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Full text of "Boccaccio and his imitators in German, English, French, Spanish, and Italian literature, "The Decameron""

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BOCCACCIO AND HIS 
IMITATORS 



FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE JONES 



BOCCACCIO 
AND HIS IMITATORS 

IN GERMAN, ENGLISH, FRENCH, 

SPANISH, AND ITALIAN 

LITERATURE 

''THE DECAMERON'' 



FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE JONES 

Instructor in Romance Languages 
University of Illinois 



CHICAGO 

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO PRESS 

1910 



Copyright 1910 By 
The University of Chicago 

Published January 19 10 



Composed and Printed By 

The University of Chicago Press 

Chicago, Illinois, U. S. A. 



J 73 J- 



PREFACE 

The following list of the imitations of the tales found in the Decameron 
is designed to give to the student of comparative literature some idea of 
the extent to which the novels of Boccaccio were used by later writers as 
material to be worked over into poems, dramas, and operas. These imita- 
tions are arranged chronologically and are grouped by countries, '^ermany 
is placed first as leading all the other countries of Europe in its adapta- 
tions of Boccaccio's stories. England comes next, and then the three 
Latin countries. • In this list are included all the prose or poetical narratives 
or dramas which are commonly called imitations of Boccaccio. No 
attempt is made to discuss the sources of these stories, nor to settle disputed 
questions, such as whether an author imitated Boccaccio himself or some 
imitator of Boccaccio. It is enough that the plot in all its main features 
agrees with the Decameron story which was directly or indirectly its source. 

Several attempts of this kind have been made before: Du ^leril, in 
his Histoire de la Poesie Scandinave (1839), has a chapter entitled "Des 
Sources du Decameron et de ses imitations." Dunlop, in his History of 
Prose Fiction (1851), brings together a number of imitations; Zambrini's 
Bibliografia Boccaccesca (1875) is, as its subtitle indicates, a list of the 
"Edizioni delle opere di Giovanni Boccacci latine, volgari, tradotte ct 
trasformate." Several studies upon separate stories of the Decameron 
have been published, such ^^ that of Anschiitz, Novelle vom Falken und 
ihre Verbreitung in der Literj! ir, and that of Schofield on the Seventh Novel 
of the Seventh Day. Koeppel has studied the influence of the Italian 
novel on the English literature of the sixteenth century and Bourland the 
history of the Decameron in Spain. Valuable as these contributions have 
been for the fuller understanding of the extent of Boccaccio's influence 
upon European literature, it is hoped that the results arrived at by those who 
have thus studied the subject in certain aspects, may be of increased value, 
by being brought into comparis(jn with those reached I)y otiuT students 
in the same field. 

If the list of Boccaccio imitations wlii( h is litre presented is a longer 
list than that given by Dunloj), Du Mrril. and Zanihriiii, it is I)ecause 
within the last twenty-five or thirty years a numljer of studies on Boccaccio 
have api)eared similar to those mentioned above, the results of which have 
been utilized in the following tables. Neither Dunlop nor Zainbrini have 
given a chronologically arranged list sufllciently compli-te to furnish the 
student of comjiarative literature with the data which are necessary in 



1024209 



iv BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

order to arrive at an adequate idea of the extent to which Boccaccio was 
imitated in a certain century, in a certain country, or by a certain author. 
A general view of the subject is often necessary to decide whether an 
author drew his inspiration from Boccaccio or from some other source. 
The fact that six stories in the Canterbury Tales resemble those of the 
Decameron would certainly indicate that Chaucer had some acquaintance 
with the book. 

Over eight hundred imitations are here brought together, but the list 
does not include those found in Scandinavian literature, which would bring 
the number up to at least a thousand. It is hoped that the list will be 
found reasonably accurate, but in all probability errors will be found, since 
many of the works referred to could not be consulted and the so-called 
imitations had to be accepted upon the authority of those who have con- 
sulted them. A star placed before the date indicates that the imitation 
has been verified by reading of the author's work. In one case only does 
the star indicate second-hand knowledge of the story and that is in the 
case of several Spanish authors where the outline of the story is given so 
fully by Miss Bourland as to leave no doubt as to its similarity with the 
Decameron story. As to the dates, it is hoped that they are correct. In 
general, the date given is the one which is believed to be that of the first 
public appearance of the work in manuscript or in print. In the case of 
some collections like Von der Hagen's Gesammtabenteuer or Lami's Novelle 
letterarie, this rule has not been followed. Whether the stories in these 
collections antedated Boccaccio or not, their PHblication in the nineteenth 
century may fairly entitle them to be imitatik''"^s of Boccaccio in the sense 
that they are thus brought before the moder^ reading public for a second 
time. 

It has seemed best not to incumber the following list with detailed 
references to the work in which the imitation occurs. The title, so far as 
it indicates the character of the story, has been given whenever possible, 
but references to editions, volumes, pages, would defeat the object aimed at, 
which is to bring together, in the smallest compass possible, the imitations 
of the Decameron in European literature. As for acknowledgment of indebt- 
edness to others, the Bibliography gives the principal sources from which this 
list has been made up. Again the hope is expressed that the list is reason- 
ably accurate, i. e., accurate enough for the purpose for which it was 
intended, to bring together in a sort of bird's-eye-view all of the reworkings 
of the stories of the Decameron, in prose or verse, which number nearly 
a thousand and which form no inconsiderable part of the literature of the 
six centuries which will soon have elapsed since the birth of Boccaccio. 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS. "THE DECAMERON" 

If a twentieth-century playwright were to sit down with the Bible and 
the Decameron before him from which to select plots to work over for the 
entertainment of the public, the very proximity of the two books would be 
considered sacrilegious. In the sixteenth century, however, no less pious 
a person than Hans Sachs drew almost equally from these two world-famed 
story-books for subjects for his poems and plays without shocking the good 
citizens of Nuremberg in the least. In England, there was the same feeling 
in regard to Boccaccio; Roger Ascham complains bitterly of the "Italian- 
ated Englishmen" of his time, "who make more account of a tale in Bocace 
than a story in the Bible." No jest-book of this period was complete 
without some stories from the. Decameron, and Shakspere, Greene, and Ben 
Jonson all drew upon the Italian story-tellers for plots. Spanish writers, 
too, used the Decameron freely. Lope de Vega was too prolific a writer 
not to seize upon all the available material of his time for plots, but the 
fact that he took eight of them from Boccaccio must not be attributed so 
much to lack of other material as to the great popularity which Boccaccio 
enjoyed in Spain. 

In Italy, Ser Giovanni, Sercambi, and Sacchetti, whose collections of 
narratives all appeared before the close of the fourteenth century, retold 
many of the Decameron stories and from them the fashion spread to Eng- 
land where Chaucer was inspired to write his Canterbury Tales in imitation 
of the Italian novelists. 

During the fifteenth century Boccaccio had few imitators. Antoine 
de la Sale, in his Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles (1456), imitated the framework 
and a few of the incidents of the Decameron, while a few stories like those 
of Griselda and Ghismonda were retold in every country of Europe. The 
beginning of the sixteenth century, however, saw a Boccaccio renaissance 
which appears to have been most flourishing in Germany under the leader- 
ship of Hans Sachs, who found in the Decameron material for more than 
sixty Schwdnke, Fastnachtspiele, and Meistergesdnge. In the latter part 
of the century Ayrer also dramatized half a dozen or more of the stories. 
Numberless jest-books were compiled in imitation of the Decameron and 
contained many of its narratives, such as Pauli's Schimpf iind Ernst (1522) 
early in the century and the five collections which appeared from about 
1556 to 1566 — Kirchof's Wendunmuth, Lindencr's Raslhiir/ilein, Wickram's 
RoUwagen, Schuman's N achtbilchlcin , and Martin Montanus's Garten- 



2 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

gesellschaft. Even Luther made use of some of these stories in his 
Tischrcdcn. In England, Painter's Palace of Pleasure initiated a series of 
imitations of Boccaccio. This book, which among many other tales from 
the Italian novelists contains sixteen from the Decameron, ranks as more 
than a mere translation and greatly influenced the Elizabethan dramatists. 
It was followed in 1576 by Turberville's Tragical Tales, containing a num- 
ber of poetical translations, and by that curious imitation of Boccaccio and 
Dante, Tarleton^s Newes out of Purgatorie. In France, Nicolas de Troyes, 
whose Grand Parangon de Nouvelles was published in 1536, retold almost 
as many stories as Hans Sachs, but in prose form. Henri Estienne, in his 
Apologie pour Herodote some years later, retells Boccaccio's tales in prose. 
The turn of France was to come in the following century when La Fontaine 
retold in poetical form twenty or more stories with such art that it is hard 
to tell which is the master and which is the pupil. 

The Italian novelists of the sixteenth century are too numerous and 
too well known to need more than a passing mention. Parabosco, Cinthio, 
Grazzini, Bandello, Straparola, and Malespini — all of them included a 
few of Boccaccio's stories in their own collections. The most bold-faced 
borrowing, however, was practiced by Sansovino, who included a large 
number of Boccaccio's stories in his Cento Novelle Scelte and then refused 
to acknowledge the debt. The importance of this collection, however, lies 
in the date when it was published (1566) — the same year in which Painter's 
Palace of Pleasure appeared in England, Timoneda's Patranuelo and Alivio 
de Caminantes in Spain, Estienne's Apologie pour Herodote in France, 
and, a few years before, of numerous jest-books in Germany. This year, 
then, may be said to mark the culmination of the revival of interest in 
Boccaccio in the sixteenth centur}^ In the early part of the seventeenth 
century Lope de Vega wrote eight dramas based upon the Decameron and 
a few of the English dramatists of that time borrowed some of the incidents 
to furnish a scene or an act of a play, but the only imitator of Boccaccio in 
that century worthy of mention is La Fontaine, who himself became a 
second Boccaccio, so far as imitators are concerned. For a hundred years 
afterward the French stage echoed and re-echoed these twice-told tales in 
comedies and comic operas, all deriving their inspiration from La Fontaine, 
as is plainly indicated by the title of a work published by De Theis in 1773 — 
Le Singe de La Fontaine, which contains a number of Boccaccio-La Fontaine 
imitations. The last quarter of the eighteenth century saw a renewal of 
interest in Boccaccio which was especially marked in Germany. Goethe 
in 1776 writes of a projected drama based upon the Falcon story; Lessing's 
Nathan der Weise (1779) immortalized the story of the three rings; Burger, 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 3 

in his Lenardo und Blandine (1776), retold the Ghismonda story in verse, 
and Langbein, in his Schwdnke {I'jgi), the "Seventh of the Seventh." 

Paul Heyse versified the story of Cymon and Iphigenia in his Braut 
von Cy pern (1856), whUe Billow's Novellenhuch, oder Hundert Novellen 
nach alien italienischen, spanischen, franzosischen, laleinischen, englischen 
und deutschen bearheilet (1836), besides its framework, owes one tale to 
Boccaccid, "Der Genius." This awakening of enthusiasm for Boccaccio 
had its parallel among the Romanticists of England and Franc&% That 
only his premature death kept Keats from following up his "Isabella" 
(181 9) with other romances from Boccaccio is shown by a letter of Reynolds 
in which this statement is made: "Two stories from Boccaccio, the ' Garden 
of Florence' and the 'Ladye of Provence,' were to^have been associated with 
tales from the same source, intended to have been written by a friend" 
(Keats). In 181 9, Barry Cornwall anticipated Tennyson and Longfellow 
in his poem of the "Falcon," and Collier's Poetical Decameron (1820), 
reviews Lewicke's version of the ever-popular story of Titus and Gesi[)pus. 
Toward the middle of the century the pre-Raphaelite painters, Holman 
Hunt and Millais, both painted pictures illustrating the tale of "Lorenzo 
and Isabella," and Alillais painted "Cjinon and Iphigenia," a subject treated 
later in 1884 by Sir Frederick Leighton. Tennyson's "Golden Supper" is 
imitated either from Turberville's Tragical Tales (1576) or from Boccaccio, 
and William Black, in his Sabina Zemhra (1889) (Anschiitz), gives a resumd 
of the falcon story taken either from Tennyson or Boccaccio. Strange to 
say, in this era of woman's rights, a number of versions of the Griselda 
narrative have appeared. Silvestre and Morand '(1893) wrote a mysthre 
entitled Griselidis, and Hauptman also has produced a Griselda drama. 

Out of the hundred stories of the Decatneron some have naturally been 
more jjopular than others. Several have been worked over in poetical or 
dramatic form as many as thirty or forty times, while others have been 
retold only once. That the popularity of these tales did not depend entirely 
upon Boccaccio's skill as a story-teller but upon the story itself is shown by 
the fact that those which in Landau's Quellen des Decamcrons have the 
longest pedigree are generally such as have been most often imitated since 
Boccaccio's time. From the Orient to the Occident, the faithful friend, 
the patient wife, and the unhappy lover have always aijjjcaled to jwjjular 
symfjathy, while a joke which has in it enough of humcjr to render it forever 
laughable, such as the one-legged goose, although Boccaccio's version of 
it is not particularly well written, counts more than twenty imitations. 

The narrative which leads in poj^ularity in all the countries of Europe 
is the last story of the Decameron — that of Patient Griselda (X, 10). 



