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Full text of "The birds of South America"

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THE BIRDS 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA. 



VOL. II (Plates.) 






(}XA..J^-^-^' 



»« 



Bhali'otr^e, W/nAU^^ We<^i^ff^li K^dcklx^H- Ht*^ 

ILLUSTRATIONS 






^yo/i 



OF THE 



GAME BIRDS AND WATER FOWL 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA. 



BY 



H. GRONVOLD 



LOND ON: 
JOHN WHELDON & CO., 

38, GREAT QUEEN STREET, KINGSWAY, W.C. 

19 17. 





/ 



PUBLISHER'S NOTE 

The series of plates included in the present volume were originally 
intended to illustrate the second and third volumes of the " Birds of South 
America," of which only the first vol, comprising "A List of the Birds of 
South America," was published. This work as projected by the late Lord 
Brabourne, in conjunction with Mr. Chubb, was to have comprised 16 vols, 
with 400 hand-coloured plates. The first volume mentioned above had only 
appeared, however, when further progress was delayed by Lord Brabourne's 
last visit to South America, while his return to the Army when War broke 
out, and his subsequent death at Neuve-Chapelle in 1915, put an abrupt stop 
to the work. So little text had then been completed, and the work as 
projected was so extensive and costly, that nothing could be done in the way 
of completing even a second volume, but feeling that the fine series of plates 
already finished by Mr. Gronvold (and partly printed) merited publication, 1 
made arrangements to issue them in the present way, and I have added 
short notes on most of the species as compensation for the absence of any 
other text. 

H. KIRKE SWANN. 

London, Dec. 1916. 



DESCRIPTION OF PLATES. 



Plate Issued No. in 

No. in Part. List. 



1, 2, 3 Rhea americana, R. rothschildi, R. pennata (American Rhea, 

Rothschild's Rhea and Darwin's Rhea). The Rheas are flightless 
birds of very large size, measuring from four to five feet in height, 
with small and imperfect wings, long legs and small feet ; represented 
in Africa by the Ostriches and in Australia by the Emus, but most 
nearly allied to the latter, having three toes on the foot instead of two 
as in the former. The American Rhea is the E. Brazilian species, 
Rothschild's Rhea, the common Rhea, is the sub-species (the R. 
Americana of previous authors), inhabiting Uruguay, Argentina, etc., 
and Darwin's Rhea is the Rhea of Patagonia and Chili. All frequent 
open country, never wooded districts, and are found in parties of three 
or four to twenty or thirty. When hunted by horsemen, who employ 
the I'o/as, or thong and balls, they travel at a great speed, using the 
wings only to steer with. The flesh of young birds is excellent but 
the old are never eaten. Where not molested they will frequent the 
neighbourhood of the estana'as. Several females lay in one nest, a 
depression in the ground, each laying a dozen or more eggs, so that a 
great number are sometimes found. 

5 Tinamus SOlitarius (Solitary Tinamou). The Tinamous, a remark- 

able group, have no very near affinity to any other family. Super- 
ficially they resemble the Partridges, and are so called by the 
Spaniards, while the flesh is most delicate eating. They are essentially 
ground birds and swift runners, non-perching and non-gregarious ; in 
size small, ranging from that of a Quail to that of a common fowl ; 
some 70 species in all are found in South America. The flight is 
heavy, noisy and short, but very rapid ; the food is insects chiefly, 
also fruit, seeds and grain. The male alone incubates. Nest : a 
hollow in the ground lined with leaves. Eggs : always clear unspotted 
and highly polished, in colour turquoise, deep green, purple, yellow, 
reddish, or chocolate brown according to the species. The Solitary 
Tinamou inhabits Paraguay and S.E. Brazil. 

45 RhynchOtUS rufescens (Great Tinamou). Inhabits S.E. Brazil, 

Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. Known on the pampas of 
Argentina as Ferdiz ;^ratide, or Great Partridge. It is about 14-in. in 
length. The Perdiz comun or Common Partridge is the Spotted 
Tinamou {No/kura maatlosa). 

69, 70 Taoniscus nanus (Dwarf Tinamou) ; Calopezus elegans (Martinetta 
Tmamou). The Dwarf Tinamou inhabits Brazil and Paraguay. 
The .Vtartinetta .says Hudson (the word Tinamou, by the way, is 
never used except by naturalists for any of these birds) is a fine game 
bird of Patagonia, south of the Rio Colorado, inhabiting the elevated 
tablelands chiefly where patches of dwarf scrub occur among the 
thorny thickets. It also occurs in W. Argentina. 

72 Tinaraotis pentlandi (Pentland's Tinamou). Inhabits the upland 

valleys of the mountain ranges from North Chili to Ecuador. 

96 Penelope Obscura (Dark C;uan). The Curassows and Guans, com- 

prismg the Gallinaceous family Cracidce, form one of the most 
characteristic groups of the larger birds inhabiting the South American 
forests. They number some fifty species, all essentially arboreal in 
habits, frequenting dense woods and generally building a large nest in 
trees, the eggs being white or merely speckled. The present species 
has a wide range, viz. : Uruguay, S.E. Brazil, Bolivia and N. Argentina. 
The other fifteen species of Penelope are confined to the more tropical 
parts of S. America. 



Plate 


Issued 


No. 


in Part. 


7 


I. 



8 

No. in 
List 

98 Penelope jaequaea (Crested Guan). This species is the Pavo de 

Alonte, or Wood Turkey of the Spaniards. It is found in Uppe 
Amazonia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. 

8 I. 99 Penelope pileata (Red-breasted Guan). Inhabits N.E. Brazil. 

9 I. 107, 115 Ortalida ruficauda (Red-tailed Guan). O. erythroptera (Red-winged 

Guan). Beebe found the Red-tailed Guan associating with domestic 
fowls in Venezuela, and mentions the belief (held also elsewhere) that 
they inter-breed, producing fine game cocks, but no such hybrids 
could be produced. The Red-winged Guan is found both in 
Venezuela and Ecuador. 

