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A COLLECTION OF 



REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN SON OS, NATIONAL SONGS, 
WAR SONGS, RALLYING SONGS, &C 



ADAITED TO THE 



Popular Melodies of the Day. 

Including Marching Through Georgia, Battle Cry of Freedom, 
Tramp, Tramp, Kingdom Coming, Etc. 








The Sang Bouquet. 



This beautiful, illustrated volume of songs, sheet-music size, contains 
the best collection of English and American ballads and songs with cho- 
ruses. It is the cheapest folio of music published, and many thousands of 
copies have been sold in the past year. Contains 224 pages, sheet-music 
size. Price in paper cover, beautiful title, 50 cts; by mail 65 cts. Cloth 
edition $1.00 ; by mail $1.20. 



The Parlor Bouquet. 

Companion to the "Song Bouquet," and contains instrumental music of 
different grades of difficulty. A splendid collection of fantasias, marches, 
dance music, etc 224 pages, sheet-music size. Trice 50 cts ; by mail 65 
cts. Cloth edition $1.00, by mail $1.20. 



Dur National War Songs. 

In this elegant volume we find all the favorite old songs of the war, 
and many other pieces that have become dear to Americans. The best and 
standard palriotic songs, national hymns, etc., are all included in this col- 
lection. Beautiful illustrated cover, and nearly 200 pages of music. Price 
75 cts : by mail 90 els. Bound in boards $1.00 ; by mail $1.15. Bound 
in cloth $1.50 ; by mail $1.65. Edition with words only 25 cts. 



School Bells. 

The new singing book (or <lay-schools, just issued and entitled "School 
Bells," has been compiled and edited with the view of helping all school 
teachers, whether musicians or not, in conducting and teaching music with 
the aid of black-board exercises ; and the work is also intended as a musical 
text-book. The elementary exercises are simple, yet progressive and com- 
plete, and the lessons are amusing and instructive. No other book of this 
kind contains such a choice variety of Songs for Little Children, Action 
Songs, Marching Songs, Motto Songs, Glees, Choruses and Part Songs by 
some of the best writers of Europe and America. A cultivation of ta^te 
and style is particularly aimed at. The Outline History of Music, in the 
form of questions and answers, will be found both entertaining and valua- 
ble. "School Bells" contains 224 pages, elegantly printed and bound, 
convenient in shape and size, and the songs are classified and graded in 
divisions. Price, 50 cents per copy ; or, $5.00 per dozen. The usual lib- 
eral discount is given to schools. 

Mailed post-paid to any address on receipt of retail price. 

CLEVELAND and CHICAGO. 




Song JSoofi* 



A COLLECTION OF 



REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN SONGS, NATIONAL SONGS, 
WAP SONGS, RALLYING SONGS, &C. 



ADAPTED TO THE 



Popular Melodies of the Day. 

Including' Marching Through Georgia, Battle Cry of Freedom, 
Tramp, Tramp, Kingdom Coming, Etc. 



PUBLISHED BY 



£>♦ JSraitiard's SottSt 



CLEVELAND and CHICAGO. 



Copyright 1884, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



CONTENTS. 

PART I. CAMPAIGN SONGS FOR 1884. 

^ for Blaine 16 

Baiile Song 8 

battle Song for the Campaign of 1884 15 

Blaine's our Banner Man 13 

Blaine for our President 13 

Democrats (The) 7 

Fur Old Lang Syne 4 

Hark the Bugle calls to Arms 11 

Hold the Fort for Blaine and Logan 10 

Ho ! my Comrades 5 

H uirah for Blaine and Logan 5 

Marching to Victory 3 

Onward Republicans are Marching 14 

Plumed Knight (The) 4 

Rally for the Leader 9 

Tramp, Tramp 13 

Year of Eighty-four (The). 6 

PART n. OUR NATIONAL WAR SONGS. 

America. 34 

Babylon is Fallen Work 10 

Battle Cry of Freedom Root 5 

Battle Song Root 6 

Brave Battery Boys Bliss 46 

Can the Soldier Forget? Root 45 

Columbia the Gem of the Ocean 39 

Columbia's Guardian Angels Work 23 

Coming Home From the Old Camp Ground Rogers 34 

Corporal Schnapps Work 24 

Farewell, Father, Friend and Guardian Root 30 

First Gun is Fired, The Root 42 

Glory, Glory Hallelujah 41 

Grafted into the Army Work 20 

Hail Columbia 57 

How It marches, the Flag of the Union Root 14 

Just Before the Battle, Mother Root 1 2 

iu-t After the Battle Root 13 

kingdom Coming' Work 

Lay Me Down and Save the Flag Root ll 

Little Major Work 19 

Marching Through Georgia Work 6 

On, On, On Root 1 1 

Our Captain's Last Words Work 43 

Onr Flag and the Union Forever Ickes 35 

Our Last Grand Camping Ground Work 9 

Oh, Wrap the Flag Around Me, Boys Taylor 16 

Sleeping for the Flag Work 15 

Song of a Thousand Years Work 33 

Starved in Priv>n Root 21 

Star Spans ed Banner 37 

Stand up for Uncle Sam, Boys Root 44 

Take your Gun and go, John Merrill 40 

They nave Bi oken up their Camps. Root 27 

Tis finished Work 3s 

Tramp, Tramp Root f 

Uncle Joe's Hail Columbia Work 22 

t Chair Root 25 

Washington and Lincoln Work 31 

W« Were Comrades Together in the Days of War Coe 28 

Well Fight It Out Here on the Old Union Line Root 14 

We'll Go Down Ourselves Work 17 

When Johnny Comes Marching Home Lambert 29 

When Sherman Marched Down to the Sea 33 

Who Shall Rule This American Nation ? Work 27 

Yankee Doodle 47 



-^ V SONG BOOK. -V 



MARCHING TO VICTORY. 

Tune. — "Marching Through Georgia." 

Bring the good old bugle, boys, and let it sound again j 
While we sing a welcome to the candidate from Maine I 
Let it tell the nation that we all shall vote for Blaine, 
All cast a vote for Blaine and Logan. 

CHORUS. 
Hurrah, hurrah 1 We'll shout the chorus free ! 
Hurrah, hurrah ! We'll make a jubilee ! 
James G. Blaine the statesman, our next president shall be I 
Yes, he is marching to vict'ry 1 

See the scattered Democrats in broken ranks, dismayed I 
They can never beat us, for their game's already player, 
Now with Blaine and Logan we will join the grand parade, 
While they are marching to vict'ry ! — Chorus. 

Come once more, ye gallant boys, and rally to the polls ; 
Listen to the chorus, how its echo grandly rolls ! 
Tis the voice of millions of true-hearted, honest souls, 
As they are marching to vict'ry. — Chorus. 



THE PLUMED KNIGHT. 

Tune. — "Battle Cry of Freedom." 

We will rally to the standard, we'll rally once again, 

Shouting the battle cry of vict'ry ! 
Yes, we'll rally for the right, boys, and catt a vote for Blaine, 

Shouting the battle cry of vict'ry ! 

CHORUS. 

The Plumed Knight forever ! hurrah, boys, hurrah ! 
Stand by yuur leader, for honor and law ! 
Yes, we'll rally to the standard of Blaine and Logan, true, 
Shouting the battle cry of vict'ry ! 

We will gather from the hillside, with loud and happy voice, 

Shouting the battle cry of vict'ry ! 
For we know that Blaine and Logan are now the people's choice ! 

Shouting the battle cry of vict'ry ! — Chorus. 

Yes, we'll gather round the Plumed Knight — the friend of Garfield^ 
Shouting the battle cry of vict'ry ! [tot 1 

For Rebublicans are faithful — the country finds them true, 
Shouting the battle cry of vict'ry !— Chorus. 
Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons 



FOR OLD LANG SYNE. 

Tune. — "Old Lang Syne." 

We stand united, firm, resolved 

To do our duty well ; 
And when November comes again, 
We'll make our good work tell. 
For old lang syne, my boys, 
For old lang syne ; 
We'll keep the party's record clean, 
For old lang syne. 

Then here's a hand, my comrade bold, 

And give us a hand o' thine ; 
We'll vote for Blaine and Logan, too, 
For the sake of old lang sync ! 
For old lang syne, my boys, 
For old lang syne. 

!1 vote f'»r Blaine tod Logan. no\ 
For the sake of old lang syne. 



HURRAH FOR BLAINE AND LOGAN. 

Collin Coe. 
We'll vote for Blaine, the candidate so loyal, firm and true ; 
We'll vote for John A. Logan, for he led the boys in blue ! 
We'll rally round the standard ; let the contest now begin 1 
Hurrah for Blaine and Logan, too — for they're the men to win ! 

CHORUS. 
Three cheers for Blaine ! the candidate from Maine ! 
We'll rally round the standard, and we'll rally not in vain 1 
Then shout for Blaine ! three cheers for Logan, too ; 
For they're the people's chosen, and they're loyal, brave and true I 

In Blaine, the wise old statesman, we have confidence and trust ; 

With him the nation's honor will not fall beneath the dust ! 

And for the gallant Logan let us always raise a cheer ; 

He stood by us, that soldier brave, when danger hover'd near ! — ChO. 

Then gird ye for the contest ! march ye boldly to the fray ! 
Republicans ! be faithful, and we'll surely win the day ! 
Then vote for Blaine and Logan, they are now the people's choice ! 
Republicans ! be firm and true, and make the land rejoice ! — CHO. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 

HOI MY COMRADES! 

Tune.— "Hold the Fort." 
Ho 1 my comrades, see the signal 

Waving in the sky ! 
'Tis banner of our party — 
Victory is nigh ! 

CHORUS. 

Hark ! the glorious echo swelling — 

'Tis the people's voice ! 
Hold the fort for Blaine and Logan, 

They're the people's choice. 

See the mighty host advancing ! 

To the polls we come 1 
Cast a vote for right and honor, 

Vote for peace and home. — Chorus. 

See the glorious banners waving, 

Hear the bugle blow 1 
Blaine and Logan now must triumph 

Over every foe !— Chorus. 



6 
THE YEAR OF EIGHTY-FOUR. 

Tune. — "Kingdom Coming." 

Oh, comrades ! don't you know the story 

Of the gallant boys in blue, 
How they fought and starved to save the Union 

From a treach'rous rebel crew ? 
Then here's the soldier's honest ticket ; 

Let us make it win once more ! 
We'll work and vote for Blaine and Logan 

In the year of eighty-four ! 

CHORUS. 

The Democrats, ha, ha ! 

Are all at sea, ho ho 1 
It must be now the kingdom's coming 

In the year of eighty-four. 

Democracy is growing weaker 

With the years that come and go ; 
And soon we'll send it up Salt River, 

Where the woodbine twineth low. 
All hail to you, old gray-haired soldier ! 

Come and try your strength once more ! 
Come, cast a vote for Blaine and Logan, 

In the year of eighty-four. — Chorus. 

The statesman, Blaine, we love to honor, 

For he's ever firm and true ; 
And John A, Logan is a soldier 

That was brave and gallant, too. 
Then do your duty next November 

As you did in days of yore ; 
And win the fight with Blaine and Ix>gan, 

In the year 01 eight-four. 



7 

THE DEMOCRATS. 

Taoe.— "Sword of Bunker Hill." 

He lay upon the rum-hole floor, 

His eye was growing dim, 
When with a feeble voice he called 

Another Dem. to him. 
"Weep not, my boy," the veteran said, 

"It's not so bad's you think ; 
But quickly from yon counter bring 

A Democratic drink — 
But quickly from yon counter bring 

A Democratic drink 1 " 

The drink was brought, the Demmy's eye 

Lit with a sudden flame ; 
And as he grasped the "forty- rod," 

He murmured Tilden's name. 
Then said, "My boy, I leave you now ; 

The party's killed, I think ; 
But, mark me, mark me ! don't forget 

The Democratic drink — 
But, mark me, mark me ! don't forget 

The Democratic drink." 

