(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Blue and White"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/bluewhite1935sain 



The Blue and White 




1935 



Published by 

THE SENIOR CLASS 
Saint Augustine's College 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



LUE AND WHITE 




MRS B. B. DELANY 



y. 



D WHITE 




BISHOP B. B. DELANY 

In recognition of their lives of unselfish successful service and of the high 
esteem that we hold for them, the class of nineteen hundred and thirty-five 

dedicates this book to 
Bishop and Mrs. B. B. Delany 



1UE AND WHITE 



FOREWORD 

Age and maturity in experience seem to give an authori- 
tative value to advice unsolicited or asked Judged by 
such a standard, I can only merit your consideration 
through sincerity. At this time you are, perhaps, too 
close to your tour years of college life to get the proper 
perspective for a worthwhile evaluation. However, some 
few years hence, when you have had opportunity to test 
the value of these years of preparation, I should like to 
feel that you will be able to see these values: 

First: A true sense of responsibility for obligations 
assumed. 

Second. The ability to make social adjustments that 
will enable you to be actively helpful in your com- 
munity. 

Third: A deep appreciation of the beauty of life and 
its meaning through a spiritual security that has given 
you the courage to live daily as a christian. 

Fourth: The inspiration to maintain a high standard of 
efficiency in your chosen field 

The knowledge that these values have come to you 
through your Alma Mater should make you loyal alumni, 
actively interested in the future welfare and develop- 
ment of your college. With good health and deep true 
living you will not fail to find happiness and success. 



THEODORA R. BOYD 



LUE AND WHITE 




MISS THEODORA R BOYD— Adv 



iser 



LUE AND WHITE 




REV. EDGAR H GOOLD, President 



BLUE AND WHITE 



ADMINISTRATION 




Arthur P. Chippey, M.A. E. Doreen Frost, II. A. Cecil I). Halliburton, M.A. 

Biology English Social Science 

Jessie E. Guernsey, M.A. Pearl A. .Snodsrass. M.A. 

History Biblical Literature and Librarian 

Charles H. Boyer, M.A. 
Dean 
Reginald L. Lynch, B.A. Theodora R. Boyd, II. A. 

French French 

Julia B. Delany, B.A. Cecil X. Coble. B.S. Elsie M. Cooke George Henry Mitchell, B.S. 

English Science Call. Prep. Registrar Men's Proctor 

M. II. Latham Bernice Taylor, B.S. Estella Grayson, B.S.. B.A. 

Dean of Women Assistant to Superintendent Assistant Librarian 



LUE AND WHITE 



Editor's Word 

It should not be necessary for Editors to have the last word. They should fade out 
gracefully without a ripple or a splash to show where they went down. This is a 
very mixed metaphor but may be laid to emotion. 

I cannot go without a word. I confess that it was with fear and trembling that 
I saw election time for our Annual approach. 

This is a public expression of gratitude for the splendid work of my staff. There 
has been the greatest harmony existing among all of us, enviable as well as rare 
For their cooperation as well as their work, I thank them all. However, the work 
of our Business Manager and our Class Sponsor should be cited. The business-like 
way in which Miss Almira Jessie Kennedy handled and directed the raising of the 
necessary funds for our Annual is to be commended. Last but not least is the 
painstaking way in which Prof. Theodora R. Boyd pointed the way whenever we 
needed her timely advice and suggestions. 

And so, we leave you. If our graduation means that our homes, loved ones, and 
the communities in which we may be found will benefit by our presence, we shall 
have accomplished our aim for the foul years spent here. As a class, we are 
naturally eager to promote the welfare of St. Augustine's, our Alma Mater. And 
you as our teachers and our friends must realize that whatever improves St. August- 
ine's will improve in some measure our welfare as a race. 

LEO LIONEL OXLEY, Editor 



LUE AND WHITE 






BLUE AND WHITE 
STAFF 



Leo L. Oxley 
Editor 



Almira J. Kennedy 
Business Manager 




:: 'i''^. ' ; 



Associate Staff 




Hki.kn C. Harris 
.1.-st. Editor 



Charles D. Keciv 
Circulation Manager 



J 



( rRETCHES SlIAVLRS 

Asst. Adv. Manager 



Hi'bye E. Collins Fekxaxdo P. Ooer Stella C. Joxes Rosa L. Clark 

Associate Editor Typist Advertising Manager Assoc. Bits. M(ina</< j r 



LUE AND WHITE 




in 



LUE AND WHITE 




> 

Z) 

Q. 
< 



II 



LUE AND WHITE 



CLASS POEM 

LOYALTY 

A s we leave thy loving care 

L oyal mother, help us dare, 

M idst the tumult of the fight 

A nswer to the blue and white 

M ay we with thy courage stand, 

A nd defeat the foes of man. 

T numph in the hardest fight, 

E ach defend thy banner bright, 

R ise to conquer in thy might 

D own the ages may we tread, 

E ach, the pathway you have led, 

A nd when ends this life in night 

R each the heights of truth and right 



ANN MORGAN OXLEY. 



