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Full text of "Bizarre"

Published at 
Lebanon val- 
ley College-- 

sylTanja by*' 

fne Jtiraor Class 

o/^Nineteen 

Fourteen. 




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George Daniel Gossard 




EORGE DANIEL GOSSARD was born in Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, two and one-half miles south of Greencastle, 
on November 26, 1868. He was the second child of Hilary 
and Mary Gossard. Both of his parents and all of his seven 
brothers and sisters are still living. 
In his early youth he attended the public schools of his native county 
and later when his parents moved near Hagerstown, Maryland, those of 
Washington County, that state. It was during the public school period of 
his life that the foundations of his future intellectual power and strength 
of character were firmly laid. The teachers who were most responsible 
for the heights which he attained in later life are Ezra Shieldlcnecht, of 
Funkstown, Maryland; Martin Luther Keedym, now judge of the Wash- 
ington County Courts, and Joseph Shuman, of near Middleburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Even in his boyhood he was of a highly religious turn of mind, with 
the result that he was converted on his eighteenth birthday and three days 
later joined the United Brethren Church at Middleburg, of which Rev. 
S. H. Snell was then pastor. On January 21, 1888, he was granted 
Quarterly Conference License to preach ; and on March 2 of the same year 
he delivered his first sermon, the text of which was, "The harvest is past, 
the summer is ended, and we are not saved." 

His youthful determination to obtain a higher education resulted in his 
entering West Virginia Normal and Classical Academy three days after he 
preached his first sermon. He graduated in his preparatory course in the 
spring of 1890 and entered Otterbein University in the following fall. 
While at college he became noted for his remarkable capacity to do much 
more work in a given time and do it well than the average student. This 
is demonstrated by the fact that he finished the regular three-year classical 
course in two \ears, graduating with the degree of A. B. in 1892. 

In the following fall he entered Union Biblical Seminary, where his 
work was characterized by an even greater intensity of purpose and crown- 
ed with even greater success than his work in college. In fact he applied 
himself too closely to his work and consequently was forced to drop out of 
the seminary for one year to recuperate his health. He graduated in 1896 
with the degree of B. D. 

During the period of his enforced absence from the seminary he was 
not idle by any means but served his first charge, Marion Circuit, which 
consisted of three churches with a total membership of eighty-five. He was 
considerably inconvenienced by the lack of a parsonage and the necessit\ 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 



of keeping a horse; yet in spite of all these hardships he received only about 
$300 for his first 3"ear's services. 

In March, 1897, he was granted Annual Conference License to preach 
and was ordained on March 2, 1892 at Dallastown, Pennsylvania, bv 
Bishop E. B. Kephart, D. D., L. L. D. 

After having served on Marion Circuit for two years he was sent to 
Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, where he remained until March, 1902, when 
lie was transferred to Salem Church, Baltimore, Maryland. 

He was a member of the General Council Y. P. C. U. from 1904 to 
1909 and has been a trustee of L. V. since 1908. 

During his pastorate at Baltimore his masterful executive ability, his 
sterling character, his eloquent presentation of Christian principles, and 
tiie remarkable demonstration in his own life of their power for righteous- 
ness cauifed him to become widely known as one of the most successful min- 
isters of the denomination, brought him the degree of D. D. from L. V. in 
1910, and finall\' in the fall of 1912 when the trustees of L. V. sought a 
man to succeed the Reverend Lawrence Keister, D. D., S. T. B., who had 
recently resigned from the presidency of this institution, resulted in his 
selection to fill the vacancy. 

That their selection was a wise one has already been adequately de- 
monstrated. Upon his first appearance before the student body, at the 
opening exercises of the college year, Dr. Gossard endeared himself to all 
who heard him. In his address on that occasion he strongly emphasized 
that he does not believe in those schemes of education which tend to develop 
only one phase of a student's being, but that he will try to work out a sys- 
tem here which by providing for physical, intellectual, social, and spiritual 
needs, each in their proper place, will develop well balanced men and 
women, capable of fighting life's battles fairly and successfully. By help- 
ing to put our athletics on a firmer basis with financial aid and personal 
influence; by opening new opportunities to many of us thru improving 
some of our courses, no matter how strong they may already have been; by 
his fearless and successful efforts to secure justice for members of the fa- 
culty or of the student body when occasions demanded ; by the example of 
his character; by his manhood, he "has kept the faith:" and under his 
guiding hand L. V. will widen the scope of her influence, increase the mani- 
festation of her power for good, and will be a more substantial pillar in 
church and state, a more bounteous source of individual and civic righteous- 
ness, than ever before. 







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7aZ>/^ 0/ Contents 

Book I The College 

Book II Organizations 

Book III Events 

Book IV Athletics 

Book V L' Allegro et il Penseroso 



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BOOK I 

The College 













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Processional 

HE thots and deeds of one generation are bound by indissolu- 
ble bonds to the thots and deeds of the next. The life of to- 
day is absolutely dependent upon the life of yesterday, and the 
life of tomorrow will be just as dependent upon the life of 
today. The character of each individual, group, nation, or 
civilization is determined by those of its progenitors, and it in turn will 
determine the character of its successors. Past, present, and future are 
simply terms used to designate the different phases of the irresistible ten- 
dency of institutions when once firmly established to perpetuate them- 
selves. 

This law holds true with special force to colleges and universities. 
A constantly changing current of human life flows incessantly thru the 
halls of such an institution, faculty and students, ever coming and ever 
going, who, as they come, are pervaded by the spirit, impelled by the 
ideals, and dominated by the customs of those who went before and who, 
as they go, leave the same spirit, ideals and customs to those who are to 
follow. Thus there develops that continuity of existence which makes 
one feel that his alma mater is a distinct entity apart from the many dif- 
ferent personalities who are responsible for her existence. Our own Leb- 
anon Valley is the same college that opened its doors for the first time in 
1867. 

The same college, and yet how different ! For despite the fact that 
the real fundamental spirit of an institution must essentially remain for- 
ever the same, "the old order changeth," and every ideal and every cus- 
tom followed in an effort to attain it, thru the experiences of students 
and teachers, become stepping stones over which the institution rises, 
stage by stage, to higher planes of realization. Our alma mater has pass- 
ed thru many such stages. In 1834 a small private school was conducted 
in the southern end of a local blacksmith shop. The same year marked 
the founding of the Annville Academy, which was conducted in a 
frame building erected especially for that purpose. In a very few years 
this humble institution became favorably known over a wide territory and 
secured a very liberal patronage. By 1859 those who controlled it deem- 
ed it no longer able to meet the demands of the community ; and con^ 
sequently in that year the old building was torn down, a large three-story 



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brick building erected, and the curriculum greatly changed. Gradually 
the faculty was increased and the courses of study brot up to the stand- 
ard set by the typical academies of the period. That this "new" Annville 
Academy was markedly instrumental in shaping the thot and character 
of this community is attested by the fact that on its rolls are found tTie 
names of many of the greatest and most famous men and women of this 
section of the state. Finally in 1865, upon the decision of the United 
Brethren denomination to found "a school of high grade," the owners 
of the Academy building offered to donate it as the home of the pro- 
posed school. This kind offer was thankfully accepted, and accordingly 
in the spring of 1866 Lebanon Valley College began her remarkable ca- 
reer. In the following year a new building was erected to the north of 
the original building. The curriculum adopted was the average one fol- 
lowed by the small denominational colleges of the time but was hardly 
equal to the present curriculum of a good second-class high school. The 
road along which the young institution was forced to travel was hilly and 
strewn with rocks; but gradually, as the years rolled by, in spite of the 
jealous opposition of her enemies, in spite of the lack of co-operation on 
the part of many of those who should have had her best interests at 
heart, in spite of her location away from centers of population, in spite 
of the lack of a substantial endowment, old courses were gradually dis- 
continued and new ones added, the faculty was increased and strength- 
ened from time to time, the student body grew larger, new equipment 
was secured, additions made to the libraries, the Engle Conservatory of 
Music was erected, a large number of efScient men and women of 
strong characters had been graduated and were serving themselves, their 
fellows, and their Creator in many walks of life — in brief, the school was 
in a flourishing condition, when, like a thunder bolt from a clear sky, on 
Christmas Eve of 1904 a fire of mysterious origin laid the main building 
in ruins. Altho sorely tried by this terrible ordeal of fire and with cer- 
tain ruin apparently staring her in the face, our alma mater passed safe- 
ly thru the crisis of her career. Her friends, pervaded by the progressive 
spirit of her founders, impelled by their ideals of service, and dominated 
by the customs appropriate to these ideals, rallied bravely to her support ; 
and in the short space of a year there sprang into existence our present 
Administration Building, the Men's Dormitory, the Ladies' Hall, and the 
Carnegie Library. 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U f 



So from the ashes of the old Lebanon Valley there arose, Phoenix- 
like, a new and greater Lebanon Valley, an institution which grants the 
palm to no small college in the state. We admit that in athletics we do 
not rank very high ; but when we consider that our school has always had 
practically no endowment to carry on even her main work and much less 
to carry on athletics, beneficial tho they may be, we are perfectly justified 
in our assumption that a season is a success if the team wins about half 
of the games. However now that a compulsory athletic fee is collected 
from every student we feel sure that we shall soon raise the requirements 
for a successful season and that our teams will measure up just as well 
to the new requirements as they have to the old, or better. Our literary 
activities compare well with those of any small college in the state. Com- 
petent critics tell us that the work done in our literary societies is seldom 
surpassed. Our Annual Junior Oratorical Contest has given birth to 
undergraduate productions which are hard to match anywhere. In view 
of the high standard of the literary work done here it is strange that Leb- 
anon Valley has not taken a more active part ii; intercollegiate debates 
and oratorical contests ; but as it is she secured first place in the State 
Intercollegiate Prohibition Contest three years ago and this year the first 
debating team in her history would have defeated Juniata if the contest 
had not been judged by men utterly incompetent for the task. However 
it is in the work of the class rooms and laboratories that Lebanon Valley 
has secured her greatest prestige. Our faculty is composed of earnest 
men and women, all of whom have, not only a wide general knowledge 
of their respective fields of learning and an intensive knowledge of the 
particular courses which they are conducting, but also the ability to pre- 
sent their various courses in such ways that the best possible educational 
results are obtained. In the wealth of its attainments and the scope of 
its scholarship, our present faculty — with all due respect to the noble 
men and women who have served here so well in the past — has never 
been surpassed in the history of the institution, nor is it equalled by the 
faculty of any other small college in the state. Our laboratories are large 
and roomy, taking up the entire north wing of the Administration 
Building, and are equipped for all the work done in the science courses 
that are offered. The truth of this is demonstrated by the fact that 
Johns Hopkins, a school whose severe requirements are almost proverbial, 
gives advanced standing in its Department of Medicine for some of the 









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f LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 



work done here. In connection with the Departments of Chemistrj' and 
Biolog}', the Departments of History and Political Science and Philosophy 
and Education deserve special mention, while all the other departments 
o( the school, after the present holders of the chairs have had sufficient 
time to develop their plans, will probably equal in efficiency the depart- 
ments of which special mention has been made. Thus we might go on 
lauding our faculty and its work, our buildings, our equipment, etc. ; 
but space does not permit our doing so. 

Let it be borne in mind that we realize that our alma mater is far from 
being perfect. We realize that many changes are necessary. Our most 
imperative present need is a large endowment. If Lebanon Valley has 
accomplished so large a volume of good in the past without an endow- 
ment, how much more good would she accomplish with an endowment ? 
Imagination is impotent to picture it. Our next most important need 
is a gymnasium. We need a place, well adapted to the purpose, sup- 
plied with the proper equipment, and under a competent, well-trained, 
scientific, intelligent instructor, where our physical needs can be admin- 
istered to as well as our intellectual and spiritual needs are administered 
to elsewhere. 

With an adequate endowment and a gymnasium a brighter day will 
dawn for our alma mater. Another stage in her evolution will be ush- 
ered in. Pervaded with the same old spirit which gave her birth, im- 
pelled by loftier ideals for the symmetrical development of well-balanced 
men and women, and dominated by newer customs better adapted to 
this purpose, Lebanon Valley will move onward, majestically and trium- 
phantly, a greater force than ever for righteousness, helping to lighten 
humanity's burden of ignorance, feeding human souls with the Bread of 
Life, aiding Happiness to overcome Sorrow and Love to annihilate 
Hate. 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U f 



The Corp 


oration 

RUSTEES 




BOARD OF T 


President George D. Gossard 


, and Faculty, E.x-Officio 

nnsylvania Conference 




Representatives from the Pe 


Rev. W. H. Washixger, A. M., D.D. 


Chambersburg 


1915 


Rev. John E. Kleffman, D. D., 


Chambersburg 


1915 


Rev. a. B. Statton, D. D., 


Hagerstown, Md. 


1913 


S. H. Bowers, Esq., 


Lemovne 


1914 


Rev. John W. Owen, A. M., B. D., 


York ■ 


1915 


George G. Snyder, Esq., 


Hagerstown, Md. 


1914 


W. O. Appenzeller, Esq., 


Chambersburg 


1913 


Rev. L. Walter Lutz, A. B., 


Dallastown 


1913 


Rev. D. M. Oyer, A. B., 


Boiling Springs 


1914 


Rev. J. F. Snyder, 


Red Lion 


1915 


Representatives from the East 


Pennsylvania Conference 




Isaac B. Haak, Esq., 


Myerstown 


1913 


John Hunsicker, Esq., 


Lebanon 


1913 


Rev. J. A. Lyter, D. D., 


Harrisburg 


1913 


Jonas G. Stehman, Esq., 


Mountville 


1913 


Rev. D. D. Lowery, D. D., 


Harrisburg 


1913 


George F. Breinig, Esq., 


Allentown 


1913 


Hon. a. S. Kreider, 


Annville 


1915 


S. F. Engle, Esq., 


Palmyra 


1915 


Rev. D. E. Long, A. B.. 


Annville 


1915 


■Rev. U. S. G. Renn, 


Harrisburg 


1915 


Representatives from the Virginia Conference 




Rev W. F. Gruver, D. D., 


Martinsburg, W. Va. 


1913 


Rev. a. S. Hammack, D. D., 


Dayton, Va. 


1913 


W. S. Secrist, 


Keyser, W. Va. 


1913 


Rev. E. E. Neff, 


Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 


,1915 


Prof. J. N. Fries, A. M., 


Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 


, 1915 


Elmer Hodges, 


Winchester, Va. 


1915 


Trustees-at-Large — H. S. Immel, 


Esq., Mountville; Warren A. j| 


Thomas, Esq., Johnstown ; A. J. 


Cochran, Esq., Dawson. 




Alumni Trustees— Prof. H. H. Baish, A. M., '01, Altoona; R 


EV. L 


E. RuNK, B. D. '99, Harrisb 


Lirg; Rev. F. Berry Plummer, || 


A. B. '05, Baltimore. 






■^Deceased. 




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Alumni Association 

Officers 

President, O. T. Ehrhart 

Vice-President, Claude Engle 

Secretary, R. B. Saylor 

Treasurer, S. H. Derrickson 



Executive Committee 



Dr. Seth Light . , 
Elmer Haak 
John Batdorf 
Alfred K. Mills . 
J. W. Espenshade 
Dr. M.W.Brunner 



Lebanon 

Myerstown 

Annville 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 



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The Administration Building 




The Administration Building is situated on the west side of the 
campus and faces College Avenue. It is a beautiful, three-story, modern 
college building, built of buff brick and trimmed with terra cotta. On 
the first floor are the private offices of the President, the Treasurer, 
and the Registrar ; the recitation rooms of the departments of Philosophy 
and Education, German Language and Literature, English Bible and 
Greek Language and Literature, and Chemistry, the chemical stock-room, 
the laboratory of Elementary Chemistry, and the laboratory of 
Advanced Chemistry. On the second floor are the recitation rooms of the 
departments of History and Political Science, Mathematics and Astron- 
omy, English Language and Literature, and Physics; the private labor- 
atory of the professors of Physics and Chemistr\ , the physical stock-room, 
the laboratory of Elementary Physics, and the laboratory of Advanced 
Physics , and the ofl^ce of the College News. On the third floor are the 
recitation rooms of the departments of Romance Languages and Latin 
Language and Literature, and of Biology ; the biological stock room, and 
the laboratory of Biology ; the studios of the department of Art , and the 
hall of the Philokosmian Literary Society. 



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The Library 




The Library, which is situated south of the administration building, 
is partly the gift of Andrew Carnegie, whose name it bears. It is model- 
led after the Gothic type of architecture and well serves the purpose for 
which it was intended. Unlike the other college buildings it is only two 
stories high. On the first floor are the offices of the librarians, two read- 
ing rooms, and the book stacks. The one reading-room is well supplied 
regularly with a large number of the popular, educational, literary, religi- 
ous, social, and scientific journals and magazines, and local and metropoli- 
tan newspapers; while the other reading-room is for the use of students 
engaged in research work. These publications in connection with govern- 
ment reports, etc. are filed on a large semi-circular balcony and are of al- 
most inestimable value to students engaged in special research work or to 
those desirous of obtaining special or general information on the topics of 
the day. The library proper consists of 14,000 volumes, to which has 
recently been added the library of the late Dr. Eberly. On the second 
floor are the commodious recitation-room of the Department of Oratory and 
rooms designed to accommodate future additions to the library. 



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The Engle Conservatory of Music 




The Engle Conservatory of Music is one of the oldest of our build- 
ings, having been erected in 1905. It is the gift of Benjamin F. Engle, 
who during his lifetime was one of L. Vs. most earnest supporters. The 
building is three stories high and is built of brownstone. On the first 
floor are the chapel, which has a seating capacity of about 600 and 
which contains a large pipe organ and a stage adequate for theatrical per- 
formances, star-course numbers, etc. ; the offices and parlor of the Depart- 
ment of Music; and a dressing room. The second floor contains practice 
rooms well equipped with pianos. On the third floor is a fine suite of 
rooms for the student-janitor of the building and the halls of the Kalo- 
zetean Literary Society. 



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The Girls' Dormitory 




The Girls' Dormitory is a three-story building and modern in every 
respect. In the basement is a large kitchen and laundry. On the first 
floor is our college dining-room, which could amply accommodate another 
time as many students as it now does; the parlor, which is the scene of 
many a brilliant social occasion and the place where the girls entertain the 
fellows ; and lounging room for the girls. On the other floors are the 
suite of the matron, the rooms of some of the lady professors, and those of 
the young ladies — in all there are accommodations for about fifty ladies ; 
and the hall of the ladies' society, the Clionian Literary Society. This is 
one of the most artistically designed and best executed buildings we have. 
This, of course, is perfectly proper, since it contains the best part of the 
student bodv. 



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7"/?^ Men's Dormitory 




The Men's Dormitory is situated on the southwest corner of the 
campus. It is a large, three-story building, built of red pressed brick and 
trimmed with Indiana limestone. Beside a number of single rooms there 
are sixteen suites of three rooms each.. In all there are accommodations 
for about one hundred residents. All who room in this building are re- 
quired to obey certain rules and regulations formulated by the Senior- 
Junior Council for the purpose of protecting the health and morals of 
the residents of the building. 





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J"/?^ Academy 




The Academy building donated in 1866 is the original building of 
the institution. For many years it was used only as a dormitory, but last 
summer it was remodeled and repainted, with the result that it now com- 
pares favorably with the rest of our buildings. Almost all of the prepara- 
tory classes recite in this building. Besides the recitation rooms, it con- 
tains a suite of living rooms for the principal and his family, dormitory ac- 
commodations for about forty students, and several suites for the use of 
married students and their families. It also contains a large parlor, con- 
taining a piano, etc., for the use of the residents of the building and a 
room in which the meetings of the Academy literary society (The Soph- 
roneon) are held. 



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The President's Residence 




We can justly be proud of the house occupied by the president. It 
is a comparatively new building, having been erected several years ago. 
President Funkhouser was the first president to occupy the home. It 
contains all the modern conveniences, including heat, light, and water. It 
is situated on the northwest corner of the campus and faces Sheridan 
Avenue. Every graduate of Lebanon Valley recalls with pleasure the vari- 
ous social functions which in the past have taken place within the four 
walls of this home. 




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JZf^ New United Brethren Church 




The new United Brethren Church was dedicated on November 17, 
1912. It is situated on the northwest corner of College Avenue and 
Main Street. The edifice is constructed of King of Prussia marble and 
all the woodwork is of solid oak, which, altho simple in itself, aids in 
giving the building an imposing appearance on the inside as well as on the 
outside. At the southeast corner of the structure is a massive tower 
eighty-four feet high. The main auditorium has a seating capacity of 
about 1600. By drawing aside the curtains which separate it from the 
Sunday School room the total capacity can be increased to 2500. Each 
class has a separate room but by opening doors and throwing aside cur- 
tains a view of the pulpit can be secured from all parts of them. In the 
basement are rooms for the Junior, Intermediate and Primary depart- 
ments, a large social room, a well equipped kitchen, and an adequate 
heating plant. The total cost of the new church was $75,000, all of 
which has already been subscribed. 



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GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, D.D. 

PRESIDENT 

West Virginia Normal and Classical Academy, 1 890; A.B., Otterbein Uni- 
versity, 1892; B. D., Bonehrake Theological Seminary. 1896; Trustee of 
Lebanon Valle;^ College, 1908; D. D., Lebanon Valley College, 1910; 
Special work at various times at Johns Hopkins Unioersity; President, Leba- 
non Valley College, 1912. 



Page 26 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE" 1914 U ] 




HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M. 
Professor of History and Political Science 



Cumberland A^alley Normal School. 
'94; A. B., Ursinus College, '99; A. 
M., Lebanon \^alley College, '00; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin Summer of '94 ; 
Correspondence Department, University 
of Chicago, '04-'05 ; Professor of History 
and Political Science Lebanon Valley 
College, 1900. 



JOHN EVANS LEHMAN. A. M. 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, '74; 
A. M., Lebanon Valley College, '77; 
Special student, Ohio University, '91 ; 
Cornell, '92; Professor of Mathematics 
and Astronomy, Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, 18S7. 




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ALVIN EDGAR 

SHROYER, A. B., B. D. 

Professor of Greek and Bible 



K. S., Lebanon Valley College, '00; 
I'ausht in Ohio Normal, '01-'02 ; B. 
D,, Union Biblical Seminary, '03 ; Past- 
or U. B. Church, Highspire, Pa., '03- 
'09; Professor of Greek and Bible, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1909. 



SAMUEL HOFFMAN 

DERICKSON, M. S. 

Professor of Biological Sciences 

Newport High School ; Lebanon Val- 
ley Academy, '96-'97 ; Lebanon Valley 
College, '02; M. S., Lebanon Valley 
College, '03; Student Johns Hopkins 
University; Acting Professor of Biolo- 
gical Sciences, Lebanon Valley College, 
'04 ; Professor of Biological Sciences, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1906. 
















It ) LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 j l] 




CHARLES CLINTON PETERS, A. M. 
Professor of Philosophy and Education. 



A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 'OS; 
Professor of Classical Languages and 
Mathematics, Clarksburg College, '05- 
'06; President and Professor of Philoso- 
phy and Mathematics Clarksburg Col- 
lege, '05-06 ; Professor of Philosophy 
and Economics Westfield College, '07- 
'09; Austin Scholar Harvard, '09-'10; 
Dean and Professor of Philosophy and 
Education Westfield College, '10-11 ; 
Dean and Professor of Philosophy and 
Education Lebanon Valley College, 1911. 



HENRY ECKERT WANNER, B. S. 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics 

Vork High School, '03; B. S., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, '09; Assistant 
Chemist Arizona-Mexican Mining and 
Smelting Co., '07-'08 ; Professor of 
Chemistry and Physics Lebanon \'alley 
College, 1909. 






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LUCY SNAVELY SELTZER, A. B. 
Professor of German 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1910; 
Post-Graduate Columbia University, 
Summer 1911 : Professor of German, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1910. 



FA LB A LOVE JOHNSON, A. M. 
Professor of English 



A. B., College for Women. Colum- 
bia, S. C, '05; Professor, College for 
Women, Columbia, S. C, '06-'08; A, 
M., Columbia University, '11 ; Professor 
of English, Lebanon Valley College, 
1911. 




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GEORGE H. PRITCHARD. A. B. 



A. B., Ohio Northern, '07; Com- 
mandant and Athletic Director Howe 
School, Howe, Ind., '09-'10; Principal 
Texarcana High School, Arkansas, Tex. , 
'lO-'ll; Athletic Director Trinity Uni- 
versity, '11-'12; Instructor in Physics 
and Athletic Director Lebanon Valley 
College, 1912. 



ROBERT McD. KIRK LAND, A. M. 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professorship of 

Latin Language and Literature, and 

Professor of French 



Colgate Academy, '95 ; Attended Col- 
gate University, '95-'97 ; A. B. Univer- 
sity of Chicago, '99; A. M., University 
of Pennsylvania, '08 ; University of 
Pennsylvania, '07-'10; Harrison Fellow- 
ship in Classics, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, '08-'10; Member of American 
Philological Association ; Instructor in 
several Private Schools, '00-'05 ; In- 
structor at Urslnus, '06-'07 ; Instructor 
at Princeton, '10'-12; Professor of Latin 
and French at Lebanon Valley College, 
'12. 







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SAMUEL O. GRIMM 
Principal of Academy 

Milleisville State Normal School, 1907: 
Pd. B., Millersville State Normal School, 
1909; A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 
1912; Principal. Lebanon \'alley Acad- 
emy, 1912. 



MAY BELLE ADAMS 

Oratory and Public Speaking 
Instructor in English 



Graduate, Emerson College of Oratory, 
'97 ; Instructor, Gushing Academy, Ash- 
burnham, Mass., '97-'00 ; Instructor 
Cazenovia Seminary, Cazenovia, New 
York, '00-'04 ; Graduate Study, Emerson 
College, '04 and '06; Professor of Ora- 
tory and Assistant in English, Willia- 
mette University, '07-'10 ; Professor Ora- 
tory, Lebanon X'alley College, 1910. 











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/D/4 MA NEVA L SHELDON, Miis. B. 
Pianoforte, Harmony, Ear Training 

Public Schools, Liberty, Pa.; Mans- 
field State Normal School ; tjraduate 
Susquehanna Conservatory, '07 ; Sum- 
mer '07 Severn Studios, New York City ; 
Instructor Pianoforte, Harmony, and 
Musical History, Susquehanna Univer- 
sity, '07-'10; Engle Conservatory of 
Music, Lebanon Valley College, 1910. 



E. EDWIN SHELDON, Mus. M. 
Director of Conservatory, Professor of 
Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony, Coun- 
terpoint and Fugue 



Alma College, '92 ; Oberlin (Ohio) 
Conservatory, '95 ; Graduate New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music, '00 ; In- 
structor Pionoforte and Theory, Toledo 
Conservatory, '02-'03 ; Musical Director 
Susquehanna University, '03-'10 ; Music- 
al Director Lebanon \'alley College, 
1910. 




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FLORENCE S. BOEHM 
Instructor in Art 

Lincoln School, Philadelphia; Ann- 
ville High School, '02; Lebanon Valley 
College, Art Department, '04 ; Drexel 
Institution, '04 ; School of Industrial 
Art, '07 ; Instructor in Art, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1908. 



Page 34 



GERTRUDE KA THERINE SCHMIDT 

Professor of Voice Culture, and Musical 
History 



New Jersey State Normal School, '06 ; 
CJraduate Institute of Musical Art of 
New York City, '10; Supervisor of 
Music, Wordbridge School, '06-'07 ; 
Soprano Soloist Livingston Avenue Bap- 
tist Church, New Brunswick, N. J., '09- 
'12; Instructor in Voice Culture, and 
Concert Solist, New York and New 
Brunswick, N. J., '10-'12; Instructor in 
Voice Culture, and Musical History 
Lebanon Valley College, 1912. 




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CHARLES H. ARNDT 
Instructor in Biology 




OR A BELLE BACH MAN, Mus. B. 
Instructor in Pianoforte 












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GEORGE A. WILLIAMS 
Instructor in Latin 



EDNA E. YARKEKS 
Instructor in History 



CLARA KEE HORN 
Instructor in Mathematics 




BOAZ G. LIGHT 
Instructor in Physical Geography 






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} LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 




FLORENCE E. CLIPPINGER 
Instructor in English 



WILLIAM S. STAGER 
Instructor in Mathematics 



G. ADOLPHUS RICHIE 
Instructor in English 




PHILO A. STATTON 
Instructor in Violin 



Page 37 



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WILLIAM HENRY WEAVER MRS. VIOLETTE NISSLEY FREED 

Treasurer Lebanon Valley College Matron 




REV. HENRY B. SPA YD 
College Pastor 












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Classes 



Classes of Lebanon Valley College, 

Seeking knowledge that shall make them free, 

Loyal to Alma Mater and mankind, 

As they strive to emerge from bondage's gloom. 

Are : Seniors, whose college course is almost run, 
And then to larger and grander service ; 

Soon to follow, Juniors, wisest of all. 

To take their place in life's front battle ranks ; 

Sophomores, slow, but slightly improving. 
In casting ofif ignorance's dire spell ; 

Ending the group. Freshmen, now patiently 

Climbing to heights attained by their cousins — 

Something nobly done for self, school, and race. 

Should be the aim of all whose names here stand. 

H, E. S. 



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Senior Class History 

F you will travel with me in imagination for a few moments, I 
will take you through four years of real college life. Did you 
ask, "Who is that happy crowd flying over the campus?" 
'T is the Freshman Class. How scared the Sophomores 
look when they see them ! Do you see that green bunting 
around the windows of the Freshman girls' rooms? The 
Sophomore girls have decorated. Do not be frightened ! That is only 
Mr. Ritchie going up the rainspout to bring down the Sophomore emblem 
from the cupola. I am sure you enjoy seeing the tug-of-war in which the 
Freshmen pull every Sophomore man across the goal and then march home 
waving that banner which stands next to the Stars and Stripes, the CRIM- 
SON and STEEL. Tonight the' Sophs are tired, having been walked 
over by the Freshies in the football game ; so they have refrained from 
keeping watch and have permitted the little "green" flock to quietly 
and peaceably steal away to Lancaster, where they celebrate the triumph 
by a banquet that has never been and never will be excelled. You, of 
course, must concede the Freshmen the victory in the debate for the Sopho- 
mores are conspicuous by their absence. 

We have had a happy time the first year ; but college hfe is not 
made up entirely of pleasures, as we find in our second year, which is full 
of disappointments cheerfully received. Now we are the class that should 
have been frightened for our boys are outnumbered three to one. Do 
not offer us your sympathies, but offer them to the Freshmen. 

Do you see our girls fighting those Freshies who, notwithstanding 
our defeat in the tug-of-war, would not permit our class to retire in peace 
after the set-out ? No, not even the injured ! Do not think that our girls 
lowered their dignity by engaging in the class-scrap, for women must 
stand up for that which is right. Let us pass to brighter things. 

We are now entering the gates of our Junior year. This is where 
we see the real fruits of the intellectual side of our college life. The 
1913 Bizarre" is one of the results of this productive period. Do you see 
the advertisements for "She Stoops to Conquer?" You will notice that 
the poster says, "Repeated by Request." ' This shows the ability of our 
class along another line. 

And now, let us gaze at the Senior year, a time long anticipated. 
Hard work has been interspersed with receptions and parties. The weary 
road we have traveled, the burdens we have borne, the sorrows we have 
endured, the bluffs we have worked and the flunks we have escaped, all 
are forgotten. Our associations, our good times, the inspirations of our 
faculty and our achievements linger fondly in our memory. While seek- 
ing the glory of 1913, we have always kept in mind the welfare of our 
Alma Mater. Dear as the Crimson and Steel is to us, dearer still is the 
White and Blue — HiSlORiAN. 



Pise 41 




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President, 
Vice President, 
Secretary, 
Treasurer, 



Seniors 

CLASS OF 1913 

Officers 

First Semester 

Victor D. Mulhollen 
Lottie M. Spessard 
Sara E. Zimmerman 
John E. Sherk 



Second Semester 
E. Kephart Boughter 
Charles Y. Ulrich 
Elizabeth H. Rechard 
John E. Sherk 



Page 42 



Historian, 
Poet, 



Lottie M. Spessard 
Sara E. Zimmerman 



Motto — Vis Unita Fortior 
Flower — Red Clover 
Colors — Crimson and Steel 

YELL 

Boom-a-lacka ! Rack-a-jacka ! Boom-a-lacka ! Bing ! 

Rip-a-zipa ! Rip-a-zipa ! Rip-a-zipa ! Zing ! 

Wahoo ! Yahoo! Wahoo! Gee! 

Nineteen Thirteen, L. V. C. 