10 11. 119 Cumana jacuting-a (Spix's White-headed Guan). a native of S.E. 

Brazil and Paraguay. 

11 I. 121 Aburria aburri (Wattled Guan). Found in Columbia and Ecuador. 

12 1. 122 Chamsepetes goudotii (Goudot's Guan). Inhabits Colombia, 

Ecuador and Peru. 

13 I. 132 Odontophorus capueira (Capoeira Partridge). This species inhabits 

S.E. Brazil. All the other members of the genus are confined to 
Western Tropical America. Gould, who has admirably figured and 
described the birds of this group in his Monograph of the Odon- 
tophorinse, calls them the "Partridges of America." Newton 
considered them closely allied to the Old World Quails. About 14 
species occur in S. America, together with 6 species of the allied 
genus Eupsychortyx or " Crested Quails." 

14 1. 144 Coluraba COrensis (Barefaced Pigeon). The Pigeons and Doves "of 

South America are very numerous, and comprise nearly 70 species. 
The habits of many are akin to those of their Old World congenora, 
but in several genera such as Geotrygo?i, the Ground-Doves, they are 
of course much modified. The Bare-faced Pigeon is a native of 
Venezuela. 

15 I. 145, 176 Columba picazuro (Picazuro Pigeon); Columbina grisea (Grey 

Ground-Dove). The Picazuro Pigeon inhabits Brazil, P.iraguay, 
Uruguay and is the common wood-pigeon of Argentina. In appear- 
ance and habits it resembles its European name?ake, the Ring Dove 
or Wood Pigeon. The Grey Ground-Dove inhabits Brazil, Guiana, 
Venezuela and Columbia. 

16 1. 148, 151 Columba maculosa (Spot- Winged Pigeon) ; C. sylvestris (Paraguayan 

Rufous Pigeon). The Spot-Winged Pigeon has a wide range extending 
from Peru to Argentina. It resembles the Picazuro Pigeon but ma> 
be at once distinguished, says Mr. Hudson, by its spotted back and 
wings. The Paraguayan Rufous Pigeon is found in S. Brazil as well 
as Paraguay. 

17 III. 154, 206 Columba albilinea (White-naped Pigeon); Geotrygon bourcieri 

(Bourcier's Ground-Dove). As indicated above two species of Pigeons 
of widely dissimilar appearance and habits are depicted on this plate. 
The first-named ranges from Columbia and Guiana to Peru and 
Bolivia, while the second inhabits W. Columbia and W. Ecuador. 

18 IV. 155 Columba araucana (Chilian Pigeon), Inhabits Chile, and is known 

as "Torcaza." 



Plate Issued No. i 

No. In Part. List 



9 



19 I- 162, 179 Zenaida auPiCUlata (Violet-eared Dove); Chamspelia talpacoti 

(Talpacoti Ground Dove). The Violet-eared Dove, or " Tortolita " 
which inhabits the greater part of S. America, has an affinity to the 
European Turtle Dove. The Talpacoti Ground-Dove, a pretty 
chocolate-coloured dove breeds, says White, in the orange groves in 
the province of Salta, Argentina ; it ranges northward through Brazil, 
Bolivia and Peru to Venezuela and Guiana. 

20 I. 195, 196 Leptoptila ehloroauchenia (Green-naped Dove) ; L. callauchen 

(Salvadori's Dove). Both these species are found in Argentina and 
Paraguay. The Green-naped Dove, a handsome species, is an inhabi- 
tant of wooded districts, but a ground feeder, and of solitary habits. 
The bird is said to utter a single melodious note. 

21 II. 221, 251 Pardirallus rytirhynchus (Black Rail) : Creciscus viridis 

(Cayenne Crake). The Rails and Crakes of South America are very 
numerous, some fifty species being known to science. The Black 
Rail, a species hardly larger than our English Water-Rail, is found, 
says Hudson, throughout La Plata, everywhere where reeds and rushes 
grow. It has a wide range covering nearly all the southern half of S. 
America. The Cayenne Crake inhabits Colombia, Guiana and Brazil. 

22 IV. 231 Aramides Chiricote (Azara's Wood-Rail). A native of Paraguay 

and Brazil. 

23 II. 232 Aramides ypecaha (Ypecaha Wood-Rail). The Spaniards, says 

Hudson, call this species Galline/a, from its supposed resemblance to 
a fowl. It is a large species, measuring some 19-in. in length, and 
frequents the reed-beds, etc., and where not persecuted will come out 
of the reeds by day, even entering the villages. It is pugnacious and 
will attack the domestic poultry. An excellent account of this bird's 
habits is given in Hudson and Sclater's Argentine Ornithology (II., 
PP- 15 •■54)- It also inhabits S. Brazil and Paraguay. 

24 1. 263 Fuliea g-ig-antea (Gigantic Coot). Six species of Coot inhabit S. 

America, of which three are common on the pampas of Argentina and 
Patagonia and are generally widely distributed. The present large 
species and one other are found in Bolivia, Peru and N. Chili ; while 
the Horned Coot is confined to Bolivia and N.W. Argentina. 

25 I. 274 Podiceps major (Great Grebe). The Grebes of S. American number 

9 species. Tliey differ little from their European congenora. The 
present species is about the size of our Great Crested Grebe, and 
is found from Peru and Bolivia to the Straits of Magellan. 

26 IV. 344, 345 Larus Cirrhocephalus (Grey-headed Gull): L. maculipennis 

(Spotted-winged Gull). The S. American Gulls and Terns are 
numerous, some 37 species being known, of which several are 
cosmopolitan species included also in the British avifauna. The 
Grey-headed Gull ranges no further north than S.E. Brazil and 
Peru nor further south than Argentina. It retains its pearl-grey 
hood throughout the year, although it lightens in the winter. The 
Spotted-winged Gull is found from S. Brazil to Patagonia and Chili, 
and is called Gaviota. It breeds on inland marshes, and its eggs are 
delicate eating, resembling those of the Plover in taste and appearance. 



