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Full text of "Bomb"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bomb1920virg 



THE- 



BUNB 




I 



A BGDK Pl/BLISHLD aNNUflLLY 

BV TME. 

COI^PS OF- Cfll^ETS 

OP THE- 

VIRGINIA MILIlRy INSTITI/TE. 

LtXIN^TON, l/fl 



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FOREWORD 



TO the casual reader this book 
will portray most of the joys 
and a few of the sorrows of 
Cadet Life. 

To the Class of it's source may it 
ever be a relaxation in times of ten- 
sion, a spur to the jaded imagination, 
a memoir of the most intimate asso- 
ciations and the truest friendships 
of a lifetime. Suffering as they may 
have, "the slings and arrows of out- 
rageous fortune", it remains but for 
the future to erase all troubled mem- 
ories and to supplant them with only 
happy recollections. 




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attttutir, tmtaluablr ai&, aui> mittrtng 
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Ijaur uinn tijp ri'a^tprt. gratttuJir, anh 
loup nf all mljo lutoiu Ipm. 

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I. Thl In5titi;te. 


H./Ithlltics 


I. ^DMINISRATION 


M. Clubs &0r6ANIZ7ITIONS 


IQ. Cusses 


W.The Hops 


E. flcaoEMic 


K. Hot Shots 


Y. MlLITflRY 


I. flDVERTISEMEMTS 



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BOARD OF 
VISITORS 



TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1. 1920 

HON. RORER A. JAMES Danvtlh. la. 

HON. GEORGE L. BROWNING Orange. J' a. 

GEORGE W. STEVENS, ESQ Greenlee. la. 

CAPT. L. W. H. PEYTON Staunton, la. 



TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1, 1922 

MR. W. 0. WINSTON Richmond, la. 

MR. FRANCIS BELL Dublin, ['a. 

MR. 6. TAYLOE GWATHMEY Norfolk, la. 

CAPT. M. C. JACKSON Petersburg, la. 

COL. GRANVILLE GAINES Warrenton. Va. 



MEJIBERS OF THE BOARD EX-OFFICO 

COL. JO LANE STERNE 

Adjutant General of V^irginia 

Richmond . la. 

HON. HARRIS HART 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Richmond . la. 



Page Fifteen 




FACULTY 



j-«r 




.MA.f()R-(;EXKKAI. I-IDWARI) WKST XICIIol-S 

Born, Petersburg, Virginia, June 27, 1S5S. Student lluiue and Cook's 
sehool '66- '()9 and at MeCabe's sehool '69- '74. Graduated froui the Virginia 
Jlilitary Institute in 1878 as the fourth distinguished graduate in his elass 
and a eadet Lieutenant. Studied la\\- at the University of Virginia. Assist- 
ant professor of niatliematies at V. Jl. I. '78- '81. Practised law in Norfolk 
'Sl-'82. Profe.ssor P^ngineeidng V. Jl. I. '82- '90 and of mathematies '90-'97. 
Sinee 1907 Superintendent V. !M. I. Author of Xiehols' Analytical Geometry 
and Nichols' Differential and Integral Calculus. Since 1903, associated with 
The American Reporter International Railway Congress in scientific investi- 
gation. Member, Virginia Geological Society, Society for the Promotion of 
i-'ngineei'ing Education. The Committee of Collegi' Presidents and Summer 
Camps, and the State Geological Commisson. Cliaiiiiian of the Virginia State 
Council of Defense, and of thr Association of Military Colleges. 
"T's li, ydii ynunii riisiiil ht a num." 



^^^M^^^^B^^^BMk 




fOl.. XATIIAXIKI, B. TUCKER. 
B. S., C. E. 

student at Shenaiuloah Valley 
Aeademy. Attended V. ^I. I. '85- 
'88, graduating first in his class 
with the rank of cadet quarter- 
master, and the degree of C. E. 
Appointed ass't professor of Latin 
at V. M. I. '88-'89, being transferi-ed 
to the Department of Chemistry as 
ass't professor '89- '91. Was ad- 
junct professor of Mineralogy and 
Geology V. M. I. '91- '96. Since 1896 
he has been professor of Mineral- 
ogy at V. jM. I. Member of State 
Boai'd of Education, '07- '11. 
"Oh! Think, think, think a minute. 

I don't u-ant to knoiv ivhtit thr hook 

snys." 




COL. HrxTLi; i'i-;.\i)Li;p<»x. 

M. A., Ph. D. 

Born at Frederick Hall ; Louisa 
County, Virginia, January 22, 1858. 
A student at Aspen Hill Academy, 
'73- '75, he entered the L'uiversity of 
N'irginia, receiving the degree of M. 
A. in '81. Instructor in Pantops 
Academy. He then resumed his 
studies in chemistry at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, '82- '83, and chem- 
istry and mineralogy at the Univer- 
sity of Gottingen, Gemiany, '83- '86, 
being awarded his Ph. D. at the lat- 
tci' in '86. Appointed instructor at 
Tuft.s University, Boston, Mass., '87- 
'89, he resigned his position to be- 
come professor of Natural Science 
at Bethlehem College, AV. Va., '89- 
90. Since July 30, 1890, he has 
been professor of Chemistry at the 
Virginia Military Institute. 
"Tha-a-a t'll do." 



Page Seventeen 




COI.. FRANCIS JIALLORY, C. p]. 
Born August 15. 18fiS. Graduated 
from \orfolk Academy, '86. Enter- 
ing V. JI. T.. he graduated as second 
Jaelvson Hope medalist. July 1889, 
with the degree of ('. E. Command- 
ant and pi'ofessor of Mathematics at 
Pishhurne JMih'tai'v Academy. '89- 
'91. Post ad.iutant and a.ssistant 
professor of Mathematics at V. M. 
I., '91 -'94. He then resumed his 
studies, taking post graduate work 
in Physics, ]N[atheni.atics and Astron- 
omy at Johns Hopkins University, 
'94- '97. Appointed ad.junct profes- 
sor of Physics and Astronomy at V. 
M. I., '97- '99. Since '99 he lias been 
professor of Physics and Electrical 
Engineering at the Vii'giiiia Mill 
tary Institule. 

"Eh/ Which %iny dues thi' current go? 
eh?" 




COL. HENRY CLINTON FORD. 

B. S., Ph. D. 
Born December 12, 18(i7, Char- 
lotte County, Virginia. Attended 
private school in Charlotte County. 
Student Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College. Blacksburg, Virginia, 
'84- '85. Entered V. M. I., '85, grad- 
uating fourth in his class in '89 with 
tlie rank of cadet adjutant and de- 
gi'ee of B. S. Assistant professor 
of Modern Languages and Tactics. 
V. j\[. I., '89- '90, Commandant of 
Cadets. Wentworth Military Acad- 
emy. Lexington, Missouri, '90- '93. 
Student at the University of Vir- 
ginia. '93- '95, which conferred upon 
him the degree of Ph. D., in '99. 
Ad.junct professor of Latin and Eng- 
lisll. V. M. L, '99- '02 and Command- 
ant of Cadets, '02- '04. Since '04 
professor of Latin and History, V^. 
M. L A member of the State Board 
of Education. 
"Now you are talking like a Bosbevki." 



■ >^^>*•<^^^«^S:^7•^»^^'l'MJOil'|J^l•^'llI'■ 



/V//7'• Eigliteen 




COL. JOHN MERCER PATTON, 
M. A. 
Entered V. M. I., '76, graduating as 
first Jackson Hope medalist in '80. 
Ass't professor of Mathematics, 
French and Tactics, Y. M. I., '80- 
'82. A student at the University of 
Berlin, '82- '83, and at Paris, Madrid 
and Seville, '83- '86. Appointed as- 
sociate professor of Modern Lan- 
g-uages at the University of Indiana, 
Jan. to June '86. Instructor at 
Belvue High School, Va., '86- '87. 
Principal of St. Paul's School for 
Boys, Cal., and Visalia Normal 
School, Cal. A law student, '90- '92. 
Ass't principal at Hoyt's School for 
Boys, Cal. Principal of Literature, 
Grammar School; Principal of L'n- 
ion High School No. 1; and instruc- 
tor in Modern Languages, Oakland 
High School. Oakland, Cal. Pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages and 
Commandant of Cadets at the L^ni- 
vei'sity of Arizona. Ass't professor 
of Modern Languages at V. M. I. 
Since 1915 professoi' of Modern 
Languages at V. M. I. 
"Keep your desks clean, children." 




COL. THOMAS ARCHER JONES, 
B. S., C. E. 
Student Norfolk Public School 
and Gatewood's School for Boys. 
Entered V. M. I. in 1895, graduat- 
ing in June 1898, as the first dis- 
tinguished graduate of his class and 
a cadet lieutenant. With the South- 
ern Paving and Construction Com- 
panv, '98- '00; with the Asheville 
Street Railways Co., 1900-1903; Sea- 
boai'd Airline Railway, '03- '05. Ad- 
junct professor of Engineering at 
V. M. I., '05- '07. Member State 
Highway Commission, '06. Col. and 
professor of Civil Engineering V. 
M. I., '07- '18. Retired in 1918 on 
account of ill healtli. 
"Ehf eh! draw a figure." 



_r^^ 



PagL Nineteen 




COL. CHARI.KS WVATT WATTS, 
('. K. 
Student Norfolk Academy, '87- 
'89. He graduated from V. M. I., 
fifth in his class and cadet lieuten- 
ant in '93. An instructor at Dan- 
ville Military Academy, '93-'96. As- 
sistant professor of iMathematics at 
V. M. I., '96- '99, and adjunct pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, '99- '08. Lt. 
Col. and associate professor of 
Mathematics V. M. I., '08. Since 
'09 he has been professor of Mathe- 
matics at the Viro-inia :Milita7'y In- 
stitute. 
"Let us takf this fiqurt- as an illuslra- 




COL. Ror.KRT THOMAS KKRLIX. 
M. A., Ph. D. 
Boi-n, Newcastle, Mo.. March 22, 
1866. JI. A. Central College Mo., 
1890. Attended Johns Hopkins Uni- 
vei-.sity. '89- '90; University of Chi- 
cago aod Harvard. Ph. D. Yale. '06. 
Prof. English. Mo. Valley College, 
■90-'94. Activr Ministry 51. E.. 
Church, South. '95- '9S. Chaplain 
3i-d 5Io. \'ol. Spanish American 
War. Prof. English Mo. Valley Col- 
lege- '10- '02. Southwestern Univer- 
sity, '02- '03. State Normal, '03- '06. 
Instructor English Yale, '06- '07. 
Prof, of Literature, State Normal, 
Farmville, Va., '08- '10. Since 1910 
Prof. English at V. M. 1. Editor 
and Author of a number of volumes 
of poems and other works. Head 
of A(bninst ration Department of a 
liranch of the Khaki Univer.sity in 
France. 

"(J/as.f t/o to till- hoard." 



HifflfflffliS 



Pa,i,- T'L-^.nly 




C01>. WILLIAM M. Ill XLKV. 
A. B. 

Received his A. B. from Johns 
Hopkins in '04, and took post grail- 
uate work '06- '08. Assistant editor 
and reporter for the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger, The Washington 
Post and the Baltimore Sun, '08- '10. 
He was assistant professor of Polit- 
ical Science at the University of 
Virginia, '10- '14. Since 1914 lie 
has been professor of Political 
Science, Philosophy and Economics 
at V. M. I. He is secretary of the 
University Commission on Southern 
Race Question, and Advisory Editor 
of the Virginia Journal of Educa- 
tion. Also Executive Secretary of 
the Virginia Council of Defense. 
"I'll venture to say that you gentlemen 
ivill find this interesting if you ivill read 
it over." 



LT. (iEORGL A. DKLMnsill KL, 

U. S. A., COL. VA.. X. G. 
Graduated from the Virginia Mili- 
laiy Institute in 1899 with the 
rank of cadet first captain. A Tac- 
tical officer at V. M. I., '99- '01. He 
served as a lieutenant with the 
Puerto Rico Regiment, being trans- 
ferred from this to the regular 
army, and sei-ving both in Puerto 
Rico and the Philippines. Retired 
from the army in '04. With the 
Engineering Department of the New 
York Centi'al Railway, '05- '15, leav- 
ing this to become Post Adjutant 
and Instructor in JIathematics, V. 
M. I., '15-17. Recalled to the ac- 
tive list '17 and a.ssigned as Com- 
mandant of Cadets and professor of 
Military Science and Tactics for the 
period of the war. Since February 
1919, he has been Executive Officer 
and Aide to the Superintendent. 
"Yah. sir, hut you understand the regu- 
lation must he enforced. Sah." 



H^^^-^SX. 



ige T-zienly-oftf 




COL. R. C. BULL 

Received B. S. degi'ec at Colorado 
College in 1904, A. B. Universitj' of 
Kansas 1906, M. D. Jefferson Jledi- 
eal College 1909. 1st Lieut. Medieal 
Resei've Corps, V. S, A. 1912, 1st 
Lieut. M. C. Regular Army May 1, 
1913, Capt. M. C. June 7th, 1916, 
Major retired May 15, 1917, Lieut. 
Col. M. C. Nov. 8, 1918 to May 31, 
1919, Army Medical School, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 1912-1913, Sanitary 
Train, 2nd Division 1913-1916, Ad- 
.iutant, Walter Reed Hospital, 1916- 
1918, Personnel Division, Surgeon 
(Jeneral's Office, 1918-1919. Since 
Sept. 1, 1919, Professor of Biology 
iuid I'ost Surgeon V. M. 1. 
"(iijdd morning; iihut Kin I ilo for 
you.'" 




COL. THOMAS ADDIS EiLMKT 
MOSELY 

Born August 27, 1886, JIaryland. 
Received A. B. at Hopkins, 1907. 
Received Ph. D. at Hopkins in 1915. 
Instructor Jlodcrn Languages at 
Pi'ineeton 1911 to 1916. Professor 
Romance Languages Washington & 
Jefferson, 1916-1919. Since Sept. 
1919, Professor of Kouiance Lang- 
uages V. M. I. 



•^^''^s^iiliii 



Page Tiie?ity-iiio 




COL. HENRY M. NELLY 
Bom January 1, 1878, Parkers.- 
burg, W. Va.. V. M. I. September 
1894 to June 1895. Graduated U. 
S. M. A. 1902. Commissioned 2nd 
lieut. Inf. and stationed at Fort 
Sheridan, III, upon graduation. 
Phillipine Island 1903-1906. Trans- 
ferred to San Franeiseo, Cal. 1906. 
Graduated V. S. Infantry and Caval- 
ry School 1907. Instructor in Draw- 
ing U. S. M. A. 1907-1911. Head 
Coach and Football Representative 
U. S. M. A. 1908-10. Commissioned 
1st Lieut. Inf. 1911, stationed Fort 
Douglas, Utar. El Paso, Texas 1913 
to 1915. Transferred to Tientsin, 
China 191 5- '17. Promoted to Major 
A. G. D. July 1917. Major & Div, 
Adj. 34th Division, Camp Cody, New 
Mexico, 1917 to '18. Service in 
France Oct. '18 to Nov. '18. Pro- 
moted to Lt. Col. and Corp. Adj. 
1st Army Corjjs, France, Nov. '18 
to April '19. Promoted to Col. Inf. 
May 1919. Commandant and pro- 
fessor of Mil. Science & Tactics V. 
M. I., since Sept. '19. 
"Men of the corps, a bomb has been 
fired." 




LT. C(tL. ROBERT BARCLAY 
POAGUE, B. S. 

Born Rockbridge Co., Va., Decem- 
ber 5, 1881. He graduated from V. 
^L L ill 1900. standing fourth in his 
class. \\i;h Amei-ican Telephone 
and Telegraph Co., and the Pennsyl- 
vania Railway. Commandant of 
Cadet; Chambcrlain-Hunt Academy, 
Port (;ibson, Mifs., '02- '03. With 
1he (lulf and Ship Island Railway, 
(Julfpoi't, Mis-., '03- '04. Assistant 
I'l-ofesi-oi' of Physics V. M. I. '04, 
being tranffcrred to the Department 
of Drawing as adjunct professor 
'OS- '13. In charge of the Summer 
Coaching School, '08- '12. Since '13, 
Lt. Col. and arociate professor of 
Engine ci-iiiT ; acting head of the De- 
pai'tiiK nt f ince 1917. 
"// yon hnve nny knoivledgc uhatever 
you htive most effectively concealed it." 



Page Twenty-three 






V 




J.T. COL. K. S. rEKKIXS 

Born Norfolk, V., 1885. Entering 
V. M. I. in 1900 he graduated in 
1905 as a Cadet Captain. Entered 
Field Artillery United States army 
in 1908. During the wai' he was 
assigned to the 350th Field Artillery 
for a time but was soon transferred 
to the Inspector Generals Depart- 
ment uudei- whieh his duties were to 
inspect the different Artillery or- 
ganizations befoi'e they went over 
seas. 

"Du \iiu $(ivv\- that. Huh?" 




LT. CUL. A. B. DOCKERY 

Born December 6, 1878, Hernan- 
do, Miss. Graduated V. M. I. 1898. 
Graduated U. S. M. A. 1912. Com- 
missioned 2nd Lieut. Cav. and sta- 
tioned at San Francisco, Cal. Trans- 
ferred to Phillipine Islands 1903. 
Promoted to 1st Lieut. Cav. JNIarch 
1911. Piomotcd to Capt. 10th Cav. 
July 191H. Mexican Border 1915 to 

1917. Promoted to Major Cav. 1916. 
Instructor Fort Meyer, Va., Train- 
ing Camp. Commander 1st Bn. 318th 
Inf. Cam]) Lee, Va. Inspector 155th 
Depot Brigade Camp Lee Va. Pro- 
moted to Lt. Col. Inf. Aug. 1918. 
Ass't Chief of Staff 14th Div. at 
Camp Custer, Mich. War College 
Washington, D. C, Nov. to Dec. 

1918. Commander 1st squadron 4th 
Cav. McAllen, Texas. Trans, to 
Ringgold, Texas. Assistant Prof. 
Mil. Science and Tactics V. M. I. 
since Sept. 1919. 

"/ am the only instructor — here. — 
Quit talkinii. quit talking — Everything 
is filthy, nasty, iin/l ilirty." 



^y^m-- 



l'n,j,- TK,;,ly-in„r 



'-'M^ 




MAJOR BRAXTON DAVIS MAYO. 
B. S. 
Born at Shenandoah, Page Coun- 
ty, Virginia, May 24, 1884. Enter- 
ing V. M. I. in 1905, he graduated 
as third distinguished graduate of 
his class in 1909 with the degree of 
B. S. Instructor at Fishburne Mili- 
tary Academy '09- '10. He was as- 
sistant professor of Engineering V. 
M. I. '10- '17, teaching branches of 
Higher Mathematics. Since 1917 he 
has been adjunct professor in the 
department of Mathematics at the 
Virginia Military Institute. 

"It's a lead pipe cinch." 




MA J. STEWART W. ANDERSON 
Graduated V. M. I. 1908. Com- 
mandant Charlotte Hall Mil. Acad- 
emy. Electrical Eng. Navy Dept. 
Ass't Prof. V. M. I. Instructor Uni- 
versity Wis. Adj. prof. Physics V. 
M. I." 1914- '17. U. S. Army 1917- 
'19. Commissioned 2nd Lieut. Eng. 
•lune 1917. 1st Lieut. Aug. 1917. 
Capt. Aug. 1918. Stationed at Fort 
McPherson. Transferred to Camp 
(lordon. In France with 307th Eng. 
St. Mihiel and Argonne Drives. 
Since Sept. 1919 adjunct professor 
of Electrical Engineering V. M. I. 
"Go to the Board." 



-'-^S^ 



/'SX^' 



Fay, /-..,«/}-/,: 




MAJ. SAMUEL MOKEHEAD 

MILLNER, JR. 
Gi'aduatcd V. II. I. as cadet lien- 
tenant in 1911. Ass't professor V. 
M. 1. ]911-'14. <ii'aduato work Uni- 
versity Wisconsin 11)14 'Ki. Adj. 
profes;;or V. Jl. 1. li)l(i-'17. First 
Ft. Meyer Training Camp 1917. 
Commissioned 1st Lieut. F. A. Serv- 
ed Avith 314th F. A. at Camp Lee. 
Ordered ahi'oad .March 1. 1918, as 
Billeting Officei-. Served in that ca- 
pacity until July 1919. Adjunct 
professor of Romance Languages V. 
M. T. 1919. 

"iriiiil's ill, It. sirj'" 




MAJOR JAMES A. ANDERSON 
Born Linden, Va., Dec. 26, '92 
Graduated V. M. I. 1913, 1st in class 
Instructor Shenandoah Valley Aca- 
demy 1913-14. Instructor v! il. I 
in C. E. Dept. 1914-15, 15-16. Stu- 
dent Coi-nell University '16- '17, C 
E. Coi-nell June '17. Entered ser- 
vice as Capt. Q. -M. C. Va. N. G 
July 7, 1917. Served in Richmond 
Va. and Camp Sevier, C. C, Julv 
7. 1917. to May 1. 1918. A.ss't Q, 
M. 30th Div. France .t Belgium May 
11, '17 to Sept. 10, '18. Ass't to 
Operation's Officers 1st Army Head- 
(|uartei's Sept. 11, 'IS to Jan. 26, 
'19. A.ss't to Admin. Officers Head- 
quarters 7th Corps Army of Occu- 
pation Jan. 21. 'IS to July 5. '19. 
Dis'ed July 5. Promoted to Major 
Aug. 1. 1918. Biomoted to Lt. Col. 
April 26. 1919. Since Sept. 1. 1919. 
Jlaj. and Adj. Prof. Eng. V. M. L 
"That prrjhhiii shouldn't take a good 
iiKin (jvir t'uo hours.' 



^^8laiiifiifi-«ii^- 



I'lir/f Tiiiiily-six 




MAJOE FRANK A. GROVE 
Graduated V. M. I. 1912. Instruo- 
lor in preparatory schools 1913- 
1914. Ass't Prof. V. M. I. 1914- 
1916. Commissioned 1st Lt. Field 
Artillery U. S. A. Aug. 15, 1917. 
Served 15 months in France with 
the 15th F. A. 2nd Division, taking- 
part in the operations around Ver- 
dun, the Aisne defensive, Chateau 
Thierry, and the Aisne-Marne offen- 
sive. Sent back to the States in 
Aug. 1918 and promoted to the rank 
of Captain. Discharged at Camp 
MeCIellan Feb. 8, 1919. Since Sept. 
1919 Major and adjunct professor 
of Mathematics at the V. M. I. 

"Got a cheiv, 'Wink'?" 




JiA.J. GEORGE LLOYD IJARTON. 
JR. 

Born Suffolk, Nansemond County, 
Virginia, October 5th, 1891. Phi 
Beta Kappa. Raven. Bachelor and 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy, L^niversity of Virginia. In- 
.structor in Latin" 1912-1916 and in 
Latin and Greek 1916-1917, Uni- 
versity of Virginia. Civilian In- 
structor in the Virginia Miltary In- 
stitute since November 1st, 1917. 
Adjunct Professor of Latin and 
French since July 1st 1919. 

"Are you arquaiyited luith the form of 
the verb 



--^"^-Miliiiis**^- 



Page Tn.i:enty-sei<en 



V 







^[AJ. ENGLISH BAGBY 
A. B. Piinceton 1913. M. A. 
Princeton 1914. Ph. D. Johns Hop- 
kins 1918. Prof. Richmond Acad- 
emy 1914-1915. April 1st 1918-Jinie 
1st 1918 Johns Hopkins R. 0. T. C, 
U. S. A. C. Injured in line of Duty. 
Discharged in July. Air Service 
Sept. 1818. 1st Lieut, to July 1918. 
"/ have a very spceial rcdson. 




CAPT. WILLIAM :M. IKXiE 
Api)oiiitcd Gadct U. S. M. A. from 
Missouii. 

Gadcl r. S. il. A. June 14. 1912 
1o June 13. 1916. Commmissioned 
Second Lieutenant. Corps of Engi- 
neei's. June 13, 1916. Coras. First 
Liuet. Coi-ps of Engineers Aug. 12, 
191li. Served Avith First Engineers 
in ISidwnsville District, Sept. 16, 
1916 io Ajiril 5. 1917. Washington 
Barracks, D. C. April 10 to May 22. 

1917. Corns. Captain, Corps of En- 
gineers, May 15, 1917, and assigned 
to Seventh Engineers, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, May 25, 1917, to Feb. 
24. 191S. With the A. E. F. from 
Jlarch 16. 191S. Io July 29, 1919. 
Corns. Major of Engineers, Aug. 1, 

1918. At' Camp Gordon, (ia. 7th 
Engineers, Aug. 2 to Aug. 29, 1919. 
Assistant to District Engineer. Kan- 
sas City District, Sept. 2 to Nov. 5, 

1919. Assi.stant Prof. Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics, Virginia ililitary 
Institute. Nov. 10. 1919, to date. 



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SUBS 




Capt. R. G. Belazza Assistant professor of French and Spanish 

Capt. A. H. Blair Assistant professor of Mathematics 

Capt. H. P. Boykin Assistant professor of Matliematies and Drawing 

Capt. J. A. B. Dillard Assistant professor of Chemistry and Geology 

Capt. W. R. Goodwin Assistant professor of Chemistry 

Capt. R. A. Marr Assistant professor of Mathematics 

Capt. T. F. Morton Assistant professor of English and History 

Capt. H. M. Read Assistant professor of English and History 

Capt. J. T. Rhudy Assistan professor of Physics and Eletrieal Laliatory 

Capt. B. F. Wilheil Assistant professor of IModern T>angnages 



^.m^: 



Page Tfcenty-nme 



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CLASS 




PRES. J.C.JORI>AH JH, 

ViCE-pREs. - --C.S.iETfWES 
MISTORUH J.C.?ARR0TT 



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Page Thirty-six 



JOHN BUCHANAN ADAMS, JR. 

ALTA VISTA. VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1917 

"John," "J. B." "Johnny" 

"Disguise our bondage as ive icill. 
'Tis woman, iL'oman rules us still.' 

— Moore. 
Third Class : Private Co. "F." 
Skcond Class: Private Co. "F" ; Marshall 

Final Ball. 
FiKST Class: Private Co. "F" ; Noble 47: 
Marsliall Final German. 




On a well-remomberod day m early Septembei-, in the ycai- of our Loid, 
one thousand nine hundred and seventeen, there came into our midst, the 
future honor and glory of the old Institute, this noble product of the sub- 
urbs of Lynchburg. He had no sooner embarked upon the rough waters of 
rathood, than his abilities were recognized, and he was made section mar- 
cher of that famous 7th section. At the end of his rat year, he had made 
two momentous decisions — of liecoming the master of test-tubes and hydro- 
chloric acid fumes, and that all women are liars and deceivers, except one. 
With his pcrserverance and natural ability, you may rest assured of his suc- 
cess in the tii'st, and it would not be surprising if one day we learn that the 
unknown element between barium and radium has 
been discovered. As to his success in the latter, there 
is no doubt in the minds of anyone who has seen the 
number of specials he receives, post-marked "Lynch- 
burg." In June, 1920, the Institute loses a valuable 
son, but one who cannot fail to bring future credit 
and honor to his Alma Mater. John, j'ou are a true 
friend, good-natured, unselfish, loyal and all of us 
unite in wishing you the sincerest Godspeed. 



"All right . Mister, hou- bout a jokef" 




Page Thiriy-se-vcn 




RAYMOND ALVIS 

FISHKKSVILLK. VA. 
Born lS"-)7 .Matriculated 1916 

■■Rriy." ■■Atihi Alvis" 
"^limy yo out far n'ool, and come home 
shorn tlwinsclvts. " 

— Cervantes. 
FinKTH Ci-As.s : Private Co, "F" ; Cailet 

I irdiestra. 
Thiki) Class: Private Cu. "F." 
Skcoxi) CiAss: Private Co. •T" : Mar- 

sliall Final I'.all. 
FiiisT Class: I'rivate Co. ".V" : Xol)le 
47: .Marsliall Final Cernian. 



'Twas back in the days wlicii Twenty were rats that this little Ray, the 
sunshine of Mi-t;inia, drifted thru the arch and cast his radiance over bar- 
racks. His marvelous ability to produce an excuse at a moment's notice soon 
earned for him the moniker of Alibi Alvis. With his roommates he has al- 
ways been noted for the easy way in which he could out for a "bone" and 
win. Along some other lines he has not been quite so fortunate, notably, 
backing "dark horses" at the hops and filling "interior .straights" in E-2. 

As a rat he drew some awful chords out of his horn while practicing 
wdth the "Keydet Orchestra," and even became so proficient in this brand 
of wind .iamming that he attained the magnifieient position of understudy 
to the Great and Only "Tom Du. " His accuracj' 
while chewing tobacco has long been the terror of 
the grasshoppers and the envy of all the members of 
the Crackei' lian-el cli(iue down in " FEEsherville,', 
by heck ! 

When the wav came on our Hero champed his bit 
around barracks a U'w weeks and then departed for 
Fortress ilonroe in spite of "Old Nick's" refusing to 
accept his i-esignation. Acting thus, he saci'ificed bis 
record to his patriotism and accepted his dismissal as 
the need of a would-bc-hei-o. Down among the "Big 
Gun Wrastlcrs" anil working hard, he was in a migh- 
ty fair way to lie sporting his "liaby Pin" by Christ- 
mas, when Kaiser Bill called quits and the "Canqi 
("ontiiioeiit " returned to the ])ursuits of the elusive 
.lip. 

"// ( nil knou- yon oil an holh hit/ iloys, hat for Crafts 
sake pipe ilonn nnil Itt a tiny snatj off a little hay." 




^:JMiiJ»li«li^i'ljMn«»il; 



T/iirly-ni/liI 



WM. ANDREW ARRINGTON 

AltlilXijlTON, YA. 
Born 1900 Matriculated 1916 

"Peter ■■Bllir ■■Biy Biuk" 
"A?id still they utiztd. tind still their 
wonder grew. 
That one small head eould eontain all 
(he thought) he kneii." 

— Goldsmith. 
Fourth Class: I'rivute Co. "B." 
Third Class : Corporal Co. "E." 
Skcomd Class : Private Co. "E" : Co. 

Baseball: llarshall Final Ball. 
FmST Class : Private Co. "E" ; Noble 
47: Jliirsliail Final (iernian. 




Into the jaws of Hell eaiiie Pete on one 8epleniber Morn when his guid- 
ing star rolled Snake Eyes consecutively to the God of Fortune. He suc- 
cessfully passed through his Rat year, during the usual gross things, as tell- 
ing an Old Keydet "to be seated." As a hard third classman he donned 
those corporal cheverons and become ideal "in running" (demerits). When 
his blouse had a couple of stripes upon it he became an electrician, contrary 
to the laws of Nature being born and bred an Artist of the first water in 
both knocking off hay. and slinging a line. 

When his country called he went to Camp Taylor as a rough and ready 
Artilleryman. There "Big Buck" became the "Bell Boys Buddie" and the 
"Chum of Old Taylor." An officer suggested traiis- 
fei'ral to the tank corps, he being one by nature, but 
Bill did not like this as there would be bigger ones 
there and he could and would not be outshone. 

Pete, though no large man in stature, deserves his 
monogram, having been on the Varsity Poker Squad 
for two years. As a first classman he was all right 
till Leap year '20 rolled around, but from then on he 
has been S. 0. L. Neither his own Calic nor Dame 
Fortune courted him while the choice Avas theirs. He 
thinks he will be a .jeweler after getting a dip., hav- 
ing a good supply of stock in rings, pins, and lava- 
lierres. However. Avhatever he is we know he will 
i-oll a bunch of "Naturals" and soon be the holder of 
a "Full House." 

"They're good. Drag the pot." 




^^^S^- 



Page Thirty-nine 



wm 



V 




JAMES HOLLAND BACKUS 

XOltKdLlv. VA. 

Horn 1898 Matriculated 1917 

"Sop". "If hafkiis." "Holland" 

"Sober, steadfast and demure." 

—Milton. 

'I'miiu Cla.ss : I'rivate Co. "F," 

SixoxD Class: Sersfrtiit Cn. "F" ; il;ir- 

sliiiU Final Ball. 
FiiisT Class: I'rivate Cu. "F" : I'lvsi- 
il.Mit A. SI, A. CUili: Nohlt^ 47: Mar- 
shall Final (Jcniian. 



Backus, -lanios llollaiul!! Xo, not the mirthful Deity, of whom Barracks 
entertains numerous worshippers. But his namesake is not among that hap- 
py-go-lucky congregation — that is, so far as we know, he is not (?) How 
'bout it, Sop? But when it comes to hitting the hay, or smoking a good 
cigar, Sop is all there. And as for an engineer, well, even the blaster En- 
gineer would swear he wasn't a Liberal Artist. Really, he was a top Ser- 
geant in that liraneh of the service, and that explains his skill and marvelous 
ability in that dii-ection. But as for a true friend, and one that's true to the 
score, Ave again say. Sop is all there. L'nder his amiable exterior lives one 
of the best natures that can be found, and he is one who will go far out of 
his way to perform a favor for any and everybody. 
Diogenes, in his search foi' an honest man, would have 
done well to scrutinize this one closely. So, "Whack- 
us, " Ave know you will nevei' need it, but in any event, 

if l)y some peculiar turn in the wheels of fortune you ^^ -^ ^^_^_^ 

should need a helping hand, here's ours, heart and ■» "^^^^P? 

soul. 



■Ifakc 



11 f (It first call. 




P,ujr Farly 



^■•>^<n^?^,.; 



-.!'Jj?U'L'l.'.l'. 



BERTRAM MARK BACHARACH 

ATLANTIC CITY, X. J. 

Born 1898 Matriculated 1916 

"Bert." "Beaney" 

"lltid sighed to /iiany. tliri' had loved 

but one." — Byron. 

FouKTH Class: Private Co. "F" : V;ir- 
sity BasketbaH; Scrub Footb;ill. 

Thikd Class : Corporal Co. "A" ; A'ar- 
sity Basketball; Swimming Team; 1st 
Medal Swimming Championship. 

SiicoxD Class : Sergeant Co. "A" ; Cap- 
tain Swimming Team ; Athletic Coun- 
cil : Varsity Basketball; All South At- 
lantic Basketball; Marshall Final Ball. 

First Class : Lieutenant Co. "B" ; Pres- 
ident Athletic Association ; President 
Monogram Club: Bomb Staff: Cadet 
Staff : Hop Committee ; Varsity Foot- 
ball ; Captain Basketball Team ; All 
South Atlantic Ba.sketball ; Captain 
Swimming Team ; Varsity Baseball ; 
Vice-President Yankee Club ; Mono- 
gram (4. 3. 2. 1); Marshall Final 
German. 




To gaze on that picture one could, gues.s some of the virtues. l)ut it would 
take a wieer sage than inhabits these walls to enumerate the many good 
qualities of the real thing. To say "Bert" is a good fellow hardly starts 
it, or to say "a Lion among Ladies," would be merely a beginner for him. 
One of the best men that ever wore the grey is an adequate tribute, for such 
is his standing among those that have known him for four years, or one. 

As an athlete he holds the highest position in the class ; four years on 

the bafketball team, and captain in the last. In football "Beaney" was a 

.sensational "Find." not only winning his monogram but he was one of the 

main faetoi-s in the Thanksgiving victory. He was named on the All South 

Atlantic Basketball Team, which shows his mettle 

along that line. He has been Captain of the Swam- 

ming Team for the past three years, and in his first 

I'lass year was President of both the Monogram. Club 

and the Athletic Association. 

"Bert" is unusually prominent during the hops 
and many a strange damsel has "fallen" for his danc- 
ing or winning ways. He goes from here into busi- 
ness, the success of which is assured. No man who 
has gone through four years wdth his enviable record 
could change in the future, so our best w'ishes go out 
with the surety of a lifelong V. M. L man. , 



"Boy, 1 sure did fait for her. scef" 




H(it/e !''i'-*y-nne 




CALDERON CARLISLE BARKER 

AXTOX. VA. 
Horn l.SW Matriculated 1916 

"Bud," "Judge" 
Sin p. it is a gentle thing 
iUlofed from pole to pole." 
FouKTH Class : Private Co. "B." 
Third Class: I'rivate Co. "B" : Com- 
pany Baseball. 
ShxoND Class : Private Co. "B" ; Com- 
pany Rifle Team : Company Baseball ; 
Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "E" ; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, l). G."s Associa- 
tion; Noble 47: Marshall Final Ger- 
man. 



After quite a lot of preparation for entering "college," "Btid" drifted 
into the Arch one morning early in September, 1916, strolled nonchantly up 
to the O. D., saluted and reported for duty. Having been told that this 
place was "heaven," he was not quite prepared for the reception tendered 
him at the hands of those "mean Third Classmen," but soon became aecits- 
tomed to their daily vi.sits and the life here. 

Thruout his four years at the Institute, "Judge's" strong point has been 
penalty tours. No "keydet" in recent years has even shown any promise of 
equaling his record in this respect. Therefore, his militaiy aspirations have 
not rini very high and his chief ambition is to rank 
the Commandant, even if he has to die first to accom- 
pli.sh this desire. On the very few occassions his name 
happened to miss the list of "tourists," the, "Bud" 
considered it a suspension day for himself and might 
be seen taking a little exercise that afternoon by 
walking in the vicinity of East Lexington, having 
quite a number of friends in that thriving metropolis. 
Aside from this, his principal occupation is "hitting 
the hay" and he may be found in his "lily white" (?) 
at almost anytime, even during Morning Inspection. 

During his many tours, both night and day, a 
kindred feeling sprang up between "Judge" and 
others of the "trifling element," which quickly de- 
veloped into a close friendship and spread thruout 
the entire corps. Here's wishing vou the best of luck, 
"Bud." 

"/ sifetir I'm gonna start studying next month." 




^^. 



WM\ 



riif/r Fiirly-tiin 



THOMAS HATCH BENNERS 

BIRMINOHxVM. AI.A. 
Born 1898 Matriculated 1916 

"Tom," "Open Face" 
FOUKTH Class: I'rivafe Co. "A." 
Thied Class: C(ir|i(ir:il Ci\. "A": Chiss 

Basketball (4. H). 
Second Class: Coldi- Serjeant ; Y. -M. 

C. A. Cabinet: Marsball Final Ball. 
First Class: Lieutenant Co. "A"; Foot 

ball Squad (l!. ]): ITesident Y. M. V. 

A.; Bomb SI aft": Treasurer Cadet; 

Noble 47 ; llarsluill Final German. 




"Halt! who's there." "Open face Tom, Sir,"' and so he made his de- 
but into militai-y circles. Innocuous rat, running corporal, color sergeant, 
and the saintly fii'st lieutenant, — Tom i.s now upon the threshold of gradua- 
tion. 

Beyond being from Alabama, and rooming in a menagerie, Tom has no 
vices. The clicking of chips and rattling of dice are an abomination, and 
betting approaches a sacrilege. But it is said that all truly great men have 
a weakness, and his lies in love of food. Yea verily, his hunger is everlast- 
ing, and his appetite dieth never. Growley holds no terror for him and eggs 
are a delicacy. 

He loves hunting and may be seen any holiday 
roam.ing around with a gun. But he has one thing 
on most of us, as he knows how not to go wrong. 
When he is a portly gentleman of fifty we may ex- 
pect that he will have bagged the big game of life. 




"How about n hack scratching . Hawkf" 



^^-gCV, ^, 



^JXJ*^ 



Page Forty-flir 




>' 



FRANCIS WILLIAM BERRY, JR. 

LURAY. VA. 

Born 1897 Matriculated 1916 

"Bud." "Majf," "Major" 
" Bloo/iiiriff idol made o' mud. 

