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Full text of "Bobashela"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

VyLLSAPS-Wit «.0'M LIBRARY 

in 2011 with funding from 

JACKSOM, h'!:o = iSi?Pl 392:0 ^ 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bobashela1984mill 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE ARCHIVES 



MILLSAPS-WILSON LIBRARY 
MiLLSAPS COLLEGE 
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39210 




Editor: MSry Vassar Ballard 
Photographers: 
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Millsaps . . . a "thousand^i«dividuals who ^ooktkep^h^ less 
traveled and chose tfe anaaH libeml arts school- to iftves1:%i"fot "* 
our college education. In an ine!»fas4ngly;15gchnical -wAofld we- 
que§tion what lies ahead of us-7--particialai«^'-'^fe7^1^84. Is 
OAvelHs prophiSGy beiriS; fulfilled? \Vill .w^ h^strippcd-of our 
individuality as w^ move' mto an ersi M ;whidh" the computer is 
named TIME magazine's Man of the Yea't? Sever^;B?5Ilsa^s . 
students ^nd professors exarfiirie these questiQhs«bri:the pages to 



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"Orwell envisioned a world of spiritless 
souls manipulated by fear and condemned 
to a technologically sensuous wasteland. 
There was immediacy without transcen- 
dence, existance without vital historical 
memory, and neither persona! nor social al- 
ternatives to futility. Through the liberal 
arts one is equipped to remember the fu- 
ture, to anticipate the past, and to see the 
present as the time when spirit is summoned 
into flesh for its role in the divine comedy. In 
this regard, the liberal arts are the answer to 
1984. 

—Dr. T.W. Lewis 111 

professor of religion 

class of 1953 









"I think Millsaps has the potential to teach us a lot about our real 
selves . . . The fact that it is a relatively small school makes the atmo- 
sphere one in which it is easy to get to know many people. Such a setting 
contributes to the feeling of individuality, certainly but at the same time a 
certain completeness. 



One who has not undergone what is loosely called the "Mill- 
saps experience" probably cannot understand this sense that I'll 
call diversified unity, but we know that feeling . . . "—Lisa Hap- 
good 

class of 1985 






10 



"What we are about at Millsaps is 
the study of human existence on this 
earth. Will our graduates make the de- 
cisions required to become better, 



more humane, more affirming of life in 
all its highest manifestations or will 
they simply harden themselves, reject 
life and liberty for others (and ultimate- 
ly themselves), and seek to control and 
manipulate the world? The latter may 
seem safer. Orwell's prophecies may 
thus come true, but if so, it will be 
because of our own subversion of all 
that we have talked about for these 
two hundred years. A liberal arts edu- 
cation is one designed to prevent this 
kind of Orwellian world from occur- 
ring. 




11 








12 




"In considering the relevence of a 
liberal arts education in 1984, and the 
future, I find that liberal arts should be 
a vital part of the educational process, 
and that Millsaps should continue to be 
a leader in this area. With specializa- 
tion usually comes less emphasis on 
the cultural heritage of modern soci- 
ety. However, 1 have always been 
proud that 1 attended a college which 
had the foresight, and the fortitude, to 
prepare me for life practically, cultural- 
ly, and socially. In this respect, I think 
that Millsaps College deserves much 
respect and praise from all its students. 
As alumni, we should expect and sup- 
port no less an effort in the future, so 
that the "Renaissance man" will never 
cease to exist." 

-Jayson T. Garrett 
Class of 1984 




13 



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IS 



"How does our society of 1984 compare to Orwell's? Ours is a 
global community, still vibrant with the diversity of mankind and 
hopeful as experienced through the eyes of our youth. What we 
could create in the future is a very mediocre, unproductive, and 
inhumane society, if those institutions which have traditionally 
served to elevate the human spirit betray their trust. A liberal arts 
education is one instrument by which we can assure the contin- 
ued expression of man's humanity, goodness, talents, and God- 
given gifts. —Dr. Jeanne Middleton Forsythe 

professor of education 

class of 1971 




16 



i 



''No matter how much the 
world becomes the same — the 
individual will still prevail . . . 




17 





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Friday Forum 



Fall 1984 
Southern University Jazz Ensemble 
A Japanese Living Experience 
Early Infantile Autism: A Forty Year Perspective 
Church-Related Colleges: Where are we going? 
Student Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
Chemical Dependency: Its Use, Abuse and Addiction 
Celebrating the Sesquicentennial of Brahm's Birth 
Computers and a Humane Society 

Dr. Robert Bergmark and Dr. Jimmy Purser 
Election Year 1983: Analysis and Forecast 
An Englishman Looks at America 
Traditional Storytelling of the Chippewa 
Mississippi Choctaw: Yesterday and Today 
Images of the Great Depression 

Dr. Robert McElvaine 
Spring 1984 
Brain Specialization: Research and Speculation 

Dr. Russell Levanway 
The World Population Crisis 
Lourdes Henebry 
Dreaming? Art or Science 
The Crucible of Race: White Culture and Race 
Black Businessmen and their Achievements 
The Millsaps Model-Retrospect and Prospect 
Herpes: Hedonism and Hysteria 
Modern India: Ghandi's Legacy 
The Course of Soviet Foriegn Policy 
Achilles: An Opera in Progress 

Dr. Richard Freis 
Jackson Symphony String Quartet 
A Reading from The Salt Line 




20 




21 



















Who We Air & Where We Are Goiq^ 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

STUDENT SYMPOSIUM 

November 2-3, 1983 

The purpose of the Symposium is to look at a subject that is filied with myths and 
misconceptions in an inteliectuai and inquisitive way so that clarification and 
enlightenment of the subject are made possible. 

Schedule 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2 

9:30 a.m. An Historical Overview of Sex Research 

Dr. Warden B. Pomeroy 

The purpose of this session is to provide a context for the symposium. The issue 
of sexuality should be made problematic at this point. The variety of sexual 
behaviors across many cultures and in different periods should be discussed. 

1 :30 p.m. The Development of Sexual Orientation 

Dr. Martin S. Weinberg 

The purpose of this session is to look at both heterosexuality and homosexuality 
and see what the impact of our orientation has on other aspects of the lives 
of individuals and societies. 

7:30 p.m. Sex Roles: Being a Man, Being a Woman 

Dr. Judith Worrell 

The purpose of this session is to look at the contemporary views of the role of 
both man and woman in our society and look at the connection between 
sexual orientation and gender role. 

9:00 p.m. Coffee and Reception 

Boyd Campbell Student Center 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3 

11:00 a.m. Androgeny and Future Decisions 

Dr. Jeffrey Kelly 

The purpose of this session will be to look a how gender roles are changing, 
what predictions can be made and how these changes might affect sexual 
behavior in the future 







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Student Symposium 



22 




The Symposium is a great opportunity for student 
involvement. The student involvement includes: 
choosing the topic; planning and organizing by the 
committee; paying for the Symposium; and actual 
implementation of the Symposium. Work on the 
Symposium starts in the middle of the summer 
toward the goal of the program in November. 

— Juli Bradsher 





Who We Are (^ 
Where We Are Goiqg 

student Symposium 

Academic Complex 

Recital Hall 

Millsaps College 



23 







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24 




homecoming = 



The two days of featured events in Millsaps Homecoming 1983 were highlighted Saturday at half-time during the Majors vs. 
Maryville game as Maud de Les Gober was crowned homecoming queen. Although some outdoor activities were interrupted by 
rain on Saturday, alumni, administration, faculty, parents and students were still able to enjoy sorority and fraternity displays 
and several different booths that sold balloons, Majors hats, tee shirts, pop corn, and soft drinks. Special attractions over the 
homecoming weekend were an art exhibit that featured work by alumni and faculty in such areas as photography, 
woodworking, needlework, oils and watercolors. Also featured were performances by "Jean and Kelly" and the Troubadours. 
"The Great Debate: Part II," which featured Gen. Louis Wilson and Professor Howard Bavender debating current issues, was 
held Saturday morning. 

— Tracey Miller 



25 




"Go Greek!" read the buttons worn by 
fraternity and sorority members March 20- 
25. Greek Week gave members a chance to 
join together in activities to promote Greek 
life. Activities included a discussion of the 
pros and cons of the Greek system, an ice 
cream social, a blood drive, a balloon sale to 
raise money for Multiple Sclerosis Society, 
and ended with a band and picnic in the 
bowl where David Coffee and Mary Vassar 
Ballard were named Greek God and God- 
dess. 






= greek week 




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26 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17 

12:30 p.m. FIRDAY FORUM 
Speaker; 

Bishop H. Ellis Finger 

Former President of Millsaps College 
Presiding: Bishop Carlton P. Minnick 
Academic Complex, Room 215 

5:30 p.m. REUNION DINNER 
Speaker: 

Dr. N. Bond Fleming 
Former Chairman, 
Department of Philosophy 
Participating: 

Dr. Henry M, Bullock 
Former Chairman, 
Department of Religion 
Cafeteria (Cost — $7.00) 

7:30 p.m. RECEPTION 

Honored Guests: 

Millsaps Alumni of the 

United Methodist Episcopacy 
Past and Present 
Faculty Members, 
Departments of 
Religion and Philosophy 
Home of Dr. and Mrs. George Harmon, 
1837 Peachtree Street 

8:15 p.m. "WEST SIDE STORY" 
The Millsaps Players 
Marion L. Smith Auditorium, Christian Center 



founder's dayq 



CELEBRATING THE 

BICENTENNIAL OF THE 

METHODIST CHURCH IN 

AMERICA 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18 

10:30 a.m. SYMPOSIUM 

Topic: "Why the College Needs the Church" 
"Why the Church Needs the College" 
Speakers: 

Bishop Joel McDavid 

Bishop Roy C. Clark 
Academic Complex. Room 215 

12:00 noon FOUNDERS DAY LUNCHEON 

Speaker: 

Bishop Nolan B. Harmon 

Special Events: 

Distinguished Professor Award 
Alumnus of the Year Award 

Cafeteria (Cost $7.00) 

2:00 p.m. MEMORIAL 

Ceremony at Major Millsaps Mausoleum 
West Campus 

8:15 p.m. "WEST SIDE STORY" 

The Millsaps Players 
Marion L. Smith Auditorium, Christian Center 





28 




MILLSAPS 
ARTS& 
LKCTURK 
SKRIKS 

1983-84 




The Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series is dedicated to expanding cultural enrichment opportunities in Mississippi by 
providing dynamic encounters with the most celebrated and acclaimed talents of our day. This year's performances were 
certainly no exception, including Peter Beard with his lecture film presentation entitled The End of the Game, The Peking 
Opera, Carmina Burana performed by the Millsaps Singers, Leslie Mitchell, a frequent lecturer to the British Studies at Ox- 
ford Program, Mr. Jack Daniels Silver Cornet Band, The National Theater of the Deaf, and the Millsaps Players in four pro- 
ductions. 



29 




The first production of the 1983-84 year by the Millsaps Players 
was Tennessee William's "Camino Real". It ran from October 12- 
15 and was directed by Mr. Lance Goss, with technical director 
Brent Lefavor. 

Don Quixote — Walt Johnson Lord Mulligan — Robert Williams 
Sancho Panza — Trent Watts Lady Mulligan — Katrina Jameson 
Gutman — Nick Mowen Kilroy — Darin Hyer 

Police Officers — Doug Fortinberry, Kelly Hitchcock 
The Mummer — Charlie Weatherall Street Cleaners — Scott 

Barlow and Farley Hollibaugh 
Casanova — Michael Case 

Olympe — Susan Bickerstaff A. Ratt — Tom Roberts 

Lord Byron and the survivor — Gerald Hopkins 
La Modericita — Mary Jane Emling The Bum in the Window — 

Steve Dees 
The Dreamer — David White Loan Shark — Greg Worthington 
The Gypsy — Elizabeth Neill Baron De Charlus — Andrew Libby 
Esmerelda — Robbie McDonald Lobo — Paul McNeil 

Nursie — Starla Stavely Margurite — Carol Tyler 

Abdullah — Michael Raines Fugitive pilot — Trent Watts 

Fugitive Co-pilot — Charles Lowe 

Pedestrians — Robert Foose, Donna Luther, Donna Carol Diestle- 
meier, Marc Gandy, Nancy Passantino, Carol Young, Marianne 
Royals 

Camino Real proved to be a fascinating performance. Its produc- 
tion will hold many fond memories for all those involved. The long 
hours of rehearsals, the Saturday afternoon paint parties, Darin's 
incredible set design, Walt's carpentry skills, Brent's cheesecake, 
running the 4/40 for the fugituve scene, the bird escaping. Lord 
Byron's speech, to name a few. 




30 




31 




An Inspector 

Calls 

The second production of the year by the Millsaps 

Players was J. B. Priestly's "An Inspector Calls" which 

ran from November 14 through 19. Directed by Mr. 

Lance Goss, the technical director was Brent Lefavor. 

Arthru Birling — Robert Williams 

Mrs. Birling — Susan Bickerstaff 

Sheila Birling — Alys Barlow 

Gerald Croft— Trent Watts 

Eric Birling — Greg Worthington 

Inspector Goole — Andrew Libby 

Edna — Donna Carol Diestlemeier 



32 






Separate Tables 

Eacy year senior theatre majors are required to direct their 
own play. December 8 — 10 seniors Katrina Jameson and 
Michael Case directed two one-act plays by Sir Terrence 
Rattigan called "Separate Tables" Technical director was senior 
Walt Johnson. "Table By The Window" was the play directed 
by Michael Case. 

Mabel — Kara Winsett Anne Shankland — Lori Trigg 

Lady Matheson — Trish Lamkin Miss Cooper — Starla Stavely 
Mrs. Railton-Bell — Stephanie 

Reddoch John Malcolm — Nick Mowen 

Miss MEacham — Elizabeth Neill Charles Stratton — Richard 

Grove 



Doreen — Dclecia Seay 

Mr. Fowler — Tom Roberts 

The play directed by Katrina 

Jameson was "Table Number 

Seven" 

Major Pollack — Darin Hyer 

Mr. Fowler — Tom Roberts 

Miss Cooper — Starla Stavely 

Charles Stratton — Richard 

Grove 

Jean Tanner-Stratton — Robbie 

McDonald 

Doreen — Delecia Seay 



Jean Tanner — Robbie McDonald 



Mrs. Railton-Bell — Stephanie 

Reddoch 

Sybil Railton-Bell — Mary Jane 

Emling 

Lady Matheson — Trish LAmkin 

Miss Meacham — Elizabeth Neill 



Mabel— Kara Winsett 



33 




West Side 
Story 



Anybodys — Patricia Lampkin 
Graziella — Mary Jane Emiing 
Velma — Lori Trigg 
Minnie — Karr Winsett 
Clarice — Susan Van Cleve 
Pauline — Tammy Freeman 
Mildred — Melissa Parker 
Bernardo — Michael Case 
Chino — Luis Camero 
Pepe — Jay Sutterfield 
Indio — Sam Nicholas 
Luis — Tom Roberts 
Anxious — Charlie Weatherall 
Nibbles — Marc Gandy 
Moose — Robert Foose 
Riff — Darin Hyer 
Action — Gerald Hopkins 
A-Rab — Kevin Brune 
Baby John — Todd Joachim 
Diesel — Kevin Krieger 
Big Deal — Richard Grove 
Snowboy — Tony Lobred 
Tony — Jay Gotten 
Maria — Shari Schneider 
Anita — Betsy Ellis 
Consuela — Susan Bickerstaff 
Teresita — Starla Stavely 
Rosalia — Kathie Magee 
Francisca — Donna Luther 
Estella — Amy Adams 
Margarita — Pamela Machado 
Doc — Robert Williams 
Lt. Shrank — Trent Watts 
Officer Krupke — Nick Mowen 
Glad Hand — Walt Johnson 



34 





The Sixtieth Season 



^> 



"WEST SIDE STORY" 



Based on a Conception of 
JEROME BOBBINS 



Book By 



ARTHUR LEONARD STEPHEN 
LAURENTS BERNSTEIN SONDHEIM 



Entire Original Production Directed and Choreographed by 

JEROME ROBBINS 



Originally Produced on Broadway by Robert E. Griffith and Harold S. Prince 
by Arrangement with Roger L, Stevens 

Directed by 
LANCE GOSS 

Scenography and Technical Direction by 
BRENT LEFAVOR 

Choreography by 
UNDA CAMERON 

Vocal Direction by 
WILLIAM CARROLL 



Rehearsals, rehearsals, and more rehearsals 
. . . dancing and singing far into the night . . . 
scaffold moving requires more coordination 
than dancing, hearing the "Dance At the 
Gym" music in your sleep . . . torn ligaments, 
fractured ribs, and sore everything . . . "My 
dance partner is an uncoordinated klutz!" Miss 
Brewster falls for Gladhand on the stairs . . . 
Buff "does it" again . . . "What do you mean 
pick her up?" . . . Fosse Fosse 1, Fosse Fosse 
2 . . . The gun really works! . . . Quit breathing, 
you're supposed to be dead . . . Doc throws 
Snowboy in to the orchestra pit . . . "Ther's a 
dime for us" Consuela's wig . . . Ka-tri-na! 
Diesel destroys the set . . . Lighten up . . . cool 
lessons . . . two bulls eyes and completely miss- 
ing the board! . . . Miss Linda . . . 
. . . West Side Story was definately a memo- 
rable experience. 



THURSDAY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16-18, 1984 

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22-25, 1984 

at 8:15 o'clock 

The Marion L. Smith Auditorium 

THE CHRISTIAN CENTER 

MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



35 




Millsaps Black Students Association, designed to stim- 
ulate and improve the social and academic atmosphere 
for black students, played a vital role in the observance of 
Black History Week. The week is observed throughout 
the nation to recognize the outstanding contributions 
blacks have made to our country in every area. Members 
of Black Student Association were very active in this 
year's successful telephone campaign. Also pictured is a 
The week began with a Friday Forum entitled, "Black 
Businessmen and their Achievements" featuring Charles 
Bannerman. Other activities included a gospel songfest, a 
film on human rights, a talent show, and a speech by 
Senator Douglas Anderson. 