12 



LUE AND WHITE 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



Eric R. Clarke President 



ELISA A. M. OxLEY Secretary 

Fernando P. Oger Treasurer 



Class Colors: Peagreen ami Pink 



Motto: Reaching for the Infinite 



Flower: Sweet Pea 



13 



LUE AND WHITE 




SENIORS 

Margaret Geneva Adams 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Program Committee 3. 



Artemesia Bowden 

San Antonio. Texas 




Olivia Beatrice Browning 

Raleigh, X. C. 

Choral Club 2. 3, I: College Choir 2, 3, -t. 



Eric Rudolph Clarke 

New York, N. Y. 

Acies Club 1, 2, 3, 4-; Ferguson Club 1, 2. 
3, t; Track Team 1, 2. 3, Captain 4; Vice Presi- 
dent Student Association 3, President 4; Secre- 
tary Varsity Club 4; Eta S'pma Mu Scientific 
Society 4; Football Manager 3, !•; Student In- 
structor Chemistry 4. 



Adele Jones Dent • 
Brunswick, Ga. 

I.es Elites Club 3, 4; Dramatic Club 4; 
Choral Club 3, 4, 



11 



LUE AND WHITE 



SENIORS 

Okay Coward Finch 
Wcldon. X. C. 

Ferguson Club 1. 2, 3; Les' Elites Chili 1 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4j Dramatic Club 1. 2 
("■iris' Friendly Society 1; Captain Basketbal 
Team 1, 2, 8. 



Abraham Frank Gadsden 
Savannah, Ga. 



Ferguson Club 1, 2, 3, *; Aeies Chili 1. 2, 3, !■; 
Scroller Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Brotherhood St. 
Andrews 3, 4. 



Vera Mary Gang 

Galveston, Texas 

Class Secretary 3; Altar Guild 3, I; French 
Club 4. 



Helen Christiana Harris 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating- Club 1, 2; 
Les Elites Club 3, 4-; French Club 4; Girls' 
Friendly Society 1, 2; Junior Auxiliary 4; 
President Class 3; Archery Club 2; Xegro 
Literary Society 2; Associate Editor I'm Staff 
3, 4; Assistant Editor Blue, and White; Stu- 
dent Instructor French 4. 



Stella Christina Jones 

Asheville, X. C. 

Garden Club 3, 4; Basketball 1. 2, 3, 4; Pres- 
ident W. A. A. 4; Dramatic Club 2," 3. 4- 
Les Elites Club 2, 3, 4; Advertising Manager 
Blue and \Vhite. 




^V~ 




/ 




■ ■ 



Si 



:■><- 



^ m 




15 



BLUE AND 



IT 




SENIORS 

Charles Dotsox Keck 

Graham, X. C. 

Ferguson Club 1, 2. 3, 4-; Scroller Club 4; 
Circulation Manager Blue and White. 

Almira Jessie Kennedy 

Passaic, X. J. 

Dramatic Club 8; Business Manager Blve 
a xi) White; Ferguson Club 4; President Les 
Elites Club 3, 4; President Junior Auxiliary 
4; French Club 4; Secretary W. A. A. 3, 4 
Assistant Manager I'm 4: Basketball 3, 4 
Assistant Secretary Student Association 4 
Archery Club; Assistant to Dean of Women 
3. 4. 

Helen Elizabeth Kornegay 

Kiiiston. X. C. 

Ferguson Club 3, 4; Negro Literary Society 
4; Les Elites Club 3, 4. 



David Pulaski Lane 
Raleigh, X. C. 

Football Team 1. 3. 4; Basketball 1, 3, 4. 



James Washington Mask, Jr. 

Hamlet. X. C. 

Debating Club 2; Dramatic Club 3, 4; Varsity 
Club 4; Football Team 3, 4; Manager Basket- 
ball 3, 4. 



Hi 



L U E A 



WHITE 



SENIORS 

Si'sie Lee Morten 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Member Social Committee 3. 



Fernando Pail Ogeh 

Washington, I). C. 

Ferguson C'lul) 1, 2, 3, 4; President Negro 
Literary Society; President Dramatic Club 
3, 4; Treasurer Acies Club 4; Treasurer Class 
t; Staff Blue and White. 



Eliza Axx Morgan Oxley 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Secretary Class 1, 4; Entertainment Con 
mittee 3; Student Instructor Biology 4. 



Leo Lionel Oxley 

New York. N. Y. 

Business Manager Pen 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary 
Student Organization 4; President Ferguson 
Club 3; President Sigma Alpha Forensic So- 
ciety 3; Manager Track Team 4; Acies Club 
2, 3; Editor-in-Chief Blue and White. 



Maryland LeRov Perry 

Raleigh. X. C. 

