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Full text of "The Bontecou genealogy : a record of the descendants of Pierre Bontecou, a Huguenot refugee from France, .."

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THE BONTECOU GENEALOGY, 



A RECORD 



THE DESCENDANTS 



Pierre Bontecou. 



A HUGUENOT REFUGEE FROM FRANCE, 



IN THE LINES OF HIS SONS. 



John E. Morris. 



HARTFORD, CONN.: 
Press of The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company. 

1885. 



THE LIBRARY 

aniQHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 
PROVO, UTAH 



INTRODUCTION". 



This work was begun early in the winter of 1882-3, 
and occupied about two years. During this period over 
twelve hundred letters were written and sent, many books 
and records examined, and all known sources of informa- 
tion thoroughly exhausted for data concerning this family. 
The undertaking has reached such a degree of success 
that but few names are missing from the record, and the 
utmost but unavailing diligence has been exerted to obtain 
some trace of these.' Since early in 1884, however, no 
changes have been noted except those voluntarily furnished 
to the compiler. 

' It is not known that any have failed of record here, except the 
possible descendants of David Bontecou (104), and William Henry 
Bontecou (130). These may, in part, be accounted for by the follow- 
ing, whom the compiler has been unable to find a place for: 

"Bontecou , Public house, 66 Lispenard.st. (name refused)" — 

New York City Directory, 1828-9. 

"Charles Bontecou, son of Daniel and Catharine Bontecou, born 
March 6, 1851." — New Haven, Conn., Toicn Records. 

The name of a Charles Bontecou was given the compiler as a resident 
of Caro, Tuscola County, Mich., but a search there failed to reveal 
any trace of him. 

Thomas R. Trowbridge, Jr., of New Haven, in a paper read before 
the New Haven Colony Historical Society, and published in the third 
volume of their papers entitled History of the Ancient Maritime Inter- 
ests of New Haven, mentions " Eliakim Bonticou, an aged mariner, 
with a face reminding one of the beak of a Roman galley." The 
compiler has never elsewhere met with this name in his researches, and 
concludes that Mr. Trowbridge intended to refer to Captain Eliakim 
Benham (See No. 39 in this genealogy), who flourished at the time of 
the incident in which the name occurs; viz., the celebration of peace, 
in 1814, at the close of the war with Great Britain. 

A John Francis Bonticou resided in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1841-5. 



4 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

The work originated in the desire of the compiler to 
trace his lineal descent on the maternal side. Nothing like 
a genealogy was at first contemplated ; but, the discovery 
of each fact developing a desire for further knowledge, 
the work continued to grow until its present proportions 
were reached. 

Pierre Bontecou, the emigrant, had three sons, of two of 
whom we possess some degree of knowledge. The line of 
Daniel, the elder of these, became early extinct. From the 
other, Timothy, most of those appearing in these pages 
have descended ; and it has been thought best to make this 
a true genealogy of his descendants, rather than the one- 
sided paterlinealogy that is commonly presented. It has 
been estimated that the proportion of descendants in the 
female branches of the average New England family, 
passing through seven generations, is as sixty-four to one 
in the male branches. The amount of labor required to 
search out and record the former being in the same pro- 
portion, or greater, most genealogists are deterred from 
the attempt to record them; and this large proportion, 
having by vaQTQ custom lost their right to the name, though 
their blood is as thick and kinship as great, are thus barred 
out and treated as aliens. 

Lest the compiler be charged with the errors and defi- 
ciencies which must necessarily exist in a work of this 
character, lie asks the reader to remember that he is not 
the author, and is dependent for his information upon 
others ; if therefore he has been furnished with names 
and dates written in a careless or illegible manner, uo 

He was a native of France, and came to America wlien fourteen years 
old. He was not a descendant of Pierre. 

The name of "Paul Bontecou, le jeune," a resident of the Isle of 
Ke, is earl}' recorded in the Archives Nntionnles at Paris, without further 
comment. Is is quite probable that he was a fyrother of Pierre. 

The above note contains all mention found of the name Bontecou, 
not having a place in the record. 



BONTECOU FAMILY. 5 

amount of diligent study will amount to a guarantee that 
tlie errors existing in the original manuscript are not per- 
petuated in these pages. 

So far as possible, the ordinary, every-day events in 
the lives of those mentioned herein have been put down ; 
not that in themselves they possess particular interest 
(for in the lives of most people no startling or extraordi- 
nary events occur), but because there is no reason to 
doubt that as large a degree of interest towards them 
will be excited in the minds of those that come after 
us, as moves us in contemplating the deeds and condi- 
tions of our forefathers, which we shall never cease to 
regret were not more carefully recorded and preserved. 

It will be apparent that no effort has been made to ren- 
der this a work of literary pretensions ; the compiler has 
simply aimed to secure a record of facts. In stating them 
the language of others has been freely appropriated, de- 
rived both from manuscript and printed page. His thanks 
are due to all who have so generously furnished material 
for this genealogy, and who have by a kindly interest 
encouraged him in his work. The cordiality and good-will 
manifested by all with whom it has been his good fortune 
to come in contact, either in person or by correspondence, 
have served to cheer his labor, and borne no unimportant 
part as a means to its completion. 

Wiiile acknowledging his indebtedness to all, it will not 
be improper to mention the names of Rev. Charles W. 
Baird, D. D., of Rye, N. Y., and Rev. A. V. Wittmeyer of 
New York City, to both of whom he is under great obliga- 
tions for information furnished, and from whose labors in 
research he has reaped a much-appreciated benefit. 

With these introductory remarks, and without apology 
for the shortcomings of the work, which of very necessity 
are numerous, this volume is sent fortli in the hope that 
amongst its readers it may find some share of acceptance. 



BONTECOU. 



The Family. — Its Name and Early History. 

The family of Bontecoii, while not possessing the ac- 
knowledged antiquity of some, is still known to be respect- 
ably ancient. I regret that I have been unable to follow 
the line continuously back to its first known ancestor ; but 
failing this, the record is commenced with Pierre^ the 
refugee to America, as the earliest member to whom the 
lineage of the family can be traced. 

The name is of Dutch or Flemish origin, and is undoubt- 
edly derived from a symbolic representation of a brindled 
or spotted cow, used by some remote ancestor as his busi- 
ness or house sign.' Proof of this assumption is offered in 
the following extract from Rose's Biograpliical Dictionary 
(Vol. IV. p. 428) ; and while the individual alluded to is not 
known to have borne any connection with the family now 
extant in this country, it is but a fair assumption that the 
probability of a similar derivation of the name is the case 
in our family, antedating the one referred to here : " Bon- 
tekoe (Cornelius Van), a physician," the son of a burgher 
of Alcmaer, whose name was (Johan) Gerard Decker, 
but who obtained the name of Bontekoe from having ap- 
pended to his house the sign of a cow of many colors." 

' Arthur's Dictionary of Family Names (New York, 1857), derives the 
name from " Bonte, goodness, strength, fruitfulness, and cul (pron. kv), 
the bottom behind: denoting, figuratively, the humor or turn of mind." 
Tills definition is ratlier a forced translation than the probable soared 
of tlie family name. 

^ " He was born in 1G47, and studied medicine at the University of 
Leyden. Iluviug taken his degree he visited the Hague, Amsterdam, 



BONTECOU FAMILY, 7 

The derivation of the name is further illustrated. Not 
far from the village of New Paltz, Ulster County, N. Y., 
is an insignificant settlement or hamlet called Bontecou 
Mountain. The name naturally suggests the proprietor- 
ship, at some time, of the surrounding land by some one of 
the Bontecou family; but investigation has revealed the 
fact that Bontecou was in former years a Dutch tavern, 
called Buntekau (pronounced Bontecoo), from its sign, 
which represented a brindled cow. 

The change which occurred in its orthography in later 
years, after the removal of the family to France, was a 
natural one, and expressed in its French form the same 
idea as originally conveyed. 

During the two centuries that the name has been extant 
in America, the pronunciation of its terminal syllable has 
become anglicized to the sound of cue, while the mode of 
spelling it remains unchanged, with but few unimportant 
exceptions, chief of which is the substitution of the letter 
i for e in the second syllable. In this work I have adhered 

and Hamburg. Frederic William, Elector of Brandenburg, named 
him physician to the court; and he repaired to Berlin, where he died 
Feb. 13, 1685, from a fall which fractured his skull. The Elector 
honored his memory by a pompous funeral. He was most zealous in 
recommending the use of tea to neutralize acidity, to which he at- 
tributed all fevers; in short, he regarded this beverage as a universal 
panacea. His enthusiasm on this subject is quite ludicrous, for he 
went so far as to endeavor to prove that both the physical and moral 
condition of man would be improved by the use of tea, as in its subtle 
elements and principles he conceived it to possess properties nearly 
allied to those of the animal spirits. He proposed the drinking of not 
less than 100 or 200 cups in the day ; and he equally recommended the 
use of the pipe, which, according to his doctrine, ought to be continu- 
ously used during the twenty-four hours. These and other singular 
opinions entertained by him render his name of no celebrity in the 
annals of medical science, but rather present him as an example of 
grave error arising from speculative doctrines, to be avoided by all who 
desire to exercise their profession for the benefit of mankind." He 
was the author of a number of books, which were printed at Amsterdam 
in 1688. 



8 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

throughout to tlie orthography as expressed in the signa- 
ture of the earliest American ancestor of the family. 

For the gratification of those who may be interested in 
heraldry I will remark that the " coat of arms " of the 
Bontekoe family is thus described in Rietstap's Armorial 
General : " Bontekoe. — De sinople, au cheval arrete 
d'argent," — a white, or silver horse, standing, on a green 
ground. Whether or not this family is entitled to the use 
of this arms I am unable to say. I know of no instance 
of its adoption. 

The member of the family of whom we possess the 
earliest knowledge is Guilliame Isbrand Bontekoe, a 
Dutch navigator who lived in the early part of the seven- 
teenth century. 

In a volume containing a collection of voyages, by 
Thevenot, translated into French from the original Dutch, 
published in Amsterdam, 1681, the principal article is 
entitled Journal ou description d^un voyage aux Indea 
Orientals commence en 1618, et accompli en 1825, a brief 
resum6 of which is as follows: 

William Isbrand Bontekoe, a Dutch navigator, lived in 
the first part of the seventeenth century. In 1618 he 
was captain of the " Nouvelle Hoorn," a ship of 1,100 
tons and a crew of 206 men, and set sail for the East 
Indies. After touching at the then uninhabited island 
of Mascaruque, and at Madagascar, he was upon the point 
of arriving at Batavia, when a fire broke out in his vessel. 
While making efforts to extinguish it, he was deserted 
by sixty-six of his men, who escaped from the ship in a 
shallop and a small skiff. Being unable to subdue the 
flames, he remained upon the vessel until, the fire reach- 
ing the magazine, the ship was thrown into the air and 
destroyed. Bontekoe, in falling, had the good fortune to 
grasp a spar, which supported him in the water until he 
was picked up by the shallop, whicli was fortunately near 



BONTECOU FAMILY. V 

at hand. By his bravery and knowledge of navigation 
this frail bark was brought safely to Sumatra after a peril- 
ous voyage of fourteen days, and at a moment when the 
crew were giving way to despair. At this point Bontekoe 
and his men endeavored to disembark, but were repulsed 
by the natives and compelled to make the weary voyage 
back to Bata via, where they fortunately found a Dutch 
fleet. 

At another time, commanding a ship of thirty-two guns, 
Bontekoe took part in the expedition in which Cornelis 
with eight vessels ravaged the coast of China. 

The original source of the foregoing accounts is from 
the pen of Bontekoe himself. These facts have been 
utilized by Alexandre Dumas in a tale entitled Bontekoe^ 
being the first in his volume Les Dramas de la Mer. 
Unfortunately no record is known to exist relating to this 
man's descendants, but it was probably one of his sons 
who crossed the border and settled in France. 

The family in France were Protestant, and undoubtedly 
endured the privations and suffering imposed upon the 
Huguenots by the Romish Church, both before and sub- 
sequent to the revocation of the Edict of Nantes.' " By 

'"The revocation of the Edict of Nantes was signed by Louis 
XIV. of France, Oct. 18, 1685, in the castle of Nantes, which was 
built in the year 938. The edict was the outcome of the troubles 
between the Catholic and Protestant factions in France, which resulted 
in the assassination of Henry III., on the 2d of August, 1559, by 
Jacques Clement, a Dominican monk. On his death Henry IV. 
ascended the throne. He was considered a heretic and an apostate, 
but became a Catholic on July 25, 1593. He put an end to the reli- 
gious struggles in his dominion by signing and publishing the Edict 
of Nantes on the 13th of April, 1598. In the preamble of this act the 
King recognizes that God is adored and prayed to by all his subjects, 
if not in the same form, at least with the same intention, so that his king- 
dom will forever merit and preserve the glorious title of Most Christian. 
The edict was declared perpetual and irrevocable, as being the princi- 
pal foundation of union and tranquillity of the state. It accorded in 
brief the following; Full liberty of conscience in spiritual jurisdic- 



10 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

this act of revocation and the consequent fliglit of those 
embracing ' the Religion ' from her borders, France was 
deprived of a large population of her most intelligent and 
useful citizens, and the adjoining states of Holland and 
Switzerland, as well as the neighboring islands of Great 
Britain, were correspondingly enriched by the influx of 
this best blood of France. America, too, became the 
gainer by a large immigration to her shores of this ster- 
ling people, skilled in the mechanic arts." 

Among the refugees from France at this time were 
Pierre Bontecou and his family ; tarrying for a time in 
England, they arrived in America in 1689.' 

" During the year 1685 there was a large addition of 
French Protestants to the population (of New York). 
By the year 1695 they had increased to nearly two hun- 
dred families, and were among the most influential of the 
city. At first they worshiped in a small building on 
Marketfield Street; then a more commodious chapel was 
built upon Pine Street, — ' L'Eglise du Saint Esprit ' 
(The Church of the Holy Ghost). It was built of stone, 
70 by 50 feet in size, and there was attached to it a bury- 
ing-ground. They worshiped here for one hundred and 
thirty years." {Smiles's Huguenots.') In this graveyard 

tion, the public exercise of religion in all places where it was estab- 
lished in 1597 and in the faubourgs of towns, admission of Protest- 
ants to public offices, of their children to schools, of their sick to 
hospitals, of their poor to a share of the charities, and various other 
liberties. Henry IV., however, had to sacrifice his life for the signing 
of this edict, for he was assassinated by Ravaillac on the 14th of May, 
1610. He was succeeded by Louis XHI., through whose reign the 
condition of Protestants became worse; and finally, in the reign of his 
successor, Louis XIV., on the 18th of October, 1685, a revocation of the 
edict was signed, which put an end to the exercise of Protestant wor- 
ship and compelled all those not Catholics to flee to other countries." 
1 This is the advent j^ear of the name in America, notwithstanding that 
Washington Irmng, in his Knickerbockers History of Neio York, uses it 
in connection with events occurring many years earlier. (Book VI., 
Chapter VIII.) 



BONTECOU FAMILY. 11 

the early Bontccous were buried, and their remains were 
undisturbed until 1831, when the advancing tide of com- 
mercial prosperity demanded their resting-place for less 
sacred purposes; so the august remains of all there in- 
terred were reverently removed to the churchyard of " St. 
Mark's in the Bowery," where for over fifty years they 
have lain undisturbed. In the records of this ancient 
Church of Saint Esprit is found nearly all that can be 
known of the early history of the Bontecou family in 
America. 



FIRST GENERATION. 



Explanation of Arrangement. — The figures on the left of the 
page number the descendants consecutively. The figures found in the 
right-hand margin refer totlie oldest child of the person against whose 
name they are placed, the record of whom (with the other children of 
the same family) will be found in the next succeeding generation ; 
excej)t that those to the right of the head line of each family refer 
back to the place of the head of the family in the consecutive order. 

Pierre Bontecoii, merchant, his wife (Marguerite 
Collinot), and five children, were in 1684 fugitives from 
the Isle of R^ to " La Caroline," as we are informed by 
records in the ArcJiives Rationales at Paris. The govern- 
ment of Louis XIV., after placing all possible hindrances 
in the way of his escaping subjects, and condemning to 
the galleys those who were arrested in their flight, still 
kept its eye upon those whose efforts had terminated in 
success, and their names and destinations became a matter 
of national record, to which we are indebted for this 
earliest knowledge of our fugitive ancestor. Although 
his departure from France was made from the Isle of R^, 
his previous residence was in La Rochelle, hard by, — a 
city of large commercial importance, and a stronghold of 
Protestantism. In this city his son Daniel was born, and 
doubtless his other children. 

The flight of this family to " La Caroline " (a general 
term used to designate the continent of North America) 
was by way of England, and it was not until 1689 that 
they appeared in New York. The date of their advent 
there is practically fixed by the following extract from the 
manuscript of M. du Simitiere, now in the possession of 



FIRST GENERATION. 13 

the Philadelphia Library Company: "New York, May 31, 
1769. I have been informed by Mr. Buvelot, who had it 
from old M'^^ Bontecou's own mouth, that she came in 
New York from France during the time that Leisler had 
the Government,' that she and her family were well received 
by him." 

It is unfortunate for our purpose that so little relating 
to our ancestor can be found upon record. In the absence 
of this we can only conjecture what his history in this 
new land could have been. That the competence which 
tradition relates the family enjoyed in their native country, 
and which his position as a merchant would imply, was 
lacking for a time in their new home, seems to be proven 
by the fact that for a few years a pension was paid by the 
French Church to " Madame Bondecoux," as evidenced by 
the ancient records of that church. The material attain- 
able for the construction of the subsequent history of 
Pierre Bontecou is so meagre that I have thought best to 
present without comment a transcript'^ of such records 

'Jacob Leisler, a German by birth, was, in 1683, appointed one of 
the judges of the Court of Admiralty in New York. Lieut. -Gov. 
Francis Nicholson was in command of the colony when Leisler, sup- 
ported by the mass of the lower orders of the inhabitants, seized the 
fort and the public funds the last of May, 1689, and assuming the gov- 
ernorship, retained it by force until March, 1691, when, upon the arrival 
from England of Governor Sloughter bearing the commission of King 
William, he was arrested, imprisoned, tried for " treason and murder," 
condemned to death, and executed May 16, 1691. 

* '1'ranslation of Extracts from the Register of the FRENcn 
Church in New York. 
To-day, July 24, 1690, was baptized in this church, Marie, daughter 
of Pierre and Marguerite Bontecour; born on the 21st of this month, 
and presented for holy baptism by Daniel Poutrhau and Marie Per- 
dricau. 

D. PoUTREAtT. 

Peiret, Minister. Marie Perdriatt. 

To-day, Julj-^ 24, 1690, was baptized Rachel, daughter of Pierre and 



14 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

containing mention of his name as I have been able to 
find, and leave the imagination of the reader to construct 
such account of his career as seems to him warranted by 

Marguerite Bontecour; born on the 21st of this month, and presented 
for holy baptism by Andre Paillet and Judiq Piau. 

Andre Paillet. 
Peiret, Minister. Judhit Pl\ud. 

To-day, Sunday, July 2, 1693, after the morning service, was bap- 
tized in this church, by Mr. Peiret, minister, Thimotee, son of Pierre 
and Marguerite Bontecoux ; born on the 17th of June last, and presented 
for holy baptism by Thimotee Archambaud and Elizabeth Hestier. 

Thimothee Archambaud. 
Peiret, Minister. Elizabeth Gourdon. 

To-day, Sunday, May 7, 1699, after the evening service, was bap- 
tized in this church, by Mr. Peiret, minister, Jeanne Marie Audar, 
daughter of Daniel Audar and of Marthe Jaufrey; born on the 30th of 
last April, and presented for holy baptism by Mr. Pierre Bontecoux 
and Jeanne Audar. 

Peiret, Minister. 

To-day, Sunday, July 16, 1699, after evening prayer, was solemnly 
celebrated, by Mr. Peiret, minister, the marriage of Mr. Estienne Per- 
driau and Miss Marguerite Bontecoux, after the publishment of their 
banns on three different Sundays. 

Pierre Bontecou. Estienne Perdriau. 

Marguerite Collinot. Marguerite Bontecou. 

Sarra Bontecou. Elizabeth Hastier. 

H. JouRDAiN. Marie Perdriau. 

Abraham Gouneau. P. Jouneau. 

A. BONNIN. 

Peiret, Minister. 

