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Full text of "Bizarre"

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BIZARRE 



Liebanon Yalley 
College 







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i/it'y vo/((//f^^ 




HERVIN ULYSSES HOOP, A. M., Ph. D. 



staff. 



E&itor=in=C!:bief. 

Robert Reuben Buttkrwick. 



assistant EDitors. 



College department. 
Thomas F. Miller, Sue Snyder Moyick. 



ILiterarB Societies. 

Samuel Edwiv Rupp. 

/IRuslc department. 

William Spencer Roop. 



Christian associations. 
William Otterbein Roop. 



atbletlcs. 

Harry Herbert Yoke. 



artists. 

Arthur Garfield Smith, David Montgomery Oyer. 



Business /IDanager. 

Samuel F. Daugherty. 



•assistant business /IDanaGcrs. 

Henry Huston Baish. Morris Wixkield Brunner, 

Cyrus William Waiighell. 



Salutatnu6. 



fENTLE Reader.— The Third I'oliime of the BizaeeE, the 
product of the honest toil and industrious labors of the class 
^^-ai^ of 1901, greets you. We hope that you are eager and anxious to 
examine the results of our labor. 

Of course a College Annual is, in a sense, the book of a year and of a 
Class. That it might not, however, be a mere gay Ephemeron, the Book 
of a Day, the Editors have tried to give you a Publication which would 
represent the inner life of Lebanon Valley College, and still hold its place 
among its contemporaries. Uniform kindness and courtesy were shown 
us by all classes, societies, and from whomsoever material was obtained. 
To all contributors the Editors say : Gratias reddimns. 

All that has been said , and whatever caricatures may appear on these 
pages, is not intended to harm anyone, but with the kindliest feelings 
toward all. 

The work of the Editors is finished. 

Editors. 



Xebanon Dalles Colleoe, 



ll^ EBANON Valle3' College, founded in faith and prayer, has 
wrought faithfully and successfully for the Church and the world 
f^i^^ through thirty-four years. Standing, as it does, for character, 
high scholarship, noble manhood and womanhood, it has wielded a silent 
but far reaching influence, permeating, uplifting, and vitalizing the whole 
organism — the Church. 

The institution has been carried forward as nearly as possible in the 
spirit of the founders and with gratifying success. Its aim is to secure 
the highest form and grade of literary, scientific, and Christian education 
through trained, experienced, and thorough teachers under constant and 
positive religious principles and influences without restriction of individ- 
ual opinion. 

The College offers three full four year courses of study, — well adapt- 
ed to the attainment of a thorough training for culture and discipline, 
affording in this way the best preparation for the learned professions, for 
technical study, or for the practical duties of life. The studies are so ar- 
ranged that the students, from the very beginning of the course come in 
contact with the regular professors, thus receiving not only careful per- 
sonal attention, but also the inspiration which the genuine scholar and 
teacher, by his influence, always imparts. As a result, the College has again 
and again sent out students and teachers who have taken high rank and 
honors in the oldest and greatest institutions in our land. 

During the past few years the College has had phenomenal success. 
The number of students has been more than doubled ; the Faculty has 
been increased ; the courses of study revised and strengthened ; the old 
buildings greatly improved ; the handsome and commodious Music Hall 
erected, and now an 84x60 foot wing is being built to the north end of the 
main College structure. All these improvements are proving satisfactory, 
stimulating to higher work. The Schools of Music, Art, and Elocution 
have had an honorable record of success. 

While we now have the best internal organization and equipment in 
our history, yet the time has come for even a more vigorous propaganda. 



The direct appeals that are now being put forth are sure to awaken and 
sustain more effective interest in the College. 

Large advance in every direction is imperativel}' demanded, and is 
just within reach. The College has earned the right to the full employ- 
ment of our effective denominational organization in maintaining and in- 
creasing the work with which it has been entrusted. Upon this belief the 
College was founded. B3' partial realization of it, our present success, by 
God's blessing, has been won. It is our earnest hope that all our friends 
will turn the hearts and minds of the young people to us, and that gener- 
ously we may receive financial aid for increased efficiency. The safest and 
best place to put money is in the Christian Colleges. 

— Anon. 




Calenbav. 



1900. 

Sept. 3, Monday — Examination for Admission begin. 

Sept. 4, Tuesday — Registration for the Term. 

Sept. 4, Tuesday — Organization, 2 P. M. 

Sept. 5, Wednesday — Instruction begins, 9 A. M. 

Nov. 29, Thursday — Clionian Literary Society Anniversary. 

Dec. 21, Friday — Fall Term of Sixteen Weeks ends. 

Cbristmas IRecess. 

1901. 

Tuesday — Winter Term begins, 9 A M. 

Sunday — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Friday — Washington's Birthday, a holiday. 

Friday — Winter Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 

Tuesday — Spring Term opens, 2 P. M. 

Wednesday — Instruction begins, 9 A. M. 

Fridaj' — Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Friday — Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Thursday — Decoration Day, a holiday. 

Saturday — ^Junior Oratorical Contest. 

Sunday — Baccalaureate Sermon by President Roop. 

Sunday — Annual Address before Christian Associations, 

7.30 P. M. 
Monday — Conservator}' Concert, 7.30 P. M. 
Tuesday — Meeting of Board of Trustees, g A. M. 
Tuesday — Public Meeting of Alumni Association, 7.30 P. M. 
Wednesday — Commencement of Department of Music, 

7.30 P. M. 
Thursday — Commencement. 
Friday — Spring Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 



Jan. 


2, 


Feb. 


12; 


Feb. 


22 


March 


24, 


March 


28; 


March 


29, 


April 


5 


May 


3: 


May 


30, 


June 


8, 


June 


9, 


June 


9> 


June 


10, 


June 


1 1 , 


June 


u, 


June 


12, 


June 


13. 


June 


14. 



Zbc Corporation. 



trustees. 

Rev. Ezekiel B. Kephart, D. D., LL. D., . Annville, Pa. 

Henry H. Kreider, Esq., Annville, Pa. 

Simon P. Light, Esq., Lebanon, Pa. 

Rev, Jacob R. Ridenour, Middletown, Md. 

John H. Maysii^les, A. B., East Deerfield, Mass. 

Rev. Solomon L. Sw.^rtz, Middletown, Md. 

John C. Knipp, Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. John E. Kleffman, B. S., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Prof. George A. Newman Harrisonburg, Va. 

Rev. Arthur B. Statton, A. M., . . . . Hagerstown, Md. 

Reno S. Harp, Esq., A. M., Frederick, Md. 

Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D. D., Da3'ton, Ohio. 

Rev. Samuel D. Skelton, Winchester, Va. 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph. D., . . . . Shamokin, Pa. 

Samuel W. Clippinger, Esq., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Adam R. Forney, A. M., Annville, Pa. 

Isaac B. Haak, Esq., Myerstown, Pa. 

Rev. Charles A. Mutch Reading, Pa 

Rev. Charles W. Stinespring, Frederick, Md. 

Rev. William H. Washinger, A. M Chambersburg, Pa. 

Rev. Sylvester K. Wine, A. M Stephen City, Va. 

Henry B. Miller, Esq Harrisonburg, Va. 

Rev. Daniel Eberly, D. D., Abbottstown, Pa. 

William H. Ulrich, Esq., Hummtlstown, Pa. 

Edward Kern, Esq., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. John C. S. Myers, Annex, Va. 



Rev. John B. Chamberlin Washington, D. C. 

Benjamin H. Engle, Esq Harrisburg, Pa. 

Valentine K. Fisher, A. B., Berne, Pa. 

Samuel F. Engle, Esq., Palmj'ra, Pa. 

William A. Lutz, Esq., Shippensburg, Pa. 

Rev. Hiram B. Dohner, B. D., Bellegrove, Pa. 

Rev. Samuel Ludwig, ......... Churchville, Va. 



]Ex=®tncio. 

President Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D. 

Professor John E Lehman, A. M. 

Professor James T. Spangler, B D. 

Professor H. Lenich Meyer, M. S. 

Prof. Benjamin F. Daugherty, A. M. 

Miss M. Etta Wolfe, A. M. 



©fficers of tbc Boavb of trustees. 

President, . . William H. Ulrich, Esq. 
Secretary. . . Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph. D. 
Treasurer, . . Isaac B. Haak, Eso. 



Executive Committee. 

Hervin U. Roop, Chairman. 

Is.AAC H. Albright, Secretary. 

Isaac B. Haak, Reno S. Harp, 

Benjamin H. Engle, Henry H. Kreider, 

William H. Ulrich, Hiram B. Dohner. 

13 



Committees. 
Jfinance. 

Hiram B. Dohner, Chairman, Henry H. Kreider, 

Solomon L. Swartz, Samuel W. Clippinger, 

Sylvester K. Wine, Charles A. Mutch. 



]£n&ovvment. 

EzEKiEL B. Kephart, Chairman, William H. Washinger, 

Daniel Eberly, Adam R. Forney, 

Charles W. Stinespring. 



ffacult?. 

William A. Lutz, Chairman, Isaac H. Albright, 

Samuel D. Faust, Isaac B. Haak, 

Reno S. Harp. 



Xibrarv anJ) apparatus. 

James T. Spangler, Chairman, John R. Ridenour, 

Samuel Ludwig. 



GrounDs, JBuilMngs anC Domestic Department. 

Benjamin H. Engle, James B. Chamberlin, 

John S. C. Meyers, Valentine K. Fisher, 

Samuel D. Skelton 



Hu&iting. 

Samuel F. Engle, Chairman, Henry B. Miller, 

John H. Maysilles, Benjamin F. Baker 

/IDatron. 

Anna Mary Keller, B. S. 
14 



dFacult^. 




REV. HERVIK U. ROOP, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT. 

Professor of riiilosophy, Pedagogy, and Ora- 
tory. 



JOHN R. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Malhcinalics and Astronomy. 




15 




REV. JAMES T. SPANGLER, A. M., B. D., 

Professor oj the Greek Language and Litera- 
ture. 



H. LENICH MEYER, M. S., 
Professor of Natural Science. 





REV. BENJAMIN F. DAUGHERTY, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Litera- 



ls 



f^ #> , 




M. ETTA WOLFE, A. M., 
Professor of the English Language and Liter- 
lure, and Instructor in German. 



NORMAN C. SCHLICTER, A. B., 
Instructor in French and English. 





HIRAM H. SHENK, A. B., 
Instructor in Political Science. 



17 




CHARLES E. vSNOKE, B. E. n., 
Insiyuctor in Geography and History. 



REV. CHARLES E. HURLBURT, 
Instruclor 211 the Ensrtish Bible. 





WILLIAM (). ROOP, 
.-l.ssi/ant in Latin. 




HARRY L. EICHINGER, B. O. 
Instriiclor in Elocuiion. 



HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, 

Director of the Department oj Music, and In- 
structor in Piano, Organ, and Theory, etc. 




MRS. HERVIN U. ROOP, A. M. 
Voice Culture. 



19 




MABEL E. MANRECK, 
Assistant in Piano. 



MADAME VOX BEKEGHY, 
( 'ioliii , etc. 





CHARLES H. B. OLDHAM, 
Assistant in Piano. 




EDITH BALDWIN, 
Painting and Drawing. 



WILLIAM C. ARNOLD, 
Instructor in Stenography and Typeivriting. 





THOMAS W. GRAY, 
Instructor in Gymnastics. 




BISHOP E. B. KEPHART, D. D., L.L. D. 
Lecturer oit International Law. 



REV. DAMIEL EBERLY, D. D., 
Lecturer on Philosophy of History. 





REV. DAVID S. ESHLEMAN, B. D. 
College Pastor. 






Glasses, 







Senior Claes. 



Flower: ^ C\C\ Colors. 

Ivy. Vfvf Lavender and White. 



Motto: 
"Palujam qui meruit ferat. " 



Rick-a-rack ! Rick-a-rack ' Rip, rha, rho ! 
Kaz-a-kah ! Kaz-a-kah ! Ho, hip, ho ! 
Hip hurrah ! Hip hurrah ! Ri, rah, ri ! 
Nineteen hundred, L. V. C. 



©fftcers. 

Clyde J. Saylor, President. 

Enid Daniel Vice Presiderit. 

Nellie Buffington Secretary. 

OrEN G. Myers Treasurer. 

Alvin E. Shroyer, Historian. 

Harry E. SpESSArd Poet. 



25 



Ipoem. 



Four years have we miugled our voices in glee 

Like the little birdies that sing, 

At the advent of spring, 
As we roamed through the meadows so gay and so free, 
Wheu the hush of the evening and the wispering dew 

Bid our hearts leap for joy at the close of the day ; 
We cherished the past, and the future we knew 

Of 1900, would be for aye. 

The songs of the poets are lingering still ; 

For Homer yet sings, 

And Horace e'en brings 
In visious of splendor, the old Roman hill. 
Astronomy no doubt has muddled our brains. 

And left them as glooming as tombstones gray ; 
But the stars sing together in heavenly strains. 

That 1900 will live for aye. 

Can we ever forget those bot'uy excursions. 

O'er hilltops and dell, 

Till the curfew bell 
Tolled an episode grave in faculty versions ? 
We plucked the violet in its soft velvet plume 

As it danced on the brim to the rivulet's lay ; 
But the sweet rose of Sharon is ever in bloom 

For 1900 at the judgment day. 

Our dear Alma Mater we ever shall bless ; 

Our curriculum is done. 

Our life is begun, 
And each holds a crank to the wheel of success ; 
Though the labor be hard and the speed be slow. 

Our pluck and ambition increases for aye, 
And the buzz of the wheel will echo low 

That 1900 has gained the day. 

H. E. Spkssard. 



26 



^embetsbip- 



Nellie Buffington, 
Madie Burtner, 
Rene Burtner, 
Enid Daniel, 
Edna Groff, . 
Anna E. Kreider, 
LiLLiE G. Kreider, 
Reba F. Lehman, 
Fred W. Light, 
David E. Long, 
Oren G. Myers, 

Ross NiSSLEY, 

Lena Owens, . 
D. Augustus Peters, 
Jacob Peters, 
Ralph D. Reider, 
Clyde J. Saylor, 
Alvin E. Shroyer, 
Charles E. Snoke, 
G. Mason Snoke, 
Nora E. Spayd, 
Harry E- Spessard, 
Adam Wier, 



Elizabethville, Pa. 
Harrisbiirg, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Oakville, Pa. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Elreno, Oklahoma. 
Steelton, Pa. 
Steelton, Pa. 
Middletown, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Shamokin, Pa. 
Newville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
York, Pa. 
Chewsville, Md. 
I,ititz, Pa. 



27 



Ibistor^ of Senior Class. 




HEN the notable class of Nineteen Hundred organized, they pre- 
sented me with a chronological string. Upon this I have filed 
■^^^^ such facts which are pleasant reminiscences. Reminiscences 
that form the links of a golden chain which binds us in closest fellowship. 
Well we remember the day when we left our paternal homes with sad 
hearts. The thought of separating from the loved ones at home to dwell 
far from one another, and soft words, mingled with tears, from a mother's 
heart of purest love, seemed to be about to break our hearts. Fortunately, 
the peril was averted. This organization has proved a fair substitute for 
the home circle. The indescribable human propensity to love and be 
loved has been mutually subserved. Thus subservient one to another, 
the will of the Omnipotent is promoted — hearts are cheered, tempers made 
sweet and burdens lightened. 

The class is distinguished philanthropically. The affections of the 
members at no time have been bestowed exclusively upon the individuals 
of its own circle. Benevolence and universality of good will have caused 
hearts to love those in the lower classes. All practicable exertions have 
been put forth to do them good. 

Proof of congenialty is evident from the fact that a large portion of 
the class, in company with portions of the other several classes, partici- 
pated in a chestnut picnic at Mt. Gretna, Oct. 7, 1899. This natural 
affinity is further verified by the fact of the trolley party to Lebanon, 
Dec. 5, 1899. 

Not only social distinctions have come to our notice, but also lit- 
erary. Rev. A. K. Wier has honored his institution and his class by 
winning second prize in the oratorical contest at Mt. Gretna Chautauqua 
last summer. In the rhetoricals on the evenings of Dec. 16, and 18, 
1899, other members have ably shown that prizes will be in danger of ap- 
prehension whenever future opportunities are offered. 

The most joyous event of the year was the memorable occasion of 
Feb. 2, '00. In moments of quietude, we delight to review the pleasures 
of that evening. The unsurpassed kindness of the Juniors has indebted 
us, which debt devastating time may not obliterate. Our remembrance of 

28 



those who provided the bounteous banquet, shall ever remain unimpaired 
because of the tangible expression of love. 

The number of special meetings held during the last six months has 
reached the grand total — sixty six. Let it suffice to know, that in these 
sessions extremel}^ eloquent and animated addresses have been delivered. 
Since they have been cop3'righted, they will not appear in this volume. 
The probabilities are that the authors of those addresses will have them 
published shortly in book form. 

A few more revolutions and the happiest moments of our youth will 
be fulfilled. Unwearying time has silently borne us to the portal thru 
which our exodus is imminent. The responsibility of men and women 
forces itself upon our view. We are confident that the discipline of our 
college life has prepared us to enter into the world's great battles, to fight 
the powers of darkness, that truth may triumph and that the human 
minds in the desolate and benighted nations of the earth may be emanci- 
pated. 'Tis sad to say farewell. To think that our daily intercourse 
shall cease gives us heart pain. The ties that bind shall not be severed 
when we are far from one another. The memories that now live shall ever 
live. We go forth to prove ourselves better men and women than we 
have thought one another to be. When all the victories have been won, 
and we are promoted and matriculated into heaven's university whose 
course extends thru the eternal years, then will our joy be complete. 

— Alvin E. Shrover. 




29 



Iftrst division Senior IRbetovical. 



SaturDas Evening, H)ec. 16, '99. 



PROGRAM. 

MARCH. 

INVOCATION. 

Environment, 

Revelators of Character, 

Trusts, 

PIANO SOLO— Rhapsodic No. 12, 

Carrie FreTz. 
Culture of the Memory, 
The Truth, 
VOCAL SOLO— Cradle Song, 

Reba Lehman. 
Logic, 

Rubyat — Omar Kyani, 
PIANO SOLO— Staccato Etude, 

Charles Oldham. 
The Telescope of the Mind, 
The True Mission of America, 
The Evils of Intemperance, 
PIANO DUET — Gallop Brilliant, 



Rene D. Burtner. 

Nellie Buffington. 

Fred Weiss Light. 

lAszt. 

David E. Long. 

Seth Light. 
Taiibett. 

Charles E. Snoke. 

Enid Daniel. 

Gotschalk. 

Alvin E. Shrover. 

Lizzie Kreider. 

G. M. Snoke. 

Behr. 



Susie Mover and Alma Engle. 



30 



Secont) Division Senior IRbetorical. 



/IDonOag Evening, Dec. 18 '99. 



PROGRAM. 

MARCH. 

INVOCATION. 

The People We Meet, 
The History of Chemistry, 
VOCAL SOLO — I Fear No Foe, 

Harry Raab. 



C. Madie Burtner. 

Ross NiSSLEY. 

Piasuti. 



Music of the Spheres, 
The Journey of the Stars, 
Through the Opera Glass, 
PIANO SOLO— Polonaise, 

Arabella Batdorf 
The Martyr of the Nineteenth Ceutury, 
The Worth of a New Condition, 
VOCAL SOLO — Irma, 



Anna Elizabeth Kreider. 
Ralph D. Reider. 
Reba F. Lehman. 
Tschaikowski-Liszt. 