4 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

Chaucer, Hans Sachs, Lope de Vega, Perrault, and Goldoni have all 
availed themselves of this subject, besides a host of minor viriters. As 
early as the end of the fourteenth century her story formed the subject of a 
mxstbre. Although Griselda did not rank as a saint, her sufferings seemed 
to entitle her to a f)lace not far belovif them. Naturally enough this recital 
was used to point a moral in numerous Miroirs des Dames and Exemples de 
bonnes et mauvaises femmes, while Lope de Vega entitles his Griselda 
play. El exemplo de casadas. The story was in Spain the most popular of 
the Decameron. To the jealous Spaniard who kept his wife bolted and 
barred behind her balconied window, Griselda would indeed seem a 
"perfecta casada." 

At the present day, the conduct of Griselda appears foolish and 
unreasonable, and her weak submissiveness most irritating. It is necessary 
to remember, however, as has often been pointed out, that she was the 
vassal as well as the wife of the marquis. Another reason sometimes 
assigned for the popularity of the story is the fact that the type of woman 
most commonly portrayed in the fabliau is weak and frivolous and that the 
character of Griselda is purposely exaggerated to show that an obedient 
wife was altogether an impossibility. In a treatise of the latter part of the 
fifteenth century, sometimes ascribed to Albrecht von Eyb, on the question 
"heirathen und nicht heirathen," the negative side is supported by the 
argument, "Die frauen sind hoffartig und herrsiichtig," while the affirma- 
tive asserts "Es giebt viele heilige Frawen," and follows with the tale of 
patient "Grisardis." Aside from serving as an encouragement to those 
who contemplate matrimony, the Griselda story was made by Petrarch to 
sen^e as a sort of allegory, a personification of the human soul, afflicted by 
heaven — a suggestion which was taken up by countless preachers who 
worked over and over the well-worn subject, until every particle of its 
didactic suitability was well-nigh exhausted. , It is hard now to understand 
the great authority exercised all over Europe in literary matters by Petrarch. 
His judgment was final, and when he took Griselda as a specimen of the 
ever-popular t)rpe of the "persecuted woman," reasonable or unreasonable 
though her conduct might be, and set her up in the niche of fame, a saint 
she must always remain. 

The next most popular recital in the Decameron is that of Ghismonda 
(IV, i), which has been dramatized and set to music and painted until its 
renderings reach the number of forty. The character of Ghismonda is 
exactly the opposite of that of Griselda, but the disobedient daughter 
appealed to the popular imagination quite as much as the obedient wife. 
One thing is certain, however, the fiery Ghismonda is not quoted in any 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 5 

Mirair as an example for daughters to follow. The story owes its popularity 
to its own merits and not, as in the case of the Griselda narrative, to the 
influence of Petrarch. A secret passageway, discovery, murder, suicide, 
all made up a first-class tragedy, then as now. In addition to all these 
horrors the recital contains one version of the popular story of the "eaten 
heart" of which another version is contained in the account of the wife of 
Guglielmo of Rossiglione which is in this same day of the Decameron. 
The heart of Ghismonda's lover is served up to her in a goblet by hef father 
— a dramatic climax which appealed strongly to a sixteenth-century audience 
which reveled in the gloomy Senecan tragedy. It is the first Italian novel 
which was dramatized for the English stage. In Italy the narrative was 
especially popular — a dozen or more Italian writers dramatized it, and 
operas were composed upon the subject. The unhappy lovers hence- 
forth were mentioned in literature along with Paolo and Francesca, Romeo 
and Juliet, Tristan and Isolde, and were even used to adorn the backs of 
playing-cards in Spain. As compared with the Griselda story with its 
happy ending which made it after all a comedy in the Dantean sense, the 
horrible ending of the Ghismonda incident makes of it a real tragedy, an 
accumulation of horrors hardly equaled by anything from Seneca's pen. 

In cheerful contrast to the foregoing narratives stands the seventh 
story of the seventh day of the Decameron. Madonna Beatrice, instead of 
being a persecuted heroine, is, instead, the persecutor of her husband. 
She is the conventional heroine of the fabliau and as such she is most popu- 
lar in French literature, where La Fontaine's witty version of the tale made 
it so popular that within the next century more than half a dozen comedies 
and light operas bore the title Mari, cocu, baitu et content. Instead of being 
the heroine of only one narrative, the same lady, under different names, 
masquerades in all the stories of the seventh book, now hiding her lover in 
a cask, now shutting the door in her husband's face, and now making him 
believe that, having eyes, he sees not. 

With Ginevra, who ranks as fourth in poi)ularity among Boccaccio's 
heroines, we have another persecuted lady, who, patient and forgiving as 
she shows herself to be, is far removed from the too humble Griselda] 
The wager with which the story begins is as old as the time of the Tarquins, 
and affords a never-failing element of human interest. The villain is as 
deep-dyed a villain as lago. The old servant who refuses to carry out 
orders to kill the wife or children of his master is also a favorite character 
in fiction. Then there is the ever-[)opular "recognition sc(!ne" and the 
punishment of the villain. Shakspere, with his unerring feeling for what- 
ever was most j^ojiular in the dramatic material at liand in liis time, seized 



6 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

upon this, one of the best-known stories of his time, as the subject of his 
Cymbeline. While Ginevra is not the subject of a "mystery" as was 
Griselda, she is the subject of a "Miracle de Notre Dame," the scene 
of which is laid in Spain, the refusal of the old servant to carry out his 
orders being naturally attributed to the intervention of the Virgin. 

Boccaccio's selection of feminine types of character would not be 
complete without including that of the simpleton, the silly, vain, sentimental 
woman, Madonna Lisetta, the Venetian lady who was persuaded by her 
confessor that the Angel Gabriel was in love with her, whose story, strangely 
enough, is found in the fourth book of the Decameron which begins with 
the account of Ghismonda and contains nothing else but "tragical tales." 
Marmontel's version of this recital has become famous in French litera- 
ture, and his Mart Sylphe, which satirized the feminine sentimentalism 
of his time, was both preceded and followed by a number of tales of the 
same character and bearing the same title, in which the vain, credulous, 
sentimental young wife is held up to ridicule even more skilfully than in 
Boccaccio. Perhaps it is not too much to say that a more or less far- 
fetched parallel can be found between almost every modern novel and 
some story of the Decameron. In making such a comparison, surely it 
might be said that this story contains in germ the plot of Madame Bovary. 
This exhausts the list of Boccaccio's most popular heroines and we now 
turn to a discussion of his heroes. The faithful friend far surpasses in 
popularity the unhappy lover or any other masculine type presented by 
Boccaccio. The history of Titus and Gesippus (X, 8) numbers almost 
as many imitations as the Griselda story. Just as the tale of Ginevra 
dealt with the same theme as the legend of Lucretia, and the Ghismonda 
and Guiscard narrative is that of several unhappy lovers of antiquity — 
Pyramus and Thisbe, Hero and Leander — so these two friends were 
known to the ancients as Damon and Pythias, Orestes and Pylades. The 
story was especially popular in England where in Elyot's Governor the 
incident is given as a model of what a gentleman's conduct ought to be. 
So well known was the story that it was mentioned whenever the subject 
of friendship was discussed. In Italy the narrative seems to have been 
less popular, although it was one of the three which Beroaldo translated 
into Latin before the beginning of the sixteenth century, along with the 
romance of Cymon and that of Griselda. The masculine mind perhaps 
_y more than the feminine loves to propose to itself difficult questions of 
'-^ conduct and to settle them in imagination, at least, in a magnanimous way. 
This story is a Boccaccio version of the eternal de amicitia theme, of which 
the reductio ad absiirdiim is found in Goldoni's II vero amico. Closely 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 7 

related to the story of Titus and Gesippus in spirit is that of Federigo 
(V, 9), the faithful lover who sacrificed his beloved falcon to please his 
lady. Here again a difiicult question of conduct is settled in a way that 
accords with the ideals of the time in regard to unquestioning obedience to 
the wishes of the liege lady and perfect obsen-ance of the laws of hospitality. 
Federigo is at the same time the perfect lover and the perfect host. Besides 
these reasons the story probably owed much of its popularity to the fact 
that falconry was more than a favorite amusement with the nobles of the 
fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. It was a ruling passion, a fact which 
made the sacrifice of Federigo seem almost equal to that of a father sacri- 
ficing his child. The "best short story in any literature," as it has been 
called, is also by popular consent one of the most popular. 

The servant who gets the better of his master by means of a witty 
answer is too common in comedy and real life to escape the attention of 
Boccaccio. Chichibio (VI, 4), the cook, and his famous story of the 
one-legged crane seem to have been especially popular in German and 
English literature. How it came across the ocean, to be told and retold 
by the negroes of the South, seems at first hard to explain, but when it is 
remembered that the first colonists in Virginia probably brought with 
them or related at table tales from Tarletoii's Newes out of Purgatorie, it is 
easy to see how the vision of the poor cook, sitting in putgatory for having 
stolen the leg of a chicken, would appeal to the imagination and conscience 
of the old family negroes, who told and retold the story until it was embodied 
in literature in Colonel Carter of Cartersville. 

Still another popular masculine type is that of the merchant who comes 
to town and is robbed by a woman who pretends to be his long-lost sister 
or cousin or aunt. Andreuccio of Perugia, the horse merchant who went 
to Naples, and who had probably got the better of his neighbor in many 
a horse-deal, and now finds himself in a ridiculous plight in a strange city, 
was too good a subject for ridicule not to render popular Boccaccio's 
narrative. Next to imagining himself a hero, the average man loves to 
laugh over his fellow-man who is duped by a woman. 

So far as the ]jopularity of a narrative may be determined by the num- 
ber of imitations of it which have been discovered, the sixth .story of the 
seventh day, that of Madonna Isabella and her two lovers, comes next. 
The po[jularity of this seventh book of the Decameron, which is sometimes 
called that of "woman's wiles," is shown by the fact that this is the second 
story from that book which has been adjudged to be the most jmpular. 
One other book, the tenth, furnishes two of the most popular tragic tales. 

Thus has the world made its unconscious selection of llu- narratives that 



8 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

have pleased it most. Dififerent persons have ventured to make arbitrary 
selections of the "best stories" in the Decameron, but the unconscious 
judgment of posterity is a better criterion of the worth of a story than that 
of any one person or group of persons. Boccaccio himself in the Decameron 
made a selection of the "hundred best stories" of his time, some of which 
now seem to us far-fetched and void of interest, but sifted as they have been 
in the course of time, these ten romances, which are not merely twice-told 
tales but which have been retold forty and fifty times even, contain in them 
most of the elements of comedy and tragedy which fall within the range 
of human experience. 

The accompanying tables are intended to show the relative popularity 
of the dififerent Novelle of the Decameron. It must be acknowledged that 
merely adding up the different versions without regard to their importance 
is not a perfectly satisfactory test, yet it is perhaps the best that can be 
devised and gives a result that is approximately correct. No matter how 
poor the imitations may be, these frequent repetitions of a tale show that 
it w§3 one of which the world never grows weary. 

r'T'^Of the ten authors cited as the principal imitators of Boccaccio, Hans 
Sachs easily leads the rest in the quantity and La Fontaine in the quality 
of his imitations. Chaucer in England and Lope de Vega in Spain, by 
imitating the Italian story-teller, contributed something new to the litera- 
ture of their respective countries. While the literary value of Sercambi's 
versions is not great, he helped to keep alive in the minds of his country- 
men the memory of Boccaccio until the invention of printing. Martin 
■Montanus in his Gartengesellschajt and Timoneda in his Alivio de los Ca- 
minantes retell the old tales with few additions or modifications. Nicolas 
de Troyes does the same. Painter merely selects and translates, and San- 
so\'ino, whose collection is exactly contemporaneous with Painter's, is an 
out-and-out plagiarist who refuses to acknowledge his debt to Boccaccio. 
These ten authors, then, represent the two classes of imitators, those who 
merely transcribed and those who made out of the old tale a new literary 
product. All but two, Chaucer and Sercambi, belong to the sixteenth 
century and are representative of a renaissance which resurrected Petrarch 
and Boccaccio as well as Plautus and Seneca. 

The geographical remoteness of these different authors shows with what 
comparative rapidity literary fashions spread from. one country to another. 
While Hans Sachs was turning Novelle into Schwdnke, Nicolas de Troyes 
put out his Grand Parangon de Nouvelles and a little later Timoneda wrote 
his patranas. From Nuremberg to Seville, Griselda was enshrined in the 
hearts of the populace as a domestic saint, and the one-legged crane crossed 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 9 

mountains and rivers and seas to be finally metamorphosed into the one- 
legged goose. 

In estimating the popularity of Boccaccio in different countries Germany 
is found to surpass the others. There are several explanations for this. 
Germany was nearer geographically to Italy than the other countries. 
Hans Sachs was indefatigable in his work of adapting the "cento novella" 
to the taste of his countrymen and influential enough to leave after him 
such men as Martin Montanus and Ayrer to continue the work. -German 
scholars with unwearying patience have ferreted out these metamorphosed 
Novelle in their own literature more thoroughly than has been done in 
other countries. As for Spain, the small number of imitations found in the 
literature of that country is partly due to the fact that only recently has the 
field begun to be worked. The spirit and atmosphere of the Decameron, 
however, pervades from beginning to end that panorama-like succession 
of episodes which makes up the picaresque novel. 