36 



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Mr. William Carroll 
Brent Alexander 
Lisa Anderson' 
Carrie Arnold* 
Chip Bailey* 
Karren Baker 
Tina Ball* 

Mary Vassar Ballard 
Scott Barlow 
James Barnett 
Mont Berry 
Debbie Bowland 
Lisa Bowden 
Suzannah Bowie* 
Donald Brooks 
Beau Butler 
Regan Carrie 
Billy Carr 
Bunny Carroll 
Chrissie Clark 
Jane Clover 
Michael Collum 
Keith Cook* 
Mary Lynn Dixon 
Leigh Dodson 
Betsy Ellis* 
Erin Fairley 



Pat Fiedler* 
Lou Flowers 
Michelle Forrester 
Nick Fox 
Etoile Frazier* 
Jay Garrett' 
Maud Deles Gober 
Stuart Green' 
Kelly Hale 
Kevin Hitt 
John Holland 
Jynnifer Jemison 
Mark Kingsley 
Tracey Kirby' 
Karen Kuebel 
Ken Lancaster 
Kevin Lott 
Steve Langworthy 
Lynn Lovett 
Lisa Manyfield 
Jolene McCaleb 
Joe McCall 
Susan Meriwether 
Nancy Messer 
Susan Murrell 
Jimmy Otts' 
Melissa Parker 



\Md I / ' // 



Marian Phillips 
John Pigott 
Cheryl Pitcher 
Tom Potter* 
Kim Purtle 
Diane Regina 
Kristen Reid* 
Tammy Reno 
Anne Ritchie 
Sean Searcy 
Blake Smith 
Starla Stavely' 
Patton Stephens 
Paige Sullivan 
Cece Todd 
Jamie Ware 
Mike Weber 
Joe Williams 
Nan Williams* 
Wareen Williams 
Kara Winsett 
Amy Wright 
Carol Young 
Lee Barlow* 
*Troubadours 



p troubadours & singers 



in concert 



"The great thing about Singers is that it brings a lot of different kinds of people 
together who share a love of music." 

— Nick Fox 



39 





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Student Body Association 



From producing many open campus wide parties to purchasing a badly needed typewriter for the Bobashela 
office, the Student Body Association has had an active year. Both senators and officers have worked hard to 
maintain open communication lines between students and college administrators. Besides providing social events 
for students, the SBA has made several procedural improvements which help the student government operate 
more efficiently. Serving on the SBA is best summed up by one student senator as " . . . participating, becoming 
involved with and meeting the student's needs." 



41 



1984 Commencement Exercises 



The 1984 graduation exercises were held on 
Sunday, May 6, 1984. The guest speaker was 
Dr. George L, Maddox, Jr., Professor of Medical 
Sociology at Duke University Medical Center. 
President George Harmon awarded the diplo- 
mas. 

(Upper right) Members of the graduating ciass prepare for 
the ceremony to begin. (Below) — Dr. Harmon awards Brad 
Cooper his diploma. (Right) — The seniors and faculty en- 
joy the address given by guest speaker Maddox. 














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Millsaps 



An institution of the United Methodist Church 



>^ 







The New York Times Selective Guide to Colleges, 1982-83 edition, is just that — a 

selective guide. Of the more than 3,000 public and private colleges and universities 

in the United States, the Guide has selected "265 of the best and most 

interesting four-year institutions in the country — the ones students in a 

buyer's market should know about." The Guide's report cites the capable 

faculty and strong curriculum in the liberal arts, sciences, and pre- 

j,-i>^j^ professional programs as keys in establishing Millsaps as the "best 

'■^^♦^".v."' school in Mississippi" and one in which "by national standards the 

education is a bargain." Also noted as factors which make Millsaps 

choice for serious students are the College's strong athletic 

program, attractive and comfortable campus, and enjoyable 

^aP^ student life style. 



Cited for its "sterling academic reputation," "attractive campus," and "good 

moral atmosphere," Millsaps was saluted by Good Housekeeping as one of 

the South's most outstanding colleges. Along with nine other institutions, 

public and private, Millsaps was recognized for its pre-med, pre-law, and 

cooperative programs and its reputation as a feeding school for 

^,v;,,;->, graduate institutions. The article reflected the opinions of southern 

V'^"*^^'' • women who listed the colleges included as the ones they would pick 

^-■'?.^5'*'.'A:J for their own sons and daughters. 

■'.":'iJ,.il;«<«'», 



Reporting on CBS network television coverage of Division III football. Sports 

Illustrated highlighted the refreshing discoveries veteran sportscaster Tom 

Brookshier made while covering the Millsaps - West Georgia game in 

Jackson. Noting that at Division III colleges athletes are students first, 

and mindful that more than 3% of Millsaps' student enrollment of 

1 ,205 is on the football team, Brookshier commented, "This is the way 

college football was meant to be played." These games "caught the 

spirit of American football," the article said. 



Recognized as one of "today's bargains" in higher education, Millsaps was 

'■.3*?'-^'<?** selected by Changing Times for its list of "50 colleges that offer high 

''5'<i%.'«5^^?5'*V academic standards and below average prices." In addition to costing 

^;^5^%$''' ^^ss ''''^" '^^ national average for private schools, colleges included on the 

"..■OfvA^'S.^ >" [jg(_ jjjgj (jjgjj standards: average scores of entering freshmen rank well 

above the national average, admissions policies are selective, a high 

percentage of the entering classes continue through for four years 

and graduate, and a good proportion of the students pursue 

graduate study. Millsaps' 1982 Rhodes Scholar Brad Chism was 

featured in the article's lead photograph. 



The 1983 edition of Peterson's Guides, The Competitive Colleges, in- 
cludes Millsaps among the 296 undergraduate institutions with the 
most competitive admissions situation in America today. 



46 



Millsaps is listed with 227 other colleges in Barron's Guide, The Most Prestigious Colleges, all 
chosen because of their "rigorous selectivity and the resulting high calibre of students chosen." 



Regional Liberal 
Arts Colleges 



Schools with regional reputations that emphasize the liberal arts 
East of Mississippi River 

Share of Responses 
Citing School 

1 . Colby-Sawyer College (N.H.) 22.9% 

2. (Tie) Marymount College (N.Y,). 
Marymount Manhattan College (N.Y.) 

and Trinity College (Vt.) 20.0% 

5. (Tie) Concordia College (N.Y.) 

and Gallaudet College (D.C.) 17.1% 

South and Border States 

Share of Responses 
Citing School 

1 . Millsaps College (Miss.) 35,4% 

2. Wofford College (S.C.) 19.8% 

3. (Tie) Mary Baldwin College (Va.) 

and Southwestern University (Tex.) 14.6% 

5. Asbury College (Ky.) 12.5% 

6. (Tie) Transylvania University (Ky.) 

and Westminster College (Mo.) 10.4% 

Midwest and West 

Share of Responses 
Citing School 

1 Evergreen State College (Wash.) 1 7 3% 

2. Alma College (Mich.) 16.3% 

3. (Tie) Hillsdale College (Mich.) 

and Hiram College (Ohio) 1 5.4% 

5, (Tie) Alverno College (Wis.) 

and Muskingum College (Ohio) 13.5% 

7. (Tie) Bethany College (Kans.) 

and Monmouth College (III.) 12.5% 

ijSNim 



uaNews 

&WORLDRePORT 




SELECTIVE GUIDE 
TO COLLEGES 

By Edward B. Fiske 

Education Editor of 

She ^'cUt JJork Simc0 

Millsaps College 



Jackaon, MS 
39210 



Location Small City 
Total Inrollmant 1 ,200 
Undorgraduataal.iao 
Malo/Fomala 50/60 
ACTComp24 
Financial Aid 65% 
■xponaa Pr $ 
Applicants 490 
Accoptad395 
■nrollod 220 
Acadomica * * * 
Social wx 
Q of L **-v 



Kepnnicd by permission of 
TIMES BOOKS, a division 
o( Quadrangle/ The Nc* 
York Times Book Co . Ini 
Three Park Avenue 
New York. N V 10016 
Copyright ' 1982 
By Edwird B. Fiskc 



From the Mississippi backwoods to the growing capital city of Jack- 
son, accolades accrue for tiny Millsaps College, by popular acclaim the 
best school in Mississippi. As far as small liberal-arts colleges go, Millsaps 
is hardly a competitor to those above the Mason-Dixon Line; but its under- 
graduates say the education they receive is of good quality, well-rounded — 
and fun. 

Getting A's at Millsaps Is difficult, but students report that if your 
ambitlons are somewhat less lofty you can probably realize them without 
grinding. The faculty rates highly in accessibility and overall ability, and 
small classes ensure "an unavoidable encounter with teachers." Although 
the pace is relaxed, there are few gut courses and the atmosphere remains 
"fundamentally Intellectual." Tuition may be the highest of any college In 
Mississippi, but by national standards the education is a bargain. 

Millsaps has a rigorous core curriculum with requirements in English, 
history, math, religion, and science. An easy way to fit all these demands 
Into one's schedule is through the popular Heritage program, an interdisci- 
plinary approach to the cultural heritage of the West that fulfills more than 
half the core requirements. Heritage meets for four lectures, two discus- 
sion seminars, and one lab a week, and, with its companion English writing 
course, accounts for two-thirds of a freshman's workload. Despite this 
heavy commitment, more than half of the entering class each year enrolls. 
Juniors who enjoyed the Heritage experience often opt for the honors pro- 
gram, which covers a broad interdisciplinary topic and requires a major 
thesis in the senior year. 

The premed and prelaw curriculums at Millsaps are highly regarded 
— both by students and by graduate schools. Three-quarters of medical- 
school hopefuls and virtually all would-be lawyers have been accepted at 
graduate programs In the last decade. New to the college in 1979, the man- 
agement school offers bachelor's degrees In accounting, administration, fi- 



nance, and economics, and students can begin working on an MBA during 
their senior year. Other good programs include the fine arts, music (an ex- 
cellent faculty and strong preprofessional training), and mathematics. All 
majors require students to pass a comprehensive examination in their 
chosen field before graduation. 

Students may take the Oak Ridge Science Semester," a semester at Ox- 
ford, London, or Aix-en-Provence, or gain academic credit for internships 
In business and health, or research in marine sciences at the Gulf Coast Re- 
search Laboratory. Cooperative programs with Vanderbilt, Columbia, 
Georgia Tech, and others lead to degrees in engineering and medical tech- 
nology. 

Here and there a student from Illinois, Ohio, or Arizona infiltrates Mill- 
saps, but by and large the one-fifth who are non-Mississippians are from 
adjacent states. Millsaps was the first college in the state to adopt volun- 
tarily a policy of open admissions for minority students and has developed 
a special premedlcal program for the disadvantaged. The number of black 
students, however, is still only about 5 percent. 

High-caliber football and tennis attract a fair number of jocks, but ath- 
letics are secondary to learning at Millsaps. "Our football team can go un- 
defeated, and the players walk off the field worrying about tests on Mon- 
day," observes one undergraduate. While Millsaps is a Methodist-spon- 
sored institution, only a quarter of the students have any affiliation with 
this church. Most profess a conservatli/e life-style, but not all. Says one 
premed, "We do have a political activist because we see him picketing 
each time tuition Is Increased." 

Millsaps has an need-blind admissions policy and is able to meet "95 to 
100 percent of the demonstrated financial need of all enrolling students." It 
also offers as many as 125 merit scholarships yearly, worth a total of more 
than $200,000. 

More than three-quarters of the students live in comfortable alr-condl- 
tloned campus accommodations, and only juniors and seniors may seek 
other housing. The freshmen have their own single-sex dorms and strict 
visitation regulations. Upperclassmen choose among two women's dorms 
(one with a kitchen), a men's dorm, or four fraternity houses. There is no 
sorority housing, though a third of the women as well as men are Greek-af- 
filiated. Students buy either a twenty-one- or fourteen-meal plan with tick- 
ets redeemable in either the cafeteria or the grill. 

Students rarely leave the area on weekends. If there are any big events 
In the state, chances are they will take place in Jackson, which is a fact stu- 
dents appreciate about their location. Ten miles to the north is a huge 
reservoir, popular for weekend water sports. Fraternities and sororities, 
while an exclusive group, don't dominate campus activities. Each of the 
eight organizations must throw one open party a year, and most provide 
more. Any latent animosity between independents and Greeks Is resolved 
on the intramural playing fields each week. The whole campus also organ- 
izes the yearly Elizabethan Faire. Beer (and other alcohol) is banned on 
campus but is the staple at fraternity parties, which are exempt from the 
trustees' regulations. 

Some of the smartest students in Mississippi attend Millsaps. although 
as one student notes, "True intellectuals tend to leave the state" — as do 
Millsaps graduates. One chemistry major sums her experience up: "Wher- 
ever I go In the state of Mississippi if I tell people I am attending Mlllsapo, 
they raise an eyebrow and say, 'That's a good school.' And I quite agree." 



47 



1984 Southern Literary 
Festival 



Millsaps was the setting for 
scholars, authors, and students 
who gathered together to 
study Southern literature April 
12. Those featured in the con- 
ference included Eudora Welty 
(in whose honor the event was 
held), Margaret Walker Alex- 
ander, Paul Binding, Charlotte 
Capers, Michael Kreyling, Car- 
ol S. Manning, Danieie Pitavy- 
Souques, Reynolds Price, Eliz- 
abeth Spencer, Rutyh Vande 
Kieft, James Whitehead, Joel 
Williamson, and Stuart Wright. 




,->.'"■ 
•*<" 



SN*^^---, 



AN EXPLORATION OF THE 

VALUE AND IMPORT OF SOUTHERN FICTION 

IN THE WORLD TODAY 



it — "V 




>.>■ ' 







HO}^ORlNG THE 

SEVENTY-FIFTH 

BIRTHDAY OF 




MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

]ACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 

APRIL 12'H, 1984 




southern literary festival 



THE NEW YORK TIMES 



ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT monday. april 



16. 1984 



Eudora Welty Honored 
On Her 75th Birthday 



By FAYS. 

SpacUItoThtNe 

JACKSON, Miss., April 14 — With 
rtiypipagiw and sighs, with flowers 
and peacock feathers, old friends and 
new worshipers alilte gathered in this 
quiet Southern caplud Friday to cele- 
brmte the 75th birthday of Eudora 
Welty. Miss Welty, a gentle and gra- 
dous Misslssippian, accepted it all — 
analyses of her work by European 
and American scholars, parties, re- 
ceptions, interviews — with serenity. 

She is considered a great American 
writer and one of the most eminent 
Southern writers living. This much of 
her craft is known: She listens and 
watdMS, and through her blue eyes 
even the small things take on mean- 
ing. 

And by all accounts, she is also ex- 
traordinarUynice. 

When a man delivered the fifth 
birthday bouquet to her pleasantly 
cluttered living room Friday morn- 
ing, Miss Welty gave a slight gasp. 
"Have you ever seen the likel" she 
exclaimed, examining the irises and 
yellow camaticRis as if they were the 
tint she had ever beheld. 

Known tor Her Sbort Stories 

The ?rtnner of numerous awards, 
including the 1973 Pulitzer Prize for 
fiction. Miss Welty, who has been 
translated Into languages across the 
world, has made her literary repuu- 
tioo primarily through shori stories. 
Her latest book, "One Writer's Begin- 
nings," ranks No. 6 on The New York 
Tinaes best-seller list for nonfiction 
and has given Its publisher. Harvard 
University Press, the first best seller 
of its 71-year history. 

Yet It was not Just the writer, but 
the person who scholars and friends 
affectionately came to honor at par- 
ties and at a three-day symposium at 
Millsaps College, here in this green 
and flowering city. 

And even those who did not attend 
I full of praise. 

*I won't be extreme, but she's the 
most charming and intelligent 
woman in the worid," Robert Penn 
Warren declared in a telephone inter- 
view. "A splendid and talented 
writer." 

"People love Eudora," explained 
her friend Charlotte Capers, "be- 
cause Eudora loves them.' 

Her short hair falling in soft white 
waves, her sUn folded Into wrinkles 
here aiid there. Miss Welty promised 



JOYCE 

nYorkTliBn 

an audience Friday that "I'll go on 
writing." No one stirred; no one ex- 
pected otherwise. The words were as 
predictable as the mockingbird's 
song in spring. 

Recalling the Eariy Years 

"One Writer's Beginnings" recalls 
the scenes and moods of her early 
years. This passage Illustrates both 
the observant, secure child and the 
full-grown writer in her : 

"When I was young enough to still 
spend a long time buttoning my shoes 
in the morning, I'd listen tovrard the 
hall: Daddy upstairs was shaving in 
the bathroom and Mother downstairs 
was frying the baccm. They would 
begin whistling back and forth to each 
other up and down the stairwell. My 
father would whistie his phrase, my 
mother would try to whistie, then 
hum hers back. It was their duet. I 
drew my buttonhook in and out and 
listened to It — I knew it was 'The 
Merry Widow.' The difference was, 
their song almost floated with laugh- 
ter: how different from the record, 
which growled from the beginning, as 
if the Victrola were only slowly being 
wound up. They k«>t It running be- 
tween them, up and down the stairs 
where I was now just about ready to 
run clattering down and show them 
my shoes." 

By reading aloud Miss Welty's 
words, often just as spare and whole 
as those, speakers at the Southern 
Literary Festival symposium evoked 
moans of pleasure on the second floor 
of the Academic Complex. 

Southerners love to tell stories, and 
as a child, Miss Weltv would plant 
herself between two adults and com- 
mand, "Now talk." Cardl S. Manning 
of Mary Washington College recalled 
Miss Welty saying, "And then my 

ears would Just open like morning 

glories." 
"Oooofa," the audience sighed. 