ROLL 



E. Kephart Boughter 
Florence E. Christeson 
Florence E. Clippinger 
Victor M. Heffelfinger 
Clara K. Horn 
Landis R. Klinger 
Edith M. Lehman 
John F. Leininger 
Boaz G. Light 
Victor D. Mulhollen 
Elizabeth H. Rechard 



Ivan L. Ressler 
G. Adolphus Richie 
Palmer F. Roberts 
John E. Sherk 
Lottie M. Spessard 
Harry E. Ulrich 
Charles Y. Ulrich 
Mark H. Wert 
George A. Williams 
Edna E. Yarkers 
Sara E. Zimmerman 



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E. Kephart Boughter Philokosmian 
Historical-Political 

Class: Tug-of-War, 1909; Man- 
ager Basket Ball Team, 1909-1910; 
Football and Basket Ball Teams, 
1910-1911; Associate Editor "Bi- 
zarre 1913"; President, 1913. So- 
ciety: Pianist, 1911; Recording 
Secretary, 1911; President, 1913. 
Glee Club, 1910-1911; Cast: "She 
Stoops to Conquer," 1912; Cast: 
"Merchant of Venice," 1912; Cast: 
"As You Like It," 1913. First 
Prize Amateur Theatrical Contest, 
1912; Death League, 1911-1912- 
1913; Member Dauphin County 
Club; Secretary L Q. Club. 



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Florence E. Christeson Clionian 
Historical-Political 

Member Lebanon County Club, 
1910-1911; Cast: "Breezy Point," 
1910; Member Girls' Glee Club, 
1911-1913; Member Glee Club 
Quartette, 1911-1913. 




Page 43 






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Florence E. Clippinger Clionian 
Modern Language 

Society: Vice President, 1912; 
Treasurer, 1913. Y. W. C. A.: 
Delegate to Eaglesmere, 1912; 
President, 1912-1913. Secretary 
Biological Field Club, 1912. Teach- 
er in Academy, 1910-1911; 1912- 
1913. 



Victor M. Heffelfinger Kalozetean 
Historical-Political 

Class: Baseball, 1910; Football, 
1910, 1911; Basket Ball, 1911, 
1912. Society: Sergeant-at-Arms; 
Corresponding Secretary; Editor 
"Examiner." Cast: "She Stoops 
to Conquer," 1912. 




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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 j j] 




Clara K. Horn Clionian 

Historical-Political 

Class: Treasurer, 1909-1910; 
Secretary, 1911; Historian, 1912; 
Department Editor "Bizarre 1913." 
Society: Chaplain, 1910-1913; 
Secretary, 1910; Editor "Olive 
Branch," 1911; Critic, 1912. Y. 
W. C. A.: Chairman Social Com- 
mittee, 1910-1911; Star Course 
Committee, 1910-1912; Chairman 
Devotional Committee, 1911-1912; 
Chairman Membership Committee, 
1912-1913; Vice President, 1911- 
1912; Delegate to Easton Confer- 
ence, 1913. Cast: "Breezy Point," 
1910; Cast: "She Stoops to Con- 
quer," 1911. Department Editor 
"College News," 1912-1913; Secre- 
tary Mathematical Round Table, 
1911-1912; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Academy, 1911-1913. 



Landis R. Klinger Philokosmian 
Chemical-Biological 

Class: Football, 1909-1911; Tug- 
of-War, 1909-1910; Manager Base- 
ball, 1911; Manager Basket Ball, 
1911; President, 1911; Assistant 
Business Manager "Bizari-e 1913." 
Society: Corresponding Secretary, 
1910; Recording Secretary, 1911; 
Vice President, 1912; "Philo" 
Quartette, 1911-1913; Anniversary 
Quartette, 1912, 1913; President, 
1913. First Prize Amateur The- 
atrical Contest, 1912; Cast: "She 
Stoops to Conquer," 1912; Cast: 
"Merchant of Venice," 1912; Cast: 
"As You Like It," 1913. Quar- 
tette, Junior Oratorical Contest, 
1911; College Octette, 1912-1913; 
Vice President Glee Club, 1911- 
1912; President Glee Club, 1912- 
1913; Death League; Treasurer I. 
Q. Club. 










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John F. Leininger Philokosmian 
Historical- Political 

Class : Toastmaster, Freshmen 
Banquet, Class of 1910. Society: 
Chaplain; Vice President, 1911- 
1912; Critic, 1912-1913. President 
Y. M. C. A. President Athletic 
Association. President Biological 
Field Club. 



Edith M. Lehman Clionian 

Modern Language 

Class: Secretary, 1909; Treas- 
urer, 1910; Department Editor, 
"Bizarre 1913." Society: Editor 
"Olive Branch," 1909; Secretary, 
19C9, 1912; Anniversary Orator, 
1912; Critic, 1913; President's Ad- 
dress, Anniversary, 1913. Y. W. 
C. A.: Cabinet, 1909-1913; Vice 
President, 1910. Cast: "Breezy 
Point," 1910; Cast: "She Stoops 
to Conquer," 1912. Secretary 
Mathematical Round Table, 1911; 
Glee Club, 1912; Member Student 
Volunteer Band; Associate Editor, 
"Cclleg-e News," 1912-1913. 







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Boaz G. Light Kalozetean 

II;s'orical-PoIi;ical 

Class: Baseball, 1909-1910; Foot- 
ball, 1910-1911; Tug'-of-War, 1910- 
1911; Treasurer, 1911-1912; As- 
sistant Business Manager, "Bi- 
zarre 1913." Society: Correspond- 
ing Secretary, 1911; Record- 
ing Secretary, 1912; Presi- 
dent, 1912-1913. Orator, Anniver- 
sary, 1913. Cast: "She Stoops to 
Conquer," 1912; Cast: "Merchant 
cf Venice," 1912. Cast: "As You 
Like It," 1913. Third Prize, 
Junior Oratorical Contest, 1912; 
Instructor Lebanon Valley Acade- 
my, 1912-1913. Member, Mathe- 
matical Round Table. 



Victor D. Mulhollen Philokosmian 
Historical-Political 

Class: Football, 1911; Class De- 
bating Team, 1911; President, 
1913; Business Manager "Bizarre 
1913." Society: Editor "Living 
Thoughts;" Treasurer; Critic; 
Reader, Anniversary, 1913. Y. M. 
C. A.; Star Course Committee, 
1911, 1912, 1913; Delegate, State 
Convention, Bradford, Pa., 1912; 
Vice President. Cast: "Merchant 
of Venice," 1912; Cast: "She 
Stoops to Conquer," 1912; Cast: 
"As You Like It," 1913. Business 
Manager "College News," 1911; 
Associate Editor "College News," 
1913. Member Senior-Junior 
Council, 1911-1912; President Sen- 
ior-Junior Council, 1912-1913. Half 
of second prize Junior Oratorial 
Contest, 1912. Field Agent, Leb- 
Valley College, Summer, 1912. 
Juniata Debating Team, 1913. 



Page 47 






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Elizabeth H. Rechard Clionian 

Historical-Political 

Poet and Vice President of the 
Class of 1909, 1905-1906. Society; 
Judge, 1906; Orator, Anniversary, 
1912; Vice-President, 1913. Cor- 
responding Secretary, Y. W. C. A., 
1912-1913. Secretary, Mathemati- 
cal Round Table, 1913. Member, 
White Shield Single Standard 
League. 



Ivan L. Ressler Kalozetean 

Chemical-Biological 

Class: Tug-of-War, 1909-1910; 
Baseball, 1909-1910. Society: 
President, 1912-1913; Essay, An- 
niversary, 1913. Member, Y. M. 
C. A.; Biological Field Club; 
Mathematical Round Table; Pro- 
hibition League; Purity League; 
"Graybill Bunch;" Beta Sigma 
Kappa; Deutscher Verein; Death 
League. Captain, Scrub Baseball, 
1910-1911; Scrub Baseball Team, 
1911-1912; Assistant Manager, 
Baseball, 1911-1912; Manager, 
1912-1913. 




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LEBAlMQN VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 




G. A. Richie Philokosmian 

Historical-Political 

Class: Football, 1909-1910; Tug- 
of-War, 1909-1910; Baseball, 1909; 
Debate, 1909-1910; Basketball, 
1910-1912; Vice President, 1910; 
President, 1911; Editor-in-Chief, 
"Bizarre 1913." Society: Corre- 
sponding Secretary, 1909; Treas- 
urer, 1909-1910; Vice President, 
1912; Chaplain, 1912; President, 
1912; Judge, 1913; Member of 
Building Committee, 1910-1913; 
Oration Anniversary, 1913. Y. M. C. 
A., Delegateto West Chester, 1911; 
Treasurer, 1911; Trustee to Sum- 
mer Conference Fund, 1911-1912; 
Star Course Committee, 1911,1912, 
1913; Chairman Star Course Com- 
mittee, 1913. Cast: "She Stoops 
to Conquer," 1912; Cast: "As You 
Like It," 1913. Mathematical 
Round Table: Treasurer, 1912. 
Vice President, 1912. Prohibition 
League; Vice President, 1911; 



President, 1912. Secretary to Col- 
lege Treasurer, 1910-1911; Senior- 
Junior Council, 1911-1913; Man- 
ager Football, 1912; Athletic. As- 
sociation Executive Committee, 
1912-1913; Instructor in English, 
Academy, 1912-1913; Juniata De- 
bating Team, 1913; Member Death 
League; "I. Q." Club. 




Palmer F. Roberts Philokosmian 
Historical-Political 

Class: Anchor, Tug-of-War, 
1910; Vice President, 1911. So- 
ciety: Chaplain, 1909; Executive 
Committee, 1911; Vice President, 
1911; President, 1912; First Ora- 
tor, Anniversary, 1913. President 
Ministerial Association, 1913. Pas- 
tor, Linglestown Charge, 1909; 
Sinking Spring Charge, 1911. 
Member Prohibition League, 1910. 
Lecturer for Anti-Saloon League, 
1911. Half of Second Prize, 
Junior Oratorical Contest, 1912. 



Page 49 





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1911-1912; 

Building 

President, 

Treasurer, 



John E. Sherk Philokosmian 

Historical-Political 

Class: Treasurer, 1912-1913. So- 
ciety: Janitor, 1909-1910; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, 1910-1911; 
Recording Secretary, 
Judge, 1912; Member 
Committee, 1912-1913; 
1913. Y. M. C. A.: 
1912-1913; Prayer-Meeting Lead- 
er, 1912-1913; Delegate to State 
Convention, Williamsport, Pa., 
1913. Cast: "She Stoops to Con- 
quer," 1912; Cast: "Merchant of 
Venice," 1912; Cast: "As You Like 
It," 1913. Assistant Business 
Manager "College News," 1910- 
1911. Senior-Junior Council, 1912- 
1913. 



Lottie M. Spessard Clionian 

Historical-Political 

Class: Vice President, 1912; 
Historian, 1913. Society: Chap- 
lain, 1908; Recorder, 1910-1911; 
Recording Secretary, 1911; Treas- 
urer, 1912; Vice President, 1912 
President, 1913; First Oration 
Anniversary, 1912. Y. W. C. A. 
Vice President, 1912-1913. Cast 
"She Stoops to Conquer," 1912 
Cast: "Breezy Point," 1909. Mem- 
ber Student Volunteer Band. Man- 
ager, Girls' Glee Club, 1911-1913. 



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Harry E. Ulrich Kalozetean 

Historical-Political 

Class: Vice-President, 1912- 
1913. Society: Solo, Anniversary 
Program, 1913. Manager Men's 
Glee Club, Season 1911-1912. 



Charles Y. Ulrich Kalozetean 

Historical-Political 

Class: Baseball Team, 1910; 
Manager Class Football Team, 
1910; Class Debating Team, 1910; 
Tug-of-War, 1910-1911; Captain 
Class Basket Ball Team, 1911- 
1912; President, 1912; Associate 
Editor of "Bizarre 1913." Socie- 
ty: Chaplain, 1910; Corresponding 
Secretary, 1911; Censor, 1913. 
Ministerial Association, 1910-1911; 
Secretary Lancaster County Club, 
1911; Cast: "She Stoops to Con- 
quer," 1912; Cast: "Merchant of 
Venice," 1912; Member Senior- 
Junior Council, 1912-1913; Mem- 
ber I. Q. Club. 




Page 5 1 






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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U ] 




George A. Williams Kalozetean 
Chemical-Biological 

Class: Tug--of-War, 1910; Man- 
ager Debating' Team, 1911; Bas- 
ketball Team, 1912; President, 
1912; Department Editor "Bizarre 
1913." Society: Assistant Sar- 
geant-at-Arms, 1910; Editor "Ex- 
aminer," 1910; Recording Secre- 
tary, 1911; Vice President, 1912; 
President, 1913; President's Ad- 
dress, Anniversary, 1913. Y. M. 
C. A.: Delegate to Eaglesmere 
Summer Conference, 1912; Cabi- 
net, 1912-1913. Academy Scholar- 
ship, 1910. "College News" Staff, 
1911-1912. Treasurer Athletic As- 
sociation, 1911-1912. Secretary 
Prohibition League, 1911-1912. 
Mathematical Round Table: Vice 
President, 1912; President, 1913. 
First Prize Junior Oratorical Con- 
test, 1912. Cast: "She Stoops to 
Conquer," 1912. Cast: "As You 
Like It," 1913. Lebanon County 



Club, 1909-1912. Assistant in 
Physics and Chemistry, 1911-1912. 
Biological Field Club. Instructor 
in Latin, Academy, 1912-1913. 
Deutscher Verein. White Cross 
Single Standard League. Alter- 
nate, Juniata Debating Team, 
1913; Preacher's Sons Club, 1913; 
Chairman Class Day Committee, 
1913. 




Mark H. Wert Philokosmian 

Historical-Political 

Society: Chaplain, 1911; Vice 
President, 1912; President's Ad- 
dress, Anniversary, 1913. Y. M. 
C. A.: Cabinet, 1912-1913. Presi- 
dent Ministerial Association, 1912- 
1913. Member Senior-Junior 
Council, 1912-1913. Pastor: Inter- 
course Charge, 1909-1911; Pleas- 
ant Hill Charge, 1911-1913. 






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Sara E. Zimmerman Clionian 

Modern Language 

Class: Secretary, 1910-1912; 
Poet, 1909-1913; Poet, "Bizarre 
1913." Society: Chaplain, 1909- 
1911; Recording Secretary, 1910- 
1912; Treasurer, 1911; Critic, 
1911; Third Orator, Anniversary, 
1912; Vice President, 1913. Y. W. 
C. A.: Corresponding Secretary, 
1911; Treasurer, 1912. Cast: "She 
Stoops to Conquer." 



Edna E. Yarkers Clionian 

Historical-Political 

Class: Secretary, 1909; Depart- 
ment Editor "Bizarre 1913." So- 
ciety: Reader, Anniversary, 1910 
and 1912; Treasurer, 1912; Critic, 
1913; President, 1913. Y. W. 
C. A.: Secretary, 1909-1910; 
Treasurer, 1910-1911; Delegate to 
Eaglesmere Conference, 1912; 
Chairman Devotional Committee, 
1912-1913. Cast: "Breezy Point," 
1910; Cast: "She Stoops to Con- 
quer," 1912; Cast: "As You Like 
It," 1913. Editor-in-chief of "Col- 
lege News," 1912-1913. Instruc- 
tor in English History, Academy, 
1912-1913. 






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Page 54 




Senior Class Poem 

E have endeavored and we trust have wrought 
Each one his best in this fast-passing phase of life, 
Our College years — far different ways 
Time soon must call us to — may just the thought 
Of service lead us on. As we have sought 

In all to know the truth, each heart now prays 

For strength to dare and do, but to the maze 

Of action which confronts us each has brought 

A will and purpose firm. Now as we stand ^ 

Upon the threshold and look back again 

Our vision lingers on the days gone by. 

The future, not the past 's at our command, 

We meet it gladly, but we strive in vain 

To leave old friends, old times without a sigh. — PoET. 



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Junior Class History 

N September, 1910, forty-seven students organized the class of 
191-1. 

Practically the first clash we had with the Sophs was the 
Tug-of-War, which we won 7-1, a larger score being pre- 
vented by our opponents' yielding before "time out" was 
called. But Oh, the straw ride after the feeds in the evening ! 

On November third, we held the greatest banquet ever held by a 
class of this institution. We left the campus openly in broad daylight 
and arrived safely in Harrisburg where the feast was held in the Metro- 
politan Hotel. 

The football score was 22-0 and basket ball 25^10, each in our fa- 
vor. The class debate was never held due to the parleying of the Sophs, 
who did not submit a question until the last week of the college year. 

But save your pity, for one more fiizzle must be recorded against 
those Sophs. The valuable cup that had been offered to the class win- 
ning a cross country run from the Water Works to Annville, was never 
awarded, because a suffragette Prep induced one of the officials to start 
the Sophs on the race a few minutes before our men and the other of- 
ficial arrived at the starting place. 

The following year, we had an advantage not possessed by the Sophs 
who preceded us, in that, in their language, we were pitted against the 
"greenest" class that ever arrived at the college. Early in the year their 
president was arrayed in green, as befitted a Freshman, and brought into 
chapel, while his helpless mates sat idly by wondering who husked the 
corn since they left home ; whereas the wonder in Mr. Heister's mind to 
this day is whether he will ever be paid for printing their silly posters. 

Their first attempt was a feed at the Water Works, a miserable 
failure, in which the few who arrived there relied for protection upon 
town ruffians (by whom they are now "cussed" for not having been 
given something to eat.) But alas, the CS. ! 

But their greatest courage and best judgment was shown in their 
holding their class banquet during the Thanksgiving vacation, to enable 
all their members to be present. How different from the way in which 
we departed ! Now was our time to get out posters (which are paid) 



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pronounced by their own cousins to be the best posters ever gotten out 
by a class. And what a display made by "Coxey's Army" with rakes and 
hoes as they paraded the streets yelling to keep up their courage ! But 
then one can't blame the town merchants for objecting to having their 
windows scratched with rakes. Realizing their sad plight, the mob tried 
to get revenge by starting a class scrap; so after breaking the gallery door 
in Engle Hall, (the bill for which has left the class insolvent to this day), 
they attacked two of us while the rest of us were scattered to the four 
corners of the campus. But the great battle went against them (even 
the Freshies called it a draw), the intervention of the Council being the 
only thing that prevented a picture in this book of "a class bound by the 
ties of hemp." 

We easily won the basket ball game, 17-4, while the class debate 
was a literal runaway. 

So readeth the history of the class of 1914 : a class noted for its 
class meetings, cool, deliberative bodies ; a class that adopted its constitu- 
tion the first year ; a class which never tried to substitute a show for 
class dues. 

Dear reader, do you doubt the truth of this wonderful history ? If 
so, watch for signs of anger in the interested parties, for "the truth cuts." 



Former Members of the Class of 19 J 4 



William Becker 
Walter D. Biever 
John B. Curry 
David Gruber 
Warren H. Hayes 
Paul Hummel 
Daisy Klein 
Edward L. Kreider 



Henry H. Kreider 
Arthur Light 
Edith Morrison 
Claude D. Reddick 
Frank Shearer 
John E. Sherk 
Harry E. Ulrich 
George Zullinger 



Page 56 



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Junior Class Poem 




LASSMATES: our course is nearly run, we've neared the 
hill's white brow, 
'Twas 1914's future once, but 'tis our present now. 
Three years have gone since we've appeared within old 
L. V.'s halls, 
It's true she has derided some, but she's given us more applause. 
A worthier or a cleverer class L. V. could never boast; 
Nor never shall, tho she should drain our land from coast to coast. 

The tasks we have accomplished and the vict'ries we have won 

We've been busy every moment from rise 'til set of sun 

In Freshman year 'twas football and the dreaded tug-of-war, 

And basketball and baseball — triumphs by the score. 

That first year's sheet is white and clean, no failures there recorded, 

Tho oft the waters were "sae" deep, all safe our way we forded. 

With Sophomore and Junior years came trials with our gain. 

But with bright days of sunshine must be mingled days of rain. 

And surely one great vict'ry compensates for slight defeat — 

Remember the debate! Has L. V. ever known a mightier feat ? 

Then courage still, be brave, classmates, we soon shall reach the summit. 

With "Dum Vivimus, Vivamus" we'll lay our laurels on it. 

Then here's to 1914, and to Alma Mater, too, 

To Her it ever has, is now, and ever will be true, 

And let's resolve to do our best, tho weak that best may be. 

And filled with treasures will return the ships we put to sea, 

O, tho our anchor may not be all I have fondly sung. 

We'll honor '14's memory and the deeds that she has done. 



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Juniors 



CLASS OF 1914 

Officers 
President — D. Ellis Zimmerman, Fall Term 
William S. Stager, Winter Term 
John B. Lyter, Spring Term 

Vice President — Edward H. Smith, Fall Term 

Clarence H. Ulrich Winter Term 
Catharine B. Bachman, Spring Term 
Secretary — Harry H. Charlton, Fall Term 

D. Leonard Reddick, Winter Term 
L. B. Harnish, Spring Term 

Treasurer — M. Josephine Urich, Fall Term 
Edgar M. Landis, Winter Term 
C. Edward Mutch, Spring Term 
Historian - C. Edward Mutch 

Poet - - Blanche M. Risser 

Motto — Dum V'ivimus Vivamus 
Flower — Daisy 
Colors — Granite-Blue and Brown 

YELL 

Baz-el-roo ! Gaz-el-koo ! Bric-a-brac ! 

Bliv-a-doo ! Gliv-a-doo ! Rick-o-rack ! 

San-a-lic ! Dan-a-ric ! Kosh-a-kav-a-kee ! 

Nineteen Fourteen ! L. V. C. 



Charles H. Arndt 
Catharine B. Bachman 
Harry H. Charlton 
Leray B. Harnish 
Edgar M. Landis 
John B. Lyter 
E. Mav Meyer 



ROLL 

C. Edward Mutch 

D. Leonard Reddick 
Blanche M. Risser 
Lester A. Rodes 
Carl F. Schmidt 
Edward H. Smith 
Henry E. Suavely 

D. Ellis Zimmerman 



William S. Stager 
Paul L. Strickler 
Clarence H. Ulrich 
M. Josephine Urich 
John A. Walter 
Russell M. Weidler 
David E. Young 



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Charles H. Arxdt 
Annville 



Kalozetean 
Chemical-Biological 



"Th/it critic eye, that /iiicrascope of wit. 
Sees hairs and pores, examines hit by hit." — Pope. 



( pVSSY" mewed for the first time on October U, 1892. 



He came to the Academy 
in the spring of 1909, and was the thirteenth member in the class of thirteen 
which graduated in 1910. He had wasted many gallons of midnight oil in his 
strenuous efforts to capture first honors, but in vain. However he is a most excellent 
student, especially in biology. In this department he has become so proficient that this 
year he was made an instructor. From the hour that he first struck L. V. he has had a 
hard time evading the attempts of the Co-eds to entangle him in affairs of the heart. 
He has probably taken more lives deliberately in cold blood that the famous "Lady- 
Guillotine" of the French Revolution. He received his nickname on account of his 
fondness for dissecting cats. He has absorbed so much biology that he can tell how to 
extract teeth from the amoeba without pain, and how^ much reason a mule will manifest 
before becoming unreasonable. The sacred associations of our birthplaces tend to draw 
us all thither sooner or later ; so with Charles it is "all roads lead to Jonestown and the 
sooner the better," especially since Miriam left school. If "Pussy's" present attain- 
ments are a criterion of what we may expect of him in the future, we would not be sur- 
prised if some day he should startle the world with discoveries as revolutionary as those 
of Darwin. 




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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 




Catharine B. Bachman 

Annville 



Clionian 
Historical-Political 



' To see her is to love her. 
And love but her forever: 
For Nature made her what 
And never made another." — 



she is 
Burns 



f r^ITTIE B. 
Tv on January 6, 1893. but 



"Kit", one ot the most loyal ot our girls, was born in Lebanon 
vliile she was still very young, her parents desiring 
that their children should grow up in a more intellectual environment, moved to 
Annville. "Kit" attended the local public schools and was graduated from the High 
school in the class of 1910. She demonstrated that her parents hopes were not in vain, 
for in the following autumn in company with her chum, "Jo," she entered L. V. with 
the class of 1914. She is one of its standbys and we are proud of her. She never fails 
to do her part and it is to her that we owe much of the success of this book. "Kit" 
possesses great intellectual ability and is a profound thinker — that is when she takes the 
time. She is very charming as a hostess, as can be vouched for by the class, which has 
spent many pleasant evenings at her home. She has a keen sense of wit and 'is always 
ready with a quick retort. "Kit" is rather fond of the sterner sex and even since she 
has entered our midst, she has been showered with Cupid's darts. First froT' ""e d'''e'-- 
tion and then from another they would come, and then from both directions at once \ 
battle royal ensued, the flight of the arrows being so thick as to obscure the -un but the 
end finally came and it was found that the "Lyter" arrows had passed harmle-sh b\ 
while the heavier ones have been known to "Stick". "Kit" expects to teach one \ear — no 
longer. Beyond that we are not able to prophesy, but we are sure that she will Stick 
to anything that she undertakes. 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U ] 




Harry Hayward Charlton Kalozetean 

Lowell, Mass. Historical-Political 

"His English style an' gesture fine 
Are a' elean out o' season." 

— Burns. 
T" TARRY is a New Englander, a fact of which he is extremely proud. He first tried 
-* -• to attract the attention of others to himself thru the medium of his vocal chords 
on May 18, 1887, at Allston, Mass. After living thru various degrees of fortune, which 
kept him on the jump from the north to the south and back again ; but being exceed- 
ingly young at the time, he can give no satisfactory account of them, for which those 
who know him best are thankful. Finally after he got along a little in years he decid- 
ed upon a business career. However, after being graduated from Lowell Commercial 
School, he still was unsatisfied and consequently came to L. V. where he is getting 
what he desires, a good foundation in Biology. He is a tower of strength at center or 
at tackle on the varsity football team and has also done good work on the 1914 basket- 
ball team. Unlike most fellows he does not smoke but spends his spare time in dream- 
ing of the time when he will have captured his Ph. D. from Yale. Believing that 
"Variety is the spice of life", he can be seen now in the company of one fair co-ed and 
now in that of another. However we believe there is just a slight possibility that some 
of them have the same belief. Being "a hale fellow well met" and having developed 
to a remarkable power that rare faculty of "stick-to-it-iveness" Harry will eventually, 
we believe, soar to planes all too rare for many of the rest of us. 



Page 61 



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Philokosmian 
Historical-Political 



Leray Bowers Harnish 

Carlisle 

"Doth with his eternal motion make 
A sound like thunder everlasting" . — JFordsivorth. 



LERAY came to L. V. strongly possessed with the idea that it pays well to advertise, 
and he has long since proved its truth. In his capacity as reporter for local Car- 
lisle, Harrisburg, and Philadelphia newspapers, he has done more in three years 
to spread (ar and wide thru the clarion voice o( the press the name and fame of L. V. 
than all others together have done in a decade. In that short time he has secured for 
this institution at advertising rates, space to the enormous amount of over $11,000. "The 
Reporter's" greatest publicity feat was his successful attempt to place an appropriate L. 
V. exhibit in the state capitol at Harrisburg, where thousands who otherwise would may- 
be never have even known that there is a L. V. C, now have an opportunity of learning 
not only that there is such an institution, but also that she compares favorably with any 
small college in the state. Since entering L. V. this genius for publicity has held two 
responsible editorial positions, on the Annville Journal and Hershey Press respectfully. 
At present, in partnership with another member of 1914, he is conducting the "College 
Book Store." While "The Reporter" has been booming L. V. and her activities, he 
has incidentally been securing much publicity for himself, with the result that of all the 
students now at this institution, he is probably the widest known. The passage of the 
compulsory athletic fee rule, which has already been productive of so much good, was 
due in a large measure to the tactful way in which he presented the proposition to the 
proper authorities. In spite of the fact that "The Reporter" is a very busy fellow, he 
finds time to indulge freely in a single recreation, a walk three times a day with ''the 
idol of his heart" and ' the ideal of his dreams". After a thoro psychological examina- 
tion of this dispenser of intelligence, we have concluded that he would probably make a 
good stump speaker, a barker for a side show, or riproaring, howling evangelist. 



Page 62 



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Edgar Michall Landis 
Myerstown 

"Laugh and the 



Kalozetean 
Mathematical-Physical 



•orid laughs ivith you." 
-Ella Wheeler Wilcox. 



rHIS personification of mirth is forced to claim relationsfiip with the dusty town of 
"Kelchnerville". twelve miles east of Annville. Born on March 12, 1892, he had 
plenty of time before he would be able to enter college to learn the traditions and 
standing of the school in the town that made Albright famous (?) And he did learn 
them, greatly to the benefit of himself and all too well to the loss of the place referred 
to ; for being a rather precocious youngster, in accordance with the theory of evolution, 
the belief that there is a constant change for the better, he showed sound judgment in 
preferring L. V. as his Alma Mater to the school in his home-town. Life at L. V. 
grew a bit brighter when this jovial fellow trailed in in the fall of 1910, and as a result 
of his being here it has continued to do so. His "Cuckoo-laugh" is surely unassumed 
and has frequently served as an alarm clock in the Boys' Dorm. One of the most fami- 
liar groups in the whole campus system is "Edt" and his D (o) ubie, the only Myers 
town affiliation to which he lays claim. Edgar is a good all-around student and sel 
dom cuts classes ; however his cuts at the station are perhaps even fewer than those from 
his classes. It took him but a tew days to learn that college life here is on a much high- 
er plane than he had been accustomed to seeing it at home ; but being a clean-cut 
young fellow, he had no difficulty in adjusting himself to it. The success of ourjunior 
play, "The Private Secretary", was due in a large measure to the business-like way in 
which he managed it. A profound student, with a fine physique, a broad smile, a 
large heart, and a sterling character he has fine prospects of becoming one of the most 
famous members of a famous class and will some day make up for the deficiencies of his 
home town. 







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John B. Lyter 
Harrisburg 



Kalozetean 
Historical-Political 



"^:/ <^ci7r lov'd lad, i onviiiicin <■ siiiuj, 
A tri'iichiroiis iin liniition." — Burns. 



JOHN, or "Hans", our boy with the brilliant head — so far as color goes — was born 
at Mountville, July 11, 1889. He is a graduate of Harrisburg High, class of 
1910. He was a very bashful boy in his first year, at least so we thot ; but during 
liis freshmen year we saw very litfle of him, for being granted a leave of absence by 
the school authorities he went abroad, going from place to place visiting points of beauty 
and of interest until he landed in "Frantz". Here he must have been satisfied, for my 
what a long time he remained ! However in his sophomore year, when the birds were 
singing songs of springtime and reminding us that it was time for baseball, he came 
back to us, for he is a baseball player of more than local reputation. He is one of the 
best third-sackers and most dependable hitters that has ever worn the "L", and with 
him as captain of this year's team we expect one of the most successful seasons L. V. 
has ever had. John takes things as they come and never allows darts to thwart his path- 
way, but alas! cupid's dart must have lieen too much for him, for it is said that he, 
too, is capable of falling in love. John's greatest desire in life is to be a millionaire, and 
as future success is plainly visible in all other paths, this may be the poor boy's fate. 
His quiet manner and habit of religiously letting other people mind their own business 
will do much to make his after life even more successful than his successful career here 
has been. 



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} LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 p j 




E. May Meyer 

Annville 



'So mere a luoinan in her iv/iyi 



Clioxian 

Modern-Language 

-Rossetti. 



MAY was born in Annville, on May 11, 1892, and has lived there ever since. She 
attended the public schools for a while ; but instead of finishing the course in 
the High school she entered the Academy. While in the Academy she soon 
came into a well deserved reputation for doing excellent work ; and unlike many of us 
she has kept up her record since enteiing college. May is one of the most talented musi- 
cians that ever graduated from L. V. conservatory. Her remarkable capacity for doing 
work is attested by the fact that she took her senior year in piano along with the liter- 
ary studies of her freshman year in College. Upon the occasion of her senior piano 
recital, she covered herself with glory as a result of the artistic way in which she ren- 
dered her selections, while the rest of us were so proud of her that the class went tem- 
porarily into debt to present her with a beautiful floral display, which, however, was 
lost in the maze of other tokens of a similiar nature with which she was so profusely pre- 
sented by her friends. She has always been one of 1914's most loyal members and of 
all the brilliant affairs that our class has held, her entertainment of us after our victory 
in the tug-of-war contest with 1913 will always be remembered as being one of the most 
enjoyable. After her graduation in piano, May continued her musical education under 
Mr. Maurits Leefson, of Philadelphia, a famous teacher. Besides being an ex- 
cellent musician, she is a star in all her classes. However, in spite of all her good 
points. May has one weakness — she is too easily pursuaded, for she can be swayed by 
a "Reed." 