"Oh, don't forget" — his accents broke— 

A groan, and he was drunk. 
They took him to the station-house 

And laid him in a bunk ! 
The party's gone, and Sammy's old j 

Few Democrats remain ; 
While twenty millions bless the men 

Who nominated Blaine ! 
While twenty millions bless the men 

Who nominated Blaine ! 



8 

THE BATTLE-SONG. 

D. A. Kota. 

Tune.— Hurrah for Blaine and Logan ! 

Do you hear the people call 

For our Blaine, the statesman true ? 
Do you see the Chieftain tall, 

Wearing yet the loyal blue ? 
These men both true and tried — 

By the people trusted long ; 
Let us fight upon their side, 

And sing for them this battle-song : 

CHORUS. 

Hurrah, hurrah ! for the man from Maine ! 

Hurrah for Logan, the Chieftain brave ! 
And join the army that votes for Blaine — 

The army that did the Union save. 

Do you see the platform strong 
Lifting high the nominees ? 
Do you see the mighty throng — 

Mighty as the stormy seas — 
Pressing now to stand with Blaine ? 

See ye not the men of might, 
From the Western coast to Maine, 

Ready for the loyal fight? — Chorus. 

See ye not the Plumed Knight 

leading now his cohorts brave, 
In the thickest of the fight, 

On the highest battle-wave ? 
See ye not our Logan true 

Drawing now his loyal sword, 
Charging with the Boys in Blue, 

Driving back the Ret>el horde?— CHORUS. 



9 
RALLY FOR THE LEADER. 

Geo. D. 'Herrick. 

The bugle has been sounded, 

It echoes through the glen. 
It stirs the loyal millions 

Of brave and honest men ; 
They hear the nation calling 

Her sons so brave and true, 
To rally for the leader 

And win the victory, too 1 
To rally for the leader 

And win the victory too ! 

CHORUS. 

Then rally for the leader ! 

For Blaine, the people's choice 1 
His name shall be our watch-word, 

His praise in ev'ry voice ! 
Then rally for the leader — 

For Blaine, the people's choice ! 

Our souls are springing forward, 

Our voice is on the air, 
We bring a crown of honor 

That none but Blaine shall wear ; 
We want him now, for freedom, 

To fight the battle through, 
And we'll swell his ranks with millions 

Of loyal "Boys in Blue," 
And we'll swell the ranks with millions 

Of loyal "Boys in Blue." — Chorus. 

Then raise the sweeping chorus, 

The right must surely win J 
Clear out the White House mansion, 

For Blaine is going in 1 
Put down the head of treason, 

We'll fight the battle through, 
And stand by Blaine and Logan, 

With millions tried and true, 
And stand by Blaine and Logan, 

With millions tried and true. — CHORUS. 



10 

HOLD THE FORI FOR BLAINE AND LOGAN. 

Tune— "Hold the Fort." 

Float aloft the stars of freedom ! 

Upward towards the sky, 
Freemen rally round the standard, 

For the time is nigh 1 

CHORUS. 

Hold the fort for Blaine and Logan 

While our pulses thrill ; 
Loyal men, in solid column, 

Answer back "we will." 

When to save our glorious country 

We must brave the storm ; 
Vote for Blaine and reformation, 

Justice and reform ! — Chorus, 

Honor to our loved commanders ; 

Let the echo run 
Unto every kindred nation 

Now beneath the sun. — Chorus. 

Sound aloud the good-time coming, 

Sound the trump of fame. 
They, who lead us on to glory, 

Boast an honored name. — CHORUS. 

On to vict'ry 1 onward, onward I 

With our flag in sight, 
We shall vote for Blaine and Logan, 

For the cause is right.— Chorus. 



11 

HARK, THE BUGLE CALLS TO ARMS. 

Tune. — "Marching Through Georgia." 

Mrs. Mary E, Kail. 
Hark, the bugle calls to arms and voters gather near ; 
Our signal lights are at the front and victory doth appear, 
Should coward souls be in the ranks, we'll send them to the rear, 
And cast our votes for Blaine and Logan. 

CHORUS. 
Hurrah, hurrah ! there's victory in the air ; 
Hurrah, hurrah 1 there's victory everywhere, 
And Blaine and Logan will unite the victory to share 
While we go marching for the Union. 

Our statesmen who assembled in the city of the West, 
To nominate for President the man they thought the best, 
They know that then the people's vote would bravely do the rest, 
For they would vote for Blaine and Logan. — Chorus. 

Full twenty years of lessons learned have taught both small and great, 
That intellect alone must guide the gallant ship of state, 
And we have learned instead of war that we can arbitrate 
By casting votes for Blaine and Logan. — Chorus. 

Our institutions must be kept without a blot or stain, 
And we must educate the child of humble birth and name, 
And this is why the laboring men will cast their votes for Blaine, 
Will cast their votes for Blaine and Logan. — Chorus. 

And now we hear the glorious news that like a clarion bell, 
Rings o'er the land from North to South where gallant heroes fell, 
And listening nations bow the knee to hear our voters tell 
That they will vote for Blaine and Logan. — Chorus. 

Then float aloft the stripes and stars and lift your banners high ; 
Send every voter to the front, resolved to do or die ; 
Wheel into line your radiant hosts and shout your battle cry, 
Hurrah ! hurrah for Blaine and Logan. — Chorus. 



12 

BLAINE FOR OUR PRESIDENT. 

Tunc — "Battle Cry of Freedom."' 

They are coming from the mountain; coming from the plain, 

Shouting he battle cry of freedom ! 
From the grand Pacific slope and from the coast of Maine, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 

CHORUS. 

Blaine lor our President, echo the rills, 
Blaine for our President, answers the hills 1 
We are coming from the mountains, coming from the plains, 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom 1 

They are coming with their banners waving in the light, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
Men who fought to save the country are coming in their might, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 



Blaine for our President, sounds on the air, 
Blaine for our President, rings every where ! 
We are ~oming with our banners waving in the light 
Shouting the battle cry of Iretdom ! 

We have got a man to lead us honest, pure and good, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
We will labor to maintain eternal brotherhood, 

Shouting the battle cry oi freedom ! 



Ulaine for our President, thus shall we stand, 
Union and Liberty ! over the land, 
We have got a man to kad us, honest, pure and good, 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom 1 

No scheming politician shall lead us in the fight, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
We are sure to gain the victory working for the right, 

Shouting the battle ciy of freedom ! — Chorus. 

Now rally up your forces, all, loyal men and true, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
For there ts a glorious work for each noble heart to do. 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! — Choku.*. 



13 

BLAINE'S OUR BANNER MAN. 

Wm. T. Rogers. 
From the valley, mount and plain, 
Comes the loud and stirring strain, 
"Rally round the starry banner, banner of the free," 
Yes, we'll rally in our might, 
Marshal for the coming fight, 
And the statesman Blaine our noble banner man shall be 1 
CHORUS. 
Hurrah, hurrah ! we're bound to win the day, 
With Blaine and Logan leading in the van ; 
Yes J we'll rally to the call, 
Marching onward, one and all 
To victory, and Blaine shall be, shall be our banner man. 
Fiom the East and from the West 
Comes the voice of millions blest 
By the rule of those whose wisdom, peace and plenty gave — 
Peace and safety to our land ; 
And we'll ever faithful stand 
By the man who's proved a patroit, patroit true and brave. — Chorus. 
Let the discontented rave, 
Foaming like an angiy wave, 
While they haste to join their forces, forces with the foe ; 
We will firm united stand, 
With the patriots of our land, 
And for Blaine we'll strike a strong, a strong and telling blow. — Cho. 

TRAMP, TRAMP. 

Tune.— Tramp, Tramp. 
Oh ! the Democrats are sick, thinking, Sammy, dear of you ; 

And they'll never touch your "barrel" any more I 
For they thought you were the man that could safely pull them through, 

Now they think that Sammy's nothing but a bore ! 

CHORUS. 
Tramp, tramp, tramp the boys are marching ; 

Cheer up, comrades, and be true 1 
For Republicans must win as they've always won before, 
And we'll cast a vote for Blaine and Logan, too ; 
From the Democratic camp comes a wail of bitter woe, 

For they find their rations getting very small ; 
And in November next, they will let the last hope go, 
For they can't elect a President at all ! 



14 
ONWARD REPUBLICANS ARE MARCHING. 

By Mrs. Mary E. Kail. 

Tune.—" Tramp, Tramp, &c." 

All around us is the dawn and united we shall stand, 

Till we see the golden brightness of the day, 
And we hear the bugle call sounding o'er Columbia's land, 

Rousing voters all to enter in the fray. 

CHORUS. 

Onward Republicans are marching, 

Voting for Blaine and Logan too, 
And though enemies arise we are sure to win the day, 

For our leaders they are loyal men and true. 

le our Eighteen-Eighty-Year opens up a nobler fame, 
We must labor for the glory of our land ; 
Heaven keep the stripes and stars, every fold without a stain, 
And unite Columbia's sons in heart and hand. — CHORUS. 

We must labor to protect all the interests of our land, 

Agriculture, commerce and whatever be, 
hile free trade must be suppressed and our working men must stand, 
As the sovereigns of the land and of the sea. — Chorus. 

Ah, we never shall forget our three hundred thousand slain, 

Nor the starry flag still waving in our sight, 
Gallant men who gave their lives on the mountain side and pla 

That our glorious institutions should be bright. — Chorus. 

Now with joy we hear the call from the ocean state of Maine, 

And from where the Sierras proudly rise ; 
For the principles we love, and for Logan and for Blaine, 

We will send our chants of victory to the skies' — Chorus. 



15 

BATTLE SONG OF THE CAMPAIGN OF 1884. 

Mrs. Mary E. Kail. 

Tune.— "Battle Cry of Freedom." 
We are coming from the mountain, coming from the plain, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
From the grand Pacific slope and from the coast of Maine 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
With Blaine and with Logan we're marching along ; 
Voters along the line join in the song, 

We will vote to keep our nation in wealth and honor strong, 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 

We are coming for the rights of the people of our land, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
In the councils of the nation our workingmen must stand, 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom 1 
Onward to glory ! onward hurrah ! 
Our hosts are advancing in battle array, 
Blaine and Logan at the front, we are sure to win the day, 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom 1 

We are coming for the flag that our fallen heroes bore, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
When they said that they were coming three hundred thousand more, 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom 1 
With Blaine and with Logan, the noble and true 
Pledged for the starry flag red, white and blue, 
And the people all rejoicing to see the work we do- 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 

We are coming to the front and have counted all the cost, 

Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
Not a soul must dare to falter nor let the day be lost 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! 
Onward to glory in power of the right, 
The people are coming — march on in the fight, 
While we sing our battle song, with the starry flag in sight 
Shouting the battle cry of freedom ! , 



16 

A SONG FOR BLAINE. 

Tune.— Tramp, Tramp. 
From the lumber camps of Maine, to the ship-yards on the shore, 

Which have waited for the hammer's ring in vain, 
First there came a pleading voice, which has now become a roar, 

"Give us our wise leader, Jimmy Blaine." 
Hark, hark, hark, the voices swelling, 

From the seaboard over mountain and o'er plain, 
"We have waited long enough, and our temper's getting rough, 

We want our brilliant statesman, Jimmy Blaine." 

At the anvil and the loom, in the works and the mine, 

The toiling masses listen with delight, 
As they hear the glad refrain, which they echo back again, 

"Hurrah, hurrah ! for noble Jimmy Blaine 1 " 
Hark, hark, hatk, the chorus swelling, 

From the seaboard over mountain, mine and plain, 
"We work hard for our money, and we want our rights protected, 

And the man to do that business is Jimmy Blaine." 

