and was camped at White 
Plains in 1778. His regiment was paid 
off at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in April, 
1781. His father-in-law was Colonel 
Thomas Craig, also of Revolutionary war 
fame. He was second lieutenant in 
Captain Abraham Miller's company, Col- 
onel Thompson's battalion of riflemen. 
In November, 1775, he was promoted to 
first lieutenant and quartermaster . of 
the battalion ; afterwards as quartermas- 
ter of the Ninth Pennsylvania of the 
Continental Line. In 1 780 he was commis- 
sary of purchases for Buck's company. 
He was born in 1740, passing from this 
life in 1832. He was married in 1790 to 
Dorothy Briner. 

General T. C. Miller, grandfather of 
Mrs. Noyes, was a resident of Gettys- 
burg, Pennsylvania, and served in the war 
of 1812. He also had brothers who were 
in active duty during that war and one 
or two died in prison ships, one passing 
away on the Jersey. General T. C. Miller 
was a warm, personal friend of Francis 
Scott Key, who was the author of The 
Star Spangled Banner. 

From the "Pennsylvania Statesman," 
published at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 28, 1843, on me m Hamilton Li- 
brary, Carlisle: 

(General T. C. Miller was at that time 
a candidate for associate judge- of the 
district of Cumberland, Franklin and 
Perry counties.) 



eral Miller are confident of giving him 
600 majority. Let Cumberland do her 
duty and the General will be elected by 
a handsome majority." 



"General Miller. We learn from 
Franklin county that the friends of Gen- 



GENERAL THOMAS C. MILLER. 

The military career of this gentleman 
deserves some notice, and we think gives 
him additional claims on the favor of his 
fellow citizens. A volunteer, who served 
with the General during the last war, has 
furnished us with a full history of their 
services and hardships, from which we 
shall make a few extracts,, in order to 
show that, whatever the "volunteers" 
may call General Miller, he has given 
strong proof that he is at all events, an 
American and a patriot. 

To the Editors of the Pennsylvania 

Statesman, Gentlemen : 

I am not in the habit of dabbling in 
politics, but when I see the character of 
a man with whom I have been intimate 
through life wrongfully assailed and tra- 
duced, I can not withhold from him my 
feeble support. 

I have been acquainted with General 
Miller from the late war to the present 
day, and can aver that his whole course of 
life, which has fallen under my observa- 
tion from that day to this, has been unex- 
ceptionable. Of his civil services I need 
not speak neither need I say a word in 
relation to his character as a man. But 
I have a soldier's feeling for a fellow- 
soldier and I must say that if the man 
who serves his country faithfully in the 
hour of danger deserves the gratitude of 
his countrymen, then will General Miller 



2l8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in the present contest in your district, 
be surrounded and supported by a host 
of friends. I will tell you of some of the 
services he rendered. In 1814, when the 
news reached us that the British had 
burned Washington, he mounted his horse 
and never ceased his exertions until he had 
raised a volunteer rifle company, which 
he marched to Baltimore in forty-eight 
hours. Besides leaving his home and 
business, he incurred considerable ex- 
pense in raising and marching the com- 
pany, for which he never asked or received 
remuneration, further than his monthly 
pay. The night after the battle of North 
Point, the main body of our army having 
been driven back into their entrenchments, 
a fragment of the army was cut off from 
the main body by the rising of the tide 
in an arm of the bay, and could not reach 
the entrenchments without passing 
through the British lines ; they were, 
moreover, destitute of provisions, and 
were in a very bad way. In this emer- 
gency Colonel Cobean rode along the line 
and asked who would volunteer to go and 
bring the men up? Many marched out 
and offered, but General Smith and Com- 
modore Rogers forbade their going, saying 
that every man would be wanted in the 
morning. Part of Captain Miller's com- 
pany being among those cut off, he and 
William McClellan, now of Gettysburg, 
although the night was wet and dark, 
procured horses, and each taking a bag 
of bread and some canteens of whiskey, 
stole through the lines of the British sen- 
tinels, reached the men, and after giving 
them something to eat and drink, marched 
them safely by a circuitous route into 
the American quarters before daylight. 



For this daring feat the General was nick- 
named Jasper and McClellan was called 
McDonald, after two famous partisan sol- 
diers of the Revolution in truth among 
his fellow-soldiers General Miller is, to 
this day, called Old Jasper. His conduct 
throughout the whole campaign met the 
approbation of his companions in arms, 
and he was elected by a unanimous vote 
major of the battalion composed of his 
own company. Captain Cobean's com- 
pany of Gettysburg, Captain Campbell's 
company of Gettysburg, Captain Eichel- 
berger's company of Dillsburg, Captain 
's company of Peach Bot- 
tom and Captain McKinney's company of 
Shippensburg, very many members of 
which companies are living witnesses of 
the fact. He has since been elected to 
several important military offices in his 
brigade. Immediately after the close of 
the last war, he was elected colonel of 
the Eigthy-sixth Regiment at Gettysburg. 
When his term expired, he was elected 
brigade inspector and after that was 
twice elected brigadier general, which 
commission I believe he held until his re- 
moval into Cumberland county in 1840. 

As a politician, I differ in some respects 
from General Miller, but I have so much 
confidence in the patriotism and integrity 
of the man, and so many good reasons to 
believe him the true friend of his country, 
that I am sorry I am not a citizen' of your 
district, so that I might be able to give 
him a lift at the next election. 

Signed, 
A VOLUNTEER OF 1814. 

He was elected. 



Daniel Craig, one of the great-grand- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



219 



fathers of Mrs. Noyes in the paternal line, 
died in 1776. Of this family Colonel 
Thomas Craig, son of Daniel Craig, re- 
ceived his commission October 23, 1776, 
as captain in the Revolutionary war and 
rose to the rank of colonel. He married 
Jean Jamison and his daughter, Marga- . 
ree, married William Miller, great- 
grandfather of Mrs. Noyes, who founded 
Millerstown, now Fairfield, Pennsylvania, 
and was for many years representative 
and senator of a district in the state legis- 
lature and was a very prominent and in- 
fluential man. In the fall of 1814, T. C. 
Miller raised a rifle company and marched 
to Washington to defend the city after 
it had been attacked by the British. He 
was elected a few years later, brigade 
inspector of the military section, perform- 
ing his duties with capability and honor 
and was afterward general of his division. 
In 1824 he was elected high sheriff of 
the- county and in 1835 he was appointed 
by Governor Wolf registrar and recorder 
to fill a vacancy in that office. He was a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and at 
his death was buried with military hon- 
ors, the remains being escorted to the 
grave by a military organization known 
as "the Blues" and also by the fraternal 
societies to which he belonged and a great 
majority of the citizens of Gettysburg. 
He owned at one time the ground on 
which Evergreen cemetery (a part of 
National cemetery) at Gettysburg was 
laid out. Mrs. Noyes has in her posses- 
sion a large oil painting of this honored 
ancestor, which was made in colonial 
times and which she prizes very highly. 
Captain Thomas C. Miller, father of 
Mrs. Noyes, was born in Gettysburg, 



Pennsylvania, July I, 1827, and having 
arrived at years of maturity wedded Mary 
McCulloch, who was born in Dickinson, 
Pennsylvania, July 22, 1826. He served 
as a soldier of Company F, Seventh Mis- 
souri Cavalry, in the Civil war and won 
the rank of captain but was obliged to 
resign on account of an attack of typhoid 
fever, after which he returned home. He 
re-enlisted, becoming a lieutenant of Com- 
pany K, One Hundred and Forty-sixth 
Illinois Infantry. His regiment rendez- 
voused at Camp Butler and was on duty 
at Springfield, Illinois, at the time of the 
funeral services of President Lincoln. 
Captain Miller died June 21, 1905, and 
was buried at Moss Ridge cemetery in 
Carthage. For a number of years prior 
to his death he lived retired and was 
a most respected and worthy man, who 
enjoyed the unqualified confidence and es- 
teem of all who knew him. His widow 
died March 22, 1906. In the family 
four children : Laura, now Mrs. Noyes ; 
J. Oliver, who is living in Baconsfield, 
Iowa; Anna, the wife of R. Herron John- 
son, of Adams, Kansas ; and Margaretta, 
the wife of Rev. T. S. Hawley. of Trini- 
dad, Colorado. 

Unto Dr. and Mrs. Noyes were born 
five children, four of whom yet survive. 
Fannie is living with her mother. Mary 
Coyle is the wife of Ralph Harper Mc- 
Kee, professor of chemistry at Lake For- 
est University near Chicago. Helen Mil- 
ler is now a teacher of languages at 
Synodecal College, at Fulton, Missouri. 
Julia Tate was a graduate of Wilson Col- 
lege at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, 
June 7, 1906. 

Dr. Noyes was a prominent and valued 



22O 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



member of the Masonic fraternity, serving 
as master of his lodge in Carthage for 
many years. In his political views he 
was an earnest and unfaltering republican, 
and was supervisor and for two terms 
was postmaster at Carthage. Not only 
in the line of his profession but in public 
and private life as well he did much ser- 
vice of a beneficial nature for his fellow- 
men. The sterling traits of his character, 
his many acts of kindness and charity and 
the honorable principles which formed the 
basic element of all that he did and said, 
made him a man whom to know was to 
respect and honor, and there are many 
residents of Carthage and Hancock 
county who still cherish his memory. His 
wife and daughters are members of the 
Presbyterian church. Mrs. Noyes or- 
ganized the society of the Daughters of 
the American Revolution in the fall of 
1897 an d was regent therein for three 
years. She is a lady of innate culture and 
refinement, of superior intelligence and 
of most kindly purpose and the family 
have long occupied an enviable position 
in social circles in Carthage. 



PROFESSOR JAMES E. WILLIAMS. 

Professor James E. Williams, superin- 
tendent of schools of Hancock county and 
one of the capable educators of western 
Illinois, was born in Hancock township, 
October n, 1859, his parents being P. 
D. and M. A. (Dale) Williams. The 
paternal grandfather, Rev. Levi Williams, 



was a Methodist divine, who preached for 
many years in Hancock county and this 
part of the state. While in New York 
the Williams family were close neighbors 
of the Mormon prophet, Joseph Smith. 
Rev. Levi Williams married a Miss 
Barnes, whose father was a sergeant in 
the war of 1812. The ancestry of the 
Williams family can be traced back to 
Roger Williams, the apostle of freedom, 
who founded the colony of Rhode Is- 
land, The father of our subject was born 
in Wayne county. New York, May 2, 
1836, while the mother's birth occurred 
in Hancock township, this county, on the 
1 2th of February, 1840. P. D. Williams 
arrived in -this county in 1837. almost 
seventy years ago and is now engaged in 
business as a shoe merchant of La Harpe, 
Illinois. Because of the fact that he lost 
a part of his hand in a threshing machine 
he could not go to war but was always a 
stalwart advocate of the Union cause. 
His political allegiance is given to the 
democracy and he has served as justice of 
the peace and school director. Both he 
and his wife are earnest and helpful mem- 
bers of the Christian church, in which 
he is now serving as an elder and also 
as president of the official board. People 
of the highest respectability, they enjoy 
the warm regard of all with whom they 
have come in contact and are numbered 
among the most prominent residents of 
their town. She at one time was a pupil 
of her husband when he was a teacher in 
Hancock county. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has at- 
tained the Royal Arch degree. In their 
family were nine children. The eldest 
is Professor Williams of this review. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



221 



Emma, who taught in the district schools 
of Hancock county for three or four years, 
is now the wife of J. M. Preston, of 
Fountain Green, Illinois. Ida is the wife 
of W. F. Moyes, of Monmouth, Illinois, 
and she, too, was a successful teacher of 
this county, having been in one room for 
seven years in Elvaston. Laura is the 
wife of George B. Howes, of Peoria, Illi- 
nois, and she, too, taught for several years 
in Hancock county, spending two years 
in the public schools of Carthage. Charles 
C. is now foreman of the Journal at 
Peoria, Illinois. . Mary, who was also a 
capable schoolteacher following the pro- 
fession for seven years in the public 
schools of La Harpe, is now the wife of 
E. I. Soule of that town. Kate, who 
taught for five years in the schools of 
La Harpe, is now a teacher in Bowen, 
Illinois. 

Professor Williams, whose name intro- 
duces this record, remained at home until 
nineteen years of age and during that 
period pursued his education in the public 
schools. He afterward entered Carthage 
College, from which he was graduated 
in the class of 1885, winning the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. Like his father he 
began life as a schoolteacher, which pro- 
fession he followed at Elvaston, where 
his sister also taught for a number of 
years. Professor Williams was connected 
with the schools there in 1883. Follow- 
ing the completion of his collegiate course 
he taught school at Camp Point, Illinois, 
having charge of the preparatory depart- 
ment there. In 1886 he took charge of 
the Burnside school and at the same time 
he devoted his time and energies to the 
study of law. The same year he was 



elected superintendent of the public 
schools at Ness City, Kansas, and organ- 
ized and graded the schools of that city, 
where he remained for four years, during 
which time he established the system of 
public instruction upon a safe and substan- 
tial basis. In 1892 he removed to La- 
crosse, Kansas, where he remained for 
two years as superintendent of the public 
schools, leaving that place to settle in La- 
Harpe, Illinois, where he was engaged in 
the dry goods business. He conducted a 
store there for several years with good 
success and was carrying on the trade at 
the time he was nominated and elected to 
his present office that of superintendent 
of schools of Hancock county. W r hile in 
La Harpe he was also a member of the 
board of education for several years and 
acted as its president for two years. The 
cause of education has always found in 
him a stalwart champion, who has enter- 
tained high ideals and labored untiringly 
for their adoption. 

On the I3th of June, 1892, Mr. Wil- 
liams was united in marriage to Miss 
Daisy K. Brown, of Ness City, Kansas, 
who was at one time a pupil of his in the 
high school. She is a daughter of Cap- 
tain J. W. and Catherine (Kouts) Brown, 
both of whom were natives of Indiana, 
in which state Mrs. Williams was also 
born. Her father served as a captain 
under Major McKinley in the Civil war 
and was personally and intimately ac- 
quainted with him. He was also a rela- 
tive of John Brown, of Harper's Ferry 
fame. His death occurred in March, 
1892, while Mrs. Brown passed away 
twenty-five years ago. In their family 
were five children, all of whom are living, 



222 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



namely : Effie, the wife of A. W. Nu- 
som. of Gervais, Oregon ; Mrs. Williams ; 
George W., also of Gervais, Oregon; 
Cora, the wife of W. A. Brooks, of that 
place ; and Helen, who lives with Mr. and 
Mrs. Williams and is a teacher in the 
schools of West Point. Unto Professor 
and Mrs. Williams have been born two 
children : Ralph Brown, who was born 
in La Harpe, December 13, 1895, and is 
now a student in the public schools of 
Carthage ; and Philip, who was born 
April 9, 1903, in Carthage. 

Professor Williams is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, Masonic and Odd 
Fellow fraternities and both he and his 
wife are members of the Christian church, 
in which they take an active and helpful 
part. He is now serving as one of its 
elders and has been superintendent of 
various Sunday-schools. The family 
home is on North Adams and Buchanan 
street, where about a year after coming 
to this state he erected an attractive resi- 
dence. His political allegiance is given 
to the democracy. In his private and 
public life he is methodical and systematic, 
so directing his business interests as to 
accomplish the best results possible. He 
has given uniform satisfaction by the ca- 
pable manner in which he has discharged 
the duties of the office which he is now 
filling. His practical experience as a 
teacher in the schoolroom well qualified 
him for the work and under his guidance 
the schools of Hancock county have made 
substantial improvements. Professor 
Williams is devoted to his home and 
family and is one in whom the graces 
of culture and learning have vied in mak- 
ing an interesting, entertaining gentleman. 



DAYTOX WILLIAM REED. 

Dayton William Reed is one of the ex- 
tensive landowners of Wythe township, 
having a valuable farm of three hundred 
and seventy- four acres on sections 16, 17, 
1 8 and 19. He is one of the native sons 
of this township, his birth having oc- 
curred on the 3Oth of September, 1854. 
His paternal grandfather was Jacob Reed, 
and his father, William W r allace Reed. 
The latter became a pioneer resident of 
Hancock county, taking up his abode in 
\Vythe township in 1836 when but sixteen 
years of age. He secured three hundred 
and twenty acres of wild prairie land and 
transformed the virgin soil into pro- 
ductive fields, sharing in the hardships 
and privations of pioneer life, while en- 
gaged in the arduous task of developing 
and improving a new farm. For more 
than six decades he resided upon the old 
homestead but in 1898 went to live with 
his daughter in this vicinity. In early 
manhood he had wedded Selena Chandler, 
a daughter of Adolphus Chandler, and 
she passed away in 1866. 

Dayton W. Reed was the second child 
and only son in a family of five children. 
At the usual age he entered the district 
schools and after completing his prelimi- 
nary education he spent one year as a 
student in Carthage College. Through 
the period of his minority he largely as- 
sisted his father in the work of the fields, 
and when twenty-one years of age he be- 
gan teaching school in W'ythe township, 
following that pursuit during the winter 
months, while in the summer seasons he 
carried on farming for twelv6 years. In 
the meantime, ambitious to achieve good 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



223 



farming property of his own, he made in- 
vestments in land, becoming owner of 
three hundred and twenty acres on sec- 
tions 17 and 1 8, Wythe township. He 
also bought eighty acres more on section 
1 6, and since 1894 he has resided con- 
tinuously at his present home. His landed 
possessions now comprise three hundred 
and seventy- four acres on section 16, 17, 
' 18 and 19, Wythe township, where he 
carries on general agricultural pursuits, 
also raises horses and cattle. He likewise 
feeds stock, both cattle and hogs for the 
market, shipping about two hundred head 
of hogs annually. He is a man of sound 
business judgment, reliable in his dealings 
and careful and progressive in his under- 
takings and the goodly measure of suc- 
cess which he is now enjoying has come 
to him as the reward of his own labors. 
On the loth of March, 1881, Mr. Reed 
was married to Miss Laura Fulton, who 
was born in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 9, 1857, a daughter of 
Robert and Harriett (Trussell) Fulton, 
natives of Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania and of Xew Hampshire respect- 
ively. Her paternal grandparents were 
William and Nancy Fulton, of Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
Reed have a family of eight children: 
Harriett, born January 30, 1882; Harry, 
who died in infancy; Clara, born May 3, 
1885; Frank, who died at the age of two 
years; Jessie, born March 16, 1889; 
Gratia, November 2, 1891 ; Laura, Decem- 
ber 15, 1893; and Robert, April 29, 1896. 
All of the living children are still at home. 
Mr. Reed has served as school treasurer 
since 1894 and is interested in the cause 
of education to the extent of giving hearty 



support to all progressive movements for 
the benefit of the schools. He votes with 
the Republican party and is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen camp at Warsaw, 
also holding membership in the Congre- 
gational church of Wythe township, of 
which he has been a trustee. Analyza- 
tion of his life record shows that he has 
placed his dependence upon the safe sub- 
stantial qualities of energy and determi- 
nation in order to secure success, realizing 
that "there is no excellence without great 
labor" and that "honesty is the best 
policy." 



ROBERT SMITH GORDON. . 

Robert Smith Gordon is acting as sta- 
tion agent for the Wasbash Railroad and 
also for the Toledo, Peoria & Western 
Railroad at Hamilton. He was borri here 
December 10, 1866, and belongs to one 
of the oldest and most prominent pio- 
neer families of this portion of the state. 
His paternal grandfather came to where 
the city of Hamilton now stands more 
than seven decades ago, there being fewer 
than five hundred people in the entire 
county at that time. He entered one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land from the 
government and it is upon this tract that 
the city of Hamilton now stands. He 
aided in reclaiming the wild land for the 
uses of civilization and was connected 
with the early development and progress 
of the county here until his death, which 
occurred in 1846, while his wife passed 
away in 1848. In their family were but 



224 



BIOGRAPHICAL REJ'IEU' 



two sons, the younger being Samuel Gor- 
don, father of our subject, who is men- 
tioned elsewhere in this work. "Samuel 
Gordon was born in Peterboro. Xew 
Hampshire, and after arriving at years 
, of maturity was married to Miss Per- 
melia Alvord, who was born in Erie 
county, Pennsylvania. Her father was a 
Baptist minister of that state and came 
to Hamilton at an early day, preaching 
in this place and in the county, so that 
he left the impress of his individuality 
upon the moral development and progress 
of the community. Samuel Gordon on 
starting out in life on his own account 
gave his attention to farming. He also 
laid out the Gordon addition to the city 
of Hamilton and was closely associated 
with many movements and events which 
have shaped the history of this part of 
the state. He was school director of 
Hamilton district, No. 3, and was city 
clerk for about four years. He was also 
alderman of the second ward for six years 
and his co-operation could always be 
counted upon as a helpful factor to pro- 
mote public progress and improvement. 
He died October 2, 1901, while his wife 
passed away September 19, 1890. She 
left a family of four daughters and two 
sons : Eleanor, who is a Unitarian min- 
ister located in Des Moines, Iowa; John 
A., a book merchant of Hamilton, Illi- 
nois; Alice" A., and Agnes C., who make 
their home together in the old homestead ; 
and Mabel B., a teacher in the public 
schools of Hamilton. 

The other member of the family is 
Robert Smith Gordon of this review, who 
was the fifth in order of birth. In his 
youth he attended the public schools and 



assisted his father in the work of the] 
home farm. At the age of seventeen 
years he put aside his textbooks and gave 
his undivided attention to farm labor and ' 
on the ist of May, 1886, he secured the 
position of station agent for the Wabash 
and Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroads at 
Hamilton, in which capacity he has since 
been engaged. He is a courteous, oblig- 
ing official, who has won the good will of 
many patrons of the road and at the same 
time he represents the corporation with 
true fidelity and devotion. He is likewise 
president of the Loan and Building As- 
sociations of Hamilton, which was or- 
ganized in 1889, while since 1901 he has 
filled the present position. The other of- 
ficers are A. B. Agnew, vice president; 
J. A. Gordon, secretary; and E. M. Le- 
Roy, treasurer. 

On the 2d of October, 1903, Mr. Gor- 
don was united in marriage to Miss Laura 

B. Bridges, who was born in Hamilton, 
April i, 1866, and is a daughter of W. 

C. Bridges. They had one child, Laura 
Ellen, born December 20, 1904, who died 
in June, 1905. Mr. Gordon has a very 
wide acquaintance in this part of the 
county and is a worthy representative of 
an honored pioneer family that has been 
associated with the substantial develop- 
ment and progress of this section of the 
state from an early day. In his political 
affiliation he is a republican and has 
served as alderman, mayor and township 
school trustee. Fraternally he is a Ma- 
son, belonging to the Blue Lodge, Royal 
Arch chapter and Order of the Eastern 
Star of Hamilton and Knights Templar 
of Augusta, being very highly appreciated 
bv all the members of each fratemitv. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



225 



CHARLES \V. BOSTON. 

Charles \Y. Boston, who carries on 
farming- in Carthage, his native township, 
was born January 13, 1862, his parents 
being Reuben J. and Sarah J. (Dale) 
T>i iston. The father was born in Ken- 
tucky and was brought to Illinois by his 
parents when about eight years of age, the 
family settling in Hancock county. The 
grandfather purchased land in Carthage 
township, where he made a home for him- 
self and family and under the parental 
roof Reuben Boston was reared to man- 
hood, becoming familiar with the arduous 
task of developing a new farm in a front- 
ier district. After attaining adult age he 
purchased the farm now owned and occu- 
pied by his son, Charles \V., on section 33, 
Carthage township, and comprising one 
hundred and ten acres of rich and pro- 
ductive land. He also bought other prop- 
erty from time to time until he became the 
owner of five hundred and sixty acres 
of valuable land all lying in Carthage 
township. He placed many improve- 
ments on these different tracts and made 
model farms of his property, contributing 
in large measure to the agricultural prog- 
ress and prosperity of this part of the 
state. Throughout his active life he 
carried on general farming and stock 
raising and in his later years removed to 
Carthage, where he lived retired, until 
his death, which occurred when he was 
sixty-seven years of age. His life was in 
consistent harmony with his professions 
as a member of the Methodist church and 
he was never known to take advantage of 
the necessities of his fellowmen in any 
trade transaction. His political allegiance 



was given to the democracy. His widow 
still lives in Carthage at the age of sev- 
enty-six "years and is a devoted Christian 
woman, holding membership with the 
Methodist church. 

Charles W. Boston acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Carthage 
township and during the periods of vaca- 
tion assisted in the home work. He con- 
tinued to aid in the labors of the farm 
and following his father's death he as- 
sumed its management and is now the 
owner of two hundred and thirty acres of 
the old estate upon which he was born. 
He has made additional improvements 
here, remodeling the house, and today 
has a fine farm property equipped with 
modern accessories and conveniences. 
Well kept fences divide the place into 
fields that are devoted to the raising of 
various cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate and the latest improved machinery 
is used in the work of plowing, planting 
and harvesting. He also raises high 
grades of stock, including cattle, hogs 
and horses, and he feeds cattle quite ex- 
tensively for market. 

Mr. Boston was married June 26, 1884, 
to Miss Mary Rowena Yetter, a daughter 
of William Yetter, who is now living a 
retired life in Carthage. He was born in 
Ohio seventy-two years ago, and in 1846 
came with his parents, Lewis and Sarah 
(Bear) Yetter to Hancock county. He 
was a soldier of the One Hundered Eight- 
eenth Illinois Volunter Infantry, and after 
his return engaged in farming in Carthage 
township till he returned to Carthage. 
His wife died in 1895, at the age of fifty- 
seven years. Mrs. Boston was born in 
this county near Webster and in that lo- 



226 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cality obtained her education. She has 
become the mother of six children, five 
of whom are living, namely : Ava May, 
who was the wife of David R. Kim- 
brough, a resident farmer of Carthage 
township, who died September 2, 1896; 
Golda ; Lula ; Gaylord ; Fern ; and Ernest, 
all at home. 

Mr. Boston exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures 
of the democracy but has never sought or 
desired office for himself. He, with his 
wife and the four eldest children belong to 
the Baptist church and he has lived an 
upright life, being found reliable in cit- 
izenship, straightforward in his business 
dealings and honorable in all of his rela- 
tions with his fellowmen. 



FRANCIS M. CUTLER. 

This is a utilitarian age and the suc- 
cessful man is he who recognizes his op- 
portunities and utilizes the forces at hand 
to best advantage. The laggard has no 
place in the world today and it is pre- 
eminently true that in America "labor is 
king." It is therefore the men of dili- 
gence, of enterprise and keen business dis- 
cernment, who are continually working 
their way to the front and to this class 
belonged Francis M. Cutler, a grain mer- 
chant of Carthage. He was born near 
this city February 15, 1855, a son of Na- 
than and Hannah (Ward) Cutler. His 
father was born on a farm in Erie county, 
New York, August 3, 1819, and in 1835 



took up his abode upon a farm near Can- 
ton, Fulton county, Illinois, where he re- 
sided until 1852, when he came to Han- 
cock county, settling four miles north of 
Carthage. There he resided until 1854, 
when he located upon the farm where the 
birth of Francis M. Cutler occurred. His 
wife was born in Wabash county. In- 
diana, July 27, 1817. Both were con- 
sistent members of the Baptist church, in 
which Mr. Cutler served for a number of 
years as deacon. His early political sup- . 
port was given to the democracy and he 
afterward become a stanch prohibitionist 
because of his views upon the temperance 
question. He filled the office of township 
supervisor and was also a member of the 
school board for several years. The 
family numbered seven children, of whom 
three died in infancy, while four are still 
living, namely : Parkhurst W., a stock- 
man residing near Carthage ; James C., 
living four miles southeast of Carthage, 
Illinois; Francis M. ; and Martha E., the 
wife of Millard F. Turner, of Oklahoma. 
The mother died in 1890 and the father 
in 1898, their remains being laid to rest 
in Carthage cemetery. 

Francis M. Cutler was educated in the 
district schools of Carthage and in Cen- 
tral college at Pella, Iowa, which he at- 
tended for two years. He was trained 
to all the work of the home farm and 
subsequently settled upon a farm of his 
own southeast of Carthage. There for 
many years he successfully and energet- 
ically carried on general agricultural pur- 
suits, but in 1891 retired from his farming 
operations and was afterward engaged in 
the grain trade at Carthage. He dealt in 
grain in large quantities, having the only 




FRANCIS M. CUTLER 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



227 



.levutor in Carthage, and his business fur- 

fcished an excellent market for the farm- 
ers. His elevator had a capacity of 

'[twenty thousand bushels and in the con- 
duct of the business Mr. Cutler met with 

jvery gratifying success. After Septem- 
ber. 1904, he also conducted a real estate 
and emigration agency, making trips with 

'people to the southwest and locating for 
them farms in Kansas, Oklahoma and the 
Indian Territory, but mostly in Ok- 
lahoma. 

In 1882 Mr. Cutler wedded Mary E. 
Harnest, a native of this county and a 
daughter of Samuel E. Harnest, of Car- 
thage. She died May 13, 1895, leaving a 
son who died at the age of seventeen 
years. On the i8th of November, 1897, 
Mr. Cutler wedded Mrs. Ida Byington, 
(nee Talbot), -who was born on a farm 
near Roseville, Illinois, and by her former 
marriage had a daughter, Nellie, who was 
born in Burlington, Iowa, and is now, at 
the age of eighteen years, attending 
Shurtleff College at Upper Alton, Illinois. 
She was also a student in the Woman's 
College at Jacksonville, Illinois, for two 
years and is making a specialty of the 
study of music. Mrs. Cutler was the 
widow of Charles E. Byington, who 
was a dealer in hats and men's furnish- 
ing goods in Burlington, Iowa, and 
a son of Judge Byington, of Iowa City, 
Iowa. Mrs. Cutler bore the maiden 
name of Ida Talbot and was a daughter 
of John Talbot, a soldier of the Civil war, 
who enlisted from Illinois. In his busi- 
ness life he was an attorney at Galesburg, 
Illinois. His widow still survives and 
now makes her home with her daughter, 
Mrs. Cutler. In December, 1905, Mr. 



Cutler moved his family to an elegant new 
modern residence on Main street. His 
business interests were most carefully con- 
ducted, his efforts being discerningly di- 
rected along well defined lines of labor 
that resulted in the acquirement of grati- 
fying success. In his political views he 
was a prohibitionist and worked with the 
party for the past twelve or fourteen 
years. Both he and mwwife were mem- 
bers of the Baptist churgp and in its dif- 
ferent activities Mrs. CutiajSftfeost help- 
ful. She is a teacher in'^UjaSunday- 
school, president of the missionary so- 
ciety and is likewise vice pres%ent of the 
P. E. O. In the city wher^they re- 
sided both were held in high esteem and 
their friends were many, while the hospi- 
tality of their own home was greatly 
enjoyed. 

Mr. Cutler passed away August 10, 
1906, and is buried at Moss Ridge ceme- 
tery. Mr. Cutler was highly esteemed by 
his fellowmen for his Christian manhood, 
his generous nature, his quiet benevo- 
lence, and his devotion to family and 
friends. While friends may think on his 
departure with sorrowful regret, it is the 
home that grief has its abiding place. 
Only last December they moved into their 
beautiful new home on Main street. With 
everything worth living for bound up in 
that little family circle, death has come 
and it can be no more the same. But 
with grief abides also Christian faith and 
fortitude, and no words of consolation 
need be expressed to those who already 
appreciate the value of the precious 
promises given by our Creator as recorded 
in the Scriptures both in the Old and New 
Testament. 



228 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



CHARLES GERVIS CLARK. 

Charles Gervis Clark, who in 1863, be- 
came a resident of Carthage, where for 
more than a quarter of a century he was 
engaged in the real estate business, rank- 
ing among the men worthy of the public 
trust, his life work reflecting credit and 
honor upon the state in which he made 
his home, was born in New Berlin, New 
York, January 8, 1820, a son of Gervis 
and Rachel (Caple) Clark. His maternal 
grandfather, Colonel Caple, was a soldier 
of the Revolutionary war and an uncle of 
our subject was a soldier in the Mexican 
war, Gervis Clark, Sr., died when his 
son was only four months old, leaving 
the mother with the care of this, her only 
child. Later she married a Mr. Stimp- 
son and there was one daughter by that 
union, Mrs. A. E. Alexander, who is 
now living at Denver, Colorado. 

Charles Gervis Clark of this review 
acquired his education in the schools of 
Jefferson and of Jamestown, New York, 
and in both cities studied law. Follow- 
ing his preparation for the bar he engaged 
in active practice in Cobleskill. Schoharie 
county, New York, where he remained for 
eight years. He then went to Jamestown, 
New York, where he remained for a num- 
ber of years and was a partner of Judge 
Abner Hazeltine. and in April. 1863, he 
came to Carthage, where he turned his 
attention to the real estate business. He 
became familiar with land values and en- 
abled many clients to make judicious and 
satisfying investments and at the same 
time contributed to his individual success. 

Mr. Clark was married on the boundary 
of Greene and Albany counties. New 



York, at Greenville, December 3, 1846, 
the lady of his choice being Miss Mary 
Andrews, who was born in Worcester, 
Otsego county, New York, April 30, 1826, 
a daughter of Simeon J. and Clarissa 
(Lake) Andrews. Her father was born at 
Middlefield, Otsego county, New York, 
and died when the daughter was only 
eighteen months old. The mother's birth 
occurred in Greenville, Greene county, 
New York, and she passed away at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Clark, in Car- 
thage on the the i3th of September, 1886, 
at the very advanced age of eighty-nine 
years, her remains being interred in Moss 
Ridge cemetery. She was the daughter 
of a Revolutionary soldier. Mr. An- 
drews was a merchant, drover and farmer 
and was an enterprising business man. 
Unto him and his wife were born six 
children: Evaline, who died in child- 
hood ; one who died in infancy ; Lucy, 
who became the wife of Reuben Reed, 
who resides in Kent, Orleans county. New 
York, but both are now deceased; Am- 
brose, who died at the home of Mrs. Clark 
in 1873; Mary, now Mrs. Clark; and 
Elizabeth, who became the wife of Fred- 
erick Chapman and made her home in 
Wisconsin, but died in Jersey City, New 
Jersey. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark became the par- 
ents of eight children. Charles Andrews 
married Miss Jennie McCulloch and died 
in 1905, leaving a widow and eight chil- 
dren, Edward, Margaret, Gervis, Stewart, 
Mary, George, Virginia and Robert. 
Ella Lee Clark died in childhood. George, 
Fred, Libbie, Louis, and Ada also passed 
away in childhood. Edward, the only 
surviving member of the family, is living 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



229 



with his mother and is engaged in the 
real estate business in Carthage. Mr. 
Clark was a devoted member of the Pres- 
byterian church, to which his widow also 
belongs. She has always been a teacher 
in the Sunday-school, being a teacher in 
the primary department for forty years. 
Mr. Clark took a most active and helpful 
part in church work, doing all in his power 
to promote its growth and extend its 
influence. In politics he was a republican, 
but was without aspiration for .office, pre- 
ferring to devote his undivided time and 
attention to his business affairs, which 
were of an important character and 
reached extensive proportions. He pos- 
sessed strong, native intelligence, laudable 
ambition and high purpose and displayed 
many of the sterling traits of character 
which won him recognition as one of na- 
ture's noblemen. Although he started 
out in life in moderate circumstances he 
amassed considerable means and was thus 
enabled to leave a goodly property to his 
widow. He passed away April n, 1900, 
his remains being interred in Moss Ridge 
cemetery at Carthage. During the years 
of his residence here he had won many 
friends by reason of his straightforward 
dealing, his consideration for others and 
his kindly, social nature. Mrs. Clark is 
now eighty years of age but is still quite 
active and busies herself with reading or 
needlework. She is indeed a very bright 
and intelligent lady, spending the evening 
of her days in an attractive home sur- 
rounded by many friends. She has a 
large circle of friends in Carthage who 
will doubtless receive with pleasure the 
record of her life, as published in the 
Biographical Review of Hancock County. 



HOMER J. ELSEA, D. O. 

It is within comparatively recent years 
that osteopathy has become a factor in the 
healing of diseases but in a comparatively 
short time it has become a universally ac- 
knowledged power in checking the rav- 
ages of illness and restoring health and 
there are today many practitioners of this 
school, not only in America but through- 
out the country, whose work is proving 
an inestimable boon to their fellowmen. 
Dr. Elsea, following this profession in 
Carthage, has an extensive patronage 
throughout the city and this part of the 
state and is one of the worthy and capable 
exponents of the science. His birth oc- 
curred, in Randolph county, Missouri, 
February 3, 1879, his parents being Ben- 
jamin and Telitha (Taylor) Elsea. The 
father was born in Shenandoah county, 
Virginia, in November, 1822. There is 
now no surviving member of his father's 
family. The mother of our subject was 
born in Boyle county, Kentucky, April 
1 6, 1841, and at an early day her father 
removed to Missouri, where he resided 
until after the outbreak of the Civil war, 
when he came to Illinois, where he fol- 
lowed farming, his death occurring in this 
state. In his family were ten children, 
five of whom are yet living: William 
Taylor, a resident of Randolph county, 
Missouri; Mrs. Telitha Elsea; Mary, the 
wife of Thomas Heath, of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri ; Joseph, who is living in Illinois ; 
and Mrs. Fannie Skeggs, of this state. 

Benjamin Elsea went to Missouri with 
his father when about sixteen years of 
age and there resided upon a farm, mak- 
ing his home in that state until his death. 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Although he was not a soldier during the 
Civil war he worked for the government 
throughout the period of the struggle, car- 
rying the mail for the soldiers who were 
so far away from home and friends. His 
political allegiance was given to the de- 
mocracy and for many years he served 
as justice of the peace, discharging his 
duties with fairness and impartiality. 
Both he and his wife were members of the 
Christian church. He was twice married, 
his first union being with Mary Jane 
Graff ord, who died 'in 1859, leaving five 
children, of whom four are living: J. 
W., Benjamin and Felix Grundy, all of 
Randolph county, Missouri ; and John C., 
who resides in San Francisco, California. 
For his second wife Benjamin Elsea_ chose 
Telitha Taylor and they had eight chil- 
dren, of whom seven yet survive. Lydia 
is the wife of L. P. Hatler, of Havre, 
Montana, and has four children, Frank, 
Iva, Ernest and Oval; David J. Elsea, a 
graduate of the State Normal School at 
Kirksville, Missouri, became a singing 
evangelist and at Colchester, Illinois, was 
ordained a minister of the Christian 
church. He is now one of the able 
preachers of that denomination and has 
charge of the church in Creston, Iowa. 
He married Miss Ruby Jameson, of 
Abingdon, Illinois. Leona Florence is 
the wife of W. L. Holbrook, of Jetmore, 
Kansas. Thomas G. died at the age of 
two and a half years. Lucy Victoria is 
the wife of Dr. F. M. Henderson, of 
Stronghurst, Illinois. Both are grad- 
uates of the American School of Oste- 
opathy at Kirksville, Missouri, and they 
have one child, Madge Elsea Henderson, 
ten years of age. Lena Catherine is the 



wife of Dr. J. S. Barker, formerly of 
Memphis, Missouri. They, too, are 
graduates of the Osteopathic School at 
Kirksville and are now living in La 
Harpe, Illinois. Homer J. is the seventh 
in order of birth. Lottie G. is the wife of 
Dr. C. I. Stephenson, formerly of Lin- 
coln, Nebraska, and now located at Au- 
burn, Nebraska. They, too, are grad- 
uates of the Kirkville School of Oste- 
opathy. The have one child, Elsea Win- 
nebeth. In the family there is one min- 
ister of the gospel, three daughters, one 
son and three sons-in-law, who are prac- 
titioners of osteopathy. The mother of 
this family is still living, making her 
home among her children. She had two 
brothers, William and Silas Taylor, who 
were soldiers of the Civil war, enlisting 
in Missouri. 

Dr. Elsea, of Carthage, was a student in 
the district schools of Randolph county, 
Missouri, and afterward was graduated 
from the high school of Kirksville, Mis- 
souri, having attended school there for 
five years. He later entered the State 
Normal at Kirksville, where his more 
specifically literary education was com- 
pleted. He was afterward in a mercantile 
school in Kirksville for six months, at the 
end of which time he entered the Amer- 
ican School of Osteopathy, at Kirksville, 
from which institution he was graduated 
on the 26th of June, 1902. He has since 
been located in Carthage He also has 
an office in Dallas City, Illinois, where 
he spends each Monday and Friday. He 
has a large city and country practice and 
has been very successful, effecting many 
cures among his patrons. He is well 
qualified for the profession by reason of 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



28 1 



his thorough preparation and he is con- 
tinually promoting his efficiency through 
the knowledge which comes by experience. 