Plate Issued K-^.in 

No, in Pari. Ll=t. 

27 III. 369, 360 ThinOCOrus orbig-nyianus (D'Orbigny's Seed-Snipe); T. rumi- 

ci\i)rus (Common Seed-Snipe). Speaking of the Common Seed- 
Snipe, Hudson says •' This curious Inrd has the grey upper 
plumage and narrow long sharply pointed wings of a Snipe, with the 
plump body and short strong curved beak of a Partridge." It feeds 
on seeds (mainly clover seeds), and tender buds and leaves. It is 
about 6J inches in length, and inhabits Tierra del Fuego, Chili and 
Patagonia, ranging north to the pampas of Argentina and also Peru 
and Bolivia in winter. D'Orbigny's Seed-Snipe has a very similar 
range. 

28 IV. 366 HaematOpus durnfordi (Dumford's Oyster-catcher). Like its 

European congener this striking bird frequents the sea-coast of 
Patagonia where it is met with it pairs, or sometimes small flocks. 
Four other species occur, and the Plover family is in fact well 
represented in S. America by some 65 species, of which no less than 
17 are on the British list, these including the Turnstone, Grey Plover, 
Spotted Sandpiper, Ruff, Sanderhng, Knot, Grey Phalarope and other 
familiar species. 

29 V. 371-2-3 Belonopterus cayennensis, B. g-risescens, B. chilensis 

(Cayenne Lapwing, Argentine Lapwing, Chilian Lapwing). The first 
of these species occurs in Guiana, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, 
the second from Paraquay and Uruguay to Argentina, the third 
in Peru, Chile and the Falkland Islands. The Cayenne Lapwing 
much resembles the Old World Lapwing both in appearance, habits 
and nesting, but is considerably larger, measuring about i3-in. in 
length. It is a bird of the pampas and is known as Teru-ierii from 
its cry. 

30 V. 384, 385 Charadrius OCCidentalis (Western Plover) : C. falklandicus 

(Falkland Island Plover). The Western Plover has been recorded 
only from the province of Tarapaca, N. Chile. The Falkland Island 
Plover has a wider range than its name indicates, extending to Chile, 
Argentina, and Uruguay. The nest, says Gibson, is always placed near 
the water and is a slight scraping in the ground, lined with dry grass ; 
eggs 3, spotted with black on an olive ground. 

31 V. 418 GullinagO g-igantea (Giant Snipe). This fine species inhabits Brazil, 

Paraquay, Uruguay and Argentina. Nine other species of Snipe occur 
in S. America. 

32 VI. 430 Burhinus bistriatus (Double-striped Thick-knee) A Native of 

Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil. It has much of the appearance and 
habits of the English Thick-knee or Stone Curlew. 

33 III. 439-40 Psophia Oehroptera (Ochre-winged Trumpeter) : P. viridis (Green- 

winged Trumpeter). Six species of Trumpeter are found in S. 
America ; of the two figured thefirst inhabits the Rio Negro region of 
N. Brazil, and the second the Rio Madeira region of Central Brazil. 

34 VI. 457 Ajaia ajaja (Roseate Spoonbill). This fine species which occurs 

over S. America as far south as the Rio Negro in Argentina is 
usually seen, says Hudson, on the pampas in small flocks of 6 to 20, 
which all feed together, wading to the knees and sweeping their 
long flat beaks from side to side as they advance. This family comes 
between the Ibises, of which 13 species are found in S. America, and 
the Herons, cf which 29 species occur, besides 3 species of Storks, 
There are also the Screamers, three in number, and 4 kinds of 
Flamingoes. 



Plate 


Issued No. in 


No. 


in Part. List. 


35 


VI. 457 



Ajaia ajaja juv. (Roseate Spoonbill, young) 

36 III. 501, 505-6 Chloephaga melanoptera (Andean Goose), C. rubidiceps (Falk- 

land Island Goose) : C. poliocephala (Ashy-headed Goose). In this 
fine plate Mr. Gronvold has depicted three out of six species of this 
fine genus of Geese, all which occur at the Straits of Magellan, 
4 being found in the Falkland Islands, two migrating north to 
Argentina in winter, and one, the Andean Goose, inhabiting the high 
Andes from the Straits of Magellan to Chile, Peru and Bolivia, 
descending to the plains in winter. Two species of Swan, the 
Black-necked and the Coscoroba occur throughout the southern half 
of S. America, and the Anatidx are further represented by 43 species 
including 'I'eal, Pintails, Shovelers, Wigeon, Pochards, Lake Ducks, 
Spurwinged Ducks, and Merganser. 

37 II. 507 Dendrocygna viduata (White-faced Tree-Duck) The Tree-Ducks, 

three in number, are widely distributed over S. America, the present 
species being found southward to Argentina. Hudson says it utters 
three long clear whistling notes. The common " Pato silva '' or 
Whistling Duck of Argentina is however the Fulvous Tree-Duck 
(Dendrocygua fulva). 

38 V. 515 Mareca Sibilatrix (Chiloe Wigeon). This species says Hudson, is 

most abundant on the pampas of Buenos Ayres and Argentina ; it is 
resident and usually seen in small flocks of 12 to 20, but sometimes 
as many as 100 to 200. 



Printid by 

Gko. K. Flower. 

"^c 36artbcIomcw Wnsec ' 

12—14, Verulam Street 

London, E.G. 



)nUinini 



ILLUSTRATIONS TO 



THE E 



il-JLV. 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA. 



BY 



H. GRONVOLD. 



A Series of original and authoritative plates, 
illustrating typical species, intended to accompany 
" The Birds of South America," Vol. L {List), 
by LORD BRABOURNE and CHARLES CHUBB, 
issued in 1913. 