Il'ot they call the Great Gaivd Bud." 
— Kipling. 
ForisTH Class: I'rivate Cci. "F." 
Thiku Class: Corporal Co. "F" : Foot- 

\k\\\: Secretary and Treasurer, Literary 

Society. 
Skcond Class: 1st Sergeant Co. "B" : 

:Marsliall Final Ball. 
First Class: Captain Co. "B" : Hop 

Committee: Marshall Final (ierman. 



Known to the ^tal)le sci'geant as "that bloody faced guy," to the women 
as the "Cave ilan." and to the Iveydets as the "Major," he amply fulfils 
all thcee cognomens. The hardest blow was when as a sentinel on New 
Year's morn, he heard someone singing. "I've Got My Captain Walking For 
Me Now." By centering his mind upon the fair sex he survived the ordeal. 
He saw "Red" repeatedly, after being asked by a rat if he had any message 
for the bride. Ever since then, he has a hard time securing a company 
.■sponsor. 

In spite of his disappointments in love, he is an aurora borealis in mili- 
tary affairs, and the bucks daily blush with shame when he comes strutting 
down the line. Hand the world the same line you 
have handed us, I'.ud, and someone will fall for it yet. 



"Speaking unoffieially- 




■''''■"fti|i^if|;i]|]^^ 



I',:,;,- l-urly-loui 



RICHARD JEXXESS BUNDY 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 
Born 1899 Matriculated 1916 

"Cyrus" "Bun" "Boondi" "Aja.\" 
"An army travels on its stomach." 

— Napoleon. 
Fourth Class : Private Co. "C." 
Third Class : I'rivate Co. "C." 
Skcoxd Class: Sergeant Co. "E" ; Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "A" ; Noble 
47 ; Jlarshall Final (;ernian. 




"What ho! The Guard I" cried the sentinel as this long, lean and lanky 
drink of water shuffled into the arch, way back in the dark ages of Sep- 
tember, 1916. Surviving the reign of terror as a rat. he came back strong 
and has clung to the ship for four long yeai's. 

His capacity for food is unlimited, his only superior along this line be- 
ing Tom Benners. You can find him at every hop, but don't let that fool 
you. He doesn't go to shake a "nasty foot" — the supper attracts him. In 
fact, he is the first one every time to be fed and watered, and yet the last 
to leave the trough. 

The sight of a text-book makes him turn deathly pale. He doesn't be- 
lieve in hell, 'cause it would be a foolish to have two 
places so much alike as barracks and the iirfernal 
regions. Utah will be his future home. Then he 
won't disappoint so many women. 




'Let's knock 'em for a row of heer bottles 



/^Si^^v 



Page Forly-five 




HENRY IRVqNE BURGER 

NATURAL BRIDGE, VA. 
Horn 1S96 Matriculated 1915 

"Ilinry." "Judge," "The Jurist" 
"Thou h/ist a grim appearanee . 
And thy face bears a command in it." 
— Shakespeare. 
FiUKTH Class : Private Co. "F." 
Thiku Class : Private Co. "F." 
Skcoxd Class : Sergeant Co. "E" ; Cap- 
tain Co. "E-^ Baseball Team; Baseball 
Sfjuart: Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class: 1st Lieutenant Co. "F" ; 
Ba.-jeball Squad; Marshall Final Ger- 



As a rat, llcni-i was, well, to put it mildly, notorious amoiij>' tlii' Third 
Classmen. When he .swam through the dark days of his rathood into the 
glory of being a mean Third Classman, he decided that running was useless 
foi' sueh as he, and accordingly set out for the opposite extreme. However, 
when he came back to us from his period in the army, he had suffered a 
change of view, and even took to wearing cuffs to "rev." 

"The military" is his fetish, and he knows the I. D. R. backwards and 
forwards. 

After much thought, he decided that Civil and Electrical were too hard, 
and "Arts" too easy for him, and so perforce took Chemistry. In the labora- 
tory, his motto is "Spare the ammonia, and spoil the 
works," and he drives all others out of his corner. 

Jtidge always has a ready line to sling, no matter - "^ W 

whether there's anything in it or not, and when you 
get him .stai-ted, he'll keep on 'till he runs downi. 

,i 



'Well I'll l„ durned! What d'\<,u knmi about that?" 




^^iiiiiilfliii^^ 



Piujr Furly-six 



\VM. JONATHAN CALVERT, JR. 

PORTSMOUTH. VA. 

Born 1901 Matriculated 1917 

"Kid." "Coivhoy," "Keydet" 

"Tell me not in mournful numbers 
.Life is but an empty dream." 
I knoic that already. 

— J nonymous. 
Third Cla.ss : Private Co. "K." 
Skcond Class: Privatt- Co. "K" : Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
I'iRST Class : Private Co. "B" ; Cadet 
Staff: JlarsliaU FItuiI Ofrman. 




Early in September, 1917, this young lad wended his way from Ports- 
month along the tortnons route to the sacred old tOAvn of Lexington; subse- 
quently matriculated at V. M. I., signing various pledges and papers, the 
contents of which he held in total ignorance, and mechanically and unknow- 
ingly passing through sundry details of becoming a "Third Class Rat." And 
what is more, he traveled on a pass and has since been deluded by the usual 
barracks talk of a Christmas furlough for diligent and deserving keydets to 
such an extent that he procured a pass especially for the occasion. 

According to his statements, with great effort and emotional gloom, he 
passed thru his year as "third class rat," leaving behind only mechanical 
drawings to be picked up later on. As a second class- 
man he gladly became a disciple of "Chappie," and 
ever since has been an ardent reader of Ibsen, Tur- 
genreff, Browning, Ibanez, and many other wielders 
of a mighty pen. Being jibed incessantly for taking 
the light course which affords such ample opportuni- 
ty for "hayhitting" during daylight hours, has never 
worried him in the least, and even if he is the "only 
and spoiled child of indulging parents," he appro- 
priates his spare time in digesting such instructive — 
and interesting — subjects as Social Psychology or the 
Russian language. 



'Fle's a funny fool ; he tiekle 




^ 



Page Forty-seven 



V 





WILLIAM MALLAN CASEY 

IANCH}5UK(;. VA. 
Born 1897 Matriculated 1915 

■■Henry." ■■II. C." ■'Do/d." "Meri" 

"Dancing's a touthstnni that true beau- 
ty tries. 
Sor suffers eliarins that nature's hand 
denies." 

— Jenyus. 
Fourth Class: riivatf Co. "E." 
Third Class: Coriioinl Co. "A": Class 

Football. 
Skcond Class: 1st Sei'fteant Co. "A"; 
Assistant Maiiasrer Basketball : Secre- 
tary and Treasurer L.vneliburt; Club : 
Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class: Lieutenant Co. "F" : Ad- 
vertising Manager of the "Cadet" ; 
\"i(e-I'resident Lynchburg Club : Noble 
47: Marshall Final Oernian. 



"Hcin-y" higan his cai-eer as a cadet with the class of '19. but the god- 
dess Minerva decided that "20 was able to .supply him with a more congenial 
atmo.'phcrc and thus we gained a good man in 1916. His life here has fol- 
lowed a path ^inlilar to the course of trtie love; he "bulled out" Christmas 
in his first llird class year, was "busted" from top sergeant in his second 
class year, and, altho he was appointed lieutenant finals, he lost this along 
with the other cadet officers among the noble forty-seven in his first class 
year. In the company and on duty "H. 0." was efficient as a matter of 
principle. But if you have ever talked to him in quartei's. you know that 
there never was a finer Bolshevik at heart in the world: the sound of an ex- 
ploding bomb always threw liim into grandiloquent 
ccstacies of transcendentalism, nor was his .jubilance 
diminished by those nerve wracking long rolls — the 
true test of sineerety of attitude. Those who know 
"Merk" also must confess he has a way with the 
women, and this is supplemented by his mastery of 
the terpsichorean art. With every confidence in your 
future, "Henry," we bid you good-bye, good luck, 
(idd bless you. 



" Thats ample.' 




^"iiiiiilfcii^ii^ 



Poije Fiiily-i-iijlil 



DE SENN CHUNG 

CANTON, CHINA. 
Born 1898 Matriculated 1916 

"George ," "Lammy Tivin," "Doctor" 

"And I tvoultl that my tongue could 
utter. 
The thoughts that arise in me." 

— Tennyson. 
Fourth Class : Private Co. "D." 
Thiri> Class : Private Co. "D." 
Second Class : Private Co. "D." 
First Class : Private Co. "C." 




m-^ 






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This 



f 



"Are you a German spy?" This was the first 
greeting extended to George when he appeared in the 
barracks under the thick war clouds of the early 
months of 191t). 

As one of the famous eleven chemists in the first 
class, George invented a smoking pipe, which has been 
proved to be very sanitary, because it absorbs all 
nicotine from the tobacco before it's inhaled. 

With such inventive talent success in life is as- 
sured. In leaving, our Alma Mater sends out a noble 
son to that great Republic on the other side of the 
Pacific to spread his spirit and fame. 

"Great God!. I uill bet you a dollar." 



'^^"'-'-^^^^-^S^^ 



Page Forty-?uiie 




HOWARD FREEMAN COMEGYS 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA. 

Horn 1899 Matriculated 1916 

■■Ed." ■■Crazy Ed." "£. F." 

"Tilt first of April usually reminds 
in'jst of us lihat ii'c art the other ^04. 
days. 

— Mark Tivain. 



"F": Cluiir- 



Rine 



FoiHTH Ci.As.s: rrivute Co 

Third Class: Ccirporal Co, 
man Pin Committee. 

Skconi) Class : Sergeant Co. "B" 
Committee; Marsliall Final Ball. 

First Class : Private Co. "B" ; Presi- 
dent O. G.'s Association ; "Bomb" 
Staff: President Oklahoma Club: 
Noble 47; JIarsluUl Final German. 



This "kcydet," follower pans parsille of that almighty 7.5 and visutal 
major dome of the art of reaching "B" Co. from II-2 in nothing fiat, came 
thru the Main Arch in the fall of 1916, with the rest of '20. Realizing with- 
in the first few days of his servitide that one's "rat" year was no time of all 
times in which to create a riot or sensation "Ed" took a liack seat with the 
rest of us to await developments — and Finals. 

In his third class year before he had looked down fi'om the mighty 
heights of a corporal even a month, "Crazy Ed" got a deck on the world 
in general and our neighbors on the other hill in particular, loaded up the 
Evening gun with small boulders, horse shoes, et cetera one day and let 'er 
rip, tearing great holes in the foliage and atmosphere 
and removing his coveted chevrons at the same time. 

Tho a born "Artist" some one convinced him that " ' 

he ought to be a follower of "Piggy" and make a 
famous name for himself in the Engineering field. 
This he started out to do but at the end of midyear 
e.\ams, the lure of "Chappy" was too nmeh for him 
and another good man fell by the wayside. Here, 
however, Ed seems to have found his calling and bids 
fair to become one of America's proverbial "moo" 
artists. 



'/ stcear, hoy, I'd turn liolsheviki if 
there uas any money in it." 




:iS^Biliiv--u-, jnui.;rt---5^ - 



Piiiie Fifty 



EDWIN COX 

RICHMOND. VA. 

Bom 1903 Matriculated 1917 

"Eddie," "Pete," "Chesty." " Edii'ina" 

"Light is the love of woman . 
Fleeting her fickle voiu." 

—r. iM. I. Muse. 

Thied Class : rrivate Co. "C" ; Minstrel 
Show : Literar.v Sooiet.v. 

Second Class : Private Co. "C" ; Mar- 
shall Pinal Ball. 

First Class : Private Co. "D" ; Scrub 
Football (1. 2); Noble 47: Marshall 
Final Cerman. 




A few day.s after the class of '20 embarked upon its career as a thii-d 
clasp, someone discovered a fat little molecule in one of its sections. Upon 
being questioned on the matter, this, replied, in a thin treble voice, that its 
name was "Cox, Sir." That this yottthful voice would be a disgrace to the 
third class was immediately noticed and remedied by his kind classmates; 
referring him to Demosthenes as an example. With many ups and downs. 
"Maxes" and Penalty Tours, and incidentally visits from his ever thought- 
ful classmates, Eddie passed through his Rat year. 

Returning next fall, it was a hard matter for him to decide upon what 
course to follow; but after taking another look at the numl)er of maxes in 
the previous in Chemistry, he decided to become a 
desciple of "Old Rat." Since this time he has kept 
right on demonstrating that when it comes to H2S04 
and H2S, he is still the same old high-brow. 

Since this time Plddie has often risen to remark 
that all Avomen are deceivers and "witness him" on 
never again. Now P^ddie, in saying goodbye, we can 
only wi.sh that it will be for a very short time and 
that during this period your wor.st luck will not be 
half so bad as vour best has been. 



"Th' Hell-u-do. 




.^===5> 



-rvCin.,.„ 



r2^ 



I'lun hijiy 




UABNEY HUTTER CRAIGHILL 

LYXCHBUR<;. VA. 
Horn 1898 Matriculated 1^16 

■■/)«/;.■■ ■■Qrackerr -IVinkr ■■Dadd\-" 

"D'isguisf our bondage as ive will, 
I is 'a Oman, uornan. rules us still." 
— Tho/nas Moore. 

I'oiicTH Class: rrivate Co. "C" : Final 
Hall Committee. 

Thiki) Class: Cdrpiu-al Co. "E"' : Ves- 
ir.Miian Episcopal Cluirdi Club: Class 
Pin Committee: Hop Coiiiniitteo : Final 
Ball Committee. 

Si'XO.ND Class: Quarterniastei- Sertreant 
Co. "C" : Vestryman Episcopal Church 
Cluh: "Bullet" Staff: Class Kim: Omi- 
uiittee; Marshall Final Ball. 

FiusT Class: Lieutenant Co. "C" : Ves- 
tryman Episcopal Church Club : I'resi- 
dent Lynchburg Club : Jlinature Ring 
Committee; Assistant Advertisinj: ilan- 
ager "Bomb" ; Associate Editor "Ca- 
det" : Noble 47 ; Marshall Final Ger- 
man. 



As a "Jlister" avc have little to say of "Dab" because he attended to 
his daily "juties" in the prescribed manner but when he came to the im- 
portant office of a "Corp" finals he then began to shoulder the responsibili- 
ties of his command. During his third class year his daily post was follow- 
ing his chin ai'ound the stoop seeing that the dumb misters walked the nar- 
row path. His second class was interrupted (?) so to speak with a months 
"camouflaged Christmas furlough" at that time returning from the services 
of his country. But now he at last reached the lop of all aspirations, get- 
ting a dip., for which no one has looked forward to more than he. Even 
now he has us guessing concerning the "fair sex," seeming at times to be 
immune to their influences and at others a little sus- 
ceptible. The proper "dope" is said to be had on 
liim now as some remarkable changes have been made 
lately, and it seems as if he is completely in the re- 
lentless gi'asp. After reporting released from "strict 
niilitary discipline," he expects to settle down in the 
Hill City and contract a pile of long green. What- 
ever his choice may be it goes without saying that 
his efforts will certainly be realized. In closing these 
words, we can all say that he was a valuable asset 1o 
his class, a loyal friend and a perfect gentleman. 
Your many frit'uds are looking at you, Ci-acker. 



"i ou inoir, seef" "So." 




H,u/,- Flfly-t-.io 



rff^rirP-- 



^T^^^SX 



THOMAS CALVIN DAVIS 

PAMPLIX, VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1917 

"D(i(" "Old" "Squmv" 

"A horse, a horse, my kint/doiii for n 

horse. " 

— Shakespeare. 

Thikd Class: I'rivate Co. "D." 

SiccoND Class : Private Co. "D" : Assist- 
ant P>usiiiess Manager "Bullet" ; Per- 
sonnel Staff: Marshall Final Ball. 

First Class : Private Co. "D" : Asso- 
ciate Editor "Cadet" : TreasuriM- 
"Konib": XoMe 47: Marsluill Final 
(JcrniaiL 




"Doc" came to us from Kaiidolph-Macon where he spi'iit two yt>ars of 
his career; but untainted by this "college life," he quickly entered into the 
true spirit of cadet life, as is evidenced by the innumerable confinements 
served during his period of eadetship. It was not until his first class year 
that he met his dowiifall. This came about in his cavalry career, when he 
began to live in mortal dread of anything that had a mane and tail. This 
is the only thing that anyone has ever known him to fear, and in conse- 
quence of this fear, he developed a chronic case of "gim i'iding, " along with 
praetieally all the other members of the riding class. 

During the Avar he enlisted in the Field Artillery and was a.ssigned to 
the Central Officers' Training School at Camp Zachary 
Taylor, Kentucky, but upon the signing of the armis- 
tice, he returned to V. JI. I, In parting from him, it 
is with genuine sorrow that we bid farewell to a true 
and loyal friend, who won the love, esteem and de- 
votion of all those with whom he came in contact. By 
his remarkable power of concentration and his excep- 
tional ability, combined with a most charming per- 
sonality, he will gain among his fellow men a place 
tliat will reflect untold credit on his Alma Mater. 



"Taking equitation . Mr. O. D. 




--^ 




HKAH 




MARSHALL E. DERRVBKRRY, 
JR. 

XASHVII.LK, TKNN. 

Horn 1 898 Matriculated 1916 

"Doc" "Derry" 

"Stiff ill npini'in, aliviiys in the nrong." 
— Dryden. 

ForRTii Class : I'rlvute Co. "B." 

Third Class: Corponil Co. "C" : Class 
Basketball. 

Secon'u Class: 1st Sergeant Co. "C" ; 
Vice-President Tennessee Club : Mar- 
shall Final Club. 

FiKST Class: Captain Cu. -V ; "Cadet" 
Staff; President Tennessee Club: Mar- 
shall Final GeruiaiL 



"Yes I cuine t'l-oui tb.e Capital City of the Volunteer State and I'm 
proud of it." These are the words that eome some several times a day from 
"Doe" along with gestures of many kinds. Then starts a list of miraculous 
deeds accomplished out there and, although doubtful in character, they are 
always sworn to witli the news of the X. T. and A. to back them. 

However the affliction or good luck, of coming from Tennessee has not 
hindered but helped this curly headed boy along at the Institute and he has 
been completed succe's in both the academic and military departments. Be- 
sides this he has made a host of friends who rate him among the best. 

"Derry," as they call him, has, however, not been a complete success 
with the opposite sex. He first met defeat at the 
hands of one of Nashville's Belles and later sought 
solace by falling "head over heels" for one from the 
Tidewater section of this country, although he has 
never seen her for more than two hours in his life. 
The outcome of this affair has taken on a shadowy 



aspect, but still he keeps on trying to provi 
blonde with curly locks can be a vamp" and 
I'equirements are that thev shall not be i 
Tall. 

The liest of luek to you, "Doc." With 
ing the iiistinile loses one of its best men. 



'(Iriinc nil l^tiiy til, '/ ;< ' for a nhile." 



that "a 
the oulv 
v,.r "T" 



^^MmMml&m$»m 




I'luj.- Fifly-faiir 



JEFFERSON SCALES DE SHAZO 

HOUSTON, VA. 

Born 1897 Matriculation 1917 

"DeShako" "Jeff" "Bessie" 

"In maiden meditation fancy free. 
Lord, lihat fools these mortals be." 
— Shakespeare. 
Third Class : Private Co. "A." 
Second Class : Private Co. "A" ; Mar- 
shall Pinal Ball. 
First Class: Private Co. "A": NoIjIh 
47 ; Marshall Final German. 




In spite of the fact that the experience of an older brother should have 
warned him again.st such action. Jeff came from away down in Southern 
Virginia and entered barracks with an irresistible desire to laugh. And 
laugh he did for the first few days while hidden away up in the 99 suite, a 
veritable rat heaven, until one of these occupants, being caught in a breach 
of regulations, brought the wrath of the 3rd class down upon them like a 
storm. 

But the 1st year doesn't last forever, and the next year found this long, 
lean, lanky youth back, and a full fledged 2nd classman. There he threw 
away his life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness by deciding to sttidy the shape 
of a voltage wave and also formed the disgraceful 
habit of displaying his unmusical talents to his room- 
mates, much to their displeasure, at all times of day 
and night. 

As his ai'tions testify, Jeff thinks there are lots 
of things from which more fun may be derived than 
visiting tlie city of Lexington on F. C. P. and Satur- 
day afternoons; among these joys being the privilege 
of riding the ponies over the hills of Rockbridge. If 
any camp lures him from home after receiving his 
diploma we are sure it will be one at which he rides 
when at drill and does not walk. 



If'hat d' you hopef Ole Thing.' 




mi 



Pcuje Fifty-five 




WILBUR FIELD FAIRLA.MB 

ItlCIIJIOXl). VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 191 

"Sheef)" " Fairslieep" 

'Till' secret of siaeess is constant nork 
— Xoyonians. 
Fourth Class: l'riv;itc Co. •■C." 
Third Class: Corporni Co. "A." 
Secoxi) Class: Color Ser.iiwmt : 

tary and Treasurer Rkhiiiinid 

Company Baseball ; Marshall 

Ball. 
First Class: Lieutciiaiit Cn. "C" 

ball Scpiad (4. :{, 2, li : Noble 4'; 

shall I'iiial CenuaTi. 



!>ecre- 
Club ; 
Final 

Base- 
Mar- 



To look at liiiii you would hardly guess his main ambition, namely, to 
play big bfothci' to the women. During his more sunny days, when enjoy- 
ing the obsolete V. C. P., Sheep made quite a point of this. In faet, when 
it came to dressing Christmas trees he irdght be termed a howling success. 
But after the New Year's party melt called upon to forego such pleasures, 
and has given it up accordingly. 

Sheep lives for two things, skating and baseball, being an adept at 
either. His life vacillates between this and military. Enlisting in the local 
Marines during the war, the only thing coming between him and the bright 
lights of Paris (Island) was the untimely signing of the Armistice. Upon 
his discharge he resumed his pre-war activities and 
expects to be an Engineer in the very near future. 

So if you .see the Thames on fire in after years __ 

vou A\ill know tlia1 Fairlaiiib has done it electricallv. 



'// hoop, can't see you today." 




'^ ^^^ T^rf^.-:r.;«-^^_5X 



/'(!(/(■ Fifty-six 



\J-\^ 



'£j'^<J- 




CHARLES C. GAILLARD 

(JREENVILLE, TEXAS. 

Born 1898 Matriculated 1916 

"Cos/no" " Giggling Gus" "Cliailu 

"Gillyid" 

"And aalks ivitli manner indiintim/ 

I'm not s(j handsome as fascinating 
— r. M. I. Muse 
FoUHTH Class : Private Co. "F." 
Thiki) Class : Private Co. "F." 
Second Class: Private Co. "F" ; Mai 

shall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "F" ; Bat Uet 

ball Squad (2. T); Noble 47; Marshall 

J^inal German. 



Back in the old days when Tom Dulaney played double base (it was 
base too) in the "Victrola" and "Big 'Uns" sold for a dime at the P. E., 
a lanky Greenvillain came dragging through the Arch. When accosted by 
the man with the red rag over his shoulder, he admitted that this cognomen 
was Snake and that he aimed to adopt V. M. and I. as his Alma Mater, 

Two days of being At Home to mean Third classmen sufficed to impress 
upon his cerebrum the fact that all good little rats tacked a "Sir" on to all 
remarks addressed to old Keydets, tiniu'd out on the Stoojts and shed their 
kicks at the door of their second stoop kitchens. 

After he had passed the ordeal of the broomstick and had returned as 
a Mean Third Classman, his fondness for stokeing his 
puss was exceeded only by his aversion to being 
- "rolled." It was during this phase of his hectic 

career that our Hero took a leading role in an alleged 
Bomb Outrage. 

It was perhaps the tendency of casting bread upon 
the waters, as much as any other of his sterling 
qualities that earned for him his own particular niche 
in the atfections of his classmates. However, be that 
as it may, when the class breezed down the aisle and 
lined up so Old Nick could pass 'em around, Cosmo 
\\a& there with bells on. It is the universal opinion 
of his instructors that his intimate knowledge of why 
is H2S0 and other abtruse problems will bring him 
out on top, just a "kallyhootin, " and so now, all ye 
breatheren in Twenty, .stand back and watch his 
smoke. 

"/ swear she ivasn't such a gross titanic." 




Page Fifty-se 





OLIVER T. GALLMAN, JR. 

SI'AIITANBURG. S. C. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1917 

■■Bud- -O. T." -O/lie" 

"jMy dutits as a gentleman have never 
interf erred 'icith my pleasure." 

—Osear fCilde. 
Thihd Class : I'nvate Co. "E." 
Skcond Class : Sergeant Co. "F" : Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
FiissT Class : Private Co. "A" : Vice- 
I'resident .South Carolina Club ; Mar- 
shall Final German. 



"Bud" desei'led the east' and lu.xury of Wolt'ord College, he says it's 
somewhere in South Carolina but we can't vouch for the truth of the state- 
ment, and hit the trail for V. M. I. armed only with a hay-hitting and food- 
taking instinct. Unable to indulge these to the best advantage while a rat 
he has spent he entire period since then in an attempt to make up for lost 
rime. How he and Tom Benners can sit at the same mess and leave enough 
for anybody else is a iii-ohlem that even "B. D." couldn't work in a thou- 
sand years. 

An annual fui'lough or two managed to keep "Bud" from becoming a 
victim of the "Institute Blues" but a certain visit to the wilds of South 
Carolina in December of his first class year managed 
to effectually upset his usually peaceful fi-ame of 
mind. "With the exception of this single fall from 
grace he has managed to stay far away fi'om the 
wiles of beautiful calic 

"Bud" is rather undecided as to his career, and 
at times thinks seriously of usui-ping Wallace Reid's 
title of the handsomest man in fildom. Whatever he 
undertakes, whether it is to be a .iob in a restaurant 
or the financing of much needed improvements in 
South Carolina, no man can doubt his success. His 
good natui-e, abundance of high spirits and raini 
.iudgment will successfully carry him through what- 
ever trials 1lie woi'ld will have to ofl'er. 

Men. that food-taking instinet's done got ine again." 




^ 



l-(Uj,- Fijty-niihl 



hi iiiiMt 

llliiil: 



ANDREW HAYS GRAHAM 

BRIDGEWATER, VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1916 

"She Frog" "Frog" " Grinny" 

"A friend may tvell be reckoned the 
masterpiece of nature. 

— Emerson. 

FovKTH Class : Private Co. "A." 

THip.n Ci^ss : Private Co. "A." 

Skcond Class : Private Co. "A" : Mar- 

^;liall Final Ball. 
First Cl.vss : Private Co. "A" ; Presi- 
dent Shenandoah Valley Club, Noble 
47: Marshall Final German. 




But for the armistice the Germans would have added another specimen 
to their scientific collection, namely, a "Fhang Fi-og. " "She Frog" says he 
did not choose that branch for the green hat cord, but because of his ex- 
perience is breathing thin air from his vantage point of six feet five. Be- 
sides his ability as an aviator, "Andy" is quite a horseman, locking his 
long legs around a horse so that no animal living could dislodge him. 

His high morality is the talk of the chaperon's bench — "Grinny" 
ncvei' def ccnding to the level of cheek dancing. 

To fee him shambling along you would never expect him to set the stars 
on fire. Init he nearly succeeded on January 1, 1920. His roman candle go- 
ing jtist two feet higher than any other of the 47. 

Stay with them "Grinny" and you'll make a for- 
ttme, and find a wife vour size vet. 




'That's all right. Big Buck." 






-i^:-..r^ 



Page Fifty-nine 




FRANCIS KENNEDY GREEN 

JIIDDLEBrKG. VA. 

Horn 1900 Matriculated 1916 

"(jiitsic" "Silas" "Irish" 

"My kingdom for a horse.' 

— Shakespeare. 
FuuKTH Class: I'l-ivute Cn. "K." 
Thikd Class: Corporal Co. ■■I',." 
Second Class: Private Co. ■'?".": Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "P.": Marshall 
Final German. 



You know it has been said that "Fools rush in where angels fear to 
tread," and that is the reason "Gutsie" gives for coming here. Thotigh ht' 
is far from feminine in appearance, he must have had fond hopes in that 
direction because he was the only specimen of the genus male in the Fox Croft 
School for females the year before he cast his foi'tune with those who came to 
the grim old barracks on "The Hill." We don't know what his ambitions are 
now, but he had joined the marines and signed up for the aviation camp. 
But the armistice was signed cutting short his career in this direction (that 
is, we hope it did K 

Of all things though, the quickest way to get him on his eai- is to try to 
put something over him; he prefers it the other waj' 
around. In fact there are onh' two things he has 
been known not to try to get out of, and they are — a 
good stoi'v in till' "Cosmo" and the hav. 



All, don't (jet on your ear ahoiit it! 




Pdt/e Si.vty 



PAUL GROOVER 

Ql'ITMAN, GA. 

Born 1898 Matriculated 1916 

"Cionni" "One" "P. Grow" 

"The ivotnen pardoned all except his 

face." 

Fourth Class : Private Co. "C." 

Thiko Class : Corporal Co. "F" ; Vice- 
President Georgia Club. 

Second Class : 1st Sergeant Co. "F" ; 
President Georgia Club ; Assistant 
Manager Ba.seball : Marshall Final 
Ball. 

FiBST Class : Captain Co. "A" ; Presi- 
dent Georgia Club ; Business Manager 
"Cadet" ; Chairman Ring Committee : 
Marshall Final German. 




It was in the fall of the year 1916 that "one" P. Groover was received 
into our midst by the gentle, sweet and sympathizing voices of the proud 
wearers of the Corp. "Chevs." Little did we dream that this personage was 
destined to rise to the highest office in the Cadet Corps. But from the start, 
he gained for himself the reputation of being "the most running rat in "C" 
Co. As a corporal "Gonni" pi'oved himself \\-orthy of a real office and 
in his second class year we found him 1st sergeant of "F" Co., and to say 
that he was a hard orderly sergeant would be putting it mild. And right 
here is a most befitting place to say that Paul's aripirations began to turn 
toward other things than those of a military nature ; for the call from the 
"fair sex" came and from the number of "sheets" 
that eame to "suite 99," addressed to him, we became 
uneasy as to whether he would even spend the re- 
mainder of the year with. us. But perhaps it was a 
pas.sing fancy, for he decided to stick until Finals 
anyway. 

And when the Final formation rolled around, the 
clear and unmistakable words came forth across the 
parade ground like the shot from a cannon, — "To be 
Captains, 'One' P. Groover." From the pinnacle of 
this glory he has gained the prestige and confidence 
of us all. A man of the highest standards and ideals, 
his friendship is an accomplishment, for to know him 
is to love him. 

"How 'bout opening the ivindows." 




'f^^^ 



PiUfi Sixty-'ine 




ROBERT HAIRSTON, JR. 

REIHSVILl.K. N. C. 

Horn 1900 Matriculated 1916 

"Bob" "Hunk" "Connie" 

"Thy fatal shafts unerring move, 
I hoiv before Thine alter. Love." 

— Smollet. 

Fourth Class: Private Co. "D" : Track 
Squad. 

Third Class: Corporal Co. "D." 

Skiond Cla.ss : Serfreant Co. "D" : Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 

First Class: Private Co. "D" ; Assist- 
ant Manager Dramatic Club : Xoble 47 ; 
.Marshall Final Cernian. 



He appeared in tlie Arch one day in early September, carrying a suit 
ease in one hand and a tobacco twist in the other. The latter was labled 
"The Pride of Rcidsville" bnt we are still inclined to believe that it referred 
to our noble "Hunk" for no other hamlet on the map can own up to pro- 
ducing- a similar speeiman. His tirst ten months' sojourn with us was .spent 
in elo; c confinement with the "Duke of Newsoras" and in comparison with 
that fhining light. Hunk's country bumkin appearance .showed up like that 
of a Broadway stage-door Johnnie. 

On his first vi: it to the Hops as a rat. Hunk fell as flat as a flounder 
for the entire fair .(.x. The "Divine Right of Love" is now his firm belief, 
and few can withstand that irrestiblc line which he 
has picked up from associating with that gay old de- 
ceiver. "Stud" Eipley. 

lie is a disciple of "Piggy": entertaining fond 
ideas of remodeling roads and bridges of North Caro- 
lina to meet the requirements of construction "a' la 
die" Anderson. 

All in all, we find only one fault with Bob: he 
falls to Ave]) (in the .job occasionally and wakes up 
to find his nice biscuits all cut up into thin slices. 



"Rip. you're ruilit. All iio/iien art 
bar one." 



liars ami deeeitful — 




Si.\iy-in.:n 



w^m^^^^m^'-^sm^ 



FRANX'IS BASKERVILLE HARDY 

BLACKSTUNE, VA. 

Born 1899. Matriculated 1917. 

"Bun" "F. B." "Lever" 

"True as the needle to the pole 
Or as the dial to the sun." — Booth. 
Thihd Class : Private Co. "F." 
Second Class : Private Co. "F" ; Com- 
pany Baseball Team ; Marsliall Final 
Ball. 
FinsT Class : Private Co. "F" ; Company 
Baseball Team: Xoble 47; Marsliall 
Final German, 




It was a memorable day in Baekstone when this illustrious son left his 
native haunts to seek fame and forttme at the Virginia Military Institute. 
Military? That's him all over. He started "running" from his rathood, 
and this habit eontinued even when he became a first classman. After the 
stormy and tempestuous year at the hands of the mean third classmen, he 
entered the much smoother waters of old cadetship. As a second classman 
his latent talents came to the fore and after a short while he became truly a 
marvel in the art of signalling. His ability in this respect was quickly 
recognized and, as a first classman, he was made cadet instructor in this 
branch of the military course. Although he is an able disciple of "Monk," 
as an Electrical Engineer, it is not at all improbable 
that he will become a painter, because of an intimate 
knowledge of colors, and especially of a certain .shade 
of Rlo^\n When the time arrives for us to leave the 
old Institute, we say goodbye, (tho we hope for only 
a short while), to one whose friendship cannot be 
\alued too highly. Francis, we admire you for what 
\()u aie and honor you for what you will be. May 
you b( e\er favored by the gods, as you have estab- 
lislud ^()urself in the hearts of us all. 



"You certify to that!" 




UjHiiiiiiais^i 



Page Sixty-three 




GEO. WASHINGTON HARD^", Jr. 

SHRKVEI'OUT. LA. 
Horn 1900. Matriculated 1917. 

"S//iixh//i<" "G'jou" "G. ll'aiiy" 

"From ivomen mayest thou It-arn of 
lioiiifn, eve?i from her icho fooleth 
thee shall thou knoic hoir others fain 
lioulil fool thee." 

— "iMaxims of Xoah." 
Third Clas.s : Private Co. "C." 
Skco.n-d Class: .Sersjeant Co. ■■C" : Pub- 
licity Committee; Cadet Staff : Bullet 
Staff; JIar.shall Final Ball. 
First Class: Private Co. "C" ; Edltor- 
iii-Cliief "Tlie Cadet"; Publicity Com- 
niiltw : .athletic Council ; Editor "Spring 
Suiiiilcnipnt" ; President Louisiana Club ; 
-Bonili" Staff: :\[arsliall Final Cennan. 



Ves, it's from Louisiana. That wc knoAv, also that he started his career 
with an aim to be the Biggest Dog in Barraclvs and the most worthy follower 
of "Chappie." We know by the number of wedding invitations he has re- 
ceived, bearing the same postmark which used to be upon the "Pink Sheets" 
he was wont to receive daily, that he has been luisuecessful in the former. 
And we know that he has been very successful in the latter by the stars that 
adorn his sleeves, and his ability as a past master in the "Art of the Artists." 

GJeorge possesses a most fluent "line," and j)roved his ability to get by 
with almost anything when, dressed in a Keydet uniform, and Avearing liis 
first class cape turned back so that the red lining showed up to best advan- 
tage, he casually sauntered into the lobby of the Secl- 

liach Hotel in Louisville Kentucky, and on encotin- ,,^^^ 

tering a first Lieutenant of the Field Artillery, and 
being questioned by the said Lieutenant as to the na- 
tionality of the uniform he wore, calmly smoked bis 
cigarette, assumed his characteristic nonchalant pose 
and proceeded to inform and convince the Lieutenant 
that be was an officer in the Canadian Northwest 
Jlounted Police. 

"Sunshine" informs tis that after many years of 
"College" life he is to be a lawyer of gi'cat fame. We 
have no doubt of bis success, 1lin1 line of his will get 
liiiii b\' at aiivlliing. 



■■D—I I dulut m,ike hut ,1 



that 




^-O^-' 



P<i(/f Six/y-four 



willia:\i hamaiett hardy, 

Jr. 
F(H;t wokth. tkxas. 

Born ISW. .Matriculated 1916. 

"PFiU" "Ilanimitt" "Chicken" 
■ "llcnchard" 

"Brother thy tail h/ings dou-n bchinil. 

— KipHrKj. 
FouKTH Ci.A.s.s: Priviite di. "D." 
Thiuu Class : Corporal Co. "E." 
Second Class: Sergeant Co. "E" : As- 
sistant Manager Traclv : Co, 
Team; Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class: 1st 1-ieutenant C( 
President Texas (^luli ; Marshal 
German. 



Kille 



"D" : 
Final 




"Will" blew in on the trail of a Southwester from the Great State, filled 
with ambition and hay. After undeTgoing the usual trials of a I'at his per- 
sonality with,stood the many tribulation:; thrust upon him and emerged tri- 
umphant. His return to the Lone Star State was preceded by a telegram 
which put Caesar's triumphal message to Rome, far in the shade. It read like 
an extract from a patriotic song: "Stars and Stripes are mine." 

The stripes have staid with him through thick and thin biit the stars 
died a hard death when he elected to become a disciple of "Piggy." We 
don't blame them at all, because no self respecting stars would want to find 
Jhemselves in the possession of an engineer. 

He is undecided as to his fiiture, being divided be- 
tA\een a desire to pursue his studies in civil at some 
large university, and a wish to gain some practical 
experience. Whatever it turns out to be we are sure 
of his success. Good luck old man. may your Roof 
never leak and vour Bridge never fall. 




"If'ho 'uent (hmn on' my lust collar. 



'.^f=^' 



WM^ 



Page Sixly-fii 






'.s u 




JOHN C. HASKELL 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Born 1900. Matriculated 1916. 

"Jaun" "Johnnie" 

"A ever do to/Jay iihat can he done to- 
morroiv. 
For many things both great and small 
Alust never needs be done at all." 
Fourth Cla.s.s : Private Co. "A." 
Third Class : Corporal Co. "A" ; Class 

Football. 
Skcoxd Class : Sergeant Co. "A" : Scrub 

Football, Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class: Private Co. "A": Presi- 
dent McCuires Club ; "Noble 47" ; Mar- 
shall Final German. 



In practically all ol' the graduating classes of this institution there is at 
least one representative of the "Local Boys." Jolm claims the distinction 
of being a member of this class and well has he lived up to their noble tradi- 
tions and attainments, except in his ability to obtain a furlough and in his 
attempts at being a "I>ig Dog." in both of which his efforts have been wholly 
unsuccessful ; the latter, however, does not seem to be a cause of much worry 
in his young life. 

He is forely afflicted with an acute ease of "laziness" but this cannot 
be held against him to any great extent as such an attainment seems to be 
common to all of tho.se who choose to follow the life of an "arti.st." 

But, nothwithstanding these minor failures, he has 
proven himself of marked ability and is indeliby 
stamped with that key of success — perseverance — and 
if he ever detei-mines to do a thing, that thing will lie 
done in spite of all obstacles. 

Thru his ability he has been an officer in the cadet 
battalion for two year-s and thru his charming per- 
sonality he has won the fi'iendship and good will of 
the entii'e I'drps. Il is with genuine sorrow that we 
see his pei-iod of cadetship drawing to a close. 




^^ 



Pa/,,- Sixly-s 




HOWARD BURKS HAWKINS 

HrXTINCJTOX. W. VA. 

Born 1899. Matriculated 1917. 