Football Team 1, 2, 4; Basketball Team 1, 2; 
Varsity Club .'5, 4; Dramatic Club 3; Tennis 
Team 2, 3, 4. 





■w 

\j^ 



... 




17 



BLUE AND WHITE 







*'"■'■ '.: 



/ 






.majpm 





V > 




SENIORS 

Gretchex Shavers 

Leaksville, N. C. 

Choral Club 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3; Les Elites 
Club 3, 4; Assistant Advertising Manager Blue 
and Whit?:. 



William Joseph Stirrup 

Miami, Fla. 

Football 1, 2, 3, Captain 4; Varsity Club 3. 
President 4; Vice President Class 4. 



Dorothy Mae Washington 

Gastonia, N. C. 

President W. A. A. 2, 3; President Garden 
Club 4; Junior Auxiliary 3, 4; Secretary Les 
Elites Club 4; Dramatic Club 3, 4. 



Hexry Robert Williams 

New York. X. Y. 

Basketball 2, 3. 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Scrollers 
Club 4; Entertainment Committee 3; Student 
Instructor Physics 4. 



Kathleen* Mercelixe Williams 

Savannah, Ga. 

Girls' Friendly Societv 1. 2; Archery Club 
2. 3, 4; Ees Elites Club 3, 4; W. A. A. 4; Bas- 
ketball 1, 2. 3, 4; Treasurer Garden Club 4. 



George Scott Wimbish 
Raleieh. N. C. 



Football 1. 



18 



1UE AN 



WHITE 




CHESHIRE BUILDING 



CLASS SONG 

Alma Mater, dear old Alma Mater, 

Today we're starting on the voyage of life. 

With memories of you dear Alma Mater 

We weigh our anchors and set sails for strife. 

Calm and Peaceful, the waters may be now 

But we know that this will not last always. 

We must prepare for the when, the why and the how. 

When the storm begins to gather day by day. 

Many have left from this same shore 
Some to return and others to be seen no more. 
To you, dear Alma Mater, we'll always your praises tell. 
Friends, teachers, classmates, a long last farewell. 
Words and Music by 

Olivia Browning. 



19 



BLUE AND WHITE 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF '35 

AS we sit and soliloquise, sotto voce, fingering our much worn memory books which arc 
really scrapbooks containing' bits of diaries, autographs, cartoons and souvenirs — all 
dating from the ever-to-be remembered day of September 22, 1931. a panorama of memories — 
memories that thrill and burn — are awakened! How beautiful are some of the pictures that 
hang in memory's hall. How comical are some of the recollection of those "First Weeks At 
College." 

From all parts of the United States and the West Indies we hailed, zealous, aspiring, 
enthusiastic young men and women. 

Registering, together with getting acquainted with each other, made the first few days very 
exciting. How strange was the endless routine of having our lives regulated by bells. Every 
day we had to adhere to a certain schedule — chapel in the morning and chapel in the evening. 
But gradually we adjusted ourselves to the bells and other features of the College and 
accepted the Campus as our home. 

Directed by the leadership of Nathan Perry, our president, we started to work. Did I sav 
work? I believe I did. T suppose that we did have to put forth some effort to get our 
class work but not too much to keep us from exercising our few privileges. 

Our first class venture was to entertain the upperclassmen on October 31, at a Halluween 
Party. 

By the middle of the year, members of the class were holding worthy positions on the 
debating team, the Ferguson Club, the Acies Club, the Girls' Friendly Society, the Sunshine 
Club, the Choral Club and the Staff of the St. Augustine's Pen. 

Turning to the pages relating to the second year of this class, one sees a decline in member- 
ship, but two new students joined the class — Almira Kennedy and Claudius Gabriel, a native 
African. With Robert Johnson as pilot of our class we soon plunged into a sea of activities. 
We were fortunate in winning the Sophomore-Freshman Debate. We occupied leading posi- 
tions in all of the clubs on the campus and members of our group, as delegates, represented 
St. Augustine's at the Student Volunteer Meetings both in Raleigh and Greensboro. A mem- 
ber of our class attended the King's Mountain Conference as our ambassador. 

The fall of 1933 found us following the leadership of our president, Helen Harris. We 
participated in activities and events just as inspiring and helpful as those of the preceding 
year. The high scholarship of several members of this class stood firm. Under the guidance 
of a member of our class the Les Elites Club was organized. 

Members of '35 established closer bonds between the Washington High School, Raleigh, N T . C, 
and St. Augustine's and a member of '35 travelled as far as the District of Columbia as an 
ambassador from St. Augustine's College to the Cardoza High School, bis Alma Mater. 

Then came our most important year — under the careful guidance of Eric R. Clarke. Visions 
of practice teaching became realities, and many, many times did we hear that "Teacher, I 
don't know" — it sounds differently too, when one says it and when it is said to one. Four 
members of '35 were appointed to distinguished positions as student instructors in Biology, 
Chemistry, French and Physics, while another continued as Office Secretary to the St. 
Augustine's Conference for Church Workers. 