LONDON: 
JOHN WHELDON & CO., 

38, GREAT QUEEN STREET, KTNGSWAY, W.C. 



A, 0(0 ni an f»I«^ 



NOTE. 



' ik»v. '-if *^i5; 






TKb furtK^f delays in the publication of Vol 2. of this work 



jccasioned by the interv'tntion of the war and the death of tf 



:ie 



Brabc 



the ft 



journe at the tront have made it impossible to 
complete the Text for vol. 2. The publishers however feel that 
the fine series of plates executed by Mr. Gronvold for the work 
will possess a sufficiei^t value to the subscribers to merit their 
publication withouf any further text tharr is to be fourid in Vol. 1, 
already issued (2l8 net). A first series of 19 plates is therefore 
offered herewith. A further series, including also the missing 
Nos. in the present series, are. already printed or on the stones 
and it Is expected will be ready very shortly. Only 2D0 sets of 
each part will be issued. 



October, 1915. 



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2. Ortah'/Jfi erjthropLera 

U<(1 VI -III (jfil GiLun . 



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Vol. 11. PL 11. 




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Vol. II. PI . 14^. 





Columha cnrens is . 

Bare -faced. Pig eon. 



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The' Birds of South- J^rrherica. 



Vol. II. Pi. 1.5. 




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Vol. n. PI. 16. 




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Mr. DRESSER'S PUBLICATIONS. 



;gDn 



NOTE.— John Wheldon & Co; hold the entire stock of these work*. 
Special terms <|uoted to the trade. 



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the Rollers, With 27 fnelu hand-coloured plates, imp. 4to, cloth 
(pub. £5 net). £4 10s. 1893 

The above two beautiful monographs of striking and interesting groups of birds should be in every 

ornithological library. 



London; JOHN WPTEt.rtOIsT fc Co., ,38,- GreAt Queen Street, Kingsway, W.C. 



i^art. E. CoBtJuninjr4^ Hand-Coloured PlateV. lasTnet. 



ILLUSTRATIONS TO 



THE BIRDS 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA. 



BY 



H. GRONVOLD. 



A Series of original and auttjoritative plates, 
illustrating typical species, intended to accompany 
" The Birds of South America," Vol, I. (List), 
by LORD BRABOURNE and CHARLES CHUBB, 
issued in 1913. 



LONDON : 

JOHN WHELDON & CO., 

38, GREAT QUEEN STREET. KINGSWAY, W.C 



^yr^sonitn z;^ 



NOTE. 

le^^wSys in the publication of Vol 2^oRp[i^vo? 
occasioned by the intervention of the war and the death of the 
late Lord Brabourne at the front have made it impossible to 
complete the Text for vol. 2. The publishers however feel that 
the fine series of plates executed l>y Mr: Gronvold, for the worlt 
will possess a sufficient value to the subscribers to merit their 
publication v/ithout any further text than is to be found in Vol. I. 
already issued (2l8 hef). A first series of 19 plates is therefore 
offered herewith. A further series, including also the missing 
Nos. in the present series, are already printed or on the stones 
and it is expected will be ready very shortly. Only 20Q sets of 
each part will be issued. 



October, 1915. 



The Birds of Souik Aner; 



LCCb 



Vol. II. PL lO. 



■ -itM 



■i\\ ^ 

7S i \ 




Curruuicv jacuixngcL. 

Spue's While -hexixLtd GhLaw. 



ale & DatmelsstMj.L""'' irap. 






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AroMu'des ypecaJicu. 

ypecaha Wood.-Ruil. 



B»l<t & Cameltiecm.. \^^ x 



Tkr Buds o/' SoijJJh A 



mervcfiy 



Vol. IT. PL 37. 



w 



\ 







V 



V 



Dendroc^gna. vidnjolcu. 

White -faced Tree -Duck. 



Balfe & I>Mae1s„m,L*.^ j 



Mr. DRESSER'S PUBLICATIONS. 



301= 



NOTE— John Wheldon & Co. bold the entire stock of theie workt. 
Special terms quoted to the trade. 



3nc 



Dresser (H. E.). A History of the Birds of Europe; including all the 
species inhabiting the Western Palaeafctic Region, with 633 
beautifully executed band-coloured plates by Joseph Wolf, J. (j. 
Keulemans and E. Neale, also the SUPPLEMENT, with 89 additional 
coloured p/a<es, together 9 vols, roy. 4to., orig. pts. £60 net. 

. : ■ 1871—96 

TKe stock of, ttis great aildiovaluaMe, a» well as most beautiful, work k' now nearly exKaiisted. 

^Do., Siipplement only, with 89 additional coloured, plates, in 

9 pts., roy, 4to (only a few copies for sale). £9 98. net. 1895-96 
A Companion Work to the "Birds of Europe." 

Dresser (H.., E.). Eggs of the Birds of Europe, including all the 
species inhabiting the Western Peilaearctic Area, 2 vols, complete 
in 24 orig, parts, 4to. with 106 coloured plates of figs., J£l2 12$. net. 

—^ Do., the 24 parts, bound in 2 vols, 4to, new half morocco, 

gilt lops, £14 net. , 1910 

Tbis work forms a necessary complement to the Birds of Europe, and is uniform )n siie with 
It. TTi 106 coloured plates contain accurate figures of nearly 2,000 eggs. The Plates hive all 
been executed by 'he three-colour photographic process direct from the eggs without tbe interven- 
tion of an artist, thereby securing the utmost exactness in reproduction of markings, etc. In 
addition to the coloured figures of eggs a large Dumber of illiutratipos' of the oetts and eggs In 
silu are given in the text. n^; ■ P ■ ' ■ • • ' ' 

Mr/ Dresser had the practical assistance m the preparation of the work of the Rev. F. C. R. 
jourdain, the late Prof. Newton, and Howard Saunders, Mr. A, H. Evans, Mr. S. A. Butuilio, 
and Mr, F. W. Waterhouse. .. - : 

The author's collection of eggs, as well as his library, have lately been' deposited in .t)ie Mu>eum 
of Manchester University, and these volumes are of especial interest as forming a record of so 
valuable a collection. 

