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The Senior Class Number 


Winston-Salem City High School 
MAY, 1916 






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NC 
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Page 
Black and Gold Staff Frontispiece 

Dedication 5 

Class Roll 6 

Class Poem, High School Memories, Luella Cochran 22 

Class History, Nell Horton 25 

To Victory, Madge Sills 28 

Sunset Land (Verse), Louella Cochran 30 

How a Fellow Feels, Banks Newman 31 

Class Prophecy, Bessie Ambler 32 

Sale of Senior Belongings, Clement Hanes 38 

Class Characteristics, Norwood Wilson, Helen Fletcher 40-41 

Senior Bequests 42 

The Yellow Streak, Gordon Ambler 43 

Editorials 47 

Senior Personals, Madge Sills 49 

With the Fun-Makers, Ellen Shepherd, Frances \ 

Medearis, Banks Newman, Luther Lashmit, : 52 

Carl Long . . * ) 

Subjects of Senior Essays 60 

Football Team 61 

Athletics, Jacquelin Taylor 62 

Baseball Team 63 

Exchanges- _ : 64 

Basketball Team 65 









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Published Jour times duiing each School Year by the S.udents 
of the Winston- Salem City High School 



Entered at the Post Office at Winston-Salem, N. C, as 
Second Class Mail Matter 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Bessie Ambler, '16 Editor-in-Chief 

Luther Lashmit, '16 Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Luella Cochran, '16 Tom Cushing, '18 

Madge Sills, '16 Eleanor Schofield, '18 

Banks Newman, '16 Walker Cantrell, '17 

Eleanor Smith, '17 Burke Fox, '17 

Frances Jewett, '17 Alan Wright, '17 

BUSINESS MANAGERS 
Joseph Cook, '16 Edwin Nash, '16 Carl Long, '16 

Vol. VI May, 1916 No. 4 



DEDICATION 

we lovingly dedicate this, the last number 

of our magazine, to the head of our 

english department 

MISS MARY WILEY 

who has directed our literary efforts 

and aspirations with so much 

patience and ability 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 



GUaaa of *lfi 




BESSIE AMBLER 

"Bess" 

"The uncertain glory of an 
April day." 

Class Prophetess; Editor-in- 
Chief of Black and Gold; 
Corrector of Charles D. Mc- 
Iver Literary Society, 1st 
term; Member of Rooters' 
Club. 



THELMA ADAMS 



"Hi 



"To knoiv her was to love 
her." 



Member of Rooters' Club; 
Member of Program Com- 
mittee of Charles D. Mclver 
Literary Society; Member of 
Athletic Aesociation. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 




LUELLA COCHRAN 



"Sister" 



"Words from her pen nat- 
urally flozu." 

Class Poet; Press Reporter of 
Charles D. Mclver Literary 
Society; Member of Rooters' 
Club. Associate Editor Black 
and Gold. 



RUTH CRAVER 

"Ruthum" 

"Great thoughts, great feel- 
ings came to her, 
Like instincts, unawares." 

Member of Athletic Associa- 
tion. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 




RUBY DAVIS 

"Oobi" 

"Be to her virtues very kind, 
Be to her faults a little blind.' 

Member of Rooters' Club. 



I 



m -" 



HELEN FLETCHER 



'Fletch' 



'She looks as clear as morn- 
ing roses newly quashed 
<with de<w." 



Class Statistician; Chairman 
of Program Committee of 
Charles D. Mclver Literary 
Society; Member of Orches- 
tra; Member of Rooters' Club. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 




LENA HANES 

"Rags" 

"Unthinking, idle, wild, and 

young, 
I laughed, and danced, and 

talk'd and sung." 

Member of Rooters' Club. 



NELL HORTON 



'Saint' 



"Looks freshest in the fashions 
of the day." 

Class Historian; Secretary, of 
Charles D. Mclver Literary 
Society, 1st and 2nd terms; 
Leader of Rooters' Club; 
Member of Athletic Associa- 
tion. 




10 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 




NANNA JOHNSON 

"Coon" 

"And like music on the waters 
Is thy sweet voice to me." 

Member of Program Com- 
mittee of Charles D. Mclver 
Literary Society, 1st and 2nd 
terms; Member of Rooters' 
Club; Member of Athletic 
Association. 



ALMA LACKEY 

"Ma" 

"To business that we love we 
rise betimes and go to it 
with delight." 

Member of Rooters' Club. 




55% fR 



\ 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 



1 1 



MAUDE LONG 



"Midget" 

"There was a soft and pen- 
sive grace, 

A cast of thought upon her 
face." 




Secretary of Class; Member 
of Student Council ; Member 
of Rooters' Club; Compiler 
of Quotations for Senior Black 
and Gold. 



FRANCES MEDEARIS 



"Dink" 



'Sweet promptings unto kind- 
est deeds were in her very 
looks." 



Vice-President of Class; Cor- 
rector of Charles D. Mclver 
Literary Society; Member of 
Rooters' Club; "Fun-Maker" 
for Senior Black and Gold. 




12 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 




NOLIE PARRISH 

"Noch" 

"Those about her 
From her, shall read perfect 
ivarp of honor." 

Member of Roolers' Club. 



MARY POLLARD 



"Mi 



"Happy am I, from care I'm 

free, 
Why aren't they all contented 

like me?" 



Member of Rooters' Club; 
Member of Athletic Associa- 
tion; Member of Arrange- 
ment Committee of Charles D. 
Mclver Literary Society. 







THE BLACK AND GOLD 



13 




ELLEN SHEPHERD 



"Shep" 



Talking she knetu not ivhy 
and cared not what." 



"Fun-Maker" for Senior Black 
and Gold; President Charles 
D. Mclver Literary Society, 
1st and 2nd terms; Pianist of 
High School Orchestra ; 
Leader of Rooters' Club; 
Member of Athletic Associa- 
tion, 



OLA SHORE 

"Odie" 

"Contented ivi' little and can- 
tie nvi' mair." 

Member of Rooters' Club. 




i.J 



H 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 




MADGE SILLS 

"Madgetee" "Lady" 

"She is wise, if I can judge 
her." 

Associate Editor of Black and 
Gold; Critic of Charles D. 
Mclver Literary Society, 1st 
and 2nd terms; Member of 
Program Committee Charles 
D. Mclver Literary Society, 
1st and 2nd terms; Class 
Dreamer; Member of Rooters' 
Club. 



LURLINE WILLIS 

"Leanie" 

"LaugJi and be fat" 

Member of Athletic Associa 
tion. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 



i5 




MATTIE WILSON 



"Mutt" 



The sweetest thing that ever 
grew beside a human 
door." 



Member of Student Council; 
Member of Rooters' Club; 
Compiler of Quotations for 
Senior Black and Gold. 



ROSALIE WILSON 



'Rollie" 



"A daughter of the gods, 

divinely tall, 
And most divinely fair." 

Member of Rooters' Club; 
Member of Arrangement 
Committee of Charles D. Mc- 
Iver Literary Society. 




i6 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 




BLANCHE ZIGLAR 

"Little Un" 

"Her voice tuas ever soft, 
Gentle and low, an excellent 
thing in woman." 

Member of Students' Council ; 
Member of Athletic Associa- 
tion. 



: w„: :'-,;« ' 



GORDON B. AMBLER . 

"Senator" 

"The very pink of courtesy." 

Vice-President and Chairman 
Executive Committee of Cal- 
vin H. Wiley Literary Society, 
Section B; Member of High 
School Debating Team; Class 
Story-Teller. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 



17 




JOSEPH L. COOK 
"J oe " 

"A scholar, and a ripe and 

good one, 
Exceeding iui.se; fair-spoken 

and persuading." 

President of Calvin H. Wiley 
Literary Society, Section B ; 
Business Manager of Black 
and Gold; Member High 
School Debating Team ; Mem- 
ber Juvenile Club, Athletic 
Association; Compiler of Quo- 
tations for Senior Black and 
Gold. 



J. CLEMENT HANES 

"Jingle" 

"Thou art as long and lank 
and lean as are the rock- 
ribbed sands." 

Treasurer of Class; Manager 
Baseball Team; Member 
Executive Committee Calvin 
H. Wiley Literary Society, 
Section B; Class Auctioneer; 
Member Rooters' Club, Juve- 
nile Club, Student Council. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 




LUTHER S. LASHMIT 

"Doub" 

"I never knew so young a 
body with so old a head." 

Vice-President and Chairman 
Executive Committee of Cal- 
vin H. Wiley Literary So- 
ciety, Section A; Assistant 
Editor-in-Chief of Black and 
Gold; President of Juvenile 
Club; Member High School 
Debating Team; Member 
Student Council, Orchestra, 
Athletic Association ; "Fun- 
Maker" for Senior Black and 
Gold. 



CARL H. LONG 



"Bobbie' 



"And when a lady's in the 

case 
You know all other things 

give place." 

Secretary and Treasurer of 
Athletic Association; Assist- 
ant Business Manager of 
Black and Gold; Member of 
Executive Committee Calvin 
H. Wiley Literary Society, 
Section A; Member of Foot- 
ball Team, Juvenile Club, 
Rooters' Club; "Fun-Maker" 
for Senior Black and Gold. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 



iQ 



r* 




EDWIN A. NASH 

"Nash" 

"I am not in the roll of com- 
mon men." 

Assistant Business Manager 
Black and Gold; Member 
Basketball and Baseball 
Teams; Secretary Juvenile 
Club. 



■■^uMMm.... 



H. BANKS NEWMAN 

"He hath a lean and hungry 

look ; 
He thinks too much; such 

men are dangerous." 

Member of High School De- 
bating Team, and Typewrit- 
ing Team; Winner of Rem- 
ington Typewriting Medal 
and Kimball's Magazine 
Typewriting Medal; "Fun- 
Maker" for Senior Black and 
Gold. 




20 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 




TYCHO N. NISSEN 



"He's winding up the watch 
of /lis wit; by and by it 
will strike." 



Member Athletic Association. 



■":; -a 



HARREL SPEER 

"O, it is excellent to have a 
giants strength." 