Dr. Elsea was married October 2, 1904, 
to Miss Ava Murphy, who was born near 
Abingdon, Illinois, and is a daughter of 
Henry and Althea Murphy. Her father 
was a farmer and removed from Illinois 
to Nebraska, where he lived for two years, 
when he went to Kansas, where he died 
seventeen years ago. Following the 
father's death Mrs. Murphy and the chil- 
dren returned to Abingdon, Illinois, where 
she still makes her home. Mr. Murphy 
was a stalwart supporter of democratic 
principles and was a prominent member 
of the Christian church, serving as elder 
for many years, frequently preaching on 
Sundays, while through the week he fol- 
lowed farming. He served for a number 
of years as one of the trustees of Abing- 
don College, an institution conducted 
under the auspices of the Christian church. 
Unto him and his wife were bom nine 
children, who are yet living, as follows : 
M. C., of Abingdon, Illinois ; Adda, the 
wife of C. W. Robinson, of Abingdon; 
Clinnie, the wife of J. J. Armstrong, of 
Lincoln, Nebraska; I. E., living in Love- 
land, California; Meadie, with her mother 
in Abingdon; J. W., of Dallas City, Illi- 
nois ; 6. H., with his mother in Abingdon. 

Both Dr. and Mrs. Elsea are faithful 
members of the Christian church and take 
an active part in its work. He is a stanch 
prohibitionist, thus giving expression of 
his belief in temperance principles, which 
he labors to uphold in every possible way. 
He has his office at his residence at No. 
in Adams street. Though a young man 
he has been very successful. He is a 



gentleman of fine personal appearance, 
reserved and dignified in manner, posses- 
sing an enterprising spirit and laudable 
ambition. Both he and his wife and her 
mother are welcomed into the best social 
circles of the city and have gained many 
friends during the period of their resi- 
dence here. 



SAMUEL -T. STONE. 

Samuel T. Stone, deceased, was a florist 
of Carthage and conducted the only green- 
houses in Hancock county. He was born 
at Stone's Prairie, Adams county, Illinois, 
September 25, 1855, his parents, Enoch 
P. and Emily (Burke) Stone, being 
farming people of that locality. The 
father continued to follow farming there 
until the spring of 1856, when he re- 
moved to Pontoosuc township, Hancock 
county, settling upon a farm, where he 
made his home until 1869. He then re- 
moved to what became the Stone home- 
stead, where he conducted a nursery busi- 
ness southeast of Carthage. His death 
occurred there December 16, 1880, while 
his wife passed away February 13, 1891, 
the remains of both being interred in 
Myers cemetery in Pontoosuc township. 
Their religious faith was that of the Meth- 
odist church. In their family were eight 
children: E. R., now living in Kansas; 
Eliza J., the deceased wife of Ervin Kid- 
son ; Mary A., the wife of Richard Pome- 
roy, of Elvaston, Illinois; Melvina, the 
wife of Benton Hull, of Pontoosuc town- 
ship; Ellen, who ly/es with her sister in 



232 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Elvaston; Irel H., of Kirksville, Mis- 
souri; Ervin W., of Beardstown, Illinois; 
and Samuel T., deceased. 

In taking up the personal - history of 
Samuel T. Stone we present to our readers 
the life record of one who was a respected 
and prominent business man in commer- 
cial circles in Carthage for a number of 
years. He acquired his early education 
in the district schools and afterward at- 
tended the Carthage high school and the 
Carthage college. He then engaged in 
the nursery business with his father until 
twenty-one years of age, after which he 
carried on a farm of his own until 1895, 
devoting it to nursery stock. In that year 
he added a greenhouse and more and 
more largely concentrated his energies 
upon the florist's business. The same 
year he took up his abode on Main street 
in Carthage, where he established a green- 
house, conducting at the same time the 
one upon his farm. This is the only 
greenhouse in Hancock county. It is 
steamheatecl and splendidly equipped in all 
particulars. Mr. Stone soon secured a 
liberal patronage and his business in this 
line proved profitable from the beginning. 

On the 1 8th of March, 1891, was cele- 
brated the marriage of Samuel T. Stone 
and Miss Ava L. Leighton, who was 
born in Des Moines county, Iowa, Jan- 
uary 31, 1867, a daughter of William E. 
and Ella A. (Waller) Leighton. The 
mother was born in Shellsburg, Iowa, 
September 27, 1847, and the father, a 
native of the same state, was bom Au- 
gust 14, 1839. Mr. Leighton was for 
four years connected with the commissary 
department during the Civil war. He has 
always been a farmer and still supervises 
a farm in Hancock county, although he 



makes his home in Carthage, having come 
to Hancock county in 1889. Both he and 
his wife are consistent members and 
earnest workers in the Christian church 
and he is a democrat in his political views. 
In their family are four children, all of 
whom are living, namely : Mrs. Stone ; 
Hope, a teacher in the public schools of 
Bowen, Illinois; George E., living in 
Galesburg, this state; and Edith M., who 
has successfully taught in the public 
schools of Carthage and Hancock county. 
Mrs. Stone is eligible to membership 
in the Daugthers of the American Revolu- 
tion, as among her ancestors were those 
who fought for the independence of the 
nation. James Leighton, a brother of her 
father, was killed in the battle of Vicks- 
burg. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Stone were 
born seven children: William A., Gladys 
Ida, Edward Harold, Clifford L., Clara, 
Gertrude A. and Adelaide Lenore, all of 
whom are natives of Hancock county. 
Mr. Stone died December 27, 1905, after 
an illness of several weeks and his re- 
mains were interred in Moss Ridge ceme- 
tery. In manner he was quiet and re- 
served, but was always interested in 
modern enterprises and though he was 
not a politician in the sense of office seek- 
ing he did much in a quiet way to promote 
the welfare of his party, to which he was 
at all times loyal. He voted with the re- 
publican organization and was connected 
with the Modern Woodmen. He was 
also a city fireman. Both he and his wife 
held membership in the Methodist church 
and did all in their power to promote its 
welfare and growth. In his business 
affairs Mr. Stone wrought along modem 
lines, realizing that there is no excellence 
without labor and his close application 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



233 



and diligence made his business a profit- 
able one. Mrs. Stone is still continuing 
the business and she employs men to 
keep the furnace going in the greenhouses 
night and day. She is a bright, energetic 
business woman, who has an intimate 
knowledge of the trade and the needs of 
the plants and flowers and the products 
of the greenhouses find a ready sale on 
the market because of beauty, color, size 
and fragrance. In his family Mr. Stone 
was a kind and loving husband and father 
and for many years was a very dutiful 
son to his aged mother, to whom he gave 
filial care and attention. 



WILLIAM H. HONCE. 

William H. Honce, deceased, who in 
public regard occupied an enviable posi- 
tion, so that his death was the occasion 
of uniform- regret when his life's labors 
were ended, was a native of Monmouth 
county, New Jersey, born on the 26th of 
July, 1830. He remained in the place 
of his birth until nineteen years of age 
and acquired his education in the public 
schools there. Thinking to have better 
business opportunities in the west he then 
went to Butler county, Ohio, where he 
secured employment as a farm hand by 
the month, residing in that county until 
after his marriage to Miss Sarah Jane 
McBroom, a daughter of Andrew and 
Jane (Robinson) McBroom. The wed- 
ding was celebrated at Middletown, Ohio, 



November 27, 1851, and the young couple 
resided upon a farm in Butler county 
for about three years after their marriage. 

On the expiration of that period they 
removed to Adams county, Illinois, where 
they spent two years and then came to 
Hancock county, settling in Montebello 
township, where Mr. Honce purchased 
a farm of eighty acres, beginning its 
cultivation with characteristic energy. 
He added to this farm from time to time 
until at his death he owned two hundred 
acres of rich land, all of which was under 
cultivation. The improvements were 
placed there by him and he developed a 
model farm property, which he carefully 
cultivated until his demise. His fields 
were well tilled and he annually harvested 
good crops, while the improvements upon 
his place were in keeping with ideas of 
model farming. 

Mrs. Honce was educated in Butler 
county, Ohio, where her father followed 
farming. Later he removed to Indiana, 
spending his remaining days in that state, 
his death occurring about twenty-six 
years ago. His wife also passed away in 
Indiana when Mrs. Honce -was but six 
years of age. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Honce 
were born seven children, of whom Mrs. 
W. M. Moore is the eldest. Lizzie, the 
second daughter, is now the wife of Thad- 
deus Thomas and has two children, Alta 
and Lester. Mrs. William H. Thomas is 
the third of the family and is mentioned 
elsewhere in this work. Anna is the wife 
of George Phipps and has three children, 
Harry, Vera and Carl. Ollie is the wife 
of John Marshall and has four children, 
Clyde, Greta, Yetta and Lois. W r illiam 
R. married Minnie Brady and has one 



234 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



child, Beulah. Mary L. died at the family 
home in Montebello township, at the age 
of nineteen years. 

In his political views Mr. Honce was a 
democrat but cared nothing for office, 
preferring to devote his time and atten- 
tion to his business affairs, in which he 
met with signal success. He made a 
creditable -record in agricultural circles 
and left a valuable farm property to his 
family. He died August i, 1899. 



WILLIAM H. THOMAS. 

William H. Thomas, deceased, was one 
of the early settlers of Hancock county 
and a representative farmer, whose busi- 
ness activity and devotion to the public 
good made him a leading and valued resi- 
dent of this part of the state. He was 
born near Columbus, in Adams county, 
Illinois, November 29, 1851, and when 
but two years of age was brought to So- 
nora township by his parents, Isaac and 
Louisa (Nichols) Thomas, who took up 
their abode in this county in 1853. His 
father was born in Kentucky and his 
mother in Adams county, Illinois. She 
is still living and makes her home in Car- 
thage with three of her children. The 
father, however, passed away upon the 
home farm in 1901. He had for many 
years been a prosperous and enterprising 
agriculturist of the community, his resi- 
dence here covering a half century. He 



worked earnestly and persistently and his 
diligence and perseverance constituted 
strong and salient elements in his success. 
He was a member of the Christian church 
and his life was in harmony with his 
professions. 

William H. Thomas was reared upon 
the old homestead farm and acquired his 
education in the public schools of Sonora 
township, pursuing his studies through 
the winter months, while in the summer 
seasons he aided in the labors of the fields. 
He worked with his father until his mar- 
riage, after which he purchased a farm 
in Montebello township of two hundred 
acres, devoting his attention to its culti- 
vation and improvement until his removal 
to Elvaston. He was married December 
24, 1878, to Miss Alpharetta Honce, a 
daughter of William H. and Sarah Jane 
(McBroom) Honce, the former a native 
of New Jersey and the latter of Indiana. 
They became residents of Ohio at an early 
day and in that state Mrs. Honce was 
reared. About fifty-five years ago they 
came to Illinois, settling in Montebello 
township, Hancock county, among its pio- 
neer residents. There Mr. Honce pur- 
chased a tract of land and developed a 
farm, making a good home for himself 
and family. His remaining days were 
devoted to the improvement of the prop- 
erty and upon that place he passed away 
on the ist of August. 1899, his remains 
being interred in Montebello township. 
His widow still survives him and now 
resides with her children, further mention 
being made of the family on another page 
of this work. She had six children : 
Lydia, now the wife of W. M. Moore, 
of Hamilton, Illinois; Lizzie, the wife of 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



235 



Thaddeus Thomas, of Montebello town- 
ship, Hancock county ; Mrs. Thomas of 
this review ; Anna, the wife of George 
Hliipps. of Prairie township; Ollie. the 
wife of John Marshall; and William R., 
who is a grain and produce merchant en- 
gaged in business at Hamilton. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
was blessed with three children, all of 
whom are yet living. George M., resid- 
ing on the old home farm in Montebello 
township, where he is successfully en- 
gaged in carrying on general agricultural 
pursuits, married Miss Stella Miller, of 
Elvaston, a daughter of Dr. J. R. Miller, 
of Elvaston, Illinois. Minnie Leota is the 
wife of Frank Rohrbaugh, a farmer of 
Elvaston. Yetta May is the wife of 
Claude Walker, a resident farmer of 
Prairie township. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas resided in Sonora township until 
the spring of 1881 and then removed to 
a farm, which Mr. Thomas purchased, 
about three miles and a half northwest 
of Elvaston. There they resided for 
twenty-one years, his attention being 
given to the work of the fields and the 
further improvement of the property but 
in 1903 he determined to retire from 
active business life and took up his abode 
in Elvaston, where he erected the resi- 
dence which is now occupied by his 
widow. There he passed away on Sat- 
urday, February 6, 1904, at the age of 
fifty-two years, two months and eight 
days. He had resided in the county for 
more than a half century, or practically 
throughout the period of his entire life 
and those who had known him from his 
boyhood days recognized in him the ster- 



ling traits of character in harmony with 
the strong and salient principles of an 
honorable manhood. He was active and 
industrious in business and was straight- 
forward in his dealings. His political 
views were in accord with democratic 
principles but he did not care for office. 
He held membership in the Presbyterian 
church and was serving as one of its 
trustees at the time of his death. He was 
interested in all that pertained to the 
material, intellectual or moral progress of 
his community and his support of bene- 
ficial public measures was never of a luke- 
warm character but was strong and stead- 
fast, so that he became one of the valued 
citizens of his part of the county. 



HARRISON O. KNOX. 

Harrison O. Knox was the first white 
man born in Wythe township, and it 
would be difficult to find many residents 
of this county who are more familiar with 
its history or have longer resided within 
its borders. Events which are to others 
only matters of hearsay have been to him 
matters of personal experience or obser- 
vation, and he has been an. interested wit- 
ness of the growth and development of 
the county from pioneer times to the 
present. His memory goes back to the 
days when many of the homes were log 
cabins, in which were huge fireplaces, 
over which the cooking was done, while 
the little home was lighted by tallow 
candles, and the work of the fields was 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



done with primitive farm machinery. All 
this has changed and Mr. Knox has kept 
pace with the onward march of progress. 
He was born in Green Plains on sec- 
tion 25, Wythe township, May 5, 1833. 
His parents were Samuel and Malinda 
(Doughty) Knox, and the maternal 
grandfather was Thomas Doughty, a sol- 
dier of the Revolutionary war. Relatives 
of Mr. Knox were also members of the 
Union army in the Civil war. The father 
was born on the ocean while his parents 
were coming from Scotland to the new 
world in 1775, and his wife was a native 
of Virginia, born in 1794. They came 
to Illinois in 1830, and in 1832, took 
up their abode in Hancock county, their 
son Harrison being the first white child 
born in the part of the county where they 
made their home. Samuel Knox was a 
member and minister of the Christian 
church, and while living in Wythe town- 
ship, preached the first sermon ever deliv- 
ered within its borders. This was in 
1832. He also preached in McDonough 
and Adams counties, and in Iowa and 
Missouri, doing much good work in the 
spread of the gospel and in planting the 
seeds of Christian civilization in the mid- 
dle west. He died in the year -1865, and 
thus passed away one whom to know was 
to esteem and honor. The world is better 
for his having lived and he left behind 
a memory which is still cherished by all 
who knew him. His wife survived until 
1871, and both were laid to rest in Green 
Plains cemetery in Wilcox township. 
Their children were seven in number, of 
whom four are now living: William, 
who is living in California, and is eighty- 
two years of age ; Franklin., of Kansas ; 



Harrison O., of this review; and Sarah, 
the wife of George B. Reid, of Monroe 
City, Missouri. 

Harrison O. Knox acquired his early 
education in the schools of Green Plains 
and afterward attended the Warsaw high 
school. He was reared to agricultural 
pursuits and throughout his entire life has 
followed farming as a vocation. Hav- 
ing reached man's estate he was married 
in 1862 to Miss Sarah Louisa Crawford, 
whose birth occurred in Wythe township, 
in 1843, her parents being Thomas and 
Jane (Stockton) Crawford, both of whom 
are now deceased. Mrs. Knox died in 
1875, leaving a daughter, Eva J., now the 
wife of Charles Homer McMahan, of 
Wilcox township. They became the par- 
ents of five children, Carl D., Robert F., 
William R., George H. and Francis H. 
On the 22d of March, 1882, Mr. Knox 
was again married, his second union being 
with Miss Hannah W. Davidson, who 
was born in Sussex county, Delaware, in 
1859, a daughter of Samuel and Margaret 
J. (Christopher) Davidson. They, too, 
were natives of Delaware, the former 
born September 7, 1818, and the latter 
in 1824. The father devoted his life to 
general agricultural pursuits, and in 1869 
came to Hancock county, settling in Wil- 
cox township. Thirty years later he 
passed away, in 1899, while his wife died 
in 1898, and they were laid to rest side 
by side in the Congregational cemetery 
in Wythe township. Mr. Davidson was 
drafted for service in the Civil war but 
was too old to go to the front. In their 
family were seven children : Francina, 
who died in infancy ; William Henry, of 
Carthage; Joseph B., who lives in Basco, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



237 



Illinois; Sarah Frances, and Elizabeth 
Annetta, both deceased ; Hannah W., now 
Mrs. Knox ; and Edward P., of Wythe 
township. Mrs. Davidson died Novem- 
ber 25, 1898, at the home of Mrs. Knox, 
and Mr. Davidson passed away at Basco, 
M^y 30, 1899. They were married in 
1842 and were earnest Christian people, 
respected by all who knew them. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Knox has been born one 
son, Harrison Lucian, whose birth oc- 
curred in 1888 in Wilcox township, and 
he is at home with his parents. He has 
been liberally educated and was a student 
in Warsaw Seminary. 

After his first marriage Mr. Knox lived 
in Wythe township for two years, and 
then removed toWarsaw, where he en- 
gaged in the dry goods business for three 
years. Subsequently he devoted two 
years to the milling business and in 1873 
he came to Wilcox township, where he 
has since carried on general farming. In 
1879 he bought forty acres of land on 
section 25, where he built a home, in 
which he has since resided, his attention 
being given to the cultivation and devel- 
opment of the fields. He taught school 
in Walker, Wythe, Wilcox and Rocky 
Run townships before his return to Wil- 
cox township and even before his removal 
to Warsaw, thus being identified with the 
early educational progress of his part of 
the county. He has never been interested 
in the progress and development of the 
county along material, social, intellectual 
and moral lines and his co-operation has 
ever been a valued factor in movements 
for the public good. His political alle- 
giance has been given to the Republican 
party since its organization. His first 



presidential vote was cast for Millard 
Fillmore in the Wythe schoolhouse on 
the 4th of November, 1856, when he was 
defeated by James Buchanan. On the 6th 
of November, 1860, Mr. Knox voted for 
Abraham Lincoln at Bank's schoolhouse 
in Rocky Run township, where he was 
teaching in a log building, having there 
one hundred and eight scholars, or an 
average of sixty-two and a half for six 
months. Since 1860 he has continuously 
voted the republican ticket and he has 
been honored with various local offices, 
serving as school director, as school treas- 
urer for sixteen years, as tax collector, 
as assessor and as town clerk. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Wythe 
Christian church known as the old brick 
church and live in harmony with their 
professions. Mr. Knox is one whose 
memory forms a connecting link between 
the primitive past and the progressive 
present and he relates in most interest- 
ing manner many incidents of the early 
days. Mr. Knox began life as a poor 
boy but has worked his way steadily up- 
ward and his life record has been charac- 
terized by continuous progress along 
many lines. He has gained success and 
at the same time has developed a charac- 
ter which makes him worthy of the trust 
and confidence of his fellowmen. 



SIMON D. WEISER. 

S. D. Weiser, superintendent of the 
Hancock County Infirmary and poor 



2 3 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



farm, was born at Northumberland, 
Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 6th of June, 1861, there residing 
until 1872, when he came to Illinois and 
took up his abode at Fountain Green, 
Hancock county. His parents were Solo- 
mon and Mary A. (Miller) Weiser, like- 
wise natives of Northumberland county. 
The great-grandfather, Conrad Weiser, 
was an early resident of Pennsylvania, 
residing near Philadelphia. He was a 
warm personal friend of Washington and 
served as colonel in the Revolutionary 
war. His son, Philip Weiser. was a pio- 
neer to Northumberland county and 
bought a large tract of land there. He 
was a very successful man and at the 
time of his death, about the close of the 
Civil war, he was considered the wealth- 
iest man in Northumberland county. 
Solomon Weiser was the eighth in a fam- 
ily of nine children and was educated 
at the high school at Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and later he was an extensive 
farmer and followed that ocupation 
throughout his entire life- in order to pro- 
vide for his family. Selling there he 
moved his family to Hancock county and 
purchased a tract of land in Fountain 
Green township upon his removal to the 
middle west in 1872, and there he re- 
mained until his death, which occurred 
when he was about eighty-one years of 
age. He was a democrat in politics and 
a public-spirited man, although not an 
office seeker. However, he served as 
treasurer of Northumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, at an early day. His re- 
mains were interred in Fountain Green 
cemetery and his widow still makes her 
home in the village of Fountain Green. 



She is a member of the Lutheran church 
and a most estimable lady. She was 
born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. 
Her father was an extensive land and 
mine owner in the coal and iron regions 
of Pennsylvania. 

S. D. Weiser is one of a family of ten 
children, seven of whom yet survive and 
as stated, he came to Illinois with his par- 
ents when a youth of eleven years. His 
early educational privileges were supple- 
mented by study in Carthage College and 
he also attended the Western Illinois Nor- 
mal School, at Macomb, this state. He 
remained upon the home farm for some 
years after completing his education, and 
then became a school teacher, acting as 
principal of the schools at Nauvoo, Illi- 
nois, for eight years, and also teaching 
in different places in the county. He like- 
wise followed that profession in Kansas, 
where he resided for several years, but 
regarding this merely as an initial step 
to further professional labor, he took up 
the study of law in Carthage in the office 
of Manier & Miller. Going to Kanas, he 
was admitted to the bar in that state and 
practiced for a few years, also teaching 
school in Neosho county. Upon his re- 
turn to Hancock county he went to 
Nauvoo, where he engaged in teaching 
until the spring of 1901. when he removed 
to Carthage and became the deputy cir- 
cuit clerk, which position he held for a 
year. He then resigned and again re- 
sumed school teaching, until he was nom- 
inated for the office of circuit clerk on 
the democratic ticket, but was defeated. 
In December, 1904, he was appointed to 
his present position as superintendent of 
the Hancock County Infirmary and poor 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



239 



farm by the board of county supervisors, 
and has since acted in that capacity with 
credit to himself and the satisfaction of 
the public as is shown by his reappoint- 
ment in September, 1906. He has the 
supervision of the farm of two hundred 
and sixty acres. He is recognized as one 
of the progressive and influential repre- 
sentatives of democracy in this locality, 
his interest therein and his fitness for lead- 
ership making him well known as a factor 
in local democratic ranks. 

On the 28th of October, 1886, Mr. 
Weiser was married to Miss Hattie J. 
Tyler, of Fountain Green, a daughter of 
John H. and Amanda (Williams) Ty- 
ler, who came to Illinois from Connecti- 
cut, where the father was bom. Mr. Ty- 
ler was a farmer by occupation, and also 
an engineer and carpenter He acted as 
engineer on the railroad for some years, 
and he now resides at Fountain Green. 
It was there that Mrs. Weiser obtained 
her education. Four children grace this 
marriage: Hazel Grace, who was born 
in Neosho county, Kansas, and was edu- 
cated in this county and in Carthage Col- 
lege, is now a teacher in the public schools 
of Carthage township. Luther C. died at 
the age of fourteen months. \Yi11iam J. 
B., born in Nauvoo, and Mary A., born in 
Nauvoo, are both at home. 

The parents are members of the Luth- 
eran church at Carthage, and the mem- 
bers of the household occupy an enviable 
social position. Mr. Weiser is well qual- 
ified for the office which he is now filling 
and in which he is giving uniform satis- 
faction in the prompt and able manner 
in which he discharges his duties, and 
all place confidence in him. 



JOHN RICHARD GALBRAITH. 

John Richard Galbraith, deceased, was 
a well known and respected agriculturist 
of Hancock county. His life record be- 
gan in east Tennessee on the ist of Sep- 
tember, 1852, and ended in El Pao, Tex- 
as, July 15, 1905. His father, John R. 
Galbraith, was the owner of extensive 
landed interests and slaves in eastern Ten- 
nessee, but owing to the Civil war he 
lost nearly all of his property, and in the 
fall of 1865 came with his family to 
Illinois, hoping to retrieve his possessions 
in the north. In March, 1866, he pur- 
chased a farm one mile east of Ferris, 
and thereon made his home until his death. 
His sympathies during the period of hos- 
tilities were with the south and his polit- 
ical allegiance was ever given to the de- 
mocracy. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Esther X. Hagler, was born and 
reared in eastern Tennessee, and there 
lived until after her marriage, when she 
came with her husband and the family 
to this state. She. too, died on the home 
farm near Ferris. 

John Richard Galbraith was educated 
in the common schools of Hancock coun- 
ty, having accompanied his parents on 
their removal to the north when thirteen 
years of age. As a young man he as- 
sisted in the work of the home farm and 
later his father purchased the farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres upon which 
John Richard resided during the whole 
of his married life. In the '703, John 
Richard Galbraith and his brother, Ben- 
jamin, went to Texas, where they engaged 
in the cattle business for a few years, 
when,, on account of the ill health of the 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



former, he returned to Illinois, selling 
his interest in the Lone Star state to his 
brother, and thus acquiring his brother's 
interest in the farm in Prairie township, 
which had been given to them by their 
father. He continued to reside upon this 
place until his death and was one of the 
prosperous agriculturists of the county. 
As his financial resources increased he 
made extensive and judicious investments 
in property and became the owner of an- 
other valuable farm in Hancock county. 
At the time of his death he was also 
one of the stockholders of the State Bank 
of Hamilton, and held considerable prop- 
erty at Elvaston. In connection with his 
brother, David, he owned and operated 
an electric light and heating plant at Min- 
eral Wells, Texas. He possessed excel- 
lent business ability, executive force and 
keen discrimination, which enabled him 
to readily recognize and utilize opportuni- 
ties. He was always straightforward in 
his dealings, and it was through his wise 
investment and careful management that 
he gained the large measure of success 
which he enjoyed in his later years. 

In December of 1880, Mr. Galbraith 
was married to Miss Adona Hagler, a 
daughter of John C. and Elizabeth 
(Ethell) Hagler. Her father was born 
in east Tennessee and when a young man 
came to Illinois, settling in Scott county, 
where he engaged in merchandising for 
more than a quarter of a century, becom- 
ing one of the leading business men of 
that locality. During his residence there 
he also held many public offices and po- 
sitions of trust and was called to repre- 
sent his district in the state legislature. 
He became the associate and friend of 



many of the distinguished men of the 
state and entertained at his home a num- 
ber of the prominent political leaders of 
Illinois, including U. S. Grant and Ste- 
phen A. Douglas. 

Following his marriage, Mr. Galbraith 
continued to engage in farming in this 
county until failing health caused him to 
seek a change of climate in the hope that 
he might be benefited thereby. He went 
to El Paso, Texas, but it proved unavail- 
ing, and he passed away on the I5th of 
July, 1905, after which his remains were 
brought back to Illinois for interment in 
Moss Ridge cemetery. He was a man 
held in the highest esteem by all who knew 
him, possessing a sunny, genial disposi- 
tion which gained him many friends. He 
voted with the democracy, but was with- 
out political aspiration, preferring to de- 
vote his time and attention to his business 
interests and the society of his friends. 
He had few, if any, enemies, being on the 
contrary one who gained the kindly re- 
gard of all with whom he came in con- 
tact. He was a Christian man, but was 
liberal in his religious views, and in his 
will remembered several churches, and 
during his lifetime was a willing con- 
tributor to their support. Throughout an 
active business career he displayed many 
sterling traits of character, and wherever 
he was known his name was honored. 
To his wife he was a most devoted hus- 
band, counting no personal effort or sac- 
rifice on his part too great if it would 
promote her welfare and happiness, and 
it is in his own household that his loss 
is most deeply felt, although it is the oc- 
casion of wide-spread regret throughout 
the community. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



241 



DAVID AYERS. 

Among the native sons of Wythe town- 
ship who are still connected with gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising interests 
within its borders is numbered David 
Ayers, whose natal day was May 19, 
1865. His father was William Ayers, 
and his grandfather, David Ayers, both 
of whom were natives of Ireland, the 
former having been born in Belfast. 
Having arrived at years of maturity, he 
married Miss Mary Clark, likewise a na- 
tive of Belfast, and a daughter of George 
and Margaret (Arbuckle) Clark, the 
former a son of David Clark, and the 
latter a daughter of Archie Arbuckle, both 
of whom were natives of Ireland and were 
of Scotch ancestry. George Clark, in the 
year 1845, became a resident of Brook- 
lyn, New York, and in 1848 arrived in 
Warsaw, Illinois. There he carried on 
business for many years as a stone mason, 
and died in that town in 1896, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-two years. His 
wife passed away in 1887, when eighty- 
nine years of age. 

The marriage of William Ayers and 
Mary Clark was celebrated on the 3ist 
of December, 1861. They had come to 
Hancock county with their respective par- 
ents when about eight years of age, and 
were reared upon farms in Wythe town- 
ship. Subsequent to their marriage they 
took up their abode on a tract of land on 
section 31, Wythe township, where they 
lived for many years, and as his financial 
resources permitted, Mr. Ayers kept add- 
ing to his place from time to time and 
extending his landed possessions until he 
owned many acres on sections i and 2, 



Rocky Run township. He died in 1889, 
and is still survived by his wife, who 
since 1893, nas made her home in 
Carthage. 

David Ayers, the third in a family of 
four sons and six daughters, is indebted 
to the Green Plains district school for the 
educational privileges he enjoyed. His 
boyhood and youth was passed in his 
parents' home, his time being occupied by 
the duties of the schoolroom, the pleas- 
ures of the playground and the work 
of the fields. On attaining his majority, 
he started out in business on his own ac- 
count, and for one year cultivated rented 
land, after which he purchased forty acres 
on section I , Rocky Run township. There 
was a log house upon the place and a 
part of the land was fenced. A portion 
of the farm, however, was still covered 
with the native timber. Mr. Ayers be- 
gan its further development and improve- 
ment, but after three years he sold that 
property and bought one hundred and 
seventy acres of improved prairie land on 
section 30, Wythe township. He has since 
resided upon this place, and has converted 
it into rich and productive fields. His 
wife owns eighty acres adjoining and 
their combined tracts of land constitute 
one of the best farms of the neighbor- 
hood. Mr. Ayers has built a good house 
and barn here and set out a good apple 
orchard of eight acres. He carries on 
general farming, also raising cattle, horses 
and hogs, and his business in both 
branches is proving profitable. 

On the ist of March, 1887, Mr. Ayers 
was married to Miss Minnie McMahan, 
who was born in Wythe township, a 
daughter of Robert and Frances (Walk- 



242 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



er) McMahan. Their children are: 
Fannie, born November 18, 1889; and 
David H., born May 22, 1893. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Ayers are well known and 
the consensus of public opinion regarding 
them is altogether favorable. Mr. Ayers 
belongs to one of the prominent old pio- 
neer families of the county. Both his 
father and his grandfather were soldiers 
of the Mormon war, the latter having 
taken up his abode in Hancock county in 
1835. He retained his residence here un- 
til his death, on the ist of December, 1887, 
and thus passed away one who had aided 
in the early development and progress of 
the county, reclaiming it for the uses of 
civilization. The work instituted by the 
grandfather and carried on by the father, 
is now continued by David Ayers, who is 
accounted one of the representative agri- 
culturists of his community. His political 
support is given the democracy and he 
has been road commissioner, while in the 
spring of 1905, he was elected on the 
democratic ticket to the office of super- 
visor. Fraternally, he is connected with 
the blue lodge of Masons, at Warsaw, and 
with the Modern Woodmen camp at El- 
derville, Illinois. 



MAJOR x LEONARD A. HAY. 

Warsaw will for many years be a cen- 
ter of public interest as the home of the 
Hay family. On the pages of military 
history appears the name of Major 
Leonard Augustus Hay, who rendered 



signal service to his country as a volun- 
teer in the Civil war and as a member of 
the regular army for many years there- 
after. He never sought political prefer- 
ment or honors, but rendered to his na- 
tion no less signal service by a lofty pa- 
triotism and unfaltering loyalty to the flag 
and to every duty incident to military 
service, whether in the midst of sangui- 
nary conflict or upon the frontier. 

As stated in the history of his parents, 
given before, he was the second son of 
Dr. Charles and Helen (Leonard) Hay, 
and was born in Salem, Indiana, Decem- 
ber 3, 1834, spending the first six years 
of his life in that town. He was in his 
seventh year, when in 1841, the family 
came to Warsaw, and in the public schools 
of the city, he pursued his education. In 
early manhood he was identified with 
various business interests and was con- 
ducting an enterprise on his own account 
during the early period of the Civil war, 
but on the 2d of July, 1864, feeling that 
he could no longer content himself to re- 
main at home while the country's safety 
was endangered, he joined the Union 
army as a private and was assigned to 
duty with Company D, Third Bat- 
talion of the Fifteenth Infantry. On 
the 2d of July, 1864, he was ap- 
pointed as second lieutenant in the 
regular army and was assigned to the 
Ninth Infantry, with which he remained 
throughout the period of his service. On 
the 2gth of September. 1864. he was com- 
missioned a first lieutenant and on the 
nth of March, 1878, he was made a 
captain in the Ninth Regiment of Infan- 
try. He was engaged in active duty on 
the frontier, covering all the territory 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



243 



from the Dakotas to Arizona and from 
the Missouri river to the Pacific coast. 
During that period there were many In- 
dian uprisings that called the troops forth 
to active battle. He was very popular 
with his fellow officers and with the men 
who served under him a fact which is 
indicated by the records, which show that 
there were fewer deserters from his com- 
pany than from any other in the army. 
He continued in command of his com- 
pany in active service until the I5th of 
June, 1891. when he retired for disability 
incurred in the line of his duty. Cam- 
paigning against the Indians upon the 
frontier in inclement weather had im- 
paired his health, and he retired to War- 
saw to spend his remaining days in the 
city in which his boyhood and youth 
were passed. Here, in accord with an act 
of congress conferring additional rank 
on officers who had served in the Civil 
war, he was made a major retired. 

Major Hay was married in New York, 
December 5, 1869. to Miss Blanche 
d'Ormond. whose death occurred about 
two decades ago. He left no children 
and yet he had an especial fondness for 
children and young people and was greatly 
beloved by them. Of the many memen- 
tos gathered in his lifetime none were 
cherished more dearly than numerous 
keepsakes of these young friends. 

Major Hay was a man of superior in- 
tellectual force, whose leisure was largely 
devoted to reading and study and his 
scholarly attainments and broad culture 
made him a charming conversationalist 
and entertaining companion. He held 
friendship inviolable and nothing could 
swerve him in his loyalty to a friend, 



whose claims upon his time and attention 
were at all times recognized. He was 
always interested in the general welfare 
of his city and served as a member of the 
library board in 1892, but he preferred 
that his public service should be done as 
a private citizen rather than as an office- 
holder. In recent years, however, the se- 
lection of books for the public library was 
left almost wholly to him. He was of 
the highest type of manhood, noble and 
chivalrous, recognizing genuine worth in 
others and showing appreciation for all 
admirable qualities in his friends and those 
with whom he acme in contact in any re- 
lation in life. In manner he was free from 
ostentation or display. A kindly spirit 
and generous sympathy was manifest in 
all that he said or did and he had the un- 
failing courtesy of a gentleman of the old 
school. Emerson has said, "The way to 
win a friend is to be one," and this state- 
ment found verification in the life of 
Major Hay. 



HENRY ROBLEY DICKINSON. 

No history of Hancock county would 
be complete without mention of Henry 
Robley Dickinson, deceased, who was one 
of the founders of Hamilton, who estab- 
lished a lumber business in the town in 
1855, and for many years was one of the 
most active and enterprising citizens of 
the county, carrying forward to success- 
ful completion whatever he undertook, 
while his labors were also of a character 



244 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'lE}}' 



that contributed not only to his own suc- 
cess but 'also to public progress and im- 
provement. He was born December 10, 
1818, in Keene, New Hampshire, in which 
state his parents, who were farming peo- 
ple, spent their entire lives. His educa- 
tion was acquired in the old-time subscrip- 
tion schools of ,the Granite state and at 
the age of twelve years he ran away from 
home and spent six months on a sailing 
vessel. Feeling that he had enough of the 
sea, at the end of that time he made his 
way to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was 
employed at carpenter work for some 
time. He afterward removed to Greene 
county, Illinois, where he followed that 
trade, and also became the owner of land- 
ed interests. A few years later, in 1849, 
he removed to Hancock county and took 
up his abode in a log cabin near Iron 
Spout Spring. There he lived for several 
years in true pioneer style amid frontier 
surroundings and environments. He was 
' one of the original promoters of the ferry 
across the Mississippi river, belonging to 
a company which secured its charter to 
operate the ferry in 1850. With the work 
of development and improvement in his 
community and county he was closely 
identified from that time until his death. 
He had several landings for his ferry boat 
as it crossed to Keokuk, Iowa, and the 
business proved a profitable one to the lo- 
cality in early days before many bridges 
spanned the "father of waters" and made 
travel by rail or private conveyance an 
easy matter. In connection with Bryan 
Bartlett and others, Mr. Dickinson laid 
out the town of Hamilton and the enter- 
prising village stands today as a monu- 
ment to his energy and forethought. In 



connection with Mr. Bartlett, who was his 
brother-in-law, he owned nearly all of the 
land upon which Hamilton has been built, 
and he also became the owner of several 
farms in the county, purchasing property 
from time to time and thus placing his 
money in the safest of all investments 
real estate. In 1855 he embarked in the 
lumber business at Hamilton and contin- 
ued in the trade until his death, securing 
a good patronage as the years passed by 
and making extensive annual sales which 
brought to him a very gratifying income. 
His other business interests also proved 
profitable and as the years passed away 
he became one of the substantial citizens 
of the county. 

One of the early indications of his 
prosperity was that in 1856 he replaced 
his pioneer log house by a frame residence 
of two stories, which he erected in the 
western part of Hamilton on the bluff 
overlooking the Mississippi river and 
commanding a fine view of the attractive 
scenery afforded by the broad expanse of 
the river and the city of Keokuk beyond. 
About two years later, in 1858, Mr. Dick- 
inson built another large house, contain- 
ing ten rooms beside basement and clos- 
ets. Into this home he removed and made 
it his place of residence throughout his 
remaining days with the exception of a 
brief period of three years during the Civil 
war, when he conducted a hotel in another 
building. On the expiration of that 
period, however, he sold out and returned 
to his former home and there he lived 
in comfort for many years, his business 
interests bringing to him all of the ne- 
cessities and many of the luxuries of life. 

Mr. Dickinson was first married in 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



245 



Greene county, Illinois, to Miss Wright, 
and they had one child, Oscar, who was 
killed while serving in defense of the 
Union in the Civil war. The wife .and 
mother, however, died a short time after 
her marriage. On the 6th of April, 1843, 
also in Greene county, Illinois, Mr. Dick- 
inson was married to Minerva Bartlett, 
who died soon after the birth of their 
only child, George R. Dickinson, who for 
a number of years resided on a farm near 
Belfast, Iowa, where his death occurred. 
On the 1 5th of October, 1848, Mr. Dickin- 
son was joined in wedlock to Miss Agnes 
Decker, a native of Greene county, Illi- 
nois, who died in Texas, April 25, 1857. 
There were three children of that mar- 
riage : Joan, the wife of Henry Marck- 
ley, of Wythe township, Hancock county ; 
Charles O., who is living in Hamilton; 
and Frank, who makes his home in Selina 
county, Kansas. The fourth marriage of 
Mr. Dickinson was celebrated on Christ- 
mas day of 1858, when Miss Emeretta 
Jane Hawley became his wife. She was 
born in Onondaga county, New York, 
February 6, 1826, and came to Ohio in 
1836. A year later she removed to Lee 
county, Iowa, where she lived for twenty 
years, her home being on the bluff back 
of Montrose, just opposite Nauvoo, com- 
manding a scene of rare beauty, this be- 
ing one of the most attractive districts 
of the great Mississippi valley, and seri- 
ous discussion has been held in political 
circles in Washington concerning the re- 
moval of the capital to this site. While 
living there Mrs. Dickinson witnessed the 
burning of the Mormon temple. She was 
there residing at the time that Joseph and 
Hiram Smith, the prophets and leaders 



of the Mormon faith, were killed and 
while they lay in state at Nauvoo. Mrs. 
Dickinson is a daughter of Adna and 
Clarissa (Smeed) Hawley, natives of 
Vermont, in which state they were reared 
and married. Subsequently they removed 
to a farm in Onondaga county, New 
York, where they resided until coming to 
the west. By the last marriage of Mr. 
Dickinson there were born two children. 
The daughter, Emma, born October 20, 
1850, was married on the 3d of May, 
1892, to Charles Bartlett, of Hamilton, 
and died January 30, 1896, leaving a son, 
Lawrence D. Bartlett, who was born May 
16, 1893, ar >d is now with his father in 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. John Dickinson, 
born January 19, 1861, was drowned in 
the Mississippi river at Hamilton, March 
22, 1885. 

