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Full text of "Biographies of the founders, ex-presidents, prominent early members and others of the Massachusetts Dental Society"

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BIOGRAPHIES 

OF THE 

Founders, Ex-Presidents, Prominent 
Early Members and others 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Dental 
Society 



[ILLUSTR.\TED] 



BY 



WALDO ELIAS BOARDMAN, D.M.D. 

Editor Harvard Quinquennial Catalogue, Dental Department, Harvard University 

Former Editor Massachusetts Dental Society. Member Committee on 

History, National Dental Association. Chairman Committee 

on History, Massachusetts Dental Society. 




Published by 
Massachusetts Dental Society 

Boston, Mass. 

1914 



vs ^^ 



FRANK P. BROWN - PRINTER - BOSTON 



TO THE MEMORY OF THE FOUNDERS 
AND BUILDERS OF 

THE MASSACHUSETTS DENTAL SOCIETY 

WHOSE FAITHFUL SERVICES AND MEMORIES 

NOW FORGOTTEN BY THE PROFESSION 

THEY SO WELL SERVED, 

THIS VOLUME IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED 

BY THE AUTHOR 



INDEX 



Abbott, C. E. 
Adams. J. F. 
Andrews, R. R. 
Atkins, E. N. 
Atkinson, W. H. 

Ball, J. W. 
Banium, S. C. 
Batchelder, J. H. 
Bishop, H. F. 
Blake, E. 
Boardman, W. E. 
Bowdoin, W, L. 
Brackett, C. A. 

Chandler, T. H. 
Chase, A. H. St. C. 
Clapp, D. M. 
Codman, B. S. 
Codman, J. T. 
Cooke, A. A. 
Cooke, G. L. 
Cooke, W. P. 
Coolidge, J. B. 

Daly, J. M. 
Davis, C. G. 
Dowsley, J. F. 
Draper, H. S. 
Dudley, A. M. 

Eames, G. F. 
Evans, T. W. 

Faxon, F. S. 
Hanagan, A. J. 
Flynn, M. W. 

Gerry, G. A. 
Glover, N. A. 

Ham, S. F. 
Harriman, G. V. 
Harrington, D. G. 
Harris, E. N. 
Haskell, L. P. 
Hawes, N. W. 
Hitchcock, E. B. 
Hitchcock, T. B. 
Howe, O. 
Hurlbut, C. S. 
Hurlbut, J. S. 

Ingalls, D. B. 

Keep, N. C. 
Kidder, J. H. 



223 

87 
96 

143 
195 

Id 
198 
62 
144 
149 
107 
150 

'5' 

32 
217 

84 

153 

68 

59 
'54 
121 

,56 

1 58 
77 
i'5 
'13 
160 

99 
200 

'17 

137 

94 
162 

34 

35 

3' 

3« 

209 

163 

yo 

42 

165 

132 

66 

81 

54 

72 



Kinsman, E. O. 
Knight, J. K. 

Lawrence, A. 
Leach, D. W. 
Leach, E. G. 
Lindstrom, C. R. 
Lowe, G. A. 

McDougall, S. J. 
McLaughlin, J. J. F. 
McQuillen, J. H. 
Maxfield, G. A. 
Meriam, H. C. 
Miller, H. M. 
Moffatt, G. T. 
Morgan, N. 

Noble, L. 

Page, E. 
Page, W. E. 
Papineau, A. 
Parker, A. H. 
Paul, J. T. 
Piper, H. H. 
Pray, M. W. 
Proctor, C. M. 

Rodgers, C. W. 
Rolfe, E. C. 

Salmon, L A. 
Savage, G. E. 
Searle, F. 
Shepard, L. D. 
Shepherd, J. 
Smith, E. H. 
Smith, M. C. 
Stanley, N. A. 
Stephens, S. G. 
Stockwell, C. T. 
Stowell, S. S. 

Taylor, L. C. 
Tourtelotte, J. N. 
Tucker, E. G. 
Tucker, J. 

Waters, G. F". 
Webber, C. 
Wetherbee, I.J. 
Wheeler, A. F. 
White, S. S. 
William.s, D. (',. 
Wyman, A. V. 



123 
103 

167 
169 

57 

^33 
114 

29 
125 
203 
105 

92 
170 

64 
172 

174 

177 
102 
179 
180 
221 
214 

37 
219 

21 1 
44 

40 

129 

82 

74 
181 

135 
126 

•31 

88 

182 

II I 

185 
187 
188 
190 

79 
193 
46 

'38 

207 

48 

216 



PREFACE 

The collection and compilation of data and photographs of the 
organizers and ex-presidents of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
together with many of the prominent early members, was begun by 
the writer in the year 1900, and continued, at intervals of time, until 
the year 1912. In 1913 the Society made an appropriation for the 
publication of same. 

The object of this publication is to permanently, and as nearly 
authentically as possible, place on record the work accomplished by 
the men who were pioneers in the organization and those who have 
been elevated to the presidency, the highest honor in the gift of the 
Society, and help, also, to promote the cause, by gathering statistics 
by others for record, and in time allow for some competent person of 
the future to write a concise history of the dental profession of the 
world — so that future generations may know what has been achieved 
by these men. 

One of the first records of a regular dental practitioner in Massa- 
chusetts appears in an advertisement in the Boston Gazette and 
Country Journal, (published at Boston) under date of September 19, 
1768, which states : — 

Whereas, many persons are so 

unfortunate as to lose their Fore-Teeth by 

accident, and otherways, to their great 

Detriment, not only in looks, but speaking 

both in public and private: — This is to 

inform all such, that they may have them 

replaced with artificial ones, that look as 

well as the Natural and answers the end of 

speaking to all intents, by Paul Revere, 

Goldsmith, near the head of Dr. 

Clarke's Wharf, Boston. 
All persons who may have had false 

Teeth fixt by Mr. John Baker, Surgeon 

dentist, and they have got loose, (as they will 

in time) may have them fastened by the 

above who learnt the method of fixing them 

from Mr. Baker. 

On July 19, 1770, appears the following advertisement in the Boston 
Gazette and Country Journal: 

Artificial Teeth. 
Paul Revere, 
Takes this Method of returning his most 
Sincere thanks to the Gentlemen and 
Ladies who have Employed him in the care 
of their Teeth he would now inform them 



and all others, who are so unfortunate as 

to lose their Teeth by accident or otherways, 

that he still continues the business 

of a Dentist, and flatters himself that 

from the experience he has had these 

Two years (in which time he has fixt some 

Hundreds of Teeth) that he can fix them as 

well as any Surgeon-Dentist who ever 

came from London, he fixes them in such a 

Manner that they are not only an Ornament, 

but of real Use in Speaking and Eating: 

He- cleanses the Teeth and will wait 

on any Gentleman or Lady at their Lodgings, 

he may now be spoke with at his shop opposite 

Dr. Clark's at the North End where the 

Gold and Silversmith's Business is carried 

on in all its branches. 

Following him came the men who are the subjects of these bio- 
graphies. 

The Massachusetts Dental Society in its early days brought about 
the organization of the Harvard Dental School, the New England 
Dental Journal^ 1881, and other journals. 

It also brought together in professional comradeship and continuity 
the progressive practitioners of Massachusetts and surrounding 
states of New England, and made known to the dental world the 
men whose biographies and likenesses illustrate these pages, some of 
whom have acquired a reputation not only national but. inter- 
national as expert operators, scientists, authors, inventors and 
orators. Probably no state in the Union has produced a more dig- 
nified, talented or progressive set of men than those prominent in 
the earty days of the Society. 

The author is indebted to many of these men and to their descend- 
ants, and from personal acquaintance with many others who have 
passed to the great unknown and of those now living, also from 
histories and other works, for the help given in preparation of this 
publication, and hereby extends his thanks to all who have in any 
way contributed to make these biographies possible. 

It may be interesting to know that from November 7, 1864, to 
April I, 1867, this Society had held twenty- three meetings with a 
total attendance of 402 members, or an average of about fifteen 
members at each meeting. 

The Society at one time seriously considered a $50,000 plan for a 
building to house itself, library and museum. 

On November 12, 1867, the Society voted to purchase a microscope 
at an expense of $142.72 and on December 13, 1877, a new one was 
purchased to replace the old at the price of $41. The old one be- 
coming passe, has since by vote of the Society been deposited in 
the Museum of the Harvard Dental School. These microscopes 



were freely used by such members as Drs. T. B. Hitchcock, R. R. 
Andrews and others. 

On February ii, 1868, there was offered for action of the Society, 
a petition to be presented to the Legislature for a law to protect the 
public from dental imposition, the petition was laid on the table 
as unfinished business. 

On June 29, 1876, Dr. George T. Moffatt, Chairman of Committee 
on Regulation of Dental Practice in Massachusetts by law, reported 
that it was not practicable to procure legislation on the subject. 

On June 9, 1881, Dr. A. M. Dudley moved for a new dental law, 
and the Law Committee, on December 15, 1882, reported that Governor 
John D. Long's bill had been laid on the table and referred to next 
Legislature. The Society voted an expression of opinion against 
passage of this bill. 

At the Twenty-second Annual Meeting on December 9, 1886, it 
was voted to take up the matter of the application for legislation 
for a new dental law relative to the petition of Dr. Lewis T. Foss 
and finally voted that the Society take no action relative thereto. 

On May 21, 1868, Dr. L. D. Shepard offered a deprecatory motion 
relative to a second dental college. This was due to the fact that 
the Harvard Dental School had been established the previous year, 
and many thought that the starting of the Boston Dental College 
was wrong in principle and not field enough for rival schools in New 
England, however, after a hard fought battle before the Legislature, 
said body authorized its organization, and the two schools have 
continued side by side until 1899 when Tufts College absorbed the 
Boston in connection with her Medical School. 

Up to June 17, 1873, this Society had held monthly meetings, but on 
this date voted a change to semi-annual meetings, which were held 
in June and December, the former month for the semi-annual and the 
latter month for the annual. This continued down to and including 
1890, when the Society voted to eliminate the semi-annual meeting, 
and the annual to be in June. 

The Society at its Annual Meeting on December 14, 1876, voted to 
hereafter print a list of its members in future notices, and accord- 
ingly on Dec. 13, 1877, the list printed contained fifty-eight members 
in good standing. On Dec. 13, 1889, the Secretary was hereafter 
voted an annual salary of twenty-five dollars. 

Previous to the enactment of the dental law, junior membership 
had been created allowing those to join the Society who were ineli- 
gible to active membership, but in July, 1892, by vote of the Society, 
all juniors were made active members and the junior membership 
abolished, for the reason that the dental law having been enacted 
in 1887, therefore there was no necessity, for such membership. 

There had, from time to time, been much discussion relative to 
making the Society more efficient in various ways and by a larger 
membership, accordingly on June 8, 1893, a resolution was passed rec- 
ommending districting the State Society and on June 7, 1894, after 



the new plan of districts had been drawn and perfected by Drs. J, K. 
Knight, George A. Maxfield and Waldo E. Boardman, being respect- 
ively the President, First- Vice and Second Vice-presidents, (the com- 
mittee having it in charge), the Society was then divided by arbitrary 
lines into seven districts, these divisions to be made on lines of 
railroad communication. These seven districts were given the names 
of the North Metropolitan, the South MetropoHtan, the North 
Eastern, the South Eastern, the Central, the Valley, and the Western 
District Dental Societies, with the Massachusetts Dental Society 
as the parent organization. These districts were each represented in 
the parent organization by five Councillors. 

On June i, 1898, the North Eastern District, not having energy 
enough to hold but one meeting after its organization, was absorbed 
into the MetropoHtan District by vote of the parent Society, and on 
June 7, 1900, the North Metropolitan being desirous of amalgamating 
with the South Metropolitan, it was voted to allow the consohdation, 
thus reducing the districts in number from seven to five, where it 
now stands. Under this districting the Society increased in energy, 
in character and influence and in membership from one hundred 
members to seven hundred and thirty-two members at present. 

Dr. Stockwell presented at this meeting a motion that the annual 
meeting, hereafter, be limited to members only of the Society, and it 
was so voted. 

On June 3, 1893, Dr. George A. Maxfield made a motion that a 
committee be appointed each year to recommend to the Governor 
of the State names for appointment to the Board of Registration 
in Dentistry, in the expectation that politics might be eliminated 
from such appointments, and this motion prevailed. This committee 
continued, by appointment each year, down to May, 191 1, when it 
was aboHshed. 

June loj 1909, the Society by resolution voted to become a compon- 
ent part of the National Dental Association and offered amendments 
to its Constitution and By-Laws to that effect. These amendment 
have from time to time been laid over till the National was ready to 
receive all the State Societies of the United States, which was com- 
pleted in 1912, and at its annual meeting in May, I9i3,this Society 
adopted the perfecting amendments making the Massachusetts Dental 
Society a component society. The total membership to date has been 
approximately 1300. 

Of the 142 known deaths with records to date, their total ages 
are 9384, or an average of nearly 66>^ years, the eldest being 97 and 
the youngest 26. 

WALDO ELIAS BOARDMAN. 

May, 1913. 



10 



MINUTES AND PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS DENTAL SOCIETY 

First Meeting 

Boston, March 4, 1864. 

Pursuant to a call, the Dentists of Boston met at the rooms of 
the Young Men's Christian Association in Tremont Temple to con- 
sider the propriety of organizing a Dental Association. 

The meeting was called to order at 7.30 o'clock, P. M., and tempo- 
rarily organized by the election of Drs. I. A. Salmon, Chairman, and 
S. J. McDougall, Secretary. 

Some remarks pertinent to the occasion were made by the chairman, 
and a discussion followed in which the expression was general in favor 
of the object of the meeting. 

On motion a committee, consisting of Drs. Salmon, Hitchcock, 
Ham, Harriman, and McDougall, was appointed to draft a Consti- 
tution and By-Laws and report the same at the next meeting. 

It was also voted that when this meeting adjourns it be to meet 
on the evening of the 15th inst. at the same place at 7.30 o'clock. 

Adjournment. 

Second Meeting 

Boston, March 15, 1864. 

Pursuant to adjournment, the Dentists of Boston and vicinity 
met at 7.30 o'clock at the rooms of the Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation. 

Meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Having learned 
that the room was engaged for other purposes, the meeting was 
immediately adjourned to meet at 8 o'clock at the office of Drs. 
Clough and Harriman, in the same building. 

Evening Session 
8 o'clock. Office of Drs. Clough and Harriman. 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. The report of 
the previous meeting was read and approved. The Committee 
appointed to draft a Constitution and By-Laws presented their 
report, which, on motion, was received and the Committee discharged. 

It was then voted that the meeting proceed to the consideration 
of the Constitution, and that each article be acted upon separately. 

Articles i and 2 adopted. 

Article 3 amended and adopted. 

Article 4 read and Sections i, 2 and 3 adopted; Section 4 amended 
and adopted. 



Article 5 adopted. 

Article 6 rejected. 

Article 7 adopted. 

On motion, future consideration of the Constitution was laid on 
the table. 

Article i of the By-Laws was read and adopted. 

Article 2 of the By-Laws was read and adopted. 

Article 3 amended and adopted. 

Article 4 adopted. 

On motion it was voted to adjourn to meet at such time and place 
as the Secretary might designate, notice thereof to be given through 
the newspapers. Meeting adjourned at 10 P. M. 

Third Meeting 

Boston, March 24, 1864. 

Pursuant to notice, the Dentists of Boston and vicinity again met 
at the rooms of the Y. M. C. A. at 7.30 o'clock P. M. 

Meeting called to order by the Chairman. 

On motion it was voted that the Secretary be excused from reading 
the report of the previous meeting. 

The Constitution as presented was read for the information of 
new members. 

On motion, Art. 5 of the By-Laws was taken up for consideration, 
was read and adopted. 

Sect, i of Art. 6 was read amended and adopted. 

Sect. 2 of Art. 6 was read and adopted. 

Sect, i of Art. 7 was read and adopted. 

Sect. 2 of Art. 7 was read, amended and adopted. 

Sect, i of Art. 8 was read and adopted. 

Sect. 2 of Art. 8 was read and adopted. 

Sect. 3 of Art. 8 was read and adopted. 

Article 9 was read, amended and adopted. 

Order of Business was read, amended and adopted. 

On motion, the Constitution was taken from the table. 

On motion. Art. 2 of Constitution was striken out. 

On motion, a preamble setting forth the reason for organizing a 
Dental Association and also its objects was presented and adopted. 

An amendment to Sect. 2 of Art 4 of the Constitution was presented 
and, on motion, adopted. It was then 

Voted, To adopt the Constitution, as amended, as a whole. 

On motion, the present Chairman was requested to act as President, 
and the present Secretary to act as Secretary and Treasurer, until 
the annual meeting. 

On motion, an Executive Committee was appointed by the Chair, 
to serve till the Annual Meeting, consisting of Drs. Rolfe, Wetherbee, 
McDougall, Harris and Harriman. 

Eleven members then signed the Constitution and paid the entrance 
fee. 

Meeting adjourned at lo P. M. 

12 



Fourth Meeting 

Boston, April 4, 1864. 

The regular meeting of the Association was held this evening at 
the usual place. The President in the Chair. 

In consequence of the absence of the Secretary, it was 

Voted, That Dr. E. N. Harris act as Secretary pro tern. 

On motion of Dr. Rolfe it was 

Voted, That the By-Laws relating to the admission of candidates 
for membership be suspended for this meeting. 

The following names were then proposed, and referred at once to 
the Executive Committee, viz: 

Drs. N. C. Keep and James M. Daly both of Boston, proposed by 
Dr. E. C. Rolfe. 

Dr. William W. Russell of Boston, proposed by Dr. I. J. Wetherbee. 

Dr. B. B. Chandler of Boston, proposed by G. B. Harriman. 

Dr. Alfred Greenwood of Boston, proposed by Dr. T. B. Hitchcock. 

Dr. S. P. Bartlett of Boston and Dr. D. S. Bartlett of Roxbury, 
proposed by Dr. S. F. Ham. 

The Executive Committee reporting favorably upon all these 
names, the Society proceeded to ballot and all were elected. 

An interesting discussion then followed upon the use of Nitrous 
Oxide Gas as an Anaesthetic. 

On motion of Dr. Wetherbee it was 

Voted, That the Secretary be instructed to pubUsh a notice in 
the Boston Journal correcting the error that appeared in a notice 
of the proceedings of the last meeting, published in that paper, and 
in connection with this notice to state the time of holding the annual 
meeting, and also to notify members through the daily papers of the 
next monthly meeting of the Association. 

On motion 

Voted, That this Association now adjourn to meet in this place 
on the first Monday evening in May at 7.30 o'clock. 
Adjourned. 

E. N. Harris, Secretary pro. tern. 



Fifth Meeting 

Boston, May 2, 1864. 

The regular meeting of the Association was held at the usual 
place. Dr. Salmon in the chair. 

Secretary's report of previous meeting was read and approved. 

The reading of previous reports was then called for. These reports 
were read and approved. The Constitution and By-Laws were then 
read by request. On motion, it was 

Voted, That the By-Laws relating to the admission of members 
be suspended for the evening. The following names were then 
proposed, and referred to the Executive Committee, which reported 
favorably upon all, viz: 

13 



W. I. Thayer of Chelsea, proposed by S. J. McDougall, 

E. S. Blake of Boston, proposed by T. H. Chandler. 

E. G. Tucker of Boston, proposed by I. A. Salmon. 

A. Papineau of Waltham, proposed by S. IF. Ham. 

J. T. Codman of Boston, proposed by S. F. Ham. 

Upon balloting these gentlemen were all admitted to membership. 
On motion, it was 

Voted, That the rules be suspended for the purpose of amending 
the Order of Business, which was accordingly amended. On motion, 
the chair appointed T. H. Chandler, N. C. Keep and I. J. Wetherbee 
a committee to consider the subject of a Seal and recommend a suit- 
able device to the Association. 

On motion, the Executive Committee was instructed to procure a 
black-board for the use of the Society. 

After some remarks by Dr. Keep, a discussion followed relative 
to the time of holding the Annual Meeting. 

On motion, the Executive Committee was instructed to prepare a 
suitable notification for the use of the Association. 

Adjourned. 

First Annual Meeting 

Boston, May i6, 1864. 

The Annual Meeting of the Association was this day held at the 
usual place, commencing at the time appointed. Dr. Salmon in the 
chair. 

On motion of Dr. Harris it was 

Voted, To suspend the rules relating to the admission of members 
in order to admit gentlemen present from abroad. The following 
names were then presented: 

H. F. Bishop, of Worcester, proposed by E. N. Harris. 

A. A. Cooke, of Milford, proposed by T. B. Hitchcock. 
G. L. Cooke, of Milford, proposed by T. B. Hitchcock. 

B. T. Currier, of Boston, proposed by I. J. Wetherbee. 

These names were referred to the Executive Committee who 
reported favorably upon all. The Society immediately proceeded 
to ballot, and the gentlemen proposed were all chosen. 

The Society then proceeded to ballot for the candidates for the 
officers for the ensuing year. Messrs Wetherbee, Harris and T. H. 
Chandler were appointed by the Chairman as a Committee to collect, 
sort and count votes. 

On motion of Dr. Rolfe, it was 

Voted, That an informal ballot be taken before proceeding to the 
election of each officer, in order thereby to get at the name most 
prominent in the minds of the members for such office, and such 
informal ballots were accordingly taken. 

The, following named gentlemen were then chosen, viz: 

Dr. N. C. Keep President 

Dr. I. J. Wetherbee Vice-President 

14 



Dr. T. H. Chandler Recording Secretary 

Dr. E. C. Rolfe Corresponding Secretary 

Dr. S. J. McDouGALL Treasurer 

Dr. E. N. Harris Librarian 

Dr. I. A. Salmon 

Dr. a. a. Cooke 

Dr. B. S. Codman 

Dr. H. F. Bishop 

Dr. T. B. Hitchcock 



Executive Committee 



On motion, each and all of these elections was made unanimous. 

On motion of Dr. Hitchcock it was 

Voted. That a committee of three be appointed by the chair to 
nominate a member to deliver the Annual Address at our Second 
Anniversary' meeting. 

Messrs. Rolfe, Hitchcock and Cooke were appointed, who nomi- 
nated Dr. N. C. Keep, and as a substitute, Dr. I. J. Wetherbee. The 
report was accepted. 

By nomination-at-large, Messrs. Wetherbee, Bishop, Clark, Rolfe 
and Harris were appointed delegates to attend the next meeting of 
the American Dental Association. 

The Treasurer then reported seventy-five dollars in the treasury 
and no bills yet presented. 

On motion of Dr. Rolfe, it was 

Voted, That an effort be made to obtain the use of the rooms in 
Tremont Place, now occupied by the Sufifolk District Medical Society 
and others, and that the Executive Committee be authorized to see 
on what terms said rooms can be obtained. 

On motion of Dr. Wetherbee it was 

Voted, That the Secretary be required to prepare and transmit a 
correct account of the proceedings of this meeting to the Dental 
Cosmos, Boston Medical Journal, and such other journals and papers 
as he may see fit. 

On motion of Dr. A. A. Cooke it was 

Voted, That the Executive Committee be instructed to provide 
for the printing of the Constitution and By-Laws. It was also 

Voted, That they cause five hundred copies to be struck off. 

Voted, That all arrangements relative to an entertainment at 
our next annual meeting be referred to that Committee. On motion 
of Dr. Thayer it was 

Voted, That the meeting adjourn to meet again at 8 o'clock P. M. 
at^the same place. 

Evening Session — May i6. 8 o'clock. 
Society met again pursuant to adjournment, a pleasant evening 
was passed in conversation and discussion, but no business was tran- 
sacted. 
Adjourned. 

T. H. Chandler, Secretary. 

15 



FIRST CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS DENTAL SOCIETY 

Adopted March 24, 1864 

Printed 1865 

PREAMBLE 

We, the undersigned, do declare ourselves an association to cul- 
tivate the Science and Art of Dentistry, and all its collateral branches; 
to elevate and sustain the professional character of dentists, and to 
promote amongst them mutual improvement, social intercourse, and 
good will; and have adopted for our government the following Con- 
stitution and By-Laws, and order of business. 

.CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I 

Name 

This Society shall be known as ''The Massachusetts Dental Asso- 
ciation." 

ARTICLE II 

Officers 

The officers of this Society shall consist of a President, Vice-Pres- 
ident, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, Treasurer, 
Librarian, an Executive Committee (to consist of five members), 
and such other officers as may be designated by the By-Laws, which 
officers shall be chosen annually by ballot. 

ARTICLE III 

Members 

Section i. This Society shall consist of Active, Corresponding, 
and Honorary members. 

Section 2. The Active members shall consist of Practitioners of 
Dentistry residing in the State of Massachusetts. They shall be 
twenty-one years of age, of good moral character, and shall have 
received a diploma from a reputable Medical and Dental College, 
or shall have been five years in the practice of Dentistry, including 
term of pupilage. 

Section 3 . Corresponding members shall consist of jPractitioners of 
Dentistry, residing in this or other states of the Union, or in foreign 

16 



countries, who manifest a disposition to advance the science and 
art of the profession by contributing to its literature. 

Section 4. The Honorary members shall consist of Practitioners 
of Dentistry who have honorably retired from practice; of Practi- 
tioners of Medicine and Surgery; or others who have made valuable 
contributions to the Science of Dentistry. 

ARTICLE IV 

Powers 

The Society shall use one common seal, with such device and in- 
scription as may be agreed upon, and shall grant to its members, 
in the name and form prescribed by the By-Laws, such certificate as 
under its seal may authenticate and perpetuate the memory of such 
membership. 

ARTICLE V 

Amendments 

The Constitution may be altered or amended with the consent of 
two-thirds of the members present, — the proposition stating the 
amendment, in writing, to be submitted by five members, at a regular 
meeting, and lie over until the next regular meeting. 

BY-LAWS 

ARTICLE I 

Officers 

Section i. Duties of the President. The President shall preside 
at all meetings of the Society ; call special meetings, upon the request 
of five active members; sign all diplomas, certificates, or letters 
testimonial; appoint all committees not otherwise provided for, and 
be ex-oficio member of all standing committees. 

Section 2. Duties of the Vice-President. The Vice-President 
shall, in the absence of the President, preside; and in case of the absence 
of both of those officers, a President 'pro tern shall be appointed. 

Section 3. Duties of the Recording Secretary. The Recording 
Secretary shall keep minutes of all meetings; notify officers and mem- 
bers of their election; give notice to members of all meetings; have 
the custody of the seal; sign all diplomas, certificates, and letters 
testimonial, and certify to all ofl5cial acts of the Society in connection 
with the President. 

Section 4. Duties of the Corresponding Secretary. The Corres- 
ponding Secretary shall take charge of and conduct the correspond- 
ence of the Society. He shall keep a copy of all official letters he 
may write, with replies to the same. 

Section 5. Duties of the Treasurer. It shall be the duty of the 
Treasurer to keep all moneys of the Society committed to his trust; 
to pay them over by order of the President, countersigned by the 

17 



Secretary, and keep a correct account of the same in a book provided 
for that purpose. 

He shall make a full and detailed report of the financial affairs of 
the Society at the Annual Meeting in each year; and at the expiration 
of his term of office shall deliver to his successor all funds, papers, 
and books relating thereto. 

Section 6. Duties of the Librarian. The Librarian shall have 
charge of all books and manuscripts belonging to the Society, and 
shall be Curator of the Museum. He shall keep an accurate cata- 
logue of the same, and shall report at the Annual Meeting the con- 
dition and contributions made to the Library and Museum during 
the year. 

ARTICLE II 

Executive Committee 

The Executive Committee shall ascertain the qualifications of 
candidates for membership, and report the same to. the Society; 
audit the accounts of the Treasurer ; provide proper places for meetings; 
superintend the printing for the Society, and transact such other 
business as may be referred to it. 

ARTICLE III 

Membership 

Section i. Candidates for membership may be proposed at the 
regular meetings, — recommendations for the same being made in 
writing, signed by two of the members of the Society. The name of 
the candidate shall then be referred to the Executive Committee, 
whose report shall be acted upon at the next regular meeting; two- 
thirds of all the votes cast being necessary for an election. 

Section 2. No person shall be entitled to the privileges of active 
membership until he. shall have signed the Constitution and paid 
the initiation fee. If he omit the same for one year, his election shall 
be void. 

ARTICLE IV 

Dues 

Section i. The initiation fee shall be three dollars, payable at 
or before signing the Constitution. The annual contribution shall 
be two dollars, payable at the Annual Meeting. Any member who 
neglects to pay his annual contribution two successive years shall 
cease to be a member without action of the Society, provided the 
Treasurer has notified him of his indebtedness. 

Section 2. Corresponding ^d Honorary members shall be exempt 
from the pa^Tnent of all dues; and as a mark of distinction for long 
continued service in the profession, by special action of the Society, 
the dues of an Active member may be remitted. 



ARTICLE V 
Privileges of Members 
Active members shall be entitled to debate and vote on all questions 
discussed in the Society, and be eligible to any office in its gift. 

Corresponding and Honorary members shall be entitled to a seat 
in the meetings of the Society, and have the privilege of debating 
all questions not involving pecuniary expenditure. 

ARTICLE VI 
Resignation or Expulsion of Members 

Section i. Any member shall have leave to resign upon appli- 
cation made therefor in writing, provided all arrears due from him 
to the Society have been discharged, except in the case of impeach- 
ment. 

Section 2. Any member may be impeached by three members 
for violating the laws of this Society, for malpractice, or other gross 
misconduct. The member so impeached shall have transmitted 
to him a written copy of the impeachment, with notice of the time of 
hearing before a committee of five members appointed for that pur- 
pose; then, if the report of said Committee sustain the impeachment, 
the Society, at the next regular meeting, may, by ballot, suspend 
or expel such member, by a majority of three-fourths of all the votes 
cast. 

ARTICLE VII 

Meetings 

Section i. Five Active members shall be necessary to constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business at any meeting of this Society. 

Section 2. The regular meetings of this Society shall be holden 
on the first Monday evening of each month. 

The time of meeting shall be at 8 o'clock from April to October, 
and 7.30 o'clock from October to April. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Annual Meetings 

Section i. The Annual Meeting shall be holden on the third 
Monday in May, at 10 o'clock A. M. and shall be devoted to the 
election of the officers of the Association, and such other business 
as shall relate to the interests of the profession. 

Section 2. None but members of this Association shall be present 
during an election. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Association at each Annual 
Meeting to appoint one of its members to deliver an address at the 
next annual meeting. 

ARTICLE IX 

Alterations or Amendments 
These By-Laws may be altered or amended at any regular meeting, 
by a vote of two-thirds of the members present, provided said al- 

19 



teration or amendment shall have been presented at a previous 
meeting. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

I. All meetings of the Society shall be called to order by the pre- 
siding ofl&cer at the hour appointed. 

Reading of the Minutes of the previous meeting. 

Reports of Committees. 

Applications for membership, and the election of members. 

Unfinished business. 

New business. 

Presentation of written communications. 

Presentation of specimens of morbid anatomy, and operative 
and mechanical dentistry. 
9. Oral communications. 

At the meeting of September 5, 1864, Dr. Wetherbee offered the 
following preamble and resolutions, viz: 

Whereas, John A. Cummings of this city has taken out letters- 
patent, thereby vesting in himself the exclusive right to use India 
Rubber for artificial plates or palates for the base of artificial teeth, 
therefore 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts Dental Society solicits the co- 
operation of all Dental Associations and Societies and all others 
interested in testing the validity of said letters-patent, in such form 
or manner as the exigencies of the case demand. 

Resolved, That all associations and societies, and others who may 
take action in the premises, are requested to report the result thereof 
to Dr. E. C. Rolfe, Corresponding Secretary of this Association. 

Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed from this asso- 
ciation, that they be and hereby are instructed to obtain from such 
evidence as may be had, a legal opinion on the validity of said letters- 
patent, and to report at the next meeting. 

Committee chosen: I. J. Wetherbee, I. A. Salmon, N. C. Keep. 

September 19, 1864. Voted, That the resolutions passed at the 
last meeting be published in the Boston Journal. 

The Society also voted to invite all dentists of the State to be 
present to consider the claims of the Dental Vulcanite Company; 
and the Corresponding Secretary was instructed to furnish the various 
Dental Societies of the country with a copy of the resolutions. 

At this meeting it was proposed to establish a Dental Journal (by 
Dr. Lawrence) and incorporate the Society, and establish a Dental 
College (by Dr. Wetherbee). 

Committee chosen on Dental Journal; Drs. Keep, Thayer, Lawrence 
Salmon and Chandler. 

(By Dr. Wetherbee.) A Committee was appointed to draft 
resolution and give notice through the Boston Journal of an invita- 
tion to apply for an act of incorporation at the next session of the 
General Court. 

20 



Committee appointed on nomination at large, viz: Wetherbee, 
Harris and Keep. 

October 3, 1S64. Report on the Cummings patent claims. 

November 7, 1864. Dental Journal Committee reported, "That 
in consequence of the disturbed state of the country and the high 
price of materials and labor, it is inexpedient at present to act in the 
matter, and request that the committee be discharged. Accepted 
and discharged. 

Committee on Incorporation asked for futher time to report. 

December 5, 1864. Dr. Wetherbee, chairman of the committee 
upon the subject of incorporation, reported that we cannot obtain 
an act to incorporate the Association without $5000 paid into the 
Treasury, and therefore our only course is to obtain a special Act 
of Incorporation. Report accepted. 

Voted, That the same committee act as a special committee to 
obtain a special act of incorporation. 

Committee of five appointed to consider and report upon a scale 
of prices. Drs. Keep, Brown, Rolfe, Harris, and Wetherbee. 

January 2, 1865. Voted, That a committee of three be appointed 
to petition Congress not to extend the Goodyear Rubber patent. 
Drs. Rolfe, Lawrence and Keep appointed. 

January 16, 1865. Partial report on Goodyear patent extension. 
Discussion had on fees by committee and members. 

February 6, 1865. Committee on fees made a partial report. 
The following resolution by Dr. Leach was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That we consider the formation of the U. S. Dental 
Protective Union opportune, and do, as a Society, consider it a privi- 
lege as well as a duty to aid said Society by becoming members. 

February' 20, 1865. Committee on Charter reported that the 
matter had gone before the proper committee of the Legislature. 

Committee on Goodyear Vulcanite matter reported progress. 

March 6, 1865. Committee on Charter reported. The Committee 
on Education, to which the matter was referred by the Legislature, 
sent to the President of our Association a notice that they should 
report leave to withdraw our petition : The President then appeared 
before that committee who said they could not change their purpose 
on account of the numerous other cases of like neglect to give legal 
notice, but, when this is so reported to the House, a motion will be 
made by one of our friends there, to give leave for publication, which 
will cure the neglect and secure for us our Charter at the present 
session. 

April 3, 1865. Legislature suggested we change Association to 
Society for Charter purposes. 

May I, 1865. Dr. Wetherbee reported on Charter by producing 
and reading document. The name Association was changed to 
Society. 



21 



SECOND ANNUAL MEETING 

Boston, May i8, 1865. 
The following of&cers were elected, viz: 
N. C. Keep, President 
E. G. Leach, Vice-President 
T. H. Chandler, Recording Secretary 
Enoch C. Rolfe, Corresponding Secretary 
Samuel J. McDougall, Treasurer 
Edward N. Harris, Librarian 

Executive Committee. 
Ambrose Lawrence 
. John T. Codman 
H. F. Bishop 
Thomas B. Hitchcock 
Samuel F. Ham 

Dr. N. C. Keep was chosen to deliver the annual address. 

The following named delegates were chosen to represent the Society 
at the meeting of the American Dental Association at Chicago, viz: 
Drs. Wetherbee, Lawrence, Keep, Leach, Bishop, Harris, Gerry, 
Shepard, Rolfe, Hitchcock, Salmon and B. S. Codman. 

The following resolutions were presented by Dr. WetherBee, viz: 

"The following Preamble and Resolutions offered, being substan- 
tially the same as have been already adopted by the American Dental 
Convention, and American Dental Association, at this last meeting, 
viz: 

Whereas, In the opinion of the Massachusetts Dental Society 
not less than two years pupilage in the office of a competent dentist 
and attendance upon two full courses of lectures in Dental College 
will qualify an individual to practice dentistry properly, therefore, 

Resolved, That practitioners of dentistry be requested not to receive 
into their ofl&ces students for a less term than two years, and under 
no consideration, unless they agree to attend lectures in and be 
graduated from a dental college before entering upon the practice of 
the profession. 

Resolved, That it is the duty as well as the interest of the people 
to require of all who hereafter enter upon the practice of dentistry, 
that they shall have received in course a diploma of graduation from 
a Dental College as the first requisite for public confidence and pat- 
ronage. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be pubKshed. 

October 2, 1865. On motion of Dr. Shepard after reading an 
article in the newspaper concerning the Webber-Twitchell case in 
the Mechanics Exhibition, it was 

Voted, That a committee of three be appointed to draw up and 
present to the Examining Committee of that Exhibition, a remon- 
strance against awarding premiums on Exhibitions pf Artificial Teeth. 
Committee appointed: Drs. Shepard, Lawrence and Rolfe. 



November 6, 1865. On motion of Dr. Wetherbee it was 

Voted, That a committee of three be appointed to take under 
advisement the subject of the establishment of a chair of dentistry 
in the Massachusetts Medical College, in accordance with the recom- 
mendation of the President in his annual address, and to take such 
action as the matter demands. By nomination at large the committee 
appointed were Drs. Keep, Wetherbee and Chandler. 

March 6, 1866. The committee of which Dr. Keep is chairman, 
reported on the subject of Professorships of Dentistry in Harvard 
Medical School and reported recommending the appointment of a 
committee to confer with the authorities of that college. 

Committee appointed (on motion of Dr. Rolfe) Drs. Keep, Rolfe 
and Shepard. 

May 7, 1866. Resolved, That in view of the distinguished services 
rendered this Society by Dr. McQuillen of Philadelphia, we give him 
the Society's diploma. 



THIRD ANNUAL MEETING 

Boston, May 24, 1866. 
The following officers were elected for the ensuing year, viz: 
President, N. C. Keep, M.D., Boston. 
Vice-President, E. G. Leach, Boston. 
Recording Secretary, L. D. Shepard, D.D.S., Boston. 
Corresponding Secretary, E. C. Rolfe, M.D., Boston. 
Treasurer, S. J. McDougall, M.D., Boston. 
Librarian, E. N. Harris, D.D.S., Boston. 