President of Calvin H. Wiley 
Literary Society, Section A; 
Captain of Football Team '14, 
'15, '16; Captain of Baseball 
Team '13, '14, '15, '16; Cap- 
'ain of Basketball Team '15, 
'16. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 



21 



Jjjffi> 




JACQUELIN P. TAYLOR 
"Jick" 

"Shall I not take mine ease 
in mine oivn time?" 

President Athletic Associa- 
tion; Marshal Calvin H. 
Wiley Literary Society, Sec- 
tion B; Manager Football 
Team; Member Juvenile 
Club. 



NORWOOD W. WILSON 



'Pedro" 



'He was a man; take him all 
in all." 



President of Class; Chairman 
Student Council; Press Re- 
porter Calvin H. Wiley Lit- 
erary Society, Section A; 
Class Statistician; Member 
Football Team, Juvenile Club. 




22 THE BLACK AND GOLD 

If tglt ^rijool iHnttortPB 

QUasa ifoem 

i 

"I'm going now, Joe. Good-bye," I call, 
"You'll sweep up my foot tracks no more." 
And good old Joe gives his kindly smile 
As I step a last time through the door. 
But I pause as I cross the portal now, 
Of our old eleventh grade room; 
The happy faces all are gone, 
But mem'ries before me loom. 



I like the memory of the mornings best; 

Mr. Moore at his desk, you know, 

As he reads God's Word and offers prayer, 

Then a choice little verse or so. 

It is as they are at the start of the day 

With yesterday's trials behind, 

And the sun shining down on a clean new morn 

With its joys and struggles to find ; 



That I see their strength and their weakness too, 

To fight life's battle of strife; 

For the happy old high school days are gone, 

We must start the race of life. 

And it's not as we think in our golden youth — 

Just a brilliant dash to the goal, — 

It's a long, hard track with roughs and steeps ; 

But the prize brings joy to the soul. 

4 
There's a different prize for every man, — 
Miss Miller has taught us that. 
In the names that glow upon history's page 
From the humblest to monarchs who sat 
Upon their thrones in resplendent array; 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 23 



They all have striven to clasp 

At the end of the race the true reward; 

But oft 'twas beyond their grasp. 

5 
For the boon of the soul is the finer things 
That are neither bought nor sold. 
With a single aim we must strive for them 
As Eneas in the tale of old. 

With the patient aid of Miss Wood we've gained 
The worth of the story he told, 
And a victory of mental and moral force 
That to strive at hard tasks will mould. 

6 

But the small tasks of life will confront us, too, 

And these are the ones that count. 

There's many a man, his eyes on a star, 

Neglects problems of small amount; 

And thus he never reaches his goal, 

For each is a stepping stone. 

So Miss Hunter carefully taught the girls 

The art of making a home. 

7 

The commercial students have prepared 

To conduct the business phase 

Of the work of the world. For each, there's a part 

In the masterful scheme, and ways 

To utilize all the brawn and brain 

By each of us possessed. 

So Miss Dodson and Miss James have tried 

To help them do their best. 



For the best is required; the strong will rule 

In the struggles we each must meet; 

And our minds must be trained to keep pace with the years 

To make our worth replete. 

And, ah, as again remembrance brings 

The good old days to mind, 



24- 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 



How far toward this end did Miss Mary strive 
Though we thought it a daily grind. 



I remember all the original ways 

She thought up to relieve the strain, 

And the double worth in work and thought 

From her period we would gain. 

All our teachers did their best to make us strong, 

And worthy may we be; 

For in each of our hearts for them shall live 

A thankful and dear memory. 

10 
But my High School days are over now, 
And I softly close the door; 
Should I breathe a prayer as I leave this spot 
It would be, that forevermore 
Throughout our lives in work or play, 
Our standard would always be 
That, "only the best is good enough", 
In this land of the brave and free. 



Luella Cochran. 



A A A 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 



25 



(EiasB Ijtstnrg 




NE bright September morning, eleven long years ago, 
there was excitement in many homes in Winston- 
Salem, for a host of little boys and girls with "shin- 
ing morning faces" were to enter school for their 
first time. From all sections of the city these little 
scholars came, and when the school records were made out that 
afternoon, it was found that they had filled to overflowing the 
first grades of the West End, the North, and East Schools. This 
was the Class of 1916, and as we look back on those first days 
that we spent in school we cannot help but smile. 

But even then no one doubted that our class would be a 
success. The very click of our little heels as we marched through 
the halls with heads high and chests raised seemed to express 
determination. 

Soon each small hand tightly clasped its first real school 
book, and a look of proud ownership covered each beaming face. 

Then came the good times at recess. Such feats as jump-the- 
rppe, stealing-sticks, hop-scotch, and crack-the-whip were a part 
of our daily schedule. It was usually with a feeling of regret that 
we heard "rise, one, two, three", which meant "you may go now," 
and we looked forward with eagerness to the day when we, too, 
should have second recesses. 

How quickly the time passed ! Before we could hardly 
realize it, our little Third Reader had been left far behind, and 
we were joyjully entering Grammar School. 

Here, for the first year or so, our feet wandered only through 
"paths of pleasure", but soon the novelty began to wear off, and 
then we noticed that our way was rough and difficult. At the 
sight of long division and geography and history our spirits sank, 
and our steps grew slow and uneven. Yet in spite of all our 
failures, we pushed steadily onward, and soon we found our- 
selves ready to enter High School, 



26 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



Think of it ! For years we had studied with this one ideal 
in our minds, "to enter High School," and now that we really 
were to become students there, our joy was complete. Up to this 
time we had been considered children ; just pupils; now we thought 
ourselves pupils no longer but students. Imagine our surprise, 
then, when we found our teachers did not agree with us; worse 
still, they plainly told us that "we had not yet put away childish 
things." 

During our first and second years, it is true that we some- 
times had to work pretty hard ; but these thoughts of hard work 
are immediately swept out of our minds by the recollection of 
the many happy times we spent at class picnics, straw-rides, and 
parties. How we eighth and ninth grades did enjoy them! 

Our Junior year was not all happiness, however, for we were 
forced to buckle down and work as we had never worked before. 
Sometimes it seemed to us that we would never be able to master 
the perplexing problems of plane goemetry, but most of us man- 
aged in some way to reach the seventy-fifth notch, and then, again, 
joy reigned. 

The first thing that we, as Seniors, did was to assume a 
very dignified air, and proceed to frown upon all misconduct by 
the lower classmen. Then, when we had become perfected in 
the art, more serious things were earnestly undertaken. 

The event that stands out most prominently in our minds is 
the adoption of Student Government. We are the second class 
in the history of our school to have attempted this form of gov- 
ernment, and we feel very proud of the fact. 

In the Commercial Department the members of our class 
who have taken this course have all done unusually well, and 
some of our number have won fame by their rapid typewriting. 
These are Gordon Ambler, Banks Newman, Alma Lackey and 
Lurline Wills. We who are not so proficient wish to congratulate 
them on their success. 

But our ability has not only been recognized in our school 
but the outside world has heard of some of us. Luella Cochran 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 



27 



has had several of her poems printed in a number of newspapers 
both in North and South Carolina, and Gordon Ambler's articles 
have won for him much praise, as well as financial reward. 

To athletics our class has contributed a number of good men 
this year, having four representatives on the football squad, two 
on the basketball team, and three on the baseball team. Although 
we did not again win the State Championship in basketball, our 
team made an enviable record, losing only one game, and that by 
a single point. 

But we must not fail to mention the many social affairs that 
we have enjoyed so much since the first of the year. A number 
of athletic and debating teams have been entertained from time to 
time, and all of our entertainments have been voted a great suc- 
cess. 

And now as we are about to pass out from our High School 
forever, the feeling comes to us that only by continually striving 
to live up to the ideals that have been set before us can we repay 
our school for the many happy and inspiring days we have been 
permitted to spend here. 

May we not fail to meet this obligation! 

Nell Horton. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 



®o lirtnrg 




T was the night before Commencement. My mind 
was filled with joyful anticipation of the morrow 
and yet mingled with the joy was sadness, for the 
ties of years were to be severed ; our class, bound by 
common interests, was to be broken ; our loyal band 
was to send its boys and girls out into the world, into the world 
as individuals with individuals' work to do. 

Would the coming years fulfil the bright promises of the 
present? As if in answer to my question, Inspiration softly 
touched me. 

"I should like", she said, "for you to go to the Land of 
Ideals. Imagination shall be your guide and Hope and Joy 
your companions by the way." 

And so saying, she called Imagination, and quicker than 
thought spread before me the fair Land of Ideals. 

In the heart of the Land was the Fountain of Purity, its 
waters flowing deep under ground, making all about it sweet and 
fresh ; and hard by the Fountain stood the Temple of Endeavor 
with its altar of Faith, its walls lined with Courage, Fidelity and 
Perseverance kept the Temple of Endeavor and they seemed to 
diffuse an atmosphere of their own about the place. 

"Yes," whispered Inspiration, anticipating my thought, "only 
those who take Fidelity and Perseverance as their companions 
really succeed in the Land of Ideals. Tell this to your class- 
mates and friends as you meet with them on the morrow. And 
tell them also," she added as stern-faced Duty greeted us, "that 
only he who makes friends with Duty earns a place in the House 
of Success." 

Just then Duty beckoned to us to follow her. But Imagina- 
tion had other sights for us to view before she left us. Into a 
quiet, sequestered vale she led us where Modesty, fearing lest 
loud-sounding Praise make her known to the world, was in hid- 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 29 



ing; then on through a by-path she brought us into a barren, 
wasted land, strewn with fragments of building materials, broken 
and defaced. 

"The Plain of Failure," said Imagination. "'Tis here in 
this suburb of Ideals, that many, losing sight of lofty aims, waver 
in their purpose, and so, swerving from the path Ambition would 
have them follow, waste their lives in fruitless endeavor. On 
every side you see signs of greatness, but alas, greatness accom- 
plishing nothing; for without steady Purpose, Determination and 
Stick-to-it-ness no one can accomplish Life's tasks." 

"And just over the way lies Success," I murmured, for 
through the wavering tree tops I could detect the shining turrets 
of the House of Success. 

