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Full text of "Biographical review : containing life sketches of leading citizens of Schenectady, Schoharie and Green counties, New York"

974.701 ML 

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1336482 



RHYNOLD'" f-<i^TORlCAL 
GENEALOGV COLLECTION 



1833 01125 9774 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



VOLUME XXXIII 



CONTAINING LIFE SKETCHES OF LEADING CITIZENS OF 

SCHOHARIE, SCHENECTADY 
AND GREENE COUNTIES 

NEW YORK 



Who among men art thou, and thy years how many, good friend ? — Xeni )PHANES 



^\^^ 



no\ 



Sci^l^ 



BOSTON 
Biographical Review Publishing Company 



ATLANriC STATES SERIES OF BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEWS. 



The voluiriL-s issued in this series up to date are the following: 



I. 
II. 
III. 
IV. 
V. 
VI. 
VII. 



IX, 
X. 

XI. 

XII. 
XIII. 
XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 

XVII. 

XVIII. 

XIX. 



OrsEGO CouNTV, New York. 
Madison County, New York. 
Ukoome County, Nkw York. 
Columbia County, Nkw Yukk. 
C.\yu<;a County, Nkw VDrk. 
Dklaware County, New Yukk. 
Livi.n'O.ston and Wyo.ming Coumti 

Nkw Viikk. 
Clinion and E.SSKX Counties, Ni 

York. 
Hami'den CouNiY, Massachusetts. 
Franklin County, Massachuseits. 
Hampshire County, Massachusetts 
Litchfield County, Connecticut. 
York Couniy, Maine. 
Cumberland Couniy, Maine. 
Oxford and Franklin Countii 

Maine. 

CU.MBERLANI) CoUNTY, NeW JeRSEY. 

Rockingham County, New Hampshif 
Plymouth County, Ma.ssachusetts. 
C'amden and Burlington Countii 
New Jersey. 



XXIII. 

XXIV. 
XXV. 
XXVI. 
XXVII. 
XXVIII. 
XXIX. 



XXX. 
XXXI. 
XXXII. 

XXXIII. 



.Sagadahoc, Lincoln, Knox, and 
Waldo Counties, Maine. 

SlKAFFORI) AND BeLKNAI' COUNTIES, 

New Hampshire. 
Sulliyan and Merrimack Counties, 
New Ha.mpshire. 

HiLLSBORO AND CHESHIRE CoUNTlES, 

New Hampshire. 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Norfolk County, Massachusetts. 
New London County, Connecticut. 
.Middlesex County, Massachusetts. 
Essex County, Massachusetts. 
Somerset, Piscataquis, Hancock, 

Washington, and Aroostook 

Counties, Maine. 
Worcester County, Massachusetts. 
Berkshire County, Massachusetts. 
Somerset and Bedford Counties, 
Pennsylvania. 

ScHOHARIE,SCHENECTAnY AND GrEENE 

Counties, New York. 



NoTF.. — All the biographical sketches published in this volume were submitted to their respective subjects or to the sub- 
scribers, from whom the facts were primarily obtained, for their approval or correction before going to press, and a reasonable 
time was allowed in each case for the return of the typewritten copies. Most of them were returned to us within the time allotted, 
or before the work was printed, after being corrected or revised ; and these may therefore be regarded as reasonably accurate. 

A few, however, were not returned to us; and, as we have no means of knowing whether they contain errors or not, we 
cannot vouch for their accuracy. In justice to our readers, and to render this work more valuable for reference purposes, we have 
indicated all uncorrected sketches by a small asterisk (*), placed immediately after the name of the subject. They will be found 
printed on the last pages of the book. 

i;. K. i>l;b. CO. 



1 3364 82 

PREFACE. 

^^^^NE oeneration passeth away, and another generation cometh " — an ancient 
\\J writer thus summarizes the unending story of the Hfe of man on the earth. 
Multitudes who came and went long, long ago left but scanty memorials of themselves 
and of their work, and these exceedingly hard to get at, necessitating in our day on 
the part of the heir of all the ages a new profession, requiring detective ardor and 
skill — that of the archaeologist. With the advance of the art of living has kept 
pace both the study of the past and the writing of contemporary records, the present 
generation being especially mindful of its obligations in this respect to posterity. 

For one hundred and twenty-three years has the American republic kept with 
open door the best and best-attended training school in the world for the develop- 
ment of individuals, the result being an unrivalled body of intelligent, loyal, serviceable 
citizens, builders and, if need be, defenders of their country. 

The BiOGR-\PHiCAL Review, of which the present issue, devoted to Schoharie, 
Schenectady, and Greene Counties, New York, is the thirty-third in our Atlantic Series, 
has for its object to preserve the life stories, with ancestral notes, of numerous repre- 
sentatives of the American people of to-day, well known in their respective localities — 
men and women of action and of integrity, helpers in the world's work — to the end 
that future generations may keep their memory green, may emulate their virtues, 
profit by their experience, and haply, with increased advantages of learning and 
resources, better their example. 

BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY. 
October, 1899. 




AUSTIN A. VATES. 



BI06RAPHIGAL. 




■ON. AUSTIN ANDRKW 
YATES, one of the lend- 
ing attorneys of Schenectady, 
served with the rank of Cap- 
tain in the Civil War, and as 
Major of the Second Battalion, 
New York Infantry, was on 
duty with his command in va- 
rious camps during the Spanish War, but is 
better known by the title of Judge, having 
been elected to that office in 1873. 

He was born in Schenectady on March 
24, 1836, son of the Rev. John Austin and 
Henrietta Maria (Cobb) Yates. The original 
ancestor in America was Joseph Yates, an Eng- 
lishman, who emigrated in 1664 and settled 
in Albany. Christopher Yates, son of Joseph, 
and the next in this line, had a son Joseph, 
who was born in Albany, and settled in Glen- 
ville, N.Y., where he carried on a large plan- 
tation bordering upon the river, and owned a 
number of slaves. 

Christopher Yates, second, son of Joseph, 
second, and great-grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was one of the well-to-do residents 
of Schenectady in his day. While serving as 
a Lieutenant in the Provincial army, he was 
wounded at the siege of Ticonderoga in the 



Erench War. He served as a Captain under 
Sir William Johnson in the engagement at 
Eort Niagara, and received fnmi King George 
III. a land grant of nine thousand acres. His 
term of service as member of the first I'mvin- 
cial Congress expired just si.\ days prior to the 
signing of the Declaration of Independence. 
Entering the Continental army as a Colonel, 
he served as Assistant Department Quarter- 
master under General Philip Schuyler, and 
participated in the battle of Saratoga. He 
reared tive sons, each of whom performed some 
notable achiex-ement. Joseph C. Yates, the 
eldest son, was one of the founders of Union 
College and Governor of New York, 1S23-25; 
John B. served as Colonel of a cavalry regi- 
ment in the War of 181 2, was member of Con- 
gress from ]\Iadison County, and built the 
Welland Canal; Henry was a State Senator 
from Albany; Christopher was the founder of 
St. George's Lodge, F. & A. M., Schenec- 
tady; and Andrew, Judge Yates's grandfather, 
known as the Rev. Andrew Yates, D. D. , was 
one of the first professors at Union College. 

Dr. Yates was a man of superior intellectual 
endowments, and was well versed in ancient 
and modern languages, including Holland 
Dutch. His professorship at Union College 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was productive of much benefit ti) that institu- 
tion while in its infancy. His whole life was 
one of useful activity. Laboring diligently to 
increase the facilities for religious worship, he 
built thirteen churches, mo.stly missions of the 
Reformed denomination, all of which are still 
standing anil are in a flmirishini,' ccnulition. 
lie inherited cnnsiderable wealtli liom his 
falliei'> estate. l'"or his first wile he married 
.Mary Austin, who was of Kn-lish I'uritan 
stock, and was a relative of the founder of 
Austin, Tex. Of this union there were two 
sons — John Austin and Andrew 1-". His sec- 
ond wife, who was formerly a Miss llociker, of 
Hartford, Conn., became the mother of three 
children — Mary Austin, James, and Anna K. 
Andrew Yates also reared John Dominis, who 
became the consort of the Queen of the Sand- 
wich Islands. Dr. Yates died in 1844, and 
his widow survived him some ten years. 

The Rev. J..hn Austin Yates, his eldest son, 
was born within tlie jMccincts of L'liion Col- 
lege, Schenectady, in iSoi. After graduatin^^ 
from that institution he sjient scjme time in 
Europe studying the modern languages, and 
spoke French and (ierman fluently. He was 
afterward a tutor at Union College for some 
years, or until called to the jxistorate of a Re- 
formed church in Jersey City. As a ludjiit 
orator he acc(uire(l a wide reputation. The 
memorable cholera epidemic of 1S49 numbered 
him among its many victims; and his death, 
which occurred in Schenectady on August 26 
of that year, when he was but forty-eight years 
old, was sincerely lamented in other localities 
as well as the vicinity of Union College. 



In i.Sjcj he married Henrietta Maria Cobb, 
an ado])ted daughter (jf liis uncle. Colonel 
John B. Yates. He was the father of five 
children, namely: Henrietta C<ibb, who died 
in infancy; Mary Austin, who married John 
Watkins, and died in Columi)ia, S. C. , in 
1853, leaving a family, of whom John U. 
and Grace S. Watkins are now living; John 
15., second, who served as Colonel of the 
l*'irst Miciiigan Engineers under General 
Sherman during the Ci\il War, was later a 
division engineer on the ]{rie Canal, and is 
now in the government service at Grosse Point, 
Mich. ; Austin A., the subject of this sketch; 
and the late Captain Arthur Reed Yates, 
United States Nav\-. CajHain ^'ates was 
graduated from the Naval Academy, Annapo- 
lis, in 1S57, and was thus senior to Schley and 
Sampson. He was for some time a naval at- 
tache in Japan. He served upon Admiral 
Farragut's staff during the Ci\-il War, and re- 
ceived that officer's hearty commendation in 
recognition of his gallant conduct at the battle 
of Mobile Hay. He died at Portsmouth, 
\. II., No\ember 4, 1.S92, on the eve of pro- 
motion to the rank of Commodore. The 
mother died in March, 1842, aged thirty-one. 

Austin Andrew Yates's birth took place 
while his father was an instructor at Union 
College, and he was the second representative 
of the family hum within its limits. He at- 
tended the public schools until entering the 
Schenectady Lyceum for his preparatory 
course, which was completed when he was but 
thirteen years old; and in September, 1849, he 
began his classical studies at Union. Leav- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ing college in 1S50, he spent two years in 
Western Massachusetts, where he continued 
his studies under the tutorship of David M. 
Kimball, and, passing a successful examina- 
tion for the Junior class, he completed the 
course and was graduated from Union College 
in 1S54. He read law in the office of the late 
Judge Potter, and was admitted to the bar in 
1S57, when twenty-one years old. During the 
first few years of his practice he devoted a part 
of his time to newspaper work, first as editor 
of the Schenectady Daily Times and later of 
the Evening Star. 

Enlisting in Company H, One Hundred and 
Thirty-fourth Regiment, New York Volun- 
teers, during the Civil War, he was promoted 
from the rank of Lieutenant to that of Cap- 
tain. He was in the reser\-e force during the 
battle of Fredericksburg, and at Chancellors- 
ville he received such severe injury to his eyes 
as to necessitate his discharge for disability. 
Re-enlisting as Captain of Company F, 
Fourteenth Regiment, United States Veteran 
Reserve Corps, he participated in some en- 
gagements near Washington, and on the occa- 
sion of a sudden attack made by the enemy 
under General Jubal A. Early, he assisted Pres- 
ident Lincoln, who happened to be present, 
from the field. In November, 1S63, he was 
sent with three companies to suppress a riot 
among the miners in Carbon County, Pennsyl- 
vania. Among the various official duties of 
his command after the close of hostilities was 
that of the execution of Mrs. Surratt and the 
other conspirators, which is one of the most 
unpleasant recollections of his military ser- 



vice. He was brevetted ALajor in 1.S65, and 
appointed Judge Advocate under Joseiih Holt, 
Judge Advocate General, and after his dis- 
charge from the army in 1S66 he resumed his 
law practice in Schenectady. 

Politically, Judge Yates is a Republican. 
In 1867 he was unsuccessful as a candidate for 
the Assembly, owing to a factional discord in 
the party. Pie was elected District Attorney 
in 1868, re-elected in 1871, and in 1873 was 
elected Judge by a large majority. He was a 
candidate for the State Senate in 1885, but 
lacked ten votes of being elected. In 1887 he 
was successful in his candidacy for the Assem- 
bly, and was re-elected in 1888. Upon the 
expiration of his term as Judge he once more 
returned to his practice, and is now conducting 
a profitable general law business. 

On December 18, 1S65, Judge Yates was 
joined in marriage with Josephine de Vendell, 
daughter of John I. Yates. They have one 
daughter, Henrietta C. 

In September, 1S80, Judge Yates was com- 
missioned Captain of the Thirty-sixth Separate 
Company, National Guard, State of New York, 
and later he was commander of the Fifteenth 
Battalion. In May, 189S, as Major of the 
Second Battalion, New York Infantry, he led 
his command to the field in the Spanish War, 
and served in camps on this side of the water 
at Hempstead, Lytic, Chickamauga, Tampa, 
P^ernandina, and Camp Harden. He retired 
in October, ha\-ing served through all the 
camps and service which have been the cause 
of such caustic criticism; and, though his regi- 
ment lost thirtv-one by death, he brought 



lUOCRArmCAL REVIF.W 



home every one of his four hunclrecl and thirty- 
six men alive. 

Judge Yates was president of the National 
Guard's Association in i8go, and for a number 
of years Commander of the local post of the 
Grand Army of the Re|nd)lic. He is ;i .M;i>ter 
Mason, as were many of his aiicestnrs. iiuliul- 
ing his father, grandlather, ami ureal-. grand- 
father. 



NDKKW J. GUFFIN, M.D.. a sue 
cessful physician of Carlisle, was born 
in Greenbush, Rens.selaer County, 
N.\'., June 6, 1846, son of John and Hannah 
(Uing.s) Guffin. The Guffin family is of 
Scotch-Irish antecedents, and was founded in 
America by the Doctor's ,L,'randfatlicr, .Aiuliew 
Guffin, who was born in Xewiy, Coui)t\- Down, 
Ireland, in 1756. 

Andrew Guffin cmi;;rated to America when 
a young man, settlin;,^ first in Dutchess 
County, New York. Later he moved to .Sclio- 
dack, near Nassau, Rensselaer Count), where 
he resided until his death, which occurred in 
1842. He was extensively eni^aged in farm- 
ing. In politics he was a Whig, and his 
religious affiliations were witli the Dutch Re- 
formed church. In i/Si he nianied Haiinaii 
Ustrom, who was b<irn in Dutchess Count)-, 
New York, of German ancestry. .Slie died in 
1835, '" the age of seventy-three. They were 
the jiarents of fourteen children; nainel)-, I^Jiz- 
aheth, Rebecca, Andrew G., .Sarali, James, 
John. Thomas, George, Mar)-, Josiah, Henr\-, 
Hannah, FTijah, and Jonas. Elijah became a 



teacher in an asylum for deaf-mutes. All the 
other sons were farmers. 

John Guffin, the Doctor's father, followed 
agriculture in .Mban)- and Rensselaer Counties 
successively until the last fifteen years of his 
life, which he spent in retirement as a resident 
of the city of Albany. He was \-ery success- 
ful financial])-, owning a number of farms and 
other real estate. In politics he was a Repub- 
lican and in his religious belief I'resbyterian. 
He died in 1S79, aged eighty years. His 
wife lived to the age of about eighty-two. 
.Slie w-as the mother (jf four children, namely: 
Emma, who is no longer living; Andrew J., 
the subject of this sketch; Charles \V. . a clerk 
in the American Mxpiess Office in New York 
City; and Jolin C. , who was formerl)- secretary 
of the American Sewing Machine Com])any of 
New York. 

Andrew J. Guffin, having completed his gen- 
eral education at the Albany Classical Insti- 
tute, enlisted for service in the Civil War; and 
subsequent to his discharge he began the study 
of medicine under the direction of Dr. J. R. 
Houlware, a leading physician of Alban\-. He 
then took the regular course at the .Albany Med- 
ical College, where he was graduated in 1868. 
After a year's experience as [jhysician at the 
alnishouse, he settled for ])ractice in Nassau, 
N.A'. , w-hcnce he went to Canaai-i Four Cor- 
ners, and still later to New Canaan, Conn., 
from which place he ren-|oved to Clifton Park, 
.Saratoga Count)-, N. A'. In 1897 he came 
to Carlisle, where he has already built up a 
good practice. 

Dr. Guffin is a member of the Schoharie 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



County Medical Society. Politically, he is a 
Republican, and is now serving; as Health 
Officer. A member of the Piesbyterian 
church, he was formerly president of the local 
branch of Christian Endeavor Society, and is 
now its treasurer. 

Dr. Guffin married October 21, iS6g, \'ira 
Phillips, of Nassau, Rensselaer County, 
N. Y. , daughter of John and Mary Phillips. 
Of this union was born one child, a son, John 
C. ;\Irs. Guffin departed this life in 1S90. 
John C. Guffin was graduated from the Cobles- 
kill High School, and is now book-keeper at 
William V. Downer's Life Insurance Aoencv. 



lEXWICK DIBBELL, general mer- 
chant, Tannersville, Greene County, 
was born at Piatt Clove, in this 
town, July 5, 1 86 1. His parents were Har- 
mon B. and Deborah M. (Hummell) Dibbell, 
his father a native of Colchester, Delaware 
County, and his mother a native of Piatt Clove, 
His grandfather, Amos Dibbell, who was a 
native of Holland, settled in Delaware County, 
New York, as a pioneer, and resided there 
until 1834, when he went to Piatt Clove. He 
was a millwright by trade, following that occu- 
pation a number of years, and his death oc- 
curred at the age of eighty-four. His wife, 
formerly Charlotte Williams, of Colchester, 
died at eighty-nine \ears of age. The\' had 
a family of ten children. 

Harmon B. Dibbell learned the trade of 
a millwright, which he followed at Piatt 
Clove for a time, later movins; to Kingston, 



where he engaged in manufacturing. After- 
ward he went to P^lka Park, erecting there a 
mill, which he conducted for the rest of his life. 
In 1863 he raised Company E of the P'ifteenth 
Regiment, New York Yolunteers, engineer 
corps, and this compan)- he commanded until 
mustered out at the close of the war. He was 
a Democrat in politics, acted as a Justice of 
the Peace for some time, and was a prominent 
man in the community. He died at the age of 
se\ent\--one. His wife, Deborah, was a daugh- 
ter of Jeremiah Hummell. Her father was a 
farmer and an early settler of Piatt Clove, 
where he resided until his death, which oc- 
curred when he was ninetv years old. Har- 
mon B. and Deborah M. Dibbell were the 
parents of six children, three of whom are liv- 
ing — Egbert, Renwick, and George W. Dib- 
bell. Egbert is now residing in South Dakota. 
The mother still survives, and resides with her 
son in Tannersville. 

Renwick Dibbell came to ElkaPark with his 
parents when six years of age. He attended 
the common schools, and assisted his father in 
the lumber business until his father's death. 
Forming a partnership with a 'Sir. Goslen, he 
entered the contracting and building business 
at Elka Park, erecting a number of cottages 
there, also the Poggenberg Hotel, the Scho- 
harie Mansion, and the Catherine Tower. 
This structure is built of stone and is fifty feet 
high. It is fourteen feet at the base, and has 
stone steps on the inside leading to the top. 
In 1 888 Mr. Dibbell took up the profession of 
a civil engineer, and did considerable survey- 
ing in different park.s, also la}-ing out roads 



1!RK;RA1'III( Al, 



and running farm lines. In 1895 the firm 
purchased the store of C. V. Gray, one of the 
largest mercantile establishments in town, in 
which they carried a full stock of groceries, 
boots, shoes, notions, and other merchandise. 
This store was conducted in connection with 
their contracting business until Octolier 14, 
1898, when the partnership was dissolved. 
Since that time Mr. Dibbell has carried it on 
alone. Mr. Dibbell has resided here since his 
early boyhood, and takes an active interest in 
local public affairs. Thr()u.i;h his efforts a 
post-office was establisiiet! at Klka I'ark, and 
he has been Postmaster there for the ])ast five 
years. He also succeeded in causinj;- the ex- 
tension of the telegraph and telephone lines to 
Elka Park and Schoharie Mansion, he being 
the owner of the telephniie line. He has 
control of the switch office for tiie Catskill 
Mountain Telephone Company, and is local 
agent of the Western Union Telet^raph Com- 
l)any. Having a long distance telei)li()ne, they 
can converse with New ^'ork, Boston, and 
other cities. At tlie ]iresent time lie devotes 
his entire attention to his mercantile enter- 
prise, the telegrai^h and telephone agencies, 
employing five assistants. 

On October 17, i.SS;,, Mr. Dibbell was 
joined in marriage with Miss Alice Bishop, of 
Hunter, daughter of Asa and Ann (Hrown) 
Bishop. Her father s])ent ni<ist of his life as a 
farmer in Ulster County. He died in West 
-Saugerties. Mr. and Mrs. Dibbell have four 
children- I'lavius, hlstella, Agnes, and Kl- 



has served on town, county, and State commit- 
tees, has been a delegate to a number of 
county and State conventions, and was Ta.\ 
Collector two terms. He is a mendjcr of the 
Knights of I'ytliias, in which he has held a 
number of the offices, and belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd hV-llnws. He and Mrs. 
Dibbell are members of the Methodist Kpisco- 
[lal clnncli. 



nura. 
Mr 



a Democrat in p(J]ilic^ 



Ih 



fHOMAS R. 1'0TT1-:R, a prosperous 
farmer of (ilenville, Schenectady 
County, N. Y. , was born in this town, Decem- 
ber 2, 1837, .son of Johnson and Su.san M. 
(Romeyn) Potter. His ]»rents were born in 
Saratoga County, the father in Galway, June 
25, 1S03, and the mother in Clifton Park, 
Julv I, 1807. The paternal grandfather was 
Simeon Potter, who came to Glenvillc about 
the year 1809, and settled upon a farm in the 
north-west part of the township, where he re- 
sided for the rest of his life. His funeral 
was the first one held in the Glenville Re- 
formed church. The maiden name of his wife 
was Phcebe A. Beach. 

Johnson Potter, the father, came with his 
]wrents to Glenville when si.v years old, and 
was reared to agricultural jnirsuits. He became 
one of the stirring men of his day, and owned 
a farm of one hundred and forty- eight acres, 
which is now occuiiied by his son, Spencer S. 
Potter. He served as a Trustee of the town 
and as Commissioner of Highwa_\-s. In poli- 
tic- he sup])nrted the Democratic part)-. John- 
son and Susan M. Potter were the jxirents of 




c;. X. FKISDIE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



seven children, all of whom grew to maturity, 
and tour are living, namely: Jedediah D., a 
resident of Chicago; Thomas R., the subject 
of this sketch; Spencer S., who resides at the 
homestead, as above mentioned; and J. Antoi- 
nette, wife of William H. Hollinbcck, of 
Hoffman's Ferry. The others were: Phcebe 
Ann, Harriet X., and Fannie E. The father 
died July 5, iSgi, surviving the mother, who 
died January 20, 1SS5. 

Thomas R. Potter acquired a district-school 
education. Like his ancestors he has followed 
agriculture with success, for many years culti- 
vating a farm of one hundred and twenty-six 
acres. 

Mr. Potter contracted the first of his two 
marriages January 6, 1S61, with Jane Ann \'an 
Wormer, who died June 9, 1893, leaving two 
children — Frank and Eliza J. Frank, who is 
in the insurance business, married Nellie F. 
Bennett, of Lansingburg, Rensselaer County, 
and has four children — Lelia B., Jennie E., 
Thomas R., and Henry B. Eliza J. is the 
wife (if Elmer W. Keklerhouse, of Hoffmans, 
and has one daughter, Hazel L. On January 
26, 189S, Mr. Potter married for his second 
wife 'Sirs. Effie C. \'an Wormer, daughter of 
Abram S. and Bernetta M. (Dunham) Lode- 
wick and widow of Oscar \'an Wormer. Her 
father was a native of Schodack, Rensselaer 
County, and her mother of Lexington, N.Y. 
Mrs. Potter had four children by her first 
marriage, namely: Nancy B. , Bessie R. , and 
Blanche L. \'an "Wormer, who are living; and 
Jennie Inez, deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Potter is a Democrat, and 



served with ability as Supervisor five years. 
He belongs to Touareuna Lodge, No. 35, 
L 0. O. F., and he and >L's. Potter are mem- 
bers of Gold Medal Lodge, No. 554, Patrons 
of Industr\'. 



/^[JTrANDISON N. FRISBHi, of Mid- 
V^X tlleburg, N.Y., president of the 
Middleburg & Schoharie Railroad and an ex- 
tensive dealer in real estate, is a native of 
Roxbury, Delaware County, this State, born 
on May 24, 1S31, son of William and Marilla 
(Norton) Frisbie. He received a common- 
school education, and at seventeen years of 
age was apprenticed to learn the harness- 
maker's trade of his brother at Fultonham. 
Three years later he became equal partner. 
Subsequently he bought out the business and 
conducted it alone for some time. In 1854 he 
began the manufacture of harnesses in Middle- 
burg. and, being the only person engaged 
here in that line of industry, met with great 
success, and did a most profitable business. 
In 1S67 he purchased a half-interest in the 
general store of Charles I-larles; and some 
years later he bought a half-interest in the 
firm of W. G. Lounsbury & Co., in the hard- 
ware trade. Subsequently his two sons, 
Daniel D. and George D., were taken into 
partnership; and in time the entire manage- 
ment of the business passed into their hands, 
.Mr. Frisbie himself giving his attention to 
real estate and insurance, which have since 
been his principal lines of activity. He has 
managed large real estate transactions, and has 



IJIOCRAI'IIICAL KEVIKW 



built a number of fine houses. His present 
residence, which is one of the finest in town, 
is one which he has remodelletl. 

Since March 25, 1878, Mr. Frisbie has been 
president and ^enerai manager of the Middle- 
burg & Schoharie Railroad, much of whose 
success is due to him. This road, which was 
constructed under the authority of a lei^^islative 
enactment of May 8, 1867, is six miles in 
length, and connects Middlcburg ;iiul Scho- 
harie villages. The road and trains are con- 
tinued five miles farther north to a junction 
with the Delaware & Hudson, but the Scho- 
harie valley road has greatly handicapped the 
Middleburg Company, since the latter de- 
pends upon the northern .stretch as an outlet. 
At one time it would have been possible to 
purchase the Schoharie road, antl Mr. I^'risbic 
strenuously urged that this mi,<;ht be done, 
offering to make a subscription of b\e thousand 
dollars for the purpose. Since then it has 
been impossible to buy it. It may be inter- 
esting to review here in brief the history of 
the inception and growth ol the Middleburg 
branch. When the Delaware & Hudson bad 
been built as far as Oneonla, and the ]ieo|)le of 
Sch(jharie had determined to connect with it 
there, a few prominent men of this town met 
at a hotel, and, after carefull}- considering the 
matter, decided that they would also make a 
junction at Schoharie by raising one hundred 
thousand dollars, half of which wouUl be sub- 
scribed by the town and the other half by pri- 
vate individuals. As a matter (jf fact, the 
total capitalization, full)- ])aid in, was but 
ninety-twcj thousand dollars. The town was 



bonded but comparatively little to raise the 
full amount of its subscri])tion. The bonds ol 
the company, which w'cre placed at par (seven 
percent, interest), were retired in 1S93, prin- 
cipal and interest, by James Borst, railroad 
commissioner. The individual subscribers to 
the stock numbered about seventy-five, and in- 
cluded many small holders in and about Mid- 
dleburg, about seventeen thousand dollars 
being in Albany b(ddings and the Ijalance in 
New York. No indebtedness was incurred 
in the construction and equipment of the road, 
as one of the first resolutions passed by the di- 
rectors bad been that work was to stop as soon 
as funds were wanting. The road is now in 
paying condition, and shows clearly that it has 
been most efficiently managed. Mr. Frisbie 
is one of the first and largest local subscribers 
to the stock of the First National Bank, and 
from the time of its organization has been its 
vice-president. 

In 185S Mr. P'risbie was imited in marriage 
with Kate Dodge, daughter of Daniel D. 
Dodge, late of this town. Mr. Dodge was a 
prominent merchant and for one year member 
of the State Assembly. Mrs. Frisbie departed 
this life in June, i.SqS. She was the mother 
of four children, namely: Daniel D. and 
George 1)., the .sons above mentioned; and 
two daughters, Laura and Fmma. Laura is 
now the wife of Dow Beekman, whose biog- 
raphy may be found on another jiagc of the 
Rkview. All these chiklren are graduates of 
Hartwick .Seminary in Otsego Coinit)-, an in- 
stitution of which Mr. Frisbie has for many 
years been treasurer and trustee. Mr. Frisbie 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ami his family are members of the Lutheran 
church, and Mr. Frisbie is an Elder in the 
church. He was for several )'cars superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school. 



"ENRY T. BOTSFORD, a leading 
farmer of Greenville, Greene County, 
N.Y. , was born in this town on De- 
cember 1 8, 1845, son of Dr. Gideon and Maria 
L. (Tallmadge) Botsford. Dr. Botsford's 
grandfather, Gideon Botsford, Sr. , resided in 
Newtown, Conn. He was possessed of liberal 
means, had large influence in his community, 
and represented his town in the councils of his 
State. Amos, one of his thirteen children 
and the grandfather of Henry T. Botsford, 
was born in Newtown on February 13, 1780. 

Having obtained an academic education, 
Amos Botsford entered upon the study of 
medicine at the age of eighteen years, received 
his diploma at twenty-one years, and im- 
mediately afterward came to the new town of 
Greenville and settled for the practice of his 
profession. Dr. Amos Botsford was married 
on September 20, iSoi, to P^lizabeth Clark, 
daughter of Joseph Clark, of Connecticut; and 
his house-keeping began in what has since been 
known as the Ell. Knowles place. A few 
years after he purchased a lot and built the 
house in which Pierce Stevens now resides. 
Later he purchased of Jonathan Sherrill the 
lot and dwelling now occujMed by his son-in- 
law, Dr. B. S. McCabe, and there resided 
until his death. 

" For many years Dr. Amos Botsford was 



the only physician of standing or professional 
ability in this section of the country, conse- 
quently his services were much sought and his 
labors were arduous. His custom when visit- 
ing his patients was to ride on horseback. 
Few men possessed a finer physique than the 
Doctor. Of dignified ajipearance, he com- 
manded the respect of all, even at first sight. 
He was a faithful, intelligent, and successful 
practitioner for over fifty years. He repre- 
sented his town in the Board of Supervisors in 
the years 1826, 1827, 1831, 1834, and 1849. 
He was one of the incorporators of Greenville 
Academy. He was a faithful member of the 
Presbyterian church in Greenville, and for 
man}- years an acting Elder in it. He died 
on August 16, 1S64. His wife died Decem- 
ber 3, 1855. 

" There were born to them two sons and two 
daughters. Eliza, the eldest, born June 5, 
1807, was married to Charles Callender, and 
died April 4, 1871, leaving three children — 
John, Charles, and David. Of these John is 
engaged in the manufacture of brick in Boston. 
Charles (deceased) was a manufacturer of paint 
in Newark, N.J. David is now deceased. 
Clark Botsford, the second child of Dr. Amos, 
was born September 15, 1808. He was grad- 
uated from Union College at the age of nine- 
teen. He then studied law, and subsequently 
practised his profession in the western part of 
the State. Mary L., the youngest child, mar- 
ried Dr. B. S. McCabe, and has continued to 
reside in the house where she was born and in 
which her parents died." 

Gideon Botsford, third child of Dr. Amos, 



Iil()(;RAl'IllC.\L KKVIKW 



and father of Henry T. Hotsfnrd, was born on 
June 5, 1811. He obtained a good education 
at Greenville Academy, and sulisequently, in 
1832, was graduated from the Fairfield Medical 
College. He began the practice of medicine 
with his father, and for fifty years continued to 
devote his entire energies to the work of tlic 
profession he so much loved. Like his father 
he was a man of commanding appearance and 
agreeable addres.s, and like him he wmi and 
enjoyed the respect and cunfulcncc of the im- 
munity. Mver active, and lia\ ing in view tlie 
improvement of his nati\e village, lie ne\er 
lost an opportunity to jiromote the ])u])lic wel- 
fare. Me was for man)- years an ICKler of the 
Presbyterian church, of which from early life he 
wasa faithful member. He served as a promi- 
nent member of the Hoard of Trustees of Green- 
ville Academy. Tiie Doctor's wife, Maria 
L. , was the daughter of Dr. Henry 'I'allmadge, 
and a si.ster of Mrs. John ("x. Ilart. (.See 
sketch of John G. Hart.) Of the four chil- 
dren born to her, two are living — Henry T. 
and .Anna M. Dr. Hotsford was a Democrat 
in polities, and served the town as Supervisor 
for two terms. 

Henry T. Hotsford resided with his father 
ui) to the time of the hitter's death. In i.SjS 
he purchased of Robert Hawley a farm that he 
owned for eleven years, and in 1 S90 he bought 
the farm which is now his home. His house, 
which is the hnest in the village, was begun 
in 1.S91 and cmipleted in 1X92. Mr. ]5otsf<,r(l 
is one of the largest land-owners in the t<iwn. 
He now carries on the homestead larm of 
twenty acres ..pposite his own, the (.ideon 



Hickock farm of one lumdreil acres, and the 
George Conklin farm of two bundled and 
twenty acres. He is a man of wide leading, 
and especially well informed on tojjics of pub- 
lic interest. 

Mr. l?otsford married in iSSj Mary, daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Ivmily I'lobbins, and a 
native of (ireenville. Her father was a car- 
penter by trade, and he also carried on a farm. 
He died at the age of seventy-one, having 
been twice married. His wife, Kmily, who 
was born in (ireenville, died in i8gi. Of her 
two children Mrs. 15otsford is the only one 
living. Mr. and Mrs. ]?otsford have one 
child, Frances Helena by name. In politics 
Mr. Hotsford is a Democrat. He has dealt to 
quite an extent in real estate. He and his 
wife are members of the Presbyterian church, 
and he has been one of its trustees lor many 
years. 



\RMON BECKKR, whose death oc- 
curred January iS, 1S97, at the hame- 
.tead in Coblcskill, N. V. , now 
occupied by Mrs. Becker and her daughters, 
was during his long life an esteemed citizen of 
this town aiul one of its successful farmers. 
He was born June 19, 1.^13, at Duanesburg, 
Schenectady County, and was a .son of Nicho- 
las liecker. He came from patriotic stock, 
both his jiaternal grandfather. Captain John 
Becker, and his maternal grandfather, John 
h'erguson, having fought as brave soldiers in 
the Revolutimiary War, the former command- 
ing a company of minute-men. 

Nicholas Becker lived in Duanesburg some 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years after his marriage to Jean Ferguson of 
Edinburgh, Scotland; but in 1S23 he came 
with his family to Cobleskill, and, taking up 
a tract of forest-covered land, began the 
laborious task of clearing a farm and establish- 
ing a home. 

Harmon Becker was a lad of ten years when 
he came here with his parents. He assisted in 
the pioneer labor of reclaiming a farm from the 
forest, and, having subsequently succeeded to 
its ownership, was here industriously and pros- 
perously engaged in general farming and saw- 
milling to the close of his life of eighty-three 
years. He was a stanch Democrat in his po- 
litical affiliations for the greater part of his 
life, and served as Supervisor two terms and as 
School Inspector a number of years. In his 
last years he voted with the Prohibition party, 
believing strongly in the equal suffrage plank 
t)f its platform. A valued member of the Lu- 
theran church, he held nearly all the offices 
connected with that organization, and for 
thirty-six consecutive years was superintendent 
of its Sunday-school. 

On January 17, 1849, Mr. Becker married 
Miss Julia A. Myer, who was born in Barner- 
ville, N. Y. Her father, Stephen Myer, was 
of Dutch extraction. The emigrant ancestor of 
the Myer family came to America from Hol- 
land in old Colonal times, and was one of the 
original settlers of Ulster Count)', in this 
State. Mrs. Becker's paternal grandfather, 
Peter L. Myer, was born and brought up in 
Saugerties, Ulster County. Removing thence 
to Schoharie County, he devoted his energies to 
tilling the soil. His death occurred at the 



venerable age of ninety-one years. He, too, 
served with honor in the Revolutionary War. 
Stephen Myer continued during his life in 
the occupation to which he was trained, and in 
addition to general farming carried on a sub- 
stantial business as a miller, owning and op- 
erating both a saw-mill and a grist-mill. He 
lived to be eight)'-one years of age. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Elizabeth Mowers, 
was born in Ulster County, a daughter of Jacob 
Mowers. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Myer had 
four children, two of whom are still living, 
namely: Mrs. Jkcker; and her si.ster, Sally 
C. , who is the wife of Charles Ryder. Mrs. 
M}'er died at the age of eighty-one years. 
Both she and her husband were active mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church, in which he filled 
all the offices. He was also prominent in 
local affairs, and for a number of years served 
as Highway Commissioner. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Becker — Elizabeth Jean and Mary Isadore. 
Mrs. Becker and her daughters live on the' 
home farm, which they have managed with 
success since Mr. Becker's death. They carry 
on general farming, using judgment in all mat- 
ters pertaining to the care of their one hundred 
and seventy-five acres. A part of the land is 
devoted to grazing, and a part to the raising of 
wheat, corn, and hay. They also continue 
the saw-mill business. Mrs. Becker and the 
Misses Becker are faithful members of the 
Lutheran church, and also of the Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union. 

The history of the Harmon Becker home- 
stead is unique in that for fifty-six years no 



[IICAL RI'.VIKW 



death occurrod on the place, either of its 
nwners nr f:imily, or of the men i>r maids 
emi)loye(i by them durin.i; that time. The 
carefully-kept records show that more than 
ninety souls lived, either permanently or tem- 
jHirarily, on tlie farm during those years. 



'TICrilKN A. CURTIS, an account- 
iiit in tiie Schenectady frei^dit office 
if the Delaware & Hudson Canal 
Company Railway, was born on January 8, 
1850, in Hlenheim, Schoharie County, N.Y. 
That town was the native place oi his parents, 
Stephen i.. and l-Lliza (Maham) Curtis. His 
grandfather, Benjamin P. Curtis, who did gar- 
rison duty at Sackett's Harbor, N.Y., during 
the War of 1S12, went to Blenheim from 
Duanesburg, .Schenectady County, N.Y. Jo- 
seph Curtis, the father of Iknjamin 1'., came 
from Litchfield, Conn., to New York State 
soon after the close of the Revolutionary War, 
and, clearing a farm in the wilderness, suc- 
ceeded through his energy and ]ierseverancc in 
establishing a comfortable home. Of the chil- 
dren of Stephen L. and Eliza Curtis there are 
but two survi\(jrs : Stephen A., the subject of 
this sketch; and Stanlc)- ])., who is now sta- 
tion agent for the Delaware & Hudson River 
Railway at IMattsburg, N.Y. He married 
Harriet Cardner, and has three sons, namely : 
Stanley, born in iS,S6; Charles, born in 1889; 
and (Jeorge T., born in 1892. 

Stephen A. Curtis acquired his preliminary 
education intbe public schools of Hlenheim and 
Jeffer.son, and completi'd his studies at the semi- 



nary in Stamford, N. V., where he was fitted for 
educat ional work. For a number of years he was 
a successful teacher in Schoharie and ]5roome 
Counties. Coming to Schenectady in i88i,he 
entered the freight office of the Delaware & 
Hudson Canal Company Railwa)' as book- 
keeper, and here after eighteen years of faith- 
ful service he remains at this da)-, a valuable 
meniber of their clerical force. 

Mr. Curtis married Klla M. Danforth, 
daughter of Elijah Danforth, of Jefferson, N.Y. 
They have one daughter, Adeline. She is the 
wife of Ira Brownell, of Schenectady, and has 
one child, Eleanor, born in 1897. 

Mr. Curtis has been cpiite actix'c in public 
affairs, having served as E.xcise Commissioner 
and upon the board of United States Supervi- 
sors. Politically, he acts with the Democratic 
])arty. He is Past Dictatorof Lodge No. 3715, 
Knights of Honor; is a charter member and 
by dispensation First Prophet of Saugh-Naugh- 
ta-da Tribe, No. 123, Improved Order of Red 
Men. He attends the Congregational church, 
and is now serving as a trustee. 



ON. SIMON J. SCHERMERHORN, 
an ex-member of Congress, one of 
the most [jrominent men of Rotter- 
dam, N.Y. , was born in this town, September 
26, 1827, son of Jacob I. and Maria (\'eddcr) 
.Schcrmerhorn. His father was born in Rot- 
terdam in 1789, and his mother was born here 
in 1788. Mr. Schernierhorn is a descendant 
in the eighth geneiation of Jacob Janse Schcr- 
merhorn, who arrived from Holland about the 




J(_)Sl::rH MALCOLM. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



25 



year 1650, and founded the family which since 
that date has been prominently identified with 
Rottertlam and vicinity. The majority of its 
representatives have been extensive farmers. 
Jacob I. Schermerhorn, the father above named, 
was a leading spirit in local public affairs, and 
served with ability as Supervisor. 

Simon J. Schermerhorn accpiired the usual 
district-school education provided for the chil- 
dren of his day, and he certainly made good 
use of his meagre opportunities. Reared a 
farmer, like most of his neighbors, he has fol- 
lowed farming with unusual success, and he 
still has large agricultural intere.sts. He has 
also dealt extensively in broom corn, and for 
thirty )'ears he was engaged in the manufacture 
of brooms. He has business interests in other 
directions, and is vice-president of the Mohawk 
National Bank of Schenectady. 

On February 4, 1857, Mr. Schermerhorn was 
joined in marriage with Helen Veeder, who 
was born in Woestina, March 29, 1837, daugh- 
ter of Harman and Eleanor (Truax) Veeder. 
Her father was born in Rotterdam, and her 
mother was a native of Schenectady. Mr. and 
Mrs. Schermerhorn have five children living; 
namely, Mary V., Sarah, Alice A., Andrew T., 
and Simon. 

Mr. Schermerhorn 's public record, which is 
familiar to the readers of the Review, deserves 
more space than can consistently be allotted 
to a brief sketch. His efforts in behalf of 
improvements during his several terms as Super- 
visor, as well as the advance made in educa- 
tional facilities while he was Commissioner of 
that department for this county, fully merited 



the hearty commendation which they received. 
He ably represented this district in the As.sem- 
bly during the session of 1S62, was a I'residen- 
tial Elector on the Cleveland ticket in 1888, 
and as a member of the Fifty-third Congress 
he supported such measures as were in his es- 
timation calculated to bestow the most benefit 
on the nation as a whole. Mr. and Mrs. Scher- 
merhorn are members of the Dutch Reformed 
church. 



fOSEPH MALCOLM, of Catskill, N.Y., 
head of the firm of Malcolm & Co., and 
one of the oldest woollen manufacturers 
in the State, was born in Middlebury, Vt. , on 
August 24, 1838, son of Joseph and Harriet 
(Hrundage) Malcolm. His paternal grand- 
father, James Malcolm, was a silk weaver, 
who lived and died in Paisley, Scotland. 

Joseph Malcolm was born in Scotland, and 
lived there until sixteen years of age, when he 
came to America and found employment as a 
mill operative in Middlebury, \'t. , where in 
time he worked his way to the superintendency 
of a large mill. Later he had a mill of his 
own in Matteawan, N.Y. , and subsequently 
one in Pittsfiekl, Mass. He retired from busi- 
ness in Pittsfiekl, and died there at fifty-two 
years of age. In religious faith he and his 
wife were Presbyterians. Mrs. Harriet B. 
Malcolm was born in Cornwall, Orange 
County, this State. She died at the age of 
seventy, ha\-ing been the mother of eight chil- 
dren. Of these, two died in infancy. Will- 
iam and Abraham are now deceased, and 
James, Joseph, Samuel, and George are living. 



IJIOORArmCAL REVIEW 



Samuel Malcolm resides in New York City, 
and James and George are in Pittsfield. 

Joseph Malcolm began his working life at 
twelve years of age, going into a woollen-mill 
at I'ittsfield, Mass., as a wool sorter. He had 
worked his way ii]} t<i being in charge of the 
card and spinning room, when he enlisted, in 
1.S57, in Company D of the Highth United 
States Infantry, which during his connection 
with it was on duty at Castle Williams and at 
Fort Columbus, New York Harbor. Dis- 
charged in 1859, Mr. Malcolm returned to his 
position in the I'ittsfield mill, and he subse- 
quently remained there until some time after 
the breaking out of the Civil War. For one 
hundred days in the early jiart of the .struggle 
for the Union, he was in the Allen (iuard, sta- 
tioned at Worcester and in Boston. On Sep- 
tember 18, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, 
Forty-ninth Regiment, Mas.sachusetts Volun- 
teers, which left the State in November under 
command of Colonel William V. Bartlett, 
sailed for New Orleans in January, 1863, and 
a few months later took part in the memorable 
siege of Port Hudson, where occurred .some of 
the most desperate fighting of the war. Pri- 
vate Malcolm, always showing his .sturdy 
Scotch determination when (lut\- was most jjcr- 
ilous, was the first man to volunteer for the 
storming party. He doubtless inherited mar- 
tial ardor, as his mother's father was a soldier 
in the War of 1812, and her grandfather in the 
Revolution. His five brothers also enlisted, 
and were in ser\ice from two to four years. 
One lost his life in the war, antl one was 
wounded. 



After being mustered out at Pittsfield, 
Mass., September i, 1863, Mr. Malcolm went 
to Little I'alls, N.Y. , and was there for two 
years as sujierintendent of the Mohawk Wool- 
len Mills. I-"()llowing that he was succes- 
sively suijerintendent in the knitting-mill at 
Amsterdam, \. Y. , in Troy, a_<;ain at Amster- 
dam, then in Cooperstown, N. Y. , where he 
was both superintendent and a jxirtner in 
Groat Van Brocklin's Mill. Going back once 
more to Amsterdam, he started a woollen in- 
dustry in company with one of his present 
partners, Mr. Pettingill. In 1S86 he came to 
Catskill, where he has since been most success- 
ful in the management of his woollen-mill. 
In this plant one hundred and seventy hands 
are employed, and all kinds of men'.s, 
women's, and children's underwear are manu- 
factured. The mill is the second largest in 
this section. 

Mr. Malcolm's first wife was before her 
marriage Julia Marsh. She died leaving one 
daughter, Hattie L., now the wife of Hamil- 
ton Jones, a plumber of Catskill, of the firm 
of H. T. Jones & Sons. Mr. and Mrs. Jones 
have one child, Dorothy. Mr. Malcolm's .sec- 
ond wife, whose maiden name was Jennie 
Lewis, is the mother of one child, James L. 

In politics Mr. Malcolm is a Republican. 
He has been a member of the Catskill Board of 
Education, and he takes a lively interest in all 
matters pertaining to the general welfare. He 
is a director in the Catskill National Bank, 
and was formerly a director in the Young 
Men's Christian Association. He is a Mason, 
having membership in the Blue Lodge of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



North Moosick and in the Royal Arch Chapter 
of Catskill. Of the last-named body he is a 
charter member, and he has served it as scribe. 
He is a member of the Knights of Pythias of 
this town: of J. W. Watson Post, G. A. R. : 
of the A. O. U. W". ; and of the Rip Van 
Winkle Club. He has been delegate from the 
post to the State commander}-, but in genera] 
has refused offices in the various fraternal or- 
ganizations to which he belongs, as the de- 
mands of his business leave him little leisure. 
Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm are members of the 
Reformed church. 



/@Yo 



EORGE HAXER, M.D., an able 
\f;^J_ phx'sician and prominent citizen of 
Tannersville, Greene County, N.Y. , was born 
in Prattsville, Greene Count v, on the 6th of 
August, 1847. His sole heritage was that of 
an unsullied name and a constitution which 
had been developed through generations of in- 
dustrious sons of the soil. For three genera- 
tions the Haners and their wives have been 
hard-working, persevering, and in some degree 
successful citizens of Greene County. 

Martinus Haner, the Doctor's great-grand- 
father, was one of the pioneers who came to 
Prattsville from the more settled regions of 
Columbia Count}'. He immediately engaged 
in peeling bark for the tanneries, which at that 
time formed the chief indu.stry of the neigh- 
borhood. This pursuit he followed as long as 
his health permitted him to work. His son 
Martin continued the gathering and sale of 
bark, but besides this he cleared a larsre farm 



and won by his diligent apj^lication a degree of 
prosperity and comfort. 

Martin Haner married :\Iiss Shoemaker, a 
native of Columbia County, by whom he had 
seven children, namely: Isaac; Henry; Will- 
iam M., the Doctor's father; Patty M. ; Eliza- 
beth; Lavinia; and Mima Ann. Patty M. 
married Samuel Chamberlain, who is no longer 
living; Lavinia became Mrs. Spencer; Mima 
Ann was married to Henry Palmer; and 
Elizabeth became the wife of Edward Cronk. 
Martin Haner brought up his children in such 
a way as to fit them for the battle of life; and, 
if he did not leave them a fortune, he at least 
taught theni to win their own way to respect 
and independence. His wife died at the age 
of fifty, but for a few years more he remained 
with his family, closing an honorable life, with 
the love and respect of all who knew him, at 
the age of si.xty-six. 

William M. Haner, like his brothers and 
sisters, obtained his education in the common 
schools of the town. In the course of time he 
took possession of a part of the old homestead 
property, which he farmed with some success 
until 1 866, when he removed to lewett. 
There he purchased a farm, but he only occu- 
pied it one year; and then selling it he re- 
moved to the town of Ro.xbury, near Grand 
Gorge, Delaware County. Here he purchased a 
large dairy farm, which he continued to occupy 
until 1895. He is now (July, 1S99) seventy- 
six years of age, and is living with his children 
at Tannersville. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics, and has held office as Road Commissioner 
and Overseer of the Poor. 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His wife, Cornelia, was a daughter of Jacob 
ami Jennie (Stanley) Maginnes, who also were 
among the first settlers in Prattsville. She be- 
came the mother of eiglit children, four of 
whom are still living, namely: (icorge, the 
subject of this sketch; Jennie I".. ; Homer H. ; 
and Clark R. Jennie K. is the wife of 
Charles Voss, the genial I'cstmaster of Tan- 
nersville, a sketch of whom will be found 
elsewhere in the Ri;vn:w. Homer has been 
for twenty years general agent for the Davis 
Sewing Machine Con)])any, and for upward of 
three years he represented their interests in 
Australia. Clark is a hook-keeper and clerk, 
and resides at Tannersville. Mrs. Cornelia 
M. Haner died on May 15, 1899, at the age 
of seventy-three. She was for many years a 
useful and honmed member of the Methodist 
Kpiscopal church. 

Thus it will be seen that George Haner 
started in life with no great advantages, but 
such as he had he turned to the very best ac- 
count. All that the common schools of Pratts- 
ville had to gi\e he devoured with avidity, 
and speedily made his way at eighteen years of 
age from the jnipils' bench to the teacher's 
ilesk. (Juiet and reserN'ed though he was, his 
efficient work soon called the attention of trus- 
tees and school commissioners, and he suc- 
cessively and successfull)' taught in the schools 
of Red FalKs, Jewett Centre, Windham, and 
Prattsville in Greene County, and Gilb(ja, Gal- 
lupviiie, and Mi(klleburg in the neighboring 
county of Schoharie. With the ]iower to 
teaci) came the lox'c of and craving for more 
knowledge and he very soon proceeded to Fort 



I^dward Institute, where he took an advanced 
course of study. A period was, however, put 
to his attendance at this school through lack 
of funds, but, nothing dauntetl, he turned to 
manual labor to sup[)ly his needs in this direc- 
tion. He obtained work as a carpenter, and 
it was while thus engaged that a direction was 
given to his mind which determined his choice 
of a lifework. He was assisting to build a 
house for Dr. D. M. Leonard at Broome 
Centre, Schoharie County, and in discussing 
his future with that gentleman he was advised 
by him to adopt the profession of medicine. 
Taking this advice, he at once began his studies 
with Dr. Deonard, with whom he remained 
until he entered the Medical College of the 
New York University, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1877. Thus equipped, 
Dr. Haner took up his residence in the town of 
Conesville, where he jiractised with success 
until iSSo, when he came to Tanners\-ille. 

In 1S80 Tannersville was only a small vil- 
lage, and the arrival of a young doctor with a 
university dijiloma and some experience was 
indeed an acquisition. He \-ery speedily im- 
pressed the inhabitants with his jirofessional 
knowledge and abilit)', and as the years have 
rolled along his practice has increased and his 
reinitation as a skilful physician has continued 
to grow. For ten years he practised without 
opposition. Besides his ordinary practice he 
has a large clientele among the many city 
boarders who visit Tannersx'ille during the 
summer months, and among whom he is de- 
servedly po])ular, both from a professional and 
social point of view. His [Mcsent residence 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



29 



was erected in 1881, but it has been recently 
enlarged and beautified and made complete by 
a most convenient suite of offices. 

In politics the Doctor is a Democrat. He 
has twice represented his town as Supervisor, 
and during the latter term was chairman of the 
board. The esteem of his fellow-citizens has 
also been manifested in his election to the 
office of Coroner for three terms of three years 
each. 

His public spirit has led him to take an 
active interest in all that concerned the pros- 
perity and development of the village in which 
he resides. He was one of the incorporators 
and its first president. He took measures for 
the laying out of its sidewalks, and was a 
member of the building committee which 
erected the first public school-building. 

In 1S77 Dr. Haner was united in marriage 
to Miss Agnes More, of Roxbury, Delaware 
County, a daughter of Andrew and Ann E. 
(Hardenburgh) More and a third cousin of the 
late Jay Gould. She had two sisters, Cornelia 
and Kate, and she has one brother, Samuel P. 
Kate was married to Mr. M. L. Benham. 
Samuel P. More is a publisher in Great Bend, 
Pa. Dr. and Mrs. Haner have one daughter, 
Helen. 

The Doctor is a charter member of the 
Mount Tabor Lodge, F. & A. M., and be- 
longed formerly to the Gilboa Lodge. He is 
a member of the County Medical Society, of 
which he has been secretary for three years, 
and also of the New York Physicians' Mutual 
Aid Association. 

Dr. Haner is also a prominent and enthusias- 



tic member of the Methodi.st Episcopal Church, 
and actively and generously participated in the 
movement which resulted in the erection of the 
present beautiful edifice in Tannersvillc be- 
longing to that body. He worked indefatiga- 
bly in the erection of the Methodist Episcopal 
parsonage, and to these objects combined has 
contributed upward of five hundred dollars. 

His interest in Sundax'-school work dates 
back to his Conesville days, when he was su- 
perintendent of the school; and ever since he 
came to Tannersx'ille he has been ready with 
hand and brain, sympathy and purse, to advance 
the work of God in the church' of his choice. 
He has held almost every office that a layman 
can hold, representing his brethren at both the 
district and annual conferences, and is at the 
present time a trustee. 

Dr. Haner is yet in the prime of life, and if 
spared will be of inestimable service to the 
communitv amid which he resides. 



flMEON LAPE. a thriving general 
merchant of Charlotteville, X.V., 
^ was born in the town of Summit, 
Schoharie County, X.Y., October 19, 1S27, 
son of Samuel and Lana Lape. His paternal 
grandfather, Samuel Lape, who was the grand- 
son of a German immigrant and the father of 
several children that grew to maturity, was 
formerly a thriving farmei of Sand Lake, N. V. 
Somewhat late in life he accompanied his son 
Samuel to Summit, and his last davs were 
spent in this town. He was a member of the 
Lutheran church. 



i;i()(;k.\1'I1I(;.\i. ri;\jk\v 



Samuel LajK-, the younger, Simeon Lapc's 
latlicr, served in the War i.l iSij. lie came 
to Suniniil when a ymini,' man, ami, settlinj^ 
here upon a farm of one luiiuireil ami lilt\- acres, 
which he afterward enlar>;ed, he became one of 
the most extensive farmers in this section. 
Though not a seeker after place, he consented 
to iiold some of the miiinr tnwii nflices. (Origi- 
nally a Democrat in pidilics, he afterward be- 
came a Re|)ublican. As one df the must active 
ami influential membeis of the Lutheran 
cluircii, it was ,-enerally his hit to entertain 
the preachers, and his famil)' was taught to 
believe that religious devotion was just as 
necessary at hume as in a place of []ub]ic wor- 
ship. He dietl at the age of seventy-three, his 
wife sin\iving him several years. They were 
the jiarents of si.xteen children, of whom ten 
died in infancy and six liveil to maturity, the 
latter being; Luther, Simeon, J(jhn, (ieorge, 
Josiah. and I'llizabeth. Luther and Josiah 
occupy the homestead. John is a resident of 
I'last Worcester, X. V. ; and I'd i/.abeth, who 
is the eldest, married Abraham Harrington, of 
Worcester, where she resides. (icorge, who is 
living in 15rookl\ii, N.\'., was for a time en- 
gaged as teacher in the New Wnk Conference 
.Semiiiarv and in ci\'il engineering. 

.Simeon Lape was educated in the common 
schools of Summit. lieginning industrial life 
as a farmer, he fiillowe<l that occupation until 
thirty-eight years oUI, when, in partnership 
with a Mr. Decker, he purchase.l the general 
stock of goods of the store .4" La M.mte & Co., 
of Charlotteville, .\. ^•. This lopLirtnership 
lasted but about )i\'e months, at the end of 



which time Mr. Decker withdrew, leaving his 
associate soL- proprietur of the establishment, 
which fur the jiast tliirty-one \ears Mr. Lape 
has carried on alone. As his trade developed, 
he enlarged his facilities and increased his 
stock, and for a number of years he has 
transacted an extensive general mercantile 
Inrsiiicss. Like his father he adheres to Ke- 
liublican principles; and, while he inx'ariabi)' 
has refused tu becimie a candidate for local 
offices, he accepted the aiipointment of Post- 
master, which he heUI in all for about twenty 
years. 

In 1.S48 Mr. Lape was imited in marriage 
with Miss Lucy La Monte, of Charlotteville, 
daughter of Thomas W. and I^lizabeth Maria 
(Payne) La Monte. Mrs. Lape was a descend- 
ant of John La Monte, of Ctderaine, County 
Antrim, Ireland. Her first American ancestor 
was Robert La Monte, who came to this coim- 
try with his mother, the widow of John, and 
settled in Ccdimibia County, this State. 

Her great-grandfather, William La Monte, 
son of Robert, served in tlie Revcdutionary 
War, and was i)resent at the siurender of Cen- 
eral Purgo)'ne. He married for his fust wife 
Mrs. Phcebe Perkins, born (ioss, and settled 
upon a farm in North Hinstlale, N.V. After 
her death he moved into the then wilderness 
of Schoharie Comity, locating in what is now 
the town of P'ldton, where he lived to an ad- 
vanced age. .Mrs. Lape's grandfather, also 
named William, was born in Hinsdale, Janu- 
ary 16, 17.S4. When a young man he settled 
in Indton, but ajjout the year i S06 removed to 
Charlotteville, wliere he acquired jjossession of 



BIOGRA PH ICAL RFAH KAV 



31 



some seven hundred acres of land. An enter- 
prising business man, he kept a country store, 
and operated saw and grist mills. Being- 
familiar with common law, he acted as legal 
adviser to his neighbors, pleaded their cases in 
the lower courts, and was several times elected 
a Justice of the Peace. In his religious belief 
he was a Methodist. He died September 5, 
1847. His wife, Jane, a daughter of Thomas 
Stillwell, died August 25, 1S63, aged eighty 
years. They were the parents of si.\ sons and 
five daughters, all of whom married and be- 
came the heads of families. 

Thomas W. La Monte, Mrs. Lape's father, 
was born in Fulton, August 29, 1S03. He 
was a prominent business man of Charlotte- 
ville in his day, and proprietor of the store 
which is now owned by Mr. Lape. He was 
also active in political and religious affairs, and 
was one of the founders of the New York Con- 
ference Seminar)'. I-le died June 3, 1853. 
His wife died April 7, 1898, aged eighty- 
seven years. She was the mother of thirteen 
children: Jacob, Lucy, Elizabeth, William 
and David (twins), Thomas, Jennie, George, 
Kate, Austin, Hannah, Maria, and Julia. All 
the children received a good education. 
Thomas was for a time engaged in teaching at 
the Conference Seminary, but later became a 
Methodist minister. George, who taught 
school for some time in the South, became a 
successful paper manufacturer and the owner 
of a valuable patent. 

In 1850 Mr. Lape joined the Methodist 
church, which he has since served as steward, 
trustee, and superintendent of the Sunday- 



school, also contributing liberally to its sup- 
port. Mrs. Lape died October I S, 189^, leav- 
ing no children. She was a member of the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union and of 
the Independent Order of Good Templars. 



tNDKKW J. McMillan, who in the 
fall of 1898 was elected Assemblyman 
»« — - from Schenectady, is a thriving 
farmer of Rotterdam, N. Y. He was born 
upon the McMillan farm, a part of which he 
occupies, on February 9, 1S56, being the only 
son of Andrew and Ellen (Darrow) Mci\lillan. 
His father was born here on January 12, 1832, 
and his mother was born in Schenectady in 
1832. This farm was the property of his pa- 
ternal grandfather, James McMillan, a native 
of New Scotland, who settled here about 
seventy years ago, and who lived to be ninety- 
one years old. The maiden name of James 
McMillan's wife was Margaret Wingate. She 
died at sixty-five. 

Andrew McMillan, the father, succeeded to 
the homestead, and is still actively engaged in 
its culti\-ation. He has made \-arious imjjrove- 
ments in the property, and is widely known as 
a practical and successful agriculturist. In 
politics he acts with the Republican party, 
and in his religious belief he is a Presbyterian. 
Ellen, his wife, whom he married in 1844, has 
had but one son, Andrew J., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Andrew J. McMillan was educated in the 
district schools. As a youth he assisted his 
father, from whom he obtained a good knowl- 



32 



BIOOKArilKAL REVIEW 



edge of farming, and since reaching manhood 
he has tilled the soil upon his own account. 
He has at his disposal one hundred and seventy- 
seven acres, which he devotes to generul farm- 
in-;, and raises excellent crops. 

In X.-vcmbcr. i.SSj. Mr. McMillan was 
united in niarriai;e with Anna I.. l.iddK-, who 
was horn in 1 )iKUK-slHn-i;-, daughter of .\K'\an- 
cler Liddlc. A sketch of her family will he 
f(jund on another pa,i;e of the Ki;\ii w. Mr. 
and Mrs. McMillan have one .son — Kverett, 
who was born December 2;, 1SS4. 

Mr. McMillan is now in his third year as 
Supervisor, and is renderini; efficient service in 
that capacity. rolitically, he is a Republican. 
He belongs t.j the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, being a member of Lodge No. 171, 
,,f Mount Pleasant. 



l.Ml'.R K. GOOD.SKLL, of Hunter, sta- 
)n agent, telegraph operator, and 
agent of the American l-'-Xjiress Company on 
the .Stony Clove ^ Catskill Mountain Rail- 
roail, was born in Jewett on April 17, 1865, to 
Amos anil Harriet (Egbertson) Goodsell. His 
great-grandfather Goodsell was one of the jmo- 
neer settlers of Jewett, coming to that jdace 
from the .State of Connecticut. His grand- 
father, John Goodsell, who tini.shed clearing 
the tract of land taken uji liy the great-grand- 
father and spent his life engaged in farming, 
died at the age of tifty-sevcn. John Goodsell' s 
wife, whose maiden name was .Samantha Peck, 
married for her first hu.sband a Mr, Hogardus. 
She died at the age of fifty-four. Hy her sec- 



ond marriage she had ten children, as f(dlows: 
Amos, Amelia, .Mansfield, Amanda, J. I{mory, 
Lois, Adela, Anna, l-".lbert, and Sarah. 

Amos Goodsell was reared on a farm, and 
during boyhood he attended the common 
schools of Jewett, his native town. For over 
twenty years he carried (jii his farm in Jewett 
Centre. He then sold out, and since that time 
he has been working where he jdeased. He is 
a Republican, and has held a nimiber of town 
offices. His wife, Harriet, who died in 1SS4, 
at the age of forty-eight, was a native of Jew- 
ett, and the daughter of Jacob Fgbertson, an 
early settler and a farmer of that place. Mr. 
Egbertson and his wife both died at the age of 
eight}'-two. The)- had nine children ; namely, 
John, Justu.s, Eliza, .Sally, Tully, Caroline, 
Harriet, Jane, and Maria. Amos and Harriet 
Goodsell reared a famil\' of three children; 
namely, lilla, George, and Palmer E. The 
daughter, Ella, is the wife of D. Clarence 
Gibbony, attorney-at-law, of Philadelphia ; and 
her brother George is employed b\- the Mis- 
souri, Kansas & Te.Nas Railroad at St. Louis. 
The parents were active members in the Meth- 
odist PLpiscopal Church of Jewett. 

Elmer E. Goodsell received a common-school 
education. He then servetl some time as a 
teacher, and he subsequently attended Green- 
ville Academy and luistman's Business Col- 
lege. He was graduated at the last-named in- 
stitution in June, 1S8.S, and shortly after came 
to the Hunter station as assistant to Mr. Pur- 
hans, who was the agent until 1894. When 
Mr. Purhans left the |ilace, Mr. Goodsell was 
ajipointed to succeetl him, and in the few years 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFAHEW 



he has held the position he has made himself 
exceedingly popular with both officials and 
patrons of the road. He is furnished one as- 
sistant the year through, and sometimes in the 
summer three. Most of the telegraphing he 
does himself. The Hunter station is the lar- 
gest on the line, being moreover the terminal 
station; and Mr. Goodsell is the oldest station 
agent on the line as to time of service for this 
company. 

In i8gi Mr. Goodsell was united in mar- 
riage with Anna Bell Anderson, daughter of 
George W. Anderson, coal and lumber dealer, 
whose biographical sketch appears on another 
page of this work. Mrs. Goodsell, who has 
one sister, Mabel Anderson, is the mother of 
two children — Marguerite and Anderson. 

Mr. Goodsell is an ardent Republican, but 
he has refused all public offices. He is a 
member of Mount Tabor Lodge, No. 804, 
F. & A. M., of Hunter, and both he and Mrs. 
Goodsell arc members of the Methodist church 
and workers in the Sunday-school. Mr. Good- 
sell was formerly secretar)- and librarian of the 
Sunday-school. 



SEYMOUR BOUGHTON, a promi- 
nent resident of Charlotteville, was 
born in Summit, November 17, 
1834, son of Seymour and Phcebe (Mi.\) 
Houghton. The father came here from Con- 
necticut, settling first in Charlotteville, and 
later moving to Summit village, where he 
kept a hotel. He afterward engaged in the 
cooper business, and also ran a distillery. 



Studying law, he was admitted to the bar in 
1840, and thenceforward carried on a profitable 
general law business. 

Actively interested in public affairs, Sam- 
uel Boughton, the elder, was elected to the 
Assembly on the Anti-rent ticket in 1845, 
was t\i'ice elected Supervisor as a Democrat, 
was for some years a member of the county 
committee, served with ability as K.xcise 
Commissioner, and was Postmaster for eight 
years. He was very pojjular with all classes 
irrespective of party, and his personal charac- 
ter was such as to fully merit the high esti- 
mation in which he was held. He was an 
active member of the I^aptist church. He re- 
turned to Charlotteville in 1866, and died here 
in 1871, aged eighty-one years. Nine chil- 
dren were born to him and his wife, Phoebe, 
namely: Lucius, who died December 11, 
1S26; Harvey; Mary; .Squire, who died De- 
cember 9, 1 819; Phoebe; Polly; Louisa; Har- 
mon K., who died in 1851, aged twenty-four 
}'ears; and Seymour, the subject of this sketch, 
he and his sister Mary being the only sur- 
vivors. 

Seymour I^oughton after finishing his educa- 
tion learned the carriage painter's trade in 
Cobleskill, mastering it without much diffi- 
culty, as he had a natural genius for handling 
the brush. P2ngaging in business for himself, 
his first contract, wdiich amounteil to two thou- 
sand three hundred dollars, was tendered him 
by parties in Gallupville; and he subsequently 
enlarged his business. For many years he 
conducted the largest carriage-making estab- 
lishment in the count}'. He also did most of 



1;1()(;K.\1'HI( AI. KK\ IKW 



the repairing and painting in this and tlic ad- 


I^ENRY C. VAN ZANDT, M.D.. a 


jacent towns, and at one time he eanied on 


rp^ prominent physician of Schenectad)', 


two shops. Of hite he has l)een gradually 


^^ is a native of this city. lie was 


withdrawing fmni hiisiness, but still continues 


jjorn on January 11, 1844, son of (iilbert and 


to f(dlow his trade to some extent. Mr. 


Myra (llalliday) Van Zandt. The family 


Houghton's connection with public affairs 


of which he is a representatixe w;is founded in 


began as a boy in the .Assembly at .Alban)', 


.Ameiica by Johannes \'an Zandt, who came 


and he was elected Town Clerk the year he be- 


from .Anheim, Ilollaiul, in 1660, and wh(.)se 


came a voter. lie afterward served as Con- 


grave is still \isil)le in Trinity Churchyard, 


stable two years, held some minor town ofTices, 


New York City. 


was elected .Sui)ervis(ir in 1S7S, reelected in 


Peter P. \'an Zandt, a grandson of Johan- 


1S79, was County C"lerk from iSSi [(, 1888, 


nes, settled in Schenectady, and several of his 


was I'ostmaster under Andrew Johnson antl the 


descendants have won distinction in this local- 


second (Cleveland administration, and has been 


ity, lie was elected a member of the Assem- 


a member of the Democratic Town Connnittee 


bl)', and while in Albany he married a Miss 


for many years. His jiolitical record is a most 


.Munson, of Schoharie. Dr. \'an Zandt's 


honorable one, and it is worthy of note that 


grandfather was Garrett \'an /'.andt, who 


while some of tlie offices to which he was 


served as a soldier in the War of 1812, and 


elected were hotly contested, his cantlitlacy for 


was stationed at Sackett's Harbor. The Doc- 


a second term as .Super\isor was without oppo- 


tor's mother was a daughter of Judge Halliday, 


sition, a fact which demonsti-ates the confi- 


of Rochester, N. A^ 


dence of his fellow-t<iwnsmen in his ability and 


Henry C. \'an Zandt pre[xued for his col- 


integrity. 


legiate course at the Schenectady High 


Mr. l^oughton contracted his first marriage 


School, and was graduated from Union College 


with Maggie I-'erguson, daughter of Thomas 


with the class of 1865. Ilis ]iiel iminaiy med- 


i'erguson. .She bore him four children, 


ical studies were pursued under the diiection 


iiamel)- : Arthur J., l-'rank, and Thomas (i., 


of Dr. \'edder, of Schenectady; and after grad- 


none of wh.,m are living; and Charles I-., wh<. 


uation from the Albany Medical Sclicxd he 


is a ]iainter by trade and a musician of local 


began the practice of his ]irofession in this 


repute. l-"or his second wife he married 


city, where he has gainetl a high reinitation. 


I'innna Xadle)-, daughter of Christoplier Nad- 


lie is also engaged in the drug business, and 


ley, and by this union he has two children — 


has one of the best equipped apothecary estab- 


Ivlith and lb. ratio S. 15oughl..u. 


lishments in this x'icinity. 


Mr. li.uighton bel..n,i;s to Jefferson L.idge, 


Dr. \'an Zandt is a meml)er of the sur- 


Xo. 554, !••. & A. M., and John L. Lewis 


geons' staff of P:ilis Hospital, of Schenectady, 


Chapter, No. 229, K. A, M. 


also a membei' of the Schenectad)' County 



1336482 




H. C. \'AX ZAXDT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



37 



Medicnl Society and of the State Medical 
Association. He belongs to St. George Lodge, 
No. 6, F. & A. M. ; is a Trustee of Schau- 
Nangh-ta-da Tribe, No. 123, Improved Order 
of Red Men; and is a member of the Holland 
Society. 

He married Ilattie Hilderbrand, daughter of 
Henry Hilderbrand, of Schenectad)', N. Y. In 
his religious belief the Doctor is an Episco- 
palian, and is a warden of Christ's Church. 



HOMAS UORMADY, a retired locomo- 
tive engineer and a member of the 
Schenectady Board of Aldermen, was born in 
the town and county of Carlow, Ireland, Sep 
tember 10, 1S27, son of Andrew and Bridget 
(Rice) Dormady. Coming to Schenectady 
with his parents when two }-ears old, Thomas 
Dormady passed through the common schools 
of this city, and was graduated from the high [ 
school. After learning the machinist's trade ' 
in the railway shops at Alban}-, he followed it 
as a journeyman for a _\"ear, and then became a 
locomotive engineer on the Mohawk & Hudson 
River Railroad, which is now a part of the 
New York Central s_\stem. His first engine, | 
which was imported from England in 1S31, was 
originally called the "John Bull," but on being 
enlarged was renamed the "Rochester. " For I 
over forty years he ran a regular day train be- ! 
tween Schenectady, Alban_\-, Utica, and Syra- 
cuse, and in 1894 he practically retired. In 
1 87 1 he was elected to the Board of Aldermen 
for three years, and he was afterward re- 
elected for the two succeeding terms. As the I 



Democratic candidate fur Mayor in 1S79, he 
lacked but three votes of being elected. In 
1890 he was again a memijcr of the upjier 
branch of the city government, and in 1897 he 
began his fifth term in that bod}-. The ward 
he represents is consideretl a Republican 
stronghold, a fact which ampl)- attests his 
ability and pcpularit_\". 

Mr. Dormad)- married Mar_\- Sheean, a native 
of Troy, N.Y. , a daughter of Philip Sheean 
(deceased). His children are: Thomas, born 
in 1858, a graduate of the high school and 
now a telegraph operator in Schenectad_\- ; 
Annie, a graduate of St. John's Convent 
School ; Libbie, now the widow of J. J. Mur- 
phy ; and rhilip, also a graduate of the high 
school and at present in the employ of the 
city. 

Mr. Dormady belongs to the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, and has served as local 
chief of Division 83, now Di\'ision 172. 



§(^HN T. BENHAM, M.D., of Cones- 
ville, N.Y. , one of the best known phy- 
sicians in this part of the country, was 
born in Hudson, N. Y. , October 19, 1823, son 
of Dr. John P. and Elizabeth (Smith) Benham. 
He is a descendant in the ninth generation of 
his emigrant ancestor, who was an Englishman, 
and is the fourth representative of the family 
in a direct line to practise medicine. The 
great-grandfather was Dr. Cornevius Benham, 
who ]Dractised in Catskill, N.Y. , for many 
years; and his widow, who was of Dutch de- 
scent, married for her second husband Dr. 



38 



lilOC.RAl'IIK AL kK\lK\V 



Van Hiiren, a relative of rrcsident Martin Van 
Hurcn. Dr. Tliomas Benham, the gnindfatlicr, 
|)ractisL(l in Asiiland, N. V., where he died at 
the aj;e of eighty-nine years; and two of his 
sons, namely, John P. and Jacoli, became suc- 
cessful ])hysicians. 

Dr. John P. Benham, the father, resided in 
Hudson for many years, and then, moving; 
from that town to Conesville, [irnctised there 
for the rest of his life. He was favorably 
known over a wide circuit as a capalde ]ihysi- 
cian, whose powers of endurance were unusually 
vi<rornus; and at the time of his death, which 
occurred at the age of seventy-three years, he 
was the oldest active medical practitioner in 
this count)'. He rearetl twn children : John T. , 
the subject of this sketch; and Margaret K., 
who married lulwin 11. Marshall and resides in 
Troy, N.Y. 

John T. Benham began his educaticjn in the 
district sciinuls, and advanced in learning b\' 
attending the Schoharie ,\cademv. After 
working at the car])enter's trade some twelve 
years, he took u\> tiie study of meilicine with 
his lather, who carefulK" directed his prepara- 
tions. He also attended lectures at Woodstock 
and Castleton, \'t., and at the Berkshire Medi- 
cal College, Pittsfield, Mass. He subse- 
quently s])cnt a year at the Hroadwa\- Hospital, 
New York City, where he obtained much valu- 
able experience, anel returning to Conesville 
he entete 1 upon the practice of liis profession 
in com|)any with his father. l-"or o\er fifty 
years he has labored diligently and success- 
fully in his calling, visiting the sick in all 
kinds of weather, aniKirenllv ohlivhuis <if his 



own health or comfort; and he is still remark- 
ably vigorous and active. 

Dr. Benham married for his first wife Ro- 
sanna Hoogland and for his second Anna M. 
Ladcr. He has two daughters b\' his first 
union, namely: Donna I., who married Oscar 
Mervin ; anti .Margaret K. , wife of Julian 
Myers. 

The Doctor has always been a great reader 
and an independent thinker, accustomed to rea- 
son out things, as he says, for iiimself, even 
the deep questions of life. His religious opin- 
ions are liberal. Many kindly acts in the way 
of charity can be traceil directly to him, and 
he is highly respected by the entire community. 



§ EDWARD YOUNG, one of Middle- 
burg's literary men and the editor of 
the Middleburg Gnct/tr, is a native of 
Prattsville, Greene County. He was born on 
Januarv 6, 1S4S. His elementar)- education 
was obtained in the public schools, and subse- 
quently he attended Ro.xbury Seminar\', from 
which he was graduateil. As editor of the 
Gazette he exercises a strong influence in 
moulding public opinion and in placing before 
the townspeojile information which keejis them 
in touch with the most progressive thought of 
the da)'. The editorial columns of his paper 
are marked by vigorous and positive e.xjjression 
of opinion on all questions of national or local 
moment, as well as by cool and conser\at ivc 
criticism ami level-headed judgment. He does 
considerable writing for other jniblications. 
Thoioughlv interested in the welfare of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



39 



town and believing that she needs the services 
of her best citizens in public life, he has freely 
given time and effort to serve her in many 
ways. For two years he was Town Clerk, and 
for twelve consecutive years, beginning in 
1881, he was village Clerk. In 1889 he rep- 
resented Schoharie County in the Assembl}-. 
He was one of the most ardent workers in se- 
curing the incorporation of the village, and 
also of the water company. Of the last named 
he is now one of the directors. He is a stock- 
holder in the First National Bank, and since 
1892 has been treasurer of Middleburg Acad- 
emy. He is also a member of the Board of 
Education. In politics Mr. Young is a most 
loyal Democrat, and his party has chosen him 
as delegate to State and county conventions, 
and as a member of the county committee. 

On November 15, 1893, Mr. Voung was 
united in marriage with Inez Bouck, of Cones- 
ville, a daughter of James A. Bouck. He is 
a prominent Odd Fellow, and is at the present 
time District Deputy Grand Patriarch for the 
Schoharie district. Canton Young, of Scho- 
harie, of which he is a member, is named for 
him. 



lYRUS SHOWERS, civil engineer, 
contractor, and builder, of Tanners- 
lle, N. Y. , was born in this town, 
November 9, 1859, son of Isaac and Merilla 
A. (Loomis) Showers. He is of the si.xth 
generation of his family in America, the line 
being traced back through Lsaac, Japhet, Mi- 
chael, Jfihn, to the emigrant progenitor, who 
came from Holland and settled in New Jersey, 



there spending the re.st of his life. A more 
extended accoimt of his ancestors will be found 
in a sketch of Isaac Showers, which appears 
elsewhere in the Review. 

Isaac Showers, Cyrus Showers' s father, was 
born in Hunter in 1827, and spent his youth 
on farms in this locality. He later engaged in 
civil engineering, which he followed quite ex- 
tensively, and became one of the largest resi- 
dent land-owners in this section. He is now 
living in retirement. His wife, Merilla, was 
a daughter of Alvin J. and Harriet (Palmer) 
Loomis, of Windham. She became the mother 
of eight children, four of whom are living; 
namely, Cyrus, PImma, Henr)- W. , and George 
Harding Showers. Emma married Edward 
Osborn, and resides in California. Plenry 
W. is attending the Albany Law School. 
George Harding Showers is studying civil 
engineering at the Troy Polytechnic Institute. 
The others were : Jennie, who married Stephen 
\'ining, of Windham, and died at the age of 
fort}--one : Elmer, who died at thirteen; Isaac, 
who died young; and Irving, who died at the 
age of four years. The parents are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Cyrus Showers was educated in the common 
schools of Tannersville, and resided on the 
home farm of three hundred acres, of which he 
took entire charge at the age of eighteen. He 
kept fifty cows, made butter for the local mar- 
ket, and supplied Hotel Kaaterskill with milk 
for some years. At the age of twenty-five he 
went to Onteora Park to assist in building the 
cottages, and was made its superintendent. 
He later built a large number of houses, com- 



plctir)}; contracts amounting to one hundred 
thousand dollars in four years. He nls<i built 
his present dwelling, and continues to fdllow 
the business of a civil engineer, disjila) ing a 
marked ability for that profession. He at one 
time engaged in mercantile business for a short 
period. Politically, he is a Republican. Ap- 
pointed Deputy Sheriff in i88S, he served 
until 1891 and again from 189410 189S. He 
was an Assessor two terms and a member of 
the county committee for several \ears. He 
has been secretary of the village l^oard of 
Trustees ever since its establishment, and is 
also a member of the Hoard ui Health. 

In 1883 Mr. Showers was joined in mar- 
riage with Lillie 1^. I-"ord, who was born in 
Lexington in 186^, daughter of Charles L. and 
Harriet (Ihmiphrey) h'onl. Her father and 
grandfather were botli natives of Jewctt ; antl 
Charles 1.. b'ord, who at one time carried on a 
farm and kept a boarding-house in Lexington, 
moved to Tannersville, where he was similarh 
engaged, and still sjiLiids his simimers in that 
village. Mrs. Showers's mother was a native 
of Lexington, daughter of tlie Rev. Eli H. and 
Kmil)- (Cline) Humphre\-, the former of whom 
was a well-known HajHist minister, and died at 
the age of eight)'. Her grandjiarents had a 
family of twelve children, nine of whom are 
living, among them Hiram, Horace, Salirina, 
Lucina, Susan, Harriet, Ophelia, Ludocia. 
The others were: Amasn, Mary, and b'.li/a- 
beth. Charles L, and Harriet Ford are the 
l)arents of two chilchen : Lillie, who is now 
Mrs. Showers; and Jennie L. , wlio married 
Dr. Robert L. Craliam, of l!roi,klyn, X. \'. 



Mr. Showers is an active member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a 
steward and trustee, and he served u])on the 
building connnittee which erected the new- 
church edifice. Mrs. Showers united with the 
church at the age of fifteen. She is a mem- 
ber of the choir, and was organist for eight 
years. 



;chtmvi-:r iiui!ni-;i.L, m.d., an 

able physician and prominent citizen 
if Jeffers,,n, X. V. , was Ixirn in Gil - 
ban, Schoharie County, X.Y. , l-'ebruary 2, 
1843, son of Jacob Richtmyer and Harriet 
(Pierce) Hubbell. The name llubbell, which 
originated in Wales, is said to have been de- 
rived fr(jm Ihiliba, a Danisli chief who camped 
u];oi) a hill. It passed through several changes, 
including Hubbashill and Hubhill, before the 
present form of spelling was adoptetl. 

Richard Hubbell, the immigrant ancestor, 
of whom the Doctor is a descendant in the 
eighth generation, was born in Wales in 1627. 
He arri\cd in Xew I-"nglantl in i'')45, and in 
1647 he t(Jok the oath of allegiance to the Xew 
Haven Colonial government. In i6f>4 he 
moved to Fairfield County, Connecticut, and 
in 1685 became one of the original ]iroprietors 
of Fairfield township. He died October 23, 
1699, and his remains were interred in Strat- 
ford buryiiig-groiind, now ineludeil witliin the 
limits of the city of Rridgejiort. Richard 
Hubbell was tiiiee times married, and was the 
father of fifteen children. l-"rom liim tlie line 
(jf descent is traced direcll}', through Samuel, 




RICHTMVER HUBBELL. 



bi(k;rai'Hical rfa'ikw 



Nathan, Peter (first), Peter (second), Matthias, 
and Jacob R., to Dr. Richtmyer Hubbell, the 
subject of this sketch. 

Peter Hubbell, second, the Doctor's great- 
grandfather, who married Sally Hiirlburt, re- 
moved with his family from Connecticut to 
Schoharie County early in the present centurw 
His brother-in-law, Joseph Hurlburt, built the 
first store in the village of Gilboa, and resided 
on what is known as the Dr. Fanning farm. 

Matthias Hubbell, Dr. Hubbell's grand- 
father, accompanied his parents from Connect- 
icut when a boy, and during his acti\-e )-ears 
he was Justice of the Peace and followed gen- 
eral farming in the towns of Gilboa and Blen- 
heim. He married for his first wife Sophia 
Richtm}-er, who was of German ancestry. 
The grandparents were buried in the old cem- 
etery in Gilboa village. 

Jacob Richtmyer Hubbell, Dr. Hubbell's 
father, was a lifelong resident of this county. 
He died in Sharon Springs, N.Y. , November 
II, 1896, aged just seventy-si.\ }'ears, and was 
buried in Jefferson. His wife, Harriet, was a 
daughter of Benona and Betsey (Davis) Pierce, 
of North Blenheim. Her father was a de- 
scendant of Captain Michael Pierce, who came 
over from Iingland about 1645, settled at Scit- 
nate, Mass., in 1647, and was killed in a fight 
with Indians in King Philip's War in March, 
1676, while commanding his company. This 
is the line of ancestry: Captain Michael,' 
Ephraim,- Ephraim,^ Mial,-* Job,^ Job," and 
Benona,' father of Mrs. Hubbell. Benona 
Pierce was born in 1781, a son of Job Pierce, 
Jr., of Rehoboth, Mass., and died in 1855. 



His wife, Mrs. Betsey D. Pierce, born in 
May, 1789, died in September, 18S1. 

Jacob R. and Harriet (Pierce) Hubbell were 
the parents of si.\ children, namely: Richt- 
myer, the subject of this sketch; Charles B., 
a furniture dealer and undertaker in Jefferson; 
Hiram P., a physician of Stamford, Delaware 
County; I^lizabeth, wife of J. Perry Charnplin, 
of Ruth, Schoharie County ; Sophia, who mar- 
ried J. E. Preston, of Sharon Springs; and 
P'red E. Hubbell, who died September 23, 
1892, aged about thirty years. 

Richtmyer Hubbell acquired his early edu- 
cation in the district schools and at the acad- 
emy in Roxbury, Delaware County, which he 
attended one term. At the age of si.xteen he 
began teaching during the winter season, his 
summers being devoted to agriculture; and, 
having taught schools in Gilboa, lilenheim, 
and Eminence, he in 1S63 began the study of 
medicine under the direction of the late Dr. 
A. A. Wood. In the fall of that year he ac- 
companied his preceptor to Wisconsin, where 
he resumed teaching for a time at Almond, 
Wis., and also continued his studies with Dr. 
Wood and Dr. Guernsey, of Almond, Wis. In 
1864 he enlisted as a Corporal in Comjiany M, 
First Wisconsin Heavy Artiller)-, of which he 
was shortly afterward appointed clerk, and he 
served until the close of the Civil War. Re- 
turning to Schoharie Countv after his dis- 
charge, he subsequentl}' entered the Philadel- 
phia Universit)' of Medicine and Surgery, 
from which he was graduated P'ebruary 21, 
1 866. Borrowing the money to jnirchase a 
team and medical outfit, he began the 



lilOCRAl'IIlCAI. 



practice of his profession in Harpers field, 
Delaware County, X. Y. For the succeed iiijj 
ele\en )'ears iiis practice, which covered a 
wide circuit, extending into two adjninini;- 
ciiunties, i<ept liim c<instantly driviiij; from 
jjlace to place through all kinds of weather. 
While residing '" Harpersfield he served lour 
terms as Town Clerk and three terms as Su- 
pervisor. On December 25, 1S76, Dr. Hub- 
hell .sold his jiractice, together with his real 
estate in HariJersfield, to his brother, Hiram 
r. , and removed to Jefferson, where lie almost 
immediately accpiired prominence as a skilful 
physician and surgeon. Although his practice 
is large and his time exceedingly valuable, be 
has never been known to neglect the worthy 
jioor, believing, as he does, that life and 
health are as dear to them as to those who are 
more fortunate ; and, as lie himself declares, if 
they are unable to ]3ay him in dollars and 
cents, the\- have nifjre than licpiidatetl his 
claim upon them b\- their genuine gratitutle. 
He has frequently held the offices of presi- 
dent and secretary of the Eclectic Medical So- 
ciet\- of the Suscjuehannah District, comi^rising 
the comities of Schoharie, Delaware, and Ot- 
sego, and during his professional career he has 
directed the i)re]iaratory studies of five stu- 
dents, four of them becoming skilful medical 
practitioners and one a successful druggist. 
Two of the fi\e are now deceased. In iS.So he 
established the Jefferson Banking House, which 
he carried on for two years ; and, when the 
jiresent bank at Stamford, N.Y. , was founded, 
he was retpiested to become its president, but 
his professional duties prevented him from ac- 



cepting the office. His hearty co-o]ieration is 
alwa\-s to be depended upon in forwarding all 
measures calculated to be of benefit to the 
town. He was active in securing the present 
water-w<irks s\stem, together with a iniblic 
fountain, the Jefferson Co-operative Creamery, 
and so forth ; and he is using his influence for 
the establishment of a union free schocd, with 
academic advantages. He is activeh' en- 
gaged in general farming, raises Jersc}- cattle, 
and owns about two thousanil acres of agri- 
cultural property. 

On April 29, 1866, Dr. Hubbell married 
for his first wife Amelia S. Decker, of Gilboa, 
daughter of Jacob Decker and a sister of 
William H. Decker, Supervisor of that town. 
She died January ig, iSSg, leaving four chil- 
dren — Frank J. , Hattie A., ]5enona R., and 
Grace Greenwood. b'rank J. is a prosjierous 
farmer of Jefferson, and Hattie A. is the wife 
of Charles E. Nichols, an attorney of this 
town. The other children reside at home. 
On August 27, 1890, the Doctor married for 
his second wife Miss Rose E. Decker, his first 
wife's sister. Of this union there is one son, 
P'red D. , born July 3, 1893. 

Politically, Dr. Hubbell is a Republican, a 
protectionist, and a firm belie\'er in gold as a 
monetary standard. He belongs to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and has been a mem- 
ber since he was si.xteen )ears old. 



FORGE EASHER, a prosperous 
farmer of Duanesburg, N.V. , and an 
.'.x-member of the State Assembly, was born in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



45 



this town, September 20, 1S34, son of James 
M. and Marion (Kennedy) Lasher. The 
father's birth took place July 4, iSii, in a 
log house on the Lasher farm. This farm was 
cleared from the wilderness by the paternal 
grandfather, George Lasher, who was a native 
of Dutchess County, and came here in the year 
1800. A sturdy, persevering man, he suc- 
ceeded in overcoming the manv difficulties of 
a pioneer's life; and he resided here until his 
death, which occurred August 15, 1S46. He 
married Helen McMillan, a native of Glasgow, 
Scotland. In politics he voted with the Whig 
party. He was an active member of the Dutch 
Reformed church. 

James M. Lasher, the father, succeeded to 
the ownership of the farm, which he still holds; 
and for many years he cultivated it energeti- 
ally. Moving to Mariaville in 1S62, he was 
engaged in mercantile business and the manu- 
facture of lumber here in compan\- with his 
son George until his retirement in iSSo, since 
which time the store and saw-mill have been 
leased. Politically, he acts with the Republi- 
can party. For many years he has been an 
Elder of the Presbyterian church. Marion, his 
wife, who was born in Milton, Saratoga 
County, July 5, 1812, died on July 20, iSSS. 
She was the mother of five children, namely: 
Anna A., who married the Rev. James W. 
Johnston, and died in North Carolina in 1S86; 
Mary Helen; George, the subject of this 
sketch; John Kennedy, of Yonkers ; and Will- 
iam M. Lasher, of New York City. 

George Lasher began his education in the 
common schools, and completed his studies 



with a commercial course at Eastman's Busi- 
ness College, Poughkeepsie. At the age of 
twenty-one he became associated in business 
with his father, under the firm name of Lasher 
& Son, and since the retirement of the elder 
Lasher he has had full charge of the property, 
including the management of the farm, which 
contains two hundred acres. :\Ir. George 
Lasher is unmarried. 

Since becoming a voter he has manifested a 
keen interest in local public affairs, and his 
ability displayed in various official capacities 
has proved beneficial to the communitv. He 
served as Justice of the Peace for several years, 
was Supervisor three years, and was a member 
of the Assembly in 1881. He is particularly 
interested in educational matters. In politics 
he is a Republican. He and his father occupy 
a handsome residence located upon the shores 
of a beautiful lake. They are highly respected 
members of the community. Mr. Lasher is an 
Elder of the Presbyterian church. 



LBERT OSBORX BRUCE, M.D., a 
well-known practising physician of 
the town c^ Seward, N. Y. , has been located in 
the village of Hyndsville for nearly twoscore 
years, and with one exception is the olde.st- 
established practitioner in Schoharie County. 
He was born in the neighboring town of Sum- 
mit, December 6, 1S39, a son of the Rev. 
Samuel and Theodosia (Harrington) Bruce. 

Samuel Bruce, Sr., father of the Rev. Sam- 
uel, was born and reared in Scotland, and he 



BIOCRAPHKWL REVIEW 



lived tlicrc until after his marriai^e. Cominj; 
tiien til America with his bride, formerly a 
Miss .\riiistrun,L;, he became a [Huneer settler 
(if Oneida County, New \'ork, where he took 
u]) a tract of wild lantl. clearetl a s]iace, and 
erected the lo-- house in which he made his 
home during his remaining clays. With untir- 
ing energy anil true heroism lie kiboied to re- 
claim a farm from the piimeval forest, and his 
elforls were well rewarded. He ])assed to the 
life be\ond at the age of si.\ty-five years ; hut 
his wife- sur\ived him man\' years, attaining 
the age of ninet\-five. 

The Rev, Samuel Bruce was one of a family 
of three children. 1 le was brought ui) at the 
old homestead, and received his early education 
in the pioneer schools of his district. Pos- 
sessing great mental abilit\', he continued to 
add to his store of knowledge by judicious 
reading and studying, and for several }ears was 
employed as a teacher. He afterward settled 
on a farm in Summit, where he carried on 
general farming for some time. He also 
preached at Schoharie and elsewhere in this 
county. He was ordained as a minister of the 
Lutheran church, and subsequently followed 
his vocation in Otsego County, settling at 
South Worcester, where he died at the age of 
seventy-two years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Theodosia Harrington, was a daugh- 
ter (jf William Harrington. She survived him, 
passing away at the \enerable age of fourscoi'e 
and ten years. Of their eight children seven 
are now living, namely: .Samuel W. ; James; 
I'-.lbert (). ; Richard; l-'.li, who .iccupies the 
old homestead ; Lavinia, wife of Oliver AIuw- 



braiiy; and Martha, wife of Sylvester Smith, 

of ()neonta. I,uc\' Jane is deceased. 

JClbert (). Jiruce left home when a lad of ten 
years to become a pupil in the New \'ork Con- 
ference Seminary, which he attended until it 
was burned, four }ears later. He subsetfuently 
read medicine with Dr. George H. Leonard, 
antl in 1S59 was graduated from the Castleton 
Medical College at Castleton, Vt. Returning 
then to I-:ast Worcester, Otsego County, Dr. 
Hruce assisted his former instructor, Dr. Leon- 
ard, a few nKHiths, and then came to H\nds- 
ville, where he has since remained, a trusted 
physician and an esteemeil citizen. During 
this time he has seen H\ndsville developed 
from a small hamlet of three or four houses to 
a flourishing village, and in its advancement 
and welfare he has been an important factor. 
He has built up an extensive practice, his ride 
extending twenty miles in either direction from 
the village; and from his first day of practice 
until the present date he has kept abreast with 
the times in regard to the progress made in the 
science of medicine. Through the leading 
medical journals he keeps informed of the new 
tliseases and their treatments, and of the newer 
methods emjiloyed in curing old-time diseases 
of ail kinds. 

Dr. Bruce is a charter member of the Scho- 
harie County Medical Society, of which he 
has been president three )ears and secretary 
five yearfc, also having held all the other offices. 
Beforet his body of his professional brethren 
the Doctor is frequently called upon to read 
jiapers; and he has likewise contributed arti- 
cles un different topics, including diphtheria 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



47 



and typhoid fever, to the Medical World. He 
is also a member of the New York State Med- 
ical Society, and has been a delegate three years. 
In politics he is a sound Democrat. He has 
served as Town Clerk six years ; was Super- 
visor in 1869 and 1870; has been a member of 
the School Committee several years; and from 
1885 until i88g, under President Cleveland's 
administration, he served as Postmaster. Dur- 
ing that time he was nominated as candidate 
for member of Assembly, but being Postmaster 
he was obliged to withdraw his name. He is 
a prominent Mason, belonging to Cobleskill 
Lodge, F. & A. M., No. 394, and to Cobleskill 
Chapter, R. A. M., No. 229. He is a member 
of the Methodist church, of which he is a trus- 
tee, and for many years has been connected 
with its Sunday-school. 

Dr. Bruce was married June 21, 1S57, to 
Miss Cynthia Brown, the only child of Perley 
Brown, who was for many years a prominent 
man and the leading merchant of Summit. 
Dr. and Mrs. Brown ha\-e an adopted son, 
Bertie, now a pupil in the Cobleskill High 
School. 



tOBERT SELDP:N, M.D., a leading 
physician of CatskiU, N.Y., residing 
_• at 271 Main Street, was born in 
Shancsville, Ohio, on August 21, 1S47, his 
parents being Dr. Orrin G. and Catherine 
(Hall) Selden. His grandfather, Robert Sel- 
den, was a Scotchman, by occupation a miller. 
He came to this country when his son Orrin was 
seven years of age, and, settling in Massachu- 
setts, worked at farming there during the re- 



mainder of his life. The maiden name of his 
wife was Balfour. 

Orrin Selden was brought up on a farm, and 
followed agricultural pursuits until he became 
of age. His education was received in the 
common schools and in the academy at Haver- 
hill. While still a young man he went to 
Ohio, where he taught school for some time. 
He subsequently studied medicine, and prac- 
tised in Ohio and Wisconsin. He settled in 
Catskill in 1S77, and here he resided until his 
death in 1894, one of the leading practitioners 
of this vicinity. His wife, Catherine, was 
born in Win.sted, Conn. She was the daugh- 
ter of Reuben Hall, a shoemaker by trade, who 
espoused the cause of the black man and early 
allied himself with the anti-slavery party. He 
went South, and started a school and Sunday- 
school for negroes at Fayetteville, but was 
burned out, losing all his property. He then 
removed to Penn.sylvania and later to Ohio, 
where he died at the age of eighty. Orrin 
G. Selden and his wife were the parents of 
three children, of whom there are living Rob- 
ert and Mary. Mrs. Selden died at the age of 
fifty-two. She was brought up a Methodist, 
but after her marriage she joined the Presbyte- 
rian church, of which her husband was a mem- 
ber. 

Robert Selden spent his early life in Ohio. 
He read medicine with his father, and then 
took a course at the Charity Hospital Medical 
College, of Cleveland, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1S70. He began practice at Shanes- 
ville with his father, and continued there after 
the latter removed to Wisconsin. Subse- 



bi(k;r.\1'1iical review 



c|iiciitly the father and son were associated in 
])racticc here until the death of the father. 
Dr. Robert Selden has been here since 18S2. 
He has a very large practice and one that is 
constantly increasing. His patients are to be 
found not only in the village, but in all the 
outlying districts. 

Dr. Selden was married in i.SSo to Charlotte 
E. Gardiner, daughter of William H. C.anlinLT. 
She was born in Whitcsboro. X. V. , where her 
father was a physician. Later lie went to 
Ohio. While there he received an aiJpoint- 
ment as ])Ost surL^oon for the arm)' at Nash- 
ville, and while enga-ed in the discharge of 
the duties of that jjosition he was attacked 
with cholera, which proved fatal. His wife, 
Kmily Hull, bore him six children, of whom 
the living are: Mrs. Huss, of Cleveland; .Mr.s. 
.Selden; and Kmily H. Dr. and Mrs. .Selden 
have two daughters — Catherine E. and l^'an- 
nic, both of whom are attending school. 

The Doctor is a member of the New York 
Meilical Association, and has been its vice- 
president ; also a member of the Greene County 
Medical .Societ)-, of which he has been presi- 
dent. He has read numerous valuable jjajicrs 
on medical subjects before both organizations. 
He has been a Ma.son since i.Sjo, He holds 
membership in Catskill Lodge, No. 468, F. & 
A. M., of which he is a trustee and a Past 
Ma.ster; in Catskill Royal Arch Chapter, No. 
285, of which he is a charter member and 
]iresent High Priest; in Lafayette Comman- 
dery, K. T., of Hudson, of which he is 
Past Commander; in .Mystic Shrine, Cypress 
Temple, of Albany; in the iMaternal Union of 



Anointed High Priests, which includes the high- 
est officers from the various Royal Arch Chaji- 
ters of the State; and in the Association of 
Temidar Knights Commandeis. He is medi- 
cal examiner for a number of the largest insur- 
ance companies and for the A. O. U. W., of 
which he is a member and has been for several 
years financier. In politics the Doctor is a 
Democrat. He was Town .Suiierxisor for one 
year. His library, of which he is ju.stly 
proud, is the largest and finest jirivate library 
in the count)'. Dr. and Mrs. .Selden are mem- 
bers of .St. Luke I'^piscopal Church, and he has 
been f(jr a number of )-ears a vestryman. 



fOHN A. NKWKLL, of the well-known 
mercantile firm of Potter & Newell, 
Main Street, Windham, Greene County, 
N.\'., was born in Durham, N.Y. , on Sep- 
tember 21, 1829, son of Aiulrus and Julia 
(Bushnell) Newell. His paternal grandfatiier, 
John Newell, was a native of Southington, 
Conn., and came to Durham among the early 
pioneers of that town. 

Captain John Newell, as he was widely 
known from his rank in the State militia in 
the carl)- training. days, built first a log cabin 
and then a frame house, which he kept as a 
tavern for many )ears. He was of sturdy 
stock that could endure hardships without 
flinching, and his common sense equalled his 
stalwart frame. He was a militia man in the 
War of I Si 2. He li\ed to be over seventy 
years of age, and liis wife .ilso lived to be old. 
Thev reared a familv of eight children. 




JOHN A. NEWELL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



.Andrus Newell, who was born in Durham, 
became a prosperous farmer on his one hundred 
and sixty acres. Me tore down the building 
that his father had used as a tavern, and 
erected in its place the large and handsome 
house which is now the home of his son 
Charles. Like his father he was a man of 
sound judgment and of sj^lendid phj'sical 
strength, being hearty and hale up to the time 
of his death, at the age of eight)'-si.\. He was 
originally a Whig in politics and later a Re- 
publican, and he held numerous offices during 
his long and active life. His wife, Julia, died 
at the age of fifty years. She was a native of 
Westbrook, Conn. Both were devoted mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. Of their 
ten children Louisa died at the age of twenty- 
seven, Zina died at the age of seventy-one, and 
Edwin at the age of five years. The li\ing 
are: John A., Sylvia, Abby, Adelbert, Eliza- 
beth, Charles, and Eliezur D. Sylvia is the 
wife of the Rev. S. H. F"ellows, of Wauregan, 
Conn. Abby is the wife of Professor Gilbert, 
teacher of mathematics in the high school 
at Albany, N. Y. Adelbert is a prosperous 
farmer of Coxsackie, N.Y. Elizabeth is Mrs. 
Borland A. Peck. Charles is a farmer on 
the old homestead, and Eliezur resides with 
him. 

John Newell lived with his parents until he 
was about sixteen and a half years of age, when 
he came to Windham. He had received a 
common-school education, and upon coming 
here he began learning the cabinet-maker's 
trade with Mr. Potter, his present partner. 
At the age of twenty-one, having finished his 



apprenticeship, he went to New Vork City, 
where he worked for two years. During this 
time he saved a small amount of money, and at 
the close of his second year he received an 
offer from Mr. Potter to return to Windham 
and enter into partnership with him. This 
offer he accepted, and in 1S52 was formed the 
partnership that is now the oldest in existence 
in this county. Since that time Messrs. Pot- 
ter & Newell have built up a very large trade 
in Windham and the surrounding region. 
Both gentlemen are skilled workmen in every 
branch of furniture manufacturing, having 
made all kinds of furniture by hand. The)' 
ha\-e in past years done considerable manufact- 
uring on their own premises, and still continue 
to manufacture coffins and caskets. Their 
trade in furniture is extensive, and as they are 
the only undertakers within a radius of ten 
miles they practically do all the business in 
that line hereabouts. No firm is better known 
in all the surrounding country than that of 
Potter & Newell. 

Li 1856 Mr. Newell married Eunice Hunt, 
who was born in the house in which Mr. New- 
ell now resides. Her parents were Daniel 
and ALary (Rowley) Hunt, both of whom were 
members of the Presbyterian church. Of their 
family of four boys and five girls three are 
living and reside in Windham. Mr. Hunt 
was a leading man in the town and [jrominent 
in all public affairs. By occupation he was a 
miller, and he built the mill now standing 
here and the mill-race. Mrs. Hunt, who was 
born in Lexington, died at the age of sixty- 
three. Mrs, Newell died on October 10, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



189S, dropping suddenly Iroin heart disease, at 
the age of sixty-seven. Mr. Newel! has lost 
his two children — Highland and Mary K. 
Highland Newell, who was a young man of 
unusual promise, died at the age of twenty- 
three. He was a member of the Hami)den 
W'ateh Company, of Springfield, Mass., having 
learned the watchmaker's trade in his native 
place. He hatl been in business three years 
when cut down by a fatal illness. Mary K. 
died at five years of age. 

Politically, Mr. Newell is a Republican. 
He has served his townspeople in the office of 
Ccdlector of Ta.xes and as Auilitor of the town 
accoinits, and has been a candidate for Super- 
\-isor. He is a member of Mountain Lodge of 
Ma.sons, No. 529, having joined shortly after 
the lodge was organized. His interest in 
Masonic affairs has been acti\e antl unremit- 
ting, and he has held nearly every office in the 
lodge. He was Master at the time the Ma- 
sonic Temple in New York was detlicated. 
l-'or nearly fifty years Mr. Newell has been an 
active W'orker in the Presbyteiian church in 
this place, and for the last thirty years has 
Ijeen the leading tencjr in the church choir, 
which is the best in any town in the coiml)- 
outside of Catskill. He comes of a musical 
family, all of them being singers. ]'"or more 
than a quarter of a centur)- he has been an 
I-llder in the church, and for nine years he 
served the .Suntlay-school as its superintend- 
ent. He can scarcely remember the time 
when he was not connected with the Sunday- 
school, either as pupil, teacher, or sui)erin- 
tendent. 



(^UHN U. CAMPBELL, who owns and 
/"•J I occupies the (dd Campbell homestead in 
^-'^ Rotterdam, N. \'. , was born in Albany 
this State, May 14, 1.S44, son of Daniel D. 
and Julia A. (Sitterly) Campbell. Mr. Camp- 
bell's father, who was adoptetl by an aunt, was 
a son of Jacob and .Angelica (]5radt) .Schermer- 
horn. Jacob was a son of Simon and Sarah 
(Vrooman) Schermerhorn. Simon was a son of 
Jacob and Margaret (Teller) Schermerhorn. 
Jacob was a son of R)er and Ariantje (Bradt) 
Schermerhorn ; and Ryer was a son of Jacob 
Janse Schermerhorn, the emigrant ancestor, 
who was born in W'aterland, Hollanil, in 1622, 
and who married Jannettie .Segers \'an \'oor- 
houdt. 

John D. Campbell was reared in Albany, 
and acquired his education in the schocds of 
that city. Since earl)- manhootl he has been 
extensively engageil in agiicultmal pursuits, 
and is now the owner of the Camiibell home- 
stead of three hundred acres and the X'edder 
farm. His place, with its Colonial brick 
mansion, is one of the most iiretentious and 
attractive country seats in this section, the 
spacious grounds being shaded by grand old 
trees, thus adding to the comfort as well as the 
, beauty of the surroundings. 

On August 23, 1 87 1, Mr. Campbell was 
joined in marriage with P21izabeth Clute, who 
was born in Schenectady, N.\'. , October 30, 
1S48. She is now the mother of four children, 
namely: Da\id, bom IJecember 3, 1873; 
Julia A., born June 22, I S76 ; John D., Jr., 
born March 25, 1878; and Bessie B. , born Au- 
gust 7, 18S0. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Campbell is one of the most noted agri- 
culturists of Rotterdam, and he makes a spe- 
cialty of raising thoroughbred cattle and 
horses. Politically, he is a Democrat, and 
was a member of the Assembly in 18S2. 



NDREVV G. BALDWIN, proprietor of 
one of the best dairy farms in Gilboa, 
N.Y. , was born in Greenville, 
Greene County, this State, December 11, 1827, 
son of Harvey and Eliza (Boyd) Baldwin. His 
father was born in Woodbury, Conn., Septem- 
ber 7, 1799, and his mother was born in 
Greenville, March 17, 1800. His paternal 
grandfather, Andrew Baldwin, who was a 
native of Connecticut, and lived there a num- 
ber of years after marrying, removed with his 
family to Greenville, and later from there to 
Mount Morri.s, N. Y. , where he died. Pie was 
an industrious farmer. He had six children, 
namely: Deborah, who never married ; Nancy, 
who was the wife of Judge Reuben Hine, of 
New York City; Harvey ; Andrew, who died 
while young; Hannah, who married James 
Conkey, of Mount Morris; and Harriet, who 
married William Barnes, of Monmouth, 111. 

Harvey Baldwin, father of Andrew G., was 
fourteen years old when his parents settled in 
Greenville. He remained there until 1837, 
when he removed to a farm in ConesviUe, 
Schoharie County, where his death occurred on 
December 14, 1849. He was the father of 
five children, two of whom are living, namely: 
Andrew G. , the subject of this sketch; and 



William L. Baldwin, a lawyer of Breakabeen 
and ex-district attorney. The others were: 
Ann Jane, wife of the late Dr. E. R. Alackcy, 
of Catskill, N.Y. ; John H., M.D., who died 
in Olive City, Ulster County, N. Y. , in 1889; 
and James Harvey, who died at the age of ten 
years. The mother died September 7, 1857. 

Andrew G. Baldwin acquired his education 
in the schools of Greenville and ConesviUe. 
He aided in carrying on the honie farm until 
his father's death, and continued to reside in 
ConesviUe for five or six years afterward. 
Coming to Gilboa in 1S55, he was engaged in 
mercantile pursuits until 1861, when he pur- 
chased a farm, on which he lived about three 
years. Eor the past thirty-four years he has 
occupied a residence in the village, but still 
manages his agricultural property, which con- 
sists of two farms, one containing one hundred 
and ninety-seven acres and the other one hun- 
dred and twenty-three acres. \\'ith the aid of 
hired assistants he carries on general farming 
and dairying. He has dealt somewhat exten- 
sively in cattle, and at one time handled Ca- 
nadian horses. 

For more than thirty years Mr. Baldwin has 
served as a Justice of the Peace, and in that 
capacity he transacts most of the minor legal 
business in this vicinity. During his four 
years upon the Board of Super\-isors he was 
chairman of the legislation and printing com- 
mittees, and was a member of the committee 
on accounts of County Treasurer. He has 
also held other offices. He was alwa3's 
strongly opposed to slavery. His first Presi- 
dential vote was cast for the Whig candidate in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1S52. His allegiance to the Republican party 
dates from its formation, when he assisted in 
perfecting the local organization. He has 
served upon varinus Cdmniittccs, and lias 
missed but cine town cleclion since becoming 
a voter. 

Mr. 15aldwin married Charlotte K. .Stryker, 
daughter ol I'eter 15. .Stryker. who came with 
his parents I'lom New Jersex- in 17S5, the 
Strxkcr family bein- tiie very first to settle 
in this section. Mr.-;. 15aUlwin's grandfather 
came from Holland. Her father was quite 
active in public affairs, and prominently 
identified with the Dutch Reformed church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin have had five children, 
namely: Carrie E. , who married William Ha- 
garton, M.D. , for twenty-four years a well- 
known physician of Cilboa; Minnie K. , who 
married Henry Car)iL-nter, and is no longer 
living; George .S., M.IJ., who is now practis- 
ing in New York City; Lewis C, a dentist, 
who also practises in the metropolis; and 
Grace A., who is studying music. 

Mr. Baldwin joined the Dutch Reformed 
church in 1S65, and during his period of mem- 
bership has served as hllder, Deacon, treasurer, 
and .sui)erintendent oi the .Sunday-school. 



§()HN 11. GRAY, proprietor ,,f 
N.\'., was born in Oliv 
County, this .State, Janiiar\- 13. iS: 



1 general 
County, 
, Ulster 

;, son of 



Morgan and Rachel (l-'reileigh) Gray. His 
frrandfather, Martin lirav, was a lifelong resi- 



dent of Columbia County and a prosperous 
farmer. 

Morgan Gray, father of John H.. was born 
in Saratoga, and he there followed farming 
some years. He later came to Greene County, 
and remained a short time, then went to (Jlive 
in I'lster Countv, and in i S68 settled u))on a 
farm in .Saugerties, where he is still residing. 
He is now sevent_\-five years old, but possesses 
the acti\-it_\- of a much \diniger man. He is 
a member of the Dutch Reformed church. 
His wife, Rachel, was born in .Saugerties, 
daughter of .Samuel Freileigh, a ])rosi)erous 
farmer of that locality. She died at the age 
of fifty-six, having been the mother of seven 
children, of whom si.\ are li\ing; namely, 
Samuel M., John H., Carrie, Mary, Abbie, 
and Charles. Carrie married Daniel York, 
Mar_\- married (.)rville .Smith, and Abbie is the 
wife of Frank .Smith. 

John H. Gray was educated in the common 
schools. He assisted his father on the farm 
until he was thirty-one years old, when he pur- 
chased the general store conducted up to that 
time by his brother Samuel M., and, adding 
other goods, carried on the business for four 
years. Selling out to his brother-in-law, he 
came in 1890 to Tannersville, and [lurchasing 
land in the centre of the town, on the west side 
of Hunter Turnpike, erected his iiresent store, 
in which he has carried on a jirofitable business 
ever since. The store is sixty by one hundred 
feet, and two stories high, the ujiiier tloor 
being used for storage purjwses. He carries 
a large and varied stock, including dr\- and 
fancv goods, boots and shoes, hav and grain. 



KIOGRAPHICAI. REVIEW 



paints and oils, groceries, hardware, house- 
furnishing goods, carpets, crockery, harnesses, 
robes, all kinds of patent medicines, wines, 
liquors, cigars, and tobacco. He also has a 
millinery department. He opens in April and 
closes January i. With the aid of twenty-one 
employees, he transacts a large business, sup- 
plying all of the hotels and park resorts in this 
locality. He buys by the carload, and the 
character of his trade demands the handling 
of the finest quality of foreign and domestic 
goods. Ill connection with his store he carries 
on a well-equipped liver}- stable, keeping an 
average of thirty horses. 

In 1882 j\Ir. Gray married Jennie Carnright, 
a native of Ouarryville, Ulster County, daugh- 
ter of W'ynkoop and Abbie (Freileigh) Carn- 
right. Her father was born in West Hadley, 
Ulster Count)-. He moved from there to 
Ouarryville and later to Malden-on-the-Hud- 
son, where he has resided for the past twentv- 
five years and is general overseer on the stone 
dock. Her mother also was born in Ouarry- 
ville. She was a daughter of Samuel P. Frei- 
leigh, a farmer of that town, who was of Dutch 
descent. Mrs. Carnright, who is no longer liv- 
ing, was the mother of two children: Jennie, 
who is now ]\Irs. Gra\-; and Carrie, who married 
James Homnnil. Having a good common- 
school education and possessing excellent busi- 
ness abilit}-, Mrs. Gray is a valuable assistant 
to her husband, and has a general supervision 
of the store. She attends to most of the buy- 
ing, and gives her particular attention to the 
millinery department, which is well stocked 
with seasonable goods. Mr. and Mrs. Gray 



ha\-e one daughter, Maud .S. , aged fourteen. 
She is attending the academy in King.ston, and 
makes a specialt_\- of music. 

Mr. Gra\- is a Democrat in politics. He is 
a great lo\'er of horses, and keeps a number of 
speedy animals, and Mrs. Gray is also fond of 
driving. 



RCHIBALD TINNING, one of the 
eacling farmers of Princetown, N.Y., 
was born in Glen, Montgomery 
County, this State, August 6, 1S24, son of 
James and Hannah (Bradt) Tinning. The 
father was born in Scotland in 1785, and in 
early life he followed the useful calling of a 
school teacher. He later kept a store on the 
Erie Canal, and in 1840 he settled in Patter- 
sonville, where he ran a general store in con- 
! nection with fanning for eleven years. He 
tlien moved to Florida, N.Y., where he spent 
the rest of his life, and died in 1S6S. 
Politically, he acted in his later years with 
the Republican party, and in his religious 
belief he w-as a Presbyterian. Mrs. Hannah 
Bradt Tinning, his wife, who w-as born 
in Glen in 1795, and died in 1S38, was the 
mother of si.x children, three of w-hom are 
living, namely : Archibald, the subject of 
this sketch; Susan, who is now Mrs. Dougal, 
of Glenville; and Jane, who resides in Monte- 
rey, Cal. The others were: Catharine, who 
became Mrs. Dorman ; Margaret, who became 
Mrs. Brownell; and Joseph Tinning. The 
mother died in 1S38. 

Archibald Tinning was reared and educated 



IIIOCKAIMIICAI. 



in Montgomery County. He began life as a 
clerk in his father's store, and later engaged 
in mercantile business on his own account. 
He became a property holder in Schenectady 
County in 1840, purchased his present farm in 
Princetown in i S49, and has resided here since 
1850. He now owns about tliree huiulred 
acres, which he uses for general farming and 
pasturage. He raises large and superior crops, 
and realizes good financial results. He keeps 
from twenty to thirty head of fine cattle, also 
raises sheep, and his stable contains some ex- 
cellent horses. 

In 1.S48 Mr. Tinninj; married Sarah Mc- 
(jee, who was born in New York City, daugh- 
ter of William and Maria (Weast) McCee, 
will) came to reside in I'rincetown several 
years prior to her niarriai^e. She is the 
mother of five chiltiren ; namely, James, Will- 
iam. l-"rances, Maria, and Martha. -Mr. and 
Mrs. Tinning have eight grandchildren. 

Having acquired a competency, Mr. Tin- 
ning has practically retired from active labor, 
and will henceforward enjoy a well-earned rest 
at his comfortable home. In politics he acts 
with the Republican party. He and Mrs. 
Tinning are members of the Dutch Reformed 
church. 

Of late years Mr. Tinning has found the 
winters too severe, and he anti Mrs. Tinning 
have made several journeys to California to 
enjoy that delightful climate, and visit friends 
and relatives, making his headquarters with his 
.son William, who is a successful lawyer. Ik- 
has visited the Vosemite and other natural 
wonders of the State, also taking great interest 



in the sugar beet factories and other great in- 
dustries and improvements that are being car- 
ried on. 



RANK \. STRAU13, the founder and 
iger of the telegraph line and bus- 
iness in Middleburg, X. V., is of German birth 
and parentage. He was born in Altlieim 
Oberamt Horb, Wiirtemberg, on June i, 1S47, 
.son of Michael and Wallpurga Noll (\'on Hurr- 
linger) Straub. His father, who was born in 
Wiirtemberg, of an ancient and honored familv, 
came to this country in 1851. 

In the Fatherland Michael Straub had been 
a farmer and the owner of a large \ineyard, 
where he mniuifactiired wine on quite an exten- 
sive scale. He was a man of note in bis na- 
tive place, and esteemed by all who knew him. 
After coming here, he settled in Williamsburg, 
on the outskirts of Brooklyn, where he kept a 
hotel until 1S63. His wife, who was one of 
twins, was bcjrn in 18 16, and died on June 28, 
1852, not long after her arrival in America. 
Both parents were members of the German 
Catholic church. Of their fi\e cliildren one, 
Rosa, is deceased. Those living are: John; 
Carl A., who has been for thirty-two )ears in 
the regular army; Marie .S. ; and l-'rank \., of 
Middleburg, whose ])ersonal history is given 
below. 

l-'rank Straub received his education in a 
German school in Brooklyn, N. \'. He 
learned the machinist's trade in that city. 
Later he joined the I'nioii army and was 
stationed at h'ort Schuyler under (ieneral 




FRAN'K X. STRAUB Ay:u (.raxd-ijal(,hter, MILUKEU WELLS. 



RIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Schofield. At the close of tlie war he learned 
the barber's trade in New York City, and 
there worked at it for some years. Com ins; to 
Middlebiirg in iS6S, he opened a barber shop 
here, and has since been in acti\-e business in 
this town. He has been interested in every 
important movement which has touched closely 
the welfare or progress of the town during 
the last thirty years. 

The fire department, which is considered 
one of the best volunteer organizations in the 
State, owes him a special debt of gratitude. 
It was started on Decemljer 31, 1887, by a vote 
of the village trustees. A commodious brick 
engine-house was built at a cost of two thou- 
sand dollars, and a steamer and a hook and 
ladder company formed. Mr. Straub raised 
fifteen hundred dollars for the hook and ladder 
company, and made a personal contribution of 
one hundred dollars toward the steamer. He 
was foreman of the old Eagle engine, and was 
foreman of the hook and ladder company under 
the new organization. He has always since 
been connected with the fire department, and 
takes an active interest in all matters connected 
with it. He was also a pioneer mover in be- 
half of the water compan_\', and together with 
Mr. James C. Borst laid the first line of pipe 
on October 26, 1S94. He assisted in survey- 
ing and in making maps at the time the vil- 
lage was incorporated. For twelve years he 
had control of the telephone and of the local 
office of the United States Signal Service. 
The telegraph line, which he manages and op- 
erates, was built in June, 1889. This is pat- 
ronized b}- all the leading business men in 



Middleburg, and is now regarded as an indis- 
pensable element in the transaction of daily 
business. 

Mr. .Strnub was married in 1S70 to Emma- 
rette E. Gernsey, daughter of Montre\ille 
Gernsey, of this phice. She was liorn in Mid- 
dleburg. Her father is a native of this 
count)', ani.1 her mother, whose maiden name 
was Alida ]5ecker, was a native of Breakabeen. 
Mrs. Gernsey died at the age of thirty-six, 
having been the mother of nine children. Of 
these the following-named six are living: Mrs. 
Straub, Julia, Edith, Rosa, Roxy, and Lett. 
Mr. and Mrs. Straub are the parents of three 
children — Inez, Charles A., and Arthur F. 
The first of these is the wife of Frank Wells, 
a well-known druggist of Middleburg, and is 
the mother of one child, Mildred. Charles 
A., who is a graduate of the Union College of 
Pharmacy, is a druggist in Troy. Arthur is a 
baker in Albany. 

Mr. Straub is a communicant of the Episco- 
pal church and a vesti\man. He was con- 
firmed in St. Luke's Church, Middleburg, in 
1S69, by the Right Rev. William C. Doane. 
All the members of his family were baptized 
in the Episcopal faith. In 1S86 Mr. Straub 
made a trip to Europe and visited his birth- 
place, where he was accorded a most generous 
reception. 

Mr. Straub is a Mason, an Odd Fellow, and 
a member of the Columbian Literary Society 
and of other fraternal organizations. The fol- 
lowing record is of interest in tliis connection : 

He was elected Quartermaster Sergeant of 
Steuben Zouaves, Twenty-fifth Regiment, Com- 



lilOGRAI'HK AI. KK\ IIAV 



])any I, in 1865; joined Good Temphirs, 
Albany, in i.S'67; raised to the sublime degree 
of Master Mason at Middleburg Lodge, No. 
66^, V. &. .\. M., in 1877; secretary of same 
lodge from i KS i to 1886; trustee of lodge from 
1896 to 1901 ; elected to membership of La 
Hastille Lodge in 18S3, and elected secretary 
of La Hastille Lodge in 1885; reorganized 
Lagle Lnginc Com])any and elected foreman 
of same in 1884; organized Scribncr Hook 
ami Ladiler Company in 1888, and elected 
foreman of Scribner Ilocjk and Ladder Com- 
pany for two years; elected assistant chief 
of Middleburg Fire Department, and elected 
member of Oncongena Tribe, No. 242, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, 1898; elected nieni- 
her of Middleburg Kncampment. No. 129, 
1S94; ai)poiiUcd under Governor Morton No- 
tary ruhlic. 1S95 to 1901 ; elected Trustee 
and Collector of village of Middleburg, 1.S97. 