•I've Loved tbe Oouide WorM' 

Like a minimalist William Faulk- 
ner, Miss Welty writes about familiar 
people and emotions. She is Southern 
in her use of settings and idiom and 
dialogue but, according to the histo- 
rian C. Vann Woodward, she does not 
bring the burden of the South's his- 
tory — slavery, war, defeat, occupa- 
tion — into her work. 

To her, people are Individuals, not 




Tin Ntw York TlmM/Huben Worley Jr. 

Eudora Welty blowing out candles on a cake at a celebration of her 7Sth 
birthday during a literary festival In Jackson, Miss. 



archetypes, in human situations. She 
acknowledges that it takes a creative 
reader to see between the lines and 
answer her vibratlcms at tbe same 
pitch. 

"I've always been aware and ob- 
servant of the outside world," she 
said in an interview in the comfort- 
able, two-story home where she has 
lived since high school. "I've always 
loved the outside world, things any- 
body can see with open eyes and 
ears," 

"Mississippi is a wonderful place," 
she continued, swatting at a gnat. 
"There's lots of variety; not as much 
as it used to be, because now it's more 
like everywhere, at least the cities, 
Jackson. But it's the only city. The 
older places and quiet places don't 
seem to have changed that much. ' ' 

•It's tbe Imagination' 

In discussing one of her stories, 
however, she described tiie ingredi- 
ent that transforms her Misslssiroi 
into literature read around the world. 

"What went Into the writing is uni- 
versal. It's the imagination, which is 
like a great sea," she said. Creating a 
story Is like creating a bouquet, she 
suggested, like picking one flower 
from here and another from there 
until they all form one harmonious 
array. 

Miss Welty's work is marked by a 
sense of place, of family and com- 
munity, as well as a comic sense of 
irony. All of those elements were 
present at the soiree given in her 



honor Friday evening at the white- 
columned mansion of Mrs. Warren 
Reimers, a patron of the arts in Jack- 
son. ^ . 

It was a tteautiful night, tiie air 
warm and carrying the soft scent of 
the Soutii in springtime. Standing 
amid the azaleas in pink and wtiite 
bloom upon the lawn, guests could 
squint through the new leaves of the 
oak trees to find a full moon. The 
magnolia reached hi^r than the 
balconies of the two-story house. 

Within the spacious and formal 
rooms, servants poured champagne 
and white wine and set out the buffet 
of tiny sandwiches, strawberries and 
cream, and platters of cakes. 

In the midst of this elegance, Jane 
Reid-Petty, a longtime friend of Miss 
Welty, confided that the author and 
her friends were looking forward to 
going to a favorite resuurant, Bill's 
Burger House, for a more intimate 
celebration tmught. "He doesn't have 
a liquor Ucense, but he always brin^ 
out a bottle of whisky from tlie back 
for Eudora," she explained. 

Planting herself on the mansion s 
broad staircase, which was ti»e sort 
that Rhett Butler might have swept 
Scarlett O^Hara up In his arms, Mrs. 
Petty recalled for the scores of guestt 
last year's birthday party at her Gulf 
of Mexico beach house. 

"We hung a banner," she recount- 
ed. " 'Eudora, the grandest gull on 
the Gulf.'" 

As everyone laughed. Miss Welty 
replied, "I still am." 



49 




50 










■''^w--.i,!»^(r(^: 













The Great Race of '83 
politics as usual 
by Beau Butler 

If there is one feature that can be predicted about a gubernatori- 
al race in our great and enlightened state, other than the fact that 
the winner will under no circumstances be a Republican, it is this; 
inevitably, the candidates show their true mettle as Election Day 
approaches and insure that the campaign will deteriorate into a 
low-level, banal, mudslinging contest that tests the candidates' 
ability to adumbrate each other through verbal abuse rather than 
through their knowledge of political issues. This gubernatorial race 
was no exception. Yes, there was that good old time name-calling 
and yes, the Clarion-Lcdgcr ran front page stories of the accusa- 
tions, and yes, the apathetic masses discussed the pulp and delud- 
ed themselves that they were participating in meaningful political 
analysis. All the familiar elements were present. What was unprec- 



edented, however, was the nature of the mud-slinging and the 
questions it raised about political integrity. 

For the future Millsapians who may happen to read this com- 
ment years from now, the basic story is this. Three Jackson attor- 
neys, all of whom were ardent supporters of the Republican candi- 
date Leon Bramlett, made allegations that the Democratic 
candidate, former attorney general Bill Allain, was homosexual 
who frequently turned tricks with three black transvestite prosti- 
tutes. All the gory details were published in the C-L. Political 
science professor John Quincy Adams was quoted in the New 
York Times article about the uncertainty the allegations had 
thrown into the outcome of the race. And Johnny Carson let the 
nation know on the Tonight Show, "the three popular things in 
Mississippi: Hoddy-Toddy, Billy, and Bill Allain (cheer, a beer, and 
a queer)" Allain, of course, denied the charges and reported that 
the Republican party had never stooped so low and been so 
desperate as to what they had done. He took a lie-detector test and 




52 



passed. The attorneys did the same. 

So who was right? It matters little now, for Allain won, of course. 
At this writing, the question of his sexual preferences has been all 
but dropped (although for a while Billy Mounger, the Julius Caesar 
of the legal trimverate, swore that the "truth" would be exposed). 
The fact that Allain won says much about two powerful forces in 
Mississippi society and politics. One is religion. As a state in the 
heart of the Bible belt, Mississippi likes to feel it does its part in 
protecting the moral fiber of America. Given a culture like this, an 
accusation of such an abomination as homosexuality directed to- 
ward a candidate for the state's highest elected office can be a 
mortal wound. 

And yet it wasn't. Allain never came out with positive proof that 
the allegations were false, and as a divorcee, had no loving wife 
and family to disprove them by force of example. What helped 
Allain win was something that is probably more deeply rooted in 
Mississippi politics than any religious force; and that is the state's 



aversion to Republicans. While we may elect a national senator or 
representative from that party, the state offices are almost invari- 
ably reserved for members of the party that has produced such 
great leaders as Bilbo, Barnett, and Eastland. There is still some- 
thing in the political subconscious of the Mississippi political mind 
that still associates the loss of our "Southern way of life" in the 
Civil War, with the harshness and humiliation of Grant's recon- 
struction policies, and that something has made Mississippians 
vote by and large for Democratic candidates. 

As to political integrity, the question can be put with relative 
simplicity; when will Mississippi ever develop a mature political 
mentality? When will we realize that policy issues are immensely 
more important than some facade of morality and righteousness? 
Until something is done about this, all we can hpe for is a lively 
event one every four years and a dearth of progressive, far-sighted 
policy that will get the state out of its bottom-oriented rut every 
year for an eternity. 




i< 



The 



Lion In 
Winter** 

The Millsaps players ended 
their 60th season with the roman- 
tic comedy "The Lion In Winter". 
It was a small intimate cast and 
we all agreed that "we should 
have been great fools not to have 
done this show." 

Mike and Gerald have fun with 
spirit gum. Princess Alais is defi- 
nitely from the South of France. 
"What's a dance-belt?" John's 
"pimples" by Brent Lefavor. 
Throwing Katrina on the floor is 
Mike's favorite part. Richard is a 
sick boy! Curtain call, Scotty? 
"Can I borrow your breath 
spray?" The bent sword. Poor 
John. High school chatter. Oedi- 
pus complex? Tight tights. LINE! 
Not a kiss, a KISS! Picture might. 
His beard sheds. The moving 
crew — Kara, Susan, Robbie, and 
Alys. Keep me posted! "But it 
was!" My Three Sons. "Beautiful 
Baby." 

King Henry II of England — Mi- 
chael Case 

Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine — 
Katrina Jameson 

Prince Richard Lionheart — Ger- 
ald Hopkins 

Prince Geoffrey, Duke of Brit- 
tany — Tom Rishel 

Prince John — Bryan Grovesnor 

Princess Alais Capet — Angela 
Franck 

Prince Philip of France — Scott 
Higginbotham 







k 




ft- 




if\ 



54 




Who 
Cares? 

More than you 
might think . . . 

Many Millsaps students allow time in 
their hectic academic schedules to vol- 
unteer. Taking on the responsibility of 
leading a Cub Scout troop would be a 
challenge under any circumstances; 
but when the Scout Master and Den 
Mother are college students and the 
scouts are visually impaired, it's bound 
to be an extraordinary experience. 
Seniors Denise Heaman and Kimble 
Scott lead a Cub Scout troop. 

Several Students have dedicated up 
to 72 hours of training to work with 
CONTACT, an anonymous crisis line. 
These individuals deal with everything 
from referral calls to actually interven- 
ing in suicides and deep depressions 
experienced by the callers. 

Several students volunteer their 
time as tutors to handicapped individ- 
uals of all ages from the Jackson area. 
R.E.A.C.H. stands for Religious Educa- 
tion and Activities for Community 
Handicapped. 

Leading a comfortable life here at 
Millsaps is an easily accomplished task 
for most of us students. But take a look 
a few blocks west of campus and you'll 
find Jackson's mid-town area isn't 
quite as conducive to a comfortable li- 
festyle. Millsaps students Lee Rice, 
Mary Vassar Ballard, Lisa McGee and 
others volunteer an hour of their time 
on Friday afternoons in an effort to 
make life a little brighter for the chil- 
dren in Bethlehem Center's Kindergar- 
ten program. A little playtime for these 
students is relaxing and means so much 
to the children who claim "It's a long 
week 'til Friday." 




The British Studies at Oxford program enables several 
Millsaps students to attend summer school at St. John's 
College in Oxford, England each year. The students attend 
two lectures a day and benefit from the intellect of such 
eminent british scholars as Sir Roy Strong, Hugh Trevor- 
Roper and A.L. Rouse. The Summer Session previously 
attended by ten Millsaps students in 1983 had as its theme 
Britain in the Renaissance. Courses were offered in such 
topics as English Reformation, Jacobean and Elizabethan 
Stage, Shakespeare's Tragedies, Shakespeare's Histories 
and Romances, the social aspects of Renaissance Drama, 
and many others. Students received six hours credit for 
their studies. The six weeks spent in England will be remem- 
bered as much for learning to play rugby as for writing 
papers; as much for tips to Hard Rock Cafe for "American 
Burgers" as for breakfasts of kippers and stewed tomatoes. 

Oxford is only 90 minutes from London by train, so 



students take advantage of afternoons or long weekends to 
shop at Harrod's, visit museums, tour Buckingham Palace 
and Parliament and view the Tower of London. This year's 
group will never admit to having spent hours looking for 
London Bridge . . . The students "drank in" the Oxford 
atmosphere at many of the local pubs, and after 11:00 one 
could always spot a group of British Studies students at one 
of the local discos or in a line at the Kebab Stand. 

The experience of studying at one of the most famous 
Universities in the world, living for six weeks abroad and 
traveling around Britain, and oftentimes into Europe, is one 
the British Studies at Oxford students rarely forget. 

— Emilie McAllister 

"About my summer in London . . . Prince Andrew, 
where are you?" 

— anonymous International Studies participant 



56 



broadening our horizons . . . 

british studies 




57 



"Look, honey! Can you believe we used to wear this 
stuff?" That's probably what you'll say to your spouse ten 
years from now when you settle down with your Boba- 
shela for a night of reminiscing. Yes, those were the days — 
Thursday nights at C.S.'s, California Day with Ruby inquir- 
ing "What for ya,hon?", hours spent playing Trivial Pur- 
suit, . . . "Where's the Beef?" . . . wearing sweats to class 
because the alarm failed you again (sure) . . . hanging 
around the bowl when you know that term project is due 
Friday and you haven't started it . . . whining to Hazel to let 
you by "just this once" when you forget your I.D., flipping 
to the Letters to the Editor section of the P&W to see what 
the latest controversy is . . . Sure, some things are distinctly 
1984, but some things never change. 



--^•iXSl/^ 



i?Ant^ 







si'ppers 




58 



whai vre. 








h\6h -ftp 
\cmiS shoes 



^ 






drop v^/5-/- 




what happened 



Russian Premier Andropov dies 

replaced by Chemenko 
Sally Ride — first American woman in space 
ABC airs controversial "The Day After" 
Winter Olympics field in Sarajevo 
Governor Bill Allain elected 
Secretary of Interior James Watt resigns 
U.S. Marines killed in Beirut 
England invades tfie Falkland Islands 
Vanessa Williams — first black Miss America 
David Kennedy dies 

Korean airplane KAL007 shot down' by U.S.S.R. — 56 Americans die 
Americans invade Grenada 
Deployment of U.S. nuclear missiles in Europe 
Supreme Court upholds ban on school prayer 

Democrats fight for presidential nomination: Jesse Jackson, Gary Hart, John Glenn, Walter 

Mondale 
Computer whiz kids break into U.S. Military computer 
Iran-Iraqu continues use of chemical warfare 
Massive peace protest staged in Europe 
Lech Welesa wins Nobel Peace Price 
Barney Clark — first artificial heart transplant 
Menachem Begin resigns as Prime Minister of Egypt 

break-up of AT&T 
The Big Chill — freezing weather plagues Americans 



0^«r 















M 

i«>°^ 







. • - r,^ ep \ 








60 




Flashdance 

Risky Business 

The Big Chill 

Terms of Endearment 

The Right Stuff 

Never Say Never 

Splash 

Yentl 

Return of the Jedi 

Romancing the Stone 

Christine 

Police Academy 

Footloose 

Against All Odds 

Greystoke 

Hard to Hold 

Swing Shift' 



what we watched 




0) 

s 
a 

s 

(0 



Texibooi'< 
Seniorsj 




62 



If 




^#.^ 



Finishing papers . . . completing projects . . . perfecting your 
jury piece . . . cramming for exams . . . selling back books . . . 
counting the days 'til graduation . . . packing for the homeward 
journey . . . 




63 



vm^ 









Master Major 
Major's Lady 



66 




Maud 
DeLes 
Gober 



Maud DeLes Gober, a senior elemen- 
tary education major, is a member of 
Kappa Delta sorority. Kappa Delta Epsi- 
lon, the education honorary, and Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa. She is also a member 
of the Millsaps Singers and the Trouba- 
dours. She was elected homecoming 
queen during the 1982 and 1983 home- 
coming festivities, and was selected for 
the 1984 edition of Who's Who Among 
American College Students. 



Mike Ford 



Mike Ford is a senior accounting ma- 
jor, and also a four year member and 
captain of the Millsaps Majors basketball 
team. He is also a member of Omicron 
Delta Kappa, leadership honorary, and 
president of Alpha Eta Sigma, the ac- 
counting honorary. Mike was chosen for 
the 1984 edition of Who's Who Among 
American College Students, and received 
the Tribett Scholarship for having the 
highest quality point index for the year 
last May and was an Else Scholar last fall. 

by Tracy Miller 



67 



homecoming court 1983 




escort^Ry Patrick Patrick 



68 





Maud DeLes Gober was once again elected 
as the Millsaps College Homecoming Queen 
for the second consecutive year! 

Maud DeLes, the daughter of Reverend and 
Mrs. W.T. Gober of Jackson, is a senior major- 
ing in Elementary Education. She is a member 
of Kappa Delta Sorority and has also been 
elected Millsaps Major's Lady in 1983-84. 
Maud DeLes is a member of Kappa Delta Epsi- 
lon Education Honorary, Omicron Delta 
Kappa and Sigma Lambda Leadership Honor- 
aries, membership on the Panhellenic Council, 
participation in the Millsaps Singers and the 
Millsaps Troubadors and membership in the 
Chapel Series Committee. 

Maud DeLes spends her spare time as a 
volunteer with REACH (Religious Education 
and Activities for the Christian Handicapped) 
and singing in various churches and clubs in 
Jackson, including participation in the Gallo- 
way Methodist Church Chancel Choir. 

The title of queen is an honor which is sure 
to have made her great, great, great uncle very 
proud — for Major Reuben Webster Millsaps 
was the primary benefactor of the college over 
which this queen reigns! 



homecoming queen 1983 



Maud DeLes Gober 



69 




The Biology Award— Todd Willis 


Union Pacific Award for Geology — Garrcth J. Davies 


The J.B. Price Chemistry Award — Lisa Bowden, Scott 


Major in Geology Award — Steve Ingram $100 


Story, Robert Mangliardi 


Awards — David Ruhl, Charles 0. Peele 


The Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry — 


The Ross H. Moore History Award— Billy Wheeler 


B.M. Britt 






Else Scholarships — Don Keenan, Paul Ogden Terri 


/ Senior Award — Micahel Osborne 


Clark, Mike Ford, Monty Hamilton, Melvi Upchurch 


Eta Sigma Phi Award for Excellence in First year 


Wall Street Journal Award — Lee Allbritton 


Latin — Catherine Lewis 






Senior Accounting Award — Tim Renault 


Second year Latin — Stuart Green 






Freshman Mathematics Award— Robert Mangliardi 


Magnolia Coullet Senior Award — Kevin O'Malley 






Mathematics Major Award — Andy Garmon, Zeather 


Computer Science Award — Jan Bickerstaff 


Gladney, Gary Hall 


Myrtis Meadors Teaching Award — Betsy Ellis, Marsha 


The Albert Godfrey Sanders Award in French — Jim 


Webb 


Boswell, Barbara Hearn 


Edgar Moore Award for Scholarship — Anna L. 