In his o^vn country, the memory of Boccaccio was kept alive by that 
long line of Italian novelists which includes Sacchetti, Bandello, and Stra- 
parola, no one of whom borrowed more than a dozen or twenty tales from 
the master, but whose aggregate of imitations is considerable. Boccaccio's 
mission here seems to have been to elevate story-telling to a profession and 
to call into existence the professional story-teller. 

Among the French, the framework of the Decameron seems to have been 
imitated even more than the novella, in such collections as the Cent Nou- 
velles Nouvelles, the Joyeux Devis, the Tresor des Recreations, the Comptes 
du Monde aventureux, the Series, and the Heptameron. France, too, 
enjoys the distinction of being the only nation which has proiluced a rival 
to Boccaccio, the incomparable La Fontaine, to whose exam])le and ])restige 
is due a large number of the versions which go to swell the number of Boc- 
caccio imitations in that country. The smaller number of those found in 
English literature may be due to the fact that until r62o no complete Eng- 
lish translation of the Decameron was publisiied. But whatever it may 
lack in quantity is made u]) in quality, the genius of Chaucer and Shak- 
spere has adfled more t(j the glory of Boccaccio llian dozens of versions by 
less renowned imitators. 



lO 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 



TABLE A 
The following table shows the number of imitations of each novella. As will 
readily be seen, the ten most popular ones are in order of popularity: X, lo; IV, i; 
VII, 7; X, 8; II, 9; IV, 2; VII, 6; V, 9; VI, 4; II, 5. 

Giornata 



Novella 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


VII 


VIII 


IX 


X 


I 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 


3 
9 

7 
4 
4 

I 

2 
4 
3 


I 

13 

4 

5 

18 

7 

4 

14 

29 

8 


S 

9 

18 

2 

ID 

6 

3 

17 

II 

6 


40 

27 
2 

3 

7 
4 
3 

14 
7 
6 


15 

2 

3 
9 
3 
2 

5 
15 

21 

3 


3 

I 

3 

20 

I 
I 

3 


I 

14 


2 

8 

5 
16 

13 
25 
35 
19 
10 
I 


12 
7 
3 

12 

4 
5 

18 

3 
3 


14 
19 

6 

I 
2 
14 
3 
3 
3 
7 


9 

5 

2 

12 

10 

I 

4 

35 

6 

50 


Approxi- 
mately 


40- 


lOO-l- 


904- 


100 -f 


70 + 


50- 


130-t- 


604- 


80+ 


130 + 



Total 850 -I- . 

TABLE B 

The ten authors, a summary of whose imitations of Boccaccio is given in the fol- 
lowing table, are selected, two from each country, Germany, England, France, Spain, 
and Italy, to show the wide geographical distribution of these tales of the Decameron. 
This table shows that the ten most popular ones mentioned above have nearly all 
been imitated by four or five of these authors. 

GERMANY 

Hans Sachs 

• 2-3-6. 

■ 2-4-5-6-9. 
. 1-2-3-6-8. 
. 1-2-3-4- 5-6-7-8-10. 

■ 1-3-7-8-9-10- 

• 1-4-5-10- 

• 1-4-5-6-7-8- 



I 

II 

III 

IV 

\' 

VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 

X 



. I-2-3-4-6-7-9-IO. 

■ -1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9- 

. 2-4-7-8-10. 
Chaucer 



III.. 


.4. 


VII.. 


.9. 


/III.. 


.1. 


IX . 


.6. 


X.. 


.5-10 



Martin Montanus 


I. . 


• 4- 


II.. 


.--8. 


III. . 


•1-3-7- 


IV.. 


. 1-2-5-8-10. 


v.. 


.1-10. 


VI.. 


.4-7-10. 


VII.. 


•2-3-4-5-7- 


VIII.. 


.2-8. 


IX.. 


. 2-6-10. 


X.. 


.8. 


) 

] 


^AINTER 


I.. 


.3-5-8-10. 


II... 


■ 2-3-4-5-8. 


III.. 


.9. 


IV.. 


.1. 


VIII . . 


•7 


X.. 


■ 3-4-5-9- 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 



II 









FRANCE 






Nicolas de 


Troyes 






La Fontaine 


I... 


• 2-5-10. 






II. 


. . . 2. 


II... 


• 2-3-5-6-7- 


-9- 




III. 


. . . 1-2-3-5-6-S-10 


III... 


. 4-6-9-10. 






IV. 


. . .2. 


IV... 


. 1-3-6-8-g. 






V. 


...4-9- 


v.. 


.3-4-6-7-8. 






VII. 


. . . 2-5-7-8-9. 


VI... 


.3-7-10. 






VIII. 


. . . 1-8. 


VII. . . 


. 3-7-8-10. 






IX. 


. . . 2-6-10. 


VIII... 


. 1-2-4-7-8. 










IX.. 


. 1-2-3-5-8- 


-9-10. 








X... 


. 1-2-4-5-6- 


-7-8-9-10. 









SPAIN 





Lope de Vega 


n. 


. . 2. 


III. 


■3- 


V. 


..4-9. 


VIII. 


. . 10. 


X. 


. . 1-8-10. 



TiMONEDA 
II.... 5-9. 

VI.... 4. 

VII....7-8. 

X....I-8-IO. 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

VI. 

VII. 

X. 

X. 

IV. 
VII. 

X. 

II. 

IV. 

VII. 

V. 

VI. 

II. 



Sercambi 

9- 

2-4. 

1-2-3-4-8-10. 

9- 

1-3- 

4- 

10, 

10 



.Han.s Sachs; 

Sercambi; 
.Hans Sachs; 
.Hans Sachs; 

Sansovino 
. Hans Sachs 
. Hans Sachs 
. Hans Sachs 
. Hans Sachs 
. Hans Sachs 
. Hans Sachs 
. Han.s Sachs 



Sansovino 
. . . 5-7-9-10. 
...3-4-5-8-9. 
. . . 4-6-9. 
. . . 1-2-4-9. 
...4-6-7-8. 
...3-4-6. 
...7-8. 

Lope de Vega; Timoncda; 



ITALY 

I.. 
II.. 

v.. 

VI.. 

VII.. 

VIII.. 

IX.. 

Nic(olas) (ie T(royes); 
Chaucer. 
Montanus; Painter; Nic. de T. 

Montanus; Nic. de T. ; La Fontaine; Timoncda; 

Montanus; Nic. de T. ; Timoneda; Lope de Vega. 
Nic. deT. ; Timoncda; Sansovino. 
Montanus; La Fontaine. 
Sansovino. 

La Fontaine; Lope dc Vega; Sansovino. 
Montanus; Timoneda; San.sovino. 
Montanus; Painter; Nic. dc T.; Timoncda; San- 



12 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 



TABLE C 

The following summary by days of the total number of imitations in difiFerent 
countries shows an approximate total of 850 imitations. 





I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


VII 


VIII 


IX 


X 


Total 




13 

5 

9 



II 


23 
22 

25 

5 
20 


17 
14 
30 
3 
23 


32 
24 
24 

5 
27 


17 
21 

17 
2 

19 


23 

5 

5 

3 

II 


37 
25 
38 
5 
29 


25 

5 
21 

2 
13 


26 

7 
19 

I 

17 


39 
38 
18 
18 
22 


250 + 
150 + 
200 + 


England 




Spain 


200 — 


Italy 


Approximately 


850 + 



























*i598. 
*i767. 

1570. 

*i548. 

*i563- 

1563- 

*i566. 

1542. 
*i536. 
*i69i. 

1804. 

1570- 



'1545- 
1563- 
*i746. 
*i779. 
*i566. 
*i704. 

*I72I. 



*i557- 
1608. 
1788. 
1808. 



I. I 

Ayrer: Der Falsch Notarius mil seiner unwahrhajten Beicht. 

Voltaire: Lettre a S. A. Monseigneur le Prince de XXX, sur 

Rabelais. 

Olimpia Fulvia Morata: Opera. 

I. 2 

Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der Jud am romischen hof." 

Kirchhof: Wendunmuth, "Von der romischen Keuschheit." 

Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, fol. 61. 

Luther: Tischreden, "Der Jud von Wittenberg." 

Bebelius: Facetiae. 

Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un Juif qui demeuroit a Paris." 

Mme de Sevigne : Lettre a Monsieur de Coulanges. 

Lantier: Correspondance de Suzette d'Arly^ Lett. CXLL 

Olimpia Fulvia Morata: Opera. 

I. 3 

Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der Jud mit den dreyen ringen." 

Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, fol. 8. 

Gellert: Gedichte, "Die Geschichte von dem Hute." 

Lessing: Nathan der Weise. 

Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "The Three Rings." 

Swift : Tale of a Tub. 

Anon, poem, Dublin: "Saladin est assez connu." (Manni.) 

I. 4 

Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Ein junger monch." 

Mahrold : RoUmarschkasten. 

Imbert: Fabliaux. 

Guichard: Fables el Contes, "Le moine ruse." 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS I^OTATORS 13 

I. 5 

*i567. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "The Marchioness of Monferrato." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une belle bourgeoise de qui un 

roi fut amourevix." 
*i523. Cornazzano: Proverbi, "Verchh si dice aWter. Tutta e fava." 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novell e Seel te, "La Marchesanadi Monferrato." 

I. 6 
*i544. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Die hundert suppenkessel." 

I. 7 

*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Bergamino morde una avaritia." 
*i554. Straparola: Notti, XIII, 7, "Giorgio Servo." 

I. 8 
*i566. Painter: Po/ace p/P/ea^wre, "Borsieri and Grimakli." 
1570. Castelvetro: Arte Poetica, "Domandando messer Erminio." 

I. 9 
1876. Topin: Diversites Litteraires, "La justice et la vertu des rois." 
♦1375. Sercambi: Novelle, "De Pigritia — II re Sparaleone di Porto- 

gallo." 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "II r^ di Cii)ri." 
*i875. Papanti: / Parlari di Certaldo. 

I. 10 

♦1566. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, '' AXhevto oiBoXogm." 

♦1536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un viel medecin (lui fut amou- 

reux." 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Messer Alberto da Bologna." 

II. 1 

1563. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, fol. 9. 

n. 2 

♦1547. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Rinaldus, dcr i)tTa\\i)t kauffmon." 

♦1566. Painter: Po/arc o/P/ea5Mre, "Rinaldo of Este." 

*i6o2. Ben Jonson: The Widow. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'nii man hand (jui fut des- 

troussd." 
*i666. La Fontaine: Conies, "L'Oraison de Sainl Julian." 



14 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

1704. Houdart de la Motte: Le Talisman. 

1765. Lemonnier: Renaud d'Asti. 

1 771. CoUe: La Veuve. 

1783. Radet: Renaud d'Ast. 

1834. Lacoste: UOraison de Saint Julien. 

*i6i6. Lope de Vega: El llegar en ocasion. 

*i375. Sercambi: Novelle, "De devotione in Santo Juliano." V 

11- 3 

C^ *i566. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "The King of England's Daughter." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Un neveu qui espousa une fille 

d'Angleterre." 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Tre Giovani male il loro 
havere spendendo." 

II. 4 
*i558. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Landolphus, ein burger." 
*i566. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "Landolfo Ruffolo." 
1460. Juan Martorell: Tirant lo Blanch, cap. CCL, "Un mercador- 
havia posat en un baril." (Farinelli.) 
♦1375. Sercambi: A/'o?;e//e, "De restauro facta per fortuna." 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Landolfo Ruffolo." 

11- 5 

*i546. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Andreuczo mit 3 ungluck." 

1546. Miigling: Drei unglUck Andreutzo. 
♦1557. Martin Montanus: Andreiitzo-Historia. 

1563. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, io\. 2,S- 
♦1598. Ayrer: Ein Fastnachtspiel von Antreuxo. 
*i566. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, " Andruccio.'^ 
*i677. Aphra Behn: The Rover. 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un marchand de chevaux." 

1682. Le Noble: Promenades, "Blaise Goulard." 
*i6i7. Figueroa: El Passagero. 
*i6i8. Espinel: Marcos de Ohregon. 
♦1624. Reyes: El Curial de Parnaso. 
♦1546. P. Aretino: // filosofo (commedia). 

♦1566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Andreuccio da Perugia venuto 
a Napoli." 

161 2. Vicentino: Andreuccio di G. B. (poem). 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 1 5 

1748. Anon.: Nasceta, Vita e Desgrazie de Biaso Valentino (poem) 
(vernacular). 
*i875. Pitre: Tradizioni Popolari Siciliani, "Lu figghiu tistardu." 
1878. Gianandrea: Tradizioni marchigiane, "El mercante." 
1880. Nerucci: Novelle viontalesi, "Paolino da Perugia." 



II. 6 

♦1549. Hans Sachs: Historia, "Die edel fraw Beritola." 

*i588. Greene: Perimedes, The Blacksmith, "Story of Mariana." 

*i6o2. Aliddleton: Blurt — Master Constable. 

*i677. Aphra Behn: The Rover. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Des pitoyables fortunes d'une 

noble femme nommee Bricole." 
*i565. Giraldi Cinthio: Ecatommithi, V, 8, "Cesare Gravina si fugge da 

NapoU." 
♦1755. Lami: Novelle letterarie, "Carduino" (also in Scelta di C. L.). 

II. 7 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "La fille du Soudan de Babylonic." 
*i666. La Fontaine: Contes, "La Fiancee du roi de Garbe." 