H.ARLK.S K. NICHOI..S, a prominent 



la\v)er and ex-.Supervisor of Jefferson, 
.Schoharie County, was born in this 
town. May 2, 1862, son of Hiram (). and Kli/.- 
aheth (Totten) Nichols. His great-grand- 
father, Lzra Nichols, who was a pioneer in 
Delaware County, went there from Danhurv, 
Coun., when the grandfather, Daniel Nichols, 
was eight years (dd. The latter became a 
prosperous farmer in Harpersfield. He had a 
family of nine children, namely: Laura; 
Fanny; .Sally; Daniel S. ; Ivzra ; Hetsey, who 
became Mrs. Hecker Clemen; Whitman; 
Hannah; and Hiram ()., above named. 



Hiram (). Nichols, father of Charles E. , 

I formerly carrictl on mercantile business iu con- 
nection with farming. He is now retired. 
His wife, Flizabeth, is a daughter of John and 
Amanda (Davis) 'I'otten, of Harpersfield. 
They have had three children: Charles F., the 
subject of this sketch; Orson, who died at the 
age of twenty-six years ; and Rollo, who is a 
prosperous dairy farmer in Harpersfield, is an 
influential member of the Kepublica.i jiarty, 
and served as a Justice of the Peace. 

Charles F. Nichols was graduated from the 
Delaware Literary Institute, I-"ranklin, in 
1.SS2, and for a time attended Hamilton Col- 
lege. His law studies were completed in 
Schoharie, and, having been admitted to the 
bar in 18.^5, he in August of the following 
year opened an office in Jefferson. The skil- 
ful and energetic handling of some of his first 
important cases was the means of gaining a 
numerous and profitalile clientage, and he has 
become a well-known ]iractitioner before the 
courts of Otsego, Delaware, Greene, Ulster, 
-Mbanv, and .Schoharie Counties. He has 
figured prominently in several hotly contested 
suits, one of whicli, an action brought by 
certain parties for the recover)' of ta.xes, neces- 
sarily aroused the interest of the general pub- 
lic; and his able management of another 
notable case, which had its origin in a [loliti- 
cal dispute, resulted in a victory for the local 
Republican orgiuii/ation. As one of the most 
able and active sujij^jrlers of that party he has 
rendered valuable cimunittee service, has been 
a delegate to \arious convent i(jns, including 
the one which nominated (lovernor IJlack, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA'IEW 



was a candidate for District Attorney in 1888. 
While holding the office of Supervisor in 1S92- 
93, he was chosen chairman of the equaliza- 
tion committee and a member of the com- 
mittee that erected the new almshouse, was 
instrumental in securing an appropriation for the 
repair of the fort, and rooms of the Historical 
Society at Schoharie. He has held other posi- 
tions of trust. 

Mi: Nichols married Hattie A. Hubbell, 
daughter of Dr. Richtmeyer Hubbell, of Jeffer- 
son. They have two children — Grace A. and 
Charles E., Jr. 

Mr. Nichols is a member of the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon Fraternity of Hamilton College, and 
has reached an advanced degree in the Masonic 
order, being a Past Master of the Blue Eodge, 
and the only resident of this town who belongs 
to the Commandery and the Mystic Shrine. 
His lucrative practice has enabled him to 
amass a competency ; and besides holding con- 
siderable stock in the water compan}', of 
which he is a director, he owns some valuable 
real estate, including agricultural property and 
village lots. Mr. and Mrs. Nichols are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



"^^ nT.LlAM A. WAS 
V^V^ leading physician 



.SSON, M.D., a 
Greenville, 

N. V. , was born in 1S52 in Hamburg, Erie 
County, this State. He is the only son of 
Horace and Susan E. (Oberholser) Wasson. 
His grandfather, John Wasson, was one of the 
pioneers of Hamburg, coming to that place. 



which lay in the old Holland patent, in 1800, 
at the age of nineteen. There he worked at 
farming during the remainder of his life, and 
on the homestead the succeeding generations 
of the family have been born. He served dur- 
ing the War of 1812 as a Captain in the mili- 
tia. He died at the age of seventy-four. His 
wife, who died in middle life, was before her 
marriage a Miss Griffin, Of the five children 
born to her, two are living — Horace and 
Thomas, both of whom reside in Buffalo. 

Horace Wasson was born on the ^^'asson 
farm in Hamburg in 1S23, and was reared to 
farm life. In early manhood he showed 
marked administrative ability, and this secured 
his appointment to the responsible position of 
superintendent of the Erie County Insane Asy- 
lum in Buffalo, the duties of which he dis- 
charged in a faithful and efficient manner for a 
quarter of a century. The institution was a 
large one, having about a hundred and fifty 
inmates. Mr. Wasson is one of the well- 
known citizens of Buffalo. He gave up his 
position in the asylum in 1873, and has since 
given his attention to his personal business 
interests in that city. His wife, who is of 
German stock, was born in Otsego County. 
Her father, John Oberholser, who reached the 
advanced age of ninety-four years, was a car- 
penter, and worked at his trade in Lancaster 
County when a \"oung man. Later he re- 
moved to Otsego Count}', and finall}- to Am- 
herst, Erie County, where he resided until his 
death. He had a famil}' of nine children. 
Mrs. Wasson is a member of the Church of the 
Disciples. She has two children : Dr. Will- 



IJIOGRArniCAI. RF.VIEW 



iam A. ; and Carrie, wlio is the wife of W. S. 
Turbctt, of Buffalo. 

Dr. W'a.s.son bcj^an cariiin;,' his own living' 
in his thirteenth \ear, when he went to work in 
a broker's oflfice in Huffalo, lie was there for 
a year, and then became an employee in the 
Kric County Savinf^s Bank for another year. 
Following this he attended St. Luke's .School 
for a year, and then went to Rochester as j,'en- 
eral agent for the Knickerbocker Life Insnr- 
ace Company, this being in 1X67 and 1868. 
Subsequently lie was for a year in colie,:;e at 
Alliance, Ohio, and he then returned to 
lUiffalo and became an assistant iiouse ])liysi- 
cian in the luie County Hospital, This 
position he held until 1S72, when he was 
appointed house physician. W'liilc there he 
attended lectures at the University of Ihiffalo, 
and in 1.S72 received his det^ree from that in- 
stitution. In 1873 he jiave up iiis jilace at 
the hospital, and opened an office in Huffalo for 
the practice nf medicine. There he remained 
until 1880, when he came to (ireenville. lie 
has here a large general jiractice, and is one of 
the most popular i)h)sicians of the town. Iiis 
present residence, built for jiim in 1885, is one 
of the finest in tlie vilhige and, indeed, one of 
the finest to be found in anv of tiie villages in 
the comity. 

The Doctor was marrictl in 1875 to Carrie 
K. Wooster, a native of Westerlo, daughter of 
Charles K. and Mclis.sa (Hitchcock) Wooster. 
Her parents had a family of four children. 
I'"or many years they resided here, Iier father 
being one of tile well-known farmers of the 
town. Dr. and Mrs. W'as.son have an only 



daughter, Alice M., who is the wife of John 
H. .Sandford, a druggist in this town, and has 
a little daughter. Ruth. 

Dr. Wasson is a Democrat. He is warmly 
interested in all ])ublic matters, but the de- 
mands of his jjrofession prevent him from tak- 
ing a very act i\e part in political alfairs. He 
is a member of the (ireene County .Medical 
Society, and while in Huffalo was a member of 
the l':rie County Medical Society, and also of 
the liuffalo Medical Club, which has since 
developed into the Buffalo Academy of Medi- 
cine. The Doctor occasionally takes a rest 
from his professional labors by indulging Iiis 
tastes as a sportsman. He is an e.\celleiit 
shot, and is the owner of several guns and of 
hunting dogs. He has been actively associ- 
ated with the Masonic organisation since 1877, 
when lie jiiineil the (Jueeii City Lodge in 
Bulfalo. Upon coming here he recei\ed mem- 
hershiji in the James M. Austin Lodge, and of 
this lie lias been five years Master, and was 
two years District Deputy in the (dd b'.leventh 
District under C.rand Master William Sliever 
and Crand Master liumham. He has filled all 
the chairs in the lodge. It was at his instiga- 
tion that the C.reen\ille Koy:d yXrch Chapter 
was organized, and he has been its High Priest 
from the start. He was a charter member of 
Jefferson Lodge, A. (). V. W. , of HulTalo, and 
while ill that cit\' was i.'.\aniiiiing plnsician ot 
tlie lodge. He has held the office of trustee of 
the academy, and is at the present time a 
member ..f the Hoard of Lducation. He is 
also one of the three lire commissioners of the 
town and chief ol the lire department. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



63 



WILLIAM T. WADDELL, Super- 
visor of the town of Duanesburg, 
N. Y. , was born where he now resides, son of 
William and Jane (McMillan) Waddell. His 
father, who is still living, was born near lidin- 
burgh, Scotland, Ala}' 5, 1815, and his mother 
was born in Rotterdam, N.Y. , about the 
year 1820. 

William \\'addell emigrated when nineteen 
years old, first locating in Rotterdam, and for 
a time he followed the tailor's trade. Turning 
his attention to agriculture, he came to Duanes- 
burg over fifty years ago, and, purchasing the 
farm which his son is now cultivating, he 
tilled the soil successfully for the rest of his 
active period. Jane, his wife, became the 
mother of two sons, namely: James McMillan 
Waddell, a Civil War veteran, who is now a 
lumberman in the West; and \\'illiani T. , the 
subject of this sketch. Mrs. Jane M. Wad 
dell died in June, 1S91. William Waddell 
has been a Republican in politics since the 
formation of the part}-, and in his religious be- 
lief he is a Presbyterian. 

William T. Waddell was educated in the 
common schools. From his youth upward he 
has made general farming his chief occupation, 
having assisted his father until taking the 
entire management of the property. Besides 
the original home farm of one hundred and six- 
acres he owns ninety-five acres of adjoining 
land. He raises large and superior crops, and 
makes a specialty of breeding full-blooded 
Guernsey cattle and Shropshire sheep. His 
industry and progressive tendencies are dis- 
played to excellent advantage, and his farm. 



which is desirably located, contains good, sub- 
stantial buildings. 

In 1S71 Mr. Waddell married fur his first 
wife Jennie Wilkins. She died in 1.S73, leav- 
ing one son, Samuel W. , w-ho married Eliza- 
beth Mead, resides in this town, and has one 
son. In 1875 Air. Waddell married for his 
second wife Louisa Schrade, a native of 
Duane.sburg. By this union there is one son, 
Harry. 

Mr. Waddell has long been prominently 
identified with local public affairs, having 
served as Inspector of Elections several years, 
Overseer of the Poor two years. Justice of the 
Peace six years, while he is now serving his 
sixth term as Supervisor, being indorsed by 
both parties. In politics he is a Republican. 
He belongs to St. George Lodge, No. 6, F. & 
A. AI., of Schenectady. He has held all of 
the important chairs of Bethan}- Lodge, No. 
524, I. O. O. v., and is a Past Master and 
now .secretary of I^mpire Grange, No. 784, 
Patrons of Husbandry. He attends the PLpis- 
copal church. 



SEWIS SHELAIANDINE, formerly a 
prosperous farmer and cattle dealer of 
^^^ Jefferson, was born in this town, July 
16, 181 1. He was a son of John and Lizzie 
(Washburn) Shelmandine and grandson of 
Richard Shelmandine an Englishman, who 
was one of the first settlers in Jefferson. 
Richard Shelmandine married a Aliss Kniskem, 
of I^lenheim, and resided upon a farm in this 
town for the rest of his life. He and his wife 



64 



;i()(;i< Ai'iiKAl. 



reared four sons and one daii{,rhter; namely, 
Henry, Borant, Henjamin, John, and Mary. 
Henry was a lifelong residL-nl "f Jefferson. 
Horant, who was in his )inin;,^cr days a hunter, 
later went to Oil Creek, I'a. Henjaniin 
settleil in I'enns) Ivania. Mar\- married Oba- 
diah Ruland. 

John Shelniandine, father of Lewis, was 
l)orn in Jefferson, and here sjient the active 
l)eri<)(l of his life in tilling the soil. In iSoi 
he married Lizzie Washburn, of Danhury, 
Conn. .She became the mother of nine chil- 
dren, namely: Kate, who is no longer living ; 
Josei)h, who died in Jeffer.son in iSS.S; Re- 
becca, who died in Farmington, I'a. ; Khcda, 
who died in Illinois; Lewis, the subject of 
this sketch; Daniel, wlio died in Blenheim; 
Reuben, who died in Jefferson in i S94 ; Sally, 
who died in New York; and Charles, who died 
in Ohio. John Shelniandine died at the age 
of forty-seven years, leaving his wife with a 
large and dependent family. She, however, 
was an e.\ceedingly capable woman, and suc- 
ceeded in bringing up her children. She was 
a member of the Methodist Lpiscopal church 
and a devout Christian. 

Lewis .Shelmancline was Init fourteen years 
old when his father's death made it necessary 
for him to become self-su]iporting, and he 
jjegan industrial life as a farm assistant. 
While still a young man he engaged in farm- 
ing on his own account, and sbottl\- alter his 
marriage he returned to the li<imestead farm. 
His energy and thrift soon placed him among 
the leading dairy farmers and cattle dealers of 
the count)', his farm in the meainvhije ha\ing 



been increased from about one hundred to four 
hundred acre.s. He raised, bought, and sold 
live stock, took many prizes at fairs, ])urchased 
premium cattle, which he sold at a jjrofit, and 
became witlely known as an excellent authority 
in all matters relating to the live-stock inisi- 
ness. He was a jirogressive as well as an 
industrious man, and cjuick to apjireciate every 
improvement in agricultural machinery, being 
the first farmer in Schoharie County to |)ur- 
cbase a mowing machine. In 1856 he liuilt a 
new farm residence, and in 1871 he erected a 
handsome house in the villa;;e, where his last 
days were spent. 

On March r,, 1S34, Mr. Shelmandine was 
joined in marriage with Harriet Pitcher, wiio 
was born in the town ot Sunmiit, l'ehniai\- 5, 
I Si 3, a daughter of Horace I'itclier. l^ight 
children were the fruit of their union; namel\-, 
Charles, Elizabeth, Phcebe A., Catharine, 
Sarah M., Mary, Lmeline, and Roniinda. 
Charles married Lydia I!idckwa\-, and resides 
in I'jninence, N.Y. Llizabeth is the wife of 
l'"rank Hannay, of Lminence. Sarah M., who 
married David (',. Vrn\,Qv. of Summit, died 
February 2S, 1S70. Marv first marrietl Will- 
iam L. I'ro])er, who died leaving one s(jn, 
Lewis. She afterward married David S. 
Palmer, a resident of Jetferson. Lmeline m:ir- 
ried T. (). Hurnett, and resides in Summit; 
and Romiiida married Hynm linrnett, and 
resides in Cobleskill. Charles and Pdi/abeth 
were formerly scho.d teachers. All the chil- 
dren united with the Methodist I'.piscopal 
church. 

In politics Mr. .Shelniandine went from tlie 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



GS 



Whig party to the Democratic party, became 
a Republican at the breaking out of the Civil 
War, and in his last days joined the party of 
Prohibition. He assisted in building the 
Methodist church at East Jefferson, of which 
he was for some years a steward and trustee. 
Benevolence was one of his leading traits, and 
he relieved the suffering of the poor with a 
willingness free frum ostentation. He died 
]\Iarch 5, 1SS9, surviving his wife some nine- 
teen years, her death having occurred Februarv 
23, 1870. Mrs. Shelmandine, like her hus- 
band, was an earnest member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and both were mourned as a 
severe loss to the communitv. 



"EXRY F. OL?*ISTEAD, Cat.skill 
agent of the Greene County Bible 
Depository and a retired agent of 
the American Express Company, was born in 
Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Conn., Novem- 
ber 22, I Si 3, son of Nathan and Martha 
(Watrous) Olmstead. His parents were both 
natives of that town, and his paternal grand- 
father, Jared Olmstead, followed fanning there 
as long as he lived. Nathan Olmstead was a 
carpenter by trade, and besides following this 
mechanical calling he taught school many 
years. His death occurred in Ridgefield at the 
age of fifty-seven. He was a member of the 
Congregational church. His wife, ]\Iartha, 
who was a daughter of John Watrous, a farmer, 
was a member of the I\Iethodist Episcopal 
church. She died at thirty-four years of age, 
having been the mother of seven children. 



Henry F. Olmstead is now the only survivor 
of his father's family. In his boyhood he at- 
tended the common schools of Ridgefield, and 
subsequently, both prior to and after complet- 
ing a course at Hilton Academy, he taught 
school in Norwalk. Relinquishing educational 
work, he went to Hudson, N.V, , to learn the 
trade of a hatter, and worked as a journeyman 
there two years. In 1S42 he came to Catskill, 
where he continued his trade on his own ac- 
count for two years, and opening a retail hat 
store continued it for a period of nearly 
twenty-five years, during the latter part of the 
time occupying the building in which he now 
has an ofifice. For fifteen years, beginning in 
1 85 I, he conducted in addition to the other the 
business of the local agency for the American 
Express Company. In 1SS6 the express busi- 
ness had become so developed in importance 
that he disposed of his hat business. He con- 
tinued to represent the company until Decem- 
ber, 18S0, when failing health compelled him 
to relinquish the arduous duties of his posi- 
tion. As a reward for his long and faithful 
service the company placed him on their emer- 
itus list, retiring him upon half-pay. Since 
1 88 1 he has transacted a real estate business, 
has been the local agent for foreign steamship 
lines, has looked after the Clark estate, and 
for the past five years has been the Catskill 
agent for the Greene County Bible Depository. 
In politics he was originally a Whig, and, fa- 
voring the principles of the Republican move- 
ment, he was instrumental in organizing that 
party in this locality. He was Civil Justice 
for sixteen years, and three years Police Justice, 



lilOCRAPHICAL KEVIKW 



and was rn)tecl for the imjiartial manner in 
which lie clisiiused of all cases coniinj; under 
his jurisdiction. 

In 1S44 Mr. (Jlmstead was united in mar- 
riage with I.ydia H. Utley, daughter of Ralph 
and Sarah (Huntington) Utley. He has had 
two children, namely: a daughter, Mary How- 
ard Olmstead, who is organist of the I'resbyte- 
rian church, and who teaches music; and a 
son, Henr)- F. , who died aged four )ears. 

Mr. Olmstead was formerly a member of 
the .Sons of Temperance. For many )'ears he 
has been an Elder of the Presbyterian church. 
He is a permanent Deacon, and was superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school for nearly twenty 
years. He has outlived the majority of his 
business contemporaries, having participated 
in the development of Catskill from a small 
hamlet to its present size. He still has in his 
possession the old hand sled, built by him forty- 
five years ago, upon which he transported the 
American E.xpress packages during the early 
days of that company's existence. 



\ETER V. VAN EPS, a well-to-do 
farmer of Glenville, N.Y. , was born 
in this town, November 13, 1825, son 
of Albert and Anna (Swart) Van lips. The 
family is of Dutch origin, as the name im- 
plies. Its immigrant progenitor was Dirk 
Van Ei)S, who settled in Schenectady County 
as early as 1662 fir 1663. Johannes Dirksie 
Van l'"|)s, son of Dirk, and the iie.xt in line, 
was killed in the Indian massacre of 1690. 
He had four sons and four daughters; and 



Invert Van Eps, one of his sons, great-grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was twice 
married, and had five sons and five daughters. 
J(jhannes liaphst \'an Pips, the grandfather, 
was born in (ilenville. May 13, 1731. When 
a young man he locatetl upon a tract of wild 
land, which he cleared into a gootl farm, and 
the rest of his active years were devoted to 
its cultivation. He married y\nna X'edder on 
May 2, 1761, and had a family of thirteen 
children. He died January 11, 1.S13. 

Albert Van Eps, the father, was born in 
Glenville, May 16, 1785. A sturdy and a 
thrifty farmer, he made excellent use of the 
resources at his command; and he resided here 
until his death, which occurretl March 17, 
1.S31. Politically, he acted with the Whig 
party. He was a member of the Reformed 
church. Mrs. Anna Swart \'an Eps, his wife, 
was born in this town, Januar\- 16, 1790, and 
died July 22, 1841. They had nine children, 
four of whom are living, namely: Ann Eliza, 
born September 16, 1819; Sarah, born Sep- 
tember 12, 1823; Peter v., the subject of this 
sketch; and Josiah, born February 11, 182S. 
The others were: John A., born December 14, 
1 81 3; Jacobus S., born December 24, 1815; 
Harmanus S. , born August 13, 1817; Josias, 
born December 11, 1821, died in infanc}'; ami 
Susanna, born June 18, 1830. 

Peter V. Van PIjjs was educated in the 
.schools of his native town. While still a 
youth he began to assist in the work of the 
farm ; and, having succeeded to the ownership 
of a p(jrtion of the homestead pro])erty on com- 
ing of age, he has tilled the soil with ener- 




PETER V. VAN EPS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



69 



getic diligence and resulting prosperity for the 
past fifty years. His farm is situated in the 
fertile valle)- of the Mohawk, not far from 
Hoffman's Ferry, and in the immediate vicin- 
ity of the spot where his ancestor erected a 
primitive abode in the pioneer days. The 
region abounds in charming natural scenery, 
including Wolf Hollow; and the traveller who 
goes out of his way to ride through this pictur- 
esque ravine is amply paid for his pains. The 
cries of the wild beasts heard by the early set- 
tlers have given way to the more welcome 
sounds of implements of industry, and the 
valley is now dotted on either side with well- 
kept farm-houses. 

On June 3, 1S51, Mr. \'an Eps was united 
in marriage with Mary Ann Davenport, who 
was born in Troy, X.Y. , March 23, 1828, 
daughter of David Davenport. Mrs. \'an Eps 
is the mother of three sons, of whom the fol- 
lowing is a brief record: Jewett Edwin, born 
December 25, 1S52, married Mary Conda, and 
is now cashier of the First National Bank, 
Schenectady; Da\-id Augustus, a prosperous 
farmer of Glenville, born September 15, 1S54, 
married Annie R. \'an Loan, and has two 
children — Jewett E. and Helen M. ; and 
Frank Stanley \'an Eps, born July 4, 1859, 
married Marion Bosworth, and is now a Chris- 
tian Science healer in Chicago. 

Owning one of the oldest farms in Glen- 
ville, Mr. Van Eps keeps up with the times in 
the way of improvements, and occupies a hand- 
some modern residence. In politics he is a 
Republican. He is esteemed both for his 
manly characteristics and as a representative 



of one of the most highly reputalile families 
in this section of the county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Van Eps are members of the Reformed church, 
and are socially prominent. 



ICHOLAS BRADT, a prominent resi- 
dent and representative of one of the 
oldest families of Woestina (Rotter- 
dam Junction), N.Y., was born in this town, 
September 14, 1824, son of Abram N. and 
Maria (Vedder) Bradt. He is a descendant of 
Arent Andriese Bratt, or Brat, the first of the 
family to settle in Schenectady County, who 
died soon after his arrival here in 1662. 
He married Catalyntie De Vos, daughter of 
Andries De Vos, who was Deputy Director of 
Rensselaerwych. The first ancestor to locate 
in Rotterdam was Abram A. Bradt, who was 
an industrious farmer, and who died at Woes- 
tina. The maiden name of his wife was Sarah 
Van Patten. Nicholas A. Bradt, the grand- 
father of the subject of this biography, was 
born in Rotterdam, N.Y., August 15, 1773. 
He was in his younger days a blacksmith, but 
later turned his attention to farming, which 
he followed energetically for the rest of his 
active years. He was at one time Alderman 
from the Third Ward of Schenectady, Albany 
County, and also held minor offices. In poli- 
tics he was a Jeffersonian Democrat. He died 
July 9, 1850. He married Margaret Mabee, 
who was born in Rotterdam in 1776, and died 
December 13, 1S50. The_\- were members of 
the Dutch Reformed church, and the grand- 
father was an Elder for more than twenty years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Abram N. 15radt, the father abuvo nanicil. 
was burn in W'ocstina, Aiij^ust 22, 1793. He 
was an able farmer and a leading citizen, serv- 
ing as Supervisor in 1846 and filling other 
town offices. In jxilitics he voted with the 
Democratic party. He was an active member 
and an Klder of the Keformcd chureh. Maria, 
his wife, whom he married May 2, 1818, was 
born December 5, 1801. .She became the 
mother of .seven children, three uf whom are 
living, namely: Jemima, who married Jolin \'. 
Van Patten, <>f Glenvilie; Nicholas, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and llarman Hradt, who 
resides in I'etersburg, \'a. The cithers were : 
Margaret, Simon, Sarah, and a child that died 
in infancy. The mother died May 12, 1833; 
and the father, who survived her many years, 
died November 5, i.S-S. 

Nicholas Hradt was educated in the district 
schools of Woestiua, and unrkiiij; with his 
father acquired a good knowledge of general 
farming. He has made agriculture a profitable 
eiiiploviiient, and since 1.S60 lias resided on the 
farm (jf one lunuired acres which he is still 
carrying on witli energy. He also owns the 
homestead farm, which contains the same 
number of acres, anil he ranks among tlie well- 
to-do residents of this section. 

On September 29, 1857, Mr. Hradt was 
united in marriage with Hester Hradt, who was 
born in Rotterdam, November 13, 1834. Mrs. 
Hradt became the mother of seven children, 
namely: Helen K,, born I'ebruary 15, 1862; 
Aaron I-'rank, born June 2'j, 1865; Margaret, 
born October 13, 1869; ]':iizabeth, horn June 
17, 1872, now the wife of Martin H. Scher- 



merhorn ; .Simon \'., born January 29, 1873; 
Maria, who married .Simon \'. X'eeder, and 
died at the age of twenty-one years; ar.d 
Abr:mi, who dieil at the age of twent\-four. 
Mrs. Hradt died May i, 1889. 

Mr. Hradt has been a Trustee of tlie town, 
was an Assessor for some time, and has ren- 
dered efficient services in other town offices. 
Politically, he is a Democrat. He attends the 
Reformed church, and his children are mem- 
bers. 



I'LLSON O. (;Ri:i:X, contractor and 
builder, of Tannersville, (ireenc 
County, N.Y., and a Civil War 
veteran, was born in Hunter, this county, May 
25, 1844, son of Giles and Sarah (Warner) 
Green. His father was born in Hunter, May 
23, 1800, and his mother, who was of Dutch 
descent, was a native of Conesville, Schoharie 
County. His iiaternal grandfather, Seth 
(rreen, who came from Connecticut, found his 
way here b)- the aitl of marked trees, and was 
the third to settle where the village of Hunter 
is now located. Taking up a tract of land, he 
erected a log house and followed farming. He 
was quite prominent here in liis day, and served 
as Justice of the Peace. He died at the age 
of eighty-seven. He had a large family of 
children, si.x of whom li\ed to be o\er eighty 
years old. 

Giles Green, father of Nelson (). , obtained 
his education in the common schools, and in 
his \-outh woiked ui)on the home farm. Later 
he had one hundred and twenty-tive acres of 
the homestead propert)-, upon which he erected 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



71 



a dwelling and engaged in farming, becoming 
well-to do. Besides this property he owned a 
number of houses in Hunter. In jjolitics he 
was a Democrat. He died at eighty-nine years 
of age. His wife, Sarah, died at the age of 
eighty-four. She was the mother of four 
children, three of whom are living; namely. 
Nelson O., Emma E., and Gilbert. Emma 
E. Green is the widow of George Pollock, and 
Gilbert is a resident of this town. The [jar- 
ents were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Nelson O. Green began his education in the 
common schools of Hunter. He resided at the 
parental home until he was thirteen years old, 
when he went to Romeo, ^lich., twentv-eight 
miles from Detroit, where he remained two 
years, attending school and following various 
kinds of employment. Returning East, he en- 
listed in 1S62 in the One Hundred and Twen- 
tieth New York Regiment, with which he 
served three years in the Civil War. He saw 
a great deal of active service, and was slightlv 
wounded. He participated in the battles of 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettys- 
burg — at the last-named place the regiment 
losing one thousand out of fifteen hundred men 
in a short time — the battles of 'SWnc Run, 
Spottsylvania, Tolapotamie, Chickahominv, 
Cold Harbor, and the siege of Petersburg, 
where on March 25, 1S63, he was taken 
prisoner. He was confined in Libby Prison 
until paroled, when he rejoined his regiment 
in Washington. He was made Second Ser- 
geant, but declined further promotion, and 
was mustered out at the close of the war. 



Upon his return he went tn Saugerties, 
N.Y., where he was engaged in farming for 
two years. Later he worked in the chair 
factory at Susquehanna, and followed this 
occupation for twelve years in different towns. 
Coming to Hunter in 1S74, he was employed in 
the chair factory for four years, and then turned 
his attention to carpentering, doing a consider- 
able business in this line in towns along the 
Hudson for si.\- years. When Onteora, Elka, 
and Twilight Parks were opened, he engaged in 
contracting for the building of cottages: and be 
has erected a number at each place, employing 
a large force of men. 

In 1874 Mr. Green was joined in marriage 
with Alice M. Lester, of Hunter. Thev have 
had four children — Jeanette, William, Robert, 
and Jasper. Jeanette, who is a graduate of the 
State Normal School, is now engaged in teach- 
ing. Jasper died at the age of nineteen. 

Mr. Green is a Republican in politics, but 
has declined public office. He is a comrade of 
A. N. Baldwin Post, No. 263, G. A. R. , of 
Hunter, and has served as color-bearer for seven 
years. 

EORGE LINTNER DANEORTH, 

one of the leading lawyers of Scho- 
harie County and a resident of JMiddleburg, 
was born here on July 19, 1S44, son of Judge 
Peter and Aurelia (Lintner) Danforth. All 
the traditions of his family and the surround- 
ings of his youth lent their influence in 
preparing him for the legjl profession. His 
grandfather, George Danforth, who died in the 
South, was a lawyer of pre-eminent ability, 



7z 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and his father was perhaps the most eminent 
praetitioner of law tliat the county lias pro- 
(hieed. His grandmother, whose maiden name 
was Cornelia Swart, was born in Schoharie 
C"iuinty of Dutch parentage. One of his 
uncles, (jeneral (ieorge K. Danfortli, acc|uire(l 
a hi^h reputation in public affairs, .uid dislin- 
guished himself as a brij^ade commander in the 
Civil War. 

Mr. iJanforths fatiier, Judge I'eter S. ])an- 
forth, lived to the age of more tiian threescore 
and fifteen )ears, and in his lung and honor- 
able career filled many ]uil)lic positions. In 
1S72 he was made Justice of the .Su))reme 
Court. lie was a member of the Dutch Re- 
formed cluucli. His wife was a member of 
the Lutheran church until her man iage, when 
she united with the Reformed church. .Mrs. 
Danforth died at the age of seventy-one. She 
was a daughter of the Rev. Ceorge A. Lintner, 
D. D., who was for many years jjresident of the 
Lutheran .SvikkI and for twent_\--five years pas- 
tor nl St. Paul's I.utheriui Church at Schoharie, 
X. V. He died at the age of seventy-five, leav- 
ing two children- Mrs. Danforth and Joseph 
.Albert Lintner. The latter has been for many 
years entonndogist for the State cjf New \'ork. 
Judge and Mrs, D.uforth had three children; 
nnmely, (ieorge I.., Cornelia, and the Hon. 
I'lliot Danforth. Cornelia married Isaac \V. 
Ferris, a s.,n of Chancellor Isa:ic Ferris, of 
New Vovk L'ni\eisity. 

(ieorge L. Danforth, the subject of the 
present sketch, in his boyhood attended the 
connnon scbo.ds <.| Middleburg, a select 
.sch.M.l, and .Schoharie Academy; and Liter, 



after continuing his studies for a uhile under 
a [irivate tutor, he entered Rutgers College, 
from which he was gradated in 1S63. F'rom 
his early years he had spent much time in his 
father's olfice, and in realilv he was in practice 
at the age of nineteen. At the age of twenty- 
one he was admitted to the bar, and since that 
time he has been in activ'c practice. His 
clients come from all pints of the Stale, and 
he has practised in all the .State courts, in- 
cluding the United States Circuit Court of this 
district. He is at the ])resent time, with few 
exceptions, the oldest member of the bar in the 
county. He has been referee in many imi)oi-- 
tant cases, and counsel in a large nund)er of 
cases involving intricate points (jf law and title 
to real estate, and trustee of estates in this and 
adj<iining counties. l-"or s(jme time p:ist he has 
been counsel in the celebrated case in the h'irst 
D(.'|)artment known as the Coal Oil Johnny 
•Soaj) Case, a suit invcilving hmidreds of thou- 
sands of dollars. Whether as counsel b.r 
prosecution or defence, he has met with remark- 
able success in winning legal contests for his 
clients. 

On December 15, I S69, Mr. Danforth was 
iniited in marriage with Anita W'hitaker, a 
native of Xew York and (kiughter of (ieorge 
and Hannah (Daggett) Whitaker. Her jniter- 
nal grandfather, the Rev. J.inathan Whitaker, 
was a Unitarian clergyman, and |)ieached 
mainly in Massachusetts, where he died at the 
age of sixty. .Among his sons were several 
clerg\-nien, a judge who resided in New Or- 
leans, and a well-kn..wn government ..fficial. 
Mrs. Danliaths father was en-ajied in mercan- 




F. r. IIKAKD. 



B I OG R A P H I C A L R E\' I EW 



75 



tile business, shipping and importing South 
American products. He spent the greater part 
of his life in New York, Init died in Massachu- 
setts at the age of fifty-four, at tlie home of a 
brother. His wife was the daughter of a 
wealthy ship captain and philanthropist of 
Edgartown, Mass. She died at the age of 
seventy-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Danforth 
have lost two children. They have one son 
living — Pierre W. Danforth, who is now 
studying law with his father, and has for some 
time been engaged in newspaper work. He is 
the youngest editor in the county, and now 
edits and publishes the Middleburg Pnss, a 
si.x-column quarto, which is an enterprising 
weekly paper. 

Mr. Danforth and his family are members of 
the Dutch Reformed church, and Mr. Dan- 
forth has been an Elder in the church for some 
thirty years. He is warmly interested in 
Sunday-school work, and teaches the Bible 
class ; while his wife has a class of boys. For 
many years he has been sent as a delegate to 
the General Synod. He devotes much time to 
literary work, frequently delivering addresses 
and lectures and contributing articles to news- 
papers and periodicals. Of fine executive 
ability, he readily manages the many interests 
which press upon his personal attention, and 
which would puzzle the average man to manage 
at all. He is a trustee of Rutgers College, 
and president of its alumni association, and is 
also president of the Schoharie County Histoii- 
cal Society, trustee of the Union Free School 
and Academy of Middleburg, director of the 
First National Bank, and treasurer of the 



Middleburg & Schoharie Railroad Company. 
Since the organization of the fire de])artnieiit, 
ten years ago, he has been its chief. He has 
given considerable attentinn to fraternal soci- 
eties, and is an acti\-e worker in both tlie 
Masonic and Odd 1^'ellows fraternities. 

Mr. Danforth's home is the spacious man- 
sion in the prettiest portion of the valley, 
where the Danforth family has lived and exer- 
cised hospitality for many \-ears. 



RANKLIN PHIRCE BFARD, M.D., 

of Cobleskill, Schoharie County, well 
known as a skilful physician and surgeon and 
a large real estate owner, was born November 
29, 1852, in Jefferson, N.Y. , a son of Jacob 
L. and Polly (Wilsey) Beard. He comes of 
pioneer ancestry, his great-grandfather Beard 
having been an original settler of that part of 
Schoharie County that was named, in his 
honor. Beard's Hollow. There the Doctor's 
paternal grandfather, John Beard, a prosperous 
farmer, spent his long life. 

Jacob L. Beard was born and educated at 
Beard's Hollow; but when eighteen years old 
he left the ancestral farm and came to VVarner- 
ville, this county, where he served an appren- 
ticeship at the wagon-maker's trade. After 
following this calling as a journeyman and 
also in business for himself for several years 
in that town, he removed to Jefferson, and in 
1863 transferred his business and his residence 
to the neighboring \illage of Summit, where 
he was engaged in farming for a quarter of a 
century. In 1SS9 he came to Cobleskill; and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



fmrii tliat time until his dcitli, in I S<j3, be 
resided with his .s.m, Dr. licird lie was a 
steadfast Democrat, anti for a score of years 
served as Justice nf the Peace. His wife, 
Polly W'ilsey, who was horn in Wainerville, 
was a daughter of Colonel \\'il>c\, an ofTicer in 
the Revolutionary ainiy. She hore her hus- 
band seven children; namely, David, Samuel, 
Rose, Franklin Pierce, Marion, Adelle, and 
John. The mother died at the a-e of si,\ty- 
ei^dit years, in 1.SS9. Holh [uirents were 
members ot the Metliodist h:]>iscoi)al clunch. 

Franklin P. Heard received a practical com- 
mon-school education, and in his early man- 
hood taught in a district scIkjoI fi\-e terms. 
Leaving home then, he turned his attention to 
the study of medicine, ha\ing for his instruc- 
tors successivelv Dr. ("oincll, of Richmond- 
ville; Dr. Spauhlin-. of Summit; and Dr. 
Wo.kI. of Jefferson. lie subse<inent ly entered 
the Albany Medical Colle-e, from which he 
was .L;raduated as a member of the class of 
1S75. PcLjinnini; the ]>ractice of his profes- 
sion in Fminence, he continued there about 
two years. He then located in Summit, and 
for ten years ranked as the leadin,<; practitioner 
of that vicinity. Dr. Heard came to Cobles- 
kill in iS.sri; and here, also, his eminent skill 
and his close attention to his professional 
duties has ranked him the leadin- physician of 
the county, liis opinions beini; lari^cly sought 
after in consultations extending to adjoining 
counties. 

He is a member of the .Schoharie County 
Medical Society and of the ('ohleskill Lodge, 
F. & A. M. He was a .Supervisoi' in Summit 



in 1S.S2, a Coroner in .Schoharie County nine 
years; and from (_)ct(jber, 1895, until October, 
1S97, he was examining surgeon of the Pen- 
sion Department. 

Dr. Heard is the proprietor of two fine farms 
in Richmondville, this county, one in Hlen- 
heim, and om- in .Summit of trto hundred 
acres, and ninety acres of land in Cobleskill. 
The latter has been platted and divided into 
building lots, a street being laid out through 
oneixirtion. He has 1 ikewise valuable huilding 
])roperty in the village, including lots on VAm 
Street, west of the Catholic church; and he 
owns a fine business block in Summit. 

In April, 1873, Dr. Heard married M iss Alice 
D., daughter of John Chickering, of Summit. 
a well-known mechanic. Dr. and Mrs. Heard 
ha\-e five children; namely, C. Clautle, John 
J., Leona, Mildred, and David. G. Claude, 
who m.irried Lulie Kilts, is a succes.sful agri- 
culturist in Richmondville. John J., who was 
graduated fn.ni the Albany Medical School in 
1897, is a [physician in Sharon Springs, N. \'. 



IRHY WTLHKR, an enterprising mer- 
bant of (Juaker Street, Duanes- 
burg, -Schenectady County, N.Y., was born 
in this town, September 25, 1820, son of 
Kirby and Mercy (Allen) Wilber. He at- 
tended scho(d until fourteen years old, wiien 
he entered the emi)loy of Job Cleveland as a 
store clerk, ;ind remained with him two years. 
After a short time spent in a store at Sche- 
nectady he returned, and for the next three 
years worked for James L. O Neil. In 1840 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



he went to Braiiiard ]?ridge, Rensselaer 
County, where he clerked in a general store 
conducted by Hastings & Smith, cloth manu- 
facturers, for eight years, at the end of which 
time he purchased the stock, and for the suc- 
ceeding five years carried on business in com- 
pany with his brother, E. G. Wilber. Selling 
out his interest in 1S53, he returned once more 
to Duanesburg; and, associating himself with 
his brothers in a shoe manufactory in the lo- 
cality known as Quaker Street, he was for the 
next few }'ears engaged in selling their prod- 
ucts on the road. This business was started 
in 1S45 by R. P. U. Wilber, who began mak- 
ing shoes for the retail trade; but five years 
later he established a manufactory to supply 
the wholesale dealers only, and continued in 
business until his death, which occurred in 
1S54. The present store of Wilber & Co. 
was opened in i860, and carried on in connec- 
tion with the factory until 1867, when the 
firm was dissolved. The business was con- 
ducted by Kirby, E. G., and Charles C. Wilber 
until 1874, since which time Kirby and his son 
Charles C. have been sole proprietors of the 
mercantile establishment, consisting of a 
well-stocked general store having a large pat- 
ronage. The senior partner is one of the old- 
est business men of this section in point of 
experience, and through his ability, integrit}', 
and other commendable characteristics he has 
acquired success. Aside from his mercantile 
business he deals quite extensively in real 
estate. His own residence is one of the hand- 
somest in town. 

Mr. Wilber contracted the first of his two 



marriages in 1843, with Lucy Ann Crego, of 
Chatham, Columbia County. She died in 
1877, and in 1880 he married .Mrs. Pha-be J. 
Auchanipaugh, born Stevens, a native of 
Wright, Schoharie County. He is the father 
of five children, all by his first wife, namely: 
Elllen M., who married the Rev. Milton Tator, 
and died at the age of fifty-one years; Emily 
W., wife of Arthur D. Meail, of Schoharie; 
Augusta A., wife of Charles E. Hoag, of 
Quaker Street; Adeline C, wife of Walter 
Briggs, of Schenectady; and Charles C. Wil- 
ber, who is in business with his father. Mr. 
Wilber has ten grandchildren. In politics he 
is a Democrat. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. 

Charles C. Wilber was born at Brainard's 
Bridge, May 30, 1847, and was educated in 
the schools of Duanesburg. Like his father 
he entered mercantile pursuits when fourteen 
years old, and is an excellent business man. 
He acts with the Democratic party in politics, 
and served with ability as Postmaster for three 
years. On December 2i, 1870, he married 
Emily Moon, who was born in this town in 
September, 1847, daughter of John and Emily 
Moon. She is the mother of one son, Aichie 
M. Wilber, who was born March 13, 1880. 



WALTON VAN LOAN, of Cat 
N.Y., publisher of the Ca 



:atskill, 
;atskill 

Mountain duidc, was born in New York City 
on January 8, 1834, son of Matthew D. and 
Julia A. (Thompson) Van Loan. His grand- 
father, Isaac Van Loan, a resident of Catskill, 



78 



RE\"IKW 



was a mason by trade, but was engaged for a 
long period as captain of a passenger sloop 
plying between Catskill and New York. Cap- 
tain Van Loan died at tlie age of seventy-two. 
His wile, Jane Dies, who was born in Gilboa, 
died at the age of seventy-four. 

Matthew D. Van Loan was one of a family 
of four children. He was reared in this tnwn 
and educated in the common schools. In 1S41 
he went to .\ew ^'ork City and opened a da- 
giierrenty])e studio, being the first man in the 
United States to make a business of producing 
poitraits by the new jhoicss. He continued 
taking pictures for ten years in New \'ork, and 
from there went to rhihi(icl])hia and later to 
Washington, engaging in tlie same business. 
Subsequently and up to tlie time of his de.ith, 
in i.S5^>, lie was en-.phiyed in the custon:- 
liouse in .San l-'rancisco. Widely known as 
a dagucrrent\pe artist both in this country and 
abroad, he took many ]iri/.es in American 
cities and was given special iionors in Lng- 
lan;l. While in New York he had a revolving 
gallery in the Delnvuiico Building, the only 
one ever known. His wife, Julia, who died 
at the age of seventy-seven, iiore him three 
ciiildren, two of whom are living. These are 
Walton and Spencer. The latter, who was a 
scd.lier in the Civil War, resides in this vil- 
lage. H.)th iKirents were communicants of the 
l-lpiscopaj church, the father being one of the 
vestryuKii. 

Walton Van Loan resi.jed in Catskill until 
he was twelve years of age, and then went 
with his father to different cities. |-"or a time 
he attended the luiblic scho( Is in Philadel- 



phia. When about thirteen years of age he se- 
cured an appointment as page in the national 
House of Representatives. This position he 
held from 1K46 to 1S50, receiving in ])ayment 
sixty dollars per month in gohl. In 1.S52 he 
went to Californa via Nicaragua to join his 
father, and ])aid his own fare. He carrieil a 
letter of introduction from Daniel Webster to 
the custom-house officials in .San i'Vancisco, 
and shortly alter his arrival was given a ])osi- 
tion in the custom diouse. Hut he remained 
in it only a short lime, leaving to go as clerk 
in a large book store. After four years in 
that business he returned to Catskill and 
bought out a store, which he conducted for the 
next twenty years, up to iSjS. In that year 
he' started his ])resent business, which has 
provetl to be most successful. He has issued 
about thirty-six thousand guide books and 
about fifty thousand maps of the Catskills, 
taking in the entire chain. He is conceded 
to be the most reliable authority on points 
concerning the geography and topography of 
the Catskills, and no man in the country can 
approach him in extent of information con- 
cerning this beautiful region. He has been 
to th.e top of nearly every peak in the entire 
range. 

iVIr. Van Loan was married in 1874 to Lucy 
Beach, a native of Michigan. He has now 
lived in Catskill for forty-three years, and in 
his present residence ever since iSfij, when il 
was built. He is a member of .St. Luke's 
Church, and has the unparalleled record of 
having been its treasurer for thirty years. 
His wife is also a member of the same church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and both are active religious workers. The 
society has just completed a stone edifice, 
which was opened on June 6, iSgg. This is 
saitl to be one of the most beautiful buildings 
to be found on the banks of the Hudson. 



^Frederick leross frazee, the 

I Is editor and proprietor of the Jefferson 
Courier, Jefferson, N.Y., was born in the town 
of Gilboa, N.Y., June 24, 1S72. His father, 
Charles Osborn Frazee, is a much respected 
and well-to-do farmer. 

Mr. Frazee traces his paternal ancestry back 
to Benoni Frazee, his great -great-grandfather, 
who was of Scotch descent, and who during 
the Revolutionary War was a resident of New 
Jersey and aided the patriot cause by hauling 
supplies for the American army. l^enoni 
Frazee lost his little property through the 
worthlessness of Continental money. With 
his wife and eight children, he migrated, about 
the year 17S3. to Schoharie County, then 
almost an unbroken wilderness, and settled on 
a farm one mile from the present village of 
Gilboa. Very soon thereafter he died, leaving 
his widow and children to take care of them- 
selves. 

Benjamin, the second son, who was born 
March 8, 1774, remained on the farm with his 
mother until he became a man. About the 
year 1797 he married Margaret Monfort, of 
Dutch lineage. Two years later he settled on 
the farm now known as the I'razee home- 
stead, at South Gilboa. He had five chil- 



dren, two sons and three daughters. He died 
August II, icS62, aged eighty-eight years. 

Hiram, the second son of Benjamin 1'" razee, 
was born November 19, 1804, and until his 
death, which occurred April 2, 1850, he lived 
on the farm with his father. On I^'ebruary 
13, 1S33, Hiram Frazee married Phicbe H. 
Osborn, by whom he had five children, only 
two of whom survived him. 

Charles Osborn, the father of the subject of 
this sketch and the eldest son of Hiram Fra- 
zee, was born on the ancestral farm, April 27, 
1836. After the death of his grandfather he 
bought the place which is still his home. 
January 28, 1864, he married Phoebe A. 
Clark, a descendant of the Clark family of 
Blenheim. Five chiliiren were born of this 
union, but only two are now living, namely: 
Harriet Estelle, who is now the wife of John 
T. Shew, and lives at Harpersfield, where Mr. 
Shew is engaged in the mercantile business; 
and P'rcflerick Leross. who is now, as above 
noted, in the newspaper business at Jefferson. 

I'rederick Leross P'razee in his early years 
received a good common-school education, and, 
entering Stamford Seminary in the fall of 
1888, finished a college preparatory course of 
study there in 1891, receiving a regent's cer- 
tificate and a diploma, which graduated him 
from that school. In the fall of the same 
year he entered Union College at Schenectady, 
N. Y. Here he pursued his studies for two 
years. 

In college Mr. Frazee was popular both in 
society and athletics, and stood high in his 
class. He was a member of his class foot-ball 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



team, and he belongs to the Greek letter soci- 
ety, which is one of the largest and most pros- 
perous college fraternities in the world. On 
leaving college he returne;! to his home at 
South Gilboa and soon after went to the State 
of Illinois. In 1893 he returned to his former 
home, where he remained until February, 
1S94, when he came to Jefferson and embarked 
in the newspaper business. 

The place then supported two newspapers, 
the Co/in'tr and the Schoharie County C//roii- 
iclc. The former, which was an old estab- 
lished journal, was then edited by George M. 
Proper, and the latter, founiled in 1891 by 
Albert C. Mayham and Charles H. Sluitts, 
was the property of Mr. Shutts, who has ]nir- 
chased Mr. Mayham's interest in the estab- 
lishment. M."-. Frazec purchased both of tlicse 
newspai'.er ])lants, and, merging the Cliroiiich 
into the Coinin; enlarged the same. His ca- 
reer as a new.spaper editor has been a success- 
ful one. He receives the hearty support of 
t!ie business men of Jefferson, and a good pat- 
ronage from the i)coi)le at large. He is 
not only a pleasii-.g writer, but a practical 
jirinter as well, having learned the mechani- 
cal as well as the editorial part of newsjiaper 
work, so that he is familiar with all the de- 
tails of the i)usinLS.s. He owns one of the 
best equipped country offices in the State. 

On July 16, 1.S95, Mr. l-^ razee assu.ned 
matrimonial responsibilities, being united in 
marriage with Miss Nellie Hubbell, a highly 
esteemed young lady of Jefferson, daughter of 
C. H. Hubbell. 

Mr. Frazee is a member and an (ifiicer of 



Working Lodge, No. 554, I". & A. M.. and 
also a church memiber, belonging to the Dutch 
Reformed church at his former home. South 
Gilboa. In the spring of 1899 Mr. I-" razee 
was elected Town Ckrk of Jefferson for two 
years by a handsome majority. He is much 
interested in the welfare and development of 
his town, is a loyal Kejiublican in politics, 
and an ardent worker for iiis party. He pos- 
sesses a genial disposition, is wide-awaki.- and 
enterprising, and never can do too much for a 
friend. 



§ACOH L. KILTS, an energetic farmer 
of Carlisle, N.V., was born in this 
town, September 2, 1S46, son of Will- 
iam and Julia A. (Kmiiie) Kilts. He repre- 
sents the fourth generation of his family in 
America, being a great-grandson of Peter 
Kilts, who came from Germany, and settled 
on a farm in Stone Arabia, now the town of 
Palatine, Montgomery County, \.V. 

Four of the sons of Peter Kilts located in 
Sharon, one of the number being John, the 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch. 
John Kilts spent the active period of his life 
in Sharon, and died at the age of eighty-seven 
years. He married a Miss Smith, anil his 
children were: William; Benjamin; Conrad; 
George; Kate, who married Solon'ion Fmpie; 
Margaret, who married Daviij Fmpie; .Susan, 
who married Gideon lCm])ie; .Sophia, who 
married Daniel Shafer; and Magdalene, who 
married Fd Pointer. Of these the survivors 
are: .Margaret, Susan, and Sojjhia. All of 




CHARLES DICKINSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



«3 



the grandfather's sons reared families. They 
were members of the Lutheran church. 

William Kilts, the father above named, 
was reared and educated in Sharon, his native 
town. He assisted in carrying on the home 
farm until after his marriage, when he moved 
to Carlisle and settled upon a farm of one 
hundred acres, known as the Hilsinger place, 
which is now owned by his son, Jacob L. He 
engaged in general farming and stock-raising, 
made a specialty of hay and grain, and realized 
good financial returns as the result of his in- 
dustry. Politically, he acted with the Demo- 
cratic party. For years he was one of the 
main pillars of the Lutheran church, serving 
as Deacon and Elder, and frequently as a del- 
egate to the Synod. He was well informed, 
especially upon subjects relating to religion. 
William Kilts died November 20, 1890, aged 
seventy-five years. Julia A. P'mpie Kilts, his 
wife, was a daughter of Adam Empie. They 
were the parents of ten children, three of 
whom are living, namely: Jacob L., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Wesley H. ; and Cynthia 
A., wife of Charles J. Warner. The mother 
died in i88j. 

Jacob L. Kilts passed his boyhood and 
youth in attending the district school and 
assisting upon the home farm. When a 
young man he managed the property jointly 
with his brother Wesley, but later succeeded 
to its ownership. He has seventy acres under 
cultivation. Aside from producing hay and 
grain, he raises cattle and sheep, and has ac- 
quired a wide reputation as a stock dealer. 
He also deals largely in clover seeds, produc- 



ing an original variety which is cleansed by 
machinery, and whose superiority makes it 
eagerly sought for by the neighboring farmers. 

Mr. Kilts married Melvina Shafer, daugh- 
ter of Sylvester Shafer, and has four children; 
namely, Beardsley W., Bertha E. , Avis M., 
and Aurie J. 

In politics Mr. Kilts is an earnest sup- 
porter of the Democratic party. He has fre- 
quently been solicited to accept nominations 
to town offices and to serve upon committees, 
but has always declined. He is a Deacon of 
the Lutheran church, is also a class leader, 
and prominenty identified with the Sunday- 
school. 



HAKLES DICKINSON, M.D., who 

was for many years the leading 
physician in Seward valley, Scho- 
harie County, was born in Plenrietta, Monroe 
County, N.V. , on May 31, 1833, son of 
Lyman and Harriet A. (Webster) Dickinson. 
He is a descendant of early colonists of New 
England. 

The first ancestor of this branch of the 
Dickinson family in America came from 
England, about 1640, and settled in the 
Connecticut valley. Dr. Dickinson's grand- 
father, James Dickinson, was born in Connect- 
icut. He came to this State shortly after the 
Revolution and settled in Canaan, Columbia 
County. Several years later he removed to a 
farm in Roscboom, Otsego County, and there 
remained until his death, at the age of 
seventy-seven. 



BIOGRArmCAL REVIEW 



Lyman Dickinson, son of James, was born 
in Canaan and one of a family of seven ciiil- 
ilrei). He lived with his parents until he was 
twenty-one years of age, when he went tn 
Henrietta, where he enga^^ed in mcclKinica] 
work for a number of years, at tlie same 
time doing some farming. He then rcmoNcd 
tu Nurtliern Indiana, Init ten years hUer re- 
turned to Riiseboiim. Some )ears afterward 
he moved t(j Tioga valley, and, purchasing a 
farm, continued to reside there until his death, 
at the age of eighty-eight. He attended tiie 
Presbyterian church. His wife was the daugh- 
ter of Aaron Webster, and was born in Canaan, 
N. \'. .She was of the seventh generation from 
the first representative of this branch of the 
Webster fami]\- in America. One of her an- 
cestors, John Webster, who settled in Hart- 
ford abcnit 1636, was the fifth (i(ivcrnor of 
Connecticut, holding the office one year, 
1656-57. He afterward remo\ed to Hadley, 
Mass. Her grandfather was one ot the ia- 
vorite scouts of Ceneral Putnam during the 
war of the Revolution. Her father, who was 
born in Connecticut, removed to Canaan and 
later to Koseboom. His first wife died at the 
age of twentysi.v, leaving only one child, 
Charles, now Dr. Dickinson. She was a 
birthright (Juaker. His second wife, whose 
maiden name was Sarah .Sut]ihci), had f]\e 
children, two of whom ate lixiiig, by name 
Orville and I.yman D. She lived to the age 
of eighty. 

Charles Dickinson in his early years at- 
tended the common scIkjoIs and later the 
academy at Cherry Valley. He began the 



study of medicine with Dr. James E. Sutphen, 
of Seward, and subsequently took three courses 
of lectures at the Albany Medical College, 
from which he was graduated in i860. Return- 
ing then to Seward, he began the practice of 
iiis ];r(jfession, and lemained until 1 869, when 
he removed to J5inghamton. At the <:nd of a 
year and a half he came back to Seward, and has 
since made this the scene of his ]jrofessional 
labors. He has now been longer in practice 
than any other physician in this section of the 
county. Dr. Dickins(]n is energetic and per- 
severing in whatever he undertakes, and is 
able as a business man as well as skilful in 
his profession. During early anil middle life 
he hatl a large practice, ami ccjvered a wide 
circle in his ministrations; but in later years 
he has retired to a more limited field. An un- 
tiring student through all his career, he has 
given attention, not simply to medical subjects, 
but to science and literature in general. He 
has now and then lectured im some scientific 
or literary subject; and during the summer of 
1896, while he was making the tour of lun'ope 
for [deasure and study, he wrote, by recpiest, a 
number of letters on his travels for the Cobles- 
kill />/,/,:v. 

'I'he Doctor has lived f(jr twenty-seven years 
in his present house. He was married in 
i859toCelia M. France, daughter <if Gilbert 
G. ]''rance and one of a household group of 
seven children. Her father was a wel 1-known 
farmer of this region, where the family has 
been settled ever since the Revolution. .Mrs. 
Dickinson was a member of tlu' Methodist 
church. She died at the age of thirty-eight, 



BIOGRAPHICAT. REVIEW 



leaving three children; namely, Everett M. , 
Melville D., and Hattie A. All of these are 
graduates of Cobleskill Academy. ]V)th sons 
are Knights Templar. Everett M. Dickinson 
has been for the last seven years a jeweller in 
North Adams, Mass. , where he conducts a large 
business. He married Lam-a Mann, who died 
in 1894, and by whom he had two children — 
Angle and Everett. In 1895 he married 
Louise Tower Wallace. She had one child — 
Gertrude Wallace. Melville D. Dickinson 
studied medicine with his fatiier, and was 
graduated at Albany in 1890. He was also 
for two years a student at Cornell Univer- 
sity. He is now assistant surgeon of the Troy 
Hospital, and is physician to St. Vincent 
Orphan Asylum. He married Emma Cole, 
and has one child, Cclia. Hattie Dickinson 
is the wife of Clarence H. Shafer, of Cobles- 
kill. Mr. Shafer is engaged in the jewelry 
business. 

Dr. Dickinson is a member of the Schoharie 
County Medical Society, has been its presi- 
dent, and has served as delegate to the State 
society. He has written and read before the 
society papers on a variety of medical subjects. 
Politically, the Doctor is a Democrat, and he 
has held a number of important offices in the 
town. As Justice of the Peace he has 
done a large amount of important business, 
and as railroad commissioner he has rendered 
valuable service. He was formerly a Free 
Mason at Cobleskill. P^or many years he has 
been a leading member of the Methodist 
church and for over thirty-five years a Sunday- 
school teacher. 



SAAC SHOWl'IRS, a retired civil engi- 
neer, was born in Hunter, August 27, 
1S27, .son of Japhet and Sylvia (Putts) 
Showers. His first American ancestor 'Vvas 
an emigrant from Holland, who settled in New 
Jersey, where he spent the rest of his life, and 
was a farmer. The next in line, John 
Showers, probabl)' came to America with his 
father. After residing in New Jersey for a 
time he settled on a farm in Albany, N. Y., 
where he died at an advanced age. Michael 
Showers, son of John and grandfather of Psaac, 
was a native of Albany. He worked on a farm 
there until reaching his majority, when he 
came to Great I'lats (now Lexington) and 
built a grist-mill, which he conducted a few 
years. He then took up a large tract of moun- 
tain land in what is now Jewett, and resided 
there with his family. He died in 1819, aged 
forty-nine years, lea\'ing a widow and ten chil- 
dren. His widow, who again married, died at 
the age of fifty-three years. 

Japhet Showers, above named, was born in 
a log house on the home farm in Jewett, seven 
miles below where his son Isaac now lives, and 
always resided in that locality. He was a 
farmer, and fairly successful. In politics he 
was a Democrat, and held some of the town 
offices. He died at the age of sevent}-. His 
wife, Sylvia, was a daughter of Isaac Putts, a 
well-to-do farmer of Lexington. Her father 
was twice married. I^}' his first wife he had 
fourteen children; and by his second wife, for- 
merly Mrs. Ruby Pel lows, of Dover, N.J., 
widow with four children, he was the father of 
seven children. Isaac Putts and his second 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wife l)oth livetl to be about ninety-two years 


Cruz, Twilight, Sunset, and li^lka — compris- 


old. Japhet and Sylvia (Hiitts) Showers had 


ing in all twelve hundreil 


acres. In 1857 he 


a family of eleven children, of whom four are 


ailo])ted the profession 


civil engineering. 


living — Michael, Isaac, Louisa, and Caroline. 


and lor the i)ast forty ye 


rs he has surveyed 


Michael is married, antl resides on an adjoin- 


not only all the 1 lardin- 


jiugli |)atent, but a 


ing farm, Louisa married Hcasle)' Teasler, 


great many farms througln 


ut this region. He 


and Caroline is the wife of (icorge 15enn. The 


has surveyed also land ne 


ir the Hudson Kiver 


mother died at the age of seventy-one. .Siie 


in I'lster County, .and 1 


as i(ini|ileted much 


was a Methodist in her religious belief. 


work f(ir the great qnair 


les in that locality. 


Isaac -Showers at the age of eight )ears went 


He has .also been called 


upon in many law- 


to live at the home of a neighbor, with wliom 


suits as an expert; and, 


ilthon,-h in 1895 he 


he remained fi\e )cars, and he spent another 


was compelled on account 


if ill health to ivlin- 


year upon a farm in tlie \icinily. At the age 


quish active work of this 


kind, his advice is 


of si.xteen he went to Jewett. and secured em- 


still sought upon man)' in 


porlanl matters. In 


ployment for si.\ niontlis at seven ilollars per 


1890 he sold the farm 


if two hundred and 


month. He ne.xt worked in a saw-niill, where 


si.xty-si.x acres adjoining 


his home ]iropert\-. 


he received one hundred and twent\- dcijiars a 


He erected a new dwell 


ing hcnise and other 


year for ten years, and saved seven hunched 


buildings ui)ijn his pre.se 


it faini, which con- 


dollars of iiis earnings. After his marriage he 


tains se\cnt_\- acres, used 


lirincijially for dairy 


located nil a farm adjoining his jjresent home, 


purposes. He also owns three other farms and 


which is about one anil a half miles from the 


outl)-ing land, amounting 


in all to one lliou- 


village of 'raimersvijle, on the road to Jcwetl, 


sand acres, and is one of 


the largest resident 


first purchasing one luindied and twelve acres 


land-owners in the town. 




and later buying more land. lie remained 


In 1854 Mr Showers wa 


s united in marriage 


there until 1 89 1, and from 1X46 to 1879 held 


with Merilla Loomis, d 


ughter of Alvin J. 


the agency for the I lardingburgh Land Grant, 


and Harriet (Palmer) L 


lomis, of Windham. 


Lot 25, consisting of twent)'-ei-ht thousand 


Her father, who was a b 


utcher in that town. 


acres, surveying and selling about twenty-one 


died at an advanced a-e ; 


md her mother, who 


thousand acres during that time. In 1879 he 


was a native of Ashland 


(lied at the age of 


purchased seven thousand acres l)ing in Ulster 


fort\-nine. I\Ir. and .Mrs 


. Loomis had eight 


and Greene Counties, which he smvcyetl and 


children, of whom five 


re living; namely. 


laid out in farms. It was in a poor contlition 


Addison, Merilla, Chloc, 


I.ovisa, and Julia. 


at the time he ttiok possession, but he improved 


Merilla is now .Mrs. Sh( 


wcrs, Chloe married 


it to such ,in extent as to make it more desir- 


Jonathan Tiaphagen, \ .1 


visa is the wife of 


able, an.l now besi.lcs a large number of 


William Young, and Ji 


lia married Geiuge 


farms the district contains four ])arks — .Santa 


Goodrich. Mr. and Mrs. 


Isaac .Showers have 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



had eii;ht children. The four now livint;- are ; 
Cyrus, Knima, Henry W. , and Georye H. 
Showers. Cyrus is a civil engineer, A 
sketch of him appears elsewhere in the Re- 
view, hjiinia married lulward Osborn, a 
blacksmith in California, and has five chil- 
dren. Henry W. is attending the Alban}- 
Law School, and George Harding Showers is 
a student at the Pol)-technic Institute, Troy. 
The others were : Jennie, who married Ste- 
phen Yining, and died in California, leaving 
two daughters — Bertha and Mingie; Elmer, 
who died at fourteen; Isaac, Jr., who died 
young; and Irving, who died at the age of four 
years. 

Mr. ShoAvers is a Republican in jiolitics, but 
has declined to serve in office. He was in 
1S48 a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He has been a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church for fifty-five years, 
a class leader forty-three years, and has also 
been connected with the Sunday-school as 
teacher and superintendent. He assisted in 
building the churches at Tanner.sville and Jew- 
ett, and contributes liberally toward the sup- 
port of both. 



ILLIAM KOHRIXG, of Glenville, 
e.\-chairman of the Board of Super- 
visors, was born upon the farm where he now 
resides, September 3, 1862, son of August and 
Elizabeth (Martin) Kohring. The parents, 
who were natives of Germany, came to Glen- 
ville about the year 185S, and settled upon a 
farm. August Kohring was a sturd}' and in- 



dustrious man, possessing the keen intelli- 
gence and ambition to advance which is charac- 
teristic of his race; and he was respected as 
a worthy, u])right, and progressive citizen. 
When naturalized he embraced the principles 
of the Democratic party, but withdrew his 
allegiance on account of the slavery question, 
and thenceforward acted with the Republicans. 
In his religious belief he was a Methodist. 
August Kohring died July 7, 1897. His wife 
is still living. They reared two sons, namely: 
William, the subject of this sketch; and 
George, who died in February, 18S9, aged 
twenty-seven years. 

William Kohring began his education in the 
common schools and completed his studies with 
a two years' course at a commercial college in 
Schenectady. He has made agriculture his 
chief occupation, and is now the owner of the 
home farm of about fifty acres. He carries on 
general farming in an able and progressive 
manner, keeps .some fine Jer.sey cattle, and is 
regarded as one of the leading farmers in this 
locality. In politics he is a Republican, and 
since reaching his majority he has taken a 
lively interest in local public affairs. He has 
served as a Justice of the Peace four years, and 
was Supervisor for the years 1896-97, being 
chairman of the board the last )-ear. 

On March 18, 1891, Mr. Kohring was 
united in marriage with Lillie Muller, who 
was born in Brooklyn, N. V. , daughter of Ded- 
rich and Sophia Muller. I\Irs. Kohring is 
the mother of one daughter, Lillie E. , who 
was born December 5, 1892. 

Mr. Kohring is well informed upon all the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



important topics of the clay, and his public 
services were characterized by an intellij^ent 
appreciation of the people's needs. Ho is a 
Master Mason, and belongs to St. (ieorge 
Lod-e, \o. 6, V. &. A. M., of Schenectady. 
He is a nieinhL-r of the Methodist Episco|)al 
church. 



URYEA HEEKMAN, president of 
the First National Bank of Middle- 
bur-, Schoharie County, N'.Y., was 
born at Seward, this county, August 9, 1840, 
son of Nicholas and Alida (Becker) Beekman. 
Of Dutch ancestry on tiie ])aternal side and 
German on his mother's, he is a rejjresentative 
of one of the oldest and most notable families 
in the county. 

The first pro-enitor cjf the Beekman family 
in this country was John Beekman, aii early 
settler in Albany, N.'S'. , who later removed to 
a farm in the Mohawk valley. William, the 
ne.Nt in line of descent, born in 1767, was the 
first Judj^eof Schoharie County, which ])osition 
he held for thirty years. When a boy he was 
clerk to Colonel Marius Willet. Ife was ap- 
pointed County Jud.:,'e by Governor Geort,'e 
Clinton, and held that office until i<S33. In 
the years 1798, 1 <Soo, iSoi, and i,So2he rcjire- 
sented his district in the State Senate. He 
was married July I S, 1788, to Joanna Low, 
(lau;;hter of Nicholas Low, and he afterward re- 
moved to Sharon, this comity. His death took 
|)lace at Sharon on N(jvember 26, 1845, in the 
house which he had built in 1802-4, and 
which is still standin},^ 

Nicholas ]5eekman, son of Juilge Beekman 



and father of the subject of this sketch, was 
born at .Sharon, N. \'. , November 27, 1790. 
He became a prominent citizen of the town of 
Middebur<^, where for a Iimil; period he was 
engaged in farming and hop-growing, being 
one of the first ho])growers in the .Schoharie 
valley. He served as .Super\isor and in other 
offices, and represented the count) in the State 
legislature of 1841. His marriage, which oc- 
curred June if). 1811, united him with Alida, 
daughter of David Becker, antl their wedded 
life extended through a ])eriotl of over si.xty 
years. He survived his wife b\' two years and 
four days, dying Januar\- 13, 1S74. Of their 
twelve children, si.\ survi\e(l them. 

Duryea Beekman came to .M iddlebiirg with 
his parents when a boy. His education was 
obtained in the schools of this town. Since 
earl\- manhood his cajnicity has been demon- 
.strated in \arious lousiness enterprises, and he 
now IkjIcIs a high position in the business com- 
munit)'. lilected president of the Bjrst Na- 
tional Bank of Middleburg at the time of its 
organization in 1880, he still remains in office. 
The bank is regarded as one of the best in this 
part of the State, and its reputation is due in 
chief measure to its e.Ncellent management. 
I\fr. Beekman was for man)' years secretary and 
is now vice-president of the Middleburg & 
Schoharie Railroad. He is a director of the 
Davenport, Middleburg & Durham Railroad 
Comjiany anil a director of the MerchaiUs' and 
Farmers' Mutual hire Insurance Company. In 
[loliticsa Democrat, he served in the legisla- 
ture of 1879, having been elected by a majority 
of one thousand \]\c lunulred and six votes; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and he lias frequently represented his party in 
State and other conventions. He is a member 
of Middleburg Lodge, No. 663, F. & A. M. 

On October 19, 1S59, Mr. Heekman married 
Llizabeth Richtm_\-er, a daughter of Peter and 
I'^lizabeth Richtmyer. l\h-s. Beekman's pater- 
nal grandfather, Captain George Richtmyer, a 
native of Germany, came to America in 1745, 
and settled at Hartman's Dorf, in the town of 
Middleburg. Captain Richtm}'er was subse- 
quently an oiificer in the American army during 
the Revolutionary War. He fought at Bemis 
Heights, and served with distinction in every 
engagement that occurred in the Schoharie 
valley. "Slv. and Mrs. Beekman have been the 
parents of three children, namely: Charles, 
who died in infancy; Dow, of whom a separate 
sketch appears in this volume ; and William G. 



OW BEEK:\L'\N, of Middleburg, 
one of the leading lawyers and busi- 
ness men of Schoharie County, was 
born in this town, February 8, 1S62, son of 
Duryea and Elizabeth (Richtmyer) Beeknian. 
He comes of an old Schoharie County family, 
and a fuller account of his ancestors may be 
found in connection with the sketch of his 
father, Duryea Ikekman, on the preceding 
page of this volume. 

After the usual common-school course Dow 
Beekman prepared for college at Hartwick 
Seminary, Otsego County. He then entered 
Union College, at which he was graduated in 
1S84, having taken four of the most important 
prizes in the course. From September, 18S4, 



until June, 1886, he was professor of mathe- 
matics at L'nion Classical Institute, Schenec- 
tady, N.Y. , and during the same period he de- 
voted his spare time to the study of law in the 
office of Judge Samuel W. Jackson, of that cit)-. 
In September, 1886, he was admitted to the 
bar at Saratoga, and immediately began the 
practice of his profession in Middleburg. 
Since then he has built up what is probably 
the largest law business in this part of the 
county. In 1889 he was elected District At- 
torney of Schoharie County, receiving a major- 
ity of one thousand eight hundred votes, and 
during his term of office he never presented an 
indictment that was set aside or quashed. He 
has been attornc}' and counsel in many impor- 
tant cases, is attorney for the ^Middleburg & 
Schoharie Railroad Company, for the Daven- 
port, Middleburg & Durham Railroad, and 
also for the corporation of the village of 
Middleburg. He is the possessor of an un- 
usually extensive library. 

"Sir. Beekman is also a man of practical busi- 
ness abilit}-. He is a director of the Middle- 
burg & Schoharie Railroad Company, attorney 
and treasurer of the Merchants' and Farmers' 
Mutual Fire Insurance Compan}-, and a director 
and secretar}' of the Middleburg Telephone 
Exchange Company. A Democrat in politics, 
he is secretary of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee, and has delivered many addresses in 
different parts of the State in ever)- Presiden- 
tial campaign since he became a voter, having 
on several occasions been sent out by the 
Democratic State Committee. He has also 
delivered addresses on subjects foreign to poll- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tics, and his aljility as a speaker has liccn fre- 
quently recoj;ni/.e(l by the jiress. 

Mr. Bcekman has been Master of Middle- 
burt,' Lodge, No. 663, V. & A. M., for four 
years. In 1 896 he served as District Deputy 
(Irand Master of the Eleventh Ma.sonic Dis- 
trict, which comprises Delaware, Schoharie, 
and (ireene Counties. He is now District Dep- 
uty Grand Master of the ]-li.i;hteenth District, 
comprisin}^ Schoharie and ()tse,i;o Counties, 
lie is a ineniber of John L. Lewis Chaj)ter, 
k. A. M. He has also been District Deputy 
Grand Sachem of the Im|)n>ved Order of Keel 
Men, and belongs to the Iiidcijcndent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

On June 9, 1891, Mr. Heekman married 
Miss Laura Frisbie, daughter of Grandison N. 
Frisbie, of Middleburg. Two children have 
blessed their union — Marjorie Elizabeth and 
Douw Frisbie. 



IIO.MA.S W. JERALDS, a retired busi- 
e;_|_ ncss man and wealth)' resident of Ash- 
land, was born in \\'aterbur\-, Conn., August 
2.S, 1S39, son of Thomas and Mary (Brown) 
Jeralds. ]5oth his father and his paternal 
grandfLither, whose gi\'en name was Ransom, 
were natives of Bethany, C(jnn. Ransom 
Jeralds, howe\er, remo\-e(l from that town to 
W'allingford, same .State, where he carried on 
a farm for the rest of his active jieriod, his 
death occurring at the age of seventy-nine 
years. 

When a young man Tiiomas Jeralds became 
a .Methodist minister, and was attached to the 



New York Fast Conference for about twentv 
years. He was subsecpienth' engaged in the 
silverware business at Meritlen, Conn., until 
his retirement. He died at the age of forty- 
.seven years. His first wile, .Mary, who was 
a nali\-e of Burlington, Conn., died in earl_\- 
womanhood, leaving two children, namely: 
ICllen M., who married Henry Wooding, and is 
no longer living; and Thomas W. , the subject 
of this sketch. l-'or his second wife he mar- 
ried Betsey Parker, a sister of Charles Parker, 
a ])rominent manufacturer of Meriden and 
the first .Mayor of that citv. Of this union 
there were three chiklren, two of whom 
are li\ing, namely: Sarah R.. who married 
John Ten I-^xck ; and Mary A., who m:u'ried a 
Mr. Morgan, of Meriden, Conn. Mrs. Betsey 
P. Jeralds is still living, and is now ninety-two 
)ears old. 

Thomas W. Jeralds went from the \\'alling- 
ford High School to the academy in Meriden, 
and his studies were completed at the Ashland 
Collegiate Institute. loitering mercantile 
business in this town, he continuetl it in Chesh- 
ire and still later in Wallin-tunI, where he 
kept a general store for simic time. From 
Wallingford he removed to .\shland, \.V., 
where he engaged in active business until his 
retirement in 1890, and where lie still makes 
his home. He has business interests in \-:iri- 
ous places, and his time is now devoted to the 
care of his in\estments ami to the management 
of his fine estate in this town. This valuable 
[property, which is known as Crescent Lawn, 
consists of one himdrecl and fift\-five acres of 
desirabl}' locatetl land, useil chiefly for dairy 




W. JKRALIJS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



purposes aiul the cultivation of small fruits, 
and containing two substantial residences ad- 
joiniui;- each other. 

In iS6oMr. Jeralds was joined in marriage 
with Frances A. Tuttle, a native of Ashland, 
daughter of Albert and Aurelia Tuttle. Al- 
bert Tuttle was a well-to-do merchant and 
speculator. He figured conspicuously in the 
public affairs of this town, and held all of the 
important local offices. He also served as 
Postmaster, and while a member of the Assem- 
bly he introduced the act incorporating the 
town of Ashland. He was the father of five 
children by his first union, and by a second 
marriage he had two children, one of whom 
became Mrs. Jeralds. Mrs. Jeralds died Jan- 
uary g, 1898, aged fifty-eight years. She was 
a member of the Methodist Iipiscopal church 
and a lo\-ely Christian lad)-. She left three 
children; namely, Carolines., Hattie A., 
and John T. Caroline married Lorenzo R. 
Cook, of the White Sewing Machine Com- 
pany, and proprietor of a large dry-goods store 
at Wallingford, Conn. Hattie A. married 
Charles C. Carroll, a jeweller of Wallingford, 
and her children are: Barbara J., P'rances W., 
and Doris J. John T., who is residing in 
East Haven, Conn., married Berta L. \\'hit- 
lesey, of East Haven. 

In politics Mr. Jeralds is a Republican. 
He held the appointment of I^ostmaster both in 
Cheshire and Yales\ille, and ser\-ed with abil- 
ity as Supervisor in Ashland for the years 
1S91-92. PI is interest in the welfare of Ash- 
land began some forty years ago, when he first 
engaged in business; and during the period of 



his residence elsewhere his attachment to the 
place was unabated. Pie is a member of and 
a trustee of the Methodist P^piscopal church, 
but has contributed liberally to the different 
churches. He takes a li\-el\' interest in Sun- 
day-school work, and rendered valuable aid in 
securing and furnishing the rooms of the Young 
Men's Christian Association. Mr. Jeralds is 
an Odd P'ellow, and formerly belonged to the 
Meriden Centre Lodge, Meriden, Conn. 



ISS JANE VAN LOAN, one of 
the most prominent and highly re- 
spected ladies of Catskill, was 
born in this place, her parents being William 
W. and Sally (Du Bois) Wan Loan. 

Her grandfather. Captain Isaac \'an Loan, 
was in his time the leading man of the town, 
and widely known throughout all this section of 
the county. He had large shipping interests, 
and was the owner of several sloops which ran 
on the river. When young he had learned the 
mason's trade, and always as long as he lived 
he took a deep interest in the welfare of me- 
chanics, and aided them in e\ery possible way. 
Nor was his helpfulness extended to this class 
alone. E\er)- person deserving of sympathy 
was sure to find in Captain Van Loan's warm 
heart, which ox'erflowed witli kindness to all 
mankind, a fountain of consolation, and every 
worthy cause found in him an unfailing cham- 
pion. A man of fervid religious aspirations, 
in the church he was a pillar of strength. He 
was a member of St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 
and man}- )-ears one of its vestrymen. He 



lUOCRArilUAl, RF.VIEW 



took a prominent jxirt in seciirinj^ in iSoi the 
erection of tlie cliun.h edifice, which was the 
f^rst in Catskill. Not only did he aid with 
•(enerdus coiUriinitions of nione\ , hut lie j,'ave 
much time and ])ersonal effort diirin<; his ser- 
vice as a meniher of the hiiildinj; committee. 
He was one of those i^'cnial antl whole-hearted 
men wjio are sure to make friends wherever 
they ii't, and his death caused deep and wide- 
spread grief. lie never ne,t;lected the duties 
of ffood citizenship. I'or many years lie served 
the town as Kn.id ^hlster, and for a time was 
Sheri If of the county. His death occurred in 
1S40, at .seventy-two yens of a.t;e. 1 1 is wife, 
who also died at seventy-two, was horn in 
.Schoharie. Her maiden name was Jane Dies. 
.She was a daui^hter of Madame Dies, who was 
Ion- the hrst lady in Catskill. Aladame Dies 
lived in the beautiful, old-fashioned hmi.se that 
formerly stood where the Shale brick works 
now are. She was a daughter of Jacob Goelet, 
of the famous New York family of that name. 
Captain Isaac and Jane (Dies) \'an Loan had 
five children. 

William \V. Van Loan, father of Miss Jane, 
received his education in the iniblic schools of 
Catskill. He began his business career in the 
village, conducting a groceiy store until 1S2.S, 
when he solil it antl went to New York City. 
'I'here he opened a general merchandise store 
where the South h'erry .Station now stands. 
In tlio.se da)s New ^'ork had not outgrown her 
early boundaries, and Canal Street was still 
the end of the city. Miss \'an Loan remem- 
bers the old city well. In the summer of 1S32 
the cholera epidemic in New York drove Mr. 



Van Loan and his family back to Cat.skill, and 

the store and the town residence were closed. 
Hut in the fall the family returned to the city, 
where they remained until 1834. Mr. Van 
Loan then came back to his native place and 
went into mercantile business here in the store 
where Mr. Fo.\ now is. He owned consider- 
able land, which had been jxirt of his father's 
estate. He sei\'ed the town as I'ostmaster for 
some years, having the post-office where Mr. 
Hourke is now located. He died at the age of 
sevent_\'-two. He and his wife were members 
<,f .St. Luke's Church. Mrs. Van Loan was 
born in this village, and died here at the ripe 
age of eighty-four. .She was a ilaughter of 
Captain 15arent Du Hois, who was a lifelong 
resident of Catskill with the exception of the 
time he ser\'ed in the Continental arm_\' during 
the Revolution. Of the children born to Will- 
iam and Sally (Du l^oisj \'an Loan, only two 
grew to adult _\ears. These were Jane and 
Rachel. Rachel, who died in 1X91, at the 
age of sevent)-two, was the wife of John 
lireasted, who was |irominently identified with 
the Alair L.in Works and with the IMorgan 
h-on Works. He was born here, son of Peter 
Breasted, a painter, who wns a lifelong resi- 
dent in this town. John Breasted had an 
office in New York for some \eirs, but later 
returned to Catskill, and in conipan\- with 
others built the Prospect Park Hotel. He was 
the manager of this until failing health com- 
pelled him to give up business. He died in 
1884. He gave a bell lor St. Luke's Church. 
The \'an Lo:m family has been identified 
with St. Luke's Chinch longer than anv other 



mOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



faniil)' now livint;-, and Miss Van Loan has re- 
cently slK)\vn her appreciation of the signifi- 
cance of this fact, as well as her affectionate 
veneration for her grandfather and sister, by 
the gift of a beautifid spire and a costl_\- altar 
rail for the new church. This building is said 
to be the handsomest on the Hudson, and the 
spire, which has been erected at a cost of fif- 
teen hundred dollars, is a masterpiece of design 
and construction, and greatl}' admired. It can 
be seen twenty miles down the Hudson, 
towering up into the blue. In it is hung the 
bell given by Mr. Breasted. The altar rail, 
which is of solid brass, is exquisitely en- 
graved, and will be inscribed through its en- 
tire length on the front and back. On one 
side the inscription will be in memory of Mrs. 
Breasted, and on the other in memory of Cap- 
tain Isaac Van Loan. It is to be made and jnit 
in at a cost of one hundred and fifty dollars. 



ILLIAM S. HAMLIN, Postma.ster, 
and general merchant, Glenville, 
Schenectady County, N.Y., was born in this 
town, February 28, 1855, son of Anson B. and 
Abigail (O.strom) Hamlin. The father was 
born in Connecticut, September 7, 1807, and 
the mother was born in Glen\"ille, April i, 
iSii. 

Anson B. Hamlin followed the cooper's 
trade in his early days; and, coming to Glen- 
ville when still a young mm, he kept a hotel 
here for some time. He subsequently carried 
on a farm for a number of years, and, returning 



here in 1867, he was engaged in mercantile 
business until selling out to his son in 1SS2. 
His last years were spent in retirement, and he 
died May 19, 1895. He was a man of good 
business ability and upright character, and he 
gained the good will of all with whom he had 
dealings. In politics he was a Republican. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Abigail Os- 
trom, became the mother of ten children, five 
of whom are living, namely: David H. ; Jew- 
ett C. ; Christopher; William S. , the subject 
of this sketch; and Clarissa. The others 
were: Lyman G., Oliver, Heman, Rachel A., 
and Bet,sey. Mrs. Abigail O. Hamlin died in 
I 8 89. 

William S. Hamlin after attending the com- 
mon schools of Glenville completed his studies 
with a commercial course at a business college 
in Tro)-. Beginning when twelve )ears old to 
make himself useful as an assistant to his 
father, he later ga\'e his whole time to the 
business in the capacit}- of a clerk, and con- 
tinued as such until becoming its proprietor. 
He conducts the oldest-established general 
store in this part of the town, keeps a large 
and varied stock, including agricultiu'al imple- 
ments, feed, fertilizers, and so forth, and has a 
numerous patronage. 

On November 23, 18S2, Mr. Hamlin was 
united in marriage with Anna Bell, a native of 
W'est Charlton, Saratoga Count}-, daughter of 
George Bell. 

Politically, Mr. Hamlin is a Republican. 
He served with ability as Town Clerk one year, 
and is gi\-ing excellent satisfaction as Post- 
master. He has a wide circle of friends and 



lilOCRArmCAI, REX'IKW 



acquaintances who appreciate his many sterling 
qualities, and he is a member of Touareuna 
Lodge, No. 35, 1. C). (). V. 



"I:NRV van 1JKI:S1-:R, a prominent 
11— •■ (lairyiiian and ])nultr) raiser of Coble- 
skill, X.V.. pniprietor of luireka 
Stock anil roultry Farm, was born September 
4, KS39, in Sclioharie, Schoharie Count)-, a 
son of John I. and Anna (Warner) Van 
Dreser. On the paternal side he conies of 
substantial Dutch ancestry. 1 1 is i^randfather, 
the Rev. Henry \'an Drcscr, a Presbyterian 
minister, emigrated from Holland to New 
\'ork, and for sexeiitccn _\ ears thereafter 
preached in .Schenectatl) . lie married Anna 
l-"er.LCueson, a fair .Scotch maiden, who bure 
him thirteen children. 

Jolin 1. \'an Dreser siient a lar,i;e jjart of his 
early life in .Schoharie, where for seven years 
he kept a livery stable. In 1X46 he removed 
to Cohleskill, and, huyin- a lar-e farm, was 
here en.L^a.i^ed in agricultural ])ursuits for a 
number of years. When well advanced in a,i;c 
and unable lon;;er to care for liis ])ro>iL'rty, he 
sold his estate, and from that time until his 
death, at the venerable a,L;e of eighty -seven 
years, made his home with his sons, J. W. and 
Henry. He was \ cry successful as a farmer, 
and tpiite acti\e in jiublic life. He was a rCLC- 
ular attenikuit at the Lutheran church, which 
his wife joined when a ii'w] of sixteen. Her 
maiden name was Anna W'aiiier. .She was 
liorn in Warnersville, a dauj^hter (jf Jacob 
Warner, a well-known farmei- and the fust 



dairyman in Schoharie County. The first 
summer that Mr. Warner made a specialty of 
this particular branch of industry his herd of 

twent)' cows produced a ton of butter, which 
he sold in the city of New ^'ork, whither he 
drove with a team. 'Ihis transaction attracted 
such attention that for many years after he was 
known far and wide as ••lUitter Jake." Of 
the seven children born to John I. and Anna 
(Warner) \'an Dreser, si.\ <;rew to maturity, 
namely: Sarah, the widow of the late Peter 
Shaffer; Catherinj^, deceased; Jacob W. ; 
Henry, the sjiecial subject of this sketch; 
Mary J., wife of Clinton Tillepaui;h; I'mma, 
wife of John F. Face; and Almira, wile of 
Adam \'. Karkar. The mother died at the ad- 
vanced a.i;e of fourscore anil four \ears. 

llenr\- \'an Dreser was reared on the home 
farm, and educated in the district schools. 
Farl\' becoming;- interested in the art anil sci- 
ence of agriculture, he decided to make farm- 
ing his life occui)ation. In e.irly manhood he 
bought in iiartnershi]) with his brother Jacol) 
the farm on which he now I'esides, an.l for sev- 
eral yeais they worked it together. In 1895 
Mr. \'an Dreser ])urchased his brother's in- 
terest in the estate, whii.h he has since man- 
aged alone. He has addeil substantial improve- 
ments, including the erection of the present 
convenient!)- arranged hen-liouse, it being the 
largest in Schoharie County, and in every de- 
partment has met with eminent success in his 
undertakings. 

He served as [iresident of the Cheviot Sheej) 
]?reeders' As.sociation of the I'nited .St;ites and 
CaiK-.da for three vears. He is authoritv on 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



breeds ami breeding of thoroughbred cattle, 
and has ser\-ed in the capacity of judge at the 
different fairs in this and other States for 
many years. He has been emi)loyed for the 
last four years by the New York State Farmers' 
Institute as instructor in his special lines of 
agriculture. He carries on general farming, 
but makes somewhat of a specialty of the rais- 
ing of stock and poultry, and dairy products. 
He has served ably as president of the New 
York State Breeders' Association, which is 
devoted to the improvement of the breeding of 
cattle, sheep, swine, and poultry, and is a 
charter member of the Barnerville Grange, be- 
fore which he often lectures or reads papers of 
interest. 

Mr. Van Dreser was married October i6, 
1873, to Aliss Emma J. Becker, daughter of 
the late James Becker, who died on his farm 
in Cobleskill, February 16, 1895, leaving a 
widow and four children. Mrs. \^an Dreser is 
a graduate of the Normal College, a woman of 
culture and refinement. She holds a State 
certificate, and prior to her marriage she 
taught most successfully both in Cobleskill 
and Albany. 



§AMES STEVENS, of Greenville, N.Y., 
a leading insurance agent of this sec- 
tion of Greene County, was born on the 
farm where he now lives, in a house near his 
present dwelling-place. His family is an old 
one in the town, having been first represented 
here by his great-grandfather, Reuben Stevens, 
who came from Stamford, Conn., took up a 



tract of land, and became one of the pioneer 
settlers of this region. 

Reuben's son Samuel, grandfather of James 
Stevens, was born in Stamford. After coming 
here he engaged in farming. He died of typhus 
fever when f)nly thirty-two years of age, this 
being in 1813, His wife, whose maiden name 
was Sally Jones, was a native of Stamford. 
She bore him three children, all of whom are 
deceased. Left a widow while yet a young 
woman, she married a second time, and lived 
to be eighty-four years of age. In religion 
she was a zealous Baptist. 

Mr. Stevens's parents were Orrin C. and 
Mary A. (Smith) Stevens, the father a native 
of Greenville. Orrin C. Stevens worked at 
carpentering while a young man, but subse- 
quently he carried on the farm where his son 
now lives. He owned a hundred and sixty 
acres, and vas a successful farmer. He was 
warmly interested in all public affairs, and 
held various town offices, including among 
others that of Supervisor. For some time he 
was a Justice of the Peace. In politics he was 
an old-time Democrat. For years he was a 
trustee in the Presbyterian church, and one of 
its most active and influential members. Val- 
uable service was rendered by him as one of 
the Sons of Temperance. He lived to the age 
of eighty-three years. His wife, Mrs. Mary 
A. Stevens, who died in 1884, after a useful 
life covering three-quarters of a century, was 
born on a farm in West Springfield, being one 
of a family of si.x children. Her parents were 
Daniel and Sarah (Day) Smith. Of her seven 
children, three are deceased. One of them, 



l!IO(;KArHK'.\I. KKVIKW 



a son Sannicl, was Captain of Company A of 
the Thirty-seventh Wiscoiisiii Voluiitccis in 
the Civil War. and lost his life in 1864, diir- 
in.i,' the attack on I'etersburj,'. The living 
chiUlreii are: James, the sujjject of this 
sketch; Daniel, wiio is a physician ami ilrug- 
f^ist in Nebraska; Anna, who is the wife of 
1). II. Smith, a dentist of llolyoke, Mass.; 
and Orrin C, .second, who is retired from 
business and resides in M illl]]el)uri,^ 

James Stevens grew up on llie larm where 
he now resides. His education was received 
in the common schools, and at (ireenville 
Academy. Throughout his active life he has 
devoted more or less lime to agricultural ]nir- 
suits, and fur forty years he also did a large 
amount of land surveying. lie has lived in 
the house which is now his home since 1S83. 
when he removed here and took charge of his 
l)resent farm of one hundred and thirteen 
acres. He carries on general farming. In 
iS.So he began the insurance business, lieing 
elected that year secretary and treasurer of the 
village fire insurance cunipany. This office he 
has since held, and in the intervening years he 
has had the satisfaction of seeing the comiiaiiy 
constantly increase until now it carries (jver 
two milliiin dcdiars insurance. In the same 
year Mr. .Stevens received his appointment as 
general agent of four other fire insurance com- 
])anies, and in 1.S93 he organized the (jreene 
County Mutual I-"ire Insurance Com|)any, of 
which he has since been secretary, treasurer, 
and general agent. This companv. which 
does a general insurance business at si.xty per 
cent, of stock rates, now has out over two 



thou.sand, one hundred and fifty policies in 
fire, representing two million, two hundred 
and ninety-two tliousand, si.\ hundred and 
seventy dollars. Its total receiiits for the year 
1898 were twelve thousand, five hundred dol- 
lars, and the amount of money in the treasury 
on iJecember 11, iS(jS, was thirteen thousand, 
four hundred and forty-two dollars, and twcnty- 
si.\ cents. The agents of the comjjany operate 
in Greene, Albany, Cidumbia, Delaware, and 
Schoharie Counties. 

Mr. Stevens was married in 1S66 to Kliza- 
beth Sherrill, who was born in (ireenville, 
daughter of Mzra Sherrill, a well-known farmer 
of this place. She is the mother of two chil- 
dren — I.ucena and ()rrin C, tiiird. I.ucena 
married Theodore Corniley, u farmer of this 
place. Orrin C, third, who is engaged in 
insurance in (]reen\ille, married Arcia Cook, 
and has one child, James C. 

Politically, Mr. Stevens is a Democrat. 
He has held the office of SujiervLsor, and from 
January, 1SS9, to April, 1S93, lie was Deputy 
County Clerk. For five years he was clerk ui 
the Hoard of Supervisors. Shortly after being 
fir.st elected to the office of Town Clerk, he 
was chosen Second Lieutenant in Company A 
of the Twentieth Regiment of State militia, 
and went South, serving for a time in the L'nion 
army. For many years he was a member of 
John W. Watson Tost, C,. A. R. , of Catskill, 
and held the office of Adjutant in the post; 
but he subsequently joined the C. Swaine 
Ivvans Tost, No. 5S0, of South Westerlo. 

Mr. Stevens is a Mason, having joined the 
orLTAnization in March, iSvS, in Cascade 



jliH^ 



^^ 



''( 



^ 



SOLOAIUN SIAS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Lodge, F. & A. M., of Oak Hill. In 1S64 
he was a charter member of James AI. Austin 
Lodge, No. 557, of Greenville. Of this he 
was first Senior Deacon, for fi\-e \ears he was 
Junior Warden and Secretary, and for two 
years Master. He was formerly connected 
with the Co.xsackie Royal Arch Chapter, No. 
85 ; and upon the organization of the Green- 
ville Chapter, No. 283, he became a charter 
member of that bod_\'. He has held the offices 
of Scribe and King. He is also a charter 
member of Zeus Lodge, No. 360, of the 
Greenville Knights of Pythias, was formerly 
Chancellor, and is at the jjresent time Master 
of Exchequer. Mr. Stevens is a liberal sup- 
porter of the Presbyterian church, of which 
his famil)- are members. 



^OLOMON SIAS, principal of the 
public schools of Schoharie, N.Y. , 
and one of the leading educators in 
the county, is a native of Dan\-ille, Caledonia 
County, Vt. He was born June 13, 1S29. 
His father, the Rev. Solomon Sias, son of 
Benjamin and Abigail Sias, was born in Lt)n- 
don, Merrimack County, N. H. Grandfather 
Sias removed with his family from London to 
Danville, being among the pioneer farmers in 
that town, where he and his wife lived to a 
good old age. They had eight children. 

Solomon Sias, Sr. , grew to manhood on the 
paternal farm, attending school as opportunity 
offered. Feeling himself called to preach the 
gospel, and giving such proof of his calling 
that people heard him gladly, he became a cir- 



cuit taking in at dilferciit peri<ids Western 
Maine, New Hampshire, and hlasteni X'ermont. 
Py himself he acquired a kniiwled,L;e of Latin, 
Greek, and Hebrew. He was a Hiiei.t and 
forcible speaker, tlioroughly familiar with the 
Holy Scriptures, a man of great resource of 
thought and expressidu. He was accustomed 
to ride on horseback from jilace to place to 
preach every day and evening, wherever he 
could get an audience. Li L)'nn, Mass., 
where he was pastor of the L^nion Street Meth- 
odist Church, 1815-16, he started the first 
Methodist Sunda\'-school in New F^ngland. 
He was sent several times as a delegate to the 
General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, to which he belonged. He died at the 
age of seventy-two, a well-preserved man to 
the last, after thirty years of service in his 
Master's vineyard. He married a widow, Mrs. 
Amelia Rogers Hewes, the ninth lineal tle- 
scendant of John Rogers, the Smithfield 
martyr. Mrs. Sias died at the age of sixty- 
seven, having reared five children, three by 
her first husband, Mr. Hewes, and two by her 
second, namely: Solomon, the subject of this 
sketch; and Amelia, who married Azro 
Mathewson. 

Mr. Sias, of Schoharie, was educated at 
Newbury Seminary, Newbury, Vt. ; at Middle- 
bury College in that State and at Wesleyan 
L^niversity, Middletown, Conn., where he be- 
longed to the class of 1852. He was an assist- 
ant teacher at Newbury Seminary as early as 
1S50. He received the degree A.M. from 
Middleburv College, Vt., and of Doctor of 



]!Hk;rai'HICai, review 



Mfdicine from the University of X'crmont at 
liiirlington. From 1854 to 1S59 he taught at 
Fort Etlwarci Institute, New \'ork, holding 
tile cliair of professor of natur:i] scieiiee under 
Jose])h K. King president of the Institute. 
Leaving Fort Edward, he accej^ted :i call In 
take charge of a college for women at Hnnhani, 
Tex., where he remained conducting; the affairs 
of the college for eight years. lie then came 
to New York State and accepted a call to take 
charge of the seminary at Charlotteville. In 
1S74 he came to Schoharie and took the posi- 
tion he now holds, which, with the exception 
of a hrief ])eriod — 1S77 to 1S7S — s|)ent in 
Texas as president of the Soulc University at 
Chapel Hill, he has held continuously from 
that date. 

The Schoharie school has greatly improved 
under his management, and is now a first-class 
high scho(d in every respect and very flourish- 
ing. About two hundred students are enndled 
and five subordinate teachers are emidoyed. 
Mr. Sias is the (ddest principal in active ser- 
vice in the county, and is among the (ddest in 
the State as principal and teacher. lie has 
arranged for the Schoharie school the most ad- 
vanced course of any school in the county, and 
be always keeps up to the times in means and 
metliods of educational work, using the latest 
approved text-books and reference bonks. His 
efforts are unibirmly indorsed by the State 
regents, at whiise request he has spoken 
upon numerous educational to])ics in the 
conventions held at the State capital. He 
has attended all of the meetings since \Sr,6 and 
everv countv institute fnr tbirtv X'ears, s[)eak- 



ing at many of them. He has been secretary 
of the county institute for nearly fifteen years, 
has been assistant conductor one \ear, besides 
often serving briefly as assistant conductor of 
other institutes. 

He was married July 2, 1S57, to Lina 
Haker, daughter of IJaniel Haker, of Youngs- 
town, New York. One child was born of this 
union, a son named I*"re.lerick. He was edu- 
cated in the Schoharie schoids, then learned 
telegraphy at lirooklyn, N. Y. , and became 
manager of a telegraph office. Taken sudilenly 
ill with typhoid pneumonia, he ilied at the age 
of nineteen. 

Professor Sias is a fellow of the American 
Association for the Ads'ancement of Science, 
tr) which he has belongeil since 1866, and for 
sex'eral years he was an iibser\-er for the Smith- 
sonian Institution. He has had charge of an 
educational department in the Schoharie A'c- 
pnblican. to which he has contributed articles 
that ha\e been copied by the leading educational 
papers of the State, and he has been a frequent 
correspondent of several other jomaials. He is 
an active member of the Schoharie Count)- 
Historical Society, of which he was one of the 
three original organizers. He was instrumen- 
tal in securing the "Old Stone l-'ort " for the 
purposes, .f the scciety. He is likewise c.m- 
nected with the medical society of this county, 
I having served as brigade surgeon during the 
Civil War. Mr. Sias was made a Mason in 
Connecticut, was afterward connected with the 
' order in \'erminit and later in Texas, where be 
I was Ma.stei of a lodge. He is now a twenty- 
' seventh degree Mas..n, a member of Schoharie 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Lodge, No. 491, and of the chapter and coun- 
cil. As an Odd Fellow he belongs to To- 
wos-scho-ho Lodge of Schoharie, has twice 
been Noble Grand, is now a niember of Mid- 
dleburg Encampment, and Past Captain of 
Canton Young, No. 45, of Schoharie. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. 

Mrs. Sias is a graduate of the collegiate 
department of Fort Edward Institute, and has 
taught school. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sias are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and he has preached a great number of sermons 
in pulpits of Schoharie and the neighboring 
towns. 



(^Yt-NDREW G. LIUDLE, a stirring farmer 
^^ of Princetown, was born in this town, 
V. — Februar}- 23, 1S59. Son of Alex- 
ander and Barbara (Gregg) Liddle, he comes 
of highly reputable Scotch ancestry, being of 
the fourth generation in descent from Alexan- 
der Liddle, a native of Scotland, who emi- 
grated with his parents when a young man, and 
was an early settler in Duanesburg. This is 
the line: Alexander, Robert, Alexander, sec- 
ond, Andrew G. 

Alexander Liddle, first, became a large land 
owner. The farm now owned b}- his grandson, 
Alexander, second, was a part of his estate, 
and he resided here until his death, which oc- 
curred in his ninety-third year. He was a 
member of the Reformed Presbyterian church, 
and a strong Abolitionist. The maiden name 
of his wife was Mary Gifford. 

Robert Liddle, the grandfather, was born in 



Duanesburg, January 12, NS03. He was a 
prosperous farmer during his active years, and 
he died in Duanesburg at the age of eighty- 
eight. Politically, he was originally a Whig, 
and later a Republican. In his younger days 
he took an active part in military affairs, and 
was Captain of a local rifle company. He was 
an Elder of the Presbyterian church. Robert 
Liddle was three times married; and his first 
wife, Sarah Smith, a native of Princetown, be- 
came the mother of eight children, namely: 
Alexander; Abigail, born October 6, 1S2S; 
.Mary, born August 31, 1830; Ann E., born 
:\Iarch 3, 1S34; Charles, born March 7, 1836; 
Thomas G., born July iS, 183S; Abram S. , 
born June 9, 1840; and Robert W'., born 
April 2iO< 1S42. By his union with Sarah 
Robinson, his second wife, there were five 
children: Angus M., born January 29, 1846; 
Duncan N., born March 26, 1S4S; Jenette, 
born August 12, 1850; and Sarah C. and John 
E. , twins, who are no longer living. 

Alexander Liddle, second, the father, was 
born April 17, 1827, upon a farm adjoining 
the one which he now occupies. He was 
reared to farm life, and at the age of twenty- 
nine years he bought a farm in Princetown of 
one hundred and twenty-nine acres, upon 
which he resided for sixteen years, and which 
he still owns. He has occupied his present 
farm of one hundred acres in Duanesburg since 
1S85, and this property is provided with good 
buildings and is otherwise well improved. 
His energy and industry continue unabated, 
and he is highly esteemed by his fellow-towns- 
men. He supports .the Republican party at 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



national clccticms, but has never cared t<> hold 


TT^H.XRLLS \'()SS, merciianl and Post- 
l Jj master at TaiuiersviUe, Cireene 
^■^ " County, \.\'., was b<jrn in Hol- 


office. Like his ancestors he is a Retormeil 


Presbyterian in relij,Mon, and acts as an bllder 


of that church. Mrs. Harbara Gre-t; Liddle, 


stein, Germany, 1-ebruary 14, 1849, son of 


his first wile, who was a native of Rotterdam, 


P'rederick and Maria (Retting) \'oss. His 


\.\'., dieil .\|)ril 14, 1.S74, leavinj,' two .sons 


great-grandfather, Hans \'an \'oss, who was a 


— Robert A. and Andrew G. Robert A. 


native of Hidland, removed to Holstein, anil 


Liddle, born December 4, 1856, niarrietl Re- 


after living there a short time had the name 


becca Wemplc, resides in Duanesburg, and has 


changed to \'oss. He was a farmer and 


three children — James, Barbara, and Anna. 


droxer. and follnwed these occupations until 


On February 9, 1876, Alexander Liddle mar- 


his death, which occurred when he was si.xtv 


ried for his second wife .Margaret C'owell, wlio 


vears old. 


was born in England, January 30, 1839. hy 


John \'oss, grandfather of Charles, wms born 


this union he has one daughter, Jeannette S. , 


in Holland. He also followed farming, and 


who was born March 17, 1.S7S. 


was one of the largest drovers in his vicinity. 


Andrew G. Liddle, the s])ecial subject of 


He had a large family of children, among 


tills sketch, was educated in the ilistrict 


them being Frederick. Henry, H.n-ace, An- 


schools of I'rincetown. He has alwa_\s resided 


diew, and Louisa. He died at about si.xty 


upon the farm he now cultivates, which was 


years of age. I-'rederick \'uss, father of 


]>urchased by his father in ICS56, and since 


Charles, was also a farmer and cattle dealer. 


reaching manh(jod he lias successfully managed 


He shipped cattle from Denmark Co luigland. 


the property. He raises oats, rye, corn, and 


doing an extensive business in tiiat line; and 


hay, keeps about ten head of stock, and ranks 


he tilled the soil of a large farm successfully 


among the leading farmers of this section of 


until he was about sixty \-ears old, when he re- 


Schenectady County. 


tired. He then removed to Altona, near the 


Mr. Liddle married I.illie H. DeLure.st, of 


cit)- (jf Hamburg, wheie lie died at sexentN'- 


Alban)-, anil has three children, namcl\' : 


eight. He made three visits to his son 


Alexander, born July 7, i,S83;Kdith, b.irn 


Charles in America. His wife, Maria, was a 


January 26, 1SS6; and Laura M., born May 6, 


nati\e of llolstein, where her father, Adolpli 


1S90. 


Retting, followed fanning, and where lie died 


In iiolitics Mr. Liddle is a Republican, and 


at over seventy years of age. She was the 


has served with ability as .Su])ervisor for three 


mother of eleven children, nine of whom — 


years. He belongs to b'arniers' Cirange, Xo. 


namely, William. luKvanl, Charles, .Mary, Ida, 


709, Patrons of Husbandry, and has served as 


Andrew, Otto, luaiest. and Theadore — are 


Master for three years. He is a member of 


still li\'iiig, four resiiling in America. Mary 


the South Reformed Presbyterian church. 


tlie eldest sister, married bred Kocii ; Ida 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married a Lieutenant in the German army; 
Otto resides in Florida; and Ernest is in 
Philadelphia. Thei)dore is a carpenter and 
builder in Phoanicia, N.Y. The others were 
Frederick and Dora. The mother died in 
1S96, being over eighty )"ears old. The par- 
ents were members of the Lutheran church. 
Charles \'oss spent his early years in his 
native town, and acquired his education in pri- 
vate schools. After finishing his studies he 
learned the trade of a miller and a cabinet- 
maker. He began his three years' apprentice- 
ship at the latter at the age of sixteen, and 
worked as a j^iurneyman one year. In i S69 he 
came to America, sailing from Hamburg and 
landing in New York, where he at once se- 
cured employment in a bakery. He next went 
to Phoenicia, X. Y. , and he was employed in 
the Chichester Chair Factory for one year. 
At the expiration of that time he went to Sul- 
livan County, Pennsylvania, and was engaged 
for two seasons in peeling hemlock bark. Re- 
turning to Phcenicia, he spent another year in 
the chair factory, and passed the next in Ger- 
many. Upon his return to the L'nited States 
in 1876, he attended the Centennial Exhibi- 
tirjn in Philadelphia, and, remaining in that 
city the entire summer, he was employed as 
conductor on the Chestnut Street line of cars. 
Going to Delaware County, Pennsylvania, in 
the fall of that year, he worked on a farm, and 
also ran a milk route to Philadelphia, follow- 
ing this occupation for two years, when he j 
sold out and returned to Phcenicia. He later \ 
became manager of the store owned by the 
Chichester Chair Company, which position he ; 



occupied for nine years. Removing to Hun- 
ter, he erected the hotel known as "The Ik-1- 
videre, " which has accommodations for (;nc 
hundred and twenty-five guests. After con- 
ducting this hotel for eight years, he sold the 
property. Later he repurchased it, and still 
owns and rents it. He owns two dwelling- 
houses, one of which adjoins the hotel, and is 
used by him as a residence. In 1S92 he 
rented the store formerly occupied by Jacob 
Fromer. This he conducted for five years, 
when he was obliged to make an assignment; 
but he soon settled with his creditors, and 
again started in business. The building he 
now occupies he erected in 1S94 as an annex 
to his large establishment, and it was used for 
the hardware and plumbing departments. 
L'pon the expiration of his lease of Mr. Fro- 
mer's property, he removed the annex to its 
present location, where he now carries grocer- 
ies and notions. The post-office is located in 
his store; and on July i, 189S, he received the 
appointment of Postmaster for four years. 

In iSSo Mr. \'oss was united in marriage 
with Jennie E. Haner, daughter of William 
M. Haner, of Prattsville. Her great-grand- 
father, ]\Iartin Haner, who was a native of 
Dutchess Count}-, moved from there to Pratts- 
ville, and was a pioneer farmer. Her grand- 
father, also named IMartin, went from Dutch- 
ess County to Pratts\-ille, and settled upon a 
farm two miles from the village on the road to 
West Kill. He died at the age of seventy- 
five. He married for his first wife Elizabeth 
Shumaker. They had seven children, three of 
whom are living, namel}- : Lawrence, who 



DIOGRAl'HICAL REVIKW 



married Jinlith Speiucr; William M. Hancr, 
Mrs. \'i)ss's father; and Jemima A., who mar- 
ried Henry Palmer, of Gilboa. Mrs. Miiza- 
heth S. Ilaner died at the a'je of fifty. 

William M. Ilaner, after cultivating a farm 
in I'rattsville some time, moved to the town 
of Koxbury, where he continued to till the soil 
until his retirement. He is still liviii--, and 
is now seventy-six years old. His wife, Cor- 
nelia Maginnis, a native of rrattsville, is a 
daughter of Jacob and Jennie (.Stanle\\) Ma- 
ginnis. His family consisted of eight chil- 
dren, four of whom are living, naniel)': 
(ieorge Haner, I\I.D., who resides in Tanners- 
ville; Jennie l-".., who is now 'Sirs. Charles 
\'oss ; Homer, who resides in Omaha; and 
Clark R., a book-keeper in Tanncrs\ille. 
The mother attends the Methodist Ki>iscopal 
church. Mrs. \'oss was educated in the com- 
mon schools of I'rattsville and at Jewett Acad- 
emy. She is the mother of three children — 
Ralph, Kthel Ann, and Mollie ]\r. Ralph is 
attending the high school in Hunter, and 
label Ann has attained the highest rank in her 
class at school the present year. Mollie M. 
Voss, now a student in the Hunter High 
School, is considered the champion girl trick 
bicycle rider in the State. 

Mr. Voss is a Rei)ublican in politics, and 
has taken an active part in public affairs. He 
was .Super\isor in 1892 and 1 893. He was 
greatly interested in the incoporation of the 
village, and was Trustee in 1 S97 and Presi- 
dent in 1S9S. He has been a member of 
Kingston Lodge, F. & A. M., for over twenty- 
five \ears ; is a charter member of Cjtskill 



Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and also belongs 
to the Royal Arcanum. The famil\ attend 
the Congregational church as well as the Sun- 
day-sch..ol, in which Mrs. Voss is a teacher. 



IR.\ M. Tl-.kri-MN'G, a skilful and jmo- 
gressive agriculturist of b'ulton, N.Y., 
was born Julv ;, 1 , 1857, in tlie town of 
Kno.x, Albany County, a son of Henry H. Ter- 
jiening. His i)aternal grandfather, Moses Ter- 
pening, was born and brought up in ]'!soinis, 
Ulster County, \.\'., whence he removed to 
AlbLUi)' County, where he settled on a farm in 
Knox, being one of its earlier ])ioneers. Sub- 
secpiently, coming to Summit in Schoharie 
Count)-, Moses Terjiening was there engaged 
in general farming until his decease, at the 
advanced age of eight)-eight \ears. He mar- 
ried a Miss Snyder, and they reared ten 
children. 

Henr\' H. Terpening was educated in the 
district schools, and, becoming a farmer from 
choice, he purchased land, when a _\-<iung man, 
in Cortland Count)', where he pursuetl his in- 
dependent calling a few years. Not being 
very well satisfied with his prospects there, he 
S(dcl out and removetl to Knox, in Albany 
Count)-. Several years later he purcha.sed 
the farm in Fulton that is now owned and 
t)ccupied b)- his son, Ira M., and here |)assetl 
his remaii-iing cla)-s, dying August 10, i S97, 
at the venerable age of ninet)--one xears. A 
man of integrit)-, he was highl)- respected by 
all. In [xilitics he was an adherent of the Re- 
publican party. He married Cornelia L., 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



daughter of Jeremiah Havens, a lifelong 
farmer of Jefferson, N.V. They reared four 
children, namel}' : IraM., of Fulton; Eunice, 
wife of John Feeck ; Bertha, the wife of 
Charles Mann, of whom a brief sketch appears 
elsewhere in this volume; and Ilenr)- J. Both 
parents were members of the Reformed church, 
in which the father was an Elder. 

Ira M. Terpening obtained a practical edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native town, 
and from his earliest youth, when not in 
school, assisted in the labors of the home 
farm. On the death of his father he succeeded 
to the ownership of the homestead estate of 
one hundred and fift}- acres, and he has since 
managed it with signal success. He carries 
on general farming, including stock-raising to 
some extent and dairying. In politics he is 
a sound Republican. He is a member of the 
Dutch Reformed church of Middleburg, and 
he and his family attend also the Sunday- 
school connected with that church. 

On January 14, 1S76, Mr. Terpening mar- 
ried Angeline Murphy, daughter of Peter Mur- 
phy, of F'ulton, and grand-daughter of Timothy 
Murphy, the renowned Indian scout. Tim- 
othy Murphy, born in America, of Irish par- 
ents, was one of the pioneer settlers of this 
section of Schoharie Count)-, and one of the 
largest landholders of P'ulton, owning also 
large tracts of real estate in South Worcester 
and in other places along the Suscpiehanna. 
During the Revolutionary War he rendered in- 
estimable assistance as one of the most brave 
and daring scouts. His e.xplnits, which are 
well-known to all students of history, won for 



him the name (if "IMurphy, the Indian 
Killer." At Bemis Heights his galhuit con- 
duct turned the tide of affairs and gave to 
General Gates the victory. At the "Middle 
Fort," by his cool and decisive actions, and 
more especially by his refusal to obey the 
orders of a superior officer, he saved the Scho- 
harie garrison from falling a prey to the Red- 
skins. After the war he resumed the pinsuit 
of agriculture, and remained on his farm until 
his death, at the age of sixty-seven years. 
His first wife, IMargaret Feeck, was born in 
F'ulton, on Mr. Terpening's farm, and died in 
this town at the early age of forty year.s. She 
left five children, of whom Peter was the 
youngest. 

Peter ]\Iurphy inherited the ancestral home- 
stead in F'ulton and two other farms in this 
vicinity. These three he carried on simulta- 
neously, and for years was one of the largest 
and best-known agi iculturists of F'ulton, where 
he spent his long and useful life of fourscore 
and four years. He was deeply interested in 
the welfare of his native town, which he 
served as Supervisor two terms, and as Collec- 
tor a number of )ears. His wife, Catherine 
Borst, was born on the old Borst farm in Scho- 
harie, one of the nine children of Peter Borst, 
a prosperous farmer. Air. and Mrs. Murphy 
reared se\'en children, as follows: Marian, de- 
ceased; Helen, wife of John F'ollick; Mar- 
garet, who married William Wearman ; Bet- 
sey, wife of Thomas I'ollick; Ann; Kate; 
and Angeline, now Mrs. Terpening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Terpening have one son, C. 
F'rederick Terpening, M. D. He completed 



lOCRAl'HICAL RKVIKW 



his e:ui\- oducntion in the graded schools of 
Middlebiir.i;', studied medicine fur a year with 
Dr. Rifenbero, :,nd then entered the Univer- 
sily Medical C(dle-e, \ew V.irk City, class of 
1S9S. After receiviii-- his diploma, he en- 
tered the I^lackwells Isle Hospital, where he 
will i^radiiate in igoo. 



ri))-^" 



AKKl- C. LKil.MAX, .if the firm of 



Lehman lircithers, tlealers in .general 
merchandise and farmini;' implements 
at Ar-iisville, in the town of Carlisle (for- 
merly a jiart of Sharon), Schoharie Count)-, 
NA'., was born in this ]dace on April 3, 
1869, son of Sylvester and Mary Ann (Lane) 
Lehman. 

His .L;rcat-,t;randfather J.ehman came to 
.America with lim-j^o^'nc's army, having; crossed 
the l'jif;lish channel with other Germans, and 
joined the l^ritish stddiery before leavin- Ln-- 
land. After arriving in this country he de- 
serted from the army, and settletl in Sharon, 
where he was one of the first white inhabi- 
tants. It is related that he wore a metal 
breastplate which he broiit,dit over with him, 
and that this at (jne time saved his life by pro- 
tecting him frrjni a bullet. He remained in 
Shai-on as lon^ as he li\ed, engaged in farm- 
ing. He spoke onl_\' the Cerman tongue. 

His son L.enjamin, grandfather of I'arke C. 
Lehman, was bom here, and always lesided 
here until his death at the age of eight}' years. 
Like his father he was closely identified with 
the Lutheran church. He worked at his trade 
of carpenter, and he also farmed to some ex- 



tent. He settled at what is now known as the 
Lehman homestead, on which his grand.son 
Charles now lesides. This property contained 
originally three hundred and fifteen acres. 
Henjamin Lehman built most of the barns and 
houses in this vicinitw He underwent many 
hardships. While working at Stone Arabia, 
some thirteen miles distant, he would rise 
early in the morning on Monda\-, travel the 
whole tlistance on foot, and be on hand in time 
for his day's work. On Saturday night he 
walked home again. During his absences the 
farm was cared for by his sons, of whom there 
were four. lOach of these u]ion being married 
was given a jilot of land and a fair start in 
life. Henjamin Lehman had four wives. His 
s(niswere: Stephen, who is the only one now 
living, Charles, Peter, and Sylvester. I^oth 
Charles and Peter were married, and the latter 
had a family of children. Peter died in 
Hrooklyn, N. A'. Benjamin Lehman spoke the 
Cerman language ami broken Pjiglish. 

Sylvester Lehman, father of Parke C. , was 
a lifelong farmer on his hundred and seventy- 
five acres, raising mi.xetl crops. He was also 
engaged to a consideralile extent in stock- 
raising, breeding short-h.irned cattle, which 
farmers from all the neighboring towns came 
to purchase. He was an ardent worker in the 
church, and held at one time and another 
nearly all the church offices. Of his family of 
nine children, the eldest. Jay, died in infancy. 
The others were as f.dlows: Mary, who is the 
wife of William Crosby, M.D., n[ Rochester, 
Ind. ; Charles, above named, who resides on 
the Lehman homestead; Jessie, who died at 




>.M.\S K. FKKR 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the age of twenty-six; Romaine, who is a 
farmer of Sharon, N. Y. ; Sylvester, Jr., who 
is a member of the firm of Lehman Brothers ; 
Parke, the subject of this article; P\ird, who 
is a student in the classical course at Penn 
College, Gettysburg; and Bessie G. Sylves- 
ter Lehman, Jr., married Kate Allen, daugh- 
ter of James Allen, of Root, N. Y. Bessie G. 
Lehman was married in December, 1S97, to 
Lewis C. Berger, of Seward, N. Y. 

Parke C. Lehman in his boyhood attended 
the district schools in company with his 
brothers and sisters, and subsequently worked 
out at farming. After sa^•ing a small amount 
of money he went to Albany, where he took 
a course in the business college. Subsecjuent 
to that he was clerk for four years for J. P. 
Milligan; and at the expiration of that time, 
or in September, 1893, he formed a partner- 
ship with his brother Sylvester, and bought 
out the business of Mr. Milligan. This firm 
has done a most prosperous business. Their' s 
being the only general merchandise store in 
Argusville, the}' have a large trade, and, as 
their business methods are prompt and thor- 
oughly honorable, they are popular, and have 
the fullest confidence of their patrons. Many 
changes have been made in the store since 
Lehman Brothers took possession of it. 

Parke C. Lehman was appointed Postmaster 
on May 6, 189S. He had previously served as 
Deputy Postmaster. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. Both brothers are Masons and 
members of Sharon Springs Lodge, No. 624. 
Both are acti\'e in jjolitics, and prominent in 
church work. Parke C. Lehman is secretary | 



of the Sunday school and of the clunch 
council. 

Parke C. Lehman marriccl on June 16, 1898, 
Miss Lilah Wcmple, uf L„nda, N.Y., .she 
being a daughter of one of the first families of 
Montgomery County. 



(blTHOP 



HOMAS E. FP:RRIER, one of the rep- 
g j| resentative business men of Catskill, 
was born in the town of Warwick, Orange 
County, N.Y., on April 15, 1S21, .son of Jo- 
seph and Hannah W. (Pxlsall) P^errier. Ac- 
cording to the best information obtainable his 
first progenitors in this country were French 
Huguenots, who during revolutionary or relig- 
ious disturbances in P"rance emigrated to Ire- 
land and thence to America. 

His great-grandfather was Thomas P\'rrier, 
who was born in 1705, and died in 1792. 
This Thomas removed from Connecticut to 
Orange County, New York, settling near 
Amity. His wife, whose name in maidenhood 
was Hester Lucky, died in 1796. Their fam- 
ily consisted of three daughters and one son — 
Sarah, Hester, Jane, and Robert. Sarah mar- 
ried David Perkins, Hester married Benja- 
min Carpenter, and Jane became the wife of 
William Owens. 

Robert P\'rrier, who was the grandfather of 
Thomas E., and who succeeded tn the posses- 
sion of the homestead farm, was born in 1762, 
and died in 1822. He married Mary Wilcox, 
said to have been of German ancestry, who was 
born in 1764, and died in 1S36. They had a 
family of ten children, namely: William, born 



i(>(;r.\1'111(AI. rkxiew 



in 1786, who died in 1873; Anna, born in 
17S8, who died in 1.S5S; J(.s<.].h (lathLi- ..f the 
subject of tills sketch), b.irn in 1791, who died 
in 1S71; 'riioniiis, born in 1793, who died in 
1839; David, wlio was born in 1795; Hester, 
i)orn in 179S, wlio died in 1S.S9; lilizabeth, 
wild was born in i Soo ; Roliert, born in iSoJ, 
whodied in 1872; Miehael }., who was liorn in 
1805; and Sarah M., idirn in 1807, who died 
in iSji, at the a-e of fourteen years, Will- 
iam marriet! Hannah Sanions, and settled at 
Ypsilanti. Mich. Anna married Daniel 

Nanny, and settled in the town of Warwick, 
N.Y. Joseph married Hannah W. lidsali, and 
settled in the town of Warwick, N. V. Thomas 
married Sarah Dennison, and settled on the 
Ferrier homestead. David married Eliza Cain, 
and settled first in Yates County, New York, 
whence lie remo\-ed subsecjuently to .Smibury, 
Delaware County, Ohio. Hester became the 
wife of Samuel Conkliii, and settled in \'ates 
County, New York. I-:iizabeth married David 
Carr, and settled at Wantage, Sussex County, 
N.J. Robert ni irrie.! blmily Tobey, and set- 
tled at Dundee, ^'ates County, N.Y. Michael 
J. married Mary Ann Neighbor, and went to 
reside at Swartswood, Sussex County, N.J. 