But hark ! what sound appears to be thundering to our ears, 

Like a Western blizzard coming on amain ! 
Tis the outburst of the hope of the far Pacific slope, 

That at last they've got a leader, Jimmy Blaine. 
Hark, hark, hark, the chorus swelling, 

From the seaboard over mountain and o'er plain, 
Till the echoes from the West set all our hearts at rest, 

And we hail our future President in Blaine. 

Thus from North, East, South and West, all the poor and the oppress'd, 

Throughout this glorious, broad and fair domain, 
Feel their hearts within them rise, and hope dawns on their eyes, 

For they love their trusted leader, Jimmy Blaine. 
Hark, hark, hark, the chorus swelling, 

From the seaboard over mountain and o'er plain, 
The people can't be wrong, for they all join in one song, 

"Hurrah for our next President, James Blaine." 






BATTLE CRY OF FREEDOM. 

By Geo. F. Root. 

Yes we'll rally round the flag, boys, 7/e'll rally once again, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom, 
We'll rally from the hill-side, we'll gather from the plain, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 

CHORUS. 

The Union forever, Hurrah! boys, Hurrah! 

Down with the traitor, up wuh the star, 
While we rally round the flag, boys, rally once again, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 

We are springing to the call of our brothers gone before, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom, 
And we'll fill the vacant ranks with a million freemen more, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. — Chorus. 

We will welcome to our numbers the loyal, true and brave, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom, 
And altho' they may be poor, not a man shall be a slave, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. — Chorus. 

So. we're springing to the call from the East and from the West, 

Shouting the baitle-cry of freedom, 
And we'll hurl the rebel crew from the land we love the best, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. — Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



BATTLE SONG. 
Air— Battle-Cry of Freedom. By Geo. F. Root. 

We are marching to the field, boys, we're going to the fight, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom, 
And we bear the glorious stars for the Union and the right, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 

CHORUS. 

The Union forever, Hurrah! boys, Hurrah! 

Down with the traitor, up with the star, 
For we're marching to the field boys, going to the fight, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom! 

We will meet the rebel host, boys, with fearless heart and true, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom, 
And we'll show what Uncle Sam has for loyal men to do, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. — Chorus. 

If we fall amid the fray, boys, we'll face them to the last, 

Shouting the battle-cry of Jreedom, 
And our comrades brave shall hear us, as they go rushing past, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. — Chorus. 

Yes, for Liberty and Union, we're springing to the fight, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom, 
And the victory shall be ours, for we're rising in our might, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. — Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA. 

By Henry C. Work, 

Bring the good old bugle, boys, we'll sing another song, 
Sing it with a spirit that will start the world along — 
Sing it as we used to sing it fifty thousand strong, 
While we were marching through Georgia. 

chorus. 

11 Hurrah! hurrah! we bring the Jubilee! 

Hurrah! hurrah! the tlag that makes you free!" 
So we sang the chorus, from Atlanta to the sea, 
While we were marching through Georgia. 



How the darkeys shouted when they heard the joyful sound! 
How the turkeys gobbled which our commissary found! 
How the sweet potatoes even started from the ground, 

While we were marching through Georgia. — Chorus. 

Yes, there were Union men who wept with joyful tears, 
When they saw the honored flag they had not seen for years; 
Hardly could they be restrained from breaking forth in cheers, 
While we were marching through Georgia. — Chorus. 

"Sherman's dashing Yankee boys will never reach the coast 1" 
So the saucy rebels said, and 'twas a handsome boast; 
Had they not forgot alas! to reckon with the host, 

While we were marching through Georgia. — Chorus. 

So we made a thoroughfare for Freedom and her '.rain, 
Sixty miles in latitude — three hundred to the main, 
Treason fled before us, for resistance was in vain, 

While we were marching through Georgia. — Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



TRAMP, TRAMP, TRAMP. 

By Geo. F. Roq& 

In the prison cell I sit, thinking Mother dear of you, 

And our bright and happy home so far away, 
And the tears they fill my eyes, spite of all that I can do, 

Tho' I try to cheer my comrades and be gay. 



Tramp, tramp, tramp the boys are marching, 

Cheer up comrades, they will come, 
And beneath the starry flag 

We shall breathe the air again, 

Of the free land in our own beloved home. 

In the battle front we stood when the fiercest charge was marle^ 

And they swept us off a hundred men or more, 
But before we reached their lines they were beaten back dismayed, 

And we heard the cry of vict'ry o'er and o'er. — Chorus. 



So within the prison cell we are waiting f >r the day 

That shall come to open wide the iron door. 
And the hollow eyes grow bright, and the poor heart almost gay, 

As we think of seeing friends and home once more. — CHORUS, 

EXTRA CHORUS. 

Tramp, tramp, tramp, the beys are marching, 

Cheer up, comrades, they will come, 
And beneath the starry flag 

We shall breathe the air again, 

Of the free land in our*own beloved home. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



KINGDOM COMING. 

By Henry C. Work. 
Say, darkeys, hab you seen old massa, 

Wid de muffitash on his face, 
Go long de road some time dis mornin', 

Like he gwine to leab de place? 
He seen a smoke way up de ribber, 

Whar de Linkum gunboats lay; 
He took his hat an' lef berry sudden, 

An' I spec he's run away! 

chorus. 

De massa run, ha, ha! 

De darkey stay? ho, ho! 
It mus' be now de kingdom comin', 

An' de year ob jubilo ! 

lie is six foot one way, four foot tudder, 

An' he weigh tree hundred pound; 
His coat so big he couldn't pay de tailor, 

An' <t wouldn't go halfway round. 
He drill so much dey call him Cap'n, 

An' he get so drefful tanned, 
I spec he'll try an' fool dem Yankees, 

Tor to tink he's contraband. — Chorus. 

De darkeys feel so lonesome libbing 

In delog house on de lawn, 
Dey move dar tings to massa's parlor, 

For to keep it while he's gone. 



9 

Dar's wine an' cider in de kitchen, 

An' d darkeys dey'll hab some; 
I spose dey'll ail be confiscated, 

When de Linkum soldiers come. — Chorus. 

De oberseer he make us trubble, 

An he dribe us round a spell; 
We lock him up in de smoke-house cellar, 

Wid de key trown in de well. 
Dc whip is lost, de han'-cuff broken, 

But de massa'll hat his pay; 
He's ole enough, big enough, ought to know better 

Dan to went an' run away. — Chorus. 

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OUR LAST GRAND CAMPING GROUND. 

By Henry C. Work. 

On a pebbly shore, where forever more 

Gently creeps a musir laden wave — 
Tn the meadow* green, which beyond are seen, 

Camps a conq'ring army, true and brave. 
Shining are the weapons of the martiaj throng — 

Crimson-dyed their banner?, battle-worn so long ; 
But now they cast them down, and each receives a crown, 

While they chant their never ending song : 

CHORUS. 

" Our Savior and our King ! His victories shall ring 1 
His conquests thro' eternity shall sound ! 
War shal be no more — we have reached the shore — 
Safely reach'd our last grand camping ground." 

While thro' lovely dells, grander music swells — 

Richer chords from rarer harps of gold — 
Li that soft refrain, that sweet vocal strain, 

Wherein now the victors' deeds are told : 
How they toil'd in darkness, battling with the wrong — 

How, in hours of weakness, Jesus made them strong. 
Acknowledg'd as his own, he seats them on his throne, 

While they join the never ending song : — Chorus. 

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10 

BABYLON IS FALLEN. 

By Henry C. Work. 
Don't you see the black clouds 

R.sin' ober yonder, 
Whue de massa's old plantation am? 

Nebber you be frightened, 

Dem is only darkies 
Come to jine and fight for Uncle Sam. 

CHORUS. 

Look out dar, now! 

We's a gwint o shoot, 
Look out dar, don't you understand? 
Babylon is fallen ! Babylon is fallen ! 
And we's a gwine to occupy de land. 

Don't you see de lightnin' 

Fiashtn' in de cane brake, 
Like as if we's gwine to hab a storm ? 

No, you is mistaken, 

'Tisde darkies' bay'nets, 
An de buttons on dar uniforms. — Chorus. 

Way up in de cornfield, 

Wnere you heard de tunder, 
T >at is our old forty-pounder gun ; 

When de shells are missin' 

Den we load wid punkins, 
All de same to make de cowards run. — Chorus. 

Massa was de Kernel 

In de rebel army 
Ebber since he went an' run away ; 

But his lubly darkeys, 

Dey has been a watchin' 
And dey take him pris'ner tudder day. — Chorus. 

We will be de massa, 

He will be de sarvant — 
Try him how he like it for a spell 

Si we crack de butt'nuts, 

So we take de kernel, 
So de cannon carry back de shell. — Chorus. 

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11 

Ott, ON, ON, THE BOYS CAME MARCHING ! 
Or, The Prisoner Free. 
(Sequel to " Tramp, Tramp, Tramp.") By Geo. F. Root. 

O ! the day it came at last, 

When the glorious tramp was heard, 
And the boys came marching fifty thousand strong, 

And we grasped each others hands, 
Tho' we uttered not a word, 

As the booming of our cannon rolled along ! 



On, on, on, the boys came marching, 

Like a grand majestic sea, 
And they dashed away the guard 

From, the heavy iron door, 
And we stood beneath the starry banner, free. 

O 1 the feeblest heart grew strong, 

And the most despondent sure, 
When we heard the thrilling sounds we loved so well, 

Fo we knew that want and woe 
We no longer should endure, 

When the hosts of freedom reached our prison cell ! — CHORUS. 

O ! the war is over now, 

And we're safe at home again, 
And the cause we starved and suffered for, is won; 

But we never can forget, 
'Mid our woe and 'mid our pain, 

How the glorious Union boys came tramping on. — CHORUS, 

EXTRA CHORUS. 

On, on, on, the boys come marching, 

Like a grand majestic sea, 
And they dashed away the guard 

F-om the heavy iron door, 

And we stood beneath the starry banner, free ! 

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12 

JUST BEFORE THE BATTLE MOTHER. 

By Geo. F. Root. 
Just before the battle, Mother, 

I am thinking most of you, 
While upon the field we're watching, 

With the enemy in view — 
Comrades brave are round me lying, 

FiU'd with tho'ts of home and God; 
For well they know that on the morrow, 

Some will sleep beneath the sod. 

CHORUS. 
Farewell, Mother, you may never 

Press me to your heart again; 
But Oh, you'll not forget me, Mother, 

If I'm numbered with the slain. 

Oh, I long to see you, Mother, 

And the loving ones at home, 
But I'll never leave our banner, 

Till in honor I can come. 
Tell the traitors, all around you, 

That their cruel words, we know, 
In every battle kill our soldiers 

By the help they give the foe.— CHORUS. 

Hark ! I hear the bugles sounding, 
'Tis the signal for the fight i 

Now may God protect me, Mother, 
As he ever does the right. 

Hear the "Battle-Cry of Freedom," 
How it swells upon the air! 

Oh, yes we'll rally round the standard, 
Or we'll perish nobly there. — Chorus. 

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13 

JUST AFTER THE BATTLE. 



By Geo. F. Root. 



Still upon the field of battle 

I am lying, Mother dear, 
With my wounded comrades, waiting 

For the morning to appear. 
Many sleep to waken never 

In this world of strife and death, 
And many more are faintly calling, 

With their feeble dying breath. 



Mother dear, your boy is wounded, 

And the night is drear with pain, 
But still I feel that I shall see you 

And the dear old home again. 

Oh, the first great charge was fearful, 

And a thousand brave men fell ; 
Still amid the dreadful carnage 

I was safe from shot and shell. 
So amid the fatal shower 

I had nearly passed the day, 
When here the dreaded Minnie struck me, 

And I sank amid the fray, — Chorus. 