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C. Edward Mutch 
Sunbury 



Kalozetean 
Chemical-Biological 



"And melancholy marked him for her own." — Gray. 



a JtyJOSE" was born on the top of a high mountain in Montana— (Pa.) , which per- 
-^ ^-* haps accounts for his rare temperament. Of all the pessimists who ever struck 
L. V. he is probably the most pessimistic. His philosophy of human existence is, 
as he puts it, "Life is one damn thing after another"; yet in spite of the fact that 
he is thoroughly disgusted with all the Utopias ever proposed, he is loyal to any institu- 
tion or organization to which he belongs, especially his Alma Mater. Ed. says that it 
is the silent man who is dangerous ; and, therefore, he prefers to keep silent, except on 
philosophy subjects, and then only to enter upon a violent tirade against all philosoph- 
ers and their philosophies except his own. He is so passionately devoted to the study of 
English literature that he raves about it day and night, and can often be heard mumb- 
ling in his sleep lines from Chaucer, who next to Grey is his favorite poet. He is one of 
the best science students at L. V. and has developed his scientific imagination to such 
an extent, that we feel safe in prophesying that some day, in spite of the fact that he be- 
lieves the world is growing worse, he will benefit humanity with some great invention. 



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D. Leonard Reddick . Philokosmian 

Walkersville, Md. Classical 

"His life icas gi'iitle and the elements 
So /nixed in hitn that nature might stand up 
And say to all the ivorld, this is a man." 

— Shakespeare. 

TJ/ALKERSVILLE, Md., had the proud distinction of being the birthplace of this 
yy illustrious, patriotic, and robust sapling. The town referred to is such a small and 
obscure place that few know where it is located ; but this should not discourage 
Leonard, for it was from such a place that the immortal Lincoln came. When he first 
came here he was a mere boy of fifteen, so his parents sent his older cousin, "Buck", 
along to take care of their precious son. However we all know who really took care of 
the other. Scarcely had the youth come into our fold, before Mme. Louise Preston 
Dodge, Ph. D., of sacred memory, christened him "Sammy," which diminutive name 
applied to a diminutive boy has stuck to him ever since. "Sammy" ranks remarkably 
high in all his work in the class-room and has shown marked versatility. One day he 
is hailed as "The Philosopher of L. \'.", another as "The Demosthenes of the Oratory 
Dept.", and still another as "The Moliere of the French Dept." He won great fame 
as the organizer of the "Waiters' Protective Association of L. V. C." This year, how- 
ever, he exchanged his membership in that organization for one in the "Conservatory 
Eagle Society", of which he is sole progenitor. With all these accomplishments 
"Sammy" is no longer the youth in knickerbockers who landed in Annville three years 
ago but one of the most pleasing, witty, and upright young men any young lady would 
care to meet. (This last is by request.) 













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Blanche M. Risser _ Clionian 

Campbelltown ' Modern-Language 

"She seizes hearts^ not waiting for consent. 
Like sudden death, that snatches unprepared. 
Like fire from Heav'n, scarce seen so soon or felt. 

— Landsdoii'ne. 
/t FTER having exhausted the rather meager educational facilities afforded by her home 
•^ town, Blanche entered the Academy in the fall of 1908. She finished her prepa- 
ratory work with the class of 1910, the only girl in that class; but what the class lack- 
ed in the quantity of its femininity it possessed in quality, as was well demonstrated by her 
charming manner, her sweet appearance, and her masterful valedictory address upon 
graduation day. When Blanche first came here, she was a well-gowned, pretty, bash- 
ful, little girl. She is still all of these with one exception— she is not nearly so bashful 
as she once was ; yet, even now she frequently shows traces of her former timidity when, 
upon occasion her fair skin momentarily changes to a deep crimson. Since entermg 
College Blanche has become the center of quite an extensive so (u) lar system, for the 
magnetism of her good looks and sweet disposition has caused quite a number of shin- 
ing stars to cease revolving around other suns and gravitate to her, after which, how- 
ever, she has kept all of them in the paths of their own orbits. Like all the other girls 
of 1914, Blanche is a hard, successful literary student. Besides she is a good musician 
and a writer of verse, her poetical compositions enhancing not only the literary merits 
of this volume of the Bizarre but also of previous ones. 



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Lester A. Rodes 

Wormleysburg 



Philokosmian 
Historical-Political 



"The time I've lost in wooing, 
Has been my heart's undoing." — Moore. 

rHIS genius hails from York, from wfiicfi place Lebanon Valley receives so many of 
her best students. Although Lester himself has entered our midst, his heart re- 
mains in York. Every Monday morning he is accustomed to receive a letter and card 
from the aforesaid little city, and if by chance they do not come as expected he can be 
heard loudly proclaiming against cruel Fate. This curly-headed, bright-eyed chap is 
loved by all the Profs., and he works hard to retain their love. He has a winning smile 
which seldom fails to capture the hearts of the fairer members of our faculty. His stud- 
ious bent of mind, acute intellect, and ability to absorb knowledge, cannot help gaining 
for him a place in the esteem of the rest. "Lessie" (as SHE calls him) never tires of 
arguing, even tho he knows he is wrong, as is usually the case. "Dusty" (as we call 
him), is a born leader, and has bossed everything around school from the class in his 
Freshman year to Varsity Basketball in his Junior year. His room-mate gives him a bad 
reputation, for he says "Dusty" cannot be believed even when it is known that what he 
says is true. However we do not hold to this belief, as he has always been truthful, 
even to a fault. His aim in life is indefinite, except that he wants to get married as soon 
as he leaves school. 



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Carl Frederick Schmid': 
Lebanon 

-Em He 



Kalozetean 
Chemical-Biological 



und e'm Schuler." 
Strkkler. 



/^ARL was not born — he just simply grew. This intruder invaded the hot-house at 
^ Lebanon on July 29, 1893, and is still growing. We certainly hope that his mind 
is keeping pace with his body. His name surely suggests nothing but a staid old Ger- 
man ancestry, altho his ready wit may sometimes leave room for argument as to wheth- 
er a trace of green might not be found in it. Having just been graduated from Leba- 
non High with high honors, he entered L. V. with high hopes and predictions of a 
brilliant future on the part of his teachers and schoolmates, while his family looked for 
history to repeat itself; and surely he has not disappointed them, for he has often discon- 
certed the professors of German and French, aroused the fiction-loving world with his 
original stories, plays basketball with a vengeance, and can see much beauty in a moon- 
light night, however not because of his knowledge in Astronomy even tho he is well 
versed in that science. "Mitt" is particularly fond of the Grub (er) at school and we 
hope that it is helping him to broaden out and is building him up. His broad smile 
has won him many friends from Freshman to Senior. Carl intends to make his fame 
and fortune thru the skillful handling of the knife, and we certainly can wish him none 
but the highest success in his course at John Hopkins and in his profession as a surgeon. 




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Edward H. Smith 
Annville 



Philokosmian 
Historical- Political 



"Prjivi'rl 'tis the favorite attribute of gods. 
Ji ho look with smiles on men who can aspire 
To copy them." — Martyn. 

ON August 24th, 1889, "Ed," the business man of our class, made his first ap- 
pearance in this vale of materialism. Always having been very bright, he went 
thru the local public schools in a great hurry, graduating from the High School in 
1906 in a class, which, if it lacked quantity, (for as the story goes "there were only 
three of us") was noted for its quality. He then entered Lebanon Business College, 
where he received the first systematic training toward his business career. But two 
years spent in the legal environment of the law offices of Gobin and McCurdy made 
him desirous to become a famous lawyer; and consequently he came to L. V. in the 
fall of 1910 to get abroad, general training before taking up a law course. During his 
first year here he did not join any of the regular classes; but after having "looked 'em 
over," he concluded that 1914 is THE class, and entered our fold. "Ed" is always 
so busy that we often wonder how with his bookstore, his school work, the Glee Club, 
his visits to Shoemakersville, he ever finds time to breathe. Yes, "Ed" is very fond 
of that little village in Berks County, where he too, like the poet Whittier, has a 
"Maude, who on a summer'sday 
Is in the meadow raking hay." 
As has already been said, after graduating from L. V., he expects to take up the study 
of law ; but whether it will be law for two or law in a wider sphere we do not know, 
but in all probability it will be both. Forward, "Ed," do your best, for 1914 is 
mighty proud of you. 



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Henry E. Snavely Kalozetean 

Lebanon Historical-Political 

"He dives into the infinite 
And sees unutterable things in that abyss." — Pope 

# l-MIE! Who have we here? "My dear young christian friends," this distin- 
^-^ guished-looking gentleman is Henry Elias Snavely, Editor-in-Chief of the 1914 
Bizarre. It was five years ago that he, then a youth of eighteen, decided to confer a 
favor upon L. V. by coming to school here. The two years which he spent in the 
Academy were brilliant ones, for he starred in everything. Because he was so fat that 
when he had a pain he could not tell whether it was in his back or in his stomach, the 
fellows dubbed him "Slim." By the end of his career in the Academy he had estab- 
lished his reputation as one of the best debaters and orators around school. In his 
Freshman year he made a hit with a certain female member of the faculty, and all the 
"sinners" of that year's French I remember how those icy, blue eyes of hers would 
really beam when he sailed majestically into the room, always about ten minutes late, 
as she exclaimed, "How do you do, Mr. Snavely? Come in and make yourself com- 
fortable." "Slim" was a member of the 1914 debating team last year when the 1915 
team was so completely overwhelmed. This year he is the only Junior on the College 
Debating team. He is also a prominent member of the Prohibition League and is a 
zealous worker (or the cause (?) In the department of Philosphy his opinions are often 
accepted above those of the texts. Since he is a member of the notorious "Lebanon 
Bunch", it is not hard to learn where this genius hails from. However he seems to 
also have a home in Annville, for every Wednesday night "Slim" can be seen striking 
out for "up home", that is HER house. Whether to run for president on the Prohibi- 
tion ticket (?) or to go on the lecture platform as a champion of Women's Rights he 
has not yet decided ; but 1914 will always watch his career with interest. 



Page 72 



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William S. Stager 
Avon 



Kalozetean 
Mathematical-Physical 



"A mind content both croicn and kingdom is." — Greene. 



IJROAD of body, surely ! Broad of mind, more surely ! Broad of spirit, most sure- 
Jj ly ! Being a broad man in every respect, "Billy" is feared much in a tug-of- 
war, more in a calculus class, and mostly in active religious work. Little is known 
of the origin and antiquity of this son of toil, and little more is known of his present, except 
that he has a tremendous capacity for work. He is a problem to solve, more difficult 
than the most difhcult in differential calculus. That he guides the plow in vacation 
times, and toils over his books during the winter months is all of which we can be abso- 
lutely certain. Not disposed to frivolity, always safe, sane, and sure, he is certain with 
his solid foundation, literally and figuratively, to achieve with distinction as a physical 
and mental giant. From the time that he was graduated as the only member of the first 
class of the High School at Hebron, on the outskirts of which Lebanon is situated, he 
has worked steadily onward and upward, rising with the cream of the institution, the 
Class of 1914, to a high point of eminence. He declined the honor of the gridiron, in 
order that he might better work out the embryo of some bug, and turned down the ad- 
vances of the opposite sex that he might entangle himself still further in the intricacies of 
the higher mathematics. Modest but upright, slow but sure, this product of the Ameri- 
can farm is destined to show that not all the great men of a nation are born and bred in 
the city. 




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Paul L. Strickler Kalozetean 

Lebanon Mathematical-Physical 

" that tower of strength 

Which stood four-square to all the ivlnds that blew." 

— Tennyson. 

rHIS addition to a numerous progeny made his debut upon his immortal existence 
on September 27, 1893. He is a product of Lebanon High and since coming to 
L. V. he has proved that if the old proverb that "a jack in all trades is master of 
none" is true, he is the exception that proves the rule ; for of all the students now atL. 
v., he is the most versatile yet, withal, one of the most uniformly successful. His 
startling dashes around the ends and his sensational open field running with the ball 
on the gridiron, and his quick foot-work and clever shooting from almost any angle on 
the basketball floor have added many points to the credit of his alma mater ; and be- 
sides he can do the hundred yard dash in ten seconds, and is also a good base- 
ball, tennis, crokinole, and pinochle player. With him as captain of the football team 
next season we look for the most glorious record this institution has yet achieved in that 
sport. Then Paul is a brilliant student in all his branches, particularly in mathema- 
tics, an artistic pianist, and a basso of high local reputation. His Apollo-like features 
and his Herculean physique coupled with his pleasing personality have caused him to 
become the most popular young man at L. V. especially with the girls. Among the 
girls he is just as versatile as along other lines, for he has had no fewer than a dozen 
girls since he first came here. It is in connection with his affairs with the opposite sex 
that "Polly" is again the exception that proves the rule, for the young lady who at pres- 
ent is most firmly engrafted in his aflfections has hair which cannot be distinguished 
from that of our hero when they sit on the rear seat of "Doc's" Buick. With his phe- 
nominal versatility we have no doubt that "Polly" will make good in whatever he un- 
dertakes. 



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Clarence Henry Ulrich 
Hershev 



Philokosmian 
Chemical-Biological 



"Up! Up! My frii'iid (ind quit your Itook 
Or surely you'll yroic double." — JU ordsuorth. 

CLARENCE is one of the most profound students of our class. He was born at 
Hummelstoun, one of tfie largest cities (?) of Dauphin County, on August 4, 
1890. A few years later he changed his residence to Hershey, the chocolate met- 
ropolis, where he still resides. To him belongs the distinction of being the first grad- 
uate of Hershey High School, for he was the only member of the class graduated from 
that school in 1908. After his graduation he was employed for several years at the in- 
dustry that made Hershey famous : but having a great thirst for knowledge, he soon be- 
came dissatisfied with his lot, with the result that in February, 1910, he came to L. V., 
where he joined the class of 1913. The following year he again secured employment at 
Hershey, but in February, 1912, he returned to college and became one of the most loy- 
al members of whom 1914 can boast. Clarence is a diligent student and has been re- 
ceiving one "A" after another. Mathematics, Chemistry, and Biology being his hob- 
bies, he shines particularly in these departments. He is not in the least interested in 
the fair sex — and consequently spends his spare time in analyzing unknowns and slash- 
ing frogs. That his pursuit of knowledge is a serious one is not only attested by the 
excellent grades he makes but also by the fact that every day he comes all the way from 
Hershey in order to attend his classes. After his graduation here he intends to liecome 
a professor of science, for which he certainly is well equipped. May success be his ! 



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M. Josephine Urich 

Annville 



Cliontan 
Historical-Political 



"^^ //(//;/ broke in upon my brain, 
It ivas the laughint) of a maid." — Lord Bryon. 

JOSEPHINE, "Josie," or "Jo," all of which belong to the same girl, was born 
August 15th, 1894, under the same "blamed old roof" where she now reigns su- 
preme. She was graduated from Annville High School in 1910. Then assuring 
herself that she needed more knowledge, she entered L. V. the following fall. "Jo" is 
our typical college girl, for as she was informed by one of the Seniors, typical college 
girls never are bright. However those who know her best think differently for they all 
know her ability as a student. She is always happy and nothing ever worries her, not 
even an unprepared lesson in English 3. When "Jo" is not giggling you can be sure 
that she is very angry, but this seldom occurs. Unassuming and gentle as she is, this 
maid has already brought many admirers to woo her, but with all this "Jo" has never 
really fallen in love with anyone except her chum "Kit", with whom she Tnay constant- 
ly be seen — that is when Walter is away at school. She is kept very busy of late with 
her correspondence, and trying to decide "who is who." A great lover of animals, 
especially the "Beaver", we will not be at all surprised if some day she should take to 
the training of that animal. However, U. of P. also holds within her walls secret 
charms for "Jo", so it is somewhat hard to say just what the future of this fair co-ed 
may be. She told "Kit", confidentially of course, that after her graduation from L. 
V. she expects to go to some finishing school for a year or two if she can remain single 
that long. 



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J. Allen Walter 
Lebanon 



Kalozetean 
Historical-Political 



"Much study is a iceanness of the flesh." 
—Bible. 
{( T\OC" , the name by which this individual is best known, was born in Lebanon on 
-*-^ February 27, 1894. He is a member of the notorious "Lebanon Bunch" who 
hang out in room No. 1 of the Boys' Dorm. J. Allen entered L. V. in the fall of 1907, 
just one year before "Slim" enrolled for the first time. After his graduation from the 
Academy with the class of 1910, he entered the College and now says that the Lord 
only knows when he will finish. Would you believe us if we told you that he is the 
grind of the class ? Would you believe us if we told you that he has often been known 
to sit up until after midnight studying Biology and English ? Well he has done this, 
but on every such occasion he only started in on his books at about 11:50 P. M. Eng- 
lish, by the way, is his favorite study, and as he himself once said, that he will take 
English until he dies. He is always smiling and has never been known to frown or 
look angry in all the time he has been here (?) "Doc" is of the stocky, bull-dog type 
and by his persistence, in spite of his light weight, won his "L" in football. He con- 
sumes much of his time in arguing metaphysical problems with "Slim", and anyone 
who has never heard them has missed a treat. He says that he will take up the study 
of law ; but we are inclined to believe that he will teach or enter the ministery (?) 
Whatever his future work may be we hope and trust that he will "Meet (a)" with suc- 
cess. 



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} LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 p j 




Russell M. Weidler 
Coatesville 



Philokosmian 
Chemical-Biological 



"Bold of his speche and wys and ivel y-taught 
And of manhood hym lakkcde right naught." 
— Chaucer. 

/t FTER attending three high schools and teaching one year "Riis" came to L. V. with a 
J~l. sufficient store of knowledge to whet his mental appetite for more. His mother is am- 
ply justified for the pride she takes in him, tor he is good, kind-hearted, and very 
obliging in bestowing favors. He seldom changes his opinions and for this reason fre- 
quently gets into controversies with the professors. During the last year he has served 
as a member of the Annville High Scrub Faculty, in which capacity he caused quite a 
commotion among the young ladies and got a reputation for knowing "an awful lot." 
His one fault according to Professor Peters, and Professor is always right, is that he is 
too pedantic and that he is too liberal in that he is always trying to let others know 
what he knows. He is the artist of this book and his excellent work bespeaks his artistic 
temperament. He is the member of our class who was recently selected by the faculty 
as Editor-in-Chief of the College News, and we feel sure that under his leadership the 
precarious life of that publication will be changed to one of certainty and that its stand- 
ard will be considerably raised. "Rus" does not seem to have much time for affairs 
of the heart at present. Generally he has the faculty of taking things calmly ; yet he 
has a higher gear, too, when he strikes good roads. From here he expects to enter John 
Hopkins, where we are sure that judging from his work here he will have a brilliant 
career. 




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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 I jj 




David E. Young 
Manheim 

'Man resolvi 



Kalozetean 
Historical-Political 



he ivUl preach and he preaches." 
— Urich. 



(( T^AVE" is our traveling member and condescends to make himself visible around 
l-J school once in a while. He does not room in the Boys' Dorm., for he is afraid that 
its occupants might secure a Satanic influence over him. So by keeping far enough 
away from them he has succeeded in maintaining his priestly dignity, for he is a parson 
and preaches regularly every Sunday at Jonestown. He is greatly esteemed by his con- 
gregation, and one of his parishioners told him so. He is quite an authority on Biblical 
subjects and delights in spreading far and wide the doctrines of the "Millenial Dawn- 
ists. " He studies sometimes but prefers to argue about the existence of a personal devil. 
Bemg under the impression that he has no time for distractions, he has nothing to do 
with the college girls : but, then, we are inclined to believe that there is another reason 
for this, for there are rumors to the effect that he had fallen in love with a girl back 
home before he ever came here. He seems to prefer using his valuable time in manu- 
facturing sermons or, as is more frequently the case, in attempting to borrow some from 
Mark Wert. "Dave" has a very fiery temper and becomes easily excited. He plays 
tennis some, and upon those rare occasions when he does not become rattled, he plays 
an excellent game. He is also a baseball pitcher of no mean ability. He has never lost 
the "all wise" expression which he brought here with him, nor are there chances that he 
will ; for It IS a good stock in trade in the profession for which his deeply religious nature 
so well qualities him and in which with the qualities already mentioned, and with his 
oratorical powers, he will probably serve well. 




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D. Ellis Zimmerman Philokosmian 

Annville Mathematical-Physical 

"For there was never yet philosopher 
That eould endure the tooth-aehe patiently." 
— Shakespeare. 

77'LLIS boasts of having been born in the town of Annville, which event took place in 
-'-' 1894, and of having received his preparatory training in the public schools of his 
native heath. He is one of the few quiet boys in our class. On account of his gentle 
nature he has been nicknamed after a member of the tiger family. He is a young man 
of achievement and attributes his success to the fact that his father has a "pull" on the 
community. He is a brilliant literary student ; and not being an athlete, he puts much 
of his spare time on music, an art in which he is exceptionally talented. He is profi- 
cient upon both the piano and violin, but claims no laurels in voice culture. However, 
altho he cannot make a falsetto tone, he can make a set of false teeth. He takes little 
part in the social life of L. V. or of the town, a condition which we cannot explain : 
but being rather young and having a name with plenty of "room" in it, we predict that 
some day he will demonstrate that there is also room enough in his heart for just one 
girl. After his graduation from L. V., "Buss" expects to take post-graduate work at 
some Lutheran school and later take up the study of dentistry. And may he be a pain- 
less workman. 




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Sophomore Class History 

UST as we began the illustrious career of our college life, so 
we have continued thru a year and a half, successful along 
both athletic and scholastic lines. Success has beamed upon 
us from the very time of our entrance at L. V. Some say 
that a lucky star is leading us along the narrow path ; but, 
P-«t be that as it may, the class as a whole takes for its motto, 
"Spes sibi quisque," and this accounts to a great extent for the victories 
we won from the Sophs last year and from the Freshies this year. We 
have a history which, even if our class should be annihilated at this time, 
would descend to our posterity like a most precious jewel, a memorial of 
a class that has achieved what no other class has achieved in the past. 
Since it is impossible to enumerate all the events of this year and a half, I 
will endeavor to pick out only a few of the most noteworthy. 

A few weeks after we came to school, the Sophs woke up one 
morning and found the prominent places of town decorated with posters 
put up by us. Several weeks later we deliberately went on a straw ride to 
the Water Works. How the Sophs raved when, upon coming there in 
a team which they had secured, they were unsuccessful in breaking up 
our feast and carrying away some of our men ! Then came the tug-of-war, 
which, altho the Sophs resisted heroically, we won by the overwhelming 
score of 16-0. When school opened a few days after Thanksgiving the 
question arose, "Where are the Freshies." The only plausible answer 
was, "They have gone on their banquet." All attempts to capture any 
of us failed, and when we marched triumphantly across the campus upon 
our return, not a Soph was in sight. However one morning we were sud- 
denly aroused by the cries of, "The Sophs have put up their posters." Be- 
fore breakfast every poster had been torn down and the Freshies ate a 
breakfast which is still remembered by the cooks at L. V. That same 
morning after chapel occurred the class rush, which, after quite a little 
wrangling, was declared a draw. 

This year was not so eventful as last year, for the Freshies are rath- 
er dormant. Their first waking up occurred one dark night when we 
kindly obliged a number of them to accompany us and put up our post- 
ers. The tug-of-war was a repetition of the one of last year, for our op- 
ponents pulled and pulled in vain, while we won by the score of 6-0. 
Later came the football game. In our Freshman year the Sophs for some 
reason did not play us. The game this year was a remarkable demonstra- 
tion of physical strength and endurance, and again our lucky star seemed 
to lead us to victory, for we won by the score of 7-6. 

Our class has not only accomplished great things in the past, but it 
will accomplish great things in the future, for we have a class composed 
of excellent athletes as well as exceptionally brilliant students. 




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Sophomores 






CLASS OF 1915 






Officers 






First Semester 


Second Semester 


President, 


Carl G. Snavely 


Faber E. Stengle 


Vice President, 


Harry M. Bender 


John O. Jones 


Secretary, 


Florence Mentz 


Ruth V. Engle 


Treasurer, 


John W. Larew 


John W. Larew 


Historian 


Paul J. Bowman 


Poet, 


Verling W. 


Jamison 



Motto — Spes sibi quisque 
Flower — JBlue Violet 
Colors — Blue and White 

YELL 

One, Nine, One, Five, 
Zee, Zaw, Zum, Zive, 

Hullaballo ! Gazoo ! Gazifteen ! 

Lebanon Valley Nineteen Fifteen 



ROLL 






Harry M. Bender 
Gideon L. Blouch 
Paul J. Bowman 
C. E. Brenneman 
Helen E. BrightbiU 
Wm. C. Carl 
Van B. Dayhoff 
Ira Clyde Eby 
Larene Engle 
Ruth V. Engle 
Ruth E. Engle 
Phares B. Gibble 
Ethel I. Houser 
Mary L. Irwin 
Verling W. Jamison 
John O. Jones 



J. Maurice Leister 
John W. Larew 
Thomas B. Lyter 
Willis McNelly 
Florence C. Mentz 
M. Luther Miller 
John H. Ness 
Howard L. Olewiler 
May Belle Orris 
Carl G. Snavely 
Philo A. Station 
Faber E. Stengle 
Ralph W. Stickell 
Frank M. VanSchaak 
Laurence Shepley 
A. L. Weaver 



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Sophomore Class Poem 

Said a friend to me : 
"Pray, what do those letters mean, 
The big ' '15' and the 'S. S. Q,' 
With 'L. V. C in between." 

Said I: 
" 'L. V.' stands for Valley, 
The Lebanon, don't you know, 
The biggest and the best 
In all the land 
And yet it's bound to grow. 

'C is for the College, 

A school of the very best kind, 

You'll go many a mile 

And search a long while 

If a better one you will find. 

'S. S. Q.' means 'Spes Sibi Quisque,' 

The motto of our class. 

To it we ever will be true. 

For it as for the 'White and Blue' 

We'll carry many victories thru." 

Said my friend to me : 
"But how is this. 

The ' '15' you have wholly passed." 

Just wait a while," 

Said I with a smile, 
"I've saved thfe best for the last. 

' '15' stands for the Sophomore class, 

A bunch of jolly, good friends 

Who stand together 

In wind or weather 

To further each other ends. 

So let us drink to dear old ' '15,' 
Drink, classmates, drink with me. 
Did I hear a suggestion of wine ? 

OH NO! 
But we'll drink to her health 
With the bounteous wealth 
Of sparkHng H,0." 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 I jj 





Freshman Class History 

HE FIRST real opportunity we had of becoming acquainted 
with one another was in the registrar's office, where aided by 
Prof. Wanner's sound advice and winning smile the apparent- 
ly trying ordeal of matriculation was easily passed through. 
After this had been accomplished, feeling that we now really 
belonged to L. V., we proceeded to the organization of our 
class, which in spite of the vigilance of the Sophs and their efforts to pre- 
vent it, was no harder a matter than our matriculation. 

Because we are the youngest Freshman class that ever entered this 
institution and on account of our supposed weakness upon our first ap- 
pearance we were taunted by the S.ophs. However, they have since learned 
that we are not only the youngest class but also one of the wisest. 

Although we took these first steps cautiously, in the brief time that 
we have been here, even the know-it-all, grim-looking, restless Sophs have 
been forced to recognize our ability, for instead of meekly allowing our- 
selves to be downtrodden and harassed by them and in spite of their super- 
ior numbers and wider experience, we have already held many class part- 
ies, none of which they succeeded in breaking up, defeated their poster 
expedition, and in all other things showed such determination and class 
spirit as has won the respect and admiration of the whole college. 

Of all the achievements of our first year at L. V. the longest to be re- 
membered and the most cherished by all of us is the banquet which we 
held January seventeenth at the Metropolitan Hotel, Harrisburg. In spite 
of all the strenuous efforts the Sophs made to prevent this event, all of us 
who intended to do so participated in this joyous occason. Here again 
as a result of our successful strategy, the slowness of the Sophs was more 
plainly shown than ever before — and we did not find it necessary to go 
during a vacation in order to hold it. 

We have already shown our devotion to our Alma Mater by the 
manner in which we have taken part in the leading entertainments of 
the institution and the way in which we have adapted ourselves to real col- 
lege life in the true and loyal L. V. spirit. In athletics we are well rep- 
resented on the football, basketball, baseball, and track teams. On the 
track team we have the only weight men of whom our college can boast. 
In scholarship we also rank very high and are already getting to be recog- 
nized as a class of brain as well as of brawn. Thus no matter into what 
phase of college life you may look you will find some of our members tak- 
ing an active part. 

Ai.d now as we look into the future we realize that from such a class 
as ours much can be expected. Holding before us ideals which are of the 
highest and principles which are of the noblest, we believe that we will 
realize all that is expected of us and that success will crown the efforts of 1916. 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 Q j 



Freshmen 


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CLASS OF 1916 








Officers 








President — D. Mason Long, First Term 








S. Huber Heintzelman, Second Term 








Ira S. Ernst, Third Term 








Vice President — Ira S. Ernst, First Term 






David J. 


Evans, Second Term 






Conrad K. Curry, Third Term 






Secretary — Mary A. Spayd, First Term 








Esther Heintzelman, Second Term 








Josephine Mathias, Third Term 








Treasurer — Rob 


ert Hartz, First Term 






Rob 


ert Hartz, Second Term 






David J. Evans, Third Term 






Historian — Blanche Black 






Poet — Paul Witmeyer 








Motto — Facta non Verba 






Flower — Snap Dragon 








Colors — Celestial Blue and Navy Blue 






YELL 








S-I-X-T-E-E-N 








Kee-ri ! Kee-ro ! Kee-ro-ren ! 






Fee-lum ! Kee-lum ! Fee-fo ! 


Fixteen ! 






Lebanon Valley 1916 








MEMBERS 








Blanche Black S. Huber Heintzelman 


Thomas Pell 






Victor R. Blouch Irene Hershey 


S. Hope Renn 






Pauline Byrd Chas. H. Holzinger 


Albert G. Shaud 






Conrad K. Curry Elmer A. Kirkpatrick 


Addie E. Snyder 






Mary I. Daugherty Alfred B. Krause 


Lester F. Snyder 






Ira S. Ernst D. Mason Long 


Mary A. Spayd 






David J. Evans John A. Long 


Violet M. Ulrich 






Ruth A. Gingrich Edward S. Light 


Marcel von Bereghy 






Ralph Gender Josephine S. Mathias 


Esther Wareheim 






E. Viola Gruber Wilham E. Mickey 


Ruth Whiskeyman 






Robert E. Hartz Esther K. Moyer 


Paul Witmeyer 






Esther Heintzelman Helen Oyler 


Clayton H. Zuse 






Page 86 
















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Freshman Class Poem 






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HEN we came here in September 






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Green we were, we will allow, 






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We created a sensation; 


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Um — Take a look at us now. 


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For one great, big, long semester 


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We dared not look up at a 'frau.' 




If you think that we've not changed some, 


Wliill 


Um — Take a look at us now. 


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For that same great long semester 


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Wee green caps adorned each brow. 


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If you think that we still wear 'em, 


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Um — Take a look at us now. 


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In most contests we were victorious 


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To no classes would we bow. 


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And, although we detest boasting 


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Um — Take a look at us now. 
We were good in all our studies 


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Tho' we won't tell why or how. 


And the happy Profs, are saying 


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Um — Take a look at 'em now. 


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Now we're going on our vacation 


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We are leaving one and all. 


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If you're watching for improvement, 


Um — Look us over in the Fall. 




—Poet 




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Academy History 




O WRITE the history of such a noble institution as the Leba- 
non Valley Academy means something. We will not at- 
tempt to give an extended record of the past, for its past 
achievements have already been very ably set forth. We will 
confine our words to the accomplishments of the present 
scholastic year. 

At the opening of the year we found ourselves in our new headquart- 
ers in the beautifully remodeled Academy building. How delighted we 
were with the prospects of having a building which we could call our 
own, separated from the college, where we could promote our own in- 
terests unmolested ! We also found ourselves under the direction of a 
new principle. We were also sorry that Professor Spessard had left us, 
but we were glad that such a man as Professor Grimm had been chosen 
in his stead. And he has fulfilled our fondest hopes. He has been our 
constant source of inspiration outside as well as in the classroom, and we 
have learned to love him. Many familiar faces were missing from among 
the student body. Some of the best had graduated and others had de- 
serted. Our wail of sorrow had scarcely begun, however, when it was 
changed to a song of rejoicing, for we found among our company a num- 
ber of stalwart, good-looking, and promising lads and lassies who had step- 
ped in to repair the loss. And as a rule they have made good. The 
Academy spirit has been better this year than ever before, and the "Preps" 
have distinguished themselves in many ways of which space will not per- 
mit the telling. In baseball the boys are again distinguishing themselves. 
The season of 1912 was the most successful in the history of the Acade- 
my, and this year, with some excellent new material, we expect to beat 
the record. The senior class, though few in number, promises to uphold 
the high standard of the Academy. Let us continue to bear in mind 
our motto "Virtus in Actione Consistit," and we will not fail to add ad- 
ditional lustre to the fair name of Lebanon Valley Academy. 