"Just over the way," repeated Imagination, "but separated 
by a deep ravine" — and so saying she brought me through a rugged 
path into — not a clear, beautiful country as I had always thought 
Success to be in — but into a hard, forbidding land. 

"Can this be the end of our quest?" I cried. "Is this the 
House of Success?" And I pointed to the unadorned, rather 
insignificant structure standing before me. 

"Yes," answered Imagination, "but see, the House of Suc- 
cess is built on the foundation stones of Hard-work, put together 
with Thoroughness and Determination ; and see, though the out- 
look is poor, how bright is the uplook — " and she pointed to the 
dazzling radiance above the turret-tops. 

Just then the portal of the house flew open and Patience, 
with her ponderous keys, stood ready to unlock for us the shining 
treasures within. But Experience, grave with the weight of 
years, gently thrust her aside. "Not yet," she said, "not yet — may 
a representative of the Class of 1916 enter the House of Success. 
Go back to your classmates," she turned to me, "and say to them 
that some of them will go into the world as lawyers, doctors, busy 
workers ; others will remain in the quiet circle of the home, but no 
matter what their work, no matter what their sphere of influence, 



30 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



lessons of purity, truth, perseverance, determination, unswerving 
obedience to duty must be heeded if they would crown their labors 
with success." 

The vision faded. But clear in my mind remains the lesson 
it brought, and gladly did I share it with my classmates. 

Madge Sills. 



Did you ever hear of a wonderful land 

Just beyond the sunset glow, 
Full of birds that warble throughout the year 

And flowers wherever you go? 
The land is there if we only could reach 

The signboard that points the way, 
And the path that leads to the open gate 

Is for only the joyous and gay. 

'Long the path grows the dew-sprinkled violet and rose, 

It's but wide enough for two; 
And the luscious berries that sparkle near by 

Would be food for me and you. 
There is music there and the melodies 

Are tuned to the Maker's ear 
By the bubbling brook as it gurgles along 

And the breeze singing far and near. 

And through the gate stretches far away 

That beautiful sunset land. 
There'll be merry, laughing children there, 

And lovers strolling hand in hand. 
So please go with me to the little path 

Near hidden in its winding way, 
And together let's find the gate and the joy 

Of our Sunset Land, today. 

Luella Cochran. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 31 



HEX I entered High School, my highest ideal was 
to graduate as soon as I possibly could. In the 
ninth grade I envied the graduate more than ever 
before. In the tenth I laid my plans as to how I 
was going to act when I graduated, whom I was 
going to send invitations to, what my graduating essay was going 
to be on, how many medals and honors I was going to carry off; 
and above all how proud I was going to make my parents when 
they heard me delivering my declamation which was to win the 
silver loving-cup. All this rushed to my head when I was a 
Junior. Ah ! how mistaken I was ! 

Vacation came. I worked at the store and prayed for the 
time to fly faster that I might become a Senior and graduate — above 
all, graduate. It seemed that time just would not hurry; it in- 
sisted on lagging and making me wish all the harder. 

At last, with a cry of delight, I tore the August sheet orf 
the calendar and welcomed September 1st, the day I was to be- 
come a Senior — but now all my desires to graduate were gone. 
None of the happy thoughts which had greeted me when I thought 
of the wonder of being a Senior and graduating occurred to me. 
A feeling of despair came over me, something like sorrow, some- 
thing like — oh ! I don't know how I felt, but if you have ever 
been to see a sick friend who you know cannot live very long and 
that that is the last time you will see him, you know something 
of my sensations as I came back to the dear old High School for 
the last year. For weeks this was the uppermost thought in my 
mind ; medals, honors, scholarships, everything that I had planned 
was forgotten. A feeling of depression had taken possession of me. 

But at last I began to brighten up ; there was college to plan 
for, the chance of another four years with my books. 

And so the days have passed ; the time draws near when the 
end shall crown my labors. As I have not yet graduated I can- 
not tell how I shall feel on that important occasion, but one thing 
I am sure of ; the memories of graduation day will live in my heart 
forever. H. Banks Newman. 



32 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



GHasa flmpljprg 




IT was in the Fall of the year 1940. I was traveling 
through the county selling books, — yes, I was just 
a book-agent, if you please, — when, by strange cir- 
cumstances, I was drawn back to Winston-Salem, 
the scene of my girlhood, the happiest part of my 
life. How strange I felt as the old, and yet wonderfully new, 
town loomed up before me ! What conflicting emotions surged 
over me as I reached for my grip, adjusted my prim little bonnet, 
and hurried forth from the over-heated car! 

A waiting electric 'bus took me, not to one of the great sky- 
scraper-hotels for which the new Winston-Salem was famous, 
but to a modest little hostelry that suited better my slim purse. 

I had hardly gotten settled in my comfortable little quarters 
when a timid knock interrupted me. Giving a last friendly pat 
to my bonnet before putting it away, I cried, "Come in." 

In answer, the door was pushed slightly ajar and a little old 
lady, fat as a butter-ball, walked, or rather waddled, in. 

"Excuse me," she said, "but I am the housekeeper of this 
place and I just wanted to make sure you were comfortable. 
Why — " suddenly she started — "aren't you one of the W.-S. H. 
S.'s Class of '16? — Bessie Ambler that was?" 

"Bessie Ambler that was and always will be," I answeredva 
trifle shortly, for the one affair of my girlhood had been rudely 
broken. 

"Well, well!" she cried, eagerly seizing me by the hand, "to 
think of Bessie Ambler turning out to be such a sedate, proper 
little old maid!" She laughed till the tears rained down her 
cheeks. "Now, my dear, you must just let me sit down and have 
a good, old-timy gossip with you." 

As the one chair in the room was filled with my dusty travel- 
ing garments I perforce had to let her sit on the edge of the bed, 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 33 



though the springs fairly swagged as she seated her ample frame 
by my side. 

"Now, you don't know who I am, do you?" she began fairly 
breathless. "I'll give you three guesses, for I've changed my 
name three times since I saw you last." 

In vain I conjured my brain for some hint as to who she 
could be. "I give it up," I said at last. 

"Do you remember a tall, slender, quiet (?) girl who sat 
just across the aisle from you in the eleventh grade?" 

"Can you be Helen Fletcher?" I cried, for a demure little 
wink suddenly brought back the Helen I knew. 

"Helen Fletcher that was," she repeated my words, "Helen 
Fletcher that is and always will be, for, after making three ven- 
tures into matrimony, I have decided that single felicity is most 
desirable after all and have taken back my maiden name." 

"Indeed," I murmured. 

"Yes," she replied, "and there's another of our classmates 
who is about to do the same, — Ola Shore, do you remember 
her?" 

"Why, surely Ola Shore is not div — " I caught myself just 
in time. "Ola was a commercial student, I remember, and so 
quiet — ■" 

"It's the quiet kind that always give you the surprise. Ola 
got a position in New York as a stenographer, became so carried 
away with city life that she married the manager of a vaude- 
ville show, and, notwithstanding her husband's protests, took train- 
ing as a ballet dancer." 

"Will wonders never cease?" I cried. "Do you know any- 
thing about the other Seniors of 1916?" 

"Yes, indeed," she answered. "Madam de Lacke (Alma 
Lackey) is quite a noted chiropodist and Blanche Ziglar is making 
a name as the leader of the Woman's Rights Movement in our 
city. Ruth Craver sings at one of our new 'movies' and will 
really be a 'Prima Donna' soon at the rate she is going. And 
Norwood Wilson, our class president and member of our student 



34 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



council, gained such valuable experience in managing us that he 
has organized a company for the purpose of promulgating the doc- 
trine of student government in all high schools, and employs all 
of Harrel Speers' time distributing literature on the subject." 
Here Helen paused for breath. 

"Henry Stanley," she continued, "you remember Henry? 
Well, he is a high official in the New Zealand-Australian Air 
Line Railroad. You see he has gone far from us. Luella Cochran 
long ago decided there was more money in publishing poetry than 
in, writing it, and now carries on a large printing establishment 
with Lurline Willis as her business manager. She was, as you 
remember, a firm believer in young women and their place in the 
world, and, carrying out this doctrine, she has employed Ruby 
Davis as her proof-reader and Mattie Wilson as her advertising 
agent. Oh my," she concluded dismally, "there is somebody call- 
ing. I must go down." She deserted me quicker than she 
came in and I was left to my own thoughts for a while. 
■ ■ ' '■ ' * * * 

The next day I entered upon my usual routine of work, — that 
of going from house to house, trying to interest the "inhabitants 
thereof" in the merits of "Modern Housekeeping." Going 
through a short cut to the residential part of the city, my eye was 
struck by a sign on one of the store windows, "Hair-Dressing 
Free. Welcome All." Being of a curious nature, I sauntered 
into the store. A motto in gilt letters hung right over my head 
which read "Be original at all costs/' 

"Huh, that sounds like Madge Sills 'way back there in the 
old school days," I said aloud. 

A little lady, busily coiling a woman's tresses into fantastic 
loops and rolls, furiously blushed as I read the sign. 

"Did you call me?" she asked. 

"No," I replied. "I was merely reading this motto above 
me. It reminded me of a schoolmate of mine, — Madge Sills." 

"Madge Sills, — why that's my name," she cried, "or at least 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 35 



it used to be." And so it turned out. Here was Madge, our 
"dreamer," — our idealist, wasting her time and talent in a Hair- 
Dressing Establishment. 

She left the lady, upon whom she was inflicting unmerciful 
pulls in her quest for originality, and talked to me for a while. 
"Ellen Shepherd," she told me, "is my partner here. She gives 
lessons to those who wish to reduce their weight. She has her 
office in the next room, but is out at present. But I know she'll 
be sorry she missed you, Bess." 

"Well, I'll come again," I rejoined, and so I took my de- 
parture. 

* * * 

The first house I entered on my round of duties was a large, 
roomy affair full of fresh air. As the day was unusually cold it 
seemed strange that so many windows should be open. I fairly 
shivered as I was shown into the sitting-room and told that 

Mrs. (I did not catch the name) would be down in a 

moment. Soon I heard a gentle swish of silk and, looking up, 
I beheld a tall, rather stout, middle-aged lady with beautiful 
golden hair and a benevolent smile on her placid countenance. 