Oh, the glorious cheer of triumph, 

When the foeman turn'd and fled, 
Leaving us the field of battle, 

Strewn with dying and with dead. 
Oh, the torture and the anguish, 

That I could not follow on! 
But here amid my fallen comrades 

I must wait till morning's dawn. — Chorus. 

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14 
HOW IT MARCHES ! THE FLAG OF THE UNION. 

By Geo. F. Root. 

How it marches ! the Flag of the Union, 

The dear old Flag of the Union, 
And our bosoms swell with pride, 

While we see it floating wide 

Over all as the Flag of the Union. 

CHORUS. 

How it marches ! the Flag of the Union, 

The dear old Flag of the Union, 
It shall float pow'r and pride, 

Over all the land so wide, 

Ever more as the Flag of the Union. 

Oh ! our boys love the Flag of the Union, 

The dear old Flag of the Union, 
In the front of every fight, 

'Mid the battle's lurid light, 
They died for the Flag of the Union. — Chorus. 

Sailors, too, love the Flag of the Union, 

The dear old Flag of the Union, 
They have nailed it firm and fast, 

To the top of every mast, 

For their joy is the Flag of the Union. — Cvo&US. 

Unrle Sam loves the Flag of the Union, 

The dear old Flag of the Union, 
And amid the loss we mourn, 

Says in thunder tones so stern, 

"All shall honor the Flag of the Union." — CHORUS. 

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WE'LL FIGHT IT OUT HERE ON THE OLD UNION LINE, 

By Geo, F, Root. 

Well rally again to the standard we bore 

O'er battle-fields crimson and gory, 
Shooting "Hail to the Chief," who in Freedom's fierce war, 

I lath covered that banner with glory. 



15 

CHORUS. 

Then rally again, (hen rally again, 

With the Soldier and Sailor and Bummer, 

And we'll fight it out here, on the old Union line, 
No odds if it takes us all summer. 

We'll rally again, by the side of the men 

Who breasted the conflict's fierce rattle, 
And they'll find us still true, who were true to them then, 

And bade them " God speed" in the battle. — Chorus. 

We'll rally again, and that " Flag of the Free" 
Shall stay where our heroes have placed it, 

And ne'er shall they govern, on land or on sea 

Whose treason hath spurned and disgraced it. — Chorus. 

We'll rally again, and our motto shall be, 

Whatever the nation that Dure us, 
God bless that old banner, "The Flag of the Free," 

And all who would die with it o'er us ! — Chorus. 

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SLEEPING FOR THE FLAG. 

By Henry C. Work. 

When our boys come home in triumph, brother, 

With the laurels they shall gain j 
When we go to give them welcome, brother, 

We shall look ior you in vain. 
We shall wait for your returning, brother, 

Though we know it cannot be ; 
For your comrades left you sleeping, brother, 

Underneath a Southern tree. 

CHORUS. 
Sleeping to waken 

In this weary world no more ; 
Sleeping for your true-loved country, 

Sleeping for the flag you bore. 

You who were the first on duty, brother, 

When " to arms " your leader cried — 
You have left the ranks forever, brother — 

You have laid your arms aside. 



16 

From the awful scenes of battle, brother, 

You were set forever free, 
When your comrades left you sleeping, brother, 

Underneath that Southern tree. — Chorus. 
You have cross 'd the clouded river, brother, 

To the mansions of the blest, 
11 Where the wicked cease from troubling," brother, 

" And the weary are at rest." 
Surely we would not recall you, brother, 

Bat the tears flow fast and free, 
When we think of you as sleeping, brother, 

Underneath that Southern tree. -Chorus. 

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, WRAP THE FLAG AROUND ME, BOYS. 

By R. Stewart Taylor. 
Oh, wrap the flag around me, boys, 

To die were far more sweet, 
With freedom's starry emblem, boys, 

To be my winding sheet. 
In life I loved to see it wave, 

And follow where it led, 
And now my eyes grow dim, my hands 

Would clasp its last bright shred. 

CHORUS. 
Then wrap the flag arcund me, boys, 

To die were far more sweet, 
With Freedom's starry emblem, boys, 

To be my winding sheet. 

Oh, I had thought to greet you, boys, 

On many a well won field, 
When to our starry banner, boys, 

The trait'rous foe should yield; 
But now, alas ! I am denied 

My dearest earthly pray'r — 
You'll follow and you'll meet the foe, 

But I shall not be there.— Chorus. 

But though my body moulder, boys, 

My spirit will be free, 
And every comrade's honor, boy*, 

Will still be dear to me. 



There, in the thick and bloody fight 

Ne'er let your ardor lag, 
For I'll be there still hov'ring near, 

Above the dear old flag. — Chorus. 

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WE'LL GO DOWN OURSELVES. 

By Henry C. Work. 
" What shall we do, as years go by, 
And peace remains a stranger — 
With Richmond yet in rebel hands, 

And Washington in danger ? 
What shall we dc for leaders, when 

Old Age this race is cropping ?" 
I asked some ladies whom I met — 
And didn't it set them hopping ! 

CHORUS. 
" What shall we do ? 
What shall we do? 
Why, lay them on the shelves, 
And we'll go down ourselves 
And teach the rebels something new, 
And teach the rebels something new." 

" What shall we do when armies march 

To storm the rebel quarters — 
If as of yore, their marches end 

Beside Potomac's waters? 
May not we call our soldiers home ? 

May not we think of stopping ?" 
I strove to frame the question fair — 

Eut didn't it set them hopping !— CHORUS. 

" What shall we do when all the men 

For battle have enlisted — 
And yet the rebels hold their ground, 

And law is yet resisted !" 
Instead of doing as I should — 

The theme politely dropping, 
I ventured yet one question more — 

Oh, didn't it set them hopping ! — CHORUS. 

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18 

LAY ME DOWN AND SAVE THE FLAG. 

By Geo. F. Root. 
They arose, whose name was Legion, 

As an overwhelming wave, 
And the battle surged its billows 

Round a chosen few and brave ; 
And they neared ihe sacred banner, 
With their foul and flaunting rag, 
When the dying hero shouted, 

44 Lay me duwn and save the Flag." 
CHORUS. — So he fell, the brave commander, 

Like the oak from mountain crag; 
But his last words still are ringing, 
4, Lay me down and save the Flag." 
To the Snoc of Secession, 

They had bared the fearless brow — 
They had heard that voice and heeded — 

Could they hear and heed it now ? 
But his heart is in the battle — 

Shall the hallowed ensign drag, 
While a hand is left to rescue ? 

44 Lay me down and save the Flag." — CHORUS, 
Then I hey looked at one another 

In ihe speechlessness of woe, 
As each eye would ask a brother, 
Shall we stay, or shall we go ? 
And again the sight was blasted 

By the traitor's boastful rag, 
And again the word fell sternly, 

44 Lay me down and save the Flag." — CHORUS. 
Oh, beloved, ye who murmur 

For the dear ones gone before, 
For themanly son and brother, 

That may greet you never more ; 
For the loving arm that shielded, 
For the hope whose pinions lag, 
Let the lids that quiver, falter, 

44 Lay me down and save the Flag." 
I Slumber calmly, brave commander, 
chorus FOB l Where thou art no pinions lag, 
last VERS! i Fame will hear thy words forever, 

( " Lay me down and save the Flag." 

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19 

LITTLE MAJOR. 

By Henry C. Work 

At his post, the "Little Major " 

Dropp'd his drum, that battle day ; 
On the grass, all stain'd with crimson, 

Through that battle night he lay — 
Crying M Oh ! for love o! Jesus, 

Grant me but this little boon 1 
Can you, friend, refuse me water ? 

Can you, when I die so soon? ' 

CHORUS. 
Crying " Oh ! for love of Jesus, 

Grant me but this little boon ! 
Can you, friend, refuse me water ? 

Can you, when I die so soon ?" 

There are none to hear or help him — 

All his friends were early fled, 
Save the forms, out-stretch'd around him, 

Of ihe dying and the dead. 
Hush — they come ! there falls a foot-step ! 

How it makes his heart rejoice 1 
They will help, Oh, they will save him, 

When they hear his fainting voice. — Chorus. 

Now the lights are flashing round him, 

And he hears a loyal word, 
Strangers they whose lips pronounce it, 

Yet he trusts his voice is heard. 
It is heard — Oh, God forgive them I 

They refuse his dying prayer ! 
" Nothing but a wounded drummer," 

So they say, and leave him there. — Chorus. 

See ! the moon that shines above him, 

Veils her face as if in grief; 
And the skies are sadly weeping — 

Shedding tear-drops of relief. 
Yet to die, by friends forsaken, 

With his last request denied — 
This he felt his keenest anguish, 

When at morn, he gasped and died. — Chorus. 

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20 

GRAFTED INTO THE ARMY. 

By Henry C. \Vo*k. 
Our Jimmy has gone for to live in a tent, 

They have grafted him into the army ; 
He finally pucker'd up courage and went, 

When they grafted him into the army. 
I told them the child was too young, alas ! 

At the captain's forequarters, they said he'd pass— 
They'd train him up well in the infantry class — 

So they grafted him into the army. 



Oh Jimmy farewell ! Your brothers fell 

Way down in Alabarmy ; 
I thought they would spare a lone widder's heir, 

But they grafted him into the army. 

Drest up in his unicorn — dear little chap ; 

They have grafted him into the army ; 
It seems but a day since he sot in my lap, 

But they grafted him into the army. 
And these are the trousies he used to wear — 

Them very same buttons — the patch and the tear — 
But Uncle Sam gave him a bran new pair 

When they grafted him into the army. — Chorus. 

Now in my provisions I see him revealed — 

They have grafted him into the army ; 
A picket beside the contented field, 

They have grafted him into the army. 
He looks kinder sickish — begins to cry — 

A big volunteer standing right in his eye ! 
Oh what if the ducky should up and die 

Now they've grafted him into the army. — CHORUS. 

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21 
STARVED IN PRISON. 

By Geo. F. Root. 
Had they fallen in the battle, 

With the old flag waving high, 
We should mourn, but not in anguish, 

For the soldier thus would die ; 
But the dear boys starv'd in prison, 

Helpless, friendless and alone, 
While the haughty rebel leaders, 
Heard unmov'd each dying groan. 



Yes, they starved in pens, and prisons, 

Helpless, friendless and alone ! 
And their woe can ne'er be spoken, 

Nor their agony be known. 

Had they died in ward or sick-room, 

Nursed with but a soldier's care, 
We should grieve, but still be thankful 

That a human heart was there — 
But the dear boys starv'd in prison, 

Helpless, friendless and alone, 
While the heartless rebel leaders 

Heard unmov'd each dying groan. — CHORUS. 

Oh 1 the thought so sad comes o'er us, 

In this hour of joy and pride, 
That the hearts we loved so fondly 

Might be beating by our side ; 
But the dear boys starv'd in prison, 

Helpless, friendless and alone, 
While the cruel rebel leaders 

Heard unmov'd each dying groan. — CHORUS. 

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22 
UNCLE JOE'S "HAIL COLUMBIA!" 

By Henry C. Work^ 

Uncle Joe comes home a singing, 

Hail, Columby ! 
Glorious times de Lord is bringin' — 

Now let me die. 
Fling de chains into de ribber — 

Lay de burden by : 
Dar is one who will delibber — 

Now let me die. 

CHORUS. 

Ring de Bells in eb'ry steeple ? 
Raise de Flag on high ! 

De Lord has come to sabe his people- 
Now let me die. 

