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Full text of "Bizarre"

Digitized by the Internet Arcinive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bizarre1902leba 



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College. 


VOLXJ]VIE 


IV. 



1902. 



DEDICiVTIO^^T. 



TO OUR EFFICIENT 
PROFESSOR AND PRECEPTRESS 

IVlAUE) Etta A^^olfe, 

AS AN EXPRESSION OF OUR ESTEEM 

THIS VOLUME IS 

r>Ei:)ICATEE). 




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Iprolooue. 



New days come and old days go, 
In and outward classes flow ; 
Now remembered, now forgot. 
Even as the fates allot. 
Try they to endure or no 
Years will bring their overthrow. 

Faded have the rest ? Our claim 
Is to find less fleeting fame : 
Yes, this book you'll soon forget 
And our laurels fade, but yet 
May we hope to feel we've won 
By some kindly deeds we've done. 

If when life a burden seemed 
And your hearts with sorrow teemed 
One kind word, a smile, a prayer. 
Helped you here, consoled you there, 
Cease not when our spheres you fill 
To hold for us your good will. 

Though our task is idle, vain, 

Ere we close we ask again 

As succeeding years roll on. 

New friends made and old ones gone. 

When the Crimson meets your view 

Just one thought for 

1902. 




EDITOR IN CHIEF 
ASSOC. EDITORS. 



ARTISTS 



BUSINESS MAUAGERS 



T,^ 



?LE o 




L»ebanon Valley College. 



rf|¥i""¥"""ii|i'Jl HE church of Christ is the repository of divine truth and the 
ff ^m^ fi conservatory of Christian education. This has been and al 
[f /T ji ways will be true. Hence the leaders of the church through 
[l ^^ j] the centuries have been the leaders of the higher education. 



[Siij5'i»iiiil[" jIjinIJ Uwight, Edwards and Finney were great educational as well 

as religious leaders. Luther, Wesley and Otterbein, great denominational 
founders, were University men, and hence champions of Christian educa- 
tion. 

Though the founder of the church of the United Brethren in-Christ 
was as scholarly as saintly, the demands for education in our early liistory 
were either meager or slightly recognized. About the middle of the nine- 
teenth century, the need of a Christian College in the eastern part of the 
Church, became imperative and led to the establishment of Lebanon 
Valley College in the year 1866 and the granting of a Charter, with full 
University privileges in the following year. 

By nature's endowment, in the heart of Lebanon Valley, unsurpassed 
in beauty and healthfulness, Annville is the most desirable site in the 
State, for a college. Three commodious and well equipped buildings, 
the Ladies Hall, the Administration building and the Engle Conservatory 
of Music grace the beautiful ten-acre campus. The Conservatory and the 
annex to the Administration building have been additions of the last three 
years, with largly increased internal equipments for the growing needs of 
the College. 

The enrollment for the past five years, in 1897-124; in 1898-^04; in 
1899-257; in 1900-292; in 1901-325; shows our steady and substantial 
growth . 

Three standard courses leading to the regular degrees in Arts and 
Sciences are offered in the College proper, besides the Preparatory and 
Music courses. Within thirty-four years 318 persons have been graduated 
and more than 4000 have received partial training for life's great work. 
Our graduates have taken positicms by the side of the graduates of the oldest 



and strongest institutions of the country. They fill honorable positions 
in the leading Universities. In Science, Literature, Law, Theology, 
Teaching, Medicine, Journalism and Commercialism they have made en- 
viable records. 

Lebanon Valley College stands for the highest Christian culture, the 
symmetrical development of the entire man for the best service in any 
vocation of life. She has wrought well in the past, better than similar 
institutions of like resources and with the unanimous and generous sup- 
port of her friends will do vastly better in the future. Here is a splendid 
opportunity for men of means to have their silver and gold transmitted in- 
to lives of beauty and service for the Church and the Nation. 




Calendar. 



1901 

Sept. 3, Tuesday — Examinations for Admission. 

Sept. 4, Wednesday, g A. m. — Fall Term begins. 

Nov. 28, Thursday — Clionian Literary Society Anniversary. 

Dec. 20, Friday — Fall Term of Sixteen Weeks ends. 

Christmas Recess. 
1902 

Jan. 7, Tuesday, 9 A. m. — Winter Term begins 

Feb. 9, Sundaj' — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Feb. 22, Saturday — Washington's Birthday, a holiday. 
March 28, Friday — Winter Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 

SppinS Recess. 

April 2, Wednesday, 9 a. m. — Spring Term opens. 

April 4, Friday — Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society. 

May 2, Friday — Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary Society. 

May 30, Friday — Decoration Day. 

June 15, Sunday, 10.15 A., m. — Baccalaureate Discourse by Pres. Roop. 

June 15, Sunday, 6 p. m. — Campus Praise Service. 

June 15, Sunday, 8 p. m. — Annual Address before the Christian Asso. 

June 16, Monday, 7.30 p. m. — Conservatory Concert. 

June 17, Tuesday, 2 p. m. — Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

June 17, Tuesday, 7.30 p. m. — Public Meeting of Alnmni Association. 

June 18, Wednesday, 7.30 p. m. — Commencement of Department of 

Music. 

June Tg, Thursday, 10 a. m. Commencement Exercises. 

June 20, Spring Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 



13 



The Gorpopafion. 



Trustees. 

Rev Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., and 
Rev. Ezekiel B. Kephart, D. D., LL 
Samuel W. Clippinger, 
Rev. Daniel Eberly, D. D., 
John C. Knipp, 

Rev. Wm. H. Washinger, A. M., 
Rev. John E. Kleffman, B. S., 
William A. Lutz, . 
John C. Heckart, . 
William H. Ulrich, 
Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D. D., 
Benjamin H. Engle, 
Henry H. Kreider, 
Rev. Solomon L. Swartz, 
Adam R. Forney, A. M. 
Rev. Hiram B. Dohner, B. D. 
Isaac B. Haak, 
Samuel B. Engle, . 
Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph. 1)., 
Simon P. Light, Esq., A. M., 
Rev. Charles Mutch, 
Valentine K. Fisher, A. B., 
Rev. Arthur B. Statton, A. M., 
Reno S. Harp, Esq., A. M., 
George C. Snyder, 
Rev. Charles W. Stinespring, 



Faculty, Ex- Officio. 
D., Annville, Pa. 

Chambersburg, Pa. 
. Abbottstown, Pa. 
. Baltimore, Md, 
. Chambersburg, Pa. 

Duncannon, Pa. 

Shippensburg, Pa. 

Ballast own. Pa. 

Hummelstown, Pa. 
. Dayton, Ohio. 
. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
. Middletown, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Bellegrove, Pa. 
. Myerstown, Pa. 
. Palmyra, Pa. 
. Shamokin, Pa, 

Lebanon, Pa. 
. Reading, Pa. 

Berne, Pa. 
. Hagerstown, Md. 
. Frederick, Md. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Frederick, Md. 



14 



Rev. John B. Chamberlain, 

Edwvrd Kern, . . . . 

John H. Maysilles, A. B., . 

Rev. Sanford D. Skelton 

Rev. Sylvester K. Wine, A. M., 

Henry B. Miller, 

Rev. a. p. Funkhouser, B. S. 

Rev. J. R. Ridenour, 

Rev. J. N. Fries, . . . . 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
East Deerfield, Mass. 
Winchester, Va. 
Stephen City, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Middletown, Md. 
Dayton, Va. 



Officers of the Board of Trustees. 



President, 
Secretary, 
Treasurer, 



William H. Ulrich, Esq. 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph. D. 

Hervin U. Roop, Ph D. 



Executive Committee. 

Hervin U. Roop, Chairman. 

Isaac H. Albright, Secretary. 

Isaac B. Haak, Reno S. Hakp, 

Benjamin H. Engle, Henry H. Kreider, 

William H. Ulrich, Hiram B. Dohner, 

Simon P. Light, Esq. 



Committees. 

Finance. 

Hiram B. Dohner, Chairman, Henry H. Kreider, 

Solomon L. Swartz, Samuel W. Clippinger, 

J. C. Heckart, a. p. Funkhouser. 



15 



EndoiArment. 

EzEKiEL B. Kephart, Chairman. William H. Washinger, 

Daniel Eberly, Adam R. Forney, 

John C. Knipp, Simon P. Light. 



Faculty. 

William A. Lutz, Chairman. 
Samuel D. Faust, 

Reno S. Harp. 



Isaac H. Albright, 
Isaac B. Haak, 



Library and Apparatus. 

Geo. C. Snyder, Chairman. John R. Ridenour, 

C. W. Stinespring, C. A. Mutch, 

S. K. Wine. 



Grounds, Buildings, and Dontestic Department. 

Benjamin H. Engle, Chairman. A. B. Stratton, 

James B. Chamberlain, Valentine K. Fisher, 

Sanford D. Skelton. 



Auditing. 



Samuel F. Engle, Chairman. 
John H. Maysilles, 



Henry B. Miller, 
J. N. Fries. 



Matron. 

Anna Mary Kellar, B. S. 



i6 



Faculty. 




REV. HERVIN ULYSSES ROOP, A. M., ]"h. D. 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Philosophy and Pedagogy. 



JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor oj Mathematics and Astronomy. 




17 




REV. JAMESTHOMASSPANGLER A. M., B. D , 

Professor of the Creek Language and 
Literature. 



REV. BENJ. FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 





MAUD ETTA WOLFE, A. M., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature 
and Instructor in German. 



THOMAS GILBERT McFADDEN, A. M., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 





NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A. M., 

Projessor of French and Instructor tn 

English . 



HOWARD E..ENDERS, M. S., 
Professor of the Biological Sciences. 




19 




HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M., 
Professor oj History and Political Science. 



ANNA C. R. WALTER. A. B., 

Instructor in Elocution, Oratory and Physical 
Culture. 





WILLIAM OTTERBEIN ROOP, A. B. 
Instructor in Latin. 



CYRUS W. WAUGHTEL, A. B., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 




'HI 


1 


-^ mm nMs- 



HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, 

(LONDON KNG.) 

Director oj t/ie Department of Music, 

and Professor of Voice, Piano, Organ, 

and Tlieory. 



MABEL MANBECK, 
Assistant in Piano. 





CHARLES H. B. OLDHAM, 
Assistant in Piano. 



WILLIAM C. ARNOLD, 
Stenography and Typewriting. 





THOMAS W. GRAY, M. E., 
Instructor in Physical Culture. 



BISHOP E. B. KEPHART, D.D. LL.D., 
Lecturer oti I titer national Lam. 




REV. J. T. SHAFFER, 
College Pastor. 



23 




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1901 



i Classes I 



•^r»<<^<«^«^'0^«j-o^ijo« 



1903 



Senior Glass. 



Flower : ' ^\ ^ Colors : 

Carnation. >/ !-♦ Orange and Bhuk. 



Motto : 
Honore el Lahore. 



Yell. 



Rickety, Rackety! Rhe! Rah! Rah! 
Kasaki, Kasaki ! Zini ! Zu ! Zu ! 
Rickety, Rackety ! Zip! Zah ! Zuni ! 
Zu Rah! Zu Rah! 1901. 



Officers. 

D. M. Oyer, President. 

W. S. Roop, . . .... I ue President. 

S. F. Daugherty, Secretary. 

M. W. Beunner, Treasurer. 

W. H. BuRD, Historian. 

E. M. Balsbaugh, . . ; . . Poet. 



28 



IVIembepsliip. 



Henry H. Baish, 
Edward M. Balsbaugh, 
Morris W. Brunner, . 
William H. Burd, 
Robert R. Butterwick, 

LiLLIE BURKEY, 

Lewis E. Cross, . 
Samuel F. Daugherty, 
Frank B. Emenheiser, 
Karnig Ku5'oonijian 
Emma F. Loos, 
Ruth Leslie, . 
Thomas F. Miller, 
Susie S. Moyer, 
David M. Oyer, . 
William O. Roop, . 
William S. Roop, 
S. Edwin Rupp, 
A. Garfield Smith, . 
Cyrus W. Waughtel, 
Harry H. Yoke . 
Mary Zacharias, 
Kathryn Landis, 



Bendersville, Pa. 
Hockersville, Pa. 
New Bloomfield, Pa. 
New Bloomfield, Pa. 
Jonestown, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Rayville, Md. 
Dallastown, Pa. 
Dallastovvn, Pa. 
Tarsus, Asia Minor. 
Berne, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Donelly's Mills, Pa. 
Berry Church, Pa. 
Upper Strasburg, Pa. 
Harrisbnrg, Pa. 
Highspire. Pa. 
Oberlin. Pa. 
Rohersville, Md. 
Red Lion, Pa. 
Siiippensburg, Pa. 
Sinking Springs, Pa. 
Union Deposit, Pa. 



Poem. 



The horologue of time hns struck another year, 

Its slow and solemn chime warns us the day is near 

When ail our school work done, 

Our class, dear Nineteen-one, 

Forth from these halls must go 

To battle with the foe 

That never sounds a truce or ever knows a fear. 

The happy days now past too rapidly have flown ; 

Too beautiful to last, each hour and moment gone. 

But in our future years, 

Through eyes made dim by tears. 

Back to these days we'll look 

Like to a shady nook. 

To find the springs of joy our pilgrimage has known. 

'Tis needless to relate the years of toil endured. 

The process to narrate how every mind matured ; 

How changed in every taste, 

Through, virtue or Ijy grace. 

From fainting hearts to brave. 

Who nothing else do crave 

But that the Right and Truth to all may be secured. 

'Tis sacrilege to tell the secret joys now past, 

So let us guard them well, dear classmates, to the last; 

Forbid that one should deem 

The past an idle dream. 

But let our college days 

Be like the sun's bright rays. 

To light our hearts with joy where'er our lines are cast. 

When in the closing years that mark our life's decline, 

When we forget our fears and all our doubts resign, 

Then in that quiet peace 

Which brings to all release. 

With hearts that fondly yearn. 

Then backward we will turn 

To days that brought no pain or thoughts of sad repine. 



31 



Kind friends we would entreat that joii be ever true, 
We pray that you us greet with love that's ever new. 
Remember Nineteen-one 
While shines yon golden sun, 
For in our future life, 
Amid its din and strife. 

We'll pause each hour to give a kindly thought of you. 

E. M. B. 




32 



History. 



fiiii^'^'«Ji« HE untiring pendulum of time in its ceaseless yearly vibration 
f ^^. J, has made us cognizant that again one entire year has elapsed 
/T l1 since last the history of the class of igoi was recorded on the 
^"^ j] pages of the Bizarre. Concerning this most worthy class, what 

fiiiii|ii[ ^Lr iiij^iiBfJ was one year ago a mere matter of conjecture, has now become 

the record of time. The history of the past year being now complete, as 
one views from this milestone the experiences of the past, the ob.stacles 
which have been overcome, the joys which have been ours in common, 
one finds rising within him the mingled emotions of pride, joy and regret 
— regret that these days are gone, that the eve of separation is at hand. 
But the future, be it what it may, shall ever cherish fond memories of the 
experiences as a class of our last year at L. V. C. 

A year ago when the history of this organization was written it was 
the source of much annoyance to the historian, as well as to the other 
male members of the class, that he could record the names of but three 
ladies on the list. But it is with considerable pride that the present his- 
torian announces the increase of this number to a prim half dozen amiable, 
cultured, young ladies. One member having quit school but five others 
having allied themselves to the organization since June last, the class has 
numbered during its senioi'age but one short of two dozen against that of 
nineteen as Juniors. 

It has been remarked that the class of igoi has proven to be the best 
rounded out, the best symmetrically developed class that has ever taken 
the role as Senior class at Lebanon Valley College. Though it does not 
boast of any of its number as freaks of learning or prodigies along any 
line, yet there isn't any one of its numbers of whom it may justly be said 
that he is not a good student or that he is not prepared to occupy some 
important position in life. It has always been strongly represented in all 
the various phases of college life, — the Christian associations, athletics, 
literary societies and the several social functions connected with the 
school. It has been during the year, in the true significance of the term, 
the Senior class of the College. 

33 



Its career during the past year, as previously, has been one of con- 
tinued progress and success. "The even tenor of our way" however, has 
been interspersed by many very agreeable events. One of these was the 
occasion of our being entertained at dinner by our class sister, Miss Susie 
Moyer, at her home in Derry. It was on the fifth of Februaiy when 
sleighing was at its best, that a team of four good horses, amid the merry 
jingling of bells, drew the sleigh in which were comfortably deposited the 
several jolly members of the class of 'oi. A dinner fit for princes was serv- 
ed to us on our arrival. Toasts abounding in kindly humor and rare wit 
were given. Games were afterwards played, music rendered by members 
of the class, and songs sung in chorus with characteristic spirit. It was 
an evening which commands for itself a permanent place in the memories 
of every member. 

Another long-to be-remembered event and one which goes to mak? 
up the history of this organization was the magnificent banquet given to 
this class by the hospitable Juniors. The two classes were conveyed to 
the Hotel Eagle on the evening of February 22d, where, laying aside all 
class spirit and in due recognition of the common brotherhood of man, we 
mingled together in a spirit from which was obliterated all semblance of 
class distinction. Words are to the historian but feeble instruments with 
which to express the feeling of pleasure and of appreciation for the Juniors' 
generosity. 

One of the most striking characteristics of this class is its modesty. 
This has been manifested on various occasions but revealed itself most 
forcibly at the time when the election of historian was held. So reluctant 
are the members of this class to speak of themselves that it was only after 
a half dozen members had declined and the acceptance of the resignation 
of the present officiating historian was refused by the class, that the latter 
was prevailed upon to sketch this account. 

The all prevailing thought which forces itself upon the mind of every 
Senior as he so rapidly approaches the long expected commencement is a 
serious one, the thought of final dissolution of the class to which he has 
become so closely aflSliated. The history of the class ot tgoi ceases on 
Commencement Day and thenceforth each member will go out into life, 
not only to make his own history individually, but to assist in making the 
common history of mankind. May each, as he departs these walls of 
learning and enters the schools of real life, be imbued with such powers 
and strength of character that, no matter what sphere of life he may enter, 
he may always be a credit to himself, an honor to his class and a perma- 
nent benefit to mankind. Historian. 

34 




If the reader thinks the artist h^s been too severe in his interpretation of 
Senior virtues a more complimentary culmination of this "Evolution" may be 
seen on page 154. 



Juniol* Glass. 



Flower : ^ ^ O '^°'°'' ' 

Crimson Clover. ^ Jm * Crimson. 



Motto. 



Yell. 



Hip, Rah! Boom, Rah! Hur, Rah I Re, 

1902, L. V. C. 
Hip, Yell! Rip, Yell! Zip, Yell! Zu, 
Crimson, Crimson, 1502. 



Officers. 

S. H. Derickson, Preside7it. 

A. W. Miller, Vice President. 

G. H. Albright, Secretary. 

Nettie S. Lockeman, .... Treasurer. 

D. J. Cowling, Historian. 

C. C. GoHN, ■ . Poet. 



36 



Poem. 



Hail to thee, fair 1902 ! 
Hail thou banner of Crimson hue! 
Thy glories old shall ever be 
The pride of dear, dear L. V. C. 

Three years have swiftlj' glided by 
The fourth hard pressing, now is nigh 
And soon from the height we'll cast a glance 
Upon the world's vast, broad expanse. 

To Lebanon Valley we hope to give, 
A class that through all time shall live 
For in our work, it is well known 
We always trj' to hold our own. 

The days we spent within these hills 
Will urge us on where duty calls ; 
Across life's stream a bridge they rear, 
From Ignorance to wisdom's sphere. 

Upon this bridge we've made fast friend 
Whom we will love till life's stream ends — 
Friendships formed which none can sever, 
Friends are we, aye friends forever. 

Sweet happy days, too soon you go ! 
Oh stay till "we ourselves do know !" 
When to our motto we've been true 
To realms beyond we'll go with jou. 

Poet. 



38 




GEORGE HENRY ALBRIGHT. 

George Henry Albright a diminutive 
pecinien of ancestral greatness, stands 
ill the head of his class — alphabetically. 
He claims Manheini, Lancaster County, 
as his birth place and prophecies that the 
claim will be reciprocal in a few years. 
Until latel)-, gossip had dubbed George a 
bai helor, but her judgment was in fault 
for hi; heart was completely taken after 
an easy assault, by one of the Co-eds. 
"Allie,'' while scmewhat sawcd-off, is 
made of athletic fiber and has been prom- 
inent ill all college sports, being a mem- 
ber both of the Varsity foot ball and base 
ball teams, as well as captain of his class 
teams. He expects to become a veterin- 
ary surgeon and at this early date is so 
proficient in his chosen vocation, that 
his professional service is an iudispen- 
saljl e need of the Jockeys' Club. 



GERTRUDE MAY BOWMAN. 

Gertrude "June" Bowman, a 3'oving 
lad3' whose beauty is excelled only by 
her good looks, was born on a beautiful 
afternoon in the delightful month of June 
iS8o(i'), in the handsome city o£ Dayton, 
Ohio. The lovely quiet of that afternoon 
seems to have implanted in her very be- 
ing a yearning, which, since her arrival at 
Lebanon Valley, can be satisfied only by 
afternoon strolls, preferably Sanday. 
She is one of our most popular sisters and 
"G. B." has been significant to her many 
admirers in more ways than one. 
"June" is pursuing a course of instruc- 
tion in the Conservator)', specializing in 
instrumental music, with a view to be- 
come an Accompanist. She is an adept 
already, being able to perform difficult 
parts of many compositions admirably — 
■with one hand. Miss Bowman is a grad- 
uate of the Steele High School of her 
native city. 




39 




DAVID DANIEL BUDDINGER. 

David Daniel Biiddiiiger was lioni on 
Sunday, in Butler County, Iowa, in a 
town whose name he has entirely forgot- 
ten. Rev. B'lddinger, for he is a minis- 
ter of the old Puritan type, is the assail- 
ant of SabLalh desccr, t on and strivis so 
far as his environment permits to live 
peaceahl}' with all men. He believes in 
the injunction "Don't do as I do, hut do 
as I preach." He is loyal to his cla^s 
even at the risk of his niinisterial rela- 
tions, for on one memoraule occasion he 
disobeved the coiiiinand 'Whosoever shall 
smite thee on the right cheek, turn to 
him the other also," and flew into a class 
frav. His wife proved his saviour, how- 
ever, for she drew him out of d.mger by 
the tail of his clerical haliilin^ent and pre- 
served that part of his reputation. After 
graduation he will enter Union Biblical 
Seminar\ . 



DONALD JOHN COWLING. 

Donald John Cowling, the "nice" boy 
of the class, is a relative of John Bull, 
and is indigenous to soil surrounding 
Trevalga, Cornwall, England. After pats- 
ing a few years in his native countiy he 
made the acquaintance of Uncle Sam 
and afterwards was adopted into his foster 
Uncle's large family. Donald is a young 
man of studicus habits, bright intellect, 
and faultless manners, seasoned with a 
dash of sentimentality. His brushes with 
the gentler sex have been frequent and 
in most cases disastrous to his usual tran- 
quility of mind, but his native aggress- 
iveness, augmented by a modest opinion 
of his masculine attractiveness, has often 
stood him in good stead. He is some- 
whit undecided as to his future vocation 
but will likel)', after graduation, enter 
Harvard University to pursue a course 
in English. 




40 




SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON. 

Siiniuel Hoffiiuui Dericksou is a des- 
cendant of the eaily tettJeis of New Port, 
Pa. Fioni early childhood he betrayed 
a niiirkcd love for nature, human nature 
of the opposite six included, and after 
his preliminary training in the public 
schools, entered the Scientific depart- 
ment of L- V. C. for further study in his 
chosen field. While here he has distin- 
guished himself as a careful student and 
a powerful "prefser" of beautiful botani- 
cal (?) specimens. Not only in Science 
has he shown himself an apt student, but 
in Mechanics as well. Lately he has con- 
structed a spinning "Jenn}'," on which a 
patent is now pending, and which bids 
fair to be more successful than any of his 
previous attempts in this realm. Mr. 
Derickson, the hustling business mana- 
ger of the Bizarre, will after graduation 
complete his education alircad. 



NETA BEATlilCE ENGLAR. 

Neta Beatrice Englar, from the best 
mannscripts obtainable, was born at New 
Wiiisdor, Md. in the san:e year in ^\liich 
the Centenniel was celebrated. Later 
she lived in the Buckeye State and from 
there came to Lebanon Valley on pleas- 
ure bent, being instrumental in having 
that mysterious organization, the Ohio 
Club, incorporated shortly after her 
arrival. Miss Englar in more waj'S than 
one, is a womanly girl and her associates 
revere her as being the paragon of com- 
mon sense and often are guilty of trivial 
inelegancies for the purpose of securing 
audience in one of her nianj' curtain 
lectures. She is a warm defender of 
woman's rights and seldom hesitates to 
make her claims good by spirited 
speeches in the class meetings. She 
has rare musical talent which expresses 
itself in masterly renditions of popular 
airs. 