Beginning German Award— Doris Sullivan, Susan 


Walker, hon. mention, Ann McCord 


Burcaw 


Clark Essay Medal — Bill Thompson 


Intermediate German Award — Mary Woodward 



70 




Senior Awards in German — Ann McCord, 


The Chi Omega Social Science Award — 


Jolene McCaleb 


Terri Clark 


The Albert Godfrey Sanders Award in 


The Kappa Alpha Eric Gunn Memorial 


Spanish — Karren Baker, Pierre Glemot 


Scholarship — Sheila Farnsworth 


The Senior Music Award — Carrie Arnold 


The Lambda Chi Purple Bathtub Award — 




John Quincy Adams 


Award for General Physics — Nancy 




Derryberry 


The Sigma Lambda Award — Dr. Shirley 




Olson 


Award for Classical Physics — Scott Story 






Theta Nu Sigma— Rakesh Mangal 


John F. Kennedy Award in Political 




Science — Steve Dickerson 


Jim Lucas Scholarship — Walter Johnson 


American Bible Society Award — Marilyn 


Young Volunteers in Action — Lisa Manyfield 


The C. Wright Mills Award in Sociology— 


Student Telephone Campaign Award — 


Nedo Carpenter 


Kappa Sigma 


The West Tatum Award — Neena Paul 




Circle K Award— Rakesh Mangal 





theatre awards 



Best Actor — Michael Case for "King Henry" in The Lion in Winter 

Best Actress — Katrina Jameson for "Queen Eleanor" in The Lion in Winter 

Best Supporting Actor — Darin Hyer for "Riff" in West Side Story 

Best Supporting Actress — Betsy Ellis for "Anita" in West Side Story 

The Cameo Award — Tom Roberts for "A. Ratt" in Camino Real 

The Freshman Award — Kelly Hitchcock 

The Hains Award (scene design and set construction) — Walt Johnson 

The Backstage Award (properties, costume, and make-up) — Elizabeth Neil! 

The Alpha Psi Omege Award (outstanding senior — Darin Hyer 

The Mitchell Award (player of the year) — Katrina Jameson 



The character of J. Worthing- 
ton Foxfeiiow in Walt Disney's 
"Pinochio" summed up the feel- 
ings of many Millsaps students in- 
terested in theatre in his gleeful 
proclamation "Hi Diddle Dee 
Dee, it's an Actor's Life for Me". 

The work which is poured into 
each theatrical production actu- 
ally begins the very night of audi- 
tions. Following the casting or 
parts are the seemingly endless 
nights of rehearsal and practice. 
As the play unfolds throughout 
the weeks of practice, behind- 
the-scenes preparations are also 
made: sets are designed, lighting 
and sound are arranged, props 
are gathered, costumes are al- 
tered and makeup is perfected. 
The friendships made, the tech- 
niques learned, and the energy 
expended all culminate in the 
overwhelming nights of finally 
performing for an audience. The 
play doesn't end with its perfor- 
mance, however; it is treasured 
and tucked away in the memo- 
ries of each person involved with 
the production. The productions 
of 1983-84 brought with them 
memories of Saturday afternoon 
paint parties, Darin's set design, 
Walt's carpentry skills. Brent's 
cheesecake, the bird escaping 
and running the 440 for the fugi- 
tive scene. 



72 




resident assistants = 




The life of a Resident Assistant can be rewarding in many ways and much 
less so in others. The single room, the extra pennies in the pocket and the 
close camaraderie among RA and "hall-mates" are among the favorable 
aspects of the job. The position of RA also has its quirky, more question- 
ably enjoyable requirements such as giving foot massages, evicting males 
from the dorm after visiting hours, late night phone duty and quieting 
rowdy 'dorm-dwellers'. The opportunity to grow closer to one's peers while 
still serving a necessary function as confidante, middle-man and overseer 
can be a very gratifying experience for a resident assistant. (Pictures show 
R.A.'s in training during summer workshop) 



Ezelle 

Perry Key 
Larry Bellan 
Paul Bergeron 
John Perry 
John Rosella 
Blake Smith 

Franklin 

Lee Rice 
Lisa McGee 
Gay Pepper 
Florence Hines 
Betsy Ellis 

Galloway 

Bill Hetrick 
Paul Ogden 
Greg Sliman 
Kimble Scott 
Bill Tull 
Mike Greer 

Sanders 

Keri Slaton 
Denise Heamon 

Bacot 

Lisa Hapgood 

Stephanie Durow 

Juli Bradsher 

Emilie McAllister 

Inger Wray 

resident directors 

Franklin — Alice Jackson 

Ezelle — Margaret Hitt 

Galloway — Mike and Linda Stratford 

Bacot — Kelly and Karen Thueson 



73 



business team 




A group of 10 students was chosen by the School of als competition in Atlanta. The students who market- 
Management to participate in the Emory Intercolle- ed "Heritage House" coffee competed against teams 
giate Business Games. The team of students, after from twenty-seven other schools from throughout the 
submitting to a business environment computer simu- United States and Canada in this prestigious invita- 
lation, culminated the year by participating in the fin- tional competition. — Paul Ogden 



74 



who's 



Suzannah Marie Bowie 

— Soloist in Millsaps Singers' production of Messiah 

— Alternate to the Collegiate Artist in voice in 1983 
Mississippi Music Teachers Assn. competition 

— Millsaps Troubadors 

— Omicron Delta Kappa 

— First major in Church music at Millsaps 



Carrie S. Arnold 

— Student conductor of Millsaps Singers — 2 yrs. 

— Troubadors — 4 yrs. 

— Eta Sigma 

— Sigma Lambda 

— Panhellenic President 







Betsy Bradley 

— Editor of 1983 Bobashela 

— Chi Omega — V.P., Sec, Rush Chairman 

— Pres. — Sigma Tau Delta 

— Omicron Delta Kappa; Sigma Lambda 

— Chairman, Publications Board 



Julia Elizabeth Bradsher 

— Chairman of 1983 Student Symposium 

— Campus Ministry Team Exec. Committee and Voluntary 
Services Committee Chairman 

— Public Events Committee 

— R.A. in Franklin, Summer 1983-84 
— Freshman Orientation Committee 



75 



Puddin Collins 








— Varsity 


Tennis member 


80-'84. Most Im 


Droved 


'82, 


Captain 


'84, NCAA Div. 


HI All-American 


1982, 


1983 


— Phi Mu 


Fraternity 








— Dean's 


List 1981-83 








— Tri Beta, Sigma Lambda 


, Theta Nu Sigma, Alph 


la 


Epsilon 


Delta 








—Financial and Social Affa 


irs Committees 







Erin Fairley 

— Organist, Millsaps Singers 

— President, Vice-President Kappa Delta Sorority 

— Resident Assistant 

— Omicron Delta Kappa 

— Eta Sigma 








-r:--f-^ 







Brad Cooper 
— SGA Secretary 

— Emory Intercollegiate Business Games 

— Chairman, Orientation Committee 

— Chairman, Judicial Council 

— Membership Recruitment Chairman, Executive Board 
Member Lambda Chi Alpha 



Maud DeLes Gober 

-Homecoming Queen 1982, 1083 

— Singers/Troubadors (soloist) 

— Sigma Lambda 

— Kappa Delta Epsilon 

— Kappa Delta Sorority — Panhellenic Council 
Representative 



76 



Mike Ford 

— Tribbett Scholarship recipient 

— Else Scholarship recipient for completion of business 
courses 

— Omicron Delta Kappa 

— Basketball team, Captain 

— recipient of Mississippi Society of Certified Public 
Accountants Scholarship 



who's 



John 


Holland 




-J.B 


Price Chemistry Award 1 


— Omicron Delta 


Kappa 


— Sigma Lambda 


, historian 


-Eta 


Sigma 




-Phi 


Eta Sigma, 


charter member 



o 




Ken Lancaster 

— Lambda Chi Alpha, Outstanding Associate Member, 
Fraternity Educator 

— Omicron Delta Kappa 

— Sigma Lambda, President, Secretary-Treasurer 

— Millsaps Singers, Troubadors 

— Eta Sigma, Alpha Eta Sigma, Phi Eta Sigma 



Don Keenan 

— Else Scholarship 

— Lambda Chi Alpha, President 
— Judicial Council 

— Food Service Committee, chairman 

— Emory Business Games Team 



Wanda Malone 

— Alpha Kappa Alpha, President 

— Black Student Association, Vice-President 

— participant in Minority Study of Public Policy at Lyndon 
B. Johnson School 

— United Methodist Scholarship recipient 

— Omicron Delta Kappa, Leadership Award 



Inger Wray 

— Resident Assistant 

— Peer Advision, Biology Dept. Lab Assistant 

— Kappa Delta Sorority, Secretary 

— Chairman of 1983 Millsaps Telephone Campaign 

— Sigma Lambda, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Beta Beta Beta 




Jim Ritchie 

— David Martin Key Scholar 

— Kappa Alpha, Social Chairman, Council of Honor 
Commander, Ritualist, Brotherhood Chairman, By-laws 
Revision Chairman 

— Purple & White Photography Editor, photographer 

— Alpha Epsilon Delta, Theta Nu Sigma, Beta Beta Beta 



John D. Rosella IV 

— Dean's List 

— Beta Beta Beta, Theta Nu Sigma, Phi Eta Sigma 

— Who's Who Among College Students 

— Resident Assistant 

—valued friendships developed at Millsaps 



78 



Denise Lynn Heamon 

— Chi Omega Fraternity, pledge trainer 

— Student Executive Board, Treasurer, 2nd Vice-Pres. 

— Omicron Delta Kappa, President 

— Sigma Lambda 

— Resident Assistant 



who'sqi 



Mark Mitchell 

— Interfraternity Council, President 

— Judicial Council 

— Lambda Chi Alpha, President, Alumni Secretary, 
Athletic Director 

— Theta Nu Sigma 

— Peer Advisor, 2 yrs. 







^>^ 
.r t - 













David Ruhl 




—4 yr. Ictterman in Varsity Football 




— Geology Club 




— Theta Nu Sigma 




—Kappa Alpha Order, Vice-President and PI 


3dge 


Director 




— Larry Boland Scholarship Award 





Kimble Scott 

— Sigma Delta Pi, Vice-President 

— Pi Kappa Alpha, Rush Chairman 

— British Studies at Oxford University 

— Resident Assistant, Peer Advisor 
— Chi Omega Owl Man Court 



o 



79 



Paul Friedrich Ogden 

— Omicron Delta Kappa 

— Emory Intercollegiate Business Games, 1983-84 

— Resident Assistant, 1981-84 

— College Senator 

— Millsaps Singers 




Lee Dempsey 

— Peer Advisor/Orientation Counselor 

— Lab Assistant, Computer Dept. 

— Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Treasurer, Scholarship 
Chairman Publicity Chairman 

— Robert Mason Strieker Scholarship 



Jolene Lucille McCaleb 

— Omicron Delta Kappa 

— Phi Eta Sigma 

— Bobashela, business manager 

— Eta Sigma 

— Schiller Gesellschaft, Intermediate German Award 



80 



Melvin Upchurch 

— Emory Business Games Team, President 1983-84 

— Alpha Eta Sigma, Vice-President 

— Else Scholarship 

— Eta Sigma 
— Dean's List 



who's q] 



Rakesh Kuman Mangal 

— Omicron Delta Kappa 

— Student Government Association, 1st Vice-President 

— Theta Nu Sigma, President 

— Student Test File Committee, President 

— J.B. Price Chemistry Award 



Jimmy Otts 

— Millsaps Singers, Troubadours 

— Phi Eta Sigma 

— Eta Sigma 

— Student Senator 

— Peer Advisor 



o 




81 



Tana Ruth Browning 

— Chi Omega Sorority, Panhellenic Representative, 
Treasurer 

— Sigma Lambda 

— Kappa Delta Epsilon 

— Varsity Head Cheerleader 

— Homecoming Court 



Dale Burrus 

— Alpha Eta Sigma, Treasurer 

— Chi Omega Sorority, Social Chairman, Secretary 

— Rush counselor 

— Student Senate 

— Peer Advisor 




Lisa Catledge 

— Chi Omega Fraternity, President 

— Resident Assistant, Bacot Dorm 

— Sigma Lambda 

— Intramural sports — Chi Omega 

— Millsaps Women's Soccer Club 



Terri Clark 

— Reid and Cindy Bingham Award; Junior Scholar of 
Distinction in Political Science 

— Else Management Scholar and Whitehead Scholar 

— Omicron Delta Kappa, Vice-President 

— Sigma Lambda, Omicron Delta Epsilon 

— Eta Sigma, President: Phi Eta Sigma, Secretary 



82 



who's i^ 



Joseph K. Williams 

— Sigma Lambda 

— Millsaps Christian Fellowship, President 

— Task Force on Church relations and Campus 

— Dean's List 

— Pi Kappa Alpha 



o 







Stephanie Durow 

— Bacot Resident Assistant, 2 yrs. 

— Lady Majors Varsity Basketball, 4 yrs., Captain 
1982- 83, Most Improved Player, 1980, 1983 

— Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Secretary 2 yrs. 

— Dean's List 

— Intramural sports: soccer, volleyball, softball 



Editor's note: We regret that due to lack of space we were unable to list all of the 
activities and accomplishments of these seniors. Each Who's Who recipient listed five of 
their honors for publication. 

nb 



83 



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II 

II 




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81 



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11 
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<&.CAf-« '"'J'^ 




Senate 




Denise Heamon — 2nd Vice 

President 
Rakesh Mangal — 1st Vice 

Pres. 
Jynnifer Jemmison — Secretary 
Billy Wheeler — President 
Bridget Fairley 
Anne Hogue 
Elizabeth Collins 
David Loper 
Gayle Huff 



Jo Watson 

Lady Margaret Sullivan 

Jack Denver 

Dean Good 

Lori Trigg 

Paige Sibley 

Debbie Fischer 

Margaret Corban 

Mark Kingsley 

Kimble Scott 

James Barnett 



Jim Boswell 
Chris Cheek 
Jamie Noble 
Wynn Franks 
Richard Harb 
Louise Jackson 
Ned French 
Mac Bailey 
Dek Terrell 
Patrick Patrick 
John Pigott 



86 




Kimble Scott questions a bill on the floor. 

Debbie Fischer emphasizes her view of election procedures. 

Senators Paige Sibley and Chris Cheek discuss the importance of a more liberal visitation policy. 



87 



Omicron Delta Kappa 



honors, scholarship, leadership, character, service 




Betsy Bradley 
Terri Clark 
Paul Ogden 
Suzannah Bowie 
Denise Heaman 
Dr. Ross Moore 
Dr. Charles Sallis 
Dr. Frank Laney 
Dr. Sam Knox 
Dr. George Harmon 
Dr. Robert King 



Lida Burris 
Rob Buxton 
Mike Ford 
Erin Fairley 
John Holland 
Jolene McCaleb 
Ken Lancaster 
Emilie McAllister 
Billy Wheeler 
Rakesh Mangal 
Zeather Gladney 



Joe Williams 
Beau Butler 
Susan Graves 
Debbie Jordan 
Don Keenan 
Greg Sliman 
Inger Wray 
James Barnett 
Maud de Les Gober 
Mark Mitchell 



88 



Sigma Lambda 



character, scholarship, involvement 




Ken Lancaster, Pres. 

James Barnett, V.P. 

Betsy Bradley, Sec./Treas. 

John Holland, Hist. 

Carrie Arnold 

Lida Burris 

Suzannah Bowie 

Tana Browning 

Rob Buxton 

Beau Butler 

Lisa Catledge 

Chrissie Clark 

Terri Clark 

Cecilia Collins 



Brad Cooper 
Jay Dickens 
Mike Ford 
Erin Fairley 
Maud de Les Gober 
Richard Harb 
Denise Heaman 
Bill Hetrick 
Debbie Jordan 
Wanda Malone 
Emilie McAllister 
Paul Ogden 
Billy Wheeler 
Hobby Williams 



Inger Wray 
Jeff Alexander 
Stephanie Durow 
Zeather Gladney 
Lisa Hapgood 
Rakesh Mangal 
Jolene McCaleb 
Mark Mitchell 
Jim Ritchie 
Susan Graves 
Faculty advisors: 
Dr. Richard Mallette 
Janice Streetman 



89 



Alpha Epsilon Delta 



pre-med honorary 




Alpha Eta Sigma 



accounting honorary 



90 



theatre honorary 



Alpha Psi Omega 




"Beam me up Scottie, there is no intelligent life backstage." Tiss-you Bird . . . Fur Boy and M.J. . . . 
Don't EVEN mess with me!!! ... I am ZOOOEEE ZUURREE! . . . Just deal with it . . . "Hey, Marie, got 
a cigarette?" . . . CHURL! . . . This is a true fact . . . Ek, ek, ek, normal, lonely . . . Basket Case . . . 
"practice" cast party . . . midnight dinner at the Mayflower . . . Not Burlap! . . . "Be happy, smile, 
they love you!! Lucy's here too, Stephanie . . . "Move it Sailor!!" . . . Pepe le Beaux . . . Isaac Alanson 
Goss . . . Eaves WHO? . . . Who needs aerobics? We have Lancercise! . . . sounds like a plant stand 
. . . Personally, I like Red Zinger Tea . . . T-shirt and mug money? . . . She doesn't know who 
Houseman is, crucify her! . . . The Peeking Opera . . . 'And remember 1 AM the president." ... Pa 
dum pa dum, echoes the beat of my heart . . . Pehvehrsion Great Lovahhh! (Ha!) . . . "Hi, we're the 
Mulligans, your new neighbors." . . . Even in Mississippi we turn right on red . . . Tonight culture, 
tomorrow, curves . . . Goodbye and God bless . . . "Go out and come back in again." . . . Pictures and 
pimento cheese . . . "It has indeed been a delight!" . . . "The curtain line has been spoken, bring it 
down." 