To-day, Wednesday, January 17, xlfft> after morning prayer, was 
presented for holy baptism, Jeanne Ester, daughter of Samuel Bourdet 
and of Judith Piaud; born on the 29th day of last December, baptized 
by Mr. Peiret, minister, and presented by Pierre Bontecou and Marie 
Ester Charron. 

Peiret, Minister. 

To-day, Sunday, January 19, 1701, after the evening service, was bap- 
tized in this church, by Mr. Peiret, our minister, Marguerite Perdrieau, 
daughter of Estienne (Perdreau) and Marguerite Bontecou; born on 
Tuesday, the 14th of the present month, at nine o'clock in the morning. 



FIRST GENERATION. 15 

tlie few facts recorded, I think it may be safely assumed 
that he was a man of some prominence among his country- 
men and in the church. It will be noticed that no date 

and presented for holy baptism by Pierre Bontecou and Elizabeth 
Perdrieau, widow of the late Jean Hastier. 

P. Bontecou. 
Peiret, Minister. Elizabeth Hastier. 

To-day, Friday, September 1st, 1704, died Mr. Pierre Peiret, minister 
of this church, towards nine o'clock in the morning. 

On the second of September, Mr. Peiret was buried in the public 
cemetery of this city. 

Today, Sunday, September 10th, after the evening service, at the 
request of the Consistory, the heads of families remained and unani- 
mously resolved to pay the widow of Mr. Peiret, minister, besides the 
current quarter, which will be due on the next festival of St. Michael, 
one whole year of the salary which this church paid him. 

BoNGRAND. Jean Barberie, Elder. 

Daniel Gaillard. Jean David, Elder. 

JosDE David. Auguste Jay, Elder. 

Vincent Fillow. Elias Neau, Elder. 

Elte Pelletreau. P. Montels. 

Jean Perlier. Nicholas Jamain. 

Jean Le Chevalier. Estienne De Lancey. 

Denis Richer. Andr^: Laurau. 

Jean Fajet. Augustus Grasset. 

Jean Lafont. F. Vincent. 

Jean Cazalz. Andre Foucaut. 

J. Garreau. p. Bontecou. 

Thomas Bayeux. D. Jaudin. 

Elias Boudinot. Loumain. 

Ben.tamin Dhariette. Pierre Morin. 

Jean Mayon. A. Bonnin. 

Andrew Stuckey. Rene Rezeau. 

Abraham Giraud. Paul Droilhet, Elder. 

Isaac Garnier. Daniel Menard. 

To-day, Sunday, September 10th, 1704, the heads of families, being as- 
.sembled with the Consistory, agreed to write by the first regular mail to 
Mr. Laborie, in order to ask him whether he is willing to come and preach 
for us and to administer the sacraments in our present circumstances. 

Bongrand. Jean Barberie, Elder. 

Daniel Gaillard. Jean David, Elder. 



16 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

of death, either of Pierre or his wife, has been found. We 
only know that the former was alive in 1724. The church- 
yard of the old Huguenot Church in Pine Street — L'Eglise 

Vincent Fillow. Paul Droilhet, Elder. 

Elie Pelletreau. Auguste Jay, Elder. 

Jean Perlier. Elias Neau, Elde.r. 

Jean Le Chevalier. P. Montels. 

Denis RicnER. Nicholas Jamain. 

Jean Fajet. Estienne De Lancey. 

Jean Lapont. Andre Laurau. 

Jean Cazalz. F. Vincent. 

J. Garreau. Augustus Grasser. 

Thomas Bayeux. Andre Foucaut. 

Elias Boudinot. P. Bontecou. 

Benjamin Dhariette. D. Jaudin. 

Jean Maynon. Loumain. 

Isaac Garnier. Pierre Morin. 

Daniel Menard. A. Bonnin. 

Andrew Stuckey. Josue David. 
Abraham Girad. 

To-day, October 22, 1712, after the mornintj service, Mr. Louis Rou 
baptized Ester Anclierim, bora on the 2nd of this month, daughter of 
Zacharie Ancherim and Anna Naudin, and presented for holy bap- 
tism by Pierre Bontecou and Ester Le Conte. 

Pierre Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Minister. Esther Le Conte. 

To-day, Wednesday, February 18, 1713, after morning prayer, Mr. 
Louis Rou baptized Daniel Bontecou, born on the 14th of this month, 
son of Daniel Bontecou and Marie Machet, and presented for holy bap- 
tism by Pierre Bontecou aijd Jeanne Peltreau. 

Daniel Bontecou. 
Pierre Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Min. Jeanne Pelletaux. 

At New York, this 27th day of December, 1724. To-day, Sunday, 
after evening prayer, Mr. Moulinars baptized Elizabeth Hastier, born 
on the 13th of this month, daughter of Mr. Jean Hastier and Elizabeth 
his wife, and presented for holy baptism by Mr. Pierre Bontecou and 
Mrs. Pregente Carre. 

Jean Hastier. 
P. Bontecou. 
J. J. Moulinars, Pastor. Pregente CARiii. 



FIRST GENERATION, 17 

du Saint Esprit — undoubtedly received their remains; 
and upon its destruction in 1831, to make way for the 
U. S. Sub-Treasury building, they were removed with all 

Extract prom tue Documentary History of New York, Vol. 
3, p. 260, Quarto Edition. 
Morris Newinhuysen of the City of Neic York, Marriner, being sworn 
on the Holy Evangelists, saith, that being Master of the Sloop Constant 
Abigail, whereof John Van Bnigh was Capt., he was taken in the said 
sloop the 9th of November, 1706, about fifty Leagues of Scilly, by a 
French Privateer. That after he was taken, one John Thompson, 
Boatswain of the Sloop, & one of the French-men belonging to the 
Privateer, were together in the Cabbin of the Sloop, opening the Let- 
ters, in hopes to find a piece of Money, for he could not read. That 
the said Thompson reading the Superscriptions of some of the Letters, 
found some directed for France, whereupon, so soon as the said 
French-men went out of the Cabbin, the said Thompson called this 
Deponent to come into the Cabbin to him, where there was a Candle 
burning. That Thompson told this Deponent, there was some Letters 
directed for France, which he desired the Deponent to read, because, 
perhaps, they might find some Bills of Exchange in them ; whereupon 
the Deponent looking on the Letters he found some of them were not 
signed, and said, he believed there was Roguery in them, because they 
were not signed. That amongst those Letters there was one pretty 
near three sides, wherein was something mentioned, according to the 
best of this Deponents understanding, to this effect, That if the 
French Squadron that took Nevis, had come hither, they would have 
met with less Resistance. That the Letter being writ in French, and 
the Deponent understanding very little of that Language, he could not 
make out the whole sence of the Letter. That this Deponent told 
Thompson what he understood of the Letter, and said he believed there 
was more to the like effect, but Thompson telling him the Frenchmen 
were coming into the Cabbin, the said Thompson threw the Letters 
over board for fear there might be something in them that might be 
prejudicial to New- York. That the said Letter was directed to Bochell, 
but does not remember to whom. That the writing of the said Letter 
was like the handwriting of Capt. Benjamin Faneuil, which this De- 
ponent has several times seen, before he saw the said Letter, but can- 
not say that he wrote it. That this Deponent likewise saw at the same 
time several other Letters directed to France, which seemed by the 
character to be writ by several persons, two of which said Letters were 
signed by Piere Bontecou, but that he read neither of the said Letters 
signed by the said Bontecou. This Deponent further saith, That by 
the said Capt van Brugh's direction, he lookt over the Letters sent 
3 



18 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

others there interred to a vault in St. Mark's churchyard, 
Stuyvesant Place and Second Avenue, where they con- 
tinue to repose. 

from this place, on board the said Sloop, for England, and put them 
in to a Bag, and the Bag into the said van Brugh's chest, but that he 
did not then perceive any Letters directed to France. — That this De- 
ponent, about a day or two after he saw the said van Brughen in 
France, he acquainted him with what he had discovered in the afore- 
said letter. And further this Deponent saith not. 

M. VAN NiEWENHUYSEN. 

Sworn before a Committee of the Council, tlie 25th of February, 1707. 

Geo. Clarke. 

New York, April 19, 1708. 
The afore-written is a true Copy of the Original in my Office. 

Geo. Clarke. 



SECOND GENERATIOK 



'children of pierre and marguerite (collinot) 1 
bontecou. 

I. Marguerite Boiitecoii, born in France; emi- 
grated to America with her parents, reaching New York 
in 1689. "She married, July 16, 1699, Stephen Per- 
driau, mariner, freeman of the city of New York. Their 
children were : 

'Marguerite, born Jan. 14, 1701. 

* Stephen, born March 4, 1703. 

' It is not at all certain that tbese are recorded in the order of their 
birth. 

* To-day, Sunday, July 16, 1699, after evening pra3'er, was solemnly 
celebrated by Mr. Peiret, minister, the marriage of Mr. Estienne Per- 
driau and Miss Marguerite Boutecoux, after the publishment of their 
banns on three different Sundays. 

Pierre Bonticou. Estienne Perdriau. 

Marguerite Collinot. Marguerite Bontecou. 

Sarra Bontecou. Elizabeth Hastier. 

H. JouRDAiN. Marie Perdriau. 

Abraham Gouneau. P. Jouneau. 

A. BONNIN. 

Peirit, Minister. — French Church Records, New York. 

^To-day, Sunday, Jan. 19, 1701, after the evening service, was bap- 
tized in this church, by Mr. Peiret, our minister. Marguerite Perdriau. 
daughter of Estienne (Perdriau) and Marguerite Bontecou ; born on 
Tuesday, the 14th of the present month, at nine o'clock in the morn- 
ing, and presented for Holy Baptism by Pierre Bontecou and Elizabeth 
Perdriau, widow of the late John Hastier. 

P. Bontecou. 

Peiret, Minister. Elizabeth Hastier. 

— French Church Records, Nero York. 

* To-day, March 10, 1703, after service, was baptized Estienne Per- 
driau, son of Estienne Perdriau and of Marguerite Bontecou, presented 



20 BONTECOU FAMILY, 

'HosEA, born Jan. 27, 1705. 
I have found no record of deaths in this family. It is 
my purpose to include the descendants of this marriage, 
should any be found, in a subsequent volume. 

II. Peter Bontecou, possibly one of the five children 
who fled from the Isle of Rd with their parents in 1684. 
The only mention of him I have been able to find is in 
Valentine's History of New York, p. 398, where "Peter 
Bontecou" is included among the schoolmasters in New 
York in 1702. 

III. Sara Bontecou, born in France; reached New 
York with her parents in 1689. Her name appears in 
the register of the French Church in New York, as a wit- 
ness at the marriage of her sister Marguerite, July 16, 
1699; as sponsor for Daniel Audard, son of Daniel Aud- 
ard and Martha Joffray, Jan. 17, 1703; and as sponsor for 
Hosea Ferdriau, son of her sister Marguerite, Feb. 4, 1705. 
' She married, Oct. 19, 1709, Alexander Resseguie of Nor- 
walk. Conn. Their children were : 

Alexander, born Aug. 27, 1710 ; married, Feb. 
16, 1737-8, Thankful Belden. 

for Holy Baptism by Daniel Bontecou and Marie Bontecou. He was 
born on March 4th, and baptized by Mr. Peiret, minister. 

Daniel Bontecou. 
Peiret, Minister. Marie Maton. 

— French Church Records, New York. 

' To-day, Sunday, February 4, 1705, was baptized Ozee, son of Es- 
tienne Perdriau and of Marguerite Bontecou his wife, by Mr. Laboric; 
born on the 27th of last January, at eight o'clock in the morning; and 
had for sponsors, Aman Bonnin and Sara Bontecou. 

Stephen Perdriau. 
A. Bonnin. 
J. Laborie, M. Sarra Bontecou. 

— French Church Records, New York. 

' Mr. Alexander Resseguie took to wife Mrs. Sarah Bontecou, ye 
daughter of Mr. Peter Bontecou of New York, Oct. 19, 1709.— iVb?-- 
walk. Conn. , Town Records. 



SECOND GENERATION. 21 

Peter, born Dec. 19, 1711 ; probably died un- 
married. 
James, born Nov. 6, 1713; died in tbe French 

and Indian War. 
Abraham, born July 27, 1715; married Jane 
. He left a large line of descend- 
ants. 
Isaac, born May 24, 1717. 
Jacob, born Aug. 14, 1719 ; married Mary Cur- 
tis of Stratford, Conn. He died Dec. 
27, 1801. 
Sarah, born July 12, 1721; died May 25, 1753. 
Sara Bontecou died in May, 1757. Her husband died 
in October, 1752, leaving an estate valued at £8,784. The 
compiler has secured a large amount of data pertaining to 
their descendants, which it is his purpose to publish in a 
subsequent volume. 

IV. Daniel Bontecou, born in La Rochelle, France, 10 
in 1681 ; emigrated with his parents to America in 1689. 
He became a merchant, and was an elder in the French 
Church in New York ; also elected Treasurer of the same 
in January, 1751, which office he resigned ' in November, 
1754. 

• We have received from Mr. Daniel Bontecou the sum of nine hun- 
dred and seventy-five pounds, eight shillings, and three and one-half 
pence, current money of this city, which sum belongs to the French 
Reformed Church of New York, to wit: the sum of nine hundred and 
thirty-five pounds, in eight bonds, the interest of which is to be used 
for the maintenance of the ministry, with the exception of twenty -eight 
shillings a year, which belong to the poor of the said church ; and the 
sum of forty pounds, eight shillings, and three and one-half pence in 
cash, in settlement of his account as Treasurer of the moneys of the 
said church and ministry. At New York, Oct. 22, 1754. 
£975 8s. Sid. Vallade, Elder. 

Jacques Buvelot, Elder. 

Charles Jaxtdin, Elder. 

Jacques Desbrosses, Elder, 
— Frcmh Church Records, New York. 



22 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

He married, probably about 1712, Marianne Machet, 
daughter of ' Jean and Jeanne (Thomas) Machet, from La 
Tremblade, France, then living at New Rochelle, N. Y. 
' She was naturalized in New York, June 17, 1726, and 
was living in 1761. 

The most interesting episode in the history of Daniel 
Bontecou of which we have any knowledge occurred in 
connection with a difficulty which arose in the French 
Church in 1763. The following account is from the pen 
of the Rev. A. V. Wittmeyer, the present pastor of this 
church : 

" On the 23d of May in that year, the Rev. Jean Carle, 
then minister of that church, resigned his functions in 
order to return to Europe. At the request of the Consis- 
tory, he consented to remain till tlie following spring, in 
order to give the church time to secure another minister 
from abroad. 

" At a meeting of the church held on the 30th day of 
May, Daniel Bontecou and eleven other gentlemen were 
elected a committee, with the elders of the church, to 

' "Jean Machet, ship carpenter, who settled first in Oxford, Mass., 
but removed to New Rochelle, N. Y., was a native of the same place 
(La Tremblade). At the time when the last severities against the 
Protestants began to be exercised, Machet was pursuing his trade in 
the seaport town of Bordeaux. ' We left our goods, our furniture, 
and our clothes,' he writes, 'I and Jeanne Thomas, my wife, and 
Pierre, Jean, Jeanne, and Marianne, our children, for the sake of our 
religion, and fled from persecution, only saving our bodies.'" — The 
Huguenot Emigration to America, by C. W. Baird. 

^ At a Council held at Fort George, in New York, June the 17th, 
1726. . . . 10th. An Act for naturalizing Peter De Lage, John 
Zenger, Paulus Deseer, Nicholas Jaboien, Abraham Rodrigos Rivera, 
Abraham Carcas, Nicholas Van Taerlingh, Matthias Borrell, Johannes 
Roorbagh, Johannes Lashier, Louis Sacombell, Marianne the wife of 
Daniel Bonticow, Pierre Elizee Gallaudet, John Draugaud, Michel 
Berthom, William Crolges, Jean Ballereau the wife of James Ballereau, 
and Garrit Cornelisen. — Journal of the Legislative Council of Neic 
York, Vol. 1, p. 536. 



SECOND GENERATION. 23 

enter into a correspondence with the Consistory of the 
Walloon Church of Amsterdam, with a view to securing a 
new minister ; and should their efforts fail there, to address 
themselves to the company of pastors and professors of 
Geneva. The committee thus appointed wrote, in accord- 
ance with the instructions given them by the church, to 
the ecclesiastical authorities named, under date of June 5, 
1763 ; addressing at the same time a letter to Mr. Jacob 
Henry Chabanel, a merchant at Amsterdam, and a member 
of the Consistory of the Walloon Church, in which they 
requested him to advance the funds necessary to bring to 
New York the pastor to be elected, and to use his good 
offices in the selection of a proper candidate. 

" In all these letters the church, through its committee, 
obligated itself to accept as its minister the person thus 
chosen. On the 2d of December came a letter from the 
Consistory of Amsterdam bearing the information that, 
by a majority vote, the Rev. Mr. Menauteau had been 
chosen by them to succeed the Rev. Mr. Carle, in accord- 
ance with the powers given them by the church of New 
York. On the 27th of the same month came a letter from 
Mr, Chabanel, informing the New York church that the 
gentleman thus elected was not a proper person for them : 
that he was, in fact, of unsound mind, and that he was 
preaching in Amsterdam to empty pews ; and that in con- 
sequence, he (Mr. Chabanel) had refused to advance the 
money to pay his passage to America. This second let- 
ter became the starting-point of a long, and at times very 
acrimonious, correspondence between the church in New 
York and that in Amsterdam, and Mr. Chabanel. The 
New York Consistory naturally refused, not only to re- 
ceive Mr. Menauteau, but even to assume the expense 
incurred by this election ; nevertheless, on the 30th of 
March, 1764, the newly elected pastor arrived in New 
York, where his conduct soon proved him to be really 



24 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

insane, and he was sent back on the first convenient 
occasion that presented itself. In reference to this mat- 
ter, and as late as the autumn of 1764, entire harmony 
prevailed in the councils of the church ; but about this 
time Mr. Vallade, who united the offices of elder, Treas- 
urer, and Secretary, was strongly opposed by an influential 
party in the church, at the head of which stood Daniel 
Bontecou. The grounds of this opposition are not clearly 
stated, but tlie sequel of the quarrel would seem to indi- 
cate that the grievance against Vallade had reference to 
his management of the finances of the church. Although 
he was warmly sustained by the acting minister, Mr. Te- 
tard, and by a large majority of the Consistory and of the 
members of the clmrch, he resigned his three offices on 
the 13th of December, 1764, — 'moved thereto by delicate 
scruples,' as the records say. 

"Soon after this resignation occurred an event which 
enabled the two parties in the church to take up distinct 
positions, and which precipitated matters to an unprece- 
dented extent. By a letter bearing date Jan. 6, 1765, a 
Rev. Mr. Daller, who seems to have recently arrived, in- 
vites the Consistory to determine whether it will receive 
him as minister, or not ; and if the latter, threatens to 
take tlie matter into court. This candidate was a young 
French-Swiss, and seems to have had no other claim upon 
the church than a letter of recommendation from Mr. 
Chabanel of Amsterdam ; at the same time there seemed 
to exist no personal objections to him. 

" Summoned thus to take definite action, the Consistory 
ruled that Mr. Daller had no legitimate claim upon the 
church ; but that being present they would receive him as 
their minister, provided he would consent to be installed 
according to the discipline of the Reformed Church of 
France, and that he would be bound by such other con- 
ditions as the then state of the church seemed to render 



SECOND GENERATION. 25 

necessary. This conditional acceptance Mr. Daller re- 
jected, and now, if indeed he had not already done so, 
openly joined the party of Mr. Bontecou ; which hereafter 
sustained his claims per fas et nefas. On Jan. 20, Mr. 
Vallade, who, although occupying no longer any official 
position, was evidently the head of the party in power,/ 
presented to the Consistory a memorandum consisting of 
four articles, which clearly reveals to what extent the hos- 
tility of the two parties had progressed. The first article 
affirms the present necessity on the part of the Consis- 
tory of exercising its disciplinary powers ; and signals 
out Daniel Bontecou and four others, whom it accuses of 
spreading scandalous reports, especially against Mr. Val- 
lade, as worthy of severe discipline. Article 2 reproaches 
Mr. Daller with trying to enter the church by underhanded 
means, and proposes that the conditional offer made to 
him should in consequence be withdrawn. Article 3 de- 
clares the meeting held on the 16th of January, 1765, by 
the Bontecou party, at the house of a Mr. Bonnet, a mem- 
ber of the Consistory, to be contrary to the rules of the 
church, and hence illegal and of no authority ; and Article 
4 is a vindication of the acts of Mr. Vallade. These arti- 
cles were duly voted on and accepted by the Consistory on 
the 24th of January. 