Mr. Dickinson gave his political alle- 
giance to the Republican party from the 
time of its organization and was one of 
its ardent and earnest supporters. His 
fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth 
and ability, frequently called him to pub- 
lic office and he served as alderman, as 
assessor and mayor of Hamilton. He was 
also prominent in Masonry, taking the 
degrees of the lodge, chapter and com- 
mandery. The death of Mr. Dickinson 
occurred October 7, 1897. He had for 
forty-eight years been a resident of Han- 
cock county, and was known to all the pio- 
neer settlers in this part of the state. He 
came here when the county was but 
sparsely settled and when the work of 
development and improvement lay largely 
in the future. His name is closely asso- 
ciated with many of the business interests 
and public movements that have resulted 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



beneficially to the county and at the same 
time in his private business interests lie 
won a gratifying measure of success. He 
started out in life empty handed as a sailor 
boy, but he possessed strong determina- 
tion, unfaltering courage and resolute pur- 
pose and upon those qualities as a foun- 
dation builded his success. He was not 
only an active and enterprising business 
man, but also a thoroughly reliable one 
and his fellow townsmen entertained for 
him both admiration and respect. Mrs. 
Dickinson still survives her husband, but 
has been gradually losing her eyesight, 
owing to a cataract, since 1896. She 
has long been a resident of this part of 
the country, her home being just across 
the river in Iowa during the period of her 
girlhood and early womanhood, while 
since Christmas day of 1858 the date of 
her marriage she has lived continuously 
in Hancock county and is held in the high- 
est esteem by many warm friends. 



LEONARD THOMPSON FERRIS, 
M D. 

Dr. Leonard Thompson Ferris, de- 
ceased, was for fifty-five years actively en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine at Foun- 
tain Green and his life was of utmost ben- 
efit to his fellowmen by reason of his pro- 
fessional skill, his kindly spirit and his 
broad, humanitarian principles. Although 
several years have come and gone since he 
passed away, his memory is revered by all 
who knew him and he left behind him an 



example of professional . integrity, loyal 
citizenship and honor in private life that 
is indeed worthy of emulation. He came 
to Hancock county with his parents, 
Stephen G. and Eunice (Beebe) Ferris, 
in December, 1832, journeying westward 
from New York to Illinois by way of the 
Ohio and Mississippi rivers. His parents 
had to clear the land for a space upon 
which to erect a log cabin and there they 
lived in true pioneer style for many years. 
As the years came and went they pros- 
pered in their undertakings. They made 
needed improvements and in course of 
time had one of the best developed farm 
properties in this part of the county. The 
father was born in Norwich, Chenango 
county, New 7 York, and the mother in 
New London county', Connecticut. He 
was a tanner by trade, but after coming 
to the west followed farming, making his 
home in Fountain Green township. He 
died in 1876, while his wife passed away 
in 1860, and they were both laid to rest 
in Fountain Green cemetery. They were 
strong and devoted members of the Bap- 
tist church and instilled into the minds of 
their children lessons of integrity and up- 
rightness which bore good fruit in later 
years. In their family were six children, 
all of whom are now deceased. 

Dr. Ferris of this review was born in 
Steuben county. New York, in 1817, and 
was therefore a youth of about fifteen 
years when he came with his parents to 
Illinois. He completed his education in 
the schools of Fountain Green and deter- 
mining to devote his life to the practice 
of medicine, he attended medical lectures 
for one winter in Jacksonville, Illinois, 
and afterward was graduated from the 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



247 



St. Louis Medical College in 1848. He, 
however, entered upon the active practice 
of medicine in 1845, opening an office 
in Fountain Green, where he built an of- 
fice in 1847. He practiced there for over 
fifty-five years, or until his death. He was 
a successful general practitioner, making 
progress in harmony with the advance- 
ment that has ever characterized the med- 
ical fraternity. He attended rich and 
poor, high and low, never refusing to 
respond to a call even though he knew 
there was little hope of pecuniary remun- 
eration. He had a most warm, charitable 
heart, and a tale of sorrow or distress 
awakened his ready sympathy. Through- 
out his entire life he occupied the old Fer- 
ris homesead in Fountain Green but 
greatly improved the property. 

On the 23d of May, 1850, Dr. Ferris 
was married to Miss Helen M. Gilchrist, 
who was born in Saxton River village, 
in Rockingham county,' Vermont, October 
23, 1831. She is a descendant in the sev- 
enth generation of Edward A. Winslow, 
who came over in the Mayflower. Her 
grandfather, Samuel Gilchrist, was bom 
in Lunenbury, Massachusetts, was a 
farmer by occupation and lived in the old 
Bay state until he attained his majority. 
He married Miss Elizabeth Allen, who 
was born in Pomfret, Connecticut, and 
they had three sons, John, Allen and 
Charles, all now deceased. The grand- 
father resided at Walpole, New Hamp- 
shire. Her father, Charles G. Gilchrist, 
was born at Walpole, New Hampshire, in 
1802, and there owned a farm. In Sep- 
tember, 1837, he removed with his family 
from Vermont to McDonough county, 
Illinois, being over three months on the 
16 



road. They started on the nth of June, 
reaching their destination on the I3th of 
September. They settled on a farm in 
McDonough county, and there Mr. Gil- 
christ carried on agricultural pursuits as 
long as his health would permit. He, like 
Dr. Ferris's father, had to clear land in 
order to have a space big enough on which 
to build a house. He and his family lived 
in a log cabin for many years and went 
through the usual experiences and hard- 
ships of pioneer life. They saw many 
Indians and there were large herds of 
wild deer. The county was sparsely set- 
tled and with the development and prog- 
ress of that section of the state Charles 
G. Gilchrist was closely identified Charles 
G. Gilchrist cast his first presidential vote 
for Andrew Jackson and upon the organ- 
ization of the Republican party joined its 
ranks, continuing to give it his support 
until his death, which occurred in 1880, 
when he was eighty years of age. His 
grave is made at Hillsgrove, McDonough 
county, Illinois. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Minerva Holton, was 
born in Westminster, Windham county, 
Vermont, in October, 1805, spent her 
girlhood days in her native place and 
afterward taught school. Benjamin Par- 
sons, her grandfather, was a private in 
the Revolutionary war for a number of 
years. Mrs. Gilchrist died May 30, 1875, 
and was buried by the side of her hus- 
band in Hillsgrove cemetery. She was 
a member of a Baptist church. In their 
family were five children, of whom Mrs. 
Ferris is the eldest. Charles A. died in 
New York city, January 22, 1906. David 
Van Brugh lives at the old homestead at 
Hillsgrove, Illinois. Erastus H. is de- 



248 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ceased. Edward M. is a resident of Cen- 
terville, Iowa. Of this family Charles A. 
Gilchrist enlisted for service in the Tenth 
Missouri Infantry in the Civil war, join- 
ing the army as a captain. He served for 
five years and was mustered out with the 
rank of brigadier general, being then in 
command of the Fiftieth Regiment of 
Missouri Colored Troops. Edward M. 
was also a soldier in the Civil war. 

After the parents removed to Illinois, 
Mrs. Ferris and her brothers, Charles A. 
and VanBrugh Gilchrist, were sent back 
to New York to be educated, and attended 
the private school conducted by Miss Hoi- 
ton, for four years. She was an aunt of 
Mrs. Ferris and her school was then lo- 
cated at No. 1 1 Amity street in New York 
city. When Mrs. Ferris returned home 
she brought with her a piano, which was 
the first one in McDonough county, and 
it is still in her possession. It is a square 
piano, having six beautiful carved legs 
and is much narrower than the square 
pianos were ordinarily made. It was 
manufactured by J. Thurston some time 
between the years 1812 and 1817. This 
piano was shipped from New York to 
New Orleans, thence up the Mississippi 
river to Warsaw, and from there hauled 
to McDonough county. Mrs. Ferris's 
children, grandchildren and friends still 
love to hear her play the old-time melodies 
with which she became familiar in her 

\ 

girlhood days. 

Unto Dr. and Mrs. Ferris were born 
ten children, all born in the old home in 
Fountain Green township. Fidelia, the 
eldest, died in childhood. Dr. Charles L. 
Ferris, of Carthage, the second in order 
of birth, is a graduate of the Rush Med- 



ical College. He married Ella Connor, of 
Warsaw, this county, and they have two 
children, Helen I., a graduate of Carthage 
College and now principal of the high 
school in Mt. Carroll, Illinois ; and Ruth 
A. Lelia, the third member of the family, 
is the wife of Edward Lionberger, of 
Fountain Green township, and they have 
four children, Fay, Gay, John and Edith. 
Delia died in childhood. Alice Lovina is 
the wife of Charles R. Martin, of Car- 
thage township, and has two sons, Leon- 
ard Ferris and Edward Stephen Martin. 
John Milton died in childhood. Ulysses 
Stephen lived in Carthage township, wed- 
ded Miss Mary White and has one son, 
Wilber White Ferris. Ralph William 
married Carrie Banks, lives on a farm in 
Fountain Green township and has one 
child, Frances. Mary H. Ferris is at 
home with her mother. Hiram Gano is 
traveling for Irwin Neisler, a druggist, of 
Decatur, Illinois. The death of Dr. Fer- 
ris occurred on the igth of July, 1900, 
when he was eighty-three years of age. 
In politics he was a republican, inflexible 
in support of the party from the time of 
its organization, but his father, his brother 
and his brothers-in-law were all democrats. 
He served as town clerk, as collector and 

SEAV puE S.IE3X XUEUI JQJ aopajtp jooqos SE 
instrumental in building the brick school- 
house at Fountain Green, superintending 
the construction of the same. Fraternally 
he was a Mason, joining the lodge in Ma- 
comb, McDonough county, in 1849. He 
became a- charter member of Carthage 
lodge, in which he passed all of the chairs. 
His remains were interred in Fountain 
Green township by the side of his parents 
and all of the Ferris relatives. There was 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



249 



allotted to him a long life, which was char- 
acterized by usefulness and honor and his 
name was to many a synonym of all that 
is straightforward and upright in life. He 
and his wife not only celebrated their 
twenty-fifth wedding anniversary but also 
their fiftieth wedding anniversary, on 
which occasion their children and grand- 
children were present. They traveled 
life's journey, happily together for many 
long years and theirs was largely an ideal 
married relation. After Dr. Ferris passed 
away Mrs. Ferris lived in the old home- 
stead, which was in the same yard as the 
Doctor's office in Fountain Green. There 
she remained until 1902, when she re- 
moved to Carthage, purchasing a home on 
Madison street, which she has since great- 
ly improved. She and her daughters, 
Mary H. and Mrs. Martin, are all devoted 
members of the Presbyterian church and 
likewise belong to the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, in which order 
Mary Helen has been the efficient record- 
ing secretary for the past three years. 
Mrs. Ferris is a lady whom it is a rare 
pleasure to meet, for she possesses a true, 
warm heart for all mankind and strong, 
native intelligence and a retentive mem- 
ory combined with innate culture and re- 
finement. She also possesses a marked 
wit and jovial disposition and her kindly 
humor serves to draw to her all with 
whom she is brought in contact. She is 
yet actively interested in matters of pub- 
lic moment and she deserves prominent 
mention in this volume among the resi- 
dents who have lived in this part of Illi- 
nois from pioneer times. She celebrated 
her seventy-fifth birthday October 23, 
1906. when fourteen ladies from sixty- 



five to seventy-five years of age were 
present. 



MARTIN A. HENRY. 

Martin A. Henry, numbered among the 
veterans of the Civil War, who is now 
living a retired life in Augusta, for many 
years was actively identified with agri- 
cultural interests. He is a native of 
Brown county, Illinois, born on the loth 
day of February, 1844, and there he re- 
sided until about twenty years ago, when 
he came to Augusta. He acquired his 
education in the common schools of his 
native county, where he was reared to 
manhood, and assisted in the operation 
of his father's farm. He is a son of Rob- 
ert L. and Mary A. (Langdon) Henry. 
The former was born in the state of New' 
York, and the latter in Kentucky. Mr. 
Henry arrived in Illinois in 1820, and his 
wife came a few years later. They were 
married in Brown county, this state, 
which was then a part of Schuyler county, 
and throughout his entire life Mr. Henry 
carried on general agricultural pursuits 
and also worked at the cooper's trade. 
Following the death of his wife he lived 
with his children and spent his last days 
in Fulton county, Illinois, where he 
passed away at the age of eighty years. 
He held membership in the Presbyterian 
church, while his wife was a devoted 
member of the Baptist church. Both 
were laid to rest in Brown county. Illi- 
nois. In their family were ten children, 
but only two are now living, the younger 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



brother being Hiram Henry, of Fulton 
county, Illinois.- 

As before stated, Martin A. Henry was 
reared in the usual manner of farm lads, 
early becoming familiar with all the work 
incident to the development and cultiva- 
tion of the fields. When twenty-three 
years of age he started out in life on his 
own account and was engaged in farming 
for'some years. He continued actively in 
that occupation until 1885, when he sold 
his farm and removed to Augusta. He 
had been enterprising and progressive in 
his methods, tilling the soil and cultivat- 
ing his crops, and gained thereby a com- 
fortable competence, finding a ready sale 
on the market for all of his farm prod- 
ucts. His labors as an agriculturist were 
uninterrupted save when on the gth of 
August, 1862, he responded to the coun- 
try's call for troops, enlisting as a mem- 
ber of Company D, One Hundred and 
Nineteenth Illinois Infantry. He contin- 
ued at the front until the close of the war 
and took part in many of the principal en- 
gagements of the Western Army, be- 
ing frequently under fire. He was mus- 
tered out at Mobile, Alabama, on the iSth 
of August, 1865, and received an hon- 
orable discharge at Springfield. He held 
the rank of corporal and at the time he 
was mustered out was a sergeant. He 
now maintains pleasant relations with his 
old army comrades through his member- 
ship in Union post, No. 302, G. A. R.. 
at Augusta, of which he has been com- 
mander for five terms and is now acting 
as quartermaster of the post. 

Mr. Henry was first married on the ist 
of December, 1866, to Miss Mary C. Cox, 
who was bom in Brown county, Illinois, 



a daughter of James Cox, one of the early 
settlers of that locality. Mr. Cox was a 
native of Kentucky and reared his fam- 
ily in Brown county, where Mrs. Henry 
acquired her education. She died there 
on the 8th of August, 1870, at the age 
of twenty-seven years, leaving two chil- 
dren, Mertie M. and Joseph E. The 
daughter is the wife of Albert H. Kin- 
ney, of Lavonia, New York, where he is 
engaged in merchandising. Joseph E. 
Henry resides in St. Louis, Missouri, 
where he is head shipping clerk for the 
Medart Patent Pulley Company. He was 
born in Brown county, as was his sister, 
and he married Ellen Walsh, by whom he 
has two children, Herbert R. and Isabelle. 
For his second wife Mr. Henry chose 
Eliza J. Burgesser, a daughter of George 
W. and Margaret (Thomas) Burgesser, 
both natives of Pennsylvania. In 1844 
her parents came to the west, locating in 
Brown county, Illinois, where her father 
followed farming, and there they resided 
until called to their final rest. Mrs. 
Henry was born in Adams county, Ohio, 
but was reared and educated in Brown 
county, Illinois, being only four years of 
age at the time of her parents' removal 
to this state. She was first married to 
Charles Todd, of Springfield. Illinois, 
who died leaving a son, Ala, who died 
when twenty-five years of age. By the 
present marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
there are three children: Robert E.. re- 
siding at home, is the principal of the 
schools at West Point, Illinois. Leltie 
is a teacher at Warsaw, this state. How- 
ard M. died when eight years of age. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Henry are consist- 
ent members of the Methodist church 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



251 



and he gives his political support to the 
Republican party. He served as a mem- 
ber of the town board for two years and 
has been street commissioner of Augusta 
for the past thirteen" years. He is hold- 
ing that position at the present time, and 
is a capable official, manifesting the same 
loyalty whether in public office or out 
of it that he displayed when he followed 
the old flag upon southern battlefields 
and defended the Union cause. His busi- 
ness activity in former years was crowned 
with a measure of success that now en- 
ables him to live retired and he is spend- 
ing his days pleasantly in Augusta amid 
many friends, who entertain ' for him 
warm regard. 



W. H. AND J. A. PLUMB. 

W. H. and J. A. Plumb, the president 
and secretary respectively of Plumb 
Brothers Brick & Tile Company, with 
offices at Carthage, are prominent repre- 
sentatives of industrial activity in this 
county. The factory is located in Pilot 
Grove township, between Burnside and 
Carthage and is devoted to the manufac- 
ture of brick and tile. The business has 
been conducted by the present company 
for about four years and the plant has 
three kilns which turn out about fifty 
thousand brick or twenty thousand tile 
of high grade every week. The com- 
pany is incorporated and since its estab- 
lishment has borne an unassailable repu- 
tation in business circles' by reason of the 



honorable methods instituted and also 
by reason of the excellence of its product. 

William H. Plumb, one of the active 
members of the corporation and the pres- 
ident of the company, was bom in Ful- 
ton county, Illinois, July 17, 1862. His 
parents are Thomas J. and Elizabeth 
(Anderson) Plumb. The father, a native 
of London, England, came alone to the 
United States when fourteen years of age 
and with brave spirit and resolute pur- 
pose sought to earn a living in the new 
world, thinking that he might enjoy bet- 
ter business opportunities on this side of 
the Atlantic. One of his first positions 
was assistant to the cook on a Missis- 
sippi river steamboat, and he gradually 
made advancement in the business world 
until he became connected with the coal 
mining interests of Illinois, continuing in 
that field of activity until his death, which 
occurred at Bemadotte. Fulton county, 
this state, when he had reached the age 
of fifty-one years. His widow still sur- 
vives and resides in Basco, Hancock 
county, at about the age of seventy years, 
being now the wife of William Hen- 
dricks, a retired farmer. 

William H. Plumb pursued his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Fulton 
county and became a resident of Hancock 
county in 1881. For two or three years 
thereafter he was located in Basco and 
then removed to Carthage, where, in con- 
nection with his brother, he engaged in 
the manufacture of brick and tile for 
about twelve years, so that he had broad 
practical experience when they organized 
the present company and removed to Pi- 
lot Grove township, where they reside. 

William H. Plumb was married in 



252 



BIOGRAPHICAL REJ'IEll' 



1897 to Mrs. Laura E. Taylor, who was 
born in Bear Creek township and was ed- 
ucated there, she bearing the maiden 
name of Laura E. Fisher, and was a 
daughter of Greenberry Fisher, one of 
the early settlers of the county. She was 
the widow of Joseph Taylor, by whom 
she had two children, Alta and Gertie, the 
latter now deceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Plumb has been born one child, Norvin. 
Mr. Plumb is a democrat in his political 
views and he belongs to the Hancock 
County Mutuals a fraternal insurance 
order. 

John A. Plumb, who is associated with 
his brother in the manufacture of brick 
and tile as secretary of the company, was 
born in Fulton county, Illinois, November 
8, 1864, and was educated in the common 
schools. Since attaining his majority he 
has been associated with his brother Wil- 
liam in the line of business in which they 
are still engaged. They have a well 
equipped plant, supplied with all modern 
machinery, and the output is of such a 
quality as to command a ready sale on the 
market and bring the highest prices. The 
office of the company is located in Car- 
thage but the factory is situated in Pilot 
Grove township. George W. Jones is 
treasurer of the company but the Plumb 
Brothers hold the greater amount of 
stock, and the enterprise has gained a 
place among the leading manufacturing 
interests of the county. 

John A. Plumb was married to Miss 
Katie Morris, a daughter of O. P. Mor- 
ris, of Dallas City, Illinois, and the two 
families are prominent socially, while in- 
business circles the brothers have gained 
a most commendable place. They have 



the enterprise and determination which 
enable them to overcome difficulties and 
to solve intricate business problems and 
their history illustrates the possibilities 
that are open in this country to earnest, 
persistent young men who have the cour- 
age of their convictions and are deter- 
mined to be the architects of their own 
fortunes. 



JOHN H. CRABILL. 

John H. Crabill, a prosperous and pro- 
gressive farmer of Fountain Green town- 
ship, claims Ohio as the place of his na- 
tivity, his birth having occurred in Cham- 
paign county, September 12, 1837, and 
in the paternal line he comes' cf German 
ancestry, his paternal great-grandfather, 
Jacob Crabill, having been born in the 
fatherland, while his paternal grandpar- 
ents, John H. and Mary (Rhodes) Cra- 
bill, were natives of Virginia, and his 
maternal grandparents, John and Eliza- 
beth (Pence) Steimberger, were natives 
of Maryland and Virginia respectively. 
His parents, Benjamin S. and Angeline 
(Steimberger) Crabill, were natives of 
Culpepper county, Virginia, and Cham- 
paign county, Ohio, the former bom in 
1816, while the latter was born in 1814. 
They were married in the Buckeye state, 
where the father engaged in farming pur- 
suits until 1849, when he made an over- 
land journey to this township, the trip 
covering a period of twenty-two days. 
Here he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land located on section 5, and 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



253 



owned by William Dunn, one-half of the 
tract being covered with timber, while an 
old frame house was the only building 
that stood on the place. He at once set 
to work to further clear and develop the 
land and made many improvements in the 
way of fences and buildings. In 1858 he 
erected a large brick' residence, and he 
burned the brick on his place which was 
used in the construction of the house. 
From time to time he also increased the 
boundaries of his farm by adding at dif- 
ferent times two eighty-acre tracts, so 
that in all he owned three hundred and 
twenty acres all in one body, this being 
placed under a very high state of culti- 
vation, so that he annually gathered 
abundant harvests. He was a very prom- 
inent and influential man in his part of 
the country, and his integrity and honesty 
were never called into question, for he 
was noted for his reliability and trust- 
worthiness. His death occurred in 1896. 
while his wife had passed away several 
years previous to that time, her death oc- 
curring in January, 1880. 

John H. Crabill is the eldest of five 
sons and two daughters, of whom one 
son and both daughters have passed 
away. He was reared in Ohio to the 
age of twelve years, where he attended 
the Runkel district school, and then ac- 
companied his parents on their removal 
to this state, where he continued his 
studies in the Rossville district school in 
this township, near his father's home. He 
remained under the paternal roof until 
twenty-four years of age, assisting his fa- 
ther in clearing and developing new land, 
so that he early became familiar with all 
the duties and labors of the farm, and 



shared with the family in the hardships 
and privations, as well as the pleasures of 
a frontier existence. 

Choosing as a companion and helpmate 
for life's journey, he mas married, Octo- 
ber 10, 1 86 1, to Miss Prudence Tipton, 
likewise a native of the Buckeye state, 
her birth having occurred in Muskingum 
county, December 10, 1842, a daughter 
of John and Elizabeth (Dunlap) Tipton, 
natives of Maryland and Ohio respective- 
ly. Her mother died in 1845. when the 
daughter was a little maiden of three 
years, and the father was afterward mar- 
ried again, his second union being with 
Margaret Lloyd, a native of Ohio, where 
they were married, and in 1856 the fa- 
ther removed with his family to Illinois, 
their home being established in McDon- 
ough county, where the father passed 
away about 1888, while his widow sur- 
vived until 1889. when she, too, passed 
away. 

Following this marriage Mr. Crabill . 
located on a farm on section 34, La Harpe 
township, which he operated for one year, 
when he removed to Sheridan county, 
Missouri, remaining there one year, after 
which he returned to Illinois and operated 
leased land in McDonough and Hancock 
counties for eleven years, when, in 1872, 
he returned to the old homestead farm 
and continued his farming operations 
there until the time of his father's death, 
when he purchased the interest of the 
other heirs in the estate, and has here 
continued his residence to the present 
time. He has continued the work of de- 
velopment and improvement which was 
begun by his father and now has an up- 
tordate and well improved farm property. 



254 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW' 



From time to time he has added to his 
landed possessions and now owns two 
hundred and six acres all in one body, 
lying on section 5, Fountain Green town- 
ship, and at one .time he owned eighty 
acres on section 4, but has since disposed 
of this to his son Frank. In addition to 
carrying on general farming pursuits, 
Mr. Crabill is also engaged quite exten- 
sively in raising stock, including Norman 
horses. Short Horn cattle and Poland- 
China hogs, and this branch of his busi- 
ness is proving a profitable source of rev- 
enue to him. 

Unto our subject and his wife have 
been born five sons and five daughters, 
namely : Ida, now the wife of J. W. 
Ketchum, of Durham township; Ella, at 
home : Benjamin, of Fountain Green 
township; Emma, the widow of William 
Burrow, who likewise resides in this 
township ; Frank, who owns and operates 
a farm in this township; Marv. the wife 
of Edward Rich, of this township; Janie 
and Fred, at home; Mahlon, who lives in 
this township ; and Ray, at home. 

Politically a democrat, Mr. Crabill has 
taken a deep and helpful interest in the 
work of the party, having served three 
terms as assessor, while for twelve years 
he acted as school director. He is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order, belonging to 
the lodge at La Harpe, and is popular 
among the brethren of the craft. Having 
resided in Illinois since the age of twelve 
years, which covers a period of more than 
a half century, the greater portion of 
which has been spent in Hancock county, 
he has here a very wide and favorable ac- 
quaintance, for the name of Crabill has 
long been associated with the develop- 



ment and improvement of this portion of 
the state. He is ever reliable in all trade 
transactions and has won the confidence 
and good will of all with whom he has 
come in contact and is accounted one 
of the representative agriculturists of this 
county. 



ROBERT C. GIBSON. 

Robert C. Gibson is the owner of one 
of one of the model farm properties of 
Hancock county, situated in Pilot Grove 
township, and is also engaged in general 
merchandising and in the hardware busi- 
ness at Burnside under the firm name of 
R. C. Gibson & Company. He is like- 
wise one of the extensive landowners of 
the county and is a factor in its finan- 
cial circles. The extent and importance 
of his interests make him one of the fore- 
most representatives of business interests 
in this part of the state, and while promot- 
ing individual success he has at the same 
time contributed to general progress and 
prosperity, which are ever dependent 
upon the activity and enterprise of the 
leading business men of the community. 

Mr. Gibson was born on section 27, 
Pilot Grove township, Hancock county. 
August n, 1850. and in the common 
schools of the township acquired his edu- 
cation, while spending his boyhood days 
in the home of his parents. James and An- 
geline (Bennett) Gibson. The father, a 
native of Ireland, came to this country 
with his father, the mother having died 
on the Emerald isle. He was at that time 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



only three years of age. The grandfa- 
ther of our subject settled in New York 
and there engaged in farming and also 
worked on the canal. When still a young 
lad James Gibson also began working on 
the canal and was there employed until 
about eighteen years of age. He at first 
was driver on a packetboat and afterward 
worked on what was called a scow boat, 
utilized in dredging out and repairing the 
canal. He continued in that labor until 
twenty-three years of age, when he was 
married and came to the middle west, Jo- 
eating first near Rushville in Schuyler 
county. Illinois, where he spent a few 
months. He afterward went to Ray 
county, Missouri, where he remained for 
about two years, and then became a resi- 
dent of McDonough county, Illinois, 
where he purchased land and made his 
home for about three years. On the ex- 
piration of that period he took up his 
abode on section 27, Pilot Grove town- 
ship, Hancock county, and invested in 
eighty acres of land upon which he made 
his home, residing there for about forty 
years. When the four decades had passed 
he removed to section 16 of the same 
township, where he lived for fifteen years 
and afterward located at Burnside, where 
for eight years he lived retired from ac- 
tive business cares. His life had been 
one of untiring activity and enterprise 
through a long period and he well merited 
the rest which came to him in the evening 
of his days. He died at Burnside at the 
age of eighty-nine years and was a re- 
spected resident of the locality, for 
he was a faithful member of the Christian 
church and had lived in harmony with 
its teachings and his professions. His po- 



litical support was given to the democ- 
racy. His wife passed away in 1860, at 
the age of forty-four years. She, too, 
was a member of the Christian church 
and both lie buried in McKay cemetery. 
They were the parents of four children of 
whom two are now living. 

Born and reared on the old homestead 
Robert C. Gibson continued to reside 
there until five years ago, when he pur- 
chased his present farm just north of the 
village of Burnside, comprising one hun- 
dred and thirty-six acres. He has placed 
all of the improvements upon it and has 
a model farm, on which he raises the 
cereals best adapted to soil and climate. 
He also engages in stock raising and has 
fed from one hundred to five hundred 
head of cattle annually for the past thirty 
years. He has likewise made investment 
in property that has proved profitable and 
is today the owner of eleven hundred and 
forty acres of the rich farming land of 
Hancock county, all of which is well im- 
proved, the greater part being in Pilot 
Grove township. He therefore stands as 
one of the leading representatives of agri- 
cultural interests, and his success is rich- 
ly merited, having come to him through 
capable business management, unfalter- 
ing industry and close application. In 
addition to his farming interests he has 
many other business enterprises under his 
control. Being a man of resourceful abil- 
ity he readily recognizes and utilizes the 
opportunities which surround all. He 
engages in general merchandising and 
also in the hardware business at Burnside 
under the firm style of R. C. Gibson & 
Company. For two years he was vice 
president of the State Bank at Burnside 



256 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and he was one of the organizers of the 
U'hite Cottage Telephone Company, of 
which he has been treasurer and the offi- 
cer of the line since its establishment. He 
erected a large brick store building in 
Burnside and is one of its most enter- 
prising citizens, having contributed in 
large and substantial measure to its 
growth and improvement through the 
conduct of his varied interests. 

Mr. Gibson was married on the /th 
of November, 1872, to Miss Hattie Low- 
rey, who was born in Schuyler county, 
Illinois, a daughter of Edward and Hat- 
tie Lowrey, who came to Hancock county 
about 1865. The father was for many 
years a farmer of Carthage township and 
died at the age of eighty-eight years, 
while his wife passed away when eighty- 
seven years of age. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Gibson have been born six children, all 
of whom are living, as follows : Elmer, 
a farmer of Pilot Grove township, where 
he owns one hundred and sixty acres of 
land, married Amanda Miller, by whom 
he has a daughter, Frances. Charles C, 
residing on section 27, Pilot Grove town- 
ship, wedded Miss Carrie Pennock, by 
whom he has a son, Virgil. James F. is 
a practicing attorney in Carthage, and is 
represented elsewhere in this volume. He 
married Miss Birdie Tyner, and they have 
one son, James. Iva is now the wife of 
John Houd, their home being in Dallas, 
Illinois. She is the mother of one child, 
Arlo. Ida is the wife of Lesley Brad- 
field, and has one child, Elzie. Sylvia is at 
home, and completes the family. All were 
born and educated in Pilot Grove tow'n- 
ship. 

Mr. Gibson is a member of the Ma- 



sonic fraternity, in which he has attained 
the Royal Arch degree and also holds 
membership relations with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows. His wife is a 
member of the Christian church and is 
a lady of culture and refinement. They 
have a handsome modem home upon 
their farm, together with large barns and 
other outbuildings, all of which are kept 
in perfect repair and are typical of the 
utmost spirit of progress and improve- 
ment along agricultural lines. Mr. Gib- 
son is widely recognized as a most public- 
spirited man and has taken an active and 
helpful interest in many movements 
which have been of direct benefit to the 
community and the county. In manner 
he is free from ostentation and display, 
caring not for notoriety, yet he deserves 
the praise that is usually given a self- 
made man and the high regard which is 
accorded him by his friends. Among the 
names of the prominent business men of 
Hancock county who have been closely 
identified with its interests and have as- 
sisted in its rapid and substantial growth 
he is numbered. By the force of his na- 
tive ability and steady perseverance he 
has raised himself to a position of wealth 
and honor. 



WILLIAM OLIVER BUTLER, 
D. D. S. 

Dr. William Oliver Butler, serving for 
the second term as postmaster of La 
Harpe and has for almost a third of a 
century been an able and leading repre- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



257 



sentative of the dental fraternity here, 
was born in St. Francisville, Missouri, 
March 25, 1850. His father, Noah B. 
Butler, was born near Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and in early manhood wedded Lu- 
cinda C. Dickenson, a native of Tennes- 
see, whose birth occurred near Memphis. 
His grandparents were Hezekiah and 
Elizabeth (Payne) Butler, natives of 
Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively. 
The father, Xoah B. Butler, became a 
physician and in the spring of 1851 re- 
moved to La Harpe, Illinois, accompanied 
by his wife and then their only child, 
\Yilliam O. For a quarter of a century 
thereafter Dr. Butler devoted his time 
and energies to the practice of medicine, 
continuing an active representative of the 
medical fraternity in this town until his 
death, which occurred September 17, 
1876. His widow still survives him and 
makes her home in La Harpe. 

\Yilliam Oliver Butler, the eldest in a 
family of seven sons, spent his boyhood 
days in La Harpe and completed his lit- 
erary education by a course of study at 
Knox College, at Galesburg, Illinois. He 
afterward began preparation for the med- 
ical profession in the Missouri Medical 
College at St. Louis and afterward at- 
tended the Pennsylvania Dental College. 
Between the two periods of his college 
work, however, he engaged in practice 
for two years. He was graduated in the 
spring of 1876 but had purchased the 
practice of D. \V. Mills in 1873. While 
he was attending his second course of 
lectures a dentist from Burlington, Iowa, 
took charge of his practice. He now 
occupies one of the finest offices in the 
state in towns of the size of La Harpe 



and has a large practice, which is ac- 
corded him in recognition of his skill and 
ability. His equipment is unusually good 
and he has always kept in touch with the 
progress made by the profession as the 
years have gone by. On the I5th of 
June, 1882, Dr. Butler was united in 
marriage to Miss Louella Holliday, who 
was born in Shelbina, Missouri, June 27, 
1854, and was educated in the public 
schools of Blandisville, Illinois, and in 
Lewiston Seminary in Fulton county, this 
state. She is a daughter of Louis and 
Mary (Parker) Holliday, both of whom 
.were natives of Virginia. Unto Dr. and 
Mrs. Butler have been born five daugh- 
ters and two sons, but one of the sons is 
now deceased. 

Dr. Butler has given close attention to 
his professional duties and ^yet has found 
time for activity in political and fraternal 
circles. He is a prominent Mason, be- 
longing to the lodge, chapter and com- 
mandery and has held the position of 
deputy grand lecturer of the state of Illi- 
nois since 1883. He is also a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and he belongs to the Christian 
church, in which he has long served as 
deacon and has also been secretary for 
six years. In his political views he is 
an earnest republican and in 1901 was 
reappointed by President Roosevelt to 
the office of postmaster, in which position 
he is now serving. He takes a deep in- 
terest in clean politics, being opposed to 
misrule in municipal affairs and feeling 
that political business should be adminis- 
tered with the same honesty and fidelity 
that is demanded in industrial, commer- 
cial or professional life. In his own ca- 



2 5 8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



reer he has been actuated by worthy mo- 
tives and high principles and during al- 
most a lifelong residence in La Harpe, 
covering a period of fifty-five years, he 
has commanded the uniform confidence 
and respect of his fellowmen by his close 
adherence to rules of conduct and action 
that neither seek nor require disguise. 



GEORGE WALKER. 

Investigation into the history of any 
community will show that a few courag- 
eous spirits have become pioneer settlers 
and that the work that they have insti- 
tuted, the plans they have formed and 
the labors they have carried forward con- 
stitute the foundation upon which has 
been builded all of the later progress and 
prosperity. It was to this class of citi- 
zens that George Walker belonged and 
his name is inseparably interwoven with 
the history of Warsaw and of Hancock 
county. He was born in Maryland, Feb- 
ruary 29, 1804, his parents being John 
and Mary (Wilmot) Walker. He was 
reared in the place of his nativity and 
attended the old-time subscription schools 
of that day, pursuing his studies for only 
about three months each year. In the 
school of experience, however, he learned 
many valuable lessons and became a well 
informed man of good practical business 
education. He was reared to farm life 
and in early manhood became a firm be- 
liever in the Christian religion. When 
but nineteen years of age he began preach- 



ing as a minister of the Baptist faith and 
for fifty years continued the work of the 
gospel. He reared his family in that 
faith and labored untiringly for the up- 
building of his church. He never accept- 
ed a dollar for marrying a couple, for 
preaching at a funeral or for any reli- 
gious service, but gave his time and tal- 
ent freely to the gospel work. 

While living in Kentucky Mr. Walker 
rented land from Zachary Taylor and in 
1831 had his goods all packed ready to 
load and start for Illinois. He was at 
that time taken sick with bronchitis and 
did not come till 1833. He first lo- 
cated at Quincy and two weeks later en- 
tered one hundred and sixty-two acres of 
land about twenty-two miles north of that 
city. There he began the development 
and improvement of a farm upon which 
he resided through the succeeding two 
years. On the expiration of that period. 
in 1833, ne purchased six hundred and 
forty acres of land from two attorneys 
who spent the night at his home. An -in- 
teresting fact about these attorneys is 
that on that trip they were going from 
Carthage to Quincy on horseback. One 
horse gave out and they put both saddles 
on the remaining horse and with each 
man in a saddle on the one horse proceed- 
ed on their way to Quincy and were thus 
riding when they stopped over night at 
Mr. Walker's residence. This tract was 
located a half mile south and a quarter 
of a mile west of the land which he had 
entered for a dollar and a quarter per 
acre. Upon his second purchase he built 
a double log house with one room above 
and two below. This was his home until 
1849, ' n which year he built a kiln, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



259 



burned brick and then erected a brick 
residence. 

Mr. Walker was closely identified with 
the early development and progress of 
his portion of the state and for years 
was one of the largest land holders of 
Hancock county. He shared in the usual 
hardships and privations of pioneer life, 
but as the years passed by changes were 
wrought and he was enabled to secure all 
of the advantages and comforts known to 
the older civilization of the east and 
south. For many years he engaged 6X7 
tensively in stock raising, being one of 
the leading representatives of this busi- 
ness in his section of the state. He also 
made large purchases of land and after 
giving one hundred and sixty acres to 
each of his seven children he had over 
two thousand acres remaining. He was 
perhaps the wealthiest citizen of his lo- 
cality at this time. He improved his 
land from its primitive condition, setting 
out immense orchards and placing his 
fields under a high state of cultivation. 

In 1870, Mr. Walker went to Florida 
and set out an orange orchard covering 
five hundred acres within three miles of 
Jacksonville. He remained there for 
nine winters and in the tenth winter was 
stricken with paralysis. He also "pur- 
chased one hundred and fifty acres of 
land adjoining the home of Harriet 
Beecher Stowe and he and his family be- 
came well acquainted with the Stowe 
family, by whom they were entertained 
for some days. He was a very industri- 
ous man of unfaltering perseverance and 
indeed may be numbered among the 
world's workers. He was a man of keen 
insight into business affairs and of un- 



faltering energy and was seldom at error 
in a matter of business judgment. He be- 
came moreover one of the influential and 
leading citizens of the community and in 
1848 was elected to represent his district 
in the state legislature of Illinois. He 
spent two winters in Springfield and be- 
came associated with many of the dis- 
tinguished men of the state. During the 
second winter in company with Stephen 
A. Douglas, Abraham Lincoln and Jacob 
C. Davis in a hired vehicle he drove to 
his home in Hancock county, a distance 
of one hundred and twenty miles, to make 
a visit over Sunday. They arrived Fri- 
day night, and that night such a heavy 
fall of snow took place that the next 
Monday morning they had to drive a 
herd of cattle ahead of them to break the 
road to Quincy, to which place they rode 
on horseback. They were three days in 
getting to Springfield. Mr. Walker was 
re-elected to the Illinois legislature in 
1854. his family, however, remaining 
upon the farm, while he discharged his 
official duties in the general assembly. 
He took an active part in the delibera- 
tions of that body and was connected with 
much of the constructive legislation of 
that period. In his home community he 
was also elected justice of the peace and 
filled that office for fifteen years, his home 
being his courthouse. Mrs. Robert Mc- 
Mahan, who was an exceedingly bright 
girl, would sit at her father's knee when 
between the ages of eight and twelve 
years and from his dictation would read 
the revised statutes to the court. His po- 
litical allegiance was given to the democ- 
racy, but though he differed in his views 
from many of the distinguished Illinois 



260 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



statesmen of that period he always en- 
joyed their warm personal regard and 
friendship. 

In May, 1826, Mr. Walker was mar- 
ried to Miss Rachel Clark, a daughter 
of James and Susan (Naswanner) Clark. 
Mrs. Walker was born in Pennsylvania 
and by this marriage there were nine chil- 
dren. Henry M., the eldest, lived near 
Carthage, Illinois, but died in California 
at the age of seventy-nine years. He had 
four sons, one of whom, Charles Wil- 
liam, is living in Carthage, George San- 
ford in Missouri, Franklin W., on a 
farm near Carthage, and one, John 
Henry C., probate judge in Ft. Collins. 
John E. Walker, the second of the family, 
born in February, 1829, was a railroad 
man and died in 1891, at the age of sixty- 
two years, leaving a wife and two chil- 
dren, who are residents of Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts. Mary Jane is the wife of Dr. 
James Caples, living about sixteen miles 
from Sacramento, in Sacramento county, 
California. Rebecca Ann is the widow 
of Joseph Her and lives in Gault, Califor- 
nia, about thirty-two miles from Sacra- 
mento. James Ely died at the age of 
five years. George Walker died in 1905 
in Warsaw, leaving a son, Warren W., 
of Joplin, Missouri, and a daughter, Mrs. 
Lillian- Pederson. Susan Frances became 
the wife of Robert McMahan and is men- 
tioned later in this sketch. Henrietta 
became the Avife of Taylor Doty and after 
his death married James Jenkins and died 
April 17, 1904, on the old home farm in 
Hancock county. Charles Pierce is a 
resident of Los Angeles, California, 
where' he is engaged in merchandising 
and is also vice president of a bank. The 



father, George Walker, died October 9, 
1879, at the age of seventy-five years 
and his wife passed away October 9, 1883, 
also when seventy-five years of age. In 
the years of an active and useful career 
he had become widely known and in fact 
was one of the historic figures in Illinois 
history during the middle portion of the 
nineteenth century. His influence was 
widely felt in behalf of public improve- 
ment, his business operations were of an 
extensive and profitable character and his 
genuine personal worth was such as to 
win for him the admiration, good will 
and respect of all with whom he came 
in contact. Though more than a quarter 
of a century has passed away since he 
was called to his final rest he is yet re- 
membered by many of the early citizens 
of the county who knew and honored 
him. 