91 



Beta Beta Beta 



biology honorary 




Bobashela 



yearbook 



92 



Campus Ministry Team 





service club 



-:a»rfB 



«• 



Circle K 



93 



English Club 




-•VAC.' ^f^ .'' ''^4i— • c'- 



Eta Sigma 



scholarship 



94 



FCA 





intervarsity fellowship 



MCF 



95 



Newman Club 



Catholic student organization 




Phi Eta Sigma 



freshman scholarship honorary 



96 



French honorary 



Pi Delta Phi 




Spanish honorary 



Sigma Delta Pi 



97 



Sigma Tau Delta 



English honorary 





Theta Nu Sigma 



science honorary 



98 



literary magazine 



Stylus 



w<m^ 



1 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ 










"Singers 



99 



Troubadours 





Phi Alpha Theta 



history honorary 



100 



Judicial Council 



s^ .#A^^ - 







German honorary 



Schiller Gesellschaft 



101 



SBA 



Student Body Association 




The officers of the 1984 SBA: John Pi- 
gott, president, Jamie Noble, first vice- 
president, is in charge of social activities. 
Mac Bailey, second vice-president, is in 
charge of elections. David Leper, secre- 
tary, is in charge of student information. 
Beth Collins, treasurer, is in charge of fi- 
nances. 



Right: sitting, Jamie Noble, John Pigott, 
Standing, David Leper, Mac Bailey, and Beth Col- 
lins. 



102 




Student Executive Board 



SEB 




The Student Executive Board was led for an unprec- 
edented two years by Billy Wheeler. The 1983 SEB, 
under President Wheeler's liberal administration, de- 
fended student rights in many ways. Wheeler fought for a 
more liberal alcohol policy, a fight he fought since his first 
term. 

Among the other accomplishments of the 1983 admin- 
istration were the set up of a typewriter room, lights in the 
bowl, parties at CS's, fraternity houses, in the bowl, and 
forums. 

by Jo Watson 



Above; Pictured left to right are secretary Jennifer Jymison, first vice- 
president Rakeshi Mangal, president Billy Wheeler, second vice-presi- 
dent Denise Heaman, and treasurer Debbie Jordan. 



103 



Who's in 
What 



Alpha Epsilon 
Delta 

Leena Paul, pres. 
Debbie Haller, v. p. 
Marty Woleben, treas. 
Pim Thanapet, sec. 
Rakesh Mangal, rep. 
Jack Denver, hist. 
Paul Bergeron 
Cecilia Collins 
Lee Demsey 
Joseph Derfey 
Zeather Gladney 
Michael Greer 
John Holland 
Rife Huckabee 
Maan Joudeh 
Daria Kathman 
David Leggett 
Lamar Lindsay 
Tara McPherson 
Cheryl Morgan 
Michael Osborne 
Jim Ritchie 
John Rosella 
Greg Sliman 
Mike Weber 
Todd Willis 
Inger Wray 
Joe Williams 
Jimmy Otts 
Charles Woods 
Tom Carey 
Jeffery Croat 
Mellissa Lattimer 
Kevin Hitt 
Robert Taylor 
Craig Dungan 
Stuart Green 
Cary Hudson 
Jeanne Poole 
Louis Sturgeon 
Bob Tibbs 
Chris Wheeler 
Mark Mitchell 
John Perry 



Alpha Psi Omega 



Katrina Jameson, pres. 
Walt Johnson, v. p. 
Mary Jane Emling, sec. 
Michael Case 
Darin Hyer 
Carol Tyler 
Elizabeth Neill 
Trish Lamkin 
Andrew Libby 
Robert Williams 
Robbie McDonald 
Nick Mowen 
Steve Dees 
Stephanie Reddoch 
Lida Burris 
Starla Stavely 
Tom Roberts 
Tammy Freeman 
Susan Bickerstaff 
Robert Foose 
Lori Trigg 
Gerald Hopkins 



Beta Beta Beta 

Anne Carlisle, pres. 
Paul Bergeron, v. p. 
John Rosella, sec. 
Todd Willis, treas. 
Greg Sliman 
Debbie Haller 
Harriet Hays 
Mike Weber 
Associate members: 
Puddin Collins 
Rakesh Mangal 
Tom Carey 
Melissa Latimer 
Jimmy Otts 
Cheryl Morgan 
Adrian Ware 
Joe Williams 
Charles Woods 
Mark Mitchell 



104 



Circle K 



Denise Heaman 
James Barnett 
Rob Buxton 
Billy Wheeler 
Mac Bailey 
David Loper 



Debbie Jordan 
Jo Watson 
Jack Denver 
Lee Rice 
Jim Ritchie 
Beth Collins 
Louis Sturgeon 
John Perry 
Charles Woods 
Jolene McCaleb 
Maan Joudeh 
Nancy Stanford 
Fonda Hughes 
Richard Bailey 
Stacy Scott 
Adrian Ware 
Puddin Collins 
Ed Hutchison 
Tara McPherson 
Cheryl Morgan 
Mark Mitchell 
Craig Dungan 
Mark Hutchison 
Allison Ourso 
Richard Harb 
Mike Weber 
Demethous Morris 
Dek Terrell 
Jimmy Otts 
Cloey Rein 
Jamie Noble 
Jacqueline Love 
Jim Boswell 
Don Keenan 
Debbie McGregor 
Peggy Barrett 
Brad Cooper 



Deutscher Verein 

Tina Ball 
Andrew Libby 
Eilleen Payne 
Doris Sullivan 
Lee Barlow 
Pat Fiedler 
Jacqueline Knox 
Patricia Bonner 
Jolene McCaleb 
Anne McCord 
Susan Bercaw 
Patricia Lamkin 
Paul McNeill 
Mr. John Guest 



Bobashela yearbook 
staff 

Mary Vassar Ballard — editor 

Mac Bailey 

Jane Clover 

Anthony Cloy 

Stephen Bush 

Elizabeth Collins 

Betsy Gwin 

David Loper 

Tom Kearns 

Paige Sullivan 

Perri White-Spunner 

Lee Rice 

Mary Vidrine 

Susan Van Cleve 



English Club 



Lisa Catledge 
Michael Collum 
Frances Corley 
Ann Day 
Lee Howell 
Walt Johnspn 
Donna Jolly 
Karen Krutz 
Renee McCain 
Michelle Miggs 
Jim Reames 
Angie Taylor 
Ginger Tucker 
Edna Wasson 
Doug Page 
David Moore 
Steve Bush 
Ashley Owen 
Kelly Wilford 
Madora Mclntyre 
Mary Weir 
Tracy Miller 
Wes Brown 
Sonya Reeves 
Ricky Ramirez 
Ginger Jackson 
Lida Burris 
Betty Burton 
Marilyn Deiner 
Helen Gillaspy 
Lauren Gorden 
Betsy Bradley 
Susan Graves 
Betsy Gwin 
Lucy Lacey 



Meridyth Myers 
Ann McCord 
Diane Studdard 
Paige Sullivan 
Bill Thompson 
Glenn Williams 
Dr. Richard Mallette 
Dr. Bob Padgett 
Dr. Judith Page 
Dr. Dan Hise 
Dr. Austin Wilson 
Dean Paul Hardin 
Dr. George Boyd 



Eta Sigma 



Terri Clark, pres. 
Mark Britt 
Rife Huckabee 
Rakesh Mangal 
Betsy Bradley 
Kim Corley 
Steve Dickerson 
Erin Fairley 
Mike Ford 
Andrew Gehman 
John Holland 
Ken Lancaster 
Wanda Malone 
Jolene McCaleb 
Paul Ogden 
Leena Paul 
Jim Ritchie 
Greg Sliman 
Melvin Upchurch 
Tim Kynerd 
Cheryl Morgan 
Jo Watson 
Jeff Alexander 
Carrie Arnold 
Diann Byrum 
Marilyn Diener 
Joe Dorfey 
Mike Greer 
Jimmy Harris 
Jimmy Otts 
Billy Wheeler 
Rob Buxton 
Zeather Gladney 
Lauren Gordon 
Emilie McAllister 
Julia Park 
Jeanette Prince 
Larry Bellan 
Monty Hamilton 
Florence Hines 



Black Student 
Association 

Wanda Malone, pres. 
Mark Shepard, v. p. 
Zeather Gladney, treas. 
Zelphia Rowe, sec. 
Donald Brooks 
Willis Bridges 
Rosie Brown 
Delisa Borders 
Steve Clay 
Victor Cooper 
Rhonda Cooper 
Larry Cooper 
Wardean Dodd 
Edmond Donald 
Ken Eiland 
Veronica Glenn 
Melba Goodloe 
Pam Gates 
Carol Gunn 
Charles Johnson 
Rosa Jackson 
Jacqueline Knox 
Andrew Kiwanuka 
Sanford Knox 
Robert Lenoir 
Rosalynde Lewis 
Jacqueline Love 
Sheila Moran 
Joy Miller 
Hiawatha Martin 
Tefera Muche 
Gail Martin 
Kelvin McLauren 
Demethous Morris 
Lisa Manyfield 
Johnny Oliver 
Tom Scott 
Kim Stiff 
Brenda Thigpen 
Tammy Thames 
Darrel Thomas 
Johnny Teague 
LaJocelyn Walker 
Adrian Ware 
Pam Ward 
Calvin Seals 



Eta Sigma Phi 



Kevin O'Malley 
Deana Stark 
Dean Brashear 
Marilyn Diener 



Bill Thompson 
Lida Burris 
Betsy Bradley 
Steve Martin 
Jodi Graff 
Betty Burton 
Jim Woodrick 
Debbie McGregor 



Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes 

Donald Brooks 
Tommy Meriwether 
Elizabeth Jordan 
Tom Puree!! 
Mickey Giordano 
Susan Seal 
Melissa Latimer 
Greg Bost 
Greg Harding 
Jim Benton 
Roger Garrett 
Steve Buckner 
Mont Berry 
Dwayne Deer 
Kevin Russell 
Lee Rice 
Ken Ranager 
Edmond Donald 
Charles Johnson 
Robert Dupler 
Stephanie Durow 
Vic Cooper 
Willis Bridges 
Diane Regina 
Nita Oates 
Mary Elizabeth Kraft 
Don Holcomb 



Phi Eta Sigma 



Kenneth Blackwell 
Kevin Blackwell 
Mac Bailey 
Mary Vassar Ballard 
Betsy Bradley 
Rosie Brown 
Lida Burris 
Beau Butler 
Rob Buxton 
Terri Clark 
Beth Collins 
Patricia Cooper 



Steve Dickerson 
Leigh Dodson 
Erin Fairley 
Mike Ford 
Andy Gehman 
Zeather Gladney 
Lauren Gordon 
David Byron Griffith 
Debbie Haller 
Lisa Hapgood 
John Holland 
Gerald Hopkins 
Rife Huckabee 
Virginia Jackson 
Daria Kathman 
Suzie Kelty 
Tim Kynerd 
Ken Lancaster 
David Leggett 
Lamar Lindsay 
David Loper 
Rakesh Mangal 
Emilie McAllister 
Jolene McCaleb 
Paul Ogden 
Jimmy Otts 
Julia Park 
Leena Paul 
Marian Phillips 
Jeanne Poole 
Lee Rice 
Alan Rickets 
Nancy Stanford 
Lessley Strieker 
Pim Thanapet 
Bob Tibbs 
Barton Thrasher 
Ellen Wasson 
Nan Williams 
Mary Woodward 
Jo Watson 
Karren Baker 
William Billups 
James Boswell 
Sara Bowden 
Johanna Burkett 
William Carr 
Cynthia DiRago 
Shannon Doughty 
Bridget Fairley 
Sheila Farnsworth 
Barbara Hearn 
Carol Ladd 
Robert Mangialardi 
Hiawatha Martin 
Mona Mitchell 
Timothy Patterson 



Laura Pittman 
Timothy Potter 
Laurie Pruitt 
Teresa Quon 
Joseph Robertson 
Edward Sanders 
Delecia Seay 
Patton Stephens 
Wayne Stracener 
Susan Van Cleve 
Connie Watson 
Michele Wren 
Mary Zito 



Pi Delta Phi 

Teresa Bingham 
Helmut Fickenwirth 
Susan Graves 
Jimmy Harris 
Patricia Rishel 
Malavika Tiwari 
Glenn Williams 
Dr. Priscilla Fermon 



Purple and White 

Lida Burris, ed. 

Tracey Miller, ed. 

Jo Watson, mang. ed. 

Mark Leger, bus. mgr. 

Kelly Wilford, news ed. 

Mark Ricketts, sports ed. 

Joe Austin, photographer 

Betty Burton 

Stephen Bush 

Elizabeth Collins 

Lou Flowers 

Steve Fisher 

Susan Graves 

Donna Jolly 

Debbie Jordan 

Matt Kaye 

David Moore 

Ashley Owen 



Schiller 
Gesellschaft 

Gilbert Renfrow 
Ann McCord 
Jolene McCaleb 



Patricia Bonner 
Scott Stiffler 
Mary Woodward 
Thomas Morgan 
Mr. John Guest 



Sigma Delta Pi 



Patti Rishel 
Kimble Scott 
Paige Sullivan 
Steve Dickerson 
Helen Gillaspy 
Walter Johnson 
Dr. Kahn 
Dr. Fermon 
Mr. Bufkin, advisor 
Mrs. Hederi 



Sigma Tau Delta 



Betsy Bradley, pres. 
Betsy Gwin, v. p. 
Lida Burris 
Betty Burton 
Marilyn Deiner 
Helen Gillaspy 
Lauren Gordon 
Susan Graves 
Lucy Lacey 
Meridyth Myers 
Ann McCord 
Diane Studdard 
Paige Sullivan 
Bill Thompson 
Glenn Williams 
Dr. Richard Mallette 
Dr. Bob Padgett 
Dr. Judith Page 
Dr. Dan Hise 
Dr. Austin Wilson 
Dean Paul Hardin 
Dr. George Boyd 



Phi Alpha Theta 

Dr. Ross Moore 
Dr. Frank Laney 
Dr. Adrienne Phillips 
Dr. Robert McElvaine 
Dr. Charles Sallis 
Emilie McAllister 
Robbie Muth 



Leona Poison 
Billy Wheeler 
Jane Yandell 



Alpha Eta Sigma 



Ken Luckett 
Mark Biggs 
Dale Burrus 
Diana Bynum 
Pam Chance 
Collin Cope 
Margaret Corban 
Jan Cumberland 
Shellie Day 
Mike Ford 
Pam Gates 
Stan Gibbons 
Kathryn Harrison 
Rosa Jackson 
Paul Kavanaugh 
Tim Kynard 
Ken Lancaster 
Kaye Lee 
Ken Luckett 
Nyle Luke 
Henry Lyons 
Paul Ogden 
Jeanette Prince 
Joe Rooks 
Andy Solomon 
Diane Studdard 
Louis Thibodaux 
Melvin Upchurch 
Janet Walsh 



Theta Nu Sigma 

Rakesh Mangal, pres. 
Bob Donald, v. p. 
Jack Denver, sec. 
Leena Paul, treas. 
Maan Joudeh, rep. 
Lamar Lindsay 
John Holland 
Mike Weber 
Mike Greer 
David Ruhl 
Todd Willis 
Debbie Haller 
Lee Dempsey 
Mike Osborne 
Greg Sliman 
Zeather Gladney 
Bob Donald 



David Leggett 
Joe Williams 
Charles Wood 
Louis Sturgeon 
Jim Ritchie 
Cheryl Morgan 
Tara McPherson 
Melissa Latimer 
Joe Durfey 
Van Roeling 
David Coldwell 
Mark Mitchell 
Larry Bellan 
Tom Purcell 
Andrew Gehman 
Craig Dungan 
Jeanne Poole 
Byron Griffith 
Tom Carey 
Adrian Ware 
John Perry 
Pim Thanapet 
Kenneth Blackwell 
Rob Buxton 
Gareth Davies 
Stephen Ingram 
John Ratliff 
Michael Noone 
Stuart Green 
Kevin Blackwell 



107 



1— 




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!l WK*Si-s«aa i^SsiPSf-HaS E«JiSSK?^- ■■, 






Going 
Greek 

is it worth it? 

"The Greek system is regressing our college 
community instead of expanding and benefiting 
the school." This seems to sum up the opinion of 
many faculty and students at Millsaps. 

A major issue brought up this year was the 
purpose of the Greek system. The Greek organi- 
zations provide different outlets and served dif- 
ferent needs for different people. Some faculty 
do see Greek organizations as a peer advisory 
group, but feel that the peer advisory group of 
the college should be enough for the students. 

If the fraternities show social direction and 
community involvement can the organization 
benefit the college and community and the indi- 
vidual? The faculty and others do not realize the 
many positive aspects of Greek life. Most 
Greeks at Millsaps are involved with many ser- 
vice projects and philanthropies; but the college 
is only aware of the "social" aspects of these 
groups. This year, the Greeks attempted to 
show the college the wide range of activities they 
were involved in, as well as become more active 
with the independents at Millsaps. 

— Perri White-Spunner 
Mary Vidrine 

1. Mr. Bavender questions Greeks' purpose on campus dur- 
ing program sponsored by Phi Mu. 2. Whit McKinley goes up 
for two in an intramural basketball game. 3. Arch Bullard 
welcomes special initiate Jackson mayor Dale Danks into Pi 
Kappa Alpha. 4. Members of Kappa Delta sell balloons for 
Homecoming festivities. 5. Dean King presents the much- 
coveted Scholarship Trophy to Alpha Kappa Alpha on Tap 
Day. 6. Phi Mu's team up to support a Majors home game. 7. 
Bibis Jordan and sisters treat needy children to a trip to the 
zoo. 



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II 




Football 



n 



Another hot August and three weeks of 
practice came and went with as many new 
faces on our roster as old ones. The first 
game came shortly thereafter, and we went 
to Memphis with two inexperienced fresh- 
men quarterbacks and a lot of anticipation 
about what lay ahead for us. We returned to 
Jackson with a hard fought victory over our 
biggest rival, Southwestern. We knew after 
this we had a lot of potential, but also had 
much hard work to do. The 1983 season 
proved to be one of the most successful in 
years. An impressive seven wins against two 



losses are only a part of the accomplishments 
made. This team, who for the most part had 
never played together, unified early and 
played as a team from the onset. This team 
put a player, Edmond Donald, on the Kodak 
All-American Team, as he rambled for the 
most yards in the history of this school. The 
Majors will miss some of these old faces as 
graduation will take its toll on the Majors' 
roster, but there will be new faces to fill these 
shoes and to continue this great winning tradi- 
tion of Millsaps football. 