Joseph h'errier, who was bmught up to 
agricultural life, settled on a farm adjoining the 
homestead. His wife, in maidenhood Hannah 
W. Kdsall, was of luigli.sh ancestry. They 
reared the bdlowing children : J.ihn M., born 
in 1 816. marrieil I'rances Cideman in 1 84 1, 
and died in 1.S4:; as the residt (if an ac- 
cidi'ut. Sarah M., born in iSiS, who married 
Matthew liailey in 1 S40, after liis death i)e- 



canie the wife of James Thompson in 1S62, died 

August 10, I S99. Tliomas 1{. , born in iSji, 
is the subject of this sketch. Louisa, iiorn 
in 1824, married Cornelius J. Jones in 1845, 
and after his death married for her sec- 
cmd husband William Walling. She died in 
185S. Almira, born in 1827, married t^n'- 
nelius J. I.aziar in 1.S44, and is still living. 
Kdsall, i)orn in 1831, married Anna M. Hum- 
mel ill 1859, and is now one of the faculty 
of Lafayette Cdlege at Kaston, I'a. Robert, 
born in 1835, mariietl Cecelia D. Jones, and 
died in 1877. 

Thomas !■:. I'errier when in his fifteenth 
year left home and went to lulenville, where 
he remained two and a half }ears, working in a 
country store. He then attended the district 
school for a year, after which he taught school 
for a year at Bellvale in the town n\ Warwick. 
Then, returning home, he was emplo\ed tlur- 
ing the summer of 1840 on his father's farm. 
fn the fall of that year he left home for a trij) 
through the West with the view of gaining a 
knowledge of the countr}- and of possibly find- 
ing a desirable place in which to settle. Rail- 
roails weie few in those da\s ; and much or 
most of liis jouiiie}' was made b\' steamboat, 
c.inal, or stage. Going to Newbing, he trav- 
elled by steamboat to Albany, ami thence to 
Jiuffalo by way of the luie Canal. After 
spending a da_\- or two at ISuffalo and Niagara 
Falls, he went by steamboat on Lake I'jie to 
Cleveland, Ohio, and thence by canal toColum- 
bus, ( )hio. Then, after staying a few days with 
an uncle at Sunbury, he took the stage from 
Columbus to Da)ton, anil from there travelled 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



by canal to Cincinnati. From that place he 
went by steamboat on the Ohio River to Louis- 
ville, Ky. , where he stojiped for a few days, 
and then went by boat clown the Ohio to the 
Mississijjpi and u]3 that river to St. Louis, 
Mo., in which city he remained for two weeks. 
From St. Louis he went on up the river to 
Ouincy, 111., and after looking about in that 
neighborhood for a week or two he took a 
school in Pike Count}-, which he taught until 
the following spring. He then returned home 
by way of the Alississippi and Ohio Rivers to 
Pittsburg, and through Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey, partly by canal and partly by rail, to 
New York Cit}-, and thence to Newburg by 
boat, arriving home in April, 1S41. He then 
resumed work on his father's farm, following 
that occupation during the summer and teach- 
ing school in the winter in the neighboring 
school districts. In 1S45, when in his twenty- 
fifth year, he was married to Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of John W. and Dorothy Wheeler (Rogers) 
Vandererf, and settled on a farm of ninety 
acres, adjoining his father's, which had for- 
merly formed a part of his grandfather's home 
stead. Here he followed an agricultural life 
for twenty }ears. Then, selling out, he re- 
moved to Catskill, N. Y. , where, in company 
with his brother Robert, who had preceded 
him to that place by about five years, he en- 
gaged in the manufacture of brick. Shortly 
afterward they enlarged their sphere of opera- 
tions by engaging in building in Brooklyn, 
N.Y., Robert removing to New York to look 
after their interests there, while Thomas re- 
mained at Catskill to superintend the manu- 



thc 



facture and shipping of the bricks. At 
great financial panic of 1873, which proved 
very disastrous to their building operations, 
Robert returned to Catskill in very poor 
health, and soon afterward died. Thomas, hav- 
ing previously purchased his brother's interest 
in the brickyard and other projierty, continued 
to carry on business alone until 1SS2, when he 
took his son-in-law, Percival Golden, into part- 
nership; and the firm has since been conducted 
under the name of Ferrier & Golden. Mr. 
Ferrier has been a director of the Catskill 
National Bank for the last twenty years or more, 
and is now vice-president of that institution. 
He is president of the Catskill Building and 
Loan Association and treasurer of the Catskill 
Rural Cemetery Association. He is also 
largely interested in the Catskill Knitting- 
Mill, owning a three-eighths interest, which 
concern, one of the largest and most important 
in the town, gives employment to from one 
hundred and fifty to one hundred and si.xty 
hands. 

Mr. Ferrier is a Republican in politics. In 
1 885 he was elected Supervisor of the tow-n, 
and, being subsecjuently re-elected to the same 
office, served therein for five years. He also 
was elected County Treasurer, in which office 
he served three )-ears, declining a renomination 
on account of advancing age, he being then in 
his seventy-fifth )-ear. In religion a Presbyte- 
rian, he has been for a number of 3-ears a trus- 
tee and Elder of the church of that denomina- 
tion in Catskill. His reputation is that of a 
business man of more than average ability and 
of the strictest integrity, and also that of a cit- 



IJlOOKArilK Al, Ki:\ IKW 



i/A-n who has rcndcrccl useful service to the 


ten year.s in Gilboa, where he was one of the 


town and wiiose aitl and influence can always 


leading farmers and a citizen of influence. 


bo counted upon in favor of any practical meas- 


Possessing considerable legal knowledge, he 


ures tor the moral or ])h\sical betterment of the 


transacted law business to some extent for his 


community- 


neighbors, h\- whom he was highl\- esteemed. 


Mr. anil Mrs. l-"eriier have been tlie |)arents 


At his death he left his widow, whose maiden 


of three children, namely: Hannah j-lizabeth, 


name was Rachel Ward, with four children — 


born in May. 1S41;, who married in 1S72 


Orman West, Julia Ann, David, and William. 


Hiram W. Lane, and has one child. Herbert 


She subsequently married again, and b\- her 


A. i.ane. horn in 1.S70: Willis Wentworth, 


second husbaiul, George Hughson, had four 


born in October, 1.S50, who died in iSji, as 


sons — John C. , (jcorge, Cephas, and Robert. 


the result of an accident; and Mary Wheeler, 


John C. Hughson left home at the early age of 


born in ICS54, who marrietl I'ercival (iolden in 


sixteen years, and after woi'king <iut for a few 


1S75, ami has had tour children — Lizzie F. 


years he became interested in the liuuber busi- 


(lolden, born in iS-6. wh.idied in iSS's, Wil- 


ness. He died a millionaire. 


lis 1'. Golden, born in 1SS2, May ^hirshall and 


David West, Jr., was born September 2-], 


Mabel French (".olden, twins, born in 18X7. 


1S13, and died June 12, 1SS3. He was reared 




on a farm, and was engaged in agiicidtural 




]nnsuits to a greater or less extent during his 


I^UAII Hi]5HLl-: WI'ST, a welLknown 


entire life. Having a natural a])titude for 


|=? apiarist ol Middleburg, N.V., is one 


mechanics, he also worked at the carpenter's 


^*— ' ot the l.u-i^est honey producers of 


trade in his early manhootl. riu'chasing a 


Schoharie County and with but two excep- 


tract of woodland, he cleared a space, on which 


tions the largest in the entire .State, if not in 


he biult his fii'st tlwelling, and in a few years 


the Union. He was burn i\Lirch 5. 1.S45. in 


he erectetl a fine set of other fi'ame buililings. 


the neighboring town of (iilboa, the birth- 


Thereafter he attended to the cidtivation of his 


place ol his father, David West, Jr. His 


lanil imtil liis death, at the age of si.xt\-nine. 


great-grandfather West, who came, it is be- 


He married -March 20, 1.S40, Celinda Dib- 


lie\-ed from Lngland, was one of the original 


ble, daughter of Noah and Abigail (Cri])])en) 


.settlers of C.ilboa, whither he reniowd fioni 


Dibble. Her paternal grand|)arents were Dan- 


Connecticut in Colonial times, coming here 


iel and Lois (I'omeru)-) Dibble, the grand- 


when the country was a wooded wilderness and 


mother the daughter of D.uiiel I'.ir.-.eroy, a 


rearing the small log cabin in which he ami 


Re\-olutionar\' soldier. The parents of Ce- 


his family first found shelter. 


linda Dibble had ten children, three of whom 


David West, Sr.. the grandf.ither of Noah 


sinvi\e, namel\-: Jane, born in 1S20; Abi- 


D., spent the larger jiart of his threescore and 


gail, Ixnn 111 1S22; and Amanda, burn in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1826. Noah Dibble, who served as a soldier 


home farm in Gilboa. At the ago of twenty 


of the War of 1812, was a carpenter in Mid- 


he commenced teaching school, and he was 


dleburg, and well known throughout this sec- 


thus employed in his native town for ten 


tion as a builder of saw-mills, which he made 


terms. He also assisted in the management of 



a specialty. He died at the age of seventy-si.x 
years. Mrs. Abigail Dibble died on Septem- 
ber 12, 1869, aged seventy-nine years, six 
months, and nine days. In religion she was 
a Baptist. David West, Jr., and his wife, 
Celinda, were also members of the Baptist 
church. Of their union but one child was 
born, Noah D. , the special subject of this 
biograph)'. The mother was born on February 
23, 1 81 7, and died May 17, 1893, at the age 
of seventy-six years. 

As mentioned above, Daniel Pomeroy, her 
grandmother Dibble's father, great-great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
a soldier of the American Revolution. He 
was under Washington, and it is related that 
the General on parting gave him his cane as 
a keepsake. This cane Daniel Pomeroj' gave 
to his daughter Lois (Mrs. Daniel Dibble), 
with the request that she should hand it down 
to her eldest son, Noah Dibble, to be always 
kept in the Dibble family, held by the eldest 
son of each succeeding generation. From 
Noah Dibble the Washington cane passed to his 
eldest son, Ichabod Dibble, brother of Ce- 
linda; from Ichabod to his eldest son, Sylves- 
ter; and at the death of Sylvester, leaving no 
son, it came into the possession of his brother, 
Jesse Dibble, its present owner, who is a cou- 
sin of Noah Dibble West, the special subject 
of the present biography. 

Noah D. West grew to manhood on the 



the home farm until attaining his majority, 
when he took possession of a few of its acres, 
and turned his attention to the culture of bees, 
an industry in which he had been interested 
from boyhood. Ten years later he bought his 
present farm of ten acres, located two miles 
from the village of Middleburg, on the road to 
Catskill. Here he has continued his chosen 
work, from year to year enlarging his opera- 
tions. 

After his parents" death he came into full 
possession of the old farm of one hundred 
twenty acres, formerly owned by himself and 
father together; and since the death of his 
father he hss bought and now owns three ad- 
joining farms, including in all four hundred 
acres. All this land, then covered by a dense 
forest, was once the property of his grand- 
father, David West. 

In his five bee yards Mr. \\'est has five hun- 
dred swarms of bees, which produce annually 
from eight to ten tons of honey. This he sells 
in the leading cities of New York and New 
England at the highest market price. He has 
made a special study throughout his life of bees 
and their habits, and in his efforts to obtain the 
best results from bee-keeping at the least possi- 
ble cost he has invented and patented a spiral 
wire queen-cell protector and a spiral wire 
queen-cage, which have proved of great value. 
Although these inventions have been before the 
public but a little more than seven years, they 



iii()(;rai'I1Ic.\l kkvikw 



are in ilcniand ihroiij^hoiit the LJnitctI States, in 
Canada, in Kngland — ■ in fact, in all ])arts of 
tlie wf)rld ; and lie is ciirryin,^' i)n a \er\ snbstan- 
ti;il business as the sule in:nuitactLirer ut these 
articles. ]-"iir tliree successive )ears he was 
chosen, and i)aid, In act as jiulj^e on the differ- 
ent races of bees anil of honey, bee ajjpliances 
and bee literature, at the New bjiKhiiul fairs 
held at Albany, on which occasions a large va- 
riety of apiarian .i^noils was disphued and lar.ge 
])4eniiunis awarded. On jidv ii, 1 1S99, lie 
leceived the appointment of bee inspector for 
the State of New \'ork. 

He is a Republican and a I'robibit ionist in 
politics and an active member of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church, in which he has been 
class lender, a teacher, and tiie su|)erintendent 
of its Sunday-scho,,l. 

Mr. West m;irried June 23, 1867, Sarah A. 
liaskin. She is a daughter of Joshua Maskin 
and a grand-dauj;hter of Moses and Hanah 
(Halt) Haskin. natives of Dutchess County. 
Her grandparents were pioneer settlers of 
]5roome, N. \'. The)' reared fifteen children, 
one (jf whom is yet living, Joshua. The 
grantlmother was a Ouaker in her religious be- 
lief. J..sluia Haskin was engaged in farming 
in Hroome until 1S71, when he rem(j\-ed to the 
town of .Maine, Hro.ime Cumty, where he has 
a fine farm of one hinulred acres. b'ormerly 
a Democrat in iiolitics, he has been identified 
with the Republican party since the Rebell- 
ir,n. He has served as Assessor and as Over- 
seer of the I'oor. He married Deborah A. 
Hugbson, daughter of Nich.das and Charlotte 
(Duncan) Huglison, formerly of lirounie, but 



later of Norwich, Chenango County. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hiighson had ten children, of whom four 
are living, namely: Deborah A., now Mrs. 
Haskin; Hiram Hugbson; Jane, wife of John 
DeMoney; and Charlotte, wife .>f Charles M. 
Markel. Of the seven children born to Joshua 
Haskin and his wife these five are li\'ing: 
Sarah A., now Mrs. West; I-idwin S. ; (iros- 
venor; Alice M., wife of Dr. Dudley; and 
Hiram A. All except .Mrs. West reside in 
Rroome C'ountv, and all, with their jiarents, 
are mendjers of the Methodist ]-:piscopal 
church. 

Mr. and Mrs. West have eight children; 
namelv, ( )rman, Ruth .\., lulwin IL, Mima 
A., David J., Alice C, Charles D., and Hat- 
tie D. The four younger are still in schtud. 
Orman M., a graduate of Middleburgh Acad- 
em_\- and Union College, was formerly a schoid 
teacher, was graduated at the Drew Theologi- 
cal .Seminar)-, and is now preaching in I'ort 
Coldeii, N.J. He married Dora Dorman, and 
they have one son, Dorman. Ruth married 
Delos H. C.ridley, formerly a teacher, farmer, 
and bee-keeiier, later a student at Drew 'J heo- 
logical Seminar)-, now preaching at Speeds- 
ville, N. ^'. The)' have one son, X'ernon 
J. :\Irs. C;ridley was vice-president of the 
Women's Christian 'femjierance L'nion at 
Madison, N.J. Kdwin H. West married 
Sophia .M. Shafer. He was in his earlier 
years a farmer, interested in bee culture, also 
a teacher; and after his graduation from the 
Middleburg High School he was f,,r a time a 
clerk in .Schenectady, a position which he 
resigned to become a member of the police 



RIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



force in New V,.:k City. I'lma A., forniciiy 
a tcaclicr in tiic pulilic scluxils, is tiic wife of 
]-'lnicr ]?. Wood, of Hroomc, ami has one son, 
Howard C. Mrs. West is a mcmlier of tlie 
W. C. T. U. ; and she and all of her children 
are active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and of the Sunday-school, in which all 
the ekler children have been teachers. 



§0H\ M. CONOVER, a descendant of 
an old Dutch famil)' of repute and a 
representative farmer of Duanesburg, 
Schenectady County, N.Y. , was born in Glen, 
Montgomery County, this State, December 26, 
1839, son of George \V. and Sarah M. (Rad- 
ley) Conover. The father was born in Elor- 
ida, N. Y. , in 1S12, and the mother was born 
in the same town in iSiS. The name was 
originally \'an Couwenhoven, and was short- 
ened to its present form prior to the birth of 
the great-grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch. Its bearers were prominent among the 
early Dutch families, and contemporaneous 
with the \'an Rensselaers, Van Beekmans, and 
other Knickerbockers. The immigrant pro- 
genitor was one Wolfret Garretson Wan Cou- 
wenhoven, who came from Amersfoort, in the 
province of Utrecht, in 1630, and settled in 
Rensselaerwyck. He was employed b)- the 
Van Rensselaers as superintendent of farms for 
six years; and in June, 1636, he with others 
purchased a large tract of land at the western 
end of Long Island. His sons were: Gerrit, 
Jacob, Derrick, Peter, and John. 

Cornelius V. Couwenhoven, the great-great- 



grandfather of Mr. Conover of Duanesburg, 
was born in 1 7 1 o, and died in 1S04. He 
hail seven children; namely, John, William, 
Peter, Jacob, Jane, Abraham, and Isaac, the 
great-grandfather. Isaac Conover was born 
I'Y^bruary i i, 1759. He served as a soldier in 
the Continental arm}' during the Rexdlution- 
ary War, antl died September 21, 1S45, leav- 
ing several children, among others Marcus, the 
grandfather, who was born in New Jersey, Oc- 
tober II, 1786. Marcus Conover was an early 
settler in PTorida, N.Y. , where he engaged in 
farming, and was a leading resident of that 
town. His last days were spent in Illinois, 
and he died in June, 1844. ^^^ married Sarah 
L. Schu\ier, who was born February 19, 1794, 
and died in June, 1S45. 

George W. Conover, son of Marcus, was 
reared in P"lorida, N. Y. , and received his 
business training as clerk for his uncle, John 
J. Schulyer. Later he was admitted to part- 
nership, and for several )'ears the firm carried 
on a general store in Amsterdam, N.Y. Re- 
linquishing business on account of failing 
health, he took a protracted journey by team 
with P'unis I. \'an Derveer, through Pennsyl- 
vania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, passing 
through Chicago when it was but a village, 
and driving as far West as the Mississippi 
River. He returned to his nati\'e State in the 
same manner, much benefitted in health, and, 
resuming mercantile business in Auriesville, 
Montgomery County, he remained there until 
1850. Selling his store, he invested in real 
estate both in this State and the West, and, 
purchasing in 1859 the farm in Duanesburg, 



Ii8 



lilOGRAl'IIICAI. RKVIEW 



which his son now owns, he ilevotcil the rest 
<jf his active period to ai;ricultunii iniisuits. 
In politics lie originally acte.l with the \Vhij,'s, 
anil with the niajoritx' of that element he went 
into the ranks of the Re|iLil)lican part) at its 
Inrniation. (ieor-e W. Cnnover died in 1S94. 
On March 13, 1S39, he married Saraii I\I. 
Ka.lley. .laughter nf J dm 1'. and Anna (Clay- 
ton) Kadley, <.f Florida, N.V. Her grand- 
father, l'hili|] Radlc}-, was an earl)- settler in 
that town, and he lived to reach a good old 
age. 'I'he Radle\- farm was inherited by John 
1'. Raclley, who occupied it until his death, 
which occurred November 2-j, 1S62, his wife 
having died March 22, 1S55. Mrs. Sarah 
ConoNcr is still living, antl resides at the 
homestead near the Scotch church. She 
reared but one son, John M., the subject of 
this sketch. 

John M. ConoN'er was reared and educated 
in Glen. At the age nf twent}--onc he became 
associated with his father in carr)ing on the 
home farm, and after his father's tleath the 
farm fell to his ])ossession. It is one nf the 
best pieces of agricultural property in the 
neighborhood. He grows all kinds of grain, 
cuts a large quantity of hay annually, raises 
some excellent cattle and horses, and displays 
good judgment in all his undertakings. His 
residence and outbuildings are exceedingly 
desirable. 

On October 5, 1864, Mr. Conover marrieil 
for his first wife Anna 1!. Van Vechten, who 
was b.un in b'loiida, \.V., IJecember 6, 
1S45. She died March 12, 1884, leaving 
three children, namelv : Archie R., born Sep- 



tember 23, 1866; Mabel, born May 13, 1S74; 
and Kdna, born May 20, 1877. Archie R. 
C"ono\ei', who was graduatetl from L'nion Cid- 
lege in 1 889, is now a lawyer in .Amstertlani. 
He married Jessie Dougall, and has one daugh- 
ter, Marion. Mabel is the wife <if the Rev. 
F. W. McKee, pastor of the historic Scotch (or 
Unitetl Presbyterian) Church, Florida, N.V. ; 
1 anil Fdna is umiiarried. ( )n March 25, 1890, 
I Mr. C.nover married for his second wife Mary 
\\. Smeallie, who was born in I'riiicetnwn, 
N.V., February ig, 1846, daughter of John 
and Jane (Milmine) Smeallie, the former of 
whom was a native of that place. ]5uth par- 
ents were born in 1816. 

Politically, Mr. Conover is a Re|)ublican. 
He has inherited man\' of the sterling charac- 
teristics of his race, whose thrift}- and indus- 
trious habits made possible the development of 
the vast resources and wealth for which the 
lunpire State has long been noted, and he has 
every reason to be proud <if his origin. He is 
a meniber of the United rresbxterian Church 
of Fl.irida, N.Y. 



HOMAS J. K1LMI-:R, M.U., the well- 
known physician of Schoharie, X.\'., 
was born in Cobleskill, this county, November 
22, 1833, son of Daniel and Maria (Shaffer) 
Kilmer. He is of Cierman extraction, and a 
representative ot the third generation of his 
family in this country, being the grandson of 
John I. Kilmer, a native of Germany, who 
settled in Cble.skill as a pioneer. 

John 1. Kilmer acquired a tract of land con- 




T. J. KILM 



BIOGRAPHTCAL REVIEW 



taining five hundred acres, a considerable [lor- 
tion of which he cleared for agricultural pur- 
poses. Commencing bis farm life in a log- 
house, he later built a frame dwelling near the 
village of Rarnerville; and through energ\- 
and perseverance he became one of the most 
prosperous farmers of Schoharie County in his 
day. Possessing intellectual powers of a high 
order, which had been developed by a good 
education, he became the owner of a large 
library, and fostered his desire for knowledge 
by continued reading. Being of a religious 
turn of mind, he united with the Lutheran 
church, and for years was one of its most ac- 
tive members. He lived to be ninety years 
old. He had a family of six children. 

Daniel Kilmer, the Doctor's father, was a 
lifelong resident of Cobleskill ; and, succeed- 
ing to the ownership of some three hundred 
acres of the homestead property, he became 
successful as a general farmer. He was pro- 
gressive as well as energetic, and not only kept 
up with the times in the way of agricultural 
improvements, but aided in developing his 
neighborhood b}- the erection of buildings. 
His ability and sound judgment necessarily 
made him an influential factor in public 
affairs, and he rendered efficient service to the 
town as Supervisor for some time. He died 
at the age of fifty years. His wife, Maria, 
was a daughter of John I. Shaffer, who at one 
time owned the land which is now occupied by 
the village of Cobleskill. She became the 
mother of thirteen children, of whom eleven 
are living, namely: Augustus; Josiah ; Mar- 
garet, wife of lilijah Griffin; Daniel A.; 



Thomas J., the subject of this sketch; An- 
drew G. ; Syhcster A. ; Chavmce\' C. ; Jonas 
M. ; Aurelia, who married XapoU-on Pal- 
matier; and Delia, wife of David I. Hoock ^ 
all of whom reside in this State. Mrs. Maria 
S. Kilmer lived to be eighty-three years old. 
The parents were members of the Lutheran 
church. 

Thomas J. Kilmer acc|uired a common-school 
education in his native town, and subset|Liently 
taught two terms of school in Cobleskill. He 
assisted in carrying on the home farm for a 
time prior to entering upon his medical 
studies, which were begun at Port Crane under 
his brother's direction. He was graduated 
from the Eclectic Medical College, New York 
Cit}-, in 1874, and was afterward associated 
with his brother some seven years, at the expi- 
ration of which he came to Schoharie, where 
he practised successful!}' until 1888. Estab- 
lishing the Kilmer Sanitarium, he continued 
in charge of that institution until failing 
health caused him to withdraw from its man- 
agement in 1893. His success at the sanita- 
rium, where patients are received from every 
part of the State, has given him a wide repu- 
tation as a skilful physician. Besides attend- 
ing to his private practice, which is the larg- 
est in town, he prepares several effective 
remedies which ha\e a large sale. 

In 1S54 Dr. Kilmer was united in marriage 
with Elmina Palmitier, a native of this town, 
daughter of John H. Palmitier. Dr. and Mrs. 
Kilmer have had four children — Josiah, Ira 
P., Julia S , and Herbert. The last-named is 
no longer living. Josiah and Julia S. reside 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



;it liniiie witli tliL'ir pniciits. Ira P. mnriied 
JiKiii Xcthaway, aiul has two children — Strat- 
tnn and Miiia. llerl)crt, who was a railroad 
man, Iclt a widinv and hmr children — Ardah, 
X.iah, josiah, and Ilcihert. 

Dr. Kilmer is a nieniher of the Schnharie 
and Delaware County Pklectic Medical So- 
cietw ol which tor thiee years he has been a 
censor. lie likewise helongs to the Masonic 
order. lie was lornicrly a Deacon and a class 
loader of the Methodist Kpiscopal church at 
Port Crane, and the faniilv are members of the 
same relisiious denomination in Schoharie. 



.\M.\\ r. PKTTIXGII.L, of the f^rm 
f Malcolm & Co.. woollen manufac- 
turers, Catskill. X.Y. , was born in 
Florida, Montgomery County, this State, on 
September 25, 1S47, hi* parents being David 
and Jeannette (McNee) Pettingill. His 
father's family is of English descent. 

David Pettingill, who was born and reared 
in the Mohawk Valley, was one of the original 
promoters of the Erie Canal, and rode on the 
first boat that passed over the waters of the 
canal after its completion. He carried on 
farming to some extent, and also was engaged 
in mercantile business in .Amsterdam. He 
spent his last years in Amsterdam, his death 
occurring there at the age of seventy-three. 
His wife, Jeannette, was one of a family of 
ten children. She was born in Schenectady 
County, this State. Her father, James Mc- 
Nee, was a native of Glasgow, Scotland. Im- 
migrating to this country, he lived tor a time 



in Schenectadv County, and later in Montgom- 
ery Count}-. He died in ]\Iontgomery County 
at eighty-eir;ht years of age. His wife, wbo.se 
maiden name was Ma.xwell, was of Scottish 
descent. David and Jeannette (McNee) Pet- 
tingill had eight children, namely: Agnes; 
Mary A., who is now Mrs. Millmine; Will- 
iam; Peter: Klb, who is now Mrs. Hager- 
man ; Haman ; Louisa, now Mrs. Millmine; 
and Anna. The mother of these children died 
j at the age of si.xty-three. Both she and her 
I husband were members of the Presbvterian 
J church. 

Haman Pettingill attended the public 
schools until he was eighteen years of age, 
when he began learning the machinist's trade. 
He subsequently worked at his trade as a jour- 
neyman in Amsterdam, and later in West Al- 
bany at the locomotive works, and after that 
was seven years a knitter in the knitting-mill 
at Amsterdam. In 1SS2 he became a partner 
of Joseph Malcolm, a sketch of whom may be 
found in this work. The two men carried on 
a woollen-mill in Amsterdam for a time, and 
then removed to Catskill, the present company 
being formed. Mr. Pettingill has charge of 
the machinery, which has all the latest im- 
provements. The firm manufacture men's, 
women's, and children's underwear, every 
piece produced bearing their special trade- 
mark. This mark is known to all experienced 
buyers as belonging only to a good class of 
garments. About a hundred and seventy 
hands are employed. 

Mr. Pettingill has been twice married. 
The maiden name of his first wife, who was 




STEI'IIKN L. MAIIA.M. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born in New Yurk, was Margaret Morehead. 
The\' were marrietl in 1877, and she died at 
the age of thirty-one. His present wife, 
whose maiden name was Isabel Lusk, was born 
in Coxsackie, being the daughter of Gilbert 
and Elizabeth Lusk. Mr. Lusk was for man}' 
years one of the well-known merchants of Co.\- 
sackie, and later of Catskill. Of the second 
union one child has been born, Charlotte. 

Mr. Pettingill is a member of Catskill 
Lodge of Masons, No. 46S. In politics he is 
a Republican. He is a member and trustee of 
the Presbyterian church, and Mrs. Pettingill 
is a communicant of the Episcopal church. 



ON. STEPHEN L. MAYHAM, of 
Schoharie, former Presiding Justice 
)f the Supreme Court, General 
Term, Third Department, and an e.x-member 
of Congress, was born in Blenheim, N. Y. , Oc- 
tober 8, 1826, son of Jt>hn and Ik'tsey (P'ergu- 
son) Mayham. He represents the third gener- 
ation of the family founded by his grandfather, 
Henry Mayham, who emigrated from Ireland 
in 1790. 

Acquiring a tract of ft)ur hundred acres of 
wild land, which embraced the site now occu_ 
pied by West Troy, N.Y. , and the Watervliet 
Arsenal, Henry Mayham cleared a portion for 
agricultural purposes and sold the remainder. 
He died at the age of ninety-three. His 
wife's family name was Welch. 

John Mayham, son of Henr)', was a native 
of West Troy. Locating in Plenheim when a 
young man, he spent the rest of his life as a 



prosperous farmer, his death occurring at the 
age of sixty-five years. He took an active in- 
terest in political and religious matters, with- 
out aspiring to office, although he ccmsentetl to 
serve as Supervisor, and faithfully performed 
the duties of that ofifice for several terms. He 
was highly respected by the entire conmiunity. 
His intellectual attainments enabled him as a 
public speaker forcibly to discuss the impor- 
tant issues of the day. He married Betsey 
Ferguson, daughter of John Ferguson. Her 
father was a native of Scotland. Coming to 
this country, he settled at Pine Plains and 
later removed to Delaware County, where he 
died at an advanced age. John Mayham and 
his wife were the parents of twelve children, 
eleven of whom, seven sons and four daugh- 
ters, grew to maturity. Five .sons became 
professional men. Thomas Mayham, M. D., is 
now Mayor of Fond du Lac, Wis. ; another son, 
who was a physician, died in that State; a 
third was County Judge of P""ond du Lac, and is 
no longer living; Stephen L. is the subject 
of this sketch; and the youngest son, Banks, 
who became a noted lawyer in Southern Illi- 
nois, died suddenly at Murphysboro, 111. The 
mother lived to be sixty years old. 

Stephen L. Mayham grew to manhood in 
Blenheim. As a youth he assisted in cultivat- 
ing the home farm when not pursuing his 
studies, and a local biographer has fittingly 
said that his education was acquired with a 
book in one hand and a plough-handle in the 
other. At the age of eighteen he started in 
life as a district school teacher. Two jears 
later he entered the law office of Samuel Jack- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



son, who at tliat time was located in Gilboa, 
and afterward became Justice of the Supreme 
Court for the l-"ourth Judicial District. His 
legal preparations were com])!ctc(l in the office 
of Love & Freer, Ithaca, \. V. ; and after his 
admission to the bar, in i.S4,S, he bc^'an the 
practice of his profession in Hlenheim. His 
ability as counsellor and attorney rapidly as- 
serted itself, with the result that he soon found 
himself in control of a Jar.ije ,L;eiier:>l law busi- 
ness. His many (lual ilicat ions, not the least 
anion- wliich was bis personal poini]arit\, 
made him esjiecially eli-ihle to public office; 
and he was not Ion-- |)erniittcd by his felhiw- 
townsmen to devote his whole time to his pri- 
vate affairs. 

He served as Superintendent of Schools two 
years and as Supervisor three \enrs; was 
elected District Attorney in 1S59 by a lar,L;e 
majority, and held office two years. In the 
fall of 1S62 he was elected to the Assembly. 
In 1866 he accepted as a forlorn hope the 
Democratic nomination for Slate Senator from 
the Fifteenth District, coniprisin-- the counties 
of Schenectady, Schoharie, and Delaware; 
and, although realizing his expected defeat, he 
had the satisfaction of reducing the Republican 
majority. In i,S'6,S he was elected to liie 
Forty-first Congress in tlie Congressional dis- 
trict comprising Aliiany and Schoharie 
Counties, and in iSj.S was elected Representa- 
tive lo the I'orty-firth Congress from the 
Thirteentii District, including the counties of 
Schoharie, Creene, and LMsler. During his 
first term lie served upon the Connniltees on 
Private Land Claims and the bi.xpeiiditures of 



the State and Post-office Departments. In the 
Forty-fifth Congress he was assigned to the 
Committees on the District of Columbia and 
State Department Fxpenditures, and was chair- 
man of the .Subconnuittee on \\'a\s and 
Means. His conunittce work in both sessions 
was laborious and efficient, and his record in 
the national House of Representatives was 
irreproachaiile. In 18X3 he was elected 
County Judge and Surrogate ..f Schoharie 
County, a jiosition which he held until ap- 
pointed by (iovcrnnr Hill to a seal upon the 
Supreme Hcnch ; and in November, iS.Sj, the 
people ratified the (iovernor's choice by elect- 
ing him for ;i full term. His decisions, which 
are carefull\- conceived, have been in perfect 
accoi'd with legal icquircmenls anil generall)' 
sustained Ijy the Court of Ajjpeals. 

Since i,sr,2 the Judge has resided in 
Schoharie. He was president <if the Hoard of 
Public Education for eight \ears, and was the 
first president ol the Schoharie X'alley Rail- 
road Company. Judge Mayham's scholaily 
attainments and ability as a public speaker 
have adde<l much to his popularity, which ex- 
tends far beyond the limits of his own county. 
Since his retirement from the bench he has 
been associated with his son Claude at Scho- 
harie in the active jiractice of his ])rofession, 
and is often called ujion to act as referee in 

eminently tpialificd him tor such ]»isition. 

Judge Mayham married Julia Martin, a 
gr,ind-dau,i;htcr of Cicneral I-'recgift Palihin, 
who served in the Continental Army dining 
the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Mayham died 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"7 



in 1S95, aged sixty-four \enrs. She was tiie 
mother of three sons, F. :Matt, Don S., 
Claude B. , and one daughter, Ida L. , who is 
now the wife of George Manschaffer, of this 
town. F. I\Iatt Mayham was a prominent 
lawyer. He died in Schoharie in 1889, aged 
thirty-nine years. Don S. Mayham studied 
law with his father: and, after serving for a 
time as clerk of the Surrogate Court, he en- 
tered the Albany Law School, from which he 
was graduated in 188S. He was admitted to 
the bar the same year, and practised with his 
elder brother until the latter's decease, when 
he entered into partnership with his younger 
brother. He was a Democrat in politics, and 
served as clerk of the State Senate in 1S92. 
He married IMary B. Borst, daughter of 
Thomas Borst and grand-daughter of Ralph 
Brewster, a prominent lawyer of this locality 
in his day. Dying in June, 1896, at the age 
of thirty-three years, Don S. ^Mayham left one 
son, Stephen L. Mayham, second. Claude B. 
Mayham was born in Schoharie in 1868. His 
early education was completed at the Schoharie 
Academy, where he taught for two years, and 
began the study of law with his brother. He 
was graduated from Columbia College in the 
class of 1 89 1, with the degrees of Bachelor 
of Laws and Bachelor of Philosophy, and 
was associated with Don S. ;\Layham until 
1896. For a short time he was in partner- 
ship with Lyman S. Holmes, of Cobleskill, 
in Schoharie. While in college he was an 
all-round athlete and captain of the base- 
ball team. He was also president of the lead- 
ing literary society and a member of the Delta | 



Upsilon fraternity, and he sang in the Glee 
Club. He takes a leading part in the literary 
and musical matters in Schoharie, and is i.nc 
of the most popular young men in town. 



SRAEL P. UTTER, a leading farmer 
and representative citizen of Oak Hill, 
Greene County, was born in this town, 
on a farm near his present residence, on the 
second da\- of December, 1829. He is a son 
of Bani Utter, and grandson of James, the an- 
cestor of the Utter family of this county. 

James L'tter was born in the State of Con- 
necticut. He came among the earlv settlers 
to this section of New York, took up land, and 
built a log cabin, in which he lived for a num- 
ber of years. Shortly before his removal from 
Connecticut, he had served in the Continental 
army in the Revolution. His wife, whose 
name was Hannah, was born in Spencer, Conn. 
She came on horseback through the wilds, he 
walking beside her. Of the eight children 
born to her, none are living. She died at the 
advanced age of ninety-five, and her husband 
died at the age of ninety-three. Both were 
lifelong Presbyterians. 

Bani Utter, above named, was born in Oak 
Hill, not far from where his son now lives, 
and spent his whole life here. He helped his 
father build a saa-mill. This mill was car- 
ried away by rising waters, and he subse- 
quently built another, which he operated for 
many years. He engaged in farming on the 
farm where he was born, and he helped to 
build the old Utter house, which, previous to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



its destruction by fire in US94, was one of tiio 
landmarks of the place. Hani Utter died in 
the old house at the age of seventy-four. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Cynthia Stan- 
nard, was the dauj^diter of Mliakim Stannard, 
wild was a ]>i(ineer settler in Durham, X.\'., 
Cuming from Connecticut. She died at 
sevent)-eii,dit years of age. Of her ten chil- 
dren, Allied. Kuth, and I.\nian are deceased. 
Alfred was a soldier in the Civil War, and 
lost his life while in service. 'I'he living 
children are: Julia, now Mrs. Whilmore; Is- 
rael; I.<.uisa, now Mrs. Taylor; Almeran; 
Kliakim; Adelaide; and Addison. Both par- 
ents were Methodists. 

Israel Utter in his boyhnod attended the 
common schools of liis native town, ami when 
not occupied wilii his lessons helped his father 
on the farm. Later lie worked on tlie farm on 
shares for a time, Init eventually he inuchased 
the farm adjoining the one where he now li\'cs. 
After having operated that successfully for a 
number of years, he bought his present place 
and iiuilt his handsome residence and the other 
buildings. All these are thoroughly well 
built, and the barns and outbuildings arc 
thoroughly equijijied for carrxiug on farming 
in accordance with the latest and most a|)- 
proved methods. Mr. I'lter now owns the two 
farms, embracing about two hundred and si.xtv 
acres. He devotes his time chietlyto dairy- 
ing, making butler for the Xew Vuik markets. 

.Mr. Utler's marriage took i)lace in 1.S55, 
his wife l)eing Caroline, the daughter of Jacob 
and Hannah (Xilcs) Tompkins. Mr. Tom], 
kins spent his life on a faim in this town, and 



died here at the age of si.vty-four. He and his 
wife weie (jroni incut mendjcrs of the Meth- 
odist church, anil he held nimierous official 
positions in the cluircii. Mrs. Tompkins, who 
was born in Coe\nians, X.'S'. , lived to l)e 
ninety-three years of age. Of the children 
born to her, the foil,, wing-named are living: 
Mary, who nuirried Kufus (iifford; Ann, who 
married James Gifford; William, who is in 
California; Sarah, wlio married Alexander 
Lounsbur\-; Mrs Utter, who was born on 
June 12, i,S34; I.ibby, the wife of i'hih, 
Wicks; and Xiles Tompkins, who resides on 
the Tomjikins farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Utter have had two children, 
one of whom died in infanc)'. Their d:uighter 
.Alice married ]{lwin llaskins, only son of 
farmer Henry llaskins of this town. She has 
five children — Dora, Utter, Henry, Kdison, 
and Paul — all of them being now in school. 

In ]iolitics Mr. Utter is a Republicim, as 
was his father before him. He takes not only 
a warm interest, but an active jiart in all mat- 
ters pertaining to the welfare of the town. 
I-"or nine years he was an Assessor, being three 
times re-elected, and for one year he w:is 
chairman of the Hoard. In iSS'i and i.S,S2 he 
was Sujiervisor of the town. b'or thirty-five 
years he has been a mendicr of the Methodist 
church, and for the i)ast tliirty ye:us he has 
been one of its trustees, a steward, and ciass 
leader. The Sunday-school has always had 
his warm and e:u'nest su])port, and he luis been 
both teacher and superintendent. His wife 
and daughter h:ive ;ilso been workers in botli 
church and Sunday-school, and the latter has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



129 



sung in the choir nnd pjnyed the organ. Mr. 
letter is one of tlie most ostcenied citizens of 
liis town. 



§AME;S S. ST a ley, a prosperous farmer 
of Sharon Springs, was born in Flor- 
ida, N. V. , March 20, 1825, son of 
Henry I. and Sarah B. (IMcDonald) Staley. 
His maternal ancestors were Irish Protestants, 
and his mother came to America when she was 
four \-ears old. The Staleys are of Dutch 
origin, and the name was originally spelled 
Stael. The first Stael, or Staley, in America, 
settled in Florida, when that section of the 
State was mostly a wilderness, and he resided 
there for the rest of his life. His wife's peo- 
ple, who came from Germany to New Jersey, 
sold her for a sum sufficient to pay for their 
passage over, and he worked to purchase her 
freedom. 

Jacob Staley, James S. Staley's grandfather, 
was a lifelong resident of Florida, and fol- 
lowed general farming during his acti\e years. 
He had a family of si.\ children, including 
Henry, Valentine, Oliver, Betsey, and two 
other daughters. Betsey became Mrs. Blood. 
Valentine and Henry succeeded to the owner- 
ship of the homestead, which contained about 
two hundred acres. Valentine afterward moved 
to Genesee, N. Y. Both the grandparents and 
great-grandparents were members of the Dutch 
Reformed church. 

Henry I. Staley, James S. Staley's father, 
was reared at the homestead in Florida. Pur- 
chasing his brother's interest, he cultivated 
the property for a number of years. Selling 



to his brother-in-law, Mr. lilnod, and coming 
to Sharon Springs in 1S33, lie bought the J. 
Cady farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 
which he occu]3ied until his death. He was a 
well-known .stock-raiser, owned good horses, 
and was noted as an excellent judge of these 
animals. In politics he was a Democrat. 
Henry I. Staley died in 1S70. He was the 
father of ten children; namel)-, Jacob, Valen- 
tine, F'anny, Ann Plliza, William H., John, 
James S. , Robert, Sarah, and Alexander. 
Fanny, William H., John, Robert, and Sarah 
are no longer living. Valentine resides at 
Sharon Springs; Alexander occupies the home- 
stead; Ann Eliza is the widow of William 
Othman, late of Cobleskill, N. Y. ; and Sarah 
was the wife of Peter Spraker. 

James S. Staley was fitted for college at the 
Ames Academy, but was prevented from pur- 
suing a classical course by an accident which 
seriously affected his eyesight. He was how- 
ever, enabled to turn his attention to educa- 
tional pursuits, and after teaching in the dis- 
trict schools of this locality for twelve years 
he went to New York City, where for four 
years he had full charge of Leake and Watts 
Orphans' School, having the aid of three assis- 
tants. That position he was forced to resign 
in order to undergo treatment for his eyes. 
Having spent nine months under the care of 
a .skilful specialist, he returned to Sharon 
Springs. He continued to teach school until 
1S58, when he purchased the Hunt farm, 
which contains about ninety acres and was for- 
merly a part of his brother \'alentine's prop- 
erty. He was at one time quite extensively 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cngaj^cd in raisiiij; Imjis, luil iinw dcvntcs liis 
atteutiun tn ,:;ci)cral and dair\- farming and 
fniit • j^iuwing. lie act|uirc'd considerable 
Ijroniincncc in public affairs during bis 
younger days, serving as Su])erinlendenl of 
Schools three years, Ciminiissioner of High- 
ways two terms, Railroatl Commissioner three 
years, and Supervisor one )ear. 

Mr. Staley married Ann K. Hodge, of the 
town of Canajoharie, daughter of Isaac G. 
Hodge. Her father was formerly a well- 
kiKnvn figure in public affairs, and a leading 
member of the Methodist church, which he 
bellied to organize. His family consisted of 
four sons anil se\-en daughters. The daughters 
were all graduated from the Ames Academy 
ami iiualified to teach. .Mrs. Staley taught 
school foi- some }'ears before marriage. Afr. 
and Mrs. Staley have one son, George K. He 
married Minnie Snyder, daughter of Nathan 
Snyder, and has two children — Karl and .May. 

Mr. Staley belonged to a lodge of Odd Fel- 
lows that disbanded many years ago, and he 
has ne\er joined anothei'. He is a mendier of 
the .Methodist Kpiscopal clnucb, in which he 
has served as steward, class leader, and in 
other cajiacities. He is n<iw a trustee, and 
superintendent of the .Sunday-school, and a 
well-known worker in the cause of religion, 
temperance, and morality. 



V'^X)/ \IAA.\-S\ SAI.SHI'KGH, a prosper- 

\^^ <.us agriculturist of liyndsville, in 

the town of Seward, Schcibarie County, was 

born in Wright, N.Y. , Uclober 22, 1835, in 



the same house in which his father, the late 
I'hili]! .Salsbergh, first opened his eyes to the 
light of this world. He is of German ances- 
try, being a great-giandson of Jacob .Sals- 
l)ergh, who emigrated from (]eiinany to this 
coimtrv when a \(iung man. 

Jacob .Salsbergh located in llu' town of 
Wright as one of its original settlers, and took 
u]> a homestead of three hundred acres. At 
the time he reared his log cabin in tlie little 
o])ening which he first made in the forest, 
there were no ])aths e.\ce|jting the Indian 
trails, and the redskins and the wild beasts 
were his only companions. His wife, Win- 
ney, who lived to the remarkable age of one 
hmidred and one years, was born in (Germany, 
where she spent the first si.xteen years of her 
life. .She came to .\merica then, poor in 
|)ocket, and for six \eai-s after iier arrival in 
iMshkiU, X.V., worked to pay for her passage 
across the ocean. 

John .Salsbergh, the grandfather of William, 
was born in the little log house in the town of 
Wright in which his |)arents made their home, 
and on attaining his majority was given pos- 
session of a [lortion of the original farm. He 

Seward, where he died at the ripe old age of 
eighty-four. His wile, .Margaret Sternbergh, 
died at the age of fourscore years. H(ith were 
members of the Kifoinicd chuich. 

Their .son, Thilip Salsbergh, was one of a 
family of eleven children, all of whom were 
brought Uj) on the home farm, and I'duiated in 
the district school. He inherited a portion of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the estate, and was eni;agecl in tillinj;- the soil 
until 1S40, when he removed to Seward, and, 
buying a farm, continued his chosen vocation 
until his death, at the age of eighty-five years. 
He was held in high resi)ect as a man and a 
citizen, and was jjarticularl)- active in manage- 
ment of the affairs of the Reformed church, in 
which he held all the offices. He married 
Catherine W'oolford. Of the ten children 
born into their household, eight are now liv- 
ing, as follows: Margaret, widow of Gilbert 
Shank; Rebecca W. , wife of Ira Frazier; 
John T. ; Catherine M., widow of Christian 
Markley; William, the subject of this brief 
sketch; Allen; Jemima, wife of Harlem 
Southworth ; and Amanda, wife of John Mark- 
ley. The mother passed to the life immortal 
at the age of seventy-eight years. 

William Salsbergh received a common- 
school education, and until his marriage 
worked on his father's farm. He then bought 
his present farm of eighty-se\-en acres. By 
dint of persevering labor and the e.xercise of 
good judgment he has made of it one of the 
finest-improved estates in this locality. The 
farm buildings are substantial and well 
adapted to the purposes for which the)- were 
erected. He carries on general farming with 
profitable results, each season raising good 
crops of hay and hops. At the Schoharie 
County Fair he has taken premiums for his ex- 
hibits. In politics he is a steadfast Republi- 
can. He is interested in all enterprises tend- 
ing to benefit the town or count}-, but has 
never been an aspirant for public office. He 
is a liberal supporter of the Methodist Episco- 



pal church, (if which he lias bcrn an active 
member for years, and has seivetl faitiifully as 
trustee and class Icatler. lie has also been 
identified with its Sunday-school, of which he 
has been superintendent a number of terms. 

On July 2, 1856, Mr. Salsbergh married 
Emeline Van Tyle, who was born in Seward, 
one of the five children of Daniel R. and Han- 
nah (Guernsey) Van Tyle, her father a promi- 
nent farmer, one of the most highly esteemed 
citizens of Richmondville. Mr. and r^Irs. 
Salsbergh have one child, a daughter Elva. 
She is married t(j Luther Brumaguem, and has 
four children — Stewart, Arthur, Ernest, and 
Floyd. 13y a former marriage to Lawyer O. 
Strander, Mrs. Elva Ikumaguem has a .son 
William. He has been adopted by his grand- 
father Salsbergh, and is now known as Will- 
iam Salsbergh, Jr. 



ICHAEL O'HARA, farmer and 
boarding-house keeper at Tanners- 
lle, N.Y. , was born at Croton 
Landing, town of White Plains, Westchester 
County, N.Y., February 7, 1850. His par- 
ents were John and Julia (Traver.s) O'Hara, 
his father a native of West Meath County, Ire- 
land, and his mother of Queen's County. His 
grandfather, Henry O'Hara, who was a farmer, 
spent his entire life in Ireland. 

John O'Hara came to America when about 
twenty years of age, arriving here during the 
construction of the Hudson River Railroad. 
He located at Croton Landing, and followed 
the trade of a brick-maker, which he had 



DIOGRArmCAL REVIEW 



IcMincil in Kiiglanil. At tlic ciul of twenty- 
five years he removeil limn Crotuii Landing U> 
Haines Falls, settling on a farm of one hun- 
ilrcd and fifty acres. During his latter years 
he conducted a boarding-house. Politically, he 
was a Democrat. He died at the age of si.xty- 
nine. Ills wile, Julia, ami four of their si.\ 
children; namely, Henry, .Michael, William, 
and Rosa, are still living, all residents of this 
town. The other two children were Julia antl 
Mary. 

Michael O'Hara came to Haines Falls with 
his parents when si.\ years of a,i;e, and was 
educated in the common schools. At the age 
of sixteen he went to work on a farm, continu- 
ing there until his marriage in 1S7.S, when he 
inirchased a small farm of two acres, on which 
he now lives. He erected all of the buildings 
here, and soon began to take summer boarders. 
The house is located one mile from Tanners- 
ville, on the road to Haines Falls, and is 
about the same distance from tjie latter place. 
It is called Tannersville Cottage, is situated 
on an elevation twenty-two hundred feet above 
sea level, and commands a view of the sur- 
rounding country. There are accommodations 
lor thirty people, the rooms being usually oc- 
cuijied during the entire season. 

In 1S78 Mr. UTlara married Miss l':ila T. 
Haskins, a native of Hunter, thiughcr of John 
and Mary (McGinley) Haskins. Her father, 
who was a native of Ireland, came to America 
when a young man, and locating at Jewett en- 
gaged in farming in connection with the tan- 
ner's trade. He died there at the age of 
eighty-two. Mr. and Mrs. Haskins had a 



family of twelve chiUlren, si.\ of whom are liv- 
ing; namely, Rosa, Mary, Klizabeth, Cather- 
ine. Jane, and Klla T. (Mrs. O'Hara). The 
mother died at fifty years of age. Mr. and 
Mrs. O'Hara have three children — Herbert, 
Mary Amelia, and John. 

Mr. Ollara is a Democr.it in politics. He 
has been on the Town Committee several 
\ears, serving as chairman part of the time, 
was a member of the County Committee a 
number of years, and a delegate to the Con- 
gressional Convention in iSyS. He was Com- 
missioner of Ilighwavs six years, being first 
elected in KS93, re-elected in 1894 for two 
vears, again in 1 S96, and serving until 1898. 
The family attend the Catholic church, in 
wiiich they are activel}- interested. Mr. 
O'Hara has serveil as a trustee, was a member 
of the buikling conmiittee, and contributes 
liberally toward its support. He belie\-es that 
one of the best methods of educating his chil- 
dren is by providing them with good books, 
and his ht)me contains a well-selected library. 
Mr. O'Hara at one time owned the Hunter 
Turn|iike, which was later sold to the town of 
Hunter and is new a free road. 



§OIlX -A. CORDON, a prominent farmer 
and business man residing in Carlisle, 
.Schoharie Comity, was born in Root, 
\.\'. , l'"ebruar\- 20, 1840, son of Charles and 
Mary (Lyker) (iordon. The family is of 
.Scotch origin. 

Mr. Gordon's grandfather, William Cordon, 
came to New Vurk from New Jersex' in 1802. 




JOHN A. GORDON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



■35 



Settling upon a tract of wild land in the town 
of Root, containing ninet\"-six acres, he cleared 
a good farm, upon which he resided for the rest 
of his life. He served as a soldier in the War 
of 1812, and for many years afterward he took 
an active part in military affairs. His chil- 
dren were: David; James; Peter; John; 
Charles; Gilbert; William, who died young; 
Lydia; Margaret. Si.x of his sons became 
prosperous farmers in this State and reared 
families. Gilbert Gordon was a physician, 
and for a number of years practised his profes- 
sion in Newark. 

Charles Gordon, the father of John A., was 
a native of New Jersey. Removing to Root 
with his father and the other members of the 
family at about the age of thirteen )'ears, he 
assisted in improving the homestead, which 
eventuall)' came into his possession. He dealt 
quite extensively in cattle and sheep, sent 
large quantities of wheat to the Albany 
market, and was known as one of the most en- 
terprising and successful farmers of his day. 
At the time of his death, which occurred June 
22, 1S80, at the age of ninety-one years, he 
was one of the largest land-owners in town, 
his estate comprising six hundred acres. In 
politics he was a Democrat, but took no part 
in public affairs beyond casting his vote. He 
was an active member of the Dutch Reformed 
church. His wife, Mary, became the mother 
of nine children, seven of whom lived to ma- 
turity, namely: Margaret; Gertrude; James 
H. ; Louisa; Elizabeth; John A., the subject 
of this sketch ; and Jane. Margaret married 
Charles Grantier, and is no longer living; 



Gertrude is the widow of Henjamin Albaiigli, 
and resides in Carlisle; Louisa married Will- 
iam Colyer, and lives in Root; and Jane is the 
wife of Lorenzo Gardinier, of Root. Mrs. 
Mary L. Gordon died September 16, 1868. 

John A. Gordon was educated in the dis- 
trict schools of his native town. He resided 
at the parental home until his marriage, when 
he settled upon a farm of one hundred and ten 
acres in Carlisle given him b}- his father. He 
has since occupied a prominent place among 
the leading agriculturists of this town. He 
has increased his estate by purchasing more 
land from time to time, being now the owner 
of about three hundred acres, which he devotes 
to general farming. Although hop culture is 
largely carried on by the farmers of this local- 
ity, he has never engaged in it, as he considers 
the dairy business far more stable; and he 
realizes excellent results in that branch of 
agriculture. He owns a blacksmith shop and 
hardware store, was originally one of the prin- 
cipal stockholders in the cheese factor}', and is 
now the sole owner. He also owns some valu- 
able real estate in Argusville. As a public- 
spirited citizen, he takes a lively interest in 
all movements calculated to promote the gen- 
eral prosperit)' of the town. 

Mr. Gordon married for his first wife Annah 
E., daughter of Martin Gardinier. She bore 
him three children, namel\- : Minnie, a gradu- 
ate of the Clintiin Liberal Institute, now 
organist at the Methodist Episcopal church; 
Ostrom, who died at the age of five years; and 
another child, who died in infanc\-. Minnie 
Gordon was married on October 26, 1S9S, to 



•36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



Henry K. Tcrbusli, a \v:i;;i)n ni:iki.i' of Carlisle 


musician. He was tlie organizer and for fift\- 


vill.i;,'c. l-'or his sccoinl wile Mr. (lonlon 


years the leader of Ford's String ]5and, anil 


marrial Sarah l'. Hill, ilau-htcr of Hradtonl 


was familiarly known as "Uncle Dave." In 


Hill, a ])niminL-nt man of this SL-ctiun of the 


politics he was a Democrat, and served as Tax 


cnnnty. 1-lnyd H., the (Hily ehiUl hnni of 


Ccdlector and Cmstable. He resided on the 


this imiim, was dniwned at the a-e (if nine 


farm now occupietl by his son, and dieil at the 


years. 


age of eight)'. His wile, Abigail, was a 


A DeniDcrat, l)nt nut an active politician. 


daughter of William b'aulkner, an Hnglish- 


Mr. (;or(lnn has rendered -ood .service to the 


man. Her father was a shoemaker and farmer. 


tovvn in a piihlic capacity, ha\ing filled the 


and was prominently identified witli pcditical 


olTices of Assessor and Trustee of the School 


affairs, having been elected to Congress. 


District, and havini,' actetl as a Justice of the 


:Mrs. Abigail Ford died at the age of thirty- 


Peace for the past ten years. He is president 


seven. She was the mother of three children, 


of the Cemetery Association, was the first 


two of whom are living, namely: ICdwin L. , 


Master aiul is now a Trustee of .Ai-Liiisville 


the subject of this sketch; and Jeanette, who 


Gran.i^e, No. 297, Patrons of Hushandry. Ik- 


married John P. Miller, of Jewett. The par- 


is officially connected with the Methodi.st 


ents were members of the Paiitist church. 


I'lpiscopal cluuch, of which his wife and 


luhvin L. Ford spent his boyhood and youth 


daughter are meniher.s. 


in assisting his father, and also in woiking by 




the month nu farms near his home. In 1862 




he enlisted as a private in Company F", One 




^^^^umi ^ 


Hundred and Twentieth Regiment, New York 


yiuWlN L. 1-()R1), M.D., a ])rominent 


\'olunteers, for service in the Civil War. 


JCL ^ ])hysician of I,e.\iiii;-t-)n, N.V., and 


Among the engagements in which he took part 


a veteran of the Civil War, was horn on the 


were the battles of Chancellorsvi lie, F'reder- 


farm where he now resides Octoher it,, 1S42, 


icksburg, Gett)'sburg, and Culpepper. He 


son of David and Abigail (I-'aulkner) Vn\\\. 


was severely wounded at (ietts\'lnirg, anil was 


His paternal grandfather, Joel I'or.l, who was 


in the hospital three months. When convales- 


a nati\-e of Connecticut, came to Lexington 


cent he was detailed as hospital nurse, and 


with an o.x-team, bringing iiis wife and three 


upon his reciAcry he rejoined his regiment. 


children, and making his way by the aid of 


He was taken ]irisoner at Mine Kim, and dur- 


marked trees. He began life here in a log 


ing his captivit)- was confined in l.ibhy Prison, 


cabin, and after clearing a tract of land built 


Helle Isle, Anders.mville. Savannah, and Mil- 


a frame house. He was the f ither of thirteen 


ler, da., where he was exchanged. Resuming 


children, none of whom are living. 


active duty, he ])art icipated in the battle of 


David l'"ord, the D(JCtoi's father, was a 


Hatcher's Run and the siege of Petersburg, was 



niOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



present at Lee's surrender, and was mustered 
(Hit in June, 1S65. Deciding to enter jirofes- 
sional life, be began the study of medicine 
with Dr. S. L. Ford, of West Kill, and later 
attended lectures at the Alban\- Medical Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1868. 
Locating in Lexington, where he had already 
practised to some extent, he acquired a large 
and lucratixe practice, and has faithfully dis- 
charged his duties as a physician for the past 
thirty years. Being the only physician in 
town, he has a large local field of opera- 
tion, and his outside practice co\ers a wide 
circuit. 

In 1S72 Dr. Ford married for his first wife 
F' ranees A. Cox, of Cambridgeport, Mass., 
daughter of the Rev. Leonard Cox, who was 
a graduate of Harvard University and a Baptist 
minister. Mr. Cox at one time preached in 
Lexington, but is now a ;'esident of \'irginia. 
Of this union there were two children, neither 
of whom is living. Dr. Ford's first wife died 
at the age of forty, and in 1SS7 he married for 
his second wife Annie L. Dunham, of Lexing- 
ton, daughter of the late Aaron B. and ^Lary 
(Bonestell) Dunham. Of this union there are 
two children — Edwin and Fthel. 

Dr. Ford is a member of the Greene County 
Medical Society, and is Medical Mxaminer for 
the Phojnix, Mutual, Equitable, and other in- 
surance companies. He belongs to the Grand 
Army of the Republic and the Knights of 
Pythias. Politically, he is a Democrat. He 
was Town Physician and a member of the 
Board of Health several years. He and his 
family attend the Bapti.st church. 



Wn.LIAM GRAXnV, a carpenter and 
builder of Blenheim, and at the 
present time a member of the Board of .Sui)er- 
visors from this town, was born here im No- 
vember I, 1S6S, son of Alexander and Julia 
(Kellogg) Granby. 

Richard Granby, his great-grandfather, who 
was a native of Ireland, came to this country 
during the war of the Revolution, and joined 
the Colonial army, in which he subsequently 
rendered valiant ser\ice. After peace was de- 
clared, he came to Blenheim and settled on the 
farm about a mile from the present village, 
which is now owned by William Granby, his 
mother, brother, and his sister. Here he died 
in old age. 

Richard's son William, first, grandfather of 
the present William Granby, was a native of 
Blenheim. He engaged in farming and in the 
lumber business, and also worked as a cooper. 
He was a very prominent citizen in the town, 
and served as School Overseer and in other 
public capacities. He was one of the leaders 
in the movement to build the Methodist 
church, and held the offices of class leader and 
steward in that body. His death occurred at 
the age of eighty-eight. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Susan Badgely, was a native 
of Coeymans. Their children were: Alexan- 
der, William, George, Jane, Ellen, and three 
others that died young. The mother died at 
the age of eighty-eight, after sixty-five years 
of happ} married life. 

Alexander Granbv, father of the third U'ill- 
iam, engaged in mercantile business in early 
life, but later learned the cooper's business, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and worked at that with farming during tiic 
remainder of his life. He was well known 
and highly respected in these parts, and was 
\ery suecessfid in all his husiness ventures. 
Politically, he was a Re])uh]iean, and was 
Town Clerk and Assessor f<ir some years. He 
died at the age of si.\ty-five. He is survived 
by his wife, Julia, and their three children, 
namely: Arthur, who resides on the (iranby 
homestead; Susie, who married John R. Herg, 
of New York; and William. Mvs. Granby is 
living in New York with her daughter. .She 
was born in Carthage, Jefferson Comit)-, 
daugliter <if John Kellogg, a shoemaker and 
dealer of that place. Her parents had a large 
family of children. 

William (Iranby, the subject of this sketch, 
grandson of the first William, attended the 
public schools of the town until about thirteen 
years of age, and during the ne.xt ten years 
gave his attention to farming. Then for some 
f:\-e years he worked at carijentering, though 
he still resided on the homestead farm. The 
estate originally comprised a huntlred and forty 
acres, and of this he inherited a third. He 
was especially interested in tlair)ing, finding 
his markets in Albany and in New York. 

Mr. Cranby has shown his interest in the 
welfare of the community by liis attendance on 
the county con\'entions every )ear, excepting 
one, since he became a voter. In 1893, having 
been elected Town Clerk, he moved into the 
village, where he has since resided. He de- 
clined the nomination for the clerk's office for 
a second term, but became candidate for 
Sheriff in the county on the Republican ticket. 



Although defeated, he ran far ahead of the 
ticket, and had the satisfaction of carrying his 
own town, usually Democratic, h_v eighty-si.x 
votes. He made the greatest lun e\-er made 
for the office by a Keiiublican candidate. Ik- 
has twice declined the nomination for the 
office of Sujjervisor, but in 1 .S9S was elected to 
that office for a term of two years. No better 
representative could have been sent, and he 
has the hearty suiijiort of his townspeople. 
Mr. Granby is a member of the Odd I'elhnvs 
Ortler, and at present Noble (irand. Shortly 
after he joined the organization, two years ago, 
he was chosen permanent secretary. As a 
musician, Mr. Granby has actpiired considera- 
ble local reinitation. l'"or many )ears he has 
been leader of the choir at the Methodist 
church, and for the last five years he has been 
the chiu'ch organist. 



KNRY VAN HKRG1-:N, the well- 
f=^ known miller of Co.vsackie, N.Y., 
IS born in Athens, Greene County, 
on December 30, 1S50, son of Peter and Mary 
(De Griff) Van Bergen. The founder of the 
\'an Bergen famil)- in this countr)- came from 
Holland t.) Albany, N.Y., in early Colonial 
times, and later, in iC>j^, with his three 
sturdy sons, settled in Leeds, now the town of 
Catskill. One of the immigrant's sons, Peter 
by name, was born in Albany. I-'rom him the 
line is through his son Henry, fcdlowed by 
thi'ce in successiv'e generations bearing the 
name Peter, the biurth Peter being the father 
of the subject of this sketch. Henry, first, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and his descendants above named, were all 
born in Coxsackie. The family is among the 
very oldest in Coxsackie, and all the land em- 
braced within the town limits was at one time 
owned by the Van Bergens. The first Re- 
formed church, which was built in 1740, stood 
on land which was the gift of one of the mem- 
bers of this family. 

Peter Van Bergen, the great-grandfather, 
resided about a half mile from the present vil- 
lage. He died in 1854, at the age of ninety. 
His wife's maiden name was Woodbeck. 
They had a large family of children. Grand- 
father Peter had a brickyard near the present 
town of West Coxsackie, or at Lower Landing, 
which he carried on with great success. He 
was one of the leading men in the town, and a 
member of the Assembly in 1846. He was 
a stanch supporter of the Democratic party. 
His first wife, the grandmother of Henry \"an 
Bergen, was an Egbertson. She bore him two 
children. His second wife was before mar- 
riage Christina Van Wormer. She was born in 
Glenville, Montgomery County. Of her six 
children, two are living, namely: Isaac, who 
resides in New York; and Christina, who is 
the wife of W. R. Adams, at Four Mile Point. 

Peter Van Bergen, father of the subject of 
this sketch, purchased a farm of his own in 
early manhood, and later had a part of his 
father's farm. He lived just across the line in 
New Baltimore, and died there at the age of 
sixty-six. Like his ancestors he was an active 
member of the Dutch Reformed church, and 
one of its leading officials. His wife, Mary, 
who survives him, was born in Amsterdam, 



N.Y. , a daughter of Diedrich De Graff, a 
farmer, who married a Aliss Van Wdnner, and 
had a large family. She is the only survivor of 
her father's family. Her father died at the age 
of sixty, and her mother at the age of seventy- 
five. Three children were born to Peter and 
Mar)' Van Bergen ; and two. Nelson and 
Henry, are living, both millers in this town. 

Henr}- Van Bergen, the special subject of 
this sketch, obtained his education in the com- 
mon schools, and subseciuently assisted his 
father on the home farm until the latter' s 
death. He then came to the \-illage and built 
the grist-mill, which he has since so success- 
fully operated. It is a steam-mill, and has 
three runs of stone and a set of rollers. A 
very large custom business is here done in 
grinding grain, and from this mill large quan- 
tities of buckwheat flour are put into the 
market. 

;\Ir. \'an Bergen's marriage occurred in 
I 886, his wife being Pha;be J., only child of 
the late Captain James Delamater, for many 
years one of the best-known pilots on the Hud- 
son River. She has borne him two ciiildren 
— Mamie and Lawrence. 

Mr. \'an Bergen upholds the time-honored 
principles of his family in his adherence to the 
Democratic party ; but he believes in putting 
in office the best man, regardless of party affil- 
iations. In 18S7 and 18S8 he was Supervisor 
in the town of New Baltimore. In 1888 he 
was a candidate for County Clerk, and was 
elected by one hundred and fifty-one votes, 
all the other members of the ticket being de- 
feated by three hundred votes. After serving 



BIOGRAl'HICAL KF.VIKVV 



three years he was attain iiominatecl in 1.S91, 
and was re-elected liy a thousand majority, 
running six iunulrtd aliead of his ticket. 
Three years later, in 1S94, he was again nomi- 
nated, hut failed of election, t,'oing down in 
the Democratic "land slide." In 1 Sg^ he 
was Tresidential l-llectnr from this district. 
lie was on the County Committee, being its 
chairman in I.S'92, and was re-elected in the 
f.dlowing year, iiiit rcsigne.l. lie has at dif- 
ferent times refused tiie nomination both to 
the .State legislature and to Congress. lie is 
one of the Town Water Commissioners, and 
has served on tlie Hoard of lulucat ion for tlie 
last three years, liaving under his charge the 
school at WYv-t Coxsackic'. lie is a member 
of the Knights of I'ythias, and he and his fam 
ily are adherents of the Dutch Reformed 
church. 



\Rl.i:S .S, HURXl'.TT, M.lX, of 
.Summit, Schoharie County, X.V., 
was born in I'Jninence, X.V., Sep- 
tcml)er I;,, 1.S50, son of 1-rancis and J^lelissa 
((iermond) Hurnett. Hoth the father's family 
and the mother's are of l-jiglish origin. The 
Burnetts came hen- from Connecticut. Mat- 
thias lim-nelt, Dr. Ihunett's grandfatlicr, wh.. 
was born March ,S, 177.S, and died April 
19, 1,S4S, was an early settler in Jefferscin. 
After locating here he was married to Susan 
(iuerin. She was born March 25, 1780, and 
she die.) I'ebruary 27, 1 S44. They were the 
])irents of nine sons and four daughters. All 
uf the sons became prosperous farmers. 



l-'rancis lUunelt, Dr. Hurnett's father, was 
born in Jefferson, September 25. 1S21. 
l-larly in life he engaged in general farming in 
I'.mineuce, where he tilled the soil energeti- 
cally for the rest of his active period, and he 
died July 7, 1.S90. lie was the father of four 
chiUhen, namely: Lucetta F., who married 
Charles llul)bell, of Jefferson; James, who is 
engaged in mercantile business in .Summit; 
Hyron, a resident of C.ibleskill; and Charles 
S., .M.D., the subject of this sketch. 

Cliiirles S. Hm-nett acquired his early educa- 
tion in tlie schools of Imminence, N.V. On 
leaving school he was employed for a time as 
a clerk in his brother's store, and then going 
to Newark, N.J., he worked at the car]>enter's 
trade. His medical studies were begun under 
the direction of Dr. 1-. H. Heard, were contin- 
ued with Dr. Bigelow, of Albany, and later at 
the Albany Medical School, which he entered 
in 1876. His expenses there he defrayed with 
funds saveil from his earnings. He dis|ilayed 
such market! proficiency in his studies that 
when he was graduated, in 1S79, he was 
chosen (nator of liis class, the majority of 
whose mendjers had pursued a classical course 
prior to entering a professional school. I're- 
ferring a cmmtry practice, he first settled at 
North Hlenheim, where he resided seven years, 
at the expiration of which time he came to 
Summit, succeeding to the practice of Dr. 
Heard. He has gained a high standing among 
the leading physicians in this section. 

In iiolitics he is a Democrat. In 1 .S97 he 
was elected Coo.ner for a term of three years. 
He belongs to the County Medical Society, 




J.\.Mi;s W. WAUDELL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



takes a lively interest in the advancement of 
science, and as a progressive, public-spirited 
citizen he is actix'ely concerned in all matters 
relative to the improvement of this town. The 
residence he now occupies was erected by him 
in 1893. 

Dr. Burnett married Nannie Huckin;;ham, 
daughter of Merritt Huckini;ham, of Gilboa. 
Mrs. Iiurnett is a member of the Methodist 
Kpiscopal church. 



§AMES W. WADUELI., former Super- 
visor of Duanesburg", N. V., was born 
where he now resides, Jmie i, 1S26, 
being the only son of David and Mar)- (Coie^ 
Waddell. His father was born in the north of 
Ireland, August 14, 1794; and his mother was 
born there, February 15, 1792. 

Shortly after their marriage, which took 
place May 23, 1S16, David Waddell and his 
wife came to the United States, settling in 
Duanesburg; and about the year 1S25 he 
bought the farm which is now owned by his 
son. A sturdy, industrious, and progressive 
farmer, he labored diligently to maintain a 
comfortable home for his family; and, being a 
worthy, upright man, he gained the sincere 
esteem of his fellow-townspeople. In politics 
he supported the Democratic part)', and in his 
religious belief he was a Presbyterian. David 
Waddell died May 7, 1S62, and his wife died 
May 7, 1 87 1. They were the parents of eight 
children, namely: Ruth, born November 22, 
1817; Rose Anna, born May 24, 1820; Fi- 
delia, born July 11, 1822; Mary Jane, born 



February 28, 1824; James W. , born, as above 
mentioned, June 1, 1.S26; Margaret, born 
April 3, i82i); Hannah, b.irn March 25, 1831 ; 
and Sarah M., boiii September i, 1833, Of 
these, four are now living, namely: l"'idelia, 
who resides at the (jld homestead; Mary Jane, 
the wife of Thomas II. Tiunbull, of Rotterdam 
Junction, N.V. ; James W. , the subject of this 
sketch ; and Margaret, now the widow of S. 
Putnam, and living in South Schenectady, 
N.Y. Ruth, the eldest, was the wife of 
Elijah Rockwell; and Hannah, the seventh 
child, was the wife of Dr. D. S. Kellogg. 

James W. Waddell spent his earl)- bo)-hood 
years in attending the district school and as- 
sisting his father upon the farm, and later 
during the winter months attended school at 
Charlotteville and Fort Plain Seminaries. 
Succeeding to the ownership of the prop- 
erty, which contains two hundred and thirty 
acres, he has improved it by erecting new 
buildings, carries on general farming ener- 
geticall)-, and keeps from twenty to twenty- 
five head of stock. 

On September 3, 1873, Mr. Waddell was 
united in marriage with S. I^lecta Howard, 
who was born in Duanesburg, January 27, 
1S43. Four children were born of this union, 
and two of theni aie lixing, namel)- : George 
W. H., born August 8, 1879; an'l William 
D., born Ma)- 13, iSSi, both of whom are at- 
tending a business college. The others were: 
Mary; and another daughter, who died in in- 
fancy. Mrs. Waddell died January 26, 1S99. 

Politically, Mr. Waddell acts with the 
Democratic party at national elections. He 



lilOGkAPHICAL REVIEW 



has been Supervisor and Road Commissioner, 
holding each of these offices three terms and 
rendcrinjj capable service to the town, lie 
takes a lively interest in the ])iiblic institu- 
tions of the town, and is ever ready In aid in 
improving the general welfare of the eomnni- 
nity. Mr. Waddell attends the I'reslnterian 
church. 

j:()R("i1': I.. lOX, editor of tlie Mid 
dleburg X.zcs, is a native ..f Middle 
burg, \.\'. lie was born on April 3, 1S71, 
son of Lewis and IClizaheth (Wilbur) h'ox. 
His father, who is nnw living retired, was for- 
merly engaged in the \yd\)cr manufacturing 
business in Pen Van, and later in IJaldwins- 
ville and Middleburg. Ilismnther was i)orn 
in Schoharie. His parents had a family of 
five children. 

Mr. l-'ci.\ received his education in the com- 
mon and high schools of Middleburg; and in 
iSSS, shortly after leaving the high school, he 
began the publication of T/n- Jimrir<i>/ Voutli, 
a monthly story paper. This was issued from 
Middleburg, and had a circulation in every 
State in the Union. The following year it was 
.sold to a pidjlisiiing house in Boston, and sub- 
sequently Mr. l-'o.x lunchased the South 
Orange, 'A.]., Journal, and moved it to Mid- 
dleburg. Associating himself with Welling- 
ton E. Hassler, a prominent business man and 
a Republican, he began the publication of the 
Middleburg AVtw, a weekly paper. At first 
the venture seemed most tmpromising, and the 
field was a limited one, but the energy and 
perseverance with which the projjrietors have 



worked, the fortunate melhotls employed by 
the business management, and the enterprise 
shown in the news cohnnns ha\e together 
united to push tiie jiaper into the front rank 
of Reimblican weeklies. It is now one of the 
leading news organs of the count)-, and has a 
large circulation. While its columns give 
ample space to events of national importance. 
it does not forget to emi)hasi/.e matters of local 
interest, and is always foremost in agitating 
local improvements. At \arious times it has 
been ilesignated by the Rejjublican leaders as 
the organ in which tlie State laws should be 
jirinted. 

Mr. Fo.x was married on October 28, 1897, 
to Mabel Almy. She was born in Franklin- 
ton, and is a daughter of Iv C. Alm\-, whcj was 
formerly a farmer of that town, and is now re- 
tired and living in Middleburg. Mr. Fo.x is a 
mcmlK-r of Middleburg Lodge, No. 663, F. & 
A. M., and has held the office of Junior r:)ca- 
con of the lodge. lie is a member of La liis- 
tile Lodge, No. 494, I. (). O. v., and has 
filled nearly all the offices in the lodge, being 
now Past Noble Grand. lie is also a member 
of Oncongena Tribe of Red Men. Profession- 
ally, he is a member of tlie New York lulito- 
rial As.sociati..n and the New York Press As.so- 
ciation. lie and his wife attend the Methodist 
church. 



UGH B. GARA, proprietor of the 
West Knd Hotel, Hunter, N.V., 
IS born in Manch Chunk, Pa., 
Ajiril IS, 1855, son of John an<l Mary (Mc- 
Intire) Gara. His father was born in Ire- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



>4S 



land, anil here he learned the trade of a shoe- 
maker, which he followed as long as he lived. 

Emigrating to America in 1S48, John Gara 
settled in Mauch Chunk, and in 1855 he re- 
moved to Hunter, where his death occurred in 
1859, at the age of thirty-nine years. In pol- 
itics he was a Democrat. His wife, Mary, 
also a native of Ireland, is now seventy years 
old. Her father, Hugh Mclntirc, was a shoe- 
maker and tavern-keeper. He came to Amer- 
ica on a visit, and after his return to Ireland 
he continued in business until his retirement, 
when he was succeeded by his brother. Hugh 
Mclntire had a family of seven childen. Of 
these the four now living are: Mrs. Gara; 
Joseph, who is in a post-office in Ireland; 
Katy, widow of Thomas Haggerty, who died 
in Mauch Chunk, Pa. ; and Patrick, who is a 
hotel proprietor in Ireland. John and Mary 
(Mclntire) Gara were the parents of eight 
children, of whom two are living; namely, 
Mary and her brother, Hugh B., the subject 
of this sketch, with whom she resides. The 
others were: Patrick, who died March 7, 
18S9, aged thirty-nine; John I"., who died 
November 4, 18S8, at the age of twenty-nine; 
Hugh, first, who died in Ireland, at seven 
years of age; and three children who died 
young. 

Hugh B. Gara was brought by his parents 
to Hunter when six months old. He was ed- 
ucated in the common schools, and at the age 
of twelve entered the chair factory, where he 
was employed until eighteen. He continued 
to follow his trade as a journeyman one year 
in a chair factory in Newburg, from which 



place he went to New York City, and a year 
later became a travelling salesman in the cli-y- 
goods business. Prior to this his brother, 
John F., had erected the present West End 
Hotel in Hunter, which was opened in 1887; 
and Mr. Gara left the road to assist him in 
this enterprise, in a general way. Upon the 
death of his brother, Hugh took control of the 
house, and has since conducted it. 

The West End is pleasantly located near 
the terminus of the Stony Clove and Catskiil 
Mountain Railroad. It is si.xty by thirty 
feet, with a wing twenty-eight by seventy, 
four stories high, and has accommodations for 
one hundred and thirty guests. The rooms 
are large, well ventilated, well furnished, and 
lighted with gas. The bath accommodations 
are ample, and the sanitary arrangements are 
unexcelled. The house is within easy reach 
of Hotel Kaaterskill and Laurel House, and 
of Onteora, Elka, and Twilight Parks. 
There is a good livery stable in connection. 

On October 12, 1898, Mr. Gara was united 
in marriage with Mary E. O'Carroll, daugh- 
ter of David and Kate (O'Neil) O'Carroll, of 
Dungarvan, County Waterford, Ireland. Her 
paternal grandfather, Michael OXarroll, a sea 
captain, was also a native of that town. Her 
father, who was reared to sea life, became 
master of a vessel plying between Ireland and 
P"rance, and was also engaged in trade be- 
tween Cork and Liverpool. Abandoning the 
sea, he opened a ship-broker's office in Cardiff, 
Wales, and conducted that business until his 
death, which occurred in 1S84, at the age of 
fifty-seven. His wife, Kate, was a sister of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



the Rev. Hugh O'Ncil, a sketch of whom ap- 
pears elsewhere in the Kk\ik\\. She ilicil in 
1S77, at the af,'c of forty-one. She was the 
mother of three children. The only survivor 
of these is Mary K., who was educated in the 
Mercy Convent, Dungarvan, and is now Mrs. 
Hugh H. Gara. She is a fine pianist, and 
also received sjiccial instruction in painting 
and the I-'rench language. She kept house for 
her father until his death, and with the aid of 
two assistants continued his business until 
coming to the United States in 1S86. IVe- 
vious to her marriage she resitlcd with her 
uncle, the Rev. l-"ather 0"Neil. Mrs. Gara 
is a valuable assistant to her husband, being 
a woman of much executive ability. 



"KRHKRT L. ODKLI.. :\I.D., an able 
II — I ph)sician and specialist of Sharon 
Springs, N.Y. , was born in Sum- 
mit, this county, July i S, 1S59, son of Isaac 
I., and Harriet L. (Haldwin) Odell. The 
family was founded in America, late in the 
seventeenth or early in the eighteenth century, 
by the great-great -great-grandfather, who emi- 
grated from I'jigland and settleil on Long 
Island. 

I.saac L. Odell, the father, who was burn in 
Jefferson, N. \'. , in 1.S15, mo\ed to Summit 
when a young man, and carried on tpute an ex- 
tensive Inisiness as a coojicr. He took consid- 
eral)le interest in i)uhlic affairs, serving as 
Town Clerk and in oilier offices. In pcditics 
he supi)orted the Democratic party, and in his 
religion.', belief he was a Methodist. His wife, 



whose maiden name was Harriet L. Ikddwin, 
was born in iSiS. The)' were the ])arents (jf 
live ehildien, namely: Daniel ; George \V. ; 
I'eter L. ; Julia I-:., who married H. A. 
Wright, of Worcester, \.Y. ; and Herbert L., 
tlie subject of this sketch. The father died in 
1893, the mother's death having oceurreil a few 
months ])revious. Daniel, (jcorge W., and 
I'eter L. Odell reside in Sunmiit. 

Herbert L. Odell acquired his early educa- 
tion in the public and select schools. His 
medical studies were begun under the direction 
of Dr. F. r. Beard, then of Summit and now 
of Cobleskill, with whom he remaineil four 
years. He was graduated from the Albany 
Medical College in 18S3; and, while pursuing 
his course in that city, he studied with Dr. 
Jacob S. Mosher. Locating for practice in 
Hobart, N.Y., he remained tliere until March, 
1892, when he came to Sharon .Springs. Dur- 
ing the last six )ears of the time spent at Ho- 
bart he was associated in practice with Dr. 
J. S. McNaught. While preparing for his 
profession. Dr. Odell made a special study of 
dermatolog)- ; and, since entering into jirac- 
tice, he has given much attention to the treat- 
ment of rheumatism, in which he is remarka- 
bly successful. Dining the summer a large 
number of jiatients come to .Sharon -Springs, in 
order to a\ail themselves of his treatment and 
at the same time to receive the benefits of the 
sulphur baths. Di'. Odell attends, also, to 
most of the obstetric [iractice in this locality. 
He was f..rmerly ]iresidcnt of the Delaware 
County Medical Society, is president of the 
.Schoharie ami a member of the Albaii) County 




liARKKT \V. MATTICE. 



r.IOGRArillCAL REVIFAV 



Medical Societies. Progressive as well as 
energetic, he keeps in touch with advanced 
ideas by making frequent xisitsto the hospitals 
of the metropolis. 

Dr. Odell and Eva L. Moose, only daughter 
of Robert J. Moose, of Mobart, N.Y. , were 
iniited in marriage on May 13, 1885. Tiicy 
have three daughters — Grace, Eloise, and 
Beatrice. 

Politically, Dr. Odell acts with the Demo- 
cratic party. Me is a Master Mason, belong- 
ing to the Blue Lodge in Sharon Springs, and 
is also an Odd Fellow. He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
is now serving as steward. 



EORGE M. FAULKNER, Supervisor 
and Justice of the Peace, Lexington, 
Greene County, N.Y., was born in this town 
September 6, 1842, son of Alfred and Sarah 
(Cross) Faulkner. Mis paternal grandfather, 
William P\aulkner, was a native of Liverpool, 
England. Me came to Lexington before mar- 
riage, and, settling on a farm, engaged in its 
cultivation, and also followed the trade of a 
shoemaker. A man of considerable natural 
ability, in politics he was a Democrat, and 
represented his district in the Assembly. Me 
married Abigail Drake. They lived to an ad- 
vanced age, and had a large family of children. 
Alfred Faulkner grew to manhood upon the 
home farm. Later he cultivated a farm of his 
own in Malcott, where he resided for the rest 
of his life, and was quite active in public 
affairs. His first wife, Sarah, died about the 



year 1S45. She was a daughter of George 
Cross, a farmer and lifelong resident of Lex- 
ington. She had three children: Mary, who 
married Frank Moore, of this town; Victor, 
who is in I-'lcischmauns, Delaware County; 
and George H., the subject of this sketch. 
For his second wife he married Ann P^aulkncr, 
who at her death left two children — James and 
Sarah. Alfred F^aulkner died at se\'enty-three 
years of age. 

George H. p-aulkner spent his early years 
with an uncle on a farm about a mile below the 
village, and was educated in the common 
schools. He followed agriculture until 1886, 
when he came to the village, and engaged in 
selling farming implements. He also trans- 
acts a great deal of legal business and has con- 
siderable practice in the minor courts. 

In 1890 Mr. F'"aulkner married Miss Mary 
M. Banks, daughter of Joseph Banks, a farmer 
of Hardenburg, N. Y. One son, Leon, has 
been born of this union. 

Politically, Mr. F\aulkncr is a Democrat. 
He has been Justice of the Peace since 1882. 
He was Justice of Special Sessions one term, 
is now serving as Supervisor, and has been 
Tax Collector two years. Me is a trustee of 
the Baptist and Methodist churches, and Mrs. 
Faulkner attends the Baptist church of Lexing- 
ton. 



ARRET W. MATTICE, a well- 
known and highly respected agricult- 
urist of Schoharie County, owns and occupies 
a farm on the Middleburg road in the town of 
Fulton, about two miles from Fultonham. He 



'SO 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was born June 2, 1830, a son of Adam L. 
Matticc, and is a direct descendant of Niciiolas 
Mattice, who emigrated from Germany in the 
early part of the eighteenth century and took 
up a tract of wild land in the vicinity nf tiie 
U])per Fort, Schoharie County. 

Conrad Matticc, son of Nicholas and the 
next in lino of descent, was a lifclDiig resi- 
dent of this jiait of the State. In his caily 
nianhund he located on land in iMiddlehnr- 
where his son Lawrence, the ,i;randfathcr of 
(iarret W. , was liorn. 

At the time nf the Revolution, Lawrence 
Mattice, though but a boy of si.xteen, was em- 
ployed at the Middle ImhI, and with Muri.li\ 
and other brave soldiers marched out to meet 
tlie enemy. On one of his hasty expeditions 
he and a companion succeeded in taking pris- 
oner a man by tiic name of Adam Chrysler, 
whom they carried to the fort. He continued 
in service until the close of the war, when he 
settled on a farm, and from that time until his 
death, at the venerable age of eight)-six \ears, 
was engaged in cultivating the land. lie was 
quite jirominent in the management of town 
matters, and at one time was nominated to the 
.State Assembly. llis wife, Maria lirown, a 
native of this part of the county, Ixne him 
se\en children, none of whom sur\-ive. She 
lived to be ujjward of eighty years of age, and 
died at the old homestead. Both she and her 
husband were members of the Lutheran 

Adam L. Mattice was born September 15, 
1S03, in Middleburg. I'ollowing in the 
footsteps of his ancestor.s, he became a tiller of 



the soil. On coming of age he jiureliased a 
farm not far from the old home, and in the 
log house that stood in the clearing began 
life for himself, jioor in pocket, but rich in 
energy, courage, anil ambition. By dint of 
in(Uistr\' and economv he sLicceetled in |)a\- 
ing lor his lan<l, besiiles which he laid up a 
small suiu. On Ai)ril 5, 1S49, having .sold 
his lirst estate, he took jiossession of the 
farm now occupied b)' his S(}n, Garret W. , 
and here resided until his death, July 5, 
iSSS. A man of sound judgment and good 
linancial ability, he became prominent in the 
town, and served as Highway Commissioner 
and Assessor for a number of )-cars. Both 
he and his wife were active members of the 
Baptist church. He married Dinah Mattice, 
who was born in the town of Blenheim, a 
daughter of David Matticc, a prosjjerons 
farmer. They had a family of f^vc children, 
three of whom survive, naiuely : Garret W. ; 
Dinah, wife of Josiah Mann; and Kli/.al)eth, 
wife of I'etcr Shaffer. 

Garret W. Mattice was born in the log cabin 
in which his parents settled soon after mar- 
riage, and (luiing his earlier years he assisted 
in the pioneer laboi' of retleeming a farm from 
the wilderness. In 1849 he came with them 
to his present faini, which he and a brother 
who died in 1877 lielped to iiuprove. l''rom 
that time until the death of his father, in 
iSSS, Mr. Mattice had the general oversight 
of the property, which is now in his posses- 
siiiii. This farm coiUains one hundred and 
seventy acres of land, and lie also owns a farm 
of (jne hundred acres on the road to Cohleskill. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Skilful and progressive, he hns met with 
success as a general farmer. He raises ha_\', 
grain, and hops, is an extensive dealer in 
cattle, and from his small herd of cows makes 
a choice grade of butter, which he ships to Al- 
ban}'. He has made many of the most impor- 
tant improx'ements on the place, including the 
erection of the present commodious dwelling- 
house and the substantial barns and farm 
buildings. 

In politics Mr. Mattice atifiliates with the 
Democratic party, and besides serving as Com- 
missioner of Highways he was Supervisor from 
1S96 until iSgS. He is a regular attendant of 
the Baptist church, and in the building of the 
new edifice of that denomination gave material 
financial assistance. 

On March 24, 1866, Mr. Mattice married 
Rachel Cowan, a daughter of James Cowan, 
well known in Fulton as an able farmer and 
lawyer. Mr. Cowan married Emeline Cary, 
of Schoharie, who passed to the life immortal 
at the age of sixty-eight years, while he at- 
tained the age of fourscore years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mattice have one child living, a son, 
Paul B. , and they have been bereft of two, 
namely: Eli G. , who died aged three j-ears, 
six months; and Ira C, who died aged four 
years and sexen months. Paul B. Mattice 
after his graduation at the ]\Iiddleburg High 
School entered Cornell University, class of 
igoi, intending there to fit himself for the 
bar. During the Spanish War he enlisted, 
July 17, 189S, in Company K, Two Hundred 
and Third New York Volunteers, and served 
until March 25, 1899, when he was mustered 



out as Corp( 
up his studi 



. On 
It CoriK 



HARLES E. NICHOLS, counselh.r- 
at-law, and District Attorney of Greene 
County, and one of the best-known 
and most respected residents of Catskill, was 
born in Athens, Greene County, March 20, 
1S54. His father is General George Sylvester 
Nichols, and his mother in maidenhood was 
Ann Netterville Foster. 

His paternal grandfather was Judge Sylves- 
ter Nichols, a native and prominent citizen of 
Athens. Besides carrying on a farm, the 
grandfather was a manufacturer of brick and 
lime, was also engaged in freighting on a large 
scale, being the owner of several vessels. He 
was also County Judge of Greene County for 
several years. He married Lucy E. Hamilton, 
who also was a native of Athens. She died in 
1S91, at the age of ninety. Seven of their 
children grew to maturity; namely, George 
Sylvester, Samuel Hamilton, William T., El- 
bridge, Charles P., Henry O. , and Sarah. 

George Sylvester Nichols, the first-named 
son, was born in Athens, N. Y. , January 12, 
1S20. He attended private schools in Athens 
until twelve years old; and in 1832 he entered 
Lenox Academy, Mass., where he remained 
one year. In 1S34 he went to Fairfield Acad- 
em)-, Herkimer County, N. Y., for a year ; and 
during the year 1S37 he .studied at the acad- 
emy in Kinderhook, N. Y. , which was estab- 
lished by his grandfather. From 1838 to 
1S46 he was captain of the sloop "Science, " 



lUOGRAI'HICAL REVIEW 



luviicd by liis father, carrying brick, lime, 
hay, aiul pniducc from .Athens t(j Xcw \'ork. 
He was appointed Hrigade Quartermaster of 
the Thirty-seventh lirigade of New York State 
Militia, and commissioned by Govenmr Will- 
iam C. Bouck on Sejitember 14, 1S43; and he 
was appointed Brigadier-general of the Thirty- 
seventh Ikigade by Governor Silas Wright 
,,„ March 3, 1S45. In 1847 antl iS4.She was 
employed in Troy, N.Y., as suiicrintcndcnt of 
Colonel J. Hooker's docks, barges and canal 
boats, and general manager of his transporta- 
tion line to New York. He started for Cali- 
fornia in 1849, sailing from New ^'ork on 
l-"ebruar)- 5 in the steamer "Crescent Cit)' " for 
San Francisco. .After staging a month on the 
isthmus, in (lorgona and Panama, he left the 
last-named place on the steamer "Oregon " on 
her first trip up the coast, and, arriving at San 
Francisco on the first day of April, 1S49, went 
directly to Slitter's .Mill, Colcjma, where he 
was engaged neail)' two years in packing and 
trading. He left San Francisco for home 
aijout December 1, 1850, b_\- steamer, going to 
Panama, from there crossing the isthmus to 
Chagres by mule and bungo, as on the trip 
out, ami tlience reaching New Y(jrk by steamer 
about the first of January, 1.S51. In the 
spring of 1.S51 he was elected Supervisor of 
the town of Athens, and twf) years later was 
nominated by the Democratic party for .State 
•Senator for the Tenth District, which includes 
(keene and Ulster Counties, but was defeated 
liy the Prohibition candidate. In 1855 he was 
again nominated for State Senator, this time 
by the American part)-, was elecleil, and 



■served one term. On June 8, i860, he was 
ap[)oinled one of the Board of Commissioners 
of I"..\cise for Greene County for three years. 

When hostilities began between the South 
and the North, he felt that his former military 
training would be of value to hij countr\-, antl 
decided to offer himself as a \obniteer. On 
November 23, 1861, having rece'ived an aji- 
pointment as Major in the Ninth New \'ork 
Cavalry, and having been given his commis- 
sion by Governor Morgan, he left Albany on 
the same day for the national capital. Upon 
going into active ser\ice, his bravery and abil- 
ity at once became conspicuous, antl his jiro- 
motion was rapid. On May 30, 1863, he was 
made Lieutenant Colonel of his regiment, and 
on June 14, 1864, was commissioned Colonel 
bv Governor .Seymour. He was mustered out 
with the regiment at Buffalo, N.Y. , on July 
17, 1865. (Jn March 13, 1S65, "for gallant 
and meritorious services in all the cavali)- en- 
gagements under General .Slieridan," he was 
brevetted Brigadier-general of United States 
V.ilunteer.s. 

On June 25, i8r,7, he was appuinted by 
C<. Hector H. A. Smythe Inspector of Customs 
in the New York Custom House, and on No- 
vemlKM- 8, 1875, he was apjiointed, by Collec- 
tor Chester A. Arthur, Deputy Collector of 
Customs. In 1S79 he was nominated for 
member of Congress by the Republican ])arty 
in the Fifteenth Congressional District (Ul- 
ster, Greene, and Schoharie Counties), but 
was defeated. In i88j he was aiijiointed by 
Secretary of the Interior, the Hon. H. .M. 
Teller, Special Ivx.uuiner in the pension office; 



15 1 0(^. I-l A P H I C A L R I'.V I E\V 



and in this capacity he served tliree )ears. 
For three years also subsequent to 1885 he held 
the office of County Clerk of Greene County, 
having been elected by the Republican party. 
Since 1889 General Niciiols has retired from 
active life. 

On October 7, 1845, he married Ann Net- 
terville Foster, daughter of Captain James G. 
and Ann K. Foster. Mrs. Nichols was born 
in Athens, N.Y., and died there at the age of 
eighty. Her father was a sea cai^tain, and 
commanded a ship that ran from New Vork 
to Liverpool, England. During the embargo 
placed upon American vessels by the French, 
he anchored his vessel in the river, a few miles 
below Athens, to get it in fresh water, and 
while there met Ann Colson, with whom he 
fell in love at sight. He made only one more 
voyage, and then married and settled in Athens, 
where he went into the brick-making business. 
This he gave up after a time, and subsequently 
carried on a store until his death, at the age of 
seven ty-si.\. He owned a fine farm. His 
wife died at the age of seventy-eight, having 
been the mother of six children. Five chil- 
dren were born to General George S. and Ann 
N. Nichols, and four of them are living; 
namely, Mary, Foster, Charles E., and Ar- 
thur. Mary married Frank N. Howland, who 
is a member of the firm of Smith & Candee, 
the oldest and leading firm of dealers in lime, 
brick, and builders' supplies in New York 
City. Foster Nichols is purchasing agent for 
M. Guggenheim's Sons, who are among the 
largest smelters and refiners in the United 
States. Arthur Nichols is a mining operator 



in Leatlville, Col. 
Episco|)alian, as 
was formerly a nu 
tion. He reside: 



Mrs. Nichols was a devout 
also the general; and he 
her of a Masonic organiza- 
in "The Old Nest" in 
)me for half a 



Athens, which has been his 
century. 

Charles E. Nichols spent his early years in 
his native town of Athens, and receivetl his 
early education in the district schools. Sub- 
sequently he attended the high school at 
Englewood, N.J., the l-'airfield .Seminary at 
Fairfield, N.Y., and the Fort Edward Collegi- 
ate Institute. Then, following the memorable 
advice of Horace Greeley, he went West, and 
was employed in the general office of the Colo- 
rado Central Railroad at Golden, Col., for 
about four 3-ears. Having decided to enter the 
legal profession, he gave his mind with ardor 
to the necessary studies, and was admitted to 
the bar in Colorado in 1880. He practised 
his profession in that State for about two 
\-ears, during which time he also engaged to 
some extent in mining. Then, returning East, 
he was admitted to the bar in the State of New 
\'ork in 1S82, after which he practised law in 
Athens for some three years. In 18S5 he was 
appointed Deputy County Clerk under his 
father, which )30sition he held until iS8g. 
He was then appointed Clerk to the Surro- 
gate's Court by the present surrogate, and 
served until December, 189S, a period of ten 
}ears in all, when he resigned, having been 
elected District Attorney in the fall of that 
year. He still has three years to serve in this 
office. 

Mr. Nichols was married in i Sgo to Mrs. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mary li. Willis, who was Ijorn in roiiiiecticut, 
the daujjhter of the Rev. H. 11. Hate.s, an 
Episcopalian clerf^yman. I ler inotiicr's maiden 
name was E. Samanthe HascDm. Both parents 
were natives of Vermont. They had three 
children. Mr. 15ates was rector (if a church in 
Glens Falls, N.^'., at the breaking out of the 
Civil War; and, when one of his wardens iiad 
enlisted as a Colonel and another as a Major, 
he resigned his charge at their request, and 
went to the front as chaplain of their regiment. 
lie remained with his regiment throughout the 
war, and sid)se(|uent]y, his health jjcing im- 
paired, took a small charge in Oak Hill, this 
county. There he died in 1,S68. lie was an 
active .Mason, and was buried with Masonic 
rites. The lodge of which he was a mend)er 
erected a monument to his memory at Oak 
Hill, X. v., where he was buried. 

Mr. Nichols is Vice-Chancellor in the 
Knights of Pythias I.odge in Catskill, and 
Junior .Sagamore of the Red Men. In i<S82 
he was a memljer of the Lodge of Knights of 
I'ylhias in Athens, He has resided in Catskill 
since i.S'<jo, when he removed here fnmi Athens. 
He and his wife aie members of the Episcopal 
church, which has recently erected a beautiful 
new church edifice. While in Athens Mr. 
Nichols was a lay-reader in the church there, 
and for three N'ears superintendent of the Sun- 
day-school. 



JCllARH WIXI':C,ARD. a well-kn.iwn 
niller .if Ilyndsville, Schoharie 
Coimty, was boin near this village 
September 19, 1S45, a son of George and 



Eliza A. (Isham) VV'inegard. He is of Ger- 
man ancestry, and a grandson of one of the 
earliest settlers of this section of .Sclioliarie 
County — Richard W'inegard, first, who came 
here from Schodack, Rensselaer County. 

There being no roads across the ciumtr)- in 
tliose early days, Grandfather W'inegard made 
the jc)urne_\- liither tlinuigh the uidnnken woods 
on hniseback ; ant), luning secured a tract of 
land in the heart of tlie forest, he felled trees, 
and thus made an opening in which he [lut uj) 
a small log cabin of rude construction, with no 
windows, and c.nly a l,lankct fur a do<,r. Ik- 
was a tailor; aiul, in connectinn with clearing 
a farm, he worked at his trade whene\ei- he had 
an opportunit}-. He succeetled finel\- at both 
occupations, and in the course of a few )-ears 
had cleared and placed under cultivation a 
number of acres of land. Prudent, thriftful, 
anil a good manager, he at length found that he 
was warranted in replacing the log-cabin with a 
substantial frame house, and in building a com- 
fortable barn and a shed for his new wagon and 
farming imi)lements. A man of intelligence 
and sound judgment, he became intluential 
in the commimity and a leader in religious 
circles. He was a devout Methodist, and a 
regular attendant at the prayer-meetings held 
seven miles awa_\', a journe)' that he took on 
horseback. 1 le far outlived the allotted .sjian 
of human life, his pilgrimage on eaitli extend- 
ing over a period >A one huiuhed and two 
years. His wife. Charity Rickart, was also of 
(icrman descent. .She proved herself a true 
heljimeet, assisting him in their early days of 
labor while li\ing in the log-cabin, anil train- 



]!IOGR.\riIICAL REVIEW 



ing their seven children to hahits of industry 
anil usefulness. She preceded iiim to the 
better world, passing away at the age of eighty- 
five years. 

George Winegard assisted his father in his 
pioneer labors, and after I'eaching man's estate 
purchased the old Peter Markle farm near b_\-, 
in the town of Seward, and sjient many years 
in improving it. lie built a new dwelling, a 
barn, and other farm buildings, and was there 
engaged in agricultural pursuits several )-ears. 
Subsequently coming to H)-ndsville, he bought 
land, rebuilt the .saw-mill and built a grist- 
mill, and during the remainder of his life was 
prominently identified with the highest and 
best interests of this little village, and was 
largely instrumental in its development. In 
politics he was, in early manhood, a stanch 
Whig, and later a Republican. A man of 
eminent piety, deeply interested in advancing 
the cause of religion, he was very active in the 
Methodist church, with which he united when 
young, and was for many years a class leader 
and one of the trustees. When its present 
house of worship was erected he was one of the 
foremost in hastening the work, and contrib- 
uted fourteen hundred dollars toward the 
building fund. He died at the age of seventy- 
two years, leaving a host of friends who sym- 
pathized with the family in their great loss. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Eliza A. 
Isham, was born in this town. Her father, 
Benjamin Isham, was a prominent citizen and 
a pioneer merchant of Hyndsville. She was a 
woman of culture, having been educated at a 
New York City-boarding-school. She was a 



distant relation of John Ouincy Adams. Mrs. 
Winegard survived hei- husband, ilying at the 
age of eighty-two years. They reared live 
children, namely: Emily, wife of Rector h'os- 
ter; Phebe, deceased; (ienrge, deceased; Rici)- 
ard ; and Albert. 

Richard Winegard was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, and until lie was thirt)-five }ears 
old he worked with his father on the farm and 
in the mill. Since the death of the father 
he and his brother Albert ha\e devoted their 
attention to the grist-mill, and, in addition to 
dealing somewhat in grain and feed, have car- 
ried on a very extensive business in custom 
grinding of corn, flour, and feed. The nine 
acres of land included in the original property 
they utilize by raising on it ha\', grain, and 
potatoes. 

Politically, Mr. Winegard is a steadfast Re- 
publican, and takes an active interest in local 
and county affairs. P"raternally, he is an Odd 
Fellow, belonging to Richmondville Lodge. 
True to the religious faith in which he was 
reared, he is a faithful member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, which he has served 
for many years as trustee, steward, class 
leader, and church recorder, having taken up 
the work laid down by his father and success- 
fully carried it on. 

On December 23, 1S74, Mr. Winegard was 
united in marriage to Miss Maggie J. Weid- 
man, daughter of Nicholas and Ann (Starkins) 
Weidman, of Schoharie County. Mr. and 



Mrs. Winegard have one child, a daughter, 
I Lottie E., wife of Benjamin F. Empie, a mer- 
' chant of Hyndsville and Town Clerk of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Seward. Mr. and Mrs. l-nipic arc the im.ud 
pareiit.s of a briglit baby j^irl, HcriiiLc L. , born 
on February 2, 1S99. 



.\i<Tii()i.().Mi:\v II. ci.rTi';, cne 

CleiiviUe, N.V., wa.s born in Sche- 
nectady, June 21, 1S31, .son of IIenr\' and 
Cathaline T. (Ilaverley) Clute. His .tjrand- 
father, Hartli<donie\v Clute, served as a .soldier 
in the Ke\idutionar_\- War. He was for scjnie 
time a boatman mi the Mohawk River; and on 
one occasion he had for a passenger the Hritish 
commander, Sir Henr)- Clinton. The maiden 
name of Grandfather Chile's wife was Margaret 
Peters. 

'I'heir son, Henry Clute, above named, was 
a native of Schenectad)'. When a \-nung man, 
he engaged in the grocer)- business, which he 
foll.nved for the rest of his life. He died 
about 1.S35. JJ'^ wife, Cathaline, was a na- 
tive of GKnville. Her paternal grandfather 
was John Haverley, a large land-owner of this 
town in his day. His death occurred the same 
night that the subject of this sketch was horn. 
John Haverley married Anna Adams, a repre- 
sentative, it is thought, of the noted IMassachu- 
setts famil\- which has given two Presidents — 
John an.l John Cjuincy Adams — to the United 
States. Henry and Cathaline T. Clute reared 
four children; namely, Susan H., Christian 
]]., P.artholomew H., and J<,hn H. ]l Clute, 
all of whom, c.\cepl liartholomew H., are re- 
siding in Rotterdam. The mother died May, 



I.S.S2. The parents were members of the Re- 
formed chinch. 

Partholomew H. Clute pas.sed his boyhood 
and y(nith in Schenectady and Glenville, and 
attended school in these places. His father's 
death threw him upon his own resources at an 
early age, and he began life as a workman in 
the broom factcjries of Schenectady at eleven 
dcdlars i>er month. In iS5ohe\vent to Illi- 
nois, wliere he engaged in raising broom-corn 
on leased land. He also established a factory, 
and manufactured the first lot of Western-made 
brooms ever sold in Chicago. Although this 
enteriuise pr<ivcd tpiite successful, the gold 
fever soon caused him to sell out, in order to 
tr)- his fortune in Calif(jrnia. Going there by 
the overland route, he followed various occupa- 
tions on the Pacific Coast for four years. Re- 
turning then to Schenectady Count}', he leaseil 
land in Glenville until 1S63, since which year 
he has resided upon his ]3resent farm of one 
hundred and ten acres. He has a valuable 
piece of agricultural propert}-, with good build- 
ings and modern improvements. He keeps 
from twenty to twenty-fi\-e cows, and derives 
considerable profit from the sale of milk. 

On October 20, iHs.S, Mr. Clute was joined 
in marriage with Agnes Swart, who was born 
in Glenville, April 13, iS'32, daughter of 
Josias and Catharine (X'edder) Swart. Her 
])arenls belonged to highly reputable families 
of this county. Mrs. Clute is the mother of 
three children, namely: Kitte\'., who is now 
I\Irs. McCullum; Klma, who is now Mrs. 
Dick; and Clarence Clute. 

In politics Mr. Clute is a Democrat. To 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



the energy and perseverance which served him 
so well in his boyhood days is due in a great 
measure the prosperity he now enjo}-s, his 
activit)' continuing unabated. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clute are members of the Reformed church. 



§OHN S, GARY, a well-known resident 
of Braman, in the town of Cobleskill, 
and proprietor of one of the oldest 
mills in this section of the county, was born 
in Schoharie, in a house on the road to 
Howes Cave, on July 19, 1827, son of Sam- 
uel and Mercy (Swan) Gary. 

His father, who was born in Stonington, 
Conn., was brought up in Sprakers Basin, 
Montgomery County, N.Y. , on a farm. He 
also worked somewhat during boyhood at raft- 
ing on the Mohawk River, but eventually 
came to the farm of George Lawyer in 
Schoharie Court House, and during the re- 
mainder of his life was engaged in farm labor, 
either there or on other farms in this county, 
working on shares. His wife, Mercy, was the 
daughter of a pioneer of Kno.x, Albany 
Gounty, who built the first mill in that 
region. He was a stanch patriot in Revolu- 
tionary times, and was in active service in the 
army throughout the war, being ele\'en times 
wounded. His wife lived to the surprising 
age of one hundred and three years. On her 
one hundred and third birthday she rode 
twenty miles on horseback, but the exertion 
was too much for her, and she ilied from its 
effects. Mrs. Mercy Gary was the youngest 
of quite a large family of children. Of her 



own children, seven in number, John S. was 
the youngest, and is now the only one living. 

Mr. John S. Gary spent his early years at 
Barnerville, where he attended the public 
schools. After leaving school he was en- 
gaged for a time in selling dry goods and 
small wares along the canal, but later settled 
in Orleans Gounty, where he worked for six 
months in a wagon-building shop. At the 
end of that time he came to Barneiville, and 
opened a wagon-maker"s shop in company 
with Henderson Pollock. After working 
there for some time he hired a shop near by, 
and carried on wagon-making and painting 
and some cabinet work. Going then to 
Schoharie, he worked at carriage-building in 
the winter and at painting in the summer for 
a few years, and then began working as a 
millwright along Cobleskill Greek and the 
Schoharie River Valley. He built a large 
number of grist and saw mills, and invented a 
water-wheel of which he afterward constructed 
and put in place about two hundred in this 
and adjoining counties. In 1S75 he came to 
his present mill. This he had repaired dur- 
ing his early millwright work, it having been 
built by his wife's grandfather, Peter Low- 
meyers in 1790. A part of the original 
structure is in use \-et, and is in well-pre- 
served condition. The mill has two stories 
and a half. The lower floor is devoted to cus- 
tom and merchant work, principally to the 
manufacture of rye and buckwheat flour, which 
is marketed in New York and in other States. 
There are three mill-runs, besides a "pony 
stone." The second floor is devoted to puri- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



fyin^^ ;iml storini; the L;raiii, wliilc the top floor 
is uscil for scoiirinj^ ami cleaning j;rain ami 
for storage. This is one of the oldest mills 
in the section, as well as one of the largest 
run by water power. Mr. Gary has now been 
connectetl with milling interests for nearly 
half a century, probably longer than any other 
man now living in this region. 

On the last day of January, 1S49, Mr. Gary 
was united in marriage with I'hfebe Gicjrdon, 
a native of Carlisle and daughter of John Gor- 
don, a farmer of that town, who died at the 
age of sixty years. Mrs. Gary was one of a 
family of ten children, and has herself been 
tiie mother of eight, of whom five are living. 
These are: Alice, Andrew, Laura, Rosalie, 
and Walter. The three deceased are: Har- 
riet, who died at the age of nine years of 
diphtheria: Retta, who died at the age of 
eighteen months; and Lyman IL, who died 
at the age of si.x months. Alice, who married 
Henry Holmes McDonald, a carpenter and 
contractor of bridges, has three children — 
h'rank, John P., and Rhoda. Andrew mar- 
ried Gynderilla Severson, and has four chil- 
dren — Hattie, Foster, Daisy, and Florence. 
The son, l-"oster, is a painter and decorator 
in Gobleskill. Laura married Thomas Ghick- 
ering, a merchant of Lawyersville. Rosalie, 
who married Judd Hassett, a farmer, has one 
child, Ralith G. Walter Gary, an engineer, 
married Jennie Merchant, and has two sons 
— 01 in and lunery P. 

Mr Gary is Republican in ])olitics. He 
takes a warm interest in all ]uiblic matters, 
but has never cared to hold public office. He 



is a member of the Masonic lodge at Coble- 
skill, of De Witt Council at Albany, and of 
John L. Lewis Chapter at Gobleskill. He 
built the house in which he now resides, and 
two others near by which are rented to ten- 
ants; also one with a store adjoining, and 
owns more houses than any other man in 
town. Li religious views Mr. Gary is a 
Methodist. He is connectetl with the Meth- 
odist church here, has been steward in the so- 
ciety for many years, and an active worker in 
the Sunday-school. Mrs. Gary likewise has 
been a member of the church since her early 
girlhood. Mr. Gary is a progressive man. 
He has been keenly alive to every plan pro- 
mulgated for the iir.provement of the town, and 
has kept his own jiroperty in unexcelled con- 
dition. Down at the mill he has built a large 
wall eleven feet high, containing boulders 
weighing a ton, to keep the water from over- 
flowing. His other real estate property also 
shows that it is constantly looked out for and 
never allowed to lack repairs. 



OULS A. HOKN.S, proprietor of La 
Touraine. Tannersville, was born in 
the north of b'rance, February 8, 
1855, son of Augustus and Josephine (de 
.Sainte Roch) Hoens. His i)arents were na- 
tives of Iklgium, and his father, who was a 
farmer, died at the age of thirty-eight. His 
mother was twice married, and had si.x chil- 
dren, Louis being the eldest by her .second 
husband. Mrs. ]!oens came to America with 
five of her children. She spent her last days 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



with her son Louis, dying at the age of fifty- 
eight. 

Louis A. Boens accompanied the family to 
the United States, first settling in Helport, 
Long Island, and a year later removing to 
Hunter. His training in the business of hotel- 
keeping was begun at the Laurel House, with 
which he was connected in different capacities 
for several years. In 1889 he completed and 
opened La Touraine, which was built and fur- 
nished under his personal supervision, and has 
accommodations for fifty guests. It is a favor- 
ite resort for New York people, and has a large 
patronage. The table is a special feature, and 
is provided with poultry raised upon the 
premises. 

In 1886 Mr. Boens was united in marriage 
with Kate Askin. Her parents, John and 
Mary Askin, who are no longer living, had a 
family of si.xteen children. Mr. Askin was a 
native of Ireland. He died at the age of 
eighty years. The Boens family attend the 
Roman Catholic church. In politics Mr. 
Boens acts with the Democratic party. 



(S)| ON. HENRY S. DE FOREST, ex- 
Mayor of Schenectady and an e.xten- 
ive real estate dealer, was born in 
this city, February 16, 1847, son of O. L. 
and Sarah (Vedder) De Forest. 

His great-grandfather De F^orest and his 
grandfather De F^orest, both of whom were 
named Jacob, were lifelong residents of Sche- 
nectady County. Jacob De F'orest, second. 



was a well-to-do farmer and the father of a 
large family of children, one of them a son 
Jacob, who became a iirospemus farmer, and 
another Martin, who acquired wealth in mer- 
cantile pursuits, and was a man of prominence 
in this section of the State. 

O. L. De F~orest, born in this county in 
1S06, son of the second Jacob, was a coojier 
by trade, and followed that business in this 
city successfully for a number of years, or until 
his death, which occurred in 1859. He served 
as Sheriff of Schenectady County and also as a 
Deputy. 

His wife, Sarah, was a daughter of Nicholas 
Vedder, of Schenectady Count)-, whose ances- 
tors were among the early Dutch settlers in 
the Mohawk valley. Seven children were 
born of their union, namely: Anna, who died 
young; Rebecca, wife of Stephen D. Gates, of 
this city; Jacob, a furniture dealer, who 
served as Sheriff one term, and died in 1894, 
aged about si.\ty-two years, leaving a widow and 
five children; Ella, who married Christopher 
\'an Slyck, and died in 1S94, leaving two 
children; F^ank V., Assistant Chief of Police; 
Henry S., the subject of this sketch; and 
Lansing, a farmer in the town of Glenville, 
this county. The mother, Mrs. Sarah \'edder 
De F^orest, died in 1867, aged fifty-nine years. 
Henry S. De Forest attended the Union 
School, and completed his studies with a com- 
mercial course at Eastman's Business College, 
Poughkeepsie. Entering the employ of his 
brother-in-law, Christopher Van Sl)ck, a 
broom manufacturer, as clerk and book-keeper, 
he was later admitted to partnership; and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



after the dissolution of that firm, in 1878, he 
became extensively engaged in the cultivation 
of broom corn, which he carried on success- 
fully for eight years. When a young man he 
displayed a decided preference fur tlie real es- 
tate business, and his first lainl piirxhase cun- 
sisted of two lots for which he paid mie liun- 
dred dollars each. .MjoiU tiie \ear iSSfi he 
turned his attention exLJiisively to city piup- 
erty, his transactions in which diiiinj; tlie last 
twelve years have amounted tn twu niiUiuii 
dollars. He organized tlie s\iuiicates whicii 
erected the Edison Hotel, at a cost of one hun- 
dred and eighty-five tliousand dollars, and the 
Van Curler Ojiera House, completed in 1 ,Sc;3 
at a cost of one iunuJred and two thousand 
d.dJars, of wliich he is the huyest individual 
owner. rre\ious to the business depression 
of 1893, and since 1897, he has erected many 
hundreds of buildings for residence aiuj business 
purposes. He has laid out sc\eral tliorough- 
fares, including Foster Avenue, named in honor 
of Professor John Foster, of L'nioii College; 
Summit and Fast Avenues; and Terrace Place. 
The.se localities have been protected ai^ainst 
the encroachments of the liquor traffic l,ir;;el\- 
through his in.strumentality, and his excellent 
judgment in regard to the real estate inteiests 
of the city has jiroved excecdiiigl)' beneficial 
to iirojjerty h(j|ders. He is one of the largest 
owners of the Metropolitan Asphalt Pavement 
Company, which was organized in 1^95, and 
which has paved the principal streets of this 
city in a most satisfactory manner. He is con- 
sidered to-day the most extensive real estate 
dealer and owner in Scheneetadv. He is also 



the largest owner in the Schenectady Daily 
Gazette, the leading newspaper in the city. 

Politically, he is a Democrat. He served 
as City Recorder four years and as IMayor for 
the same length of time, and deserves much 
credit foi- giving the city a sound and jiidgres- 

ing the election (j[ the new brick railway sta- 
tion, and an entirely new sewer system was 
among the number of public improvements 
completeii timing his term of office. 

On September 6, 1.S76, Mr. IJe l-'orest mar- 
ried Lucy ]-:. Van Fpps, of this city, daughter 
of the late Harmon Van ]-:pi)s. They have 
two daughters, namely: Peulah, a recent grad- 
uate of Lasell Seminary; and Pearl, aged 
ele\'en years. 

Mr. De Forest is a director of the Schenec- 
tady State Hank. He is a Master Mason and 
a trustee of the Voung Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. His business office is located at 
420 and liis residence at 436 State Street. 
As noted above, his influence and judgment 
have long been prominent factors in siia|iing 
the course of |niblic improvements in this citv. 
The fact that he began business without cai)i- 
tal will enable those readers of the Ki.Mi.w 
who have hitherto been unfamiliar with his 
early business life to better appreciate liis un- 
tiring energy and iierseverance. 



ll.\UNCI':V SMITH, of West Cat- 
,kill, \. v., dealer in coal, hay, 
straw, and grain, was born in Ko\- 
bury, Delaware County, this State, on July 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



25, 1847. His parents were Jonas M. and 
Deborah (Kater) Smith, both natives of Rox- 
bury. His paternal grandfather was David 
Smith, a native of Scotland. Immigrating to 
this country, Da\'id Smith settled in Roxbur}-, 
and there made his home many )ears, his 
death occurring at the advanced age of ninety- 
one. His wife, Jane More, also born in Scot- 
land, died at the age of eighty-nine. She was 
the mother of a large family of children, of 
whom the only survivor is R. B. Smith, of 
Cortland, N.Y. 

Jonas M. Smith was reared on a farm in 
Roxbury. He was educated in the public 
schools, and he subsequently taught school for 
a while. Going west as far as Illinois, he 
lived for a time in that State, and then re- 
turned to his native town and started a variety 
store, which he carried on until 1863. Re- 
moving in that year to Ashland, Greene 
County, he engaged in farming, also devoting 
his energies to some extent to mercantile 
affairs. Subsequently he came to Catskill, 
where he died at the age of sevent}'-fi\e. He 
was a man of influence, and served as Town 
Supervisor for four terms, as well as in other 
positions of trust. His wife died at the age 
of fifty-nine. All her four children are living. 
They are: Chauncey, Mary, Nettie, and 
Addie. Mary married William H. Tompkins, 
of Ashland. Nettie is now Mrs. Lewis, and 
Addie is Mrs. Wiers. 

Chauncey Smith remained in his native 
town until he was seventeen years of age. 
(joing then to Ashland, he remained there 
thirteen years, and at the end of that time he 



came to Cats]<ill. In 1S77 he was engaged in 
tiie steamboat business at the I'oint, and I'loni 
1878 until iSy:! he was in tiie Hour and grain 
business. For a part nf this tiiue, some nine 
years, he also carried on a mill. He met with 
excellent success, but finall\- ga\e up all other 
business interests, and has since devoted him- 
self to his coal and grain business, which is 
one of the most prosperous enterprises in the 
town. In 1898 he erected the building which 
he now uses. He has both wholesale and re- 
tail trade, and is known as a man thoroughly 
estimable and upright. 

In 1870 Mr. Smith was united in marriage 
with Aravesta Lewis, who was born in Dur- 
ham. Eight children have blessed this union; 
namely, Vernon M., Howard C. , Raymond E. , 
William IL, Lizzie, Robert C. , Arthur, and 
Clifford H. Vernon M. Smith is in the real 
estate and insurance business in Iowa and 
Minnesota. He married Maud Jennings, and 
has one son, Chauncey Joseph. Howard C. is 
a dealer in horses, and resides in this town. 
He married Carrie Crawford. Raymond and 
William are in school. 

Mr. Smith is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Water Board and of the School 
Board, and a trustee in the Savings Bank. 
He was one of the organizers of the Catskill 
Rural Cemetery, and is one of its trustees. 
He and his wife and three of their sons are 
members of the Methodist church. 'Sir. Smith 
is a trustee of the church, and ;\Ir.s. Smith has 
been a teacher in the Sunda\--school. Both are 
earnestl)' interested in all efforts to promote 
the moral and spiritual growth of mankind. 



i64 



IJIOGRArillCAL kE\IK\V 



fUIIN II. STKRXHKRG, vice-president 
:mcl director uf the Siianm, Seward, and 
Carlisle Insurance C(mi])any, and a 
leading liopgrdwer of Seward, resitles on tlie 
Lunenburg turnpike al;out three miles from 
Seward village. He was born on the Sternberg 
homestead in this town on April 17, 1832, son 
of Abraliam and Anna M. (W'orniuth) Stern- 
berg, and is a representative of one of the old- 
est families in .Schoharie County. His great- 
grandfather, Nicholas Sternberg, who was 
born in .Schoharie, was a lineal descendant of 
Lambert .Sternberg, who came to America from 
Germany. 

Nicholas Sternbei'g was one of the jiioneer 
.settlers of the town of Sharon, now Seward. 
lie cleared land and built a log cabin near the 
site where John H. .Sternberg now li\es. He 
became very prosperous, and a prominent man 
in this section, and owned a flour-mill and 
some three hundred acres of land. 

John Sternberg, son of Nicholas, and grand- 
father of John II. Sternberg, was born on the 
homestead and reared there. The pro|)crty 
eventually reverted to him, and he spent his 
life in improving it. He built the jjresent 
house. A man of intel ligence and .sound judg- 
ment, he was highly respected by all with 
whom he came in contact, and he was an espe- 
cially valued member of the Lutheran church, 
in which he held at different times all the 
offices. His wife, whose maiilen name was 
Anna Shafer, was a native of this region. 
She died at the advanced age of eighty year.s. 
All of the eleven children born to this worthy 
jKiir grew to maturity. One ol the sons, 



named Levi, was educated f(jr the ministry in 
the Lutheran church. John Sternberg served 
for a time as Coroner. 