Executive Committee 
I. J. Wetherbee, D.D.S., Boston 
J. T. Codman, Boston 
George T. Moffatt, M.D., Boston. 
E. Blake, Boston 
H. F. Bishop, M.D.S., Worcester. 
Annual address by I. J. Wetherbee. 

Delegates chosen to represent the Society at the American Dental 
Association are Drs. Keep, Chandler, T. B. Hitchcock, Mofifatt, 
E. G. Leach, O. F. Harris, E. C. Rolfe, A. A. Cooke, E. N. Harris, 
W. L. Bowdoin, S. J. McDougall and J. M. Daly. 

Two hundred and fifty dollars was raised on the spot to entertain 
the American Dental Association. 

October 22, 1866. A special meeting was called by Drs. Chandler, 
I. A. Salmon, T. B. Hitchcock, S.J. McDougall and John T. Codman 
for the puqxjse of considering buying a building for Society purposes. 
A committee of five was appointed with full powers, viz: N. C. Keep, 
Wetherbee, McDougall, Hitchcock, and Chandler. 

On motion of Dr. Chandler, voted that the officers be directed to 
memorialize the Legislature for authority to hold property to the 
amount of $50,000. 

23 



November 5, 1866. Report made that $1160.30 was raised to 
entertain the American Dental Association and that $1062.50 was 
spent, leaving a balance in the treasury of $97.80 

Dr. McDougall introduced his new gold foil and offered to give 
the Society, for the building fund, the profits in all sales of foil till 
next April. Voted to accept. 

January 7, 1867. Voted to publish a New England Dental Journal. 

On motion of Dr. A. Lawrence 

Voted, That a committee of five be appointed to appear before 
the legislature and oppose granting a charter to the Rubber Company. 
Committee is composed of A. Lawrence, Shepard, E. G. Leach, 
N. C. Keep and E. N. Harris. 

On motion of Dr. Moffatt, the same committee was authorized to 
memoralize Congress against the re-issue of the Goodyear patent. 

Voted to subscribe for English Dental Journal for Society's use, 
on motion of T. B. Hitchcock. 

April, 1867. Dr. Keep reported that the Committee on Colleges 
had attended to its duties, held several meetings with the Committee 
of the Medical Faculty, consisting of Drs. Bowditch, Bigelow and 
Ellis, that a plan had been agreed upon which was satisfactory to 
each committee, and had already been unanimously adopted by the 
Medical Faculty. Dr. Shepard gave a statement of the plan adopted. 

Dr. E. G. Leach could not give his approval to that clause which 
required that all professors should be regular graduates in medicine. 

Accepted as a report of progress. 

The progress on new magazine was reported. 

May 5, 1867. A report was made of Committee on Editors. 
Dr. Chandler being recommended and was elected for the new maga- 
zine. 



FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING 

Boston, May 23, 1867. 
Progress was reported on magazine. Plan was adopted by the 
Connecticut Valley Association, the Connecticut State Dental 
Association, the Maine State Dental Society, the Merrimack Valley 
Dental Association and the Massachusetts Dental Society. 
The following officers were chosen for the coming year: 
President, E. G. Leach 
1st. Vice-President, H. F. Bishop 
2nd. Vice-President, E. N. Harris 
Recording Secretary, J. T. Codman 
Corresponding Secretary, E. C. Rolfe 
Treasurer, S. J. McDougall 

Librarian, (I. A. Salmon declined) George T. Moffatt 
(elected June, 1867) 

24 



Executive Committee 

T. H. Chandler 
T. B. Hitchcock 
g. t. moffatt 
Edward Blake 
L. D. Shepard 

Annual address, H. F. Bishop, "The History of Dentistry," to 
appear in the new magazine." 

Voted, That Dr. Chandler prepare a paper for publication in the 
new magazine on the "Early History and Formation of the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society." 

Voted, That the magazine be published by July if possible. 

October 8, 1867. On motion of Dr. Hitchcock, voted to purchase 
a microscope and Si 75 was appropriated for same. 

November 12, 1867. Microscope reported purchased at a cost of 
$142.40 

The Dental School report was that Harvard College would add 
three Professorships, one of Dental Pathology and Therapeutics, 
one of Operative Dentistry, and one of Mechanical Dentistry to their 
Professorships of Anatomy, Physiology, Surgery, and Chemistry, 
making the dental school. 

December 10, 1867. Report made that a cabinet had been purchased 
for museum specimens. 

January 14, 1867. Report made that cabinet for library was ready 
for contributions. 

February 11, 1868. Petition was presented by W. I. Thayer for 
action by the legislature to protect the public from dental impostors, 
this was laid on table till after dinner. 

March 10, 1868. Report made of the death of the first member, 
Roswell Cutter, M. D. 

May 12, 1868. P. R. Ridgway was elected an active member. 



FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING 

Boston, May 21, 1868. 
The following officers were elected, viz: 
President, E. G. Leach 
First Vice-President, T. H. Chandler 
Second Vice-President, George L. Cooke 
Recording Secretary, D. G. Harrington 
Corresponding Secretary, L. D. Shepard 
Treasurer, J. T. Codman 
Librarian, G. T. Moffatt 
Microscopist, T. B. Hitchcock 



25 



Executive Committee. 
I. A. Salmon 
O. F. Harris 
T. B. Hitchcock 
James Shepherd 
Edmund Blake 

Orator, T. H. Chandler, Subject, "Dental Education." 

Drs. Davis of New Bedford and A. Lawrence of Lowell resigned 
from the Society. 

The following resolution was introduced by Dr. L. D. Shepard 
and adopted. 

Resolved, by the Massachusetts Dental Society at its business 
meeting May 21, That we congratulate the profession of New England 
upon the establishment of a Dental College in Boston in connection 
with Harvard Medical College, and that we pledge to this College 
our earnest and undivided support. 

Resolved, That we deprecate the effort to establish a second college 
in Boston, at the present time. 



26 



FOUNDERS 



27 




SAMUEL J— McDOUGALL, M.D. 

Samuel J. McDougall, whose grandparents were Peter and Clairissa 
(McTavish) McDougall of Perth, Scotland, was the son of John 
and Elizabeth (Gilson) McDougall, and born in Albany, New York, 
June 29, 1830. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of his native 
city. As he grew to manhood he taught school for several years 
in the city of his birth. Later he began the study of medicine with 
Dr. James H. Ormsby, and afterward he entered and graduated 
from the Albany Medical School in 1857. 

For a time he was resident physician at the Albany Hospital. 

Having obtained a sound preliminary education and also in medicine 
and being well equipped in the practice of the latter profession by 
reason of his hospital experience, he shortly afterward was attracted 
to dentistry and took up this study in Boston about the year 
i860; eventually acquiring the practice of Dr. Kendall, a dental 
practitioner of that city. 

He was for a time located in the practice of dentistry on Hanover 
Street, Boston, thence removing to 18 Boylston Street, on the sight 
where stands the present Young Men's Christian Union Building. 
Dr. McDougall not only bought the practice but the house of Dr. 
Kendall on the same location, and later sold the same to the Y. M. C. 
Union and removed to Tremont Street, and afterwards to Boylston 
Street nearly opposite the Public Garden. 

Dr. McDougall retired from practice about the year 1900 and 

29 



spent most of his time during the following seven or eight years in 
travel, residing at Colorado Springs, Colorado, with a daughter 
(Mrs. Arthur G. Brigham) a portion of the time, and at other times 
with another daughter, Mrs. Clara M. Lawrence, of Jamaica Plain, 
Massachusetts. 

Dr. McDougall was married on May 2, i860, to Miss Elizabeth 
Miller of Albany, N. Y. Three daughters survived him, Mrs. Wil- 
mot S. Haskell, of Boston, and the two previously mentioned. 

Dr. McDougall was the original founder of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, having enlisted several others in the cause, and was 
active for many years in its service, being the fifth person to sign 
the Constitution and By-Laws. He was the Thirteenth President, 
having been elected December 14, 1876, and on June 5, 1895, he 
was made an Honorary member. 

It was in February, 1864, that Drs. McDougall and D. G. Harrington 
accidently met in the S. S. White depot, and while conversing on the 
subject of the want of union and brotherly feeling among dentists, 
one of them asked, ''Will you be one of six to form a dental society?" 
The other, after assenting, called on Drs. Chandler, Ham, Harriman, 
M. W. Pray, E. N. Harris, and others to the number of twelve, 
and thus Drs. McDougall and Harrington were the original founders 
of the Society. Dr. McDougall being the first to broach the subject. 

Dr. McDougall was a member of the New England Dental Society; 
the Massachusetts Medical Society and the Albany (N. Y. ) Medical 
Society. 

He held the chair of Professor of Dental Art and Mechanism in 
1868 and 1869 in the Boston Dental College, and at another time 
(1874-1875) was Professor of Pathology and Dental Therapeutics 
in the same institution. 

Dr. McDougall was well known in medical circles throughout 
New England. He died at the home of one of his daughters in 
Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, February 8, 1907, beloved by all 
who knew him, a genial, whole-souled gentleman, and whose con- 
fidence the writer enjoyed for many years. 



30 




DANIEL GROUT HARRINGTON, D.M.D. 

Daniel Grout Harrington, the subject of this sketch, was the son 
of EH and Betsey (Grout) Harrington, and born in Westboro, Massa- 
chusetts, May 19, 1832. 

Young Harrington's early education was received in the public 
schools of his native town, and later at the Kimball Union Academy 
of Meriden, New Hampshire, from which he was graduated in 1855. 
A few years later he settled in Boston, Massachusetts, and entered 
upon the practice of dentistry. 

He entered the Harvard Dental School in November, 1869, and was 
graduated in 1870 with the degree of D.M.D. 

Dr. Harrington was a member of the Harvard Dental Alumni 
Association till 1891, and its President from 1875 to 1876. 

He was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
in conjunction with Dr. Samuel J. McDougall, who was the originator, 
and was seventh in signing the Constitution and By-Laws, and became 
Recording Secretary for a number of years, and Vice-President in 
1875, and in 1895 ^'^s elected an Honorary member. He was also 
one of the original members of the Boston Dental Improvement 
Society. 

He was a member of the New England Dental Society previous 
to 1887. 

Dr. Harrington married Miss Caroline Payson, of Holliston, Mass., 
in 1858, who survived him. He died in Newton, Mass., June 13, 1899, 
of Addison's disease. Dr. Harrington was a member of the Eliot 
Congregational Church of Newton, in which he took a lively interest 
and in its Sunday School work. 

31 




THOMAS HENDERSON CHANDLER, A.M., LL.B., D.M.D. 

Thomas Henderson Chandler, son of Alexander S. and Alice 
(Henderson) Chandler, married September 20, 1823, in Boston by 
Rev. Thomas Baldwin, was the eldest of a family of five brothers.. 
Born in the old Chandler homestead, Vernon Place, at the North 
End, Boston, Massachusetts, July 4, 1824, he brought himself by 
hard and untiring work to a prominent position among the literary 
and professional men of that city. 

His early education was obtained in the old Eliot School, from 
which he was graduated at the head of his class, with the Franklin 
Medal. He next entered the Boston Latin School, under Master 
Dixwell, graduating four years later as Franklin Medalist and class 
leader. 

Harvard's doors now stood open to him and he entered, after pass- 
ing the admission examination with honors. His college career was as 
successful as had been his previous scholastic efforts, and he obtained 
several prizes for excellence in his studies, and graduated as a Phi 
Beta Kappa man and president of the Hasty Pudding Club. Having 
decided to follow the profession of law, he entered the Harvard Law 
School, graduating in the class of 1853. 

His eyes now commencing to trouble him, he applied for the post 
of usher in the Boston Latin School, and obtained it through his 
high scholarship and testimonials to his capabiUties given him by 
Edward Everett, president of Harvard College. In 1858 he began 
the study of dentistry, a science then almost in its infancy, and some 

32 



years later studied medicine, retaining, however, dentistry as his 
specialty. 

On the organization of the Harvard Dental School in 1869, he was 
offered the post of Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Dentistry, and, 
on the resignation of Dr. Nathan Cooley Keep in 1872, he was 
appointed professor with the degree D.M.D., honoris causa. 

The death of Dr. Thomas B. Hitchcock in 1874 left the school 
without a dean, and Dr. Chandler was unanimously elected to fill 
the vacancy. During the twenty-one years he held this post, never 
until the few months preceding his death did he fail in attending a 
single meeting of the faculty or miss fulfilling a single duty connected 
\n\h the office. 

The students all liked him, and his associates all respected him for 
he was a man of the most unobtrusive and retiring disposition, which 
was often carried to the pitch of diffidence. 

His hterary work consisted chiefly of papers for the different 
medical and dental journals; an exhaustive article on "Thumb Suck- 
ing in Childhood and its Results," was translated into several Euro- 
pean languages, and obtained a European reputation for its author. 

Translations of two works on dental caries by Leber and Rotten- 
stein, and the other from the French of Magitot, were the chief 
events of his literary career. In this epoch of push and hurry it can 
be said of few persons that their work was done slowly, thoroughly, 
and to last. Dr. Chandler's ambition was not to be a shining light, 
but to use his best judgment, his utmost skill, and the greatest care 
in every task, however trivial, that he undertook. He was a good 
husband, a kind father, a true citizen, and an honest man. 

Dr. Chandler died on August 27, 1895, at his home, 72 St. Stephens 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

Dr. Chandler was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Dental 
Society in 1864, having signed the Constitution and By-Laws as the 
twelfth member. In 1864-1865 he was its Secretary, and President 
in 1869-1870, and afterwards, in 1877, its Corresponding Secretary. 
He was also a member of the Merrimack Valley Dental Association 
and its President in 1879- 1880. A member also of the American 
Academy of Dental Science and its President in 1881-1882 and an 
Honorary Fellow of the same in 1893. 

He was a member of the New England Dental Society on and 
previous to 1887. 

The confidence and assistance rendered the writer by this scholarly, 
genial and kindly gentleman was much appreciated during his early 
dental career. 

"He was a man, take him for all in 
all. 
I shall not look upon his like again." 



33 




SAMUEL FRANKLIN HAM, D.M.D. 

Samuel Franklin Ham was the son of Samuel and Caroline (Odi- 
orne) Ham, and born in Portsmouth, New Hamsphire, June i8, 1833. 

His early education being obtained in Portsmouth, N. H., he then 
entered the Harvard Dental School in 1869 and graduated in 1870 
with the degree of D.M.D. 

Dr. Ham was appointed Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry 
in the Dental Department of Harvard University in 1869, which 
position he held until 1873. 

In 1879 he received the appointment of Instructor in Operative 
Dentistry in the same institution, which he relinquished in 1880. 

Dr. Ham was a member of the Harvard Dental Alumni Association 
from 1872 to 1891, Vice-President in 1873 and elected to the Presi- 
dency in 1874. He was an Active Fellow of the American Academy 
of Dental Science of Boston in 1888, resigning in 1891; he was also a 
member of the Dental Protective Association of the United States, 
and became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society March 
4, 1864, being the thirteenth member to sign the Constitution and 
By-Laws, although one of the twelve founders of the Society. 

Dr. Ham was married to Julia A. Odiorne on April 5, 1858. Several 
years ago he retired from the practice of dentistry and removed to 
Los Angeles, California, where he entered the business of light 
hardware, in which line he continued until 191 1, when he perma- 
nently retired from business for a well-earned rest from a long and 
busy life in a land 

"Where a leaf never dies, 
in the still blooming bosom, 
and the bee bangs itself 
on through a whole year 
of flowers." 

34 




GEORGE BLODGETT HARRIMAN, D.D.S. 

George Blodgett Harriman, the son of Arthur L. and Mary G. 
Harriman, was born in Groton, New Hampshire, March i8, 1837. 

Young Harriman's early education was obtained at the New 
Hampton Institute, after which became to Boston in 1857, and studied 
dentistry under John Clough, M.D., and began the practice of same 
in the following year 

He entered, in 1868, the Boston Dental College, and graduated 
in 1870, with the degree of D.D.S. The next year after graduation, 
he was elected Dean of the College, serving two years; later he was 
chosen trustee, and remained a member of the board until after the 
school was transferred to the Tufts College Corporation. 

As a student at the college he became deeply interested in micro- 
scopy under Professor King Brown, and for several years was an 
enthusiastic student of that science, conducting certain important 
investigations. For a time he was Professor of Histology and Micro- 
scopy in the college. 

By the help of a simple process of dissecting teeth, invented by 
himself, he made a very important discovery in 1869. For many 
years Dr. Harriman was called as an expert on the blood for the 
Supreme Court of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine and Ver- 
mont. 

Dr. Harriman was one of eight graduates who met in one of the 
lecture rooms of the old college, at 5 Hamilton Place, on March 

35 



4, 1872, and organized the Boston Dental College Alumni Association, 
now known as the Boston and Tufts Dental Alumni Association. 

He was Chairman of the Executive Committee during the first 
two years of its existence, was President in 1897, and again Chairman 
of the Executive Committee in 1898, and an Active member until 
his death. 

He was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
and was the eighth signer of its first Constitution and By-Laws on 
March 4, 1864. 

For a long time he suffered from asthma and had gradually with- 
drawn, in part, from active practice. 

In March, 1905, he closed his office in Park Street, Boston, and took 
a trip to California, returning early in May. 

It had been his custom for several years to visit Moo'sehead Lake 
region in Maine, on the opening of the fishing season in the spring; 
and though urged by friends not to do so this year, he left Boston on 
May 13 accompanied by Mrs. Harriman, reaching Roach River House, 
Moosehead Lake. There pneumonia supervened and he died on May 
22, 1905. 

As has been beautifully said, "The call of the Wild led him back 
close to Nature's heart, and with his head on her bosom he slept." 

Dr. Harriman was a prominent Mason, a life member of Boston 
Commandery, and an earnest supporter of the First Free Baptist 
Church of Roxbury. 

Though he never aspired to salaried political office, he was at one 
time active in Republician politics, serving as a member of the State 
Central Committee. 

He was a man of moderate wealth, of sterling character, and 
Christian brotherhood. A widow, his second wife, and three sons 
survived him. 

His first wife was Mary E. Stanley; by this union there were three 
sons, George S., Edwin F., and Albert H. 

He was married on November 28, 1888, at Ellsworth, Maine, to 
Miss Mattie B. Means as second wife, who siu:vives him without 
children. 



36 




MARK WENTWORTH PRAY 

Mark Wentworth Pray was born in 1827, at Lebanon, Maine, the 
son of James and Mary Pray, both natives of the town of Lebanon. 

Young Pray received his early education in the town schools; 
later he studied dentistry in Great Falls, New Somersworth, New 
Hampshire, with Dr. Alphonso Severance about the year 1855, and 
a year later was admitted to partnership under the firm name of 
Severance and Pray; in the early '6o's he sold out his practice there 
and opened an ofl&ce at 129 Tremont St., Boston, Mass., also one in 
Exeter, N. H., dividing his time between them, making his home in 
Maiden, Mass. 

In 1870 he gave up his Exeter office and devoted his time wholly 
to the Boston practice. In 1874 he moved from 129 to 170 Tremont 
Street, and in 1894 he again moved, this time across Mason Street to 
171 Tremont Street, where he remained in practice until his death, 
which occurred at Beachmont, Mass., July 28, 1899. A widow, two 
daughters and one son, Dr. Mark M. Pray — a dentist in practice 
in South Framingham, and a brother, Dr. J. E. S. Pray — a dentist 
practicing in Exeter, N. H., survived him. 

Before studying dentistry, Dr. Pray taught music in Boston for a 
few years. He was not a graduate of any dental school, but he built 
up a large and lucrative practice and until the last few years of his life 
he gave his whole attention to his practice, rarely taking a vacation 
and then only for a week or less. 



37 




EDWARD NATHAN HARRIS, D.D.S. 

Edward Nathan Harris was the son of Edward Nathan and 

(Robblee) Harris, and said to have been born in Reading, Mass., 
January 24, 1831, although there is no record on the town's books for 
such purposes. 

His father was a Baptist minister, settled at Germantown, Penn- 
sylvania, at the time of his death. 

Young Harris's early education was obtained in the public schools, 
and later he entered the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery and 
graduated in 1854 with the degree of D.D.S. Returning, he commenced 
practice in Calais, Maine, in the year of his graduation; afterwards 
removing to Boston, where he practiced for thirty-two years or until 
his decease. 

He was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
being the sixth signer of the Constitution and By-Laws on the fourth 
of March, 1864. 

Dr. Harris was oneof the original members of the American Academy 
of Dental Science, of Boston, of which he was Recording Secretary 
from 1867-187 1 arid Corresponding Secretary from 1878-1879 and from 
1 889- 1 89 2, and had rendered great service to the Academy since its 
formation, for twenty-five years. 

Dr. Harris was a genial, kind-hearted gentleman, devoted to his 
profession, and a man highly respected by a large circle of friends for 
his sterling qualities. His faithful, conscientious and unremitting 

38 



labors were deeply appreciated and will long be remembered by his 
associates in the Academy. 

His death occurred in Calais, Maine, March 12, 1893, from Bright's 
disease. He was survived by two sons and two daughters. 

"He is not dead; I will not say 
That he is dead — He is just away, 
With a cheery smile and wave of the head 
He wandered into an unknown land." 



39 




IRA ALLEN SALMON, D.D.S. 

Ira Allen Salmon, the subject of this sketch, was the son of Jesse 
and Mary Weeks (Goodno) Salmon, and born in Monterey, Schuyler 
County, New York, February lo, 1830. 

His parents moved to Knoxville, opposite the city of Corning, 
New York, where he received a good grammar and high school edu- 
cation. While a youth, young Salmon went to New England, and 
lived in Maine during the first years of his manhood. 

In 1849 lie commenced his dental pupilage with his uncle. Dr. David 
H. Goodno, and continued it later with Dr. Parsons, of Portland. 
He entered upon the practice of his profession in Boston during the 
year 1854, in partnership with Dr. Goodno, and they soon acquired 
an extensive operative and mechanical practice, doing a large busi- 
ness in mechanical work for the profession throughout New England. 

In 1856 Dr. Goodno went West, and Dr. Salmon assumed the entire 
practice. He soon, however, formed a partnership with Dr. Samuel 
Franklin Ham, who had been his student, and who took charge of 
the mechanical department. After a short partnership Dr. Ham 
withdrew, and Dr. Salmon, finding an increasing practice, decided 
to devote his exclusive attention to operative dentistry as a specialty, 
and was very successful in dif&cult cases of dental surgery. 

He was one of the pioneers in "building down" with gold. Many 
front teeth, treated by him in this manner, were doing service more 
than thirty-five years after. 

Dr. Salmon was a charter member of the Massachusetts Dental 

40 



Society, being Organization President, and the fourth member to 
sign the Constitution and By-Laws on March 4, 1864. 

He was also a member of the American Dental Convention and of 
the American Dental Association, being Corresponding Secretary 
of the latter during the years 1869, 1870 and 187 1. 

He was a delegate to the dental section of the Ninth International 
Medical Congress, which was held in Washington, D. C, in 1887. 

He was also a member of the New England Dental Society on and 
pre\'ious to 1887. Also a member of the Dental Protective Associa- 
tion of the United States. 

He was, in 1866, elected an Honorary member of the Maine Dental 
Society, and of the Connecticut Valley Dental Society in 1892. 

Dr. Salmon, in 1867, received the degree of D.D.S. from the Penn- 
sylvania College of Dental Surgery. 

On the organization of the Harvard Dental School, Dr. Salmon was 
appointed University Lecturer in Operative Dentistry, and served 
in that capacity for nine years, from 1868 to 1877. 

In his practice he excelled in the line of regulating or, as called 
to-day. Orthodontia, and this was the principal part of his work. 

In the line of scientific research and invention Dr. Salmon's name 
became well known, for he was the inventor of the Salmon Auto- 
matic Mallet and the Salmon Operating Chair; of the Salmon System 
of hot water and steam heating for buildings, steam cars, and street 
cars, and also of an improvement in autoharp mechanism. 

He also invented a simple device called the aircostic telephone, 
being the first to turn a corner without use of a battery, where here- 
tofore voice sound could not be transmitted except by straight wire, 
Ha\dng secured a patent on same, he sold it to Bell. It consisted of 
an ordinary wire attached to diaphragm with a receiver. 

He made connection from the house of a Mrs. Pope in Dorchester 
or Mt. Pleasant, where he had resided, to the Methodist Chapel on 
Howard Avenue, where the audience in the chapel could distinctly 
hear the concert given in the home of Mrs. Pope. 

At the age of 21 Dr. Salmon was married at Vassalboro, Maine, to 
Maria W. Chaffee, daughter of a retired Boston builder, and she and 
two sons survived him. 

His domestic life was ideal, of love, and devotion. He was an ardent 
Methodist, and worked and wrote wdth fervor and an intelligent 
insight for the promotion of a high Christian faith during more than 
forty years of his life, which ended at Dorchester, Mass., on April 10, 
1896, from paralysis. 



41 




THOMAS BARNES HITCHCOCK, M.D., D.M.D. 

Thomas Barnes Hitchcock was born in Boston, Mass., June 22, 
1839, being the son of David K. and Abby H. (Barnes) Hitchcock. 

Young Hitchcock received his early education in the pubHc schools 
of Newton, Mass., and at the age of eighteen years was a pupil in the 
office of his father, who was a practicing dentist. Thence he attended 
the Harvard Medical School and received the degree of M.D., in i860, 
and the dental (honorary) degree of D.M.D., in 1870. 

Dr. Hitchcock was appointed Professor of Dental Pathology and 
Therapeutics in Harvard University in 1868. holding the chair till 
1874. In 1872 he was appointed Dean of the Dental Faculty, holding 
the post till 1874. 

Dr. Hitchcock served in the Civil War and was commissioned assis- 
tant surgeon and assigned to the Forty-second Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Regiment, November 11, 1862. Col. I. S. Burrell, commanding. 
Three companies of this regiment, with most of the field officers, 
including Dr. Cummings, the surgeon, were taken prisoners at Gal- 
veston. Dr. Hitchcock was left with the rest of the regiment in and 
about New Orleans to discharge the arduous duties of surgeon in 
field and hospital. 

They were so severe that he was attacked by fever. He was 
afterwards appointed on the staff of General Nathaniel P. Banks, 
Commanding the Department of the Gulf, where he served with dis- 
tinction during the remainder of his term of service, receiving honorable 
mention from the Commanding General. 

42 



Dr. Hitchcock was a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
ha\T[ng joined March 4, 1864, his signature to the Constitution and 
By-Laws being the fifteenth; also a member of the American Academy 
of Dental Science of Boston, American Dental Association, New 
York Odontological Society, Boston Society of Dental Improvement, 
and an honorary member of the Maine Dental Society, being elected 
in 1870. 

Dr. Hitchcock was the life and soul of the Harvard Dental School, 
and, as has been said, he wore out his life in its cause. The Monthly 
Review of Dental Surgery, published in Great Britain in 1875, thus 
states; — "He was best known in this country (England) as editor 
and annotator of Wedl's Dental Pathology and as author of Reports on 
Dental Histology." 

Threatened a few years previously with phthisis, he was unable 
to relax his labors in science, in practice, and at the school; and there- 
fore succumbed to an attack of cerebro-spinal-meningitis, adding 
one more to the roll of victims from overwork. 

An enthusiast in all he undertook, he won for himself the highest 
esteem of the medical profession in Boston. Honest of purpose, 
fearless of speech, and kindly of heart, he won the admiration of 
those with whom he came in contact. 

Dr. Hitchcock's death occurred in Newton, Mass., June 24, 1874. 



43 




ENOCH CARTER ROLFE, M.D. 

Enoch Carter Rolfe, the subject of this sketch, was the eldest 
child of John and Betsey (Abbott) Rolfe, and born in Rumford, 
Maine, April i6, 1812. He studied medicine with the late Dr. 
Simeon Fuller of Rumford, and graduated from the Maine Medical 
School in the class of 1838. 

On May 16, 1839, ^^ married Emeline, the daughter of James 
Small, Esq., of Rumford, and commenced the practice of medicine 
at Farmington Falls, Maine, the same year. He remained there until 
1849, when he removed his family to Boston, Mass., where he con- 
tinued the practice of medicine. He left a fine practice at Farming- 
ton, and went to Boston that his children might have the advantages 
of Boston schools. Dr. Rolfe at once became greatly interested in 
the Boston schools, and was a member of the school board for twenty- 
five consecutive years. 

He was also Professor of Physiology and Hygiene in Tufts College 
in 1 854- 1 85 5, and a member of the General Court of Massachusetts 
in 1857-1858. 

He was selected chairman of the committee for re-districting the 
state, a very important committee. 

Dr. Rolfe was admitted a member of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society in 1852. He was one of the organizers and charter members 
of the Massachusetts Dental Society, having signed the Constitution 

44 



and By-Laws on March 4, 1864,. as the first signer, and for many years 
remained a member. 

In 1859, he formed a co-partnership with Dr. James M. Daly of 
Boston, under the firm name of Daly and Rolfe, and established 
themselves at 20 Hollis Street, for the practice of dentistry, which 
continued to his death in 1875. He was a prominent member of 
the Shawmut Avenue Universalist Church, and his residence at the 
time of his demise was at Watertown, Mass. 

Dr. Rolfe died in Boston on March 27, 1875. Of his three children, 
all born in Farmington, George, the eldest, died when a young man; 
Henr)^ graduated at Harv^ard College, and is now living in Virginia 
City, Nevada; while his twin sister, Emma, is the wife of George P. 
Eustis, Esq., of Boston. 



45 




ISAAC JOSIAH WETHERBEE, D.D.S. 

Isaac Josiah Wetherbee was the son of Rev. Josiah and Abigail 
(Jones) Wetherbee, born in South Reading, Vermont, March 9, 18 17. 

His father was a leading clergyman in the Free Baptist denomina- 
tion, and served with distinction in the War of 181 2. 

Dr. Wetherbee's early education was obtained in the country 
schools of his neighborhood, and he early evinced a marked genius 
for mechanical pursuits. 

Arriving at manhood, he studied for the ministry under his father, 
and was ordained at North Hampton, N. H., June 2, 1841, and at 
once began preaching. He held pastorates at Kittery, Maine; and 
afterward in Charlestown, Mass., where he resided in 1845. 

In 1846, by reason of ill-health, he was obliged to relinquish his 
profession as minister, and he then turned his attention seriously 
to dentistry, which he had for some years studied and practiced 
among his friends in a private way. He further pursued his studies 
with the limited text-books then extant, and in 1850, received from 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, the honorary degree of 
D.D.S. , in February of that year. Establishing himself in Boston, 
he early became prominent in his profession. 

In 1865 the Boston Dental Institute was organized with seventy 
members, and he was elected president. The Society held meetings 
monthly at which lectures were given on dental science and allied 
subjects, until it was superseded by a charter for the Boston Dental 
College on June 3, 1868. Upon the formal organization of which 

46 



institution in July following, he was made president, a position which 
he held (with the exception of four years, from 1869 to 1874 inclusive), 
until 1899, when the Boston Dental College was merged in the Tufts 
College Dental School. In addition to his presidency, he occupied 
for the first fifteen years the chair of dental science and operative 
dentistry, emeritus. He was also a trustee of the Boston Dental 
College from its organization in 1868 till its corporate existence ended. 

Dr. Wetherbee was one of the organizers and charter members 
of the Massachusetts Dental Society, being the second member to 
sign the Constitution and By-Laws on March 4, 1864, and became an 
honorary member June 5, 1889. He was also honorary member of 
the Vermont Dental Society, and at one time president of the American 
Dental Association. 

Dr. Wetherbee was twice married. Some years after the death of 
his first wife, he married, on February i, 1872, Miss Almira Woods, 
of ArHngton, Mass., who, with a daughter and son, survived him. 

His son, Irving J. Wetherbee, who succeeded his father in dentistry, 
died in Groton, Mass., October 26, 1909, aged 35 years'. 

Dr. Wetherbee died, from heart-failure, in Boston, Mass., June 24, 
1902. A few weeks previously, he was present at the thirty-eighth 
annual meeing of the Massachusetts Dental Society, in apparent good 
health, and took an active part in the discussion of the various papers 
presented. 



47 




DAVID GARDINER WILLIAMS, D.D.S. 

David Gardiner Williams was the son of David and Eunice (Cran- 
dall) Williams, and born in Royalton, Vermont, November 17, 18 19. 

His early education was obtained in the "little red school-house" 
in Royalton and in Castleton Academy in Vermont. 

His dental education began with Dr. Thomas B. Hitchcock, at 
149 Court Street, Boston, in 1850, and in 1859 at no Court Street, he 
started for himself as a practitioner, then at 164, 552 and 688 Tremont 
Street, and later at Stone Building, 711 Boylston Street, and finally 
in Hotel Pelham, where he retired in 1895. 

His dental degree was received from the Boston Dental College in 
187 1, and that same year he was made a trustee of that institution. 

On March 4, 1864, he was one of the organizers of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, being the third signer of the Constitution and By-Laws, 
but the records do not disclose when his membership ceased. 

Dr. Williams married Rachel Child in 1842, and by this union 
had six daughters, and one son by his second wife. 

He was a strong Republican in politics and a strict Congregationalist 
in religion. 

Dr. WilHam's death occured in Newton Center, Mass., September 
17, 1911, at the age of 92 years. 

Dr. Williams was of striking personality, resembling in appearance 
Washington and ''Mark Twain," and was beloved for his old- 
fashioned courtliness and kindness of heart. 

He well remembered when matches were invented and was fond 
of telling of his grandfather, a fine old gentleman, who wore knee 



breeches, and also how he used to ha-ve a little pair of silver tongs 
that he would take a hot ember from the great wood fire in the old 
kitchen and light his pipe by it. This grandfather came from Con- 
necticut and gave his cattle and horses to aid in the Revolutionary 
War instead of going back again after being wounded, where he had 
been a soldier. 



49 



EX-PRESIDENTS 



51 



IRA ALLEN SALMON, D.D.S. 

Organization Chairman, March 4, 1864, and Organization 
President, March 24 to May 16, 1864. 

(See biography under Founders, page 40) 



53 




NATHAN COOLEY KEEP, M.D., D.D.S., D.M.D. 

First, second and third President 

The subject of this sketch was born in Longmeadow, Mass., Decem- 
ber 23, 1800. He was the son of Samuel Keep and Ann BHss. 

Skill in the use of tools, which had been apparent from childhood 
and which he inherited from his father, seemed to have destined 
him for some mechanical pursuit; by his own inclination he selected 
the trade of jeweler. 

After obtaining a limited education at the village school, at the age 
of fifteen he left his home at Newark, N. J., where he was appren- 
ticed to John Taylor, a manufacturing jeweler. 

He had nearly completed the term of his indenture, when a general 
stagnation in the jewelry business caused his employer to dismiss 
his apprentices, and young Keep, now master of his trade, returned 
to his native village. With a strong determination to seek his liveli- 
hood in a large city and a desire to study dentistry, he went to Boston 
in 182 1, where he combated with many obstacles before he gained 
a footing in his profession. 

The practical training for his professional work was obtained 
from Dr. John Randall, of Boston, who, as was common in those 
days, united some practice of dentistry with the general practice of 
medicine. Dr. Keep could have had no better schooling than the 
years of apprenticeship in Newark, where he gained a manual dex- 
terity and a practical experience in working in metals. He was 
obliged, to a great extent, to make his own operating instruments and 
to discover for himself the best way of performing many of the deli- 

54 



cate and difficult operations that are continually presenting them- 
selves to the practitioner. 

Dr. Keep early recognized the truth that the highest eminence in 
the specialty of dentistry involved a general acquaintance with 
medical science. 

Under this conviction, he attended without interrupting his active 
practice, the regular course of lectures at the Harvard Medical 
School, from which he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1827. 

After completing his medical course, he devoted his entire time to 
dentistry. At that date there were fewer sources of information than 
at present, but Dr. Keep thought for himself and ventured boldly 
into original research and developed many new methods and ideas. 

He was one of the first few original manufacturers of porcelain 
teeth in America and carried the art to a high degree of perfection for 
that day. 

He spent many evenings in his cellar testing in a baking furnace 
new enamels and bodies he had compounded. In a competitive 
exposition he received the first premium for the excellence of his 
imitation of natural teeth and was considered unequalled in all 
that pertained to the niceties of their manufacture. His signal ability 
in this direction made him master of his art; he had the artist's eye 
and the delicate touch so rare in any profession. 

In 1843 the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery conferred upon 
him the honorary degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery and Harvard 
University conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Dental Medicine in 1870. 

Dr. Keep was one of the founders of the Harvard Dental School, 
having advocated the founding of the chair of dentistry in connection 
with the Harvard Medical School, in an address as President of the 
Massachusetts Dental Society. 

Three years later the school was organized with a force of distin- 
guished professors, with Dr. Keep as professor of Mechanical Dentistry 
(1867-1871) and as the first Dean of the Faculty, which he served from 
1868 to 1872, when he resigned. 

It was through his efforts that the Harvard Dental School was the 
first to admit as a student a young colored man, the faculty deciding 
that the Dental School of Harvard University would know no dis- 
tinction of nativity or color, and among the six who received the first 
dental doctorate degree from that institution was Robert Tanner 
Freeman, the first colored man to receive dental collegiate honors. 

The museum of the Harvard Dental School was established by Dr. 
Keep, who at the time urged it as a depository of "rare and curious 
specimens, casts, models, records of cases and other material, gathered 
in private cabinets and liable in a few years to be scattered and lost, 
shall be preserved and made accessible to all who wish to study them 
and thus become a substantial contribution to public science, and lend 
important aid to the advancement of dentistry." . 

Dr. Keep was a charter member of the American Society of Dental 

55 



Surgeons, and one of its first Executive Committee. When a move- 
ment was inaugurated to organize the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
Dr. Keep, alone of the older practitioners, came in with the younger 
men and assisted them in its organization. He was the first member 
elected, April 6, 1864, at the Society's fourth meeting. He became a 
leader and the Society's first President after organization, elected 
May 16, 1864, at the first annual meeting and re-elected President, 
March 18, 1865, serving until 1867. He had contributed papers to 
the Society's meetings. 

Dr. Keep was the leading witness in the celebrated trial of Prof. 
John W. Webster for the murder of Dr. Parkman in 1849, ^-^d on 
his testimony, and that of Dr. Lester Noble, who had been an assist- 
ant with him at the time that Dr. Parkman had his dentures made, 
the fate of Professor Webster was seen by all to depend. 