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Lebanon Valley Academy 



President, 
Vice President, 
Secretary, 
Treasurer, 



Officers 

First Semester 
Oscar E. Krenz 
George M. Haverstock 
Mabel E. Snyder 
Prof. S. O. Grimm 
Poet, - - Elta M. Weaver 

Motto — Virtus in Actione Consistit 
Flower— Dandelion 
Colors — Red and Black 
YELL 
Boom-a-lacka ! Boom-a-lacka ! Boom-a-lacka ! 
Chick-a-lacka ! Chick-a-lacka ! Chick-a-lacka ! 
Boom-a-lacka ! Chick-a-lacka ! Ree ! Rah ! 
L. v., L. v., L. V. A. 

MEMBERS 

George M. Haverstock 
Lemuel Heisey 
Nathan I. Herr 
Herman E. Hetrick 
Irwin S. Hoffer 
Russel E. Hoffer 
Peter C. Hoffman 
Oscar E. Krenz 
Lahman I. Leister 
Mark Y. Light 
Clyde A. Lynch 
C. L. Mackert 
C. Howard McCann 
Robert P. McClure 
Abner D. Medsger 
Harry M. Mentzer 
Ramon Merediz 
Allen B. Meyer 



Second Semester 
George M. Haverstock 
Abner D. Medsger 
Robert P. McClure 
Prof. S. O. Grimm 



Isaac H. Albright 
Raymond H. Arndt 
Frank S. Attinger 
Irwin O. Bacastow 
Clayton W. Bachman 
John Bachman 
David B. Basehore 
Anna Bleuchard 
Joseph W. Bomberger 
Oliver R. Brooks 
Gerald O. Brubaker 
W. E. Canoles 
Abram Dearolf 
G. A. Dehuff 
Anna I. Dubble 
Allen B. Engle 
Norman I. Fake 
George W. Hallman 



Bow ! 
Chow 
Ray ! 



Ray G. Miller 
Edward Miller 
John D. Mowery 
Oscar C. MulhoUen 
John W. Oakes 
Harold W. Risser 
Jose Sainz 
Harry E. Schaeffer 
Mabel E. Snyder 
Harry D. Spitler 
D. W. Stangle 
Cleason J. Weaver 
Elta M. Weaver 
S. A. Wengert 
C. Harold Wine 
J. Arthur Wisner 
Harold K.Wrightstone 



Page 90 



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Academy Poem 

OUR A. B. C'S. 

stands for Academy, 
The Preps, sometimes named, 
For students and scholars 
We've always been famed, 
We've quite a few boys. 
The girls number three. 
Of these they're as proud. 
Just as proud as can be. 

"B" stands for boys. 
So noble and strong. 
The girls are right with them, 
In right or in wrong. 
They belong to a club 
With a great, big long name, 
I can't spell or pronounce it. 
But that's all the same. 

"C" stands for Club, 
Of our fine baseball boys. 
When we cheer at our games. 
We make a big noise. 
You see, I'm no poet, 
But, then, I'm a Prep. 
When I get to college, 
I'll make a big rep. 

Poet. 






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Seniors in 

Conservatory 

Officers 
President, Myrle Behney 

Vice President, Ora B. Bachman 
Secretary, Velma L. Heindel 

Class Flower — Daisy 
Class Colors — Green and White 

Roll 
Ora B. Bachman 
Myrle Behney 

Velma L. Heindel 




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Conservatory of Music 



Seniors 
Ora Belle Bachman, (Organ) 
Myrl Behney, (Organ) 
Velma Lucretia Heindel, (Piano) 



Juniors 
John Fred Arnold 
Mary Lydia Light 
Mary Elizabeth Painter 



Sophomores 
Leroy Clarence Barnet Dana Brandt 

Mabsl May Bensing Dora Ruth Rylant 



Freshmen 
Ruth Albright 
Alice May Bomberger 
George Frederick Botts 
Mrs. O. R. Bittner 
Grace Berger 
Ruth Brunner 
Margaret Davidson 
Edith Denlinger 
Anna Dubble 
Miriam Ellis 
Suzanne Frantz 
William Frantz 
Mrs. S. O. Grimm 
Edith M. Gingrich 
Ruth Hammer 
Nora Hammond 
Marguerite Jones 
Maude Kershner 
Elizabeth Kreider 



AND Specials 

Edna Landis 

Christie Lerch 

Marie Louser 

Katherine Light 

Elizabeth M. Mark 

E. Ruth Quigley 

Irving L. Reist 

Mabel Elizabeth Snyder 

Ida S. Smith 

Mabel Shanaman 

Dora Dorothy Silberman 

Tasie Shaak 

Velma Stauffer 

Vera Snyder 

Myrle Turby 

H. John Witman 

Naomi Witman 

Sarah Cordelia Wengert 



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Oratory Department 



Maude Baker 
H. M. Bender 
G. L. Blouch 
Paul J. Bowman 
C. E. Brenneman 
Helen E. Brightbill 
William C. Carl 
H. H. Charlton 
Anna Dubble 
I. Clyde Eby 
Larene Engle 
Ruth V. Engle 
Ruth E. Engle 
P. B. Gibble 
Velma L. Heindel 
Esther Heintzelman 
Ethel I. Houser 
Mary Irwin 
Verling W. Jamison 
John O. Jones 
Lillian Kendig 
Elizabeth Kreider 



Howard Kreider 
Mary Kreider 
John W. Larew 
Edith M. Lehman 
J. Maurice Leister 
Margaret Leitheiser 
Clyde L Lynch 
Florence Mentz 
M. Luther Miller 
V. D. Mulhollen 
Jennie McGovern 
John H. Ness 
Howard L. Olewiler 
Belle Orris 
Blanche M. Risser 
C. G. Snavely 
Philo A. Statton 
Faber E. Stengle 
Clarence H. Ulrich 
M. Josephine Urich 
Edna E. Yarkers 



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Maude H. Baker 
Mattie K. Bomberger 
Cora Brunner 
Florence E. Christeson 
Mary L. Christeson 
Sarah Helms 
Harold W. Landis 
Mary E. Maulfair 
Frances Moore 



Esther Shenk 
Hattie M. Shiffer 
Roy W. Spangler 
Catherine Stein 
Mary Stein 
Mary Weaver 
Joseph F. Wells 
Mary Zimmerman 



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Organizations 



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Senior- Junior Council 




Officers 




President, Victor D. Mulhollen, '13 




Secretary, Lester A. Rodes, '14 




Members 




Victor D. Mulhollen, 'l.i Lerav B. Harnish, '14 




G. A. Richie, '13 C. Edward Mutch, '14 




John E. Sherk, '13 Lester A. Rodes, '14 




Charles Y. Ulrich, '13 Edward H. Smith, '14 




Mark H. Wert. '13 






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President, 

Vice President, 

Recording Secretary, 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer, 

Pianist, 



Officers 

Florence E. Clippinger 
Lottie M. Spessard 
Larene Engle 
Ethel I. Houser 
Sara E. Zimmerman 
V^elma Heindel 



Florence H Clippinger 
Larene Engle 
Sara E. Zimmerman 
Edith IVL Lehman 
Edna E. Yarkers 



Maude Baker 
Helen E. Brightbill 
Florence E. Clippinger 
Mar^- Daugherty 
Larene Engle 
Ruth V. Engle 
Velma Heindel 
Esther Heintzelman 
Clara K. Horn 
Ethel I. Houser 
Edith AL Lehman 



Cabinet 

Lottie M. Spessard 
Ethel L Houser 
Velma Heindel 
Clara K. Horn 
Mary A. Spayd 

Members 

Josephine Mathias 
Florence Mentz 
iVL Belle Orris 
Helen Oyler 
Ruth Quigley 
Dora Ryland 
Mary A. Spayd 
Lottie M. Spessard 
Esta Wareheim 
Edna E. Yarkers 
Sara E. Zimmerman 



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FFICERS 


President, 




John F. Leininger 


Vice Presid 


ent. 


Russell M.Weidler 


Secretary, 




Paul J. Bowman 


Treasurer, 




J. E. Sherk 


Chorister, 




Lester A. Rodes 


Janitor, 




P. A. Statton 


Pianist, 




F. E. Stengle 



Cabinet 

G. A. Williams J. E. Sherk 

M. H. Wert Russell M. Weidler 

C. H. Arndt Lester A. Rodes 

V. D. Mulhollen John F. Leininger 

Paul J. Bowman 



C. H. Arndt 
R. H. Arndt 
Frank Attinger 
G. L. Blouch 
Paul J. Bowman 
William C. Carl 
Prof. S. O. Grimm 
G. H. Hallman 
Leray B. Harnish 
George M. Haverstock 
S. Huber Heintzelman 



Members 

John O. Jones 
Verling W. Jamison 

0. E. Krenz 
Lehman L Leister 
John F. Leininger 
V. D. Mulhollen 
John H. Ness 

1. L. Ressler 
G. A. Richie 
Sedic S. Rine 
L. A. Rodes 



C. Laurence Sheplev 
J. E. Sherk 
JJenry E. Snavely 
P. A. Statton 

F. E. Stengle 
Russell M. Weidler 
Mark H. Wert 

G. A. Williams 
Harold Wine 
David E. Young 
Clayton H. Zuse 



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Ministerial Association 






Officers 






President, Mark H. Wert P. F. Roberts 






Vice President, G. A. Richie C. E. Brenneman 






Secretary, Phares B. Gibble John H. Ness 






Treasurer, C. E. Brenneman I. S. Ernst 






Members 






Raymond H. Arndt Clyde A. Lynch 






Gideon L. Blouch C. H. McCann 






C. E. Brennema;i John H. Ness 






O. R. Brooks John W. Oakes 






H. E. Canoles Howard L. Olewiler 






I. S. Ernst G. A. Richie 






P. B. Gibble P. F. Roberts 






G. H. Hallman H. E. Schaeffer 






P. C. Hoffman Mark H. Wert 






O. E. Krenz D. E. Young 






J. Maurice Leister Clayton H. Zuse 






HoxoRARY Members 






President, G. D. Gossard Prof. A. E. Shroyer 






Rev. H. B. Spayd Rev. W. H. Weaver 




Pa^e 102 





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College News 



Issued weekly during the College Year by the Christian 
Associations of Lebanon Valley College 



Social 
Clara Horn 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Edna E. Yarkers, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Edith Lehman, '13 

Victor Mulhollen, '13 
DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Athletics 
13 Ivan L. Ressler, '13 

General 
J. F. Leininger, '13 
John B. Lyter, '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

H. H. Charlton, '14 

ASSISTANT 

Philo A. Station, '15 






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Clionian 

QLIONIAN: to thee We bow in praise, 

l^et every maiden's heart rejoice in thee. 

In each young life thy influence do show, 

\Jn Fortune's velvet altar bring us nigh; 

iSo frost can chill the love we bear for thee. 

Indurated and fixed, 'tis thine to have 

And ever use so others, too, may k^ow 

M aught else but good while at thy shrine the^ bow. 

-C. B. B. 





















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Clionian Literary Society 



Catliarine B. Bachnian 
Ora B. Bacliman 
Maud Baker 
Blanche Black 
Helen E. Brightbill 
Pauline Byrd 
Florence E. Christeson 
Florence E. Clippinger 
Mary Daugherty 
Miriam Ellis 
Larene Engle 
Rutli V. Engle 
Ruth E. Engle 
Edith A. Gingrich 



M E M B E R S 

Mrs. S O. Grimm 
E. \'iola Gruher 
\'elma Heindel 
Esther Heintzelman 
Irene Hershey 
Clara K. Horn 
Ethd I. Hauser 
Edith M. Lehman 
Josephin; Mathias 
Florence Mentz 
E. Mae Meyer 
Vera Meyers 
Esther Moyer 
M. Belle Orris 



Ruth Quigley 
Elizabeth Rechard 
Hope Renn 
Blanche M. Risser 
Dora Ryland 
Mary A. Spayd 
Lottie M. Spessard 
Addie Snyder 
M. Josephine Urich 
Esta Wareheini 
Elta Weaver 
Ruth M. Whiskeyman 
Edna E. Yarkers 
Sara E. Zimmerman 



Motto— Virtute et Fid; 
Colors — Gold and White 
Flower — Yellou' Chrysanthemum 
Paper — Olive Branch 



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Rio! Rio! 
Clio ! Clio 



Sis! Boom! Bah! 
Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 









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OFFICERS 

Fall Term Winter Term 

President, Editli Lehman Lottie Spessard 

Vice President. Lottie Spessard Elizalieth Rechard 

Recording Secretary, Florence Mentz Blanche Risser 

Corresponding Secretary, Catharine Bachman Catharine Bachman 

Treasurer, Edna Yarkers Florence Clippinger 

Editor, Sara Zimmerman Elta Weaver 

Chaplain, Mary Spayd Florence Mentz 

Critic, Clara Horn Edna Yarkers 

Pianist, Velma Heindel Ora Bachman 

Recorder, 

\ Miriam Ellis Belle Orris 

\ Larene Engle Josephine Urich 



Judges, 



Spring Term 
Edna Yarkers 
Sara Zimmerman 
M. Belle Orris 
Ruth V. Engle 
Josephine Urich 
Josephine Mathias 
Clara Horn 
Edith Lehman 
Velma Heindel 
Catharine Bachman 
Mary Daugherty 
Esther Heintzelman 



Page 108 



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Philokosmian 

PHILOKOSMIAN : thou art lov'd indeed, 
Here oft within th^ dear halls we come. 
In hours of trial and sensations stveet ; 
Let thee then with tranquil restoration 
Or soothing balm dispel the weary night, 
Kind to all whom to thee desire may lead; 
Cjur source of strength, an eternal regard 
Sinks in our hearts whene'er we think of thee; 
May all behold in thee what they would be, 
If^ears do pass n'er cease to prove in might 
/± lover of th^ precepts good and true 
I\or ever stray in thought or deed awa}g. 



-C. B. B. 



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Philokosmian Literary Society 



Isaa.- H. Albright 

Frank Attinger 

David B. Basehore 

\icti)r BloLich 

G. Fred Botts 

Paul J. Bowman 

(Jerald Brewbaker 

Conrad K. Curry 

CJeorge Dehuff 

Allen B. Engle 

Ralph Gonder 

Robert Hartz 

George Haverstock 
S. Huber Heintzelman 

Russell E. Hoffer 
P. C. Hoffman 

Landis R. Klinger 

Maurice Leister 

J. F. Leininger 



Raymond H. Arndt 

Ir\'in Bacastow 

Gideon L. Blourh 

Joseph V, Bomberger 

E. Kephart Boughter 

C. E. Brennemaii 

William C. Carl 

Abraham Dearolf 

J. C. Ditzler 

David J. Evans 

Leray B. Harnish 



John O. Jones 
O. E. Krenz 
Lahman 1. Leister 
John W. Larew 



M E M B E R S 

Clyde A. Lynch 
Robert McClure 
\'ictor D. Mulhollen 
John H. Ness 
David B. Pugh 
G. Adolphus Richie 
Harold Risser 
L. A. Rodes 
John E. Sherk 
Carl G. Suavely 
Philo A. Statton 
Ralph Stickell 
Alvin L. Weaver 
Russell M. Weidler 
Harold Wine 



Raymond Merediz 

John D. Mowery 

Oscar Mulhollen 

H. L. Olewiler 

Thomas E. Pell 

D. Leonard Reddick 

Sedic S. Rine 

P. F. Roberts 

Albert Shaud 

Edward H. Smith 

Lester F. Snyder 

Clarence H. Ulrich 

Cleason Weaver 

M. H. Wert 

Arthur Wisner 
Paul E. Witmeyer 

J Harold K. SVrightstone 
D. Ellis Zimmerman 

Clayton H. Zuse 



Motto — Esse quam videri 
Colors— Old Gold and Blue 
Paper — Living Thoughts 

YELL 

Hobble Gobble! Razzle Dazzle I L. V. C. 

"Esse quam videri !" 

Hobble Gobble ! Razzle Dazzle ! Sis ! Boom ! Bah ! 

Philokosmian ! Rah ! Rah I Rah ! 



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Philokosmian Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

President— G. A. Richie, First Term 

Landis R. Klinger, Second Term 
E. Kephart Boughter, Third Term 
John E. Sherk, Fourth Term 

Vice President — D. Leonard Reddick, First Term 
Lester A. Rodes, Second Term 
Russell M. Weidler, Third Term 
Recording Secretary— H. L. Olewiler, First Term Edward H. Smith, Fourth Term 
Philo A. Statton, Second Term 
Sedic S. Rine, Third Term 
Carl G. Suavely, Fourth Term 
Corresponding Secretary— GGideon L. Blouch, First Term 
Clayton H. Zuse, Second Term 
S. Huber Heintzelman, Third Term 
Conrad K. Curry, Fourth Term 



Chaplain — Clyde A. Lynch, First Term 
John H. Ness, Second Term 
H. L. Olewiler, Third Term 
P. C. Hoffman, Fourth Term 

Critic — J. F. Leininger, First Term 

V. D. Mulhollen, Second Term 
M. H. Wert, Third Term 
Landis R. Klinger, Fourth Term 



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Pianist— John O. Jones, First Term 

Lester F. Snyder, Second Term 

John O. Jones, Third Term 

D. Ellis Zimmerman, Fourth Term 

Judge— John E. Sherk, First Term 

John E. Sherk, Second Term 
G. A. Richie, Third Term 
Janitor— R. H. Arndt, First Term G. A. Richie, Fourth Term 

S. Huber Heintzelman, Second Term 
Clayton H. Zuse, Third Term 
David J, Evans, Fourth Term 

First Assistant Janitor— Lehman Leister, First Term 

David B. Basehore, Second Term 
P. C. Hoffman, Third Term 
Harold K. Wrightstone, Fourth Term 
Second Assistant Janitor— Harold Risser, First Term 

Raymond Merediz, Second Term 
H. K. Wrightstone, Third Term 
Harold K. Risser, Fourth Term 

Editor— Alvin L. Weaver, First Term 
Alvin L. Weaver, Second Term 
William C. Carl, Third Term 
William C. Carl, Fourth Term 



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Kalozetean 

K.ALOZETEAN : ever would roe be 
/\ true and loyal hand to all manl^ind, 
LjOVe, the highest law, we strive to fulfill, 
Cy ur aim to serve in spite of all the dust, 
jealous and brave we feel for man a bond 
tLntire and k^en; close behind those years which 
I ime shall weave we'll gaze upon the linl^s that 
r.ver hold us fast; then on friendship's flood 
y^s we return to cheerful haunts of old 
l\l otoriousl}) we'll sing thy praise. 



-C. B. 



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Kalozetean Literary Society 



Charles H. Arndt 
Fred Arnold 
Harry M. Bender 
William N. Canoles 
Harry H. Charlton 
I. Clyde Eby 
Ira S. Ernst 
Phares B. Gibble 
George M. Hallman 
Victor Heflfelfinger 
Verling W. Jamison 
Elmer A. Kirkpatrick 
A. B. Krause 



M E M B E R S 

Edgar M. Landis 
Boaz G. Light 
Mark Y. Light 
Mason Long 
David E. Long 
John Long 
John B. Lyter 
Thomas B. Lyter 
C. Howard McCann 
A. D. Medsger 
Allen Meyer 
William E. Mickey 
M. Luther Miller 

Motto — Palma non sine Pulvere 
Colors- Red and Old Gold 
Paper — The Examiner 

YELL 

Wah-Hoo ! Wah-Hoo ! Wah-Hoo ! Re ! 

Palma non sine pulvere ! 

Wah-Hoo ! Wah-Hoo I Wah-Hoo ! Re ! 

Kalozetean L. V. C. 



C. Edward Mutch 
John W. Oaks 
\. L. Ressler 
Carl F. Schmidt 
Henry E. Snavely 
Faber E. Stengel 
Paul L. Strickler 
Charles Y. Ulrich 
Frank M. Van Schaak 
Marsel VonBereghy 
J. Allen Walter 
Geo. A. Williams 



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Kalozetean Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

President— Boaz G. Light, Fall Term 
I. L. Ressler, Winter Term 
George A. Williams, Spring Term 

Vice President— Frank Shearer, Fall I'erm 
Recording Secretary— Edgar M. I.andis, Fall Term H. H. Charlton, Winter Term 
J. Allen Walter, Winter Term Henry E. Snavely, Spring Term 
Harry M. Bender, Spring Term 

Corresponding Secretary— F. E. Stengle, Fall Term 

Harry Bender, Winter Term 
I. Clyde Eby, Spring Term 

asurer— John B. Lyter, Fall Term 

John B. Lyter, Winter Term 
John B. Lyter, Spring Term 
Editor— Verling Jamison, Fall Term Sergeant-at-Arms— Norman Fake, Fall Term 

T. B. Lyter, Winter Term G.W.Hallman, Winter Term 

Edgar M. Landis, Spring Term John Long, Spring Term 

Assistant— A. D. Medsger, Fall Term Pianist— Paul L. Strickler, Fall Term 

Fred Arnold, Winter Term F. E. Stengle, Winter Term 

M. VonBereghy, Spring Term Fred Arnold, Spring Term 



Critic— Henry E. Snavely, Fall Term 
Carl F. Schmidt, Winter Term 
Charles Y. Ulrich, Spring Term 
Chaplain— P. B. Gibble, Fall Term 

Verling Jamison, Winter Term 
Ira. S. Ernst, Spring Term 






Page 116 






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Sophronean 

SOPHRONEAN : thou home of men and maids, 

\J happ^ let us be while we are here, 

lerhaps too soon the da^ will come when we, 

Jiome to our cares will go, and thee forget; 

ixing then thy peals of gladness over all, 

O sing thy songs of praise out far and wide, 

Jyow with th^ jo^ our inmost bosoms fill, 

rLver be thou our guide as on we go, 

y\nd as We meet again within thy halls 

IS aught let us knew but peace and joy in thee. 

—C. B. B. 



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Sophronean Literary Society 



Isaac H. Albright 
Raymond H. Arndt 
Invin O. Bacastow 
D. B. Basehore 
Gerald O. Brubaker 
Anna Hubble 
Allen B. Engle 
CJeorge Hallman 



M E M B E R S 

Geo. M. Haverstock 
Russell E. Hoffer 
O. E. Krenz 
Lehman I. Leister 
Mark Y. Light 
Clyde A. Lynch 
Robert McClure 
A. D. Medsger 

Motto — Virtus pro Honore 
Colors Orange and Black 



John Oakes 

Harold W. Risser 

H. E. Schaeflfer 

Mabel Snyder 

Elta Weaver 

C. Harold Wine 

Harold K. Wrightstone 



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Sophronean Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

President -Russell E. Hoflfer, Fall Term 
O. E. Krenz, Winter Term 
Harold Risser, Spring Team 

\^ice President — George M. Haverstock, Fall Term 
Harold Risser, Winter Term 
A. D. Medsger, Spring Term 
Recording Secretary — Elta Weaver, Fall Term 

Mabel Snyder, Winter Term 
Geo. M. Haverstock, Spring Team 

Corresponding Secretary — Mark Y. Light, Fall Term 

Robert McClure, Winter Term 
I. H. Albright, Spring Term 
Treasurer — Harold Risser, Fall Term 

A. D. Medsger, Winter Term 
D. S. Basehore, Spring Term 

Critic — Norman I. Fake, Fall Term 

Geo. M. Haverstock, Winter Term 



Chaplain — Raymond H. Arndt, Fall Term 
H. E. Schaeffer, Winter Term 
John Oakes, Spring Term 



Choristor — O. E. Krenz, Fall Term 

I. H. Albright, Winter Term 
I. H. Albright, Spring Term 



Sentinel Allen B. Engle, Fall Term 
R. H. Arndt, Winter Term 
C. Harold Wine, Spring Term 



Clyde A. Lynch, Spring Term 



Pianist — H. E. Schaeffer, Fall Term 

C. Harold Wine, Winter Term 
Mabel Snyder, Spring Term 



Editor — Anna Dubble, Fall Term 

Elta Weaver, Winter Term 
Robert McClure, Spring Term 



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Girls' Glee Club 

Lebanon Valley College 



Personnel 



Prof. Gertrude K. Schmidt, 
Lottie M. Spessard, 

First Sopranos 
Catharine B. Bachman 
Edith A. Gingrich 
Velma Heindel 
Myrl Turby 
Velma Stauffer 

First Altos 
Ora B. Bachman 
Ruth E. Engle 
Vera Myers 
Sara Zimmerman 

Reader 

Helen E. BrightbiU 



Musical Director 
Business Manager 

Second Sopranos 
Helen E. Brightbill 
Florence E. Christeson 
Ruth Quigley 
Dora Ryland 



Second Altos 
Ruth Brunner 
Florence E. Clippinger 
Mary A. Spayd 
Lottie M. Spessard 

Soloist 

Edith A. Gingrich 



Accompanist 

V^elma Heindel 



Engagements 



March 4, 

March 7, 

March 8, 

March 10, 

April 9, 



Palmyra 
York 
Red Lion 
Dallastown 
Hagerstown 



April 10, 

April 11, 

April 12, 

April 21, 



B.iltimore 
Baltimore 
DiUsburg 
Annville 



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SEASON 1912-13 






Officers 




President, 


Landis R. Klinger 




Secretary, 


F. E. Stengle 




Treasurer, 


H. H. Charlton 




Librarian, 


L S. Ernst 




Musical Director, 


Prof. E. Edwin Sheldon 




Business Manager, 


Alvin L. Weaver 
Personnel 




First Tenors 


First Basses 




L. A. Rodes 


R. M. Weidler 




T. A. Lyter 


A. L. Weaver 




F. E. Stengle 


P. A. Statton 




I. S. Ernst 


D. M. Long 




Second Tenors 






H. M. Bender 


Second Basses 




Edw. H. Smith 


L. R. Klinger 




O. E. Krenz 


G. Fred Botts 




V. W. Jamison 


H. H. Charlton 
C. G. Snavely 




Quartette 






L. A. Rodes 






T. B. Lyter 


Reader 




E. E. Sheldon 


Verling W. Jamison 




G. Fred Botts 






Violinist 


Trombonist 




Philo A. Statton 


Thomas B. Lyter 
Engagements 




Feb. 20. Jonestown 


Feb. 29. DiUsburg 




Feb. 21. Lykens 


Mar. 3. Annville 




Feb. 22. Elizabethville 


Mar. 8. Lebanon 




Feb. 27. Harrisburg 


Mar. 10. Humnielstown 




Feb. 28. Duncannon 


Mar. 11. llcrsht\ 


Page 


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White Shield Single Standard League 




Officers 

President, Esta Wareheim 

Vice President, Esther Heintzelman 
Secretary, Mary L. Daugherty 

Treasurer, M. Belle Orris 



Catharine B. Bachman 
Ora B. Bachman 
H. Maude Baker 
Blanche Black 
Florence E. Christeson 
Florence E. Clippinger 
Mary L. Daugherty 
Larene Engle 
Ruth V. Engle 
Viola Gruber 
Velma Heindel 



Members 

Esther Heintzelman 
Clara Kee Horn 
Ethel Houser 
Mar}' Irwin 
Edith Lehman 
Josephine S. Mathias 
Florence Mentz 
Vera Meyers 
M. Belle Orris 
Helen Oyler 
Ruth Quigley 



Elizabeth Rechard 

Blanche M. Risser 

Prof. Lucy S. Seltzer 

Mary Spayd 

Lottie M. Spessard 

M. Josephine Urich 

Esta Wareheim 

Ruth M. Whiskeyman 

Edna Yarkers 

Sara E. Zimmerman 



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Raymond H. Arndt 
I. H. Albright 
G. L. Blouch 
G. F. Botts 
Paul Bowman 
C. E. Brenneman 
Gerald Brewbaker 
W. C. Carl 
Abram Dearolf 
George DeHuff 
I. S. Ernst 
David Evans 
Leray B. Harnish 
George M. Haverstock 
S. Huber Heintzelman 
V. W. Jamison 



John O. Jones 
L. R. Klinger 
J. F. Leininger 
John W. Larew 
D. Mason Long 
Howard McCann 
Robert McClure 
William Mickey 
Luther Miller 
Victor D. Mulhollen 
John H. Ness 
John W. Oakes 
I. L. Ressler 
G. A. Richie 
P. F. Roberts 
Sedic S. Rine 
Clayton H. Zuse 



John E. b'herk 
Carl G. Snavely 
Henry E. Snavely 
Lester F. Snyder 
Philo A. Statton 

F. E. Stengle 
Ralph Stickell 
Marcel Von Bereghy 
A. L. Weaver 

R. M. Weidler 

G. A. Williams 
Harold Wine 
Arthur Wisner 
Paul Witme^ er 
Harold K. Wrightstone 

D. E. Young 









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Biological Field Club 




Officers 
President, Charles H. Arndt 

V'ice President, H. H. Charlton 
Secretary, F. E. Stengle 

Treasurer, Prof. S. H. Derickson 



Charles H. Arndt 
Albert Barnhart 
Paul J. Bowman 
William C. Carl 
H. H. Charlton 
Florence E. Clippinger 
Prof. S. H. Derickson 
Prof. S. (). Grimm 
Lera\ B. Harnish 
Edith AI. Lehman 
John F. Eeininger 



Members 

John H. Ness 
Howard L. Olewiler 
D. Leonard Reddick 
Ivan L. Ressler 
Carl F. Schmidt 
Edward H. Smith 
F. E. Stengle 
Frank \'an Schaak 
Russell M. Weidler 
George A. Williams 
Edna E. Yarkers 



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Mathematical Round Table 




Officers 
President, Russell M. Weidler 

Vice President, G. A. Williams 
Secretary, Lottie M. Spessard 

Treasurer, Lester A. Rodes 



G. A. Williams 
Clara K. Horn 
Elizabeth H. Rechard 
Paul J. Bowman 



Paul J. Bowman 
Prof. S. O. Grimm 
Leray B. Harnish 
Clara K. Horn 
Prof. J. E. Lehman 
Edith M. Lehman 
Boaz G. Light 
Florence C. Mentz 
Prof. C. C. Peters 



Members 

Elizabeth H. Rechard 
Ivan L. Ressler 
G. A. Richie 
L. A. Rodes 
Lottie M. Spessard 
Philo A Statton 
Faber E. Stengle 
Russell M. Weidler 
G. A. Williams 



Edna E. Yarkers 



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Deutscher Verein 




Officers 

Carl F. Schmidt, President 
John B. Lyter, Vice President 
Helen E. Brightbill, Secretary 
Paul J. Bowman, Treasurer 
E. May Meyer, Pianist 



Catharine B. Bachman 
Marcel Von Bereghy 
Paul J. Bowman 
Helen E. Brightbill 
Harry H. Charlton 
Van B. Dayhoff 
George Dehuff 
Larene Engle 
Ruth V. Engle 
David J. Evans 



Members 

Viola Gruber 
Victor M. Heffelfinger 
Esther Heintztlman 
S. Huber Heintzelman 
Mary L. Irwin 
Lillian Kendig 
Edgar M. Landis 
Edith M. Lehman 
Boaz G. Light 
John W. Larew 



John B. Lyter 
T. B. Lyter 

Florence Mentz 
E. May Meyer 
Blanche M. Risser 
Carl F. Schmidt 
Mary A. Spayd 
Philo A. Station 
Paul L. Strickler 
M. Josephine Urich 



Page 130 



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Ministers' Sons Club 




MEMBERS 

G. A. Williams, President 

R. M. Weidler, Vice President 

Philo A. Statton, Secretary 

Charles H. Arndt, Treasurer 

I. H. Albright 

Conrad K. Curry 

J. C. Ditzler 

John O. Jones 

D. Mason Long 

John Long 



John B. Lyter 
T. B. Lyter 
C. Edw. Mutch 
L. A. Rodes 
Carl G. Snavely 
Lester F. Snyder 
Donald W. Stangle 
A. L. Weaver 
C. Harold Wine 



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Nutt Club 




Purpose : To cu 


tivate the nutty qualities in its members 
Yell 




Ki-wax ! Ko-jang ! Knutt ! 




Bang 


Crax ! Ratzel ! Mutt ! 




N 


utt ! Nutty! Knutt! 
Inmates 




Chief Nutt 


Butch Carl 




Hazel Nutt 


Hee Haw Baker 




Filbert Nutt 


Jamey Jamison 




Butter Nutt 


Fat Von Bereghy 




Beech Nutt 


Sally Van Schaack 




Cocoa Nutt 


A'larkus Hopkinus Wertus 




Wall Nutt 


Vic Heffelfinger 




Pea Nutt 


Floss Cloppinger 




Dough Nutt 


Hellie Brightbill 




Hickory Nutt 


Ikey Ressler 




M. T. Nutt 


Abe McClure 




Old Nutt 


Rosy Orris 




Fussy Nutt 


Goosey Heintzelman 




Nuttier Nutt 


Miss Ethel Irene Houser 




Nuttiest Nutt 


Reporter Harnish* 




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EMBERS IN FaCULTATE 




Chest Nutt 


Hiram Shenk 




Bitter Nutt 


Ma Adams 




Grape Nutt 


Pop Wanner 




Just Nutty 


Miss Jonny 




Clamoring for Admission 




Darwin's Missing Link Sara Zimmerman 




Original Banana Peel John Sherk 






Asylum Address 






Hell's Halfacre 






Pigsknuckles 






Knutt 




'Note : Since Miss Jonny has jined the club Reporter Harnish has 




withdrawn voluntarily. 