Dresser (H. E.). A Manual of Palaearctic Birds, in 2 parts, roy. 
8vo, special thin paper edition adapted for travellers and field 
naturalists, 308, /Je/. 1902—3 

-—^-rDo,, ordinary thick paper edition, 2 pts., roy. 8vo^ 258. ne/. 

This work, especially adapted to meet the requirements of field naturalists and travellers, is 
published in two parts, which may be bound in one volume if preferred; it contains nearly 
1 000 pages of letter press, and two plates by the late Mr. Joseph Wolf. It treats of the 
birds fouM throughout Europe and Asia tiorth of the Himalayas, including Corea and Japan: 
together more than 1,200 species and subspecies, of each of which the English and scientific 
names are given, with a careful selection of the principal references, th* vernacular names in 
different languages, a concise description of fhe different stages of plumage, the distribution and 
habits, as well as a description of the nest and eggs if known. 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Meropid*, or Family of 
Bee-eaters, with 34 finely band-coloured plates, imp. 4to, in parts 
(pub. ;^5 5s. neO, £4 10«. 1884r-6 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Coraciidae, or Family of 
the Rollers, with '27 finely hand-coloured plates, imp. 4to. cloth 
(pub. £5 net). £4 10s. 1893 

The above two beautiful tnono^riifihs of striking and interesting groups of birds should be in every 

ornithological library. , 



London: JOHN WHELDON & Co., 38, Great Queen Street, KingswaV.W.C. 



PartlSr Coataininsr JL Hand-Co!oared JPIates. f2ls. netl 



ILLUSTRATIONS TO 



THE BIRDS 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA 



BY 



H. GRONVOLD. 



A Series of original and authoritative plates, 
illustrating typical species, intetided to accompany 
" The Birds of South America, " Vol. I. {List), 
by LORD BRABOURNE and CHARLES CHUBB, 
issued in 1913. 



LONDON 

JOHN WHELDQN & CO., 

38, GREAT QUEEN STREET, KINGSWAY, W.C. 



"Sj'.Z'i "ff* 



NOTE, 

'Ke' turther" Hetays in the publication of Vol' 2. of this work 

I occasioned by the intex'vention of the war and the death of the 

late Lord Brabourne at the front have made it impossible to 

complete the Text for vol. 2. The publishers, however feel that 

gi the fine series of plates executed by Mr. Grbnvold for the work 

will possess a sufficient value to the subscribers to merit their 

publication without any further text. than is to be found in Vol. 1. 

I' already issued (21$ net). A first series of 19 plates is therefore 

offered herewith. A further scries, including also the missing 

Nos. in the present series, ate already printed or on the stones 

land it is expected will be ready very shortly. Only 200 sets of 

each part will be issued. 



October, 19/5. 



The Birds of Soujth America. 



Vnl^ II PI 17 




3alp & Daiuelsson L'" imp 



}. Cohxmha albiiiruea.. 
WTiit& TLopetL Pigeon.. 

2. GeotrygoTv hourccerv. 

BourcLCf's Ground.' Dove 



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^oh- n. Ph. 33. 





}. PsophJn ochjupUr(L . 
Odire- winged JrumpeJej-. 
2. Psophia vii-idis. 

Green ■ winged Tnuiipeler. 



RaJp 4. l)MiieJ««,v, ;_td 



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Mr. DRESSER'S PUBLICATIONS. 



3ac 



NOTE.— John Wheldon & Co. hold the entire stock of these works. 
SpecUl terms quoted to the trade. 



sac 



Dresser (H, E.). A History of the Birds of Europe, including all th^ 
species inhabiting the Western Palae£U"c,tic Region, with 633 
beautifully executed handrcoloured plates by Joseph Wolf, J. G. 
Keulemans and E. Neale, also the SUPPLEMENT, with 89 additional 
coloured phfes, together 9 yoh, i6y: 4tb.,fing, pts. &60 net. 

■■'■ " ' ;';■■■<■'. :v-'-.. ,■.-•.' -J'S?!— 96 

Tbfc (tbcV of tbie gfetx and iavaliuble, ki well ai inoit beaoiilul, Work is now Oiearly cxbantlnL 

Do., Supplement only, with 89^ additional coloured plates, in 

9 pts., roy, 4to (only a few copies for sale). £9 98. ne<, 18(95-96 

A Companion Work to the "Birds of Europe." ' 

Dresser (H. E.). Eggs of the Birds of Europe, including all the 
species inhabiting the Western Palaearctic Area, 2 vols, complete 
in 24 orig. parts, 4to. with 106 coloured plates of figs., £12 129. net. 

Do., the 24 parts, bound in 2 vols, 4to, new half morocco, 

gill tops, £14 net. 1910 

This work forms a necessajcy. complenjent to the Birds of Europe, and is uniform in size with 
it. Tb 106 coloured plates contain a«urale figures of nearly 2,000 eggs. The Plates have all 
been executed by the three-colour photographic process direct from the eggs without the interven- 
tion of an artist, thereby securing the utmost exactness in reproduction of marlilngs, <tc. In 
addition to the coloured figures of >. :. l:i.:c uumber of illuitratioQs of lh» nests and eggs in 
.i((o are given in the text. 

■ n Dresser had the practical assistance in the preparation of the work of the Rev. F. C. R. 
i.n, the late Prof. Ntwtoil, and Howard Saunders, Mr. A. H, Evans., Mr. S. A. BotarliD, 
.,i,a Mr. F. W. Walerhouse. ' 

The author's collection of eggs, as well »s his library, have lately been deposited in the Museum 
of Manchester University, and these Volumes are of especial interest as forming a record of so 
valuable a collection. 