Dr. Keep was a member of the Harvard Dental Alumni Associa- 
tion, and an honorary member of the Maine Dental Society, 1870-75. 

Dr. Keep married, April 15, 1830, Miss Susan Prentice Haskell, 
who died in 1868. To them were born Susan Haskell, who married- 
Calvin Gates Page, M.D.; Samuel Hamilton, M.D., who had chosen 
his father's profession and was in active and successful practice as 
his partner at the time of his death in 1861; John Haskell, who 
married Isabella H. Dickinson, and Ann Bliss, who married 
George Glover Crocker. 

Dr. Keep came from a religious family, several of whom were 
clergymen. In early life he united with the Congregational Church 
in Newark. In Boston he was for many years an esteemed member of 
the Bowdoin Street Church; afterwards of the Essex Street Church 
and at the time of his death he was connected with the Central 
Congregational Church. 

Dr. Keep was an invalid for several years before his death and 
lived to reach the age of 75 years. He closed his long and useful life 
on March 11, 1875, at Boston, loved and respected by both his profes- 
sion and the public. 



56 




ELBRIDGE GERRY LEACH, D.D.S. 

Fourth and Fifth President 

Elbridge Gerry Leach, the subject of this sketch, was the son of 
Lemuel and Betsey ( ) Leach, and born in Wendall, Mass., 

March 14, 1814. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools and many 
years later he entered the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery 
and graduated March i, 1867, with the degree of D.D.S. 

Dr. Leach became an influential member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society in 1864, soon after its organization and was its fourth 
and fifth President in 1867 and 1868. 

On June 5, 1889, he was made an Honorary member, and in 1868 Dr. 
Leach was appointed Lecturer on Dental Hygiene in the Harvard 
University Dental Department, serving till 1870, two years. He 
also served as Clinical Instructor in Operative Dentistry during the 
academic years of 1884-85. 

His death occurred at Locks Village, Mass., July 29, 1898. 



57 



THOMAS HENDERSON CHANDLER, A.M., LL.B., D.M.D. 

Sixth and Seventh President 
[See Biography under Founders, page 32] 



58 




ALBERT ANDREW COOKE 

Eighth President 

Albert Andrew Cooke was the son of Reuben and Sally Smith 
(Woodward) Cooke, and born at Warehouse Point, Connecticut, 
September 24, 181 7, of the eighth generation in line of descent from 
Major Aaron Cooke, born in 1610. Capt. Aaron Cooke, 2d, eldest 
son of above, was born in 1640, was an early settler of Northampton; 
his second son, Lieut. Westwood Cooke, was born in 1670, and his 
eldest son, Ensign Noah, born in 1694, and the latter's youngest son, 
was Lieut. Noah, 2d, born in 1730, and his fifth son, Ensign Timothy, 
was born in 1 756. The latter was twice married and by his first wife was 
born Reuben Cooke; his fourth son, born February 6, 1795,- who was 
the father of the subject of this sketch. Thus you will observe his grand- 
father was Timothy and his father Reuben. The latter was seventh 
in line of descent from Capt. Aaron of North Hampton, The Captain 
was made freeman in Dorchester in 1635, went to Windsor, Conn., 
with a colony of emigrants, to Westfield about ten years, thence to 
North Hampton, where he lived till his death in 1690 at the age of 
eighty years. 

The subject of this sketch, spent his early childhood, to the age of 
ten years, at Hadley, Mass; after which he removed with his parents 
to Warehouse Point, the place of his birth. He was the eldest of 
eight children. His father meeting with severe financial losses, 
and dying while the children were young, threw much of the care and 

59 



support of the family upon him. He met the responsibility like a 
brave boy and proved true to the sacred trust. 

This involved many sacrifices, perhaps to an ambitious boy more 
difficult to endure than the shortway of his school privileges, still he 
was able to secure the common school advantages where he lived, and 
to close his school-days with an academic training at the celebrated 
school at Wilbraham. 

His early religious training was in the Presbyterian church, of 
which his parents were both members. 

After his removal from Hadley, he was thrown under the training 
of the Episcopal and the Methodist Episcopal churches. It was under 
the ministry of the last named that he was awakened and converted 
at the age of eighteen. At the close of his studies at Wilbraham, he 
taught school for several terms at Suffield, Conn., Bordentown, N, J., 
and Feeding Hill, Mass. It was during his residence at Bordentown 
that he studied dentistry with Prof. Kingsbury, afterward of Phila- 
delphia. 

It was at this time, also, that he received a local preacher's license 
from the church of his choice, and, in company with Prof. Kinsbury, 
held reKgious services, far and near, in school houses and farm kitchens. 
Full of enthusiasm, and perfectly devoted to his Lord, he wrought 
with untiring zeal. 

In 1840 he located in Chicopee, and entered upon the practice of 
dentistry, with the thought of making this his life-work, uniting with 
the Methodist church of that place, and identifying himself heartily 
in all Christian endeavor. 

He was chosen superintendent of the Sunday School, leader of a 
class, and was abundant in labor. 

He first preached at Feeding Hill, Mass., where he taught school 
during the winter months to supplement his scanty salary ; afterwards 
preached at Shelburne Falls, Chester Village (now Huntington), 
North Brookfield, Princeton and Oxford. At Oxford his health 
failed and he was reluctantly compelled to retire from active minis- 
terial work. 

It was while living at Oxford that he was chosen, by common con- 
sent, to represent the town at the General Court; and he continued 
a resident of the town for two and a half years. 

On the death of Rev. C. W. Ainsworth in 185 1, at that time preacher 
in charge of this church, Dr. Cooke, whose health had improved, 
was called to Milford to fill out the unexpired term of service. He 
afterwards withdrew, on again failing in health, and immediately 
engaged in his former profession of dentistry, in Milford, at the age 
of thirty-five years. 

For twenty years he was associated with his brother, under the 
firm name of A. A. and G. L. Cooke. 

He was a lover of mankind. This led him to devote his life, so 
long as ability was given, to active and strong endeavor to rescue 

60 



men from the peril and ruin of a bad life. He early identified him- 
self with the cause of the bondman; and all through those years 
when it cost much to champion their cause, he was true to the slave, 
and when their deliverance came, he rejoiced as one of that goodly 
company who, by voice, pen, and active toil, had helped forward 
the day. 

He also identified himself with the advancing cause of temperance, 
from earliest childhood to age a total-abstinence man, and one who 
has faithfully served as president of temperance orders, and as a 
viligance committee for the prosecution of the rumseller. He was 
a pure-minded man, — thought, imagination, conduct, was chaste 
and holy. He possessed intellectual abiUty far beyond the average. 
As a student, all through his ministry he would rise before daylight, 
and, when his mind was clear and strong, would devote himself 
conscientiously to his studies. Thus his naturally strong mind 
became stronger, and stored with valuable knowledge that gave 
force and weight to his spoken words; he held his own opinions, was 
able to clearly form them, and to ably defend them when once formed. 
He was, therefore, a friend upon whom one could safely rely, or 
foe, if need be, for the cause of truth, that one well might fear. 

It was at Bordentown, N. J., where he became acquainted with 
Miss Maria Fidelia Talbot, — an acquaintance that ripened into 
friendship, and deepened into love that continued unchanged for 
thirty-eight years. They were married at Enfield, Conn., in 1842, 
by Rev. Thomas Masey. 

Rev. and Hon. Dr. Cooke, died in Milford, Mass., February 4, 
1880, beloved of all whose acquaintance he held. 
'' Dr. Cooke became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
May 16, 1864. The records of the Society do not reveal when his 
membership ceased. His election to the presidency occurred on May 
18, 1871. 



61 




DR. JOHN HENRY BATCHELDER 

Ninth President 

John Henry Batchelder, the subject of this sketch, was the son of 
Colonel Henry and Abigail (Mann) Batchelder, of Beverly, Mass., 
and a great-grandson of Benjamin Pierce, of Salem, Mass., who was 
killed at the battle of Lexington, April 19, 1775, and born in Bev- 
erly, Mass., January 16, 181 7. 

He received his early education in the schools of his native town, 
and at the New Hampton (N. H.) Academy. 

When a young man he was for a time messenger in the Merchants' 
Bank, in Boston, and afterwards in business in New York and Phil- 
adelphia. 

He finally decided to seek his fortune in the far West. From 
Philadelphia he went to Buffalo, then on to the great Northwest 
Territory, reaching the present State of Wisconsin just after the 
Black Hawk War. He journeyed on horseback through a dense forest 
to a clearing known as Summit, Wisconsin, and at once engaged in 
trading with the Indians, and with success. Returning to Boston, 
however, he decided to adopt the profession of dentistry, and studied 
with that object. He was for a time a student of Dr. William T. W. 
Morton, known in connection with the discovery of the anaesthetic 
properties of ether. 

He practiced his profession for fifty-six years; fifty-four in Salem, 
occupying for forty- three years the same office, at 137 Washington 

62 



Street; which was also his residence. He possessed great mechan- 
ical skill and ingenuity, and had a large and lucrative practice. He 
retired in February, 1901. 

He was a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, having 
been elected October 3, 1864. He was its President, elected May 23, 
1872, for one year, and on October 30, 1890, was made an Honorary 
member. 

Dr. Batchelder became an Active member of the American Academy 
of Dental Science in 1870, and served as its President from 1885 to 
1887, and was made an Honorary Fellow in 1890. 

He was a Republican in politics. He was a genial gentleman, most 
conscientious and painstaking in whatever he undertook, and one 
who enjoyed to an unusual degree the respect and esteem of his fellow 
citizens. He was also a public-spirited man, ever ready to give the 
best of his valuable services to the public in whatever capacity he 
was called upon to serve. He was for five years in the City Council, 
being a member when Wenham Lake water was introduced. He 
was a member of the School Board, also of the Board of Aldermen for 
four years, and for three years was president. On July 4, 1865, just 
at the close of the Civil War, he was chief marshal of the floral 
procession which was a memorial event in the annals of Salem. 

In 1866-1867, he was a member of the Massachusetts House of 
Representatives. He was a member of the Veteran Corps, Salem 
Cadets, in 1883. 

On April 21, 1903, a compUmentary dinner was given to him by 
some of the leading dentists of Boston. 

Dr. Batchelder was married October 22, 1839, to Jane Reed Smith, 
daughter of Elisha and May Butler (Bass) Smith, of Boston. Mrs. 
Batchelder died June 12, 1899. Of six children, two were then living, 
Mrs. Osgood of Salem, widow of Charles Stuart Osgood, late Registrar 
of Deeds, and Mrs. Hassam, wife of John T. Hassam, a lawyer of 
Boston. There were also six grand-children and two great grand- 
children. 

Dr. Batchelder died at his home in Salem, Mass., January 7, 
1904, after a long illness, beloved by all who knew him. 



63 




GEORGE TUFTON MOFFATT, M.D., D.M.D. 

Tenth President 

George Tufton Moffatt, was the son of Joseph Lobdell and Antoin- 
ette S (Jones) Moffatt, and born in Roxbury, Mass., August 

7, 1836. 

His early education was obtained in the pubHc schools of his native 
town until thirteen years of age, when, removing to the western part 
of the State, he completed his school education at WilUston Seminary 
in Easthampton and at the high school in Holyoke. 

He studied dentistry with the celebrated Dr. Joshua Tucker, and 
entered upon the practice of his profession about 1857. In i860, he 
received the degree of M.D. from Harvard University and later, in 
1870, was given the honorary degree of D.M.D. from the same 
institution of learning. 

In 1868, he was appointed Professor of Operative Dentistry in the 
Harvard Dental School, which chair he held until 1879. 

Dr. Moffatt was a member of the Harvard Dental Alumni Associ- 
ation from 1872-1891. He was an Active Fellow of the American 
Academy of Dental Science from 1871 to 1895. Treasurer from 1872- 
1875; Corresponding Secretary, 1876-1878; and Vice-President, 
1881-1882; and President 1882-1885. 

Dr. Moffatt was a member of the New York Odontological Society; 
of the Odontological Society of Great Britain; of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, elected March 5, 1866, to 1895; audits tenth President 
elected Decemljer 11, 1873. A member of the Massachusetts Medical 

64 



Society, and an honorary member of the old Connecticut Valley 
Dental Society, 1892-1895. 

In June, 1872, Dr. Mofifatt was married to Miss Emma A. Patterson, 
of Lowell, Mass. 

In the early '8o's, Dr. Moffatt had an office in Paris, France, being 
associated with Dr. E. A. Bogue, of New York; Dr. C. D. Cook, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; and Dr. G. C. Daboll of Buffalo, N. Y., the latter 
now of Paris. 

In Boston, associated with him at various times, were Drs. N. W. 
Hawes, L. D. Shepard, D. M. Clapp, and E. P. Bradbury, all now 
deceased. At one time his practice was said to be the finest in New 
England. 

For a number of years he resided in Colorado, for his health, but 
returned to Boston a few years before his death which occurred from 
cerebral congestion, April 2, 1895, leaving two sons to mourn his 
loss, the eldest of whom, Robert Tucker Moffatt, D.M.D., has followed 
his father's profession. 



65 




JARIUS SEARLE HURLBUT, D.D.S. 

Eleventh President. 

Jarius Searle Hurlbut, was the son of Asaph and Asenath (Searle) 
Hurlbut, and born in West Springfield, Mass., January 5, 1842, 
being one of six children, five of whom were sons; of these, three died 
at the age of twenty-one. 

At the age of ten years young Hurlbut, with his parents, moved 
to Springfield, and in i860 he was graduated from the high school 
of that city. 

Soon afterward he entered the office of his brother, Dr. C. S. Hurl- 
but, senior, with whom he was associated for several years as student 
and partner. He attended the Philadelphia Dental College, graduat- 
ing in the class of 1865. 

His health being poor, after his graduation he went to St. Paul, 
Minn., where he practiced for a year. In 1866, he returned to Spring- 
field, Mass., and opened an office; here he remained for twenty-seven 
years. In December, 1893, he removed to the Masonic Building in 
the same city, occupying a suite of rooms with his nephew. Dr. D. 
Hurlbut Allis. 

In the Connecticut Valley the name of Hurlbut almost suggests ' 
the word dentist, for three of Dr. Hurlbut's brothers and two of 
his nephews have studied the profession. 

Dr. Hurlbut's reputation was national. Joining the Connecticut 
Valley Dental Society on June 5, 1866, he served the same as Executive 
Officer and President. He was a member of the Massachusetts 

66 



Dental Society, joining in 1873, serving on many committees and once 
as orator, and on December 11, 1874, was elected President. 

He was a member of the Northeastern Dental Association; the 
American Academy of Dental Science from 1877 to 1886; and a 
member of the National Dental Association, and also of the New 
York Odontological Society. 

On the enactment of the Massachusetts State Dental law in 1887, 
the then Governor Oliver Ames, appointed him one of the five members 
of the Board of Registration in Dentistry and he served until 1896, 
when he resigned, having been its Chairman from 1892 to date of 
resignation. He had also been President of the National Association 
of Dental Examiners. 

In 1893, he was a member of the World's Columbian Dental Con- 
gress. He was also on the staff as dental surgeon of the Springfield 
Hospital. 

It will be gathered from the foregoing sketch of a busy life, that Dr. 
Hurlbut was studious, alert, and progressive from his early youth. 
As a doctor of dental surgery, he stood in the foremost rank of his 
profession. 

He died at his home in Springfield, Mass., November 9, 1902, of 
apoplexy, leaving a widow but no children. 

By his strong personality, his broad cultivated views, his refined 
manners and dignified bearing, he was one of the leaders in influencing 
an intelligent public to that just appreciation of the dental profession 
which later years witnessed. 



67 




JOHN THOMAS CODMAN, D.M.D. 

Twelfth President. 

John Thomas Codman, the son of John and Rebecca B. (Hall) 
Codman, was born in Boston, Mass., October 30, 1826. 

Dr. Codman belonged to an old Boston family. His preliminary- 
education was obtained at the now historic place — where his father's 
sociological tendencies carried his family — Brook Farm, where he 
went at the age of seventeen years. 

At Brook Farm, young Codman spent three years, the experience 
of which indelibly shaped themselves upon his life. There he came 
into contact with such men as George Ripley, the leader and founder 
of the Brook Farm experiment; George William Curtis, Nathaniel 
Hawthorne, an idealist in its broad sense and the writer of many 
familiar romances; Charles Anderson Dana, and others of promi- 
nence who came as visitors. Among these latter were Ralph Waldo 
Emerson, poet, philosopher and essayist; James Freeman Clarke, 
talented writer and preacher; Rev. Cyrus A. Bartol, faithful and 
independent; Theodore Parker, son of a Lexington Revolutionary hero, 
bold and brave; Henry D. Thoreau, a charming writer who spent 
two years in a hut at Walden Woods; Margaret Fuller, remarkable 
for her intellectual capacity and who became the wife of Count 
D'Ossoli, of Italy; Elizabeth P. Peabody and her sister Sophia, who 
became the wife of Nathaniel Hawthorne; George Bancroft, the his- 
torian; Orestes A. Bronson, prominent essayist, who was by turns, 

■ 68 



a Radical Unitarian, Universalist, Presbyterian and Roman Catholic; 
A. Bronson Alcott, teacher and lecturer; William EUery Channing, 
in whose x-iens ran the blood of one of the signers of the Declaration 
of Independence, a beloved preacher, and many others. 

When the experiment was given up, young Codman started his 
real professional life in Roxbury, close to Boston. Here he made his 
way with little professional knowledge, as in those early times it was 
necessar\' to do, there being no dental schools in existence. 

His early life out of school hours was employed more or less busily 
in a machine shop with his father, and at fourteen years of age he 
began the work of an old-time dental student, grinding tooth-body 
and carving and baking artificial teeth in the laboratory of his uncle, 
Dr. William W. Codman. 

He decided, in middle life, to study dentistry, although he had 
been practicing dentistry for some time before that, as previously 
stated. 

In the early '50's, he associated himself with the late Dr. Albert 
T. Emery, on Temple Place, Boston, from whence he removed to 
Taunton in 1857. 

In 1863, Dr. Codman began a long professional career m Boston. 
He became associated with Dr. Nathan Cooley Keep, a sturdy dental 
pioneer of New England, which continued for seven years. 

While associated with Dr. Keep, the Harvard Dental School was 
organized, and Dr. Codman early took advantage of this opportunity 
to enter on November 2, 1869, and graduated in the second class 
which went forth from that instutition in 1870, with the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Medicine, and was chosen Secretary of his class. 

At this period of Dr. Codman's studentship. Dr. Keep was Dean of 
the Harvard Dental School and Dr. Codman always took pleasure 
in the fact that Dr. Keep's signature as Dean had been placed on 
his diploma. 

Dr. Codman was a man of pronounced literary tastes and ten- 
dencies; for twenty years he contributed frequently to magazines 
and newspapers and many of his articles appeared in the Boston 
Daily Globe, those dealing with Boston in his early days being par- 
ticularly interesting. 

He contributed essays for the Massachusetts Dental Society and 
others, and his book, pubHshed in 1894, on "Brook Farm Memories, 
Personal and Historical," is an evidence of his strong literary bent. 
This book is the only history of the Brook Farm experiment written 
by a member of that community. 

On December 13, 1859, in New York City, Dr. Codman was married 
to Miss Kezzie Hinckley Clark, a descendent of Thomas Clark of 
Plymouth, Mass. 

By this union there were three sons and one daughter, viz: Charles 
F. Codman, Benjamin H. Codman, D.M.D., the latter of whom 
succeeded to his father's practice, both of Boston; John C. Codman of 
Detroit, Mich.; and Mrs. John Mclntyre of New York. 

Dr. Codman became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society 
on May 2, 1864, and continued in Active membership till the year 

69 



1895- when he was made Honoran-. He was Secretan- from 1867 to 
1868, Recording Secretan- in 1868; Treasurer 1866 to 1887, and was 
elected as the twelfth President. December 10, 1875. 

He was anActi^■e member of the Har\-ard Dental Alumni Associa- 
tion from 1871 to 1891, Vice-President in 1872, President 1872-1873, 
and made an Honoran." member in 1899. 

He was also a member of the old Connecticut Valley Dental Society 
in 1866 and made Honorary in 1892. A member of the Merrimack 
\'alley Dental Association in 1873. and of the New England Dental 
Society on or pre^•ious to 1887. continuing his membership till same 
was merged in the Northeastern Dental Association in 1895, when 
he was elected to Honoran.- membership in the latter. 

He was a member of the Boston Society of Dental Improvement 
for many years. 

Was also a member of the American Academy of Dental Science 
1870 to date of resignation in 1893; its Recording Secretary" 1879-1881, 
and Anniversary- Orator in 1889. 

He was also a member of the Dental Protective Association of the 
United States. 

In 1879. Han-ard University appointed Dr. Codman an Instructor 
in Operati\-e Dentistr}^ which position he held until the close of the 
year 1881. 

Dr. Codman was a versatile man, of pleasing personality and greatly 
respected by all with whom he came in contact, and the writer 
takes pleasure in confirming the above estimate of the man, whose 
confidence and good will he enjoyed for many years. 

Dr. Codman departed this life at Revere, ^lass., on December 14, 
1907. 



70 



SAMUEL J McDOUGALL, M.D. 

Thirteenth President 

t 
(See Biography under Founders, page 29) 



71 




JAMES HARVEY KIDDER, A.B. 

Fourteenth President 

James Harvey Kidder was the son of Captain and Calista (Taft) 
Kidder, and born on June 5, 1825, at Alstead, New Hampshire. 

After spending his early boyhood on his father's farm, young 
Kidder studied at Kimball Union Academy, and afterward at Dart- 
mouth College, where he acquired special distinction as a debater, 
and from which he was graduated in 1850, with the A.B. degree. 

He afterward studied medicine at the University of Maryland, 
for three years, and finally decided to take up dentistry, studying 
with his brother. Dr. Frederick Kidder, at Claremont, N. H. 

He then opened a dental ofl&ce in Lawrence, Mass., and here he 
continued till the end of his life, growing year by year in professional 
and social esteem. 

On November 5, 1866, Dr. Kidder, joined the Massachusetts 
Dental Society and was its fourteenth President, elected December 13, 
1877. On June 5, 1895, he was elected to Honorary membership. 

He was also a member of the Merrimack Valley Dental Associ- 
tion, and its President in 1869. 

Dr. Kidder was of high standing in the Masonic fraternity. His 
religious convictions were decided, and he was acceptably prominent 
in connection with Grace Episcopal Church; with the Lawrence 
Young Mens' Christian Association, of which he was one of the found- 
ers, and with the Lawrence City Mission, of which he was treasurer. 

72 



His financial ability was marked, and his probity was never ques- 
tioned. He was president of the Pacific National Bank for the first 
twenty years of its existence, and was active in the affairs of the Essex 
Savings Bank. 

Dr. Kidder was united in marriage, in i860, to Adelaide S. Dodge, 
daughter of George Dodge, of Lancaster, Mass., she died in 1896. 
Three children survived, viz: J. Harvey Kidder, of Chicago, 111., and 
two married daughters. 

On June 6, 1900, at his home in Lawrence, Mass.; there passed to 
the Great Unknown, James Harvey Kidder, a man beloved by all. 



73 




LUTHER DIMMICK SHEPARD, A.M., D.D.S., D.M.D. 

Fifteenth President 

Luther Dimmick Shepard was born in Windham, Maine, Sep- 
tember II, 1837; his father was the Reverend John W. Shepard, a 
minister of the gospel, and his mother was Ehza (Burns) Shepard. 

Dr. Shepard was descended from Scotch and EngHsh stock, and all 
his ancestors for one hundred and fifty years had lived in the State 
of New Hampshire. 

His father, a Congregational minister, moved from Windham to 
South Merrimac, N. H., shortly after the birth of his son, and there 
young Shepard spenL his boyhood. The family next moved to 
Nashua, N. H. 

Young Shepard attended the Phillips Andover Academy and after- 
wards Amherst College, from which he was graduated in 1862, with 
the degree of A.B., and six years later, in 1868, Amherst conferred 
upon him the A.M. degree; and eleven years later, in 1879, Harvard 
University gave him the honorary dental degree of D.M.D. But 
six honorary dental degrees were ever conferred, and his was one of 
the six. 

In 1861, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery conferred upon 
him the degree of D.D.S. 

Dr. Shepard was one of the early members of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, having been elected February 6, 1865, and was 

74 



largely instrumental in urging the founding of a chair of dentistry 
in the Harvard Medical School of the University. 

It was upon the suggestion of the late Nathan Cooley Keep, M.D., 
in his address as President, and at the first annual meeting of the 
Massachusetts Dental Society in 1865, recommending a school, that 
a committee was appointed by said Society with the faculty of the 
Medical School, said Committee being Drs. N. C. Keep, Enoch C. 
Rolfe, and Luther D. Shepard. 

Various meetings having been held, meanwhile, it was not until 
November 27, 1867, that the school was evolved as a part of the 
Harvard Medical School, and opened in February, 1868, with Dr. 
Shepard on the staff of teachers as Adjunct Professor of Operative 
Dentistry. In 1879, he was appointed by the Corporation of the 
University full professor, continuing in the chair until 1882, when 
he officially severed his connection with the school. 

Through the personal efforts of Dr. Shepard a meeting of dentists 
from the western part of the State of Massachusetts was convened 
in Springfield, November 10, 1863, when they organized the Connecti- 
cut Valley Dental Society, adopting a Constitution and By-Laws, at 
which meeting the late Dr. Flavius Searle was elected President, 
and Dr. Shepard, Secretary. Eighteen members signed the Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws at that meeting, and, at this writing, (there is but 
one Ii\-ing member), Dr. P. H. Derby of Springfield. (Deceased, Jan. 4, 

1913) 

Dr. Shepard served the Society as its Secretary until October 1866, 
when he was elected its President. 

In 1865, Dr. Shepard moved to Salem, Mass., previous to which 
time he had practiced in Northampton and Amherst. He was a 
partner in Salem with the late Dr. Willard Lewis Bowdoin. About 
1867, he moved to Boston, where he remained in practice until his 
decease. On coming to Boston, he was a partner with the late 
celebrated Dr. Joshua Tucker and Dr. George T. Moffatt, who were 
reputed to have the finest practice in the City of Boston in those 
days. Some years after he severed his connection with these gentle- 
men and opened an office for himself, continuing in active practice 
until the day of his death. 

Dr. Shepard, also, had much to do in the Massachusetts Dental 
Society with the agitation for a law to regulate the practice of den- 
tistry in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. After several years' 
discussion the measure was finally secured from the Legislature of 
the state by outside influence rather than from within the Society. 
The law took effect in April, 1887, and Dr. Shepard received the 
appointment from Governor Oliver Ames as a member of the first 
Board of Registration in Dentistry. He was chosen its first chairman 
and remained in that office until his resignation from the Board, 
April 15, 1892. The following year, 1893, he became president of 
the World's Columbian Dental Congress, which met in Chicago, 
111., in that year. 

Dr. Shepard was recognized in the dental profession for his edu- 

75 



cational qualifications, his great ability as a dentist and teacher, 
and broad-mindedness. He was an ardent worker in the interest 
of his profession and won for himself the highest honors within its 
gift. He was known throughout the land as a man possessing high 
attainments, and had many friends in this and foreign countries. 

Notwithstanding the friends he made, by his intense aggressive 
spirit in the societies with which he was connected, he caused the 
ill-will of many with whom he came in conflict. Much of this feel- 
ing was dissipated in later life from recognition of his clear and 
broad-minded views, his earnestness and great ability displayed in 
the field of dentistry. 

Dr. Shepard first advocated the use of the stool for dental operations 
at the chair, and was the first to publish an account of its use and 
healthfulness in the various dental journals of that period. He was 
a writer and speaker of note in the many dental societies, banquets 
and functions of the prof ession, seldom being absent from those in his 
home town. 

His afiiliation with the Massachusetts Dental Society, soon after 
its organization, made him an Active member continuously up to his 
death, with the exception of a single year, when he resigned, coming 
back into the Society the following year, in 1885. 

He was its Secretary in 1866-1867; and the fifteenth President, 
being elected December 13, 1878; also Councillor from 1896 to his 
decease. He joined the Merrimack Valley Dental Association in 1864, 
and continued a member until 1884; was President in 1872-1873. 
He was a member of the Harvard Odontological Society and a life 
member of the Harvard Dental Alumni Association, becoming Pres- 
ident of the latter in 1902- 1903. He was an Active fellow of the Amer- 
ican Academy of Dental Science from 1870 to 1884, when he resigned. 

He was an active member of the New England Dental Society, 
until its merger, in 1895, with the Connecticut Valley Dental Society 
into the present Northeastern Dental Association, and thus continued 
until his demise. 

In 1879, he was President of the American Dental Association and 
continued a member of its successor, the National Dental Association. 
Was an Honorary member of the Maine State and New Hampshire 
Dental Societies; and in 1906 was President of the New England 
Amherst Association. He also was a member of the University Club 
of Boston, the Boston Athletic Association, and the Boston Yacht 
Club. He was formerly a member of the Eastern Yacht Club, and 
was a member of Winslow Commandery, Knight Templars, Salem, 
Mass., as well as a member of the Boston Medical Library Association. 

Dr. Shepard was married on October 5, 187 1, to Josephine Bailey, 
of Boston, who with one son, Luther D. Shepard, Jr., A.B., M.D., 
D.M.D. survived him. 

His sudden death from angina pectoris, occurred at his home in 
Hotel Wadsworth, Boston, January 26, 191 1. 

Dr. Shepard was in active practice of his profession from 1858 to 
1911. 

It can be truly said of him, " all of which I have seen 
a part of which I was." 

76 




CHARLES GORDON DAVIS, D.D.S. 

Sixteenth President 

Charles Gordon Davis, the son of Nathaniel and Charlotte (Gordon) 
Da\ds, was born on Davis Island, in the Town of Guilford, Lake 
Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire, June, 1825. 

Young Davis early obtained his education in Bristol Academy, and 
afterward attended Dartmouth College, and studied medicine, but 
being of a mechanical turn of mind, he was attracted to the field of 
dentistry, and entered the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery from 
which he graduated in the class of 1850 with the degree of D.D.S. 

It has been said of Dr. Davis that he possessed a broadness of mind, 
a nobility of character, and a rugged honesty of professional endeavor 
in his work that seemed to emanate from the granite hills of his 
native state, and that approached them in endurance and solidity. 
He was an honest and close student in youth, and in early manhood, 
like Webster, taught school. 

Dentistry, when he entered the profession, was just emerging 
from the barbarism of empiricism. 

Dr. Davis was a zealous worker and a thinker; he gave all his 
energies to his chosen profession and was recognized as an authority 
from the beginning. 

Selecting New Bedford as the field of his life work, he found here 
all that this world can give in a large and selected clientage that 

77 



shortly gave him a national reputation. The sons and daughters 
of New Bedford, although transplanted to other climes, made annual 
pilgrimages home to receive his professional services, a condition 
and a duty handed down to their children and grandchildren. 

Dr. Davis was a member of the Old Colony Dental Association, 
of the Merrimack Valley Dental Association, and the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, being elected the sixteenth President of the latter 
December ii, 1879. He was also an Active fellow of the American 
Academy of Dental Science from 1867 to 1870, when he resigned. 

For a time, 1868-1869, he was Adjunct Professor of Dental Science 
and Operative Dentistry in the Boston Dental College. 

Dr. Davis was a frequent contributor to dental journals, a sharp, 
ready, fluent and logical debater, and one of the most conscientious,, 
honest and skillful of men that ever worked in the human mouth. 

At New Bedford, Mass., on January 8, 1890, his spirit crossed the 
Great Divide, leaving a widow and daughter, Miss Mabel E. Davis, 
who survived him. 



78 




GEORGE FRANKLIN WATERS 

Seventeenth President 

George Franklin Waters, the son of George Washington and 
Sarah (Forbes) Waters, was born in Ashby, Mass., March 23, 1824. 
His father was born in Ashby, July 4, 1798, and his mother was born 
in Greenfield, May 30, 1798. 

Young Waters' early education was obtained at Ashby and Gorham 
Academy, in Maine. He then began the study of dentistry in Boston 
with Dr. Gunn on Court Street, and practiced in that city; Waterville, 
Maine; and Newton, Mass.; ending with his practicing in Boston, on 
Beacon Street. 

Dr. Waters was a member of the Orthodox Church, in Gorham, 
Maine, when he resided there with his parents, but after coming to 
Boston he became interested in Spiritualism. 

In politics Dr. Waters was a Republican. He was an active worker 
in various scientific societies, among them were the American Society 
for the Advancement of Science; the Agassiz Society; the Natural 
History Society, and the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

His work with the miscroscope was that of an enthusiast. He was 
a profound student of natural history. During his busy life he 
invented the electric brush for the relief of arterial tension, which 
is recognized by physicians as of great value in nervous and kindred 
disorders. 

Dr. Waters also invented the long handled pruning knife, now 
extensively used throughout the country for extermination of moth 

79 



cocoons, but which at that time was Httle appreciated. He also 
invented the hemp and hair flesh brush, sold only by himself at the 
time. 

He was a great lover of nature, especially of flowers and plants of 
all varieties. 

His unselfish efforts to enlighten others how to care for themselves 
by the use of simple means or remedies was constant and is well 
illustrated in the following: Years ago he gave a lecture before a 
scientific society of Salem on the use of common cooking soda for the 
relief and cure of scalds or burns, and characteristically, he poured 
boihng water upon his bare arm, and then, applying the soda and 
wrapping a handkerchief around the burn, proceeded with his lecture. 
At the time he created quite a sensation, and received many grateful 
acknowledgements from housewives and those who endanger them- 
selves over cooking ranges, and from those who had been benefitted 
by the information he had given. 

During his last illness of more than a year's duration, he philo- 
sophically watched and commented on the progress of the disease, 
and even in his dying hours, he called attention to death's work. 
To him death had no terrors; he believed that there was only one life, 
that death simply changed the conditions. 

Dr. Waters joined the Massachusetts Dental Society, January 7, 
1867, and o^ resigning October 30, 1890, was placed on the Honorary 
membership roll. On December 8, 1880, he was elected as the 
seventeenth President of the Society. For a number of years he was 
a member of the National Dental Association. 

It was at his residence in Newton Centre, Mass., that he passed to 
his reward, on August 12, 1896, leaving a widow and three daughters. 
A son died some years previous to Dr. Waters' death, at the age of 
twenty- three years. 



80 




DANIEL BOWMAN INGALLS, D.D.S. 

Eighteenth President 

Daniel Bowman Ingalls, the subject of this sketch, was the son of 
James and Mary (Cass) Ingalls, and born in Sulton, Vermont, May 
25, 1829. 

His early education was obtained in the common schools of Connec- 
ticut; he then learned the trade of a machinist at Norwich, which 
he followed until twenty-six years of age, when he entered the study 
of dentistry in Clinton, Mass., and in which town he practiced his 
profession from 1856 to 1903, when he retired from active life. 

Dr. Ingalls was a member of the Merrimack Valley Dental Associa- 
tion, and its President in 1874. Was also a member of the North- 
eastern Dental Association, and afterwards, in 1898,, was made an 
Honorary member of the same. 

He joined the Massachusetts Dental Society on July 9, 1867, and 

on December 9, 1881, became the eighteenth President of the Society. 

■ Dr. Ingalls received the degree of D.D.S. from the Boston Dental 

College in 1874. He was a member of its board of examiners from 

1885 to 1890 inclusive. 

At Newbury, Vermont, he was married to Rebecca Nelson Randall, 
on October 22, 1850. 

Dr. Ingalls departed this life at CUnton, Mass., on August 19, 1909. 



81 




FLAVIUS SEARLE, D.D.S. 

Nineteenth President 



The subject of this sketch, Flavius Searle, was born in South- 
ampton, Mass., April 4, 18 14, his boyhood being passed in his native 
town. His studies were intended to prepare him for the ministry, 
meanwhile supporting himself by teaching. He entered Amherst 
College, and subsequently Marietta College, but his health did not 
permit him to continue at either. He then began the study of medi- 
cine, but early made a specialty of dentistry under the tutorship of 
Dr. Walker, of Northampton, who was both physician and dentist. 

After his graduation from Dr. Walker's office, he commenced the 
practice of dentistry in Springfield, Mass., in 1839, but frequently 
made excursions into adjoining towns for a time as an itinerant. 

Dr. Searle was the inventor of various methods and appliances, 
but gave everything that he devised as contributions to the advance- 
ment of his profession. 

For several years he made his own instruments, and in 1858, being 
in need of a new operating chair, there being none in the market, 
he made one for himself. Of this chair he said, "I used to go to 
church and try to be good, but that chair would go with me, and be 
working its parts together before the whole congregation." In this 
chair his last patient sat. 

A remarkable tribute was paid to Dr. Searle, in October, 1887, by 
the Connecticut Valley Dental Society, of which he was the principal 

82 



founder and first President, elected in 1863, i" ^ celebration of the 
fiftieth anniversary of his professional life. 

This was the "judgment day" for Dr. Searle, and his professional 
associates from all over the land constituted the Court of Justice, 
either by their presence or personal letters, and this was not all; the 
Honorable Mayor of the city, representatives of medical, legal, 
clerical and other professions came to do him honor; in fact he was 
overwhelmed with expressions of esteem, love and congratulation. 
They all poured upon his consecrated head every possible expression 
of regard and love, and made his soul glow with unutterable joy and 
gratitude. Seventeen months from this happy event he was dead, 
passing over the "river." 

The Honorary degree of D.D.S. was in 185 1 conferred upon him by 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. 

Dr. Searle was a man of retiring disposition, gentlemanly demeanor, 
and sympathetic nature. He was earnest and conscientious in the 
practice of his profession, tenacious in his views, but open to reason, — 
a progressive conservative. 

No man in his profession was more highly esteemed by his brethren, 
and in the community in which he lived he was regarded with an 
affectionate reverence. 

He died at Springfield, Mass., February 10, 1889, beloved of all. 

Dr. Searle joined the Massachusetts Dental Society on December 5, 
1864, and was elected as the nineteenth President, December 15, 1882. 
Many years after he resigned his membership, but the records fail to 
give any date. 

He became an Active Fellow of the American Academy of Dental 
Science in 1867, and in 1880 was made an Honorary fellow. 



83 




DWIGHT MOSES CLAPP, D.M.D. 