As before stated, Susan Frances 
Walker became the wife of Robert Mc- 
Mahan. The latter was a son of Andrew 
McMahan, a native of Kentucky, who 
came to Hancock county, Illinois, in 1831. 
This was the year of the great snow a 
winter memorable in the history of Illi- 
nois. There were few settlers in the 
northern part of the state and the cen- 
tral -and southern sections were but 
sparsely settled. All over Illinois there 
were great stretches of unimproved 
lands and Mr. McMahan took up a tract 
of government land of about one hun- 
dred and sixty acres which was developed 
into a good farm and remained the fam- 
ily homestead until the death of himself 
and wife. As the years passed by he 
added to his original holdings until he 
became an extensive landed proprietor 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



261 



and at the time of his demise still re- 
tained possession of six hundred acres, 
while in the meantime he had given to 
each of his four children a tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres. 

Three of his children are now living, 
while Angelina, who became the wife of 
Captain Williams, of Warsaw, died 
March 26, 1901. 

Robert William McMahan, born June 
15, 1830, on the old family homestead in 
Hancock county, Illinois, acquired his 
education in the subscription schools of 
the early day. He was reared to farm 
life, spending the greater part of the 
year in the labors of the field and 
meadow, while in the winter seasons lie 
pursued his studies. With the family he 
shared in the hardships and privations 
incident to the settlement of the frontier. 
He chose as a life occupation the pursuit 
to which he had been reared and continu- 
ously followed farming until he reached 
the age of sixty-six years, when he re- 
tired from business and has since lived 
in Warsaw, purchasing a beautiful home 
in the city. On the I3th of July, 1859, he 
was united in marriage to Miss Susan 
Frances Walker, daughter of George 
Walker, the honored pioneer, and unto 
them have been born six children. Clara, 
the eldest, born April 5, 1860, died June 
26, 1864. Charles Homer, born Decem- 
ber 4, 1861, is living in Wilcox township, 
this county. He married Eva J. Knox 
and they have five children living, while 
Harry and one other died in infancy. 
Those who still survive are Carl David, 
Robert Francis, William R.. George 
Howard and Francis McMahan. Cora 
F,. McMahan died in infancy. Mary Ida 



McMahan, born September 15, 1866, is 
now the wife of David Ayers and their 
place adjoins the old homestead. They 
have two children, Francis and David. 
Nellie Rachel McMahan, born November 
25, 1875, is the wife of Howard Baker, 
a lumberman of St. Louis, Missouri. 
George W. W. McMahan, born July 9, 
1873, uves upon the old homestead and 
rents the' farm which his parents gave 
him. He married Florence Fry .and has 
one daughter, Anna Rozetta. 

John McMahan, the second son of An- 
drew McMahan. lives on the old home- 
stead where he was born sixty-three years 
ago. He married Clara Reed, now de- 
ceased, and they had five children, of 
whom one has passed away. 

Thomas Jefferson McMahan, the 
youngest member of the family of An- 
drew McMahan, is living in St. Louis 
and has been married twice, but his sec- 
ond wife is also now deceased. 

Both the Walker and McMahan fam- 
ilies have lived in this county from pio- 
neer times and have been closely associ- 
ated with its history in all of its various 
phases. Mr. Walker lived here during 
.the Mormon siege, but did not take part 
on either side. He saw many houses 
burned, however, and knew of the whole 
proceedings. Mrs. McMahan can re- 
member seeing Joseph and Hiram Smith, 
the Mormon prophets and leaders, who 
were murdered. She saw the blood on 
the floor and also the hole made through 
the window pierced by the bullet that 
killed Joseph Smith. Her mind bears 
many interesting pictures of pioneer 
days and she relates in vivid style and 
with great accuracy many of the events 



262 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which have left their impress upon the 
annals of Hancock county. 



ASA L. BENNINGTON. 

Asa L. Bennington is the leading con- 
tractor and builder of La Harpe. No 
man has done more for the improvement 
of the village, for the greater part of its 
leading business houses and fine residences 
have been erected by him and stand as 
evidence of his skill and enterprise in the 
line of his chosen vocation. His life rec- 
ord began in Bloomfield, Iowa, on Christ- 
mas day of 1 86 1, his parents being Jacob 
S. and Emeline (Lane) Bennington, 
the former bom in Adams county, 
Ohio, December 5, 1826, and the latter 
near Mount Sterling, Illinois, December 
24, 1829. The paternal grandfather, 
Jonathan Bennington, was born in Penn- 
sylvania, October 20, 1789, and was 
reared near Hagerstown, Maryland. He 
wedded Jane C. Ramsey, who was born 
near Boone Station, Kentucky, January 
9. 1799, and was a daughter of Robert 
Ramsey, who was one of Washington's 
body guards in the Revolutionary war. 
The maternal grandparents were Asa and 
Matilda (Conover) Lane. On leaving 
Ohio Jacob S. Bennington removed to 
Davis county, Iowa, and in 1869 became 
a resident of Henderson county, Illinois, 
where he lived until 1892, when the fam- 
ily removed to La Harpe. His wife 
passed away in September. 1885. In their 
family were the following named : Ma- 



tilda, who was bom in Iowa, June 7, 
1853; Lee J., born in Iowa, December 
n, 1856; John F., bom in Iowa, May 
10, 1858; Phebe M., born in Missouri, 
August u, 1863; Jacob S., born in Mis- 
souri, March 28, 1865; Carroll L., born 
.in Missouri, April 6, 1867; and Charles, 
born in Illinois, February 28, 1870. 

Asa L. Bennington was reared in his 
father's home to the age of sixteen years, 
when he started out upon an independent 
business career and since that time he has 
provided entirely for his own support, 
so that whatever success he has achieved 
has come as the direct reward of his 
own labors. He was employed at farm 
work for about five years and then 
learned the carpenter's trade under the 
direction of his father. He has engaged 
in building operations since that time 
and for the past seventeen years has been 
contracting. At the present writing, in 
1906, he has the contract for the erection 
of the new Carnegie library in La Harpe 
all the business houses and large build- 
and with a few exceptions he has built 
ings erected in this village for the past 
fourteen years. He keeps abreast with 
the most modern progress as displayed 
in the builder's art and his efforts have 
been an important factor in the substan- 
tial improvement of the city, greatly aug- 
menting its attractive appearance. His 
excellent workmanship and his fidelity to 
the terms of a contract have been impor- 
tant elements in his success. 

In 1891 Mr. Bennington was married 
to Miss Hattie Landis, who was born 
April 3, 1871, and is a daughter of Isaac 
and Finett (Levings) Landis, natives of 
La Harpe township. They have four 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



263 



children : Clair, born March 23, 1892 ; 
Celia May, January 14, 1894; Beulah 
Vernon, January 21, 1896; and Minnie 
M., October 14, 1900. 

Mr. Bennington votes with the Repub- 
lican party and has served for two terms 
as alderman at La Harpe. Community 
affairs are of deep interest to him and 
his co-operation can always be counted 
upon as a 'factor to further the welfare 
and promote the progress of his adopted 
town. Fraternally he is connected with 
Bristol lodge, No. 653, I. O. O. F., and 
with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and in his life exemplifies the beneficent 
spirit of these organizations. An analy- 
zation of his character shows that his sal- 
ient traits are such as are universally ad- 
mired and valued and in his home town 
they have made him a representative 
citizen. 



JAMES W. CASSINGHAM. 

James W. Cassingham dates his resi- 
dence in Hancock county since 1857. He 
is now living retired in La Harpe but 
was formerly identified with agricultural 
and manufacturing interests. He was 
born in Muskingum county, Ohio, June 
1 6, 1840, and in the paternal line comes 
of English ancestry, his grandfather be- 
ing Thomas Cassingham, a native of 
England. His father, James Cassing- 
ham, was also born in that country and 
came with his parents to America in 1826. 
the family home being established upon a 
farm in Ohio. In early life he learned 

17 



the shoemaker's trade, which he followed 
throughout his entire business career. 
He wedded Miss Martha Oden, a native 
of Virginia and a daughter of Elias 
Oden, and they became the parents of 
four children, three sons and a daughter. 
James W. Cassingham, the third in 
order of birth, left home in 1855 when 
only fifteen years of age and came to 
Illinois with a family of the name of 
Decker, settling upon a farm in McDon- 
ough county. There Mr. Cassingham 
remained until March, 1857, when he left 
.the Decker family and came to Hancock 
county, where he was employed at farm 
labor by the month until 1861. When 
the tocsin of war sounded and men from 
all departments of life flocked to the 
standard of the country, coming from the 
workshop, the fields, the offices and the 
counting rooms, he too gave evidence of 
his spirit of valor and loyalty and on the 
loth of May, 1861, enlisted in the Six- 
teenth Illinois Infantry as a member of 
Company F. He served for four years, 
being mustered out at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, in July 8, 1865. He was once 
wounded, though not seriously, and after 
the close of the war, having for four 
years been a most faithful soldier, he re- 
turned to Hancock county, settling in La 
Harpe township near the village of La 
Harpe. There he purchased a farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres, which he 
cultivated for almost a quarter of a cen- 
tury, or until 1889, when he took up his 
abode in the town. In that year, in 
connection with C. H. Ingraham and J. 
R. Booth, he established a brick manu- 
facturing plant in La Harpe and was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of brick for 



264 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



about ten years, when he sold his interest 
to Mr. Ingraham and retired from active 
business. On the 26th of February, 
1903. he sold his farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, all of which was under 
cultivation. 

Mr. Cassingham was married Feb- 
ruary 4, 1866, to Miss Elizabeth Bryan, 
who was born March 22, 1839, in Penn- 
sylvania. They became the parents of 
six children : Arthur, who was born De- 
cember 18, 1866, and resides in Memphis, 
Missouri ; Martha, who was born Novem- 
ber 10. 1868, and is the wife of Warren 
Talbott, of Warren county, Illinois ; 
Charlie C., who was born October 25, 
1870, and lives in Spokane, Washington; 
Mary D., who was born March 22, 1872. 
and is the wife of John M. Lyon, of La 
Harpe: Rose, who was born August 2, 
1876, and is the wife of Herbert Locke, 
of Blandinsville, Illinois ; and Lora, who 
was born September 16, 1879, and who 
is the wife of Clifford Prather. of La 
Harpe. On the 2ist of October, 1886, 
the family mourned the death of the wife 
and mother, who on that day passed away 
at the age of forty-seven years. On the 
ist of October, 1887, Mr. Cassingham 
wedded Mary A. Bryan, the widow of 
Cowden M. Bryan. She was born in La 
Harpe. April 24. 1845. It was soon 
after his second marriage that Mr. Cas- 
singham retired from the farm and re- 
moved to La Harpe, where he has since 
resided. His political affiliation is given 
to the Republican party and in the Ma- 
sonic fraternity he has taken the degrees 
of the lodge and chapter. A residence 
of almost a half century in this county 
makes him widely known and numbers 



him with its early settlers, while his ac- 
tivity in agricultural and manufacturing 
lines gained him considerable prominence 
as well as a gratifying measure of success 
in his business dealings, so that he is 
now enabled to live retired in the enjoy- 
ment of a rest which he has justly earned 
and richly deserves. 



SAMUEL C. VINCENT. 

Samuel C. Vincent, deceased, came to 
Hancock county in 1844 and although he 
passed away in 1870 he is yet remem- 
bered by many of the older settlers who 
knew him and respected him as a man 
of genuine personal worth. He was born 
January 6. 1822, in West Avon', Living- 
ston county, New York, and attended 
school in Erie county, that state, but was 
largely self-educated. On the 8th of Oc- 
tober. 1843, ne wedded Mary Jj An- 
drews, who was born, in Connecticut in 
1821. In the spring of 1844 they re- 
moved to La Harpe, where for about ten 
years Mr. Vincent was engaged in teach- 
ing school. Soon after his arrival in 
this county, however, he purchased a 
tract of land, to which he added at inter- 
vals until at his death he owned one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in the cor- 
porate limits of La Harpe. He died Au- 
gust 15, 1870, leaving a wife and six 
children. He was well known among 
the early settlers of this part of the 
county and his interests were closely 
allied with its progress and development. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



265 



for he gave hearty support to any move- 
ment that tended to promote the material 
or moral welfare of his community. 

The six children of the Vincent family 
are: Mary A., born April 24, 1845, anc ' 
now the wife of J. W. Cassingham; 
Maria Rosabel, who was born April 10, 
1847, am l is the w 'fe f Farmer R. Nudd ; 
Frances A., who was born February 19, 
1850, and is the wife of Frank James, 
of Galesburg, Illinois ; Byron Zelotus, 
who was born July 4, 1852, and is in 
Shenandoah, Iowa ; Judith Keziah, who 
was born July 8, 1855, and after her 
marriage to Charles Sanford died in De- 
cember. 1875; and Elma, who was born 
September 19,' 1858. and died October 
25. 1903. The mother, Mrs. Mary J. 
Vincent, passed away January 28, 1890. 

The eldest daughter, Mary A. Vin- 
cent, was educated in the public schools 
of La Harpe and at the age of fifteen 
began teaching, which profession she fol- 
lowed for fourteen years. She was then 
married, on the ist of July, 1874, to 
Cowden M. Bryan, who was born in 
Pennsylvania. June 16, 1830, a son of 
Jacob and Mary (Bagsley) Bryan, who 
were likewise natives of the Keystone 
state. Cowden M. Bryan came to La 
Harpe township with his parents about 
1840 and lived upon a farm until 1857, 
when they removed to the village of La 
Harpe. He was a natural mechanic and 
possessed considerable genius in that di- 
rection. At different times he was con- 
nected with photography, gunsmithing 
and the jewelry business and conducted 
a jewelry store in La Harpe for about 
fifteen years. 

LInto Mr. and Mrs. Bryan was born 



a daughter, Juie L. Bryan, whose birth 
occurred March 27, 1875, and who on 
the 2 ist of August, 1894, became the 
wife of Frank J. Scott, now a resident of 
Galesburg, Illinois. The death of Mr. 
Bryan occurred December 9, 1884, and 
on the ist of October, 1888, his widow 
became the wife of James W. Cassing- 
ham, of La Harpe township. 



JAMES J. MOFFITT. 

Few native sons of Hancock county 
can claim so extended a residence within 
its borders as James J. Moffit, who was 
born on section 7, Sonora township, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1831. This was the winter of 
the great snow in Illinois memorable in 
the history of the county and a year 
prior to the Black Hawk war, a fact 
which indicates that the Indians were 
still numerous in this part of the Missis- 
sippi valley. His parents were John and 
Mary (Moffit) Moffit, natives of county 
Sligo, Ireland. The latter was a daugh- 
ter of Thomas Moffit. who on a sailing 
vessel crossed the Atlantic f.-pm the 
Emerald isle to the new world, and made 
his way to St. Louis by the Ohio river 
route and up the Mississippi. Eventually 
he settled in St. clair county, Illinois, liv- 
ing on the river,.bottom for three years, 
after which he returned to the state of 
New York and took up his abode in 
Rochester. John Moffitt, father of our 
subject, emigrated from Ireland to Amer- 
ica in 1818, and settled in the district of 



266 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Harrisbu'rg, Pennsylvania, where he 
worked at farm labor for two years. At 
the end of that time he journeyed west- 
ward with George Middleton and his un- 
cle, James Mofntt, going to Galena, Illi- 
nois, where he worked in the lead mines 
for three years. They then left that state 
in canoes, floating down the Mississippi 
river. Becoming hungiy while thus mak- 
ing their way down the stream, they one 
evening saw a light, toward which they 
proceeded to make their way. It was 
upon the present site of the city of 
Quincy, and on landing they found there 
a camp of Indians, so that they hastily 
made their departure. They continued 
on their way to St. Louis, and in a short 
time left that place for Rochester, New 
York, making the overland journey with 
ox teams. John Moffitt was married 
there about 1826 to Miss Mary Moffitt, 
and with his bride returned to St. Louis, 
where he resided until the fall of 1828, 
when he came to Hancock county, set- 
tling near Nauvoo. He entered from the 
government about three hundred and 
twenty acres of land on sections 7 and 
1 8, Sonora township, most of which was 
at that time covered with timber. In the 
midst of the forest he built a log cabin 
and began clearing away the trees. As 
soon as it was possible to plow he would 
place his land under cultivation and in the 
course of time became the owner of a well 
developed property there. The year 1839 
witnessed the advent of the Mormons into 
that locality and he gave them some of 
his land that they might improve it. The 
pictures of pioneer life indicated exactly 
the conditions which existed in Hancock 
county at that period. The streams were 



unbridged, the prairie was covered with 
its native grasses, the timber was uncut, 
and only here and there had a little clear- 
ing been made to show that the work of 
civilization had been begun on the fron- 
tier, while deer was plentiful and there 
were many wild animals roaming over 
the prairies or in the woods. The In- 
dians, too, were numerous and going 
upon the warpath, Mr. Moffitt, during 
the Black Hawk war, enlisted in the army 
under Captain James White. He partici- 
pated in the military movements that 
ended in the ejection of the savages and 
received a land warrant for his services. 
He afterward added to his land until he 
had about four hundred acres in Sonora 
township. He figured prominently in 
many events which are now recognized 
as of historic importance and lived in this 
locality throughout the period of the 
Mormon difficulty. He saw them estab- 
lish the city of Nauvoo, and later saw 
them driven from their homes and the 
Mormon temple destroyed by fire. He 
died March 15, 1853, while his wife long 
survived him, passing away March 17, 
1881. They were the parents of eleven 
children, of whom three sons and three 
daughters reached mature years but the 
daughters are all now deceased. The liv- 
ing sons are: James J. ; John, a lawyer 
of Chicago; and Thomas B., who is liv- 
ing on the old home place. 

James J. Moffitt lived with his parents 
until 1852, sharing with the family in the 
hardships and privations of pioneer life. 
and aiding in the work of the fields when 
plowing, planting and harvesting were 
largely clone by hand, for the improved 
farm machinery of the present day was 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



267 



then unknown. In 1852 lie went to Cal- 
ifornia, starting across the country with 
ox teams, and after getting near the 
mountains he traded his oxen for pack 
horses. At length the party with which 
he traveled reached Eldorado county, 
Colorado, where he remained for a year 
and a half. During that period his fa- 
ther died, and his mother wishing him 
to return home, he made the journey by 
way of the Nicaraugua route and up the 
Mississippi to Nauvoo. He then re- 
mained with his mother and established a 
general mercantile business in connection 
with T. J. Newton, his father-in-law. 
Three years later, on account of failing 
health, he retired from the store and took 
up his abode on his farm, which com- 
prised eighty acres of the old homestead. 
He then bought forty acres from his sis- 
ter and subsequently made purchase of 
another tract, so that he owned altogether 
one hundred and seventy acres on section 
7, Sonora township. In 1859 he erected 
a good frame residence thereon and has 
since made some additions to this house. 
As a companion and helpmate for life's 
journey Mr. Moffitt chose Miss Saman- 
tha A. Newton, to whom he was married 
on the I3th of February, 1855. She was 
born in Erie, Pennsylvania, December 3. 
1837, a daughter of Timothy J. and Fi- 
delia (Webster) Moffitt, the former a na- 
tive of Erie and the latter of Fredonia, 
New York. She is also a granddaughter 
of Thomas and Mary (Hillsgrove) New- 
ton, natives of England, and Ebenezer 
and Roxie (Benjamin) Webster, natives 
of New England. Mrs. Moffitt was -the 
eldest of seven children and accompanied 
her parents on their removal from the 



Keystone state to Canfield, Trumbull 
county, Ohio. A year later they became 
residents of Rochester, Iowa, where her 
father engaged in merchandising, and in 
May, 1847, they took up their abode in 
Nauvoo, where the following spring Mr. 
Newton established a general mercantile 
store, which he conducted successfully 
until his death on the 4th of February, 
1860. His wife long survived him and 
died March 24, 1891. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. 'Moffitt were born seven children: 
Ida E., now of Billings, Montana; Fran- 
cis E., who died at the age of one and a 
half years ; Louis J., who is engaged in 
mining at Wallace, Idaho; Mary F., the 
wife of J. Henry Dover, a cattle dealer 
and horseman of Billings, Montana : 
James A., who died at the age of two 
years; Julia, the wife of J. F. Ochsner, of 
Nauvoo; and Edward P., who is cashier 
in a bank at Anaconda, Montana. 

Mr. Moffitt is a democrat and has held 
the offices of assessor, collector and other 
local positions. His religious faith is 
that of the Catholic church. The name 
of Moffitt has been interwoven with the 
history of the county since its earliest 
pioneer development, and he of whom we 
write has taken an active and helpful 
part in the progress and improvement 
from a very early period. His mind 
bears the impress of many of the early 
historic annals of the county and he can 
relate many interesting incidents of this 
locality, when it was a frontier section 
far removed from the older settled dis- 
tricts of the east because of the lack of 
all rapid transportation facilities or rapid 
means of communication. It was then 
the "far west," in which there were many 



268 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



difficulties of pioneer life to be borne, 
while dangers were not lacking owing to 
the proximity of the red men and their 
opposition to the encroachments of the 
white race upon their hunting grounds. 
Mr. Moffitt has lived to see remarkable 
changes here and as a worthy pioneer set- 
tler deserves prominent mention in this 
volume. 



WILLIAM K. SMITH, M. D. 

Dr. William K. Smith, successfully en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine and sur- 
gery in La Harpe, was born in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, on the 25th of De- 
cember, 1844, of Scotch parentage. 

Dr. Smith completed his more specific- 
ally literary education in a high school 
of Iowa and having determined upon the 
practice of medicine and surgery as a life 
work he prepared for his chosen calling 
in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons at Keokuk, Iowa, from which he 
was graduated in 1875. He had, how- 
ever, been a student in the Chicago Med- 
ical College in the winter of 1867-8 but 
completed his medical training in Keo- 
kuk. He entered upon the active prac- 
tice of medicine in Mercer county, Illi- 
nois, and was a practitioner of Hender- 
son county, Illinois, from 1869 to 1883, 
when he came to La Harpe, where he has 
since built up a good business, having to- 
day an extensive patronage which is in- 
dicative of the confidence reposed in his 
skill by the general public. 

In early manhood Dr. Smith enlisted 



for service as a soldier of the Civil war 
in 1861, becoming a member of the Ninth 
Missouri Infantry, with which he served 
until the spring of 1862, when that regi- 
ment became the Fifty-ninth Illinois In- 
fantry. He continued at the front for 
three years and was honorably discharged 
in 1864 but was afterward attached to 
the cavalry bureau and did duty in the 
southwest and on the frontier until 1866. 
The same spirit of loyalty that he dis- 
played during the dark days of the Civil 
war has always been manifest in his citi- 
zenship. 

In January, 1873, Dr. Smith was unit- 
ed in marriage to Miss Alice M. Hub- 
bard, who was born in Hatfield, Hamp- 
shire county, Massachusetts, a daughter 
of the Hon. Elisha and Cordelia (Ran- 
dall) Hubbard, who were natives of 
Massachusetts. Dr. and Mrs. Smith 
have now resided in La Harpe for twenty- 
three years and have a wide acquaintance 
here, the hospitality of the best homes 
being cordially extended them. More- 
over Dr. Smith has the respect of his pro- 
fessional brethren, for he always closely 
adheres to a high standard of professional 
ethics and has that laudable ambition 
which prompts thorough and discrimi- 
nating study whereby his skill and effi- 
ciency are being continually increased. 



WILLIAM L. WOODSIDE. 

William L. Woodside, who for many 
years was connected with agricultural in- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



269 



terests in McDonough county, Illinois, 
but is now living" retired in La Harpe, 
was born in Washington county, Vir- 
ginia, February 2, 1833, a son of John G. 
and Jane Woodside, natives of Virginia 
and North Carolina respectively. His 
paternal grandparents were James and 
Mary (Goliher) Woodside, also natives 
of Virginia. The father was a farmer 
by occupation and at a very early period 
in the development of Illinois made his 
way across the country to this state from 
Virginia, being six weeks on the road. 
He arrived in Blandinsville township. 
McDonough county, November 16. 1833, 
and took up his abode in a little log 
cabin on section 9, securing the title to 
one hundred and sixty acres of land. Not 
a furrow had been turned or an improve- 
ment made upon the farm and with char- 
acteristic energy he began its develop- 
ment, clearing away the timber and 
breaking the prairie land and in course 
of time the farm was developed into a 
good property, the fields yielding rich re- 
turns in bounteous harvests. There the 
father resided until his life's labors were 
ended in death on the i8th of March, 
1853. and his wife survived until Sep- 
tember 23, 1871, when she, too, was 
called to her final rest. 

William L. Woodside was the young- 
est of a family of three sons and three 
daughters and is now the only one sur- 
viving. He was educated in the common 
schools of McDonough county and after 
his father's death he purchased the inter- 
est of the other heirs in the old home- 
stead property, which was then partially 
improved. In 1872 he built a large frame 
house. He also has a large hay and horse 



barn on the place and grain and^imple- 
ment sheds. He bought at different 
times one hundred and fifteen acres which 
is situated on the northwest corner of the 
old home place. The land has never been 
out of possession of the family and 
through the efforts of Mr. Woodside and 
his father has been converted into a very 
valuable and productive farm. In all of 
his business undertakings he has been 
practical and progressive and his labors 
have brought him very desirable success. 
He continued to engage in general farm- 
ing and stock raising until October 2, 
1899, when he was injured by a tree fall- 
ing upon him, breaking his left leg and 
hurting him internally. He was con- 
fined to his bed all winter and on the 7th 
of March, 1900, the family removed to 
La Harpe, where he has since resided. 
He remained upon the old homestead 
place from November 16, 1833, until 
March, 1900, covering a period of more 
than two thirds of a century. He still 
owns the farm, which he now rents for 
six dollars per acre and this brings him 
a very gratifying income. On the ist of 
March, 1901, he purchased his present 
residence on East Main street and is now 
comfortably situated in a pleasant home 
in La Harpe. 

On the roth of April, 1859, Mr. Wood- 
side was married to Miss Mary Isabell 
Frits, who was born in Monroe county, 
Indiana, August 24, 1839, a daughter of 
Captain James Frits, who commanded 
Company F of the Sixteenth Illinois In- 
fantry in the Civil war and was a brave 
and loyal soldier. Her mother bore the 
maiden name of Julia Ann Kern and was 
born in Indiana, while Mr. Frits was a 



270 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



native of Virginia. Mrs. Frits' parents 
were Conrad and Mary A. (Berry) 
Kern. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Woodside 
have been born six children : Thomas 
Franklin, who was born April i, 1860, 
and is living in Keokuk, Iowa; Emma 
Jane, born January i, 1862, and now the 
wife of Nathan Ferris, of Blandinsville, 
Illinois; Sarah Louisa, born July 23, 
1864, and now the wife of Joel Smith, of 
Walnut, Kansas; Mary Ella, born Janu- 
ary n, 1868; Jennie May, who was born 
May 14, 1870, and is the wife of J. E. 
Quayle, of Orion, Illinois; Mina Alice, 
who was born October 18, 1874, and is 
the wife of Dr. C. H. Stockon, of Love- 
land, Colorado. The wife and mother 
passed away October 18, 1903, and was 
laid ,to rest in La Harpe cemetery. She 
was a most estimable lady and they had 
traveled life's journey together for forty- 
four years. Mr. Woodside is a member 
of the Christian church, in the work of 
which he has taken an active and helpful 
interest. He served as deacon of the 
church for many years and was clerk and 
treasurer for ten years. His political al- 
legiance has been given to the Republican 
party since age conferred upon him the 
right of franchise and he is a member of 
the Blue lodge of Masons and of the An- 
cient Order of United Workmen. His 
entire life' has been passed in this section 
of Illinois and he has a wide acquaint- 
ance, having long been known as an en- 
terprising farmer and one thoroughly re- 
liable in all business transactions. His 
success is attributable in very large meas- 
ure to his own efforts and his persever- 
ance and energy have enabled him to 
work his way steadily upward until he is 



numbered among the men of afflu- 
ence living in La Harpe. 



now 



JOHN FAULKNER. 

John Faulkner, a horticulturist and 
agriculturist living in Sonora township, 
is one of the worthy citizens that Penn- 
sylvania has furnished to Hancock 
county. His birth occurred in Chester 
county of the Keystone state, on the 6th 
of June, 1839, and he comes of Irish and 
German lineage. The paternal grandfa- 
ther, a native of the Emerald isle, took up 
his abode in New Jersey in the latter part 
of the eighteenth century and died soon 
afterward. His son, James Faulkner, 
was born in Ireland and came to the 
United States when only eighteen months 
old. When about fifteen years old he 
went to sea and for five years was upon 
the water. He was afterward married in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Miss 
Catherine Kimes, who was born in Penn- 
sylvania and was a daughter of Jacob 
Kimes, a native of Germany. The young 
couple began their domestic life in the 
Keystone state and James Faulkner 
worked at the shoemaker's trade, which 
he had learned after leaving the sea. In 
the spring of 1844, however, he made his 
way westward to Nauvoo but on reach- 
ing his destination he found things very 
different than had been reported and in 
consequence thereof he removed to Au- 
gusta, where he lived until 1848, when 
he returned to Nauvoo. Not long after- 



PI AN COCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



271 



ward he purchased sixty acres of land on 
section 6. Sonora township, and ninety 
acres in Appanoose township, where he 
carried on general farming and also 
raised stock. Thus his life was one of 
activity and his industry was to him a 
source of gratifying income. He died 
December 28, 1870, and was laid to rest 
in the Catholic cemetery, at Nauvoo, on 
the first day of the year, 1871. His wife 
survived him for exactly fifteen years, 
passing away on the 28th of December, 
1885. In their family were the follow- 
ing named: Ellen, who died the wife of 
Martin Roser. Mrs. Sarah Ritter, of 
Fort Madison, Iowa : John, of this re- 
view: Mrs. Catherine Fulton, of So- 
nora township; and Mrs. Mary Webber, 
of Las Vegas, New Mexico. 

John Faulkner was only about six 
years of age when his parents removed 
from Pennsylvania to Hancock county, 
so that his education was acquired in the 
common schools of this part of the state. 
He always remained at home with his 
parents and following their death he pur- 
chased the interest of the other heirs in 
the old home property, since which time 
he has resided upon and conducted the 
farm. He raises peaches and grapes, 
having six acres planted to both fruits. 
He has followed farming with the best 
methods of carrying on agricultural pur- 
suits and has made a close study of the 
work of cultivating fruit trees, so as to 
produce the best results. He and his fa- 
ther built a house of stone taken from 
their place, and he also has a large barn 
thirty-two by thirty-six feet with stone 
basement. 

On the 7th of October, 1871, Mr. 



Faulkner was married to Miss Lillian 
Ward, who was born in Middletown, 
Ohio, August 3, 1850, a daughter of 
James and Margaret C. (Striker) Ward, 
natives of Ireland and New Jersey re- 
spectively, the latter a daughter of Ste- 
phen A. Striker. Mr. and Mrs. Ward 
were married in Ohio in 1841, and for 
some years he engaged in merchandising 
in Middletown. In 1852, however, he 
closed out his business interests in the 
Buckeye state and came to Nauvoo, after 
living for one year at Montrose, where 
he conducted a tavern. Subsequent to 
his abode in Nauvoo, he lived retired. 
His wife died May 12, 1852, while he 
survived until February 4, 1874. Each 
had been previously married, this being 
their second union. Mr. Ward had three 
children by his first wife, and she had two 
children by her first husband. There 
were four children by the second union : 
Ella, the Wife of Fred Hellerrich, of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky; Laura S., the wife of 
Frank Brown, of Marion county, Mis- 
souri ; and Charles and Lillian, twins, but 
the former died in infancy. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Faulkner 
was blessed with nine children : Mary, 
who was born August 26, 1872, and is 
the wife of Thomas G. Kelly, of Rock 
Creek township : James, who was born 
February 16, 1874, and is now living in 
Carthage; John, who was born April 9, 
1876, and resides in Sonora township: 
Helen, born July 19, 1878; William, who 
was born . November 5, 1880, and is lo- 
cated in Nauvoo ; Aloysius, who was born 
December 19, 1882, and is at home: 
Thomas, who was born April i, 1885. 
and died in December, 1886; Lorena, 



272 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



bom July i, 1889; and Henry, August 8, 
1891. The family are communicants of 
the Catholic church at Nauvoo, and Mr. 
Faulkner's political support is given to 
the Democratic party. More than six 
decades have passed since he came to this 
county and he has therefore witnessed 
the greater part of its growth and de- 
velopment, for the work of progress had 
been scarcely begun when he took up his 
abode within its borders. He has vivid 
recollections of the typical pioneer con- 
ditions, for in his youth much land was 
still uncultivated, while the log cabin 
was no unusual feature in the landscape. 
Now these primitive homes have been re- 
placed by substantial farm residences and 
there is every evidence of advancement 
along agricultural and horticultural lines 
as well as industrial and commercial 
pursuits. 



HUGH JACKSON. 

Hugh Jackson, a prominent and pro- 
gressive fanner, owning one hundred and 
forty acres of valuable land situated on 
section 23, Appanoose township, is a na- 
tive of Fulton county, New York, his na- 
tal day being September 23, 1837. His 
parents, James and Mary (Ferguson) 
Jackson, were natives of Scotland, the 
father born near Glasgow, while the 
mother's birth occurred on the island of 
Bute. The paternal grandparents were 
James and Bell (Thompson) Jackson, 
and the maternal grandparents were 
Hugh and Catherine (McFarlane) Fer- 



guson, who located in Fulton county, 
New York, about 1830, where he en- 
gaged in general agricultural pursuits. 
The father of our subject emigrated from 
Scotland to America in 1832, his destina- 
tion being Fulton county, in the Empire 
state, where he was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Ferguson. Here he engaged 
in farming until 1840, when he removed 
to Albany county, where his death oc- 
curred in November, 1861. His widow 
then came to Hancock county in 1862, 
where she passed away in July. 1885. In 
their family were nine children : James, 
who died at the age of twenty-two years ; 
Hugh, of this review ; Peter, of Carthage 
township, Hancock county ; John and 
Robert, both residents of Appanoose 
township ; William, of Orange county, 
California ; Miller, who was drowned in 
the Mississippi river in 1867; Lansing, 
living near Durango, New Mexico ; and 
Catherine, who makes her home with her 
brothers, John and Robert, in Appanoose 
township. 

Hugh Jackson, whose name intro- 
duces this record, acquired his education 
in the district schools of New York, and 
was there reared to farm life, assisting 
his father in the operation of the home 
farm until nineteen years of age, when 
he came to Hancock county, where he 
worked at farm labor, being in the em- 
ploy of others until 1862. Saving his 
earnings, he was at that time able to 
make purchase of land and engage in 
farming on his own account. He first 
bought eighty acres situated on section 
23, Appanoose township, which at that 
time was wild prairie. He improved 
his land, and placed the fields under cul- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



273 



tivation. He built a small house con- 
taining three rooms, and he also erected 
board stables and other outbuildings for 
the shelter of grain and stock. Here he 
carried on agricultural pursuits and as 
the years passed by he prospered in his 
undertakings, so that he was later en- 
abled to make further purchase of land, 
adding sixty acres which adjoined his 
original purchase, so that he now has one 
hundred and forty acres in all. In 1870, 
he built a kitchen to his house, and in 
1886 remodeled and added to his dwell=- 
ing, so that it now contains eight rooms. 
In 1872 he built a horse and hay barn, 
and he also has ample cattle sheds, corn 
cribs and other outbuildings found upon 
a model farm of the present age. In ad- 
dition to his farming interests he former- 
ly engaged extensively in the raising of 
horses, cattle and hogs, shipping about 
two carloads of cattle annually. He. 
however, abandoned this branch of his 
business in 1895, and since that time has 
left the more arduous tasks to others and 
at the present time merely gives supervi- 
sion to his business interests. In the 
winter of 1859-60, in company with two 
comrades, he started with ox teams for 
Pike's Peak, where he prospected for two 
months and took up a mining claim, 
which he later traded for a cow. He then 
journeyed on to New Mexico, where he 
dispose^ of the cow for thirty-five dol- 
lars, which was considered a good price. 
He then sold his oxen and bought ponies 
and started toward home, stopping in 
Kansas City, where he disposed of his 
ponies and took passage on a steamer 
for New Orleans. He then spent two 
winters on a steamboat. In the summer 



of 1860 he traveled through eastern Kan- 
sas and southern Illinois and then re- 
turned to New Orleans, where he spent 
some time, subsequent to which time he 
went to St. Louis, being in that city at 
the time of the inauguration of President 
Lincoln. 

On the 30th of March, 1865, Mr. 
Jackson was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary A. Hammond, who was born in 
Staffordshire, England, in 1840, and 
when two years of age was brought by 
her parents to Hancock county, where 
the father bought three hundred acres 
of land, situated in Pontoosuc township, 
where they both passed away, the former 
on the 26th of December, 1885, while 
his wife survived for only four days, 
passing away on the 3Oth of the same 
month, and they were buried in the same 
grave. In their family were ten chil- 
dren : William, who was killed by light- 
ning; Thomas, who was drowned in the 
Mississippi river; John, a resident of 
Monterey county, California; Isaac, of 
Butler county, Kansas; Mary A., now 
Mrs. Jackson ; James, of Lancaster 
county, Nebraska ; Hannah, the wife of 
John Cosgrove, of Appanoose township; 
Fannie, who died in infancy ; Sarah, the 
wife of J. J. Worley, of Valisca, Iowa; 
and Martha, the widow of Thomas 
Stretch, of Appanoose township. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have been 
born the following named : Mary Ellen, 
born August 29, 1866, married Charles 
A. Thompson, of Butler county, Kansas. . 
Arthur M., born January 22, 1868, died 
in Appanoose township June 6, 1905, 
leaving a widow, who in her maidenhood 
was Miss Annie Brady, and who now 



274 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV I Ell' 



makes her home in Nauvoo. James T., 
born November 2, 1871, is employed in a 
lumber office in Kansas City, Missouri. 
Ada, born August 18, 1873, is the wife 
of L. R. Traverse, and makes her home 
in Oquawka, Illinois. Laura, born June 
5, 1875, is at home. 

Mr. Jackson gives his political support 
to the Democratic party, and has taken a 
very active and helpful interest in the 
local ranks of his party, being called to 
fill a number of offices of public trust. 
He was town clerk for several years, 
served as supervisor for one year, as col- 
lector three years and as township treas- 
urer for twenty years, and in all of these 
offices he discharged his duties with sat- 
isfaction to the public and with credit to 
himself. In his religious faith he is a 
Presbyterian, and since 1875 has served 
as elder of the church. 

He is a public-spirited man who gives 
his aid and co-operation to every move- 
ment which tends for the advancement 
of his community. He has led a very 
busy life, and, having come to Hancock 
county when much of the land was still 
unimproved and uncultivated, he made 
purchase of a tract which he improved 
until it is today one of the fine farming 
properties of Appanoose township. 



GEORGE FRAZER. 