Dan Keel 



Opponent 


Score 


Southwestern 


6- 3 


at Memphis 




Sewanee 


48-14 


Trinity 


43-13 


Baptist 


51- 


Austin 


20-45 


Maryville 


49- 


Southwest 


17-15 


Georgia 




Washington 


40- 3 


Miles 


14-34 


Record: 7-2 







132 



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A.> 



Far bottom left; Two members of the Millsaps defense sack the Trinity quarterback and 
prove that the defense deserves its Division III top ten ranking. Left: Edmond Donald, 
Millsaps' first team Ail-American, turns upfield for a long gain. Below: Coach Davis 
discusses the game plan for the Majors' next possession with quarterback Steve Fuson. 
Bottom; The tough Major offensive line creates a hole for the fullback to take advan- 
tage of. 





133 




1st row: Cheerleaders — Jamie Noble, Tereau Pearson, Jim Ball. Demethous Morris, Bill Lang, Debbie Arnold, Kevin Krieger, Tana Browning, George Cooke. 2nd row: Ronnie 
Griffin, Mickey Giordano, Curtis May, Clayton Sanford. Ken Ranger, John Wells, Kelvin McLaurin, Steve Fuson, Jay Sutterfield, Cary Amann, Bryan Edwards, Vic Cooper, 
Charles Johnson, Monty Hamilton, Johnny Walker, Murray Foster, Cowboy Skinner. 3rd row: Head Coach Harper Davis, Greg Harding, Greg Bost, Doug Burgess, Dwayne Deer, 
Robert Dupler, Mark Fails, Joby Church, Elton Buras, David Cheek, Edmond Donald, Larry Bellan, Tom Metz, Roy Murell, Tom Purcell, Dr. Sam Knox. 4th row: Coach Tommy 
Ranager, Allen Andrews, Jim Bobo, Tommy Powell, Collin Cope, Gary Crum, Kyle Hux, John Turner, Frank Wiggers, Dan Keel, Louis Sturgeon, Paul Vanderventer, David Ruhl, 
Jimmy Purvis 



134 




Above: The Majors are congratulated by their opponent for a hard fought 

victory. 

Left: This kickoff starts the Majors off to a 51-0 victory over Baptist 

University. 



f;.,- n 



135 



Basketball 



NCM SOUTH REGION TOURNAMENT 
March 2-3. 1984 

.^*>f(h Carolina WrslryjFl C'llm^ 



•CENTRE COLLEGE 



< 



♦LEMOYNE-OUEN 
COLLEGE 



•MILLSAPS COLLEGE 



*NORTH CAROLINA 
UESLEYAN COLLEGE 




NCAM teag 



Below: Co-Captains Mike Ford and Roger Garrett ac- 
cept the Millsaps Invitational Championship trophy 



A combination of hard work and team ef- 
fort gave the 1983-84 Majors a record setting 
year. In Coach Don Holcomb's third year at 
Millsaps, the Majors soared to a 20 win sea- 
son against just 6 losses. This marks the best 
record in the history of basketball at Millsaps. 
The season was highlighted by first place fin- 
ishes in the 2nd Annual Millsaps Dr. Pepper 
Classic and the Trinity University Invitational 
Tournament in San Antonio, Texas. Also, a 
third place finish in the South Regionals in 
Rocky Mount, North Carolina marked the 
first ever bid to the NCAA Division III Nation- 
al Tournament for Millsaps. This was an out- 
standing turnaround from last year's 9-16 re- 
cord. As a team, the Majors ended up ranked 
third in the nation in field goal percentage 
and seventh in scoring defense. Billy Waits, a 
sophomore, led the nation in field goal per- 



centage the entire year. He was named to the 
first team All-District team. 

Also, the Majors currently have a 14 game 
winning streak at home. This includes being 
unbeaten at home this year in 13 games plus 
the last game of the 82-83 season. Tom Scott 
was the team's leading rebounder, and his 
scoring ability provided a vital part of the 
Majors' attack. Scott, a second team All-Dis- 
trict performer, was also named team M.V.P. 
Roger Garrett, point guard, led the team in 
assists. The depth of this year's team will be 
an asset for replacing the three seniors: Co- 
Captains Mike Ford and Roger Garrett, and 
Tom Scott. With nine players returning, the 
Majors will be trying to duplicate their trip to 
the National Tournament next year. 

Roger Garrett 




136 



Opponent 


Score 


Springhill 


66-63 


Tougaloo 


66-48 


Washington 


52-45 


Baptist Christian 


70-28 


*Trinity 


59-52 


'Tougaloo 


56-49 


Georgia Southwestern 


62-60 


Sewanee 


56-71 


Maryville 


65-60 


Pensacola Christian 


82-45 


Oglethorpe 


65-74 


Springhill 


61-58 


Belhaven 


53-47 


Belhaven 


57-67 


Southwestern 


54-47 


"Colorado College 


85-62 


"Trinity 


70-55 


Washington 


44-40 


Maryville 


54-45 


Fisk 


41-43 


Southwestern 


69-50 


Fisk 


69-56 


Georgia State 


45-54 


Sewanee 


66-54 


Lemoyne Owen 


69-88 


Centre College 


65-56 


Record: 20-6 




'Millsaps Invitational Champions 




"Trinity Tournament Champions 





Below: Tom Scott faces a Trinity opponent as lie moves the ball down the court. 





Kneeling: Donald Brooks — manager. Head Coach Don Holcomb, Assistant Coach J.R. West, Reynolds Cheney — trainer. 

Standing: Mont Berry, Steve Buckner, Johnny Oliver, Roger Garrett, Tom Scott, Kevin Austin, Kevin Russell, Jim Benton, Tommy Merriweather, Billy Waits, Mike Ford, Ken Ei- 

land, Tracy Griffin. 



137 



Below: Johnny Oliver looks for an open teammate in a contest against Tougaloo. 
Right: Billy Waits, Division Ill's leader in field goal percentage, moves inside for two points. 





Above: Kevin Russell prepares to defend against this Belhaven opponent. 
Right: Ken Eiland and the Millsaps defense full-court press Trinity. 




138 



Below: Coach Don Holcomb returns to the bench after giving instructions to his players on the 

court. 

Below Right: Kevin Austin towers over a defender and scores two. 




Above: Co-captain Roger Garrett exhibits perfect form as he lofts a free throw into the air. 
Left: Billy Waits looks for a chance to work the ball in to an inside teammate. 



139 



Soccer 



Millsaps soccer team started its 1983 season with a bear on its 
back. After our first eight matches, six of which were on the road, we 
were blessed with a 2-6 record. The defense had held the opposition 
to an average of less than two goals per game. The offense, however, 
couldn't seem to make the transition from our defensive third to the 
back of the opposition's net. 

It was at this point that George had what he calls "a chalk talk". 
This was definately our turning point. One could say that we became 
motivated, fired up, etc.; our record speaks for itself. 

From this point on we not only began to win, but we began to play 
like a team. WE learned from our mistakes in the early part of the 
year, and we made this knowledge work for us. 

The best part of this season was the fun we had together as a team. 
For the first time in three seasons we traveled together on a bus, as a 
team should. We shared experiences that we will all cherish for the 
rest of our lives. We all worked hard and spent what often seemed like 
forever running our circuits, but we reaped the reward of victory in 
our 12-7 record and we had a little fun along the way. — Andy 
Solomon 





Upper right: Doug Page and Mike Croal wait patiently for tiie game to begin. 

Above: Albert LaBasse prepares to make a move to the goal against a UNO 

defender. Right: Alan Vestal waits to clear the ball. 



Jt 



140 



OPPONENT 


SCORE 


Belhaven 


0-5 


Principia 


1-0 


Maryville, Mo. 


1-2 


Southwestern 


1-2 


Maryville, Mo. 


0-3 


Univ. of the South 


0-1 


Birmingham-Southern 


4-2 


Univ. of New Orleans 


0-1 


Mississippi College 


3-0 


Birmingham-Southern 


5-1 


Maryville, Tn. 


2-0 


Centre College 


3-1 


Tougaloo 


1-0 


Centenary 


1-0 


Memphis State 


3-0 


Belhaven 


1-5 


Mississippi College 


2-0 


Tougaloo 


1-0 


Nicholls State University 


1-0 


Record: 12 wins, 7 losses 





Below: Coach George Gober discusses second half strategy with the team. 




'■■^•■!^^:-y^:^::j'' 




:^«i.A :*-■:*» - . 



Sitting: Charles Lowe, Kevin Brune, B.A. Holman, Bill Brune, Luis Camero, Marion Lyons, Andy Soloman, Sean Pennstra, E.J. Croal, Andrew Tomlinson, Doug Page. 
Standing: Arch Bullard, Albert LaBasse, David Cook, Kevin Callison, Brad Whitney, Alan Vestal, Mike Howard, Robbie Muth, David Wilson, Mike Croal, Dana Doyle 
(manager), George Gober (coach). 



141 



Right: Arch Bullard heads the ball for a clear. Below: Sean Peenstra prepares to go 

for a shot against Birmingham-Southern. 




4 >tt 



•^1 








Above: E.J. Croal scores one of his many goals. Right: Albert LaBasse skillfully 
defends the offensive attack of his opponent. 



• « 



^ 



142 



Ladies' Basketball 



This has been a season to be remembered 
not only by those who viewed the Lady Ma- 
jors' progress, but even more so by those who 
participated. Throughout the year, our team 



experienced the results of hard work and to- 
getherness that led us to have the first win- 
ning season ever. At the beginning of the 
season we experienced a traumatic setback 



Opponent 


Score 


Opponent 


Score 


Blue Mountain 


56-74 


Blue Mountain 


40-74 


Baptist Christian 


91-36 


Belhaven 


52-68 


Southwestern 


81-65 


"Judson 


68-43 


Fisk 


62-65 


'Sewanee 


53-42 


Sewanee 


57-58 


Southwestern 


46-68 


Principia 


59-51 


Covenant 


87-56 


MacMurray 


81-21 


Tennessee Temple 


59-70 


Lindenwood 


77-45 


Maryville 


52-65 


Sewanee 


70-53 


"Harding 


82-51 


Judson 


55-42 


"Southwestern 


49-57 


Belhaven 


57-72 








Record: 


11-10 






'Millsaps Invitational Champions 






"Southwestern at Memphis Invit. 2nd Place 





through the tragic loss of one of our players. 
Through the memory, respect, and love of 
her, we were able to pull together and be- 
come stronger as a team. This first winning 
season was fully dedicated in loving memory 
of our teammate — Robin Rowland. Looking 
back over the season and the times shared 
over various road trips and many patience- 
demanding practices, we not only learned 
about the importance of being part of a team 
on the court but also in our personal lives. 
These extra times shared outside of the gym 
seemed to enhance our winning in a new way. 
Although we did have our share of rough 
times when nothing seemed to go our way, 
we pulled each other through them. Together 
we would like to especially thank our 
coach — Mary Ann Edge, our trainers and 
managers, and all our loyal supporters. Al- 
though the numbers 11-10 are not very im- 
pressive on paper, to each of us it will truly be 
"a season to remember." 

Bibis Jordan and Melissa Latimer 




Robin A. Rowland 
1965-1983 



1st Row: Paula Henderson — trainer, Tara Long, Carol Ladd, Bibis Jordan, Mary Elizabeth Craft, Ann 

Williams — manager. 5 

2nd Row: Diane Regina — manager, Jean Rose, Melissa Latimer, Whitney Dorion, Robin Rowland, Coach Mary 

Ann Edge. 

3rd Row: Nita Dates, Nancy Messer, Susan Seal, Suzy Kelty. 



143 



Bottom right: Mary Elizabeth Craft works the ball around her opponent. 

Bottom left: Jean Rose drives for a successful lay-up. Right: Susan Seal looks for an open Lady Major. Below: Melissa 

Latimer prepares to move the ball inside as Nancy Messer and Suzy Kelty work to get open. 




Tennis 



Motto — You're a winner and you can do it , . , M.M.D. & J.C. . . . 
A.B, & S.M, . . . B.B. & S.P. ... Are they locked in there? . . . Mini 
tennis at McGee, MS . . . J. A., hurt again? . . . C.M.'s private collec- 
tion . . . R.C. & R.B., need some new shorts? . , . "Man, I'm sorry" 
(Patrick, losing your cool?) . . . L.F., you party too much . . . "What 
was that?" . . . "It was out!" . . . "Volley, volley, volley!" . . . "Stop so 
I can get some gum." . . . "I'm failing everything!" . . . "Look, sweet- 
heart ..."... "I'm a fill-in-the-blank!" . . . "Sugarfoot!" . . . "I've 
got a maid ..."... A.B. dodging the Indianola sign . . . Practice? 
What's that? . . . S.G., tennis bartender . . . Move your feet, feel the 
beat! . , . M.M.D. blowing groceries at S.E.L. . . . "Go Le Ann and 
Cathy!" . . . Another one of those moving curbs, Coach? . . . Walk- 
mans . . . Skippy , . . "I'm going to be the best server and volleyer on 
the team." . . . Blue eyeshadow . . . "Chubby girls are cute!" . . . 
"You got an extra racquet?" . . . "What's the square root of 64?" . . . 
"What's the square root of 49?" . . . Choke! . . . "You got hit with a 
flashlight?" . . . "Where's our incredible team captain?" . . . Fetus 
. . . "Anybody got a dip?" . . . R.C. — #1 in the South . . . The Nasties 
. . . B.B. — Mr. Congeniality ... "I can't believe you called that out!" 
. . . Flat tires ... "I broke the strings in both racquets — perfect 
timing!" . . . Georgetown/Houston basketball game at the Harpers 
. . . Nationals — Kalamazoo, Michigan and Atlanta, Georgia . . . 
"Okay, let's get organized! Rod Cook — 16th in the Nation!" 





Top right: Alison Boyd puts everything she has into this serve. Above: Steve Martin 
sends a forehand down the line. Right: All-American Rod Cool< places this shot 

perfectly. 



.<l^. 



Below left: Billy Bergner awaits a net shot. Below right: Cathy McCauley 
shows precise form as she volleys. 




147 



Front: Molly Kiser, Holly Walters, Cathy McCauiey, Stephanie Pella, Alison Boyd. Puddin Collins. Back: Le Ann 

Fleetwood, Mary Dulaney, Anne Pate, Susan Pate, Debbie Arnold. 




Opponent 


Score 


University of New Orleans 


4-5 


Tulane 


0-9 


Miss- Univ. for Women 


3-6 


Birmingham Southern 


2-7 


Louisiana Tech 


0-9 


Southeast Louisiana 


3-6 


Delta State 


7-2 


Principia 


2-7 


Tulane 


0-9 


Southwestern at Memphis 


3-6 


Univ. of Minn, at Morris 


9-0 


Univ. of Minn, at Morris 


9-0 


Univ. of Southern Miss. 


1-8 


Mississippi College 


7-2 


UNO 


4-5 


Emory 


1-8 


Univ. of the South 


6-3 


Oglethorpe 


9-0 


Univ. of Southern Miss. 


1-8 


Mississippi College 


9-0 


Hendrix 


7-2 


Southeast Louisiana 


3-6 




Opponent 


Score 


Tulane 


3-6 


Centenary 


3-6 


Birmingham Southern 


3-6 


Central Univ. of Iowa 


1-8 


Delta State 


6-1 


Univ. of Wisconsin-Stout 


9-0 


Drury 


3-6 


Ripon 


7-2 


William Carey 


8-1 


Tulane 


1-8 


Bellarmine 


9-0 


Lawrence Univ. 


9-0 


Carleton 


2-7 


Principia 


3-6 


Luther 


8-1 


Depaw Univ. 


4-5 


Univ. of Southern Miss. 


0-9 


William Carey 


8-1 


Univ. of Southern Miss. 


0-9 


Calvin College 


7-2 


Emory 


2-7 


Oglethorpe 


7-2 


Centre 


5-4 


Univ. of the South 


8-1 


Jackson State Univ. 


9-0 


St. John's Univ. 


4-5 



Front: Steve Martin, Jim Crenshaw, Jim Taylor, Rod Cook. Back: Ben Ward, Kevin Kreiger, Billy Begner, 

Patrick Patrick, Rob Buxton, Jeff Alexander. 



148 



Baseball 



Opponent 


Score 


Rust 


12- 3 


Rust 


18- 5 


Lane 


1- 2 


Lane 


5- 6 


South Western 


3- 2 


South Western 


3- 8 


Washington 


0- 5 


Washington 


6-11 


Principia 


6- 1 


Principia 


4- 3 


Principia 


1- 7 


N. Alabama 


3-13 


South Western 


9- 2 


Southwestern 


13-13 


St. Olaf 


3- 4 


North Park 


3- 1 


Mississippi College 


4- 7 


Belhaven 


1-10 


Belhaven 


2- 7 


Rust 


-14 3 


Rust 


3-13 


Belhaven 


6- 


Belhaven ' 


2- 1 


Sewanee 


4-13 


Sewanee 


10-11 


Sewanee 


18-11 



The 1984 Millsaps baseball team opened 
the season with many questions. A young 
pitching staff faced perhaps the toughest 
schedule in recent years. Kevin Martin and 
Jim Page pitched well while having to pitch 
with little rest. Henry Lyons, Elton Burrous, 
and Stan Gibbens came in to fill the void. The 
Majors returned five starting defensive play- 
ers to their positions. Senior Joe Rooks in 
leftfield has held down his position for 4 
years. Nick Anderson, Roger Dankel, and 



Jim Page have been getting the nod for 3 
years in centerfield, second base and third 
base respectively. Senior Kyle Hux, a junior 
college transfer, returns as a catcher. To fill 
the other three positions were Chad Lamar 
at shortstop, sophomore Mark Bryan in right- 
field, and Senior Steve Hancock at first base. 
Freshman Ronnie Griffen filled in at various 
positions. With only losing three seniors from 
the 1984 team, the Majors expect to have 
another successful campaign in '85. 