"Hmck" "Hawk Eye" 

"\oi by my sins li'ilt thou jiiilye rin . 
Rut h\- the iroris of uiy hand." 

—Srrv,,,. 
Thiud Clas,s: I'rivate Co. "F." 
Skioxd Class: Sergeant Co. "F" ; Foot- 

,ha.il Squad; Ba.sketball Squad; <."lass 
■ Basketball; Marshall Final Ball. 
First Ol.\ss : Private Co. "F" ; Varsity 

Football ; Varsity Basketball : lloiio- 

grani Club; •■Xol.i,. 47- : .A[arsli;il| Final 

German. 




Say, have you ever heai'd aixmt that l)ravi' hand, the nobh' forty-seven! 
Well here is one of its members, the only original "Hawk." He eanie to us 
from Huntington, W. Va. where he took part in high school athletics and 
after the shock of his rat days he has made V. M. I. a worthy athlete. 
"Hawk" campaigned with the basketball team for two years and the var- 
sity football for one. His playing was of the highest order and he never 
failed to put all he had into the game. Howard journeyed to Camp Taylor 
with the rest of us and says that while "Old Taylor" was all right, those 
week ends in Louisville were better. "Hawk" is a chemist by name and 
nature but from all indieations we feel that the romance attached to the life 
of a traveling salesman will suit him better. He says 
that he is going to pull off a big deal in Philadelphia 
about the time that our team hits Penn. next year, and 
from the way things look now we don't see how he 
can miss. Whatever it may be old boy, we all hope 
that your sevens and elevens all come on the first shot 
and that the others come afterwards; and we know 
that you will keep the "dice" rolling in the future 
as you have in the past. The best of luck to you; a 
true tj'iend and a good fellow. 



'What do you ichoof. 'She Frogf 




rvC^i- 



Piic/e Sixty-se-ven 




rpT? 



^^eE-lB 




CILBERT WOODROW HEISIG 

HEAlMdNT. TEXAS. 
Horn IQOl. Matriculated 1917. 

"Jiiv" "Pony Boy" "Wang" 
'Dark Ilorst" "Senator" "Cadet" 

"But still his tongue ran on, the less 

Of Jieight it bore, uith greater ease." 

— Butler. 

Third Class: Private Co. "F." 

Second Class: Private Co. "F" : "Kul- 

let" Staff: Marshall Final Ball. 
Ftrst Class : Private Co. "A" ; "Cadet" 
Staff: "Bomb" Staff: Noble 47: -Mar- 
shall Final (iernian. 



"Jew" i-ame to u.s as a third class rat in the fall of 1917. Altho his first 
year eei-vod only to prove to him, as well as to everyone else, that he was 
not a shining- light in military affairs, he returned in the autumn of 1918 to 
demonsti'ate that he was an "Aiii'ora Borealis" of a Liberal Artist. In ac- 
cord with his true artist character, he obtained the soft job of mail-carrier, 
but was quickly "busted" from this for satisfying his ever pressing hunger 
while the 0. D. was looking on. lie paid dearly by touring in front of bar- 
racks evci'y Wednesday, Saturday, and Siniday for several weeks. 

Pursuing his course as an artist, "Wang" was back again in 1919 for 
his first class year, in order to get the full benefit of Y. M. I. But. alas! he 
was among the forty-seven who were deprived of all 
privileges for firing a roman candle, blank cartridge, 
or some other "death-dealing" weapon on the night 
of December 31- January 1. The "Senator" is a great 
one for arguments and if you stay ^\ith him you arc 
Ijound to lose. W hen \oii do give up he \\ill quit 
arguing Init he won't stop talking, so leave him alone. 
"Jew," we know you will " kiuick them for that 
pi'ovei-bial row" when you get out in the world and 
success is bound to be youi's. Here's looking at you. 
"Pony Boy," and hoping that you will learn to ride 
a horse before you pass to the next world. 



'Ilov n'.dul (t liiil, 




■^£^: 



"(I'lf Sixty-i-iijhl 



%iiiiifiMiis|i 



3eitiB 




FRANK LEWIS HERRING 

MOS8 POINT. MISS. 
"Fish" "Ledbetter" "Little Mar. 



women shall not rule." 

■ — Sophocles. 

Private Co. "D."' 

Corporal Co. "D." 

Qiiarterma.ster Sergeant 

Mississippi 




■■Jf'hile I livt 

1<'0UETH Cl.\SS 

Thiku Class : 
Second Class 

Co. "D" ; Vice-President 

Club ; Assistant Manager Baseball : 

Marshall Final Ball. 
FiKST Class : Private Co. "D" : Manager 

Baseball ; President Mississippi Club : 

Athletic Council: "Cadet" Staff; Noble 

47 ; Marshall Final German. 



History tells us that Napoleon was exceedingly short in stature. If 
there is any truth in this, "Fish" resembles him in at least one particular. 
During his four years of toil, trouble, trial and tribulation. "The Herring" 
has been more or less entangled in many plots and plans detrimental to the 
general peace of the Institute. His debut was made in a famous egg fight 
when he was a rat and the climax was reached as a member of "the noble 
Forty-seven." 

"Fish" reflected great credit upon himself and his family when he 
elected to become a devotee of the Arts. The diffieulties offered by Russian 
authors and the exponents of Psychology have held no terrors for him. 

His sojourn at Camp Taylor developed his great 
love for horses and his experiments in equitation dur- 
ing his first class year were aided by a folding ladder 
which he always carried in his blouse. 

Though supposedly a citizen of Mississippi, Fish 
seems to take an unusual interest in the state of Ala- 
bama, and his life seems a barren waste when he can- 
not count one pink sheet from that part of the eoiui- 
try in his daily mail. There is only one conclusion 
to be drawn, that he intends to pick up his better 
half and recover the '20 hardware he sent in that di- 
rection at an early date. 

And in future years we will all be borrowing 
money from the financier who will be just able to 
reach to the top of his glass-topped, mahogany desk 
"down ill (lie Miss." 

"Back to back." 

.. /-^^^ 




KHiMPliii? 



Page Sixty-nine 




CHARLES EUGENE HOGE, Jr. 

FKAXKFOItT. KY. 

Born 1900. -Matriculated 1916. 

"Charlie' " Arbuckle" 

"My spirits grrjiv dull and jam I iirjiild 
Beguile the tedious day nith sleep." 

— Shakespeare. 

ForiiTH Cl.^.ss: I'rivate Co. "E" : Hop 

Committee: Scnil) Football. 
'I'HiiiD CL.i.s.s : Corporal Co. "C" : Hop 

Committee: Scrub Football. 
SEfON'D Class: Sergeant Co. "K" : i;di- 

tor-ln-Cliief "Bullet"': Kiiiu' Committt'c: 

Scrub Football. 
First Cl.\ss : Private Co. "C" : Editor- 

in-Cliief "Bomb" ; President Kentucky 

Club: Scrub Football: Hoi, Committee: 

Xohlc 47; Marsliiill I-inal Ccriiian, 



You would hardly thin]'; tiiat tlic owner of tlii.s handsome photo hails 
from the wild:-; of the ISlue (Jrass, and to be exact his address in Hoges' Sta- 
tion, outside of Jett, four miles from Frankfort, which sports electric lights 
and street cars. Neither woiild one guess that he is the champion heavy- 
weight of the age; he has also won more pie eating contests than any other 
man in Hoges' Station, Ky. 

A moi'e persevering lover than Charlie never graced these walls. Every 
night since he was been a Rat he takes forth pen and ink to try and place 
himself in the good graces of one in a far pastoral country. As an athlete 
our hero stuck with the football team as a scrub foi- four yeai's. playing on 
the class team in every contest. As a Mexican athlete 
he is also the peer of all in the class. He is the 
center of all class room deliates and is seldom .silenced. 
The success of this volumn largely depends on his 
])i'rsi •^•(■rance and hard work. Charlie expects to take 
up scientific farming and it can be well assured that 
he will be a wonderful success, as all fat men love to 
sit and Match the crops grow. His good spirits and 
jovial nature have made him everybody's friend and 
the Avishes of all in the school go (uit with him for a 
long and successful career. 



'Don't hand iiu that stuff. 




Pitijr .Seventy 



fiav-T^ 




iUHE B^MIB 



MONTGOMERY C. |ACKSON\ 

Jr. 
l'b7rEltSBri!(i. VA. 

Born 1900. :\Iatriculated 1916. 

"Mo7ik" "Monty" "Yak" 

"If I had the faith that Daruin had 
I knoiv what I would do. 
I'd cut a hole in the back of my coat 
And let my tail liany thru." 

— Anon. 

Fourth Cla.s.s : Private Co. "D." 

Thtkd Class : Covporal Co. "D" ; De- 
signer Class Ring. 

SKC0^'D Class : Sergeant Co. "C" : A.s- 
sistant Business Manager Spring Sup- 
plement: Bullet Staff: Jliirshnll Final 
Ball. 

I'^iRST Class: Lieutenant ("o. "E" : I>ra- 
niatif Club: Busini'ss .Mimager "Spring 
Supplement": '('jilii SmiT: Assistant 
Editor-in-Chief anil .\rr Editor "Bomb"; 
Secretary and Treasurer Y. M. C. A. ; 
Noble 47 ; Marshall Final German. 




First Call for D. E. C. sounds, and "Monk" begins to shave If he does 
it sooner he will be boned for beard on face. Surely this little guy was born 
for a life of luxury, for it must be confessed that he likes late hours with a 
little hay in between. Breakfast means nothing to him and Taps he never 
heeds, drawing or reading until the wee sma' hours of the morning. As a 
rat the Old Cadets would ask our "Monk" why he was so ehesty : as a 
Mean Third Classman the newly cadets had to suppress an inclination to 
request him to bring his face from behind the bushes. 

His .stunts range all the way from eating peanuts in the Zoo to scratch- 
ing himself. With the exception of his inability to SA\ing by his tail, he is 
a living proof that Darwin was right. From a study 
of his church attendance ^ve conclude that he is pos- 
sessed of Hebrew instincts. 

He isn't electrical by nature even though his stor- 
niic baltei-ics keep supplying juice after his dynamo 
has I'un do^^■n. Let him once get his hooks on that 
elusive dip and he will hie himself back to the land 
of his nativity; there he hopes to rake in the "long 
areen" galore. 



"Happy Christmas!" (in subdued tones) 




C^'-- 



Page Seventy-o 




n/ 



rpiiral Co. "F" ; Class 
Cominitree: Pin Com- 



EDWARD SHAIX JEFFERIES 

BUOOKIA'X, XKW YORK 

Born 1899. Matriculated 1916. 

"Ned" "Jeff" "E. J." 

"Tis better to have loveil and lost, 
Titan never to have loved at all." 

— Shakespeare. 

FniKTH Class: I'rivatc Cn. "F" : Class 
Virt-rresidenr. 

Third Class: I 
President: Hu] 
niittee 

SKtoxD Class : Sergeant Co. "F" ; Class 
Vife-President : President Ring Com- 
mittee ; Hop Committee ; Business Man- 
ager "The 19i;0 Bullet" ; Leader Final 
Ball. 

First Class: Battalion Quartermaster; 
Class Vice-President ; Business Mana- 
ger "The 1920 Bomb" : President Cotil- 
lion Club : President Yankee Club ; 
Leader I'lrial Cernian. 



The abo\c bare statement of facts A\ould be a tit and chei'ished epitaph 
to go on any "Keydet's" service record. But his virtues and accomplishments 
do not stop" w-ith those mentioned above and those who have known him for 
four years can attest to his ability as a leader of men. His efforts as a class 
officer have been of infinite value to the class in its many trials and tribula- 
tions and he has never .started anything that he didn't finish — and finish well. 

"Jeff" has been directly responsible for the success of the hops this 
yeai-. tho he did have the habit of using his whistle to the unfair advantages 
of the rest of us on those "special extras." In this last year, as Second 
Lieutenant and Quartermaster, he did remarkably efficient work in the 
"H's" ^^•ith the assistance of his capable staff con- 
sisting of "'Doc" llenty, "Dooley." "Cosine," and 
"Julius" F>ibbs. 

"Ned" lias ihc h.'ibil jicc-uliai' to all "i-unning" 
Cadets oi' telling 1lie autliorities exactly what he 
thinks, despite the fact that he often takes the view 
directly opposite theirs. He is a man through and 
through and any class is to be congratulated on hav- 
ing one such as he. Loved by many, admired and re- 
spected by all, we cannot help but feel that his suc- 
cess in after life will ])arallel his accomplishments 
here. 



"K ell boys, is 'my mail' assorted." 




PfU/r Se-vefily-tivo 



^.r,,^..|,«lsfe 




WILLIAM DANIEL JONES, Jr. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Born 1898. Matriculated 1917. 

"Bill" "Weyurn" 

"Thin hair is tin abomination to a man." 
— Maxims of A'oah. 

Third Class : Private Co. "E." 

Second Class : Sergeant Co. "D" ; Vice- 
President Florida Club : Marshall Final 
Ball. 

First Class: Lieutenant Co. "D" : Pres- 
ident Florida Club: Noble 47. ilar.shall 
Final German. 




"Bandoline Bill" acquired the habit in the Everglades of Florida while 
chasing escaped Seminoles or Orioles, whichever brand he was. Just why 
he does it nobody has been able to find out. His hair has been getting fewer 
and far-betweener ever since his arrival but "Weyum" still persists in try- 
ing everything from soap and water to electric vibrators. 

"Bill"' acted in haste and repented in the few uio- 
• ments of leisure allowed him when he decided upon 

Chemistry as his path to fame and fortune. 

" Weyum 's" most noted accomplishment was due 
to the fact that he was able to go anyone at least 
one better on any subject no matter whether he had 
ever heard of the question undei' discussion, or was 
forced to draAv upon his powers of clairvoyancy and 
unequaled imagination. His tales are of a marvelous 
degree of ingenuity and. though his audience is 
skeptical in the extreme, he gains credit for being 
able to silence any member of the corps when weird 
tales are the order of the day. 

He may turn out to be the greatest specialist in 
the countiy. or the most dependable family physician 
in his locality, but his many admirable traits will 
prove to be the best prescriptions at the command of 
anyone in gaining new additions to the long list of 
those who are proud to call him friend. 

"Wait a minute. Let me say something." 




. I '1 »l^BB«»if|;;|£i 



Page Se-venty-thr 



L^^' 




JULIAN CLE.MEXT JORDAN 

DA.WILI.i:. VA. 

Horn 1S99. Matriculated 1916. 

"S'ln" " J uliiin" "Ch ui/nv" 

"Flu itirudl fi/iiiiiinc ilotli draiv us 
on." 

— Grjithi -Faust. 

KciUKTH Class: I'rivate C"(i. "C." 

Thiiui Class: Corijoral Co. "B" ; I'iu 
Committee: Hop Committee: Class 
I'ootlnill : Scnib Baseball: Vioe-I'resi- 
(lellf Class. 

Sk( i)Xi) Class: First Sergeant Co. "E" : 
I'resident Class: Viee-Presideiit Ath- 
letic Association : Vice-President Y. M. 
C. .\.: .\ssistant Editor "Bullet"; Ring 
Committee: Hop Committee: Ba.seball 
Squad ; Marsliall Final Ball. 

First Class : Captain Co. "D" : Class 
President ; Assistant Editor "Bomb" ; 
Hop Connnittee. Jlarshall Final Ger- 
man. 



Behold, gentle reader this .exponent of the 20th centin-}'. fair of face, 
gentle in speech, but big in action. He first graced these walls in the fall 
of nineteen sixteen and has always been the most anxious to leave at Finals 
but is generally here when the first Rat crosses the arch in the Fall. 

Julian has many accomplishments: the main ones being his magnetic in- 
fluence over his fellow cadets (and may it be also stated that many of the 
fair damsels that are wont to grace the hops, are well within his magnetic 
scope), the sportsman-like spirit that very few attain, and a personality that 
holds him in the highest esteem and respect of every Cadet in the Institute. 
For two years he ha,s led the class thru' trials and tribulations, always on 
the top. 

Our worthy Pi'esident intends to enter the tobacco 
business after a year or so in some University. His 
classmates can well picture him \nX\\ a large wad of 
"Natural Leaf" in his jaw several years from now, 
tho' his first attempt was a gross disaster He has 
guided us in oni' erring ways and will always be re- 
garded as a staunch friend, a smiling companion, and 
a Man's man. 



" An\ 




1*1 1!:::., 



Pa„c Sri'.-nly-fnu 



.1] 



WALTER CLAUDf: KERLIN 

ItOAXdKK. VA. 

Born 1898. Matriculated 1017. 

"Chappie" "Robert T" 2nd. 

"Bashf Illness may sorneti/nes exclude 
pleasure; 
But seldom opens any avenues to sor- 
row or remorse.' 
Thikd ("i.\ss: Private Co. "E." 
Second CL.iSS : I'rivate C<i. ■■P." : .Mar- 
. shall Final Ball. 

Fjkst Cl.\.ss: Private Co. ■•IV: Marsluill 
Final German. 




Hailing from an alleged metvopolis, "The .Matjic City." and in a bash- 
ful ■^\•a}^ "Chappie" joined Old '20 at the beginning of the second lap, be- 
lieving that "Distance Lends Enchantment." 

He is a jack of all trades, being able to take any thing to pieces from a 
Victrola to a Generator; thus being technically inclined, his lot Mas cast with 
"Monk," and he has become adept in running down elusive electrons and 
vanishing volts. His remarkable ability in the manipulation of vectors, bor- 
dering upon the uneanny, has planted him firmly in the hearts of the little 
man with the "Specs." 

"Chappie's" only cross seems to be "Boots and Saddles;" at this drill 
he is wont to dismount frequently without command. 

^ ; _, We believe this is due to his absent-mindedness; that 

is, forgetting he has been discharged from the Marine 
Aviation Corps. 

It is not necessary for us to wish him success in 

life for he has proved to us, by his unlimited ability 

tlic determination, that no set goal is im]ios,silil" ; 

thercfoi-e we <'aii only wish liim (.!od-speed and liap- 

piness throiigli life's battles. 



Let's ijo to the Hay." 




-^S^^ 





WILLIAM D. LAVENDER 

CEN'TKRVII.LE, ALA. 



Rorn 1000. 

■■Ifillh 

"II hat's done 



Matriculated 1917. 
■■U' til lie" 



annot he undone." 

— Shakespeare. 
Thii;!! Ci..\.^.«: I'rivure Cu. "E." 
Sv:io.No Class : Private Co. "E" : Mar- 

•shall Final Ball. 
First Cr.ASS : Private Co. "E" : Public- 
it.v Committee; Military Secretary: 
Librarian: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet: Cadet 
Staff; Noble 47; Marshall Final Ger- 



'Tis .-eldoiu that Fate destines a mere rat for the measure of fame ac- 
quired by "Willie" when the news spread that the third class were to be 
allowed ample opportunity to foUoAV the rainbow to its mysterious end, but 
it is to the lasting credit" of this small prize package that he sur^-ived the 
category of Pink. Purple, Green and Lavender and caused the third class to 
marvel over the effects of his ruthless gaze would have had on newly cadets 
had he been piivilcged to be a hard third classman. 

As a mail ordirly he came to control the happiness of the second class 
by dolling out the prized letters from home at 10 o'clock C. P., thereby forti- 
fying the recipient against the wrath of professoi-s, or making such things 
mere trifllcs as compared with the disappointment 
over not receiving letters due by all the laws of prob- 
ability. 

As military secrrtai'y to the Commandant in his 
first class year !u was constantly consulted by the 
victims of circumstances, about the punishment due 
them under the new progressive scale of penalties 
whereby the 10th offense for smoking is 16 months 
Restricted Limits, 128 confinements, and confiscation 
of smoking material. Excused from all drills l)ut 
Cavalry, it was his i>i-(iucl boast that first stand in ('. 
D. 1\. rxanis tcstilicil td his aliilitv (■?)as a hdi-senian. 



"Hon- do you rate thatf" 




W^^M^mM^^^'^M 






FRANCIS DRAKE MALLORY, Jr. 

PARIS, TEXAS. 

Born 1899. Matriculated 1917. 

"Sausage" "Oyster" "Monk" 

"Epp" 

"Had I hut an hour to live 
That little hour to hliss I'd give." 

— Jnaehrion. 
THrRD Class : Private Co. "C." 
Second Class : Private Co. "C" ; liar- 
shall Final Ball. 
FiKST Class : Private Co. "C" : "Bomb" 
Staff: "Cadet" StaflE; Noble 47; Mar- 
shall Final German. 




-^^^^ 



"Oyster" found the monotony of barracks existence a sharp contrast 
to the fast life of gay "Paree" but like the rest of us he passed through his 
"rat" year quietly, altho disgustedly. His rebellious nature, however, became 
only too evident in his second year and expressed itself for the most part in 
a number of midnight adventures and holiday celebrations. His persistence 
in pleasure seeking was undiminished by his enlistment in the U. S. M. C. 
and his "devil dog" doings only sharpened his antipathy for all things mili- 
tary and for every regulation of discipline. But it remained for his first 
class year to bring out the real "Bolshevik" tendencies in "Sausage." No 
one enjoyed more than he, the sound of an exploding bomb or any of the 
other escapades of the third class. No one experi- 
enced such ecstatic enjoyment in the performance of 
his duty as a member of the Noble 47, as did "Monk" 
at 12:01 on the morning of January 1, 1920. Even 
^y^ESii his serious thoughts are pervaded with ideas of 

pleasure, so if you are ever looking for "Epp." seek 
him in one of the big electrical concerns of naughty 
New York City. 



'You can get it if you 'out it.' 




W^^^SM 



Page Se-venty-seven 




RICHARD COKE :MARSHALL III. 

rOI!T8MOL'TH. VA. 

Horn 1%0. Matriculated 1917. 

"Cokey" "Xiffffcr" 

") 011111/ hlood must have its course; 

.Inil (Very dog his day." 
•riiiiiii Class; Private Co. "D" 

Fddlhall. 
Skciinu Class: Sergeant Co. "D' 

Football ; Assistant Manager 

.Marshall Final Ball. 
FiKsT Cl.\ss : 2nd Lieutenant Co. "B" ; 

-Manager Track ; Jleraber Atiiletlc 

Ciinncil: Y. JI. C. A. Cabinet; Marsliall 

Final (Jennan. 



StTub 



; Sfrub 
Track : 



Least but not last of the JIarshalls to take up the daily duties of cadet 
life ; and burdened M-ith the e.xample of the others he came, he saw, he was 
conquered. There was added to the despondency of his rat daj'S the 
overwhelming prospect of a future course in "Civil." The following year, 
even too young to go to camp or to join the reno^\Tied S. A. T. C. he had 
the doubtful recompense of being Sergeant Jla.jor, and with the readjustment 
of things he managed to hold down a sergeantcy. During his first class year 
he proved his capabilities as a Civil Engineer by being first aid to "Oley" 
Anderson in surveying the White farm and the new athletic field, thereby 
piling up so many hours of credit that he was able to defy even the pi'ogres- 
sive scale of penalties. A quiet model youth whose 
only hindrance to zero demerits was the habit of tak- 
ing f)-equent chances of being late returning on F. 
C. P. 



"Tell r/ie soinethijit/ to siiy 




i>? 



iMiiiiii 



Paiir Sri;n!y-ii,,/il 



WILLIAM H. MILTON, JR. 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Born 1900. Matriculated IQ16. 

"Rose Bud" "Rosie" 

"11 ith cheeks like unto a budding rose." 
— "Bill Shakespeare." 
Private Co. "C." 
Corporal Co. "C." 
Sergeant Co. "D' 
Club; Marslial 



FotiKTH Class 
Third Class : 
Second Class : 

President N. 

Ball. 
I^iKST Class : Lieutenant Co. "A' 



C. 



Vice- 
Final 



Pres- 
ident N. C. Club; "Bomb" Statf; Hop 
Committee ; Dramatic Club ; Chairman 
Athletic Association Publicity Commit- 
tee ; Noble 47 ; llarshall Final German. 




Here it is. A beaming smile, and not a single hair out of its place. This 
last feat is " Rose-Bud's" greatest pride and joy. Who \\\\\ evei' kno^v how 
long it took to discipline that last contrary hair and how many lates he has 
run. due to putting on a last few touches before leaving for every formation? 

Yet appearances are often deceiving, as in this case. Beneath that 
simple brow there Itirks a massive brain — sort of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 
affairs. 'Rosie" is a hell-cat when he gets woimd up. L^nfortunately, he was 
once bitten by a Devil Dog while unwinding, thereby necessitating the Pas- 
teur Treatment for Hydrophobia. 

His main "ambish" is to "jazz" things electrically when he leaves tliis 
Hall of Shame. 




^==S> 



Do I leant a date? — Hoiv tall is shef 



-"^--fv-^rv-^-' 



Page Se-venty-nine 



^1€E BCfllilB 





EDWARD ROBT. .MONROE, JR. 

HU< )( )KXEAL, VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1916 

"Squirrel" "Eel" "Mont" 

"Cn/itpiiiiy. villninous lonipany, has been 
the ruin of me." 

— Shakespeare. 
Fourth «"i.ass : Private Co. "B." 
Third Class : Private Co. "B." 
Second Class : Private Co. "B" ; Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
First Cl.ass : Private Co. "D" ; Noble 
47: Marshall Final (German. 



Altho not flit out for a military career. " Squirrel" ha.s .survived four 
years in the House of Honor and i.s itow ready to take up his former exist- 
ence. His first two years were uneventful, but by means of the Kaiser's ab- 
dication and our consequent demobilization Squirrel pulled a camouflaged 
Christmas furlough during the third. That began his career of Bolshevism, 
for upon retui-ning he shifted from Engineering to the Arts. Then came a 
period of uneventful I'outinc but this could not last forever. Upon the or- 
ganization of that variegated band, the Xoblf 47. he became a confirmed 
member and has so remained. 

His main ambition is to see a woman twice without falling for her. and. 
to gain this end. he expects to travel extensively. So 

if you are evei' in the Orient and see a tobacco store 

with a familial- name drop in and he will welcomi' 
you «i1h thai evci' present smile and ingi-owing 
dimple. 



Any tnnil from Deraturf" 





WMM B»iB 



FRANK LESLIE MONTAGUE,JR. 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Born 1898. Matriculated 1917. 

"Frankie" "Montag" 

"If neither loving friends nor foes can 
hurt you. 
And all men count uith you but none 
too much." 

— Kipling. 
Third Class : Private Co. "B." 
Second Class : Sergeant Co. "B" ; Ten- 
nis Team; Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "E" ; Tennis 
Team : Marshall Final German. 




Tile aliovc named product blew in, "rcoc-ed" tdi- first corporal, direct 
from John Mar.shall High School Cadet Corps. He promptly proceeded to 
spoil all of his chances by entering the third class. 

In due time he became a sergeant and for a while held everything from 
that to a bevo cadet lieutenant. Women hold no charms for him, however 
he "vamps" them all with his classic exhibitions of terp.siehorean art. 

His principle faults are speed, dignity, and conscientiousness. The com- 
bination of these with ability and the willingness to work until he sees the 
job well done lias enabled him to make a success of his course in Civil En- 
gineering. '20 expects the same from you later in life, Frank. 




All' H — /. let's roll the hones for it: 



Page Eighty-one 




WALTER S. MONTGOMERY, JR. 

SPAKTANBURO. S. C. 
Born 1900 Matriculated 1916 

"Monty" "Monk" "Scotti" "Son" 

'A letter deferred maketh the heart sick. 
But li'hen it cometh it may begin: 
Dear Friend." 

— Maxims of Xoah. 
FouKTH Class : Private Co. "D." 
Third Cl.\ss : Corporal Co. "D" : 

President South Carolina Club. 
Second Class : Ser^'eant Co. "C" ; 

shall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "C" ; I're.sident 
South Carolina Club : Noble 47 ; Mar- 
.shall IMnal Gernmn. 



Vice- 



Mav- 



Thc fame of "Sputtanbui'g" has never been in doubt since the moment 
"Monty" donned his first pair of long trousers, filled his trunk with pen- 
nants, silk shirts, and pillow eases ready to enjoy the pleasures of college 
life at the Institute. As a rat "iMonk" gained a great deal of attention on 
account of his more or less military bearing. After successfully navigating 
the perils of his thii'd class year Walter faced the future with the wish for 
Ix'tter things and nianrully turned his back on the past, and the few deficient 
subjects it held. 

Having reached the tui'iiing point of his career at V. JI. I. his lot was 
ca.st Avith Chappie's Liberal Artists, probably with the hope of improving 
his assertions on "The Greater Love." The "Love 
'^ales of Hoffman" cannot compare with "Monk's" 
Hunchausen-like adventures in the same realm. He 
1 olds the uncontested record for rapid-fire episodes 
cf this character, and each one seems fairer than the 
1; St. Seen in action at the hops he is imcomparable. 
a id his correspondence list containts many additions 
a '^tei' each one. 

It is the firm opinion of the host of friends "Mun- 
t:> " has won at V. M. I. that he will devote his nuuiy 
talents not in one line of endeavor but in many ami 
t'.at each will prove an unquestioned success. 



'Boys I /I'll till- greater love." 




^^^^iprf-^tftenp^^j^^^ 



Pniie Ei,ihly-lv.f, 




HORACE HENNING MUNSON 

UICHMOM), VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1915 

"Horrible" "Horrible Horace" 

"Harry" 

"Of all the words of both tongue and 
pen. 
The saddest are these. I'm bulled 
again." 

— Anonymous. 
Fourth Class : Private Co. "E. " 
Thikd Class : Corporal Co. "F." 
Second Class : Private Co. "F" ; 

shall Final Ball. 
FiKST Class : Private Co. "F" ; 
dent Richmond Clul) ; Noble 47 
shall Final German. 



Mar- 



Presi- 

; Mar- 




Horace sig-ned away his freedom in September, 1915, for foui- year.s he 
then thought, but now he has decided it takes five years to get the full bene- 
fit of the Institute. Having been so advised by the "Local Boys," he was 
a "running mister" and was rewarded with a corporal. After ten months 
as "number 4" he decided he would get a new start, so he began his Third 
Class year all over again. Not being a member of the Z. D. C, his clierished 
chevrons were removed after .seven months of his second go-round for ex- 
cess demerits and he began the life of a private in the ranks, which isn't such 
a hard life after all. 

In bis second class year he attained the ambition of many and became 
the "little drummer boy" of the corps, making the 
irksome march to and from the Messhall a pleasure. 
Thus he slipped through his second class year, burst- 
ing into his long hoped for first class year, like the 
rosy dai-sn. 

All went .smoothly for "Horrible" until he was 
pursuaded by that horrid combination to enter the 
pyrotechnical celebration staged for the arrival of 
1920. He carried thru his part of the program as 
arranged and led the "Old Yell for "20" which ended 
up the night 's performance. Just like the rest of the 
"Noble 47" he took his medicine, as bitter as it was, 
and again became accustomed to penalty tours and 
confinements, and in return has been rewarded by 
now being able to call himself "a graduate of the 
V. M. and I." 

"/ sivear I reckon he's about the dumbest commandant ive've 
ever had." 




iliiiM]=r-rv^ 



Page Eighty-three 




JACK WILLIAM NURXE^' 

SUFFOLK. VA. 

l?<)rn ISQ9 Matriculated 1916 

"Jink" "Sin" 

"A nighUngale dies for shami if luiotlur 
hinl sings better." 

— Burtun. 

I'oniTH ('i.A.ss: I'l-ivatf To. "l i." 

riiii;i] Ci.A^is: O(iriior;il Co. ■T" : Vcsli'.v- 
iii:in Kiiiscopal Cluireh Club; <'lass 
l'...iiliall. 

Si...\ii CLAS.S : 1st Serjeant Co. "D" ; 
.\^--istant Manager Basketball : Adver- 
lisiiii; JIanager '■Bullet"; Viee-I'i-e.si- 
(lont Tidewater Club: Marshall Final 
r.all. 

KiusT Cla.ss : Captain Co. ■'E" : Hop 
Committee : Manager Baslietball : Ad- 
M-rtising Manager •■BomlV" ; President 
Tidewater Club: Marshall Final Cer- 
man. 



The exotic adject i\es, "irrcstiblc, " "impulsive," "cheeky." applied 
so promiscuously to this favorite son of Suffolk fall far short of the mark 
when it comes to describing our Jack. He attracts the attention of every- 
thing from the cradle to the grave ; in trousers, skirts, or neither, from near 
or far. lii fact such are his attractions, detractions, and oddities that the 
usual classic remark for a new calie watching parade is, "who is that little 
chubby Captain with the right oblique nose?" Be it said for him that if 
she is worthy of his steel he has never yet failed to give her all the informa- 
tion she asked for and a little more besides. 

From a professor of the Terpsichorean art in Suffolk he devcloinil into 
a past mastei- of jazz at our hops, with going so fni- 
in producing invocations as to gain the title of the 
"CTalloping Hession." Be it said for him, hoAvever, 
that he falls short of the title in one respect-such was 
his savior faire — that he never lost his head, which is 
indeed remarlcalile in view of the many feminine 
hearts he caused to Hutter. 

His fi'iendship is a valued, if uncertain quantity, 
and thanks to the warmth of his nature his true 
friends are many and loyal. Owing to his aforemen- 
tioned iriesistiblc qup.lilies we have no doubt Ihat in 
life's mad \\\\\v\ he'll nc-^-er fail to take down llie 
barbed wii'c o:ii-t,.]'s on all occasions, even though it 
should coiiK' to iiiiiiini.; coal in Bluefield. 

"Conn on ftllons. it's time to go to the hay." 




M^Mm_ ^T&n^-^s%^ 



l'n„r t:,,,l.ly-l<iur 



^"■^^'■ 



WILLARD NEWTON PARKER 

RICHMOND. VA. 

Born 1900 Matriculated 1917 

"The Royal Long-tried" "Walrus" 

"Pfilly" 

"firily. all is vanity ami vexation of 
spirit." 

— Proverbs. 

Third Class: ITivatt" Cu. -K- ; Chiss 

. Football. 

Second Class: Quartermaster Seriieaul 

Co. "B"; Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class: Private Co. "B" ; Fooihall 

Squad: Noble 47: Marshall I'Miial <;i'r- 

iiiaii. 




Behold a man who believt's he can fool the whole workl by keeping 
silent and thus having it said of him — "8till water runs deep." "The Royal 
Long-Tired Odysseus" of Homer's dreams had nothing on him if you will 
only listen to his troubles. 

Prim and prceise as an old maid in his room, he bears up the traditions 
of the First Class Privates by being a "Bolshevik" in appearance, and ac- 
cording to Our Major Bud, his habitually initriDinied whiskerettes and un- 
shined .shoes are the one note of discord in the front rank of "B" Cumpany. 
Whenever the "Walrus" has his turn at the wash basin, \\v makes the 
. front room look like the high seas, and his greatest disappointment was the 
time he saw a eavali'v liorse shove his whole muzzle 
, into the trough and blow, thus establishing a I'ecord 
that even he has been unable to equal . 

At present his goal is an engineering ))o^'itil)n in 
some wild country where ho can wear hip boots with 
spui's a foot long. 




"I 



rv^^' 



Page Eiylily-jivi 




JOHN CROMWELL PARROTT 

KOAXOKE. VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1916 

"Twee Ticee" "Bird" "Holy John" 
"Jack" 

"Full many a floicer is horn to blush 
unseen, and naste its fragrance in the 
desert air." 

Fourth Class : Private Co. "B." 

Third Class : Corporal Co. "D" ; Class 
Historian. 

Skcond Class : Sergeant Co. "E" ; Class 
Historian ; Assistant Leader Final 
Ball ; Assistant Cheer Leader : Ring 
Committee : "Bullet" Staff : Vice-Presi- 
dent S. W. Va. Club. 

First Class : Private Co. "E" : Class 
Historian : Cheer Leader ; Vice-Presi- 
dent Cotillion Club : Assistant Editor 
"Cadet" : Humor Editor "Bomb" : As- 
sistant Leader Final German ; Presi- 
dent Dramatic Club ; President South- 
west Va. Club ; Toastniaster First Cla.ss 
Banquet. 



"Jack" hails fioiu the ".Magic City" and, despite this fact, he's proved 
himself an all right sort of a fcllc-v. One of the biggest mistakes of his life 
was made at the end of his third class year when he failed to avail himself 
of the opportunities of oI)taining an education and, instead of taking Liberal 
Arts, he decided to listen to "R. B. " three times a day. Eight now. tho' 
full of bridge de.'-igns and such things, he is further advanced in the art of 
"shooting the l)uir" than even the l)cst of "Chappie's" disciples. It is hard 
to imagine what "Twee" would be today if he had taken the dialetie course. 
As it is he is capable of ( arrying on a Huent eonvi>i-sation with anybody from 
"Fannie Dooley" on u]). 

"Bird" has been a worthy successor to the far- 
famed cheer leaders of yore, namely "Bobljie" liond 
and "Jimmy" Thompson, and it is rumored that our 
teams were not the only features which attracted the 
huge mobs to the games played in Roanoke this year. 
The boy is talented too: he sings, plays the piano 
al)out as well, and is an exponent of the most modern 
terpsichorean art — using Jack Honore's (^leaqua bolh 
in — and externally. 

"Jack" has liecn a class officer and has been one 
of the leading factors in pulling the class thru' its 
many ti'ials and tribulations. Always jovial, he 
made liimself one of the most popular men in school 
and his i)leasing pei'sonality will be missed by us all 
next year. 

"// hat' re V"" putting out." 



&0M^v^^W^SB^ 




Ptiije Eiijlity- 



WILLIAM COALTER PAXTOK 

DANVILLE. VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1916 

"Pax" "Pause" 

"Loves Labor Lost." 

— Shakespeare. 
FouKTH Class : Private Co. "D." 
Thikd Class : Corporal Co. "E" ; Hop 

Committee. 
Second Class : Quartermaster Sergeant 

Co. "A" ; Hop Committee ; Assistant 

Business Manager "Bullet"; Mar.sliall 

Final Ball. 
FiKST Class : 1st Lieutenant Co. "B" : 

Assistant Business Manager "Bomb"' : 

Hop Committee; Noble 47; Marshall 

Final German. 




A sense of humor saves many a situation, and in four years at V. M. I. 
there is many a situation to be saved. JIany a time vhen it seemed like a 
case of "all's lost save honor" to those of us cursed with a senous turn of 
mind it was only a case of "all's lost save humor" with "Pousse" and just 
so many times have peals of laughter and a beaming countenance informed 
lis that he had nabbed the ray of .sunshine that was to lift us all out of the 
ditch. 

Don't be misled, however, by this jovial exterior to think that he is but 

a child of pleasure, for a long look into those dark brown eyes give a hint 

of depths unplumbed. though we suspect the fair sex has been given more 

opportunities 1o solve their mysteries than fellow 

"keydets" less susceptible to his blandishments. 

Through all the turmoil of Bolsheviki ideas, he re- 
mains true to his colors and standards. His opinion 
is one to be respected, for when all the rest of us 
have finally reached a conclusion through tortuous 
arguments and reasoning we look to "Pousse" lack- 
adaiseally smoking his pipe in the corner and find 
that was what he had been thinking all day. 



Jntl I only shot a roman randle and a skyrocket." 




■^-if^-..JX,_,**^ 



Page tighiy->ix en 




MORTON WILSON POTTS 

FOliT WORTH. TEXAS. 

Horn 1000 Matriculated 1917 

"(](ip'n" "Itx" "Mri" "iMoton" 

"Out of sight, out of mind: 
In sight, never mind." 

— Anonymous. 
Thiki) Ci..\.s.s ; I'l-ivute Cn. "E." 
Seco.ni) Ci,-\s.s : Sergeant Co. "B" ; Com- 
pany Rifle Team: Marshall Final Ball. 
KiR.ST Ci..\ss: Private Co. "B" : Xohle 
47: Marshall Final German . 