"Good morning," she remarked hospitably as she stretched 
out a soft white hand which I immediately took possession of. 

With such a good start it was no time until we were deeply 
immersed in the qualities of my book. 

"Well, Miss " she said in conclusion. 

"Ambler," I supplied graciously. 

"Well, I believe I'll take a copy. — Miss Ambler, — Ambler," 
she mused. "What is your first name, may I ask?" 

"Anything from 'Elizabeth' down to 'Bess,' " I replied. 

"My goodness!" — and she fairly jumped out of her seat, — "I 
believe I went to school with you! Before I married," with a 
becoming blush, "I was Rosalie Wilson." 

"Why, of course. I might have known," came from my 
surprised lips, — "golden hair and such a lover of fresh air. Why, 
certainly!" 



36 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



What fun it was to meet another of the old Seniors! With 
what eager expectation did I ask, "What do you know about the 
others?" 

"I guess I know a good deal, for 'Missie,' — (you remember 
Mary Pollard) — lives with me and my husband. You know she 
and I never could be separated and so, when her husband died, 
she came to stay with us and we couldn't get on without 
her. — 'Missie,' I say, is a great newspaper reader and keeps me 
supplied with all the latest. She was just reading last night in 
the new Scientific, which, by the way, Edwin Nash is editor of, 
that Carl Long had invented a wonderful electrical essay-writer 
and that Professor Clement Hanes, of Centerville Female Acad- 
emy, was using it with great success in his work as teacher of 
punctuation in that institution. Jacquelin Taylor, I understand 
from Missie's news-gathering," she continued, "has been last 
heard of in Marmalula, Africa. He got mad at Joseph Cook 
for marrying his girl and went off in a fit of rage to be a mis- 
sionary to the Hottentots. Let me see," she continued, for Rosalie 
always loved to talk, "who else were Seniors? Oh, yes! Nell, 
Frances, and Thelma. Well, Nell is only a first-class old maid 
with a green parrot and all the other paraphernalia! Imagine 
Nell, of all our classmates, turning out so. Thelma is librarian 
at our Carnegie Library now, and she actually looks large perched 
up on the stool at her desk. Think of it! 'Dink' Medearis is a 
social reformer right here in our city. She's a wonder! The 
other 'Frances' in our class, — 'Frit,' you know, — is a Red Cross 
nurse and goes crazy over every good-looking soldier!" 

" 'Twas ever thus," quoth I. As Rosalie paused for breath 
I asked about Lena Hanes. 

"Oh, Lena lives in New York and is getting rich quick from 
her talent as a designer of fashions. She makes an annual trip 
to Paris and receives her inspiration over there." 

"Maude Long," I remarked, "is a schoolmarm, I suppose, in 
some quiet country town." 

"Why, haven't you heard about Maude?" said Rosalie. 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 37 



"Her graduation essay, you remember, was on prison reforms, 
and she became so infatuated in the subject that she adopted as 
her life-work the teaching of tatting to the women inmates of 
our State penitentiary. Imagine quiet, dainty Maude teaching 
in a jail. And Nolie Parrish," she continued, "is stumping the 
country for Lieutenant-Governor against Luther Lashmit. Oh, 
yes," she laughed in answer to my look of surprise, "the women 
are coming to the front in this good old State! Nanna Johnson 
is County Superintendent of Schools and, as I told you before, 
Frances Medearis has an important municipal office." 
"Luther has entered politics, you say?" 

"Yes," Rosalie answered. "If he doesn't get the position of 
Lieutenant-Governor over Nolie, he will enter the race for Mar- 
ket Inspector." 

"And Joseph Cook?" 

"Why, Joseph has gone into the insurance business and rumor 
has it that he is getting rich insuring even the weather. But 
you haven't told me anything about yourself or Gordon." 

"Oh, Gordon divides his times between speechifying and 
scribbling," I replied, ignoring her question as to myself. "He 
keeps his private secretary, Banks Newman, exceedingly busy." 

Just then the doorbell rang and the servant ushered in a portly, 
ministerial looking, bald-headed gentleman. 

"My pastor," murmured Rosalie, and rising to greet him, 
she said pleasantly, "Dr. Nissen, let me introduce you to an old 
acquaintance," and, as the startled look came on the man's face, 
I saw he was no other than Tycho Nissen, — old Tycho we used 
to enjoy teasing. 

What a time we three had talking about old days; and, when 
later Missie joined us, we felt as if the years had rolled back 
and we were again Seniors in dear old W-S H-S ! 

With a sigh, I at last tore myself away from the pleasant 
group and resumed my ardent task of selling books! 

Bessie Ambler. 




38 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



HO bids? One silver vanity box, belonging to Joseph 
Cook. In addition to the regular powder case, this 
box contains a place for a comb and brush. Joe 
says he can safely recommend the mirror as Tycho 
Nissen powdered his smiling countenance by it and 
it stood the strain remarkably well. 

What is that? Why, certainly, Miss Willis, you can carry 
paint in it if you do not desire the comb and brush. Too small, 
you say? 

How much am I offered for it? What? Only six cents, 
Miss Johnson? Ah, thank you, Miss Shepherd, six and a half 
cents! An article of this value going for six and a half! Six-n-a- 
half. Seven! Who bids eight cents? Going, going, gone. Nine 
cents to Carl Long. Come forward and claim your property, 
Carl. 

The next article I have for sale is a three-reel feature film, 
staged in the Domestic Science Department of the City High 
School; and photographed by Jack Taylor, who calls it "Safety 
First". In the first reel we see Miss Nolie Parrish, driven to 
the top of the table by a fat mouse. By the expression on her 
face we see she is yelling. In reel number two the hero, Edwin 
Nash, has heard Miss Parrish's yell and is coming to her assistance 
as fast as possible. He rushes into the room, makes a grab for 
the fat mouse, chases him around the room. Finally, in reel 
three, we see Mr. Nash drawing his sword, plunging it into the 
heart of the cruel mouse ; then with a smile of heavenly bliss 

assisting Miss Parrish from the table, and proudly 

leading her from the room. 

Do I hear a bid for this? What, only one dollar-fifteen for 
a reel of this class? Why, with this reel you could put the Rex 
out of business. One-fifteen, going, going, your last chance; gone 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 39 



to Mr. Luther Lashmit, rival of Mr. Nash's for the fair heroine's 
hand. 

Next, a volume of choice poems with Henry Stanley's name 
on the title page; and recommended by the Governors of Min- 
nesota and Iowa as choice bits of Southern dialect. Who bids? 
It will be a long time before you will get another chance at any 
of Mr. Stanley's poems as the first edition has been given away. 

How much am I offered? Did you say ten cents, , Miss 
Fletcher? Thank you. Folks, these poems are worth twelve 
cents of anybody's money. Come on, start the old ball rolling. 

Who will give me fifteen cents? I am offered eleven cents; 
who will make it twelve? Classmates, this is a shame, poems by 
one of your number and you not willing to buy them. Going, 
going, gone, thank you, Miss Adams, eleven cents is better than 
nothing. 

Behold this wonderful invention, people. This article is a 
microscope, so strong that you can actually see the ham in the 
sandwiches sold by the Domestic Science Department of the High 
School. This wonderful instrument was invented by Miss Maude 
Long, and used by Miss Nell Horton, to see that no ham large 
enough to make a sandwich is left in the refrigerator. This often 
happened before the discovery of this powerful glass. Misses 
Bessie Ambler, Rosalie Wilson, Madge Sills, who have charge 
of the noble work, have told me to announce that, as complaints 
about the scarcity of ham in the sandwiches have become so 
numerous, beginning Monday morning, a microscope will be given 
with each sandwich, so that the ham may be plainly visible. Those 
wishing an instrument may obtain one there. 

This next little volume, a treatise on the Art of Misspelling, 
by our classmates Tycho Nissen and Norwood Wilson, is the last 
thing I have for sale. How much am I offered? Fifteen cents. 
Thank you, Miss Sills. I am sure you will find the book an in- 
valuable addition to your library. 

Clement Hanes. 



CLASS CHAIJ 



NAME 



LUTHER LASHMIT 

NORWOOD WILSON.... 

JOSEPH COOK 

GORDON AMBLER 

BANKS NEWMAN 

CLEMENT HANES 

EDWIN NASH 

JACQUELIN TAYLOR... 

TYCHO NISSEN 

CARL LONG 

HENRY STANLEY 

THELMA ADAMS 

BESSIE AMBLER 

LUELLA COCHRAN 

RUTH CRAVER 

HELEN FLETCHER 

LENA HANES 

FRANCES HITCHCOCK 

NELL HORTON 

RUBY DAVIS 

MAUDE LONG 

NANNA JOHNSON 

MARY POLLARD 

MADGE SILLS 

ELLEN SHEPHERD .... 

OLA SHORE 

NOLIE PARRISH 

MATTIE WILSON 

ROSALIE WILSON. 

LURLINE WILLIS 

ALMA LACKEY 

BLANCHE ZIGLAR 



DISPOSITION 



Humorous 

Clever 

Studious 

Cynical 

Pleasant 

Easy-going 

Explosive 

Pessimistic 

Quiet 

Resolute 

Good-Natured 

Breezy 

Vivacious 

Humorous 

Quiet 

Dignified 

Explosive 

Demure 

Attractive 

Studious 

"Steadfast and Demure", 

Care-free 

Jolly 

Sunny 

Merry 

Retiring 

Sweet 

Happy 

Lovable 

Good-Natured 

Modest 

Dignified 



FAVORITE EXPRESSION 

You are right, there 

Why to be sure ! 

Hush now, little one 

And still we wonder why 

O ! For goodness' sake 

Shoot a jit 

So good-night 

Well, I should worry 

I declare I don't know 

That's a cinch ! 

Just like when I 

My Stars! 

Two by four ! 

My Eye ! 

What did you say ? 

Grand ole thing! 

O my soul! , 

O hang it ! 

I'm all tired! 

My goodness ! 

"Shucks!" 

You ole mean thing 

Horrors! 

Oh Swat It! 

Oh, Hello! 

Oh, me ! 

Gracious ! 

Good gracious ! 

Oh, Heavens ! 

Sakes Alive! 

Good-Night! 