" In this same meeting of the Consistory was read a letter 
from Messrs. Smith & Scott, two eminent lawyers at that 
time, in which they informed the Consistory that they had 
been retained by Mr. Daller, and that they had advised 
him to submit his differences with the church to arbitra- 
tion, as a lawsuit would be ruinous to all concerned. To 
this letter the Consistory replied on the same day, thank- 
ing the counsel for their friendly letter, and offering to 
convince them of the regularity of its proceedings if they 
would appoint a time for an interview. 

" While this matter was pending, Mr. Bontecou and his 



26 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

associates, on the 2d of February, addressed a letter to 
Mr. Tetard, minister of the church, requesting hira to 
allow Mr. Daller to occupy his pulpit on the following 
day, which was Sunday, and intimated that if he would do 
so they would return to the church. To this letter Mr. 
Tetard at once replied, stating that after consultation with 
the Consistory, he felt obliged to deny the request of the 
petitioners as incompatible with the resolutions of the 
Consistory excluding Mr. Daller from the church, which 
resolutions were largely based upon the fact that he (Mr. 
Daller) openly joined them in their opposition to the au- 
thority of the Consistory. On Feb. 7, the interview with 
Messrs. Smith & Scott took place in the room of the 
Consistory. The church was represented by the Rev. Mr. 
Tetard and Mr, Vallade ; and Messrs. Buvelot and Verje- 
reau attended the Rev. Mr. Daller. Mr. Vallade gave a 
circumstantial account of all that the church had done 
since the resignation of Mr. Carle, and the different let- 
ters written to Amsterdam and Geneva, and alleged that 
Mr. Daller had no manner of claim upon it. This the 
lawyers freely admitted, but advised that in the interest 
of peace the church should receive Mr. Daller as its min- 
ister, on condition of his obtaining from abroad the cer- 
tificates which, they owned, he still lacked. To this the 
representatives of the church opposed the rules of their 
government, which forbade their taking such a step. The 
lawyers answered that those rules were here impracticable. 
Unable to come to an agreement, Mr. Buvelot arose and 
read a most scandalous protest, signed by Mr. Bonnet, and 
addressed to the elders of the church. On the 17th, Mr. 
Daller presented to the Consistory, through Mr. Verjereau, 
a written statement of what he considered his claims upon 
tlie church. Tliis statement was signed by Messrs. Smith 
& Scott, and bore, furthermore, the written approbation 
of the Rev. Messrs. Ribzema and Ladlay of the Dutch 



SECOND GENERATION. 2/ 

Church, that of the Rev. Mr. Treat of the Presbyterian 
Church, and the qualified approbation of the Rev. Mr. 
Ronde, another Dutch minister. In this statement Mr. 
Daller offers again to obtain from abroad the necessary 
papers which he lacked, and concludes by renewing his 
menace of a suit at law if his proposals are rejected. 
The examination of this document was postponed by the 
Consistory to the 23d of February, when the claims therein 
set forth were finally and definitely set aside. The state 
of things had now become exceedingly critical. Frequent 
meetings of the Bontecou party — who assumed more and 
more to be the true representatives of the church — were 
held. Mr. Bonnet, at whose house these meetings were 
usually held, had by this and other acts excluded himself 
from the Consistory, and Mr. Louis Pintard, who had suc- 
ceeded Mr. Yallade as elder and Secretary, left this church 
and joined Trinity Church ; this reduced the Consistory to 
a very small number, and that body itself, according to cus- 
tom, elected elders and deacons to fill the vacant places, — 
viz., Messrs. Blanchard, Etienne des Brosses, and Noble. 
The election of these gentlemen — all, of course, oppqsed 
to Mr. Daller and his adherents — brought matters io a 
climax. According to custom, the names of the new elders 
and deacons were published from the pulpit without oppo- 
sition, on the morning of the following Sunday, July 21, 
prior to their official installation a few days later ; but 
when Mr. Tetard came to church in the afternoon, he saw 
in the audience Daniel Bontecou and his friends, who had 
not appeared there for six months. Foreboding trouble, 
he repeated before the benediction what he had said in 
the morning ; namely, that if any one had any objections 
to make to the instalLation of the new elders and deacons, 
he must reduce them to writing and present them to the 
Consistory. He then implored every one to leave the church 



28 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

quietly, after which he pronounced the benediction. This 
was the signal for an attack : making their way to the 
chancel, Daniel Bontecou and his party evidently stopped 
Mr. Tetard as he was coming down from the pulpit, loudly 
protested against the election of the new elders, and created 
such a tumult that those who had already left the church 
came back, and even strangers who were passing by, came in. 
Some of the latter took part in the quarrel ; but the majority 
endeavored to separate the two factions, w'ho were coming 
to blows, and finally, but with great difficulty, succeeded. 
This unfortunate occurrence only confirmed the Consistory 
in its course, and its authors were threatened with a judi- 
cial pursuit ; which threat, however, seems never to have 
been carried out. But in the mean time the unseemly 
strife went on. Mr. Vallade, who wished to retire to his 
farm at New Rochelle, asked to be entirely relieved of his 
duties as Treasurer, with which he still remained charged, 
although he had nominally resigned his office long before. 
"This was done on the 17th of February, 1766, when 
Mr. Jacques des Brosses was chosen treasurer of the Poor 
Fund ; but ' in view of the unsettled state of public affairs, 
and the bad administration of justice,' the Consistory re- 
fused to elect a Treasurer for the remaining funds of the 
church, but confided them for safe-keeping to Mr. Elie des 
Brosses, a member of Trinity Church. In reality this 
action seems to have been taken in consequence of an 
anonymous letter signed 'Liberty Boys,' which had been 
thrown the preceding Saturday into Mr. Yallade's house, 
by a person who fled immediately afterward. This letter 
threatened Mr. Vallade with ' great evils,' unless he would 
hand over the funds of the church to the 'real elders' 
by the following Monday. In the same letter the acting 
minister, Mr. Tetard, is treated most indecently, and the 
opinion is expressed that the church ought to be given to 



SECOND GENERATION. 29 

Mr. Daller. Suspecting its origin, the Consistory ordered 
that all those who claimed to be elders of the church 
should declare under oath whether or not they had any- 
thing to do with it, and that these declarations should be 
published in the Gazette. The legitimate elders at once 
complied, declaring that they knew nothing about the 
matter. The only other persons that responded were 
Mr. Bonnet, who claimed to be an elder, but whose dec- 
laration was a very equivocal one, and Daniel Bontecou, 
who made affidavit that he had nothing to do with it. 
On the 31st of March, 1766, each member of the Consis- 
tory received a letter signed by D. Bontecou, J. Buvelot, 
J. Hastier, and D. Bonnet, inviting them as legal repre- 
sentatives of Mr. Vallade to meet the signers on the fol- 
lowing Monday at the house of Mrs. Brock, there to make 
answer to such demands as they, the signers, had to 
make against Mr. Vallade ; and adding that if their 
request were denied, they should consider it a refusal to 
give them satisfaction, and take such measures as they 
considered necessary. The Consistory only saw a snare 
in this communication, and declined the invitation to meet 
the signers at IVirs. Brock's, — which was a tavern, — on 
the very proper ground that church business ought to be 
transacted, and according to their custom usually was 
transacted, in the room of the Consistory. It must now 
have been evident to the Bontecou party that the party in 
possession of the church was too strongly intrenched in 
its positions to be legally dislodged, and too wary to be 
entrapped into any voluntary surrender. Accordingly, on 
Sunday morning, June 29, 1766, Daniel Bontecou and his 
friends forcibly took possession of the church, prevented 
the regular service from being held, and finally closed its 
doors against its legal occupants. After having tried 
various means in vain to regain possession thereof, Mr. 



30 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Tetard, the ejected minister,' petitioned the governor of 
the Province for redress, whicli petition was read in Council 
and referred for further consideration." 

It is not difficult for us to foresee the final result of 
this quarrel. The Bontecou party, being the weaker, 
and doubly so by the illegality of their cause, " went to 
the wall." Mr. Daller withdrew from the contest, and 

' To bis Excellency Sir Henry Moore, Baronet, Captain General & 
Governor in Chief in and over the Province of New York &c. &c. &c. 

The petition of John Peter Tetard, Clerk 
humbly sheweth, 
That by au Act of the General Assembly of this Province in the year 
of our Lord 1703 as also by the Deed of Purchase, the Property of the 
frcnch Church of this City is vested in the Person of the Minister 
and Elders of the same for the time being, and their Successors for 
ever. That in April, 1764, Mr. Carle, the late Minister of said Church, 
returning to Europe, Your Petioner, before his departure, legally suc- 
ceeded to him in the Ministerial functions of the same; And in 
that Station Continued uninterupted till the 29th day of June, 1766 
(being a Sunday), when Messrs daniel Bontecou, John Hastier, James 
Buvelot, Francis Basset and Frederic Basset, all of the City of New 
Y'ork, in a riotous manner and contrary to the Peace of our Sovereign 
Lord the King, took Possession of said Church, before the usual time 
of divine Service, and there by main force opposed the Elders and 
every regular officer of the same in their respective Duties, absolutely 
refused your Petitioner Admittance into his Pulpit, and after having 
different ways profaned that House of Prayer, they then proceeded to 
break the locks of said Church, and affixed Locks of their own to 
Every door; by means whereof they, to this day, have most unjustly 
and illegally kept possession of the same to the inexpressible Detriment 
of this Pious Institution, and to the great Scandal of Civil Society as 
well as Keligion. 

To whom therefore can your Petioner so properly apply for Redress 
in so unprecedented a grevance as to your Excellency in Council? 

Your Petioner therefore begs that Your Excellency and the Honor- 
able Board will be pleased to take his case under your wise Considera- 
tion; And then he is well Assured that he shall obtain the most ample 
Justice: For which, as in duty bound, Y^our Petioner will Ever pray. 

J. P. Tetard. 

17. Oct 1767. Read in Council & Referred for further Considera- 
tion. 



SECOND GENERATION, 31 

Daniel Bontecou appears no more in connection with the 
French Cluirch. When we consider his age at this time 
(eighty-five), we can certainly admire the vigor of mind 
and body which prompted such a display of energetic enthu- 
siasm for a cause we are bound to believe he considered 
right, however it may appear in the cold light of history. 
And we should not lose sight of the fact that our onl^y 
record of this episode is that written by the winning party 
to justify its action to posterity ; however honestly designed, 
it could not be expected to set forth the arguments or re- 
criminations of its opponents. Even this ex -parte state- 
ment lets us see that the Consistory was divided against 
itself; that the expulsion of one member was regarded as 
illegal, and the minority considered him as still an elder 
and the remodeled Consistory usurpers ; that the Treasurer 
was so obnoxious that a considerable portion of the church 
were willing to take desperate measures to dislodge him ; 
and that the quarrel over Mr. Daller was a mere stalking- 
horse to hide the original grounds of feud. It is difficult 
to believe that a man in extreme old age would from sheer 
wantonness maintain for two or three years, with the fury 
of a hot-brained youth, a quarrel which ended in nearly 
destroying his own church. 

To the manuscript of ]\r. du Simitiere, in possession of 
the Philadelphia Library Company, we are indebted for 
the following valuable contribution to the history of Daniel 
Bontecou : " I knew this gentleman very well for many 
years. In the summer of the year 1770 being in company 
with him, he told me that he was born at La Rochelle 
from the descendant of the famous Dutch navigator Bonte- 
coe, that his parents fled from France for the sake of 
religion when he was an infant, that they went to Eng- 
land, and soon after came over to New York, that he had 
then resided there 82 years, that about the latter end of 
the last century he went on a voyage to the Spanish main 



32 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

in the West Indies, but had not been from New York since 
his return from tlience. Mr. Bontecoe was many years 
an elder of the French Church in New York, and at the 
above mentioned time he enjoyed a good health, sound 
judgment and tolerable memory. He complained that his 
eyesight fail'd him a little." 

In the lapse of a century and over, the record of most 
men's life becomes nearly obliterated : it is fortunate if 
anything remains to furnish an insight into their character, 
their work, and the place they occupied. The few items 
that can be gathered here and there are treasured as of 
priceless worth, and studied and reviewed with eagerness, 
that perchance some traits may be revealed therein which 
may serve as a foundation upon which to rebuild their 
history. In the scattered records available for this pur- 
pose that relate to Daniel Bontecou, we plainly see the 
adventurous youth, the prosperous merchant, the trusted 
churchman, and finally the persistent and vigorous old man, 
standing staunchly by his friends and battling strenuously 
for his cause. After dwelling for eighty-four years in the 
city in which his family had found an asylum, he passed 
away in November, 1773,' closing a well-rounded life of 
ninety-two years.'' 

' " A few days ago died aged 92, Mr. Bonticout, a French Gentleman, 
many years an inhabitant of this city." — iV. Y. Gazetteer, Nov. 25, 1773. 

^ The following are tkansckiptioks op records not elsewhere 

REFERRED TO, RELATING TO DaNIEL BoNTECOU. 

1. From the Registers of the French Church, New York. 
To-day, March 10, 1703, after service, was baptized Etienne Perdriau, 
son of Etienne Perdriau and of Marguerite Bontecou; presented for 
holy baptism by Daniel Bontecou and Marie Bontecou. He was born 
on March 4th, and baptized by Mr. Peiret, minister. 

Daniel Bontecou. 
Peiret, Minister. Marie Mayon. 

To-day, Sunday, May 26, 1712, Susanne Forestier, daughter of Pierre 
Forcstier, born on the 30th of last April, was presented for holy bap- 



SECOND GENERATION. 33 

V. Siisanne Bontecou, probably one of the five chil- 
dren who were refugees from France with their father, 
Pierre. The only trace of her that I have been able to find 

tism by Daniel Bontecou and Siisanne Coutau, and baptized by Mr. 
Louis Rou, Pastor. 

Daniel Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Pastor. Susanne Coutat. 

To-day, Sunday, Aug. 31, 1712, after evening prayer, Mr. Louis Rou 
baptized Thomas Pelletreau, born on the 27th of this month, son of 
Elie Pelletreau and Jeanne Machet, and presented for holy baptism by 
Daniel Bontecou and Madeleine Vincent. 

Daniel Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Minister. Meri Leddel. 

New York, September 19, 1714. To-day, Sunday, after evening 
prayer, Mr. Louis Rou baptized Mary Anne Odard, born on the 11th 
of this month, daughter of Daniel Odard and Marthe Jeffrey, and pre- 
sented for holy baptism by Daniel Bontecou, and Anne Many. 

Daniel Odart. 
Daniel Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Min. Anne Many. 

To-day, Wednesday, March 9, 17|§, after prayers, Mr. Louis Rou 
baptized Anne Ballereau, born on the 8th of this month, daughter of 
Jacques and of Jeanne Ballereau, and presented for holy baptism by 
Daniel Bontecou and Anne Many. 

Jacques Ballereau. 
Daniel Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Pastor. Anne Many. 

To-day, Sunday, February 18, 172^, Mr. Louis Rou baptized Jeanne 
Pelletreau, born on the 6th of this month, daughter of Elie and Eliza 
beth Pelletreau, and presented for holy baptism by Daniel Bontecou 
and Elizabeth Pelletreau. 

Daniel Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Pastor. Elizabeth Pelletreau. 

To-day, Sunday, April 18, 1736, after the second service, was bap- 
tized in this church by me, the undersigned minister, Samuel Pintard, 
born in New York on the 5th of last April, son of Mr. Jean Pintard 
and Mrs. Catherine Carre, his wife, and presented for holy baptism by 
Mr. Daniel Bontecou and Miss Susanne Boudinot, in the name of 
Miss Marie Catherine Boudinot. 

Jean Pjntard. 
Daniel Bontecou. 
L. Rou, Pastor. Susanne Boudinot. 

5 



34 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

is in Vol. III. of the Documentary History of Neiv York, 
p. 283 : " All act of opposition to that which was passed on 
Sunday last, the 20th of September, 1724, in the French 

By virtue of a license granted by Cadwallader Golden, President of 
the Council of New York, dated Marcli 12, 1761, being the first year of 
the reign of George Third, our legitimate sovereign, I celebrated the 
marriage of Guillaume Lucy and Elizabeth Hatier, on March 12, 1761, 
at seven o'clock in the evening, in the house of Mr. Hatier, in the 
presence of the Hatier family, of Mr. and Mrs. Bontecou, Basset, son- 
in-law of Mr. Hatier, and Mr. Rivet, officer in the American Royal 
Regiment. 

Registered on July 7th, 1761. 

Jean Carle, Pastor. 

To day, July 22, 1764, towards eight o'clock in the evening, I mar- 
ried Mr. Jacques Buvelot and Marie Bonnet (widow) both of this city 
and members of the French Church. I celebrated the said marriage by 
virtue of a license granted by the Lieutenant-Governor of this Province, 
dated the 9th inst., and in the house of the said lady, Marie Bonnet, in 
presence of Messers. Daniel Bontecou, Jean Hastier, Daniel Bonnet, 
and Mrs Elizabeth Basset. 

Done in New York the said 22nd of July, 1764. 

J. P. Tetard, Pastor. 

2. Fi-om Journal of the Legislative Council of New York. 
At a Council held at Fort George in New York, May 17, 1723. 
Present — His Excellency Wm. Burnet, Esqr., &c. 

Capt. Walter. Mr. Barberie. 

Coll. Beekman. Mr. Harison. 

Mr. Van Dam. Doctor Colden. 

Mr. Morris, JuN^ 

His Excellency communicated to this Board the address of the 
General Assembly of this Province. 

Ordered, that Capt. Walter, Mr. Harison, and Doctor Colden be a 
select Committee to Join a Committee to be appointed by the House 
of Representatives to prepare the Draft of An Address to be presented 
to his Majesty from the Governour, Council, and Assembl}- of this 
Province, and in order thereto the said Committee will meet tomorrow 
at the hour of three in the afternoon at the House of Mr. Bonticow in 
this city. (Vol. I. p. 496.) 

At a Council held at Fort George in New York, June the 28, 1723. 
A message from the A.ssembly by their Speaker acquainting this 
Board that himself together with Coll. Morris, Mr. Phillipse, Capt. 



SECOND GENERATION. 35 

Reformed Chnrcli of the City of New York, and signed 
afterwards by some members of said Church." This "act 
of opposition" disapproves the action of the Consistory 

Jansen, Col. Provoost, or any three of them, are appointed a Committee 
by that House to Meet and Make their observations upon a Act passed 
in the Colony of Connecticut the Ninth of May last, Relating to the 
Division Lines between that Colony and this, and Desireing his Excel- 
lency that he will be pleased to appoint a Committee of the Council to 
joyn thereon. 

Ordered, that Cap' Walter, Mr. Clarke, Mr. Harison, Doctor Colden, 
and Mr. Morris, Jun", or any three of them, be a Committee to Join a 
Committee of the House of Representatives for the purposes in the 
said Message, and that the said Committee do meet to morrow at three 
in the Afternoon at the House of Mr. Bonticow in this City. (Vol. I. 
p. 503.) 

At a Council held at Fort George in New York, Sept. ye 2nd, 1725. 

Ordered, that Mr. "Van Dam, Mr. Barberie, and Doctor Colden, be a 
select Committee to .Join a Committee of the Assembly in Examining 
the Accounts of Coll. David Provoost, late Tonnage Officer. 

Ordered, that Mr. Bobin, tUte Deputy Clerk of the Council, do Acquaint 
the Assembly that this Board desires them to appoint a Committee of 
that House to Join a Committee of this Board for that purpose,, at the 
House of Mr. Bonticow in this City, at ffour in the affternoon on Thurs- 
day, come sevennight. (Vol. I. p. 518.) 

3. From the New York Gazette, Revived in the Weekly Post Boy, Feb. 
5, 1750. 
To BE Sold. The five following Lots of Ground in this City, viz. : 
One Lot fronting Nassau- Street, near Gold-Street, 30 Feet and a half 
Front, and 69 Feet back; One other Lot fronting Ann-street, right 
back of the other, and is 22 Feet front, and 60 feet back ; Two other 
Lots fronting Gold-street, 20 Feet front each, and from 49 Feet and a 
half to 48 Feet deep; And one other adjoining to the Two last, 20 
Feet front on Gold-street, and 47 Feet deep, fronting Ann street. Any 
Person inclining to purchase any of the said Lots, may apply to Daniel 
Bounticon, in the Smith's Fly, who will dispose of the same on reason- 
able terms. 