II. 8 

♦1558. Martin Montanus: Spiel vom vertriehenen grafen. 
*i563. Kirchhof: Wendunniiith, "Von den gluckfiillcn eines graflfen von 
Anglers." 

1584. Germanus: Comoedia des ohne schuld verjagten grafjcns von 
Angiers. 
♦1598. Ayrer: Der Graf von Angiers. 

1601. Anon. ])lay at Cassel: Von den wiinderharcn glilcksfdUcn cincs 
grafjen. 
♦1626. Anon. {>lay at Dresden: Comedia vom Grafen vom Angiers. 
*i8i6. Goethe: Balladen, "Der Vertrielme Graf." (?) 

1817. Hammer: Ilistorischer Rosengurtcn, "Roiienol." 
♦1566. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "The Karl of Angiers." 

1579. Forrest of Fancy (mentioned), "The good Erie of Kngcrs." 

1 704. Mary Pit : Violenta, or the rewards of Virtue. 
♦1536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un G^nte qui fut it Angiers." 
*[566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "II Conte dWnversa." 



l6 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

/ n. 9 

*i548. Hans Sachs: Commedia, "Die undultig frau Genura." 

1563. Pauli: Schimpf iind Ernst, lo\. 10. 

1596. Anon, play acted at Breslau: Historia von einen Kaufmann von 

Padua. 

1682. Kongehl: Der unsclmldig, beschuldigten Innocentian Unschuld. 

*i85o. Von der Hagen: Gesammtahenteuer , "Von zwein Kaufmonnen." 

1 518. Anon.: Frederyke of Gennen. Printed at Antwerp. 

■^ *i592. Greene: Philomela. 

*i6o3. Westward for S?nelts, "Fishwife's Tale." (Perhaps published 

1620.) 

*i6o9. Shakspere: Cymheline. 

*i636. Heywood: Challenge for Beauty: 

1682. Durfey: The injured Princess, or the fatal Wager. 

1759. Hawking. (Altered from Shakspere.) 

1759. Garrick. (Altered from Shakspere.) 

1826. Anon.: The Beautiful Caroline. A Captain of Hussars. 

1498. Anon. : Miracle de. Notre Dame, "Comment le roi d'Espaigne perdit 
sa terre." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un marchand qui gagea a un 
autre." 

1796. Dejaure: Tnioghne, ou la Gageure indiscrbte. 

*i 566. Timoneda: Patranuelo, " Finea fue juez de su marido." 

*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Bemabo da Genova." 

^ 1570. Castelvetro: Ar/e Poe^zca, "Del vanto del giuoco," etc. 

1755. Lami: Novelle letterarie di Firenze, "La Pianella." 

*i875. Imbriani: Novellaia fiorentina, "Novella del Signer Giovanni." 

*i875. Pitre: Fiabe Siciliane, "La Stivala." 

II. 10 

*i666< La Fontaine: Cow/e5, "Le Calendrier des Vieillards." 
1708. P. de la Croix: Contes Turcs, "Histoire d'un Tailleur et de sa 

Femme." 
1749. Antreau: Le Galant Corsaire. 

1753. Chassaigne: Le Calendrier des Viellards. 

1754. La Motte: Le Calendrier des Viellards. 

1792. Sedaine: Le Calendrier des Vieillards. 

1793. Dupre: Le Calendrier des Vieillards. 
1826. Paul de Kock: Le Calendrier des Viellards. 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 17 

III. I 

*i545. Hans Sachs: ^c/^wan^e, "Ein stummund die nonnen." 

*i557. Martin Alontanus: Wegkurzer, "Ein junger bauernknecht." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un valet d'une abbaye de 

Nonnains." 

*i667. La Fontaine: Co«te5, "Mazet de Lamporecchio." 

1 761. Anseaume: Mazet (comedie). 

♦1375. Sercambi: Novelle, "De malitia hominis." 

1500. Anon.: El Bolognese, ovvero Masetto da Lampolecchio. 

*i8o4. II Casti: Novelle Galanli, "L'Ortolano delle raonache." 

III. 2 

*i529. Hans Sachs: Schu'dnke, "Der ku'nigin fuesknecht." 

*i82o. Barry Cornwall: Dramatic Scenes, "The Florentine Party." 

*i666. La Fontaine: Conies, "Le Muletier." 

1790. Dubreuil: UAmant Travesti. 

1807. Gersain: Les Pages du Due de Vendome. 

1823. Paul de Kock: Le Midetier. 

1555. Bandello: Novelle, I, 25. 

1637. Bracciolini: La Bulgheria convertita, Canto VIII. 

HI. 3 

♦1548. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der cuplet miinich." 

*i566. Martin Montanus: Garlengesellschaft, "Ein miinch in der Beicht." 

1542. Bebelius: Facetiae, "De astutia mulierum." 

♦1850. Von der Hagen: Gesammlahenteuer, "Der Schiiler zu Paris." 

*i6o6. Marston: The Parasi taster. 

i6o8. Shar|)ham: The Fleire. 

*i6i6. Ben Jonson: The Devil is an Ass. 

1663. Rhodes: Flora's Vagaries. 

16^^- Fane: Love in the Darke. 

*i68i. Otway: Soldier's Fortune. 

♦1709. Susannah Centlivre: The Busybody, Act HI. 

*i566. Henri Estienne: Apologic pour Hcrodolc, "Une fenimc d'Or- 

l(-ans." 

*i588. Des Pdriers: Nouvelles Recreations (H. 94), "Une fcmmc d'Or- 

l^ans." 

* 1 66 1 . Mol ibre : /. ' F^cole des Maris . 

1661. Dorimont: La fcmtne Ituiustrieuse. 



l8 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

*i668. La Fontaine: Contes, "La confidante sans le savoir." 

*i6o3. Lope de Vega: La discreta enamorada. 

*i375- Sercambi: iVoz'e//e, "De malitia mulieris adulterae." 

1684. Sagredo: V Arcadia in Brenta. 

III. 4 
*i378. Chaucer: Canterbury Tales, ''TheMiWer'sTaXQ:' 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un bonhomme qu'on apelloit 

Pucien." 
*i375- Sercambi: Ar<j7;e//e, "De prelato adultero." 

III. 5 

1579. Forrest of Fancy, "Seigneor Francisco Vergelis." 
*i6i6. Ben Jonson: The Devil is an Ass. 
*i7o9. Susannah Centlivre: The Busybody, Act II. 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un valet qui donna un beau 

cheval." 
*i558. Bonaventure des Periers: Nouvelles Recreations, "De maistre 

Berthaud." 
*i566. Henri Estienne: Apologie pour Her odote. 
*i674. La Fontaine: Contes, "Le Magnifique." 

1 731. Houdart de la Motte: Le Magnifiqtie. 
*i773. Sedaine: Le Magnifique. 
1879. Barbier: Le Magnifique. 

1570. Castelvetro: Poetica d'Aristotile, "Ricciardo per la sua leggiardia," 
etc. 

III. 6 

*i548. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Die piilschaft im pad." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un homme qui mena la femme 

de son voisin aux estuves." 
*i665. La Fontaine: Contes, "Richard Minutolo." 

1705. Houdart de la Motte: Richard Minutolo. 
*i398. Sacchetti: Novelle, CCVI, "Farinello da Rieti." 
*i565. Giraldi Cinthio: Gli Ecatommithi, IX, 6, "Gerardi ama la mogUe 

di Filebo Spoletti." 

III. 7 

*i566. Martin Montanus: Thedaldus und Ermilina. 

1670. Grimmelshausen: Dietwald u. Amelinda {na.raes only). 
♦1536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un homme qui fut amoureux." 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 19 

III. 8 

*i552. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der Bawer in fegfewer." 
*i563. Kirchhof: WendimmiUh, "Von einem trunckenen Hollander." 
*i85o. Von der Hagen: Gesammtabenteuer, "Der begrabene Edelmann." 
*i456. Antoine de la Sale: Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, "D'un yvroigne de 

la Haye."' 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un abbe qui fut amoureux." 
*i588. Des Periers: Nouvelles Recreations. 
*i674. La Fontaine: Contes, "Feronde ou le Purgatoire." 

1776. Imbert: Nouvelles Historiettes en vers. 

1778. Hardouin: Almanack des Muses, "Le Mort Parlant." 

1608. Sharpham: The Fleire. 
*i64o. Fletcher: The Night Walker. 
*i375. Sercambi: Novelle, "De tradimento fatto per monacum." 

1450. Poggio: Facetiae. . 
*i875. Pitre: Fiafee 5fa7ia«e, "Li tre cumpari." 

III. 9 

1554. Anon. Strassburg: Zwo liehlichen Historien. 

1563. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, fol. 8. 

*i59i. lersele Pieter: Wisen Roei van Vrowen. 

♦1883. Lambel: Erzdhlungen und Schwdnke, "DsizBloch." 

♦1536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Un Comte de Rossillon." 

1883. Andreau: Gillette de Narbonne (pp6ra.). 

*i566. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "Giletta. oi NsiThonne." f^ 

♦1590. Shakspere: All's Well That Ends Well. 

1 513. Accolti: La Virginia (commedia). 

*i55o. Straparola: Notti, VII, i, "Ortodosio Simonc, mercante." <• 

♦1637. Basile: Pentamerone, "Cinliella e il re di BcUo Paese." 

III. 10. 

♦1850. Von der Hagen: Gesammtabenteuer, "Die Tcufelsacht." 

♦1674. La Fontaine: Cow/e5, "Le Diablc en Enfcr." 

*i536. Nicolas dc Troyes: /^ara/zj^ow, "D'un Hcrmitc." 

♦1375. Sercambi: Novelle, "Dc Romito." 

♦1398. Sacchctti: ATow/Zc, loi, "Ciiovanni c Ic trc rumite." 

♦1476. Masuccio: Novellino, V, "II Pajja a Roma." 

*i8o4. II Casti: Novelle Galanti, "II Diavolo ncll' Inferno." 



/y 



20 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

IV. I 

1472. Albrecht von Eyb: Guiscardo und Sigismonda. 
*i47o. Niklas von Wyle; Translatzion, " Von Guiscardo und Sigismunda." 
*i5i5. Hans Sachs: Ein kleglichen tragedi des Jiirsten Concreti. 
*i557. Martin Montanus: Guiscardus und Sigismunda. 

1563. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, io\. 45. 

1580. Anon., Frankfort: Ein gar erbdrmliche History. 
*i776. BUrger: Lenardo und Blandine. 

1 821. W. V. Schutz: Gismunda. 

1837. Imraermann: Ghismonda. 
*i847. Simrock: Volksbiicher, "Eine schone Historic von dem Fursten zu 
Salerno schoner Tochter Gismonda." 

1532. William Walter: Amorous Mysterie, "Guystarde and Sygys- 
monda." 
9 1566. Painter: Po/ace <?/P/ea5Mye, "Tancred and Gismonda." 

1568. Thomas Howell: N ewe Sonets and pretie Pamphlets. 
*i568. R. Wilmot: Tancred and Gismond. 

1574. Henry Wotton: Play lost. 
*i7oo. Dryden: Sigismonda and Guiscardo. 
*i7i7. Susannah Centlivre: The Cruel Gift. 

*i775- J- Thomson: Tancred and Sigismunda. Names fr. Bocc; plot 
from Gil Bias (perh. Saurin's Tancred, 1763). 

1 81 3. F. Howard: The Father's Revenge. 

1493. Jean Fleury: La piteuse et lamentable historic de Gismond. 

1538. Ant. Prevost: Les Regrets d' amours. 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "De la belle Gismonda." 

1 551. Habert d'Yssoudun: Tr. from Beroaldo. 
*i685. Guevara: Intercadencias, "La desdichada firmezza." 
*i438. L. Aretino: De amore Guiscardi et Sigismunda. 

1483. Accoiti: Versi, "Poiche, I'amato cor vide presente." 

1485. Benivieni: Novella di Tancredi. 
*i498. Beroaldo: Carmen de duobus amantibus, "Fabula Tancredi in 
latinum versa." 

1508. Antonio da Pistoia: Filustrato e Pamfila. 
*i550. Parabosco: / Diporti, 10, "Gasparo_e Briseida." 

1569. Razzi: La Gismonda {irdigedidi) . 

1583. Guasco: La Ghismonda. 

1588. Asinari: // Tancredi (tragedia). 
*i597. Torelli: II Tancredi {Sceltd, di C. L.). 
1614. Campeggi: II Tancredi (tragedia). 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 21 

1875. Bemoni: Tradizioni veneziane, ''Risguardo belo e Rismonda 
bela." 

1627. Branchi: II Guiscardo. 

1750. Cocchi: Gismunda (opera). 

1836. SafB: Tancredi, principe di Salerno. 

1876. Piazzano: La Gismonda di Sorrento (opera). 
1743. Hogarth: National Gallery, "Gismonde." 

IV. 2 

*i546. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Der Engel Gabriel." 

*i557. Martin Montanus: Wegkurzer, "Monch Albrecht." 

*i563. Kirchhof: Wendunmuth, "Ein monch." 

♦1598. A}Ter: Der verlarjt Franciscus mit der venedischen wirtfrawen. 

1768. Lowen: Die neue Agnese. 

*i834. Biilow: N ovellenhiich , "Der Genius." 

1582. Whetstone: Heptameron, "The adventure of fryer Inganno." < 

♦1589. Greene: The Spanish Masqiierado (mentioned only). 