Clyde Saylor. 

Nora Elizabeth Spayd. 

Klein. 



LiLLiE Kreider. 

The Prospects of the Negro, Harry Edgar Spessard. 

The World's Greatest Battle, Adam K. Weir. 

piano duet — L'Trisistible, Kremser. 

H. Oldham, Elizabeth Stehman. 



31 



S^unior Class. 



Floivcr: 
Carnation. 



01. 



Colors: 
Orange and Black. 



iVotto: 
Honore et Lahore. 



13ell. 

Rickety, Rackety ! Rhe ! Rah ! Rah ! 
Kasaki, Kasaki ! Zitn ! Zu ! Zah ! 
Ricket}-, Rackety! Zip! Zah! Zun ! 
Zu Rah! Zu Rah! 1901. 



©fftcers. 




A. Garfield Smith, 


. President. 


M. W. Brunner, . . 


. I 'ice President 


Harry H. Yoke, . . 


. Secretary. 


E. M. Balsbaugh, . . 


. . Poet. 


L. E. Cross, .... 


. . Historian. 



32 



poem. 



Once more the Cycle of Time 

Has turned on its ceaseless round ; 

While still the Junior class 

In the cause of right is found. 

A year with its light and shade 
Has so quickly passed away ; 

And now to fair Wisdom's shrine, 
We come, our vows to pay. 

At her fountain deep we've drunk, 
Our burning thirst to quell ; 

With gratitude and love to her 
Our hearts within us swell. 

We place upon her altar bright 
Our heartfelt, deepest thanks ; 

For she, in all her majesty. 

Reigns o'er the Junior ranks. 

Three years have now already passed 
Since our bright natal day ; 

Only one more year of toil 

Remains to quickly glide away. 

Already we have pass'ed through 
The Freshmen vales so green ; 

Also through the Sophomore realm. 
For gay Sophomores we've been. 

But now we are Juniors bold. 

Juniors at old h. V. ; 
And we are recognized as such 

Wherever we may be. 



33 



I could tell of woncirous deeds 

And noble acts we do ; 
Yet, for fear you think nie vain, 

I dare only zoish you knew. 

But when our school days are over. 
And from these. halls we go, 

Out into the storms of life, 

You will then be glad to know, — 

That the lessons here we learned. 

The trials undergone ; 
Have taught us this truth clearly, 

There are victories to be won. 

Battles in the cause for right 

We can't afford to lose ; 
Then the precepts here we learned 

In life's stern school we'll use. 

We may meet with greater trials. 

Rough thorns may pierce our feet ; 

But since our purging here. 

With smiles each one we'll greet. 

With calm defiance in our eyes. 
The wrongs of life we'll face ; 

Marching on to battle hard 
With each foe of our race. 

The fight cannot be very long. 
For life's so short a span ; 

Hence in the part given us 

We'll do what good we can. 

That when the Master comes to call 
The weary ones from strife. 

We may enter his palace fair 
To gain eternal life. 

For this life is but a great school. 
Our classmates are mankind ; 

Death will be Commencement day, 
And Christ the examiner kind. 

O that when before that bar 
Of justice we must stand. 

We may, pure and untainted, be 
A redeemed, united band. 

34 



Not on any of our class 

A stain of guilt be found ; 

But this blessing for us all 

As we stand, the throne around : 

"Ye good and faithful servants, 
Full well have ye all done ; 

It gives me joy to welcome 
The class of 1901." 



-E. M. B. 



35 



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XTbe Juniors. 




EDWARD MILLER BALSBAUGH 
is a non-descript specimen from no place 
in particular, but tradition has it, that he 
was born at Hockersville, Dauphin coun- 
ty. He spends much of his time in writ- 
ing verse of all kinds of meters, but the 
kind of meters he likes best is "to meet 
her alone." Thus we see that he can 
fittingly fill his position of class poet. 
Also in teaching his country school, the 
rod and the pupil very often meet. He 
sometimes wears a mustache and some- 
times does not, as it varies with his 
moods. He expects to be a lawyer, and 
we think he will some time startle the 
world by winning his cases, by' the use 
of verse. 



ROBERT REUBEN BUTTERWICK 
is a good-hearted, all-round article, being 
nearly as broad as long ; and true to his 
name Robert is a "reub" in the full 
sense of the term. 

Burly in life he heard a noise and after 
recovering from his fright he concluded 
that it was a call to the ministry. He ac- 
cordingly entered Union Biblical Semi- 
nary at Dayton, O., from which he grad- 
uated a finished divine in '95. He is a 
studious sort of fellow, and because of 
his zeal has stored his cranium with funds 
of knowledge. He is to-day an active 
minister of the gospel and is also "a 
man." He believes with the Ijible that 
"it is not good that 'man' should be 
alone" and purposes taking unto himself 
a helpmeet in the near future. He is "a 
man" of sterling character, "a man" of 
purpose and intends going to Yale after 
graduating from this institution. 




37 




MORRIS WINFIELD BRUNNER 
made his first appearance on tbe earth at 
New Bloomfield, Pa. People at first con- 
sidered him a remnant of pre-historic 
man, but he has outgrown that similarity 
so that now he almost resembles modern 
man. He is a graduate of C. V. S. N. S. 
class of '95 and has spent a few success- 
ful 3'ears in teaching. 

Morris is one of those quiet sort of fel- 
lows whom you scarcely know to be 
about. He is very studious; and as a re- 
sult is a well-informed j'oung man. He 
has been taking private lessons in the art 
of courting, and during the past year has 
l)een testing his al)ility in the art on one 
of Annville's fair young damsels. 

Biunner purposes practicing osteopathy, 
and we wish him every success in this 
comparatively unexplored realm. 



HENRY HUSTON BAISH 
one cold winter morning, awakened 
the residents of Bendersville by en- 
deavoring to sing a medley of his 
own composition. A mob immedi- 
ately set out to ascertain the source 
of this angelic harmony and to their ut- 
ter amazement found only a little bald- 
headed babe. He entered Shippensburg 
Normal School from which he graduated 
in '95. After teaching three years in Al- 
toona he entered L. V. C. in '98. His 
voice has changed. He is no longer abl e 
to charm with his own voice ; but by 
making happy the hearts of others, has 
caused music to flow from their lips. 
After graduating he will re-enter the pro- 
fession of teaching on a larger scale. 




38 




L. E. CROSS, 
author and gentlenian, first beheld the 
light of morn steal into the gray sky in 
Baltoles, Maryland. As his name sug- 
gests you would think him to be a man 
of very repelling disposition, but he is 
just the opposite. He attracts the atten- 
tion of ladies from all parts of the coun- 
try. He has for a long time been taking 
anti-fat and the effects are very evident. 
We thiuk if he keeps on at this rate, he 
will be more nearly fashioned after the 
lightning rod. He is a man who will cer- 
tainly make his mark. After graduation 
he expects to marry and spend several 
yenrs in European travel. Mr. Cross will 
probably be an historian, or a lecturer on 
"Woman's rights,'' man versus woman. 



SAMUEL F. DAUGHERTY, 
a wonderful specimen of humanity, first 
beheld this mundane sphere near Dallas- 
town, York county. This happy man has 
the good fortune of being married, and is 
very often disturbed in the midst of his 
most studious moods by callers, whom he 
finds it his duty to entertain. While very 
young he taught school for a number of 
years, and "his fame" has spread over 
the country far and wide. His future is 
clouded in mystery, but it is thought he 
will either be a politician, a minister of 
the gospel, or aspire to the presidency of 
the United States. 




39 




FRANK BENJAMIN EMENHEISER 
was born somewhere in York county. He 
is one of the married men of our class, 
and we have come to the conclusion that 
the onlj' time he ever was in a hurry was 
to get a wife. 

Emenheiser is making a specialty of 
most anything, but especially of Litera- 
ture in which he displays remarkable 
brilliancy. 

He is a kind of a slow moving world in 
himself and we would hardly venture to 
say whiit the future has in store for him. 
It has been rumored that he expects to 
enter the ministry. 



KARNIG M. KUYOOMJIAN 
is called "Chemical Engine" for fhort. 
His birth was the most important fact of 
his life, and this occurred in that ancient 
city of Iconium, Asia Minor. After at- 
tending Saint Paul's Institute at Tarsus, 
and graduating from the high school of 
his native city, in 1897 he succeeded in 
coming to America for further education. 
Through the influence of an Armenian 
Missionary he came to this place, where 
he has been spending the last three 
years. He is noted especially for his 
truthfulness, as he lias never been known 
to tell a lie, for he seldom speaks. He 
purposes, in the future, to go back to his 
native country, and to strive to rnise his 
people to a higher standard of life, 
spending his time mostly in teaching or 
anything along the professional line. 




40 




EMMA REBECCA LOOS 
was born at Berne, Berks Co., Pa. She is 
cue of the most illustrious of the class of 
'oi, and also one of its most loyal. Miss 
Loos has traveled considerably, both in 
the northern and western states, which 
has added much to her large store of in- 
formation. She has shown peculiar apti- 
tude for the subject which she has cho- 
sen for her specialty — German, and will 
probably be professor of the same some 
day in Lebanon Valley College. If she 
wearies of German, she intends to devote 
her time to mathematics, which is also 
one of her specialties. Beyond this, her 
future is like the unclouded sun, for it 
da/zles the eye of the prophet, and the 
task is given up. 



THOMAS F. MILLER 
is a relic of Donnelly Mills, Perry Co., Pa. 
He studied at New Bloomfield Academy, 
and had experience as a pedagogue. He 
graduated from C. V. S. N. S. in '95. 

Thomas is an unassuming and well be- 
haved boy, and is a reputable stump- 
speaker. Rumor has it that William 
Jennings Bryan wants him to stump Leb- 
anon County, and has offered him twen- 
ty dollars per "stump" and promises to 
make him minister to Honolulu. 

Tom however has declined the offer, as 
he is contemplating matrimony. Mr. 
Miller has been the successful manager 
of the foot-ball team for several years. 




41 




SUE SNYDER MOVER 
came to life at an early age in the small 
romantic town of Derry Church, Dauphin 
Co., Pa. She attended the public schools 
of her native town and later took 
up preparatory work at Lebanon Valley 
College. Miss Mo)'er has chosen literary 
work as a specialty, and intends to pur- 
sue a course along this line of work after 
graduation. She is also very fond of sur- 
veying, takes a great interest in all 
scientific departments and all new dis- 
coveries, especially in iron mines, etc. 
The only remedy known to cure her of a 
headache is "a letter," and this remedy 
has never been known to fail. She is of 
a very cheerful disposition, and never 
wearies of life, but we fear she will 
"End(h)ers" some day. 



DAVID MONTGOMERY OYER 
was born at Upper Strassburg, Franklin 
Co., Pa. It is fortunate for "Dave" that 
his birth occurred at Upper and not 
Lower Strassburg, as his natural trend is 
downward, thus Providence was consid- 
erate in placing him at Upper Strassburg 
because the distance from the Plutonic 
region being greater his chances for 
heaven are better. 

This gentleman frequently goes off in- 
to imaginary fits of intoxication at which 
periods he is simply uncontrollable, soon 
however the spell leaves him and he 
is again lovel)' and gentle as a lamb. 

Oyer purposes entering the ministry 
to which profession he will doubtless be 
an ornament. 




42 




WILLIAM OTTERBEIN ROOP, 
familiarly known as "W. O.", is a pro- 
duct of the famous Cumberland i'alley, 
having spent his earliest years at New 
Cumberland, Cumberland Co., Pa. When 
quite young he evinced the desire to be- 
come an orator and consumed much of 
his time in studying the orations of Cic- 
ero and Demosthenes. He migrated 
with his parents to Harrisburg where he 
attended school and graduated from the 
High School with high honors in April 
'c8. During the same year he came to 
L. V. C. and became a member of the 
class of 1901. His early inclination for 
oratory has made him an eloquent 
speaker, and won for him a place on the 
anniversary program of the P. L. S. Mr. 
Roop expects to pretch. 



WILLIAM SPENSER ROOP 
was born on a farm near Highspire, Pa., ' 
and he finds no difficulty in convincing 
people that he is a farm product. 

He began his search for wisdom in the 
public schools of Highspire, but soon 
outgrew them and entered the schools of 
Steelton. These he left to enter L- V. 
C. It is reported that "Willie" was 
accustomed to "play bags" at school, 
but no one knowing his great love for 
study is willing to credit the rumor. 
William is one of those easy-going, hap- 
py-go-lucky fellows, who likes every- 
body and whom everybody likes. He al- 
ways wears a smile and a dirty shirt. He 
has won many laurels on the grid-iron 
and it is for these that igoi is especially 
proud of him. 




43 




S.WIUEL EDWIN RUPP 
was born near Oberlin, Pa. He received 
his early educational training in the pub- 
lic schools of Oberlin. He also attended 
the "School of Commerce" at Harris- 
burg, Pa. He taught school for two 
ternis near Steelton, Pa. 

Edwin's appetite has failed since at 
College. It is reported that when at 
th? National Hotel in York, on the occa- 
sion of the foot-ball game between York 
Y. M. C. A. and L. V. College, he did not 
order a single viand, but simply sat and 
watched the other boys devouring the 
victuals. Edwin is fond of visiting dream- 
land when in class, he says he finds more 
pleasure there than in reciting. 

Mr. Rupp is rather spiritually inclined 
and has the ministrv in view. 



HELEN IRENE SHANK 
is the most pious girl of our class. She 
is a minister's daughter, and is a native 
of Newburg, Pennsjlvania. Although 
she has joined our ranks but a short time 
ago she has a deep love for her class, and 
has found most congenial companions 
among her class brothers. She is taking 
the Latin Scientific Course and has proven 
herself to be a remarkable student in 
science. Her greatest success was 
achieved when she delivered her oration 
on "The Other Side of the Question." 
She expects to go on the platform as 
soon as her college course is completed. 
Her highest aim is to be the means of 
obtaining for woman the rights v\hicli 
ought to be hers. 




44 




ARTHUR GARFIELD SMITH 
was born at Rohrersville, Md. He re- 
ceived his early education in the Rohr- 
ersville public schools and the Hagers- 
town High School. In the Fall of '97 he 
entered L. V. C. and was immediately 
and unanimously elected to the Fat 
Man's Club, of which he has been a 
prominent member ever since. It has 
been rumored that Garfield conducts ex- 
tensive correspondence with Hinds & 
Noble and that he uses this firm's "bony 
literal" translations extensively, but all 
who know Smith's natural propensities 
for Latin and Greek have long since dis- 
missed the rumor as false. This gentle- 
man expects to pursue the Law Course 
in the University of Maryland. 



CYRUS WILLIAM WAUGHTEL 
was born full grown, at Rocky, York Co., 
Pa. After working on a farm for some 
years he entered York County Academy. 
He taught school, and is a graduate 
of Central State Normal School, class of 
'96. In '97 he found his way to L- V. C. 
where he is renowned for devotion to 
study. He has made valuable contribu- 
tions to literature. William is a very in- 
teresting "chap," and will doubtless 
make his mark in the world. Waughtel 
purposes to make a specialty of peda- 
gogy and after graduation from Lebanon 
Valley he hopes to pursue his studies at 
Johns Hopkin's, in Germany, and 
France. 




45 




HARRY HERBERT YOHE 
was born when quite young, near 
Shippensburg, Pa. It is said that he 
worked on Lis father's farm until seven- 
teen years of pge, but the authority for 
this statement is not very good. His 
class-mates are ready to believe that he 
ate on his father's farm, and slept on his 
father's farm, but if he worked there, 
they think it must have been in his 
sleep. 

Harry attended the Cumberland Valley 
State Normal School and taught school 
at Cherry Grove, before coming to Leba- 
non Valley. Rumor has it, that when he 
slopped teaching there were scarcely 
any shingles left on the roof of the build- 
ing, thesehaving been used for emphasis 
and inspiration. 



iff 



46 



Class Ibistor^. 




|fHAT the task of writing an "Historical Sketch" of the Class of 
1901 is now not a pleasant one, to a member of that organization, 
is evident, when one considers the excellent record this class has 
made together with the fact that every member is modest almost to a 
fault, and would far rather the record of our meritorious deeds should re- 
main hidden from the gaze of nineteenth century opinion, when that opin- 
ion is so unqualified to pass judgment upon the motives of a twentieth 
century class. But the privilege of remaining quiet is not ours. Such 
diversity of talent, coming from the Orient, the Occident, the North and 
the South, cannot be hid The World has gained an inkling of the worth 
of this first class which Father Time has considered able to graduate 
amid the new and perplexing problems of a new century, and demands 
to know something of its past actions. 

As the class has been represented the last two years, in the "Bizarre," 
that fanciful and enduring monument to the class of '99's studious solici- 
tude for her Alma Mater, it is incumbent upon me to take cognizance of 
onlj^ the present school year. 

When the first meeting was convened last fall, when we could feel 
ourselves Juniors, we ascertained with dismay that some of our most es- 
teemed members did not respond to their names. There was a solemn 
halt in the regular proceedings of that meeting, while we shed a unani- 
mous silent tear for the loss of these class mates. But as the weeks rolled 
on, the ranks were filled up and augmented by valued additions. 

It has always been to us a source of annoyance, that we can boast of 
but three ladies. And while these are the finest girls in the College, yet 
our boys, on account of their number, cannot all be favored with their 
association. We could not permit them to favor the Senior girls with 
their attention because they honor indiscriminately boys from Sophomore 
down to first year Preparatory with their company. Yet we must occupy 
the leisure hours of the sixteen active young men in some way : so we de- 
cided to make use of this surplus by training them for athletes. How well 
we succeeded may be judged from the fact that we furnished material for 

47 



nearly half the Varsity foot-ball team , while our class team had such terrors 
that none dared to accept the challenge which we flung at large. 

It is only doing justice to the energy and ability of our instructor, 
Miss Wolf, to say that our Rhetorical Exercises were the most interesting 
and instructive ever rendered on the platform at L. V. C. This was the 
comment of a most appreciative audience, which filled the house, having 
found out in some mysterious way that the Juniors had charge of the 
evening's entertainment. 

On Friday, February 2, we banqueted the Seniors at the Hotel 
Eagle. Our action in thus establishing a precedent may be criticised but 
it was done to set an example to the lower classes, that they may get 
away from this selfish class spirit, which is a canker of College life. On 
this occasion when everything was mirthful and everywhere we looked we 
saw Senior talking with Junior, and the colors of the two classes festoon- 
ed together ; there was a link formed which may always be kept intact, 
and which will show to our predecessors how much better for L. V. C. 
students to dwell together in unity than to indulge in class brawls at 
commencement week. 

We cannot forget the honor and delight we experienced on March, — 
when we were privileged to spend the evening with Dr. Roop, his wife, 
and Miss Wolf, at the president's home. The hospitality extended on 
that occasion savored not of freezing formality, but all contributed to the 
entertainment of each. 

Oh ! the pleasures of the Jr. year are many, and we might wish Time 
to slip a cog and grind this old year over again. But we are being 
whirled relentlessly on ; soon we will wake to the realization that the 
dreamed of, wished for Seniority is an actuality to be born as a necessity, 
which will end by ushering us out into the vineyard, where we shall have 
the chance to put into practice the truths learned here, and so honor old 
L. V. C. by showing that the work she does, by way of transforming the 
untutored boyish and girlish minds, into trained agents, mighty in capa- 
bilities and performances, is second to none. 