41 




MAUD ALMA ENGLU. 

Maud Alma Eiigle, a native of Dauphin 
Coiiiitx , was born on December i6, iS8i. 
It is s id she took first prize at a country 
fair frr being the prettiest baby on the 
groui ds, and our readers will agree that 
she has not lost any of that childish 
beaulv. It is for work done on the 
social committee of the Y. W. C. A. that 
she is especially known. Her ability as 
a hostess has often been evinced by the 
ni. ny pleasant evenings a certain Senior 
spends at the Hall. Miss Engle is also 
taking up a course in "Nature Study," 
applying herself assiduously to the 
"studies." She is prompted to do this 
in the hope of some day becoming a 
minister's wife. Her talent for music 
needs no comment, save that she is now 
bending her energies, so as to satisfy an 
ambition to successfully manage a re- 
fractory Church Choir. 



CLAUDE ROY ENGLE. 

Claude Roy Engle differs only from most 
great men in that he was born in a senii- 
city-country locality four miles from 
Harrisburg, some twenty years ago. Al- 
though his environment made progress 
along most lines possible, he is unalter- 
ably opposed to agricultural innovations 
and insists on working with a "Spayd." 
Being preeminently a ladies' man he is 
second to none in hustling baggage and 
running errands. His musical talent is 
well known and his deep bass voice fre- 
quently adds to the "charm" of many a 
midnight serenade. Claude is especially 
interested in Science and spend all his 
spare time in th2 Che.nical Lab., playing 
with his favorit^ compound iron filings 
and sulphuric acid. Long live Claude and 
his ambition to be a "prof," but that 
short lived many be his experiments with 
H2S is the prayer of all his friends. 




42 




CLAYTON CLEVELAND GOHN. 

Clayton Cleveland Gohn because of his 
extraction and intention, commonly call- 
ed "Preacher" was known as a child to 
the residents of Red Lion, Pa. It is 
breezed about that the gentle folk in the 
quiet village of his nativity, even after 
his varied experiences as the son of an 
itinerant minister and with the addition 
of a score of 3ears, are still wont to think 
of him as of yore. He is a man of gentle 
disposition, "goo-goo" eyes and an ex- 
ceedingly glib tongue. A large and 
ready vocabulary, aided by a vivid im- 
agination, makes variety of expression 
in the vernacular tongue, not only a mat- 
ter of ease but an accomplishment pecu- 
liar to himself. Before entering Lebanon 
Valley in the fall of 1900, Mr. Gohn at- 
tended Western College, Toledo, Iowa. 



JOSEPH LEHN KREIDER. 

Joseph Lehn Kreider is a son of the 
soil but springs from an influential family. 
He arrived in Annville about the year 
1879, a few days too late for Fourth of 
July celebrations for that year, but con- 
soled himself with a unique 'celebration' 
of his own much it is said, to the discom- 
fort of the entire household. The family 
record shows that the first word escaping 
his infant lips was "coin" and he subse- 
quently betrayed a decided propensity 
for the "specie." Joe is a young man of 
sterling qualities, doubtless because of 
which he was connected with the "Ann- 
ville Journal" in the capacity of printer's 
"Devil," and later elected a deacon of the 
church. Joe expects to become an elec- 
trical engineer and purposes entering 
State College to pursue his studies in 
that remunerative vocation. 










Ml^^^^K^^^> ' 


jmI 


^^ 



43 




THOMAS ADAM LAWSON. 

Thomas Adaiu Lawson, a perfect type 
of that famous organization known as the 
"Sons of Rest,'' began his life of "ease" 
in Dallastown, Pa. After passing an indif- 
ferent boyhood in a large easy chair of 
his father's office, he bestirred himself 
for the first time and came to Lebanon 
Valley. His career here is, as might be 
expected, as uncheckered as his youthful 
days — for he seldom moves. He claims 
descent from the early New England set- 
tlers described in Knickerbockers His- 
tory of New York, and his actions give 
us little reason for doubting his veracity. 
However his phlegmatic tendencies 
seem to contribute largely to his won- 
derful mathematical abilities, else how 
could he be the genius at numbers he 
has proven himself to be. Tom, some 
time since, roused himself from his 
accustomed lethargy long enough to 
produce "What Man Wants." It was 
a hit. 



NETTIE SUSANA LOCKEMAN. 

Nettie Susana Lockenian was born, 
laughing, in the City of York, Pa., in the 
year 1SS4 A. D., and if this chronology is 
correct is the "baby" of the Class, 
although we are inclined to believe '94 
is more nearly the true date. Never- 
theless she would still be the "baby." 
Of gigglers galore, Miss Nettie is an easy 
winner and keeps the entire class in a 
constant flux of good humor. This 
natural characteristic has not gone un- 
rewarded for her smiles are so magnetic 
that even a Sophomore has been drawn 
near enough to spread the contagion, 
and we doubt not are sufficiently power- 
ful to attract him for some time to come. 
She is a musical student and Treasurer 
of '02. Her future rests entirely with 
the Sophomore — but a further divulgence 
would be sacrilege. 




44 




ISAAC FISHER LOOSE. 

Isaac Fisher Loose was turned loose in 
the world in Berks County, Pa., and after 
having imbibed the proverbial "nourish- 
ment" of that section and l)eing fully 
grown, wandered to Lebanon Valley in a 
P. & R. "side door palace car." His re- 
mo'Se is bitter that the train ever stop- 
ped at Annville and the "Unpropitious 
Fates" is the theme of many a melan- 
choly soliloqu}-. He is a great favorite 
ofall— except the ladies, toward whom he 
shows a marked indisposition. "I key" 
always wears a smile or a frown and never 
hesitates, even on the slightest provoca- 
tion, to send one to Pluto's realms. Mu- 
sic and Tom Paine are hishobbies, for the 
former of which he has considerable talent 
Isaac is taking a full musical course and 
will complete his education in Germany. 



ARTHUR WESLEY MILLER. 

Arthur Wesley Miller is a signal proof 
of the effect of environment. The sub- 
ject of our short sketch — generally known 
because of some imaginary effeminate 
characteristics, as "Miss Artie" — was 
born at Mechanicsburg, Pa. "Artie" is 
the best mechanic in the class and has 
proven himself so competent that his 
ingenuity has been utilized in stocking 
the Physical and Chemical Laboratories 
■with paraphenalia. His room is filled 
with curiousl}- constructed contrivances, 
prominent among which is an automatic 
"nerve" producer. The Sophomores will 
readily testify to its effective operation. 
Aside from this mechanical skill "Artie" 
is an artist of no small caliber, the illus- 
trations of the Bizarre being a proof 
of his ability in this direction. His fu- 
ture is uncertain since he hesitating 
whether to become an artist or a minister. 




45 




EDITH MYERS. 

Edith Myers, the "longest" member 
of the class, has also the distinction of 
having the shortest name. This vision 
of fairness came to light, according to 
her own figures, on December 6, 1880, in 
Jersey City, N. J. It is said that her 
growth was so rapid that her native state 
became too small for her and in obedi- 
ence to a well obeyed law in Physics her 
parents moved to capacious Pennsylvania. 
Miss Myers is now a resident of Mt. Joy, 
Pa. She entered the Art department of 
Lebanon Valley and has distinguished 
herself as a faithful interpreter of what is 
beautiful and sentimental in human na- 
ture. We are proud to claim her as one 
of the artists of the Bizarre, and are con- 
fident our refideis will appreciate her 
consummate skill when "Every Man's 
Goal" is seen. "Long" live Miss Myers. 



WILLIAM JACOB SANDERS 

William Jacob Sanders shoved on this 
mortal coil in Millersville, Pa., and not 
infrequently regrets the occurrence. 
After receiving his early training in the 
public schools of Sunbury, he entered 
Lebanon Valley. "Bill" is the "warmest" 
member of the class ; he is Editor-in- 
Chief of the Bizarre, was the first presi- 
dent of 1902, and shows marked executive 
ability in all class enterprises. Cupid's 
darts usually penetrate hearts painlessly 
but since Billy's was pierced he has been 
subject to intermittent fevers. He is 
generally thought to be impulsive and 
eccentric, but a closer acquaintance re- 
duces these prejudices to a minimum. 
"Bill" believes in making a good appear- 
ance and is the "Beau Brummel" of the 
class. He will after graduation take a 
course in Political Science and Philos- 
ophy in Columbia University. 




46 




LUCY ANNA. SHERK. 

Lucy Anna Sherk made her debut in 
Ihewoildin H irrislntrg, Pa. She "dis- 
remembers" the date, she says, but it 
makes no difference snice the accom- 
panying cut shows it was not a half 
century since. In the Harrisburg public 
schools she secured the rudiments of 
education and cinie to Lebanon Valley 
in the Fall of oo, entering the Conserva- 
tory fcra complete musical course. She 
is an accomplished pianist and sings 
alto in the Chorus Class and in Sunday 
School. Miss LuC3' is a five day student, 
spending Sundaj' at her home, much to 
the regret of one certain Junior, who 
laments the fact that Sunday trains are 
so inconvenient. Miss Sherk h; s many 
admirers and as to her future we will 
simply say she is a Go (h) ner. 



WILLIAM ALGERNON SITES. 

William Algernon Sites was reared in 
Harrisbuig, Pa. The rearing however 
was for some reason discontinued rather 
abruptly and "Billie" has ever since been 
obliged to "look up to people." Al- 
though he is a Lilysutian, nevertheless 
he possesses traits which differentiate 
him widely from Gulliver's creatures. 
By dint of perseverence, prompted by a 
noble aim, he is making his way through 
college, in a manner creditable to him- 
self and the class of which he is a mem- 
ber. Little love for social life, a heart 
impervious to Cupid's wiles, a solemn 
countenance, a quiet disposition and too 
much time given to prayers, are his chief 
failings. He is a preacher by trade and 
we predict for him a successful future if 
he will mend his ways and wear cork in- 
soles in his shoes. 




47 




ELIZABETH LUCRETIA STEHMAN. 

Elizabeth Lucretia Stehman, our 
modest class sister, was born in Mount- 
ville, Pa., on the 24th of June, 18S0, 
aboat 4 p. ui. Miss Elizabeth was nour- 
ished on rural diet and became so ac- 
customed to lacteal compounds that even 
now she manifests a decided preference 
for "pap" (bread and milk), and unless 
procured for her, leaves for the parental 
domicile at once. These departures are 
frequent and nettle the "head" of that 
taljle exceedingly. She is also a lover 
of athletics, heartily supporting her class 
in all gymnastic contests, in appreciation 
of which she was recently elected Cap- 
tain of the '02 Base Ball Team. Miss 
Stehman is acting President of the Y. 
W. C. A., and enjoys the distinction of 
having been the first lady president of 
'02. She is a student of the Conserva- 
tory and unless Cupid interferes will 
teach music after graduation. 



ALFRED TENNYSON SUMNER. 

Alfred Tennyson Sumner, a native of 
the dark continent was born in Bonthe, 
Sherbro, West Africa. At an early age 
he attended the United Brethren Mission 
School at Shangeh, graduating there in 
'95. During the two succeeding years 
Alired taught in his native village. See- 
ing the great need of his people and feel- 
ing that higher training would better 
qualify him for his future work in the 
field of missions, he came to this country 
in the summer of '98 and in the fall of the 
same )-ear entered Lebanon Valley. 
Since here Alfred has proven himself to 
be a gentleman, a student brilliant l)e- 
yond expectation, and a universal favor- 
ite. Mr. Sumner contemplates a medical 
education in the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, after which he will return to Africa 
as a missionary. Success be with him is 
the wish of '02. 




History. 



if'¥"""¥"""¥'yl0R two long years the melodious harp of 1902 has been wrapt 
{ ^ ji in darkness and its echoing strings hushed ; but I now 
1^ '^Sg j\ proudly, though unworthily, release its cords and set free its 
[^ *!' jj rapturous strains. Not strains of pretended modesty sending 
[iiiiiil;iiiiii;l[iin[iiil[iiiil] out at every beat the discordant notes of conceit, selfishness 
and bigotry, but strains full of sympathy, resounding with the harmonious 
echoes of truth and worth. 

Having faithfully endured the trials of Freshmen, we left our first 
patron and were graciously received by the kind guardian of the Soph.s, 
and, while under his guidance, bonds were formed that have pained our 
hearts to break and pictures drawn which now shine in all their splendor 
on the illumed walls of memory. Precious indeed are these pictures, re- 
minding us of tenderest ties severed and sweetest joys all too soon re- 
legated to the stern and sombre region of the past. There is one, how- 
ever, that stands out more prominent than the rest ; it is a scene of Com- 
mencement week and we tarry a moment to give its history. 

The Seniors had just launched into the mighty deep of the future, 
leaving in their wake a troubled and stormy sea. Presently the banner of 
the Freshmen, that emblem of presumption, conceit and ignoronce, from 
the gallery flopped its saggy folds into the troubled air. A death-like 
hush ensued — a moment — and a little band of doughty Sophs, arising 
from who knows where, with its Crimson banner streaming with light, 
appears on the scene and soon the conflict is on. Fiercely seethes the 
strife, it is carried without, under the open sky, and the battle between 
Crimson and Scarlet, between right and wrong, light and darkness rages 
in all its fury. The gods are on the scene — Bishops and elders, clergy 
and laity alike contend with darkness for the light. See ! the line of 
Scarlet wavers, their ranks break, their emblem is seized. The fates are 
inexorable. Zeus awards the victory to the Crimson and the conflict is 
over. The sordid ensign of Scarlet was cleansed, and divided among 
the victors, and the radiant banner of Crimson, though torn and tattered, 
now shines in its augmented splendor in the Armory of 1902. 

49 



Summer vacation comes and goes and we, a band of twenty, are sol- 
emnly ushered into the presence of the august ruler of the third quadrant. 
Having sworn allegiance, we applied ourselves to our tasks and have been 
favored with recognition for achievements in both athletics and literary 
work. 

On the evening of February 22nd we gave a Banquet to the Seniors 
and, under the drapings of Orange, Crimson and Black, Junior and Senior, 
side by side, mingling their voices in glee and their hearts in deepest 
friendship, alike partook of the sumptous feast. 

The evening of March 14th is one long to be remembered, it being the 
occasion of the President's reception to the Juniors. Just after dusk the 
Sophs, were noticed skulking about the campus in their best clothes. It 
was thought at first that they designed to obstruct the path of tlie Juniors 
but, when advances were made against them, they earnestly pleaded their 
innocence and piteously begged to be taken along to the reception. This 
of course could not be. but the President having compassion on their 
child like ways, promised that if they would be good until next year,' he 
would give them a little reception of their own. The remainder of the 
evening was indeed crowded with pleasures for us all and Pres- and Mrs 
Roop, by their kind and thoughtful hospitality, have won our sincere 
gratitude. 

What we sh ill become in the future does not yet appear but we look 
forward with cheerful hopes, for in the past, smooth and placid has been 
our sea, and balmy the breezes that have wafted us on our way. 

These then are the strains! Dear Harp, sweet are thy lays. Thou 
has cheered our hearts with pleasing memories of our past and inspired 
us with a nobler devotion to thy cause. Go, retire into thine own silence 
and may he who would henceforth release thy restrained harmony be less 
unworthy to touch thy sacred chords. 

Historian. 



50 



Sophomore Glass. 



Flowers : f /^ 4^ Colors : 

Red and White Rose. W'\3# Scarlet and White. 



Motto. 
"Nulla dies sine linea," 



Yell. 

Bootii-a-raka ; boom-a-raka 
Booin-a-raka, re 
Ripi-Zipi : rip-i-zipi 

Rip-i-zipi, ze. 

Boom-a-raka, rip-i-zipi 

Who are we. 

1903 of L. V. C. 



Officers. 

C. A. Fisher, President. 

Paul P. Smith, Vice President. 

E. C. Roop, Secretary. 

J. Walter Esbenshade, . . . Treasurer. 

Edith E. Spangler Poet. 

J. Walter Esbenshade, . . . Historian. 

W. C. Arnold Keeper of Archives. 



52 



^^W^^'^^^^^i/A^. 




EizJXiT T Phils'. 



Membepship. 



William C. Arnold, 
David D. Brandt, 
Charles W. Christman, 
Urias J. Daugherty, 
Milton E. Donough, 
J. Walter Esbenshade, 
Charles A. Fisher, 
Thomas W. Gray, 
Sara E. Helm, 
Amos L- House,. 
Walter R. Kohr, . 
Hiram F. Rhoad, 
Charles E. Roudabush, 
Emmett C. Roop,. 
Ralph C Schaeffer, 
Lillian M. Schott, . 
John M. Sheeslev, 
RussEL S. Showers, . 
Paul P. Smith, 
Edith E. Spangler, . 
Clinton A. Sollenberger, 
Edward F. C. Beckmeyer, 



. York, Pa. 

Newville, Pa. 
. St. Thomas, Pa. 

Dallastown, Pa. 

Myerstown, Pa. 

Bird-in-Hand, Pa. 
. Lebanon, Pa. 

Ickesburg, Pa. 
. Lebanon, Pa. 

Markelville, Pa. 
. York, Pa. 

East Hanover, Pa. 
. Myersville, Md. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
. Hummelstown, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
. Progress, Pa. 

Sheffield, Ontario, Canada. 
. Annville, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
. Harrisburg, Pa. 

York, Pa. 



54 



Poem. 



I sit withiu uiy cozy nook, 

The fire burns dull and low ; 
My eyes are closed, I backward look, 

'Twas just two j-ears ago 
That home was left and all so dear, — 

'Twas just two years ago. 

'Twas at that time there might be seen 

At h. v. C. you know. 
Lads, lasses, stupid, slow, and green. 

And bashful, too, I know. 
Assembling all from far and near, — 

'Twas just two years ago. 

Soon they came forth as Freshnien bright. 

That was two years ago ; 
But now they stand, arrayed in light, 

Pure as the driven snow ; 
As Sophs they stand, a famous Ijand, 

Since just a year ago. 

And see how far their brightness pours 

Its rays, where'er they go ! 
Of course, they are the Sophomores, 

Round them there's nothing slow; 
Not even if the Freshmen and 

The Juniors tell you so. 

Around their motto all do bow 

And worship, chanting low, 
"Nulla dies sine liriea," — 

May all soon learn to know 
The blessed truth therein contained, 

And act it as they go. 

Their days as Sophs will soon be o'er. 

But they'll not stay below ; 
They'll work and strive as oft before. 

They'll push right on and go 
To where their white and scarlet leads, 

A joyful, gladsome morrow. 

POKTKSS. 



56 



History. 



Wvf' iii"'VW ISTORY in general is divided into epochs, the beginnings and 

[f ^—^ ll endings of which are marked by some great event. As there 
[l DIj Jj are epochs in universal history so are there epochs in the 
[l j1 history of a class in its course through college. The events 

[C'^i lAriinil^iiil] marking the epochs in class history are commencement days. 

They are the great transition days of college life, when inferiority is aban- 
doned for superiority, and when dignity is given up for still greater dig- 
nity. In the history of a college class, from the time it assumes responsi- 
bilities as such, until it bids a final farewell to its Alma Mater, and its 
members scattered to the four corners of the earth, there are tour epochs, 
the responsibility and dignity of which increases through each until it 
gloriously culminates on that day of all days to a college student — Com- 
mencement day. 

The class of Nineteen Hundred and Three has already completed its 
first epoch and the wheels of time are rapidly rolling in toward the close 
of the second. A glance at the Bizarre of last year will show a record of 
the achievements of the Freshman year, so that after having recorded the 
happenings of the present year the historian will consider his task com- 
pleted 

As in a great historical drama successive epochs are not characterized 
by the same actors, so in epochs of class history we do not always find 
the same people. This has been true of our class. At the beginning of 
our second epoch, the Sophomore year, we grieved to note the absence of 
five of the most esteemed of our numbers. Since that time another has 
withdrawn from our ranks. We feel their loss keenly. Their absence 
reduced our number to eighteen members, but we have lately welcomed 
two others into our circle. Every department in the college is represent- 
ed in our class. Our number of ladies is still limited to three. 

The achievements oi our Sophomore year have been many and to 
particularize would require too much space. We have furnished material 
for every organization in college. Our members have been heard from 



57 



on the athletic field, in the Literary societies and the Christian organiza- 
tions ; we have representatives in the musical organizations and the Dra- 
matic Club ; in fact our members are seen in every walk of college life. 
The work of our girls is especially noteworthy ; one of them very success- 
fully represented the Clionian society at its twenty-ninth anniversary ; 
another has been engaged in a critical study of literature, especially the 
works of Shakesphere and Tennyson, giving some time also to present 
day writers, particularly. Van Dyke; the other has spent some time dur- 
ing the present year in short story writing, in which she has been quite 
successful. 

The third epoch will soon be upon us. Our aim as Sophomores is 
to be prepared for the greater responsibilities which will then devolve up- 
on us. Our motto is "Something each day," and we believe with the 
the poet that, 

"New occasions teach new duties ; 
Time makes ancient good uncouth ; 
They must upward still and onward. 
Who would keep abreast of truth." 

Historian. 




58 



ppeshman Glass, 



Flower ; * /^k /-^ Colors: 

Violet. ^'^V* Red and Blaik. 



Motto. 
Qui stiidel coniingeie meiain, multa luht fecilque. 



Yell. 

Rac-a-de-cax ! Co-ax ! Co-ax ! 
Rac-a-de-cax ! Coax! Co-ax 
Lebanon Valley, 1904. 
Sis-Booni-Bah. 



Officers. 

Chas. H. Fisher President. 

John I. Shaud, Vice President. 

Mary N. Light, Secretary. 

Wm. E. Riedel, Treasurer. 

Mary N. Light, Poetess. 

Ralph W. Appenzellar . . . Historian. 



60 



Membership. 



Ralph W. Appenzellar, 
Edw. S. Fenstermacher, 
Chas. H. Fisher,. 
William M. Grumbein, 
Frank Heinaman, 
John H. Graybill, 
J. Arthur Knupp, 
Mary N. I<ight, 
Wm. E. Reidel 
Frank L. Scott, 
John I. Shaud, 
Albert J. Shenk, 
Monroe W. Smeltzer, . 



Clianibersburg, Va. 
Cressoiia, Pa. 
York, Pa. 
Aiinville, Pa. 
Columbia, Pa. 
Aiiiiville, Pa. 
Peiibrook, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Dallasto\An, Pa. 
Kpyville, ^kl. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Penbrook , Pa . 



62 



Foem. 



"They are Freshman," folks said, 
In a depreciating tone, 
But their minds now are changed. 
Since we've become known. 

Of course we are Freshman, 
We'er proud of it too ; 
We are making things move. 
Although we are new. 

We call ourselves, "Freshman," 
But what's in a name? 
It is through our actions 
We merit true fame. 

Let us be and not seem. 
As we journey along. 
And thus make our lives 
One lovely sweet song. 

And if we are earnest, 
And all do our best. 
Our reward is not wanting. 
For we'll stand the test. 

So four years from now. 
Folks may view from afar 
The glorious triumph 
Of the Class of '04. 



63 



History. 

if¥"""¥ ¥jl S the existence of the Freshman class has been brief, our his- 
f f^^ ji tory is naturally corresponding in size, but short as it is, the 
it \^\ m Historian is perfectly conscious of his incompetency to do it 
[t ^'^ jj justice. And it is to be remembered that we have some his- 
[iiiii^iifiiii;l[iiii iii^hiilj tory, to reveal which would be sacrilege. 

Our experiences as Freshmen have not differed materially from those 
of which you have heard time and time again. As others have done be- 
fore us, so each of us, scornfully turning a deaf ear to the advice of our 
parents, and being filled with the feeling that now I am my own boss, 
came here with a head of about twice its normal size. But after we had 
fixed our rooms into some semblance of home, after the Seniors had fully 
impressed us with their dignity, the Juniors with their cousinly affection, 
and the Sophs with their intentions of "doing us," our hats were once 
again the proper size and we set about to make for ourselves history 
which should endure. 

One of our first steps was to organize, which was done in a peaceable 
manner, and looking back over our numerous trials and difficulties we 
chose for our motto: "He who strives to reach the goal, first bears and 
does many things." And now we were ready to make our presence known 
and felt. 

The faculty was the first to awaken to the fact that Xhey had within 
the school a prodigy, mirabile dictu (Sophs' version, miserabile visu,) 
and therefore set themselves to the prodigious task of providing for us. 
They perceived that we are not ordinary mortals and so they prepared 
themselves in due proportion. And, it may be added to our credit, they 
found that it was not a momentarj' delusion, but was and is a welcome 
reality. 