♦1590. Tarleton's Newes out of Purgalorie, "The tale of friar Onyon." 

*i 456. Antoine de la Sale : Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, " Le faiseur de pape." 

*i566. H. Estienne: Apologie pour Herodote. 

1666. La Fontaine: Contes, "L'Hermite." 

1 710. Petit de la Croix: Contes Per sans, "Malek." 

1730. Panard: Le Sylphe Suppose. 

1743. Saint-Foix: Le Sylphe. 

1756. Cointreau: L'Atnant Salamandre. 

*i76i. Marmontel: Le Mari Sylphe. 

1765. Favart: Les Sylphes Supposes. 

1783. Qudtant: L'Amant Sylphe. 

1856. St. George: Le Sylphe (op6rz.). 

♦1470. Masuccio: Novellino, I, 2, "II quinto e\!inp,c\hta." 

♦1550. Parabosco: / Diporti, 111, "Un fratc s'innamura d'uiui donna." 

1553. Doni: Novelle, 7. 
1585. Malcspini: Novelle. 

1554. Bandcllo: Novelle, II, 2. •^ 
♦1804. II Casti: Novelle, " L'arcangclo Gabricllo." 

IV. 3 

♦1548. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Die drey j)iilctni Schwcstcm." 

♦1536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, " Trois jouveiuc-aux de Marseille." 



22 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

IV. 4 

*i5i6. Hans Sachs: Historia, "Constancia und Gerbino." 
ar *i576. Turberville: Tragical Tales, "The king of Thunise had a 

daughter faire." 
*i755. Lami: Novelle letterarie di Firenze, " La Novella di Cerbino." 

IV. 5 

*i5i5. Hans Sachs: /fw/ma, "Derermort Lorenz." 

*i557. ^lartin Montanus: Wegkurzer, "Jungfrau Lisabeta." 

jO(^ *i576. Turberville: Tragical Tales, "A merchant's daughter loved her 
brother's boy." 

*i8i9. Keats: "Isabella, or the Pot of Basil." 

*i82o. Barry Cornwall: The Sicilian Story. 

*i849. J^Iillais: Liverpool Gallery, "Isabella." 

*i868. Holman Hunt: Walker Art Gallery, "Isabella." 

IV. 6 

*i556. Hans Sachs: Historia, "Andreola mit Gabrioto." 

*i56o. Wickram: Gahriotto u. Reinhard. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une jeune fille amoureuse d'un 

jeune compaignon." 
*i565. Giraldi Cinthio: Ecatommithi, V, 6, "Graziosa e il podesta." 

IV. 7 

*i54o. Hans Sachs: Historia, "Wie zwei liebhabende von einen Sal- 
venstock sturben." 
^ *i576. Turberville: Tragical Tales, "Symone likt of Pasquine passing 
well." 
*i84o, Alfred de Musset: Simone. 

IV. 8 

*i544. Hans Sachs: Historia, "Wie zwei liebhabende menschen vor lieb 

starben." 
*i557. Martin Montanus: Wegkurzer, "Hieronimus hatte lieb eine 

jungfrau."j 
*i563. Kirchhof: Wendunmuth, "Einer edelichen person.'' 
*i85o. Von der Hagen: Gesammtabenteurer , "Frauentreue." 
^ *i576. Turberville: Tragical Tales, "A merchant's sonne that Girolamus 
bight." 
1579. Forrest of Fancy. 



BOCCACCIO AXD HIS IMITATORS 23 

*i8i9. Barry Cornwall: Dramatic Scenes and Other Poems, "The Broken 

Heart." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes : Parangon, "D'un jeune tils qui mourut." 
^ *i558. Marguerite de Navarre : Heptameron, " " La mort de deux parfaits 
amants." 
*i839. Alfred de Musset: Silvia. 
*i635. Tirso de Molina: Los arnantes de Tertiel. 
& 1554- BandeUo: Novelle, I, 20. 

♦1550. Straparola: Notti, IX, 2, "Rodolino ama Violante." 

IV. 9 

*i85o. Von der Hagen: Gesammtabentetier, "Das Herz." 

*i872. Lambel: £rzc/i/Mw^e«, "Das Herzemaere." 
.& *i576. Turberville: Tragical Tales, "In Provence were two knights." 

*i7o7. English Chaphook, "The Constant but Unhappy Lovers." (Clous- 
ton: Pop. Tales.) 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "De deux chevaliers." 

*i566. H. Estienne: Apologie, "Un mari fit manger a sa femme le coeur 
d'un gentilhomme." 

*r375. Sercambi: Novelle, "De prava araicitia vel societate." 

IV. 10 

♦1546. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der juengling in Kasten." 

♦1557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Ein jungling in eincm 

Kasten." 
♦1456. Antoine de la Sale : Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, " Le cure amoureux." 
*i536. Reyes: El Menandro. 

♦1550. Parabosco: / Diporti, 4, "Un giovane h nascoso in un forziere." 
*i565. Giraldi Cinthio: Gli Ecatommithi, III, 3, "Bice fa eiitrarc il giudicc 

in un cofano." 



1 5 1 6. Griininger : Historia von eines reyclien burgers son. 

*i546. Hans Sachs: Historia, "Der cdcl jung Cimon." 

*i557. Martin Montanus: Historia, "Cymon und Iphigenia." 

1616. W. Waldung: Cymon Galesus. 

1370. Anon.: Trans, in English verse. 

♦1856. P. Heysc: Die Brant von Cypcrn. 

/^ *i584. Greene: The Tritameron of Love, "Chymon, more wealthie than 
wittie." 



24 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

*i675. T. C. (Gent.): A pleasant and delightful history oj Galesus Cymon. 

*i7oo. Dryden: Cytnon and Iphigenia. 

*i767. Cymon (played by Garrick). 

*i847. Millais: "Cymon and Iphigenia." 

*i884. Sir Frederick Leighton : "Cymon and Iphigenia." 

*X499. Beroaldo: Mythica historia Joannis Boccaccii. 

1584. Ingegneri: La Danza di Venere. 

1792. Camillo Cajafa: Cimone (epic poem). 

V. 2 
yy *i588. Greene: Perimides, The Blacksmith, "Costanza, and Alcimedes." 

V. 3 

*i543. Hans Sachs: Petrus floch mil seiner lieben. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "De la grande infortune de deux 

amoureux." 
*i877. Imbriani: Novellaja fiorentina, "II figliolo del re di Portogallo." 

V. 4 

*i85o. Von der Hagen: Gesammtahenteuer , "Die Nachtigall." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "De la fille d'un chevalier." 

*i666. La Fontaine: Contes, "Le Rossignol." 

1743. Vergier: Contes et Nouvelles, "Le Rossignol." 

*i62i. Lope de Vega: El ruysenor de Sevilla. 

*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Ricciardo Manardi." 

1755. Lami: Novelle letterarie di Firenze, "La Lusignacca." 

*i78i. Gamerra: La Corweiie, Canto XXVI. 

*i8o4. II Casti: Novelle, "II Rossignuolo." 

*i82o. Barry Cornwall: Dramatic Scenes, "The Florentine Party." 
♦1779. Lessing: Nathan der Weise (with I, 3, and X, 3). 

V. 6 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "De deux amans qui furent at- 
taches." 
♦1556. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, " Gian di Procida." 
*i575- Tasso: Gerusalemme Liberata, '^ Olmdo djid ?)oiron\diy 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 25 

V. 7 

*i545. Hans Sachs: Commedia, "Die Violanta eines ritters tochter." 
1579. Forrest of Fancy, "Theodore enamoured of Maister Emeries 
daughter." 
*i6o8. Beaumont and Fletcher: Triumph of Love. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Du danger en quoy furent deux 
amoureux." 

V. 8 

*i522. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, "Der Koler sach ein frauen und einen 

Ritter." 
*i54o. Hans Sachs: Historia, "Wie der jung edelman Anastasius ein 

jungfrau erworb." 
1569. Christopher Tye: A notable Historie of Nastagio and Traversari. 
♦1576. Turberville: Tragical Tales, "In Italic there is a citie hight i 

Ravenna." 
1579. Forrest of Fancy (mentioned), "I might bring in Nastagio if I 

would." 
♦1633. Shirley: A Contention for Honour and Riches. { ? ) 
*i659. Shirley: Honoria and Mammon. (?) 
*i7oo. Dryden: Theodore and Honoria. 
*i8i9. Byron: Don Juan, III, 105, 106. 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une vision qui apparent a un 

amoureux." 
*i487. Correggio (or Alunno): four panels relating the talc of Nastagio 

{Burlington Mag., 1903). 
1820. Strocchi: // Cavaliere. 
1839. Paolo Costa: Opere, "La Donna di Guido dcgli Anastagc" 

(poem) . 
*i875. Giacosa: Trionjo d'Amore (secolo XIV) (not an imitation i)n)l)- 

ably). 

V. 9 

♦1543. Hans Sachs: Der Edelfilk. 

1738. Hagedom: Fabcln u. Erzdhlungcn, "Der I'aikc."' 

1776. Anon., ein Lusts[)iel— Nationaltheater, Wicn: Ihr luilkc. 

♦1776. Goethe: Brief an Frau von Stein, Der Falkc (minlioiied). 

♦1819. Barry Cornwall: Dramatic S<rws and Other I'ocms, "Tlie 
Falcon." 

♦1863. LongfelKjw: Talcs of a Wayside Inn, "Stii.Unl's Talc." 



26 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 



*i879. 

*i887. 
*i67i. 

1700. 

1718. 

1719. 

1719. 

1725- 
1772. 

1772. 

1793- 
1863. 

*l620. 

*i566. 
1564. 



Tennyson: The Falcon (St. James Theater, London). 

Wm. Black: Sabina Zembra, "Ser Federigo's Falcon." 

La Fontaine: C antes, "Le Faucon." 

Jean Palaprat : Le Faucon (never played or printed) . 

Dauvilliers: Le Faucon, ou la Constance (comedy). 

Louis Fuzelier: Le Faucon (comedy). 

Mile Barbier: Le Faucon (comedy). 

Drevetiere : Le Faucon et les Oyes de Boccace. 

Sedaine: Le Faucon (comic opera). 

De Theis: Le Singe de La Fontanie, "Frederic et Clitie." 

J. B. Radet: Le Faucon. 

J. Barbier: La Colombe (comic opera). 

Lope de Vega: El Halcon de Federico. 

Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Federigo degli Alberichi." 

Brugiantino: Cento Novelle in rima. 

V. 10 



*i546. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Die mullerin und ferberin." 

*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschqft, "Eine frau der andern fiir 

ubel hielt." 
*i52o. Morlini: Novelle, XXX. 

VI. I 

*i548. Hans Sachs: "Der unperet riter mit Oreta." 

*i375. Sercambi: Novelle, "De moctu placibili." 

*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Monna Horetta." 

VI. 2 

*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Asti fornaio con una parola." 



'1536 



'1375 
1570 



VI. 3 

Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une jouvencelle qui reprit 

I'evesque." 

Sercambi: Novelle, "De pulcra responsione." 

Castelvetro: Poetica d'Aristotile, II. 



/. 



VI. 4 

*i522. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, "Ein fasant soil nur ein bein haben," 
♦1540. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, " Der Koch mit dem Kranich." 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS I^nXATORS 27 

*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Ein koch stillt seines 
herren zom." 

1656. Gerlach: EntrapeUae. 

1660. Hermotimius: De grids pedibus. 

1677. Horl: Bachusia. 

1665. Lange: Deliciae Academicae. 

1 691. Biderman: Utopia. 

1767. Vademecumfiir lustige leiite. 

1862. Bechstein: Mdrchen, " Der Leherle's Schiwab." 

1898. Zocher: Schanes grimes Alpenland, "Die pfiffige Kochin." 

*i590. Tarleton's Newes out of Purgatorie, "The Tale of the Cooke." 

*i896. Hopkinson Smith: Colonel Carter of Cartersville, "The One- 
legged Goose." 

1681. D'Ouville: La fleur de toutes Nouvelles. 

*i566. Timoneda: Alivio, "Porque sedijo, se dijera ojte, sacara su 

piema." 

*i574. Santa Cruz: Floresta espanola. 

1879. Coelho: Contos populares portuguezes. 

*i562. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte," C\\\ch\h\o cwoco.^^ 

1684. Sagredo: Arcadia in Brenta. 

VI. 5 

♦1548. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Die zwcn ungcrschaflen Rcuter." 

VI. 6 

1570. Castelvetro: Poetica d'Aristotile. 

VI. 7 

♦1557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Kin wiri niniini i-inc 

jungfrau." 
1 541. Percgrinus: Convivialiiim Scrmonum liber, "Dcr scnis juvciic 

uxore." 
♦1536. Nicolas do Troyes: Parangnn, " D'un hommc qui avail accuse sa 

femme." 

VI. 8 

VI. 9 

♦1562. Sansovino: Cento Novellc Sccllc, "(iuido Cavaicanti." 



28 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

VI. lo 

1538. Bebelius: Facetiae, "De stationario." 
*i540. Hans Sachs: "Der Munnich zwieffel mit seim heylthumb." 
*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschafi, "Ein stationierer zeigt 
kohlen fur heiltum." 

