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Full text of "The Black and Red 1946"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 
St IVIichael's University School 



http://www.archive.org/details/blackred194600univ 



THE BLACK AND RED 

AUGUST, 1946 No. 76 

Managing Editor . . . The Headmaster 
assisted hy the Masters and Boys 



CONTENTS 

Editorial : 5 

School Notes 6 

Academic Results, June, 1945 _ _ 7 

In Memoriam _ 8 

Salvette '.'.. 9 

Speech Day _. 9 

Sports Day „ 10 

Colours Awarded. 1 946 1 1 

The Ker Cup 12 

Cricket 13 

The Don Chapman Cup _ 18 

Swimming and Diving _ _ 19 

Gymnastics , _ _ _ - 19 

CrosS'Country Run _ 19 

Tennis - 19 

Rugby Football - '. 20 

Cadet Corps -....- _ 29 

Shooting _ 31 

Old Boys Notes 3 2 

Marriages - _ 33 

Births - 33 

Decorations - 33 

Honour and Service Roll _ _ 3 5 

3 




EDITORIAL 

Our first word this year must of necessity be to those Old Boys 
who have returned from service overseas. Wherever they may be, 
we would like them to know that we do extend to them all a hearty 
welcome back home. Already many of them have visited the School 
and we hope that more will do so from time to time as they get the 
opportunity. 

The Black and Red is considerably curtailed this year on account 
of the lack of paper. As a result, we have had to omit many pictures 
and items about other matters which would otherwise have appeared 
in this issue. 

This year, as ever>' year, we are losing a number of Senior boys 
whom we are going to miss very much. We do hope that in future 
years, they will look back on their years spent here with gratitude 
and some pleasant memories. 

The increased enrolment of last year has been fairly well main' 
tained this year and the Schoolhouse has been taxed to capacity. 

We regret to note that since the last issue, we have received 
news that three more of our Old Boys have lost their lives on active 
service: W. A. Albert, 1937-1941; H. H. Mackenzie, 1938-1939; 
J. G. Mackid, 1925-1932. We have also to note the passing of two 
Governors of the School: Mr. C. A. Cotterell, who died at Van- 
couver last February, and Mr. J. W. Spencer, who died on June 18th. 
Also we have to note the death of the Rev. Canon N. E. Smith, who 
died on January 31st, 1945, and who for many years was a valued 
friend of the School. For many years these gentlemen were interested 
in our success and achievement and the School is poorer for their 
passing. _G. H. S. 



SCHOOL NOTES 

CONGRATULATIONS TO . . . 

Grant as the Ker Cup winner for 1946; 

Pearson as the winner of the Don Hugh Chapman Cup for 1946; 
Dalziel as Senior Sports Champion; 
Shaw as Intermediate Champion; 
Kreger II as Junior Champion; 

Kruger as the wmner of the Cross Country Race for 1946; 
Cadet Captain Grant, Officers, N. C. O.'s, and Mr. Cropper on 
the outstanding achievements of the Cadet Corps. 



Our thanks are due to J. P. Chadwick, J. G. Wenman, H. B. 
Holt, F. N. Cabeldu, A. G. Tisdale, F. G. SkiUings, Old Boys, and 
the Masters and to Mr. A. McKinnon for their efficient help on 
Sports Day. 

Last September we welcomed to the Staff Mr. R. G. Thistle waite, 
B. A., B. Paed. During the year he has acted as Form Master of 
Grade X and assisted in general duties. 



We were glad to give a warm welcome to Mr. W. R. G. Wen' 
man last November, after an absence of five years during which time 
he served with H. M. Forces Overseas. 



We are sorry to report that last December, after nearly 20 years 
of active and efficient service with the School, Miss E. W. Bowden, 
our Matron, was compelled to give up her post on ?ccount of ill 
health. We extend a most cordial welcome to Mrs. Proverbs who 
joined us last Term. 



After the Cadet Inspection on May 7th, the boys of the Corps 
were given a 9:00 o'clock leave. After having experienced a very 
strenuous day, it was much appreciated. 



A Confirmation Service was held at St. Luke's on Sunday, 
May 19th. A large congregation attended the Service at which 
Shipley I, Shipley II, Perram, Snape, Taylor, Ballantyne, Shaw, 
Morgan. West, Wheatley, Howard, and Burnett v.'ere confirmed by 
the Lord Bishop of British Columbia. The Bishop gave a very im- 
pressive address which no doubt will long be remembered by the boys. 



Twice this year we have been compelled to try our hand at fire 
fighting. On October 17th, we extinguished a small fire at the Rifle 
Range and on .June 13th, the Swimming Tank was threatened by 
some wood in the furnace room which had become overheated. On 
both occasions, the fire was well under control before the arrival of 
the Fire Brigade. 



We are grateful to Mr. E. Ball, former Mi listcr o'" Education 
for Saskatchewan, for twenty- three Volumes of "'Canada and its 
Provinces". The gift forms a very valuable addition to our Library. 



The 40th Founder's Day was observed at the School as usual 
on October 7th. The Headmaster gave an account of the Founding 
of the School and its grov^th through the years. He stressed the ideals 
of the Founders and referred to the achievements of the Old Boys of 
the School and expressed the hope that the present boys would be 
worthy successors. The usual cheers for the Headmaster and the Old 
School wen.- then given. 



As usual the Armistice Day Service was held at 10:45 in the 
Front Hall The Headmaster conducted the service which was at' 
tended by all the boys and members of the staff. The names of those 
who have lost their lives in the two Wars were read out. Prayers 
were offered for the bereaved. Prayers were followed by the laying 
of the School Wreath on the Honour Roll by Dalziel. 

The Service concluded at 11:00 o'clock with the sounding of 
the Last Post by the trumpeters of the Cadet Corps Band, after which 
the boys filed past the Honour Roll, leaving by the front door. 



We offer our warmest congratulations to our Chairman of the 
Board of Governors, Mr. F. E. Winslow, on being awarded the 
O. B. E. for long and outstanding service to his fellow citizens during 
the War years. 

Our best thanks are due to Dr. W. H. Worthington for the 
beautiful photographs of Donald and Jack. These have been suitably 
framed and now hang in the School dining room. 



ACADEMIC RESULTS— JUNE, 1945 

The results of the Matriculation Examinations were very credit' 
able. Pete Thompson headed the list of Junior Matriculants. 
The results were as follows: 

SENIOR MATRICULATION 
D. I. W. Braide A. G. Beckton 

JUNIOR MATRICULATION 
P. H. Thompson T. H. Oxland 

R. E. Cave-Brown-Cave P. J. Wyllie 

Pete Collett (S) M. Carle (S) 

D. Collett (S) B. Watt (S) 



3ln 4Wemoinam 



Canon ^'ocman ifcHiott #mitl| 

(Priest) 

Friend of the School 
Died January 31, 1945 



3|. W. Spencer 

(Governor, University School) 
Died June 18, 1946 



(L. ^, (gottercll 

(Governor, University School) 
' Died February 14, 1946 



SALVETTE 



Pv. R. Badda 


P. 


K. Huus 


R. 


G. 


Pollard 


B. Baker 


R. 


S. Jacoby 


E. 


W. 


Saville 


D. N. P. Baxter 


V, 


S. L. Johnson 


B. 


M. 


Shanks 


W. K. Bennett 


D. 


W. Macdonald 


D 


V. 


Shaw 


H. K. Boas 


W^ 


. D. McDougall 


J- 


R. 


Skillicorn 


F. M. Boas 


D 


R. Mackie 


H. 


B. 


Smith 


J. A. Campbell 


I. 


B. Mackie 


A. 


E. 


Stewart 


A. C. Cotter 


C. 


L. Mitchell 


R. 


I. 


Strang 


R H. Francis 


D. 


B. McLellan 


A. 


N 


Sundt 


L. R. Gilbert 


O. 


B. Morgan 


R. 


H. 


Sundt 


H. J. Gough 


D. 


I. Newton 


D. 


L. 


Taylor 


H. W. R. Harrison 


P. 


C. Noel 


I. 


A. 


West 


E. F. Horsey 


P. 


D. Paterson 


A. 


L. 


Wright 



SPEECH DAY 

The 40th Annual Speech Day was held on Friday, 21 June, 
when the Very Rev. Dean Spencer Elliott presented the academic 
prizes. 

The proceedings opened with Prayers and the reading of the 
Scripture. The Headmaster then gave his Report, outlming the 
academic and athletic achievements of the past year. 

He then introduced the Dean who in a clear forceful manner 
emphasized the importance of a liberal education and the necessity 
of applying oneself diligently to those subjects the practical appli- 
cation of which was not readily apparent. During the course of his 
remarks he stressed the importance of religious training which played 
so vital a part in the School curriculum. 



PRIZE LIST 



Form Via. 1st, D. L. Morgan 

2nd J. A. West 

Va. 1st D. B. McLellan 

2nd, W. D. McDougall 

Vb. 1st - E. P. Rimmer 

2nd P. D. Paterson 

3rd D. E. Cook 

IV. 1st D. J. Ballantyne 

2nd R. I. Strang 

3rd G. G. Pritchard 



Remo\e A. 1st D. I. Newton 

2nd - H. B. Smith 

B. 1st T. R. Chfford 



Shell A. 1st J. T. Barker 

2nd C. Branson 

B. 1st R. H. Sundt 

C. 1st, H. W. R. Harrison 



Primary, Good Progress P. T. Clifford 

Senior Scripture Prize - - P. O. Morrow 

Intermediate Scripture Prize -.... R. I. Strang 

Junior Scripture Prize _.. — G. E. Pearson 

Shell Scripture Prize _ _ I. C. Forrester 

Confirmation Class — 1st ~ D. V. Shaw 

2nd D. J. Ballantyne 

Headmaster's Awards Dalziel, Grant, Morant 

Chapman Cup - — G. E. Pearson 

Ker Cup -....- - - - - M. A. Grant 




-^'■■J^^ 



Su -^ 



■*^»£s tot^' **%*«* 



Dalziel Shaw Kreger II Kruger 

Senior Champion Intermediate Champion Junior Champion Cross Country Winner 



SPORTS DAY 

Sports Day this year was held on June 1st. In spite of the rain 
the previous day, the weather was ideal and a very large number of 
parents and friends of the School were present. There was a large 
and representative group of Old Boys to witness the event, many of 
them having returned from Service Overseas. 

The presentation of prizes was made by Dr. G. H. Worthington 
of Vancouver, B. C. The Headmaster welcomed the guests and said 
that it afforded him great pleasure to have Dr. Worthington present 
the prizes. Dr. Worthington addressed the gatheiing and pointed out 
to the boys the great advantages which they derived by reason of 
attending the School. Mr. Winslow, Chairman of the Board of 
Governors, thanked Dr. Worthington for his address and kindly 
interest. 