The Sophs were the next in order to recognize our supremacy and 
although they let drop some rather unkind and sarcastic remarks concern- 
ing us, still they have thought it policy to stop with that and not to do 

65 



deeds ofviolence. It seems to us that the main diffierence which lies be- 
tween the Sophs, and us is, in the language of Socrates, that they not 
knowing think they know, while we not knowing do not think so. 

As to the Juniors, they being naturally concerned in us, their con- 
sins, and in addition seeing the brillancy of our class, took many pains in 
helping us over the critical periods of our historj', and have truely been, 
"A lamp unto our feet, and a light unto our path," for which services 
we return our grateful thanks 

And the Seniors ! Well, lest we should offend them, we will not say 
anything more than that we have found "Senior dignity" to be a sham, 
but that we hope and expect that, when they have become rid of their al- 
most infinite conceit, thev will make their mark. 

In athletics we have also shown our strength and skill and have been 
able to cope with and conquer others in respect to quality, notwithstand- 
ing the fact that we are lacking in quantity. 

In fact, in all departments of college work we have shown our ability. 
Everywhere our influence is a powerful factor and not alone in the dining 
Hall, as has been remarked only too truthfully of the Sophs. 

Of course we feel proud of ourselves, think that we are the star class 
of Lebanon Valley, and that fate has decreed that we shall startle the 
world by our achievements, both individually and as a body. However 
to say more concerning our future would be to overstep the bounds of 
modesty, and so we leave you to follow our course in the future and to 
judge for yourselves whether or not we have fulfilled our own expectations. 

Historian. 



66 



I 




68 



Prepapafopy. 



Titus A. Alspach, . 
Virgie M. Bachman, . 
Harvey Barnhart, 
Archie S. Beatty, 
Thomas B. Beatty, 
William W. Berry, . 
Lizzie Boeshore, 
Ruth Braselmann, 
Raymond K. Buffington, 
Lillie S. Burkey, 
William H. Chrisemer, 
Michael Clemens, 
Arthur R. Clippinger, 
Lulu M. Clippinger, . 
Joseph L. Daugherty, 
Nellie Davis, 
Mary E. Dean, 
Oscar J. Ditzler, 
Carrie Dunkle, 
Bessie A. Englar, 
Ralph Engle, . 
Raymond Engle, 
Park F. Esbenshade, 
Elmer C. Erb, . 
Frank B. Erb, 
Harry Fahr, 
Grace Fisher, . 
Irvin H. Fisher, 
Charles A. Fry, 
Elias M. Gehr, . 
Frank Gray, 



Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
. Quincy, Pa. 

Quincy, Pa. 
. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lickdale, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Elizabethville, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Middletown, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Mowersville, Pa. 
. Chambersburg, Pa. 

Shoemakersville, Pa. 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

Boyertown, Pa. 
. Gratis, Ohio. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Bird-in Hand, Pa. 
. Hockersville, Pa. 

Shirmanstown, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Palmyra, Pa. 
. Cressona, Pa. 

Bellegrove, Pa. 
. Cedar Lane, Pa. 

Blain, Pa. 



69 



Margaret Gray, . 
Robert B. Graybill, 
Harry M. Haak, 
John B. Hambright, 
Adam G. Heilman, . 
Valeria S. Heilman, 
Rush M. Hendericks , 
Albert Herr, . 
Clarence Herr, . 
John F. Herr, 
William C, Herr, 
May B. Hershey, . 
Ruth M. Hershey, 
Harry T. Hinkle, . 
Eugene E. Hite, 
Maggie M. Horst, 
Mary Horstick, 
Titus H. Kreider, 
Kathryn M. Landis, . 
John Lehman, 
Max F. Lehman, 
Jean S. Leininger, 
Jennie Leslie, 
Ruth M. Leslie, 
John A. Light, 
John B. McLaughlin, 
Harry E. McLaughlin, 
John G. Loose, 
Arthur S. Miller, 
Bryon W. Millei. 
Harry M. Moyer, 
Ellen L. Oberholtzer, 
George D. Owen, 
Charles C. Peters, . 
Samuel A. Ranch, 
Rosa Reddick, 
George E. Reiter, 
Marie B. Risser, 
John R. Robb, . 



Ickesburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Florin, Pa. 
. Greble, Pa. 
Greble, Pa. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Royalton, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Union Deposit, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
West Lebanon, Pa. 
Carsonville, Pa. 
Carsonville, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Upper Berne, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Fredericksburg, Pa. 
Nevi^ Bloomfield, Pa. 
Altenwald, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Walkersville, Pa. 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Lawn, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



70 



John E. Rooks, 
Charles Shaffner, 
Weidtnan R. Seibert, 
Cyrus E. Shenk, 
Ira R. Shoop, . 
Charles L- Shuyler, 
Williani J. Smith, . 
Emanuel Snyder, 
Max O. Snyder, 
Mary Stover, 
Walter Strayer, 
George B. Uhrick, 
Jennie Vallerchamp, 
Raymond Wagner, 
Charles A. Weaver, 
Edith Weisenborn, 
John Yiengst, . 
Mary E. Zimmerman, 



Rochester Mills, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Sinking Springs, Pa. 
Deodate, Pa. 
Mt. Holly Springs, Pa. 
Montgomery's Ferry, Pa. 
Olivebury, Pa. 
Yoe, Pa. 
Liverpool, Pa. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Flinton, Pa. 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Millersburg, Pa. 
Suedburg, Pa. 
Steel ton. Pa. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Mt. Zion, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 



71 



j! lftMiiii|[iiiiiiii;||Niiiiii|iNiiiiirtNiiiiii^'i!iiiiii|iiiiiiiiii|iiiiiiiiiiJiiNiiii^^ ih ^iiiiiiiil^iiiiiiii|[iiiiiiii]l[iiiiiiiij^ii ijj[iiiiiiii;|[iiiiiiii^iiiiiiiii|[iiiiiiiij;iiiiiiii;|[iihiiij|iiiiiiiife 



(Zoi^servatory 
o$ Mlisic 



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I 




GRADUATES IN MUSIC. 



Ghorus Glass. 



Gertrude Bowman, 
LiLLIE Kreider, 
Kathryn Landis, 
Alma Light, 

LiLLIE BURKEY, 

Bessie Englar, 

Nettie I_,ockeman, 

ViRGIE BACHMAN, 

Arabella Batdorf, 
Sue Mover, 
Carrie Dunkle, 
H. H. YoHE, 
S. H. Derrickson, 
C. W. Christmant, 
W. R. Appenzellar, 
A. C. T. Sumner, 
R. Herr, 

F. L. SCHOTT, 



Anna Kreider, 
Valeria Heilman, 
Mary Zacharias, 
Ruth Leslie, 
Edith Myers, 
Nellie Davis, 
Jennie Leslie, 
Mary Zimmerman, 
Emma Batdorf, 
Grace Fisher 
W. A. Arnold, 
C. R. Engle, 
W. J. Sanders, 
W. S. Roop, 
W. T. Gray, 
Ralph Engle, 
L. E. Cross, 
A. W. Miller. 



74 



L>. Y. G. Quartette. 



C. E. SHENK, 
ist. Tenor. 



T. W. GRAY, 
2)id. Tejior. 



W. C. ARNOLD, 

1st. Bass. 



R. W. APPENZELLAR, 
2nd. Bass. 



76 




77 



Gollege Orchestra. 



Pythagoras : "Music of the Spheres' 

Teacher of Harmony. Inspiration. 

A. C. T. SUMNER, 
Bag Pipe. 

J. W. ESBENSHADE, 
Jew's Harp, 

L. E. CROSS, 
Fish Horn (E Flat.) 

S. H. DERICKSON, 
Fog Horn {B Flat.) 

W. O. ROOP, 

Megaphone . 

A. W. MILLER, 
Month Organ. 

D. M. OYER, 
Comb. 

C. R. ENGLE, 
Horse Fiddle. 

C. A. SOLLENBERGER, 
Accordian . 

I. F. LOOS, 
Street Piano. 

B. OLDHAM. 
Leader. 



78 



Glionian. 



Colors : Motto : 

White and Gold. Virtute et Fide. 



Yell. 



Reo ! Rio ! Sis ! Bum ! Bah ! 
Clio ! Clio ! Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



Officers. 

Emma Loos, President. 

Elizabeth Stehman, .... Vice President. 

Sarah Helm Recordiyig Secretary. 

Sue Mover, Correspotiding Secretary. 

Lillian Schott, Critic. 

Rosa Reddick, Chaplain, 

May Hershey, Librarian. 

Edith Spangler Forum Editoress. 



80 



G. L. S. Roll. 



Miss Arabelle Batdorf, Miss Anna Kreider, Miss Lillian Kreider, 
Miss Reba Lehman, Miss Emma Batdorf, 

Miss Susie Moyer, 

Miss Emma Loos, Miss Elizabeth Stehman, 

Miss Aima Engle, Miss Lillian Schott, Miss Edith Spangler, 

Miss Sarah Helm, Miss Rosa Reddick, 

Miss Edith Myers, 

Miss Margaret Gray, 

Miss Nettie Lockeman, Miss Gertrude Bowman, 

Miss Kathryn Landis, Miss Lucy Slierk, Miss Ruth Hershey, 

Miss May Hershey, Miss Mary Zacliarias, 

Miss Valeria Heilman, 

Miss Ruth Leslie, Miss Lillie Burkey, 

Miss Bessie Englar, Miss Neta Englar, Miss Mary Stover. 



82 



History of C L,. S. 



mt 



^" ' "in'JJ HIRTY years have passed since the Clionian Literary Society 

of Lebanon Valley College was organized, through the 
influence of Miss Sarah Burns of the class of 1873. At the 
time of organization the membership was necessarily small, 
[€ii^Nii.iii^iiiiiiii|[iiil] because its privilege was limited to boarding students only. 
At first the weekly meetings of the Society were held in a small room 
in South College. This room was not furnished and had no library at all, 
but in a short time the ladies from town were admitted to membership 
and as the Society became larger the girls were given a hall in the same 
building. By great efforts which the girls made they succeeded in 
having the present hall comfortably furnished during the years 1876 and 
1879. The Society was especially indebted to Miss Althea Fink Merick, 
for the beautiful statue of Minerva which she presented to the Society, and 
also to Miss Sarah Burns who presented a bookcase and also the first 
books of the Library. The first Anniversary of the Society was held 
during Commencement Week of 1874, but in 1876 the time was changed 
to Thanksgiving Day, which is nearer the time of organization. 

Thanksgiving Day has been the Anniversary Da)' of the Clionian 
Society all these years. One of the most memorable events in its history 
was the celebration of the Quarto Centennial Anniversary held on 
November 26, 1896. 

The Society holds its meetings on the Friday evening of each week. 
Two evenings of each term are spent in joint session with the Kalozetean 
and Philokosmian Societies. The girls feel that their society work is 
one of the most helpful parts of their College work, and consequently 
make a great effort to have the weekly meetings as profitable as possible. 
May all members of the Clionian Literary Society be ever true to their 
motto: " Virtue et Fide." 



83 



Philokosmian, 



Colors : Motto. 

Gold and Blue. Esse quam vidert. 



Yell. 



Hobble gobble, razzle dazzle, L. V. C, 

Esse quam videri ; 

Hobble gobble, razzle dazzle, sis boom bah, 

Philokosmian, rah, rah, rah! 



Officers. 

D. M. Oyer President. 

M. KuYOOMjiAN, Vice President. 

C. G. DoTTER, Recording Secretary. 

W. C. Arnold, Corresponding Secretary. 

W. H. BuRD, Critic. 

C. A. SOLLENBERGER, .... Organist. 

C. H. Fisher, Cliaplain. 

D. M. Oyer Treasurer. 

M. O. Snyder, Janitor. 

W. R. KOHR Editor. 

P. P. Smith, Librarian. 



84 



Roster. 



G. H. Albright, 
H. H. Baish, 
C. E. Boughter, 
W. H. Burd, 
A. R. Clippinger, 
C. G. Dotter, 
R. L. Engle, 
C. H. Fisher, 
W. M. Grumbein, 
F. Heinaman, 
J. L,. Kreider, 
H. M. B. Lehn, 
T. F. Miller, 
W. O. Roop, 
J. I Shaud, 
W. A. Sites, 
M. O. Snyder, 
C. Thompson, 

C. A. 



W. R. Appenzellar, 

C. F. C. Becknieyer, 

D. D. Brandt, 

R. R. Butterwick, 
S. F. Daugherty, 
F. B Emenheiser, 
J. W. Esbenshade, 
E. S. Fenstermacher, 
R. B. Graybill, 

C. C. Herr, 

T. H. Kreider, 

K. M. Kuyoonijiaii, 

D. M. Oyer, 
W. S. Roop, 
A. J. Slieuk, 
P. P. Smith, 

C. A. Sollenberger, 

E. B. Ulrich, 
Weaver, H. H. 



W. C. Arnold, 
C. S. Bomberger, 
M. W. Brunner, 
C. W. Christman, 
U. J. Daugherty, 
J. R. Engle, 
P. F. Esbenshade, 
E. M. Gehr, 
J. B Hambright, 
A. L. House, 
W. R. Kohr, 
A. W. Miller, 
W. E. Reidel, 
W. R. Seibert, 
C. L Shuler, 
E Snyder, 
A. C. T. Sumner, 
C. W. Waughtel, 
Yohe. 



86 



History of the P. U.S. 



P 



[f W"'"'¥ ¥% HILOKOSMIANS may take a just pride in the annals of 

fj their history . 

l] The Society was organized May 6, 1867, the year that 

1] L. V. C. received its charter from the state of Pennsylvania, 

"iiirtii ii|iiiiiiiiii^iiilj and its power and influence have increased with the growth 

of the College. 

The membership of the society has steadily grown and 1901 finds 
four hundred and eighty nine names recorded, of which fifty six are act- 
ive members. Last year's Annual showed a membership of fifty four. 

We lost from the active roll seven graduates and eight undergradu- 
ates, and gained seventeen new men during the year. 

In the thirty four years of its existence the society has sent forth to 
battle in life a body of men of whom L. V. may well be proud, for they 
iiave attained to enviable positions in professional and business life. 

Although the chief object of the society is to give a literary training, 
yet, the business meetings afford a valuable experience, and arouse an in- 
terest probably as great as the literary sessions. 

Prior to 1876 the society did not have a proper meeting place, which 
was a great hindrance to growth and success. However in the autumn 
of that year the hall which we now occupy was secured and arranged for 
use. 

The society undertook the building of a hall a number of years ago ; 
sufiicient money had been subscribed for the erection of a suitable build- 
ing but the College authorities objected for varied reasons and the project 
was given up for the time. 

During last year the project was revived and judging from the prog- 
ress made and the loyalty of all Philos we have hope of possessing a home 
of our own, which will not only be a monument to the society but a credit 
to the institution . 



87 



Previous to 1878 the College did not have a reading room for the use 
of students. The society opened one which met the demands of the stu- 
dents. In 1898 the management was transferred to the College authorities 
upon request. 

In order to supply an imperative demand a lecture course was ar- 
ranged and presented to the public in 1 88 1 . The success of ttiis enterprise 
financially induced the facult3' to assume charge of its direction. Two 
years of failure caused it to revert to the P. L- S. and since 1884 the 
courses have been of high standard. Lectures and companies of national 
repute have contributed to the instruction and entertainment of the public 
and student body. 

In January, 1891, the College Forum, which had been edited and 
published by the faculty at a loss, was transferred to the society in recog- 
nition of its success in managing bnsiness enterprises. That the society 
has been able to overcome the difficulties incident to such a publication 
and to present to the friends of the College a paper worthy of perusal, has 
been clearly demonstrated during the past ten years. The Forum itselfis 
sufficent evidence of the wisdom of this change in management. 

The society owns a library of 895 volumes, fully catalogued. The 
books have been carefully selected from the world's best literature. At 
present the library is located in the basement of the main College buildine , 
but it will shortly be removed to a room in the Music Hall provided by 
the College authorities for the combined libraries of the College 

A department of Natural History originated in 1877, but not having 
a suitable room the idea was abandoned after a large collection of speci- 
ments had been made. The specimens are at present under the care of 
the Science department 

The manner in which the business interests of the society have been 
conducted in the past is a fair indication of what we may expect in the 
future. Esse qiiam videri, has been a guiding principle to lofty ideals and 
an incentive to noble action. With the increased and unprecedented 
prosperity of Lebanon Valley College we may well expect the scope of the 
society's work to widen and its influence to become a more powerful fac- 
tor in the culture and development of those who wish to make L V. C. 
their alma mater. 

Historian. 



Thirty= Fourth Anniversary. 



Friday Evening May 3, 1901. 



Hannah's Promenade, Ellis. 

Orchestra. 

INVOCATION. 

Wedding of the Wind's waltzes, Hall. 

Orchestra. 
President's Address, Morris W. Brunner. 

Salome, Lorraine. 

Orchestra. 
Debate — Resolved : That in form and operation the government 
of the United States is superior to that of England. 
Affirmative : Negative : 

H. H. Baish, W. H. Burd, 

Thos. F. Miller, S. F. Daugherty 

Flag Dance, Tobani. 

Orchestra. 

Honorary OraTiox— The True Ideal, Rev. A. A. Long, A. M. 
Decision of Debate. 

Judges: G. M. D. Eckels, A. M., Sc. D., 

Ira L. Bryner, A. M., 

Hon. John S. Arnold. 

Mosquito's Parade, Whitney. 

Orchestra. 

MUSIC BY KURZENKNABE'S ORCHESTRA HARRISBURG. 



89 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vol. XIV, APRIL, 1901. No. 2. 

STAFF: 

William H. Burd, 'ci. 'oi. Editor-in Chief. 

ASSOCIATE : 

William O. Roof, 'oi. Charles W. Christman, '03. 

W. Ralph Appenzellar, '(4. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS: 

S. F. Daugherty, '01, Chief. 

W. C. Arnold, '03, Assistant. C. H. Fisher, '04, Assistant 

The College Forum is published monthly by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
of Lebanon Valley College. 

The College Forum will be forwarded to all subscribers until an order is received for 
its discontinuance, and all arrearages have been paid. Address all business communica- 
tions to S. F. Daugherty, Business Manager, Box 184, Annville, 1 a. 



TERMS :— Fifty Cents Per Year. Single Copy, id Cts. 
Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as si cond-class mail matter. 

EDITORIAL. 



The spring term of Lebanon Valley College opening Wednes- 
day, March 27, under very favorable conditions. It will be grat- 
ifying to the friends of the college to know that the rapid progress 
which has strongly characterized this institution during recent 
years continues in every department. Increasing appreciation 
throughout the country of the work done here is being manifested 
by the number of new students which steadily increases each 
term. A score or more new names appear on the college regis- 
ter since the opening of the present term, of students desiring to 
do regular college work, while nearh' a hundred strange faces may 
be seen in the corridors daily, faces of those who are here pursu- 
ing the normal course which has this term been newly connected 
with the college. To old students returning to their alma mater, 
unusual appearances would present themselves. The Dining 
Hall is now three times daily filled to its greatest capacity, which 
is a condition never existing before in the history of the Hall. 
These indications are very pleasing to the friends of the institu- 
tion and at the same time we feel that the high standing which 
the school now occupies fully warrants every success. 
90 



Kalozetean. 



Colors : Motto : 

Red and Old Gold. Palma non sine Pulvere. 



Veil. 

Wah hoo ! Wah hoo ! 

Rah ! Rah ! Ree. 

'Palraa non sine Pulvere." 

Wah hoo ! Wah hoo ! 

Rah! Rah! Ree! 

Kalozetean, L. V. C. 



Officers. 

C. R. Engle, President. 

R. C. SCHAEFFER, Vice President. 

C. E. Shenk Recording Secretary. 

R. K. BuFFiNGTON, Correspov,din^ Secretary. 

C. A. Fisher, Censor. 

D. J. Cowling Critic. 

C. E. RouDABUSH Chaplain. 

R. M. Hendricks, Librarian. 

W. J. Sanders, Editor to Forum. 

E. E. Erb Sergeant-at-Arms . 

I. F. Loos, Organist. 

C. E. Shenk, Prophet. 



92 



Membeps of K. L». S. 



E. M. Balsbaugh, D. D. Buddinger, R. K. Buffington, 

D. J. Cowling, L. E. Cross, 

I. J. Deitzler, 
S. H. Derickson, M. E. Donough, C. R. Engle, 

E. E. Erb, C. A. Fisher, 

J. H. Graybill, 

H. M. Hartz, R. M. Hendricks, I. M. Hershey, 

I. F. Loos, H. M. Moyer, 

G. E. Reiter, 

H. W. Rhoad, S. E. Rupp, C. E. Roudabush, 

W. J. Sanders. F. L. Scott, 

R. C. Schaeffer, 
J. M. Sheesley, C. E. Shenk, R. S. Showers 

M. W. Smeltzer, A. G. Smith, 

Walter Straj-er. 



93 



Kalo. Prophecies. 



|»|||||"""¥"""iiiii'l] ROM its organization in 1876 to the present time the Kaloze- 
ff _^% j] tean literary Society has held a prominent place among the 
1 "Vr jj literary organizations of the College. All its members are 
C *i^ Jj taking active part in its Literary work, and many by their 

iiiii;|iii Aiiiiiijl^iiilj literary talents and genius are continually in the eyes of the 

public. The growth of the Society during the past year has been encou- 
raging and the interest manifest in its work, lively. But as history is not 
the province of the present writer, but forecasting it, rather his business, 
he begs that what little has preceeded will be considered as but introduc- 
tory. 

In about twenty years Mr. Cowling will visit his son 'Daniel' at 
Lebanon Valley College ; methinks he must find him as well as every 
other student, a Kalo, snugly occupying a magnificently furnished Hall, 
in the Engle Conservatory. 

Mr. A. G. Smith, a present senior, will, after graduation enter the 
Ministry, for want of a better job, or may be for the full purpose of per- 
forming marriage ceremonies. We hope all members will patronize him, 
and besides feel sure if this be done, his financial success will be greatly 
enhanced . 

Twenty five years have now passed since with much amusement the 
sonorous 'snores' of Edwin Rupp struck our auditory nerve. Mr. Rupp, 
who, for some time had been attempting to reach the moon, finally and 
strange to say by an invention of his own succeeded in reaching that 
satellite. He states that he slept there one night, and futher affirms that 
it is very 'moonlight' and that the earth appears to be quite near. 

C. R. Engle, who some ago time purchased a spade, with the inten- 
tion of digging a short route to China, recently found a 'Bow' and for 
some time since has been rounding himself into a 'Bowman' with a view 
to vie with Cupid in archery. But we are sorry to state that with 
prophetic vision we see him, because of his duplicity, make a complete 
failure of both enterprises. 

J. M. Hershey has taken the first successful trip in a flying machine, 
ever taken by man. Leaving his home one afternoon nothing was heard 
of him for two years, when he was found in jail in South Australia. 
His long absence in voluntary rather than forced, and his reason for his 

94 



continued stay is, that he has found his proper sphere, and because of 
his congenial and synipathetic surroundings, he shall make a cell his 
future abode. 

Elmer Erb has been canvassing the state soliciting funds for a new 
institution to be organized at Hockersville. This is intended to be a 
school where will be taught Shorthand, Bookkeeping, Spooning, Farming 
and Blacksmithing. The last trade will be reduced to a science and we 
have no doubt many noted trotters of Lebanon Valley will be sent there 
to be shod. 

Mr. S. H. Derickson the great Botanist is comparing the plant life 
of the earth with that of mars. 

R. K. Buflfington left his home one day, and nothing was heard of 
him for sixteen years. When he did return he brought with him several 
million dollars. Tiiere is no definite knowledge as to how he secured 
this vast sum, but it is feared he made it in some 'Pedro' joint. Even 
his father is a little suspicious about it. 

Dr. Schaeffer has made himself famous for quickly curing diseases. 
One of his chief methods is hypnotic suggestion, and being unmarried 
his greatest success is achieved among the young ladies. 

Harry Mover the great scientist and inventor, has recently dis- 
covered that the mind of man may be transferred to the skull of an 
animal, with a result that the animal will immediately talk ani think. 
While this is generally true he has found an exception, refening to the 
last named result, in the c ise of Mr. S leesley's brain. When it was 
placed in the skull of a jackass the beast immeditately expired. 

Roudabush and Donough were busy delivering campaign speeches 
throughout the country in 1924, for the Presidential and Vice Presidential 
Candidates Bryan and Scott. By the oratory of these men Mr. Bryan's 
political aspirations were as nearly realized as in 1900. It is now 
rumored that Donough has been promised a Cabinet position, by Bryan, 
for "stumping" the country in 1928. 

M. W. Smeltzer is leader in dress reform in New York City. All 
the fashions of the sporting world are copied after him. Since he is in 
New York the center of fashion has been referred from Paris to that 
place. 