The outstanding achievements of our class were the presenting to our College department 
of two full page copper cuts of campus views and the starting of a scholarship fund for worthy 
students. 

And now we have almost completed the College Chapter of our history. We are glad to 
graduate and yet we look hack with regrets over the happy days we have spent here, only 
because they seem to have passed too quickly. 

Gee! Bells to the last. Commencement begins at ten. We must don our caps and gowns, 
the symbol of Senior dignity, and go forth to receive our degrees. 



20 



BLUE AND WHITE 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

We, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-five, on the eve of graduation, 
do hereby make our last Will and Testament. 

To our Alma Mater we bequeath our undying love and gratitude for all that she 
has done to develop our two-fold life — mental and spiritual. 

To the faculty and officers of the administration, we bequeath our gratitude for the 
loving, inspiring guidance given us during the last four years, and for their con- 
siderate and cooperative frame of mind. 

To our parents and guardians we bequeath from the depths of our hearts a fuller 
and richer appreciation for the struggles and efforts that they put forth for us during 
these years of depression. 

To the juniors, we bequeath our loyalty, sincerity and our cooperative attitude 
in school interests, our quiet dignity and a senior year of happiness and hope. 

To the sophomores, our sister class, we bequeath our sincere interest in school 
activities, our zeal to encourage others to attain and hold high standards, and our 
prayers for their future success. 

To the freshmen, we bequeath our studiousness and carefully planned methods of 
study, and a more pleasant and happier sophomore year. 

To those who are coming after us, we bequeath all those things they seek in an 
ideal College : 

A campus full of beauty, physical and spiritual ; 

Twenty-six growing oak trees which will give them inspiration: 

An inviting dining-Iiall full of wonderful surprises, joy and bappv remembrances: 

A quiet Chapel for worship and meditation; 

Opportunities for enlightening, enriching companionship and, as a whole, all the 

facilities for a well-rounded education. 

To the incinerator, we bequeath our continual tardiness, lazv attitudes, and pessi- 
mistic views of life. 

Signed on this twenty-seventh day of May. in the year of our Lord, Nineteen Hun- 
dred and Thirty-five, at St. Augustine's College. Raleigh. N. C. 

The Senior Class, 

Dorothy Mae Washington, 

Legal Representative. 
Witnesses: 

Artemesia Bowden 
Margaret Geneva Adams 
Abraham Frank Gadsden 



J I 



LUE AND WHITE 



CLASS PROPHECY 

It is said that history repeats itself and in the repetition we are led to believe 
that the "sparks 'o genius fire" will create greater geniuses. This class of '"35" 
boasts some of the most outstanding personalities in the history of St. Augustine's. 
It also dares to boast this group as a repetition of geniuses capable of presenting 
before you their realized dreams and ambitions of the future materialized. 

Because this class of thirty-two personages wants to convince you of their unique 
abilities, see them, before you in the year 1955 — returning to Raleigh in fame, honor 
and success to dedicate the New Research Laboratory at St. Augustine's College, 
an individual gift of the class for the furtherance of the honor of St. Augustine's. 

Because the group is scattered throughout the United States, a special dirigible 
has been chartered to tour the States for each member of the class of '"35" to board 
and soar through the air in majestic state to return to the "Happy Landing" aviation 
field in Raleigh. 

The giant air craft, piloted by George Wimbish. left the "Happy Landing" field 
to make its first stop in New York. Susie Morten, well known Night Club Hostess 
was on board the liner speeding to fulfill an engagement at the exclusive Palais d'Or. 

In New York, Doctor Eric Clarke and Nurses Rosa Lee Brown and Claudia Todd 
rushed to the air port from the hospital where Henry Williams, the famous scientist 
was recuperating from the bite of a deadly coral snake received on his expedition 
with Scientist LeRoy Perry to South America. They boarded the airship in a happy 
reunion and explained to the hostess their patient's condition. 

We were happily informed that Almira Kennedy, who recently received her doc- 
tor's degree at the Sorbonne in Paris, was appointed head of the French department 
at St. Augustine's College. Ten years of separation have crowded so much into our 
experiences that we chattered like parrots and were quite surprised when our ship 
came to the airport in Boston. 

Leaving the airship for a brief period of one hour, we decided to pass the time 
in a theater near by. Imagine our utter surprise at finding Helen Harris, star 
actress in the play "Wives or Sweethearts." After the play we went back stage to 
congratulate her upon her brilliant acting and were happy to learn that she was leav- 
ing for St. Augustine's too, and would join us. During our ride back to the airport we 
were informed that Dorothy Washington was history professor at Atlanta University 
and that Vera Gang, Adele Dent and Fernando Oger were spreadini; the St. Augus- 
tine light by efficient service in the field of Social Work, in Texas, Virginia and Wash- 
ington, D. C. We reached the airport and there followed such a noise of cheers, greet- 
ings and happy reunions that we were not aware of the fact that we had left Boston, 
until our hostess was handed a radio-grammed message which informed us that we 
would be joined at the next stop by Helen Kornegay, librarian at Virginia State 
and Kathleen Williams, Physics instructor there also, who were then attending a 
teachers Conference in Savannah. 