The results of the 

220 yds. under 14 
220 yds. under 16: 
220 yds. Open: 
100 yds. under 14r 
100 yds. under 16: 
100 yds. under 12: 
100 yds. Open: 
100 yds. under 10: 
Tug'of'War: 



events were as follows: 

Kreger II, Burnett, Smith. 30 1/5" 
Shaw, Badda, Bennett. 26 3/5" 
Dalziel. Whittome, Kreger I. 25 4/5" 
Kreger II, Burnett, Pollard. 12 2/5" 
Badda, Shaw, Benntt. 11 2/5" 
Pearson, Fox, Shanks. 13 3/5" 
Dalziel, Whittome, Kreger I 10 2/5" 
Barker II, Warren, Harrison II. 15" 
Boarders. 



10 



75 yds. under 9: 

i Mile under 16: 

120 yds. Hurdles, Open: 

4 Mile under 14: 

Old Boys' Race: 

2 Mile Open: 

Junior Relay: 

Relay Race, 400 yds.: 

Sack Race, 50 yds. : 
1 Mile Open: 
High Jump Open: 
High Jump under 16: 
High Jump under 14; 
Broad Jump: 
Broad Jump Under 16: 
Broad Jump Under 14: 
Cricket Ball Throw: 
Cross Country Race: 
Senior Champion: 
Intermediate Champion: 
Junior Champion: 
Gymnasium Champion: 

SHOOTING: 

Harvey Challenge Cup: 
Harvey Memorial Rifle: 
Braidwood Cup: 

CADET CORPS: 
Platoon Cup: 



Barker II, Campbell II, Spaven. 

Shaw. Badda, McLellan. 59" 

Dahiel, Duke, Riley. 17" 

Burnett, Kreger II, Smith. 80" 

J. R. Kingham, R. Ker, W. J. R. Peers. 

Mackenzie, Vidler, Harrison I. 2' 21" 

Fox, Shanks, Mackie II, Forrester. 

The School (Dalziel, Kreger I, Whittome, 

Shaw). 43 4/5" 
Fox, Barker II, Pearson. 
Mackenzie, Vidler, Harrison I. 
Perram, Grant, Duncan. 4' \lh" 
McLellan, Shaw, Morrow. 4' 82" 
Kreger II, Burnett, Huus. 4' 3*" 
Dalziel, Morant, Duke 18' 111" 
Badda, Shaw, McLellan. 16' 10*" 
Burnett, Kreger II, Newton. 14' 11" 
Baker, Bennett, Shaw. 92 yds. 8" 
Kruger, Kreger II. 
Dalziel. 



Clifford I. 

Davison. 

Davison. 



No. 1 Platoon 



This year for the first time, there was presented the St. Luke's 
Challenge Cup for the winner of the 100 yds. Open. This was won 
by Dalziel who won the event in 10 2/5". We are very grateful to 
the wardens and vestry of St. Luke's for their kindness in establishing 
this Cup in the School. 



COLOURS AWARDED, 1945-46 

PREFECTS— Grant, Morant, Mothersill, Moilliett, 
Morrison, Bryn- Jones, Dalziel. 

CRICKET— Morgan. 

GYM — Morrow. 

SHOOTING— Bissett, Clifford I, Whittome. 

RUGBY — Perram, Vidler, Riley I, Duncan, Morant. 

ATHLETIC CAP, for good all round athletic ability — Dalziel. 



11 




M. A. GRANT 
Winner of the Ker Cup 



12 




CRICKET, 1946 

At a meeting held early in the term G. D. Morant was elected 
Captain for the season and O. B. Morgan, a new boy of considerable 
promise, was chosen to assist him as Vice-Captain. Only four of 
last year's team were available and it was evident that it would be 
no easy matter, especially as the season was very short, to bnng the 
side up to standard. 

Six fixtures were arranged but only iive v.'ere completed, as 
heavy rain fell at Shawnigan Lake after 40 minutes of play. Three 
matches were won, two drawn, and one lost. 

Shaw headed the batting averages, scoring 77 runs for an 
average of slightly over 19. Baker had an average of 14 and Morgan 
one of 12. Shaw also led the bowlers, his 10 wickets costing him 
4.3 runs apiece, but the brunt of the bowling was shared by Morant 
and Morgan, the former taking 21 for 140 for an average of 6.67, 
and the latter 16 for 101 for a 6.31 average. 

The full team for the- year was as foUov^-s: G. D. Morant 
(Captain), O. B. Morgan (Vice-Captain), R. G. R. Dalziel, M. A. 
Grant, T- D. H. Bryn^Jones, D. V. Shaw, B. P. Baker, S. G. G. 
Riley, J. L. Whittome, W. E. Cox, and M. L. Clitford. 

The Clayton Cup, which since 1912 has been competed for by 
teams within the School, was this year won by DaUiel's team. 

Some talent was noticed among the more junior boys: Myers, 
Henley, Shipley II and Skillings being particularly keen. 

1st XI MATCHES 

ScH(X)L VS. Oak B.ay C. C. 

The season was opened against Oak Bay, a new club, who 
fielded a side mainly composed of boys. Batting first, Oak Bay fared 
badly against Morgan, who took 3 for 11, and Shaw, whose figures 
flattered him beyond measure, 5 for 3. Morgan showed that he could 
hit the loose ball and batted freely and well, while Shaw, who came 
in later, hit some very bad bowling hard. The School won by 41 
runs. 

13 



OAK BAY C. C. 



UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 



Scott b 

Godfrey c 

Robinson b 

Maj. Dobbie .. c 

Capt. Hobday 

Ibw 

Connolly b 

Jermaine 

Booth b 

Hurn b 

Sherratt _ b 

Hearn b 

Extras 



Morgan _ 1 

McKenzie 

b Morant 3 

Morant _ 1 

Riley 

b Morgan 17 

Shaw 1 1 

Morgan 

not out 4 

Shaw 

Shaw 

Shaw 

Shaw 2 

4 



Morgan _.. b 

Grant b 

Bryn-Jones ... c 

McKenzie ... Ibw 

Shaw b 

Morant Ibw 

Dalziel b 

Baker Ibw 

Duke 

Whittome ... Ibw 
Riley b 



Hobday 36 

Booth 1 

Jermaine 

b Godfrey 4 

Godfrey 4 

Hobday 20 

Hobday 2 

Godfrey 

Godfrey 7 

not out 3 

Hobday 

Godfrey 



Total 43 



Extras 7 



Total 84 



School vs. University School "Incogs" 

The "Incogs,*" playing their first game since 1941, were too 
strong for the School and won by 54 runs in a twelve-a-side match. 
With the exception of Morgan the School bowlers were ineffective 
and were treated w-ith scant respect. Morgan took 5 for 32 and the 
School fielding was moderate. The earlier School players failed 
miserably and Bryn-Jones alone looked like a batsman. Dalziel and 
Bennett improved matters late in the innings by vigorous and un- 
orthodox methods. 



UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 
"INCOGS" 

W. J. R. Peers c Bryn-Jones 

b Morgan 40 
J. A. Gibbs c Grant 

b Morgan 1 "> 

A. G. Tisdall b Morant 1 

R. H. Tye ... c Riley 

b Morgan 28 
A. M. Cupples 

Ibw Morant 3 

R. L. Challoner 

b Morant _ 

J. D. Inverarity 

c Whittome 
F. G. Skillings b Morgan 6 

stpd Grant 

b Morgan 

J. A. Richardson not out 14 

J. G. Wenman 

b Morgan 3 

H. P. M. Holt did'not bat 

W.R.G. Wenman did not bat 

Extras 1 

Total 120 



UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 



Morgan b 

Shaw b 

Bryn-Jones c 

Baker 

Grant b 

Morant c 

Riley - Ibw 

Whittome c 

Dalziel _ c 

Bennett c 

Duke b 

McKenzie 

Extras 



Holt 1 

Tisdall 

Richardson 

b Cupples 6 

run out - 

Tisdall 4 

Gibbs 

b Cupples 3 

Gibbs 2 

Tisdall 

b Wenman G. 
Gibbs 

b Challoner 27 
Wenman R. 

b Gibbs 14 

Wenman R 1 

not out 4 

4 



Total 66 



14 



School vs. Brentwood College 

The School were lucky to make 95 and were largely indebted 
to Shaw, who, though unorthodox and fortunate to a degree, hit the 
hall hard and was undefeated with 52. Clifford, playing his first 
game for the 1st XI, helped Shaw to add 27 runs for the last 
wicket. The School fielding was poor: catches were missed and the 
ground fielding was bad beyond expression. When stumps were 
drawn Brentwood, only one run behind and with three wickets still 
in hand, had played enterprising cricket and Vv'ere most unlucky not 
to win. 



UNI\'ERSITY SCHOOL 

Morgan c cr b Ley 3 

Bryn-Jones run out 8 

Grant Ibw Dunlop II 2 

Shaw not out 52 

Baker _ c D'Easum 

b Atkins 1 3 

Morant b McMahon 2 

Dalziel c Atkins 

b Ley 3 

Bennett c Dunlop II 

b McMahon 

Riley b McMahon 

Duke c McMahon 

b Ley 6 

Clifford c s- b Atkins 5 

Extras 1 

Total 95 



BRENTWOOD COLLEGE 

Atkins c Morgan 

b Morant 18 

Dunlop I run out 36 

Powell b Morant 1 

Ley b Morgan 12 

Kerbey b Morant 2 

D'Easum not out 8 

Dunlop II b Morant 

McMahon c ^ b Shaw 4 

Alexander not out 3 

Smith did not bat 

Buxtan did not bat 

Extras 1 



Total for 7 wickets 94 



School vs. Shawnigan Lake School 

Shawnigan battled feebly and were out for 35. Morant took 
5 for 13 and Shaw 4 for 3. Morgan batted patiently for the School 
and Dalziel added 12 by vigorous methods but the School batting 
was not impressive. The School won by 18 runs. 



SHAWNIGAN LAKE 

Goodenough Ibw Morant 

Oostermyer Ibw Morgan 6 

Relton c Grant 

b Morant 4 
Shaw 

b Morant 1 

Morant 

Morant 8 

Dalziel 

b Shaw 

Forrest b Shaw 

Hanson not out 5 

Freeth b Shaw 

Patterson b Shaw 

Extras - 1 1 



Chipman c 

Pearkes b 

Randall b 

Collen c 



UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 



Morgan 



Bryn'Jones ... b 

Grant Ibw 

Shaw b 

Baker b 

Morant c fe^ b 

Dalziel c 

Clifford b 

Cox _ b 

Riley 

Bennett b 

Extras _ 



Patterson 

b Relton 20 

Relton 3 

Oostermeyer 5 

Randall 5 

Randall 4 

Randall 

Forrest 

b Randall 12 

Relton 

Randall 1 

not out 

Randall 1 



Total 



35 



Total 



53 



15 



School vs. Shawnigan Lake School 
The return match at Shawnigan Lake was stopped by rain after 
forty minutes play. Shawnigan Lcike lost three wickets for 24 runs, 
Morant taking 2 for 8. 