L. E. Cross has left for Utah, settled among the Mormons, and even 
at this early advice is the husband of six wives. 

I. F. Loos has been representing Lebanon Vallc}' College by his 
wonderful musical ability. Mr. Loos is well known over all Lebanon 
and Berks Counties as a musician. 

95 



Fisher and Graybill are the champion prize fighters of the world. 
Fisher worsted Graybill in several successive rounds but the latter won a 
decided victory in the twentieth round. 

R. S. Showers has started an Elocutionary School in his native city. 
Mr Showers is an expert elocutionist, having taken a special course at 
Lebanon Valley. His work was considerably hindered recently by the 
elopement of his wife. Before her demise she secured all prepaid tuition 
handy, and took besides, part of her husband's voice as a sample of her 
former success. 

W. J. Sanders has recently discovered a large island near the North 
Pole, which will probably be named in the honor of its discoverer. A 
delegation of Kalos will be sent to inhabit it, as well as other congenial 
company, for it is rumored that the gentleman is tired of his wanderings 
and solitude. 

D. D. Buddinger is famous for being the most skillful clairvoyant 
ever sent out by the Kalo Society. He at one time had a communication 
with Hendricks, who says he has a good time over there and invites all 
other Kalos to join him. He states further that Reiter and Rhoad are 
there also, and never tire of speaking of the times spent in the Kalo Hall. 
At this juncture Hendricks excused himself, stating that the 'Old Man' 
wanted him ; Mr. Hartz coming in at this time and hearing the final 
remarks, requested that the whole story be related to him. 

Prophet. 



96 



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pssociatioi^s. 



^;iiii»«iijiiiMiii|iii«»iii|lii i|iii»»iiijiii«iiiijjii»»iiij|iin«ii|J|iiiiiiiijj|i iiij|ii«iNiiJ|iii iJ]iiiiiiiiijjii»iiiijj|iiiiiiiijjjiiii«ii|||iiiiiiiijjjiiiiiiiijjiiiiniiijjjiiiiNii^ iiiiliiwiiilliiiiiiijjir 



Y. W. C. A. 



Elizabeth Stehman, .... President. 

Edith Myers, Vice Presidc7it. 

Emma Loos, Recording Secretary. 

Edith Myers, Corresponding Secretary. 

Reba Lehman, Treasurer. 



Social Committee. 

Reba Lehman, Lillie Kreider, 

Nettie Lockeman. 



Missionary Committee. 

Sue Moyer, Edith Myers, 

Rosa Reddick. 



Bible Study Committee. 

Miss Wolfe, Sue Moyer. 



Devotional Committee. 

Reba Lehman, Emma Loos, 

Sue Moyer. 



Membership Committee. 

Edith Myers, Rosa Reddick, 

Margaret Gray. 



Membeps Y. W. G. A. 



Reba Lehman, Sue Moyer, Lillian Kreider, 

M. Etta Wolfe, Alma Engle, 

Elizabeth Stehman, 

Edith Myers, Mary Zacharias, 

Emma Loos, Rosa Reddich, Kathryn M. Landis, 

Margaret Gray, Nettie Lockeman, 

Jennie Vallerchamp. 

Delegates to Northfield. 

Reba Lehman, Sue Moyer, Elizabeth Stehman. 



99 



Y. W. G. A. and Y. M. G. A. 



'f'¥"""¥"""¥|fl WO of the most important organizations of the institution are 
'^ -^. /I the Y. W. and the Y. M. C. A. 

7F j1 The Y. M. C. A. was organized in 1881 with I. W. 

^^ i\ Sneath as president It was not until five years later that 
iii'l^iii'iiii^B.'iiii'^Niiij the young women of the college seeing the need of a similar 
organization, organized the Y. W. C. A. on October 14, 1888, Miss Mary 
Erisman having the honor of being elected the first president. 

These two organizations have been gradually growing and the inter- 
est in them has been increasing until today they are two of the leading 
organizations of the college and a mighty influence for good to all who 
come in contact with them. 

Each of the associations holds a weekly prayer meeting and once a 
month they meet in joint session, to discuss difl^erent phases of missionary 
work. They are both intensely interested in missionary work, and while 
most of the work of each association is done independently of the other 
yet along the missionary line they have united their efibrts and are edu- 
cating a boy in Africa 

The Y. W. C. A. had three representatives, Miss Lehman, Miss 
Moyer, and Miss Stehman, at Northfield during the Summer conference 
of '00. Mr. Oyer, Mr. Baish, Mr. Yohe and Mr. Esbenshade were sent 
as delegates for the Y. M. C. A. 

We hope the present condition of these two associations is only the 
beginning of a glorious future, and that they will continue to be a blessing 
to the lives of all who come under their influence. 



Y. M. G. A. 



D. M. Oyer, President. 

J. W. ESBENSHADE, .... Vice President. 

D. J. Cowling, Secretary. 

W. C. Arnold, Treasurer. 



Devotional Committee. 

S. F. Daugherty, W. C. Arnold, 

R. S. Showers. 



Missionary Committee. 

J. W. Esbenshade, C. W. Christman, 

A. W. Miller. 



Membership Committee. 

D. J. Cowling, C. W. Waughtel, 

A. L. House. 



Bible Study Committee. 

H. H. Baish, R. R. Butterwick. 



Social Committee. 

H. H. YoHE, W. H. Burd, 

H. H. Baish. 



Members Y. M. G. A. 



W. C. Arnold, A. R. Clippinger, S. F. Daugherty, 

C. W. Waughtel, J. W. Esbenshade, 

A. C. T. Sumner, 

K. Kiiyoonijian D. M. Oyer, 

H. H. Baish, H. U. Roop, R. R. Butterwick, 

C. A. Sollenberger, D. J. Cowling, 

H. L. Eichinger, 

J. E. Lehman, U. J. Daugherty, 

F. B. Emenheiser, A. L. House, Max Snyder, 

C. W. Christman, C. H. Fisher, 

Ed Beckmeyer, 

Frank Heinaman, W. R. Appenzellar, 

R. S. Showers, S. H. Derrickson, Emanuel Snyder, 

T. F. Miller, P. T. Esbenshade, 

J. T. Spangler, 

J. B. Hambright, W. E. Reidel, 

R. K. Buffington, H. H. Yohe, E. M. Gehr, 

T. A. Lawson, H. E. Enders, 

N. C. Schlicter, 
A. \V. Miller, H. H. Shenk, 

W. H. Burd. 



Delegates to Northfield. 

H. H. Baish, D. M. Oyer, J. W. Esbenshade, 

H. H. Yohe. 



Senior Rhetorical. 



First Division. 



Saturday Evening, Dec. 8, 1900. 



Piano Solo— Soaring, Schumann. 

Sue Moyer; 
Life's Ilkisions, Edwin M. Balsbaugh. 

The Pennsylvania German, Emma F. Loos. 

"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,,' William H. Burd. 

Vocal Duet — I Live and Love Thee, Ca»ipana. 

Bessie Englar, Carrie Dunkle. 
The Reward of Vice, 
The Reward of Virtue, 
The Sublime in Astranomy, 
"Honore et Lahore," 
Piano Solo— Air de Ballet, 

Neta Englar. 
The Power of Thought, 
Man's Pilot, 

Woman in Man's Sphere, 
Piano Solo — Nocturne, 

Mary Zacharias 



Lewis E. Cross. 

Henry H. Baish. 

Frank B. Euienheiscr. 

Thomas F. Miller. 

Chaiiiinade. 

William O. Roop. 

S. Edwin Rupp. 

Cyrus W. Waughtel. 

Chopiti. 



104 




$111 

VffC 



Senior Rhetorical, 



Second Division. 



Saturday Evening, Dec. 15, 1900. 



Organ Solo — Phantom March, 

Prof. H. Oldham. 

INVOCATION. 

"Carpe diem" 

The Unity of the Human Mind, 

"Tekel," 

Piano Solo — Nocturne, 

Kathryn Landis. 
Appreciation of Liberty, 
"The Man in the Moon," 
A Silent Revolution, 
Vocal Solo — Intermezzo, 

Anna Kreider. 
John Sherman, 
Evangeline, 
Our Nation's Growth, 
Piano Solo— Valse Styrinne, 

Lillie Kreider. 



R. R. Butterwick. 

M. W. Brunner. 

S. F. Daugherty. 

Chopin. 

Karnig Kuyoomjian, 

D. M. Oyer. 

Sue F. Moyer. 

Delibes. 

Wm. S. Roop. 
A. G. Smith. 
H. H. Yohe. 
Wollenhaupt. 



1 06 



Junior Rhetorical. 



First Division. 



Saturday Evening February i6, 1901, 



Piauo Solo — Polonaise, 



INVOCATION. 

Rulh Leslie. 



Chopin. 
Rulh Leslie. 

Ideal Manhood, D. J. Cowling. 

Queen Victoria, W. A. Sites. 

Piano Solo — Frisches Grun, Spindler. 

Lillie Burkej'. 

True Nobility, J. Lehn Kreider. 

What We All Want, T. A. Lawson. 

Vocal Solo— Doris, Nevin. 

Mary Zacharias. 

The Age of Mystery, C. C. Gohn. 

Africa in History, A. C. T. Sumner. 

Piano Solo, — March des Tambours, S»iith. 

Isaac Loos. 



107 



Junior Rhetorical. 



Second Division. 



Saturday Evening March 2, 1901. 



INVOCATION. 



Piano Solo, 



Polonaise, Op. 25, 
Gertrude Bowman. 



An Analysis of the Heart 
Sabbath Observance, 
Piano Solo, 

Sir Arthur Sullivan 

Coal, 

Vocal Solo, 



Polonaise, Op. 40, 
Lucy Sherk. 



Still As The Night, 
Nettie Lockenian. 
The Negro Dialect in Literature, 
Development of the State, 
Piano Solo, Polonaise, Op. 53, 

Charlotte Miller. 



Chopin. 

S. H. Dericksou. 

D. D. Buddinger. 

Chopin. 

A. W. Miller. 

G. H. Albright. 

Bohni. 

C. R. Eugle. 

W. J. Sanders. 

Chopin. 



loS 



Junior Banquet. 



Hotel Eagle, Friday, February 22, ipoi. 



Guests of the Class, 
Toastniaster 



Members of 'oi. 
D. J. Cowling '02. 



"The Father of His Country, 

'•Sanhedriu," 

"The Jockey," 

"Puellae," 

"Class Spirit," 

"Pueri" 

"Auf wieder sehn" 



G. H. Albright, '02. 
L. E. Cross, 'oi. 
A. G. Smith, '01. 
H. H. YOHE, '01. 
W. H. BURD, '01. 
Sue Mover, 'oi. 
W. J. Sanders, '02. 



COMMITTEE, 

W. J. Sanders, Chairman. 

D. J. Cowling, S. H. Derickson. 



109 



Twenty=Ninth Anniversary 



Clionian Literary Society. 



Thursday Evening, Nov. 29, 1901. 



Duet — La Baladiue, Lysberg. 

Lucy Sherk, Nettie Lockeman. 

INVOCATION. 

Piano Solo — Octave Study, Kitllah. 

Arabelle Batdorf. 
President's Address, Sue Moyer. 

Vocal Solo— L'lticantatrice, Arditi. 

Anna Kreider. 
Oration — "Harvest of a Quiet Eye," Emma Loos. 

Duet- Rbapsodie Hungrosie, Liszt. 

Sue Moyer, Elizabeth Stehman. 
Oration — Rowing, not Drifting, Edith Spangler. 

Solo— Spring is Only Love, G}-anglo]J. 

Reba Lehman. 
Critique — "Wild Animals I Have Known," Thompson. 

Elizabeth Stehman. 
Vocal Trio— Ah ! Lovely Night, Fabl. 

Lillie Kreider, Emma Batdorf, Kathryn Landis. 
Honorary Oration — "The Circle Complete," Estelle Stehman. 

Chorus — Serenade, Schubert. 



Twenty=fourth Anniversary 



Kalozetean Literary Society, 



Friday Evening, April 5, 1901, 



La Sainte Vierge, 


Gustave Lange. 


March Grand Entre', 


Scull. 


INVOCATION. 




Pizzicata Polka, 


Strauss. 


President's Address, 


C. R. Engle. 


Valse Suite, No. 2, 


Weaver. 


Oration — Idealism , 


D. J. Cowling. 


Violin Solo, 


Selected. 


Miss Elizabeth Johnson. 




Oration — Name Making, 


C. E. Roudabush. 


Dance of the Cotton Dollies, 


Scull. 


Dissertation — Star-Dust and Life, 


L. E. Cross. 


Saxophone Solo, 


Selected. 


Mr. J. J. Scull. 




Oration— "Put Up Thy Sword," 


A. G. Smith. 


Concert Galop — Fire Alarm, 


Lhicotn. 



CONSERVATORY COMMENCEMENT. 



Monday Evening, June 11, 1900. 



Organ, Prelude, Merkel. 

Prof. H. Oldham. 

Voice, (a) Sacred Love, Liszt. 

(b) Resolution, Lassen. 

Lillie Kreider. 

Piano, Octave Study, G. Liebing. 

Edna Groff. 

Piano, "Rouet d'Oniphale," Saint-Saens 

Annie Kreidar. 

(Second piano, H. Oldham.) 

Voice, "Angel's Anthem," Schnecker. 

Lillie Kreider. 
Piano, Tarantelle, Thalberg. 

Lena Owens. 

Piano, Polonaise, Op. 22, Chopin. 

Arabelle Batdorf. 

[Organ, H. Oldham.) 

Voice, E- Strano'Poter, ''Faust." 

Lillie Kreider. 

Conferring of Degrees, 

President H. U. Roop. 

Quintette, Hymn of Praise,Syniphony, Mendelssohn. 

Lena Owens, Arabelle Batdorf, Anna Kreider, Edna Groff, 

(Organ, H. Oldham.) 



Class Day Exercises. 



Wednesday, June 13, 1900. 



Instrumental Quartette, 

Lillian G. Kreider, 
Edna E. GrofF, 

President's Address, 

Optimist, 

Pessimist, 

Vocal Solo, 

Poem, 

Prophecy, 

Dutch Address, 

Instrumental Duet, 

Lillian G. Kreider, 

Class Oration, 

Wilier, 

Chronicles of Ages, 

Auctioneer, 

Vocal Solo, 

History, 

Calendar of 1901, 

Brotherly Presentation, 

Preseutation to Girls, 

Presentation to Boys, 

Presentation to Juniors, 

Response, 

Class Song, 

Ivy Oration, 



Lena M. Owens, 
Annie E- Kreider. 

Charles E. Snoke. 

Enid Daniel. 

Ralph Donald Reider. 

Rel a F. Lehman. 

H. E. Spessard. 

Fred Weiss Light. 

D. E. Long. 

Lena M. Owens. 

Adam K. Wier. 

Seth A. Light. 

G. Mason Snoke. 

Rene D. Burtner. 

Annie E- Kreider. 

Alvin E. Shroyer. 

Nellie P. BuiBngton. 

Ross Nissley. 

Clyde J. Saylor. 

C. Madie Burtner. 

Nora E. Spayd. 

Sue E. Moyer. 

Oren G. Myers 



113 



Commencement Exercises. 



Thursday, June 14, 1900. 



Music, Orchestra. 

INVOCATION. 

Music, Orchestra. 
Coimiieiiceinent Oration, Dr. Elias Hershey Sneath. 

Music, Orchestra. 
Presentation of Diplomas and Conferring of Degrees. 

Music, Orchestra. 



114 



Athletic Association. 



Officers. 

H. U. Roop President, (ex-officio ) 



Chas. Fisher, 

S. H. Derickson, . 

C. W. Christman, . 

W. C. Arnold, . . 



. P?eside}it. 

. Vice President. 

. Secretary. 

. Treasurer. 



Executive Committee. 

Prof. B. F. Daugherty, Prof. J. T. Spangler, 

A. C. M. Hiester, Dr. E. B. Marshall, 

Ray Miller, H. O. Nutting, 

T. J. Barr. 



ii6 



Base Ball Season of '00. 



ff '111' m fl S a result of the creditable work done by the base-ball team of 

[l f^^ Ij the last season Lebanon Valley has been able not only to 
fl Til il maintain her former high standing in this department of 
[s ^'^ j\ Athletics, but against odds to raise it above that held by her 



[fiiii||[iii«iiil[iiiriii^iiiilj sister and even larger institutions. Through the efiBcient 
coaching of Mr. Clemens, the effective pitching of our star twirler Mr. 
Winter and the all around good work of the team, some of the best teams 
in the collegiate ranks bowed to the inevitable and bit the dust. 

However the opening of the season was not as auspicious as the most 
sanguine had hoped. The first game was played with Ursinus at College- 
ville with a resulting score of i6 to 14 against ns. This defeat, by no 
means overwhelming, was probal ly due to an accident which befell Mr. 
Fisher in the early stage of the game, forcing his retirement, and subse- 
quently disabling him for the entire season. We were extremely fortu- 
nate, for the remainder of the season, in having so able a base- ball general 
as Mr. Clemens, succeed him. 

On Friday, April 13, we crossed bats with Yale Law School on the 
home grounds. This team visited us, while on a tour of the eastern Uni- 
ted States and prior to this stop with us had been without exception vic- 
torious, among others vanquishing the 'crack' Albright Collegiate team. 
But here the tide of success was turned to defeat, the home team winning 
in a well earned game, with a score of 8 to 7. 

Five days later the Carlisle Ind'ans made an attack on Annville, with 
a view to add nine scalps to their trophies, before 'shaking' the town. 
But disappointment must came some time, even to a 'red -skin', for the 
game of only five innings duration, played in a drizzling rain, resulted in 
a score of 4 to 4. 

Saturday, April 28, found the best team Franklin and Marshall was 
able to ship on the home diamond, 'sizing' up the 'ranch' and remarking 
on what an 'easy' problem they had to solve. But alas ! after a one sided 
and uninteresting game the official score showed a total of 10 to i against 
them. Let us make a sad story short. 

117 



Oil May 12, the home team needing a little practice, played with a 
Lebanon organization and ran up a score of 1 8 to 6. 

May 23 marks the second departure of the team and with it one of the 
greatest victory of the season. In open day light we attacked the In- 
dians, in their own quarters, Carlisletown, and gave them a decided de- 
feat to the tune of 8 to 4. The band even stopped playing in the eighth 
inning, and the 'squaws' refused to flirt with the pale faces on the grand- 
stand. How the team found its way home we are unable to say. 

However on May 26, the last straggler returned and just for fun, 
Reading Y. M. C. A. was tendered a 'goose egg' for its aspirations, the 
other score showing a margin of 22. 

In rapid succession the three remaining games of the season were 
played, in two of which, one by Susquehanna at Harrisburg, June i, with 
• a score of 7 to 15, the other by Villa Nova, at Annville, June 8, with a 
score of 6 to 12, we were worsted. The final game was played at Ann- 
ville on June 14, with Susquehanna, resulting, because of the determina- 
tion of our boys to end the season in triumph, with a victory and a score 
of 7 to 3. 



£s£ 



118 



The '00 Base Ball Team. 



Manager — H. H. Shenk. 



Captain — C. Fisher. 



Speraw, c. Winter, p. Fenstermacher, s. s. 

Albright, i b. Clemens, 2 b. 

Shenk, 3 b. 

HoUenbaugh, r. f. Wier, c. f. 

Snoke, 1. f. 

Sub. Gray. Fisher disabled succeeded by Clemens. 





1 
Games Played. 




Date. 






Place. 


Score. 


April 7. L. 


V. vs. Ursinus, 




Collegeville, 


14 — 16 


" 13- 


" " Yale Law School, 


Annville, 


8- 7 


" 18. 


" " Indians,* 




" 


4— 4 


" 28. 


" F. and M., 




" 


10 — I 


May 12. 


" Lebanon, 




" 


18— 6 


" 23. 


" " Indians, 




Carlisle, 


8- 4 


" 26 


' " Reading Y. M. 


C. A., 


Annville, 


22 — 


June I. 


" Susquehanna, 




Harrisburg, 


7— 15 


8. 


" " Villa Nova, 




Annville, 


6— 12 


" 14- 


' " Susquehanna, 


Tota 




7— 3 
104 68 



Games won, 6; Lost 3; Tie i. (* Rain, five innings.) 



119 



Foot Balfi Season of '00. 



^'i|i""""i "iiii'|J1hE foot ball history of Lebanon Valley is comparatively short. 

[ff Am^ Jj Our first indulgence in this college sport dates but four years 
[i C\ j1 back and concerning the recor.ls made in this brief period 
A ^"^ l1 many praiseworthy instances may be cited. Adverse criti- 
[Cii^iiiiji^iii iiii^NBl] cism, however, will attempt to show you that there has been 
a falling off in the work of the team of the season just past, but that this 
statement is groundless we need but to refer you to the 'oo record follow- 
ing. Upon comparison with the '99 record in lest years' Bizarre ycu 
will note that the schedule is a much stronger one, sab-^tituting such well 
known aggregations as the Carlisle Indians. P. R. R. Y. M. C. A., 
of Philadelphia, Gettysburg and others, for the weaker teams heretoiore 
played. Again, remember that in the present schedule one more game 
was played than by any previous team, and despite these odds, the score 
column foots 85 points for L. V. to 133 by opponents as against 79 to 14S 
on last years tally sheets, leaving a margin of 21 points in excess of last 
years record. This exposition of the relative merits of the two teams is 
made to show some pessimistic prodigies the error of their way, and to 
assure the team that the noble efforts it put forth for the Blue and White 
are appreciated, at least by those who are competent to judge 

The first four weeks of the season were devoted to hard prrctice un- 
der the coaching of Jack Hedges, U. of P's famous end. In this time, 
and against odds such as only a University man can appreciate, he suc- 
ceeded in whipping into form a team, which in a first practice game on 
Sept. 15, ran up a score of 33 to o against the strong Harrisburg High 
School team, which in previous years we defeated by a margin of but six 
points. But this was not the crucial test of his work. One week later 
his proteges meet in conflict, in Carlisle, with the famous Indian team, 
and in a game of twenty minute halves, played such foot ball as to 
astound the 'red-skins', and give them for their trouble a score of but 34. 

To the regret of every student our efficient and congenial coach in 
the following week, left for Philadelphia, his duties at the University 
making his presence there imperative. 



October 6, found the team in Philadelphia, in our first game with the 
P. R. R. Y. M. C. A , in strength second only to U. of P's team of the 
same city. The hot weather made the 'playing' in the truest sense of the 
word, worii, and this hard fought contest ended with a score of i6 to o, 
in favor of the rail road boys. 

On the following Saturday, Oct. 13, the most interesting and bitterly 
contested game of the season, was played on the home gridiron. The 
Franklin and Marshall team with a large contingent, arrived in the morn- 
ing, and during the early hours of the afternoon large crowds from Leba- 
non and the neighboring towns gathered on the College campus. The 
game is on, F. and M. is demoralized by the terrific plunges through her 
veteran line and the telling gains made around her swift ends. The ball 
is in mid- field and, by hard playing and good head work, within fifteen 
minutes after play opened, the pig skin is planted, under her goal posts. 
Before the half closes she retiliates and at the end of the half the score is 6 to 
6, both goals having been kicked. The latter half opens with the same 
characteristic spirit as the former. All that brain and muscle is capable 
of, is utilized in this final struggle for victory. Defeat is not disgraceful 
but nevertheless galling, especially when victory depends on the possess- 
ion of only a few patry yards of mother earth. But a few minutes are left 
for play and the ball is in our territory, in our possession. A signal, a 
piSS, a fumble — that word in foot ball parlance which causes thousands to 
groan as in agony — and a touchdown for our opponents ends the game, 
with a score of 12 to 6. 

On Oct. 20, the home team played at Collegeville with Ursinus and 
suffered defeat. Score 16 to o. 

Muhlenberg the next team on the schedule arrived in 'Annwille,' 
Saturday, Oct. 27, in lively hopes of victor}'. But these developed into 
morbid anticipations, towards the close of the first half, at what the final 
score against them would be. We left them 'down easy' and sent them 
home rejoicing with a score of 36 to o in our favor. 

In Steelton, Nov. 3, with the Y. M. C. A. of that place, we rendered 
much to the delight of the spectators and much to our chagrin, a serio- 
comic show of how not to play foot-ball. The boys forgot to remember 
the score but after much trouble we learned it from an uninterested party 
by telegram. 

With the three remaining games, York Y. M. C. A., at York, score 
10 to o in favor of the Blue and White, Susquehanna University, at Sel- 
ings Grove, score 17 to o, and Gettysburg, at Gettysburg, score 22 to o, 
this checkered season closed. 



First Team. 

T. F. Miller, Manager. Chas. A. Fisher, Captain. 

Jack Hedges, Coach. 



NAME. 


WEIGHT. 