48 



Ifirst Division 3unior IRbetorical. 



SaturDa?, Januars 27, 1900. 



PROGRAM. 
IVOC \TION. 
Piano— Valse, 

Lena Oweus. 
Oation— Our Priceless Heritage, 
E ilogy- Garret A. Hobart, 
Oration — The Boss in Politics, 
Vocal Solo — Fairest Maiden, 

Reba Lehman. 
Oration — The Responsibility of Man, 
Oration— The Greatest Evil, 
Oration — The Enduring Monument, 
Piano — Trot de Cavalier, 

Lillie G. Kreider. 
Oration -One Side of the Question, 
Eulogy — Dwight h. Moody, 
Vocal Solo— Still Is the Night, 

Arabelle Batdorf. 



Marek. 

W. H. Burd. 

Emma F. Loos. 

H. H. Baish. 

Lucanioni. 

K. Kuyoomjian. 

F. B. Emenheiser. 

M. W. Brunner. 

Rubinstein . 

L. E. Cross. 

S. F. Daugherty. 

Bo lull. 



49 



Second Division 3uniov IRbetorical. 



SaturDaSr iFebruar^ 17, 1900. 



PROGRAM. 

INVOCATION. 



Piano — Valse Impromptu, 



Ruth Leslie. 



Plus Ultra, R. R. Butterwick. 

Truth Conquers, S. E. Rupp. 

A Departed Guest, Sue Moyer. 

America's Aspiration, T. F. Miller. 

Vocal — Rose Queen of Flowers. Spohr. 

Lillie G. Kreider. 

False Ambition, H. H. Yohe. 

International Arbitration, W. S. Roop. 

The Other Side of the Question, Helen I. Shank. 

Man His Own Star, C. W. Waughtel. 

Piano — Valse, Chopin. 

Charles Oldham. 

Man Wanted, A. G. Smith. 

The Value of Fiction, D. M. Oyer. 

Superstition a Greater Bane Thau Skepticism, W. O. Roop. 

Duet— Overture, Schubert. 
Anna Kreider and Reba Lehman. 



50 



Sopbomore Class. 



Flower: 
Crimson Clover. 



'02. 



Color. 
Crimson. 



Motto: 




Tvtjfit 6:avT6z/ 




mil 




Hip, Rah! Boom, Rah! Hur, Rah! 


Re, 


1902, L. V. C. 




Hip, Yell! Rip, Yell! Zip, Yell! Zu, 


Crimson, Crimson, 1102! 




©rganisation. 




William Jacob Sanders, . . . 


President. 


Donald John Cowling, . . 


Vice Preside?it 


Thomas Adam Lawson, 


Secretary. 


Claudk Roy Engle, .... 


Treasurer. 


Donald John Cowling, . . 


Historian. 


William Jacob Sanders, . . 


Poet. 



53 



IPoem. 



Two years of our college course quickl)' have flown, 

But two years remain to us yet, 
From Freshmen to Soph's we have gradually grown, 

Aud we have but a single regret. 

Our numbers are seventeen, — Sophomores bright, 

Four girls and lads just thirteen, 
For a year and a half not a girl was in sight. 

Which we think was decidedly mean. 

They called us the stag class, as truly we were. 
Not one bonny lass, they were right. 

But now we defy them to cast such a slur, 
For we've lasses in whom all delight. 

Our class color, crimson, a banner we wave 

With a motto of Greek on its side, 
"Know Thyself," render, and much trouble save, 

For now there's no time for a ride. 

We do well in our branches the faculty says. 

In Latin and Greek we arc "hot," 
When tired of creeping and walking, instead 

We vary the program and "trot." 

We play with the pig-skin, three of us I mean, 
On the "Varsity" team, by the way, 

A. center, a half-back, a quarter-back, lean. 
But we'll all be players, some day. 

At tennis and basket-ball we are quite fine. 

But our ladies surpass us in these. 
At "marbles" we play, just to have a good time. 

When the Juniors and Freshmen we tease. 

They'll tell you our heads are large and quite swollen, 

Now don't believe any such things, 
Since they know that on '03a march we have stolen. 

By purchasing 1902 rings. 

54 



Our Sophomore days are fast nearing their close, 

As Juniors soon we'll be known, 
'Neath the banner of crimson each foe we'll oppose. 

And fresh laurels show new vict'ries soon. 

Three cheers for the Sophomores, loud let them ring 

Hurrah, for its girls and its boys. 
Farewell to the "Soph'' class soon will we sing 

Farewell to its griefs and its joys. 

As ever we fight in life's battle and din. 
May we all to the Crimson prove true. 

Persevere, never to quail in the end we will bring. 
Renown to our loved 1902. 




55 



YiDembeisbip. 



George Henry Albright, 

David D. Buddinger, 

Donald John Cowling, 

Augustus C. Crone, 

Samuel Hoffman Derrickson, . 

Claude Roy Engle, 

J. Lehn Kreider, . . . . 

Nettie IvOCheman, .... 

Isaac F. Loose, 

Thomas' Adam Lawson, . 

A. Wesley Miller, . . . . 

Edith Myers, 

William Jacob Sanders, 

William A. Sites 

Elizabeth Stehman, . . . . 
Alfred Charles Tennyson Sumner, 



Shamokin, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Wilt, Pa. 
Newport, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
York, Pa. 
Berne, Pa. 
Dallastown, Pa. 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
Mount Joy, Pa. 
Sunbury, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Mountville, Pa. 
Bonthe, Africa. 



56 



H (3liinp6e of the ifuture. 




i) ,^Wi*Twasa perfect day — the birds, from their mellow throats, were 
pouring forth that ecstasy which showed their complete harmony 
with nature ; the sun answered by shedding his yet gentle rays 
upon the dewy verdure; a faint breeze was rustling among the new-formed 
leaves and tender buds. My heart swelled with joy as it responded to 
these delicate appeals of nature and I longed for a closer communion with 
God's creation. Accordingly, having broken my fast and having obtained 
permission from the faculty, I wandered along the banks of the rippling 
Quittapahilla, musing on the scene before me and pondering the future. 
Suddenly, I came to a spot peculiarly beautiful and sitting down, I fell 
into a profound contemplation on the future of the class of '02. \As I 
was thus musing, my eyes wandered over the sparkling surface of the 
stream before me, when presently from among the reflected trees and sky, 
emerged the form of an aged man . He stepped upon the bank and sat at 
the foot of a huge rock. He looked upon me with compasrion and beck- 
oned me approach. I drew near with awe which he at once dispelled by 
a tender, a sympathetic look. He bid me sit by his side and said "My 
son, I have heard thee in thy soliloquy." Then, after having raised my 
thoughts with a few sublime words and having opened my mind by com- 
munion with his own, he spoke the following: 

"For the past two years, I have been watching your illustrious class 
and have found that it lacked only one essential to success — ladies. I 
have therefore bestowed upon it four of the most beautiful, talented and 
refined. The tallest will devote a few years to teaching, will then marry 
a minister and ever after find happiness in living for others. The two 
most beautiful will give their lives to music whose melody, producing 
vibrations reaching to the utmost boundary of the shores of time, will ex- 
tend down through eternal ages, ever increasing in power and effect. 
The fourth will be an artist. Her works will far transcend, in beauty and 
excellence, all that mortal eyes have ever beheld. While the cycles of 
eternity roll round, to her, man will pay involuntary tribute; even at the 

57 



farthest point of remotest history her genius will be the subject of deepest 
study. I have been especially interested. I have looked carefully into 
the future of each one and have found that they are to occupy the most 
exalted positions the coming century has to bestow. G H. A., after 
graduating at L- V. C, will take a medical course at the University of 
Pennsylvania. He will graduate with honors and will spend the rest of 
his Ife in relieving the suflFerings of the brute creation. D. D. will be a 
D. D. His influence will be mighty and his life a pattern. In 1921 he 
will be elected Bishop. S. H. D. will be a naturalist; he will revolu- 
tionize all prevalent theories and produce life from chemicals ; he will 
found a university and all subsequent scientific research will be directed 
by his writings. C. R. will enter the business world ; he will become a 
great financier and President of the Penn. R. R. Co. His influence and 
support will be sought by the most prominent politicians and he will be- 
come a mighty factor in reforming corruptions of government. J. L. K , 
after leaving college, will become an industrial manager; he will amass 
great wealth and then settle down to a life of ease; he will see that the 
community's interests are cared for and will be regarded the most impor- 
tant man in the neighborhood. T. A. L- will be a physician^a master of 
his profession. All his cures will be effected by scientific means, his 
chief remedies being plenty of rest and a forbidding of exertion at any 
time. I. F. L,. will spend several years in traveling abroad, will then 
continue his study of music in Germany after which, returning to Amer- 
ica, he will organize a concert company. His compositions will obtain 
world wide fame and his name will be a household word to posterity. A. 
W. M. will be a "shepherd of the sheep" and these he will assist in tem- 
poral as well as spiritual affairs. W. J. S. will be a lawyer and politi- 
cian, the leader of all great political movements, multitudes will be sway- 
ed by his oratory and in 1920 he will be elected President of the United 
States. W. S. will devote a few years to teaching, will then make the 
languages a specialty, will make several tours into the interior of Africa 
and in 1918 he will publish a grammar of the monkey language. A. C. 
T. S. will be a missionary. Thousands will be civilized and christianized 
by his efforts and he will be made Bishop of Africa. ' ' 

Just then he paused — there was still one name for which I had been 
eagerly listening ; I turned to inquire after his future but lo ! I was alone. 



58 




O/f >. w 



Xi?C\\Wh6X So\\l 



^^VVP'^SS/)/,,,^^^ 




^luzittPbo^ 



3frc6bman Claee. 



Flower. 
Red and White Rose. 



'03. 



Colors. 
Scarlet and White. 



Motto: 
Nulla dies sine liuea. 



13ell. 

Boom-a-raka! Boom-a-raka ! 

Boom-a-raka-ru ! 
Rip-i-zipi ! Rip-i-zipi ! 

Rip-i-zipi-zu ! 
Boom-a-raka ! Rip-i-zipi ! 

Who are we? 
1903 of L. V. C. ! 



©rGanisation. 

H. L. ElCHINGER, . . 

J. Walter Esbenshade, 
Edith E. Spangler. 
Russell S. Showers, . 
Russell S. Showers, . 
J. Walter Esbenshade, 
W. C. Arnold, . . . 



. Preside7it. 

. Vice Preside7it. 

. Secretary. 

. Treasurer. 

. Poet. 

. Historia7i. 

. Keeper of the Archives. 



61 



Ipoem. 



Roll on, thou mighty avalanche of time ! 

A voice from out thy rushing waves cried, come, 
Come, chosen ones of every clime, 

In L- V. C, come, make your home. 

From hill and vale, where nature in its beauty 
Swelled the mind with purity of thought, 

From towns and cities, with light hearts in rapture. 

Came we forth to learn the wonders man has wrought. 

With noble aspirations and with thoughtful minds. 
We crossed the portal of our present home. 

Forsook all pleasure that this world might find. 

Determined on its thorny path no more to roam. 

Before the world we stand in full array, 

Stand, as the lustrous class of 1903, 
We guard her virtue hourly every day. 

And pure before the world she'll ever be. 

Proud are these sacred walls that they contain 
So many noble hearts both stout and true. 

Scarlet and White (our colors bright), now win the fame 
Which to none others ever has been due. 

Our cousins, yes the noble Juniors, 

Who struggled hard with toil and care, 
Who treated well the present Seniors, 

Shall soon the honors nobly share. 

We too, the prize shall soon obtain. 

When we the path ourselves have trod. 
The lessons learned, we shall maintain 

In after years to honor God. 

R. S. Showers. 



62 



^embevsbip. 



Wm. C. Arnold, 
J. Wesley Balsbaugh, 
Christian S. Bomberger, 
David D. Brandt, 
Charles W. Christman, 
Urias J. Daugherty, 
Milton E. Donough, 
Harry L. Eichinger, . 
J. Walter Esbenshade, . 
Charles A. Fisher, 
David S. Ferguson, 
Tom W. Gray, 
Sara E. Helm, 
Amos L. House, 
Sol. D. Kauffman, . 
Walter R. Kohr, 
Hiram F. Rhoad, 
Charles E. Roudabush, 
Ralph C. Schaeffer, 
Lillian M. Schott, 
John M. Sheesley, . 
Russell S. Showers, . 
Paul P. Smith, 
Edith E. Spangler, 
J. W. Turnbaugh, 



York, Pa. 
Hockersville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Newville, Pa. 
St. Thomas, Pa. 
Dallastown, Pa. 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Birdin-Hand, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Ickesburg, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Markelville, Pa. 
Dallastown, Pa. 
York, Pa. 
East Hanover, Pa. 
Myersville, Md. 
Hunimelstown, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Progress, Pa. 

SheiSeld, Ontario, Canada 
Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Yeoho, Md. 



63 



Class 1f3istor^, 




HE moment the last diploma was given to the members of the 
class of Eighteen Hundred and Ninety-nine there sprang into 
existence, with no ostentation or commotion, yet with a silent 
force that could not be resisted even by the omnipotence of tht new-born 
Seniors or the arrogance of the "Baby Sophs" a class which is destined to 
become the flower of Lebanon Valley, — the class of Nineteen Hundred 
and Three. Springing as it did from such a "heterogeneous mass of human- 
ity" it is not at all surprising that there is the diversity of talent which 
exists in its fair ranks. Born under a lucky star and accompanied by 
propitious omens throughout its early infancj' no fears are entertained for 
its future welfare. 

Organization is the secret of effective work. With this thought in 
mind a meeting was called for the purpose of organizing ourselves into a 
firm and compact society for the maintenance of our rights and more 
efficient defense against the wile s of our avowed enemies the classes of 
Nineteen Hundred, and Nineteen Hundred and Two. At this meeting a 
committee was appointed to draft a constitution. This committee com- 
pleted its work in a few days and the class effected a permanent organiza- 
tion on October 19, 1899. Immediately after its ratification, the consti- 
tution was signed by fifteen members. This number has increased to such 
an extent that we are now the largest class in the institution, having on 
the untarnished pages of our record twenty-four signatures. 

But we cannot always be Freshmen, and as it will be but a short time 
until we shall take a step higher, it is altogether proper to recount here 
some of our many achievements during the year. Suffice it to say with 
regard to our classwork that we have been conquerors. In athletics we 
are the banner class. Fisher, the captain of the foot-ball team. Gray the 
coach, and Showers the famous Canadian kicker, we proudly call our 
brothers. Besides these. House, Balsbaugh and Roudabush played on 
the first team during the foot ball season of Ninety-nine. It is a matter 
of History that we as a class challenged the Seniors to a game of foot 
ball, but either because they were unwilling to condescend, or because 

64 



they feared the inevitable, our challenge remains unacknowledged to this 
day. The class boasts of having as one of its members, the only contor- 
tionist in school. No matter in what direction we have chosen to put 
forth our efforts success has attended us. 

We entered upon our course with but three of the gentler sex among 
our number. Although these are mentioned last they are by no means 
least That worth rather than numbers exists, is attested by the fact 
that they have all had such a desire for knowledge, and such an ambition 
to win fame, that they have undertaken to complete the classical course 
by the side of their stronger brothers. We are proud to acknowledge 
them as sisters. 

During its short existence the class has been noted for its modesty, 
industry, ambition and morality, and will ever be characterized by these 
virtues because upheld by true dignity. 

J. W. E. 




65 



f I 








CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 



dFacult^. 



REV. HERVIN U. ROOP, A. M., Ph. D., 
President. 

HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, Lon. Eng. 

Director. 

Piano, Voice, Organ, Harmony, Etc. 

MABEL E. MANBECK, 
Piano. 

CHAS. H. OLDHAM, 
Piano 

MADAME VON BEREGHY, 
Violin, Strings, Etc. 

M. ETTA WOLFE, A. B., 
English Literature, German. 

NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A. B., 
French, English. 

EDITH BALDWIN, Drexel Institute, '97., 
Painting, Drawing, Etc. 

Elocution, Oratory, Etc. 



*To be filled. 

68 



Cbotus Class. 



Arabelle Batdorf, ...... Annville, Pa. 

Emma Batdorf, ...... Annville, Pa. 

Eva Bretz Halifax, Pa. 

Maurice Brightbill, ..... Annville, Pa. 

LiLLiE Burkey, ....... Lebanon, Pa. 

S. F. Daugherty Annville, Pa. 

S. H. Derrickson, ...... Newport, Pa. 

Alma Engle, ....... Harrisburg, Pa. 

Claude Engle, ...... Harrisburg, Pa. 

Grace Fisher, Palmyra, Pa. 

Emma Gingrich, ....... Annville, Pa. 

Margaret Gray, Ickesburg, Pa. 

Thomas Gray, ....... Ickesburg, Pa. 

W. R. Herr, Annville, Pa. 

W. D. Hollenbaugh, ...... New Bloom field, Pa. 

Anna Kreider, ...... Annville, Pa. 

LiLLiE Kreider, ....... Annville, Pa. 

Reba Lehman Annville, Pa. 

Ruth Leslie, Palmyra, Pa. 

Alma Light, Annville, Pa. 

Fred Light, ....... Lebanon, Pa. 

Nettie Locheman, York, Pa. 

Emily Loose Palmyra, Pa. 

Mabel Manbeck, ...... Lebanon, Pa. 

A. W. Miller, ....... Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Edith Myers, ....... Mt. Joy, Pa. 

O. G. Myers Oakville, Pa. 

Lena Owens, ....... Elreno, Oklahoma. 

Harry Raab, ....... Dallastown, Pa. 

Mamie Risser, ....... Lawn, Pa. 

W. S. Roop, Highspire, Pa. 



70 



I. E. RuNK, ....... Lebanon, Pa. 

W. J. Sanders, ....... Sunbury, Pa. 

Elizabeth Shope, ...... Annville, Pa. 

A. E. Shroyer, ....... Shamokin, Pa. 

H E. SpESSARd Chewsville, Md. 

Ida Staller, ....... Friedensburg, Pa. 

Elizabeth Stehman, ..... Mountville, Pa. 

A. C. T. Sumner, Bonthe, Africa. 

Jennie Vallerchamp, . . ■ . . . Millersburg, Pa. 

Clara Vallerchamp, ...... Millersburg, Pa. 

Tekoa Winey, ....... Richfield, Pa. 

George Winter, . . . ... . . Ouarryville, Pa. 

Mary Zacharias, . . . . . . Sinking Spring, Pa. 




71 



^U8ic anb Ert department. 



*HE Music Conservatory, in connection with Lebanon Valley Col- 
''^5l ^^S^' ^''^ been made a distinct feature of the college. Under the 
Wj^^ management of Professor Herbert Oldham it has realized marked 
improvements in every line. The enrollment for the Spring term is one 
hundred and fifteen lessons in Voice, Pipe Organ, Piano, Organ and 
String Instruments, on the consevatory plan. 

The Conservatory building, donated to the college by its worthy 
friend Mr. B. F. Engle, is almost completed and will be occupied next 
Fall, altho the Auditorium will be used this Spring. The Conservatory 
contains a large pipe-organ ; and will be fully equipped for the study of 
all branches in Music and Art. 

The Art Department is -under the control of Miss Edith H. Baldwin, 
who has proved herself a competent instructor in every phase of her 
work. 