Twentieth President 

The subject of this sketch, Dwight Moses Clapp, was born in 
Southampton, Mass., on June 5, 1846, being the son of Moses and 
Almera (Russell) Clapp. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of that 
town and afterward he studied at Westfield Academy, and having 
graduated from that institution, he prepared for his life work in the 
profession of his choice by placing himself under the preceptorship 
of Dr. H. M. Miller, of Westfield, and sometime afterwards, under 
that of Dr. James Lewis, of Burlington, Vermont. 

Aiming to equip himself in the completest manner for his future 
work, he visited Europe in 1869, and during his few years stay across 
the ocean was associated for about a year with Dr. Charles R. Cofl&n, 
of London, England, and subsequently spent some time with Dr. 
Mason, of Geneva, Switzerland. 

His return to the United States was destined to inaugurate — by 
his opening an office for practice in Boston — that interruptedly 
successful professional and social career — the closing of which was 
the great regret of his many friends. Thenceforth he was associated 
with the "Hub of the Universe," until his demise, having from the 
first, by his personal qualities and professional efficiency, added 
many of his patients to his circle of personal friends, and especially 
becoming recognized by his brother dentists increasingly as a force 
making for the best interests of dentistry. 



It is a fact, and speaks eloquently of Dr. Clapp's qualities as a man, 
that most of his intimate friends, and his associates in his sports, 
were those whom he first knew as patients. Men went to him for 
his professional skill, but having once fallen under the spell of his 
unusual personality, they became permanently his friends. 

In 1880, Dr. Clapp entered the dental department of Harvard 
University and graduating in 1882, received the degree of D.M.D., 
and the same year he was appointed an Instructor in Operative Den- 
tistry in the same institution, and in 1890, CHnical Lecturer on 
Operative Dentistry, which continued down to the day of his death. 
In 1899, he became a member of the Administrative Board of the Har- 
vard Dental School, which retained the benefits of his presence in 
its councils during the remainder of his life. 

He held membership in the National Dental Association, the Amer- 
ican Academy of Dental Science, the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
being elected to the latter December 11, 1874, and its Secretary in 
1877-1878, and elected its twentieth President on December 14, 1883. 
(He had served on numerous Committees of said Society, including 
its Executive Committee). He was also a member of the Boston Society 
of Dental Improvement, the New England (afterwards merged into 
the Northeastern) Dental Society, and the New York Institute of 
Stomatology; the Harvard Odontological Society, of which he was 
two years its President, 1899- 1900, becoming an Active member in 
1885; for eleven years he was also Treasurer, 1886-1897; Anniversary 
Orator in 1887. A member of the Dental Protective Association of the 
United States; a life member of the Harvard Dental Alumni x-Yssocia- 
tion; Vice-President of the latter in 1893, and elected president June 
25, 1894 and was an Honorary member of the Vermont State Dental 
Society. 

For a period of ten years he was a useful member of the Massa- 
chusetts Board of Registration in Dentistry, having been appointed 
by Governor Greenhalge in 1896. 

Dr. Clapp was the author of several papers read in dental society 
meetings, and of various articles appearing in the dental magazines. 
He also contributed to the "American Text-Book of Operative Den- 
tistry" the chapter on "Combination Fillings." 

While perhaps no man had a wider circle of professional acquain- 
tances or stood higher among them, yet his interest in his profession 
absorbed only a part of his energy and sympathies He sought and 
found companionship which nourished his devotion to art, literature, 
and outdoor life. He was a member of the Boston Art Club, the 
University, the Oxford Club of Lynn, the Appalachian, and other 
organizations. 

The love of nature, especially in its wider aspects, was a vital 
concern with him. He was a member of long standing of the Megantic 
Fish and Game Club, and owned a camp in the Maine woods, where 
he was accustomed to spend a large portion of each summer. When 
professional duties kept him from these longer trips, he found whole- 
some recreation in other outdoor sports. 

85 



In the locality of his activities, his energy and capacity in the mat- 
ters which concerned his professional relations to dentistry and to 
his state were well known, with their splendid fruition. There too, 
was especially known and appreciated the fact that he was not nar- 
rowed in mind by his interest in his special vocation, but was one 
whose outlook, as testified to by the various avocational fields he 
cultivated, marked him out as sustaining a robust, all-round relation 
to the world of humanity, including its social aspects, its literary 
and artistic products, its recreations, and its natural environments. 
But his personal influence upon dentistry of his time belongs to the 
entire profession. 

It was a source of great satisfaction to Dr. Clapp that his only son 
made choice of his father's profession, and the resultant association 
in practice was fruitful of happiness to both. 

In 1872, Dr. Clapp was married to Miss Clara Josephine Simonds, 
daughter of Henry Simonds, of Lynn, Mass., the fruit of this union 
being two children, a son and daughter. 

The daughter Ethel, died at the age of six years; the son, already 
referred to was Howard Clapp, D.M.D., of Boston, who died March 10, 
1913. At his summer home in Lynn, Mass., on September 18, 1906, 
Dr. Clapp passed to the Great Unknown from cardiac disease, leaving 
a widow and son. 




JOHN FRANCIS ADAMS 

Tzventy-first President 

The subject of this sketch was born in Boston, Mass., September 
29, 1838, being the son of Oliver and Zilpah (Sawyer) Adams. 

His early education was obtained in the Boston public schools, he 
then entered upon the study of dentistry with Dr. Edmund Blake, 
later removing to Worcester, Mass., in 1858, and associated himself 
with Dr. Oliver F. Harris for about eight years, and on Dr. Harris 
leaving Worcester, Dr. Adams succeeded to the practice, until May, 
1904, when he was striken with paralysis. 

It was in 1884-1885 and 1886-1887 that Dr. Adams served the dental 
department of Harv^ard University as Clinical Instructor in Operative 
Dentistry. 

In 1877, the Connecticut Valley Dental Society, of which he was 
a member, elected him President, and the Massachusetts Dental 
Society, which he originally joined in 1867, made him the twenty- 
first President on December 12, 1884. 

Dr. Adams was also President of the old New England Dental 
Society in 1892. 

From 1875 to 1903, Dr. Adams was an Active fellow of the American 
Academy of Dental Science and was made an Honorary fellow the 
latter year named. 

Dr. Adams was formerly a member of the Quinsigamond Boat 
Club and the Commonwealth Club of Worcester. 

On July 25, i860. Dr. Adams was united in marriage to Miss Ellen 
J. Wilson, at Worcester, Mass., the fruit of this union being three 
sons and one daughter. 

March 21, 1910, in Falmouth, Mass., there passed from this earth 
Dr. John Francis Adams, after years of illness, leaving a widow, and 
the number of children above named, viz: Philip W., Walter S., and 
John W. Adams., and Mrs. Harrison W. Davis, a daughter. 

87 




STEPHEN GIFFORD STEVENS, D.D.S. 

Twenty-second President. 

Stephen Gifford Stevens, was of Scotch ancestry on his father's 
side and of EngHsh descent on his mother's side; son of Isaiah and 
Mary Varney (Hall) Stevens, born in Brooks, Maine, December 4, 
1844. 

His father was born in Windham, Maine, November 27, 1809, and 
died December 10, 1885, while his mother was born in Norway, 
Maine, April 21, 1815, and died June 3, 1859. 

Dr. Stevens was the only son and third child of a family of six 
children, the others being daughters. 

When the Civil War broke out in the early '6o's, he enlisted as a 
soldier, being a member of Company D, New York Frontier Cavalry. 

He began his professional career in Lynn, Mass., and while prac- 
ticing dentistry attended lectures at the Boston Dental College, 
graduating with the class of 1877. 

Soon after this he bought the practice of Dr. S. R. Robbins, and 
moved to 175 Tremont Street, Boston, where he continued for many 
years, afterward removing to 2 Commonwealth Avenue, where he 
was in practice up to the time of his demise. 

In his chosen profession Dr. Stevens filled many offices of honor 
and responsibility. He was a trustee and auditor of the Boston 
Dental College for many years. 

He joined the Massachusetts Dental Society on June 6, 1878, and 
on December 9, 1885, was elected its twenty-second President; and 



was President of the New England Dental Society in 1893; and was a 
member of the Northeastern Dental Association, as well as of the 
Alumni Association of the Boston and Tufts College Dental School. 
He was a Fellow of the American Academy of Dental Science, and also 
a member of the Boston Society of Dental Improvement. 

Students always found him a firm friend and adviser. In the 
conduct of the college he was a strong advocate of whatever seemed 
best to him for a sound professional education. His nature was that 
of a strong, sincere, and positive man, and this quality gained for 
him the respect of all who knew him. 

Dr. Stevens' death came suddenly from apoplexy, and occurred in 
Boston, Mass., September 5, 1904, leaving a widow, Helen Elizabeth 
Stevens. 



89 




EDWARD BIGLEOW HITCHCOCK, M.D., D.M.D. 

Twenty-third President. 

Edward Bigelow Hitchcock, the subject of this sketch, was a son of 
the late Hon. David K. and Abbie H. (Barnes) Hitchcock, and born 
in Newton, Mass., February 5, 1854. 

His early education was received in the public schools of his native 
city, arid afterwards he studied at the Phillips Andover (Mass.) 
Academy. 

In 1874, he entered the dental department of Harvard University, 
graduating in the class of 1877 with the degree of D.M.D. ; subse- 
quently, in 1878, he received from Dartmouth College the medical 
degree of M.D. 

Dr. Hitchcock was a member of the Harvard Dental Alumni 
Association from 1875 to 1900, and also of the Harvard Odonto- 
logical Society from 1880 to 1899. 

He had been Corresponding Secretary, Anniversary Orator, mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee, and in 1880, was elected President, 
and later was made an Honorary member of the Society. 

On December 12, 1878, he became a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, serving as second and first Vice-Presidents respec- 
tively, and finally was elected twenty- third President on December 
6, 1886; later as a councillor in said Society from the Metropolitan 
District, and also filled many committee appointments. 

He was an Active Fellow of the American Academy of Dental 

90 



Science from 1881 to day of his death, and prominent in a number of 
other organizations. 

Dr. Hitchcock was united in marriage to Lillian B. Comstock in 
1885, and his untimely end came on January 26, 1900, from pulmonary 
tuberculosis, at his home in Newton, Mass., a widow and young son 
surviving. 

The large circle of devoted friends to whom his faithfulness to duty 
and his professional skill had endeared him, miss the bright smile 
and cheerful disposition which characterized him, and long will re- 
member the exemplary fortitude he displayed during his last illness. 



91 




HORATIO COOK MERIAM, D.M.D. 

Twenty-fourth President. 

Horatio Cook Meriam was the son of Horatio Cook and Esther 
(Lewis) Meriam, and born in Tewksbury, Mass.. March 20, 1849. 

His father was born in Concord, Mass., in the house situated at 
what is known as Meriam's Corner of Revolutionary fame. The 
father was by profession a lawyer, and for a time was assessor of the 
Port of Boston, a young man of literary tastes and wrote important 
articles for various periodicals. 

His mother was Esther Lewis, of Canton, Mass. The family on 
both sides came to this country from County Kent in England, thus 
will be seen the characteristics of father in the subject of this sketch. 

His early education was obtained in the district school ofTewskbury 
and later, for a short time, in a school in Lowell, but he always said 
that in his boyhood his best learning was directly from his talented 
father. 

In the year 1870, he entered the Harvard Dental School, leaving 
it the following year to enter the office of Dr. John H. Batchelder, 
of Salem, where he remained for two years. In September 1873, 
he re-entered the dental school, graduating in the class of 1874 with 
the degree of D.M.D. 

He also gained knowledge in the office of the late Dr. Gustavus A. 
Gerry of Lowell. 

He joined the Harvard Dental School Alumni Association and 
was Vice-President in 1877, and became President in 1879-1880. 

92 



Dr. Meriam was appointed Clinical Instructor in Operative Den- 
tistry in Harvard University in 1884- 1885, and served as Instructor 
in Operative Dentistry from 1885-1889. 

He was an able and popular instructor as the writer can testify, 
having been a student under Dr. Meriam. 

Dr. Meriam was a member of many organizations, in all of which 
he was an earnest worker. In most of the local societies he had held 
many offices, including the presidency. 

He was a member of the Harvard Odontological Society and was 
Anniversary Orator in 1883, and President 1886-1887 ^-^d 1888-1889; 
having been elected a second time after an interregnum of a year 
between his first and second terms. 

He was an Honorary member of the Odontological Society of Great 
Britain, a member of the Dental Protective Association of the United 
States, of the Essex County and of the Lynn Dental Societies, of the 
American Academy of Dental Science; librarian of the latter 1881- 
1888, Vice-President 1908-1909, and President 1909-1910. 

He was a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, having 
joined December 11, 1874, and had held all the important offices 
in the Society, including the presidency, having been elected as the 
twenty-fourth, December 9, 1887. He afterwards served on numer- 
ous committees and was a Councillor from the ^Metropolitan District 
Dental Society, 1905-1910 inclusive. 

He was an associate member of the Ne\^ York Institute of Stoma- 
tolog}', and an Honorary member of. both the Connecticut Valley 
Dental Society and the Maine Dental Society. 

Among other organizations, other than dental, in which he held 
membership, were the Essex Institute; the Essex County Association; 
the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the Massachusetts Reform 
Club, and the Salem Light Infantry Veterans Association. 

These show his interest in science, and in the cultivation of flowers 
and fruits, of which he had a large garden, and in good citizenship. 

On September 12, 1878, he was married to Miss Edith Worcester 
of Salem, by whom he had five sons, the fourth of whom bears his 
father's name and is now (191 2) studing dentistry in the junior class 
of the Harvard Dental School, and is to follow his father's profession. 

Dr. Meriam was a fluent speaker and writer, as the dental journals 
and published proceedings of various dental societies will confirm. 
He was a genial, wholesouled gentleman of extremely sensitive nature 
and a genius in man\' ways, having devised numerous appliances, 
materials and ways of operating for the benefit of his patients. 

A man of great ability as a dentist, he freely gave in cordial help- 
fulness to others what he had obtained. He had rare literary taste 
and acquaintance, and in speaking had command of a wealth of 
appropriate quotations. His whole life was industrious, earnest, 
faithful, clean, upright, christian. 

His spirit passed "over the river" on August 11, 191 1, at his home 
in Salem, Mass., due to heart disease, from which he suffered for two 
months. 

93 




GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS GERRY, D.D.S. 

Twenty-fifth President. 

Gustavus Adolphus Gerry, the subject of this sketch, was the son 
of John and Caroline (Lawrence) Gerry, and born in Harvard, Mass., 
June 22, 1831. 

He received his early education in the public schools, and later 
in the Groton Academy, and then began the study of dentistry with 
Dr. Fitch, of Clinton, Mass., in 1857; afterwards entering the Boston 
Dental College and graduating in the class of 1874 with the D.D.S. 
degree. 

Dr. Gerry commenced the practice of dentistry in Gardner, Mass., 
removing to Lowell, Mass., in 1857, where he continued until his 
demise. 

He was affiliated with several dental societies, among others the 
New England Dental Society, of which he was at one time President, 
and became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, June 11, 
1864, and elected twenty-fifth President of same on December 14, 1888. 

He became a member of the American Academy of Dental Science 
in 1888 and continued the same to the date of his decease. 

In 187 1, he was elected President of the old Merrimack Valley, 
Dental Association, after having served as the first Recording Secretary 
for six years. 

Dr. Gerry's political activities were not a few, for he served the 
City of Lowell in the Common Council 1867- 1868, the last year as 

94 



President of that body, and in 187 1, he was a member of the Board 
of Aldermen. From 1887 to the day of his death he was a member 
of the School Committee. 

Dr. Gerry was a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of 
the Odd Fellows fraternity. 

On January 29, 1861, he was united in marriage at Lowell to Miss 
Francis Crowell of that city, and his death occurred in Lowell on 
October 24, 1890, from cancer of the stomach. A widow and two 
sons survived him; Dr. George Henry Gerry of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
and Dr. Arthur Crowell Gerry of Lowell, both followers in their 
father's profession. 



95 




ROBERT ROBBINS ANDREWS, A.M., D.D.S., F.R.M.S. . 

Twenty-sixth President. 

Robert Robbins Andrews, son of Thomas Jefferson and Jerusha 
Baker (Robbins) Andrews, was born in Boston, Mass., August 7, 1844. 
His father was a Custom House officer and his great-grandfather was 
Robert Lash, a friend of Paul Revere. He was a ship builder, con- 
tempory with John Hart, the builder of the old frigate '' Constitu- 
tion." He was also a Revolutionary soldier, whose sufferings' as a 
prisoner of war in the old mill prison in England, are a tradition among 
his descendents to-day. His son, Robert Lash, of Chelsea, Mass., 
commanded the Knights Templar at the laying of the corner-stone of 
Bunker Hill Monument. 

Robert Robbins Andrew's mother's father, Joseph Robbins, was the 
first shell-comb maker in this country. He came from England, and 
settled in Newbury, now Newton, Mass. He was said to be an artist 
in his work, and I am told that many of the antique shell combs 
prized by the old families are the work of his hands. 

His son. Dr. Robert L. Robbins, the uncle and the preceptor of 
Robert, the subject of this sketch, practiced dentistry for over forty 
years in Boston, and carved all the teeth he used. 

Young Robert was the fourth of five boys. His father died when 
he was four years old. His eldest brother was the late Rev. C. D. 
Andrews, D.D., of Christ Church, St. Paul, Minn., who died in 1907. 

96 



He also has two sisters, the oldest, Mrs. M. A. Denison, a well-known 
writer and author of many books. She wrote "That Husband of 
Mine," that had a sale of over three hundred thousand copies. 

She has written many poems and stories for magazines, and is 
still writing, although over eighty years of age. 

Young Andrews' early boyhood was spent in Chelsea, Mass., 
Washington, D. C, Camden, N. J., Buffalo, N. Y., and in Hyde 
Park, Mass. He attended the common schools in each city. To 
learn dentistry he served seven years with his uncle. Dr. R. L. Robbins, 
of Boston, from the time he was fourteen years of age until he was 
twenty-one. 

He served two years in the army during the Civil War, as a private 
soldier and as an officer. He entered as a private soldier in the autumn 
of 1862, in Company H, Forty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, and 
came home as a sergeant. He again enlisted in Company 3, Sixtieth 
Massachusetts Volunteers, as a Lieutenant, and was acting on the 
staff as acting quartermaster or adjutant almost the whole time 
he was in the regiment. He was under General Butler and General 
Banks, serving from the fall of 1862 to 1864. 

He graduated from the Boston Dental College in 1875, paying 
his college fees the last year by demonstrating dental embryology 
to his classmates; after graduating and receiving the degree of D.D.S., 
he was made Professor of Dental Histology, and taught for seven years, 
and was one of the college trustees for many years. 

His first year of practice was in Boston, he also had an office in 
Hyde Park, Mass., where he practiced two days in the week. Early 
in 1869, he located in Cambridge, Mass., and has practiced his pro- 
fession there ever since. In 1892, he received the honorary degree of 
A.M. from Dartmouth College, in recognition of his research work in 
dental embryology. Has been deeply interested in microscopical 
work for over thirty years, and has done much original research work 
along this line and made many valuable contributions on this topic 
to our literature. He wrote the chapter entitled "The Embryology 
of the Dental Tissues" for the first and second edition of Kirk's 
"American Text-Book of Operative Dentistry." 

He was honorary secretary from the United States to the Inter- 
national Medical Congress, at Berlin in 1890. 

Dr. Andrews was elected a Fellow of the Royal Microscopical 
Society of Great Britain, May, 1895, '^^d is a corresponding member 
of the Microscopical Society of Belgium, and of several other similar 
organizations, and was chairman of the committee on Microscopy 
and Bacteriology, World's Columbian Dental Congress, Chicago, 1892; 
honorary chairman of the section of Oral and Dental Surgery, Pan- 
American Medical Congress, 1892. 

Dr. Andrews became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society 
in 1873, and was elected as the twenty-sixth President on December 
12, 1889. He has been the recipient of many other honors: having 
served as President of the Connecticut Valley Dental Society in 1888; 
also the same of the American Academy of Dental Science in 1893-1895, 

97 



and of the Merrimack Valley Dental Association in 1882, and has 
served on numerous committees of the foregoing organizations. 

He is a member of the Boston Dental Improvement Society; the 
section on Stomatology of the American Medical Association; and is 
an honorary member of the New York Odontological Society; honor- 
ary member of the New York Institute of Stomatology; the New 
Jersey State Dental Society. 

He is a member of the Boston Art Club (having been a member for 
more than twenty-five years), the University Club of Boston, and 
Colonial Club of Cambridge, Mass. 

In 1867, he invented a mallet for condensing gold in filling teeth. 
In 1899, he was elected to the trusteeship of Tufts College Dental 
School. 

Dr. Andrews was married in Hyde Park, Mass., September 14, 
1870, to Mary Emily LeSeur, the daughter of Dr. Horatio LeSeur, 
a former well-known dentist in Boston, where he practiced dentistry 
for forty years. The fruit of this union are two daughters and two 
sons. 

Dr. Andrews is a Republican in national politics, but non-partisan 
in city affairs. He attends the Congregational Church. 

He is a member of the military order of the Loyal Legion (elected 
in 1897) of the Massachusetts Commandery. 

He is a connoisseur in art and ivory Japanese carvings, etc., and 
formerly was a member of the Warren Literary Association, and of 
the Mercantile Library Association of Boston. He has written 
several dramatic plays, and is a poet of no mean parts, having written 
several poems, showing him to be a many-sided and talented man. 




GEORGE FRANKLIN EAMES, M.D., D.D.S. 

Twenty-seventh President 

The subject of this sketch, George Franklin Fames, was born in 
Swanville, Maine, May 26, 1854, the son of FrankHn Prince and Abigail 
(Howe) Fames. 

His early education was obtained in Belfast, Maine, graduating 
from the high school, and from the Eastern State Normal School in 
1875. For four years he was a teacher in the public schools of Maine, 
and held the chair of Natural Science at E. M, C. Seminary, Bucksport, 
Maine, for three years. 

In 1877, he received the degree of D.D.S. from the Philadelphia 
Dental College; and the M.D. from the Jefferson Medical College in 
1882; afterward taking a post-graduate course in the Boston City 
Hospital, and the London (England) Throat Hospital. 

Dr. Fames practiced general medicine in Philadelphia for two years 
and in Bucksport, Maine, for three years. 

He was lecturer on First Aid to the Injured at the Boston Young 
Mens' Christian Association from 1884 to 1888 and from 1890 to 1900; 
he was professor of pathology and therapeutics at the Boston Dental 
College from 1889 to 1899 inclusive, and he was also lecturer at the 
Tufts College Medical School from 1892 to 1894 on laryngology. 

Dr. Fames was elected June 5, 1884, a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, and elected in December 1886, Secretary, resigning 
in December, 1888; on July 9, 1891, he was elected President, as its 
twenty-seventh. 

99 



He was Vice-President of the American Academy of Dental Science 
from 1899 to 1900. He is a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion and has served as chairman of the section on Stomatology. He 
is a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society and an active 
fellow of the Boston Medical Library Association. 

We also find him an honorary member of the Maine Dental Society. 

He is the author of "The Practice of Dental Medicine," 1899, 
and other professional treatises. He is somewhat of a genius, having 
invented numerous dental and surgical instruments. 

Dr. Eames has retained a lucrative practice in Boston since 1883. 



100 




JOSIAH WARREN BALL, D.D.S. 

Twenty-eighth President 

The subject of this sketch, Josiah Warren Ball, was the son of 
Josiah and Elmira (Fales) Ball, and born in Holden, Mass., June 
28, 1841. 

Young Ball was educated in the Holden High School, and later 
studied dentistry under Joseph N. Tourtelotte, M.D., of Worcester, 
Mass., afterward going to Alabama, and was associated with his 
brother. Dr. S. Ball, for three years. He then removed to Boston and 
entered the Boston Dental College, graduating from that institution 
in the class of 1870, receiving the degree of D.D.S., and received the 
appointment of assistant demonstrator of Operative Dentistry, and in 
187 1 was made demonstrator of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, 
serving until 1875. 

Dr. Ball served in the Civil War from 1 861- 1865 in the Third 
Battalion, Massachusetts Militia, First and Second Cavalry regiments, 
and was promoted to a lieutenancy. All through the war he was 
carried on the army rolls under the name of Warren J. Ball. 

Dr. Ball married, first, Elizabeth B. Farrington, of Roxbury, Mass., 
who died during the first year of their marriage, while traveling 
abroad. In October, 1879, for the second time he was united in mar- 
riage, on this occasion to Edna E. Smith, of St. John, New Brunswick. 

Dr. Ball was affiliated with the New England Dental Society, 
and joined the Massachusetts Dental Society on April 11, 187 1, 
and was elected July 7, 1892, as its twenty-eighth President. 

He is a member of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Associa- 
tion, of the Loyal Legion, Soldiers Historical and Benevolent Society, 
and the Boston Art CMub. 

lOI 




WASHBURN EDWARD PAGE, D.M.D. 

Twenty-ninth President. 

Washburn Edward Page, the son of Edward and Rebecca Jane 
(Wright) Page, was born in Leominster, Mass., August 2, 1853. 

His early education was received in the grammar and high schools 
of Charlestown, Mass. Soon after leaving these schools he began the 
study of dentistry with his father and later entered the Harvard 
Dental School (in 1874), and graduated in 1877 with the degree of 
D.M.D. 

Dr. Page became afi&liated with many societies, among others were 
the. Harvard Dental Alumni Association, of which he was Treasurer 
from 1880 to 1897, a period of seventeen years. 

For many years he was a member of the Harvard Odontological 
Society and its Corresponding Secretary from 1879 to 1880, and Presi- 
dent 1878-1879, and Treasurer from 1883-1886. Also a member of 
the Dental Protective Association of the United States. 

He was President of the New England Dental Society in 1891, 
and a member of the Northeastern Dental Association, of the National 
Dental Association, and was elected on December 13, 1877, a member 
of the Massachusetts Dental Society, and its Secretary from 1879 to 
1886, and on June 9, 1893, he was elected its twenty-ninth President. 

He married, first, Adelia C. Waite, of South Boston, Mass., and on 
March 16, 1909, Miss Mabel Littion French, of Boston. 

Dr. Page has been an active and energetic worker in the dental 
societies, and also on behalf of the Harvard Dental School in aid of 
raising funds for same. 




JOSEPH KING KNIGHT, B.A., D.C.D., D.M.D. 

Thirtieth President. 

The subject of this sketch, Joseph King Knight, was born in Newark, 
Ohio, September 14, 1849, being the son of James and Martha (King) 
Knight. 

His early education was obtained in the pubHc schools of Newark 
and later (1869- 1869) he attended Dartmouth College, receiving the 
A.B. degree as of 1872; and Cornell University in 1870-1872. 

He entered the Boston Dental College subsequently, and graduated 
in the class of 1883, with the degree of D.C.D., and in 1906 the Tufts 
College Dental School conferred upon him the degree of D.M.D. 

Dr. Knight was professor of Prosthodontia in the Boston Dental 
College, and also in Tufts College Dental School since 1888. 

Dr. Knight was married in Hyde Park, Mass., where he resides, 

to L Angeline Leseur, daughter of Dr. Horatio Leseur, one of 

the early Boston dentists, on April 16, 1873, and three children have 
been born to them; one, a son, Joseph King Knight, Jr., A.B. , D.M.D,, 
is associated with his father in his profession. 

On June 5, 1884, Dr. Knight became a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, and was elected the thirtieth President on June 7, 
1894, and it was during his incumbency of the office that the Society 
was divided into seven districts, and it was his handiwork which 
drew the first draft of the then new Constitution and By-Laws. 

He was elected corresponding secretary of the American Academy of 

103 



decdoli^"^''''^ '"^ '^°^' ^^'^''''^ ^'" ^^^' '^'^' '^^^'^ ^^ '■^^'''^'^ '■^- 
He is also a past presiding officer of the Boston Dental Alumni 
Association; a member of the Roxbury Dental Club; the Hyde Park 
Masonic Lodge; the Knights of Pythias; Beta Theta Pi; and many 
other organizations, and has held a prominent position in the official 
lite of church and town.. 



104 




GEORGE ARTHUR MAXFIELD, D.D.S. 

Thirty-first President 

George Arthur Maxfield, the son of Arthur L- — — and Orissa 
(Anderson) Maxfield, was born at Chicopee Falls, Mass., October 
29, 1848. On his father's side he is a direct descendant of Samuel 
Windsley, one of the twelve men who obtained the grant to begin a 
plantation at Merrimack, Mass., in 1638. 

In 1854, Dr. Maxfield's father with his family removed to Holyoke 
and his early education was obtained in the public schools of that city. 

He entered the University of Pennsylvania in 1879, and graduated 
with the degree of D.D.S., in 1881, and established himself in practice 
in Holyoke in 1883. 

He was elected a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
June 6, 1883, and has attended every annual meeting since that date. 
On June 6, 1895, Dr. Maxfield was elected its thirty-first President. 
As first Vice-President he was one of three members who planned the 
reorganization of the Society into seven districts and the drafting 
of the then new Constitution and By-Laws. 

For eleven years he was Secretary of the Connecticut Valley Dental 
Society till its merger with the New England Dental Society (of which 
latter he was also a member) into the present Northeastern Dental 
Association in 1895. 

He is an honorary member of the New Hampshire, Vermont and 
Connecticut Dental Societies, and also several dental societies out- 
side New England, such as the Delaware, etc. 



He was appointed a member of the Massachusetts Board of Reg- 

Btration in Dentistr\" bv the late Governor Roger Walcott, in 1897, 
to fill the \-acancv caused by the death of Dr. E. V. McLeod, of New 
Bedford, who died on December 24, oi that year; and had served 
for over fourteen years, on said board, when he retired in May, 1Q13. 

Dr. Maxfield has written many papers on dental subjects which 
have been published ia the dental journals. 

He also has invented several dental appliances, and was joint 
inventor, with Dr. Newton Morgan, of the Morgan-Maxfield Disk 
Mandrel, which for its srmphcity and utib'ty has become one of the 
standard dental appliances. 

Dr. Maxlield was married to EHzabeth R. Bennett, of Holyoke, in 
1871, who died in 1882, and married, ia 1885, Martha H. Currier 
of Holyoke. By this union they had one child, a son who died ia 
rgoQ, when nine jrears of age. 

Dr. Maxfield is an associate member of the New York Institute of 
Stomatology. 

Dr. Maxfield has labored industriously and intelligently to elevate 
the standard of professional life by active hard work in the various 
dental societies of which he is a member. 



ro6 




WALDO ELLAS BOARD^LAN, D.M.D. 
Thirty-second President 

Waldo Elias Boardman was the son of EHas and Saxah Haitshom 
(Hoi^diis) Boardmaa, and honi in Saoo, Maine, Septanbo- 1, 1851. 

E^ received his eariy education in the pnUic sdiods of fab native 
dty; and the Bryant and Stratton Business College of Portland, 
Maine. 

ELe descmded original^ from William Bcxdman of Cambci^gc, 
KngianH, who setded in Camlxii^e, Ma^u (in New Ei^and) widi 
his motbfT and stqifather (her seocnd husband). Sbtghea Day, who 
was the first CamlHJk^e pnater, 

WHUam was prclbablty bom in 1614, was freeman in Cambrid^ 
Mass., in 1652, and came from London, England, in the ^bip Jidm, in 
1638. WnUam's iztber was Andrew Bordman ci Cambo^e, ¥Jog- 
land. \l'illiam died ^larch 25, 1685, aged 71 yeais. He was a tailor, 
steward and cook of Har%'aid CoOege. He left dj^ cinldren, five 
sons and three dau^ters; a son, Andrew, succeeded his father as 
oolkge coc^ and mai^ged the office ot steward; another son snc p e e ded 
as ocrfkge cook and steward; thus this position remained m the famity 
one hundred years. A nephew, Andrew, also succeeded to said office 
in 1703. and held it for forty-four years. He was town ckfk of Cam- 
bridge. Mass., for thirty-ooe successive yean, town treasorcr for 
thirty-sLr successive years, from 1701; «jertman for eightim years. 
between 1706 and r732; representative, r7i9 and 1720; and died >Iay 
30, i747< aged 76 yeaF&. 

On his mother's side young Waldo descended from Capt. Jonathan 

107 



Poole, the noted Indian fighter, who was appointed October, 1671, 
quartermaster, and in May, 1674, Cornet of the "Three County 
Troop," and held that office when the war broke out in 1675. 

The monument of Capt. John Parker on Lexington (Mass.) 
Common, is commemorative of another ancestor on his mother's 
side of the family. 

Young Waldo first engaged in the boot and shoe business with his 
father, in his native city, in 1869. In 1871 he came to Boston to engage 
in a professional line, that of patent sohcitor and council in patent 
causes, in which he remained for nearly seven years, when his health 
failed owing to overwork. After four year's rest he entered the news- 
paper business, in which he was a partner, in New York City, in the 
publication of a weekly trade journal devoted to the cotton belt. 

ReHnquishing his interest after more than a year's experience, he 
entered the drug business, and later the confectionery business, in 
which latter he continued for two years; after which, in 1883, he en- 
tered the Dental Department of Harvard University and completing 
the three years' course, graduated from that institution on June 29, 
1886, with the degree of D.M.D. 

It is more than passing interest to note his capacity for faithful 
work and what^he has contributed toward dental society organization. 

He began the practice of dentistry in 1885; was instructor in opera- 
tive dentistry, dental department of Harvard University, 1890- 1900, 
inclusive; Curator of the Dental Museum of same institution from 1891 
to the present time and largely built it up from a small nucleus; 
librarian of the dental department in the same institution, from 1897; 
and still holds the office which he also built up from a handful of 
books to its present proportions of over 2000 volumes. 

He has been editor of the Quinquennial Catalogue of the dental 
department, which he started in 1896, and still holds the office. 

He is a member of the Administrative Board of the dental school 
of Harvard University, having been appointed in 1899, at its organi- 
zation, and still holds the office. 

On December 8, 1887, he was elected a member of the Massachu- 
setts Dental Society; a member of the Executive Committee from 1889 
to 1894, inclusive, and Secretary of said committee for each year; 
second Vice-President, 1894; first Vice-President, 1895; and on June 
3, 1896, was elected thirty-second President. He was one of the 
three officers who reorganized the Society into seven districts in 1895, 
and in drafting its then new Constitution and By-Laws. 

He was temporary President of the South Metropolitan District 
Dental Society at its organization in 1895. During that year he also 
organized the North Metropolitan, -the North Eastern, the Central, 
and South Eastern District Dental Societies. 

He served the South Metropolitan District as Councillor to the 
Massachusetts Dental Society in 1895 and 1896; Councillor ex-officio 
1905-1911 inclusive; and again Councillor in 1911 for term expiring 
in 1916. He also served as Treasurer of same district from April 
1896 to 191 1 inclusive, a period of fifteen years. 



He has been a member of the Executive Committee of the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society from i88g to the present time, and the past 
ten years its Chairman, except during the year 1909-1910. He was 
its editor from 1898-1904. He has served on numerous committees 
each year of the above-named Society. In 1886 he became a member 
of the Harvard Dental Alumni Association and life member in 1895. 
Was elected Secretary and Chairman of the Executive Committee, 
which he held for a period of fifteen years, or until elected President 
in June 1910. 

He was elected an Active member of the Harvard Odontological 
Society in 1887, and its Recording Secretary and Chairman ex-officio 
of the Executive Committee from 1891 to 1896, inclusive; elected 
President 1896, serving two years, and in February 1913, was elected 
to Honorary ^Membership. 

Elected an Active member, 1897, of the Northeastern Dental 
Association, member of the Executive Committee and Chairman, 1898; 
president 1899- 1900; member of Executive Committee and Chairman 
1901, 1902, 1906 and 1909, and a member 1910. He is also a member 
of the Dental Protective Association of the United States, and also 
a member of The National Dental Protective Association (19 12), 
and a member of the board of fifteen trustees. 

In 1899, he joined the American Academy of Dental Science of 
Boston, and has served as Recording Secretary since May, 1909, to 
1914, when he was elected vice-president. 

Elected an Associate Member in (1905) of the New York Institute 
of Stomatology. Member of the World's Columbian Dental Congress, 
Chicago, 111., 1893; member of its finance committee for State of 
Massachusetts. 

Member of committee of fifteen on Organization of the Fourth 
International Dental Congress, St. Louis, Mo., 1904; was chairman of 
the Publication of Proceedings Committee; member of the committee 
of four on nomination of officers; member of the Finance Committee. 

Elected an Active member, August, 1899, at meeting in Niagara 
Falls of the National Dental Association; member of the Necrology 
Committee, 1900-1903 inclusive; member of the Executive Council, 
1902, 1908-1909; Vice-President for the East, 1903-1904; and President 
i904-i905;andSecretary of the Committee on Oral Hygiene 1911-1912; 
member of the Committee on History since July, 1905 ; Vice- Chairman, 
Committee on State and Local Societies, 19 10 to 19 13; Chairman, 
local Committee of Arrangements, meeting at Boston 1908. 

He is a member of the Executive Council of the Federation Dentaire 
Internationale (1909 to i9i4),andwas a member of the Commission 
on Education in August, 1904, when he read a paper before that 
commission. 

Besides his many Dental Society duties, Dr. Boardman was a mem- 
ber of the Boston Art Club, 1902-1906, inclusive, and a member of 
the Boston City Club. 

He is a life member of the Massachusetts Society Sons of the 
American Revolution; a member of its Board of Managers for 

109 



three years; and has been a delegate and attended each convention 
of the National Society at Denver, 1907; Buffalo, 1908; Baltimore, 
1909; Toledo, 1910; Louisville, Ky., 1911; and Boston, 1912; at 
Chicago, i9i3,but not present; member of the Credential Committee, 
191 1 and 1914, and Chairman in 1912. 

Member of the Boston Chapter, Massachusetts Society Sons of 
American Revolution, and a Director, 1910-1911-1912, and elected 
Vice-President, May, 1913 and President, 1914. 

He is a life member of the Bostonian Society; life member of the 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association; likewise of the 
Boston Young Men's Christian Union, and other kindred societies; 
the same of Massachusetts Society of Colonial Wars. He is also a 
member of the Sons of the Revolution. 

Was Honorary President, Lewis and Clark Dental Congress, Port- 
land, Oregon, July, 1905 ; and Honorary Chairman of general committee 
for state of Massachusetts. 

Vice-President Jamestown, Dental Convention, Norfolk, Va., 
Sept., 1907, and chairman on Membership for Massachusetts. 