School vs. Brentwood College 
This, the final match of the season, was played at home, the 
School winning on their merits. Morant took 4 Brentwood wickets 
for 7 runs in 13 overs and bowled at his best. Morgan took ^ for 
18 and Brentwood were out for 36. The School fared little better 
and it was only when Morant and Baker were together that any 
stand developed. The latter refused to flatter the bowling, and hitting 
well, was undefeated with 33 at the close, at which time the School 
had scored 55 for 8 wickets. 



BRENTWOOD COLLEGE 



Atkins c £?■ b 

Dunlop I b 

Kirby c 

Powell b 

Ley - 

D'Easum b 

Alexander c £f b 
McMahon I ... b 

Stone II b 

Dunlop II b 

Smith 

Extras 



Morant 9 

Morant 2 

Baker 

b Morant 2 

Morant 

run out 4 

Morgan 5 

Morgan 

Morgan 

Morgan 

Morgan 

not out 3 

1 1 



Total 36 



UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 

' -'organ c Stone 

b McMahon Q 

Bryn'Jcnes b Ley 5 

Grant c D'Easum 

b Ley 1 

Shaw _ b Ley 

Baker not out 33 

Morant c D'Easum 

b Dunlop 9 

Dalsiel c Atkins 

b Dunlop 

Clifford c D'Easum 

b Ley 

Cox b Dunlop 

Riley not out 1 

Whittome did not bat 

Extras 6 

Total for 8 wic\ets 55^ 



CHARACTERS OF THE 1st XI 

MORANT (Capt.) — Developed splendidly with the ball. BowHng with spirit 
and keeping a length, he was the mainstay of the School attack and 
never failed. A weak batsman but fair in the field. As a captain he 
lacked experience, was rather excitable, and paid insufficient attention 
to the placing of his field. Extremely keen and enthusiastic. 

MORGAN (Vice-Captain) — A good all rounder. Never really did himself 
justice but is a batsman of real promise with some excellent shots in 
front of the wicket. His running between the wickets is poor. As a 
bowler he kept a fair length but had a tendency to no ball. A sound 
fielder with good hands. Enthusiastic to a degree and possesses a know 
ledge of the game such as is all too seldom seen. 

BRYN'JONES— -A left-hander with an attractive style who has never come 
off. The strokes are there but confidence and decision are still lacking. 
He is a betten. bowler than he himself believes and could excel in this 
department. Fair in the field. 

DALZIEL — He can punish loose bowling but his defence is weak and he 
possesses no strokes on the off-side. His bowling always lacked sting 
and frequently length. Very active in the field and was keen and 
enthusiastic at all times. 



16 



GRANT — Lethargic and not active enough as a wic! e: keeper and too apt 
to use his pads rather than his gloves. Somewhat improved as a bat 
and was beginning to develop the necessary confidence. 

SHAW — Quick on his feet and h ts the loose ball ha d but possesses little 
in the way of defence. Has had success with the ball against tail-end 
batsmen but his control of length is faulty and he bowls far too few 
good balls to worry a batsman of any experience. Fair in the field and 
has proved a useful member of the side. 

BAKER — The most improved member of the team and a natural hitter of 
real promise. He hits straight and times the ball well on the leg side. 
His defence, though not strong, has improved. A fair field and not 
without promise as a bowler. 

RILEY — As a batsman he had some idea of defense but his attacking strokes 
were few. Keen in the held. 

WHITTOME — He has come on somewhat with the ball but his bowling 
lacks "hostility" as yet. Interest and etfort would bring him wickets. 
A bad fielder. 

CLIFFORD — Has developed a fair defence and a few strokes on the leg side 
but is too prone to "'nibble" on the off side. Very keen in the field 
and has good hands. Enthusiastic to a degree and shows real promise. 

COX — Quite keen and promising. Strong on the leg side but his defence is 
by no means sound. Very fair in the field. 




THE CRICKET XI 

Shaw, Whittome, Baker, Riley, Cox, Clifford I, 

Dalziel, Morgan, Morant, Bryn-Jones, Grant 



17 




G. E. PEARSON 

W'inner of the 

Donald Hugh Chapman Cup 



13 



SWIMMING and DIVING 

The Swimming and Diving competitions were held on June 
10th. Mr. A. McKinnon acted as judge and was accompanied this 
year by tw^o excellent swimmers from the Y. M. C. A., who gave 
some astounding performances and demonstrations of what can be 
done in the various styles of swimming. These same young men 
recently went to Eastern Canada and now hold Canadian Cham- 
pionships. 

Our own Swimming competition was won by Gilbert who was 
awarded the Mathews Cup. The Diving was won by Riley. 



GYMNASTICS 

The Gym competition was held on March 22nd. As usual Mr. 
A. McKinnon acted as judge. He complimented Mr. Taylor, the 
instructor, and the boys on their work and judged DaUiel as Captain 
of the Gym VIII for 1946. Dalziel was awarded the Hay Croft Cup. 
The remaining members of the team w^ere Riley I, Kreger I, Kreger II, 
Perram, Bryn-Jones, Riley II, and Morrow. 



THE CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

This year the Run was held on March 29th; 72 boys took the 
run and the winner was Kruger; he covered the course in 25 minutes 
and won the Cup presented by the Old Boys. 

The best Junior for the third year in succession was Kreger II. 
Quite a large number of Juniors participated and made good time. 



TENNIS 



The finals were held on June 13th but were unable to be com- 
pleted on that day on account of rain. They were completed later 
and the Singles Championship was won by Perram who defeated 
Bryn-Jones 6-4, 6-1. Perram was awarded the Barnacle Cup. The 
Doubles were won by Perram and Dakiel who defeated Bryn' Jones 
and Morgan 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. 



19 




RUGBY FOOTBALL, 1945-46 

With nine members of last year's team available, prospects for 
the 1945-46 season were promising. It was soon evident, however, 
that the knowledge of the game possessed by many was extremely 
sketchy and that in the vital positions, at half and in the centre, 
there were definite weaknesses. These weaknesses were never eradi' 
cated, with the result that behind the scrum the team never showed 
to advantage and time and again only the lion-hearted play of Dalziel 
saved them from eclipse. Among the forwards there was much talent 
and by mid'season a fairly well balanced pack, particularly strong 
in the "'loose,'''' rounded into shape. 

Twelve matches were played by the 1st X'V, seven of which 
were won and five lost. 

The official team for the season was as follows: R. G. R. Dalziel 
(Capt.), R W. Bissett (Vice-Capt.), P. M. Perram, W. M. Riley, 
M. R Vidler, R. W. Duncan, G. D. Morant, J. D. H. Bryn-Jones, 
M. A. Grant, R. R. Badda, D. M. Kreger, F. E S. Atkins, J. O. 
Mothersill, D. H. Francis, and K. W. Bennett. 

The 2nd X'V played six matches, three of which were won, two 
lost and one drawn. Some fair talent was revealed, particulary among 
the forwards, where McLarty, McLellan and Morrison were pro' 
minent. Here again lack of sound knowledge was evident and the 
backs were weak. 

In addition to the 1st and 2nd teams a llO'lb. team was organ- 
ized and matches we're played with Fairbridge Farm School, Oaklands 
School, and on a slightly different weight basis, with Shawnigan Lake 
School. In this group were players of real promise who should be 
outstanding in the more senior teams in the near future. 



20 




THE RUGBY XV 

Kreger I, Mothersill, Morant, McLarty, Perram, Duncan, Atkins, Bennett, 

Grant, Bissett, DaUiel, Riley I, Vidler, 



Badd 



a. 



Bryn'Jones. 



FIRST FIFTEEN MATCHES 

School vs. Victoria High School 
The School opened the season at Victoria High School, where 
they were successful by the only try scored. 

The ground was heavy and the game was a forward one. The 
School pack, though outweighed, managed to give the backs a fair 
share of the ball but poor passing spoilt many a promising movement. 
After a period of defensive play the School exerted pressure and 
just before half time Perram all but scored. He was injured, however, 
and did not appear after half time. 

The game was very even after the restart v.'ith little outstanding 
play by cither side, although Badda put in some useful work for the 
School on the wdng. Shortly before the end the School forwards 
carried the ball over for the only score of the game. 

School vs. Brentwood College 
This game was played at Brentwood on Nov. 10th and resulted 
in a win for the home team by the only try scored. 

Rain fell throughout and play was largely of a forward nature. 
Brentwood had a decided advantage in the first half but though the 
School were hard pressed, they succeeded in holding out until half 
time. As the whistle blew, Perram, the School outside half, was in- 
jured and following the resumption of play, Brentwood sportingly 
dropped a man. 



21 



The School did better in the second half and had a fair share 
of the game, hut the only score came in the last five minutes when 
bad tackling let a Brentwood player in :t the flag for an unconverted 
try. 

The School backs were weak all round and the tackling of the 
team as a whole was poor. The work of the School forwards, of 
whom Stephenson was by far the best, was inferior to that of their 
opponents both in the loose and in the line out. 

School vs. Brentwood College 
The home game against Brentwood College was played under 
perfect weather conditions and resulted in a win for the School by 
two goals, a penalty goal, and a try (16 pts.) to a goal (5 pts.). 

Dalziel opened the scoring for the School after about ten minutes 
play making no mistake with a penalty kick from inside the Brent- 
wood twenty-five. At this stage, Brentv.ood were more convincing 
behind the scrum but the School forv.ards were superior in the loose 
and fully held their own in the tight. Shortly before half time, the 
School went further in front when Kreger I picked up a loose ball 
inside the Brentwood tweny-five and dodged his way over at the flag. 
Dahiel failed to convert. After the r:sumption play contin'ied to b" 
very even and for the most part between the two twenty-fives until 
Perram, taking advantage o^ a Brentwood fumbk near the half v.ay 
line, gathered, ran around the opposition ?nd cut in to score between 
the posts. Dalziel converted and the School led 11-0. This lead v,'as 
increased when Dalziel, taking a prss from Perram on the half wav 
line and using his great speed, ran around the opposing backs and 
down the wing to score a grand try at the flag for Morant to add 
the extra points with a splendid kick. Late in the game, bad tackling 
allowed a Brentwood player to cross at the flag and score between the 
posts. Goal was kicked and the School won 16-5. 

Although without two of their regular members, the School 
played keen, robust football: the forwards were fast on the ball and 
the tackling was greatly improved. The backs were not very con- 
vincing but took full advantage of mistakes by the opposition. Ste- 
phenson, Francis and Bennett were the pick of the forw^ards while 
Dalziel was easily the most effective of the backs. Both newcomers, 
Riley II at scrum half, and Br>'n-Jones at full back showed to advan- 
tage in their first game for the School. 

School vs. 0.\k B.\y High School 
The School were not at full strength for their game against 

Oak Bay High School at Cranmore Road, but their form was very 

disappointing and Oak Bay won 12-3. 