4. The Last Will and Testament op Daniel Bontecou. 

In the name of God. Amen. I, Daniel Bontecue of the City of 

New York, Gentleman, being in good state of health and of sound 

and disposing mind, memory, and understanding — thanks to God for 

the same— but calling to mind the uncertainty of life and certainty of 



36 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

in dismissing from the pastorate the Rev. Louis Rou, 
" contrary to the Rules of our Discipline, to the Word of 
God, and Equity," and bears the signature of sixty male 
members of the church, after which, " Here followeth the 
names of the widow, women, and others, members of the 
same church, which have signed the same act." There 
are twenty-five of these names, among which is that of 
Susanne Bontecou. 



Death, Do therefore make and ordain this my last Will aad Testament 
in manner and form following, that is to say, first and principally I 
commit my soul into the Hands of Almighty God my Creator, and my 
Body to the Earth to be decently interred at the discretion of my 
Executors hereinafter named, hoping for a Resurection to eternal Life 
thro' the Satisfaction and Righteousness of Christ my Redeemer, and 
as to such temporal Estate as God hath been pleased to bestow upon 
me, I dispose thereof in Manner following: that is to say, I will and 
desire that my just Debts and funeral Expenses be paid and satisfied 
within some Convenient Time after my Decease. Item. — I do hereby 
give, devise, and bequeath unto Timothy Bontecue, Juu', the son of my 
Brother Timothy Bontecue of New Haven, in New England, the Sum 
of one hundred Pounds, with the Payment of which sum I do hereby 
expressly charge my real and personal estate. Item. — All the rest, 
Residue, and Remainder of my Estate whatsoever and wheresoever 
both real and personal, I do hereby give, demise, and bequeath unto 
Mary Bassett, the wife of Francis Bassett of the City of New York, Pew- 
terer, and to her Heirs, Executors, Administrators, and Assigns forever. 
Lastly, I do hereby nominate, constitute, and appoint the said Francis 
Bassett, Executor of this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking. 
Annulling and making void all former and other Wills and Testaments 
by me at any Time heretofore made, declaring this and this only to be 
my last Will and Testament. In testimony whereof I have hereunto 
set my hand and seal this twentieth day of August in the year of our 
Lord, one thousand seven hundred and seventy two. 

Daniel Bontecou. [l. s.] 

Signed, sealed, published, pronounced, and declared by the Testator, 
as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who 
subscribed our names hereto as Witnesses in his presence and at his 
request. 

Cornelius Blanchard. 
Will Hartshorne. 
GiLBT Burger. 

(This will was proved in New York, Nov. 30, 1773.) 



SECOND GENERATION. 37 

TI. Marie Bontecou, born in New York, July 21, 
1690, and baptized in the French Church on the 2-lth 
of the same month. She appears, March 10, 1703, as 
sponsor for her nephew, Stephen Perdriau, son of her sis- 
ter Marguerite. No further trace of her is found, unless 
we may consider it possible that she became the wife of 
Francis Bassett, who was associated with her brother, 
Daniel Bontecou, in the troubles in the French Church, 
in 1763-6, and was tlie Mary Bassett to whom Daniel, 
in his will, bequeathed the greater part of his estate. 
(See Daniel Bontecou's will, pp. 35, 36.) No record of 
such a marriage, liowever, appears in the Registers of the 
French Church. 

VII. Bacliael Bontecou, born in New York, July 
21, 1690 (twin with Marie). She probably died young, as 
nothing further is found relating to her. 

VIII. Timothy Bontecou, born in New York, June 11 
17, 1693, and baptized in the French Church on the 2d of 
July. His boyhood was undoubtedly passed in that city, 
and when he became of sufficient age to think of taking 

an active part in the affairs of life, he repaired to France, 
to acquire the trade of a silversmith.' From the time of 
his leaving America until the year 1735 (a period of prob- 
ably more than twenty years), we have no positive knowl- 
edge of his history.' It is quite likely that he remained 

' This fact was related to the graudfather of the writer over fifty 
years ago by his cousin, Polly Storer, who was for eighteen years an 
inmate of Timothy Bontecou's household, and is beyond question re- 
liable. It was recorded at the time, and the paper containing the 
statement is in the possession of the writer. 

* A tradition exists which by some is thought to relate to Pierre 
Bontecou, the refugee, while others claim that it has reference to 
Timothy. We have such intimate knowledge of Pierre's arrival in 
this country, together with that of his family, that it may be set down 
as untrue so far as he is concerned. Whatever foundation in fact may 
have existed to base such a tradition upon, it must be conceded that 
in its entirety it is untrue, also, as relating to Tinwtliy Bontecou, with 



38 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

abroad long enough to lay the foundation of, if not to have 
fully acquired, the comfortable fortune which he subse- 
quently possessed. He probably, also, married in France, 
for his wife Mary died in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 5, 
1735, at the age of thirty-three years, as evidenced by 
her gravestone now existing in the old cemetery of that 
city, removed from the still older burying-ground in the 
public square. We have no knowledge of the time of his 
return to this country, but it was probably not long pre- 
vious to the above event. 

He again married, Sept. 29, 1736, Mary Goodrich, 
daughter of Colonel David and Prudence (Churchill) 
Goodrich of Wethersfield, Conn. Col. Goodrich was an 
officer in the army during the French and Indian War, a 
prominent citizen in his town, and a justice of the peace, 
and in the latter capacity performed the ceremony of his 
daughter's marriage. She was born Dec. 15, 1704, and 
died about 1760, aged fifty-six years. Timothy Bontecou 

the possible (and most probable) chance of its being of a similar nature 
to the story of the three black crows. 

The Tradition.— Timothy Bontecou, a refugee from France for 
the sake of his religion, left behind him in his flight a wife and two 
infant sons. Years rolled by, and Timothy, having in all this time 
received, from his retreat in the New World, no news of his family, 
and concluding that his wife had perished in some one of the terrible 
massacres of the day, again married, and became once more the father 
of two children. One of these died in infancy, the mother herself 
not long surviving ; the other in course of time became a sailoi', and 
dying at sea in his early manhood, was buried at St. Thomas in the 
West Indies. Some twenty years after Timothy's advent in New York, 
while one day walking on the street in that city, he met a lady whose 
familiar appearance impressed him ; closer scrutiny revealed her as tlie 
wife he had left in France, and who, hearing nothing from her hus- 
band in all these years, had crossed the sea in search of tidings of him. 
With her were her two stalwart sons, now grown to manhood. The 
recognition between husband and wife was mutual, and the reunited 
pair thereafter lived happily together. The situation is quite romantic, 
as well as embarrassing. The reader is at liberty to believe so much of 
it as he chooses, but will undoubtedly find it difficult to reconcile the 
claims of the tradition with the known facts of Timothy's history. 



SECOND GENERATION. 39 

resided on the west side of Fleet Street in New Haven, 
riot far from the water-side. He was a considerable owner 
of real estate, both there and in New York. His religious 
affiliations were with the Churcli of England, and in the 
absence of a cliurch of that denomination in New Haven 
lie became a member of the one in Stratford, being regis- 
tered there Oct. 12, 1735 ; and some years later, when 
a new church was to be erected, he contributed X15 
toward the building of it' and became the owner of a- 
pew. Undoubtedly he was a regular occupant of this pew 
on the Sabbath ; the distance of fourteen miles to Strat- 
ford being no great obstacle to the privilege of worshiping 
in his own church. His wife, Mary, is registered as a 
communicant there May 25, 1740. When Trinity (Epis- 
copal) Church in New Haven was established, he was 
one of the founders, and its first recorded warden, in 
1765. He was also a member of the committee appointed 
to purchase a site for the church edifice.^ He owned and 

'"The Episcopal Society built a house also in 1743; but on the 
principle of stocli ownership, and not by a public tax." . . . "It 
was unanimously voted y" 1st day of January, 1744-5, that the 
proprietors of y church should chuse their ground for their pews 
according to what they have given towards building the same." 
— History of Stratford, by Rev. Samuel Orcatt. 

* To all people to whom these presents shall come — Greeting: 
Know y that I, Enos Ailing of New Haven, Town and County and 
Colony of Connecticut, for the consideration of two hundred and 
seventy-one pounds five shillings lawful money, rec* to my full satis- 
faction of Timothy Bonticou and Isaac Doolittle, Church Wardens, 
and Christopher Kilby and Stephen Mansfield, Vestrymen of Trinitj'- 
Church in s'^ New Haven, and y rest of y« members of y s'' Episco- 
pal Church, do give, grant, bargain, sell, and confirm untoy« s' Timo- 
thy Bonticou, Isaac Doolittle, and y" rest of y« Professors of y Church 
of England and members of s'' Trinity Church, for y time being and 
to their successors, a certain piece or parcel of land, containing one 
acre and a half, more or less, situate and lying at a place called Greg- 
son's Corner, in y" town plat, in s'' New Haven, bounded Northerly 
on the Market Place or highway. Easterly on highway or Town street, 
Southerly by land in possession of Sam' Cook, and Westwardly by 



40 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

occupied a large square pew in this church, prominently 
located. 

At the time of the British invasion of New Haven, in 
July, 1779,' he was an old man eighty-six years of age, a 
resident of the household of his son Peter, on the corner 
of Olive and Wooster Streets. On this occasion he was 
the victim of outrage by the British troops. A mob of 
soldiers visited the house, and the old gentleman was 

land in possession of Ealph Isaacs, together with y" dwelling house, 
barn, and other buildings thereon. To have, and to hold j" s<^ bar- 
gained and granted premises, with all and singular the appurtenances 
unto them, y" s'' grantees, and their successors and assigns, forever to 
their own proper use, for the support and maintenance of s'' church, 
and I, y" s'^ Enos Ailing, do for myself and my heirs. Ex''* and Adm", 
covenant with y s'' grantees, their successors and assigns, that I shall 
not nor will, nor shall my heirs and assigns, or any of them, ever 
have, challenge or claim any right, title, or interest in or to y" same, 
or any part thereof, but thereof and therefrom shall and will be ever 
barred and secluded by these presents. In witness whereof, I have 
hereof set my hand and seal, this 31st day of October, 1765. 

Ends Alling. [seal ] 
Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of 

Jere" Townsend, Jr. 

Robert Brown. 

— New Haven Land Records, Vol. XXVII. p. 369. 
' "New Haven was invaded by a British force of twenty -six hun- 
dred men, under Governor Tryon of New York and Brig. -Gen. Garth, 
in the summer of 1779. They were conveyed from New York in 
two ships-of-war and forty-eight transports and tenders, commanded 
by Commodore Sir George Collier, and sailing up New Haven Bay 
on the night of the 4th of July, landed the next morning in two divis- 
ions, one at East and one at West Haven. They advanced upon the 
town from both directions, — opposed, however, by the inhabitants, 
but without avail. The shipping drew near and menaced the inhab- 
itants with bombardment. Before night the town was completely 
possessed by the invaders, and the soldiery committed many ejicesses 
and crimes, plundering houses, and murdering some citizens. ... It 
was the intention of Gen. Garth to burn the town; but the rapid 
increase of the militia, who flocked in from the surrounding country, 
caused him to retreat to his ships, and he sailed away, carrying with 
him some forty citizens of the town." — Lossing's Field Book of the 
llevolution, Vol. I. p. 422. 



SECOND GENERATION. 41 

robbed of his silver knee and shoebuckles, — his daughter- 
in-law, the wife of Capt. Peter, being ordered to pull them 
off. Personal violence was offered ; and on an attempt 
by the soldiers to bayonet him, she interposed herself 
between them and saved his life. Infuriated at being 
baffled in their murderous design, they were ripe for any 
degree of iniquity, and the daughter of Capt. Peter un- 
fortunately presenting herself at this juncture, she was 
seized by the soldiers, and her abduction attempted ; but 
her mother with great tact and courage interfered, and 
while entertaining the soldiers with food and drink, 
secretly sent for assistance, which speedily arrived in the 
form of a guard of soldiers, obtained through the efforts 
of an influential royalist neighbor. This put a stop to 
their outrageous conduct; but they had well-nigh suc- 
ceeded in their designs upon old Timothy, for he was 
found by the guard with a rope around his neck, the other 
end thrown over a beam of the house, and the mob evin- 
cing a diabolical disposition to pull him up, which was 
prevented by the officer in charge. 

The once ample estate of Timothy Bontecou was 
undoubtedly greatly depreciated and diminished during 
the war, and what remained of it was deeded by him to 
his son Peter in 1778, in consideration of support dur- 
ing the rest of his life.' 

' Copy of Bond given by Peter Bontecou. 

Know all men by these presents, y' I, Peter Bontecou, of the Town 
and County of New Haven, in the State of Connecticut, am holden 
and do stand firmly bound and obliged unto my Hon'^"^ father, Timothy 
Bontecou of s'^ Town, in the just sum of Two thousand pounds. Law- 
full money, payable to my s** father, his heirs, Ex^ Admin^', unto the 
which payment well and truly to be made and done I bind myself, my 
heirs, executors, administrators, firmly by these presents, signed with 
my hand and sealed with my seal. Done in New Haven, Oct. 6, 1778. 

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas s'' Tim" 

Bontecou hath by Deed herewith of even date conveyed unto s'^ Peter 

Bontecou, one certain house and home lot, and two lots of land in the 

oyster shell field, and it being their agreement that in consideration of 

6 



42 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

He died in New Haven, Feb. 14, 1784, aged ninety-one 
years, and was buried beneath Trinity Church. He is 
known to have been a prominent and useful citizen, a 
zealous churchman, and a good man. 

s"* lands being conveyed unto s'^ Peter, he was to become under obli- 
gation to support and maintain his s^ father from the day of the date 
hereof during his natural life. Now, therefore, if s'^ Peter, his heirs, 
executors, or administrators, doth from the day of the date hereof, Pro- 
vide for his said father with every thing needfull and necessary to make 
the life of his s'^ father comfortable, and support and maintain him in 
sickness and health, During the Term of his natural life, then the 
foregoing bond to be void; but, if otherwise, then to remain in full 
force. 

Signed, Sealed, & DeP 
in presence of Peter Bontecou. [seal.] 

Samuel Bishop, Jr. 

William P. Cuymert. 



THIRD GEJ^^ERATIOK 



CHILD OF DANIEL AND MAKIANNE (mACHEt) BONTECOU. 5 

10 I. Daniel Boutecou, Jr., born in New York, Feb, 14, 
1713 ; baptized Feb. 18, 1713. Very little is known about 
him. In 1737 he was a member of the military company 
commanded by Capt. Cornelius Van Horne. He married 
Marquise le Boyteulx, whose name appears as a signer 
of the petition in opposition to the act of the Consistory 
dismissing the Rev. Louis Rou from the pastorate of the 
French Church in New York, Sept. 20, 1724. From this 
circumstance it would appear that she must have been 
much older than her husband. The date of this marriage 
is unknown. They were both living in 1744, but no later 
trace of them is found. They had no children. 

CHILD OF TIMOTHY AND MARY BONTECOU. 9 

11 I. Timothy Boiitecou, Jr., born in 1723, probably 17 
in France. He was a silversmith, and resided in New 
Haven, Conn. He married, Nov. 5, 1747, Susanna Prout, 
daughter of John Prout, Esq., of New Haven, and Sibbyl 
Howell of Southampton, L. I. She was born April 1, 
1718, and was drowned Oct. 9, 1755, with five others, by 

the upsetting of a ferry-boat, while returning from the 
ordination of Rev. Nicholas Street, in East Haven. He 
married for a second wife Susan Gordon ;' she died in 
November, 1805.=^ He died in May, 1789.= 

' From information given, I have assumed that her family name was 
Gordon, but this is not positive. 

''"Died — In this city, Mrs. Susan Bonticou, widow of Mr. Timothy 
Bonticou, set. 69.'' — Connecticut Journal, Nov. 21, lb05. 

''"Died — lu this city, Mr. Timothy Bonticou, aged 6u." — Con- 
necticut Journal, June 3, 1789. 



44 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF TIxMOTHY AND MARY (GOODRICH) BON- 9 
TECOU. 

12 I. Peter Bontecoii, born in New Haven in 1738. 27 
He was married Nov. 14, 1762, by the Rev. Chauucey 
Whittlesey, to Susannah Thomas, daughter of Jehiel and 
Mary Thomas of New Haven. She was born Sept. 9, 1739, 
and died in New Haven," Sept. 20, 1799. Peter Bonteeou 
was captain of the barque " Hawke,'" of 47 tons, trading 

to Ireland, and returning via the West Indies In order 
to secure storage for his cargoes of rum and molasses, 
he built a house, with a large cellar, now standing on the 
corner of Olive and Wooster Streets, and known as the 
" Wooster House." This building remained in an unfin- 
ished condition, as to its interior, at the time of the Revo- 
lution, although occupied by the family. Capt. Bonteeou 
on one of his homeward voyages entered the harbor of 
New York, which chanced to be at that time in posses- 
sion of the British, and was captured and confined on the 
prison-ship " Jersey " ; but afterwards escaping and mak- 
ing his way homeward through Long Island, was seized 
with the small-pox (undoubtedly contracted in prison), 
and died at a tavern in Huntington, in 1779. Letters of 
administration were granted to his widow March 5, 1781. 
His estate inventoried at £600 10s. Oft?. 

13 II. Daniel Bonteeou, born in New Haven, Sept. 9, 36 
1739. He graduated from Yale College in 1757 ; then re- 
paired to France to pursue the study of medicine. About 
1760 he was appointed surgeon in the French Army, and 
undoubtedly served in that capacity a number of years. 

He returned to New Haven and announced himself as 

' "Died — In this city, Mrs. Susanna Bonticou, aged 60 years, relict, 
of Capt. Peter Bonticou." — Connecticut Journal, Sept. 25, 1799. 

°Capt. Bonteeou commanded also the brig "Mansfield," the brig 
"William," and undoubtedly others. 



THIRD GENERATION. 45 

fullows, in The Connecticut Journal and New Haven Post 
Boy of Feb. 1, 1771 : 

" The subscriber takes this method of informing the 
Public that he proposes to pursue the practice of Physick 
in this Place. Likewise Surgery in all its branches, as 
Bone Setting, &c., and Midwifery. 

"Daniel Bontecou. 

" New Haven, January 25, 1771." 

He married, Sept. 12, 1775, Mrs. Rebecca Rohde, widow 
of Dr. John Rohde' (a native of Prussia), and daugliter 
of Joseph and Sarah (Southmayd) Starr of Middletown, 
Conn. She was born June 8, 1733. Dr. Bontecou was 
a prominent member of Trinity Church, New Haven, 
a vestryman in 1774-5 and 1777-8, and for the last 
two years clerk of the vestry. He died Aug. 20, 1778. 
The Connecticut Journal of Sept. 2, 1778, contained the 
following obituary notice : " On Thursday, the 20th inst., 
departed this life for a better. Dr. Daniel Bontecou, of 
this Town, in the thirty-ninth year of his age ; a gen- 
tleman of liberal education in his profession to which he 
was regularly bred, he was truly respectable, was prudent 
and judicious in his practice ; possessed many good and 
useful qualities, was modest and benevolent and just ; a 
worthy citizen and an excellent Christian. In him the 
several relations of husband, parent, and friend, shone 
with dignity and honor. He was beloved through life, and 
his death is sincerely lamented. May his virtues excite 
an emulation in others, and provoke them unto love and 
good works." His death was the occasion of a sermon 
by the Rev. Bela Hubbard, rector of Trinity Church. 

In common with many who died during the disturbed 
and critical days of the Revolution, Dr. Bontecou left but 

'"Yesterday afternoon, departed this life, Dr. John Rliode, for 
many years a noted physician and surgeon in this town." — Connecti- 
cut Journal, Jan. 35, 1775. 



46 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

little estate, the principal item of value in the inventory 
being a silver tankard valued at £11 10s., the next being 
" one negro woman, Flora, value, £10." This woman he 
had rescued from a brutal master by purchase, and she 
long survived him, and is remembered by persons now liv- 
ing (1883). It is related of her, that upon the approach 
of the British in their raid upon New Haven in July, 
1779, she saved the valuables of her mistress by burying 
them in the garden. 