Member and delegate of Fifth International Dental Congress at 
Berlin, Germany, 1909. 

Member New York Historical Society; National Geographic 
Society; Economic Club of Boston; American Medical Association; 
also of the Boston Athletic Association, and the Harvard Club of 
Boston, and is a member of the Winthrop Lodge B. P. O. Elks., No. 
1078; also the New England Historic-Genealogical Society. 

His hobby in early hfe was the subject of Lepidoptera (insects, 
beetles, etc.) of which he has a fair collection which he has preserved 
since he was fifteen years old. 

Dr. Boardman was appointed a Justice of the Peace for Massachu- 
setts in 1874 by Lieut. Gov. Thomas Talbot, and still holds the com- 
mission; also appointed a Notary Public in 1876, by Gov. Alexander 
H. Rice, and still holds the said commission of office. 

Dr. Boardman has been a frequent contributor to our periodical 
Hterature, and has read many papers before the Massachusetts Dental 
Society, Harvard Odontological Society, American Academy of 
Dental Science, the Dental Society of the State of New York, and the 
Federation Dentaire Internationale, and other organizations. 

He has visited Europe on five different occasions. On June 15, 
1882, he married Miss Margaret Elizabeth Brown of Boston, and 
resides at Winthrop, Mass. 

He is Chairman of Executive Committee for Massachusetts of the 
Panama-Pacific Dental Congress. 

His practice has been confined to Boston, except for a time in 
in Bristol, England, in 1889. 

Burton Lee Thorpe. 




SIDNEY SHERWOOD STOWELL, D.D.S. 

Thirty-third President. 

The subject of this sketch, Sidney Sherwood Stowell, was the son 
of Austin and Hyla Cleopatra (Watkins) Stowell, and born in Peru, 
Massachusetts, July 12, 1858. 

He received his education in the district schools and prepared for 
college alone. In 1879, ^^ entered the ofhce of Dr. Charles L. Ander- 
son, of Springfield, Mass., as a student. In 1882, he entered the 
University of Pennsylvania, and graduated from the dental depart- 
ment, in 1884, with the degree of D.D.S. 

After graduation, he commenced the practice of dentistry in the 
office of Dr. J. Searle Hurlbut of Springfield; a short time later, 
wishing to be independent, he removed to Dalton, Mass., and opened 
an office for himself, where he remained one year and thence removed 
to Pittsfield, where he has since resided, in pursuit of his chosen calling. 

Dr. Stowell was a member of the Connecticut Valley Dental Society; 
of the Ninth International Medical Congress, in Washington, D. "C, 
1887, where he demonstrated the "Stowell Tooth Crown." 

He was a member of the staff of the New York Dental School in 1896; 
and since that date a corresponding member of the New York First 
District Dental Society; a member of the New York Academy of 
Medicine. He is also an Honorary member of the Dental Society of 
the State of New York, and of the New Hampshire Dental Society. 

On June 7, 1894, he was elected a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, and elected thirty-third President, June 2, 1897. 



Dr. Stowell has given much time and study to aeronautics and has 
made many ascensions in balloons from Aero Park, Pittsfield, Mass., 
where he is a member and director of the Pittsfield Aero Club. He 
belongs to the Masonic fraternity and in politics is a Republican. 

As to religion, he is a modern liberal thinker and takes greater inter- 
est in the "here and now" than in the "was" and "perhaps-may-be." 

He has been twice married, the second time at Brooklyn, N. Y., 
December 23, 1910, to Miss Blanche Edith Hulse, of Pittsfield, Mass. 
His last engagement and marriage was very unique. While on a 
balloon trip with Miss Hulse in 1909, he proposed marriage when above 
the clouds and was accepted. In his elation he was prompted to 
perform a feat fraught with great risk. He deflated the balloon at 
5000 feet altitude and parachuted to a landing. This adventurous 
act has never been repeated by any American balloonist. Soon 
after this ascension he married, as above stated. In 1909, in company 
with Willian Van Sleet, Dr. Stowell made the longest balloon trip 
ever made from Pittsfield, landing at Eastport, Maine. Soon after 
he gave up the sport. 

Since writing this biography Dr. Stowell's death has occurred. He 
died May 10, 1914, in Pittsfield, while riding on a trolley car near 
Pontoosuc Lake. While leaning from the car, he was struck by a pole 
carrying the overhead system, fracturing his skull. 



112 




HARRY SIMMONS DRAPER, D.D.S. 

Thirty-fourth President. 

Harry Simmons Draper, the son of Francis and Sarah EHzabeth 
(Simmons) Draper, was born in North Cambridge, Mass., July 15, 
1863. 

The subject of this sketch received his early education in the 
Rice primary, grammar, and English high schools of Boston, grad- 
uating in 1879, receiving the Franklin medal. 

In 1880, he began the study of dentistry in the ofi&ce of the late 
R. L. Robbins, D.D.S. , former treasurer of the Boston Dental College; 
later he entered said institution, and graduated in 1884 with the degree 
of D.D.S. 

He is a member of various organizations, among others that of the 
Boston Society of Dental Improvement and for many years its Secre- 
tary-Treasurer; an Active fellow of the American Academy of Dental 
Sciences 

He was elected, on June 24, 1885, an Active member of the Massachu- 
setts Dental Society, and its President on June i, 1898. 

A member of the Northeastern Dental Association, and an ex- 
President of the Boston Dental College Alumni Association, and 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees of the Boston Dental College 
from 1895-1903. He was also Clinical Instructor in the same institu- 
tion, 1885 and 1886. 

Dr. Draper was married at AUston, Mass., to Miss Fenetta Moore, 
daughter of the late General Hobart Moore, on the second day of 
January, 1893. 

113 




GEORGE ALBERT LOWE. 

Thirty-fifth President. 

The subject of this sketch, George Albert Lowe, was born in Rock- 
port, Mass., October 5, 1851. 

Has early education was obtained in the public schools of Rock- 
port, after which he studied dentistry in Gloucester, Mass., with 
Herbert E. Dennett, D.D.S., and John P. Dennett, D.D.S.; then 
practiced for a while in Gloucester, afterward removing to Rockport, 
where he has continued with a lucrative practice to the present day 
in his chosen profession. 

Dr. Lowe is a member of the Northeastern Dental Association, 
and became a junior member of the Massachusetts Dental Society on 
June 9, 1887. On June 7, 1899, ^^ was chosen President of the Society, 
the highest honor within her gift. 

Dr. Lowe was a member of the Board of Selectmen of Rockport in 
1881 and 1882; of the School Committee from 1892 to 1895; of the 
first Board of Water Commissioners for the town of Rockport in 1893, 
and was one of the Water Commissioners till 1904. 

He is a member of Ashler Lodge of Masons and Granite Lodge of 
Odd Fellows; of the latter he is a Past Grand, and is Financial Sec- 
retary at the present time. 

Dr. Lowe was married to Emma Sophia Manning, on September 
28, 1881, at Rockport, Mass. They have two children, George Albert, 
Jr., and Robert Manning Lowe. 

114 




JOHN FRANCIS DOWSLEY, D.C.D. 

Thirty-sixth President. 

John Francis Dowsley was born in St. Johns, Newfoundland, 
February 13, 1853. His parents were Warren FeHx Dowsley and 
Margaret Beates, who were married October 21, 1844, at St. Johns. 

It appears that the subject of this sketch was baptized as John 
Francis Valentine Dowsley, on February 13, 1853, his sponsors 
being George Dowsley and Dowsley. 

Young Dowsley's education was obtained in St. Johns before his 
migration to the United States. His father, Felix, met a tragic 
death, being "cast away" on an island off the northern coast of New- 
foundland, and ice prevented any one from reaching them (there 
were several in the party), they died from cold and starvation. Mr. 
Dowsley kept a diary of his sufferings up to the moment of his death, 
the same being in the possession of His Grace the Archbishop of St. 
Johns. 

The subject of this sketch was formerly a telegrapher, at one time 
located in the old Tremont House, Boston, and while thus engaged, 
took up the study of dentistry and prepared himself to enter the Boston 
Dental College in 1882, remaining one year, when he transferred to 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 1883, and graduated 
from the latter institution, in the class of 1884, with the degree of 
D.C.D. 

He then established himself in Boston, where he has since continued 
in the practice of his profession. 



Dr. Dowsleyisa member of the Northeastern Dental Association; 
of the American Academy of Dental Science; and on July lo, 1888, 
was elected to Active membership in the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
and on June 6, 1900, was elected its thirty-sixth President, serving 
one year. 

In the year 1887, when the new dental law for the State of Massa- 
chusetts was enacted, he received an appointment as one of the 
five members of the Board of Registration in Dentistry, which he 
has continuously held, down to the present time, having been its 
chairman since 1896. 

He is a member also, of the National Dental Association and by 
virtue of his membership on the Board of Registration, is a member 
of the National Association of Dental Examiners, having been presi- 
dent of the latter. He has served on various committees of nearly 
all the several societies mentioned. 

He was a member of the World's Columbian Dental Congress, at 
Chicago, 111., 1893, and of the Fourth International Dental Congress, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1904, and of the Fifth, at Berlin, Germany, 1909. 

He is a trustee of the Forsyth Dental Infirmary, the building for 
which is now in process of construction. 

Dr. Dowsley has been twice married. On February 4, 1885, at 
Boston, he married Miss Mary A. Cloney, who died in said city, 
November 7, 1899, leaving several children, among others being 
Katherine Sydney born July 3, 1886, and Margaret Bates, born Decem- 
ber 27, 1891, and one son. 

On February 25, 191 1, Dr. Dowsley married for the second time, on 
this occasion to Miss Mary Isabelle Ford of Boston, who died on 
December 7, 1912. 



116 




FREDERICK SEARS FAXON, D.D.S., D.M.D. 

Thirty-seventh President. 

Frederick Sears Faxon was the son of William and Clarissa (Sears) 
Faxon, and born in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), Mass., 
October 5, 1854. 

The subject of this sketch received his early education in the public 
schools of North Bridgewater (now Brockton) and upon leaving the 
high school about the year 1868, began a business career as a dry 
goods clerk for three years, and spending the next few years as book- 
keeper in an express office; as well as in a branch office in Boston of 
the Manhattan Life Insurance Co., and later assistant bookkeeper 
in the West Boston Savings Bank, until its failure. He then became 
an engraver at Gurney Bros, jewelry store in Brockton, on gold and 
silver, and later, after a voyage at sea, which satisfied his boyish 
desire in that direction, young Faxon decided that future responsibil- 
ities demanded that he settle his mind permanently upon something 
for his life work, and accordingly chose dentistry. 

Entering the Boston Dental College in 1879, he pursued his studies 
till the year 1881, when he graduated with the degree of D.D.S., and 
then received the appointment on the board of clinical instructors, 
serving till 1885. 

In 1909, the Tufts College Dental School conferred upon him the 
degree of D.M.D. 

Dr. Faxon is a member of numerous societies, among them is the 
Massachusetts Dental Society, being elected to Active Membership 

117 



December 8, 1887; of which he was the thirty-seventh President, 
elected June 5, 1901. 

He is an Active fellow of the American Academy of Dental Science, 
being admitted in 1908; and also a member of the Northeastern 
Dental Association; of the Boston and Tufts College Dental Alumni 
Association. He is a member and an ex-President of the Brockton 
Dental Society; and a member of the National Mouth Hygiene 
Association. 

Apart from dentistry, he is a member of the Paul Revere Lodge of 
Masons; a member of the City Government of Brockton in 1896 and 
1897. 

Dr. Faxon is a trustee of the Brockton City Hospital and member 
of the executive committee for the past five years. He is a cl;iarter 
member of the First Unitarian Church of North Bridgewater, and is 
now a member of the standing committee. 

On the famous "Yellow day," so called, September 6, 1881, Dr. 
Faxon was united in marriage to Mary Althea Hall, at Brockton, and 
the fruit of this union shows a boy and girl now living. 



118 




ANDREW JOSEPH FLANAGAN, D.D.S. 

Thirty-eighth President. 

The subject of this sketch, Andrew Joseph Flanagan, was born in 
Springfield, Mass., July lo, 1866, and the son of the late Terrence, 
and the late Mary (McQuade) Flanagan. 

Young Flanagan attended the Barrows grammar school, and the 
Springfield high school, class of 1885. After finishing his studies 
at the high school, he spent several years in the office of the late 
James E. O'Brien, D.D.S., of Springfield, as a dental student. He then 
matriculated at the Philadelphia Dental College, and graduated in 
the class of 1889 with the degree of D.D.S. During his senior year 
at the dental college, he also pursued a special medical course at the 
Medico-Chirurgical College of the same city. 

Dr. Flanagan commenced the practice of dentistry in April, 1889, 
in Springfield, in the Evans House block and remained there four 
months, after which he removed to 352 Main Street, but is now located 
at 317. 

He was appointed dental surgeon to the Mercy Hospital at its 
beginning, and still holds the position. 

Dr. Flanagan is a member of many dental and scientific societies, 
among which may be mentioned the following: New York Institute 
of Stomatology; National Dental Association; American Medical 
Association; Northeastern Dental Association; and the old Connecti- 
cut Valley Dental Society. On June 7, 1894, he was elected a member 

119 



of the Massachusetts Dental Society, and elected its thirty-eighth 
President, June 4, 1902. 

He is an Honorary Member of the Vermont Dental Society; of 
the Central Dental Association of New Jersey; and of the Connecticut 
State Dental Association. 

He is also a member of the Horace Wells Dental Club and Hartford 
Dental Club, both of Hartford, Conn. A past president of the New 
England Alumni Association of the Philadelphia Dental College. 
He was President also of the Northeastern Dental Association in 1901, 
and has held several chairmanships in the sections of the National 
Association. 

He has also been a generous contributor to the good work of these 
various societies by serving on various committees and presenting 
many clinics and essays relating to dentistry. 

He has been a contributor to the columns of many dental journals, 
and to several of the local papers. 

The local dental society invited Dr. Flanagan to prepare a chapter 
on dentistry, which appears in the history of Hampden County, 
published in 1904. 

Dr. Flanagan was a member of the Fourth International Dental 
Congress, St. Louis, Mo., in 1904, and served on the various commit- 
tees on finance. He is a member and Vice-President of the Connec- 
ticut Valley Historical Society of Springfield. 

Notwithstanding the many dental organizations in which he holds 
membership, he has found time to give of his ability for the cause of 
civic pride. 

He is a member of the Nayasset Club; of the Board of Trade and 
has served on several committees; a director of the Springfield Im- 
provement Association; a member of the Massachusetts Civic League; 
of the St. Michaels Cathedral parish. 

He was the first district deputy of the Knights of Columbus in 
Massachusetts. One of the organizers of the Home City Council 
of Springfield, Chicopee and Holyoke Councils. During his time 
as district deputy, eleven councils were organized and instituted 
by him in Massachusetts. He is a member of the Home City Council 
K. of C. at the present time. 

He was appointed on May i, 191 1, for the term of five years, by 
Mayor Edward H. Lothrop of Springfield, a Park Commissioner; 
and he helped to direct the good work of the six hundred odd acres of 
park and playground area of Springfield. 

Commencing in 1894 and to the present time, his contributions to 
dental literature have been voluminous. No less than twenty-nine 
essays and talks given before nine state societies and fifteen local 
organizations ; in addition he has given clinics to the number of seven- 
teen or more during these years. 

The foregoing sketch shows an active, energetic, forceful and inde- 
pendent member of the dental profession. 




WILLIAM PARKER COOKE, D.M.D. 

Thirty-ninth President. 

William Parker Cooke, was the son of George Lamb and Emma 
Augusta (Clarke) Cooke, 'and borne in Milford, Mass., March 15, 

His early education having been obtained in the public schools of 
his native town and after graduating from the high school, he took up 
the study of dentistry under his father, and then entered the Dental 
Department of Harvard University, where he took the degree of 
D.M.D. in 1881. 

His is a life member of the Harvard Dental Alumni Association 
and was president of the same in 1 890-1 891. In 1887, he received 
an appointment as instructor in Operative Dentistry, in Harvard 
University, serving till 1890, when he received the appointment of 
lecturer in Crown and Bridgework, holding said position until 1892, 
when he was promoted to instructor in same till 1895; thence to in- 
structor in crown and bridgework and metallurgy till 1900, when he 
was further promoted to assistant professor of Mechanical Dentistry, 
in which capacity he served till 1907, and in that year he received the 
appointment to a full professorship of Prosthetic Dentistry, which he 
now holds. 

He is also a member of the Administrative Board of the Dental 
School, receiving the appointment in 1899. He has been Anniversary 
Orator (1895) and President of the Harvard Odontological Society, 



iSqo; President of the American Academy of Dental Science, 1897- 
1899. 

On June 24, 1885, he was elected a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, and chosen the thirty-ninth President, June 3, 1903. 
He was formerly a member of the New England Dental Society and 
assistant Secretary of the same; is a member of the National Dental 
Association, and of th€ Dental Protective Association of the United 
States, and the National Dental Protective Association. He has 
served on many committees of these various societies, and been an 
energetic and resourceful man. 

He has also contributed papers to various organizations. In 
politics he is a staunch Republican. In religion an ardent Methodist, 
in the church of which he has commanding influence. 

In the new building of the Harvard Dental School, he was of the 
greatest assistance to the dean in the planning of the same and 
providing its equipment, and in the raising of funds for furthering 
the cause, and made possible the completed plant in dentistry. 

Dr. Cooke was married at Milford, Mass., on November 10, 1892, 
to Caroline Lucia Wicks, the fruit of this union being two sons and a 
daughter. 

Dr. Cooke has practiced dentistry in Boston since 1881, having 
been associated with the late Dr. Luther D. Shepard up to the time 
of the latter's demise. 

The ancestors of the subject of this sketch date back several cen- 
turies ; viz : 

Major Aaron Cooke, born in 1610; his eldest son, Capt. Aaron 
Cooke, born 1640; his second son, Lieut. Westwood Cooke, born 1670; 
his eldest son. Ensign Cooke, born 1694; his youngest son, Lieut. 
Noah Cooke, born 1730; his fifth son, Ensign Timothy Cooke, born 
1756 and twice married; his fourth son, by first wife, was Reuben 
Cooke, born February 6, 1795; his third son, George Lamb Cooke, 
born October 2, 1823, and the father of the subject of this sketch. 

Albert Andrew Cooke, the ninth President of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, was the eldest brother to George Lamb Cooke. 



122 




EDGAR OSGOOD KINSMAN, D.D.S., D.M.D. 

Fortieth President. 



Edgar Osgood Kinsman was the son of John Osgood and Margaret 
(Hawes) Kinsman, and born in Cambridge, Mass., April 6, 1856. 

Young Kinsman's early education was obtained in the pubUc 
schools of his native city, graduating from the high school in 1874. 

Entering the Boston Dental College the following year, he was able 
to graduate in 1877, with the college degree of D.D.S. , and was elected 
secretary of his class. During the year 1905, the Tufts College 
Dental School conferred upon him its degree of D.M.D. 

It was in October, 1874, that young Edgar entered the office of Dr. 
Robert R. Andrews and remained with him seven years, three as a 
student and four years as his assistant, and it was here that he was 
able to perfect himself in his chosen profession, that he established 
in Brattle Square, Cambridge, during the year 1881, where he remained 
for twenty-eight years in one office, removing to 5 Boylston Street, 
in 1909, where he has since successfully continued. 

Dr. Kinsman is a member of many dental societies as well as of 
fraternities; among others, he is a member of the Boston and Tufts 
College Dental Alumni Association, having been its Secretary three 
years, and President in 1895. 

He was elected a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society on 
December 12, 1878, and was its Secretary for the long period of sixteen 
years, when, on June i, 1904, he was elected the fortieth President. 
He is also a member of the Northeastern Dental Association, having 

123 



been a member of the old New Eng^bnd Dental Soddly, and its 
Secrdtarv for seiren yeaxs, or imtil its naeigar into tbe &st named 
a^odatnra, of ^sMdi lattES* lie has seired as Secr^aiy, l^Tmg beoi 
ciloseii It :rr~~"~'z rr ir: rS35, and dedbed to die Fieadency in 1913. 
He ji : ^ li jZ : - : :ir 1 1 7 ~ beidiqi in flie Vexmont and New TTamp - 

It"^:.- i_:iz; :j:t fi: :5;: :J::: :Jif 3 .-: r. I^eatal Cdl^e ap- 

r.:?:^::- zz ±^- 1 r: ;:::77::.:/ _7 :: :jif :ii:i7 :: ::^ m:i:?ii ydxk the 

m '.-L- impoitant 

::;■ ::: frjretaiy- 



icKiEcr li 
latter ;ri 
in 191CL 



124 




JOHN JOSEPH FRANCIS McLAUGHLIN, D.D.S. 

Forty-first President. 

John Joseph Francis McLaughlin was a son of Patrick J. and 
Honorah (Kittredge) McLaughUn, and born in CHnton, Mass., 
May 8, 1871. His preliminary education was obtained in the public 
schools of his native town, and graduating from its high school ; after- 
wards he studied at Holy Cross College, at Worcester, Mass. 

He then entered the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, in 
Philadelphia, and took the full course, graduating with the class of 
1895, of which he was its treasurer for three years. 

On April 8, 1895, Dr. McLaughlin was elected to membership in 
the Massachusetts Dental Society, and June 7, 1905, the Society 
elected him its forty-first President. 

He is a member of the C. N. Pierce Dental Society; Knights of 
Columbus; and the B. P. O. Elks, No. 487, having occupied all the 
chairs of the latter organization from Chaplain to Exalted Ruler. 

Dr. McLaughlin retired from the practice of dentistry in 1907, 
and is now engaged with his father-in-law, Mr. Edward Rowan, 
founder of the "House of Decigold," in the manufacture and sale 
of Rowan's Extra Pliable Decimal Filling Gold. 

Dr. McLaughlin married Miss Evelyn Rowan, dt St. Augustine's 
Church, New York City, October 21, 1903. She is a graduate of 
the Academy of the Sacred Heart, Manhattanvillc, New York City, 
and was the secretary of its alumnae at the time of her marriage. 

125 




MURDOCH CAMPBELL SMITH, A.M., D.D.S., M.D., D.M.D. 

Forty-second President. 

Murdoch Campbell Smith was the son of Neil (Neal ?) McMullen 
and Elizabeth Bezanson (Bezanton ?) Smith, and born in Corn- 
walHs, Kings County, Nova Scotia, February lo, 1856, being the 
youngest of eleven children, all of whom reached adult life. 

His ancestors were among the earliest settlers of Nova Scotia; 
his father's people, leaving Scotland about 1755 or 1760, came to 
New York where they lived for a short time and then drifted to Boston, 
where two children were born. 

They left Scotland during stormy times for America and did not 
find this country a bed of roses, for, soon after, the outbreak of the 
Revolution finds them living in Halifax; somewhat later his father 
took a government grant of land situated on Oak Island in Chester 
Basin, and on this grant were indications which induced excavation 
for the money of Capt. Kidd, the same having been conducted at 
frequent intervals to the present time. 

His mother's people settled with the German colony in Lunenburg 
County, soon after the settlement of Halifax; they also saw stirring 
times with the Indians, French and American's, and their time was 
well occupied for many years. Her people were descended from the 
French Huguenots, who were driven out of France during the religious 
wars and compelled to seek asylum on the American continent. 

Young Murdoch's early education was obtained in the public 
schools of his native country, the Acadia University (Wolfville, Nova 

126 



Scotia), after which he entered the Howard University (Washington, 
D. C). and graduated with the degree of D.D.S., in 1887, and the 
following year received the degree of M.D. from the same institution. 

Years afterward, desiring to perfect his dental education, he entered 
the dental department of Harvard University and received the 
degree of D.M.D. in 1898. 

In June. 1910, his alma mater, Acadia University, honored him by 
conferring the honorary- degree of A.M. 

Young Smith early started from home to seek his fortune in the 
Golden West, crossing the great plains in 1877, the beginning of his 
wanderings; reaching CaUfornia in the autumn of that year, at which 
time occurred what was known as the dry-year-panic, he saw the 
State of California in a depressed condition. For the eight succeeding 
years we find him employed at the Pacific Rolling Mills in Potrero, 
Cal., where he made special study of iron and steel, finally becoming 
an expert workman, when, unfortunately, he was injured and unable 
to follow his usual occupation. During those years he explored much 
of the countn,' lying north of California to British Columbia. After 
this injur}-, he traveled extensively throughout the Western and South- 
ern States and Territories, and later returned to his home inNova Scotia. 

In 1884, he again crossed the continent to California for the winter 
months; thence in the spring, he traveled north to British Columbia, 
and procured a position on the building of the Esquimault Dr\' Dock, 
after which he returned east during the autumn of 1885, for the pur- 
pose of completing his education for a mining engineer, but finally 
decided upon a medical and dental profession, and that dentistry 
should be his chosen calling. 

He sought- and procured a position in a dental office in Lynn, Mass., 
and finally became its proprietor. It will thus be seen that young Smith 
was well equipped practically when he began the study of dentistry. 

Dr. Smith has been an extensive traveller through Canada and 
the United States; and has visited Europe and Africa on numerous 
occasions. 

Dr. Smith is a member of numerous clubs, and other organizations. 
He was Clinical Lecturer in the New Orleans College of Dentistry in 
1 900. He is a life member of the Han.ard Dental Alumni Association ; 
in 1900-1901, was president of the New England Branch Alumni of 
Acadia University; a member of the Dental Protective Association 
of the United States; member of the Harvard Odontological Society; 
the Northeastern Dental Association; the American Academy of 
Dental Science; and on June 8, 1893, he was elected to membership in 
the Massachusetts Dental Society, and on June 6, 1906, the Society 
elected him its forty-second President. He is a councillor of the 
Metropolitan District of the Massachusetts Dental Society; member 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and of the National Dental 
Association; was a member of the local committee of arrangements 
when the Association met in Boston in 1908. Member of theFourth 
International Dental Congress at St. Louis, Mo., 1904; of the Fifth 
International Dental Congress at Berlin, Germany, 1909; and of the 

127 



Sixteenth International Medical Congress at Budapest, Hungary, 1909. 
Is a member of the Association Stomatologique Internationale, and 
of the Lynn Dental and the Essex Dental Societies, and the Lynn 
Harvard Club. 

Formerly a member of the Canadian Medical Association, and 
Canadian Dental Association. 

A member of the British Medical Association in Toronto, 1906; 
also a member of the French Congress of Stomatology at Paris, 191 1; 
member of the American Association of AppHed Science; of the 
National Geographic Society; Boston Scientific Society; of the 
Intercolonial Club of Boston, and of the Park Club of Lynn, and an 
associate member of the Boston Medical Library Association. 

Dr. Smith is a member of several fraternities, etc., among others 
are the Knights Templars, Olivette Commandery, Lynn; Aleppo 
Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S. of Boston; Improved Order of Red Men. 

It will be seen that Dr. Smith is a great society and club man. 

Dr. Smith is a lover of forest, farm and fishing life. He is the 
owner of a large apple orchard farm in Nova Scotia, where he is wont 
to go; and being a lover of the rod and line, he is never so contented 
as when seated in the bow of a canoe, with an Indian guide in the 
stern, paddling beyond civilization upon lake or stream. 



128 




GEORGE EMMONS SAVAGE 

Forty-third President 

George Emmons Savage the son of Isaac Rice and Clara (Ball) 
Savage, was born in Rutland, Mass., January 5, 1851. 

His early education was received in the public schools of Paxton, 
Mass., where he went on leaving Rutland. 

1868 found him in Worcester, where he learned the engraving and 
die-sinking trade; afterwards he engaged in the boot and shoe busi- 
ness as a cutter. 

He began the study of dentistry with Dr. Sumner C. Whitney of 
Worcester in 1881, and commenced the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion in 1884. 

Dr. Savage is a member of the Northeastern Dental Association, 
and on June 7, 1894, was elected a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, becoming its forty- third President by election on 
June 5, 1907. 

He is a member of the National Dental Association, having been 
elected in 1899. In 1908, he was chairman of the section on Clinics. 

Dr. Savage was a delegate to the Fourth International Dental 
Congress at St. Louis, Mo., 1904; and to the Fifth International 
Dental Congress at Berlin, Germany, in 1909; and was a member of 
the American Committee to forward the work of the congress. 

He has twice visited Europe (1909 and 191 1), visiting Great Britain 
and the Continent. 

He was been thrice married: June, 1870, he married Miss Winifred 

129 



K. Morgan, who died in 1878; in April, 1897, he married Mrs. Minnie 
M. Porter- Ward. By his first wife he was blessed with two sons, 
Frederick Lawson Savage, since deceased, and George Arthur Savage, 
who was a speciaHst in porcelain in dentistry and deceased April 5, 
1914. 

Dr. Savage's activities have been mostly coh,fined to dental societies 
and all which applies to his chosen profession, and he has been a 
faithful worker in them all officially and on committees. 



130 




NED ALBERT STANLEY, D.M.D. 

Forty-fourth President. 

Ned Albert Stanley, the son of Albert Eastman and Ada (McCarron) 
Stanley, was born in Leicester, Vermont, October 17, 1861. 

The subject of this sketch received his early education in the public 
schools of his native town; later coming to Boston, he entered the Har- 
vard University department of dentistry, and graduated in the year 
1884 -vs-ith the dental degree of D.M.D. 

He later became a life member of the Harvard Dental Alumni 
Association, and its president in 1905. 

Dr. Stanley is a social and society worker, holding membership in 
many organizations, several of which are herewith recorded, viz: 

The Harvard Odontological Society, its anniversary orator in 1899 
and president in 1904 and 1905, two years; a member of the American 
Academy of Dental Science; Associate member of the New York 
Institute of Stomatology; member of the Northeastern Dental Asso- 
ciation and president of the latter in 1909. 

It was on October 28, 1890, that he was elected an Active member 
of the Massachusetts Dental Society, and on June 3, 1908, he was 
elected as the forty-fourth President. 

He was for five years a councillor from the South Eastern District, 
and is a member of the Dental Hygiene Council of Massachusetts. 

Dr. Stanley was appointed by Harvard University as Clinical 
Instructor in Operative Dentistry in 1906, which position he now 
holds. 

On June 30, 1892, at New Bedford, Mass., Dr. Stanley was united 
in marriage to Grace S. Lawton, who died in October, 1904, and on 
April 27, 1908, at Boston, Mass., he married, for second wife, Caroline 
Russell, the fruit of this union being a girl and boy. 

131 




CORNELIUS SEARLE HURLBUT, D.D.S. 

Forty-fifth President. 

Cornelius Searle Hurlbut, the subject of this sketch, was a son of 
Cornelius Searle and Mary (Allis) Hurlbut, born in Springfield, Mass., 
June I, 1871. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of his native 
city, where he graduated from its high school in the class of 1890. 

Young Cornelius afterward spent one year in Amherst College, 
taking a special scientific course. Thus prepared, he then took up 
the subject of dentistry in the office of his father (who came to Spring- 
field in 1852), in 1 89 1 and 1892, and in the latter year (1892) he entered 
the University of Pennsylvania from whence he was graduated in the 
class of 1895, receiving the degree of D.D.S. 

Dr. Hurlbut is a member of the State Society known as the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society, being elected in the year 1896, and forty- 
fifth President on June 9, 1909. 

He is an Associate Member of the New York Institute of Stoma- 
tology. 

At Springfield, Mass., October 4, 1899, Dr. Hurlbut was married 
to Miss Marion Adams of the same city. 



132 




CARL RICHARD LINDSTROM, D.D.S. 

Forty-sixth President. 

Carl Richard Lindstrom was the son of Carl Edward and Katrina 
(Linberg) Lindstrom, and born in Stockholm, Sweden, April 20, 
1869. 

The subject of this sketch received his early education in the public 
schools of his native city of Stockholm, and in a private preparatory 
school; after which he prepared for the study of dentistry under the 
tutelage of Dr. E. W. Vidfond of Stockholm as preceptor. 

Being of an ambitious turn of mind, he left his home in Sweden 
and came to the United States in 1888, and soon after entered the 
Philadelphia Dental College, graduating in the class of 1891 with its 
degree of D.D.S. 

Dr. Lindstrom first began the practice of his chosen caUing in 
Worcester, Mass., being associated with Dr. S. W. Cooke, but he 
soon after located in Lynn, where he remained until 1904, when he 
located permanently in the City of Boston. 

He holds membership in many organizations, viz: June 7, 1894, 
he was elected an Active member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
and on June 14, 1910, the society chose him as its forty-sixth President. 
He is an Active member of the American Academy of Dental 
Science; of the Lynn Dental Society; of the Northeastern Dental 
Association; of the National Dental Association, and the American 
Medical Association. 

He also holds membershij) in the Twentieth Century Club of 

^Z2> 



Boston; of the Economic Club of Boston; and the National Geographic 
Society, of Washington, D. C; and was formerly a member of the 
Tedesco Golf Club of Swampscott. 

Dr. Lindstrom is also a member of the Framingham Country Club. 
He was the founder of the Lynn Dental Dispensary, the first institu- 
tion of the kind in the State of Massachusetts to be established in 
connection with social settlement work, and has for years been vitally 
interested in educational and civic problems. 

Dr. Lindstrom, when a resident of Swampscott, some years ago, 
was a member of the Swampscott School Committee. 

He is now particularly interested in scientific farming, having 
recently purchased a considerable number of acres in Southwestern 
Massachusetts. 

In 1898, Dr. Lindstrom was married to Miss Cornelia Marsh, of 
Winchester, Mass., daughter of the builder of the Simimit Railroad 
of Mt. Washington, N. H. They have one son as the fruit of this . 
union. 

Dr. Lindstrom was one of the first dental appointees on the staflF 
of a hospital in New England to lecture on Oral Hygiene (1900), 
and has continued since. 



134 




EUGENE HANES SMITH, D.M.D. 

Forty-seventh President. 

Eugene Hanes Smith, the son of Asa and Mary (Cosby) Smith, 
was born in Old town, Maine, October 23, 1853. 

Young Smith received his early education in the Allen Brothers 
English and Classical School at West Newton, Mass., and later he be- 
gan his professional studies with the late Dr. Samuel J. Shaw of 
Marlboro, Mass., ultimately entering the Harvard Dental School 
in 1871 ; remaining till 1872, when he withdrew; again entering in 1873, 
and graduating in 1874 with the degree of D.M.D. 

On October 12, 1876, Dr. Smith married Carrie Maria Shaw, of 
Marlboro, Mass., the daughter of his old preceptor, the late Dr. 
Samuel J. Shaw. Later he became associated with the late Dr. Luther 
D. Shepard, and after several years severed his connection and 
opened an ofl&ce for himself at his present location on Dartmouth 
Street, Boston. 

In 1 88 1, Harvard University appointed him to the instructorship 
in Operative Dentistry, which continued till 1884, when he resigned. 
After six years severance from the dental school, he again received 
an appointment, this time in 1890, as instructor in Orthodontia, 
serving until 1895, when he was appointed to full professorship in 
Mechanical Dentistry and Orthodontia, retaining the same until 1907, 
when the title was changed to Professor of Orthodontia and Pros- 
thetic Dentistry. In 1908, the title was again changed to Professor 

135 



of Clinical Dentistry and Orthodontia, which appointment he still 
holds. 

In 1895, soon after the death of the beloved Dean Chandler, who 
had served as dean of the Harvard Dental School for twenty-one 
years, Dr. Smith was appointed to the vacancy, which position he 
has held to the present time, and is also, by virtue of being Dean, 
Chairman of the Administrative Board of said school, such board 
having been created in 1899, it being the executive body of the depart- 
ment. 

Under his management as Dean, the school has grown in quantity 
and quality, and largely to his efforts is due the fact that the school 
has a fine, new, commodious and well-equipped building, erected 
three years ago on a lot adjoining and connected with the magnificent 
group of marble buildings of the Harvard Medical School. 

Dr. Smith has led a busy life, with a large and lucrative practice. 
He has found time to become closely acquainted and associated with 
the school, as the above records fully show, and from time to time 
he has contributed valuable papers before dental societies and to 
the journals. 

December 14, 1876, he was elected an Active member of the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society, and on May 11, 191 1, the society elected 
him the forty-seventh President. 

Dr. Smith was anniversary orator, in 1884, of the Harvard Odon to- 
logical Society, and president of said Society in 1881 and 1882. For 
two years, during 1893 and 1894, he was president of the American 
Academy of Dental Science. He is also a member of the Dental 
Protective Association of the United States; of the National Dental 
Association; and a member of the local committee of arrangements 
when the latter association met in Boston in 1908. Dr. Smith is an 
Associate Member of the New York Institute of Stomatology. He 
has served as vice-president and president of the University Associa- 
tion of Dental Faculties; also a member of the Boston Society for. 
Dental Improvement. 

Dr. Smith is a prominent club member, being connected with the 
Boston Art, University, Harvard Union, and Oakley Country Club. 
He is also a member of the Boston Medical Library Association; also 
of the New York University Club, and the Harvard Club of Boston. 



136 




MICHAEL WILLIAM FLYNN, D.D.S. 

Forty-eighth President. 

Michael William Flynn, the subject of this sketch, was the son of 
Edward and Margaret (Daily) Flynn, and born in Monson, Mass., 
on the twenty-seventh day of November, 1865. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of his native 
town. In' the year 1888, he entered the Philadelphia Dental College 
and graduated 'from that institution in the year 1890 with the degree 
of D.D.S. 

Dr. Flynn established himself in his chosen calling in the year 1890, 
in the village of Thorndike, a part of the town of Palmer, where he 
practiced his profession for two years ; thence removing to the City of 
Pittsfield, where for the past twenty-one years he has enjoyed a large 
and lucrative practice, and where he has the confidence of the public 
at large and the staunch backing of his fellow members in the dental 
profession. 

In 1895, Dr. Flynn was elected a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, and on May 2, 191 2, was elected as its forty-eighth 
President. 

On the nineteenth day of June, 1895, he was married to Miss Helen 
T. Buckley. By this union there have been bom five children, three 
boys and two girls. 

Dr. Flynn is a charter member of Kabida Council, Knights of 
Columbus, a Grand Knight for two years, and a member of the 
board of trustees for several years. 

He is also a member of the Park Club and president of Park Whist 
Club, and has participated in many whist matches during the past 
fifteen years, representing the club in nearly all the matches played in 
New England. Dr. Flynn is also a member of the Pittsfield Lodge 
of Elks and a member of the St. Charles Church. 