The Oak Bay forw^ards were very keen and vigorous in the 

loose completely outplaying the School and making constructive work 

by the School backs ver>' difiicult by their "kick and run" tactics. 
From scrambles near the School line Oak Bay scored two tries in 

each half: none were converted. The School replied in the second 



22 



halt when Bissett, the scrum half, ran through on his own from the 
Oak Bay twenty-five to provide one of the few bright spots in a very 
poor game. Morant failed to convert. Although Dalziel was always 
dangerous and Kreger I made one good run, the School backs were 
far from happy, and though the tackling of the team showed some 
improvement, the handling and kicking left much to be desired. 

School vs. Shawnigan Lake School 
The School were too strong for their opponents at Shawnigan 
Lake and won by six tries and a goal (23 pts.) to nil. 

The general calibre of play w^as not good and little of a con- 
structive nature was shown by either team. Kreger I opened the 
scoring early in the game and both Dahiel and Perram added tries 
before half time when the School led 9-0. 

Following the change over, play was somewhat more spirited. 
Dalziel was the first to score; then came two quick tries by Perram, 
the second after clever use of the "dummy". Duncan finished the 
scoring vvhen he snapped up a loose ball and ran through on his own, 
a just reward for keen forward play. The place kicking was poor, 
Morant being the only one to kick goal though Riley I, Dalziel, 
Perram and Francis also tried their hands. The School three-quarters, 
of whom Dalziel and Perram were the best, were never together, and 
the halves were far too slow. Stephenson, Duncan and Vidler were 
the pick of the forwards. 

School vs. Royal N.wal College (2nd XV) 
Weather and ground conditions were excellent and some very 
open football was expected. Unfortunately, this did not prove to be 
the case, as the College backs favoured the shortkick, and the running 
and passing of the School three-quarters was so poor that they pro- 
fited little from a fair share of a dry ball. 

Early in the game Dalziel took a pass from Perram and went 
through the centre on his own from half way to score between the 
posts. This try was purely the result of DalziePs own great speed and 
determination and was not brought about by any constructive work 
by the backs. Morant failed to convert. A little later Badda forced 
himself into the clear on the right wing but with only the full back 
to beat his scoring pass to Perram was too long delayed and forward. 
Play was of a ver>' even nature until shortly before half time the 
Naval College were awarded a penalty thirty yards out and almost 
on the touch line from which spot a splendid penalty goal was kicked. 
Immediately after play was resumed some very bad handling in 
the College twenty-five and some keen and vigorous play by Duncan 
resulted in this player beating the opposition to the ball after a Col- 
lege man had dropped a pass in his own in-goal. Riley I failed to add 
the extra points. The School increased their lead when Riley I, having 
dribbled a loose ball some yards, gathered, and when tackled near the 
line, gave to Morant, who forced his way over for a try which 
Dalziel turned into a goal. Towards the end, the College applied 

23 



pressure and for some time play was in the School twenty-five. No 
further score resulted, however, and the School v. on a well-contested 
game 11-3. 

Of the School forwards, Stephenson, was outstanding and re- 
ceived good support from Vidler and Duncan who were excellent 
in the loose. Bissett was too slow at the base of the scrum. Riley I 
and Perram were not happy either in attack or defence, and Dalziel 
alone appeared capable of scoring a try or acting resolutely when 
danger threatened. 

School vs. Brentwood College 

Brentwood, playing at home, were too clever for the School in 
this, the third game of the season between the schools. 

Fortune favoured the School when in the first minute a faulty 
kick by a Brentwood player placed the ball in the hands of Badda, 
the School right wing. Badda ran strongly to v.'ithin five yards of 
the Brentwood line, where he was tackled, and Duncan, who was 
up in support, scooped up the loose ball and fell over near the 
corner for a try which Morant failed to improve. 

Brentwood then attacked strongly and, well-served by two good 
halves, their outsides were always dangerous. Before half time two 
unconverted tries had been scored and this advantage would have 
been greatly increased but for the splendid tackling of Dalziel whose 
defensive play was of a high order. The School forwards played 
fairly well, and the backs had their chances, but their handling was 
faulty and opportunities were thrown away. 

After the change over both sides played vigorous football but 
Brentwood were always more constructive and despite heroic efforts 
by Dalziel increased their lead by a goal late in the game and won 
by two tries and a goal (11 pts.) to a try (3 pts.). 

The School forwards more or less held their own throughout 
though their packing in the loose was inferior to their opponents. 
Once again the School backs were most unconvincing in attack and 
with the exception of DaUiel and Badda defended badly. 

School vs. Victoria High School 
The game was played at Victoria High School and resulted in 
a win for the home team by a goal and a try (8 pts.) to a try (3 pts.). 
During the first half the High School had the better of the 
game but only managed to score once when bad tackling allowed 
their right wing to cross at the flag and to score between the posts. 
The tr^^ was converted. The School replied shortly before half time 
when, following a scrum in midfield, Dalziel, using his great speed 
and determination, beat man after man to score a try which Morant 
failed to improve. 

After half time the School played with spirit and had rather 
more of the game, but the forwords were always struggling to hold 
their own against taller and heavier men. In consequence the School 



24 



backa had ver>' tew opportunities and the halves were not quiek or 
clever enough to turn them to advantage. The High School increased 
their lead when one of their backs forced himself over during a 
scramble on the School line but the try was not converted. In the 
closing minutes the School exerted strong pressure: both Perram and 
Badda were all but over and the best chance of the day was ruined 
when Grant's vital pass to Perram was untakeable. Little good 
football was played, but both sides were keen and the game was 
robust to a degree Of the School forwards Vidler, Francis and 
Riley I were prominent, while of the backs Perram showed that given 
running room he could be dangerous, and Dalziel was his determined 
courageous self. 

School vs. Brentwood College 

This, the fourth game of the season between the two teams re- 
sulted in a win for the School by the odd try in three. 

The ground was heavy and the ball v^^et but no rain fell during 
the game and both sides handled fairly well and play was extremely 
keen and vigorous throughout. 

From the opening whistle the School exerted pressure and main- 
tained It until half time. The forwards fully held the Brentwood 
pack in the line out and the tight and were deiinitely superior in the 
loose where they were far quicker on the ball. Vidler was very 
prominent for the School in the loose and was a constant source of 
worry to the Brentwood centres and halves. The School backs while 
not as sound as their opponents, were definitely more thrustful. Two 
good chances were lost when first Grant and then Perram w^ent right 
through the centre and only lack of support prevented certain tries 
Dalziel frequently tested the opposing full back with high punts and 
on at least one occasion a try almost resulted. Shortly before half 
time, following a scrum on the Brentwood line, the forwards pushed 
their opponents over and Duncan scored a try which Morant failed 
to improve. 

After the breather the School continued to press and Dalziel 
increased the lead with a typical determined dash down the left wing. 
Riley I failed to convert. Brentwood then rallied and for the rest of 
the game fully held their own. Their wings were always dangerous 
but the School tackling, particularly that of Riley I and Dalziel, was 
keen and sure. Perram and Badda also played good defensive football 
at this stage. Shortly before the end Brentwood scored a very nice 
try on the left wing at the flag. This try was not converted and the 
School won a fine game 6-5. 

The School team gave a very spirited and improved display. 
The improvement was especially noticeable behind the scrum where 
Grant played with new dash and confidence and Perram gave a 
pleasing display both in attack and defense. Dalziel gave his usual 
lion-hearted exhibition, v^'hile Riley I and Badda on the wangs held 
difiicult opponents well. 



25 



School vs. A Royal Canadl^n Naval College Team 
The School, without Colours, were too strong for a team from 
the Naval College and won by three goals, a penalty goal, and a 
try (21 pts.) to a penalty goal and two tries (9 pts.). 

Ground and weather conditions were good and the game was 
very open. Kreger I and Morrison scored tries in the opening half 
while Morant converted Morrison's try and was also successful from 
a penalty. The College replied with two tries and the School led 
11-6 at half time. 

After the restart Duncan put the School further ahead and 
Grant added the final try shortly before the end. This last try was 
by far the best of the game and came when Perram, by clever use of 
the '"dummy,'' put himself through the centre, drew the fullback 
and gave Grant, who was well up in support, a scoring pass. Morant, 
who kicked well throughout, converted both tries. The College 
failed to cross the School line during the second half, but were sue 
cessful Vv'ith a penalty given agamst the School for "feet up". The 
School forwards were too active for the opposing pack and gave the 
outsides many opportunities. The backs, v;ithout Dalziel, v^'ere not 
convincing, but Grant displayed improved form and Perram once 
again proved himself the most intelligent three-quarter in the School. 

School vs. Chilliw.ack High School 

The game with Chilliwack High School was played at home. 
B. Watt, a member of last year's School side, was instrumental in 
arranging the fixture and is to be warmly commended, not only for 
his play, which was of a high order, but for his enthusiasm and 
keenness in carrying his knowledge of football to his new school and 
furthering its advancement there. 

For some time play was fairly even but gradually the School 
gained control and Chilliwack was hard pressed. The School backs 
finished badly, however, and time and again promising movements 
were ruined. In addition Chilliwack defended well. Perram and 
Dalziel combined well several times but it was Badda who opened the 
scoring when he crossed at the flag. Morant failed to convert. 

After the resumption the School controlled the game completely 
but the backs were never together and the Chilliwack defense held 
until shortly before the end when Francis, who had a good match, 
fought his way over from a line out. Morant failed to convert and 
the School won 6-0. 

ChilUwack were a heavy side, played vigorous football and 
defended well. The School, though the better side, threw their 
chances away, and their backs, including Dakiel, gave a poor display. 

, School vs. Old Boys 
This, the final match of the season, was played at the School 
and resulted in a win for the Old Boys by three goals and a try 
(18 pts.) to 0. 



26 



The Old Boyj with Gibbs, the Victoria Rep Team captain, at 
centre three-quarter, were particulary strong behind the scrum. Their 
pack, well led by Corry, a prominent forward on this year's Pro- 
vincial Champions, Varsity Thundcrhirds, fully held their own with 
the School scrum who were without Riley I and Francis. 

After a spell of fairly even play the Old Boys opened the 
scoring when R. DaUiel caught the School napping going over on 
the blind side follovvang a scrum near the School line. The try was 
scored between the posts and Williams added the extra points. A 
little later Corry shook oif several School tacklers in a determined 
run and scored far out. Williams failed to convert. 

After the change over, with the wind at their backs, the School 
for a short time e.\erted pressure. The backs showed little of a con- 
structive nature, however, and after Morant was wide with two 
penalty kicks, the Old Boys again took command. R. Dalziel scored 
his second trv far our V'/hen he forced his way over after picking up a 
loose ball: irresolute tackling was responsible for this try which 
Williams goaled with a magnificent kick. The School Vv'ere saved 
on two occarions, once by Bryn-Jones Vv'hen he brought Gibbs down 
when this dangerous player was in the clear, and once by Kreger I 
who bundled Creer>' into touch at a critical moment. The Old Boys 
were not to be denied, however, and Gillies, running strongly on the 
right wing, crossed at che flag and scored between the posts for Boak 
to add the extra points. 