HEIGHT. 


AGE. 


GAMES. 


Miller, c. . 


174 


5-9>^ 


25 


no 


Yohe, r. g. 






177 


5-^oyi 


23 


8 


W. Roop, r. t. . 






170 


6 


22 


10 


Balsbaugh, r. e. 






151 


5-7 


23 


9 


Roudabush, r. h. b. 






135 


5-6>^ 


21 


7 


Fisher, q. b. 






154 


59^ 


25 


6 


Gra)', f. b. 






179 


5-9j^ 


26 


10 


House, 1. g. 


• 




165 


5-8 


26 


10 


E. S. Rupp, 1. t. 






165 


5-9 


22 


ID 


Cowling, 1. e. 






152 


5-8^ 


21 


7 


Showers, 1. h. b. 






163 


5 10 


20 


6 


SUBS. 










Sheesley, t. 


160 


5-9'A 


IC) 


6 


Albright, h. b. . 






130 


bAV^ 


22 


6 


Oyer, e. 






145 


5.6 


24 


5 


Fenstermacher. q. b. 






132 


5-8 


20 


4 


Brunner, e. 






151 


5 lyi 


27 


3 


Shaffner, t. 






175 


5.10 


23 


3 


C. Engle, h.b. . 






148 


5-9 


20 


3 


Gohn, e. 






148 


5-9 


22 


3 


Snyder, g. 






220 


5-9% 


17 


2 


Dietzler, t. 






160 


5.10 


17 


2 


Smith, g. . 






170 


5-6 


20 


I 



Games Played. 



Date. 


Sept. 


15- 


Sept. 


22. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


13- 


Ojt. 


20. 


Oct. 


27. 


Njv. 


3- 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


17- 


Nov. 


24. 



Place. Score. 

L. V. zv. Harrisburg High School, Aiinville, 33 — 

L. V. vs. Indians, Carlisle, 

L. V. vs. P. R. R. Y. M. C. A. 

L V. vs. Franklin and Marshall, 

L,. V. vs. Ursinus, 

L,. V. vs. Miihlenburg, 

L. V. vi. Stiilton Y. C. A., 

h. V. vs. York Y. M. C. A., 

L. V. vs. Susquehanna University, Selins Grove, o — 17 

L. V. vs. Gettysburg, Gettysburg, o — 22 



o— 34 

Philadelphia, o — 16 

Annville, 6 — 12 

CoUegeville, o — 16 

Annville, 36 — o 

Steelton, o — 26 

York, 10 — o 



Total, 
Games won, 3; Lost, 7. 



85—133 



124 




im^'^iS^^^- '.- ^^d^!^Jsi>'^:k>S<^''" ^,<^<y{i^\3^ 



CAMPUS SCENES. 



Second Team. 



Manager — A. L. Hou5E. Captain — 3. H. Albright. 

R. Engle, c Smith, 1. g. Baisli, r. g. 

Derickson, 1. t. Kreider, r. t. 

E. Roop, 1. e. 

Gohn, r. e. Kohr, 1. h. b. Albright, r. h. b. 

C. Engle, f. b. Sanders, q. b. 



Substitutes. 

Hendricks, e. Becknieyer, e. SchaefFer, q. b. 

Raab f, b, SoUenberger, g. 

Karuig g. 



Games Played. 

Dale. P/acc. Score. 

Sept. 29. L. V. vs. Lebanon Y. M, C. A., Annville, o — 5 

Oct. 24. " " Lebanon High School, " 42 — o 

Nov. 23. " " " " " Lebanon, 35 — o 

Total, 77 5 



126 




EVERY MAN'S GOAL 



This sketch was abstracted from our Artists' private collection and represents 
theni at their favorite pastime. 



Tennis. 



Racquet Tennis Glub. 

Officers and Members. 

N. C. SCHLICHTER, P/Tsidf/i/. H. H. Baish, Secretary. 

R. W. Appenzellar, P)operly Man. D. M. Oyer, Treasurer. 

J. W. Esbenshade, T. G. McFadden. 



Bison Tennis Glub. 

Officers and IVlembeps. 

T. W. Gray, President. D. J. Cowling, Secretary. 

C. A. Fisher, Treasurer. Bert Oldham, Manager. 

R. C. Schaeffer. E. F. Beckmever, 

E. C. Roop, ■ F. L. Scott, 

W. J. Sanders. 



Olympian Tennis dub. 

Officers and IVIembers. 

Park F. Esbenshade, President. D. D. Brandt, Secretary. 

R. K. BuFFiNGTON, Vice President. C. W. Christman, Treasurer. 

R. M. Hendricks, A. W. Miller. 

128 



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^;fi««iii|ii««iii|iii««iii|iii««iii|Siiii«ii|iiwiii|S ii|iii»«ii|5ii»«i||[ii ii[iiii»«ii[|iii«iiii[5ii»iii|ji iijiiiiiiiiJJii»iiJJ5iiiNii|jjiiiiiii|Jiiiiiii||Jiiiiiii|J5 ii5iimii|j|iiiiiiii||[f 



Political Organizations. 



McKinley and Roosevelt Glub. 

Officers, 

H. H. Baish, . 



S. E. Rupp, . . 
R. S. Showers, 
A. G. Smith, . 
W. H. BURD, . 
R. C SCHAEFFER, 
W. S. ROOP, 

E. M. Balsbaugh, 
A. G. Smith, 
W. C. Arnold, 



President. 
Vice President. 

Recording Secretary. 

Corresponding Secretary. 

Treasurer . 

Sentinel. 

Captaiii . 

First Lieutenant . 

Second Lieutenant . 



Bryan and Stevenson Glubi 

Officers. 

H. H. YOHE President. 

C. H. Fisher, Secretary. 

M. E. DoNOUGH, Treasurer. 

Wooley and IWetcalf Glub. 

Officers. 

C. S. BoMBERGER, .... President. 

C. W. Chrxstman, .... Secretary. 

F H. Heinaman, .... Treasurer. 




N\^\\\\\Vn' 



Gollege Beneficiary Glub. 



Organized Nov. 30, 1900. Incorporated Dec. 3, 1900. 

Data. 

Design. 

To make night hideous and raise h — 1 generally. 

Motto. 

More quicker, Eddie, more quicker. 

Pass -Words. 

Loan us a V (or) Look out for Pres. 

Favorite Haunt. 

Home Sweet Home. 

Initiation Pee. 

Five Dollars, payable in advance. 

Lively Amusement. 

Mr. Hinkle, the Janitor. 

Club's Official Carriage. 

The Wheelbarrow. 
Refreshments. 

Apples in season. 

Pire Alarm. 

The College Bell. 

Officers. 

E. S. Fenstermacher, . . . Rmg{ing) Leader. 

Walter Kohr, Wire Stretcher. 

E F. Beckmeyer Key- Hole Plugger. 

J. Sheesley, Traveling Solicitor. 

Mary Kellar, Caterer. 




A'KHIGHfOF LA 



Knights of L»abop. 



Pass Word — Papa. 

Motto — Here's to the man who rocks his babe, 
And thinks its uiighly fine ; 
Who after many years of toil, 
Has rocked some eight or nine. 



F. B. Emenheiser, 

B. F. Daugherty, 

D. D. BUDDINGER, 

A. L. House, . . 

C. A. Weaver, 
I. M. Hershey, 

C. E. Boughter, . 



Officers. 

Past Chief. 

Noble Chief. 

Noble Dispenser of Lacteal Fluid. 

Worthy Spanker. 

7 'enerable Washerman . 
Proficient Inspector. 
Spiritual Adviser. 



Fan-dubs Degree Men. 



F. B. Emenheiser, 



B F. Daugherty, 



T. G. McFadden, 



H. E. Enders, 

H H. YoHE, 



C. E. Boughter. 
Cradle Degree Men. 

A. L. House. 



First Degree Men. 

H. U. Roop. 



C. A. Weaver, 



I. M. Hershey, 



H. H. Shenk, 



Applicants. 



C. E. ROUDABUSH, 

C. R. Engine. 



Black-Balled Candidates. 

N. C. Schlicter, R. W. Appenzellar, 

H. H. Baish, L. E. Cross. 



Jockeys' Glub. 



Officers. 

J. T. Spangler, .... President, {Ex-Officio.') 
B. F. Daugherty, , . . Treasurer, {Ex-Officio.) 



H. U. Roop, 



Board of Directors. 



Miss M. Etta Wolfe. 



N. C. SCHLICHTER, 





Judges. 




H. H. Shenk, 


E B. Kephart, T. G 


McFadden 


S. F. 


Daughertv, 


. Chief Jockey 




H. H 


Baish, . 


. . Chief Clerk 




A. G. 


Smith, . 


Head Trainer 


G. H. 


Albright, 


Veteritiary 


Surgeon. 


D. M 


Oyer, 


Starter. 




R. R. 


Butterwick, . 


Senior Grooin. 


C. A. 


SOLLENBERGER, 


. . Stable Boy. 




D. J. 
Distance- One Term 


Cowling, 


Book Maker 




Entries 


Prize — 70 per 


:ent or Over 


Beginners' Greek, 


ridden by 


"Solly"* 


45 per cent 


Beginners' Latin, 


ridden by 


"Solly"* 


49 per cent 


Anabasis, 


ridden by 


Showers 


70 per cent 


Caesar, 


ridden by 


"Sammy" 


99 per cent. 


Iliad, 


ridden by 


KOHR 


90 per cent 


Cicero, 


ridden by 


Reuben 


94 per cent. 


Apology, 


ridden by 


Christman 


98 per cent. 


(jerniania. 


ridden by 


"Davy" 


89 per cent. 


Memorabilia, 


ridden by 


"Appy" 


95 per cent 


Agricola, 


ridden by 


"Espy" 


93 per cent. 


Prometheus, 


ridden by 


Henry 


90 per cent. 


Terrence, 


ridden by 


Sites 


85 per cent 



^Disqualified in both, after third "heat." 
All steeds sired by Hinds and Noble. 



137 



bea^ue «^M^ of Death. 



Pass Word — Nike. 
Motto — Give 'em H — 1. 
Insignia — Cross bones and skull. 
Song — Hail, hail the gang's all here 

What the H — 1 do we care etc. 





Officers. 


T. 


Yarg, . . . 


. His Satatiic Majesty 


W 


Poor, . . . 


. His Junior Majesty. 


A. 


Htims, . 


. His Heavy Recorder. 


H 


Ehoy, . 


High Cockolotum. 


J- 


Yelseehs, . . 


Aqueous Dispenser . 


C. 


HSUBADUOR, . 


Chief Se7itinel. 


G. 


Thgirbi.a, 


Water Carrier. 



Candidates for First Degree. 

M. E. DoNouGH, D. D. Brandt, 

R. W. Appenzellar, Hambright, 

Knupp, Gehr, 

Max Snyder. 



Associate Members. 

Miss M. Rallek, Miss R. Kcidder, 

Miss E. Namhets, Miss M. Eflow, 

Miss N. Retcilhcs. 



Next Victims. 

Reyemkckb, J. Ytrehguad, 

Newo, E. Poor, 

P. Edahsnebse. 



139 



Appendicitis Glub. 



Officers. 

C. C. GOHN, President. 

C. Clayton Oohn, . . . Vice President. 

Cleveland C. Gohn, . . Secretary. 

C. Clayton Gohn, . . . Treasurer. 



Active Members. 

C. C. Gohn, (i) R. S. Showers, (3) 

F. L. Scott, (2) H. E. Enders. (4) 



Associate Members. 

Miss Lucy Sherk, Miss Anna Walter, 

* Miss Sue Moyer. 



Prospective Members. 

C. E. RouDABusH, G. H. Albright, 

Miss Edith Myers, Miss Nell Davis, 

Miss Nettie Lockeman, 



Haunts of Members. 

Neighboring Hen Roosts, (i) Foot-Ball Gridiron, (3) 
Old Forty- Five, (2) Derry Church. (4) 



*To be Supplied . 

Aa analysis of the Appendixes of the "members" given on opposite page. 



141 




2)er 2)eut8Cbe 1klub. 



"2)ie Beamten. 



Iberr IRcitcr, iprasit>ent 

3fraulein IRebMcl?, Sel^retar 

Iberr Smeltser, Scbatsmelster 



^ItGlieber. 

UDerr ©augberts, jfraulein %oos, 

Iberr IFfie^, Iberr Cross, 

Iberr IRboaC, Iberr jftsber, 

Iberr ©ra^biU, jfraulein 'Krei&er. 



fIDottO. 

•'Es macbt nicbts aua vvte long Oas Mort, 
©effnet Oen /IBunC unO plauOert fort !" 



142 



Dpamatic Glub. 



Officers. 

T. W. Gray, Business Manager. 

J. W. ESBENSHADE, .... Stage Manager. 

C. R. Engle, Property Man. 

Miss A. C. Walter, . . . Coach. 



Per Telephone, 



Plays. 

Box OF Monkeys. 



My Uncle's Will, 



Members. 



W. C. Arnold, 

R. W. Appenzellar, 
C. H. Fisher, 

C. C. GOHN, 

D. M. Oyer, 
A. G. Smith, 

Miss Emma Batdorf, 
Miss Bess Englar, 
Miss Valeria Heilman, 
Miss Lillie Kreider, 



L. E. Cross, 
J. W. Esbenshade, 
Park Esbenshade, 
T. W. Gray, 
W. J. Sanders, 

H. H. Yohe, 
Miss G. M. Bowman, 
Miss Neta Englar, 
Miss Anna Kreider, 
Miss Lucy Sherk. 



143 



Aiiiiiiiiii liiiBiiii'iifliiiiii'iiiiiiiiii'iiaiiiiii'iiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij iiiitiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'i^ ife 



^|iiii««iiiiiiiwiii|iiii"iiiiifi«»iii[iS«iiiiijii««niiJi«i«n^ 



The Stopy of Glenhilton Hill. 



if|¥"""¥""'¥|fl HIS legend was set down many years ago, with no attempts 
f am^ j) ^t elaborate diction, by Mildred and me, while yet we lived 
1% {\ j\ in Wynwoode. 

fs ^^ Jj Wynwoode is a delightful town and just large enough 

[Cii^iii i iiiil[iriiii'^iiil] to forbid any one from conscientiously calling it a village. 
Three or four broad streets easily paroled without fatigue and guarded 
by nothing more formidable than stalwart old trees prove its existence. 
Its people are of a sturdy American type who have sprung from an indus- 
trious ancestry and who, therefore, are never in need of prosperity. In- 
deed many of them are content to eat the bread for which their grand- 
fathers worked, so idle and yet so saving are they. Because sons and 
daughters are in possession of a pleasing patrimony ii.dolence seems to be 
instinctive. 

To one of Altrurian philosophy, Wynwoode is an ideal place, each 
man, woman and child having an equal right to do nothing but to love 
one another. Charity is the pervading spirit of every heart and every 
home. By day, the smoke curls from the old fashioued chimneys into 
wreaths of loving kindness ; and beams of blessing burnish every window 
place by night. 

A queer little fact about the town is the custom, established many 
years ago, of entertaining all strangers fiee at the Colonially constructed 
hostelry, known as the Squaw Inn. A very pious old man is in charge 
of the place, who succeeded thereto in accordance with the will of a wide- 
ly loved father ; but the son, now grown old, is loved and reverenced even 
more if such a circumstance be possible. His surname is Mask, unto 
which thro respect the heroic title of "Captain" has long since been ad- 
ded. Now in his declining years another title precedes this and everyone 
addresses him as Saint Captain Mask. 

With the exception of the Inn, no public buildings of any kind are 
in the town. Instead of going to school children are taught at their 
mother's knee, and many a little boy drops to sleep with a spelling-lesson 



146 



for his cradle-song. Nor has a church house been deemed necessary for 
a room in Squaw Inn has, ever since its foundation, been used as a place 
of worship. Soul stirring services are held here every evening at the hour 
of six, the keeper of the Inn always leading them; and, tho strangers 
alone are compelled to attend the short sermon and vesper visitation of 
the spirit, as we love to call the after part of the meeting, the room is al- 
ways filled. 

If ever a higher power comes nigh unto men it is at a Wynwoode as- 
semblage of saints. The creed of each is love, Bjuutiful Love, and 
Captain Mask teaches and re-teaches it nightly. Yet no one ever tires of 
him or his creed. 

It is an evening in the autumn tide. The wood-dove deigns a drows- 
ing song and the papaw ripens at the touch of frost into luscious life. 
Other birds are singing their farewell lullabies in kaleidoscopic northern 
boughs. It is the hour of six. Mildred, my sister, and I enter the sacred 
Inn chamber. We are the first to come for the evening service. Captain 
Mask is in his father's old, red chair by the niahogony table and his head 
as usual, is bowed over the calf bound Bible. Others have kept coming 
in and have taken their seats quietly ; and now all are waiting for the 
Saint Captain to raise his head and utter his well- rendered word of wel- 
come. And still we wait. The clock ticks on and on. "How impress- 
ive will be his speech when once he begins," is in the mind of more than 
one. An hour has really passed and the Saint has not yet moved. But, 
see! he raises his head at last. He rises and begins to speak, slowly and 
solemnly, these words, "I must die! I must die ! Bury me in Glenhilton 
Hill at early morn I am resting upon the bosom of a lofty Love." He 
sits down and the stony eye reveals ihe sad fact that the Death- Angel has 
been in our midst. 

As order is next to piety in Wynwoode, there is no confusion. 
Tornby Phelps, who is much respected for his extreme age, rises ; and 
walking to the side of the cold Saint Captain issues this command : 

"Fellow souls, get home! Get ye home! and thank God that the 
good keeper died in so great peace. Mantell Evans and the brother Ben- 
tleys will remain." 

In accordance with his own wish, at early mourn the remains of Saint 
Captain Mask rest in the Wynwoode cemetery. The four men had buried 
him as they have buried others in Glenhilton Hill, with no word from a 
human ritual, but with the music of the little brook that swept the marsh 
grass as strings of an angel's lyre, for a benediction. 

The death of Mask was of the sudden kind that from its very unac- 

147 



countability startles every body. His goodness is the theme for a hun- 
dred tongues ; and be it further said to his credit that not a single post- 
humous fault can be found in him. Uiienvious, without malice and free 
of all guile, he died as a true follower of the pure Christ. 

Squaw Inn stands closed au'l out of an uncommon respect not a man 
visits it during the whole day. Entire Wynwoode is in mourning and a 
dozen crape folds drape as many doors, all in memory of the same sweet 
Saint Captain. 

As citizens of a peculiarly beautiful town, we always take a just pride 
in our cemetery, and Tornby Phelps — "Careful Torn," as the women 
called him — has had charge of it for many years. He lives his bachelor 
life in a quiet little cottage right near the one small gate and on the inner 
side. Thro his efforts every thing in Glenhilton Hill smiles at you. 

It is again the hour of six. The minutes of but a single day have 
passed away since the chief religious spirit of the place had suddenly en- 
tered into the silence of death. Glenhilton Hill is closed for the night. 
Old Tornly, as is his wont, sits contemplatively upon an old rustic sofa 
in front of his cottage. His eyes are fixed intently upon the fresh earth 
covering the body of his aged friend, the Saint Captain. Soon they 
moisten with tears, and in sorrow he bows his head, rich in the silver 
locks of honored age. In this position he falls asleep, the peace of the 
October night conducing to its soundness. 

While he sleeps a mysterious happening is taking place in old Glen- 
hilton Hill. The ground upon the Saint Captains grave "s pushed back 
b3' a rising hand, then a rising arm. Soon a head appears and in but a 
second more the spirit of the Saint stands in the narrow path of the ceme- 
tery. A perfect likeness of the real man, it stands and listens. A mo- 
ment passes. Then swiftly moving toward the gate, the spirit opens it 
and passes down the long hillside into Wynwoode. Soon Squaw Inn is 
reached; and, as spirits predominate over matter, it disappears with all 
haste directly thro the closed green shutter. A moment more and the 
spirit is again moving through the Glenhilton Hill gate. Slipping quietly 
to the side of sleeping Tornly a document is undisturbingly placed in his 
hands. 

It had been but five minutes since the spirit first appeared and in this 
time it had gone to the Sijuaw Inn, hid procured the document, had re- 
turned to the burial-ground with it, and now was no more. Its mission 
ended, it had vanished. 

Soon it is morning. With the coming of sun beams among the frost 



148 



cracked cliestnut burs, Tornhy awakens. He discovers a carefully fold- 
ed document, of what nature he knows not, in his hand. But he shows 
no alarm at the strange incident. It is useless for him to open it for he 
cannot read. With the calm patience and precision of a man of fourscore 
years he places it in his cottage until noon. 

After several hours of planning he goes into Wynwoode and summons all 
of the townspeople. To their surprise he tells them of his strange acqui- 
sition and appoints Mantell Evans to read the curious paper. So odd is 
the proceeding that the people listen breathlessly when Evans begins : 

To My Beloved Friends at Wynoode: 

I have communed often with the Divine One and he has commission- 
ed me, at my death, to tell you that in Glenhilton Hill every buried soul 
now dwells in Htaven. It is the only cemetery in all the earth that bears 
this great aud unusual distinction. Be glad for this; but after the burial 
of old Tornby Phelps, whose death shall follow mine, close its gate for- 
ever. Strife will ensue immediately as to who shall keep the Squaw Inn 
and sad human sin will henceforth abound in many hearts. As j'ou had 
abundant faith in me while I lived, may you likewise believe that this 
order and prophecy is from 

Your religious brother ; 

Saint C.\ptain Mask. 
Wymvoode, July j- 

Of course all believe it genuine, and their belief is strengthened by 
the sudden death of old Tornby on his way back to Glenhilton Hill, where 
he always loved to dwell. After his burial the order of the document is 
heeded ; and the strange, but beautiful, cemetery is locked, to remain so 
forever. Wynwoode is proud of its righteous possession, but as the Saint 
Captain prophecied it will never have another. 

It is now about the middle of winter. Strife has indeed been in our 
midst. A new burial place has twenty dear souls within its borders, but 
many of them are lost by the sin of envy. 

Mildred and I love to linger by the gate of Glenhilton Hill ; and 
sometimes we wish that we too were buried there and might join, on Res- 
urrection morning, the band of purified souls that Saint Captain Mask 
will lead into the Eternal City. 

J. R. H. 



149 



Fpayer.* 



Almighty God, whose fingers trace 

The arcs eternal of the soul, 

We wait before thy wondrous face 

As spring before her blossom-dole. 

To praise thee for the years that came 

And left a being and a name 

Upon our alma mater dear. 

And built the history her men revere. 

We wait before Thy wondrous face. 

To pray thee for the years to be ; 

The past that was, ran well its race ; 

So help the long futurity. 

Whate'er the onward years may bring. 

Diminish not the blossoming. 

Of stalwart faith in ev'r}- mind 

And teach us well, to doubt is to be blind. 

That Truth can guild the lowest spire 
Can crown the humblest head a king, 
Can touch the wisest minds to fire. 
And turn to song earth's sorrowing. 
We also plead that love be taught 
To glorify tenfold our thought. 
And place a glow within our eyes 
That men know us kindest of the wise. 

O clothe our arms with strength divine 
Endow our hands with matchless skill, 
That we may pile upon this shrine 
A palace pleasing to Thy will ! 
Increase the workmen day by day. 
Till everywhere men rise to say 
Behold, abundant built and blessed, 
This is the crowu of learning in the West. 



*Printed b}' permission from I'rof. N. C. Schlichter's Alumnal Ode. 



150 



IVIelancholy. 



Just what I am 
And how I came 

Into this world of sorrow, 
Why born today 
To pass iiway 

Upon the coming morrow? 

Why live to die, 
Why smile, to sigh. 

Why tears must follow pleasures? 
Why hearts no more 
As once before 

Contain love's golden treasures. 

Why suffer pain 
Still ne'er complain 

If fortune doth forsake me, 
Why cares do press 
With awful stress 

And ruin overtake nic? 

Why hopes that bloom 
Today at noon 

By eve are dead and wasted, 
Why joys not mixed 
With ill betwixt 

B)' man are never tasted? 

Why friends betray 
Who yesterday 

My love had shared in common ; 
But now the5''re gone, 
I'm left alone, 

No helping hand to summon. 

Alone and sad, 
Methinks nigh mad, 

I brood o'er past and future, 
Recall woes gone 
Curse those to come, 

A wretched, forlorn creature. 



Such thoughts arise 
And cloud the skies 

That once with light were beaming ; 
The darkness grows 
The chill wind blows, 

And ray eyes with tears are streaming 

The storm has passed, 
Joy breaks at last. 

As after rain the sun's glow 
Streams through the mist 
By dew drops kissed 

Reveals the glorious rainbow. 

The world is bright 
No more the night 

Of melancholy brooding 
Hangs like a pall, 
O'er hope, o'er all, 

But now fair Hope I'm wooing. 