Abraham Sternberg was b(jrn in the house 
built b\- his father, and was etiucated in the 
public schools of this district. He assisted 
his father on the farm for some time, and 
eventually assumed full management, carrying 
on general farming. He cultivated ;il)out two 
hundred acres of land. As a citizen he was 
active and well-informed, and for many years 
served as Supervisor, holding the office during 
the trying days of the Civil War. He was 
also Town Clerk for some years. I'"or many 
years he was a trustee of the Lutheran church, 
and was particularly active at the time the new 
building was erected. He also held other 
offices of public trust, and was one of the 
first to introduce hop-growing into Schoharie 
County. He wa.s also one of the original in- 
corporators of the First National Bank of 
Cobleskill. His wife, Anna, who is still liv- 
ing at the age of eighty-one, was one of a large 
famil)' of children born to Henry Wormuth, of 
Sharon, an early settler here, and by occupa- 
tion a tanner and currier. As was her hus- 
band, she has been a lifelong member of the 
Lutheran church. She has been the mother of 
eight children, of whom there are still liv- 
ing — John H. ; James II., who is a physi- 
cian at Waterloo, N. V. ; Irving, a ph^'sician 
of (iouverneur, N.Y. ; Henrietta, who marrietl 
Barnabas I^ldred; and Jerome, who is a lianker 
in Lrie, I'a. Jerome Sternberg has two sons, 
wh(} are in the same bank with him. 

John H. Sternberg obtained a good practical 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•cs 



education in the public schools near his home 
and at Hart wick Seminary. After completing 
his studies he was for some years engaged in 
farming on different farms away from Seward; 
but in 1S92 he came back to his native place 
and settled on his present farm, where he has 
since been largely engaged in hop culture. 
He has about fifty-two acres devoted to raising 
this important crop. 'Sir. Sternberg was one 
of the incorporators of the Sharon, Seward, 
and Carlisle Insurance Company, of which he 
has ever since been a director and agent, and 
for the last six years vice-president. The 
company is in a very prosperous condition, and 
has a capital of a million and a quarter of 
dollars. 

In politics Mr. Sternberg is a Democrat. 
He has been Collector of the town for some 
time, and for a period of eight years, begin- 
ning in 1890, he filled the office of Supervisor. 
He is the only man in the town who has held 
this important office for so long a time. J\Ir. 
Sternberg has been a lifelong member of the 
Lutheran church, and has officiated in all the 
different church offices. He is at the present 
time serving as a trustee of the society. He 
has also been warmly interested in the work of 
the Sunday-school, and was formerly a teacher 
therein. His wife is connected with the 
church, and has also been a worker in the Sun- 
day-school. A number of their children are 
church members. 

Mr. Sternberg was united in marriage on 
January 30, 1S65, with M. Ellen Eldredge. 
She was born in Sharon, near Sharon Springs, 
daughter of Robert Eldredge, a native of 



Sharon Springs. Her grandfather, liarnahas 
Eldredge. was among the first settlers of that 
place, and owned nearly all of the land where 
the present village nou- stands. He kept a 
tavern, and was interested in the manufacture 
of saleratus. His seven sons, to each of whom 
he gave a fine farm, became prominent men in 
their section of the State, and some of them 
were well-known hotel-keepers. They were 
active in public affairs, and creditably perpet- 
uated the memory of their father. Barnabas 
Eldredge died at the age of seventy-two. He 
was widely acquainted, and commanded the re- 
spect of all who knew him. 

Robert Eldredge was reared in his nati\e 
town. He sold the farm given him by his 
father, and bought another near the church in 
Sharon, comprising about two hundred acres, 
and located thereon a house and store. Eor 
twelve years he was in business there, a well- 
known merchant and a successful one. He 
was at one time judge of the county, and 
usually went by the name of Judge Eldredge. 
He was also a Justice of the Peace, and his 
opinion and advice were eagerly sought on im- 
portant occasions. He died at the age of fifty- 
three. Although not connected oflicially with 
any church organization, he was a man of 
straightforward Christian principle, and a be- 
liever in the doctrines of the Universalist 
church. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Margaret Adams, is still living at Cobleskill, 
in the full possession of all her faculties at 
the advanced age of ninety-one years. She 
was born in the town of Sharon. Six of her 
seven children grew to maturitv, and four of 



UIOGRAI'HICAI. REVIEW 



them are living, namely: John A. ; M. Ellen; 
Spencer, who resides at Dwiglit, 111. ; and 
James, who is a merchant and Postmaster in 
California. Horatio Olcott and Elizabeth are 
deceased. 

Mrs. Sternberg resided with her parents 
until her marriage. She was educated in the 
ciimniDn schouls and in Cherry \'alley .\cad- 
univ. She has three chilcheii ; namely, How- 
ard J., Charles A., and R..l)crt I!. The first 
of these, who married Anna \'orhees, is pro- 
prietor of a hotel at Seward. Five children 
have been born to him, of whom four are liv- 
ing, namely: (irace A., who is with Mrs. 
Sternberg, and is atteiidiiig school; Julia A. ; 
(ieorge V. ; and I.e Ray. Charles A. Stern- 
berg married for liis first wife I.i^/.ie Clark, 
who died at the age of twenty-two. He mar- 
ried for his second wife Mamie Clark. He is 
a graduate of Hellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege in New \'nrk Cit)', and is now in pr;ictice 
at Gloversv ilie, having gone to that place from 
Howes Cave. Robert Sternl)erg married 
Louise Snedecor. 'I'hey have one child, b'lor- 
enee Louise, born June 17, 1 8r)S. Robert 
.Sternberg was liorn in Seward imd worked 
on the farm until he was sixteen years (dd. 
lie then :ittenileil Ilartwick Seminary for 
tliree years, and subsequently took a four 
ye;irs' course at Curnell University, gradu- 
ating in 1H90 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. He then taught .school in Blue 
Point, Long Island, for a time, and has since 
l>een ajipointed Schocd Commissioner of the 
second district of Schoharie County, sncceed- 
injf Thomas \i. I'inegan. He has iield the 



office since January i, 1893, and is regarded 
as one of the most efficient officers in educa- 
tional w<irk in this section of the State. He 
h;is tilled in his leisure moments studying law, 
and was admitted to the bar in 3\Larch, 1899. 



§()SI-;ril I'CTM.XN, who cultivates a 
l)ro<kiclive farm in Rottei(l;nn. .Sche- 
nectady Coinit)-, N.W, was l)orn in tiiis 
town M;i\' ,^, 1M33, son of A;iron and Nancy 
(Hagermau) Piitman. His f:ither was born 
here in 1 805, and his grandfather, John Put- 
man, was among the early residents. His 
great-grandfather, Aaion Putman, first, who 
came from Holland, settled in Rotterdam as a 
jiioneer. All of the ab(jve-named ancestors 
were industrious farmers. 

Aaron Putmiui, second, son of Joim, im- 
proved tlie farm whicli his son Joscjih now 
owns, and was one of the able faiiners of his 
day. In politics he acted with the Re|)ublican 
party, and was a Justice of the Peace for sev- 
eral years. He was a member of the Dutch 
Reformed cluircii, and an earnest advocate of 
temperance. He died at the age of sevent)- 
si,\ years. Nancy Hagerman Putman, his 
wife, was a natis'c of Amsterdam, N. \', and 
the locality in that town known as Ihigerman's 
Mills was named for her f:ither. Of her chil- 
dren two :ne li\ing, nanul_\ : John A. Putman, 
a real estate dealer in Hro(jklyn; and Josejih, 
the subject of this sketch. The others were : 
Dr. b'rancis D. i'utman, who died at the age 
of twenty-three; M;iggie \'. Hagerman, who 
died No\endjer 19, 1875; PTizabeth, who be- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



■ 67 



came Mrs. Sauter, and died in 1897; Ernes- 
tus H., who died at tiie age of ten years; and 
two children who died in infanc)-. The 
mother lived to be eighty-two years old. 

Joseph Putman acquired his education in the 
schools of Rotterdam and Syracuse. When 
thirteen years old he made himself useful 
about the farm, and after completing his stud- 
ies he gave his entire attention to farming at 
the homestead. At the time of his marriage 
he began to work the farm on shares, and he 
continued to do so until his father's death, 
when he purchased the interest of the other 
heirs. He owns one hundred and twenty-five 
acres of desirably located land, which afford 
excellent opportunities for both tillage and 
pasturage, and, aside from raising the usual 
crops, he disposes of the milk of from fifteen 
to twenty cows. 

On September 10, 1S62, 'Sir. Putman was 
joined in marriage with Martha E. Shufelt, 
who was born in Rotterdam, September 6, 
1S40. Her parents, George and Pauline 
(Britton) Shufelt, are not living. Her father 
was a prosperous farmer. Mrs. Putman is the 
mother of two daughters — Purlie and Minnie, 
both of whom reside with their parents. Pur- 
lie married Van D. Sager, a building contrac- 
tor, and has one son, Clinton Sager, who was 
born June 22, 1S92. ]\Iinnie is the wife of 
George H. Putman, an employee at the Edison 
Electric Works, Schenectady, and has one son, 
Joseph W. , who was born January 9, 1S9S. 

Although taking- a lively interest in town 
affairs, and supporting at the polls the candi- 
dates for local positions whom he considers 



most desirable, Mr. Putman has never cared to 
hold public office himself. In national elec- 
tions he acts with the ReiHiblican ])arty. He 
is sincerely respected for his sterling integrity 
and high moral character. He is a member of 
the Reformed church. 



§OHN B. KNIEFEX, late a leading hop- 
grower of Middleburg, X. Y. , and, at 
the time of his death, on January 25, 
1S99, the only hop-buyer with an oflfice in the 
town, was born at New Baltimore, Greene 
County, on July 5, 1S35. He was a son of 
John and Sophia (Crook) Kniffen, and de- 
scended from a line of agriculturists sprung 
from English stock. His first ancestor in this 
country came from England to a farm in New 
Jersey. His grandfather Kniffen removed 
from New Jersey to this State in early man- 
hood, and spent the remainder of his life in 
New Baltimore, where he died in extreme old 
age, lacking only three years of having reached 
a full century. 

John Kniffen, father of John B., was born 
in New Baltimore, and was there educated in 
the public schools. He was reared to a 
farmer's life, but also did some work at the 
stone cutter's trade. Although strong and 
healthy, with every prospect of a long life, he 
was stricken down in the fulness of manhood, 
and died at the age of fifty-three from typhoid 
fever. He was a zealous member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, one of the trustees of 
the society, and for many years a class leader. 
He was a noted exhorter and a iDOwerful man 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in prayer. His wife, Sophia, who died at the 
age of seventy-six, was also a lifelong and ac- 
tive Methodist. She was the mother of four 
sons and five daugliters, and of these nine chil- 
dren the sui)ject of this sketch was the latest 
survivor. 

Jnlin H. Kniffen received a practical educa- 
tiiKi in tiie ])ublic schools, and durinLC \:icalion 
time worked on his fntlicr's farm, wlicrc he 
learned the art of successfid tannin,^. At 
eighteen years of age he came to .Middleburg, 
where until he reached his majority he worked 
by the month on farms, and at the same time 
made arrangements so that he was enableil to 
attend scliool during the winter. At tlie age 
of twenty-one he [)urchased a farm of some 
forty acres, which formed the nucleus of Ills 
later splendid projierty of o\cr three hundred 
acres. As a farmer he was \-ery successful ; 
and he and iiis son, who was in business with 
him for a number of years, were looked upon 
as two (jf the most progressive agricultLU'ists in 
this regioii. The Kniffen estate embraces 
practically two farms, botli of wJiich are in a 
high state of cu]li\ation. All the buildin-s 
on the farm upon wliicli he lived, and also the 
house where his son lives, were built by Mr. 
Kniffen. In i .S6o he began the tullure of 
hops in a small way, being among the first 
here to engage in that enterprise. He con- 
stantly increased the scale of liis operations, 
and in his later years had some fifty acres de- 
voted to ho]i-growing, ])roducing annually some 
one hundrcil and twenty five bales of hops. In 
iS.So be began buying hops, and from that 
time on be wa.s interested witli Cbailes .S. 



May, who is proprietor of one of the largest 
hop markets in Albany. Mr. Kniffen was the 

first man in iMidd!el)urg to become a buyer, 
and lie was latterly, as before mentioned, the 
only one in town who had an office. He 
raised grain of different kintls on his farm. 
Mr. Kniffen was married in 1S55 to Tabitha 
W'ormer, a native of Middleburg, and daughter 
(if John W'ormer, a successful and prominent 
farmer of this place. Of the four sons and 
four daughters born of tliis union, seven chil- 
dren are living, namely: baner}- W. , who was 
in business with his father; luskine; l-;stella; 
Amoretta; ]'2velyn ; I' rank ; and l^llicjt. ]*"r- 
skine, who married Molly Howman, is in tlie 
insurance business connected with the Mutual 
Reserve I-'riend As.sociation. Estella is the 
wife of I.uther Jackson, overseer of the North 
Shore Road at -South Schenectady, and is the 
mother of seven children — John, b'lora, 
b'rank, Harry, Clauile, Clarence, and b'ord, 
who is (leceasetl. Amoretta marrieil Charles 
D. Mitchell, will) is in a shoe factory at Hing- 
hamton. They have a family of three chil- 
dren—by name. Belle, Clifford, and I'orrest. 
I-:velyn is the wife of Clarence McBain, a 
member ol the firm of Bassler & Co., of Mid- 
dlel)urg, and she is the mother of four children 
— Xellie, John. Loui.sa, and Alice Leona. 
b'rank, who also is a farmer and was interested 
in Ijusiness wit!) his father, married Dora 
Crosljy, and has one daugliter, Delia. IvUiot 
Kniffen resides near the (dd home, and is in- 
terested ill bee culture, in jioultry raising, and 
in general fnrming. He married bllla \an 
\-,.ras. 



40^i 




(lEOKC.t: \v. i'.i:i.i-iN<. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



169 



In politics Mr. Kniffcn was a stanch Demo- 
crat. He was a member of Micldlcburg 
Lodge, No. 663, F. & A. SI, with which he 
had been connected for twenty years, and he 
was buried with Masonic lienors. He fol- 
lowed the religious faith of which his father 
was so devoted a disciple, and was one of the 
strong men in the Methodist church at IMiddle- 
burg. He was a member of it for forty years, 
and his wife and nearly all of his children are 
members. At the time the new church edifice 
was erected, Mr. Kniffen contributed a thou- 
sand dollars toward its construction. 



/^pTEQRGE W. BELLINGER, editor and 
V^X publisher of the Cobleskill hidi-.r at 
Cobleskill, N.Y., was born in this town, De- 
cember 18, 1S43. His father, George Bel- 
linger, was born, bred, and educated in 
Seward, Schoharie County, where he worked 
at farming until sixteen years old, and then 
learned the blacksmith's trade. When ready 
to establish himself permanently, George Bel- 
linger came to Cobleskill, and was here indus- 
triously employed at his trade until his death, 
June 26, 1867. He married Miss Caroline 
Shafer, a daughter of Jacob Shafer, a prosper- 
ous farmer of this town, and a descendant of 
one of its earlier pioneers. Two children 
were born of their union; namely, George VV., 
and a child that died when \'oung. The 
mother is still living in Cobleskill. 

George W. Bellinger received a practical 
education in the public schools of his district. 
Having become interested in the subject of 



photography wiien a ynung man, he iuid an 
opportunity to learn the art in 1X65, when Mr. 
Oswald J5urnett o])ened tiie tirst re.nular studio 
in the town on the third Moor of the liuilding 
now occupied by Charles H. Sehaffer. .Mr. 
Bellinger proved an apt pupil, and in a short 
time bought out his employer. lieing a man 
of enterprise and good business abilit\-, well 
endowed with artistic talent, he met with ex- 
cellent success, and, having gained a wide 
reputation for superior skill, he won an exten- 
sive and lucrative patronage in this and sur- 
rounding towns. Removing to the present 
site of the dental parlors of Dr. L. T. Browne, 
he there carried on his work until the fire of 
1873, which destroyed all of his equipments. 

The following month Mr. Bellinger em- 
barked in a new career. He bought the 
Cobleskill Index, which was established in 
1S65 by William H. Week and the Hon. 
Henry E. Abel, and during the twenty-six 
years that this paper has since been under his 
management he has kept it in a leading posi- 
tion among the local journals of Schoharie 
County. It has been greatly enlarged, its cir- 
culation increased fourfold, and its subscrip- 
tion rate reduced from a dollar and a half to 
one dollar per year. Through its columns he 
has been a strong advocate of all movements 
tending to benefit the community, and has ren- 
dered valuable aid to the Democratic party by 
his sound and stirring editorials. He has al.so 
been influential in establishing different organ- 
izations in the locality, among them being the 
Cobleskill Agricultural Society, formed in 
1876, largely by his personal efforts and his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"talks" on the subject in the Index. Mr. 
Hel linger was a member of this association's 
board of management from its inception to the 
year 189S, and during a like period he served 
without salary as its secretary. 

He has also been secretary and treasurer of 
the Cobleskill Rural Cemetery Association si.\ 
years, and has served two terms as one of the 
village tru.stces. He is pniminL-ntl}- connected 
with the Farmers' and Merchants' Bank, of 
which he was one of the projectors, as a mem- 
ber of the finance committee, and is jircsident 
of the Schoharie and Otsego Mutual l-"ire In- 
surance Company. In politics he has always 
been a loyal Democrat. 

In the year 1871 Mr. I5ellinj;er married 
Miss Minnie Moulton, tlie only daughter of 
the Hon. F. P. Moulton, an aljje anil influen- 
tial citizen of Montgomery CuLinty. IMr. and 
Mrs. Uellinger ha\e two children, namely: 
Vernon M., teller in the Farmers' and Mer- 
chants' Hank ; and Maud S. 



'KRHFRT KIPr, general merchant and 
[)roi)riet'jr (jf the Kipp House, Lex- 
ington, ("iieene County, N. V. , was 
born in this town Marcii 6, 1S52, son (if Isaac 
and Nancy (\'an Hcusen) Kiiip. He is dI 
Dutch descent. I.saac Kipp, lirst, his great- 
grandfather, was a ]3ioneer settler of Dutche.ss 
County, New York. Benjamin Kipp, son of 
Isaac, first, resided in Dutchess County until 
twenty-one years old, when he came to (ireenc 
County. The trades of a carjienter and mill- 
wright, which he had previously learned, he 



followeil in this locality for twenty years, or 
until 1802, when he purchased a farm in Lex- 
ington. Here he resided until his death, 
which occurred in 1837, at the age of si.xty 
years. He married Sally Noyes, a native of 
New Jersey, antl became the father of eleven 
children. The sur\iviirs of this family are: 
Isaac, second; and Harriet, who married a Mr. 
Jones, of Hartford, Conn. Mrs. Sally N. 
Kipp died at the age of seventy-one years. 

Isaac Kipp, second, father of Herbert, was 
born in this town, April 12, 181 8. He fol- 
lowed farming on the homestead until 1850, 
when he went to California, and was fairly 
successful in the gold mines on the middle 
fork of the American River. After spending 
a year there, he returned to Lexington, and re- 
mained on the home farm until 1858, when he 
made a trip to Tike's Peak. In 1S77 he opened 
the general store now carried on by his son, 
and under the firm name of 1. Kipp & -Son 
conducted a jirofitable enterprise until 1887, 
when he disposed of his interest and went to 
Nebraska. The ne.xt five years he s]ient upon 
a farm in that .State, and then he once more 
returnetl to his nati\'e town, where he is now 
residing with his son. In jiolitics he is a 
Democrat. He was Supervisor two terms, and 
he acted as a Justice of the Peace forty years. 
He is a member and a trustee of the Bajitist 
church. His wife, Nancy, was a native of 
Lexington, daughter of Cornelius \'an Heu- 
sen, a farmer. -She died at the age of sixty 
\ears, having been the mother of six children. 
Tlie fi\e now living are: Mary, who married 
William H. Mosher, of South Dakota; C. L. 



BIOGRAPHICAT. RF.VIEW 



Kipp, who is Postmaster at Lexington; Her- 
bert, the subject of this sketch; Jennie, who 
married R. L. Ilogaboom ; and Edwin L. 
Kipp. 

Herbert Kipp was educated in the schools 
of Lexington and at Eastman's Business Col- 
lege, Poughkeepsie. He worked on the home 
farm and also had charge of a stage route until 
1 8/6, when he went to Illinois and spent one 
year. In 1877 he, in company with his 
father, engaged in general mercantile business 
in Lexington, and the partnership continued 
until 1887, when he bought the elder Kipp's 
interest. P'or the next two years he was a.sso- 
ciated with his brother, C. L. Kipp, and since 
1889 he has conducted the establishment 
alone. He occupies two floors, the main store 
being thirty by forty feet, with an annex forty 
by twelve feet, and carries a full line of gro- 
ceries, boots, shoes, hats, caps, hardware, flour, 
grain, drugs, carpets, oil cloths, dry goods, 
notions, and other articles of general merchan- 
dise. In connection with his mercantile busi- 
ness he conducts the Kipp House, a favorite 
summer resort, accommodating fifty guests. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Kipp was united in marriage 
with Miss Mary ¥. Jones, of Jewett, daughter 
of Benjamin Jones, a farmer, who resides with 
a son, and is now ninety years old. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kipp are the parents of three children — 
Pearl, Clara May, and Ralph. 

Politically, Mr. Kipp acts with the Demo- 
cratic party. He was Postmaster under Cleve- 
land's first administration four years, held the 
same office three years during President Harri- 
son's administration, and was Supervisor one 



term. He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. Mr. and Mrs. Kipji attend the I'.ap- 



fOIIN H. PRANCE, the representative 
of a pioneer family of Seward, Scho- 
harie County, has a well-improved farm 
located on the road to the Seward Depot, abmit 
six miles from Cobleskill and two miles from 
the village of Hyndsville. He was born in 
Seward, March 30, 1834, and this town was 
also the birthplace of his father, Peter I-" ranee 
— or LTncle Peter, as he was familiarly known. 

Tracing the line back to the great-grand- 
father, we find a Revolutionary patriot, of 
whom and his family this story is told: 
W'hile he was off at Schoharie defending the 
fort, his sons, Henry and John, who had re- 
mained at home, were taken prisoners. John 
was killed; but Plenry, the grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, fortunately escaped from 
his captors, and after lying in the woods for a 
day or two made his way home. 

Henry France came to Seward in Colonial 
days, while yet a young man, and took up a 
tract of unbroken land in the depths of the for- 
est. A few years later he removed to an ad- 
joining farm, and was there engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits until his death, at the age of 
fourscore and eight years. He united with 
the Lutheran church in early manhood, but 
was afterward an active member of the Meth- 
odist church. Pie was interested in the cause 
of temperance, and through his influence the 
use of licjuor in the harvest field was abolished. 



HIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His wife bore him fourteen ciiildrcn, one of 
whom is now living — Gilbert, a farmer in 
Seward. 

Peter France spent his life of seventy-four 
years in Sewaril, receiving his education in the 
district school, and on the home farm acquir- 
ing a practical knowledge of agriculture. On 
leaving the parental roof he purchased land at 
Seward Valley, then known as Neeley Hollow, 
where he spent some years. Selling that he 
bought the estate on which his son, John II., 
now resides, and from that time until bis death 
was prominently identified witli the agricult- 
ural interests of this part of the tuwn. Po.s- 
sessing a good fund of general information, 
and being a man of sound judgment, he was 
often called upon for counsel and advice, and 
his opinions were a]\va\s respected. In poli- 
tics he affiliated with the Democrats prior to 
the Rebellion, but after that time was a .stanch 
Republican. Influential in local affairs, he 
served as Overseer of the I'onr and as High- 
way Commissioner for several \ears. His 
wife, Elizabeth Diefendorf, was born at Frey's 
Hush, Montgomery County, X. '\'. , one of the 
twelve children of a pioneer farmer, John Die- 
fendorf. Both jiarents united with the Meth- 
odist church when \'iung, and as true Cliris- 
tians exemplified its teachini;s in their daily 
lives. Hoth were active in church work, tlie 
father being class leader of tiie Seward Valley 
church society for many years, and tlieir hospi- 
table home was ever open to the ministers of 
the circuit. The)' reared three children, as 
follows: John H., the subject of this sketch; 
Fmeline, wife of Sylvester Rewlanil, of Mor- 



risville, N.Y. ; and Louisa. The latter, who 
died October 17, 1892, after many years of 
illncs.s, was wife of the late Norman Ottman, 
a graduate of the Normal School. Mr. Ott- 
man was for some years a teacher in Seward, 
and afterward was here engaged as a merchant 
until the breaking out of the Civil War. I-"n- 
listing then as a private in Colonel Ellsworth's 
regiment, the One Hundred and l^'orty-fourth 
New York \'olunteer Inf;nUr\-, he went bravely 
forth to serve his country, and was killed in 
battle. 

John H. France received a good common 
school education, anil till he was twenty-five 
\ears of age assisted his father in farming. 
Then taking the farm on shares, he carried it 
on successfully until the death of his father, 
when the whole estate of one hundred and 
twenty acres came into his ]iossession. He 
iias since continued in his chosen vocation, 
and besides harvesting excellent crops of hay 
and grain each season he has raised large quan- 
tities of hops, a stajile product of this region. 
He keeps about fifteen Jersc}- and Durham 
cows, and makes a fine quality of butter, with 
which he sup|)lies private customers in Troy 
and Albany. His farm is well equipped with 
nifxlern machinery and ini])leinents for carrying 
on his work; and the buildings, which were 
nearly all erected b\- his father, are kept in 
fine rejiair. 

Mr. h'rance is a Republican in jiolitics, and 
has served as Inspector of hllections in his 
town. He is a charter mendier of the local 
organization of Good Tem])lars, and also of 
the Sewartl Grange, 1'. of IL, in which he has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



held all the offices up to Master. In the 
former society he was for several years the 
Chaplain. One of the most active and influ- 
ential members of the Methodist church, he 
materially assisted in building the new house 
of worship of this dencmination, and in remod- 
elling the old one at Seward Valley. He was 
the first child christened in the first frame 
church edifice erected in this part of the coun- 
try, and having joined the church at the age of 
sixteen, he is now, with but few exceptions, 
the oldest member of this locality. He has 
been trustee and class leader, and was for a 
number of years chorister of the Methodist 
Episcopal choir, in which he and his children 
sang. Since a boy of fourteen he has been 
connected with the Sunday-school as pupil, 
teacher, or superintendent, having held the 
latter position three terms, and during the 
past five years has had charge of the ladies' 
Bible class. 

;\Ir. France has been twice married. On 
June 12, 1855, was solemnized his union with 
Orpha Diefendorf. She was born in Seward, 
a daughter of George Diefendorf, and was one 
of fourteen children; namely, Susan, Sylvester, 
Jacob, Henrietta, Salina, Jane, Judson, Orpha, 
Sophronia, Peter, Abraham, Wealthy, Rensse- 
laer, and Nancy. She died at the age of 
thirty-four years, leaving five children, of 
whom the following is a brief record : Clarence 
L. , a skilful farmer and able business man of 
Cobleskill, married AUie Rose, and has three 
children — Anson, Grace, and Harry: Emory 
died at the age of four years ; \\'elton, a farmer 
in Seward, married Clara Hevener, and has 



four children — Ezra, Sadie, Norman, and 
llattie; Allie :\Iay, wife of Charles Sutphen, 
a farmer near Richniondville, has three chil- 
dren — John, Emma, and Orjilia; Lizzie mar- 
ried Jacob Van Woert, a son of the Rev. Jacol> 
Wan Woert, formerly pastor of the Dutch Re- 
formed church. Her husband, who for several 
years was an instructor in the Cobleskill Higli 
School, died at the age of twentv-five )ears, 
leaving her with two children — Dora D. and 
Jacob H. She now lives with her father. 

On June 27, 1S69, 'Sir. France married Mrs. 
Sarah Wigley, who was born at Fonda, Mont- 
gomery County, N. Y. , a daughter of Frederick 
Dockstaden, a farmer. By her first husband, 
Gilbert Wigley, she has one child, William 
Wigley, who is a fireman on the New York 
Central Railway. He married Ella Card, and 
has had three children — Willie, Bernice, and 
Bvron, the last two being; deceased. 



LEXANDER M.acMILLEX, one of the 
most influential citizens of Carlisle, 
Schoharie County, was born in 
Bethlehem, Albany County, X.Y., on October 
4, 1S42, son of James and Ellen X. (Waldron) 
MacMillen. His great-grandfather ^lacMillen 
was a Scotch emigrant who settled in Albany. 
His grandfather, who resided in Xew Scot- 
land, X. Y., died there at eighty-si.\ years of 
age. He was a farmer and a leading politi- 
cian among the old-time Whigs. He occupied 
prominent civil ofl^ces, such as those of Super- 
visor and Collector, and was one of the active 
and influential members of the Presbvterian 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



church. He had a family nf eleven children, 


pervisor of Carlisle, being the second Repub- 


seven sons and four daughters, all nf whom are 


lican in this strongly Democratic town to hold 


now deceased. They were: Ji.lm, Andrew, 


that office, the other Rei)ui)lican bidding 


James, Henry, Alexander, \\ illiani, .\;n()n, 


it for only (jne term. Though a member of 


Mary, Nancy, Catherine, and one whose name 


the minority Jiart)', he met with defeat only 


is not remembered. Of these, James, father 


once or twice, and then by no larger majority 


of Ale.xander MacMillen, w;is the only one that 


than tweiitw He has served for many years 


settled in this county. Most of these brothers 


on the Re|iublican county conniiittee. .Mr'. 


were Reiuiblicans politically, and were asso- 


MacMillen is the largest land-owner in town. 


ciateil with the Presbyterian (.1uim.1i. James, 


and the wealthiest citizen of Carlisle. l''or 


however, was a Methodist. He was a quiet, 


the last twenty-eight years he has been a suc- 


conservati\e man, thoroujj;hl_\- well-informed on 


cessful hop-grower, [irobably making a greater 


the topics of the day. He left his childhood's 


success of that iiulustiy than any other farmer 


home at about fourteen years of a-e, and a 


in the localit\'. About a hundred acres of his 


number of years after his niarria,i;e he came to 


farm arc cleared lantl, and in adtlition to his 


Carlisle and bouj,dit the farm where his son 


hop cr'ops he has raised general produce. He 


Alexander, then eij;lit years old, now li\-es. 


formerl)- owned three other farms, which had 


It was then known as the Henry Hest farm. 


come to him through the foreclosures of mort- 


It contained, originally, a hundred acres, but 


gages, but these he has now disjiosed of. He 


since it came into [possession of its [iresent 


is the largest tax-payer in Carlisle. Mr. Mac- 


owner it has been enlargetl b\' the addition of 


Millen was a stockholder in the old bank at 


twenty acres. James MacMillen was married 


Cohleskill, and is a charter member, stock- 


three times, and had two children— Ale.xander 


holder, and director in the new bank. He 


and William. The latter enlisted in the 


owns fifty shares, the largest number owned by 


northern army when under the age of the draft- 


one man. Mr. IMacMillen and his wife are 


mark, saw gallant service at b'airfax Court- 


among the strongest supjiorters of the Meth- 


house, and subse(|uently died of typhoid fever. 


odist church in this i)lace, and both sing in 


He had previously worked with his father on 


the choir. l\Iis. MacMillen is a member of 


the farm; and his death, while a severe shock 


the church, and an active worker in the .Sun- 


to all his family, was especially affecting to 


day-school, in which she has been a teacher 


his father. 


for man)- years. When the Christian I'ji- 


Alexander MacMillen is the leading Repub- 


tleavor Society was started heie, she becaiiie 


lican in Carlisle, and one of the most |ironii- 


its i)resident. 


nent in the count)-. .Somewhat singular is the 


The maiden name of Mrs. MacMillen, who 


fact that he has attended only two caucuses in 


was married in 18(14, was l''.veline Hradt, and 


his whole life. 'I'hree times he has been Su- 


she is a daughter of William 15i"ailt, deceased. 



inOCRAl'HICAL KF.VIKW 



formerly a farmer of Cobleskill. Her paternal 
graiulfather, who came hitlier fioiii Albany 
County, clcareil the farm ami built the house 
now staiuiiiii;' on it. Her grandfather, James 
Boughton, who lived to the advanced age of 
ninety )-ears, was the leading man in the Pres- 
byterian church at Carlisle, and in his last 
_\ears he sat in one of the chairs inside the 
altar rail. Mrs. AlacMillen's father was a 
member of the Dutch Reformed church. He 
had a family of four children. Mr. and Mrs. 
:MacMillen have one child, William A., who 
since attending the Alban_\" fiusiness College 
has been in business with his father. He 
married Ada Dockstader, and has one son, 
Irvin A. 



RANK AKELEY, dealer in general 
b merchandise at West Fulton, was born 
here on October 20, 1S51, his parents being 
James and Sally J. (Shutts) Akeley. 

James Akeley, who was born in January, 
1S12, came to this town in 1840, and settled 
on a fine farm of about two hundred acres, near 
what is now his son's store, and here he re- 
mained engaged in agriculture until his death 
in 1S61, at about the age of fifty. His wife, 
Sally, survived him many }ears, and died in 
February, i8g8. She was the daughter of 
John Shutts, of Greenville, Greene County, 
a lifelong and prominent farmer, and also a 
veterinary surgeon. Her mother was of Con- 
necticut birth. Mr. and Mrs. Shutts had a 
family of four children. Of these the only 
survivor is Mrs. Salome Hart, who resides 



near Greenville. Seven children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. James Akeley, and all are liv- 
ing. They are: I'ltlgar, who resiiles at Ci.bl.:- 
.skill; Emily, who is the wife .,f William 
Richards; Ur. John S. , who is a physician in 
Ravena, .\lbany Count}-; Martin A., wlm is 
County Clerk of Schoharie County; Lorenzo, 
farmer and Supervisor (1899) ; Frank, the sid)- 
ject of this sketch; and Mary J., who married 
John Hinds, of Greenville. Hoth parents at- 
tended the Methodist church. 

Mr. Frank Akeley, after obtaining his educa- 
tion in the common schools of his native vil- 
lage and at the Normal School at .Albany, 
taught school for a while. In 1871 he went to 
work in the store of M. B. I'elhjws, situated 
opposite his present place of business, and 
there remained until 1S75, when he went to 
Xew York for a short time. Later in the 
same year he returned, and began teaching the 
school at West Fulton. During the farming 
season of that year, 1876, he worked for si.\ 
months on a farm, but in the fall taught school 
at Fulton. Not long after he bought his pres- 
ent building, and since that time he has had 
a prosperous career as a merchant. He carries 
a large stock of goods, including groceries, 
boots and shoes, dry goods, read\--made cloth- 
ing, underwear, glassware and hardware, patent 
medicines, and, to some extent, farming im- 
plements. A gradual increase of stock has 
made it neces.sary for him to have enlarged 
quarters; and, since starting, he has opened a 
second floor, so that he has now an exceedingly 
well -equipped business. 

In politics ;\Ir. Akeley is a Republican. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



For a time he served as Assistant Postmaster. 
He was married in 1881 to Elniina Zeli, a na- 
tive of Breakabcen, ant! tlaugliter of Adam and 
Nancy (Shafer) Zeli. Mr. Zeh was a lifelong 
farmer. He had four children. After his 
ileath his widow married a second time. Mr. 
and Mrs. Akeley have one chikl, Hazel, who 
is at school. Mr. .Vkcky has served on the 
county committee. He is liberal in reli.nious 
views, and believes in de.iling with unques- 
tionable honesty in all his business transac- 



,i;\-. CHARLIES WADS WORTH 
1'1TC1H:R, pastor ..f the Reformed 
Dutch church at .Micicllelniri;-, 
Schoharie County, is one of the most able, 
progressive, and popular clergymen of his de- 
nomination and a highly esteemed citizen. 
He was born March 2, 1849, near Cohoes, 
Albany County, a son of the Rev. William 
Pitcher, whose birthjjlace was Red Hook, 
Dutchess County, N.Y. His ])aternal -rand- 
father, who was an officer in the War of 1812, 
was a i)rosperous farmer and an extensive land- 
holder at Upi>er Red Hook, where he died at 
the advanced a.L;e of fourscore years. His 
wife, Catherine Kip]), also attained a ripe old 
age. Hoth were members of the Dutch Re- 
formed Church of Upper Red Hook. They 
had five children, none of whom are now 
living. 

The Rev. William Pitcher was reared <in the 
home farm, and obtained his elementary etluca- 
tion in the district schools. He subsequently 
studied at Williams College and Princeton 



Seminary. He began his professional life as 
pa.stor of a Dutch Reformed church at Jackson, 
N.Y. ; and three \ ears later he assumed charge 
of the " lk)ght " church at Watervliet, three 
miles from the village of Cohoes. After a 
faithful service of thirteen years in that place 
he accei}ted a call to South 15ranch, Somerset 
County, N.J., where a church, small in num- 
bers, had been but a short time organized. He 
labored there twenl\-seven \ears, a long and 
successful [lastoiiite, in which he built up a 
flourishing society. Going then Icj (Greenwich, 
Washington County, X.V., he there lived in 
retirement until his demise, at the age of 
seventN-three years. He was a gifted speaker, 
a sermonizer of especial note; and many of his 
|iulpit discourses, ]Hiblishe(l in book form, 
were forcible exponents of his theological be- 
lief. A man of strong personality and lunisual 
sweetness of character, he letl a pure. Chris- 
tian life, and in a rare ilegree won the lo\-e 
and esteem of all with whom he came in con- 
tact. He was three times married. His first 
wife, Mary Aim A\'adsworth, died in young 
womanhood, leaving one son, De Witt Pitcher, 
now a bo(jk-keeper in Hudson, X.\'. His 
second wife, Jane K. Wadsworth, sister to his 
first wife, was born at Hantam Falls, Litch- 
field Count}-, Conn., a daughter of Henry 
Wads.vorth, a jjrosjierous merchant. She was 
a sister of the Rev. Charles Wad.sworth, D. D. , 
of Philadelphia, and James L. Wadsworth, 
who is now li\ing retired from active pursuits 
in Darien, Conn. Of the children horn of 
this union two are now living, namely: 
Charles W., the special subject of this sketch; 




CHARLES W. PITCHER. 



and Jane E. , wife of VV. B. Warner, a photog- 
rapher at N(uthpi)rt, I.oiii;- Island. Tlic mother 
(lied at the a-e of thirty-six years, and the 
father siihsctpiently married Alary Ann Mel.ean. 
The Rev. Charles W. Pitcher received his 
elementary education in the public sch(i(ds of 
South Branch, N.J., which he left at the age 
of sixteen }'ears to go to New York Cit\-, 
where he was clerk in a jewelry store and in a 
dry-goods store for four )'ears. He then con- 
tinued his studies at a select school in Ne- 
shanic, N.J. , and at Rutgers Grammar School 
in New Ikunswick, which he attended two 
years, and after that at Rutgers College four 
years and at the theological seminary two 
years. On January 26, 1876, having pre- 
viously been licensed to preach by the Newark 
Congregational Association, he was ordained 
to the ministry at Randolph, N.Y. , and at 
once took charge of the weak and struggling 
society, which in 18S3 he left in a most flour- 
ishing condition, it having doubled numeri- 
cally and financially under his efficient labors. 
The ensuing four years he was pastor of the 
church at Stanton, N.J., which under his 
guidance was wonderfully revived, large num- 
bers being added to the organization, which 
increased in usefulness each year, and, accord- 
ing to the stated clerk of the classis to which 
it belongs, reached the highest degree of pros- 
perity in its history. From 1SS7 until 1S91 
Mr. Pitcher had charge of the Kirkpatrick Me- 
morial Church at Ringoes, N.J., where his 
efforts were again blessed with success. Under 
his fer\ent and elocpient preaching of the 
gospel, great interest was awakened ; and, dur- 



ing a great revival that followed, sixty mcm- 

lu'is were added to the cliurch in one Sunday, 
forty of the converts being ba])tized that day. 
Coming rr,.m there to ]\I iddleburg, he has 
here been exceedingl)- prospered in his relig- 
ious work, the church liaxiug grown as regards 
both its memhershi[i anil its intlnence. A 
faithful and conscientious worker in the Mas- 
ter's vineyard, he has not only endeared him- 
self to his immediate parishicjners, but has won 
the respect of the entire community. 

On July 14, 1875, Mr. Pitcher was married 
to Anna M., daughter of Abraham and Ann K. 
(Naylor) Amerman. Her parents were natives 
and lifelong residents of Somerset County, 
New Jersey, where the mother died when 
sixty years old, and the father, who was a 
prominent citizen of South Branch, a miller 
and merchant, died at the age of threescore 
and ten years. Mrs. Pitcher is one of a fam- 
ily of four children, all of whom are living, 
the other three being: Theodore; Elizabeth, 
wife of Abraham S. Ikekman ; and Louisa, 
wife of H. W D. \'an Liew. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pitcher ha\'e had two children, namely: Le 
Roy, who lived but nine months; and Anna 
Lee. Mrs. Pitcher, a woman of culture, is a 
thorough musician, being a talented singer and 
a fine pianist. While at Ringoes she was 
leader of the church choir, the organist in the 
Sunda3'-school, and one of its corps of teachers. 
She is a very active member of the church and 
of its various societies, belonging to the Chris- 
tian Endeavor, the Ladies' Missionary Society, 
the Ladies' Aid Society, and the Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union. She is presi- 



mOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



dent of tlic Woman's Classical Uniun of Scho- 
harie County. 

The Dutch Kcf..rnu(l Chunh ..f Middlc- 
hing is, with possibly an exception in Al- 
bany anil Schenectady, the oldest society and 
worshipping in the oldest building in this part 
of the State. This house of worship was 
built in 17S6. and has since been kei)t in ex- 
cellent repair. The funds for its erection were 
collected by committees sent throu<;h the colo- 
nies for the purjiose, tiie strur;i;ling little so- 
ciety here, organized about 1730, being too 
poor to give much toward it. The meetings 
were probably held in privite houses or barns 
until a small frame building was put u\t for its 
accommodation in 1732. That building, ac- 
cording to Roscoe, was dedicated in 1737. It 
was burned with the village on October 17, 
1780, and six years later replaced Ijy the pres- 
ent edifice, in which the first sermmi was 
preached November iS, 1787, the Rev. George 
W. Schneider being the minister. l-'roni tlie 
time of the first regularly f)rdained minister of 
the church, llendrick 1 lager, who was settled 
in 1713, the fcdlowing have held pastorates: 
h"red I lager, 17JO; John Jacob IChle, 1 730: 
Reinhardt luiekson, 1732; Michael \Vei.s.s, 
^7i^'' Johannes Schuyler, 1736-55; John 
Mauritius Goetschius, 1757-60; Abram Rose- 
krantz, 1760-65; Johannes Schuyler, 1766-79; 
Rynicr Van Nest, 17.S0-85; George W. 
Schneider, 1785-88; J. C. Roeffel, 17.SS-97; 
Ryiiier \'an Nest, 1797-1804; I)a\id De\oe, 
1812-15; John T. Schermeriiorn, 1816-27; 
John Garretson, 1827-33; J. 15. Steele, 1834- 
38; Joshua Hoyd, 1840-42; L. iMessereau, 



1842-45; Jacob West, 1846-52; I. M. See, 
1852-54; !•:. Vedder, 1855-63; W. IC. 
Hogardus; J. S. Scott, D. D.. 1865-70; 
S. W. Roe, 1). D., 1871-76; J. I). Gardner, 
1876-So; I-:. N. Sebring, 1880-85; D. K. 
\'an Doren, 1885-go; and the Rev. Charles 
W. Pitcher, 1S91. 



§()I1.\ .\. l-i;kGUSOX, one of the be.st- 
known farmers in Duanesburg, N.\'., 
was born in Princetown, in the same 
county, Schenectady, January 24, 1S22, son of 
Duncan and Hannah Ferguson. The jiareiits 
were nati\es of Princetown, and the paternal 
grandparents, John and Janet I-'erguson, were 
natives of Scotland. John Ferguson emi- 
grated prior to tlie Revolution, and lie serx'ed 
as a soldier in that struggle. He was an 
early settler in Princetown, where be tilled the 
soil industriously for the rest of his active 
period, being one of the progressive farmers 
of his day. He ami his wife lived to a good 
old age. 

Duncan P'erguson, the father, was a lifelong 
resider,t (jf Princetown, and for many years he 
carried on general farming with pros]ierous 
results. In |)olitics he was at one time a 
Whig, and later a Republican. His family 
consisted of eight children, two of whom are 
living, namely: John A., the subject of this 
sketch; ami Duncan Ferguson, who resides at 
the lioiiK'stead in Princetown. The others 
were: Thomas, Robert, Daniel, Jeanelte, Ann, 
and Mary. The father lived to be eighty-two 
vears old, and the mother died at about 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



scvcnt_\'ciglit years ulcl. They wore nienihei-s 
of tlie rrcsbyterian church. 

John A. l'"cri;iis()ii was ctUicatcd in the liis- 
tiict schools of Princetown. In 1S43, when 
twenty-one years old, he boii_;:;ht his first real 
estate, consisting of a farm of one hundred 
and fifty-five acres in Duanesburg, where he 
has since resided, and he is now the owner of 
other valuable lands. For a few years he was 
engaged in mercantile business at Esperance, 
Schoharie County; but general farming has 
been his chief occupation, and aside from 
growing the usual field and garden [products of 
this locality, he raises cattle and sheep. 

In 1S44 Mr. Ferguson was joined in mar- 
riage with Elizabeth Humphrey, who was born 
in Charlestown, Montgomery County, in 1S23, 
daughter of William Humphrey. Two daugh- 
ters, Almira and Delia A., were born of this 
union, which lasted a little more than fifty 
years. Mrs. Ferguson died February i, 1895. 

^Ir. Ferguson's farm contains substantial 
buildings. He is still cultivating it, and 
under his careful treatment it is made to yield 
large crops. His easy circumstances are the 
result of patient industry, and he possesses 
other excellent qualities which command the 
respect of all who know him. Politically, he 
acts with the Republican party. In his relig- 
ious belief he is a Presbyterian. 



^AVID EXDERS, a prominent and 
well-to-do resident of Esperance 
township, N.Y. , was born at Scho- 
harie Junction, September 10, 1S33, son of 



Jacob P. and ICva (Kniskcrn) Hndcr.s. He is 
of the fifth generation in descent from Har- 
drum lenders, who emigrated from Holland, 
and, settling as a i)ioneer in this county, became 
a large land-owner. A deed for twelve hundred 
and seventy acres, now in the jiosscssion of Mr. 
David linders, was originally conveyed from 
King (}eorge in 1729 to Augustus \'an Cort- 
land, who in turn transferred it to a person by 
the name of Holland. The latter transferred 
it to Mr. Dow, from whom it went to Hardrum 
Enders and his descendants. John lenders, 
son of Bardrum, reared a family of four chil- 
dren, one being a son Peter, who served as a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War. Peter En- 
ders became the owner of all but one-seventh 
of his grandfather Eardrum's property, and was 
an extensive farmer. He had a family of two 
sons and six daughters, and among the latter 
were: ^laria, who married John Enders; 
Christina, who married Josejih I. Borst ; 
Xancy, who married Philip Deitz; and an- 
other, who married Harmon Beecher. The 
sons were: Peter I., and Jacob P., the father 
of David. 

Jacob P. Enders followed general farming 
throughout the active period of his life, and 
like his predeces.sors was noted for his energy 
and abilit}-. He was a member of the Dutch 
Reformed church, was kind-hearted and char- 
itable, and his high character gave him consid- 
erable influence with his fellow-townsmen. In 
politics he was a Democrat. He was the 
father of nine children; namely, Peter, John, 
David, the subject of this sketch, Maria, 
Elizabeth, Christina, Eva, Katharine, and Ma- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tilila. Of the daughters four married. Peter 
resides in Ksperance ; Jnhn, who liveil on tlie 
old homesteatl, was accidentally killed by a 
runaway horse. 

David luulers received his education in the 
district schools, at the RicliniondviUe Acad- 
emy, wliich was destroyed by lire some nine 
weeks after its opening, and at the Sciioharie 
Academy, where his studies were completed 
under Trofessor Hri^^^^s. lie resided at home 
until after his marriaye, when he purcliascd a 
piece of prn])erty known as Slini^erland farm, 
upon which he remained nine \ears, and then 
removed U> the farm where he now resitles. 
Ilis homestead is considered one of the hand- 
somest in Sloansville. He takes a keen inter- 
est in the advancement of the town, and as one 
of its wealthiest and most public-spirited resi- 
dents his ait) and influence are visible in all 
measures instigated therefor. He sei'ved as 
Railroad Commissioner for fifteen consecutive 
years, or until the b(jard was abolished. He 
was elected to the Assembly in iSyi'), on the 
Democratic ticket, and serxetl with abilit\ 
upon the Committees on Intel ior .AffLiirs, \'il- 
lafjes, and Agricultuie. His interest in jiub- 
lic affairs has in various WL13S proved beneficial 
to the community, and his well-known ])ersis- 
tenc\' is a sufficient guarantee that whate\er he 
undertakes will be successfully accomplished. 
This was recently demonstrated by the comijle- 
tion of a fine new bridge over the Schoharie 
River at Sloansville, an im|irovement which 
was strenuously op|)osetl by inanw but through 
his instrumentality was finally built. 

Mr. Kndcrs married for his first wife Mary 



E. Larkin, daughter of Daniel Larkin. Two 
children were the fruit of this marriage, 
namely: Jacob, who died at the age of four 
years; and Nancy. l-'or his second wife he 
married lunula Williams, daughter of Olaff 
11. Williams. 

Mr. lenders is a Master Mason, and belongs 
to Schoharie Lodge, No. 492. In his relig- 
ious belief he favors the Haptists. but contrib- 
utes toward the support of other churches. 
Mrs. luiders is a Lutheran. 



LM1:R 1:. KR1;I(;1-:R, proprietor of a 
well-known restaurant in Prattsville, 
ami a citizen i)r(iminently identified with the 
public affairs of this town, was born in Ash- 
laiiJ, N.V., March 7, 1861, son of luhvard and 
Mahaln (Benjamin) Kreiger. 

His father, who is a nati\'e of German)-, was 
engaged in a rex'ohitionary movement there 
which resulted in his being obliged in 1S47 to 
seek refuge in the L'nited Slates. Locating 
in Prattsville, he was in the em[doy of Smith 
& Ofler for five years, at the enil of which time 
he mo\ed to Ashland, where for the succeeding 
nine\earshe was engaged in farming. Ne.\t 
corning to Hunteislield, he continued to cany 
on general farming until iSSS, when he re- 
tired from active labor. He is now seventy- 
five \ears old, and is residing in the \illage of 
Prattsville. Ilis first wife, Mahala, who was 
a daughter of Joseph Heujamin, of Prattsville, 
became the mother of four children, all of 
whom grew to matuiitN'. ()iie son was acci- 
dentally ki 1 led while gunning in 1.S93, atthc 



RIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•83 



nge of tliiil_\-four years. The li\'iiii;- aie : 
I'Vank, who is resitliny 011 the farm in Ilun- 
tersliehl; Kate, who married ^[erritt Allierti; 
aiui I'llmer ]•., the speeial siihjeet of this 
sketeh. Mrs. Mahala Kreiger died in 186.:;, 
aged thirty-si.\ x'ear.s. lulward Kreiger mar- 
ried for his second wife IMary Ham, by wiiom 
he has one child, a son, wlio is residing in this 
town. 

Elmer E. Kreiger was educated in the inib- 
lic schools. He remained at home until 
twenty-two years old, when he became an as- 
sistant on the Stanle}" Hall farm, and at the 
end of one year was given the entire charge of 
that ]iroperty, which contains five hundred 
acres. During his fourteen years as manager 
of this establishment he met with good 
financial results. After leaving Stanley Hall 
he bought a farm of two hundred acres in the 
town of Gilboa, which he sold to good advan- 
tage a year later, and, coming to Prattsville in 
1894, he engaged in the restaurant business. 
He was also quite an extensive speculator in 
cattle prior to relinquishing agricultural pur- 
suits, and in that business he became widely 
known throughout this section of the State. 
As a prominent Democrat he takes a lively in- 
terest in political affairs, and is very popular 
with his fellow-townsmen. He was elected to 
the Board of Supervisors for the years 1893, 
1894, 1895, 1896, and 1S97 by a large major- 
ity, and during those years he frequently acted 
as temporary chairman of that body. 

]\Ir. Kreiger is unmarried. He was made a 
Mason at the age of twenty-two, and is now 
Junior Warden and a trustee of the Blue 



Lodge in this town. lie i. a director, and 
snperinteiideul of grounds, of the Trattsville 
Agricultural and llorticullural As.sociation, 
and is alwa_\s read}' to assist in forwarding 
public improvements. While not a rhurch 
member, he contributes toward the support of 
the various denominations, and is in close 
sympathy with the different moral and relig- 
ious societies of the villaue. 



OLONEL ALONZO FERGUSON, 
r of Cobleskill, N.Y. , secretary of the 
Schoharie and Otsego Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, and a veteran of the Ci\-il 
War, was born in the town of Nassau, Rensse- 
laer County, this State, on March ig, 1820, 
son of German and Elizabeth (SI iter) I'"ergu- 
son. His parents were both natives of Nas- 
sau. One of his great-grandfathers, a German 
of the name of Sornberger, was a pioneer set- 
tler of Dutchess Count}-. His paternal grand- 
father was Jeremiah I-"erguson, and his mater- 
nal grandfather, John Si iter, both of Nassau, 
and the latter a Revolutionary soldier and 
pensioner. 

In 1S26, about three years after the death 
of his wife Elizabeth, which occurred when 
their son Alonzo was only three and a half 
years old, he came to Cobleskill. Here he 
spent the rest of his life, and died at the age 
of seventy-si.\. In religion he was a Meth- 
odist. 

Ccdonel Ferguson was only six years old 
when his father came to Cobleskill. Here, up 
to his fifteenth 3ear, he received what little 



.84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



education the common schools of that clay 
afforded in winter, and in summer he was em- 
ployed on farm work. At the age of seventeen 
he was ajjprenticed to learn wa^on-making, and 
for the succeeding nine years he worked at tlKit 
trade. At twenty-si.\ he entered a villrige 
store at Carlisle as clerk, and there remained 
fur a year. In the spring of 1S47 he became 
a partner .if the late Charles Coiiitcr at Cnl)K- 
skill, ciintinuing the conneclinii until 1S51, 
when he engaged in tiie hardware Inislness at 
Cohleskill on his own account. This he car- 
ried on for torn- _\ears, and at the ind of that 
time .sold out to the late Charles 11. .Shaver. 
In 1S50 and 1.S51 he was Clerk of the town of 
Cohleskill. In 1855 he remove.] to the city 
of iUiffalo, and in 1.S62 entered the government 
service in the commissary department of the 
arm)-. 

He was ordered to duty in Kentucky, and 
followed the army to rittsl)urg Landing. 
Having contracted a fever, he was obliged to 
return nmtb about tlie fust of June, but shortly 
after was commissioned .Adjutant by (iovernoi- 
Morgan to organize the (|uota of the Twentieth 
Senatorial District of New N'ork under the call 
of President Lincoln for three huiHJied thou- 
.sand volunteers, and he immediately repoited 
to (-(dnnel Richard h'ranchot at Mohawk, 
Herkimer Count}', where camp was estab- 
lished. This was early in July, i.sr,:;, and 
on the twenty third (.f the fcdlowing month the 
One Hundred and Twenty-hrst Regiment 
went til the front with one thuusand and ten 
men. A second regiment being needed to 
comidete the quota, at the earnest request of 



the war connnittee, he was again assigned by 
the governoi to the task, and on October 15, 
1862, the One Hundred and Fifty-second Reg- 
iment was mustered into service, thus complet- 
ing the enlistment of more than two thousand 
men within the space of three months. (iov- 
erniir Morgan commissioned him Lieutenant 
Ctdonel of the One Hundred and Fifty-second 
Re,;inient, and on Oclnber 2 1 he left with his 
commaiul for the fmnt. In January of the fol- 
lowing \ear he was i)romoted to the rank of 
Colonel. He was with liis regiment at the 
siege of .Suffolk, Va. , under General I'eck, in 
April and May, 1.S63, and from there was or- 
dered to the Peninsula, thence to Washington, 
and thence, in July, on to New Ynrk to sup- 
press the draft ridts. His was the first volun- 
teer regiment to arrive in that citv. Order 
being restoied, be was directed by General 
Caid))-, who was in commajid at New "\'ork, to 
pi-oceed to Schenectady and be present there 
during the enforcement of the draft. He was 
then ordered back to New York, where his 
command remained on detached dut\- until Oc- 
tober, when be was ordered to join the second 
corps of the Army of the I'.itnmac. About the 
first of December the C.lnnel was obliged to 
resign on accmmt of inip.iired health, not being 
willing to remain in tlie service unk-ss be 
could perfoini active duty. 

Retm'ning Noitb he engaged in business in 
the city of New York, and subseqently in the 
State of Florida. In 1876 he .served as a 
mendjcr of the State Senate of h'lorida. being 
sent from the first district <if that State. Ik- 
was at the cajiital when the arguments on the 



BIOGRAPHICAL KEVIEW 



Tildon and Hayes rcturny wcil^ made, knew the 
otTu-ials who canvassed Ihe returns, ami learned 
from the lips of tlie seeretar_\- of Stale all that 
related to the question. Returning in 1.S79 to 
his olil lumie, he here engaged in the hardware 
business, but later sold out ami started an in- 
surance business. In this line lie has been 
very successfid, having been agent for most of 
the standard companies. In October, 1S95, 
he organized the fire insurance company of 
which he is now secretary. During his recent 
residence here he has been chairman of the 
Republican county conmiittee for four years, 
and for two 3'ears he was a member of the state 
committee. 

Colonel Ferguson was married in March, 
1S47, to ]\Iary Courter, of this town. She was 
born in Schoharie, and died in 1859, at the 
age of thirty-two, leaving two children: 
Charles, who is now a travelling agent in the 
\\'est ; and Sarah, who died at the age of 
thirty-three. The latter was the wife of 
Frank M. Goodrich, and the mother of two 
children, one of whom is living. The Colonel 
was married in April, 1S65, to Libbie M. 
Pegg, a native of Springfield, Otsego County, 
and daughter of George A. Pegg, a well-known 
hotel-keeper of that town. By this marriage 
there is one son, Howard P., who is now in 
business with his father. He was for si.\ 
years in New Vork as a hotel clerk. 

The Colonel is a member of Cobleskill 
Lodge, Xo. 394, F. & A. M., having joined 
in 1865. He takes an active interest in town 
affairs. Colonel and Mrs. Ferguson are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church, of which he has 



ui !•; 



.f years, being 



APTAIN ANDRI-W J. \'.\X1)1';r 
POLL, dealer in ire, a highly re- 
elected litizen of New Paltimore, 
N.Y. , was born in this town on May 7, 1838, 
his parents being Andrew and Jane (Van 
Slyke) Vanderpoel. His grandfather, also 
named Andrew, was a nati\e of Colinnbia 
County. He spent his life there engaged in 
farming, and died there at the age of fifty- 
eight. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Elizabeth Smith, was born in Connecticut. 
None of their seven children are li\'ing. Her 
death occurred at the age of seventy-eight. 
She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and had a brother who was an Pokier in 
that church. 

Andrew \'anderpoel, the second, father of 
the subject of this sketch, came to New Balti- 
more when a young man, purchased a farm 
here, and subsequent!)- engaged in farming 
until about the age of sixty years when he 
retired and moved to New Baltimore vil- 
lage, and at the age of sevent\-nine he died. 
He was a Deacon in the Dutch Reformed 
church and for man)- years an Elder. In pol- 
itics he w-as first a Whig and later a Republi- 
can. He was a man of sound judgment, and 
his advice and counsel were sought by many. 
His wife, Jane, was born in this place; and 
was a daughter of Tunis \'an Slyke, a farmer 
and large land-owner. She w-as one of a fam- 
ily of eight children. Of the six born to her. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



four are living, namely: Tunis, who resides in 
New Baltimore ; Andrew J. ; I'ctcr, who is 
in Massachusetts ; and Mrs. Alida Mead of 
this town. Tlie mother died at the age of 
ninety years. 

Captain Vandcr|)()el in his boyhood attended 
the district school, and at the age of twenty 
studied for a time in Ciaverick Institute. He 
began his working life on his father's farm, 
and subsequently went into business, forming 
a partnership with a Mr. Smith under tlic linn 
name of Smith & Vanderpoel, and f(ir six \ ears 
carrying on a general merchandise stnre. At 
the end of that time he disposed of his inter- 
est in the business to .Mr. Holmes. .A little 
later he started a coal yard in New liiltimore, 
also entered the ice business, also ran boats to 
New York. He then bought back bis interest 
in the store from Mr. Ibdmes, retaining it until 
iSSo, when be .sold it to Mr. Xebson. Dinin-- 
the next six years be was captain of the " City 
of Hudson," the day boat which ran from 
Calskill to Albany. While occupying this j 
position he removed bis family to Catskill, 
where he continued to reside until iSS;, when 
be returned to this town. .After be left off 
riuming the "Cit\- of Hudson," be was eii- 
;;aj;ed in the transportation of frei-lit to .\ew 
■S'ork, l)ut in 1897 bis dock buildings burned, 
and he discontinued the freiybt trade. Since 
then he has carried on an ice business, bousing 
twenty-si.x thousand tons of ice a year and dis- 
bursing it in large quantities in New York at 
wholesale. In 1.S90 the Captain bought his 
present beautiful estate, which is a fine farm 
devoted principally to fruit orchards. It is 



known as the Dr. Cornell homestead, and over- 
looks the gliding Hudson. 

Captain Vanderpoel has been twice married, 
the first time, in 1869, to Klizabeth Randall, 
and the second time in 1882 to Ella Jennings. 
The first IMrs. X'anderpoel was a Nova Scotian 
by birth. She died at the age of thirty-nine, 
having been the mother of five children, namely : 
\\'est(ui K. and I'rank, who are in California; 
Martha and Margaret who are in New Jersey, 
and Andrew, also in California. The .sec.n.l 
Mrs. Van.lerpoel was b..rn near Durham. Her 
father, Daniel D. Jennings, was a well-known 
hotel-keeper in bis native town of Cairo. He 
died when his daughter Ella was a young girl. 
His second wife, Eleanor Souser, a descendant 
(jf the noted .Salisbur_\' family which came from 
England, was born in Jefferson in the town of 
Catskill. She bore him four children, of 
whom there are living: I'eter, of New York; 
Irving, a Catskill lawyer and bank jiresident ; 
and I\Irs. X'anderpoel. Caiitain and Mrs. 
\'anderpoel have one child, Peter Jennings, 
now eleven years of age. They lost two little 
sons — John Iienb:nn, at two years of age; and 
Worthington, who died an infant. 

The Cai)tain is a Republican; Init be refuses 
to accept nomination for pulilic office, though 
frequently :isl<cd to dcj so. He is a Mason, 
being fornieily associated with Ark Lodge of 
Co.xsackie and at present a member of Social 
Ericndship Lodge of New ]?altim(nc. Of the 
latter be is a clKU'ter mendjcr, one of three, 
and since its organi/.at ion has lieen treasurer of 
the lodge. Mrs. X'anderpoel is a member (.f 
the Dutch Reb.rmed Church of Cat.sk ill. 



BIOCRAl'llICAL 



w. 



ILLIAM IIENRV DECKER, Su- 
pervisor of the town of Gilboa, 
Sclioliaric County, X.\'. , ;uul li_\- occuixUion a 
dairviiian and fruit-i;ro\vcr, was born in Gilboa 
on Xoxcmbcr 12, 1 S46. Mis parents were 
Jacob and i?etsy Ann (Sbew) Decker, and his 
paternal grandfather was Tunis Decker, whose 
iniini^rant progenitor was one of a colon}- of 
Dutch emigrants who settletl in Deckertown, 
N.J., and Columbia County, New York. 

Tunis Decker was born in 1765 in Columbia 
County, and lived there for some time. He 
came eventually to Gilboa, and purchased a 
tract of three hundred acres, part of which es- 
tate is where his grandson William now re- 
sides. Although ostensibly a farmer, he was 
a man of varied talents, and could turn his 
hand to almost any kind of work. He came 
here in 1833, and died some twenty }ears 
later, in his eighty-ninth year. His remains 
were the first to be carried into the Shew Hol- 
low [Methodist church for funeral services. 
No other place seemed so fitting as the church 
for which he had worked and sacrificed, and to 
whose interests he was so thoroughly devoted. 
His wife, whom he had married shortly after 
the Revolution, survived him some years, dy- 
ing at the age of eighty-eight. Of their fam- 
ily of twelve children three died in infancy. 
The nine that continued life's journey were : 
Cornelia, Jacob and Sophia (twins,) Polly, 
Catherine, Susan, Eliza, Cornelius, and 
George. Eliza Decker died on Long Island of 
yellow fever. Tall stature was a family char- 
acteristic. The three sons became farmers, 
and each upon settling in life for himself was 



given a hundred acres of land from the paternal 

estate. Cornelius died in New I.cmdon, Wi.s. 
He hail three sdiis, only ime ni whom is living. 
This one and William Henry Decker are the 
only livin- male descendants (if Tunis Decker 
bearing his name. (jeoige had two sons, but 
both are deceased. 

Jacob Decker, who was born June 30, i.Si i, 
at Conesville, Schoharie County, N. Y. , and 
died in Gilboa, N.Y., on Christmas Day, 
1S79, was a carpenter, and followed his trade 
for twenty-twti years, being considered one of 
the most skilled workmen in these parts. He 
lived with his parents until his marriage, and 
then settled on the lot his father gave him, 
living first in the log house on the premises 
which became the birthplace of the subject of 
this sketch and most of his brothers and sis- 
ters. Later Jacob Decker built a large house. 
He was a Republican from the formation of 
the party, and a leader in all local affairs. 
He was deeply interested in the progress of the 
church, and was one of those who helped build 
the Methodist church edifice at Shew Hollow. 
He was class leader for fourteen years. In- 
deed, this family has been and still is noted 
for its liberal support of all religious organ- 
izations both in a moral and a financial way. 
Jacob Decker's wife, Betsy Ann, was a grand- 
daughter, on her mother's side, of Captain 
Hagar, who won renown during the days of the 
Revolution by his valiant service in behalf of 
the colonists. His brother Joseph was shot 
during the war, and his father was carried a 
prisoner to Canada, and detained there until 
the end of the struggle. One of three pewter 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



plates, the history of which is connected with 
the Revolution, is still preserved in Mr. 
Decker's family. They were thrown into a well 
by the wife of Captain Haj^ar just before the 
house was burned by Grant's Indians and Tor- 
ies, and they were taken from the well at the 
close of the war. Mrs. Betsy Ann Decker 
died at ei^^hty years of ai^e, on March 12, 
1894. She was the mother of the following- 
named children: Marietta; S. Amelia; Martha 
A.; Francclia; Rozella; Alniira, who died at 
the age of six years; Helen, who died young ; 
William II.; and two ehler sons, who died 
young. Marietta married David .Simonson, 
and resides in Ilobart, N. V. Amelia married 
Dr. R. Hubbcll, of Jefferson, N.\'., and died 
in 1889. Francelia is the wife of William R. 
Ladd, of Bangor, Me. Rozella is the sec(jnd 
wife of Dr. R. llubbell, of Jefferson, N. Y. 

William Henry Decker is a man of fine phy- 
sique, and in iiis jnime was known as the 
strongest and nKjst actix'e man in this .section. 
He has been known to lift twelve hundred 
pounds dead weight. He earl\- engaged in 
blacksmithing, for which he seemed so well 
adapted by nature, and in wood working and 
repairing. His motto was, "Do it right and 
you won't have to do it o\er again"; and, as 
this sentiment found constant expression in all 
work that he did, he had no difficulty in secur- 
ing the best trade in his line in this vicinity. 
But after twenty years of mechanical labor he 
was attacked by rheumatism, and it became 
necessary for iiim to make a change in this 
business. Ik therefore confined himself to 
farming on bis two hundred ami ihirtyeigiu 



acres, devoting his attention chiefly to dairying 
and fruit-growing. His dairy of si.\ty milch 
cows is one of the largest in town, and is com- 
posed of e.xcellcnt stock. He has about s\x 
hundred apple-trees. He is one of the five 
directors in the creamery company at South 
Gilboa, and ]irevii)us to its incdr])orat ion was 
one of the committee that built the creamery 
and carried on the business. This creamery, 
which is one of the most e.xjK-nsixe in this 
vicinity, cost, with buildings ami et|uij)ment, 
seven thousand thdlais. 

rolitically, Mr. Decker is a strong Repub- 
lican. He has attended many conventions, 
and e\-ery year since he became a \(.iter has 
taken an active part in election and ncjinina- 
tion of officials. With the exception of one 
year, when he was sick, he has always been 
l)resent at town elections. He has held the 
offices of Collector, Road Commissioner, I'oor- 
master. Assessor, Constable, and, intleetl, 
e\ery office in the town exce|)t those of Town 
Clerk and Justice of the Peace. If he lives 
till the end of his present term he will have 
been Super\isor of his town five }ears. ICvery 
nomination has come to him unsolicited. 
While he was serving as Road Conmiissioner 
thirty britlges were re])aired in one season, but 
expenses were ke[it at a minimum. In I .S96 
he was elected .Sujiervisor for two years; in 
1898 he was re-elected, for one year, as the 
unanimous choice of both parlies; and in the 
early i<art of the present year, 1899, he was re- 
elected for two years. His o|)pnnent at his 
first election was Stephen W'ildsey. who had 
been on the board twice before. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Decker has been twice mnrried, his 
wives being sisters, daughters nf Hiram 
linnvn, of Dutch descent. Mr. IJrown is liv- 
ing, but his wife died in April, 1S96. They 
were the jsarents of two sons and three daugh- 
ters, namely: Eliza; Reuben; Jacob, who re- 
sides in Gilboa; Addie; and Angle. Addle 
Brown, to whom Mr. Decker was married first, 
died in her thirty-fourth year, on November 
21, iSSg. She was the mother of five chil- 
dren, and is survi\'ed by three; namely, Lizzie 
E., Zanah, and Arthur B. Willie J. died at 
two years of age, on November 2, 1880; and 
Inza died at four years of age, on October 22, 
1884. Mr. Decker's present wife was before 
marriage Angle Brown. Mr. Decker is a 
member of the Shew Hollow Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. He has always been a temper- 
ate man in every way, using neither tobacco 
nor into.xicants of an}' kind. His genial tem- 
per and hearty good humor make him a gen- 
eral favorite, and his jovial laugh is a pleasant 
sound to hear. 



"'CS)/lLLIAM D. SHAKER, M.D., a 
Y^V^ rising young physician of Oak Hill, 
town of Durham, N. Y. , was born in Coble- 
skill, Schoharie County, March 16, 1870, son 
of Daniel G. and Mary J. (Van Volkenberg) 
Shafer. His paternal grandfather, Daniel 
Shafer, was a lifelong resident of Cobleskill, 
where he cultivated a farm during his active 
period, and died at the age of eighty years. 

Daniel G. Shafer, Dr. Shafer' s father, ac- 
quired a good education in the common schools 



my y. 



lit 



and at Charlotte Academy. I'n 
he was associated with his brdthei 
finally [lurchased a piece of agricultural ]irop- 
erty of one hundred and thirt)- acres, situated 
near Mineral Springs, upon which he sjient his 
last years, and wdiere his widow, Mrs. Mary J. 
Shafer, still resides. In politics he was a 
Democrat. Mrs. .Shafer's father, Hiram \'an 
Volkenberg, was a farmer of Schoharie Count)-. 
She is the mother of two children: William 
D., the subject of this sketch; and Mary, wife 
of Jesse Shafer of Mineral Springs. 

After attending the common schools and the 
high school of Cobleskill, William D. Shafer 
began the study of medicine with Dr. Allen of 
that town, and latei attended the New York 
Eclectic College, from which he was graduated 
in 1892. He began the practice of his profes- 
sion in New York City, and went from there 
to Livingstonville. Since July, 1896, he has 
been the only physician at Oak Hill, and his 
practice, which has already assumed large 
proportions, extends into Schoharie and Al- 
bany Counties, necessitating long tedious rides 
in all kinds of weather. 

In 1892 Dr. Shafer was united in marriage 
with Jessie Dillenbeck, daughter of Jonas Dil- 
lenbeck, a druggist of Cobleskill. They have 
one son, Rudolph. 

Politically, Dr. Shafer acts with the Demo- 
cratic party. He served as Coroner in Scho- 
harie County, resigning that office when he re- 
moved from Livingstonville. He is treasurer 
of the Lyman Tremaine Lodge, No. 265, 
I. O. C^. F., Oak Hill, and a member of the 
Middleburg Encampment. He is medical e.\- 



15IOORAPHRAL REVIEW 



amincr for the New \'uik Life and I'luilciitial 
Insurance Companies; also fur the Masonic 
Life Association of Western New ^'ork, ant! 
formerly belonged to the New York Eclectic 
Society. He attends the LpiscoiJal church, of 
which Mrs. Shafer is a member. 



i;\'. iircii ()Ni:ii., |iast.,r «i .si. 

Mary's Chiuxh, Hunter, N.V., and (if 
.St. I'rancis de Sales C.'inuch, I'later- 
kill, was bdin iu Dun^arvan, Count)- Water- 
ford, Ireland, May l8, 1S38, son of Patrick 
and Kllen (McSweency) O'Neil. 

The first of the family to settle in Waterford 
was his great-grandfather, Hugh (VXeil, who 
went there from Shaw's Castle, County Ty- 
rone, lulward O'Neil, his grandfather, was 
born in Kilkenny, and was a farmer. Patrick 
O'Neil, his father, who was born in Water- 
ford and was a farmer in early life, later 
engaged in the bakery business in IJungar- 
van. lie was also a s]jirits merchant, antl 
before the advent of railroads he ran a line 
of carriages known as post coaches. lie was 
a great admirer of Daniel O'Connell, and 
while taking an active part in electing a mem- 
ber of ])arliamenl he contracted an illness 
whicii causeil his death at the age (jf tift}-two 
years. 

Patrick O'Neil was a highly resjiected citi- 
zen and an able supjiorler of the church. His 
wife, l'".llen, was born in Tijiperary in 1796, 
ilaughter of Thomas McSweency. Dining the 
Rebellion of 179.S her parents took refuge in 
a town in the county of Walerfonl. She was 



the mother of eight children, of whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch and his sister Margaret are 
the only survivors. Margaret, now Mrs. 
O'Callahan, resides with her brother in Hun- 
ter .She has a daughter who is the Assistant 
Reverend Mother in the convent at West Troy. 
One of Father O' Neil's brothers, Edward, was 
educated in St. John's College, Waterford, 
from which he was gratluated in 1S52. Ik- 
was ordained to the priesthood, and .sent to 
Manchester, luigland, where lie became a 
Canon, and served in th.it cajiacity until his 
death, which occurred in iSyj, at the age of 
si.\l)'-sevcn. 

Hugh O'Neil began his education in a 
classical school, pre])ared for college imder 
private tutors, and in 1858 went to .Vllhallows 
College, where lie was graduatctl in 1 .S60. 
His theological studies were pursued at Water- 
ford and at .St. Mary's College, Oscott, luig- 
land, where he w.is a fellow-student with the 
late King Alplionso of Spain antl with tlie 
father of the late General Garcia, the Cuban 
leader. He was orilained a priest of the 
Roman Catholic Church, Februaiy 9, 1867, 
and his first appointment was to .St. liarnabas 
Cathedral, Nottingham, P.'ngland, where he re- 
mained nine months. His next charge was at 
the village of Ilkeston, now a city, where his 
duties reipiired him to co\'er a circuit of lortv- 
five miles; and during his labors there, which 
e.xlentled through a period tif ele\en _\ears, he 
erected a church and a school building and de- 
veloped the parish into a highly ])rospcrous 
condition. The loutine work which he acconi- 
plishetl imaided is now performed by eight 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



'93 



priests. At his own request he wns trans- 
ferred to the village of Ilathersage, Peak of 
Derbyshire, famous as the home of Robin Hood, 
and with the assistance of the Duke of Norfolk 
he repaired and opened an ancient church built 
previous to the Reformation. 

At the expiration of four and one-half years 
he came to the United States on a leave of ab- 
sence, arriving in New York in 1SS2, and, 
subsequently deciding to remain this countr)', 
he severed his connection with his Engli.sh 
parish and accepted an assignment to a mission 
church in Philadelphia. At the request of the 
bishop of Indianapolis he went to St. Patrick's 
Church in that city. After that he was again 
stationed in Philadelphia for a short time, and 
then became attached to the diocese of Albany, 
and was assigned to St. ]\Iar)"'s Church in 
Troy. In 18S7 became to Hunter as pastor 
of St. Mary's Church. 

The arduous duties of a widely distributed 
district, which included villages and settle- 
ments within a radius of fifty miles, were zeal- 
ously and energetically performed by him for 
five years, or until his circuit was di\'ided, 
since which time the concentration of his 
labors has enabled him to accomplish results 
far more visible in their effects. Beside effect- 
ing the enlargement and improvement of St. 
Mary's Church, he erected St. P'rancis de 
Sales Church in Platerkill in 1891. At both 
of these churches he officiates the year round, 
celebrating two masses each Sunday during the 
summer season, besides holding week-day ser- 
vices whenever occasion demands. He for- 
merly conducted service regularly at the hotel 



Kaaterskill during the season, l)ut these he 
was obliged to relintpiish on account of his in- 
creasing labors elsewhere. lie has earnestly 
endeavored to promote the spiritual welfare of 
his widely-scattered Hock, and the zeal he dis- 
plays in conducting the affairs of his pastorate 
has gained for him the good will of the entire 
community. He organized the Sacred Heart 
and Rosary societies, and he takes a lively in- 
terest in the work of the town improvement so- 
ciety, of which he is a member. At the ear- 
nest request of the people of Lexington he 
aided in securing the erection of a church in 
that village; and he has also repaired St. 
Henry's Church, located between Ashland and 
Prattsville. 

Father O'Neil began to interest himself 
in political affairs shortly after his arrival in 
this country, and in 18S4 he headed a commit- 
tee who, at the P^ifth Avenue Hotel, New- 
York City, presented the late Hon. James G. 
Blaine with a gold-headed cane. He is a nat- 
uralized citizen of the United States, and sup- 
ports the Democratic party. 



§OHN G. EMPIE, who has been actively 
identified with the agricultural interests 
of the town of Seward, Schoharie 
County, for more than thirty years, is the 
owner of a well-improved farm lying about one 
mile from the village of H}-ndsville. He was 
born in Sharon, N.Y. , January 5, 1S36, a son 
of Peter Empie, Jr. He is of French and 
German anccstr\-, and the descendant of one of 
the earliest settlers of Schoharie Countv — his 



•94 



BIOGRAPHICAL RE\'^1EW 



great-graiulfathcr, John Juiipic, liavin;,' re- 
moved in early manhood from Stone Arabia, | 
Montgomery County, to tlic town of Sharon. | 
A hard-working pioneer, John l-;ni|)ie cleared i 
a farm from the wilderness, and tliere passed ' 
the remainder of his life. | 

Peter Kmpic, Sr., grandfather of John C. 
.sjjent his seventy-seven years of life on the oUl 
homestead in Sharon, Schoharie Comity, work- 
ing as a farmer through boyhood, early man- , 
hood, and old age. He cle.ired off wood, ciil- | 
tivatcd the soil, and in coiusc ol time erected 
sub.stantial frame buildings in place of the 
original log house and barn. His wife, Katie : 
Lehman, was born in Sharon. Slie was a 
daughter of Jolm Lehman, whose father was 
one of the original settlers of tliat place. Of 
their eight children, none survive. 

Peter Liii]iic, Jr., son of Peter, Sr. , was 
born and i)niught up on the old farm in 
Sharon, and received his education in the jmo- 
neer schools of his day and generation. P'ol- 
lowing in the footsteps of his ancestors, he 
chose farming as his life occupation, and on 
reaching manhood purchased land near the 
parental estate, and was there successful 1)' en- 
gaged in his independent calling until his de- 
cease, at the venerable age of eighty-three 
years. He was a Democrat in politics, greatly 
interested in public affairs, and served his fel- 
low-townsmen as Assessor for a number of 
years. Hoth he and his wife were members of 
the Kclormed church. He married Maria 
Lmjiie, who was born in .Sharon, a daughter of 
a later John pjnpie than the pioneer. Peter 
and Maria P^mpie had .^even children; namely. 



Norman I)., Jane K. , John C, I'eter IL, 
Aim.i S., Harvey L. , and Hewitt C. 

lohn (j. ICmpie acijuired a ])ractical educa- 
tion in the conmion schools of Sharon and at 
the Carlisle .Seminary. He subsequently 
taught school several terms, both in Sharon 
ami Seward, but in iSfi/gavc up his position 
at the teacher's tlesk to take possession of his 
present line estate of one hundred acres, which 
was formerly known as the l-'alk farm. From 
vear to year he has matle marked improvements 
on the place, having erected within the last 
quarter of a century all the buildings that are 
now on it and cleared off much of the wood. 
He has a large part of the land under cultiva- 
tion. He carries on general farming in all its 
branches, and in past times he raised vast 
quantities of hops, which proved a valuable 
crop. 

In iiolitics :\Ir. lunpie affiliates with the 
Democratic party. He has served accejitably 
in various local offices, including those of Su- 
pervisor, Commissioner of Highwa\s, and 
trustee of his school district. He has also 
been secretary and trustee of the People's 
Cemetery .Association of Sharon ever since its 
organization in I ^6y. 

(Jn June ;,o, 1.S58, Mr. luiipie married Miss 
Nancy C. Horst. who was also born in Sharon, 
as was her father, Peter G. Borst, a lifelong 
farmer of that place. .Mr. and .Mrs. V.m\w 
have two children- the Rev. .\lfred R. and 
lulward J. The Rev. Alfred R. l-jiipie was 
' graduated from Hart wick Seminary, and is now 
preaching in Maryland, Otsego County, X.V. 
I He married Mi.->> .\nna Skinner, and they have 




ALONZn WAKKMAX. 



Al'lllCAl, KI'A' 



'97 



one child, Lillian. Mdward J. ICmpic married 
Miss Anna Ncllis, and is the father of two 
ehiUhen-^l'A-erett and Nancy l>;ila. Mr. and 
I\Irs. John Ti. l-inpie are members of the Ln- 
theian cluneh, in wliieh he has been Deacon, 
I'lder, and secretary. 



(^JyrLONZO WAKEMAN, for many years 
fc* one of the leading farmers of I.awyers- 
^>> — ' ville, Schoharie Count)-, was born 
October 2j, iSio, in this town, and here spent 
his entire life of nearl_\- seventy-eight years, 
his death occurring on August 31, iSSS. He 
was of patriotic Revolutionary stock, his pa- 
ternal grandfather, Gershom W'akeman, a na- 
tive of Fairfield, Conn., ha\'ing served as an 
ofificer in the war for American independence. 

Gershom Wakeman was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, lie was among the very first to enlist in 
the Colonial forces, and was killed in one of 
the early battles of the war. His wife, Eliza- 
beth Downs, was born in Fairfield County, 
Connecticut, daughter of David Downs and the 
descendant of one of the earliest settled families 
of that county. She died not very long after 
her husband's death, lea\ing seven children : 
namely, Abigail, Abel, Gershom, Dolly, 
Amelia, I.saac, and Seth B. , the latter of 
whom was the father of Alonzo Wakeman. 

Seth B. Wakeman was brought up on a 
farm. In early manhood he learned the car- 
penter's trade, which he subsequently followed 
many years in Lawyersville, where he was one 
of the first settlers. He erected the house now 
occupied by his son Alonzo's widow, the resi- 



dence of Stanton Courier, of Cohlcskill, and 

several business houses of this hu-alily. IK' 
bought a farm of two hundred acres near the 
sdllageand also other land in town; and for 
some years prior to his death, at the age (jf 
eighty-two years, was successfidly engaged in 
general farming. He likewise carried on an 
extensive business as a manufacturer of lum- 
ber, being the owner of a saw-mill. His first 
wife, Clara Nichols, a nati\-e of l<"airfield 
County, Connecticut, died in early womanhood, 
leaving him five children, namely: Horace; 
Alonzo, the special subject of this sketch; 
Horatio; Maria; and Charles. In religion, 
both parents were of the Universalist faith. 
After the death of his first wife Seth B. 
Wakeman married Sarah Wheeler, also of 
Fairfield County, Connecticut. 

Alonzo Wakeman in 1878 bought the \-alu- 
able farm of two hundred acres, on which his 
daughter Emma now resides, and until his 
death, as above mentioned, was recognized in 
the community as one of its foremost agricult- 
urists. Strictly honest and upright, he was 
influential in the neighborhood, and, as a 
Notary Public, for many )-ears transacted a 
good deal of business. In politics, he was an 
ardent supporter of the principles of the Re- 
publican party, but persistently refused to ac- 
cept all offices, even that of president of the 
National Bank, of which he was one of the 
founders and for many years a director. 

Mr. Alonzo Wakeman's first wife was Miss 
Catharine Stall, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Stall, of Sharon, Schoharie County, 
N.Y. ; she li\-ed ten months after their mar- 



198 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



riajje, her death occiirrinj; in icS^4 at the 
age (jf nineteen years and eleven mnnths. 
In June, 1838, Mr. VVakeman married Mary 
O'Dell, who was born September 26, 1S15, in 
Keddin'i, Conn., daii^diter of Dr. Joseph 
O'Dell. Mrs. Wakeman is of French ances- 
try, her great-grandfather O'Dell, mie of the 
first settlers of Norwalk, Cnnn., havin^^ emi- 
grated to that town from l-'rance in Colonial 
days. Nathan O'Dell, her grandfather, was a 
prosperous farmer and a lifelong' resident of 
Norwalk, Conn. His wife, .Mary Hurritt, 
bore him fourteen children, all of whnm grew 
to maturity and married. Josei)h O'Dell, 
having received his early education in the 
common schixds, jiursued the stud\- of medi- 
cine, at first with erne (;f the local physicians, 
Dr. Jesse Shepard, and afterward in New 
York City. On graduating, he located first as 
a practitioner in Dover, Ccmn., whence he re- 
moved to Redding, Conn., where he continued 
actively engaged in the jiractice of his jiroies- 
sion. -At the age of thirty one years he died 
in Charleston, .S. C. , while there for the bene- 
fit of his health. His wife, Lucy Wakeman, 
was born in I-'airfield, Conn., a daughter of 
Cershom Wakeman, second, who was an uncle 
of .\lonz(i Wakeman. Cicrshom Wakeman, 
second, married .Sibbell ]5radley, of Fairfield, 
Conn., and Luc)- was their onlv daughter. 
They were \ery prominent members (jf the 
Congregational church. 

Mr. Alonzo Wakeman is survived by his 
wife and four children ; namely, ICmma, Clara 
A., FUa, and .Sarah W. l-lmma J. married 
Solomon Lark in, a farmer, who died in 1X97, 



leaving lier with one child, Charles W. 
Larkin; Clara A. is the wife of Romeyn 
Hrown, a hardware merchant of Oneonta, and 
the mother of three children — Wakeman, 
Floyd, and an infant (deceased) ; billa is the 
wife of George .Stor)-, acarjienter; and .Sarali 
W. is the wife of Daniel J. Gannon, who is 
her third husband. .Mrs. Wakeman and all 
her family except one are valued members of 
the Lutheran church. 



(9>r NDRKW J. KLINF, proprietor of a 
h\ well-stocked general st<ire in Patter- 
^^-' sonville, Schenectady County, N.V., 
was born in this place, November i, 1850, son 
of Joseph and Janet (Staley) Kline. His 
father was born in Aiken, Montgomery 
County, in i.SiS, and his mother was born in 
I'rincetown, this county, in 1823. Grand- 
father Kline was an early settler in .Montgom- 
ery County, and there carried on general farm- 
ing for the rest of his active period. 

Josejih Kline was reared on his father's 
farm. At the age of eighteen he came to I'at- 
tersonville, then called Hoffman's Ferry, and 
for a number of years he kept a grocery store. 
Removing to Swartztown, N.^'., he carried on 
the same business in connection with a hotel, 
and also cultivated a farm. H is acti\ity con- 
tinued until a few- _\ears jirior to his death, 
which occurred at the age of seventy-five 
years. His wife died at seventy. She was 
the mother of si.\ childien, naniel)' : (ieroe G., 
who died at the age of forty-si.v yeais ; .Andrew 
J., the subject of this sketch; Oliver S. ; Jen- 



'99 



nie M., who is now Mrs. Hcrrick ; Harriet 

A. : Mini l-:il.i, who is n.nv I\Irs. (iix-- Mrs. 
Janet KliiK- was a iiK'nihci- of tiio Rclunncd 
cluuLh. 

Aiulicw J. Kline was reared and eilueated in 
Swartztown. ^\■llen a }iiunt;' man lie hei;an 
business as a dealer in t'arni produce along the 
Mrie Canal, ami was thus engagetl for twelve 
years. Since iSSf) he has heen located at his 
present place of husiness in Pattersonville. 
His store, which is one of the leading sources 
of supply in this section, is well stocked with 
agricultural implements, fertilizers, and gen- 
eral merchandise. 

In 1S77 Mr. Kline was united in marriage 
with Henrietta Sterling, of Florida, N. Y., 
daughter of W'inslow Sterling. Mrs. Kline is 
the mother of three children; nameh', Jessie 
R., Bertha H., and Boyd J. 

Politically, ]\Ir. Kline is a Democrat. 
Able, energetic, and conscientious, he has se- 
cured a firm foothold in business through his 
own exertions, and he full)- merits the high 
esteem accorded him by his fellow-townsmen. 



§OHX ROE, senior partner in the firm of 
J. & E. Roe, general merchants of 
Greenville, N.Y. , was born in Wiscon- 
sin on October 16, 1849, son of William P. 
and Marietta (Newman) Roe. His paternal 
grandfather, William Roe, was a farmer by 
occupation. He liked to go from place to 
place, and lived successively in Athens, 
Greenville, and Cairo, owning farms at differ- 
ent times in each of these places in Greene 



County. He died at Cairo at the age of 
eighty-four. His wife Jane, who was before 
her marriage a P.uker, was born in Greenville. 
and belonged to one of the old pioneer families. 

William P. Roe, s,,n of William and Jane, 
was born in .Athens, N.\', , and reared to farn) 
life. He lived for a time in Wisconsin, 
where he was interested in speculating and in 
farming, and held the office of Town Supervi- 
sor. Later he returned to \ew York State, 
settled in Greenville, and died here at the age 
of seventy-eight. He was County .Superinten- 
dent of the Poor for three years. In ])olitics 
he was a Democrat. His wife, Marietta, was 
a native of this place, and died here at the age 
of fifty-two. She was tlie daughter of Alva 
Newman, and one of a family of si.x children. 
Her father was a Greenville farHier, but he re- 
moved from Greenville to Wisconsin, and died 
there at the age of seventy. IMrs. Marietta N. 
Roe was the mother of si.x children. Of these 
five are living, namely: John, the subject of 
this .sketch; Jasper, a farmer; Annis, who 
married Charles Roe; I-:ila, who married 
Charles Coonley; and Edgar, who is a member 
of the firm of Roe Brothers. Both parents 
were Baptists. 

John Roe came with his father and mother 
to this town when eight years old, and worked 
with his father until twenty-si.x years of age. 
In the winters of 1S71, 1S72, and 1S73 he 
taught school in Greenville, and one winter he 
attended the Poughkeepsie Business College. 
Then, at the age of twenty-six, he formed a 
partnership with M. P. Blenis, which con- 
tinued for twelve years, or until the time of 



HIOr.RAI'IIICAL REVIEW 



Mr. lilcnis's death. For the first year they 
operated a {general store located opposite Mr. 
Roe's |)resL-nt stand, m<)\ inj; across the street 
at the end nf that time. Upon the death of 
Mr. Ulenis, Mr. Kdgar Roe bouj;,'ht out his in- 
terests, and the firm assumed its present name. 
There is only one store in town larger than 
this. A full line of general merchandise is 
carried, including dry goods, groceries, boots 
and shoes, crockery and glass ware, carpets 
and oil -cliiths, hats and caps. One clerk is 
emplnyed. Mr. Roc has now been in business 
over twenty-three years, and is one nf the old- 
est merchants here. He is knnwn thri)u,i;h all 
the country side, and eiijii\s the esteem of 
every one. 

In 1878 Mr. Roc married Arvillia Deyo, a 
native of Durham, and daughter nf .Miln De\ci, 
now the popular blacksmith of (ireenville. 
Of this union four children have i)een born, b)' 
name Milo H. , ImikI, Mary, and John. 

In politics Mr. Koc is a Demmrat. lie lias 
given valuable service to the town in lumiernus 
public positions. In 1890, and the four suc- 
ceeding years, he was Sujiervisor, and in 1.S94 
and 1895 he was chairman of the board. He 
has been a member of the Hoard of ICducation 
ever since it was organized. W'liile chairman 
of their board in his last term the .Su|)er\ isors 
presented him with a very fine eas)- chair, this 
being an expression of their appreciation of his 
services while a niemJJer of the IkkI}-. In 
1897 he was elected .Superintendent of the 
I'oor, tf) ser\e until 1900. Mr. Roe makes a 
most efficient manager for tlie almshouse. 
Under his caie the place is kept in tiie i)e^t of 



repair, and everything about it is neat and or- 
derly, while the health and comfort of the 
seventy inmates is carefully looked after. 

Mr. Roc is a prominent Mason, being con- 
nected with James M. .\ustin Lodge, V. & 
A. M., and Greenville Royal Arch Chapter, 
No. 283. He has held all the offices in the 
lodge, having been warden, deacon, master 
for two years, and secretary si.\ years. His 
membership in the lodge dates back twenty- 
five years. He is a charier member (jf the 
chapter, and has always been its treasurer. 
He is frequently sent b)- his fellow-townsmen 
as delegate to county con\entions, and is a 
meniiier of the Town and County Committee. 
No worthy object fails to receive his warm and 
acti\e su|>port, and he is often the originator 
of ])lans, the carr)ing out of which ])roves to 
be a benefit to the town aiul the communilv. 



KRANK U. CASPHR, manufacturer of 
extension tables and the patentee of 
tajjle supports for drop-leaf tables, in the 
town of Cobleskill, Schoharie County, has a 
large and finely ecpiipped plant at Howe's 
Cave, not far from the railway station of that 
village. He was born October 10, KS57, in 
the town of Cobleskill, and is the only sur- 
viving son of George Casper, a well-known 
business man of this section of the county. 
He is of German and Scotch descent, and the 
representative of a pioneer family of Scho- 
harie County, his paternal grandfather, whose 
nan-.e was I'eter, having been an early settler 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of this town. I'ctcr Casper was a tanner ami 
the Dwner of a giioil hcniestead, wliich he 
managed successfully until his death, at the 
age of threescore )'ears. lie antl his wife, 
whoso maiden name was Margaret Herron, 
were among the leading members of the Re- 
formed church. They reared a large family 
of children. 

George Casper left the home farm on be- 
coming of age, engaged in business for him- 
self as a miller, purchasing a clover-mill and 
a saw-mill, and afterward a planing-mill antl 
a cider-mill, all of which, with the exception 
of the first named, he is still operating with 
success. With true German thrift he saved 
each year a portion of his earnings, and soon 
erected the house in which he is now living. 
He has also accumulated some other property. 
A strong Democrat in politics, he takes an 
intelligent interest in local matters, and has 
served his fellow-townsmen in various ways. 
He has held different offices in the Reformed 
church, of which he and his wife are active 
members, and for a number of years has been 
Elder of the church. He married Emeline 
Berner, who was born in Barnerville, this 
county, a daughter of John J. Berner. Of 
their five children three are now living, as 
follows: Ella, wife of Sylvester Mann, of 
Howes Cave; Alice, wife of Harvey Boorn ; 
and Frank L. John P. Casper, who was pre- 
paring for the ministry at Rutgers College, 
died at the age of twenty-three years, and a 
daughter, Ida, wife of Ira Rickard, died on 
March 13, 1899. 

Frank L. Cas|)er in his boyhood and youth 



acciuired a practical common-school education, 
and until attaining his majority assisted his 
father in the care of his different mills. De- 
sirous, then, of turning his natural mechani- 
cal ability to some good account, he began 
the manufacture of furniture on a small scale, 
and succeeded so well that in the course of a 
few years he was forceil to build an addition 
to the shop in which he had started his cpera- 
tions. He subsequently leased the main 
building of the old Braman woollen factory, 
and, erecting near by a drying kiln, a finish- 
ing-room, and a wareroom, has here since 
18S2 devoted his entire time to the making of 
extension tables. His plant is furnished with 
the latest improved and approved machiner)-, 
much of which he designed and made in his 
own factory, this being, with a single excep- 
tion, the only one of the kind between Bingham- 
ton and Albany. He employs a large force of 
men all the time in order to meet the demands 
of his customers in the six New lingland 
States, New York, and Pennsylvania, his 
tables being sold on their merits His trade, 
already large, is constantly increasing, orders 
being daily received from firms in different 
parts of the Union. His factory anil resi- 
dence are both warmed by steam heat and 
lighted throughout by electricity. 

Mr. Casper is a steadfast Prohibitionist in 
politics, and labors hard to advance the tem- 
perance cause. He is an active member of 
the Reformed church, in wliich he has served 
as Elder and treasurer, and has also held 
other offices. He has been connected with 
the Sun:lay-school for many years, much of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the time being its superintendent or the 


now resides in McHenry, 111., is the wife of 


te.icher of the Bible class. 


Isaac Wentworth, formerl) of .\tbens, Greene 


On March 5, 1879, Mr. Casper marrieil 


County. N.V. 


Miss Hello Ik'cker, daughter of I'rancis 


William H. .Stewart's early \ears were spent 


Heckcr, a prominent manufacturer of Scho- 


in Jackson\ille in the town of Coxsackie, and 


harie County, owning and operating mills at 


he atleniled the public scho(ds thereuntil he 


Central Hridge, Galupville, and Heme. Mr. 


was fifteen years of age. He then went to 


and Mrs. Casper have two children — I.e Roy 


woik as errand iioy in the store of Daniel 


and Lc Grand, the eldest a i)'.i|)ii in tiie Coble- 


Whiting, who dealt in general merchandise, 


skill High -School, cl.iss of 1899. The 


and also cairied on a brick manufactor)' and 


younger son will enter Col)leskill lli.i;h 


a wood yard. \'oung .Stewart rose from the 


School the con-.ing fall. 


bumble position of errant! boy to that of clerk. 




and in this capacity worked for Mr. Whiting 


,^.»— >. ^-> 


some ten or twelve years. Subsequently to that 


Y^)m1.LIAM 11. STi:\V.\RT, iiropiietor 


he was clerk for a year in the Wormer House, 


)^Y, "' t'l^' -"^l^'^^^'i^ li"i'^^- ill Athens, 


now the Arlington Ib.use, of Athens, and at 


N.\'., and a rc])rescntativc citizen of this 


the end of that time, in 1S73, be purchased bis 


pi.ice, was boin in Jacks(jnville, now Iviilton, 


]iresent propert}-. The small bouse then stand- 


in the town of Co.x.sackie, Greene County, on 


ing oil the lot was toin down, and the finel_\- 


December .S, iS4r), son of William (". and 


appointed .Stewart bouse of to-dav erected in 


Margaret (Hardick) Stewart. William C. 


its place. The building is three stories high, 


Stewart, who was boin in Coxsackie, was a 


and is tiltetl with all modern imiirovements. 


lawyer i)y pnifession, and practisetl in his nn- 


such as stcamdieating ajjpai-atus, electricity for 


ti\e town for over a quarter of a century. He 


call bells and for lighting, hot and cold water 


was a leadin;; man there, and for a nundjcr of 


and sanitary bath tubs. Besides the main 


years was justice. In bis later life lie made 


bouse, Mr. Stewait owns the three adjoining 


bis home with bis son William. His death 


houses and the dock where the ferry boat fiom 


occurred in i,SS4, at the a-e of si.\ty-ei<;bt. 


Hudson lands. He has accommodations for 


He was a Republican in politics. His wife 


about fifty guests, and as a landlord is descrv- 


was born in the town of .Athens, and died in 


e<lly popular. He has always taken an active 


Ivirlloii at the aj^e of si,\ty-lhree. She was 


])art in p(ditics, and has been trustee of the 


the dau-hter of Jacob Hardick, who carried on 


village a number of )ears and also scho(d 


farming; on what was known as the Hardick 


trustee. 


farm. .Siie iiore her husband six children, 


Mr. .Stewart was married in 1H77 to Ida 


only two ,.f whom are livin-; namely, William 


Ibdlcnbeck, wiio was b.irn at (aiilderland 


H. and bis sister, I.ncy J. Ibe latter, ubo 


Centre, in All)any County, daughter of Garret 




RC.K VV. ANDKKSOX. 



IUOGRAl'HIt:AL REV 



and Harriot (\'an Valkenbcrg) Mollenbcck. 
Her father, who was a farmer, died when onl_v 
forty years of age. Her mother, who was burn 
in Albany, is still living, being now sixty- 
nine years of age. Of Mrs. Hollenbeck's 
three ohildren, ]\Irs. Stewart is the only one 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have one child, 
Hattie W., who lives with them. They lost 
a son, Wilfred D., at the age of ten years. 

Mr. Stewart is a member of Custer Lodge of 
Odd Fellows, No. 50S, and of the Knights of 
Pythias, No. 129, of Athens. He has served 
several years as a member of Mackawack Hand 
Engine Company, but is now e.xempt from 
duty with that company, though he is an active 
member of the Hook and Ladder Compan)-, 
which is said to be one of the finest in the 
State. He is also a member of the Horse 
Thief Detective Association, and one of its 
riders. He is the oldest hotel man in this 
town, and with one exception the oldest in the 
county. His wife and daughter attend the Re- 
formed church. In connection with his hotel 
Mr. Stewart carries on a livery, which is one 
of the best in the town. 



KORGE W. ANDERSON, the lead- 
ing business man of Hunter, Greene 
County, N. Y., dealer in wood and coal and 
building supplies, and proprietor of the Cen- 
tral House, was born in New Sharon, Mon- 
mouth County, N.J., May 12, 1S50, his 
jiarents being Jacob and Matilda (Brown) An- 
derson. His grandfather Anderson resided in 
Perrineville, N.J., in which town Jacob was 



born in 1814. His grandmother, whose 
maiden name was Mary ]?aldwin, was tiie 
daughter c.f Thnmas Ibldwin. Her father 
lived t(i the ach'anced age of niiiet) -three. 
She died at the age of fifty, having been the 
mother of five children. 

Jacob Anderson was a carpenter and builder 
by trade, and for thirty-five years carried on 
business in Hightstown, Mercer County, N.J., 
where he was a prominent citizen. The last 
years of his life were spent on a farm. In 
politics he was a Republican. He was an ac- 
tive member of an Odd Fellows organization. 
His death occurred in 1890, at the age of 
seventy-six. His wife, Matilda, who was born 
in Hightstown in 1824, and died in 1896, was 
the daughter of Captain George \V. Ikown, 
who commanded a company of militia stationed 
at Sandy Hook in the War of 181 2. Both 
Jacob Anderson and his wife were members of 
the Methodist church. Of their family of five 
sons and two daughters, only one, a son Jacob, 
is deceased. The living are: Abijah A., 
William W., George W., Carrie M., Thomas 
B., and Lilly B. Carrie married John W. 
Brown, and Lilly is the wife of Bills Flock. 

George \\'. Anderson lived with his parents 
and attended the common schools until he was 
about sixteen }ears old, when he began life for 
himself. At first he worked on a farm, and 
then he learned the carpenter's trade. His 
brothers, it may be mentioned, are also en- 
gaged as carpenters and builders. He worked 
at his trade in Hightstown, Freehold, New 
Brunswick, and Newark, N.J., and at College 
Point, Long Island. Coming to Hunter in 



BIOGRAPHICAL KF.VIEW 



1876, Mr. Anderson worked f(ir fmir \ears as a 
wheelwright, but at tlic end of that time en- 
gaged in the building business. His success 
has been remarkable. He has seen the town 
double in size since he came hero, and has liini- 
sclf put up the more important of the new 
buildings. He built the Methodist thurch and 
the Kaatsberg Hotel, remodelled the Hunter 
House, built the chinch and the chair factory 
at Kdgewood, and nian\- houses in Iliuiter, 
Edgewood, and Tannersville. During busy 
seasons he employed thirty hands, carrying; 
on the largest contracting business anywhere 
in this section. During a number of years 
he has supplied large quantities (jf luml^er to 
other builders, and for some time he was the 
only lumber dealer in five towns <if this sec- 
tion. He is consequently widely known. 
Mr. Antlerson's house, which is one of the fin- 
est in the village, was built by him, as was 
also the building in wliich his office is now 
located, and which was from iSSo to 1S.S7 used 
as a .sash and Mind shop. Since 1S.S4 Mr. 
Anderson has done little or no building, but 
has given his time and attention to the man- 
agement of his large lumlier \ard and carriage 
repository. In connection wiih this he does 
a large business in coal, wood, and grain, ami 
carries a line of paints, oils, and hardware sup- 
plies, and all kinds of building material used 
by both cari)enters and masons. He is the 
only coal dealer in Hunter, Windham, Ash- 
land, or Jewett. 

Mr. Anderson was married in IS'JJ to Julia 
!•:. Lake, daughter of Hiram and 15atli.sl,el)a 
(Lounsberrv) Lake. She was l)orn in I'"iee- 



hold, N. \'. Her father, who was a farmer, 
died at the age of si.xty, and her mother died 
at the age of fifty-three. Of their two chil- 
dren, Hiram and Julia K., Mrs. Anderson is 
the only one living. Mr. Lake was twice 
married. l!)' his first wife, formerly Julia 
Rockwell, of East Durham, X.V., he had 
two sons — James M. and Charles K., the 
latter now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson 
have two daughters, namelv : Mabel, who is 
yet in school ; and Anna Bell, who is the 
wife of KImer ]'.. Goodsell, telegra]ih ojjcrator 
and agent on the Stony Clove & Catskill 
Mountain Railroad. (See biogra])hy on an- 
other [)age. ) There are three grandchildren — 
Marguerite, Anderson, and \'era. 

Mr. AntJerson has always shown a vital in- 
terest in all ]niblic affairs since first he came 
to Hunter. He has served the town in the 
office of Assessor for three \ears, as Commis- 
sioner of Streets, as trustee and clerk of the 
School Board, as one of the Trustees of the \il- 
lage, and is at tiie ])resent time a memi)er of 
the Town Committee. His political affilia- 
tions arc with the Repulilican jiarty. He and 
his family are members of the Baptist church, 
hut they attend the Methodist cliurch in 
Hunter, Mr. Anderson being a trustee of liie 
church and treasurer of the jjoard. He can 
alwa_\s be depended ujion to work for an_\' good 
cause in the churcii as well as outside. He 
was one of the jirojectors of the Maplewood 
Cemeter)' Association, and for man\' xears has 
been its president. l*"raternall\', he is a mem- 
ber and treasurer of .Mount Tabor Lodge, No. 
So;, V. & A. M., anil of Mountain c;hai)ter, 



BIOCR.M'IIICAI. 



R. A. M. He was one of the charter mcmben 
of Catskill Chapter at CatskiU. 



§AREU VAN WAGENEN, a well- 
knuwn and prosperous agriculturist of 
I.awycrsxillo, Schoharie Count}-, own- 
inj;- and occup\'ing the valuable estate known 
as Hillside farm, was born January 13, 1835, 
near Sharon Hill, in the neighboring town of 
Seward. Son oi Rynear Van \\'agenen, he is 
of Dutch ancestry, being a lineal descendant of 
Aart Jacobsen Van Wagenen, who emigrated 
from W'ageningen, Holland, a town not far 
from the Rhine, to Bergen, N.J., in 1650, and 
whose name, with that of his wife, Annetji 
Gerrits, was recorded as a member of the 
Dutch church of Kingston, Bergen County, 
June 24, 1 66 1. 

Conrad \'an Wagenen, grandfather of Jared, 
was born January 15, 1752, in Somerset 
County, New Jersey, whence in early manhood 
he removed to Charleston, Montgomery 
County, N.Y. , as one of its earliest settlers. 
He took up unimproved land, and, having 
cleared a portion of it, devoted himself to gen- 
eral farming, in conjunction with which he 
operated a small tannery. He subsequently 
came to Schoharie County, and, buying a farm 
near Sharon Hill, resided there until his 
death, at the venerable age of ninety j-ears. 
Tradition says that he was present as a guard 
at the execution of Major Andre on October 2, 
17S0, at Tappan. 

Rynear \'an Wagenen with his numerous 
brothers and sisters was brought up on a farm. 



spending his earliest years in Charleston, 

N. Y. , and completing his education in the dis- 
trict schools of Sharon, whither he accompa- 
nied his jiarents when a boy. On reaching 
man's estate he bought land in Cobleskill, 
where for a number of years he was engaged in 
farming. His death occurred at the home of 
his son Jared, in the seventieth year of his 
age. He was c|uite acti\c in local matters, 
ser\ing his fellow-townsmen in various offices 
besides that of Justice of the Peace, which he 
held several terms. In politics he was a 
strong adherent of the Democratic party. His 
wife, Emily Good)'ear, was born on ffillside 
farm, then owned by her father, Jared Good- 
year, who was born and reared in Hampden, 
Conn. Mr. Goodyear on removing to New 
York became a pioneer settler in a small town 
near Ithaca, which was named Goodycars. 
On account of malaria he left that place, and 
coming to Schoharie County bought two hun- 
dred acres of woodland in Cobleskill, and here 
spent the remainder of his life. He erected 
a log house for his first dwelling, and then 
began the improvement of his propert)-. He 
cleared a considerable tract of his land, and, 
being an energetic, progressive man, he was 
very successful not onl}- as a farmer, but as one 
of the most popular tavern-keepers of this 
vicinity. Four sons were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Rynear Van Wagenen, and three of them 
survive, as follows: Jared, of Lawyersville ; 
Albert, of Boston, Mass. ; and James, who re- 
sides with his brother Jared. Both parents 
were members of the Reformed church. 

Jared \'an Wagenen li\'ed at home until 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



nine years old, when he became an inmate of 
the houseliolcl of his uncles, Willis and Gcorj^c 
Goodyc.ir, uhn i)iiiii;;lu him uj), their home 
being the farm where he now resides. lie 
attended the district school and assisted in the 
farm labors until the death of his uncles, and 
since that time has had entire eiiarj^^e of this 
magnificent farm of two hundred and fifty 
acres, one of the finest in its im|)rnvenients (jf 
any in this section of Schoharie County. He 
makes a specialty of dairyinj,', keeping a herd 
of thirty or forty cows, and manufactures a fine 
grade of butter, which he sells to special cus- 
tomers in this vieinit)-. A few )ears ago Mr. 
Van Wageneu l)uilt his lar-e barn, three 
stories ill height, nne hunched aiui thirty In' 
eighty - seven feet, with all imideiii equiii- 
ments, including an engine and two silos of 
two hundred tons capacit)-. 

He has been an active member of the Coble- 
skill Agricultural Society; al.'^o of the New 
York State Agricultural As.sociatioii ; nnd is 
vice-president of the b'armers' and Merchants' 
Rank. In jKdilics he is a loyal Democrat, and 



l)eeii Supi 



-f the town 



He contributes liberally toward the mainte- 
nance of the Hutch Reformed church, of which 
he .'ind his famil}' are members, and in which 
he has held many of the offices. 

On November iS, 1S5S, I\Ir. \'an Wagenen 
married I.oraine McNeill, the only child of 
Mr. and Mrs, l^razillia McNeill. Ilcrni..ther 
is still living, a capal)le Wdinan of eighty-si.\ 
year.s. Mr. and Mrs. Vau Wagenen have one 
son living; namely, Jaretl, Jr., born May 14, 
1S71; and have been bereft of one, Albert, 



who dieil at the age of fifteen years. Jared 
\'an Wagenen, Jr., obtained his elementar\' 
education in Lawyersville, and after his grad- 
uation at the Cobleskill High School took the 
bachelor's degree in 1S91, and the Master's de- 
gree in 1896 at Cornell University, where he 
has since taught in the Dairy Department. 
He is now assisting his father on the home 
farm. He married Magdalena Lamont, the 
<inly child of ]■:. W. Lamont, a prominent 
farmer of this town. Two children have been 
born of this union; namely, .Sarah Lamont and 
Loraine McNeill. 



UDOLl'H HlCSTLl-:. M.D., a leading 
l)h)'sician antl sui'geon of Ihuiter, 
N.V., was born in Troy, this State, 
on August 20, 1 866, his ])arents being John 
and Wilhelmina (Shutheis) J5estle. His 
father, who was of (lerman birth, came to 
Troy, N.Y. , before marriage, and engaged in 
the restaurant business. He died when onl)- 
thirty-four \ears of age. He and his wife were 
members of the rresb\terian church. Mrs. 
IJestle also was born in Geinianw being one of 
a family of several children. She is still liv- 
ing at Kingston, this State. Her father, who 
was a druggist and medical practitioner, lived 
to the advanced age of ninety-eight years. Of 
her eight children, four aie living, namel)- : 
George, who resides in New York; Henrietta, 
who marrie.l William Weston, of Rondout ; 
August; an. I Rudolph, the sjiecial subject of 
this biography. 

Rudolph ]5estle received his elementary edu- 



lUOC.KAPIlICAL KKN'IKW 



cation in tiie common schools, and at the age 

cif oii,'hteen began the stiuly of medicine with 
Dr. McLane, a leading physician of Troy, and 
Dr. O'Conner of the Troy Hospital. He sub- 
sequently entered the Albany Medical College, 
and was graduated at that institution in iSSS, 
at twenty-one years of age, standing high in 
his class. He immediately began the practice 
of his profession in Tro}-, but eighteen months 
later removed to Burke, in Franklyn County, 
X. Y., where he remained for the next si.\ 
years. He then came to Hunter, where he has 
since been in practice. He is a general prac- 
titioner, and also a surgeon of unusual skill, 
having performed many difficult operations. 
During his two years in the Troy Hospital, and 
for several months while he was in the New 
York Polyclinic, he had a large amount of val- 
uable experience in attending cases of appendi- 
citis, and in his subsequent practice he has had 
remarkable success with the many cases of that 
nature brought to him for treatment. 

Dr. Bestle is a member both of the Greene 
County ^Medical Society and of the Medical 
Society of Northern Xew York. He is also a 
member of the Sixth Separate Company of 
militia of Tro_\', and of the Arba Reed Steamer 
Company of that city. Fraternally, he holds 
membership in F'rontier Lodge, F. & A. M., of 
Chateaugay. In politics the Doctor is a Re- 
publican, and in religious faith an Episcopa- 
lian, being connected with St. Paul's Episco- 
pal Church of Troy. Although he has been in 
Hunter a comparatively short time, he has al- 
ready built up a large practice, and is very 
popular both socially and professionally. 



ELLINGTON E. HASSLER, one of 

he leading business men of Middle- 
burg, X. Y. , was born on August 19, 1848, .son 
of David and Augusta (Tibbit.s) Hassler. His 
paternal grandfather was Henry Bassler. He 
was born in Knox, Alinny County, and spent 
his early years in that place. After his mar- 
riage^he came to Huntersland, this town, and 
settled on what is now known as the Bassler 
homestead, where he spent the remainder of 
his life, and where he died at the age of forty- 
four. His wdfe, whose maiden name was .Mary 
Saddlemyer, was also a native of Albany 
County. She lived to reach the age of eighty- 
nine. Of the ten children born to her, five 
are living, namely: Amanda, who married Re- 
solved Macomber; Amaziah ; I-:iiza Ann, who 
married Peleg Cook; Sylvester, who occupies 
the old homestead; and Lucy, who married 
Salem Smith, and resides near Rensselaerville, 
Albany Count}-. 

David Bassler, who was born in Hunters- 
land, March 22, 1822, and died September 13, 
1893, was reared on the home farm, and up to 
1859, with the exception of one year, was en- 
gaged exclusively in agricultural work. In 
i860 he went into mercantile life in Hunters- 
land; and in 1S69 he bought the Luther 
Vroman store in Middleburg, at the corner of 
Main Street and Railroad .Avenue, and thus 
became the proprietor of what to-day, under the 
efficient management of his successors, is one 
of the leading stores in town. David Bassler's 
wife, to whom he was married in October, 
1S47, was the daughter of Harry and Betsy 
(Styles) Tibbits, of Huntersland, early resi- 



RIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tlcnts of the- town. Mr. Tibbits lived to be 
ci^hty-fivc years of age, and Mrs. Tibbits lived 
to be sixty. Mrs. Augusta T. Hassler, who 
(lied on September 7, 1S80, at the age of fifty- 
two, was one of four daughters born to her 
parents. She was a member of the Christian 
church at Iluntersland. Her chiUlren were. 
Wellington K. liassler; Ida, who married Peter 
W'ormer; and Mlla. who married (leorge H. 
Hyde, of Middleburg. 

Wellington K. Hassler was educated in the 
public schools, and at .Starkey Seminary, from 
which he was graduated in June, 1869. Fol- 
lowing this he was clerk in his father's store 
for two years, and tlien in 1.S71 he w;is admitted 
to a half-interest in the business, which as- 
sumed the name of D. Hassler & Son. In 
April, 1S75, John II. Cornell bought the elder 
Mr. Bassler's interest, and the firm name was 
changed to Hassler & Cornell. On January i, 
1880, Mr. Cornell retired. In 1887 Mr. Hass- 
ler took into partnership two of iiis clerks, 
C. L. McHain and George H. Wheeler, and 
the firm name has since been W. K. Hassler 
& Co. 

Mr. Hassler is a wiile-awake man, and is in- 
terested in varied enterprises of a jirogressive 
character. He is a warm-hearted Republican, 
and has been connected with the Reiniblican 
County Committee for some time, six years as 
its chairman, and a number of years as secre- 
tary of the committee. On April i, 1889, he 
assumed the duties of Postmaster of Middle- 
burg. He held this position five years, and in 
that time he greatly improved the postal ser- 
vice of this town, had the satisfaction of seeing 



the ofTice raised from the fourth class to the 
third class list, and the position of Postmaster 
made a salaried one. Since then the salary 
has been increased by five huntlred dollars. 
Mr. Hassler was nominated for the Assembly 
in 1S94, and again in 1S96, and in both in- 
stances ran ahead of his ticket by hundreds of 
votes. Since 1894 he has been president of the 
Mutual P'ire Insurance Association, which was 
formed that year by the business men of Mid- 
dleburg, to embrace Schoharie, Otsego, and 
.Albany Counties, Chenango and Montgomery 
Counties having been added since. This as- 
sociation has met with remarkable success, and 
does a very large amount of business. Mr. 
Hassler is also a director in the Oak Hill and 
Mid:lleburg Local Exchange Tele])honc Coni- 
panies; a director of the I'irst National Hank 
of Middleburg; director of the Middleburg and 
-Schoharie Railroad; and president of the hoard 
of trustees of Starkey Seminary, which position 
he has held since 1881. He was a trustee of 
Middleburg Academy lor six _\ears,' and for 
four years of the time president of the board. 
Ten \ears ago he founded the .Starkey Semi- 
nary Monthly, of which he was the editor until 
1S97. Mr. l^assler is an active worker in the 
Reformed church, and since 18S4 has been 
su])erintendent of its Sunday-schoid. From 
1882 to 1888 he was secretary of the County 
Association of Sunday-schools, and subse- 
quently for five years he was president of the 
association. .Since 1893 he has been president 
of the Schoharie County Hible Society. 

Mr. Hassler's store is in a most prosperous 
condition. Four assistants are employed in its 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



nKiiia;;cnicnt ; aiul since it is one of the oki- 
established business enterprises in this region, 
and has always maintained its early reputation 
for honest dealing and high grade goods, it has 
the confidence and the patronage of the public. 

Mr. Bassler has seen many and important 
changes in Midclleburg since he first began 
business here. The handsome school-house 
has been built, man_\' of the big b\isiness blocks 
have been erected, and a water supply system 
has been introduced into the town. He him- 
self has aided in many of the more noteworthy 
improvements. On January i, 1890, he asso- 
ciated himself with ]\Ir. G. L. Fo.\ in founding 
the Middleburg Xcios, a paper advanced in rank 
and one now growing steadily in favor, as well 
as one which bears the distinction of being the 
first Republican paper in this end of the 
county. 

In 1S74 Mr. rSassler was united in marriage 
with Alida, only child of Hezekiah Manning, 
and a native of this place. Mr. Manning was 
born here, and spent his entire life engaged in 
farming. He died in 1S89. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Maria Beekman, was born in 
Sharon. She resides with Mr. and Mrs. Bass- 
ler. Since his marriage Mr. Bassler has made 
his home at the old Manning homestead, which 
is a very attractive place just outside the vil- 
lage, the house being sheltered by tall elms 
and stately pines, surrounded by extensive 
grounds, and guarded by the dark-browed, lofty 
cliffs which stand as venerable sentinels at the 
eastern portals of the Schoharie Valley. Mr. 
Bassler is a great fancier of poultry, and has 
model poultry yards, where he raises many 



fancy 1 


reeds 


such 


.J 


s I 


-egh.i 


ns. 


1'1\ 


niDUlh 


Rocks, 


and 


Light 


B 


am 


ihs. 


He 


ma 


kes a 


feature 


of egg-pro 


luc 


ng 


poult 


r\', 


and 


.ships 


eggs West as 


far as 


Co 


ora 


lo, ai 


d S 


Kith 


as far 


as Mar) 


land. 


He 


s a 


so a fane 


er 1 


,i ]], 


dstein 


cattle. 



















§OHX A. MYERS, a veteran agricult- 
urist of Seward, N.Y., living about two 
miles from the village of Ilyndsville, 
was born in this town, March 27, 1819, a son 
of Philip P. and Catherine (Strobeck) Myers. 
His paternal grandfather, Peter Myers, came 
from Dutchess County to Schoharie County at 
an early period of its history, and for a short 
time lived in Seward. He removed from here 
to Otsego County, and, purchasing land near 
the town of South Valley, improved a farm, on 
which he resided many years. He finally re- 
turned to Seward, and died at the home of 
his son, Philip P. He was twice married, and 
by his second wife, who was the grandmother 
of John A., had five children. 

Philip P. Myers, son of Peter, was reared to 
farming pursuits, and soon after his marriage 
settled on the I\Iyers homestead, now owned 
and occupied by his son, John A. Here he 
toiled with persistent energy to clear and im- 
prove a farm, and was numbered among the re- 
spected and successful farmers of the neighbor- 
hood. His death occurred at the age of three- 
score years and ten. He was a strong sup- 
porter of the principles of the Democratic 
party, but never aspired to political office. 
His wife, Catherine, was born in Seward, 
being one of the si.\ children of John A. 



I5IOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Stn)bcck, a ])romiiient pioneer fnrnier nf tlie 
town, and one of its most esteemed cili/ens. 
Mr. Strobeck as a young man served in tlie war 
of the Revolution, and in one of its l)attles was 
severely wounded. He attained the atlvanced 
age of eighty years. Philip 1*. and Catherine S. 
Myers reared six children, two cjf wiiom are 
living, namely: John A., tlie first-born; and 
Catherine, residing in East Worccslcr, l)cing 
the wife of Abraham Smith, who is her second 
husband. 

John A. Myers was educated in the disliict 
school. For three and one-half years after his 
marriage he li\ed on the old home farm with 
his parents, subsequcntl\- lived for a \ear with 
his father-in-law, and then rented a farm on 
shares for four years. Ihuing accumulated 
some mone\', he next boui;ht a farm of one 
hundred anti nine acies on Wine^ard Hill, 
wiiere he lived for eii,diteen years, when he 
sold that and purchased a larger farm, of one 
hundred and forty acres, which he carried on 
two years. Returning then to the old home- 
stead, he took charge of it until the death of 
his father, and after that event lie bought out 
the (jther heirs, and has since been its side 
possessor. 'I'liis ])lace contains one hundred 
and twenty-five acres of land, most of which is 
under cultivation ; and he has also another es- 
tate near by of one hundred and twenty-two 
acres, whicli he rents by the }ear. lie has 
practically given up the management of his 
property to his son Peter, who lives with him, 
and they are carrying oil general farming and 
dairying with signal success, and are also en- 
gaged to some extent in manufacturing lumber. 



In politics .Mr. .Myers is identifieil with the 
Democratic party, but has persistently refused 
to accept all offices excepting those of High- 
way Commissioner and Collector of Taxes, 
both of which he filled a short time. He is 
an active member of the Methodist ]-:|)iseo|)al 
church, of which he has been trustee and 
stcivard, and has been connected with the 
Sunday-school. 