Dec. 23, 1787, Dr. Bontecou's widow married Capt. 
Ephraim Pease,' a prominent citizen of Enfield, a magis- 
trate and member of the General Court; removed thither 
with her children, and died there April 6, 1802, at the age 
of 69.^ 

In the old cemetery in New Haven, stands a tablet with 
the following inscription : 

^ "Married — last Sunday, Captain Ephraim Pease of Enfield, to Mrs. 
Rebecca Bonticou of this city." — Connecticut Journal, Dec. 26, 1787. 

2 " Died at Enfield, Mrs. Rebecca Pease (formerly of this city), relict 
of Mr. Ephraim Pease, in the 69th year of her age. Mr. Pease was 
lier 4th husband." — Connecticut Journal, April 22, 1802. 

Note. — Rebecca Starr is said to have been a remarkably beautiful 
woman. She married (1st), July 27, 1753, Thomas Tyler. He died 
Nov. 7, 1754, leaving one daughter, Miriam, born May 17, 1754, who 
married Capt. William Powell of New Haven, Oct. 28, 1773, and died 
March 12, 1808, leaving no children. She married (2d), Sept. 23, 1756, 
Dr. Johan Rohde, a physician of New Haven, who was born in Heili- 
genbad, Prussia, in December, 1723. They had the following children: 
I. John, born March 4, 1757. II. Frederick, born Jan. 14, 1759. died 
Nov. 22, 1759. III. Thomas, born Sept. 10, 1760. IV. Joseph, born 
Nov. 12, 1763, died Jan. 3, 1776. V. William F., born Jan. 24, 1766. 
VI. Andrew Southmayd, born April 9, 1768. He married and resided 
in Charleston, S. C. VII. Catharine, born Jan. 27, 1770, died Jan. 14, 
1773. VIII. A son, born and died July 8, 1772. She married (3d) 
Dr. Bontecou ; and (4th) Capt. Pease. 



THIRD GENERATION. 47 

Dr. Daniel Bontecoti, 

Son of 

Timothy & Mary (Goodrich) 

Bontecou, 

& a descendant of a French 

protestant, who left his country 

at the revocation of the edict of 

Nantes. He was born in New Haven 

Sept. 9, 1739. 

graduated at Yale College 1757, 

Died Aug. 20, 1778, 
& interred in the ancient bury- 
ing grounds of the public square. 
This monument is erected to his memory 
By his only Son Daniel Bontecou of 
Springfield Ms. 

14 III. David, born 1742, died 1766 ; unmarried. 

15 IV. James, born 1743; died Nov. 8, 1760. 

}yl^c^ {^^ ^t^^^t-^ S£./ur /3 /7V7 

16 V./^ daughter. Nothing is known of her, except 
that she married a Mr. Lathrop, a cabinet-maker of New- 
Haven, and had no children. An oil portrait of her, torn 
and defaced, is in the possession of Mrs. Elisha Peck (92) 
of New Haven. Its dilapidated condition was thought by- 
its possessor to be due to ill-treatment by the British in 
their raid on New Haven in 1779, but old Capt. Peter 
Storer (86) confessed to the compiler that he and " Tom 
Bontecou " (64) found it in the garret when they were 
boys, and used it as a target for their arrows. 



FOURTH GE:t^ERATION. 



CHILDREN OF TIMOTHY, JR., AND SUSANNA (pROUT) 11 
BONTECOU. 

17 I. Timothy Prout Boiitecou, born in New Haven, 38 
Aug. 20, 1748. He married Elizabeth Upson, daughter 

of Daniel Upson of New Haven. He was master of the 
sloop " Delight," engaged in trade between New Haven 
and New York. He died Nov. 28, 1785, in the same 
house, on Water Street, in which he was born. His 
widow married Jacob Morgan of Amity (in Woodbridge), 
May 22, 1789. 

18 IV. Eleanor Boiitecou, born Dec. 25, 1749-50. 
She grew to womanhood, and was engaged to be married; 
but the groom failed to appear at the appointed time, and 
was never heard of afterward. She became insane, but 
recovered. The date of her death is unknown. 

19 III. John Bontecoii, born in 1751, baptized Dec. 1, 
1751. He was a tailor. He married, Aug. 7, 1784, Lois 
Dunwell of New Haven ; removed to New York, and died 
there about 1818. They had no children. 

20 IV. William Bontecou, baptized Aug. 12, 1753. 
Died young. 

CHILDREN OF TIMOTHY, JR., AND SUSAN (gORDON) H 
BONTECOU. 

21 I. William Bontecou, born in New Haven in 17G3. 45 
He married, Nov. 13, 1784, Hannah Storer, daughter of 



FOURTH GENERATION. 49 

John and Hannah (Brown) Storcr of New Haven. She 
was born in 1764, and died in New Haven, June 20, 1842. 
William Bontecou resided on Water Street, occupying, 
with his brother Thomas, a house on the south side of 
tlie street, immediately west of the site of the present 
engine-house. He was a manufacturing tailor, and had a 
partner in New Orleans who sold out the business and 
absconded with the proceeds. After this loss, he removed 
to Troy, N. Y., but returned again to New Haven, where 
he died of consumption. Sept, 29, 1807. 

22 II. Thomas Bontecou, born in New Haven in 17G6. 54 
He married, Feb. 13, 1790, Ruth Storer, daughter of John 
and Hannah (Brown) Storer, and sister of his brother 
William's wife. The ceremony was performed by Rev. 
James Dana. She was borij in New Haven, Sept. 13, 1769, 
and died in New York, Jan. 20, 1852. Thomas Bontecou 
was a master mariner, chiefly engaged in the West India 
trade. During the Revolutionary War, he was captured 

by the British. Through the latter part of his life he was 
engaged in trade between New Haven and New York. 
He died Sept. 8, 1805.' 

23 III. EHzabeth Bontecou, born March 20, 1770. 60 
Married, July 31, 1790, William Hood of New Haven. 

He was born April 16, 1766, and died Dec. 26, 1842. 
She died April 11, 1837. 

24 IV. Samuel Bontecou, born in New Haven, March 2, 68 

1773, married Phebe Tallman, dq,ughter of and 

Hannah (Brush) Tallman of Long Island. She was born 
Jan. 16, 1776, and died May 16, 1847. Samuel Bontecou 
removed to Lansingburg, N. Y., about 1794, He was a 

' "Died — In this city Mr. Tliomas BoQticou, late master of one of 
the New York Packets, aged 39 years." — Connecticut Jourtial, Sept. 
12, 1805. 

7 



50 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

tailor by trade, and for a number of years postmaster of 
Lansingburg. He was a man of energetic disposition, 
and was looked upon as the head of the family by his 
immediate relatives, whom he treated with great kindness 
and liberality. He died in Lansingburg, May 3, 1850. 

25 y. Siisaunah Bontecon, born in New Haven in 76 
1775. She married, Dec. 1, 1793, Marcus Merriman, Sr., 

of New Haven, as his second wife. He entered the army 
at the age of 17, and assisted in the defense of West 
Bridge when the British attacked New Haven, July 5, 
1779. He lay under the cannon at Cedar Hill all night, 
and contracted a cold from the effects of which he never 
fully recovered. In 1780 he enlisted as a regular soldier, 
and remained in the service until the close of the war. 
He died Feb. 20, 1850, aged 87.' She died Jan. 11, 1807, 
aged 32.^ 

26 YI. Koswell Boutecoii, baptized Sept. 18, 1784. He 
was a silversmith, and died in Charleston, S. C, un- 
married. 

CHILDREISr OF PETER AND SUSANNAH (tHO]\IAs) BON- 12 
TECOU. 

27 I. Polly Augusta Bontecou, born in New Haven, 81 
Aug. 13, 1763. She married, July 22, 1781, Capt. Nathan- 
iel Storer, son of John and Hannah (Brown) Storer, and 
brother of the wives of William (21) and Thomas (22) 
Bontecou. She was a remarkably handsome woman, 

'"Another Patriarch Go^■E. — Marcus Merriman, Esq., aged 
87 years, a well-known and highly-respectable citizen, was released 
from earthly trials, this noon, after an illness of a week. His demise, 
though he had long passed the space allotted to man, will cause sincere 
Sorrow in many an attached circle. He leaves an untarnished reputa- 
tion to his children, and will be long remembered as a pure, just, and 
upright man." — New Haven Register, Feb. 20, 1850. 

'^"DiED. — In this city, Mrs. Susannah Merriman, wife of Major 
Marcus 'iilexxim^in." — Connecticut Journal, .Tan. 15, 1807. 



FOURTH GENERATION. . 51 

possessing the French type of bcanty : tall and erect, with 
brilliant and expressive dark eyes, and carrying herself 
with qniet dignity and grace. She retained her mental 
faculties to a remarkable degree in her old age. Her 
memory was unimpaired, and to it we are indebted for 
many incidents in the family history which she related to 
its younger members. She was the young girl whom the 
British attempted to abduct, as related in the account of 
her grandfather, Timothy Bontecou (9). She died in New 
Haven, March 28, 1849. Capt. Storer served as a private 
in the War of the Revolution, until its close. He went to 
sea, and became master of a vessel; made several voy- 
ages to China ; succeeded to his father's business as ship- 
builder, and at the same time carried on mercantile trade. 
In the latter he was unsuccessful, and again went to sea. 
In 1811^ on a voyage to China in the ship " Huntress," 
wliich he commanded, he was lost, with his son Nathaniel, 
his nephew Thomas Bontecou, Jr., who was his mate, and 
all hands. The vessel was owned by John Jacob Astor, 
and had loaded with seal fur in the Pacific, and started 
on her way to China, but was uever heard from. 

28 II. James Bontecou, born in New Haven, Aug. 6, 91 
1766. He entered upon a seafaring life at about fifteen 
years of age, setting out upon his first voyage from 
Philadelphia. He rose to be master of his vessel. He 
married, June 2, 1803, Joanna Clark, daughter of Samuel 
and Anna (Hawley) Clark. She was born Oct. 13, 1781, 
and died Jan. 8, 1872. He died of yellow fever on board 
the brig " Freeman," on his passage home from Berbice, 
July 12, 1806.' 

' " Died on the 11th inst., of a fever, oa his passage from Berbice, 
Captain James Bonticou, master of the Brig "Freeman," of this port, 
Si. 40. A wife and two small children, and numerous friends and 
acquaintances have most siucerelj^ to deplore his death. As a tribute 
of respect to the deceased, the vessels in the harbour set their colors 
at half-mast." — Connecticut Journal, July 31, 1806. 



52 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

29 III. David Bontecou, born 1767 ; baptized Aug. 23, 
1767 ; died 1767. 

30 IV. David Bontecou, born Sept. 9, 1768 ; died Jan. 
26, 1769. 

31 V. Susannah Bontecou, born 1769; baptized July 
23,1769; died 1769. 

32 TI. Susannah Bontecou, born 1770 ; died Dec. 25, 

1777. 

33 VII. Peter Bontecou, born 1770; died June 12, 
1794, of consumption. 

34 VIII. Sarah Bontecou, born 1775; baptized July 30, 93 
1775. She married in 1795, Justus Trowbridge, son of 
William and Rebecca (Painter) Trowbridge of New 
Haven. He was born May 4, 1774, and died 'in New 
Haven, March 2, 1810. He was a hatter. She died Jan. 
9,1861. 

35 IX. David Bontecou, born March 17, 1777. He 99 
married, Oct. 1, 1796, Polly Clark, daughter of Samuel 
and Anna (HaAvley) Clark, whose sister Joanna married 

his brother James (28). The ceremony was performed at 
the house of his cousin William Bontecou (21). His wife 
was born April 11, 1776, and died in Troy, N. Y., Jan. 
17, 1861. David Bontecou was a shoemaker by trade. He 
lived in New Haven for a number of years after his mar- 
riage, and several of his children were born there. He 
then emigrated to Coeymans, N. Y., on the Hudson, the 
journey being made all the way by sloop. The latter part 
of his life was spent in Troy, w^hcre he died May 5, 1854. 

CHILDREN OF DANIEL AND REBECCA (roIIDE) BON- 13 
'i'ECOU. 

36 I. Eehecca Bontecou, born in New Haven, March 13, 109 
1777 ; she married in Enfield, Conn., July 5, 1795, Rev. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 53 

Menzies Rayner, son of Benjamin and Mary Rayner of 
Long Island. He was born in Hempstead, L. L, Nov. 23, 
1770, and died in New York City, Nov. 22, 1850. She 
died in New York, March 22, 1862. They are both bui-ied 
in Greenwood Cemetery. Rev. Menzies Rayner obtained 
his education principally under the direction of private 
instructors. When quite young he became a member of 
the Methodist Society, and before he was twenty-one years 
of age was received as a preacher in the traveling con- 
nection of that denomination. Two years later he was 
ordained in Lynn, Mass., by Bishop Francis Asbury. He 
continued in this connection for two years longer, when, 
receiving an invitation to settle over the Protestant Episco- 
pal parish of St. John's in Elizabetlitown, N. J., he accepted 
the same, and was accordingly ordained as minister of the 
church by the Right Rev. Bishop Provoost of New York. 
He continued pastor of the Elizabethtown church for 
about six years, when, July 12, 1801, receiving a call to 
the rectorship of Christ Church in Hartford, Conn., he 
removed thither and remained for ten years in this con- 
nection. He was the first pastor settled over this parish. 
At the expiration of this time (Oct. 14, 1811) he accepted 
an invitation to St. Paul's Church in Huntington, Conn., 
and became rector of the two parishes of Huntington and 
New Stratford (now Monroe). Here he remained seventeen 
years, when, after careful inquiry and examination, he em- 
braced the doctrine of universal salvation, and answered 
a call to become pastor of the Universalist Church and 
Society in Hartford, to which place he removed Nov. 1, 
1828, just seventeen years from the time he before left it. 
He remained here about four years, and then took charge 
of the Universalist Church in Portland, Me., remaining 
there four years also. At the end of this time he 
removed to Troy, N. Y., and spent the period of four 
years there, and at the neighboring village of Lnnsing- 



54 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

burg. In the latter part of August, 1840, he removed 
to New York City, continuing there until his death, and 
serving for a time as pastor to the Universalist Society in 
Bleeker Street. Of his literary efforts the following pub- 
lished account is given : " Mr. Rayner has written much 
and with acknowledged ability upon religious subjects; of 
some of his works large editions have been sold. During 
his last residence in Hartford, he edited and ■ published a 
weekly paper entitled The Religious Examiner, which was 
continued several years, and was conducted with distin- 
guished candor and ability. At Portland he also aided in 
the publication of a periodical called The Christian Pilot. 
A few of his numerous works have been stereotyped, and 
all bear intrinsic evidence of sincerity, moderation, intelli- 
gence, and industry." 

While he was Universalist minister at Hartford, he 
printed a letter written in verse, addressed to the wardens 
and vestry during his rectorship at Christ Church, asking 
for payment of arrears of his salary. As a matter of in- 
terest, it is here appended. 

" THE DUNNING LETTER. 

"For ten years, commencing in 1801, I was the Minis- 
ter (commonly called Rector) of the Episcopal Church, 
in the city of Hartford, called ' Christ Church.' During 
tlie summer and fall of two successive years, after preach- 
ing twice in Hartford on the Sabbath, I used to travel 
twelve miles and preach a third time, at a place called 
Warehouse Point, in East Windsor ; where an Episcopal 
Society was soon collected and organized, and subse- 
quently a handsome building was erected for their accom- 
modation, the Corner Stone of which I had the satisfaction 
of laying, with appropriate religious services. 

"It happened at a certain period in my ministerial labors 
above named, that I became afflicted with a troublesome 



FOURTH GENERATION. 55 

complaint — not very unusual, it is said, with the Clergy 
— it was the want of what has been denominated the 
' NEEDFUL.' There was due to me from the parish in Hart- 
ford, some two or three hundred dollars; but — owing 
to my natural diffidence, I suppose — I could hardly sum- 
mon sufficient resolution to disclose the necessities of the 
case. The Yestry of the Church were in the habit of 
having frequent meetings, to consult together upon the 
affairs of the Parish. Such a meeting they were to have 
on the ensuing Sunday evening, at the house of a Mr. 
Olcott, but my appointment at the above-named place 
would not allow me the opportunity to meet with them. 
I therefore concluded that I would communicate what I 
wished to say in the epistolary form, and avail myself of 
the license which is always allowed in poetry. I ought 
to add that whatever may be thought of the merit or de- 
merit of the article, it had the effect to relieve me. at once 
from the afore-named embarrassment, for the very next 
day the amount due was handed over. Here follows the 
epistle — subsequently called the Dunning Letter." 

to the wardens and vestrymen of christ's church, hartford. 
Gentlemen : 
On Sunday evening next you will attend 
At Mr. Olcott's, my esteemed friend. 
I much regret that such my engagements are 
As will prevent my meeting with you there. 
At Warehouse Point I must give my attendance, 
The brethren there say I'm their sole dependence. 
The sheep, they say, will scatter wide and stray, 
If hireling-like the Shepherd flee away. 
To lead them into pastures fresh and fair, 
And guide them to the fold, shall be my care. 
But still, my chief attention must be due. 
And shall be given, my Hartford flock to you. 
Wolves, greedy of their prey, around you roar 
With cruel rage, impatient to devour; 
They frown, they flatter, every art employ, 
That some unwary sheep they may decoy. 



56 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Let not their numbers nor their rage alarm, 
Your heavenly Shepherd will preserve from harm, 
And shield you still with his Almighty arm. 
Meanwhile his under Shepherd will not cease 
His labors to preserve the flock in peace ; 
To explore the lost, the wandering sheep direct. 
And in his Master's strength the fold protect. 

What now I have to add you must forgive; 
The shepherd also with the sheep must live. 
He makes the feeding of the flock his care, 
And must have food to eat, and clothes to wear. 
Nor will it do if he alone's supplied. 
His growing household must not be denied. 
Three little babes — I'd almost said 'twas four, 
And, if in time, there be as many more. 
They every one, and their dear mother too. 
Must still depend on me — and I on you. 

A cold and barren winter's drawing near, 
A season which the sons of want may fear; 
To lay in stores, and for that scene prepare, 
The little ant may teach should be our care; 
The fire with fuel must be closely tended; 
An hundred dollars here are soon expended; 
And to withstand the force of every storm, 
The back, and other parts, should be kept warm; 
For men and women proper clothes be had, 
And children in soft flannels should be clad; 
And if you'd have your household round you smile, 
The well remembered pot must daily boil. 

More items of expense I might disclose, 
But why repeat what every body knows ? 
Farmers and Merchants each their claims will make, 
And these must all be paid — and no mistake — 
Physician, Surgeon, Cobbler, Tinker, Tailor, 
All want their fees — perhaps at last the Jailor — 
All want their fees, in full, and without failure. 

But now, to be more serious, and conclude — 
(For hitherto I fear I've been too rude.) 
My wants are pressing, my resources few, 
And for relief must look alone to you. 
The sum is small which I've a right to ask, 
But to collect it, doubtless, is a task. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 67 

The times are dull, cash not in circulation; 
And each can scarce "work out his own salvation." 
A part of what is due my turn may serve, 
I hope that better days are in reserve. 
I urge no more; I will be no complainer; 
I am 

Your humble servant, 

Menzies Kayner. 