Bressed days, I lib to see dem, 

Hail, Columby ! 
I hab drawn a breff of freedom — 

Now let me die. 
Ninety years I bore de burden, 

Den he heard my cry ; 
Standin' on de banks ob Jurdan — 

Now let me die. — Chorus. 

Dis is what de war was brought for, 

Hail, Columby ! 
Dis is what our faders fought for — 

Now let me die. 
Dar's an end to all dis sorrow, 

Comin' by and by 
Prayin' for dat bressed morrow — 

Now let me die. — Chorus. 

I hab seen de rebels beaten, 

Hail, Columby ! 
I hab seen dar hosts retreatin' — 

Now let me die. 
Oh ! dis Union can't be broken, 

Dar's no use to try ; 
Nosech ting de Lord has spoken — 

Now let me die.— Chorus. 



23 

I'll go home a singing *' Glory !" 

Hail, Columby ! 
Since I heard dis bressed story — 

Now let me die. 
Tis de Ransom ob de nation, 

Drawin' now so nigh ; 
'Tis de day ob full salbation — 

Now let me die.— Chorus. 

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COLUMBIA'S GUARDIAN ANGELS. 

By Henry C. Work. 

An echo floats down from the mountains, 

And finds on the prairies release ; 
An echo whose wonderful burden, 

Is " Victory ! Liberty ! Peace !" 

CHORUS. 
" Glory to God in the highest !" 

And the people shall answer " Amen !" 
Columbia's Guardian Angels 
Return to thei- empire again. 

The banner hangs high in the heavens, 

The beacon commences to burn ; 
The shout of the freedman goes upward, 

To welcome their waited return. — CHORUS. 

The stronghold of Tyranny trembles — 

Her minions retire in dismay, 
Like specters that fade in the darkness, 

Before the arrival of the day. — Chorus. 

They bring us the place among nations 

Our ancestors gave us before ; 
The birthright that some would have barter'd, 

They now in its fullness restore. — CHORUS. 

They bring us that blessing of blessings, 

Which few were yet looking to see — 
A firm and unchangeable Union, 

In fact, as in theory, free ! — CHORUS. 

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24 
CORPORAL SCHNAPPS. 

By Henry C. Work. 
Mine heart is proken into little pits, 

I tells you, friend, what for ; 
Mine schweetheart, von ccot patriotic kirl, 

She trives me off mit der war. 
I fights for her der patties of te flag — 

I schtrikes so prave as I can; 
Put now long time she nix remempers me, 

And coes mit another man. 

CHORUS. 

Ah ! mine fraulein 1 

You goe c mit Hans toZhermany to live, 
And leaves poor Schnapps pehind — 

Leaves poor Schnapps pehind. 

I march all tay, no matter if der schtorm 

Pe worse ash Moses' flood; 
I lays all night, mine head upon a schtump, 

And "sicks to schleep " in der mud. 
Der nightmare comes — I catch him ferry pad — 

I treams I schleeps mit der Ghost ; 
I wakes next morning, frozen in der cround, 

So schtiff as von schtone post. — Chorus. 

They kives me hart pread, tougher as a rock — 

It almost preaks mine zhaw ; 
I schplits him sometimes mit an iron wedge, 

And cuts him up mit a saw. 
They kives me peef, so ferry, ferry salt, 

Like Sodom's wife, you know ; 
I surely dinks dey put him in der prine 

Von hundtred years aco. — Chorl s. 

Py'n py we takes von city in der South — 

We schtays there von whole year ; 
I kits me sourcrout much as I can eat, 

And plenty loccar pier. 
I meets von laty repel in der schtreet, 

So handsome effer I see . 
I makes to her von ferry callant pow — 

Put ah ! she schpits on me. — Chorus. 



25 

" Hart time.' !" you say, " what for you folunteer Y' 

I tolt you, friend, what for : 
Mine schweetheart, von coot patriotic kirl 

She trove me off mit der war. 
Alas ! alas ! mine pretty little von 

Will schmile no more on me ; 
Put schtill I fights der patties of te flag 

To set mine countries free. 

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THE VACANT CHAIR. 

By Geo. F. Root. 
We shall meet, but we shall miss him, 

There will be one vacant chair ; 
We shall linger to caress him 

While we breathe our evening prayer. 
When a year Bgo we gathered, 

Joy was in his mild blue eye, 
But a golden cord is severed, 

And our hopes in ruin lie. 

CHORUS. 
We shall meet, but we shall miss him, 

There will be one vacant chair; 
We shall linger to caress him 

When we breathe our evening prayer. 

At our fireside, sad and lonely, 

Often will the bosom swell 
At remembrance of the story 

How our noble Willie fell ; 
How he strove to bear our banner 

Thro' the thickest of the fight, 
And uphold our country's honor, 

In the strength of manhood's might. — CHORUS. 

True they tell us wreaths of glory 

Ever more will deck his brow, 
But this soothes the anguish only 

Sweeping o'er our heart-strings now 
Sleep to-day, Oh, early fallen, 

In thy green and narrow bed, 
Dirges from the pine and cypress 

Mingle with the tears we shed. — Chorus. 

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26 

THE SWORD OF BUNKER HILL. 

By Covert. 
He lay upon his dying bed ; 
His eye was growing dim, 
When with a feeble voice he called 
His weeping son to him : 
" Weep not, my boy !" the vet'ran said, 
" I bow to heaven's high will — 
But quickly from yon antlers bring 

The Sword of Bunker Hill ; 

But quickly from yon antlers bring 

The Sword of Bunker Hill." 

The sword was brought, the soldier's eye 

Lit with a sudden flame ; 
And as he grasped the ancient blade, 

He murmured Warren's name : 
Then said, " My boy, I leave you gold — 

But what is richer still, 
I leave you, mark me, mark me now — 

The Sword of Bunker Hill ; 
I leave you, mark me, mark me now — 

The Sword of Bunker Hill. 

'Twas on that dread immortal day, 

I dared the Briton's band, 
A Captain raised this blade on me — 

I tore it from his hand : 
And while the glorious battle raged, 

It lightened freedom's will — 
For, boy, the God of freedom blessed 

The Sword of Bunker Hill ; 
For, boy, the God of Freedom blessed 

The Sword of Bunker Hill." 

" Oh, keep the Sword !" — his accents broke — 

A smile — and he was dead — 
But his wrinkled hand still grasped the blade 

Upon tha» dying bed. 
The son remains ; the sword remains — 

Its glory growing still — 
And twenty millions bless the sire, 

And Sword of Bunker Hill ; 
And twenty millions bless the sire 

And Sword of Bunker Hill. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S Brainard's Sons. 



27 

THEY HAVE BROKEN UP THEIR CAMPS. 

By Geo. F. Root. 
They have broken up their camps, 
They are laughing o'er their tramps, 
They are gladly greeting friends who flock around them ; 
They have left the scanty fare, 
They have left the tainted air, 
For they've dashed to earth the prison wall that bound them. 



They are coming from the wars, 

With their wounds and with their scars ; 
But they're bringing back the dear old flag in glory— 

They have battled long and well ; 

And let after ages tell 
How they won the proudest name in song or story. 

We are eager with our thanks, 

We are pressing on their ranks 
We are grasping- hands that held the States unbroken ; 

Yet we sadly think of those 

Who have fallen 'mid their foes, 
And the welcome that we give is sadly spoken. — Chorus. 

Oh, the long delay has passed, 

They have brought us peace at last ; 
And how proudly through our veins the blood is bounding, 

As we bless our honor'd dead, 

While the steady martial tread 
Of returning legions in our ears is sounding. — CHORUS. 

Copyrighted and published in sheeUfonn, with music, by S. Brainard's Soot. 



WHO SHALL RULE THIS AMERICAN NATION? 

By Henry C. Work. 

Who shall rule this American Nation ? 

Say. boys, say? 
Who shall sit in the loftiest station ? 

Say, boys, say ! 
Shall the men who trampled on the banner ? 

'l'hey who now their country would betray ? 
They who murder the innocent freedmen ? 

Say, boys, say ! 



28 

CHORUS. 

M No, never ! no, never !" 

The loyal millions say , 

And 'tis they who rule this American Nation 1 
They, boys, they ! 
Whc shall rank as the family loyai? 

Say, boys, say ! 
If not those who are honest and loyal ? 

Say, boys, say ! 
Then shall one elected as our servain, 

In his pride, assume a regal sway? 
Must we bend to a human Dictator ? 

Say, boys, say ! — Chorus. 
Shall we tarnish our national glory ? 

Say, boys, say ! 
Blot one line from the wonderful story ? 

Say, boys, say ! 
Did we vainly shed our blood in battle ? 

Did our troops resultless win the day 
Was our time and our treasure all squander'd! 

Say, boys, say !— Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Erainard's Sons. 

Wfe WERE COMRADES TOGETHER IN THE DAYS 
OF THE WAR. By Collin Coe. 

We were comrades together when the boys march'd away ; 

In hard times we were aithful, -\nd n good cimes we were gay; 
And sometimes we were longing for the dear ones afar — 
We were comrades together in the days of the war. 
chorus. 
Don't you hear the bugle calling, comrades, to-day? 
Echoing still in mem'ry of the days passed away ! 
Rally round the camp-fire, from near and from far ; 
We were comrades together in the days of the war ! 
We have marched along together, in the sun and the rain ; 

We've faced the fight together, and together borne the pain 1 
And each one ells his story of the wound or the scar — 

We were comrades together in the days of the war. — Chorus. 
To the dear ones gone before uf, here's a health, comrades all ! 

We soon shall go to meet them, at the last great bugle call ! 
Beneath the star of Liberty, the bright, shining tar — 

We're growing old together since the days of the war. — Chorus. 
Coryrghted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. BnUMUfd'l 



29 

WHEN JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME. 

By Loujs Lambert. 
When Johnny comes marching home again, ? 

Hurrah, hurrah 1 
We'll give him a hearty welcome then, 

Hurrah, hurrah ! 
The men will cheer, the boys will shout, 

The 'adies they will all turn out, 
And we'll all feel gay, 

When Johnny comes marching home. 

The old church bell will peal with joy, 

Hurrah, hurrah ! 
To welcome home our darling boy, 

Hurrah, hurrah ! 
The village lads and lassies say, 

With roses they will strew the way, 
And we'll all feel gay, 

When Johnny comes marching home. 

Get ready for the Jubilee, 

Hurrah, hurrah ! 
We'll give the hero three times three, 

Hurrah, hurrah I 
The laurel wreath is ready now, 

To place upon his loyal brow, 
And we'll all feel gay, 

When Johnny comes marching home. 
Let love and friendship on that day, 

Hurrah, hurrah 1 
Their choicest treasures then display ; 

Hurrah, hurrah ! 
And let each one perform some part, 

To fill with joy the warrior's heart. 
And we'll all feel gay, 

When Johnny comes marching home. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Son*. 



30 

FAREWELL FATHER, FRIEND AND GUARDIAN 

By Geo. F. Boot 
All our land is draped in mourning, 

Hearts are bowed and strong men weep; 
For our loved, our noble leader, 

Sleeps his last, his dreamless sleep. 
Gone forever, gone forever, 

Fallen by a traitor's hand ; 
Tho' preserv'd his dearest treasure, 

Our redeem'd, beloved land. 

CHORUS. 

Farewell father, friend and guardian, 
Thou hast joined the martyr band, 

But thy glorious work remaineth, 
Our redeemed beloved land. 

Thro' our night of bloody struggle, 

Ever dauntless, firm and true, 
Bravely, gently forth he led us, 

Til. the morn burst on our view — 
Till he saw the day 01* triumph, 

Saw the field our heroes won ; 
Then his honor'd life was ended, 

Then his glorious work was done. — Chorus. 