Above: Joe Rooks rounds first base 
after a single. Left: Kyle Hux swings 
mightily for a base hit. 



149 



Right: Jim Page unloads a hard fast ball. Below: Centerfielder Nick 
Anderson quickly relays the ball into the infield. 





The 1984 Baseball Team 



Name 

Nick Anderson 
Greg Bost 
Mark Bryan 
Elton Buros 
Tom Carey 
Roger Dankel ' 
Stan Gibbens 
Mickey Giordano 
Steve Hancock 
Kyle Hux 
Chad Lamar 
Henry Lyons 
Kevin Martin 
'im Page 
Joe Rooks 
Steve Whitter 



Class 

junior 

freshman 

sophomore 

sophomore 

junior 

junior 

junior 

freshman 

senior 

senior 

sophomore 

junior 

sophomore 

sophomore 

senior 

sophomore 



Position 

centerfielder, pitcher 

catcher 

rightfielder 

outfielder, pitcher 

catcher 

second baseman 

pitcher 

outfielder 

first baseman 

catcher 

shortstop 

pitcher 

pitcher 

third baseman, pitcher 

leftfielder, pitcher 

pitcher 




^-s^-^w"" 



150 



Left: Major catcher Kyle Hux prepares to receive the pitch. Below: Joe Rooks heads to the on-deck circle. 




Above: Nick Anderson hustles down the first base line in an attempt to beat the 
throw. Left: Steve Hancock intently awaits the pitch from the Belhaven hurler. 



151 



Cheerleaders 



The Millsaps College cheerleaders worked very hard this year. 
Under the leadership of head cheerleader Tana Browning, the 
squad endured many long hours of rigorous practice in prepara- 
tion for cheerleader camp and the upcoming season. Cheerleader 
camp was held at Memphis State University the first week in 
August. Squads from all over the United States competed. Bring- 
ing home 3 Superior and 2 Excellent ribbons, the Millsaps cheer- 
leaders proved to be among the best. Throughout football season 
and into basketball season, the cheerleaders painted many signs 
and prepared "little treats" in order to help arouse spirit. Cheers 
with stunts and pyramids as well as pom pon routines and dances 
were a major part of each game. Having had a winning season in 
both football and basketball, the Millsaps College cheerleaders of 
1983-84 really had a lot to cheer about! 




Above: The cheerleaders lead the student body during a pep rally. Above right: 
Head Cheerleader Tana Browning leads the cheerleaders in practice. Above far 
right: Debbie Arnold may look shy in this picture, but her spirit really shows when 
she cheers. 




-r*r' 



k- 




bf «r^-i«»-7 y.*i. ■'■ -.--K.*.- 




f 



152 




153 



Intramurals 



Under the leadership of George Gober and 
the Intramural Council, Millsaps has estab- 
lished an excellent intramural program that 
involves a large part of the Millsaps commu- 
nity. Students and faculty both enjoy the fun 
and exciting competition that intramural 
sports provide. The sports that are included 
in this fine program are flag football, soccer, 
volleyball, basketball, tennis, and softball. 








«^rt»*'» 



'"■^ ■». 




154 




155 



A Final Look . . . 



The athletic year 1983-84 proved to be a successlul one for the Millsaps Majors. The football team carried on its fine winning tradition while 
the basketball team established what they hope becomes a winning tradition with an excellent 20-6 record and an NCAA bid. The Lady Majors 
pulled together to overcome a tough personal loss and achieve a winning season. Also, the soccer team posted a successful record and brought 
continued respect to the young Millsaps soccer program. Although the tennis teams did not have winning records, their members displayed 
strong talent and the young teams show much promise for future seasons. The 1984 baseball team was also young, but it played many hard 
fought games and exhibited potential for a good 1985 year. All in all, Millsaps teams displayed skill and teamwork that made their fans proud. 
Here's a final look at the 1983-84 Millsaps Majors. 





157 




■■■■■■■■■■■I 




? ^wS'^i.SvJ SJ 



-edujcaidn 



s 

(0 

& 



George M. Harmon 
B.A., Southwestern at 

Memphis 
M.B.A., Emory University 
D.B.A., Harvard University 




i: 




160 



administration 



?rTTy7 ] 1 ! ■■ 

' ' ' »' i ^^^y^^" 




1 


^^^^^^^T^^^^ftabT 


^^^HE 


^ x: ^^ii^:^SS-, r-> « ' 1 B 




1 ■ 




eF," 




^^ ^^^^H 



Robert E. Shive 

Associate Dean of the College 

B.A., M.S., Southern Methodist University 

Ph.D., Iowa State University 

Robert H. King 
Dean of the College 
B.A., Harvard University 
B.D., Ph.D., Yale University 



Don E. Strickland 

Vice Pres. for Business Affairs 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

C.P.A. 

Jack Woodward 

Director of Financial Aid 



161 



English 



George Boyd 
A.B., Murray State 

College 
A.M., University of 

Kentucky 
Ph.D., Columbia 

University 



Daniel G. Hise 

A.B., Univ. of California 

at Berkeley 
Ph.D., Tulane University 



Robert H. Padgett 


Paul D. Hardin, Emeritus 


Austin Wilson 


A.B., Texas Christian 


A.B., Millsaps College 


A.B. Valdosta State 


Univ. 


A.M., Duke University 


College 


A.M., Vanderbilt 




M.A., University of 


University 




Georgia 


Advanced Study: 




Ph.D., University of South 


Vanderbilt Univ. 




Carolina 


Fulbright Scholarship, 






Universite de Clermont- 






Ferrand 






Elizabeth Jones 


Judith Page 


Richard P. Mallette 


B.A., Millsaps College 


A.B., Tulane University 


A.B., Boston College 




M.A., Univ. of New 


M.A., Ph.D., Harvard 




Mexico 


University 




Ph.D., Univ. of Chicago 






162 



Art and Theatre 




Lance Goss, Chairman of Theatre Brent Lefavor 

A.B., Millsaps College 

A.M., Advanced Study, Northwestern University 
Special Study, Manhatten Theatre Colony 
Summer Theatre, The Ogunquit Playhouse and 
the Belfry Theatre 
University of Southern California 

Lucy Webb Millsaps, Chairman of Art jack Agricola 

B.F.A., Newcomb College 
M.A., Univ. of Mississippi 



1&3 




s 

u 
O 

S 



(0 

s 
S 



Billy Bufkin, Chairman 

A.B., A.M., Texas Tech. College 
Advanced Study: Tulane University 
Diploma de Estudios Hispanicos de 
la Universidad de Madrid 

Robert J. Kahn 

B.A., State Univ. of New York 
M.A., Middlebury College 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Univ. 



Priscilla Fermon 

John L. Guest 

A.B., University of Texas 
A.M., Columbia University 
Advanced Study: New York Univ. 

Ottendorfer Fellowship in 
Germanic Philosophy, Bonn 

University Fullbright Scholar, 
University of Vienna 




164 



Jonathan M. Sweat, Chairman 
B.S., M.S., The Julliard School of 

Music 
A.Mus.D., Univ. of Michigan 

Donald D. Kilmer 

B.M., M.M., Indiana University 
Advanced Study: Union Theological 
Seminary 
Univ. of Kansas 
Univ. of Illinois 



Magnolia Coullet 
A.B., Millsaps College 
A.M. Univ. of Pennsylvania 
B.M., Belhaven College 
A.M. (German), Univ. of Mississippi 

Francis E. Polanski 

B.M., Eastman School of Music, Univ. 

of Rochester 
M.M., Univ. of Michigan 



William P. Carroll 

B.M., Millsaps College 
M.M., M.S.M., Southern Methodist 
University 



McCarrell L. Ayers 

B.S., Eastman School of Music, 

of Rochester 
M.M., Indiana University 



Univ. 



history department 




Adrienne Phillips 

B.A., Northeast Louisiana Univ. 
M.A., Univ. of Mississippi 



Ross Moore, Emeritus 
B.S., M.S., Millsaps College 
A.M., University of Chicago 
Ph.D., Duke University 



Frank M. Laney, Jr. 

A.B., Univ. of Mississippi 
A.M., Ph.D., Univ. of Virginia 



Robert S. McElvaine 
B.A., Rutgers University 
M.A., Ph.D., State Univ. of New York 
at Binghamton 



W. Charles Sallis 

B.S., M.S., Miss. State Univ. 
Ph.D., University of Kentucky 



165 



religion 




Thomas W. Lewis, III 
A.B., Millsaps College 
B.D., Southern Methodist Univ. 
Ph.D., Drew University 



Lee H. Reiff 

A.B., B.D., Southern Methodist Univ. 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 



166 




Michael H. Mitias 
A.B., Union College 
Ph.D., University of Waterloo 

Robert E. Bergmark 
A.B., Emory University 
S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University 



philosophy & classics 




Catherine R. Freis 
B.A., Brooi<lyn College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 



Richard Freis 

B.A., St. John's College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 



167 



biology 




Dr. James P. McKeown 
A.B., University of the South 
A.M., University of Mississippi 
Ph.D., Miss. State University 

Dr. Meyers 



Dr. Dick Highfill 

A.B., M.A., Univ. of California at 

San Jose 

Ph.D. University of Idaho 

Robert B. Nevins 

A.B., Washington University 
M.S., University of Missouri 
Adv. Study, Univ. of Missouri, 
University of Mississippi 



168 



i 



chemistry 




Jimmie Purser 

A.B., Millsaps College 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

D. Eugene Cain 

B.S., University of North Carolina 
A.M., Ph.D., Duke University 



Allen D. Bishop, Jr. 
B.S., Millsaps College 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
Ph.D., University of Houston 

Roy Berry, Jr. 

B.S., Mississippi College 

Ph.D. University of North Carolina 



169 



It's Millsaps' committed, caring 
professors that make the differ- 
ence — Here is what some stu- 
dents had to say about their teach- 
ers . . . 



"Dr. Pritchard has firmly established that he be- 
lieves in the Millsaps academic standard — the tougher 
the better! 1 feel that his patience in helping students 
during and after office hours, his classroom discus- 
sions, his extremely caustic grading, his tedious assign- 
ments, his intelligence, and his sense of humor are 
some of the ingredients that make him a quality teach- 
er. 

Computer majors learn the idiosyncrasies of not 
only the teacher, but also the individual, especially if 
some can manage to get him to CS's for a while to 
maintain a friendly conversation outside of class. 

I mostly admire Dr. Pritchard for his ability to with- 
stand the jeers and sometimes plain rudeness of stu- 
dents and keep demanding quality from us." 

— Rosemary Sanders 

"Mr. Kilmore exemplifies a true musician — one 
who always works to improve their talent. Whatever I 
do with music in the future, 1 want to do my best, 
because Mr. Kilmer may be listening. He cares about 
each student and propels them toward excellence." 

— Erin Fairley 

"Lance Goss is many people; an instructor, an advi- 
sor, an actor, a director, but first and foremost he is a 
friend. When you have lost all self-confidence he re- 
tains faith in you and helps you believe in yourself by 
making you do things you were convinced you couldn't 
do. Every life Lance touches is made lovelier, happier, 
fuller, . . , and a lot richer." 

— Katrina Jameson 

"Dr. Berry gives more time outside class to his 
students than any other teacher I have known. He 
even comes on campus on the weekends to help his 
students. Dr. Berry has influenced me by showing me 
that more than just the working hours, dedication and 
devotion are necessary to be a success in your field." 

— Rakesh Mangal 

"Dr. McKeown's courses are very demanding, but 
preparatory for any medical school, whether it is Yale, 
Harvard, Johns Hopkins, or even Ole Miss Medical 
School. 1 have learned to work very hard, but most of 
all, I have learned to enjoy biology to the maximum 
level due to the reflection of Dr. McKeown's friendly 
personality and ingenuity." — Rakesh Mangal 




170 



o 
o 

(A 




Ben Nichols 



George M. Beardsley 

B.S., Stanford University 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 



172 



geology 




Delbert E. Gann 

B.S., University of Missouri 

M.S., Northeast Louisiana University 

Ph. D., Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy 

Wendell B. Johnson 
B.S., M.S., Kansas State College 
Advanced Study, Missouri School of Mines 
University of Missouri 



173 



computers 




Allen David Bishop 

Professor of Chemistry, Computer 
B.S., Millsaps College 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
Ph.D. University of Houston 

Thomas Pritchard 

B.S., University of Chicago 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee 




Jimmie Purser 

University of North Carolina 

R.W. McCarly 

B.A., Millsaps College 
M.Ed., Miss. State University 



174 



mathematics 




Samuel R. Knox, Chairman 
B.A., A.M., Univ. of Mississippi 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Crawford Rhaly, Jr. 



Susan Howell 

B.A., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi 

Herman L. McKenzie 
B.S., Millsaps College 
M.Ed., M.S., Univ. of Mississippi 



L 



175 



U 

u 
(I) 



o 




Howard Bavender 

A.B., College of Idaho 
M.A., Univ. of Wisconsin 
Advanced Study, Univ. of Texas 



John Quincy Adams 
B.A., Rice University 
M.A., University of Texas 
J.D., University of Texas 
Advanced Study, Univ. of Texas 



176 



education 




Jeanne M. Forsythe 
B.A., Millsaps College 
M.Ed., Ed.D., Harvard University 



Marlys T. Vaughn 

B.S., M.Ed., Miss. State Univ. 
Ph.D., Univ. of Southern 
Mississippi 




Steve Hering 

B.S., Florida Southern College 
M.Ed., Ed.D., Memphis State 
Univ. 



177 



f 



physical education 




V 



.»>' ^/ 



James A. Montgomery 

A.B., Birmingham Southern College 

Ed.D., George Peabody College 

Donald Holcomb 

B.S., M.Ed., Memphis State University 





Mary Ann Edge 

B.S., M.S., Univ. of Mississippi 

Advanced Study, University of Southern Mississippi 

Thomas L. Ranager 

B.S., Miss. State Univ. 
M.Ed., Mississippi College 



178 



^#^ 



psychology 




J. Harper Davis 

B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi State University 

Advanced Study, Mississippi State 

University 




Russell Levanway 

A.B., University of Miami 

M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Edmond R. Venator 
A.B., University of Buffalo 
Ph.D., Emory University 



179 



management 




Walter P. Neely 

B.S., M.B.A., Mississippi State University 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Dr. Larson 



Shirley Olson 

Associate Professor of Management 
B.A., Mississippi State University 
M.A., Mississippi College 
D.B.A., Mississippi State University 



Gail Sype 

Instructor of Business Adm. 
B.A., Western Michigan University 
M.B.A., University of Michigan 



Jerry D. Whitt 

Professor of Accounting 

B.B.A., M.B.A., North Texas State University 

Ph.D., University of Arkansas 



180 




Carl G. Brooking 

Associate Professor of Econ. & 
Quantitative Management 

B.S., Millsaps College 

M.S., Ph.D. University of 
Pennsylvania 

Betsy Jane Clary 

Associate Professor of Economics 
B.S., M.S., Miss. State University 
Ph.D. Univ. of Mississippi 

Steve Carroll Wells 

Associate Professor of Accounting 
A. A., Copiah-Lincoln Jr. College 
A.B., M.A., University of Miss. 
C.P.A., Adv. Grad. Studies 

Sue Yeager Whitt 

B.B.A., North Texas State Univ. 
M.B.A., Ph.D., Univ. of Arkansas 

Terry Sheldahl 

Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.A., Drake University 
B.B.A., Armstrong State College 
Ph.D. University of Alabama 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 



181 



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Bill Campbell 

Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees 

James Livesay 
Director of Church 

Relations 
Assistant to the Vice 

President for 
Institutional 

Advancement 

William B. Franklin 

Vice President for 

Institutional 
Advancement 

Floy Holloman 

Executive Director of 

Millsaps 
Alumni Association 

Lee Anne Brandon 

Public Information 
Director 



Laurie Brown 

Martha McCrary 

Jim Parks 

Marita Sanders 

Joycelyn Trotter 

Floreada Harmon 




182 



Katherine Lefoldt 
AC Hostess 

Leonard Poison 

Director of Services 

Nancy White 

Secretary, Business 
Affairs 




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Patricia Fennell 
College nurse 

Janice Streetmen 
Career Placement 

Nancy Moore 

Associate Dean of Student Affairs 

Jane Cooper 

Associate Loan Officer 



Don Fortenberry 
Chaplain 

Cheri Gober 

Secretary, Financial Aid 

Martha Galtney 

Secretary to the Dean 



183 



Frances H. Coker 

A.B. Millsaps College 

M.S.T., Illinois Institute of Technology 

Advanced Graduate Work; University of North 

Carolina 
Upsulla University (Sweden) Univ. of Hawaii 

Allen Scarboro 

A.B., Kenyon College 

M.A., Hartford Seminary Foundation 

Ph.D., Emory University 

Lourdes Henebry 

A.B., University of Central Florida 
M.A., Eastern New Mexico University 

7= sociology = 




184 




Fred Deckard 

Director of Computer Services 

Janet Coburn 
Grant Wycoff 
Larry Horn 
Ann Elsenheimer 



computer services 




185 



secretaries 



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Dot Knox, Cathy Martella, Susan Eskeridge, Bryan Rutledge, Carney Stevens, Dean John Christmas, Becky Brach 



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Marge Cannada, Janis Hamblin, Elizabeth Ranager, Virginia McCoy, Floy Nelms 