On May 2,S, 1.S39, Mr. Myers married I'mily 
li. Youngs, who was born in .Seward, a daugh- 
ter of Adam Youngs, formerly a well-to-ilo 
farmer and lumber manufacturer, he having 
been owner of the saw-miil now ojierated by 
.Mr. Myers and his son. Mr. and Mrs. Myers 
have had nine children, six of whom grew to 
mature }ears, namel}- : Adam, a i)liysician in 
Puskirk, Rensselaer County, who marrieil Mary 
Diefemlorf, ami has tw., children — Victor and 
Ralph; Millard, deceased, who married Han- 
nah Shear, and had mie child, Emily; b'.lmira, 
the wife of Harvey Oliver, a farmer; Peter, 
who lives on the home farm, married Mary 
Marks, and has three children- J.ihn D., 
Howard C, and Dewey Willard; I..ircnzo, the 
oldest child, who died leaving a widow, wIk.sc 
maiden name was Lottie M. Simmonds, and 
one child, Lewis; and Julia, who died at the 
age of eighteen years. 



ri:iji;rick i:isi-;xMb:\(;i':R, Police 

lustice, Schenectady, \.Y., was born 
in this city, March 21, 1X49, son of I"'erdinaiid 
and Wilhelmina (Laman) Eiscnmenger. I'he 




FREDERICK EISEX.MLXc;KR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



parents were born in Germany, tlie father 
about the year 1827. 

In 1S46, having acquired a good education 
and mastered the machinist's trade, he came 
to the United States, intending to engage in 
business. Instead of adhering to his original 
plan, he entered the employ of the Schenec- 
tady & Utica Railway Company, with whom 
he remained about sixteen \ears. In 1S62 
he enlisted as a private in Company K, 
One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment, 
New York Volunteers, with which he served 
in the Civil War until fatally wounded in 
May, 1S64, his death occurring on June 16 of 
the same year. I\Irs. Wiliielmina Eisen- 
menger, his wife, was left with two children : 
Pauline, who died in 1S65, aged five years; 
and Frederick, the subject of this sketch. 
The mother died in 1S86, at the age of sixty- 
eight. 

On August II, 1S62, Frederick Eisen- 
menger, when but thirteen years old, joined 
the same regiment in which his father en- 
listed, and was enrolled in the ranks of Com- 
pany B, being one of the youngest volunteers 
to enter the service. He was detailed to serve 
at division headquarters under Alajor-general 
John W. Geary, commander of the Second 
Division, Twentieth Ami}- Cori)s, and after- 
ward Governor of Penns}lvania. While in front 
of Atlanta he received a severe wound in 
the jaw, and he was mustered out with his 
regiment in June, 1S65. In 1S68 he began a 
four years' apprenticeship at the machinist's 
trade in the Schenectady Locomotive Works, 
and he completed the term. Feeling the need 



of a better education, he studied nigl)t>, and 
while still emiiloyed at the works he began tu 
read law under the directicn of Judge Yate.s. 
He practised his profession until May 2, 1SS2, 
when he was appointed Police Justice, 'i'he 
duties of this position he has performetl with 
marked ability for over sixteen years. His 
present term will expire in 1900. 

In September, 1874, Judge Eisenmenger 
married Louisa, daughter of the late Louis 
Pepper, of this city. They have two children, 
namely: Frederick, who was graduated from 
the high school in 1S95, and is now in the ex- 
perimental department of the General Electri- 
cal Works; and Clara, now a student at the 
high school. 

Judge Eisenmenger belongs to St. George 
Lodge, No. 6, F. & A. M. ; is Past Com- 
mander of Horsfall Post, No. go, G. A. R. ; 
and president of the One Hundred and Thirty- 
fourth Regimental Association. He is a 
member and has been an official of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. His residence at 105 
Union Avenue was built by him in 1SS7, and 
he purchased for his mother the house in which 
she spent her last years. 



''CrV)/lLLIAM W. BURGE 
^Y^ the village of Fultc 



:RGETT, M.D., of 
:onham, one of 
the foremost physicians and surgeons of Scho- 
harie County, was born in F"ultonham, May 14, 
i860. He is the son of Charles S. and Julia 
A. (Teller) Burgett, and is a lineal descendant 
in the sixth generation of one of two brothers 
who came from Holland to America in the 



mOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



early part of the eighteenth century and set- 
tlcil (in .Manhattan Island. They bought land, 
and afterward leased one hundred acres near 
the present site of Trinity Church in New 
York City, for a term of ninety-nine years. 
l?oth married, and both had suns in the Revo- 
lutionary army. "Hurghardt," the original 
spelling of their .surname, was retained until 
within a comparatively few years. 

Millbury Hurghardt, or lUugctt, the ncxl in 
line of descent, was a ])ionecr of Schoharie 
County, and the fouiuler of the taniily in h"ul- 
ton, where he reared his eight children, one of 
whom, Millbury, was the succeeding ancestor. 
.Storm liurgett, son of Conrad Huigelt, was the 
Doctor's grandfather. He w.)s born in ImiI- 
ton, and there he liveil and died. He owned 
the farm now in tiie possession of Mr. C. I'.. 
Markhani, of whom a brief sketch may be 
found <in anotiier page of lliis x'ohime. He 
was a wagon-maker and carpenter b)' trade, oc- 
cupations at which he worked in conjunction 
w.ith farming, and was well known as one ot 
the most industrious and thrifty men of the 
connnunit)-. ']"o .Storm Hurgett ami his wife, 
whose maiden name was Sally I^aniier, si.\ 
children were born, three of whom are livin-; 
namely, Charles S. , I.ydia, wife of Timothy 
Hecker, and I'eter. 

Charles S. Hurgell was born in l-'ulton, .\u- 
gust 30, I S3 1, nnd spent his earlier years on 
the home f.irm. He siibsec|uentl\' learned the 
blacksmith's trade, at which he continued to 
work until 1 Sr.r,, when he bought the hotel 
which he has since managed successtully. He 
is a stanch Democrat in politics, hut has never 



been an aspirant for official honors. ]5oth he 
and his wife are members of the Lutheran 
church. In 1851 he married Julia .A. Teller, 
who was born .August 4, 1S3J, in l'"ulton. 

Her father, Cornelius Teller, spent the en- 
tire si.\t)-one years of his life in this town, 
being engaged during his active jieriotl in 
agricultural pursuits on a small farm that he 
hatl bought near his boyhood's home. He was 
one of the leading Democrats (jf tliis vicinit)-, 
and served as a Ta.\' C.dlector two terms in the 
earlier ])art of this century, when the entire 
receipts for the )ear were but one thousand 
one hundreil dollars, against the eight thou- 
sand dollars collected in iSyS. His wife, 
I.avinia Woman, was a daughter of Martin 
\'roman, a lifelong farmer of what is now the 
town of .Middlebuig; and Lavinia N'roman's 
mother, the grandmother of Mrs. Charles S. 
liurgett, was before marriage a Miss Zeie, 
who was born in Middleburg in Colonial days, 
and from the age of seven to fourteen years, 
during the entire period of the Revolution, 
lived in the Upper I'ort. Cornelius Teller's 
father, William Teller, was born in Schenec- 
tady, N.\',, whence he came when a young 
man to this county, and in I Soo settled in the 
town of Middleburg, where he lived until his 
death, at the age of forty-two years. He was 
a shoemaker by trade. After coming here he 
married .Maggie Feeck, the descendant of one 
of the original settlers of this part of the 
county. She survived him, living to the age 
of fifty-si.x years. l^oth were active members 
(;f the Reforme.l church. They reared eight 
children. 



Of the five chiklren born of the union of 
Charles S. and Julia A. (Teller) lUirLjett, three 
are still living; namely, Marion, the Doctor, 
and Laura. Marion, after the death of her first 
husband, Krank 1'. Ilaynes, married Warren 
P. Hollenbeck, a prominent farmer in the town 
of Broome, N. Y. Laura marrieil first Plarland 
Hayncs, of Fulton, who died leaving her with 
one child, Marion ILirland. She is new the 
wife of F. J. Graham, a shoe dealer of New 
York City, and has one child by this marriage, 
Mildred. Both parents are members of the 
Lutheran church. 

William W. Burgett obtained the rudiments 
of his education in the public schools of Ful- 
tonham, and was further advanced in learning 
by a course of study at the high school under 
Professor Sias, of whom a biographical sketch 
appears elsewhere in this Review. A short 
time he spent as a clerk in the store of H. T. 
Kingsley, and he taught school one term in 
Fulton. Going then to Schoharie, he read 
medicine two years with Dr. Layman, after 
which he entered the medical department of 
the L'niversity of New York City, from which 
he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in March, 1S82, at the age of twenty-one 
years. In addition to the regular curriculum 
of the university, he took special clinical ex- 
aminations at Bellevue Hospital under Profes- 
sor William H. Thompson, while at the same 
hospital he received private instruction in 
physical diagnosis from Professor Alfred L. 
Loomis, in operative surgery from Professor J. 
W. Wright, and in urinary- analyses under Pro- 
fessor John C. Draper. Returning to Fulton- 



ham immediately after his gracUiation, Dr. 

Burgett here began the duties of his profe-ssion, 
and has since built up a large and successful 
patronage as a general medical practitioner. 
In iS,S4 he erecteil his present residence in the 
village, and also a substantial barn on the same 
lot. He has served a number of terms on the 
local Hoard of Health, and for si.x years has been 
County Coroner. Politically, he is a sound 
Democrat. He is a member of the Schoharie 
County Medical Society, of which he has been 
vice-president and president. He is also a 
member of .Middleburg Lodge, Xo. 663, F. & 
A. M. , and is at present Master of Fultonham 
Grange, Xo. S09. 

On September 25, 18S3, Dr. Burgett mar- 
ried Miss Maggie E. Schaeffer, who was born 
in P'ulton, daughter of Hendrick Schaeffer, a 
retired farmer of Fulton. Among the pioneer 
settlers of the town of Schoharie was Christian 
Schaeffer, one of the largest landholders of that 
locality, whose son, Jacob Henry, born in 
Schoharie in iSoS, was the grandfather of :\Irs. 
Burgett. Grandfather Schaeffer was a lifelong 
agriculturist of Schoharie, where he spent his 
eighty-eight years of earthly existence, and 
was one of its most esteemed citizens. He 
was a Republican in politics, and served as an 
Overseer of the Poor. He contributed liber- 
ally toward the support of the Lutheran church, 
of which he was one of the oldest and most in- 
fluential members. His wife, Ann Alida 
Groesbeck, who died at the age of eighty-four 
years, bore him ten children. Hendrick 
Schaeffer married Helen Borst, a native of 
Middleburg, and a daughter of Peter H. Bcrst, 



2l8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the representative of an early family of Seho- 
liarie County, and himself one of the most 
wealthy and prominent of its farmers. He 
was a member of the Lutheran ehureh, and his 
death, at the ai;-e of sixty-five years, removed 
from that organization one of its substantial 
supporters. His wife, Nancy PZffner, a life- 
long resilient of Middleburg, died in 1861. 
Mr. and ^h-s. Hendrick Schaeffer reared four 
children, of whom three are living, as follows: 
Charles, a farmer in Schoharie; Alida, wife of 
Seneca Haynes; and Maggie K., now Mrs. 
Burgett. Peter, a carpenter, died at the age 
of thirty-five years. 

]3r. and Mrs. Burgett have two children, 
namely: William Layman, who was named for 
one of the Doctor's early preceptors; and 
Charles Leiand. Dr. Burgett is an elder and 
one of the trustees of the Lutheran church, 
and Mrs. Burgett also is an active church 
member, and for many years has been a teacher 
in the Sunday-school. 



WILLIAM H. MEAD, M.D., the vet- 
eran physician and surgeon of Wind- 
ham, Greene County, N.Y. , was born in 
Jewett, this county, on April 6, 1833, to 
Stephen and Caroline (Hosford) Mead. His 
great-grandfather Hosford, whose Christian 
name was Gideon, was a prominent farmer and 
land-owner in Farmington, Conn., and Dr. 
Mead has in his possession some of the ances- 
tral deetls bearing the seal of King George. 

riiilip Mead, the Doctor's paternal grand- 
father, was born in Dutchess County, New 



York, and grew up on a farm. He remo\ 1 to 
Jewett when his son Stephen was five ears 
old, finding his way hither by folh ing 
marked trees. He lived first in most 1 nii- 
tive fashion in a log hut, but in time cl ired 
a goodly tract of land and erected a com odi- 
ous frame house. He was a lifelong f; iier. 
After spending some years in Jewett, hi vent 
to Cayuga, near W^eedsport, where he r^ ided 
until his death, at sixty years of age. The 
maiden name of his wife was Hannah ' )wn- 
send. They had a large family of childri. 

The Doctor's father, Stephen Mead was 
born in Dutchess County, and reared ti farm 
life. When he became of age he pur- a.sed 
a farm in Jewett, where he spent the rem nder 
of his life, and where he died at the ,e of 
eighty-six. He followed agriculture anc lum- 
bering, and did a large business in ;lling 
bark to tanners. He and his wife, Ca line, 
were members of the Methodist Epicopal 
church. Mrs. Mead died at the age ofiixty- 
nine. She was the daughter of Joel andvlaria 
Hosford, farmer folk of Jewett. Her ather 
died at the age of eighty-four, and her mther, 
who was of Dutch descent, died while lite a 
young woman, although she lived to be four 
children. Stephen and Caroline Mea were 
also the parents of four children, three o .vhom 
are living, namely: Dr. William H., ofVind- 
ham; Dr. J. H. Mead, of Hunter, a sk.ch of 
whose life is to be found on another pa^ ; and 
Adeline, who married Alanson Woodvvith, of 
Hunter, whose biography also appears 1 this 
volume. 

William H. Mead's early life was s] nt on 



lUCX-.RAI'HICAI, RKVIF.W 



his father's farm in Jewett. He attended the 
common schools of th>.' town, and later hecanu' 
a teacher in thctn and in t lie schools i if Ilunlcr. 
After teaching for several years he to.ik up the 
study of medicine with his brother Joel, then 
settled in Hunter, and he subsequent 1\' attended 
the Albany Medical College. After his grad- 
u;Uion in iS6S he began jiractice in .Ashland, 
where he remained until 1S79, when he came 
to Windham. He has now been in continuous 
practice here for thirty years, and, barring one 
or two exceptions, is the oldest medical practi- 
tioner in service in the county. He has given 
much attention to surgery, and has performed 
some remarkable operations, his skill being 
known throughout the county. His career as 
a general practitioner has also been a distin- 
guished one. 

In 1856 Dr. William H. :\Iead was united 
in marriage with Matilda Winter, daughter, 
and one of a number of children, of Moses 
Winter, a farmer of Jewett. Mrs. Mead died 
November 26, 1S96. Of the three children 
born to her, one died at the age of ten months, 
anil another at the age of five years. A daugh- 
ter, Eugenie, is living. She is the wife of 
Emery A. Hill, a well-known Windham 
farmer, and has two children — Blanche and 
William Henry. 

Dr. Mead is a stanch Republican. His first 
Presidential vote was cast in 1856, and he has 
voted every election since with the exception 
of one. He has held a few minor offices in 
the village, but in the main has refused public 
office. He is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity in this town, and was elected Junior 



Warden within two weeks after joining the 
organization. He has been a member of the 
Cireene County Medical .Society ever since it 
was started, twciity-fivc years ago. His church 
connections are with the Methodist society of 
this place, of wliich also his wife was a mem- 
ber. For many years he was steward in the 
church, but within a slmrt time he has tendered 
his resignation of that office. For many years, 
too, he was a teacher in the .Similay-school nnd 
chori.ster of the church. During their resi- 
dence in Ashland Mrs. Meatl also was a 
teacher. Throughout his long and useful life 
the Doctor has been a promoter of every good 
and philanthropic cause, and has been actixel)- 
interested in ever)- effort to jiromote the well- 
being of his fellows. 



§0H\ ROSSMAX, M.D., a prominent 
physician of Schoharie County and a 
resident of Middleburg, was born in 
the town of Fulton on ]\Iarch S, 1847, his 
parents being George and Marietta (Beard) 
Rossman. His fir.st ancestors in this country 
came from Germany, and were among the early 
settlers of Columbia County, Yew York. His 
grandfather, whose name was Christopher, was 
born in that county, and lived there during 
early life. Before the birth of his son George, 
Christopher Rossman removed to Schoharie 
County and settled in Summit, where he 
passed the remainder of his life. In politics 
he was a Rejiublican, and both he and his wife 
were members of the Methodist church. Mrs. 
Rossman, whose maiden name was Lana 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mickcl, was born in Schoharie of an old fam- 
ily. She was the mother of fourteen children, 
all of whom grew to maturity. TIk-n' were 
named as follows: George, Mary, John, Iktsy, 
William, Christina, Nathaniel, Thoebc, David, 
Lucy, Charles, Huldah, Jane, and Cassie. 

Dr. RiisMnan's fatlier was born in Summit, 
received his education in the common schools 
there, and subsequently removed to l-'ulton, 
where he bought a farm and resided until his 
death, at the age of forty-seven, rolilically, 
George Rossman was at first a Reinililican and 
later a Democrat. I''or twenty-two years lie 
served as a Justice of the Peace. He was 
twice married. His first wife, Maiietta, who 
died when their .son Jolm was four years of age, 
was born in R icliniondvilje. She was a tiaugh- 
ter of Jacob Heard, and one of a faniil)' of four 
children. Her father was a farmer of that 
town, and subseciuently of Fulton. Late in 
life he removed to Ceneseo County, where he 
died at the advanced age of ninety. Mrs. 
Marietta H. Rossman was the mother of two 
children. Her daughter, Louise, is deceased. 
The second wife of (ieorge Rossman was before 
her marriage Marcia Holmes. She also was 
born in l-'ulton, of one of the old families. 
She died at the age of forty. 

John Rossman in his bri\liood and youtli se- 
cured a good rommon-sciiool education in the 
juiblic sch.i.ds, which he attended both snnmier 
and winter. In I sr,3 lie began to read medi- 
cine with Dr. J. D. Wheeler, of Middleburg, 
and in i sr).S' liu was graduated at the Philadel- 
phia Cniversity of Mediiiiu-and Surgery. He 
began practising with Dr. Wheeler, i)ut at the 



end of a year went to West Fulton and .started 
an indc])cndent practice. Three years later he 
returned and again engaged with his former 
partner, but after a year of joint work the two 
doctors severed their connection, and since 
then Dr. Rossman has worked alone. He has 
built u|> a large general ])ractice, and is now 
tlie oldest |)hysician in town in point of 
service. 

The Doctor married his first wife, Mary, 
the daughter of Cornelius li.>uck, in 1869. 
She died at the age of twenty eight, leaving 
three children ^ Marietta, Anna A., and 
Charles H. Marietta married M. J. Woman, 
and is the motlier of tliree chililren — Cecil, 
Lena, and Marguerite. .Anna is the wife of 
Dr. Simpkins of this town. Charles married 
Agnes McLean, and lias one child, Marion, by 
name. The Doctor's second wife, whose 
maiden name was Lizzie 15. .Smith, is a native 
of Middleburg, and the daughter of Silas 
Smith. She is a member of the P^piscopal 
churcli, but an attendant of the Reformed 
cliurch. 

For the past fifteen years Dr. Rossman has 
been Health Officer of the town, holding his 
office by annual re-elections. He is an active 
and inlluential mendier of tlie Schoharie Medi- 
cal .Society, and was secretary of the Board of 
Pension I'^.xaminers for the county. He is a 
Democrat, but iie\er an office-seeker; in fact, 
he lias never been willing to accept public 
office, cNcejit in cases where it has seemed 
]dainly his duty to do so. He is a member of 
Middlelnug L<.dge, \o. C,G:„ F. & A. M. ; of 
John L. Lewis Chapter, No. 229; of St. 



George's Commandery, No. ^■j ; La Hastile 
Lodjje, No. 494, I. O. O. V. ; .tikI Midilloburg 
Mncampmcnt, No. i J9. In the Blue Loilge ho 
has held all the offices, having been Master for 
two years, and secretary and Junior Warden for 
the same length of time each. He is Past 
Noble Grand of the Subordinate Lodge of this 
district, and Past Chief Patriarch of the Kn- 
campment, and was District Deput\ fur two 
years. I-'or seven years he has been president 
of the Midilleburg Cemetery Organization. 



'VLVESTLR K SACK, of Cntskill, 

^/^ dealer in carriages and harnesses, 
and present member of the New 
York Assembly from Greene County, was 
born in Prattsville on September 8, 1S36, son 
of Hart C. and Clarissa H. (Van Luven) Sage. 

The founder of the Sage family in America 
is said to have been David Sage, who came to 
New England in 1652, and settled at ^liddle- 
town, Conn., where he died in 1703, aged 
si.Nty-four years. 

David Sage of a later generation, grand- 
father of Mr. Sage, of Catskill, was one of the 
early settlers of Broome, Schoharie County, 
N. Y. , and resided on a farm there throughout 
the greater part of his life. 

Hart C. Sage, son of the second David here 
mentioned, was brought up on the farm in 
Uroome, but after his marriage came to Cat- 
skill. Here he remained two years engaged 
in mercantile business, and at the end of that 
time went to Prattsville, where he carried on 
a store. He died at the age of thirty-si.v. In 



early life he \:\\y^\\\ m hunl |..r -r.,,,.,! irmis. 
He was prominent among the Odd I-'ellows, 
and after he went to Prattsville he built a hall 
there for the organization. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian church, and conformed his 
daily life and walk to his professed beliefs. 
His wife, Clarissa, who siiared his religious 
faith, was born in Broome. She was a de- 
scendant of one of the early settlers there, and 
one of a large family of children. She died at 
.seventy, having been the mother of five chil- 
dren, namely : Osmar C. , who is now deceased ; 
Omar V.; Sylvester 15.; II. Clarence; and 
Hart C, Jr., also deceased. Omar \'. Sage 
is a well-known jniblic man. He was Clerk 
of Greene County for two terms, and member 
of the New Xoxk Assembly two term.s, and for 
the past five years he has held the im]OTrtant 
position of Warden of Sing Sing Prison. H. 
Clarence Sage is a profes.sor of music, residing 
in New York City. 

Sylvester B. Sage when a lad of eleven years 
lost his father, and at a very early age he was 
obliged to shift for himself. After working in 
Prattsville for a time as clerk in a store, he 
was in business there down to 1869. He then 
sold out his trade and stock and came to Cat- 
skill, and for eleven years, from 1869 to 1S80, 
conducted a grocery here. In 1880 he received 
an appointment as under sheriff, and this office 
he filled in an entirely acceptable manner for 
three years. At the end of that time he 
opened his present business, which has since 
proved to be such a success. In his extensive 
warerooms on Main Street are to be found 
vehicles of all kinds, harnesses, whips, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



general horse and carriage furnishings. He 
does a larger business in this line than any 
other firm l)etwecn Alliany and New \ink. 
He makes many of the harnesses lie carries in 
Stock, and sells many at wholesale, keeping 
five harness-makers employed the entire year. 
All wagons and carriages to be found in his 
repository are built by the best manufacturers. 
He employs fourteen men in the store, and 
sells at both whidesale and retail. lie is 
among tiie oldest busine.ss men on the street, 
and, with two or three exceiitions, the oldest 
in the town. 

In i>olitics Mr. -Sage is a Democrat. He 
held the ofnee of Town Collector for a year, 
and that of Police Justice for six years, and 
was then ai>poinled Under .Sheriff. He has 
also been on the Hoard of lulucation several 
years, and was clerk of the board during the 
greater part of his period of membership. In 
l.Sfj7 he was elected to the Assembl)', receiv- 
ing three thousand, eight liundred and sixteen 
votes, against three th(nisand, four hnndied and 
fifty-three Ifor John R Logendyke. During 
tliat vear he was a member of the Committees 
on Internal Affairs and Villages. In iS.jS he 
was again elected to the Assembly, agaiii.st 
D. (i. fireen, of Coxsackie, and is now serving 
on the Committees on (ieneral Laws and Re- 
vision, the two best in the House. 

.Mr. .Sage married, in iS6i, Alice, daughter 
of Darius \V. Smith, proprietor of a .sale stable 
in 24lh Street, New York. Of this imion two 
children have been born - Francis \'. and 
Clarence H. The latter is in business with 
liis father. .Mr. .Sage's business is located in 



one of the handsomest blocks in Catskill, and 
his residence, purchased in 1S72, occupies one 
of the most si.i^btly sjiots in the town. 

Mr. Sage is a member of Catskill Lodge, 
\o. 46S, ha\ing Joined many _\ears ago. He 
held the office of Clerk for a long time, but has 
declined all other offices. He is at the jiresent 
time vice-jiresident of the Catskill Driving 
I'ark Association, and ].resident of the Moun- 
tain Dew Hrewery, and a director in both or- 
ganizations; also a member of the Ivxecutive 
Committee of the Retail Carriage Dealers' 
Protective Association, which is a national or- 
ganization. In i8(j5 he was jiresident of the 
association. Mr. Sage and his family are all 
members of the Tresbyterian church. He is 
one of Catskill's most progressive and most 
liiglily respected citizens. 



HARLKS ]•:. WbHDMAN, M.D., 
the well-known medical ])iact it ioner of 
(iallupville, in the town of Wright, 
his native jjlace, was born on November S, 
1S70, his jiarents being Daniel and Louisa 
(Vroman) Weidman. His grandfatlier, Peter 
I. Weidman, who was born in Middleburg, 
was a farmer by occupation, and there spent 
the early part of his active life. Later he 
lived in the town of New Scotland for ten 
years, and at the end of that time came to 
Wright, where he died at the age of seventy- 
live. Peter I. Weidman's wife, the Doctor's 
grandmother, P'.dith I loughtaling, a native of 
New Scotland, Albany County, is still living 
on the old farm. All her life she has been 




CHARLES E. WEI U.MAX. 



mOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a devoted member of the Lutheran church. Of 
the five children born to her, onl}- one is living. 

Daniel W'eidman, son of Peter I., was reared 
on a farm, and received his education in the 
common schools. He spent the later years of 
his life on the old homestead, his death occur- 
ring at the age of fift}'-t\vo. In politics he 
was a stanch Republican, as his father before 
him had been. He was a leading agriculturist 
of his town and an acti\"e member of the 
Lutheran church. 

Dr. Weidman's mother, who was the daugh- 
ter of Albert \'roman and one of a family of 
eleven children, was born in 1S46, in the town 
of Gviilderland, in Albany Count}-, this State. 
Her father was a speculator in farm produce. 
Her mother, whose maiden name was Van 
Aurnum, is still living. Besides the Doctor, 
Mrs. Weidman had two children, namely: Aus- 
tin J. ; and Edith, who is the wife of Charles 
S. Young. Mrs. W'eidman died in iS8g at 
the age of forty-three. Both parents were 
members of the Lutheran church, and the 
father had held the office of Deacon as well 
as others of less importance. 

The boyhood of Dr. W'eidman was spent on 
the home farm. He attended the common 
schools and Hartwick Seminary, graduating 
from the last-named institution in 1891. 
Subsequent to this he taught school in Gal- 
lupville for two years. He pursued the study 
of medicine in the Albany Medical College, 
was graduated in 1895, and since that time 
has been located here. He has demonstrated 
his fitness for the profession in which he has 
engaged, and has built up a flourishing prac- 



tice, his ability being recognized by all who 

have had occasion to call upon liim. Al- 
though he has been here but a cumpriralively 
short time, he has won many friends profes- 
sionally; and his services are in rei|uisition, 
not only in the village, but also in the outly- 
ing districts. 

Dr. W'eidman was married in the fall of 
1896 to Minnetta C. Barringer, who was bcirn 
in Germantown, Columbia County. .She is the 
daughter of John I. Barringer, a druggist of 
Hudson, former]}' of Germantown, and one 
of a family of three children. Li politics, the 
Doctor is a Republican. He has served on 
the town Republican committee, and has been 
candidate for Coroner. He has held a number 
of offices on the election board, among these 
being that of ballot clerk. In 1S9S he was 
elected Supervisor of the town of U'right, and 
in 1S99 ^^'^s re-elected for two \ears. Profes- 
sionally, he is a member of the Schoharie 
County Medical Society. He is a member of 
Orion Lodge, No. 624, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; is Past Grand, and has been 
through all the other chairs. Mrs. W'eidman 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church of 
W'aterford. 



,OBHRT ELLIOTT, whose death oc- 
urred on January 6, 1899, was for 
man\' years a representative citizen 
of Hunter, X.Y., being well known in the 
third quarter of the century as a general mer- 
chant, and later as the builder and proprietor 
of the Kaatsberg. He was of Scotch-Iri.sh 
parentage, and was born on June 24, 1822, in 



BIOORAPHICAT- REVIFAV 



Ireland, where liis father, whose name was 
Thomas. s|)ent his entire life engaj;eil in agri- 
eiiltiue. 

Thomas Mlliott and his family were stanch 
members of the Presbyterian church, and he 
was an KUIcr for many years. lie lived to be 
eijjhty years old. 1 1 is aife, Jane McLane 
Klliott, was of Scotch descent, and one of a 
large family. She was the mother of the fol- 
lowing' - named children: Robert; John, who 
lives in Kansas; Thomas, Jr., also in Kansas; 
Samuel, Harriet, and James, all three de- 
ceased; Helena and Jane, who are living in 
Ireland; and Adam, who went to Australia. 
James Klliott was educated for the Presbyte- 
rian ministry at Hclfast. He subsequently 
taught in Canada. 

Robert I-:iliott inherited from his parents 
those sterling qualities which ever character- 
ized his dealings, and which were such potent 
factors in shaping his successful business 
career. He was educated in the national 
schools of Ireland. At the early age of cight- 
teen years he took the place of a jMofessor in 
one of those schools, and performed the duties 
of the [losition for si.\ months in a highly cred- 
itable manner. At the end of that time he set 
sail for America. He soon obtained a posi- 
tion in a tannery, and after a short time he 
entered the cmjiloy of Mr. Kilwards, who be- 
longed to the prominent Hunter family of that 
name, and who was descended from the Jona- 
than I'.dwards family of Massachusetts. Mr. 
I'Mii.itt kept books for Mr. lulwards until that 
gentleman died, and he then entered tlie em- 
ploy of his brother. Colonel William W. 



lulwards, with whom he came to this town in 
1848. Colonel Edwards carried on a large 
tannery here, and Mr. Klliott had charge of 
the accounts of the concern until his employer 
went out of business. 

In 1853 Mr. Klliott opened a general store, 
and for the next twenty-five years he conducted 
a large and successful business. At the end of 
that time he sold out, and later bought the lot 
upon which be erected the beautiful Kaatsberg. 
This fine house be built in 18S3— the finest 
house in Hunter village. He ran this as a 
summer boarding-house up to 1897, when he 
gave u]) the management to his son, Robert d. 
Klliott. All built under Mr. Klliott's super- 
vision, it is a monument to his thoroughness 
and is admired by e\cry one. 

In 1855 Mr. Klliott married Mary A. Cald- 
well, a lady of Canadian birth. Of the six 
children born of this union, four are living; 
namely, Helena, I':imore I-;., Clara, and Ro- 
bert (j. b"Jmi}re V.. , who is a prominent ])h\-- 
sician in Catskill, married Mabel Sanderson, 
a daughter of Judge Sanderson, of Catskill, 
and has two sons — John Sanderson and Robert 
Caldwell. Clara resides with her mother. 
Helena is the wife of Dr. C. P. McCabe, of 
Greenville. Of her three children one is liv- 
ing, a daughter Dorothy. 



^;I•:M1A1I DCXCKIT., who resides on 
/^l his farm in the town of Seward, about 
^ lile from the village of Hyndsville 

in .Schoharie Count)-, is living retired from 
active pursuits, enjoying the fruits of his ear- 



licr years of toil. He was born April 7, 
iSji, in C";inaiiiiiaric, N.\'., a son of George 
C. l)inK'i<el, and tiie ilesccnilaiU of a jiionccr 
settler of that town. 

His great-.^nuuHatlier, Dunckcl, wliosc name 
was Peter, enii-rateel from Gcrnianv in Colo- 
nial limes. IV'ter Dunckcl took up a large 
tract of unbroken land in Canajoharic, and, 
erecting a small log cabin in the wodds, settled 
there with his wife and children. He was an 
industrious, hard-working man, and while 
clearing a farm for himself he assisted in the 
upbuilding of the town. His son George, who 
was the grandfather of Jeremiah Dunckel, the 
subject of this brief sketch, enlisted as a sol- 
dier in the Revolutionary army, and at the 
battle of Cedar Swamp was unfortunate enough 
to lose an eye. 

George Dunckel was born in Germany, and 
spent the first ten years of his life in the 
Fatherlanil. Coming then to New York with 
his parents, he performed his full share of the 
pioneer labor of redeeming a homestead from 
the forest. When, on the death of his father, 
the farm came into his possession, he continued 
the improvements already begun; and prior to 
his death, which occurred at the age of eighty- 
four years, he had a fine set of frame buildings 
on the place, which was one of the best in its 
appointments of any in the neighborhood. 
Si.x children were born to him and his wife, 
Elizabeth Countryman. She, too, lived to an 
advanced age. Both were active members of 
the Lutheran church. 

George G. Dunckel, son of George, grew to 
manhood on the ancestral farm in Canajoharie, 



where from his youth up he was familiar with 
its daily labors. He subsequently became .sole 
owner of the hmnestead pro])crty, and was there 
prosperously engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until iS4,S. Selling out at that time, he came 
to Seward, and, having purchased the farm now 
owned and occupied by his son Jeremiah, he 
carried it on until his decea.se, at the age of 
seventy-seven years. A man of energy and in- 
telligence, he was a valued member <i\ the 
Democratic party, and for a number of terms 
served wisely as Assessor and Highwa_\- Com- 
missioner. He was a Methodist in his relig- 
ious belief, and an active member of the 
church of that denomination. He married 
Maria Cook, daughter of John R. Cook, a 
farmer and blacksmith of Canajoharie. They 
had a family of eleven children, three of whom 
are now living, namely: Jeremiah, the fifth- 
born; Levi, who lives at Central Bridge; and 
Sophronia, widow of Austin Lorv, late of 
Hyndsville. 

Jeremiah Dunckel obtained his early educa- 
tion in the common schools, and under the in- 
struction of his father became well versed in 
farming pursuits. When the family came to 
Seward he accompanied them, and, remaining 
an inmate of the household, assisted in the 
management of the new farm. This valuable 
estate of two hundred acres he now holds in 
his own name, having purchased the interest 
of the remaining heirs. In its care he has 
shown excellent judgment and skill. He has 
carried on general farming to advantage, devot- 
ing a part of the land to raising hops, a profita- 
ble crop in this section of the State, and has 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



also niL-t with success as a dair_\iiian. He has 
sdmetimes had as many as fuity cows in his 
herd, and his l)utter has always met with a 
ready sale. Oi recent )ears he has relegated 
the management of the estate to his eldest son, 
Lucius Dunckel. 

On October 5, 1S43, Mr. i:)unckel married 
Lana A., daughter of .Sylvanus Nestle, a well- 
known tailor of .Sprout 15rook, N. V. She died 
at the age of sixty-one \ears, iiaving boine him 
four children. Of these two are dead, namely : 
listher, who married Anson ll\iuls; and Helen 
M., who married Irving .Schoolcraft. The two 
now living are Lucius and George. Lucius, 
born April 6, 1X46, has spent iiis life on the 
home farm, of which he has had full charge 
since 1S82. He is a DciiKjcrat in politics 
and lias served as school trustee. In i86g he 
married Adelaide Lory, daughter of John 
Lory, of Seward. 'I'hey have one child, Lottie 
Ann, who married Clark Houton, Postmaster 
and merchant at Hyndsville, and has two chil- 
dren — lulna ]?elle and J. Leroy. George, a 
resident of G.bleskill, married Angerilla I'alk. 
They had five children: Jerry; Ann; Una and 
Ula, twins; and Oscar, who died at the age of 
nineteen years. After the death of his first 
wife, Mr. Dunckel married Henrietta Young, 
who was born in Seward township, where hei- 
father, Jeremiah \'oung, a farmer of Seward 
township, but a native of Onondaga County, 
died aged .seventy years. Her mother, whose 
maiden name was Caroline ]'.. W'eatherwax, 
was born in Rensselaer County. She died in 
1S92, aged eighty-one years, leaving seven 
children out of a family of ten born to her and 



her husband. .Mr. and Mrs. ^'oung were 
members of the Lutiieran church. 

Mr. Lunckel is a standi Jeffersonian Demo- 
crat, dyed in the wool. He has taken an ac- 
tive interest in advancing the welfare of the 
town and count)', but has invariabl)- refused 
public office, although he has served as trustee 
of the School lioard. He was one of the orig- 
inators of the Cohleskill Agricultural Society, 
and has been among its most active and valued 
members. Mrs. Diuickel is a member of the 
Methodist church. 



§AMKS ]?. DALEY, of I'rattsville, at- 
torney-at-law and a Civil War vet- 
eran, was born in Ohio, township of 
Richfield, INIarch 7, 1S45, son of Daniel and 
Mary Ann (Champlin) Daley. His jjaternal 
grandfather, Joseph Daley, and his great- 
grandfather, Obadiah Daley, were lifelong 
residents of Columbia County, New York, 
and the latter was the son of Joseph Daley, 
first, who came from New luigland to Chat- 
ham, N.Y., where he cleared a farm. Joseph 
Daley, second, Mr. Daley's grandfather, was 
a prosjierous farmer, and noted tor his pliysi- 
cal strength and jiower of endurance. He 
married Hannah Son. Her fatiier was an 
early settler in Columbia County, antl she in- 
herited a (lart of the Son farm. The Krnnd- 
parents died at tiie age of eighty years. They 
reared a large family of children, and none 
are now living 

Daniel Daley, James 15. Daley's father, fol- 
lowed the blacksmith's trade in Chatham for 



ISIOC.RAl'inCAf. 



a time, and moving from there to Lebanon 
Springs, N. Y., he earrict! on the wagon-mak- 
ing business lor sonic \c;us, finally retiring 
to a farm in Cliatliani, where lie tlieil at the 
age of seventy-seven. He was widely known 
among (Md I'ellows, having been a member of 
that onler for many years; and he also had a 
large number of friends and acquaintances 
outside of that fraternity. His wife, Mary 
Ann, was born in Chatham, daughter of Will- 
iam and Mary (Kenyon) Champlin. Her 
father, who came to this State from Rhode 
Island, taught school in New York Cit\' prior 
to settling upon a farm in the town of Chat- 
ham. He had a family of six children. 
Daniel and Mary Ann Daley were the parents 
of ten children, si.\ of whom are living; 
namely, William C. , George, James I?., 
Henry, Sarah, and Charles. William C. and 
George Daley are practising law in Chatham, 
and a sketch of each will be found in the Bio- 
c.K.M'iiiCAL Review of Columbia County. 
James li. is the subject of this sketch; Henry 
is a lawyer residing in Co.xsackie, N.Y. ; 
Sarah is the widow of Nathan C. Hagerborn, 
late of Stillbrook, N.Y. ; and Charles is 
residing at the homestead in Chatham. 
The mother died at the age of seventy- 
two years. The jjarents were Baptists. 
They, were highly esteemed for their many 
excellent qualities, and obituary notices 
of each were published in the county news- 
papers. 

Having supplemented his common-school 
studies with a course at the Lebanon Springs 
Academy, James B. Daley turned his atten- 



tion to educational pursuits, teaching schools 
in Columbia and Renssehier Counties, New 
\'ork, and in Berkshire County, Massachu- 
setts. His law studies were jjursuod in the 
office of his brother (leorge, an.l after his a<l- 
mission to the bar in 1 872, he began the prac- 
tice of his profession in lYattsville. In the 
spring of 1S73 he returned to Chatham, where 
he was in business one year, at the end of 
which time he removed to Windham, Greene 
County, and for the succeeding eight years 
was a member of the firm of Daley & Tal- 
madge, who transacted an extensive general 
law and real estate business. After the di.s- 
solution of that partnership he once more re- 
turned to Prattsville, where he has practised 
continuously to the present time. His Civil 
War services were performed in Company B, 
Ninety-first Regiment, New York Volunteers, 
with which he participated in a number of en- 
gagements, including the battle of Five 
Forks; and he witnessed the surrender of 
General Lee at Appomattox Court House. 

In June, 1878, Mr. Daley was united in 
marriage with Lucy Tyler, who was born in 
Roxbury, Delaware County, daughter of Henry 
and Deborah (Hull) Tyler. Her father was 
a wealthy farmer. He eventually removed 
from Roxbury, his native town, to Pratts- 
ville, where he spent the rest of his life. 
Henry Tyler died at seventy-three, and his 
wife died at seventy. They reared three chil- 
dren: Lorinda, who married John Erkson, a 
leading merchant of Prattsville: Lncv, who 
married Mr. Daley; and Annie, who married 
Homer B. Van Cott, of Norwich, N.Y. .Mrs. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Daley was a graduate of the l-"urt Edwards 
Institute, and prior to iier marriage she taught 
music at the institute in Ellenville. Siie 
dieil in iSy6, aged forty-six years. As a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
she took an active interest in religious work, 
and was sincerely respected for her estimable 
character and rare intellectual qualities. She 
left four children; namely, M.uuie, I'Jiima, 
I'-thel, anil James, aged res[)cctivcly sixteen, 
fourteen, twelve, and ten years. 

Politically, Mr. Daley is a Republican. 
He has served with ability as a trustee of the 
village and of the Cemetery Association for a 
number of years, and acts as a notary public. 
His literary talents arc highly appreciated in 
l'ratts\'ille and vicinity, ami his frequent con- 
tributions to the various county papers upon 
different subjects are widely read. His more 
notable writings are: a series of articles de- 
scribing his war experience, published in the 
Catskill I-.xamiiur ; another series devoted to 
Western life, printed in the Hunter /V/«7//.r, 
and a number of articles upon legal subjects, 
which have been bmuul with the law journal 
for preservation. Mr. Daley attends the 
Methodist lipiscopal church. 



'ON. JOHN A. 'IRISWtJLD, of Cats- 
kill, \.\'., cx-Congressman and 
liner Judge and Surrogate of 
Greene County, was born in C'airo, this 
C(umt_\-, Nnvemi)er iS, \%22, .son of Ste])hcn 
H. and Phiebe (.\shley) C.riswold. He is a 
reineseiitalive of the (iriswuld family ot Con- 



necticut, an account of whom appeared in the 
I Mixgazinc of American Histor}' in 1S84. Mis 
father was born in Greene County, New 
York, I-"ebruary 26, 1793; and his grandfather, 
Jeremiah (iriswold, came to Catskill from 
C(Hinecticut about liie\ear i Soo, accompanied 
by his family. 
! Jeremiah Griswold, who was a prosperous 
farmer, lived to an advanced age. He married 
.Mary Hill, whose birth took place either in 
Massachusetts (jr Connecticut in December, 
1753. She served the patriot cau.se during the 
Revolutionary War by making cartridges for 
her brothers. Siie died December 8, 1841. 
Stephen 11. (iriswold, Judge Griswold's 
father, studied law, but did not enter into 
practice, preferring instead to engage in agri- 
cultural pursuit.s. He owned a good farm in 
Cairo, where he resided until his death, which 
occurred June 14, 1S44. As a stanch supporter 
of the Democratic party he took an active in- 
terest in tlie jjolitical affairs of his day, and 
was universally esteemed for his upright char- 
acter. He was a Free I\Iason, antl in his 
)iiunger days was identified with the local 
151ue Lodge. He and his wife, rhcebe, were 
members of the Methodist ]-:piscopal cluircb. 
Mrs. Griswold was a native of Catskill, where 
her father, John Ashley, was an industrious 
farmer. She became the mother of ten chil- 
dren, live of whom are living, namely: John 
A., the subject of this sketch; Miles, who re- 
sides in one of the Western States; Atitli.son, 
a well-known lawyer <if Catskill; .\lonzo, who 
is residing on a farm in Jesup, la. ; and Mar- 
ion, wlu) is a banker in Ohio. Tlie others 




JOHN A. t;RIS\VOLU. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'i3 



were: Mar\-, Stci>hen, luiiily, Jcidnie, ;uul 
MalKila. Stephen, who entered the I'ni.ni 
army as a surgeon early in the Civil War, was 
eaiUiiretl by the enemy at the first battle of 
Hull Run, anil ilied in [irison. Jerome, who 
was a ilrii;;i;ist in Kansas, was killed by Con- 
t'eilerate raiders iimler (Juantrell. Judge (iris- 
wokl's mother died June 13, 1S77, aged 
se\ent\-two \ears. 

IIa\ing pursued his preliminary studies in 
the public schools, John A. Griswold became 
a pupil at the academies in Prattsville and 
Catskill, concluding his attendance at the lat- 
ter at the age of sixteen. After teaching for 
a time, he applied himself to the stud\' of law 
with his uncle, Addison C. Griswold, and 
Richard Corning, the latter a brother of Eras- 
tus Corning, of Albany. Subsequently he 
continued his preparations in Syracuse, N.Y. , 
and was admitted to the bar as an attorne\- and 
counsellor of the State in 1S4S. Commencing 
the practice of his profession alone, he was 
later associated with Addison Griswold until 
elected District Attorney in 1S57, and afterward 
he was for some time in company with Rufus 
W. Watson. He ably performed the duties of 
District Attorney for three years, winning in 
that capacity a high reputation; and his able 
handling of several important cases, both as a 
public and private practitioner, caused his ele- 
vation in 1S64 to the position of Judge and 
Surrogate of Greene County. His four years' 
service upon the bench was extremely credita- 
ble to himself as well as beneficial to the com- 
munity; and in i868 he was elected to a seat 
in Congress by the Democratic party, defeat- 



ing Thonias Cornell, of Rondout, by a major 
ity of live hundred votes. His work in the 
national House of Representatives was charac- 
terized by a thorough understanding of the 
principles of federal government and a clear 
conception of the many imjiortanl ijuestions 
submitted lor legislation; and, when a conven- 
tion was deciiled upon for the purpose of revis- 
ing the Constitution of the State of New ^■()rk, 
he was again called into service as a delegate 
from his district. In iSjdhewas a delegate 
to the National Convention which nominated 
Samuel J. Tilden for President. He has also 
rendered his share of service in town affairs, 
serving as a Supervisor in 1S72; and his inter- 
est in the w^elfare of the community in which 
he lives was not eclipsed by the higher 
public duties to which he has been called. 

In 1S57 Judge Griswold married :\liss Eliza- 
beth M. Roberts, a daughter of the late Will- 
iam Roberts, who was a prosperous farmer of 
Cliftondale, Ulster County, this State. Mrs. 
Griswold died Novembers, 1 S96, aged si.xty- 
six years. Judge Griswold resides in what is 
known as the Cornwall house, situated on an 
estate commanding a view for twenty miles 
around of the varied and picturesque scenery 
for which the Catskill region is noted. He 
has survived all of his former legal contempo- 
raries in this section, but is still upon the 
active list; and, if not as young in years as his 
personal appearance would indicate, his mental 
capacity retains its accustomed vigor, and his 
strong, manly character is as much appreciated 
to-day as it was during the period of his public 
services. He is a Master Mason, and was for- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



nicrly a member of the Catskill I.ndge, N'( 
46.S. In his relii;i(His belief he is an lCpi^ 



ILLARD T. RIVKNUURG, M.U., 
a well-known medical practitioner 
of Middlebiir^, \. V., was born in the village 
of Chatham in (ihent, Columbia County, this 
State, on November 25, 1S63, son of J. Mor- 
gan and Charlotte (Tipple) Rivenburi;. As 
his name indicates, he is of Dutch ancestry, 
although his family has been settled in New 
York for many years. 

His grandfather, Henry Rivenburg, was 
born in Columbia County, and there spent his 
entire life. He helped in clearing a part of 
the farm which he occupied and carried on. 
The Doctor's father was an agriculturist, and 
was a man highly respected in his town. He 
was killed by the cars at the age of thirty- 
seven. His wife, who was born in Otsego 
County, was descended from Revolutionary 
stock. S!ie was also related to Walter Gunn, 
who with his wife was in the mission field in 
India, under the auspices of the Lutheran 
church. Hoth parents were members of the 
Reformed church at Ghent. Of their three 
children, two grew to maturit)'. These are 
the Doctor and John Rivenburg, .Superintend- 
ent of Poor for Cidumljia County and a coal 
dealer at Ghent. 

Dr. Rivenburg was educated at the Hoys' 
Academy, Troy, the South 15erkshire Insti- 
tute, Mass., and the University of Buffalo, 
from the last named of which he received the 
degree of Doctor of Meilicine in 1SS5. 



While in college he was president of the 
Alpha Omega Delta Society, and his society 
sheepskin bears his own official signature as 
such. He was the founder of the college so- 
ciety known as the "Secret Seven." Dr. 
Rivenburg first settled for practice at Blen- 
heim, but after a short stay there he came, in 
1887, to Middleburg, where he has won a po- 
sition of influence. He covers a wide area in 
his professional visits, and receives calls for 
consultation from physicians resiiling twenty- 
five miles distant. 

The Doctor was married on October 14, 
I 89 1, to Helle Stanton, a graduate of the Al- 
bany Female Academy and a daughter of John 
Stanton, who was a merchant, and later rail- 
road station agent of this town. She was 
born on the homstead of her grandmother, not 
far from here, and is descended from one of 
the oldest and most honored families in this 
region. Among her ancestors was brave Gen- 
eral James Dana, who was immortalized by 
Washington in his first general order immedi- 
ately following the battle of Banker Hill, 
where Dana, then Ca])tain, comnKuuled a 
comjiany of the Connecticut line of Conti- 
nental troojis. 

Dr. Rivenburg is a physician of the county 
almshouse. He has served as [iresident and 
vice-president of the Medical Society of Scho- 
harie County, and is now medical e.xaminer 
for several well-known insurance companies, 
chief of which aie the Mutual Life of New 
York, tiie North-western, the I'enn, the Brook- 
lyn, the Nederland, the Manhattan, the 
Bankers', and the United States Acciiient. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



iS 



In iSS6 1)0 took ;i i)ost-L;r:ulii:itc course at 
tlic Collcj^c of Physicians ami Surgeons in 
New York. Mo is a charter member of the 
John M. Scribner Hook and Ladder Company, 
and for five years was in active service, since 
which time he has been on the reserve list. 
Fraternally, he is Master of Middleburg Lodge, 
No. 663, F. & A. M. ; and Past Sachem of 
Oiicongena Tribe, No. 240, I. O. R. M. He is 
treasurer of the Village Corporation; also a 
trustee of St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran 
church, and assistant superintendent of the 
Sunilay-school. 



AXIEL \V. J1:NKINS, agent of the 
D. & H. Railroad at Central 
Bridge, Schoharie County, N.Y., 
was born in Glen, Montgomery County, on 
September 27, 1846, son of Nathaniel and 
Eleanor (Shannon) Jenkins. His great- 
grandfather Jenkins, who was a Welshman by 
birth, came to this country and settled on 
Long Island, where he died. At the time the 
British invaded the island he was made a pris- 
oner of war. After the close of the Revolu- 
tion the family removed to Duanesburg, Sche- 
nectady County, this State. William, one of 
the sons and grandfather of Daniel W. Jen- 
kins, was born on Long Island, but spent the 
last years of his life in Montgomery County, 
where he died in old age. 

Nathaniel Jenkins, son of William by his 
second wife, was born in Montgomery. He 
was reared on a farm, and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools. He was one of a 



large family ol children, only two ..f whom 
are now living, both physicians and promi- 
nent in their professions — namely, Thomas, 
resiiling at Vandalia, and George, at Kiibourn 
City, Wis. Nathaniel was very successful in 
his farming, and was highly respected by all 
who know him. He died at the age of eighty- 
two. His wife, I'.leanor, who died at the age 
of eighty, was born in Prattsville. Both were 
members of the Society of Friends. 

Daniel W. J-enkins received a practical 
common-school education, and on September 
I 5, 1863, at the age of seventeen years, entered 
the employ of the Albany & Susquehanna 
Railroad Company. This road has since be- 
come a part of the D. & H. C. Company sys- 
tem. Mr. Jenkins's father was agent at 
Quaker Street (now Delanson), and at that 
time the equipments of the ticket ofifice were 
carried in a tin box, and the way bills were 
made out on a board that was set up in 
the embankment. The road then ended at the 
Schoharie Creek, near the present Schoharie 
Junction. Mr. Jenkins has since seen it ad- 
vanced all the distance to Binghamton. There 
was only one train per day, as against fifty 
per day at the present time, and most of the 
modern improvements have been added since 
then. Mr. Jenkins succeeded his father as 
agent at Quaker Street, and in 1868 became 
the agent at Central Bridge, where he has 
since remained. He has now two assistants. 
He is the youngest of seven children, the 
others being: De Witt C, at .Syracuse; Zerah 
and William A., at Delanson; Mrs. Lottie 
Christman, of Iowa; Mrs. Colonel Coryell, 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



whose husband is an cx-paymastc-r of the 
D. & H. Road; and Mrs. M. S. lloa-, ..1 Al- 
bany. In adtlition to his duties as station 
agent, Mr. Jenkins docs a large business in 
handling coal, lumber, hay, and straw. 

As a business man Mr. Jenkins is known as 
a -MuLstler." Whatever he tmds to do he 
does with all his might, and, as a rule, suc- 
cessfully. Recognizing his superior business 
cjualifications, the 15oard of Trustees of the 
Schoharie County Agricultural Society elected 
him president of the society, which position 
he has held for the jiast eight or ten years. 
As a representative of this organization he 
has been one of the leading spirits in the 
State organization of county societies, serving 
on the li.xecutive Committee; and for the past 
few years he has been vice-president of the so- 
ciety, frequently visiting Albany during the 
legislative sessions in the interests of agri- 
cultural societies generally. 

In politics Mr. Jenkins is a stanch Demo- 
crat, and has frequently attended county ami 
State conventions as a representative of his 
party. In the winter of 18S9 he accepted the 
nomination for Supervisor of the town of 
Schoharie. At the succeeding town meeting 
he was elected, and he has served the town 
continuously since then as Supervisor, having 
been elected three times without opposition. 
He was chairman of the board for the years 
1893, 1896, and I'^Q/, and at the spring meet- 
ing held May 2, 1899, was again honored by 
being unanimously elected chairman for the 
ensuing two years. As Supervisor he has 
e.Ncrted a i)owcrful influence. He was largely 



instrumental in effecting a settlement of the 
suits brought against the county by several 
towns of the county (including the town of 
Schoharie), when the law went into effect re- 
quiring the amount raised by ta.vation of the 
railroads in tcnvns having a bonded railroad 
debt to be deposited with the county treas- 
urer as a sinking fund with which to meet the 
bonds when due. In this settlement the town 
of Schoharie receivetl its full share — in fact, 
more than she hail reason to e.xpect. As a 
member of the county board he has looked 
carefully after the interests of the county, be- 
lieving liberality without extravagance in the 
care of county jiroperty to be a benefit in the 
long run, and firmly advocating the policy of 
the county paying its debts instead of paying 
interest on old claims. He is always fore- 
most in any movement which contemplates 
the interests of his town, and more than once 
has contributed of his means for such a pur- 
pose. 

On September 9, 1869, Mr. Jenkins was 
united in marriage with Harriet L. Rosekrans, 
daughter of Charles Rosekrans, of Jonesville, 
Saratoga County. 

Mr. Jenkins is identified with the order of 
Masonry, being a thirty-second degree Mason; 
and he has many social ties in Schoharie 
County. He belongs to Schoharie Valley 
Lodge, No. 491; John L. Lewis Chapter of 
Cobleskill; Temple Commandery of Albany, 
a noted commandery in the .State; to Ue Witt 
Clinton Council of Albany: and to Cypress 
Temple f)f the Mystic Shrine, of the same 
city. He is also a member of Wellington 



ItlOCKArillCAI. 



»37 



Lodge, No. 731. I. O. O. F.. of Central 
Hriilge. He is an attendant and liberal sup- 
porter of the Lutheran church. 



7^iI.\RLi:S FOWLICR, proprietor of 
I Jj the I'uwlcr House, I'rattsville, was 

^*^ ' born in Lexington, Greene County, 

N. Y., September 15, 1845, son of David S. 
and Agnes (Muir) Fowler. 

The Fowler family is of English origin. 
There were several immigrants of this name 
in New England in early Colonial times. It 
is said that William Fowler, who arrived in 
Boston in June, 1637, and tlie next year went 
to New Haven, was the ancestor of n-.ost, if 
not all, of the P'owlors, of Connecticut. 

Silas Fowler, great-grandfather of Charles 
I-'owler, was a native of Connecticut. After 
his marriage he came to New York State, and 
settling in Le.xington. now Jewctt, resided 
there until his death, which occurred at the 
age of eighty-four years. He was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier from this State, and a memento 
of his services in the shape of a flint-lock gun 
taken by him at the battle of Bunker Hill is 
now owned by his grandson, Addison Fovvier, 
of Le.xington, N.Y. He reared a family of 
eight children. 

Silas Fowler, second, Charles Fowler's 
grandfather, was three years old when his par- 
ents moved to Lexington. He remained at the 
homestead until after his marriage, when he 
purchased a farm near by, and tilled the soil 
industriously for the rest of his life. His 
wife, wnose maiden name was Hannah Mc- 



Lane, is a native of Livingston, N.Y., a 
daughter of George Mcl.ane. Her father fol- 
lowed the shoemaker's trade in connection 
with farming. She became the mother of 
nine children; namely, Charles, Rachel, 
David S., Louise, Elizabeth, Minerva, Silas, 
Addison, anil Julia. Charles, Rachel, and 
Silas are no loni;er living. Elizabctii mar- 
ried Addison De Yoe. .Minerva married 
Henry Moore, of Yilford, Michigan. Silas 
Fowler, second, died at the age of seventy- 
four years, and his wife lived to be ninety-six 
years old. They were both members of the 
Dutch Reformed church. 

David S. Fowler, Charles I'-owler's father, 
was born in Lexington, February 24, 181 8. 
Beginning life for himself upon a leased farm, 
which he afterward purchased, he resided in 
his native town until 1875. He then removed 
to Prattsville, where he bought a farm and 
carried it on for two years, at the end of 
which time he retired and purchased a resi- 
dence in the village where he is still living. 
Mr. F'owler, who is unusually active, both 
physically and mentally, for one of his years, 
remembers when deer roamed fearlessly over 
the town of Lexington. He has witnessed 
the growth of Prattsville from a struggling 
little settlement, and saw its founder, Colo- 
nel Pratt, set out many of the shade trees that 
now adorn its main thoroughfare. He was in 
his younger days interested in military affairs, 
serving as an officer in a local artillery com- 
pany. He has a distinct recollection of the 
days when slavery was permitted in this sec- 
tion. Later he belonged to tiie famous 



238 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Know-Nothing party. Ho has voted the 
straight Democratic ticket tor sixty years. 
David S. I'owier contracteil tlie first of his 
two marriages in 1S41 with Agnes Miiir, a 
native of Scotland, who died in 1873; and for 
his second wife he married Laura Goodsell, 
whose ancestors came from ConnLcticut. He 
is the father of three chiltlren, all by his first 
iinii)ii; namely, M.try, Charles, and Agnes. 
Mary marrietl A. 15jckwith, a prosperous 
farmer of Lexington. They have one tlaugh- 
ter, Ada, who is the wife of George Kaeder, 
antl has one son, Charles. Agnes married 
Alon/.o Johnson, of Lexington, and her chil- 
dren are: Charles, May, and Willie. 

Charles Fowler acquired a common-school 
education in his native town. He was reared 
to agricultural [nirsuits, and assisted his 
father in carrying on the homesteatl farm until 
the latter's removal to I'rattsville, when he 
took charge of the ])ro|)erty which he managed 
for five years, or until it was sold. Coming 
to Prattsville in 1880, he in ^Llrch of that 
year bought a half-interest in the Prattsville 
House, in the management of which he was 
associated until July, 18X2, when he sold out. 
He immeiliately jnirchased his present prop- 
erty, which, alter repairing and refurnishing, 
he opened as the l''owlcr House. Here he has 
ever since entertained the travelling public in 
a most hospitable manner. The Fowler 
House i)roviiles am])le accommodations for 
fifty guests. It occupies a sightly location 
on the banks of Schoharie Creek, in a region 
noted for its beautiful and varied scenery. 
Its sanitary and other conveniences for the 



health and comfort of its patrons are unsur- 
passetl, and a first-class livery stable con- 
nected with the house affords excellent facili- 
ties for driving over the surrounding country. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Fowler was joined in marriage 
with Mary Coggshall, of this town. She was 
born in Rensselaerville, daughter of Asa and 
.Mary (Joyce) Coggshall, the former of whom 
was a native of Gilderlantl and a scho(dmaster 
by occuj^ation. Asa and Mary Coggshall had 
a famil)' of ten chikiren, nine of whom are 
living; namely, Harvey, George, Origen, 
Sarah, Samuel, Asa, Mary, Julia, and Aletta. 
Sarah married E. P. Churchill, of Prattsville, 
and Aletta married Dwight Miller. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fowler have one daughter, Edith, who 
completed her education at the .Stamford 
Seminary. 

In politics Mr. l<"owler is a Democrat. 
Though frequently solicitetl to become a can- 
didate for public office, he invariably de- 
clines. Mrs. I'owler and her daughter are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



liS. JULIA A. WILSON, one of 
he best known temperance workers 
in Jelferson, Schoharie County, 
N.V., was born in this town in January, 
1828, daughter of John and Laura (Hamilton) 
Nichols. .She is of New England ancestry on 
both sides. Her great-grandfather Nichols, 
whose name was Daniel, was a resident of 
Western Massachusetts. Her grandfather, 
Ezra Nichols, came to New York from Will- 
iamstown, Mass., settled as a pioneer at North 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



HaipcrsML'ld, Delaware County, N. V., and 
tlirouj;]! energy and ]ierse\-eranee became the 
owner of a jjood farm containinj; about two 
lunulrod acres. He resitled in that town for 
the rest of his life. ]'>/ra Nichols married 
I'^lizabeth Knapp, of Danbury, Conn., antl his 
children were: Daniel. John, Clemon, L'li, 
Sarah, anil Chloe. Daniel died in Harpers- 
field; Clemon died in Jefferson, at the age of 
ninety-four years: Eli died in Madison, Ohio; 
Sarah became Mrs. Knapp; and Chloe became 
Mrs. Dixon. 

John Nichols, Mrs. Wilson's father, was 
born on April i8, 1787, and was five years old 
when his parents removed to Delaware 
County. During his early years he resided 
for a while in Dutchess County. He settled 
in Jefferson in 1S18, having resided with his 
father for some time previous to coming here. 
When his farm was ready for permanent occu- 
pancy he went to Connecticut for his bride, 
with whom he began life in a new house and 
on a new farm. His industry and thrift 
enabled him to accumulate a large amount of 
property, and this he divided among his chil- 
dren, his real estate alone amounting to twelve 
hundred acres. John Nichols lived to be 
ninety-five years old. He was fond of read- 
ing, and was a good mathematician. He also 
possessed considerable musical ability, and 
taught a singing-school in his neighborhood 
for a number of years. Charitable and affec- 
tionate in his disposition, he was considerate 
of the feelings of others. His firm belief in 
the immortality of the soul was the result of 
long and patient study of the Bible. In poli- 



tics he was :i Republican. His wife, [.aura, 
who w:is a native of Danbnry, ("f)nn., became 
the mother of seven children, namely: .Susan, 
born in 1822: I'ranUlin, born iti 1824: 
Wesley, born in i82r); Julia A., the subject 
of this sketch, horn in January, 1828; Clara 
1^., born in 1832; Cynthia L., born in 1834; 
and George H., born in 1836. .Susan, who 
died in 1845, was the wife of Joseph Hallen- 
beck, a farmer. Franklin, who settled as a 
farmer in Altona, Knox County, 111., married 
Margaret Multcr. Their children are: Wal- 
ter, now residing at the old homestead in 
Altona, 111.; George, a farmer of Summit, 
N.Y. ; Nathan and Irving, who live in Illi- 
nois. Wesley died in 1834. Clara K., who 
is a graduate of Musicdale Seminary, Salem, 
Conn., and was for some time engaged as a 
teacher of music at Level Green Institute, 
near Suffolk, Va., and at Goldsboro College, 
N.C., was married in 1857 to the Rev. John 
O. Evans, of Harpersfield, N.Y. Mrs. Evans 
has two children, Thomas D. and I'lorine, 
both of whom possess remarkable musical 
talent. Mr. Evans died in 1895 at Earned, 
Kan. Cynthia L. Nichols, who is unmarried, 
resides in Jefferson. George H. married 
Maria Titus, and has three children — John, 
Clara E., and Fred, all of whom are married. 

Julia A., now Mrs. Wilson, was graduated 
from the New York Conference Seminary, 
Charlotteville, in 1852. She studied paint- 
ing in Cobleskill, N. Y., and, having com- 
pleted her preparations for educational work, 
she went to Suffolk, Va., where she taught 
painting at a young ladies' seminary, and was 



lilOGRAPHKAL KKVIEW 



at one time its principul. She afterward 
taught French and mathematics at the GdMs- 
boro (N.C.) Coile<(e, remain iiii^ there until 
compelleil by failing health to return North, 
when she relinquished her work witli reluc- 
tance. She married Henry Wilson in 1.S55, 
and has resided in Jefferson continuously to 
the present time. She has had two children, 
neither of whom is livin^c. Mrs. Wilson is 
one of the most active n-.embers of the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union in Jef- 
ferson, having served as recording secretary 
and as corresponding secretary, also as a dele- 
gate to several State and county conventions. 
She is a charter member of the local lod-e, 
Indeiiendent Order of (lood Templars, in 
which she is a I'ast Vice-Temjilar, and is its 
treasurer at the present time. She belongs 
to the Patrons of Husbandry, and is Chaplain 
of the local grange. Mrs. Wilson is an active 
member of the Presbyterian church, and for 
years has devoted a great deal of her time to 
Sunday-school and other religious work. 



ILl.IAM LAI-D1:R C.\MP15i:i.l., 
Chief of Police, Schenectady, X. "S'., 
was boin near (-ateliouse, Kirkcudbrightshire, 
Scotland, February 2, 1.S44, son of William 
and Susan (Lauder) Cani|ibell. The family for 
many preceding generations consisted of indus- 
trious farming people, and some of its repre- 
sentatives were overseers on large estates. The 
grandfather, also named William Caniiibell, 
was a native of Perthshire, and s]ient the 
greater part of his life as a farm overseer in 



Kirkcudbrightshire, in the south of Scotland. 
He married a Miss Campbell, who, though not 
a near relative, belonged to Clan Campbell, 
and in all probability w^as a descendant of the 

same stock. The grand])arents reared four 
sons and four daughters. Two f]f the latter 
married well-to-do husbands, and were left 
widciws with TUeaiis. Coming to y\merica with 
tlieir children in 1S55, they purchased fine 
farms in Prescott, Canada, o])positc Ogdens- 
burg, X.Y. , and became afiluent. One was 
tlie widow of William lilack, and the other of 
David McKiimon. 

In i,S5- William Campbell, the father of 
William Lauder, sailed fr.im Wigton with his 
wile and six of his children, for Liverpool, 
where he embarked for the L'nited States on 
board the ship '■William Tapscott, " Captain 
William Bell. Arriving at New York, August 
17, 1S5.S, after an eight weeks' passage, they 
were met at Castle Garden b)- two other mem- 
bers of their family, James and Mary, who had 
preceded them a year before. The parents .set- 
tled first at 15ay Side, Long Island. They had 
ten children, two of whom died in Scotland; 
and Charles, aged nine, and Robert, aged one 
year and si.\ UKJUths, died of scarlet fever while 
on the [lassage over, and weie buried at sea. 
The li\ing are: James, a farmer and landseai)e 
gardener, who married a Miss Palmer, and re- 
sides at Hartford, Conn. ; Mar_\-, who married 
John Dillen, a farmer, and resides at Chop- 
tauk, Candine County, Md. ; William I.., the 
subject of this sketch; -Susan, who married 
Robert llemmens, an Lnglishman, and a 
mouKler by trade, residing in Schenectady; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Jessie, wife of James Myers, a contractor 
and Iniililcr at Sclicncctatly, \.V. ; ami Mar- 
<;arct. wlio is tlic widow of janics Mac- 
gregor, late l'a\ master's C'lcik in the Tnilcd 
States navy, is now livini;- in Haltimnre, Md., 
and has one dan-htLM'. James C-aniphell, who 
is now residing at llartforil, Conn., was super- 
vising agent and lantlscape gardener for tlie 
Morgans of New York for seventeen years, and 
was employed in the same ca|)acit_\- b\- the 
(iarretts of J^alliniore, Md., having charge of 
their entire estate, amounting to three thou- 
sand acres, with several assistant snperintentl- 
ents umler hin). The father died in 1894, 
agetl nearly eighty-three \ears, surviving the 
mother, who died in 1.S90, aged seventy-seven. 
William L. Campbell obtained his elemen- 
tary education in Scotland, where (as well as 
in the United States, after his arrival here) he 
attended both the day and night schools. Hav- 
ing acquired a good knowledge of landscape 
gardening from his father, and receiving from 
the latter his full Iibert_\- some years jirevious to 
his majority, he entered the employ of i\ndrew 
Boardman, of Poughkeepsie, N. V., where he re- 
mained seven years, supervising the laying out 
of that gentleman's gardens, roads, lawns, and 
pleasure-grounds, having previously attended 
school and worked with his father, at Flushing, 
Long Island. lie followed landscape garden- 
ing until joining the Schenectady police force 
in 1869, and during his residence in Poughkeep- 
sie he drove the first stake in laying out the 
grounds of Vassar College. From his boy- 
hood he has taken a lively interest in out-door 
games, and he was known in his youth as a 



good all around athlete. Coming to Schenec- 
tady in i,sr.,S Mdely foi' the pnrp.ise of attend- 
ing a Slipper given by the St. Andrew's Soci- 
ety, he was indueed to loe.ite here, and on Au- 

the eapilnl p,diee force in this city. That 
botly was .lisbanded eleven montlis afterward, 
and going to Saratoga he was for the succeed- 
ing tliree months in charge of a force whose 
duty it was to jiatrol the streets and watch 
private property, he ha\ing been the first uni- 
formed police officer to do tlut\- in that village. 
Returning to this city after S])ending the sum- 
mer months in .Saratoga, he again in Sejitem- 
ber, 1870, joined the regular Schenectady 
police force as a |iatrolnian ; was acK'anced on 
June I, 1872, to the position of assistant to 
Charles II. W'illard, whom he succeeded as 
chief on July 6 of the same year. He has 
held that ofifice ever since, a period of twenty- 
seven years, having acted chief from July 6 
to December 3, 1872, when he received reg- 
ular appointment — longer than that of any 
other chief or superintendent of police in the 
State of New York, and, as far as known, in 
the United States. 

On Januarv 10, 1872, Mr. Camiibell was 
joined in marriage with Harriet S. Orr, of 
Saratoga, N. Y. They have had two sons, one 
of them, Bertie, died at the age of one year. 
William Alexander Campbell, who was grad- 
uated from Union University in 1S97, and after 
studying law at the law school of the same 
university, where he graduated June 26, 1899, 
and was admitted to the bar July 13, 1899, 
is, like his father and grandfather, unusually 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



well-developed physically. lie is j)roficient 
in athletic sports, and a chanipior, bicycle rider 
and lawn tennis player. 

Mr. Cami)bell belongs to the Masonic Order, 
the Mlks, the Knights of Pythias, and the Tor- 
esters. 

In his report as chief of police of the city of 
Schenectady for the year ending November 30, 
1898 — an interesting and valuable document, 
betokening a clear head antl an earnest pur- 
pose — Mr. Campbell reconimeiuls tiuit tlie 
penal ordinances, so far as the\- relate to peace 
and good order, together with the sanitary rules 
and regulations of tiie cit\, be printed in 
pamphlet form the size of a pocket diary and 
placed in the hands of the newsdealers for 
sale; that police officers and city officials be 
provideti with copies; and tiiat pu])ils in the 
schools should be instructed as to their duties 
in observing ordinances. He would have even 
the smallest cliild thus led to see that a 
policeman is his servant and not his master. 
l''ollowing the adoption of this plan, he sagely 
thinks that "another generation would see the 
number of policemen in cities reduced to one- 
half the raticj ]ier thousand inhabitant now 
employed, and in this way our citizens would 
become more nearly self-governing." 



.l.I.XM II. AI.l'.RO, of Middle- 
g, Schoharie County, X.V., is 
of I'jiglish, Welsh, and Ibdjand ancestry. On 
the jiaternal side he is a descendant of John 
Albro, who was born in Alilijon), lu)gland, in 



1617, and who married in 1647 Doratha I'otter, 
widow of Nathaniel Potter. 

In 1634, at the age of se\enteen years, John 
Albro embarked in the ship "Francis" from 
Ipswich, ICngland, for Boston. In 1638 he 
went with William h'reeborn to Portsmouth, 
R.I. In 1639 certain lands at Portsmouth, 
R.I., were granted to said John Albro and 
olliers, by the king of England, on condition 
that they build upon those lands within 
one )-ear — which the\' diii. And upon the 
lands thus acquired John ,\lbro and his 
ilescendants lived for nearly two hundred 
years. In 1644 this John .Albro was a Cor- 
poral in the Cidonial militia, rising succes- 
sivel)' in after years to be Lieutenant, Cap- 
tain, and Major. In 1649 he was chosen to 
view cattle, to be clerk of weights and meas- 
ures, and member of Town Council. In 1660 
and 1661 he was a commissioner, and member 
of a committee to receive contributions for 
agents in Mngland. In 1666 he was appointed 
with two other persons to take areas of high- 
ways and driftways not set off. In 1670, with 
three other [lersons, he loaned the colony of 
Rhode Island seven pounds on account of the 
town of Portsmouth. I'rom 1671 to 16.S6, 
with the excejition of a few years in the seven- 
ties, he was an Assistant, a town ofTicei-. In 
1676 he with three other persons was ap- 
pointetl a committee for the care and disposal 
of powder for the supply of Portsmouth. He 
was also a commissioner to order watch and 
ward of the island. Tliis was during King 
Philiji's War. He was also a member of the 
court-martial at Newport to tr)- certain Ind- 




WILLIAM HENKV ALUKU. 



niOr.RAlMIKAL RF.viiav 



ians. In 1677 he was a member of a commit- 
tee in the matter of injurious and illegal acts 
of Connecticut. In 1679 he was one of the 
members of a committee to draw uji a letter to 
the king of Knglantl, giving an account of the 
territory of Mount Hope ami of their late war 
with the Indians. He was also appointed with 
one other person a committee to lay out the 
western boundary line of the colony. In 1685 
he, Major John Alhro, Assistant and Coroner, 
summoned a jury in the case of an Indian 
found dead on clay-i>it lands. The verdict of 
the jury was "That the saiil Indian being 
much distempered with drink, was bewildered, 
and by the extremity of the cold he lost his 
life." In 1686 he was a member of Sir lul- 
mund Andros's Council, and was [)resent at 
their first meeting at Boston, December 30, 
1686. In 1697 he was allowed twenty shill- 
ings for his expenses for going to Boston. He 
died December 14, 1712. His will, dated 
December 28, 1710, was proved in 1713. By 
it he divided a considerable amount of real and 
personal property among his sons and daugh- 
ters and their children. He was buried in his 
own orchard. His children were: Samuel, 
Elizabeth, Mary, John, and Su.sannah. 

John Albro, second, who is in the direct 
line of descent to the subject of this sketch, 
married Mary Stokes, April 27, 1693. In 
1677 he and others granted five thousand 
acres of land to be called East Greenwich, 
upon which land so granted stands the present 
town of East Greenwich, R.I. He died De- 
cember 4, 1724. His son, John Albro, third, 
who was horn August 23, 1694, married Ruth 



Lawton, November j;, 17J5. II. had a son 
John, fourth, stmietimes called Jonathan, who 
was born January 2, 1734, and married Sarah 
Taber, October 21, 1759. This fourth John 
Alhro was a private in Cai)tain Benjamin 
West's company, Colonel John Topham's regi- 
ment of Rhode Island troops, during the Revo- 
lutionary War, from March 16, 1 77S, to h'eb- 
ruary 20, 1779. John, fourth (or, as he was 
more commonly called, Jonathan) Albrf), had a 
son Isaac, who was born at Portsmouth, R. I., 
September 3, 17C5. Isaac Albro married 
Sarah Bliss, whose ancestors were English and 
Welsh. She was a daughter of William Bliss, 
whose father, Josiah Bliss, was the son of 
John and Damaris (Arnold) Bliss, the latter 
a daughter of Benedict Arnold, who was one of 
Rhode Island's earliest and best governors. 
John Bliss was an Ensign in the Continental 
Army in 1667, also a Deputy. In 1696 he was 
a Major for Rhode Island. Governor Arnold, 
his wife's father, built as a wind-mill for 
grinding grain, it is now said, the Old Stone 
Tower, which for a great many years has been 
one of Newport's greatest curiosities to visi- 
tors, and which for a long time was supposed 
to have been built by the Northmen, or Norse- 
men, who landed on the coast of New England 
before the discovery of America by Columbus. 
About the year 1800 Isaac Albro and family 
moved from Portsmouth, R. I. , where for 
nearly two centuries his ancestors had lived, to 
the town of Berne, Albany County, N. V. 
About the year 1785 John Bliss, who was a 
brother of Sarah Bliss, wife of Isaac Albro, 
removed from Portsmouth to Greenfield, Sara- 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



toga Coiintv, N. V. , seven miles from Saratoga 
Springs. In the month of February, 1801, 
Joiin HI iss walked all the way from liis iKmic 
in Greenfield, Saratoga County, N. V. , to 
Newport, R. I., to sul^mit to the ordinance of 
baptism. John Bliss had twelve sons and four 
daughters. One of the sons, Isaac Bliss, was 
the father of P. 1". Bliss, the author <if the 
Gospel Ilymn.s, and a singer and musical com- 
poser of world-wide reputation, who met a vio- 
lent death December 29, 1S76, by a railroad 
accident at Ashtabula, Ohio. Isaac Albro was 
a prosperous farmer. He died November 12, 
1838, having survived his wife Sarah about 
thirty-three years. 

Their son, Benjamin Albro, who was born 
December 25, 1S02, married Mary K. Bassler, 
of Middleburg, Scholiarie County, N.Y., 
January i", 183S. She was born July 25, 
1818, and died February 7, 1884. Her ances- 
tors originally came from Holland, and previ- 
ous to the Revolutionary War settled in the 
towns of Berne and Knox, Ali)any County, 
N.V. In early life Benjamin Albro taught 
school in Albany and Sciioharie Counties, and 
afterwards in Wayne and Cayuga Counties, 
New York. Me was engaged in mercantile 
business for some years, was Town Superin- 
tendent of common schools of the town of Mid- 
dlel)urg, and for the last forty-live years of his 
life lie lived upon a farm near the village of 
Middlelnng. He was an honored niendjer of 
the Middlcburg Methodist I'.piscopal church 
for seventy-three years, and was noted for his 
integrity and character. He died l'"el)ruary 
10, 189s, aged ninety -two years. 



Benjamin Albro and Mary K. Albro, his 
wife, had a s.mi, William Henry Albro, the 
subject of this sketch, who was born in the 
town of Middlcburg, Schoharie County, N.V., 

on September 8, 1840. He obtained his ele- 
mentary education in tiie district and select 
schools of the town, was fitted for college at 
Charlotteville Seminary and Fort F.dward In- 
stitute, and he attended and was graduated 
from Union College at Schenectady, N.V. 
He taught .several terms in the district schools 
of the town. Afterward he read law in the 
office of W. H. luigle, Fsq,, of Middlcburg, 
during the vears 1864 and 1865, and was ad- 
mitted to jiract ice as an attorney and counsel- 
lor-at-law of this State at a general term of the 
Supreme Court held at the capitol in the city 
of Albany, N.Y., on Decembers, 1S65. On 
January i, 1866, he foinied a partnership for 
the practice of law with the said W. H. 
Kngle, which continued until l-'ebruary, 1S74, 
when it was dissolved by mutual consent. He 
then opened an office in the village of Middle- 
burg, where he has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law up to the present time. 

On October 31, 1867, William Henry Albro 
married Elizabeth Dodge, daughter of the late 
Daniel D. Dodge, of Middlcburg, N. Y., now 
deceased. Three children were the fruit of 
this union, namely: Willie I). Albro, who 
was linrn Januai'}' 29, 1870, and who died ot 
scarlet fever April 14, 1872; Arthur D. 
Alin-o, who was born October 29, 1871, and 
who died November 28, i S93 ; and Grace I). 
Albro, who was born May 5, 1874. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Dodge Albro was born in the 



HIOr.KAl'HICAI, KKVIKW 



town of Micldlcbiirg, Schoharie County, N.Y. , 
on September 7, 1S37, anil ilicci I-'cbriiaty S, 
1S92. She was a most excellent wife and 
mother, ami was liclil in high esteem by all 
who knew her. Her denth caused as nuK h 
genuine sorrow as that of any other person ever 
did in the community in which she was known 
anil had lived. In every true sense of the term 
she was of the iidhlest and best t\ pi.' «i women. 
Her husband, the subject of tiiis sketch, and 
their daughter, Grace D. , are all of the family 
who now survive her. The son, Arthur Dodge 
Alhro, a bright anil promising young man, 
who had just entered upon business life, sur- 
vived his mother only about two years. Since 
the death of mother and sun, the father and 
daughter live together in the old home and 
constitute the remnant of what was once a 
prosperous and happy family. 

Upon Arthur's death his business came into 
the hands of his father; and since then, in ail- 
ditiim to his general law practice, the subject 
of this sketch has been conducting a large and 
successful mercantile business. His store is 
one of the largest in the county, carrying a 
large stock of drugs, groceries, and miscellane- 
ous goods. His law office contains one of the 
largest and best-selected law libraries in the 
county. He has been fairly successful as a 
lawyer, and also as a business man. He has 
held some official positions, among them that 
of School Commissioner of First Commissioner 
District of Schoharie County, during the years 
1879, 18S0, and 1 88 1. He was elected to 
that office by a majority of two hundred and 
eighteen votes at a time when there was a natu- 



ral political majority of about five hundred 
against him. He points with pride to the 
record which he made while holding that ofTice. 
No paper sent by him to the office of the State 
Superintendent of I'lihlic Instruction was re- 
jected or sent back to him for correction, and 
no request was ever made by him to the super- 
intendent that was not cheerfully and |)rom])tly 
granted. 

The subject of this sketch is a member of 
' the Masonic fraternity ; also of the Methodist 
I Mpiscoi);il church, nf which he has been a trus- 
tee for many years, and in which he has held 
i other positions of trust. He was virtually the 
j founder of the Union I'ree School and Acad- 
emy at Middleburg, N.Y., and was the first 
president of the Board of Education of that in- 
stitution. His daughter Grace was one of the 
first graduates of this institution. 

The Alhro family, of Aldhoro, hjigland, of 
which the original John Alhro was a member, 
had a coat-of-arms, a record of which may he 
found in the public offices of London at the 
present day. From the facts aforesaid, it 
clearly appears that Mr. Albro is a lineal de- 
■scendant in the .seventh degree of John Albro, 
of Aldboro, England, born 1617; that he is 
also a lineal descendant in the si.\th degree of 
Benedict Arnold, Governor of Rhode Island for 
three terms, beginning in 1663, and who built 
Newport's Old Stone Tower; and that he is re- 
lated in the sixth degree to P. P. Bliss, author 
of Gospel Hymns and a celebrated musical 
compo.ser. He takes pride in tracing his an- 
cestry back through the centuries and tf> and 
through families in whose veins flowed some of 



248 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



the piiresl ami best of Kiij^lisli, Welsh, ami 
Ilollaml blood. 



1)\V1\ 1). 1I.\(;1-:R, a -cncral nuichaiit 
151ciilK-iiii. Schoharie County, is 
prominently identified with the leading inter- 
ests of this section of the State. He was born 
May 31, 1847, in Middlcburj;. N.V., a son of 
Daniel J. Ilager, ami tlie lineal descendant, 
we are told, of one of four hnjthers who came 
from Holland to America in the seventeenth 
century, and assisted the settlement of eastern 
New York. 

His paternal grandfather, Jacob Hager, was 
for many years an extensive farmer in Fulton, 
whence he and his wife, Catliern Fech, re- 
moved with their twelve children t(j Oeland, 
Orleans County, X.\'. , where both died when 
well advanced in years. The grandfather was 
active in local affairs in both counties in which 
he resided, and in both he owned and cleared 
large tracts of land. Six of his children sub- 
sequently returned to .Schoharie County, and 
for a time li\ed in ]5reakabeen. They were: 
Tunis, Jacob, John, Daniel J., Jane, and .Mar- 
garet, none of whom are now living. 

Tunis Hager married Rebecca 15ecker, and 
settled in Sharon .Springs. Jacob married, 
and removed to Albany, and in iS49hewcnt 
with the gold-seekers to California. Return- 
ing from the Pacific Coast to .Schoharie, he 
kept the public house known as the Wood 
House a few )ears, after which he conducted a 
hotel that occu|5ied the site of the jiresent ca]ii- 
tt)l building in Albany, and then coming back to 



this county he farmed it in the town of ]^si)cr- 
ance until his decease. John went with his 
brother Jacob to California, came back with 
him to Schoharie, and after his marriage made 
a second trip to the (iolden Gate. Returning 
Fast, he went into the livery business with 
Jcs.se Mills in New V,,rk City. In a short 
time he sold out to his ])artner, and opened a 
li\er\- on his own account at S96 Broadway, 
and at the St. Nicholas Hotel, where he car- 
ried <in a thriving business some years. Re- 
tiring then from the livery, he bought a beau- 
1 tiful farm in Rhineheck. whither he removed 
! with his wife and tliree sons, and there lived 
until his death, at the age of threescore and 
ten years. 

Daniel J. Ilager was horn in Fulton, Sep- 
■ tember 5, iSii. He learned the shoemaker's 
trade in his native place, and after his mar- 
riage, at the age of twenty one, he continued 
to work at it first at Middleburg, then at 
Breakabeen, and finally in Blenheim, where he 
[lassed his last years, d\ing Seiitember iS, 
1871. He was a loyal Republican in politics, 
and as a soldier in the Union army he jiartici- 
pated in several of the battles of the Civil 
War. He married I-:ii/.a C. Zelie, who was 
a native of Fulton, being the eldest of a fam 
ily of nine ch ildren — b:iiza C, Lias, Chris- 
tina, David, Jane, I^phraim, Harriet, Andrew, 
and :\Iargaret — born to Peter Zelie, whose 
wife was before marriage a Miss Vroman. 
(l-'urther ancestral history may be foimd on an- 
other jxige of this work, in connection with the 
sketch of Luther Zelie.) Mrs. Fliza C. Zelie 
linger was born November 10, 1816, and died 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



October lo, 1S74. She had five children, 
naiiiel}- : Mary C. , wile of George Becker, the 
repieseiuative of an old family of Schoharie 
County; William S., a farmer in l?len- 
heini; I'eterZ., a farmer in Oswego County; 
Kdwin D. ; and Harriet A., wife of Peter 
Bur-ett, of Schoharie County. Ixith jxirents 
were members of the Methodist Episcojjal 
church of ;\Iiddleburi;-, in which the father 
held various offices. 

Kdwin D. Hager attended the district 
schools in his youthful days, and until he was 
sixteen years old he remained at home with his 
parents. He subsequently worked out by the 
day, sometimes as a farm laborer, for two 
years, after which he was employed by his 
brother-in-law as a clerk in Breakabeen for 
three years. The ensuing year he was en- 
gaged in the mercantile business for himself 
in Blenheim. He then sold out, and for two 
years was employed as a clerk or a teacher. 
In 1 868 he went to Catskill, where he re- 
mained a year, when he returned to Blenheim, 
and for a year was here a clerk in a general 
store. Going then to Middleburg, Mr. Hager 
was with J. Xevill three years, and then, in 
partnership with the late Silas Sweet, he 
bought out the store of John Hager, in Blen- 
heim, and carried on a successful business 
until the death of ]\Ir. Sweet, three years 
later. The following spring he sold out the 
business, and the ne.xt year purchased a half- 
interest with Seneca We.st, and later formed 
a copartnership with Ira Haverly, to whom, at 
the end of four years, he sold out. Two years 
later Mr. Hager purchased the building which I 



he is now occupying, and put in a new and 

complete stock of merchandise. lie has now 
one of the largest stores in this section of the 
county, and carries the finest stock of goods in 
his line. Iking one of the oldest merchants 
in this locality, and with two exceptions the 
oldest in the county, he is well known, and it 
is safe to say no man has a better reputation, 
or is more highly esteemed in business and 
social circles. 

Mr. Hager is a strong sih'er man in poli- 
tics, and takes a prominent jwrt in local 
affairs. For eighteen consecutive j-ears he 
was a member of the county committee, and 
was a regular attendant at all conventions. In 
1882 he served as a delegate to the State con- 
vention held in Syracuse, and in 1883 as a 
delegate to the Congressional convention. He 
has served as Supervisor of the town four 
terms, in 1S78, 1S79, 18S2, and 1SS3; and in 
1 884 he was appointed Postmaster by Pres- 
ident Cleveland, a position to which he was 
again appointed in 1892. He is one of the 
trustees of the school district, and a stock- 
holder in the Blenheim Creamery Company, of 
which he has been president since its incorpo- 
ration. Fraternally, he united with the Mid- 
dleburg Lodge, F. & A. M., in 1S70, and is 
also a member of the IMiddleburg Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. 

On November 16, 1876, :\Ir. Hager married 
Nellie E. Beckwith. of Springfield, Mass., 
daughter of Calvin and Lucy B. Balton Beck- 
with. Mr. and :\Irs. Hager are the parents of 
three children, namely: Clyde L. , who died at 
the age of twenty-two months; Eugene B., 



25« 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born August 28, 1877; and Florence A., born 
July 20, 1882. Kugene 15. Hagcr, who was 
educated in the graded schools, was formerly 
employed as clerk in Brooklyn and New York 
City, but is now in business with his father, 
lie married, December 15, 1897, Margie Dib- 
ble, who was born March 8, 1878, in Middle-. 
burg, a daughter of and Eliza- 
beth (Dexter) Dibble. Mr. Hagcr and all his 
family attend the Methodi.st Episcopal church. 



MHRO.SE R. HUNTING, a promi- 
nent citizen of Schoharie, N.Y., re- 
siding on the Hunting homestead, 
was born in this town on September 14, 1S33. 
son of Joseph and .Mary A. (Chesebro) 
Hunting. 

The first of his family in this country was 
John Hunting, who came from ICngland in 
August, 1638, and settled in Dedham, Mass. 
He was one of the founders of that town, and 
an Elder in the church there for many years. 
He had a son named John, of whom little is 
known, and a grandson, Nathaniel, who was 
graduated at Harvard College, and subse- 
quently preached to the church in East Hamp- 
ton, N.Y., for fifty-seven years. 

The fourth in line, Nathaniel Hunting, sec- 
ond, was educated for the ministry, but poor 
health compelled him to give up his beloved 
profession, and devote himself to agriculture. 
His son, Joseph Hunting, was a sea captain. 
After this Joseph came two others of the same 
name. The first of these, who was the grand- 
father of Ambrose R. Hunting, was the first 



Hunting to come to Schoharie. He came 
hither from Long Island in 1791, accompanied 
by his mother, and settled on the farni which 
has since been in the possession of his de- 
scendants. He was a shoemaker by trade, 
but was engaged more or less in farming and 
in mercantile affairs. 

The third Joseph Hunting, father of Am- 
brose R., was born in Schoharie in 1S05, and 
resided in the town throughout his life. He 
was known as a man who attended strictly to 
his own affairs and caused no annoyance to 
other persons by interference. He never 
brought suit against any one, was never sued, 
and never called upon to serve as a witness. 
In politics he was a Democrat. He was a 
leading member of the Methodist church, and 
for more than forty years a class leader. His 
wife, Mary, was born in Knox, Albany 
County, the daughter (.f I'clcg Chesebro, a 
cooper and farmer. Her graiidfatlier, Chris- 
topher Chesebro, who was a carpenter by 
trade, fought in the Revolution. He lived 
originally in Stonington, Conn., but removed 
thence to Knox in 1791. 

Ambrose R. Hunting was reared on the pa- 
ternal homestead, and attended the public 
schools until he was seventeen years of age. 
He then was sent to Schoharie Academy for 
two terms, and afterward to the New York 
Conference Seminary at Charlotteville. After 
studying there for two years, he was prepared 
to enter the Junior class at Union College, 
Schenectady; but, his family being opposed to 
the profession he had chosen, he yielded to 
tlieir wish33 and withdrew from school. After 



)«iti <•»- V- 




AM klKKNliAKK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



teaching for several terms he returned to the 
farm antl began devoting himself to agri- 
culture. 

Mr. Hunting has been a loyal member of 
the Methodist church for fifty years, and has 
held every position in the church to which a 
layman is entitled, except that of lay delegate 
to the general conference. In politics he is a 
Democrat. He has held the office of Super- 
visor for four years, that of School Commis- 
sioner for two terms, and for a year he was a 
member of the Assembly. Fraternally, he is 
connected with Schoharie Valley Lodge, No. 
491, F. & A. M. ; and John L. Lewis Chap- 
ter, No. 229, R. A. M. 

Mr. Hunting was first married on April 14, 
1S59, to Amanda Severson. Two sons were 
born of this union: William J., who died in 
1S75; and Edwin F., who is a graduate of the 
Albany College of Pharmacy, and is now a 
successful druggist in that city. On June 5, 
1869, Mr. Hunting was married to Mary M. 
Northrop, who was born in Berne, Albany 
County, the daughter of Asa T. and Ann E. 
Northrop. By this second marriage there is 
one child, Florence A. She has received a 
musical education at Claverack Listitute. 



"IRAM RIFENBARK, a representa- 
tive citizen of the town of Summit, 
residing in the village of Charlotte- 
ville, was born in Summit on April 30, 1839, 
his parents being Aaron and Mar}' (Banks) 
Rifenbark. 

The family is of German origin, and Mr. 



Rifenbark's great-grandfather spelled his name 
Rifenbarek. The grandfather, Henry Rifen- 
bark, came from Cnlumbia Coimty in 1 S02 or 
near that date, and settled about two miles east 
of Summit village. There he owned a whiskey 
still, a store, and an inn or tavern. He was a 
man of influence and of considerable projjerty, 
and his tavern was often the gathering place 
of important assemblies. Town meetings were 
sometimes held there. His brother Peter was 
a clergyman of the Dutch Reformed church. 
Henry Rifenbark's wife was a daughter of 
Caleb Clark, who was captured by the British 
and Indians during the Revolution, and carried 
to Canada. There Mr. Clark was kept at P^ort 
Niagara under guard, but was sent out every 
day with other captives under a guard of 
Indians to chop wood in the forest. The Ind- 
ians, believing that it was impossible for 
them to escape, often left them alone during 
the day, returning for them at night. Mr. 
Clark and his fellow-prisoners, however, with 
sturdy pioneer determination, resolved to make 
an effort to regain their freedom. Accord- 
ingly, one morning after their captors had left 
them, they started on snow-shoes for the Mo- 
hawk River, carrying the food that had been 
measured out to them for their mid-day meal. 
For many days this was all the food they had. 
At length, at the end of a week, he and his 
companions came to a deserted and tumble- 
down hut in the Mohawk Valley, where they 
found some mice. These they were forced to 
eat to keep themselves from starving. They 
finally reached home in safety, but Mr. Clark 
always felt exceedingly bitter toward the Brit- 



254 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ish. Henry Rifcnbark and his wife had seven 
diililicn, three sons — Harry C, Aaron, and 
libenezer — and four daui^diters — Julia .Ami, 
Hattie, Harriet, ant! Caroline. All of the 
boys became farmers. 

Aaron Kifenbari<, who was born in Summit 
in 1804, and died in 1SS3, was a leatling citi- 
zen here and a i)r(iminent man in the Demo- 
cratic parly. He was twiee married, the tirst 
time to Mary Bani^s and the .second time to 
her sister Catliarine. The tirst wife died in 
I S4S and the second in 1S95. The si.\ chil- 
dren — William H., John, who is deceased, 
Hiram, Ebenezer, I'ernielia, and Hettie — were 
the fruit of the first marriaye. The first- 
named of these, who resides in Hobart, Ind., 
is a leading Republican there, and in iKyj and 
1899 was a member of the Indiana legislature. 
He is prominent in business circles and as a 
Grand Army man. In the year 1S98 he was 
engaged in building county roads. In 1893 he 
exhibited at tlie World's Fair steel neck yokes 
and whiffletrees manufactured by the com]»ny 
of which he was president. Ebenezer Rifen- 
bark resides at Summit. He fought for the 
Union in the Ci\il War, and was wounded at 
Getty.sburg. Permelia is the wife of Winthroij 
D. Gallup. Hettie married P. P. (iordon, 
M.D., of Hobart, Ind., and died in 1X92. 

Iliram Rifenbark recei\ed his education in 
the public schocds of .Summit and at Char- 
lotteville Seminary. At the age of se\en- 
teen he engaged to work mi a farm se\en 
months f(jr si.\ty-five dollars, Mr. 11. Master.s, 
his em]ilo)er, who was away trom home miKh 
of the time, told him one day to sow a jiiece 



of land to buckwheat, putting in two bushels 
of seed. This was new work to Rifenbark. 
He began sowing broadcast, and soon found 
that he had put half the seed on a quarter 
of the land. He then .sowed the remainder 
of the seed more sparingly, making it cover 
the other three-fourths of the land. He 
watched the growth with interest, but before 
har\est time the cows g(jt into the field and 
ate up the grain, thick and thin. He lost not 
a day in that se\en months. In the winter he 
attended schoid, and the ne.\t se\en months 
he worked for a farmer in l-'ulton, his only 
h.iliday being the iM.urth of July, which he 
insisted on keeping. The next winter he 
taught school four months at ten dcdlars a 
month. April i of his nineteenth year found 
him engaged to a farmer in Summit se\en 
months at eleven dollars a month. This sum- 
mer there was not a day of lost time, the man 
for whom he worked gi\ing him the P'ourth of 
July. The following winter he again taught 
in the same district where he taught the first 
term, but witli an increase of two dollars a 
month in his wages. He continued to teach 
school winters after this until he was married 
and settled on the farm, teaching one term in 
the winter, while on the farm, at two dollars a 
d.i)-. When tweiu\- \eai-s old he workeil se\-en 
months at RichinoiuK ille, driving team for the 
iron foundry at twelve dollars a month. The 
next sjiring he began working at carjientry, 
continuing for three summers under a boss, 
and after that time he took jobs for himself 
till he purchased his father's farm of ninety-six 
acres in 1868. h'our vears later he sold the 



BIOCIRAPHICAL RKA'IEW 



25s 



farm, and bought the property, including the 
store now bclongini;- to Levi J. Lincoln in 
Charlotteville, N. V. After condncting a gen- 
eral merchandise business there for ten years, 
he sold the property, and, buying a vacant lot, 
built the residence he now occupies and the 
store across the street, where lie conducted 
business for twelve years. He then sold the 
goods to Kingsley& Griffin, to whom he rented 
the store. Since that time he has been selling 
agricultural implements and fertilizers, and 
looking after business for himself and others. 
Mr. Rifenbark is a strong Democrat. He has 
shown a warm interest in political matters 
ever since he became a voter. He has been 
on the Town Committee a number of times, 
on the School Board several terms, in 1S65 
Town Clerk, and much of the time since 
1870 Notary Public. He has also served two 
terms as a Justice of the Peace, and has done 
a large amount of business settling estates 
and drawing contracts. He has served as ex- 
ecutor of a number of the wills filed in this 
town, as he is known to have an excellent 
knowledge of technical law points. From 
1888 to 1890, inclusive, he was Supervisor of 
Summit. His record as Supervisor is marked 
primarily by a strong effort to secure an honest 
and economical expenditure of the public 
funds. Fearless and daring in his personal 
expression and effort when he believed himself 
laboring in a worthy cause, he met with some 
opposition, but in the main won a loyal recog- | 
nition from his constituents. He broke up 
abuses in the county relating to the housing 
and feeding of vagrants, secured action bv the , 



governing board that caused the removal of all 
luxuries from the county prison, and worked 
hard for a rethiction of expenses in e\-ery way. 
He served on the Committee on Sheriffs' Ac- 
counts, on public and other buildings, and on 
the Committee on Legislation. 

Mr. Rifenbark married Amelia Burnett, 
daughter of Colonel George O. Burnett, who 
was prominent in the militia. Mrs. Rifen- 
bark attended Charlotteville Seminary, and 
subsequently taught school for ten terms be- 
fore her marriage. She is active in church 
work, and when the Good Templars and the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union were in 
existence here was one of their earnest sup- 
porters. ]\rr. Rifenbark was also connected 
with the Good Templars, being Chief Tem- 
plar. He has been clerk of the Baptist church 
at Summit, a member of the ministerial com- 
mittee, trustee, and for years superintendent 
of the Sunday-school. He is the teacher of 
the Bible clas.s. He is strictly temperate in 
all things. His early life taught him the 
value of money, and he then acquired the hab- 
its of industry and economy which are still 
characteristic of him. He is a liberal con- 
tributor to every good cause, but never up- 
holds extravagance or waste. 



ICHAEL LACKEY, Jr., real es- 
tate and insurance broker, a well- 
known business man of Greene 
County, is a resident of Tannersville, where 
he was born on November 24, i860, son of 
Michael and Catherine (Burke) Lackey. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



parents arc still livinj^, and make their home 
with him. 

His paternal ^grandfather, 'I'homas Lackey, 
who was born in Irelanil, went to Mn^land in 
1821, and resided there until 1.S29, when he 
emigrated to America, and, settling in New 
York City, followed the trade of a cabinet- 
maker. In 1S35 Thomas Lackey retired from 
active business pursuits and came to Tanners- 
ville, where he resiiled with his son, the elder 
Michael, until his death, which occurred in 

iS53- 

Michael Lackey, Sr., father of the subject 
of this sketch, was born in Ireland, May 18, 
1S15. I le came to America with his parents 
when fourteen years old, and was educated in 
the night schools of New York City. He 
learned the trade of a house painter, which he 
followed there for a time and then removed to 
Tannersville, where he continued in the same 
occupation. He also kept a country tavern in 
the old stage times when Tannersville was a 
hamlet called Greenland. He is a Democrat 
in politics, and has held offices. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Catherine Burke, is 
a native of Ireland. They have had four chil- 
dren, two of whoin are now living; namely, 
Michael, Jr., and his sister, Lizzie P. The 
latter is the wife of Michael H. Dolan. 

Michael Lackey, Jr., acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools of Tannersville. 
At the age of fifteen he went to New York 
City, and entered Lhrich's dry-goods store on 
Eighth Avenue, where he kept the country 
order books for one year. He then engaged 
in the ice cream and confectionery business at 



the corner of I'.ighth Avenue and Fifty-ninth 
Street. Returning to Tannersville later, he 
taught school until 1.S83, at the same time 
studying law and becoming a practitioner. 
In 1.S75 he jiurchased a farm of one hundred 
acres in Hunter known as Onteora Glen, 
which he conducted with his other business 
until 1892. I'roni May 10, 1 891, to October 
20 of that )ear, he was proprietor of a laundry, 
having an exclusive contract for Onteora Park, 
including thirty cottages and a large inn; and 
he was ably assisted in this work by his wife. 
He moved from his farm in 1892, renting it 
until 1896 when he exchanged that property 
for the half-way house on the roatl to Hunter, 
and removed to the village of Tannersville. 
Soon after his return he erected a dwelling- 
house, office, and store, the latter of which is 
well stocked with stationery, school supplies, 
sjiorting goods, and other merchandise, and is 
carried on by his wife. He does quite a busi- 
ness in the buying of Christmas-trees for the 
New York market, shipping from six to ten 
carloads annually. In 1893 he engaged in 
the real estate business. He erected a large 
building which he rents. He makes collections 
for many concerns through the coiuity, and 
was appointed assignee for \Villsey& Fromer, 
one of the largest firms in this vicinity. As 
local representative of several large insurance 
companies, he has securetl some of the prin- 
cipal risks in the town. He has a great deal 
of law practice in the minor courts. 

In 1883 Mr. Lackey was united in marriage 
with Julia Weller, daughter of Thomas 
Weller, formerly an inn-keeper in Hirming- 



r.lOGRAl'IIJCAL 



257 



ham, England. They have five children — 
Robert !•:., Charles H., luhvard \V., Mary L., 
ami Clara I'". 

I'lditically, Mr. Lackey is a Democrat. In 
1SS9 he was appointed Deputy Sheriff, hold- 
ing that office three years; and he was a can- 
didate for Supervisor in i8gi. He was ap- 
pointetl Postmaster in 1893, and held that 
position until 1S9S, giving general satisfac- 
tion. He has been Counsel for the village 
corporation ever since its organization, has 
acted as notary public for the past fourteen 
years, and is frequently called upon to address 
political meetings. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, and Past Chancellor of 
the local lodge. 



'TEPHEN LOUDON, a retired 
//^ farmer of Fulton, Schoharie County, 
was born in the town of Blenheim, 
N.Y., February 16, 1821, son of John and 
Sarah (Tinkelpaugh) Loudon. 

John Loudon was born in Delaware, where 
he grew to man's estate on the parental home- 
stead. Choosing farming as his life occupa- 
tion, he moved to Schoharie County, which 
was then in its primitive wildness. He took 
up a tract of land in Blenheim, at a time 
when there were very few clearings in that 
locality or in the county, and there partly im- 
proved a farm. Disposing, however, of his 
newly acquired land in Blenheim, he bought 
land in the neighboring town of Gilboa, and 
was there engaged in his independent calling 
until his death, at the venerable age of eighty- 



three years. His wife, whose maiden name 

was Sarah Tinkelpaugli, died at the age of 
fifty-nine years, having borne him ten chil- 
dren. Four of the nine are still living, 
namely: I\Lary, wife of John Mattice; 
Stephen: Libby, wife of Jacob I. Coons; and 
Nancy. Both parents were members of the 
15aptist church. 

Stephen Loudon, by persevering industry 
and wise economy, accumulated considerable 
property, and while yet a young man pur- 
chased a farm in Breakabeen, which he after- 
ward sold, and bought a large farm on Bouck's 
Island, adjoining the Governor Bouck home- 
stead. Upon that farm he resided until 1S94, 
when he bought his present home property, 
which is managed by his son-in-law, C. E. 
Markham, in connection with his own farm. 
Mr. Loudon has always been deeply interested 
in the welfare and advancement of the town of 
his adoption. In politics he is a firm sup- 
porter of the principles of the Democratic 
party. 

On August 31, 1846, Mr. Loudon married 
Lavinia Whaley, who is a native of Dutchess 
County, New York, and is the only living 
child born to the late Daniel and Sarah (Car- 
penter) Whaley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Loudon have three daughters, 
namely: Caroline, wife of Prof. C. E. Mark- 
ham, teacher and farmer of Fulton; Emma, 
wife of George Coykendall ; and Mary, wife of 
Peter E. Schoonmaker, both of whom are suc- 
cessful business men in Kingston, N. Y. 
These daughters are all graduates of the State 
Normal School, and were all of them teachers 



2S8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in their younger days. Mr. Loudon is a 
member of the Baptist church, and Mrs. 
London belon<:s to the Reformed church. 



§AC015 l'R()MI-:k, one of the most suc- 
cessful business men in Tannersviiie, 
N.Y., was born in Wittenberi,', Ger- 
many, October 14, I.S49, son of Daniel and 
Mary (Liepold) Fromer. Ills father, who 
also was a nativ-e of Wittenberi;, emigrated to 
the United States in 1853. After his arrival 
in this countr)' Daniel I'ronier followed the 
trade of a chair-maker for a time, and then 
turned his attention to farming, first in Jewett 
and later in Tannersviiie, where he died at 
seventy-two. His wife, ALary, who was a 
native of Germany, was the mother of six chil- 
dren, namely: Mary; Rosa; John, first (de- 
ceased); Daniel, Jr.; Jacob; and John. Mary 
married Leonard I.. Woodard. Rosa became 
the wife of Clarence Willsey. John keeps a 
boarding-house. Daniel, Jr., is proprietor of 
a hotel. Mrs. Mary L. l<"romer died at the 
age of seventy-one. The parents were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. 

Jacob Fromer acquired his education in the 
schools of Jewett, and worked on the home 
farm until he was nineteen years old, when he 
went to the oil regions of Pennsylvania, going 
thence to West Virginia, and later entering 
mercantile business in I'arkersburg, Va. 
Disposing of his establishment there at the 
end of eighteen months, he came to Hunter, 
where he engaged in the e.\|)ress business and 
also ran a stage to the Catskill. lie aban- 



doned this enterprise at the expiration of a 
year and a half, and again entered mercantile 
business, carrying on a general store under 
the Cascade House for the same length of 
time. He ne.xt erected a building sixty by 
sixty feet, and three stories high, adjoining 
his present office, and, putting in a stock of 
general merchandise, carried on business until 
1S92, when he sold out. He started in a 
small way, but as his trade increased he was 
forced to enlarge both his stock and floor 
space in order to meet the demands of his pa- 
trons. He transacted a business amounting 
to over one hundred and twenty-five thousand 
dollars annually, and employed twelve assist- 
ants. In 1893 he maile a trip to Florida, 
and upon his return in 1894 opened a sale and 
livery stable here and another at Elka Park, 
Hunter, both of which he has since conducted 
successfully, also doing quite an extensive 
business in the selling of carriages, sleighs, 
robes, and harnesses. He keeps twenty 
horses, and at times has as many as thirty for 
livery purposes. In connection with this he 
is engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business, and besides his stable and office he 
has erected several dwelling-houses. 

In 1S75 ^Ir. Fromer was united in marriage 
with Susan Showers, a native of Hunter, 
daughter of Michael Showers, a farmer of that 
town. Her parents had a family of six 
children, four daughters and two sons. ]\Irs. 
I-"romer's sisters are all married. 

Mr. I-"romer is a Republican in politics. 
He was Supervisor continuously from 1S93 to 
1899, having with a few exceptions served 



BIOGRArHICAL REVIEW 



longer than any -other member of the board; 
and during his term of office he siicceeiled in 
reducing tiie taxes. He was largely instru- 
mental in securing the incorporation of the 
village, and was trustee a number of years. 
He and Mrs. I'ronier are attendants of the 
^[ethodist Episco[Kil church, and contribute 
to the support of other denominations. 



'OLOMON KELLEY was born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1823, on the farm in 
Princetown, N.Y., on which he now 
resides, he being the owner thereof and de- 
voting his energies to its improvement and 
cultivation. His parents were Solomon and 
Grace (Wingate) Kelley. His father was 
born in Rotterdam, N.Y., and his mother in 
Princetown. His paternal grandfather was 
William Kelley, a Scotchman, whose occupa- 
tion was that of a miller and a farmer. He 
was an early settler in Rotterdam, but after- 
ward resided in Princetown and in Duanes- 
burg, and died in Mariaville. 

Solomon Kelley, the elder, learned the car- 
penter's trade, which he followed for several 
years. Settling upon new land in Princetown 
when a young man, he cleared the farm which 
is now owned by his son, and erected the 
buildings. An industrious farmer and a citi- 
zen of worth, he gained the good will of his 
neighbors by his many sterling qualities. In 
politics he voted with the Whig party, and in 
his religious belief he was a Presbyterian. 
He was the father of ten children, five of 
whom are living, namely: Solomon, the sub- 



ject of this sketch; Robert; John; Samuel; 
and Grace. The others were: William, An- 
drew, Sally, Jane, and .\[ar)- A. 

Solomon Kelley was reared at the home- 
steatl and educated in the district schools. 
He has always resided at his birthplace, and 
succeeding to its ownership he has made gen- 
eral farming a profitable employment up to 
the present time. He is still smart and ac- 
tive, with the ability to perform a day's work 
which would tire many younger men, his early 
vigor giving no sign of decay. In politics he 
is a Republican. He attends the Presbyterian 
church. 

When twenty-seven years old Mr. Kelley 
married for his first wife P^velyn Love. His 
present wife was before marriage Nancy 
Gregg. By his first marriage he has one son, 
William, who is living at home. 



fAMES H. FLANAGAN, a prosperous 
farmer of Tannersville, N.Y., and a 
veteran of the Civil War, was born in 
New York City, February 14, 1842, son of 
Matthew and Margaret (Olwell) Flanagan. 
He is a descendant of the O' Flanagans of Ire- 
land. His great-grandfather Flanagan was 
named Thomas, and his grandfather was Pat- 
rick O' Flanagan. 

Matthew P'lanagan, son of Patrick, emi- 
grated to America when a young man, first 
settling in New York City. After his mar- 
riage he came to this locality, where he 
worked in a tannery for some time, and then 
purchased a farm. Politically, he was a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



Democrat. He died at the age of sixty-eight. 
His wife, Margaret, was a native of Ireland. 
She was a daughter of John Olwell, a farmer, 
who emigrated to the United States, and spent 
his last years on a farm in the vicinity of 
Tannersville. Matthew and Margaret I-'hina- 
gan were the parents of ten children, seven of 
whom grew to maturity, and tivc arc now liv- 
ing; namely, James H.. I'atrick, Alice, Kate, 
and Rose. I'atrick lives in Newark, N.J. 
Alice married John Honlahaii, and resides in 
Brooklyn. Rose married Patrick (iillooly, 
and is also residing; in Brooklyn. The 
mother died at the aLje of fifty-six \-ears. 

James H. Flanagan came to Tannersville 
with his parents when very yonni;, and at- 
tended the commcm schoids. At the aj^e of 
twenty, in 1862, he enlisted in Company ("i, 
Fourteenth United States Infantry. In the 
second battle of Hull Run he was severely 
wounded in the leg, anil he lay u|)on the field 
for ten days unattended. He was then taken 
to Washington, and after being in various 
hospitals was discharged in 1863. Upon re- 
covering from the effects of his wound he re- 
enlisted in the Cavalry, Indejiendent Corps, 
and was stationed on the frontier, where he 
served three years. He was tnustered out as 
a Corporal. Returning to Tannersville, he 
worketl on his father's farm for two years, at 
the end of which time he went to Wisconsin, 
and from there to .St. Clair County, Illinois, 
where he remained one and a half years. He 
then returneil Fast, and, again settling in 
Tannersville, has followed farming with good 
results ever since. His proi)iTty originally 



consisted of one hundred and fifty acres, but 
he disposed of one hundred acres to good ad- 
vantage. In politics he is a Republican, and 
served as lixcise Commissioner some time. 

In 1S76 Mr. Flanagan married Miss Mary 
!•;. Smith, of Brooklyn, daughter of Patrick 
Smith, a member of the police force of that 
city. They have four children- — ICileen, 
h'airie, Una Fideen Desmond, and Oscar. 
luleen anil l-"airie are now preparing them- 
selves for educational work. 

.Mr. Flanagan is a comrade of A. N. Bald- 
win Post, G. A. R. He is an earnest advo- 
cate of temperance, and has rendered valuable 
service to the community in that direction. 
The family attend the Roman Catholic 
church. Mr. I-'lanagan from childhood has 
shown a marked liking for literature, and he 
has a fine library containing books by some of 
the very best authors. He is also very fond 
of music, and has a choice collection of in- 
strumental and classical musical works. 



§()1IX BKAUT, a retired farmer of Rot- 
terdam, was born in this town, Octo- 
ber 6, KS39, son of Aaron I. and V.Vva 
C. (Veililer) Brailt. The jiarents were natives 
of Schenectady; and the father was a prosper- 
ous farmer of Rotterdam, where he spent the 
greater part of his life. He died at the age of 
fifty-eight years, and his wife lived to he 
ninety-one. They were the jiarents of five 
cliildren, two of whom are living, namely: 
John, the subject of this sketch; and Aaron 




Jull-X l;KAiii. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



263 



B. , who resides in Schenectady. The others 
were: Francis, Hester, and Ilelen. 

John Bradt acquired his education in the 
common schools of his nati\-e town. After the 
completion of his studies he assisted his father 
in carrying on the home farm, thereby obtain- 
ing a good knowledge of agriculture; and in 
early manhood he and his brothers, Aaron B. 
and Francis, purchased their sister's interest 
in the old homestead farm, which contained 
about one hundred and sixty acres, located 
along the banks of the Mohawk River. This 
they carried on successfully together till 
Aaron sold his interest. After that the farm 
was managed by John and Francis until 1889. 
In that year Mr. John Bradt retired, and built 
a handsome residence in the village, which he 
has since occupied, the industry displayed dur- 
ing his long period of activity having placed 
him in easy circumstances. It is interesting 
here to note that the ancestral farm has been 
handed down from his grandfather to the fourth 
generation, being now owned b)' Mr. Bradt's 
nephew, Aaron J. Bradt, son of Francis above 
named. 

On December 28, 1871, Mr. Bradt was 
united in marriage with Eleanor Dorn, who 
was born in Princetown, August 3, 1847, 
daughter of Alexander and Harriet Dorn. 
Her father, who was a stirring farmer of 
Duanesburg, died at the age of sixty-one 
years. He was an active member of the 
Dutch Reformed church and for more than 
forty years an Elder. Mrs. Dorn is still liv- 
ing, and resides in Duanesburg. 

In politics Mr. Bradt is a Republican, but 



takes no [xirt in public affairs beyond casting 
his vote. He has l)een a Deacon of the Re- 
formed church for the past eight years, and 
Mrs. Bradt is a member of the church. 



KXJAMIX I. TALLMADGE, the 
well-known attorne)- and counsellor- 
at-law of Windham, X.Y. , is a na- 
tive of New Baltimore, Greene Count}-, and 
was born on November i, 1869, his parents 
being Thomas D. and Helen (Raymond) Tall- 
madge. Thomas D. Tallmadge's paternal 
grandfather, who was a leading farmer of 
Greene County, died before Benjamin I. was 
born. 

Thomas D. Tallmadge spent his life on a 
farm until he was a middle-aged man, when he 
opened a general merchandise store. After 
carrying that on for several years, he removed 
with his family to Albany, his son Benjamin 
being then about fourteen years old. Later 
Thomas D. Tallmadge removed to Oneonta, 
where he for a time conducted an ice business 
and afterward a market. He retired from busi- 
ness in Oneonta, and subsecpienth" resided 
there until his death, in June, 1893, at the 
age of sixty-three. He was stanchly a Demo- 
crat, but never took an active interest in local 
politics. His wife, Helen, was the daughter of 
John G. and Elizabeth Hinman Raymond, of 
Coxsackie. Mr. Raymond, who had resided in 
New Baltimore previous lo coming to Cox- 
sackie, was a large real estate owner. He 
died at Coxsackie in his seventy-ninth year. 
Of his .seven children one son, Wallace W., 



264 



lilOr.RAPHKAL REVIEW 



who is a nicrcliaiit, resides at Coxsackic. 
Hoth he ami liis wife were Presbyterians. 
Thomas 1). ami Helen Tallmaclge were the 
parents of eleven children, all of whom are 
livin;;. They are as follows: Raymond, who is 
book-keeper and general manager for Van Slyke 
& Horton, of Albany; Alice A. ; Josiah C, an 
attorney at Catskill ; Pllizabeth ; Edward C, 
who is in the employ of the John G. Myers 
firm in Albany; Matilda, who is the wife of 
the Rev. Samuel \V. l^aton, jiastor of the 
Methodist l-lpiscopal church at Patter, Pa. ; 
Thomas 1)., an artist residing in New York 
City; Caroline; IJenjaniin I.; Mac; anil R. 
DeW'itt, who was a meniljcr of the First New 
York Volunteers in the late war. The mother 
of these children is still livin-- in Onconta, and 
her four daughters reside with her. .She and 
her two youngest ikuiglitcrs arc nienihcrs of the 
Baptist church, while Alice and lili/.abeth are 
connected with the Methodist church. The 
family is remarkable for its musical ability, 
and all four of the daughters have sung in 
church choirs. lulward C. Tallmadge also, who 
is a member of the First Reformed Church, 
has sung in the clioii'. He is likewise a mem- 
ber (jf the Consistory. 

lienjamin I. Tallmadge resided with his 
parents until he was about sixteen }ears of 
age. After attending the public schools of 
New Baltimore, he began a sjjccial course in 
Windham preparatory to stud\ing law, which 
enabled him to secure what is known as a law 
student's certificate from the Hoard of Regents 
in Albany. He entered the office of his 
brotlier, the Hon. J. C. Tallmadge, who was 



then practising in Windham, and there he re- 
mained until his admission to the bar in 1893. 
Immediately upon his admission to the bar he 
formed a partnership with his brother, under 
the firm name of J. C. & B. I. Tallmadge, and 
this continued until F'ebruary, 1897, since 
which time he has been in business alone. 

The Hon. Josiah C. Tallmadge, who is now 
a leading attorney in Catskill, began his prac- 
tice in W'inilliani in 1S75, having previously 
studied here with his uncle, Kugene Raymond, 
who started in practice here over fort)' )ears 
ago. From 1 S90 to 1893 the Hon. J. C. 
Tallmadge was District Attorney of Greene 
County, and during that time was engaged in 
some notable criminal trials. He was one of 
the attorneys in the Loring Robertson case, 
which is one of the most celebrated, not only 
in the county, but in the State. His success 
in winning this for his client won for him 
great praise. Tallmadge brothers were for 
several years the only attorneys in Windham. 

Mr. Tallmadge was married in i S94 to Rose 
B. Graham, wlio was born in this town, the 
(laughter of Lucius S. and Phiebe (Bump) 
Graham, the father a well-known shoe dealer. 
Both .Mr. and Mrs. Graham are deceased, the 
former at the age of sixty-nine and the latter 
at the age of fifty-five. They were active 
members of the Episcopal church. Their four 
children are: Mrs. Tallmadge, who is the 
eldest; I'lla, who married L. 11. Townscnd; 
Margaret R. ; and ]-:dwin. Mr. and Mr.s. Tall- 
madge have one child, a daughter Dorothy, 
aged two \ ears. 

Mr. TallmadLre is, as was his father, a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2C5 



DemDcrat, but he docs not engage activcl}- in 
politics. lie is a Mason and nieniber of 
Mountain Lodge, No. 529. Moth lie and his 
wife are mcmlicrs of the l'rcsh_\tcrian church, 
and he is treasurer of the Board of Trustees, 
leailer of the choir, and an acti\-e worker in the 
Sunday-school. i\Irs. Tallmadge is the church 
organist. Mr. Tallmadge was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Windham Water Company, and 
he is now secretary and treasurer of the organ- 
ization and one of its directors. 



tLBERT CHASE, a well-known 
farmer of Hensonville, was born in 
*» — Lexington, January 4, 1S19, son of 
Benjamin and Lydia (Skiff) Chase. The 
family is of English descent. Thomas and 
Aquila Chase, brothers, emigrated from Eng- 
land, and were living at Hampton, N. H., as 
early as 1640. A few years later Aquila re- 
moved to Newbury, Mass. "A large majority 
of the Chases of the United States," some one 
has said, "are his descendants." Thomas 
Chase married Elizabeth Philbrick, and had 
five sons. The fourth son, Isaac, removed to 
Edgartown, iMartha's Vineyard, Mass. He was 
twice married, and had a number of children. 

]3enjamin Chase, the father abo\-e men- 
tioned, was a son of Zephaniah Chase, and 
both were natives of iMartha's ^'ineyard. 
Zephaniah Chase, the grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, came to Lexington as a pio- 
neer. He cleared a large tract of land, and 
spent the rest of his life there, dying at the 
age of eighty. 



Benjamin Chase resided on the home farm 
for some years. Later he purchased a farm 
nearby, where he spent the rest of his life. 
1 1 is death also occurred at eighty years. When 
a young man he was an officer of the militia. 
His wife, Lydia, who, like himself, was a 
native of Martha's Vineyard, became the 
mother of ten children, nine of whom grew to 
maturity, and two are now living, namely: Al- 
bert, of Hensonville; and Ira, who resides in 
Jewctt. The others were: Benjamin, who 
lived in Lexington, and died aged ninety- 
three; Elizabeth, who resided on the old home- 
stead, and died at eighty years of age; Lydia, 
who married Orin Burges.s, of Hunter, and died 
at the age of si.xty ; William, who died in 
Ohio at eighty; Lucinda, who married Mathias 
Chittenden, and resided in Callicoon, Sullivan 
Count}-, where her death occurred when she 
was si.xty years old; Mary, who became the 
wife of Samuel Cook, of Sidney, Delaware 
County, and died at the age of si.xty; and 
Sarah, who became Mrs. Peleg Chamberlain, 
resided in Michigan, and died at the .same age. 
The mother died in 1S27, at the age of fifty. 