In connection with the Music Department are a number of organiza- 
tions, the most prominent of which are the Chorus Class, Quartette, Glee 
Club and Philo Orchestra. The Chorus Class is under the leadership of 
Prof. Oldham and is composed of forty-three voices. Musical Recitals are 
given at regular intervals during the year, and the success with which the 
programs are rendered shows the work done in this Department. 



72 



philo ©rcbestra. 



A. C. T. SUMNER, 

Firsl I 'ioliv . 

J. W. ESBENSHADE, 

First I "iolin . 

R. S. ENGLE, 
Second I 'ioliii 

J. R. ENGLE, 
Flute. 

W. O. ROOP, 

Mayidolin. 

A. W. MILLER, 
Mandolin . 

H. E. SPESSARD, 
Cor net. 

H. M. B. LEHN, 
Trombone . 

C. S. BOMBERGER, 
Cello. 

C. E. SOLLENBERGER, 
Organist. 

H. C. KLINGLER, 

Leader . 

73 



Xebanon IDalle^ doiiCQC ©uartette. 



H. E. SPESSARD, 
1st. Tenor. 



S. D. KAUFFMAN, 
2nd. Tenor and Musical Director. 



W. S. ROOP, 
1st. Bass. 



C. R. ENGLE, 
2nd. Bass. 



H. L. EICHINGER, 
Elocutionist and Business Manager . 



75 



©uattette. 




j,„JhE present College Quartette was reorganized in the second week 
^4.!^^ of the Fall Term of '99, at which time Mr. Kauffman was elect- 
ed musical director and Mr. Eichinger, business manager. 

During the present college year the quartette has filled many engage- 
ments, several return engagements, and have return engagements now 
for their third appearance in several places. 

They also made a tour of two weeks through the central and western 
parts of the State where they met with grand success. 

Larger things may yet be expected from this well organized concert 
company. 




76 



• • > • ^Dv. • < « 



Xiterar^ 



Socictiee. 



Clionian 
Literary Society. 



CUontan. 



Colors : Motlo : 

White and Gold. Virtute et Fide. 



Reo! Rio! Sis! Bum! Bah! 
Clio ! Clio ! Rah ! Rah I Rah ! 



©fficers. 

Reba Lehman, President. 

Nellie Buffington Vice-President. 

Enid Daniel Recording Secretary. 

Nora Spayd, Corresponding Secretary. 

Anna Kreider, Critic. 

LiLLiE Kreider, Chaplain. 

Edith Spangler, Librarian. 

Nora Spayd, Fotum Editress. 



80 



C X. S. IRolL 



ss Nellie Buffington, 
ss Arabelle Batdorf, . 
ss Emma Batdorf, 
ss Madie Burtner, 
ss Enid Daniel, 
ss Alma Engle, 
ss Margaret Gray, 
ss Anna Kreider, 
ss Sarah Helm, 
ss Lillian Kreider, 
ss Reba Lehman, 
ss Emma Loos, 
ss Sue Moyer, 
ss Edith Myers, 
ss Rosa Reddick, 
ss Lena Owens, 
ss Lillian Schott, 
ss Edith Spangler, 
ss Noi"a Spayd, 
ss Elizabeth Stehman, 
ss Elizabeth Shope, 
ss Mary Zacharias, 
ss Ruth Brasselman, 
ss Nettie Locheman, 



Elizabetliville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Ickesburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Berne, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Mt. Joy, Pa. 
Walkersville, Md. 
Elreno, Oklahoma. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
York, Pa. 
Mountville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Sinking Spring, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
York, Pa. 



1bi8tor^ of the C. %, S. 




IRTUTE et Fide." This is the motto which has been the guiding 
star of every Clio since 1871. when Miss Sarah Burns, of 
the class of 1873, with a small number, organized the Clionian 
Literary Society. 

The meetings were held every Friday evening in a small room in 
South College, but as the membership increased the Society was given a 
large room in the same building. By the untiring efforts of the Clios the 
Hall was painted, papered and comfortably furnished. In 1891, a new 
piano was purchased. In the same year the Hall was further adorned by 
a beautiful statue of Minerva presented b}' Miss Althea Fink Merick. 

The first Anniversary was held June 9, 1874, but in 1876 it was de- 
cided to hold the Anniversary on Thanksgiving Day, it being nearer the 
time of organization. November 26, 1896, the Society celebrated its 
Quarto- Centennial Anniversary. 

All during the years of the existence of the C. L. S. its members 
have been endeavoring to make the weekly meetings interesting, so that 
the time the Clios spend in behalf of the Society may stand out in after 
years as an enjoyable and profitable period of their life. When we trace 
the lives of our alumnae we feel that the influence of the Society was not 
in vain, but that they have gone from its halls into the busy world en- 
countering the battle of life true to the motto "Virtute et Fide." 

The present year has been a profitable one to us ; and the girls have 
all shown a personal interest in the work. May true Clionianism be the 
characteristic predominating in the lives of the girls of L. V. C. 

Historian. 



82 



XTwent^^lEiGbtb Hnnivereat^, 



Uburs&ap JEvening, IRov. 30, 1899 



PROGRAM. 

Piano Quartette — "Priest's March," Mendelssohn 

Misses L. Kreider, Owens, Batdorf and Stehman. 

INVOCATION. 

Vocal Solo — "Good Day Marie," 

Reba Lehman. 
President's Address 
Piano Solo — "Les Courriers," 

Arabella E. Batdorf. 
Oration — "An Aid to Evolution," 
Vocal Duet— "Good-Bye Ye Flowrets Fair," 

Lillie G. Kreider, Mary Zacharias. 
Oration — "The Phonograph of the Ages," Sue S. Moyer, 

Piano Solo — "Polka de Concert," 

Lena M. Owens. 
Eulogy — "Epictetus, " 
Vocal Solo— "Call Me Back," 

Anna E. Kreider. 
Honorary Oration — "The Rent Veil," 
Chorus — "Good Night," 

Society. 



Pessard. 



Anna E. Kreider. 
Ritter. 



Enid Daniel. 
Abt. 



Wallace. 

Nora E. Spayd. 
Denza. 

Ella Nora Black. 
Flotow. 



83 



Kalozetean 
Literary Society. 



Ikalosetean. 



Colors : Motto : 

Red and Old Gold. Paltna non Sine Pulvere. 



Iffell. 



Wah hoo ! Wah hoo ! 
Rah ! Rah ! Ree. 
"Palma non sine pulvere." 
Wah hoo ! Wah hoo ! 
Rah ! Roo ! Ree ! 
Kalozetean L. V. C. 



©fficers. 

W. J. Sanders, President. 

R. S. Showers, Vice-President. 

C. A. Fisher Recording Secretary. 

C. E. RouDABUSH, Correspondi7ig Secretary. 

A. G. Smith Censor. 

S. Edwin Rupp, Critic. 

D. D. BuDDiNGER, Chaplain. 

S. H. Derrickson, Librarian. 

E. Balsbaugh Editor to the Forum. 

H. Rhoad, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

L. E. Cross, Organist. 



86 



riDembers of 1k. X. S. 



E. M. Balsbaugh Hockersville, Pa. 

J. W. Balsbaugh, Hockersville, Pa. 

D. D. Buddinger, ....... Annville, Pa. 

R. D. Burtner, Harrisburg, Pa. 

D. J. Cowling, ....... Greensburg, Pa. 

L. E. Cross, Rayville, Md. 

S. H. Derrickson, ...... Newport, Pa. 

M. E. Donough, ...... Myerstown, Pa. 

C. R. Engle, ....... Harrisburg, Pa. 

C. A. Fisher, ....... Lebanon, Pa. 

J H. Graybill, Annville, Pa. 

H. M. Hartz Palmyra, Pa. 

I. M. Hershey, Halifax, Pa. 

D. E. Long, Annville, Pa. 

Chas. Haines, ....... Belle Grove, Pa. 

F. W. Light, Lebanon, Pa. 

I. F. Loos, ........ Berne, Pa. 

Harry Moyer, ....... Derry Church, Pa. 

Ross Nissley, ....... Hummelstown, Pa. 

M. L. Nissley, ....... Derry Church, Pa. 

C. E. Roudabush, Myersville, Md. 

Samuel Rauch, ....... Lebanon, Pa. 

H. W. Rhoad, ....... East Hanover, Pa. 

S. E. Rupp, Oberlin, Pa. 

W. J. Sanders, ....... Sunbury, Pa. 

J. M. Sheesley, ...... Penbrook, Pa. 

A. E. Shroyer, . . . . . . . Shamokin, Pa. 

R. S. Showers Sheffield, Ont. 

A. G. Smith ' . . Rohrersville, Md. 

M. W. Smeltzer Annville, Pa. 

Bert. Strayer Flinton, Pa. 

Walter Strayer, Flinton, Pa. 

J. W. Turnbaugh, Butler, Md. 

A. K. Wier, Lititz, Pa. 

T. S. Winey, Richfield, Pa. 

Irvin Winey, ....... Richfield, Pa. 

87 



Ibistot^ of m. %, S. 




' iw TAKE liberty to reiterate such facts as are necessary to convey a 
clear idea of the inevitable forces which led to the organization 
of the Kalozetean Literary Society. 

During the first ten years, in the histroy of L. V. C, one male liter- 
ary society flourished. When in the year 1876 David D. DeLong assum- 
ed the respsnsibility to direct the affairs of the college, he saw that the 
highest good would be obtained by having two male societies. He knew 
that incalculable profit' would result from friendly and healthy rivalry. 
He was the strongest force to induce the lower classmen to withdraw from 
their society to organize another one. He preferred lower classmen to in- 
sure permanence to the new organization. Jan. 15, 1877 is the memor- 
abledateofpermanent organization. Mrs. DeLong suggested "Kalozetean" 
as an appropriate name for the youthful society. Again the quick mind 
of woman has its abiding influence upon history. When Prof. McFadden 
presented the name, the gentlemen received it with delight and unani- 
mously adopted the same. It is our only aim, as it has been our elder 
brothers', to seek the beautiful, the noble, the good and the true. 

The prosperity and needs of the society have increased with the mul- 
tiplying years. Mr. C. E. Rauch started the library which has grown to 
nearly one thousand volumes. Sept. 2, 1885, a charter was procured 
which grants all the powers and privileges of a corporation at law. The 
gymnasium has been maintained as well as circumstances have permitted. 
More attention has been paid to physical culture during the last year than 
in any preceding year. This is in harmonj' with the increased interests 
in athletics in general. 

Much might be said about the pleasures and benefits derived from 
society work. Some of us have been favored to witness the greatest 
miracle of the age — the unfolding and expansion of human minds, the 
most wonderful powers that the Omnipotent has placed in His great uni- 
verse. Our banner "Palma non sine pulvere," floats before us and these 
words in old gold magically impel us onward thru the rough and rugged 

88 



places, and over seemingly unsurmountable heights which must be scaled 
to reach the goal. Especial delight comes to everyone who stops for a 
moment and looks into his memory, which brings before the mind's eye 
the sweet visions and fond recollections of the evenings spent in joint 
session with Clionians. 

Too soon, relentless time whirls and hurls the cycles of our college 
years into the irretrievable past ! Ah ! how often would we penetrate its 
vaults, but the impenetrable doors are closed after each moment has 
passed. We may look that way, but we cannot go there. Our unfurled 
banner is wafted by the constant breeze of the fleeting present toward the 
great door of the future. We follow cheerfully. 

Our minds turn to the future. Yet a little while and our fellowship 
shall be severed. We shall battle with stern realities and struggle with 
stupendous diSiculties. Defeat may meet some of us in the way. In the 
evening of our lives, in solitary moments, our souls look thru eyes made 
dim with tears, to the time when we made the history of the Kalozetean 
Society. Only then will we fully comprehend the opportunities we had 
and perhaps lost. Then our hearts will faint 

"For of all sad words of tongue or pen 

The saddest are these, (it might have been.") 

Alvin E. Schroyer. 



89 



XTwent^^XEbirb Hnniversat^. 



ifriDay Evening, Hpril 6, 1900. 



PROGRAM. 
March — Realm of Beauty, Armstrong. 

INVOCATION. 

Waltz — Colonial Days, Weaver. 

Lebanon Banjo Club. 
President's Address, Wm. J. Sanders. 

Trio — Mandolin and Guitar, Messrs. Becker, Artz, Hershberger. 

Oration — "Man an Altruist," David E. I<ong. 

Overture — Cupid's Realm, Armstrong. 

Oration — "The Great Despoiler," S. Edwin Rupp. 

Banjo and Piano, Selected. 

Mr. Rutter and Miss Atkins. 
Oration — "The Possibilities of a Cell," Samuel H. Derrickson. 

Polka — Philomela, Eno. 

Paper on "Der Einsige," Alvin E. Shroyer. 

Ocarina Duet, Selected. 

Messrs. M. A. and A. G. Reizenstein. 
Honorary Oration — "Cadmus and Caliban," 

Samuel J. Evers, A. B., B. D. 
March — Little Rascal, Heller. 



Music by Lebanon Banjo Club. 



90 



Philokosmian 
Literary Society. 

3m: 



pbilokosmian. 



Motto: Colors: 

Esse quam videri. Gold and Blue. 



Hobble gobble, razzle dazzle, L. V. C, 

Esse quam videri ; 
Hobble gobble, razzle dazzle, sis boom bah, 

Philokosmian, rah, rah, rah! 



©fficers. 

H. E. SpESSARd, President. 

H. H. YOHE, Vice-Presidetit . 

W. H. BuRD, Recording Secretary. 

C. W. WaughTEL Correspondi7ig Secretary. 

T. F. Miller, . . . . . . Critic. 

J. R. EnglE, Organist. 

S. F. Daugherty, Chaplahi. 

D. M. Oyer Treasurer. 

K. M. KuYOOMjiAN Jaiiitor. 

J. I. Shaud, ...... .Editor. 

H. H. Baish Librarian. 



93 



IRoster. 



G. H. Albright Shamokin, Pa. 

W. C. Arnold, York, Pa. 

H. H. Baish, ....... Aspers, Pa. 

C. S. Bomberger, ...... Annville, Pa. 

C. E. Boiighter, ...... Lebanon, Pa. 

D. D. Brandt, Newville. Pa. 

M. L. Brownniiller, ...... Reading, Pa. 

M. W. Brunner, ...... New Bloomfield, Pa. 

W. H. Burd, Donnelly Mills, Pa. 

R. R. Butterwick, ..... Jonestown, Pa. 

C. W. Christman St. Thomas, Pa. 

A. R. Clippinger, ..... Mowersville, Pa. 

S. F. Daugherty, ...... Annville, Pa. 

U. J. Daugherty, ...... Dallastown, Pa. 

H. L,. Eichinger, . . . . . Annville, Pa. 

C. G. Dotter Annville, Pa. 

F. B. Emenheiser, ...... Annville, Pa. 

J. R. Engle, . . . . ... Palmyra, Pa. 

R. L. Engle, ....... Palmyra, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, ..... Bird-in-Hand, Pa. 

E. S. Fenstermacher, ..... Cressona, Pa. 

D. H. Ferguson, ...... Annville, Pa. 

I. H. Fisher. ....... Cressona, Pa. 

W. M. Grumbein, Annville, Pa. 

A. L. House, ....... Annville, Pa. 

S. D. Kauffman, ...... Dallastown, Pa. 

H. C. Klinger Oriental, Pa. 

J. E. Kreider, ...... Annville, Pa. 

T. H. Kreider, Annville, Pa. 

W. R. Kohr, York, Pa. 

K. M. Kuyoomjian, ...... Iconium, Asia Minor. 

94 



H. M. B. Lehn Alger, Pa. 

G D. Light, ....... Jonestown, Pa. 

A. W. Miller, . . ... . . Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

T. F. Miller, . Donnelly Mills, Pa. 

O. G. Myers, Newville, Pa. 

D. M. 05-er, ....... Upper Strassburg, Pa. 

R. D. Reider, Middletowt., Pa. 

H. H. Risser, ....... Canipbelltown, Pa. 

W. O. Roop, ...... Harrisburg, Pa. 

W. S. Roop, Highspire, Pa. 

C. J. Saylor, Annville, Pa. 

W. R. Seibert, ....... Sinking Spring, Pa. 

J. I. Shaud, . . . . . . Annville, Pa. 

A. J. Shenk, Annville, Pa. 

P. P. Smith, Annville, Pa. 

C. E. Snoke Newville, Pa. 

G. M. Snoke Annville, Pa. 

C. A. Sollenberger, ...... Harrisburg, Pa. 

H. E. Spessard, ...... Chewsville, Md. 

A. C. T. Sumner, Bonthe, Africa. 

E. B. Ulrich, Annville, Pa. 

C. W. Waughtel Dallastown, Pa. 

H. H. Yohe, ....... Shippensburg, Pa. 



95 



Ipbtlokosnuan Xiterar^ Society. 

Founded May 6, 1S67. 




FTER thirty-three years of varied experiences, the Philokosmian 
Literary Society stands to- day in the strength by which it has 
been characterized during its entire life. The Annual of last 
year showed a membership of forty six. We lost nine members in the 
graduating class and three from the lower classes, leaving a remainder of 
thirty-fonr with which to begin this year's work. At the time of writing 
this history fifteen new men have joined our society and five ex active 
have returned to school, making a net gain for the year of twenty mem- 
bers. With an active membership of fifty-four the society is accomplish- 
ing the end for which it was founded — the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge. Up to the present time four hundred and seventy- two 
names have been signed to our constitution, from which number have 
come college presidents and professors, ministers, doctors, lawyers, repre- 
sentatives in our state legislative halls, and eminently successful business 
men. 

In the early years of the society the literary interests alone required 
attention, but the business interests have increased during the years until 
now the business sessions demand as much time and furnish as large a 
field for experience as do the literary sessions. 

Previous to 1876 inconveniences were suffered from the want of a 
proper meeting place. In the fall of the year the room which we occupy 
at present was secured and fitted up. This hall, however, does not meet 
our demands, and it is with pleasure that we look forward to the near fu- 
ture when we shall occupy a larger and even better furnished room than 
now. 

In 1877 an honorable dismissal was granted to several members who 
founded what is now our esteemed contemporary, the Kalozetean Literary 
Society. The emulaton incident to the existence of these two societies 
has tendered more effective the work of both, and it was with this end in 
view that another society was organized. 

96 



A reading room being considered an imperative necessity in the col- 
lege and the need not having been supplied, in 1878 the society opened 
one. It successfully met the demands of the students under the society's 
management unt'l 1898, when, on request, it was transferred to the col- 
lege authoiities. 

In accordance with the usual spirit of progress and in pursuance of a 
long felt demand, a lecture course was prepared and submitted to the 
public in 1881. The success of this venture gained for us such antago- 
nism that the faculty was induced to deprive us of this business enterprise. 
Two years of failure in conducting similar courses brought about its re- 
turn to the P. L,. S., and since 1884 the patrons of this source of instruc- 
tion and entertainment have never been disappointed. 

In January, 1891, the College Forum, which had been edited and 
published by the faculty at a loss, was transferred to the society in recog- 
nition of its now thoroughly established reputation for successfully hand- 
ling business enterprises. The Forum today is a sufficient evidence of the 
wisdom of this change in management. 

Not the least valuable part of our possessions is a library, fully cata- 
logued, of 895 volumes of the best books in the world's literature. 