"Cap'n Tex" Potts in the fall of 1917 advised Old Nick that he was go- 
ing to gi\e the Institute a trial. Pic displayed great indignation at the out- 
set because he was not allowed to have his pet rattle snake in barracks but 
was slightly appeased when the Commandant assigned him to the same room 
as Squaw Baby Davis. 

On entering the second class he decided to follow Chappie thru the lib- 
ei-al ai'ts, the most liberal of these being that of sleeping anywhere, anytime, 
and thru anything, lie also aspired to, and won the high rank of sergeant 
ill this year, and lliere is no doul)t that his efficiency in "B" Company won 
it the cup that year. This efficiency is proved by the fact that the Kaiser 
abdicated almost immediaely upon "Mo's" arrival at 
Camp Taylor, where he hoped to secure a Second 
Lieutenant in the Field xVrtillery. 

In his fir.st class year he joined the Royal Order 
of 0. G.'s, in Mhich organization he did very com- 
mendable work until he resigned to join the Noble 
Forty-seven, this lieing the last organization in which 
he figured. 

Morton is kno-\\n to us as a loyal and true friend, 
and his ])leasiiig personality and constant genial dis- 
position lia\r won the I'espect and admiration of all 
who have known him. 



'//;/ // — too nnuh — take it!' 




^^^ 



Pai/f Eiijlily-riylit 



• IIIH 
ijlllllll 




I1PKE b<sm:b 



•\X/='U^ 



\J^ 



LITTLETON SAVAGE ROBERTS 

NORFOLK, VA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1917 

"Hump" "Cootie" " Rohhh" 

"The devil ean quote scriptures for his 
oun purpose." 

— Shakespeare. 

Third Class : Private Co. "D." 
Skcond Class : Sergeant Co. "D" ; Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
FiKST Class: Private Co. "D" : Noble 
47 : Marshall Final German. 




Upon making the great discovery tliat he could listen to a Chemistry 
Lecture without going to sleep, and in addition, that he could combine his 
ideas of chemistry and bolshevism successfully, our hero (?) could see no 
other course than Chemical Engineering. To what his success as a highbrow 
has been due m'c have not discovered, since he has been known to ask re- 
peatedly the difference betAveen the duties of the Officer of the Guard and 
the Quarter Guard sentinel. 

He is very fond of walking, especially Sunday afternoon, and is often 
seen wending his way toward East Ijexington. He is the composer of many 
"odes to Venus." He once narrowly escaped being drowned in his own music, 
and now plays the "Vic" constantly. His principal 
object in life is to learn the art of keeping two flames 
burning for him at the same time. In this he has 
partially succeeded, due lo the able assistance of 
Burger's book on "EIow to make Love." His princi- 
pal setback occurred when several at Sweet Briar com- 
pared notes, and found that he used the same line 
foi' all. 



■And all that sort of thing." 




^^S^ 



Page Eigllty-nlnc 




WILLIAM THOMAS SEMMES 
ROBERTS 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1916 

"Cutie" "Billie" 

"At last our young affections run to 
nastr 
Or liiiter hunt the desert." 

— Byron. 

iMintTH Class: I'rivate Co. "C" : Track 
Siniiul. 

'I'miti) Ci.A.ss : Ccirporal dt. "C" ; Track 
.S(iuad; Scrub Basketball: Coinpany 
Baseball. 

Second Class : Sergeant Co. "C" : Scrub 
Football ; Scrub Basketball : Scrub 
Baseball ; Captain Co. Baseball : Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 

FjRST Class : Private Co. "C" ; Scrub 
Basketball ; Baseball Squatl : Athletic 
Association: Publicity Committee: As- 
.sociate Editor "Cadet" : President 
Washington Club; Manager-Treasurer 
Dramatic Club: "Noble 47": Marshall 
Final German. 



'enaiiidin'cd' 



Billy .joined us in oiii- rodent days. During this joyful and care-free 
year he decided 'twas best to let all natural inclinations take a back seat 
and only show that side of us that "rats" are supposed to show. i. o.. a 
silent voice and a "running" attitude, hence, when Finals came, he was one 
of the high and mighty corporals that thinks a First Captain hasn't even a 
look-in when they're considered— Sie Semper Coporalis. 

"Cutie" managed to eke out a fair existence until his second class year 
when he fell under the wiles of "Piggy" — and thereby hangs a tale. 

With an ovci'powei-ing weakness for "les femmes," Billy can be foinid 
most any night either in that characteristic pensive mood of the 
or else tcai'ing off that hound .sheet to "her;" whil ■ 
Roofs and Bridges, not to mention the other woriies 
that "Piggology" causes a weak mind, lay crest- 
fallen and neglected by the wayside. But even with 
these inborn traits that try to pull a good man down 
— "Sometimes a man's a man for -a'-that," as the 
poets Fay, and in closing here's looking at you. Billy, 
for there's a reserved seat in this game of life for 
you, right down on the "bald-headed" row! 4 



'Danniiit 'Stud.' shut up an' ht ti i/uy study!" 




^ ^-"-^iiiSiSllIteiiif^r-^ 



Pfuji' iXincty 



FREDERICK M ALONE 
SATTERFIELD 

WASHIXGTOX, D. C. 
Born 1899 Matriculated 1917 

"Freddie" "Eaglebeatie" "Squatter" 

"Oh, blest liitli temper ivhose unclouded 
ray 
Can make tomorroic cheerful as 
today!" 

— Pope. 
Thikd Class : Private Co. "F." 
Second Class : Sergeant Co. '"F" : Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
First Glass : Private Co. "F" : Vice- 
President Washington Club ; Marshall 
Final German. 




In that awkward year of our rathood. one, A\alking' down the ranks of 
"F" Co., might have seen "finning out" vrith the rest of us, a medium-sized 
youth with reddish hair, hook-nose, smiling eyes, and good looks. That was 
"Freddie," the "Freddie" that was destined to live with us the remainder 
of our years at V. M. I., and to pass through the mill of everlasting friend- 
ship, to the end. In his passage through the gruelling and weeding cogs of 
the machinery he has ever won fame for himself, beginning by securing 1st 
stand in his third class year and a sergeantcy in "F" Co. As soon as pos- 
sible after America's entrance into the World AVar Freddie left the Institute 
to east his lot with those patriotic men who were sacrificing all for their 
country and entered the Field Artillery Officers' 
Training School at Camp Taylor, Ky. Upon the close 
of the war he returned to V. M. I. and resumed his 
studies and duties as a sei-geant. Such a person- 
ality as his is hard to describe, for it is not the 
personality of one man, but the per.sonalities of sev- 
eral men, merged into one. In this combination, he 
has held on to those qualities whicli have made him 
what he is, the truest of friends, the most steadfast 
to duty, and a brilliant and enjoyable companion, who 
has won the hearts of both "kevdet" and "calic." 



"Well, that was clever! 




Page Nineiy-one 





RICHARD CARTER SCOTT. Jk. 

ItlCHMdXD, VA. 

Born 1000 Matriculated 1917 

"Ciirtt'r" "Dump" "Scotti" 

"If she muhrvidue me. 
It'lint care I, hoic fair she hef 

— Sir IV alter Raleiyh. 
•I'll 11:11 Class: I'rivate Co. ••D." 
Skcomi Class: I'rivatt' l^i. "E ' : Mar- 
shall Final Hail. 
i'lKsT Cla.ss : I'rivate Cu. "F" : Si'cre- 
tary JIcGuire's CItil) : Nolile 47: .Mar- 
sluill Final German. 



Ladies and geiillenieii, if you i-aii behold these liquid orlis long enough 
to listen to my tale, avc will attempt to give you some information on the 
subject. Hailing fvoiii the Capitol City, he is widely known as "one of the 
loeal boys" and reputed to mo\e in the "highest social strata." He under- 
went his rathood as any ordinary mortal and so attained the exalted position 
of an old cadet. He had his experience holding the reins of authority as a 
sergeant but decided he had rather cast his lost with the common herd as 
everyone docs sooner or later, and he gained a wide reputation as a mail- 
carrier during his second class year, when all the recipients of letters had to 
.journey to his I'oom while he, as an artist playing true to his rolni's. early 
showed his preference for hay. Another item — he has 

grown and risen from company to company, trying a 

different one each year, and this bodily expansion was 
in co-opei'ation with a likewise spiritual development 
which reaches out as a magnet and ' ' grapples friends 
to him with hoops of steel." His cup of life is over- 
flowing with the milk of human kindness and all who 
so desii'c are welcome to drink to their heart's con- 
tent. 



'You sivear!" 




■ r- 



I'ai/r Sinily-liio 



THOMAS ALFRED SLACK 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS. 

Born 1900 Matriculated 1916 

"Tom" "Coyote Pete" 

"I love to talk, and talk and talk. 
I pull a lot of clever stuff. 
i\Iy one regret in life is this. 
I don't get listened to enough." 

Fourth Class: Private Co. "D." 
Third Class : Corporal Co. "A," 
Second Class : Sergeant Co. "A" ; Mar- 

.shall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "B' 

Committee; Xoble 47: JIarsha 

German. 



Hop 
Final 




This young Texan can't be described very well in such a brief sketch — 
it would take a volume to enumerate his many and varied traits, but, for 
those who know him, a sketch is not necessary and you who haven't this 
honor will have to use your imagination. 

During "Coyotes" "four years at the Institute he received one letter only 
from a "calic," hence not having the usual "keydets" diversion at hand he 
passed the time "jigging" and "fiddling." He can play his fiddle for hours 
on a stretch, to his roommates grief, and he can clog dance till the ceiling 
falls, and he can expound theories till he's lilue in the face, to say nothing 
of his unlucky adversary. 

HoAvevcr A\hen his faithful fiddle is laid uj) foi- 
repairs he has been occasionally seen studying, and 
this, combined with an ttnusual amount of grey mat- 
ter, has enabled him to pass Civil Engineering, a feat 
which speaks for itself. 

In other words, he is a gay jolly blase youth with 
just the right amount of seriousness, and it is with 
more than the usual amount of regret that his fiiends. 
the entire corps, bid him adieu. 



"You see, it's like this." 




r-vC 



Page Ninety -three 




RLSSELL MAYES SMITH 

CHICAGO. ILL. 

Born 1896 Matriculated 1916 

-Rus" ■■Sihmitty'' -Chi' "R.M." 

" Thou art as ivise as thou art beautiful." 
— Shakespeare. 

Thiki> Class: Private Co. "D' ; Cadet 
Orche.stra. 

.SKcciMi Cl.\ss: Private Co. "B" ; Cadet 
tirche.stra : Marshall Final Ball. 

First Cl.\s.s : Private Co. "D" : Mana- 
irer Cadet Orchestra; Y. M. C. A. Cab- 
inet : JIarshall Final German. 



"Rus" (iitend V. M. I. in the fall of 1916 wilh the rest of '20 but east 
his lot with that certain species of animal called "The Third-class Rat." Un- 
til Finals he managed to eke out an exciteless and meager existence, which 
is all that is expected of a rat after all. 

He entered the Air Service in 1917 and returned last year to get another 
crack at that "dip" and joined '20 in her race toward the goal. "Rus" 
is an ardent disciple of ilorpheus and the wonder of it all lies in, that despite 
this natural instinct, he is an engineer, and a high-brow at that. How he 
has managed to pull the wool over "Piggy's" eyes still remains a mystery. 

However his most noted achievement has been of a musical character. 
As a member and manager of the best orchestra V. 

M. I. has evei- turned out we all bow low to you. 

"Rus," for mIicii you start "jazzing" that banju 
thei-e's iKiiic <-aii hold a caii(lle 1(i you. 



"Sjritrh your tail and take off." 




-W^i^MMm 



l\ii/i- Siiuly-luur 



^v 



HAROLD SYDXOR 

XOKFOLK. VA. 

Born 1898 -Matriculated 1917 

"Syd" "Scrntth" "S/nall Change" 

"And he learned about ivo?nen from 
her." 

■ — Kipling. 
Third Class : Private Co. "C." 
Second Class : Private Co. "C. : Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
First Class: Private Co. "C" : llarsliall 
Final German. 




Yes, true to the eharaet eristics of most specimens of his weight and 
dimensions he makes a lot of noise, but he is harmless. A natural born ' ' high 
brow," he works on the theory that "hay" is good for brains, in fact such 
is his zeal along this line that occasionally he moves his abode and that of 
the brain producing apparatus further down the stoop after taps to escape 
the harangues of the D-2 poker club. 

It was after he came to the town of Lexington that he found that "a 
woman is only a woman" and is consequently a sadder but a wiser man. 
Be doubly true with your success hereafter as you 
have been with us. 




"The hand will not troop the line.' 



Page Ninety-fi-ve 



V 






1}; 




HUXTINGTOX MCDONALD 
TURNER 

WASHINGTON. 1 1. C. 

Born ISQC) Matriculated 1916 

"Hunt" "Ilonty" "['a/iipy" 

"I /ini nionanh rjf all (hearts) I survey." 
— Anonymous. 

l-'iirnTH Class: Private Co. "F." 

'rmiiu Class: Corporal Co. "I""; Cla.ss 
Fdotliall. 

Sk( (iM) Class: Battalion Serjeant Maj- 
or; I''ootball Squad; Marshall Final 
Hall. 

I'liisT Ci \.ss : Biittallon .VilUitant ; ■■I'.nUih" 
Siaff: Fnutliall Squad; Noble 47: Mar- 
shall Final (Ternian. 



Behold sti-aiiuei-! the Acqiic of prrfec-tioii, the "Perfeet Man." To gaze 
into those jet black orbs or to sui'vey him from head to foot is all that is 
necessary to make any woman fall. But gazing further into his eyes one can 
see not only a mere "Lady Killer" but a friend ir;deed to all. 

If yoti ever ask where he is from, it may be Milwaukee, Washington, 
Gloucester Co., Va., or perhaps Paris or Geneva. They say he took his first 
lessons in "Vamping" on the other Continent, any way he is "All Amx'ri<-an" 
along that line. 

Hunt has been one of the mainstays of the football squad for four years 
and his presence will be missed in the future. A more running man never 
graced these walls, his knife-like creases are one of 
the features of the Institute always pointed out to 
strangers. 

Always ready to accommodate anybody, and the 
fact of his being an all round good fellow has won 
bim a place in the hearts of all. Good luck to you 
"Yampy." may the gi'eater bn-e come soon; for at the 
rate you ari' going over the available supply, there 
won't be anything but broken hearts left in a few 
years. 



T(j tin Larliis: "I'll sjiear I do." 

To tin Cadets: "If hat did she say ahout 








CHARLES WALLACE 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

Born 1898 Matriculated 101 (, 

"Chnz" "Charlie" 

"Gie /tie ae spark o Nature's fire. 
That's a' the learnin' I desire." 

— Robert Burns. 
KouKTH Class : I'rivate Co. "C." 
Third Ci-ass : Corporal Co. "D." 
Skconu Clas.s : Sergeant Co. "D" : JUii^ 

Committee; Marshall Final Ball. 
First Cl.4.s.s : Private Co. "D" : Xotilp 47 : 
Marshall Final (ierman. 




Woman hatt'i-, hay hittci-. with a natural propensity for singing ('I) after 
"Rev." Charlie has passed tiirough the four years unscathed. As a Keydet he 
has shown that the exception proves the rule by being one of the few from 
Fredericksburg to squeeze suecessfitlly through thi?se sacred halls of learning 
and maintain his unblemished moral integrity. 

Kepeatedly he was heard to remark on the ease of sleeping in a canoe 
on the Rappahannock with the right girl at the paddle. He highbrows in his 
only Liberal Arts subject — Cots and Covers. Also he is a hard-boy. as the 
authorities claim he was not born but quarried. Their conclusions are based 
upon his twice being under close arrest for attempting to maltreat both 
"Rats" and "Subs." 

Machinery is as easy to him as an interlinear 
pony is to the struggling Latin scholai'. He can take 
a watch to pieces, pnt enough back to make it run. 
and still have some left over. When that last "Dis- 
missed" is given, just watch that guy and see his old 
trusty sliako go soai-ing o'er the (iuard Tree. 




7 rau't see it that 



Page Kincly-s 



^ _> 




WILLIAM TURNER WALLIS, JR. 

CLAIlKSBrRG. W. VA. 

Born 1900 ^latricLilated 191 7 

■■If'hity" "ff. T." "Hello" 

"Kith ivords of learned length and 
thunderous sound, 
Amazed the rustics ranged round." 

— Goldsmith. 
Third Class : Private Co. "F." 
Second Cl.\ss : Private Co. "F" ; Mar- 
shall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "A" ; Noble 
47 ; Marshall Final German. 



Turner had every reason to believe that he had proved the exception 
to the feeling of ins ignifieance common to most "Kat.s" when, on his second 
day. he encountered an F. Company sergeant on a portion of the 4th stoop 
considered .'acred to the presence of old cadets only, while further distinc- 
tion came \\htn all were caused to marvel whether in "finning out" he 
sought the mechanical advantage of an unbalanced center of gravity. 

His expressed reason for choosing C. E. over L. A. was a disinclination 
to entire!}- forego the distinction between reveille and ta])s. but he has lived 
to a bitter rcafization that the other extreme is certainly not without its 
advantages. 

As a first classman his eagerness to guard the In- 
stitute on any of three days with a consequent ab- 
sence to Cavalry is ample proof of the realization of 
a limitation which he frankly admitted imder trying 
circumstances, to the Lt. Col., in the strongest of 
terms. 

Moved to emulate the achievements of others of 
oui- kind who here serve as examples in khaki: he 
hopes to serve as a Provisional Second Lieutenant in 
the Engineers before returning to the coal mines of 
his native town, the birthplace of "Stonewall" Jack- 
son, from which many are to be enticed to this, his 
best loved home. 

"llou' does it feel to he .'" 




"^Saiiiiiiiiiasi&ifc 



P/ii;, Ninrty-eiylil 



HSIN CHU WANG 

AXTHWEI, CHINA. 
Roni 1898 Matriculated 1Q18 

"Charles" "If nrplhuj" "Judge" 

"Give every man thy ear. hut feic thy 
voiee : 
Take eaeh man's ccnsur 
thy judgment." 

Second Class: Private Co. "D, 
First Cl.\ss : Trivate Co. "C." 



hut reservi 









I; ^ 








%jf 1# ^5 jJ^ ;/^ ^ f 



The above creature is a rare specimen of .second 
class "rat," who was imported directly from the far 
off Celestial land of China. While but a meek rat, 
Charles appreciated the full value of hay, therefore 
enlisting- with the rest of those second class artists 
and became a famous desciple of old Chappy, the V. 
JI. I. sage. Perhaps Warpling- will never foi-get his 
first year at V. M. I., especially those kind greetings 
rendered to him by the friendly third classmen. 

Charles has succeeded in whatever he has under- 
taken. We know his ambition and sincerity will en- 
able him to become one of the future leaders of the 
great Republic of China. 

"Aiv dum! Let's kill the Japs.' 



/Z- 



Page Niriety-niue 




^1€E B<M1B 



-.- /=¥ M 




GEORGE DELAWARE 
WHITFIELD 

FRANKLIN. VA. 

Born 1897 Matriculated 1916 

"Duke" "Esiy" "Whitt" 

"Thou art as riisr as thou art beautiful." 
— Shakespeare. 
Fourth Class : Private Co. "C." 
Third Class : Corporal Co. "C." 
Second Class r Sergeant Co. "C" ; Mar- 

sliall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "C" ; Marshall 

Final Oernuui. 



Look liiiii over; Sir Isaac Newton has nothing to put this mathematical 
genius to doing. In fact after listening to him talk for half an hour (if 
suoh a thing is possible) one would think that the latter would be ashamed 
of some of the theories he advanced. 

His chief faults are the mandolin, singing, and the attraction for the fair 
sex around Franklin. The last may seem a mystery to some, but froni all 
indications seems to be true. While LTncle Sam was in the midst of the Great 
Sti'uggle, Lieutenant "Esky" served in every capacity from a lance corporal 
to a Bevo Lieuteiumt at the Institute while waiting his call to the "Heavies." 
One of his greatest worries is whether to return to Newsoms or Franklin and 
take up his "daily duties." But whatever he does 
we know that he will continue with the determination 
to carry it throtigh to a finish. j[^lUP^^'^>'* 



^.- 




'Hop up iitiil Siotch. I'm hard! 



Pnijc One llniuind 




EDWIN JAMES WILLIAMS 

JACKSON, GA. 

Born 1899 Matriculated 1916 

"E. J." "E." "Tjeke" "Dog-Ear" 

-A. H. H." 

"The saddest ivords that tongue can 
speak 
Is the Dodo's call of Zeke, Zeke, Zeke." 
— Caag. 
Fourth Class : Private Co. "B. " 
Third Class : Private Co. "B" ; Swim- 
ming Team ; Third Swimming Medal. 
Second Class : Private Co. "B" ; "Bul- 
let" Staff; Marshall Final Ball. 
First Class : Private Co. "B" ; "Bomb" 
Staff ; "Cadet" Staff ; Swimming Team ; 
Noble 47 ; Marehall Final German. 



"Zeke" from "Ty Ty," a little piece of dirt down in Georg;ia, cau.ses us 
to doubt the integrity of the report "that everything i.s peaches" that hails 
from that state. In spite of this shortcoming, however, his vieissitudinous 
career at the Institute is really a subject of interest. As a rat he was char- 
acterized by his intrepid front when accosted by the adverse third classmen. 
As a bomb thrower his practical jokes on the commandant were subjects of 
great amusement to everyone but himself and his unfortumite roommate 
"Cosmo." 

At the hops (Sub having spotted him cold). 

Sub. — "Ai'e'nt you under restrictions?" 
A. H. H. (despairingly) — "Yes, sir." 
Sub. — "Report to your room under arrest." 
A. H. H. (undertone) — "Hard but square, quoth 
the monkey." 

In spite of the high potential difference once ex- 
isting between "E. J." and our local anthropoid, he 
decided to sip the CURRENTS of the Pierian Spring. 
In .spite of his technical endowments, however, his 
editorial accomplishments have clearly demonstrated 
to the ai-tists that literary ability is only a side issue 
of the engineer. As the old bones of fortune have 
"Snake-eyed" so consistently during the past four 
years for him, the best that we can msh him is that 
his future "passes" will speedily reduce his Nemesis 
lo Ik'i- last shekel. 

"Witness this 'E' men!" 
■ ■ "Wake nte up at first call." 



fe 




iBMilliiiiif*^ 



Page One Hundred-one 




WIIJ.IAM ALEXANDER 
WINSTON 

KIXdSTdX, X. V. 
liorn ISOS Matriculated 1916 

•■/)'///■■ ■■jrUlii" ■■Stein" ■■ICallie" 

■^ (III (Jdssiiii luii II li'iin and hungry 

look : 
III thinks too iiiuih: such men are 
/Ian r/e rolls. " 

— Shaiespeare. 
I'oriUH Ci ASS : I'riv;iU- ('... -A." 
'riiiiiii Class : C.iriM.i'al ('(.. -A." 
Sij..\i, Class: Supply SpLucant i^n. "1"' : 
Assisi:nil Maiia-iM- F..otl.aU ; Marshall 
l-'iiial r.all. 
ri};si Class; Caplaiii C.>. --F' : Maiui- 

-cT I-' hall ; \ali'(lictni-iaii : -'I', iiili" 

SiaTI ; -Cailcr' SialT: Marshall I'inal 
GcrmaiL 



"Bill"- tliis Kill sun (if North and South. \\as one of tlir initial inemhcr.s 
of ''JO and sinci' his '"liat" year has heeu looked up to by everyone. Per- 
haps one i-eason U>r this is that he rivals "Burks" in the nundjer of his an- 
eestors, as he rhiiins kin A\ith everyone in Mi'^inia from I'oeahontas to 
"Labby Jim." 

This reservi'd young man passed his fii-st three years at the Institutt- 
without a single demerit, but on attempting to run lights to correspond ^^•itb 
a certain young lady he was caught, and this variation from the straight 
and narrow path admitted him to tlie i-anks of those who really enjoy V. 
M. I. life. 

"Willie" has the distinction of having more nick- 
names than any man in barracks, but for every name 
he has a good trait which we are sure will carry him 
to success in the oncoming conflict with the wo]-ld. if 
not M-ifh Avomen. He was not attracted to the latter 
until his l-'irst (Mass year, but from all indications he 
has ninic than snccreilcd in making up for lo.st time. 

"Stein's" motto has always been, "Good women, 
fast horses, and a .julep on the side." Of these he has 
genei'ally proved a good judge, though with exce] 
lions. TTowever eight or nine trips in football an 
basket liall have improved his judgment, if not 
discretion, in respect to the above. 

Dui-ing his entire jieriod of eadetship "Bill" has 
been a leadei'. and that he will so continue in later 
life we have nci doubt. 

"/ tun i/oin// to do it. so I suppose you iiill." 



^,v.^^ 



liMiiiiliji 




I'fiil, One HiiiulreJ-lifo 




EX-CLASSMATES 



y-^ 



Addison, G. D. D., liifliiuoiid, A'u. 
Adelstein, K. L., SmitliviUe, Va. 
Adkins, K. JI., Lynchburg, Va. 
Allison, R. K., Douglas, Ariz. 
Armstrong, H., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Austin, S. L., Chicago, 111. 
Barley, L. C. Alexander, Va. 
Bonds, R. E„ Bluefield, W. Va. 
Black, \V. il., Wa.shington, D. C. 
Bly, M. C, Reesburg, Va. 
Bletcher, F. O., Winnipeg, Canada 
Bowles, .T. C, Columbia. Va. 
Birch, K. F., Leesburg, Va. 
Butler, C. X., Philadelphia, I'a. 
Cannon, E. R., Jr., Charlotte, is'. C. 
Gates, McF. U, Spartanburg, S. C. 
Cato, R. E., Aniericus, lia. 
Chapman, P. D., Salem, Va. 
Chisholm, W. S., Chariottsville. Va. 
Clay, R. M., Catlettsburg. Ky. 
Cohen, H., Norton, Va. 
Crockett, W. S., Ardmore, Okla. 
Cutchins, S., Richmond, Va. 
Dance, D. R.. Corinth, Miss. 
Davis, N. B.. Patlaka, FVa. 
Draper, H. D.. Santa Barbara, Cal. 
Dudley, H. E.. Danville, Va. 
Eva, V. F.. Duluth, Minn. 
Finley, H. P., Williamburg, Ka. 
Ford, W. K.. Clifton Forge, Va. 
Freeman. H. G., Richmond, Va. 
(ieohegan. \V. M., Chase City, Va. 
Glynn, W. R.. Ashville, N. C. 
Hagan, .T. C. .Jr.. Richmond, Va. 
Hamilton, F. W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hancock, B. L.. Lynchburg, Va. 
Harper, R. F., Pinners Point, Va. 
Harriss, R. B., Chattanooga, Va. 
Hartley, K., Fairmont, W. Va. 
Hawkins, S. A., .Tr., Charleston, W, Va. 
Herold, V. AV., Newport, Ky. 
Hicks, .1. W., Graham, Va. 
Hood C. R.. Hoods Post Otlice, Miss. 
Hoyt, A. W., Duluth, Minn. 
Ireys, H. T.. Frankfort, Ky. 
.Tohnston, H. S.. Fredericksburg, Va. 
.Tones, T. M., Deeatur, Ala. 
Keerans. C. L., New York, N. Y. 
Kimherly. R. B., Ocmulgee. Okla. 
Kirven. C. Carsicama. Tex. 
Kirwani. .T. JIcG., Baltimore. JId. 
Kaiser. C. JI.. Fort Worth. Tex. 



Lacy, S. C, Winchester, Va. 
Leech, .J. C, Lexington. Va. 
Lange, L. G., New t)rleans. La. 
Lemaster, E. B., Memphis, Tenn. 
Litton, W. B., Dryden, Va. 
Loth, F. R., Wayneslioro, Va. 
Lupton. C. P.. Lynchburg, Va. 
Lyons, M. H.. Jbihile. Ala. 
Mann, J. C. Greenwood. Miss. 
iLissie. W. H., Washington. Va. 
Jlasia. .T., Chang Chung, China 
Jlontgoniery, Z. D., Frankfort, Ky. 
Moore. T. O., Newburn. N. C. 
Morri.son, H. T.. Richmond, Va. 
Newell, .T. R., Richmond, Va. 
Newell, W. M., Stevens City, Va. 
N'orvell. L., Jr., Beaumont, Tex. 
O'Hair, R. H., Green Castle, Ii\d. 
Parker, .1. W., Y'azoo City, Miss. 
Parks, I. H., Monrovia, Cal. 
Pittman, D. D., Luray, Va. 
Parks, I. H., Monrovia, Cal. 
Potts, .T. T., Richmond. Va. 
Pritchett. .1. T.. Lynchburg, Va. 
Reid, .T. K., The Plains, Va. 
Ripley. F. E.. .Tr.. Taylor. Tex. 
Robertson, H. H., Blackstone, Va. 
Robertson, .T. C, Salem, Va. 
Robinson, .T. Iv. E., Lexington, Va. 
Robinson. W. E., Lancaster. Va. 
Russell, E. R., Ashville, N. C. 
Saffold, P. W., Montgomery, Ala. 
Schwartz, B. W., Wyomissing, Pa. 
Seilley. T. T., New York. 
Seward, I... C. Petersburg, Va. 
Silverstien. .T. L., Charleston, W. Ve 
Simmons, H. N., Norfolk. Va. 
Simian, W. C, Port Norfolk, Va. 
Smith, A. C, Lady Smith, Va. 
Smith. E. A.. Rhodhis.s, N. C. 
Smith, W. N.. Raleigh, N. C. 
Smith, J. A.. New Orleans. La. 
Strawn. B. L., Strawn, Tex. 
Swain, L. N., Danville. Va. 
Swift, C. G.. West Point. Va. 
Turman, S. B.. Tampa, Fla. 
Waller, B. Y., Banhani, Tex. 
Waters, W. S., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Weisel. S. R., Norfolk. Va. 
Welch. C. T., Lexington, Va. 
Williams, E. B.. Memjjhis. Tenn. 
Woodsen. J. S.. Oakman. Cal. 
Yancey. J. G., Collins. Ga. 



Paffe One HunJt ed-three 




t^l^EB^ 



3n il^mnriam 

biul|atan IStrharifinn lanre 

Hirhmmib, "Hirginta 
BvUlpft in Art inn Nnn. 1. 1918 



I'(,,jrO:ulluiut,,djiiu 



W^M^mi^^^^S^ 



fu 




FIRST CLASS 



WAS back in the dark ages of nineteen sixteen when silk socks sold 
for forty cents a pair and when all the automobiles that Lexington 
sported were a couple of Fords and a "Liberty Brush." that the 
class of Nineteen Twenty first made their debut to the profession 
of "Arms" and had their introduction to mess hall "Growley". 
They were days lived in a trance for most of us, but true to the 

theories of time and tide, the year rolled by and left us no longer the hated 

stepchildren of the Corps but real, hard third classmen. 

The third class year passed as all do, with bombs and other disorders of 
all natures, surrendering fully to the call of the wild, endeavoring to leave 
the impression that we were the next hardest thing to nails in the community. 

After the passing of the underclassmen's trials we returned to take up 
the more serious duties of Second Classmen. Due to the unsettled conditions 
caused by the war times, many of our classmates who were of age, enlisted 
in the summer, and before the cessation of hostilities "Twenty" had nearly 
fifty men in the service. Later in the year nearly all returned and the class 
was reunited again. During this period officers were made from the Second 
Class and they carried out their duties like soldiers. After the acquisition 
of the coveted rings the big aim was for each and every man to obtain the 
cherished "Dip." 

Once more the Lexington Special pulled into the Rockbridge Metropolis 
and deposited its load in September, and among the number were nearly all 
of the old class to take up the duties of First Classmen, the highest honor 
in the Institute. The fall of the year rounded out beautifully, with a highly 
successful Football season and a Victorious Thanksgiving Day. But there's 
many a slip between the cup and the lip, and it happened on New Year's 
night, when the dismal clock in the tower tolled the hour of midnight — 
Bedlam broke loose ; the fires of Babylon or the fall of Tyre and Sidon could 
not have created as much noise and illumination. Fire works of all descrip- 
tion and other forms of explosions tore loose and amid the melee came a 
rousing cheer for the New Year and the Class of Nineteen Twenty. 



.-^ = 



Page One Hundred-five 



But as one old sage quotes, "You'll neither pick roses off thorns nor figs 
off thistles," so the reaper began to han^est the punishment of youthful folly. 
No hops, no freedom, no more to strut decked in the regal plush of an officer, 
but to carry that rusty musket until the Authorities see fit to reinstate. 
It is a bitter pill, but it is a bad sportsman that does not take his punishment 
with a smile and a good nature We see our mistake, so beware ye all who 
follow. 

Ill alhlcti<-s "'I'w ciity " fui-nished a good portion, Baeharac-h. Hawkins, 
Beniiers and Turner represented us in Football and Bacharach and HaAvkins 
regulars on the Basketball quint. 

For Oflicei's Jordan and Jeffries wei-e chosen to lead, after three years 
of conscientious service: no hettci- men could liavc been iiicked. 

The days are few until we will say good bye to these walls and go out 
into life as citizens. It is hard to think that we could have lowered ourselves 
in the estimation of oui' Officers by the New Year's Spree, and we have de- 
termined to stick out the punishment and do our duty in such a manner that 
before Finals there «ill be no more restrictions, and endeavor to leave a 
record that any V. M. I. man could be proud of and to reflect nothing but 
credit on our Alma Mater. 

— Historian. 




iMiP™^iiii^ 



P<,,/,0?„H„,iJr,:i-.<i.x 







s 



y 



iW^ifilliii 



Page One Htindi ed Se-ven 



-^^X/Xj" 






c-^^Wf, 




ilW 







^^=s> 



I'liffc Orir IhniJrrJ-i-'uilil 



OIlaaH nf 1921 



K. Mc'C. PATE President 

H. P. McCUISTION Vice-Presideht 

J. H. JORDAN Historian 



Airington, K. T.^ Kichinond, Va. 
Ashley. J. R.. MrKinney, Tex. 
Ayres. .T. C. Aetomuc, C. H.. Va. 
I'.alfoui-, ('. H., .Tr.. Jv'orfolk, Va. 
Harrow. E. I'.. .Jr., Port Norfolk, Va. 
Berry, M. K.. Vernon, Tex. 
Blackwell, P. H.. Henderson. Ky. 
Boatwriglit, J. I>., Portsmouth, Va. 
Bond, A. J., Richmond, Va. 
Booze, J. M., Lake Charles. La. 
Bowles, .7. C. Colnmhiii. Va. 
Bowman. C. W.. Brownsville. Pa. 
P.ri,l;.^s, It. C, Taylor, Tex. 
P,rocl;rnhorough, A.. Richmond, Va. 
('lnisii;in. H. C. Lynchburg, Va. 
Clarksdu. H, W., Chicago, 111. 
Ci.hh, B. ('.. Portsmouth, Va. 
('(Idle, H. H.. Cluirlestown. W. Va. 
Cosliy, C. H., I.yiichhurg. Va. 
i'v.ii'^. .1. E.. I>eertield, Va. 
Crisi. .1. !•".. Montgomery. Ala. 
Ciockci. .1. F.. Dublin. Va. 
Cunnning, H. S., Washington. D. C. 
Davidson. It. P.. Washington. D. C. 
Davis. W. T.. JIadi.son. Fla. 
Dearing, A. W.. Lexington. Va. 
Dickerson. H. AV., Richmond, Va. 
Dickson. It. It.. Organ Cave, W. Va. 
Diap.'i-. II. D.. Santa Barbara, Cal.' 
DiilT. It. C. Saginaw, Mich. 
Diiiiscili. .1. 1".. Paris. Tex. 
Eniliicy. A. \\'.. Fredericksburg. Va. 
Emerson. A.. Portsmouth, Va. 
Esris, .1. S.. Danville. Va. 
Evans. T. B., Church View, Va. 
Fain, .T. C, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Foster. H. E.. Lake Charles, La. 
Fuller. W. A.. Danville, Va. 
Oai-row. H. W., Houston. Tex. 
(iilbert. C. v., Donner. La. 



Olover. .1. JI.. Uichniond. Va. 
(ireatluiul. It. .. .Ii-.. Xoilolk. Va. 
Creene. .1. P.. Washington. D. C. 
Oridley. W. (i.. Kirkville. X. Y. 
Hagan. .1. ('.. .Ir.. Iti.hniond. Va. 
Hamilton. F. T.. Amiistou. Ala. 
Haruioii, H. W.. Richmond. Va. 
Harwood. E. E.. Trenton. Tenn. 
Horn. .1. r>.. Rocky Mount. X. C. 
Ingram, I>. T.. Richmond. Va. 
Ire.xs, H. T.. Frankfort, Ky. 
.Tohnson. W. B.. Bluetield, W. Va. 
.Tones. C. W.. Xorfolk. Va. 
.Tones, H.. San Angelo. Tex. 
.Tones. .T. W.. .Martinsville. \'a. 
•loi-dau. .T. H.. Kan.sas City. JIo. 
Eane. F. C, Youngstown. Ohio 
Iviug. W. M.. Frederick.sbnrg. Va. 
Ivnapp. .J. W., .Tr., Richmond. Va. 
I^acy. C. A.. .Tr.. Memphis. Tenn. 
Laiue, E. R., Windsor, Va. 
Land. H. C. Blackstone. Va. 
Lauck. E. W.. Luray. Va. 
Lee, H. D. L., Elkins. W. X-.t. 
Linthicum, T. C, Deming, X. M. 
Lockey, H. W., Chipley, Fla. 
Lyons, H. M.. Mobile, Ala. 
.Mann. .T. H. C. Petersburg, Va. 
Marshall, S. A., Jacksonville, Fla. 
-Ma.sou. S. A., Hampton, Va. 
Jlears. C. B.. Chincoteague. Va. 
Mcrson, D,. Portsmouth, Va. 
MilliNM-. IP P... Lyiichliurg. Va. 
.\loiii..,.. W. D.. .Ir.. Wasliingt(.n. D. C 
.Moss. ('. .M.. Lake Charles. Va. 
Murrill. It. S.. Charlotte. X. C. 
McCinston. R. H. I'.. Paris. Tex. 
JtcCullouch. R. R.. Wa.shington, D. C. 
AlcKeller. G.. Forney. Tex. 
McMillan. H. H.. Br'istow. Okla. 



rnCiri.^ 



"^ S:5"-kJ> 



Paffc Otii Hundred-nine 




T'MM 'nm^B- 



Oi-me, A. J., Atlanta. (!a. 
Ovorby, D. A., Jr., DaMville. Vii. 
Pate, R. McC, NortolU. Va. 
Paxton, P. L., Buena Vista. Va. 
Payne. .T. B.. .Jr., Dalla.s. Tex. 
Pendleton. J. .K. .Tr.. I.exiiif-'toM. Va. 
Pendleton. X. W.. Wytlieville. Va. 
l'liilli|is. ,J. B.. Perdne. Ky. 
Powell, a. v.. Danville. Va. 
I'riee, W. .1.. Centerville. Md. 
Rathburn, G. R.. South Betlilelieni. Pa. 
Reynolds. W. F., Richmond, Va. 
Ribble, .7. M., Petei-sbui-f;, Va. 
Ripley, F. E., Jr., Taylor, Tex. 
Roche, H. S.. ,Tr.. MiddlesUorough, Ky. 
Robertson. I>. A.. Lynchburg, Va. 
Robertson. .). .T. .Jr.. Cumberland. Va. 
Robinson. .J. K. 1-:.. [.exintrton, Va. 
Russells. «.. New York. N. Y. 
Sedwicii, J. H.. Albany. Tex. 
Semans. .1. T.. I'liiontown. I"a. 
Smith. B. H.. Billinfis. Jlont. 
Snnth. .J. T., Lout; View. Tex. 
Smith. T. \V.. P.innhiL'hani. Ala. 