Albert Chase in his early childhood attended 
the common schools of Lexington. He resided 
at home until the death of his mother, when, 
a lad of eight years, he went to live with an 
uncle in Jewett, about two miles below Hunter 
village. At the age of twenty he returned to 
Lexington and learned the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed for about twenty-five years, 
becoming one of the largest contractors in this 
.section of the county. He erected many pri- 
vate residences, business blocks, mills, bridges. 



BIOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



and other structures, employing a number of 
men. He came to Hensonville in 1845, 
when this village was in its infancy, and did 
;in extensive business here, erecting many of 
the present buildings. Purchasing a saw- 
mill in 1863, he carried on a large lumber 
business for some years. He removed to his 
present farm, consisting of three hundred acre.s, 
in 1858, erected his dwelling-house and other 
buildings, ami, relinc|uishing his contracting 
business a few years later, gave his principal 
attention to farming. Since 1880 his son, De 
Mont, has had charge of the cultivation of the 
home acres. Mr. Chase and his .son have jHir- 
chased two additional farms, one being devoted 
to dairy purposes, and they keep twenty-seven 
cows, mcstly Jerseys. 

In 1844 Mr. Chase was united in marriage i 
with Mi.ss Laura O. Woodworth, of Windham, 
daughter of Abner and Betsey (Judson) Wood- 
worth. Her father, who was a native of 
Cherry Valley, and followed farming during , 
his active period, spent his last days in liast 
Jewett, dying at the age of eight_\-two years. [ 
Her nKjther, who was horn in Windham, died 
at the age of forty-eight. Mr. and Mrs. 
Woodworth reared a family of six children. 
Of these the three living are: Laura, who is i 
now Mrs. Chase; Lucius, who resides in [ 
Hunter; and Lueiiula, who is the wife of Dr. 
Mead. Mr. and Mrs. Chase have had five chil- 
dren — .Sophronia, Lydia, Abner, Lmery, and 
De .Mont L. Chase. .Sophronia died of diph- 
theria at the age of se\enteen. Lydia, who is 
no longer living, married Cyrus Hloodgood, 
clerk of Catskiil Countv. Abner died at the 1 



age of two years. Emery, formerly a member 
of the law firm of Hallock, Jennings & Chase, 
later Jennings & Chase, was elected Judge of 
the .Supreme Court in 1896. He married 
Mary Churchill, daughter of the jMojirietor of 
St. Charles Hotel, of New York, and has two 
children — Jessie C. and Albert W. Cha.se. 
De Mont L. Chase is now associated with his 
father in carrying on the farm. He has served 
as Supervisor and Tax Collector. He married 
Jo.sephine Osborn, daughter of l-;ibert Osborn, 
of Brooklyn, and has two children — Leona L. 
and Elbert O. Chase. 

Mr. Chase is a Re])ublican in jiolitics. He 
has been Overseer of the IVtor, and has acted 
as Justice of the Peace for four years. He is 
connected with the Order of Good Templars, 
also with the -Sons of Temi)erance, and has 
filled some of the important chairs in these so- 
cieties. He is a member fif the Methodist 
Episcnj)al church, of which he has been trus- 
tee, steward, and class lender for many years. 
He has also been district steward, was a mem- 
ber of the building committee which erected 
the new church, and served as trustee of the 
parsonage. He was formerl}' superintendent of 
the .Sunday-school, and Mrs. Chase was a 
teacher. 

^Cdu/lLLIA.M S. VA\D1:RBILT, a rep- 
^V resentative citizen of the \illageof 
Clrcenville, was born in New ^'ork City on 
Eebruary 10, 1S45, his jiarents being William 
-S. and Susan A. (Wright) Vanderbilt. He 
belongs to a family that has for many years 
been jirominent in Rockland County. His 




WILLIAM S. \'AXDERBILT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



groat-gnimlf;itlicr scttlcil in Clarkstowii, in 
that (.•(Hinty, wlien a young man, ami resided 
there on a farm chiring the remainder of his 
life. His grandfather, Isaac \'anderbilt, was 
born in Clarkstown, and sjient his life there 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

William S. Vanderbilt, Sr. , son of Isaac 
and father of the subject of this sketch, was 
also born on the homestead, but at the age of 
fifteen he left the parental roof and learned the 
merchant tailor's trade. At twenty -one he 
began business for himself in New York City, 
and subsequently for twenty-seven years con- 
ducted it most successfully. His store was at 
416 and later at 408 Broadway, and his was 
one of the best-known tailoring establishments 
in the city. He died on February 13, 1S64, 
being only forty-eight years of age. His wife, 
Susan, who died in 1893, at the age of sixty- 
nine, was born in Greenwich village, now a 
part of New York City, and spent the whole of 
her life in the great metropolis. She was the 
daughter of Charles S. Wright, who was for 
many years one of the most influential mem- 
bers of the School Board of Trustees of the 
Ninth Ward in the city of New York, and for 
a long time its chairman. At one time Mr. 
Wright was waited upon by a committee to see 
if he would accept the nomination to the legis- 
lature. Mr. Wright declined the honor. He 
lived, about 1824, in the house in Greenwich 
village which his father had built. It was then 
out in the country, and the canal wound its 
sluggish way through what is now Canal Street. 

\\'illiam S., Sr., and Susan \'anderbi]t, had 
eight children, of whom four are now living; 



namely, William S. , Oliver DeClray, John, 
and Mrs. George W. Vanderhoef. Mrs. \'aii- 
derl)ilt, after the death (if her first husband, 
married Andrew Hdoghmd, a prnminent and 
well-to-do citizen of New \'(jrk, and mie of the 
best-known members of the New York Produce 
Exchange. Mr. Hoogland was born on May 
20, 181 5, and died in 1879. He was a direc- 
tor in the Corn Exchange Bank, and of the 
New Amsterdam Insurance Company, and for 
many )'ears a member of St. Andrew's Curling 
Club, its president in 1873 and 1874, and at 
one time president of the National Curling 
Club. He also represented the St. Andrew's 
of New York City at the national convention 
at Toronto in 1S73. To the last-named club he 
gave a fine flag. He held membership in the 
Dutch church, and was one of its active and 
liberal supporters. At one time he was a mem- 
ber of the Seventh Regiment of militia, and 
later a member of the \'ictorian Association. 

William S. Yanderbilt, the subject of this 
sketch, lived in New York City until 1871, 
when he took up his residence in Greenville. 
He boarded in different families for a number 
of years, but in 1S88 began buying land, and 
the following year built his present handsome 
residence. He owns a number of fine farms, 
including what are known as the Lewis Sher- 
rill and Prevost farms. Mr. Yanderbilt is 
one of Greenville's most public-spirited citi- 
zens, and has shown this in manv ways. He 
built in the village a beautiful opera house, 
and gave a great stimulus to the introduction 
of water in the town by placing it in all of his 
buildings. 



270 



BIOGRAPHICAL RF.VIEW 



Mr. Vanderbilt married in 1876 Miss Mary 
J. Hickok, of this town, a descendant of one 
of the old and leading families. She died at 
the age of thirty-three, leaving one daughter, 
Lizzie H. Vanderbilt. On November 14, 
1888, Mr. Vanderbilt married Mary Rccd, 
daughter of John K. and Ann (.Sherrill) Chap- 
man. Her father was born :it Sali.sbury, 
Conn. While yet a mere lad his father, Rob- 
ert L. , moved to the vicinity of Greenville, 
where he died in 1S57, eighty-two years old. 
Mrs. N'anderbilt's father was an early i^old 
hunter on the Pacific Coast, going to Cali- 
fr)rnia by the way of the Isthmus of Panama in 
1849. After acquiring considerable money for 
those days, he returned to Greenville, was 
married, and shortly after went to Janesville, 
Wis., where with a brother, lie enj^nged in 
the dry-goods business. Here his daughter 
Mary was born. lie returned to Greenville in 
1865, residing there until his death in 1888, 
at the age of seventy years. His wife, Mrs. 
Vanderbilt's mother, was the daughter of 
Lewis Sherrill, a descendant of one of the pio- 
neer families of the town. Her grandfather, 
Jonathan .Shenill, had extensive tanneries. 
One of them was located on the corner where 
Coonleys Hotel now stands. Jonatiian .Sher- 
rill built and occupied the house that is now 
the residence of Dr. H. S. .McCal)e. His 
home at the time of his deatli was the house on 
North Street owned by Ciiarlcs K. Knowles, 
of Albany (a grandson), and used as a summer 
residence. He died in 1.S51, in his eighty- 
second year. 

Lewis Sherrill, for many years president of 



the old Greenville Academy, was a broad- 
gauge public-spirited man. He was a success- 
ful farmer and stock-raiser, a life-member of 
the New York State Agricultural Society, and 
the fir.st president of the Greene County Agri- 
cultural Society. The stone walks about the 
village, among other things, are largely the 
result of his energy and push. He died in 
March, 1SS9, at the age of eighty-eight. His 
wife, h'.sther Ford, died in 1872, at the age of 
sixty years. Mr. and Mrs. Vanderbilt have 
two children living, the elder being William 
Stephen, and the younger George \'aiulerhoef 
Vanderbilt. 

In politics Mr. \'anderbilt is a Repui)lican, 
and some years ago he was very active in all 
political matters. He is a member of James 
M. Austin Lodge, 1". & A. M., of which he 
has been ti'easurer for a number of years, and 
he holds membershi]! in the Royal Arch Cha|.- 
ter, of (ireenville. He is also a charter mem- 
ber of the Knights <if Pythias organization 
here. He is warden and treasurer of the h'-jjis- 
copal church, and treasurer of Greenville Fire 
District. 

T^AGK T. HOAGLAND, editor and 
h-^ proprietor of the A',r<W, Oak Hill, 
was born in Malugin's Grove, near 
Dix.in, Lee County, 111., March 23, 1.S56, son 
of Abram Allen and ICunice F. (Hloodgood) 
Hoagland. He is of the eighth generation in 
descent from Christophal Hoageland, who was 
born in ll.)ll;uid in ir,;,4, emigrated to Amer- 
ica about tlie year 1654, and settled in New 
Amsterdam. 



lilCKlRArillCAI, 



From Christophal the ancestral line is traced 

tliniu_';h his clilost son, Cliristophor, - wlio was 
born in the vicinity of lirooklyn, N. V. ; John,' 
wiio was liorn in Flatlands, N.J., in 1701, and 
elicd in 1767; Jacob Iloa-cland,^ born in liar 
bin-cr, X.J., in 1735; Abraham Ilooyland,-^ 
wlio was iiorn in Soworland, New Harbinger, 
Somerset County, N.J., alx>ut the year 1773; 
Henoni llooyland," who was born in Gilboa, 
N. V. , February 25, 1796; and Abram Allen 
lloagland,' who was born in Gilboa in 1S31; 
to Page T. Iloagland,' the subject of this 
sketch. 

Jacob Hoageland resided in New Jersey 
until after tlie settlement of his father's estate, 
when he came to New York, and, after sojourn- 
ing for a time in Schoharie County, went from 
there to Albany County, where he passed the 
rest of his life. Abraham Hoogland, of the 
fifth generation, accompanied his parents to 
Gilboa in 1785. Remarried Polly RI. Eraser, 
daughter of Benoni Eraser, who was one of the 
earliest settlers in Schoharie County and a 
Revolutionary soldier. On September 11, 
1S17, Benoni Hoogland, the grandfather, mar- 
ried Katy Shoemaker, who was born August 
-9, 1 79 1, daughter of Jacob Shoemaker. 
Grandfather Hoogland died May 25, 1867, and 
the grandmother died May 27, 186S. They 
were the parents of nine children, two sons 
and seven daughters, and five of their family 
are now living. 

About the year 1S54 Abram Allen Hoag- 
land, Mr. Page T. Hoagland's father, removed 
from New York to Illinois, where he followed 
his occupation of carpenter and joiner for a 



short time. Then going from there to Kau 

Claire, Wis., he purchased a farm of one hun- 
dred and si.xty acres ailjoining the town site. 
Two years later he returned to New ^'ork, and 
from 1859 to 1 866 resided in Ashland and 
Jewett, Greene County. After the close of 
the Civil War he again went to Illinois. He 
located in Rockford, and resuming his trade 
remained there until shortly after the deatli of 
his father, in 186S, when he came to Gilboa to 
care for his mother, who died suddenly within 
the following year. The ne.xt two years he 
spent upon a farm in Johnson Hollow, town of 
Roxbury, N. Y., and in 1870 removed to 
Oneonta, this State, where he was eniplo)-ed 
in the car-shops of the Albany & Susquehanna 
Railroad Company. He ne.xt settled in Bing- 
hamton on a leased farm, which he carried on 
until 1876; and the year after he cultivated the 
G. H. Bloodgood farm in Conesville. He 
then came to Oak Hill, followed his trade here 
for two years; and in 1S79 he returned to 
Conesville, occupying the Hawver farm for 
about one year. Removing to Superior, Neb., 
in 1880, he resided there some years. He is 
now living upon a large farm in Oak Hill. 
His first wife, luuiice E. , whom he married in 
1854, was a daughter of Abraham Bloodgood. 
Her father, who was a tanner, spent most of 
his life in Jewett, and her mother was a repre- 
sentative of the Tower family of New England. 
It is said that some of her ancestors came over 
in the "Mayflower." Abram Allen Hoag- 
land's first wife died in 1894, at fifty-nine 
years of age. The maiden name of his second 
wife was Eugenia Brand Lynam. He is the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



fatlKT of two chilclrcn, both by his first wife: 
Ta-^c T., the subject of this sketch; and Kdith 
G., who married William J. W'imi, of l<riilj;e- 
port, Conn. 

Page T. Hoagland came from \\'isc(jnsin to 
Greene County with his parents when about 
three years old. His educational opi)ortuni- 
ties were confined to the schools of the various 
localities in whiib he lived uji to 1.S70, when 
he became a pupil in the Oneonta -raded 
school, under the supervision of Professor 
N. X. Hull. lie was i^raduated in 1872, and 
immediately entered the store of L. Goldsmith 
as a clerk. Afterward he worked for Joseph 
and Morris Price in the same capacity, and 
later for Miller & Pope, dealers in Hour and 
provisions. lie taught school in Sullivan 
County during the ensuing winter, and then, 
joining his father on the farm at Binghamton, 
he remained there the following seas(jn. In 
the fall of 1S79, having previously taught 
■schools in Conesvillc and Rensselaerville, he 
entered the store of Hagadorn Brothers, Gil- 
boa. A year later he went to Superior, Neb., 
and, after being employed as a clerk during the 
fall and winter of iSSo and 1881, he in the 
spring became a cow-boy, and remained on 
the ranch until July of that year, when he went 
to Plattsmouth, Neb., twenty miles below 
Omaha. P'ailing to find employment in the 
city .stores, he worked in a brick-\ard until, 
through the influence of a friend, he obtained 
a subordinate position ui)on the clerical force 
of the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad. 
In 1883 he was a])p(jintetl assistant station 
agent on the Chicago, Burlington & (Juincy 



Railroad at Pacific Junction, la., resigning in 
January, 1884, in order to take the position of 
manager of the loss and damage dejjartment of 
the Burlington & Missouri Railroad at their 
headquarters in Omaha. He continued to serve 
in that capacity until the ensuing fall, when 
he was forced by ill health to return to Gilboa. 
In March, 1885, he purchased of 11. V. 
Jones the Jeffer.son (N.V.) Connn; which he 
conducted for over three years, selling in .Au- 
gust, 1888, to George M. Projier, of Eminence, 
N.V. He ne.xt purchased the Monitor, a paper 
published in Gilboa, which he carried on until 

1893, when he disi)osed of it to Berton C». 
Griffin, and coming to Oak Hill in the spring 
of 1894 established ihc Rccoii/, which he has 
conducted successfully ever since. He has a 
well-equipped [dant with ample facilities for 
handling the con.stantly increasing circulation 
of his paper, and his advertising department is 
both popular and profitable. 

In June, 1882, Mr. Hoagland was unitetl in 
marriage with Prances Stryker, daughter of 
Abraham .Stryker, of Gilboa. She died in 

1894, at the age of thirty-seven, having been 
the mother of seven children. Of these, five 
are living — Scott R., Hazel C, Ciuy W., 
Cecil A., and b'.llen V. On September 4, 

1895, he married for his second wife IClla 
Cherritree, daughter of Walter S. Cherritree, 
a native of Durham and prominently identified 
with the foundry interests of Oak Hill. 

In ixditics .Mr. Hoagland is a Republican, 
and during his residence in Jefferson he servetl 
as Town Clerk ami as School Trustee. He 
served in the same capacity in Gilboa, where 



lilOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



he was candidate for Supervisor in 1S93, and 
was again liis p.uty's camliilato for Town Clerk 
in 189S. ] le has been a memlier of the Repub- 
lican County Committee since 1896. He was 
made a Mason at Jefferson in Working Lodge, 
No. 554, V. & A. M., of which he was Junior 
Warden for two \ears. In 1889 he was de- 
niitted to C.ilboa Lodge, No. 630, of which he 
served as secretary four )ears. He is now a 
member of Cascade Lodge, No. 427, Oak Hill. 
In 1892 he joined Blenheim Lodge, No. 651, 
L O. O. F. , from which he withdrew to be- 
come a charter member of Lyman Tremaine 
Lodge, No. 265, Oak Hill, of which he was 
treasurer for the years 1896 and 1897, and was 
chosen \'ice-Grand in 1 89S. He was made 
Noble Grand January i, 1899, serving until 
July I of the same year. During this year he 
was recommended to the Grand Lodge as sec- 
retary to the Grand Committee, District of 
Greene. He is also a member of Middleburg 
Kncampment, No. 129, and Valley Chapter, 
No. 38, Order of the Eastern Star. At the 
age of fourteen he was confirmed by Bishop 
Doane, of Albany, and has served as vestry- 
man of the Episcopal church. Educational 
and literary matters have absorbed his leisure 
time, and he has a well-selected library of 
standard works. 



"jClLDA B. CHAPMAN, wife of J. P. Chap- 

J man, of East Cobleskill, Schoharie 

County, N. V. , and a prominent worker in the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union, was 
born at Bramanville, in the town of Cobleskill, 



on April 9, 1S52, her parents being Nelson 
anil Catherine M. (Braman) Bice. Her family 
is of Dutch origin, a representative of it com- 
ing from Holland in 1657, and .settling in New 
Vork when it was called New Amsterdam. 
The name was originally spelled Ikiys, as it 
still is in Holland. 

Mrs. Chapman's paternal grandfather, Joshua 
Bice, who was a farmer and later a merchant, 
settled on land in liast Cobleskill. He was a 
man of strong Christian character, and for 
si.xty-tw-o years was an earnest and devoted 
member of the Methodist church. He was the 
first member of the church here. At the age 
of seventy-four years he handed in the class- 
book that he had used in the many years when 
he had held the position of class leader, saying 
he was too old to attend to it any longer. 

Mrs. Chapman's father. Nelson Bice, was 
born at East Cobleskill, where his daughter 
now resides. He lived in this county nearly 
all his life, and for the nine )-ears preceding 
his death he lived on this place. He was a 
farmer by occupation. For six years, while 
residing in Middleburg, he served as Assessor 
of the town, being nominated to the office by 
acclamation. hi politics he was a Democrat. 
At the age of twenty-three he joined the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and from that time 
until his death, in 1S80, he was one of its 
faithful members. For many years he held 
the office of superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, for eight years that of class leader, and 
for many years he was one of the church trus- 
tees. He served his townspeople as school 
trustee for a number of years. His wife. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Catlicrinc, was hum in Hranianvillc, dauj^litcr 
of John W. I^iaman. llcr ^Grandfather, Will- 
iam Hraman, was an l-ln^^lishman ; and his 
wife, whose maiden name was Do Lamater, 
was half I-'rench and part IJutch, being a de- 
scendant of the Re\-. llverardus l^ogardiis and 
iiis wife, Anneke Jans. John W. liraman 
built a woollen-mill in Hramanville. The 
place was named in his honor, and he was one 
of its most highly valued citizens. He was a 
.strong advocate of temperance. When at the 
advanced age of seventy he taught the village 
school in Rramanville. For twelve years he 
was a Justice of the Peace. He married Eliz- 
abeth Wetsell, daughter of Cliristopher Wet- 
sell, a German who owned about a thousand 
acres of land and a number of sla\es. When 
the State gave them freedom, some of Mr. 
Wetsell's negroes remained with him, and 
some of them accompanied fClizabeth Wetsell 
when she married and left home. 

Mrs. Chapman's father was an owner in the 
woollen-mill built b_\' her grandfather l-iraman, 
but when she was three years of age he re- 
moved to Ivist Worcester. 'I'here the family 
lived for the ne.xt five years, at the ^:\n] of 
which time they went to ICast Cobleskill. 
Six years later they removed to h'ultonhani, 
and after staying in that ])lace four \ears the\- 
returned to East Cobleskill, where Mrs. Chaj)- 
man has since made her home. She attentled 
the district schools until she was si.\teen years 
old, and was then sent to Schoharie Academy, 
where she remained for some time, studying 
academic branches antl music. She subse- 
quently studied music with Miss Rankin, of 



Middleburg. Her marriage occurreil on Octo- 
ber 25, 1S71, and since that time she has 
shown her abilit)- not only in the administra- 
tion of her domestic duties, but in \arious re- 
sponsible luiblic [jositions. In connection 
with her efforts in behalf of the cause of tem- 
l)erance she has been count)' superintendent 
of the Simday-school work of the Woman's 
Christ iiui Temiierance Union. l-'or twenty-one 
)ears she was a teacher in the Sunday-school 
of the Methodist church, of which she is a 
member. 

Mr. Chapman was born in h'ultDn, his par- 
ents being Jacob and Huldah (Winans) Chair- 
man. His mother was the daughter of the 
Rev. Mr. Winans, a Baptist minister. Mr. 
Cha])man is an enterprising farmer and a man 
who commands universal esteem. He has 
been twice elected Supervisor of the town of 
Middleburg. 

Mrs. Chapman takes an acti\e interest in the 
advancement of agriculture, and has written 
several valuable essays, which were read be- 
fore the State Agricultural Societ)- and before 
the State Dairymen's Association. She has 
also read jiapers before the count)- Sunday- 
school conventions, and has been one of the 
judges of award at two siKer metlal contests. 
Mrs. Chapman is the mother of tluee daugh- 
ters—Lena May, Mildred II., antl Agnes E. 
The first named is a gratluate of tlie Cobleskill 
High School ami ot Syracuse University. 
Mildred H. is a graduate of the Cobleskill 
High Schoid, and is now jireparing to take a 
course of study in Syracuse University. 
Agnes E. is ten years of age. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



§ AUGUSTUS SNYDER, supcrintcnd- 
ont of the I'oltz suiniiiLT home at 
■ fohleskill, N.V., near Warnersville, 
was born in this town, October 6, 1S44, son of 
William and Rebecca (Houck) Snyder. He is 
of thrifty derman ancestr)-, and a lineal ile- 
scendaiit of one of the original settlers of this 
section of Schoharie County. 

William Sn\der, first, his great-great-grand- 
father, emigrated from Germany in Colonial 
times, and located on Helderberg Mountain, 
near Albain', N.Y. , but prior to the Revolu- 
tion he came to Cobleskill, where he took up 
a tract of wild land and began the improve- 
ment of a homestead. In the ensuing struggle 
for independence William Snyder took an ac- 
tive part, serving as a soldier in the army until 
the close of the war. The Lutheran church, 
which was built by him, contained a tablet 
bearing his name. 

Peter W. Snyder, the grandfather of J. Au- 
gustus, was born on the old Snyder homestead, 
which later passed into his possession. He 
was an industrious, energetic worker, and 
added materially to the improvements on the 
estate, erecting the present comfortable set of 
buildings. He married Catherine Warner, a 
daughter of Nicholas Warner, who also was 
one of the earliest settlers of this part of Scho- 
harie County, and formerly the owner of al- 
most the whole of the present site of the 
village of Warnersville. A man of good 
understanding, interested in the cause of edu- 
cation, Peter W. Snyder had the distinction of 
being the first English school-teacher in this 
valley. P'or many years he served as Justice 



of the Peace; in 1826 and 1827 he was a mem- 
ber of the Assembly; and was also (jue of the 
first railway commissioners in this locality. 
He died at a ripe old age in 1850. Peter W. 
Snyder anel his wife were members of the 
Lutheran church. Of their union seven chil- 
dren were born. ]\Irs. Catherine W. Snyder 
survived her husband a score (jr more of years, 
attaining the venerable age of ninety-three. 

Their son, William Snyder, second, was 
born and reared on the old home farm, and 
eventually succeeded to its ownership. He 
carried it on successfully for many years, but 
later sold it, and, buying a farm near by, there 
spent his remaining days, dying at the age of 
seventy-si.\' )'ears. In addition to general 
farming he was extensively engaged in mill- 
ing, and built the plant now known as Sny- 
der's mills, a large mill having four runs of 
stone, which is now operated by one of his 
sons. He manufactured large ciuantities of 
flour and made a specialty of custom grinding, 
for years carrying on a lucrative business. 
He was an uncompromising Democrat, influen- 
tial in local affairs, and held many public 
offices, being Supervisor five years, E.xcise 
Commissioner eighteen years, and Justice of 
the Peace a number of terms. He attended 
the Lutheran church, antl gave generously 
toward its support. He was three times mar- 
ried. His first wife, whose maiden name was 
Diana Bouck, died at an early age, leaving two 
children — George W. and Margaret. George 
W. attended Franklin and Schoharie Acade- 
mies and Union College, after which he entered 
West Point, where he was graduated at the 



276 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



head of his class in the engineer's department. 
In 1858 he was appointed Second Lieutenant, 
and he was afterward stationed at different 
points along the coast, including l^oston, I'en- 
sacola, Key West, Charleston (S.C. ), and Fort 
Moultrie. In 1861 he was ordered to I-'ort 
Sumter, and while there was twice promoted, 
first to the rank of First Lieutenant and then 
Captain. lie was sul)sc(|Liently panded for a 
time, and on returning to Washinj;l(jii was ap- 
pointed as Aide de-camp to {".eiieral Heintzel- 
nian, and was with him at tiie battle of Hull 
Kun. Taken sick with tyi^hoid fever just 
after the battle, lie died November 17, i.SYn. 
He hail been brevctted Lieutenant Colonel. 
As a snldicr he was brave and courageous, 
faithful in the performance of every duty. 
The father's second wife, Lavina Houck, lived 
but a few years. He subsequently married for 
his third wife Rebecca Houck, who was born 
in Cohleskill, a daughter of David Houck, and 
a lineal descendant of Covernor Bouck. She 
bore him seven children, of whom three are 
now living; namely, J. Augustus, David H. , 
and William. The mother tlied at the age of 
fifty-eight years. 

J. Augustus Snyder lived with his parents 
until sixteen years old, when he began life for 
himself. While working with his father he 
had learned the miller's trade, and he subse- 
quently operated for five years a grist-mill that 
his father bought in Hyndsville. lie then 
went West, and at Saginaw, Mich., he en- 
gaged in railroad construction and lunibering 

lered the mill now owned by his brother. 



David H. , and this he operated a few years. 
After that he carried on a farm seven years, 
selling out at the end of this period and remov- 
ing to Richmondville, where he was engaged 
as a retail grocer and marketman for five years. 
During the next six years Mr. Snyder kept a 
hotel, and shortly after .selling that property he 
assumed his present responsible jjosition as su- 
l)erintendent of the Foltz place. I'nder his efh- 
cient management marked impro\emeiUs have 
been made <in the estate. The grounds have 
been linely laid out and beautified, antl the 
new house has been built, the homestead being 
now one of the most attractive in the vicinity. 
On June 2^, i,S,S2, Mr. Snyder married Miss 
Mary C). Baker, who was born in Worcester, 
Otsego County, N. V. , one of the six children 
of Sherman S. Baker, a well-known cattle 
dealer of that town. Politically, Mr. Snyder 
is a straightfdrward Republican, interested in 
public mattei's, and while in Michigan served 
as Justice of the I'eace. I-"raternally, he is a 
thirty-second degree Mason, ]irominent in the 
order, and a member of Cohleskill Lodge, 
F. & A. I\L ; the John L. Lewis Chapter, 
Cohleskill; St. C.eorge's Commandery, K. T. , 
of Schenectady; and Temple Consistory, No. 
2, of Albany. lie also belongs to Cohleskill 
Lodge, No. 500, L O. O. F. In religious 
matters he is broad and liberal. 



"ON. EMORY ALBERT CllASF, of 

Catskill, Justice of the Sui)reme 
Court for the Third Judicial Dis- 
trict of New York, was born nn August J I, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



277 



1S54, at Hensonville, Greene County, N.Y. , 
where his parents, Albert and Laura (W'odiI- 
worth) Chase, are still living. On the ])ater- 
nal side he is of Knglish descent, and on tlie 
maternal of Scotch. 

The ancestral home of the Chase family was 
at Che.sham, England. Thomas Chase, a 
prominent resident of Cheshani, had a son 
Kichard, who married Joan Bishop at Cheshani, 
April 16, 1564. This couple haii a son 
Thomas, born at Cheshani, who emigrated to 
America about the year 1639, ^"f' settled at 
Hampton, N. H. He married Elizabeth, a 
daughter of Thomas Philbrick, and remained 
in Hampton until his death in 1652. He had 
a son Isaac, born April i, 1647, who is com- 
monly referred to as Lieutenant Isaac. This 
son married for his second wife Marv Tilton, 
and lived at Vineyard Haven, ^lartha's \'ine- 
yard. He died there, May 19, 1727, and is i 
buried on the hill overlooking the head of 
Vineyard Haven. 

Isaac Chase and his wife had a son Joseph, 
born February 26, 1689, who married Lydia 
Coffin. Their first child, Abel, was born 
October 9, 17 19. He married Eebruary 14, 
1744, on Martha's Vineyard Island, Mercy 
Mayhew. They had a son Zephaniah, born 
March 14, 174S. He married for his first wife 
Abigail Skiff. Zephaniah Chase was a mem- 
ber of Captain Smith's seaport company during 
the Revolutionary War. After the close of the 
war and in the year 1787 he sold his property 
in Vineyard Haven and migrated to the pres- 
ent town of Le.xington, Greene Countv, N. Y. , 
then County of Albany. His son 13enjamin, | 



born January 21, 1774, married Lydia Skiff, 
and had a son Albert, born January 4, i8ig. 

Albert Chase and Laura O. Woodworth were 
married on September i, 1S44. They have 
two sons, namely: Demont L., of llensonville, 
N.Y. ; and Emory A., of Catskill, the s]x-cial 
subject of this hiogra|)hy. Albert Chase was 
engaged for many _\ears in contracting, build- 
ing, and lumbering. Since retiring he has 
lived on a farm. 

Most of the early life of Judge Chase was 
spent on his father's farm. He attended the 
public school at Hcnsonville, and continued 
his studies at the Fort lulward Collegiate In- 
stitute, but did not graduate. He was fitted 
for the legal profession in the office of King & 
Hallock (Rufus H. King and Joseph Hal lock) 
at Catskill. In April, 18S0, he became inter- 
ested in the firm of Hallock & Jennings; and 
in 18S2 he became one of its members, the 
firm name being changed to Hallock, Jennings 
& Chase. After Mr. Hallock's retirement, 
September 22, 1890, the business was con- 
tinued under the style of Jennings & Chase 
until December, 1896, when it was dissolved 
in consequence of Mr. Chase's election as 
Justice of the Supreme Court for the Third 
Judicial District. In a district usuallv Dem- 
ocratic he was elected on the Republican 
ticket by a majority of about thirteen thou- 
sand. Since the ist of January, 1S97, he has 
devoted himself to the duties of that office. 

The jurisdiction of a Supreme Court Judge 
extends throughout the State, but the judges 
are elected by districts. The Third District 
is composed of seven counties — Rensselaer, 



278 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Albany, Schoharie, Columbia, Greene, Ulster, 
and Sullivan. Judj^e Chase has always been 
a Republican in politics, and ii]) to tlie time 
of his election as a Supreme Cmiit Judge he 
attended as a delej,'ate nearly every town, 
county, district, and State convention of the 
Re])ublican party. During his career at the 
bar he was constantly connected with imjjor- 
tant litigations ill the Third Judicial District 
and other parts ol the State. He lias been 
admitted to practice in the United Stales Dis- 
trict and Circuit Courts and in the L'nited 
States Supreme Court. 

Judge Chase has long been prominent in the 
local affairs of Catskill. He was a member of 
the Hoard of lulncation for fourteen years ]ire- 
vious to December, iScjG, and for five years 
was its president. He served for a long period 
as corporation counsel of the village of Cats- 
kill, retiring from that office in ICS95, and was 
Supervisor of the town of Catskill in 1.S90. 
He has also been conspicuously identilied with 
several of the most representative local inter- 
ests. He is now first vice-president of the 
Cat-skill Savings Iviiik, a diiector in the Tan- 
ners' National J^ank antl in many other local 
enterprises. He is a member of the I'resby- 
terian church. 

ICmory A. Chase married Mary IC. Churchill 
on the thirlietii day of June, 1.SS5. They 
have tw.) children —Jessie Churchill Chase 
and Albert Woodworth Chase — and have a 
pleasant home at 25 Prospect Avenue. 

Although Judge Chase is one of the youngest 
men eleclc;! to the Supreme Court in this 
State, he has met with a very favorable recep- 



tion, as shown by the following resolutions 
and newspaper comments. 

At a meeting of the Schoharie County bar, 
held at the Surrogate's office in the village of 
Schoharie, the twenty-fifth day of January, 
1897, the fidlowing resolutions were unani- 
mously adojited : — 

" Riso/vfd, that the bar of Schoharie County 
ha\e watched with jdeasure ami apjirobation 
the hokiing of Judge hanory A. Chase's first 
trial term following his recent election, antl 
they congratulate themselves that Schoharie 
County has had the privilege and honor, as 
well, of seeing him start out in their midst of 
what we trust and expect will be a long and 
distinguished judicial career. 

'■ RcsohY.i. that, while hitherto he has been 
a stranger to maii\- of us, yet we desire to 
testify to his patience and kindness; to his 
fairness, skill, anil judicial ability, as mani- 
fested in conducting the trial of causes; to the 
ease and facility with which he has put off the 
lawyer and assumed the dignity of the judge; 
to his evident desire to be right and impartial 
in his rulings; and we congratulate the bar and 
the ]ieople of this State, and assure them that 
they have made no mistake in elevating to the 
bench Judge luiiory A. Cha.se. We extend to 
him the pledge of our loyalty antl friendshij), 
and ex]iress the desire that he shall long con- 
tinue to wear the judicial ermine." 

From the Alban\- Daily Pnss Kiiicker- 
bockcr : — 

••Judge Chase has won a very enviable reiiu- 
tation during his sitting for ability and in ex- 
pediting the administration of justice. " 



iU(x:R.\riiic.\i 



From the Albany Times Union: — 
••It was the fust term i)t' Justice Cluisc in 
this city, and lie lias inaclc a tavorahle imprcs- 
sinn <in the nu-iiiiicis of the har in this county, 
not only as an honorable gentleman, but a lair 
anil impartial lawyer, possessing extensive 
legal knowledge." 

From the Albany Moniiiii:;- /■x/'/rss : — 
••Justice Chase convened the March trial 
term of the Supreme Court on the first day of 
.^^arch. He came to Albany for the first time 
as a presiding justice, and was unknown to 
many members of the bar. He adjourned the 
term yesterday, and left the city, having won a 
reputation for judicial abilit}', fairness, and 
courtesy that is well deserved. 

■•Justice Chase has been a model presiding 
justice. He was confronted with a calendar of 
three hundred and forty-four cases, and during 
the three weeks of the term he disposed of 
si.xty-si.x cases. Of this number twenty-six 
were settled, twenty-eight tried, eleven re- 
ferred, and a change of venue was made in one. 
This is a somewhat remarkable record ; and, if 
other justices were as anxious to expedite busi- 
ness as is Justice Chase, many cases would not 
drag along in the courts for an extended period 
of time. " 

P'rom the Albany Evening Journal : — 
"The Judge has proved himself to be one of 
the most popular men who ever have sat upon 
the bench in the court room in the City Hall." 
From the Albany Evening Journal : — 
"During the term just concluded Justice 
Chase has shown himself to be a model presid- 
ing officer. His first circuit has demonstrated 



him to be practically all that a judge should 

From the Troy Tinics : — 

"The Hon. hlmory A. Chase, of Catskill, 
Justice of the .Supreme Court, has just finished 
his first trial term in Schoharie County. The 
term was highly successful, and Justice Chase 
was congratulated by the bar on the impartial- 
ity of the rulings and the fairness of his 
charges. Justice Chase has a fine command of 
language and a thorough knowledge of the 
rules of evidence. The opening of his judicial 
career fulfils the prophecy of his nomination." 

From the Hudson Republican : — 

"The Hon. I^mory A. Chase, of Catskill, 
Justice of the Supreme Court, Third Judicial 
Departinent, has accepted the invitation of the 
Appellate Division of the Supreme Court in 
the First Department to hold a special term in 
New York City beginning May 17 and contin- 
uing until June 5. Justice Chase was chosen 
to the bench at the last election of a Supreme 
Court Justice in this judicial district, and lie 
has alread)- so thoroughly proved his efficiency 
as to warrant the high compliment which is 
contained in this invitation from the judiciary 
of New York City. Justice Chase has just 
finished holding a term of court at Hudson, 
where, as usual, his impartiality and judicial 
ability were praised by everybody. He is 
remarkably well fitted for the office which he 
fills, and it has not taken the courts, the bar, 
and the people long to find it out." 

PTom the Tro)- Times : — 

"The term of the Supreme Court just clos- 
ing in this city has given the law3-ers and the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pco])lc ail oppditiinity to hoconiL- atc|iiaiiUc(J 
with tlic judicial qualities of the ])icsiclinj; 
justice, the Hon. Kmory A. Chase, of Cats- 
kill. Acquaintance has meant admiration. 
In sitting as judj(e at civil and criminal trials 
of unusual magnitude Justice Chase has shown 
promptness, fairness, and mastery of the law 
and its principles that have assured to him tiie 
place of a favorite in the esteem of the people 
hereabout. His future visits to this city in 
either a judicial or a social capacit)- will he 
cordially welcomed." 

The Albany Kvpirss, siieakinj; of the Octo- 
ber trial term of the Supreme Court, presided 
over by Judge Chase, says, " The term has 
been one of the longest and most satisfactory 
e\er held in this county." 



J-.T1':R I. .STAXI.KV, M.U.,anabIe 
])h_\sician and a highly esteemed citi- 
zen of Windham, Greene Count}-, 
X.V., was born in I larpersfield, Delaware 
County, this State, on August ii, 1825, son 
of Nathan and I'amelia (Hogaboom) Stanley. 
His grandfather, l^ichard Stanley, came to 
New York .State fiom New Jerse_\- during the 
Revolutionary War, being among the farming 
population of that colon)- who were so harassed 
by the Hessian troojjs brought over to re-en- 
force the 13ritish army that they abandoned 
their homes. 

Richard Stanley, settling in tlie wilderness, 
cleared a farm in what is now the town of (iil- 
boa, Schoharie County, where he resided for 
a number of yeais. His last days were spent 



in Harpersfield. He was the father of three 
children. Information at hand does not locate 
for a certainl)- the birthplace of his son 
Nathan, the Dcjctor's father, but he was prob- 
ably reared in Schoharie Coinit}-. He served 
as a soldier in the War of 1.S12. 

Nathan Stanley acconi[)anied his father to 
Harpersfiekl, and, succeeding to the ownership 
of the homestead, he resided there for the rest 
of his life. His wife, I'amelia Hogaboom, 
was a native of I'rattsville, Greene County. 
She became the mother of fourteen children, 
o[ily three of whom are living, namel\- : John 
L., who is residing in Kansas; Peter I., the 
subject (jf this sketch; and Jane, who married 
\\'illiani Samiison. The jxuents both lived to 
be sevent\--eight years old. The\- were origi- 
nally Presbyterians, but in their later years at- 
tended the Methodi.st Episcopal church. 

Peter I. Stanley acquired his early education 
in the district schools and at the .Stamford 
Academy. He ren-iained upon the home farm 
until he was twenty-one, when he went to 
work in a woollen factor)-, and continued in 
that emiiloyment one year. Deciding to enter 
professional life, he began the study of medi- 
cine at the age of twenty-two with Dr. Covel, 
of Stamford, and completed his preparations at 
the Albany .Medical College, from which he 
was graduated in 1853. Locating in Ashland, 
he resided there for si.\tcen years; and, as he 
was the only ])hysician in the town, he was 
keiit constantly busy in attending to a large 
and lucrative jiractice, which extended over a 
wide circuit. At the earnest solicitation of 
the people of Windham he in 1869 removed 




PETER I. STANLEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



283 



to this town, where 
ample fieUl in whieh 



as e\cr since found an 
lenionstrate his ability 
and usefulness; and it may he truthfully said 
that the entiie et)mmunity has priifited by his 
fitlelit\-, |ironi[)titucle, and skill. He has re- 
ported many interesting^ cases to the County 
Medical Society, of which he has been a mem- 
ber ever since its organization, some forty 
years ago; and be has several times been called 
upon to serve as its jiresident. As his physi- 
cal powers remain unimpaired, he still con- 
tinues to take long rides; and the inhabitants 
of all this locality consider themselves fortu- 
nate in being able to reap the benefits arising 
from his long experience as a practitioner. 

In 1 85 3 Dr. Stanley was united in mar- 
riage with Sarah Bassett, a native of Harpers- 
field and a daughter of Joshua Bassett, a pros- 
perous farmer of that town. Dr. and Mrs. 
Stanley have had ten children, five of whom 
are living; namel}-, Ella M., Ada E. , Joseph- 
ine A., Nathan Wilniot, and Sarah Kathleen. 
Ella M. married J. C. Talmadge, a lawyer of 
Catskill, and has two children — Leone S. and 
N. Edna. Ada E. married Edgar C. ]\Ioon, 
a printer in New York City, and has two chil- 
dren — \'ernon S. and Lena A. Josephine A. 
is the wife uf Lawyer Alellen, a boot and shoe 
dealer in Windham, and has three children — 
Stanley H., Edith A., and Sheridan Wilmot. 
Nathan Wilmot Stanley is a civil engineer 
employed in the department of public works 
in New York City. Sarah Kathleen Stan- 
ley is an artist of local repute, her talent, 
which is of a high order, having been 
cultivated under corajDetent instructors in 



New York. Of the otlier children one 
ilied in infancy; J5elle and Charles died 
while young; \'ernon C. died at the age 
of twenty-two years, while pursuing his medi- 
cal studies; and William .Sheridan, who was 
a hardware merchant in Cairo, N. Y. , died at 
the age of thirt)'-one years. The latter was 
also an artist of ability both with the brush 
and needle. Among the dearly-prized prod- 
ucts of this genius is a piece of work five feet 
long and three feet wide, executed from an 
original design, and representing a deer in the 
forest on its wa}- to drink. Another, which is 
a painting representing two admirably drawn 
dogs of different sizes, called "David and Go- 
liah, " has received favorable comment from 
artists of note. 

Politically, Dr. Stanley is a Republican. 
He was a member of the Ashland Board of 
Supervisors in i860, has served as Town Clerk 
in Ashland for two years and as Coroner for 
the same length of time. He is a Chapter 
Mason, and formerly belonged to the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows. For the past 
twenty-five years he has been a Pension Ex- 
aminer. 



§ACOB M. SNYDER, the genial, ac- 
commodating, and popular proprietor 
of the Snyder House at Gallupville, in 
the town of Wright, Schoharie County, was 
born in Berne, N.Y., May 6, 1837, a son of 
Peter I. Snyder. He is the worthy represent- 
ative of one of the early settled Dutch fami- 
lies of this section of the State. His grand- 
father, John Snyder, and his great-grandfather, 



2$4 



niOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Liidwig Snyder, natives of Holland, emigrated 
to America in Colonial days, ami both served 
as soldiers in tlie Revolutionary army. 

John Snyder came with his jiarcnts to 
Schoharie whi.-ii a young man, and witli them 
settled in the unbroken woods. At the he- 
ginning of the Revolution he entered the 
Continental army, and on July 26, 1782, was 
carried as a prisoner to Canada. lie tliere en- 
listed in the British arm\-, from wliicli lie very 
soon after made his esca]ie, ami returned to 
Schoharie. Here he was afterward engaged in 
agricultural pursuits until iiis decease, in 
1850. He married a Miss Dorstein. She 
died at an advanced age, after bringing u[) a 
large family of children. 

Peter I. Snyder was born on the homestead 
in Schoharie in 1802. Learning tlie trade of 
a shoemaker in his youth, he followed it for a 
time in Heme, Allxmy County. Returning 
to Schoharie, he lived there a while, and after 
that he was located in Gallupville as a shoe- 
maker a few years, and then he removed to 
Knox, Albany County, where he died at the 
age of sixty-seven years. He was a Democrat 
in his jiolitical affiliations, and served as an 
Overseer of the Poor. While a resident of 
Ikrne lie united with the local lodge of Odd 
Fellows, an orgaiiizatinn in which lie took 
great interest all his life. Poth he and his 
wife were active members of the Lutheran 
churcii. Her maiden name was ICva Dietz. 
She was born in the town of Heme of German 
parentage, being one of the fourteen children 
of John H. Dietz. p:ieven of these children 
grew to mature life, and the average age of 



nine of them was seventy-nine years, a record 
for longevity .seldom efiualled. Of the seven 
children born to Peter 1. and Lva (Dietz) 
Snyder four grew tn years of maturity and two 
are now living, namely: Jacob M. ; and Eliza- 
beth, wife of Sidney Sluihldt. The mother 
died December 12, 1885, aged eighty-two 
years. 

Jacob ^L .Snyder received iiis early educa- 
tion in the district schools of Heme, and after 
finishing his studies learned the shoemaker's 
trade, which he followed in Knox until 1863. 
Coming then to Gallupville, he opened a cus- 
tom shop, in wiiich for twenty-two years he 
made shoes to order, being the jdoneer of that 
line of industr)' in this region. In 1885 he 
purchased from the former owners, Twitchell 
& Collins, the old Collins House, to which he 
has since built an addition. It is now known 
as the Snyder House, has been entirely refur- 
nished, and is one of the best country hotels 
in this section of the State. Mr. Snyder also 
owns a livery stable, whicii he carries on suc- 
cessfully in connection with his hotel. 

He is prominently itlentifietl with the Demo- 
cratic party of this locality, which he has rep- 
resented at various county conventions as a 
delegate. In i8qi and 1892 he was one of 
the Board of Supervisors, and for six years he 
has served as Town Clerk. 

On November 27, 1862, Mr. Snyder mar- 
ried Julia Allen. She is a daughter of Syl- 
vester Allen, who was formerly a carpenter of 
Knox, Albany County, but is now successfully 
engaged in farming in that town. .Seven 
children have been born of this union, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2SS 



four of them are now living; namely, Jeffer- 
son, Edna, J. Miner, and Ursula. Jefferson, 
who married Nellie Becker, was for seven 
years connected with the Albany day line of 
steamboats, and for four years was connected 
with the management of Stanwix Hall in Al- 
bany, but is now proprietor of Hotel Berne in 
Berne, N.Y. 

Edna is the wife of Sanford D. Schell, a 
farmer in Gallupville, and has six children — 
Eva, Libbie, Hazel, Martin, Jefferson, and 
Howard. J. Miner, for four years connected 
with the Albany day line of steamers and 
now manager of the Snyder House, married 
Carrie Zimmer. Ursula is the wife of 
Charles E. Spateholts, a farmer of Wright. 
Mrs. Snyder is a Methodist in her religious 
belief and a regular attendant of the church 
of that denomination. 



fOSEPH W. VAN SCHAICK, for many 
years a prominent farmer of Sharon, 
Schoharie County, was bom in this 
town, June 5, 1804, son cf Koert and Margaret 
(Wilson) Van Schaick. He was a descendant 
in the fourth generation of Francis Van 
Schaick, one of three brothers who emigrated 
from Holland and settled in New Jersey. 
Francis Van Schaick died in New Jersey; and 
his son William, grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, settled in Glen, N.Y., where he 
probably spent his last days. William Van 
Schaick married Patience Schenck, who also 
was of Dutch descent. 

Koert Van Schaick, father of Joseph W., 



served in the Continental army during the 
Revolutionary War, several others of that name, 
who were relatives, being enrolled among the 
patriots. He came from Glen to Sharon .some 
time between the years 1790 and 1796; and 
the title to the homestead, upon which his 
grand-daughter now reside.s, was issued in the 
latter year. He cleared a large farm, built 
the present residence, which is now about one 
hundred years old, and was favorably known 
throughout this locality. He lived to be over 
seventy years old. His wife, Margaret, who 
came from New Jersey, was of English and 
Scotch descent. She became the mother of 
nine children; namely, Mary, Patience, Mar- 
garet, Joseph W., the subject of this sketch, 
Leffert G., Rachel, Sarah, James, and another 
son who died in infancy. James, who served 
as an officer in an artillery company connected 
with the State militia, was accidentally killed 
by the premature discharge of a cannon at an 
election celebration in 1844. He was unmar- 
ried. The other .seven married, and had fam- 
ilies. 

Joseph W. Van Schaick succeeded to the 
homestead, which he occupied his entire life, 
and was one of the stirring farmers of his day. 
Though not an aspirant for public office, he 
was honored with election to various local 
positions of trust, serving acceptably as Super- 
visor of the town in 1849, and was highly es- 
teemed for his many excellent qualities. He 
was a firm, stanch, and lifelong Democrat. 
He was a prominent member of the True Re- 
formed church of Sharon, and by his liberality 
and labor was instrumental in a great measure 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in the liiiildin-; of tlic clnirch fdificc. lie 
died on April 23, iSSo, honuicd and esteemed 
by all who knew him. 

Joseph VV. \'an Schaick married l^lizabeth 
Slinf^crland, daiij;hter of Cainaiii Jacul) Siinj;- 
crland, of Hethlchem, Albany County, who tlied 
in 1.S90. Her father died when she was \oung, 
anil sliu was reared in Sharon by an aunt. 
Mr. and .Mrs. \'an .SchaJLk were tlie luireiits 
of eight children; namely, Knert, Klizabeth, 
Mary, Catliarine, John, Slingerland, Sarah, 
and I'jnilv. 'I'iie eldest, who was a well- 
known singer and teaciier, died at the age of 
thirty-three \ears, lea\-ing one s(jn, William, 
will) is now residing in Rochester, N.V. 
Slingerhuid died in California. Elizabeth, 
Mary, and Saraii are no longer living. liniily 
is the wife of Mr. \'an Schaick, of Mont- 
gomery County. John is an attorney in 
Cobleskill, and an e.\-State Senator. 

Miss Catliarine \'an Schaick is a graduate 
of the State Normal Schixd at Albany. She 
was for several \-ears a successful teacher, but 
gave uji educational work in i8tS3 in order to 
care for her mother. After the death of her 
mother in iSyo, Miss Van Schaick took charge 
of the homestead; and, being a woman of good 
executive ability, she lias managed the prop- 
erty energetically ever since. She possesses 
literary tastes and attainments of a high order; 
and these, together with her excellent .social 
qualities, endear her to a large number of 
friends and accjuaintances. She is a strict ad- 
herent of the Dutch Reformed cluircli. The 
house she occiijiies has long been conspicuous 
a.s a landmark. It contains many relics in 



shape of family utensils used by her grandjiar- 
ents ; also the Revolutionary musket, with its 
highly ])rized date of 1776 engraved thereon, 
and the old sword hanging idly in its scabbard 

lii-b up on the wall. 

The \'an Schaick family are sturdy-g<jing 
Americans, and in e\ery generation men of 
this name have gone forth to serve their coun- 
try upon the battlefield and in the council 
chambers of the go\ernment. The family 
cherish the traditions of Alkmaar, Leyden, 
Brill, and the Beggars of the Sea. They rev- 
erence the memor)- of William of Orange and 
Prince Maurice, under wlmm their ancestors 
fought the Spanish tyrant. 15ut they have 
trans])lanted these memories anil traditions to 
iVmerican soil, and are thorougii patriots. 
Down to the latest generation the strong qual- 
ities of the race ha\'e descended. The recent 
ajipointment of Louis J. Van Schaick, son of 
e.x-Senator \'an Schaick, to a Second Lieuten- 
ancy in the L'nited States regular anii\', 
marks the beginning of another career which 
bids fair to be an honored and a useful one. 



'TKI'H1;N p. HALLOCK, of Co.x- 
sackie, NA'. , dealer in provisions, 
grain, hay, and straw, was born in 
New Baltimore, N.Y., on March 5, 1S3S, his 
parents being Joseph Z. and Phcebe (Herrick) 
Hal lock. His paternal grandfather, Zebulon 
Hallock, was either born in New Baltimore 
or came there as a child in the eaily days of 
its settlement. He was a tanner and shoe- 
maker, and worked at those trades all his life. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



287 



He died at the age of seventy-two. His wife 
was before her marriage Sally S. Kidmore. 
They had a large family of children. 

Joseph Z. Hallock was a farmer. He spent 
all his life in New Baltimore, and died there 
on January 2S, 1899, at the age of eighty-four 
years. He was a prominent citizen in his 
town and a farmer on a large scale. He was 
a member for si.\ty-four years of the Christian 
church, and held leading offices in the church. 
His wife, Fhrebe, was born in New Baltimore, 
daughter of John Herrick, a well-known 
farmer of that town. She is still living at the 
age of eighty-two. Of the five children that 
have been born to her, four are living, 
namely: Stephen P.; Andrew, who resides at 
the Upper Village; Leander; and Charles. 

Stephen P. Hallock received a practical ed- 
ucation in the public schools of his native 
town. The first twenty-four years of his life 
were spent on his father's farm, and at the 
end of that time he came to Coxsackie, and 
entered the dry-goods store of Collier & Van 
Vliet as clerk. Three years later he pur- 
chased Mr. \'an Vliet"s interest in the busi- 
ness, and the firm became Collier & Hallock. 
This partnership continued until 1880, when 
Mr. Hallock sold out to Mr. Wolf, and bought 
out the grocery business of David Hallock. 
He was then located on the opposite side of 
the street, but a few years after he bought out 
Piatt Coonley's business, with his entire stock 
of groceries and provisions, and then removed 
to his present stand. In 1896 his son Roscoe 
was admitted to partnership in the business. 
This is the largest grocery in Greene County, 



carrying on besides its immensj retail trade a 
large wholesale department. Mr. Hallock is 
the oldest grocer in the town, and in course 
of his long business career he has seen many 
changes in the village and a great increa.se in 
population. 

Mr. Hallock was married in 1864 to Carrie 
Webber, who was born in this town, daughter 
of William Webber. She is of Holland de- 
scent on her grandfather's side, her grand- 
mother having been a native of Connecticut. 
Her father spent his life on a farm in this 
town, and was not only a farmer but the lead- 
ing auctioneer of Coxsackie. He was a promi- 
nent Democrat, and held a number of town 
and county offices, among them being that of 
county superintendent of the almshouse at 
Cairo. His death occurred at the age of 
seventy. He and his family attended the 
Dutch Reformed church. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Elizabeth Vermillia, was 
born in Coxsackie. She died at the age of 
seventy-five, having been the mother of seven 
children — Christina, Millisson, Robert, 
Carrie, John W., Addie, and Sallie. Of these 
two are deceased, namely: Millisson, who 
married J. H. Brandow; and Robert. Chris- 
tina, who is a widow, married for her first hus- 
band Richard Halstead and for her second 
husband Richard Cornwall. Addie is the 
wife of O. T. Schermerhorn, of Cairo, and 
Sallie married J. O. Cornwall. Mrs. Hal- 
lock's paternal grandmother lived to be ninety- 
two years of age, dj'ing on the farm where her 
son William was born and where he lived and 
died. Mr. and Mrs. Hallock have an only 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



child, Roscoe, who has always been in his 
father's store except during the four years 
when he was Assistant Postmaster. He 
bought an interest in the business in tlic 
spring of 1896. 

Mr. Hallock is a Republican and a strong 
advocate of the principle of protection. He 
has served many years on the Hoard of Educa- 
tion, for several terms as Trustee ami Treas- 
urer of the village, and has always taken an 
active part in all public matters. He was one 
of the most earnest promoters of the beautiful 
new school-house, which was erected at a cost 
of thirty thousand dollars. For more than 
thirty years he has been a member of the Sec- 
ond Reformed Church, of which also his wife 
and son are members. Mr. Roscoe Hallock 
is a member of Ark Lodge, F. & A. M., of 
Coxsackie. Although Mr. Hallock's best ener- 
gies have been given to his store, he has found 
time to devote to other business interests. 
For a number of years he operated the Hallock 
steam-mill and the foundry connected with 
it. This was started by his brother David, 
who erected the buildings, but the jilant was 
burned in 1892. It was an important indus- 
try in Coxsackie for many years. At one time 
Mr. Hallock carried on a feed, grain, and salt 
business at West Coxsackie. During early 
life, for a number of years, he taught school 
in the winter time. 



Ur,l-;NI': !•:. lUnVE, a rising young 
awyer of (iilboa, was born in South 
Londonderry, Vt., May 22, 1S67, son of 



Flwin A. and Jennie (Walker) Howe. He 
is a descendant on both sides of early arrivals 
at I'lymouth, Mass., and his paternal grand- 
father was prominently identified with the 
public affairs of Vermont in his day. Elwin 
A. Howe enlisted as a private at the breaking 
out of the Civil War, and was later commis- 
sioned Captain of a company belonging to the 
One Hundred and Eighth United States In- 
fantry, a colored regiment. After the war he 
engaged in the wooden-ware Inisiness in Lud- 
low, Vt., becoming one of tlie ])rincii)al stock- 
holders in a large enterprise known as the 
Ludlow Toy Manufacturing Company, of 
which he was superintendent. He is widely 
and favorably known throughout the Green 
Mountain State as a leading Republican, hav- 
ing served four years in the lower iiouse and 
two years in the State Senate. He was for- 
merly Postmaster of Ludlow and superinteml- 
ent of the water-works. He married Jennie 
Walker, a representative of a highly reputable 
Vermont family and a sister of the Hon. Will- 
iam H. Walker, a prominent lawyer, who 
served in lioth branches of the legislature and 
as a Justice of the Sujireme Court. Mr. anil 
Mrs. Elwin A. Howe have had six sons and 
three daughters, all of whom are studiously 
inclined, and are making goot! use of the lib- 
eral education which it has been their good 
fortune to receive. 

Eugene K. Howe pursued his jireparatory 
course at the Hlack River Academy, Ludhnv, 
and was graduated at MiddJchury College 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in iSSS. 
He was one of the honor men of his class, and 




I), i;. IIIK IlLMC 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



belongs to the various college fraternities. 
In 18S7 he was appointed official reporter for 
the Vermont legislature, hohling that office 
for four years in the House and two years in 
the Senate. His law studies were begun in 
the office of liatehckler & Iiarber, of Vermont ; 
and, while pursuing the regular course at the 
Albany Law School, his spare time was spent 
in the office of the Hon. Alden Chester, of 
that city. He was admitted to the bar in 
1S91, and, beginning the practice of his pro- 
fession in company with J. S. P>ost, he re- 
mained in Albany some four years, during 
which time he figured in several important 
cases. In 1S95, at the advice of friends, he 
came to Gilboa, where he has already estab- 
lished a large general law business, and has 
become a familiar figure in the courts of 
Schoharie, Greene, and Delaware Counties. 
He is a forcible advocate and a fluent speaker, 
is familiar with court procedure; and these 
essential qualities, together with the ability he 
displays in preparing his cases, give ample 
evidence of the brilliant future which has 
been predicted for him. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

Mr. Howe married Florence Eaton, daugh- 
ter of William Eaton, a successful business 
man and highly respected citizen of West Ar- 
lington, Vt. Her father's people were na- 
tives of Vermont, and her mother's family 
were from the South. She is a graduate of 
the State Normal School at Albany, attended 
the Emerson School of Oratory, Boston, and 
was a successful teacher previous to her mar- 
riage. Of this union there are sons, Eugene 



S. and Carroll K., and a daughter Marion. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howe are members of the Dutch 
Reformed church. 



WIGHT B. HITCHCOCK, a retired 

business man of Windliam, was born 
in this town on February 3, 1830, 
being the son of Lucius and Eveline (Hayes) 
Hitchcock. He is a grandson of Lemuel 
Hitchcock, a native of Connecticut, who was 
one of the pioneer settlers of Greene County, 
coming first to Durham. 

Later Lemuel Hitchcock removed to that 
part of Windham known as Big Hollow, where 
he settled, and subsequently remained until his 
death, at the age of seventy-fi\-e. He had ten 
children. His first home here was a log 
cabin; but later, as increasing prosperity at- 
tended him, he erected a large frame house. 
He was one of the prominent men in this part 
of Greene County, and during the Revolution 
served the country as a military officer, hold- 
ing the rank of Lieutenant. 

Lucius Hitchcock was born in Durham. 
He was brought up on a farm, and all his life 
was devoted to agricultural pursuits. He 
built a house in Big Hollow near that of his 
father, and there made his home to the end of 
his days. In politics he was a Republican, 
and in religious faith he followed the teach- 
ings of his father and was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. His wife, Eveline, who 
died at the age of fort_\'-si.\, was born in 
Granby, Mass., and was one of a family of ten 
children. Her father, Luther Hayes, who was 



lilOGRArmCAL REVIEW 



a saddler of that town, settled eventually in 
Durham, where he died at the age of eighty 
years. Mr. and .Mrs. Lucius Hitchcock were 
the parents of five children. l-"our of these are 
living, namely: Dwight 1?.; I'latt O. ; Har- 
riet, who married the late Gcuri^c I'. Tow nscnd, 
of Windham; and William. 

Dwight H. HitchcK-k livL'd with his parents 
in Hig IIoHdw, and helped on the home farm 
until he was twenty-one years of age, when he 
began working out by the month. His habits 
were frugal. He saved his wages, and event- 
ually bought a farm near his father's. There 
he remained ten years. He then removed to 
.\shland, and, in company with .Mr. R. I.. 
I'ai'sons, bought (JUt a store, where he carried 
on business for five years. .Selling out at the 
end of that time, he came to Windham and 
went into [lartnershi]) with John Patterson. 
.\fter twelve years of successful enterprise he 
retired from business. Mr. Hitchcock's place 
is one of the finest in Windham. It is known 
as the Colonel Roberts<jn homestead. 

Mr. Hitchcock has been twice married. 
His first wife, whose maiden name was Julia 
.■\lwater, died in her thirtieth year. She was 
born in Hig llnlldw. Her father, .Alfred .Xt- 
w.iter, faianetl fur sume time in liig Hollow, 
later fur twenty years in Windham, and finally 
removed to Colorado, where he died. Mrs. 
Julia A. Hitchcock was the motlier of two 
children, neither of whom is li\ing. She was 
a (le\()ted member of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. ilitchcock's second wife, also a native 
iif Windham, was before her marriage .Sarah 
R. IJaniey. Her parents were Abira and 



Lydia (Robertson) Harney, and her grandpar- 
ents were Aaron and Rebecca (Saxton) Harney. 
Her grandfather, Aaron, was a native of New 
Hampshire, but came to Windham in early 
manhood and began work as a journe\'man car- 
penter, settling near the village. He lived to 
a good old age. He is well remembered as 
the builder of the tanneries in this section. 
Rebecca, his wile, died at tile age of thirty- 
four years, having been the mother of three 
children. She was a native of Reiisselaer- 
ville, of which place her )xirents were early 
settlers. 

Abira Harney, who died in liis seventieth 
year, carried on a farm where the cemetery 
now lies. He was a lifelong resident of this 
locality, having been born in tlie town and 
reared in the village. His wife, Lydia, was a 
daughter of Colonel James Robertson, who was 
one of the first to take up and clear land in the 
town of Windham. He was a prominent man 
in these parts, very active in all jniblic affairs. 
He died at the age of seventy-eight. Of his 
eight children two are living: James, of Os- 
wego Ccnmty, New York; and bllbert, who re- 
sides in Washington, D. C. Mrs. Lydia R. 
Harney died at the age of eighty-one. Of her 
four children one son, l-;il)erl, died in i S(/,, 
and the other, Samuel, <lied at the :iye of 
twelve years. The living are: Mr.s. Hitch- 
cock and Mrs. L. \'. Hrisack. IMrs. Hitch- 
cock's parents and grandparents were members 
of the Presbyterian church. 

Politically, Mr. Hitchcock is a Republican. 
He has always taken an active share in local 
matters and in all questions of pidjlic interest. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He and Mrs. Hitchcock are members of the 
Presbyterian church and active workers in that 
body. Mr. Hitchcock is an 1^ 
church. 



:r of the 



^^^TANTON COURTKR, a weli- 
^-/"^ known manufacturer and builder of 
•^"*^' Cobleskill, N.Y., was born in this 
town, February 23, 1839. His father, the 
late Charles Courter, was for many years an 
influential resident of Cobleskill. His pater- 
nal grandfather, Ralph Courter, who was born 
and bred in Germany, came to America, and, 
after living a short time in New Jersey, re- 
moved to Schoharie, where he engaged in the 
manufacture of shoes. 

Charles Courter, one of a family of seven 
children, spent his early life in Schoharie, 
but when a young man began work on his own 
account in Middleburg as clerk in a store. 
Going thence to Lawyersville, he there en- 
gaged in business until his removal to Cobles- 
kill, in 1837. He subsequently assisted in 
building the Albany & Susquehanna railway, 
of which he was for many years a director. 
He also built many fine brick blocks in Cobles- 
kill; but after the disastrous fire of 1873, in 
which he lost heavily, he practically retired 
from active pursuits, although he retained real 
estate interests until his death, which occurred 
in 1879, at the age of threescore and ten 
years. He was a stanch Democrat in politics, 
and served as one of the village trustees a 
number of years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Helen Lawyer, was born in Law- 
yersville, and was a daughter of Thomas 



Lawyer, a lifelong resident of that town. 
She died at the age of si.\ty-cight years. 
Both parents were attendants of the Lutheran 
church. Five of their children survive; 
namely, Josephine, Stanton, Henrietta, Cor- 
delia, and Helen C. 

Stanton Courter in his youth attended acad- 
emies at Schoharie and Fort Plain, and was 
afterward graduated from the Buffalo Commer- 
cial College. Before attaining his majority 
he went to Chicago, where his father had been 
instrumental in establishing the extensive 
lumber firm of C. Courter & Co., which dealt 
in lumber manufactured in its own mills in 
the timber districts of Michigan. He was 
there for a time in the employ of that com- 
pany, and going thence to Milwaukee, Wis., 
he was connected with the extensive railway 
operators, Rogers, Courter & Co., until they 
sold the Milwaukee & Western Railroad to 
the St. Paul Railway Company, when he be- 
came confidential secretary of Sherburne S. 
Merrill, manager of the road under the new 
officials. In 1864 Mr. Courter returned to 
Cobleskill, and for eleven years was first 
cashier of the First National Bank, which he 
and his father had established. The follow- 
ing three years he spent in Pensacola, Fla., 
looking after the lumber interests of his father 
in that State. The Florida property being 
then sold to an PInglish syndicate, Mr. Courter 
again returned to his native town, and on the 
death of his father succeeded him in business, 
becoming owner of the manufacturing plant of 
Courter & Overpaugh. With characteristic 
enterprise he has almost entirely rebuilt the 



lilOGRAPHICAL KEVIKW 



original wori<s, and now lias a large factory 
finely equipped with modern machinery and 
appliances. In addition to turning out vast 
amounts of dressed lumlier and building ma- 
terials of all kinds each year, he manufactures 
furniture of all descriptions, and as a con- 
tractor for buildings has erected some of the 
finest residences in this part of the county. 
His own dwelling, on the corner of Alain and 
(irand Streets, is a spacious Colonial man- 
sion, with large rooms and halls and high 
ceilings. 

Mr. Courteralso built the Cobleskill elec- 
tric light plant, which has proved of inesti- 
mable value as a means of lighting the 
village, the corporation, and the residences of 
the town. Fraternally, he is a Mason, be- 
longing to Cobleskill Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
and to John L. Lewis Chapter, R. A. M. 



)UCIU.S A. WOODWORTH, proprie- 
tor of the Ripley House in Hunter, 
was born in Jewett on January i8, 
1833, his parents being Abner and Sophronia 
(Jud.son) VVoodworth. The family, which is 
of Scotch descent, was a pioneer one of 
Jewett, living there first in a log cabin and 
clearing the wild forest land. Mr. Wood- 
worth's grandfather, Lemuel VVoodworth, was 
born in Jewett, and lived there to a good old 
age. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Lydia Winters, lived to be seventy-five years 
old. Their cliildren were as follows: David; 
Alanson: Hiram: l.ennicl: Reuben, who died 
young; Lydia, who married a I'ulier; Nancy, 



who married a Fairchild: and Sally, who mar- 

I ried a Slater. 

Abner Woodworth was born in Jewett. He 
was reared on a farm, and was interested in 
agricultural laliors as long as he lived. When 
about eighteen years of age he became the 
owner of a farm, and this he carried on until 
his death, a period of neaily si.xty years. He 
was a very earnest Christian man :ind an ac- 
tive worker in tlie Methodist church, of which 
he and his wife were members. Mrs. So- 
phronia Woodworth, who died at the age of 
forty-seven, was born in Jewett. She was the 
daughter of Dr. Judson, an oUl-time physician 
of Windham, who is believed to have come 
from Hartford, Conn. Abner and Sophronia 
Woodworth were the parents of six children. 

Lucius Woodworth lived with his parents 
until he was twenty-one years cdd. He was 
educated in the common schools and at I-'er- 

! gusonville Collegiate Institute. He taught 

! school one winter in Hunter, and worked in 
this vicinity at carpentering with his brother- 
in-law during the summer. At twenty-one 
years of age he went out to Wisconsin, where 
he stayed for three years, working at his trade 
in the summers. One winter he taught school 
at I':ikhorn, in that State; one winter he at- 
tended school ; and the third he worked in a 
sho]). In 1 86 1, in company with two other 
men, he startetl for Colorado, journeying in 
his own conveyance, which was a large covered 
emigrant wagon. The distance was eleven 
hundred miles. Indians were often seen, but 
they were not hostile, and the trip was made 

i in safety. .'\rriving in Denver, Mr. Wood- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



295 



worth remained there a short time, and then 
went up to Hlaei< Hawk, torty miles farther, 
into the minima region. There tor a year he 
was engageil in buiLling t|uartz-mills, antl at 
the end of that time he became himself pro- 
prietor of a mill, which he operated for the 
next three years. The country was then al- 
most a wilderness, and this mill was one of 
the first started in that locality. At the end 
of three years he sold out his mill and re- 
turned East, but only to remain for a short 
time. The Western fever was on him strong, 
and he returned to Wisconsin and purchased 
a farm. Not long after he had an opportunity 
to go to Nashville, Tenn., to do carpentering 
for the Northern army: and, when some time 
later he returned to Wisconsin, he sold out 
his farm and decided to push on farther west 
to Montana. Going down to Chicago, he 
bought twenty mules, loaded a wagon train 
with freight, and started westward. The 
freight was to be delivered in Denver. This 
was in the dead of winter, and the undertaking 
was most perilous. For two months Mr. 
Woodworth travelled without seeing a spark 
of fire, except for cooking purposes. But he 
reached Denver safely, delivered his load, and 
then returned to Council Bluffs, where he 
hired his mules kept until spring opened. 
Then securing a load in Omaha for Denver, he 
carried it out there, a distance of six hundred 
miles, and upon delivering it reloaded in 
Denver for Salt Lake City. After covering 
the eleven hundred miles, he camped for about 
ten days, and then sold out his mule train, 
and went to work for another man to drive a 



I 
freight team to Helena, Mont. With a 

wagon drawn by four mules he traversed the 
five hundred miles in twenty-five days. .Ar- 
! tisans were scarce in Montana, and Mr. Wood- 
worth went to work at his old trade, building 
a mill, and receiving in jiayment his board 
j and ten dollars a day in gold. After a time 
1 he formed a partnership with a Mr. Hen- 
\ dricks, bought a quartz mine and put up a 
quartz-mill, which he operated for three years. 
Upon selling out his own business he took 
charge of a quartz-mill for Daler & Larkey at 
Iron Rod, on Jefferson River, and was super- 
intendent there for six years. In 1882, after 
a varied and hazardous experience in journey- 
ing through the Far West, he returned East, 
and the following year began business at his 
, present occupation. The hotel of which he 
I is now proprietor was built in 18S6. It has 
accommodations for fifty guests, and during 
the summer mont+is he has a large number 
of boarders. Since 1883 he has conducted a 
livery stable, having been the first man in 
town to open one. 

Mr. Woodworth has been twice married. 
The first Mrs. Woodworth was born in Big 
Hollow, and her maiden name was Adele 
Hitchcock. She was the daughter of Anson 
Hitchcock, a leading farmer of Big Hollow. 
Her death occurred at the age of thirty. The 
second ;\Irs. Woodworth was born in New 
York City, her maiden name being Mary Ran- 
son. She was one of a family of four chil- 
I dren, the others being: Gussie, who married 
John Coreja: Addie, who lives in Brooklyn; 
I and Georgiana, who married Bert Allen, 



296 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mrs. Mary Woodworth died at the aj^e of 
thirty-five. She was a member of the Metho- 
dist church. Mr. VVooilworth has one daiif^h- 
ter, Ada C. 

Politically, Mr. Woodwurtli is a Republi- 
caTi. I-'or two years he was a meiiiber nf tlie 
Board of Hdiication, and in 1 .S94 he was As- 
sessor. He is one of the most popular men in 
Hunter and one of tlie most pojjular landlords 
in this section of the .State. lie is a man of 
remarkable intrepidity, as shown by his dar- 
ing jouriieyini,'s in the West. 



'RANK A. CHAPMAN, proprietor of 
Hotel Chajiman at Hlenheim, -Schoharie 
County, N.V., may be spoken of as an ideal 
landlord, being active, enterprising;, and at 
all times obliging and pleasant. He was born 
in the nearby town of l-'ulton, June 25, 1S71, 
a son of Moses L. Chapman, a lifelong resi- 
dent of that place. 

His paternal grandfather, Jacob Chapman, 
was born in Rensselaerville, Albany County, 
and lived there after marriage. Removing 
then to Knlton, he bought a large tract of 
timi)ered land at ]?ouck's Falls, where he 
cleared and improved a homestead, and passed 
his remaining days, tlying at the advanced age 
of eighty-eight years. He was prominently 
connected with the Methodist church of that 
place, in which he ser\'eil in vaiidus nflicial 
positions. His wife, Hnldah Wynans, a na- 
tive of Cooksburg, N.V., bore him eleven 
children, of whom seven are living, being. 



with one exception, residents of Schoharie 
County. They are: Spencer, a farmer at 
Bouck's Falls; Nancy C, wife of Chauncey 
Shattuck, of Michigan; Maria Mann, of 
Breakabeen; Moses L. ; James 1'., ex-Super- 
visor of Middleburg; Elizabeth L. , wife of 
Dr. Holmes; and William W.. of Bouck's 
l-"alls, e.x-Sui)ervisor of I'ulton. The ile- 
cea.sed are: Adam, late of Bouck's I'^alls; 
Harriett l".. ; Isabella, deceased, who married 
Hiram Ackerson ; and Dr. I'eter L. 

Moses I.. Chapman remained at the jiaren- 
tal homestead until he was of age, and then 
engaged in agricultural pursuits on his own 
account. He bought a large farm in h'ulton, 
on which he maile substantial improvements, 
including the erection of a new set of build- 
ings, and was there successfully employed as 
a general farmer until his death, at the com- 
paratively early age of forty-two years. He 
was a Democrat in politics and an active 
member of the Methodist I^piscopal church, to 
which his wife also belonged; and both were 
interested in its Sunday-school. He maniecl 
Huldah A. Beard, daughter of Jacob and Ade- 
line (Phillips) Beard. Her parents were 
wealthy members of the farming community 
of Richmondville. They reared three chil- 
dren, namely: Sarah, who married Judge 
Holmes, for twelve years Judge of Schoharie 
County; Huldah A.: and John. Mrs. Beard 
died at the age oi forty-live years, and Mr. 
lieard afterward removed to Genesee County, 
where he attained the venerable age of ninety 
years. ( )f the nine children born to the par- 
ents, si.x are still livin- as follows: William 




AMl.L D. I-KISIWK. 



' ' 'li'ULUY 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



H.; the Hon. Charles Cliapmaii, a iiiembcr of 
the Assembly; IJa, wife of J. S. Hunt, of 
Boston; Frank A.; Flora, of Boston; and 
Dora. Hattie is deceased. The mother 
passed to the life beyond when fifty-five years 
of age. 

Frank A. Chapman was but ei-ht years old 
when his father died. He remained at home 
until after completing; his education in the 
schools of West Fulton and Blenheim, and 
then came to his present hotel as a clerk for 
his brother, a capacity in which he remained 
two years. Going then to Worcester, Mass., 
he was an attendant at the asylum for the in- 
sane three years. In 1S93 Mr. Chapman re- 
turned to Blenheim and purchased the hotel, 
which he has since conducted with eminent 
success. He has enlarged the building, 
partly refurnished it, made substantial im- 
provements in and around it, and has now a 
model public house, the leading one in this 
section of the State. It is well adapted for 
the entertainment of guests from the city. 
Connected with it is a first-class livery, with 
a number of horses of good qualities, one pair 
especially being the finest of any in the vicin- 
ity. Mr. Chapman has had charge for some 
time of the stage line between Middleburg 
and Gilboa, and also of the line from the 
latter place to Grand Gorge, si.x miles be- 
yond, and has the contract for carrying the 
mails between these places. 

On December 28, 1893, Mr. Chapman mar- 
ried Elizabeth M. Ross, who was born in 
Littleton, Me., a daughter of Joseph and 
Hester (Weeks) Ross. Her mother was born 



in -St. John, N. B. Mrs. Chapman was edu- 
cated at the Ricker Classical Institute in 
Houlton, Aroostook Comity, Me., and |)re- 
vious to her marriage she taught school in 
that town. Mr. Chajjman is a Democrat in 
politics, and a member of the Mitlilleburg 
Tribe of Red Men and of Gilboa Lodge, F. & 
A. M. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman are both 
members of the Eastern Star Lodge, F. & 
A. M., of Gilboa. 



ANIEL D. FRISBIE, editor and 
proprietor of the Schoharie Rcpubli- 
cau, was born in Middleburg, his 
present home, on November 30, 1859. Son 
of Grandison Norton and Kate (Dodge) Fris- 
bie, he is the representative of a family that 
has done much to promote the industrial, edu- 
cational, and political advancement of this 
county. The family traces its line back to 
New England ancestry, and two of its early 
members in this country bore officers" commis- 
sions and served with distinction in the Con- 
tinental army during the Revolution. A bio- 
graphical sketch of Grandison Norton Frisbie 
appears on another page of this volume. 

The Dodge family were among the early 
settlers of the county, coming from New Eng- 
land and becoming allied by marriage with 
the good old Dutch stock, of which Colonel 
Zelie, of Revolutionary fame, was the best 
early representative, and the Hon. Daniel 
Danforth Dodge, grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was later the most jarominent, 
having represented this county in the State 



lilOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



legislature and attained the greatest success 
as a merchant and financier. 

Daniel 1). I-'risbie was ethicateil in the 
schools of his native town and at Ilartwick 
Seminary, one of the oldest scats of learning 
in the State. At the latter institution he 
laid the foundation of a thorou.^h, broad, and 
liberal education, develoi)ing marked literary 
t.istes, which in after \ears frund opportunity 
in journalism for cmidoymenl. In the I'hilo- 
|)hronean Society, of which he became ])resi- 
dent, were brought out an ajjlitude for debate 
and the qualities which have since made him 
an easy, graceful, and torcetul public speaker. 

On the completion of his course at the sem- 
inary, he entered actively upon a business 
career which has jiroved singularly successful. 
He accepted a clerkship in the store of his 
father in the spring of 1876, and continued in 
that capacity until i.S.Si, when he was ad- 
mitted to partnership. Later the firm became 
G. N. I'"risbic & Sons by the admission of his 
brother. In 1 S92 the senior retired, and the 
firm became D. IJ. & G. 1). Frisbie, continu- 
ing thus until Ajiril i, i ."^99, when a multi- 
plicity of business cares lead the subject of 
this sketch to retire in favor of Ids brother-in- 
law, Nathaniel Manning, Jr. iJuring the 
twenty-three years of his connection with 
the business he had the satisfaction of seeing 
the modest cmnitry store develo]i into a modern 
department store, the largest, perhaps, in tlie 
county in point of sales and stock carried, and 
widely known for its exact aiul honorable 
methods. 

]5elieving that it is the duty of every citizen 



to take an intelligent interest in public 
affairs, Mr. l'"risbie, within a year after at- 
taining his majority, was made president of 
the local Democratic Club in the fall of 1882, 
anil again in 1884, when Mr. Cleveland car- 
rieil New York antl won the Presidency for his 
])arty. It is worthy of remark that the town 
of Middleburg in those years rolled uj) the 
largest Democratic majorities in a decade. 
In 1.S86-87 he was a niember and treasurer of 
the Democratic County Committee, rendering 
valuable service. For several years he has 
served as chairman of the Town Committee of 
his party. Mr. Frisbie has never held a po- 
litical office, but his services in behalf of the 
Democratic |iarty have been so cons]iicuous for 
so many years that he has been prominently 
mentioned for member of Assembly; and, if 
merit meets with due reward in old Schoharie, 
he will soon be thus honored. 

Seeking a wider opportunity for the atlvo- 
cacy of his ]5olitical ])rinci]iles and for the 
exercise of literary tastes, he purchased, Au- 
gust, 1.S87, the Schoharie RcpuHicmu of the 
estate of A. A. Hunt. The paper was estab- 
lished, in iSig by Derrick Van V'echten, and 
is probably the second oldest in the State. 
In January, 1896, its size was enlarged, and 
its circulation has increased tlireefold under 
the present management. Its columns are 
rich with the best reading of the day, and its 
hop reports are regartleil as thoroughly reli- 
able and comprehensive. As an advertising 
meditun it unquestionably takes the lead, as 
its circulation is principally among the large 
purchasing classes of the .Schoharie valley. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



rolitu-allv, the Kif<iil'/ii<)ii is soundly and un- 
oqiiiviK-allv Democrat ic. It was established as 
a Democrat ie or>;an, and has always been true 
to its lirst prin.ciples. Its editorials are often 
([uoteil in the leading' jiapcrs of the State, anil 
it is regarded as in every way the equal of the 
best county-seat papers to be found in the 
Commonwealth. In 1S94 the seventy-fifth 
anniversary of its founding was celebrated; 
and upon that occasion Mr. Frisbie purchased 
the three-story block in the central part of 
Schoharie, and made it the permanent home of 
the paper. The editorial offices are on the 
first floor, as are also the mechanical and job 
printing departments. The composing-rooms 
are on the second floor. 

The esteem in which Mr. Frisbie is held 
by his brethren of the press is shown by his 
election in 1S9S as second vice-president of 
the Democratic State Fditorial Association. 
He is also a member of the State Editorial 
Association, a non-partisan organization. 

In recognition of his interest in the cause 
of education, Mr. Frisbie was in 1S93 ap- 
pointed treasurer of Middleburg- High School, 
and was reappointed for a second term. In 
iSgs he was elected a member of the Board of 
Education, and re-elected in 1898. Since 
September, 1897, he has been president of the 
board. In concert with his associates, the 
school has been advanced to a proud position 
among the educational institutions of the 
State, its finances strengthened, and the num- 
ber of its students increased. 

In 1894, when the business men and farmers 
of the interior counties felt severely the exac- 



tions ol the stock iire insurance comi)anies, 
Mr. iM-isbie assisted, with others interested, 
in the formation of the Mutual I'"ire Insurance 
Company, became one of its directors and a 
member of its Iv\ecutive Committee. In 
1897 the necessity arose for another comjiany 
in this county, and the Merchants' and 
Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company was 
organized, with Daniel D. Frisbie as presi- 
dent. The company during its two years' 
existence has saved thousands of dollars to its 
policy holders, and has accumulated a sub- 
stantial surplus. In time it promises to be- 
come one of the strongest institutions of the 
county. 

Mr. Frisbie is a director of the Middleburg 
& Schoharie Railroad Company, and since 
1894 has been its secretary and a member of 
its Finance Committee. He is itlentified 
with St. Mark's Lutheran Church, was for five 
years superintendent of its Sunday-school, 
and is at present its financial secretary. Of 
fraternal orders he is a member of Middleburg 
Lodge, No. 663, F. & A. M. ; and is also a 
Past Sachem of Oucongena Tribe, I. O. R. M., 
No. 242. He is also president of the Colum- 
bian Literary Union Association, which was 
an inspiration to young men in Middleburg 
for many years, and holds its reunion, Janu- 
ary I, 1900. He is a hop-grower, and has 
done much, through his paper and otherwise, 
to advance the interests of the growers of the 
county. 

The latest enterprise to engage the atten- 
tion of the subject of this sketch, and one that 
he hopes to utilize largely for the public good. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



is tlic mills and water privilcj^e located mid- 


1S37, in Carlisle, being a son of William 


way between Middlehiiri; and Schnharie, 


Chambers, who was born in the ^ame town, 


which he acquired April i, 1899. Tiie mills 


June 2, kSio. His paternal grandfather. 


are being improved by the addition of modern 


David Chambers, first, was born and reared in 


machinery, and their eajjacity greatly in- 


Charlt(jn, -Saratoga County, whence he removed 


creased. Under the l-'risbie MillinLC Com- 


in iSoo to Carlisle, Schoharie County. Pur- 


pany the business will be extended, and a 


chasing three hundred aci'es of heavilv tim- 


good market afforded farmers for their grain. 


bered land, Cirautlfather Chambers began the 


Mr. h'risbie also has in mind the establish- 


improvement of a homestead, on which he sub- 


ment of an electric plant, to i)e operated by 


sec|uently resiiled until his death. 


water power, whereby the people of Mitldleburg 


William Chambers was one of a family of 


and Schoharie may have the benefit in their 


ten children b(}i-n in the old log house which 


business places, streets, and homes of that 


his father reared in the forest, and in common 


great modern convenience, electric lights. 


with his brotheis and sisters was etlucated in 


Should this be accomp.lished, a great public 


the ])ioneer school of the district. .Soon after 


service will be placed to the credit of the 


attaining his majority he ]nuchased land near 


subject of this sketch. 


the old homestead in Carlisle, and was there 


Mr. l->isbie was married in 1S82 to lileanor 


successfully engaged in tilling the soil until 


Manning, third daughter of Nathaniel Man- 


1S4S. In that year he sold his pro])ert)- in 


ning, E.sq., a leading citizen of Middleburg, 


Carlisle, and, going to Cherr\- \'alley in 


who traces his ancestry back to Crovernor 


Otsego County, bought a farm that he owned 


Bradford, first Plymouth colony, who came 


till his death, which occurred (m Api'il 22, 


over in the "Mayflower." The family was 


1899. He carried on general farming until 


among the earliest in the county, and has hekl 


1890. From that time on he lived retired 


an honorable place in its annals. Mr. and 


from active pursuits, at the home of one of his 


Mrs. Frisbie are the parents of three children 


sons in Decatur, not far from Clierry \'alley. 


— G. Norton, Cornelia M., and Daniel 


He was a strong Republican in politics and 


Manning. 


a member of the Christian church, to which 




his good wife also belonged. Her maiden 


"irXAVIlJ (TIAMHI-:RS, a thriving agri- 


name was ]5etsey Salisburv. .She was hoin in 


IfeH cultuiist of Cobleskill, N.V., own- 


Carlisle, and was a daughter of James Salis- 


("~**-^ ing and occupying a well-improved 


Inu'w formerl)- of Albau)' County. She died 


farm of one hundred and sixteen acres on the 


at the age of seventy-five years. Of her eight 


Carlisle road, about three miles from the vil- 


children these six are still living: Mary, 


lage of Cobleskill, is one of the town's most 


Da\id, James, Norman, Stewart, and I'lliza- 


respected citizens. He was born January I 1, 


beth. 




WILLIAM H. BALDWIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



I)a\'icl Clianibcrs completed his L-ducation at 
the Cherry Valley Hi-h Scho.il, and after- 
ward, until he was twenty-three )ears old, as- 
sisted his father in the labors of the home 
farm. He then married, February 15, i860, 
Catherine M. Richtmyer, daughter of Christian 
Richtmyer, a farmer of Cobleskill. Mr. 
Richtmyer was born, and he lived and died, on 
the farm which Mr. Chambers now occupies, 
and which he has managed to good purpose 
ever since his marriage, now thirty-nine years 
ago. He carries on general farming, raising 
principally hops and hay, although he has 
other crops, and pays some attention to raising 
sheep of the Shropshire breed. He has on his 
place a fine grove of maple-trees, from which 
he makes considerable sugar each season. The 
original owner of this homestead was Conrad 
Richtmyer, Mrs. Chambers's grandfather, who 
was one of the first settlers of the town, coming 
here with his family when his son Christian 
was about three years old. This son succeeded 
to the ownership of the paternal acres, and here 
reared his two children — one son, Julias, and 
one daughter — -Mrs. Chambers being the only 
survivor. Mr. and Mrs. Chambers have one 
child, Florence. She is the wife of Adam J. 
Karker, and has four children — Orrin C, 
Blanche M., Lloyd D., and Myra A. Mr. 
Karker and his family reside with Mr. and 
Mrs. Chambers, and he assists in the manage- 
ment of the homestead property, although he 
has a fine farm of his own near by. 

In politics Mr. Chambers has always affili- 
ated with the Republican party, which is in 
the minority in this section of the State, and 



he iias the distinctinii of being the only Super- 
visor elected on that ticket in Schoharie 
County tor thirty years. He held the office 
in the years 1X94 and 1X95, being elected by 
a majority of forty-three votes in a town whose 
Democratic majority was usually three hun- 
dred. He attends and liberally supjiorts the 
Dutch Reformed church, of which Mrs. Cham- 
bers is a member. 



ILLIAM H. BALDWIN, New Bal- 
timore, N.Y. — ^The Baldwins are of 
I£nglish descent. Their ancestors held the 
manor of (3sterarsfee in Aylesbury, Bucking- 
hamshire, in the time of Flenry II. The 
owner of the manor in 11 go was Sylvester 
Baldwin, known as Aylesbury. In 1546 the 
manor of Dundridge, Aston-Clinton, four miles 
from Aylesbur}', was added to the estate. In 
1638 Sylvester Baldwin embarked for America 
in the ship "Martin," accompanied by his 
wife, two sons, Richard and John, and four 
daughters. He died during the passage, and 
his will was admitted to prt)bate in Boston the 
same year. He left a large estate. His fam- 
ily settled in New Haven, Conn. His son 
John, after losing his wife and chiUl, settled 
in New London in 1664. In 1672 John mar- 
ried again, and remtned to Stonington. His 
son Theophilus married Priscilla Mason, 
grand-daughter of the famous Captain John 
Mason, who led the settlers against the Pequod 
Indians in 1637, and destroyed the tribe. 

John Baldwin, son of Theophilus and Pris- 
cilla (Mason) Baldwin, married Eunice Sjiald- 



3o6 



RIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in<;. Their son Zil);i, born in 1752, was the 
-rcat-ramlfathcr of William H. lialdwin. 

William 11. lialdwin was married in 1874 
to Kittic \'aii Hcrycn, (laii<;htcr of John Van 
licrgcn, of Coxsackic, N. \'. She died in 
I.S76, the infant daughter Liz/.ie surviving; her 
a few months. 

In 1880 William II. lialdwin married Lillie 
Summers Jones, of I'hiladeli.hia. Mrs. liald- 
win is a mendu'r of the Chester County Chap- 
ter of the n. A. R. Her ancestors were 
anKjni;- the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania. 
Her great-grandfather, Cidonel Jonathan Jones, 
served his country in the capacity of Captain, 
Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, anti Colonel of the 
Continental army, being promoted after active 
service in the campaign in Canaila in 1776. 



.\kSll.\I.I, 1). HICI-:, of Schoharie, 
lealer in gentlemen's furnishing 
goods, hats, caps, boots and shoes, 
in business (Jii Main Street, was born in this 
town on June i, i^^J, son of Joshua and 
Jemima (Headle) iiice. His grandfather, 
Aaron Iiice, was a native of Holland. He 
came to New York in early manhood, lived for 
a time in Dutchess County, and suhsec|uently 
removed to Schoharie, where he spent the last 
years of his lite. 

Joshua Iiice, above named, who was born in 
Dutchess County, was brought up on a farm, 
and was early accustomed to farm work. He 
also learned the shoemaker's trade. He came 
to this town shortly after his marriage, and 
.settled on a small farm which he cairied on. 



engaging in .shoemaking during his spare time. 
A man of great industry and very frugal, by 
degrees he added to his property till he was 
the owner of one hunched and twenty acres. 
He resided here si.\ty-two years in ail, and 
died at the age of eighty-one. He was an old- 
fashioned, zealous Methodist, always active in 
chinch work, and was one of those who took a 
leading part in building the Methodist church 
edifice at blast Cobleskill. He also took a 
warm interest in the Sunday-school. It is 
.said that in every-day life he applied the prin- 
cijiles he professed to believe. His wife, 
Jemima, who also was an active church worker, 
was born in Dutchess Count}'. They reared a 
family of thirteen childien, only three of whom 
are living. These are : Levi M., Marshall D., 
and Asher. 

Marshall D. Iiice receixed a practical educa- 
tion in the public schcjols of Schoharie, and 
subsetpiently, at the age of si.xteen, began his 
working life as clerk in the store of (). li. 
Throop in this village. Three years later he 
went to blast Cobleskill, where for three years 
he was in partnership with his father. At the 
end ol that time he removed to Cobleskill and 
started in business for himself, which he con- 
tinued for two years. doing then to New 
York City, he was employed for two years in 
a wholesale hat store. This brought him up 
to the clo.se of i,sr)3, and in December of that 
year he enlisted in Company II of the Third 
New York Regiment of Cavalry. h'or a year 
he remained in New Vnvk Harbor at draft ren- 
dezvous; but at the end of that time he was ap- 
pointed Lieutenant of a company of cavalry. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and went to the Ircmt, ioiiiin,^- his roj;inn.'in :it 
I'ctersbuff;-. Later liis Cdmpany went to Nor- 
folk to do j;x-ii^-''al ilnty. and thence to North 
Carolina, where iMi'. Hiee was appointed a 
]iro\(ist-niarshal. Snl)set[nently he was assist- 
ant iirovost-niarsha! at Norfolk, \'a., and then 
Aide-ile-eanip on General Mann's staff. /\fter 
being ninslereil out of the serxice in 1S65, he 
remained at Norfolk, \'a., for a year and a half, 
and was engagetl in buying up government 
horses and mules at auction and selling them 
at private sale. In atlclition to this he carried 
on some mercantile business. He then re- 
ceived an appointment as United States In- 
spector of Spirits at Chicago, and went to that 
city. Returning to his native town at the end 
of nine months, he engaged in the general gro- 
cerv and house furnishing business, which he 
continued for ten years, or up to 1894, when he 
purchased the block where he is now carrying 
on business. He put in a large stock of goods, 
and has met with all the success he could have 
hoped for. 

Mr. Bice was married in 1879 to Melissa M. 
Jones, who was born in Duanesburg, N.Y. In 
politics he is a Democrat. He has been Con- 
stable for some years, also Overseer of the 
Poor, but has refused all other public offices. 
Forty years ago he joined Schoharie \'alley 
Lodge, No. 491, F. & A. M., and he is at the 
present time the oldest member of this lodge. 
He has been Master for several years, and has 
filled all the other offices. In 1S61 he joined 
the Chapter of Canajoharie, and in 1S63 he 
joined the Masonic chajiter at Cobleskill, 
being one of its charter members. He is a 



niemiier (il the Schoharie Lodge of Odd Fel- 
lows, ami has fc.r many years been coiuiected 
with the tire department. .Mr. ]5ici- attends 
the Methodist church, and is a trustee .if the 
■^"^^i^'ty- ^^^ 

AMI) ]\I. HINMAN, the popular 
merchant of New HaltinKire, Greene 
County, N.Y. , was born in this town 
on the last day of January, 1863. He is the 
only surviving son of the late William C. 
Hinman, who established the Hinman store, 
and who for many years was one of the leading 
citizens of New Baltimore. Mr. David M. 
Hinman's grandfather was a native of Connect- 
icut, and came from that State to Albany 
County, New York, when it was being cleared 
and settled. He was a school teacher by pro- 
fession, and followed that calling through a 
long life. He taught music as well as the 
common branches of learning. He died at the 
age of eighty. 

William C. Hinman was born in Albany 
County, and reared on a farm near Ravena. 
He pursued his studies in the district school, 
and in addition was privately instructed by his 
father. In early life he learned the carpenter's 
trade. Later he became a tradesman on a 
small scale near Utica, and subsequent to that 
he came to New Baltimore. Here he was 
clerk for John G. Raymond for a time, and he 
subsequently established the business, which 
has since become the largest of its kind in the 
town. The buildings now in use were built 
by him some time after the business was 
started. At first he was in partnership with 



3o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his lircithcr, llcniian II. Ilinnian, later with 
William Fulk-r down to 1.S76. Then for 
eleven \ears, or up to the time of his death in 
1S87, he carried on the business alone. He 
ilied ayed si.\ty-nine year.s. His wife, whose 
niaiilen name was Jane Terry, was born in 
foeymans, N. \'. She was one of the ten chil- 
dren of John Terry, a lifelmiLC farmer of that 
place. She is now se\enty-fi\e years of aye. 
Of her seven children tliree are living — Kliz- 
abeth, Annie, and David AI. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. William C. Hinman were active in the 
affairs of the iVIethodist chinch, and both 
worked earnestly to secure the building of the 
church edifice, Mr. Hinman being on the com- 
mittee having the matter in charge. He was 
for }ears the strong man in the church, and to 
him all looked for o.unsel. He was a Repub- 
lican in politics. At the time of his death he 
was the oldest merchant in the town. 

David M. Hinman attended the public 
schools of New Baltimore, anil subsequentl}' 
received private instruction for some time. 
He went to work in the store at an early age, 
and soon became his father's most trusted and 
efficient clerk. l^pon the death of his father 
he .succeeded to the business, which he has 
since successfully managed. He carries a 
large stock f)f general merchandise, including 
groceries and provisiijns, dr}' goods, hardware, 
paint.s, oils, glass, oil-cloths, and ladies' and 
gentlemen's furnisliing goods. The store has 
been the largest in the town since it was 
started fifty )'ears ago. Mr. Ilinman's sister 
now acts as book keeper, and she is al.so the 
ojjcrator on the Western Union Telegra]jh 



line here. There is a long distance tele- 
phone in the store. Mr. Hinman has in a 
measure steppeil into the place his father for- 
merly occupied in the chuicli. He is a mem- 
ber of tlie Board of Stewards, for six years has 
been superintendent of the Sunday-school, and 
he is vice-i^resident of the l-Lpworth League, of 
which he has been a member ever since the 
branch here was organized. His politics are 
Republican. He has held the office of Town 
Clerk for a year. 



§UDSON BURHANS, junior member of 
the enterprising firm of Borst & Bur- 
hans, Coblcskill, N.V., millers, niam:- 
facturers of buckwheat, wheat, r)-e, and graham 
flours, and custom grinders of general feed, is 
a well-known business man of this town. He 
was born the first day of January, 1849, in 
Carlisle, Schoharie County, which was al.so 
the birthplace of his father, John Burhans. 

The emigrant ancestor of the Burhans family 
emigrated from Holland to the State of xNew 
York in the seventeenth century. Mr. Judson 
Burhans's grandfather, Peter Burhans, .spent 
the early ]iart of his life in Greene County, 
New V,.rk, whence he removed to Carlisle with 
his parents. He married Annie Ihnnmel, 
the descendant of a Dutch family of C.reene 
(^lunty, and was the father of eight children, 
of whom two are yet living. His wile tlied in 
Carlisle at the age of threescore and ten years. 
John Iknhans, son of Peter and father of 
Judson, received his education in the district 
schools of Carlisle, and on the parental farm 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was \vi 



ai;ri(.'ulturc. Dcciilin.i; tn make laniiing his 
lilc occuixitidii, he purchased tlie did hdiiic- 
stead when he hecanie nf age, and fioni that 
time luitil liis death, at the aL;e (il se\'ent}'-six 
)-eais, eairietl on general farming most success- 
fully, lie married I.axinia Loucks, who was 
born in Carlisle, the daughter of Peter Loucks, 
a well-to-do farmer, and descendant of an early 
settler of the towai. Six children were the 
fruit of their union, namely: Judson, the sub- 
ject of this brief sketch; Andrew; Melvin; 
Peter; Romeyn ; and Walton. Mrs. Burhans 
is still living, an acti\-e woman of seventy 
years. She is a member of the Lutheran 
church, to which her husband also belonged. 

Judson Burhans attended the district school 
until fifteen years old, when he began working 
out as a farm laborer and carpenter's appren- 
tice. After learning the trade he worked at 
carpentering in the summer season and taught 
school winters for ten years, finding time also 
to fit himself for a book-keeper at the Pough- 
keepsie Business College. After that he was 
employed as a book-keeper at Coble.skill for a 
while, and then went to Albany, where he was 
engaged as a commission merchant from 1882 
until 1886, when he disposed of his business 
in that city and returned to Cobleskill. Buy- 
ing an interest in the Cobleskill mills, he has 
since, with the co-operation of his partner, Mr. 
Borst, materially increased the capacity of the 
plant, which now produces on an average one 
hundred barrels of buckwheat flour, fifty barrels 
of rye flour, and forty tons of feed e\-ery 
twenty-four hours. These gentlemen make a 



specialty ol buckwheat Hour, which they manu- 
facture from a luimbcr one grain, bought di- 

years they ha\e sold to wholesale and retail 
dealers in all parts of the Union large auKJunts 
of their "Sure Rising Buckwheat," which is 
pronounced by the trade to be one of the most 
popular on the market, rixalling Hecker's, the 
Martha Washington, and the 1. X. L. brands. 

On July 24, 1878, Mr. Burhans married 
Miss Mary E. Becker, one of the six children 
of Francis Becker, formerly a miller in this 
part of Schoharie County, but later a resident 
of Berne, Albany County. She was born and 
educated in Gallupville, a village not far from 
Colbeskill. Mr. and Mrs. Burhans have two 
children — P' rank J. and PLlla Ploy, both of 
whom are in school. 

P"raternally, Mr. Burhans belongs to the 
Albany Lodge of Odd P""ellows. He also 
joined the Improved Order of Red Men while 
living in that city. He was one of the incor- 
porators of the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank 
of Cobleskill, and is one of its directorate. In 
politics he is independent, voting with the 
courage of his con\'ictions for the best men and 
best measures, regardless of party ties. He 
attends the Methodist p:piscopaI church, of 
which Mrs. Burhans is an acti\e member. 



,ETER MAGP:K, a well-known ship- 
builder of Athens, N. Y. , was born 
on November 23, 1S3S, in Baltimore, 
Md., where his parents, John and Anna (Ca- 
hill) Magee, settled when they emigrated to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



this country from Irtlaiul. lie is tlic only one 
now living of a family of ei.u;i)l tliildien. IScitli 
father and mother were members of I lie Catho- 
lic church. The mother died at tlic age of 
seventy one. 

Mr. Magee was reared in lialtimore, and in 
his childhood attended a parociiial school in 
that city. When he was only thirteen years 
old, his father died and he had to be.L^in to as- 
sist his widowed mother. lie learned the 
ship-builder's trade, serxirii; a four years' ap- 
prenticeship wilii Jolm J. .Ahraiiam, who was 
reckoned one of the best shiii-builders in that 
region. When he had completed his jjeriod 
of apprenticeship, he began wori<ing for Mr. 
Abraham as a journeyman, and in a short 
time was reeeising higher wages than any 
other man in the yard. After this he spent 
one _\ear in ]\Iound City, 111. ; and, when he 
returned, he again engagetl with Mr. .Abraham. 
Leaving Haltiniorc a second time and going 
to New ^'ork City, he worked a while for 
Theodore Roosevelt, now (iovernor of the 
State, several months for William II. Webb, 
and then put U|i a vessel foi' \'an iJuzen 
Brothers. He next entered the service of the 
L'nited .Stales as a mechanic at Tort Royal, 
and tiiere lemained two years and one montii. 
L'jion leaving I'ort Royal he came to New 
\'ork and took a eoiilract bir work at liie biot 
of Si.xteenth .Street, being then only twenty- 
three years of age. After executing this to 
the satisfaction of all concerned, he went to 
work for Sinionson, the shipduiilder, this 
being tluring tiie eight-houi' strike. 

Subsequently he was employed iu Mr. 



J. R. I5aldwin's yard at New Haltimore, and 
from tiiat ])lace lie came to Athens and started 
business for himself. He was first in com- 
pany with Mr. Matthias \'an Loan in 1871, 
and this partnership continueil for twenty 
years, tlie firm being known as \'an Loan & 
Magee. Since iSSS Mr. Magee has been 
without a partner. During the time he has 
been in the }ard heie he has built over two 
luuulred X'essels, and has rebuilt man)' more. 
He is one of the best known and most repu- 
table ship-builders in this region. His son 
Josei^h acts as his bjrenian. 

Mr. Magee was married in 1S71 to Mary J. 
McCabe, who was born in Greene County. 
She has borne iiim three children: Joseph, 
abo\'e mentioned; Mary; and Hannah. All 
the children have receivetl a i)ublic-scho(]| etlu- 
cation. The daughters reside with their jiar- 
ents. Joseph married Mary Hrennan. 

Mr. .Magee is a Democrat in ])olitics, and 
for many years has been member of town anil 
county committees. He has attended many 
conventions as delegate. In i>SS5 he was 
elected Sheriff of the county, and for the three 
succeeding years he efficiently filled that 
office. He has been a member of the School 
Hoard for thirty years, and for the same length 
of time a Trustee of the village. 

Mr. Magee's house is one of the tinest in 
.Athens. He puts a large amount of money in 
circulation in the town ever)- week when he 
pays off his force of workmen. He and his 
family attend the Catholic church. They are 
actively interested in all efforts to promote the 
welfare of the communilw 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



jUTHER ZELIK, a wide-awake, enter- 
prising business man of Fulton, Scho- 
harie County, prosperously engaged 
as a general nierchaiU in the village of Break- 
aheen, was born in this town on July 7, 1874. 
The son of l-lphraim and Helen (Becker) Zelie, 
he is the representative of one of the earlier 
families of this part of the county, and comes 
of patriotic stock, his great-grandfather, Colo- 
nel Zelie, of the Revolutionary army, having 
had command of the Upper Fort in Fulton 
during the Colonial struggle for independence. 

Peter Zelie, son of Colonel Zelie and 
grandfather of Luther, spent his entire life of 
seventy-five vears in Fulton, and here married 
Eliza X'roman. He was a carpenter, and fol- 
lowed his trade until well advanced in years, 
when he retired from work, and spent his re- 
maining days with his son Ephraim. His 
wife survived him, attaining the age of four- 
score years. Both were devout members of 
the Reformed church. They had eleven chil- 
dren. 

Ephraim Zelie, the father above named, was 
born in 1839 in Fulton, and obtained his edu- 
cation in the district schools. At the age of 
ten years he began working out, and from that 
time fought the battle of life for himself. 
When old enough to labor at the anvil, he 
learned the blacksmith's trade, at which he 
subsequently worked as a journeyman in differ- 
ent parts of Schoharie County. Going then to 
Cleveland, Ohio, he remained there three 
years, but preferring to establish himself per- 
manently in New York he returned home, and 
in 1861 located in Breakabeen, where he con- 



tinued at his trade for twenty )-ears. From 
that time until his death, May 20, 1S97, he 
lived on a farm in h"ultiin. He was a firm 
supporter of the principles of the Democratic 
party, and served for a while as C(dlector of 
Ta.xes. He married Helen Becker, one of the 
two children of Henry and Rebecca (Berg) 
Becker. Her father, who was a farmer, died 
at the age of fifty years, and her mother died 
at the age of forty-eight. Five children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim Zelie, and of 
these two are living; namely, Luther and 
Laura, twins. Laura is the wife of Floyd 
Mattice, of North Blenheim. Both parents 
were active members of the Lutheran church, 
in which the father served as an holder, besides 
holding other offices, being for a number of 
years a teacher in the Sunday-school. 

Luther Zelie in boyhood and youth attended 
successively the village schools of Fulton and 
the Middleburg High School, and afterward 
completed the course of study at the Albany 
Business College. Returning to Fulton, he 
taught school a year in this town, and then 
began his mercantile career as a clerk in the 
store of Cottrell & Leonard, hatters and fur- 
riers in Alban}-, where he remained three 
years. Coming to Breakabeen in 1895, Mr. 
Zelie bought out the long-established business 
of Mr. E. Patterson, a well-known merchant, 
and has since conducted the store with emi- 
nent success. He has considerably increased 
the original stock, carrying now a complete 
assortment of groceries, provisions, boots, 
shoes, hats, gentlemen's clothing and furnish- 
ing goods, and also a full line of hardware. 



lilOGRAl'HICAL RE\'IK\V 



in all (if which he hns built up a substantial 
trade. 

On January 26, iSyS, Mr. Luther Zelie wa.s 
united in marriage with Mi.s.s Kcziah Shafer, 
dau-hter of Josejjh A. Shafer, of lUeakabeen. 

.Mr. Zelie is an Odd Fellow, beini; a mem- 
ber ..f lUenbeim l.od.ue, I. O. O. \- . In poli- 
tics he affiliates with the Democratic party, 
and is now serving; as 'I'own Clerk. lie and 
his wife arc faithful mciulicrs of the Lutheran 
church and of the Sunday-school connected 
with it, .Mr. Zelie being the superintendent of 
the school. 



IGI^KRT R DODGK. of Ashland, was 
rn in ( jiecnville, (iiecne County, 
N.\'., ()ct(jl)er 24, 1S22, son of Antlrew and 
Ruth (Hlackmar) Lodge. He is a grandson of 
Mose.s Dodge, who mo\ed his family from 
Ma.ssachusetts to FreehoUl, (ireene County, in 
1804, and followed the blacksmith's trade in 
connection with other mechanical occupations 
for the rest of his life. Moses Dodge is said 
to have been a descendant of William Dodge, 
one of the early settlers of Salem, Mass. 

Andrew Dodge, father of I'gbert B. , was 
born in Massachusetts. When a )i)ung man 
he engaged in farming in ]<"reehold. J^'rom 
1.S15 to I.S47 he carried (jii a general store, 
and he also manufactured p..tash. His last 

an<l he died at the age of eighty one years. 
He served as Postmaster for thirty years. In 

Republican. During the somewhat violent 
agitation against the ^Lisunic fraternity which 



took place in his day, he sided with the oppo- 
nents, and was known as an anti. Mason. An- 
drew Dodge married Ruth Llackmar, a native 
of Great Jbrringlon, Mass., daughter of Abel 
Hlaekmar. a prosperous farmer and cattle 
dealer. She became the mother of ten chil- 
dren, tiirce of whom are living; namei\-, big- 
bert li. , .\ugnsta, and Louisa. Augusta is the 
widow of the Rev. John X. Spoor; and Louisa 
m;irried D.miel C. Searles, ,il (ireenville. 
Mrs. Ruth Dodge died at the age of Hfty-five 
years. The parents of Ruth Dodge were mem- 
bers of the Christian church, of which she was 
also a mend)er. 

Egbert R Dodge obtained his knowledge of 
the iirimar_\- branches of learning in the com- 
mon schools of LreehoUl, and completed his 
studies at the academy in (ireenville. He 
taught several terms of school in Greene and 
Dutchess Counties previous to 1S47. In that 
year he engaged in trade at Freehold, where he 
continued in business some thirteen years, and 
in i86o he removed to Ashland. Securing a 
site adjoining the hotel, he openeil a general 
store, which for the succeeding two ye;irs was 
the only source <if supply in this vicinity. He 
was therefore called uiion to carry a varied 
stock, wliich was transported from New \'ork 
City by river boats to Catskill. After being 
out of business two years he (in iSThj) built 
a new store; and, putting in a large stock of 
general merchandise, he continued in trade 
until iSSo, when he was succeeded by his son. 
After being relieveil of the cares of business 
he coidd not remain idle, preferring instead to 
continue in the stole; and as Assistant I'ost- 




EGBERT B. DODGE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



n 


as 


or ho 


lias 1 


1' 


1st 


thirt) 


year 


r 


■cs 


iJcnt 


Fillni 


1' 


lei 


CO M 


minis 



tial 
the 
Rep 



lulled the mails here for the 
He was rostmaster under 
■e and durini;- a part oi the 
aticin. He has witnessed 
langes and improvements in the postal 
and has a distinct remendirance of 
wiien stages were the only means of 
nee. He has voted at every I'residen- 
:tion since 1844, when he supported 
didacy of Henry Clay, and is now a 
can. He served as a Supervisor in 



1868, as Town Clerk in 1870, was a Justice of 
the Peace for fourteen years, and has settled 
many e.states. 

In 1853 Mr. Dodge was united in marriage 
with 1-Iliza C. Sax, who was born in Cairo, 
tireene County, daughter of Jacob Sax, the 
descendant of an early Dutch settler and a 
prosperous farmer of that town. J\Ir. and Mrs. 
Dodge reared three children ; namely, Francis, 
Edgar S. , and Ella M. Dodge. Francis suc- 
ceeded his father in business, and is now the 
leading merchant in this section, also Post- 
master at the present time. He married Mary 
Clark, and has two children — Frederick C. 
and Florence. Edgar S. , who is a horse 
dealer, married Sarah Frances Martin. P^lla 
M. married Edward Snow, a carpenter of 
Kingston, and has three children — Herbert, 
Harold, and Laura. I\Irs. Eliza C. Dodge 
died August j8, 1S97, aged sixty-six years. 

As an intelligent, progressive, and public- 
spirited citizen, who can be depended upon for 
assistance in forwarding any movement calcu- 
lated to be of benefit to the community, Mr. 
Dodge is highly esteemed by his fellow-towns- 



men, among whom he has for )-ears been a 
prominent and inlluenlial figure. He ]ios- 
sesses an extensive knowledge of the town's 
history for the past thirty-eight years, has been 
a careful reader of instructive books, and his 
judgment in matters of public importance is 
still sought for and relied upon. He was for- 
merly a member of the Inde|iendent Order of 
Odd Fellows. In his religious belief he is a 
Presbyterian, and liis sou Francis is promi- 
nently identified with the Presbyterian church. 



iHARLES P. McCAHE, M.D., of 

Green\ille, one of the foremost prac- 
tising ph3-sicians of Greene County, 
was born on August 11, 1856, in the house 
where his father, Bradley Selleck McCabe, 
M. D. , now resides. His family is an old one 
in the county, having been prominent here 
since 17S3, when Stephen McCabe, his great- 
grandfather, settled in New Baltimore. 

Stephen McCabe was born in New Jersey in 
1755. During the Revolution he enlisted and 
served for a time in the Continental army. 
At the close of the war he came to New Balti- 
more with his wife, Mary P\irrar, and their 
family, his son Benjamin being then three 
years of age. There he settled on the estate 
now owned by Hiram Miller. 

Benjamin McCabe, the third son, was mar- 
ried in 181 2 to Sarah Gedney, of New Balti- 
more, and continued to reside on his father's 
place till 1825, when he purchased and re- 
moved to the farm now occupied by Mrs. Cath- 



3«8 



hi OC; RA PH IC AL K E\' I K\V 



cnrt. Ill I.S34 he houglit and rcniovL-d to the 
farm now nwnud l)y Adam I.urcnz. Hcnja- 
niin's wife, Sarah, was the daughter ni Joshua 
Gedney, who was one of the pioneer settlers of 
New Haltimorc, where he heeame the owner of 
a fine farm. He was l)orn in Westchester 
County, of wliich liis father was an early set- 
tler, anil it was on his father's land in that 
county that the battle of White Plains took 
place. josluKi Cedney and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Hennett, were zealous Meth- 
odists, and their descendants to the jnesent 
generation have continued in the faith of that 
church. Mrs. Gedney died at seventy. She 
was horn in Westchester County. Her chil- 
dren were: I'eter. Bartholomew, Joshua, Sam- 
uel, Absalom, Sarah, Hannah, ami Taticnce. 
Of Iknjamin McCabe it has been written, "He 
was possessed of a discriminating mind and a 
sound judgment, and was ne\'er known to shed 
a tear nor to laugh audibl)-, so jierfectly were 
his passions under his control." He died on 
November 6, 1S55, surviving his wife only 
nine days. He was the father of the follow- 
ing-named children: Caroline, Jane, Hamil- 
ton, Bartholomew G., Bradley S. , Philip P:., 
and Mary. Uf these, Hamilton J., the eldest 
son, has for many years been engaged in the 
tin and hardware business in Creenville vil- 
lage; and I5artholomew ('.., the second .son, 
who was graduated in medicine, died at De- 
posit, Delaware County, N. Y. 

Bradley Selleck McCabe, M.D., father of 
the subject of this sketch, received his medical- 
diploma from the .\lbany Medical C.dlege in 
iSsO, and short] v entered on the duties of his 



profession in ])artnershii) with Dr. Gideon 
Botsford, with whom he had begun the study 
of medicine some years before, after attending 
Greenville Academy. 'Phe late Dr. Botsford 
was a notable man of his time in (Ireenville, 
and had a ver\ large jnactice. Dr. McCabe, 
who has been his worth}' successor, is known 
throughout the comity for his skill both in 
medicine and in surgery. He has been for a 
lunnber of years a member of the Board of 
Trustees of Greenville Academy. He rep- 
resented his town in the Board of .Supervisors 
six years, was twice chairman of the Board. 
He has also represented the county in the 
State legislature. 

He w:is marrieil on June 26, 1S50, to Mary 
P., youngest daughter of the late Dr. Amos 
Botsford. Three children have been born to 
him — Amos B,, Charles P., and George G. 
Amos B. McCabe, who has been in the sub- 
treasury in New York City since I S90, was 
born on September 17, 1852, and during early 
manhood engaged in agricultural pursuits. He 
married Helen Kyle, of Alban\-, arid has two 
children — John C. and Mar\- B., the son 
being now in the emplo)' of the New Wnk 
Pife Insurance Comixmy. (Jeorge (i. McCabe 
was born on June 26, 1S60. He was formerly 
in the employ of P. Winne & Co., of this 
place, but is now carrying on a drug business 
for himself. He was Postmaster for eight 
years under Cleveland, and he is the present 
Sujiervisor of the town. He married Plmme- 
line Stevens, the ceremon\- t:iking place on 
Jamiary S, \S<jy Dr. Bradley S. McCabe 
was I'ostmaster for lour years under P'ranklin 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Pierce, and also under James Buchanan. He 
was formerly connected with the Odd Fellows, 
and was for some years an active worker in 
that organization. 

Charles P. McCabe after attending the 
Greenville Academy went to Boston, Mass., 
and entered the Conservatory under the famous 
teacher, Petersilea, where he remained for two 
years. Returning to his native place, he 
taught music for some years, but in 1880 
began the study of medicine with his father. 
Subsequently he entered the Medical College 
at Albany, and in March, 1883, took his de- 
gree from that institution. After some time 
spent in the Boston hospitals and attendance 
on the clinics there, he came back to Green- 
ville and settled to practise with his father, 
continuing in partnership with him till 1890. 
He has since practised alone. He has patients 
in all the surrounding towns over a radius of 
fifteen miles, and besides his extensive medi- 
cal practice has many difficult surgical cases. 
He built his present residence in 1889. 

Dr. Charles P. McCabe was married on Sep- 
tember 10, 1884, to Helena F., eldest daughter 
of the late Robert Elliott, of Hunter, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Of 
this union three children have been born, of 
whom Clara, the eldest, died at the age of four- 
teen months, and Millicent at the age of five 
and a half years. One daughter is living, 
Dorothy K. In religious faith Dr. Charles P. 
McCabe is a Methodist. Both he and his wife 
are prominent workers in the church, and he 
has been superintendent of the Sunday-school 
and for many years one of the stewards. For 



many years he sang in the choir, and formerly 
he held the position of organist. He orga- 
nized the Greenville Musical Union, a chorus 
of seventy voices, and so great was its reputa- 
tion that at one time the largest hall in the 
town was filled on si.\ successive evenings to 
listen to it. Mrs. McCabe was a teacher in 
the Sunday-school for many years, and also 
sang and acted as organist. She is a graduate 
of Kingston Academy and of Chamberlaine 
College in Randolph, N.Y. She was born in 
Hunter. 

Dr. Charles P. McCabe is a member of the 
New York State Medical Society, and is now 
president of the Greene County Medical Soci- 
ety. In politics he is a Democrat. In 1893 
he was elected and served as Supervisor, but 
he refused to accept the nomination a second 
time, and has uniformly declined to run for 
other offices, feeling that his practice needs 
his undivided attention. He is, however, con- 
nected with various fraternal societies, namely: 
with James M. Austin Lodge of Masons, of 
which he was Master for three terms; with 
Zeus Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, of 
which he was Chancellor for two years, and of 
which he is a charter member and was the first 
commanding officer. He has unusual business 
aptitude. He is president of the Greene 
County Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and 
was formerly president of the Village Fire As- 
sociation, which operates in Greene, Albany, 
Delaware, and Schoharie Counties, and he is 
a director in both companies. Ever since the 
Greenville Board of Education was organized 
he has been one of its most active members. 



330 



lilOGRAl'lIlLAL REVIEW 



TT^HRISTIAN RECTOR, who owns a 
I J| good farm in Glenville, N.Y., on the 

^ banks of the Mohawk River, was 

born where he now resides on October 16, 
1S36, son of William and Susan (Ilavcrley) 
Rector. 

William Rector was a native of this State. 
Settling when a young man upon the farm his 
son now owns, he successfully followed agri- 
cultural [)ursuits for the rest of his active 
period. He took a leading j)art in public 
affairs, holding various town offices, and in 
politics he was a Democrat. He was a Dea- 
con and I'^Ider of the Reformed church. His 
wife, Susan, was born in the house which her 
son Christian now occupies. She was the 
daughter of Christian Haverley, who built the 
house with brick made upon the farm. She 
became the motlier of three children, namely: 
AnnaM., wife of James T. Wyatt, of Glen- 
ville; Christian, the subject of this sketch; 
and Susan Rosa, who is no longer living. 
William Rector lived to be nearly eighty-five 
years old, and his wife died at eighty-three. 

Christian Rector was reared and educated in 
Glenville. I-"rom his youth upward he has 
been engaged in tilling the soil, and, succeed- 
ing to the ownership of the homestead property 
of two hundred and seventy acres, he has real- 
ized excellent returns as a general farmer. 
His success is the result of practical knowl- 
edge, diligent effort, and sound judgment. 

On October 10, 1866, Mr. Rector married 
Emma Vedder, who was born in Schenectady, 
June 4, 1S45, daughter of Peter and Prudence 
(Gates) \'edder. Her father was born in Nis- 



kayuna, N.Y. , and her mother was a native of 
Schenectady. Peter \'edder was a carpenter 
and lumber dealer in Schenectady for many 
year.s, and the business is now carried on by 
his sons. He served as Super\'isor and Alder- 
man, to which offices he was elected by the 
Republican party; and as a generous, public- 
spirited citizen he was accorded the esteem 
and good will of his fellow-townsmen. In his 
religious belief he was a Baptist. Peter Ved- 
der lived to be sevcnty-si.\ years old. His 
wife died at thirt}-nine. He was the father of 
eight children, namely: Mary C, who is now 
Mrs. Van Dyke; Emma, who is now Mrs. 
I^ector; Theresa, who is now Mrs. Gilbert; 
Daniel G., Sharratt G., Albert, William, of 
Pasadena, Cal. ; and Prudence G., who is now 
Mrs. Bett.s. Mr. and Mrs. I^ector have three 
children, namely: William, a druggist in 
Schenectady; Susan R., who married George 
Koonz, of Glenville, and has two daughters — 
Mabel and l^erdena ; and Prudence, who re- 
sides at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rector are members of the 
Reformed church. Politically, Mr. Rector 
acts with the Democratic party. 