Dresser (H. E.). A Manual of Palaearctic Birds, in 2 parts, roy. 
8vo, special thin paper edition adapted for travellers and field 
naturalists, 308. ne/. 1902 — 3 

Do., ordinary thick paper edition, 2 pts., roy. 8vo, 258. net. 

This work, especially adapted to meet the re<^uirement8 of field naturalists and travellers, is 
published in two parts, which may be bound in one volume ii preferred ; it contains nearly 
1,000 pages of • letter press, ind tvro plates by the late Mr. Joseph Wolf. It treats of the 
birds found throughout Europe and Asia north of the Himalayas, including Cprea and Japan: 
together more than 1,200 species and subspecies, of each of which the English and scientific 
names are given, with a careful selection of the principal references, the vcrnactdar names in 
different languages, a concise! description of the different stages of plumage, the distribution aad 
babitt, as well as a description' of the nest and eggs if known. 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Meropidae, or Family of 
Bee-caters, With 34 finely hand-coloured plates, imp. 4tO, in parts 
(pub. .^5 5s. ne/.). JE4 10s. , 1884—6 

Dresser (H. E,). A Monograph of the ; Coraciidae, or Family of 
the Rollers, with 27 finely hand-coloured plates, imp. 4to, cloth 
(pub. £5 neO- £4 lOs. ^ .'893 

The above two bemiliful monographs of striking and interesting groups of Tjirds should be in every 

oroitbological library. . 



London: JOHN WHELDON &Cov .^8, Gteat,' Queen Street, Kingsway, W.C J 

.5 

I 



Part. I\r Containing' ^ Hand- 



FSs. net 



ILLUSTRATIONS TO 



THE BIRDS 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA 



BY 



H. GRONVOLD. 



A Series qI oHginal and authoritative plates, 
illustrating typical species, intended to accompany 
"The Birds of South America/' Vol. I. {List), 
by LORD BRABOURNB and CHARLES CHUBB, 
issued in 1913. 



LONDON: 
JOHN W HELD ON & CO., 

38, GREAT QUEEN STREET, Kli^(3SWAY, VV C. 



S^/, t (^iC, 



1^^' 



NOTE. 

■I )M i| I .. 

;• THe^fvirtner delays in the publication or Vol 2. pi Hlils" woftc 
I occasioned by the intervention of the war and the death of the 
late Lord Brabourne at the front have made it impossible to 
complete the Text for vol. 2. The publishers however feel that 
the fine series of plates executed by Mr. Gronvold for the/work 
will ppssess a sufficient value to the subscribers to merit their 
I publication, without any iurth^r text than is to be found in^VpL 1. 
already issued (2l8 net). A first series of J[^ plates is therefore 
p offered herewith. A further series, including also the missing 
K^ Nos. in the present series, are already printed or on the stones 
I andf it is expected wiir be ready very shortly. Only 200 sefs of 
each part will be issued. 

October, 1915. 



1 



The, Blt-cLs of SouJK ArwerLc/i, 



Vol. II. PL 18. 




CobumbcL arajujcaruxj ^. 

ChUinjXj Pig&oTv. 



B«i= 4 Da„„]5B0., L'^unp 






R. 



^ 






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Mr. DRESSER'S PUBLICATIONS. 



z^ac 



NOTE.- 



-John Wheldan ,& Co. hold the- entire stock of the>e workt. 
Special terms quoted to the trade. 



Dresser (H- £•)• ' A History of the Birds of Europe, including all the 
species inhabiting , the ■ Western Pcdaearcric Region, with (>3'i 
beautifully executed hand -coloured plates by Joseph IVolf, J. G. 
Keulemans and E. Neale, also the SUPPLEMENT, u»7/2 89 additional 
cohured p/a<es, together 9 vols, roy. 4to., orig. pts. £60 net. 

. : ■■.-',- ,:■■.:■■-:■• ■■ .. : -1871—96 

The stoick, of this great and inyalusUe, ?i well as most beautiful, workvis now nfevly ekhaurted. 

— — ■ — Do., Supplement only, with 89 additional coloured plates, in 
9 pts., roy, 4to (only a few copies for sale). £9 9s, net. 1895-96 

A Companion Work to . the " Birds of Europe." 

Dresser (H. E.). Eggs of the Birds of Europe, including all the 
species inhabiting the, Western PalaearCtic Area, 2 vols, complete 
in 24 orig. parts, 4to.u>(f/» 106 coloured platei of figs., £12 12a. net 

Do., the 24 parts, bound in 2 vols, 4to, new half morocco, 

gilt tops, £14 net. 1910 

This work forms a necessary complement to the Birds of Europe, and i& uniform in size with • 
it. Th 106 coloured plates contain accurate figures of nearly 2,^000 eggs. The Plates have all 
been executed by the three-colour photographic process direct from the . eggs without the interven- 
tion of an artist, • thereby securing the ulmost cjtactness in reproduction of markingt, etq. In 
addition to the coloured figuries of eggs a I •' i iiniber of illustrations of the n^ts Mid. eggs in 
sllu arc given in the text. •' . 

Mr. Dresser had the practical assistance iq the preparation tsi the work of the Rev. F. C. R. 
Jourdain, the late Prof. Newton, and Howard Saunders^ Mr. A. H. Evans, Mr. S. A. fiuturlin, 
■and Mr. K. W. Waterhouse. ' ', -; 

The author's collection of eggs, as well as his library, have lately been deposited in the Museum 
of Manchester University, and these Volumes are of especial interert ,as fprming a record of so 
valuable a collection. . , .' ' . 

Dresser (H. E.). A Manual of Palaearctic Birds, in 2 parts, roy. 