George Frazer,, filling the office of su- 
pervisor in Walker township, where he 
carries on general agricultural pursuits. 



is a son of Lafayette and Caroline Frazer, 
who are mentioned elsewhere in this vol- 
ume, in connection with the sketch of J. 
I. Frazer. He whose name introduces 
this record was bom in Adams county, 
Illinois, in 1850, and following the re- 
moval of the family to Hancock county 
he pursued his education in the district 
schools of Walker township. He re- 
mained under the parental roof until the 
time of his marriage, which was cele- 
brated February 26, 1873, when he was 
twenty-two years of age, the lady of his 
choice being Miss Rebecca Shipe. who 
was born in Rocky Run township in 
1854, a daughter of William and Mary 
(Shipe) Shipe, who were farming people 
and came to Hancock county in the early 
'505, their home being in Rocky Run 
township. In the Shipe family are four 
daughters: Rebecca, now Mrs. Frazer: 
Emma, the wife of William Sauble, of 
Adams county ; Gertrude, at home ; and 
Catherine E., the wife of Harry Frazer, 
of Quincy, Illinois. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Fra- 
zer's father gave him two hundred and 
twenty acres of good land, situated on 
section 19, Walker township, and he has 
made splendid improvements upon the 
place, erecting an elegant residence in 
1876 and building a commodious and 
substantial barn in 1880. This structure 
is forty by sixty feet and other buildings 
are in keeping with it, ample shelter being 
thus afforded to grain and stock. Mr. 
Frazer has engaged in the raising of stock 
quite extensively and at the same time has 
tilled his fields so that they have brought 
forth rich harvests. He has also added 
to his landed possessions as the years 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



275 



have passed by and his labors have in- 
creased his financial resources. He now 
has two hundred and sixty acres in the 
home place, one hundred and twelve acres 
elsewhere in Walker township, a tract of 
one hundred and twenty acres in the same 
township where his daughter resides, one 
hundred acres in Rocky Run township 
and ninety acres in Adams county, Illi- 
nois. His holdings are therefore exten- 
sive and indicate a life of thrift and en- 
terprise, of good business ability and 
keen foresight. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Frazer 
has been blessed with six children, all 
bom in Walker township: Mary C, who 
died at the age of sixteen months ; James 
L., who is a graduate of the Gem City 
Business College at Quincy and assists in 
the operation of the home farm; Edith, 
the wife of William Schildman, who re- 
sides upon her father's farm in Walker 
township, and by whom she has had one 
daughter ; Elberta May ; Lafayette, who 
is living on one of his father's farms in 
Walker township, and who married Ina 
Tripp, by whom he has two children ; 
Marvin, who at the age of twenty-two 
years is at home; Elberta G.. also at 
home. Marvin and Elberta are attending 
the Gem City Business College at Quincy. 

Mr. Frazer is a stalwart democrat in 
his political views and is now serving as 
supervisor of this township for the fourth 
or fifth term a fact which is indicative 
of the confidence reposed in him by his 
fellow townsmen and his promptness and 
fidelity in the discharge of his duties. He 
has also served as school director and as 
treasurer of the school board. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Odd Fel- 



lows and has been treasurer of his local 
lodge. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Methodist church, contributing 
generously to its support and are actively 
interested in its work. Wherever known 
they are held in high esteem and are rec- 
ognized as leading people of the commu- 
nity. Both are representatives of well 
known and honored families of the 
county and they have reared a family of 
whom they have every reason to be proud. 
They are now comfortably situated in 
life, and with the exception of the farm 
received from his father Mr. Frazer has 
acquired all that he possesses. He now 
has a most attractive home, supplied with 
all the comforts which go to make life 
worth living and both he and his wife 
gladly extend the hospitality of their 
home to their many friends. In disposi- 
tion he is kindly and charitable and in all 
life's relations he has been straightfor- 
ward and honorable. He has ever been 
a great reader and deep thinker and is 
recognized as a man of sound judgment 
whose opinion is often sought by friends 
and neighbors in matters of individual or 
public interest. 



JUDGE CHARLES J. SCOFIELD. 

Judge Charles J. Scofield, of Carthage, 
whose ability as lawyer, jurist, orator and 
author has made him widely known be- 
yond the borders of his native county and 
state and whose life has been one of sig- 
nal usefulness and activity not only for 



276 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV IE]}' 



the benefit of his individual interests but 
for the benefit of his fellowmen as well, 
was born in the city which is yet his 
home, on Christmas day of 1853, his par- 
ents being Charles R. and Elizabeth 
(Crawford) Scofield. The family is of 
English lineage and was established in 
Stamford, Connecticut, between the years 
of 1635 and 1640. His father was born 
at Dewittville, Chautauqua county, New 
York, in 1821, and spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth in the place of his na- 
tivity, coming when a young man to Han- 
cock county, Illinois, where, in 1851, he 
joined his brother, Bryant T. Scofield, 
who was one of the prominent early at- 
torneys of Carthage. He read law with 
his brother and afterward entered into 
partnership with him. On the dissolution 
of this business connection Charles R. 
Scofield formed a partnership with David 
Mack under the style of Mack & Scofield 
and this became one of the strongest and 
most prominent law firms in the county, 
the connection being maintained until the 
death of Mr. Scofield in January, 1857. 
In February, 1853, ne was married to 
Miss Elizabeth Crawford, a native of 
Crab Orchard, Kentucky, and a daughter 
of Harrison Crawford, who was one of 
the early residents of the county and who 
at the time of Mr. Scofield's death was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits near 
Carthage. Mrs. Scofield had two sons, 
Charles J. and Timothy J., and with them 
she returned to her father's home about a 
mile from the city. Subsequently they 
again took up their abode in Carthage, 
where her death occurred on the 27th of 
May, 1877. She was a member of the 
Christian church and she devoted her life 



untiringly to the welfare of her sons, the 
younger of whom, Timothy J. Scofield, 
is now at the head of the trial department 
of the Union Traction Company, of Chi- 
cago, and was formerly assistant attorney 
general under General Moloney. 

The elder son, Charles J. Scofield, was 
a student in the public schools of Car- 
thage until 1868, when he matriculated in 
the Christian University at Canton, Mis- 
souri, from which institution he was 
graduated in the class of 1871 with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. For three 
years thereafter he was a teacher in the 
high school of his native city and during 
that period devoted his leisure hours out- 
side of the schoolroom to the study of law 
under the direction of his uncle, Bryant 
T. Scofield, and William C. Hooker and 
George Edmunds, who occupied the same 
offices. On examination he was admitted 
to the bar in June, 1875, and in the fol- 
lowing October was appointed master in 
chancery of the circuit court of Hancock 
county, which position he filled continu- 
ously until going upon the bench. In the * 
meantime he also entered upon the active 
practice of law, which he continued alone 
for four years, occupying offices, however, 
with William E. Mason, a prominent at- 
torney. His success came soon because 
his equipment was unusually good. His ' 
native and acquired abilities were soon 
manifest in the able manner in which he 
handled important litigation. His mind 
is analytical, logical and deductive and 
moreover he is a worker, recognizing that 
close application and unfaltering indus- 
try are concomitants for success at the bar 
as truly as in the fields of manual labor. 
In February, 1879, he formed a partner- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



277 



ship with Henry \Y. Draper, one of the 
most prominent lawyers of Cartilage and 
an able politician. Under the firm style 
of Draper & Scofield they practiced until 
the death of the senior member, July 8, 
1 88 1, when his brother, Timothy J., hav- 
ing been admitted to the bar, Judge Sco- 
field formed a partnership with him un- 
der the firm of Scofield & Scofield. In 
the fall of 1884 A. W. O'Hara was ad- 
mitted to the firm as Scofield, O'Hara & 
Scofield. which relation was continued 
until June, 1885, when Charles J. See- 
field was elected one of the three judges 
of what was then the sixth judicial circuit 
of Illinois, comprising the seven coun- 
ties of Hancock, Adams, Pike, McDon- 
ough, Fulton, Schuyler and Brown. On 
the expiration of his six years term he 
was re-elected and sat upon the bench for 
twelve consecutive years. He was nomi- 
nated for a third term in 1897 but in the 
meantime the legislature had changed the 
boundaries of the district whereby Han- 
cock was assigned to a district so strongly 
republican that there was no hope of 
election for a supporter of democracy and 
Judge Scofield, who has always been a 
stanch democrat, therefore declined to be- 
come a candidate. In 1893 ne was a P~ 
pointed by the supreme court of the state 
one of the judges of the appellate court 
for the fourth district and sat upon that 
bench for four years, or until the expira- 
tion of his second term as circuit judge. 
His legal learning, his analytical mind, 
the readiness with which he grasps the 
points in an argument, all combine to 
make him one of the capable jurists of the 
state and the public and the profession 
acknowledge him the peer of any member 



of the appellate court. Since retiring 
from the bench Judge Scofield has en- 
gaged in practice in Carthage, at various 
points in the state and in other states as 
well. His practice has been of a most 
important character, calling him into In- 
diana, Iowa, Missouri, to Chicago and 
other cities. Various offers have been 
made to him in the line of his profession 
in Chicago, but he has preferred to main- 
tain his residence at his old home in Car- 
thage and from this point goes forth to 
perform his professional service, being 
recognized as one of the strong and able 
members of the Illinois bar. 

Judge Scofield was married Septem- 
ber 12, 1876, to Miss Rose Spitler, the 
adopted daughter of Dr. Adam Spitler, 
of this city, and a graduate of Carthage 
College. Their home is situated on the 
same lots where his parents began their 
domestic life and its hospitality is well 
known to the citizens of Carthage. They 
are members of the Christian church, in 
the work of which they have taken a most 
active and helpful part. In addition to 
his law practice Judge Scofield has acted 
as a minister of the Christian church for 
many years, and although accepting no 
regular pastorate has filled many pulpits 
and is regarded as one of the strong rep- 
resentatives of the Christian ministry. 
He holds the degree of LL. D from Eu- 
reka College, one of the schools conduct- 
ed under the auspices of his denomina- 
tion. He belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias, to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and other fraternal organizations 
and gives unfaltering allegiance to the 
democracy with firm faith in the party 
principles. He has won much more than 



2/8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



local fame as a writer and has published 
two volumes, "A Subtle Adversary," a 
leading temperance work, and "Altar 
Stairs," a work bearing on the questions 
of Christian faith, both of which have 
had good sales. His ability as an orator 
has caused his services to be much in de- 
mand for public addresses and for the de- 
livery of addresses before various con- 
ventions in Boston, Chicago, Denver and 
elsewhere. He is a fluent, earnest and 
forcible speaker, and while he employs 
the adornment of rhetoric with good ef- 
fect, they are but the avenue of expression 
for facts which he deems of vital interest 
to the race at large or to the body which 
he is addressing. He has frequently 
been chosen as a delegate to the church 
federations. In an analyzation of his 
character it will be seen that he has 
brought all of his native talent, acquired 
ability and energies to bear upon the one 
purpose of the fulfilling of his duty to 
his fellowmen and to his country. With 
a keen sense of individual responsibility, 
believing that man is his brother's keeper, 
he has labored to uphold the political and 
legal status and to promote intellectual 
and moral advancement, his work being 
directed not only by a sense of duty but 
the higher motive of principle. 



JAMES L. BRADFIELD. 

James L. Bradfield, a retired farmer 
and large landowner, making his home 
in La Harpe, was bom in Coshocton 



county, Ohio, June 29, 1854. His pater- 
nal grandfather, James Bradfield, was a 
resident of Virginia and married a Miss 
Nichols. Their son, James N. Bradfield, 
was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, 
and having arrived at. years of maturity 
was married in Ohio, April 12, 1853, to 
Miss Ada Wolfe, who was born in Co- 
shocton county, Ohio, and was a daugh- 
ter of James and Sarah (Meredith). 
Wolfe, natives of the Buckeye state. 
After their marriage James N. Bradfield 
followed farming in Ohio for a year and 
in the fall of 1854 removed to Muscatine, 
Iowa. In Hardin county, that state, he 
purchased a farm whereon he resided un- 
til the fall of 1870, when he sold that 
property and came to Hancock county, 
Illinois. Here he invested in a tract of 
land in Durham township, whereon he 
resided for about twenty-one years, when 
in 1891 he sold out and went to Ne- 
braska, making his home in the latter 
state until 1899. In that year he made 
a visit to the old home place in Durham 
township and died there on the 4th of De- 
cember of that year. He had for a num- 
ber of years survived his wife, who 
passed away June 25, 1886. In their 
family were four children : James L., 
of this review ; William F., of La Harpe ; 
Henry S., of this county; and Laura M., 
the wife of Clark H. Rice, of Hancock 
county. 

James L. Bradfield spent his boyhood 
days on the home farm under the parental 
roof and at the age of seventeen years be- 
gan farming on his own account upon 
rented land, which he operated for four 
years. On the expiration of that period 
he established a general store at Disco, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



279 



where he also engaged in the grain and 
stock business in partnership with his fa- 
ther. After a year he sold out and 
through the succeeding three years op- 
erated rented farms. He next bought 
eighty acres of improved land in Durham 
township, whereon he resided for six 
years and at the end of that period in- 
vested in one hundred and fifty-six acres 
in La Harpe township. Taking up his 
abode thereon he made the place his home 
until March, 1905, when he removed to 
La Harpe, building a fine residence, con- 
taining ten rooms, besides halls and clos- 
ets. It is heated with furnace, supplied 
with bath and all modern improvements 
and is one of the fine modern residences 
in the city. In addition to this property 
Mr. Bradfield has extensive landed in- 
terests and is now the owner of four hun- 
dred acres of valuable land in Durham 
and La Harpe townships. He also owns 
an interest with others in a half section of 
coal land in Colorado and has seven hun- 
dred acres of unimproved land in north- 
western. Nebraska. He likewise owns 
stock in the Waldorf Metal Mining Com- 
pany, of Colorado, is a director in the La 
Harpe State Bank, of which he was one 
of the organizers, and is a stockholder of 
the Coulson, Brundage Hardware Com- 
pany, of which he is vice president and a 
director. His business investments are 
now extensive and return to him a splen- 
did income, so Tthat he can well enjoy a 
retired life, his property returning him 
sufficient capital to bring him all of the 
comforts and many of the luxuries of 
life. 

On the 1 5th of February,. 1872, Mr. 
Bradfield was married to. Ellen Refzer, 
18 



who was born in Durham township and 
was educated in the district schools, a 
daughter of Daniel and Hannah (Mor- 
ris) Retzer, natives of Lancaster and 
Green counties, Pennsylvania, respective- 
ly. The mother came with her parents 
to this county in 1843, while the father 
arrived in 1851, so that they were closely 
connected with the county from pioneer 
times. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bradfield 
were born four children : Estella R., 
born December 31, 1872, is the wife of 
Wesley Davis, who resides upon the first 
farm which Mr. Bradfield purchased in 
the country. James Harvey, born De- 
cember 17, 1875, is a practicing physi- 
cian of Sheridan, Wyoming; Leslie S., 
born August 30, 1869, is living in Pueblo, 
Colorado. Mary E., born September 22, 
1883, is the wife of Clair J. Thomas, who 
resides upon one of her father's farms in 
La Harpe township. 

Mr. Bradfield is a member of the Meth- 
odist Protestant church and his political 
allegiance is given to the Republican 
party. He has served for three years as 
commissioner of highways of La Harpe 
township, also as school director and jus- 
tice of the peace of La Harpe township, 
being elected to the last named position 
in the spring of 1905. His interest in 
community affairs is that of a public-spir- 
ited citizen whose labors are actuated by 
an earnest desire to benefit the locality 
and promote the welfare of town and 
county. In an active life he has displayed 
excellent ability and keen discernment, 
making judicious investments and gain- 
ing gratifying success. He has earned 
for himself an enviable reputation as a 
careful man of business and in his deal- 



280 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ings is known for his prompt and honor- 
able methods, which have won him the 
deserved and unbounded confidence of his 
fellowmen. 



ADAM KROPP. 

When a man passes on the highway of 
life others who perhaps started out ahead 
of him surrounded by more advantageous 
circumstances, it is always interest- 
ing to examine into his career and note 
the causes of his advancement and suc- 
cess. Mr. Kropp is one whose life rec- 
ord has been characterized by many good 
business traits that have resulted in his 
winning a place among the substantial 
residents of Hancock county, where he 
now owns valuable farming property, 
situated in Walker township. He 
was born in Germany in 1831, a 
son of Peter and Elizabeth (Carman) 
Kropp, who were likewise natives 
of that country, in which they spent 
tives of that county, in which they spent 
their entire lives. Of their family of nine 
children Adam Kropp is the only one now- 
living. The days of his boyhood and 
youth were passed in his native country 
and when twenty-two years of age he 
came to America, the voyage consuming 
twenty-eight days. A colony of three 
hundred people made the trip at the same 
time. Locating in Pennsylvania, Mr. 
Kropp remained for two years, after 
which he removed to Missouri and then 
came to Hancock county, Illinois, where 
he worked as a farm hand bv the month. 



In 1862 Mr. Kropp was married to 
Mrs. Annie Catherine Staff (nee Cress), 
who was born in Germany, November 16, 
1835. Her parents coming to America, 
settled on a farm in Hancock county, but 
both are now deceased. Their family 
numbered six children, of whom four are 
now living: John, a resident farmer of 
Walker township ; Mrs. Kropp, deceased ; 
Elizabeth, the wife of Lewis Keiner, of 
Walker township; and another John, who 
died in Nebraska ; Catherine, the wife of 
Leonard Egley, living in Warsaw, Illinois ; 
and Caroline, the wife of Fred Beeler, 
of Walker township. Mrs. Kropp's first 
husband was Nicholas Cress, a native of 
Germany, who died in Warsaw, Illinois, 
in the latter part of the '505. There were 
three children by that marriage, of whom 
one is now living, Caroline, the wife of 
Lewis Brackensick, who lives in Adams 
county, Illinois, and has four children, 
Annie, Lewis, Irma and Albert, who are 
with their parents on a farm. Mrs. 
Kropp had two brothers, both named 
John, who were soldiers in the Civil war 
and served until its close. One of them 
was called big John and the other little 
John. 

After his marriage Mr. Kropp pur- 
chased ninety-five acres of good land on 
section 29, Walker township, and the 
young couple began their domestic life 
in a log cabin there. He afterward re- 
placed the primitive home by a frame 
residence, which later was destroyed by 
fire, and he then built his present dwell- 
ing. In addition to his farm he likewise 
owns twenty-seven town lots in Tioga. 
He carried on general farming and stock- 
raising and his business was carefully 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



281 



conducted, being therefore a source of 
gratifying income. He was drafted for 
service in the Civil war but hired a sub- 
stitute and remained at home, concentrat- 
ing his energies upon his business inter- 
ests. He came to America on borrowed 
money and while in Pennsylvania, as the 
result of industry and frugality, paid off 
the debt. He has since been a hard work- 
ing man and his earnest toil and perse- 
verance, together with the assistance of 
his estimable wife, brought him a goodly 
competence and he is now comfortably 
situated. His land is rented and he prac- 
tically lives retired from active business, 
enjoying a well merited rest. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Kropp were born 
four children, all natives of Walker town- 
ship, namely : Henry, a farmer of Rocky 
Run township, who married Anna Keith 
and has four children, Winnard, Leoline, 
Carlton and Eugene; John, a farmer of 
Walker township, who wedded Louisa 
Kunz, and has five children, Ursula, Wil- 
lis, Eva, Esther and Edith ; Elizabeth, 
who is keeping house for her father ; and 
Annie, the wife of Rev. P. Ott, of Calu- 
met, Iowa, by whom she has one daugh- 
ter, 'Lizzie. The children were all edu- 
cated in the district schools. In 1890 the 
family was called upon to mourn the loss 
of wife and mother, for Mrs. Kropp 
passed away in January of that year, 
amid the deep regret of many friends as 
well as her immediate family. She was a 
member of the German church at Tioga, 
and was laid to rest in the Tioga ceme- 
tery. Mr. Kropp is also a member of the 
same church and his political allegiance 
is given to the Republican party. He has 
justly won the broad American title of 



a self-made man. He recognized the fact 
that in America labor is king and he paid 
his allegiance to that sovereign. Work- 
ing persistently year after year he has 
steadily advanced toward the goal of 
prosperity and is now accounted one of 
the substantial residents of Walker 
township. 



JAMES W. BOLINGER. 

Among the retired farmers who now 
make their home in Disco but who in for- 
mer years were actively identified with the 
agricultural development of Hancock 
county is numbered James W. Bolinger, 
whose birth occurred in Monroe county, 
West Virginia, July i, 1838. When only 
about four years of age his parents, Philip 
and Mary Bolinger, drove with team and 
wagon from West Virginia to Meigs 
county, Ohio, where the father engaged 
in farming for about ten years, and then 
continued his journey by wagon to Ed- 
gar county, Illinois, where he continued 
his farming operations for several years 
and then removed to this county, where 
he followed the pursuits which had been 
his occupation through many long years. 
During their later years, however, they 
resided for a time in the eastern part of 
this state, but at the time of their demise 
were making their home with our sub- 
ject. The father passed away in 1872, 
while the wife survived for only about 
two years, being called to her final rest 
in 1874. 

James W. Bolinger is the fourth in or- 



282 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



der of birth in a family of eight daughters 
and two sons, of whom only three sur- 
vive, the sisters being Elizabeth, the wife 
of John Taylor, of Hamilton, Illinois, 
and Sarah, the wife of John Redford, a 
resident of Terre Haute, Indiana. Mr. 
Bolinger acquired a common school edu- 
cation, but his advantages in this direc- 
tion were somewhat limited. He has, 
however, in later years added much to his 
knowledge by reading and investigation. 
He remained under the parental roof un- 
til twenty-five years of age, assisting in 
the development of the home farm, when, 
on the 1 4th of January, 1867, he was 
united in marriage to Miss Mariette Zer- 
by, whose birth occurred on the farm 
which is still her home. Her parents 
were Daniel and Mary Zerby. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Bolinger took up their abode on the farm 
which belonged to his father-in-law, and 
which constituted one hundred and twelve 
acres situated on section 6, La Harpe 
township. The land was unimproved 
and the only building upon the place was 
a small house, but our subject at once set 
to work to clear the land and cultivate 
the fields, and in due course of time he 
gathered rich crops. The property is 
now well improved, the fields being di- 
vided by woven wire fences, and there are 
likewise many substantial outbuildings 
for the shelter of grain and stock. In 
1891 the original home of the family was 
replaced by a modern frame residence 
and altogether the place is one of the at- 
tractive country homes in this section of 
the state. He also set out an orchard, 
containing apple, peach and plum trees, 
and grapes are also found upon the place. 



Mr. Bolinger continued to improve and 
cultivate his farm until 1903, when, feel- 
ing that his labors in former years now 
justified his retirement from the more ar- 
duous duties of life, he purchased two lots 
in the village of Disco, on which he 
erected a good frame residence, contain- 
ing eight rooms and supplied with all 
modern conveniences and accessories and 
here he and his wife are now living in 
honorable retirement, the farm being con- 
ducted by his son-in-law, Allen St. Clair. 
In the family of this worthy couple are 
three children : James- W., a telegraph 
operator, being stationed at Wilburton, In- 
dian Territory ; Minnie, the wife of Cyrus 
Rice, a resident of Durham township; 
and Emma, the wife of Allen St. Clair, 
residing on the homestead farm. In his 
political views Mr. Bolinger is a stalwart 
democrat but has never been active in the 
work of the party. He holds membership 
in the Methodist Protestant church at 
Disco, in the work of which he is a help- 
ful and interested factor. Starting out in 
life a poor man, he has worked diligently 
and persistently to acquire a competence 
that now enables him to rest from further 
labor and he and his wife are companion- 
able people, highly esteemed in the com- 
munity where they have lived and labored 
throughout the greater part of their lives. 



JOHN B. HASTINGS. 

John B. Hastings, who is the owner of 
valuable farming and stock raising inter- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



283 



ests in Hancock county and moreover has 
extensive landed possessions in the west, 
owning and conducting a very large stock 
ranch in Kearney county, Nebraska, is a 
native son of Illinois, his birth having oc- 
curred in Adams county on the 3Oth of 
December, 1842. His parents were Sam- 
uel R. and Martha A. (Anderson) Hast- 
ings, natives of Kentucky and Maryland 
respectively. The father was a 7 son of 
Benjamin and Rachel (Hitch) Hastings, 
also natives of Maryland, and the mother 
was a daughter of John and Elizabeth 
(Guerrant) Anderson, who were natives 
of Virginia, while the great-grandfather, 
James Anderson, was also born in the 
Old Dominion. In the year 1837 Benja- 
min Hastings became a resident of 
Quincy, Illinois, and John Anderson had 
previously located in Adams county in 
1835. entering land within two miles of 
the present site of the city of Quincy. He 
became the owner of an extensive and 
valuable tract of six hundred and forty 
acres, while Mr. Hastings owned the 
northeast quarter of section 22, Melrose 
township. He died in the year 1839, 
while John Anderson survived until 1885. 
The son of the former and the daughter 
of the latter were married in Adams 
county and Samuel R. Hastings became 
the owner of two hundred acres of land 
on section 22, Melrose township, which 
was unimproved. He transformed it into 
a richly cultivated tract and put up a 
number of buildings thereon. It was tim- 
ber land when it came into his possession, 
but he cleared away the trees and brush 
and while thus engaged he cultivated 
land, which he rented. He continued to 
rent a farm for about five years, at the 



end of which time he removed to his 
home place. In 1868 he bought one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of the southeast 
quarter of section 15, Montebello town- 
ship, Hancock county. This was im- 
proved prairie land and he also invested 
in one hundred and sixty acres in Marion 
county, Missouri, near Palmyra, and one 
hundred and sixty acres near Kingston, 
Caldwell county, Missouri. He resided 
upon the home place until he had a stroke 
of paralysis in the spring of 1903. Los- 
ing the use of his vocal organs thereby, 
he has since lived with his son, John B. 
Hastings, and on the 3d of October, 1906. 
he will have reached the age of eighty-six 
years. Earnest, persistent labor consti- 
tutes the strong element in the success 
which he has enjoyed as the years have 
gone by and as the result of diligence and 
perseverance he became the owner of val- 
uable farming property. 

John B. Hastings is the eldest of a fam- 
ily of five sons and two daughters, of 
whom three sons and one daughter are 
yet living. He made his home with his 
father on the old farm until twenty-two 
years of age and acquired his education 
in the public schools. On the i6th of 
January, 1865, he was married to Miss 
Martha E. Watson, who was born near 
Quincy on the i6th of December, 1845, 
her parents being Benjamin and Maria 
(Tyrer) Watson, natives of Kentucky, 
in which state also lived her grandfather, 
James Tyrer. Mrs. Hastings was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Quincy. For 
two and a half years after their marriage 
they resided upon the old Hastings farm 
and at the end of that time Mr. Hastings 
fitted up a freight train for the govern- 



284 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU* 



ment to be used from the Missouri river 
west to designated points. He was in 
Denver, Colorado, on the i6th of June, 
1866, at which time a public celebration 
was held because of the turning on of the 
first irrigation water. For two years Mr. 
Hastings engaged in freighting in the 
west, after which he spent the succeeding 
year upon the old home place and in the 
fall of 1868 he came to the farm which 
his father had purchased in Montebello 
township and which was given to John B. 
Hastings and his brother, Green B. Hast- 
ings, who have always been equal part- 
ners in their business dealings. They se- 
cured the home place of one hundred and 
sixty acres and have added to it until 
they now own four hundred acres on sec- 
tions 14 and 15, Montebello township. 
They own three hundred and sixty acres 
of improved land in Faulkner township, 
Clark county, Missouri, which is used 
as a stock farm, and in 1887 they began 
the importation of horses from England, 
France and Belgium, devoting their at- 
tention to the raising of three breeds. 
They at first lxught twelve head and 
since that time have made two other ship- 
ments, one of thirty-two head and the 
other of thirty-eight head. They contin- 
ued in business until 1893, when they re- 
tired from the field as importers. They 
now raise draft horses and have one stal- 
lion for service of the Percheron breed 
upon the home place, and one Belgium 
stallion on the Missouri farm. They rais; 
from ten to twelve head of draft horses 
each year and they raise short-horn cat- 
tle, Poland-China hogs and Shropshire 
sheep. Their place in Hancock county 
is called the Montebello Stock Farm. In 



addition to this property they also own 
twelve hundred acres of land in Kearney 
county, Nebraska, which is used as a 
stock farm for the raising of cattle, horses 
and hogs. They also have five hundred 
acres of plowed land devoted to the rais- 
ing of wheat, corn, oats and alfalfa. 

Unto Mr. Hastings and his first wife 
were born four children : Emily J., who 
died at tffe age of twenty-one years ; Sam- 
uel R., at the age of twenty-four; Cora 
E., at the age of twenty-three; and An- 
drew L., at the age of twenty-five; while 
the wife and mother passed away in No- 
vember, 1877. On the 8th of June, 1899, 
Mr. Hastings was again married, his sec- 
ond union being with Iva Simmonds, who 
was born in Adair county, Missouri, July 
15. 1875. and is a daughter of John S. 
and Mary (McConnell) Simmonds, na- 
tives of Illinois and Missouri respective- 
ly. Her grandparents were Squire and 
Martha A. (Cox) Simmonds, natives of 
Indiana, while the maternal grandparents 
were Asa and Martha V. (Peusa) Mc- 
Connell, the former a native of Missouri 
and the latter of France. Their children 
are: Lessie E., born March 15, 1900: 
Mary E., November 17, 1901; Green. 
June 4, 1903 ; and John, September 4. 
1905, the two sons being named for the' 
father and the uncle, who have long been 
partners in business. 

Mr. Hastings of this review votes with 
the democracy and has held the office of 
road commissioner in his township, but 
is not active as a politician, preferring to 
leave office seeking to others, while he 
concentrates his energies upon his busi- 
ness affairs. Both brothers are recog- 
nized as men of excellent business enter- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



285 



prise and capacity, straightforward in 
their dealings and quickly recognizing 
good business opportunities and ad- 
vantages. 



CLINTON CUTLER. 

Clinton Cutler, living retired in Car- 
thage after many years' connection with 
agricultural interests, lias now passed the 
eighty-first milestone on life's journey, his 
birth having occurred in Erie county, 
New York, September 9, 1825. There 
he lived until twelve years of age, his 
youth being largely passed in attendance 
at the public schools. His parents were 
Jonas P. and Martha (Jones) Cutler, 
both natives of Vermont, where they 
lived until after their marriage. They 
then removed to Erie county, New York, 
and the father served as a justice of the 
peace in the town of Holland. He also 
engaged in farming there for a number of 
years, or until his removal to the middle 
west about 1837, in which year he lo- 
cated in Fulton county, Illinois, where he 
devoted his time and energies to farming 
until 1851. He then came to Hancock 
county, settling in Pilot Grove township, 
where he purchased a tract of land, on 
which he carried on general farming until 
his death when he was sixty-eight years 
of age. He was a member of the Mis- 
sionary Baptist church and a man whose 
entire life was characterized by the most 
honorable principles and manly conduct. 
His political allegiance was given to the 
democracy. For many years Mrs. Cut- 



ler survived her husband and passed away 
in Winterset, Iowa, at the advanced age 
of ninety-one. She was the mother of 
eleven children, nine of whom still sur- 
vive. 

Clinton Cutler, whose name intro- 
duces this review, was a youth of twelve 
summers when he accompanied his par- 
ents on their removal from the Empire 
state to Illinois. He attended the public 
schools of Fulton county and through 
the periods of vacation assisted his fa- 
ther in the farm work, remaining with 
his .parents until after their removal to 
Hancock county in 1851. Subsequently 
he lived in Pilot Grove township, where 
he purchased one hundred and six acres 
of land, making his home thereon for a 
number of years or until after the death 
of his first wife. He later purchased 
land in several different townships of 
this county and successfully carried on 
farming until 1903, when he took up his 
abode in the city of Carthage, where he 
has since lived retired, enjoying in well 
earned rest the fruits of his former toil. 
His property he has divided among his 
first children and he now occupies a 
pleasant home in Carthage owned by 
Mrs. Cutler. 

Mr. Cutler has been married twice. He 
first wedded Miss Mary Ann Christ, who 
was born in Pennsylvania and became 
the mother of six children. Charles H., 
the eldest, now a resident of Des Moines, 
Iowa, married Sarah Walker, who died 
leaving a large family : Benjamin, a 
farmer of Winfield, Kansas, died at the 
age of forty years ; Caleb is residing in 
Centerville, Iowa ; Joel S. makes his home 
in Chicago; John A. died in infancy; and 



286 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Laura is the wife of John Lawton, a 
blacksmith of Carthage, by whom she 
has five children. For his second wife 
Mr. Cutler chose Mrs. Nancy A. Booth, 
the widow of John N. Booth, a farmer 
who resided in Carthage township. He 
was born in Kentucky and in his boyhood 
days came with his parents to Hancock 
county. At the time of his death he was 
the owner of two hundred and thirty- 
five acres of valuable farming land, which 
constituted the visible evidence of a life 
of thrift and enterprise, and through the 
kindness and liberality of his father-in- 
law, John Booth, she received the deed 
of this farm. In politics he was a demo- 
crat. Unto him and his wife were born 
three children, Amanda M., Eddie and 
John E., all of whom were born in Car- 
thage township but are all now deceased. 
Mr. Booth was forty-two years of age at 
the time of his demise. Mrs. Cutler was 
educated in the common schools of Car- 
thage township. She was a daughter of 
Edward and Mahala White (Collins) 
Russell. Her father was born in Mary- 
land and there resided until after his mar- 
riage. A farmer by occupation, he fol- 
lowed that pursuit in the south and in 
1838 came to Illinois, settling in Car- 
thage township, Hancock county, where 
he became the owner of extensive prop- 
erty interests and carried on general ag- 
ricultural pursuits there throughout his 
remaining days. He died at the age of 
sixty-eight years in the faith of the 
United Brethren church, of which he was 
a devoted member. His political views 
accorded with the principles of the Re- 
publican party. His wife lived to the 
advanced age of ninety-five years and, 



having passed away on the 25th of De- 
cember, 1899, was laid to rest by his side 
in Franklin cemetery of Carthage town- 
ship. Unto the second marriage of Mr. 
and Mrs. Cutler have been born six chil- 
dren, of whom five are yet living. Clara 
Josephine, the eldest, is the wife of Sam- 
uel Law, of Carthage, and they have one 
child. . DeWitt Clinton, residing in 
Carthage township, married Olive Rhor- 
bough and they have two children, Clara 
Ethel and Edith, the latter a music teach- 
er residing at home. Edward P., living 
in Carthage township, where he owns 
and operates one hundred and sixty acres 
of land, was married to Nellie Haney and 
they have two children, Harrison H. and 
George C. Frank Clarence, residing in 
Carthage township, where he owns a 
farm of eighty acres, married Matilda 
Huey, a daughter of Robert Huey, and 
they have two children, Paul and Leotta. 
Ralph Cyrus, residing on the home place, 
which he now owns, married Daisy Reno, 
a daughter of Newton and Leonora Reno, 
of Carthage township, and they have two 
children, Kenneth and Mildred. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cutler are most highlv esteemed 
people, widely and favorably known in 
Carthage, and during the long years of 
his residence in Illinois, covering almost ' 
six decades, Mr. Cutler has ever com- 
manded the respect and good will of those 
with whom he has been associated 
through social, political or business rela- 
tions. He well merits the ease and re- 
tirement he now enjoys. Mrs. Cutler 
from her father and husband received a 
good estate and has arranged for the suc- 
cess of her sons by aiding each to get a 
start in the business world. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



287 



FREDERICK MAIRE. 

Frederick Maire, who for a number of 
years was a traveling salesman for a 
paint house but is now living retired in 
Hamilton, was bom in Alsace, France, 
December 31, 1844. The ancestry of the 
family can be traced back through au- 
thentic records to a date prior to 1700. 
The great-grandfather was Theodore 
Maire and the grandfather Francis Maire. 
The latter was a captain in the French 
army and served under Napoleon. His 
son, Alexander Maire, also a native of 
France, was married to Miss Mary Ann 
Lorentz, a daughter of Ignatius Lorentz, 
who was sergeant major in the command 
of the Prince of Conde in the army which 
opposed Napoleon. Alexander Maire, a 
man of broad and liberal education and 
strong mentality, served as professor of 
ancient languages in the university of 
France. In 1856 he came to America 
with his wife and their only child Freder- 
ick, arriving in New York, whence he 
went to Rochester, spending one term as 
a teacher in a seminary for young ladies. 
He afterward removed to Basco, Han- 
cock county, Illinois, where he purchased 
two hundred and fifty acres of land as an 
investment. He rented the farm, how- 
ever, and made his home in the town, 
where he conducted a general store for 
several years. In 1868, however, he sold 
all of his interests in Hancock county and 
removed to York county, Virginia, where 
he was engaged in the oyster business and 
in the conduct of a general store for three 
years. On the expiration of that period 
he disposed of his interests in the south 
and removed to New York city, where he 



purchased a book store on Ann street, con- 
ducting his business in the metropolis and 
making his home across the river in New- 
ark, New. Jersey. He continued a resi- 
dent of New York until 1880, when he 
returned to France, where he died in 
1893, while his wife passed away in 1891. 

Frederick Maire pursued his prelimi- 
nary education under private tutors and 
spent three years as a college student. He 
was associated with his father until 1872, 
when at the age of twenty-eight years he 
secured a position as decorative painter, 
which trade he had learned in France. He 
was thus engaged until 1880 in New York 
city and from 1886 until 1888 was ed- 
itor of a magazine called the House 
Painter and Decorator, which was pub- 
lished in Philadelphia. He has also writ- 
ten several books on painting and he is 
certainly an expert in the art of decora- 
tive painting. In 1880 he went to Basco, 
where he remained until 1883, when he 
removed to Hamilton and purchased two 
acres of land just north of the cemetery. 
In 1888 he bought eleven acres on the 
bank of the Mississippi river just north 
of the city, there residing for three years, 
during which time he was employed by 
Harrison Brothers & Company, of Chi- 
cago, as a traveling salesman for paint 
and also as an expert on paint. He con- 
tinued with that house for eleven years, 
being one of its most efficient and trusted 
representatives, but in 1899 he severed 
his connection with Harrison Brothers & 
Company and has since been living re- 
tired with his family in Hamilton. He is 
one of the finest artists in the county and 
some of his work has won high praise. 

On the 24th of May, 1864, Mr. Maire 



288 



BIOGRAPHICAL RE}' IE}}' 



was married to Miss Hannah Fisher, who 
was born in Rockville, Indiana, a daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Cox) Fish- 
er, natives of Ohio. They came to Han- 
cock county in 1856 and Mr. Fisher gave 
his attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits. Mr. and Mrs. Maire were married 
in Alexandria, Missouri, and unto them 
have been born the following named : 
Marie, the wife of Cyprien Bedouin, a 
captain of the French army; Renee, the 
wife of J. V. Crum, a merchant of Ham- 
ilton ; Elizabeth, who is the widow of Eu- 
gene Droussent, of Hamilton; Theresa, 
the wife of Henry Cuerden, a merchant 
of Hamilton ; Annette, at home ; Paul M., 
who owns a farm in Montebello town- 
ship ; and a son and daughter, Samuel A. 
and Louise, now deceased. 

Mr. Maire is a Catholic in religious 
faith, while his political allegiance is 
given to the Republican party. While 
living in Virginia he served as township 
clerk. He gave his attention to his busi- 
ness interests for a number of years 
and with a desirable capital retired to 
private life to enjoy a well-earned rest. 
He devotes considerable time and atten- 
tion to artistic work and his excellent 
conception of artistic subjects, his fine 
shading and color have made him an artist 
of more than local fame. 



HARRY R. FOLCKEMER. M. D. 

Dr. Harry R. Folckemer, who though 
a young man has attained success and 



prominence in his profession that many 
an older practitioner might well envy, is 
now located in Dallas City, where al- 
ready a liberal patronage has been accord- 
ed him. He was born in Camp Point, 
Illinois, in 1880, his parents being Henry 
and Ellen (Craver) Folckemer. Some 
of his ancestors were in the war of 1812 
and his great-great-grandfather on the 
mother's side served as a major in the 
second war with England. The father. 
Henry Folckemer, was born in Shrews- 
bury, York county, Pennsylvania, in 
1836, while his wife's birth occurred in 
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, in 1845. H- e 
learned the tinner's trade in his native 
town and came to Illinois in 1866, set- 
tling at Camp Point, where he established 
a hardware store, which he is still con- 
ducting. During the period of the Civil 
war he served in the- Fifty-first Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry and was in the 
army of the Potomac under General Mc- 
Clellan, participating in the battle of An-, 
tietam. He served for one year, after 
which he returned home and has since 
1866 been connected with the hardware 
trade of Camp Point. In politics lie is 
an unfaltering advocate of the democracy 
and has held a number of local offices, 
serving for several terms as alderman 
and in other positions of public trust. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Odd 
Fellows and with the Knights of Pythias 
and he attends the services of the Meth- 
odist church, of which his wife is a mem- 
ber. In their family are three living chil- 
dren ; Paul M., who is in business with his 
father; Harry R., of this review; and 
Richard, who is in Indian Territory. 
Dr. Harry R. Folckemer acquired his 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



289 



early education at Camp Point and passed 
through successive grades until he was 
graduated from the high school. Later 
he attended the University of Illinois at 
Champaign for two years and acquired 
his professional education in Chicago as 
a student in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, from which he was graduated 
in the class of 1905. In the same year he 
came to Dallas City, where already he 
has obtained a large city and country 
practice. He is a regular physician, thor- 
oughly proficient in his profession and is 
constantly adding to his knowledge by 
reading and observation as well as by 
practical experience. He has a well 
equipped office on Third street in connec- 
tion with his home and has done excellent 
work as a representative of the profes- 
sion. Like his father he gives his polit- 
ical allegiance to the democracy. He is 
also a member of the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity and of the Masonic lodge, and 
of the Hancock County Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association. 
A young man of strong intellectual force 
and laudable ambition, he is wide-awake 
and enterprising and it needs no gift of 
prophecy to foretell that a successful fu- 
ture awaits him. 