The greatest undertaking of the society, no doubt, was the building 
of a hall, which would have been accomplished but for the objections on 
the part of the college authorities, sufficient money having been subscribed 
for the erection of a suitable building. 

A department of Natural History originated in 1877 had to be aban- 
doned on account of lack of room and the failure to successfully consum- 
mate plans for the erection of a society building after a large collection of 
specimens had been secured. 

The satisfactory manner in which the above interests have been con- 
ducted up to the present time is a guarantee that the membership has been 
governed by an incentive "to be rather than to seem," and knowing that 
in the future it shall wear the "white flower of a blameless life" as it has 
done in the past, it must attain to even greater heights than heretofore 
because of its additional opportunities resulting from the prosperity attend- 
ing, and which promises to continue with Lebanon Valley College. 

Historian. 



97 



XTbirt^^XTbirb Hnnivetear^, 



Jfridas Evening, /I15as 4, 1900. 



PROGRAM. 

St. John's Comniandery March, Farrar. 

Orchestra. 

INVOCATION. 

Overture — Jollities, Biicholz. 

Orchestra. 
President's Address, Harry E. Spessard. 

Caprice — Little Mischief, Armand. 

Orchestra. 
Debate — Resolved: That the Attitude of the United States toward 

the Philippine Islands is Justifiable. 
Affirmative : Negative : 

Robert R. Butterwick, Oren G. Myers, 

Charles E. Snoke. William O.Roop. 

Evening Serenade, Fuhrt. 

Orchestra. 
Honorary Oration — The Practical Man, 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, A. M., Ph. D. 
Decision of Debate. 

Judges : Hon. R. L. Myers, Rev. Craig B. Cross, 
C. V. Henry, Esq. 
March — Boston Tea Party, Pry or. 

Orchestra. 



Music by Kurzeuknabe's Orchestra, Harrisbnrg. 

98 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vol. 


XIII. 




MARCH, 


1900. 








No. 1. 










STAFF 




















Galen D. Light, 'co, 


Editor-iu 


Chief 
















ASSOCIATE : 














Harry 


E.Spessard, 'oo. 


ALFRED 


C. T. 


Sum 


NER, 'r2. 










HENl 


5Y H. BaISH, 'CI. 


C 


HARL 


ES VV 


. CHRIST! 


JAN, '03. 










BUSINESS MANAGERS: 


















S. F. Dadgherti 


,-, '01, (-hie: 


f. 








H, 


L. 


Kicking 


ER, '03, 


Assistant. 




W. C 


:. Ar: 


NCLD, '03, 


Assistant. 




T 


HE College For 


UM is published monthly 
of Lebauon Val'h 


by the Phi 
?y College. 


lokcs: 


mien 


I^iterary Society 



ill be forwarded to all subscribers imtil jiu order is received fcr 
Tearages have been paid. Address all business coiniiiuuica- 
tious to S. F. Daughkrtv, Business Manager, Box 1S4. Auuville, la. 

All matter intended for the Forum should be submitted to the Editorial StaflTuot later 
than the 15th of the month preceeding its appearance in the Forum's columns. 

TERMS :— FIFTY Cents Per Year. Single Copy, id Cts. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as stcond-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



"Unity is strength" has become a time- 
IHJlcnCy worn expression, whose truth is verified 

of XHnitV'. daily on every hand. Small particles of 
atoms form the molecules which produce the 
sturdy oak that scorns the howling tempests : little drops of water 
make the boundless tides of the ocean ; little grains of sand make 
the solid portion of our globe. Could these small things have 
produced such marvelous results had there not been a union be- 
tween them? No! The grammarians differ as to which of the 
two sentences is correct — one and one is two, and one and one 
are two. Relative to our subject, we fall in with the former, for 
the idea of plurality is swallowed in that of unity. Every varia- 
tion from unity is a step towards plurality and nullity. Our 
world and the measureless waste of the heavens, where sway in 
perpetual motion thousands of worlds, is the product of the great 
Triune Unity. The marvelous engines and machines of the 
present day are so, because of the exquisite agreement in their 
several component parts. The world's greatest battles have been 
won by those victorious, because there was unity of purpose in 



Zbc dfotum. 




IpHE College Forum is a monthly paper whose publication was be- 
gun in 1888 under the direct supervision of the College Faculty; 
later, however, the Philokosmian Literary Society assumed sole 
control and has retained it ever since. At first but an eight page paper, 
it now has twenty-four pages filled with college news and contributed ar- 
ticles of no mean merit, written especially for it. Purposing to represent 
carefully all the departments, — the Forum should be in the hands of every 
minister of the co-operating conferences to aid him in presenting the Col- 
lege interests ; of the Alumni that they may remain in touch with their 
Alma Mater ; of the parents that they may know something of the future 
home of those whom they may send; indeed, of all United Brethren that 
they may be acquainted with their own institution which is moulding the 
lives of many of their sons and daughters for greater usefulness. 







.Christian Associations.... 



•{^^=^ 






Ij). M, C H. 



Nora Spayd, President. 

Reba Lehman Vice-President. 

Nellie Buffington, .... Recording Secretary. 

LiLLiE Kreider, Corresponding Secretary. 

Sue Mover, Treasurer. 



Social Committee. 

Nellie Buffington, Enid Daniel, 

Reba Lehman. 



/ll5issionar\? Committee. 

LiLLiE Kreider, Sue Mover. 



JSible Stu&B. 

M. Etta Wolfe, Mary Zacharias, 

Enid Daniel. 



/IDembersbip. 

Reba Lehman, Lena Owens. 



103 



p. csb, c. a 



©fticers. 

H. E. SpESSArd President. 

G. D. Light Vice-President. 

D. J. Cowling Secretaij. 

A. E Shroyer Treasurer. 

Comnuttees. 



2>evotional. 

S. F. Daugherty, a. L. House, 

A. C. T. Sumner. 



^cmberelMp. 

G. D. Light, W. C. Arnold, 

L H. Fisher. 



^i0SionarB. 

C. E. Snoke, a. E. Shroyer, 

H. H. Baish. 



Social. 
D. M. Oyer, O. G. Myers, 

W. J. Sanders. 



Delegate to Northfield Student Conference, 
S. F. Daugherty. 

104 






, \^ 




L/^ 






^ 



f^8-^ 



HtF)letic Hssociatton. 



©fficers. 



PrES. H. U. Roop, . . . President, {cx-officio). 

H. H. Baish, President. 

A. G. Smith, Vice-President. 

D. M. Oyer, Secretary. 

R. R. BuTTERWiCK, . . Treasurer. 



Executive Committee. 

Prof. B. F. Daugherty, Prof. J. T. Spangler, 

Dr. E. B. Marshall, A. C. M. Hiester, 

Ray Miller, T. J. Barr, 

H. O. Nutting. 



1 06 



foot Ball Hssociation. 



Thos. F. Miller, Manager. 

Chas. a. Fisher Captain. 

Thomas W. Gray, Coach. 



/IDembers of tbe Ueam of 1899. 

H. H. YOHE, r. g. 
S. Roop, r. t. 



W. 



I. F. Loos, c. 
A. L. House, 1. g. 
S. E. Rupp, 1. t. 
W. R. Gable, 1. e. 
S. A. Light, f. b. 
R. S. Showers, L h. b. 



D. M. Oyer, r. e. 
T. W. Gray, f. b. 
J. A. Hershey, r. 



h. b. 



C. A. Fisher, q. b. 



A. W. Miller, c 
C. Shaffner, g. 
G. Albright, e. 
D. J. Cowling, f. b. 

C. E. ROUDABUSH, h. b. 

W. J. Sanders, q. b. 



Substitutes. 

A. G. Smith, c. 
H. Raab, g. 

E. M. Balsbaugh, e. 
C. R. Engle, h. b. 
W. Balsbaugh, h. b. 



1 08 



foot Ball Season. 



llpHE Foot Ball Season opened here most auspiciously last Fall, 
with the strongest eleven, in the history of the college. There 
W^^^ was plenty of good material from which to select, and by the 
earnest efforts of "Capt." Fisher and "Coach" Gray, the season was 
promising. 

The managers were handicapped however, because the majority of 
candidates, while they all had the necessarj' qualifications for successful 
players, lacked experience. Man}' of them having never played before. 

In view of this fact the managers are to be commended in being able 
to develop a team, which by the end of the season was as strong as any 
of those of our sister colleges. 

The team wishes to express its appreciation to the Faculty and those 
of the students who contributed so liberally to the encouragement and 
support of the team ; to manager Miller, who worked so untiringly to 
make the season of 'gg excell the previous ones ; to Dr. E. B. Marshall, 
who has always been a loyal supporter of the college, and especially to 
the department of Athletics. He has always taken an exceedingly ac- 
tive interest in all college sports, being not only the most loyal supporter 
financially, but always ready to render professional service on every 
occasion demanding his assistance. What the team most desires is more 
men who will encourage and assist it as does the worthy Doctor. And 
last, but not least, to its loyal Lebanon Friends who by their presence 
and encouragement at the games, cheered the boys on to victory. 

Editor. 



109 



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Extracts from tbe Senior IRbetoricals. 




CLUBS. 




.A 


5- 


r 


y 






0« 


r ■< 







Hnte*|portam Society. 




I HERE is perhaps no department of the College that is receiving 
more attention at present than the social department. There has 
been provided, by the College authorities, a beautifully furnished 
parlor. Besides this there are two famous retreats, known as Lover's 
Eeap and Lover's Retreat, both of which are easy of access, yet these do 
not supply the present demand. As a result a new department has been 
established known as the Ante Portam Society of Lebanon Valley College, 
where all the most interesting and up to date topics are discussed by the 
members of the association. Among the most important we note the fol- 
lowing : Loveine, Courtology, Spoonmethology, Jollyism, Matrimonial- 
ism, Scrapism, and many other like topics. We give the entire list of 
members. 



Motto. — Love is sweet. 
YEtL. — Who are we, who are we ! 
•Lovers, spooners, L- V. C ! 



©fficers. 

A. G- Smith President. 

H. H. YOHE Recording Secretary. 

C. R. Engle, Treasurer. 

J. W. Esbenshade Genei-al Agent 

Bert Oldham, Business Manager. 



©bief Spooner. 

A. Garfield Smith. 

Hssoctate /IDembers. 

Sue S. Mover, Nora E. Spayd, 

Alma Engle, Edith Spaisgler, 

Clara Vallerchamp. 

IProspective /IDembers. 

D. J. Cowling, W. C. Arnold, 

E. M. Balsbaugh, Enid Daniel, 

Lillian Schott, Edith Myers. 

125 



Hnti*Mbi8f^et Societ^^. 



N. C. SCHLICHTER, . . . Pres. (ex-officio.) 
H. H. Baish, Manager. 



Committee on IRajors. 

F. B. Emeniieiser, Walter Roudenbush, 

Ralph Englh. 



Committee on (Bas) IRum. 

M. E. DoNouGH, A. W. Miller, 

A. K. WiER. 



applicants for /iDembersbip. 

W. R. KoHR, W. C. Arnold, 

J. M. Sheesley, W. R. Sites, 

J. L. Dickson, J. C. Loos, 

H. H, RissER, T. H. Kreider, 

J. I. Shaud, p. p. Smith. 



127 



IV.: 



Hssociatton. 



S. Edwin Rupp, 
r. r. butterwick, . 
Cyrus W. Waughtel, 
William O. Roop, 



//is Reverend //ighness. 
Big Rubber Neck. 
Little Rubber Neck. 
Dean of Exchequer. 



Hctive /iDembers. 

R. R. BuTTERWICK, 

F. B. Emenheiser, 
S. E. Rupp, 

W. O. Roop, 



R. D. Reider, 
O. G. Myers, 
T. A. Lawson, 
C. W. Waughtel. 



UDonorars Members. 

C. E. RouDABuSH, Miss Rose Reddick, 

Miss Edith Myers, Wm. H. Burd, 

Miss Nellie Buffington, S. D. Kauffman. 



128 



*ffnebriate Hssociation. 



®rgani3c& 3an. 5, 1899, Cbartcrc^ 3an. 6, '99. 

Song. 

Beer, beer, glorious beer, 
Pill yourself right up to here. 
Drink a good deal of it, 
Make a good meal of it, 
Glorious, glorious beer. 

/IDOttO. 

"Take a little wine for your stomach's sake." 

©fflcers. 

T. A. Lawson, President. 

W. C. Arnold Vice-Preside^it. 

R. D. BuRTNER, Recordijig Sea-etary . 

J. W. ESBENSHADE, Treasurer. 

Malfting Delegates. 

Ross NiSSLEY, R. D. Reider, 

W. J. Sanders. 

purcbasing Committee. 

H. H. YOHE, C. E. ROUDABUSH, 

W. S. Roop. 

jfloor Scrubbrs. 

O. G. Myers, G. D. Light. 

E. S. Fenstermacher. 

Sen=5en Committee. 

D. J. Cowling, S. H. Derrickson. 

A. E. Shroyer. 



129 



lEucbre Club. 



Motto. — Do the other fellows or they'll do you. 
Colors. — Silver and Old Gold. 
Yell. — Partner, partner, Clubs are trump ; 
Catch the signal on the jump. 
Grab the coin and salt it down 
Watch the other fellows frown. 



©fficers. 

C. W. Christman, President. 

A. W. Miller Vice-Presideiti 

J. W. TuRNBAUGH Recording Secretary. 

K. M. KuYOOMjiAN Treasui-er. 



Coacb. 

Red Snoke. 

flOascot. 

C. E. Snoke. 

©utsi&e Sentinel. 

M. M. Smeltzer. 

tFnsi&e Sentinel. 

Rev. D. D. Buddinger. 

©fficial Scorer. 

C. E. Boughter. 

XHmpires. 



Ross NiSSLEY, 



Fred Light. 



D. J. Cowling, 
H. H. Yoke, 



prospective /iDembers. 



130 



D. E. Long, 

W. R. KOHR. 



nDatdeb riDen's Club. 



Motto. — What is home without a baby. 

Colors. — Blaclc and Blue. 
Yell. — Mamma, mamma, where is this? 

Mamma, mamma, where is that? 

Mamma, mamma, where's my hat? 

Mamma, mamma, Tit for Tat. 



H. C. Klinger, . . . Chief Domestic. 
S. F. Daugherty, . . Floor Walker. 
H. L. EiCHiNGER, . . Up Stairs Mati-on. 
I. M. Hershey, . . . Down Stairs Matron . 

A. K. WiER Adniinisti-ator of Paregoric. 

F. B. EmenheiSER . . Model Papa. 



Hctive /iDembers. 

Henry Clay Klinger, Samuel Frobisher Daugherty, 

Hard Luck Eichinger, 

In Memoriam Hershey, Alcibiades Kallikrates Wier, 

Froelich Bartholomew Emenheiser. 



prospective /iDembers. 

H. H. Baish, R. R. Butterwick, 

W. C. Arnold, C. R. Engle, 

W. J. Sanders. M. L. Brownmiller, 

H. H. YoHE, H. E. Spessard, 

Jno. Sheesley. 

131 



Colleoc Hpenue (Bastronomtc 
Hssoclation. 



/IDanager. 

L. E. Cross. 

IResiftent /IDembers. 

D. J. Cowling, O. G. Myers, 

S. H. Derrickson, F. B. Emenheiser, 

S. F. Daugherty, U. J. Daugherty, 

E. M. Balsbaugh, C. W. Waughtel, 

S. D. Kauffman, G. H. Albright, 

W. H. BuRD, T. A. Lawson, 

A. E. Shroyer, L. E. Cross. 



S. F. Daugherty, 



C. W. Waughtel, 



E. M. Balsbaugh, 



D. J. Cowling, 



Carvers. 

prije Eaters. 

S. H. Derrickson. 

Steah Cboppers. 
potato parers. 
Cbiet /IDuncber. 

S. D. Kauffman. 



F. B. Emenheiser. 



O. G. Myers, 



G. H. Albright. 



W. H. BURD. 



132 



...Literary... 




"irt riDtobt Ibave Been/' 



Written for the "Bizarre." 



FEU FOLLET, 'oi. 




I 1 V? T was growing cooler after an unusually waim day in earh' June. 
The sun had gone toward the west to search for other victims 
upon whom to pour his hot sweat}' beams, leaving me to the 
enchanting influence of the Summer twilight. I was not alone, for L. V. 
C. is a CO educational institution. She was a Senior soon to graduate. I 
was a Junior. We with a number of other students had strolled out after 
supper to seek bodily comfort which the dusty oven-like streets of Ann- 
ville did not afford, and had naturally moved in the direction of "Lover's 
Leap," where we had found a comfortable seat on a large mossy log 
overlooking the placid contented looking Quittapahilla. 

Will not niy readers sit there with me now? Especially those of you 
whose school life at dear old L. V. C. is one of the most pleasant things 
which the mind has stored away for the quiet hour, when the food de- 
manded by the memory is something exquisitely refined and heart ex- 
perienced. Happy indeed is the man, or woman, after leaving school, 
when deeply engaged in carving a name and place in the great hard 
world, if he can boast a good supply of pleasant incidents, long past per- 
haps — but they will live, beautiful things, to be caressed by memory's 
fond touch, even when L. V. C. has nearly forgotten us, and when time 
and care have traced their lines upon the faces whose smiles once made 
our hearts beat quicker, and fired the discouraged soul to new ambitions. 
Be with me for a time that I may let you appreciate to some extent an 
incident which had much to do with changing my life ; whether for good 
or bad, I leave you to judge after you have read. 

My companion was a lady from Baltimore. She was unlike any 
other girl I ever met, in that she could talk sensibly for an hour at a 



134 



time. This singularity may have been one of the characteristics which 
attracted me, for I loved her. All the boys did. They could not help it 
when she was so very kind and thoughtful and treated us all alike. She 
was small, but perfectly formed, and her little head, which had more 
Logic, Ethics and Philosophy in it than the best man in her class had 
ever dreamed of, was crowned with a profusion of golden curls which 
were always arranged as only her little hands could do it. I would like 
to describe her e^'es, but cannot, for when I looked into them I always 
thought of something else, and I don't even know their color, but I think 
they were blue. 

I know she did not love me, when there were so manj^ other fellows 
smarter, handsomer, and richer, and beside I had the reputation (deserved 
perhaps) of being a "woman hater." 

Pondering all these things, together with the fact that Commence- 
ment was now very near at hand when our paths would diverge and we 
should likely see little of each other ; it is little wonder that my appear- 
ance was meditative as we sat there listening to the frog orchestra, which 
was having a concert down at the water's edge. 

Painful reflections such as these could never last long in Vivian's 
presence. She turned to me and asked: "Why so pensive, friend of 
mine." 

To turn her attention from me I asked in return : ' ' Did you ever hear 
the legend couple! with the name of this place?" 

"No" she replied, "why havn't you told me before when you know 
how such things interest me?" 

"Well perhaps time did not give me the opportunity" — 

"Ah yes, some of you men must always have opportunities thrown 
down for your inspection and choice else you refuse to act, ' ' she said, with 
that sarcastic expression which sometimes marred her sunny countenance. 

"Well, with your permission, I will take the opportunity now." 