Smith. \V. I).. .Tr.. Birmingham, Ala. 
Stokes. W. JI.. .Tr.. Lynchburg. Va. 
Srrotlier. H. S.. Culpeper. Va. 
Stuart. \V. L).. .Tr.. Richmond. Va. 
Syiuc, S., Washington, D. C. 
Taylor, R. W., Jr., Moorehead City. X. 
Tbouipsou, R. C, Huntington, W. Va. 
Tichenor. H. McD., Monroe. Ga. 
Tinsley. S. H., Richmond. Va. 
Tvler. H. G., Jr., Norfolk. Va. 
Vaughan. F. F., Hampton. Vii. 
Von Schilling, F.. Hampton. Va. 
Washington, S. W., Charlestown, W. 
Waters. W. E.. Loui.sville. Ky. 
Watson. H. L., Jr., Kienraond, Va. 
Weaver, R. C, Port Norfolk. Va. 
Wessells. S. A.. Greenbush. Va. 
Welton, R. H. B.. Norfolk. Va. 
Wiliner. F. I^.. Riclimond. Va. 
Wilson. S. B.. Jr.. aiempnis. Tenn. 
Wilson. W. Y.. Memphis, Teun. 
Winfree, R. N., Lynchburg, Va. 
Womeldorf. L.. El Paso. Tex. 
Young. W. T., Jr.. Corinth. Miss. 




■ i^^^'^. 



I',u/r One 1 1 ,nulri\l-l,'n 



#inuii[ErS 



V 



'x; 




EECONO CLASS 



N the fall of the year 1917, there assembled at the Institute, for the 
first time, a eroMd of men who are now tlie present Second Class. 
The Class today does not comprise all those frightened "newly" 
cadets who matriculated together. Many of them have been called 
to other fields, but the great majority has stayed and has fought 
onward until it now finds itself within sight of the celebrated goal, 

for which many have striven and fewer have attained, namely the right 

to call oneself a First Classman. 

It is useless to discourse on the trials and tribunals of the "Rat" year. 
Every man, from the very start, seemed to have the idea of doing his best, 
so things went on veiy smoothly, as is usual in the year when one is a New 
Cadet. 

When the Class of '21 came back as Third Classmen, there was a firm 
desire in the hearts of all to uphold all the traditioiis laid dowTi by preceding 
third classmen. Every man had the spirit of "do it, or get busted trying." 
It^ was done. 

The Third Class officeis consisted of Pate as president and Dickson as 
vice-president. During this year of 1918 and 1919, there was much unrest 
due to the war conditions, and many new trials and problems which were 
unprecedented were met with. It is the opinion of everyone that these 
difficulties were met fairly and squarely, and overcome. 

In this, the Second Class year, we assembled, bound together more closely 
than ever before by the ties of friendship which originated back in '17. 

At the first class meeting, Pate was re-elected president and McCuistion 
was chosen to hold down the office of vice-president. With two such men 
at the head, it is an aforegone conclusion that this year will add to the glory 
of the class. 

On December 1st the class rings were put on, and some have stayed put 
and some have not. Plans have already been formulated for the other out- 
standing feature of the Second Class year, namely the Final Ball. If these 



Page One Hundred-eleven 



plans do not miscai'i-y, a brilliant function is to be expected. Clarksou and 
Gi'i'athcad were (•li(is<>n leaders of this year's social affairs. 

In the other fields of scholastic endeavor the men of '21 have been 
prominent. 

In football, Dickson, Smith, J. T., ^Mason, Stuart, Ingram, and Wilson, 
\V. Y., were awarded gold footballs, while Leech and Shipley received mono- 
grams. Leech was unanimously elected captain for the coming year. 

On the liaslsctball Icaiii the Second Class was represented by Leech, Lee, 
and Stuart, with Lee as the recipient of a gold basketball. 

The baseball and track teams have more than a proportional represen- 
tation of Second Classmen. 

Such is the history of lln 
men who started the ball to 
good work up unlil the end. 

: . • — Historian. 



lass of 1921 and it is to be expected! that the 
)]lino so merrily back in 1917 will keep the 







m 



"'TV -1 






WMMlMmX^^^ 



Piiijc One lluiutn-.l-turhe 



Jn iTO^tttDrtcim 

ftUtam ^Inau i'trnuii 

(Brrcumonii, iBisHtsaippi 
Bith Scmubrr 24. lUlU 



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, -x. 



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l'(li/r On,- llundir.i Fnurlrcn 





19:^2 



Page One Hundred Fifteen 




,.^=5 



^jniniiiteair--^^^^ 



Pdiif One HunJrcii-sixteen 



BCtlB 




(UlaBB of 1922 



W. R. HARRISON President 

W. V. SIIAXNOX Vice-President 

J. T. CORE Historian 



Adams, J. v., Taylor, Tex. 
Agnor, G. L., Lexington, Va. 
Ames, W. C. Jr., Smlthfleld, Va. 
Amiss, F. T., Luray, Va. 
Anderson, C. E., Sandy Level, Va. 
Arclier, W. W., .Jr.. Richmond, Va. 
Adkinson, W. H.. ,Jr., Washington. E>. 
Badgett, J. M.. South Bo.ston, Va. 
Bain, K. A., .Jr.. Portsmouth. Va. 
Baker, L. B., Slireveport, La. 
Barr. A. W.. Wincliester. Va. 
Barry. X. G., Middlesburg, Ky. 
Bell, S. H., Dublin. Va. 
Block, A. W., Jr.. Duluth, Minn. 
Blankensliip, J. JI.. Richmond, Va. 
Bonney, F. P., Norfolk, Va. 
Bowles, G., Winchester, Va. 
Brown, F., Hillsboro, 111. 
Bunting, J., Jr., Salem, Va. 
Campbell, A. JI., Jr., Lynchburg. Va. 
Campodonico, J. J., Richmond, Va. 
Carroll, E. L., Charlottesville. Va. 
Carter, R. G., Leesburg. Va. 
Clark. E. JL, Danville, Va. 
Colonna, J. O., Washington, D. C. 
Core, J. T., Richmond. Va. 
Crenshaw, A. D., Linville, Va. 
Curdts, A. P., Norfolk, Va. 
Cutchins, J. H., Franklin, Va. 
Dabney, R. L.. Houston, Tex. 
Douglas. W. S.. Hillsboro. 111. 
Douglas. T. B.. Pittsfield, 111. 
Drewry, AV. F., Petersburg, Va. 
Edmonds, R., Jr., Norfolk, Va. 
Edmund, W. W., Lynchburg, Va. 
Estell, H. F., Jr., Huntsville. Tex. 
Estes, W. S., Harrisonburg, Va. 
Ferguson, J. W., Jr., Waynesville. N. C. 
Follett, J. D., Berwyn, Pa. 
Fontana. A. W., Jr.. New York. \. V. 
Francis, C. K.. Jr.. West Tulsa. Okla. 
Gatlin. il. P., Jr.. New York. N. Y. 
Gayle. K. H., Jr.. Norfolk. Va. 



Glazier. S., Norfolk. Va. 
Grant, R. C, Warren. Ohio 
Gray, G. T., Jr., Norfolk, Va. 
Groce, J. H., Waxahachie, Tex. 
Haas, H., Harrisonburg, Va. 
Hairston. J. J., Wenonda. Va. 
Harper, J. S., Dunton, Tex. 
Harrison, W. R., Boyce, Va. 
Harris, S. G., Jr., Lynchburg. Va. 
Hohson, J. R. A., Jr., Richmond, Va. 
HoUaday. J. C, Jr., Suffolk, Va. 
Hopkins, W. C Atlanta. Ga. 
Hubard. H. T.. Jr.. Norfolk, Va. 
Huff. C. W.. Jr.. Riclimond. Va. 
Huger, S. S., Lexington, Va. 
Jackson, S. S.. Richmond. Va. 
Johnson, D. V., Norfolk, Va. 
Johnson, J. ()., Norfolk. Va. 

King. C. B., Port Worth, Tex. 
Kinnear. W. A.. Lexington. Va. 

LaRue. R. H.. Columbus. Kan. 
Lynch. G. P.. Jr.. Richmond. Va. 

JlcCrae, E. B., New York, N. Y. 
Manning. L. H.. Talladega. Ala. 
Marshall. W. C, Richmond. Va. 
Martin, R. P., Richmond, Va. 
Miller, P. O., Richmond, Va. 
Moncure, M. W., Jr., Richmond. Va. 
Moore. J. P.. Norfolk, Va. 
MorrLson. G. E., Woodstock, Va. 

Nelson. N. H.. Richmond. Va. 
Norman. K. G.. Richmond. Va. 
O'Brien. W. V.. Middleport. Ohio 
Pace. H. L.. Franklin. Va. 
Parrot. B. F.. Roanoke. Va. 
Patter.son. \V. A.. Jlount Sterling. Ky. 
Peed. S. B.. Norfolk. Va. 
Perkinson. W. M.. Peter.sburg. Va. 
Phillips. H.. Orlando. Fin. 
Porter. T. B.. Jacksonville. Fla. 
I'orterfield. J. B.. Jr.. Birniingham, Ala. 



-iMIiilliili 



Page One Hundred-scventeen 



V 



.u.-ll. 11. A.. Uiclini >ii(l, \'a. 

l;;li. W. M,. .MM.lisniivillc-. \':;. 

illrr, S. P... West r..iiii, Va. 
Kahily. \V. 'I'.. I'l'fcisi.iirLi. \":i. 
ipy, T. ('.. Kansas Cily, .Md. 
icy. .M. i:.. Sliaslau-L'. Va. 
Reynolds, A. S.. .M..iii-.ie, Ga. 
RicVeely. It. .M.. .Ir.. Baltimore, JId. 
Riiaiaer. II. I'.. Norton, Va. 
RoliHrtsiin. W. i:.. L.Michliiirf.'. \:\. 
Uutlin, ('. 1... I'ird.M!<kslinru. Va. 
Setllr. S. K.. Klinl Hill. \"a. 
Sliaklel'Td. A. i:.. l'.iriMin.:;hani. Ala 
Shannon, \V. \'.. I'.nizil, Ind, 
Shields. K. W., l'i)ip Kidi-'e, Mass, 
Skillnian. \V, (I., Dallas, Tex, 



S..\ilhall, S. u.. HinHidd.x, (". H., Va. 
Soiith.L'atr, H, S.. N.irlnlk. Va. 
Spratt, T, <;.. Kichlands. \'a. 

Stul.bs, !■■. IV. M ■.„■, La. 

Syer, ('., .Ir., Norfolk, \a. 
Teasley. H. ,l„ rortsniourli, Va, 
Tillinan, S, P.,, Birniinj^dunn, Ahi. 
Townsend. C, E,. Jrount Clair. X, .1. 
Venable, R. R.. Faniiville, Va. 
Veuable, \V. T.. .Ir,, Farniville, Va, 
Wesi-ott. W, C, Atlaniic City, X, J. 
White, E, v., Leesburg. A"a. 
White. W. B,. Lalie Charles. La. 
Wilson, H, W„ Chatham, Va. 
Yaffey. R. .T., Xoi'folk, \a. 
Vounic, .1. .M„ I.awton, okia. 




iWiiliii 



Piu/r Ihif lliiiuin\i-fi,/hlr<n 




THIRD CLASS 



"Ye Keydets of old V. M. I. 

Who love your Alma Mater, 

Whose Spirits spread for eighty years. 
Upon the land and water; 

Your gloi'ious spirit noAv renew. 
And listen to the story 

Of how the elass of Twenty-tAvo 
Bids fair to join your I'anks of fanir and glo 



IND READER! Have you ever had a two months vaeation seem 
as two weeks? Nov.- that is just how our first summer furlough 
passed by. Hardly had we broken in our new eordovans when we 
found ourselves on the Lexington Limited (to two coaches) bound 

for oh the dear old barracks. 

We will leave it to all you old Cadets fi'om '39 to '21 that it is sure 
one grand and glorious feeling to get back to the one dear spot to every 
alumnus, and greet your fellow cadets and especially your classmates. Now 
just what is at the bottom of all this more brotherly love? Other schools 
have "School Spirit"; but show us one that has that old "V. M. I. Spirit." 
Traditions and environments have a great deal to do with it but most of all 
in our opinion is the one fact that we all went thi'U a year of hardships to- 
gether. We thank the Lord that our class is among those who were handled 
as men and not as mollycoddles during the "Rat year." It has been proven 
since the beginning of the world and to every member of our class especially, 
that to those, who have endured suffering together, is a tie of friendship 
and love evei'lasting. 

So to our f orrow and to our joy the fii'st of September found some 
thirty members of our class back in scliool to drill "those rats." Dur- 
ing the next ten days or ;o our •■lass Avas augmented to a number around 
one hundred and forty ; a good fize class to say the least. 

Things began with a good .start in most depai'tments and most con- 
spicuous in Football and j\Iilitary. In football the prospects seemed so good, 
as was later proven, that each contender had to knuckle down to work right 
at the start. Some fifteen or twenty classmates were among the candidates. 
In the military department, with the four new R. O. T. C. Units, everyone 
was interested because of the nearness of that long looked for trip to unveil 
the statue of General Jackpon in Richmond. 

In the meantime our first class meeting brought up several points of 
interest, most notable the unanimous re-election of our faithful president, 
W. R. Hari'ison, and our worthy vice-president, W. V. Shannon, and the 



...m^^ 



Piuje One llundreJ-iibietf 



V 



vote to ask into om- i-la.ss men wlio had left upper classes during the war. 
Mantor and Summers, of athletic note, were both unanimously asked to join 
us. We are proud of you both and know you will prove Avorthy of '22. 

Sure enough, on the morning of October 10th, the whole battalion en- 
trained for Richmond. The trip there pa.ssed uninterrupted and with nothing 
exciting. On arriving in Richmond about five o'clock, we were marched to 
the Grey's Armory, our headquarters. It was here that we were notified of 
another victory for our Football Team. They ha^ang played in Richmond 
that afternoon. A short Avhile was spent in organizing the Corps in the 
Armorj'. As soon as this Avas over the whole Corps was granted leave until 
12 o'clock midnight When ranks broke a mad rush was made for the door. 
Classmates joined classmates, as did keydets their parents and friends of the 
fair sex. 

That night the «hole Corps was the guest of honor at a big hop in the 
Richmond Blues Aiinory, given by the young ladies of Richmond. Those 
Avho went spent a most enjoyable evening and those who cared not to trip 
the light fantastic took in a show or the Virginia State Fair. Hula ! Hula ! 

The next afternoon, Saturdaj% we had one long hot parade. Thanks 
that that was all. Again we were turned loose for the night. All of us 
managed to find the place that best suited our tastes. Some went to dinner 
parties at the Country Club of Virginia, many to the Jefferson Hotel for 
dinner and a real snappy shag afterwards, A\-hile still others took in the 
other hotels. 

The next afternoon, Saturday, Ave had one long hot parade. Thanks, 
giving Day. We'll say that was some trip. Mantor, Summers and Bunting 
Avere our supports to that 13 to victory over our ancient rivals. 

With Football season OA-er, and a great one at that, Ave thought Ave 
Avould don the independence and anarchistic freedom of the Third Class- 
men. 'TAvas on the tenth of December our fir.st bomb AA-as heard. Yes ! The 
night was cold and dreary too, just because Ave had to A\'alk Special Guard. 
But for Avhat care Ave, for in just a fcAv Aveeks later Old '22 Avas heaid from 
again. The other 21 bombs for the Class of TAventy-two Avere shot Avithin 
the course of eighteen hours on the last day of ]\rid-vear Exams. Great 
work! Eh? 

To quote another: 

"Place the name of the Class among the rest. 
Who've done their duty Avell : 

And to the classes folloAving, 
Someone this story tell. 

Jjct him give fame and glory 
To the Thii-teen chosen fcAv, 

Who thi-CAv the boml)s and saved the name 
Of the Class of TAA-enty-TAVo. " 

XoAv in l!asl\c11iall we did our share toAvards Avinning the South At- 
lantic ('hampioiishi]). Suniniei's, Bunting and Campbell, all of varsity caliln-e 
represented us, besides a large number on the scrubs. Just look out foi' us 
in Baseball and Tracl<. 

As a closing word let us say to our deal' Alumni and fellow-cadets, that, 
although we are yciiiiig in the game, Ave have been here long enough to get 
the true \'. .M. 1. spirit into our bones. We shall foi'ever honor your Alma 
Mater, and oui's to he, in defeat and glorify hei- in victory. 

— Historian. 



" ' "* ':J'-'Ai'IJ'y'?.'.'.lv.fS 

Piiijr Our lluiulnJ-Uiriily 



V 



V 



rOURTtI CLASS 




fz^^^l ' T-\V. 



Page One Hundred-iiventy-one 




1 



•.^^7^, 



Page One IlunJn-J Tiventy-lwo 



-IfV'V 



Jourll) (ElasH 



R. C4. HUNT President 

J. W. CALDWELL Vice-president 

J. D. HANKINS Historian 



Adams, J. H., Alta Vista, Va. 
AdaiiLs. M. I., Mobile, Ala. 
Akers, E. L., Jr., Lynchlnug, Va. 
Alexander, K., Jr.. Washington, D. C. 
Anderson, S. T., Charleston, W. Va. 
Bailey, B. P., Jr., New York City, N. V. 
Rarrlnger, J. H., Charlottesville, Va. 
Barrow, H. B., BlacUstone, Va. 
Barrow, J. L.. Bhukstmie. Va. 
Baxter, J. M.. Wasliingtcn. D. C. 
Breeder, 3. N.. Biniiinuhani. Ala. 
Behr, A. J., Chandler, Okla. 
Belden, A. W., Jr., Woodlawn. I'a. 
Blaine, S. F., Lexington. Va. 
Blanks, J. R., Clarksville, Va. 
Bowman, J. M., Quitman, Ga. 
Branie, T. A., Jafk.son. Miss. 
Rrazelton, J. B.. Tyler. Tex. 
Briggs. A. S.. Itichmond. Va. 
Brooks, E. C, Raleigh, N. C. 
Brooks, T. L., Oceana, Va. 
Brown, E. R., Deer Park, Tex. 
Bruck, L. H., Tyler. Tex. 
Bndd, R. D., Peterslnn-g. Va. 
Buracker, J. A., P>altimore. lid. 
Butler, H. L., Jr., Norfolk. Va. 
Caldwell, J. W., Radford, Va. 
Campbell, W. D., Jr.. Lynchluirg. Va. 
Carstens, C. L., Shreveport, La. 
Cary. 11.. Richmond. Va. 
Casey. R. E., Lvnchlmrg, Va. 
Causey, J. C, Suffolk, Va. 
Clappell, C. J.. Jr.. Macon. Ga. 
Clarkson, J. L.. Millboro, A^a. 
Cohoon, W. E., Suffolk, Va. 
Coleman. .J. H., Petersburg, Va. 
Coleman. S. B.. Snell, Va. 
Comegys. W. B., Ardniore, Okla. 
Cooke. S., Jr., Sheffield. -Ala. 
Cornelius, AV. L., Antlers, Okla. 
Costolo, H., Lynchburg. Va. 
Copenhaver, J. R.. Marion, Va. 
Crane, W. E., Jr.. Saginaw, Mich. 
Culpepper, C. !>.. Meridian. Miss. 
Cunningham, E. H., Louisa, Va. 
Cunningham, J. H., San Antonio, Tex. 
Cnre. J. W.. Roanoke. Va. 
Dahney. A. E.. Jr.. Oklahoma City. Okla. 
r)aulie. L. L.. Ardinore. Okla. 
Davenport, .T.. Roanoke. Va. 



Davis. K. L., Hamptnii. Va. 

Dennis, H. B.. Salislmry. Md. 

Denn.\-, C. O., White Post, Va. 

Derryberry. !>. T.. Nashville. Tenn. 

Dillon, E. P., Indian Rock, Va. 

Drinard, J. E., Richmond, Va. 

Dudley, T. U., Jr., Middleburg, Va. 

Duncan, T. W., Missoula, Mont. 

Durham, E. A., Garden City, N. Y. 

Edmondson, J. P., Radford, Va. 

Ek, W., Wilmington. D. C. 

Evan.s, C. F., Youngstown, Ohio 

Ewing, W., New Orleans, La. 

Fargo, W. G., Augusta, Ga. 

Farrar, C. W., Richmond, Va. 

Farwell, C, A., New Orleans, La. 

Fletcher, L. D., Accomac C. H., Va. 

Foster, S. P., Norfolk, Va. 

Fox, R. O.. Cleveland, Ohio 

Frankin. A. G., Richmond, Va. 

Franklin. I'l C. Richmond. Va. 

Gardere. J. P.. Jr.. Marlin. Tex. 

Gatewood, It. L.. Newport News, Va. 

Gill, L. S., Berkeley, Va. 

Glrand, J.. Phoenix, Ariz. 

Goode. M. R., Lynchburg, Va. 

(Toodman, P. P., Norfolk, Va. 

Greenwood, A. AV., Planter.sville. Tex. 

Gwatlimey. A. T., Richmond, A'a. 

Hankins, J. D.. Richmond. Va. 

Hardwick, M. V., Huntington, AV. Va. 

Harris, J. A., Spotsylvania, A'a. 

Hart, C. J., Jackson, Miss. 

Hassinger, AV. H., .Jr., Birmingham, Ala. 

Hendon, .T. A.. Louisville, Ky. 

Herrman. W. E., Roanoke, Va. 

Hodgson, N. P., Athens, Ga. 

Hoff, P. L.. Snell. Va. 

Hor.sle.v, C. B.. Richmond. A'a. 

Hunt, 'r. G.. G<irdonsvilIe. Va. 

Ingram. AA'^ .B., Richmond, Va. 

Irby, F. B.. Newport, Ark. 

Ivey, E. C, Jr., Lynchburg, A'a. 

Jackson, R., Roanoke, A'a. 

Johnson, C. A., Florence, S. C. 

Jones. F. AV., Gloucester, Va. 

Jones. W. F.. Marshall. Tex. 

Joyner, E.. Norfolk. A'a. 

Keesee, P. C Witt. Va. 

Kilfoyle, AV. G.. Tyler, Tex. 



Page One Hundred Tiventy-t/iree 



Kyle, J. H., Lyiirliburt'. \:i. 

La Follette, La F. JlcK., ('h;n-|pstoii. 

Va. 
List, C, Pine Bluff. AiU. 
Ledoiix, L. K.. SwiirrhiiHU-r. l\\. 
Lifiht, C. P.. Waslilriiiloii. 1 >. C. 
Lloyd. H. M., Wasliiiij;t(iii. 1 >. (.". 
Lowe. R. G., Huntersvillf. Ala, 
Lowenberg. C. Norfolk. \'a, 
McCampbell. T. P.. (Joliiid. 'I'cx. 
McClanirock, .1. R.. .Jr., (ii-cfiihoro, N, 
McFerran, W. R., Clevolanil, Ohio 
MaoGi-egor, D. L.. Dulufli. Miim. 
MeLoney, D., Newtown, Ky. 
Mollillan, E. C, Bi-istow. OUla. 
McQuaile. E. W.. Bluetield. W. Va. 
Major, A. J., Norristown, Pa. 
Mallory, F.. .Ir.. Lexington. \n. 
Malone. F. R.. .7r.. (Ir-eeiisboro. Jld. 
Maloney. F. C, .Jr.. Lymliburg. Va. 
ilann. JI. II.. .Jr.. New York Citv. N. 
llason. J. W.. Rocky Mount. N. ('. 
Mattliews. H.. (}nitTnaii. Ca. 
Mays, B. P.. Angiisia. (ia. 
Miller, G. T.. Wasbin^lon. V.-i. 
Miller. H. W.. Aslieville. N. C. 
Miller. H. !>.. Morganton, N. C. 
Mitchell, .1. a.. Petersburg. Va. 
Moore, W. F., Mansliehl. Va. 
Morgan, T. P.. Eagle Knck. Va. 

Morriss, B. E.. Blackst \'a. 

Mose.s, D. D.. .Jr.. l.ynrhl.inx'. \'a. 
Nash. W. L.. Norte. Ik. V.i. 
Nicholson. C. M.. .Ir.. St. I.caiis, .\I,,. 
Nixon. T. 8.. Augusta. (Ja. 
Page. F. JL. Aberdeeti. X. (". 
Page. H. H.. Arvonia. Va. 
Parker, C. I^., Yazoo City. .Miss. 
Paterson, W. B.. Mobile. Ala. 
Pawley, E. P., .Jr.. I'ort an I'rinc.-. U 
Peeples, T. G.. Valilosia. (,a. 
Penniman, G. A.. I>allas. Tex. 
Peterson. E. D.. Cliitiroicagne. Va. 
Pett.vjohn, M. M.. Lynchliurg. Va. 
Phelan. G. R., Memphis. ■Peiin. 
Phillips. T. D., Winchester. Ky. 
I'lowder, E. R.. Richtiiotid. Va. 
I'olk. C. L.. Helena. Ark. 
I'orter, H. W.. Louisa. Va. 
I'orter. P. B.. Louisa. Va. 
I'ressler. H. P., .Jr., Austin. Tex. 
I'reston. R. H.. .Jr., I'^ort Wortli, Tex. 



I'rctluw. II. H.. .Jr.. .Sutlolk, Va. 
Prince. F. P.. Norfolk, Va. 
Kanisay. C. 8.. L'niontown, Pa. 
Iteiil. .1. G.. Richmond, Va. 
Richardson. R. C. Iticlimond, Va. 
Itiess. M.. Mercedes. Tex. 
UHlierds. C. .Jr.. Tubhlock. Texas 
Itdbcrtson. G. L., I,oachapoka. Ala. 
Itoliertson. T. H.. Fayette. Ala. 
RoiTieyn. C. H.. Washington, D. C. 
Itnllin. .J. J{.. Roanoke. Va. 
Ityhnid. L. H.. Richmond. Va. 
.Sauinlers, C. W., .Jr.. Richmond. Va. 
Saunders. II. Pel?.. Washington. D. C. 
Sawyer. T. !>.. Norfolk. Va . 
Schmidt. .V. C. Memphis. Tenn. 
Semans. C. S.. t'niontowti. Pa. 
Sherviii. W. H.. .Ir.. Richmond. Va. 
Shields. T. I).. Leonard. Tex. 
Shorter. W. C. Giillands. Va. 
Slnan. IL. Bloomington. 111. 
Smith, (i. S.. Charlotte. N. C. 
Sniffen. B. H.. Hampton. Va. 
Southall. W. v.. lUnwiddie. C. H.. Va. 
Staly. !•:. A.. .Jr.. Memphis. Tenn. 
Stern. C. K.. Richmond. Va. 
Stevens. .1. K.. III. X.nv Orleans. I,a. 
Stewart. I'.. .Vshhind. Ky. 
Stiles. R. S.. Newark. N. .1. 

Sydnor. G. \V.. Kichii d. \a. 

Terr.\. R. S.. Lynchburg. \:i. 
Thornton. P. X.. Fredericksburg. Va. 
Tliomas. C. M.. Guinea Mills. Va. 
Thornton. Chicago. III. 
Timberlake. F. S.. Berryville. Va. 
Thomp.son. E. C. Chatham. Va. 
Trencliard, G. H.. Florence. S. C. 
Turner. A. E.. Quitman. Ga. 
Turtier. R. A.. Mobile. Ala. 
Turner. \V. M.. Mitineapnlis. Jlinti. 
Vaden. T. H.. Clnitham. Va. 
Ward. E.. Berkely. T'al. 
Weaver. C. .Jr.. oklahctna City. Okla. 
Wells. W. S.. .Jr.. .Jackson. Miss. 
Weisel, A. A.. Norfolk. Va. 
William.s. 1-^. McC. Berryville. Va. 
Williams. .1. R.. Henderson. Ky. 
Witichester. JI. D.. <;alveston. Tex. 
Withers. R. W.. Suffolk. Va. 
Woodward, .1. K.. SufTolk. Va. 
Wooldrid-e. W. I'.. Pittsburg. Pa. 
Varborough. M. N.. Iticlimond. Va. 



HuiiJrrd l\^,-nly-l'jur 




rnURTH CLASS 



^HIS year ours is the largest class in school, there being at the present date over 
two Iinndred new cadets enrolled. AVe are, prophec.v proving true, a unit of 
fill III,' sirength for the Institute, when, in our future years, we shall have 
|iii~-i'.i iiiini mean third-classmen, rejoicing in our freedom newly-gained, into 
dignified First-classmen, rejoicing in capes and privileges. 

During this session tlie Institute was saddled with a "doubly redoubled" 
burden. In addition to tlie infantry training of former years there has come 
artillery, cavalry, and engineering units. Hampered by a lack of facilities in 
botlr men and materiel, the worli has gone nobly on. This class, having to learn 
artillery as well as infantry, lias been placed in somewhat adverse circumstances. But 
we "carry on" and we don't think we are a disgrace to tlie Institute, nor will we fail 
lier in the pinch. 

We have seen a record-breaking standard set in the world of athletics this year. 
Most of the old letter men were liac-k Init we gave Hunt, Gardere, and Fox to the football 
team, and Page, Kyle, and Romeyn were dur best in basketball 

Our gi'eate.st days were after our football team completely demoli.sbed V. P. I. at 
Roanoke. We were made old cadets during the Thanksgiving liops and lived tlirough it 
to the fullest extent of the law. Some of us missed the Christmas hops on account of 
a small matter one night after taps when we turned out in full force to celebrate 
nothing in general, and everytliing in paniculai-. with ilnshing dippers and clanging 
water buckets. 

Early in January we had the only meeting, which any class holds the tirst year, 
to elect our class officers. Hunt was chosen president, Caldwell vice-president, and 
Hankins historian. Both elections were unanimous and we truly feel proud of the men 
we have made our leaders. 



We promi.se all we are able to 
fully coale-sced, we shall come iiitu 
the honor and .sliow the spirit ol' V 
not been altogether devoid of merit : 



iive to the Institute in future years, when, a class 
imr own. In all things we have tried to uphold 
Ji. I. (U:r past, tliongh we ourselves speak It, has 
We have been laying foundations deep and strong. 



To our future destiny! It nuist inevitably unroll: Fate cannot be hindered. Yes, 
it lies witliin our own free will to nuike or r.iar our future condition and goal. When 
we look back upon the milestones — and e\try day once seemed to be a league — we 
have passed, and swear that thus the future will lie good : then we will surely leave 
our Impress true. 

HISTORIAN. 



Page One Hundred Tii-enly-five 



Clhr IS^aHnu W\\i] 



Ellis barrarkfl is a fmuiu jjlarr. i|iiit luitr it mliilr luui'rr hrrr. 
Biiit hrar mru aau a iiiiHrn timr-i. "3 uinu't rnmr bark. 3 Hiurar." 
Sut tl|py rnmr bark. 

Hitci] riirar antluiritii. tliry kttniii tlirii batr tlinn all. 
ilbrii liniij tn arr tlip luitaiftr murlil. au^ iitbrr tbinris rrrall. 
But tbrij rnmr bark. 

IJiut arr alumni rnmr an^ atanft arnnn^. 
A hulk itpim rarh farr. aa tbn nn aarrrh nnnntti. 
ItUirn tbrji rnmr bark. 

(Tbrii nrt tnnrthrr uibrit tlirii arr far aiuaii 
iTbrit talk nf barrarka, anii nnr anir all ha aaji. 
"Jlf Jl rnitlft nrt hark." 

lHhat ia tlir tbtitn that brinria juut bark in aftrr iirara. 
iTbat makra unn trll jinitr rlaaa rlnn^blIr in trara. 
Anil thru rnmr bark ? 

3a it tbr malla au^ air abnnt tlir jtlarr? 
3a it tn arr mhat jtnu ijniirarlf ^i^ farr 
iTbat brings unit bark ? 

iTia ratbrr mnrr than tltrar that mill unt Irt i|nn atau amaii 
3'rnm it. uibrn iinit rnnlft s\itni\ but half a iiau. 
iliil rnminit bark. 

3t ia tbr mm iinu Intir aiiii knrm Innn ijrara ann. 
illrmrmbraurr nf tin* atajja mitb iniu. atift an 
IJnn rnmr hark. 

Ulm. H. ifliltnn. .llr.. '211. 



P,iO'- 0„r UiiiiJrrJ Tivnity-six 



— * 




Page One Hundred Tiventy-seven 




Piii/c One UiinJicit T-v.:ciity-,i,jhl 



-ff^,,-^^^ 




ENGINEERIN 



BACK Sight 




Col. Thomas A. Jones, Retired 
Lt. Col. R. B. PoagiK- 
Maj. J. A. Anderson 
Capt. E. H. Nichols 





FIRST CLASS 




Alvis 




Parker. W. 


Berry, F. . 




Parrott, J. C 


Green, F. 




Roberts, W. 


Hairston, R. 




• Slack 


Hardy, W. 




Smith, R. 


Marshall, R. 




AVallis, W. 


Montague 




Whitfield . 



<^N 



Page One Hundred-tvjenty-nine 



Kj^ 



1A.A> 




I',i,/,- On,- Iliindrcd-lhirty 



-■^^t-S^- 




ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 



J^ 





Col. Francis Mallory 






Maj. S. W. Anderson 






Capt. J. T. Rhudy 






FIRST CLASS 




Arrington, 


W. 


Jac-kson, M. 


Bundy 




Kerlin 


Davis, T. 




llallory 


DeShazo 




Milton 


Faiiiamb 




Wallace. C. 


Hardy, F. 




Williams. E. 



Paqe One Hundred-thirty-one 




.;^^=^. 



P<l/,r Onr lhiliJr,-J-l/urly-/ivr> 



'"Wi^mMmM 



y4' 









^ 



CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING 



, \ 





Col. Hunter Pendleton 






Col. X. B. Tueker 






Col. R. C. Bull 






Capt. J. A. B. Dillai-d 






Capt. W. R. Goodwin 






FIRST CLASS 




Adams, J. 


B. 


Graham 


Benners 




Hawkins 


Burger 




Jones, W. D. 


Chung 




Roberts, L. 


Cox 


■■■''■ -.. ';■ ■ 


Satterfield 


Gaillard 




Sydnor, H. 



'-^^i^^::>):-:r-:}^Mi;2i:Mli^'^ 



Page One Hundred-tliiviy-three 



-l/N^ 




LIBERAL ARTS 





Col. R. T. Kerlin 






Col. H. C. Ford 






Col. W. M. Hunley 






Maj. English Bagby 






Capt. H. M. Read 






FIRST CLASS 




Baoharaeh 




Hoge 


Backus 




Jefferies 


Barker 




Jordan. J. 


Calvert 




Lavender 


Casey, W. 




Monroe, E. 


Comegys 




Alontgomery 


Craighill 




Munson 


Derryberry 




Numey 


Gallman 




Paxton, W. 


Groover 




Potts, M. 


Hardy, G. 




Seott, R. 


Haskell 


..y : --.l :\ .-. - 


Turner, H. 


Heisig 




Wang 


Herring 


' 


Winston 



^. 



■f^^: 



Page One HitnJred-thirty-five 




IHE AmKHTY Six I'-^^ 



SUMNER SCHOOL 



ID you ever have that peculiar sensation derived from looking back 
and finding more things behind than happened to be in front? It's 
a weird feeling, more especially when that little bit of parchment 
certifying that you have suceessfullj' completed your college educa- 
tion happens to be depending on those things in front. 

Thoi-oughly understanding the situation, being ambitious young 
men desirous of seizing each and every opportunity to be found, there 
gathered near two score, more or less intelligent individuals, in a certain spot 
mthin the County of Rockbridge. Here, far from the maddening crowd, 
safelj' isolated from the pleasures and diver.sions of the city, they sought to 
try the soothing influences of Calculus and like subjects upon their wearied 
minds. 

In the coui'se of time oar heroes gained much helpful knowledge which 
enabled them to find the value of X when given Y and Z; to write a letter 
which would not begin "Dere Mabul;" to determine the distance between 
the earth and the moon through the use of a dead soldier as the only instru- 
ment, and to locate the most profitable "still" .situations among the sur- 
rounding mountains. 

In a certain chronicle of like events written in ye good old days we read 
of the arrival of proselytes at "B. D's." shrine laden with the sackcloth and 
ash uniform and certain heavy articles which gave forth a pleasant clinking 
sound when a suitcase was given a sudden ,iar. "0 Temporal O Mores! 

Senatum " well the Senatum has seen fit to deprive the erstwhile 

garden of this United States of Four Roses and other more or less desirable 
flowers. We digress, it is true, but it was necessary to explain the moun- 



r,ir,e Our U,nuln;l-lliirty-six 



taiuous search of the "still" places which pi-oved such an interesting diver- 
sion to the temporary residents of Rockbrido'c Alnm. 

The master mind which dominated the research work of these most ex- 
cellent young men was so eogwheeled and "Calenlnsed" np to the ninth power 
that it was possible to use an evoluted Fireplug, Rocks, and other natural 
phenomena as successful instructors in the art of gathering knowledge of 
subjects forgotten but not gone. 

Not for an instant should the reader believe that the light recreation 
afforded by the perusal of these aforementioned arts demanded the entire 
absorption of every available moment of time. Far from it In considera- 
tion of the e\^dence presented it is quite evident that the far deeper study 
of necromancy occupied many all- too fleeting moments. This conclusion is 
derived from the knowledge that the wee small hours of the night were often 
disturbed by weird and oft repeated calls upon the mystic number twenty- 
one to bring the bacon home. It is also likely that history came in for a 
large share of attention, for it was remarked by a majority of those present 
that the pictures of the four most famous queens in the world when gathered 
in one hand provided sufficient food for thought and firm grounds for an 
unfaltering trust in their ability to enrich the holder. 

Notwithstanding their absorption in these matters it required the as- 
sistance of many "Shepherds" to hold the summer Keydets to the straight 
and narrow path. In spite of the difficulties in the matter of location and the 
almost insurmountable obstacles Avhich beset the path of pleasui'c, it was 
finally decided to transform the wilds of the village into a resemblance of 
a habitable city. It is true that paved streets, cabarets, the latest shows, and 
other accessories Avere unobtainable, but by employing extraordinary dili- 
gence, with the use of great inventive genius a fair measure of success reA\'ard- 
ed the efforts of the laborers. The strain of jazz bands began to float out upon 
the still air during the wee small houi's. joy was unconfined, and gaiety 
reigned supreme. 

As might have been expected there were times when everything grew 
dull and tiresome, when the hot sun beat dov.n upon the weary workers and 
almost added brain fever to brain fag, when even the fish bit; and when the 
"daily juties" of old barracks life would have been a welcome relief. But 
these moments of depression were dispelled by the origination of some new 
sport, outdoor or indoor. Many employed their time in efforts to instruct 
the waitresses in the art of making biscuits, with only a moderate degree of 
success. 

If the constant dropping of water will Avear away a stone it is equally 
as certain that the constant passing of seconds will wear away time. The 



Pat/e One Hundred-thirty-seven 



V 



sunmier drew to an end and the passing days conjured up visions of open- 
ings, gray uniforms, reveille and rifles. The time drew near when a fond 
farewell would be spoken to the Alum and the caravan would wend its way 
toward the meti'opolis of Lexington to take up winter quarters. 

Pi'eparations were begun to end tin- ti-rm in a blaze of celebration, if 
not of glory, and plans wei'c laid A\ith this end in view. The surrounding 
country was searched foi- suitable music and at last an orchestra was en- 
gaged in Waynesboi'o and transported to the scene of action. Xo detail was 
neglected and when the night arrived in due course of time everything was 
ready for the best effort in the way of Final Balls that had ever been pulled 
off. 