When from mountain, hill and valley, 

To their homes our brave boys come, 
When with welcome notes we greet them, 

Song and cheer, and pealing drum ; 
When we miss our loved ones fallen, 

When to weep we turn aside ; 
Then for him our tears shall mingle — 

lie has suffer'd— he has died. — Choru*. 

Honor'd leader, long and fondly 

Shall thy mem'ry cherished be ; 
Hearts shall bless thee for their freedom, 

Hearts unburn shall sigh for thee ; 
He who gave thee might and wisdom, 

( '.ave thy spirit sweet release, 
Farewell father, friend and guardian, 

Rest forever, rest in peace. — Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



31 

WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN. 

By Henry C. Work. 

Come, happy people ! Oh come let us tell 

The story of Washington and Lincoln ! 
History's pages can never excel 

The story of Washington and Lincoln. 
Down through the ages an anthem shall go, 

Bearing the honors we gladly bestow — 
Till every nation and language shall know 

The story of Washington and Lincoln : 

CHORUS. 
Who gave us independence, 

On continent and sea — 
Who saved the glorious Union 1 

And set a people free ! 
This is the story — oh happy are we — 

The story of Washington and Lincoln. 

Parents to children shall tell with delight, 
The story of Washington and Lincoln ; 

Free-born andfreedmen together recite 
The story of Washington and Lincoln. 

Earth's weary bondmen shall listen with cheer- 
Tyrants shall tremble and traitors shall fear — 

When in its fullness of glory, they hear 

The story of Washington and Lincoln. — CHORUS. 

Though on the war-cloud recorded with steel, 

The story of Washington and Lincoln; 
Peace, only Peace, can completely reveal 

The story of Washington and Lincoln. 
Thanks to the Lord for the days we behold ! 

Thanks for the unsullied flag we unfold ! 
Thanks that to us, and in our time, was told 

The story of Washington and Lincoln. — CHORUS. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



- 

TIS FINISHED; OR SING HALLELUJAH. 

BY Henry C. Woril 
Tis finished ! 'tis ended ! 

The dread and awful task is done ; 
Tho' wounded and bleeding, 

'Tis ours to sing the vict'ry won. 
Our nation is ransom'd — 

Onr enemies are overthrown 
And now, now commences, 

The brighest era ever known. 

CHORUS. 

Then sing hallelujah ! 

Sing hallelujah ! 
Glory be to God on high ! 

For the old flag 
With the white flag, 

Is hanging in the azure sky. 

Ye joy bells ! Ye peace bells ! 

Oh never, never music rang 
So sweetly, so grandly, 

Since angels in the advent sang. 
Your message is gladness 

To myriads of waiting souls, 
As onward and worldward 

The happy, happy echo rolls. — CHORUS. 

Come patriots ; come freemen ! 

Come join your every heart and voice; 
We've wept with the weeping — 

Now let us with the blest rejoice, 
With armies of victors 

Who round about the white throne stand — 
With Lincoln, the Martyr 

And Liberator of his land. — Chorus. 

Copyti'shted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Rrainard's Sons. 



33 

WHEN SHERMAN MARCHED DOWN TO THE SEA. 

Our camp fires shone bright on the mountain 

That frowned on the river below, 
While we stood by our guns in the morning, 

And eagerly watched for the foe , 
When a horseman rode out from the darkness 

That hung over mountain and tree, 
And shouted, "Boys, up and be ready, 

l-'or Sherman will march to the sea." 

When cheer upon cheer for bold Sherman 

Went up from each valley and glen, 
And the bugles re-echoed the music 

That came from the lips of the men — 
For we know .hat he stars on our banners, 

Mure bright in their splendor would be, 
And the blessings from Northland would greet US 

When Sherman march'd down to the sea. 

Then forward, boys ; forward to battle, 

We march'd on our wearysome way, 
And we storm'd the wild hills of Resaca, 

God bless those who fell on that day ! — 
Then Kenesaw, dark in its glory, 

Frown'd down on the flag of the free, 
But the East and the West br re her standard 

When Sherman march'd down to the sea. 

Still onward we pressed till our banners 

Swept out from Atlanta's grim walls, 
And the blood of the patriot dampened 

The soil where the traitor's flag falls ; 
But we paused not to weep for the fallen 

Who slept by each river and tree, 
Yet we twined them a wreath of the laurel, 

And Sherman marched down to the sea. 

Proud, proud was our army that morning 

That stood by the cypress and pine, 
Then Sherman said, " Boys, you are weary, 

This day fair Savannah .s mine !" 
Then sang we a song for our chieftain, 

That echoed o'er river and sea, 
And the stars on our banners shone brighter 

When Sherman marched down to the sea. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S Brainard's Sons. 



AMERICA. 

My country, 'tis i f thcc, 
'.and of Liberty, 

ce I -ing ; 
Land where my fathers died, 
I^nd of the :ide, 

rv'ry mountain Bldl 

Let freedom ring ! 
My native country, thee, 
: the noble free, 

Thy nunc I love ; 
I love thy rocks and rills, 
Thy woods and templed hills, 
My heart with rapture thrills, 

Like that above. 
Let music swell the breeze, 
And ring from all the trees 
v cet freedom's song ; 
Let mortal tongues awake, 
Let all that breathe partake, 
Let rocks their silence break, 

The sound pre I 
Our h ' I I to thee, 

Author of liberty, 

To thee we sing, 
Ling may our land be bright 
With freedom's holy light ; 
1'rotcct us by thy migh', 

Great God, our king ! 



COMING HOME FROM THE OLD CAMP GROUND. 

By William T. Rogers 
We are breaking up camp and marching away ; 

The war is over at last j 
We are ill going home to rejoice with our friends, 
And talk o'er the scenes that have passed. 

CHORUS. 

V'e are coming home again from the old camp ground, 

And the scenes of war ami strife, 
We are coming home again to the friends we love, 

And the joys of a peaceful life. 



35 

We have long been parted from our dear kind friend, 

And the joys of a peaceful home ; 
We have long been camping in the stranger's land, 

And wishing for the end to come. — Chorus. 
Our old flag's coming, our brave old flag ; 

On many a battle-field 
It was torn and tattered by the shot and shell, 

But never would the old flag yield. — Chorus. 
We are coming home again, but we're not all coming, 

For many have passed away ; 
We have laid them to rest near the old camp ground, 

And they quietly sleep there to-day. —Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 

OUR FLAG AND THE UNION FOREVER. 

By Isaiah Ickes, 
We will stand by the Union forever, 

By the flag of the brave and the true, 
By the glorious star spangled banner, 
With its beautiful red, white, and blue. 
chorus. 
See it waving, waving, waving, 

Tis freedom's emblem fair, 
See it waving, waving, waving, 
In glorious triumph there. 
Oh its folds to the free air of heaven, 

By our fathers unfurled long ago, 
Shall ne'er wave o'er America riven, 

By the hand of a traitorous foe. — Chorus. 
On the field o'er the dead and the dying, 

Where the loud din of battle is rife, 
See our emblem of liberty flying, 

Oh, its triumph is dearer than life. — Chorus. 
Let us trust in the might of Jehovah, 

For the right with His might will prevail, 
Wkh the fl'g of the free floating over 

Our hosis, Oh we never shall fail. — Chorus. 
Three times three for the Union forever, 
Three times for the brave and the true, 
Three times three for the star spangled banner, 
With its beautiful red, white, and blue. — Chorus. 
Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



36 
HAIL COLUMBIA 

Hail ! Columbia, happy land ! 

Hail 1 ye heroes, heav'n-born band, 
Who fought and bled in freedom's cause, 

Who fought and bled in freedom's cause, 
And when the storm of war was gone, 

Enjoy'd the peace your valor won. 
Let independence be our boast, 

Ever mindful what it cost ; 
Ever grateful for the prize ; 

Let its altar reach the skies 1 

CHORUS. 

Firm united let us be, 

Rallying round our liberty. 
As a band of brothers join'd, 

Peace and safety we shall find. 

Immortal patriots, rise once more ! 

Defend your rights, defend your shore ; 
Let no rude foe, with impious hands, 

Let no rude foe with impious hands, 
Invade the shrine where, sacred, lies 

Of toil and blood the well-earned prize ! 
While off ring peace sincere and just, 

In heav'n we place a manly trust 
That truth ard justice will prevail, 

And every scheme of bondage fail. — CHORUS. 

Sound, sound the trump of fame, 

Let Washington's great name 
Ring thro' the world with great applause, 

Ring thro' the world with great applause; 
Let every clime to freedom dear, 

Listen with a joyful ear. 
With equal skill, with god-like pow'r, 

He governs in the fearful hour 
Of horrid war, or guides with ease 

The happier hours of honest peace 1 — CHORU1, 

Behold the chief who now commands ! 

Once more to serve his country stands 
The rock, on which the storm will beat, 

The rock on which the storm will beat, 



37 

But arm'd in virtue, firm and true, 

His hopes are fixed on heav'n and you ! 

When hope was sinking in dismay, 
When gloom obscured Columbia's day, 

His steady mind, from changes free, 
Resolved on death or victory ! — Chorus. 

Published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER. 

By Francis H. Key. 
Oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, 

What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming ? 
Whose broad stripes and bright stars thro' the perilous fight, 
O'er the ramparts we watch'd were so gallantly' streaming ! 
And the rockets red glare, the bombs bursting in air, 

Gave proof through the night that our flag still was there. 

CHORUS. 

Oh say, does that star spangled banner yet wave, 
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave ? 

On the shore dimly seen thro* me mist of the deep, 
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, 

What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, 
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses ? 

Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, 

In full gioiy reflected now shines in the stream. — CHORUS. 

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore, 
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion, 

A home and a country shall leave us no more? 

Their blood has wash'd out their foul footsteps' pollution. 

No refuge could save the hirelings and slave, 

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave. — CHORUS. 

Oh thus be it evev, when freemen shall stand 

Between their loved home and the war's desolation ; 

Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n rescued land 
Praise the Power that hath made and preserv'd us a nation. 

Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, 

And this be our motto, " In God is our trust." — CHORUS. 

Published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard s Sons. 



38 

SONG OF A THOUSAND YEARS. 

By Henry C. Work. 
Lift up your eyes, desponding freemen ! 

Fling to the winds your needless fears ! 
He who unfurl'd your beauteous banner, 
Says it shall wave a thousand years ! 

CHORUS. 

"A thousand years I" my own Columbia ! 
Tis the glad day so long foretold 1 
'Tis the glad morn whose early twilight 
Washington saw in times of old. 

What if the clouds, one little moment, 

Hide the blue sky where morn appears — 
When the bright sun, that tints them crimson, 

Rises to shine a thousand years ! — Chorus. 

Tell the great world these blessed tidings ! 

Yes, and be sure the bondman hears ; 
Tell the oppress'd of ev'ry nation, 

Jubilee lasts a thousand years 1 — Chorus. 

Envious foes, beyond the ocean ! 

Little we heed your threat'ning sneers ; 
Little will they — our ch ;, dren's children — 

When you are gone a thousand years. — Chorus. 

Rebels at homa ! go hide your faces — 

Weep for your crimes with bitter tears; 
You could not bind the blesed daylight, 

Though you should strive a thousand years. — CHORUS. 

Back to your dens, ye secret traitors ! 

Down to your own degraded spheres ! 
Ere the first blaze of dazzling sunshine 

Shortens your lives a thousand years. — Chorus. 

Haste thee along, thou glorious Noonday ! 

Oh, for the eyes of ancient seers 1 
Oh, for the faith of Him who reckons 

Each of his days a thousand years ! — Chorus. 

Published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



39 

COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN; 

Or, Red, White and Blue. 

Oh, Columbia ! the gem of the ocean, 

The home of the brave and the free, 
The shrine of each patriot's devotion, 

A w,orld offers homage to thee. 
Thy mandates make heroes assemble, 

When Liberty's form stands in view, 
Thy banners make tyranny tremble, 

When borne by the red, white and blue. 