137 




AURELIUS FINCH WHEELER 

Forty-ninth President. 

The subject of this sketch was born in North Fen ton, New York, 
on the eleventh day of March, 1873, and is the second son of Lyman 
A. and Mary (Rogers) Wheeler. 

Young Wheeler's early education was obtained at the Shaker 
Community, in Hancock, Mass., where his mother taught school for 
four years, and later the grammar and high schools of Hammonton, 
New Jersey, and still later in the Connecticut Literary Institution at 
Sufl&eld, Conn., where he received military as well as academic train- 
ing. 

He entered the Boston Dental College in the autumn of 1897. 
Leaving school upon the call of the government for troops to serve 
in the war with Spain, he enlisted, May 3, 1898, as musician in Com- 
pany C, Second Massachusetts Infantry, United States Volunteers, 
for a period of two years or during the war. 

Young Wheeler served with his regiment in Cuba, taking part in 
the battles of El Caney and San Juan Hill, the seige and surrender of 
Santiago. 

Returning with the regiment to this country and while on furlough 
(the war being practically over), he entered the University of Penn- 
sylvania in October, 1898, obtaining a leave of absence of ten days 
from the University in which to return home for muster-out with his 
regiment on November 3, 1898. He again returned to his studies 

, 138 



and was graduated with his class on Wednesday, June 13, 1900, with 
the degree of D.D.S. 

On August 15, 1901, Dr. Wheeler was elected an Active member of 
the Massachusetts Dental Society and on May 8, 1913, at Boston, 
Mass., was elected its forty-ninth president to preside over its fiftieth 
anniversary to be held at Boston in May, 19 14. 

Dr. Wheeler was married on the third day of May, 1904, to Miss 
Florence Muzzy, of Spencer, Mass. He is a member of the First 
Baptist Church of Worcester, Mass., being Chairman of its Music 
Committee, and he is also a member of Col. E. R. Shumway Camp 
No. 28, U. S. W. v., being a Past Commander, with the rank of Colonel. 

He is a member of the Delta Sigma Delta Dental Fraternity, 
having made Epsilon Chapter while in the University of Pennsylvania 
and upon graduation passed into the Supreme Chapter of that organ- 
ization. He is a member of the Worcester Motor-Boat Club, being 
its Vice-Commodore, and is a member of the Worcester Continentals, 
holding the office of "Chief Musician." 



139 



PROMINENT MEMBERS 



141 




ENOS NICKERSON ATKINS 

Enos Nickerson Atkins was the son of Asa and Rachel (Tuttle) 
Atkins, and born in Provincetown, Mass., January i, 1835. 

His early education was probably obtained in the public schools 
of his native town, although his descendants are not positive. 

As far as they have been able to learn, he received his dental educa- 
tion in North Bridgewater, (now Brockton), Mass., but with whom is 
not known. Neither is it known when and where he began the prac- 
tice of his profession, although he was in active practice until the time 
of his death, which occurred at Provincetown, Mass., March 10, 
1897, leaving a widow and four children, two sons and two daughters. 

On March 5, 1866, Dr. Atkins became an active member of the 
Massachusetts Dental Society, and for many years continued to 
take an active part in its affairs, but when his membership ceased is 
problematical, since the records do not show. 

In politics Dr. Atkins was a staunch Democrat and in religion a 
strong Universalist. He was a member of the Royal Arcanum for 
many years previous to his demise. 

At Barnstable, Mass., on August 8, 1866, Dr. Atkins was married 
to Temperance N. Bassett, and by this union was blessed with four 
children above mentioned. 



143 




HENRY FITCH BISHOP, D.D.S. 

Henry Fitch Bishop was born in Lisbon, Conn., April 3, 1820, 
the son of Reuben and Abigail (Adams) Bishop of Canterbury, 
Conn., daughter of Capt. John Adams, who served in the Revolution- 
ary War. His early education was received in his native town and 
later, in 1854, he received from the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery the degree of D.D.S. 

In 1868, he was made a member of the board of trustees of the old 
Boston Dental College, serving until 1874. He also was Adjunct 
Professor of Dental Art and Mechanism in the same institution for 
1868 and 1869. 

He is best considered in "A Half-Hour's Autobiography" written 
by himself in the eighty-eighth year of his age, and which is herewith 
reproduced, as follows: 

"It is my conviction that I ought to be up and doing, and that I 
have already lost a full half-hour by too long a nap, which has ex- 
hausted half the time I had sacredly set aside to perform a certain 
piece of work. Which work was to be a complete autobiography 
from my birth to the present time! I am well aware that it will be 
a busy half hour's work. But what of that? Nobody else in the 
world will do it for me — and what a great pity to have such a long 
life go out in darkness! You see, Mark Twain has me at a great 
disadvantage. He had a bright talented daughter, Susan, who was 
never going to let her father suffer any sort of neglect; and so she 
wrote him up, and now he is rehashing the dish. Do you suppose we 

144 



should ever have heard of Twain if Susan had not perpetuated his 
memory? 

"But my half hour is slipping by, and the preservation of my mem- 
ory must be accomplished if possible. So here is to my work in good 
earnest. 

"In a quiet little town of Connecticut called Lisbon, on the third 
day of April, 1820, there was born a little freeman, and that was I. 
As I say, I was born a freeman on 'Freeman's Meeting Day,' while 
the State election was still taking place in all the towns. My parents 
were congratulated on having the homeliest baby in the whole town, as 
I have been told. As to my blood — the Henry Adams who emi- 
grated to this country and settled in Braintree, now Quincy, Mass., 
the great, great grandfather of John Adams, the second President of 
the United States, was also the great, great, great, great grandfather 
of my humble self on the maternal side. 

"As to my personal life, I had many and varied experiences, but not 
wishing to weary you with these I will at once tell you what, if any- 
thing, I have done to deserve an autobiography: 

I remember when a small boy asking my mother what dentists 
did, for I didn't know, and she told me 'they worked at repairing 
teeth.' Later my father used to tell me about Dr. Wooffendale, 
an Irish doctor who came to this country just about one hundred 
years ago, and whom he employed. Dr. Wooffendale took calves' 
teeth, and filing them down to the proper shape and size, pivoted them 
on the roots of natural teeth for his patients. My father accom- 
pUshed the same work himself when that of Wooffendale had failed. 
You see how easy it is to acquire dental knowledge. Be that as it 
may, father had four sons who became dentists, of who'm I was one. 

"When I first commenced my dental study European countries 
seemed to be in advance of America in dental science. What few 
text-books there were, were in French or German, but the practice 
was mostly in the hands of ignorant barbers, and it became a serious 
duty to rescue the profession and make it a science for skilled artists 
and surgeons. 

"Americans soon took the lead and made the practice what it is 
to-day, really an American profession. Not a large, enlightened 
city in the world but has American dentists now practicing in its 
midst. Some of these cities have more than a score who hold almost 
all the practice worth gleaning. America was the first country to 
establish a dental college well equipped to teach the science, and now 
has about thirty of these institutions scattered among the largest 
cities. 

"Permit us to boast a little of what we (as dentists) have accomplished 
for all mankind in the discovery and introduction of anaesthetics. 
In 1846, or just before Horace Wells, a dentist of Hartford, Conn., 
discovered what was known then as 'laughing gas,' or oxide chloride. 
When properly administered to a patient it would prevent suffering 
under severe surgical operations. In 1846, Dr. Morton, a dentist 
practicing in Boston, learned from Dr. Jackson, a chemical professor 

145 



in Boston, that ether would prevent suffering, and through Dr. 
Morton's perseverance ether came to stay as a valuable anaesthetic 
in surgery. In Boston hospitals that year, Dr. Morton let his dis- 
covery be known as Letheon. He made his formula known among 
his fellow dentists, of whom I was one (for a consideration, of course), 
and it was compounded of ether and calomel, which latter was no use 
except as a blind to protect the simple sulphuric ether from being 
too easily discovered and thus hurting his financial interests in the 
sale of Letheon. 

"I was the first dentist to give the Letheon in Worcester, where I 
was then in practice. Its success was marvelous. I visited Spring- 
field, Hartford, New Haven, and New York, and was the first to 
introduce the anaesthetic in those several cities to my fellow-practi- 
tioners in their ofi&ces. In Hartford, I met Dr. Wells, who knew 
as much about it as I did. In New Haven, Dr. Weit was taught 
and in New York the Burdells and Dr. T. B. Gunning were instructed, 
and in each case successful and interesting experiments were made for 
the first time with this anaesthetic in those cities. The year following 
(viz., 1874) Dr. Simpson, of Glasgow, discovered chloroform, which 
nearly set aside the use of ether for quite a period. But finally ether 
asserted itself as safer than chloroform. I might also state that the 
dentists have the credit of inventing dental splints, so necessary in 
sustaining the under jaw when broken, till nature has time to reunite 
the fractures, as in the case of Secretary Seward, who was the victim 
of an assassin's attack upon his life. The surgeons had to call in the 
dentists to help his recovery. So again in cleft palates and other 
deformities and irregularities arising from premature or retarded 
dentition. They all properly belong to the dental practice as well 
as the aesthetic art in helping to make the human face as beautiful 
and as perfect as conditions will allow. 

'T fear I may weary my friends with such a long account of my 
professional experience, and exhaust more than thirty minutes in 
their relation. But my friends must remember I was in practice 
about fifty years in this country and in Germany. It has been my 
good fortune to have the personal acquaintance of almost all the 
American dentists who went abroad to practice in the large cities. 
When I left my Worcester practice to practice in Hanover, Germany, 
I went equipped with the best possible introductions to Americans 
there, from those I left at home who were equally prominent here — 
such as Dr. Keep and the Tuckers of Boston, Townsend and True- 
man of Philadelphia, Harris and others of Baltimore. This gave me 
a useful field abroad to help form a European Society of American 
dentists, which I did, and was honored with one of its offices. This 
good fortune gave me an intimate personal acquaintance with Evans 
of Paris, Abbot and Miller of Berlin, Dr. Jenkins of Dresden, and 
others who welcomed me into their homes and hearts. 

'T shall be pardoned if I speak of Dr. Evans of Paris, as I am about 
to do, for I very much admire him for just what he did. When he 
had accumulated millions, and had become renowned for his services 
to the Emperor and Empress, and widely known throughout the 

146 



world for his efforts in ambulance service in war, his chief interest 
became to do some lasting good for America before he died. He had 
conceived the idea of establishing a home for American girls coming 
to Paris, which would protect them and give them superior advan- 
tages while they pursued their studies in music and art. This 
project failed through some controversy in regard to his property, 
after his death, but his other idea, that of an American Museum, is 
now finally to be realized in Philadelphia. 

"The last call I made upon Dr. Evans I found him in his office receiv- 
ing his patients and friends and still at work for them. He greeted me 
as coming just at the right time, as his patient was just about leaving, 
and he wanted me to sit with him till another expected caller should 
arrive, and meanwhile he would partake of his simple lunch which 
Mrs. Evans had put up for him in a basket to carry to his office. I 
had often dined at his palatial tab e at his residence, and as an honored 
guest at his right hand, but I never had a more enjoyable time — 
though I ate nothing, he gave me good things for digestion. Bless 
his memory, I loved him. 

"In Germany I found myself astonishing the German idea of rever- 
ence to royalty. At Hanover, Prince Albrecht had a palatial resi- 
dence, and the young princes, his children, were committed to me for 
the care of their teeth. When I was sent for to come to the palace 
the little boys were assembled with their mother, the princess, a 
very accomplished lady, who speaks English fluently. How shocked 
some of the ofl&cers and attendants must have been to see me take 
up the youngest son in my arms and give him a hearty smack of a kiss 
in his royal mother's presence! It violated all rules. But the human 
appeal of the sweet little child looking confidently up into my face 
made me forget all else, and I think the gracious lady forgave me, for 
she only smiled. When I told the incident at home to the German 
household I realized the enormity of my offence in the eyes of the 
simple German ladies with whom I was living. After my return 
from Germany I did not resume practice, but enjoyed the leisure 
of a quiet life, with some geneological work which I wished to put on 
record, and frequent travel. 

"My eightieth birthday found me with a pleasant party of friends 
in Mexico. My eighty-eighth birthday is close at hand — but as I 
said at the start my autobiograj)hy was shortened by a nap, and the 
clock warns me that my time is up. Perhaps my readers will say 
with Sancho Panza: 'Blessed is the man who invented sleep.'" 

The above account of a portion of his life fully confirms the fact 
that Dr. Bishop was a genial gentleman of the old school. 

Dr. Bishop, in 1867, was an active fellow of the American Academy 
of Dental Science, and in 1885 was made an associate fellow and so 
continued to the close of his life. 

Dr. Bishop's residence in Worcester covered a period of thirty 
years of practice, from whence he repaired to Hanover, Germany and 
for three years practice was Court Dentist, as has been so fully 
told above in his own words. 

147 



Dr. Bishop was the author of a "History of Lisbon, Conn., from 
Early Colonial Days." 

Following the death of his wife he returned to the United States 
to live, and since has made his home alternately with his daughters, 
Mrs. James V. Chalmers, and Mrs. James Whitman of New York 
City; the former being the wife of Rev. James V. Chalmers, the 
Vicar of the Church of the Holy Trinity of New York City. 

Dr. Bishop was elected an active member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society on May i6, 1864, but the records fail to show for how 
long a period his membership continued. He died in New York 
City on January 14, 1910, in his ninety-first year. 




EDMUND BLAKE 

The subject of this sketch, Edmund Blake, was the son of Stephen, 
Jr., and Rachel (Capen) Blake, and born in Stoughton, Mass., on the 
twenty-fourth day of July, 1819. 

His early education being obtained in the public schools of his 
native town, he then taught school in the early years of his life. 

Determining to fit himself for the profession of dentistry he studied 
with Dr. S. S. Shocking, and afterwards entered upon the practice of 
his profession. This was long prior to the advent of dental colleges, 
and when a dental education had to be obtained in some office. 

Dr. Blake was an ardent abolitionist and quite active in politics 
at the beginning of the Civil War. He joined the Massachusetts 
Dental Society on May 2, 1864, soon after its inception and remained 
and active member for some years, but the records do not indicate 
when his membership ceased. 

Dr. Blake was married to Caroline S. Fay, and his death occurred, 
at Stoughton on the twenty-first day of March, 1875, leaving a widow, 
one son arid three daughters. 



149 




WILLARD LEWIS BOWDOIN, D.D.S. 

Willard Lewis Bowdoin, the subject of this sketch, was born in 
Belchertown, Mass., August 17, 1820, being a sou of John and Hannah 
(Lewis) Bowdoin. 

In 1869, Dr. Bowdoin became a trustee of the Boston Dental College, 
and in 1870 he graduated from said institution with the degree of 
D.D.S. ; in 1879, ^^ was appointed Clinical Lecturer and in 1880, 
Professor of' Clinical Dentistry in the same institution. 

Dr. Bowdoin became an active member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society in the year 1865, but the records are dumb on the 
length of his membership. He also became an active fellow of the 
American Academy of Dental Science in 1867. 

He was married on June 4, 1867, to Lucy H. Proctor at Danvers, 
(noW Peabody), Mass., who survived him, he having passed the 
"great divide" at Salem, Mass., on. April 27, 1870, suddenly and 
unexpectedly. 

Dr. Bx)wdoin was possessed of sterling professional and social 
qualities. 



150 




CHARLES ALBERT BRACKETT, D.M.D. 



The subject of this sketch, Charles Albert Brackett, was a son of 
Joseph and Lydia Lucretia (Hunt) Brackett, (descendant of Captain 
Richard Brackett of Braintree, Mass., 1629), and born in Lempster, 
N. H., January 2, 1850. 

Young Charles early education was received in the public schools 
and under the tutelage of his parents. 

Later, in the twenty-first year of his age, he left the farm of his 
parents and entered the Harvard Dental School and graduated in the 
class of 1873, with the degree of D.M.D. ; from this time onward we 
find him climbing the ladder to a lucrative practice and positions of 
influence and honor. 

Dr. Brackett has practiced dentistry at Newport since 1873, and 
been continuously a teacher since 1874 in the Harvard Dental School, 
having passed several grades of offices to a full Professorship of Dental 
Pathology since 1883. He is also a member of the Administrative 
Board of the school since the board's organization in 1899, andhas 
held many offices in dental and civic life, among others the following: 

President of the Rhode Island Board of Registration in Dentistry, 
1888 to 1897; 

Chairman committee for drafting the new city charter for the 
City of Newport, 1906; 

Member of the Representative Council, and corporation of the 
Newport Hospital. He is also a trustee of the Peoples' Free Public 
Library; 

151 



A member of the Newport Dental Society; delegate to the seventh 
and ninth International Medical Congress; the former at London, 
England, 1881; and the latter at Washington, D.C., 1887; member 
of the World's Columbian Dental Congress, Chicago, 1893; member 
of the Rhode Island and New Hampshire Dental Societies; of the 
Northeastern Dental Association; Associate Member of the New 
York Institute of Stomatology; the New York Odontological Society; 
and the National Dental Association. 

President American Academy of Dental Science, 1891-1893; 
president Connecticut Valley Dental Society, 1879, having joined 
the latter Society, June 17, 1873, as an active member; president 
New England Dental Society, 1899, and a member of the Merrimack 
Valley Dental Association 1878-1882, when it and the two previous 
societies later became the Northeastern Dental Association. 

On December 11, 1873, he was elected a Corresponding member of 
the Massachusetts Dental Society, and is at the present time. 

Some time director First National Bank and Aquidneck National 
Bank; Coddington Savings Bank; Newport Trust Company and 
other corporations. 

He was formerly president of the Rhode Island Harvard Club. 

On February 3, 1886, Dr. Brackett was united in marriage to Mary 
Irish Spencer, of Newport, R. I. 



152 




BENJAMIN STORER CODMAN, M.D. 

Benjamin Storer Codman was a son of Thomas and Mary (Wild) 
Codman, widow of Aaron Draper, and born in Boston, Mass., Febru- 
anv' 24, 1816, where he spent his lifetime. 

On his mother's side, he was a descendant of John Alden and Pris- 
cilla ^Slullins of the "Mayflower." He was also of the same ancestry 'as 
President John Adams, and of John Eliot, the Apostle to the Indians. 

He began his dental career about 1838, as assistant to his brother, 
Willard W. Codman, who was at that time in the laboratory depart- 
ment of Drs. Joshua and EUsha G. Tucker. After graduating from 
the^ Medical School of Harvard University in 1845, he entered upon 
the general practice of dentistry. 

After the year 185 1, Dr. Codman bought from Joseph Burnett, 
an apothecary, his stock of dental supplies, and securing as partner 
Mr. A. M. Shurtleff, of Boston, opened a dental depot on Tremont 
Street, under the firm name of Codman & Shurtleff, where he remained 
to the date of his decease. The business is still carried on under the 
firm name, by Mr. Shurtleff, who is now quite aged, in the manufact- 
ture of and dealers in dental and surgical instruments. 

Dr. Codman married in 1851, Miss Elizabeth Loring, of Boston, 
who died in 1876. They had no children. 

Dr. Codman became a member of the Massachusetts Dental 
Society on May 2, 1864, but the records are not clear as to his length 
of membership. 

There have been five dentists in the Codman family; the brother 
of deceased, Willard W. Codman (born in Boston in 181 1 and died of 
angina pectoris, Dec. 14, 1886); the son of the latter, Dr. Henry J. 
Codman, who followed dentistry, but since deceased; his student, a 
nephew. Dr. John Thomas Codman; and the latter's son, Benjamin 
H. Codman, D.M.D. 

Dr. Codman died in Boston, Mass., February 22, 1894. 

153 




GEORGE LAMB COOKE, D.D.S. 



George Lamb Cooke was the fifth child and third son of Reuben 
and Sarah Smith (Woodward) Cooke, born in Hadley, Mass., October 
2, 1823. 

He was descended from Major Aaron Cooke in the seventh genera- 
tion; Major Aaron having been born in 16 10; his eldest son, Capt. 
Aaron Cooke, was born in 1640, and his second son, who was Lieut. 
Westwood Cooke, borri in 1670, whose eldest son. Ensign Noah, was 
born in 1694; who in turn was Lieut. Noah Cooke, youngest son born 
in 1730, and his fifth son. Ensign Timothy, was born 1757, and married 
twice, and by first wife was born his fourth son, Reuben Cooke, on 
February 6, 1795, the father of the subject of this sketch. His eldest 
son, Hon. Albert Andrew Cooke, brother of Dr. George Lamb Cooke, 
was the eighth President of the Massachusetts Dental Society in 187 1, 
serving for a year. 

The subject of this biography received his early education in the 
public schools of his native town. 

For nearly half a century he was a resident of Milford, Mass., where 
his insight into the art of dentistry was obtained in the ofl&ce of his 
brother, above named, in 185 1 and 1852. He later attended the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, receiving in 1853 the honorary 
degree of D.D.S. 

For some years he practiced in the office of his brother, later be- 
coming his partner. After the lapse of about twenty years he with- 
drew and set up an independent office. Here he built up a large and 

154 



lucrative practice. He sought the advancement of dentistry, and 
became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society on May 
i6, 1864; his membership ceased in 1892. 

Dr. Cooke was a devoted member and pillar in the Methodist 
Church in Milford, and one of its best officers, having been super- 
intendent of its Sunday School for forty-six years. He also took a 
great interest in municipal circles as in professional life, and actively 
promoted all good movements which seemed to him conducive to 
the elevation of society. 

Dr. Cooke was married September 19, 1854, at North Brookfield, 
Mass., to Miss Emeline Augusta Clarke, who was the daughter of 
Timothy P. and Emeline (Moulton) Clarke, born in Spencer, Novem- 
ber 19, 1830. 

Dr. Cooke died at his summer residence. Cottage City, Mass., 
August 3, 1900, leaving a widow, one son, William Parker Cooke, 
D.M.D., well known in professional circles in Boston; and two 
daughters. Miss Sarah Isabella and Miss Mary Theresa Cooke, both 
of Milford. 



155 




JOHN BACON COOLIDGE, M.D., D.D.S. 

John Bacon Coolidge, the subject of this sketch was born in Natick, 
Mass., August 24, 1820, his parents being John and Hannah (Badger) 
Coolidge. 

His early education was obtained by dint of hard work and knocks; 
his parents were his moral mentors and at the age of fourteen years 
he announced his intention of learning the trade of a shoemaker and 
in the place of his nativity, it being one of the principal shoe centers of 
Massachusetts, he did this, and attended evening school in West 
Natick and Framingham. 

He also studied medicine and dentistry in Natick, and when Presi- 
dent Lincoln called for volunteer dentists he walked to South Framing- 
ham, joined a band of one hundred doctors on their way to Washington 
in 1863, and was stationed at a temporary hospital near the^ White 
House. 

After returning from the war, he opened an office on Winter Street, 
Boston, and later opened offices elsewhere. Meantime he had taken 
a degree at the New York Medical College, and his dental degree of 
D.D.S. from the Boston Dental College in 1870. 

He was the first to use the nitrous oxide gas as an anaesthetic, 
giving an exhibition of this at his Winter Street office as far back as 
1864. 

With Dr. Isaac J. Wetherbee, he started the organization of the 
Boston Dental College in 1867 the legislature, granting a charter in 

156 



i868. The college was, in 1899, merged with Tufts College Medical 
School as the Tufts College Medical and Dental Schools. 

Dr. CooUdge was a member of the Board of Trustees and Secretary 
of the same for fifteen years, and was adjunct Professor of Dental 
Art and Mechanism from 1869 to 1872, also member of the faculty for 
twenty-seven years. 

Dr. Coolidge was a prolific inventor, and many of the instruments 
that are seen on the modern dentists' workbench are the product of 
his mind. One of them is the clock mechanism attached to vul- 
canizers of the present day for the timing and shutting off of gas 
automatically w^hen \ailcanization is full. The original working 
model of such was deposited in the museum of Harvard Dental School 
some few years ago. 

Dr. Coolidge's death occurred on Saturday, February 3, 191 2, at 
the age of 91 years, in Natick, Mass. 

He was widely known as the oldest practicing dentist in the United 
States, being hale and active to the last. 

He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Ella M. Wilson, of Natick, Mass. 



157 




JAMES MONROE DALY, D.D.S. 

James Monroe Daly was the son of James W. and Sarah E. (Owen) 
Daly, and born in Salisbury, Vermont, December 23, 1829; and 
moved to Middlebury, Vt., with his parents when a boy and later 
to Bristol, where his early education was obtained; he then came to 
Boston when he was sixteen years of age. 

He studied dentistry with Dr. Sabine on Franklin Street, and began 
the practice of dentistry in Boston in 1845, ^-nd at the age of twenty- 
five he went into bu^ness on Harvard Street. Later in life he took 
the college course of dental education in the Boston Dental College, 
soon after its organization, and graduated in 1870, with the degree 
of D.D.S. 

Dr. Daly became a trustee of the Boston Dental College in 1869, 
and continued till 1900, when that institution was merged with Tufts 
College Medical School. 

On April 4, 1864, Dr. Daly joined the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
but the records do not disclose the date when he severed his connection 
with the organization. 

Dr. Daly was a partner of the late Enoch Carter Rolfe, M.D. — 
one of the founders of the Massachusetts Dental Society — from 
1859 to 1875. 

In 1852, Dr. Daly married Amelia S. Churchill, daughter of Thomas 
and Sally (Sprague) Churchill, who died in i860. In 1864, he married 
Elizabeth Bispham, daughter of Eleazer J. and Mary E. Tolman 
Bispham, of Dorchester. Two children were born of the first marriage, 

158 



one died in infancy and the other, Dr. James Harlow Daly, a pro- 
fessor in the Boston Dental College before its merger with Tufts 
College. One son by the second marriage, Dr. M. Ordway Daly, 
who was associated with his father in dentistry up to the time of 
his death, which occurred on April 6, 19 13. 

Although he had been faithfully at his profession for many years, 
yet Dr. Daly had found time for other things, and had been an active 
worker in the Third Congregational Church of Dorchester, and of 
the jMen's Club connected with it. He was also a member of the 
Royal Arcanum, Knights of Honor, Middlesex Club, and Norfolk 
Club, and also of the Vermont Association. 

He was in fairly good health, and went to his office in the city every 
day, where he practiced his profession with his son before named. 

About seven months preceding his death he met with an accident 
which compelled him to relinquish the practice of dentistry after 
more than fifty years service. 

Dr. Daly died at his home on Adams Street, Dorchester Lower 
Mills, Mass., on the evening of December 27, 191 2, being survived 
bv a widow and two sons above mentioned. 



159 




ALBION MANLEY DUDLEY, D.D.S. 

Albion Manley Dudley, son of Albion Smith (born at Kingfield, 
Me., August 6, 1816) and Lydia French (Manley) Dudley, (born at 
Putney, Vt., and died at Dedham, Mass., November 19, 1849) was 
said to have been born in Boston, Mass., in August 1845, although 
not found recorded on the city records. 

Young Dudley received his early education in the public schools of 
his native city, and in Provincetown, Mass., and in the Seminary at 
Tilton, N. H., and Wilbraham, Mass., and later he studied at the' 
Harvard University Medical School and the Boston University. 

Leaving school while at Wilbraham, in June 1862, he enlisted as 
a private in Co. D, of the thirty-third Massachusetts Infantry Regi- 
ment. He had been refused muster, but being determined to go and 
go he did, but was invalided home in 1863. On his recovery he 
joined the fifty-eighth Massachusetts Regiment and served until 
after the battle of Petersburg. As a soldier he distinguished himself, 
winning a lieutenancy and being brevetted .captain for bravery. 

After the war closed he entered upon the study of dentistry, and in 
1869 was graduated from the Boston Dental College, who, with Dr. E. 
G.Barton, of Reading, Mass., constituted the entire class which gradu- 
ated the first year from that institution. In 1870 and 1871 he served 
as Professor of Institutes of Dentistry and Dental Therapeutics. 

Dr. Dudley took rank with the leading dentists of the City of Salem, 
where he located and was a prominent figure for many years in various 

160 i 



dental societies, having served as secretary for eighteen years and as 
president of the Merrimack Valley Dental Association, also of the 
New England Dental Society. On December 13, 1870, Dr. Dudley 
became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, and a vice- 
president in 1875 and 1876; and ceased his membership in 1893. 
He was formerly Corresponding Secretary of the American Dental 
Association, and was an Honorary Member of the Vermont, New 
Hampshire, and the American Dental Society of Europe. In 1882, 
he was a member of the International Medical Congress, which met 
in London, England, and was secretary of the dental section of the 
International Medical Congress held at Washington, D. C, in 1867. 
Dr. Dudley was identified with many charitable and financial 
organizations. He was married in 1871 to Miss Jennie L. Butler, 
whose mother was a lineal descendent of General Isaac Putnam; 
she died in 1875. Dr. Dudley ''passed on" at his home in Salem, 
Mass., March 7, 1899. 



161 




NATHANIEL ALBERT GLOVER 

Nathaniel Albert Glover was born in Bristol, England, in 1826. 
■His early education was obtained in the regular schools of Bristol and 
at Oxford College, England, and he also took a course in medicine 
in the Harvard Medical School in 1853-1855. 

Dr. Glover, pre\dous to coming to the United States, was a druggist 
or chemist in Bristol, England, and migrated to America in the year 
1849. AfterhavingHvedinCanada, 1850 and 1851, he settled in Boston, 
Mass., w^here he began the work of his profession of dentistry and 
practiced in Boston since i860. 

Dr. Glover joined the Massachusetts Dental Society on October i, 
1866, but the records do not mention when his membership ceased. 

He was a genial gentleman, sympathetic, honest, conscientious and 
much esteemed by his patients. 

He was married to Miss Louisa Southerland Stayner, of Hahfax, 
N. S., in Canada, July 23, 1851. One son, WiUiam Liddiatt Glover, 
spent a year (1876-1877) in the Harvard Dental School, and has 
since then been in the banking business in Boston. 

Dr. Glover died in Boston from Bright's disease, September i, 1877, 
lea^dng a widow and several children. He was a kind husband and 
father and a worthy member of the dental profession. 




NATHANIEL WARE HA WES, D.M.D. 

Nathaniel Ware Hawes was born in Wrentham, Mass., August 
II, 1838, and drew his first and last breath in the same house. He^was 
a son of Benjamin and EUzabeth J. (Holmes) Hawes. 

On reaching manhood, with a view to adopting the profession of 
dentistr>'^ he placed himself, in 1862, under the instruction of his 
uncle, Dr. George E. Hawes, of New York City, with whom he con- 
tinued for two or three years. He proved an assiduous pupil, and one 
who was acquainted with him at the time speaks of his having, even 
in those days, executed mechanical work of pronounced excellence. 
In 1865, he began practice in Wrentham and also at Foxborough. A 
few years later he opened an office in Boston, where his technical 
proficiency, together with his personal character, was destined to 
make him one of the best known of its dental fraternity. 

In 1 869- 1 870, he held the appointment of demonstrator of operative 
dentistry' in Harvard University, and the following year was promoted 
to assistant professor of operative dentistry in the same institution, 
retaining the office till the year 1879, when the honorary degree of 
D.M.D. was conferred upon him. 

He was a member of the American Academy of Dental Science 
from 1882 to 1893, when he in November of that year resigned. He 
was one of the earliest active members of the Boston Society for 
Dental Improvement. 

On March 6, 1865, he became a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, remaining a member until 1884. 

163 



He was a liberal contributor of valuable papers to the literature 
of the dental profession. He was a man of genial manners and gen- 
erous impulses. His unbounded hospitality was best known by the 
delightful outings that were given by him at his beautiful house in 
Wrentham, where he died on April i, 1900. He was twice married and 
left a widow, formerly Miss Ida B. Sturtevant of that town, to whom 
he was married November 16, 1881. His first wife, Miss Caroline 
C. Fisher, of the same town, he married January 18, 1865. 



164 




OSCAR HOWE 

Oscar Howe, son of Adonigal and Lucretia (Howe) Howe, was born 
in Princeton, Mass., July 2, 1830. 

He was educated in the public schools of his native town and later 
took up the study of dentistry with Dr. Levi Fosket of Winchendon 
and Dr. Seth Miller of Worcester; and practiced in his native town 
for over fifty years, being one of Princeton's noted men and identified 
with one of the oldest families in that town. 

In May, 1854, in Princeton, Dr. Howe married Sarah Amanda 
Adams, daughter of Nathan and Mary (Braman) Adams. Father of 
three children: Walter Sumner, who died in Princeton, February 12, 
1890; Ellsworth Eugene, a resident of Grafton (Fisherville), and Fred 
Clayton, of New Haven, Conn. 

Dr. Howe was descended from Abraham How, a nephew of John 
How who came to this country and was in Watertown in 1657, was 
one of the proprietors of Marlboro in 1660. Coming to Worcester 
County he purchased one hundred acres of land at Princeton, on 
what was then called "Watertown Farms," and was one of the found- 
ers of the town of Princeton, being of the seventh generation. 

Dr. Howe made regular visits to Westminster and Hubbardston 
for thirty years. He had done more dentistry and made more friends 
for years than any other dentist in Worcester County. 

Dr. Howe always made his home in his native town, spending his 
winters, in later years, at the homes of his sons in New Haven, Conn., 
and Fisherville, Mass., and the summer at Princeton. 

165 



In politics he was a staunch RepubKcan, and had served as chairman 
of the Republican Town Committee for a time. He was a musician, 
and held the position of organist at the Congregational Church in 
Princeton for sixteen consecutive years. His wife died in June 1907, 
and he died at the home of his son at Fisherville (Grafton), December 
29, 1911, at the ripe age of eighty-one years, five months and twenty- 
seven days, leaving two sons, Ellsworth E. Howe, president of the 
Grafton Co-operative Bank at Fisherville, Mass., and Fred Howe, of 
New Haven, Conn., the latter manager of the Bradstreet Agency 
at New Haven. 

Dr; Howe was elected a member of the Massachusetts Dental 
Society, September 4, 1865, but the records are meager as to the time 
whep he ceased hjs membership. 



166 




AMBROSE LAWRENCE, D.D.S. 

Ambrose Lawrence was the son of Alvarus and Eliza (Farnsworth) 
Lawrence both of DubHn, New Hampshire, and said to have been born 
in Boscawen, New Hampshire, May 2, 1816, but the records of said 
town do not record his birth. He learned the trade of machinist at 
Peterborough, in that state, and subsequently went to Lowell, Mass., 
to take the position of overseer in the Suffolk Mills. Remaining there 
but a short time, in 1837 he went to Georgia and studied dentistry 
with Dr. Smith, a relative of his wife. Returning north in 1839, 
he opened dental rooms in Lowell, where he practiced for many years. 
During his residence here he took an active part in politics, having 
at different periods been elected to the Common Council; twice to 
the Board of Aldermen; to the School Board, and was chosen mayor 
of the city in 1855, as the candidate of the American party. 

He was prominently connected with the Masons and Odd Fellows. 
About 1870, Dr. Lawrence removed to Boston, where he gave most 
of his attention to the manufacture of Lawrence's Amalgam, so 
familiar to all dentists. He became lecturer in the Boston Dental 
College, in which he was at one time a professor of Institutes of 
Dentistry, 1868 and 1869; he was also trustee of same institution in 
1868, and Professor of Mechanical Dentistry and Metallurgy, 1874 to 
approximately 1877. He was graduated from the Pennsylvania 
College of Dental Surgery in the class of 1866, and belonged to several 
dental societies. 

On June 11, 1864, he became a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, resigning on May 21, 1868. 

167 



He was president of the Merrimack Valley Dental Association, 
being elected its first president in 1863, and so continued for six years 
or imtil 1869. 

Dr. Lawrence was twice married, his widow and one son survived 
him, Dr. George W. Lawrence, formerly a dentist of Lowell, Mass., 
and afterward of Chicago, 111. 

The subject of this sketch died in Boston, Mass., of apoplexy, 
April 23, 1893. 



168 




DWIGHT WELLS LEACH 



The subject of this sketch was the son of Warren and Hannah 
(Reynolds) Leach, and born in North Leverett, Mass., December 24, 

His early education having been obtained in the schools of his 
native town, he later took the course at Pierce Academy in Middle- 
boro, Mass. 

Subsequently he studied dentistry with Dr. Charles Leach, of 
Middleboro, Mass., and entered upon the practice of dentistry at 
Abington in the autumn of 1858. 

The following year, 1859, he'located at Randolph, Mass., and several 
years after opened a branch office in Boston, where he was perma- 
nently settled in practice at the time of his death, though retaining 
his residence at Rartidolph. 

Dr. Leach was a member and some time treasurer of the Old Colony 
Dental Association, and was also an early member of the Massachu- 
setts Dental Society, having been elected February 6, 1865. The re- 
cords, however, are silent as to the time his membership ceased. 

He was also a member of the Order of Masons and belonged to the 
lodge in Randolph, as well as to that at Abington. 

Dr. Leach was married to Elizabeth Sprague Ring at Kingston, 
Mass., on May 19, 1861. His death occurred at South Braintree, 
Mass., on September 2, 1895, due to an accident while attempting 
to board a moving train at that station. A widow and two grown 
daughters survived him. Dr. Leach was highly respected for his 
professional attainments and genial disposition. 

169 




HENRY MARTIN MILLER 



Henry Martin Miller was a son of Asa and Laura (Rogers) Miller, 
and born in Tatham (West Springfield), Mass., June lo, 1826. 

His early education having been obtained in the public schools 
of those days, he turned his attention to teaching and for seven winters 
taught school in that neighborhood; afterwards, in 1849, he took up 
the study of dentistry with Dr. Isaac Woolworth, at Westfield. 

On September 2, 1851, he commenced practice at Plymouth, Mass., 
but returned to Westfield in October, 1856, and remained there ever 
since, except during the year 1866. The art of carving teeth was 
learned from Dr. George H. White of Springfield. For twenty years 
he had his office in the Comer Block, afterwards moving to Masonic 
and Morgan Blocks respectively. He finally located at his home, 
15 State Street. 

He has ever been an ethical, conscientious and unselfish practitioner. 
An active working member of the old Connecticut Valley Dental 
Society, serving in many subordinate offices, and its president in 
1873 and 1874. 

On January 8, 1866, Dr. Miller was elected an active member of 
the Massachusetts Dental Society, but the records are meager as to 
when said membership ceased, but probably near the close of his life. 