The Old Boys, who were a young team, gave a very creditable 
performance: they played spirited, and at times clever football, and 
gave the School a lesson in passing and handling which was badly 
needed. 

The School played hard but were outclassed. Dalziel tackled 
well and received fair support from Badda and Kreger I, but the 
halves, Bissett and Grant, v.^ere overshadowed by their opposite 
numbers. The forwards held their own, but Riley I and Francis v.'ere 
sadly missed. 

The following represented the Old Bovs: J. A. Gibbs, D. I. W. 
Braide. A. G. Beckton, W. E. Rednath. W. R.' Batten, J. E. Boak, I. 
Dalziel. R. A. Creer^^ J. Twiss, G. D. Corry. R. Williams, D. Gillies, 
B. Watt, R. L. Norman, D. B. Gillespie and R. M. Dalziel. 



CHARACTERS of the FIRST XV 

DALZIEL (Captain and Centre Three-quarter) — Really better suited to the 
wing position he combined poorly, but his speed and determination 
made him a most effective player and a consistent scorer. His kick- 
ing was weak, but he was fearless in face of forwards and his tackling 
was beyond praise. Captained the side with enthusiasm and set a 
splendid example by his spirited and courageous play. 

BISSETT (Vice-Captain and Scrum Half) — Keen, but was too slow and 
clumsy and never developed an understanding with his stand-off half. 
His defensive kicking was useful at times and he possessed a good 
knowledge of the game. A poor tackle. 



27 



BR YN- JONES (Full-back) — Lacks experience as yet but has made a very 
promising start. Handles fairly well but is slow to clear and is none 
too happy in face of forward rushes. A very vigorous and effective 
tackle. 

PERRAM( Centre Three-quarter) — A promising centre who played the game 
intelligently and unselfishly. He possessed good hands, a useful 
"dummy,'" a fair turn of speed, and his tackling has improved con- 
siderably. Weak in face of forwards with the hall at ther feet, and 
made little use of his kicking. 

GRANT (Stand-off half) — Lacks a sound knowledge of the game but has 
come on considerably. His handling and passing were very faulty and 
he had no understanding with his scrum-half. Improved as a tackle, 
possesses courage and is keen to learn. 

BADDA (Wing Three-quarter) — New to the game but is keen and shows 
promise. A detcnnined runner and a good tackle. 

KREGER I (Wing Three-quarter) — Played some useful games and, given 
enough ground in which to move, is hard to stop. His tackling has 
improved considerably but in general his play is most inconsistent. He 
must learn to face forwards and to improve his kicking which is very 
weak. 

MOTHERSILL — A useful forward in the "tight": none too strong in the 
"loose" and the line out. Has little idea of combination as yet. 

ATKINS — A keen and vigorous forward who filled the position of "hook" 
in a promising manner. Excelled in the "loose" and was a fair tackle. 
Rather excitable and prone to commit minor infringements. 

MORANT — Rather tall for a front-rank man but played fairly well in the 
"tight". Excellent in the "loose" with the ball at his feet, and was 
always prominent in any short passing among the pack. His play in 
the line out and his tackling are still weak. Came on splendidly as 
an all-round kick and shows real promise in this department. 

RILEV I — Played both as a three-quarter and as a forward, and, though hap- 
pier in the latter position, performed creditably in both. An honest 
worker both in the "tight" and in the "loose". Combined poorly and 
was- caught with the ball too often, but his thrust and determination 
made him a dangerous man near the line. A magnificent tackle. 

FRANCIS — A good second row man who applied his weight well in the 
scrum and used his height to advantage in the line out. A vigorous 
player he was extremely dangerous near the opposing goal line, but he 
is still far too prone to commit minor infringements. 

VIDLER — A very valuable back row forward. Always on the ball in the 
"loose" and a tireless worker who played the game with zest and en- 
thusiasm and never disappointed. A weak tackle as yet and must 
improve in this important phase of the game. 

DUNCAN — An excellent wing forward whose work in the "loose" was of 
a high order. Always hunting for tries and was extremely dangerous 
near the opposing line. A weak tackle and must improve in this 
department. 

BENNET — Made an excellent start as a wing forward. Keen, unselfish, and 
revelled in the game. A magnificent tackle and an extremely promising 
footballer in every way. 



28 



THE CADET CORPS 

The following appointments were sanctioned hy the Head- 
master: 

Cadet Captain M. Grant 

Cadet Lieutenant R. W. Bissett 

Cadet Lieutenant P. Perram 

Cadet Company Sgt. -Major ..... McLarty 

Cadet Conipany Q. M. S Moilliet 

Our activities in this direction were carried on as usual, only in 
a somewhat modified form. During the war years we endeavoured to 
follow the official courses laid down by N. D. H. Q., but owing to 
the excessive in-roads it made on our spare time, the work was 
drastically curtailed and such items as signalling, knotting, and 
First Aid were ruled out. 

Early in the Xmas term two old members of the School, Bissett 
and Stephenson I, re-joined us after having put in a year's training 
with the Regular Army. We benefited greatly from their up-to-date 
knowledge, Stephenson helping with the P. T. and Bissett with the 
Shooting. 

Our early efforts at Company Drill were seriously hampered by 
the weather, which seemed to take a delight in turning on a deluge 
each Wednesday. Of the first 20 Wednesdays of the year only t 
were fine enough for outside work. As a result our Cadet activii:ies 
had to be carried on in either the Gym. or in No. 3 Classroom. This 
might have become tedious in the extreme had it not been for the 
timely arrival of outside help. 

On Nov. 21st we were accorded a practical demonstration of 
the uses of the "Walkie-Talkie"; this was followed by a motion 
picture film portraying its uses in the Field, and the dire results that 
might accrue from its mis-use. Developments in Radar were also 
shown and in such a way that even the youngest member of the Corps 
was able to digest the priciples of this latest invention. We extend 
our ver>' sincere thanks to Sgt. -Major McKinnon who was responsible 
for this very interesting break in our routine. 

On Jan. 16 Lieut. P. Harrison arrived in the nick of time and 
for an hour extemporized on his experiences while on "Operational 
Flying". As a lecturer we congratulate him. The information he 
imparted was of a very practical nature; the serious side of flying 
was duly stressed and throughout the talk there ran a keen sense 
of humour. We hope he will visit us again. 

Lieut. W. R. Batten, M. C, helped out on another atrociously 
wet Wednesday. This time we obtained first-hand information on 
the work of the Armoured Car Division, particulary in the actions 
that centered around Caen and Falaise. We were not able to eluci- 
date the occasion during which he won the M. C. but we gather 
that it was during the fighting in Holland. Heartiest congratulations. 
Major Ransome, Asst. Cadet Officer for this area, visited us 
on Feb. 16, bringing with him moving pictures of G. L's in training, 
the Youth Movement that is being inaugurated in U. S. A. and the 

29 



various progressive steps that have been made m the World of 
Science since 1939. This visit, made at no inconsiderable incon- 
venience, was greatly appreciated by all. 

The first 10 days of the Summer term found us \ orking over- 
time in an effort to achieve that standard of proficic/xy which has 
now become tradition. In this work Capt. Grant is to be highly com- 
mended for having brought the Corps successfiiUy through a year 
that did not lend itself kindly. 

By dint of daily practice the Eand under the guidance of the 
Headmaster and Sgt. Dalziel proved itself to be of inestimable value 
especially during the latter days of training, when our marching 
needed much material assistance. 

Our Annual Inspection took place on the arcernoon of May 6. 
For this event we were blessed with perfect weather and an unusually 
large gathering of parents and guests. These f.ictors undoubtedly 
helped in bringing our Ceremonial, etc., up to the high standard that 
we strive to attain. Major Ransome, the Inspecting Officer, seemed 
definitely satisfied with the work that had been covered during the 
year and commended all on their fine display. In his few brief v.'ords 
at the close of the Ceremony, he stressed the fact that the Cadet Corps 
Training was in no way an inducement for the Youth of the Country 
to become militar>'-minded or even to instil a preference for things 
militar>% but that its purpose was to inculcate a spirit of teamwork, 
and at the same time to exert a degree of discipline, which, although 
distasteful to most, was beneficial to all. On his recommendation the 
Headmaster granted a general Leave to all members of the Corps. 

As usual we attended Divine Service at St. Luke's Church on the 
evening of June 16. This Ser\'ice, first held in 1942, was brought 
into being by the stress and dangers of war; despite the fact that we 
are now at peace its significance still stands. We are grateful to the 
Rector for his timely message on that occasion. 




INSPECTION DAY 



••*t 






• • * « • • ••• 



: V' 



U"t 




^&2X 




A most unfortunate epidemic of "Pink-Eye" during the Easter 
term played havoc with the shootmg averages of certain members of 
the Corps. Despite this annoyance, 6 "Possibles" were attained during 
the course of the year, (the marksmen being Grant, Perram, Vidler, 
Bissett, Cox and Shipleyll), while on 41 other occasions scores 95 
and over were registered. 

Two teams of 1 1 each were entered in the D. C. R. A. com- 
petition, which was fired during Jan., Feb., and Mar. The scores 
below would indicate that the School still possessed Shots comparable 
with those of 1942 and that there are others, who with further prac- 
tice and experience will prove formidable. Unfortunately time did 
not allow us to enter in other matches. 



1946 D. C. R. A. 



"A" TEAM 

R. W. Bissett 90 89 

M. L. CliiTord 91 90 

D. Davison 96 79 

D. Graham 78 91 

M. Grant 95 87 

R. Harrison 86 94 

D. Henley 91 85 

V. Kruger 89 89 

P. Perram 83 92 

J. West 84 85 

J. Whittome 89 95 



9 5 
96 
95 
93 
90 
84 
86 
78 
86 
93 
91 



Av. 
91.3 
92.3 
90.0 
87.3 
90.6 
88.0 
87.3 
85.3 
87 
87.3 
91.6 



"B" TEAM 

D. M. Kreger 89 

H. L. Mackenzie 82 
W. H. McDougall 73 
R. H. McLarty ... 89 

D. Moilliet 89 

O. P. Morrow 91 

J. O. Mothersill . . 80 

S. G. Riley 81 

G. R. Shipley 84 

R. V. Snape 86 

M. R Vidler 85 

R. G. Dalziel — 

E. Francis — 



87 


88 


88.0 


79 


95 


85.3 


84 


85 


80.6 


93 


72 


84 6 


91 


92 


90.6 


91 


91 


91.0 


73 


80 


77.6 


— 


— 


81.0 


83 


84 


83.3 


— 


91 


88.5 


84 


92 


87.0 


85 


— 


85.0 


96 


88 


92.0 



972 976 987 



929 946 958 



Average: 88.94 
1945: 87.14 



Average: 85.84 
1945: 84.2 

Those averaging 90% or over in the 3 Shoots will receive their 
2nd class medals from Ottawa in due course. 