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Exercises of Commencement Week 

of 1912 

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 
8 :00 p. M. President's Reception to Senior Class. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 

7 :45 p. M. Academy Commencement. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 9 

10.30 A. M. Baccalaureate Sermon by I. E. Runk. 
6:00 p. M. Union Campus Praise Service. 
7 :30 p. M. Annual Address before the Christian Associa- 
tions by Prof. H. H. Baish. 

MONDAY, JUNE 10 
12:00 to 5:00 p. m. Art Exhibit in New Studio. 
8 :00 p. M. Exercises by the Graduating Class, Con- 
servatory of Music and School of Oratory. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 11 
9:00 A. M. Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees. 
2:00 p. M. Class Day Exercises. 
2 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. Art Exhibit. 
7:30 p. M. Junior Oratorical Contest. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 

10:00 A. M. Forty-sixth Annual Commencement. Ora- 
tor, Hon. Victor Murdock, U. S. Senator from Kansas. 
Subject: "Insurgency." Conferring Degrees. 

12:00 M. Annual Alumni Dinner and Re-union. 

1 :30 p. M. Convention of Ministers of Co-operating 
Conferences. 

3:C0 p. M. Base Ball, Athletic Field, Vaisity vs. Alumni. 

7 :45 P. M. Annual Plav, Merchant of Venice. 



Page 133 



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Academy Commencement 

June 8, 1912 



PROGRAM 

Invocation' 

PiAN'o Solo — a Cradle Song 

b Spring Witchery 

Vera F. Myers 

President's Address 

Phares B. Gibble 

Reading — Trick vs. Trick 

Ira S. Ernest 



Class History 



E. Viola Gruber 



Eulogy — Clara Barton 

Caroline C. Shoop 

Social Customs of the Manor 

Sedic S. Rine 

Piano Solo — Morceau de Salon, Op. II 
Esther E. Ferxsler 

Conservation of the "Big Three" 
Gideon L. Blouch 



Prof'hecy 
Parting Ode 



Robert E. Hartz 



Virginia C. Shoop 



Presentation of Diplomas 

Rev. I. Calvin Fisher 



Jeffrey 
If'ihon Smith 



Smith 



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^^/^^ Baccalaureate Services 

Sunday, June 9, 1912 

10.30 A. M. 



PROGRAM 

Organ Prelude — March Colennele 

Invocation 

Hymn— Holy ! Holy ! Holy ! 

Scripture Reading 

Prayer 

Anthem — Like as a Hart 

Announcements 

Offering 

Solo — O Love Divine 

Mrs. Edith Frantz Mills 
Sermon— Life's True Ideal 
Hymn — In the Cross of Christ I Glory 
Benediction 
Organ Postlude — Selected 



Lemaire 
Rev. H. B. Spayd 



Spe 



G. Nevin 



Rev. I. E. Runk 



7.30 p. m. 



Miss Ora B. Bachman 



Gounod 



Organ and Piano Duet — March Religieuse 

Misses Ora B. Bachman, Velma L. Heindel 
Invocation 

Anthem — The Hour of Prayer Scott 

Hymn — Onward Christian Soldiers 
Scripture 
Prayer 

Duet — Come Ye to Him Misses Myrle Turby, Grace Berger 

Announcements 
Offering 

Address— Optimism Prof. H. H. Baish, '01 

Hymn— No. 110 
Benediction 
Organ Postlude— Selected Miss Ora B. Bachman 



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Department of Music 

and 

School of Oratory 

COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 
Monday, June 10, 1912 

Invocation 

Allegro From Eroica Symphony . . . Dcrthoven 

Misses Spayd, Fry, Diehm, Gingrich, 

Strickler and Light 

a Praeludium MacDoivcll 

b SONETTE 47 DEL PeTRARCA L'lSZt 

Miss Spa yd 

"The Passing of Arthur" Tennyson 

Miss Yarkers 

a A Bird as Prophet Schumann 

b Staccato Caprice Vugnch 

Miss Fry 

Polonaise in E major L\s%t 

Miss Light 

"As Vou Like It." ( Act 3, Scene 2) . . Shakespeare 
Miss Smith 

Nocturne AND Prelude (Carnival mignon) . Schu/t 
Miss Strickler 

Finale From Etudes Symphoniqul . . Schumann 
Miss Gingrich 

Meeting of Evangeline and Gabriel . Longfellow 
Miss Brightbill 

Scherzo in E Chopin 

Miss Diehm 

Presentation of Diplomas by 

President Lawrence Keister, S. T. B., D. D. 






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/ LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 






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Class Day 

Tuesday, June 11, 1912 

PROGRAM 

1912 MANIFESTO 

■'NIGGER IN THE If'OODPILE" 

ANTE BELLUM FREPARATIONES 

REVERIES 

KLU KLUX KLAN 

THE SADDEST STORY El'ER TOLD 

-A MID-SUMMER NIGHTS DREAM" 

All REVO I R 



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Annual Junior Oratorical Contest 

June 11th, 1912 

PROGRAM 
Invocation 
Vocal Solo — At Twilight Time .... Cadman 

Miss Myrle Turby 
Oration — Man — His Mission in Life 

B. G. Light 
Or.ation — The Key to Power 

V^ D. Mulhollen 
Vocal Solo — Selected 

G. F. BoTTS 
Oration — The High Water Mark 
G. A. Richie 
Oration — Conservation 

P. F. Roberts 
Voc.'VL Duet — I Feel Thine Angel Spirit 
Miss Edith Gingrich 
Max F. Lehman 
Oration — The Independent Judge 

G. A. Williams 

Piano Duet — Serenade Mendelssohn 

Allegro 

Miss Ruth E. Engle 
Miss Meda Diehm 
Decision of Judges 

First Prize, $20 in Gold, G. A. Williams 
Second Prize, $10 in Gold, divided be- 
tween P. F. Roberts and V. D. 
Mulhollen 
Third Prize, $5 in Gold, B. G. Light 



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College Commencement 

June 12, 1912 

PROGRAM 

March — Love of Liberty .... //'. //. Soiiton 
Invocation 

Overture — Raymond A. Thomas 

Commencement Oration — Insurgency 
Hon. Victor Murdock 

A Hungarian Romance Thfo. Bendix 

Presentation of diplomas 

Selection — Bohemian Girl Balfc 



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7/?^ Merchant of Venice 



Presented Under the Auspices of the Christian Associations 
Wednesday, June 12, 1912 



Cast 

The Duke of Venice 

The Prince of Morocco I c - . » p„.»,o 
„, „ . , , ,- buitors to rortia 

The Prince of Arragon \ 

Antonio, a merchant at Venice 

Bassanio, his friend, suitor hkewise to Portia . 

Salanio ) 

Salarino \ Friends to Antonio and Bassanio 

Gratiano ) 

Lorenzo, in love with Jessica 

Shylock, a rich Jew .... 

Tubal, a Jew, his friend .... 

Launcelot Gobbo, the clown, servant to Shylock 

Old Gobbo, father to Launcelot 

Leonardo, servant to Bassanio 

Portia, a rich heiress 

Nerissa, her waiting maid 

Jessica, daughter to Shylock 



S. O. Grimm 
\ J. F. Leininger 
( J. E. Sherk 
V. D. Mulhollen 
J. W. Ischy 
C. Y. Ulrich 
L. R. Klinger 
C. C. Smith 
C. F. Harnish 
Oliver Butterwick 
Guy Wingerd 
E. K. Boughter 
R. M. Weidler 
L. A. Rodes 
Edna E. Yarkers 
Carrie S. Light 
Helen Weidler 



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Forty-Second Anniversary 

Clionian Literary Society 

1 Friday, November 22, 1912 




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PROGRAM 




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March — Lance and Shield . . . L. P. Laurendcau 






Invocation President Gossard 

Concert — Berceuse Liidivig Schytte 


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President's Address — A God Within 
Edith M. Lehman 


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Piano Solo — Der Erlkonig . . Schuhert-HojfiiKinn 
Velma Heindel 

Oration — The Servant in the House 

Lottie M. Spessard 


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Oration — A New Reformation 




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Elizabeth Rechard 
Duet — Hear Me, Norma Bellini 


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Edith A. Gingrich Lottie M. Spessard 
Reading — Edith's Flight and Triumph . . Difkcns 






(Selection from "Dombey and Son") 


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Edna Yarkers 
Oration — The Other Side 




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Sara E. Zimmerman 
Chorus — Forget-Me-Not Olyivard 


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Girls' Glee Club 
Overture — The Golden Sceptre . . R. Schlepegrell 




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Thirty-Sixth Anniversary of the 

Kalozetean Literary Society 

Friday Evening, April 4, 1913 

PRCK^RAM 
March — Spirit of Independence . . Ahc Holzman 
Invocation- — Rev. J. A. L\'ter '85 

Overture — Lustspiel .... Keler-Bcla. Op. 73 
President's Address — George A. Williams 
Oration — The Menace of Deforestation 

BoAZ G. Light 
Piano Solo — Original Composition 

M. Luther Miller 
Readinc, — Sam Weller As Witness 

(From the "Pickwick Papers" b.v Uickens) 
Victor M. Heffelfinger 
Essay— Did Taft Make Good ? 

Ivan L. Ressler 
Baritone Solo — On the Road to Mandalay 

Harry Edwin Ulrich 
Oration — Peace Among Perplexities 

Charles Y. Ulrich 
Intermezzo— April Moods . . . Max C- E"!/nic 



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Forty-Sixth Anniversary of the 

Philokosmian Literary Society 

Friday Evening, May 2, 1913 

PROGRAM 

March — United Liberty Loscy 

Orchestra 

Overture — Stradella I on Flotuic 

Orchestra 
Invocation' — B. F. Daugherty, D. D. 
President's Address 

Mark H. Wert 
Le Muletier De Tarragone .... Henrion 

G. Fred Botts 
Oration — Message of Heredity and Enxironment 
Palmer F. Roberts 

Reading — Gordon's Reprieve Greblc 

Victor D. Mulholi.en 
Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes . . t'oyrhh 

Philo Quartette 
Oration — The Dawn 

G. A. Richie 

Violin Solo — Souvenir Dnlhi 

Philo A. Statton 
Eulogy — Clara Barton 

John F. Leinixger 

Exit March — Love of Liberty .... Stoiifon 

Orchestr.a 



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Junior Class Play 

The Private Secretary 

Monday, April 7, 1913 

By Charles Hawtrey 
Under the Directorship of Miss May Belle Adams 

Caste of Characters 

Mr. Marsland Russel Weidler 

Harry Marsland (his nephew) Paul L. Strickler 

Mr. Cattermole Harry Charlton 

Douglas Cattermole (his nephew) Carl Schmidt 

Rev. Robert Spalding D. Leonard Reddick 

Mr. Sydney Gibson, Tailor of Bond Street .... John B. Lyter 

John (a servant) Edgar M. Landis 

Knox (a writ server) Ellis Zimmerman 

Edith Marsland (daughter to Mr. Marsland) . Miss Blanche Risser 
Eva Webster (her friend and companion) Miss Catharine B. Bachman 

Mrs. Stead, Douglas' landlady Miss Mae Meyer 

Miss Ashford Miss Josephine Urich 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

Song Recital 

BY 

MISS GERTRUDE KATHERINE SCHMIDT, Soprano 

ASSISTED BY 

MISS MAY BELLE ADAMS, Reader 
MR. E. EDWIN SHELDON, Accompanist 

Thursday Evening, Oct. 17, 1912 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

Engle Auditorium, Annville, Pa. 

PROGRAM 

Wui Melodien zieht es mir Brahms 

BoTSCHAFT Brahms 

Vergebliches St.-^ndchen Brahms 

Die Theure H.'VLLe (Tannhauser) . . . Wagner 

Count Gismoxd Robert Broimint/ 

Miss Ad.ams 

H.\rk! Hark! the Lark Schubert 

Chantons les Amoures de Jean | Deux Chantons 
Jeune Fillette \ DE XVIIIe Ciecle 

Three Indian Love Lyrics ^-Jmy Woodforde-Finden 

Kashmiri Song 

Less th.4n the Dust 
Till I Wake 
Mr. McLerie's Convalescence . . . J. J. Bell 
Miss Adams 

You and I Liza Lehmunn 

Dearest • Sidney Homer 

April Rain R. H. Woodman 






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Lebanon Valley-Juniata Debate 

Held at Juniata College, Huntington, Pa. 




V. D. MULHOLLEN H. E. SNAVELY G.A.RICHIE 

QUESTION : Resolved, That a new constitution should be form- 
ed for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by a convention called for 
that purpose. 

Lebanon Valley, Negative 
Decision, Affirmative 

Lebanon Valley was represented by Victor D. Mulhollen and G. A. 
Richie, Seniors, and Henry E. Snavely, a Junior. 



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Star Course 



1912-1913 



A U S P I C K S 



Young Women's Christian Association and 
Young Men's Christian Association 



Attractions 

November 15 — Walter Eccles and the Four College Girls 

December 14 -The Dixie Chorus 

January 29— Dr. William A. Colledge, D.D., F. R. G. S. 

February 15 — The Hussars 

March 25 — The Emilv Waterman Concert Company 



Committee 



G. A. Richie, '13, Chairman 
Edith M. Lehman, '13 
Lottie M. Spessard, '13 
Velma L. Heindel, '13 
Victor D. Mulhollen, '13 



Charles H. Arndt, '14, Treasurer 
Russel M. Weidler, '14 
Ruth V. Engle, '15 
Vera F. Myers, '15 
Faber E. Stengle, '15 




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Lebanon Valley Diary for 1912-1913 

SEPTEMBER 

10. Male and female students, mostly female, "float" in. Richie busy 

carrying suitcases. 
1 1. New girls arrive. Charlton looks them over and finally takes a walk 

with Dora Ryland. New President in chapel. 
12. Classes start on schedule time, especially Prof. Peter's. Charlton 

takes another walk. Freshmen organize. 1915 slow as ever. 
1.5. Soph posters appear. No signs of class scrap. Velma arrives minus 

"Gee" — Downhearted. . 

14. New professors making good. Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. reception 

to new students. "Reporter" renews friendship with Ethel 
Houser. 

15. Sunday. All go to church. Students get call-down for talking. 

Maude arrives. Business Manager happy. 

16. New students homesick. Scrub Glee Club organized to refresh their 

depressed spirits. First football practice. 

17. Prof. Shenk introduces the Turkey-Trot to Sociology class. First 

appearance of Death League. 

18. Maude leaves. Business Manager is ill and cannot attend to his 

duties. Landis falls asleep in Astronom\- class — Sauerkraut for 
dinner. 

19. McCann starts prep Prayer-Circle. "Abe" McClure shouts and 

breaks up the meeting. New rules for Ladies' Dorm, emanate 
from Prof. Johnson — as good as can be expected. 

20. Ness chokes on "doggie" in dining-hall. Prof. Kirkland gives 

graphophone entertainment in French classes. Bible exam — all 
flunk. 

21. "Pop" Wanner and Miss Boehm take a stroll. Hikers' Club or- 

ganized — Bowman and Edith Lehman the only members. 

22. Sunday again. Students get another call-down in church. "Oley" 

takes Ruth Quigley home from church, Sedic takes Velma. 

23. Prof. Peters begins 10-0 combination roll-call and grading system in 

his classes. Faculty take a firm position in chapel — on the 
rostrum. 



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New football material arrives. Second appearance of Death League 

— Consternation in Mens Dorm. 
Football team puts up stiff fight against the Carlisle Indians and holds 

them to 45-0. Big celebration upon return of the team. 
"Oley" gets his last letter from York. Sophs go on party to Mt. 

Gretna. Mary Daugherty makes a hit with Richie. 
Fish for dinner. Girls revolt against Dorm, rules — Prof. Johnson 

sore— ESTHER HEINTZELMAN ENTERTAINS. 
"Kep" and Ruth spend morning in library. Many new faces in 

ladies' parlor — Velma missing. 
Sunday. No students in church but get usual call-down for talking. 
New Absence Rules go into effect. Prof. Johnson tries to lecture 

the girls, but on account of her lack of imagination must rely upon 

the assistance of Prof. Adams, who prompts her from behind the 

door. 

OCTOBER 

Faculty Choir renders first anthem in Chapel. Freshmen slip off for 
a good time — where were the Sophs? 

'Tis the morning after the night before. John Lyter sleeps in Phi- 
losophy. Oh those Harrisburg girls! 

Soph girls spend evening with "Kit." Bo\s leave for Conference. 
Reporter Harnish makes a hit with Miss Johnson. 

Glee Club returns from Conference — why? Girls take a walk after 
society and get lost in the moonlight. 

Football team goes to Gettysburg. Lose, score 6-0. Velma blue 
because Dayhoff stayed in Harrisburg. 

Flverybody goes to church. Ruth Quigley flirts with "Pat" Kreider. 
Floss Christeson worried. 

Belle Orris falls down the "Ad" Building steps. Everybody- out for 
mass meeting. "Jo" Urich sings "Dearie, My Dearie." 

Freshmen go on a straw ride. They wisely leave the Sophs behind. 
Mason Long greatly in demand. 

"Tom" Lyter out for a walk. His watch stops and he arrives home 
late. 

"Jo";\'Lathias tells Esther Heint/elman she thinks Pell is THE fel- 
low. Blanche Risser has a date with "Shep." 



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Boys go to Maryland to sing. Prof. Johnson oversleeps herself and 

sneaks into Chapel while Prof. Lehman is praying. 
Football team plays Delaware, score 0-0. Come home with the ball. 

Esther Heintzelman hugs Mowery. 
Church again. Brenneman gets fussed and drops a quarter into the 

plate. 
Ruth Engle and Boughter take a walk. Olewiler and Ruth Quig 

ley do likewise. Statton helps Brighty to sweep the leaves. 
Ethel Houser has the mumps. Harnish sad. Blanche and "Sammy" 

take a stroll. 
"Jo" Urich and "Sammy" 'Reddick eat an apple in History 2. Boys 
take girls to Waterworks for Supper. Quigley and Olewiler 
get home last. 
Miss Schmidt and Miss Adams give recital. Velma shines with 
Dayhoff — very indignant because he did not take her to the 
restaurant. 
Last practice for Albright game. Everybod\- out to try new yells. 

Heffelfinger asks to take May Meyer to the game. 
L. \ . C.'s great day — Albright game — we win 10 to 7. Boys have 

big parade and bon-fire — everybody happ\ . 
"Fat" Biever home from Philadelphia— "Jo" Urich happy. Blouch 

asks Velma to go to church — enough said. 
More "doins" in Chapel. L. V. buries Albright. A crowd of boys 
and girls go on a party to Gretna and hike it home. Statton ar- 
rives home first — why? 
Mary Irwin very happy— Dayhoff ditto. \'elma informs the girls 

she is disappointed in Mary. 
Miss Johnson lectures English 3. First meeting of the "Deutscher 
Verein." Viola Gruber wears a new dress — Carl thinks it very 
pretty. 
Edna Kilmer '12 arrives to teach IMath. Shepley calls to see 

Blanche. 
Reception for Pres. Gossard. Everybody "floats" and has a good 

time. Brenneman gets on wrong train — (Miss Johnson's). 
Football game with Dickinson, lost 52-3. Mary Irwin and "Jo" 
Urich go to the game. 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



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27. Beautiful day. Students forget to go to church — do the next best 
thing by taking a walk. Leister and Shepley eat two chickens. 

28. "Jo" Urich and Lester Rodes go on a drunk. Sophs think the Fresh- 
men are going on their banquet and tie up a few of the boys. 
Foolish Sophs are as stupid as ever. 

29. President Gossard talks to students in chapel. Says he heard some 
of the girls call Mr. Dearolf "Dearie" at the game. "Jo" and 
Mary blush. 

30. Lottie Spessard makes a date to go walking with Boaz Light. Hef- 
felfinger entertains Philosophy 3, while Prof. Peters .talks. 

.1 1 . Dayhoff makes a date with Velma for Othello. Philos have Hal- 
lowe'en Part). Elverybody goes and has a good time. May 
flirts, but all in vain. 

NOVEMBER 

1. Big time in Clio — Girls do turkey-trot until called down by dignified 
Seniors. 

2. We trim Indian Reserves 35-0. Charlton loses six teeth ( ?) Girls 
on third floor lower basket of eats to hungry males. 

3. Miracle of miracles, "Cotton" Dehuff makes his bed. 

4. Miss Johnson tells "Philosopher" Snavely he will flunk English. 

5. Election Day. Everybody who can votes for Kreider. 

6. Snyder goes to sleep in German 1 and falls to the floor. Parade and 
speeches in honor of A. S. Kreider. Mackert makes oration. 

7. "Jo" Urich gets mail from Philadelphia — happy. 
"Jo" writes letter to Philadelphia — nuff-sed. 

9. Back to the woods for Highspire A. C. We win 102-0. 
10. Bowman calls on Edith. 
Edith sleepy and grouchy. 

Prof. Wanner in Chemistry: "Miss Brightbill, what is Mr. Stat- 
ton thinking of?" 

13. Lots doing, but can't think of anything in particular. 

14. Ground is broken for track. We have pipe dreams of a track team 

in April. 

15. Star Course — Walter Eccles and the Four College Girls. All the 

boys want the girl in pink, 
lb. Crippled team goes to Albright, loses 7 to 20. 

Page 15-t 



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17. 



George Williams goes to church. 

Reddick gets gay in English and asks what is the difference between 

a Canto and a Quarto. 
"Slim" philosophizes — says lie does not want his bo\s to do the same 

as he. 
"Brighty" has Professor Wanner's goat. 
Shepley decides to join the Nav}-. 

Clio Anniversary. Miss Zimmerman defends Zantippe. 
Football game, L. V. 39, Millersville 'i. 
Everybody on team breaks training. 

Blue Monday. Where are the sweaters for the Football team? 
Prayer meeting. Rodes attends. 
Dr. Gossard gives talk in Chapel — subject: Boost Lebanon Valley 

while on your Thanksgiving Vacation. 
29 and 30. Thanksgiving Recess. _ Nearly everybody home for 

turkey. 

DECEMBER 



3. 



Sunday. Richie has a "social game" of hearts in his room. Plum- 

mer wins. A few Thanksgiving returns. 
"Oley" and others return. Ruth does not. He cannot eat, but fills 

his pockets with fudge. 
Lecture by Dr. Hoenshel on, "Where the Shamrock Grows." 

4. Sophs' "lucky star" enables them to win football game from Freshies, 

7-6. Charlton, Schmidt, Strickler, and Lyter induce Juniors to 
buy ice-cream for the Freshies and then eat it themselves. "Re- 
porter" stung for a quarter. 

5. Athletic Association holds annual election. "Butch" Carl elected 

Assistant Tennis Manager — "Vaulting ambition which o'er 
leaps itself." "Oley" and Ruth devour fudge. 

6. Prof. Johnson gives lecture in English 3 on domestic science and 

scientific feeding. Unearthly sounds heard at 4 p. M. — Some- 
body says Men's Glee Club is rehearsing. 

7. Hiking Club goes in pairs, not in a crowd. Klinger misses supper 

and must buy chicken and waffles for two. 

8. Colder. Joint session of Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. The rest as usual. 






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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U ] 



0. Picture of faculty and students taken. Tables have feeds at supper. 

"Johnnie" breaks up Girls' Prayer Circle and sends members to 

bed. 
10. Music and Oratory Recital. Girls do leap year stunt with residents 

of Boys' Dorm. They ring dinner bell to call out their chosen 

ones. Prof. Johnson goes along to restaurant. 
I I . Prof. Peters informs class in Philosophy /i that they will not know 

anything after they have completed the course. 

12. ']>easurer sends letter to Krenz and others asking them why they re- 

fuse to eat at Dining Hall. Is it necessary? 

13. Clio-Kalo Joint session. 

14. Dixie Chorus. Esther Heintzelman says that the negro prayer meet- 

ing was not typical of the negro, at least not like the one she usual- 
1\ attends. 

15. Ruth has an idea that "Oley" is jealous. Everybody takes a town 

girl after church, 
lb. Von Bereghy gets ducked, and then hot, but soon cools off. Plum- 
mer has not quite completed his post-graduate work. 

17. Faculty Meeting. "Rah! Rah!" says he gets enough to eat. Some 

one threw a biscuit in "Lessie's" tea. How sad! 

18. Barbers do rushing business — Professors Shenk, Derickson, Peters, 

Wanner, and Grimm get their wool taken. 

19. All of the above mentioned have colds. "Johnnie" gives tea to Eng- 

lish 3 — Everybody bored. 

20. Christmas Vacation begins. Everybody leaves. 

JANUARY 

1. New Year's Day. Last day of vacation. 

2. Some students come back, for extra vacation petition had Hvmked out. 

3. Seniors come back. "Polly" L. thinks Clara needs exercise and takes 

her for a hike far into the country. 
4'. Bluer than indigo. Who 's Who and Why with "Kit"? 

5. Charlton is lopsided, because his sweet tooth had a shock during vaca- 

tion. 

6. "Kit" entertains Junior class in honor of her birthday. Charlton 

cannot eat fudge — what a pity ! 



Page 156 






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} LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE" 1914 t )f 



speech is impeded. 



7. Prof. Peters catches a cold and finds that hi 

Therefore gives tests. 

8. Cold no better. More tests. "Heff" takes Edith L. to the "Rose 

Maid" at Lebanon. 

9. Edith goes around singing "I want to be a Janitor's Child." 

10. Boxes from home. Strenuous basketball practice. 

1 1 . First basketball game, lose to Gettysburg, score 45-9. 

12. "Social Unrest" in Boys' Dorm. Hurray for "Diamond Dick". 

13. Blue Monday. The Profs, do all the reciting. Many students go 

to Lebanon to see "Bunty Pulls the String." 

14. Prof. Seltzer flirts with Prof. Kirkland in chapel. Meeting of 

"Deutscher Verein." 

15. Pres. Gossard entertains Seniors. May receives a letter from Dun- 

cannon. 

16. May is hilarious.. Blanche comes to school without her hat. 

Why? Her hair curls when it rains. 

17. Freshmen hold banquet at Harrisburg. Oh where, oh where are the 

brilliant (?) Sophs? Why does "Brightie" leave English 3? 

18. Edith A. Gingrich announces her engagement to Clair F. Harnish, 

'12. Basketball victor\- over Susquehanna, score 25-11. 

19. Sunday. Everybody crams for exams. 

20. Everybody "wets his pencil and sharpens his knife." At last we are 

off for the exams. 

21. More grinding and more exams. 

22. Common lament of the Profs, is, "Make 'em stop pickin' on me." 

Sophs hold combination class meeting and subscription dance to 
wipe out their debts — rank failure. 

23. We are still forced to give some attention to the Profs, for they are 

not all killed yet. 

24. All ready for encores. Everybody nervous. 

25. Pedestrian Club in action. Basketball team loses to Muhlenburg, 

score 35-20. 

26. Sunday. Same Sunday, same grub, same length of sermons — every- 

thing the same. 

27. "A bite of water and a cup of bread" and right back to my work, for 

"diligence is the price of success." 



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28. Thif. is getting to be the worst place for grinding I ever struck — even 

"Stick" IS not strolling. 

29. Pres. gi\'es a spiel in chapel on the sanctity- of these old college build- 

ings. 

30. "Stick" out once more — He is seen doing the arm in arm promenade 

thru Annville. 

31. "Ress" misses his alarm clock again. He says he is going to stay up 

all night tonight in order to hear it. 

FEBRUARY 

1. Basketball game lost to Pennsylvania Military College, score 25-19. 

\'elma gets a letter from the West. 

2. Beautiful day. Esther H. does the missionary act by taking Marcel 

to joint session and to church. 

3. "Jo" comes to Economics 2 tooting her steamship whistle. 

"Johnnie" suffering with neuralgia and has everybody's sympa- 
thies, maybe. 

4. Cherries for supper. Fellows throw seeds on the floor while the 

girls tramp on them with delight. Great fun. 

5. Prof. Peters and Prof. Shenk get hair cuts. Miss Adams doef. not 

know them. 

6. Maude Baker plays with dogs on campus. "Brennie" tells her to 

be careful lest they bite her and cause "hydraform". 

7. Neuralgia still causing much woe. "Ike" calls for "Brightie" and 

takes her to the Movies. 

8. Uorm. girls on a hike. Quigley and Engle forget to come back for 

supper. Basketball victory over Lebanon Y. M. C. A., score 
33-17. 

9. Chicken for dinner. "Kirk" swallows a feather and is tickled for 

the rest of the day. 

10. Fellows have strenuous Glee Club rehearsal. The town is disturbed 

by a peculiar noise. 

11. "Tammy" Jones tells Prof. Wanner to shut up. Prof, answers by 
sticking out his tongue. Students' Recital. 



12. 


Lincoln's Birthday, but no holiday for us. 
from Philadelphia. 


"Jo' 


receives more mail 


Pa_e ISS 









It 



\3. Kalo boys working hard getting ready for Masquerade. Blanche 
says she will not go masked for the fellows would not know her. 

14. Beautiful day. Great time at Kalo Masquerade. "Ress" and 

"Strick" shine with their Harrisburg trade. 

15. More sunshine. Girls visit Boys' Dorm. Star Course, "The Hus- 

sars." Basketball game lost to Schuykill Seminary, score 21-19. 

16. "Ress" very blue because Harrisburg has gone home. John Lyter 

comforts him with a white counterpane. 

17. Blue Monday. Even "Red" Kirkpatrick changes his color and is 

"blue." 

18. Faculty proposes plan to induce students to take greater interest in 

chapel services. Students reciprocate the favor by doing likewise 
for the faculty. 

19. Viola Gruber informs Blanche that she is the most popular girl in 

the Freshman class. Mary Spayd raises a row. 

20. ]\Iiss Richardson visits girls and discusses Y. W. C. A. work with 

them. Societies meet tonight on account of game tomorow night. 

21. Boys' Glee Club leaves for big trip. Basketball victory over Susque- 

hanna, score 46-17. 

22. Washington's Birthday. Big annual L. V. banquet. Co-eds visit 

Boys' Dorm. "Brightie" stranded in "Ike's" room. 

23. Great surprise, "Oley" gets up for Sunday breakfast and goes to 

church. Boys' Glee Club returns from very successful trip. 

24. Sophs have a class meeting — "nothin' doin' " as usual. Miss Ware- 

heim flirts with the librarian. 

25. Clear skies and calm seas. Only twenty-five more days until vaca- 

tion. 

26. Great day for strolls. Harnish and Houser act as special repre- 

sentatives of the Hikers' Club. Lover's Leap is popular. 

27. Belle Orris jumps on "Flossie's" bed with both feet without taking 

time, in her fit of ecstasy on receiving a ten-spot from home, to 
notice that "Floss" had not yet vacated. 

28. Societies meet as usual on Friday night. Fellows call for girls and 

go to Movies. Profs. Johnson, Schmidt, Adams, and Seltzer go 
to Harrisburg to see "Robin Hood." Basketball game lost to 
Mt. St. Mary's, score 42-26. 



Page 15^1 
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MARCH 

1. "March comes in like a lion." Dorm girls take advantage of the 

wind and wash their hair. 

2. The Harnish-Nicholson-Hemminger-Johnson-McClure Advertising 

Troupe begins operations at the "Snabbertaggle," booming Water- 
man Fountain Pens, Alexander Gospel Hymns No. 2, and Harnish 
and Smith Bibles and Testaments. 

.1. Still cold and windy. Editor-in-chief has a bad cold. Why? 

4. Prayer-meeting. Klinger almost gets there. He discovered what 
he was doing in time to turn back. 

3. Rev. Nicholson speaks in chapel. Good effect. Sophs become con- 

scious stricken, and hold class meeting to determine ways and 
means to pay their debts, 
b. "Oley" goes out to the wash-lady for Ruth's dress. 

7. Girls' Glee Club leaves for York. Big day for the co-eds. Some 

of the fellows downhearted. 

8. Big doings at the post office. Extra bag of mail from York. 

9. And still they go to the "Snabbertaggle." Full house every night. 

The dorm, girls embrace their opportunities. 

10. Klinger, Olewiler, Stickell, Statton and others continue to weaT 

long faces and bewail their fate. "Wh\' doesn't that Glee Club 
come back?" 

11. But there shall be great rejoicing. The "Suffragettes" arrive at last. 

"Stick" on the job, as well as all the aforementioned. 

12. Manager Ressler getting baseball team into proper condition. Big 

times expected. 
I.-). Boys busy on the campus, f^ven Harnish is diligently doing his 
"college" work. 

14. Girls go to the "Snabbertaggle" and receive call-down by Rev. 

Nicholson. Basket passes Prof. Peters without receiving a con- 
tribution — evidently the Reverend hasn't studied Royce. 