As she demurely smiled her willingness to listen to me, I began : 

In the early part of the sixteenth century, this country for many 
miles on either side of the Susquehanna river, as far as the head of the 
Chesapeake Bay, was completely under the control of an independent tribe 
of Indians, (the Susquehannocks.) This tribe was not allied with the 
great federation — the "Five Nations" — and up to this time had been 
peaceably and wisely governed by two chiefs, one young, the other old. 
This arrangement was probably made so that the Senior chief would be 
an experienced warrior, while the younger was being prepared for the 



135 



higher position when his superior should succu.nb to the ravages of time 
or accident. 

At this time a rivalry existed between the old chief Usk* who had led 
them for so man}' years, and the young chief Yniol, wh<j was very popu- 
lar on account of his courage and skill. 

This rivalry grew until finally Yniol decided to incite a rebellion and 
attempt to make himself ruler of the greater part of the tribe, if not the 
whole, at once. The only thing which deterred him was his love for 
Guinevere, Usk's daughter. For a long time his ambition struggled with 
his love and the combat put him in so miserable a state of mind that he 
decided to confide the whole matter to Guinevere and to abide by her 
decision. 

She listened to all in stolid silence. When he had finished she ad- 
vised him to think over the whole matter again and to use his own judg- 
ment, and above all to do nothing for a day or two. 

That night while before his wigwam at one end of the camp, he began 
to consider again each side of the proposition : to gratify his ambition 
or to restrain it. He knew he had the confidence and could rely upon the 
aid of a great majority of the warriors, who at a word from him would 
fight to the death to further his interests. 

Why not strike the blow at once ? Then he remembered the words 
of his sweet heart telling him to do nothing hasty. It was a beautiful 
night. The moon beams plaj'ed on the softening countenance of Yniol 
as the foliage far overhead trembled with rapture at the kisses of the 
zeph5'rs as they passed thru the tree tops. All else was so silent that the 
answering whispers of the leaves en the lofty oaks could be plainly heard. 
His heart became quiet in harmony with these surroundings. He sat long 
and mused on the goodness of the Great Spirit in making all these things 
so beautiful for the enjoyment of his children. Then he fell asleep and 
dreamed of the happy hunting-grounds. 

But while Yniol is thus deciding to be peaceable, Guinevere has gone 
to her father and told him what she had heard and adds that Yniol will 
certainly attack him before two days have elapsed. 

The enraged father quickly summons his men and is soon working 
havoc at the other end of the camp. The surprise is complete. Yniol's 
men are either killed or taken prisoners — he alone escapes, badly 
wounded. 

*This legend is based on historical facts, but as the names have been forgotten 
they have been supplied according to the fancy of the author from Tennyson's 
"Idyls." 

136 



Imagine his condition — his tribe is an exclusive one and it has cast 
him out because of the treachery of the one he loved. All bewildered he 
wanders westward, knowing not what to do nor where to go. The re- 
mainder of that night and the next day he travels slowly, hungry, faint 
from loss of blood and worse than all else heart broken. At the close of 
the day he reaches this beautiful stream which was then much larger than 
it is now. Just on this high bank he becomes utterly exhausted. Sink- 
ing down where he could see the dancing waves far below, he again slept 
and again dreamed the same dream from which he had been so rudely 
awakened the night before. He thought he saw the Great Spirit smiling 
and beckoning him to come, but between them was a dark, cold stream. 
He seemed to say : "Oh my Father I can't swim this river, I am wound- 
ed." The answer came back : "Throw yourself in and you will be cured." 
Yniol awoke with a start. The moon had reached the Zenith and in 
her reflection on the surface of the water, he thought he saw the face 
that had smiled so pleasantly in the dream. 

The poor delirious Indian was rolling to the edge of the rock in or- 
der to reach what seemed the culmination of his hopes. 

A cloud came across the moon and the water became dark and fore- 
boding. Yniol drew back shuddering. Again the cloud passed and again 
the smiling face seemed to encourage him. This time the effort was suc- 
cessful and a splash broke the stillness of the night. And who can say 
that his hopes were not fulfilled? 

I paused as this was all I knew of the legend . Vivian had apparent- 
ly lost all recollection of her surroundings and put her entire energies in 
reflecting on the details of what she had just heard. 

It was growing dark and the other students could be heard singing as 
they came back from their tour farther up the stream, where they had 
gone in search of Botanical specimens. Soon they would be with us. 

I asked softly: "To use the words you taught me awhile ago, 'why 
so pensive friend of mine?' " 

"Why I don't believe that story can be true." 

"How can you doubt it when I have told you." 

"Well, first, you said was only a legend; second, your Yniol does 
not have the tnie characteristics of an Indian brave; third, your Guine- 
vere is not womanly. No matter how low in the scale of public opinion 
a woman may fall, and no matter how low she may be, she would never 
assume a treacherous attitude toward the man who loved her, even tho 
she had a positive aversion for him . ' ' 

137 



"You have a very good opinion of women in general — " 

"I wish yours was better. Do you really enjoy your reputation you 
have gained as a woman hater? I should think you would feel very un- 
comfortable when you reflect that the people you hate include half of all 
humanit}'." 

"I wonder you didn't say the better half of all humanity. Do you re- 
member one evening last winter I was speaking to you on this very sub- 
ject, and that I offered myself as an object for you to try to reform? 
Well, whether or not you have been trying, I don't know, but I know 
you do not realize how well vou have succeeded, for, because of your un- 
selfish and thoughtful actions since I have known you, I think better of 
the whole sex, and, Vivian, I love you." I tried to refrain from taking 
her hand which lay so quietly on the log at her side, but could not. 

While I was speaking Vivian, was looking off across the water so that 
I could not see the expression which might tell me — What? 

For about thirty seconds I endured this suspense. The only question 
in my mind would have been : What form will her resentment take? only 
the passive little hand gave me the shadow of a vague hope. 

"Have you nothing to say to me?" I asked slowly. 

Then she turned to me with a smile, which an idiot might not have 
misunderstood, and said : "Only this, I have loved you for a long time and 
I have known that you loved rm, but I was so afraid you would not tell 
me," and she added after a pause, "You know I could not have made 
any advance.? even tho this is time for a leap year. You have made me 
very happ3^" 

How unjust we men are in this respect. How near I came to missing 
my opportunity for happiness with the only girl I ever loved, and yet I 
know that had she made the first advance, even by a glance, she would 
have dropped in my estimation and I would have thot her forward. 

The crowd now having come in speaking distance, some one said : 
"What are you two talking about so long?" 

"Relating history" replied Vivian. — "And making history, ladded." 

Then we followed the rest home, while the whippoorwill sang on the 
log we had just left, and every day ] redouble my thanks to the "Capri- 
cious fates,' for that evening spent on "Lover's Leap." 



138 



H fllMsjubgrnent. 



Rider and Light, two senior men, 
To the station came one day ; 
Acting of course as seniors would. 
But not one whit as seniors should, 
They began at once some tricks to play. 

At the station a "Vassar" girl 

Was speaking with a friend of mine — 

A Junior too, by the way — 

And she thus was heard to say, 

As she tried to look real kind ; 

"Too harshly we dare not judge 

Our fellow-men we say ; 

But from the tricks I have seen 

I suppose they are Freshmen green, 

For that is the way they plaj'." 

"Oh! no," said the Junior true, 
"They are senior men at school ; 
But of course you could not know 
They act thus just for show, — 
While in truth they act the fool." 

B 



139 



SpririG. 



Siuging birds ou tree-tops high, 

Tell once more sweet spring is nigh. 

Tin}' little brooklets flow 

Through the quicklj' melting snow, 

Little flowers now outward peep 

From the grass 'neath which they sleep ; 

Daffodils and buttercups, 

Daisies and Johny-junip-ups ; 

Many others that we love. 

Smiling toward the sun above, 

In the blue, ethereal sky. 

As the hours go fleeting by. 

Since long winter's waste is o'er 
His dread cold we'll fear no more. 
Cheerful spring has come again. 
Driving back dull care and pain ; 
Making all things bright and gay, 
Chasing every gloom awa}'. 
Fields are pleasant to be seen, 
Grass and trees once more are green ; 
Blossoms grownig everywhere 
Whose perfumes sweet fill the air; 
While the birds and honey bees, 
Treasures seek among the trees. i 

Hear once more the schoolboy's shout 
As from school he now comes out ; 
School days now have all been done. 
Spring, sa3-s he, the time for fun. 
Is the best of all the year. 
For it brings him greatest cheer. 
How could all the birdies sing 
If we had no lovely spring? 
How could all the flowers grow 
If we always had the snow? 
These are some questions he asks. 
As he leaves his school-room tasks. 

140 



Spring the choice is of my heart, 

With it I would never part. 

Summer, autumn, winter, each 

May be taken from my reach ; 

If for them you leave me spring, 

Since with it my heart can sing. 

Who would change sweet spring so bright 

For cold winter's long, dark night? 

Who would give spring's genial rays 

For winter's short, clouded days ? 

Not I, I beg leave to say, 

I would not give a single day. 

Spring for me a lesson has 
Which I dare not idly pass. 
As the flowers I once must sleep. 
While my friends around me weep ; 
As the flowers they'll lay me low, 
'Neath the clover or the snow. 
But from sleep I too shall rise. 
And shall mount above the skies ; 
Where the angels ever sing, 
Where the days are always spring. 

E. M. Balsbaugh. 



141 



flDemor^. 



While sitting alone in my study, 
As the shadows round me play, 

A kind and truthful memory 
Brings scenes of a by-gone day. 

It calls me back to my boy-hood days, 

The days of my greatest joy ; 
It brings to mind dear, harmless plays 

I loved so well when a boy. 

It whispers low of a mother's love, 

The purest love ever given ; 
That always leads to joys above 

And blissful rest of heaven. 

It also tells of a father dear, 

Who always was kind and true ; 

Who ever tried my days to cheer. 
And taught me the right to do. 

It shows a sketch of my happy home, 
A house full of joy and mirth ; 

A place where sorrow could not come, — 
'Twas the dearest spot on earth. 

It talks of love and fond dreams of youth. 
The wildest, brightest dreams life knows; 

Which now Time's hand so rude, yet ruth, 
Has buried 'neath oblivion's snows. 

How well those visions I now recall. 

Of places 1 so long to see ; 
Remorseless Time has claimed them all. 

But memory is left to me. 

Memory sweet of by-gone years, 
Happy years too quickly flowu ; 

I could shed the most bitter tears. 
Over scenes now passed and gone. 

142 



For this is a truth the poets tell, 
That the brightest, saddest joy. 

Is for man to reiiieuiber well 

The blithesome daj'S when a boy. 

When like a lark, so gay and free, 

Without a care or sorrow ; 
Each da}' was then a jubilee. 

With never a thought of the morrow. 

Never weary ere the daj'S would close 
And the nights softly descend ; 

Knowing well while in sweet repose, 
God's angels their watch would lend. 

Guardians of love over my bed. 

Kindly, faithful vigils kept ; 
While unheeded the hours sped. 

As I calnil)', sweetly slept. 

And if perchance they brought a dream, 

It was one of exquisite bliss ; 
Innocent pleasures which would seem 

Mingled with a mother's kiss. 

Would those days might return again, 
And bring back their matchless joys ; 

Gladly I'd give these days of pain. 
With all their idle, mocking toys. 

How foolishly I did them resign. 

In my ignorance long ago ; 
Which plainly shows when they were mine, 

Their true worth I did not know. 

I bartered them for seeming pleasure, 
But which proved to be a curse ; 

Not knowing, I gave all my treasure 
For sorrow, pain, grief and worse. 

Still there remains one glittering star, 
To cheer me with its kindly light ; 

Memory will ever from afar. 

Bring some scenes, cheerful and bright. 

And oh, if memory should me fail. 
Life would then be sad indeed ; 

My soul would lift the bitterest wail, 
And my heart would freely bleed. 

143 



For it is the greatest of God's gifts 
In, the mind of man concealed ; 

All of our dark clouds it lifts, 
B}' it all our wounds are healed. 

Memory, like the bright sun's shining, 
Dispels the gloom and brings sweet peace; 

To each cloud it is a silver lining; 
It bids the raving tempests cease. 

What matter then though storms may roar, 

My consolation it will be ; 
It shall abide till life is o'er. 

Yea even through eternity'. 

For will not heaven brighter seem, 

When earth's dark shadows all are past ; 

If lueniorj- brings a single beam 
Of mortal joj-s that could not last ? 

E. M. B.\L.SB.\UGH. 



144 



Commente on foot Ball. 



Pro. and Con. 



In the good old town of Annville 
There stands a College Hall, 

Where some jolly students study 
And sometimes play Foot-ball. 

Many opinions have been passed 

On that exciting game ; 
Most every-body censures it, 

While some few do not blame. 

But of all the foolish remarks 
That ever have been heard, 

The ones most earnestly given 
Have been the most absurd. 

The college dude saj'S, "Don't you know 
Its quite-ah out of plathe." 

While the facts of the matter is. 
He's afraid he'll spoil his face. 

The people of the good old town 

Say, "None would play but fools ; 

'Tis not for foot-ball that we send 
Our children to these schools. 

If we want our dear boys to die 
We'll send them to the wars ; 

To fight the burly savages 
On the Filopino's shores. 

It is a brutal, bloody game, — 

In fact it is a sin. 
I can't see why indeed, they did 

So rude a game begin." 



145 



Their fathers thus to each one write, 
"Now boys, no foot-ball play; 

For if in that game you indulge 

From school you'll come away. 

Do you think I'll let my boy 

For life a cripple be? 
No ; it may seem to 3'ou great fun, 

But in it no fun I see." 

Now it was about December 

That the girls of the school, 

Began to play some Basket-ball 
Just according to the rule. 

Why, to be sure they all would wear 
The abbreviated (?) skirt ; 

Just something like the bicj'clist, 
The girl you call a flirt. 

Now this was quite permissible. 
And none were there to blame, 

Until some "jays" came passing by 
Who never saw this game. 

"Well did you ever," so said one, 
"See girls in such a trick ? 

The girl that plays the foot ball game 
Must be most awful slick. 

I am sure I would much rather 

My daughter to espy, 
If she were baking bread and cake, 

Or rolling out a pie. 

Oh, what is this world coming too, 

I wonder at this rate ; 
Where shall an honest man now look 

To find his sou a mate?" 

And thus the talk is carried on, 
'Tis done in ignorance, too ; 

For not one of all these men 

The school a harm would do. 

But so many seem to forget 

That times are not the same ; 

We do not travel on their stage. 
Nor will we play their game. 

146 



True, foot-ball may be very rough, 

But it takes pluck to play ; 
And who is there that will deny 

That pluck e'er lost the day? 
* 
'Twas General Roosevelt that once said 

On Cuba's bloody field ; 
That it was on Yale's gridiron 

He learned never to yield. 

Foot-ball trains a sure, quick eye, 

A hasty thought and act ; 
These are a few of its virtues, 

What ever it may lack. 

And to all who are finding fault, 
There is this much to say ; 

The game is here, do not object. 
But let your dear boy play. 

Don't hinder him, but rather aid 
And help him all you can ; 

For this you'll find if you but wait, 
'Twill make of him a mati. 



Balsbaugh. 



H7 



Cbc 2)\)tng Century. 



'Tis the death day of a "grand old age." 

Yet, no solemn voices bid farewell 
To the century old ; sad and lone 

He is lying, waiting for his knell 
Soon to ring from out the great high dome 

Of the belfry on the Hall of Time. 
Other sounds of earth, in silence sad. 

Wait in tears, to hear his funeral chime. 

Nor is he first to die this death 

Of his ancestors, eighteen now sleep 
In the dark sepulchre of the past. 

Nor in oblivion ; myriads weep 
Still, as they recall joys of the last 

And oft told tales of their own grand sires. 
Who were friends of the last century's 

Nearest kin, and his true admirers. 

Ah yes, this is a sad solemn year ! 

For the nineteenth century is dying now. 
As his long, grand, course has now been run. 

And although the death dew's on his brow ;- 
And although we know his work is done ;— 

Still we grieve to part from one so dear; 
One who all, living, loved ; dying, mourn 

As they only mourn who mourn a peer. 

Yea, much more than peer to all, is he ; 

But as all things else must die their death. 
And the good and bad alike must fall. 

So the dying century's last breath, 
Like a tender warning to us all, 

Is expiring now on the silent air ; 
While the millions mourn to see him pass:- - 

Pass away in seeming sleep, so fair. 

Not one selfish trait was there in him. 

From his infancy always was he 
The companion of our joys and grief, 

Where fond mirth held sway he loved to be ; 



To the sad he always brought relief, 

He has looked on wounds and battle scars, 

And on death in all its various shapes. 

On disease, tombs, and dread funeral cars ;- 

On dark crime, vice, and all else that mars 

The serenity of life's deep stream, 
Stirs up segments of forgotten pain, 

Or else stifles the flickering gleam 
Of sweet hopes, which like the fallen rain, 

May swell forth in the heart of man, 
As a tiny, bubbling spring bursts out 

On its course to do what good it can. 

When first he came our nation was young. 

France and England were in deadly strife. 
Other countries hoary and quite old. 

While America, gasping for life. 
Left alone in the pitiless, cold, 

And ambitious world, hopeless and sad. 
As the sole resort toward the nineteenth 

Century turned, and he made her glad. 

It was under his nurturing care 

That her glorious banner was led 
On from victory to victory ; 

In its wake and everywhere it shed 
Fond enlightenment and sweet liberty. 

He has led her through the throes of war. 
Through crises, panics and secession. 

And taught her that she need fear no more. 

He has broadened her great, wide domain, 

Which else the calm Mississippi bound. 
To fair California's Golden Gate. 

Yea, even follows the wide world round 
To the Philippines; where just of late 

Her "starry" flag was boldly unfurled 
As the harbinger of light and truth. 

Civilization and peace to the world. 

We cannot recount all blessings giv'n. 

But the bright halo of joy he brought 
Will ever light up memory's hall. 

For of friends he always will be thought 
The most kind and dearest of them all. 

And when he, who now to all is so dear, 
Shall have passed away, we'll sing this dirge, 

As cold in death he lies on his bier. 

149 



Oh farewell, thou dearest friend we bad ; 

With bleeding hearts we bid thee adieu ; 

Bitter tears can only feebly show 

Our great love for the best friend we knew ; 

Yet our grief availeth not, thou must go. 
Sad is the wail of a sorrowing race ; 

Sadder stijl 'tis for them all to know- 
There are none who can fill thy place. 

Sing no more ye dancing brooks and rills. 

Nor ye whistling birds on tree and tower ; 
But bow low your heads in grief forlorn, 

'Mid ghastly silence, in this death hour ; 
While all in the once glad world now mourn. 

O deep sounding sea, toss thy white serge. 
Bid thy dark caverns more sadly moan. 

And help swell this universal dirge. 

Ve mountains and everlasting hills, 

O'er thy sharp crags bid the stormy blast 
Blow keen, and let thy whistling pines spread 

Our grief, until 'tis shared by the last. 
Remotest orb in the vault o'er head. 

Only when the singing spheres do change 
Their harmonies to relentless rage 

Will our grief attain a fitting range. 

When such vent to our grief has been given, 

Then we may bid a final farewell. 
And 'mid the twilights of future years, 

Devout mothers to children will tell 
Of the Nineteenth Century's death ; tears 

Will show their sorrow, but oft they'll do 
Braver dee'ls than their sires, and wonder 

If the old zvere better than the new. 

Bai,sbaugh. 



150 



Hpplteb (Sluotations. 



Seniors. 

BuRTNER. — "Come give us a taste of your quality." 