22 



LUE AND WHITE 



While conversations were merrily kept up, some one turned on the radio and 
across the air waves the voices of Gretchen Shavers, radio artist, and her rhythm 
girls entertained us with an hour of snappy tunes. Someone turned the radio dial 
just in time to hear the interesting voice of Coach James Mask, reporting the twentieth 
victory of the "horses" over the "hears" since the memorial victory of thirty-four. A 
lusty yell went up from us in honor of another St. Augustine's victory. 

Our last stop before the end of the trip was at Atlantic City where we were 
joined by Dr. William Stirrup and his assistant nurses, Willie Roberson, Rosa Lee 
Clarke. Willie Scotton and Ruby Collins, who have gained world fame by the astound- 
ing treatment for dumb-bells called "brains." This treatment will make College 
students stop flunking classes. They informed us that Dentists David P. Lane and 
Abraham Gadsden were joint owners of a suite of officers and rooms carrying the 
sign of "Painless Pullers." on the main entrance door. 

Amidst our sighs of joy and fatigue on such a long journey the dirigible began its 
homeward flight. Conversations were dropping to just a few couples when someone 
informed us that lawyer Charles Keck was making the people sit up and take notice 
of his oratorical battles in the courtrooms and that Artemsia Bowden was President 
of a Junior College. 

Someone called our attention to the homes and buildings appearing below us. 
The dirigible slowly circled the changed business section and then went to the 
"Happy Landing" field where we were given a royal welcome by a Committee 
made up of '35's. From the airport we were escorted to Ann Morgan Oxley's 
beautiful home. She is English Professor at St. Augustine's College. In her large, 
beautifully decorated music room the '35's are being entertained by Mile. Stella 
Jones, famous dancing artist and Madam Olivia Browning, noted musician, who 
has just returned from a year's study of music in Europe. 

Before the musicale was over, Mrs. Okay Coward Finch, now a proud mother of 
a beautiful daughter, joined the group. 

It was almost time for the dedication service, so we were whirled on elevated 
cars to our dear old Alma Mater, St. Augustine's College. We happily viewed the 
familiar haunts of our College days. At this point a voice hailed us and we were 
surprised to see Leo L. Oxley, head of the Law Department and former field repre- 
sentative of the College for six years. 

He informed us that we were expected in the New large Assembly Hall where the 
dedication would be held and proceeded to lead the way. 

Thus pass before you, in review, all of the members of the memorable class 
of '35. Should viiu doubt the possibilities of such great achievements, just remember, 
"large oaks from little acorns grow." 

"One spark o genius fire makes the Burns." 

Eliza A. Morgan Oxley. 



23 



LUE AND WHITE 



STAFF ST. AGNES TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 







Frances A. Worraix, R.N. 

Superintendent 

Ethel M. Youxg, R.N. 
I ,. . _ ., Director of School 

hance.s L. Stemox, H.N. Mattie D. Westcott, R.X. 
loom Supervisor Night Supervisor 

Sister Ax.va Mart 
rechnida Matron 



Gexeva S. Collins, R.N. 
Assistant Superintendent 



LUCILE ZlJIMERMAXX, R.X. 

Anaetlietist and Laboratory 



2-1 



1UE AND 



I T E 



1 Heist' 


,.v";.- . - : -;/ ; ;;^>^ ,J|| 55:........-. 

iMIBSH^K'S'f. ? ® ® Mr ?\ 

•P^Wlrf B B'B VB i ; f-te. 


: ' ..■£„,„.........» *.."&' '" "' ;J ' ; ' ' m* . '' 


"^S—"- 


:: " """-^ "■ " ; ™ 



ST AGNES HOSPITAL 




NURSES' HOME 



25 



LUE AND WHITE 



HOSPITAL AND NURSES 

We, the Class of 1935 of St. Agnes Hospital Training School for Nurses be- 
lieve that no occupation can be quite intelligently followed or correctly under- 
stood unless it is at least to some extent illumined by the light of history and inter- 
preted from the human standpoint. 

At historical periods our profession has taken unique and surprising forms and 
prominent nurses have led lives of high adventure and distinction. The universal 
appeal to sympathy and training has made nursing the occupation of noble and 
loyal women, from the earliest dawn. The prevailing religious philosophies and 
beliefs of an age have profoundly influenced nursing growth. "Inasmuch as ye have 
done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.' 

The nursing profession calls for superior women who recognize the need for 
three years or more of rigid education and training. For medical terms must im- 
mediately bring to mind the condition, the technique involved in treatment, and the 
knowledge which will enable her to carry out the physicians orders with, celerity 
and accuracy. 