1563. Kirchhof: Wendunmuth, "Reliquiae mit Kohle verweckselt." 

1568. Hulsbusch: Sylva sermonmn, "Hierophanta ostendit foenum pro 
reliquiis." 

1566. Luther: Tischreden, 3, 256, ed Forsteman. 

1656. Gerlach: Eutrapeliae. 

1665. Lange: Deliciae Academicae. 

1884. Baumbach: Abenteuer und Schwanke, "Die gestohlene Feder." 
*i59o. Tarleton's Newes out of Purgatorie, "The Vickar of Bergamo." 
*i589. Greene: The Spanish Masquerado (mentioned only). 
*i535. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un moine nomme frere 

Ciboulle." 
*i566. H. Estienne: Apologie, "Un religieux nomme frere Oignon." 
*i550. Parabosco: Diporti, 3 (end), "II morto Lazaro." 

VII. I 

*i54o. Hans Sachs: "Der Farber von Florenz." 

*i590. Cobler of Caunterburie, "Old Wives' Tale." 

*i55o. Straparola: Notti, V, 9, "La Thia fa scongiuro al marito." 

VII. 2 

1541. Gast: Convivialium Sennonum, "De a.du\teY^." 
*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschafi, "Eine frau verbarg ins 
olfass." 
1609. Sommer: Emplastrum Cornelianum, "Eine fraw in ein fass ver- 
steckte." 
*i566. Estienne: Apologie, "Une femme qui fit entrer son ami en un 
tonneau." 
1623. Les Delices de Verboquet. 
1674. La Fontaine: Co«te5, "Le Cuvier." 
1 761. Audinot: Le Tonnelier (opera). 
*i52o. Morlini: A/'oreZ/ae, "De viro in dolio." 

VII. 3 

♦1557. Martin Montanus: Wegkurzer, "Monch Rinaldus." 
1608. Mahrold: Rollmarschkasten. 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 29 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un Jacobin et sa commere." 
*i566. Estienne: Apologie pour Herodote, "Une Siennoise etant avec 
frere Regnard." 



VII. 4 

*i522. Pauli: Schimpf nnd Ernst, "Eine fraw ward bewert frum." 
*i546. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Das Weib in Brunnen." 
*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Wie einer sein wcib fur 
die hausthiirversperrt." 
1805. Zschokke: Peter Rotbart (imitated from Moliere). 
*i6o3. Westward for Smelts, "The Fishwife of Richmond's Tale." 
*i566. Estienne: Apologie, "Une Parisienne fait demeurer son mari 

en la rue." 
*i668. Moliere: George Daudin. 
*i4oo. Libro de los enxemplos, " Mulierum malitiam nemo idiscere" 

potest." 
*i375. Sercambi: Novelle, "De geloso e muliere malitiosa." 

1483. Arienti: Le Porretane, "Uno contadino lassa la moglie fori di casa." 
*i486. Bibiena: La Calandria. 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Toiano chiude fuor di casa la 

moglie." 
*i57-. Tasso: Intrighi d' Amore, IV , ^. 
1687. Casalicchio: L'Utile col dolce, 89. 
1865. Passa-tempo dei curiosi. 

VII. 5 

♦1543. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Der eyferer hort peichl." 

1563. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, U)\. jg. 

♦1557. Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Zu hcii ht luirt einer .scin wcib." 

♦1563. Kirchhof: WendunmiUli, "Die frau beichtet dcm manm-." 

1790. Ramlers Fabellese, "Der falsche beichtvattr." 

1576. Tho. Twyne: The Schoolmaster. 

♦1456. Antoine de la Sale: Cent Nouvclles Noiivcllcs, "Lc mari Con- 

fesseur." 

*i666. La Fontaine: Con/e^, "Lc mari Confcsscur." 

1731. D'Allainvil: Le mari curicux. 

1878. D'llcrvilly: Im Fontaine des BcniMnuid {<nm{-d\i'). 

1554. Bandello: A^'oW/g, "Un geloso ode la confessione della moglie." 

iS8o. Malespini: Novelle, 92, "Ritornato uno di viaggio." 



30 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 



/ 



1459- 
1545- 

*i545. 

*i563. 

1738. 

1742. 

*i85o. 

*i549- 
*i590. 

1607. 

1611. 
*i6io. 

1678. 
*i456. 

*i566. 

1614. 

1681. 

*i698. 

1837- 

1483. 
*i550- 

1555- 
*i566. 

1580. 



1450 

1450 

1450 

1542 

1548 

*i553 

*i559 

*i792 

1826 



VII. 6 

Poggio: Facetiae, "Muliebris vafrities." 

Gast: Sermones Conviviales. 

Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Die listig Bulerin." 

Kirchhof: Wendunmuth, "Einen einaugigen ritter betreugt seine 

hausfraw." 

Hagedorn : Ver stick in poetischen Fabeln und Erzdhlungen. 

Van Eflfen: (Eiivres diverses, "Von einer geschwinden Schalkin." 

Von dor Hagen: Gesammtabenteuer, "Der Ritter und die Niisse." 

Mery Tales, "Of the inholder's wyfe and her two lovers." 

Tarleion's Newes, "The Gentlewoman of Lyons." 

Sharpham: Cupid's Whirligig. 

Turneur: The Atheist's Tragedy. 

Beaumont and Fletcher: Women Pleased, II, 6. 

Ravenscroft: The London Cuckolds. 

Antoine de la Sale: Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, "Une dame et ses 

deux compaignons." 

Estienne: Apologie, "Une femme florentine ayant deux amants 

en sa maison." 

Bouchet: Screes. 

D'Ouville: Elite des Conies. 

Dancourt: La Parisienne. 

La Farce du Poulier a quatre personnages. 

Arienti: Le Porretane, "La moglie di marchesino Ottobuoni." 

Parabosco: / Diporti, 16, "Oderico fa uscir di casa il marito." 

Bandello: Novelle, "Una donna si trova aver tre innamorati." 

Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Madonna Isabella con Lionetto." 

Malespini: Novelle. 

VII. 7 
Anon. : Von dem Schreyher. 
Anon.: Der Schreiher im Garten. 
Rosenblut: Der Mann im Garten. 
Gast: Sermoius Conviviales. 

Burkhard Waldis: Esopus, " Vom alten mann und seinem weibt. 
Hans Sachs: Meisterlied, "Von einem ungetreuen knecht." 
Martin Montanus: Spiel vom untreuen Knecht. 
Langbein: Schwdnke, "Der Kammerdiener." 
Falk: Satyrische Werke, "Frau in der maske der zofe vom manne 
geprugelt." 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 31 

*i526. C Mery Tales, "Of the wyfe and her prentys." 

*i56o. Sackful of Newes, "There was an old man that could not well see." 

*i59o. Cobler of Caiinterburie. 

*i66i. Davenport: The City Nightcap. 

1675. Fane: Love in the Darke. 

1682. Ravenscroft: Loiidon Cuckolds. 

1815. Singer: Shaks per e's Jest Book. 

*i456. Antoine de la Sale: Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, "La bonrgeoise 

d'Orleans." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Comment une femme fit aller son 
mari en un jardin." 

1644. D'Ouville: Elite des Contes, "Ainsi il fut cocu, battu et content." 

1665. Contes a rire. 

*i666. La Fontaine: Cow/e5, "Le cocu, battu et content." 

1670. Roger Bontems en Belle Hiimeur. 

♦1695. Dancourt: Le Tuteur. 

1738. Wiege: Le Mari, cocu, battu et content (comedie). 

1883. Kryptadia, "La femme de marchand et le commis." 

*i566. Timoneda: Alivio, "Avia un aldeano mujer hermosa." 

*i6oo. Romancero General, "Novela in redondillas." 

*i68o. Andres Gil: Entr ernes del Amiga Verdadero. 

*i378. Ser Giovanni: Pecorone, "Ceccolo di Perugia." 

1459. Poggio: Facetiae, "De muliere quae virum defraudavit." 

1555. Bandello: Novelle, I, 5. 

*iS66. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Ludovico discuopra a Madonna 
Beatrice." 

1580. Malespini: Ducento Novelle, 61. 

*i78i. Gamerra: La Corneide, Canto XVIII. 

VII. 8 

♦1556. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der Bawcr mit dem Zopf." 

♦1598. Ayrer: Fastnachtspiel, "Der ubcrwundcn Eyffcrer." 

♦1850. Von der Hagen: Gesammtabenteucr, "Der vertreute Wirlh." 

♦1883. Lambel: Erzdhlum^en, "Der verkerte Wirt." 

♦1540. Andrew Borde: Mad Men of Gotham, "Twelfth Talc." 

♦1590. Cobler of Caunterburie, "Old Wives' Tale." 

♦1603. Westward for Smelts, "The Fishwife of Brainford." 

♦1633. Ma.ssinger: Guardian, IV. 

♦1456. Antoine de la Sale: Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, "Le bourgeois de 
Tours." 



32 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une femme que son mari avait 
trouvee." 

1630. Les Delices de Verboquet le Genereiix. 
*i666. La Fontaine: Conies, "La Gageure des trois Commeres." 
*i566. Timoneda: Patranuelo, "A marquina las narices cortaron." 
*i548. Firenzuola: Discorsi degli animali, "La sventurata col naso 
mozzo." 

1552. Doni: Filosofia morale. 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Undiviene geloso della moglie." 

1580. Malespini: Novelle, II, 40. 

1625. Campeggi: Novelle due. 

VII. 9 

*i78o. Wieland: Oberon, "Sechtesgesang." 

*i396. Chaucer: Canterbury Tales, "Merchant's Tale." 

*i64i. Marmion Shackerley: The Antiquary. 

*i720. Pope: Poetical Works, "January and May." 

1644. D'Ouville: Elite des Contes. 

*i666. La Fontaine: Contes, "La Gageure des trois Commeres." 

1723. LeSage: Les Trois Commhres. 

* 1 7 5 2 . Vade : Le P airier. 

1833. Desmares: Gageure des Trois Commhes. 

VII. 10 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un compagnon qui promist 
revenir." 

VIII. I 

1538. Bebelius: Facetiae, "Factum cujusdem Francigena." 

*i55i. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Die petrogen puelerin." 

1 71 9. Frederici: Der undankbare franzoss. 

*i387. Chaucer: Canterbury Tales, "The Shipman's Story." 

*i456. Antoine de la Sale: Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, 18. 

♦1536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Une dame vouloit 200 florins." 

*i666. La Fontaine: Contes, "La Femme avec Galant Escroc." 

1753, CoUe: Le Galant Escroc. 

1773. De Theis: Le Singe de La Fontaine, "La double attente." 

1787. Contes d rire. 

1 781. Imbert: Nouvelles Historiettes,''^'L& Tadirc\\6 rovcv^w.J'^ > 

1450. Poggio: Facetiae, "Anser venalis." 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 33 

VIII. 2 

*i539. H. Vogel: Das schon goUschmidtsweih. 

*i545. Hans Sachs: Der pfarrer mit sein korock. 

*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Ein pfaff giebt seinen 

chorrock zum pfand." 
*i558. Lindener: i^a^^fiwc/z/em, "Der pfaflf und frau Belcora." 
*i563. Kirchhof: Wendummith, "Ein studiosus verbult sein rock." 
*i593. Watt: Der Student mit dem morser. 

1670. Sommerklee und wintergriin, 333. 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Un gentilhomme donna pour 
cinquante escus de velours." 

VIII. 3 

*i563. Hans Sachs: "Die Schwarzen unsichtigen edlen stein." 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Colandrino cercando la 
Elitropia." 

VIII. 4 

♦1545. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der thum probst." 

1582. Whetstone: i2"e/»/awero«, "The Priest of Fiesole." 
*i456. Antoine de la Sale: Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles, "Un chevalier de 

Bourgogne." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un prestre qui cuidoit estre 
avec une femme." 

1 584. Bouchet : Serees. 

1659. Facet: Reveille-matin. 

161 1. Puenta: Jardin de Amadores. 

1554. Bandello: Novelle, II, 47. 
♦1566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "II Proposto di Fiesole." 

1580. Malespini: Novelle. 

VIII. 5 

VIII. 6 

1522. Pauli: Schimpf und Krnsl, ii)\. ^4. 
♦1546. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, " Der ])achen dich." 

1450. Poggio: Facetiae. 
♦1566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Bruncj c BufTalmacco imbolano 
un f)orco a Calandrino." 



34 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

VIII. 7 

*i545. Hans Sachs: "Der Student im Schnee." 
fi^ *i566. Painter: Pa/ocs o/P/m^Mre, "Helena of Florence." 
*i633. Massinger: The Guardian. 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une femme qui trompa un 

escolier." 
*i7o7. LeSage: Le Viable Boiteux, "Patrice et Lusita." 

VIII. 8 

1450. Rosenblut: "Die wiedervergeltung." 

♦1557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Zween gesellen." 

*i558. Lindener: Rastbiichlein, "Zwen giitt gesellen." 

1608. Mahrold: Rollmarschkasten. 

1691. Der kurzweilige Arlequin, "Der gestraffte buhler." 

*i79i. Langbein: Schwdnke, "StiWeKsiche." 

♦1850. Von der Hagen: Gesammtahenteuer , "Die drei muniche von 
Colmar." 

1635. John Jones: Adrasla. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Paraw^o^z, "De deux voisins." 

*i558. Bonaventure des Periers: Nouvelles Recreations, "De celui qui 

acheva I'oreille." 

*i566. Estienne: Apologie, "Un cousturier de Florence." 

1584. Bouchet: Series. 

*i666. La Fontaine: Co«fe5, "Le faiseur d'oreilles." 