The .splendor of that dance is beyond description, and it will suffice to 
say that the oldest inhabitant declared he had never seen anj'thing to equal 
it After this great blow-out came the exodus. Some departed with heavy 
hearts and all with heavy heads. But the sight of barracks ^nth the asso- 
ciated realization of re-exams made the Alum seem a veritable paradise, and 
all found it hard to think of settling down for ten weary months until the 
welcome air of Auld Lang Syne should again release them from the thrall 
of monotony. 




EoI^eka! I HAVt FoOMO HirA! 



^.,--^7^ 



'^^^s^i^it • • » • I I'L 



Piiqr On,- HiinJr.J-thirly-eiglU 




■(f^.:: 



■mm^ 



Page One Hundred Tkirty-nl. 



c 




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I'dijc On,- lluiiJieJ-jorty 



\f\/\f 




TACTICAL 
OFFICERS 



A 192G MODEL "SUB- CHASER- 
COLONEL H. M. NELLY 

Professor of M. S. & T. Coiiuiiandant of Cadets (Captain Infantry U. S. A.) 
LT. COLONEL T. B. DOCKERY 
Assistant Professor M. S. is T. (Captain Cavalry U. S. A.) 
LT. COLONEL K. S. PERKINS 
Assistant Professor iM. S'. & T. (Captain Field Artillery U. S. A.) 
MAJOR WM. HOGE 
Assistant Professor M. S. ^' T. (Captain Engineers U. S. A.) 
ALAJOR FRANK A. GROVE 
Assistant (Jonunandant Instructor in Artillery _-- 

AL^jOR S. ^L MILLNER 
Artillery 
ALAJOR S. W. ANDERSON . •' 

Instructor Engineering 
•' MAJOR J. A. ANDERSON 
'■•■■-■- Instructor Engineering ■ • • ' 

CAPTAIN HENLEY P. BOYKIN 
V ; ' Infantry Supervising Co. "B." 

CAPTAIN HERNANDO M. READ . - .— 

Infantry (Bayonet) Supervising Co. "C." ■ ' '. 
CAPTAIN J. A. B. DILLARD 
Infantry Supervising Co. "D." 
CAPTAIN WEIR R. GOODWIN 
Infantry (Bayonet) Supervising (Jo. "F." 
^ CAPTAIN ALEXANDER H. BLAIR 

Artillery i 

CAPTAIN RUSSELL G. BELLEZZA 

Cavalry 

CAPTAIN THEODORE F. MORTON 

Infantry (First Aid Military o Hygiene) Supervising Co. "E." 

CAPTAIN JAMES T. RHUDY 

Infantry (Signalling ) Supervising (Jo. "AJ' 



^-^ 



-tx/^N-, 



-TV-"^"^^ 



Faqc One Hundred-fnrty-one 




1/-^ 





Col. G. A. Derbyshire 




Col. i;. C. Bull 




JIaj. J. W. JlfCUing .Mii.i. K. A. Sole c.ii.t. E. H. Xichols 




Capt. L. E. Steek 



(';ilil l; A M: 



i^..-^.^f^. 



I'ai/i- Onr lliuhhr,t-)orly-l-^o 



'rnmn^m 




MILITARY STAFF 



COLON Ef. GEORGE A. DERBYSHIRE 

(Scrond Lieutenant U. S. /Ir'rny. Retired) 
:• • ■ Exerntivc Officer 

COLONEL RAYMOND C. BULL 

' ■ (Mcjor iMedienl Corps U. S. Army. Retired) 
Surijeon 

;\IAJOR JAMES W. IMcCLUNG . 

Treasurer 

MAJOR ERNEST A. SALE 

Quartermaster and (Jo/iiniissary. and Military Store Keeper 

'CAPTAIN E. HUNTER NICHOLS 
Quartermaster 

CAPTAIN LESTER GAYLE 
Quartermaster 

CAPTAIN LEWIS E. STEELE , 
.= . Assistant Military ^Storc Keeper 

'."■-. . CAPTAIN ROBERT A. ?iIARR , ' ■• - 
Post Adiutnnt 



OTHER OFFICERS 

COLONEL JOSEPH R. ANDERSON 

Historiographer 

MISS NELLIE TRACY GIBBS - . 

Librarian 

*ResiBTie(l January 24, 1920. 



Paqe One Hundred-jorly-three 




;i^?- 



I'inirOiir lllinJrrJ-\nrlyl„ 



connissiQNCD 

OFFICERS 



'Ji^« 



P. Groover Capt. Co. "A" 

F. W. Berry, Jr Capt. Co. "B" 

M. E. Derryberry. Jr Capt. Co. " C " 

J. C. Jordan. Jr Capt. Co. "D" 

J. W. Nurney Capt. Co. " E " 

W. A. Winston Capt. Co. ' 'F" 

11. McD. Turiier 1st Lt. & Adjt. 

T. H. Benners 1st Lt. Co. "A" 

W. C. Paxton 1st Lt. Co. "B" 

W. F. Fairlamb 1st Lt. Co. "C" 

AV. H. Hardy, Jr 1st Lt. Co. "D'.' 

B. M. P.aehai'aeh 1st Lt. Co. " B " 

H. I. Burger , 1st Lt. Co. "F" 

E. S. Jefferies 2nd Lt. & Q. M. 

W. H. Milton. Jr 2nd Lt. Co. "A" 

R. C. Marshall, 3rd 2nd Lt. Co. "B" 

D. H. Craighill 2nd Lt. Co. "C" 

\V. D. Jones, Jr 2nd Lt. Co. "D" 

M. C. Jackson, Jr 2nd Lt. Co. " E " 

W. M. Casey 2nd Lt. Co. "F" 



Paqe One Hundved Forty-five 




^:- 



Paiic One lIuiiJrrA Fnr/y-six 



•n^Iltea'^r-^^*^^ 




1 

Qllfp (Eolnra 

THE STAFF 

H. \l. Turner First Lirutenant and J/ljiiitint 

E. S. Jefferies Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster 

A. ]. Orme Sergeant Major 

H. D. Lee Color Sergeant 

N. H. Pendleton Color Sergeant 



';^z2L^L^lfyY}^z:^[^;''f' 



Paife One Hundred Fnrty-seve 




^^ 



Pdffc One Hundred Foriy-ciyht 



iIlli*iiP' 




"IT^rrn-rrr^-S'/ 




Groover, P Captain 

Beniiers, T. H First Lieuteriant 

Milton, W. H Second Lieutenant 

Sedwick First Sergeant 

SEE GE ANTS 

lIcKellai- Wilscni. \V. Y. Mdiinie ^^mitli. B. Vim Scliilliii;; Ayres 

CORPORALS 

Young Ferguson Jackson. S. Bunting Budianun 

Southgate Kidgley Hobson Wescott Ranipy 

FIRST CLASS PRIVATES. , : ; 

Bundy Graham Heisig 

De siiazo Haskell Wallis 

PRIVATES 

Adams. .1. H. Cure Fuller Mitoliell. .T. Reynolds 

Adams. J. V. Crane Gallmaii Morrison Reiss ■_ 

Akers Davidson Gilbert MeCanipbell Schmidt 

Alexander Diekerson Hardwick McCurdy Sheilds 

Alvis Douglas Harris McCauley Stroud 

Anderson Draper Herman McQuail Stokes 

Barr l>udley Irby Xixon Smith. .T. T. 

Briggs Duncan .Tohnston, J. Norman Vadeii 

Brown, D. Estill Johnston. W. Parker Washington 

Campbell Fargo .Tones, H. Porter Woulridge 

Campodonlco Farwell Jones, N. F. Pretlow Winchester 

Clark.son Franklin Keesee Peeples White. E. 

Jlidyette Rainey 



i^ffM 



Page Otic Hundred Foriy-uin 




w^m It. 





£I1IQ; 



■^^^^ 



I'aO'- One IlunJrcJ Fifty' 



■4 V 





^ ^^'^'!drrpV^'Tf5'rU„'^. .^^ l^m^ 



g|j*[|pMf-f^ 



(Enmpang "1" 

Berry, F. W Captain 

Paxton, W. C First Lieutenant 

Marshall, R. C Second Lieutenant 

Pate, R. Mc First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 

Fain (ireathead Jlasfni Pendleton, H. 
Berry, M. K. Ireys Estes - .. 

CORPORALS ' 

Miller Fontana Boniiey I'.nwden Porter - _ 

Core Little Edmonds Klnulv (iavle V. .. 

La Puie . ,; 

FIRST CEASS PRIVATES. " ^ ' 
Calvert Kerlin Slack 
Comagys Parker Green 

PRIVATES • . . 

Anderson Cnhfion Morris NelS(jn Stephens 

Atkinson Coleman Ivey Page Stewart 

Balfour Cunniniiham .Tones Potts Synie 

Barrow Denny Land Powell Thornton 

Baxter Foster Le I'eux Price Trenchard 

Blackwell Fox Jlaniiin;; Rahily Vaiighan 

Blank Gatewood Martin Komeyn Weaver 

Belden Harmon Jlersoa Ryland AVilUams 

Bowden Harwood Miller Sloan Wells 

Brame Hart Moncure Snlftin White 

Brooks Hoff Moore Smith Wilson 

Brown Ingram Morgan Settle Yaffev 
JIcMUIan 







>>*5x 



'liiiiilifei^sali 



I>,UH- (Jin- IhiihlnJ Fifly-liio 




Derryberry, M. E Cciptain 

Fairlamb, W. F First Lieutenant 

Craighill, D. H Second Lieutenant 

Jordan, J. H First Seryeant 

SEKGEAXT^ 

Manu Overbey Ripley - - StrDtlitr 

Robinson Leech Cosby . . 

CORPORALS ■ 

Venable, W. Crenshaw Fhilp I'uUer Ames : 

Stubbs Patterson Venable. R. Marshall .Tohnson 

FIRST CLASS PRIVATES. 

Hardy. G. Jlontsoniery Whitfield 

Mallory Sydaor Wan- 

PRIVATES 

Ashley Cunninirhani Gwathniey ililler Ituffner 

Bailey Dillon Horsley Pace Sherwin 

Barry Drinard Jack.son, J. Peterson Smith. I. ^^■. 

Bowman Duke Johiison Phillips Thumiisiui 

Brooks Embrey Kilfoyle Polk Ticlii-n.H- 

Buch Evans King Porterfield Tilman 

Gary Follett Kyle Pressler ■rurner, W. 

Chappell Franklin Lee Reid Weisel 

Cluing Garrow Lowe Richardson Whitted 

Cobb Gray JIcLoney Robertson. D. Williams 

Cornelius Greene Ma,ior Robertson..!. Withers 

Crist Greenwood Jlarshall. S. Roche 

Crockett Groce Matthews iToberts. W. 



W^M. 



.■c%i:; 



Paye One Hundred Fifty-l/iree 



'^■ 



V 



\i- 



':'-K 





/^■;.v,;.:^^^- 



I'a,., <) :l i:,:i:.:n. lilly- 



mmmm 



m 



iHB 






^% 




(Cmiipmuj "S" 

Jordan, J. C Captain 

Hardy, W. H First Lieutiuant 

Jones, W. D Second Lieutenant 

AlcCuistion First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 

Hagan. J. C. Ingram, D. T. I'hillips. .T. B. 

Brockenlinuigh McMillan ■ - Stuart 

CORPORALS 

Blankensliip Colonna Holladay Peed Shackelford 

Campbell, A. Curdts Hopkins, C. Perkinson Shannon 

Macrae . 

■ FIRST CLASS PRIVATES. 

Davis Roberts, L. Wallace 

Herring Smith, R. M. Hairston, R. 

PRIVATES 

Archer Budd Glazier Lynch Robertson, W. 

Arrington, R. Butler Goode Malone Rcsenthal 

Badgett Christian Gridle,\' Maloney Riis.sell 

Barrow, H. B. Coleman Haas Mallory, F. Smith, W. D. 

Barrow, J. L. Cooke, S. Hendon Mears Sydnor, G. W. 

Behr Costello Hubard Millner Timberlake 

Black Cox .loyner Monroe, E. Tinsley 

Blain Daube .Tones, P. W. Moore, W. Thompson, R. C. 

Bond Hearing Kane Moses Weisel, A. A. 

Booze Duff Lauck Payne Wilson, B. W. 

Bowles, J. C. Dunseth Lockey Ramsay Winfree 

Brazelton Edmond, R. Lloyd Rice, H. Woodward 

Bnick Enniierson I^oweidierg Robertson, T. H. 



■rt?^^^,- 



Page One Hundred Fifty-fiz 



^S/'^J 




-■:^-m>^ 



'^^^^^S^mM 



Paye Ouc Un:ui,i\i Fiflysix 











Nurnei, , J. AV Captain 

Bacharach, B. M First Lieutenant 

Jackson, A I. C Second Lieutenant 

Boatwright, J. L First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 
Seniuns, J. rnniiiiin,:.' Miirrill Hoi-ne Knapp (?'ciiii;e. H. 

CORPORALS 

Dri'wry Clark. E. Bain Huirer Kinnear 

H;irpcr Douglas. W. I'an-ott. B. Spratt Skillman 

FIRST CLASS PRIVATES. 
An-ington, W. Hnge Parrott, J. 

Barker Montague Williams 

PRIVATES 

Adauis. :.L Davis. W. Iviiig. W. Nash Saw.ver 

Bain Derr.vherr.v. L. I.iglU Xichol.son Saunders 

Buracker Ek List Penn.vliacker Semans. C 

Briggs. R. Est'-s. W. LaviMuU'r Pawle.v Shields 

Caldwell Foster. H. I.iutliicuni Penninian Ta.vlor. U. 

Carroll Frances Lynns Pettyjohn Turley 

Carter. R. Gardere Masai. .1. Plowden Ward 

Craig. E (ilrand Martin. R. Preston White. A. 

Carstens (roodman Mead Princ;> Wilnier 

Comegvs. W. C.raves Moss I'ugh Wils m. S. 

Dabney. V. Hodgson McCulloch Ratlihun Yarhnnigh 

MeFarren Reynolds 



,-jt§nL. 



Page One Hundred Fifty-seven 




iL^l^^^ 



--^2^^ 



' •III*' 

. 1' itiim' 



Pa,„- Our llurijrfj Fifly-eit/ht 





lU.l|iblti.U.llWiiiUUiUUlll!!lllll_ 




W. A. ^VillSton Captain 

H. I. Burger First Lieutenant 

W. M. Casev Second Lieutenant 

H. W. Clarkson : . . First Sergeant 

SERGEANTS 

Dicksim. R. R. Allen. L. E. Waters, W. E. .; • 

vVelton. R. H. B. Hniiiilton. F. T. Shipley. H. V. 

CORPOKALS 
Grant O'Brien Agnor I >aline.v Mantor 

Huffl . , • Bootli S.ver Harrisen.W. Summers 

P^IRST CLASS PRIVATES 
Adams, .T.B. Gaillard Hawldns Satterfield 

Baclais Hard.v, F. Munsoii - Scott, R. 

PRIVATES 

Amiss Dennis Ivilmer Rice, G. Teasley 

Baker Ednionsoii I.acy Rimmer Terry 

Barringer Ewing I.aFollette Roberds Tliomas 

Beecher Fletclier Laine, E. Robertson, G, Turner, A. 

Bell Gatling JIacGreagor Rutfin, .T. Turner, W. 

Bowles, G. Gill Mays Saunders Tyler 

Casey, R. Glover I'age, F, Shorter Watson 

Causey Hankins I'axton, P. Southall, S. Weaver, C. 

Copenhaver Harriss I'lielan Southall, V. Wes.sells 

Culpepper Hassinger I'orter, P. B. Spindle Wonieldorf 

Cutehin Hopkins, A. Powell, H, Stacy Young, W. 

Davenport Hunt Kibble Stern Yancey 



/y'^'K-.. 



Page One Hundred Fifty-nine 




ESCORT OF THE COLORS 







ini 1 \i.U)\ Dkii.i, 



l;j:;i^(:iM!:| !::!(::;,. 



Pa,,r Ouf llundifA Silxy 





,f^^--::#^' 



Page One Hundred Sixiy-one 




Inspection on Stoops 




Inspertion on TTill 



IMliliii 



P,u„ ()i:i- IliiiulnJ Sixly-l-u-o 




Q^Q^I*^ QJx 



'^^ I 1 1 III.i; ilie S. A. T. C. of 1918, nor its predecessor, the 'former K. O. T. C. 

\ h..(l an.\ appreciable effect upon the military system of V. M. I., owing to the 

|\ I Ml that infantry was the only course of instruction offered. However, with 

J^ \ 111! lieginning of the session of 1919-20, the "Reservation" took on an aspect 

^ Ml l)ustle and innovation such as must have , caused "StonevvaU" to turn 

II --i ' o\ei m his grave at the sight of such radical departures from the time-honored 

I ^,'^-J' | [ S(|uads right, squads left" of earlier days. 

The principle of the R. O. T. C. as now established by the government is the 

de^elopment at the various colleges of a sufficient number of officers on the reserve 

list to supply the country's needs in the event of war, without the confusion and delay 

that marked our belated advent into the recent conflict. 

The Institute has been signally honoi'ed with four units of the R. t). T. C. : 
Engineering, Artillery, Cavalry, and Infantry, headed by officers of the regular army and 
supplied with an enlisted personell and complete equipment for all branches. 

In an Institution so essentially military, such variety is Indeed the spice of life. 
Though infantry training for all as the foundation of discipilne still reigns supreme, 
the specialization for a part of the time by each cadet, according to his choice, in one 
of the above courses, has done much to relieve the monotony of an invariable routine 
and to make for a balanced output of officer material. 

The institution here, of the R. O. T. C, far from being a deiiarture from tradition, 
is an indication of a progressive spirit and an assurance of rlie continued value of 
V. M. I. to the nation in the future as in the past. 




Raime Practice 



Machine (iiin Drill 



,._rv 



Page One Hundred Sixty-three 




The Enlisted Personnel 




Til- :^t.'ililes 



m. 



t\\t%nf\niK3l\'\ iiiiiiil 



I'ayr Oni- lliiiuirrd Sixty-four 





s>- 



H^IW 



i^^i 



Page One Hundred Sixty-fi've 



^\f\/\J 





A Few o( rlu- Cluns 



^=S) 



^jj^ynrtStea^^-^i'^^^'^ 



Prifff On,- lluiutn-d Sixly-six 



WMM B^. 




Pa,/,- Oil,' IliinJieJ Sixly-sez; 



"L>'' \ / ""O 



CDACHC5 




COACH "RED" FLEMING 

"]{E1)" cainc to us direct from the 
Marine Corps where his constant associa- 
tion with a great number of V. M. I. men 
imbued the old "Spirit" into him. He 
came determined to beat \'. ]'. I. on 
Thanksgiving Day and we all know how 
he took his position for the first year 
and prodned a team wliicli foi- the first 
time in nineteen years, was able to turn 
the tables on Tech. 

His record speaks for itself. For three 
years he played on tli<' Wasliington and 
Jefferson team, duiiiii;' wliieli time, he 
was picked by Walter Camp for his AU- 
American Team, For two years follow- 
ing his graduation he played pi'ofcssion- 
al ball in Ohio and, at the termination of 
his cnntraet, enlisted in the iMai'ine Corps, 
«liei-e lie i)layed on the Marine's team at 
(juanlieo until he reeeixed his eonimis- 
sion shortly before the arnnstice. He 
received his discharge sometime latei-, and 
the Institute was fortunate in being able 
to seeur(> his service as coaeli. 

Coaeii I'Meiiiing deserxcs a 
that can i)ossibly be best owe 
for he has accoiu])lishe(l in oi 
others haxc tried for maii.w 
mired and res]iecled liy all who have niel 
him and his pleasiut; altiludc and per- 
sonality ha\-c made him innuiiieralili' 
I'l-iends. We know tliat liis success in 
other lines will jiarallel his accomplish- 
meiits licri'. 



Ihc praisi' 
upon liim, 
yeai' what 
lie is ad- 



I'a,/, l)n, Ihnuli.'J Sixty-riijhl 





COACH H. J. SPRUHAX 

Next to the militarj^ supremacy 
of the Institute, and possibly, from 
a purely personal viewpoint, even 
above that in the hearts and hopes 
of all Cadets, the success of our ath- 
letic teams holds sway. Honored in 
defeat and glorified in victory, the 
"Big Team" embodies our spirit 
at home and carries our standards 
abroad. At times, certain memor- 
able occasions, it A\'as, and is, the 
Institute. 

The success of our teams this year 
has been notable. JIuch of the 
credit for that success must be 
given to the coaching. For the best 
of that coaching we thank the effi- 
cient, unassuming Spruhan. In foot- 
ball an able lieutenant, in basketball 
a superalative 1 c a d e r — the best 
coach of the best team in the South- 
Atlantic. Not the hail-fellow--\vell- 
met kind who makes his best im- 
pression at the beginning and dwin- 
dles to insignificance at the end, but 
one for whom respect and friend- 
ship grows by long association. The 
team, the Corps, the Institute, can 
never express too fully its apprecia- 
tion of his woi-k and of him. 



CAPT. H. jM. read 

Capt. Kead was a member of the 
Class of 1916. After his graduation 
he became a .sub-professor of the In- 
stitute and has so continued up to 
the present, with the exception of 
the time which he spent at Camp 
Lee. 

In the spring of 1918 he volun- 
teei-ed his services as coach of Track 
and thus undertook the eolo.ssal task 
of raising a second rate sport to its 
present high position among the 
athletics of V. M. I. The squad was 
composed, for the most part, of Rats 
who had more ambition than abil- 
ity. Init wei- ' anxious to give their 
all for a man whom they all ad- 
mii'cd and rei-peeted. By his untir- 
ing efforts the coach turned out a 
team of which the school was justly 
proud. 

It is no small honor to hold the 
high position that the V. M. I. team 
holds in Track and, as has been 
shown, this honor is due in no 
small measure to the faithful work 
of Capt. Read. It is not generally 
known that the coach receives no 
compensation for his ser^dces, and 
that what he does is done because 
of his love for his Alma Mater and 
his desire to see V. M. I. at the 
head of tlie list in all branches of 
sport. 



^'fm. 



'fi^r!^ 



Page One Hundred Sixiy-nitie 



^'' 



(§in Alma ilatrr 

Music liy -Maj. Basl)y and C. B. King, '22 
Woids l)v W. 11. Milton. Jr. '20 



(01ft B. iH. Jl. IB in nitr lirarts tn&aii. 
Shr rur;is atanfts lujial in Ihr sainr nlft maji. 
(§urB is thr a;tirit that aliall nriirr ftir. 
Pin or luar uir arr fur U. M. 3. 



(tl|iirua : 

Mr Imir luir ©Ift Alma iMatrr. 

Srnp tn alumnna nr frirnft. 

As nnr mr atanft. tlirn lutt tbia lanft. 

IJrinift lit' hrr hiatnrit atift mm. 

Itlr hnir lutr ©Ift Alma iTlatrr. 

IBr l)nmu- ©li) TS. iH. 31. 

Jt'a thr aamr in ftrfrat nr in nirtnru. 

Jfnr! 11. IH. 3. ahall nnirr iiir. 



Piiur U-i,' llunJrrA Sv-vciity 




fMlM^^m: -■■.. ■■.■:;f^:' 



Page One Hundred Sevi^nty-one 







Piuir On,- IliniJrrd Srvnily-li^i, 





FDDTBALL 



( 'ai)taiii 
.Maiiai>x')' 



. .R. R. r)i<'ksoii 
.W. A. Winston 



WILLIAM A. WINSTON 

"Bill" earned the distinction this year of being the 
licst manager any athletic team has had since the year 
Jimmy Hamlin so capably fostered the basketball team 
under his management. It has often been said that the 
position of manager is- the most important and yet the 
least lauded position connected -with the team, and this 
is about the case here as elsewhere. The manager must 
AX'ork untiringly and no matter how much he does there 
is usuallj' one thing left undone — or someone to complain 
about some such trivial omission, at least. No one thinks 
of the manager as an essential to success. The game is 
l)Iaved and so-and-so is the star winning all the credit. 
True, the men who have the skill and training to play 
Ihe game should get the credit — and their monograms 
as a reward — but the man who attends to every little 
detail connected with the entire season should also get 
liis shai-e. 

There was nothing too good for the men on his team 
and "Bill" attended to every detail connected with their 
comfort. The numerous trips wei'e Avell arranged and 
the usual inconveniences were somehow avoided. It was 
both quite appropriate and incidental that the successful 
team of the yeai' of lOlO should be for1uiu\te enough to 
lia\'e sucli a capable manager as "liill" Winston. 



- ■ FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 1919 ' ■ 

September 22. Hampden-Sidney 0— V. M. I.— 3 

October 4. St. Johns College (cancelled) 

October 11. William and Mary (Richmond) 3 21 

October 18. University of Virginia (Charlottesville) .... 7 • 

October 25. North Carolina A and E (Roanoke) 21 ' 

November 1. University of N. C. (Chapel Hill, N. C 7 .-,29 

November 8. Davidson (Lynchburg) 7 .^ 14 

November 15. Roanoke College ' '41 

November 22. Gallaudet (cancelled) ' " ' ■ 

Thanksgiving V. P. I. (Roanoke) 13 



-^:- 



rrfiT^Tnrr^ 



P/ii/c One Hundred Seventy-three 



t 



:; 



V 




Jontball 




T has luiii>' lireii tlic (Ircaiii ; 
ambition of faithful supporters 
of V. M. I, to see her athleties 
placed on a par with her siiperi- 
oi'ity in aeademie and military 
lines. In many pi'evious years it 
has l)een so often tile fate of her fol- 
lowers to be forced to content them- 
selves with much less than would satisfy 
llc.'ir fondest hopes and as])irati(jns. This 
vi'ai'. ho^\ever. it was a different Mory. 

"Red" Flemii^o- came (.low n fi-o;ii 
Washington and Jeffei-son and inaugu- 
rated a system of open play and a for- 
A\ard |)a 'sing game, hithei'lo unkiinwn 
at the Institute, -which \\(n-ked \\oiiflers, 
winning game; which would have been 
lost by ditfei'cnt tactics. 

"J'inky" Spruhan taught the line to 
hold and showed each man the rudiments 
and fine points of playing his ])osition. 

Colonel Nelly descended from his ofli- 
eial dign.ity and gave the keydets a 
cl'.ancc to even up the score, incidentally 
gi\ing thi'in the benefit of his long ex^ 
ix'riciice as head coach at West I'oint. 

".lininiy" Leech, that stinnpy minia- 
Inre whii'lwind, left off fighting niggm-s 
\\\\h the Marines in Haiti and came back 
to make life miserable for the opposing 
(hfciisi'. "Jere" Hunting came ba<-k fi-oni 
Salem to wiggle thrcnigh the line and 
take in forward passes. "Tuggy" Stu- 
art bai-ked out those "touchdown" sig- 
nals and made the enemy Ihank iheir 
stars that thai missing fool or so iiadn"t 
been added to his stature. "Wooden" 
Dickson bucked the line all ovei- the lot. 





iiiiliinii-*fi^^ 



I'll,,,- <)»,■ lhinJi,\l S,-v,nly-lnur 






"Jjei't" Bacliarach deserted Paris Island 
to boot the liall seventy yards oi' so. 8ani 
Masoi and Hawkins broke up plays be- 
fore thej^ had started and pulled down 
passes with ease and certainty. Summers 
joined us from West Point and Mantor 
applied his experience in the tank corps 
to a worthiei- cause than pushing over 
houses and stone A\-alls. Smith held the 
center position and Avith Harrison and 
Hunt, and occasionally Turner. (4ardere 
and Shipley on the flanks, conihined ^\ith 
1hi' two above mentioned, put the llin- 
denburg' line in the shade. 

l>oys, I tell j'ou we had a football 
team ! We hated to lose to Virginia and 
we'll have to hand it to N. C. A. & E., 
but they taught us our faults and made 
it hard for the rest of our opponents. At 
Chapel Hill, whei'e Virginia later dipped 
her eoloi's. the team ran Avild. It was 
there that they gained the name of the 
"Flying Cadets," a name as appropri- 
ate as "Stonewall" to Jackson. At 
liynchburg Davidson put up a stiff fight. 
It began to l)e a pleasure for those battle- 
scarred heroes to come back and give 
the team a chance to show its mettle to 
barracks, to smile and he smiled at, rath- 
ci- than to mourn and receive condolences. 





m 



Pane One Huinired Scventy-fi-ve 




o 



\& 






Sliipley 



/'=^:' 



r<i,/,- On,- llniuii.J Srv.iily-six 



m.3, 13 1. i. J. n 



■ ' ■ ' - ' 'Tis a long lane that has no turning. 

SAvcet are the uses of adversity, as V. !M. I. has had ample oecasion to 
note in the courfo of the past fifteen or twenty years. Only a school which 
has tasted naught but defeat from its traditional rival for eighteen years — 
V. 51. I. 's la.'-t victory over V. P. I. was won in 1900, the historians tell us — 
can know how ineffably sweet to the Lexington lads was the triumph 
achieved at the Fair Grounds on Xov. 25, 19] 9. 

V. JI. I. won because the Cadets were the better team. Nobody who saw 
the game is likely to challenge the statement. The heavier Tech eleven 
fought desperately to avert defeat but its best efforts went for naught against 
the superior play of the Cadets. That there was nothing savoring of a fluke 
about their victory was proved by the fact that for most of the game the 
V. M. I. team was without the services of Leech, its star halfback around 
whom the team's offense was built, but notwithstanding this handicap the 
Cadets kept the play for the most part in their oppenent's territory and 
'"•orcd a uccnd tcuehdoAni in the last period by way of sewing things up 
-ind maldiig alisohitely cei-tain of the result. 

It is useless to try to pick the Jtar of tlie (_'adft team as every single 
man did his utmost and was, consequently, an essential cog in the successful 
machine and, therefore, a star. Stuart was the gamest little fighter ever 
seen on the Roanoke field and his touchdown a,';sured the victory. Bunting 
was speed per.sonified and caught the long pass for the first touchdown, while 
Dickson played his .'uberb defensive game thruout. Bacharach made his 
initial appearance in the backfield after Jimmie Leech was banished and his 
long punts averaging aroinid sixty-five yards kept the ball in Tech's terri- 
tory. The line worked as a unit and Tech could neither hold ror gain thru 
the charging onslaught of Mantoi-, Summers, Harrison, and Smith, Hawkins 
and Ma' on cut ;hort Tech's hopes of gaining around the ends and, time and 
again, broke up plays before they could well get started. As said before, 
the game was one of eleven stars, or rather of twenty-two — as Tech played a 
beautiful game and, tho outplayed, they vs'ere not outfought. 



-ircS-i'; 



jPfl^f One Hundred SeTeniy-se-ven 



V 








Dabney 



Mcruistion 



THE SCRUBS 

Little need be said, and not enough ean l)e said, of 
the scrubs who aetually made the team what it was. 
L'ntii-ing, unrewarded, and unseltish. these men worked 
as hard as any man on the varsity and anyone of them 
would have been a star on the avei-age team had he only 
had the chance. 

And still these men were not scrubs in the actual 
sense of tlie woixl. They were all called on time and 
again to (ill a place on the varsity and in every ease 
they made good. They are members of the Big Team of 
1919-20 and we look upon them as such. 






Fiix I'.cnni 



iHlltlPi 



I'luj,- On,- Ihni.inJ S,-vrnly-,-iylit 




.^^ -- 



Page One Hundred Se-venly-nine 



•^ 




-^.. 



i'iUli- Om- IlnuJrrJ l-ujlily 



i!i """"i''fe=- 

l'|jllll«_ilj-;p-i^^ 




-lA^ 



BASKETBALL 



Captain B. JI. Bacharach 

^ranager J. W. Nurney 



H.UrFIOXS of the ^oiith Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion and Champions of the South! A scientifically developed ma- 
( hiue of stars, each of whom gave his best to the team and yet made 
ail enviable individual record; a highly capable Coach, who knew 
the game as an expert and had the confidence of his men as well 
a- confidence in them ; a squad of the gamest, most faithful Scrubs 
that ever built up a Big Team; and five hundred loyal Keydets as full of 
fight as the players themselves — these are some of the reasons why the 
Ba'ketball feascn of 1919-20 will always be remembered as one of the most 
gloriously succesi-ful periods in the athletic annals of V. M. I. 

No rerume written to space can begin to do justice to the spectacular 
features of the past season in which there was nothing monotonous except 
the ircqucncy and regularity with which V. M. I. 's opponents were skillfull}^ 
and thoroughly trimmed. It was never a question of "Who won?", but 
"What's the score?" In this connection it may be noted that in almost 
every game V. M. I. rolled up an imposing score, at the same tim,c allowing 
the other team to make only an occasional basket. Virginia Tech. enjoyed 
the twin distinction of being the only team to score over twenty points 
againft V. M. I., and of being the only team to prevent V. M. I. from scorinsx 
over thirty points in a game. 

V. M. I.'s bewildering fast floor work and almost perfect 
pasring. combined with the fact that every man on the team 
cculd— a'xl did — shoot, proved too much for every rival for 
South Atlartic honors. A five-star basketball team is about as 
common as a royal straight flush — and about as easy to beat 
Tl'i'i fact was evidenced when the team got off to a fljing st.nt 
and played through the season Avithout a slump. 

To coach G. H. Spruhan belongs a vast amount of the m di< 
for the splendid performances of his team. He showed himseU 
to be a tireless worker, an inspiring coach, and a genuine spoits 
r-ar. Brpidcs the flawless manner in which he directed th< 
strategy of every game, he possessed an uncanny knack of pn K- 
ing rut a weak spot in the game — and of strengthening it. Only 
the team itself could appreciate the value of his services more 
than did the Alumni and Corps. 

Captain "Bert" Bacharaeh, the All-South Atlantic guar 
in 1919 and 1920, and now playing his fourth year on the 
Varsitv, well deserved the honor of leading a team that 
furni bed three men 1o the mythical All-South Atlantii- 

Xurne.v 




Pajt One Huiuired Highty-nm 



V 



quint. Besides bis uiiusiuil (iiialiticatifins t'oi' tlir captaincy, be combined 
lighting speed with an ability to score that is most uniisnal in a guai'd. And 
time after time, he would race down the floor and cage the ball while his 
forward was wondering what it A\as all about. Bacharaeh made 76 points 
during the season while bis opposing forwards i\'ere making 50. 

"Jimmie" Leech, Captain for lf21, and All-South Atlantic Guard in 
1920, is fitted in every way to succeed Bacharaeh as Captain. He rated close 
to Bacharaeh in scoring ability and proved his value to the team by guard- 
ing even closer than his running mate. Leech was generally busy making 
his forward miserable, but he found time to get in nearly every play and 
he could invariably be relied on to take the ball down the floor by himself. 

"Jere" Bunting, All-South Atlantic forward, demonstrated his clever- 
ness by leading a free-scoring team in the number of points made. Bunting's 
accurate passing contributed to many of the scores made by his team-mates, 
and he always managed to elude his affectionately clinging guard long 
enough to display his distinctive and exceedingly effective "south-paw 
hook." Moi'eover, the goals he tossed from, the foul line helped to swell 
V. !M. L's top-heavj^ scores and to give him the substantial total of 139 points 
(o the undersized number of 8 made by his opponents. 

Summers, at center, developed rapidly and astonishingly during the sea- 
son. His Improvement in form and speed became more obvious in every 
game, his guarding became airtight, and his shooting deadly. His work 
reached its climax in the last game of the season, in which he out.jimiped, 
outscored, and outplayed his stellar rival. Parrish of V. P. I. Summers 
scored 72 points for the season, while the ])ivot men of opposing teams con- 
tented themselves with making 38. 

Henry Lee, at right forward, ranked next to Bunting in scoring ability, 
having 112 points to his rivals 14. Lee started the season with a rush, annex- 
ing 13 goals from the floor in the first game played. His playing was at Its 
best In the first game with V. P. I., in which he turned in six prettily ex- 
ecuted field goals. A superior brand of basketball is natui-al to him, and he 
is expected to play his usual distinguished ganu:' next year. 

Campbell waited all season for his chance, which eanu' when he replaced 
Lee at forward. While he was not 1 lie finished player Lee was, he made up 
foi' this by his determination and figbling spirit. Campbell could be counted 
on to play al to]) speed eveiy niiiiuti' that he was in the game. 

Stuart and Hawkins, substitute guards, were awai'ded letters for their 
wholehearted, consistent playing throughout the season. On an average 
team, these men would have starred, a fact clearly shown whenever either 
of them played in a game. Stuart, in particular, was quick-thinking and 
aggressivt', and he should prove a worthy running mate for Leech next sea- 
son. Unfortunately, Hawkins, like Bai'harach, will be lost by graduation. 

The Senilis, especially llie "ral" leaiii, caiinni be two highly praised for 
the unselfish spirit shown in their «ork with the Varsity. It was the nightly 
scrimmages with the Scrubs that perfected te Varsity's game, and anyone 
who has seen the Varsity play will concede that the Scrubs did their work 
tlioriiiighlv. 



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Page One Hundred Ehjhly-lhree 



The deciding game of the series with V. P. I, was plaj^ed in Lynchburg. 
It was in itself a classic and deserves to be described from start to finish. 
Both teams «'ei-e at the height of their development and both teams were 
deteraiincd to win. The lead changed hands several times in the first half, 
but the Varsity proved itself of Championship caliber by drawing ahead un- 
til it held the long end of a 16 to 12 score at the close of the first period. 
Tech was out for blood in the second fi'ame, but V. M. I. was there to win 
that game and every man Avas full of the confidence and fight that had 
proved the undoing of every opponent. The second half was repetition of 
the first, and the critical game of the season ended in V. jNI. I.'s favor 28 to 
26. For V. M. I., Bachai'aeh played his last game like the star that he is. 
Bunting's shouting and passing Avere marvels of accuracy and Leech's game 
wa'i flaAvle.'s. Campbell, playing right forward, was in the thick of every 
scrimmage. Summers, at center, was at his best in every department of the 
game and stood out as the star of the clas.sic. 

Earlier in the season, several teams had cancelled, and now an attempt 
was made to schedule other contests, particularly with Georgetown and 
Vandci'bilt. This was impossible, and the greatest Basketball Team in the 
history of the Institute rested on its laurels. 



BASKETl'.ALL SCHEDULE 

1920 

Date Score Score 

Jan. 10 Roanoke Y. M. C. A 18— V. ^l. I.— 54 

Jan. 14 llampden-Sidney 2 40 

Jail. 17 Roanoke College 14 60 

Jan. 21 Kaiulolph-Maeon 10 53 

Jan. 24 V. P. 1 25 31 

Jan. 28 Aubui'ii 19 ' 45 

Jan. 31 I'nivt i-sify of X'irginia 13 44 

Feb. 7 ^Ve^ leyan 15 30 

Feb. 1 1 Davidson Cancelled 

Feb. 14 V. 1". 1 23 14 

Feb. 18 Lebanon Valley College Cancelled 

Feb. 21 St. Johns College 10 36 

Feb. 25 Trinity 13 46 

Mar. (; V. I>. 1 26 28 



^:- 



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/',/,/,■ ()::,■ lliinJr,J l.ujhfy-finn 




Page One Hundred Eighty-five 




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I>a„i- h'nur lluiuirrj l-yu/hly-si. 




BABE BALL 



HE Baseball Team — with only three of last year's monogram men 
left as a nucleus — has started a hard schedule and apjjears to be one 
of the best teams that has ever represented the Institute. The team 
has a big obstacle to surmount, namely the records of both football 
and basketball, but the foi-m shown thus far gi\'es us cause to be- 
lieve that Spruhan is going to duplicate Ms previous records in the 
other sports and turn out a •^^'inner. 