,LARENCE M. BOORN, station agent, 
telegraph operator, freight agent, and 
passenger agent at Seward station, 
Schoharie County, is a capable, pleasant, ac- 
commodating official, well adapted for the 
responsible position that he holds. He was 
born September 6, 1863, in 13ecatur, Otsego 
County, N. Y. , the town in which botli his 




CHRISTIAN RECTOR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



323 



father, Nathan Boorn, and his grandfather, 
whose name was Amos, first drew the breath 
of life. Amos Boorn was the son of one of 
the earliest settlers of Decatur, and was born 
and reared in a log cabin. A man of industri- 
ous habits, energetic and ambitious, he cleared 
the timber from a large tract of land, and thus 
reclaimed from the wilderness a fine farm. 
He lived to the age of seventy years. 

Nathan Boorn was born in the log house in 
which his parents began housekeeping. In the 
days of his boyhood and youth he greatly as- 
sisted his father in felling the giant trees of 
the forest and in tilling the soil. He after- 
ward learned the blacksmith's trade, and for 
many years followed it in his native town. 
Subsequently removing to the near-by town of 
East Worcester, he there set up his smithy, 
and now, though he is seventy years of age, he 
is still active. 

" Week in, week out, from morn till night, 
You can hear his bellows blow." 

He married Catherine Brazie, one of the 
thirteen children of Francis Brazie, of Coopers- 
town, N.Y. Four children were born of their 
union, and three are living, as follows: Clar- 
ence M. ; Ortentia, wife of Alfred R. Robbins; 
and Friend. Both parents are consistent mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
politics the father is an uncompromising Re- 
publican, and, though never an office-seeker, 
has served two terms as Town Clerk. 

Clarence M. Boorn was educated in the pub- 
lic schools, and at the age of seventeen he left 
home in order to study telegraphy. As soon 



as he had acquired a sufficient knowledge of 
the art, he was appointed night operator at one 
of the stations on the Delaware & Hudson 
River Railroad, and he has since, for a period 
of seventeen years, been in the employ of the 
same company. For some time he had 
charge of the telegraph office at Unadilla, 
whence he was transferred as agent to Schen- 
evus, also in Otsego County, and in 1896 came 
to Seward. Here he has faithfully and satis- 
factorily performed the duties pertaining to his 
office, and in every way has proved himself 
worthy of the confidence reposed in him. Po- 
litically, he is a supporter of the principles of 
the Republican party. 

On March 19, 1890, Mr. Boorn married 
Miss Edna M. Winegard, who was born in 
Seward, one of the two children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Abram Winegard, well-to-do and promi- 
nent members of the farming community of 
this town, and pillars of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. Mr. and Mrs. Boorn have one 
child, Carl W. Mr. Boorn attends the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Boorn 
is an active member. 



WILLIAM B. KNISKERN^ 
getic farmer and one of 



N, an ener- 
the most 

popular young men of Blenheim, N. Y., was 
born in Fulton, this State, September 6, 1868. 
He is the son of Rufus and Helen M. (Best) 
Kniskern, and is of the fifth generation in 
descent from Johannis Kniskern, his pioneer 
ancestor, who was the original owner (as early 
as 177s) of the farm on which he resides with 



324 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his father and mother. This is the line: 
Johannis, ' Joseph," Christopher,' Riifus,-' 
William B.s 

The grandfather, Christopher Kniskern, son 
of Joseph, succeeded to the ownership of the 
homestead, and was an industrious farmer. He 
married Olive Dornburgh. Their children 
were: Hamilton, who resides in Blenheim, and 
is a cooper by trade; Angelinc, wife of Joseph 
Fink; Adeline, who married .S. L. Perry; 
Mary, who married William S. Ilager; Kliza- 
beth, who is unmarried; Rufus, the father of 
William B. ; Caroline, who married Jeremiah 
Zeh ; and Martha, who married a Mr. Shaffer. 

Rufus Kniskern was reared on the ancestral 
farm, which he inherited in turn, and here he 
Cdiitinues to make his home. Devoting him- 
self to its cultivation during the active period 
of his life, he gave particular attention to 
carrying on a dairy and raising hops, making 
the most of his opportunities for success. He 
married Helen M. Best, daughter of William 
and Nancy (Hagadorn) Best, of P'ulton. 
Rufus Kniskern is a member of the Methodist 
lipiscopal church, and his wife is a Lutheran. 

William B. Kniskern acquired a public-school 
education. From his youth he has worked 
upon the homestead farm, which for some time 
he cultivated jointly with his father. He now 
crops about twenty-five acres, has fifty acres of 
excellent pasture land, and keeps from twelve 
to fifteen cows. He has relinquished the 
growing of hops, preferring to devote his en- 
ergy to general farming and dairying. 

Mr. Kniskern married Mary C. Hanes, 
daughter of John Hanes, of Fulton. They 



have one son, Harold. Politically, he is a 
Democrat. .Altiiough frequently solicited to 
accept nominations to town offices, he has 
generally declined, but has rendered valuable 
service to the party as a member of the town 
and county committees, and was a candidate 
for Supervisor in i8g8. He attends the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 



Yq)OREN p. COLK, attorney-at-law and 
jell farmer of Conesville, N. V. , was born 
"^^^ ^ in this town, May 31, 1S52, .son of 
I'llder Loren P. and Charlotte (Weed) Cole. 
He is a grandson of Avery Cole, who moved 
with his family from Vermont to that part of 
Blenheim which is now Gilboa, Schoharie 
Count), and was engaged in farming for the 
rest of his life, his death occurring at the age 
of seventy years. 

A\ery Cole was an active member of the 
Baptist church. He was a Whig in politics, 
and held some of the town offices. The 
maiden name of his wife was Polly l^lair, and 
their children were: Suel, Ambrose, Loren P., 
Anson, liarnard, Ahaz, Rosetta, Mary, and 
Esther. Of these Ambrose, who resided in 
Indiana, and Rosetta, who married Patrick Van 
Dyke, are the only survivors. Mary married 
Warren W. Parsons; Esther married Daniel C. 
Leonard; .Suel and Barnard died in Gilboa; 
Anson died in Western New York; and Ahaz 
died in Windham, this State. All except 
Suel li\'ed to be sixty-three j'ears old. 

Elder Loren P. Cole, father of the subject 
of this sketcli, was born in \'ermont in 1808, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ami came to Schdliario County wlicn he was 
four years old. Ho resided in C.ill)oa until 
1845, when he eanic to Conesvillc and became 
an extensive farmer, owning some three hun- 
dred acres of land. He was an ordained min- 
ister of the Baptist denomination. He sup- 
plied pulpits in this section for many years, 
and also taught school. He served as Super- 
visor for the years 1853-59, 1864, and 1879, 
being in the latter year the oldest man on the 
board. He also served as Highway Commis- 
sioner, Superintendent of Schools, and Gen- 
eral Inspector. Elder Cole died in 1886. He 
was twice married. His first wife, Phoebe M. 
Pierce, died two years after marriage, leaving 
one daughter, Phoebe Ann, who married E. G. 
Case. For his second wife he married Char- 
lotte Weed, whose ancestors came from Con- 
necticut. Seven children were born of this 
union, namely: Alzina, who married W. H. 
Braman; Pluma, who married Bartholomew 
Becker; Julia E., wife of James A. Bouck ; 
lanthc, wife of George W. Gurnsey ; Char- 
lotte, who married Giles P. Guernsey; Lean- 
der, a farmer of Conesville; and Loren P., the 
subject of this sketch. The mother's death 
occurred a few weeks prior to that of her hus- 
band. 

Loren P. Cole was given the advantages of 
a good education, and after the completion of 
his studies he taught seven terms of school in 
winter, and worked summers on a farm of his 
father's. Purchasing the home farm in 1876, 
he carried it on until 1889, when he sold the 
property to his brother Leander, and bought a 
residence in the village. His law studies 



were jjursued in the office of Le Grand Van 
Tyle, now District Attorney; and since estab- 
lishing him.self in practice he has built up a 
large business both in Conesville and Gilboa. 
In public affairs he has rendered able services 
to the town and county as Supervisor for eight 
years, acting as chairman of some of the most 
important committees. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

Mr. Cole married in 1873 Martha Leonard, 
daughter of Peter H. Leonard, formerly of 
Prattsville, and now of Bainbridge, N.Y. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cole have no children. They attend 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 



AVID T. SLATER, general mer- 
chant of Hensonville, in the town of 
Windham, Greene County, N. Y. , 
was born in Jewett, July 24, 1839, son 
of Hugh and Sally (Woodworth) Slater. 
His parents were natives of Greene County, 
his father having been born in Cairo, and his 
mother in Hunter. 

His paternal grandfather, Elihu Slater, who 
was born in Connecticut, came to Cairo as a 
pioneer, built a log cabin, cleared a farm, and 
tilled the soil during his active period. 
Grandfather Slater died at the age of seventy- 
three; and his wife, Sally Beach Slater, who 
was the mother of a large family, died at 
seventy-two years of age. They were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Hugh Slater, father of David T. , was reared 
on a farm in Cairo, and resided there until 
twenty-one years old. He then went to Jew- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ett, where lie followed the occiiiiation of a 
farmer until his death, which occurred at 
seventy-two years of age. In politics he was 
a Democrat until 1856, when he became a Re- 
publican, his views having changed on the 
slavery question. He held several town 
offices. His wife, Sally, was a daughter of 
Lemuel Woodworth, a prosperous farmer of 
this section. Four of the five children born to 
them arc living, namely: David T., the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Mary, who married Henry 
Whitcomb; Lydia, who became the wife of 
An.son R. Mott; and Dayton, who is a drug- 
gist in Hunter. The mother, Mrs. Sally 
Woodworth Slater, died at seventy-one. 

David T. Slater began his education in Jew- 
ett, and completed his studies at Ashland 
Seminary. At the age of twenty-six he went 
to Cairo, where he followed farming and ran 
a saw-mill for six years, at the end of which 
time he sold his property and came to Henson- 
ville. Purchasing an interest in a general 
store, he was a partner in the concern for 
twenty-two years, then becoming sole proprie- 
tor of the establishment. He conducts a 
thriving business here, carrying a large stock 
of dry goods, groceries, clothing, boots and 
shoes, patent medicine, hats, caps, and other 
wares. 

In 1S64 Mr. Slater was united in marriage 
with Miss Elizabeth Winter, daughter of Har- 
rison Winter, of Jewett. They have had eight 
children, four of whom survive — Jonathan, 
Lilian, Dayton, and I^va. Jonathan married 
Laura Shcrcr. He is a minister of the gospel 
in Brooklyn, N.Y. Lilian is a pupil at a 



seminary in New York City, and the others 
are also attending school. 

Since 1884 Mr. Slater has acted with the 
Prohibition party, and has been Inspector of 
Elections. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, has been class leader, and 
also superintendent of the Sunday-school. 



UNCAN M. LEONARD, M.D., of 
Broome Centre, Schoharie County, 
was born in Roxbury, Delaware 
County, N. Y. , August 27, 1S37, son of Henry 
and Huldah (Hull) Leonard. His grand- 
father, John Leonard, was a native of Ger- 
many, being the son of an Englishman who 
settled in that country and married there. 
John Leonard, on coming to America, first set- 
tled at Black River, Vt., but later removed to 
Delaware County, New York, and was one of 
the first to make a clearing in Roxbury. He 
died in that town, August 23, 1826. He was 
an active member of the Baptist church. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Ruth Olmstead, 
died March ig, 1842. They had but one son, 
Henry, Dr. Leonard's father. 

Henry Leonard was born in Roxbury, July 
4, 1789. Succeeding to the ownership of the 
homestead, he gave his princiijal attention to 
dairy farming and stock raising, and through 
energy and thrift he realized good financial 
results. In politics he was a Whig. Henry 
Leonard died December 20, 1871. His wife, 
Huldah, who was born June 20, 1799, was a 
daughter of Seth Hull, of Hartford, Conn. 
She died September 10, 1864. They were the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



jnircnts of twelve children, namely: SalinaJ., 
horn Cletober 5, 1820; John, born June 6, 
iSjj; Peter H., born May 21, 1S24; George 
H., born January 11, 1826; Daniel C, born 
September 16, 1S27, died in July, 1897; Asa 
D. , born Sejitember 4, 1829; Lucy, born 
March 13, 1832, who married John Weckle; 
Samuel \V., born December 8, 1S33; William 
II., born June 27, 1835; Duncan M., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; MaryE., born April 25, 
1839; and Charles K., born May 20, 1842. 
George H., who practised medicine, served in 
the Civil War, and died in Brooklyn, N.Y. ; 
John, who became a surgeon of repute, served 
three years in the army, and owing to ill- 
health he subsequently engaged in farming; 
Peter H., Daniel C. , and Asa D. were 
farmers; Samuel W. remained upon the home- 
stead ; and Mary E. married Christian Ender- 
lin, of Roxbury. Charles K., while pursuing 
his medical studies, received injuries which 
later resulted in his death. Several of the 
sons taught school in their younger days. 
The father was a Baptist and a prominent 
church member. 

Duncan J\I. Leonard completed his early ed- 
ucation at the Roxbury Academy, and having 
begun his medical studies under the direction 
of his brother George, he attended the Univer- 
sity Medical College, Castleton, Vt. , from 
which he was graduated in 1857. Locating at 
Broome Centre on January i of the following 
year, he has resided here ever since, and al- 
though he has practised his profession steadily 
for a period of over forty years he still retains 
much of the vigor and activity which charac- 



terized his youth, and attends regularly to his 
every-day duties. As a physician he stands 
high in the community, his professional skill 
and reputation for promptitude enabling him 
to maintain among the well-to-do residents of 
this vicinity a practice sufificient to keep him 
constantly busy ; yet he has never been known 
to refuse when called to attend the poor, from 
whom he could expect little or no compensa- 
tion, and he has never instigated a law suit for 
the collection of fees. Prompted by the be- 
lief that good physicians are an urgent neces- 
sity to the welfare of mankind, he has not only 
directed the preparation of several students 
and provided for their personal wants during 
their preliminary studies, but has also assisted 
them in securing an adequate college training. 

On January i, i860, Dr. Leonard married 
for his first wife Vashtie JMcHench, who died 
June 4, 1877; and on January i, 1879, he 
wedded her sister, Emma J. Their father was 
William McHench, the son of John, who came 
from the north of Ireland, and was a jjioneer 
farmer in this section. The family is of 
Scotch origin. 

John McHench had a family of four chil- 
dren; namely. Submit, William, Catherine, 
and John. Submit married Benjamin Thorn- 
ington. Catherine married John Goodfellow. 
William remained on the homestead, and 
John settled in another part of the town. 
William McHench, w-ho was a prosperous 
farmer, took an active part in public affairs, 
and held some of the important offices in 
this town. In early life he was interested 
in military affairs, and acquired the title of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Captain. He was one d tlic Icailini,' nicnihcrs 
of tlie Christian (.hincli. lie clicd at the age 
of seventy-seven years. William McIIencli 
married Ann Ferguson, and was the father of 
nine chilthcn, nanicl\- : Willard, deceased; 
James R., deceased, who settled in Minnesota, 
and became wealthy; Nancy, tlcccascd, who 
married Klder Brown, and had four chiKlrcn ; 
\'ashtie. Dr. Leonard's first wife; William and 
Wilson, twins; Antlrew and I'rancis, also 
twins; and I'^mnia J., Dr. Leonard's secoml 
wife. Of these, William, Andrew, and Emma J. 
are still living. William McHench, second, 
was graduated from the medical department of 
the University of Michigan, and is now prac- 
tising his profession in Brighton, that State. 

Dr. Leonard is the father of four ciiildren, 
all by his first marriage, namel\-: iMiinia R., 
born October 19, i860; Frances A., born .Sep- 
tember 12, 1863; Ursula J., born April 16, 
1866; and Rutson R., born June 3, 1S6S. 
I'jiima R., who is a gratluate of the State 
Normal .School, Albany, is a successful school 
teacher. l""rances is the wife of ¥. IV 
Mackey. L^rsula J. married C. S. Best, 
1\LD. , who is practising in Midtllcburg, 
N.V. Rutson R. Leonard, 1\I.D., who is now 
located in Bloomville, Delaware County, New 
York, began his jireparation under his father's 
direction, and pursued his advanced studies in 
the universities of \'crmont, New York City, 
and Michigan. 

Dr. Duncan M. Leonard cultivates a good 
farm, and is quite an extensive real estate 
holder, owning about .seven hundred acres in 
all. He formerly acted with the Republican 



party in politics, but now votes independently. 
He belongs to the County Medical Society, 
and was at one time its president. For years 
he has devoted his leisure to reading, and has 
sludietl tiie natural sciences, including astron- 
oni\-. In his religious belief he is a Baptist, 
and for many years has been prominenth' iden- 
tified with that church. 



LI ROSK, former superintentlent of the 
Howe's Cave Lime and Cement 
Company and proprietor of a general mer- 
chandise store, is now retired from business 
and rcsitling at Central Bridge, N. Y. He was 
boiii in Maryland, Otsego County, N. Y., on 
February 20, 1840, son of Nathan and Deborah 
(Morehouse) Rose. He comes of English 
stock. 

His paternal grandfather, Nathaniel Rose, 
probably a native of Massachusetts, said to have 
been the descendant of one of the early settlers 
of that State (whether of Thomas Ro.se, who 
was an inhabitant of Scitnate, Plymouth 
County, before 1660, or of another emigrant, 
the present writer is nnalile to say), came to 
Columbia County, New York, in young man- 
hood. From Columbia County Nathaniel 
Rose removed to Warren, Herkimer County, 
N.Y., and finally to Maryland. N.Y., where 
he spent the last years of his life. He started 
as a poor boy, but before he died he accumu- 
lated a large property, chiefly comprised in 
land. He was able to give to each of his six 
.sons a fine farm, and then had some three hun- 
dred acres left for himself. Each son also re- 




ELI ROSE. 




MRS. ELI ROSE, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



335 



ceived a pair of horses, farm stock, and grain 
for planting. Nathaniel Rose was a Captain 
in the State militia. He died at the age of 
seventy-six year.s. His wife, who died at the 
age of seventy-five, was before her marriage 
Lovina Spencer. Her family were people of 
importance in Columbia County. She was the 
mother of eight children, all of whom married 
and had families. Both she and her husband 
were members of the Baptist church, and were 
active and liberal in their support of all church 
matters. So interested were they that they 
were instrumental in building a house of wor- 
ship almost without assistance from others. 

Nathan Rose, son of Nathaniel and father of 
Eli Rose, was born in Columbia County, New 
York, and was educated in the common 
schools there. Shortly after his marriage he 
settled upon the farm given him by his father, 
and there engaged in farming with great suc- 
cess. In time he developed dairying to some 
extent and also lumbering, carrying on in the 
last-named industry a very large business. He 
was active in town affairs and a liberal sup- 
porter of the Baptist church. He died at the 
age of sixty-nine. His wife, Deborah, who 
died at the age of eighty-one, was a daughter 
of James Morehouse, a farmer on an extensive 
scale, residing at Maryland, N. Y. Her grand- 
father, who lived to be eighty-five years of 
age, was one of the early pioneers of that 
place. Her father was killed when only thirty- 
four years old by being thrown from a horse. 
Her mother, whose maiden name was Jane Bum- 
side, was born in Maryland and died at the age 
of sixty. She was twice married, and had five 



children by her first marriage and three by the 
second. All of them grew to maturity, but all 

are now deceased save one. Nathan and Deb- 
orah Rose were the parents of five children, 
namely: John J., of Maryland, N. Y. ; Betsey, 
who is the wife of Harvey Baker, of Oneonta; 
i\Iary, who married Amos Graves, of Glens 
Falls, now deceased; Lovina, who is the 
widow of Nelson Goodrich, of Oneonta ; and 
Eli, the special subject of this sketch. 

Eli Rose received a public-school education, 
and subsequently assisted his father on the 
farm until about twenty-seven years of age. 
He also taught school for two terms. In 1867 
he entered the emi)loy of the Howe's Cave 
Lime and Cement Company, which had just 
been formed, as book-keeper. The following 
year he purchased an interest in the business, 
and he was afterward promoted through the po- 
sition of foreman to general manager and treas- 
urer. He had sometimes as many as eighty 
men under his charge ; and, besides managing 
the lime and cement business, he operated a 
general merchandise store, which he started in 
1 868 and which is now one of the oldest in the 
county. In February, 1S98, Mr. Rose sold 
all his interests at Howe's Cave to a wealthy 
syndicate, and removed to Central Bridge, 
N. Y. , where he is now living. 

A word in regard to the cement company 
with which he was so long connected may be 
interesting to the reader. This company was 
incorporated under the laws of the State of 
New York in 1867 by Hon. John Westover, of 
Richmondville, N. Y. , Jared Goodyear, of 
Colliers, N.Y., and E. R. Ford and Harvey 



35^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Barker, of Oneonta, N.Y., as charter members 
and owners. The seventy or more acres of 
land owned by the company were rude and 
rugged in the extreme, and no appliances were 
at hand. But generous ledges of limestone 
gave promi.se of rich reward to those who 
should quarry it. Houses for the employees, 
bams for the work horses, shops, kilns, and 
mills were erected; and derricks, engines, and 
other appliances were brought here. Fortu- 
nately for the company, the line of the Albany 
& Susquehanna, now a part of the D. & H. C. 
Company, ran near — .so near, in fact, that 
often in blasting large pieces (jf rock were 
thrown on the track. The ledge nearest the 
railroad, which is of dark blue limestone, is 
forty-four feet thick, and is composed, of 
course, of comparativel)' thin and light rock. 
Next above this is a ridge of gray limestone in 
ma.ssive blocks and of excellent quality and 
soundness, such as are eminently suitable for 
the construction of piers, abutments, canal 
locks, retaining walls, and all kinds of massive 
masonry. The lime produced in the kilns is 
very strong, adhesive, and of great durability. 
Its lasting virtue is well shown in the stone 
fort at Schoharie Court House, which was built 
more than a hundred years ago, and as yet 
presents no imperfection of either stone or 
mortar. Among the imi)ortant structures in 
which this cement has jjeen employed are the 
following: the new capitol at Albany; Hol- 
land House, New York City; the Scranton 
Steel Works; Troy Steel and Iron Works; and 
the reservoir at Fair Haven, Vt. As all the 
process of manufacture and the disposal of the 



output was under Mr. Rose's supervision until 
his recent retirement, no further commentary 
upon his ability both as an executive officer 
and as a financier is needed. 

Mr. Rose was married in 1870 to Mary C. 
Warner, who was born in Richmondville, 
daughter of Henry Warner. Her father, a 
farmer, who was a descendant of an old and 
honored family, died at the age of seventy 
years. Her grandfather and great-grandfather 
Warner were both carried captives to Canada 
by the Indians and held there as prisoners for 
a year. Mr. and Mrs. Rose have one daugh- 
ter, So]5hina, who assists her father in the 
store. In politics Mr. Rose is a Republican. 
He is a member of the Lutheran church, and 
is a tru.stee of the society. His wife and 
dautrhter are also members of the church. 



DGAR HARTT, Greenville's veteran 
merchant, member of the firm of 
J. G. & E. Hartt, was born on Norton Hill in 
this town on January 2, 1828, his parents being 
John and Salome (Miller) Hartt. His paternal 
grandfather, Joseph Hartt, was a native of 
Dutche-ss County, New York. The maiden 
name of his grandmother was Polly Green. 

John Hartt, the father, was born in Harts- 
ville, Dutchess County, and was a shoemaker 
by trade. He came to Norton Hill in 1820, 
previous to his marriage, and carried on a suc- 
cessful business here during the remainder of 
his working life. He hired a number of 
hands, and did considerable cu.stom work. 
His death occurred at the age of seventy-four. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He and his wife were members of the Chris- 
tian church; and he was a Deacon and active 
worker in the church. The house of worship 
was four miles from their home. In politics 
he was a Republican. Mrs Salome Miller 
Hartt was born in Dutchess County. She 
lived to be eighty-seven years old. Of her 
seven children, five are living, namely: Mary 
Ann, who resides in Greenville; Edgar, the 
direct subject of this biography; John G., a 
sketch of whose life appears below; William 
B. ; and George A., who is in the employ of 
John G. Myers, of Albany. 

Mr. Edgar Hartt received a practical educa- 
tion in the public schools of Norton Hill. 
His first business experience was in shoemak- 
ing, which he learned by working with his 
father. He followed his trade about nine 
years. The partnership with his brother was 
formed in 1S56, at the old stand; and three 
years later the store where they are now doing 
business was built. It is doubtful if there is 
a single partnership in the State that has ex- 
isted longer than this. Messrs. Hartt still 
buy goods in some instances of the firms from 
whom they bought when they began business. 
They carrj^ a very complete stock of general 
merchandise, including dry goods, groceries, 
boots and shoes, ready-made clothing, hats and 
caps, crockery and glassware, oil cloth, hard- 
ware, grain, drugs and patent medicines, wall 
paper and stationery. The business has grown 
from year to year with the growth of the vil- 
lage, which has nearly doubled in size since 
they began. 

In i860 Mr. Hartt married Augusta Chap- 



man, a native of Wcsterlo and daughter of 
Robert and Eliza Chapman, her father a black- 
smith. Both her parents died at the age of 
eighty. They had three children, two of 
whom are living. Mr. and :\Irs. Hartt have 
three children — Gertrude, Clara, and Henry 
G. Gertrude is the wife of G. W. Palen, a 
tanner residing in Western Penn.sylvania, near 
DuBois. Clara resides with her parents. 
Henry G. Hartt is a partner in the firm of 
Colier & Co., dry-goods merchants at Cox- 
sackie, where they carry on a most successful 
business. He married Grace Vanderburg. 



fOHN G. HARTT, brother of Edgar and 
his partner, was born at Norton Hill on 
October 3, 1829. Upon leaving home 
and starting life for himself, he entered the 
employ of Thomas Saxon in South Westerlo. 
From that place he came to Greenville and 
began working for Mr. Bentley, with whom he 
remained for the next nine years, during the 
first three of which he worked for fifty dollars 
a year and found his own clothes. His hours 
were from six o'clock in the morning to nine 
o'clock in the evening, and he often had to 
work until midnight. His motto always was 
that, no matter how small an amount he earned, 
he must save a little; and he always kept to 
it. He left Mr. Bentley to join his brother in 
business, starting, as has been said, in the old 
corner store. 

Mr. Hartt married in 1S59 Jane A. Tall- 
madge, a native of Greenville, N.Y. Her 
father, Henry Tallmadge, a native of Poult- 



338 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ney, Vt, was a physician by profession ; but 
he came to Coxsackie, and engaj^ed in mercan- 
tile business there. He died at the age of 
sixty-three. His wife, whose name before 
marriage was Jane A. Reed, was born in Cox- 
sackie, and died in Greenville at the age of 
seventy-five. She bore him eight children. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hartt have only one child, Ar- 
thur, who is a merchant at Ravena, Albany 
County, this State, and Postma.ster in that 
place. He was in the Greenville Local print- 
ing-office for nine years, and h;is taken an ac- 
tive part in politics. He married Rose Wil- 
sey, and has one son, Harold. 

Both John and Edgar Hartt are prominent 
members of the Republican party in this sec- 
tion. The former has been Town Clerk and 
Assistant Postmaster. Neither has cared for 
public office. Both arc attendants of the Pres- 
byterian church, and their wives and the three 
children of Mr. Edgar Hartt are members of 
the church. The brothers are among the best- 
known men in the county, and command uni- 
versal esteem. 



LIBERT G. ROSEKRAUS, Esq., a 
gencial merchant in Fulton, Schoharie 
County, was born May 5, 1837, in 
Berne, Albany County, a son of Holmes Rose- 
krau.s, M. D. His paternal grandfather, Henry 
Rosekraus, removed from Westerlo, N.Y., to 
Wright, Schoharie County, when in the prime 
of a vigorous manhood, and from that time 
until his death, at the age of fourscore )ears, 
was engaged as a tiller of the soil. His wife. 



whose maiden name was Holmes, also lived to 
be eighty years old, and dying left five chil- 
dren ; namel)', Holmes, Frederick, Henry, 
Phebe P'lansburgh, and Mrs. Hungerford. 

Holmes Rosekraus received his elementary 
education in the common schools of Albany 
County, and after reading medicine for a time 
with competent instructors, entered the Al- 
bany Medical College, from which he was 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. Locating at once in Berne, Albany 
County, he built up a very large practice in 
that town and vicinity, and became one of its 
most successful and favorably known physi- 
cians. After an active practice of thirty 
years, he passed to the higher life, at the age 
of fifty-four. He was deejjly interested in 
local affairs, and served a number of years as 
Town Superintendent. He was a regular at- 
tendant of the Baptist church, of which his 
wife was a consistent member. He married 
Melinda Weidman, one of the three children 
of Jacob Weidman, a prominent farmer of 
Berne. Twelve children were born of this 
union, and six of them survive, namely : 
Jacob; Albert, the special subject of this 
sketch ; James, a professor of music, and a 
minister; Thomas; Washington; and Eliza- 
beth. All of the children are gifted with ex- 
cei)tional musical talent, and all but two are 
quite noted throughout Schoharie County. 
The mother died at the age of seventy-five 
years. 

Albert Rosekraus attended the jjublic schools 
of Berne until ten years old, and then came to 
Middleburg, in this county, where he contin- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



341 



uod his studies at the high school and acad- 
emy, and also woiked for a while as a clerk. 
Going then to Albany, he served an appren- 
ticeship of two years and a half at the printer's 
trade; but, not liking it well enough to con- 
tinue it, he returned to Middleburg, where he 
was subsequently employed as a clerk ten 
years. Coming in 1864 to P^ulton, he bought 
an interest in his present store, and in partner- 
ship with Charles Watson carried on an exten- 
sive business for three years. The partnership 
being then dissolved, he returned to Middle- 
burg, where for the ensuing three years he 
was engaged in mercantile pursuits in the 
store occupying the present site of Wellington 
Bassler's establishment. Disposing of his 
property there, Mr. Rosekraus then bought his 
present store in Fulton, and has since carried 
on a very large and successful business as a 
general merchant. 

In politics he is prominently identified with 
the Democratic party, which he has served 
three years as one of the Democratic County 
Committee. He has been Justice of the Peace 
sixteen years, an office which he still holds, 
his present term not expiring until 1900. He 
has been Town Clerk two terms, and on three 
occasions has received the nomination for 
County Clerk. He was one of the promoters 
of the Fulton Valley Telephone Company, of 
which he has been a stockholder and a director 
several years. Fraternally, he is a member of 
Middleburg Lodge, No. 663, F. & A. M., 
which he assisted in organizing, and he was 
for some years the chorister. He belongs to 
the Reformed church. He has served a num- 



ber of years as a Deacon of the church, and he 
was for a long time the organist and chorister. 
He has also been actively identified with its 
Sunday-school as a teacher and superintendent 
and as the leader of singing. 

In October, 1858, Mr. Rosekraus married 
Margaret Zeh, daughter of Joseph Zeh, a well- 
known farmer and an old and respected resi- 
dent of Seward. She died at the age of three- 
score years, leaving three children, namely: 
Pauline, a teacher in Fulton; Dora, who was 
also a teacher for some years, and now is the 
wife of J. Brewster, a farmer in Seward; and 
Ida, who is the wife of Edwin Lawyer, and has 
one child, Albert. After the death of his first 
wife, Mr. Rosekraus married Mary Follett, 
daughter of John Follett, a cooper, of Fulton, 
their union being solemnized in October, 1897. 



(sTy-LBERT L. KERR, general merchant 
^^ and Postmaster at Haines Falls, N.Y., 
V — ' was born in this village, September 
18, 1862. He is the son of Robert and Mar- 
garet A. (Haines) Kerr. His father was born 
at Tannersville, and his mother was born at 
Haines Falls. His paternal grandfather, 
George Kerr, who was a native of Ireland, 
came to America at the age of fourteen, and 
later settled in Tannersville, where he followed 
farming. George Kerr died at the age of sixty. 
Robert Kerr, father of Albert L., engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in this section when a 
young man, and before the advent of railroads 
ran a stage-coach to Catskill. Since 1891 he 
has resided here summers, and spent his win- 



mOGRArHICAL REVIEW 



ters in New York City. He is now engaged in 
selling Christmas trees, cutting and shipping 
them to the metropolis, where they find a ready 
market. In politics he is a Republican. His 
wife, Margaret A., daughter of Peter B. 
Haines, formerly of this village, is a descend- 
ant of John Haines, who went from Staten 
Island to Putnam County, New York, where 
he died in 1771. Elijah Haines, son of John, 
moved from Putnam County to Greene County 
about the year 1779, as a pioneer, and spent 
the rest of his life here; and her grandfather, 
Edward, who was born in Greene County, New 
York, became a prosperous farmer in this 
county. Peter B. Haines, father of Mrs. Kerr, 
erected the first dwelling on the site of the 
Catskill Mountain House. He followed farm- 
ing. He also carried on a saw-mill, and was 
a useful citizen. He had a family of ten chil- 
dren. Robert and Margaret A. Kerr have two 
children: Gertrude, who married Cornelius H. 
Legg, of Haines Corners; and Albert L., the 
subject of this sketch. The parents were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Albert L. Kerr attended the common schools. 
At the age of twenty he took a clerkship in 
the post-office in this place, and later went to 
Tannersville, where he occupied the same posi- 
tion in the post-office under Mr. Mulford for 
three months (the fall season). In 1888 he- 
engaged in general mercantile business on his 
own account at Haines I'alls; and, the post- 
office having been removed to his store, he 
acted as Postmaster thirteen months. He then 
purchased the building in which he is now 
located. In 1898 he was appointed Post- 



master, and in order to more conveniently 
handle the business, which is largely increased 
during the summer, he erected a special post- 
office building adjoining his store. This office 
transacts a large money order business, has 
eight mails per day, averaging five sacks of 
first-class matter and three of papers; and 
there are two regular mails on Sunday. 

In 1888 Mr. Kerr married Belle B. Brewer, 
daughter of Nathan and Mary (William.s) 
Brewer, of this town. Her grandfather, Sam- 
uel Brewer, was born in Connecticut. Her 
father was a prosperous farmer here, dying at 
the age of seventy ; and her mother, who was 
born in Colchester, N.Y., daughter of Thomas 
Williams, died at the age of forty-three. Na- 
than and Mary Brewer had four children — 
Charlotte, Belle B., Scott, and Mott. Char- 
lotte married Norman Kerr. Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert L. Kerr have had four children, two of 
whom are living: l.ouis A.; and Harold 
Maine, who was born February 15, 1898, a 
day made memorable by the blowing up of the 
battleship "Maine" in Havana Harbor. 

Mr. Kerr is a Republican in politics. He 
attends the Methodist Episcopal church. 



fACOB VAN VALKENBURGH, M.D., 
of Sharon, Schoharie County, N. Y., 
was born in this town, June 13, 1839, 
son of Henry and Olive L. (Roth) Van Valk- 
enburgh. His ancestors were Germans from 
the Lower Palatinate of the Rhine, or Pfalz, 
Germany. They came in the great Palatinate 
e.xodus about 1709. The original surname was 



BIOGRAl'IIICAL REVIEW 



Falkenburg. Some members of the family 
wrote it Valkenburg, and about the beginning 
of the present century it assumed its j^resent 
form, \'an \'alkenburgh. 

Dr. Van Valkenburgh is a lineal descendant 
in the sixth generation of Arnold Van Valken- 
burgh, who came to America accompanied by 
his wife and one son, the latter beiny then 
eight years old. Arnold Van Valkenburgh re- 
sided in Ulster County, New York, from 1709 
to 1713, when he came to Schoharie County, 
and acquired from the Indians a tract of land. 
His son, John Joseph Van Valkenburgh, also 
resided in this county. The latter, who was 
the great-great-grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, ser%'ed in the French and Indian 
War as an Ensign. He was also a private in 
Colonel Kilian Van Rensselaer's regiment 
in the Revolutionary War, and acted as a 
scout. He had three sons — Adam, Joachim, 
and Joseph. The second son, Joachim, was 
shot by an Indian at Jefferson Lake in this 
county. 

The third Joseph, who was Dr. Van Valk- 
enburgh 's great-grandfather, was born in 1744. 
He and his two brothers served in the Revo- 
lutionary War as privates in a regiment com- 
manded by Colonel Peter Vrooman. Joseph 
Van Valkenburgh was the first of the family to 
locate in Sharon. The farm he cleared is now 
owned by John J. Van Valkenburgh, a distant 
relative of Dr. Jacob Van Valkenburgh. The 
log house of the pioneer stood about one mile 
from his great-grandson's residence. Joseph 
Van Valkenburgh married iMagdaline Brown, 
who was born in 1742. Their children were : 



Lana, Merie, Eve, Adam, John Joseph, Eliza- 
beth, Nancy, I'eter, Merie (second), Margaret, 
Jacob, Joachim, and Henry. Joseph, the 
father, died March 28, 181 5. 

John Joseph \'an Valkenburgh, second, the 
Doctor's grandfather, was born in Schoharie, 
July 23, 1771. The greater 'part of his life 
was spent in Sharon, where he owned a well- 
cultivated farm of one hundred and forty-four 
acres. He was one of the founders of the Bel- 
linger sect, being a Calvinist in religious be- 
lief. Of reserved disposition, he held aloof 
from public affairs. During the War of 1812 
he was drafted ; but, being unable to go to the 
front, he furnished a substitute. He died on 
his birthday, July 23, 1S55. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary Bender, was born in 
Bethlehem, Albany County, N. Y. , October 
13, 1776, and died June 4, i860. Their 
children were: Henry, Lana, Christian, Will- 
iam, Maria, John, Joseph, Stephen, and Eliza- 
beth. Joseph served in the Mexican War, 
was wounded at the battle of Chepultepec, and 
subsequently drew a pension. 

Henr>' Van Valkenburgh, Dr. \'an Valken- 
burgh 's father, was born in Sharon, May 14, 
1798. He belonged to the Bellinger church, 
of which he was Elder for many years. Study- 
ing theology, he became an evangelist, in 
which capacity he was widely known through- 
out New York and New Jersey. He left the 
homestead after his first marriage, but contin- 
ued to make general farming his chief occupa- 
tion. He died in this town, April iS, 1866. 
For his first wife he married Rachael Blcom- 
ingdale, who was born June 19, 1803, and who 



344 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



died April 26, 1835, leaving one son, Henry 
H. The latter, when fifteen years old, went 
to reside with a bachelor uncle in the town of 
North Greenbush, Rensselaer County, N.Y. , 
whose property he afterward inherited ; and he 
became a prosperous farmer and dairyman. 
He married, and at his death left five children. 
For his second wife Henry Van Valkenburgh 
married Olive L. Roth, who was born in Mas- 
sachusetts, July 31, 1 8 10, daughter of Joseph 
Roth. She was a descendant of John Roth, 
an Engli-shman, who was the progenitor of a 
long line of physicians and surgeons of Ux- 
bridge, England. Some of her brothers were 
well known as bridge-builders and mechanics. 
She was given a good education, and was par- 
ticularly proficient in vocal music. She was 
reared a Calvinist in religion. She died Au- 
gust 23, 1874, having been the mother of four 
children — Jacob, Albert A., Joseph, and Em- 
ily. Albert A., who was a farmer, enlisted 
in Company E, Forty-third Regiment, New 
York Volunteers, with which he served in the 
Civil War for two years, at the end of that 
time being assigned to the invalid corps. He 
died soon after his return from the army. 
Joseph, who is a merchant in Canby, Minn., 
is married, and has a family of five children. 
Emily became the wife of David Ottman, of 
Cobleskill. 

Jacob Van Valkenburgh began his education 
in the district schools, and at a later date stud- 
ied the classics and high mathematics under 
the direction of a private tutor. He afterward 
attended the Troy Academy, then presided 
over by Professor Wilson; and his classical 



studies were completed at the Hartwick Semi- 
nary. He taught school for a time, and also 
studied theology and medicine, with the view 
of becoming a missionary, but finally gave his 
whole attention to medicine. Beginning the 
study of that profession with Dr. William H. 
Parsons, an eclectic physician of Sharon, 
N.Y., he later received instruction from Dr. 
Robert Plldredge, and acquired a knowledge 
of botanic medicine under Dr. John Praymer. 
He also studied two years with Dr. J. S. Her- 
rick, an allopathic physician of Argusville, 
N.Y. ; and he received his degree from the 
Eclectic Medical College of Philadelphia, 
Pa., known as the Paine School, January 22, 
1862. Locating in Charleston, N.Y. , in 
April of that year, during the first five years 
of his practice he was obliged to contend 
against the animosity then existing between 
the eclectic and regular schools of medicine; 
but the skill he displayed in his profession at 
length gained for him the recognition of his 
opponents, and he has since received honorary 
degrees from two medical colleges. In 1867 
he moved from Charleston to Sharon, where he 
has a lucrative practice. 

Dr. Van Valkenburgh was one of the organ- 
izers of the Eclectic Medical Society of the 
State of New York, being one of the charter 
members named in the article of incorporation 
by the legislature of the State. He was corre- 
sponding secretary of the society, and served 
on various committees. He was also one of 
the organizers of the Twenty-third Senatorial 
District Medical Society, now known as the 
Susquehanna District Medical Society, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



was one of its censors. He has been health 
officer many years, acts as a Notary I'ublic, 
anil was a trustee of Slate Hill Cemetery. 
He was a trustee of the public school in his 
village for many years. He delivers extem- 
poraneous address on public occasions, on 
patriotic, educational, or religious subjects; 
frequently lectures to various societies, and 
writes for the medical and secular j^ress. A 
book -lover and a close student from his boy- 
hood, he has gathered a large library, to which 
he makes additions every year. Never idle, 
he employs each moment in some useful occu- 
pation. He owns a farm, and is out of debt. 
In politics he was formerly a Republican, but 
supported the candidacy of William J. Bryan 
in 1896. While now a Populist, he loyally 
supports President McKinley and Governor 
Roosevelt. 

Dr. Van Valkenburgh married Harriet 
Moulton, daughter of Gordon Moulton, of 
Lykers, Montgomery County, N. Y. , and of 
English ancestry. Mrs. Van Valkenburgh, 
who was a teacher in the public schools, died 
May 31, 1892. She was the mother of four 
children, namely : Emma, widow of Irving A. 
Parsons; Minnie, who married Charles Van 
Home; Moulton, wdio died at the age of 
twenty months; and Flora, who resides at 
home with her father. The daughters are all 
graduates of the Cobleskill High School, and 
the first and second were teachers prior to their 
marriage. 

Dr. Van Valkenburgh assisted in building 
the Methodist Episcopal church, which stands 
on land given by him for that purpose. He 



has served as steward and trustee and as suijcr- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. He is also a 
class leader, and acts as janitor without fee or 
reward. He is a Master Mason, having been 
a member for thirty years, or since 1869, of 
Cobleskill Lodge, No. 394, F. & A. M. 



DWARD A. GIFFORD, the well-known 
lawyer of Athens, N. Y. , for si.\ 
years District Attorney, was born in this town 
on December 22, 1856. He is a son of Al- 
fred and Christina (Hollenbeck) Gifford, and 
grandson of Joseph Gifford, late a farmer in 
Rensselaerville, N. Y. His grandfather died 
at the age of seventy-four, and his grand- 
mother died at the age of eighty. Their chil- 
dren were : John, Rufus, Abraham, Warren, 
Alfred, Margaret, Sophia, James, and Jere- 
miah. 

Alfred Gifford was born in Rensselaerville, 
Albany County, and was reared on a farm 
there. Coming to Greene County in 1868, he 
settled in New Baltimore, where he remained 
ten years. After that he was in Coxsackie for 
ten years, and he then went on the road as 
agent for the Capitol City Iron Works Com- 
pany of Albany. He has travelled all over 
the country in the interests of their business. 
His political principles are Republican. He 
and his wife are members of the Christian 
church, and reside in Philadelphia, Pa. Mrs. 
Gifford's parents were Abraham and Jane (Van 
Horsen) Hollenbeck, both of Dutch ancestry; 
and her paternal grandparents were Casper and 
Christina Hollenbeck. H^r father was for 



346 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



many years one of the promiiK'nt men of 
Athens. He had several chiUlren. Alfred 
and Christina Gifford are the i)arents of five 
sons — Lawrence 1"'., lulward A., h'rederick 
W., George K, antl William L. (".enrj;e B. 
and Lawrence F. Gifford are in I'liihidelphia. 
William L. and Frederick \V. Gifford reside 
in Boston, Mass. 

Kdward A. Gifford was reared on a farm, 
and received his elementary education in the 
common .schools, suhscquently continuing; his 
studies at home. I'^arly in life he formed the 
resolve to achieve a prosperous career. He 
obtained a legal clerkship in the office of J. 
Washington Hiseerd, of Co.xsackie, and during 
his three years' stay there gained much valua- 
ble knowledge and experience. He then en- 
tered the Law Department of Union Univer- 
sity at Albany, N.Y. ; and on January 25, 
1884, four months before his graduation there- 
from, he was admitted to the bar in Albany, 
passing a brilliant examination. Three years 
later, after successful practice of his profession 
in New York City, he abandoned it in order to 
accept a position as superintendent and general 
passenger agent and excursion agent of the 
Seneca Falls & Cayuga Lake Railroad Com- 
pany, and of the Cayuga Lake Park Company 
at .Seneca Falls, this State. These offices he 
held until October, 1889; and the following 
month he again took up the practice of law, 
settling in Athens. 

In November, 1892, he was elected District 
Attorney, being the second Republican to hold 
that office in Greene County. Re-elected in 
189s, he served until 1S98, a period of six 



years in all. As District Attorney, Mr. Gif- 
ford won a high rejiutation for ability and con- 
scientious devotion to official duty. He con- 
ducted without assistance the prosecution of 
George W. Hess, indicted for murder in the 
second degree for the killing of Hezekiah 
Iredell (a cidorcd man) ; also of I'asquale Ca- 
serta, who was tried for murder in the second 
degree for the killing of his cousin, Joseph 
Caserta. In the first case he had against him 
the Hon. Jacob H. Chute and the Hon. Eu- 
gene Burlingame, of Albany, but secured the 
conviction of Hess. In the second case the 
accused was defended by Egbert Palmer, Jlsq., 
of Catskill; but again Mr. Gifford won his case, 
and convicted Caserta of murder in the second 
degree, as charged in the indictment. Both 
cases excited great public interest, and rank 
among the most celebrated criminal cases ever 
tried in Greene County. Mr. Gifford is at the 
present time attorney for the Union Commer- 
cial Co-operative Bank of Albany, for the town 
of Athens. 

Mr. Gifford was married on June 22, 1881, 
to Ella J. Porter, of Athens, eldest daughter of 
Clark and Charlotte C. (Mead) Porter. Her 
paternal grandfather was Israel R. Porter, who 
died in 1874; and her maternal grandfather was 
Daniel Mead. Clark Porter was born in Scho- 
harie County, but in childhood moved with his 
parents to a farm in the town of Athens, where 
he still resides. He is a prominent towns- 
man, having been Supervisor, Inspector of 
F^lections, and for fifteen or twenty years As- 
sessor. They had a family of seven children; 
namely, Ella J. (Mrs. Gifford), Clark I., 




.\.\1)K1'.\V RA'VM( 



UIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



349 



Oliver G., Lottie C, Addison \V., Will 
and J. Melvin. All arc liviii- o 
William. 

I\Ir. Cifford is a member of the Kiii-li 
I'ythias Lodge, No. 129, of Athens, and G 
Master of the Exchequer of the Grand L 
of the Knights of Pythias of the State of 
York. He is also a member of the Cat 
Tribe of Red Men, and of the l^oard of T 
of Athens, and is vice-president of the 1 
trie Light Company of his town. 



:cept 

ts of 
rand 
odge 
New 
skill 



iF.v. andrp:w van vranken 

RAYMOND, D.D., LL.D, president 
of Union University, Schenectady, 
was born at Vischer's Ferry, Saratoga County, 
N.Y. , August 8, 1854, son of the Rev. Henry 
Augustus and Catharine M. Raymond. On 
the paternal side he is descended from a long 
line of American ancestors of English origin, 
the first of whom crossed the Atlantic in 1629. 
The grandfather was Clapp Raymond, a native 
of Norwalk, Conn. 

The Rev. Henry Augustus Raymond, the 
father, was born in Patterson, Putnam County, 
N. Y., May 30, 1804. He was graduated at 
Yale University with the class of 1825; and, 
entering the ministry, he labored in the Dutch 
Reformed churches in New York State during 
the greater part of his active period. 

Andrew Van Vranken Raymond completed 
the regular course of study at the Troy High 
School in 1871, was graduated from Union 
College in 1775, and from the New Bruns- 
wick Theological Seminary in 1S78. His 



initial call was t<i the l-'irst Reformed 
Cluirch in I'aterson, N.J., where he remained 
frnm 1S78 to 18.S1. He occupied the inil- 
pit of Trinity Reformed Church, I'lainlicUl, 
N.J., for the succeeding six years; and, ac- 
cepting a call to the pastorate of tlie ]M)urth 
Presbyterian Church, Albany, he labored in 
that city for se\'en \cars, or until 1894. He 
was the ninth pastor of that church, and the 
fifth occupant of its pulpit to be selected for 
college work, having been chosen president 
of Union University in 1894. He was hon- 
ored by his Alma Mater with the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity in 1887 and by Williams 
College with that of Doctor of Laws in 1894. 
He was elected moderator of the Presbyterian 
Synod of New York in 1891; was a commis- 
sioner to the General Assembly of the Presby- 
terian church for the years 1888, 1891, and 
1893. He belongs to the Phi Beta Kappa and 
the Alpha Delta Phi Societies. 



eR E. PELHAM, proprietor of "The 
Kenwood," at Haines Falls, town 
of Hunter, Greene County, N. Y., was born 
near Palenville, this county, August 30, 1863, 
son of Snyder and Christina (Saxe) Pelham. 
His parents are natives of the sanie town, 
and his grandfather, Peter Pelham, was a 
lifelong resident of the vicinity of Palen- 
ville. His father learned the trade of a black- 
smith, which he followed near Palenville many 
years, and he is still living at his former place 
of business. He is a Republican in politics. 
His wife, Christina, was a daughter of Jere- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



miah Saxe, a farmer near Palenville. She 
is the mother of four sons, all of whom are 
living; namely, Jeremiah P., Harvey C, 
Elmer E., and Adam A. The parents attend 
the Reformed church. 

Elmer E. Pelham was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town, and remained 
at home until sixteen years of age. He then 
came to the Haines Falls House, where he was 
employed for twelve years, and at the expira- 
tion of that time he erected the present house, 
known as "The Kenwood," situated near the 
Haines Corners railroad station. It is located 
on high ground, is equipped with all modern 
improvements, and has accommodations for 
fifty people. Mr. Pelham has been in the 
boarding business nearly ten years, has been 
successful, and is well known throughout the 
county. 

In 1888 Mr. Pelham was united in marriage 
with Elida F. Fatum, daughter of Henry 
Fatum, of Saugerties, N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pelham have one son, Fred E. 



"CiDU'ARD ADAIMS, wholesale and retail 
X !l ^ dealer in meat at Haines Falls, N. Y., 
was born in Durham, Greene County, February 
I, 1838, son of Seymour and Maria (Chidister) 
AdanLs. His grandfather, Joseph Adams, who 
was a native of Connecticut and of English 
descent, carried on a farm in the vicinity of 
Hartford when a young man, later moving to 
Durham, near Cornwallville, where he spent 
some years, and then settled on a farm in 
Cairo, where he died at the advanced age of 



ninety-seven years. Grandfather's wife, with 
whom he lived for over seventy years, died at 
the age of ninety-nine years and six months. 
She was the mother of five children. 

Seymour Adams, father of Edward, was born 
in Hartford, Conn., and was educated in the 
common schools. He began to support him- 
self by conducting a farm on shares, later 
coming to Cairo, where he purchased a piece 
of property and rented it to the agricultural 
society. He was engaged in business in the 
village of Cairo for a time, and on relinquish- 
ing that he gave his whole attention to his 
farm, which was devoted to dairy purposes. 
For forty-four years he supplied the Catskill 
Mountain House with poultry, butter, and 
eggs. In politics he usually voted the Repub- 
lican ticket, and was well known throughout 
the county. He was a charter member of the 
Masonic lodge in Cairo. His wife, Maria, 
was a daughter of William Chidister, of Kiska- 
tom. Her father was a farmer, and in early 
life owned the property which was later pur- 
chased by her husband. The last years of his 
life were spent in retirement at Cairo, where he 
died at the age of eighty-two. Seymour and 
Maria C. Adams were the parents of five chil- 
dren ; namely, Edward, Emily, William, Eliz- 
abeth, and Eliza. Emily married William 
Lewis, of Cairo, N. Y. ; William resides in 
Rensselaer County, New York; and Eliza died 
at the age of thirty-five. 

Edward Adams was educated in the common 
schools. He worked on a farm in Acra until 
his marriage, when he purchased a farm in 
Cairo, on which he followed farming until 



BIOGRAPIIICAL REVIEW 



1870. In that year he came to his present lo- 
cation, three and one-half miles from Tanners- 
ville, on the Little Delaware Turnpike, and 
started in the meat business, having as a sole 
customer the Catskill Mountain House, which 
he has supplied for the past twenty-eight years. 
As the hotels increased in number, he added 
to his list of patrons the Laurel House, the 
Hotel Kaaterskill, and others, his business 
becoming extensive. He supplied in 1898 
two hundred and thirty-two hotels and board- 
ing-houses, selling in five Saturdays, from 
July 30 to August 27, forty-four thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-seven pounds of meat. 
He runs three two-horse and two one-horse 
wagons, and employs seventeen men. He 
buys the choicest cuts of beef, slaughtered for 
him in New York, and uses about two carloads 
per week. He kills all the lamb and veal on 
his own premises, employing a buyer of live 
stock on the road, and keeps from ten to twelve 
tons of beef on hand at all times during the 
summer, his two refrigerators holding five hun- 
dred tons of ice. By adhering to the prin- 
ciple of fair dealing he has built up this large 
trade unaided. His residence, barn, ice-house, 
slaughter-house, and refrigerators were built 
under his personal supervision. He keeps ten 
horses and five wagons for delivering his meat. 
He also owns a farm of one hundred acres. 

In 1859 Mr. Adams married Adelia A. 
Crary, a native of Delaware County, adopted 
daughter of Jacob Craft. They have three 
children: Jennie and Jessie, twins; and Ida 
May. Jennie married George White, a hotel- 
keeper near East Durham, N.Y., son of Will- 



iam White; and she has one son, Edward. 
Jessie married Sherwood H. Camp, a carpen- 
ter in Catskill, N. Y. , son of Harmon Camp, 
formerly of Windham, N.Y. , and has one 
daughter, Edna. Ida May married Joscjili 
Hand, of New York Cit)', formerly manager <jf 
Marlboro Hotel and now clerk for a broker in 
Wall Street. They have three children — Eva, 
Florence, and Joseph. 

Mr. Adams is a Democrat in politics, and 
takes an active interest in political matters. 
He was Supervisor one term in Cairo, but re- 
fused a renomination. He is a charter mem- 
ber of Kademak Lodge, No. 693, F. & A. M., 
was Junior Warden when the lodge was first 
established, and is one of the few now living 
who organized the lodge. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Royal Arch Masons. He is liberal 
in his religious belief and a strict obsen-er of 
Sunday as a day of rest. 



iHARLES H. RAMSEY, president of 
the Howe's Cave Association, was 
born in Lawyersville, N.Y. , on Jan- 
uary 3, 1853, son of the Hon. Joseph Henry 
and Sarah (Boyce) Ramsc}-. He comes from 
a line of able and honest men and stanch Re- 
publicans. His great-great-grandfather was 
one of the pioneer settlers of Schoharie 
County. Frederick Ramsey, his grandfather, 
was born in Guilderland, and worked there for 
a time at his trade, which was that of black- 
smith. He subsequently settled on a farm in 
Cobleskill, where he spent the rest of his life, 
attaining the age of seventy-eight years. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



died at the home of one of his daughters. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Sarah \'an 
Schaick, lived to the advanced a.L;e of ninety- 
four. She was a native of this county, and a 
devoted member of the Methodist church. Of 
their ten children, seven daughters and one 
son are living, the latter being Robert Ram- 
sey, of Argusville. 

The Hon. Joseph Henry Ramsey, f(jr many 
years a leading citizen of Schoharie Count)-, 
was born in the town of Sharon on January 
29, 1816, and died in Ma)-, i iS94. He studied 
law with Jedediah Miller, and was admitted to 
practise in all the courts of the State in 1 S40. 
Subsequent to this, he continued for some time 
in Mr. Miller's office, and eventually suc- 
ceeded to his practice; hut he afterward re- 
m(jved his office to Law)ersville, where lie 
remained until his removal to Albany in 1863. 
In 185s he re])resented the Northern Assembly 
Di.strict, having as his colleague from tiie 
Southern District, Wilkinson W'ilsey. This 
was the last time the county was represented 
by two members. In the fall of that year he 
was sent as a delegate to the Whig State Con- 
vention, and was made a member also of the 
Joint Convention, comjiosed of the members of 
the Whig Convention and a State convention 
of Free Soil Democrats, which formed the Re- 
publican party in this .State. This was fol- 
lowed by his election to the .State .Senate tiie 
same year, as a Republican from the .Seven- 
teenth Senatorial District, which comprised 
Schoharie and Delaware Counties. In 1866 
he was nominated as a candidate for Congiess, 
but failed of election. In 1871, 1872, and 



1S73 he was a delegate from Albany to the 
Re|)ublican .State Convention, and also a mem- 
ber of the Republican State Committee. He 
took an active part against Judge Barnard, who 
made the order in favor of Gould and Fisk, 
and secured his imjieachment by the Senate, 
and the passage of a decree forbidding the 
judge to hold further office under the civil 
government. 

Joseph H. Ramsey was a well-known rail- 
road man, having been officially connected 
with a number of important roads. Prior to 
1858 he was active in securing subscription 
for the building of the Albany & Susque- 
hanna Railroad, and showed himself so efficient 
that in 1858 he was chosen director and vice- 
president of the company. This comj^any was 
organized in 1852; stock had been subscribed 
along the line and at Albany to the amount of 
a million dollars; and the city of Albany had 
been authorized to loan the company, on cer- 
tain conditions, another million dollars of its 
bonds. Work had already begun at different 
]ioints in Albany, Schoharie, Otsego, and 
Hroome Counties, but an une.\]5ected revulsion 
occurrctl in railroad affairs, which rendered it 
difficult to secure furtlier funds. This created 
an uneasy feeling among the stockholders, and 
they were glad to accept a proposal made by 
the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, by 
which the Canal Comjiany assumed the pay- 
ment of the principal and interest of the 
bonded debt of the road, and the original 
stockholders were to receive semi-annual divi- 
dends of seven per cent, jjer annum. As this 
was a virtual sale of the road and its franchises 



lUOGRAl'IIICAI, KKVIKW 



to the Canal Company, Mr. Ramsey and others 
of the directors were opposed to it. 'lliey 
would have preferred to keep it indeiiendent of 
any eoal or other company, to have liberal 
rates for transportation in order to have con- 
tracted upon the line the largest amount of 
business possible, and to have the orii^inal 
stockholders reap the full benefits accruing. 
As few roads in the State have been better 
paying property, it is seen to-day that his 
judgment was correct. After the execution of 
the lease, Mr. Coe F. Young, the general 
manager of the Canal Company, was elected 
president of the road in place of Mr. Ramsey. 
The latter was also president of the New York 
& Albany Railroad Company, and, subsequent 
to the death of the Hon. lu'astus Corning, 
president of the Albany Iron Manufacturing 
Company. The furnances of the last-named 
company in Albany were built during his in- 
cumbency. Mr. Joseph H. Ramsey was also 
president of the Howe's Cave Cement Com- 
pany. His wife, who was born in Sharon and 
died in 1S92, at the age of seventy-six, was 
one of seven children born to Daniel Boyce, 
farmer and miller of Shirley, and the grand- 
daughter on her mother's side of Colonel Rice 
of Revolutionary fame. Of Mrs. Ramsey's 
seven children, three arc living, namely: Har- 
riet, who is the wife of the Rev. I'ascal nar- 
rower, pastor of the Episcopal church at West 
New Brighton, Long Island; Frances, who 
married Dr. H. A. Crar}' ; and Charles H. 
Ramsey. 

Charles H. Ramsey fitted for college at 
Williamstovvn, Mass. He was graduated at 



Cornell University in I.S74, and from the Al- 
bany Law School in 1^75, and the following 
year was admitted to tlic bar. Shortly after 
he came to Howe's (!a\'e as secretary of the 
company, which had then just started. Upon 
the death of his father he was made jircsident. 
He has watched the growth of the plant, and 
has been closely identified with its develop- 
ment. It is now one of the leading industries 
of the county, and when running full time 
employs one hundred and fifty men. Large 
quantities of lime, cement, and plaster are 
manufactured ; also building stone. 

Mr. Ramsey was married in May, 1879, to 
Annie E. Stevens, who was born in Sloanes- 
ville. daughter of Mark W. and Lucy (Phelps) 
Stevens. Her father, who died at the age of 
si.xty-eight, was the president of Schoharie 
County Bank, and a very prominent man in 
his section. Her mother died when Mrs. 
Ramsey was twelve years old. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ramsey have four children — Margaret, Jo.seph 
H., Mark W. , and Charles H. 

Mr. Ramsey is a man of very varied busi- 
ness interests. He is director in the Scho- 
harie and Otsego Insurance Company, of 
Cobleskill; president of the New York & 
Canadian Pacific Railroad, which runs from 
Ogdensburg to New York ; trustee of the 
Cobleskill Cemeter)-, and member of the 
Schoharie County Historical Society. He is 
an attendant of the Reformed church, while 
his wife is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. F'raternally, he is a member of the 
Masonic Lodge of Cobleskill, and of John L. 
Lewis Chapter; also of the Kappa Alpha, 



mOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which is the oldest colle^^e society in exist- 
ence. As mi^'ht be expected, his political 
principles are Republican. 



R. A. W. CLARK, a skilful dental 
practitioner and graduate optician, 
of Jefferson, Schoharie County, the 
founder and for some years editor and pub- 
lisher of the Jfff'crsoiiiaii, now known as the 
Jefferson Coiiriti; was born in Blenheim, 
N. Y. , August 20, 1843, son of John A. and 
Catherine (Van der Vort) Clark. 

His paternal grandfather, Randall Clark, 
came to this country from Rhode Island and 
settled in IMenheim, where he became quite 
an extensive farmer and land-owner. Randall 
Clark married Phoebe Dorcas Tucker, and his 
children were: Benjamin, Eliza, Alfred, John 
A., Stephen, Lucinda, Charles, Mary J., Will- 
iam, and Hilmer. Of these the only survivor 
is Eliza, who is residing in Rhode Island. 
Hilmer died while still young, and the other 
sons all engaged in farming. 

John A. Clark, Dr. Clark's father, came to 
this county when a boy, and was reared at the 
homestead which he occupied in part until his 
death. He was prosperous as a general 
farmer, and at one time owned about three 
hundred and fifty acres of land. Politically, 
he was in his later years a Republican. He 
attended the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
was an earnest advocate of temperance. He 
lived to be sixty-six years old, and his wife 
survived him ten years. They were the par- 
ents of nine children, namely: A. W. Clark, 



the subject of this sketch; Alzada, wife of 
C. B. Atwood, a lawyer of Watertown, Conn. ; 
Lindon, a resident of Blenheim; Le Grand 
and La Grange, twins, both of whom live at 
the homestead; Fremont, who resides in 
Delhi, N.V. ; John J., also a resident of that 
town ; Ida, who married W. L. Cranch, and 
resides at Thompson, Conn.; and Ida Ursula, 
who died when about six years old. 

A. W. Clark pursued his elementary studies 
in the common schools of Blenheim, and ad- 
vanced in learning by attending the Stamford 
Seminary. After leaving school he went to 
Auburn, N.Y., with a view of engaging in 
business, but at the solicitation of Dr. A. A. 
Wood, who was then practising in Jefferson, 
he began the study of medicine in that doc- 
tor's office, and continued it for eighteen 
months. Failing health caused him to relin- 
quish his studies, and while resting he deter- 
mined to abandon medicine for dentistry. He 
accordingly became a student in the ofifice of 
Dr. H. S. Wood, of Stamford, with whom he 
made rapid progress, and in 1866 he began 
the practice of his profession in Jefferson, 
where he has since resided. An experience 
of over thirty years has given opportunities 
for acquiring a varied knowledge of dentistry, 
and his business is both large and profitable. 
He has availed himself of all modern improve- 
ments in the way of appliances. He is a 
graduate of the National College of Electro- 
therapeutics, Lima, Ohio, which college con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Master of 
Electro-therapeutics (M.E.). He deals in 
dentists' supplies, and has travelled consider- 



lilOGRArillCAL REVIEW 



3SS 



ably in the interests of tliis branch of his 
business. 

In 1871 Ur. Clark purchased a small job 
printing-office for the purpose of devoting his 
leisure moments to some useful employment, 
and engaged in the printing of small hand- 
bills, letter-heads, etc. He was shortly after- 
ward requested by his fellow-townsmen to es- 
tablish a newspaper, which he agreed to do 
provided a sufficient sum was raised to pur- 
chase a press. Although but half the neces- 
sary amount was subscribed, he determined to 
see the scheme through ; and, making up the 
deficiency from his own pocket, he bought the 
desired machinery. Without knowledge or 
experience, he entered upon his new enter- 
prise, to which he gave every moment of 
time that could possibly be spared from 
his professional duties; and as a result of 
his indefatigable labors the initial number of 
the Jcffcrsouian, the first newspaper ever 
issued in Jefferson, was delivered to the 
people on March 6, 1S72. The paper was a 
success from the start, and its subsequent en- 
largement was made necessary to meet the de- 
mands of local advertisers. For about nine 
years its founder continued to edit and pub- 
lish the Jcffosonian, which, under his man- 
agement, performed its mission in an able 
manner. He contributed much valuable mat- 
ter in connection with the publication of the 
Roscoe History of Schoharie County, and has 
since written for publication in the Jefferson 
Courier considerable historic matter, col- 
lected as far back as 1730, pertaining to the 
history of Schoharie County and the border 



wars of New York, giving a detailed narrative 
of many tragic scenes enacted on the frontiers 
of New York. He is now engaged in collect- 
ing dates and writing the liistory of the Clark 
family. 

Dr. Clark married Sarah A. Phincle, 
daughter of William anil Anna (Toles) 
Phincle. They have had two children : Sarah, 
who died in infancy; and La Mancha, who 
was graduated at the Pennsylvania College of 
Dental Surgery at Philadelphia in 1898, that 
college conferring upon him the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery. He stood high in 
his class of one hundred and eight, of which 
he was the youngest. He married Florence 
Lilian Lee, of Glen Castle, N.Y., on Febru- 
ary 8, 1S99. He is a fine operator, gold fil- 
lings and crown and bridge work being his 
specialty. The young Doctor is now asso- 
ciated with his father in a large and successful 
practice. 

As a progressive, public-spirited citizen the 
Doctor takes an active interest in public im- 
provements, and is a stockholder in the water- 
works. He belongs to the Masonic order and 
other organizations, and frequently attends 
the meetings of the State Dental Society. 
The family are all members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



WILLARD "Lh 
progressive 



LARKIN, a practical and 
farmer of Schoharie, 
N. Y. , was born at Central Bridge, Schoharie 
County, October 3, i860, son of John W. and 
Nancy M. (Enders) Larkin. His paternal 



3S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



grandfather, Daniel Larkin, a native of Rhode 
Island, was one of the pioneer settlers of 
Central Brid<;e, where he settled in early life, 
and prior to his death, at the age of seventy 
years, hud redeemed a good farm from the 
forest. He was a strong Republican in poli- 
tics, very influential in public affairs, and 
served several years as County Sheriff, being 
the only Republican in the county ever elected 
to that office. His second wife, Nancy Boyd, 
bore him three children, one of whom was 
Jdhn \V., the father above named. Both 
Daniel Larkin and his wife Nancy were mem- 
bers of the Reformed church, in which he held 
most of the offices. 

John W. Larkin completed his education at 
the Charlotteville Academy, and subsequently 
assisted in the care of the old homestead, 
which came into his possession after the death 
of his parents. He was a very energetic and 
thrifty farmer, successful in his undertakings, 
and he addetl to the imjirovements of the es- 
tate the fine set of buildings now standing. 
He died in the prime of life, at the age of 
fifty-six years. An unswerving Republican in 
politics, he served as Supervisor during four 
terms of one year each, at one time being 
chairman of the board, the only Republican 
in the county to hold a similar office. I'or 
several years he was one of the trustees of the 
Lutheran church, to which he and his wife be- 
longed, and he was also a valued worker :n 
the Sunday-school. He married Nancy M. 
EnJers, daughter f)f Peter I. lenders, an ex- 
tensive farmer and land-owner of Central 
Bridge. Of the six children born of their 



union four are now living, as follows: Will- 
ard, the subject of this sketch; Daniel; Mary 
K., wife of Frederick R. Farquher; and 
Delia B., wife of Robert S. Arcularius, of 
Brooklyn, N.Y. The mother died at the age 
of forty-six years. 

VVillard Larkin received his education in 
the common schools and at the Schoharie and 
the Claverack Academies. Returning to the 
parental home, he assisted in the farm work 
for several years, and helped to erect the pres- 
ent farm buildings. When ready to establish 
a home of his own, he bought his present farm 
of one hundred and five or more acres, which 
by judicious toil and superior management he 
has made one of the most valuable and attrac- 
tive estates in this section of the county. A 
few years ago he rebuilt the house, barn, and 
out-buildings, which are commodious and well 
equipped. Since the death of his mother Mr. 
Larkin has managed the homestead property 
in connection with his own farm, having now 
the charge of two hundreil and twenty-five 
acres of land, which he devotes to general 
farming, stock-raising, and dairying. In pol- 
itics he is a strong Republican, and in 1896 
was elected Commissioner of Highways for a 
term of two years. 

On November 29, 1881, Mr. Larkin mar- 
ried Ruth H. Hoag, who was born in Sloans- 
ville, Schoharie County, daughter of John I. 
and Mary (Carr) Hoag. Her grandfather, 
David Hoag, was one of the earliest pioneers 
of that village, where he was long engaged in 
clearing and cultivating the land. He at- 
tained the age of eighty-nine years. John I. 




Cl.AKKNCE li. ULnolKUJUlJ. 



BIOGRArUlCAL REVIEW 



359 



Hoag carried on farming on the old home 
farm until his death, March 20, 1898. His 
wife, Mary, was born in Carlisle, and was one 
of the fourteen children of John and Eliza 
(Sweetman) Carr, seven of whom are still liv- 
ing. Ten children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Hoag. The two now living are: Mrs. 
Larkin; and her brother, George W. Hoag, a 
merchant in Sloansville. Their mother died 
at the age of fifty-si.x years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Larkin's only child, John H., 
died when eleven years old. Mr. Larkin and 
his wife are prominent members of the 
Lutheran church at Central Bridge, of which 
he is treasurer, and both are teachers in the 
Sunday-school, in which Mr. Larkin has been 
superintendent for si.x years. Mrs. Larkin is 
president of the Home and Foreign Mission- 
ary Society of Hartwick Synod; and Mr. 
Larkin has been president of the County 
Union of the Christian Endeavor Society for 
five years, attending four meetings each year 
in different parts of the county. In 1S95 he 
went as a delegate to the convention in 
Cleveland. Mrs. Larkin is a member of the 
local W. C. T. U. 



,LARENCE E. BLOODGOOD, of the 
firm of Bloodgood & Tallmadge, Cats- 
kill's well-known attorneys, was 
born in Jewett on February 3, 1S49, son of 
Jason and Lucinda (Coe) Bloodgood. His 
father, who is now, at the age of eighty-four, 
living retired in the village of Hensonville, 
is the grandson of William Bloodgood, one of 



the pioneer settlers of Conesvillc, Schoharie 
County, coming to that place from New Jer- 
sey and originally from Long Island. 

William Bloodgood fought for American in- 
dependence in the Revolutionary War. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Mary Dingle, 
was from New England. She died in 1833, 
surviving her husband si.xteen years, his death 
having occurred in 1817. Their son, Lewis, 
the ne.xt in line of descent, was born in Scho- 
harie County, and spent his life there in the 
town of Conesville, engaged in farming. He 
married Catherine Califf. He died about 
1 82 1, when his son Jason was a lad of si.x 
years. 

Jason Bloodgood began his working life 
when very young. He was engaged for a 
number of years at farming and lumbering in 
his native town, and then he removed to a farm 
in Jewett, where he remained until 18S7. 
Since that time he has resided in Hensonville. 
He is a Democrat in politics. His wife, Mrs. 
Lucinda C. Bloodgood, died in 1893. She 
was born in Jewett on October i, 1809, being 
the daughter of Justus and Ruth (Bailey) Coe 
and one of a family of six children. Her 
father was born in Goshen, Conn., and came to 
Jewett in the early days of its settlement, find- 
ing his way thither by means of marked trees. 
There he spent the remainder of his days, 
making his home at first in a tiny log cabin 
and having but the barest necessities of life. 
He was a Deacon in the Presbyterian church, 
which he helped to build, and one of its active 
supporters throughout his life. He died at 
the age of eighty-four, and his wife died at the 



360 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



age of sixty-five. None of their se\eii chil- 
dren are living. 

Jason and Lucinda C. Bloodgood were the 
parents of seven children, of whom six are liv- 
ing. These are as follows: Levi; Cyrus E. ; 
Clarence K. ; Tremain S., of Jewett ; Mary, 
who is the wife of Mr. Van Valkenberg, of 
Catskill; and Isaac L. All the men of this 
family are prominent citizens in the towns 
where they reside. Three of the brothers have 
been Town Supervisors. Levi and Isaac are 
in partnership, and conduct the large general 
merchandise business at Hensonville. Levi 
and his brother Cyrus E. bought the business 
in 1868 of Messrs. Brown & Loughran, and 
were in partnership for seventeen years, when 
Cyrus sold his interest to the youngest 
brother. Levi Bloodgood married Kate Bed- 
ford, of Delaware County, and has two daugh- 
ters : Lena, who was educated at Stamford 
Seminary, and is now a teacher of vocal and 
instrumental music; and Lettie, who is in 
school. He is one of the leading Democrats 
of his county, was Town Supervisor in 1890 
and 1891, has been chairman of the Town 
Committee and many times a delegate to both 
town and county conventions. lie is a mem- 
l)er of the Methodist church and prominent in 
Sunday-school work. Cyrus E. Bloodgood is 
at the present time Clerk of Greene County. 
He was chairman of the Board of Supervisors 
of the county in 1SS2. Tremain is a farmer. 
For two years he represented his town, Jewett, 
in the Greene County Board of Supervisors. 

Clarence E. Bloodgood in his early years at- 
tended the common schools, and subsequently 



a school at Jewett Heights. He then taught 
two terms in Jewett, and in 1869 entered 
Stamford Seminary. There he continued his 
studies until July, 1871, with the exception of 
one winter, during which he was teaching. In 
July, 1871, he took the examinations for Yale, 
passing through New York on the twelfth of 
the month, while the Orangemen's riot was in 
progress. In the fall of that year he entered 
the Freshman class, and in 1875 was graduated 
in the classical department, receiving honors. 
Among his classmates were the following- 
named men, who have since been distinguished 
in national life: John Patton, United States 
Senator from Michigan; Albert S. Jenks, re- 
cently elected Judge of the Supreme Court of 
the Second District of New York State; John 
S. Seymour, formerly of Connecticut, now of 
New York City, who was Commissioner of Pat- 
ents under Cleveland's last administration; 
Edward S. Jones, First Assistant Postmaster- 
General under the .same administration; Ed- 
ward S. Atwater, of Poughkeepsie, candidate 
for Comptroller on the Democratic ticket in 
1898; and Edward C. Smith, at present Gov- 
ernor of Vermont. 

In the fall of 1S75 I\Ir. Bloodgood was 
elected School Commissioner of the First Dis- 
trict of Greene County ; and this position he 
held for nine years. In 1879 he began the 
study of law in the office of J. B. Olney, of 
Catskill, and in January, 1S85, was admitted 
to the bar. He immediately began the prac- 
tice of law, and twelve years later formed the 
partnership with Mr. Tallmadge. The firm 
has one of tlie largest law libraries in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



361 



county, and its practice is very extensive. 
Both partners have a wide circle of acquaint- 
ance throughout this section of the State, and 
command universal confidence. 

In 1 89 1 and 1S92 Mr. Bloodgood served as 
State Senator from the Fourteenth District, 
which then included Greene, Ulster, and 
Schoharie Counties. He was a member of the 
Judiciary Committee, of the Committee on 
Finance, and of the Committee on Canals, 
Roads, Bridges, and Poor Laws, and was 
chairman of the last two. He introduced some 
bills of importance, among others one that had 
been many times before presented and as often 
failed to pass. Against the opposition of 
members from large cities he secured the 
passage of the law, enlarging the scope of in- 
vestments for savings-banks. Mr. Bloodgood 
believes in "sound money." He has been 
continuously active in all duties of good 
citizenship since he graduated from college. 
In 1S95 he was chairman of the Democratic 
County Committee. He is at the present time 
a member of the State Committee for the 
Twenty-fifth Senatorial District. He has 
been a member of the State Bar Association 
since 1892. In 1897 he was elected vice- 
president of the association for the Third Judi- 
cial District of the State of New York, and 
last January was re-elected to the same posi- 
tion for the current year. In 1896 also he was 
appointed by the Secretary of the Interior spe- 
cial commissioner to investigate certain mat- 
ters connected with the Osage Indians; but, as 
the acceptance of the position would require 
him to spend an indefinite time in the Indian 



Territory, he felt obliged to decline the honor. 
Mr. Bloodgood was married in 1892 to Joseph- 
ine L. Case, of Catskill, daughter of Hiram 
Case. Mrs. Bloodgood was born in what is 
known as Potter's Hollow, Albany County. 
Mr. Bloodgood during the two years, 1895 and 
1896, was president of the Rip Van Winkle 
Club, which is the leading social club of Cats- 
kill. He is secretary and treasurer of the Com- 
mercial Mutual Fire Insurance Association of 
Catskill. 



OW FONDA VROMAN, a leading 
citizen of Middleburg and represen- 
tative of one of the oldest families 
in the county, was born in this town on a farm 
adjoining his present dwelling-place on No- 
vember 14, 1 83 1, his parents being Henry and 
Catharine (Hagadorne) Vroman. 

The first title to Schoharie lands known to 
have been recorded was obtained by his ances- 
tor, Adam Vroman, from the Indians, and has 
since been known as Vroman's land. It is 
located two miles south-west of Middleburg. 
The conveyance is dated Schenectady, August 
20, 171 1. Adam Vroman obtained a royal 
patent to these lands from King George on 
August 26, 1 714. On March 30, 1726, he 
obtained a new grant from the Indians. 
Twenty families of Hollanders settled here, 
and there was considerable friction between 
them and the Palatinates before friendly rela- 
tions were established. Adam Vroman was 
born in Holland in 1649, and came to this 
country with his father, Hendrick Meese Vro- 
man, in 1670, settling first in Schenectady. 



362 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



The father was killed in the massacre there in 
1690. Adam's two brothers were named Jan 
and Bartholomew. Me lived in Schenectady 
diirinj; the <;reater part of his life, and is bur- 
ied there; but his death occurred in Middle- I 
hurt; in 1730, at the home of his son. He was 
three times married, successively to Kn^eltie 
Kyckman, (irietje \'an Slyck, and Grietje 
Takelse Hemstreet. His first wife and her 
infant child were killed in the massacre. 

Adam's son Peter was born in Schenectady 
on May 4, i6<S4. He came from that place, 
and settled in Middleburg, in the part now 
called Fulton, on the banks of the Schoharie 
River, where he cleared a lari;e tract of land. 
His relations with the Indians were most 
friendly. He died in 1777. His wife, 
Grietje Van Alstyne, who was born in Albany 
of Dutch parentage, was the mother of twelve 
children, seven sons and five daughters. 

Adam Vroman, second, son of the above 
named Peter, and great-grandfather of Dow F. 
Vroman, was born at Fulton on September 21, 
1707, and died of consumption in 1754. De- 
spite his feeble health, he was a man of much 
energy, and one of the most ]irogressive 
farmers of this region. 

Jonas Vroman, grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Middleburg, now Ful- 
ton, on April i, 1735, and died on April 16, 
1804. Upon reaching his majority, he moved 
to the farm which adjoins Dow F. Vroman's 
property, and there built in 1792-93 the 
house, the main part of which is still stand- 
ing. He was a lifelong farmer. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Deliah Hager, died 



in 1S30, at the age of ninety-one. They were 
the ])areiits of two sons. 

Of these Henry, above named, was born on 
the farm his father had settled, and there he 
continued to reside thoughout his life. Upon 
the death of his father he came into possession 
of the propet)-. He was a man of considera- 
ble jirominence hereabouts, anil was at differ- 
ent times Lieutenant and Ca])tain in the 
militia. Both he and his wife Catherine were 
members of the Dutch Reformed church. The 
latter was a native of Middleburg, now Ful- 
ton, and daughter of John Hagadorne. She 
died at the age of seventy-nine ; and her hus- 
band died on March 2, 1859, at the age of 
eighty-two. Of their family of ten children, 
three are living; namely, Dow Fonda, Adam, 
and Susan, who is the wife of Isaac Borst. 

Dow V. Vroman received good mental train- 
ing in the public schools, and resided at home 
with his parents until he was twenty years of 
age, at the end of which time he left home and 
travelled for about four years. Returning 
then to Middleburg, he purchased the farm of 
forty acres adjoining his father's estate, which 
has since been his home. In 1854 he married 
Margaret Smith, one of a family of ten chil- 
dren born to Martin Smith, a farmer of Albany 
County, New York. Of this union nine chil- 
dren have been born, ' namely : Eugene, who 
resides in Middleburg; Charles, who married 
Mary Best, and is engaged in business here; 
Henry, who is a farmer in California; Kate, 
who resides with her ]jarents ; Dow, a lawyer 
of Tonawanda, Niagara County, a graduate of 
Union College and Albany Law School; 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



363 



Smith, an cn!;iiKcr in California; Margaret, 
who resides with lu-r iKuents; Guy, who is 
a civil engineer, a graduate oi Union College, 
Schenectady, in the class of i.SgS; and Roy, 
who is attending the high school. Mr. \'ro- 
nian is a man of sujierior intelligence, and pos- 
sesses a wide antl thorough knowledge of men 
and affairs. He has made a careful study of 
the family history, and is an authority on all 
points connected with it. In politics he is a 
Democrat; but, although he is one of the lead- 
ing men in his party, lie has never cared to 
hold public office. In 1 S90, 1S91, and 1S92 
he served as Supervi.sor of Middleburg. His 
wife and two daughters are members of the Re- 
formed church. 



TT^HAUNCEY W. HINMAN, attorney- 
I J| at-law and Justice of the Peace, resid- 

^ — ^ ing at Schoharie, N. Y. , was bom 
in Middleburg on June 4, 1835, son of John 
S. and Margaret (Pausley) Hinman. His 
grandfather, Justus Hinman, by occupation a 
mechanic, was a native of the State of Con- 
necticut. He removed to Kinderhook, Co- 
lumbia County, in this State, among the early 
settlers, and he lived there during the re- 
mainder of his life. He died at the age of 
eighty-one. His wife, who was before her 
marriage Alice Spencer, was also born in 
Connecticut. She lived to be eighty years of 
age, and reared a family of eight children. 
Of these only one son, Franklin by name, is 
living. Both parents were members of the 
Baptist church. 



John S. Hinman was born in Kinderhook, 
and was hrouglit up in th.it town. When a 
mere boy he left home, anil for some years 
subsequently he journeyed from one place to 
another, until at length he settled in Middle- 
burg and carried on wagon-making, later en- 
gaging in the practice of law. He became an 
attorney of some note, and continued practice 
for a quarter of a century. He was also Jus- 
tice of the Peace for many years. In politics 
he was a Democrat. His death occurred at 
the age of fifty-si.x. His first wife, Margaret, 
the mother of Chauncey W. Hinman, was the 
daughter of Frederick and Christiana Pausley, 
the father a lifelong farmer and during his 
last years a resident of Middleburg. She was 
bcrn in Schoharie, and died at the age of 
thirty-three. Of the six children born to 
her, four are living, the record being as 
follows: Chauncey; Charles; Helen, who is 
the widow of William Bouck; and Mary 
Jane, who is the wife of Jacob L. Zimmer, of 
Wright. Mrs. Margaret Hinman was a de- 
voted member of the Methodist church. The 
second wife was a sister of the first, and she 
was the mother of John, Justice, Albert, 
Alice, and Catharine, of whom John and Jus- 
tice are living. She died at the age of fifty- 
eight. 

Chauncey W. Hinman attended the public 
schools until si.xteen years of age, when he 
left home and went to work in Franklinton 
and Livingstonville, where he remained for 
a short time. He subsequently worked in 
Utica and elsewhere in Oneida Countv, in Al- 
bany, and in Ohio, as a clerk, and then re- 



364 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



turned to Middleburg, where he learned the 
harness-maker's trade, and subsequently car- 
ried on business until 1S62, when he enlisted 
in Company D of the One Hundred and 
Thirty-fourth Regiment as a private. He was 
in active service, and through successive pro- 
motions rose to the rank of Second Lieuten- 
ant and finally to that of First Lieutenant. 
He was at Chancellorsville and at Gettys- 
burg, and at Tilton, in the fall of 1S64, was 
taken prisoner by the rebel forces. He was 
carried to Andersonville, and there for six 
months endured horrors worse than those of 
open warfare. From being a solid, well-built 
man weighing one hundred and sixty-eight 
pounds, he became reduced to a mere skele- 
ton, and escaped death only by the fortunate 
circumstance of his release. He saw thou- 
sands of men breathe their last in the prison, 
victims of starvation and disease. The daily 
rations, which were never varied, were one- 
half pint of corn meal, the same quantity of 
beans, and one spoonful of molasses or two 
ounces of meat. To this was added, once in 
three days, a small tablespoonful of salt. 
Thirty men of Mr. Hinman's company shared 
the horrors of prison life with him. 

With peace came his release and subsequent 
discharge from the army. Returning then to 
Middleburg, Mr. Hinman began the business 
of harness-making, but in 1867 he came to 
Schoharie and began the study of law. Two 
years later he was admitted to the bar, and at 
once formed a partnership with liis brother, 
which continued until 1871. Since that time 
Mr. Hinman has been alone. He is the sec- 



ond oldest lawyer in practice in the town. 
For eight years he has been a Justice of the 
Peace and for many years a trustee of the 
Union School. 

Mr. Hinman was married in 1S72 to Alice 
ver riank, who was born in Wright, a daugh- 
ter of Alanson ver Plank and one of a family 
group of five children. Of this union six 
children were born, as follows: Nellie M., 
Douglas A., Herbert W., Mabel, Alice, and 
C. Ford. Nellie M. , who is a graduate of 
Vassar College, is the assistant principal of 
the Union School. Douglas is a graduate of 
the Albany Law School and a practising 
lawyer in Ikrne, Albany County. Herbert 
W. is in business with a florist in Saratoga 
Springs. Mabel, who was educated at the 
Young Ladies' Seminary at Binghaniton, is 
now in Europe. Alice is a student in the 
Union School, Schoharie. C. I'ord Hinman 
is studying law in his father's office. 

Mr. Hinman is an Odd Fellow of To-wos- 
scholer Lodge, No. 546. He is a member 
and trustee of the Stock Growers' Associa- 
tion. He has a general law practice, and also 
acts as pension attorney. In politics he is a 
Democrat. Mr. Hinman and his family are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and he is a trustee of the society. ]5oth he 
and his wife have been teachers in the Sun- 
day-school. 

KA GRAND L TREADWELL, a pro- 
gressive farmer and prominent citizen 
"■"^ of Jefferson, Schoharie County, 
N.Y., was born in Harpcrsfield, Delaware 



0k^ 



I 




JAMKS -]■. WVATT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



367 



County, this State, October 7, 1845, son of 
James T. and Eliza A. (Buckingham) Tread- 
well. 

His father, James T. Treadwell, was a na- 
tive of Harpersfield, N.Y., born August 6, 
I Si 2. He was one of the leading men of his 
town, where he held the office of Supervisor. 
He was also a Colonel in the militia. A 
stanch Republican in politics, he was a great 
admirer of Lincoln, Grant, Seward, and other 
great men of his party who had proved their 
fitness for high place by the magnitude of 
their services to their country. In religion 
he was a Methodist and a prominent officer of 
that church. His wife, Eliza, who was born 
in Jefferson, Schoharie County, July 14, 
181 1, was a daughter of Isaac and Sally Buck- 
ingham, her father being a prosperous farmer. 
She died in her native town, February 27, 
1896, having survived her husband nearly 
twenty-five years, he having passed away 
April 26, 1871. Their children were: Orrin, 
Sarah, Cassius, La Grand, and Addie. 

La Grand L Treadwell received a good dis- 
trict-school education. He began early to ac- 
quire a practical knowledge of agriculture, 
and since his youth has been engaged in farm- 
ing. His present farm of one humlred and 
ten acres is well located, and, kept by him in 
a high state of cultivation, it produces satis- 
factory financial results. Mr. Treadwell is a 
man of good business capacity, progressive in 
his methods, an untiring worker, and thor- 
oughly wide-awake to every opportunity for 
the improvement of his property. That he 
stands high among his fellow-townsmen may 



be inferred from the fact that he has been 
called upon to serve them as Commissioner of 
Highways and as Supervisor. He attends the 
Methodist church. He belongs to the Ma- 
sonic order, being a member of Lodge No. 
554, F. & A. M., of Jefferson. 

He married September 22, 1885, Miss Jean- 
ette C. Grant, a native of Stamford, Delaware 
County, N.Y., and a daughter of Alfred B. 
and Maria A. (Davenport) Grant. Mr. and 
Mrs. Treadwell are the parents of one child, 
J. Logan Treadwell, who was born August 12, 
£887. 

§AMES T. WYATT, e.\-Supervisor of 
Glen\-ille and a veteran of the Civil 
War, was born in Halifa.x, N. S., Octo- 
ber 22, 1834, son of John F. and Charlotte 
(Stewart) Wyatt. His father was a native of 
New Jersey, and his mother of Nova Scotia. 

John \\'yatt, his grandfather, who was born 
in Charleston, S. C, served in the Revolution- 
ary War, and for some years was a planter in 
his native State. Coming North, John Wyatt 
resided in New York State for a time, but his 
last days were spent in Nova Scotia. The 
family is of English origin. Probably its first 
representative in this country was Sir Francis 
Wyatt, one of the early Colonial governors of 
\'irginia, the first term of his wise and pacific 
administration beginning in October, 1621. 

John F. Wyatt, the father of the subject of 
this sketch, was a carpenter, and followed his 
trade during his active years. Moving from 
Nova Scotia to New York State, he resided in 
Albany until going to Cattaraugus County; 



368 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ami hcilic'd in Jamestown, Cliaiitaiic|iia County, 
at tlic Ane of cij,'litytlncc years. In politics 
he was a Republican. His wife, Charlotte, 
was tile mother of seven childieii, four of whom 
are living, namely: John A. and James T. , 
both residents of Ck-nville; ICleanor, wife of 
M. G. Martyn. of JaniesL.wn ; and William 
H. VVyatt, of .\kron, Ohio. -ihe others were: 
Hliza C. Harriet, and Adelaide. Mrs. Char- 
lotte .S. W'yatt died in Akron, Ohio, at the age 
of seventy-si.\ years. In religious faith the 
parents were Episcoi)alians. 

James T. Wyatt was reared in .Albany and 
educated in the schools of that city. When a 
young man he entered the grocery business as 
a clerk, and remained in that employment for 
four years. In October, iS6i, he enlisted as 
a private in an independent organization known 
as the Havelock Battery, which was raised in 
Albany, and became attached to the Army of 
the Potomac. He participated in some of the 
most stubbornly contested engagements of the 
Civil War, including the battle of Chancellors- 
ville, where he was wounded, and rose to the 
rank of First Lieutenant, being discharged as 
such, January 24, 1865. The .State of New 
York gave him the rank of Hrevet Major. Re- 
turning t<. Albany, he in isr,6 became travel- 
ling .salesman for Hurton & Co., dealers in 
mouldings, picture frames, and similar wares, 
and remained with that concern for eight years. 
In 1S77 he bought his present farm in Glen- 
ville, containing one hundred and forty-two 
acres of desirable land situated in the beautiful 
and fertile Mohawk valley, one of the finest 
agricultural regions in the .State. He displa_\s 



unusual practical ability and good judgment in 
managing his property, which yields a good 
income, the energy of its owner being visible 
on everv hand. 

In June, 1867, Mr. Wyatt was united in 
marriage with .Anna M. Rector, who was born 
in C.lenville, May 25, 1S35, daughter of Will- 
iam Rector and a rejiresentative of an old fam- 
ily of this town. 

Politically, Mr. Wyatt is a Republican. 
He served with ability as Supervisor during 
the years 1.SS2, 1S.S3, 1.S84, and 1SS6. He is 
a comrade of Horsfall Post, No. 90, G. A. R., 
of Schenectady. Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt have 
no children. They attend the Lpiscopal 
church. 

RNI-:ST E. BILLINGS, M.D., the lead- 
ng physician of Gilboa, Schoharie 
County, N. Y., is a native of Broome, this 
State. He was born on September 29, 1859, 
to Peter L. and Amelia (Brayman) Billings. 
His great-grandfather Billings came to this 
place from Connecticut. He was of Lnglish 
ancestry. 

The Doctor's paternal grandfather, John 
Billings, lived and died in this county, and 
was a lifelong farmer. His children were as 
follows: Thaddeus: Peter; Charles; William; 
pjnma, who is the wife of Lewis Brazee; 
Kllen, who is the widow of limerson Camp- 
bell; and Luther, who died at the age of 
twenty-one years. Charles and William Bill- 
ings both reside in this county. 

Peter Billings during the greater part of his 
active life was engagetl in farming at Broome, 



369 



but he lived for a time in Greene County, 
rolitically, he was a standi Reinihlican. I-cr 
a luiinhor of yrars lie was I'oormastcr. lie 
was a ineiiil)cr ol tlie old scliool Haplist 
church ami one of its most zealous upholders. 
His four childicn were: I'.rnest Iv and I'lrwin 
15., twins; Anna, who married Albert rainier; 
and Hurton, who died at the age of twenty- 
three years. 

ICrnest K. Hillings during his boyhood at- 
tendeil school at Broome and subsequently at 
Rensselaerville Academy. In his early years 
he had access to a well-selected library, which 
probably in a measure determined the course 
of his later life. This library consisted 
largely of works of science and history. It 
had been accumulated by his maternal grand- 
father, Benjamin Brayman, who resided in 
Broome. Mr. Brayman was a genuine lover 
of books. Not a volume on his shelves but 
was one of value and standing, and not one 
that he had not read and digested. His mem- 
ory for facts was wonderful, and no one here- 
abouts could equal him in extent of knowl- 
edge. He was e.xtremely logical, and could 
floor any one in an argument. Withal, he was 
a successful man of affairs. At that time, 
when good books, or indeed books of any sort, 
were difficult to get, his library unquestion- 
ably e.xerted a great influence in moulding the 
future of his grandson. 

After leaving school Ernest E. Billings 
taught for four or five terms, as also his twin 
brother, who subsequently obtained a State 
certificate. From boyhood it had been his 
ambition to be a physician, and accordingly, 



as soon as the opportunity presented itself, he 

b(.-an the study of nu-dieine with his uncle. 
Dr. ]•:. Hrayman. of I.ivingstonville. Alter 
a year spent there lie enteral the medical de- 
partment of the University (if the City of New 
\'ork in i,S,Si,an(l in I .S.S4 he was graduated 
at that institution with the coveted degree ot 
Doctor of Medicine. While there he showed 
esjiecial [iroficiency in mathematics and in 
microscopy. He was one of two to receive a 
certificate in the latter study. He immedi- 
ately began the practice of his profession in 
Conesville, where he remained until October 
5, 1887. Since that time he has been settled 
in Gilboa. The Doctor still has more or less 
practice in Conesville, and, in fact, in the 
four counties of Delaware, Greene, Schoharie, 
and Albany. His calmness at all times and 
his sympathy in the sick-room fortify him for 
attendance on the most serious or critical 
cases, and his warm heart and generous ex- 
pression of feeling win for him the lasting 
gratitude of his patients and their friends. 
He has made a special study of the diseases of 
women and children. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Republican. 
He was Town Clerk in Broome in 1882, and 
is at the present time Health Officer of Gil- 
boa. Since 1890 he has been a member of 
the Dutch Reformed church. For two years 
he was a Deacon in the church, and for the 
last three years has been Elder. He is a 
Mason of Gilboa Lodge, No. 630, and at the 
present time secretary of the lodge. Profes- 
sionally, he is a member of the Schoharie 
County Medical Society. He is one of the 



lilOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



stockholders in the weekly jinper published at 
Gilboa. 

Dr. Hillings married Carrie Riclitmyer, 
daughter of I'eter Richtmyer and descendant 
of one of the old and honored families of this 
vicinity. Tiiey have one child, l'>nestine. 



WILLIAM W. ClIAl'MAN, a prac- 
tical and prosperous agriculturist of 
I'-ulton, .Schoharie County, was born on the 
farm where he now resides, known as the 
Chapman homestead, November 14, 1846, a 
son of Jacob Chapman. His great-grand- 
father Chapman was one of the very early set- 
tlers of Columbia County, New York, where 
he owned an extensive tract of land and 
about sixty slaves. 

William Chapman, the grandfather of Will- 
iam W., was born and educated in Columbia 
County, but afterward became a jiioneer of 
Albany County, whither he removed with his 
family at an early day. He also was a slave- 
holder, and before his death, which occurred 
when he was but forty-seven years old, he had 
cleared a large farm, and had come to hold an 
important position among the influential men 
of the town of Rensscl lerville, in which he 
had settled. His wife, wiiose maiden name 
was Eva Solpaugh, died at the age of seventy- 
five years, after rearing a number of children. 
In religion tiiey were both of the Baptist per- 
suasion. 

Jacob Chapman was born in Rensselaer- 
ville, Albany County, wiicre he resided until 
twenty-seven years old. Coming then to 



Sclioharie County, he purchased one hundred 
acres of woodland, on which almost the only 
improvement visible was a small log house 
that occupied the site of the present substan- 
tial dwelling on the Chapman homestead, the 
house subsecpiently erected by him. He 
cleared a large part of the land he first pur- 
chased, and, having bought another lot of forty 
acres, carried on general farming and stock- 
raising with great success until his death, at 
the venerable age of eighty-seven years. In 
politics he was a Jacksonian Democrat, and 
served one or more terms as Overseer of the 
Poor. His wife, Huldah Winans, was the 
daughter of I{lder John Winans, for many 
years a Baptist minister at Preston Hollow, 
Albany County, where she was born and bred. 
They had eleven children, eight of whom are 
living, as follows: Spencer, a farmer residing 
near the old homestead; Nancy C, wife of 
Chauncey Shattuck; Adam M., a farmer at 
Bouck's Falls; Maria, widow of the late 
Almon Mann; Isabella, wife of Hiram Ecker- 
son ; Elizabeth, widow of the late Dr. George 
Holmes; James P., former -Supervisor of Mid- 
dleburg; and William W., the special subject 
of this sketch. The mother also attained a 
gootl old age, passing away at the age of four- 
score anil four years. Both parents were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
in which the father served long and faithfully 
as steward and class leader. Their son Peter, 
who was graduated from the Normal School, 
and afterward attended private lectures and 
the Philadelphia Medical College, went West 
when a young man, antl, settling in Iowa, was 




DAKNAKI) D'llAKA. 



I5U)C;RAriIICAL RK\IK\V 



there engaged first as a teacher ami later as a 
physician. He subsequently lived in Ne- 
braska, ami for six years was School Commis- 
sioner in Lincoln. Returnini;- to .Schoh.irie 
County, he practisei! medicine in {•iichmond- 
viile for six years, goini;' from there to New 
Mexico, where he had a lucrative position in 
a government land olfice until his death, at the 
age of forty-nine years. 

William W. Chapman succeeded to the 
ovvnershi[i of the home farm of one hundred 
anil fortv acres, on wliich he h.is spent his 
entire life, bein;^ known throu,i;hout tiie com- 
iiumity as one of its most skilful and thrifty 
farmers. Energetic and industrious, and well 
versed in the science of agriculture, he is 
meeting with well-merited success in his 
chosen vocation. In addition to raising the 
crops common to this region, he carries on to 
some extent dairying and the raising of 
draught horses, in which he has been some- 
what interested. A firm supporter of the 
principles of the Democratic party, he takes 
an active interest in local affairs. He has 
served on both the Town and the County Com- 
mittee and in 1 89 1, 1892, 1893, and 1894 he 
was Supervisor, having been elected and sub- 
sequently re-elected three consecutive years 
by a large majority. 

On November 21, 1877, Mr. Chapman mar- 
ried Emma Zeh, who was born in Middleburg, 
a daughter of Philip Zeh, a farmer. .She died 
at the age of thirty -one years. She was a de- 
voted member of the Reformed church. On 
December 29, 1886, Mr. Chapman married for 
his second wife Miss Keziah Hilts, who was 



born in Fulton, a daughter of Gideon D. and 
I'.li/.abclh (Ah) Hills. Her f.ilher, a native 
of Wright, removed to j-uiton whi-n hut six- 
teen years of age, and Irom that timi' until his 
decease, at the age of sixty-three years, was 
engaged as a tiller of the soil. He affiliated 
with the Democrats, and was active in public 
life, serving as .School Commissioner in his 
district and as .Supervisor of the town :i num- 
ber of years. His wife, I'^li/.abeth, who was 
born in Midtlleburg, died in I-'ulton in 1S91. 
]?oth were active members of the Reformed 
church. Of their eleven children five are 
still living, namely: George, who was gradu- 
ated from Claverack College, and now resides 
in New York City; Jennie, who married Mar- 
cus Zeh; Jay; Keziah, now Mrs. Chapman; 
and Elizabeth. Mrs. Chapman is a graduate 
of the Albany Normal School, and has had 
considerable experience as a teacher, having 
taught in her nati\'e jilace and for two years in 
the Ulster Academy. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman 
have two children — Leo H. and Alice Irene. 



ARNARD U'HARA, proprietor of 
the O'Hara House, Lexington, 
Greene County, N.V. , was born in 
Fi.shkill, Dutchess County, this State, June i, 
1 8 16, son of Teter and Lucretia (Darbee) 
O'Hara. His father emigrated from Ireland 
in 1801, first locating in New York City and 
later in Fishkill, where he worked by the 
month on a farm. Peter O'Hara was subse- 
quently engaged in farming in Westfield Flats, 
Sullivan County, and in Greenville village. 



BIOCRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His first purchase was a small piece of land, 
which he later sold. He finally hought a 
tract of forty acres situated on the Durham 
line, where he resided for the rest of his active 
period. ]5y his industry and thrift he was 
enabled to inciease his pro])erty by the pur- 
chase of adjoining land, owning at the time of 
his death, which occurretl at the age of eighty 
years, a farm of two hundred acres. He was a 
capable farmer, possessing excellent judgment 
in all agricultural matters, which enabled him 
to make good use of his resources and ojipor- 
tunities. l^esides the raising and selling of 
farm produce, he distilled apple brand}-, an 
agreeable and somewhat seductive beverage, 
known to residents of the present day under 
the more familiar name of aj^i^le-jack. He 
was also a weaver of great renown. Peter 
O'Hara was a Democrat in jiolitics, and took a 
lively interest in local public affairs, serving 
frequently as a grand juror at Catskill and 
holding minor town offices. In his religious 
belief he was a Roman Catholic and so true a 
follower of the precepts of the church that on 
one occasion he carried a child from Fishkill 
to Troy and thence to Lansingburg in order 
to have it baptized by a Catholic prie.st. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Lucretia Dar- 
bee, was a native of Coshen, Orange County, 
to which town her parents had removed from 
Goshen, Conn., settling as i)ioneers. Her 
father was a farmer and a cloth dresser for 
some years. Later he kejit a tavern in West- 
field Flats. He was killed by the overturning 
of a load of hay. I'eter and Lucretia (Darbee) 
OTIara had fifteen children, of whom six sons 



and seven daughters lived to have families; 
and si.x of the daughters were school teachers 
pre\'ious to their marriage. The only sur- 
vivors arc: I^arnard, the subject of this sketch; 
and Le\i, who still resides upon a portion of 
the old homestead, which, after the father's 
death, was divided into four farms. The 
mother died at the age of si.xty-four. .She at- 
tended the Alethodist l-lpiscopal church. 

Barnard OTIara in his l)oyhood and \()uth, 
from the time he was able to be of use, worked 
on the home farm during the farming seasons, 
and attended school winters. 

Leaving home at the age of twenty-one, he 
went to Albany, N.Y. , where he obtained em- 
plo\ment in a dry and fancy goods store. His 
em]iloyer failed a short time later, and he 
made an arrangement with the assignee to 
peddle the stock upon the road. After driving 
through Central New York with a horse and 
wagon in the emjiloy of others for some time, 
he invested what monc)- he had sa\ed in a team 
of his own ; and, borrowing the sum of three 
hundred dollars of his father, he engaged in 
peddling fur himself, soon establishing his 
credit in New \'ork City by punctually meet- 
ing his obligations. After continuing u]ion 
the road some years, or until 1N45, he settled 
in Lexington, where in the following )ear he 
completed the building of a store, which he 
stocked willi general mercliandise, and carried 
it on successfully for over thirty years. For a 
I(jng period he was also engaged in the untler- 
taking business. 

.\fter visiting some of the Western States 
he retin-ned, feeling certain that his future 



niOCRAl'IllCAI, 



prospects were just as promising in Lexington 
as elsewhere. The succeeding ten years were 
devoted to the management of his store and 
to the cultivation nf his f;irni, which he \n\r- 
ciiased in 1S65, ant! whicli lie still owns. 

In 1880, having admitted his smi as a part- 
ner, he severed his active cuiuKctiim with the 
mercantile husincss. Tiic sun cuiitimied in 
charge of the cstahlishnicnt until iSSS, siiuc 
which time the store luiiUling has hccn leased 
to others. 

The O'llara House stands upon a sit^- for- 
merly occupied liy a Haptist cliurch. It was 
completed and opened in 1S77, and is one of 
the largest hotels in Lexington, having accom- 
modations for one hundrctl and twenty-five 
guests. Situated at an altitude of sixteen 
hundred feet above sea level, and [irovided 
with ample facilities for comfort and recrea- 
tion, it offers special inducements as a health 
re.sort. 

In 1845 •^f''. O'llara was united in marriage 
with Miss Charlotte Briggs, daughter of Da- 
rius Briggs, a well-known farmer of I,exington 
in his day. She became the mother of seven 
children; namely, Mar\" A., Edgar B., 
George P., Arthur, Arrietta, Ida, and Belle. 
Mary A. is the wife of James M. Van \'alken- 
burgh, a hotel proprietor of Lexington, and has 
one son, George B. \'an \'alkenburgh, who is 
a college graduate. Edgar and George assist 
their father in carrying on the O'Hara House. 
Edgar also carries on a thriving business in 
the manufacture of cider. George O'Hara 
married Mary Smith, and has two children — 
Charlotte and Edgar L. Arthur O'Hara died 



at the age of two years. Arrietta died in 1876 

at the :igr of twenty-one years. Ida married 
I'etcr J. Kelicy, wiio is now a resident of New 
^■ork City. lUllr is residing at home. Ivdgar 
is a graduate ol Manhattan College, Xew N'ork, 
and of I'lastman's Business College, I'ongh- 
keepsie; and ( leorge took a coniinereial course 
at l''(d.som's Business College. The daught.-rs 
attended '•Kenwood," a Catholic school in Al- 
bany. In politics Mr. O'llara is a Democrat. 
He served as .Supervisor in i S^ij and 1S70, re- 
cei\ing at his re-eleition the unanimous sup- 
[lort of both the Republican and Democratic 
parties. He has been Clerk of the town and of 
the school district, and has frequently served 
as a grand and petit juror. Mrs. O'Hara died 
in December, i.S,So, aged fifty-four years. 
The faniil)- attend the Roman Catholic 
church. 



§OKL H. MEAD, M.D., Hunter's vet- 
eran plivsician and surgeon, residing on 
Main Street in that town, was born in 
Jewett on June 15, 1S38, his parents being 
Stephen and Caroline (Hosford) Mead. The 
family is of English descent, and early settled 
in Columbia County, New York, among the 
pioneers of that region. 

Philip Mead, the Doctor's grandfather, was 
one of the first settlers in Jewett, coming to 
that town by a route marked with trees, and in 
company with two or three other young men 
settling in the heart of the forest to make a 
home for himself. His first dwelling was a 
rude log hut, but after he had made a clearing 
he erected a handsome frame house. The near- 



376 



lilOC.RAl'IlUAI, RKVIKW 



est town, Cairo, was ten miles distant, and all 
supplies had to be brought from that place. 
Bears and other wild animals were abundant, 
and fearlessly prowled near the little cabin. 
After eighteen years spent in Jewett, during 
which he had cleared a large tnut of land, he 
removed to Cayuga County, then just iK-ini; 
opened up. There he remained until his 
death, at the age of seventy-eight. His wile, 
Hannah, died at the age of eighty. H'ltli were 
members of the Baptist church. Mrs. Hannah 
Mead was born in Columbia Cmnity, of jiannts 
who were pioneer settlers there. .She hail 
twelve children, all of whom are now ileceased. 
Stephen Mead was horn in Columbia 
County, but the greater p;irt of his life was 
spent in Jewett, where lie ))urchasL'd a farm in 
early manhood. In national [lolitics he was a 
Republican. He t.iok a warm interest in local 
public affairs, ai)d held several minor offices in 
the town. His deatii occurred at the age of 
eighty-si.v. His wife was born in Jewett, 
being a daughter of Joel Hosford, who married 
a Miss Mann. Her father was one of three 
brothers who came from the town of W'al ling- 
ford. Conn., to settle the town of Jewett. One 
of the brothers was named Reuben. They 
were pioneers of Jewett Heights. The Mann 
family was one of the first to settle on Man- 
hattan Island, coming over from Holland. 
Mrs. Caroline Hosford Mead died at the age of 
si.xty-seven. Both she and her husband were 
members of the Methodist church. One of 
their four children, a son, Alanson, is de- 
ceased. The living are: Dr. William H., 
who is practising in Windham (see sketch on 



another page) ; Dr. Joel H. ; and Adeline, 
who is the wife of Alanson Woodworth. 

After leaving the common .schools Joel H. 
Mead studied medicine for a time with Dr. 
F. H. Holcomb, of Windham, and then took a 
course in medicine in the Albany Medical Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1863. 
He at once began practice in Hunter, and in a 
short time had as many patients as he could 
care for. Besides his general medical practice 
Dr. Mead has given considerable attention to 
surger\, antl has performed some remarkable 
operations. For twenty years he was the only 
physician in this and several of the adjoining 
towns. He is to-day one of the oldest practi- 
tioners in the county, there being only four 
physicians whose professional career antedates 
his. He is the Nestor of the medical frater- 
nity hereabouts. 

In 1 866 Dr. .Mead married Lucinda Wood- 
worth, daughter of Abner and Sojjhronia (Jud- 
son) Woodworth. Her father, who was a 
farmer and one of the earl\' settlers of Jewett, 
died at the age of seventy-eight. Her mother 
dietl at fort\-si.\. Their six children were: 
Lain-a, who married Albert Chase, a son of 
Judge Chase of the SuiH-eme Court; Buel ; 
Lucius, a sketch of whom ajipears elsewhere in 
this book; Lemuel, who died at the age of 
twentv ; Loren, who is deceased; and Mrs. 
Meatl. The Doctor and his wife have been 
blessed with two children — Ldith and Bertha, 
the last named of whom resides with her par- 
ents, lulith married R. A. Austin, a drug- 
gist of Cairo, and has one child, Joel by name. 
The daii'diters received their finishing educa- 



tion in a private school. Both are fine per- 
formers on the organ and piano. 

The Doctor takes a warm interest in ;ill pub- 
lic matters, ami j;ives the \veij;ht of liis pnliti- 
cal influence to tlie Republican party. In iiSS; 
hc fillol the ..lllcc ..f Supcrvi.sor. lie is a 
Master Mason aiul nicniiier nf .Mount Tabor 
Lodge of IliiiUcr. lie w, is a promoter, from 
the start, of the Maplcwoml C'cuutery ori^ani- 
zation, and has always been one of its active 
supporters. In connection with Dr. Slank\- 
he is ])ension examiner for drccnc Comity, 
holdinj;- the [losition uiuler i;o\ernmeiit ap- 
pointment, lie is now president of tiie Hoard 
of Examiners. He has also iieen examiner for 
several years for various life insurance com- 
])anies, among which ma\' be named the 
I'htenix, the New York Life, the New York 
Mutual, the Equitable, and tiie ^\'ashington. 
The Doctor's famih' are members of the Meth- 
odist church. 



"CS^/aLLACK W. CRATSKR, a well- 
Y^V,^ known business man of the town of 
Summit, Schoharie County, residing at Char- 
lotteville, was born in Jefferson, this State, 
on April 12, 1S42, his parents being Robert 
and Rosetta (Gardner) Crapser. His paternal 
grandfather, Albertus Crapser, who was of 
Dutch lineage, died in Claverack at the age 
of seventy. He was by occupation a farmer, 
and in politics at first a Whig and later a Re- 
publican. He had a family of five .sons and 
four daughters. 

Robert Crapser, son of Albertus and father 



of the subject of this biography, was born and 
reared in (ireenville, \.\'., but move<! to 
Claverack in early manhood. He w;is first a 
Whig in polities iind Liter a Republican, and 
was very active and inlbieiitial in |)ublic 
atfairs. Wjien about sixty years of ;.j;c he 
was drowned wlii ie sail ing on the Hudson as 
a passenger ai)oard tiie Herkshire bout. In 
early life he laiiglu school for some time dur- 
ing the winters, and worked :it boating dur- 
ing the summers. L:iler he gave all his time 
to farming. At the age of thirty he married 
Rosetta, daughter of Andrew Gardner. She 
is still living at the age of seventy-eight, and 
makes her home with her son Wallace. The 
father had at one time two hundred acres of 
land under cultivation. He was a Justice of 
the Peace for many years. His religious pref- 
erences were Lutheran. He had only one 
other child beside his son Wallace — namely, 
Jesse, who was taken prisoner by the rebels at 
the battle of Gettysburg, and who subse- 
quently died from the hardshijis of his pri.son 
life, being still under his majority at the time 
of his death. 

Wallace W. Crapser received a good com- 
mon-school training in Summit. He early 
began farming, and engaged in that occupation 
until I.S94, being located about a mile above 
the village of Charlotteville on a farm of a 
hundred acres, and giving special attention to 
dairying. On the ist of April, i Sg;, he 
practically retired from business. Mr. Crap- 
ser is one of the \-alned workers of the Meth- 
odist church, with which he has been connected 
for the last twenty years. He is a trustee and 



378 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



steward of the church, also class leader; 
and for tiirco )ears he was superintendent of 
the Sunday-school. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, but he has never sought office, though 
warmly interested in the success of his party. 
Mr. Crapscr was first married to Mary J. 
VVhorton. She died in 1891, having been the 
mother of two children, namely: Albert, who 
died at two years of age; and Charles, who re- 
sides with his father. Mr. Crapscr married 
for his second wife Mrs. Miry Multcr Dorwin, 
the widow of Philip Dorwin. i Ici torrner 
husband was a lawyer and a leading' citizen of 
South Worcester, also a prominent Demo- 
cratic worker. She is a daughter of J. D. 
Multer, a very successful dairy farmer of this 
region and a strong Reiniblican and active 
Methodist. Mrs. Crajjser has four sisters, 
namely: Martha, who is the wife of James 
Fo.x; Alice, who is the wife of Thomas Spang- 
ler; IClizabeth, who is Mrs. Hnlson ; and 
Rose, wi>o is Mrs. Calvin Hutts. Mrs. Crap- 
scr taught school for sonic time before her mar- 
riage. She is a mcmijer of the W. C. T. U. 
and f)ne of the acti\e workers in the cliurch. 
Mr. Crapser has always been op])oseil to the 
licpior traffic, and is e\cecilingl\- tenii)crate in 
all his habit.s. 



"OWARD KATON I.()M.\.\, Ml)., 
the leading physician <if New Haiti- 
more, Cireene Connt\', N.\.. is a 
native of tlie city of .Albany, and was born on 
April 30, 1S6.S, son of John and Martha 
(Katon) Lomax. On tiic paternal side he is 



descended from French Protestants, or Hugue- 
nots, who, after the revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes in 1685, fled from persecution in their 
native country to England. 

The Doctor's paternal grandfather emigrated 
from England some time after his marriage, 
and, settling in Hoston, Mass., there engaged 
in the manufacture of soap and tallow candles. 
His son John was born in England, but was 
brought u]) in Boston, and learned the harness- 
maker's trade in tlint city. Nearly forty years 
ago John Lomax, the Doctor's father, took a 
position with Holland Terrell, the well-known 
harness manufacturer of Albany, and is now 
foreman of the estal^lishment, whicli is said to 
be the lari^^est of its kind in tlie world. He is 
an active Republican, and be takes a warm 
interest in all Masonic affairs. Among the 
]\Iasonic offices he has held may be named the 
following: Master of Mount \'ernon Lodge, 
V. & .A. M., in 1.S70; secretary of tiie same 
for fourteen vears; director in tlie Masonic 
Relief .Association of AllKiny, and one of its 
trustees for fifteen years; and secretary of the 
Ma.sonic Veteran Association for three year.s. 
His wife, Martha, was born in Chelsea, Mass. 
She is a member <if the E])iscopal church. Of 
their ei-ht children five are living- Ella, 
ILittie, 1-annie, Howard l".., and lulith. Ella 
is the wife of Harry Knight, of Denver, Col. ; 
llattie is the wile of C. W. h'orman, of York- 
t.Avn. X.\'. ; I'annie is Mrs. Charles A. Pray, 
of Lebanon. .Me. ; ;ind Ldilh is principal of 
tlie Albany Trainin- .Scho,d lor Teachers. 

Dr. Lomax was i^radnated from the Albany 
Higli Scho(d in iSSS. He subsequently en- 



BIOGR Al'II RAL R KV 1 K\V 



379 



gaged as a diaughtsman in New York City for 
a year with Gillam, the celebrated cartoonist 
of Jiui^n: He then entered the Albany Medi- 
cal College, from which he was graduated in 
1S9J, and he has since been engaged in the 
practice of his profession in this town. Dur- 
ing his first }-ear in the high school he was 
awarded a gold medal for excellence in draw- 
ing, being the first boy and the first Freshman 
to receix'e a medal in the history of that school. 
He still retains much of his early skill with 
the pencil. I'he Doctor's course in the medi- 
cal college was one of distinction. He won 
two prizes, and at graduation received honor- 
able mention in three subjects. Since coming 
here he has built up the largest practice the 
town has ever known, and is as popular as he 
is successful. He has been three times vice- 
president of the Greene County Medical So- 
ciety, and has written numerous papers and 
addresses on medical subjects, and some 
articles for publication in medical journals. 
He is a devoted student of natural liistory, ar.d 
has a fine entomological collection, also an 
interesting collection of snakes and serpents. 

Dr. Lomax is a fine singer and a skilful per- 
former on the piano, organ, and flute. He 
began playing the flute in early boyhood, under 
the instruction of his father, who was a fine 
flutist and a member of Gilmore's celebrated 
band when first it was organized. When a boy 
of only sixteen the Doctor was in demand for 
orchestras. As he became older his musical 
ability was of great service to him, enabling 
him to pay his college expenses. For two 
seasons he performed on one of the day boats 



running from Albany, and in the evenings 

plaj'cd in the orchestra at the I. eland (Jpeia 
Ht)use. For two seasons he was at .Saratoga in 
the orchestra and for two seasons at the Pros- 
pect Park House in the Catskills. He has 
pla)'ed under all the leading conductoi's of 
Albany, and is well known among the musi- 
cians of that city. 

Like his father, Dr. Lomax is interested in 
masonr)-. He is now serving his second term 
as Master of Social Friendship Lodge, No. 
741, of Mew Baltimore, and has held \-arious 
other otTices in the lodge, among them that of 
Senior Deacon. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. P"or the last four )'ears he has been one 
of the health ofificers of the town. He is a 
Deacon in the Dutch Reformed church, of 
which both he and his wife are members, and 
Mrs. Lomax has played the organ for both 
church and Sunday-school. 

The Doctor's marriage took jilace in Sep- 
tember, 1897. Mrs Lomax is the daughter of 
Newton Sweet, a leading citizen of New Balti- 
more. Her grandfather, Joshua Sweet, who 
was born in Chesterville, Albany County, was 
a carpenter by trade. He worked on the old 
Catskill ]\L)untain House, and later came to 
New Baltimore and engaged in contracting and 
building until his death, at the age of sixty- 
eight. His wife, Laura Baker, died at the age 
of seventy-four. She was one of the eight 
children of an Fnglishman who came with his 
family from England to Philadelphia, from 
there by stage to New York, thence up the 
Hudson to Albany, and thence b}- stage to 
Coeymans. He engaged in mercantile life in 



38c 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



New York City, and there fell a victim to 
small-pox. Joshua and Laura Swccl were the 
parents of three children: Frank; Newton; and 
Laura, who married Watson Ham. 

Newton Sweet was born in this town on De- 
cember 1 6, 184.S. After attendinj; Coeymans 
Academy for four years, he he-^an teaching 
school winters and working; at carpenterinf,' 
summers. This lu- tout iiuicil till twcnt)' fnnr 
years of aj;e, when he left off his Inulc and 
thenceforward kejit at iiis professional work 
all the year. lie tau-ht successively in the 
graded school at the Iron Works, Troy, where 
he remained five years; in the graded school in 
Coeymans; in New Baltimore for a \ear; and 
then, in the year 1893-94, in West Coxsackie. 
While at New lialtimore he was eletteil Supcr- 
vi.sor for 18.S7 on the Repuhlican ticket. 
The following \ear he was elected .School 
Commissioner from the .Second Distiict of 
(ireene County, which included the towns of 
New Haltimore, Coxsackie, (neenville, Dur- 
ham, Ashland, Windham, and I'r ittsviUe. 
He had eighty schools to look alter ami a 
hundred teachers to examine, ami must visit 
each .school twice a year. After serving three 
years he was re-elected for a second teiin, at 
the close of which he began teaching in West 
Coxsackie. At the end of a year there he was 
.secured for the New Baltimore sciiool, but 
while attending a teachers' institute in Cairo, 
where the Republican convention was in ses- 
sion, he was nominated for the Assembly. 
He was triumjihantly elected by a majority of 
four hundred, going ninety ballots ahead i.f the 
ticket in this town, and being the third Super- 



visor ever elected on the Republican ticket in 
this Democratic stronghold. He voted for the 
Raines Hill, and in 1897 was re-elected by a 
majority of live hundred and fifty. During 
his two terms he rendered his constituents 
valuable service. He introduced a bill to pro- 
hibit vivisection in the public schools, and 
served on various educational committees. 

Mr. Sweet has resided in New Haltimore 
village for the last eighteen years. lie is 
prominent in Masonic circles and in the 
Knights of ryihias. His wife, Adelaide, was 
born in Coeymans, the daughter of I'hilijiand 
Jane (\'an Allen) Winne. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Sweet have five children — 1-' rank, Jane (Mr.s. 
Lamox), Laura, Isaac, and .\rba. h'rank is 
the foreman of Cushman's bakery in New Ymk 
City. lie married Marietta Vanderpool, 
(laughter of Dr. A. \'. S. \'anderpool, of this 
town. Isaac has l)een for the last three years 
t|uartermaster on the "Dean Richmond." 
Arba is [irepiuing to be a locomotive engineer. 

Mrs. Lomax taught school in New Haltimore 
with most flattering success for some time 
before her marriage. She is a line nnisiiian. 
The Doctor and his wife have one son, lul- 
mund W. Lomax. 



W'^'^-' 



]■:. riioRi'i-;, of Cat.skiii. 

mendier of the firm of IMal- 
colm & Co., was born in Conesville, Sclioharie 
County, on Novendjer 15, 1869, his jjarents 
being Douglass and Catherine 11. (Ingraham) 
Thnr|ie. His jKiternal grandfather, Amos 
Thorpe, was born in the town of Hroome, 




WILLIAM E. THORPE. 