The Harvey Memorial Rifle, for the best shot in the School, 
and the Breadwood Cup fo'- the best Intermediate were both won 
by D. Davison, who througoat the year did excellent work. 

Our congratulations go to Clifford I on winning the D. C. R. A. 
Cup. Although of tender years he has represented the School for 
the past 3 years and is now coming into his own. 

The best Junior is undoubtedly Stewart. He has put up some 
very high scores and we expect him to help us out in the near future. 



31 



OLD BOYS NOTES 

The Annual Meeting was held at the School on May 16. There 
was a fair attendance and the following officers were elected: Presi- 
dent, W. J. R. Speers; Vice-President (Victoria), F. N. Cabeldu: 
Honorary Secretary, W. R. G. Wenman. 

The Old Boys' Annual Dinner was held at the Union Club on 
June 1st. The Headmaster spoke briefly, and then followed a most 
interesting talk by Captain W. B. Creery, C. B. E., R. C. N., Officer 
Commanding Royal Canadian Naval College. Capt. Creery spoke 
of his experiences while in command of H. M. C. S. Prince Robert 
with particular reference to the formal surrender of Hong Kong by 
the Japanese, upon which occasion he had represented Canada. Capt. 
Creery mentioned a happy meeting with a fellow Old Boy, C. D. D. 
Stanley, who entertained him royally in Honolulu. 



The University School "Incogs" Cricket Club, which had not 
functioned since 1941, came to life again this year. On the last 
Saturday in May they proved too strong for the School and won 
by 54 runs. The side included such ancients as R. L. Challoner, W. J. 
R. Peers, J. D. Inverarity, W. R. G. Wenman and H. P. H. Holt, 
and such moderns as J. A. Gibbs, A. M. Cupples, and J. A. Richard- 
son. A. G. Tisdall, F. G. Skillings and R. H. Tye completed the 
team. Peers was top scorer with 40, while Tye made 28, showing 
that a wound and a spell in a German hospital had affected him little. 



The Old Boys also proved too strong for the School on the foot' 
ball field. The side was young, and nine members came from Van- 
couver and one from Seattle to play. Victoria Old Boys completed 
the side Which won 18-0. Congratulations to those who participated 
and made this very worthwhile fixture possible. 



Old Boys will be interested to hear that H. B. Renwick has been 
appointed Traffic and Sales Manager for United Air Lines in 
Honolulu. 



Old Boys of more ancient vintage will be glad to know that 
D. M. W. Grubb has come back to Victoria as Manager of the 
Imperial Bank. "Des" has spent most of his banking life in Winni- 
peg, Edmonton, and in Regina where he was for some time a pro- 
minent member of the Regina Rough Riders. 



32 



Among the new honorary aides-de-camp recently appointed by 
the Governor-General were Capt. W. B. Creery, C. B. E. and Cmdr. 
K. C. McRae: both represent the Navy. 



Brock Whitney has retired from the R. C. A. F. and has as- 
sumed control of the jewelry business established in Victoria in 1907 
by his father, the late Mr. J. M. Whitney. 



In the last issue of the "Black and Red" Lieut. W. A. Albert 
was reported as missing. Word has since been received to the effect 
that the U. S. War Department have noticed his parents that he is 
officially presumed dead. Albert was awarded the Air Medal for 
"meritorious achievement and fearless and unselfish devotion to duty". 



The parents of R. M. Wallis who was killed in action Jan. 29, 
1945, have received a communication to the effect that their son 
had been "Posthumously awarded the Operational Wings of the 
R. C. A. F. in recognition of gallant service in action against the 
enemy". 



MARRIAGES 

VERNON-BRYDEN—Maurice Arthur Vernon to Sara Bryden at Ottawa, 
Ont., Aug. 21, 1945. 

CUPPLES-STEWART— A. M. Cupples to Kathleen Rooney Stewart at 
Victoria, B. C, June 5, 1946. 

YOUNG-WATSON— John Barclay Young to Rosemary Watson at Brom- 
ley, Kent, England, May 25, 1946. 

LEGGAT-SHANNON — William Strathern Leggat to Barbara Shannon on 
March 23rd, 1946, at Vancouver, B. C. 



BIRTHS 

GORDON— To Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Gordon on June 20th, 1946, a son, 
Richard Dyke. 



DECORATIONS 
V. C. 



COLONEL C. C. I. MERRITT, (1920-1923) 

C. B. 
MAJOR GENERAL J. H. ROBERTS (1906-1908) 

D. S. O. 

MAJOR GENERAL J. H. ROBERTS (1906-1908) 

BRIGADIER F. N. CABELDU (1919-1924) 

LT. COL. D. B. BUELL (1920-1922) 

LT. COL. McSUTHERLAND BROWN (1929-1933) 

LT. COL. R. P. CLARKE (1919-1922) 

MAJOR GENERAL C. F. LOEWEN (1910-1914) 

LT. COL. ROWAN C. COLEMAN (1925-1932) 



33 



C. B. E. 

MATOR GENERAL C. F. LOEWEN (1910-1914) 
BRIGADIER F. N. CABELDU (1919-1924) 

O. B. E. 

COMMANDER A. F. PEERS (1913-1916) 
LT. COL. AENEAS BELL-IRVING (1908-1912) 
CAPTAIN A. P. MITSGRA\'E, R.C.N. (1908-1913) 
BRIGADIER G. E. R. SMITH (1914-1919) 
COLONEL ALLAN FRASER. r. c. a. m. c. (1915-1917) 
COLONEL B. R. KER. R. C. A. (1908-1910) 

M. B. E. 

LIEUT. \\\ A. B. GARRARD (1909-1916) 
MAJOR P. R. LAYARD (1928-1931) 
COMMANDER K. C. MacRAE (1927-1929) 

D. S. C. 

LIEUT. I. W. COLBY (1930-1931) 

LIEUT. COMMANDER E. E. G. BOAK (1931-1934) 

LIEUT. J. E. CLAYTON, R.C.N. (1910-1911) 

M. C. 
LT. COL. ROWAN C. COLEMAN (1925-1932) 
LIEUT. WILLIAM RICHARD BATTEN (1938-1940) 
MAJOR W. S. LEGGAT (1929-1932) 

D. F. C. 

*SQUADRON LEADER J. G. MACKID (1925-1932) 
PILOT OFFICER G. A. INVERARITY (1929-1933) 
FLYING OFFICER W. L. DARK (1936-1938) 
SQUADRON LEADER A. L PINHORN (1927-1931) 
SQUADRON LEADER E. C. HAMBER (1928-1931) 
FLIGHT-LIEUT. J. D. TAYLOR (1936-1940) 
FLIGHT-LIEUT. A. P. POYNTZ (1924-1928) 

KING'S COMMENDATION 
FLIGHT-LIEUT. E. B. ALLAN, R. C. A. F. (1929-1932) 

MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES 
SUB LIEUT. C. R. A. SENIOR (1934-1936) 
*LIEUT. ERIC S. DITMARS (1928-1931) 
LIEUT. A. W. EVERETT, R.C.N. (1936-1939) 
WING-COMMANDER T. L. C. BRANSON (1930-1932) 
CAPTAIN W. S, LEGGATT (1929-1932) 
MAJOR P. R. BELSON (1911-1917) 
LIEUT. M. A. VERNON (1936-1941) 

ALLIED DECORATIONS 
SUB LIEUT. C. R. A. SENIOR (1934-1936): Order of the 

P.-^TROTIC War. First Class. Soviet Decoration. 
COMMANDER W. B. L. HOLMS. R.C.N. (1910-1916)- 

Czechoslovak M. C. 
*FIRST LIEUT. RAYMOND J. HUFF (1933-1938) D. F. C. 
Silver St.^r and Air Medal. 

^Killed in Action. 



34 



SERVING in HIS MAJESTY'S and ALLIED FORGES 

The following list is as complete as possible, the names of Old 
Boys serving in His Majesty's Forces, Rank and Unit having been 
omitted. The list is far from complete. Will all Old Boys please 
assist in keeping this list up-to-date by forwarding names and infor- 
mation of interest to the Headmaster at the School. 

Moll of l^mtoitr 

KILLED IN ACTION OR DIED ON ACTIVE SERVICE 
K. C. Campbell (1920-1921) C. A. S. F. 
R. J. Hopkins (1927-1929) RAF. 
J. B. Calvert (1932-1933) R. E. 
P. K. Allen (1929-1932) R. C. A. F 
Bonn C. Smith (1931-1932) R. C. A. F. 
R. F. W. Nixon (1917-1918), R.C.N. 

C. ]. B. Norman ( 1936-1939), H. M. S. Hood 
L M. S. Brown (1929-1933), R. C. A. F. 

R. W. Horsfield (1936-1939), R. A. F. 
G. F. Parker (1927-1930), R. C. A. F. 

E. S. Ditmars (1928-1930), R. C. N. V. R. 
L. P. Douglas (1931-1933), R. C. N. V. R. 
J. O. Thorne (1937-1940), R. C. A. F. 

D. H. J. Chapman (1930-1933). R. C. A. F. 
Bruce C. Clark (1928-1929), R. A. F. 
John D. Mercer (1938-1941), R. C. A. F. 
Paul W. Jeanneret (1935-1937). R. C. A. F. 
T. Ardies Johnston (1927-1928), R. A. F. 

A. McKenley Bull (1914-1918), R. C. N. V. R. 
W. M. D. Kerfoot (1930-1933), C. A. S. F. 
J. W. Moore (1924-1926), U. S. A. A. C. 
Wm. Scott (1938-1939), C. A. S. F. 