JOSEPH F. DEITRICH. 

Joseph F. Deitrich, deceased, was an 
indusrious, enterprising and representa- 
tive citizen of Hancock county. He be- 
came a resident of Illinois in 1865 and 



of this county in 1867. He was born in 
Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
September 14, 1826, and passed away on 
the i8th of December, 1901, at the age of 
seventy-five years. His parents, Joseph 
and Rosana (Fullmer) Deitrich, lived and 
died in Pennsylvania, where the father 
was a successful farmer. Unto him and 
his wife were born ten children, but only 
two are now living: Daniel, who resides 
in Williamsport, Pennsylvania; and 
Sarah, the wife of John Kaiser, of Mil- 
ton, Pennsylvania. 

Joseph F. Deitrich was educated in 
the subscription schools of his native state 
and was reared to farm life, remaining 
at home with his father until twenty-six 
years of age. He was then married on 
the 1st of January, 1852, to Miss Sarah 
A. Benner and they have become the par- 
ents of five children, of whom three are 
now living : Mary, the wife of Ludwig 
H. Foresman, of Dallas City; Ellen, the 
wife of George M. Cummings, who is 
mentioned elsewhere in this work; and 
Hettie, the wife of Walter Cummings, of 
Los Angeles, California. The wife and 
mother died February 21, 1862, and on 
the 1 5th of May, 1864. Mr. Deitrich was 
married to Miss Sarah E. Wolf, who was 
born in Northampton county, Pennsyl- 
vania. December 28, 1845, a daughter of 
Joseph and Mary Magdalena (Beck) 
Wolf, who were natives of Pennsylvania. 
Her great-grandparents in the maternal 
line came from Germany. Her father 
was a shoemaker by trade and thus pro- 
vided for the support of his family. Both 
he and his wife were members of the 
Lutheran church and passed away in the 
Keystone state, where they were laid to 



290 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



rest. Ill their family were five children, 
but only two are now living: Joseph, 
who resides in Williamsport, Pennsyl- 
vania; and Mrs. Deitrich. By her mar- 
riage Mrs. Deitrich became the mother of 
thirteen children, of whom six are living. 
Etta A., the wife of James Paulus, of Co- 
lusa, has eight children; Edith, the wife 
of Homer Matthews, of Burnside, by 
whom she has one child, Phineas Frank- 
lin; Grace, Joseph F., Clarence V., Vesta, 
Edna, Irene and Ellen R., at home. El- 
mira, the second member of the family, is 
the wife of Warren H. Jacobs, of Mis- 
souri, and they have two sons : Verner 
Lloyd and Otis Cleon. William, living 
in Dallas township, is married and has 
one child. Susanna, Grover C. and John 
W. are at home with their mother. 

It was in the year 1865 that Mr. Deit- 
rich came to Illinois, settling first in Mc- 
Donough county, where he lived for two 
years. He then came to Dallas township, 
where he purchased sixty-nine acres of 
land on section 13. It is upon this farm 
that his widow yet resides. Here he car-- 
ried on general agricultural pursuits. He 
built a new house after his cottage was 
destroyed by fire, also built a new barn 
and made other needed improvements. 
He also bought one hundred acres of land 
across the road from his home on section 
ii, .Dallas township. He lived a life of 
industry and enterprise and was a model 
farmer, keeping everything about his 
place in neat and thrifty condition. In 
matters of citizenship, too, he was also' 
progressive and loyal. He gave his po- 
litical support to the democracy and served 
as supervisor for several years. No pub- 
lic tras't reposed in him was ever betrayed 



in the slightest degree. He belonged to 
the Lutheran church, in which he served 
as deacon and of which his wife is still a 
member. Mr. Deitrich was generous al- 
most to a fault, being particularly kind 
and helpful to the poor and needy. In his 
family he was a devoted husband and 
father and wherever he was known he 
was respected because of those sterling 
traits of character which in every land 
and clime command respect and admira- 
tion. Mrs. Dietrich still survives her 
husband and is managing the home prop- 
erty. Like him, she has many friends in 
the county and is well worthy of repre- 
sentation in this volume. 



ARTHUR RAY MANIFOLD. 

Arthur Ray Manifold is a native son 
of Hancock county, his birth having oc- 
curred in La Harpe township, August I, 
1883. and is one of the younger represent- 
atives of agricultural interests in this por- 
tion of the state. His father, John Mani- 
fold, was born in Roane county, Tennes- 
see, a son of George and Mary Manifold, 
who, on leaving their native state came 
to Illinois, locating on a farm on section 
19, La Harpe township, this county. Here 
the son John was reared to farm life and 
after reaching man's estate was married 
in 1854 to Miss Eliza Ann Miller, and he 
continued to reside on the home place, 
assisting his mother in the management 
of her farming interests, his father having 
died in 1836. After the death of his 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



291 



mother he inherited the homestead prop- 
erty, to which he added from time to time 
until he possessed an extensive tract, com- 
prising four hundred and eighty-nine 
acres all in one body except twenty-five 
acres situated on section 19, La Harpe 
township. Here he engaged extensively 
in general farming and stockraising until 
his death, which occurred February 16, 
1901. By this marriage there is one son, 
William Edison, who is a resident of this 
township. The father was married a sec- 
ond time to Elizabeth Loretta Chapin, the 
widow of Henry Foley, and a daughter of 
Robert P. and Elizabeth Chapin. She 
was a native of Ohio, and by her mar- 
riage became the mother of Arthur Ray 
Manifold, the subject of this sketch. Her 
death occurred November 10, 1900. 

Arthur Ray Manifold acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools, passing 
through consecutive grades until he had 
completed a high school course, subse- 
quent to which time he pursued a course 
of study in Gettings Seminary, at La 
Harpe. He assisted his father in the op- 
eration of the home farm and always re- 
mained with his parents, and at their 
death came into possession of a valuable 
farm property, which he is now success- 
fully operating. 

On the 1 9th of October, 1904, our sub- 
ject was united in marriage to Miss Alice 
May Smith, who was born at Raritan, 
Illinois, but was reared in Fort Madison, 
Iowa, where she acquired her education, 
there completing a high school course. 
She is a daughter of Albert R. and Ella 
(Harris) Smith, the former a native of 
Fort Madison, Iowa, where he still re- 
sides, being engaged in the conduct of a 



dairy, and also as a dealer in real estate. 
A daughter, Eleanor Lois, was born to 
this union November 24, 1906. 

In his political views Mr. Manifold is 
a republican, while his religious faith is in- 
dicated by his membership in the Chris- 
tian church at La Harpe. He is a Mason, 
belonging to lodge No. 195, Ancient Fret 
and Accepted Masons, at La Harpe. Hav- 
ing been born and reared ini Hancock 
county Mr. Manifold has a wide acquaint- 
ance -both in business and social circles 
and both he and his wife are popular 
young people, the hospitality of their 
home being freely extended to their many 
friends. 



JOHN M. HABBEN. 

John M. Habben, who is now one of the 
most prominent German-American farm- 
ers of Hancock county, residing in Prairie 
township, where he owns a very rich farm 
of three hundred twenty acres, where his 
time and energies are devoted to general 
agricultural pursuits, is a native of Eur- 
ich, Hanover, Germany. He was born 
December 13, 1859, and when but seven 
years of age was brought to the United 
States by his parents, Mimka and Anna 
(Jaspers) Habben, likewise natives of 
Germany, who, on crossing the Atlantic, 
made their way at once to Illinois, settling 
in Adams county. There the father rent- 
ed land for three years, after which he 
made purchase of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Prairie township, Hancock 
county the farm upon which his son 



292 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



John now resides. He transformed this 
from a tract of wild land into a well im- 
proved farm and made it his home until 
his death, which occurred when he was 
fifty-two years of age, his remains being 
interred in Concord cemetery. He pros- 
pered in his undertakings and was a self- 
made man, whose prosperity was attribu- 
table entirely to his own efforts. He 
never cared for public office or sought to 
figure prominently in any public light, 
content to devote his attention to his busi- 
ness affairs whereby he provided a com- 
fortable living for his family. His widow, 
who held membership in the Lutheran 
church at Carthage, died at the age of 
seventy-three years. 

John M. Habben largely acquired his 
education in the public schools of Car- 
thage, attending both the district and city 
schools, and in his youth assisted in the 
work of the home farm. He has always 
remained upon this place since his par- 
ents took up their abode here and he now 
owns the property which he bought in 
1901 after the death of his mother, to- 
gether with one hundred and sixty acres 
adjoining the old homestead. Soon after 
buying the farm he built one of the most 
beautiful and commodious residences in 
the vicinity, the main part having a front- 
age of thirty-eight feet by sixteen feet 
deep, two stories, and a large ell in the 
rear. All is nicely finished and fur- 
nished, and also has modern conveniences 
as windmill, telephone and those acces^ 
series usually found on the place of the 
more successful men. His fields are all 
under cultivation and in addition to rais- 
ing the cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate he devotes his attention to the 



raising of high grade stock. He is well 
known as an enterprising, successful 
farmer, who is never idle a day and who 
through his diligence has gained a place 
among the substantial agriculturists of 
the community. He has almost entirely 
unaided brought himself to a position of 
wealth and independence. 

Mr. Habben was married April 16, 
1 88 1, to Miss Anna Ficht. who was born 
in Eurich, Hanover, Germany, March 8, 
1860, and came to the United States 
about 1868, living in Prairie township 
until her marriage. Her parents were 
Henry and Marie (Bruntz) Ficht. They 
were born in Germany, and there they 
followed the occupation of fanning and 
all but one of their six children were 
born. When Anna (now Mrs. Ficht). 
was about eight years old they embarked 
for America on one of the oldtime sail 
vessels, being eight weeks making the 
voyage, and after arriving in New York, 
it took eight days to come to Illinois. He 
rented land first hear Golden, Adams 
county, and there he lived but a short 
time when he moved to Prairie township, 
his wife dying within a few years. He 
was a farmer of Prairie township during 
his active life. He is now living retired 
and makes his home with Mr. and Mrs. 
Habben at the age of eighty-three years. 
Unto our subject arid his wife have been 
born five children and the family circle 
yet remains unbroken. These are: Mim- 
ka, who aids in the operation of the 
home farm; Man-, Louis, Henry and 
George, all of whom are yet under the 
parental roof. All were born upon the 
homestead farm in Prairie township. The 
parents are members of the German Luth- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



293 



eran church of Carthage and are well 
known residents of the community in 
which they make their home, enjoying the 
favorable regard of all with whom social 
or business relations have brought them 
in contact. 

While a democrat in politics he is 
rather independent, voting each time for 
the best man. He does not care for office, 
preferring to give his time to his exten- 
sive farming interests. He has been 
school director for a number of terms, the 
cause of education finding in him a warm 
friend. 



JAMES F. GIBSON. 

James Finley Gibson is one of the na- 
tive sons of Hancock county, whose life 
record stands in contradistinction to the 
old adage that "a prophet is never with- 
out honor save in his own country," for 
here in the locality where he has spent his 
entire life he has gained signal recogni- 
tion as a lawyer of ability, who, though 
yet a young man, has gained prominence 
equal to that of many a practitioner of 
twice his years. He was bom in Pilot 
Grove township, June 19, 1879, and is a 
son of Robert C. and Harriet (Lowrey) 
Gibson. He is a graduate of Carthage 
College and prepared for his chosen pro- 
fession as a student in the law department 
of the University of Wisconsin, from 
which he was graduated in the class of 
1903. He was president of his class and 
commencement orator, the two highest 
honors that could be bestowed in the law 



school. Following his graduation Mr. 
Gibson located at once in Carthage and 
opened an office. He has met with very 
gratifying success in his chosen field of 
labor and has secured a liberal clientage 
that has connected him with much impor- 
tant litigation tried in the courts of his 
district. He is a close and discriminating 
student and has comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the principles of jurisprudence 
and is correct in their adaptation. In 
1905 he was elected city attorney of 
Carthage, which position he still fills. 

On the ist of September, 1898, Mr. 
Gibson was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah Alberta Tyner, who was born in 
Pilot Grove township in 1878 and is a 
daughter of Jared L. and Emily L. Tyner. 
Her father was a popular druggist of 
Burnside, where he died and is buried. 
In the family were three children : May, 
now the wife of George W. Rhea, of 
Carthage ; Viola, the wife of Edward 
Lyon, of this city; and Mrs. Gibson. 
Unto our subject and his wife has been 
born a son, James C., whose birth oc- 
curred in Madison, Wisconsin, July 21, 
1903. Her mother, Mrs. Tyner, is still 
living and makes her home with her 
daughters in Carthage. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Gibson hold mem- 
bership in the Christian church and take 
an active and helpful part in its work. He 
served as church treasurer in 1905 and 
has put forth effective effort in behalf of 
the church and has contributed gener- 
ously of his means to its support. He be- 
longs to the Masonic fraternity, in which 
he has served as senior deacon and he is 
a stanch advocate of the democracy. He 
owns one of the largest and finest law 



294 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



libraries, in the city, with the contents of 
which he is largely familiar. In the prep- 
aration of his cases he is most thorough 
and careful, preparing for the unexpect- 
ed which happens in the courts quite as 
frequently as out of them. He is always 
well armed for any point of attack and 
is quick to notice the weak points in an 
adversary's position. He has won many 
notable forensic triumphs and is regarded 
as an able member of the bar, who is mak- 
ing rapid progress in the line of success- 
ful practice. He and his wife are recog- 
nized as people of culture and refinement 
to whom an enviable social position is 
readilv accorded. 



. GOTTLIEB BOLLIN. 

Gottlieb Bollin, in his farming opera- 
tions, keeps fully abreast with the most 
modern methods of farming, using the 
latest improved machinery and all the 
accessories which facilitate farm work. 
Advancement along agricultural lines has 
been rapid and pronounced, and Mr. Bol- 
lin is a typical representative of this spirit 
of progress. He resides on section 23, 
Sonora township, where he has a tract of 
two hundred acres, and he also owns one 
hundred and twenty acres on section 15, 
besides twelve acres of timber land in 
Sonora township on the banks of the Mis- 
sissippi river. Mr. Bollin was born in 
Baden, Germany, September 15, 1841, 
and is a son of Joseph and Agnes 
(Haire) Bollin, likewise natives of the 



fatherland. The father on leaving his 
native country made his way to Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, where he located in 1856, there 
following farming for three years, and in 
1859 he removed to Nauvoo, where he 
operated rented land in Sonora township. 
Two years later he removed to Rock 
Creek township, where he remained for 
three years and then came to Nauvoo, 
where he spent. his remaining days. His 
wife had died in Cincinnati, Ohio, leav- 
ing six sons and three daughters. The 
father was married a second time to Mrs. 
Kimes, of Nauvoo, and her death oc- 
curred in this city, while the father also 
passed away here in the fall of 1881. 

Gottlieb Bollin, the second in order of 
birth in his father's family, pursued his 
studies in Germany to the age of twelve 
years, and continued his education for 
two years after the family arrived in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. He remained with his 
parents to the age of seventeen years and 
then started out to face the responsible 
duties of life on his own account. He 
began work as a farm hand in Sonora 
township, where he was employed for one 
season and also worked for a time in 
Nauvoo township. In June, 1861, how- 
ever, he put aside all business and per- 
sonal considerations, and in response to 
the country's call for aid offered his serv- 
ices' to the government, enlisting as a 
member of the First Iowa Cavalry, at 
Keokuk. The company was mustered in 
at Burlington in August, and did duty 
in the state of Missouri. He served 
in the army until the close of the war, 
and then went with General Custer to 
Texas, where he was honorably dis- 
charged at Austin in the spring of 1866. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



295 



After the close of hostilities Mr. Bol- 
lin returned to his home, where he was 
employed as a farm hand by the month 
until 1871, when, through his industry 
and economy, he was enabled to make 
purchase of forty acres of land on sec- 
tion 15, which he had hitherto rented. 
Three years later he added another tract 
of forty acres, adjoining on the west. 
Later he added another forty-acre tract, 
belonging to the estate of his father-in- 
law, and known as the Theodore Lohr 
farm, thus making in all one hundred and 
twenty acres situated on section 15. Here 
he carried on general agricultural pur- 
suits and as the years passed by he pros- 
pered in his undertakings, so that in 
course of time he was able to make fur- 
ther purchases, at one time adding eighty 
acres situated on section 23 and at a later 
date, eighty and then forty acres, mak- 
ing a total of two hundred acres on sec- 
tion 23, and one hundred and twenty acres 
on section 15. On the two-hundred-acre 
tract he erected a house and barn, and 
has since made an addition to his house 
of brick, the residence now containing 
nine rooms, and two stories in height. 
He built a horse and cattle barn, corn 
cribs and all substantial outbuildings for 
the shelter of grain and stock. He also 
set out a fine orchard, containing apple, 
peach and plum trees. He has a wind- 
pump on his place, and has two wells, one 
thirty-three feet in depth, while the other 
is forty-three feet deep, thus furnishing 
water for stock and for use in the house. 
He has used both wire and Osage hedge 
fencing in dividing his farm into fields 
of convenient size, and thus his is one of 
the valuable farms of this portion of the 
19 



state. He is practical and progressive 
in all that he does and each year his finan- 
cial resources are greatly enhanced and 
today he is numbered among the wealthy 
citizens of Sonora township. 

On the ist of August, 1870, occurred 
the marriage of Mr. Bollin and Miss 
Christina Lohr, a-native of Prussia, born 
February 9, 1848. Her mother died in 
Germany, and Mrs. Bollin then accom- 
panied her father to America in 1855, 
being then a little maiden of seven sum- 
mers, and one of three sons and two 
daughters. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bollin 
have been born nine children, as follows : 
John Theodore, born March 13, 1871, 
and a resident of Sonora township; An- 
nie Katherine, born April i, 1873, and 
her death occurred October 26, 1874; 
Andrew, born December 18, 1874, and a 
resident of Sonora township, married 
Julia Beecher; Mary Josephine Benedic- 
ta, whose birth occurred September 20, 
1877; Jacob Joseph, born May 27, 1880, 
of Sonora township, who married Miss 
Jennie Terry, August 22, 1906; Frances 
Louisa, born March 5, 1883, and likewise 
a resident of this township; Nellie Ger- 
trude, born October 30. 1886, and Wil- 
liam Adolph and Frank Leo, twins, born 
July 22, 1889, are still under the parental 
roof. 

Mr. Bollin's study of the political ques- 
tions and issues of the day have led him to 
give his support to the Republican party 
although he has never been an office seek- 
er, for he finds that his business affairs 
make sufficient demand upon his time and 
attention, and he has attained through his 
own labors his position as one of the 
progressive and prosperous farmers of 



296 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Hancock county. He is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic and in reli- 
gious faith is a Catholic. Although start- 
ing out in life empty-handed, he possesses 
that spirit of enterprise and industry so 
characteristic of the German race, and by 
the proper use of his native talents has 
worked his way up to a position of prom- 
inence and affluence. 



GUY B. CHANDLER. 

Guy B. Chandler is the owner of a fine 
farm in Wythe township. An attractive 1 
residence stands in the midst of fine shade 
trees and there are ample buildings in the 
way of barns and sheds for the shelter 
of grain and stock. There is also an ap- 
ple orchard of two and a half acres, while 
the well tilled fields annually produce 
good crops, showing that the owner is 
thoroughly conversant with the best 
methods of tilling the soil. 

The owner, Guy B. Chandler, is one 
of Wythe township's native sons, his birth 
having occurred within its borders on 
the 1 5th of September. 1842. His pater- 
nal grandfather, Dr. Chandler, was a 
noted physician who practiced near 
Zanesville in Muskingum county, Ohio, 
but died there when comparatively a 
young man. His son, Rudolphus Chan- 
dler, born in Vermont, was but a young 
lad at the time of his father's demise. 
He learned the trade of a harness maker 
and coach finisher, and, attracted by the 
opportunities of the growing west, in 



1836, he drove across the country with 
team and wagon and purchased one hun- 
dred and- sixty acres of land, constituting 
the northwest quarter of section 20, 
Wythe township, Hancock county, Illi- 
nois. This was all wild prairie covered 
with the native grasses and there was 
little indication in the entire neighborhood 
that the work of improvement and prog- 
ress had been begun. Mr. Chandler 
brought with him to Illinois his family, 
constituting wife and three children. 
He had been married in Ohio to Miss 
Lydia Hutchinson, a native of that state, 
and unto them were born two sons and a 
daughter ere they left their old home. 
After reaching this county Mr. Chandler 
built a log house and log stable, and in 
true pioneer style began life here. He 
broke the prairie with the crude imple- 
ments then in use, finding it an arduous 
task, but he persevered in his work and 
continued the cultivation and improve- 
ment of the farm until his death, which 
occurred December 13, 1876. His wife 
passed away January 10, 1871, and was 
laid to rest in the Congregational church 
cemetery in Wythe township. 

Guy B. Chandler was the youngest liv- 
ing child at the time of his father's death. 
His early education acquired in the dis- 
trict schools, was supplemented by three 
terms of study in Warsaw Seminary, and 
he remained upon the old homestead un- 
til the time of his marriage, aiding in the 
work of tilling the soil and caring for 
the crops. On the I2th of March, 1864. 
when twenty-one years of age, he wedded 
Miss Elizabeth A. Smith, who 'was born 
in Clark county, Indiana, March 23, 1839, 
a daughter of William and Susan (Scott) 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



297 



Smith, natives of England and Maryland 
respectively, the former a son of John 
Smith, and the latter a daughter of John 
Scott. In the spring of 1856 they went 
to Warsaw and soon afterward settled 
with his brother, John Smith, in Wythe 
township. 

Following his marriage Mr. Chandler 
purchased a farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres in Clark county, Missouri, 
of which sixty acres had been cleared, 
fenced and was under cultivation. He 
resolutely undertook the task of improv- 
ing the remainder of the farm and there 
lived until after his mother's death, when 
he returned to the home place in Hancock 
county, conducting the farm for his fa- 
ther until the latter's demise, when he- 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of the old homestead. Eight years later 
he remodeled and improved the residence, 
which his brother had built. After his 
father's death he also fenced the place 
with hedge and with wire fences and he 
planted many fine shade trees, which add 
much to the value and attractive appear- 
ance of the farm. He also has an apple 
orchard covering two and a half acres. 
In 1903 he replaced the old home by a 
fine residence, containing all modern 
equipments and conveniences. It is sup- 
plied with hot and cold water and heated 
by furnace and convenient in its arrange- 
ment and tasteful in its furnishings. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Chandler 
has been blessed with three daughters: 
Luella, now the wife of P. A. Fulton, of 
Keokuk, Iowa; Nettie S., the wife of Rev. 
Edward Montgomery, a Presbyterian min- 
ister at Warsaw, Indiana; and Eve E., 
the wife of Rev. W. H. Matthews, pas- 



tor of a Presbyterian church in Chicago. 
The daughters were educated in Knox 
College, the older two pursuing the regu- 
lar course, while the other pursued the 
scientific course and also studied music 
in that institution. Mr. and Mrs. 
Chandler thus gave their children excel- 
lent educational privileges and have lived 
to see them well settled in life. They 
hold membership in the Presbyterian 
church, in the work of which they are 
deeply interested and to the support of 
which they contribute generously. Mr. 
Chandler is a republican, who has served 
as trustee of his township and also as 
assessor, discharging the duties of these 
offices with promptness and fidelity. His 
entire life has been passed in Wythe 
township and he is both widely and fa- 
vorably known in this part of the county. 
He has made an enviable record as a 
business man and has achieved a measure 
of success which is most creditable, as it 
has been honorably won. 



- CHARLES B. DOOLITTLE. 

Charles B. Doolittle, owning and op- 
erating one of the finest tracts of land 
in Appanoose township, is a native son 
of this township, having here been born 
May 25. 1838, a son of Amzi and Phebe 
(White) Doolittle, natives of New York 
and Ohio respectively. The paternal 
grandfather. Edward Doolittle, left New 
York at an early day, coming to Illinois, 
settling in Sangamon county. He 



298 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



brought with him his son Amzi, who was 
then seventeen years of age. He then 
left the son in Illinois and started back 
to New York for his wife and the other 
members of the family but died on the 
way. The son Amzi worked at farm la- 
bor in Sangamon county, receiving nine 
dollars per month for his work. 'He was' 
thus employed for thirteen months and 
during that time had saved one hundred 
dollars, which he invested in a heifer, a 
yoke of steers and a sow. He then broke 
eight acres of wild land, which he plant- 
ed to corn, and in this way he gained his 
start in life. At the end of two years, 
having raised quite an amount of stock, 
which he disposed of, and then removed 
to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he also 
broke eight acres of land, on which he 
lived until 1826, and then came to Appa- 
noose and built the first house in the vil- 
lage double log cabin. Many Indians 
were still to be found in this section of 
the state, and Mr. Doolittle traded some 
stock to them for a tract of land. He 
also conducted the first ferryboat run- 
ning from Appanoose to Fort Madison, 
Iowa. He was married in this state to 
Miss Phebe White and they took up their 
abode in Appanoose. Later in company 
with his wife and one child he started 
for his old home in the Empire state, 
traveling on a steamer up the Mississippi 
and Ohio rivers, and it was not until he 
had reached his old home that he learned 
of his father's death, he having died 
twelve years previous while on his way 
to that state for his family. Mr. Doolit- 
tle after a time returned again to Appa- 
noose, where he continued the operation 
of his ferry-boat. He also built a large 



sawmill and in connection with two other 
men built one of the first houses in Bur- 
lington, Iowa. He was a very prosper- 
ous man in all of his undertakings and 
eventually became a large landowner, 
having one thousand acres, situated in 
Iowa, Missouri, and Hancock county. 
He also conducted a merchandising en- 
terprise and dealt in lumber. He was 
very active in the ranks of the Democratic 
party, serving as supervisor, as poor mas- 
ter of the county, and during his incum- 
bency in the office of supervisor he saved 
the township several thousand dollars. 

Charles B. Doolittle, whose name intro- 
duces this record, was reared to farm life, 
assisting his father in the operation of 
the homestead property, where he re- 
ceived practical training in all depart- 
ments of farm labor. His educational 
advantages, however, were very limited 
for, owing to the unsettled condition of 
the country in his youth, there was not a 
good school system established, and dur- 
ing the short time that he pursued his 
studies the sessions of school were held 
in private homes. In 1862, in company 
with three comrades, he crossed the 
plains, traveling overland with six yoke 
of oxen, and after a long, tedious jour- 
ney, which covered four months and five 
days, they reached Walla Walla, W r ash- 
ington, where he was employed in the 
gold mines during the summer season 
and through the winter months he worked 
on different ranches. In October, 1866, 
he started down the Yellowstone river 
to Sioux City, Iowa, from which place 
he went by stage to Denison, and there 
boarded the first railroad train lie was 
ever on, his destination being Fort Madi- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



299 



son. He worked for his father for one 
year following his return from the west, 
and his father then gave him one hundred 
and nine acres of land, situated on section 
n, Appanoose township, of which twen- 
ty-five acres had been cleared, while the 
remainder was covered with timber. He 
has since cleared much of this and now 
has about seventy-five acres under culti- 
vation, which each year yields abundant 
harvests as the result of care and labor 
he has bestowed upon the fields. He has 
nineteen acres in oak timber, which is 
the first growth. He has also added many 
modern improvements upon his place, in- 
cluding good fences and outbuildings, 
which are kept in good state of repair, 
so that his farm shows evidence of an en- 
terprising and progressive owner. 

In August, 1867. occurred the mar- 
riage of Mr. C. B. Doolittle and Miss 
Nancy Olive Atherton, a native of Appa- 
noose township, and a daughter of Rob- 
ert Atherton. She became the mother of 
four sons and a daughter: Amzi. of 
Decorra, Illinois; Cora, the wife of Wil- 
liam Long, of Hancock county, Illinois : 
Harry D. and Charles Roy, on the home 
place; and John Simpson, of Xiota. Illi- 
nois. The wife and mother died about 
1894, and thus passed away one of the 
highly esteemed women of Hancock 
county, her loss being deeply regretted 
by many friends, as well as her immediate 
family. 

Mr. Doolittle gives his political sup- 
port to the Democratic party, and served 
as school director for eight years, but 
aside from this has held no public office. 
Although deeply interested in the ad- 
vancement of his countv and its welfare 



he finds little time for holding public of- 
fice, preferring to concentrate his ener- 
gies upon his own private interests, in 
which he is meeting with very desirable 
success. Although he inherited his prop- 
erty from his father he has worked hard 
in clearing and improving the place until 
today his is one of the productive and val- 
uable tracts of his section of the .state. 



WILLIAM H. HARTZELL. 

William H. Hartzell is actively con- 
nected with a profession which has im- 
portant bearing upon the progress and 
stable prosperity of any section or com- 
munity and one which has long been con- 
sidered as conserving the public welfare 
by furthering the ends of justice nnd 
maintaining individual rights and in his 
practice has attained considerable promi- 
nence, having today a distinctively rep- 
resentative clientage. 

Mr. Hartzell was born in Durham 
township. Hancock county, November 8, 
1869, and is a son of Noah and Rebecca 
(Weatherington) Hartzell. The father 
was a native of Pennsylvania, born in 
1829, and the mother's birth occurred in 
or near Columbus, Ohio, in the same year. 
Mr. Hartzell was a farmer by occupation 
and followed that pursuit following his 
removal to Hancock county. -In religious 
faith he was a Methodist, while his wife 
belongs to the Baptist church. His death 
occurred in La Harpe, while Mrs. Hart- 
zell is now living in that town with her 



300 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



daughter, Belle C., who is now the wife 
of Harry E. Claycomb and is the eldest 
of the family. The others are: Judd 
O., who resides in Monmouth, Illinois; 
Franklin, who died in childhood; and 
William H., of this review. 

Reared under the parental roof Wil- 
liam H. Hartzell pursued his education 
in the high school at La Harpe, of which 
he is a graduate, and in Gitting's Semi- 
nary. In 1886, at the age of seventeen 
years, he took up the study of law in the 
office and under the direction of the firm 
of O'Hara & Scofield, of Carthage, and 
in 1890 was admitted to the bar, being 
then twenty-one years of age. He was 
then admitted to a partnership by his 
former preceptors and the firm became 
O'Hara, Scofield & Hartzell. Following 
the dissolution of this connection Mr. 
Hartzell joined Truman Plantz in the es- 
tablishment of a law firm, Mr. Plantz 
maintaining an office in Warsaw and Mr. 
Hartzell in Carthage. The firm had an 
existence of nine months in that form, at 
the end of which. time William C. Hooker 
was admitted to a partnership and so 
continued for three years. In 1901, Mr. 
Hartzell opened an office alone on Jack- 
son street in Carthage, where he is now 
located. He possesses a fine law library, 
with the contents of which he is largely 
familiar. A self-made man, he entered 
business life as an employe of Charles 
Gill, proprietor of a general store in La 
Harpe, working in the implement depart- 
ment through the summer vacations, on 
Saturdays and after school hours. To- 
day he is a leading lawyer of Carthage, 
having one of the finest practices in jury 
cases in the county. He is indeed a 



strong and able trial lawyer and has won 
notable successes in several criminal 
cases. His is a natural discrimination as 
to legal ethics and he is so thoroughly 
well read in the minutae of the law that 
he is able to base his arguments upon 
thorough knowledge and familiarity with 
precedent and to present a case upon its 
merits, never failing to recognize the 
main point at issue and never neglecting 
to give a thorough preparation. He 
served as state's attorney from 1892 un- 
til 1896 and was also city attorney for 
La Harpe. 

On the 1 3th of June, 1891, Mr. Hart- 
zell was married to Miss Inez E. Char- 
ter, who was born near La Harpe in 1872, 
a daughter of Samuel and Salina (Lov- 
itt) Charter, both of whom were natives 
of Muskingum county, Ohio. Her fa- 
ther was descended from Kentucky an- 
cestry and came to Illinois at an early 
day, settling on a farm. He is now de- 
ceased, while his widow resides in Los 
Angeles, California. They were mem- 
bers of the Christian church and to this 
church Mrs. Hartzell also belongs. In 
her parents' family were five children : 
Phoebe and Ella, both deceased; Lucile, 
wife of J. W. Mitchell, who is living in 
Kentucky; Clara, the widow of Richard 
Sailor, of Los Angeles, California ; and 
Inez E., the wife of our subject. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Hartzell have been born 
five children, Ruth, Franklin, Philip. 
Eloise and Grace, aged respectively thir- 
teen, eleven, eight, four and one years. 
All were born in Carthage. The family 
home is pleasantly located about three and 
a half blocks northeast of the square and 
is a beautiful residence at the comer of 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



301 



Jackson and Davis streets. Mrs. Hart- 
zell is a most active and interested worker 
in the church and is now president of the 
Missionary Society. Mr. Hartzell usu- 
ally votes with the Democratic party, but 
does not consider himself bound by party 
ties and often casts an independent bal- 
lot. He is a jovial, warm-hearted man, 
a true friend and an entertaining conver- 
sationalist, who looks at life from a prac- 
tical standpoint, appreciative of its bless- 
ings and pleasures and never neglectful 
of its duties. He has won a notable pjace 
in legal circles and is respected by all 
with whom business or social relations 
have brought him in contact. 



BREVET MAJOR GENERAL OLI- 
VER EDWARDS. 

Brevet Major General Oliver Edwards 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
January 30, 1835. The family has al- 
ways furnished representatives as defend- 
ers of the country. 

Captain Oliver Edwards entered the 
colonial service in 1775, and valiantly 
aided in the struggle that secured the re- 
lease of the oppressed colonies from Brit- 
ish tyranny. He married Rachel Par- 
sons, of Northampton, and their soif, Dr. 
Elisha Edwards, father of the general, 
was bom in Chesterfield, Massachusetts, 
January 26, 1795. 

When a young man, Elisha Edwards 
went to Northampton and in the employ 
of E. Hunt learned the apothecary busi- 



ness. In 1815 he moved to Springfield, 
Massachusetts, and engaged in business 
on his own account. In 1820 he formed 
a partnership with Henry Sterns, which 
lasted until 1825, and in 1828 with 
Charles J. Upham under the firm name of 
C. J. Upham & Company he established 
a wholesale drug house. He was one of 
the subscribers to the fund that purchased 
Court Square and was chosen one of the 
nine original directors of the Chicopee 
Bank of Springfield. In 1821 he was 
united in marriage to Eunice Lombard, 
the daughter of Daniel and Sylvia (Burt) 
Lombard, the birth of the father occurring 
February 4, 1764. In 1787, during 
Shay's rebellion, Mr. Lombard was ac- 
tive on the side of the government forces 
in quelling the insurrection. He received 
the commission of quartermaster of the 
First Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia, from Governor Samuel Adams 
on July 31,1 794, and was honorably dis- 
charged January 20, 1798. He was ap- 
pointed postmaster by Thomas Jefferson 
in 1806 and held that office during the ad- 
ministrations of James Madison, James 
Monroe and John Quincy Adams until 
June 3. 1829, a continuous service of 
twenty-three years. He married Sylvia 
Burt, of Longmeadow, Massachusetts. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Edwards were born 
five sons and five daughters, seven of 
whom grew to maturity: Mrs. Caroline 
L. Smith, of Springfield, Massachusetts ; 
Mrs. Sophia O. Johnson, of Bath, New 
Hampshire; Mrs. Charlotte. E. Warner, 
of Springfield, Massachusetts; William, 
a prominent merchant of Cleveland, Ohio; 
Mrs. Julia E. Hurd, of Dorchester, Mas- 
sachusetts; Oliver, of Warsaw, Illinois; 



302 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and Mrs. Mary E. Childs, of Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

From early boyhood, Oliver Edwards, 
of this review, had shown an undivided 
interest in mechanics, taking delight in 
the construction of articles from his play- 
things. It had been his mother's inten- 
tion to give him a collegiate education, 
but so firmly was his heart set on mechan- 
ism, that she at last consented for him to 
pursue studies along that line and ar- 
ranged for him a paid apprenticeship at 
the Springfield Arsenal, and there he be- 
came a master mechanic. 

At the age of twenty-one, he started for 
Dubuque. Iowa, with the intention of 
establishing a foundry. An accident to 
the steamer coming up the Mississippi 
delayed him at Warsaw, Illinois, and 
overtures were made to him to build a 
foundry at that point. He entered a busi- 
ness partnership known as Neberling, Ed- 
wards & Company, a foundry was built 
and to this work he devoted his time un- 
til the breaking out of the Civil war. Be- 
ing in Cleveland, Ohio, when the first 
call for troops was made he determined 
to return to the state where his ancestors 
had fought to establish the Union and 
there offer his services to aid in its pres- 
ervation. He entered the service June 
21, 1 86 1, as a private, but was appointed 
adjutant of the Tenth Massachusetts 
Regiment, but was soon detailed senior 
aid-de-camp on the staff of General D. 
X. Couch, commanding the division. In 
August, 1862. he was commissioned ma- 
jor and directed to organize the Thirty- 
seventh Massachusetts Volunteer Regi- 
ment and September 4, 1862, he was mus- 
tered in as its colonel. 



His ability as a commander was many 
times demonstrated. At Salem Church, 
Va., May 3, 1863, he was placed in com- 
mand of his own and the Thirty-sixth 
New York Regiment to occupy the posi- 
tion of the extreme angle on the Federal 
line of battle, throughout the night of 
the 3d and the ensuing day. This exposed 
position was one of great peril and Gen- 
eral Sedgwick, the corps commander, ex- 
pressed his gratification at the outcome, 
frankly admitting that he had not expect- 
ed to save a single man from the exposed 
position in which it had been necessary 
to place the command. Colonel Edwards 
personally led his command through the 
terrible cannonade at Gettysburg, July 3, 
1863, and when more than thirty of his 
men had fallen in a few minutes his reso- 
nant words of confidence, "Steady, 
Thirty-seventh!" rose above the din of 
battle and held every man to his place in 
a manner that won immediate and un- 
qualified compliment delivered upon the 
field by the brigade commander. On the 
3Oth of July, 1863, an order was given 
detailing "Four of the best disciplined 
regiments of the Army of the Potomac" 
for duty at New York in connection with 
the draft temporarily suspended owing 
to the draft riots, and the Thirty-seventh 
Massachusetts was the first regiment 
named in arranging for the detail. Dur- 
ing his stay in New York Colonel Ed- 
wardS was in command of the troops at 
.Ft. Hamilton, consisting of his own regi- 
ment, two regiments of New York heavy 
artillery and some detachments of regu- 
lars that formed the permanent garrison. 
One incident only of the two months' stay 
there may be repeated there, although 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



many others would make interesting read- 
ing: Learning that prominent anti-draft 
leaders had declared that probably no fur- 
ther rioting would take place unless Mas- 
sachusetts troops were brought to the 
city, in which case not a man of them 
would be allowed to leave alive, Colonel 
Edwards promptly requested that he be 
allowed to bring up his regiment as a 
special guard for the drafting quarters, 
that no other troops be allowed in sight 
and that only the Massachusetts state flag 
be displayed unless actual conflict took 
place. The request was granted and the 
plan fully carried out, but the .threatened 
vengeance of the murderous wretches, 
who a few weeks before had drenched the 
city with blood, did not (very fortunately 
for them) go further than sullen looks 
and gloomy silence. The will of one fear- 
less commander had faced a lawless ele- 
ment boasting an organized force of 20,- 
ooo men and had won a bloodless tri- 
umph for law and order. 

It was not until fall that an opportu- 
nity occurred for leave of absence that 
enabled Colonel Edwards to return to 
Warsaw for the intended bride who had 
waited with trunks ready packed since 
May, the time first set for their marriage, 
and on September 3, 1863, Oliver Ed- 
wards was united in marriage to Ann 
Eliza Johnston, daughter of John E. and 
Catherine (Baldwin) Johnston, of War- 
saw, Illinois, whose sketch appears on 
another page of this work. 

In the battle of the wilderness. May 5, 
1864, General Wadsworth, whose divi- 
sion had been broken and driven back in 
some disorder, called upon Colonel Ed- 
wards and his regiment for assistance in 



checking the triumphant enemy and clear- 
ing the field so that the broken division 
might be reformed and put into action. 
For nine hundred yards his single regi- 
ment swept the field triumphantly, though 
at a cost of one-fourth of its number. 

"You have made a splendid charge, 
your regiment has done all I wished, and 
more than I dared hope," said General 
Wadsworth as he rode away in search of 
his division and to instant death. 

General Edwards received the brevet 
rank of brigadier general October 19, 
1864, "for gallant and distinguished 
services in the battle of Spotsylvania 
Court House and meritorious conduct on 
the field of battle at Winchester, Vir- 
ginia." 