■ — Shakespeare . 
Miss Burtner. — "My eyes make pictures, when they are shut." 

— Coleridge. 
Miss Buffington. — "Her modest look the cottage might adorn, 

Sweet as the primrose peeps beneath the thorn." 

— Goldsmith. 
Miss Batdorf. — "The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she." 

— Shakespeare. 
Miss Daniel. — "A Daniel come to judgment!" — Shakespeare. 
Miss Groff. — "Mistress of herself, though China fall." 

—Pope. 
Miss Kreider, L. G. — "And out of mind as soon as out of sight." 

— Lord Brooke. 
Miss Kreider, A. E. — "Her voice was like the warbling of a bird 
So soft, so sweet, so delicately dear." 

— Byron . 
Light, F. W. — "And, when I ope my lips, let no dog bark." 

— Shakespeare. 
Light, S. A. — "He hath a daily beauty in his life." 

— Shakespeare. 
Light, G. D. — "Like a dog, he hunts in dreams." — Tennyson. 
Miss Lehman. — "She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen. " 

—Pope. 
Long. — "That old man eloquent." — Milton. 

Myers. — "You are not like Cerberus, three gentlemen at once, are 
you?" — Sheridan. 

NisSLEY. — "A man he seems of cheerful yesterdays 

And confident to-morrows." — Wordsworth. 



151 



Miss Owens. — "It will disccurse most eloquent music." 

— S/i a Ac spcare. 
Peters, D. A. — "'Tis pleasant sure, to see one's name in print." 

— Byron. 
Peters, J. — "Thej' are never alone that are accompanied with noble 
thoughts. ' ' — Sidney . 

Rider. — "Is most tolerable, and not to be endured. — Shaespeare. 
SpESSARD. — "Who says in verse what others say in ^ros^."-—Pope. 
SCHROYER. — "Though last not least in love." — Shakespeare. 
Snoke, C. E. — "God bless the man who first invented sleep. — Saxe. 
Snoke, Mason. — "He could distinguish, and divide 

A hair, 'twixt south and southwest sides." 

— Butler. 
Miss Spayd. — "A soul, as white as heaven." 

— Beaumont and Fletcher. 
WiER. — "A young man married is a man that's marr'd." 

— Shakespeare . 

3uniors. 

BirTTERWiCK. — "I am a man." — Shakespeare. 
Baish. — "L,arge was his bounty and his soul sincere." — Gray. 
Brunner. — "Silence is the perfectest herald of joy. I were but lit- 
tle happy, if I could say how much." — Shakespeare. 

Balsbaugh. — "There is a pleasure in poetic pains which only poets 
know. ' ' — Couper. 

Cross. — "Man delights not me, — no, nor woman either. " 

— Shakespea re . 
Daugherty, S. F. — Long experience made him sage. — Gay. 
Emenheiser. — "God made him, and therefore let him pass for a 
man . ' ' — Shakespeare. 

Kuyoomjian. — "I cannot tell what the dickens his name is." 

— Shakespeare. 
Miss Loos. — "Life is a jest and all things show it, 

I thought so once, and now I know it." — Gay. 
Miller. — "High erected thoughts seated in the heart of courtesy." 

— Sidney. 

152 



Oyer. — "A foot more light, a step more true, 

Never from the heath-flower dashed the dew." — Scott. 
Rupp. — "I am fearfully and wonderfully made." — Psalm. 
Ropp, W. O. — "For many a lad returns from school 
A Latin, Greek and Hebrew fool; 
In arts and knowledge still a block 
'Though deeply skilled in hie, haec, hoc." 

— Patlison. 
Roop, W. S. — "I am not in the roll of common men." 

— Shakespeare . 
Mrss Shank. — "Let me have men about me that are fat." 

— S/iakespeafe 
Smith. — "And when a lady's in the case 

You know all things give place." — Gaj. 
Waughtel. — "Man is his own star." — Fletcher. 
YoHE. — "My heart is true as steel." — Shakespeare. 

fIDiecellaneous. 

Miss Engle. — "A merry heart doth good like a medicine." 

— Proverbs. 
SoLLENBERGER. — "He was a man of an unbounded stomach." 

— Shakespeare. 
BuDDiNGER. — I love everything that's old. Old friends, old times, 
old books, old wine." — Goldsmith . 

Gray. — "A noticeable man with large gray eyes. — Wordsworth. 
Christman. — "God tempers the wind to the shorn lamb. — Ster?ie. 
Miss Spangler. — "Her face is like the milky way i' the sky, 
A meeting of gentle lights without a name." 

— Suckling. 
DoNOUGH. — "For none more likes to hear himself converse 

Byron . 
Miss Locheman. — "Here's to the maiden of bashful fifteen" 

Sherida?t. 
Miller, A. W. — "Oh keep me innocent, make others great!" 

Caroline of Denmark. 



153 



RouDABUSH. — ^"True wit is nature to advantage dressed, 

What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed. ' 

— Pope. 
Miss Myers- — "I saw the man in the moon." — Duhkcr. 
Kauffman. — "A horse ! a horse ! My kingdom for a horse! 

— Shakespeare . 
Miss Gray.— "In maiden meditation fancy free." — Shakespeare. 
Derrickson. — "Strange to the world, he wore a bashful look, 
The fields his study, nature was his book." 

Dloomfield. 
Sanders. — "He coude songes make, and wel endite." — Chancer. 



154 



CONTENTS. 



Title Page, .............. 3 

Dedication, .............. 4 

Editorial Staff, 6 

Salulamus, .............. 7 

Lebanon Valley College, ........... 9 

Calendar, ............... n 

Corporation, .............. 12 

Committees, .............. 14 

Faculty, ............... 15 

Classes, ............... 23 

Senior Class, .............. 24 

Junior Class, .............. 32 

Sophomore Class, ............. 52 

Freshman Class, ............. 60 

Music Department, 66 

Literary Societies, ............. 77 

Clionian, ............. 78 

Kalozetean, ............. 84 

Philokosmian, ............. 91 

College Forum, . . ........... 99 

Christian Associations, ............ 102 

Y. W. C. A., 103 

Y. M. C. A., -. . .104 

Athletics, .............. 105 

Caricatures, . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 

Clubs, ............... 123 

Literary Department, ............ 133 

It Might Have Been, 134 

A Misjudgment, ............ 139 

Spring, 140 

Memory, .............. 142 

Comments on Foot-Ball, ........... 145 

The Dying Century 148 

Applied Quotations, . . . . . . . . . . . .151 



^be Business flDanagement 

Kindly ask the students of Lebanon Valley College, its patrons 
and friends to remember the advertisers who made the publi- 
cation of this, the third volume of the Bizarre, possible. We 
believe that they are all thoroughly reliable, and deserve a 
share of your patronage which we trust you will give them. 



I IiebanoD | 

|l/alley (College i 

»— This College, founded in iS)6anri chartered with full university privileges -^* 

»~^ by our State Legislature in 1867, stands for character, high scholarship —^ 

•— and noble manhood and womanhood. Here choice }-oung people from var- — • 

•~- ions states coaie into competition and fellowship with one another, nnd — ^ 

•~ with teachers of high character, sound learning and progressive niethijds -^ 

•■— and ideas. ^^^ 

^ THE COLLEGE DEPARTMENT ^ 

5^ Offers three full four year courses of study and provides as ;^ 

J^ varied and thorough learning and excellent results and mental "~^ 

J^ discipline and culture as are to he gained anywhere in the "~^ 

5^ state. The regular departments of instruction include Philos- :^ 

SX ophy, embracing Mental, Moral and Pedagogical Science ; '^ 

g~ Ancient Languages (Latin and Greek); Mathematics; English :X3 

£^ Language and Literature ; History and Political Science ; Nat- "^ 

t~" ural Science ; Modern Languages (German and French); En- ::^ 

S^ glish Bible ; Physical Culture ; Klocution. :3 

^ THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT ^ 

£~~ Covers the work of the jz?«?/rf(;r(/ High and Normal Schools and ^3 

£^ Academies and prepares for College, Teaching and Business. 'T^ 

^ THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC ^ 

^^ Offers complete courses in Pianoforte, Voice, Organ, Harmony, n^ 

XT' etc., after methods of thj foremost European Conservatories. X3 

XT' The various branches of urt are also taught. Z^ 

^ ADVANTAGES. ^ 

J^ Thoroug'iness, Cheapnsss, Completeness, Commodious Buildings and a ""^ 

S^ fine campus for Athletic purposes. "~^ 

J^ The personal attention given each student secures to hini a splendid edu- C3 

J^ cation under the most stimulating influences. '^l^ 

XT' Fall Term begins September 4, 1900; Winter Term, fanuary 2, 1901. "^ 

JX; For further information, address : ZZm 

^ President |-|ervin U. Roop, Ph. D., ^ 

^ ANNVILLE, PA. ^ 

158 



J. H. REDSECKER, Ph. M. ESTABLISHED 1852 GEO. R. ROSS, Ph. G. 

Whenever you want auythiug in Drugs and Medicines, you 
can get the Best and Purest at . 

Dr. Geo. Ross & Co.'s 

PHARMACY. 

Opposite Court House, LEBANON, PA. 

Oldest House. Largest Stock. Lowest Prices. Quality the Best. 

Thb Newest Designs 
AT THE Lowest Prices. 

C. R. BOHS, 

- - - * Jeweler and Silversmith, - - - - 

214 and 216 Market street, HARRISBURQ, PA. 

The Cut Rate Clothing Co. 



Invites you to come at once and look over their entire new line of Spring Clothing 
for Men, Youths, Boys and Children vfhich is not only the largest and best selected 
stock of 



CLOTHING; 



and Men's Furnishing Goods in Lebanon County, but the best made and the most 
reliable Clothing manufactured in the world at prices 33 '/j per cent, less than cheap 
made shelf worn clothing usually found in Lebanon. Come early and inspect our 
new mammoth stock. 

Cat Hsite Clothing Co., 

725 Cumberlaod St., Lebanon, Pa. 
Ask to see our Patent Vest==two vests in one. 

159 



WE HAVE SOLD OVER 4000 BICYCLES 

IN HARRISBURQ AND VICINITY. 

This is a positive guarantee that our business is on the SQUARE. We always 
have from one to two hundred new Wheels to pick from. You can also find in our 
three stores a full assortment of SPORTING and ATHLETIC GOODS, GUNS, 
RIFLES, REVOLVERS, AMMUNITION, PHONOGRAPHS and GRAPHOPHONES 
and RECORDS, and TYPEWRITERS. 

Our repair shop, a three-story building, is equipped with machinery suitable for 
all kinds of repair work, Vulcanizing, Enameling, Nickeling and Bronzing. 



GIVE US A TRIAL. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



6E0. 6. McFARLAND, 

1116-18-26 N. Third, 310 CurT)berland. 

HHRRISBURC, PH. 

S. F. ENGI_E, 

...IS HEADQUARTERS FOR... 

Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Caps, 

BOOTS and SHOES, GROCERIES and HARDWARE. 

...READY MADE CLOTHING... 

T\ SPEGIKLTY. 

(Near P. & R. Depot.) PALMYRA, PA. 

1 60 



The Musser Studio 



We Show the 
Latest Styles, and Guarantee 
to please. 



16 N. THIRD STREET, HARRISBURG, PA. 

. . . LEADER FOR STRICTLY 

FINE WORK. 



S-~:■«^«>t«*«;;S^:~-9 



COLLEGE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



DIVES, POMEROY & STEWART, 

HMRRISBURG, PH. 

WO/WEN'S TRIMMED HATS._^£:x 

/-..^ 5S2.Q5. $3.95, $4.95, $5.95, Etc. 

Our Millinery is notable for its newness, exclusiveness and refined appearance. 
Our order business is the finest and largest in the city. 

CHILDREN'S HATS, $1.49, $1.69, $1.95, Etc. 

WOMEN'S and MISSES' SUITS, 

GOLF CAPES, JACKETS, SEPARATE DRESS SKIRTS, SILK WAISTS and 
WASH WAISTS, in such styles as have been accepted by the leaders of fashion as 
correct for the coming season, have just been received in large numbers. Prices are 
reasonable. 

I=INE OReSS GOODS. 

This is Harrisburg's fine dress goods store, unmistakably, but every good, popu- 
lar-priced article may be had here too, at a considerable saving of money. 

l6l 




ONE 

Year's 

Growtf) 



-1S99- 




In tt)e 

pactory 

of the 



Weaver Organ & Piano Co. 

As the exceptionally fine instruments here manufactured increase in 
favor with musicians and the public generally, the factory grows in size. 
If you want absolutely the Best Piano or Organ Value to be found any- 
where, call on or write direct to 

Weaver Organ & Piano Co., 

MANUFACTURERS, 
YORK, - - PM. 



162 



SiS^SBS ^CSil2:iE3IES ■ jESSS^IiSKtiSJKSEL SlBSiI2 



....HIGH ART.... 



Photography 



ih 



\i/ 



EXCLUSIVELY AT THE 



Rise & Gates 



\i/ 



Hi 



\l/ 



S3a!28JS311I-(^aK32S!lt £ J 



142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 



If there is anything new in the Art of 'J^ 
Photography, we have it. ^ 



Vt/ 



3i33ESSiKS;3i2aiS;SKBiia 



^ Special Reduction to Students. E? 

SSSSSiS'^ESJS^ISgSSaiS'TE fWS^ flM^ SH^jfe 



SMaE-siESK asisaiississaiKaiESJKSEaisssssE; asssE- a^M gi^^cf se^^sk aissnE. se^^iisje^ 



167 



D. O. Shenk. 

G. W. KlNPORTS. 

H. L. KlNPORTS. 



Shenk 6c Kinports, 



.DEALERS IN. 



Dry Goods, Notions, Carpets, Oil Cloths, 

QUEENSWARE and GROCERIES. 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, sriLTr-.. 

CLOTHS AND CASSIMERS, 

We make a Specialty of Ladies' and Gents' Furnishings, Shoes, Rubbers. 
Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 



MiSHS Lebanon cu.f,o»1„o„<. 

Decorations for 
Weddings, Parties 
and Funerals. 

CFjestnut and Fourth Streets, / __»««,,-^_, ^"^ 
South Front Street, LEBANON, t^A. 




Qreenhouses, 



M. H. SHAUD, 

. . . DEALER IN . . . 

WATCHES p.*" JEWELRY. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

CKNDIES %J^ FRUITS. 

Families Supplied with Oysters. 

164 



!^ Eastman Business College - 
Has in its half century of work de- 
veloped the capacity of thousands in- 
to well-traiued men, capable to fill 
I every department of a business career, 
Known everywhere for the thorough 
U uess of the preparation given in the 
I least time at the smallest expense 

3ES3S5SESH5ES2S2SHSaSH5ESHSBSH5HSaSHSHSH; 




Youns: Men Trained 






g To be all-rouud business men : — or 

^ they may take up a special branch of 

g business' and be THOROUGH in that. 

B No better illustration of the value of 

S a business education can be offered 

rfl than the success of those -uho have 

S graduated from Eastman College. 

S By the old way, training for business 

R was acquired through years of ap- 

K prenticeship, but the successful man 

ffi of today is the one who enters the 

ffi field prepared for the work he is to do 

K by the new and shorter methods of 

Jn Eastman College, the model business 

[n school. 



A Tliorougli Business Man 

Is the description of the man who 
becomes successful, is known and has 
the confidence of the community. 



BUSINESS HOUSES supplied with 
competent assistants. Situations 
cured without charge, for all gradu- 
ates of the Business and Short-ha 
Courses, an invaluable feature to many 
young people. Open all the year, 

; short. Terms reasonable, 
dress as above 



i6 = 



S AA: **: **: ** *t *t A* ^l* i«- **= *t OT 

3-JV-^_-^-C» -I^ -£^ -C:> -C -C -C -J^ ri 



5 ;****:**: A* =V* = 



;**:;**:**:**: iW: fc 






And her ! 
When . r. 
The boys all ha 


... :: 


:,„> 


I vjiarks! 




The turn of her 
There s always 
Tis enoug^h to r 
To hear her siii^ 


head turns 
a strife to s 
lake a pars 
old co-ca. 


alloi 
tin 1 

ondr 
he-lu 


er pew'; 
ikl' 




The above, and three other NEiA 
and NEW WORDS, catchy. 
others of the popular OLD FA 
sides OLD FAVOKITES; and al 


up-to 


stoU-PI-DEE 
date, to nian> 
\R TUNES; be 


SONGS OF ALL THE COLLEGES. 




Copjngbt, Prwi 


Sr.so, / 


rf/,, 


,/. 


im. 



> HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers, New York City, i 
t Schoolbooks „/ a// fuMis/,ers ,il cie store. } 
3 *^ **:**::«:=«: :W= **= *t *V **: *^ r 
3 :»*^ a* :**; A* **: *t A*^ A^ A* A* =**: C 



I B B ■ ■ ■ 

! Have you got to 

I speak a piece? 



Well, we don't know of any kind of " effort," from 
he Bchoolboy'a " recitation " or the Bchonlgirre " read- 
ng." and along through the whole 8chof)l and coUepe 
rareer, down to the ■' reeponse to toaste" at the last 
*claB8 dinner," that le not provided for among : — 

Commenjcement Parts, including ''ef forte" for all 

other occasionB. $1.50. 
Pros and Cons. Both sides of live queBtions. $1.50. 
Playable Plays. For school and parlor. $1.50. 
College Men's Three-Minute Declamationf^ $1.00. 
College Mairl a' Three- Minute Readings. $1.00. 
Pieces for Pme-Speak'ing Contests. $1 .00. 
jicme Declamation Book. Paper, 30c. Cloth. 50c. 
Handy Pieces to Speak. 108 on separate cards, 50c. 



rail ( 



above free c 



1 this 



I HUTBS & nOBLE, Fabllshers 

I 4-5-13-14 Cooper Institute N. T. City 

jchoolbooka of all pvhlishers at ojie store. 



The Gity Steam I^aundry 

RAUCH & WENGERT, Proprs. bebanOH, Pa. 

Guarantees best satisfaction on 
work. Our agent at the Col- 
lege solicits your work. . 

»»«««^ DON'T FORGET HIM. 



EFFORTS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Orations, addresses, es- 
says, valedictories, salu- 
tatories, class poems, ivy 
poemSjClass mottoes, 
after-dinner speeches, 
flag-davs, national holi- 
days, class-day exercises, 
^\o6&\?>ior every possible 
occasion in high-school 
and college career ; each 
and every "effort" being 
what some fellow has 
**siood on his feet " and 
actually delivered on a 
similar occasion. 
Price, $1.50 Postpaid. 
Cloth — 640 Pages. 

HINDS & NOBLE 

4-S-6-12-13-14 Cooper Institute, N. Y. City 

Sckoolbooks 0/ aU publishers ^jme store. 





School Books 
'in a hurry 



/^^\ And at New York prices, singly t 

^^^)J or by the dozen, may be obtaioed \ 

^^^ second-hand or ttew, by any boy or 

/^^\ girl in the remotest hamlet, or any i 

^^^M teacher or official anywhere, and \ 

^Delivery prepaid \ 

/i^Sx Brand new, complete alphabetical 

catalo^e.yVf f , of school books of aU f 
puBiisherst if you mention this ad. 
EDTDS & ITOBLE 
' 4 Cooper Instltnte I7cw Tork City ' 




166 



Iffou ♦ ♦ ♦ 



Can alwa}'S get a styl- 
ish, good fitting shoe 
at the Right Price at 

JERAULD'S 

310 Market Street, 
HARRISBURQ, PA. 

Thos. H. Elliott 



ALL KINDS OF 



DONE BY HAND 



Shoe 
Repairing 

New Worli Made to Order. 