F. P. Winslow (1938-1940), C. A. S. F., Rec. Regt. 
J. T. Bryden (1920-1923), C. A. S. F. 

E. C. Clark (1928-1929), C. A. S.F. 

E. H. Robinson, Asst. Master (1940-1941), R. C. A. F. 

D. G. Worthington (1928-1931), C. A. S. F. 

J. E. Worthington (1928-1931), C. A. S. F. 

R. H. M. Borden (1937-1938) 1940-1941), C. A. S. F. 

J. L. Atkinson (1928-1931), R. C. A. F. 

J. K. Brown (1938-1939), C. A. S. F. 

R. M. Wallis (1939-1942), R. C. A. F. 

A. J. Pinhorn (1927-1931), R. A. F. 

R. J. Huff (1934-1938), U. S. A. A. F. 

J. D. Hunter (1928-1937), R. C. A. F. 

J. E. Diamond (1928-1932), R. C. A. F. 

H. H. MacKenzie, (1938-1939), R. C. A. F. 

W. A. Albert (1937-1941), U. S. A. A. F. 

J. G. Mackid (1925-1932), R. A. F. 

35 



ARMY, NAVY and AIR FORCE 



G. L. Aitken 
H. W. Akehurst 
R. C. Adams 
S. M. Adams 
A. Aivazoff 
P. Aldersey 
J. M. Atkins 
E. B. Allan 
R. E. Bailey 
E. X. Bacon 
N. P. Baker 
W. R. Batten 
J. H. Baynes 
\V. J. R. Beech 
J. S." Bcgg 
A. D. Bell-Irving 
A. E. BelMrving 
R. Bell-Irving 
P. R. Belson 

E. E. G. Boak 
J. Boak 

F. Boate 

0. H. Borradaille 

D. P. Boyd 

G. G. B. Boyd 
J. Boyce 

R. \V. Bissett 

J. H. Blythe 

T. L. C. Branson 

G. T. Bnetling 

N. F. Brooks 

J. M. Buchannan 

b. B. Buell 

E. F. Burton 
J. C. Byrn 
G. S. Burns 

G. S. Bradshaw 

R. C. Brinkley 

J. R. Bonar 

C. W. Brodigan 

R. A. Brown 

R. Carle 

C. C. Carpenter 

R. E. Chambers 

G. O. K. Chapman 

J. A. Cawston 

F. N. Cabeldu 
E. H. Cabeldu 
W. 1. Cameron 

C. b. Campbell 

1. W. Carr 

T. R. Chettleburg 

D. Clay 

J. Callahan 
T. Every-Clayton 
W. A. S. Clayton 
A. M. Cockeram 
R. C. Coleman 
D. B. Collison 
I. H. Connolly 



J. G. Cook 
J. U. Copeman 
''. G. (.cirnwal] 
R. F. Cornwall 
G. D. Corry 
P. Cos:c 
H. C. Cotterell 
R. H. Cotton 
D. S. Craig 
R. A. Creery 
W. B. Creery 
A. M. Cupples 
J. F. B. Cupples 
I. E. Challenor 
J. C. Currie 
R. P. Clarke 
L. Darcus 
M. D. A. Darling 
W. Dark 
I. K. Dahiel 
G. C. Dennis 
H. S. Davie 
W. Decker 
A. H. Disher 
W. R. Dowrey 
J. S. Drummond 
M, M. Duke 
G. L. Dunlop 
F. Dyer 

W. C. Ditmars 
L. de Duke 
A. W. Everett 

D. D. Everett 

C. C. Ferric 
S. Fetherstone 
A. W. Field 
P. L. Fowler 

E. C. Flewin 

A. W. Eraser 

D. A. Eraser 
M. P. Eraser 
H. R. Fullerton 

E. R. Gardner 
R. O. Galloway 
Y. W. Gagnon 
R. B. George 

I. A. Gihbs 
b. B. Gillespie 
W. L. Gillespie 
D. M. Gillies 
J. W. Golby 
R. E. Gook 

D. Gordon 

J. K. Gordon 

E. F. Green 

B. T. M. Griffin 
J. A. M. Griffiths 

F. N. Gibson 
B. D. Graves 
P. Graham 



T. Graham 
'. P. Harrison 
R. T. Hager 
N. P. Hager 
H. Ham 
J. W. Hackney 
E. C. Hanbcr 
W. R. Hargreaves 
R. O. D. Harvey 
H. Hawes 
E. A. Henderson 
.J. S. Henderson 
A. T. Hinchcliff 
J. H. Hornibrook 
J. C. Hodson 
J. E. V. Holms 
W. B. L. Holms 
C. J. Holms 

E. Holstcin-Rathlou 
R. Holstein-Rathlou 
H. Holstein-Rathlou 
L. W. Hokum 

R. C. Hoyle 
J. Hills 

C. W. Husband 
L. J. Hess 
A. Inverarity 
J. D. Inverarity 
J. H. Ireland 
N. S. Jackson 
H. V. Johnson 

A. Johnson 

T. A. Johnson 

F. B. Jones 
H. F. Jaekel 

H. A. W. Knight 
R. P. G. Kennedy 

B. R. Ker 

J. D. Kerfoot 

I. K. Kerr 

J. R. Kingham 

C. Kilpatrick 
P. R. Layard 
E. J. Laffin 
W. S. Leggat 

H. A. LeMarquand 
R. A. London 
R. E. C. Lord 
R. C. Louis 

C. F. Loewen 

G. R. Leslie 
R. Maybee 

D. J. Mcbean 
A. Macpherson 
K. C. McRae 
R. N. Manning 
G. Martin 

J. Mason 
D. H. Massy 
R. O. Massy 



36 



A. McBride 

D. G. McGimpsey 

K. A. Mcintosh 

W. G. Mcintosh 

R. A. McLcod 

D. S. McNicol 

S. McMullen 

A. M. Mercer 

K. R. Mercer 

A. B. Miller 

G. E. Miller 

R. Morgan 

A. P. Musgrave 

J. A. McLoughlin 

T. A. C. McLaughlin 

L. Musgrave 

J. H. Morrison 

A. Moilliet 

J. Moilliet 

J. N. Mclllree 

N. Nantes 

M. D. Neal 

H. A. H. North 

J. C. Northrup 

J. T. Nute 

H. L. Norris 

R. L. Norman 

W. M. Ogle 

G. S. Ohrt 

F. Owston 

A. Pickard 
W. H. Parker 

B. G. Parsons 
J. Parker 

A. F. Peers 
J. D. Patterson 
H. A, Phillips 

C. A. Pike 

V. G. Pinhorn 
F. C. Pollard 
W. F. A. Pollard 



H. A. Poyntz 
' 1. D. Poyntz 
W. D. Perry 
G. V. G. Prance 
G. W. E. Phillips 
J. R. Parris 

E. A. Pollock 
J. H. Redden 
J. M. Reynolds 
J. A. Richardson 

P. Ridgeway-W'ilson 

J. G. Roberts 

W. D. Robertson 

K. C. Ross 

P. T. Rowe 

V. Ridgway 

P\. D. Spencer 

C. R. A. Senior 

F. G. Singleton 

E. J. Senkler 

D. F. Slocombe 
T. D. Shaw 

P. N. Shepheard 

G. E. R. Smith 
C. G. Smith 

F. M. Smith 

F. E. Smith 

E. St. G. Soulsby 
O. L. Leigh-Spencer 

F. H. Leigh-Spencer 
R. Slater 

C. N. Sworder 

R. F. Stephenson 

M. C. Sutherland-Brown 

J. R. Smith 

G. C. Stuart 
H. A Spalding 
W. H. Stone 

G. B. Shaw 
J. Slater 

A. Thomson 



J. D. Taylor 
E. E. Teagle 
H. J. Timberlake 
A. G. Tisdall 

E. P. Tisdall 

G. A. F. Townsend 

P. C. Townsend 

A. E. Tulk 

R. B. Travis 

P. Tulk 

J. W. Tweedy 

J. A. Twiss 

D. H. Tye 

R. H. Tye 

M. G. Thomson 

D. Usher 

L. C. Usher 

M. A. Vernon 

H. R. Wade 

H. J. Wade 

C. A. Watson 
J. L. Weaver 
J. G. Wenman 

W. R. G. Wenman 
R. G. Westmacott 
R. I. Westmacott 
P. R. M. Wallis 
P. Walton 
K. Walkem 

F. O. White 
W. T. Wilkinson 
M. C. Wilson 

J. A. Wright 

H. W. H. Walker 

D. R. Wilby 
R. S. Willams 

A. W. Wolfe-Milner 
L. Young 
J. B. Young 



Compliments of . . . 

VICTORIA BOX & PAPER 

VICTORIA, B. C. 



Compliments of . . . 

J. E. Painter 
& Sons 



LIMITED 



VICTORIA, B.C. 



Phone Garden 6.511 

Barber & 
Holdcroft 

TOYS & CHINA 

1623 Douglas Street 
Victoria, B.C. 



Autographs 



Auto^vaphs 



A 



JOB 



AHEAD! 



No matter in what field of endeavor 
you may choose to make your Hving, 
every one of you boys has a big job 
ahead in this bewildering world. 
YouVe been well prepared at this 
great School and we wish you the best 
of luck in living up to the high stan' 
dards of your Alma Mater. 

KER and STEPHENSON j 

REAL ESTATE : INSURANCE : HOME LOANS 

909 GOVT. ST. - VICTORIA 



Comjpliments of . . . 

J. PARKER BUCKLE 

PRINTING CO. LIMITED 

Cam,m.zlclal catcL Social Pllttte^ 

Phone E'9913 
1024-26 Blanshard St. Victoria. B. C. 



The English Woollen Shop 

Noted for Quality 

"BRAEMAR" and "PRINGLE" SWEATERS 
"RODEX " ENGLISH OVERCOATS 



1107 Government Street 



Victoria, B. C. 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

Brown s Victoria 
Nurseries Ltd. 

Leading Florists and Seedsmen 

Flowers for Every Occasion 

WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS 

Member F. T. D. Association 



618 View St. 
Victoria, B. C. 



Tel. G'66I2 
G'3521 



Established 1885 

Quality 
Footwear 

at POPULAR PRICES 
Phone G arden 65 14 

Simpson's 
Footwear Ltd. 

649 YATES ST. 
'Where Most People Trade' 



Compliments of . . . 

Gordon Shaw 

OPTOMETRIST 

VICTORIA, B.C. 



The Boys of 
Yesteryear 

may still obtain copies of 

OLD SCHOOL 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

from 

TRIO 
Photographers 

p. O. Box 215 
Victoria, B. C. 



COLONIST WANT ADS 

The DAILY COLONIST leads 

in total Want Ads by more 

than 2 to 1. 

A Leadership Built By Results 

THE DAILY COLONIST 

WANT AD DEPT. — PHONE E-4114 

Office open 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 



Victoria Baggage 

COMPANY, LTD. 

Furniture 
Our Specialty 

STORAGE 



Give Tour Baggage Chech, 

to our Agents on Steamers 

Plying to Victoria 

CARTAGE AGENTS 

Phone: G'4118 

VICTORIA BAGGAGE CO. 

510 Fort Street 
Victoria. B. C. 



Bevan 
Si^ns 



Phone G arden 5043 



625 PANDORA AVENUE 



W. ^ J. Wilson's Boys' Department, 
because of many years experience in 
outfitting young men, is the ideal place 
to select new clothing and the results 
are sure to please the wearer 
and the ' parents alike. 



ENGLISH TOPCOATS 

TWEED JACKETS 

BRAEMER SWEATERS 

ENGLISH WOOLLENS 



We Specialize m University School 
Clothing and Accessories 



W. & J. WILSON 

Men s and Boys Clothing 
Ladies Sportswear Burberry Coats 

1217-1221 Government St. Phone E'7177 



CUNNINGHAM DRUG CO., LTD. 