Capt. "Dan" Ingram is pitching beautiful hall ami is well backed up by 
such mound ai-tists as Pate, Page, P>adgett, and Burgei-. Gardene is a new 
man but his work behind the bat has labelled him a star in that department. 
Jere Bunting is holding down first base; Stuart, Leech, and Mann are play- 
ing the other three positions in the intickl. while Jordan, Perkinson. and 
Johnson are giving them a hard fight for their jobs. In the outfield, Baeh- 
arach, McMillan, and Summers are playing stellar games with Scd^'ick and 
Roberts as alternates. 

With such good material and the confidence inspired l)y other succes- 
sers. it is only right to expect the Itaseliall team of 1920 to he one of the 
best in the section. 



-:i¥t 



:<m<^ 



Pai/e One Hundred liighty-sei 



BASEBALL SCHEDI'LE 

1920 

Date Score Score 

Sat. Mai'. 27 Lynchburg College 5— V. M. I.— 8 

Wed. Mar. 31 LaFayctte College 5 5 

Sat. Apr. 3 Ainher.st 5 4 

Sat. Apr. 10 Trinity 2 . 5 

Wed. Api'. 14 llainixlen-Sidiiey ' f ^. ; -4 ' 

Thur. Apr. 15 V. P. T. (Black.sburg^ 4 .. " 2 

Sat. Apr. 17 Roanoke College 1 .2 

Wed. Apr. 21 Delaware College 2 1 

Sat. Apr. 24 Aubui'n 7 2 

Wed. Apr. 28 U. of S. C 4 6 

Thur. Apr. 29 Roanoke College (Salem) 2 3 

Fri. Apr. 30 V. P. I. (Roanoke) 10 11" 

Sat. May 1 (ieoi'getowu (Washington) 7 1 

Wed. May 5 Pending Xo game 

Fri. Jlay 7 Lynchburg Elks (Lynchburg) Cancelled. 

Sat May 5 Lincoln Memorial 4 6 

Wed. May 12 Emoiy & Henry 4 12 

Sat. May 15 V.P.I 1 5 






I'aijr ()„,■ llunJnui Eii/lily-niihl 





Pane One Hundred Eighly-nine 



_> 




Paiir Our /liiiiJr.J M„,ly 



/''=Si;v 



jlllinij:,, 




TRACK TEAM 



1KACK has cdiiie into Its own as a niajm- si«irl ;il A'. M. I. and last year's record 
assured us that it is liere to stay. Each year since 1917, when it was declared 
a major sport, it has gained in popularity by leaps and Iwunds ; each year 
the team has improved and now bids fair to become the leadin.s contender 
in the S. A. I. A. A. Sonii thing of the stanilintr of the team can be determined 
by a review of last year's record. 

In the first met t asair.st Trinity, we won, douliling the score (Hi thcui and 
taking every first place i xcept one. Then at Blaclisburg, we lost liy a lone 
point. The meet was full of thrills and excitement, victory being undecided till the 
last event was over. Rut by far the greatest achievement of the year was tlie copping 
of second place in the !S, A, I. A, A, meet held at Johns Hopkins, our first year In the 
Association,, winning over Y. I', I, and many other fast teams. There were no out- 
standing stars on the sipiad liut a few wh.i did the best work might l.>e mentioned, 
Knapp, F,, captain, was always good for .several points in the weights and .lumps. 
Kane was a consistent wiinier of the sprints. Cleaves. .Tones A.. .Sebriiig. and Smith 
D. V. did some wonderful work and we will miss them. 

Still, the porspects are brighter this year for an even better team than last 
year's. Over a hundred men reported at the first call for candidates and are rapidly 
rounding into form, Kane, captain, and Costello, a fourth-classman, will represent 
us in the sprints. Summers and Mantor are doing wonders witli the weights, %vhile 
Semans J., who won the firsts in the S. A. I. A. A. last year, is better than he was 
then. .Jordan H. and Dickson are back again at the hurdles and are making fast time 
on them. Eipley. Shipley. Turner H., Pendleton N,, Buch and LaFollette, a new 
man, are .showing np liest in the distance runs. 

Jlanager JIarshall It. has made out a good schedule but was forced to place all 
three meets away from home on account of the lack of facilities here. The first is at 
Trinity on April 17th; the second Is at Charlottesville on April 23rd against the Uni- 
versities of 'nrginia and North Carolina. The thii-d and largest is the S. A. I. A. A. meet 
which will probably be held at Blacksburg. 

A brilliant season is predicted but let it be said that all we do, or have done is 
due to the untiring eff(n-ts of our Coach, "Son" Read. He is a wearer of the Monogram 
himself and since 1918. when he took charge of the scpiad. has lifted It to the high 
position wliich it occupies. We are truly indebted tn him; and he does this only because 
he has the true V. JI. I. Spirit, and because of his love for the Institute. 



^ 



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Page One Hundred Ninety-one 



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j^iiiiiliiir-Jic _ 



I'lii/r On, lluuJr.J Mncly-liL-ii 




TENNIS TEAH 



I 'apt. -Manager Leo 



EXXiy at V. M. I. has taken on new life within the last few yeavs 
and this present season's outlook is promising indeed. Heretofore, 
the schedule in this sport has been erratic, one year several meets 
being played, the next year none. But a review of last year's 
Spring Tournament and the enthusiasm with which it was entered 
into by the sixty entrants assui'es us that tennis has gained the 
popuiaritj' it justly deserves. 

The tournament began in the latter part of April but, on account of so 
few courts, it dragged out into June before the finals were reached. In five 
hard-fought sets, Blake defeated Lee. thereby winning the championship of 
the school. The only schedule match was played against Trinity on May 
8th, and resulted in a 3-2 victory for us. 

For his brilliant work of the past two years, Lee was selected as Cap- 
tain-Manager and from the schedule he has made out it appears to have 
been a particularly %\'ise choice. It is the largest schedule ever attempted 
but promises to be completed successfully. There are three matches away 
from Lexington and probably as many as five on our own courts. The 
Spring Tournament will be held as usual though, according to 
present plans, it will start late in May. 

About a hundred men are out working for the team and 
there is a wealth of good material from which to choose. The 
following men showed up well last year and are back again: 
Lee, Davidson, McMillan, ]Montague, Clarkson, Young, J. ]M,, and 
JIaerae. 

There are several men who are showing real skill and they 
will make it hot for someliodv in the race for the team. 



The Schedule is as Follows: 

Lynchburg College Lexington 

Geo. Washington Univ Lexington 

University of Virginia Charlottsville 

Trinity College Lexington 

St. John's College Lexington 

Trinity College Durham. N. C. 

North Carolina Univ Chapel Hill 

Yii'ginia Poly. Inst Lexington 



April 


17 


April 


24 


May 


1 


:\Iav 





May 


8 


May 


14 


May 


15 


ilav 


22 



m 



Page One Hundred Ninety- three 



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«d 








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/'««,- 0«,- lhinJr,\l Siiirly-fniir 



'f^SfeS-^' 




BYM TEAM 



('apt. -Manager 



.llui-u 



HE gymnasium team is ui'ganized i-aeh year in October ami 
practice is carried on from then until almost the last day of the 
year, preparing for the t\vo exhibits given annually, one at Govern- 
ment Inspection, the other during Finals. Those men who show 
sufficient ability at these exhibits, as judged by the coach, are 
awarded monograms. Work consists of performance on the mats, 
fiying rings, parallel bars, and the horizontal bar. 

This year's team is to be judged not by its size, which is far from tre- 
mendous, but. by the quality of the exhibitions to be given. Thru the aid 
of the coach, Maj. S. M. Millner, a \'. M. I. graduate and former gym. man, 
the team has improved wonderfully since the first practice and intends to 
present two performances which wUl supply all the thrills and pleasure that 
can be hoped for. 

Home, Ashley, Briggs, Budd, and Rylancl compose the squad this year. 
All of them will be back next fall, and with the new material to be expected, 
the gym. team for the coming session bids fair to be one of the best seen at 
the Institute for sevei'al years past. . . ' ' ■_ 



i 




Page One Hundred Ninety-five 



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^'■<y-- 




BOXING AND 
WRESTLINQ 



L'ayt.-iMaiiagcj- 



..Munill 



HESE sports have gained popularity and prestige at a remarkable 
rate during the past year, due to the fact that the Athletic Associa- 
tion has replaced the old, worn out equipment, with new mats and 
gloves. It was on account of the late arrival of this ncAv material 
that the Boxing and Wrestling teams were forced to tuni down of- 
fers of matches -H-ith West Point and several Virginia Colleges dur- 
ing the past season. 

Heretofore, about the only ]'ecognition the Boxing and Wrestling teams 
have received has been confined to bouts and matches betAveen the halves of 
basketball games at (iovcrnment Inspection and Finals. Each year, how- 
ever, an increasing ininibcr of men begin to realize the value of these sports 
and this season over seventy-five candidates were out. There is no fear of 
this interest declining and it is a surely that several hiter-collegiate meets 
will be arranged for next year. Nor is this increased interest confined to 
the men at the Institute: all over the country teams are being organized at 
the various colleges and univcr.sities, and these sports are being recognized 
as inter-collegiate athletics. 

The rapid development of these sports is. in a great measure, due to Mr. 
J. AV, Zimmerman of Lexington, whose untiring efforts and skillful coaching 
have laid the foundation for the production of teams alilc to uphold the name 
of V. M. I. in the ring or on the mat, against all opponents. 




tail,- On,- llunJrrJ Mii.ly-six 



Athldtr Assnrtatintt 



President B. M. Bacharach '20 

Vice-President J. H. Jordan "21 

Secretary & Treasurer Major Barton 

Graduate Manager Capt. H. P. Boykin 

Assistant Grad. Manager Capt. H. M. Bead 

ADillXISTRATI VE COJIMITTEE 

Colonel H. C. Ford, Chairman 
■ ■ . Colonel H. M. Nelly 

Colonel R. C. Bull ' • ' 

Major Grove 
Captain H. M. Read 

MEMBERS 

Head Coach JI. D. Fleming 

Captain Football R. R. Dickson, '21 

Manager Football W. A. Winston, '20 

Captain Basketball B. M. Bacharach. '20 

Manager Basketball J. W. Xui'ney. '20 

Captain Baseball D. T. Ingram. '21 

Manager Baseball F. L. Herring, '20 

Cheer Leader J. C. Parrott, '20 

Captain Track F. Kane, '21 

Manager Track R. C. Marshall, '20 

Manager Capt. Swimming B. M. Bacharach, '20 

Manager Capt. Tennis H. D. Lee, '21 

Manager Capt. Gym Team G. D. Hornc, '21 

Manager Capt. Wrestling R. Murrill, '21 

Pros. Monogram Club B. JI. Bacharach, '20 

Editor Cadet G. W. Hardy, '20 



Page One Hu7idred Ninety-se'ven 




p^iiSiiiiiiiiiii 



^=2^,. 



I'lUir On,- IhniJrrd Sinrly-.iiihl 



^^.HDNQGRAn CLUB 

OFFICERS ■ ■ . 

B. M. Bacharach President 

J . C. Leech f ice-President 

W. F. Drewry Treasurer 

FOOTBALL 

Leech Dickson, R. JIcCiii:ticn / 

Bacharach .' •" Mason, S. ■ Shipley •' i 

Bunting Hawkins Smith, J. T. , .. , • 

Stuart ■ Mantor ■ Miller, P. " 

Ingrain Summers Dabney - '. - '., 

Wilson - ■ Hunt Di-eivry 

BASKETBALL 

Campbell ' Summers Bacharach 

Stuart Bunting . ' . Leech 

Hawkins . Lee 

BASEBALL ' ' ;. 

Ingram Stuart Mar.n, H. 

" ■' ' \ . ■ . TKACK : . ' 

Semans, J. Brown, D. Kane - ' 

Ripley ' \ Jordan, J. H. •■ 

TENNIS 

Lee . ■ • . . . Davidson .. ' . 

OVM 
Home ''.'■,'■■ Ashley 

Pa^e One Hundred Ninety-nine 



'\/ 




J. C. Panott (>lifc>- Leader 

J. L. Boatwright Asihtant Cheer Leader 

R. C ;. McKellar 4ssist,:nt Cheer Leader 



'^^^m>. 



I'a„e Tin, IlunJnd 




Page Tiuo Hundred One 




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(«f »«ii*| I'ljtrSil'j |Hiii«il::r 



l',i,/r T-iio Ilundrrd Ttco 




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Page Tico Hundred Three 



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I'd,/,- Tv.n IhuuirrJ hour 




Paffe Ti-n Hun.irr.i Fh 



; 



V 




iiiiiiiir^«ii#l^ 



I'liiir 7-.,« lhniJy,-J Si 




CADET STAFF 



G. \V. Hardy • • • • -Editor 

J. C. Parrott Assistant Editor 

•■' - •■ . ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

M. C. Jackson '• W. D. Lavender D. H. Craighill 

CI. W. Heisig T. C. Davis W. C. Calvert 

E. J. Williams W. T. S. Eoberts B. M. Baeliaradi 

F. L. Herring - ■■. ' ^ 

P. Groover Manager 

W. M. Casey Advertising Manager 

T. H. Benners Treasurer 



Pa^e Ti:o Hundred Seven 



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HJffiJSiiii^ 



l>„y,- Tiiv, llnnJrrd hnjlit 




BQHB STAFF 



*T?= 



C. E. Hoge, Jr Editor-in-Chief 

M. C .Jackson, Jr Assistmit Editor-in-Chief and Art Editor 

J. C. Jordan, Jr iisistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. C. Parrott Elurnor Editor 

R. C. Marshall Photographie Editor 

B. M. Bacharach Athletic Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS • • .-:' 

W. H. Milton, Jr. G. W. Heisig T. H. Benuers 

G. W. Hardy W. A. Winston E. J. Williams ., 

E. S. Jefferies Business Manager 

W. C. Paxton Assistant Business Manager 

T. C. Davis Treasurer 

H. M. Turner Sales Manager 

F. D. Mallory Assistant Sates Manager 

J. W. Nurney Advertising Manager 

D. H. Craighill Assistant Advertising Manager 



"'tiki;' 

Pa,ie Ti:v Hundred Nine 




if* ■-■■!>.^'ff^. 



-iis^iift^ 



Paiu- T^v,, llunJrrJ TrN 



CADET ORCHESTRA 




USIC Is line of the essentials of a soldier's good morale. The orchestra has 
probably filled its place better this year than ever before. Composed of the 
instrnments that give tip-to-date jazz and yet retain the qualities of better 
nuisle. this organization has endeared itself in the hearts of cadets because 
it helps to fill the wide gap between home and the Institute. It's music takes 
him back to the summer, to his "Citz" friends, to the last hops and to 
occasions he likes to rememlier. In the dnary winter months it is the 
orchestra that helps to cheer him uj). 
Each Saturday night the orchestra furnishes the music at the picture show. It 
also puts on the Saturday afternoon te dansants during the hops which are the 
peppiest of them all. Of course drama would not be complete without music so the 
orchestra invariably makes the trips with the Dramatic Club, In May, a call came 
from the Richmond Alumni Association for the jazzers to furnish music for an old-time 
V, M, I. hop at the country club. This meant another trip as well as showing the 
alumni some barracks pep. In the springtime the after suisper concerts on the stoops 
help to lessen the days until finals. 

Probably the greatest contribution of all has been- the production of the "V. JI. I. 
Spirit" on a Columbia record by the orchestra and quartet. This necessitated a trip 
to New York last December. Its success has surpassed all expectations. Alunmi all 
over the world are now able to listen to the song of their Alnui Mater as only Institute 
men can render it. If you want to hear this year's cadet orcheslra ,iust try the "Spirit" 
on your "vie." 

Fain, J. C Leader 

Smith, K. M Manager 

King, C. B Piano 

Fain Violin 

Smith Saxoplione 

Groce Saxoplione 

Clarkson, H, \V Mandolin Banjo 

Orme Drums 



y^ 



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Page Tivn Hundred Elei 




19B1 BULLET 






:^^'^^^^-Sr ^ --, 






M. K. Berry Editor 

C. B. Gilbert Assistant Editor 

J.'B. Phillips Literary Editor 

j. C. Fain 4rt Editor 

J. H. Jordan Jrt Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS i 

W.J.Price ' • •. " H. M. McMillan 

S. A. Synic J. F. Oreene 

R. G. McKellar Business Manager 

S. A. Marshall, Jr Assistant Business Manager 

H. C. Land Treasurer 

R. H. B. Welton Advertising Manager 

R. S. Murrill Assistant Advertising Manager 









P<uie T^iio IliinJrrJ Tiirlve 



V^lillV ^ 



. (mi i 

A N/ / 




YMCA 



(PROMT) (REAR) ^'^ 

Y./A£.A. "CABINET" 






^". M. C. A. CABINET 










Jackson M C . 


Secretary Js" Treasurer 


Baiii 


Jordan, J. C. Marshall. R. 


Greathead 


Lavender Smith R. M. 



^,,XV_ 



Page Tico Hundred Thirteen 



\J^-- 




DRAMATIC CLUB 




J. C. Pariott Prtsident 

]. L. Boatwright I'iti-Pnsidcnt 

W. T. S. Roberts Mannger 

R. Hairston Assistant Manager 

J. L. Boatwright T. W. Smith J. D. FoUett M. G. Ramoy 

P. Goodman ' V. ( 'ai'i-oll H. P. Sloan J. C. Jordan, Jr. 

W. B. Johnsloii T. I). Shiels F. B. Irby M. C. Jackson. Jr. 

W. H. Milton, Jr. 11. S. Roche J. C. Parrott J. Girand 




^i^iiiiiiMftisiS 



I'aijc Tiio llmutrei Fnurtcrii 




Episcopal Church Vestry 




Craighill 


BlankensMp 


Nui'iiey 


Ridgley 


Joi'dan, J. H. 


Semaiis, S. 


Pate 


Richardson 



^^-^stft; 



Hr-S^ 



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Page Tr,i-o HunJred Fifteen 



_> 




iHartup (Club 



"Mose" (loodman '17 

J. C. Leach ex-'20 

W. R. Goodwin '17 

B. M. Bacharach 

F. Page & J. P. Gardere 

J. T. Smith, J. H. Sedwick & H. H. Munson. 
"Flat Head" Smith 



Captain 

.First Lieutenant 
.First Lieutenant 



Sergeant 

Corporals 

"Acting Jacks" 

'Captain of the Head" 



Boots. 



Brigos, R. 
Comegys, E. 
Dickson 
Duff 

Fairlamb 
Green, F. 
Hamilton 
Hoge 

Ingram, D. 
Jackson, M. 
Jordan, J. H. 



Kane 
Kerlin 
Knapp 
Laine 
Lyons 
Mason, S. 
Milton 
Mai lory. F. 
Mann, H. 
Monroe, W. 
AlcCuistion 
MeKellar 



Price, W. 
Kibble 
Roberts, W. 
Robertson, J. 
Seman, J. 
Smith, B. 
Stroud 
Thompson. R. 
Turley 
Waters 
Womeldorf 



. 1 - ■ "■ .' ■'.V >T • ' '"'•'"'•iii|'7i 



l\u, IlunJrrJ Sixlren 




,\- V 






:^4 '-vJ: i^j^i ij; ^' >UJ- y ■-- 



f ankpp (Elub 

E. S. Jefferies President 

B. M. Bacharach J'ice-President 

R. M. Smith Secretary is Treasurer 

Turner Shanuon Fox 

Wallis FoUett • •' MaeGregor 

Bowman P'ontana MeFarren 

Duff CTatling Ramsey 

Rathbun Macrae Semans, J. 

Russell 'Brain Seamans, S. 

Shipley Wescott Sloan 
Belden 



^S^: 



Paae Tv.-o Hundred Seventeen 



^v' 




(irxas Club 



Hardy, W President 

McCuisition fiee-Presideni 

Dabnev Secretary o Treasurer 



Adams, J. V. 


Groee 


Preston 


Allen 


Heisig 


Potts, M. 


Ashley 


Hendrlx 


Philp 


Berry, M. 


Jones. W. F. 


Riess 


Briggs 


King, C. 


Ripley 


Brazleton 


Kilfoyle 


Roberds 


Bro^\^l. E. 


Mallory 


Sedwiek 


Briu-k 


MeKellar 


Smith. J. T. 


Cunningham 


McCauley 


Slack 


Dmiseth 


McCampbell 


Skillman 


Estill 


Mantor 


Shiels 


Gaillard 


Payne 


A\')nehestor 


Gar row 


Penniman 


\\'omeldorf 


Greenwood 


Pressler 





iiiliiKir-s^^^ ^_ 



r.i;« llintdred luijhircii 




Siiifuiatpr (Eluli 



Nuniej', J. W President 

Pate, R. McC J'ice-President 

Bonney, F. P Secretary ^ Treasurer 



Backus 
Balfour 
Barrow, F. P 
Boatwright 
Brooks, T. L. 
Butler, II. L. 
Calvert 
Causey, J. 
Cobb 
Curdts 
Davis, R. L. 
Edmond, R. 
Emmerson 
Foster, S. P. 
Cxatewood 
Gayle 

Goodman, P. 
Gray 



Great head 

Holliday 

Hubard 

Jariiier 

Jones, C. W. 

Jones, T.W. - 

Johnson, D. V. 

Johnson, A. 

Lowenburg 

Mason, S. 

Marshall, R. 

McCurdy 

Mitchell, H. 

Moore, J. P. 

Nash 

Pace 

Peed 

Pretlow 



Prince 

Puller 

Roberts, L. 

Sawyer 

Sniffen 

Southgate 

Sydnor, H. 

Syer 

Teasley 

Tyler 

Vaughn 

Vonschilling 

^'eaver 

Weisel 

Welton 

Whitfield 

Withers 

Woodward, J. 



■fm^^ 



Page Two Hundred Nineteen 




IGynrblntrri (Hhtb 



Craighill, D. 
Casev, W. M 


H. . . . 






. . . President 






r 


ice-President 


Campbell, A. 


M. . . . 




Scrrctcry 


tffTreasurer 


Acres 




Ecliiiumls. \V. 


Moses 




Buck 




Goode 


Pettyjohn 




Campbell, D. 




llariis 


Eobertson, D. 




Casey, E. 




Ivey 


Eobertson, W. 




Christian 




Kyle 


Stokes 




Cosl)y 




Maloney 


Winfree 




Costello 




Millncr 







y^ 



P,,,/,- T^:o I In, hire J Tiieiily 



•1 fllMir{:;| 
|'ljiyii_«.i|::| 




Alabama (Elub 

Benners, T Presiilent 

Hamilton, F 1' ice-President 

Smith, T. W Treasurer 

Tillman, S Secretary 



Adams, F. L. 

Adams, M. V. 

Beecher 

Cohoon 

Cook 

Crist 

Hassinger 

Kilmer 

Lavender 



Lowe 
Lyons - 
Manning- 
Patterson 
Porterfield 
Robertson, G. 
Robertson, T. 
Shackelford 
Smith, W. D. 



Turner 



-W: 



■m^: 



Paqe T-~i.ii Hundred T=izenty-itne 




Parrott, |. 




§.5 


i. m- 


ginia 


(Tlub 

President 


Crockett . 










lice-President 


Parrott, B. 










Secretary o Treasurer 




Parrott, J. 








Ruffin. J. 




[verliti 








Case 




Crockett 








Jac'lvson. J. C. 




Pendleton 


X. 






Davenpoi't 




PaiTott. B 








liell 




Anderson 








Caldwell 




Rhudy, R. 








Kdniondson 




Ri.T, H. 








Copenliaver 



lii^iMM^ 



Pofff r-'.:- ll„r,Jr,J T^LCty-lK^ 



flrl^:i:nrfin 




Eirbmnuii (Elub 



H. H. Munson President 

J. C. Hagan Vice-President 

D. T. Ingram Secretary ijf Treasurer 



Montague 


Jackson, S. 


Seott, R. C. 


Fairlamb 


Briggs, A. 


Wilson, B. 


Miller, P. 


Marshall, W. 


Franklin, A. 


Ingram, W. 


Stearns 


•Ryland 


Nelson 


Parker, W. 


Reynolds 


Campodonico 


Hawkins 


Wilmer 


Huft" 


Tinsley 


Stuart 


Grant 


Farrar 


Knapp 


Saunders, C. 


Reid 


Arrington, E 


Haskell 


Norman 


Cox 


Broekenbrough 


Hobson 


Hankins 


Harman 


Blankenship 


Horsely 


Gary 


Drinnard 


Diekerson 


Plowden 


Moncure 


Watson 


Eichardson 


Shervin 


Bond, A. Jr. 


Gwathmey 


Martin, R. 


Lvnch 


Powell 


Core 


Franklin, E. 


Archer 


Sydnor, G. 


Yarborough 


Midyette 


Glover 





^ 



ryCin 



Page TivO Hundred Tiienty-tin ee 




3Ini|n iiarshaU iSiijb irlmnl (£lub 

Stuart, W. D Praidtnt 

Wilmer, F. P I'lcc-Prendcnt 

Core, J. T Sccrttary 



Bi-iggs 

Rroekeiibroiigh 

Campodonic'o 

Diekersoii 

Drinnai'd 

Farrar 

Franlclin, A. 

Fi-ankliii, E. 

Craiit 

I [arniau 

Uolisou 

Huff 

Ingi-ain. D. 



Ingram, W. 

Knapp 

Lynch 

Martin. R. P. 

Montague 

Norman 

POAVOll 

Reid 

Reynolds 
Ryland 
SaundiTs 
Sydudi-. <;. W, 
Yarlidi'ough 



iiiiliiiteii^ 



P,l,jr T-:n llundrid Ti.rnty-fotir 




Nnrth (Earnlma (Elub 



Milton, W. H., Jr President 

Murill, R. S I'ke-President 

Ferguson, J. W., ]: Secretary Is Treasurer 



Hairstoii, R. 
Home. G. D. 
Taylor, R. W., Ji-. 
Whitted, T. B, 
Brooks, E. C, Ji\ 
Clarke, H. D. 
Ek, W. 



Foreman, J. 
MeCIamrock, J. R., Jr. 
Mason, J. W., Jr. 
Miller, H. L. 
Miller, FI. W. 
Page, F. M. 
Smith, G. A. 



■.•^^ 



Field, ir. H. 



■^;.^#5^,- 



imr>:-- 



Page Tivo Hundred Tt"r?ily-five 



-' V 




Derr\ berr\ , M. E., Jr President 

Wilson, ^V. \' J'iee-President 

Harwood Secretary o Treasurer 

Wilson, S. B. 
Lacy, C. 
Phflan 
Schmidt 
Derrvbervv, L. T. 



Payr Tiu, IluiiJrrJ T^ieiily- 



nOf- 





A. iH. A. (EUtb 

Backus President 

Estes, J 1 iee-President 

Norman Secretary iff Treasurer 

Leieeh. Campbell 

Greene, F. La Follette 

Nelson . Ivey 

Spindle Casey 

Shaekleford . Anderson 

Black Pettyjohn 

Mason Clarkson. J. 



i-ir^Srv:; 



/f^;^ 



Pa//c Tiio Hundred Tiventy-seven 




IKfiiturky (Ehtb 

Hoge, C. E Pnndent 

Phillips, J. rut-Prtsidtnt 

Waters, W. E Secretary Ig Treasurer 

Pliillilis. J. Stewart. R. 

IMiillips. T. Hendon. G. 

Wains. W.E. Roche 

hxys Williams, J. R. 

ISIackwell Barry 

lIc'Loney tloge 
Patterson 



P,u,i- T-i-.u lluiulrej T-iLer.ly-ei,,/,! 



»^ffiiia 




Unitistana Olhtb 

Hardy, G. W President 

Moss, C. M J'ice-President 

Gilbert, C Serretary o Treasurer 

Baker, L. H. ' Farwell 

Booth, W. H. Moore. W. F. 

Boozf Stevens 

Carsteiis Stubbs, F. P. 

Ewing White, \V. 

Foster, H. Fontanua 



Prt(7f T-zio Hundred T-zceniy-nine 



^-/ 



fc 



^ 

^^^ 



s^^^tlEm-^ 







p. (iroover President 

A. J. Orme / ice-President 

W. C Hopkins Secretary Is Treasurer 

Williams. E. Fargo 

Tic-henor Reynolds 

Chappell Nixon 

Mays Peeples 



i^^ffiiiiiiii»ii^ 



I'lUlf TxiH IlnnJrrJ Thirly 



f;^^- 
^ 



--S'R jl4i|;-^j j[ it I* 



i 




liasbtucitnn (Elub 

Roberts. W. T. S President 

Satterfield, F. S Ike-President 

Syme, S. A Secretary CT' Treasurer 

Alexander, A. Light, C. P. Jr. 

Atkinson, W.T. Lloyd, H. M. 

Baxter, J. M. Martin, L. R. 

Colonna, J. 0. McCulloeh, R. R. 

Cumming-. H. S. Monroe, W. D.. Jr. 

Davidson, R. P. D. Romeyn, C. A. 

Greene, J. F. Sannders, H. De B. 



y^- 



'im 



Pat/e Tko Hundred Thirty-one 




tt^iliii- 



Piujr 7-.;., I Inn J,,- J T lii,ly-t-.:n 




^^^ 



'nrfiTtr^- 



Page Two Hundred Thirty-three 



iiiiaiaiilii»©^ 



Iw 




^-^ k 



■^'^ 



(EnliUion (Ulub 

OFFICERS 

E. S. Jefferies President 

J. C Parrott Vice-President 



COMMITTEE 



B. M. Bacharach 
P. W. Berry 

C. E. Hoge 
J. C. Jordan 
-J. W. Nui-iu'v 



T. A. Slack 

H. W. Clarkson 

1-t. N. Greathead 

J. C. Leech 

J. K. E. Koliiiif on 



OFFICIAL CHAPEROXE COMMITTEE 
Mrs. E. W. Nichols (Chairman 



Mr,s. M. B. Corse 
Mrs. W. W. Jefferies 
JErs. R. T. Kerlin 



Miss Elizabeth (Irahani 
Mrs. J. H. Parrott 
Mrs. X. B. Tucker 



S!B;i 



Page Ti^o Hundred T/iirty-fi-Te 




i;:::::ii:ij&ii:ij:i:;;:. 



/',/,/'■ Tt"' IliiiulirJ T/nrty-i 



iFiual (iirnitan 



E. S. Jeffcries 
J. C. Panott 



Lcadci 

Assistant Lciulci 



:\[ARSHALLS 



Adams. J. 

Alvis 

Ari-itigtim, "W. 

Backus 

Bachai'acli 

Bai'ker 

Bciniers 

Bc'i-ry, F. 

Buiidy 

Burger 

Calvert 

Casey 

Chung 

Coniegys, E. 

Cox 

Ci'aighill 

Davis, T. 

Deri-yberry, M. 

DeShazo 

Fair! ami) 

Gaillard 



Gallman 
Gi-aham 
(Irreue. F. 
Groover 
llaii'ston. R. 
Hardy, F. 
Hardy, G. 
Hardy, W. 
Haskell 
Hawkins 
lieisi- 
Hei-ring 
Hoge 

Jaekson, M. 
Jones. W. 
.lordan. J. 
Kei-liii 
Jjavciidcr 
.Mallory 
.Marshall, R. 
Milton 
Monroe, E. 



Montague 

Montgomery 

Mnnson 

Nui-ncy 

Parkei-. W. 

Paxton 

I^)tts 

Roi)erts. L. 

Roberts. W. 

Sattertield 

Scott 

Slack 

Smith, R. 

Sydnor 

Turner, II. 

Wallace, C. 

Wallis, W. 

Wang 

Whitfield 

Williams, E. 

Winston 



;«r 



-r 



7„^ C%. ^^' 



Pa^e Tivo Hundred T/iirly-scvni 



-> 



v~^>^ 




^-Siiiitt^ 



I'a,/r Tiu, llinuhr.l T litrly-cuihl 



Jiual iall 



H. W. Clarkson 
R. N. Greathead 



Leader 

Assistant Leader 



Arrinston, R. 

Ashley 

Ay res 

Balfour 

Barrow 

Berry, II. 

Black well 

Boatwright 

Bond 

Bowles 

Bowman 

Briggs 

Broekenbrough 

Christian 

Cobb 

Cook 

Cosby 

Craig 

Crist 

Crockett 

Cumming 

Davidson 

Davis 

Dearing 

Dickerson 

Dickson 

Draper 

I>uff 

Dunseth . . 

Embrey 

Emerson 

Estis 

Evans 

Pain 

Foster 

Fuller 

Garrow 

Gilbert 

Glover 

Greene 

Gridley 

Haeaii 



Hamilton 

Harmon 

Harwood 

Home 

Ingram 

Ireys 

Johnson 

Jones, H. 

Jones. C. "\V. 

Jones. J. W. 

Jordan 

Kane 

King 

Knapp 

Lacy 

Laine 

Land 

Lauck 

Lee 

Llnthicum 

Lockey 

Lyons 

Mann 

Marshall 

ilason 

Jlears 

Merson 

Mlllner 

Monroe 

Moss 

Murrill 

McCuiston 

BlcCulloch 

McKellar 

McMillan 

Orme 

Overby 

Pate 

Paxton 

Payne 

Pendleton. .T. H. 

Pendleton. N. 



Phillips 

Powell 

Price 

Rathburn 

Reynolds 

Ribble 

Ripley 

Roche 

Robertson, D. 

Robertison. .1. 

Robinson. .1. K. 

Russel 

Sedwick 

Semans 

Smith. B. H. 

Smith. J. T. 

Smith, T. W. 

Smith. W. D. 

Stokes 

Strother 

Stuart 

S.vme 

Taylor 

Thompson 

Tichenor 

Tinsley 

Turley 

Tyler 

Vaughan 

Von Schilling 

AVashington 

Waters 

Watson 

Weaver 

Wessels 

Welton 

Wilmer 

Wilson, S. B. 

Wilson. W. T. 

Win free 

Wormeldorf 

Young 



)ii^'^' 



Page Tivi, Hundred Thiriy-nlne 



'-' ■<^' 



L m, J. i'yinl 



oil. rlrar thr umii. B. IH. 3. ia nut tnftay. 

fflr'rr hrrr tn mtn tliis gamr : 

(0nr tram mill bring uh famr. 

iln Alma iHatrr'a namr. 

jfnr thnugb thr iiiibs br againat its. mr'U nut rnrr. 

^iiu'U srr UB fight thr samr : 

AlmauB thr aamr ali) apirit anii mr'U triumph nnrr again. 

Anh tbuugh ftrfrat arrma rrrtain. ita thr aamr mith B. IH. 3.; 

®ur battlr rri( ia "5s'rnrr. Nmrr Sir." 

jFnr rohrn nur liur atarta In mrakrn. nur barka fail to gain. 

®ur rnba arr an rripplrb tn roin arrma in uain. 

Slljrn tljr rnrpa roota tl]r Inubrat; mr'U ijrt min tljr iiau. 

Ehr tram it mill rallji an& "jFight." "IFigljt." "iFiglft." "Sau." 

Wt'l\ gain tbrnugh thr linra anb mr'U rirrlr tljr rniiB. 

(01b Srb. HJhitr anb ^rllnm mill triumph again: 

Sl]r "liCriifirtB " mill fight rm anb nrorr aau bir. 

®l)at'e tlir ajiirit nfB. ii. 3. 

— B. Bnmrrinn '15 



S«itH 



P,l„f Tiin lluuJrrJ forty 



^ ■, / '^J 



FIRST CLASS 




Pafff Tivo HuriJred Forty-one 



v 




/'«,/,• T-.„ HuuJrrJ I-arly-Hai 




Pai/e T-1V0 HunJreJ Furly-thiee 



_> 




-M 



I'll,,, Till, IhinJrrJ Fnr/y-fi, 



:^ (i_i«f»»||'JlCil,|'lllillM;.l:! 



-I- 




^ 



rv. ^ 



Page r-xco Hundred Forty-five 




Pai/r Tiin lluuJrrJ Forly-six 







^ 



XK; 



-^cm: 



Paffe T-.:o Hundred Forty-seven 




Old Nick who lianRCtli oi 
Put us wise to the gauK-. 

Quick! let Finals conu-. 
Our term is done 

In V. M. I. its it would be in Smi: Sinsj 
Give us each our ci^ht hour's "hav 

And l'..r-ive us our "hones" 



TIIK KKVDET'S PKAVKH 

luaJuu^Hters. 



As we tor.mve those who soaked 'em to us, 

"Ship" us not for "running the block " 
But yirant us Xmas furlough. 

For thine is the "Approved" stamp. 
The demerit book and the "growley". 
Fven unto the nineteenth of June. 

.Amen. 
"E. J. 



■j^m>:. 



^iifil^^ 



Page Two lliiiij,,:! l-,.rty-n<ilil 



•s/ 



AMmuMiTior* 




Tmc IsoLlkTloK ^hV> 4t\et^\i'^ 



THE LAND OF T 
Oh I'll tell not a tale nf the frozen North 

Where men sell their lives for gold. 
Or sinj; not of women, wine, or love. 

Or wars and deeds of old. 
But I'll tell of the land of the Golden West, 

Which the "gini" riders \ised to haunt. 
Where you go in a health.v "Ke.vdet" 

But come out a s|ieclre. .nannt. 
Where the "Bull" presides in splendor 

Handing the "grav.v slips" round ; 
But up above the fair "West" is, 

And perils and trials abound. 
This castor oil queen dispenses 

Calomel, C. C.'s and Salts. 
She sa.vs we're forever ridinj;. 

And alwa.vs disparages our faults. 



HE GOLDEN WEST 

AVliere the.v see .vou smoke thru the ke.vhole, 

TaUe your food and tobacco away. 
Its a Hue, fine place to be from 

After a long, long stay. 

Take down a broken finger. 

"Salts will set it aright. 

Std)) in a while and see us. 

You can stay up till nine at night." 
For it's C. C.'s in the morning, 

Aspirin in between. 
Calomel at mid-day. 

But food is never seen. 
This the land of fear and terroi-. 

Where the Golden West doth dwell. 
And the horrors of that country 

Have an all end\iring spell. 

Wra. H. M., '20. 



ifisfi 



Page Tiin HunJnJ Fiirly- 



v 




HeiSiS, TR.00P H-2 , UOWER. 

SquaoSpm ^ OUT For. Mis rAo?.n>ns 

OF THRovJiKG THE BULL 




HERE WE HAVE 

SriMnSEST CASES u 

DOnbO - 0L06Y 

Wow THUT THIS 

MEAD WCIOHS 



SgPPoHTEO Bt HIS om fricno 
King cascaoe, HoRR\8LE. HORACE leads Tke 
confs A ntdRf CH»st mr» T«E 



MNiiI3llilnSr-^~^-% 



/*,(»,■ r-av, llunJr,-J Fifty 



'Vv 



Jtrst (ElasB ipltmiu^urips 



Alvis : 
Arrintrton : 
Backus : 
Bacharach : 
Barker : 
Benners : 

Berry : 
Bundy : 
Calvert : 
Casey : 
Chung : 
Comegys : 
Cox: 

CraiKhiU: 
Davis: 
Derryberry : 
De Shazo: 
Fairlamb: 
Gailliard: 



Groover : 
Hairston : 
Hardy. F. : 
Hardy. O. : 
Hardy. W. : 
Haskell : 
Hawkins : 
Heisig: 
Herring: 
Hoge: 
Jackson : 
Jefferies: 
Jones : 
Jordan : 
Kerlin : 
Lavender : 
Malloi'y: 
Marshall : 
Milton: 

MontaiJTue : 
Montgomery 

Munson : 



Parker : 

Parrott : 

Potts : 
Roberts, L. 
Roberts. W. 
Satterfield : 

Scott : 
Slack : 
Sydnor : 
Turner : 



Wang: 
Whitfield: 
Williams: 
Winston : 



Resembling "Relentless Rudolph" too closely. 

Allowing "Relentless" to cut his biscuits. 

Playing with fire, thereby getting singed. 

Repeatedly attempting to look intelligent. 

Gross trifling with young ladies' affections (third otfence). 