8vo, special, thin paper edition adapted for travellers and field 

naturalists, 30s. net. 1902 — 3 

-Do., ordinary thick paper edition, 2 pts., roy, 8vo, 258. net. 

i his work, especially adapted to meet the requirements of field naturalists and travellers, is 
published in two parts, which may be bound in one volume if preferred: it contains nearly 
1,000 pages of letter press, and two plates by tbe late Mr. Joseph Wolf. It treats of the , 
birds found throughout Europe and Asia north of the Himalayas, including Gorea and Japati: 
together more than 1,200 species and subspecies, \ of each of which the English and scientific 
names are given, with a careful selection of the principal references, the vernscular names in 
different languages, a concise description of the diflferenl stages of plumage, the distribution and 
habits, as well as a description of the nest and eggs if known. 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Meropidae, or Family of 
Bee-eaters, with 34 finely hand-coloured plates, imp, 4to, in parts 
(pub. i:5 5^.. ne(,). £4 lOs. 1884—6^ 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Coraciidse, or Family of 

* the Rollers, with 27 finely hand-coloured plates, imp. 4to, cloth 

(pub. £5 net): £4 1 OS. 1893 

the above two beautiful monographs of striking and uiieit&i.ag groups of birds should be in everv 
t. ■' ; ' ornithological library. 



ondon: JOHN WHELDON & Co;, 3 fi, Great Queen Street, Kingsway, W.C. 



Part. V CooUining 4> Hand-Coloured Plates. 1 28. net. 



ILLUSTRATIONS T 



THE BIRDS 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA. 



BY 



H. GRONVOLD. 



A Series of original and authoritative plates, 
illustrating typical species, intended to accompany 
" The Birds of Sovth America," Vol. /. {List), 
by L ORD BRABOURNB and CHARLES CHVBB, 
issued in 1913. 



3 8, 



LONDON : 

JOHN WHELDON *> CO., 

GREAT QUEEN STREEf, KIlNGSWAY, W.C. 

ar 



NOTE. 

' -d fte"- ttlflf!1l5Sr 'dfefaya in tKp publication of Vol 2. oPtoF 
occasioned by the' intervention of the war and the death of the 
late Lord Brabourne at the front have made it impossible to 
complete the Text for vol. 2. The publishers however feel that 
the fine series of plates executed by Mr. Gronvold for the work 
will possess a sufficient value to the subscribers to merit their 
publication without any further text than is to be* found in Vol. I. 
already issued (21s ne<). A first series of 19 plates is therefore 
offered herewith. A further series, including also the missing 
Nos. in the present series, are already printed or on the stones 
and it is expected will be ready very shortly. Only 200 sets of 
each part will be issued. 



October, 1915. 






Q^ 



^ 



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The Birds of SnuiJh Amaru-M. 



Vol. n. PL. 31. 







GaMuvayo giganlbea. 
GiMirJb Snipe. 



BaJr ■> Dtinijisn'.ii ,1.' 



^ 



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►RESSER'S PUBLICATIONS. 



:2ac 



TE.— John Wlieldon & Co. hold the entire stock of thete works. 
Special terms quoted to the trade. 

I ■ .. :rr:3Dc=r: ,r..' ;■„ i 

Dre«ser (H. £.)• A History of the Birds of Europe, including all the 
species inhalsiting the Western Palaearctic Region, uJi</i 633 
beautifully executed hand-coloured! plates bif Joseph Wolf, J. G. 
Keulemans and E.Neale, also the SwPPLEMEHT, with 89 additional 
coloured plates, together 9 vols, roy, 4to., orig. pts. £G0 net. 

■' ^V- ;^-.,:" ' ■■■""'" . ' 1871—96 ■■ 

The stock of this great kttd jtayaluaUe, a« well at moit ;beahti{nl, work it now nevly exhaurtpd. 

—Do., Supplement only, with 89 additional coloured plates, in 

9 pts., roy, 4to (only a few copies for sale). £9 9$. net, 1 895-96 ' 
A Companion Work to THE "Birds of Europe." 

Dresser (H. E.). Eggs of the Birds of Europe/including all the f 
species inhabiting the Western Palaearctic Area, 2 vols, complete 
in 24 orig. parts, 4to. with 106 coloured plates of figs., £12 128. net. 

Do., the 24 parts, bound in 2 vols, 4to, neu) half morocco, 

gilt tops, £14 net. ^9\0 : 

This work forms a aecettary complcmeat to, the Birds of Europe, and is uniform in siie with 
it. Th 106 coloured plates contain accurate figures of nearly 2,000 eggSi The Plates have all 
been executed by the three-colour photographic jjroceSs direct from the eggs without the interven- 
tioil of an artist, thereby securing the utmost exactness In reproduction of markings, etc In 
addition to the coloured figures, of eggs a. large namber of illuttralions of the nests and eggt in 
, slla are given in the text. , ", ' >■''.':,' ■' •: 

Mr. Dresser had the practical attittan(;e in the preparaticiD of the ' work of tW Rev. F. C. R. 
Jourdain, the late-Prof. Newton, and Hiiward Saunde'rt, Mr. 'A. H, Evans, Mr. S! A. Bntudin, 
and Mr. F. W. Waterhousc. ' 

The author's collection of eggs, as Well as his library, have lately been deposited in the Museum 
of Manchester University, and these voluines are of especial interest as forming a record of so 
valuablea collection. - " 

Dresser (H. E.)- A Manual of Palaearctic Bii^ds, in 2 parts, roy. 
8v,o, special thin paper edition adapted for. trave:llers and field 
naturalists, 308. net. 1902-^3 

^Do., ordinary diick paper edition, 2 pts., roy. 8vo, 258. net. 