37 II. Daniel Bontecoii, born in New Haven, April 20, 120 
1779. His father liaving died previous to his birth, and 
his mother within a few years marrying, and removing to 
Enfield with her children, he was brought up under the 
guardianship of his stepfather Capt. Ephraim Pease. He 
married, March 16, 1798, Sybil, daughter of Rev. Elam 
and Sybil (Pease) Potter of Enfield, Conn., and granddaugh- 
ter of his stepfather. When a young man he established 
himself in mercantile business in Enfield ; he was also 
active in the militia, and held the rank of Sergeant in 
the 31st Regiment. About 1806 he removed to Spring- 
field, Mass., and formed a copartnership with Col. Solo- 
mon Warriner in the dry-goods business. His wife died 
in Springfield, May 6, 1810, aged 29. He married again, 
Nov. 13, 1816, Harriet Bliss, daughter of Hon. Moses 
and Abigail (Metcalf) Bliss of Springfield. She was 
born March 23, 1782, and died Nov. 10, 1853. In 1817 
the partnership with Col. Warriner was dissolved, and 
after continuing alone for some years, Mr. Jonathan Hunt 
(now of Oakland, Cal., — 1882) was admitted into partner- 
ship, and they continued together until 1835, when Mr. 
Bontecou sold out his interest and retired from mercantile 
pursuits. He represented Springfield in the Massachusetts 
General Court in 1820. He was elected deacon in the 
First Congregational Church March 5, 1833, continuing 
in the office until May 2, 1845, when he removed his rela- 
tions to the South Church, then a new and struggling 
society, and w^as shortly afterward elected deacon, which 



58 BONTECOD FAMILY. 

office he continued to hold until his death. In 1815 he 
purchased of Col. Warriner a homestead upon Main Street 
where Fallon's Block now stands, and his house was 
always a hospitable home for his friends. In 1846 he 
removed to the corner of Main and Howard Streets, where 
the remainder of his life was passed. After retiring from 
active business, he employed his leisure in cultivating sev- 
eral pieces of land which he owned in the outskirts of the 
town, and took great pleasure in this occupation. He 
died in Springfield, Nov. 24, 1857, aged 78. The Spring- 
field Mejjublican said of him, "He has lived long, sensi- 
bly, and usefully ; his name is associated with no brilliant 
deeds, but honor, integrity, and piety belong to it. Useful 
and faithful in his day and generation, he is called home 
fully ripe for its immortality." 



FIFTH GEKERATIOJSr. 



CIIILDIiEN OF TIMOTHY PROUT AND ELIZABETH (uPSON) 17 
BONTECOU. 

38 I. Daniel Upson Bontecon. I have been able to learn 129 

but little about him. His wife was Mary — ■ (family 

name not positively known, but probably Sheering) ; she 

was of Irish descent. He was a seaman, mate of a ves- 
sel, and was lost at sea in August, 1816. His widow died 
in 1822, and was buried in Trinity churchyard, New York. 

39 II. Snsannah Bontecon, born Jan. 24, 1774, mar- 133 
ried Capt. Eliakim Benham of New Haven, who was born 
Feb. 1, 1773. He was a sea captain, and died in the West 
Indies, March 30, 1816. Having sold his vessel in the 
West Indies, and purchased a smaller one, he was still in 
possession of a considerable sum of money, for which he 

was murdered by his mate, and his body thrown over- 
board and never recovered. The British minister (the 
United States being unrepresented) made an unsuccessful 
effort to bring the murderer to justice. It is related as a 
singular coincidence, and for the gratification of those 
superstitiously inclined, that on the same night upon which 
he was killed and thrown into the sea his family in New- 
Haven were startled by a great splash in the washtub, 
which had been fiilled for the morrow's washing, and the 
morning revealed the water splashed over the floor, but 
by what agency has never been explained. His widow 
removed to Smithfield, Isle of Wight County, Va., and 
resided there with her daughter, Mrs. Wliite, until her 
death, which occurred May 11, 1848. 



60 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

40 III. Elizabeth Boutecou, born February, 1777. She 138 
married, June 22, 1802, Amos Hall of Cheshire, Conn. He 

was a descendant of John Hall, one of the first settlers of 
Wallingford, and was born in the west part of Chesh- 
ire (then included in Wallingford), May 21, 1773. She 
died in Cheshire, June 13, 1829. Mr. Hall married (2d) 
Mrs. Orilla Bradley (nee Ives) of Cheshire. She was 
the mother of Hiram Bradley, who married her step- 
daughter, Nancy Hall (140). She survived her hus- 
band several years. Mr. Hall died in Cheshire, Feb. 18, 
1848. 

41 IV. JiiHa Boutecou, born 1778 ; died Feb. 24, 1788, 
of small-pox. 

42 V. George Anson Bon tecou, born 1779; died Sept. 
11, 1794. 

43 VI. Polly Bontecou, born June 4, 1784. She married 145 
in 1801 Daniel Benedict, son of Francis, and a descendant 

of Thomas Benedict of Nottinghamshire, England, who 
emigrated to New England in 1638. He was born in Nor- 
folk, Conn., December, 1774; removed to Vermont, and 
was admitted to the Chittenden County bar in September, 
1800. In 1824 the family removed to Western New York, 
settled on Tonawanda Creek, and in 1838 removed to Clar- 
ence, Erie County, where he died in 1842. She died June 
5, 1845. 

44 VII. Nancy Bontecou, born in New Haven, year 149 
unknown, married Thaddeus Rice, a lawyer of St. Albans, 
Vermont. When crossing Lake Champlain on the ice 

to attend court at Plattsburg, his team broke through and 
he was thrown into the water. 'He escaped, but sat in his 
wet clothes in the court-room, and contracted a severe 
cold which resulted in consumption. He died in 1808 in 



FIFTH GENERATION. 61 

New Orleans, where he had gone for the beneficial effects 
of the climate. His widow removed to Buffalo, N. Y., 
with her children, and died there in 1848. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND HANNAH (sTORER) BON- 21 
TECOU. 

45 I. Clarissa Bontecou, born May 23, 1785. She 151 

married, March 9, 1806, James Dougrey of Lansing- 
burg, N. Y. He was born in Ireland, April 26, 1781, on 
a farm near the city of Donegal, and in 1790 emigrated 
with his father to this country, and settled in Lansing- 
burg. He commenced early to earn his living by teach- 
ing, and clerking in the store of John Rutherford & Co. 
About the year 1803 he commenced business for himself, 
but abandoned it after a year or two, returned to Mr. 
Rutherford, and was admitted as a partner. He con- 
tinued with him until the latter's death in 1812 ; then 
with John Kennedy as a partner until 1819, when the 
firm dissolved, and Mr. Dougrey built and moved into a 
larger store, and in 1829 admitted his son James as a 
partner. About this time the firm of Dougrey & Son 
and Matthew Yassar of Poughkeepsie purchased the Top- 
ping distillery property, and changed it into a brewing 
and malting establishment ; this business was carried on 
until the death of Mr. Dougrey, which occurred Oct. 10, 
1838. He was an honest man, a kind husband and 
father, and a good neighbor, beloved by all who knew 
him. He was a strong churchman, and a vestryman in 
Trinity (Episcopal) Church. His widow survived him 
until June 15, 1850. They are both buried in Trinity 
Church cemetery. 

46 II. William Bontecou, born Feb. 25, 1787. Sea- 
man and captain's mate. He was accidentally killed in 
the port of New York, " while the anchor was being got 
out," Dec. 15, 1806. He was unmarried. 



62 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

47 III. Julia Bontecou, born July 13, 1789. She 157 

married, June 13, 1809, Anthony Bristol, son of Nathan 
and Annie (Lambert) Bristol of Milford, Conn. He was 
born in Milford, July 16, 1778, and died June 15, 1867. 
He was a merchant tailor, and for a few years carried on 
a country store in connection with his tailoring establish- 
ment. His wife died in Milford, Oct. 27, 1862. 

48 IV. Timothy Bontecoii, born May 10, 1791. He 
was a silversmith, and died unmarried, in Savannah, Ga., 
Oct. 2, 1815, of fever, after an illness of eleven days.' 

49 Y. Polly Bontecoii, born July 22, 1792. She mar- 169 
ried, Nov. 2, 1812, Captain Richard Hanford of Lansing- 
burg, N. Y., who was born Jan. 9, 1784. He came from 
Connecticut, and settled in Lansingburg at a time when 

it was one of the most important places on the river for 
country produce of all descriptions, requiring the employ- 
ment of a large number of vessels in the freighting busi- 
ness ; in this and the lumber business he embarked, own- 
ing two of the largest vessels on the river, the " Royal 
Oak " and " Hope," one of which he himself commanded. 
He continued in this line until the advent of canals and 
railroads turned the business in other directions, when he 
sold out and engaged in mercantile business. He lived 
greatly respected by all who knew him, and died June 5, 
1844." His widow died April 11, 1857. 

50 YI. Henrietta Bontecoii, born Jan. 8, 1794. She 174 
married, July 17, 1822, Anson Smith of New Haven. He 

1 " Timothy Bounticue, 26 years, died Oct. 3, 1815, of Fever, was a 
silversmith, and came from New Haven, Conn. ; was sick eleven days 
at Marquand, Paulding, and Pentield's, died there, and was buried 
from there." — Savannah, Ga., Register of Deaths. 

"Died lately in Savannah, Mr. Timothy Bontecou, aged about 3Ti 
years, a native of New Haven (Conn.), but for several years past a 
resident of Savannah." — City Gazette and Commercial Daily Adver- 
tiser, Charleston, S. C, Oct. 5, 1815. 



^ 



FIFTH GENERATION. od 

was a shoemaker. He was born in 1797, and died Aug. 
2, 1855: She died Jan. 24, 1862. 

51 Til. Hannah Elizabeth Bontecou, born April 2, 
1797 : died Nov. 8, 1862, in Milford, Conn., unmarried. 

52 VIII. James Bontecou, bai^n Aug. 25, 1799; died 
July 22, 1800. 

53 IX. Nancy Bontecou, born March 13, 1802. She 182 

married, Oct. 14, 1821, Wmi am B. Thoni as, a cabinet- ^ yicLt^ 

maker, and lived in Bridgeport^ (Jonn! ^he'died July 17, 

1835. After her death he went South and, resided in <^7,^M^'^ 

Georgia before the war, but returned North, again married, v 

and subsequently died in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CHILDREN OF TIIO:HAS AND RUTH (sTOREr) BONTECOU. 22 

54 I. Thomas Bontecou, born July 30, 1791. He was 
a seaman, and mate of the " Huntress," commanded by 
his uncle Nathaniel Storer. The vessel and all on board 
were lost in 1811, while on a voyage to China. 

55 II. John Bontecou, born Dec. 15, 1793 ; died Jan. 8, 
1794, of cholera. 

56 III. Susannah Bontecou, born May 2, 1796. She 
married, Aug. 9, 1827, Benjamin Hood (60) of New 
Haven. He was a tailor, and resided at one time in 
Statesburg, S. C. They had no children. She died 
Oct. 4, 1842. He died Sept. 30, 1871. 

57 IV. Harriet Bontecou, born June 25, 1798. She 183 

married, Jan. 14, 1816, Capt. Menemon Sanford, son of 
David Stebins and Olive (Johnson) Sanford. He was 
born in Pawlet, Vt., Nov. 15, 1789. About 1798 his 
parents removed to South Britain, Conn. When about 
seventeen years of age he went to sea, his first voyage 



64 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

being to Liverpool, England. In 1813, on a voyage from 
Turk's Island, his vessel was captured by the British near 
New London, Conn., and burned ; he was placed on board 
a prison-ship, where he was confined for some time. After 
his marriage he made his home in New Haven, but con- 
tinued to follow the sea as master, making voyages to the 
Pacific and Europe up to 1822, when he engaged in the 
steamboat business ; at first in boats running between 
New York, New Haven, and Hartford, and afterwards to 
various other places. In the spring of 1835 he moved to 
Hartford, Conn. In 1840 he removed to New York City, 
where he died June 24, 1852. His widow died in Oak- 
land, Cal., Oct. 11, 1883. 

58 V. Maria Bonteeou, born Jan. 17, 1801. She mar- 
ried, in 1818, Capt. Edward Huntington, who was born 
in New London, Conn., May 13, 1791. When a child his 
parents moved to Albany, N. Y. At an early age he went 
to sea. In 1813 his vessel was captured by the British, 
and he was confined in the same prison-ship with Capt. 
Sanford (57); was taken to England and discharged. 
After the war he commanded a ship in trade between 
Havre and New York, up to 1828, when he retired. After 
his marriage his home was in Brooklyn, N. Y. In 1828-9 
he removed to Hudson, N. Y., and engaged in the manu- 
facturing of carpets up to 1839, when he removed to New 
York. In 1848 he moved to Matawan, N. J., where he 
died Dec. 13, 1881. She died Aug. 16, 1875. They had 
no children. 

59 TI. WiUiam Higby Bonteeou, born March 22, 
1803 ; died Nov. 12, 1825, unmarried. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH (bONTECOu) 23 
HOOD. 

60 I. Beiijamiu Hood, born Jan. 27, 1791 ; married, 
Aug. 9, 1827, Susannah Bonteeou (56), his cousin, daugh- 



FIFTH GENERATION. 65 

ter of Thomas and Ruth (Storer) Bontecoii. She was 
born May 2, 1796, and died Oct. 4, 1842. He served an 
apprenticeship to the tailor's trade, with his uncle, Samuel 
Bontecou, in Lansingburg, N. Y., and established himself 
■ as a merchant in Statesburg, S. C. During the War of 
the Rebellion he had charge of a hospital in Sumter, S. C. 
He died in Brooklyn, N. 'y., Sept. 30, 1871. They had 
no children. 

61 II. Susan Maria Hood, born about 1792. She never 
married, and died July 5, 1873. 

63 III. EHzabeth Hood, born Jan. 27, 1794. She 195 
married, May 11, 1820, Zacheus Maples, who was born 

in Norwich, Conn., Aug. 14, 1793. He learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, and removed to New Haven, where he pur- 
sued it for a time, and then took up the trade of lock- 
smith. In 1855 he gave up business and removed to 
Brooklyn, N. Y. She died there Feb. 28, 1858, and he 
died Dec. 17, 1863. 

63 IV. Nancy Hood, born about 1796. She married, 
Dec. 18, 1855, Marcus Merriman, Jr., as his second wife. 
He was born in New Haven in 1792. He was a politician 
of the old Whig school ; represented New Haven in the 
State Legislature in 1844, and was a member of the State 
Senate in 1846-7 ; was also an officer in the Custom 
House in New Haven for some years. He died Dec. 11, 
1864. She is living (1882) with her nephew at 77 Wil- 
liam Street, New Haven. 

64 V. James Hood, born in 1798. He was a seaman, 
and died at sea on a voyage from the West Indies, being- 
mate of the vessel at the time. He was unmarried. 

65 VI. Harriet Hood, born in 1802; died Aug. 3, 1879, 
unmarried. 



66 BONTECOU FAMILY. * 

66 VII. Charles Bontecou Hood, born in 1803. He 
was a merchant in Alabama, but afterwards settled in 
Washington, Ark. He married, Aug. 31, 1843, Eliza, 
daughter of William and Ann (Whelan) Sale of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. After his marriage he gave up business and 
established his residence in Brooklyn, where he died 
Dec. 24, 1871. His widow resides (1882) at Richmond 
Hill, L. I. They had no children. 

67 YIII. Roswell Hood, born in 1806; married June 202 
19, 1839, Abby Meeker Beach. She died Nov. 25, 1852, 
aged 36. He afterwards married Mary Beach, the sister 

of his first wife, by whom he had no children. She died 
November, 1873. He died Jan. 7, 1875. Mr. Hood 
learned the tailor's trade of his uncle Samuel Bontecou. 

CHILDREN OF SAMUEL AND PHEBE (tALLMAn) BON- 24 
TECOU. 

68 I. Charles Hubbard Bontecou, born Jan. 6, 1798. 203 
He married, Jan. 28, 1826, Sarah Keeler, daughter of 
Stephen and Margaret (Pyncheon) Keeler of New York. 

She died March 7, 1869. He commenced his business 
life in 1816, as clerk in the dry-goods trade in New York. 
After a time he associated with himself, William Israel, 
and they commenced business under the firm name of 
Bontecou & Israel. Eventually this proved to be an 
unprofitable venture, and he took the road as a travel- 
ing salesman. He now (1884) resides in Lansingburg, 
N. Y. 

69 II. Hamlet Bontecou, born Dec. 23, 1799. In 1816 
he began as clerk in a hardware store in New York, and 
continued clerking until 1820, when he shipped on the 
"Henry" from New Haven, for a four-years' whaling voy- 
age. He reached New Haven, on his return, Nov. 12, 1824, 
and the following year obtained a situation as clerk in the 



FIFTH GENERATION. 67 

Troy House, Troy, N. Y., where he remained seven years. 
The following four years were spent in New York and 
in Lancaster, Mass., in the same business. He was clerk 
in the Lansingburg post-office at the time his father was 
postmaster. He died in Lansingburg, Feb. 26, 1883, 
unmarried. 

70 III. William Bontecou, born April 4, 1802; died 
Dec. 23, 1805. 

71 IV. Harriet Bontecou, born Jan. 6, 1805; died 
Jan. 15, 1830. 

72 V. William Bontecou, born March 22, 1808. He 
was a grocer in Lansingburg ; then removed to Wells- 
town, Hamilton County, N. Y. In 1882, he was living 
somewhere in Vermont. 

73 VI. Roswell Bontecou, born July 1, 1810 ; died 
April 25, 1851. 

74 VII. Cecelia Bontecou, born May 9, 1813. Resides 
(1884) in Lansingburg. 

75 VIII. Elizabeth Bontecou, born Aug. 5,1819; died 
Oct. 5, 1846. 

CHILDREN OF MARCUS, SR., AND SUSANNAH (bONTECOU) 25 
MERRIMAN. 

76 I. John Merriman, died aged three months. 

77 II. Sally Merriman, died aged eighteeen months. 

78 III. Infant. 

79 IV. Infant. 

80 V. Sarah Parmalee Merriman, born April 27, 1799. 204 
She married, Aug. 27, 1817, Eben Norton Thomson of 



68 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Goshen, Conn. He was a man of more than ordinary 
ability, and it was designed that he should be liberally 
educated ; but being prevented by circumstances from 
entering college, he turned his attention to mercantile 
pursuits and became a merchant in New Haven. He was 
generous, genial, and aifable, and a universal favorite. 
He died July 18, 1856. She died Aug. 12, 1869. 

CHILDREN OF NATHANIEL AND POLLY AUGUSTA (bON- 27 
TECOU) STORER. 

81 I. Samuel Storer, born March 1, 1782. He was 
drowned " in Mr. Broome's fish-pond," June 22, 1787.' 

82 II. Susannah Storer, born Oct. 28, 1783 ; died Aug. 
13, 1872, unmarried. 

83 III. Nathaniel Storer, born March 5, 1786; died 
Dec. 18, 1793. 

84 IV. Samuel Storer, born May 11, 1787. He fell 
out of a boat in New Haven harbor and was drowned, 
Aug. 29, 1798.=^ 

85 y. Polly Storer, born July 1, 1789. She married, 211 
July 15, 1807, Capt. George Miles, son of John and Mary 
(Bill) Miles. He was born in New Haven, Nov. 24, 1784. 
They removed to Erie, Pa. Capt. Miles followed the 
lakes for a long term of years, having been in command 

of some of the first steamboats on Lake Erie. He died 
in Erie, April 10, 1863. She died Oct. 31, 1840. 

' " On Friday last a boy about six years old, son of Mr. Nathaniel 
Storey of this city, was drowned in Mr. Broome's fish-pond." — New 
Haven Qazetie, June 28, 1787. 

^ "Wednesday last, a son of Capt. Nathaniel Storer, about 11 years 
old, fell out of a boat in our harbor, and was drowned; his body was 
talicn up, after being in the water about an hour and a lialf." — Con- 
necticut Journal, New Raven, Sept. 5, 1798. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 69 

86 YI. Peter Storer, born Aug. 6, 1791. He married, 218 
Sept. 12, 1813, Hannah Eliza Woodrufe, daughter of Na- 
thaniel and Abigail (Cooper) Woodruff of New Jersey. 

She was born April 8, 1791, and died Aug. 13, 1864. He 
commenced a seafaring life when less than nine years old, 
making a voyage to China in the ship " Sallie," with his 
father. He continued to follow the sea for over sixty 
years. His first command was the brig " Shepardess," 
when about twenty-six years old. The latter part of his 
sea life was spent in the United States Revenue service. 
About 1860 he made his home at Westville, near New 
Haven, and died there March 28, 1883. The following is 
taken from a New Haven paper: "He was a prominent 
man and a thorough Christian. His father was captain 
of the ship " Sally," which sailed from this port to China, 
and he made the trip with him in 1799, when only nine 
years of age. Since that time he had followed the sea 
continuously until his retirement. He was not in the 
War of 1812, but stood at the Fair Haven draw in 1815, 
when the " Eagle," improvised for the occasion, went out to 
capture a British gunboat which had destroyed the packet 
" Susan" of this port and committed other waste. Her 
decks and rigging were crowded with men and boys. He 
was invited to go, but owing to an injury received while in 
the woods was unable to do so. Instead of capturing the 
English gunboat, the " Eagle " herself was captured. She 
was run aground, and the motley crew were permitted to 
escape. Capt. Storer was afterward in command of one 
of the West India brigs, and then for thirty years in the 
United States Revenue service. He was commander of 
many revenue cutters, proving himself fearless and vigi- 
lant in the discharge of his duties." 