Attending drill when not required to do so. 

Breaking Ashburne's food receiving record, by partaking of three helpings of sinker type 

dessert. 
Having cave man instincts, and allowing rat to outdo his time. 
Not eating enough. 

Getting a 9.5 instead of the usual max. 

Allowing Montgomery and Turner to beat him in the race for dumbest man in school. 
Stetiping on pig tail while running to rev. 

Neglecting the Boy Scouts while as a Cadet. 

Doing work, thereby causing roommates to have heart failure. 

Allowing name to be put on register from Pamplin. 

Staying awake in church. 

Imitating Buffalo Bill at Cavalry, thereby not using chair in messhall for two weeks after. 

Having total disregard for local talent. 

Creating gross disorder at hops by dancing. 

Trying to act "Cityfied." 

Not being able to walk under Jackson Arch. 

Allowing Duke to lead him on nocturnal sequesters. 

iJeing taken for a mule at the Lexington Horse Show. 

Having two to marry on him inside of a year. 

Attempting to change from the Electrical Engineering to Arts on account of overwork. 

Allowing himself to be left waiting at the church. 

Realizing the greater Love and then refusing to allow others to dance with her at hops. 

Taking two baths in one week. 

Repeatedly falling for strange Calie while on athletic trips. 

Continually deserting horse at Cavalry Drill. 

Not using the usual stepladder when trying to mount. 

Appearing like Fatty Arhuckle in Coatee. 

Giving conclusive proof of Dai-win's Theory. 

Losing Class ring and being unable to find same. ' -, 

Same as Hardy. G. ■":-'■ 

Attempting to get biscuits that are already cooked. ...;••: 

Forgetting to fall off horse during drill, (first offence). '^ ■ '.' ' 

Plowing ground on riding Hall in abusive manner. ■■-. , .* :' t -' •' 

Having his hair combed during the hops. '-' " .■ /■ 

Not studying but three hours per night. 

Allowing himself to be bitten by a real dog. 

Voting for nationwide prohibition. 

Staying awake during class. 

Winning contest for Dumbest man in Barraclcs. 

Finding three different soul mates in six months. 

Staying at the Institute for five years due to love for the old walls. 

Falling for every thing that wears a skirt. 

Acting as fashionplate for local tailors. 

Cornering rubber market. 

Absent Midnight Insi>ection and reporting in Trunk room without authority. 

Making girls over-envious of pink cheeks. 

Staying in school one year too ~long. 

Wearing look of injured innocence at all times. 

Trying to look mannish, especially on Sunday rides. 

Having a slim chance with the women. 

Raising voice above a whisper. 

Forgetting to bring knitting to class. 

Imitating Niu'ney's style of dancing, thereby dangering lives of cadets at hops. 

Falling for the same girl Hen Hardy did. 

Writing one hundred and thirty pages in one letter. 

Giving away pictures indiscriminately. 

Having sixteen on correspondence list at one time, and using "F; 

Allowing himself to be caught in the presence of feminity. 

Not saying "Hullo" when greeting a friend. 

Riding the Gim, instead of his horse. 

Making intelligent remarks in Mechanics Class. 

U. S. C. W. A. P. at last hops, and allowing lady to say I. A. I 

Having curly hair without authority. 

Continued shimmying at hops, after repeated warnings. 



methods to obtain 



rv 



I'll J. Iz.u llunJj.J 1 ijtj one 



n:" 




17-S-- 



AdrtEO To T«e TeeTM ^ rwe£ TwEt PARRoTT 

eoES A - HUNTING 




My Gob! AMOTMtR, Ten Pov.«os I Hov. 

I Get That Weigh?- 



ffiniiiiiiKsi^i^ 



l>,i„e Till, llinulre.t Fiily-tico 



\ w 

■■J\/-J 



Ardent young Suitoi-: "I\ray T call I(i-)ii()i-i'oa\- evening- if you have notli- 
ing on?" 

She: "How dare you?" 

Heard ten years after graduation : 

Hoge : "Barker, why is it I see you in tlie Art C4allery so often?" 
Barker: "My wife has made nie eut out Burlesque Shows." 

Voices floating out of second stoop window: 

"Bretliei'cn, the Spirit mn\-etli nie in sundry plai-rs to 'kick it a liluo 

one.' " 

Second voice: "Yea verily, witness iiie also ISrothcr, A-men." 
Passing Slinistei': "A truly pious aggregation of young men." 



The secret of 'Caveman" Berry's marvelous propensity for making love 
has at la.st been discovered. While young, he was ill with scarlet fever and 
his temperature has never gone down. 



Old Mothei- Hubbard went to the cupboard, 

To try to quench hei' thirst, 
But when she got there the etipboard was bare, 

For Horace had been there first. 



At sixteen she believes anything, 

At twentv-fivc you have to show her a Blue Print. 



When qucstiomd by the Commandant alxiut his sIkx-s not being sliin'd 
" Avoirdu]>ois" lloge calmly answered that he liudn't seen his feet in t^o 
years. 

She lay in his arms and snuggled her head against his eheek- 



a rush of emotion surged thru her tenderly he caressed her and 

she closed her eyes in delight. 

' ' Poor Kitty, did I hurt you ? " 



Sub to Pai'i-ott after Taps: "Permission to be out of quarters Pari'ott?" 
Pariott : "Yes Sii-, Hunting Permit, Sir." 



Mother: "Did that young man kiss you last night?" 
Shy young daughter: "Now mother, do you suppose he got church 
leave to hear me sing?" 

Groover listening to church chimes while in a city on furlough: "I be- 
lieve that clock's ])laying a tune." 



Kcydet during Xmas hops: "May I kiss your pretty hand?" 

Young Lady: "It is easier to raise my veil than to take oft' my glove." 



Young man encountering mother after his first drink. "Son, oh Son! 
why did you do it ? " 

Older Brother in next room: "Brother, oh Brother! Whci'c did yon 
get it?" 



Paiic Tiio lltindrcd Fifly-three 



_> 



iliw i>ubs' (ipuart^rH 



P'irst of nil comes Pee Foot, 
Known ton as Majah sick. - ■ ." 
He hit the i)oys in physics 
And never missed a liek. 

We next have hard boiled Shady 
Of whom the i-ats do tell 
How in math and gymnastics 
Gave them pluperfect hell. 

Young Geese is quite a veteran 
A most efficient Sub. 
But will he be a INIajor? 
That gives him quite a rub. 

But don't forget Cap Cosine 
Of the fighting Q. M. D. 
He bosses Burke and Julius — 
That's quite a .job you see. 

Who is that cute "ee Captain? 
Well tis Doggie, on my life. 
He tried to vanq) a ealie. 
But she said "Wliei-i' is vour wife'. 



Here's Son. the bayonet fightei'. 
He makes them move so quick 
If a buck goes out he worlvs him 
Until his heart is sick. 

Don't laugh, tis only Alec 
A strutting through the place. 
He thinks himself so military 
He even shines his face. 

Ichy Belezza, the king of the Wops. 
Is what we call him here. 
Even the pawn brokers lock up 

their shops 
When they hear that he is near. 

Last l)ut not least comes out Jim 

Ted. 
The whitest of them all. 
Who ti'eats you like a man, if you 
Into his clutches fall. 

My tale is done, each one you see, 
1 will not tell my name. 
I'lH' if 1 did the tours I'd walk 
Would make me blush with shame. 

^Bolsheviki. 



^iltil^llffiii^ 



IltinJrcd Fijly-innr 




SHINE Ti^ose SHOES f 
SHAVE 'AT PUSS f 
GETTa 'AIRCUTf 

Shine 'AT visor t 
GErXr UNIFORM pwsrf 
SOCK UP At gut ! 

RAISE ATCOLLi^Rt 
CHANCE 'OSE cuff's! 

STAND UP 
/LISTER!! 





^^J^ 



IT5 Thai same oneojy feelini 




^"^ 



Page Tii;o Hundred Fifty-five 




Patjc Tiio Hundicd Fifty-six 




^^^ 



Page Ti':o Hundred Fifty-sei'en 



Tiffany & Co. 

Jewelry Silverware Stationery 
WXtches and Clocks 



Noted for Quality 



Pl'RCHASES MAYBE MADE BYMaIL 



FifthAvemte &37 -Street 
New York 



ji> 



Page r-.c'o IhniJr.J Filly-ri;//il 



^ISSIISSIIS:! 



;SIIE:SIIS:SIIS:SIIS 



Sllg:SIIS:SII5:SllS:SIISSIISSI 



gSllS:SIIS:SI^ 



THE NAIL 
AND THE HAMMER 

A Double-] ointed Fable with a Singie Moral 

THERE was once a ten-penny nail lying on an obscure shelf. It was a good 
little nail, as nails go — straight, shiny, and sharp- pointed All it lacked to 
make it a useful member of society w^as application. For all the good it was doing 
humanity, it might just as well have been rusting away under the East River. 
Then one day there came a hammer and drove the nail sharply into a wall. 
There it remains to this day, living a career of usefulness and service. 

There is a business house with a vital story to tell the world. It's a good story 
and they know it, but they don't know how on earth they can apply it. Then 
along comes the Big Hammer of Advertising, and — bang! the idea is driven 
home with a smash! 

What is the moral? 

Just this — your business may in some way differ from all other business. 
Your product may possess some quabty that all others lack. There may be a 
nail on your shelf that ought to be utilized. 

You may not realize it is there — it may take an outsider to find it. An Eskimo 
would be amazed at our factory whistles, while to us they are but a necessary 
evil. 

But even we, as advertising specialists, cannot hit the nail on the head, unless 
you take the time to explain your problems and find out what service we are 
capable of rendering you. 

In other words, take your advertising seriously. Don't rush into our office 
with some copy and say " Shoot it through tomorrow." You get speed this way, 
but not Service. 

And Service is the handle of the hammer. Without it the hammer is useless. 

For nearly half a century we have directed our energies toward perfectmg 
our service. We believe that today we are better organized than ever before 
to provide our clients with the necessities of effective advertising. 



ALBERT FRANK & COMPANY 

ADVERTISING 

Frank James Rascovar. President Harry Rascovar, Vice-PresideTit & TreasuTer 

HEADQUARTERS; 14 STONE ST., NEW YORK 



» 






m 



fniie Ti:n HunJrcJ Fifty 



V 




l_l • • • f I I'J ioi, I'j ]l II IIJ l| j. 



I'll,,,- Tizn lliunln-.l SIx/y 



''At Home" 
Since 1830 



IT is almost ninety years since 
the Boston Evening Transcript 
made its first home run, and it 
has been running home ever since. 

The Transcript is a business- 
man's paper; it frequents the finan- 
cial districts; it is a fixed institu- 
tion in educational circles; but first 
of all and most lasting of all it is a 
HOME newspaper. 

Under the family lamp it is 
much more than a newspaper. It 
is a good magazine. This is partic- 
ularly true of the Wednesday and 
Saturday issues. 

If you are one of the few good 
advertisers who are not "At Home" 
with the Transcript, look through its 
pages and see what good company 
you are missing. 




Page Tii-i> HuiiJied Sixty-one 



Benjamin Franklin ;;Deny self for selPs sake." __ 

-' ... I'-CQ 1 here are no gains without pains. 

said in J /jo: "Save to have, as many a Httle makes a mickle." 

iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ' ; 

IN 1920 THE 

Franklin National Bank 

Savs : Listen to Franklin : 
'•Thrift is power — Save and have'' 



Bank in the Nation's Capital 

Commercial facilities unexcelled 

Liberal interest allowed on time deposits 

Collections of banks and business houses solicited 

Located in the heart of the business section of Washington 

on famous Pennsylvania Avenue 

We render the most efficient service possible 

Charges One-tenth of One Per Cent 



JOHN B. COCHRAN, President 

COL. R. S. TURK, Vice-President 

THOMAS P. HICKMAN, Vice-President & Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

WM. H. H. ALLEN MILTON HOPFENNL\IER 

JOHN B. COCHRAN CHARLES P. LIGHT 

R. E. DUVALL P- J NEE 

W. H. GARDNER P. J. OH.\NLON 

S. McCOMAS HAWKEN RANKIN J. A. TODD 

E. F. HALL R. S. TURK 

THOMAS P. HICKMAN J. G. STEPHENSON 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii 

On Peiiii^xlvania Avenue at lenth Street, North-\^ est 

W ASHIiNGTON. D. C. 



I\u/,- 7--.t«, IliniJrrJ S,.\ty-t-.in 



Virginia Bridge ''>'''''' 



CO. 



ROANOKE. VIRGINIA 



Steel Structures 



of all classes 



Bridges - Buildings - Etc. 



WORKS 

Roanoke, Va. Memphis, Tenn. 

OFFICES 

Roanoke Memphis Atlanta 
New Orleans Dallas 



Page Two Hundred Sixty-three 



Equipped with many years' experience for making 
photographs of all sorts, desirable for illustrating college 
annuals. Best obtainable artists, workmanship and the 
capacity for prompt and unequalled service. 




PHOTOGRAPHERS 

"The 1920 Bomb" 



Address requests for information to our 
Executive offices. 1546 Broadway, N. Y.C. 



STUDIOS 

also convenientl\' located at 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 
PRINCETON, N. J. 
CORNWALL. N. Y. 
SOUTH HADLEY, MASS. 
ITHACA, N. Y. 



HANOVER, N. H. 
LAFAYETTE, IND. 
POUGHKEEPSIE. N. Y. 
WEST POINT. N. Y. 
ANN ARBOR, MICH. 



I'a,jr r-,:« llunJr.d Sixly-f,,,,, 



Henry Vogt Machine Co. 



Manufacturers of 



ICE and REFRIGERATING 
MACHINERY 

WATER TUBE BOILERS 

RETURN TUBULAR BOILERS 

DROP FORGED VALVES 
and FITTINGS 

"SECTIONAL" ROCKING and 
DUMPING GRATES 

"SECTIONAL" STEEL CASINGS 
for BOILERS 

OIL REFINERY EQUIPMENT 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Page Tiuo HunJteJ Sixty- five 



French Line 

"COMPAGNIE GENERALE TRANSATLANTIQUE" 
WEEKLY DEPARTURES 

NEW YORK to HAVRE 
BORDEAUX and PARIS 




Quadruple and Twin-Screw Ste 



'FRANCE" 
'LAFAYETTE" 
'LA TOURAINE" 
'CHICAGO" 



"LA SAVOIE" 
"ROCHAMBEAU" 
"LA LORRAINE" 
"NIAGARA" 



DIRECT ROUTE TO THE CONTINENT 



FOR ALL INFORMATION APPLY 



COMPANIES OFFICE, 19 State St., New York 



Agencies in All Principal Citie 



■;,/,■ /"-.iv, IlunJnJ Sixty- 





Honor Roll Tablets, Fraternity) 


Emblems, 


Rings, Seals, CKarmes, Plaques, Medals, etc. 


of the better kind 




THE GIFT BOOK 






illustrating and pricing 






Graduation and other 






Gifts mailed upon 






request. 




1 Ke Gift Book 


PHILADELPHIA 



Page T-xi-o Hundred Sixly-seven 




This small YORK REFRIGERATING SYSTEM in a Columbia, Mo., market 
saa-d ils ou;ier $289.00 in on year's operation. 



MECHANICAL REFRIGERATION 

is now recognized as the best method tor preserving perishable food 
stuffs in a fresh condition. Its advantages and benefits are more keenly 
appreciated by the Food Marketing Industrv in these times of 
scarcity and high prices than ever before — and the installations of 
York Plants are constantly increasing in number. 

A COMPLETE SERVICE 
There is a YORK MACHINE to meet every 
practical condition of Mechanical Refrigeration 

\ORK Service Stations — located in all principal cities — carrv a com- 
plete line of supplies for the Refrigerating and Ice-Making Plant 



// interested inMechanical Refrigeration, :vrite us 



YORK MjANUFAGTURING CO 



ICK-M AKINC; AM) RKFRICiERATINC; MACHINERY. EXCLISIVKLY 
YORK, PENNSYLVAM.V 




I'a.l, T-...I llunJr.J 



My-ru,t„ 



Vulcanite 

PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

REPUTATION UNRIVALED 



Philadelphia 



New York 



Boston 




Henry V. Allien & Co. 

Makers of 

MILITARY EQUIPMENT 

" ^hal Have Stood the Test Since 

1815" 



Now at our New Building 

227 Lexington Ave. Near 34th St. 
NEW YORK CITY 



WILLS-CAMP COMPANY 

Specialties in High-Class 

Young Men's Suits and Furnishings 



Daylight Corner 
9th and Main Sts. 



LYNCHBURG, VA. 



Page Two Hundred Sixty-nine 




The Reward of Merit 

In the world of commerce and industry, merit is measured by 
service rendered. And the reward of exceptional merit is high 
place and public recognition. 

International Motor Trucks have won the reward of merit. 
Today thev occupv an enviable place in the realm of business — 
a place achieved through consistent, low-cost hauling even where 
conditions are most trying. 

Thousands of practical, close-figuring business men have proved 
to their full satisfaction that they used good judgement when 
they bought International Motor Trucks. They have found that 
their expectations of service from these ttLicks and after-sale ser- 
vice from us have been more than fulfilled. 

The reward of merit — high place and public recognition — is 
adding to International Motor Truck sales every day. 



There is a style of body and size of truck 
to meet every hauling requirenient 



International Harvester Company 

OF America 



ric, ihi„j,,j 



Virginia- Western Power Co. 
Steam and Hydro- Electric Power 

General Offices: 

Clifton Forge, Virginia 

"Do It Electrically" 

Low Power Rates ofEered for manufacturers locating in 
the towns in which we operate 



Clifton Forge, Va. 
Natural Bridge, Va. 
White Sulphur, VV. Va. 
Ronceverte, W. Va. 
Hinton, VV. Va. 



OPERATIONS: 

Lewisburg, W. Va. 
Alderson, \V. Va. 
Eagle Rock, Va. 
Buchanan, Va. 
Covington, Va. 



Glasgow, Va. 
Buena Vista, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 



FOX'S 
Barber Shop 

J. E. PuUen, Manager 



A High Class 
Barber Shop 



Prompt Attention Given 
to Cadets 



W. W. Timberlake 
& Co. 

Wholesale 

CONFECTIONS 

AND 

FRUITS 

Phone 7SO 

Staunton, :: Virginia 



Pay,' TiLo HunJnd Srvfn/y^ntie 




Page Tii'o Hundred Sever:ly-li 



Superior Supply Co. 

Supplies :: Machinery 

Mine, Mill, Mechanical and Electrical 

Agents 
Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing Co. 

Send Us Your Orders 



BLUEFIELD, 



W. VA. 



Stop at McCoys for all 
things I good to eat 

CANDIES, FRUITS 

and all kinds of 
Canned Goods Our Specialty 

We have an up-to-date stock 
and would be glad to serve you 

WE DELIVER ANYWHERE AT 
ANY TIME 



McCoy's Stores 

Main and Washington St. 
Phone 147 

Nelson Street 

Phone 327 

LEXINGTON, VA. 



R. L HESS & BRO. 

Jewelers and 
Opticians 

Next Dour to Lyric 



Plates Beveled and 
Polished 



Parcel Post Orders Attended to 
at once 



Paije Tivo Hundred Si-venly-thri 



CHARLOTTESVILLE 

WOOLEN MILLS 

Charlottesville, Virginia 



Manufacturers of 



High Grade 

Uniform Cloths 

in Olive Drabs, Sky and Dark Blue 
Shades, for Army, Navy and other 
Uniform Purposes. 



AND 



The Largest (^^J^l CmiiQ ^"^ ^ 
Assortment ^^0(161 KjYayS Quali 



and Best 
ity 



Including those used at the U. S. Military 
Academy at West Point and other leading 
Military Schools of the country. 

Prescribed and used in Uniforms for Cadets, 
Virginia Military Institute 



y-.:v, IliinJi.J S,-vrnlv-1"lir 



Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Co. 

Is the Largest Insurance Company in the world. 

It has pohcies suited to people at all insurable ages and in 

all circumstances. 

Its premiums are low. and its contracts appeal to business 

men. 

In 1919, it paid a policy claim every thirty seconds ot each 

business day ot eight hours, averaging 3505.9.1 a minute ot 

each business dav. 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. 

No. 1 Madison Avenue New York City 



E. A. WRIGHT COMPANY 

Broad and Huntington Sts. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Engravers 

Printers 

Stationers 



Commencement Invitations 

Dance Programs Class Jewelry Calling Cards 

Menus Stationery Leather Souvenirs 

Wedding Stationery 



Fai/i- r-tco Uundreii Seventy-hi 



P'S^-^^ 




HAMMERSMITH- 
KORTMEYER CO. 

ENGRAVERS - PRINTERS 

Get our special price on your Complete Annual 



Largest Publishers of High Quality Complete 
Colleo;e Annuals in the United States 



MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 




I'a//,- r«v) llinuinj S,-vn,ly-six 



on a bag stands for the finest Portland Cement that the experience 
of over a quarter of a century can produce. It certifies that the 
cement was tested hourly, while bemg made, by chemists of real 
authority and that — in the grade of raw materials, exact propor- 
tionmg, thorough burnmg and fine grmding the cement represents 

"The Hi^h- Water Mark of Quality" 

Every bag of ALPHA, the guaranteed Portland Cement, is zvarranled 
to fully meet the U. S. Government standard for strength and all 
other recognized tests. 

Send for the practical 96-page hand-book. ALPHA CEMENT- 
HOW TO USE IT, which gives valuable building information on 
scores of concrete improvements and concrete work generallv. 

ALPHA PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

General Offices; Easton, Pa. 
Sales Offices: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Savannah, Pittsburgh 




Page T'iio Hundred Se-venty-seven 




NEW YORK, BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA, 
BALTIMORE, MONTREAL, PORTLAND, ME. 



QUEENSTOWN, LIVERPOOL, PLYMOUTH, CHER- 
BOURG, HAVRE, LONDON, SOUTHAMPTON, 
BRISTOL, LONDONDERRY, GLASGOW, ANTWERP, 
HAMBURG, MEDITERRANEAN, LEVANT, 
ROTTERDAM, DANZIG. 



AQUITANIA 
MAURETANIA 
IMPERATOR 
KAISERIN AUGUSTE 

VICTORIA 
CARMANIA 
CARONIA 
ROYAL GEORGE 
SAXONIA 
PANNONIA 
COLUMBIA 
ITALIA 





I'lUir Tivn llutidrcil Scfciily-riijht 



^ORGANIZED 1871 = 



Life Insurance Company of Virginia 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

Oldest -- Largest -- Strongest 

Southern Life Insurance Company 

Issues the most liberal forms of Ordinary Policies from $1,000.00 

to $50,000.00, with premiums payable annually, semi-annually 

or quarterly, and Industrial Policies from $12.50 to 

$1,000.00, with premiums payable weekly. 

Is paying its Policyholders OVER $1,750,000-00 Annually. 

Total Payments to Policyholders since organization 

OVER $23,500,000.00. 

ASSETS OVER - - $20,500,000.00 

JOHN G. WALKER, President 



I. H. &b B. H. Weinberg 

JEWELERS 




Exclusive Designs for 

Class Rings and Pins 



665 Fifth Avenue 



New York 



Page Tiuo Hundred Seventy-nine 




THIS TRADE MARK 
represents the best there is in 

BEAUTIFUL BALLADS 

SECULAR SACRliD SOLOS— DUETS-TRIOS QUARTETS 



SECULAR 




SPRINGS A LOVABLE LADYE 
STARLIGHT LOVE 


BAMBtK.) BAB-i 




SUNRISE AND YOU 


CW 1 M> 111 \H ME CALLIN' 




THERE'S A LONG. LONG TRAIL 


l.\kul l\l^ 




TOO RA LOO RA LOO RAL— THAI' 


1)1 \R 1 I 1 1 1 1 BO'l' OF MINE 




AN IRISH LULLABY 


l\l\l\(, HKI\i;S REST AND 


YOU 


VALUES 


HUM \ II Ml iiM,^- KXFW 




WHEN IRISH EYES ARE SMILING 


1 HID Mil k\n\\ 




WHERE THE RIVER SHANNON 


IN 1 III i; \k|)| V "K .\n" HKAKI 


FLOWS 


Kl.sS Ml \(. \l\ 




WHO KNOWS = 


!,l 1 ILK Bl 1 Oh HtAVKN 






LIZA DKAR 




S.'VCREI) 


MAGIC OK MIUR EYES. THE 






MOTHER NL^CHREE 




ANGEL OK LIGHT. LEAD ON 


M^ l)K\R 




CLOSER STILL WI 1 H THEE 


M> IRISH SONG OF SONGS 




EVER AT REST 


Nn- OWN INIIED STATES 




GOD SHALL WIPE AWA^' ALL 


MV RIOXR-I" FOR YOU 




TEARS 


MY U II 1) IRISH ROSE 




I COME TO THEE 


\i- \Li Ml 1 w 1 c i\t: song 




I DO BELIEVE 


\o \nu 1 HI 1 \OURS 




IT WAS FOR ME 


Rl-Ii,\ \ 1 h i\ 




LITTLE WHILE. A 


rim; ol 1 , ^U|■ KL BELLS OF 




M\- DAIS ARE IN HIS HANDS 


I'EACK 




OH. 1 ORI), RIMI \IBKR ME 


SECRET OK HOME, SWKK 1 HOMK. 


MIINI OH llol -, 1 IGHT 


THE 




M \ ool . |)i.U\, 1 UK 


SMILIN' THROUGH 




1 1 \l II \H lo I'R \N 


SONGS OK DAWN AND 1 WILIGHL 


1 Hh Ml K\ 1 \OKK 


SORTER MISS -.OU 




IHOU ARK M\ l.;ol) 



of the publishe 



M. WITMARK & SONS 

14 WITMARK BUILDING, NEW YORK 

SOLO (ifl CENTS DUET 7.S CENTS OCTAVO l.=i CENTS EAC;H. NET 



If you arc- interestL-d in Beautiful Songs (Sacred or Seculai 
Catalog, containing complete Poems and Thematic quotati- 
of tile most beautiful numbers in the well known 



WITMARK 



BLACK 

SKNl) Sr\MP 



WHITE 

•osr \GK 



SERIES 



r.TC«, IhniJnJ liiiihly 



N. C Pine 



thc-rc-fort be had in any quantity and at an\- 
time hv addressing vour /^^.«^_^ 
orders to " . . CaHip 



DAILY CAPACITY 

Planing Mills . . 400,000 feet Saw Mills . . 600,000 feet 

MILLS 
Franklin, Va. Arringdale, Va. Wallace, N. C. Marion, S. C- 

CAMP MANUFACTURING CO. 

FRANKLIN, VA. 

EASTERN SALES OFFICES ' .' 

NEW YORK, 1214 Flat Iron Building 

GEO. W. JONES, Mgr., Phone 982 Gramercy 

PHILADELPHIA, Real Estate Trust Bldg. 

E. D. WOOD, Manager 
PITTSBURGH, Oliver Building, GEORGE L. CAMP, Manager 



UNIFORMS 



Sigmund Eisner 
Company 

RED BANK, N. J. 



New York Salesrooms — 105 
Fifth Avenue. 



SPALDING EQUIPMENT FOR 
EVERY ATHLETIC SPORT 




BASE BALL, TENNIS, GOLF, 
BASKETBALL, FOOTBALL, ETC. 




Page Tii;o Hundred E'ujhly-o 



Holland- America Line 

Regular Twin-Screw Passenger Service 
Between 

NEW YORK AND ROTTERDAM 

Via Plymouth and Boulogne-sur-Mer 




TRIPPLE-SCREW S. S. STATENDAM 

30,000 Tons ReeisJer; 45,000 Tons Displacement (buildinsi. 

Twin-Screw Steamer ROTTERDAM S^J^ST:": D,7pia«mc 
Twin-Screw Steamer NEW AMSTERDAM ^I:?^S T:": Du'i.t'c",, 

The embodiment of Comfort. Luxury and Safety for Travelers to Europe. 



Twin-Scr. 

12,531 Tons Re 



Steamer NOORDAM 

22.070 Tons Displacemei 



-Screw Steamer RYNDAM 

s Reg. ; 22.070 Tons Displaceme 



HOLLAND-AMERICA LINE 

24 STATE STREET, NEW YORK 

CHICAGO, ILL. . . . 138 N. La Salle Sti 

BOSTON, MASS 89 State Sti 

ST. LOUIS, MO., Cor. Locust and Uth Str^ 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 30 Montgomery St 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN., 121 So. Third Stre. 
HAVANA, CUBA 



t 


NEW ORLEANS, LA., 


. 1210 Hibcrnia Bid 


t 


SEATTLE, WASH.. . 


. . 115 Cherry Sire 


,s 


WINNIPEG, CAN., . 


. . . 663 Main Stre 




TORONTO, CAN., . 


. 24 Toronto Stre 


t MONTREAL, CAN.. . 


286 St. James Stre 


278 Apartado 





/'-.;« IliniJrrJ l:i,ility-l-. 



Lake Charles Rice 
Milling Compan}^ 



Rice and Rice 
Products in 
Car Lots only 




LAKE CHARLES, LOUISIANA 



Page Tivo Hundred F.iylity-three 



ESTABLISHED ISIS 




Telephone Murray Hill SSOO 

Uniforms for Officers of the Army, Navy and 
Reserve Forces 

Civilian Clothes Ready-made and to order tor Men and 
Boys. Cjarments tor Outdoor Sports. 

travellers" Outfittings, Imported Haberdashery, tiats and Shoes. 

Se)id for Illustrated Catalogue 



BOSTON 

Tremontcor. Boylston 



NEWPORT 

220 Beluevue Avenue 



Gold Medal 
CRAYONS 

FOR EVERY USE 

School 
Home 
Studio 

— Made by — 



BINNEY& SMITH CO. 

81-83 Fulton St. NewYorlc 



Harris, Woodson Co. 

Inc. 

Manufacturing and Jobbing 

Confectioners 

Distributors for 

Lowney's Chocolate 
Bonbons 

701-703-705 Commerce Street 
LYNCHBURG. VA. 

Main Office and Factory 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Branch Office 
RICHMOND.VA. NORFOLK, VA. 



P(Ujr T-,;-, llundrrJ Eiijlily-jnur 





Soda Fountain 
Drinks 

Ice Cream 

Sandwiches 

have a great appeal for the 
hungry Cadet 

McCRUM'S 



Page T-zuo Hundred Eightyfive 




"The ACME LINE of 

Road Building Machinery" 

RAPIDLY BECOMING THE RECOGNIZED STANDARD 

Steel Frame Rock Crushers, Elevators, Screens, 

Bins, Road Rollers (steam and gasoline) 

and Contractors' Equipment 

Acme Stone, Gravel, Sand and Coal Unloading and Elevating Plants, 
Wagons, Dump Carts, Pulverizsrs and Concrete Mixers 



^ 


.^^ 


m 


^^r 


%i ^^2 






^R 


^m^'^'^'M 


w^ 



The Acme Road Machinery Company 

FRANKFORT, N. Y. 

Writ? tod^y for copy of our general Catalogue No. 9 
NOTE We have a few openings for first-class, live Agencies. Write us. 



I'aijr Tii» IhlnJirJ Eujltly- 



Not a 
Matter of Sentiment 
But a Business Proposition 



"Long Wear" Shoes are quality 
throughout — quahty in material 
and workmanship, quality in fit 
and comfort, quality in style and 
service. Compare these shoes with 
any other shoes on the market and 
your good judgment will induce 
youto try them. Trythemonce and 
you will neverwear anyother make. 

"Long Wear" Shoes Wear Longer 

Manufactured by 

Craddock -Terry Co. 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 





Pa^e T-.LO Hundred Eighty- 



Carr3^on! 



We do not want to distract you from read- 
ing all the good things you will find in 
"The Bomb." Just give us a minute and 
then — Carry on 

SAUER'S 

Pure Flavoring Extracts 

have been the standard of the American 
housewife for 32 years. It is the most 
widely known and largest selling brand in 
the United States. Sauer has a high 
standard of quality that has won 

Seventeen Highest Awards 

at the greatest Expositions in both Europe 
and America for 

Purity, Strength and Fine Flavor 

Some day, somewhere each of you will 
have occasion to use flavoring extracts, 
and we ask that you remember Sauer's — 
made in Old Virginia in the Old Virginia 
way— CARRY ON! 

The C. F. Sauer Company 

RICHMOND [VIRGINIA 

• — Since 1887 flavoring the food of millions. 



I'lui,- Tku H,i„.lr,:l l.iiihty^ 



Meet your friends at the 

LEXINGTON POOL COMPANY'S 



Newest and Nicest 



Pool and Billiard Parlors 



Prompt and Courteous Attention 

We have a SODA FOUNTAIN in connection with 
our parlors, and SOLICIT the CADETS TRADE 



COBB'S 
Pressing Shop 

Opposite Post-Office 

m 

Cleaning, Pressing and 
Repairing 

■ ■ m 

CALL US 

When you want your 

citizen's clothes put 

in shape 

REASONABLE! PRICES 



Phone 194 

Lexington, Va. 



V. M. L 
JEWELRY 




L. D. Hamric & Son 

Watchmakers 

Jewelers 

Engravers 



Lexington 



Virginia 



Pun,- T-.: IhiN.lnJ l:uility-nine 



Lyric Theatre 



DIRECTION OF 



I. WEINBERG 



SPECIAL 
FEATURES 



SATURDAY 
MATINEE 



Weinberg's 

Everything 
cTVIusical 



Victrolas 
Edison Recreation 



COME IN 
Hear the latest music 



Movies 

AT 

Jackson Memorial Hall 
Virginia Military Institute 

EVERY 
SATURDAY NIGHT 

BENEFIT OF 

MONOGRAM CLUB 

Direction of Management 
LYRIC THEATRE 



l',i,/, r-..,, llun.lnJ Sni.ly 



Patton's 



CLOTHIERS AND 
MEN'S FURNISHERS 



// .1/ K O F 



Hart, Schaffner cSc Marx 

,; A It 

Kuppenheimer ("lothcs 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS AND 
JOHNSON & MURPHY SHOES 



Cadets' Patronaee Solicited 



LEXINGTON, 



VIRGINIA 



Page Tivo Hundred Ninety-on 



AMERICAN INGOT IRON 

Resists Rust 




MANUFACTURED BY 

THE AMERICAN ROLLING MILL CO. 

IVIIDDLETOWN, OHIO 



/'„'„' 7'-.C" Ihni.li,:! Sinrly 



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1. m. 3. 


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Post lExrljang^ 


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Pai/e Ti!;o Hundred Sineiy-lhree 



Texaco Asphalt 

There's a Grade for Every Purpose 



TEXACO No. 130 Road Asphalt TFAACO >o. 54 Paving Ce- 

— for medium traffic Asphalt iiient — for Sheet Asphalt 

Macadam Pavement. Paving. 

TEXACO No. 96 Paving Ce- TEXACO No. 34 Paving Ce- 
ment — for heavy traffic As- ment — for heavy traffic Sheet 
phalt Macadam Pavement. Asphalt Pavement. 

TEXACO No. 6.5 Paving Ce- TEXACO No. 58 Paving Filler 

ment — for Asphaltic Concrete — for Wood, Granite, or Vitri- 

Pavement. fied Block Pavement. 



TEXACO SERVICE 

Every public official, contractor, or 
persons interested in good roads may get 
expert advice from our chemists and expe- 
rienced highway engineers free of charge. 
Ask for this SERVICE. 



THE TEXAS COMPANY 

ASPHALT SALES DEPARTMENT 

No. 17 Battery Place, 

NEW YORK CITY 



Paiir r-.:-, IliniJn.l \nirly-1,nn 



VIRGINIA 
Military Institute 



Eighty-First Year 



ONE of the few institutions, 
if not the only one, in the 
United States, combining the 
rigid military system of the 
United States Military Academy 
with Collegiate and Technical 
courses of instruction. 



E. W. NICHOLS, Superintendent 



^^ 



LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Page Tivo liinidrej A'inety-five 



Smith & Welton 

Norfolk's Greatest Fashion Center 

The One Store of Norfolk Catering to the 

^ ants of the Whole Family for 

Every Dav of the \ear with 

The Newest and Best of Everythino 

To accomplish anything in Hfe we 
must all have "A Purpose," 
whether it be good, bad or indifferent. 
The gap between purpose and achieve- 
ment can only be bridged over by 
conscientious endeavor such en- 
deavor as this store expends daily in 
its effort to serve you with the utmost 
efficiency and dispatch. 

Our purpose is "Service," and to that 
end we leave no stone unturned. 

Your demands, no matter how heavy, 
shall not swerve this store from this 
purpose. 

We would consider it a privilege to 
serve you 

IN PERSON OR BY MAIL 



Smith & Welton 

NORFOLK. : : : : MRGLNIA 



300-306 
Granbv Street 



•/-«■« Ilini.lirJ M:irly. 




REDUCED 

RATES 



SECOND FLOOR 
LAUNDRY BUILDING 



Patjc Tivo Hundred Siiiety-seveji 



Wayland' 



SERVICE 

ana s drug store 



Superior Fountain Service 

Norris and Kfunnall}) Candies 




Our Aim 

is to Serve Tou 



Your Patron- 
age is Appreciated 



P,uic ■/"■liv, Ihindr.J .\i,n-ly-ri,//,l 



The Chas. H. Elliott Company 

THE LARGEST COLLEGE ENGRAVING HOUSE IN THE WORLD 

Wedaing Invitations 

Calling Cards 

Commencement In\'itations, Class Day Programs 

Class Pins and Rings 

Dance Programs and Invitationss 

Menus 

Leatner Dance Cases and Co-Oers 

Fraternity and Class Inserts for Annuals 

Fraternity and Class Stationery) 

School Catalogs and Illustrations 

Sex'enteentn Street ana Lenign A\'enue 
Pniladelphia 



sxp£/ir 

J£W£L£fi i 
SMGKAYER. ' 



JEWELER. I 

Opticiak 



ebuan 



SOCCESSOR, .;:;. 
TO ' 




GIA5S£S 
MADE TO Fir 

YOUR £r£5 
ACCV/IAT£LY 



Lexington, 
Ya 



New Theatre 

Showing 

Pictures of Quality 



Page T-z^o Hundred hinety-nine 



We Manufacture 



Corrugated Shipping 
Cases 



Of Every Description 



GET OUR PRICES 



B. W. WILSON, President 
H. T. ADAiMS, SecV-Treas. 

C. W. THROCKMORTON, Jr., Manager 



Richmond Corrugated Paper Co. 

RICHMOND, VA. 



Piu/f Three IlunJreJ 




Page Three Huii'^fed One 



Gorrell's 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 

'^Tlw Store with a Conscience" 
Evervthiiif: foi' the 

CADETS 
WKitman's V. M. I. Seal Candies 

V. M. I. Seal Stationery 
A Live Wire between our Store and 



V. M. I. 



PHONE 4> 



l'u</, Tin,-,- llunJrcd T^^-o 







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IHE ^ iduate oi Uday enters a 
urld electrical 
C athered from the distant waterfall 
cr generated by the steam turbm 
electric power is transmitted t 
the busiest city or the smallcbc 
country place. 

Through the co-ordination of inventive genius 
with engineering and manufacturing resources, 
the General Electric Company has fostered and 
developed to a high state of perfection these 
and numerous other applications. 
And so electricity, scarcely olderthan the grad- 
uate of today, appears in a practical, well de- 
veloped service on every hand. 
RecogTiize it3 power, study its applications to 
your life's work, and utilize it to the utmost 
for*^hPbrn fit of II m nKn 1 




;rE?n*7'^ ' 



General Office 
Schenectady: KY 



©twtc 

Sales Offices in 

a 1 lirge cities 95-246F 



Page Three Hundred Three 




THESE BE ^\Y JEWELS' 



Pa,j<- Threi- lluiulrrJ Fniir