Thus, in the modern idiom the significance of the title "graduate nurse" means a 
watchful, trained observer of the symptoms of disease, of the development of com- 
plications, of the building of perfect health, and of the relief of the suffering. She is 
a Handmaid of surgery, not merely an automatic tool but an intelligent, enthusiastic, 
co-worker filled with zeal for science and giving her whole mind and heart to the 
duty that is before her. She is of inestimable value to the physician in the manage- 
ment of the complex and often treacherous phenomena of diseases. Today, the 
vision of nursing is glorious. The nurse is everywhere recognized as an indispensable 
worker in the community. 

The nurse of today finds no greater life to imitate than that of Plorenee 
Nightingale — the founder of Modern nursing, who was drawn to nursing with such 
an intense and compelling desire that, disregarding the wishes of her family, she 
solemnly pledged herself in these words: 

"With loyalty will I endeavor to aid the physician in his work and devote 
myself to the welfare of those committed to my care." 



26 



LUE AND WHITE 



NURSES 

Rosa Lee Brown 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Tennis 1, 2, 3; Swan's Club 2, 3; Class Pre; 
ideiit 1, 3. 




Rosa Lee Clark 

Scotland, Ga. 

Tennis Club 1. 2, 3; Assistant Business 
Manager Blue and White. 



Willie Anna Robertson 
Reidsville, N. C. 

Tennis Club I. 2, 3; Swan's Club 3; Class 
Treasurer 2, 3. 



Rubye Elizabeth Collins 

Gastonia. N. C. 

Tennis Club 1; President Swan's Club 2, 3; 
Assistant Editor Blue and White; Junior 
Auxiliary 1, 2, 3. 



Willie Marie Scotton 
AsheborOj N. C. 
Tennis Club 1, 2. 

Claudia Delores Todd 

Greenville. S. C. 

Class Secretary 1, 2, 3; Junior Auxiliary 2, 
Vice President 3; Swan's Club 2, 3; Tennis 1. 





if* 



27 



LUE A 



WHITE 




LES ELITES SOCIAL CLUB 

Axmika J. Kennedy President Stella Jones 

Dorothy Washington Secretary Chairman Entertainment Committee 
Kathleen Williams . .Treasurer Miss Theodoba R. Boyd Sponsor 

MEMBERS 
Cora Duren Helen Harris Mary Perry Adele Dent 

Henrietta Kennedy Helen Kornegay Mary Clifton Okay C. Finch 

Etta Faison Gretclien Shavers Ollie Saxon Wilhelmina Roberts 

Mary Wooda.rd 

" • 9* 




ZETA SIGMA RHO SOCIETY 
Left tn Hight: Wilma Levister, Secretary; Edna Baker, Ruth Boyer, Treasurer; 
Theola Newsome, Ellen Allen, President: Minnie Taylor. 

Pledges: Henrene Walker. Theresa Everette, Luetta Grady. 



28 



BLUE AND WHITE 




WOMENS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Stella Jones President Cora Durex .Treasurer 

Ai.mira Kennedy ..Secretary Mary Perry Publicity Manager 

Dorothy Washington Business Manager 



MEMBERS 
Henrietta Kennedy Pencie Nixon Okay Finch 



Minnie B. Taylor 




SCROLLERS 



Charles Johnson 
Treasurer 



Secretary 



Russell E. Blunt President 

A Urmia jr Gadsden 

Joseph .Mask. J. Clifton Powell. Lorenzo Garris, Livingston Gaskins, Maryland Perry, 
John L. Perry. Edward Syms, Leonard Hardie, Otis Hearn, Rufus Parrish, James Gihson. 
Charles Keck, H. Leo Baker, John L. Jones. Frank M. Stewart, Henry Williams. 

29 



LUE AND WHITE 




in >i; \i. i 1.1 a 






L. Thaddeus Caldwell, M.A., Director 
Marion Davis, Minnabelle Taylor, r i'lieresa Everett, Allele Dent, Charles Johnson, Joseph 
Mask, Olivia Browning, Demieira Durham, Julius Taylor, Oscar Applewhite, John Perry, 
Myrtle McDonald, Margaret Harris, Mrs. George H. Mitchell, Gretchen Shavers, Sarah Shade, 
Ellen Allen, Raymond I.ogan, Edward Pitt, Matliew Jones, James Satterwhite, Prof. Cecil D. 
Halliburton, Birney Smith. Jr.. James Clarke, Charles Dunston. 




.*...„, 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 



George E. Smith Le President 

Fraxk M. Stewart Le Tresorier 



Dorothy Bullock 
Pearl Clark 
Ethel Denning 
Louis von Evans 
Robert Fenner 
Frances Organ 
Kathleen Williams 



St. Julia A. Simpkixs Le Secretaire 

Almira Kennedy 

la Commissionaire des programmes 
LES MEMBRES 
Edna Baker Vera Mary Gang 

Livingston Gaskins 

Helen Harris 
William Jackson 

Ellen Allen 

Catherine King 
Wilhelmina Kennedy 

Junius Taylor 



30 



LUE A 



I T E 



. :si, 



Hi 


■"■ 


- 


'" «— — 




jfc^ 




: 


fLj- 


^mBJI 


* ! 