87 VII. Nathaniel Storer, l)orn Aug. 28, 1794. Lost 
at sea in 1811, in the ship " Huntress," commanded by his 
father. All on board perished. 



70 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

88 VIII. Hannah Augusta Storer, born Jan. 31, 1797. 222 

She married, Nov. 19, 1820, Chauncey Ives, and died 
Dec. 14, 1868. Mr. Ives was enrolled and did some 
duty in the War of 1812. He was for many years con- 
nected with the Sun Mutual Insurance Company of New 
York. He died Feb. 2, 1879. 

89 IX. Lydia Storer, born May 12, 1799. She married, 227 
April 13, 1822, Gi'ove Smith of New Haven, and died 
Nov. 23, 1838. Mr. Smith was born in Ridgefield, Conn. 

He was a shoemaker, or in the shoe trade, was a member 
of the Episcopal Church, and belonged to the Masonic 
Fraternity. He died Oct. 13, 1830. 

90 X. Harriet Elizabeth Storer, born in 1805; died 
Sept. 26, 1871, unmarried. 

CIIILDREISr OF .JAMES AND .JOANNA (cLARk) BONTECOU. 28 

91 I. Jane Bontecou, born in New Haven, April 21, 231 

1804. She married, Nov. 18, 1833, Charles Parsons 
Bishop, son of Charles and Phebe Bishop of Whitesboro, 
N. Y. He died in New Haven, Oct. 26, 1869. His widow 
resides there (1882), at 11 Fair Street. 

92 II. Grace Bontecou, born in New Haven, Aug. 9, 233 

1805. She married, June 14, 1831, Elisha Peck, son of 
Henry Peck of New Haven. He was born May 5, 1790, 
and died June 11, 1866. She resides at 129 Wooster Street, 
New Haven. The following account of Capt. Peck is 
from the Army and Navy Journal^ of July 7, 1866 : 

" At thirteen years of age Capt. Peck first went to sea, 
as a cabin-boy in the brig ' Argus,' on a voyage from his 
native town. New Haven, Conn., to the West Indies, and he 
continued in tlie merchant service till the year 1813, with 
the exception of two years forced service on board English 
men-of-war. Being at London in August, 1812, mate of 



FIFTH GENERATION. 71 

the embargoed ship 'Ann,' war having been declared by 
the United States against Great Britain, he was arrested 
and detained as a prisoner of war on board the prison-ship 
'Nassau' in Chatham River till the following March, when 
he was paroled and sent to Newport, R. I., in the Ameri- 
can ship ' Robinson Potter,' a cartel [ship of truce]. Having 
been exchanged, in July, 1813, he entered as master's 
mate in the United States Navy for twelve months, and 
joined ' Gunboat 92 ' at New London ; in May in the follow- 
ing year was transferred to the frigate ' Macedonian,' and 
on re-entering after his discharge, he was attached to the 
frigate ' United States,' at New London ; in December, 1814, 
he was appointed acting sailing master, ordered to the 
'Macedonian,' in a few months transferred to the 'United 
States,' and in September, 1815, sailed in the latter frig- 
ate as acting midshipman and acting sailing master from 
Boston for the Mediterranean, continuing upon that station 
till November, 1820. He served from 1821 till 1824 as 
acting sailing master of the line-of-battle ship ' Franklin ' 
in the Pacific; in the 'Brandywine' when she took Gen. 
Lafayette to France, and on her cruise in the Mediterra- 
nean in 1825 and 1826 ; was promoted to a lieutenancy in 
1826; served from 1827 to 1830 in the frigate 'Java' and 
line-of-battle ship 'Delaware' in the Mediterranean; from 
1831 to 1834 in the sloop ' Falmouth ' and brig ' Dolpliin ' in 
the Pacific; from 1836 to 1838 in the sloops 'Natchez' and 
'Yandalia,' and in command of the schooner ' Grampus' in 
the West Indies ; and from 1840 to 1843 as senior lieuten- 
ant of the New York Navy Yard. Being commissioned 
a commander in 1843, Capt. Peck from 1849 to 1851 com- 
manded the sloop ' Portsmouth ' on the coast of Africa, 
and from 1852 to 1855 was in command of the receiving 
ship 'North Carolina' at New York. ' In September, 1855, 
he was placed on the reserved list with leave pay as 
commander, and in 1863 was promoted to captain. Dur- 



72 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

ing three years of the late war he was in command of the 
Naval Rendezvous at Portsmouth, N. H. 

" In January, 1807, being then a seaman on board the 
American ship ' John,' from New York, bound for the 
north of Europe, the vessel was boarded off the coast of 
Holland from H. B. M. sloop-of-war 'Ariel,' Commander 
Joseph Olliver, and the late Capt. Peck was impressed as 
an English subject and taken on board the English vessel ; 
and though he showed a genuine American protection and 
asserted that he was a native of New Haven in the State 
of Connecticut, the English commander chose to regard 
the protection as spurious and the statement regarding 
nativity to apply to New Haven, England, and refused to 
release his acquisition. After serving on board the 'Ariel' 
till 1808, during which time he was once disabled by a 
splinter in action, he was transferred to the ' Trident' of 
64 guns, then fitting out for the flag-ship of Admiral 
Ball at Malta, and he went to Malta in her in July of 
that year. While on board the 'Trident,' 'promotion to 
the quarter-deck ' was offered to him as a reward for 
jumping overboard and saving the life of a boy who had 
fallen overboard at sea, an honor he declined ' because 
he was an American ' ; and he was rated captain of her 
maintop at eighteen years of age, an evidence of his pro- 
ficiency at that early age as a seaman. In January, 1809, 
when on shore from the 'Trident' as coxswain of a boat, 
he availed himself of a favorable opportunity and deserted, 
shipping under a fictitious name on board the hired armed 
ship 'Lord Eldon,' then ready for sea. The efforts made 
to obtain men for the ' King's ships ' rendered officers of 
vessels sailed on private account little disposed to regard 
without compulsion the King's prior claim, and interest 
impelled them to shield from apprehension those men of 
their crews suspected of desertion from men-of-war. In 
consequence of precautions taken on behalf of the deserter, 



FIFTH GENERATION. 73 

the officer and party from the ' Trident ' were foiled in their 
search, and Capt. Peck readied Gibraltar in the 'Lord El- 
don,' where, once more, by deserting from her and cross- 
ing to Algesiras, he was enabled to place himself under 
the somewhat precarious protection of the United States 
flag, by entering on board the American ship 'Alpha,' 
whose captain showed him much kindness in taking 
such precautions that he escaped detection and capture 
by English searching officers; and he reached London in 
July, and in August returned to the United States in the 
ship 'Ann.' . . . 

"Every person associated upon duty with Capt. Peck 
will recollect with a smile the many evidences of a quaint 
sense of humor that was a characteristic of his mind, and 
all will remember with pleasure how careful he was that 
these eccentricities of pleasantry should never wound the 
feelings or offend the prejudices of others, or mar the 
harmony of intercourse with associates. Always honest, 
single-minded, and courteous, a man of generous impulses, 
with a delicate sense of honor, of warm feelings and kind- 
ness of heart, he was esteemed most by those who knew 
him best. 

" The decease of this genial, cheerful, humor-loving gen- 
tleman will bring sadness to the hearts of many friends 
in the Navy, a pleasant, cheerful, respected companion 
having passed from their midst ; and the Navy at large 
will receive with regret the fact that another officer of 
the old school, whose education was essentially practical, 
a thorough and accomplished seaman, of diversified expe- 
rience, eminently conscientious, zealous, and intelligent 
in the discharge of his duty, is lost to the service for the 
future. Unfailing cheerfulness of disposition and unself- 
ish consideration were especially obvious in his last illness ; 
deprived of speech, rendered, to a degree, helpless by dis- 
ease, he seemed to endeavor, with his accustomed tender- 

10 



74 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

ness, by avoiding complaint, to spare the feelings of those 
dearest to him, — to wish to alleviate, as it were, to their 
hearts the poignancy of the bereavement that was inev- 
itable. Solaced by the pfesence of his wife and children, 
it seemed at last when his active spirit took its flight that 
in truth it had found rest." 

CHILDREN OF .JUSTUS AND SAKAH (bONTECOU) TROW- 34 
BRIDGE. 

93 I. James Trowbridge, born August, 1796 ; died Oct. 
23, 1798. 

94 II. Rebecca Trowbridge, born Nov. 8, 1798. She 236 

married, March 11, 1832, William Townsend of New Ha- 
ven, Conn., as his second wife. He is the son of Timothy 
and Hannah (Ailing) Townsend, was born in New Haven, 
Jan. 16, 1799, and is living (1883) at the corner of Dix- 
well Avenue and Charles Street ; is a carpenter and mas- 
ter builder, and has resided in New Haven and vicinity all 
his life, with the exception of one season in South Carolina. 
He has been senior warden of Christ Church for over thirty 
years. His wife (Rebecca) died in New Haven, Sept. 1, 
1881. 

95 III. James Trowbridge, born June 27, 1800. He 240 

married, March 5, 1826, Charity Cannon, daughter of 
James aq^ Mary (Burritt) Cannon of Stratford, Conn. 
She died Feb. 10, 1860. He learned the trade of an 
umbrella maker, and carried on that business on Chapel 
Street, New Haven, until 1832, when he removed to Cats- 
kill, N. Y., and entered into the employ of his brother 
Charles, in the chandlery business. He is still living in 
Catskill (1883), and has always been remarkable for 
physical health, never having had occasion to employ the 
services of either physician or dentist. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 75 

96 IV. Susan Trowbridge, born in 1802; died ill 1826, 
unmarried. 

97 V. Charles Trowbridge, born Aug. 28, 1805. He 343 
married, Sept. 15, 1829, Emily Scott, daughter of Samuel 

and Melinda (Hurlbut) Scott of Farmington, Conn. He 
early learned the printer's trade in New Haven ; did not, 
however, adopt it as a profession, but removed to Cats- 
kill, N. Y., and bought into the tallow-chandlery business, 
continuing in it till his death, which occurred Dec. 21, 
1880. He was connected with St. Luke's Church, Cats- 
kill, for nearly fifty years ; first as vestryman, and after- 
wards for many years as senior warden. He iield various 
village offices, and had a high reputation for honor and 
integrity ; he was intrusted with the settlement of many 
estates. His widow is still (1883) living in CatskiU. 

98 YI. Henry Trowbridge, born in 1807 ; died in May, 
1815. 

CHILDREN OF DAVID AND POLLY (cLARK) BONTECOU. 36 

99 I. Peter Bontecou, born in New Haven, Jan. 26, 249 

1797. When quite young his parents removed to Coey- 
mans, N. Y. He went to Troy, N. Y., when a lad, and 
obtained employment in a shoe store, of which he after- 
wards became proprietor, continuing the business until 
his death. He married, April 29, 1823, Semantha, daugh- 
ter of Reed Brockway of Troy. She was born Feb. 23, 
1803, and died in Troy, May 9, 1824. He married (2d), 
Aug. 6, 1828, Sophia, daughter of Stanley Thompson. 
She was born Nov. 23, 1806, and died in Troy, June 9, 
1850. Mr. Bontecou was cold and austere in manner, 
and strictly honest in all his dealings ; a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and a great student of theo- 
logical works. He died March 20, 1868, in Troy. 



76 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

100 II. Elizabeth Bontecou, born Oct. 14, 1798. She 
married, in September, 1820, Leonard Witbeck, son of 
John Witbeck of Lansingburg, N. Y., and died at Coey- 
mans, N. Y., Jan. 22, 1824, leaving no children. Mr. 
Witbeck married again and died at Coeymans, leaving 
a large family by the second marriage. 

101 III. Susannah Bontecou, born in New Haven, July 259 
25, 1801. She married, Oct. 28, 1820, at Coeymans, 

N. Y., Moses Northrup. He was a harness-maker, shoe- 
maker, and tanner. From the time of his marriage until 
1834 he resided in New Baltimore, Greene County, N. Y., 
in which place his wife died Jan. 15, 1829. He removed 
from there to Coeymans, Albany County, and in 1837 
to Danby, Tompkins County. Nov. 13, 1830, he mar- 
ried Eve Wolf, and by her had three children. He died 
in Danby, Nov. 14, 1847. 

102 IV. James Clark Bontecou, born in Ncm- Haven, 264 
July 11, 1803. In his infancy his parents removed to 
Coeymans, N. Y., and he lived there till about sixteen 
years of age, when he removed to Troy, and entered the 
employ of his brother Peter, in the shoe business. An 
attempt to establish himself in an independent business 

a year later resulted in failure through tlie dishonesty 
of his partner, who finally absconded, leaving the debts 
of the firm to be faced by the boy he had deceived. 
Although as a minor he could not be held responsible by 
the creditors, yet as a matter of personal honor he 
shouldered the burden. He returned to his brother's em- 
ploy as foreman of the manufacturing department; and 
at the end of seven years, by dint of unwearied industry 
and the closest economy, succeeded in paying the last 
debt of the firm. While undergoing this severe disci- 
pline he became active in the work of his cliurch ; and 
as soon as the incubus of debt had been lifted from his 



FIFTH GENERATION. tl 

shoulders, he entered the ministry of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, in the year 1827. He was ordained dea- 
con in 1829, and elder in 1831. Transferred to the New 
England Conference, he traveled several circuits, and 
afterwards served as pastor of churches in Sag Harbor, 
Charlestown, Martha's Vineyard, and Bristol. While 
stationed on Martha's Vineyard in 1835, in conjunction 
with others he inaugurated and conducted the first camp- 
meeting held on the island, — an institution that in the 
succeeding half-century has become famous. He married, 
July 22, 1836, Abby Connable, daughter of Joseph and 
Mary (Maxwell) Connable of Bernardston, Mass. She 
was a woman of remarkable strength of character and 
fine culture, whose quick sympathies and exquisite tact 
greatly added to the success of her husband, both as 
preacher and pastor. Mr. Bontecou filled, after his mar- 
riage, successful pastorates at Worthington, Circleville, 
and Athens, Ohio, at which latter place his wife died, 
June 27, 1846. 

He married (2d), Aug, 1, 1849, Mary Ann Goode, of a 
Virginia family. Subsequent to this marriage he was 
stationed at Franklin, Oxford, Sharon, Greenfield, Love- 
land, and North Bend, Ohio, and for ten years lived in 
Cincinnati, being pastor of Pearl Street and York Street 
Churches and Wesley Chapel, and financial agent for the 
Wesleyan Female Seminary. In 1870 he withdrew from 
the active work of the ministry, and after a year spent 
in revisiting the scenes of his early labors, settled in 
his home at Xenia, Ohio, and died there, Oct. 14, 1875, 
aged 72. His widow still (1883) lives near Xenia. As 
a preacher, Mr. Bontecou was methodical in statement, 
clear and logical in argument, with somewhat of disdain 
for meretricious ornament and the mere graces of rhet- 
oric. As a pastor he was of great value to the church, 
and throughout his ministry his fine administrative tal- 



78 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

ents were employed in healing divisions, overcoming 
financial difficulties, and looking after the temporalities 
of the church. As a man he was of undaunted courage, 
strong convictions; and inflexible integrity. From the 
beginning of the anti-slavery agitation, his voice and pen 
were constantly employed on the side of freedom, and 
never quailed or faltered before the storm of opposition 
and obloquy which he was sometimes called to face in his 
defense of human rights. At a time when the church 
lent the mantle of respectability to cover the liquor curse 
and crime, his voice rang out with no uncertain sound ; 
and upon every moral and politico-moral question of tlie 
last half-century he was invariably found in the front rank 
of earnest and practical workers for humanity. 

103 V. Sarah Boiitecou, born in Coeymans, N. Y., May 267 

19, 1805. She married, Feb. 18, 1834, Gilbert Dean 
Golden, son of Joseph Golden of Troy, who was born 
July 17, 1810, and died in Troy, Feb. 18, 1872. He was 
an undertaker, and proprietor of the chief establishment 
in this line in Troy. She died there, April 12, 1882. 

104 VI. David Boutecou, born Oct. 25, 1807. He left 
home when a young man, and was last heard of in Texas 
about 1840. During the War of the Rebellion the exist- 
ence of a Bontecou family in that State was rumored, and 
the natural conclusion reached was that it was the family 
of David ; but a recent search through every county in the 
State fails to reveal the existence of such a name, neither 
do the land records show that a patent to land has ever 
been issued to one of the name of Bontecou. It is possi- 
ble that he or his descendants may be living, but we know 
nothing of them. 

105 VII. Samuel Storer Bontecou, born Jan. 23, 1810, 
died July 11, 1812. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 79 

106 VIII. George Bontecou, born in Coeymans, N. Y., 273 
June 23, 1812. When he was thirteen years of age his 
parents removed to New Baltimore, N. Y. In 1830 he 
went to Troy, learned the trade of a shoemaker, and mar- 
ried, Sept. 6, 1838, Lydia Ann Whipple, daughter of Wil- 
liam W. and Hannah (Adams) Whipple of Troy. She 

was born in that city. May 28, 1818, and died there, Feb. 
20, 1864. In 1849 Mr. Bontecou relinquished his trade, 
and from that time until 1866 was engaged in the lumber 
business, as clerk, inspector, and principal ; a portion of 
the time in New York City. In 1866 he removed to 
Vineland, N. J., where he still resides, engaged in farm- 
ing and fruit culture. He married (2d), July 1, 1869, 
Margaret Dustin, daughter of Ananis and Margaret 
(Hunter) Dustin of Waterford, Erie County, Pa. 

107 IX. Edward Bontecou, born Jan. 13, 1815. He 285 

married, Sept. 2, 1842, Mrs. Cornelia Keifer, widow of 
Baltue Keifer, and daughter of Garret and Maria (Pal- 
mater) Whitbeck of Coeymans Hollow, N. Y. She died 
there in September, 1877. Edward Bontecou passed the 
years 1846 and 1847 in Texas, but returned to Coeymans, 
remaining tiiere until 1852. In that year he departed 
by steamer for California, located in Weaverville, Trinity 
County, and was for a number of years interested in 
mining enterprises there and elsewhere. In 1878 he 
removed to Newhall, Los Angeles County, and engaged 
in building roads for the Pico Oil Company. He died 
in Newhall, May 4, 1883. At the time of his death he 
held the offices of school commissioner and justice of 
the peace, and was a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

108 X. Francis Bontecou, born in Coeymans, N. Y., 288 
Nov. 17, 1819. He married, Jan. 25, 1844, Clarissa Maria 
Landon, daughter of Gardner and Mary (Bissell) Landon 



80 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

of Troy. About this time he established himself in tlie 
lumber trade, conducting it for six years in Troy, then 
for a year in California. In May, 1851, he removed to 
New York City, and continued in the same business until 
May, 1878, when he removed to Toronto, Woodson County, 



CHILDREN OF REV. MENZIES AND REBECCA (bONTECOU) 36 
RAYNER. 

109 I. Miriam Powell Rayner, born in Elizabethtown, 
N. J., Dec. 3, 1796; died in Westborough, Mass., Oct. 31, 
1881, unmarried. 

110 II. Caroline Starr Rayner, born in Elizabethtown, 293 
N. J., April 2, 1799. She married, Jan. 2, 1827, John 
Peck Burritt of Newtown, Conn. He was a comb-maker 

by trade; was born in Newtown, Dec. 10, 1800, and about 
1830 removed to Wappinger's Creek, now Wappinger's 
Falls, N. y., and established himself in the manufacture 
of those articles. He was shortly after seized with rheu- 
matism and confined for six months, and there being no 
one to attend to his business, the enterprise failed. He 
soon afterward returned to Newtown. He was drowned, 
Sept. 20, 1842, while crossing the Housatonic River in a 
row-boat. The family removed to New York, and resided 
with grandfather Rayner at 22 First Avenue. In 1860 
they removed to Stoughton, Wis., where Mrs. Burritt 
died, Sept. 21, 1882. 