Oh, I don't know ! 



A 



CTERISTICS 



LIKES MOST 



"The concord of sweet sounds 

1 Parties 

fi Notoriety 

i, Winning medals 

1 Typewriting 

1 Mamie 

Baseball 

j Ram's Horn Tobacco 

History 

His "Ford" 

] To tell personal experiences 

I Dates 

] Tomboys 

I Peanuts 

If Reading 

Chewing gum 

Crisco! 

I] Basketball games , 

l Red automobiles 

The country , 

Mt. Airy 

Serving at recess ( ?) 

i D imples 

Keeping study period (?).... 
1 Red hair 

To be let alone , 

1 Latin 

. Music 

Thin people 

To help somebody 

To typewrite 

Farm life 



DISLIKES MOST 

Not making l's 

Writing essays 

To miss a question 

To lose out 

To waste time 

Work 

Algebra 

Latin 

Attention from girls , 

Not to be noticed 

To settle down 

Math 

Library Rules 

Other "nuts" 

O's on Physics 

Studying 

Rainy days— (curls) 

Rivals 

Punctuality 

Physics! 

"Speer" mint gum 

Examinations 

Salem 

Unoriginal things 

"Monk"eys 

Notoriety 

Geometry 

Talking 

"Crushes"? 

Blushing 

Deceitful people 

Inattention 



AMBITION 



To play first fiddle 

To be an architect 

To win all the prizes 

To be a politician 

To excel William Jennings as a 

speaker 
To write a text-book on Physics 

To invent a round cube 

To graduate next year 

To get M— d's consent 

To be a Davidson graduate 

To run a locomotive 

To grow tall 

To be an authoress 

To be a poetess 

To teach school 

To get fat 

To rest 

To grow taller 

To get a M. A. Degree 

To graduate in music 

To teach school 

To be a prima donna 

To be seen but not heard 

To invent a condenser of thoughts 

To find a powder that will stick 

To write 100 words per minute 

To be a school teacher 

To play the piano 

To go to college 

To fall off 

To be a first-class stenographer 

To be matron in an orphans' home 



42 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



junior 2feqit?0ta 



We, the Seniors of 1916, on leaving this the High School, 
do hereby bequeath to the Incoming Seniors the following: 
To the class as a whole — 

The Monument of Self-Government, somewhat weather- 
worn but in a repairable condition. 

Mr. Moore's "keep-up" talks. Fresh supply on hand at all 
times. 

Nice lot of Physics note-books, well illustrated. 

The task of managing the present "Sophs," the Incoming 
Juniors. 

The privilege of straggling in at the front door. 

The privilege of attending the Sophomore parties. 

To Eleanor Taylor, Helen's "Double Mint" gum. 

To the Latin Students, the "Ughs!" and a carload of ponies 
with harness in good shape. 

To Annie Belle Yingling, Mary Pollard's ambition to live 
in Salem. 

To Eleanor Smith, a bunch of second-hand kid curlers of 
Lena Hanes'. 

To Louise Henley, Ellen Shepherd's position of pianist. 

To Ada Gray Ogburn, Frances Medearis' cure for bash- 
fulness. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 43 



®I|p § fllntu Streak 




GAIN the Referee's whistle blew and the blue-coated 
team of Drexal High School trotted defiantly out 
into the center of the gridiron to meet the Crimson 
team of Swannanoa and decide in the last quarter 
which would carry the victory home. The first 
three quarters of the game had resulted in a score in favor of the 
Blues, and well they knew that if they could only keep their 
opponents from scoring in the last quarter or score above them 
themselves, the happy news of success could be flashed back 
to Drexal that night. 

The Home Team had fought valiantly but had slowly been 
pressed back on their goal, due to the superior weight of their 
opponents, and as the whistle blew for the last quarter none knew 
better than they what it would take to claim the victory for them- 
selves. So it was a determined set of crimson-coated warriors 
that took their positions opposite Drexal's eleven. 

A better place for such a game could not have been found. 
The populace of Swannanoa had come out to witness the last 
football game of the season in tens and in scores. They had 
motored out ; trollied out ; hoboed out ; and those who could find 
no conveyance whatsoever had walked out until the grandstands 
groaned beneath their weight. Many could not find seats and in 
spite of protest they soon packed the side-lines in cheering, yell- 
ing masses — but the Home Team was losing the game. 

While all eyes were focussed on the two teams as they took 
their positions, none saw or noticed the look of despair which 
rested continually like a cloud on the face of John Wesley, a 
sturdy substitute who gazed with tear-dimmed eyes on the de- 
parting forms of his fellows.' This was the last quarter and he 
was not to be allowed to play. Had the Coach forgotten him 
or did he really think him "yellow" as he had been informed he 
did? 'Twas true in the last game he had failed to tackle a man 



44 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



when he had been the only barrier between him and their goal and 
they had lost the game as a consequence ; but he had tried and 
failed, and what more could he have done? If his ankle had not 
been half-sprained he might have gotten him anyway, but none 
thought that but himself. He realized fully as the last quarter 
began that the Coach and the team as a whole thought he had 
shown the "yellow streak," as they called it, and they wanted no 
cowards on the team. 

This was the last chance he would have to get a monogram 
this year and unless he could play in this game it would be a 
hopeless dream. In a frenzy of excited anguish he paced the 
side-lines, while in the center of the field a gigantic battle for 
supremacy was being waged. 

* * * 

Writhing, falling, fighting, every inch was being contested, 
but slowly with the precision of fate the Blues were advancing 
until the Home Team's goal was now in close proximity. With 
the regularity of clock-work the men sprang into their places. 

"Smash! Bang! Crash!" 

A cloud of dust cleared away to find Drexal's line a few 
feet further on their way, while the Reds, half-crying demons, 
retreated reluctantly in the distance. 

Only ten more minutes and the game would be over. Was it 
possible for the Reds to score? 

"Smash! Bang! Smash!" 

A linesman was out and a substitute took his place. Flesh 
and blood could not stand it. Again the lines met, and this time 
the full-back was carried off the field raving like a maniac. 

With quickening pulse Wesley watched the proceedings. 
The position of full-back was the place he had played for ; and he 
saw the accident with half joy, half sorrow. Would the Coach 
now let him play? 

Out on the field was being held a hurried consultation. 

"We will have to let Wesley play now," said Woods, the 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 45 



big captain of the team, "for he is the only sub. that played for 
full-back in the practice games." 

"Yes, he is the only one who knows the signals," agreed an- 
other, "but I hope he don't show his yellow streak this time." 

Then the Coach called him. With a wild bound of exulta- 
tion he hurried off his outer sweater, and hurling it to the ground 
he sprang out onto the gridiron. Some of his friends cheered him, 
but the greater mass remained silent. 

"Do your best now," yelled the Coach after him. 

With grim determination, he took his place and once more 
the game began. 

Only five more minutes to play, and still the Blues had the 
ball. But Swannanoa was desperate now and the line held firmer ; 
like waves on a rocky beach they beat upon them. 

Suddenly someone fumbled the ball and it shot out from the 
whirling mass like something possessed of life. Wesley saw his 
chance. With a desperate dash he made for it. Another had 
done the same but Wesley was backed by more than a mere de- 
sire to get the ball, and as he came in contact with his opponent, 
he sent him heavily to the ground, while he himself covered the 
ball. Swannanoa had a chance after all. 

With shrieks and screams and yells, the onlookers cheered 
him for his feat, and the Coach rubbed his hands in satisfaction. 
Small though the act was, it had restored confidence in the team 
and they formed their line with a quicker jump. 

The ball was snapped and passed to a half-back, and around 
left end he went. It was a trick play and the Blues were thrown 
off their guard. On, on, towards the enemies' goal he sped with 
a racing mob at his heels. But though Wesley was swift, the 
opposing full-back was swifter, and just as he got within five yards 
of the goal he tackled him ; he had saved the day for the Drexal 
faction, they sprang to their feet in wild applause. 

Only three minutes now and five yards to go. In suppressed 
excitement the crowd watched the crouching lines. With a heavy 
thud they came together once more. The ball was passed back 



4.6 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



to Wesley, and with eyes bloodshot and jaw bleeding, he dashed 
toward the seeming vortex. It was a center rush and the contact 
was terrific. The very earth seemed to shake as the two lines 
met. For a moment all was confusion. No one knew where the 
ball was. The down was made just as the Referee's whistle pro- 
claimed that the game was over. 

Quickly the men picked themselves up from the pile which 
covered the ball; all anxious to see just how close the Reds had 
come to winning after all. 

The Referee dashing up began hurrying them to their feet, 
and a glimpse of the ball was seen. Then Swannonoa broke loose. 
Yell after yell rent the heavens, for fully two feet across the 
Drexal goal lay a Crimson figure, the unconscious form of Wesley 
with the ball clasped tightly between his bleeding arms. He had 
struck the line like a battering ram and at the cost of great phys- 
ical pain had saved the game for his school. 

Loving friends hurried to his side, and as he came to in the 
arms of the Coach who had picked him up, he asked painfully, 
"Have I done better this time?" 

"Yes," answered the Coach smiling, "you have done well and 
the only yellow you shall have about you this year shall be your 
High School monogram." 

Gordon Ambler. 




®ije Hark atii dolb 

Published Quarterly by the Upper Classes of the 
Winston-Salem City High School 

Subscription Price Fifty Cents the Year 




In studying Shakespeare we unconscious- 
ON STUDYING ly develop the moral as well as the mental 
SHAKESPEARE side of our characters. His famous quo- 
tations, beautiful passages in his dramas, 
and his gracefully-worded sentences, all tend towards the greater 
development of our minds. But the moral side of our characters 
receives an equally great stimulus. 

Shakespeare shows us the "eternal fitness of things" in life 
and gives us a broader outlook on humanity. With his unques- 
tionable genius he shows us, in Shylock, a merciless Jew. And 
yet, before he casts that character aside, he makes us sympathize 
with the blood-thirsty old fellow in spite of all his crimes and 
misdemeanors. He shows us the "other side" of every question. 
He makes us love his heroes and heroines and sympathize with 
those in the meaner walks of life. We are not ashamed of the 
tears that inevitably come to our eyes when we read the mourn- 
ful passages of his great tragedies. In "Midsummer Night's 



48 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



Dream" we laugh with Puck, and in "Romeo and Juliet" we cry 
at the fate of the unhappy lovers. 