When borne by the red, white and blue, 
When borne by the red, white and blue, 

Thy banners make tyranny tremble, 

When borne by the red, white and blue. 

When war waged its wide desolation, 

And threatened the land to deform, 
The ark then of freedom's foundation, 

Columbia rode safe thro' the storm ; 
With her garlands of vict'ry around her, 

When so proudly she bore her brave crew, 
With her flag proudly floating before her, 

The boast of the red white and blue.— Chorus. 

The wine cup, the wine cup bring hither, 

And fill you it true to the brim, 
May the wreaths they have won never wither, 

Nor the star of their glory grow dim ! 
May the service united ne'er sever, 

But they to their colors prove true ! 
The Army and Navy forever, 

Three cheers for the red, white and blue.— CHORUS. 

Published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



4«i 
TAKE YOUR GUN AND GO, JOHN. 

Br H. T. Merrill. 
Don't stop a moment to think, John ; 

Our country calls, then go. 
Don't fear for me nor the children, John, 

I'll care for them, you know. 
Leave the corn upon the stalk, John, 

The fruit upon the tree, 
And all our little stores, John, 

Yes, leave them all to me. 

CHORUS. 

Then take your gun and go, 

Yes, take your gun and go, 
Ruth can drive the oxen, John, 

And I can use the hoe. 

I've heard my grandsire tell, John, 

He fought at Bunker Hill, 
He counted all his life and wealth 

His country's off ring still. 
Would I shame the brave old blood, John, 

That flow'd on Monmouth plain? 
No ! take your gun and go, John, 

Tho' I ne'er see you again. — CHORUS. 

The army's short of blankets, John, 

Then take this heavy pair, 
I spun and wove them when a girl 

And work'd them with great care. 
A rose in ev'ry corner, John, 

And here's my name you see ! 
On the cold ground they'll warmer feel, 

Because they're made by me. — CHORUS. 

And, John, if God has willed it so 

We ne'er shall meet again, 
I'll do the be*t for the children, John, 

In sorrow, want or pain. 
On winter nights I'll teach them, John, 

All that I learned at school ; 
To love our country, keep her lawRj 

Obey the Savior's rule.— CHORUS. 



41 

And now good bye to you, John ; 

I cannot say farewell ! 
We'll hope and pray for the best, John ; 

His goodness none can tell. 
May His arm be round about you, John, 

To guard you nigh* and day ; 
Be our beloved country's shield 

Till war shall pass away. — Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sods. 

GLORY! GLORY! HALLELUJAH! 

John Brown's body lies a mould'ring in the grave, 
John Brown's body lies a mould'ring in the grave, 
John Brown's body lies a mould'ring in the grave, 
His soul is marching on. 

CHORUS. 

Glory, glory hallelujah, 
Glory, glory hallelujah, 
Glory, glory hallelujah, 

His soul is marching on. 
The stars of Heaven are looking kindly down, 
The stars of Heaven are looking kindly down, 
The stars of Heaven are looking kindly down, 

On the grave of old John Brown. — CHORUS. 

He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord, 

He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord, 

He's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord, 

His soul is marching on. — Chorus. 

John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back, 

John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back, 

John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back, 

His soul is marching on. — Chorus. 

His pet lambs will meet him on the way, 
His pet lambs will meet him on the way, 
His pet lambs will meet him on the way, 

And they'll go marching on. — Chorus. 

They will hang Jeff Davis to a tree, 
They will hang Jeff Davis to a tree, 
They will hang Jeff Davis to a tree, 

As they march along. — Chorus. 
Published in sheet form, with music, by S Briinard's Sons. 



42 

THE FIRST GUN IS FIRED. 

By Geo. F. Root. 
The first gun is fired ! 

May God protect the night ! 
L:t the free-born sons of the North arise 

In pow'rs avenging might ; 
Shall the glorious union our father's made 

By ruthless hands be sundered? 
And we of freedom's saced rights 

By trait'rous foes be plunder'd ? 

CHORUS. 

Arise ! Arise ! Arise ! 

And gird ye for the fight, 
And let our watchword ever be, 

"May God protect the right 

The first gun is fired ! 

Its echoes thrill the land, 
And the bounding hearts of the patriot throng 

Now firmly take their stand ; 
We will bow no more to the tyrant few, 

Who scorn our long forbearing, 
But with Columbia's stars and stripes 

We'll quench their trait'rous daring. — Chorus. 

The first gun is fired ! 

Oh, heed the signal well, 
And the thunder tone as it rolls along, 

Shall sound oppression's knell ; 
For the arm of freedom is mighty still, 

Us strength shall Lil us never, 
That strength we'll give to our righteoni cause 

And our glorious land forever. — Chok: s. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S Brainard*s Sons. 



43 
OUR CAPTAINS LAST WORDS. 

By Henry C. Work* 
Where the foremost flag was flying, 
Pierc'd by many a shot and shell, 
Where the bravest men were dying, 
There our gallant captain fell. 
" Boys ! you follow now another ! 
Follow till the foe shall yield ;" 
Then he whisper'd "Tell my mother 
Stephen died upon the field." 
"Mother!" "Mother!" 

" Stephen died upon the field." 

Through the battle smoke they bore him, 

But his words were growing wild ; 
Heeding not the scenes before him, 

Stephen was once more a child. 
M Ah, she comes ! there is no other, 

Speaks my name with such a joy ; 
Press me to your bosom, mother, 

Call me still your darling boy." 
"Mother!" "Mother!" 

" Call me still your darling boy." 

Men who were not used to weeping, 

Turn'd aside to hide a tear, 
When they saw the palor creeping, 

That assured them death was near. 
Kindly as he were a brother, 

Strangers caught his parting breath, 
Laden with the murmur "mother" 

Last upon his lips in death. 
" Mother !" "Mother !" 

Last upon his lips in death. 
Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



44 
STAND UP FOR UNCLE SAM, MY BOYS J 

By Geo. F. Root. 
Stand up for Uncle Sam, my boys, 

With hearts brave and true ; 
Stand up for Uncle Sam, my boy?, 

For he has stood by you. 
He's made your homes the brightest 

The sun e'er shown upon ; 
For honor, right and freedom 
He's many a battle won. 



Stand up for Uncle Sam, my boys, 

With hearts brave arid true, 
Stand up for Uncle Sam, my boys, 

For he has stood by you. 

Oh, strike for Uncle Sam, my boys, 

For danger is near ; 
Yes ! strike for Uncle Sam, my boys, 

And all to you most dear. 
Rebellious sons are plotting 

To lay the homestead low, 
Their hands are madly lifted 

To give the fatal blow. — CHORUS. 

Oh, fall for Uncle Sam, my boys, 

If need be to save ; 
Yes I fall for Uncle Sam, my boys, 

Tho' in a soldier's grave. 
His flag so long our glory 

Dishonor'd shall not be, 
But heav'nward float forever, 

The banner of the free. — CHORUS. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



45 
CAN THE SOLDIER FORGET? 

By Geo. F. Root. 
Yes, beloved ones at home, we remember, 

Ah, how can the soldier forget ? 
All the vows that were said when we parted 

Are sacied and dear to him yet. 
When the night throws its mantle around us, 

We dream 'neath the heav'n's starry dome, 
Of the dear ones whose sweet spell has bound us 

And whose voices shall welcome us home. 

CHORUS. 

Yes, beloved ones at home, we remember, 

Ah, how can the soldier forget ? 
All the vows that were said when we parted, 

Are sacred and dear to us yet. 

Of the deeds that are hallowed in story, 

We think as we press on our way ; 
And the pathway that leads on to glory 

Gleams brightly before us to-day. 
For the millions that wait on our efforts, 

And myriads the future shall claim, 
When the peans of vict'ry are sounding, 

Shall most joyfully echo each name. — Chorus. 

Oh, ye hearts that with anguish are swelling, 

Ye eyes that are darkened with fear, 
For the brave ones that ye loved past the telling, 

The fallen that sleep with us here ; 
They have burst now the fetters that bound them 

And high 'mid the heav'n's brightest ray, 
E'en with glories immortal around them, 

They are loooking upon us to-day. — Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S. Bralr.ard's Sons. 



40 

BRAVE BATTERV BOYS. 

Bv P. P. Bliss, 
We come with reversed arms, 

Oh, comrades who sleep, 
To rear the proud marble — to muse and to weep. 

To speak of the dark days that yet had their joys, 
When we were together — 

Brave Battery Boys, 
When we were together — 

Brave Battery Boys. 

CHORUS. 

Ho ! Kenesaw Mountain, 

Ho ! Franklin, declare 
What soldiers for Freedom can do and dare; 

Loud peans of praise each patriot employs, 
To tell how they triumphed — 

Biave Battery Boys. 

Our hearts will recall them, 

The scenes where ye' bled, 
Where life rushed away in the torrent of red ; 

When Mission Ridge echoed the battle's fierce joys, 
When rushed to the rescue 

Brave Battery Boys, 
When rushed to the rescue 

Brave Battery Boys.— Chorus. 

We may not live over 

Each glory crown'd day, 
When bravely ye battled and won in the fray ; 

When proudly ye sported the grand battle toys, 
And fell but as victors, 

Brave Battery Boys, 
And fell but as victors, 

Brave Battery Boys,— Chorus. 

We come, Oh 1 beloved 

To garland your tomb, 
To twine 'round the marble the spring's freshest bloom ; 

To speak of a past that no present destroys. 
And call the dead roll of 

Brave Battery Boys, 
And call the dead roll of 

Brave Battery Boys.— Chorus. 



47 

Oh, brave Twenty-six, when 

The weary shall rest, 
When over our slumbers the sod shall be prest ; 

When sweetly forgetful of all that annoys, 
We'll sleep here together, 

Brave Battery Boys, 
We'll sleep here together, 

Brave Battery Boys. — Chorus. 

Copyrighted and published in sheet form, with music, by S Brainard's Sons. 



YANKEE DOODLE 

A Yankee boy is trim and tall; 

And never over fat, sir ; 
At dance or frolic, hop and ball, 

As nimble as a rat, sir. 

CHORUS. 

Yankee doodle guard your coast, 

Yankee doodle dandy ; 
Fear not then nor threat nor boast ; 

Yankee doodle dandy. 

He's always out on training day, 

Commencement or election ; 
At truck and trade he knows a way 

Of thriving to perfection. — CHORUS. 

His door is always open found, 

His cider of the best, sir ; 
His board with pumpkin pie is crown'd, 

And welcome ev'ry guest, sir. — Chorus. 

Though rough and little is his farm, 

That little is his own, sir ; 
His hand is strong, his heart is warm, 

'Tis truth and honor's throne, sir.— Chorus. 

His country is his pride and boast, 

He'll ever prove true blue, sir ; 
When call'd upon to give his toast, 

'Tis "Yankee doodle, doo," sir ! — Chorus. 

Published in sheet form, with music, by S. Brainard's Sons. 



BRAINARD'S 

Dollar Method for the Piano-Forte. 

Is the largest, cheapest and hest Method for this favorite instrument, and superior to most 
instruction books sold for double the price, 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Piano-Forte. 

Contains full and complete elementary instructions, with useful hints and explanations to 
teacher and pupil, and carefully graded exercises for practice. 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Piano-Forte. 

Is unequalled as a self-instructor, and pupils who wish to learn to play the Piano- Forte 
without a teacher will find this just the book they need. 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Piano-Forte, 

Contains a large amount of choice, new Vocal and Instrumental Music, arranged ex- 
pressly for the Piano-Forte, which alone is worth ten times its cost. 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Piano-Forte. 