Dr. Miller was married, first, in May i860, to Miss Emily Leavins 
Holmes of Springfield, Mass., who died on November 26, 1866. 
Again, for the second time, he was married to Miss Sylvia Clark of 
Westfield, Mass., July 27, 1868, who survived him, and their five 

170 



children, Mr. H. S. Miller of Westfield and Mrs. C. E. Spencer of 
Hartford, Conn., children of the first marriage; and Edward C. 
Miller of New York City, Gilbert W. Miller of New Haven, Conn., 
and Martin P. Miller of Denver, Colorado, children of the second 
marriage. 

Dr. Miller was held in the highest esteem as a sincere Christian 
gentleman, courteous and kind to rich and poor alike; interested in 
all educational and philanthropic matters and held offices of trust 
along these lines, and an esteemed trustee of banks, etc., until his 
decease; and there was no practictioner of the early years for whom 
kindHer feeUngs and respect were ever cherished. 

Dr. Miller's death occurred at Westfield, Mass., April 9, 1902, 
a widow and children surviving. A son, above noted, H. S. Miller, 
is treasurer and manager of the Bryant Box Company of Westfield. 



171 




NEWTON MORGAN, D.D.S. 



Newton Morgan is a descendent of Miles Morgan, one of the 
early settlers of Springfield, and was born in West Springfield, October 
25, 1840, being the son of Nathan and Fannie Cooley. Nathan was 
a descendent of Miles Morgan, Colonist. 

His early life was the common one of the farmer's boy of that 
period. His education was acquired in the common and select 
schools and, at the age of seventeen years, terminated in a few years 
at what was then known as the "new" Academy at Westfield, Mass. 

Thinking for some time of choosing "mechanics" as an avocation, 
the winter of 1858 was spent with Milton Bradley, who had then 
a draughting school in that city. The plans, however, did not mature 
satisfactorily and later he decided to enter the ranks of dentistry. 

The matriculation for the study of this calling was on January i, 
1 86 1, in the office of a well-known dentist in Connecticut, and later 
for a time in the ofi&ce of Dr. C. S. Hurlbut, Sr., of Springfield. After 
a few years of practice he entered the Philadelphia Dental College 
and graduated with the class of 1869. Since that time he has had a 
continuous practice at Springfield. On June 5, 1866, he became a 
member of the Connecticut Valley Dental Society, and from that time 
to the consohdation into the Northeastern Dental Association he 
has been an interested worker in the offices of chairman of the Execu- 
tive Committee, treasurer and president of the first-named Society. 
He is now an Honorary Member of the Vermont State Dental Society, 

172 



and an Active member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, having 
been elected December ii, 1874. 

In the days of the New England Dental Journal, Dr. Morgan 
did much to further the work of that periodical. To the younger 
men he has been a source of inspiration and help, and has always 
stood for the higher professional life. 

He also was joint inventor, with Dr. George A. Maxfield, of the 
Morgan-Maxfield Disk Mandrel, which for its simplicity and utility 
has become one of the standard dental instruments. 



173 




LESTER NOBLE, D.D.S. 

Honorary Member 

Lester Noble was the son of John and Irena (Robinson) Noble, 
and born in Blandford, Mass., November ii, 1819. 

On his father's side he came of Puritan stock, his father was a 
resident of Springfield, Mass., in the days of William Pynchon, going 
to Westfield in 1665. 

Dr. Noble's early education was obtained in the public schools, 
and later in the select school of Blandford, Mass., and attended 
Wilbraham Academy. He was brought up on a farm while in attend- 
ance at these schools. 

He learned the spectacle trade of Jacob Colton of Longmeadow, 
and was in company with him for a time, but even then he longed to 
become a dentist and used to experiment upon his shopmates and 
their families, "his first victims in the new art" as he used to call them. 
In 1846, he went to Boston, Mass., and studied dentistry with his 
friend and relative. Dr. Nathan Cooley Keep. For a time he was in 
the Lawrence Scientific School, at Harvard University, and took a 
coiirse in analytical chemistry under Prof. E. N. Horsford. Later he 
took a course of study at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
graduating in 1850. 

For two years after his graduation he was demonstrator of mechani- 
cal dentistry at the college, 1851-1852. He was in Washington, D. C, 
from 1852 to 1859, practicing his profession, being associated with Dr. 
Maynard. Later he went out west, prospecting for oil. While 

174 



thus engaged he froze his face, and thus affected his eyes to such a 
degree that he was obUged to relinquish his practice for the next ten 
years. In 1869. he opened an office in Springfield, locating at the 
comer of Main and State Streets; he gave up business in 1898. 

Soon after giving up practice in 1898, he read in that year a paper 
on "Personal Recollections of the Early Use of Sulphuric Ether as an 
Anaesthetic," which played no small part in clearing the misty atmos- 
phere of those early days in reference to the real discoverer of anaes- 
thesia, for his studentship started only a month after the first surgical 
operation under the influence of ether at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital. So expert was he in the administration of the then newly 
discovered ether, that Boston's most prominent physicians used to 
engage the young dentist to administer ether to their patients, and it 
is said he was the ven,- first to give ether to a woman in confinement. 

Dr. Noble figured with Dr. N. C. Keep, ^^^th whom he was associated 
at the time, as one of the most important witnesses in the celebrated 
trial of Prof. John W. Webster for the murder of Dr. George Parkman, 
November 23, 1849. ^^ 1842, Dr. Webster, was professor of Chemis- 
try in the Harv-ard ^ledical School, and applied to Dr. Parkman for 
a loan of four hundred dollars which was granted. Later Webster 
became so embarressed financially that he turned over all his personal 
property, including his furniture and collection of minerals, to Dr. 
Parkman for financial aid rendered. But his difficulties increasing 
and being at last hard pressed, he made an appointment to meet 
Dr. Parkman at his (Webster's) laboratory at the College at 1.30 
P.M., November 23, 1849. 

It was known that Dr. Parkman kept the appointment, but then he 
mysteriously disappeared. Meantime, Prof. Webster acted ver>' 
strangely. He contradicted himself in his statements and would not 
allow even the janitor to enter his laboratory-. A search in the furnace 
brought to light the mineral remains of a set of teeth, which in those 
days were car\-ed and baked. In the ashes was found enough gold 
to equal what might naturally be expected in a set of artificial teeth. 
Webster was arrested. Dr. Noble, then a student in the Baltimore 
College of Dental Surgery, was summoned and was able to produce 
the metal cast upon which the plate found among the remains of 
Dr. Parkman was made, while he was a student in Dr. Keep's Boston 
ofl&ce. Bringing into juxtaposition the plate and cast in the court 
and the demonstration that each was the counterpart of the other 
produced intense excitement. Professor Webster was convicted and 
hanged, but before execution he confessed to the murder. 

Dr. Noble was recognized, not only by the public, but, by his 
brother dentists as one of Springfield's leading practitioners, and upon 
his retirement a memorial autograph album was presented to him by 
the Valley District Dental Society. 

His studentship saw the advent of air chambers, the use of anaes- 
thesia in surger>', and the use of amalgam as a filling material. • 

On June 2, 1897, the Massachusetts Dental Society elected Dr. 
Noble an Honorary Member. 

175 



The sudden death of his brother, Dr. Henry Noble, in Washington, 
D. C, followed by that of his only daughter, Alice Louise Noble, on 
July 4, 1902, who had been associated much with him in his work, 
was a great blow to him. For some time he had been failing in health 
until the end came on February 21, 1905, at the ripe age of nearly 
eighty-six years — a Christian gentleman to the last. 

Dr. Noble was married to Mary Woolworth Burbank in Long' 
meadow, Mass., April 28, 1823; their only child was a daughter, above 
named. Mrs. Noble was born in Longmeadow and died June 17, 1908. 

While located in Washington, D. C, Dr. Noble was possessed of 
a fine, large and lucrative practice — his patients numbering many 
government ofi&cials, several presidents and others in ofiicial position. 

He was universally beloved and honored for his integrity, blame- 
less life and genial nature. He had a warm friendship with three 
generations of boys; not a boy in town but loved him, and felt sure of 
his sympathy in their boyish sports. One prominent business man 
of Springfield said to his niece,* who has furnished the author of this 
biography with most of the facts, ''Dr. Noble is just the same warm 
friend to my sons that he was to me, and I do not see that they consider 
him any older than he seemed to me twenty years ago." 

"Why should good words ne'er be said 
Of a friend until he is dead?" 



Miss Harriet C. Bliss, daughter of Dr. Noble's sister. 



176 




EDWARD PAGE, M.D., D.M.D. 

Edward Page was a son of Abel and Asenwath ( ) Page, and 
bom in Groton, Mass., December 4, 1826. 

His early education was obtained in the common schools and the 
Lawrence Academy of Groton. 

Early in life he prepared for the profession of dentistry and entered 
later in the first class of the Harvard Dental School, graduating in 
1869, and a year later took the medical degree from the Harvard 
Medical School. He is now the only living member of the first 
dental class of Harvard University, being nearly eighty-seven years of 
age, a man hale and hearty, of vigorous constitution, and in prime 
health and activity till recently. 

He became a member of the Harvard Dental Alumni Association, 
being one of its organizers and also its first president; continuing a 
member until 1901, he was made an Honorary Member; and was 
treasurer from 1874 to 1880. 

On May 11, 1869, he was elected a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, and in 1872 he was elected treasurer of the Society, 
discharging that duty for twenty-five years or till the year 1897, 
when he asked and was transferred to the Honorary roll of said 
organization, on June 2, of that year; and would have been elected 
president had he so desired at that time. 

He was formerly a member of the old New England Dental Society 
on and previous to 1887. He is also a member of the Dental Pro- 
tective Association of the United States. 

177 



Some years ago he retired from practice and became a manufac- 
turer of dental alloys. 

On August 14, 1850, at Leominster, Mass., he married Rebecca 
Jane Wright, the fruit of this union being a son, Washburn E. 
Page, D.M.D., who is in active practice of his father's profession. 
It may be said of him by the poet: 

"And in the sunshine streaming on quiet wood and lea, 
I stand and calmly wait till the hinges turn for me." 



178 




AUGUSTUS PAPINEAU 

Augustus Papineau was born in St. Martin's, Canada, June, 1831, 
being the son of John and Marguerite ( ) Papineau. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of Lancaster. 

Young Papineau, having decided on dentistry as a profession, studied 
with Dr. C. F. Home of Watertown, Mass., and began the practice 
of his profession in Waltham, Mass., in the year 1851, where he con- 
tinued until the date of his death, which occurred on August 17, 1906. 

Dr. Papineau married Miss Lucy Adams in 1865, who with two 
sons survived him. 

Dr. Papineau was one of the early members of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, having signed the Constitition and By-Laws May 2, 
1864, being the thirty-second signer; and he continued an active 
member until 1899. 



179 




AARON HALL PARKER 

Aaron^Hall Parker was the son of Benjamin and Catherine Emerson 
(Hall) Parker, and born in Woburn, Mass., on August 6, 1836. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of his native 
town- 
He began his dental education in the ofSce of the late Daniel Har- 
wood, M.D., first as an assistant, then as an associate, and later as 
successor. 

He belonged to the Apollo and Papyrus Clubs; in religion an 
Orthodox, and a staunch Republican in politics. 

On January 8, 1866, he became a member of the ^yiassachusetts 
Dental Society, but the records are lax as to when he ceased member- 
ship in said Society. 

Dr. Parker was married to Edith Norton Kurtz, at Boston, Mass., 
on June 5, 1878. His death occurred in that city, January i, 1909, 
lea\dng a widow and a son, Austin Hall Parker, D.M.D., a practicing 
dentist in Pasadena, California. 



180 




JAMES SHEPHERD 

James Shepherd was a son of Colonel James and Eliza (Phillips) 
Shepherd, and born in Northampton, Mass., August 17, 1819. 

His early education was obtained in the pubHc schools of his'native 
place. 

Dr. Shepherd was one of the early "Forty-niners," going to California 
by ship "around the Horn." After his return from California, as 
"an argonaut in search of the golden fleece," he entered the office of 
Dr. Child on Tremont Street, Boston, and later opened an office for 
himself, removing to Park street, where he continued to the day of his 
death. 

Dr. Shepherd was a member of the Boston Society for Dental 
Improvement, and an active worker in the "Boston Society of the 
Church of the New Jerusalem," (Swedenborg). 

He became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society on Jan- 
uary 2, 1865, and was an active participant until his decease. 

Dr. Shepherd married Laura Stevens, at Boston, on January 27, 
1858; and his death occurred in Boston, on November 27, 1885, 
leaving a son, James Shepherd, Jr., D.M.D., who succeeded his father 
in the practice of his profession. 

Dr. Shepherd was of genial and kindly character and highly esteemed 
for his professional and pleasant traits. 



181 




CHESTER TWITCHELL STOCKWELL 

Honorary Member. 

Chester Twitchell Stockwell, son of Emmons and Elvira (Wood) 
Stockwell, was born September 5, 1841, at Royalston, Mass. 

He received his early education in the common schools of his native 
town and Winchendon, and later graduated from Eastman's Business 
College of Poughkeepsie, New York. 

From 1863 to 1866, he was in business in Worcester and then in North 
Carolina, but in 1867 and 1868 he studied medicine in Fitchburg 
with Dr. Saunders, and afterwards matriculated at one of the Phila- 
delphia colleges. He soon left, however, and went into newspaper 
work; for two years he served on the Iowa State Register at Des 
Moines, and for other papers in the west. While at Des Moines he 
was for two years Secretary of the Iowa Central Dental Society. 
Meanwhile he began the study of dentistry with J. Todd, M.D., and 
was associated in practice with Dr. James Watts, and by 1872 had 
started practice for himself and soon built up an extensive clientele. 

After three years his health failed and he was obliged to go to 
Colorado. After a short stay there he moved to Springfield, Mass., 
in 1875, and for a year was associated with Dr. Lester Noble. For the 
following three years he was with the late Dr. Jarius Searle Hurlbut, 
and then commenced practice for himself, first in Bill's, and second in 
Dickinson's Blocks; after that in the Republican Block, where he 
remained for years. 

A dentists' study club was organized in the early '8o's under the 

182 



guidance of Professor Mayr, which resulted in the founding of the 
New England Journal of Dentistry in 1882, with Dr. Stockwell as 
editor; later he became editor of the Archives of Dentistry. 

In 1882, before the New England Dental Society at Boston, Dr. 
Stockwell read a paper entitled "The Etiology of Dental Caries: 
Acids or Germs." The author advocated the latter view. This 
paper was later read before the Connecticut Valley Dental Society 
and was published in the New England Journal of Dentistry of No- 
vember, 1882. The\'iews presented by Dr. Stockwell spread rapidly, 
and he was in\nted to read a supplemental paper at Brooklyn, N. Y., 
the same year. 

Dr. Stockwell also pubHshed two books, one entitled "The Evolution 
of ImmortaUty," in 1887; fourth edition 1906; and the other, "New 
Modes of Thought," 1901 ; which works gave him a high place among 
American philosophical writers. He was an able and eloquent 
exponent of that special form of monism, which, during the later 
nineteenth century, combined with rhapsodic pantheism of the 
poets with epoch-making discoveries of modern science which move 
and point to the unity of all things. 

Dr. Stockwell's Ufe has always been a simple one; always a lover of 
nature, he had spent much of his life out of doors and had always been 
accustomed to take long walks into the countryside with his most 
intimate friends. As he became weaker and the long years of service 
began to tell on him, he made it a rule to seek recuperation from his 
hard labors by outdoor exercise. He treated Nature as a friend, always 
looking at her from a sentimental aspect, and it afforded him an 
almost physical pain to see any of her beauties desecrated. His 
life had been a long example of rectitude in conduct, character and 
action, and many have been helped by coming in contact with him. 

Dr. Stockwell was married in 1866 to Sophia Golding Pierce, a 
native of Royalston, and daughter of Capt. Jonas Pierce, who was 
then living in Des Moines, where Dr. Stockwell had begun to practice 
dentistry. Mrs. Stockwell died in August, 1905. They had three 
sons and one daughter, viz: Louis G., who died in Burhngton, Vt., 
a few years ago; Dr. Herbert E., a physician in Stockbridge, and 
Arthur E., who is in the insurance business in Philadelphia. The 
daughter, Miss Nellie May Stockwell, has made her home with her 
father. He also had three brothers: John and Winfield of Royalston, 
and Frank who resides in Nebraska. There are also four grand- 
children. 

Dr. Stockwell's death was sudden, from heart disease, and occurred 
in Springfield, Mass., October 25, 191 1. 

He early joined the Connecticut Valley Dental Society and was for 
a time a member of the executive committee, secretary of the Society 
for four years, and president in 1879- 1880. 

He became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society on 
December 27, 1893, and resigned from Active membership April 26, 
1909, and on June 3, 1909, at its next annual meeting, was elected to 
Honorary membership. 

183 



He was also a member of the New York Odontological Society; 
a corresponding member of the Brooklyn Ethical Association, and 
an active member of the Springfield Literary Club. 

The author herewith pays respectful tribute to his memory, having 
known him for nearly a quarter of a century and to whom he looked 
in his early dental career for inspiration and example. He was a 
fine specimen of a gentleman in every sense. 

"I knew his work was good before I knew him. 
I knew he would be kind when I saw him smile. 
I believe he would fight hard for what seemed right — 
His life has given me an inspiration." 




LEVI COLBY TAYLOR 

Corresponding Member. 

Levi Colby Taylor, the son of Erastus Day and Mary (Colby) 
Taylor, was born in Lempster, New Hampshire, December 12, 1841. 
He was of New England ancestry, both maternal and paternal for- 
bears coming from England to the colonies during the early settlement. 

Yoimg Taylor was educated in the common public, or district 
schools of his native town, and later took a course at the then famous 
Henniker Academy, paying his way at the latter institution with 
money earned on a farm. From his farm savings, together with money 
earned while serving as what is known as a hammer carpenter, 
he financed his dental education. This study he began with Dr. 
George Bowers at Springfield, Vermont, in 1866, and remained as his 
student for two years. 

Dr. Taylor began the practice of dentistry on January i, 1868, at 
Holyoke, Mass., when he and Dr. H. O. Hastings purchased the 
practice of Dr. Wheeler. 

Four months later Dr. Taylor bought out Dr. Hasting's interest 
and continued the practice until May 3, 1875, when Dr. Hastings 
bought the practice and Dr. Taylor went to Hartford Conn. At the 
last named place Dr. Taylor was associated with Dr. John M. Riggs 
for a time, and then built up a successful practice for himself. 

October 27, 1868, Dr. Taylor joined the Connecticut Valley Dental 
Society. He held many of the minor offices, was three years Secretary, 
one year chairman of the executive committee and in 1877-1878, 

185 



occupied the presidency. Since then he was for fourteen years 
connected with the College of Dental and Oral Surgery under the 
regents of New York State and located in New York City. He is 
one of the trustees of this institution and lectured on oral hygiene 
and prophylaxis, a most important branch of the dental profession 
and education. 

Dr. Taylor is a member of the Connecticut Dental Association; 
of the Northeastern Dental Association; of the National Dental 
Association; and on December lo, 1875, became a Corresponding 
Member of the Massachusetts Dental Society; an Honorary Member 
of the New York Institute of Stomatology, and a member of the 
Hartford Dental Society of which he was the first president. 

Dr. Taylor has taken a keen interest in the advancement of his 
profession and has been active in its promotion, always anxious 
to keep in touch with new methods and treatment. 

On December 8, 1874, Dr. Taylor married Nellie Thayer, who was 
born in Peterboro, New Hampshire, a daughter of John Norcross 
and Loretta Hulda Thayer. Three children have been born to Dr. 
and Mrs. Taylor, Charles Brackett, who died ,at the age of seven 
years, Maude Winnifred, and Leon Everett. 



186 




JOSEPH NELSON TOURTELOTTE, M.D. 

Joseph Nelson Tourtelotte was the son of Joseph and Amy (Joslin) 
Tourtelotte, and born in Thompson, Conn., May 3, 1831. His early 
education was obtained in the public schools and at Nichols Academy. 

He obtained his dental education in Worcester and Boston, and 
practiced dentistry in Worcester, Mass., for a period of twenty years. 
During the darly years of his practice, he attended lectures and received 
the degree of medicine from the Boston Medical School in 1857. 

During the Civil War between the States, he enlisted as a private, 
but was soon appointed surgeon, and served in that capacity until 
illness compelled him to leave the service. 

Dr. Tourtelotte took a prominent part in the formation of and was 
a charter member of the Central Massachusetts Dental Society, 
and was one of its first secretaries. 

He joined the Massachusetts Dental Society, December 4, 1865, 
but the records are silent as to when he severed his membership. 

In pontics he was a staunch Republican, a member of the First 
Baptist Church of Worcester, and a Mason. 

Dr. Tourtelotte was a worthy member of the dental profession, 
always sincerely desirous for its advancement, and assisting in its 
progress while strength permitted. Even during the years of intense 
suflfering, his interest did not abate, but he hailed with pleasure 
every forward step. To all who knew him, he was a true friend, 
agreeable companion and an honored member of society, a kind 
husband and an indulgent father. 

Dr. Tourtelotte married Mary Aurelia Perry, June i, 1865, and he 
departed this life after a severe illness of several years of heart disease 
on April 25, 1876; leaving a widow, who died November 12, 1910; 
and one daughter. Amy Augusta Tourtelotte, 

187 




ELISHA GUSTAVUS TUCKER, M.D. 

Honorary Member. 

Elisha Gustavus Tucker was a son of Seth and Jane (Pay son) 
Tucker, and born in Winchendon, Mass., August i8, 1808. His 
father was a farmer, soldier in the War of the Revolution, and one^of 
the early settlers of the town. 

He began the study of medicine at Geneva, Oneida County, New 
York, in 1834, and on receiving the M.D. degree in 1837 from the 
Berkshire Medical College of Pittsfield, immediately commenced the 
practice of dentistry at Pittsfield and Lenox, Mass. It should, how- 
ever, be explained that the medical degree was at that time the only 
one available as a preliminary for those desiring to thoroughly equip 
themselves for the intellegent practice of dentistry. 

In 1838, Dr. Tucker removed to New York City, and succeeded 
to the practice of Dr. Horace Kimball, in Park Place. Soon after 
he formed a co-partnership with the late Joseph H. Foster, M.D., 
in that city, and this connection continued with marked success 
until 1841, when Dr. Tucker went to Boston to become partner of 
his brother, the late Joshua Tucker, M.D. This successful relation 
continued for ten years, after which he pursued his profession alone 
up to 1872, when his son, Winslow Lewis Tucker, A.M., D.M.D. 
became associated with him for some time. 

Dr. Tucker was a member of the American Society of Dental 
Surgeons in 1840; of the Massachusetts Medical Society in 1843; 
of the Medical Benevolent Society in 1850; and was vice-president of 



the American Dental Convention in 1857. He was one of the founders 
of the American Academy of Dental Science and president for two 
years, 1877 to 1879. 

On May 2, 1864, he was elected a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, but the records are silent as to how long he remained 
a member; presumably till December 10, 1875, when he was elected 
an Honorary member. 

On January 17, 1843 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Mary 
Harris, who survived him, with one son above named. Dr. Tucker 
died from influenza at Boston, Mass., May 18, 1895. He, by will 
dated October 8, 1892, gave to the Museum of the Harvard Dental 
School his dental instruments, nearly all made by himself previous 
to 1835. The handles of his soft gold working instruments were 
made from ivory and agate. 



189 




JOSHUA TUCKER, M.D. 

Honorary Member 

Joshua Tucker was a son of Seth and Jane (Payson) Tucker, born 
in Winchendon, Mass., August 7, 1800. His father, a fanner, soldier 
in the War of the Revolution, was one of the early settlers of the town. 
As young Tucker reached manhood, Hfe on the farm grew monotonous 
and he began to long for an occupation other than following the plow 
and swinging the scythe, and for a wider acquaintance with men and 
affairs than he could acquire in an obscure country village. So with 
what small means he could gain by his own labor, at the age of eighteen 
he entered an academy at Hampton, N. H., and about 1823 was 
qualified to assume a position as a teacher. 

In early life young Tucker was a teacher in penmanship and a 
most accomplished penman, which, no doubt, did much to train his 
hand and nerve and led him to excel in dentistry. He also did 
excellent work in pen and ink drawings. One of the best specimens 
of his work is a picture of Lafayette, executed during Lafayette's 
visit to America in 1825. 

Learning that there was a better field for enterprising teachers in 
the Southern States than in the North, he resolved to visit that section, 
and after a nine days' voyage landed at Savannah, Georgia, in the 
autumn of 1825, with no friends to assist him and with only a few 
dollars in his purse, but full of courage, energy and self-reliance. 

Immediately on his arrival, he introduced himself to Rev. Mr. 
White, principal of the Savannah Academy, made known his plans 

190 



and wishes, and found in him not only an employer but a warm 
friend. After a pleasant and profitable winter spent in teaching in 
this Academy, he was advised by Mr. White to go back into the hill 
regions for the Summer, and so went first to Athens, Georgia, with 
letters of introduction to the professors of the college, where he re- 
mained some time teaching and making acquaintances who, long 
years after, remembered him in Boston. 

From Athens he went to Columbia, S. C. Here he met Dr. D. C. 
Ambler, a successful dentist and cultivated gentlemen, who advised 
him to study for the profession which he afterwards practiced and 
honored for so many years. 

In accordance with Dr. Ambler's advice, he spent a term at the 
Charleston, (South Carolina) Medical College, and then, returning 
to Columbia, remained some months in Dr. Ambler's office, till he 
was qualified, in the opinion of his friend, to begin practice by himself, 
which he did in 1827 at Sumterville, S. C. 

He commenced, as young dentists in those days generally did, 
traveling from place to place, stopping a few days and then journey- 
ing on. He traveled in a two-wheeled chaise over a large part of 
South Carolina. In the course of these wanderings he occasionally 
saw operations which he felt were better than he could perform him- 
self, which came from the cffice of Dr. C. Starr Brewster, of Charleston, 
S. C. Young Tucker resolved when he entered the profession to let 
no opportunity pass to perfect himself in it; so he, for a time, aban- 
doned a practice which was already becoming lucrative, and repairing 
to the office of Dr. Brewster, became once more a pupil. Hard and 
conscientious study and practice enabled him to so satisfy his instruc- 
tor that, when the latter went North on a visit, he left Dr. Tucker in 
sole charge of his office and patients. 

During Dr. Brewster's absence. Dr. Tucker's attention was called 
to Cuba as a promising field for American dentists, and immediately 
upon being released from attention to Dr. Brewster's office he began 
the study of Spanish, little appreciating the difficulties of practice 
in a foreign country, and in 1829 left Charleston for Havana. 

He was somewhat taken aback on his arrival at finding that he 
could not practice his profession without submitting to an examination 
by the Protomediciado of the Faculty of the College of Medicine. 
After some weeks of anxiety, however, he passed the ordeal safely, 
receiving his diploma, submitted with tolerably good grace to the 
congratulatory embraces of a dozen or more doctors who were present 
and became entitled to all privileges of a Spanish physician. 

Three years residence in Havana made Dr. Tucker proficient in 
the Spanish language and gave him an extensive practice. In 1833, 
the cholera visited the island and raged fearfully, and he desired to 
visit Massachusetts for a short vacation, intending to return to Cuba 
upon the cessation of the epidemic. 

When he reached Boston his plans were soon changed. He was 
introduced to Dr. Daniel Harwood, who comf)limented him upon 
some of his work which had passed under his insi)ection, and finding 

191 



him inclined to remain in Boston, offered him a partnership in his 
business. This generous and unexpected offer was accepted after 
serious reflection, and the name of Harwood & Tucker remained 
associated for many years, indeed until the ill health of Dr. Harwood 
made a dissolution of the firm necessary. The mutual trust and 
cordial feelings which had existed between the two partners continued 
during their lives. 

It would be interesting to include herewith what Dr. Tucker 
has written about himself, his association with others, his manufac- 
ture of porcelain, and teeth, and filling materials, etc., and the men 
whom he educated and sent out from his office as practitioners in 
dentistry, but space forbids. 

Dr. Tucker was an Honorary Member of the Odontological Society 
of Great Britain in 1 85 9; president of the American Academy of Dental 
Science of Boston for two years, 1873-1875; and was on December 
lo, 1875, elected an Honorary Member of the Massachusetts Dental 
Society. 

lA 1839, Dr. Tucker was married to Miss Susan.L. Morse, youngest 
daughter of Isaac Morse, Esq., of Winchendon. She died in 1897. 
They had no children. After the close of Dr. Tucker's professional 
career, he passed some years in honored retirement. He died in 
Winchendon, Mass., the place of his birth, on November 7, 1881, and 
was buried in Riverside Cemetery of that town. 



192 




SJNfe 




GUSHING WEBBER 

Gushing Webber (his family do not know who were his father and 
mother, and the writer has been unable to secure any information to 
that end) was born in Boothbay, Maine, March 14, 1824. 

His early education was obtained in Boothbay, but throughout 
his life he was an untiring student of philosophy, science, and art. He 
was for many years a tenor singer in choirs and a good amateur 
violinist. But his passion seemed the investigation, often at great 
expense, of every heralded discovery and invention claiming to advance 
the science of dentistry. For years he maintained a fine laboratory 
and educated his youngest son, Walter, to assist him. 

His serious research into hypnotism and psychology made him an 
authority in the sixties, and his deductions would to-day be of value, 
but his extreme modesty prevented him claiming any recognition. 

He enjoyed an enviable reputation as a practitioner of exceptional 
skill in dentistry, and was the originator of numerous useful inven- 
tions. He held many offices of trust, in which, as also in private 
life, his conscientiousness, his charities and universal kindness were 
proverbial. 

Few men have received more flattering offers of great value both 
military and honorary than he, but his almost morbid shrinking from 
public ap[)lause caused him always to decline. 

He is said to have almost as many patients from Europe, Canada, 
and South America as from the United States. His son, after a long 
residence in England, France and Germany, informs the author that 

193 



it has proved to him that Dr. Webber had a large international repu- 
tation, for he constantly met his father's admirers and friends, both in 
and out of the dental profession, in these foreign lands. 

One side of Dr. Webber's nature was much admired by a circle 
of friends that remained very close to him throughout the years of his 
activity. He was intensely found of sport; hunting, fishing, yachting, 
etc. He owned a hunting-lodge in the Adirondacks for years and 
went there with his invited guests in the autumn months. A friend 
was once heard to accuse him, laughingly, of having crept over half 
of Maine on his knees in search of large game. 

He kept house in Sharon, Mass., for spring and autumn; a summer 
cottage at Bayside, and boarded in the city during the winter months. 

He built the Standish House, South Duxbury, Mass., and a cottage 
for his own use, where he passed August during about ten years. Here 
he kept several yachts and horses, and cultivated his famous garden 
in which every known kind of corn was grown; this was a hobby of 
his at this time. 

He designed and built several fast yachts and during his last years 
cut, with his own tools, several fine models. To sum up; nothing 
that the world invented, discovered, or dreamed of, escaped him. 

Dr. Webber was elected to membership in the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, November 9, 1869, but the records do not show when 
he ceased membership. 

His life was above reproach — a philospher, a Christian in the broad- 
est sense, he endeared to him all who came within his sphere. 

Horace Mason Perkins, D.D.S., D.D.S., D.M.D., for many years 
located in Shanghai, China, was a partner of Dr.Webber's for a little 
more than a year in Boston, before Dr. Webber's death. 

Dr. Webber was married to Ellen Louisa Everett about 1847 or 
1848, by which union there were two children. 

Dr. Webber's death occurred at his summer residence, Bayside 
(Hull), Mass., of gastric ulcer, on Tuesday, September 3, 1895, 
leaving a widow and two sons; the widow departing this life in 1910. 



194 




WILLIAM HENRY ATKINSON, A.M., M.D., D.D.S. 

Honorary Member. 

William Henry Atkinson was born in Newton, Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania, January 23, 181 5, his parents being David and Mary 
(Mergerum) Atkinson. His father, an Englishman, was a frontier 
Methodist preacher, and his mother, a native of Holland, a Quakeress, 
who was noted as a faithful parent and strict disciplinarian to her 
children, as well as a doctoress and good angel of mercy to the sick 
and distressed of the neighborhood. 

Young Atkinson spent his boyhood in his native village, which was 
destitute of those advantages of culture even for the ordinary educa- 
tion generally supposed essential to a library, or professional career, 
except that of the public school which he attended during the months 
of the winters. He was apprenticed to a tailor at an early age, filling 
in his spare time working on the farm. About this time his parents 
moved to Mercer County, then in the wilds of Western Pennsylvania, 
where they purchased a farm of one hundred acres, on which they 
lived in a log cabin in a sparsely settled neighborhood, where young 
Atkinson worked at intervals at his trade and as a farm-hand until 
he reached manhood. 

He early exhibited a desire to investigate scientific problems, and 
by perseverance and force of intellect only^ while a boy, acquired an 
education that made for himself a name well known throughout th$i 
dental profession. 

In 1840, at the age of twenty-five, spurred with an ambition -to 

19s 



become a physician, he went to Meadville, Pa., where he entered the 
ofi&ce, as a student, of Dr. William Woodruff, whose daughter, 
Martha C, he afterwards married. 

Desiring to further equip himself in his science, he attended a 
course of medical lectures in Willoughby University, Willoughby, 
Ohio, from which he graduated as an M.D. in 1847. 

He began the practice of medicine and surgery at Meadville in 
partnership with his preceptor, and later located at Norwalk, Ohio, 
where he continued his practice and investigations and made for him- 
self a reputation as an expert in obstetrics. Returning to Norwalk, 
a traveling dentist called his attention to dentistry, in which he 
became interested. He saw in it a wide field and concluded to adopt 
it as a calling. Desiring a larger field of operation, he removed to 
Cleveland, Ohio, in 1853, and formed a partnership with Dr. Frank 
S. Slawson. Dr. Charles R. Butler, of Cleveland, soon after entered 
the office of Dr. Atkinson, and was his first student and subsequently 
partner, until Dr. Atkinson removed to New York City. 

He was an ardent student of microscopy and natural sciences. He 
gained prominence in researches along this line and in the new fields 
of dental therapeutics and histology, in which he was a profound 
student and industrious investigator. 

He was an excellent operator and an expert in all departments of 
his profession, and soon acquired a lucrative practice among the best 
people in Cleveland. 

In 1859 the Ohio College of Dental Surgery conferred on him the 
honorary degree of D.D.S. Wishing a wider field and greatei: oppor- 
tunity for his talents, in 1861, he removed to New York, where he 
was engaged to manage the S. S. White Dental Depot. This he did 
for a year, when, at the age of forty-seven, he opened an office with 
Dr. William H. Allen. 

He was instrimiental in organizing the New York College of Den- 
tistry, and for a short period was Professor of the Institutes of Medi- 
cine. He was a most ingenious man and to him are credited many 
inportant methods of treatment too numerous to mention, but now 
in practical use. 

Dr. Atkinson was more widely known throughout the country 
than any other prominent dentist, and held active and honorary 
membership with nearly every dental society in the United States. 

He was president of the American Dental Association at its first 
regular meeting at Washington, D.C., July, i860. He formed and 
was the first president of the First District Dental Society of New 
York; was a member of the American Microscopical Society and the 
Odontological of Pennsylvania. In 1881, he attended the Interna- 
tional Medical Congress at London. He also visited Germany and 
France, where he was the recipient of much attention. 

He was made an honorary member of the Massachusetts Dental 
Society about 1864, and of the Merrimack Valley Dental Association. 

Dr. Atkinson was a prolific writer and frequent contributor to 
periodical dental literature. 

196 



He married, May 17, 1S40, Miss Martha G. Woodruff, at Mead- 
ville, Pa., by whom he had two sons and five daughters. 

In 1868 and 1869, Dr. Atkinson was Professor of Hygiene and Dental 
Jurisprudence in the Boston Dental College; and in 1870 and 1871 in 
the same institution he was Professor of Operative and Clinical Den- 
tistry. 

Dr. Atkinson died in the seventy-seventh year of his age of pneu- 
monia in New York City, April 2, 1891. Thus passed on "Father" 
or "Pop" Atkinson, or the "Grand Old Man" as he was familiarly 
called. 



197 




SANFORD CHRISTIE BARNUM, D.D.S. 

Honorary Member. 

Sanford Christie Barnum was son of George W. and Caroline 
Griswold (Clowes) Barnum, and born in Oakland Valley, Sullivan 
County, New York, August 24, 1838. 

His early education he received at the public and private schools, 
and at Monticello Academy, a well-known educational institution 
of that time. 

In 1858 he entered the office of his uncle, Dr. Joseph Clowes, of 
New York, as a dental student, and four years later commenced 
practice in Monticello, New York. Later he returned to New York 
and attended two courses at the New York College of Dentistry, from 
which he graduated December 2, 1868, with the dental degree of D.D.S. 

After graduation he opened offices in his uncle's house in New York 
City, where he soon acquired a lucrative practice. It was in 1862, 
at Monticello, that he conceived the idea and made practical the 
rubber dam in dental operations. 

He first used it in the mouth of a patient, Mr. R. C. Benedict, at 
Monticello, and on coming to New York in 1864 to practice with his 
uncle, to whom he demonstrated his discovery, and quickly saw the 
great advantage of the dam, he requested his nephew to present it to 
the profession as a gift. This advice was seconded by a very close 
friend. Dr. John Allen. 

Dr. Barnum was possessed with an open, generous nature, and the 
highest professional ideals; he decided to forego the opportunity of 

198 



making a fortune, which this useful invention afforded, and presented 
it as a free gift to the profession. 

This donation was eagerly grasped by the profession, which gave 
him a world-wide reputation. He was presented with testimonials 
as tokens of appreciation by various dental societies. 

Dr. Barnum never married. He died in Monticello, New York, 
December 24, 1885, at the residence of his father. 

He was a member of the Dental Society of the State of New York, 
of the First District Dental Society, and many others. He became 
an Honorary Member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, Septem- 
ber 8, 1868. 

He was a member of the First Division, Third Brigade of the Seventh 
Regiment, N.G.S., New York, and received honorable discharge in 
1873. In religious matters he was a Universalist. 



199 




THOMAS WILLIAM EVANS, M.D., D.D.S., D.D.S. 

Honorary Member. 

Thomas William Evans was born in Philadelphia, Pa., December 
23, 1823, of humble parentage and was one of three brothers. The 
eldest, Rudolph, established himself in the wholesale drug business in 
Washington, D. C, from which he retired after a successful career. 