}\/ia\e a Cunmngham Drug Company Store 

YOUR DRUG STORE 



PHONES: 

G'8185 G'8091 

Yates and Douglas : : : : 



Fort and Douglas 



Van Der Vleit, 

Cabeldu & May 

LIMITED 

Investment Brokers — Real 
Estate and Insurance Agents 



E-7174 



1212 Broad St. 



AA^Gllljsp^me 

pre/cription" c'heam/t/ 



B 



Telephone: Garden 1196 
Fort at Broad Victoria, B. C. 



Jaeger Woollens Aquascutum Coats 

(©. ^, Sarmau 

^inutc^ 

MEN'S CLOTHING 
AND FURNISHINGS 

Agents for the best English and Scotch 
Woollens and European Silks 

PHONE G-'!?n 
1 328 Douglas St., Victoria, B. C. 



CANADIAN 

ANTI - VIVISECTION 

SOCIETY 

516 Scollard Bldg. 
Victoria, B.C. 

"Mercy is the very prin- 
ciple of religion, of civil- 
ization, of the finer in- 
fluences of life." Oppose 
animal expei'imentation. 



INSIST UPON 

Velvet Quality \qq Gream 

For a Cool Healthful Refreshment 

Manufactured hy 

NORTHWESTERN CREAMERY LTD. 

1015 Yates Street Telephone £-7147 



}Aodern Science Proves . 



GOOD BREAD 

Gives Stamina 



BOTH FOR STUDY AND PLAY 



4X 



BREAD IS 
THE FINEST 
YOU CAN BUY 



CANADIAN BAKERIES, LIMITED 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



Phone 

E-1121 




Established 
1900 



C. & C. TAXI SERVICE LTD. 

906 Government St. Victoria, B. C. 



The 


Victoria 


Book & Stationery Co. 


Ltd. 




Waterman 


Fountain 


Pen and Pencil Sets 






Zipper 


Loose Leaf Ring Binders 






VISIT OUR ' 


'GIFT NOOK" 








Phone 


G1013 




1002 


Government 


St. 


Victoria 


B.C. 



The BAY Extends Sincere 

Congratulations 

to All Graduates 

and to undergraduates we extend our 
wishes for every success in the future. 



INCORPORATED 2~? MAY I670. 



TERRY'S 

■Meet me at TERRT'S' 

Victoria's 
Popular Rendezvous 
For Over 50 Years 



DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

SODA FOUNTAIN 

LUNCH COUNTER 

DINING ROOM 



Rose Rooms for V\/^edding 
Receptions and Banquets 

Cor. Fort and Douglas 
Victoria, B. C. 



FERNWOOD PHARMACY 

Headquarters for: 

Prescriptions, Drugs 
Stationery & School Supplies 

Prompt Free Delivery 

1923 Fernwood Rd. G-2722 



Complimeyits of . . . 

Columbia 

Paper 

Company 



VICTORIA, B. C. 



School Supplies 

SCHOOL CLOTHING 

AND 

SHOES for BOYS 



• Great Assortment 
• Best Quality 

• Lowest Prices 



David Spencer, Ltd. 



Expert Cleaning, Pressing 

and Dyeing 

MAIK OFFICE A\D WORKS 

Cor. FORT and QUADRA 

VICTORIA, B. C. 

Phone Empire 7155 

Branch Office: 710 Brouahton ..im—- ^ „ 

pLeB.361! i>^ OF CANADA 




W. PRIDHAM, Plumber 

Phone G'6843 618 Humboldt St. 

Victoria, B. C. 



CROSS' MARKETS 

... for — 

Quality Meats 



*'ALL OVER THE CITY" 



BERNARD LTD. 

C. C. L. BERNARD, Mgr. 

for 

Bicycles and Wheel Goods 

Bicycle Repairs . . Fishing" Tackle 

Sport Goods, Etc. 



1410 Douglas St. Victoria, B. C. Phone G 5911 



With Compliments of 

Kingham-Gillespie 
Coal Co., Ltd. 



Vancouver Island and 
Sootless 

COALS 



Telephone E mpire 1124 
613 FORT STREET VICTORIA, B. C. 



ACTIVE FUEL 

COMPANY 

Vancouver Island and 
Sootless 

COALS 

UP-ISLAND MILLWOOD 

769 FORT STREET Phone E-5343 



Compliments of . . . 

DALZIEL BOX 

— COMPANY = 

Victoria, B.C. 



Sidney Speedy Service , . . 

When you need LUMBER Phone Us 

Also LATH, SHINGLES, WALLBOARD 
of all kinds 

PAINTS and BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

SIDNEY LUMBER LTD. 

Garden 2515 2116 Government St. 



IVIauricG Lvarmichael 

1023 Fort Street Victoria, B. C. 



Compliments of . . . 

New Method 

Launderers, Dyers, Dry Cleaners ii Fur Storers 
947 North Park St. Phone G'816-6 



Mcdkut'4, /^ed COFFEE 

• REGULAR or DRIP GRIND 

• HERMETICALLY SEALED 

• DATE STAMPED 

AT YOUR LOCAL GROCER 



Office Phone E-2513 : Residence Phone G'5978 

(^yiarola QJ . & i^aiberlake 

OPTOMETRIST 

647 Yates Street, Victoria, B. C. 



TH E ROYAL TRUST 
COMPANY 

1202 Government Street 
EXECUTORS and TRUSTEES 



VICTORIA ADVISORY BOARD 

Senator G. H. Barnard, K. C., Senator R. F. Green, 

R. W. Mayhew, N. Yarrow, J. N. Taylor 

Manager: F. E. Winslow 



Head Offices Montreal, Quebec 
Assets under administration exceed $818,000,000 



Victoria pailg "^imcs 



csQGo 



^^^/te <^<UHe Pofze^ 



ff 



Hniticrsity ^clpol 




PROPOSED xVIEMORIAL 



In the War 1914-1918 over 200 Old Boys of University School 
served with H. M. Forces of whom not less than 67 gave their lives 
and 2 1 were awarded decorations. 

In the War 1939-1945. well over 400 Old Boys are known to 
have served, of whom at least 40 have paid the supreme sacrifice and 
44 decorations, including one V. C.. have been awarded. 

The Governors of the School have now definitely decided that 
this oustanding service and sacrifice made by the Old Boys of the 
School in both Wars, shall be recognized by the building of an 
Assembly Hall attached to the main School House building. 

It is felt that the erection of such a Memorial will not only be a constant 
reminder of such service but an acquisition which has become necessary and 
which will be an inspiration to future generations of boys. The proposal has 
been heartily endorsed by the Old Boys Association. 

The Building will be of brick construction and of a design which will 
conform to the general outline of the School House and will be erected over 
the present shower rooms. The lower storey will be used for much needed 
new locker rooms with direct access to the showers. On the following pages, 
plans of both upper and lower floors are shown. 

A trust Fund was opened last August and up to the present time, a 
sum of approximately $2,500.00 has been received. 

The estimated approximate cost of this Building is $13,000.00, including 
complete furnishings. It is sincerely hoped that during the coming year, an 
encouraging number of further contributions will be received in order that 
a start may be made next summer. Many have already made small contribu- 
tions and expressed their intention of giving further help from time to time. 
In this connection it should be remembered that contributions will qualify as 
Charitable Donations within the meaning of the Income Tax Act. 

Any "contribution large or small will be gratefully received. Cheques 
should be made out to the Headmaster who will personally undertake prompt 
acknowledgement and issue of the official printed receipt for the purpose of 
Income Tax. 



ExiJ-y. CoNcB-tjE SV/vLic 




Ex U'J'(NC 

&u>Lnl^4C 



U M 1 V t R, 



— 5" c M o o 







N.M.R.AIC. ARcHlfE-CfJ 



CONTRIBUTIONS TO 

THE SCHOOL MEMORIAL FUND 

UP TO DATE 



Albert, Mrs. W. A $ 20.00 

Armstrong, Mrs 40.00 

Ballantyne, Mrs. A 10.00 

Barker, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. 100.00 

Eeckton, A. J., Esq 50.00 

Bell-Irving, R., Esq 20.00 

Bernard, C. L., Esq 10.00 

Bissett, Richard, Esq 10.00 

Boas, M. Esq., 10.00 

Braide, Col. R. W 25.00 

Braidwood, James S 25.00 

Branson, Mrs. E. A 5.00 

Brown, Mrs. J. A 10.00 

Buckle, Edgar, Esq 10.00 

Canadian Bakeries Ltd. ... 50.00 

Carle, J. W., Esq 10.00 

Clark, E., Esq 50.00 

Clarke, Mrs. G 10.00 

Coglin, W.A., Esq., M. D. 50.00 

Coleman, D. C, Esq 500.00 

Cook, Mrs. M 5.00 

Corry, F. D., Esq 10.00 

Cotter, W., Esq 15.00 

Cupples, W. S., Esq 250.00 

Duke, Mrs. N 10.00 

Gilbert, G., Esq 25.00 

Gilmer, Niven, Esq 10.00 

Gough, H. J., Esq 25.00 

Graham, Graham J., Esq. 10.00 

Harman, J. Howard, Esq. 50.00 

Headmaster, The 100.00 

Henley, C, Esq 15.00 

Hills, J. I., Esq 100.00 

Howard, Capt. A. E 50.00 



Howden, P. F., Esq 10.00 

Jones, F. V., Esq 10.00 

Ker, R. H. B., Esq 100.00 

Kingham, J. R., Esq 100.00 

Kreger, Mrs. M 10.00 

Leggatt, W. S., Esq 25.00 

Lytton, Claude, Esq 25.00 

Mackenzie, Mrs. H 10.00 

Moilliett, Major E. L 10.00 

Morant, Mrs. M. E 5.00 

Morgan, Mrs. E 10.00 

Morrow, Mrs. A. M 5.00 

Nixon, Mrs. N 25.00 

Paine, M., Esq 100.00 

Perram, Hugh. Esq 20.0'^ 

Pike, C, Esq 10.00 

Pike, The Rev. F 25.00 

Pollard, Mrs. R 9.7^- 

Pott, H. E., Esq 5.00 

Schmitz, Mr. and Mrs. F. 10.00 

Schmitz, Mrs. Ferdinand 10.00 

School Prefects, 1945 6.80 

Slocombe, F., Esq 5.00 

Smith, Lieut. C 20.00 

Smith, Mrs. M. B 25.00 

Sturgis, M. G., Esq 10.00 

Sundt, Mrs. A 10.03 

Sworder, 

Mr. and Mrs. G. H. ... 15.00 

Taylor, J. D., Esq 25.00 

Watt, R. M, Esq 25.00 

Wenman, W. R. G., Esq. 10.00 

Winslow, F. E., Esq 100.00 

Wong On, Esq 20.00 

Yardley, G., Esq 25.00 



BOOKBINDING 1^ 

by i' 

FRITZ BRUNN t 

Victoria. B.C. '•