$■ ■■\* : ■'■.■ " : -. '"-^ - ,-.-. 



#S» *sft 



1 *_ *~»,v * 



7x.jf 



i< ' 



r>-'? ; -5;%f*v" .- ; i;.;-.'CJf. .'. #*■ ' •-'■', ' .MSSm 



aii'"'.-" '-'- :"v,«si'- . 



FOOTBALL 



Pictured above are the twelve Horsemen, led by William Stirrup (Captain) of Saint Augustine's College 
football team who finally brought home the baron after seventeen years. 

Left to right in the front row are D. P. Lane, right end; Saint Julian Simpkins, right tackle: H. Bond, 
right guard; W. Hayes, center; R. Johnson, left guard; W. Stirrup, captain, left tackle; M. Perrv, left end. 
Back row: Paul Evans, left halfback; H. Syms, quarterback; L. Evans, fullback; R. Singletarv right 
halfback; 0. Denning, fullback. 

Individual honors went to Captain William Stirrup and Louis Evans who were named on the All-State 
first team, Maryland Perry. Humphrey Bond and Haiold Syms were named on the All-State second team; 
H. Bond. A Singletary, L. Evans, M. Perry and Captain W. Stirrup also received honorarv mention 
by the C. I. A. A. 

Louis Evans, Robert (Fido) Johnson, Captain-elect. William Stirrup, Maryland Perry. Humphrey Bond, 
and Oliver Denning received the greatest joy and happiness from the victory because they all started out 
together to bring home the victory four years ago. Now that they have sung their "Swan Song" they can 
do it knowing that although they have met with reverses, they have finally accomplished what they started 
out to do four years ago. They have started something which thev hope the members of the succeeding 
teams will continue, namely, to beat Shaw. 



Too much credit and honor cannot be given to Harold Syms, triple threat man, who k ; rked a field 
which resulted in victory. He was a great source of pride to us all season. 



nal 



The tide was turned, football at St. Aug is on the rise, 
very well prepared. Our immortals have started something. 



From now 



our adversaries had better be 



COACHES AND STAFF 
GrEOKGE H. Mitchell . Head Coach 

\ 



T. H. COUNTEE 

James Boyeb 

Rt'SSEL Blunt / 

Solomon Bethea / 



..Assistant Coaches 



Henry Williams. Scribe 



:;l 



BLUE AND WHITE 




h 



1r# »*& 




***8sti§ 




1. Georgeous Gloria. 2. K. Singletary, Cham]) Sprinter. 3. P. Clarke, Campus 
Dancer. 4.. Track Captain Clarke. 5. '.lolly Palls. 6. "Tuttleites" and Trixy. 7. 
Happy-go-Luckies. S. (). Hearn, Basketball. 9. J. Markley, two-miler. 10. G. Smith, 
quarter-miler. 11. Quiet Clarisse. 



:;_■ 



BLUE AND WHITE 







8 i? •HI!': 



1. Circus at "Center." 2. H. Kennedy, Tennis Champ. 3. Two Sharps— one Flat. 
Deinie, Peggy and Gret. i. Sophisticated Sophs. 5. Shy Rachael. <i. Knights of St. 
Agnes: Frank. Maurice. Eric, I.eo and Hay. 7. Jolly Table Mates. 8. Diana and 
Fernando. '.). Proud Mary. 1". "Hie" the Sport. 11. The Kennedys. 



33 



THE BISHOP TUTTLE SCHOOL 

A NATIONAL CENTER FOR THE TRAINING OF 
YOUNG WOMEN FOR CHRISTIAN LEADER- 
SHIP IN CHURCH AND COMMUNITY 

SOCIAL WORK 
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
A COLLEGE DEGREE 



iS&'Jm.-'*. 






X I r 5$ 


* J* \Mfli iiiTv *"^j:4!iiif-i"*-i^*^PW 


.J ••'•I?** 






* • %#* : 




!/1aS^ - ^iPi 




Wmt- - - 


itj bJ h y ELHb;, 




;.'. mi 


^^^ 


It KB Kg 

■2'*'' ■"" *»*>»'■ JPKy 



he Bishop Tuttle School 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ADDRESS 

MISS BERTHA RICHARDS, DEAN 
BISHOP TUTTLE SCHOOL 



Raleigh, N. C. 




WHEN SCHOOL DAYS 
ARE OVER . . . 



• It is then the real problems of life have their 
beginning. North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance 
Company not only provides an avenue for employ- 
ment with possibilities unsurpassed, but through 
its modern policies supplies that margin of secur- 
ity so necessary in safeguarding present and fu- 
ture ambitions. 