1 710. Petit de la CroLx: Contes Persans, "Histoire d'Aronga." 

1808. Guichard: Cow/e5 e^ FaWe5, "La revanche." 

1883. Kryptadia, "Jean Matelot." 

*i476. Masuccio: Novellino, 36, "Dui cari compagni." 

*i55o. Parabosco: / Diporti, V, "Valerio e Teodoro." 

*i55o. Straparola: Notti, VI, i, "Si amano insieme duo compari." 

VIII. 9 

♦1545. Hans Sachs: "Der doctor im Venusperg." 
♦1598. Ayrer: Einfastnachtspiel von Meister Simon. 
1570. Castelvetro: Poetica d'Aristotile, "Bruno comminicia a mostrare." 

VIIL 10 

♦1550. Hans Sachs: Fastnachtspiel, "Nicola, der ksiuSmon.^^ 
*i6i7. Lope de Vega: El anzuelo de Fenisa. 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 35 

IX. I 

*i522. Pauli: Schimpfiind Ernst, "Vm dreiWerheT." 

*i54o. Hans Sachs: Fastmchtspiel, "Die jung erber witfraw Francisca." 

1563. Scherz mit der Warheyt. 

1568. Hulsbach: Sylva Sermonum. 

1687. Schauplatz: Der Betriger. 

1767. Vadefnecumfiir lustige Leute. 

1853. Prohle: Kinder utid Volkstndrchen. 

1888. Ueber Land und Meer, "Die Freier des Witwes." 

1450. Lydgate: The Lady Prioress and Her Three Lovers (ballad). 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parang&n, "De deux amans qui aymoint une 
veufve." 

1 881. Sebillot: Litter atur e orale de la Haute Br etagne. 

1883. Ortoli: Contes populaires de Tile de Corse. 

1 891. Pineau: Contes populaires du Poitou. 

IX. 2 

♦1508. Gallus: Mewsa />/n7o5o/'/«ca, "Die begine mit der hose." 
*i546. Hans Sachs: Meisterlied, "Die Epthesin mit der pruech." 

1548. Burkhard Waldis: Esopus, "Von einer armen Nonnen." 
♦1557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Eine abtissen hat eine hose 
auf dem haupte." 

1609. Sommer: Emplastrum Cornelianum, "Von einer beginen." 

1783. Dachtimandes: Die hosen des doktors im nonnenkJoster. 

1576. Tho. Twyne: The Schoolmaster, IV, "Of honest jests." 

1586. Warner: Albion's England, V, 27. 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une abbesse qui vouloit baillcr 

discipline." 
♦1566. Estienne: Apologie, "Une abbaisse au pays de Lombardie." 

1585. Noel du Fail: Matinees. 
♦1674. La Fontaine: Contes, "Le Psautier." 

1773. De Thdis: Le Singe de La Fontaine, " Lc Calc9on." 

1780. Vergier: GE/fz/re^, "La Culotte." 

1 881. Grecourt: QLuvres, "La Culotte et le Cordelier." 
*i470. Pulci: Morgante Maggiore, XVI, 59, "Quelhi Bade.ssil die voile 

tor la cuffia." 
*i52o. Morlini: Novelle, "De abbatissa quae monialcs arripicns." 

1525. Cinthio dei Fabrizii: Originc del provcrbi, "Ogni' cuflfia si .scusa 
di notte." 



36 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

IX. 3 

*i544. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Die kranckheit Kalandrin, der ein kind 

drueg." 
*i56o. Wickram: Rollwagenbiichlein, "Von einen radtsherren, der mit 

einem kind gieng." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un medecin qui fit accroire." 

1883. Kryptadia, "Le recteur en mal d'enfant." 
*i554. Straparola: A^o//i, "Scarpafico." (?) 

IX. 4 
*i545. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, *'Der herr mit dem verspilt knecht." 

IX. 5 

*i548. Hans Sachs: ^c/twaw^e "Der erganst pueler." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un homme marie." 

IX. 6 

*i554. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Die zwei Gesellen beim wirt." 

*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Zween jung gesellen." 

*i558. Lindener: Rastbiichlein, "Zwen gesellen herbergten bey einem 
wiirt." 

1785. Langbein: GeiicA/e, "Die Wiege." 

*i85o. Von der Hagen: Gesammtahenteuer , "Von zwain studenten." 

*i387. Chaucer: Caw/er&z<r;y Ta/e^, "The Reeve's Tale." 

*i525. Historie of the Mylner of Abington (not an imitation of Boccaccio). 

*i666. La Fontaine: Contes, "Le Berceau." 

1765. CoUe: Le Berceau {oYiexa). 

*i636. Reyes: El Menandro. 

1526. Cinthio dei Fabrizii: Origine dei proverbi, "Lu vai cercando 
Maria per Ravenna." 

1562. Castelvetro: Arte Poetica, "Dell' inganno precedente per ebrezza." 

IX. 7 

*i546. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Das bos weib mit dem wolf." 
*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte. 

IX. 8 

♦1547. Hans Sachs: 5cAwaw^e, "Die zwen Schmarozer." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "De Deux Gloutons." 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 37 

*i566. Sansovino: Cento Novelle Scelte, "Biondello fa una beflfa a Ciacco 
d'uno desinare." 

IX. 9 

*i545. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Die gensbriicken." 

*i 536. Nicolas de Troves : Parangon, " De deux hommes qui demanderent 

trois conseils a Solomon." 
*i378. Ser Giovanni: // Pecorone, V, 2. 

IX. 10 

*i557. Martin Montanus: Gartengesellschaft, "Pfaff Zianus." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un prestre." 

*i666. La Fontaine: Co w/e5, "Compere Pierre." 

1881. Grecourt: (Euvres badines, "La Charrue." 

*i8o4. II Casti: Novelle, "L'incantesimo." 

1850. Batacchi: Novelle, "'La. Scommessa.." 

*i875. Pitre: Fiabe Siciliane, "Lu rimitu." 

X. I 

1563. Pauli: Schimpfund Ernst, io\. i^. 

*i393. Gower: Confessio Atnantis. 

*i6oo. Shakspere: Merchant of Venice, Scene of Caskets. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parango?i, "D'un Florentin qui scrv'it Ic roy 

d'Espagne." 

♦1553. Torquemada: Colloquios Satiricos. 

♦1563. Timoneda: .^/i'yw, " Yendo camino solo un rey de Castilla." 

♦1574. Santa Cruz: Floresta espanola. 

*i6i9. Lope de Vega: El servir con mala estrella. 

♦1550. Straparola: Notti, XIII, 7, "Giorgio servo e il patrone." 

X. 2 

♦1550. Hans Sachs: Fastnachtspiel, " Das Wildbad." 

♦1563. Kirchhof: IVendunniul/i, "Kin cdclmnn machet cinen miinchcn 
gesundt." 
181 2. Langbein: N^eue Gedirhle, "Die Rcisc ins Bad." 
1836. Geib: Sagen und Geschirlttcn, "Der Kilter und dcr .\l)t." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, " D'un hommc lc(iu(l print un ahbcf." 

X. 3 

♦1779. Lessing: Nathan der Weise (together with I, 3, and V, 5). 
j^ 1567. Painter: Pa/afc 0/ /^/ca.s^re, "Mithridales and Nathan." 



a 



38 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

X. 4 

*i544. Hans Sachs: Gentile mit der Men frawen. 

*i566. Luther: Tischreden, "Ein Edelman hat ein schon jung weib 
gehabt." 
1 81 3. Grafifen: Romantischen Vignetten. 
*i8i5. Uhland: Die Todtejtvon Lustnau.(?) 
*iS^7- Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "Catharine oi Bologna.." 
% *i576. Turberville: Tragical Tales, "Gentile loved one Nicoluccio's 
wife." 
*i884. Tennyson: Lover's Tale, "The Golden Supper." 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un gentilhomme dont la femme 
fut enterree." 
1 500. Anon. : La amante risucitada. 
*i636. Reyes: El Menandro. 
*i554. Bandello: Novelle, II, 41. 

X. 5 

*i459. Johann Valentin: Andrae's chymische Hochzeit, "Christiani 

Rosencreutz." 

*i387. Chaucer: Canterbury Tales, "The Franklin's Tale." 

• *i567. Painter: Palace of Pleasure,'^ AnsaXdo and T)\anora." 

*i6o8. Beaumont and Fletcher: Triumph of Llonour. 

1620. Two Merry Milkmaids. 

*i866. Leigh Hunt: Italian Poets, "The Saracen Friends." 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "Le jardin de Janvier." 

1637. Maria de Zayas: Novelas Amorosas, "Jardi enganoso." 

' *i47o. Bojardo: Orlando Innamorato, Canto XII, "Iroldo e Tisbina." 

*i877. Imbriani: La novella ja fiorentina. 

X. 6 

*i547. Hans Sachs: Schwdnke, "Der Ritter mit den 2 schonen dochtem." 
*i 536. Nicolas de Troyes : Parangon, " Le roi Charles aimoit une pucelle." 

X. 7 

_ *i545- Hans Sachs: Konig Peter in Cicilia mit jungfrau Lisa (historia). 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'une fille qui fut amoureux d'un 

roy." 
♦1840. Alfred de Musset: Carmosine. 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 39 

X. 8 ^ 

*i53i. Hans Sachs: Die getreuen Jieiden (histovia.). 

1546. Hans Sachs: Titus a7id Gesip pus {comedia). 

1 541. Bnano: Etliche historien undfabeln. 

1 551. Schwartzenbach: Comedi — darinnen rechte trew tind freundschaft 
fiirgestdlt wiirtd. 
*i557. Martin Montanus: Spiel von Titus und Gisippus. 

1578. Kaspar Veres: Die zwei treivenjreunde. 

1608. Mahrold: Rollmarschkasten. 

1623. Speccius: Comoedia de Titi et Gisippi amicitia (Altdorf). 

1670. Sommerklee und winter griin, "Nicolaus und Franciscus." 
*i74o. Acerra Philologica, "Historia des Gesippi und Titi." 

1 781. Gotter: Der mann den seine fratmicJit kennt. 

1880. Widmann: Die konigen des Ostens. 
*i425. Lydgate: Fahida duorum mercatorum. 

*i53i. Tho. Elyot: The Governor, "The wonderful history of Titus and ^ 

Gesippus." 

1532. William Walter: The History of Titus and Gesippus (trans, of 
Beroaldo). 

1562. Edw. Lewicke: History of Titus and Gesippus draivcn into 
English metre. 

1569. Radcliffe: De Titi et Gisippi amicitia (drama). 

1592. Tho. Underdonne: Titus and Gesyp pus (lost). 
♦1592. Greene: Philomela (ending). 
*i620. Fletcher: Monsieur Thomas. 

1724. Faithful Friendship, or Alphonso and Septimus (ballad). 
♦1759. Goldsmith: TAe 5ee, "Story of Alcander and Septimus." 
♦1820. Collier: Poetical Decameron (review of Lewicke's version). 
*i842. Gerald Griffin: Gisippus (tragedy, Drury Lane Theater). 
*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un compaignon athenois." 
♦1622. Hardy: Gesippe, ou les Deux Amis. 

1638. Chevreau: Les Deux Amis. 

lyjT,. Boissy: Le Mari par supercherie. 
♦1566. Timoncda: I'atranuelo, "I'or Urbino, Fcdcrico con .Antonia non 

caso." 
*i6i4. Lope de Vega: La Boda enlre dos maridos. 
♦1636. Reyes: El Curial de Parnaso. 
♦1492. Beroaldo: De Tito Romano Gisippoquc Athcnirnsi. 

1 510. Nardi: Amicitia (comedia). 

1553. Anon.: Risposta di Carmidc Ataiicsc a Tito {)uinto Fulvio. 



40 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

*i555. Nobili von Montepulciano : Titus et Gisippus (poem) (Manni). 
1 613. Galeotto Oddi: Gisippo (comedia). 

1868. Lihro di novelle antic he {=Scelta di curiosita, lett. 4), ''Die due 
mercatanti." 

X. 9 

*i598. Ayrer: Comedi von Soldan von Babilonia. 
*i567. Painter: Palace of Pleasure, "Thorello and Saladine." 
*i69o. Aphra Behn: The Nun, or the fair Vow-Breaker. 
*i694. Southern: The Fatal Marriage. 

*i536. Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "D'un chevalier qui receut le 
Soudan." 

X. 10 

1470. Albrecht von Eyb : Grisardis. 

*i47i. Arigo (Steinhowel) : Griselda. 

*i546. Hans Sachs: Die geduUig und gehorsam graffin Griselda (comedia). 

1563. Pauli: Schimpf und Ernst, io\. 2^. 

*i563. Kirchhof: Wendunmuth, ''^W on 'Utrzog Durando und Fortunata." 

1582. Mauricius: Griselda (comedia). 

1590. Pondo: Griselda. 

1653. Fiedler: MarggrafWalther. 

1687. Martinus von Cochem: Griseldis. 

1810. Nicolay: Vermischten Gedichte, "Griselde." 

1804. Arnim: Ariel, "Die zweite Hochzeit." 

1830. Schwab: Griseldis, Volkssage in zehn Romanzen. 

♦1835. Halm: Griseldis. 