At the battle of Opegnam, September 
19, 1864, upon the death of General Rus- 
sell and the wounding of General Upham, 
the command of the division devolved 
upon Colonel Edwards, which he held 
until the close of the battle and handled 
with such promptness and skill, with 
such unfailing judgment as to win the ad- 
miration of his superior officers, especially 
General Sheridan, who as a mark of ap- 
preciation appointed him commandant of 
the post at Winchester, Virginia, with his 
brigade as post garrison. It was from 
the breakfast table at General Edwards's 
headquarters that General Sheridan start- 
ed on his ride to Cedar Creek to check 
the disaster of October 19. In fact, the 
friendship between Generals Sheridan and 
Edwards was so close that the former 
urged Edwards to accept the appoint- 
ment of provost marshal general on his 
staff and it was with great reluctance that 
Sheridan consented for him to return to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his old brigade. In vain was the offer 
of a command of a division not includ- 
ing his old brigade made Edwards by 
General Meade. When his return to ac- 
tive duty was decided upon the heart of 
the commander was with his old regi- 
ment and he emphatically refused to take 
any appointment which would take him 
from them. In the assault of April 2 
on the lines at Petersburg his brigade 
took an active part, being the first to 
break through the confederate works. 
Next morning General Edwards received 
from the mayor of Petersburg the sur- 
render of the city very soon after the 
evacuation of General Lee. For his serv- 
ices at this time he received the commis- 
sion of brevet major general to date from 
April 5, 1865. On the I5th of January, 
1866, he was honorably discharged from 
the service of the United States after 
declining an appointment for permanent 
military advancement of which any sol- 
dier might be proud, contentedly return- 
ing to take up the broken threads of busi- 
ness life. Returning to Warsaw, Illi- 
nois, at the close of the war, he remained 
for three years, serving the city as post- 
master for a year and a half, a position he 
resigned to become general agent for -the 
Florence Machine Company at North- 
ampton, Massachusetts, removing with 
his family to that place, and later be- 
came the company's general superintend- 
ent, during which time he patented sev- 
eral improvements on the sewing machine. 
He invented and patented the Florence 
spring skate, which the company manu- 
factured, also the Florence oil stove, the 
base of which is used in all the wick oil 
stoves used and manufactured today. 



In 1875 he retired from active business, 
and returning to Warsaw bought the 
house built by William H. Roosevelt, a 
grand uncle of President Theodore 
Roosevelt, which remains the family 
home. 

In 1882 he accepted an appointment as 
general manager of the Gardner Machine 
and Gun Company, of England, with 
headquarters in that country. After a 
year he returned to the United States for 
his family, but two years later resigned 
owing to ill health and again returned to 
Warsaw. 

He was always active in the advance- 
ment of the best interests of his city, serv- 
ing it as mayor three terms, was chosen 
many times upon the boards of public 
school and library, was frequently com- 
mander of Arthur W. Marsh Post No. 
343, Grand Army of the Republic, and 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. In 
politics he was a stalwart republican. 
During the last two years of his life he 
gathered into manuscript his recollec- 
tions of the Civil war. An ardent lover 
of nature, time never hung heavy for him 
and he spent many hours in the cultiva- 
tion of his rose garden, in growing and 
experimenting with fruits and vegetables. 
He was a keen sportsman with rod and 
gun, a friend of animals, a student of 
books, a loyal friend and an honored citi- 
zen, following faithfully every pursuit 
of earnest duty, content and proud to 
pass his life modestly, sweetly, in the land 
his valor had helped to save. 

General Edwards died at his home in 
Warsaw, April 28, 1904. There sur- 
vive him his wife and two children: John 
E. and Julia Katherine, the latter now 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



305 



living with her mother at the home in 
\Yarsaw. John E. received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Massachu- 
setts and Illinois up to the age of four- 
teen, when he was sent to Hanover Col- 
lege, Hanover, Indiana, for two years, 
and then for one year attended the Quincy 
(Illinois) Business College. At the age 
of seventeen, being in poor health, he 
went to Colorado to spend the summer 
on the ranch of his mother's uncle, Ed- 
win Baldwin, intending to enter the Uni- 
versity of Michigan that fall, but the 
charm of the west held him and the fol- 
lowing three years he spent on the ranches 
in Colorado, Texas and Indian Territory 
as a cowboy. In 1888 he went to Chi- 
cago and for a year was in the employ of 
Nelson, Morris & Company and of Swift 
& Company, but returned to Texas and 
drove a herd to Montana. For nine years 
he was in the employ of Thomas Cruse 
as foreman of an outfit and as general 
manager of all his cattle and sheep in- 
terests in Fergus County, Montana, re- 
signing to go into a general merchandis- 
ing business at Junction, Montana. A 
year later he was appointed United States 
Indian agent on the Crow reservation, an 
appointment he held for three years, re- 
signing to be appointed United States 
Indian inspector for the northwest, from 
which he resigned to go into business at 
Forsyth, Montana, where he is president 
of the Bank of Commerce, of the Electric 
Light and Telephone Company and is 
also engaged in irrigation and railroad 
construction. He has recently been elect- 
ed to represent Rosebud county as state 
senator. In 1891 he married Julia, a 
daughter of Reese Anderson, a ranchman 



at Ft. Maginnis, Montana, and to them 
have been Iwrn three children, two now 
living: Annie Johnstone and Eunice 
Irene Edwards. 

(Taken from the Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, Repubican, date September 20, 
1904) : At the presentation of a portrait 
of General Edwards by Mr. Bowen to the 
Springfield, Massachusetts, city hall col- 
lection. 

Secretary James L. Bowen, of this city, 
who made the presentation speech, said 
that General Edwards needed no memo- 
rial to keep his memory enshrined in the 
hearts of those who fought under him, 
and with him. But it was fitting that the 
members of General Edwards's old regi- 
ment should leave something to serve as 
a reminder in the city of his birth of 
their old commander. Mr. Bowen said 
that he should not aitempt to review the 
life of General Edwards, for the facts 
were too well known. His military rec- 
ord did not need to be eulogized. From 
the battle of Fair Oaks to the mustering 
out in 1865 he fought bravely. General 
Edwards had entered the service, Mr. 
Bowen said, from civilian life, dropping 
his business in the west on the call to 
arms. He came to Springfield and be- 
gan recruiting on Hampden park. And 
when the recruits that he had collected 
were portioned out to fill other brigades 
General Edwards did not sulk in his tent, 
but accepted the conditions like a true sol- 
dier. His promotion was clue, Mr. 
Bowen said, not to political- influence, but 
to his own ability. 

Loyal as he was to the state and city 
of his nativity, he was equally loyal to the 
regiment which he had organized and 



306 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which had given its organizer such credit. 
During his entire military career he ab- 
solutely refused to accept any command 
which did not include the Thirty-seventh 
Massachusetts regiment. His warm 
friend, General Sheridan, urged him, 
while commandant of the post at Win- 
chester, to accept an appointment which 
meant a lifetime of service in the regular 
army, with high rank, but it was declined, 
and he returned to the army of the Poto- 
mac, to renew the perils of 'active service 
in the field. There he positively refused 
to accept any command which did not 
embrace you men who are gathered here 
today. This refusal was carried to such 
a point as to place him in antagonism 
with officers of superior rank, but Ed- 
wards would not swerve, and finally he 
was assigned to the command which he 
sought, and through the defenses of Pe- 
tersburg he led his tried and trusted bat- 
talions, as he did in that last terrific strug- 
gle at Sailor's creek, where General Sher- 
idan, not accustomed to delay in striking 
the enemy, sat upon his horse, with the 
battlefield before him, and waited till Ed- 
wards and his command could be brought 
up from a point three miles in the rear to 
bear the brunt of the infantry fighting. 

His life as a citizen was a worthy sup- 
plement to his life as a soldier. Modest 
in his manner, the esteem in which he was 
held is showr^by the positions of trust 
given him by the community in which 
his life was passed, where every honor 
within the gift of his constituents was 
gratefully bestowed. Such, in brief, was 
the life whose close we mourn as we 
gather here today. Mr. Commander. I 
give to your keeping this memorial. 



Brevet Major General Oliver Edwards 
peerless soldier, worthy citizen, true- 
hearted comrade. 



JOHN W. BERTSCHI. 

John W. Bertschi is one of the native 
sons of Hancock county, having first 
opened his eyes to the light of day on 
section 22, Appanoose township, Febru- 
ary 12, 1852. In the years that have 
come and gone he has proved an active 
and enterprising citizen, giving helpful 
support to many progressive public 
measures and at the same time carefully 
conducting his individual business inter- 
ests. Little is known concerning the an- 
cestral history of the family save that 
earlier generations were for a long pe- 
riod residents of Switzerland. John 
Bertschi, the grandfather, born and 
reared in that country, was there married 
to Miss Steiner, and their son, William 
Bertschi, was born in the land of the 
Alps April 18, 1825. Having arrived at 
years of maturity, he wedded Miss Eliza- 
beth Walti, who was born in Switzerland. 
July 2, 1827, and was a daughter of Ru- 
dolph Walti. It was in the year 1849 
that William Bertschi came to Hancock 
county with his widowed mother and 
brothers and sisters. He was then a 
young man of twenty-four years, and 
after assisting the family to get located 
in the new world, he returned to his na- 
tive country in 1850 and there, in the 
spring of 1851, he was married. In the 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



fall of the same year he brought his bride 
to the United States and made his way 
to Hancock county, Illinois, having pre- 
viously determined to locate here where 
the family had taken up their abode. He 
purchased forty acres of land on section 
22. Appanoose township, it being one of 
the first farms of the locality. Upon it 
was the only apple orchard in this part 
of the county and people would come for 
miles around to get apples, and others 
came for long distances just to see the or- 
chard, which was an oddity in those early 
days. There was one frame house and 
one log building upon the farm and also 
two or three log stables. As Mr. Bertschi 
could not obtain possession of his prop- 
erty until the spring of 1852 he lived 
with his sister, who had the adjoining 
forty acres, during the winter. When 
spring came, however, he took up his 
abode upon his own place and began its 
development and improvement. In course 
of time he added eighty acres of prairie 
land and forty acres of timber and at dif- 
ferent times made purchase of twenty 
acres on section 15, twenty acres on sec- 
tion 1 6, and an eighty-acre tract on sec- 
tion 27. He became well known as a 
stockman, being particularly fond of 
horses, and thus well qualified for their 
care and raising. He owned the first 
imported Percheron horse sired by Napo- 
leon brought to this country. At differ- 
ent times he owned many stallions and did 
an extensive business as a breeder. He 
died March 7, 1900, and was laid to rest 
in Nauvoo cemetery, while his wife 
passed away October 7, 1893. Their 
family numbered five sons and three 
daughters, as follows : John W. ; Her- 



man and Albert, who are residing at 
Glenwood, Washington; Carl, whose 
home is in Niota, this county ; Lizette B., 
the widow of Lee Miller, of Iowa ; Otillia, 
the wife of John Kindscher, of Meeker, 
Colorado; Emma, the wife of Louis J. 
Bicker, who resides on the old Bertschi 
homestead in Appanoose township; and 
William D., also of Niota. 

No event of special importance oc- 
curred to vary the routine of farm life 
for John W. Bertschi in his boyhood and 
youth. He was a student in Center dis- 
trict school of Appanoose township and 
like other boys he enjoyed the sports 
which were indulged in by the youth of 
the neighborhood. He was trained to ac- 
tive farm labor, early becoming familiar 
with the work of the fields, and to his fa- 
ther he gave the benefit of his services un- 
til his marriage, remaining until that time 
under the parental roof. He had pre- 
viously purchased eighty acres of land on 
section 27, Appanoose township, of 
which he became owner in the spring of 
1876. There was an old log house upon 
the place that is still standing, and the 
other improvements were of a primitive 
nature. 

It was to this pioneer home that Mr. 
Bertschi took his bride, when on the 24th 
of October, 1877, he was married to Miss 
Margaret Forth, who was born in Appa- 
noose township. May 28, 1856. Her par- 
ents were Frederick and Dorothy E. ( Her- 
man) Forth, natives of Hesse, Germany. 
The father made his way. to Belleville. 
Illinois, in 1841, and lived in St. Clair 
county - until 1852, when he removed to 
Nauvoo and settled upon a farm in Ap- 
panoose township, where he spent his re- 



3 o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 






maining days, passing away on the ist of 
December, 1894. His widow still sur- 
vives him and is now living in St. Louis 
with her daughter, Mrs. John Klug. As 
stated, Mr. Bertschi took his bride to the 
log cabin upon his farm and there lived 
for ten years, after which they spent two 
years in a stone house situated opposite 
his place. In the fall of 1890 he was 
elected treasurer of the county and re- 
moved to Carthage, where he continued 
to reside until 1898, when he removed to 
the vicinity of his home place and rented 
a house, but in that year he had a modern 
dwelling erected, which he and his fam- 
ily have occupied since September, 1898. 
He has also extended the boundaries of 
his farm by purchasing sixty acres on the 
south. He is well known as a general 
farmer and stock-raiser, his attention in 
the latter direction being given largely 
to Poland China hogs. 

In 1902 Mr. Bertschi was called upon 
to mourn the loss of his wife, who died 
on the 28th of January, and was buried 
in Nauvoo cemetery. Their children 
are: William Tell, who was bom Au- 
gust 19, 1878, and is now in Portland, 
Oregon; Roscoe R., who was born April 
13, 1883, and is at home; and Wallace, 
born May 14, 1887. 

Mr. Bertschi holds membership in the 
Christian church at Carthage, and is one 
of the prominent democrats of the county, 
recognized as a leader in the ranks of the 
party. He was called to various public 
offices, the duties of which he has dis- 
charged with promptness and fidelity. 
He was first elected township collector, 
serving in 1877, 1878, 1879 and 1880. 
It was during the same period that he 



acted for one year as town clerk, and he 
has also filled the office of supervisor for 
a numlier of terms. For three years he 
was a director of the agricultural board 
of the county fair at Carthage. In the 
fall of 1890 he was chosen by popular 
suffrage to the office of county treasurer, 
and served for one term of four years, 
while since 1900 he has been assessor of 
Appanoose township. Called thus to va- 
rious offices his re-elections have been in- 
dications of his ability and the trust and 
confidence reposed in him by his fellow 
townsmen. He has wielded a wide influ- 
ence in public affairs and be it said to his 
credit that the weight of his influence 
is ever on the side of right, reform, prog- 
ress and improvement. He is a man hon- 
orable in all life's relations and whether 
in positions of public trust, in business 
circles or as a representative of social 
relations he is known as a man worthy 
of high regard and confidence. 



FRANKLIN L. McCORMICK, M. D. 

He whose name initiates this review 
has gained recognition as one of the able 
and successful physicians of Carthage and 
Hancock county, and by his labors, his 
high professional attainments and his 
sterling characteristics has justified the re- 
spect and confidence in which he is held 
in the medical fraternity in the local pub- 
lic. He is one of Illinois' native sons, his 
birth having occurred in Mount Sterling, 
Brown countv, on the 22d dav of March, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



309 



1857, his parents being Robert and Ade- 
line (Wilson) McCormick. The father 
was bom in Kentucky and both he and 
his wife spent their childhood days there 
and were married in that state. The 
name, however, would indicate Scotch an- 
cestry. Robert McCormick and his wife 
came to Illinois prior to 1849, as the 
court records show that he owned the 
ground where the Baptist church now 
stands prior to that day. He was a tan- 
ner and owned a tannery in Brown coun- 
ty, continuing in that business up to the 
time of his death. Both he and his wife 
were devoted members of the Pres- 
byterian church and were people of the 
righest respectability. The father died 
December 24, 1861, when his son Frank- 
lin was but four years of age, and the 
mother was left with the care of twelve 
children, whom she reared, giving a 
mother's loving devotion to them. She 
died at the advanced age of eighty years, 
three months and three days, passing 
away in 1896. 

Dr. McCormick is the eleventh child 
and seventh son in the family. When 
seven years of age he left Brown county 
and removed to Pike county, Illinois, 
where he acquired his preliminary educa- 
tion and afterward attaided Normal 
school. Later he engaged in teaching but 
regarded this merely as an initial step to 
other professional labor, for he desired 
to become a member of the medical fra- 
ternity and became a student in the office 
and under the direction of Dr. Harvey, 
of Pittsfield. He afterward attended the 
Missouri Medical College at St. Louis 
and pursued one course of lectures there, 
while later he entered the Keokuk Med- 



ical College, from which he was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1897. He located 
for practice at Bentley, in Hancock coun- 
ty, where he soon secured a good country 
practice, but desiring a broader field he 
removed to Memphis, Missouri, where he 
remained six months. He then came to 
Carthage on the 22d of February, 1899, 
and has since maintained a prominent po- 
sition in the ranks of the medical frater- 
nity here and has a large and lucrative 
practice. He occupies a fine suite of 
rooms in the McMahan building and is a 
general practitioner, well versed in all de- 
partments of medical science and its adap- 
tation. He belongs to the Hancock Med- 
ical Society, the Illinois State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. He is moreover grand medical 
examiner of the Hancock County Mutual 
Life Association, of which he was the 
originator, and which is now known as 
one of the most successful mutual insur- 
ance companies of the country, and owes 
its success largely to Dr. McCormick. 
Dr. McCormick was married Decem- 
ber 13, 1882, to Miss Mary E. Brown- 
ing, of Perry, Pike county, a daughter 
of William and Mary (Dorsey) Brown- 
ing, who were old residents of Pike coun- 
ty, locating there on coming from Ten- 
nessee. Unto Dr. and Mrs. McCormick 
have been born three children : Matie 
A., married June 3, 1906, to Carl C, Carl- 
ton, of Sault St. Marie, Michigan, where 
she resides. She is a graduate of the Car- 
thage high school; Nettie L., who is also 
a graduate of the high school and is cash- 
ier of the Wyman Rand Carpet Com- 
pany of Carthage; and Grace E., who is 
vet a student. Dr. and Mrs. McCormick 



3 io 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and the two elder daughters hold mem- 
bership in the Christian church. Theirs 
is a pleasant and attractive home on South 
Main street, Dr. McCormick having 
made most of the improvements there. 
Its hospitality is justly celebrated and 
their circle of friends is an extensive one. 
Dr. McCormick belongs to the Odd Fel- 
lows Society of Perry and the Knights 
of Pythias lodge at Pittsfield, Illinois. 
In politics he is a democrat but is too 
busy to hold office even if he had political 
aspirations. He is justly accounted one 
of the strong members of the medical 
fraternity in the county, having thor- 
oughly acquainted himself with the sci- 
ence of medicine, and to his knowledge he 
is continually adding through reading and 
investigation, while in his practice he dis- 
plays keen power of diagnosis, so that he 
is seldom at error in a matter of profes- 
sional judgment. 



CLARK H. RICE. 

Clark H. Rice is one of the native sons 
of Hancock county and although his resi- 
dence here has not been continuous he 
has yet spent the greater part of his life 
within the borders of the county and is 
now classed with the representative agri- 
culturists of Pontoosuc township, owning 
and cultivating one hundred and sixty 
acres of land on section 33. His life 
record began in Durham township in 
:r866 and he is a son of Henry 
and Elizabeth Rice, who are men- 



tioned elsewhere in this volume. He 
was educated in the Almater school 
and in Elliott's Business College, at Bur- 
lington, Iowa, and thus, by liberal train- 
ing, was well equipped for the arduous 
duties that come with one's entrance into 
the business world. He remained at 
home with his parents until twenty-four 
years of age and then made arrangements 
for having a home of his own through 
his marriage in 1890, to Miss Laura M. 
Bradfield, who was born in Hardin 
county, Iowa, January 4, 1870, a daugh- 
ter of James N. and Ada (Wolf) Brad- 
field. Her father was born in Virginia, 
Loudoun county, in 1833, and her mother 
in Ohio, in 1836, and they came to Han- 
cock comity from Iowa when their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Rice, was a very little girl. 
She is the youngest of their four children, 
all yet living, the others being : James 
L., of La Harpe; William F., also living 
in La Harpe ; and Sherman, a resident of 
Durham township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rice began their domestic 
life on a farm near Disco, Illinois, and 
followed farming in this county until 
1893. The succeeding three years were, 
spent upon a farm in Nebraska and on re- 
turning to Illinois, Mr. Rice was again 
engaged in farming near Disco for a year. 
He after engaged in the same pursuit 
near Argyle, Iowa, for six years, and 
in 1903 he purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of land on section 32, Pon- 
toosuc township, where he has since re- 
sided. The place is well improved with a 
good residence, barn and other modern 
equipments and as a general farmer and 
stock-raiser Mr. Rice is meeting with 
prosperity, as the result of his close ap- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



plication, careful management and laud- 
able ambition. 

L'nto Mr. and Mrs. Rice were born 
four children : One died in infancy. 
Bertha, born October 25, 1891, in Disco, 
died July 19, 1899; Charles L., born in 
Argyle, Iowa, April 26, 1898, is at home; 
Eulah E., born in Pontoosuc township, 
July 5, 1903, died on the 29th of August, 
of that year. The parents are consistent 
members of the Methodist church and 
in politics he is a republican. He has no 
desire for office, preferring to devote his 
entire time and attention to his business 
interest which, carefully conducted, are 
bringing him a measure of success that 
classes him with the men of affluence in 
his township. 



LAFAYETTE FRAZER. 

Lafayette Frazer. carrying on general 
farming in Walker township, was born 
in Walker township in 1882, a son of 
George W. and Elizabeth Rebecca 
(Shipe) Frazer. The father was reared 
to farm life and has always followed 
agricultural pursuits. His wife, also a 
native of Hancock county, was born in 
Rocky Run township. They still reside 
in Walker township and are people of 
genuine personal worth. Their family 
numbers six children, of whom five are 
now living: James, a resident of Walker 
township: Edith, the wife of William 
Schildman. of Walker township; Lafay- 
20 



ette, of this review ; Marion and Elberta, 
both at home. 

The Oak Valley school in Walker 
township afforded Lafayette Frazer his 
educational privileges, which he enjoyed 
in his youth. He remained on the old 
homestead until he had attained his ma- 
jority and on the ist of December. 1901, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Ina 
Tripp, who was born in Adams county. 
June 13, 1881, a daughter of Alva and 
Sallie Tripp, both of whom were natives 
of Illinois, the former born in 1854, and 
the latter in 1861. They are now pros- 
perous farming people of Adams county, 
Illinois, and in their family are four chil- 
dren, namely : Mrs. Frazer, Clifford, 
Verna, and Virgil. The family yet re- 
mains unbroken by the hand of death, and 
with the exception of Mrs. Frazer all are 
yet under the parental roof. 

Following his marriage Mr. Frazer 
rented a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres which was once owned and occu- 
pied by his grandfather and is now the 
property of his father. Here he engages 
in the raising of stock in addition to the 
cultivation of the cereals best adapted to 
soil and climate. In his farm work he 
is enterprising as well as diligent and his 
persistence and determination constitute 
the salient features in his life and argue 
well for his success. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Frazer has 
been blessed with two interesting chil- 
dren : Helen, born in 1902 ; and Harold, 
in 1904. The parents are pleasant, 
genial people and hospitality is one of the 
delightful features of their home. Mr. 
Frazer exercises his right of franchise in 
support of the democracy but has never 



3 I2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



been an aspirant for office, preferring to 
concentrate his energies upon his busi- 
ness affairs. 



JOHN MORGAN KISER. 

A well developed and highly improved 
farm in Wythe township is the property 
of John Morgan Kiser, who has spent 
almost his entire life in Illinois. He was 
born in Campbell county, Kentucky, Sep- 
tember 20, 1862, being the sixth in order 
of birth in a family of two sons and seven 
daughters whose parents ;werei Wilson 
and Mary (Johnson) Kiser, likewise na- 
tives of Campbell county. The paternal 
grandfather was Robert Kiser, and the 
maternal grandfather, James Johnson, 
both residents of Kentucky. In the year 
1864, Wilson Kiser brought his family 
to Hancock county and purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land on sec- 
tion 29, Wythe township. Upon this 
farm was a small house and a little stable 
and a fence had been built around the 
place. He soon remodeled the house, 
built a granary and barn and continued 
the work of improving his farm which 
in course of years became an excellent 
property, the fields returning him golden 
harvests in reward for the care and labor 
which he bestowed upon them. He re- 
mained upon this farm until' called to 
his final rest, his wife passing away in 
May. 1890. while he survived until Oc- 
tober of the same year. 

Brought to Wythe township when but 
two years of age, John M. Kiser pursued 



his education in the district schools of the 
neighborhood and when not busy with 
his text-books aided in the farm work, . 
giving his father the benefit of his services 
in the field and meadow until he had 
attained his majority. He then began 
farming on his own account, and pur- 
chased forty acres of land on section j 
28, Wythe township, from his father. 
This he cultivated for six years, at 
the end of which time he pur- 
chased the old homestead of one hundred 
and sixty acres from the other heirs and 
took possession of the place. When the 
barn was destroyed by fire in 1895 he 
replaced it by a good barn forty by fifty 
feet and in 1905 he further improved his 
place by the erection of one among the 
finest homes in the township. It is 
heated by furnace and supplied with all 
modern equipments, is tastefully furnished 
and is noted for its gracious and warm 
hearted hospitality. Mr. Kiser gives his 
attention to the cultivation of his fields 
and to the raising of Percheron horses 
and good grades of cattle and hogs. He 
also farms eighty acres of land belonging 
to his wife, and the success which is at- 
tending his efforts is indicative of his 
progressive methods in carrying on the 
farm work. 

On the 2jth of August, 1883, Mr. Kiser 
was married to Miss Rose Ewing, who 
was born in Walker township and pur- 
sued her education in the district schools 
there, while spending her girlhood days 
in the home of her parents, John and 
Margaret (Stacker) Ewing. who were 
natives of Kentucky and Ohio respective- 
ly. Mr. and Mrs. Kiser now have an 
interesting family of four children : 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



Ethel, born June 2, 1887; Emma. Sep- 
tember 10, 1893; Claud, April 23, 1898; 
and Annie, September 20, 1900. The 
parents hold membership in the Presby- 
terian church and Mr. Kiser votes with 
the democracy but he has never been an 
aspirant for office. The fact that many 
of his stanchest friends are those who 
have known him from his boyhood days 
to the present time is an indication that 
his life has been well spent and that his 
sterling traits of character are such as 
command uniform confidence and good 
will. 



ALBERT BERTSCHI. 

Albert Bertschi. a prominent stockman 
of Niota, where he is engaged in handling 
horses, cattle and sheep, is a native son 
of Illinois, having been born in Appa- 
noose township, September 18, 1871, of 
Scotch and Swiss ancestry. His paternal 
grandparents were Solomon and Eliza- 
beth Bertschi, who emigrated from the 
land of the Alps in an early day, bring- 
ing with them their son Philemon, who 
was the father of our subject. They first 
settled in New Orleans, but in 1856 went 
to St. Louis, where they remained one 
winter and then removed to Illinois, lo- 
cating in Appanoose township. Here 
Philemon Bertschi was married in 1868 
to Miss Margaret Mackie, the wedding 
ceremony being performed at French- 
town. She was a daughter of Robert 
Mackie, whose birth occurred in Scotland, 
and who emigrated to America, settling 



in Hancock county prior to the time the 
Mormons took up their abode in this sec- 
tion of the state. In this county the 
daughter, Margaret, was born and after 
reaching womanhood gave her hand in 
marriage to Philemon Bertschi. Her 
father passed away in -this county in the 
year 1870. Following his marriage 
Philemon Bertschi, father of our subject, 
located on a farm in Appanoose town- 
ship, comprising one hundred and ninety- 
eight acres, to which he added from time 
to time until at the time of his death, 
April 2, 1902, he left a valuable farm 
of four hundred acres. His wife had 
preceeded him to the home beyond, her 
death occurring in May, 1887. 

Albert Bertschi, the eldest of four sons 
and three daughters, was reared on the 
home farm, assisting his father in the 
operations of his farming pursuits, so 
that the son received practical training 
which enabled him later in life to carry 
on business on his own account. He ac- 
quired his education in district school No. 
43, near his father's home, and remained 
with his parents until he attained his ma- 
jority, at which time he was married and 
started out in life on his own account. 
He chose as a companion and helpmate 
on life's journey Miss Bessie Briley, 
whom he wedded on the 5th of April. 
1892. She is a native of Appanoose 
township, and is a daughter of William 
and Matilda (Uhler) Briley, both na- 
tives of the Keystone state. 

Following his marriage Mr. Bertschi 
took up his abode on a farm in Sonora 
township, belonging to his father, where 
he remained for ten years. After his 
father's death he removed to the old 



3*4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



homestead farm, which he operated until 
A'larch, 1905. when he took up his abode 
in Niota, where he built a large barn and 
began dealing in horses, cattle and sheep. 
He now has an associate in business, his 
partner being William Ellison. The}' are 
now engaged quite extensively in hand- 
ling horses, cattle and sheep, shipping a 
large amount of each, from which they 
derive a gratifying income. He is a 
wide-awake and enterprising business 
man well known all over Hancock county, 
his business interests taking him over a 
large territory. He is ever found re- 
liable and straightforward in all his busi- 
ness transactions and is accounted one of 
the leading factors of his village. 

In his political views Mr. Bertschi is 
a democrat, and for a number of years 
served as school director. He holds 
membership relations with the Modern 
Woodmen of America, belonging to camp 
No. 1654, at Xiota, and is also an Odd 
Fellow, belonging to lodge. No. 222, at 
Nauvoo. In his family are two children. 
Phil Albert, born April 30, 1893; and 
Bernice, born in March. 1895. 



CHARLES T. MARTIN. 

Charles T. Martin, captain on a boat 
running from Quincy, Illinois, to Daven- 
port, Iowa, is a worthy citizen of Niota, 
where he owns and occupies a fine home, 
besides other property which he rents. 
He is a native of Columbus, Ohio, his 
birth having occurred September 22, 



1840, a son of Charles T. and Mary Jane 
(Jackson) Martin, natives of Harper's 
Ferry, West Virginia, and Connecticut, re- 
spectively. Air. and Mrs. Charles T. 
Martin had accompanied their respective 
parents to Columbus, Ohio, during their 
youth and were there married about 1834, 
The father was a contractor and builder, 
and in 1842 he removed to Fort Madison, 
Iowa, where he continued his work as a 
carpenter and contractor until 1853, 
when he went to California, and his death 
there occurred three years later. In his 
family were two sons and four daugh- 
ters, of whom the subject of this review 
was the third in order of birth, and of 
whom four yet survive, namely : Charles 
T. ; Sarah A., the widow of Dr. George 
Ferrard, now residing in Chicago ; 
Helen M., the wife of W. B. Bently. and 
a resident of Fort Madison, Iowa, and 
A. A., also of that city. The mother, in 
1871. married Jonathan Allen, who was a 
retired farmer, and her death occurred 
February 13, 1906, when she had reached 
the very advanced age of eighty-eight 
years, for her birth occurred April 28, 
1818. 

Charles T. Martin, whose name intro- 
duces this record, acquired a common- 
school education in Fort Madison, and at 
the age of thirteen years entered a print- 
ing office, where he was employed for one 
year, after which he went to Davenport, 
Iowa, and worked in a job printing office 
for the succeeding six years. He then 
became interested in navigation and 
learned to be a pilot, his work being on 
the Mississippi river. Three years later 
he became captain of a boat running from 
Quincy, Illinois, to Davenport, Iowa, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



315 



which he has followed to the present time. 
In the meatime, in 1883, he bought a farm 
comprising one hundred and sixty-eight 
acres, situated on section i, Appanoose 
township, a portion of which was operated 
by his sons, while the remainder he rented 
to other parties. In the spring of 1902. 
however, he sold this property and in- 
vested in four lots and two houses in 
Niota, one of which he occupies, while 
the other he rents. He has a fine home, 
which is supplied with all comforts and 
conveniences and he is now comfortably 
situated in life. 

On the 3d of March. 1864, Mr. Martin 
was married to Miss Justina M. Dellan- 
baugh. a native of North Georgetown, 
Columbiana count}-, Ohio, a daughter of 
John and Sarah ( Sheets) Dellanbaugh. 
natives of Switzerland and Pennsylvania, 
respectively. Mrs. Martin was born June 
3, 1846, and between the ages of four 
and eighteen years pursued her studies 
in a convent at Cleveland, Ohio. The liv- 
ing members of Mr. Martin's family are 
as follows: Charles L., who was born 
March 13. 1865, an( l ' s a pilot on a boat 
running on the Mississippi river and re- 
sides in Warsaw, Illinois: Justina M., 
born August 12, 1869, and now the wife 
of Thomas Cosgrove, of Appanoose town- 
ship: Anderson A., born July 31, 1876, 
and a resident of Fort Madison, Iowa : 
Frank E., born October 23, 1878. and p. 
resident of Mammoth. Montana: Mary 
H.. who was born October 4, 1880, and 
is now the wife of Fred Jackson, of Car- 
thage township; Royal M.. who was born 
December 12. 1886, and resides with his 
parents but is employed by the Atchison, 
Topeka Santa Fe Railroad, at Fort 



Madison, Iowa; Sydney L.. born Decem- 
ber 26, 1889; Earl, born June 26. 1891. 
Those deceased are: Harriett M., who 
was born November 26, 1866, and died 
July 6, 1870; Damaras C., who was 
born May 13, 1874, and passed away Feb- 
ruary 3, 1887; John D., who was born 
February 10, 1872, and died February 5, 
1888; Sarah E., who was born March 5, 
1883. and died February 21. 1888: and 
Raymond V., twin brother of Royal, 
whose death occurred July 17, 1897. 

Mr. Martin supports the principles of 
the Democratic party and served as school 
director for four years but aside from this 
has accepted no political office. Frater- 
nally he holds membership with the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He has 
been energtic and persevering in all that 
he has undertaken and as the years have 
passed by has accumulated a comfortable 
competence so that he is now enabled to 
enjoy many of the comforts of life. Mr. 
and Mrs. Martin have reared a family of 
children of which they have every reason 
to be proud and they are highly esteemed 
people of this portion of the state. 



WILLIAM M. FERGUSON. 

William M. Ferguson, who is engaged 
in the livery business and is also a dealer 
in horses in La Harpe, was born in Ayre- 
shire, Scotland, May 29. 1867. He is a 
son of John Ferguson, also a native of 
Ayreshire and a grandson of Mathew 
Earl. The former married Grace Ear!. 



316 



BIOGRAPHICAL REV IE}}' 



a daughter of David and Margaret 
( Stevens) Earl, who were born in Ayre- 
shire as was Mrs. Ferguson. John Fer- 
guson was an engineer on the Glasgow 
& Southwestern Railroad and spent his 
entire life in his native country, there 
passing away in 1901, having for more 
than a decade survived his wife, who died 
in 1890. 

William M. Ferguson acquired a com- 
mon-school education, attending until the 
age of ten years, when he started out upon 
his business career, working with a horse 
buyer of the name of Crawford, at 
Manare Head, Scotland. He was thus 
engaged for eight years and afterward 
removed to Inchnnan, Paisley, Scotland, 
where 'he worked for a Mr. Taylor, a 
horse breeder, for two years. In 1887 
he came to America with eighteen head 
of thoroughbred horses for John C. 
Huston, of Blandinsville, Illinois, and was 
in the employ of Mr. Huston for seven 
years, the latter being one of the most 
prominent stock breeders and dealers in 
his section of the state. In 1895 he 
entered the employ of W. O. Talbert, 
feeding and caring for horses and five 
years later, with the capital that he had 
acquired, he began business on his own 
account, dealing in and shipping horses 
for himself. On the i8th of January, 
1906, he purchased the Lancaster livery 
barn in La Harpe, becoming owner of 
fourteen head of horses and twelve ve- 
hicles. He is still conducting the livery 
business and he yet deals in horses, em- 
ploying two men. He is an expert judge 
of horses, seldom at error in his estimate 
of the value of an animal and since en- 
gaging in business on his own account 



he has secured a good patronage and con- 
ducted a profitable trade. 

On the 3 ist of January, 1893, Mr. 
Ferguson was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Martin, who was born in Canton, 
Illinois, in June, 1875, and is a daughter 
of Patrick and Belle (Haley) Martin, 
who were natives of Ireland and her father 
was employed in railroad work in Illinois 
for many years. He died in August, 
1905. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson 
have been born three children : Grace, 
who was born in 1894 and died at the 
age of two years; Maggie, born in 1896 
and died in infancy ; and Raymond, born 
in August, 1903. 

Mr. Ferguson is a member of the Chris- 
tian church and his political allegiance is 
given to the democracy but he has neither 
time nor inclination to seek office, pre- 
ferring to give his attention to his busi- 
ness interests, in which he is now meet- 
ing with success. He has had no oc- 
casion to regret his determination to come 
to America for he has found here good 
business opportunities and through their 
utilization has gained a comfortable 
living. 



HENRY THOMAS PITT. 

Henry Thomas Pitt, a progressive agri- 
culturist and stock-raiser of Sonora town- 
ship, having here a fine tract of land of 
one hundred and sixty acres of rich and 
arable land, is a native of Herefordshire, 
England, his natal day being July 15, 
1836, a son of Thomas and Charlotte 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



317 



(Hardwick) Pitt, likewise natives of the 
fatherland. The son was a little lad of 
five years, when, in the spring of 1841, 
he accompanied his mother to America, 
and they at once made their way to 
Xauvoo, where they were joined by the 
father in the following spring. The fam- 
ily then located on a farm in Sonora town- 
ship, where he engaged in general agricul- 
tural pursuits. 

Henry Thomas Pitt acquired his educa- 
tion in the Elliott district school near his 
father's home, this being the first school 
built in the township. He remained with, 
his parents until his marriage on the I2th 
of December, 1861, Miss Huldah Jane 
Stevens becoming his wife. She is a 
native of Meigs county, Ohio, her birth 
having occurred March 3, 1842, and when 
eight years of age she was brought to this 
state by her parents. Daniel and Mary 
(Stabbord) Stevens, both natives of 
Maine. On removing from their native 
state they settled in Ohio, .where they 
remained from 1840 until 1850 and at 
that time went to Quincy, but four years 
later removed to Sonora township, Han- 
cock county, where he purchased a farm 
of eighty acres which he improved and 
his death occurred one year later in 1865. 
while his wife survived for twelve years. 

Following his marriage Mr. Pitt lo- 
cated on his farm of eighty acres, lying 
on section 14, Sonora township, of which 
only about fifteen acres had been cleared. 
He at once set to work to improve his 
farm and in course of time placed his 
fields under a high state of cultivation 
and planted his crops, from which he an- 
nually gathered rich harvests. On the 
place was a log cabin, in which the family 



made their home until the fall of 1866, 
when this was replaced by a more com- 
modious frame dwelling. He set out 
shade trees and an orchard containing one 
hundred and twenty fruit trees of va- 
rious kinds, of which only two apple trees 
remain. He has set out a second orchard, 
as well as small fruit of all kinds, has 
built barns and other outbuildings for 
the shelter of stock, grain and farm ma- 
chinery, and from time to time added to 
his house until he today has one of the 
finest country residences of his portion 
of the state, being supplied with all 
modern conveniences and accessories. In 
1 88 1 he added an additional tract of 
eighty acres to his home place, so that 
he now has one hundred and sixty acres 
of finely improved land. Here he is en- 
gaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing, including horses, cattle and Chester 
White and Poland China hogs. 

Unto our subject and his wife have been 
born five sons and four daughters, as 
follows : Alice Ann, who was born June 
26, 1862, and died in January, 1863 ; Ed- 
win, born March 13, 1864, a resident of 
Rock Creek township; Orin W., born in 
1866, and likewise a resident of Rock 
Creek township ; Ida J., the wife of Frank 
Stevenson, also of that township; Hattie 
C., the wife of Charles Ross, of Mont- 
rose, Iowa; Henry Thomas, of Van 
Buren county, Iowa ; John Everett, resid- 
ing in Rock Creek township ; Milton War- 
ren, of Dallas City; and Maud Allen, the 
wife of Harvey Hardy, of. Rock Creek 
township. 

In politics Mr. Pitt is independent, vot- 
ing for the men whom he regards as best 
qualified for office, regardless of party 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ties. He has served as school director 
but aside from this has held no public 
office. His religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Latter Day Saints' 
church. Mr. Pitt has led a busy and 
useful life and all that he possesses has 
been acquired through his own well di- 
rected labors. He has worked diligently 
and persistently as the years have gone 
by and now has an excellent farm which 
bears evidence of the careful supervision 
and management of the owner. 



DAVID R. SIGHTS. 

Among the self-made men who are now 
leading and influential factors in the agri- 
cultural life of Hancock county may be 
numbered David R. Sights, for, being left 
an orphan at a very early age, he has 
depended upon his own enterprise and in- 
dustry for his success in life and the posi- 
tion which he occupies today is due entire- 
ly to his own well directed efforts. A 
native of Guernsey county. Ohio, he was 
born July 4, 1847, a son of William and 
Martha (Sarchet) Sights, the former 
born in Pennsylvania, and the latter a na- 
tive of Grundy Island, France. The 
father followed farming in the Buckeye 
state, and in 1853 made his way to the 
state of Iowa, the family traveling in a 
wagon, the journey requiring six weeks, 
at which time they arrived at Keokuk, 
their destination. There the family made 
their home for two years, the father being 
employed in a brick yard, and later took 



a contract to chop wood, which continued 
to be his occupation for some time. Here 
both the father and mother passed away, 
their deaths occuring only a month apart. 