186 




food 
services 



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post 
office 



book- 
store 



187 



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Corry Acuff. Winona. MS 

Amy Adams, Mobile. AL 

Gary Amann, New Orleans. LA 

Joe Austin, Greenville. MS 

Zena Bailey. Memphis, TN 

Karren Baker, Tupelo, MS 



Susan Bale, Brookhaven. MS 

Alys Barlow, Memphis, TN 

Debbie Boland, Vicksburg, MS 

Greg Bost. Verona, MS 

Jim Boswell, Opclousas, LA 

Lisa Bowden, Gleveland, MS 



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Stephanie Rcddoch, Mel Selby, Liz Rubenstein, Delecia Seay, Elaine McAlliiy 



Penny Burton, Winona, MS 

Kevin Gallison, Atlanta, GA 

Luis Camero, Bogota, Columbia 

Carrie Campbell. Mobile. AL 

Billy Carr, Gulfport. MS 

Shawn Carroll, Slidell. LA 



Reynolds Cheney, Memphis, TN 

Priscilla Childress. Leiand. MS 

Anthony Cloy. Jackson, MS 

David Coffey, Knoxville, TN 

Billie Cook. Greenville, MS 

Keith Cook, Ocean Springs, MS 




190 




Gene Crafton, Memphis, TN 
Shannon Doughty, West Point. MS 
Beverly Jo Dean. Stewart, MS 
Maria DGssommes. Long Beach, MS 
Donna Carol Diestlemeier, Jackson, MS 
Amy Dinstel, Tulsa, OK 



Cindy DiRago. Ackerman. MS 
Wardean Dodd, Kosciusko, MS 
Danny Donovan, Memphis, TN 
Scott Drawe, Houston. TX 
Caroline Durham, New Orleans, LA 
Shelia Farnsworth. Memphis. TN 



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Michelle Forrester, Mantree. MS 
Laurie French, Jackson, MS 
Pierre Glemot. S'Brieus, France 
Diana Glenn, New Orleans. LA 
Angelique Gregory, Yazoo City, MS 
Melba Goodloe. Canton, MS 



Scott Griffin, Starkville, MS 
Ronnie Griffing, Brandon, MS 
Mark Hamrick. New Orleans. LA 
James Harwood. Memphis, TN 
Barbara Hearn, Memphis. TN 
Paula Henderson, Crenshaw, MS 



191 



Scottie Higginbotham, Mer Rouge, LA 
Kelly Hitchcock, New Orleans, LA 
Reed Hubbard, Jackson, MS 
Louise Jackson, Vicksburg, MS 
Elizabeth Jeter, Jackson, MS 
Todd Joachim, Biloxi, MS 



Lynn Johnson, Athens, GA 

Julia Jones, Memphis, TN 

John Killeen, New Orleans, LA 

Mark Kingsley, Flintstone, GA 

Carol Ladd, Vicksburg, MS 

Kevin Lott, Kilmichael. MS 



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Martha Lott, West Point, MS 
Lynne Lovett, Morton, MS 
Donna Luther, Eupora, MS 
Sharmila Malhotra, Clinton, MS 
Robert Mangialaveh, Greenville, MS 
Sylvia Martin, Kosciusko, MS 



Tom Massey, Brandon, MS 
Curtis May, Mendenhall, MS 
Susan Meriwether. Memphis, TN 
Nadine Middour, Orlando, PL 
Kelli May, Memphis, TN 
Kevin McDonough, New Orleans, LA 




192 



Susan McGovern, Starkville, MS 
Mickey McLaurin, Hollandale, MS 
Nancy Mims, Vaiden, MS 
Thomas Newman, Biloxi. MS 
Sandy O'Quinn, Baton Rouge, LA 
Melanie Page, Pascagoula, MS 



Julia Park, Jackson, MS 
Melissa Parker, Monroe, LA 
Anne Pate, Hendersonville, TN 
Susan Pate, Hendersonville, TN 
Joel Patton, Biloxi, MS 
Mike Patterson, Ackerman, MS 










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Jerry Peavy, Richland, MS 
Allison Pittman. Yazoo City, MS 
Malinda Prather, Columbus, MS 

Prout, Petal, MS 
Laurie Pruitt, Gulfport, MS 
Teresa Quon, Moorhead, MS 



Beth Ramsey, Cantonment, FL 
Regina Handle, Winona, MS 
Diane Regina, Wyomissing, PA 
Tammy Reno, Jackson, MS 
Anne Ritchie, Conton, MS 
Angela Russell, Bolton, MS 



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193 



Edward Sanders. North Carrollton, MS 

IDelecia Seay, Baton Rouge, LA 
Scott Sheinfeld, Houston, TX 
Tom Shima, Marcugo, LA 
Alexander J. Simpson, Thibodax, LA 
Connie Smiley, Meridian, MS 



Patton Stephens, Mt. Sterling, KY 
Candace R. Stewart, Charleston, MS 
Jay Sutterfield, New Orleans, LA 
Ashley Tibbs, Cleveland, MS 
Ginger Tucker, Brandon, MS 
Susan Van Cleve, Memphis, TN 




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Mary Vidrine, New Orleans, LA 

Holly Walters, Germantown, TN 

Connie Watson, Lyon, MS 

Trent Watts, Brookhaven, MS 

Jennifer Woffard, Drew, MS 

Kerry Welling, Tulsa, OK 



Michelle Wren, Jacksonville, FL 

Gary Albrecht, Reserve, LA 

David Asbury, Moss Point, MS 

Mac Bailey, Greenville, MS 

Liza Benson, Monroe, LA 

Rosie Brown, Yazoo City, MS 




194 




Rusty Brown, Vicksburg, MS 
Elton J. Buras, Jr., Jackson, MS 
Leigh Butler, Jackson, MS 
Julia Carmena, Baton Rouge, LA 
David Cheek. Etowah, TN 
Edward Croal, Gulfort, MS 



Jeffrey Crout, Jackson, MS 
William Dixon, Jackson, MS 
Leigh Dodson, Corinth, MS 
John Dunham, Baton Rouge, LA 
Delisa Dyer, Pearl, MS 
Kenneth Eiland, Louisville, MS 




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Helen France, Memphis, TN 
Laura Gillespie, Jackson. MS 
Jeff Good, Jackson, MS 
Albert A. Green IV, Seattle, WA 
Stuart Green, Vicksburg, MS 
Byron Griffith, Sunflower, MS 



Eric Gustafson, Slidel, LA 
Martha Hamilton, GreenuiUe, MS 
Beverly Harrell, West Point, MS 
Fonda Hughes, Braxton, MS 
Eric Hunt. Natchez, MS 
Paul Johnston, Biloxi, MS 



195 



John Joyner, Laurel, MS 
Matt Kaye. Memphis, TN 
Suzanne Kelty, Jackson, MS 
Albert Labasse, Marginelle, Belgium 
Bill Lang, Pass Christian, MS 
Stephen Langworthy, Springfield, VA 



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Mark Andrew Leger, Lake Charles. LA 
Catherine Lewis, Jackson, MS 
Andrew Libby, McComb, MS 
David Loper, Jackson, MS 
Jacqueline A. Love. Jackson, MS 
Paul Luttrell, Memphis, TN 



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n Pamela Machado, Destrehan, LA 
Lisa Manyfield, Jackson, MS 
Kevin Martin, Hurley, MS 
Catherine McCauley, Lake Charles. LA 

n Susan McKnight, Jackson, MS 
Demethous Morris, Magee, MS 

Tefera Muche, Gonder, Ethiopia, Africa 
Susan Murrell. Memphis. TN 
Vonee Neel, Holly Bluff, MS 
Kirk Patrick. Baton Rouge, LA 
Kristen Reid, Fort Dodge, Iowa 
Mark Ricketts, Memphis, TN 








196 




Zelphia Rowe, Chicago, IL 

Stacy Scott, Brandon, MS 

Andrew Sessions, Woodville, MS 

Paige Sibley, Jackson, MS 

Pirn Thanapet, Nakhonsawan, Thailand 

Kitty Timko, Slidell, LA 



Lynn Toney, Laurel, MS 
Paul Van Deventer, Meridian, MS 
Barr Wagstaff, Birmingham, AL 
Billy Waits, Pass Christian, MS 
LaJocelyn Walker, Memphis, TN 
Adrian Ware, Indianola, MS 



Mary Weir, Fort Wayne, IN 

John Wells, Austin, TX 

Sue Westheimer. Eupora, MS 

Laura Wheeler, Baton Rouge, LA 

Perri White-Spunner, Ocean Springs, MS 

Steve Whitten, Jackson, MS 



Kelly Wilford, Tupelo, MS 
Charles Woods. Jackson, MS 
Carol Wright, Vicksburg. MS 
Debbie Arnold, Shreveport, LA 
Suzanne Barham, Jackson, MS 
Kelly Benton, Flowood, MS 



197 



Teresa Bingham, Monroe. LA 

John Bishop, Baton Rouge, LA 

Jim Bobo, Brandon, MS 

Donald Brooks. Bossier City, LA 

Richard Brown, Pass Christian, MS 

Beau Butler. Jackson. MS 



Tom Carey. Summit. MS 

Bill Cheney, Birmingham, AL 

Chrissie Clark, Lafayette. LA 

Michael Collum, Jackson, MS 

Collin Cope, Mobile, AL 

Margaret Corban, Gulfport, MS 






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Frances Corley, Jackson. MS 
Whitney Doiron, Vicksburg, MS 
Bob Donald. Pasgoula. MS 
Edmond Donald, Lake Village, AK 
Steven Drollinger, Gulfport, MS 
Betsy Ellis, Chattanooga, TN 



Helmut Fickenworth 
Pat Fielder, Kosciusko, MS 
Debbie Fischer, Anniston, AL 
LeAnn Fleetwood, Rowlett, TX 
Kim Fox, Goodman, MS 
Stanton Gibbons, Baton Rouge, LA 



198 



Jens Gleim, Edwards, MS 
Lisa Hapgood, Birmingham, AL 
Raju Haque, Jackson, MS 
Kathryn Harrison, Tupelo, MS 
Farley Hollibaugh, Clear Lake, lA 
Janna Ingle, Baton Rouge, LA 



Rosa Jackson, Jackson, MS 
Paul Kavanaugh, Baton Rouge, LA 
Tom Kearns, Gulfport, MS 
Kevin King, Columbus, MS 
David Leggett, Pascagoula, MS 
Rosalynda Lewis, Drew, MS 




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Patti Lightfoot, Jackson, MS 
Lynn Loflin, Brookhaven, MS 
Matt Lundy, Lake Charles, LA 
Marion Lyons, Mobile, AL 
Mark Mahoney, Kosciusko, MS 
Renee McCain, Winona, MS 



Lisa McGee, Brookhaven, MS 
Debbie McGregor, Memphis, TN 
Melba McNeil, Jackson, MS 
Tommy Meriwether, Memphis, TN 
Tom Metz, New Albany, MS 
Gilbert Meyers, Baton Rouge, LA 



199 






Tracey Miller. Biloxi, MS 

Russell Mills, Waynesboro, MS 

Stacy Milam. Pine Bluff, AK 

Roy Murrell, Bioloxi, MS 

Robert Muth, Houston, TX 

Steve Napier, Jackson. MS 



Michael Parsons. Stwart. MS 

Tereau Pearson. Bay St. Louis, MS 

Sean Peenstra, Gulfport, MS 

Stephanie Pella, Pascagoula,MS 

John Perry, Winona, MS 

Cynthia Phelps. Baton Rouge. LA 



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Jeanette Prince, Jackson, MS 

James Purvis, Enterprise, MS 

Joey Rein. Brookhaven, MS 

Mechelle Roddy. Tupelo, MS 

Andy Solomon. Greenville. MS 

Helen Stark, Jackson, MS 



Kim Stiff, Jackson, MS 

Lori Trigg. Colorado Springs. CO 

Brock Ward. Meridian, MS 

Ellen Wasson. Kosciusko. MS 

Jo Watson. Electric Mills, MS 

Scott Weidie, Pearlington, MS 



200 



Bernard Wolfe, Jackson, MS 
Cynthia Alvis, Jackson, MS 
Candi Ashley, Memphis. TN 
Tina Ball, Wooduille, MS 
Jeff Berry. Jackson, MS 
Suzannah Bowie, Cleveland. MS 



Barbara Bowles, Natchez, MS 
Julie Bradsher, Biloxi, MS 
Mark Britt, Laurel, MS 
Tana Browning, New Albany, MS 
David Caldwell, Carthage, MS 
Lee Dempsey, Jackson. MS 




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Lisa Catledge, Jackson, MS 
Tim Carrigan, Clinton, MS 
Pam Chance, Crystal Springs, MS 
George Cooke, Madison, MS 
Brian Cowen, Shreveport, LA 
Jay Dickens, St, Louis, MO 



Stephanie Durow, Lyndonville, NY 
Mary Jane Emling, Jackson, MS 
Darin Hyer, Fayetteville. GA 
Jayson Carrett, Kosciusko, MS 
Roger Garrett. Milton, FL 
Mike Greer, Jackson, MS 



201 



Debbie Haller, Pearl, MS 
John Hermann. Summit, MS 
Florence Mines, Greenville. MS 
Anne Hogue, Jackson, MS Yazoo City. MS 
Keith Holmes. Kosciusko. MS 
Barbara Hopper, Kosciusko, MS 



Kyle Hux. McComb, MS 

Katrina Jameson. Brandon, MS 

Tawny Johnson, Jackson. MS 

Maan Joudeh, Jackson. MS 

Dan Keel, Brookhaven. MS 

Mary Elizabeth Kraft, Canton. MS 




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Kathy Leake, Tupelo, MS 
Mclanie Lee, Senatobia. MS 
Jolene McCaleb, Virginia Beach, VA 
Ann Mc Cord, Rienzi. MS 
Loretta McGowan, Jackson, MS 
Rakesh Mangal, Pascagouls, MS 



JoLynn Michael, Jackson, MS 

Cheryl Milner, Pearl, MS 

Elizabeth Neill, Jackson, MS 

Nita Oates, Jackson, MS 

Paul Ogden, Columbus, MS 

Kevin O'Malley, Natchez, MS 



202 



Mike Osborne, Bentonia, MS 
Charles Peel, Goodman, MS 
John Derek Reese, Cleveland. MS 
Patti Rishel. Long Beach, MS 
Van Reeling, Houston, TX 
John Rosella, Greenville, MS 



Doffie Ross, Biloxi. MS 
Kcri Slaton, Rolling Fork. MS 
Gregory Sliman, Biloxi. MS 
Diane Studdard. New Castle. PA 
Melvin Upchurch, Winona, MS 
Beth Sullivan, Jackson, MS 




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Michael Van Velkinburgh. Jackson. MS 

Janet Walsh, Gulfport, MS 

Mike Weber, Jackson. MS 

Billy Wheeler, Belnnont, MS 

Glenn Williams, Drew. MS 

Brad Whitney. Ocean Springs. MS (freshman) 



MS 

I 



Greta Ham, Brandon, MS (freshman 
Daniel Moore, Meridian, MS 
Steven Pace, Biloxi, MS 
Michael Thigpen. Kilmichael, MS 
Ellen Freeman, Union, MS {junior} 
Louis Sturgeon, Woodville, MS (senior) 



203 



204 



In memory of 

Robin Ann Rowland 

September 22, 1965-November 23, 1983 

Class of 1987 

Kevin James McDonough 

March 20, 1965-December 24, 1983 

Class of 1987 

John White Jr. 

December 17, 1921-January 15, 1984 

employee of Millsaps 1972-1984 



205 



The Little Shoppe on the 



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2951 Old Canton Road 
Jackson, MS 39216 

(601) 366-6426 $ 

Nothing's too Big for 
" the Little Shoppe " 

conventions - weddings - parties - fresh flowers 
plants - funeral work - near all hospitals 

Cindy & Billy Evans 24 Hour Service 






liH kson.M I 




One of Jackson's finest 

taverns in one of its oldest 

neighborhood grocery 

stores. Truly a unique 

experience in our nationally 

renowned restaurant. 

GEORGE STREET UPSTAIRS 

IF YOU LIKE YOURS LIVE 

354-9534 




OPEN Sa HOURS A O/OT 
7 DAYS A \A/EEK 



II nil 

TASTEE 
DONUTS 



PHOIME 601/362-5165 

2945 OLD CAIMTON ROAD 

JACKSOIM, MISSISSIPPI 3S216 




PHONE 366-2600 
WOODLAND HILLS 2 



10:00-5:30 
MON-SAT 




206 




1359-1 /2N. WEST ST. •JACKSON, MS 39202 • PHONE 601-969-9482 
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. •SaLGSun. 10:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. 



207 



David Leggitt 




/9^^ -on^ last [oo/\. . 



209 




Steve Langworthy 



211 




Jim Ritchie 



212 




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David Leggitt 
Madolyn Robuck 





David Leggitt 
Madolyn Robuck 



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I hesitate to begin my list off thankyous ffor fear off leaving 
someone out, but here goesi My deepest appreciation goes to 
Chris Cheek ffor almost all off the color photography — thanks also 
to Jim Ritchie, Steven DroUinger, and especially Susan Graves 
ffor her patience. Thanks to Paige Sullivan ffor doing the sports 
section so beautiffuUy (and single-handedly!), and to Anthony 
Cloy ffor handling all off the organizations. Jolene McCaleb saved 
me ffrom trying to juggle the books. Thanks to Perri White-Spun- 
ner, Stephen Bush, and Susan Van Cleve ffor Greeks, to Betsy 
Gwin ffor the ffeatures, to Katrina ffor everything that had to do 
with theatre . . . thanks to Cecile Williams, Gloria Simo, and 
Debbie Fischer — the events emergency crew ... to Lee Rice and 
Mary Vidrine ffor all they did . . . thanks to my pep squad — David 
Loper, Beth Collins, and Mac Bailey who taught me the true 
meaning off the word "Bobashela". And off course, the greatest 
thanks go to the One who got us through it! God bless you all . . . 



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panel portraits by Sudlow Photography 



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MILLSAPS COLLEGE ARCHIVES 



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