This work, especially adapted "to meet the /equirements of field naturalists and travellers, is 
published in two parts, which may. be bound in one volume if preferred; it contains nearly 
1,000 pages of letter press, and two plates by the late Mr.' Joseph Wolf. It treats of the 
. birds found throughout Europe and Asia north of the Himalayas, including Corea and Japan: 
together more than 1,200 species and subspecies, of each of which the English and scientific 
names are given, witb a careful selection of the principal references, the vernacular names in 
different languages, a concise description of the different stages of plumage, the distribution, and 
habits, as well as a description of the nest and eggs if kpown. ; 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Metopidae, or Family of 
Bee-eaters, u)i/A 34 finely hand-coloured plates, imp. 4to, in parts 
(pub. jC^ 5s. net.), £4 lOs. 1884—6 

Dresser (Hi E.). A Monograph of the CoraciidcE, or Family of 
the Rollers, ioith 27 finely, hand-coloured pldteSi imp. 4to. cloth 
(pub. £S net). £4 lOs. ; 1893 

"['.:■'. above two beautiful monographs of strikiug and interesting groups of birds should be in every 

ornitliological library. 



London: JOHN WHELDON & . Co., ■ 38, Great Queeil Street, Kingsway,, W.C 



^art i'?'. ConUiningr 3 Hand-CdiWred 'mtej. J28.net. 



ILLUSTR ATIGNS TO 



THE BIRDS 



OF 



SOUTH AMERICA. 



BY 



H. GRONVOLD. 



A Series of original and auttioritative plates, 
illustrating typical species, intended to accompany 
"The Birds of South America," Vol. J. {List), 
by LORD BRABOURNE and CHARLES CHUBB, 
issued in 1913, 



LONDON : 

JOHN WHELDON & CO., 

38, GREAT QUEEN STREET, ICINGSWAY. W. 



NOTE. 

/$ in the publication of Vol 2. b^rn^^orl 
occasioned by the intervention of the war and the death of the 
late Lord Brabourne at the front have made it impossible to 
complete the Text fpr vol. 2. The publishers however feel that 
the fine series of plates executed by Mr. Gronvold for the w^ork 
will possess a sufficient value to the subscribers to merit their 
publication without any further text than is to be found in Vol. I. 
already issued (2l8 net). A first series of. 19 plates is therefore 
offered herewith. A further series, irlcluding also the missing 
Nos. in the present series, are already printed or on the stones 
I and it is, expected, will be ready yety. shortly. Only 200 sets of 
each part will be issued. 



October, J9I5. 



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•RESSER'S PUBLICATIONS. 



5DC 



NOTE— John Wheldon & Co. hold the entire stock of these worits. 
Special terms quoted to the trade. 



301= 



Dresser (H. E^). A History of the Birds of Europe, including all the 
species inhabiting the Western Palseeirctic Region, ijoith 633 
beautifully executed hand-coloured plates by Joseph Wolf, J. G. 
Keulemans and E. Neale, also the SUPPLEMENT, With 89 additional 
coloured plates, together 9 vols, roy, '4tO., orig. pts. £60 net. 

.'-•■;: ; 1871—96 

The stock of this great and invaluablcj' a9 well a> most beautiful, work it now nearly exhausted. 

- — —Do., Supplement only, with 89 additional coloured plates, in 
9 pts., roy, 4to (only a few copies for sale). £9 9s. net. 1895-96 

A Companion Work TQ THE " Birds of Europe." 

Dresser (H. E.). Eggs of the Birds of Europe, including: ejl the 
species inhabiting the Western Palaearctic Area, 2 vols, complete 
in 24 orig. parts, 4to. with 106 coloured plqtes of figs., £,12 12a. net. 

— Do.S the 24 parts, bound in 2 vols, 4to, new half morocco, 

gill tops, £14 net. 1910 

■ Tliis work forms a necessary complement to the Birds of Europe, and is uniform in the with 
it. Th 106 coloured plates contain accurate figures of nearly 2,000 eggs. The Plates have all 
been executed by the three-colour photographic process direct from the eggs without the interven- 
tion of an artist, thereby securing the utmost exactness in reproduction of markings, etc. In 
addition tp the coloured 6gures of eggs a large number of illustrations of the oests and eggs in 
sllu are given in. the text. , . ; ", ■ '.:•:... 

Mr. Dresser had the practical assistance in the preparation of the' work of the R<:v. P. C. R. 
Joufdain, the late Prof. Newton, and Howard Saunders, Mr. A. H. Evans, Mr. S. A; Buturlin 
and Mr. F. W, Watethoruse. - ' 

The authors collection of eggs, as well as his library', have lately been deposited in the Museum 
of Manchesttr University, and these volumes arc of especial interest as forming a record of so 
valuable a collection, 

prjesser (H. E.)- A Manual of Palaearctic Birds, in 2 parts, roy. 
8vo, special thin paper edition adapted for travellers and field 
naturalists, 308. nei. 1902—3 

.- — — ^Do., ordinary thick paper edition, 2 pts., roy. 8vo, 258. net. 

This work, especially adapted to meet the requirements of field naturalists and travellers, is 
published in two parts, which may be bound in one volume if preferred: it contains nearly 
1,000 pages of letter press, and two plates by the late Mr. Joseph Wolf. It treats of thi; 
birds found throughout Europe and Asia north . of the Himalayas, including Corea and Japan: 
together more than 1,200 species and subspecies, of each of which the Enghsb and scientific 
names are given, with a careful selection of the principal references, the vernacular names in 
different languages,' a concise description of the different stages of plumage, the distribution and 
habiu, as well at a description of the nest and eggs if known. 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Meropidas, or Family of 
Bee-eaters, with 34 finely hand-coloured plates, imp. 4to, in parts 
(pub. 45 5s. net.). £4 lOs. 1884—6 

Dresser (H. E.). A Monograph of the Coraciidae, or Family of 
the Rollers, with 27 finely hand-coloured plates, imp. 4t6,cloth 
(pub. £5 net). £4 lOs. 1893 

The above two boausifnl monopraphs of striking and interesline croups of birds should be in every 

J nithological library. 



London: JOHN WHELDON & Gp., 38, Great Queen Street, KingswayrW.C. 




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