Should be found on every Piano- Forte in the land, whether you have another book or 
not. Its useful hints on Piano Playing, sparkling Amusements and beautiful new Songs 
and Piano Pieces render it indispensable to every Pianist. 
^TSold by most Music Dealers, or mailed post-paid en receipt of one dollar. 

BRAINARD'S 

Dollar Method for the Reed Organ. 

Is the largest, cheapest and best Method for this favorite instrument, and superior to most 
books sold for double the price. 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Reed Organ. 

Contains full and complete elementary instructions, with useful hints and explanations to 
teacher and pupil, and carefully graded exercises for practice. 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Reed Organ. 

Is unequalled as a self-instructor, and pupils who wish to learn to play the Reed Organ 
without a teacher will find this just the book they need. 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Reed Organ. 

Contains a large amount of choice, new Vocal and Instrumental Music, arranged ex. 
pressly for the Reed Organ, which alone is worth ten times its cost. 

Brainard's Dollar Method for the Reed Organ. 

Should be found on every Reed Orgau iu ihc 'and. whether you have another book or 
not. Its useful hints on Organ Playing, sparkling Amusements and beautiful new Songs 
and Organ Pieces render it indispensable to _c«*ry organist. 
iSTSold by most Music Dealers, or mailed post-paid on receipt of one dollar. 



The Peerless! 

The New Reed Organ Method ! 

An Entertaining, Progressive and Interesting Book 

The Creme de la Creme of all the best methods is 
gathered into this single volume ! 

A Feast of Musical Gems for the Organ! 

All Teachers Recommend It. All Pupils Delight In It. 

The player who uses the Peerless Organ Method 
becomes acquainted with every style of music 
and acquires a refined taste. 
The Songs are the Very Best. 

The Organ Pieces are Beautiful. 
The Peerless is already taking its position as the lead- 
ing Peed Organ Method, and progressive teachers will 
recommend it to their pupils. It is a Home Favorite as 
well as a valuable instructor. 

PRICE, MAILED POST-PAID, $2.50. 



Brainard's Chorus Gems! 

Volume I. 

A choice collection of selected Choruses by Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Rossini, Barnby, 
Curschmann, Pinsuti, Sullivan, Smart, Gade, Leslie, Macferren and other eminent com. 
posers. Compiled and adapted for the use of Musical Societies, Social Gatherings, Sing- 
ing Classes, Public Exhibitions, etc. One hundred and ten pages. 

Every vocal society in the land should have this fine book of choruses. Nothing equal 
to it has ever appeared, and it fills a long felt want. To show the high character of this 
work, we give the following 

CONTENTS OF CHORUS GEMS, VOLUME ONE. 



A Vintage Song Mendelssohn 

Aye Maria MenrH^ohn 

Birds that had left their Song. . . Mauarren 

Carnovale. (The) Rossini 

Daylight is Fading Leslie 

Evening Sullivan 

Fairy Voices Halley 

Fairies? (The) Macfarren 

Flower Greeting. (The) Curschmann 

• xood Night to the Day Halley 

■ iood B\ e Hatton 

t'rood Night, Good Night, Beloved.. Pinsuti 
Hear, Sweet Spirit Smart 



I thought of Thee Banks 

May Day Mueller 

Moonlight Glover 

Oh, Hush Thee, my Baby Sullivan 

One Morning Sweet in May Leslie 

Farting Kiss. (The) Pinsuti 

Phoebus Barnby 

Silent Night Barnby 

Serenade. (The) (Male Voices).. . .Miller 

Sweet and Low Barnby 

Water Lily. (The) Gade 

Ye Little Birds that Sit and. . ..Macfarren 
You Stole my Love Macfarren 



Price, bound in boards, 75 cents; $7.50 per dozen. 

Each of ths above beautiful Choruses can also be obtained separately, bound in 
paper covers. Price. 6 cents each, or 60 cents per dozen. 



The Criterion. 

The Latest New Sixgixg Book. 

By S. S. MYERS. 

Contains New Bongs, Glees, etc. la a Ready Iiulp for 

the Teacher; the Studies and Exercises are New, and 
Improved; it is Eminently Practical; Everybody likes 
it ; it meets all Requirements : ( fld Methods Superseded, 

and old music replaced by New, Fresh and Sparkling 1 
V«»cal Gems. 

The "Criterion"' has been written and compiled by 
one of the most successful and progressive teachers in 
this country. It will at once take its position as the 
Leading Book for Singing Classes, Schools, Conven- 
tions, etc. 

It is a book for all lovers of good vocal music, and 
the Best Book of its kind. 

Price, 60 cents per copy, by mall; $6.00 per dozen, by express. 



Brafnard's Chorus Gems ! 

Volume II. 

The great success of CHORUS GEMS, volume one, among Singing Societies through- 
out the country, that have used it, has induced us to issue VOLUME TWO, which will 
be found to fully equal its predecessor. It will be found wh.it its name implies — 
"CHORUS GEMS" — selected from the many beautiful choruses and part songs hy the 
best writers of the day. Contains one hundred and ten pages. A glance at the following 
contents will show the character of the book. 

CONTENTS OF CHORUS GEMS, VOLUME TWO. 

O, by Rivers, by whose Falls Bishop 

Great is the Depth St. Paul 

Pairing and Meeting 

• < p no More Benedict 

Schubert's Serenade, (Male Voi.) Schubert 

Spring Song Pinsuti 

Spring with Fairy Foot Returning.. I 

Tell me Flora Pinsuti 

TV 11 mc i Barnbj 

Hath its Pearls Pinsuti 

and about the Starry Handel 

Beethoven 

When the Vesper Bells Comes Florime 

Price, bound in boards, 75 cents; $7.50 per dozen. 

Bach >.f the ah. ve beautiful Choruses can also be obtained separately, bound In 
paper covers. Price, 6 cents each, or 60 cents per dozen. 



A Spring Song Pinsuti 

Ave Maria Franz Abt 

Boatman's Good Night Schira 

Evening Song. (Male Voices) Kunt?e 

Farewell to the Forest Men 

Fast the Night is FalHng,(Fem.Trio) Smart 

11 Garrett 

God in the Tempest S bubert 

Hunting Song I 

Knights Farewell. (Male Voi. t»). Kinkel 

t Beauty Mendelssohn 

Love me Little, Love me Long I.ahee 

Lullaby of Life 



THE 



Song Evangelist. 

A RARE COLLECTION OF 

Religious Songs and Hymns for the Sunday School, 

the Choir and the Congregation. 

By L. B. SHOOK. 

A Book for Every Christian Community. 
Fresh and Charming Melodies, with Words Appropriate 
to Many of the Favorite Bible Texts. 
The new and tuneful Sunday school songs in this ex- 
cellent hook are such as will place it at once in the front 
rank among all similar works. The Revival hymns are 
spirited and well written, while the best of the standard 
hymn-favorites have been culled from various sources. 
It is altogether a practical and useful book, and the 
indications are that the Song Evangelist will have an 
enormous sale. For sale by all Music and Book Dealers 

Price, 35 cents per copy, by maU; $3.60 per dozen, by express. 

Brainard's Chorus Gems! 

Volume III. 

Brainard's Chorus Gems, Volume One and Two have met with such great success, 
among Singing Societies, Institutes, Schools etc., that we herewith present Volume Three 
which will be fully equal to its two preceding volumes. 

Every vocal society in the land should have this fine book of choruses. Nothing equal 
to it has ever appeared, and it fills a long felt want. To show the high character of this 
work, we give the following: 

CONTENTS OF CHORUS GEMS, VOLUME THREE. 



Airs of Summer Roecke! 

Childhood's Melody Bergei 

Cradle Song Smart 

Down in the Flow'ry Vale Festa 

Eve's Glittering Star Kucken 

Good Morrow to My Lady Mac rone 

Happy and Light " Bohemian Girl " 

How Soft the Shades of Evening Smart 

Night S mg Rheinberger 

O, Well I Love the Spring Hatton 

Over Hi'.!, Ov^r Dale Hattor. 

Old May Morning Novello 

Outward Bound Hatton 



O, Hush Thee. My Babie Douglas 

Pilgrim Chorus I Lombardi 

Potter, The Gaul 

Rainbow, The Leslie 

Resurgam Leslie 

Shi pherd's Farewell, The Smart 

Snent Land, The Gaul 

Village Dance, The Hatton 

Wake Then, O Darling (serennd- ). ..Cellier 

Were I the Nightingale Hay 

Who Killed Cock Robin ? Pearsall 

Who Knows What the Bells Say ?... Parker 



Price, bound in boards, 75 cents; $7.50 per dozen. 

Each of the above beautiful Choruses can also be obtained separately, bouud in 
paper ccveri. Price, 6 cents each, cr 60 cents per dozen. 



Gems from the Favorite Operas ! 

Opera at Home, 

Just published. A collection of piano pctpourris on all the favorite airs from o*Sf j 

of I* 



\ 



twenty of the must popular operas of the day. No such collection of 

OPERATIC PIANO MUSIC! 

nas ever before been published, in a single volume. Opera at Home, contains all tke 
best music in the following famous operas : 

Bells of Corneville, Belle Helene. Boccaccio, Carmen, Fatinitza, Girofle-Girofla 
Grande Duchesse, Jolie Parfumeuse, Martha, Madame Favart, Mefistofele, Mignon, 
Marjulaine, Pinafore, Pirates of Penzance, Royal Middy (Sec Cadet). 

Price only $1.00 in boards. $1.50 in flexible cloth and gilt. 
Each opera usually sells for from 50 cts to $1.00, while in Opera at Home th 
principal airs in over twenty operas can be obtained for one dollar. 

Winner's Primary Schools. 

And "New Methods" for the Flute, Fife, Flageolet, Clarionet, 
Cornet, Violoncello, Banjo, German Accordeon or 

Flutina Concertina, etc. 
By Sep Winner. The latest and best "Winner Books." 

These popular, easy methods of instruction are extensively used, especially for sell-] 
instruction. In each book the elements of music aie explained in a simple and conciseJ 
manner, and a choice selection of popular music is given. The following works comprised 
the series : 

1. Winner's New Method for Piano-Forte. 

2. Winner's New Method for Reed Organ 

3. Winner's New Method for Melodeon. 

4. Winner's Primaiy School for Violin. 

5. Winner's Primary School for Guitar. 

6. Winner's Primary School for Cornet. 

7. Winner's Primary School for Flute. 

8. Winner's Primary School for Violoncello. 

9. Winner's Primary School for Banjo. 

10. Winner's Primary School for Clarionet. 

11. Winner's Primary School for Flageolet. 4 

12. Winner's Primary School for Fife. 

13. Winner's Primary School for German Accordeon. 

14. Winner's Primary School for Accordeon or Flutina. 

15. Winner's Primary School for Concertina. 

16. Winner's Primary School for Vocal Music. 

Wa would call the especial attention of dealers, teachers and amateurs to the New 
Series of Winner B<H>ks, with or without a master. Each book is arranged with special 
reference to being useful and practical for each instrument, while the Vocal Method will 
be found just the book 10 learn you how to sing. All the books in this series are strongly 
bound, printed on fine white paper, have illustrated title page, and are acknowledged to 
be the best and cheapest elementary instruction books in the market. 

g-JTAs there are a number of old and inferior editions of Winner's books in the 
market, be sure and ask for Brainard's New Edition, if you wish the latest, best and 
most useful. Price only 75 cents each. Copies mailed post paid to any address on re- 
ceipt 0/ price. Usual dibcount to teachers and the trade. 



i 




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Among the Best Class of Musical People, is larger than that of any other 
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From Twelve to Sixteen Pages of Fine Music are given in the World 

each month, making ncar'y two hundred pages of choice 

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Terms. $1 60 per Year; Single C-jples 15 Cents Each. 

55* JSrcuttard's Sous t 

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