We appreciate fully Shakespeare's genius as an author, and 
we do not fail to recognize his ability to play on our heart-strings. 

A. 



Our community has taken a great part 
SHAKESPEAREAN in the world-wide celebration of the 
TERCENTENARY Shakespearean Tercentenary. The ef- 
forts that have been put forth by the 
schools, drama society, literary clubs and music clubs have been 
more than successful ; and we should feel proud of the work they 
have done. The keen interest that has been manifested is of signal 
importance to us. For it has shown that our city is as wide awake 
intellectually as it is industrially. Business affairs have by no 
means smothered intellectual activities. But there is yet a greater 
significance to the celebration. For we are reminded that the 
great Elizabethan poet and playwright still lives in the hearts of 
the English-speaking people. We see that after three hundred 
years his influence is flowing in an ever-diverging stream through 
the literary world — the world which today is responding to that 
influence in the commemoration of the three-hundredth anniver- 
sary of his death. We are well aware that monuments of the 
usual kind are not lacking to Shakespeare, yet he needs them less, 
perhaps, than any celebrity in history ; his works are monuments 
that have brought him imperishable fame. L. 




THE BLACK AND GOLD 49 

Nanna Johnson is longing for school to close that she may 
begin "voice." 

# * $ 

Thelma Adams can hardly wait for Fall to enter the Nor- 
mal. 

$ * * 

Helen Fletcher is planning a trip to Long Island this Sum- 
mer. 

$ $ 4 

Nell Horton is rejoicing that class histories are no more. 
#• # * 

Luella Cochran has lately had a number of her poems 
copied by papers in Virginia, North Carolina and South Caro- 
lina. Best wishes, Luella, for your future efforts. 

# * * 

Gordon Ambler recently won a medal for speed in type- 
writing offered by the Remington Company. This is the second 
medal of its kind awarded this year to the Senior Class, the other 
having been won by Banks Newman. 

# # * 

Ola Shore and Ruth Craver are planning a Summer on the 
farm. Take care for the sunburns and freckles, girls. We recom- 
mend Hind's Cold Cream. 

# * * 

Ruby Davis expects to make a tour of the State as soon as 
school is out. 

# # $ 

Joseph Cook has willed the surplus (?) of the Black and 
Gold fund to the Humane Society. 

# % # 

Carl Long expects to continue his overhauling of Fords. We 
expect some day to find him rambling in a car of his own make. 



50 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



Clement Hanes finds "Home Again" ringing in his ears most 
frequently now. 

$ $ * 

Tycho Nissen expects to advertise Nissen wagons in the near 
future. 

$ $ * 

Edwin Nash is planning to loaf this Summer before starting 
on his course as civil engineer. 

* * & 

Ellen Shepherd is learning to finger the guitar and expects 
soon to be able to enter "Keith's Circuit." 

$ $ *fc 
Banks Newman has been offered a position by the Reming- 
ton Company as a demonstrator. We congratulate you, Banks, 
upon this offer; we feel sure that you well deserve it. 

$ * 
Mattie Wilson is rejoicing that she has finished geometry. 

% $ $ 
Bessie Ambler expects soon to be painting landscape in Vir- 
ginia. 

am $ # 

Mary Pollard and Rosalie Wilson are grieving that windows 
on Fourth street are no more. 

* $ * 

Alma Lackey has already secured a position as stenographer 

at D. G. Craven's. 

* $ * 

Lena Hanes hopes to further carry out her "Crisco" recipes 

this Summer. 

$ # * 

Luther Lashmit is planning to enter the Carnegie Institute 
of Technology, to study architecture. 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 51 

Jacquelin Taylor aspired to be a scientific farmer in January, 
but the hot weather since has proved too trying on his physique. 

$ #• 

Frances Medearis is becoming quite a chauffeur. We take 
the privilege of issuing a notice to all chickens, dogs and like 
pedestrians to keep off the streets. 

* # $ 

Clement Hanes and Edwin Nash are now suffering from 
an attack of popularity. Party pairing committees are often 
mobbed, when party partners are announced. 

# * 4 

Norwood Wilson is waiting for school to let out, so he can 
give his whole time to soliciting for the Journal. 

$ $ * 
Blanche Ziglar finds pleasure these days in meditating over 
the beauties of nature. 

$ $ f 

Nolie Parrish is sorry her recitations with Miss Woods 
are over. Cheer up, Nolie, you can find comfort in reviewing 
your corrected Latin composition papers. 

$ #• #■ 

Maude Long expects to be a "lady of leisure" this Summer. 

Madge Sills. 




52 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 




Uttlt % iFwn-Hakpra 

Of course it's not true, but just the 
same it's a good one to tell on Clement 
Hanes. It happened when he was 
operated on a few weeks ago. 

After the operation, the private 
rooms being full, he was taken in the 
public ward and placed between two 
other patients who had been operated on. 
On coming to, Clement emitted a loud 
sigh and in a relieved tone said, "Thank 
goodness, that's over." At which his 
left-hand neighbor said, "Don't be too 
sure. When I was operated on, the doc- 
tor left a pair of scissors and had to go 
back after them." 

"That's right," said the right-hand friend, "when I was 
operated on the doctor left a roll of bandage and had to go back 
after it." j Is 

Just as the second consoler had finished his tale of woe the 
doctor who had operated on Clement stuck his head in the door 
and in a loud tone demanded, "Has anyone seen anything of my 
hat." At which Clement fainted. — Exchange — with a change of 
names. 

% % $ 

Things Accomplished by Class of '16 
Madge has learned to recite without blushing. 
Francis M. has grown a half an inch. 
Jacquelin has learned to walk. 
Mary Pollard has become quite dignified. 
Edwin Nash talks less. 

Clement's handwriting has been interpreted. 
Helen Fletcher has learned to read Virgil. 
Lena Hanes has conquered bashfulness. 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 53 

Ijtglj §>r!)0ni itrtumanj 

Aftermath, n. On the farm, a second growth of grass. In 
Senior Class after math, is dinner. 

Bean, n. The human head. "Hit on the bean" means "hit 
on the head." 

Can, v. To be able. "I can" means "I have the ability." 
Now practically obsolete. 

Debate, n. A disguised quarrel conducted systematically. 

Declamation, n. A joke — sprung in society. 

Exams, n. A graphic representation of student intellect ; an 
X-ray view of the interior of the brain pan, especially of what 
has soaked into it. 

Latin, n. The easiest course in high school (to fail on). 
See freshmen. 

Lunch Counter, n. A part of the Domestic Science Depart- 
ment ; the high school beanery. Often called the "gravy bowl." 

Nut, n. A crazy person. — Nutty, adj. Got no sense; crazy. 

Periods, n. What the school day is made up of. — Recitation 
periods. Intervals of silence. — Study periods. Intervals of com- 
parative silence, in comparison with the Battle of Gettysburg. 

Science, n, A brain racker; the girls' favorite, especially the 
Science of Physics. 

Domestic Science, n. A science for the development of in- 
telligence in the bisection of cheese sandwiches. 

Society, n. Anything which takes up two recitation periods 
every two weeks. Formed originally for the purpose of making 
orators out of students — that is, making something out of nothing. 

Sandwiches, n. The oldest things in the Domestic Science 
Department, especially ham sandwiches. 

Rolls, n. Baked dough, manufactured by the D. S. Depart- 
ment. (Not to be confused with "light rolls.") Excellent as 
souvenirs. « 



54 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



The other night just as one of our Seniors was entering the 
Church with his best girl the preacher announced his text: 

"And they took sweet communion together and walked into 
the house of God." 

*■ * * 

Tycho Nissen on spelling class. "Plagiarize, to visit with a 
plague." 

% #■ $ 

Banks had just returned from the Y. M. C. A. where he 
had taken some letters dictated to him by Mr. Craig. 
Miss Dobson: "What did he say, Banks?" 
Banks: "Nothing. A preacher was there." 
$ $ # 

Place : Senior Room. 

Time : English Period. 

Study: Shakespeare's "Tempest." 

Action: Henry Stanley erasing the board with his usual 
extraordinary motions. Giggles on the girls' side of the room. 

Miss Mary: "More interested in Henry Stanley than 
Shakespeare. I'd be ashamed." 

# # 

Examinations 
(Apology to Shakespeare) 

Examinations are so mixed with the elements of hard work 
that wisdom might stand up and say to all the world : "This is a 
dose." 

Sir — Since this fuss about Shakespeare I've read both his 
Romeo and Juliet. Did he write any beside them two? If so, 
what others should I ought to read? — B. Luff. 

Yes, he wrote a little more. Why not read "Mack," and 
then the sequel, "Beth?" Also "Tern" and then "Pest." — Ex- 
change. 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 55 

Stoles fur 3tenljm£tt 

1. Never, even in case of being one minute late to a recita- 
tion, enter school by the front door. But run around to the side 
entrance and, after cleaning your feet, come in quietly and tip-toe 
to your room. 

2. Above all things do not promenade through the halls. 
When you become a Junior you may do this, if no Seniors are 
around. 

3. Form your line quickly and quietly on the playground. 
Keep perfect step in marching up to your room, and be sure to re- 
move all chewing gum before entering the building. 

4. Always address the upper classmen in a respectful man- 
ner, and ask them no silly questions. 

5. Sit straight in chapel, listen attentively, and do not crane 
your neck around every time the back door is opened. 

6. When snow is on the ground, come out and receive your 
just deserts. 

7. When buying at the lunch counter, make it a point al- 
ways to treat the Seniors who are close by. 

8. Regardless of circumstances, never flash any Freshman 
colors on the grounds. If you must wear colors, wear either 
Senior or school colors. 

9. Take the Seniors as your ideal. Follow what they tell 
you to do rather than what they do. 




56 THE BLACK AND GOLD 

Want (Enhtmn 

Wanted — Dimples by Mary Pollard. 



Wanted — Liniment for Jacquelin, crutches for Phin, and 
also a specialist to diagnose the cases. 