152 



Awlll'iiiiiiil'^raiilijim 




^||ilWli|||ll"lll|||ilI«ll|j|ill"Nl|j5ll«Nl|||lll»Ni;jilllllll^ 




See page 35. 



Alphabet. 



A stands for Arnold who thinks he is ■wise, 

But what talents he has, are in perfect disguise. 
B is for Butterwick, with a classical 'froutis,' 

Behind which we fear is material 'non-compis.' 
C stands for Cross, who has a temptation. 

Because he was absent, to curse the creation. 
D is for Douough a quibblerin classes. 

In positive knowledge a leader oi donkeys. 
E is for Engle an ardent adorer. 

Just now he has Gertrude as 'sub' for his Nora. 
F is for 'Fensty' who toots a tin horn, 

Precisely at tive, every cold, wintry morn. 
Q is for Gray in appearance quite seedy. 

And when Pres. comes around, his departure is speedy. 
H stands for House, a student industrious. 

Occasionally mild, but often quite blustrous. 
I is for 'Ike}'' an inverterate smoker. 

Duke's Mixture his brand, and his fav'rite game poker. 
J's for the Juniors, both the lads and the lasses, 

In every respect, the class of all classes. 
K is for Karnig the 'Chemical Engine,' 

Who eats a whole lot, just like a big 'Injun.' 
L is for Lawson, a genius at numbers, 

Who sleeps when he walks and talks as he slumbers. 
M is for Miller of 'Waterloo' fame. 

He made quite a conquestand she'll change 'Herr' name 
N is for Nothing, the Soph'mores don't know, 

Yet compared with the Juniors, they're most mighty 
slow. 
O is for Oyer an adept at scrapping, 

A novice at study, in Charity lacking. 
P is for Pres., and to tell it's a shame, 

But he ordered five Annuals so we'd mention his name. 
Q stands for questions, the Profs, all demand. 

To unravel some myst'ry they can't understand. 
R is for Rowdy, whose joints are all double. 

He can jump in a knot, without any trouble. 



155 



S is for Smith who is troubled with dropsy, 

By nature so tired, he must study by proxy. 

T's for the Trots the Jockey's Club uses, 

They're subject to spasms a result of abuses. 

U is for Uucle, a distinction forsooth, 

The favored one this time is Big Willie Roop. 

V stands for Valentine, isn't it queer. 

That each see's his likeness just ouce a year. 
W's for Waughtel, a man small in stature. 

In intellect brilliant, congenial by nature. 
X stands for unknowns the whole world around, 

Save here where its something one floor from the ground 

Y is for Yohe, a good natured soul. 

His faults we'll pass over, his virtues extol. 
Z is for Zero, the minimum grade, 

In Winter or Summer, in sunshine or shade. 



A Question 

A man may be a graduate, 

And pride himself on knowledge great : 

May lecture, preach, with skill may write. 

Converse in manner erudite ; 

Still, ten to one, 'twill be his way 

When he means "doesn't," don't to say, 

And in his talk most generally 

His "only" 's where it shouldn't be. 

For Where's the school with power to teach 

Us freedom from these slips of speech ? 



156 



Inconsistenoies> 



Inconsistency's a bone, 

This truth none will deny, 

Its shallowness has been observed 

By you as well as I. 

'Tis found in every human form 

In every walk of life : 

Among the students in our school 

Its doings are quite rife. 

Now I'm not here to criticise, 
But I would like to show 
Some inconsistencies of friends 
And school-mates that 1 know. 
I trust that none will take offense 
At things that may be said, 
And class me as their enemy, 
For what they here have read. 

'Twas Sanders asked that I should write 
A little rhyme or two ; 
Of him I'll tell a little trick- 
Perhaps the same of 3'ou. 
You see he is a Democrat, — 
When Bryan's in the ring 
He'll talk "free trade" and "equal rights. 
And "silver" songs he'll sing; 

But then when Quay is in the town 
His politics he'll change, 
He says it is the way to give 
His thoughts a wider range. 
Oh, yes, he speaks for Wooley too, 
And still he'll drink of wine ; 
Now wh}' not be consistent, Bill, 
In one particular line? 

Elocution is quite giand. 
And Showers knows it too ; 
He practices continually 
When there's nothing else to do. 
If his selections do not rhyme 
He knows just how to alter ; 
His lessons are not very few — 
He takes them of Miss Walter. 

157 



S. Edwin Rnpp a preacher is 

Yet loves his "Polar Bear;" 

With cards he's more fatuiliar 

Than with his book of prayer. 

He's quite a ladies' man I'm told, 

Oft' spoons them on the sly ; 

But when the lecture nights have come 

You'll never find him nigh. 

Prof. Spangler says he won't admit 
Of "ponying" in his course ; 
Yet in this volume he is seen 
About to mount a horse. 
And all the other Profs, assert 
That its against their rule ; 
However not one honest chap 
Is found in all the school. 

Friend Brunner's eyes won't stand the light. 

Through glasses he must see ; 

But he's been courting natural Light 

Since he's at old L. V. 

And then there's dear old Fatty Smith 

Whose friendship none will rue ; 

Who always managed while in class 

To sit beside our Sue. 

Our Arnold claims to be a man 

With Christian graces filled ; 

To hear him talk you'd think that he's 

Straight through for glory billed. 

Howe'er one Christian trait he lacks, — 

Perhaps he counts it not, — 

His heart is filled with strife and war. 

He always craves a Sliolt. 

Perhaps you'll question at this point. 

Who might the writer be? 

But should I tell I know 'twould seem 

A breach of modesty. 

So I'll not tell and thus will show, 

As does each wicked elf, 

That inconsistency pertains 

Likewise unto myself. 

Teop. *o 



158 



The GoHege Gommandnrients. 



And the President called the students unto him saying : 

1. Thou shalt not prefer anj' college to this one. 

2. Thou shalt not make any 'under estimate' of the ability of thy 
profs., neither those that are literary, nor those that are scientific, nor 
any that are connected with this college; for thy profs, are jealous profs., 
visiting the iniquity of 'under valuing their worth' upon the student, 
even unto his third and fourth college years. 

3. Thou must not consider 'reviews,' 'tests,' and 'ex-ams' as vain 
for the profs, will grade the student with zero that regardeth these things 
as vain. 

4.* 



5. Write long and loving letters to thy parents, that thou mayest 
receive many checks from home, and thy days may be long within these 
walls which the College Agent hath given thee. 

6. Thou shalt not 'slug' in foot ball. 
Thou shalt not 'spoon.' 
Thou shalt not plagiarize. 

Thou shalt not prevaricate in Faculty meeting. 
Thou shalt not covet any Senior's girl, nor his 'rep,' nor his 

'pony,' nor his wisdom, nor his dignity, nor anything which is the 
Senior's. 

But thou shalt love the President and all thy profs., and thy class 
enemies and thy girl, even as the profs, love one another. 



*The Recording Scribe was called away at this point. 



159 



A Pessimist's Gurei 



We cry for bread they give us stftnes, 
We aSk for meat they give us bones ; 
The coiv goes dry just twice a day 
The butter walks from us away. 

The coffee looks as weak as tea, 
The tea for all might water be ; 
I sip, and sip, now one, then three, 
They're all alike in taste to me. 

The oatmeal's schorched, the sugar's sour, 
The cakes too greasy to devour ; 
The spoons are scarce, just one for each. 
If more than one, they will not reach. 

Potatoes, mashed are rare and cold. 
The peas are bullets, hard and old ; 
The soup is thiu, the fowl's no dunce. 
He wandered through it only once. 

Cream cheese and dog meat once a week, 
On Sunday eve our eyes do greet ; 
Sometimes, we know its by mistake. 
They furnish each a slice of cake. 

Are )'Ou surprised that chickens near. 
Do huddle close in anxious fear. 
As by some hungry student goes. 
Bewailing all his direful woes. 

Such is our lot, they witness bear 
Who long time since have lived on air ; 
Whose stomachs from their long disuse 
Refuse to furnish gastric-juice. 

And we are now in sorry plight. 
We can no longer prowl at night, 
For though we make a lucky haul 
Our luck but adds to bitt'rest gall. 

1 60 



We dare not eat, we can not drink; 

What can we do? Not even think. 

If through our brains a stray thought flashes, 

We can not grasp it ere it passes. 

We are no longer sweet and glad. 
But mostly sour, bitter, sad : 
We look through glasses falsely shaded 
And see the world with ill pervaded. 

There is no good, all bad is rated: 

But here's a cure though homely stated, 

A cure effective, rest upon it, 

To reach man's heart, go through his stomach. 



A Prophecy. 

The students swear and quake with fright, 
In the dark halls spooks they spy, 

For the college wont have those electric lights, 
Till away in the sweet bye and bye. 



i6i 



Dictionary. 



Class Rooms — Places to loaf. 
Grades — Measures of men's minds. 
Co-eds — The school's drawing cards. 
Rat — An "animal" worn by the ladies. 
Flunk — A term synonymous with "over" work. 
The Diamond — Where "high-balls" are "hit." 
Students — A few victims of false ambition. 
Vacation — Never appreciated until forced 
Campus — A hugh waste basket and water drain. 
Ducking — An expression of one's aqueous "humor." 
Dining Hall — A mean display of unsightly china. 
I<ABORATORY — Rife with foul smells and — Seniors. 
Office — 'Where bills are paid and retribution made. 
Janitor — A man hired to amuse the "Beneficiary Club," 
Ladies' Parlor — A place with several chairs adorned. 
Bells — Rung at all hours to keep the classes awake. 
Tests — Resorted to when the profs are unprepared. 
Matron — An exponent of Mrs. Rhorer s system of cooking. 
Societies — Where embryo orators receive their sprouting. 
Matriculation — A fee paid for the privilege of "making a name." 
Post Office — Where we read the mail and chin the female. 
Slang — A vocalbulary gleaned from a close studj' of the language s 
Faculty — An informal social body which tenders weekly receptions. 
Etiquette — Practical, theoretically, and theoretically practiced. 
Chorus Class — A musical organization only surpassed by the "Quar- 
tette." 



162 



LEBAXON VALLEY COLLEGE 

MAXRICUUATipN CARIX 

,\o.-Z^O ---^^^t-**^4^ Term, ^ /fffy 

This is la crrli/y thai y' ^ 

Has rigularly matriculated and is emitted to admission to the following ctassest 







Senoirs. 



They're gone, the Seniors yes 'tis true, 
They are no more in college, 

'Twas here they drank the fatal draught. 
An overdose of knowledge. 



163 



Answers to Queries Found in Bizarre Question Box. 



All information imparted free of charge. 
Anonymous communications receive no attention. 

F. B. E. — If you sincerely believe you are called to follow the minis- 
try as a profession, do so ; however carpentry might pay better. 

John S. — No it is not the best policy to skip classes. Human nature 
abhors solitude and the professors desire company occasionally. 

D. M. O — We are grateful for your solicitude for our success and 
will make as frequent and favorable mention of your name as possible. 

Miss E. L. S. No indeed, continual laughter does not always "pay." 
The Annville Water Company will certainly reward you handsomely for 
weeping in the reservoir. 

R. S. S — The person who said you were conceited was unpardonably 
rude and we would advise you to consider the matter as a joke and let it 
pass. 

T. A. L — The proper place to say your prayers is in Chapel. And 
while this is nearly a contradiction in terms, we still hold that this advice 
is salient. 

E. S. F. — Yes if, as you say, you dislike work, we advice you not to 
dream. A m±re fancy that you are passing through some mental exertion 
or undergoing some manual labor might result fatally. 

Miss L G. K — It is indiscreet and often risky to have two "regular" 
gentlemen friends at once. It has been well said, "A Burd in the hand 
is worth two in the bush. ' 

I. F. L. — The signing of "pledges" has come into ill repute. Un- 
scrupulous persons often use the "pledge" S3'stem as a means for gather- 
ing autographs, in anticipation of the signer's future greatness. So at all 
hazards, refrain 

W. S. R. — Reciting is of course necessary on some occasions, but a 
continued indulgence in this habit is deplorable, for usually the professor 
in charge has sufficent knowledge of the subject in hand. 

164 



T. W. G. — The desertion of one's leader is no less cowardly than the 
bitrayal of ones constituents. We recommend your spirit to your breth- 
ren and refer you to our answer to the "Sophomores" for consolation. 

A. W. M. — We cannot furnish you with" Sir Rodger deCoverley's 
poems. We refer you to the Library where you may secure a volume of 
Addison's Spectator, and there acquaint yourself with this popular gentle- 
man of fiction . 

Karnig — Profane language is in all instances inexcusable. The use 
of it reflects badly on your slang vocabular)', wliich, at this stpge of your 
college course, should be considerably augmented, and sufficient for all 
trying emergencies. 

New Student. — The library is excellently lighted by numerous elec- 
tric lights. However it would be well to bring a lamp, an eye shade and 
a pair of glasses along, if you expect to consult reference bookb at night. 

Miss N. S. L. — (i) Because your friend calls few times during the 
week and twice on Sunday does not justify the rumor afloat that you are 
engaged. (2) No it is not in good taste to wear a minature photograph 
of your friend as a brooch . 

Miss A. C. W. — If the love of your friend for you is waning, and you 
fear it is a true case of cardiac collapse, we advise 3'ou to leave him alone 
for a few daj's. Your constant "anxiety" may weary him, for "Tis dis- 
tance lends enchantment and absence quickens love." 

J. W. E. — Swelling of the head is a necessary accompaniment of the 
Sophomore year. As to a cure for it, if the case is not acute, we etther 
refer you to the "League of Death" or advice that you bide your time, as 
it will disappear when you become a Junior. 

C. A. S. — If the girl really loves you, she will be content to wait un- 
til you have completed your college course, however long that may be. 
No, an engagement is unnecessary, for a well known authority has said ; 
"School children should never become engaged." 

Miss B. E. — The fact that the young man you speak of tossed a coin 
to decide which of two girls he should escort to the lecture, clearly shows 
he cared little for either. Since you were the one left you need not feel 
badly about it, for had your fortunate(?) rival the knowledge you possess, 
she would long since have been hunting new "pastures." 

Sophomores. — There are, it is true, many dangers attendent upon 
bravery, loss of life not infrequently being among them. Yes cowardice 
is nearly always self protective in its nature, it having been said, "A 



165 



coward seldom dies." However in otir humble opinion, which we cull 
from j'our actions on the night of March 14, you need have no immediate 
cause for alarm. 

Miss L. A. S. — No you are not obliged to kiss the young man good- 
night, even if he insists, for it has been recently discovered that "appendi- 
citis" is contagious. (2) Since the matron has several times disturlei 
you in your "devotions," occupy the front porch hereafter and if the lamp 
annoys you, a request to the President will secure its removal. 

Miss R F. L. — The hours between which your friend should call are 
Sand 10 p. at. (2) No he should not prolong his stay to 12, and on no 
account permit him to remain as early as 2.30 A. m. If you do not wish 
to speak to him about the matter, eat a raw onion before he arrives, 
and we are sure he will .soon be broken of his bad "habit." 

W. O. R. — Doubtless it is not proper for a young lady to "spoon" 
you, on the occasion of your first call and infinitely worse for her to 
attempt to do so contrary to your expressed wish. You should have 
called the Preceptress, for no true lady will kiss a gentleman against his 
will. We would advice you to call on ladies who employ less common 
methods of entertainment, for commonplaces should always be avoided. 

Seniors. — Yes we do consider the "end- piece" in last year's "Bizarre" 
a finely executed pen sketch and agree with you that it reflects much 
credit on the ability of your artist. However we are inclined to believe 
that it was the first product of his pen and that his "inspiration" gradually 
left him or his ink supply was limited by the time he reached "Athletics. ' ' 

Miss G. M. B. — The use of a "rat" in the arrangement of your hair, 
should be avoided if possible. Tne high pompadour at best is unnatural 
and in wearing a hat is a decided nuisance, it being nearly impossible to 
perserve its shape. (2) As to a "switch" it should only be used, when 
the purchase of a hair "tonic" is impossible, or mosquito netting a failure. 

Gehr and Hambright. — (1) It is hardly compatible with good eti- 
quette to eat with 3'our knife, and dangerous at times for knives, as they 
are made to cut, are frequently sharp. (2) No never "dump" half the 
contents of a dish on your own plates when there are seven others to be 
served, nor pass a single piece of bread, with the fingers, when the bread 
is called for. (3) Yes in boarding halls where large numbers are fed, the 
suppply is often limited, and other people are blessed with appetites as well 
as yourselves. 



166 




Some Feats of the Faculty. 

We will rent our shoes for tenement htn?es. They are large and 
commodious and will make a suite of excellent flats. We superintended 
the construction of the floors and bay-windows ourselves. Apply to 

Pkofs. L. and E. 




Wise and Otherwise* 



EVIDENT. 
Prof. S — What was God's purpose in creating man? 
Miss I^oos — So he could make woman, of course. 

SHORT A RIB. 
Miss Wolfe — Why did you embrace that young lady ? 
Curly — I was merely hunting stolen property. 

ALARMED. 
Prof. Shenk — What is the theory of Malthus? 
Arnold (angrily) — That doesn't concern me, I'm not married. 

NOT EXPERIMENTAL. 
In Psychology — How do we think ? 
Miller — I don't know, I — I — can't think — . 

TRUTH. 
President — Do you smoke ? 
Reiter — No, I furnish the draught. 

SERIOUS. 
Doctor — Where are you hurt ? 
Disabled Foot- Ball Player — Och ! ennyvhere. 

DANGEROUS. 
Prof. Shenk — This examination is only a parting shot and not aimed to 

kill any one. 
Sanders (quickly) — You're such a poor marksman though, professor. 

ONE INTERPRETATION. 
In History — Did Martin Luther die a natural death ? 
SollEnberger — No, he was excommunicated by a "bull." 

NOT THEORETICAL. 
Miss SpanglER — I believe the theory advocating kissing is all wrong. 
Miss Lockeman — I agree with you — but what time is it, I must practice 
at 2.30 



DEMONSTRATIVE. 
Prof. Daugherty — You may decline the relative pronoun. 
Lawson — -Hi-i-c-c, Ha-ee c-c, Ho-o-o-c-c. 
Prof. D — No that is the demonstrative. 
Lawson— I told you I was in Lebanon last night. 

IN LOGIC. 
Waughtel — I don't understand this point. 
Dr. Roop — The author presumed that this book be studied by students 

of average intelligence and — 
Waughtel (interrupting) — Who also presumed that the teacher have 

like qualifications. (Laughter.) 



<? 



Rupp was the greatest hand to quiz, 

That mortal ever met, 
And though a Senior now he is, 

He's asking questions yet. 



169 



Raid of the Gobbeleirs. 



(CONTRIBUTED.) 

On a night cold and -drear 

Without triumph, or cheer 

Did some revelers revel-de-raid ; 

With a pitcher and bowl, 

And a slop-jar not whole, 

And a piece of an old table "spade." 

Their course was due South 

'Twas the word from the mouth 

Of the leader so dig-in-i-fied, 

Also "Fall without fail 

On the head or the tail 

Of the first lurking enemy spied." 

The orders are "Halt !" 

Then "Forward, Assault ! 

Seize on the dark feathered foe !" 

So old "Blunder-buss" 

Not to make any fuss 

Seized the victim by head, tail, aud toe. 

Then "Face about ! Run !" 

The captain begun 

This time their direction was East ; 

And their hearts were so gay 

For they thought all the way. 

Of the glorious, glorious feast. 

Now here comes the fun 

For the cleaning's begun. 

In a manner as I shall describe 

For if Blunder-buss, Spreckle-fex 

Sap-sucker-sidel 

Didn't all want to boss I'll be died. 

But Old Hob-gobble ebel 

Bold Lip-come- alible 

Now conies to the front of the raid 



171 



All tbe poor gobbler bad 
Of his feet tail and head 
Were cut off with one sweep of the "spade." 

Then down in the bucket 

Old Hobble did chuck it, 

Till feathers and skin all came off ; 

Then the other work done 

Of the in-tes-ti-an 

Ebo Spreckle-fex started to stuff. 

Then next to the pot 

And they had not forgot 

Of seasonings lard, pepper and salt. 

And round the old stand 

They "dealt out a hand" 

'Till the boiling was brought to a stop. 

They are lax all around 

When they hear the gay sound 

Of bubbles now breaking with cracks ; 

They all take a snuff 

Of the glorious stuff 

And their lips so longingly smack. 

It is done ; now its laid 

On its back, while the "spade" 

Sinks deep in its fat, oily side, 

It is carved into four 

Each, a quarter no more 

And they munch till the morning breaks wide. 

L,K Esprit. 



172 



Notices. 



For Rcnt^ — I will rent my double barrelled corncob pipe, six hours 
per day, to any one who will guarantee to keep it hot. 

R. K. BUFFINGTON. 



Lost. — Somewhere between Ladies' Hall and Conservatory, immedi- 
ately after breakfast, a good sized appetite was lost or mislaid. Finder 
will please return same before dinner, to Prop. N. C. Schlichter. 



Dead. — Arthur Clippinger, of Mowersville, was found dead, in his 
room, Senator's Hall, N. C, yesterday' morning, playing 'solitaire. ' 



Sick. — Thomas W. Gray while practicing the popular song Hail, 
Hail, the Gang's All Here, etc., with the College Quartette on last Sun- 
day night, swallowed a sixteenth rest. Violent sickness followed, culmi- 
nating in convulsions superinduced by cramps. We are glad to note that 
the complications have been simplified and the sufferer is slowly conva- 
lescing. 



173 



Applied Quotations. 



Seniors. 

Seniors — "Ay, in the catalogue ye pass for men !" 
BuTTERWiCK — "No really great man ever thought himself so." 
Baish — "In class room I let fall the windows of mine eyes, 

And sleeping soundly do philosophize." 
BuRD — "Many waters cannot quench love." 
Balsbaugh — "The poet in him died young." 
Brunner — "Who in the darkness loves Light." 
Cross — "Consoled' be; 

A better world awaits thee in eternity." 
Daugherty — "You deceive us with that saint like face." 
Emenheiser — "I hear a hollow sound ; who rapped my skull?" 
KuYOOMjiAN — "What's in- a name?" 
Miller — "None can his mighty deeds express." 
Oyer — "It is more easy to be critical, than correct." 
Roop, W. O. — "A lion among the ladies is a most dreadful thing 
Roop, W. S. — "How like a river largest at the mouth." 
Rupp — "Time make ancient good uncouth." 
Smith — "Swears truely and with great variety." 
Waughtel — "An abridged edition." 
YOHE — "The hairs of thy head are numbered " 

(Juniors. 

Juniors — "A mob of gentlemen who write with ease." 
Albright — "Wisdom personified and-sawed off." 
BuDDiNGER — "The Devil can cite scripture for his own purpose.' 
Cowling — Nice boy ! 



174 



Derickson — " 'Twas sad by fits, by starts 'twas wild." 

Engle — "Could I love one instead of twain, I should be happier." 

GoHN — "Come, shall we go and kill us fowls." 

Kreider — "I awoke one morning and found myself — sleeping." 

Lawson — "He who aspires to outlive himself must drink old Irish 

whisk}'." 
Loos — "Who turned me loose?" 

Miller — "Although he had much wit he was very shy of using it." 
Sandfrs — "The naked every day he clad, when he put on his clothes." 
Sites — "A comedy of errors." 

Sophomores. 

Sophomores — "Conceit in weakest bodies strongest works." 

Arnold — "Wise from the top of his head up." 

Brandt — "His equal lives not, thank God for that." 

Christman — "Comb down his hair, look ! it stands upright. 

DauGHERTY — "I was not made to sport an amorous looking glass." 

DoNOUGH — "Stiff in his opinion, always in the wrong." 

ESBENSHADE — "This is the Jew that Shakespeare drew." 

Fisher, C. A. — "I never felt the kiss of love, nor maiden's hand in mine." 

Gray — "I am a bold, bad man." 

House — "Study to be quiet." 

KoHR — "So wise so young, they say, do ne'er live long." 

RouDABuSH — "Of all the girls that e'er was seen, there's none so fine as 

Nettie." 
Rhoad — "His studie was butlitel on the Bible." 
Roop, E. C. — "None but himself can be his parallel." 
ScH.\EFFER — "Of rosy cheeks and rosy hair, 

A lion tame, among the fair." 
Sheesley — "A head that's to be let — unfurnished." 
Showers — "O coward conscience, how thou dost afflict me." 
Smith, P. — "I am ever in a holidaj' humor." 
SoLLENBERGER — "Men may come and men may go, 
But I stay here forever. " 



175 



Freshmen. 

Freshmen — "Remaining fresh and green all the year around." 

Appenzellar — "I am to myself dearer than a friend." 

Fensteemacher — "To make night hideous his sole delight." 