The second brother, Theodore, a dentist, died in Paris, in 1890, after 
having amassed a fortune both in this country and Europe. Thomas 
W. Evans, the youngest brother, received a common school education, 
and at the age of fourteen entered the employ of Joseph Warner, a 
gold and silversmith of Philadelphia, whose business included the 
manufacture of certain surgical instruments and incidentally of plate, 
solders, and some of the implements used by dentists. His appren- 
ticeship with Warner brought him into occasional contact with 
dentists of that period and their methods, and in this way no doubt 
derived the impetus which led him later to enter upon the study of 
dentistry as a profession. In 1 841, he became a student in the office 
of the late Dr. John De Haven White, of Philadelphia, with whom 
he remained for two years. During his studies with Dr. White he 
attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, from which, in due 
course, he graduated with the degree of M.D. 

He practiced his profession for a time in Maryland, and later, in 
partnership with Dr. Philip Van Patten, at Lancaster, Pa., with whom 
he remained until 1847. It was during his stay at Lancaster, that 

200 



Dr. Evans performed a series of gold contour-operations, which he 
exhibited at the annual exhibition held under the auspices of the 
Franklin Institute in the fall of 1847, and for which he received a gold 
medal in recognition of the novelty and merit of his work. Dr. C. 
Starr Brewster, an American dentist, originally of Charleston, S. C, 
practicing in Paris, had his attention called to this work done by 
Dr. Evans, and was so impressed by it that a partnership was arranged 
between them. Accounts differ as to how the association of Drs. 
Evans and Brewster came about. 

The partnership between Drs. Brewster and Evans lasted until 
1850, during which year he opened an oflBice on his own account in 
the Rue de la PaLx, and entered upon a professional career which 
was as wonderful as it was unique. The same year he received an 
honorary' degree of D.D.S. from the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surger>'; February 28, 1858, the Philadelphia College of Dental 
Surger>^ also conferred the honorary degree of D.D.S. upon him. 

Although Dr. Evans was not the pioneer of American dentistry 
in Europe, yet he helped to make American dental methods known there, 
and it is certain that he brought to Europe a combination of personal 
characteristics and special technical ability which not only made him 
a conspicuous figure and gave an impetus to dental practice and a 
status to its representatives before unknown. 

He was a writer of no mean order though not a voluminous one, and 
his professional equipment in itself cannot by any means be regarded 
as the cause of his phenomenal success. His abilities as a practitioner 
were merely a contributing factor in a complexus of charactistics 
which helped to make Dr. Evans the most celebrated American 
connected with Eureopean dentistry, which was but the stepping-stone 
which served as a means for bringing him into contact with those to 
whom he made himself of value and who could contribute substan- 
tially to his success. 

He was a born diplomat, possessing a keen perceptive faculty which 
enabled him to read and correctly understand human nature. In 
short, he knew how to make the best of his opportunities, and in some 
degree create them. His association with Dr. Brewster brought him 
into contact with the aristocratic element of the French society. It 
was his avowed ambition to secure for his clientele all the crowned 
heads of Europe, and it has been asserted that in this he succeeded. 

By his skill and attractive personality he drew them to him and won 
their confidence. His confidential relations with Napoleon III has 
become historical, and its two most important results, namely, the 
diplomatic mission intrusted to him by Napoleon to President 
Lincoln during the War of the Rebellion, which resulted in the neu- 
trality of France with respect to that issue. 

The second was the aid rendered to the Empress Eugenie in her 
escape to England during the riots following the fall of Sedan and 
surrender of Marshall McMahon's army of 75,000 men to the Prussians 
and the abduction and capture of Napoleon HI, at the close of the 
Franco-Prussian War, are matters of common knowledge, and is 



perhaps the most interesting incident in his career — but space 
forbids further comment. 

Dr. Evans was, on February 20, 1865, elected by the Massachusetts 
Dental Society an Honorary Member, and in 1874 he was elected an 
Honorary Member of the American Academy of Dental Science of 
Boston. 

Dr. Evans married Agnes Josephine Doyle, who deceased June 17, 
1897, at Paris, France. 

His death occurred in Paris, France, on November 14, 1897, suddenly 
of angina pectoris, in the seventy-fourth year of his age. 



202 




JOHN HUGH McQUILLEN, M.D., D.D.S. 

Honorary Member. 

John Hugh McQuillen was born in Philadelphia, Pa., February 
12, 1826, and the son of Captain Hugh McQuillen, who served under 
Decatur in the War of 181 2, and Martha (Scattergood) McQuillen, 
whose ancestors came to the Western Continent with William Penn; 
one of whom, Thomas Scattergood, being a prominent Quaker preacher 
of historic fame. 

. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the Friends 
schools in Philadelphia, and at the age of sixteen entered as a clerk 
in an importing house with the purpose of devoting himself to com- 
mercial pursuits. His tastes, however, inclined him to medicine, and 
after attaining his majority, in 1847, he began studying for this pro- 
fession; meanwhile, dentistry attracted his notice and he also began 
its study, with Dr. Elisha Townsend, a famous dentist of Philadelphia, 
and began practicing dentistry in 1849. From about 1852 to 1861, 
he was associated with Dr. Daniel Neall, another well-known prac- 
titioner of the day, for whom he named his son. Dr. Daniel Neall 
McQuillen, now practicing in Philadelphia, at the same time contin- 
uing his course of medical studies at the Jefferson Medical School, 
from which he graduated in 1852 with the degree of M.D. 

After this Dr. McQuillen devoted the balance of his life to the 
practice of dentistry in Philadelphia, where he became a recognized 
authority as a writer, teacher, investigator and practitioner. He 
received the honorary degree of D.D.S. from the Philadelphia C(;llege 

203 



of Dental Surgery, at its first Commencement, February 28, 1853, 
Dr. McQuillen was ever active in anything that would promote the 
interest or raise the standard of dentistry. He was a marked 
power in dentistry in Philadelphia and the whole country, and did 
much work at a great personal sacrifice. 

No man in Philadelphia was more devoted to the profession or did 
more to elevate it. He was elected a member of the Pennsylvania 
Association of Dental Sxirgeons, December 4, 1849, and later became 
its president. 

In 1875 he was one of a committee of five appointed by the Penn- 
sylvania State Dental Society to frame a bill regulating the practice 
of dentistry in Pennsylvania. Dr. McQuillen was, by nature, an 
organizer. The original suggestion for the creation of the American 
Dental Association, which succeeded the old American Dental Con- 
vention, came from his pen in an article entitled "Basis of a National 
Dental Association," in which he advocated its organization. This 
article was published in "The Dental News Letter," Vol. XH, April, 
1859, page 184, over the signature of "Junius." 

He was present at the organization of the American Dental Asso- 
ciation at Niagara Falls, August 31, 1859, as a delegate from the 
Pennsylvania Association of Dental Surgeons. He was chairman of 
a committee to draft its Constitution, and imtil his death he was an 
active attendant upon its meetings and materially aided in building 
up the Society. He was elected its president in 1864. 

On October 17, 1866, Dr. McQuillen and a few others organized 
the Association of College of Dentistry, an organization which pre- 
ceded the present Faculties Association, and he was elected the first 
corresponding secretary. He was active in organizing the Pennsyl- 
vania State Dental Society, and was elected to its presidency. Dr. 
McQuillen was also the organizer and the first corresponding secretary 
of the Odontographic Society of Philadelphia, which was organized, 
May 19, 1863, and he was elected president of the same Society from 
1 868- 1 8 70. He was also a member of a number of other societies 
both at home and abroad, notably the Odontological Society of 
Great Britain, to which he contributed many papers. For many 
years he was an active member of the Academy of Natural Science 
of Philadelphia, and was especially interested in the work of its bio- 
logical and microscopical section, of which he was the founder. He 
was accustomed to spend many of his leisure hours at the Academy 
building. 

He was a naturahst by nature, and fond of outdoor life, especially 
of riding and walking in the country, which was his chief recreation. 

From 1852 until 1859 he was a frequent contributor to the "Dental 
News Letter, " published by the firm of Jones, White & Co. In August, 
1859, this journal was succeeded by the present "Dental Cosmos," 
under the joint editorship of Dr. J. De Haven White, J. H. McQuillen 
and George J. Zeigler. 

Dr. McQuillen had charge of the scientific department. Dr. White 
continued editor-in-chief until July, 1865, when he was succeeded by 

204 



Dr. McQuillen, who by this time was favorably known and recognized 
throughout the dental world as an authority on all subjects pertaining 
to dentistry. He was a practical investigator in histology and other 
branches of our science, as well as a teacher and writer of ability. 

He was particularly interested in microscopical work, and laid 
great stress upon practitioners supplying themselves with microscopes 
to carry on the study. 

Dr. McQuillen continued as editor-in-chief of the "Dental Cosmos" 
until January, 1872, when overburdened with cares in his large 
practice and arduous duties of his professorship in the Philadelphia 
Dental College, he was compelled to relinquish his editorial work, 
desiring to devote his spare time to original research in his favorite 
field of dental histology. 

Dr. McQuillen was a most conscientious and skillful operator, 
and was thought by some to be the originator in opening up proximal 
cavities from the occlusal surface. He was an interesting, instructive 
and voluminous writer. Many of his articles attracted special atten- 
tion, and were copied in the leading journals in America and Europe, 
and many of his writings were translated into foreign languages. 
Without a doubt he was the best known dentist of the day in this 
country. 

He numbered as his friends many of the most distinguished men in 
mediciiTe, art and literature. 

Dr. McQuillen took a great interest in young practitioners and 
their work, and many of our prominent men owe much of their suc- 
cess to the encouragement they received from him. 

In 1857, he was appointed Professor of Operative Dentistry and 
Dental Pathology in the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery. 
This chair he occupied until the Autumn of 1862, at which time he 
retired from the faculty, and, in conjunction with Drs. J. Foster Flagg, 
C. A. Kingsbury, Thomas Wardle and Henry Morton, organized the 
Philadelphia Dental College, which began its first term November, 
1863. 

Dr. McQuillen was elected Dean and held that office continuously 
until his death. He was also Professor of Anatomy, Physiology and 
Hygiene. Dr. McQuillen was founder of the school. His manner 
of organizing this school was severely criticised at the time; never- 
theless he put it on a solid basis and it has proved a great success. 

He labored unceasingly and untiringly until his death for the suc- 
cess of this institution, and stood for more thorough and broader 
education and better qualification of the dental practitioner. 

He gave his time, talents, energy and experience, sacrificing comfort, 
happiness, health and finally life, in order that the school which he 
so much loved might be worthy of the respect of the profession and of 
all men. The continuous strain under which he labored, added to much 
work and worry, was the ultimate cause of his death, which occurred 
suddenly March 3, 1879. 

On May 7, 1866, he became an Honorary Member of the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society. 

205 



Dr. McQuillen was an impulsive, aggressive man, called "erratic" 
at times. He had his sharp corners, but those who knew him have 
long since forgotten them and remember only the great and lasting 
good he did the profession at a day when great leaders were few. 

During the War of the Rebellion, Dr. McQuillen frequently served 
as a volunteer surgeon in the military hospitals of Philadelphia, and 
was at the battle of Antietam in that capacity. A wounded soldier 
was kept at his home for several weeks for special treatment. These 
services were rendered free of charge both to the government and 
individuals. His home was always open to the students of his College, 
and hardly an evening passed without his having from one to twenty 
of them there. 

A staimch RepubKcan in national politics and thoroughly indepen- 
dent in municipal affairs, he was one of the early members of the 
Union League of Philadelphia and of the Reform Club. He had great 
respect for all rehgious bodies, but was not closely associated with 
any. He was a great lover of music and enjoyed nothing better than 
to surround himself with friends for a musical evening. He was of a 
most artistic temperament in aU directions; a profoimd reader on all 
subjects, and possessed a very extensive library. 

Dr. McQuillen married Amelia Donnel Schellenger, November 
i8, 1852. They had five children: Sallie A. (Mrs. Henry S. Carter); 
William S.; Daniel Neall; John H., Jr.; and an infant who died At birth. 



206 




SAMUEL STOCKTON WHITE, D.D.S. 

Honorary Member. 

Samuel Stockton White was born in Hulmeville, Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania, on June 19, 1822. He was the eldest child of William 
R. and Mary (Stockton) White. 

His father died when he was eight years old. Soon afterwards his 
mother, with her children, removed to Burlington, New Jersey; where 
he resided imtil, at the age of fourteen, he was indentured to his uncle, 
Samuel W. Stockton, of Philadelphia, whose manufactiu-e of mineral 
teeth was the first in the United States to attain any commercial 
importance, to learn "the art and mystery of dentistry and the man- 
ufacture of incorruptible teeth." 

On attaining his majority he commenced the practice of dentistry 
in his uncle's of&ce, and at the same time superintended his manufac- 
turing department. In the following year (1844) he began the manu- 
facture of teeth on his own account, in the garret of a dweUing-house 
on Seventh and Race Streets, uniting with it the practice of dentistry 
in an ofl5ce in the same building. This was the initiatory step in an 
enterprise which has since grown to be the largest in the world. In 
a short time he removed to Race Street above Eighth, continuing 
both branches of his business. 

In 1845 he took in as partners Asahel Jones, of New York; and John 
R. McCurdy of Philadelphia; in that same year he relinquished the 
practice of dentistry in order that he might devote his entire time to 
the manufacture of porcelain teeth. 

The firm remained on Race Street till 1849, when it removed to 
property on Arch Street below Sixth, which had been purchased and 

207 



fitted up to accommodate the increasing business. In 1852 another 
removal to a still more commodious structure, two doors below, was 
necessitated. 

Branch houses were established in New York in 1846; in Boston in 
1850; in Chicago in 1858. Mr. McCurdy withdrew in 1859, and in 
1861 Mr. Jones also retired, Dr. White purchasing the interests of 
both. In October, 1868, the imposing structure at the southeast 
corner of Chestnut and Twelfth Streets, which had been erected by 
Dr. White and fitted up expressly for the purpose, was occupied as 
a manufactory and depot. 

Dentistry as a fine art may be said to date its beginning from Dr. 
White's entrance into business. 

The profession was in its infancy. The porcelain teeth which up 
to that time had been placed upon the market were in all respects 
but poor imitations of the natural organs. To his persistent efforts 
to produce better results .were due the wonderful advances attained 
in the teeth of his manufacture. 

Much more might be said for Dr. White's efforts in this line but 
space forbids, suflSce it that a full account may be found in Kock's 
"History of Dental Surgery." 

In February, 1853, the Philadelphia Dental College conferred upon 
him the honorary degree of D.D.S. 

He was a member of the American Dental Convention and served 
on its executive committee at the fourteenth annual meeting, held in 
New York City, June 2-4, 1868. 

On June 11, 1864, he was elected an Honorary Member of the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society. 

His readiness to lend a helping hand to inventions and enterprises 
outside of his own business is worthy of notice. He early became 
interested in the Harmonic Telegraph and assisted Elisha Gray, its 
inventor, with the means necessary for its development. He never 
for a moment wavered in his faith in its ultimate success or hesitated 
to furnish the required means promptly as called for. 

He was also a large stockholder in the American Speaking Telephone 
Company, an outgrowth of the Harmonic Telegraph, — and gave 
much time and thought to prevent litigation about rival claims, and 
was largely instrumental in the adjustment and consolidation of 
opposing interests. 

He was a patriotic and public-spirited man, — the first in America 
to respond to the call of the government for a loan in its early struggles 
with the War of the Rebellion. He was a humanitarian and liberal 
helper in philanthropic efforts, disbursing continuously for many 
years with an unstinting hand in aid of charitable objects. He was 
a worker in the great Sanitary Fair, and one of those who subscribed 
five thousand dollars each towards the Centennial Exhibition. He 
was a member of the Union League, of the Reform Club, the Franklin 
Institute, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, the United States Board of Trade, 
and many other business and benevolent associations. 

Dr. White died in Paris, France, December 30, 1879, from congestion 
of the brain, in the fifty-eighth year of his age. 

208 




LOOMIS P. HASKELL, D.D.S. 

j4n Early Pioneer Dentist of Massachusetts. 

The subject of this sketch came of old New England stock and was 
born April 26, 1826, at Bangor, Maine. When a mere boy his parents 
moved to Marblehead, Mass., where his father died leaving young 
Loomis four years old. He attended school until he was fifteen and 
took one year in high school when he went to Boston and took to the 
Benjamin Franklin art — the typesetting craft. At nineteen years 
of age, in the year 1845, he was induced to take up dentistry by his 
brother-in-law, Dr. M. P. Hanson, a dentist who taught him how to 
fill teeth but he preferred to do the prosthetic work and diligently 
applied himself in carving and moulding the pliable porcelain, and 
in this particular work he soon attracted national attention. 

In 1856 Dr. Haskell left Boston for Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but he 
chanced to make the acquaintance of Dr. W. W. Allport of Chicago, 
who induced him to become his associate. Dr. Haskell was convinced 
that the move was right and remained a partner of that famed and 
rapid operator for eleven years. In 1863, Drs. Allport and Haskell 
published "The Peoples' Dental Journal" intended to advise the citi- 
zens how to care for their health and teeth, but only eight numbers 
came from the press. This confined work disturbed his health, and 
for two years he took care of Dr. Allport's fruit farm at St. Jo, Michi- 
gan. 

He was for many years the professor of the prosthetic departments 
of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery and of the dental depart- 

209 



ment of the Northwestern University. He has contributed papers 
and clinics at all the important dental gatherings in America. 

In 1864 the Chicago Dental Society was organized at the dental 
depot of the S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Company, at that 
time on Randolph and Dearborn Streets. Of the charter members of 
that organization, there are but two living, one Dr. L. P. Haskell, 
the other Dr. E. A. Bogue of New York City. May a kind Providence 
spare both for years of further triumphs. 

Although Dr. Haskell was never a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, having left Boston ten or eleven years previous to its 
organization, yet as he is the only exponent of the dental profession, 
as far as known, who began practice in Boston long previous to any 
others now Hving, it was thought advisable to include his biography 
within the folds of this work. 



210 




CHARLES WILLIAM RODGERS, D.M.D. 

Former Secretary. 

Charles William Rodgers, son of Patrick and Bridget (O'Neil) 
Rodgers, was born in Troy, New York, October 21, 1871. 

His father died in November, 1872, and his only brother was 
drowned in 1876. 

The subject of this sketch received his early education in the 
pubUc schools. Having been forced, through circumstances at an 
early period, to earn his own living, he was compelled to discontinue 
school at twelve years of age. Between the ages of twelve and sixteen 
years, he was employed, successfully, in a laundry, as office boy to 
a physician, and as grocery clerk. 

He then traveled for several years throughout New England, Middle 
and Southern Coast States as a canvasser for home medical supplies, 
and in 1889 was employed on the Plant Line of Steamers plying 
between Tampa, Florida; Key West, and Havana, Cuba. 

In 1890 he became associated with W. Roscoe Bonsai, at Baltimore, 
acting as superintendent for several years, having charge of a large 
force of workmen in the construction of streets, sewers, railroad work, 
etc., at Newport News, and Portsmouth, Va. He also had a part in 
the preparation for the building of the large railroad station in Raleigh, 
North Carolina. The panic of 1892-3 came, and he obeyed the in- 
junction of the late Horace Greeley, "Go West, young man." 

In 1893 he arrived at Kewanee, Illinois, and was employed, first, 
as a section hand on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, 



and later, as a machine T)perator by the National Tube Works. 
The bursting of an emery wheel, causing injuries which laid him in 
bed with illness for a long time, was the indirect cause of his entering 
the profession of dentistry. So now, in 1895, while undergoing en- 
forced idleness, with a very shm purse, he conceived the idea of 
studying dentistry and, in order to successfully finance the years of 
study, looked about for some occupation at which he could work 
during vacations, evenings, Saturdays, etc. 

Having evolved a plan, he went to Chicago, 111., and entered 
Moeler's Trade School, where he took a two months' course in hair 
dressing, etc. After perfecting himself in the work, it was his idea 
to enter one of the Chicago Dental Schools, but a fortunate incident 
sent him East, so in 1896, he went to Cambridge, Mass., secured em- 
ployment, and matriculated as a student in the Boston Dental College 
in the year 1897. Having spent one year at this institution, he 
appHed for admission to Harvard University Dental School — and 
having succeeded in passing the required examinations, entered the 
Harvard Dental School, and graduated in the class of 1900 with its 
degree of D.M.D. He was president of his class. 

Thus the plan outlined by himself five years previously was suc- 
cessful as a means of reaching the goal in view. During the last year 
and a half of his college life, he was, during the early hours of the morn- 
ings, evenings and diuring vacations, employed in the drug business, 
clerking for Dr. Ambrose Saunders, of Cambridge, a graduate of the 
Academic and Medical Departments of Harvard. 

The subject of this sketch gained valuable knowledge of Materia 
Medica and prescription writing during that period, and therefore, 
in 1900, the year in which he was graduated, he was appointed by the 
Corporation of Harvard University to the chair of Assistant in 
Materia Medica in the Dental Department. In 1901 he was promoted 
to Assistant in Dental Materia Medica, serving as such until 1905, 
when he was again promoted to Instructor in Dental Materia Medica, 
and resigned from said office in 1906. 

Dr. Rodgers is a member of the Harvard Dental Alumni Association 
and was a member of the Committee on Harvard Dental School in 
1905, 1906, 1907 and 1908. He was a member of the Harvard Odonto- 
logical Society from 1903 to 19 10; vice-president for the East of 
the National Dental Association 1909-igio, and corresponding 
secretary of the same 1910-1913. He has served on numerous com- 
mittees of the Association, such as PubHc Health, Necrology, Army 
and Navy Legislation, etc., and was secretary of the latter committee 
in 19 ID, the year of the enactment by Congress of the bill authorizing 
the Army Dental Corps. 

Dr. Rodgers is a member of the Boston Medical Library Associa- 
tion, the Northeastern Dental Association, Delta Sigma Delta Fra- 
ternity, Fourth International Dental Congress, St. Louis, 1905; 
and the Fifth International Dental Congress, Berlin, Germany, 1909. 
He held Delegates' Certificates from the State of Massachusetts and 
the City of Boston to the Berlin Congress. 



He was a member of the local committee of arrangements for the 
meeting of the National Dental Association at Boston, 1908, and had 
the honor of being delegated to extend the invitation of Governor. 
Curtis Guild, Jr., the year previous, inviting the Society to meet 
in Boston. 

He assisted in organizing the Lewis & Clark Dental Congress, 
Portland, Oregon, in 1905, and the Jamestown Dental Convention, 
Norfolk, Va., 1907, having been a member of the Massachusetts 
State Organizing Committee of each. 

He became a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, Feb- 
ruary 25, 1901, and was editor of the same in 1904-1905; and was 
also elected Secretar>' of said society in Jime, 1904, holding said office 
until May. 191 2. He has ser\-ed on many committees of said society. 

He was a member of the committee of sis appointed by the Ad- 
ministrative Board of the Harv^ard Dental School in 1905 to inter- 
view and solicit money from prominent citizens for an endowment 
fund and for the new Harvard Dental School bmlding. 

Dr. Rodgers in religion is a Roman Catholic, and was the first 
president of the Holy Name Society of St. Leo's Parish, Dorchester, 
ser\'ing two years. 

He was a member of the Board of Councillors in 1905-1907-1909- 
1910 of the Catholic Alumni Sodality of Boston (a society composed 
of graduates of academic institutions), and in 191 1 was elected Vice- 
President of the same. 

He is an Honorary member of the Catholic Missionary Union, 
Washington, D. C.,and an Honorary Member of the Catholic Church 
Extension Society in America. 

He is a Jeffersonian Democrat, politically, and has always been 
actively interested in the success of the principles in which he believes, 
but has never sought or held political office. He has been a frequent 
contributor to the public press on political matters, and is the author 
of "Over-Production and Panic," a pamphlet pubUshed in 1908 in 
the interests of Mr. Br>'an's candidacy for President of the United 
States. 

He was one of the incorporators, and is a director of the Harvard 
Co-operative Bank of Dorchester, and is a member of the Harvard 
Improvement Association. 

Dr. Rodgers has been a generous clinician before various dental 
societies and a frequent contributor to dental Uterature, having read 
his first paper before the Harvard Odontological Society in 1900, the 
year of his graduation. 

He is the originator of a process for constructing a '"sectional 
bridge," a "sectional crown" for repairing badly broken down 
molar teeth, and a method of replacing broken facings on bridge work. 

Dr. Rodgers was married at Milton, Mass., April 10, 1901, to 
Mary Elizabeth Meagher: the fruit of this union is a son, Anthony 
Gerard. 



213 




HENRY HILDRETH PIPER, A.B., D.D.S., D.M.D. 
First Vice-President. 

Henry Hildreth Piper was born in Dublin, New Hampshire, 
October 28, 1852. His father was Henry Curtis Piper, a native of 
DubUn, and his mother, Harriet Elvira Stone (still hving), a native 
of Marlboro, New Hampshire. 

He is a direct descendant in the sixth generation from William 
Greenwood, the first permanent settler in Dublin Village, and one 
of the half dozen earliest settlers in the town. His family still own 
and occupy the Greenwood place. 

He was educated in the schools of Dublin, at Appleton Academy, 
New Ipswich, N. H., and at Dartmouth College, and was graduated 
from the latter institution in 1876. 

After his graduation he entered the employ of French & Heald, 
furniture manufacturers, Milford, N. H. In 1880 he married Laura 
Weeks Rice, daughter of Rev. George M. Rice, for sixteen years 
pastor of the First Church at Dublin, and Persis F. Weeks, a native 
of Lancaster, N. H. The only child of this union, Mary Stone Piper, 
was born in Milford, N. H., in 1882. 

In 1884-1885 Dr. Piper spent a year in government employ at 
Washington, D. C, and New Orleans, La. 

In 1886, he entered the Boston Dental College, where he spent 
three years, graduating in 1889 with the degree of D.D.S. Following 
close upon his graduation he entered on the practice of his profession 
at Winter Hill, Mass., and has there practiced up to the present time. 

214 



He has been an instructor in the Tufts College Dental School for 
fifteen years, and holds a degree of D.M.D. from that institution. 
He is a member of the Boston and Tufts Dental Alumni Association, 
of which he has been President; is a member of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society, ha\'ing been elected October 29, 1900. On May 2, 
191 2, he was elected second Vice-President, and first Vice-President 
on May 8, 1913, of said society;* of the Dental Hygiene Coimcil of 
Massachusetts, the latter of which he has served as President; and is 
a member of the American Academy of Dental Science, having been 
elected in 1898; and its Treasurer in 1910, which latter position he 
still holds. 

He is a director in the Associated Charities of Somerville, and for 
several years has served as one of the Vice-Presidents. 

Dr. Piper resides at 411 High St., West Medford. 

* Since writing the above, Dr. Piper has been elected President. 



215 




rADOLPHUS FREDERICK WYMAN 

Second Vice-President. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 
on December 13, 1852, and was the eleventh child of George' Collins 
Wyman and Hannah Brown. 

His early education was obtained in the pubHc Schools of his native 
town. 

He came to Boston in 1869 in May, and in July was apprenticed 
to William P. Leavitt of 19 Tremonb Row. In September, 1872, he 
entered the ofi&ce of Dr. E. V. McLeod, first Secretary of the Massa- 
chusetts Board of Registration in Dentistry, of New Bedford, and 
in February, 1877, opened an ofi&ce for himself. 

He was elected a member of the Massachusetts Dental Society, 
in 1896/ and on May 8, 19 13, was elected second Vice-President of 
the same. Since writing the above, he has succeeded to first Vice- 
President. 

On May 22, 1883, he married Ellen Loring Hayes, of New Bedford. 



216 




ASHER HARRIMAN ST. CLAIR CHASE, D.M.D. 

Secretary. 

The son of Asher Moore and Jane M. (Weston) Chase, he first 
saw the light of day in Roxbury, Mass., on November 8, 1873, and 
when six months of age, he removed to Warren, Maine, with his 
parents, where his early education was obtained in the grammar 
and high schools. 

In the Autumn of 1893 he entered Harvard University Dental De- 
partment, and graduated in 1896 with the degree of D.M.D. , and in 
the year 1907 was elected Secretary of his class. 

Aiter graduation he began the practice of dentistry in Everett, 
Mass., where he has since continued. 

He received, in 1896, the appointment of Instructor in Mechanical 
Dentistry, Harvard University, and held the same until 1899, and 
then was made assistant demonstrator in the same department 
until 1905, when he received the appointment as Instructor in Oper- 
ative Dentistry in 1912, which position he still holds. 

On June 22, 1896, he became an active member of {the Harvard 
Dental Alumni Association, and has served on various committees 
since, including the executive committee, of which he still holds the 
position. 

He has been a member of the Harvard Odontological Society since 
1901, and has served on various committees of the same, being at 
present a member of the executive committee. 

217 



On April 22, 1907, Dr. Chase was elected an active member of the 
Massachusetts Dental Society; was elected its assistant Secretary 
June, 1910, and promoted to Secretary in May, 1912, and still holds 
the office. 

He is Treasiurer of the Home for Aged Persons in Everett, Mass., 
being electbd in 1909, and still holds the position. 

In 1909, he was elected Chairman of the Board of Health of the 
City of Everett, and holds at present the office. 

He is Secretary and member of the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trade of Everett, from 1909 to date; also second Vice-Pres- 
ident of the Board of Trade, 19 13. Member of the Park Commission 
(three years), from 1905 to 1908. Secretary of the Park Commission 
(one year) from 1907 to 1908. Secretary-Treasurer Mystic Valley 
Waterways Association, 19 12 to date ; member Everett Cottage Hos- 
pital Corporation ; member Maiden Deliberative Assembly ; member 
Everett Young Men's Christian Association ; member New England 
Commercial Executives. 

Dr. Chase married, June 7, 1899, at Somerville, Mass., Miss Jean- 
nette Margaret Bradbury, of that city. 



218 




CHARLES HARDEN PROCTOR, D.M.D. 

Assistant Secretary. 

The subject of this sketch, the son of Isaac K. Proctor, a native 
of FrankHn, N. H., and Emma Bucknam, a native of Columbia Falls, 
Maine, is a descendant of Robert Proctor, the earliest American 
ancestor of the Proctor family, who first appears in this country 
at Concord, Massachusetts, where he was made a freeman in 1643. 
He married, December 31, 1645, J^-ne, the eldest daughter of Richard 
Hildreth, of Concord and Chelmsford, the ancestor of the Hildreths 
of America, who died at Chelmsford, in 1688, and whose younger 
daughter, Abigail, became the wife of Moses Parker. 

In 1653, Robert Proctor, in connection with Richard Hildreth and 
twenty-seven others, petitioned the General Court for a grant of land 
six miles square, "to begin at Merrimack River at a neck of land next 
to Concord River, and so run up Concord River, south and west into 
the country, to make up that circumference or quantity of land as is 
above expressed." The petition was granted. In 1654, Mr. Proctor 
removed to the new plantation, which was organized November 22, 
of that year, as a town under the name of Chelmsford. The last four 
or five of his children were born in Concord, the others in Chelmsford. 
His descendants resided in many of the neighboring towns, and at an 
early date some of them pushed back into the wilderness and settled 
in New Hampshire, Vermont and New Yc^rk, and have since scattered 
over the West. 

2ig 



He died at Chelmsford, April 28, 1697, leaving twelve children. 
The line of descent from Robert is James, James, James, Jonathan, 
James, Hiel and Isaac, the latter, the father of Charles M,, the 
subject of this sketch. Jonathan, the great-great-grandfather of Isaac 
was a drummer of the Second Precient Company of Woburn, Mass- 
achusetts, and was in the battle of Bennington. 

James, the great-grandfather of Isaac, was a soldier in the company 
of Captain Jeremiah Marston of New Hampshire in Colonel John 
Goffe's Regiment and was in the Colonial War at the Battle of Crown 
Point, September 30, 171 2. He also served in^ the Revolutionary 
War, having been mustered in August 10, 1776. He died on his way 
home from Ticonderoga, November 11, 1776. 

Dr. Proctor was born in Chelsea, Mass., on the 29th' day of 
March, 1880, and received his early education in the Maiden, Mass., 
pubhc schools; and was graduated from Tufts College Dental School 
in 1901, with the degree of D.M.D. In 1912, he was appointed 
Demonstrator of Clinical Dentistry in the said institution. 

On October 24, 1904, he was elected an active member of the 
Massachusetts Dental Society, and has served as its Councillor, 
from the Metropolitan District, during the years 1910-1911 and 1912, 
and was then advanced by election to Assistant Secretary, and still 
holds the ofi&ce. 

He is also Chairman of the Executive Committee of the above- 
named district. He has served as chairman of the clinic committee 
of the State Society for the years of 1912, '13 and '14, and is ex-presi- 
dent and ex-secretary of the East Middlesex Dental Society. 

Dr. Proctor has practiced in Georgia, London and Boston. He is 
a member of the Psi Omega Dental Fraternity, of the National 
Dental Association, the Massachusetts Oral Hygiene Council, Boston 
and Tufts Dental Alumni Association, and a member of the Dental 
staff of the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

On April 12, 1903, Dr. Proctor was married to Clara Marie Shute, 
of Maiden, Mass., by which union there have been four children. 
He resides at 26 Hawthorne St., Maiden, Mass. He is a member of 
the Central M. E. Church of that city, and is afl&liated with Converse 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. Tabernacle Chapter, R. A. M., Melrose Council, 
R. & S. M. of Maiden, Mass., and De Molay Commandery, K. T., 
of Boston, and the Royal Arcanum, and A. O. U. W. 



220 




JOSEPH TOTTEN PAUL, D.M.D. 

Treasurer. 

The subject of this sketch is a son of WiUiam and Marianne (Totten) 
Paul. He first saw the Ught of day on September 17, 1863. and re- 
ceived his eariy education in the Boston pubhc schools. 

In 1880, he entered the drug business and continued for the next 
five years, when, in 1885, he engaged in the United States Postal 
Service, where he remained till the Autumn of 1888, and in June of 
that year he matriculated in the Dental Department of Harvard 
University, and, in 1891, graduated with the degree of D.M.D. 

Dr. Paul has been an active society man, and among others of which 
he is a member are the following : 

On December i, 1 891, he became an active member of the Harvard 
Dental Alumni Association, and a life member in April, 1903. A Vice- 
President of said Association in 1896, and President in 1897-1898. 
Chairman of Trustees of the Permanent Fund from 1904 to 1909. 

In 1892, Harvard University appointed him to the position of 
Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry, which position he held till 
1899, when the appointment as Instructor in Operative Dentistry 
was made, and which office he still holds. 

The Harvard Odontological Society elected him to active member- 
ship in 1893, and Recording Secretary and Chairman ex officio, in 
1896 to 1901, and President in 1901-1902. 

In 1 89 1 he became a member of the Dental Protective Associa- 
tion of the United States. 

On June 8, 1893, Dr. Paul was elected an active member of the 

221 



Massachusetts Dental Society, and became a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee and its Secretary, 1894 and 1895. 

In 1896, he was made Editor; such position he held imtil his election 
to the Treasurership, which latter he still holds. In 1895-1896, he 
was Chairman of the Entertainment Committee of said Society. 

A member of the National Dental Association as early as July, 
1908, and of the Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity, and Deputy S. G. M. 
for Massachusetts in 1895. 

He is also a thirty-third degree Mason, and Honorary Member 
of Harvard University Masonic Club, also, 

W. M. Mt., Lebanon Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 1908-1909. 

H. P., St. Andrews R. A. Chapter, 1904-1905. 

T. I. M., Boston Council R. & S. M., 1910-1911. 

W. M., Mt. Olivet Ch. R. C, 1911-1913. 

G. Boston Commandery, K. T., 1914. 

A member of the Boston Curling Club, and Recording Secretary, 
1903-1905, and Secretary-Treasurer, 1908-1912. 

Charter Member Boston Bowling Green Club, and Treasurer, 
1908-1910. 

Charter Member The Curling Club of Boston, and member of the 
Executive Committee, 19 11- 

A member of the Harvard Club of Boston, 19 13. 

On June 11, 1898 at Boston, Mass., Dr. Paul married Miss Marianne, 
McGraw, by which union they have a daughter and son to bless them. 




C. EDSON ABBOTT, D.D.S. 

Editor. 



Subject of this sketch is the son of Edward C. and Alice (Edson) 
Abbott, bom in Randolph, Vt., on the 9th day of December, 1880, 
of Old New England stock on both sides. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of Franklin, 
Mass. Graduate of Horace Mann High School, Franklin, Mass., 1898. 
Spent 1898- 1899 in the dental oflSce of his father in FrankUn and 
took special work in chemistry and other subjects at the high school. 

He entered the University of Pennsylvania in 1899, and graduated 
in 1902 with the degree of D.D.S. At entrance won first place in the 
Competitive Scholarship Examination. In school participated in 
various student activities ; on chess team, track team and the depart- 
ment football team. Was on the Pennsylvania Dental Journal staff. 
Seriously considered offers to practice in Rhodesia and Madras, but 
decided to take his father's office in Franklin, when his father left 
for CaHfomia in 1902. 

On Oct. 24, 1904, he was elected an active member of the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society. In 1908 was elected Assistant Secretary. 
In 1909, he was elected Editor and still holds the office, and has held 
positions on various committees: press, history, post-graduate work, 
legislative. In 191 2, was elected Chairman of the Publication Com- 
mittee of the Journal of the Allied Societies of Dentistry, and still 
holds the office. In societies, always takes a definite stand for the 
progressive measures of the period. 

223 



Dr. Abbott was married at Natick, Mass., to Miss Lillian Favour, 
a Wellesley graduate, in July 14, 1904. They have three sons and one 
daughter. 

Dr. Abbott has been Chairman of the Educational Committee of 
Y. M. C. A., conducting a Night School for Foreigners, also Chairman 
of the Physical Department. 

Has been President of the Men's Class of the Congregational Church 
and chairman of various committees. 

In politics has been Delegate to the RepubUcan State Convention 
etc.; member of the Finance Committee of Franklin; candidate for 
Alternate to the Republican National Convention in 191 2; Organizer 
for Progressive party, and member of its Legislative Committee in 
1912, etc.; Delegate to Progressive State Convention in 1913. 

Has continuously pract ced his profession in the same office in 
Franklin and has given papers and clinics in the various New England 
States, National Dental Association, Jamestown Exposition, Central 
Atlantic States, etc., on Porcelain Inlays, Ethyl Chloride, General 
Anaesthesia, etc., etc. 



224 



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