Wanted — To know why Miss Wood selects the most dif- 
ficult passages of Virgil for tests. 



Wanted — Places, by sixteen cooks, well-trained by the 
Domestic Science Department. 



Wanted — Several sweet glances from C. H. — Frit. 



Wanted — To know whom F. M. rooted for at the basketball 
games. — E. S. 



Wanted — To know the purpose of the black spool of thread 
on Professor Moore's desk in class. Does he use it to tangle 
us up in physics? — -Seniors. 



Wanted — To know who the benefactor was who placed 
the useful mirror in the basement. — B. B., I. S., L. H. 



Wanted — To know Joseph's "get tall quick recipe". — B. A. 
and F. M. 



Wanted — A cure for blushes. — Madge. 

Wanted — To know where the "Sophs" got the big feet to 
walk over the whole school. 



Wanted — To utilize the energy wasted on chewing gum. 
H. F. 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 57 



ICuifit (Enlurnn 

Lost, Strayed or Stolen — One well-equipped cook from 
Senior Class. 



Lost or Stolen — Two positions, by Nell Horton and Ellen 
hepherd, former leaders of the Rooters' Club. 



Lost — Several sweet feminine voices from the Rooters' Club. 



Lost — Several valuable note-books written in hieroglyphics. 
Clement Hanes. 



Lost — One perfectly good heart to J. T. by N. P. 
Lost — Bashfulne^s. — Fritz Crute. 



3Tor £>&h (Enlumn 



For Sale — A good pair of brains, eighteen years old but 
never have been used. Apply to Clement Hanes. 



For Sale — A carload of ponies. — Seniors. 



For Sale — A fresh supply of grace notes found not only in 
"Oh, Dry Those Tears" but wherever they can be stuck in. — 
Nanna Johnson. 

Found — The two positions which were lost. — Two Young 
Sophomores. 



58 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



AbwttiBvmmtB 

For Sale at all Bookstores — Rudiments of Coquetry 
by Maude Long. Send for illustrated booklet. 



Have Your Hair Curled by My Magic Curlers. — Luella 
Cochran. 



Learn to Be Graceful 
Special instruction in Aesthetic Dancing. — Tycho Nissen. 



Free ! Free ! Free ! 
My Lectures on Hard Work. — Mr. Moore. 



Call for samples of my latest Complexion Cream. — Thelma 
Adams. 



For inspection of contagious disease apply to Faculty of City 
High School. Good references. 



Lessons in Dishwashing. Reasonable terms. — Nell Horton. 



Before entering college read my "Discussion on the Crush 
Question." — Nanna Johnson. 



Bureau of Popularity 
In charge of Clement Hanes and Edwin Nash. 



Ideas ! Ideas ! 
Fresh supply on hand at all times. — H. B. Newman. 



Hear the Famous Lecturer 

Norwood Wilson 

on 

"Responsibility of Student Government" 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 5 g 

The Best Sellers at High School Book Shops 

Talks on Elimination of Physics Bulk. — J. W. Moore. 
My Latest Inventions. — Carl Long. 
Hints to Amateur Vocalists. — Nanna Johnson. 
Random Thoughts on Tomboys. — Bessie Ambler. 
The Romance of the Gas Office. — Rosalie Wilson and Mary 
Pollard. 

How to Be Content Though Not in Love. — Nell Horton. 

Methods of Discipline. — Madge Sills. 

Talks on Business Management. — Joseph Cook. 

My Trip to Davidson. — Ellen Shepherd. 

Points on Chauffeuring. — Helen Fletcher. 

The Latest in Virgil : Prose Translation. — Tycho Nissen. 

How to Become Famous. — Henry Stanley. 

Hints on the Bolting of Geometry. — Maude Long. 

My Experiences With Wrigley's Products. — H. F. Fletcher. 



•&*-&«* &S&—&W 



i*^ 




60 THE BLACK AND GOLD 

^ub;prta of Btmar lEaaaga 

"An Hour With the Dictionary." — Lena Hedgecock. 

"How Modern Improvements Have Helped the Farmer." — 
Ola Shore. 

"United States and Peace." — Lurline Willis. 

"Lumbering in North Carolina." — Nolie Parrish. 

"Better Rural Schools for the State." — Ruth Craver. 

"Some Interesting Things About Birds." — Blanche Ziglar. 

"By-Products." — Frances Medearis. 

"Quaint Architecture in Our City." — Helen Fletcher. 

"Prison Reforms."— Maude Long. 

"The Magic City of Hopewell." — Rosalie Wilson. 

"The World's Debt to Missions."— Mary Pollard. 

"The Origin of Some Phrases." — Thelma Adams. 

"The Value of Our Library." — Luella Cochran. 

"Some Developments of Electricity." — Carl Long. 

"Foolish Superstitions." — Mattie Wilson. 

"Important Events in the Twentieth Century." — Ellen 
Shepherd. 

"My Trip to Washington." — Norwood Wilson. 

"Fifteen Years of the Twin-City."' — Ruby Davis. 

"Styles." — Lena Hanes. 

"Points of Interest Around Norfolk." — Clement Hanes. 

"A Trip to Richmond."' — Jacquelin Taylor. 

"Problems of the Kitchen." — Nanna Johnson. 

"The Best Friends of Man." — Joseph Cook. 

''The Rapid Growth of the Industrial World." — Edwin Nash. 

"Noted Women of the Day." — Nell 'Horton. 

"London in Shakespeare's Day." — Bessie Ambler. 

"Military Training in High Schools." — Luther Lashmit. 

"War on Alcohol." — Tycho Nissen. 

"The Value of a Business Education." — Alma Lackey. 

"The Social Conscience."' — Gordon Ambler. 

"A Senior's Thoughts on Shakespeare." — Madge Sills. 

"Educating Winston-Salem." — Banks Newman. 



64 THE BLACK AND GOLD 



iExrljattgpB 



The Tooter, Omaha, Nebraska — Your magazine is good, 
but it would be much better if you would add a few stories. 

The Clarion, Rochester, N. Y., is exceedingly rich in orig- 
inal humor and athletic "dope", but its literary department is 
sadly deficient. We would suggest some original stories and short 
poems by students. You should offer some criticisms in your Ex- 
change Department, instead of merely naming the magazines. 

The Cherry and White, Williamsport, Pa. — We welcome 
you, Cherry and White! Your Literary Department is exceed- 
ingly good, your editorials are splendid, while the locals and the 
cartoons are cleverly executed. We await with pleasure your 
coming next month. 

The March number of the Tattler, Ithaca, N. Y., is very 
cleverly gotten up. The stjjl Pfcl ic Last Five Minutes to Play," 
is unusually well-written^ Bpaper would be improved if 
more space were given to Ire^ Wnatter, and less to school news 
and athletics. 

The Index, Oshkosh, Wis. — Your magazine is up-to-date in 
every department. Especially fine is the article on "Shakespeare." 

The Item, Pasadena, Cal. — The literary work in the Item 
is very good. The jokes are fine but too numerous. "Homer on 
'The High Cost of Living' " is quite original. 

The Tradesman, High School of Commerce, Boston, Mass. — 
We would like to suggest to your well-gotten-up magazine the 
addition of a few poems, to relieve the monotony of too much 
prose. Why not print the name of your school and city on the 
cover? Otherwire, it is hard to recognize who you are. 

The March number of the Messenger, Durham, N. C, is 
excellent. The stories are very interesting and well written, and 
the poetry is very good. However, it seems that jokes are lack- 
ing. 

The Book-Strap, Charleston, West Va. — The Junior num- 







:■"" 




66 



THE BLACK AND GOLD 



ber of the Book-Strap is very good. Although there are not many 
stories, they are well written and interesting. The jokes are 
especially good, and also the poetry. 

We wish to acknowledge with thanks the following ex- 
changes : 

The Reporter Danville High School 

The Guilfordian Guilford College, N. C. 

The Hillbilly Asheville, N. C. 

The Habit ^^k Salina, Kansas 

The Rayen Rec^B wk Youngstown, Ohio 

The Stampede^ H Havre, Montana 

The Book-Strap5|^R. Charleston, W. Virginia 

The Index Oshkosh High School, Wisconsin 

University of N. C. Magazine 

The Clarion Rochester, N. Y. 

The Poplar Leaf Chapel Hill 

The Item Pasadena, Cal. 

The Messenger Durham, N. C. 

The Tradesman High School of Commerce, Boston, Mass. 

The High School Enterprise Raleigh, N. C. 

State Normal Magazine 

The Cherry and White Williamsport, Penn. 

The Tooter Omaha, Nebraska 

The Iron Clad Scotland Neck, N. C. 

The Lotus Dover, Delaware 

College Messenger Greensboro, N. C. 

The Review Central High School, Washington, D. C. 




VISIT 

Polite's Candy 
Kitchen 

For Purest Home-made Candles 
Ice Cream and Fruit 

114 W. FotirtH St. 

Those Spring Suits 
for Boys (Si Young' Men 
Have Arrived 

Something Special 
Come Take a Look 

Jtlcdi-J&iQjrij'- SfccJtJcn Gc? 

^mi II I'll ■ tJAiWMlJJMItrrKWBSI^^ 



visit our stored 

and enjoy your drink "Amid the Palms" 

Cut Flowers for all occasions 

WESTBROOK DRUG & FLORAL CO. 

Phone 278 Opp. Post Off-ce 



415 Liberty Street Telephone 589 

JL* _ 4 11 



EY! 

IGH SCHOOL BOYS 
IGH ART CLOTHING 

Fits Right When You Buy it and Stays 
Right When You Wear it 
GET »EM AT 

WINSTON CLOTHING COMPANY 

OUR MOTTO: 

"We Live and Die for Those We Love" 

Geo. C. Tudor 

District Manager 

MUTUAL BENEFIT LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

ofNewarK, N.J. 