Fisher, C. H. — "Much ado about nothing." 

Grumbein — "His very foot hath music in't when he conies up the stairs. 

Knupp — "I was never more alone than when with myself." 

RiEDEL — "A child of unpretentious mien." 

Scott — "His very soul in his eyes abode." 

Shaud — -"My mind is my kingdom, but my kingdom for a horse." 

Shenk — "E'en Sunday shines no Sabbath day to me." 

SaiELTZER — "Many a man has lived an age too late." 




176 



My Diary. 



1900. 



vPCp 


5- 


' 


6. 


' 


7- 


' 


8. 


' 


10. 


• 


1 1. 


' 


H- 


' 


15 


' 


17- 


' 


20. 


' 


22 


■ 


28 


' 


30- 


Oct 


I . 


' 


4- 


' 


6. 


' 


8. 


' 


9- 


' 


10. 


' 


12. 


' 


13- 


' 


14 


' 


16 


' 


17- 



College opens. 

Dr. Roop delivers opening address in Chapel. 

Fisher, a new student, ducked, by Water Company of the 

third floor. 
New coach, Hedges, arrives and starts practice at once. 
Y. W. and Y M. C. A. Reception to new students. 
Sollenberger tells innocent Freshman he is a Junior and a 

minister. 
Trainers' table organized and — that's all. 
Fenstermacher breaks training and goes out "on the town." 
First foot-ball game of season with H. H. S. Score 33 to 

o, our favor. 
Esbenshade starts first 'epoch' of Sophomore Class History. 
Waughtel receives his first consignment from Hinds and 

Noble. 
Foot-ball team leaves for Carlisle. Indians scalped us but 

left us alive. 
Clio-Philo joint session in the former's Hall. 
Everybody strolls. Steinmetz on guard with pitch-fork. 
Christman had his hair cut. 
Prof. Schlicter makes first "call" at the Hall. 
Foot-ball with R.R.Y.M.C.A. at Philadelphia. 
W. S. Roop recites in Logic. 

Sick in bed; symptoms, brain fever; cause, ovenvork. 
Crisis past. Convalescent and swears off for good. 
Clio-Kalo joint session. 
Game with F. and M. on home grounds. Score 12 to 6 

against us. 
Christman has his hair clipped. 
Snpder begins to 'bum' Duke's Mixture. 
McKinley and Roosevelt Club is organized. Quayites secure 

the chairmanship. 



177 



" i8. Democrats follow suit and organize Bryan Stephenson Club, 
with a membership of six. 

" ig. Wooley and Metcalf, next victims of the joke, and all Juniors 
enroll. 

" 20. Team plays at Collegeville with Ursinus. 

" 22. Eighth "test" in Logic and halfway through the book. 

" 24. Miss Ellen Oberholtzer dies. 

" 25. Miss Leah Hartz is married to Mr. Charles VVingerd 

" 26. Muhlenbeig defeated, by score of 136 to o, on home grounds. 

" 29. Christman had his hair clipped close. 

" 31. Philo Society tenders a Hallowe'en Reception to sister 
societies. 
Nov. I. Republican Club parades in Lebanon. 

Democrats and Prohibitionists hold joint indignation meeting 
and drawn their sorrows with (???!!! ). 

" 2. Prof. Schlichter, in Chapel, speaks from Proverbs 20; 1; 
Juniors visibly moved; a few shed tears. 

" 3. Game with Steelton Y. M. C. A. at Steelton. Score heard 
two days later. 

" 4. Juniors attend church services in a body. 

" 5. Extended Faculty Session. Profs, on the hunt ; some cul- 

prits caught ; sentence withheld. 

" 6. Election day and holiday. Team wins from York Y. M. C. 

A. by a score of 10 to o. 11 p. m. Returns show increased 
gain for Wooley and Metcalf. 

" 7. 8 P. M. concert by Royal Tyrolean Troupe. 

7.30 p. M. Engle buys five cents worth oi giun-drops. 
7.45 p. M. escorts Miss B. to concert. Vociferous applause 
for five minutes. 

" 8. Special services of the Faculty. Delayed witnesses return 

and render obligations ; scene pathetic ; clemency petition- 
ed and sentence withheld. 

" 9. Snyder purchases his first pack of tobacco. Buffington happy. 

" II, Church attendance very good. 

" 12. 4 p. M. regular meeting of the Faculty ; ordinary routine dis- 
pensed with; unfinished business taken up and sentence 
announced. 
5 p. M. Lightened countenances brighten the Dining Hall. 

" 15. Christman had his head shaved. 



178 



17- Football team plays at Selinsgrove with Susquehanna. Op- 
posing team's sanity doubtful. Score 17 to o in their favor. 

" 21-22. Quartette practices in Penitentiary Hall at 7.30 p. m. 

" 23. Prof. H. Oldham, delighted with the renditions, changes his 
quarters to the Conservatory. 

" 24. Final game of season with Gettysburg. All break training 
and the P. & R. conductor has his hands full. 

" 29. Quarto-Centennial Anniversary exercises of the Clionian 
Literary Society. 

" 30. Faculty attends the College Association Meeting held in 
Philadelphia, Nov. 30-Dec. i. 
College Beneficiary Club organized, and plan of campaign 
mapped out. Janitor is routed and hunts cover; a suc- 
cessful raid made on Matron's apples; an astonishing 
vault made, over Matron's head, from balcony to the 
ground, and no bones broken; college bell rang for two 
hours and twenty minutes to the tune of Whistling Rufus, 
with variations. 
Dec. I. Annville Fire Company responds in person. 

3. Junior Professor of Latin arrived with new Christmas music. 
An especially beautiful 'Carrol' among the list. 
4.30 P. M. a five dollar damage fine is imposed and ready 
cash is in much demand. Everybody "broke." 

" 4. All Latin classes excused. 

Prof. Schlicter lectures on Modern Canadian Poets, at 7.30 
p. M. to an audience of fifteen. 

" 5. J. T. S. begs for a "furlough" and leaves for Lebanon (?). 

" 8. First Division Senior Rhetorical Exercises. Waughtel sym- 

pathetically inclined, informed us in his introduction, he 
would not keep us long and then spoke only thirty-three 
minutes. 

" 13. Sam Jones lectures in Lebanon. A few Seniors attend on 
foot and occupy the "peanut." A Military Wedding was 
all they remembered. 

" 14. General Sweeney lectures on the "Golden Age." 

Miss S. brings Claude, to which Miss B. files objections, but 
these are overruled. Refreshments — a box of ' ' Lowneys. ' ' 

" 15. Second Division Senior Rhetorical exercises. Oyer vindi- 
cates the "Man in the Moon" for gettieg full on his last 
"quarter." 

179 



" ij. Christman has left his hair grow just three weeks and six 
days. Sanitary conditions still unsatisfactory. 

" i8. Examinations begin. 

" 21. Fall Team ends as also the first 'Epoch' of Esbenshade's 
Soph. Class History. 

1901 
Jan. 2. Winter Term begins. 

'• 3. Test in Science of Rhetoric. 

" 4. Rowdy turns a new leaf, pays his bill at Wolfe's, and dis- 

cards "Polar Bear" for "Wow" 

" 7. "League of Death" convenes. Appenzellar, Snyder, Gehr, 
Hambright, Donough, Brandt and Rupp receive first de 
gree. Preps, are weaned; Freshman verdure removed and 
Soph, swelling rubbed down. 

" 9. No fatalites reported. Preparatorians doing well. 

" 10. Rained like thunder. 

" 13. Missionary Rally conducted by Mr. Soper, State Secretary 
Y. M. C. A. 

" 14. Sheesley returns and pays his subscription. 

" 15. Attends all classes and reads Latin "literally." 

8 p. M. Volney B. Gushing lectures on "The Lost Atlantis. 
Engle attends unaccompanied. 

" 22. Queen Victoria dies. Flag at half-mast. 

" 25. Donough washes his rubber collar and shirt front and attends 
Society. Secretary faints. 

" 29. Donough still confined to his home with a severe cold. 
Feb. I. Karnig takes his annual bath and borrows a pair of clean 
socks. 

" 2. Chickens of vacinity declared, by the Board of Health, third 

floor, to be infested with "appendicitis" germs. 

" 3. La wson goes to church through blinding snow storm, i p.m. 

starts "What We All Want." 

" 4. The President takes precautionary measures for the safety of 

the ladies in Science of Rhetoric. 

" 5. Miss Moyer's reception to the Seniors, at her home in Derry. 
"400" bob-sleds on Cemetery Hill. Miss Walter obeys 
Newton's Law and now a County damages suit is pending. 
Miss W. is defendant however. 

" 6. Kreiger Kurious Company delights students. Miss Bessie 



E. and escort occupy front row on gallery. Gehr's Jack- 
of-tvvo-spot valuable addition to the "deck." It has been 
patented. 

7. Three chickens, from the famous Squire Smith's roost, "op 

erated on" in dissecting Room 33, Penetentiary Hall. Op- 
erating surgeon. Dr. Gohn ; consultants. Gray, Slieesley 
and Fenstermacher. 

8. Scott stricken, on way to L'-banon, with acute appendicitis 

and is conveyed to the hos[)ital. 
9 Conservatory students hear the "Boston Fidettes" at the Ac- 
ademy of Music. 

10. Operation successfully performed on Scott. 
Clio-Kalo midwinter joint session 

11. Appendicitis scare prevalent. Rush on Drug Store for 

(MgS04 7H2O.) 
Another chicken loses the 'germs.' The 'Squire on the war 
path . 

12. S F. Daugiierty misses prayer meeting. 

13. "Taffy" pull a;ii cr )ki,iole gam ;(.'') at Dr. R)op'shon;. 

14. "Hot Turkey and Fixins" supper at Hall, all for a quarter. 

Park E. borrows a half and four street car tickets and does 
the "gallant." 

15. Bard skips Philosopliy and again retouches the map of his 

western hemisphere. 

16. First Division Junior Rhetorical Exercises. Cowling pur- 

chases a dozen "kisses" from the Y. 'W. C. A. president 
and becomes eloquent 

17. Miss Davis entertains friends. 

18. Janitor finds more feathers in the halls and exclaims, — ! — ! 

— !, in Dutch. 

19. Committee on "Banquet" busy. 

20. 'Waughtel begins his "fast " 

21. Miss Gertrude May Bowman, married, in characteristic Col- 

onial style to Mr. Lewis E. Cross. OflSciating clergyman 
the Rt. Rev. H. H. Baish. The bridegroom scientifically 
kissed the bride, to the regret (?) of the latter. The happy 
pair spent their honeymoon, in the darkness, on tne rear 
porch of the Ladies' Hall. Engle retires early from the 
scenes of frivolity and consoles himself by a pathetic rendi- 
tion of "Forsaken-forsaken." 



181 



" 22. Washington's birthday. The Juniors banquet the Seniors 
at Hotel Eagle. 
Waughtel "breaks" his fast as well as the Junior class. 

" 23. Waughtel goes into a state of hibernation. 

Banquet Committee looking for a job — still looking. 

" 24. Y. M. C. A. convention at Lancaster. Gehr and Hambright 
represent the College (?) — at the table. 

" 25. Showers returns from Lancaster and takes his bed. 

" 28. 6 P. M. Waughtel still hibernating. 
March i. Prof. Enders is operated on for appendicitis. 
Clio-Philo joint session. 

" 2. Second Division Junior Rhetorical Exercises. Buddinger 

takes as his text the fourth commandment and preaches a 
sermon. 

" 3. Showers removed to Hospital in ambulance. Trouble — ap- 
pendicitis. Operation successful. 

" 4-5. Miss M. visits hospital. 

" 6. Prof. McFadden arrives and takes charge of Science Dept. 

" 7 Miss Sue M. calls at the hospital. 

" 8 Baish refuses to take Geology test. Other Seniors also excuse 
the professor. Ask Balsbaugh about it. 

" 9 Miss Susie M. goes to Lebanon and "drops in" at the hos- 

pital. Patient rapidly convalescing. 

" II. Examinations but ten days off. Gohn's first symptoms of 
appendicitis appear(?j. 

" 12. Miss Susan M. detained in Annville. 

" 13. Patient has a turn for the worse. 

" 14. President tenders the Annual Reception to the Juniors. 
Sophomores act the "baby" and get a spanking. Sanders 
and Lavvson finally decide to accept the President's kind 
invitation to attend, and arrive at 9 p. m. 

" 15. Profs. Daugherty and Shenk successfully loot the entire 
building, much booty being secured. An itemized list of 
the articles follows: One dozen magazines, one deck play- 
ing cards, kid finish, twenty R. room chairs, three bottles 
(ten year old) sherry wine, four pounds of smoking tobacco, 
two ounce packs, two packages of "Wow," half empty, one 
set of poker chips and a "hobby-horse." The supply be- 
ing sufficient for immediate demands, the next raid is in- 
definitely post-poned. 

182 



1 6. Gohn interviews Dr. Gloninger at Lebanon. Operation ad- 

vised at once ; case urgent. 
7. 45 Appenzellar and Smith make a "call" in town. 
8.15 Keep previous engagements with the Misses E. L,. S. 

and B. E. All "lovely." 

17. Showers returns to College, much improved, and spends the 

evening at the Hall. 
3 p. M. Appenzellar makes another "call" in town. 
3 30 P. M. Miss E. L. S. cancels her engagement with the 

gentleman, and occupies her pew in church alone. 

18. 7.15 A. M. Appenzellar apologizes and the reconciliation is 

mutual. 

19. Gohn tells of his sufferings to Miss Lucy S. Scene touching. 

It begins to rain. 

20. Gray discards his sweater for a clean (?) shirt. 

21. Gohn braces up and passes examinations. 

22. Winter Term ends and appendicitis fake over. 




183 



Epilogue. 



Now our irksome task has passed 
From our wearied hands at last ; 
Jokes grown stale from long abuse 
With us have no further use. 
Things that happen now, are dead, 
So you need have little dread, 
That your actions we'll portray 
In dry prose or rh)'me, we'll say. 
For 'tis shameful to call verse 
What is hardly prose or worse. 

In this little book we've tried 

To amuse you and beside 

To appease your thirst for fame, 

In large print we've placed your name. 

Hope you wont offended be, 

And think ill of us 'cause we 

Used some tell-tale habit, queer, 

Or a word dropped through the year, 

To help make our book replete 

With fun, otherwise 'twere incomplete. 

If our pleading goes for naught. 
And you censure us for aught. 
When you think again, be gay, 
"Every dog must have his day." 
If you'd even scores, don't moan. 
Write an Annual of your own. 
With these lines we take our rest 
Feeling that we've done our best; 
Proof-sheets, manuscript galore 
Fare thee well forever more — 
Amen. 



Ilnbex to Contents. 



Title Page 3 

Dedication ..... 4 

Prologue ...... 7 

Editorial Staff .... 8 

Lebanon Valley College . . .11 

Calendar 13 

Corporation 14 

Committees 16 

Faculty 17 

Autographs ..... 24 
Classes. 

Senior 28 

Junior ..... 36 

Sophomore . . . .52 

Freshman ..... 60 

Preparatory Department . . 69 

Conservatory ..... 72 

Chorus Class 74 

Quartette 76 

Orchestra ..... 78 
Literary Societies 

Clionian 80 

Philokosmian .... 84 

College Forum .... 90 

Kalozetean . . ■ . 92 



Christian Associations 




Y. W. C. A. . 


98 


Y. M. C. A. . 


lOI 


Programs ..... 


104 


Athletics 


115 


Clubs 


129 


Literary 




Story .... 


146 


Prayer .... 


150 


Melancholy 


151 


Gags and Grinds 




Alphabet .... 


155 


A Question 


156 


Inconsistencies 


157 


Commandments 


159 


Pessimist Cure 


160 


Dictionary 


162 


Question Box . 


164 


Faculty Feats . 


166 


Wise and Otherwise 


167 


Raid of Gobbeliers . 


171 


Notices .... 


17,^ 


Applied Quotations . 


174 


My Diary .... 


177 


Epilogue ..... 


184 



^be Business fiDanagcrs 

Kindl)' invite the attention of the students of Lebanon 
Valley, our patrons and friends, to the business men 
who, by their liberal advertising, have made the publi- 
cation of "The Bizarre," possible. 
We know from experience that they will deal with you 
fairly and squarely. They all deserve a share of your 
patronage, which we trust you will give them. 



Lebanon Valley 
College 

(FOUNDED IN 1866, FOR BOTH SEXES.) 

Devoted to thorough work in the Standard College Courses 
and also in Music and the Fine Arts. Its instruction is wholly 
by experienced and specially trained professors. 

/TS OBJECT 

To combine efficiency with cheapness. Yearly ex- 
penses to the student from $175 to $200. Regular 
Literary tuition $40 for 40 weeks. 

ITS LOCATION 

In the heart of the beautiful Lebanon Valley, easy 
of access, in a very healthful climate, in the midst of 
a cultivated Christian community. 

FOR INFORMATION 

Parents, guardians and young men and women are 
invited to write freely. Letters answered promptly 
and fully and catalogues sent free on application. 

OUR ALUMNI AND STUDENTS ARE OUR BEST 
RECOM M ENDATIONS. 

President Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



J. H. REDSECKER, Ph. M. ESTABUSHED 1S52. GEO. R. ROSS, Ph G. 



Whenever you want anything iu Drugs and Medicines, you 
can get (he Best and Purest at 

Dr. (5eo, IRobs S. Co/s 

' PHARMACY. 
Opposite Court Mouse, LEBANON, PA. 

oldest House. Largest Stock. Lowest Prices. Quality the Best. 

THE NEWEST DESIGNS 
AT THE LOWEST PRICES. 

C. R. BOAS. 

Jeweler and Silversmith, 

214 and 216 Market Street, HARRISBURQ. PA. 

The yyVusser Studio 

^ Leader for Strictly 



^.i6 North Third street, HARRISBURG, PA. 



We Show the 

Latest Styles, and Guarantee 

to please. 



Fine Pliotograplis. 



College Work a Specialty. 



H. A. LOSER, 

1^ DEKLER IN ® 

^"nFECtToN E R Y..,. 



Parties Supplied with Oysters and Ice Cream. 

West Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 



You Ride with Ease 


BOOKS 


in Pnenmatic Tired Rigs 


AND 




STATIONERY. 


AMOS BEAMSDERFER 






Office Supplies, Fountain 


can supply the best Pneumatic 


Pens, Base Ball, Lawn Ten- 


and Solid Tired Rigs. 


nis and Golf Supplies. Cro- 




quet Sets. The Handsomest 


Ei:ycle Sundries 


Line of Hammocks in the 
City. 


and Repairing 




Pictures flrt Novelties and 


Cor. Forge & Willow Sts. , 


Window Shades. 


Lebanon, P/. 


J. A. DeHuff, 


PHONE. 


LEBANON, PA. 



McKr^igl^t's Studio 



Vf^ For Pictures at the most reasonable prices. We 

^^fi^J aim especially to please and to make the Best 

^jS^ Grade Picture for le?s then you can get them any- 
where in the city. 



BROOCH Pins 

A SPECIALTY. 



8ir Cumb. St., 



Lebanon, Pa. 



190 



w 
o 

R 

T 
H 
Y 

W 
A 
R 

E 
S 

IN 

A 
B 
U 
N 
D 
A 
N 
C 
E 




E 
Y 

E 



A 
M 
I 



C 
R 

l> 

T 
I 



CUMBERLAND ST., 



Lebanon, PA. 



Translations 

Li.eril, 5JC. Interlinear, $1.50. 147 vol- 

Dictionaries 

German. French, Italian, Spanish, 
L-itin, Greeli, $2 00, and Si.oo. 

CompIet3ly Parsed Caesar, 
Book I. 

lias on each pa.gc, z?iteriznear trans- 
lation. //^'t-rrt/ i ransla:i^n. and every 
word completely parked. $1.50. 

HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers 

4-5-6-12-13-14 Cooper Institute, N.Y.City 
Schoolboaks of all publishers at one store 



;c!iooI Books 



m a iiciry 





And at New Yor'; prices, singly i 
or by i^e dozen, may be obtained ' 
stcoiid-kaitd or TteiVy bv any b' y < 
pirl in the remotest h.imlet, cr any , 
teacher or official anywHeic, and ' 



Brand new, complete alphabetical 
cataloeu ^,/ree,i f school books of a/^ ( 
^ubliihersy if you mention this ad. 
EDIDS tz TiZZVB 
4 Cooper Institute F:-^ Tork City " 




STEPHEN HUBERTIS, JEEIBI^ 



II 25 and II 27 North Third Street, 



HARRISBURG, PA. 



W. K. KIEBLER, 



EAGLE TONSORIAL PARLOR. 

FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED. 



ANNVILLE, Pa. 



19 It 



For HOLIDAY PRESENTS-For EVERY DAY USE 



The Lamp of Steady HaMts 

Thp Ian o that doesTi't flare up or smoke, or cniise you 
to u-;b b d lang:iia;;e ; tlie lamp that looks good when 
you gL't it and stays gor-d ; the lamp that you never will- 
ingl y pa rt with, once you have it ; that's 

iChe |Mcw Rochester^ 

other lamps mav be offered you as " just a-s ^ood " — 
they may be, in soii-ci respects, but for all around good- 
ness, there's only one. Tne New Rochester. To n)ake 
sure the lamp offered you is ■ eiiiiine. Inok for the name 
on it ; every lamp has it. (300 Varieties.) 

Old. I^amps Miade IVe-ve. 

We en n fill every li. . ^j want, ^o matter whether you 
waiita new lamp or stove, an old one repaired or refin 
ishecl, a vase mounted or other make of lump transform' 
ed into a New Rochester we can do it. Let us 
send vou literature en the sii ject. 

We are SPECIALISTS in the treatment of diseases of 
Lamps. Consultation FkHE. 

THE ROGHESTEB LAMP CO., »« ^^k ''l'"'® * »» BareUy St., He^f lork. 





192 



Stephen Lane Folger, 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY. 

CLUB AND COLLEGE PINS AND RINGS. 

GOLD AND SILVE:^ MEDALS. 



200 BROADWAY, 



NEW YORK. 




TRUE TO LIFE 



SLoiiid a Fiiclfgrapti Be 

M. G. RITTER 



xNOWS HOW TO MAKE IT SO 



121 NORTH NINTH ST., LEBAr ON, PA. 



H. H. KREIDER. 




JNO. E. HERR. 



K^reider <& Co., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

fill Kind? of 1-lard apd Soft Coal, 

LUMBER, GRAIN, FEED, SEEDS and SALT. 

Office on Railroad Street, near Depot, ANNVILLE, PA. 



193 



GEO. F. SHORE, 

^^_^bc Ibill ZLailor 

Has moved to 1264 Market street, Harrisburg, Pa., where he is showing one 
of the largest lines of Foreign and Domestic Woolens in the city. 

M. P. SPANGLER, 

NUTTINQ BUlLDINQ-8th and Cumberland Streets, Lebanon, Pa. 

^ REPRESENTING ^m. 

mew ^oxk %itc IFns. Co., of flew ^ox\;. 

BEGAN BUSINESS 1 843. 

Assets December 3 1 , 1900, ..... $325,763,152.51 

Has Paid Policy Holders and holds in trust for them 

OVER EIGHT HUNDRED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS. 

Has Paid Policy Holders in Dividends alone 

OVER ONE HUNDRED MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

THE LARGEST FINANCIAL INSTITUTION IN THE WORLD. 

ma. C. jfrants 8i Bro., 

ARE THE LEADING 

pajbiooable patter? ai)d Mep'5 Fufoi^ber?, 

775 dumberlanO Street, 

.Xebanon, ipa. 

194 



H. L. PALMER, President. 



J. W. SKINNER, Secretary. 



ORGANIZED 1857. 



The Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, 



Cash Assets, $139,512,166.31. 
Tontine Accumulatiotis, 
General Surplus, 



Liabilities, $133,945,513,67. 
$23,360,346.00 
5,666,652,64 



DIVIDENDS TO POLICY HOLDERS UNEQUflLED. 



ALSO REPRESENTATIVE FOR 



The Philadelphia Causality Company 

lr)surir)g against Accident oQd SicKoess. 

R. A. MaulFair, Annville, Pa. 




Spring: and Summer 
1901. 

Our Stock of Up-to-date Footweer 

has never been so Complete 

as at Present. 

We have Patent Leather, Tan, 
Kid and Calf — in button, lace and 
congress. Our low Shoes in Pat- 
ent Leather, Tan and Kid are 
strictly in it this 3'ear. Prices 
range from $1.25 to $5.00 the pair. 
Your Inspection is invited. 



I=EiA£'S,_ 



10 per cent, off for College Students. 



Next Door to C. Shenk. 



195 



\A/ Q WOOLF ^ ^' G£:/?BE/?/CH, M. D. 