9 The first step toward a successful career is 
financial security. Life insurance provides that 
degree of financial stability which frequently safe- 
guards early endeavors and makes more certain 
ultimate success. See a company representative 
or write the Home Office for information relative 
to the "Mutual Retirement Plan" and other poli- 
cies designed especially for young men and youns 
women whose ambition it is to attain success in 
life. 

North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Durham, North Carolina 



'No Home Complete Without a North Carolina Mutual Policy" 



James H. Higgs, President 

C. A. Haywood, Manager 



Service Is Our First 
Consideration 



RALEIGH FUNERAL 
HOME 

324 E. Cabarrus St. 

Where recollection of quality 
remains 

Ambulance Service 
Phone 1646 



Parke's Gold Camel 
Tea Balls 



INDIVIDUAL SERVICE 
"Every Cup a Treat" 

COFFEES : TEAS : SPICES 

FLAVORING EXTRACTS 

CANNED FOODS 

L. H. PARKE COMPANY 



Philadelphia 



Pittsburgh 



Brogden Produce Co. 

WHOLESALE FRUIT AND 
PRODUCE 

409-415 West Martin Street 
RALEIGH, N.C. 

Local Phones 236-237 Long Distance Phone 9901 



ST. PHILIP'S JUNIOR 
COLLEGE 

AN ACCREDITED JUNIOR 
COLLEGE 

"A School of Character" 

Noted for Honest and Thorough 
Work 

For information write 
the Registrar 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



Your Patronage Solicited 

T. H. BRIGGS & SONS, 
INC. 

THE BEST IN HARDWARE 

Lawn Mowers, Garden Tools, and 
Accessories 

220 Fayetteville Street 
RALEKIH. X. ('. 




EDELWEISS 



JOHN SEXTON &■ CO; 

MANUFACTURING WHOLESALE GROCERS- 
CHICAGO BROOKLYN 



DILLON SUPPLY 
COMPANY 



National Heating 
Equipment 

Johns Manville Roofing 

Mill Supplies 



RALEIGH 



DURHAM 



W. H. KING DRUG 
COMPANY 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



WHOLESALE 
DRUGGIST 



See your local druggist for 
your drug requirements 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & 
COMPANY 

Established 1867 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Compliments of 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Holmes 

St. Augustine's College 

Raleigh, N. C. 


Compliments of 
DUNBAR AND DANIEL, Inc. 

FINE PORTRAITS and 
KODAK FINISHING 

132 Fayetteville St. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Compliments of 

JULIUS W. HOCKADAY 
Real Estate 

Route No. 4, Box 207-A 
Mt. Clemens, Mich. 


Compliments of 

W. S. SMITH 

SHOE REPAIRING 

1114 E. Lane Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Soaps 

Disinfectants 

Deodorants : Waxes 

Cleansers : Insecticides 

Sanitary and Institutional 
Supplies of All Kinds 

• 

APEX CHEMICAL 
COMPANY 

APEX, N. C. 


College Laboratory Equipment 
and Supplies 

• 

College Athletic First Aid 

Equipment and 

Supplies 

• 

Hospital and Physician's 

Equipment and 

Supplies 

• 

WINCHESTER SURGICAL 
SUPPLY CO. 

106 East Seventh Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

WINCHESTER-RITCH 
SURGICAL CO. 

Ill North Greene Street 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



CHAS. M. FARRAR 

COAL 

COMPANY 

• 

803 Fayetteville St. 
Phone 

21 


Say Bamby Bread! 
ROYAL BAKING CO. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

R. B STREB, MGR 
ROYAL BAKING COMPANY 


Compliments of 

ARCADE HOTEL 


THE MISSION HERALD 

Official Organ of the Diocese of 
East Carolina, Rev. W. R. Xoe, 
Editor, 507 Southern Building, 
Wilmington, N. C, Subscription 
$1.00 per year. 


Compliments of 

Lewis Sporting Goods 
Company 

112 West Hargett Street 
Phone 1777 


Compliments of 
GEORGE MARSH CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERIES 

310 S. Harrington St. 

Phone 633 


Compliments of 

CAPITAL ICE & COAL 
CO., INC. 

600 West Hargett St. 
Raleigh, N .C. 


Compliments of 

PINE STATE CREAMERY 

lL'G Salisbury Street 
Phone 3912 


Compliments of 

DR. ERNEST McDONALD 

2305 7th Avenue 

New York City, N. Y. 



s 




New Benson Library 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

FOUNDED 1867 

A four year college course is offered, accredited by the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and the North Carolina State Department of 
Education, leading to degrees of B.A. and B.S., including Pre-Medical 
work and Teacher Training for State High School Teacher's certificates. 

A College Preparatory Department, Training School for Nurses and 
School of Religious and Social Workers are connected with the College. 

Thorough training, healthy environment, Christian influences. 

Moderate terms. Opportunity for self-help. 

For catalogue and information write the Registrar, 

St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, N. C.