15. Edith Lehman and "Vic" Heffelfinger take a walk. 

16. Everybody out for church. Profs. Adams, Schmidt, and Johnson 

come in after the collection. Rev. McClure interviewed Editor- 
in-chief in the interests of the welfare of the latter's soul. "Slim" 
disconcerts the Reverend gentlemen by his arguments. 



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17. St. Patrick's Day. Many show their colors by the "wearin' o' the 

Green." 

18. Winter term ends. "God be with us 'till we meet again." 
19-24. Easter Vacation. 

25. Back for the spring term. Last Star Course number— Emily Water- 

man Concert Co. 

26. Baseball team goes to Lehigh— rain prevents game. Last meetmg 

in the "Snabbertaggle." 

27. Junior play practice. Blanche makes hit with Schmidt. 

28. Postponed St. Patrick's Party is held in Ladies' parlor— some of the 

boys show the girls their appreciation by stealing the cakes. 

29. Cakes are divided among several boys in the dorm.— all think them 

very good. 

30. Fine day. Jones takes a walk with one of Annville's belles. Quite 

bold. 

31. March fuimis old proverb by going out "like a lamb." Springtnne 

is welcomed by all. 



1. 



APRIL 

(All Fools' Day). Awake to find all Ad. building chairs arranged 
on campus. Professor Derickson forgets to meet his Biology 2 
class. 

2. Tables changed at Dining Hall. Klinger happy, also Larew— why? 

Mulhollen chagrined at failure to sec\ire head of table. 

3. Home concert of Men's Glee Club. Girls' Club tenders reception. 

4. Kalo Anniversary. Floss Christeson's clock goes bad— comes to nine 

o'clock class at 7.45. First straw hats out. 

5. Baseball team plays Mercersburg— lost 4-2 

6. Big treat for Supper— Potato Chips, Cheese, Dried Horse, Crackers, 

Jelh- and Cake. 

7. JUNIORS PLAY "THE PRIVATE SECRETARY". 

8. Glee Club Concert at Lebanon— great applause from the rear of 

the hall. 

9. Girl's Club leaves for Southern Trip. 

0. Boys' Glee Club sings at Hummelstown— Ed. Smith finds a beauty. 

1. Glee Club sings again, this time at Hershey. Russell, as usual, finds 

friends among the fair sex. 



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20. 



27. 
28. 



30. 



Page 162 



Prof. Derickson takes Biology- class on field trip to Waterworks, but 
rain drives party home early. 

Prof. Kirkland plays organ in church. Girls get back from Glee 
Club trip. 

First meeting of "As You Like It" cast. 

Dr. Watkins makes address in chapel. 

Social Hour begun at Girl's Dorm — big success. Baseball team 
loses to Dickinson 4-3. 

Miss Seltzer appears with two beautiful curls hanging saucily behind 
her left ear. 

Debaters leave for Juniata at 8.08. Prof. Peters postpones Philoso- 
phy class in order to give team a send-off. Juniata wins debate, 
but ? 

We win from Delaware 10-2. 

Song service after supper in Parlor. 

Dr. Landis describes Dayton flood in chapel. 

Baseball team leaves for Southern Trip — Georgetown wins 11-4. 

"Jo" Urich loses her shoe in Philosophy. 

Track meet in miniature in Ladies' Dorm. 

Clios entertain Seniors. Brenny finds snake in his bed — better try 
a new brand of tea, Brenny. 

Track Team at Penn Relays — take fourth place in both relays and 
shot put. 

Rain, RAIN, RAIN. Strickler falls down stairs. 

Misses Clippinger and Lehman miss supper preparing paper for Bio- 
logical Field Club Meeting. 

Men's Club banquets Girls' Glee Club at Hershey Cafe. All the 
sins of the trips brought to light. 

Glee Clubs get home from Hershey ?????. 

MAY 

Seniors lead Chapel while Faculty is having its picture taken. Anna 

almost misses her train — she and Edgar sprint some. Edith M. 

Lehman elected May Queen. 
Philo Anniversary — Many girls appear in new gowns — Mickey cuts 

out "Fat" and takes ' Jo." 
Senior Dorm girls give feed to Senior boys in order to gain the good 

will of the latter — make use of their Senior privileges and parade 









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It ? LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 Q ] 



10. 

11. 

12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 



into dining-room for water — Harnish sore — also Seniors — Why ? 
JUNIORS successfully give their play at Myerstown. Rex kill- 
ed and given a militarv burial. Baseball game, L. V. 8, Ann- 
viUe, 5. 

"Butch" Carl goes out after dinner for a good time and takes with 
him a cushion, his white shoes, Bible, Wage Earning Women, 
and a Sunday newspaper. 

"Polly" returns to school — the girls sing "My Hero." Carl and 
Viola out walking from seven to ten-thirty. LAST SESSION 
OF THE 1914 BIZARRE STAFF. 

Geology class makes atrip to Cornwall — "Slim" and Mickey after 
many trials and tribulations scale a steep cliff. 11 : 30 train 
brings back Ruth and "Obey." Freshman-Sophomore Debate 
postponed another week — Sophs not ready. Mary Spayd enter- 
tains Freshman girls at a dinner of her own making — a number 
of Freshman girls are ill. 

Blanche and "Floss" go canoeing — "Floss" sends Blanche on 
ahead — Blanche gets lost in ANNVILLE. Preps hold swell re- 
ception for Academy Seniors. 

Velma Heindel gives her Senior Recital. Richie again appears with 
the little girl from Palmyra. 

May Day Exercises — "Ma" Adams greatly relieved for everything 
passes off finely. A number of boys and girls leave for a house- 
party at Gretna over the week-end. Clio-Kalo Joint Session. 

Reconciliation between "Fat" and "the girlon Main St." — Sedic 
brings Marie to baseball game — Baseball team defeats Gettys- 
burg, score 3-2. 

Not an ideal Sundav bv an means. A few couples go strolling on 
the Q. T. 

' Johnnie" Lyter brings home a black eye from the house part\ 
Kit" refuses to discuss it. 

Part of the Bizarre Staff goes to Hershey — "Kit" and Blanche 
make a hit with the Business Manager of Hershey's Weekly. 

Freshman-Sophmore Debate — Sophs secure the decision — Freshies 
have a feed. 

Sophs awake and find that during the night the Freshies put up 
posters referring to the forthcoming Minstrel Show and to 
Brighty's next years's Bizarre Staff, and giving the financial con- 
dition of the class — Sophs sore, "for the truth cuts" — Sophs 
fail in their attempt to bring a Freshman into Chapel, in spite of 
the fact that "the Seniors told us to do it." — after Chapel the 
Sophs boss leads her badly disconcerted servants into a scrap with 
the few but plucky Freshies — Mason Long cleans up Larew and 
others too numerous to mention — Some of the posters up at 



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16. 
17. 



18. 
19. 



20. 
21. 



23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 

27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 



3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 



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Page 164 



Chapel time. Therefore the Freshies win — 1915 slow as ever. 
Ora Bachman appears in her Senior Organ Recital. 

L. V. defeats Susquehanna, score 7-3. Kalos entertains Seniors. 

ANOTHER GREAT DAY FOR L. V. Albright defeated, score 
6-3 — the Dutchmen didn't have a look in — Stickell pitches 
superb ball — Viola gets the nerve of the Albright girls. Von 
Bereghy taken first place in the shot-put, third place in the dis- 
cus throw, and fifth place in the hammer throw at Lafayette. 

Very pleasant day. House party at Mt. Gretna — Oh that moon- 
light ! 

Senior exams begin — all Senior conspicuous by their anxious looks. 
"Oley" quits revival and comes back to Ruth. 

Myrle Behney gives Senior Organ Recital. 

Last chance for Freshmen and Juniors to help the Sophs pay their 
bills — Soph Minstrel Show- 

A number of Seniors look blue. 

Philos entertain Seniors. Rain. 

L. V. 3, Bucknell 4. "As you like it" at Hershey. 

Love-feast in Annville. Ness flirts with two Lebanon girls. 

Seniors get two weeks. Rodes gets his usual letter from York. 
Editor-in-Chief and Business Manager go to Harrisburg. 

Junior Conservatory Recital. 

First weekly anniversary of S. M. S. 

Final practice before the Albright game. 

Memorial Day. Senior-Sophomore House party. Albright again. 

A few students attend the anniversary celebration at Hershey. 

JUNE 

This does not seem like Sunday — all cramming for exams. 

Exams commence. Conservatory Students' Recital. 

Blue. 

Bluer. 

BLUEST. 

BLUER THAN . President's reception to Seniors. 

Academy Commencement. 

Baccalaureate Sermon. Visitors steadily arriving. 

Conservatory Cemmencement. 

Class Day. Junior Oratorical Contest. 

COMMENCEMENT DAY. Annual Play— "As You Like It." 

FAREWELL 1913. YOU ALL HAVE OUR BEST WISHES. 




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Athletics 



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Athletic Association 






Officers 




President, 


R. M. Weidler 




Secretary, 


A. L. Weaver 




Treasurer, 


W. H. Weaver 




Managers 


Assistant 


Managers 


Football, G. A. Richie 


Football, 


Henry E. Snavelv 


Basketball, L. A. Rodes 


Basketball, 


Carl G. Snavelv 


Baseball, I. L. Ressler 


Baseball, 


Edward H. Smith 


Track. P. L. Strickler 


Tennis, 


Wm. C. Carl 


Tennis, C. F. Schmidt 






11 

Executive Committee 


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Student Representatives 


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R. AI. Weidler 
L. B. Harnish 
Ct. a. Richie 


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Faculty Representatives 


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H. E. Wanner 


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A. F,. Shroyer 


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Alumni Representatives 


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A. K. Mills 


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On the Gridiron 



Not in man)' seasons has L. V. witnessed such renown and success on 
the football field as this one. 

Out of nine games pla3'ed, four were decisive victories, one a tie, and 
four defeats. This is not the record to which we aspired, but when we 
note that the record of points scored stood 184 to 134 in our favor, we 
have reasons to feel immensely proud of our warriors. 

When the season opened, the outlook was very gloomy and discour- 
aging. Only five varsity men of the 1911 team had returned, and no new- 
material came in with which the coach could whip a team into shape. It 
was not until President Gossard appeared on the scene that the football 
season assumed any appearance of reality. He set to work getting new 
men noted for their athletic ability, and he surely landed them, men of 
weight, brains, agility and grit ; all that was necessary to make a winning 
team. To assist in quickly whipping the squad into shape he secured for 
us our former coach "Stubby" Wilder. 

It was not until the Delaware game that the team began to appear 
like one that could "put it over" the "Dutchmen" from Myerstown, who 
got it into their heads that they could play football. Well, we showed 
them on October 19 that they were not in our class. Albright claims they 
retrieved their defeat b} a victory on November 16; but this we deny, for 
because of injuries, our team on that day was by no means our representa- 
tive team. 

It is impossible to give here an account of the work of each player. 
Let it suffice to say that the playing of each man was brilliant and at times 
spectacular. Much praise is due the president, manager, coaches, and stu- 
dents, who so loyall\' supported the team. 






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ForsZ/'j', Season 1912 



Charlton 




Center, Tackle 


Dayhoff 




Fullback, End 


Dearolf 




End, Fullback 


Dehiiff 




Tackle 


Gonder 




Guard 


Kirkpatri 


ck 


End 


Larew, C 


aptain 


Quarterback 


Light 




End, Halfback 


Mackert 




Tackle 


Pell 




Halfback 


Suavely 




End, Halfback 


Station 




Guard, Center 


Strickler 




Halfback, Quarterback 


Walter 




End, Center 



G. A RICHIE, Manager 



SUBSTITUTES 


Albright 


D. M. Long 


Brenneman 


Light 


Brewbaker 


John Lyter 


Carl 


T. B. Lyter 


Ernst 


Mickey 


Evans 


Schmidt 


Heintzelman 


Shepley 


Hollinger 


Snyder 


Krause 


Wine 


John Long 


Wrightstone 







HENRY L. WILDER, Coach 



Page 168 



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Wearers of the L. V. 










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Larew, '15 

Charlton, '14 

Strickler, '14 

Walter, '14 
Snavely, '15 

Statton, '15 

Davhoff, '15 

Pell, '16 
Gonder, '16 

Kirkpatiich, '16 

Light, '16 

Von Bereghy, '16 
Mackert, 

Dearolf, 

Dehuff, 

Richie, '13, Manager 




JOHN n 


LAREW, 


75 










Captain 


















1912 RECORD 






Date 


Lebanon 


Valley Opponents 






Sept. 


25 







Carlisle Indians 45 






Oct. 


5 







Gettysburg 6 






Oct. 


12 







Delaware 






Oct. 


19 




10 


Albright 7 






Oct. 


23 




3 


Dickinson 53 






Nov. 


2 




23 


Carlisle Indian Second 






Nov. 


9 




102 


Highspire Athletic Club 






Nov. 


16 




7 


Albright 20 






Nov. 


23 




39 
184 


A'lillersville State Normal 3 
134 




Pa^e 


170 
















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On the Diamond 



The baseball season of 1912 was not as successful as it might have 
been. Of the fifteen games played, five were won and ten Avere lost, altho 
some of the latter by close scores. The first two games of the season, 
those with Lehigh and Ursinus, were lost, but early in the season before 
the team had had any practice to speak of. During the Easter vacation 
the Southern Trip was made, on which games were played with St. 
Joseph's College at Baltimore, Md., Washington College at Chestertown, 
Md., and Mercersburg at Mercersburg, Pa. The team played one of its 
best games of the season at the first mentioned place, but lost 2-1. The 
first home game was played with Millersville and the next one with Dela- 
ware College, both of which were victories for us. In an excellent game 
Juniata defeated us 2-1. The next two games, with Millersville and 
Annville, were also lost; but the next game, with our would-be rivals, Al- 
bright, in which only two of our opponents reached second base, was the 
greatest game of the season and was won by the score of 4-0. This game 
was exciting thruout and will long live in the memories of all who saw it. 
On May 30, however, Albright took a double-header from us. The 
last two games, with the strong semi-professional American Iron & Steel 
Mfg. Co.'s Team and with the Alumni, were both victories. 

The season of 1913 opened with brilliant prospects, for six of the 
previous year's varsity remained, including our famous battery, and some 
promising new material had come in. Under the instruction of our coach 
and the generalship of our peerless captain, the team was soon prepared to 
open the season, notwithstanding that the weather conditions here were un- 
favorable for practice. The first few games were required to determine 
where the weak spots were ; but eventually the machine was put into ex- 
cellent running order, and games began to be recorded in the "games won 
column." This is due not so much to the playing of particular individuals 
as to the excellent work of the team as a whole. The remainder of the 
season promises to be highly successful. 









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THE 1913 LINE-UP 

Pitchers: Little, Stickell 

Catcher: T. Lyter 

First Base : Snavely 
Second Base : DearoH 

Third Base : J. Lyter 
Short Stop : Stickell, Spangler 
Fielders: Larew, Statton, Spangler 
Subs: 
Evans, Heffelfinger, 
Young 



The 1913 Schedule 



Mar. 


26 


Lehigh at South Bethlehem 


Apr. 


5 


Mercersburg at Mercersburg 


Apr, 


12 


Dickinson at Carlisle 


Apr. 


19 


Delaware at Annville 


Apr. 


22 


Georgetown University at Wash 
ington 


Apr. 


23 


Delaware at Newark 


Apr. 


24 


Washington at Chestertown 


Apr. 


25 


Rock Hill at Ellicott City 


May 


3 


Annville at Annville 


May 


10 


Gettysburg at Annville 


May 


IH 


Susquehanna at Annville 


May 


17 


Albright at Annville 


May 


23 


Susquehanna at Selinsgrove 


May 


24 


Bucknell at Lewisburg 


May 


30 


Albright at Myerstown 


June 


.S 


Juniata at Annville 


■Tune 


7 


Albright at Annville 


June 


11 


Alumni at Annville 




JOHN B. LYTER. Captain 







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Basketball at Lebanon Valley is considerably handicapped because of 
the lack of a floor. It was on this account that the team was compelled 
to obtain the necessary practice on the Lebanon Y. M. C. A. floor. Thus 
we were able to secure the services of Physical Director Miller, whose aid 
proved invaluable later in rounding out the team. Altho a difficult sche- 
dule had been arranged by Manager Rodes, we were unable to get an early 
start and hence improvement may be noticed as the season progressed. 
With all but three of the games played on foreign floors we could hardly 
be expected to win a large percentage of them. Out of twelve games play- 
ed, four were won, two of latter being home games. 

Three of the last year's varsity were back, making it necessary to fill 
two positions with new men. With a good scrub team always on the floor, 
a well rounded team was soon produced, a team distinguisht for its size and 
its weight, the mere appearance of which brought terror into the camp of 
the enemy. As we were unable to schedule any games with our old rivals, 
the success of the team is difficult to estimate, altho we feel confident that 
we could have turned the trick at least once. 

The individual work of each player is praiseworthy. The work of 
Strickler, our star forward, was especially brilliant. He played a most 
consistent game, and was always able to lose his opponent. The playing 
of Captain Snavely was of the same high quality as in the previous year, 
and would have been better had it not been for injuries. Schmidt, Miller, 
and Dearolf did exceptional work in their respective positions, and easily 
deserved their place on the team. Larew, the find of the season, developed 
into quite a star. He never played the game before this year, but showed 
such wonderful form after several weeks that he gained a regular position. 

The season was not as successful as we had hoped, but when we con- 
sider the serious obstacles encountered, we feel very proud of the boys who 
so faithfully upheld the honor of the Blue and the White In the cage. We 
are hoping that we may have a floor in the near future, when all incon- 
veniences mav be eliminated. 



Page 174 






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RECORD OF THE SEASON 



Date 


L 


EBANON 


Valle\ 


Opponent 


Jan. 


11 


9 






Gettysbvirg 45 


Jan. 


17 


22 






Bucknell 31 


Jan. 


18 


25 






Susi|uelianna 11 


Jan, 


25 


29 






Muhlenbiirg 35 


Jan. 


30 


13 


Vol 


k 


AU-CoIlegians 43 


Feb. 


1 


19 


Pa 


Military College 23 


Feb. 


« 


33 


Lebanon Y.M.C. A. 17 


Feb. 


15 


19 


Scl 


u 


•Ikill Seminary 21 


Feb. 


21 


46 






Susquehanna 17 


Mar. 


5 


32 






Delaware 26 


Mar. 


8 


26 
290 






Muhlenburg 48 
369 



LESTER A. RODES, Manager 



Wearers of the L. V. 

Snavely, '15 

Strickler, '14 

Schmidt, '14 

Larew, 15 
Von Bereghy, '16 
Dearolf 
Miller 
Rodes, '14, Manager 

The Line Up 

Forwards : Strickler, Dearolf 

Centre: Mdler 
Substitutes : Schmidt, Von Bereghv 
Cjuards : Snavelv, I^arew 




CARE (;. SSAVELY, Captain 



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Ow Track and Field 

The track department at Lebanon Valley has grown proportionately 
with the other phases of athletics this year. Altho the first time for many 
years that we have put a team on the track, we were fortunate in having 
here several men of renowned ability, about whom as a nucleus the team 
was built. Altho our track was conspicuous for its absence and we were 
without the services of a coach, yet under the management of Strickler and 
with the assistance of Captain Kirkpatrick the team has done remarkably 
well in the meets they have attended, and we hope that hereafter track 
mav have a permanent place in our school athletics. 



Page 176 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 



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^/ma Mater's Praise 

COME, brave sons and daughters true, 
Wearers of the White and Blue ; 
Now to Alma Mater raise 
Joyous songs of heartfelt praise. 

Foster mother of our youth, 
Showing us the light of truth, 
Set within a mountain vale, 
Lebanon Valley, hail, all hail ! 

Others after us shall come 

And learn to love our college home ; 

Down through all eternity 

May Lebanon Valley deathless be. 

— Prof. R. McD, Kirkland 



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77r^ /?^5m/^ 0/ « Predicament 

HE CAMPUS of the small co-ed college, situated in the 
beautiful country town of Bellview was brilliant with wav- 
ing pennants, Chinese lanterns, and booths gaily decorated 
with the college colors. Jolly boys and girls were running 
merrily hither and thither, putting the finishing touches to 
some dainty booth or directing those who were busy wit 
hammers and nails. The occasion was the annual lawn fete, given for 
the benefit of the Christian Associations ; and of course the patrons and 
patronesses were greatly interested in the coming event. 

One fair co-ed who was taking the part of Rebecca, presided over a 
Jacob's Well ; while other fascinating waitresses presided over other booths, 
dispensing sweet-meats, flowers, and smiles among their friends. How- 
ever the stellar attraction was to be a band of gypsy fortune tellers. There 
was much mystery attached to this band. Some said they were real gypsies, 
imported from a distance especially for the occasion, while others declared 
that the various parts were to be impersonated by clever school girls; but 
those who had the matter in charge kept a strict silence as to who was 
right, for they knew that all such talk would only tend to increase the 
interest in their project. And now the most real events of the evening 
were fast approaching. 

"There, the gypsy tent is ready at last," said Margaret Gale with 
evident satisfaction to her chum, Beatrice Wallington, a vivacious little 
brunette, as she descended from a step-ladder to view the mystic symbols 
which hung over the doorway. 

"But where are the gypsies. Peg?" inquired the inquisitive little Bee, 
"Have they arrived, or are they waiting to approach under the cover of 
night ? I'm anxious to have my fortune told and learn what the future has 
in store for me." 

"Rash Girl!" exclaimed Peg, assuming a pretty air of superiority, 
"Why tempt Fate ?" And then seeing the coquettish glance which Bee 
was casting upon one of the boys near by, she continued, "I think it's 
just awful the way you have been carrying on with those fellows all after- 
noon. I know that Fred Cushman thinks you are in love with him, 
and — ." 

"Now, Peg, that is hardly fair," expostulated the little girl for you 



Page 179 









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know my engagement to Dick is to be kept a close secret, until I'm 
through school, and then, too, a little flirting never harms anyone. It's 
been rare fun for me to flirt with Fred," she went on playfully. "An- 
other thing. Peg, you are too practical. It seems to me you are changed 
ever since last Commencement when Jack Huyler went west. By the 
way, do you ever give him a thot ? You know I used to think you had 
a bad case on him. But, of course I suppose there is no danger of your 
flirting or falling in love with anyone." 

Unconsciously Bee had touched upon a page in Peg's life which the 
latter, for one long year, had been trying to forget, but without success. 
"Oh Bee," she said with quiet dignity, "Do be good and go get ready for 
tonight. Be sure, too, if only for this once, to be here in good time." 

As Bee ran away to join a group of girls who were talking excitedly 
upon the veranda. Miss Sullivan, a member of the faculty and head of the 
committee on arrangements, hurriedly approached Peg as the latter was at 
the point of leaving. 

"To think that she could be taken ill at the very last minute. It's 
too provoking for anything. But you will take it, Peg, won't \ou, dear, 
just to help us out of this predicament ? " 

"Take what ?" 

"Why the part of the gypsy fortune teller! Alice Martin, who was 
to take the part, has suddenly been taken ill, and there is no one who can 
take her place but you." 

"Oh, I couldn't possibly, really I could not. I don't know the first 
thing about fortune telling." 

\ es, you could, dear, for you are really just the one to do it," 
broke in the teacher in her most persuasive tone. "Here is a little book 
on fortune telling that will coach you on some of the signs and symbols ; 
and you will know so many of the people that it will be easy to foretell 
future happiness from your knowlege of present circumstances. It's for 
a good cause, you know." 

Peg still demurred but after a pause added, 'I'll take it upon one 
condition : No one is to know that I have taken Alice's place, no one 
ever is to know it." 

After a faithful promise of secrecy from Miss Sullivan, she started for 
home, pondering over the words Bee had so playfully uttered but which 
unknown to her friend had caused the latter many sad hours in secret. 



Page 180 









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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 



An hour later saw the college grounds a scene of brilliancy and 
laughter. Electric lights flashed forth from among the trees. Fantastic 
lanterns danced about with every breath of the wind. The booths were 
in a blaze of light and color. Beautiful girls in fancy attire, as befitted 
the occasion, seemed more bewitching than ever. People were arriving in 
groups and the constantly increasing crowd was already large and gay. 

The gypsy tent in the background proved the best drawing card, for 
many were the patrons who purchased fancy splint baskets from dusky- 
faced maidens or crossed with silver the palm of the old crone who sat in 
a far away corner. The latter was hideous in appearance, but her voice 
was sweet, and the touch of her soft hands thrilled many a warm-blooded 
youth. 

Many had come and gone, but still the old crone seemed anxious and 
dissatisfied. At last she called one of the dusky maids to her side and 
whispered into her ear, "Tell the little dark-haired girl over by the taU 
pine that the gypsy has a message for her and that it will not be well for 
her if she passes it by." Away flew the messenger to return soon with 
the reply that the little maid would soon appear. 

After chatting for a while longer with the group of boys whom she 
had been jollying, Bee came running into the tent, followed by several of 
the girls. "Oh ! It's nothing but a farce," she protested. "But I'll do 
it just for the fun of it." 

"No, they are really gypsies," insisted one of the girls. "They say 
Miss Sullivan found them camping down along the creek and induced 
them to come here for the occasion." 

"Does the young lady wish me to read her palm ?'" whined the old 
hag. "Cross Perditha's hand with silver and she will reveal something 
that is to your advantage." 

Still laughingly protesting. Bee placed a silver dollar into the palm of 
the old woman, who taking the girl's hand in her own, commenced to 
stare at it fixedly as she muttered some unintelligible words. 

"I see a tall, dark young man, a handsome young man," she said at 
last. "He some big athlete and you very proud of him. His eyes follow 
little lady day and night, day and night. But you treat him bad sometime 
when you flirt with other boys. You make him very jealous. Yes, you 
make him feel very, very bad. Alas ! He go away and leave you, and too 
late you find out you treat him bad." 



Page 181 




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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U ] 



Bee's usually happy face had grown almost white and deeply serious 
as the gypsy went on, but with all she tried to smile. The other girls list- 
ened with intense interest and were very much impressed. 

"Your star is fixed in the east," mused the old woman. ''Go yet 
this day to him who loves you. Happiness awaits you, little lady, if you 
follow the old gypsy's bidding." 

The gypsy could not be induced to say another word nor did she even 
so much as raise her head until Bee and her friends had passed out. It 
seemed that they were followed by a laugh which seemed somewhat fami- 
liar. 

I wonder where Peg is," said Bee as she looked about anxiously. 
"She said it would be late before she arrived, but it is now ten o'clock and 
I have not seen her." 

Just then she caught a glimpse of Dick, who was all by himself in a 
far off corner of the campus, leaning against a large tree and evidently 
deeply buried in thot. 

With a bound she was at his side ; and a few moments later, arm in 
arm, they were strolling away from the crowd toward the library. Ex- 
cept for a few commonplace remarks she was quiet for a while, then look 
in<j; up into his face she whispered. "I am not going to keep up this farce 
any longer. I love you and I don't care who knows it." 

A few minutes later they made their way back to the crowd. My 
dear," he said, assuming an air of proprietorship and speaking loud enough 
for everyone to hear," You look very tired and I think we had better go 
hom.e." 

Those close by smiled significantly as he tenderly put her wraps 
about her and led her away from the crowd. The secret was out at last, 
and both confessed that they were glad of it. 

Part ii 

Late the next morning. Peg came to Bee's room to congratulate her 
upon the news which had been made public the night before. 

"I'm so glad of it, dear." said Peg as Bee blushed and hung her head. 
"Dick is a dear, honest, kind-hearted boy. And Bee, do try^to settle down 
and not keep him in everlasting misery with your flirtations, mild tho they 
may seem to you." 



Page 182 



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"I shall settle down and be a regular little Puritan maid," said Bee. 
"Just watch me and see." 

But I'll wager you'll bear watching," laughed Peg. "And I guess 
Dick thinks so too." 

Yes I'm very happy and I wish you could be as happy as I am. 
Say wouldn't it be great if Jack Huyler would come to town just for a few 
days. I'll wager he'd stay here always." 

At the mention of Jack, Peg turned quickly and commenced to ex- 
amine some of Bee's needle work which lay on the table. "You really 
must teach me this new stitch, Bee," she said, trying to appear calm but 
failing miserably. 

There was something between them," shrewdly observed Bee to 
herself. And then Peg surprised her by bursting into tears and crying as 
though her heart was breaking. "Tell me about it," plead the impulsive 
little girl as she threw her arms about her friend ; and after considerable 
coaxing Peg opened her heart. 

"We were engaged, Jack and I, but as Jack had vet to make his way 
and I was still in college, we told nobody about it. Jack is very demon- 
strative, you know, while I am not; and after a time, he looked upon my 
quiet ways as a proof of a lack of affection. On the contrary, I, being sure 
of his love, rather enjoyed his jealous tantrums and was often very tanta- 
lizing. One evening after a particularly stormy time, he left, vowing never 
to come again; but I didn't believe him. However, the next day he went 
west and I have not heard a word about, much less from, him since." 

"It's too bad Peggie," sympathized Bee as she stroked her friend's 
head soothingly. 

Peg now tried to resume her usual dignified manner and began to talk 
about the events of the previous evening, especially Bee's engagement. 
"I suppose," she said, "You will not go to the seashore as usual this sum- 
mer, for Dick will claim too much of your attention." 

"Indeed I shall," came the reply, "And we go a month earlier than 
usual." Just then a happy thought popped into Bee's sagacious little head 
and she immediately gave it freedom in speech. "Why not go with us 
Peg ? I am sure mother would be delighted. Perhaps we may go by way 
of New York," she added as she recalled that Dick had said that Jack 
was stopping at the St. Dennis. "You know, too, Dick will be there and 
I will like it above all things." 



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The plan looked so innocent on the face of it that unsuspecting Peg 
fell into the trap immediately. She did not know that the visit to New 
York had been a sudden conception of Bee's fertile brain and that a well- 
laid plan was behind the invitation. 

We'll shop and shop to our hearts' content," exclaimed Bee enthu- 
siastically as she picked up a guide book. "Well the St. Dennis is at the 
corner of Broadway and 11th Sts.," she read. 

Oh, I remember the place, for we stopped there last year." And 
then as Peg left, she said to herself, "My plot works splendidly. I don't 
like to deceive her, but I believe that the end justifies the means." 

About two months later they were speeding along toward New 
"Vork. Bee's mother had wisely telegraphed ahead for a suite of rooms, 
with the result that when they arrived they found everything in readiness 
for them. 

"Well, this is something like comfort," exclaimed Peg as she threw 
herself into a big easy-chair in the large bay window and looked down upon 
the hustle and bustle of the street below. 

Bee was in a feverish state of excitement as they dressed to go down 
for dinner. "What if they should not be here?" she thot to herself. 
Look your prettiest, for here everything depends upon making a good 
impression," she said to Peg. 

"Impression! Whom can I impress with my appearance?" came 
the question. 

A few minutes later they descended the stairway and entered the large 
dining room. The head waiter courteously showed them to seats, for the 
room was already well-filled. Of course Bee had purposely planned not to 
come down too early. As the two pretty, daintily dressed girls, so con- 
trasting in appearance, the one tall and somewhat slender, the other small 
and rather plump, attracted considerable attention. 

By Jove ! It's Bee," exclaimed a young man at another table close 
by, after which he arose and came over to the table occupied by the girls 
and Bee's mother, followed by another young man who was none other 
than Jack Huyler. The meeting between him and Peg was rather stifif, 
but by the time the young men had seated themselves at the same table 
with the ladies and the meal was well under way, this stiffness soon wore off. 

"Why didn't you tell me you were coming," said Dick rather re- 
proachfully. 



Page 184 









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"Oh, we decided to come very suddenly," replied Bee with a merry 
twinkle in her eyes. "Our little town was so stupid and lonely after 

you left that we just had to follow." 

The days that followed were very happy ones indeed. Whatever 
difficulty there had been between Peg and Jack was completely overcome 
at that first little tete-a-tete in one of the parlors of the hotel, from which 
the other couple discreetly absented themselves. 

"What do you think of my abilities as a match-maker?" Bee asked 
Dick. 

"Bee you are — well I was going to say a brick. You're a sly little 
schemer. Your coming to this hotel was not so much of a coincidence 
after all. 

"No, it wasn't," she acknowledged, "But Peg and Jack think so and 
you must never undeceive them." 

"I won't, but why didn't you let me into the plot ?" 

"Because, Dick, you would have betrayed it by your actions the 
minute we arrived." 

He was inclined to resent this imputation upon his ability to keep a 
secret, but Bee soon conciliated him in her usual way. 

Some days later the entire crowd was sitting together discussing in- 
cidents of their schooldays. This soon set Bee to thinking about those 
last days at school in which the lawn fete played so prominent a part. 
Suddenly she exclaimed, "Do you know I half believe in fortune tellers. 
That old gypsy outlined my life in a remarkable manner." 