DEALER IN 



TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 



Groceries, 
Notions, 
&c. &c. 



62 East Main Street, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



W]V[. WflliTZ, 

FIRST CLASS 

SHAVING and HAIR DRESSING 

PARLOR. 

il> 

West Main Street, 
fINNVILLE, PA. 



Homeopathic 
Physician, 



428 CUMBERLAND ST., 
LEBANON, PA 

DIETRICH'S 

MAKERS OF THE 

dfinest Hce Cream 
anb jfanc^ Cakes 



Catering for Weddin§:s. 



'°'5 N- ™!S S'- [ HARRISBURG, PA. 
225 Market St., ( ' 



196 



What in the world 
to give a friend ? 

College men know and the Nruo Hiven Union says, apropos 
of term-end with its good-byes : ' 'The question of zvhat in the 
zvorld to give a friend at parting seems to have been solved by 
the publication of 

Songs of all the Colleges 

which are alike suitable for the collegian of the past, for the stu- 
dent of the present, and for the boy [or girl) with hopes; also 
for the music-loving sister, and a fellow's best girl. 

"All the NEW songs, all the OLD songs, 
' 'and the songs popular at all the colleges ; 
"a welcome gift in a?iy home anywhere. " 

AT ALL BOOK STORES AND MUSIC DEALERS 

Postpaid, $1.5o. or seiit 071 approval by the publishers. $i.50 Postpaid. 

Hinds k Noble, cotp^.r,':;r., New York City. 

Dictionaries Translations, Students' Aids — Schoolbooks of all publishers at one store 

197 




Kodak Cameras and Supplies 

Pictures and 
Picture Frames 

Fine Photographs of All Kinds. 

HARPEL, 

8tb and Willow Sts. Lebanon. Pa. 



UNIVE RSITY OF B UFFALO 

MEDIC/IL DEP/1RTMET4T. 



The -6th Regular Session Commences Sept. 30TH 1901, and 
Continues Thirty Weeks. 



The lectures will be held in the large, new, three stor3' building, con- 
taining three amphitheatres and rooms for dispensary patients, chemical, 
pathological, bacteriological, histological, physiological and pharmaceu- 
tical laboratories, thoroughly equipped with modern conveniences. In- 
struction by lectures, recitations, laboratory work, conferences and clinics 
Four year graded course. Clinical advantages unexcelled and recently 
much increased. For particulars as to lectures, clinics and fees, send for 
annual announcement to 

DR. JOHN PARiVlENTER, Secretary, 

University of Buffalo, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



J. T. BUTZ, Jr.. 

The Reliable Clothier and Furnisher, 

NEWPORT, PA. 

198 



±lin!lll!lll!!!l!!l!ll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|lllllllllllllllllllll!lillllll!il!lllltllllilillligilllllllllllll!: 



The 



illcp 




Or^an | 



S Is unquestionably the finest and best reed organ now made. This is the = 

= verdict of unprejudiced judgment. Write us for Catalogue and prices before E 

E you buy one of those cheap inferior organs of which there are so many in the E 

E market and which cause you vexation, annoyance, and disgust, instead of that E 

E JDy which a really good instrument can give you. We manufacture a large = 

^ number of styles in five, six and seven octaves. = 



I WE ARE SELLING AGENTS FOR | 

E Kranich & Bach, Krakeur Bros., Kroeg'ef, = 

E Keystone, J. & C. Fisher, Ludwig, E 

5 and Franklin Pianos. E 

E All of which are sold at lowest prices and on the most liberal terms = 

S at our new store 758 Cumberland Street. = 

I Miller Organ Co., | 

I LEBANON, PA. | 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

199 




Get your Suit 
made where? 

5. SarQent's 

The Fashionable Tailor. 

Style, Fit aniPWoiia^ Guaranteed. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR WANAMAKER & BROWN'S REA^ Y 
TO WEAR GARMENTS. 

i8 and 20 West Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

The Palace Meat Market, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

BEEF, VEAb fl^lD PORK;. 



ALSO A FULL LINE OF 

Smoked and Salted Meats. 

JOSEPH G. KELCHNER. 

PROPRIETOR, 

WEST MAIN STREET, ANNVILLE. PA. 



The Reliable Hat Store 



All Styles, Shapes and Colors. A Better 
Assortment in no Hat Store in the State. 
Dunlap's Agent and Every Other Good 
Manufacturer's Agent. 



fl. f^ise & Son, 



831 Cun)berlaod Street, 



LEBANON, PA- 



DEALER IN 



JO^AJEUE Hardware, Oils, Paints, Glass, 
L House Furnishing Goods, 

A Full Line of Sporting Goods. 



East Main Street, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



TELEPHONE. 



PIPE ORGANS 

Builder of the two manual Pipe Organ in Lebanon 
Valley College Conservatory of Music, also the two 
manual instruments iu the First U. B. Church, Cham- 
bersburg, Pa., St. Paul's U. B. Church, Hagerstown, Md 
and in more than six hundred other churches throughout 
the U. S. Satisfaction guaranteed. Write for our new 
catalogue containing full information. Address, 




M. P. MOLLER, 



Hagerstown, Md. 



WATCHES, 



DIAMONDS, 



JEWELRY. 



When you buy any goods in this line either 
for yourself or for gift purposes, call on the re- 
putable and reliable Jeweler, 

J. K. LAUDERiHILCH, 

844 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 



WheQ You Want to MaKe a Present 

You will find a very satisfactory place to purchase 
it at this store. No matter how little money you 
want to spend, you will find a suitable present 
here. 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE. 
E. G. HOOVER. Jeweler. 

Watch Inspector C. V. R. R. 23 North Third St., HARRIRBURG, PA. 




THE KISOLL'S 

Wonderful Double Washer. 

TWO ARE COMBINED. 

Received Diploma of First Premium at 

World's Fair, Chicago. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 

Knoll's Gent's Spring: Frami Bicycle. ^ 
JONKS L. KNOL-L, 




107 South Fourth Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



E. ]B. ^VIAJISHAEL, M. D., 

3 i EAST 3VIAIN STREIOT, 

ANNVILLE. PA. 




m. S. Seabold, 



Paints, Oils, 

Glass, 

Dye-Stuffs, 

2 East Main St,, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Wholesale aud 
Retail 



DRUGGIST. 



Sole Proprietor of 

Dr. Fahnestock's Family Medicines. 




The ENGRAVINGS in 
this book were made by 

The Electric City 
Engraving Co., 

507 to 517 Washington Street, 
BUFFALO, NEW YORK 

Largest engraving house for 
college plates in the States. 
Write for samples and prices. 




203 



Established D. O. Shenk, 

a. W. KINPORTS, 
'™'t- H. L. KINPORTS, 

Shenk & Kinports, 



DEALERS IN 



Drij Good5, Mm% Carpet?, Oil Cloth, 

QUEENSWARE AND GROCERIES. 



they are right 
Ice and 



BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS^ntrp:- 

CLOTHS AND CASSIMERS. 

We make a Specialty of Ladies' and Gents' Furnishings, Shoes, Rubbers 
Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 



MisH's Lebanon 

(Greenhouses, 



j»^ 




Cut Flowers and 
Decorations for 
Weddings, Parties 
and Funerals. 



;h Streets. / ^j-, y, ai^-na] 

South Front Street 



Chestnut and Fourth Streets. / ^_^ _ _,—».-, 1"^ _ 

L^EBANON, r^A. 



7VY. H. SHAUD, 

<^ DEALER IN ^Btches 311(5 Jewelpy. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

FINE •• AND 

CANDIES 9& FRUITS 

Families Supplied with Oysters and Ice Cream. 
204 



When... 



In need of Shoes we invite 
you to call and see The 
Walk=Over Shoe at $3.50 
The Best in the country 
for the price. All the 
latest styles. 



The Banner Shoe Store, 



Opposite Court House. 



LEBANON, 



PA. 



M. F. BATBORF. 



A FEW SPECIALTIES IN 



LADIES' WAISTS 



and. 



DRESS SKIRTS. 

Also a full line of Dry Goods, Notions, 

Carpets, Oil Cloth, Queensware, 

Groceries, Hats, Caps, 

Boots and Shoes. 



Wm. D. Elliott 



ALL KINDS OF 



Shoe {Repairing 



Done by hand or Machine. 



We have the agency for D. L. Douglass 
$3.50 and jf3.oo Shoes. 



Give us a call and be convinced. 



New Work Made to Order. 



Main Street, 



Annville, Pa. 



Joseph Miller, 



DEALER IN 



FURNITURE 



Undertaking a Specialty. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



205 



Spring anb Summer 



LlilBAlVON, PA-. 



Woolens for Spring and Summer on 
hand. Our line is complete. The 
fabrics and colors have quality and 
style. Kmdh' call and e.xamine 
them. lo per cent, off to students. 



FINE TAILORING. 



C. E. Ri^XJCH. 



XKInTTH .V>sr> CvaiEERLAND STS- 



iAZEST eND STORE 



JNO. S. SHOPE. Propr. 




DEALER IN 



Dry Goods, Notions, Groceries, 
Queensware, Glassware, 

Carpets. Hatting;, Oil Cloth, Boots, 
Shoes and Rubbers. 

In Hats, Caps, Straw Goods and Gents' Furnishing Goods 
we always try to keep up-to-date. 



134 and 136 West Main Street, 



Annville, Pa. 



206 



Eastman Basiness College 

Has in its half century of work de- 
veloped the capacity of thousands 
to well-trained men, capable to fill 
every department af a^business c 
Known everywhere for the thorough- 
ness of the preparation given in the 
least time at the smallest expense. 



The System of Teaching 

Is based on actual daily experience 
u every brauch of business, includ- 
ng Merchandising, Bookkeeping, 
Banking, Commercial Law, Penman- 
ship, Correspondence, Arithmetic, 
Telegraphy, Stenography, Type-writ- 
ing, etc., etc. 



r~"^ 




Young: Men Trained 






To be all-rouud business men: — or 
they may take up a special branch of 
business and be THOROUGH in that. 
No better illustration of the value of 
a business education can be offered 
than the success of those who have 
graduated from Eastman College. 

By the old way, training for business 
was acquired through years of ap- 
prenticeship, but the successful man 
of today is the one who enters the 
E field prepared for the work he is to do 
E by the new and shorter methods of 
J; Eastman College, the model busi- — 
K school 



A Thorough Business Man 

Is the description of the man who 
becomes successful, is known and has 
the confidence of the community. 



BUSINESS HOUSES supplied with 
competent assistants. Situations se- 
cured without charge, for all gradu- 
ates of the Business and Short-hand 
Courses, an invaluable feature to many 
young people. Open all the year. 
Time short. Terms reasonable. Ad- 
K dress as above. 



Sbsbsb.' 



207 



Tt^e Electric p^e 




This will be called, as the woiickis 
of electiicit}- for lighting, healing 

and develop. We have attained 

perfection in ever3-thing that is up- 
to-date in furnishing offices, stores, 

factories and with everj'thing in 

this line in telephones, call bells, 

lighting and which we d) in 

a scientific manner at low prices. 



Lebanon Electric Co , 



LEBANON, PA. 



OUR STOCK 



Is a stock worth seeing at prices 
worth knowing. The best points 
in our Clothing are developed in 
wearing. 



rioyer's Cut Rate Clothing House, 

735 CUMBERLAND STREET, 

Fisher Acadeiii)' of Music Building. LEBANON, PA. 



208 



.. HIGH ART... 

Photography 

EXCLUSIVELY AT THE 

Rise & Gates 
Studio, 



142 North Eighth Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 



If there is anything new in the Art of 
Photography, we have it. 



Special Reduction to Students. 




\i/ 



iki 



\li 



i(sxsxixs)®(sxs)®®®®®®(sxsxs®<s)®®®®(^ 



209 



TELEPHONE CONNECTION. STEAMSHIP TICKETS. 

The "AETNA" write only the best Accident and Health Policies. 

C. Vernon Rettew, 

INSURANCE, REAL ESTATE AND RENTS, 
1 119 N. Third Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Fire Insurance on Summer Cottages a Specialty. First Class Companies 

only . 



OUR SAYING AND DOING 

You are interested in them 
because we of.'er what you want 

Men want their Lnundrying done the 
best way with the least wear on the goods 
Our Laundry does work which has rec- 
ommended itself to tasteful and carefully 
dressed people ever since we are in busi- 
ness. We are confideut of pleasing you. 

Standard Steam Laundry 
and Scouring Works, 

Allen F. Ward. B. S. Propr. 27 North seventh street. 

/IDercbant bailor, Lebanon, pa. 

D. P. Witmyer & Co., 

UP-TO DATE Booksellers and Stationers. 
Special attention is called to our facilities for 
supplying anything in the Book and Stationery 
line. All the latest publications. Fountain 
Pens, Pencils, Tablets and everything necessary 
in a School room. 

Lebanon, Pa. 





21 South Eighth St., 



HARRY W. LIGHT, 



NEiAi 



Second-Hand 



AND SHELF=WORN 



College Text Books. 



I=INE 



Stationery 



WALL PAPER AND 



Window Shades. 



22 East Main Street, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Harpers New 
Pl^otograph Gallery 



839 Cumberland Street. 

(Above Dr. Means' Drug Store.) 



Strictly High Grade Up-to-date Photos only. 
Special Rates to Students. 



Central Book Store 1.0 



329 Market Street, 



HARRISBURG, PA. 



* Can supply everything belongfing 
a first-class and well-appointed 

j^ Book and Stationery Store. 

* Printings and Engraving;. Also 

* Book-Bindingf. 



ARE YOU A SUBSCRIBER OF 

XLhc College 3forum? 

IF NOT, WHY NOT? 

Published Monthly. Contains all the College News. 

ONLY 50 CENTS A YEAR. 

S. F, Daughekty, Bus. Mgr. W. C. Arnold and C. H. Fisher, Asst. Mgrs. 



DENTAL KOOMS: 72 W. IVIAIN ST., 



Buy lour Books From a Collep;e Student 

College Text Books, 

NEW AND SECOND-HAND. 

jfine Stationery, 
Students' Supplies. 

D. D. BRANDT, 

First Floor Administration Building, Lebanon Valley College. 



Oup Headache Wafers 

ABSOLUTELY SAFE FOR ALL HEADACHES, IOC. 

OUR COMPOUND TAR LOZENGES just the thing for Public Speakers, Teachers 

and Singers. Clear up hoarseness, and that uncomfortable titilation in the throat. 

5, lo, 25 cts. OUR LIVER PILLS, I5 and 25 cts. OUR LIVER SALT taken 

before breakfast, a tablespoonful in hot water. N. B. — Good results after breakfast. 

Send cash or stamps by mail for any of the remedies. We will send promptly. 

LEMBEHGEH Sc CO., 

PHARMACISTS, 

Ninth Street, LEBANON, PA. 

Lighted by Gas. 29 Comfortable Rooms. Heated by Steam. 

HOTEL EAGLE 

— ' — I 1 — '^- — 

This hotel has a ta 

lately been re-built ya S Cattle yard with 

and re -furnished 3 E shedding for 100 

throMshout. ^ g h e a d of Ca 1 1 1 e. 

Fairbanks' scales 
— ®®- — 3i 1^ attached. 

Street cars pass 
the hotel every hour 

until mi-lnight be- g g Stabling for 40 

tween Palmyra and y^ R , 

»« . n M horses. 

Myerstown. 



RATES, $1.50 PER DAY. 
First-Class Livery Attached. C. F. SAYLOR, Proprietor. 

H. S. WOL-F. 

^dealerinCONFECTION ERY. 

First Class Restaurant. Green Groceries, Oysters, Ice Cream and Fresh 
Fish. Families Supplied with Oysters and Ice Cream. 

MNNi^ILLE, PM. 

213 



RIDER AGENTS WANTED 

one in each town to ride and exhibit a sample 1901 model 
bicycle of our manufacture. YOU CAN MAKE $tO TO 
$50 A WEcK besides having a wheel to ride for yourself. 

1901 Models G;t'„;L'd" $10 to $18 
00&'99MoclelsJfats$7fo$l2 

500 Second Hand Wheeis^^ ia <$fl 

takea in trade by our Chicago retail stores, ^^ lU ^ V 

many good as new 

We ship auy bicycle pN APPROVAL to 
anyone wti.-out a cent deposit vi advance and allow 

You take 
absolutely 
no risk in ordering from us, as you do not need to pay 
a cent 'f the bicycle does not suit you. 

DffI SiftT @99V 3 -whf'l until you have written for our 
y n%3l DUI FACTOR/ i^RICES and FREE TRIAL OFFER. 
This liberal offer has never been equaled and is a guarantee of 
_^ _ the quality of our wheels. 
WE WANT a reliable person in each town to distribute catalo^es for us in 
exchange for a bicycle. Write today for free catalogue and our special offer. 

J. L. MEAD CYCLE CO., Chicago. 




114 



I GRAND OPENING OF | 

i Spring and Sammet Goods i 

^ DRESS GOODS 3 

C; New shadings, new designs. Many novelties — all fresh "^ 

S^ and new. All wool French Challies and Hundreds of dif- X3 

£^ ferent weaves. Replenish your wardrobe. Buy from us X3 

C^ and you will be sure to be in style. :C3 

B SILK DISPLAY . 3 

S^ These are goods the merchant takes pride in showing. ^ 

S^ They are also the fabrics that fashionable dressed ladies ^ 

£^ are always ready to procure. Our selections are made to ^ 

S^ meet all tastes. A rare treat awaits you in our Silk De- ^ 

S^ partment. ^ 

g SUIT DEPARTMENT 3 

•^ Tells the story of what is to be worn and where the best ^ 

£^ can be had for the price. We have a very large stock of ^ 

£^ suits, Coats and Capes for Spring. Also a full and com- ^ 

£^ plete line of Silk Waists, separate Skirts and the choicest ^ 

S^ line of wash Shirt Waists ever shown in the city. We in- ^ 

S^ vite you to examine our large stock. ^ 

»~- -~j 

S^ Lace Curtains in all the newest designs ; Curtain Poles and :::3 

S^ Fi.xtures. :::3 

•— Housekeepers will find it to their advantage to examine our '^ 

^~ very large stock of Linens, Cotton Sheetings and White Quilts. ^ 

I C. SHENK, I 

^ 816=822 Cumb. St. LEBANON, PA. ^ 

215 



A. C. ZIMMERMAN, 
CARPETS, DRAPERIES, ETC., 

758 CUMBERLAND STREET, 
LEBANON, PA. 

Q^ ^^ ^A/(f^/ P HEADQUARTERS FOR 

^a. Cheap Dry Goods, Notions, 

jfwi^ Hats, Caps, Shoes, and 

^ Hardware. 

PALMYRA, PA. F^eady Made Clothing a Specialty. 

INTeRGOLI-ECIT^Te B\_/REH\J 

Cotrell & Leonard, Albany, N. Y. 

Wholesale makers of The Caps and Gowns to the 
American Collegfcs and Universities 

INCLUDING 

L,ebanon Valley, Lehigh, Uni. of Pa., Yale, Harvard, Priuceton, 
Uai. of Chicago, Uni. of Cal. and others. 

F^ich goWQS for the Pulpit and ths Bench. 

Illustrated bulletin, samples, etc., upon application. 




ISAAC WOLF, 



STRICTLY ONE-PRICE 

Clothier and Gents' Furnisher, 

828 CUMBERLAND STREET, 

LEBANON, PA. 



216 




NEW EDITION 




WEBSTER'S 

INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONARY 

JUST ISSUED. NE,W PLATES THROUGHOUT. NOW ADDED 

25,000 ADDITIONAL WORDS 

PHRASES AND DEFINITIONS 

Prepared under the supervision of W. T. HARRIS, Ph.D., LL.D., United States 
Commissioner of Education, assisted by a large corps of competent specialists. 

Rich Bindings. 2364 Pages. 5000 Illustrations. 

THE, BE,5T PRACTICAL ENGLISH DICTIONARY EXTANT. 

/^/rO^ Also "Webster's Collegiate Dictionary with Scnttish Glossary, etc. /^^tf^^Tx 
/ tm \ " First class in quality, second class in size." / ^ \ 

/ wEBSTEK'S \ —Nicholas Murray Butler / WEBSTIR'S ] 

I collegiate) „ ,— — -— , ,. . I collegiate) 

\ DICIIONAKV / Specimen pages, etc., of both books sent on application. \ DICTIONABY / 

vJlLx' G. 6 C. MERRIAM CO.. Springfield, Mass. ^^ ^ 



217 



^ hwnil^ii i^ii[iiiiAi[iiiti^iiiMii^iiiiiiiij|[iiiiiiii^iii#^Niiiiii^Niiiiii]|;iiiiiiiii[;iiM^^^ ife 



..THIS BOOK.. 



rr" 



Mas Designed anC» )Execute& anD is a 
Spectmen ot tbe artistic IKflorli 
Done at tbe 

\b Snowflake \i/ 

Printing and Publisliing 

Company 



(1/ \^> 

laibere all worft from tbe simplest OoDger 

to tbe most elaborate booh are turne& 

out at remarftabl? low prices. 

i^. C. IVI. HIESTER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Estimates cheerfully furnished upon application. 

ti „ Jf 



* 



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2l8 



IFnbex to Bbverttsenients. 



BARBERS. 




GENTS FURNISHERS. 




William Kiebler 


• 191 


Isaac Wolf, 


. 216 


William Waltz, . 


196 


H. Meyer, 


. 208 


BICYCLES. 




GROCERS. 




Jonas Knoll, 


. 202 


H. A, Loser , . 


190 


Mead Cycle Co. 


■ 214 


W. C. Wolf, 


. 196 


A. Beanisderfer, 


• 190 


H. S. Wolf, 


• 213 


BOOKS. 




HARDWARE. 




H. W. Light, . 


. 211 


J. A. Smith, 


. 201 


D. D. Brandt, . 


. 212 


HATTERS. 




J. A. DeHuff, . 


190 


A. Rise & Son. 


. 20I 


n. P. Whitmeyer, . 
Central Book Store, 


. 210 
. 211 


HOTELS. 




Hinds & Noble, 


91-197 


C. F. Saylor, 


• 213 


G. & C. Merriam & Co., 


. 217 


INSURANCE. 




BOOK BINDER. 




R. A. Maulfair, 

Spangler, . 

C. V. Rettew, . 


• 195 


S. Hnbeities, 


• 191 


• 194 
. 210 


BUTCHER. 

J. G. Kelchner, 


. 200 


JEWELERS 

M. H. Shaud, . 


. 204 


CARPETS. 




J. C. Schmidt, . 


. 191 


\. C. Ziiumerman, . 


. 216 


Laudermilch, 


. 201 


CATERERS. 




C. Ross Boas. . 


. 189 


Dietrich & Son, 


. 196 


E. G. Hoover, . 


. 202 


CAPS & GOWNS. 




LAMPS. 




Cotrell & Leonard, . 


. 216 


Rochester Lamp Co. 


. 192 


COAL & LUMBER. 




LAUNDRIES. 




Kreider & Co. . 


■ 193 


A. Ward, . 


. 210 


DENTIST. 




LIVERIES. 




Dr. Zimmerman, 


. 212 


A. Beamesderfer, 


. 190 


DOCTORS. 




ORGANS AND PIANOS 




M. B. Gcrbench, 


. 156 


Miller Organ Co. 


• IS9 


E. B. Marshall, 


. 202 


M. P. MoUer, . 


. 201 


DRUGGISTS. 




PHOTOGRAPHERS. 




W. S. Seabold, 


. 202 


Rise & Gates, . 


. 209 


Ross & Co. 


1S9 


Harpel, 


198-21 1 


Lemberger & Co. 


■ 213 


Ritter, 


• 193 


-lY GOODS. 




McKnight, 


. ICO 


C. Shenk 


• 215 


Musser, 


. 189 


ENo RAVERS. 




PRINTERS. 




Electric City Engraving Co. 


• 203 


A. C. M. Hiester, 


. 218 


Stephen Lane Folger, 


■ 193 


SCHOOLS. 




ELECTRICIANS. 




Lebanon Valley Coll 


ege, . 1S8 


i"he Lebanon Electric Co. 


. 208 


Eastman Business Cc 


)llege, . 207 


FLORIST. 




University of Buffalo 


, . . ic8 


Mish, . . . . 


. 204 


SHOES. 




FURNITURE. 




C. W. Few, 


• 195 


Joseph Miller, . 


• 205 


Banner Shoe Store, . 


. 205 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 




SHOEMAKER. 




J. S. Butz, 


. 198 


William D. Elliot, 


. 205 


Jno. Shope, 


. ;o6 


TAILORS. 




Shenk & Kinports, . 


. 204 


J. Sargent, 


» . . 200 


M. F. Batdorf, . 


. 205 


C. E. Rauch, . 


. 206 


S. F. Engle, 


. 216 


Geo. F. Shope, 


. 194