David R. Sights, is the youngest in 
a family of four sons and four daughters, 
and being bereft of both parents at a very 
early age he accompanied a neighbor to 
La Harpe township, this county, where 
he was employed for several years by 
different farmers of this section of the 
state. He was industrious and econom- 
ical, and thus saving his earnings he was 
in the course of time enabled to carry on 
farming on his own account. 

Considering -the subject of having a 
home of his own, he sought and won a 
companion December 16, 1881, by his 
.marriage to Miss Ida Kate Nichols, 
whose birth occurred in La Harpe town- 
ship. May 29, 1863, a daughter of Jo- 
seph and Thurza (Murdock) Nichols, 
both natives of Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Her parents removed to Adams 
county, Illinois, in 1853, and later took 
up their abode in La Harpe township, 
where the father purchased land and set- 
tled on a farm on section 7. Here the 
father engaged in general agricultural 
pursuits and became an extensive dealer 
in live stock. His death occurred Sep- 
tember, 1871. His widow continued to 
reside on the homestead property until her 
death, which occurred October 9, 1893. 

Following his marriage Mr. Sights 
took up his abode on the farm of his 
mother-in-law, which he managed until 
her death, subsequent to which time he 
purchased the interest of the heirs in the 
property, thus becoming owner of fifty- 
four acres of well improved and valuable 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



319 



property. He has added to his original 
purchase until he now owns eighty acres 
of improved land and five acres of timber, 
and on his place are found good substan- 
tial outbuildings for the shelter of grain 
and stock. On the 2d of May, 1905, the 
house was destroyed by fire, and in the 
fall of the same year Mr. Sights built a 
two-story frame residence, containing 
eight rooms, which is supplied with all 
modern conveniences and accessories. 
He has an orchard of three acres, which 
is 'set out to apples, peaches, pears and 
plums, and he likewise raises small fruits 
of different varieties. 

Unto our subject and his wife have 
been born three daughters : Nora Belle 
was born April 4, 1882, and is now the 
wife of Alvin Martin, a resident of Dur- 
ham township. Beulah Frances, born 
May 24, 1887, and Gladys Aldona, born 
November 5, 1897, are both at home. 
Politically Mr. Sights is a democrat, and 
has served as school director for several 
years. He belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, holding member- 
ship with .La Harpe lodge. No. 653 
Starting out in life a poor boy with no 
assistance and depending entirely upon 
his own labors. Mr. Sights has worked 
untiringly in the acquirement of a com- 
petence and is today in possession of a 
well improved farm property on which 
are found all the improvements known to 
a model farm of the twentieth century, 
and through his honesty am 1 reliability 
has gained a place among the represen- 
tative and progressive agriculturists of 
this portion of the state. He is held in 
high esteem by all who know him, and in 
his work is persistent and energetic. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON SIGHTS. 

Among the men who are interested in 
the commercial development and progress 
of Disco is numbered Thomas Jefferson 
Sights who, in connection with A. N. 
Davier. is successfully carrying on a gen- 
eral mercantile establishment at this place. 
He is a native of the Buckeye state, his 
birth having occurred in Guernsey county. 
February 15, 1839, a son of William and 
Martha Elizabeth (Sarchet) Sights, the 
former born in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, while the latter likewise claims 
Guernsey county as the place of her na- 
tivity. In the paternal line our subject 
comes from Scotch ancestry, his grand- 
parents being David and Jane Sights, 
natives of Pennsylvania and Scotland, re- 
spectively, while the maternal grandpar- 
ents were Thomas and Catherine (Mar- 
quard) Sarchet, born on the Isle of 
Guernsey. The parents of our subject 
were married in Ohio, where the father 
followed general farming until 1853. 
when he removed to Keokuk, Iowa, 
where he was employed for a year, sub- 
sequent to which time he once more re- 
sumed farming in Lee county, that state, 
and there his death occurred in Septem- 
ber, 1855, while his wife survived him 
for only one month, passing away in Oc- 
tober of the same year. 

Thomas Jefferson Sights, losing his 
parents at the early age of sixteen years, 
was thus early thrown upon his own re- 
sponsibilities for a livelihood. He pur- 
sued his studies in an old log school- 
house in his native state, the educational 
system being quite as primitive as the 
building in which he pursued his studies. 



320 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He also attended school for a time after 
his arrival in Hancock county. Follow- 
ing the death of his parents he remained 
on the farm during the succeeding winter 
and the family then removed to Keokuk, 
while our subject came to Hancock coun- 
ty, where he secured employment as a 
farm hand by the month, remaining in the 
employ of Henry Blythe, of Durham 
township, for seven years. Being of an 
industrious and economical nature, and 
watchful of opportunities for advance- 
ment, he then rented a farm, on which he 
was engaged in agricultural pursuits un- 
til 1902. .In the meantime, in 1880, hav- 
ing prospered in his undertakings, he pur- 
chased a tract of sixty-seven acres, which 
he conducted in connection with the prop- 
erty which he had leased. He later sold 
his land, and in 1902 retired from farm- 
ing pursuits and removed to Disco, 
where, in connection with A. N. Davier, 
he purchased the mercantile enterprise 
formerly owned and operated by Curtis 
Payne, and he has since been engaged in 
mercantile pursuits, in which he is meet- 
ing with gratifying success. They have 
an up-to-date stock of goods to meet the 
tastes and fancies of the general public 
and it is owing largely to the business 
ability and sound judgment of Mr. Sights 
that their store ranks among the best 
commercial enterprises of the city or 
county. On the loth of January, 1906, 
Mr. Sights was appointed postmaster and 
is proving a capable official in this re- 
gard. 

On the nth of April, 1867, Mr. Sights 
was united in marriage to Miss Irena E. 
Wills, whose birth occurred at Sardinia, 
near Cincinnati, Ohio. She is a daugh- 



ter of William and Jane (Gilliland) 
Wills, likewise natives of the Buckeye 
state. They located in Hancock county 
in 1854, where the father purchased a 
farm which he conducted until his death 
in 1901. His wife survived for only 
a few years, passing away in the present 
year. An only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Sights died in infancy. 

Mr. Sights gives his political support 
to the Republican party and has taken an 
active and helpful interest in public af- 
fairs, having filled the office of assessor 
for one term. He holds membership with 
the Methodist Protestant church, in which 
he has served as trustee and treasurer. 
Mr. Sights is ever interested in any move- 
ment that tends to the advancement of 
his community and he and his wife are 
highly esteemed for their sterling worth 
and are numbered among the worthy cit- 
izens of the county. 



EDWARD ARGAST. 

Edward Argast, who for many years 
has been a representative of business life 
in Nauvoo, where he is engaged in deal- 
ing in grapes and other fruits, making ex- 
tensive shipments, was born in Kehl, 
Baden, Germany, June 18, 1834, and ac- 
quired a common-school education while 
spending his boyhood days in the home of 
his parents, John F. and Salamoer 
( Knecht) Argast, the former a native of 
Baden and the latter of Strasburg, France', 
The mother died in Germany in 1851, and 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



321. 



the father afterward cam to America with 
his two sons but one daughter had died 
prior to the emigration, and Frederick 
John, who accompanied the father on 
the voyage, passed away in Nauvoo, Illi- 
nois, July 10, 1880. The sailing vessel 
on which they embarked dropped anchor 
in the harbor of New Orleans, after which 
John F. Argast and his sons made their 
way up the Mississippi river to St. Louis, 
where he worked at his trade of cabinet- 
making until 1854, when he came to 
Nauvoo. Here he established a whole- 
sale store, which he conducted for about 
eighteen years, or until his life's labors 
were ended -in death on the 4th of Sep- 
tember, 1872. In this country he married 
Caroline Peters, a native of Baden. This 
marriage was celebrated in St. Louis, and 
Mrs. Argast passed away in that city in 
1884. 

E)dward Argast began earning his own 
living in St. Louis, where he learned to be 
a cook. He was thus employed in that 
city, in New York and in New Orleans 
until the 7th of May, 1861. when he en- 
list for three months' service with the 
Third Missouri United States Reserve 
Corps. With that command he did duty 
in St. Louis and all parts of Missouri 
under command of John C. Fremont, and 
also proceeded to Cairo, Illinois. He 
was mustered out in February, 1862, his 
first term having expired and later he 
re-enlisted at St. Louis with the boys in 
blue of Company F, Twenty-ninth Mis- 
souri Infantry. Following the organiza- 
tion of the regiment he went to Cape 
Giranleau. Missouri, in the fall of 1862, 
and thence on to Vicksburg, participating 
in the first campaign there under General 



Sherman. He participated in the battle of 
Chickasaw Bayou on the .29th of De- 
cember where one-half of the regiment 
was lost. On the' ist of January, 1863, 
he went to Arkansas Post, participating 
in the engagement at that place on the 
loth of January, at which time five 
thousand Confederates were taken prison- 
ers. Eventually he returned to Vicks- 
burg, where the regiment remained until 
the capitulation of the city, and he partici- 
pated in the battle of Raymond, Champion 
Hills and Jackson and was present at the 
surrender of Vicksburg on the 4th of 
July, 1863. He afterward returned to 
Jackson, fighting in the battle there and 
then went back to Vicksburg, where the 
regiment remained for some time, later 
proceeding to Memphis, Tennessee. They 
were under Grant at the battle of Chero- 
kee Station and proceeded on foot to 
Chattanooga. The Twenty-ninth Missouri 
participated in the memorable battle of 
Lookout Mountain "above the clouds," 
and afterward in the battle of Missionary 
Ridge, proceeding thence to Ringgold, 
Georgia, where another engagement oc- 
curred. They went into winter quarters 
at Woodville, Alabama, and on the ist 
of May, 1864, started on the" Atlanta cam- 
paign under Sherman, proceeding from 
Atlanta to Savannah, Georgia, and par- 
ticipating in the battles of Resaca, Dallas, 
Kenesaw Mountain, the first battle of At- 
lanta on the 2 ist of May, and the second 
battle there on the 28th of May, 1864. 
The L T nion troops then besieged the city, 
and on the ist of September made a vic- 
torious entrance therein. The Twenty- 
ninth Missouri afterward followed .Gen- 
eral Hood of the Confederate army to 



322 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Chattanooga and subsequently returned to 
Georgia, taking part in the Georgia cam- 
paign and the march to the sea. They 
were then mounted and did scout duty 
until arriving at Savannah, where Mr. 
Argast sustained a gunshot wound in the 
foot. This secured him a leave of ab- 
sence for thirty days and he returned 
home, being sent from St. Louis to Cin- 
cinnati in the grand officers' hospital, as 
he was a lieutenant. He was afterward 
assigned to like duty at Columbus, Ohio, 
it being a part of his work to take drafted 
men to the front. When the war was 
over he was honorably discharged at 
Washington on the 22d of June, 1865, 
and sent thence to St. Louis, where he 
was mustered out. He was in the capitol 
city when President Lincoln was assas- 
sinated and saw him as he lay in state in 
the rotunda of the capitol. 

Following his discharge Mr. Argast 
came to Nauvoo, on the i2th of July. 
1865, and removing his family here, he 
purchased two lots and four acres of land 
in the city. In that year he had charge 
of his father's store, at the end of which 
time his father again purchased it. Later 
Mr. Argast conducted a saloon for twelve 
years on the flat, after which he removed 
his business to Main street, where he 
bought a lot and erected business blocks, 
covering one hundred feet front and two 
hundred feet in depth. He there con- 
ducted a saloon for about ten years, when 
he again sold out and removed to his 
present location on Thirteenth street a 
half block from the corner of Main street. 
He is now engaged in the grape and fruit 
business and makes extensive shipments 
of fruit. 



Mr. Argast was married in St. Louis 
to Miss Margareta Sherer, a native of 
France, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Sherer, who died of cholera in St. 
Louis in 1849. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Argast were born three sons and a daugh- 
ter : Edward, of Nauvoo ; Louis, a news- 
paper man of the same city ; William, who 
is proprietor of the Nauvoo Rustler; and 
Cora, the wife of Joseph W T elder, of 
Nauvoo. Mrs. Argast passed away De- 
cember 4, 1902, and on the 25th of June, 
1904, Mr. Argast was again married, his 
second union being with Mrs. Caroline 
Gabblemann Kettman, the widow of 
Theodore Kettman, and a daughter of 
Christian and Catherine (Hall) Gabble- 
man. Mr. Argast is a republican and 
has served for two terms as alderman of 
the first ward and for many years as 
school director. He is a Mason, belong- 
ing to Reclamation lodge. No. 54, at 
Xauvoo, and holds membership in the 
Lutheran church. He proved his loyalty 
to his adopted country by his long years 
of faithful service in the Civil war and 
he has always been interested in those 
things which promote good citizenship 
and which work for the welfare of a 
democratic government. 



FRED FORTH. 

Fred Porth. a representative of the 
farming and stock-raising interests of 
Appanoose township, was bom within 
the borders of this township June 13. 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



323 



1860, his parents being Fred and Doro- 
thy (Florich) Forth, who were natives of 
Germany. In early manhood the father 
made his way to East St. Louis, Illinois, 
where he was married, and later he en- 
gaged in farming in St. Clair county, this 
state, where he owned land. He came to 
Sonora township following the expulsion 
of the Mormons and there rented a farm, 
while later he purchased land in Appa- 
noose township, becoming owner of sixty 
acres which he subsequently sold. He 
then invested in eighty acres on section 
34, which was improved, and he contin- 
ued the work of further development and 
cultivation until 1893, when he sold that 
property, afterward living with his son 
Fred until his death, which occurred on 
the ist of December, 1894. His widow 
still survives him and now resides in St. 
Louis. The family numbered eleven chil- 
dren, four sons and seven daughters, of 
whom the subject of this review is the 
eighth. 

No event of special importance oc- 
curred to vary the routine of farm life for 
Fred Forth in the days of his boyhood 
and youth. He attended the common 
schools, worked in the fields and enjoyed 
the pleasures of the playground as op- 
portunity offered. He lived with his par- 
ents until twenty-three years of age and 
then, desirous that his labors should more 
directly benefit himself, he began farm- 
ing on his own account upon a tract of 
rented land, lying partly in Appanoose 
and partly in Sonora township. He aft- 
erward operated other farms in the two 
townships and for three years rented his 
father's place. Following his marriage 
he lived for two years on the old Webb 



place and then again farmed the old home- 
stead. One year previous, however, he 
had purchased eighty acres of land on 
section 30, Appanoose township, and 
when about twelve months had passed 
he took up his abode thereon. This was 
an improved property and he has since 
added forty acres on section 31. That 
tract, however, he sold five years later 
and then bought eighty acres adjoining 
his original purchase. His time was fully 
occupied with his farming and stock- 
raising interests, for he engages quite ex- 
tensively in the raising of Durham cat- 
tle, Percheron horses and Poland China 
hogs. As he has had opportunity, re- 
sulting from his improved financial con- 
dition, he has made changes in the ap- 
pearance of his farm through the erec- 
tion of substantial buildings. He' has re- 
modeled the barn, making it forty by 
forty-four feet, and he also made an ad- 
dition to the house. In 1902 he built a 
large barn forty by forty-four feet and 
he has since erected a commodious two- 
story residence, which is heated by fur- 
nace and is supplied with many of the 
conveniences known in city homes. 

On the 1 3th of November, 1888, Mr. 
Forth was married to Miss Catherine 
Haas, a native of Nauvoo, where she ac- 
quired her education in the public schools. 
Her parents were Joseph and Catherine 
(Emerich) Haas. The father was born 
in Switzwald in the Black Forests, Ger- 
many. Mr. and Mrs. Forth now have 
one child, Annie Marie, born March 20. 
1895. In politics Mr. Forth is an inde- 
pendent democrat, supporting the party 
at national elections but at local elections 
he does not consider himself bound by 



324 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



party ties. He served as township col- 
lector for one year but has never been 
ambitious in the sense of office seeking. 
Fraternally he is connected with the 
Modem Woodmen of America, Nauvoo 
camp. Having spent his entire life in 
this locality he is widely known and he 
has always lived as a farmer, and it has 
been his desire to become the owner of 
a good property that he might provide 
his family with the comforts of life. To 
this end he has worked steadily and per- 
sistently and the fact that he started out 
in life empty-handed and is now in pos- 
session of an excellent farm and goodly 
competence, entitles him to be classed 
with those who have just reason to be 
proud of the fact that they are known as 
self-made men. 



GEORGE LOCKE. 

George Locke, deceased, was for many 
years one of the successful fanners of 
Hancock county and through his own 
efforts won the prosperity which enabled 
him in his later years to live retired. He 
was born in Indiana, November 7, 1831. 
a son of Thomas and Grazilla (Gardner) 
Locke, both of whom were natives of 
Ohio. During the boyhood days of their 
son George the parents removed to Mich- 
igan and there he resided until he at- 
tained his majority, when he came to 
Hancock county, Illinois, and purchased 
a farm in Fountain Green township, 
comprising two hundred and forty-six 



acres of land. With characteristic energy 
he began the development and improve- 
ment of the fields and carried on his farm 
work with success for many years, or 
until 1893, when he retired from active 
business life and took up his abode in 
La Harpe, where he built a fine house, 
making it his place of residence until his 
death, which occurred on the ist of Oc- 
tober, 1902.. 

On the 6th of December, 1854, Mr. 
Locke was married to Elizabeth Webster, 
who was born in Cass county, Michigan, 
February 15, 1826. She attended the 
common schools of that state. Her par- 
ents were Amos and Susanna (Wright) 
Webster, the former a native of Rutland 
county, New York, and the latter of Ohio. 
The paternal grandfather was William 
Webster, of New York, and the maternal 
grandfather was William Wright. Mr. 
and Mrs. Webster removed to Fulton 
county about 1840 and there the father 
followed the occupation of farming. In 
the family were ten children, Mrs. Locke 
being the sixth in the family of five sons 
and five daughters. She gave her hand 
in marriage to -Mr. Locke in Lewiston, 
Fulton county, where they lived for some 
years, subsequent to which time he be- 
came a farmer of McDonough county and 
was for a long period successfully con- 
nected with agricultural interests. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Locke were born 
five children : Thomas, born October 
u, 1855, died April 6, 1883. Lowell 
G., born January 31, 1851, died October 
1 6, 1860. Clara A., born May 8, 1861, 
is the wife of Dr. I. M. Martin, of La 
Harpe. Gary E.. twin brother of Clara, 
died in July, 1862. George W., born 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



325 



November 28, 1869, died August 31, 
1895. He was instructor in penmanship 
in the Gem City Business College at 
Ouincy, Illinois, and he was married No- 
vember 28, 1894, to Pearl Creighton, of 
Peoria, Illinois. The eldest son, Thomas, 
was married June 8, 1876, to Annie Todd 
and had one child, Clevie, born November 
i, 1 88 1, and now attending school in St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

Mr. Locke was a member of the Chris- 
tian church, in which he served as a 
deacon until his death. His political sup- 
port was given to the Democratic party. 
His carefully directed labor was the secret 
of his business success whereby he ad- 
vanced to a prominent position among 
the agriculturists of the 'county, becoming 
the owner of a valuable farm, from which 
he derived an income that was sufficient in 
his later years to enable him to live re- 
tired. Mrs. Locke still survives her hus- 
band and yet resides in the home which 
he built in La Harpe in 1893. 



AUGUST WATERMAN. 

August Waterman, who at one time 
was actively engaged in general agricul- 
tural pursuits in Sonora township but is 
now living retired, although he still owns 
his farm of one hundred and four acres 
where he lives, is a native of Germany, 
his birth having occurred in Leppa, Det- 
moldt, September 19, 1837. His parents, 
Christian and Sophia (Kielsmayer) Wa- 
terman, were likewise natives of the fa- 



therland, where the father engaged in ag- 
ricultural pursuits and spent his entire 
life. The paternal grandfather of our 
subject was Christian Waterman, while 
the maternal grandfather bore the name 
of Frederick Kielsmayer. 

August Waterman acquired his educa- 
tion in Germany, completing the high 
school course there. He assisted his fa- 
ther to the age of fifteen years, when, 
thinking that other pursuits would be 
more congenial to him, he learned the 
baker's trade and emigrated to the new 
world, landing in Keokuk, Iowa, on the 
24th of June, 1857. He crossed the At- 
lantic on a sailing vessel which dropped 
anchor in the harbor of New Orleans 
and thence made his way by boat up the 
Mississippi river to Keokuk. His brother 
Fred had preceded him to this country 
and was proprietor of a hotel in Keokuk, 
and August secured work in his hostelry, 
where he was employed for one year. He 
then made his way to Sonora township, 
Hancock county, where he was employed 
as a farm hand, working by the month 
until 1868, and in that year, having saved 
his earnings, he made purchase of a tract 
of land on section 24, Sonora township, 
comprising one hundred and four acres, 
a small portion of which had been cleared. 
He further improved the place, placing 
his fields under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, fenced the place, built a house and 
barn, dug a well, and otherwise improved 
the place. He also set out fruit trees, 
from which he annually gathered good 
crops, and has since added to his fruit 
orchard, having now sixty apple trees, 
besides peach, plum and cherry trees, all 
of which are in bearing. In 1886 he re- 



326 



BIOGRAPHICAL REl'IEU' 



placed his first residence by a modern 
frame house, containing six rooms and 
having a cellar under the entire building. 
Here he carried on general agricultural 
pursuits, and in addition to the cultiva- 
tion of the fields he engaged to some ex- 
tent in the raising of high grades of 
horses, cattle and hogs. His health be- 
came impaired, however, and in 1900 he 
laid aside all business pursuits and retired 
to private life. 

On the 26th of February, 1865, Mr. 
Waterman chose a companion and help- 
mate for life's journey, Miss Susan Hu- 
ber, a native of St. Clair county, Illinois, 
who was born July 24, 1841. Her par- 
ents resided for many years in Nauvoo, 
where the daughter pursued her studies 
in the public schools, and here the father 
and mother passed away, the latter dying 
in 1848. She was a daughter of Martin 
and Christina Huber, natives of Byer, 
Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Waterman 
make their home with a niece, Louisa 
Waterman, the daughter of his brother 
William, who still makes his home in the 
fatherland. 

Although starting out in life at the 
early age of fifteen years and coming to 
a new country when still a young man, 
Mr. Waterman has allowed no difficulties 
^or obstacles to deter him in his labor, and 
from an humble financial position worked 
his way up until he is now the possessor 
of a fine farm property, from which he 
derives a good income, so that he and 
his wife are able to spend the evening 
of their days in honorable retirement. He 
has always given his political support 
to the Democratic party, and has taken 
an active interest in the local ranks of 



his party, having served for two terms 
as highway commissioner of his township 
and for three terms as school director. 
He holds membership relations with the 
Lutheran church at Xauvoo. 



JAMES G. JOHNSON. 

James G. Johnson, the inventor and 
manufacturer of Johnson's patent corn 
husker and a business man of energy and 
ability, whose success is attributable en- 
tirely to his well directed efforts, was 
born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, De- 
cember 24, 1827. His parents, George and 
Eleanor (Guthrie) Johnson, were also 
natives of the same county, the former 
born December 15, 1779, and the latter 
January 21, 1802. In 1774, James Guth- 
rie. the grandfather, built a large stone 
house on the Bardstown pike near Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, which stood as one of 
the landmarks of that section of the coun- 
try until about 1896. It was known as 
the "house of entertainment," being prac- 
tically a hostelry but more respectable 
than a "tavern," as no intoxicating 
liquors were there sold. It was there that 
many Catholic missionaries stopped on 
their way to Bardstown. being instructed 
in France by the priest to stop at the 
"stone house," where other priests would 
be sent to meet them, as it was regarded 
as a perfectly safe place. There James 
Guthrie made his home for many years 
and ran a daily stage coach to several ad- 
joining places. In the conduct of his 



GO 
O 

C-H 
O 

a 






/ 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



327 



business affairs he became a very wealthy 
man and was one of the most prominent 
and influential residents of that section 
of the country. The maternal grandfa- 
ther of our subject was a colonel in the 
Revolutionary war and became one of the 
pioneer residents of Kentucky, going 
there when the Indians still roamed 
through its forests, waging war upon the 
settlers until the district became known 
as "the dark and bloody ground." 

George Johnson, father of James G. 
Johnson, was a blacksmith by trade and 
in 1831 removed from Kentucky to 
Adams county, Illinois, where he carried 
on blacksmithing, farming and the nur- 
sery business." He died in the year 1869, 
his wife surviving until April 10, 1887. 
He was a member of the Christian church 
and his wife of the Presbyterian church 
and when called to their final rest they 
were laid in a cemetery in Adams county, 
Illinois. In their family were nine chil- 
dren, of whom seven are now living: 
James G. ; Parmelia, the wife of Thomas 
Bailey, of Camp Point, Illinois ; Ephraim 
P., living in Holden, Missouri; Moses C., 
of Harrisville, Missouri; Henry C., of 
Idaho; Mary E., the wife of Edward Ste- 
phenson, of Ottawa, Kansas; and Urith 
Serepta A., the wife of William Hanna, 
of Golden, Illinois. Of this family 
Henry C. Johnson was a soldier of the 
Civil war for four years, enlisting in the 
Fiftieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
participated in the two battles of Corinth 
and in many other important engage- 
ments. 

James G. Johnson was educated in the 
schools of Columbus, Illinois, first pur- 
suing his studies in a little log cabin 
21 



which was without a floor and which 
stood on the bank of McGee's creek in 
Adams county, a mile and a half from 
Columbus. He worked upon his father's 
farm until he had attained his majority 
and in 1855 removed to Hancock county, 
urchasing an improved tract of land in 
arn township, where he carried on 
geffei^Sarming for nine years. He then 
remw4>t|^Elvaston, where he purchased 
a farrJa; making it his home for four 
years, w*jjjen he took up his abode in Car- 
thage andijjurchased an elegant home on 
North Main street. It is surrounded by 
a beautiful and well kept lawn and in ad- 
dition to this property he owns good farm 
lands. In 1871 he invented what is 
known as Johnson's hand corn husker, 
upon which he took out a patent. Since 
that time he has manufactured this de- 
vice in Carthage and its sale extends to 
all states in the Union. Its utility is uni- 
versally recognized and it is regarded as 
the best invention of its kind on the mar- 
ket. Mr. Johnson has entire control of 
the trade and has enjoyed a good busi- 
ness in this way in the last twenty-five 
years. He is still engaged in the manu- 
facture of the husker and sells to whole- 
sale dealers. Moreover he possesses su- 
perior mechanical ingenuity, which is 
manifest in many ways in his home. 

On the 24th of December, 1850, Mr. 
Johnson was married to Miss Melvina J. 
Thomas, of Adams county, a daughter of 
Robert Thomas, who was born in Bour- 
bon county, Kentucky. They traveled 
life's journey happily together for about 
thirty-four years and were then separ- 
ated by the death of Mrs. Johnson on the 
3d of December, 1884. Two children 



328 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of that marriage, born in Adams county, 
are living", namely : Ella R., who is an 
artist of considerable ability, is the wife 
of N. P. McKee, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 
and has two sons, William Thomas and 
Irwin J. The former married Jessie Wal- 
ters and lived in Cleveland, Ohio, while 
Irwin wedded Cora Gibbins and with 
their daughter, Marjorie Maud, they re- 
side in Halsted, Kansas. Alice G. John- 
son is the wife of William L. Aaron, a 
practicing lawyer of Joplin, Missouri, 
and has three children, Lawrence J., Ella 
May and William. 

On the 1 8th of November, 1886, Mr. 
Johnson was married to Miss Minerva 
Hughes, who was born in Ursa, Adams 
county, Illinois, a daughter of Albert and 
Sarah Ann (Taylor) Hughes. Her fa- 
ther was a farmer by occupation. He 
attended the Christian church and both 
he and his wife were laid to rest in 
Adams county. Of their three children 
all are living, namely: Eliza J., who 
resides with Mrs. Johnson; and Robert 
C.. living in Ursa. 

In his religious faith Mr. Johnson is 
a Methodist and has served as elder and 
trustee of his church, while his wife be- 
longs to the Christian church. He holds 
membership with the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and in politics is a re- 
publican. He has served as alderman 
of Carthage and road supervisor of his 
township and is interested in all matters 
relating to public progress and substan- 
tial improvement. As proof of his in- 
genuity can be mentioned eight beautiful 
canes which he has made of small pieces 
of horn strung together upon an iron 
rod, and one of these is now in the Ma- 



sonic temple of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He 
also has made many pairs of beautifully 
polished mounted horns which he has 
prepared himself and which adorn his 
walls in many rooms. He has made hat 
racks and chairs of the horns and these 
are articles of furniture of great value 
and beauty. He has moreover several 
cases of fine specimens of all kinds, in- 
cluding shells, coins, beads, wood, iron, 
ore specimens, minks, owls, squirrels, an 
armadilla, sea grasses and an elaborate 
collection of eggs of more than one hun- 
dred kinds. He likewise has a large col- 
lection of Indian flint arrows of all kinds. 
He has beautiful corals and polished 
stones and a large quantity of sea mosses 
from the Pacific coast, all of which are 
nicely arranged in cabinets with glass 
doors. He has traveled from ocean to 
ocean, has visited California two or three 
times and wherever he has gone he has 
gathered his specimens and his collection 
today is doubtless worth five thousand 
dollars. He has moreover a model in his 
yard of the first log house his father 
built when he came to Illinois. It stands 
in his front yard and was made by Mr. 
Johnson. A love of the beautiful has 
been one of his strong characteristics all 
through his life and this is manifest in 
his attractive home with its fine curiosity 
cabinets. Moreover his interest in all 
these things indicates his broad and com- 
prehensive knowledge and he is indeed 
regarded as one of the best educated men 
in the county, a fact which is due not 
to any special educational advantages but 
to his broad reading and investigation 
during the leisure hours of a busy and 
active life. He is now seventv-nine vears 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



3 2 9 



of age, but is still an active and energetic 
man and moreover he commands unquali- 
fied esteem wherever he is known. 



WILLIAM F. BRADFIELD. 

William F. Bradfield, secretary and 
treasurer of the firm of Coulson, Bntn- 
dage & Company, hardware dealers of 
La Harpe, and also financially interested 
in other business affairs, although prac- 
tically living retired from the active man- 
agement of business interests, was born 
in Hardin county, Iowa, near Eldora, 
March 12, 1863. His paternal grandfa- 
ther, James Bradfield, was a resident of 
Virginia and married a Miss Nichols. 
Their son, James N. Bradfield, was bom 
in Loudoun county, Virginia, and having 
arrived at years of maturity was married 
in Ohio, April 12, 1853, to Miss Ada 
Wolfe, who was born in Coshocton coun- 
ty, Ohio, and was a daughter of James 
and Sarah (Meredith) Wolfe, natives of 
the Buckeye state. After their marriage 
James N. Bradfield followed fanning in 
Ohio for a year and in the fall of 1854 
removed to Muscatine, Iowa. In Hardin 
county, that state, he purchased a farm 
whereon he resided until the fall of 1870, 
when he sold that property and came to 
Hancock county, Illinois. Here he in- 
vested in a tract of land in Durham 
township, whereon he resided for about 
twenty-one years, when in 1891 he sold 
out and went to Nebraska, making his 
home in the latter state until 1899. In 



that year he went on a visit to the east 
and died there on the 4th of December 
of that year. He had for a number of 
years survived his wife, who passed 
away June 25, 1886. In their family 
were four children : James L. ; William 
F.; Henry S., of this county; and Laura 
M., the wife of Clark H. Rice, of Han- 
cock county. 

William F. Bradfield pursued his early 
education in the district schools and aft- 
erward attended Abingdon College in 
Abingdon, Illinois. During the period 
of his boyhood and youth he made his 
home with his parents, who removed to 
Hancock county in September, 1870. He 
continued under the parental roof until 
he had attained his majority, when he 
went to Colorado, where he worked at 
the carpenter's trade for a year. He aft- 
erward returned to Hancock county and 
began farming on rented land. He was 
thus engaged for a few years, when with 
the capital he had acquired through his 
industry and perseverance he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Durham township, which he owned for 
four years, at the end of which time he 
sold that property and bought three hun- 
dred acres of the old homestead. There 
he took up his abode, making it his place 
of residence until February, 1904. He 
has since bought and sold property and 
now owns two 'hundred and forty acres 
of land all on section 12, Durham town- 
ship. While giving his attention to farm 
work his close application and unabating 
energy enabled him to gather rich crops 
annually and to make his farm a profit- 
able source of labor. He was also one of 
the organizers of the State Bank at La 



330 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Harpe and has been one of its stockhold- 
ers and directors. He has also been a 
stockholder and director of the firm of 
Coulson, Brundage & Company since its 
incorporation in May, 1905, and is its 
secretary and treasurer. In 1904, retir- 
ing from his farm, he removed to La 
Harpe, where he has since resided and 
where he has bought residence property. 

In February, 1885, Mr. Bradfield was 
united in marriage to Miss J. Margaret 
Schultz, who was bor"n in Durham town- 
ship and is a daughter of Benjamin and 
Elizabeth (Gillette) Schultz. By this 
marriage were born three sons, J. Sher- 
man, Charles F. and Edward L. The 
wife and mother died October 10, 1898, 
and on the 3Oth of January, 1900, Mr. 
Bradfield wedded Catherine J. McManus, 
who was born near Carthage, Illinois. 
They had one child, Catherine M., who 
was born October 6, 1901, and died Au- 
gust 28, 1903. The mother passed away 
October 14, 1901, and on the :8th of 
June, 1905, Mr. Bradfield was again 
married, Clara W. Burr becoming his 
wife. She was born in Durham town- 
ship and is a daughter of Jarvis N. and 
Joanna (Oilman) Burr. 

Mr. Bradfield is a republican in his po- 
litical views and has taken much interest 
in the questions of the day and in the 
growth and development of his party. He 
has frequently been a delegate to the con- 
ventions of his party but is without po- 
litical aspiration for himself. It is true 
that his chief life work has been that 
of a successful farmer, but the range of 
his activities and the scope of his influ- 
ence have reached far beyond this spe- 
cial field. He belongs to that class of 



men who wield a power which is all the 
more potent from the fact that it is 
moral rather than political and is exer- 
cised for the public weal rather than for 
personal ends. He has displayed aptitude 
and ability in achieving results both in 
business life and in his connection with 
affairs of public importance. 



MATHEW GODDERTZ. 

Mathew Goddertz, conducting the old- 
est harness establishment in Warsaw, was 
born in Sichlar, Prussia, Germany, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1840, and was educated in the 
public schools of that country. His par- 
ents, Edward E. and Anna C. (Quartz) 
Goddertz, left Germany in 1850 upon a 
sailing Vessel, which was twenty-eight 
days in reaching the harbor of New York. 
They proceeded to Buffalo by rail and by 
way of the lakes to Chicago, thence by 
canal to Peru, Indiana, and over the Ohio 
and Mississippi rivers to Warsaw. The 
father died soon after his arrival here. 
His mother died in September, 1879, at 
the age of sixty-four years. In the fam- 
ily were three children: Mathew; Mrs. 
William Leyhe, of Alton, Illinois, now 
deceased ; and Catherine, the widow of 
Henry Hertzog. 

At his father's death, Mr. Goddertz, 
then only ten years of age, began to earn 
his own living by working on the farm of 
A. J. Steffee, by whom he was employed 
two years. His mother then married 
John Leyhe and Mathew returned home, 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



living with his mother for about two 
years. Subsequently he was employed 
at general farm labor until about thir- 
teen years of age, when he was appren- 
ticed to learn the trade of making har- 
ness and saddlery with the firm of Weir 
& Elliott. He continued with that firm 
for about sixteen months, when the part- 
nership was dissolved and he went with 
.Mr. Elliott, under whom he completed 
his trade and for whom he worked for 
eleven years, when he bought the busi- 
ness of his employer. He is continuing 
in the same line today and is now pro- 
prietor of the oldest established harness 
business in the county. With the excep- 
tion of three years it has continuously 
been conducted in the same building, hav- 
ing been located here for fifty-two years. 
Mr. Goddertz carries a large line of har- 
ness and saddlery and makes goods of 
that, class of the best grades. He finds 
a ready sale for his product and has long 
conducted a profitable business. 

On the 1 8th of March, 1860, Mr. God- 
dertz married Rachel Beck, a daughter 
of John and Elizabeth (Steiger) Beck. 
They became parents of three children : 
Catherine, who was the wife of James 
Cox, of Ottumwa, Iowa, died May 31, 
1906, and is buried in Oakland cemetery, 
Warsaw, Illinois ; Josephine, who became 
the wife of Harry Nealand, of Aspen, 
Colorado, and died in 1903, at the age of 
thirty-eight years; and Flora, the wife 
of F. B. Green, of Ottumwa, Iowa. Mrs. 
Goddertz passed away September 24, 
1 88 1. and on the nth of December, 
1889, Mr. Goddertz wedded Ella Peo- 
ples, a daughter of James and Mary Anna 
(Fox) Peoples. 



Mr. Goddertz is a member of the Mod- 
ern Woodmen, joining the order as a 
charter member of Warsaw camp, No. 
240. He is also connected with the Knights 
of Pythias and his wife is a member of the 
Christian church. He held the office of 
alderman for one term but has never 
sought nor desired political honors, pre- 
ferring to concentrate his energies upon 
his business interests, in which he has 
made creditable success. He may truly 
be called a self-made man and deserves 
all the praise that that term implies, for 
since the age of ten years he has been 
dependent entirely upon his own re- 
sources, and whatever success he has 
achieved has come to him as the reward 
of earnest, persistent labor and business 
integrity. 



GEORGE H. THOMPSON. 

George H. Thompson, in whose busi- 
ness life each step has been carefully and 
thoughtfully made, is now conducting a 
dry goods and grocery store in La Harpe 
and his enterprise is one of the leading 
commercial interests of the town. He 
was born in Baltimore. Maryland, Janu- 
ary 16, 1860, and largely acquired his 
education in the public schools of that 
city while spending his boyhood days in 
the home of his parents, Charles H. and 
Margaret ( Hergesheimer)' Thompson. 
His paternal grandfather, Edward 
Thompson, was also a native of Balti- 
more, Maryland, while the maternal 
grandfather, Charles Hergesheimer, was 



332 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a native of New Jersey. Charles H. 
Thompson, the father, was born in Balti- 
more in April, 1826, and is now deceased, 
while his wife, who was born in New 
Jersey in March, 1828, has also passed 
away. 

When a youth of seventeen years 
George H. Thompson of this review be- 
came a resident of Livingston county, 
Illinois, and for three years worked on 
a farm. He then rented sixty-five acres 
of land and for one year engaged in 
farming on his own account. Feeling 
the need, however, of better educational 
privileges, he then went to Chicago and 
pursued a course of study in the Metro- 
"politan Business College of that city. 
His education completed, he went to 
Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he pre- 
empted a claim of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, whereon he engaged in 
farming. After residing there for two 
years he was elected township clerk of 
New Hope township, Brown county, 
South Dakota, and held the office for 
four years. He was next elected town- 
ship assessor and acted in that capacity 
for two terms of one year each. At 
the same time he filled the position of 
road commissioner and was then nomi- 
nated as representative for the first ses- 
sion of the general assembly held in 
South Dakota. Before the election, 
however, he withdrew on account of 
private business interests and in his 
place was nominated J. W. Scattergood, 
who was elected. For a number of years 
he took an active and leading part in 
political affairs during the early epoch 
of statehood in South Dakota and was 
a man of influence in party ranks. He 



lived upon his farm there for nine years 
and in April, 1893, went to Salem, Ore- 
gon, where he remained for about four 
months, spending his time in prospecting. 
On the expiration of that period he re- 
turned to Fairbury. Livingston county, 
Illinois, where he engaged in the grocery 
and queensware business. There he re- 
mained for three years, on the expiration 
of which period he sold out and entered 
the employ of the Peoria Packing and 
Provision Company as manager of its 
branch house at Forrest, Illinois. After 
a year he came to La Harpe in February, 
1898, and bought the business of the 
Kem & Biggs Grocery Company. He. 
afterward added a stock of dry goods 
and notions and at present is the owner 
of one' of the largest business enterprises 
of the kind in La Harpe. 

On the 1 6th of February, 1884, was 
celebrated the marriage of Mr. Thomp- 
son and Miss Sarah A. Eyre, who was 
born January 24, 1859, in Sturgis, Mich- 
igan, and removed to Livingston county, 
Illinois, with her parents when about six 
years of age. Her father, George Eyre, 
was born in Lincolnshire, England, May 
25, 1824, and died April 30, 1879. His 
wife, Alice Catton, who was born in 
Lincolnshire, England, April 20, 1825, 
died July 9, 1901. Mr. Eyre came to 
America about 1853, locating in Sturgis, 
Michigan, and after about eleven years 
spent in that state removed to Fairbury, 
Illinois, where both he and his wife re- 
sided until called to their final rest. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson has been born a 
son, F. Boyd Thompson, who was born 
in Brown county, South Dakota, August 
i, 1885. He was graduated from Git- 



HANCOCK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 



333 



tings Seminary at La Harpe in 1903 and 
in September, 1904, entered Brown's 
Busine