"So do I," broke in Peg quietly as she pinched herself to keep from 
laughing and thereby raising embarassing questions in the minds of the 
others, for none of them suspected the part she had played in bringing 
affairs. 

The summer days were over and the beautiful days of fall were at 
hand and the little town of B — was again in a buzz of excitement as it 
was preparing, not for a lawn fete, but for the result of a predicament, 
two pretty weddings, which were to occur one after the other — and one 

of the brides was my fair fortune-teller. 

C. B. B. 
M. J. U. 




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Page 186 



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Memories 




HAVE honestly tried to love him, 
But I really never can ; 
And now he came and told me 
That his glance can the pages scan 
Which reveal my soul most completely 
In its soberest Plato-guise. 

But listen ! — Do you believe it — 

Did I ever philosophize ? 

No ! For my books, my work, and my studies 

Have crowded completely out 

Those sentiment shades of feeling 

Some girls cannot do without. 

But here is a picture consoling 

That he thru the years can descry, 

'Tis the form of some future sweetheart, 

A girl far better than I. 

Of course I am sorry —Good fellow ! 
What ! Mary, a letter for me, 
All boldly sealed and written 
In characters firm and free. 
And this: That he faithfully promises 
The same future friend to prove 
As of late when sacred memories 
Embalm his deepening love ? 

'Tis years and — well has he forgotten 
His promised friendship to me ? 
But look ! Here now is a letter, 
In those characters firm and free, 
'Tis simply a card to his wedding 
With a tiny note which says, 
"I met her two years ago, dear. 
When the leaves were turning red." 

Then as I read it over. 

To my heart came a sudden thrill 

As I wondered often in secret 

If that friend could love me still. 

But hark ! Thru the gathering twilight. 

Comes peals of a marriage bell. 

Ah me I That I ever should write it. 

My heart re-echoes a knell. — "Kit." 



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Page 188 



T^Sii^W^ 



Education 



WHY are we here ? To study, 
To train for life's great race, 
To grow fit in mind and body. 
In the world to take our place. 

But is all knowledge written ? 
Can all be learned from books ? 
Is the fruit of learning bitten 
By the one who learned books ? 

You may study till you're crazy. 
You may read until you're blind ; 
Yet your glimpse of life is hazy. 
You have still an infant mind. 

For tho you and Alexander 

Are the very best of friends. 

And your dreams and fancies wander 

Where the line of history ends; 

Tho you know the lore of ages 
And the ancient speeches all 
Both the language of the sages 
And of Teuton, Frank, or Gaul ; 

Tho they tell you you have mastered 
All that man can ever teach. 
And your name with titles plastered 
Till you scarce the end can reach ; 
Greater men than Alexander, 
Fairer art than that of Greece, 
Wars and conquests far, far grander 
Can be found in times of peace. 

Life is not a thing of gases. 
Or of metals chance-combined. 
Proper elements and masses 
Cannot make a human mind. 



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jt l LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 [ j] 



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Look around you ! See life living, 
Not thru someone else's eyes ; 
He who gives can find in giving 
Wisdom's only greatest prize. 

Those are wisest who can muster 
Some of nature's sympathy, 
Who have learned to know, to trust her. 
What she makes is what should be. 

Every time you do some kindness, 
Every soft word that you speak, 
Helps to lift your mind from blindness. 
Ignorance's hold to break. 

C. F. S. 



Josephine, My Jo 

JOSEPHINE, mv dear friend Jo; 
When your face I first saw 
Your smile was like the sunshine. 
Your every word was law, 
'Tis many years tho now, Jo, 
And from girlhood you have grown ; 
But I love you just the same, Jo, 
You're the one true friend I've known. 

Josephine, my classmate, Jo, 
We have climbed the hills together 
And many a jolly time we've had 
In every kind of weather. 
So Ie^ us keep right on. Jo. 
To each other still be true 
So that God shall ne\er sever 
\I\ friendship Jo with ^ou 

C B B 



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f O^ LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 









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The Long and the Short of the 
Christmas Holidays 

The last Christmas Holida\- Season was a period towards which all of 
us looked with more or less anxiety and joy, especialh' those who board at 
the Dining Hall. Almost from the first da>- of the school year many were 
heard counting how many days must elapse before they could satisfy their 
starving stomachs with Mother's mincepies and cookies. And, then, the 
ever present — in the dreams of the fellows — "Bonnie Lassie" was the sub- 
ject of much thot and meditation. Ah ! it is to the fellows who let their 
hearts go beyond the family circle — and their name is legion — that the Holi- 
days are dearest. For these progressive students these days are all too 
short. On Thanksgiving back at school we had a tough old rooster, called 
a turke\-, filled with concrete ; but now we had the real thing, and as the 
intrepid Perry said, "They are ours!" Back there we had gravy in the 
abstract, but here we had it in all its proven reality, in the shape of, as 
Prof. Peters puts it, "an undifferentiated whole." Then think of all the 
parties we enjoyed and of the watch services we attended between Christ- 
mas and New Year with plenty of doings all night to dispel sleep. All 
these thrilling times are now history and we look back to the Holidays with 
delight. 

However, inspired by our New Year's resolutions we decided to re- 
turn to L. V. The morning we left it was cold and quite a task to leave 
that uncommon luxury, a warm bed. Yet even this was a small matter 
compared with leaving a true heart. This was done with much ceremony 
and sorrow, as we embraced each other in one last long squeeze. 

After several long weary hours, filled with memories of our delight- 
ful vacation, especially of the squeezes, we were back again at L. \ . and 






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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 



dieting ourselves on French, Math., Chemistry, hash, chaff, and "bullers."- 
All that we remember of the long of it and all that we remember of the 
short of it can be summed up in the following original verses: 

The long of it was those twelve long days 
We spent in great anxiety ; 
The short of it was those twelve short nights 
We spent in her society. 

The long of it was those two long miles 
We traveled to her hacienda ; 
The short of it was those six short hours 
We spent with our Lucinda. 

The long of it was those weary days 
Between each spoony session ; 
The short of it was the spoon itself 
With more or less discretion. 



English 3 Examination for First Semester as Dictated 
by our Professor 

"Fost — What was the culah of the stockings of the Lady of Bath ? 
Second — Name ten troubadoah poets. 

Thurd — Quote the "Fairie Queene" from line 546 to 549. 
Foath — Name the lessah poets of King Arthah's court. 

Ansah any Foah" 

Note — (Students thrown out of class for not making 90 %, given a 
POSSIBLE chance to return upon a written demand of the President and 
Faculty). 



Page 191 



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^^<?;& 0/ June 9, 1913 
PROGRAM 

(A) OVERTURE "Lebanon Valley Sirens" 

College Orchestra, W. H. Weaver, Director 

(B) PLAYLET~"Fallible Love" World-Famous Romance 

F. L. Johnson & Company 

(C) EQUILIBRIST AND CONTORTIONIST: 

Sedic Sampson Rine, Original & Daring Feat 

(D) SKETCH— "My Idea of Happiness" 

(First Appearance in America) Quigley & Olewilcr 

(E) DAINTY DANCERS: Catchy costumes 

Brenneman & Christeson 

(F) DAYLIGHT PICTURES: 

(a) A Sophomore Minstrel Show 

(b) The Blood Spot on the Wall, or the Killing of a Bed-bug 

(G) PANTOMIMIST— "The Perfect Beauty" 

Mme. Smada Belle May 

Only Perfect Imitation of Original Venus 

(H) NOVELTYSINGER AND COMEDIENNE: 

Lottie May Spessard, In Her Latest Songs 

[a) If the Log Rolls Over Will We Drown 
(A) I am Grinding My Nose on the Grindstone 

(c) If I Die an Old Maid Will They Pickle My Bones 

(I) THE GREATEST OF ALL SPANISH DANCES : 

Boehm & Wanner, The Scream of the Season 



(J) EXIT MARCH— "Farewell 1913" 



College Orchestra 



Page 192 









l H LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 Q ] j 



u 


Junior Acrostic 






D. Leonard Reddick 






Charles H. Arndt 






Edward H. Smith 




^ 


LeRa\ B. Harnish 






E. MAy Meyer 
Harry H. Charlton 




I 
I 


CathariNe B. Bachman 
William Stager 
M. JosephiNe Urich 

C. Edward Mutch 
Paul L. STrickler 
Henry E. Snavely 
J. AllEn Walter 




T 

\ 

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Edgar M. LaNdis 

Carl F. Schmidt 
David E. YOung 
Clarence Ulrich 
Blanche M. R.isser 

LesTer A. Rodes 
Russell M. WEidler 

D. Ellis Zimmerman 
JohN B. Lyter 


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iS^^w «w^ Heard on Men 5 (r/^^ 

(Extracted From one Member's Diary) 

Jan. 20. Well here goes for our maiden performance. Prof, drill- 
ed it into lis so hard we ought to make good. Did \o\i say Jonestown? 
Right! It was dark when we got there. Prof. Sheldon started the 
excitement of the evening by stepping into a mudhole, and relieving him- 
self by such a splurge of oratory and in such a manner as to disgrace the De- 
partments of both Public Speaking and English Bible. Ernst turns up with 
his hair clipped close, and is christened "Ichthyosaurus" — no wonder. 
Some "eats" after a swell concert, if I must say it myself. President 
Klinger offers a prayer of thanksgiving at the table. All well, notwith- 
standing. 

Jan. 21. Off for L\'kens pretty early in the morning. Some time 
on the train-raising cain. Snavely lost his hat. It dropped out the win- 
dow. It was all he had, too. Went thru the mines in the afternoon. 
Talk about coal dirt, you can find in there. Another very good concert. 
Quite a bunch of girls. They had a little banquet, and lined up all the 
girls opposite our boys at the table. Of course we all had a good time. 
Every man had a girl. Botts "fell" for "Miss Doughnut." Weidler spent 
the evening with a lassie from Wilkes-Barre. Forgot to come in before 
morning. Bender almost as forgetful. I'm tired. 

Jan. 22. Rained during the morning, and dampened our spirits 
somewhat. Left for Elizabethville after dinner. Most of us ate too 
much. Elizabethville is some town. Botts lives here. Rodes and Prof. 
Sheldon are staying at the same place. Poor Rodes. "Lessie" told me he 
got the nightmare and was almost drowned by Prof. Statton and Man- 
ager Weaver got in wrong. Ed. Smith flirts with a good looking girl, 
who happened to be married. Got in wrong with her husband, but Ed. 
escapes. Not much doing after the concert. "Russ" Weidler turned in 
early. 

Jan. 2i. Sunday, we left for home instead of going to church. 
Some of the fellows stopped at Harrisburg, while some from Harrisburg 
went on to Lebanon. Evervbody dead tired. 



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Jan. 27. Traveled to Harrisburg in the rain. Concert in Techni- 
cal High Building. Charlton acted Lowery by coming in late. Missed 
the first number on the program. Lots of Alumni and ex-L. V. people in 
the audience. Happened to get a girl after the concert. Pretty nice — 
might be able to love her if I'd have time enough. Botts out late, same 
old story. 

Jan. 28. Still in Harrisburg. Krenz came in very late with a 
gash over his eye. Looks bad. Everybody's doin' the Capitol City. Long 
and Ernst strike it bad and take dinner at the Philadelphia Quick Lunch. 
All go to the Orpheum in the afternoon but Krenz. He went to the 
Colonial "so that it wouldn't look so bad" as he said. Took the Pennsy. 
to Duncannon at 5.30. Smith misses the train on account of a skirt. He 
had to take "it" home after the show. Everybody on hand for the con- 
cert in Duncannon. Only one girl in the town, the hotel keeper's daugh- 
ter. Yes, by the way, we all put up at a hotel in this town. Some class 
to the daughter. Nothing doing for me. Charlton took a cross-country 
hike, and then got in wrong. He returned the class pin, at any rate. 
Some fellows kept up their "late hours" reputation by playing poker until 
the "wee small hours of the morning." 

Jan. 29. Look over Duncannon until noon. Some fellows learn 
to cuss. Leave for Dillsburg after dinner. All well as far as Mechanics- 
burg. Then we take a slow freight. Some speed to Dillsburg. Some 
of the inhabitants fail to identify the "bunch." Everybody comes out to 
see what "blew in." Klinger has a peculiar experience, he loses his watch. 
Prof, takes a spinster home from the concert. Bender frightened by HER 
big brother. Ike Statton on the job as usual. He is some ladies' man, 
and is willing to take a chance on anything he sees. Klinger usually dis- 
covered a hen, the well-seasoned kind. 

Jan. 30. Sang in the United Brethren Church. Brother Krenz is 
the pastor, and we had to keep straight. No one in the audience sang, but 
watched us do our best. Pretty long sermon. "Some" dinner later. 
Took that slow freight home again at 1.30. I'm tired and sleepy. Expect 
to go to bed early for once. 



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Help the Poor 

Come Help Us Pay Our Debts 

Please Patronize Our 
Minstrel Show 



Our affairs have been managed badly. 

In debt eighty dollars are we, 
Our course we regret very sadly-- - 

In the future more careful we'll be. 

We promise to have no more squabbles. 
As our Bizarre Staff is now, so 'twill be; 

If Brighty again tries to run things. 
She'll have to skidoo from L. V. 

No coach have we hired for our minstrel. 
We are saving you money, you see; 

Help us this once and we'll promise 
In the future more careful to be. 

"It Is More Blessed to Give 

than to Receive" 

Class 1915, L. V. C. 

P. S. If our show is a success we will not bother you 
with a play next year 






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OGIC !" Ah, what a noble word ! 
In it is a girl by the name of Byrd, 
Then there's a Bow-man, strong and brave. 
And E. May Meyer, so solemn and grave. 
Also Mickey, who studies so hard (?), 
And "Red" Kirkpatrick, his good old pard, 
Even Eby on the very first row 
With Ruth V. Engle, who's not at all slow, 
Then Harry E. Ulrich, our Senior man. 
With Elizabeth Rechard next in van, 
And dear old "Flossie," our brightest one. 
Then Von Bereghy, who smokes like a simpleton. 
And Jamison, our great sleepy-head, 
Ditto Blouch, for he too loves his bed, 
Next Gibble, our only married man, 
And Rine, who for exams will cram. 
Then Ditzler, the big bashful boy. 
And "Josie" Urich, brimful of joy, 
There's Mason Long, our ladies' gent. 
And Stengle, the man for president, 
Then red-headed Leister, who's always late. 
And Rodes, who helped win our debate. 
Even Mary, whose last name is Spayd, 
And Ness, who always gets a good grade. 
Also Vera Myers, the little Soph, 
And Van Schaak, who was once a Prof. 
Then Ruth E. Engle, who is always good, 
And Hartz, he lives in her neighborhood. 
Then Oyler, too, the girl that's new, 
And Witmeyer, who never has much to do, 
Lastly Orris, who is known as Belle, 
Thus endeth the class we love so well (?) 
Except yours truly, who completes the list, 
"Kit" B. Bachman. Now none are missed. 



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5'om^ Things Need No Explanation 







//o-lAT^ .<,<^-^2Co-'l/ ^cCo- 







My Horse 



Ahorse ! A horse ! My kingdom for a horse ! 
Exam ! My fate depends upon my grade, 
And I must risk the hazard of discovery. 
Woe unto me should Prof, my trot espy ! 
With its aid I've passed them all but this last. 
My horse ! My horse ! My fate lies in my horse. 

B. M. R. 






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1^ LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 Q ] 





Junior Statistics 




A^aw^5 


Alias 


Chief Sin 




Charles H. Arndt 


Pussy 


Working for a Girl 




Catharine B. Bachman 


Kit 


Heartbreaking 




Harry H. Charlton 


Uncle Jerry 


Rough Housing 




Leray B. Harnish 


Reporter 


Dodging the Profs. 




Edgar M. Landis 


Etger 


His Hyena Laugh 




John B. Lyter 


Hans 


Grafting Tobacco 




E. May Meyer 


Miss Meyer 


Studying 




C. Edward Mutch 


Mose 


Being Wise 




David E. Young 


Dave 


Superlatively Religious 




D. Leonard Reddick 


Sammy 


His Good Humor 




Blanche M. Risser 


Pinkey 


Vanity 




Lester A. Rodes 


Dusty 


Cribbing 




Carl F. Schmidt 


Mitt 


A Card Shark 




Edward H. Smith 


Smitty 


Lady-like Habits 




Henry E. Snavely 


Slim 


Hot Air 




D. Ellis Zimmerman 


Buss 


Torturing the Piano 




Wm. S. Stager 


Billie 


Slow Ways 




Paul L. Strickler 


Polly 


Being a Lady Killer 




Clarence H. Ulrich 


Clarence 


Knowing His Lessons 




M. Josephine Urich 


Jo 


Giggling 




John A. Walter 


Doc 


Flunking 




Russell M. Weidler 


Rus 


Fussing 




Page 200 















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ft ) LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE - l"9l4l j] 





Junior Statistics 


Notorious For 


Is 


Will Be 


Killing Cats 


A Fugitive from Barnum 


A Horse Doctor 


Her Coquettish Looks 


A Little Girl 


An Instructor in Loveology 


His would-be Wit 


Father of the Class 


A Mormon 


Bluffing 


Trying to be Popular 


A Failure 


Darned near Croaking 


Mamma's Boy 


A Hobo 


His Red Hail 


A Sport 


A Brick Presser 


Looking Serious 


For Sale 


Disappointed 


Surviving 


Tired of Life 


Famous at Last 


Lengthy Sermons 


A Second Cicero 


A Bishop 


His Philosophy 


Now in Long Pants 


A Little Man 


Her Fatal Beauty 


Innocent 


A Militant Suffragette 


Making Trots 


Engaged 


Lost 


Pinochle Playing 


Specimen of American Manhood? 


An Author 


His Independent Air 


A Hustler 


A Mule Driver 


His Dainty Feet— Size 13 


Almost Married 


U. S. Senator from Omie-haw 


His Youth 


Growing 


The next Latin Prof 


Being Behind Time 


A Hayseed 


Pres. of L. V. 


Knocking 


Nothing in Particular 


A Cow Puncher 


His Knowledge of Hershey 


A Grind 


A Millionaire 


Flirting 


Pride of the Family 


A Society Belle 


riis Eating Capacity 


A Hoodoo 


A Wandering Jew 


Serving on H. S. Faculty 


Taking the HjO Cure 


Headliner in Vaudeville 


i 




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4 Psalm of 




Knife and Fork 




' 1 ^ELL me not, oh mournful students, 
A You have nothing fit to eat, 






While you've prunes and molasses 


l.— " 


You can well dispense with meat. 


J I 


Beef one meal with fried potatoes. 


V ni piv 


Next one 'taters with your meat. 


i^lptl ^ 


Beef thou needest, mark me, student, 




Though 'tis far too tough to eat. 




Not in eating veal or chicken 


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Is your destined end or way ; 


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And the art of eating mince-pie 


1 ¥ 1 1 


Grows to seem somewhat passe. 


! j : 


Terms are short and time is fleeting. 




Let your hearts be stout and bold, 


i-. H 


Waver not when you are eating 


1 ^{^41^ 


Warmed-up things that seem so old. 




In the dining hall at noon-day, 


i|i|l| 1 1 


In the morning and at night, 


III n 


Fear not skimmed milk nor hard biscuits. 


Keep your countenances bright. 


■^^lU 


Bless the cook and tip the waiters. 


j^i 1 


Of the hash be not afraid. 


[||l| i 


Eat your "doggies" and bologna. 


111 i 


Please don't ask how they are made. 
Fellows, then be up and chewing 


i^tM» 


With a taste for any dish. 


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Not with anxious vision viewing. 


LH; iH-i 1 


Stufi for which you have no wish. 


Wtf 


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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE - 1 914 U J 



5'ow«e of Us Are Still Wondering 

What the Sophomore class is; 

When the Hikers' Club was organized ; 

Whether the dorm girls may go strolling on a Sunday afternoon; 

What constitutes so-called Senior Dignity, and whether any one has 
ever seen any manifestation of it during the past year; 

Why the English department is not fumigated in order to kill off the 
Hunk microbes; 

Why the Department of Ph5sical Culture was introduced ; 

What is meant by a Snabbertaggle ; 

Why the faculty was ever placed in so conspicuous a place as the 
chapel rostrum ; 

When Philosophy was discovered and why it is ; 

Who carried the chairs out of the Ad. Building on April 1st ; 

Whether the Seniors will ever be able to hold amicable class meetings ; 

What really happened at the Lebanon Concert of the Men's Glee 
Club ; 

Wh\- the members of the Ladies' Glee Club did not converse with the 
Gettysburg boys on the Cumberland Valley trip ; 

Why Sherk and MulhoUen moved ; 

Whether Statton, Harnish, Boughter, Klinger, Olewiler, Stickell, 
Weaver, Etger Landis, Carl, Schmidt, and others, too numerous to men- 
tion, will ever quit; 

Whether financing a 30 horse-power Sophomore class on a one horse 
income is known as High Finance ; 

Who, the devil, he is — what, the devil, he does, and where, the devil, 
he lives. 



It was while the preparations for the great Sophomore Minstrel 
Show were in progress that the following incident took place. Luther 
Miller, of musical fame, was composing music suitable for a ballet. 
Upon its completion the composition was submitted to the dancer for 
whom it was written, Carl G. Snavely. Mr. Snavely glanced at the 
sheet a moment, and then, with a look of dismay upon his face, remark- 
ed : "Why Lut, this is written in six sharps. I can never dance to 
sharps." 



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} LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U( 



Bugs 



Bugs is one of those short, simple, Anglo-Saxon words which produce 
a deep and lasting effect without the sense of being completely over- 
whelmed, a condition which accompanies the long, sonorous words of Latm 
derivation. Altho short it has demonstrated a remarkable power to pro- 
duce lasting effects. Merely to mention the names of some bugs will m 
many cases cause a revulsion of feeling accompanied with a corresponding 
reaction, somewhat resembling the eruption of Vesuvius. 

There are many kinds of bugs. Some bugs are always sleepy and 
from their habit of perpetual dormancy they are named bedbugs. If per- 
chance, their slumbers be accidently disturbed, they make matters extreme- 
ly disagreeable for the destroyer of their peace. However if one takes the 
time to pull their teeth, they can cause no harm. There are several varie- 
ties of of this terrible creature: MullhoUeni, Sherki, Stattoni, Leisteri, 
Lighti, Rodei. The last named variety makes a delicious beverage, which 
is frequently served by the discoverer to his friends. 

By a peculiar process of metempsychosis and evolutionary differentia- 
tion many bugs are metamorphosizcd into humbugs. These are a nuis- 
ance to themselves and every one else. Most men are humbugs, altho 
there are a few who do not in any sense deserve this title. The most 
prominent of the former category are Harnish, Von Bereghy, Carl, Charl- 
ton, Schmidt, Ressler, etcetra. Most of the latter are dead. Lots of peo- 
ple think they are not humbugs enough and so go to college. 

Bugs as a rule are total abstainers, altho they are gluttons when it 
comes to eating. Some bugs don't have any names, because they have not 
yet been found, while many others would be better off if they hadn't been 

found. 

Bugs are useful for people who don't have anything else to do, to run 
around and catch. These people are called commentators, because that's 
all they do. There are not many of these people, for if there were there 
wouldn't be bugs enough for all. 

Another bug closely related to the humbug is the fire-bug. These 
are humbugs that never went to college, because they must waste their 
pent-up energy in other directions. They are the most destructive kind 
of humbugs, the others being perfectly harmless. 



Page 205 



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Bugs can be distinguished from worms by the fact that they have 
wings, while a worm must live on the dirt. If a bug was a worm then 
there wouldn't be any bugs, so that's why they have wings. In other 
words, worms creep, bugs soar. 

A Bug-house is not a house for bugs to live in, as you would think, 
but is a place that has nothing in it except a vacuum. When people are 
crazy, instead of being called idiots, they are said to be bug-house, which is 
a prettier expression. 

There is another bug which is of special use to mankind. This is the 
lightning bug. These bugs are used in the summer-time to save the 
i^ioonlight, and to make the scenery look nicer to lovers on a stroll. Be- 
sides being useful they are also ornamental, because they are so small that 
it takes a good many of them to make it light enough to see. Besides they 
cannot stay lit long at a time. When some go out others light up, so that 
there is a constant light. They are nice to put in paper bags for children 
to play with if they don't eat them. In the daytime their lights are not 
lit because they are not needed. This gives them time to clean up their 
machinery. These bugs consist of two parts, a front part and a back part. 
The front part contains his head and shoulders and other accessory organs, 
while the other part contains his lantern apparatus and the rest of the 
bod\'. 

Besides these there are June bugs, who live on grape vines, kissing 
bugs, lice of several kinds, fleas, lady bugs, turtles, frogs, and others. 

There are many other interesting things to be said of bugs, especially 
from a scientific standpoint, but if these few buggy hints will be of an\' 
benefit in helping any one to live better, the writer feels that he has done 
his duty. In conclusion we would say — "There are no bugs on us." 



I wonder whether kings like baked beans 

Or indulge in spinach some 
Or whether their princes and queens 

Chew gum. 



Page 206 






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Sophomore Directory 




Name What They Think They Are 


What They Really Are 




Harry Bender 


Caruso 




A Brass Band 




Gideon Blouch 


A Lady's Man 




Mistaken 




Paul J. Bowman 


Marathon Runner 


Steinmetz's Harry 




C. E. Brenneman 


A Dancer 




A Bum Show 




Helen BrightbiU 


Popular 




A Nuisance 




William Carl 


Honest 




A Kleptomaniac 




I. Clyde Eby 


THE Guy 




A Fizzle 




Larene Engle 


A Belle 




A Bad Noise 




Ruth E. Engle 


A Student 




A Lost Hope 




Ruth V. Engle 


Innocent 




Spoony 




Phares B. Gibble 


A Minister 




A Scoundrel 




Ethel I. Houser 


Engaged 




Married 




Mary Irwin 


A Dream 




A Nightmare 




Verling Jamison 


Cute 




A D— n Fool 




John O. Jones 


Wise 




A Swell Head 




John W. Larew 


A Gentleman 




A Rough Neck 




J. Maurice Leister 


An Orator 




A Squawker 




Thomas B. Lyter 


A Ball Player 




Some Bluff 




Florence Mentz 


A Math. Shark 




A Coquette 




M. Luther Miller 


Handsome 




"Sis" 




Vera Myers 


Betrothed 




A Weaver 




John H. Ness 


Single 




A "Pop" 




H. L. Olewiler 


An Ideal Lover 




A Sour Grape 




Belle Orris 


A Peach 




A Lemon 




Carl G. Snavely 


An Athlete 




A Mutt 




P. A. Station 


A Violinist 




A Horse Fiddler 




Faber Stengle 


A Man 




A Baby 




Ralph Stickell 


A Millionaire 




A Waiter 




Frank VanSchaak 


A Biologist 




An Old Maid 




A. L. Weaver 


A Knows-all 




All Nose 




The CLASS 


Angels 




Weak-kneed, Over- 




grown, Baby-faced, Bone-headed 


Dilapidated, Brainless, 




Sneaking, D 


^testable, Ignorant, j 


Oyster 


-faced WOPS. 




Page 208 











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Smith 



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Die Orijin off Secret Societies 

Dere vas vonce a big garten dat vas full off big trees. In dat garten 
vas Atam. He vas so lonesome mit himself. Von time he lait down to 
sleep und he got a pain in his site. It sch welled all up und ven he got 
avalce it was not schwelled up no more und he hat no pain. He valked up 
die street in dat garten und saw a voman He sed, "Vhere dit you come 
from?" She sed, "Out off your site ven you vere sleeping; die Lord made 
me out off von off your ribs." Den Atam made die voman his wife und 
called her Eve. Von day a teufel-man came in dat garten. He hat a 
swantz und lookt so ukly. He sed to Eve, "Eve, do you see dat tree dere? 
Dat iss un apfel tree. Dat dere tree has die bestest frucht in die garten. 
Ven you eat from it, it vill make you wise. Die Lord sed you daren't eat 
from it but you just taste it vonce already." Und she dit und she vas wise 
right avay. She told Atam to eat from it und he dit und he got wise right 
avay too. Den got ashamed off demselfs und dey made aperns out off 
fig leaves. Von day die Lord came in dat garten. Eve hit herself back 
off a big bush. Die Lord saw Atam und he sed, "Who ate dem apfels?" 
Und Eve sed to Atam from behind die bush, "Don't tell, Atam." Und 
Atam didn't tell. Now dat vas der furst secret societv. 

— L A R 









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Roster of the Ladies' Glee Club 

Velma Heindel 
FlOrence E. Clippinger 
Myrle Turby 
Lottie SpEssard 
Mary A. Spayd 



Florence E. Christeson 
DOra Ryland 
SaR.a E. Zimmerman 

Ruth W. Brunner 

Ora B. Bachman 
Vera Myers 
Helen E. Brightbill 
Ruth E. ENgle 

Edith A. GingriCh 

VeLma Stauffer 
Ruth QUigley 
Catharine B. Bachman 



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And Prof. Couldn't See the Joke 

Prof. Wanner. — "Mr. Strickler, were the Egyptians able to make 
brick out of dry clay ?" 

Mr. Strickler. — "No sir." 

Prof. Wanner. — "Oh yes they were, only they had to make the 
clay moist first." 

How Did She Know 
Ruth Quigley (endeavoring to recognize the Devil at the Hallow'een 
party) — "Oh it is never Mr. Olewiler, for that is not his Iiand." 

He Ought to Knoiv 
Harnish — "Why is Prof. Peters a good barber?" 
Smith — "I don't know. Why is he, Reporter?" 
Harnish — "Because he gives me close shaves." 

Sounds Like Naturefaking 
Prof. Shenk — "Some plants when they turn towards the sunlight turn 
away from it." 

Brilliant 
H. E. Suavely — "Professor, what caused the burning of the Alex- 
andrian library?" 
Young — "Fire!" 

A Problem in Finance 
Sherk (relating a story) — "Once there were two Irishmen who had 
ten cents, that is both had ten cents each between them." 

The Appropriate Instrument 
Charlton — "I must brush the cobwebs from my brain or I'll flunk 
that exam." 

Mutch — "Then what you need is a vacuum cleaner." 

All That He Had 

Tom — "John, why did you lose your temper at the last game of 
cards?" 

John — "Well, Tom, that was all I had to lose, for I've been broke 
since last Wednesday." 



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} o« Said It 
"Slim" Snavely — "Say, fellows, isn't Fat Von Bereghy a typical 
Teuton ?" 

Schmidt — "You're blamed tootin' he is." 



Loffic 
Ressler — "It is said that a man should love his worst enem}-. Whis- 
key is man's worst enemy. Therefore man should love whiskey." 

Amen 
Prof. Johnson — "Mr. Brenneman, get off my train." 
Brenneman — "Why don't you get your clothes made to fit." 

If'hat Paul:' 
Edith Lehman (Discussing missions) — "Whenever the subject of mis- 
sions comes up, we always think of the greatest missionary, Paul." 

The Source of His Inspiration 
Wert — "If Dave Young don't take care, I won't lend him any more 
of my sermons." 

To be More Exact 
A number of the girls were passing notes back and forth rather freely 
in Philosophy 3, whereupon the following conversation took place: 
Ruth Engle — "What do you call this — a mail route?" 
Mary Irvin — "No, a female route." 

iriiat If Meant 

Mutch (reading Chaucer in English 3) — "Ne maked him a spiced 
conscience. " 

Prof. Johnson — "Mr. Mutch, what is the meaning of spiced as it is 
used here?" 

•Muth — "Why I think Chaucer meant that his conscience was 
pickled." 





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Prof. Johnson (in Soph English) — "Now, Mr. Eby, what was it that 
\ou said? Was it 'convenience' of "conwenient' ?" 

Eby (indignantly) — "I did not say either, Miss Johnson, I said 
'conwicted.' " 

Good jManners 
Prof. Pritchard — "Well, Mr. Strickler, how is your shoulder?" 
Strickler — "Somewhat better. Thank you." 
Prof. Pritchard — "You're welcome, I'm sure." 

The Reason 

Shepley — "Professor, what is the psychological explanation of certain 
lights having an effect upon the emotions, for instance moonlight?" 

Prof. Peters — "Well — hm — a — why, Mr. Shepley, I think it is due 
to the complexity of the situation." 

Fiffiirrs and Their Tales 

Prof. Shenk: (in Economics 1) "Well, do you agree with those 
figures as they stand?" 

H. E. Snavely: "No, Professor, those figures lie. I worked it out 
and got a different result." 

Prof. Shenk: "Very well, Mr. Snavely, but sometimes liars figure, 
too." 

Possession Nine Points of the Law 
Prof. Pritchard — "What is a vacuum?" 