Main St., Annville, Pa. 



BOOKS m 

. . . AND . . . 

STATIONERY. 

Office Supplies. Fountain 
Pens. Base Ball, Lawn Ten- 
uis and Golf Supplies. Cro- 
quet Sets. The Handsomest 
Line of Hammocks in the 
City. 

Pictures, Art Novelties aod 
Window Shades. 

J. A. DeHuff, 

LEBANON, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis, 

1 1 25 and 1 127 North Third Street, 

HARRISBURG, PA. 

• ■ 

"Booh Binber. 

— • — 

Sunday School Books Rebound at 
Special Bates. 

• 

Magazines Bound at Low Prices. 



167 



<MA^LEBANON^ 

STEAM LAUNDRY, 

REBSTOCK & HADDON, Proprietors, 
H. B. SHEFFEY, Agt., Annville, Pa. No. 33 North Ninth Street. 

When You Want to iVlake a Present — ^ 

You will find a very satisfactory place to purchase 
it at this store. No matter how little monej' you 
watit to spend, you will find a suitable present 
here. 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY and SILVERWARE. 

E. G. HOOVER, Jeweler, 

Watch Inspector c. V. R R 23 North Third St., HARRISBURG, PA. 

THe KNOLL'S 

WONDERFUL ♦DOUBLE ♦WASHER, 

TWO ARE COMBINED IN ONE 

Received Diploma of First Premium 
at World's Fair, Chicago. 

...WRITE FOR PRICES... 

KNOLL'S GENT'S SPRING FRAME BICYCLES 






...ARE A... ^^^Mm ...OVER... 

GREAT imPROVEMENT • W^F^ wP^ • THE SOLID FRAMES • 



KNOLL'S LADIES' SPRING FRAME BICYCLE is surely a great ease for 
ladies. The difference is great ; try it before buying another. Write for prices. 

JONAS L,. KNOL»L., 

107 SOUTH FOURTH STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



A. C. ZIMMERMAN, 
CARPETS, DRAPERIES, ETC. 

758 CUMBERLAND STREET. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 






W. S. SEABOLD, 



Wholesale and 
Retail .... 



DRUGGIST. 



PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, DYE-STUPPS. 

Sole Proprietor of Dr. Fahnestock's Family Medicines. 
No. 2 East Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. W. ROSHON, 
Ipbotograpber 

34 NORTH THIRD STREET. 

Harrisburc, Pa. 

REDUCED RATES TO STUDENTS. 



♦ ♦ * * » DDoroaranncr ♦ ♦ » ♦ 



169 




THE LAMP 
THAT LASTS 



The New 
Rochester 



N95B7A\292 ^^^'^ 
WITH 9'-!^-GlOBE 

Fifteen years ago we began the manufacture of centre 
draft lamps. A dealer bought one of the first and placed 
it in his show window. Each day it is filled and lighted; 
occasionally it is cleaned and rewicked. That lamp is 
good to-day. 

Soon as The Rochester was demonstrated a success, a 
host of imitations sprang up. A few of the better ones 
still survive ; the rest are gone. Why? "You can fool 
all the people some of the time," but not all the time. 

One New Rochester Lamp in a household is but a be- 
ginning. Soon there will be others. Do you want to 
kuo.v why? Write for printed matter if inteiested. 

Tlie Rochester Lamp Co., 

38 Park Place and 33 Barclay St., 
New York. 




170 



DR. KOONTZ, 



IS THE ONLY 



Dentist in Lebanon 



THAT EXTRACTS TEETH 
WITHOUT PAIN OR NO PAY. 



All the L,atest Improved Appliances 
and Painless Methods. 

-*i-©'*^ 

We will please you with our work or 
your Money refunded. 

-«:^©^*- 

Only CROWN and BRIDGE work= 
men in Lebanon. 

We make you the best Teeth on red 
rubber for $5.00. 

Best Teeth in black rubber, $7.00. 

Gold Crowns, 22 k., $4.00. 

Gold Fillings, $1.25 up. 

Silver Fillings, 50c. 

Repairing broken plates, 75c. 

Cleaning Teeth, 50c. 

All work guaranteed for two years. 

-^:^®<c», 

Painless Extracting 23c. 

84T Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, PA. 



The Reliable 
Hat Store 



All Styles, Shapes and 
Colors. A Better As- 
sortment in no Hat Store 
in the State. Dunlap's 
Agent and Every Other 
Good Manufactu rer's 
Agent. 

A. Rise & Son, 

831 Cumberland Street, 
LEBANON, PAA. 



w. e. ^ooif, 



DEALER IN 



Groceries, 
Notions, 

vLv», vLvi, 



63 East Main Street, 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



171 



!:(sxs<a)®(sXs)®<i®®®®<s)<sxs)®®^ 



The 

Miller 
^ Or^an 



Is imquestiouably the finest and best ' 
reed organ now made. This is the ver- 
dict of unprejudiced judgment. Write 
us for our Catalogue and prices before 
you buy one of those cheap inferior or 
gans of which there are so man}' in the^ 
market and which cause you vexation, 
annoyance, and disgust, instead of that 
pleasure, satisfaction, and joy which a really good instrument can give you. 
We manufacture a large number of st5'les in five, six and seven octaves. 




....WE ARE GENERAL SELLING AGENTS FOR.... 

KRANICH & BACH, KRAKEUR BROS., KROEGER, 

KEYSTONE, J. & C. FISHER AND 

FRANKLIN PIANOS. 

All of which are sold at lowest prices and on the most liberal terms 

Miller Organ Co., 

LEBANON, PA. 



172 



M. F. BATDORF, 

Announces a Special Display of 

Ladies' White Waists. 

Also a Full Line of DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, CARPETS, OIL 

CLOTHS, QUEENSWARE, GROCERIES, HATS, CAPS, 

BOOTS, SHOES, SHIRTS. 



A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES IN SHOES. 

Patent Leather, Chrome Calf, Vici Kid, Russia Calf, Bals. 



See our display in the window of Men's Shirts, Straw Hats and Ties. 



...MAIN STREET... 



INTERCOI-LEGIMTE 

Bureau of Acaden)ic Costume, 

COTRELL & LEONARD, 

472-4-6-8 Broadway, ALBANY, N. Y. 

7VI75KERS OF THE 

Caps,Gownsand Hoods 

* FOR THE «■ 

American Colleges and Universities, 

including Lebanon Valley College, I^ehigh, Lafa- 
yette, University of Pennsylvania, Western 
University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, 
Cornell, Yale, Harvard, Columbia, 
Bryn Mawr, John's Hopkins, 
University of Chicago, University of the Pacific, University of the South and others. 
Illustrated bulletin, samples, etc., upon application. 




Class Contracts in all Parts of the Country a Specialty. 



173 



WEBSTEB- S M 



WEBSTER'S 
..INTERNATIONAL! 
1^ DICTIONARY 



A Dictionary of ENGLISH, 
Biography, Geography, Fiction, etc 



W'1 



hat better investment can be made than in a 
opy of the International ? In this royal 



GET 
THE 



quart(j volume the professional and the business man. 
the artisan, the teacher, the student, and every family will find 
a mine of information, and iind it arranged in a convenient form 
for hand, eye, and mind. 

Chas. W. Eliot, LL.D„ President of Harvard University, says: 
It is a wonderfully compact storehouse of accurate information. 

The International Should be in Every Household. 

It is standard authority of the Unitetl States Supremo Court, 
the Government Printing Ofaee, and the Eieeutive departments 
generally, and is more widely used than any other dictionary in 
the world. 

Also Webster's Collegiate Dictionary with a Scottish Glossary, etc. 
"First class in quality, secoiifl class in size."— Nicholas Mtirray Butler. 
Specimen paijes, eie., of hnVn hooks sent on application. 
G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, Springfield, Mass. 



1 



m 



INTERNATIONAL DrCTIONARY JE 



C. SHENK, 

816-822 CUMBERLAND STREET, 



Headquarters for all that is New and Stylish in LADIES' TAILOR 
MADE SUITS, SEPARATE SKIRTS, SILK and WASH SHIRT 
WAISTS. Also a full line of all the new weaves in Spring and Summer 
Dress Goods. Also all the Novelties in Trimming. 

.COME AND EXAMINE. 



174 






' e. F". ENGLE, 

^ Real Estate, ^ 



Houses on Easy Payments. 
Lumber. Wholesale and Retail. 






i^ 






(f\ ^^ ^^ Vlir 

i\\ Office. Second and Harris Sts, /n 

WHEN YOU All E THINKING 

ABOUT BUYING SHOES 

DON'T FORGET 

....TO GO TO.... 

The New Commonwealth 

SHOE STORE, 
753 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, FA. 

(P. O. S. of A. Building,) 

Where you can always get the very Latest Styles 
at Lowest Prices. 




175 



OUR HEADACHE WAFERS,^^ 

Absolutely Safe for all HEADACHES, 10c. 

OUR COMPOUND TAR LOZENGES just the thing for Public Speakers, Teachers 

and Singers. Clear up hoarseness, and that uncomfortable titillation in the throat. 

5, 10, 25cts. OUR LIVER PILLS, 15 and 25 cts. OUR LIVER SALT taken 

before breakfast, a teaspoonful in hot water. N. B. — Good results after breakfast, 25c. 

Send cash or stamps by mail for any of the remedies. We will send promptly. 

bEMBERGER & CO. 



.<? 



^• 



.^ 



.s!-^ 



Lebanon, Penn'a. 



^ 



.^ 



.«» 



Woolens for Springf and Summer on 
hand. Our line is complete. The 
fabrics and colors have quality and 
style. Kindly call and examine 
them. 10 Per Cent, off to Students. 



Ifine G^ailorinQ. 



C. F. Rauch. 



Tenth and Cumberland Sts. 




KODAK C AMER AS -^-°- SUPPLIES. 

..Pictures and Picture Frames. 



Fine Photographs of All Kinds. 



HARPEL, 8th and Willow Sts., Lebanon, Pa. 



■H SPECIHL. !■ RHTES !■ TO I- STUDENTS, tc 



176 




WEST END STORE, 

JNO. S. SHOPE, Prop. 



■» DEHL-ER IN «■ 



Dry Goods, Notions, Groceries, 
Queensware, Glassware, 



CARPETS, MATTIING, 

Olb GbOTH, BOOTS, SHOES and 
RUBBERS A SFEGIAbTY. 



(S^'^S<S>-iSx©:i&<& Sr^~-9 



In Hats, Caps, Straw Goods and 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 
We Always Try to Keep Up-to-date. 



(s~^«iSiS^iS^-:S>iS-- ^S>S:>^-_9 



Grocery Stock 

is Constantly Kept Full 
and Complete. 



As a friend of the College we invite onr oli 
friends of the same when in our town to cal 
on us to have a social hour together, and arc 
alwaj'S glad to meet new friends of the same. 
A cordial invitation is extended to all. 

134 & 136 West Main St. 





1 


1 




r«j' 


jui 




^L^ 


..._ ,\ 


'/ -JK^^^ 



177 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 

s. w. cor. broad and race sts., phila. 
Commencement Invitations 
AND Class Day Programs 



CLASS AND FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

FRATERNITY CARDS and VISTING CARDS MENUS AND DANCE PROGRAMS 

BOOK PLATES CLASS PINS AND MEDALS 

CLASS ANNUALS AND ARTISTIC PRINTING. 




Translations 

Literal. 50c. Interlinear, $1.50. 147 vol- 

Dictionaries 

German, French, Italian, Spanish, 
Latin, Greek, S2 00, and ?i.oo. 

Completely Parsed Caesar, 
Book I. 

Has on each page, interlinear trans- 
lation. /^Vi?rrt/ translation, and every 
word completely ^^T^^^. $1.50. 

HINDS & NOBLE, Ptiblishers 

4-5 6-12-13-14 Cooper Institute, N.Y.City 
Schoolbooks 0/ all publishers at one store 



@, ESTABLISHED lS-4^"7. .© 

LEHMAYER «& BRO., 

-5THE OLD AND RELIABLES- 

Clothiers, Hatters and Furnishers, 

5 E. MARKET STREET, YORK, PA. 



P. S. - A LIBERAL REDUCTION TO COLLEGE STUDENTS. 



flRE YOU fl SUBSCRIBER OF 



THI& GOLLBGB FORUM? 

IF NOT, WHY NOT ? 

Published Monthily. Contains all tbe College News. Only 50 cts. a year 

S. F. Daugherty, Bus. Mgr. H. L. Kichinger aud W. C. Arnold, Asst. Mgis. 



178 



H. S. iAZOLF. 



-DEALER IN- 



^CONf^ECTIONERY^ 

First Class Restaurant. Green Groceries, Oysters, Ice Cream and Fresh 

Fish. Families Supplied with Oysters and Ice Cream. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

H. H. Kreider. Jno. E. Herr. 

KREIDER & CO., 

W><ai.Essi.E AND Retail Dealers in 

All Kinds of Hard and Soft Coal, 

LUMBER, GRAIN, FEED, SEEDS AND SALT 




Office on Railroad St., near Depot. Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 



ISAAC WOLF, 



STRICTLY ONE-PRICE 

Clothier and Gents' Furnisher, 

828 CUMBERLAND STREET, 

LEBANON, PA. 

H. L. PALMER, President. J. W. SKINNER, Secretary- 

ORGANIZED 1857. 

THE NORTHWESTER N MUTUAL LIFE INS URANCE COMPANY, 

Cash Assets, $126,646,728.44. Liabilities, $121,112,030.71. 



Tontine Accumulations, .... $21,392,383.00 

General Surplus, . . . ' . . 5,534,697.74 

For furtlier information apply to 

R. A. Maulfair, Annville, Fa. 



179 




SPRING and SUMMER, 1909. 



Our Stock of Up=to-date Footwear for 

MEN and BOYS has never been so 

Complete as at Present. 

'-j We have them in Patent Leather, 
Tan, Kid and Calf — in button, lace 
and congress. Our low Shoes in Pat- 
ent Leather, Tan and Kid are strictly 
in it this year. Prices range from 
$1.25 to $5.00 the pair. Your inspec- 
ticn is invited. 

lo per cent, off for College students. Next Door to C. Shenk. 



Get your Suit made 
where ? ^^^^:=-' 

...AT... 

J. SARGENT'S, 

The Fashionable Tailor. 




Style, Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR WANAMAKER & BROWN'S 
READY TO WEAR GARMENTS. 



18 and 20 WEST MAIN STREET, 

i8o 



Lighted by Gas. 



29 Comfortable Rooms 



Heated by Steam. 



HOTEL EMGLE. 



This hotel has 
lately been re-built 
a n d re-furnished 
throughout. 

Street Cars pass 
the hotel every hour (^ 
until midnight be- 
tween Palmyra and 
Myerstovvn. 




Cattle yard with 

§/ shedding for loo 

head of Cattle. 

Fairbanks' scales 

attached. 

Stabling for 40 
< horses. 



RATES, $1.50 PER DAY. 

First-class Livery Attached. C. F. SAYLOR, Proprietor. 

ANNVIbbE, PENN'A. 

HARRY W. LIGHT, 



is 



■^II^INEI^ 



Second-hand 

...AND... 

SHELF-WORN 
TEXT BOOKS. 



Stationery 

WALL PAPER and 

WINDOW 

....SHADES.... 



22 BAST MAIN STREBT, 

.181 















The ENGRAVINGS in 
this book were made by 

The Electric City 
Engraving Co., 

507 to 515 Washington Street, 
BUFFALO, NEW YORK. 

Largest engraving house for 
college plates in the States. 
Write for samples and prices. 




Ili ' 1 _ J 


t' 1 














-THE PALACE- 

Meat Market, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

BEEF, VEAL & PORK. 



Also a Full Line of 



S'M*0*K*E'D 



^-—- - AND SALTED MEATS; 

JOSEPH Q. KELCHNER, 

■T'lRROPRIETOR.I^ 

West Main Street. - - - AININVILLE, PA. 



WM. WALTZ, 


M. B. CERBERICH, M. D. 


n 


^ 


FIRST CLASS 


Homoepatliic 


SHAVING and HAIR DRESSING 


Pliysician. 


. . . PARLOR . . . 


^ 


West Main Street. 


128 Cumberland, St., 


flNNVILLE, pp. 


Lebanon, Pa. 



183 



THIS BOOK 



Was Designed and Executed and is a 

Specimen of the Artistic Work 

done at the 



\*/ Snowflake \*/ 

Printing and Publishing 

Company 



\i/ 



Where all work from the simplest dodger**' 
to the most elaborate book are turned 
out at remarkably low prices. 



A.C. M. HI ESTER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Estimates cheerfully furnished upon application. 



184 



Index to Advertisements. 



BARBER. 

Wm. Waltz 183 

BICYCLES. 

Jonas Knoll, 168 

Geo. McFarland 160 

BOOKS. 

H. W. Light, iSi 

J. A. DeHnff 167 

Hinds & Noble, .... 166, 178 
C. & G. Merriam Co., .... 174 

BOOK BINDER. 

Hubertis, 167 

BUTCHER. 

J. G. Kelchner 1S3 

CARPETS. 

A. C. Zimmerman 169 

CAPS & GOWNQ. 

Leonard & Cottrell, 173 

COAL & LUMBER. 

Kreider&Co., 179 

CONTRACTOR. 

B. H. Engle, 175 

DENTIST. 

C. M. Koontz 171 

DOCTORS. 

E. B. Marshall, 169 

M. B. Gerberich 183 

DRUGGISTS. 

W. S. Seabold, 169 

Ross & Co., 159 

Lemberger & Co., 176 

DRY GOODS, 

C. Shenk, 174 

Dives, Pomeroy & Stewart, . . 161 

ENGRAVERS. 

Electric City Engraving Co., . . 182 
Elliott & Co 178 

FLORIST. 

Mish 164 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

John Shope, 177 

Shenk & Kinports, 164 

M. F. Batdorf 173 

S. F. Engle, 160 



GENTS FURNISHERS. 

Isaac Wolf, 179 

H. Moyer, 159 

Lehmayer cS: Sons 17S 

GROCERS. 

W. C. Wolf 171 

H. S. Wolf, 179 

HATTERS. 

Rise & Son 171 

HOTEL. 

C. F. Saylor. ....... 181 

INSURANCE. 

R. A. Maalfair 179 

JEWELERS. 

M. H. Sliaud, 164 

C. R. Boas 159 

E. G. Hoover, 168 

LAMPS. 

Rochester Lamp Co., .... 170 

LAUNDRIES. 

Rebstock & Haddon 168 

Rauch & Wengert, 166 

ORGANS AND PIANOS. 

Miller Organ Co., 172 

Weaver Organ and Piano Co., . 162 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

Rise & Gates 163 

Musser, 161 

Harpel 176 

Roshon 169 

PRINTER. 

A. C. M. Hiester 184 

SCHOOLS. 

Lebanon Valley College, . . . 158 
Poiighkeepsie Business College 165 

SHOES. 

New Commonwealth 175 

C. W. Few, 180 

Jerauld & Co. 167 

SHOE MAKER. 

Thomas Elliott, 167 

TAILORS. 

J. Sargent 180 

C. E. Rauch 176 



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