C. D. KENNY CO. 

TEAS, COFFEES 
AND SUGARS 

PHONE 347 COR.SrdandUBERTV 

THE NE.W MUTUAL 

$8,000,000 PROGRAM 

All Star All Feature 
4 'Special Attention to Ladies and Children" 

AMUZV 

OLDEST IN THE CITY 



Remember! mi "* A \ 

K _ — ZLnotog rap tier in 

M, ^% Jl J. ^C -1- 1 your <Joiun" 



Winkler's Bakery 

SALEM 

THEY BAKED FOR YOUR GRANDMOTHER. WHY NOT YOU? 

bakers of best bread, pies and cakes 
For the Best Boys' and Young Men's Clothing See 

HENRY ROSE COMPANY 

(Successors to N. L. Cranford & Co.) 

6>6c White Star Company 

For Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Confectioneries. Phone 98 and 99 

Where Quality Prevails 

THOMPSON'S DRUG STORE 

ICE CREAMS, SODAS, FINE CIGARS, TOILET GOODS, 
DRUGS, MEDICINE 

— I— ■ — ««MW— ■■ I I ■—«■«■■— — HIB^MM— —■ 1^^— IWIMBI ■!■■■! Ill IIIIWIIII Ill Ml ■■■ 

SHAFFNER-LANDQUIST CO. 

DRUGGISTS TABLETS, PENCILS AND INKS 

JOHN L. BRIETZ 

Better Class Foods Only 
222 South Main Phone 238 



MRS. L. K ST JiN TOM 

MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS 
209 Main Street Phone 369 



ROSENBACHER & BRO 

SPECIALTIES IN WEARING APPAREL FOR 
SCHOOL AND COLLEGE GIRLS 

Exclusive Showing of 

Smart Footwear and 

Mar-Hof Middy Blouse Suits 

Make Our Store Your Headquarters 



GUNS, RIFLES, REVOLVERS, SPORTING 
GOODS AND HARDWARE 

ROBERTS HARDWARE 

AND 

SPORTING GOODS CO 

431 Liberty Street 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Ideal Dry Goods Co. 

LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR MILLINERY, DRY GOODS, 
NOTIONS, ETC. 



Trade Street — Fourth Street 



NEW SHOES FROM OLD ONES 

Hailey's Electric Shoe Repair 

Phone 1182 
SHOES CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 



FRED M. PARRISH 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



TOURING CAR $440 
ROADSTER $390 

F. O. B. DETROIT 




P. N. MONTAGUE 

Ford Service Station 



QUALITY 
FIRST 




STIEFF 



219 S. Try on St 
CHARLOTTE, N. C 



Eliminate future troubles 
by buying in the begin- 
ning the Best piano. 
Stieff pianos have everlast- 
ing durability, combined 
with rich tone and perfect 
action. 

Over five hundred Colleges, Schools, 
Churches and Musicians use 

STIEFF PIANOS 

Write for catalog and prices 



THE SOUTHERN PUBLIC 
UTILITIES CO. 



IF THERE IS ANYTHING IN THE 
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCE OR AP- 
PARATUS LINE WHICH YOU MAY 
BE INTERESTED IN, IT WILL BE A 
PLEASURE TO US TO GIVE YOU ANY 
INFORMATION YOU MAY DESIRE 



OFFICE CORNER 

MAIN AND THIRD STS. 



Keep Smiling 

If you want a job that's neat 

Of leather that will wear, 
At the corner, 4th and Elm Streets 

Or The Electric Shoe Repair. 
Best skilled labor awaiting you, 

You'll learn it if you go, 
To West Fourth Street 132 

Or phone Eight-Seven-O. 

LADIES' SHOES A SPECIALTY 
Work Called For and Delivered 

132 W. Fourth St. Phone 870 

A. J. LINVILLE, Prop. 



OUR MOTTO: "BETTER SERVICE' 



"LET WRIGHT WRITE IT" 

P. L. Wright®. Co. 

Incorporated 

Real Estate 

and Insurance 

"A wise investment in real estate has been the 
beginning of many a man's fortune." Why not begin 
that investment now? 

We Buy, Sell, Rent and Insure Your Property 
Telephone 1045 O'Hanlon Building 

For _ 

CALL 

R. B. CRAWFORD <& CO. 

Phones 88, 89 and 312 

"Something Good to Eat All the Time" 

Rominger Furniture Co. 

Home and Office Furniture 
Pianos and Organs 

Eat Peerless Ice Cream 

Trade-Mark Registered 




BLACK 
MARIA 

'J'HE Queen ot all 
Cooking and Grate 
Coals is at your ser- 
vice at all times by 
simply 

PHONING 14 or 15 

Crystal Ice Co. 

"Sells Black Maria Coal" 



VISIT OUR SANITARY 
FOUNTAIN DAILY 

Every Drink Served in Individual Cups 
No Germs— No Chipped Glass 
The Best Ice Cream in the City 

Rankin-Butner's Profit-Sharing Drug Store 

TRADE STREET :: PHONE NO. 49 



"GET IT AT W A TKINS' ' 

BUY YOUR SCHOOL BOOKS AND 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES AT 

WATKINS' BOOK STORE 



Send it to 

v* 15he B-B 

Laundry and 
QUALITY French 

SERVICE Cleaners 

Office No. 3, West 
5th St. Phone 158 

Plant at Big Cof- 
fee Pot, South 
Main Street 

C. D. REESE CO. 

Incorporated 

Manufacturing Jewelers 

57 Warren St. 

New YorK 



College, School and 
Class Pins and Rings 
Athletic Medals and 
Trophies ^Cups, and 
Souvenirs for Ban- 
cruets ^Society Em- 
blems, Etc. 



For Dependable 

FIRE INSURANCE 

See 

The Follin Co* 

ALSO BONDING 
USE 




DELICIOUS INVIGORATING 

AIDS DIGESTION TRY IT 

The Sporting Goods Store 

Baseball, Football and Basketball Supplies. Ten- 
nis Goods, Gym. Clothing, Shoes, Etc., Sweaters 
and Jerseys. A complete stock of Athletic Supplies 

BROWN-ROGERS CO. 



W. C. WRIGHT and COMPANY 

SHOES 

The Latest Styles and Best Quality 



J^SHOP 428 N0ETH 

EVERLAST / ^Tx^$a^TP > C ltia!Jhv*< LIBERTY 

INGGIFT mgttejoz s ™ 




LOUIS M. SWINK 

Attorney at Law 
Collections and Commercial Law a Specialty 
Winston- Salem, g. C. 

Class in Service and Well-Cooked Food Always 
to be Found at the 

PHOENIX CAFE 

Salem Academy Caterers Regular Dinner and Supper 

HEADQUARTERS FOR MILLINERY AND LADIES' WEAR- 
ING APPAREL, GOSSARD CORSETS 

MRS. T. W. HANCOCK 

Phone 704 Cor. 4th and Elm Sts. 

Weir Brothers 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Phone 279 

IT WILL PAY TO INVESTIGATE 

THE PAIGE 




CRAWFORD MILL SUPPLY CO 

NORTHUP & O'BRIEN 

Architects 

Rooms 712-713-714 Wachovia Bank Building 
Phone 335 Winston-Salem, N. C. 




M$% 



Olmplu zJjelicious 



d 



u 



d 



ana so easuu serve 

Drink Coca-Cola 
IN BOTTLES 



1802 



1915 



SALEM ACADEMY 
AND COLLEGE 

Oldest institution for the higher education of the 
women of the South 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC, DOMESTIC SCIENCE, ART 

AND BUSINESS LEADING TO DIPLOMA 

OR CERTIFICATE 



14 Units (4 years High School) required for Freshman Entrance 

"The ideal of this institu- 
tion is the Christian Educa- 



tion of Young Women" 

Faculty 62 

Catalogue and Views Upon Application 



Spacious campus, modern 
dormitories, pure water, 
bracing climate, health rec- 
ord unsurpassed 

Students Enrolled 600 



SHOE REPAIRING 

Good Work. Prompt Service. Best Material Used. 

Every Job Guaranteed. 

Work Called For and Delivered. 

W. O. GILBERT 

Phone 953 427 Trade St. 



PftRTOAITS Kodak Finishing. Over 100 Styles of 

T Vii 1 11/11 I J pretty p olders> 0pp Auditorium 

ENLARGEMENTS Phone 1092 IDEAL PHOTO CO. 



CHARLIE WING 

BEST HAND LAUNDRY IN CITY 

211 MAIN STREET 

MORRISETT COMPANY 

426 Liberty Street Phone 123 

MILLINERY, DRESS GOODS, NOTIONS, COATS SUITS 

AND CLOAKS 

WINSTON-SALEM* N. C. 

C. B. WATSON J. C. BUXTON T. W. WATSON 

WATSON, BUXTON & WATSON 

Attorneys at Law 
Practice in All the Courts Winston- Salem, N. C. 

C. M. THOMAS and COMPANY 

COAL, CEMENT CONSTRUCTION 

Main Office Phones 55 and 56 

PILOT THEATRE- 

Paramount, Mc tro, V. L. S. E. and 'World 
Film Features 

O - SIX A WEEK - 6 



For Reference 

not to be taken 
from this library 



The Reason Why 

GAS IS THE ONLY FUEL USED IN DOMESTIC 
SCIENCE DEPARTMENTS IS BECAUSE IT 
IS THE MOST CONVENIENT AND MODERN 
FUEL, q ASK THOSE WHO USE IT. 

lYinston-Salem Gas Co. phone 52 

Build Your Home 

Witn Material and Advice from Those 
Who Know How to Give Yoti The Best 




Let Us Consider 
The Plans forYour 
New If ouse, which 
Would Give You 

Results 



Fog'le Bros. Co. 



PHONE 85 



"Dollars for Your Ashes' 

LEAK=COBB CO. 

REAL ESTATE 



vwoa 7* 



Dodge Brothers 

motor CAR 



It is interesting to stop and recall 

how many good things you have 

heard of the car and how very few 

of the other sort. 



THE MOTOR CO. 

The Motor is 30-35 Horsepower. The Price of the Touring Car 
or Roadster Complete is $785 (f. o. b. Detroit) 



Watch for these Features 

WILLIAM FARNUM 

in ''THE SPOILERS" 

By Rex Beach 9 Reels 

ANNETTE KELLERMAN 

in "NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTER" 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

in ' ' BURLESQUE ON CARMEN ' ' 

4— Reels of Screams — 4 

Watch and Wait for These Rig Ones. 

At the PILOT, of course