1845. Liideman: Griseldis. 

1847. Simrock: Volksbiicher, "Fine schone anmuthige Historie." 

1862. Bechstein: Mdrchen, ^' Gri&eldis." 

*igo8. Hauptmann: Griselda. 

♦1378. Chaucer: Canterbury Tales, "The Clerk's Tale." 

1560. Doloney: Of Patient Grissel and a Noble Marques (haWsid). 

1560. Radcliffe: De patientia Griselidis. 

♦1590. A Pleasant and Sweet History of Patient Grissel (trans, from the 

Italian). 

*i590. A true and admirable history of Patient Grissill (trans, from the 

French). 

♦1603. Dekker: A Pleasant Comedie of Patient Grissill. 

*i667. Pepys Diary (mention of a puppet play, Patient Gryssel). 

1739. Geo. Ogle: Gualtherus and Griselda (poem). 



CCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 



41 



j5- 

1395- 
*i45o. 

1470. 
*i536. 
*i69i. 

1714. 

1791. 
*i89i. 
*i45o. 

1460. 
*i566. 
*i6o3. 
*i6i6. 
*i65o. 



1904. 
*i373- 

1375- 
♦1500. 

1613. 

1620. 

1630. 

1700. 

1 701. 
♦1736. 

1796. 

1869. 

1875- 



Paradise of Dainty Devices, "Death of Patient Grizel and 
Ivice to Ladies." 
Miss Sothby: Patient Griselda (a tale). 
Edwan Arnold : Griselda (a tragedy) . 
Braddon, M. E.: Griselda (Princess Theater). 
Le Mystdre de Griseldis (Paris). 

Mirouer des femmes vertueuses, "La patience Griselidis." 
Olivier de la Marche: Le Parement et Triomphe des Dames. 
Nicolas de Troyes: Parangon, "De Griselidis." 
Perrault: Griseldis. 
Gillet: Griselde (comedie en vers). 
Desforges: Griselidis (opera). 
Silvestre et Morand: Griselidis (mystfere). 
Metge : Historia de las hellas virtuts. 
Castigos e doctrinas que un Sabie dava a sus hijas. 
Timoneda: Patraniielo, "Por su bondad Griseldis luh marquesa." 
Navarro: Comedia muy exemplar de la marquesa de Saluzia. 
Lope de Vega: El exemplo de casadas. 
Romancero General — Griselda y Gualtero. 

Historia de Griselda, "La qual lo marques Walter pregn^ por 
muller." 

Miquel y Planas: Histories d'allre temps, " Valter y Griselda." 
Petrarca: De obedientia ac fide uxoria. 
Sercambi: Novelle, "De muliere costante." 
Pinturicchio: Griselda (scenes from) (National Gallery). 
Galeotto Oddi: Griselda (comedia). 
Mazzi: Griselda (tragicommedia morale). 
Massimo: Griselda (tragicommedia). 
Maggi: Lm. Griselda di Saluzzo. 
Apostolo Zeno: Griselda. 
Goldoni: La Griselda. 
Paer: Griselda (ojjera). 
Agnillo d'Agnone: Griselda (drama). 

(ifjri: Idodici avvertimcnti clie deve dare la madrc alia figliuola 
(MS XIV). 




BIBLIOGRAPHY^ 

Anschiitz, R. Boccaccios Novella vom Falken. Erlangen, 1892. 
Bedier, J. Les Fabliaux, chap, vi, "Le Fabliau aux tresses." Paris, 1895. 
Bourland, C. B. Boccaccio and the Decameron in Castilian and Catalan Litera- 
ture. Paris, 1905. 
Cappelletti, L. Studi stil Decamerone. Parma, 1880. 
Cesano, Amalia. Hans Sachs ed i siioi rapporti con la letteratura italiana. Rome, 

1904. 
Du Meril, E. Histoire de la Poesie Scandinave. Paris, 1839. 
Dunlop-Liebrecht. Geschichte der Prosadichtungen. Berlin, 185 1. 
Hutton, E. Giovanni Boccaccio. New York, 19 10. 
Koeppel, E. Studien zur Geschichte der italienischen Novelle in der englischen 

Literatur des XVI. Jahrhunderts. Strassburg, 1892. 
Landau, M. Geschichte der Italienischen Novelle. Vienna, 1875. 
Landau, M. Die Quellen des Dekanieron. Stuttgart, 188 1. 
Manni, D. Illustrazione istorica del Boccaccio. Florence, 1742. 
Schofield, W. V. The Source and History of the Seventh Novel 0} the Seventh 

Day. Boston, 1899. 
Scott, M. A. Elizabethan Translations from the Italian. Pub. M. L. A., 1895-96. 
Westenholz. Die Grieseldis-Sage in der Litteratur geschichte. Heidelberg, 1888. 
Zambrini, Fr. Bibliografia Boccaccesca. Bologna, 1875. 
" Bibliothek des Literarischen Vereins in Stuttgart": 

Ayrers Dramen, Keller. Stuttgart, 1865. 

Hans Sachs, Keller. Tubingen, 1870-79. 

Kirkhoj Wendunmiith, Oesterley. Stuttgart, 1869. 

Lindeners Schwankbiicher, Lichtenstein. Stuttgart, 1883. 

Martin Montanus — Schwanbucher, Bolte. Stuttgart, 1899. 

Paidi. Schimpj und Ernst, Oesterley. Stuttgart, 1866. 

Wickram, Rollwagenbiichlein, Bolte. Stuttgart, 1903. 
"Neudrucke Deutschen Litteraturwerke " : 

Hans Sachs — Fastnachspiele, Goetz. Halle, 1880-84. 

Hans Sachs — Fabeln und Schwdnke, Goetz und Drescher. Halle, 1893- 
1904. 
"Grands Ecrivains de la France": 

La Fontaine, Regnier. Paris, 1887-90. 

I The above bibliography indicates only the principal monographs and editions 
of authors containing notes bearing upon this subject, which have been used in pre- 
paring this work. In a more detailed discussion of the different Novelle which is 
in preparation, there will appear a fuller bibliography containing references to articles 
in various periodicals. 

42 






I 



ADDITIONS 

The following additions are not to be classed as genuine imitations of 
Boccaccio, being, in most cases, merely translations or adaptations. 

II. 9 
1755. Marsh: Cymheline (adapted). 
1778. Brooke: Cymbeline (adapted). 
1806. Kemble: Cymbeline (adapted). 

1880. "Cymbeline in a Hindoo Playhouse" {Eclec. Mag., July, 1880). 

III. 8 
1801. Casti: Novelle, "II Purgatorio." 

V. I 

1850. Planche: Cymon and Iphigenia. 

V. 9 

1905. G. C. Rowland: Ten Best Stories, "The Falcon," Chicago Tribune. 
1908. Ben Greet Company, The Falcon. 

VII. I 

1548. Burkhard Waldis: Esopus, "Vom Studenten u. einem jMiillcr." 

VII. 8 
1538. Hans Sachs: Schwanke, "Die Schererin mit der Nase." 
1855. Keller: Erzahlungen, "Der PfafI mit der Snuer." 

X. 8 
1862. Bechstein: Mdrchen, "Zwci wahrc I'riunde" (Lydgate's version). 

X. 10 

OPERAS BASED UPON APOSTOLO ZENO'S LinRETTO, "gRISELDA" 

1 701. Pollarolo (Venice). 

1707. Chelleri (Piaccn/.a). 

1710. CapcUi (Rovigo). 

171 1. Prcdicri (Bologna). 

1720. Orlandini (Bologna). 

1721. Scarlatti (Rome). 

1722. Bononicini (Lonclon). 

4.? 



44 BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 

1725. Caldara (Vienna). 

1726. Conti (Vienna). 
1728. Albinoni (Rome). 
1735. Vivaldi (Venice). 
1747. Latilla (Rome). 

1793. Piccini (Venice). 
1796. Paer (Parma). 

1850. Fitzwilliam (London). 

1848. Cope: "Marriage of Griselda" (painting in the House of Lords). 

1794. Kauffmann: "Angelica" (painting; afterward engraved). 

NOTES 

The references to Pauli, Schimpj und Ernst (1863), are given on the authority of 
Du Meril. 

For Nicolas de Troyes the Mabille edition, Blhl. Elzev., has been used. 

For Sansovino, the references are to the 1566 edition, quoted by Manni. 

For Sercambi, the references are to the Renier edition. 

Approximate dates have been given in the case of Chaucer, Sercambi, Ser Giovanni 
Sacchetti, Lydgate, and Ayrer. 



INDEX OF PRINCIPAL AUTHORS 



This Index is intended to be made use of in connection with Table B, pp. lo, n. 
The roman numerals refer to the day; the arable to the novella. 



IV, 2; VII, 8; 
J, 8; VII, 5, 6; 



Aretino, P.: II, 5. 
Arnold, Edwin: X, 10. 
A}Ter: I, i; II, 5, 8; 

\TII, 9; X, 9. 
Bandello: III, 2; IV, 

\TII, 4; X, 4. 
Bebelius: III, 3; VI, 10; VIII, 4. 
Bechstein: VI, 4; X, 8, 10. 
Behn, Aphra: II, 5, 6; X, 9. 
Beroaldo: IV, i; V, i; X, 8. 
Black, Wm.: V, 9. 
Bojardo: X, 5. 
Braddon, M. E.: X, 10. 
Billow: IV, 2. 
Burger: IV, i. 

Burkhard Waldeis: VII, 7; IX, 2. 
B>Ton: V, 8. 
Castelvetro: 1,8; 11,9; 111,5; VI, 3, 6; 

VIII, 9; IX, 6. 
Casti: III, i, 2, 10; IV, 2; V, 4; IX, 10. 
Centlivre: III, 3, 5; IV, i. 
C abler 0} Caunterburie: VII, i, 7, 8. 
Cornwall, Barry: III, 2; IV, 5; V, 5, 9. 
Dancourt: VII, 6, 7. 
Dekker: X, 10. 
Dryden: IV, i; V, 8. 
Estienne: III, 3, 5; IV, 2, 9; VII, 2, 3, 6; 

VIII, 8; IX, 9. 
Fabrizii, Cinthio dci: IX, 2, 6. 
Favart: IV, 2. 
Pigueroa: II, 5. 
Firenzuola: VII, 8. 
Fletcher: III, 8; VII, 6; X, 5, 8. 
Forrest 0} Fancy: IV, 8; V, 7, 8. 
Garrick: II, 9; V, i. 
Oiacosa: V, 8. 
Giovanni, Scr: VII, 7; IX, 9. 
Giraldi: 11,6; 111,6; IV, 6, 10. 
Goldoni: X, 10. 
Goldsmith: X, 8. 
Gr^court: IX, 2, 10. 



Greene: IX, 2, 10. 

Hagen, von der: II, 9; III, 8; IV, 9; 

VII, 6; VII, 8; VIII, 8; IX, 6, 
Hauptmann; X, 10. 
Hey wood: II, 9. 
Heyse: V, i. 
Hogarth: IV, i. 
Imbert: I, 4; III, 8; VIII, i. 
Jonson, Ben: II, 2; III, 3. 
Kirchhof: II, 8; IV, 2; VI, 10; VII, 5, 6; 

X, 2. 
Kock, Paul de: II, 10; III, 2. 
Kryptadia: VII, 7; VIII, 8; IX, 3. 
Langbein: VII, 7; VIII, 8; X, 2. 
Leighton: V, i. 

Lessing: I, 3. ' 

Lindener: VIII, 2, 8; IX, 6. 
Longfellow: V, 9. 
Luther: I, 2; VI, 10; X, 4. 
Lydgate: IX, i; X, 8. 
Mahrold: I, 4; VIII, 8; X, 2. 
Marmontel: IV, 2. 
Masuccio: III, 10; IV, 2; VIII, S. 
Millais: IV, 5; V, 8. 
Moliere: 111,3; VII, 4. 
Musset, de: IV, 7, 8; X, 7. 
01im|)ia Fulvia Morata: I, i, 2. 
I'inturicchio: X, 10. 
Panard: IV, 2. 
Paral>i)sc(): IV, i, 2, 10; V, 8. 
Pauli: I, 3; II, I, 5, 9; 111,9; IV. 1. • 
Periers, <lcs: III, 3, 5, 8; VIII, S. 
Perrault: X, 10. 
Pitre: 11,5,9; 111,6,8; IX, 10. 
Poggio: 111,8; VII, 7; VIII, 6. 
Pope: VII, 9. 
Pulri: IX, 2. 

Sanhctli: III, 6, 10. * 

Sagrcdo: III, 3; VI, 4. 
Sale, Anloinc dc la: III, 8; IV, 2, 10. 
Scdainc: II, 10; 111,5; V, 9. 



45 



46 



BOCCACCIO AND HIS IMITATORS 



Shakspere: II, 9; III, 9; X, i. 
Smith, Hopkinson: VI, 4. 
Straparola: III, 9; IV, 8; VII, 

VIII, 8; IX, 3. 
Swift: I, 3. 

Tarlelon's Newes: IV, 2; VI, 4, 10. 
Tasso: V, 6. 
Tennyson: V, 9; X, 4. 
Tirso de Molina: IV, 8. 



Turberville: IV, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9; \, 

Vade: VII, 9. 

Voltaire: I, i. 

Westward jor Smelts: II, 9; VII, 

VII, 8. 
Wickram: IV, 6; IX, 3. 
Wieland: VII, 9. 
Zschokke: VII, 4. 



•'■V 



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