EIOGRAI'HICAL REVIEW 



383 



Schoharie County. He was a blacksmith by 
trade, am! worketl at that occupation all his 
life. He also did some farming. The death 
of Amos Thorpe took place in Conesville. 

Douglass Thorpe was born in Conesville on 
March 9, 1S32. He worked somewhat in the 
smithy with his father, but when about nine- 
teen years of age began learning the carpen- 
ter's trade. Subsequently he went to Dy- 
l)erry Falls, Pa., to assist in putting up a 
tannery, and after it was completed he re- 
turned to Conesville and settled on a farm. 
While there he was twice Supervisor of the 
town. In 1 88 1 he came to Catskill, and for 
the two succeeding years was in the grocery 
business in company with a Mr. Bassett, 
under the firm name of Bassett & Thorpe. 
Upon his retirement from business he was 
made Superintendent of Streets, which office he 
filled for two years. More recently he has 
been in poor health. He is a trustee of the 
Methodist church, and both he and his wife 
are members of it. 

Mrs. Catherine H. Thorpe was born in Dur- 
ham, and spent her life there until she was 
eighteen, when she removed to Conesville. 
She taught school from the time she was fif- 
teen years old until she was married, at 
twenty-two. She has been the mother of two 
children — William E. and George N., the 
last-named of whom resides on a farm in 
Conesville. Mrs. Thorpe's father was Ezra 
Ingraham, son of William and Hester (Doty) 
Ingraham. Her mother was Charlotte Newell, 
daughter of Seth Newell, a soldier of the War 
of 1812, who contracted disease while in the 



service and died from its effects. William 
Ingraham, her grandfather, was born in Say- 
brook. Conn. He came to Durham among the 
early settlers, and had a grant of a small farm, 
but worked most of the time at his trade, which 
was that of a cooper. He died at the age of 
eighty. His wife, Hester, who was born in 
Saybrook, Conn., died at fifty-five. William 
and Hester (Doty) Ingraham had ten children, 
all of whom are now deceased. Their son Ezra 
was born in Durham. He was a shoemaker by 
trade, but much of his life was spent on a farm 
in Conesville, where he died at the age of 
fifty-six. His wife, who died at the age of 
eighty-two, bore him three children, of whom 
only Catherine (Mrs. Thorpe) is living. 

William E. Thorpe attended school in 
Conesville until he was about twelve years 
old, when the family removed to Catskill. 
Here he entered the high school. At seven- 
teen he had finished his .studies, and entered 
the employ of Smith & Forshew, dry goods 
merchants, with whom he remained for a year. 
At the end of that time he took a position as 
book-keeper with Van Brocklin & Co. in the 
Catskill Knitting Mill, When, nine years 
later, Mr. \'an Brocklin retired and the Mal- 
colm Company was formed, Mr. Thorpe took 
an interest in the business, this being in Jan- 
uary, 1S97. The annual output of this mill is 
valued at between two hundred and fifty thou- 
sand and three hundred thousand dollars. 
Woollen underwear is manufactured, also 
men's dress shirts. This firm is one of the 
pioneer concerns in the making of fleece-lined 
goods. That its product bears a solid reputa- 



384 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tion in the niarkcl may be gathered from the 
fact that during all the recent business depres- 
sion the mill has been running steadily and 
often over hours. Sales are made through the 
company's agents direct to the jobbing trade, 
and there is not a State in the Union that does 
not purchase goods of Malcolm & ("n. One 
noticeable thing in the history of this business 
has been the cordial feelinj; between the em- 
ployers and the workmen. Mr. Thorpe began 
work in the office at si.\ dollars a week, and 
had his salary increased from time to time 
until it reached twenty-four dollars a week, 
lie forms a striking cxamiile of what can be 
accomplished Ijv faithfulness and api)lication. 
In March, 1.S9.S, Mr. Tliori)e was chosen 
Trustee of Catskill and after one year Presi- 
dent of the village. His politics are Republi- 
can. He is a member of Catskill Lodge of 
Masons, No. 468, and its organist; a charter 
member of the Catskill Royal Arch Chapter; 
member of the Order of Odd b'ellows. Lodge 
No. 189, in wliich he luis occu])ied the Noble 
Grand's chair ; and also a member of the Rip 
Van Winkle Club. I-"or two years he was a 
choir leader in the Methodist church, but he 
now holds membership in the Reformed 
church. l-"or five years he was a member of the 
Si.\teenth Separate Comjiany, N. (>. S. N. Y. , 
and for two years, or until his discharge, a 
member of the First Ambulance Corps. He 
has always shown a warm interest in the fire 
dei>artment, and is at the present time president 
of Wiley Hose Company and vice-jiresident of 
the Hudson River \olunteer h'iremen's Asso- 
ciation. He is a singer of unusual merit, and 



has sung on many public occasions. While in 
the emjiloy of Mr. Van Brocklin, Mr. Thor])e 
was the recipient of many hand.some presents, 
being remembered most generously on each 
recurrin;.; Christmas. 



^:NJA^HX i. a.m. wh.liam c. 

PLATNKR, of Prattsville, N.Y., 
are sons of Cornelius and Laura 
(Parmenticn I'latner. Tlieir paternal grand- 
father was a native and lifelong resident of 
Hudson, N.\'. 

Cornelius I'latner was horn in Prattsville in 
February, 1821. He learned the trade of 
hatter, which he followeil here for many 
years, first as a journeyman and later in com- 
pany with Theodore Rudolph, as a member of 
the firm of I'latner & Rudolph. Their shop 
was .U one time destroyed by a flood, hut they 
rebuilt it, and subset|uently continued the 
business. Their partnership i:eing finally 
dissolved, Mr. I'hitner o|iened a restaurant in 
the building now occupied by his sons, and 
carried it on for some time. He held quite a 
prominent position in the communit)-, took an 
active interest in town affairs, and served sev- 
eral years as Dejiuty Sheriff. He was also 
active in military matters, and was connected 
with the militia in the early training days. 
In politics he was a Democrat. 

His wife, Laura, was a native of Tanners- 
ville, N. v.. and a daughter of Winthrop Par- 
mentier. Their family consisted of ten chil- 
dren, of whom six are now living, five being 
residents of Prattsville; namely, Charles H., 



mOGRAPHlCAI, KK\JK\V 



385 



Chester A., Joseph E. , benjamin F., ami 
William C. Charles H. I'latncr is the pro- 
prietor of a general store in I'rattsviile. 
Chester A. is engaged in tlio feed business, 
and has also a large interest in the Stanley 
Hall farm of five hundred acres. He keeps 
one hundred cows, and deals largely in cattle, 
besides having other extensive business in- 
terests. Joseph E. is a druggist in Pratts- 
ville. Gustavus A. is a farmer residing near 
Ashland. Mrs. Laura Parmentier Platner 
died in 1S95, at the age of seventy years. 

Benjamin F. and William C. Platner were 
educated in the public schools of the village, 
and have always resided here. They formed 
their copartnership February i, 1885, both 
having had some previous experience as 
clerks. They have since conducted a very 
thriving general mercantile business. Their 
store, of which they are the owners, stands on 
what was formerly the old Platner homestead, 
and measures fifty by fifty feet, exclusive of 
the house and store-rooms; They carry the 
largest stock of general goods in this section, 
their boot and shoe department being the 
largest between Kingston and Catskill. 
They have been very successful, and their 
business is continually on the increase. 
Quiet, unassuming gentlemen, they enjoy a 
wide popularity. 

Mr. William C. Platner married on June 5, 
1895, Miss Marion Becker, of Grand Gorge, 
an estimable lady, the daughter of Thomas 
and Elizabeth (Wyckofif) Becker, then of that 
place, but now of Stamford village. He is a 
Democrat politically, but hitherto has de- 



clined office, preferring to give his undivided 
attention to his business. He was formerly 
interested in tlie then proposeil Kingston & 
Utica Railway, being secretary of the com- 
pany. He is a member of Oasis Lodge, No. 
119, F. & A. .M., which he joined in 18.S8, 
and in which he has filleil some of the chairs, 
being now Senior Warden. He and his wife 
belong to the Reformed church, which they 
attend and help support. 



RTHUR HEXRY FAROUHER, late 
a well-known furniture manufacturer 
and dealer of Schoharie, X.Y., was 
born in the town of Berne, in Albany County, 
this State, on October 27, 1840, and died at 
his home in Schoharie, a few weeks since, 
August 9, 1899. He was a son of James and 
Margaret (Clark) F"arquher. His paternal 
grandfather, John P'arquher, was a butcher by 
trade, and was engaged for a time in the 
market business in Ireland. In 1S30 Grand- 
father F'arquher came to America and settled 
in Berne, N.Y., where his son James had pre- 
ceded him. 

James F'arquher was born in Ireland, and 
remained in that country until after his mar- 
riage. He was educated in the public schools 
there, and subsequently engaged in the 
market business until he purchased a farm. 
Believing that the New World offered great 
opportunities to the industrious and enterpris- 
ing, he came over to this countrv with his 
wife and one child, and eventually met with 
the success he had hoped for. At first, how- 



386 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ever, it was an iiiihiU road to climb. When 
he arrived in All^aiiy lie fouiul that his money 
had i;iven out, antl he was obliged to walii 
from that city to Rensselaerville. After 
prosperity came to iiim, he bought a farm, and 
there lived until iiis deatli, at the age of 
eighty-two. He made many friemls in his 
adopted country, bein.i; highly respected by his 
fellows on account of his industry and hon- 
esty. He was at first a Whig and later a Re- 
publican; and he was warmly interested in the 
Presbyterian church, of which his wife was a 
member. Mrs. Margaret I'arquher was born 
in Ireland, being the daughter of a farmer and 
one of a family of five children. .She lived 
to be seventy-si.x years of age. She was the 
mother of thirteen children, of whom nine grew 
to maturity, namely : John; William; Joseph; 
Jane, who is the widow of Daniel Carey; 
Elizabeth: Arthur H.; Thomas; Mary, who 
is the wife of Rensselaer Taylor; and 
Francis. 

Arthur H. Farquher spent his boyhood 
years in Ik-rne, attending the public schools, 
and during vacation time assisting his father 
on the farm. In 1857, at the age of seven- 
teen, he left JKime and went to (iilboa. where 
he served three years' apprenticeship at the 
cabinet-maker's trade, and subsequently re- 
mained a year as journeyman. 

On September 25, 1861, Mr. Farquher en- 
listed in the military service of his country, 
and on the first day of the succeeding October 
was assigned to the United States Lancers. 
On November 2 of the same year he was 
transferred to Company H of the P'ourth New 



York Heavy Artillery, and while a member of 
that cf)mpany saw some of the hardest fighting 
that occurred in the whole course of the Civil 
War. The following arc among the engage- 
ments in which he took part: battle of the 
Wilderness, on May 6, 1864; Todd's Tavern, 
on May 8; Hart's Farm, May 9; Spottsylvania 
Court House, May 12; North Anna River, on 
May 23; Sheldon Farm, on May 30; Cold 
Harbor, on June 3, 1864: Petersburg, on 
June iS and July 30, 1864; Deep I^ottom, on 
.August 14; Ream's .Station, on August 25; 
Mile Run, on December 9, 1864; Hatcher's 
Run, on February 5, 1865; assault on the 
lines, on March 25; opening the campaign, 
on March 28, 29, and 30; South Side Road, 
on April 2. He was at Appomatto.x at the 
time of the surrender of Lee, April 9, 1865. 
Mr. F'arquher went into the service as a pri- 
vate, and came out of it as a Sergeant. The 
Colonel of his regiment was Colonel John C. 
Tiddball, and the Lieutenant Colonel, Thomas 
Alcott. D. F. Hamlin was the Major. The 
detachment of which I\Ir. Farquher's company 
formed a part left Washington for the front 
with twenty-two hundred men, and in five 
months' fighting, from March 23 to August 
25, lost eighteen liumlred. In one engage- 
ment of an hour's iluration sixty men of his 
own company fell. Mr. Farqidier was one of 
those who escaped unhurt. He seemed to 
bear a charmed life, and was not even 
wounded. The terrible slaughter at Peters- 
burg he never forgot. It stood out among 
m.uiy other scenes of horror as the most 
direful of all. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



387 



Returning to Gilboa, after being discharged 
in October, 1865, Mr. Farquher worked for 
his old employer until the fall of 1S66, when 
he came to Schoharie, and began working for 
a man who was located in the same building 
in which he, Mr. Farquher, subsequently car- 
ried on business. In 1S74 he became a part- 
ner, and a year later the firm changed and 
became Farquher & Settle, which was in busi- 
ness for two years and a half. Mr. Farquher 
then took his first partner, who remained with 
him for some seven years. At the end of that 
time Mr. Farquher became full proprietor of 
the business, and henceforth he continued it 
alone. Occupying the four floors of his large 
building, he carried a very large stock of fur- 
niture, and had an extensive trade. After 
1893 his manufacturing of furniture was con- 
fined mostly to custom work of the highest 
grade. The business has been established 
here for over fifty years, and has always 
merited the full confidence of the public. As 
a consequence its fair reputation has spread, 
and its patrons have come from long dis- 
tances. The undertaking department has also 
been long established here, and is the only 
one in town. 

Mr. Farquher was married to his first wife 
in 1865. She was Maria C. Benjamin, 
daughter of Ebenezer Benjamin, a farmer of 
Gilboa. In religious faith she was a Meth- 
odist. She died at the age of thirty-one, 
having been the mother of three children: 
namely, Fred R., Minnie E., and Benjamin J. 
F"red R., who married Mary R. Larkins, is a 
furniture dealer and undertaker at Centra] 



Bridge. Minnie married Robert A. Dewey, 
cashier in one of the Schoharie banks, and she 
is the mother of one son, Arthur. Benja- 



min J. was his father's assistant. He is an 
enterprising and able young man, and bids 
fair to equal his father in business ability. 
Mr. Arthur H. Farquher married for his sec- 
ond wife Ida "SI. Schoolcraft, who was born in 
the town of Wright, being one of a family of 
five children of Peter P. Schoolcraft, a farmer. 
She died at the age of thirty. She was a 
member of the Lutheran church. The pres- 
ent Mrs. Farquher was before her marriage 
Amanda Wright. She is a daughter of Ezra 

I Wright and a native of Albany County. 

I In politics Mr. Farquher was a Republican. 
He was a trustee of the village for eight 
years, and at the time of his death was still 
serving as president, having held the office for 
four years. This is a strongly Democratic 
town. Mr. Farquher usually refused public 
office, but at one time, in order to gratify the 
wishes of the party leaders, he permitted his 
name to be used on the Republican ticket for 
Supervisor, and thereby reduced the Demo- 
cratic majority from three hundred and six- 

' teen to thirty-five. He was a member and for 
three years was treasurer of Schoharie Valley 
Lodge of Masons, Xo. 491, having held also 
numerous other offices in the lodge. For 
twenty-nine years he was a member of the fire 
department, and much of the time either fore- 
man of the company or chief engineer of the 
department. He took an active part in all 

] movements affecting the interests of the town 

I and was one of those foremost in securing the 



388 



bio{;rai'Hical review 



incorporation of the village. He was a mem- 
ber and had been Commander of Hoosick Mix 
I'ost, No. 134, G. A. R.: also a member for 
many years of the Schoharie County Histori- 
cal Society. He was an attendant oi the 
Lutheran church of this place, and his son is 
Deacon of the church. 



I.LIAM JAMi:S SMl'Al.LIi:, a 

thrifty farmer of TriiKetown, Scho- 
harie County, N'.\'., was liorn in this town, 
May 10, 1S52, son of John and Jane (Milmine) 
.Smeallie. 11 is father was born here March 
^, 1.S16, and his mother was jjorn in b'lorida, 
X.V., .March 2G. iSiT,. His paternal grand- 
father, James .Smeallie, was born in Linlith- 
gowshire, -Scoihuid, A|)ril i.S, 1786, anil came 
to America in iSii. James .Smeallie settled 
vipon a farm in tlie northerl\- pait of I'rince- 
town, where he resided the rest of his life. He 
was quite ]iroinineiit in ])ublic affairs, serving 
as Siiper\'isiii- and .School Commissioner, and 
he was one of the founders of the United 
rresbyterian Church of I'lorida, N. Y. He 
married his cousin, Mary .Snieallie. .She was 
the daughter of his uncle, John Smeallie, first, 
a native of .Scotland, who came to this coinitrx' 
and served as a soUlier in the Kevolutionary 
War. 

John .Smeallie, second, son of James and 
Ahiry, was a prosperous farmer and lifelong 
resilient of I'rincetown. Heing a man of jiro- 
gressive tendencies, he made good use of his 
resources, and realized excellent results as a 
general fanner. In politics he was original)}- 



a Whig and later a Republican. He was a 
member of the Scotch church. Jane Milmine 
Smeallie, his wife, became the mother of three 
children, namely: Mary L. , wife of John M. 
Conover ; William J., the subject of this 
sketch; and Agnes Smeallie, of I'rincetown. 
John Smeallie, second, li\ed to be seventy-five 
years old, but Mrs. Smeallie died at thirty- 
eight. 

William James Smeallie was educated in the 
district schools. He resided in Duanesburg 
for ten years, but with that exception has been 
engaged in general farming in I'rincetown ever 
since reaching manhood. He is now the owner 
of one hundred acres of fertile land, com])ris- 
ing one of the best farms in town. He makes 
a specialty of breeding Jersey cattle and fancy 
IJoultr)-, owning at the present time some fine 
sijccimens of each, and his buildings arc well 
adapted for these purposes. 

Mr. Smeallie has served with ability as Kx- 
cise Commissioner twelve years, and is now 
holding the office of Overseer of the I'oor. In 
politics he acts with the Republican ]jarty. 
The family has long enjo\ed local distinction 
for thrift and prosperity, ami the subject of 
this sketch has fully demonstrated his ability 
to maintain this reinitation. Mr. Smeallie is 
unmarried. He attends the United Presby- 
terian church, of which he was elected I":ider 
in i.SSj. 

ENJAMIN H. AVICRV,-* an enter- 
prising merchant of Jefferson, 
Schoharie Count)-, and an ex-mem- 
ber of the New York State legislature, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



389 



born in Jefferson, December 29, 1S52, son of 
Heriah and Lydia (Buckingham) Avery. His 
immigrant progenitor, Christopher Avery, 
came over from England early in the Colonial 
jieriod, lived for some years at Gloucester, 
Mass., and was Selectman there in 1646, 
1652, and 1654. In March, 165S-9, Christo- 
pher Avery bought land and one-half of a 
house in Boston, situated where the pcst-office 
now stands. This property he sold in 1663, 
and in 1665 he bought a house and lot in New 
London, Conn., his son James having moved 
to that colony some years before. 

From Christopher the line is traced through 
James, Thomas, Abraham, William, Ben- 
jamin, John, and Beriah to Benjamin H., the 
subject of this sketch. The original dwell- 
ing-house, built by Captain James Avery in 
1656 in what was formerly New London and 
afterward Groton, Conn., was burned in July, 
1894. Some of the Avery ancestors fought in 
the Revolutionary War, and a monument to 
their memory has been erected by John D. 
Rockefeller, the Standard Oil magnate, who 
is related to the family. 

John Avery, the grandfather, who was a 
tanner, served in the Assembly in 1850, and 
held other offices. Beriah Avery, Benjamin 
Avery's father, was engaged in mercantile 
business in Jefferson for a number of years, 
and was quite active in public affairs, serving 
as Supervisor with marked ability. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His wife, Lydia, who was a daughter of Will- 
iam Buckingham, of Harpersfield, became the 
mother of four children — William, Benjamin, 



Mary, and Edward. William, who succeeded 
to his father's business, died in 1876, aged 
about twenty-six years; and Mary and Edward 
died in early childhood. Beriah Avery died 
in 1S91, at the age of sixty-seven years, his 
wife having died one week previous. 

Benjamin Avery attended school in Char- 
lotteville for a time, and completed his studies 
at the Stamford Seminary. Going to River 
p-alls, Wis., he was employed there as a clerk 
until 1876, when he returned to Jefferson, and 
purchased the business left by his brother 
William. He has one of the largest and old- 
est established general stores in town, and 
ranks among the substantial merchants in this 
part of the county. As a member of the 
Board of Supervisors he was active in forward- 
ing the interests of the town. In the legis- 
lature he introduced no less than twenty-four 
bills, fourteen of which became laws. He 
was assigned to the Committees on Internal 
Affairs, Villages, Fish and Game, and Agri- 
culture, being chairman of the first-named 
body; and his work in the committee-room 
and upon the floor was heartily commended by 
the majority of voters, irrespective of party. 
Politically, he is a Democrat. He has been 
treasurer of the water company since its 
organization, having been instrumental in 
securing the construction of the works, and 
he was a director of the old railroad line. 

^Ir. Avery married Anna D. Fuller, daugh- 
ter of J. Dean Fuller, of Jefferson. They 
have two children — William H. and Edna B. 
For twenty-two years Mr. Avery has been a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



390 



i:io(;rai'HI(ai, Kfc:\ip:\v 



in which he has served as steward and Sunday- 
school siipcrintciuieiit for a t;rcatcr part of 
that time. Mr. Avery is an Odd Follow, be- 
longing to Richmondville Lodge, No. 525, 
and is also a member of the band, of which he 
has been leader for a number of years. Mrs. 
Avery is a member of tiie church and of the 
Woman's Christian Temiierance Union. 



§01 IX mac; I NX IS,* superintendent of 
the Athens Knittinj; Mill, was burn in 
(iilboa, Schoharie County, on June 5, 
1S49, son (if Patrick and Mary (Hrady) Magin- 
nis. His parents were both born in Ireland. 

Patrick Maginnis was a tanner by trade, and 
followed that occupation after coniini; to this 
country and settling in C.ilboa. He retired 
from business at about fift\- years of age, and 
died about ten years later. His wife, who 
was also born in Ireland, died at sixty-si.\. 
Of their ten children four are living; namely, 
Bernard, .Anna, John, and Mary. .Anna is the 
wife of James Fitzpatrick. Mary married 
James Mitchell, since deceased. All the chil- 
dren were born in this country. 

John Maginnis remained in his native place 
up to the age of nineteen. He received his 
early etiucation in the public schools and at 
a seminary, and subsequently studied with pri- 
vate teachers and also in an evening school. 
His first industrial experience was in the cot- 
ton sheeting mill in Cili)f)a, and while there 
he worked in every department. His second 
was ill the Harmony Mills at Cohoes, where 
he worked ten vears as overseer in the weaving 



room. Following this he was for ten years in 

the \'an .Allen Cotton Mills at Stuyvesant 
I"'alls, fi\e \ears in X'alatieas sui)erintendent of 
the Wild Manufacturing Company, and seven 
years superintendent of the Harder Knitting 
C<mi])an\- in Hudson. At the end of that time 
he settled here in his present business. He 
was one of the organizers of the company, and 
he superintended the building of the mill and 
the putting in of the machinery. The factory 
is two hundred and twenty feet long by fifty- 
five feet in width, and is two stories high. It 
has si.\ sets of machinery, all of which are 
made after the most improved plans, and is de- 
voted to the manufacture of fleece-lined knitted 
underwear. About one hundred and fifty 
hands are employed, all of whom are hired and 
superintended by Mr. Maginnis. He attends 
to the disposing of the output of the mill, 
sending goods to every State in the Union. 

Mr. Maginnis has been twice married. His 
first wife, whose maiden name was Libbie 
Sparlin, was born in Hensonville. Her father 
was Philip .Sparlin, a hatter. She died at the 
age of tbirty-two, ha\ing been the mother of 
two sons— William and Byron. The former, 
who is a baker in Xorth Adams, Mass., is 
married and has three children — \\'illie, 
Helen, and John. Byron is also married. 
He is an engineer in the fire dei^artment of 
Cohoes. Mr. Maginnis's second wife was be- 
fore her marriage lunma Peck. She was born 
in Craigsville. 

Mr. Maginnis is a Republican in politics. 
He served as Alderman from Ward F'ive in 
Hudson. He has alwavs been a most success- 




JOHN McGINNIS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



393 



fill man, and since he began working has never 
been without a position. On account of his 
skill in his chosen line he has frecjiiently been 
solicited to enter positions more profitable 
than the one he was holding when asked. In 
Cohoes he was one of thirteen to help put up 
the machinery, and was engaged as overseer. 
While in Stuyvesant Falls he introduced new 
machinery into the mill, and remodelled the 
old, so that the output of the mill there was 
largely increased. 

Mr. Maginnis has been a member of the 
Methodi.st church for twenty years. Both his 
wives have also been members. In whatever 
town he has been living, he has taken an 
active part in all church matters and in the 
Sunday-school. While in Hudson he had 
charge of the prison work of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. He has been a trustee 
of every church with which he has been con- 
nected, and in Stuyvesant Falls and Valatie 
was superintendent of the Sunday-school. 



|APTAIN JAMES STEAD, superin- 
tendent and manager of the Catskill 
'and New York Steamboat Evening- 
Line at Catskill, N. Y. , was born in Cairo, this 
State, on May 23, 1832, his parents being 
David and Hannah (Mackelwaite) Stead. 

The father, David Stead, was born in Hud- 
dersfiekl, England, and in early life was em- 
ployed there in a woollen manufactory. He 
came to America when forty years of age, and 
settled in Cairo, where he bought a farm. For 
a time he carried on a woollen manufactory in 



Woodstock, a part of Cairo, but he .subse- 
quently closed out the business and engaged in 
farming. He died at the age of eighty, after 
having lived retired foi" some time in the vil- 
lage of Cairo. He was an (ild-time Whig, 
but though warmly interested in all public 
affairs was never an aspirant for office. His 
wife, Hannah, who also was of L2nglish biith, 
died in Cairo at the age of seventy-nine. She 
bore him four children, of whom there are liv- 
ing — James, John, and Levi. John, who re- 
sides in Cairo at the old homestead, carries on 
a boarding-house; Levi is in business in Chi- 
cago; and Charles is deceased. Both parents 
were members of the Episcopal church. 

James Stead left home at eighteen years of 
age, and went to work as clerk in the office of 
Lenfield, Day & Co., who managed a steam- 
boat line between New York and Catskill. In 
time he rose to be a captain, and he was in 
their employ in that capacity for several years. 
Subsequently, for three years, he was captain 
of a steamer owned by Hamilton & Smith, and 
engaged in freighting between New Baltimore 
and New York, and at the end of that time he 
acted as salesman for the same firm on a line 
of boats pl}ing between Coxsackie and New 
York. For a year during the Civil War he 
was in the employ of the government, acting 
as inspector of the bay for the army, it being 
his duty to load schooners at Jersey City and 
make reports to Quartermaster Brown. I"or 
the next three years after this he was captain 
of the "New Champion," a boat owned by 
Black & Donohue, running from Catskill to 
New York ; and, following that, he was for two 



394 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years in company witli Mr. ('icdr^'c II. I'cn- 
fielcl, his first cni])i(i\cr, runnin;,^ a line of 
barges. Then, for a second jicriod of tliree 
years, he was master of the "New Chanijiioii," 
and at the end of tliat tifne lie l)ecame one of 
the organizers of the Catskiil and New \'ork 
Steamboat Company. 

Mr. Donohiie was superintendent of tlie 
company at the start, and Captain SIcm\ was 
in command of one of tiie boats; init, upon liie 
death of Mr. D.mnliue, Captain .Stead was made 
superintendent and general manager. .\t first 
there were two small boats, the "New Cham- 
jiion " and the "Water Hrette. " These wcie 
sui)erseded after a time by the " l-lscort " and 
the "Charhitte X'anderbill, " whicli were much 
larger boats and which were in turn su]icrseded 
by others of still greater caiiacity. In iSSo 
the company built the "City of Catskiil," 
which has a keel two hundred and forty-seven 
feet in length, beam thirty-five feet in width, 
and si.\ty-nnc feet o\er all, and has a carrying 
capacity of fi\e hundred tons and accommoda- 
tions for two hunrlred and fift)' passengers. In 
I,S82 was built the " Katterskill, " two hundred 
and eighty-five feet in length, thirty-eight feet 
beam, and sixty-si.\ feet over all, and capable 
of accommodating five hundred passengers. 
This is one of the finest boats on the rivei, 
and one of the most jiopular. Jioth these 
boats were built under Captain .Stead's con- 
stant supervision, and they met the needs of 
the business until 1.S93, when the "ICscort" 
was rebuilt and her name changed to the 
"City of Hudson." In i .StjS the "Onteora" 
was built, length two hundred and forty-seven 



feet, beam thirty-fixe feet, and si.\ty-three feet 
o\er all, and cajKible of carrying si.x luiiidred 
l)eo])le. .She was built for night service, and 

is the fastest night boat afloat, having a speed 
of twenty-three miles an hour. She has made 
the run from New X'ork to Catskiil, a di.stance 
of one hundred .ind tweiitx miles, and made 
one laniling, in four hours and twenty minutes. 
Captain Stead takes much jjride in this boat, 
as she was built b)- his plans and measure- 
ments. .She is fitteil with ever\- convenience 
for the comfort of guests. This company is a 
stock concern, and does a large and constantly 
increasing business. Their boats connect with 
the Catskiil Mountain Railroad, and in the 
summer the\' carr\' a large numbei" of tourists 
and tpiantities of ficight. 

Cajitain .Stead was married in 1865 to 
Rachel K. Pettit, who was born in Dutchess 
County, a daughter of Lewis Pettit. One 
child has blessed this union, Ida II., now the 
wife of Charles I. P'iero, superintendent of the 
Pratt lir.inch of the Standard (_)il Company in 
(neenpoint. Mr. and Mrs. Imch) have one 
daughter, Rachel S. 

The Ca|)tain is a Republican in jiolitics. 
In 1S70 he was elected Sheriff, which ofifice he 
held until 1882, when he declined to serve 
longer. In 188^ he was elected to the legis- 
latLU-e, wheie he served one year. He is a 
prominent man in his part)', was for a long 
time a member of the Count)' Committee, and 
has man\' times been a delegate to Rejudjlican 
conventions. He helped nominate Ciovernor 
Morton. P"or three years he was a trustee of 
the village, and for a year president of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Biiard of Trustees. Captain Stead has the dis- 
tinction of liaving been longer in the boating 
business than an}- other man on the Hudson. 
He built his present residence in 1897. He 
is a trustee of the Catskill Savings Bank, 
and president of the Cat.skill Ferry Company 
running between Catskill and Catskill Station, 
and an owner in the last-named corporation. 
He is also one of the directors of the Hudson 
Steamboat Company. He attends the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, of which his wife and 
daughter are members. 



)EVI M. DEFAXDORF, a skilful 
farmer and dairyman of Seward, Scho- 
harie County, owner and occupant 
of a fine farm lying about a mile and a half 
from Hyndsville village, is a representative of 
one of the oldest families in this part of the 
State of New York. He was born on this 
farm on April 26, 1831, son of John and Eliz- 
abeth (Petrie) Defandorf. His first progenitor 
in this country, his great-grandfather, came 
from Germany. 

Jacob Defandorf, father of John, bought a 
large tract of heavily timbered land in Seward, 
N.Y. , which included the larger part of the 
homestead of his grandson, Levi M., and the 
adjoining estate of one hundred and seventy 
acres. In common with his neighbors, who 
were few and were settled far apart, he suf- 
fered the hardships of pioneer life, but with 
true German habits of industry and persever- 
ance worked steadily; and the end of each year 
saw more land cleared and larger crops har- 



vested. He died, jirobably in the log cabin 
which he reared on coming to the wilderness, 
at the age of fifty years, leaving a widow, Mrs. 
Susan Defandorf, and six children. Mrs. De- 
fandorf was born at Frey's Hush, Montgomery 
County, and died in Seuard at the age of four- 
score and four \ears. 

John Defandorf remained beneath the paren- 
tal roof until ready to establish a home of his 
own, when he purchased a portion of the pa- 
rental estate. Here he was successfullv em- 
ployed in general agricultural pursuits until 
his death, at the age of si.\ty-four years. 
After he had made the last payment on his 
property, he began making needed improve- 
ments. The present dwelling-house was 
erected by him. A man of intelligence, he 
was greatly interested in all things pertaining 
to the welfare of the town, but was never an 
aspirant for official honors. He married Eliz- 
abeth Petrie, one of the seven children of John 
Handrake Petrie, a well-known farmer of Car- 
lisle, Schoharie County. P'our children were 
born of their union, and two of them are liv- 
ing, namely: Julia Ann, wife of Austin 
P'rance, of Seward \'alley; and Levi M. 
The parents were consistent members of the 
]\Iethodist church. 

Levi M. Defandorf attended the district 
school when it was in session during his hoy- 
hood and youth, and in the same period was so 
well trained at home that he became as famil- 
iar with the work of the farm as he was with 
his books. On attaining his majority, he 
bought one hundred and thirty-two acres of the 
old Defandorf homestead; and, having since 



396 



lilOCKAlMIICAI, KKVIKW 



addetl to it nineteen acres by purchnsc, lie has 
a large farm, anil one of the best in line of im- 
provements and appointments of any in the 
vicinity. He devotes his time to general 
farming, raising grain and liops to a considera- 
ble extent, but making a specialty of stock-rais- 
ing and dairying. From his herd of twenty 
or more grade Holstein and Jersey cows, lie 
makes butter, the greater part of which he ships 
to his son, who is enga,i;e(l in tlie grocery busi- 
ness in 'J'roy, \.V., and some to the markets in 
Ohio and in Washington, 1). C. He has always 
taken a great interest in the establishment of 
permanent town, county, ami State agricult- 
ural as.sociations; and as an exhibitor at fairs, 
held under the auspices of these organizations, 
Mr. Defandorf has on several occasions taken 
the first i)remiuni on stock. 'I'he credit of 
establishing the ])roducts of his dairy as among 
the best in the market, he gladl)' gives to 
his deccasetl wife, who was an e.\|)ert butter- 
maker. 

Mr. Defandorf married, April 25, 1H50, 
Miss I.ucinda R. Sexton, daughter of Austin 
Sexton. Her father was formerly engaged in 
farming in this i)art of Schoharie County, 
but afterward removed to Oriskany Falls, 
N.\'., where he ojierated a grist-mill and 
where lie .--pent his remaining days. I\Ir. 
and Mrs. Hefandorf rearetl five children; 
namely, Mary F., Clark H. , Jason F, , John A., 
and Daniel A. ^h^•y is the wife of Dr. Adam 
Myers, of Husk irk, Rensselaer County, and 
has two children - \'ictor and Ralph. Clark 
H. , deceased, married Susan Ostrandcr, who 
bore him three children — Jessie, Arthur, and 



Lucinda. Jason F. Defandorf was graduated 
with high honors from the Cazenovia Acad- 
emy, afterward spent three years at the Wes- 
leyan Universit)', Middletown, Conn., and 
still later attended the Law School in Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he received the degree of 
Bachelor of .Arts, and has since been employed 
by the government in the jiost-olTice and 
in the War and Treasury Departments in 
that city. He married Miss Hattie Holmes, 
and has four children- I-llizaheth I'., James, 
John Levi, and Marion. JcjIiii A. Defandorf 
was for one year clerk in a store at Coble.skill, 
then was several years a clerk in Troy, and 
subsequentiv went into business for himself 
with (lis cou>in, Charles H. Sexton, at Troy. 
He married Fmnia Smith, and they have one 
child, Clark. Daniel A., the youngest .son, 
completed his education at the Cohleskill 
High School, and subsequently taught school 
se\'eral terms in .Seward and Sharon. He as- 
si.sts his father in the care of the home farm, 
and is also a local preacher in the Methodi.st 
church. He married Carrie \'roman, daughter 
of Harney Woman. 

After fort\-seven \ears of liappy wi.'diled 
life, Mrs. Lucinda R. Defandorf passed to the 
brighter worKl beyond, her death occurring 
June 6, iSyj. She was a woman of exem- 
jdar)' character and great personal worth, in 
every way deserving the high respect univer- 
sally accorded her. She was a faithful mem- 
ber of the Methodist church, of which .Mr. 
Defandorf is (jue of the oldest members now 
living, and in which he has held all the 
offices, having been a trustee and steward for 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years, a class loailcr for a i|uarlcr of a ccn- 
tiir\-, and for fifteen \ears superintendent of 
the Sumlay-school, in wliieh his wife, Lii- 
eiiida, was a teaciier. Hoth assisted in evei"y 
work indorsed b)- the church, ami their hospi- 
table home was ever t>pen to receive the minis- 
ters of that tlenomination. 

On January 25, i8g8, Mr. Defandorf mar- 
ried Mrs. Catherine M. Somers, daughter of 
Joseph h" ranee, a farmer of Seward, N.V. 
Three chiklren were born to the present Mrs. 
Defandorf and her former husband, Peter N. 
Somers — Howard S., Ernest F. , and Arthur 
L., deceased. 



§AMES MADISON CASE, a prominent 
busincs.s man of Gilboa, N.Y., was 
born in this town, July 7, 1849, son of 
Daniel and Betsey (Chichester) Case. He is 
a descendant of John Case, who came over 
from England more than two hundred and fifty 
years ago. 

A brief account of the life of John Case, 
the immigrant, by A. P. Case, of Vernon, 
N. Y., has recently appeared in print. In 
this book mention is made of records showing 
that John Case as early as 1640 was living in 
the vicinity of Hartford, Conn.; that in 1656 
he was an inhabitant of Long Island, a year 
or two later removing to Windsor, Conn., 
and in 1669 one of the first settlers at Sims- 
bury, Conn., so named in 1670. For four 
years he represented the town in the General 
Court, or Assembly. He married first Sarah, 
daughter of William Spencer, of Hartford. 



She died in 1691, and he afterward mairied 
I'Llizabeth Loomis, a widow. He had ten 
chiklren, all by his first wife; namely, I'lli/a- 
beth, Mary, John, William, Samuel, Richard, 
Bartholomew, Joseph, Sarah, and Abigail. 

The Case family in I'jigland is said to have 
been numerously represented for a number of 
generations at Aylsham, Norfolk County. 
Calvin Case, who was born in Connecticut, 
April 10, 1763, came to Conesville, N.Y., 
and a few years later he moved to Gilboa, 
where he acquired two tracts of land, amount- 
ing in all to two hundred acres. The prop- 
erty he occupied, which is still known as the 
Case farm, now consists of one hundred and 
si.Nty acres, and the original title is in the 
possession of his grantlson, the subject of this 
sketch. His first abiding-place was a log 
hut, the entrance to which was covered with 
a blanket ; and from a struggling pioneer he 
rose to be a well-to-do farmer, stock-raiser, 
and grain dealer. Calvin Case, it is said, 
served as a minute-man in 1777, and was 
ordered to the front at the second battle of 
Stillwater, but arrived after the surrender of 
General Burgoyne. The Case family have an 
honorable record for patriotism, seventy or rr.oie 
of that name from Connecticut having served 
in the Revolution, upward of twenty in the 
War of 1812, and over fifty in the Civil War. 
Calvin Case was married in Connecticut, 
August 2, 1793, to Jerusha Griffin, and he 
brought three children with him to Schoharie 
County. He died January 4, 1854, aged 
ninety-one years, and his wife, who was bom 
December 2, 1777, died May 7, 1S49. They 



398 



lilOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



reared a family of thirteen children, namely: 
Calvin, who moved from Conesville to Blen- 
heim; Luther, who died at Potter's Hollow; 
IClisha, Allen, and firastus, who all died in 
Conesville; Ira, who now resides at Cones- 
ville; Daniel. James M. Case's father; 
(jrifTin, who died in (iilhoa; llirain, who re- 
sided in Catskill; Jod. who died while 
yoiini;-; Jerusha, deceased, who married Or- 
lean Ue Witt, of Oak Hill; I':iiza, who mar- 
ried S. Mackey, of Gilb.ia; and I'hu-hc, who 
marrie.i William I'h.ss, of GiJlmn. The sons 
were ail farmers except Hiram, who was a 
cattle dealer, hotel-keeper, and general specu- 
lator. The i^randparents were Presbyterians, 
and most of tiieir children became members of 
that church. 

Daniel Case remained at tiie homestead to 
care for his parents in tiieir (dd ai;e, and after 
tiieir death lie succeeded to tlie ownership of 
the property iiy |Kirchasing the interests of 
the other heirs. He was an eneri;etic, indus- 
trious, and successful fanner, and at his 
death, wliich occurred November lo, KS.Sf), he 
left a good estate. His wife, Hetsey, was a 
dausjhter of Joseph Chichester, and the maiden 
name of her mother was Welch. The Chi- 
chesters are of Scotcii descent, and the 
Welches are said to be of Dutch ori.i,'in. Jo- 
seph Chichester had a family of nine children. 
Daniel and Hetsey Case reared but one child, 
James M., the sui)ject of this sketch. The 
mother died I'ebruary 19, 1875. 

James Madison Case was educated in Gil- 
bo.x, and taught several terms of school after 
the completion of his studies. He assisted 



his father in farming from the time he was 
able to be of u.se until the age of twenty-four, 
when he engaged in general mercantile busi- 
ness in C(jmpany with Abraham Walker, a 
partnership that ended at the death of Mr. 
Walker some tiiree years later. He continued 
in business alone some sixteen years, or until 
about 1.S93, when he sold out to George E. 
Hawver. He has since given his attention to 
the buying of country ]>ioduce, ineluding 
butter, which he handles cpiitc extensi\-ely. 
He also buys large quantities of wool, which 
he ships to Hoston ; and during the jiast year 
his shipments amounted to over one hundred 
thousand pountls. He still owns the home- 
stead, upon which he raises some tine horses, 
and he takes special pride in preserving the 
old dwelling which was built by his grand- 
father over eighty years ago. h'or the past 
ten years he has been actively interested in 
inland fisheries, in stocking the various 
streams in this locality, and is regarded as an 
authority on that subject. 

Mr. Case married Hattie E. Hawver, 
daughter of William W. and Samantha (Hay) 
Hawver. She was the first-born of eight chil- 
dren, the others being: I'^nma D., who died 
at the age of six years; I-llla, who married 
(;. N. Thorp: George l- 
ton, N.Y. ; James H., 
who occupies the lA 1 
ville: Flora A., who 
twenty -one years; Hertha, wife of James Car- 
penter; antl Martha, who married D. V. I'"er- 
guson, of Alton, 111. Mr. and Mrs. Case 
have hati two daughters: Merta, who died 



, a merchant of Url- 
a prosperous farmer, 
lomestead in Cones- 
died at the age of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



aged four years; and Mina, who died aged one 
year. 

In politics Mr. Case is a Democrat, and for 
a number of years was Postmaster. lie lias 
served upon tiie Town Committee several 
terms, has attended as a delegate many county 
conventions, but has never sought for or held 
local offices. He is a Master Mason, and be- 
longs to Gilboa Lodge, No. 630. 



'rank RUFUS SEARLES, M.D., 

physician and surgeon, Catskill, N.Y., 
was born in Newton, N.J. , April 29, 1868, 
son of Arthur and Alice (Martin) Searles. 
On the paternal side he comes of English an- 
cestry, and through his mateinivl grandfather 
he is a descendant of French Pi-otestants, or 
Huguenots. The first of the Searles family 
who came to America settled in Massachu- 
setts, and was a farmer. Representatives of 
the family participated in the Revolutionary 
War, the War of 18 12, and the I'rench and 
Indian War. Dr. Searles's great-great-grand- 
father, John Finlay, was an aide on the staff 
of General Green and also on that of General 
Mifflin. 

Arthur Searles, the Doctor's father, was 
reared in Massachusetts. He followed agri- 
culture until of age, when he went to New- 
Jersey. Later he entered commercial life in 
New York, and resided there until his death, 
which occurred at the age of thirty. Mr. 
Searles is survived by his wife, Alice, and 
their only child, Frank Rufus, the special 
subject of this sketch. The Doctor's mother, 



now Mrs. Lester Leggett, resides in Plainfield, 
N.J. She has one brother, Frederick Martin. 
Her parents were Lebbeus L. and Frances 
(lieach) Martin. Her father was a wholesale 
clothing merchant of Plainfield, N.J., moved 
from that town to Newton, N.J., and at one 
time resided in New York for a short jjeriod. 
His death occurred in Plainfield, N.J., in 
iSg8, at the age of seventy-eight. 

Frank Rufus Searles was educated in the 
common and high schools and at Leal's Acad- 
emy, Plainfield, N.J. His medical studies 
were completed at the Long Island College 
Hospital, from which he was graduated March 
22, 1892. He began the practice of his pro- 
fession at Plainfield, N.J., where he remained 
one year, removing from there to Hunter, 
Greene County, and two years later settling in 
Catskill, N. Y. He has made rapid progress 
in his profession, and is highly esteemed both 
as a physician and citizen. 

On November 8, 1893, Dr. Searles was 
joined in marriage with Miss Myra Rose 
Lowrie, daughter of Dr. H. H. and Myra G. 
(l^urr) Lowrie, of Plainfield. Dr. and Mrs. 
Searles have one child, P^rank Rufus Searles, 
second. There are twenty-two physicians in 
the Lowrie family, and Mrs. Searles's father 
has practised in Plainfield many years. Her 
mother, who is a native of Brooklyn, N. Y. , 
and a descendant of a branch of the family to 
which Aaron Burr belonged, has reared four 
children, namely: Caroline, who is the wife 
of the Rev. C. G. Bristol, rector of Colts 
Memorial Church, Hartford, Conn. ; Myra 
Rose, now Mrs. Searles; Maud Myra, now 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



Mrs. Julian Deane, who is residing at Spring- 
field, Mass. ; and H. H. Lowrie, Jr., who is 
manager of an insurance company in Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Dr. Searles has served as president of the 
Greene County Medical Society, :ind h;is fre- 
(piently read jinpers before tliat body upon 
timely topics. lie is now delet;;ite to tiie 
Medical Society, Stale of New York, lie is 
Assistant Surgeon of the Sixteenth tdmpan\, 
N. Ci. .S., N.\'., now actiii_i;- I'aptain ; is 
medical examiner for a number of life insin- 
ance companies; and is local health officer 
and secretary of the Hoard of L'. S. Pension 
Ivxaminers of (ireciie Coniit}'. In politics he 
is a keiuiblican. Dr. and Mrs. Searles are 
members of Christ's I'resbyterian Church. 



^OllX II. HCRIIS, Jk.,* jiroprietor of 
-^1 the lintel St. Charles, Hunter, X.V., 
^ was born in Brooklyn, Long Island, 
October 24, 1869, son of John 11. and Mary 
(Thompson) Hurtis. His father is a native 
of Washinj^ton County, New \'ork, and his 
mother was born in Nar.tucket, Mass. His 
immigrant ancestor came from h'lorence, Italy; 
and his great-grandfather Hurtis and his grand- 
father, whose name was lohn, were natives 
of Washington County, this State. 

John Hurtis was a carpenter and builder and 
a manufacturer of sieves. In his latter years 
he removed to Hunter, wheie he carried on a 
large sieve factory until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1890. He was a Justice of the 



Peace many years, was familiarly known as 
Squire liurtis, and he enjoyed the esteem of all 
who knew him. In his religious belief he was 
a Presbyterian. He married for his first wife 
Piliza l.ee, a native of Washington County, 
and had a large famil\- of children, of whom 
the only one living is John H., Sr. The 
.urandmother's tleath occurred man\ }ears ])rior 
to that of her husband. 

John H. Hurtis, Sr., was reare.l in Wash- 
ington Count)'. Ill 1S45 became to Hunter, 
and purchased a tract of land comprising three 
hutulred and fifty acres, mostly covered with 
timber, which he at first used for si)orting pur- 
poses, and later cleared for cultivation. h"or 
several years he conducted the sto\e and tin- 
ware business in New \'ork City. After that 
he engaged in the dried fruit trade and still 
later in the wholesale drug and ])atent medi- 
cine business. At the present time he is a 
])ro.spcrous real estate dealer in Hrooklyn, 
where he resides winters, his summers being 
spent in Hunter. His original residence here, 
which he built shortly after purchasing his 
]iropertv, he afterward I'ulargetl for the accom- 
modation of summer hoanlers; and it was con- 
ducted by his half-brother until 1.SS2, when it 
was destroyed by fire. In 1.S83 the present 
large hotel was erected. For three years it 
was in charge of S. P. \'an Loan, later in that 
of Mr. Scri])ture, and in 1.S93 John II. Hurtis, 
Jr., became its manager. 

John H. Hurtis, Sr., is a Republican in pol- 
itics. He was in the Assembly in i.S'75 and 
1876, anil is cpiite active in the ])ublic affairs 
of Hrooklyn. In Masonry he has advanced to 




JOHN H. BURTIS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



403 



the thirty-second degree. He has served as 
Deputy Grand Master, and Ijclongs to the Mys- 
tic Shrine; is vice-president of the Union 
League Club, Broot;l\n; and president of 
Aurora Grata Club. 

His wife, Mar_\', is a daughter of James B. 
and Mary (Gardner) Thompson. Her father 
was a graduate of Yale and a well-known 
mathematician. He was the author of Thomp- 
son's Arithmetics, and has written over forty 
different volumes, known as Thompson's 
Mathematical Series, including arithmetic, 
algebra, geonietrv, and trigonometry. He was 
at one time principal of an acadeni}- in Nan- 
tucket, Mass. During the latter part of his 
life he made his home in New York, where he 
died at the age of eighty }'ears. His wife, 
Mary Gardner Thompson, who is still living, 
is now seventy-five years old. Mrs. Mary 
Thomp.son Burtis was educated in Brooklyn 
and at a young ladies' seminary in New 
Haven, Conn. She is president of Memorial 
Hospital, Brooklyn, and is prominent in char- 
itable work. She has had seven children, 
three of whom are living: Alary L., John H., 
Jr., and Grace L. Burtis. Charles Burtis, 
M.D., was graduated from the New York 
Homoeopathic College, and at the time of his 
death was practising his profession in Atlanta, 
Ga. Grace L. is a student at Vassar College, 
Poughkeepsie. The parents are members of 
the Congregational church. | 

John H. Burtis, Jr., began his education in 
the common schools of Brooklyn, and fitted for 
college at the Latin school. He was graduated 
from Columbia College in 1894, with the de- j 



gree of liachelor of Arts, and siibse(|uently 
studied law. During the summer of 1893 he 
managed the Hotel St. Charles in Hunter, and 
since 1894 he has resided here permanently. 
This hotel, which is situated upon the highest 
elevation in the Catskill region, occujjies a de- 
sirable location on what is known as Breeze 
Lawn Farm. The building is se\entv-five feet 
front, one hundred and si.xty-three feet deep, 
and four stories high. It has broad piazzas on 
three sides, and is equipped with all modern 
improvements, including passenger elevator 
and telegraph office. With the annex it 
has accommodations for two hundred guests. 
The table is supplied with fresh cream, 
butter, eggs, and vegetables from the farm 
connected with the house; and the service 
is of the best. Aside from the hotel Mr. 
Burtis manages Breeze Lawn, consisting of 
three hundred and fifty acres. He carries on 
a dairy, and sends his surplus products to 
market. 

On October 9, 1S95, Mr. Burtis married 
Zaidee I. Scribner, a native of Hunter, daugh- 
ter of Peter H. and Agnes (Merwin) Scribner. 
Her father, who at one time was engaged in 
mercantile business in Catskill, is at present 
residing in Palenville, where he accommodates 
summer boarders. 

Mr. Scribner originally came from Connect- 
icut. He has had four children: Zaidee I., 
now Mrs. Burtis; George H. ; Bertha; and 
IMerwin. Mr. and Mrs. Burtis are the parents 
of two children — Thompson H. and Grace 
Agnes. 

Mr. Burtis is a Republican in politics, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



has been c|iiite prominent in public afiairs. 
He belongs to the Masonic Order, being a 
member of Mount Tabor Lodge and the chap- 
ter in Windham. He attends the Meth.idist 
l-j.iso.i'al einueh. 



M()R\' STK\'I-:NS, of Conesville, an ex- 
mcnil)er of the Stale legishiture, was 
born ill this town, September 24, 1.S39, son of 
Levi F. and Thirza (Sage) Stevens. His 
grandfather, Peter S., and his j^reat -grand- 
father, (iershom Stevens, both came here from 
Fairfield, Conn., in 1.S05, I'eter S. being then 
a young man. 

Ciershom Stevens iiecame the second owner 
of the first grist-mill in this region, and he 
operated it for a number of years. His chil- 
dren were: Levi, Cicrsliom, I'eter S. , Ozias, 
and two davighters. Some years after his 
death iiis son I'eter S. remodelled the mill 
into a tannery. This was afterward destroyed 
l)y fire, and two other buildings erected upon 
the site were also burned. 

Peter S. Stevens was the father of ten chil- 
dren ; namely, Levi v., Walter, Alfre<l, Nel- 
son, Tompkins, Thalia A., Sally, John F. , 
Ozias I)., and another son who died in in- 
fancy. The Old)' one now living is Tomp- 
kins, who is a well-known dealer in hides in 
New York City. Thalia A. married Andrew 
Rickev, and Sally married tHiarles Slurgis. 
Jolm I'"., who became a piiysician, was for five 
years president of a medical scliocd in St. 
Louis, Mo., and afterward practised in Prook- 
lyn, N.V. Nelson died in Cnesville, aged 



twenty-four years. Tomi)kins, Alfred, and 
Walter went to Sullivan County, and were 
instrumental in building uj) the t(jwn of Slev- 
ensvijle, where they operated tanneries for 
many \ears, being also engaged in hunbering 
and farming. Tiie Stevens l)rotliers built a 
hotel in C.inesville, which was first openeil by 
Gersiiom. 

Levi I-". Stevens, father of I-^mory, was in 
his younger days interested in the tannery at 
Cone.sville, and for a while be kept a .store. 
He succeeded to the ownership of the home- 
stead property, which was in his day a part of 
the original tract one mile square acquired by 
his granilfather. He was an able, energetic, 
and successful farmer, and favorably known 
through this section of the county. I'oliti- 
cally he was a Democrat, and held some of 
the town offices. He was an active niember 
and a prominent official of the Methodist F:pis- 
cojxil church, whose house of worshii) was 
built principally through the instrumentality 
of his father and David .Sage. Levi F. 
Stevens died March jS, iSqo, aged eighty 
years. 

His wife, Thir/.a, was a daughter of 
David Sage, who removed with his family to 
Conesville from Coniieclicut. He was a de- 
scendant of David Sage, first, who was born in 
Wales in iCy), and coming to .America w.,s 
one of the earliest seltlers in Middletown, 
Conn. The immigrant was also the ancestor 
of Russell Sage, the well-known financier. 
The Sage familv, we are told, ilates its origin 
from the time of the Norman conquest, • its 
founder having fought on the winning side at 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the battle of Hastings. Mrs. Stevens's 
father, who was born in Connecticut, settled 
upon a tract of twt) hundred acres in that part of 
Broome which is now Conesville, and became 
a successful farmer. He was one of the 
founders of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Strykersville. His children were: Daniel, 
Abiel, Simeon, Levi, Thirza (Mrs. Stevens), 
Polly, and Lucena. Abiel, twin brother to 
Thirza, died in Ashland, Greene Count)-, 
N. Y. ; Daniel died in Conesville; Levi died 
while young; and Simeon, who amassed a for- 
tune in business in New York City, died in 
Windham. 

Levi F. and Thirza (Sage) Stevens had 
seven children; namely, Diantha M., David 
S. , Delphus T. , Thalia A., Emor}', Ozro, and 
Daniel T. Stevens. Diantha M. died at the 
age of fifteen years; David S., who resided in 
Gilboa, was for twenty years a Methodist 
preacher; Delphus T. , who died at the age of 
twenty-eight, was a promising young lawyer in 
Oak Hill, N. Y. ; Thalia A. died at sixteen; 
Ozro died at eighteen ; and Daniel T. died at 
twenty-three years. The mother died in Au- 
gust, 1890, aged eighty-five years. 

Emory Stevens completed his education at 
the Charlotteville Academy. He taught 
school for some time, and afterward he was 
employed as a clerk in mercantile business at 
Conesville and Gilboa. fie then went to 
Iowa, where for the next few years he was en- 
gaged in various kinds of business, including 
mercantile. For some time he kept a sale 
stable in Des Moines, and while in that city he 
also speculated rather extensively in real es- 



tate. Since his return home he has devoted 
some tif his time to educatimial work. 

In politics he is a Democrat, and while re- 
siding in Iowa was ciiosen a delegate to repre- 
sent Harrison County in the State Convention. 
He has served as a Supervisor in Conesville 
for three years. He also served as chairman 
of the County Canvassers' Committee, as fore- 
man of the Grand Jury, and during his term in 
the Assembly he was a member of several im- 
portant committees. Mr. Stevens is a member 
of the Methodist church, and was for a number 
of years superintendent of the Sunday-school. 

Mr. Stevens married Emma Miller, daugh- 
ter of William Miller, of Conesville. They 
have six children; namely, Ward E., ^^'alter 
A., Linnie D., Ralph F. , Levi F. , and Susie 
E. Ward E. was graduated from the New 
York Dental College in 1897. Walter A. is 
a member of the police force. 



§OHN WESLEY GAYLORD, a repre- 
sentative citizen of Conesville, N. Y. , 
was born in this town on April 4, 
1840, son of George and Fannie (Humphrey) 
Gaylord. On the paternal side he is of Hu- 
guenot descent. His emigrant ancestors on 
leaving France settled first in England, 
whence some of the family found their way to 
this country. His great-grandfather Gaylord 
served as an Ensign in the Continental army 
during the Revolutionary War. He was a 
man of considerable property. 

John Gaylord, son of Ensign Gaylord, was 
but a young boy at the time his father died ; 



4o6 



mOGRAl'HICAL KKVIKW 



and he was bound out to a Captain Langdon, 
of Litchfield, Conn. He ran away, however, 
at about the age of eighteen, having received 
none of his inheritance, and with one Allen 
Griffin came to Conesvillc, journeying by way 
of Catskill, guided by marked trees. He set- 
tled on the Sotts patent, now known as the 
Van Dyke farm, and built a Ing house to live 
in. After remaining there a few years, he re- 
moved to a farm on the stage road between 
Gilboa and Cairo, in Manor Kill village. 
Subsequently he settled on the farm where his 
grandson, John Wesley Gaylord, now resides. 
He became the largest land-owner of his time, 
owning from fnur to five hundred acres. 
When he arrived here he liiul only fifty dollars 
in his pocket. He married .Sabrina Atwood, re- 
turning to Connecticut for that purpose. .She 
bore him three sons — Hiram, Henry, and 
George. To each of these he gave a handsome 
property iii)on his coming of age. He then 
himself started afresh, and in time accumu- 
lated as much as he had at first, so that during 
his life he owned between eight hundred and 
a thousand acres. roliticall)-, he was a Dem- 
ocrat, and the leading member of his party 
hereabouts. In religious faith he was a Meth- 
odist. He helped to build the Methodist 
church here, and was always one of its most 
liberal supporters. He died at the age of 
seventy-eight, and his wife died later, at about 
the same age. His son Hiram became a 
wealthy merchant of New York City. Henry, 
who removed to Catskill in 1868, became a 
wealthy dealer in live stock and wool, and later 
in real estate. He died at Catskill in Janu- 



ary, 1898, in the eighty-eighth year of his age. 
He had travelled e.xtensively. The fine bell 
on the church at Manor Kill was presented by 
him some four years ago at a cost of four hun- 
dred dollars. 

George Gaylord, father of John W. , was 
born on April 28, 181 5, in Conesville, and re- 
sided here all his life, dying in 187S. He 
kept a hostelry for drovers, the largest in the 
-State, furnishing accommodations one night 
for fifteen hundred cattle. Drovers came here 
from different .States, and it is said that one 
paid him ninety dcdlars for three tons of hay 
to feed liis drove for a single night. He was 
famed far and wide for his hospitality and for 
his sunny and genial temper. Himself an ex- 
pert judge of cattle, he bought and sold many 
head. He owned a farm of si.x hundred acres, 
upon which he raised annually from fifty to 
seventy-five tons of hay. During war time he 
kept three hundred sheep, and forty or fifty 
head of cattle. Like his father, he was a 
strong Democrat ; but he was no office-seeker. 
He was married on December 31, 1838. Both 
he and his wife were active and de\dted mem- 
bers of the Methodist church, and gave it gen- 
erous financial support. The latter, who was 
born on August 21, 1818, died in 1868. She 
was the mother of four children, namely: 
John W. ; Woodford, who was born on January 
2, 1842; George K. , who was born on June 9, 
1846; and Ugden, who was born on June 13, 
1849. George IC. , who was for many years 
engaged in the cattle business, is one of the 
largest land-owners here. He is an influential 
man, a political leader, and has twice been 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



407 



Supervisor of the town. Oi^den is in the 
nicLit business at Gilijoa. Woodford is the 
well known ex- Sheriff. 

John Wesley Gaylord was educated in the 
district schools, at Chartlotteville Hii;-h 
School and Ashland Academy, being a stu- 
dent in the last-named institution in 1S60, 
when it was burned. After his marriage he 
settled on a farm of his own, where he lived 
for ten years. He then came back to take 
charge of the homestead farm. Here he now 
owns some five hundred acres. He was for- 
merly engaged to some extent in dairying and 
in growing hay. From youth also he has been 
interested in buying and selling cattle, being 
an expert judge of stock. In 1S68 he went on 
the road in this business, but after some years 
gave it up, only to start again in 1S80 in com- 
pany with his brother George. The latter re- 
tired from the partnership in 1891, and Mr. 
J. W. Gaylord has since continued alone. In 
his early life he taught school for a time, but 
finally decided that business was much more 
congenial to him. As a cattle dealer, he has 
travelled into Canada and throughout this 
State, principally in Dutchess, Columbia, 
Green, Schoharie, Otsego, Montgomery, Jef- 
ferson, and Delaware Counties. He also went 
into Connecticut on some of his trips. He 
was usually absent from home three or four 
weeks at a time. Like his fatber, he is noted 
among all who know him for his genial hospi- 
tality. He is popular in his own town; and it 
is said that, if he takes a subscription paper 
among the people for any purpose whatever, he 
is sure to fill it with names. No family in 



the community has done more for the church 
of the town than the Gaylord family. Mr. 
John \V. Gaylord in this respect has not been 
behind his father and grandfather in generosity 
and in the support of every good movement. 
In politics he is a Democrat. 

At twent_\-three Mr. Gaylord was united in 
marriage with Mar)- K. Porter, daughter of 
a Scotch family. Mrs. Gaylord died on De- 
cember 17, 1S97, having been the mother of 
three children. Of these, John H. died in in- 
fancy; and George Porter died on December 
14, 1 889, at the age of twenty-three. P'annie 
M., the only daughter, resides with her father. 
She attended the Albany Normal School, and 
subsequently taught school until her marriage 
with Coral E. Rictchmyer. She has one 
child, Mabel G. George Porter Gaylord was 
a young man of great promise. In his youth 
he attended a select school in Broome Centre, 
and then took a course in the Albany Busi- 
ness College. He was nearly qualified to take 
his degree of Doctor of Medicine at the Uni- 
versity of the City of New York when he be- 
came ill. He was naturally a devoted .student, 
and his close confinement to his books had un- 
dermined his health. He was a Mason of Gil- 
boa Lodge, and remarkably well informed on 
Masonic history for one of his age. 



w. 



GARDINER COFFIN, cashier of 
he Catskill National Bank of Cats- 
kill and Supervisor of the town of 
Catskill, is a native of this village, and 
was born on August 10, 1S59, his parents 



4o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



being Uriah H. and Klizabetli J. (Surllcot) 
Coffin. 

The family of which he is a representative 
has existed for many generations in England. 
Tristram Coffin, the founder of the American 
branch, was the son of Peter and Joan (Them- 
ber or Thumber) Coffin, of Bri.vton, Devon- 
shire, and a grandson of Nicholas Coffin of 
that place, who died in 1613. Tristram 
Coffin, born probably at Hri.xton, about 1605, 
married Dionis Stevens. Ho came to New 
England with his widowed mother and his 
family in 1642. After residing successively 
in Haverhill, Newbury, and Salisbury, he 
finally, about i66o, settled at Nantucket, 
where he died in 1681, and where some of his 
descendants live at this day. Mr. Coffin has 
in his possession a copy of the commission, 
dated June 29, 1671, granted by Francis 
Lovelace, Governor of New York, to Tristram 
Coffin to be chief magistrate over the islands 
of Nantucket and Tuckernuck. 

.Mr. Coffin's grandfather, IV-ter G. Coffin, 
was born in Hudson, N. Y., on July 30, 1794. 
For many years he owned and ran boats be- 
tween Catskill and Albany. He died on De- 
cember 5, 1858. He was three times mar- 
ried. His second wife, the grandmother of 
P. Gardiner Coffin, was before her marriage 
Lucy O. Green. .She was born in Athens, 
N.Y., on November i, 1793, and died there 
on February 7, 1834, having been the mother 
of only one child, Uriah H. Both she and 
her husband were Episcopalians. 

Uriah H. Coffin was born on May 30, 1831. 
He was brought up in Athens, Greene County, 



N.Y., removed to Catskill, and engaged 
in grocery business there. He was captain 
for a time of the "P. G. Coffin" that ran be- 
tween Albany and Catskill, and later he ran 
on the boats plying between New York and 
Catskill. After being engaged in the boating 
business for some years, he removed to White- 
hall, N.Y. He enlisted during the Civil 
War, was commissionetl as Captain of a com- 
pany in the One Hundred and Twentieth Regi- 
ment, and remainetl in the service until the 
close of the war, being Quartermaster of the 
regiment, on the staff of Colonel George H. 
Sharp. Some time after being mustered out, 
he received an appointment in the post-office 
in New York City, and is now in charge of 
the record department of the registration 
office. In politics he is a Republican. His 
first wife, the mother of P. Gardiner Coffin, 
died at the age of thirty-five, having borne 
him three children. Of these the living are: 
Charles G.. who is in the insurance business 
in this town; and P. Gardiner. The second 
wife was before her marriage Emma Johnson. 
She was l)orn in Whitehall, N.Y. She is the 
mother of two sons now living — Arthur and 
Robert Coffin. 

P. Gardiner Coffin lost his mother when he 
was an infant. He was born and brought up 
in Catskill, ant! has been a resident of this 
village all his life. In 1S76 he was appointed 
Deputy Postmaster of the town; and, after 
filling that office in a most creditable manner 
for si.\ years, he entered the Catskill National 
Bank as a general clerk. In a short time he 
was aj)pointed teller, in 1889 he was made 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



409 



assistant cashier, and in 1896 was promoted to 
his present position of cashier, being also a 
member of the board of directors. This bank 
was organized in 1S12, and is one of the old- 
est banks, not only in the State, but in the 
United States, and has a proud history. A 
sketch of Mr. CoiTfin appears on page 5S-, and 
his portrait on page 191, of the work recently 
issued, entitled "Prominent Bankers of 
America." 

From 1S85 to 1891 Mr. Coffin was inter- 
ested with his brother in conducting a large 
general insurance business. In 18SS he 
helped to organize the Catskill Building and 
Loan Association, and he has since been its 
treasurer and one of its directors. For twelve 
years he was treasurer of Catskill village. In 
politics he is a Republican. He was elected 
Supervisor of the town in 1896, and again in 
1898 to serve one year; but by a change in 
the law he will continue in office until 1900. 
In 1898 he served as chairman of the board. 
For many years he was a leading member of 
the Republican county committee, and he was 
its chairman for a year. His activity in pro- 
moting the best interests of the village has 
been unceasing, and his townsmen award him 
due credit for his disinterested efforts. He 
is well known in both town and county, and 
highly respected. 

Mr. Coffin was married on November 9, 
1S87, to Ida Brown, who was born in Peta- 
luma, Cal. Her father. Captain John Brown, 
formerly interested in the boating business on 
the Hudson and a resident of Catskill, now 
resides in California. He removed to that 



State in 1S49, and was for many years with 
the Southern Pacific Railroad Company as 
master mariner in their steamboat service be- 
tween San Francisco and Oakland. He has 
now retired from business. Mrs. Coffin fre- 
quently visits her family in California. She 
has made the overland journey eight times, 
Mr. Coffin accompanying her once. In 1883 
she and her mother were in the railway dis- 
aster at Tehachepi, Southern California, where 
eleven out of twenty-three persons in one car 
were killed. In this accident Mrs. Coffin 
sustained injuries which kept her in the hos- 
pital for several months, and the injuries of 
her mother were of such a serious character 
that she never fully recovered from their 
effects. Mrs. Brown is now deceased. She 
was a woman of unusual literary attainments, 
anci was the author of a work on botany. It 
was through her efforts that the library in 
Alameda, Cal., was established. Her maiden 
name was Helen Walter. She was born in 
Catskill, daughter of William Walter, for 
many years a leading merchant here. F'or a 
time she lived in the family of Captain Hugh 
Taylor. Mrs. Coffin is the only daughter in 
a family of four children. Her eldest brother 
Thomas is manager of the Western Union 
Telegraph at Reno, Nev. William Brown, 
second brother, is travelling freight and pas- 
senger agent of the Great Northern Railroad 
Company of California. George W. Brown, 
another brother, is in the Wells & Fargo E.\- 
press Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Coffin have three children — 
Charles G., Robert E., and Helen M. Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Coffin is a member of Catskill Lodge of 
Masons, and chairman of Finance Committee. 
He has held mcmlKTshi]) in the Dutch Re- 
formed cliurch for many y.'ars. 



RANKLIN CLAITI-IR, the \vell-kn.,wn 
:hant of Mackey's ("urneis, (iilho;!, 
N. V. , is a native of this town. lie was horn 
on May 4, iSr");,, and is the only son cjI' I'hiliii 
and Hetsy (Robinson) Clapper. The family 
is known to be of German descent, and it is 
believed that Mr. Clapper's ,i,q-eat-,^'reat --rand- 
father was its first rei)rescntati\c in /Xnierica. 

His f,aeat-f;randfather, Henry 1'. Clapper, 
came to Gilboa from Coeymans, this .State, 
about I Si 5, and settled in the north part of 
the town, then in Uroome. He took up a tract 
of about a hundred and forty acres of wild land, 
and built first a log cabin and later a frame 
house. He felled the first trees, and did all 
the clearing;. 'I'liis farm is still owned b)' one 
of the family, a .i;i-andson (if the |iioneer. 
Henry 1". Clajiper died on the farm in 1849, 
at the age of eighty. His wife, whom he had 
married in Coeymans, dieil some \ears before 
he did. They had three sons — .Sylvester, 
Silas, and (;eor,i;e; and four daughters — 
Sarah, re-.-y, I'olly, and Harriet. Geor-e 
resided at tlie homestead. Silas settled in 
another part of the town. 

-Sylvester Clapper, j^randfalher of h'ranklin, 
was born in Coe\mans in 1802, and died in 
Sejitember, 1.SS4. He came to (iilboa with 
his parents when about thirteen years of age, 
and in time settled upon a portion of the home- 



stead farm, where he spent the remainder of 
his life. He acquired some two hundred acres 

of land. In religion he was a liiptist of the 
old schnnl. I'iditically, he was a strong Dem- 
ocrat, and a leadei" in his party in this vicin- 
ity, though he never sought office for himself. 
As a business man, he was shrewd and far-see- 
ing. His judgment was much deferred to by 
his fellow-citizens. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Louisa R\der, was born in 1807, 
anti died in 1891. Her ancestors were of Ger- 
man descent, and came here from Columbia 
Count). Tile cliildren of .Silvester Clapper 
were: I'hilip, Henry, John, and George M. 
John, who remained on the homestead farm, 
died in 1885. George M went to Michigan 
in 1883. Henr\' H. is a \er\- prosperous 
farmer in Albany County. He is married, 
and has four children. Syhx-ster Clapper was 
interested in the turnjiike road between North 
Hlenheim and Potter's Hollow, and together 
with Mr. Tibbits was instrumental in securing 
the legislation under which it was Iniilt. 

Philip Clapper, abo\c named, was educated 
in the public schools, and subsequently taught 
school for a number of terms. He has contin- 
ued to be a student thidughout his life, and 
has been much lookeil to hy his neighbors and 
acquaintances for information on doiditful 
points under discussion. In jiolitics he is a 
Democrat. His first farm consisted of one 
hundred acres, all tillable land. Later he be- 
came the owner of the homestead jiroperty, 
where he has resided since 1863, in his active 
}ears ilexnting his energies to general farming, 
giving special attention to dairying. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wife, whose maiden name was Betsy Robinson, 
is the daughter of John D. Robinson, whose 
ancestors were of Scotch-Englisli descent, emi- 
grants from Connecticut. Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip Clapper have one son, Franklin, whose 
personal history is given below, and a daugh- 
ter Emmaline, who was married in December, 
1894, to Edgar Hulbert, of North Blenheim. 

Franklin Clapper was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and in a select school, receiving 
more than ordinarily good advantages. Then 
for some time he taught school during the win- 
ter terms in the towns of Gilboa, Blenheim, 
Breakabeen, and Fulton, and engaged in farm- 
ing during the summers. As a teacher he met 
with great success, and in Breakabeen he had 
a school of seventy pupils. Deciding to go 
into mercantile business, he bought out his 
present stand in March, 1892, and since then 
has devoted himself exclusively to building 
up a trade. Although he had no previous ex- 
perience as a tradesman to guide him, he has 
prospered even beyond his expectations. He 
carries at the present time thrice the stock 
that he carried at the outset, having enlarged 
his line of drugs, groceries, dry goods, hard- 
ware, and farm tools. He sends goods over 
a radius of four or five miles. 

Since 1893 Mr. Clapper has been the vil- 
lage Postmaster. His management having 
proved satisfactory to both parties, no candi- 
date has been put forth to oppose him. He is 
also serving on his third term as Notary Pub- 
lic. Mr. Clapper has often been delegate to 
both local and county conventions. Repeat- 
edly importuned to accept the nomination for 



public ofifice, he has declined, though he never 
loses an opportunity to work fur the good of 
his party and of the community. He was in- 
strumental in the construction of a telephone 
line to ]\Iackey's Curners, thereby giving to 
the citizens of that little hamlet direct and 
rapid communication with the count}- seat and 
other parts of the county. He is a Mason of 
Gilboa Lodge, No. 630, vi which he has been 
Junior Deacon, and is warmly interested in 
the ancient craft. When he joined in 1SS7, 
he was the youngest man in the lodge. 

Mr. Clapper was married on April 21, 1897, 
to Harriet E. Wykoff, who is the eldest of the 
five children of George 'SI. Wykoff. Mrs. 
Clapper was a successful student in the One- 
onta Normal School, and previous to her mar- 
riage she taught school. Mr. Clapper has 
been a member of the Baptist choir for five or 
six years, and at the present time his wife is 
also a member. Both are popular in social 
circles, and have every outlook for a prosper- 
ous future. 



lONVAS E. MARKHAM, of Fulton, 
teacher and farmer, well known in 
Schoharie County as Professor 
Markham, was born in this town, August 10, 
1843, son of Alden, Jr., ar,d Catherine (Cook) 
Markham. Through his father he traces his 
ancestry (by what line we have not been in- 
formed) to John Alden of the "Mayflower" 
company of Pilgrims who settled at Plymouth. 
Professor Markham's paternal grandparents, 
Alden Markham, Sr. , and Elizabeth Pease 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Markham, were born, bred, ami niarrietl in the 
State of Connecticut. Soon after their mar- 
riage tliey migrated westward to Otsego 
County, New York, where, in the town of 
Worcester, the grandfather took up a tract of 
forest -covered land, from which he cleared the 
timber and improved a homestead. He became 
actively identified with the interests of the 
town, and, while establishing,' a home for him- 
self and family, also assisted in (levelopiiiL^ the 
resources of that section of the State. He was 
among the leading farmers of the eommunity, 
and for many years served as Justice of the 
Peace. He lived there until well advancetl in 
years, and then went to Massachusetts, where 
he died at the age of seventy-eight. His wife, 
who bore him seven children, also lived to a 
ripe old age. Hoth were Ba]Hists in their re- 
ligious beliefs. 

Alden Markham, Jr., was born and educated 
in Otsego County ; and, having been reared to 
agricultural pursuits, he followed farmini,' for 
some year.s. He also taught during the winter 
terms in Otsego County for a while, and later 
on for a few terms in Richmnndvillc, .Scho- 
harie County. In 1S38, or .soon after, he ac- 
ce])ted a position in the public schools fif Ful- 
ton; and, being pleased with this locality, he 
subsequently invested his money here in a 
farm, and resumed life as an agriculturist. A 
few years afterward he removed to Massachu- 
setts, where he spent his remaining days, pass- 
ing away at the age of forty-nine vears. llis 
wife, whose maiden name was Catherine I J. 
Cook, was born in the western part of l'"ulton, 
being a daughter of Nathaniel Cook, an exten- 



sive farmer, who spent his life of threescore 
and ten years in this town. Mrs. Markham 
died at the early age of thirty-nine years, hav 
ing borne her husband five children. Four of 

this family are now living, namely: Convas 
li. ; Asher; Luther ()., who for a quarter of a 
century has been Superintendent of Schools at 
Haverstraw, New York. ; and PZlizabeth, wife 
of E. \V. Haverly. Hoth parents were persons 
of eminent |)iety, and active members of the 
HaiJtist cluirch. 

Comas 1^. Markham began teaching in the 
district schools when but si.xteen years old. 
He afterward took a full course of study at 
the Schoharie Academy, and still further fitted 
himself for a teacher by attending the Albany 
Normal School, from which he was graduated 
in 1869. He has since taught in various 
towns, including I-'ultoii, where he commenced 
his career, Galluinille, in whose schools he 
was emiilo)ed twelve consecutive years, and 
l^sperance. He also taught several years in 
Piermont and Haverstraw, Rockland County. 
.Since his marriage he has resided on his farm 
of one hundred acres in l'"nlton, and, in addi- 
tion to his professional laixus in this vicinity, 
has been prosperously engaged in general farm- 
ing and dairying. He is one of the oldest and 
best known teachers of the county. 

Mr. Markham married Carrie I^ouden, of 
I'^ulton, a graduate of the Normal School, and 
for some years prior to her marriage a teacher 
in the public schools. She was born in Ful- 
ton, being a daughter of Stephen Louden, of 
whom a hinnraphical sketcli a])|)ears elsewhere 
in this \olume. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



413 



RANK H. FRANCE, a native of Sew- 
ard, now residint;" in the village of 
Cobleskill, was born on March 31, 1S59, son of 
Gilbert G. and Angeline (Ottman) France. 
He is a great-grandson of Sebastian Frantz, 
one of the pioneers of Schoharie County. 

Sebastian Frantz came from Germany in 
1752, shortly after his marriage with y\nna 
Fritz. He was born in Wi.irtemberg, in the 
year 1732, and his wife was born in the same 
place in the year following. They were Luth- 
erans, and, with three others of that persua- 
sion, left their native land in order to secure 
greater freedom of worship. The little party 
landed in New York in November, 1753. 
Sebastian was sent ahead to prospect for a 
place in which to settle, and he eventually 
chose a location in this county in what is now 
the town of Seward. 

He was a man of deep piety and great relig- 
ious zeal, and his unflinching boldness in de- 
fence of his faith has borne fruit in the lives 
of his descendants. He brought with him 
from the Fatherland his German family Bible, 
the first Bible ever brought into the town of 
Seward, and this is now in the possession of 
the heirs of his grandson, the late Gilbert G. 
France. Seven tedious years were sjient in 
clearing the land and making it capable of pro 
ducing harvests, and at the end of that time 
the desire of the immigrant's heart was ful- 
filled in the erection, at what was called New 
Rhinebeck, of a Lutheran church. The struc- 
ture was a frame building, and was the second 
house of worship reared in the town. The 
society was presided over by the Rev. Peter 



Nicholas Sommer, a travelling Lutheran 
preacher, wlio preached also to the Methodist 
congregation in the other church, which was 
located at Seward Centre. 

The children of Sebastian Frantz numbered 
twelve, and were named as follows: Anna, 
Ernest Christopher, Eva, Elizabeth, Jacob, 
Margaretta, John, Catherine, Henry, Lena, 
Lawrence, and David. At the outbreak of the 
Revolution, the two elder sons, Christopher and 
Jacob, enlisted as soldiers, and were quartered 
with their company in the Schoharie Valley. 
On October 18, while Sebastian was away 
from home doing government service, his home 
was entered by an Indian chief who was in the 
employ of the British; two of the sons, John 
and Henry, were taken captive; and the barns 
and out-buildings were burned. Thus in a 
moment were destroyed the results of years of 
earnest toil. 

Mrs. Anna Frantz, with her ten remaining 
children fled to Gravel Mountain, where she 
secreted herself for three da3-s, not daring to 
make a fire for fear that her hiding place might 
be revealed. John, one of the captured sons, 
was scalped and murdered, but Henry fortu- 
nately escaped. On the same da}', the young 
woman who was to ha\'e been the bride of 
Christopher in two weeks, was murdered. A 
pair of silver shoe buckles, her wedding gift 
from her lover, is still in the possession of her 
family. After the war Sebastian Frantz re- 
paired and re-established his home, and subse- 
quently remained there until his death in 
1S05. His wife survived him ele\en }ears. 
Both were buried on the home farm, but in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1891 the remains were disinterred l)y Gilbert 
G. France and were removed to tiie Zion Rural 
Cemetery at Seward Centre. 

The descendants of this worthy pair ndw con- 
stitute a considerable jiortinn of tlie jiopiila- 
tioi) of Schoharie, and incnihers of the fourth 
and fifth generations have become residents in 
other parts of the State. Ikni) I'rantz, who 
escaped from the Indians, spent ills early life 
on the homestead, and later 1k)u;;1u a farm near 
by, where he lived until iiis death, at the a-e 
of eighty-eij;ht. He was a most active Chris- 
tian, aiul both he and his .i;o()(l wife were iiicni- 
bers of the Methodist church. llcr maiden 
name was Maria Horn. .She was boin in Al 
bany, the daughter of Joseph Horn, a promi- 
nent clothier of tiiat place. .She hatl one 
sister, Margaret, who married David Frantz. 

Of the fifteen children of Henry I'rantz, 
fourteen grew to maturity, antl thirteen were 
married and had children. There were eleven 
sons, and of tiicse seven became class leaders 
in the Methodist chuich, and of the seven two 
became preachers, (lilbert G. !•" ranee was the 
latest survivor of this large famil)-. He had 
at one time a hundred cousins, but all, with 
one e.xception, are now deceased. 

Gilbert G. I'rance was jj.irn on the home- 
stead on December 25, 1816, the youngest 
child of his parents. He remained at home 
until the age of seventeen, attending school 
and assisting on the farm. Then lie learned 
the trade of tanner and currier. Suiisequently 
he went witii ills wife and chiUhen to Wiscon- 
sin, and in comiian\- with three others took uji 
some government land, and founded and named 



the town of Sharon. His title deed to this, 
signed by President I'idk, is still in the pos- 
session of his family. After remaining there 
for seven years, he returned Fast and traded 
his land for a farm in Richmondville, where he 
lived for five years. In 1S56 he came to his 
f.irm in .Svward, and fidm tliat time devoted 
himself to gcner.d farming, hop-raising, and 
dairying. He had at one [leriod a hundred and 
forty acres, but later he cultivated about si.\ty 
acres, iiaving also some outlying lands. He 
[ i)uilt the farm buiUlings, as well as another 
house and a store in tiie town, and several 
dwelling-houses. During the last forty years 
of his life he was a leatlcr in every advanced 
movement. He was one of the earlv ])ro- 
moters of the railroad wliich runs to Cherry 
Valley, twenty-five miles from Cobleskill, be- 
ginning to agitate the subject in 1S67 in com- 
pany with Judge Campbell and Judge Bates. 
Vpou being a])pointed one of the commis- 
sioiK-rs, along with .\l)raham Sternberg and 
Leonard W'iland, he was alile to make arrange- 
ments for bonding the town for twenty-five 
thousand dollar.s. He was Railroad Commis- 
sioner for fifteen years. 

Giliiert Ci. h'rance was married in 1840, his 
wife being the daughter of Christian Ottman, 
and a native of tiiis regi.in. She died al the 
age of sixty-two, iiaving been the mother of 
se\en children. Of these, si.\ are living; 
namely, Augusta, Anna, Helen, Millard I'il- 
more, Ichi, and I'rank H. .Augusta married 
Peter Haines, a farmer in liie valley, and has 
one child, Vergil by name. Anna, who mar- 
ried Ilannuil Strail, has t wo ciiildren — Cirace 



BIOGRArillCAL KKVIKW 



and Gilbert. Helen married David Berger, 
who was killed by a stroke of lightning-. She 
has two ehildren— Ina and Arthur. Millard 
F., who alwaxs resided with his father, mar- 
ried Mary Brown, and has one child, Leland. 
Ida is the wife of David Emerick, a travelling 
salesman in Western New York, and is the 
mother of two children — Hertha and Grace. 

Gilbert tj. France was actively interested in 
politics prior to the Civil War, and served as 
Collector and as Overseer of the Poor. So far 
as possible he refused public offices. He was 
a charter member of the Grange, and was 
one of its lecturers. He was ardentl\- in favor 
of prohibition, and was a delegate to the State 
convention at Syracuse for the Prohibition 
part}-. On the occasion of the centennial 
celebration of the anniversary of the town, he 
was the president of the day, and had full 
charge of affairs. For fifty-eight years he was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and fifty-six years a church officer. Thirt}'- 
three years he was a class leader, and twenty 
years superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
The beautiful grove fitted up b}- him is largely 
used for Sunday-school gatherings. At the 
time of his death, which occurred on April 5, 
1S9S, he was the oldest member of the charge, 
which includes Hyndsville, Seward Valle}-, and 
Seward Centre, and was probably the oldest 
church official in the State. 

P"rank H. France is by trade a carpenter and 
cabinet-maker. Since the death of his father 
he has purchased village property in Coble- 
skill, where he now resides. He has charge 
of his father's farm, and is doing a prosperous 



business. He married Carrie M. Ireland, 
daughter of Daniel Ireland, of Albany, and 
she has borne him four children, as fcdlows: 
Lulu A., Gilbert D., Daniel D. , and Mel- 
ville D. 



DGAR JACKSON,* attorney and coun- 
sellor at law, North Blenheim, 
Schoharie County, N. V. , was born in the town 
of Gilboa, this county, August 28, 1853, a 
son of John I. Jackson. His grandfather, 
David Jackson, was an early settler of Gilboa, 
where he bought a large tract of land, and for 
many years was one of its most successful 
farmers and the Justice of the Peace. To him 
and his wife, Peggy, three children were born. 
John I. Jackson, who was brought up on a 
farm, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools, followed agricultural pursuits in 
his early manhood, and after marriage pur- 
chased a farm not far froni the site of the pres- 
ent post-office in Mackey. Taking up the 
study of law, he pursued it diligentlv, and, 
after his admission to the bar, in 1S55, prac- 
tised his profession in Gilboa for nearly forty 
years, and achieved considerable fanie as a 
lawyer of sound judgment and superior ki-iowl- 
edge. He was a Republican in politics, prom- 
inent in town matters, and served as Super- 
visor. He married Mary A. Moore, a native 
of Gilboa. She was a daughter of Samuel 
Moore, who came of pioneer stock. She died 
at the age of sixty-four years, March 31, 1S79, 
leaving six children, namely: Rhoda, de- 
ceased; William M., a farmer in Iowa; Lu- 



4«6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cinda, deceased; Oscar D., a farmer; Edgar, 
the special subject of this biography'; and 
Luther. Hoth parents were members of the 
Haptist church; and the father was for many 
years a member of Gilboa Lodge, F. & A. M. 
He died on October 23, 1893, at the age of 
fourscore years. 

Eldgar Jack.son acquired the iiulinicnts of liis 
education in the public schools of Gilboa, and 
afterward continued his studies at the Dela- 
ware Literary Institute. He subsequently en- 
gaged in mechanical pursuits for a while, and 
then turned his attention to the study of law, 
which he pursued to such good purpose that in 
1886 he was admitted to practice in the differ- 
ent courts by Judson S. Lawdon and Augustus 
Hakes, Judges of the Supreme Court at Albany. 
The following two years he practised with his 
father in Gilboa, whence, in 188S, he came to 
N'orth Hlenheini, where he has built up a large 
and lucrative general practice, being emplo\ed 
in the Justice, Surrogate, County, and Su- 
I)renie Courts. In 1894 he built his present 
commodious office, which is centrally located. 
While living in Gilboa he served as Justice of 
the I'eace some years and as T(nvn Trustee. 
Since coming here he has been Commissioner 
of Highways. Politically, Mr. Jackson is a 
straightforward Republican; and, fraternally, 
he is a member of Gilboa Lodge, V. & A. M. 

Mr. Jackson married in 1S73. His wife's 
mother, whose maiden name was .Sally K. 
James, is still living, and has two children: 
Mrs. Jackson; and Orville A., of Chenango 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have one 
child, II. Warren. Mr. Jack.son is a memi)er 



of the Haptist church, while Mrs. Jackson be- 
longs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 



§AMES K. ALVERSON,* who has been 
identified with the educational interests 
of Schoharie County, New York, as 
school teacher and School Commissioner for 
the ])ast three decades, resides in Middleburg, 
where he built his present residence in 1883. 
He was born February 21, 1845, in Kerne, Al- 
bany County, a son of Leonard Alverson. His 
grandfather, Isaac Alverson, formerly a black- 
smith in tlie city of Albany, was killed in one 
of the battles of the War of 1812, while in the 
prime of manhood. 

Leonard Alverson was reared on a farm in 
Duanesbiirg, N. V. He learned the black- 
smith's trade, which he subsequently followetl 
in Heme, not far from Hunter's Land. In 
Heme he afterward settled on a farm, and also 
carried cjn a grocer)- store and conducted a 
iiotel, being very popular as a landlord. In 
politics he was a sound Democrat. He served 
as Assessor of Hcrne and as Supervisor, and 
for a number of years he was a Deacon of the 
Christian church. He subsequently pur- 
chased a farm in Hunter's Land, on wiiicii he 
engaged in agricultural jnirsuits until his 
death, at the age of si.xtyfive years. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Cutter, or, as she was familiarly 
known in her girlhood, Hetsey Wilbur, who 
was bom in Duane.sburg, a daughter of Esquire 
WillMir. Her father was a well-to-do farmer 
and an expert fo.\ iumter. He reared four 
chiiihvn, namelv: Sarah, wife of .Seth Owens; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



417 



William B. ; Elizabeth, Mrs. Alverson, de- 
ceased ; and Joseph W. 

James K. Alverson attended the common 
schools of his district until he was fourteen 
years old, and then began earning his own liv- 
ing by working out by the month, being thus 
employed until the breaking out of the Civil 
War. At the age of eighteen he enlisted 
in Company M, Seventh New York Artil- 
lery, with which he served eighteen months. 
He participated in the battles of Spottsyl- 
vania, Anna River, and Cold Harbor, where 
he was twice wounded by minie-balls, once 
in the right forearm and once in the left 
thigh. He was taken to the hospital, from 
which he was discharged as a private at the 
end of eight months. Returning home, he 
commenced his career as a teacher, being 
employed in 1865 and 1866 in Berne. After- 
ward he was principal of schools in the 
village of Schoharie, in Middleburg, and 
Wright, and in other places in Schoharie and 
Albany Counties, for a continuous period of 
twenty years. In 18SS Mr. Alverson was 
elected School Commissioner of the F"irst Dis- 
trict of Schoharie County for a term of three 
years, and in 1894 was again elected to the 
same responsible position, and served until 
1897. As School Commissioner he had to 
examine the one hundred and twelve teachers 
employed in the ninety-eight schools under his 
immediate supervision, and personally visit 
each school in the eight towns composing his 
district. Since the expiration of his last term 
in this capacity, he has resumed his former 
occupation as a teacher, and is now one of the 



oldest instructors in this part of the county and 
one of the most successful. He was formerly 
a member of the Schoharie County Teachers' 
Association, and while a Commissioner of the 
First District he built many new school- 
houses. He is a Democrat in politics, and w^as 
twice elected Collector of the town of Berne. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Moses 
Tompkins Post, No. 149, G. A. R., in which 
he has served as Ofificer of the Day and been 
Commander, and belongs also to the Middle- 
burg Lodge, Le Bastelle, L O. O. F., in which 
he has passed all the chairs, and is now Past 
Noble Grand. He and his family attend the 
Lutheran church. 

In 1S76 Mr. Alverson married Miss Rhoda 
Shoemaker, a daughter of Abraham and Phebe 
(Layman) Shoemaker. Her parents spent 
their later years of life in Middleburg, where 
her mother is still living at the age of seventy- 
tive years. Mr. and Mrs. Alverson have three 
children; namely, Leonard A., W. Layman, 
and Otis Ray. 



,HARLES E. BARRUP,* Postmaster 
of Esperance, Schoharie County, N. Y. , 
was born August 12, 1855, in Car- 
lisle, this county. His paternal grandfather 
was a veteran of the War of 1S12, and was at- 
tached to the staff of General Jackson. 

Charles E. Barrup received his education in 
the district schools, which he attended until 
reaching the age of sixteen years, when he 
found employment and became self-supporting. 
In 18S4 he opened a harness shop in Espe- 



BIOGRArillCAL RKVIKW 



ranee, and he has since cuiuliicted tlie l)iisiiiess 
very successfully up to tiie present time. Mr. 
Karrup has taken a pniminent part in trnvn 
affairs. He has twice heen elected Town 
Clerk, and he lias been a nienihei- of the 
County Coniniittee. lie is an active Denio- 
cratic worker, and has dune nuich to advance 
the cause of his iiarty Incally. He is a nieni- 
her of Schciharie l.od.L^e, !•. & A. i\I. 

In 1S79 Mr, ]5arrup was united in marria-e 
with Miss Sarah Heed, dau-hter ui Henry 
Keed, nl I'sperance. Mr. Harrup's mother is 
a descendant of the family of Shafers that 
figured lart;cly in the earlier history of Scho- 
harie County. Her grandfather and her great- 
grandfather were prominent in the construc- 
tion of the Lutheran church of Cobleskill, 
which some six jears ago celehiated its cen- 
tennial. 

§.\MHS L. UTTKR,* the leading farmer 
of Oak Hill, Durham, and owner, on a 
large .scale, ..f Western real estate, was 
born at Oak Hill, on the spot where he now 
resides, on May 20, 1S46, son of Isaac and 
Mary A. (Xiles) Utter. The farm of which 
he is now the owner has been in his family for 
three generations, his great-grandfather, James 
Utter, a Revolutionary soldier, having settled 
here when the country around was a wilderness. 
He came here with his wife and son James 
from Saybrook, Conn., in the spring of i7S;i, 
and built a log cabin. Some years Liter, 
after he hail cleared some lan.l, he built a 
fram,' house, which stood until 1S94, when il 



The second James Utter was horn in .Say- 
brook, Conn., and came here with his mother 
on horseback. He was brought up on the 
farm, and in li^oG he built a house for himself 
where his grandson's house is now standing. 
He kejit increasing his farm by buying adjoin- 
ing land, and became a very prosperous man. 
In January, 1S37, when he was only fiftv-si.\- 
years old, he slipped on the ice and broke his 
hij), and liii the 19th of the month dieil from 
the effects. His wife, to whom he was mar- 
ried on November 26, 1805, bore him si.\ 
children, none of whom are now living. Her 
maiden name was Elizabeth I'ost. .She was a 
l'resh\terian, and her husband was a I!a])tist. 

Isaac Utter, above named, son of James, 
second, and IClizabeth, was born on Deceiuber 
19, iSoS, anil died on his si.xty-fourlh birth- 
day. He ahva\s lived on the homestead, with 
the exception of four years which he spent 
elsewhere. He was interested in real estate 
in the West, jiarticularlv in Wisconsin, where 
he owned considerable land and held farms on 
mortgages. Politically, he was a Republican. 

He was a liberal cinitribiilor to the Meth- 
odi.st church, of which both he and his wife 
were members; and for nian\' years he was one 

inent [lart in public affaiis in the town, and 

incorporation. His wife, who was one of a 
family of ten children, was a daughter of Sam- 
uel Niles, wh.. moved to Oak Hill when .she 
was a young giil, and spent the remaindi.'r ol 
his life here. Mr.s. Utter resides with her .son 
James, who is her only child. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



419 



Mr. James Utter's house, which is one of 
the finest in the count\', was built by his 
father and himself and under their daii}' 
supervision. It was built entirely by the day, 
and is of the best possible workmanship. The 
son furnished the plans and gave suggestions 
for interior decorating and finishing. The 
decorations were made from exclusive designs, 
and are really works of art. There are twentv 
large and fully furnished rooms, some of them 
measuring fourteen by fifteen feet. 

Mr. Utter was educated in the common 
schools, Greenville Academy, and a select 
school in Durham. After his father's death 
he then became proprietor of the homestead 
estate, which consisted of a hundred and ten 
acres. Since then he has bought some forty 
acres adjoining and eighty more on the moun- 
tain. He keeps seven horses and twenty-three 
head of cattle of Jersey stock, and makes butter 
for the New York markets. He cuts a large 
amount of ha_\-, the annual crop sometimes 
reaching eighty tons; and, though he has built 
two new barns recently, he is still often 
obliged to stack some of it out of doors. He 
keeps two men employed the year through. 
Mr. Utter is a proficient carpenter himself, 
and has built a number of the buildings on his 
place, though others he hired built. His 
tenant house, near his own residence, is an 
example of his own workmanship. 

In 1883 Mr. Utter went into the enterprise 
of buying land in the ^^'est, and he has 
continued to buy until he now has about seven 
thousand acres there. Of this he tills some 
si.\- hundred acres, raising large crops of corn, 



wheat, and oats. In looking after his inter- 
ests he has made many trips West, [jarticu- 
larly to Dakota and Michigan, where his land 
is situated. He is one of the directors in the 
North American Loan and Trust Company of 

I New York City, which has a paid-up capital 
of over half a million and a surplus fund of a 
hundred thousand dollars. 

j Mr. L'tter married in 1871 Dora Kelsev, 
only child of Hiram Kelsey, a leading farmer 
of Albany County. Although he is an ardent 
Republican and takes active part in all politi- 
cal matters, attending State and county con- 
ventions as delegate, he refuses to accept pub- 
lic ofiRce. He is a member of the Methodist 
church, while Mrs. Utter is a Baptist. For 
many years he has been a church trustee. 
Mr. Utter is a hard worker, and everything 
about his place is kept in the best of repair. 
He is one of the best known men in the 
county. 



M'' 



iXRY C. GLTTER,*of Middleburg, 
N. Y., one of the leading ]aw\-ers of 
Schoharie Coimt\', was born on 
June 16, 1857. His father, David Getter, 
was born in Schoharie. His grandfather 
Getter, who was a native of Germany, came to 
this country when a boy, and settled at Central 
Bridge, Schoharie. He was an expert handi- 
craftsman, and followed the trades of gunsmith 
and clock-maker. A large number of clocks 
made by him are still in running order. He 
lived to be ninet_\"-eight xears of age, and his 
mental faculties were well preserved to the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



last. His wife attained the aj^e of ninety- 
three. 

David Getter grew to manhood at Central 
Bridge, where he was born, and in his youth 
learned the trade of blacksmith. Coming to 
Middleburg when he was of age, he set up his 
forge, and, starting in business for himself, 
continued actively engaged over fifty years. 
For a long period his was the only smithy in 
the town. He was an abolitionist and a Re- 
publican in politics. His vote was the only 
one cast for Fremont in his district, and four 
years later he was one of three tn vdte fur 
Abraham Lincoln. A reader and a thinker, 
he was highly respected as a man of sterling 
integrity and sound judgment, as well as of 
strong convictions and more than average self- 
reliance. In religion he was a devoted Meth- 
odist, for twenty years superintendent of the 
Sunday-school and for thirty-five years class 
leader. His house was a home for Methodist 
ministers who came that way, and many a 
weary circuit rider there found shelter and re- 
freshment. David (letter married Harriet 
Kfner, daughter of Harvey Efner, formerly of 
Palmer, Monroe C(Huity. She is still living, 
being now past eighty years of age. Her 
father lived to the age of ninet\-three years, 
and was then ne.xt to the oldest Free Mason in 
the State. Mrs. Getter has three children 
now living; namely, Harvey, Jerome, and 
Henry C. Two — Charles and Madison — are 
deceased. 

Henry C. Getter obtained his early educa- 
tion in the common schools, and at a private 
school taught by Professor James Edmondson, 



now principal of a college in Missouri. He 
studied law with Messrs. Sandford & Thorn, 
was admitted to the bar, and then went to Kal- 
amazoo, Mich., and was there for a time with 
Hriggs & Burroughs. Returning East, he 
formed in 1883 a partnership with William H. 
Fngle, whicli still continues, this law firm 
being now the oldest in the county and Mr. 
Engle the oldest lawyer in the State. Besides 
doing a large amount of office work, they have 
an extensive [iractice in the \'arious courts of 
the State, including the Court of Appeals. 

Mr. (letter married Mary E. , daughter of 
Albert Sawyer and grand-daughter of Dr. 
Moses Sawyer, formerly of Fulton. Her 
father was a farmer in Fulton. He died at 
the age of thirt\ -seven, leaving two children. 
Mr. and Mrs. Getter have one child, Jennie 
F., who is now in the high school. Mr. 
Getter resided in Fulton up to 1S97, when he 
removed to Middleburg. 

Mr. Getter is a Republican in pcditics. He 
has been candidate for District Attorney, for 
C(junty Judge, and for Supervisor, and has as- 
sisted to reduce the Democratic majority in 
the county. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. 
of Middleburg. Mrs. Getter attends the Meth- 
odist ciiurch, and he contributes to its support. 



w 



BREWSTER, M.D.,* of North 
Blenheim, N. Y. , was born in Scot- 
land, Albany County, January 8, 1863, son of 
William J. and Margaret (Ramsey) Brewster. 
On the paternal side he traces his ancestry, we 
are told, to Elder William Brewster, of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"Mayflower" and Plymouth Colony. His 
grandfather, who was born in 1795, and died 
in 1S41, operated a carding-mill in Schoharie 
County. His grandmother Brewster's maiden 
name was Silence Gallup. 

William J. Brewster, the Doctor's father, 
was born in Albany County, in February, 
1S39. His education was completed at Scho- 
harie Academy; and he taught school for a 
number of years in Schoharie County, where 
he also engaged in farming. His wife, Mar- 
garet, was the daughter of a prominent farmer 
and leading public official of Gilboa, who was 
of Scotch descent. Dr. Brewster's parents 
were members of the Reformed Church of 
Gallupville, and his father took much interest 
in church matters. He died April 13, 18S3. 

W. J. Brewster obtained his elementary ed- 
ucation in the common schools, pursued more 
advanced studies at Schoharie Academy, and 
then by teaching school earned money enough 
to enable him to take the course at the Normal 
School, where he was graduated. His medical 
studies were begun under a private instructor, 
and continued at the University Medical Col- 
lege and at Bellevue Hospital Medical College. 
He took special courses in the laboratory, and 
a very thorough course in surgery. He was 
graduated a Doctor of Medicine in 1890, and 
then went to North Stratford, Coos County, 
N. H., where he was in practice till his health 
failed. After a season of rest and recupera- 
tion he came in 1897 to North Blenheim, 
where he is now settled. He is a well-edu- 
cated physician, and has a good country jjrac- 
tice. While in New Hampshire he was a 



specialist in orthopedic surgery, in which he 
has done some remarkable work. He was a 
Health Officer in New Hampshire, and served 
also as County Coroner. He was a member 
of Coos County (New Hampshire) Medical So- 
ciety, being later a member of the Schoharie 
County Society. He is a member of Scho- 
harie Valley Lodge, F. & A. M., No. 491. 
He has written valuable papers for various 
medical journals. He is a Republican in 
politics. 

Dr. Brewster married Emily E. Earle, of 
Valleyfield, Province of Quebec, Canada, and 
has one child. 



§AMES FROST,* formerly a prominent 
citizen of Mariahville, in the town of 
Duanesburg, N.Y., was born in Wash- 
ington County, this State, August 4, 1783, 
son of Lot and Temperance (Semen) Frost. 
He was a descendant in the fifth generation of 
William Frost, first, a native of Hampshire, 
England, and a Quaker, who came to America 
and settled in Boston, but on account of the 
religious intolerance of that time was obliged 
to seek a home eLsewhere, and accordingly re- 
moved to Long Island. He married Rebecca, 
daughter of Nicholas Wright. William Frost, 
second, the next in line of descent, who was 
boin on Long Island about the year 1647, and 
resided there until his death, married Hannah 
Trior. 

Benjamin Frost, son of William, second, 
and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
was born June 9, 1719, and spent the greater 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



jKirt of Ills active life in Dutchess CniiiUy, 
New \'iirk. lie married Rose Spriii.i^er. 
Their son Lot, father of James, was born in 
Dutchess County, March i, 1744. He was a 
resident for some years of Washington County, 
whence he moved to L)uaneslnirg, taking up his 
residence on (Juaker Street, a locality settled 
by the Frienils' Society at an early date, and 
which is still known 1)\ that name. His wife, 
Temperance, was born on August 30, 1744- 

James ]'"rost accompanied his parents from 
Washington County to Duanesbiug. He re- 
ceived a good education, and taught school in 
his younger days, but relinquished that occu- 
])ation to become a surveyor, in which capacity 
he performed much work of an important char- 
acter. He projected and completed a plank 
road from Albany to Fort Hunter, and drafted 
one of the earlier maps of Schenectady County. 
In 1833-34 he surveyed the new line between 
Canada and New York State, as well as the 
greater part of Clinton, I'lsse.x, and Franklin 
Counties, then a wilderness. With his associ- 
ates he camped out for weeks and months at a 
time. At night the widves howled around 
them, and were kcj)! at bay only by fires. 
That .section of the State, the .\dirondack 
region, is now a famous place of resort in sum- 
mer. In [819 he began a survey of the east 
shore of the Hudson River, under the direction 
of the Surveyor General, traversing the river by 
sloop and making numerous .soundings. He 
also surveyed the ground for the second rail- 
road built in the L'nited States, that between 
Albany and Schenectady, and surveyed and 
made maps of all old Schoharie, besides other 



territory. In 1S35 hcsur\e_\ed lands in blliza- 
bethl(.wn (now Flli/.abeth City), N.J., belong- 
ing to Messrs. Conner, Bryant & Crane of that 
place, and Clark and (jthers of New \'<nk, and 
made maps of the city. Subsequently, remov- 
ing from (Juaker Street, to the northerly part 
of the town of Duanesbiug, about two miles 
west of Mariahville, he engaged in farming, 
and also conducted a general store. Possess- 
ing an muisual anioimt of energy and ability, 
which made him especiall)' eligible to the pub- 
lic service, he took a leading part in town 
affairs, was particidarly interested in educa- 
tional matters, acted as a Justice of the Peace 
for man\- years, and was a member of the As- 
sembly three terms. Politically, he was a 
stanch supporter of the Whig jwrt)-. Though 
reared a Quaker, he was liberal in his relig- 
ious opinions, and in his later )ears favored 
the Universalist belief. He died at his home 
in Mariahville, December 23, 1851, and his 
death was the cause of general regret. 

James F'ro.st married Mary Marsh, who was 
born in Canaan, Conn., October 24, 1787, 
daughter of Silas Marsh. .She was a good bus- 
iness woman, and rendered valuable assistance 
to her husband liy carrying on the store while 
he was absent on surveying trips. She became 
the mother of ten children — five sons and five 
daughters — all of whom grew to maturity, and 
two aie living, namely: (General D. M. Frost, 
a graduate of the Ignited States Military Acad- 
emy at West Point, and now a prominent resi- 
dent of .St. Louis, :\Io. ; and Miss M. Louise 
Frost. (ieneral Frost had a large family of 
girls, three uf whuni married Fnglish noble- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



423 



men. One of them is now living in Paris. 
The others are in England. Miss M. Louise 
Frost, who is a lady of superior attainments, 
resides at the homestead during summer, and 
passes her winters in the South. The other 
children of James and Mary (Marsh) Frost 
were: Caroline, Adelia D., Silas W., Ro- 
sanna, James, William M. , John S., and 
Phoebe A. The mother died August iS, 1864. 
The sons nearly all studied and followed engi- 
neering. John S. , who was a lawyer, died in 
1857. 



§OHN H. PUTNAM, who carries on 
farming and market gardening in Nis- 
kayuna, was born in this town, June 15, 
1 8 16. His parents, Harmon and Margaret 
(Wheaton) Putnam, were natives of this 
county. His paternal grandfather, John Put- 
nam, was an early settler here and a noted 
hunter in his day. He afterward resided in 
various places, and died in Greene, Chenango 
County, at an advanced age. 

Harmon Putnam, the father, followed the 
carpenter's trade during his active period. 
He was married in Niskayuna, which was 
thenceforward his place of residence. He 
was a reliable workman, and as an honest, in- 
dustrious citizen he stood high in the estima- 
tion of the entire community. He died at 
the age of sixty years. Margaret Wheaton 
Putnam, his wife, died at the age of twenty- 
seven. She was the mother of four children, 
of whom John H., the subject of this sketch, 
was the first-born, and is the only one living. 



Reuben and Jacob died young, and the other 
died in infancy. 

John H. Putnam was educated in the town 
schools of Niskayuna. At an early age he 
began work as an assistant on the farm he now 
occupies, which was then owned by one John 
Clark, and he afterward worked for other 
farmers in the neighborhood. When seven- 
teen years old he began an apprenticeship at 
the carpenter's trade, which was his occupa- 
tion for thirty years, or until 1S64. In 1876 
he bought his present farm of seventy acres, 
which he has greatly improved, and has since 
been engaged in general farming. 

On p-ebruary 28, 1S39, Mr. Putnam was 
joined in marriage with Mary Ann Van 
Vranken, of Niskayuna, daughter of Jacob 
Van Vranken and a representative of an old 
family of this town. Mr. and Mrs. Putnam 
have one son living, Jacob, who was born 
January i, 1846, and is engaged in farming 
with his father. He married Gertrude Mc- 
Chessen, and has four children — John, Mar- 
garet A., Julia, and Lena. 

Since the breaking out of the Southern re- 
bellion in April, 1861, Mr. Putnam has voted 
with the Republican party. He has served 
with ability as Supervisor and Town Clerk, 
each two terms. He was Highway Commis- 
sioner five years, and has been a Justice of the 
Peace. He is a Master Mason and one of 
the oldest members of St. George Lodge, 
No. 6, F. & A. M., of Schenectady, having 
joined the order in 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Put- 
nam are members of the Dutch Reformed 
church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



AUISON YOUNG.* for a number 
II of years a prominent figure in the 
public affairs of Carlisle, Scho- 
harie County, N. Y., was born in this town, 
September 20, 1846, son of Benjamin and 
Lana (Van Vaulkenburgh) Young. His great- 
grandfather was Peter Young, a German, who 
came here from Hudson, N.Y. , as a pioneer, 
and acquired possession of two separate tracts 
of land, the whole amounting to three hundred 
and ten acres. His log cabin stood about 
twenty-live roils west of the Rock School- 
house. He was a successful farmer, and his 
property, which was unencumbered at the time 
of his death, he divided among his children. 

Matthias Young, Madison Young's grand- 
father, whose birth took place January 20, 
1763, was the first white child born in Car- 
lisle. Receiving a share of his father's prop- 
erty, he erected a frame house, and carried on 
general farming until his death, which oc- 
curred May 21, 1822. He was actively inter- 
ested in political and religious affairs, held 
some of the important town offices, and was 
one of the leading members of the Dutch Re- 
formed church. He married Helena Patria, 
who was of German descent, and she died 
March 14, 1824. They were the parents of 
five children; namely, Solomon, Benjamin, 
Richard, Margaret, and Lana. The great- 
grandfather served in the war of the Revolu- 
tion, and the grandfather in that of 181 2. 

Benjamin Young, Madison Young's father, 
was born October 20, 1800. He succeeded to 
the possession of about eighty acres of his 
father's property when a young man, and cul- 



tivated his farm energetically for the rest of 
his life. He died in October, i86g. He was 
the father of six children: Helena, wife of J. 
Rose; Margaret, wife of Demosthenes Young; 
Sarah M., who married Adam Cole; Eva A., 
widow of Abraham Burnstein; Madison, the 
subject of this sketch; and Frances M., wife 
of E. C. Grantier. 

Madison Young acquired a district-school 
education, and his aptitutle for learning 
enabled him to attain unusual proficiency in 
his studies. He assisted in carrying on the 
home farm until after the death of his father, 
when he turned his attention to educational 
work, and taught school with marked success 
during the following eighteen years, with the 
exception of one term, the greater part of the 
time being spent in this and the adjacent 
localities. For the first term of teaching he 
received one dollar per day, after that two 
dollars a day, very few then receiving so high a 
salary. Finally becoming tired of the arduous 
as well as monotonous duties of a pedagogue, 
he resumed farming at the homestead, which 
contains about eighty acres of well-improved 
land; and, though not inclined to force its 
yielding power, he nevertheless raises excel- 
lent crops. 

As one of the foremost leaders of the Dem- 
ocratic party in this section, he has long 
maintained a wide influence in public affairs, 
and enjoys the confidence of all voters irre- 
spective of politics. His long and faithful 
service to the county was characterized by a 
judicious expenditure of public funds and an 
earnest desire to promote the best interests of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



425 



the people. As chairman of the Committees 
on Printing and on Ratio and Apportionment 
during his two years as Supervisor, he greatly 
reduced the expenses of these departments, 
and by close figuring was able to effect con- 
siderable retrenchment in other branches of 
the service. 

Mr. Young married for his first wife Eliza- 
beth Brounnaghin and for his second Nettie 
Hilsinger. He has no children. In his re- 
liarious views he is liberal. 



W: 



,LIAM H. NEVILLE,* a repre- 
sentative citizen of Middleburg, 
N. Y. , and a man of varied business interests, 
was born in the house which is now his home 
on August 6, 1S67, son of Jacob and Jane E. 
(Shafer) Neville. His grandfather, William 
Neville, was a pioneer settler in Sharon, and 
died there at an advanced age, leaving a large 
family. 

Jacob Neville, one of the youngest of the 
children of William, was born in Sharon on 
August 21, 1S27, and died in Middleburg in 
1891. He was for many years closely identi- 
fied with the growth of this town, and was one 
of the leaders in every worthy enterprise started 
here. His boyhood days were passed on the 
farm in Sharon, and early in life he assisted 
in the family support. His career in mercan- 
tile affairs began at the time he went into a 
store in Sharon Hill as clerk. At twenty- 
three years of age he came to Middleburg and 
entered the general merchandise store of the 
old firm of Becker & Beckman, So valuable 



did he make himself in the conduct of the busi- 
ness that upon the retirement of Mr. Beckman 
he became a iiartner in the concern, which 
thereupon assumed the name of Becker, Neville 
& Co. They were the leading merchants of 
the town, and had a large trade in all the sur- 
rounding countr)'. In time Mr. Becker sold 
his interest in the business to Mr. Hoag, and 
the firm name became Neville & Hoag. Later 
Mr. Hoag sold out to !\Ir. J. L. Engel, and 
still later a brother of the latter, Mr. A. B. 
Engel, was admitted to partnership. The 
business was then continued up to 18S9 under 
the name of Neville, Engel & Co. Upon Mr. 
Neville's retirement in 1889, the firm became 
Engel Brothers, and as such has continued in 
business to the present time. 

Among the various enterprises in the accom- 
plishment of which Jacob Neville was an im- 
portant factor may be mentioned the follow- 
ing: the Middleburg & Schoharie Railroad; 
the First National Bank and later the bank 
building; and the Union school-house build- 
ing, which is one of the finest in the county. 
He was a large stockholder in the railroad 
organization, and was a director and the vice- 
president until his death. He was also a di- 
rector in the bank as long as he lived. Politi- 
cally, he was a Democrat, and frequent appeals 
were made to him to accept public office. 
From 1885 to 1S89, under Mr. Cleveland's 
administration, he was Postmaster of Middle- 
burg; and, had not his death prevented, his 
friends would undoubtedly have elected him to 
the Assembly for the session of 1892-93. He 
was for many years an Elder in the Lutheran 



426 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



church, and ^LUcmusly assisted the church 
l)(itli !))• linancial and by mural support. 

His marriage occurred in Jainiar\-, 1S64. 
His wife was the daughter of William and 
Maria (Gridley) Shafer, and grand-daughter of 
Joseph Gridley, who was one of Washington's 
body-guard. William Shafer was born in 
Hlcnhcim, and was a lifelong resident there. 
He owned a nundx-r of dwelling-houses and 
farms, and dealt ([uite extensively in real es- 
tate, besides carrying on general farming. As 
a business man he was very successful. He 
died at the age of eighty-two. His wife, who 
tlied at the age of si.xty-four, was a native of 
Middlcburg. Of the four children born to 
them three are living, namely: iMis. Neville, 
who resides with her son on the farm settled 
by her ancestors; Margaret, who is the wife of 
George Brockway, of Chicago; and Nancy. 
The last named married A. J. l--reneyer, of 
Albany, who for many years managed the 
Freneyer House in Middleburg. 

William H. Neville obtained his education 
in the public schools of Middleburg and at 
Albany Academy. Leaving the latter after 
four years of study there, he entered the po.st- 
office, his father then being Postmaster, and 
for the succeeding four years he had practical 
charge of the office. Upon the expiration of 
his father's term he went into the store as 
clerk, and afterward he went to Albany as 
clerk in the insurance office of W. C. Rose. 
.Still later he became interested in the ]?ran- 
dow Printing Company, of Albany, but when 
the plant was burned he returned to Middle- 
burg, where he took charge of his father's 



affairs until the death of the latter. Shortly 
after this event the son bought the Middleburg 

Gazelle, of which he continued to be the pro- 
prietor for three years. .Since selling out in 
1895, he has occupied himself with looking 
after his own and his mother's real estate in- 
terests, and in doing some general farming and 
hop-raising. As he has a large real estate 
pro|)crty, including a lunnber of farms, he has 
little chance to be idle. He also retains an 
interest in the Hrandow Printing Company, 
which has been reorganized since the fire. 
Besides this he is a stockholder in the Middle- 
burg & Schoharie Railroad, in the projected 
road to Catskill, and in the National Bank. 
He is a director in the Micklleburg Telephone 
Company and treasurer of the high school. 
For three years he was Village Clerk, and for 
a number of years he served on the Board of 
lulucation. Politically, he is a Democrat, 
and for two years was a member t>f the county 
conunittee. 

Mr. Neville was married on June 22, 1893, 
to Maud \\. Lewis, who was born in Gilboa. 
She is the daughter of Oscar and Agnes 
(Strickland) Lewis. Her father is now one of 
the most prominent stock farmers in Cones- 
ville. Mrs. Neville's two brothers, Messrs. 
F'rank and Ra)nionil Lewis, are interested in 
the stock farm in compan\' with their father. 
Mrs. Neville graduateil from the Normal 
School, and taught before her marriage in the 
grammar school in Middleburg. Siie is the 
mother of one son, Donald. Mrs. Neville is a 
member of the Lutheran church, and her hus- 
band is an attendant of the Sunday services. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



427 



Mr. Neville belongs to the Masonic organiza- 
tions here; to La Bastile Lodge, No. 494, 
I. O. O. F., and Encampment No. 129; also 
to the order of Red Men. He has been Chief 
Patriarch of the encampment for one year. 



iHARLES MANN,* one of the most 
able and progressive agriculturists of 
Schoharie County, owns and occu- 
pies a well-appointed farm in Fulton, not far 
from the village of Breakabeen. He was born 
in this town, November 2, 1S56. He is a son 
of the late Almon Mann, and comes of hardy 
New England stock, his grandfather, Thomas 
Mann, having been born and bred in Vermont. 
From his hillside home in the Green Moun- 
tains Thomas removed to Albany County, New 
York, while yet a young man, and in the newer 
country cleared and partly improved a farm. 
Coming then to Schoharie County from Berne, 
he spent his remaining days in I'ulton, living 
until eighty-six years old. 

Almon Mann was born in Berne, N. Y., but 
removed with his parents to I'^ilton when a 
boy, and was there reared to man's estate. 
After completing his education, he worked as 
a farm laborer luitil ready to settle in life, 
when he bought land, which he cultivated 
some years. Prior to his death, however, at 
the age of sixty-six years, he removed to the 
village of Breakabeen. A consistent member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, he held 
many of the offices in that organization, and 
w-as connected with its Sunday-school. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Maria Chapman, 



is living at Breakabeen, an active woman of 
sixty-four years. She was born in h'ulton, the 
daughter of Jacob Chapman. .She is a sister 
of William W. Chai)man, whose sketch may 
be found on another page of this volume. She 
has twelve children, as follows: Alice, living 
in Amsterdam; Jacob H., who has been School 
Commissioner of Schoharie nine years; Theron 
H. ; Charles; Ro.se E. ; Wellington; Lilly; 
Irving; Julia; Hattie; Josiah; and Manley B. 
Charles Mann acquired his early education 
in Fulton and Middleburg. After leaving the 
parental roof he made his home with an uncle, 
and for three or more terms taught school, a 
part of the time being thus employed in Rich- 
mondville. On marrying he bought and took 
possession of his present farm of one hundred 
and fifty acres, formerly known as the Burgh 
farm, where he has since been profitably en- 
gaged in general farming and dairying. In 
the latter industr\- he is very successful, hav- 
ing a well-selected herd of Guernsey and Jersey 
cattle. On the estate he has made improve- 
ments of an excellent character, having brought 
the larger part of the land to a high state of 
cultivation, erected nearly all the buildings on 
the place, and furnished it with the latest ap- 
proved modern farm machinery and imple- 
ments. He has built a silo, which he con- 
siders a good investment for a dairy farmer, 
and he uses a separator in his dairy. Mr. 
Mann reads the leading journals devoted to 
agriculture, and he is himself a frequent con- 
tributor to the home and agricultural depart- 
ments of various papers, including the New 
York Honicstftui i\n(\ the Utica P?css. He is 



428 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



an active member of the New Vork State 
Grange, in which he has served as lecturer 
several terms. In July, 1898, he passed the 
required examinations for a milk expert in 
Albany. In politics he is an unswervin-,^ 
Democrat, and has been nominated as Assessor. 
A valued member of the Lutheran Church of 
Breakabeen, he has held the position of treas- 
urer and secretary, and for many years lias been 
sujierintendcnt of the .Sunday-sclioo] connected 
with it. 

In 1879 Mr Mann married Miss Bertha Ter- 
pening, who was burn in I'rincetown, Schenec- 
tady County, dauglitcr of Henry H. Terpening, 
a farmer of that town. Mr. and Mrs. Mann 
have four children. 



TANTON OSTEKHOUT,* one of 
the stirring farmers (jf Carlisle, 
Schoharie County, was born in this 
town. May 20, 1852, .son of Jacob and Bet.sey 
E. (Kniskern) Osterhout. His paternal grand- 
father, Abraham Osterhout, a native of Hol- 
land, immigrated to New York when young, 
and coming from Dutchess County, this .State, 
to West Carlisle, settled upon a tract of land 
containing about two hundred and fifty acres. 
A sturdy [lioneer, he improved his land into a 
good farm, and lie took an acti\e jiart in the 
affairs of the Dutch Reformcil church in his 
neighborhood. He was twice married, and by 
both of his wives had children. Tlmse of 
his second union were: Jacob A., (ieorge, 
Chauncy, Sarah, and Catherine. George, who 
was quite active in political affairs, dietl in 



1862, aged forty-five years. Chauncy, who 
was engaged in business in Cobleskill, died in 
1872. Sarah is the widow of David P. Brown. 
Catherine, who married J. J. Brown, died in 
1878. 

Jacob A. Osterhout, .Stanton Osterhout's 
father, was a lifelong resident of Carlisle. 
After his father's death he and one of his 
brothers bought the homestead. He was one 
of the first farmers in the town to engage in 
the raising of hops, wiiich he produced quite 
extensively, and he also made a specialty of 
hay and grain. He owned about four hundred 
acres of land. He was jirominent and influen- 
tial in town and count)- politics, took a con- 
spicuous part in the various conventions, but 
would not accept office. His religious prefer- 
ence was for the Dutch Reformed church. He 
was the father of seven children, namely: 
Josiah ; Stanton, tiie subject of this sketch; 
Wilson; Alfred; Albert; I^lmira; and Melissa. 
Josiah died at the age of eighteen; Melissa 
married Daniel Miekle; 1-Llmira married 
Aaron Young; Alfred is residing at the home- 
stead; antl the others are engaged in farming 
in this town. 

.Stanton Osterhout was educated in the dis- 
trict school. He assisted his father in farm- 
ing until after his marriage, wiien he purchased 
the property known as the