Charlton — "I don't know, Professor. 1 have it in my head, but I 
just can't think of it." 

ff'hat Mas the Matterf 

Boaz Light was walking rapidly along Main street and altho he 

seemed to be looking straight ahead he ran mto Chde I- b\ who was < om 

ing directly toward him, whereupon the following conversation took place 

Light — "Say, Eby, why don t \ou look wheie \ou are going^" 

Ebv — "Hm! Why don't \ ou go wluu \ou re looking' 



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Placiny Buchanan 

Prof. Shenk was delivering his famous lecture on "Buchanan" at a 
teachers' meeting in the Cleona public school house, at which the pupils of 
the school were present and during the course of his speech he asked the 
latter, 

"Who was Buchanan ? " 

"An orator," said one future president. 

"A statesman," broke in a future militant suffragette. 

"Correct," said the distinguished manufacturer of history, "but what 
is a statesman ?" 

"A man who goes around making speeches," answered the some-da\ 
successor to Mrs. Pankhurst. 

"That's not just exactly right," said our roaster of ancient chestnuts, 
"now I go around making speeches once in a while and I'm not a statesman 
at all." 

"I know," said the bright little fellow, "I mean a man who goes 
around making GOOD speeches. " 




Labratory for Psychological, Theological and Sociological Research 
— showing some of the specimens studied 






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Ressler seemed unusually interested in Calculus that particular day, 
a very rare condition, indeed ; and, Prof. Lehman highly delighted at the 
intelhgent look on his face, said : "Mr. Ressler, do you understand all 
about to-day's lesson ?" To which Ressler replied : "All but one thing, 
professor." Prof. Lehman.— "What is that ?" Ressler.— "Where did 
those figures that you erased go to?" 

Jo Mathias. — "I got a zero in Math, to-day." 
Weidler.— "Oh, that's nothing." 

Wert. "I remember you well as a baby 1 often kissed." 
Kit. — "Probably, but I couldn't help it then." 

Blanche Black.— "Polly, where do the bugs go in winter ?" 
Witmeyer. — "Search me." 

Prof. Johnson. — "Do you like Burns ?" 

Mutch. — "If they heal up quickly and leave no scars." 

Evans and Mickey were journeying home from Lebanon on the 
usual 11:50. 

"Bill," said Dave, "why don't you speak to your friend at the other 
end of the car ?" 

"Sh !" said Mickey, "wait till she has paid her fare." 

The Correct Synony/ii 
One Monday morning a drummer was standing in front of the local 
P. iSt R. station, when finally his attention was drawn to a group of 
young men, who, upon alighting from a train, formed in a group and 
rent the early morning air with unearthly yells. Whereupon the drum- 
mer inquired of "Ed." Mutch, who was loitering close by, "Who are 
those fellows?" To which "Ed" replied : "They are returned empties." 
"Returned empties?" inquired the drummer. "Yes, returned empties, 
they are ministerial students returning from their charges on a Monday 
morning." 



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Who' II Be the First 

Prof. Peters. — "Miss Bachman, have you considered the great 
problem of life ?" 

"Kit." — "Well, none of the fellows have asked me as yet." 

An Appropriate Title. 
Kit — "Jo, do you know another appropriate title for the 'Alma Mater' 
of L. V. ?" 

Jo — "No, I don't, except — well, how about the 'Annville Chorus' ?" 

If you see a strange large envelope 

That causes consternation 
Among the Senior Class, be sure 

It's an answered application. 
Just watch them as they open it. 

You'll know by the frown or smile 
Whether it's something simply great 

Or a job that's not worth while. 

But OUR Senior Class is so deucedly clever 

Tho they put on a bluff and a smile. 
Not a single one of them would expect 

To HEAR of a job NOT worth while. 







ONE SCHOONER AND TWO SHORTS 



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One day at dinner Ness winked at Richie, but Richie did not happen 
see him do so. Prof. Schmidt, however, saw the act and retorted: 
'Mr. Ness, I'm afraid that did not go where it was intended." 

Ness — "Oh yes it did. Miss Schmidt." 

Where Did Hi Get His':' 
Prof. Johnson — "Mr. Charlton, what is that quotation about great 
lien." 

Charlton — '"Some men are born, others have life thrust upon them." 



His KnoiL'ledge of Literature. 
Prof. Shenk — "In connection with your lesson to-morrow, I want you 
to read the book of Genesis." 

Bender — "Is that one of the latest novels, professor?" 



Not Up to Date 
Prof. Johnson — "Mr. Rodes, criticise De Foe's style in "The Journal 
of the Plague Year." 

Rodes — "Well I don't think it is very stylish. Do you?" 

If hy is a Funny-bone? 
]o Urich — "Professor, do you know why the bone at your elbow is 
called the funny bone?" 

Prof. Derickson — "No, I don't." 

Jo Urich — "Because it is the end of humorous." 

Time is Fleeting 

Ruth Engle — "I wouldn't like to be a boy. Would you. Miss 
Adams?" 

Prof. Adams — "Well, I've been a woman so long that I really 
wouldn't know how'." 



Page 218 






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Shifting Terms 
Prof. Schmidt — "Mr. Boughter, I see you are raising a moustache." 
"Kep" — "Yes, is it becoming?" 
Prof. Schmidt — "It might be coming, but it's not here \et." 



Literally 
Prof. Shroyer — "Mr. Wert, do you obey the Bible's commandment 
to love your neighbor?" 

Wert — "I try to, but she won't let me." 

Good Protection 
Florence Mentz — "Why is it that Miss Rechard never catches a 
cold?" 

Ethel Houser — "She's always wrapped up in her books." 

Certainly 
Prof. Shenk — "Mr. Mutch, what would you call a fellow who pre- 
tends to know everything?" 
Mutch — "A professor." 

According to Nicholson 
Prof. Peters — "Mr. Harnish, 1 am tempted to give you an examina- 
tion." 

Harnish — "Yield not to temptation, for yielding is sin." 

Did It Hit:' 
Jones — "Miss Irwin, you seem to be fond of art. Do you paint?" 
Mary (rubbing her hand on her cheek) — "What's that?" 

May Belle had a little cat, 
'Twas white and black and yellow ; 
And pretty May Belle loved it so, 
She never had a fellow. 









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The Truth Stings 



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The Exact Relationship 
Wrightstone — "Is that your baby, Professor?" 

Prof. Grimm — "No, Harold, the possession is on the other side. He 
isn't my baby, I'm his father." 

Me Wouldn't /Fonder 

"Ma" Adams (to small boy cussing his dog) — "Why you naughty 
boy. I never heard such language since the day I was born." 

Boy — "Yes, mum : I guess dere wuz a of cussin de day you wuz 

born." 

His Alania for Publicity 

Ethel Houser — "Isn't it awful to have that Business Manager after 
us with that infernal camera of his?" 

Harnish — "Yes, but imagine what the Bizarre would be if he didn't 
notice us." 



Page 220 



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^ LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 Q l 



A Discovery 

Boaz Light, a member of the scrub faculty, while conducting a class 
in physical geography, asked the question, "I suppose you have noticed that 
before a storm the clouds are always black, but that directly after a storm 
they are always white. Can you give me the reason for this, Mr. Mul- 
holien?" 

Oscar — "I guess the rain washed them off." 

THEY SriLL NEED IT 
One morning the following announcement was read in chapel: 
"THERE WILL BE A MEETING OF THE SOPHOMORE 
CLASS IN THE LIBRARY AT 12:30 TODAY. ALL SOPHS 
COME AND BRING A DOLLAR ($1 ) WITH YOU. WE NEED 
THE MONEY. ALL COME!" 

Missing the "Mark" 

After Marie's return from Reno and 'Tat's" enforced discontinuation 
from his regular, systematic exercises along Main street, the following m- 
formation was obtained by our special correspondent thru an interview: 

Correspondent — "Don't you think you have missed your "Mark" 
thru your wife's securing a divorce?" 

"Fat" — "No! And my only hope is that she and I will never meet 
again, either here or hereafter." 

Correspondent — "Wouldn't you associate with her if you met her in 
Heaven?" 

"Fat" (passionately) — "Never! I'd die first!" 

The Influence of Environment 
Bender — "No sir, I'm not going to the Glee Club banquet. I wasn't 
raised in full dress." 

Unnecessary 
Prof. Shenk — "You ought to brace up and show your wife who's run- 
ning things at your house." 

Prof. Peters — "It isn't necessarv. She knows." 



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is the Best School Master 

Prof. Wanner — "What effect does the moon have upon the tide?" 
Ruth V. Engle — "None. It affects only the untied." 

Quite a Traveler 
Mary Irwin — "Mr. Dayhoff, you have a Roman nose — it roams all 
o\er \our face." 

Dayhoff — "Yes, but you ought to see it run." 

Appropriate 
After spending some time in an examination in astronomy, one student 
handed in his paper containing the foUovv'ing words : 

"Sun, moon, and stars forgot, upward I fly." — P.aul Strickler. 

Suhincrycd 
Ulrich — "Is Mark Wert a deep thinker?" 

Heffelfinger — "Well I guess: None of his ideas ever get to the 
surface." 

II e Cannot See the Point. Can You? 
At a recent meeting of "THE BIZARRE STAFF" at Jo Urich's 
Reddick asked, "Jo, have the old folks gone to bed?" 

Taking Liberties 
Jo to Kit. — "Oh dear, why weren't you at play practice to-night ?" 
Russ (buttin' in) "I had to go to Biological Field Club to-night." 

Helen. — "Papa, dear, gaze on your prospective son-in-law." 
Mr. Brightbill. — "Um, say, young man, can you afford to marry ?" 
"Ike." — "Certainly, I have a friend who has just been elected alder- 
man and he is willing to perform the ceremony for nothing just for prac- 
tice." 

Innocence Abroad 

Oscar Mulhollen had put a key in an electric light socket and had 
burned out several fuses. 

Prof. Grimm.— "Mr. Mulhollen, what do you mean by burning out 
those plugs ?" 

Mr. Mulhollen. — "Why I didn't put any fire to them." 



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The Biggest Joke In School 
Herr MarcelderBudweiserBatzelwasserSauferhinterdemAnhauserBusch- 
zudenTonendesWachtamRhinesmitlustigeHochderKaiseraufdemUferdes - 
SchnitzFIussesoderindemSchlossLauderbachauf demGrubelbergalserdient - 
demHeiligeBierfassDonnerwettervonBereghy. 



The following have been approved by the National Board of Censor- 
ship and by the President of the White Cross Single Standard League. 

In Astronomy 
Prof. Lehman. — Mr. Zimmerman, you may go to the board and 
draw the figure to illustrate." 

Mr. Zimmerman. — "Do you mean the figure of Venus, Professor ?" 

J^eri' Serious 
Ness was calling on a widow in town, and was having a lovely time, 
whereupon a small girl appeared in the doorway and exclaimed : Mom, 
is this my new pop ?" 

The Ji'ays of Men 

Prof. Shroyer, in discussing the latest fads in women's dress, remark- 
ed ; "I would rather see a woman with nothing on than to see one in 
some of those tight skirts and low cut dresses." 

Prof. Wanner. — "So would L" 

A clever old bird is the pelican, 

Whose bill will hold more than his bellican ; 

He can store in that beak 

Food enough for a week, 
But blamed if we see how the bellican. — Ex. 

Prof. Lehman. — "Has anything ever been discovered on Venus ?" 
Klinger. — "Not if pictures of her can be relied upon." 



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Postlude 

You have before you a copy of Volume XV of The Bizarre, the an- 
nual Junior Class publication of Lebanon Valley College, which is pub- 
lished this year by the Class of 1914. 

It has been our unswerving aim throughout all our labors to follow 
the ideal embodied in our Prelude, for we have tried conscientiously to 
portray truthfully our Alma Mater as she is and to record truthfully the 
events of one of the most memorable years of her history. In other 
words, it has been our aim to get out a publication that would be a credit 
to the Stai?, the Class, and to Lebanon Valley College. 

Personally we believe that we have realized our hopes in a high de- 
gree, for we are certain that no other single publication has ever so 
thoroly and so truthfully pictured our Alma Mater and her activities. 
However of this you, dear reader, shall be the judge. 

If we have recorded some weakness or worse of yours, remember 
that we have done so without fear or malice but simply to enable you to 
see yourself as others see you and thereby to give you an opportunity to 
profit in the future by your past mistakes. Also remember that some 
other poor wandering pilgrim, thru reading an account of your sad ex- 
periences, may profit by them and thereby save himself much pain and 
suffering, and that consequently you are a martyr in the cause of civiliza- 
tion and should rejoice in that fact. 

We realize that we, too, have made a few mistakes and are heartily 
sorry for them. We are particularly sorry for the unfortunate error of 
omitting to give Prof. Lehman credit for the honorary degree of Sc. D. 
which was conferred upon him last Commencement Day by this institu- 
tion in recognition of his high attainments in Mathematics and Astrono- 
my. We beg Dr. Lehman's pardon and hereby add our mite to the gen- 
eral appreciation of his noble service here. 

Please bear in mind that we do not think that the jokes are any fun- 
nier than you do. 

We had quite a few pictures left over of "Reporter" Harnish but 
could not use them, for our other advertisers objected to specialization. 

We really expect to hear a lot about this book, wise and otherwise, 
and that much more will be said that we do not hear. But before you 
express your thots, remember that if you helped to get out a previous 
number of The Bizarre, it was not so good as this one and if you have 
not helped to get one out but intend to, its superiority has not yet been 
demonstrated. Living in a glass house, you had better refrain from throw- 
ing around your Geological specimens — give them to the Museum, for it 
needs them more than we do. 

No matter what may be said about this book, we believe that we 
shall get our reward in due season, for we have cast an entire \ear's out- 
put of the National Biscuit Company upon the slimy surface of the Quit- 
tapahilla. 

The 1914 Bizarre Staff 






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Title Page 

Cut of Dr. G. D. Gossard. 

Dedication 

Biography of Dr. G. D. 

Gossard 

Prelude 

1914 Bizarre Staff 

Table of Contents 

BOOK I— THE COLLEGE 

Processional 

The Corporation 

Alumni Association .... 

Administration Building 

Library 

Engle Conservatory of 
Music 

Ladies' Dormitory .... 

Men's Dormitory 

Academy 

President's Residence. . 

United Brethren Church 

The Faculty 

W. H. Weaver, Treas- 
urer 

Mrs.. Violette Nissley 
Freed, Matron 

Rev. H. B. Spayd, Col- 
lege Pastor 

The Classes, (cut) 

Classes, poem 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

Academy 

Seniors in Music 

Conservatory Roll 

Oratory Roll 

Art Roll 



Index 

1 BOOK II— ORGANIZATIONS 

3 Senior-Junior Council . . 97 

4 Y. W. C. A 98-99 

Y. M. C. A 100-101 

5-6 Ministerial Association 102-103 

7 College News Staff 104 

8-9 

10 LITERARY SOCIETIES: 

Clionian 105-108 

11-14 Philokosmian 109-112 

15 Kalozetean 113-116 

16 Sophronean 117-120 

17 Clubs, (cut) 121 

18 Ladies' Glee Club 122-123 

Men's Glee Club 124-125 

19 White Shield Single 

20 Standard League .... 126 

21 White Cross Single 

22 Standard League 127 

23 Biological Field Club . . 128 

24 Deutscher Verein 130 

25-37 Ministers' Sons Club. . . 131 

Nut Club 132 

38 

BOOK III— EVENTS 
38 Exercises Commencement 

Week 133 

38 Academy Commence- 

39 ment 134 

40 Baccalaureate Sei-vices. 135 
41-54 Commencement Exer- 

55-80 cises Conservatory 

81-84 and Oratory Depart- 

85-88 ments 136 

89-92 Class Day 137 

93 Junior Oratorical Con- 

94 test 138 

95 College Commencement 139 

96 Merchant of Venice 140 






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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 1914 U j 



Clionian Anniversary. . 141 
Kalozetean Anniversary 142 
Philokosmian Anniver- 
sary 143 

Junior Play, cast 144 

Junior Play, (cut) .... 145 

Faculty Recital 146 

Juniata Debate 147 

The Albright Game, 

(cut) 148 

Star Course 149 

May Day Exercises, 

(cut) 150 

L. V. Diary for 1912- 

1913 151-164 

BOOK IV— ATHLETICS 

Cheer Leader, (cut)... 165 

Athletic Association . . . 166 

Football 167-170 

Baseball 171-173 

Basketball 174-175 

Track and Field 176 

BOOK V— L'ALLEGRO 
ET IL PERSERSO 

The Muse, (cut) 177 

Alma Mater's Praise. . . 178 
The Result of a Pre- 
dicament 179-185 

Memories 186 

1914 Victories, (cut). . . 187 

Education 188 

Josephine, My Jo 189 



The Long- and the Short 

of the Christmas 

Holidays 190-191 

English 3 Exam 191 

Program at the Lyric . . 192 

Junior Acrostic 193 

Glee Club Diary 194-195 

Help the Poor 196 

Just Scenes, (cut) 197 

Logic 198 

Some Things Need No 

Explanation 199 

My Horse 199 

Junior Statistics 200-201 

Psalm of Knife and 

Fork 202 

Look Who 's Here, 

(cut) 203 

Some of Us Are Still 

Wondering 204 

Bugs 205-206 

My Choice, (cut) 207 

Sop Directory 208 

Managers of College 

Book Store 209 

Origin of Secret Socie- 
ties 209 

Ladies' Glee Club 

Acrostic 210 

Jokes, (cut) 211 

Jokes 212-223 

Postlude 224 

The End, (cut) 225 

Advertisements 229 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE" 1914^ 



Advertisements 



Page 229 









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Lebanon Valley College 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



FALL TERM BEGINS SEPTEMBER 8th, 1913 



This College was founded in 1866. It stands for Character, high scholar- 
ship, noble manhood and womanhood. 

Here, choice young people from various states come into competition and 
fellowship with one another, and with teachers of high character, sound learning 
and progressive methods and ideas. 

THE COLLEGE 

offers five groups of studies, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. They 
are the Classical, Chemical-Biology, Mathematical-Physical, Historical-Political, 
and Modern Language. 

THE ACADEMY 

covers the work of standard High Schools and Academies. Expenses very low. 

THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

offers complete courses in Piano-forte, Voice, Organ, and Harmony. 

SCHOOL OF ART 

The various branches of Art are taught. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORATORY 

Oratory offers full courses in Interpretation, Dramatic Art, and Public Speaking. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

Opening Monday, June 16th, 1913 
Closing Saturday, July 26th, 1913 



For further information address the President 



Rev. G. D, Gossard, D, D., annville, pa. 

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230 



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The Bolton 




Market Square 




Harrisburg, 


Pa. 


J. H. & M. S. Butterworth 




Proprietors 





F^ Jx Jif Buy a Guaranteed Life Income 

UO Ml IMOXJU for Yourself and Family in the 

Northwestern 
Mutual Life Insurance Co, 

H. T. ATKINS, Manager 
826 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 



WHEN COMING TO HARRISBURG STOP AT THE 

Greek American 

409 Market Street 

FOR 

ICE CREAM, SODA WATER and FINE CONFECTIONS 



Our Favorite IMeat Market 

W. M. ROWLAND, Proprietor 

^ Successor to S. H. Lutz 



MEATS 



ANNVILLE, PA. 

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231 



C. W. BORLAND 

DENTIST 
847 CUMBERLAND ST. LEBANON, PA. 

COTTREL ^ LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Makers of Caps, Gowns, and Hoods. Class Contracts a Specialty 

Wo Do ELLIOTT 

SHOEMAKER 
Repairing neatly done. Rubber work a specialty »r»r«r»» w r^ n i 

PATRONAGE SOLICITED Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

PALACE MEAT MARKET 

L F. LONG, Proprietor 
BEEF, VEAL, PORK, LARD, SAUSAGE and BOLOGNA 

Jo So BASHORE 

The Reliable CLOTHIER and only One Price 

828 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 



i 



ITH & BOWMAN 



CARPETS. R.UGS. MATTING, DRAPERIES, WINDOW SHADES and AWNINGS. 

Floor Oil Linoleum. Carpets fitted. Cleaned and Relaid at Lo-west Prices 
738 CUMBERLAND STREET LEBANON, PA. 



HARVEY Lo SELTZER 

LEADING ONE-PRICE 

CLOTHIER & FURNISHER 

769 CUMBERLAND STREET LEBANON, PA. 



HAIR CUTTING and SHAVING PARLOR 

WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE PA 

232 



i J. B. Say lor S. C. Saylor 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 



Successors to D. L. Saylor 



Contractors and Builders 

Dealers in Lumber and Goal 

Both Phones Annville, Pa. 

HARRY LIGHT 

Central Clrgr^rii 

Complete line of Groceries and Provisions 

Wall Paper, Window Shades 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

C. M. FINK 

Fresh Bread, Cakes and Pretzels 

Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

GRAYBILL'S 

BOARDING HOUSE 

WEST SHERIDAN AVENUE 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

I Rates: $3.50 Per Week Single Meal 25 Cents 

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233 



D. A. Whiskeyman 

FLORIST 

Rose Buds, Cut Flowers, Chrysanthemums. Hardy Hydrangeas, 
Plants of all kinds, Winter Vegetables. Plants furnished for 
Decoration. Dealer in fruit and ornamental trees. 

Queen and Lancaster Sts. Annville, Pa. 

Frantz^s Furniture Bazaar 

THE LARGEST FURNITURE STORE 

IN THE VALLEY 

732-734 Cumberland St. LEBANON, PA. 

Goods Delivered Free. Undertaking Embalming Promptly 
Attended to Day and Night 

BOTH PHONES 

WATCH FOR THE OPENING OF 

Bowman's Newly Remodeled Bakery 

Modern and Up-to-date in Every Respect 

Increased Facilities, Improved Products, Best Service 

THE MODEL VIENNA BAKERY 



D. B. Shiffer 

Optometrist 
14 E. Main Street = Annville, Pa. 




Eyes Examined Free by the latest methods I 

known to the optical science. Broken lenses replaced. I 

SOLID GOLD, GOLD FILLED, SILVER 1 

and ALUMINUM FRAMES | 

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234 



Baseball, Lawn Tennis, Football and Basketball Goods 

Photographic and Painting Materials 
Pennants, Leather Goods, Fountain Pens, Etc. 

Books, Stationery and Gifts of all kinds 



DUTWEILER, The Stationer 

813 Cumberland St. LEBANON, PA. 

H. W. MILLER DEALER m 

House Furnishings, Sporting Goods, Paint, Rogers' Floor Stain, 

Full Line of Spalding Baseball Goods. Special Prices to 

Athletic Clubs. Stoves and Ranges 

PLUMBING A SPECIALTY Our Motto-Honest Goods at Honest Prices 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



JACOB SARGENT 

rchant Tailor 



I Ready-to-wear Trousers Raincoats always on hand 

I Style, Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed 

I 18-20 West Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

I "Always Reliable" 

DoutricWs Clothing 

I YOUR MONEY'S WORTH OR YOUR MONEY BACK | 

I 304 Market Street Harrisburg, Pa. 

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the reader's patronage 
represents the best in the line 



Lemberger & Co., Druggists, oVltlll 

Our Motto — "In medicine quality is of first importance" 

Lemberger's Compound Tar Lozenges for throat troubles are useful to public speakers, 
teachers, singers. 

Our Headache Wafers — most effectual cure for Nervous Headache. Ask for Lemberger's 
Headache Wafers. 

Our Liver Pills — A little thing to swallow — a big thing as relief for torpid liver and consti- 
pation. If you want a prescription compounded we will be able to serve you. 
All of us are graduates in Pharmacy. We invite correspondence or telephone. 

Jos. L. Lemberger, Ph.M. LEBANON, PA. Frank Gleim, Ph.G. 



G. E. Aughinbaugh 

State Printer and Binder 



EDITION WORK 
A SPECIALTY 



Corner Court and Cranberry Sts. HARRISBURG, PA. 

When coming to Hummelstown 

Longenecker's Cafe 

IS AN IDEAL PLACE FOR 

ICE CREAM SODA, CANDY, LUNCH, ETC. 

DON'T FORGET THE NAME 

Longenecker's On the Square 



TFWFT "R Y The Gift of Gifts if 
^ J^ YY J^J^XV X properly purchased 

That's easy if you buy at our store, for our stock is large, 
carefully selected and moderately priced 



J. K. Laudermilch 

844 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 



J 1 


The Leader 




THAT'S ALL 








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PHOTOPLAYS 



POCKET-BILLIARDS 



CONFECTIONS— ICE CREAM 



EAST MAIN STREET 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



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BaseBall 
Goods 



A. J. REACH COMPANY 
Philadelphia 



These Goods Make 

Famous Players 

We make baseball goods to suit the game — we 
make it our business to know what the players 
want. Our experience in making these goods for 
over 35 years has enabled us to produce practical 
articles suited for every branch of the great Nation- 
al Game. 

Quality and Usefulness 

is where we excell — you can become a famous 
player by using the best, and the best bears the 
Reach Trade-Mark. The reputation of our pro- 
duct has been made and sustained by its high qual- 
ity — our goods are guaranteed to give you service. 
We originate, where others copy. 



REACH GOODS ARE THE STANDARD 

If We are in Need of 

College Texts, new and second hand; College Pennants, 
Seals, Fobs and Jewelry, Stationery of all kinds. School 
Supplies, Novelties, Post Cards and Magazines, En- 
graved Invitations and Name Cards 

Parker Fountain Pens Kodaks 

Circulating Library 

We go to 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

HARNISH ^ SMITH, Proprietors 
"THERE'S A REASON" 



Harry Zimmerman, D. D. 5. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

72 West Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 



lyl, H. SHAUD, Jewelry and Confectionery 

Nice line of solid gold and gold filled Watches and Jewelry at bottom prices. Securing' fresh goods every week. 

A large stock of candies. LOWNEY and FOSS Chocolates always on hand. Also Ice Cream 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE. PA. 



FARMERS BANK 

OF HUMMELSTOWN. PA. 
Accounts of Individuals and Firms Solicited Center Square, HUMMELSTOWN, PA. 

M. F. BATDORF & SON, Dealers in 

Ladies' and Gents' Furnishings. Agents for The Crosset Shoes 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

J. J. KELLER 

Full line of Groceries, Bread and Cakes 
Quality of Goods Guaranteed West Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



S„ SHORE, West Emid Store 

DEALER. IN 

GROCERIES, MEN'S FURNISHINGS, Etc. 

Annville, Pa. 



NOWADAYS ITS 

Russ Brothers' Velvet Ice Cream 

Delicious, wholesome and pure ; made with pure pasteurized cream ; frozen by 

the new method which assures absolute cleanliness and freedom from 

contamination. None nicer, none purer, richer or tastier. 

You have tried the rest, now eat the BEST 



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Double the Joys of VACATION as Well as COLLEGE LIFE With a 

KODAK 



You Press the Button We do the Rest 

TARNISH & SMIT 



H 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



H 



Miller Organ & Piano Co. 



ESTABLISHED 1873 

Pianos .*. Organs /. Victor-Victrolas 

Every Piano a Bargain 
Every Day a Bargain Day 

You can get a reliable piano any day in the year from us for $200, $250, 
$275, $300, $350, $375, $400, $425, $450, and so on, up to $1000. 

THE APOLLO PLAYER PIANO 

The only perfect player. Ask us for a demonstration. Terms to suit each 
individual. 

MILLER ORGAN & PIANO CO. 



738 Cumberland St 



LEBANON, PA. 



Factory : 8th and Maple Streets 



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The 



Big Department Store 



The most complete Department Store in Central 
Pennsylvania. Every article guaranteed. The 
Store in which you can buy anything from a 
needle to an automobile Come and see. 

HERSHEY STORE COMPANY 

HERSHEY, PA. 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies' and Gent's Furnishings 




CCFypiGr-T A PZiELC 

STERLING HATS 



AGENTS FOR 

Vassar Shoes for 

Women 

Packard Shoes for 
Men 

Arrow Shirts 
and Collars 

i Peerless Hosiery 

and Underwear 




RICKETT GLOVES 



KINPORT3 DEPARTMENT STORE 



STUDENTS' DISCOUNT 



ONE UNSWERVING POLICY OF 

Discriminating Service and Fair Dealing 

for Twenty-two Years 

That's Our Record in Placing 
Good Teachers in Good Schools 

We have placed Lebanon Valley graduates in past years. If you are a 
member of the class of 1913 and plan to teach next year, it's worth investigating. 
Send for Bulletin. 

Albany Teachers' Agency, inc. 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
Harlan P. French, President Vincent B. Fisk, Secretary and Manager 



ANDREW KRKIDER C. V. HENRY GEO. W. STINE 

President V. President Cashier 



Annville National Bank 



CAPITAL - - - $100,000 
Surplus and Undivided Profits $105,000 



3 per cent interest paid on special deposits 



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WASHINGTON HOUSE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



A. H. BIEVER, Proprietor 



COLLEGE NEWS 

A weekly summary ol events at 
College and doings of the Alumni 

SUBSCRIBE NOW 

PEOPLES DEPOSIT B^ 

3 per cent, interest paid on Savings Deposits 

CHRISTMAS SAVINGS CLUB A SPECIALTY 

Student Account John M. Early, President 

Appreciated J. Frank Smith, Cashier 



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New gar d & Bachman 

Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Hay, Straw, Salt, 

Cement, Fertilizer and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

JOS. MILLER 

Dealer in 

FURNITURE 

UNDERTAKING and EMBALMING West Main Street 

a Specialty ANNVILLE, PA. 

Caruso and the Hardman Piano 

"With best wishes for the success of 
my favorite Piano — The Hardman" 

— Enrico Caruso 

Kirk Johnson & Co. 

SEVEN STORES 116 N. 9th Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

GEORGE K. GANTZ 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

Notions and Queensware 

Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 



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JOSEPH a FISCHER 

Historical and 

Theatrical Costumer 



Costumes of all descriptions to hire for all 
plays, Shakespearean and otherwise, for 
schools, colleges and amateur organizations 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



255 South Ninth St. Philadelphia, Pa. 



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243 



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A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World 
of Official Athletic Supplies 

All athletic equipment bearing the SPALDING trade mark carries 
with it a guarantee that such article will give satisfaction and a reas- 
onable amount of service when used for the purpose for which it is, 
intended and under ordinary conditions fair treatment. 

BASEBALL, GOLF, FOOTBALL, 

TENNIS, CRICKET, BASKETBALL 

Catalogue Mailed on Request 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

126-128 Nassau St. NEW YORK 520 Fifth Ave. 

845 Broad St., Newark, N. J. 



Imperial Steam Laundry 

DODGE & ROMIG, Proprietors 
Seventh and Lehman Sts. LEBANON, PA. 



Rodes and Reddick 



REPRESENTATIVES AT 



Lebanon Valley College 



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Makers of Photographs of Quality 



Mmin^ B^tuita 



839 Cumberland Street Lebanon, Pa. 

C B. GOLLAM 

Restaurant and Confectionery 

ICE CREAM A SPECIALTY 

NONE PURER IN TOWN. TRY IT. 



Remember Our Advertisers 



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24S 



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The Largest Enqraviag Establishment 

in ihe United States specialijinq in * 

C^UALITY ENGRAVINGS ^/'COLLEGE ANNUALS 

BUREAU'OF-ENGRAVING'INC. 

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 
MINNEAPOLIS 

OMAHA ' DES MOINES MILWAUKEE 



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Index to Advertisements 



Albany Teachers' Agency 242 

Annville National Bank 242 

Aughinbaugh, C. E 236 

Bashore.J.S 232 

Batdorf, M. F. & Son 239 

Blazier's Studio 247 

Borland, C. W 232 

Bowman's Newly Remodeled Bakery 234 

Bureau of Engraving, Inc 248 

"-ottrel & Leonard 232 

College News 243 

Doutrich's Clothing 235 

Dutweiler 235 

Elliott, W. D 232 

Farmers' Bank of Hummelstown 239 

Fink, CM 233 

Fischer, Joseph C 245 

Frantz's Furniture Bazaar 334 

Gantz, George K 244 

Gollam, C. B 247 

Graybill's Boarding House 233 

Greek American 231 

Hershey Store Company 241 

Imperial Steam Laundry 246 

Keller, J. J 239 

Kinports Department Store 241 

Kirk Johnson & Co 244 

Laudermilch, J. K 236 

Lebanon Valley College 230 



Lemberger & Co., Druggists 236 

Light, Harry 233 

Longenecker's Cafe 236 

Miller, Jos 244 

Miller Organ & Piano Co 240 

Miller, H. W 235 

Newgard & Bachman 244 

Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co 231 

Our Favorite Meat Market 231 

Palace Meat Market 232 

Peoples Deposit Bank 243 

Reach Company, A. J 238 

Russ Brothers 239 

Saylor, D. L. & Sons 233 

Sargent, Jacob 235 

Seltzer, Harvey L 232 



Shope, J. S. . . 
Shaild, M. H. 
Shiffer, D. B. 



239 

239 

234 

Smith & Bowman 232 

Spalding & Bros., A. G 246 

The Bolton 231 

The Leader 237 

The College Book Store 240 

The College Book Store 238 

Washington House 243 

Waltz, Wm 232 

Whiskeyman, D. A 234 

Zimmerman, Harrv 239 



Printed by The Hershey Printing Co., Hershey, Pa