111 III. Daniel Bontecou Rayner, born in Elizabeth- 
town, N. J., Jan. 14, 1801; died in Hartford, Conn., 
Dec' 1,1801. 

112 IV. Benjamin Lester Rayner, born in Hartford, 301 
Conn., Sept. 7, 1802. He married. May 10, 1835, Nancy 



FIFTH GENERATION. 81 

Merrill, daughter of Benjamin and Dorothy (Currier) 
Merrill of Portsmouth, N. H. She died in New York, 
July 6, 1866. He studied law at Washington College 
(now Trinity), Hartford, and practiced it as a profession, 
but combined some literary work with it : besides editing 
a newspaper, he wrote a eulogistic life of Thomas Jeffer- 
son, which was published in Hartford by subscription, and 
is said to have been the first of the subscription books of 
which that city afterwards became so great a center of 
publication. After his marriage he removed to New York 
City, and owing to deafness gave up legal practice. He 
died in that city, Nov. 29, 1862. 

113 Y. William Charles Rayiier, born in Hartford, Sept. 
5, 1804 ; died there, Dec. 10, 1805. 

114 YI. Daniel Olcott Rayner, born in Hartford, May 302 
26, 1806. He married, Aug. 22, 1834, Frances Case, 
daughter of Harlow Case of Windsor, Conn. She died 
July 20, 1872. At present he resides with his daughter, 
Mrs. Yincent, at Sioux Falls, Dak. 

115 YII. Rebecca Bontecoii Rayner, born in Hartford, 
June 19, 1808; died in Westborough, Mass., Oct. 12, 1881, 
unmarried. 

116 YIII. MenziesRayner, Jr., born in Hartford, Conn., 304 
March 20, 1810. He commenced his business life at the 

age of 14, as clerk in a grocery store in Bridgeport, 
Conn. After a trial at this, both in Bridgeport and New 
York, and at other business in Hartford, he removed to 
Portland, Me., with his parents, about 1832, and estab- 
lished himself in the book trade and printing business ; the 
Christian Pilot, edited by his father, was issued from his 
establishment. He married, Nov. 14, 1833, Ann Elizabeth 
Stevens, daughter of Capt. James and Elizabeth (Trum- 
bull) Stevens of Portland. In 1835 he removed to Troy, 



82 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

N. Y., and shortly after to New York City. After a trial 
and failure in the bakery business, he obtained employ- 
ment as book-keeper in Peter Cooper's rolling and wire 
mill, and when his works were built in Trenton, N. J., 
removed there, and remained over twenty years in differ- 
ent departments. His wife died in New York, Nov. 30, 
1843. He married (2d), Aug. 6, 1844, Mrs. Susan Nodine 
of New York, daughter of Joseph and Hester (Brown) 
Prindle of Sandgate, Vt. She died at Trenton, Feb. 28, 
1858. He married (3d), March 13, 1859, Mrs. Rebecca 
Jane (McClure) Starr, from whom he was divorced in 
1874. In 1870, he went West, remaining eleven years in 
Wisconsin, and then returned to Trenton, where he now 
resides at 341 Fair Street. 

117 IX. Mary Martha Rayiier, born in Huntington, 
Conn., April 10, 1812. She married, Feb. 9, 1831, Lu- 
cius Bonaparte Allyn, eldest son of Nathan Allyn of Hart- 
ford, Conn., and died at Washington, D. C, Oct. 18, 1866. 
She had no children. Mr. Allyn was born in Hartford in 
1809. He engaged with his brother in the drug business, 
but about 1835 sold out his interest and removed with 
his wife to Wisconsin, with a view to settling there. Not 
meeting with success, they returned to Hartford, and in 
1848 removed to Washington, where he obtained a clerk- 
ship in the Navy Department which he filled for nearly 
twenty years; he was then called to a responsible and 
arduous financial position in the Treasury Department, 
which he filled creditably to himself and with marked 
advantage to the Government. Mr. Allyn married (2d), 
Oct. 31, 1867, Mary Jane Burritt (295), niece of his first 
wife, and died in Washington, Aug. 7, 1876, He held 
high rank in the Order of Odd Fellows; was a large- 
hearted, benevolent man ; sympathetic and kind, and ex- 
tremely courteous in manner. His widow resides in 
Washington, at 610 M Street, N. W. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 83 

118 X. Jane Elizabeth Barry Rayner, born in Hunt- 311 
inp:ton, Conn., May 19, 1815. She married, Feb. 21, 
1840, in Lansingburg, N. Y., George Giliuan Warner of 
Walpole, N. H. He was born in Holden, Mass., and at 

the age of 16 entered the employ of a house dealing in 
West India goods at Roxbury; at 21 he went to Troy, 
N. Y., and commenced business for himself, but after two 
years removed to Walpole, N. H., and opened a dry-goods 
and general merchandise store, which he continued until 
1848. He then removed to Westborough, Mass., and con- 
tinued in the same line for nine years, at the end of which 
period he sold out and retired from active business. He 
shortly after removed to Philadelphia, but in 1860 returned 
to Westborough, where he now resides. Mrs. Warner died 
July 25, 1885, 

119 XI. William Charles Rayiier, born in Huntington, 
Conn., April 17, 1817. He commenced his business life 
in a music store in Troy, N. Y. Having a strong musical 
taste, he became under able instruction a proficient, and 
for many years made musical instruction his business. 
He has resided in Whitehall, N. Y., Pittsfield, Mass., New 
York City, and Janesville, Wis. Making a specialty of 
organ music, he has usually filled a position as organist 
in each place of his residence ; in New York he served in 
this capacity in the North Dutch Church and the Lafayette 
Place Dutch Reformed Church. In 1863 he removed from 
New York to Janesville, and taught the piano for about 
eight years, since which time he has been engaged in 
tuning pianos, traveling in the States of Wisconsin and 
Iowa. He has never married, and calls Janesville his 
home. 

119 a. XII. Cornelia Shelton Rayner, born in Hunting- 
ton, Conn., Jan. 12, 1820; died there, July 4, 1824. 



84 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDRElSr OF DANIEL AND SYBIL (pOTTEr) BONTECOU. 37 

120 I. Catharine Rhodes Bontecoii, born in Enfield, 313 
Conn., Dec. 26, 1798. She married, Nov. 12, 1819, Wells 
Lathrop of Springfield. He was born in Becket, Mass., 
Feb. 25, 1795, and died in South Hadley, Mass., April 12, 
1871, thirty-five years after a ' second marriage. Mrs. 
Lathrop was a lady of superior intelligence and piety. 
She died Dec. 24, 1832. 

From the Springfield Republican of April 12, 1871 : — 
"Wells Lathrop, who was prominently identified with 
the business interests of Springfield half a century ago, 
died at his home at South Hadley Falls, on Wednesday, 
in his 77th year. He was a native of Wilbraliam [error : 
he was born in Becket, but his parents removed to Wil- 
braham when he was a child], a son of Capt. Joseph La- 
throp, and a grandson of the famous Rev. Dr. Lathrop of 
West Springfield, with whom he passed the winters of his 
boyhood in study. He came to Springfield when sixteen 
years old, and served as an apprentice in Warriner <fe Bon- 
tecou's store, which stood on the site of the present First 
National Bank. In 1816 he joined his fortunes with 
those of Charles Howard, who is still living, and the 
firm of Howard & Lathrop for eight or nine years kept a 
miscellaneous store in the old style. In 1824-5 the same 
firm built, at South Hadley Falls, on the site of the pres- 
ent Glasgow Mills, the first paper mill erected in Hamp- 
shire County, and during more than twenty years Mr. 
Lathrop ran it, Mr. Howard remaining liere. The enter- 
prise was not successful, however, and in April, 1846, the 
firm went into insolvency. The next month a fire swept 

' He married, Sept. 12, 1836, Mrs. Lydia Wasbbui ne, widow of Dr. 
Lewis Wasbburne of Bridgewater, Mass., and daugbter of Benjamin 
and Relief (Dunbar) Ager of Acton, Mass. Tbey bad two cbildren: 
Wells Lathrop. born Aug. 14, 1844, died young; Mary Lathroj), born 
Feb. 15, 1847, now tbe wife of Prof. Fernald of Williams College. 
Mrs. Latbrop resides in Williamstown, Mass., witb ber daugbter. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 85 

away the mill and its contents. The site was purchased 
by Joseph Carew, who had been for twenty years their 
clerk, and who then laid the foundation of his present 
fortune. Mr. Lathrop became subsequently a landholder 
in South Hadley (though not himself a practical farmer), 
and was largely interested with his brother Paoli La- 
tlirop in stock breeding. . . . Politically Mr. Lathrop was 
formerly an old Whig, but became a Democrat in the " 15 
gallon law" times of 1838, along with Ex-Mayor Bemis 
and many other Whigs of those days ; and he was after- 
wards an active and prominent Democrat, and frequently 
a delegate to the State and National Conventions. He 
was one of the founders of the Chicopee Bank ; and of one 
hundred and fifteen corporators of the Unitarian Church 
he was one of only three who survive, the remaining two 
being Charles Howard and David Barber. Subsequently, 
however, he was converted to orthodoxy under the preach- 
ing of Rev. Dr. Osgood. A man of positive qualities and 
strong convictions, he was earnest and enthusiastic in reli- 
gion, politics, or whatever he u^ertook; and some of the 
sharpest and sauciest of the political handbills which 
were so freely used to fire the hearts of voters thirty and 
forty years ago were from his pen. For many years past 
he has been an invalid, and of late has entirely withdrawn 
from active life. His funeral will take place at South 
Hadley Falls to-morrow afternoon." 

121 II. Daughter, born Nov. 4, 1803 ; died same day. 

122 III. Daniel Boiitecoii, born Oct. 23, 1804. He was 
a sailor, and died in New York of cholera, Aug. 20, 1852. 

123 IV. Martha Potter Boiitecou, born in Springfield, 317 
Mass., Oct. 10, 1806 ; died in New York City, April 30, 
1855. She married, Nov. 25, 1836, Oliver Ellsworth 
Wood, son of Joseph and Fanny (Ellsworth) Wood of 
New Haven, Conn. He was born in Stamford, Conn., 



86 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

April 14, 1812. Mr. Wood married (2d), Oct. 22, 1863, 
Catharine Bontecou Lathrop (315), daugliter of Wells 
and Catharine Rhodes (Bontecou) Lathrop, and niece of 
his first wife. He died at Westport, Conn., Dec. 18, 1883. 
From the New York Herald, Dec. 20, 1883: — "Mr. 
Oliver Ellsworth Wood, a well-known merchant of this 
city, died on Tuesday, at Westport, Conn. He was nearly 
seventy-two years of age, and was born in Stamford, 
Conn. He was a son of Joseph Wood, late judge on 
the Connecticut bench, and his grandfather was Oliver 
Ellsworth, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme 
Court by appointment of President Washington. Mr. 
Wood came to New York fifty years ago, and took a posi- 
tion as clerk in the house of Starr & Hoffman, dry-goods 
jobbers. In 1836, and from that date until 1844, he was a 
member of the formerly well-known firm of Stone, Wood 
& Starr, in Cedar Street. About 1844 he formed the 
firm of Baldwin, Willard & Wood, a dry-goods commis- 
sion house, which carried on business until 1861, when 
lie retired from business, and since that time has been 
occupied as a negotiator of securities. In addition to his 
business affairs, Mr. Wood found time to attend to the 
interests of various benevolent and religious societies. 
He was an officer of the Old Brick Church many years 
ago, and afterwards a deacon in the Church of the Puri- 
tans, Rev. Dr. Cheever's, on Union Square. Of late he 
was an elder of the Madison Square Presbyterian Church. 
When the Home Insurance Company of this city was 
in process of formation in 1853, Mr. Wood acted as 
chairman of the preliminary meetings, and on the organ- 
ization of the company he was elected chairman of one 
of the standing committees of the board of directors, 
a position which he retained for more than thirty years." 

124 V, Sybil Pease Bontecou, born in Springfield, Mass., 319 
March 31, 1808. She married, Sept. 10, 1828, Richard 



FIFTH GENERATION. 87 

Darius Morris, son of Edward and Lucy (Bliss) Morris 
of Wilbraham, Mass. (South Parish). He was born 
Aug. 30, 1797. She died in Springfield, Nov. 22, 1851. 
" Mr. Morris was a member of the Hampden County bar 
previous to 1837, when he became connected with the 
Western Railroad (now Boston & Albany), as agent to 
procure for them the right of way. After the comple- 
tion of the road he continued in their employ as wood 
agent, and became well known to all the farmers of West- 
ern Massachusetts ; and ' 'Squire Morris ' was being con- 
stantly called upon to arbitrate between the farmers in 
their disputes with one another. On the morning of 
June 21, 1870, he arose in his usual health, passed a 
half-hour in his garden, came in and lay down on a sofa, 
and shortly after died. At one time he served on the 
governor's staff and held the rank of major." 

125 VI. Mary Boiitecou, born Feb. 16, 1810. She mar- 
ried, Feb. 25, 1828, James Worthington of Springfield, 
a hotel keeper. He died Dec. 15, 1838, aged 83. She 
afterwards married Charles C. Machette, and died in 
Springfield, in July, 1846, leaving no children. 

CHILDREN OF DANIEL AKD IIAERIET (bLISs) BO^'TECOU. 37 

126 I. WilHam Boutecou, born Aug. 28, 1817; died 
Sept. 14, 1817. 

127 II. Harriet Boiitecou, born in Springfield, Mass., 323 
Oct. 9, 1818. She married, Aug. 23, 1842, Capt. Henry 
Morris, son of Edward and Mercy (Flynt) Morris of Wil- 
braham, Mass., born Feb. 25, 1819. At the age of 15 

he entered upon a seafaring life, and was master of a 
vessel before he had attained his majority. His earlier 
voyages were made to various parts of tlie globe, but he 
finally settled down in the West India trade, and made 
many voyages between New York and the West India 



88 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

islands. He was lost at sea early in March, 1844, in 
the " Mary Bright," of which he was part owner, though 
not in command at the time. His widow married (2d), 
Dec. 1, 1859, ' Charles Morris, a brother of Henry, as his 
second wife. He was born June 6, 1812. He was a 
merchant tailor, and resided in Keeseville, Essex County, 
N. Y., where he died Jan. 25, 1875, Harriet Bontecou 
possessed many admirable traits of character : gentle in 
manner, pleasing in conversation, combining the qualities 
considered desirable in cultured society with a natural 
sweetness of disposition, she made and retained many 
friends. A fond wife and loving mother, with strong 
domestic attachments, she was early called to mourn the 
loss of her husband ; which sorrow, combined with the 
uncertainty of his fate for a time, proved too great a 
strain upon her health, and it gave way and was never 
fully recovered. For the last few years of her life she 
was a great invalid, but bore her sufferings with fortitude, 
meekness, and resignation. She died in Keeseville, Jan. 
28, 1872. 

128 III. WilHam Ely Bontecou, born in Springfield, 324 
ti Ji /ft'*r Nov. 1,1823. He married, . Oct. 23, 1849, Caroline Cod- 
dington Thayer, daughter of Abraham and Abigail (Bow- 

' Charles Morris was first married in New York City, April 6, 1837, 
to Sarah Maria Smith, daughter of Isaac and Lydia (Rogers) Smith. 
She died in Keeseville, N. Y., Jan. 26. 1852. Their children are: 

I. Sarah Maria, born March 22, 1838. Married, Aug. 25, 1863, 

at Keeseville, Charles Clinton Adams of Warren, Ohio, 
a merchant. Their children, born in Warren: 

1. Jenny Morris, born April 2, 1866. 

2. Mary, born Aug. 26, 1869. 

II. Charles, born Oct. 12, 1842, married, Aug. 31. 1865, at Fair- 

haven, Vt., Fannie Haywood Cox, daughter of Edward B. 
and Arvilla (Brace) Cox. They reside in St. Louis, Mo., 
where he is a book-keeper and cashier. They have an 
adopted daughter, Minnie (Daniels), who was born in Alton, 
111., Dec. 25, 1867. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 89 

ditch) Thayer of Weymouth, Mass., born Jan. 14, 1832. 
He commenced his business life in a drug store in Boston, 
and afterwards established himself in the same business 
in Springfield. This eventually proving a failure, he 
subsequently followed the business in New York, Buffalo, 
Toledo (Ohio), and San Francisco. He served during 
the Civil War as an assistant surgeon in the Navy, and 
participated in the battle of Mobile Bay. In the spring 
of 1867 he removed to California, and has ever since 
remained there, following his profession at times ; but, 
compelled by ill health to seek open-air pursuits, he has 
chiefly engaged in " ranching." He resides at Santa 
Rosa. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 



CHILDREN OF DANIEL UPSON AND MARY BONTECOU. 38 

129 I. George Sheering Boiitecoii, born May 25, 1796. 327 

He married, March 28, 1827, Mrs. Martha Baisley, widow 
of Abraham Baisley. She died June 5, 1861. He was 
a baker, and pursued his trade in New York City until 
about 1831, when he removed to Newburg, Orange County, 
being a portion of the time in business for himself. He 
died there, Jan. 1, 1861. 

130 II. WilHam Henry Bontecou, born in 1802, and 
baptized in Trinity Church, New Haven, July 18, 1804. 
He is said to have been a mariner, and lost at sea. It is 
not positively known that he ever married, but the proba- 
bility is that he did. 

131 III. Mary Bontecou, born in New Haven in 1804. 331 
When a child she was adopted by Capt. John A. Thomas 

of New Haven, who was subsequently given charge of 
Fort Hale, on the East Haven shore of the harbor. She 
married, in 1825, George Washington Bradley, son of 
Samuel and Sarah (Bradley) Bradley, who was born in 
East Haven in 1797. He was a sailor by profession, and 
sailed as mate between New Haven, Branford, and the 
West Indies. While he was absent on one of his voyages, 
his wife died of consumption, March 29, 1827. He died 
(also of consumption) in East Haven, May 16, 1833. 

132 IV. Harriet Bontecou, born in New York City in 332 
1812. She was adopted by a Mrs. Sing of Sing Sing, 



SIXTH GENERATION. 91 

N. Y., and brouglit up there, her parents having died when 
she was a child. She lost all knowledge of the where- 
abouts of her brothers and sister, but discovered her 
brother George after his settlement in Newburg, and went 
to live in his family. She married in Newburg, May 22, 
1836, James Hamilton, born in County Antrim, near the 
village of Antrim, Ireland, Oct. 10, 1814. His father's 
family emigrated to America in 1832, and settled in New- 
burg, where Mr. Hamilton was brought up to the trade of 
mason ; but in 1814 he entered the grocery business, con- 
tinuing in it as clerk and proprietor for twenty-six years, 
when he was elected sheriff of Orange County. When 
his term of office expired, he took up his trade again ; 
but in 1878 was elected coroner, and also holds the office 
of constable. He resides (1883) at 169 Lander Street, 
Newburg. His wife died in Newburg, April 5, 1876. 

CHILDKEN^ OF ELIAKIM AND SUSANNAH (bONTECOU) 39 

benha:\i. 

133 I. Julia EHzabetli Beiiham, born Oct. 11, 1793. 340 
Siie married, March 11, 1813, Norman Hayden, a mer- 
chant of New Haven, who was born March 2, 1786, and 
died March 17, 1820. In 1825 she removed to Smith- 
field, Isle of Wight County, Va., and engaged in teaching, 

in which profession she was very successful. Sbe mar- 
ried (2d), Dec. 15, 1831, in Smithfield, Sampson White, 
a merchant of that place, and died there, Dec. 15, 1865. 
She was a strict Episcopalian, a most pious Christian, 
and a woman of great benevolence. Mr. AVhite died April 
20, 1867. 

134 II. Susan Clariiida Benliam, born Feb. 11, 1796. 344 
She married, May 9, 1818, Cleveland Jarman Salter, a 
merchant of New Haven (son of Daniel Salter), and died 

Oct. 14, 1820. Mr. Salter afterwards removed to Illinois, 



92 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

where witli several others he founded the town of Wa- 
verlj. He married (2d), Eliza Cotton of New York City, 
and by her had a number of children. He died Jan. 27, 

1878. 

135 III. Elisha Maude ville Beiiliaiii, born in New 316 
Haven, Sept. 12,1800. He married, Aug. 5, 1821, Abby 
Kimberly, daughter of Horace and Huldah (Kimberly) 
Kimberly of New Haven. She was born in April, 1804. 

He was a mariner in early life, and afterwards connected 
with mercantile pursuits. On a visit to Virginia under- 
taken for the benefit of his failing liealth, he died in 
Smithfield, April 29, 1854. Mr. Benham was a strong 
temperance advocate, and member of the popular temper- 
ance orders of his day. His widow resides with her 
daughter, Mrs. Childs, in Providence, R. I. 

136 IT. Louisa Walter Benham, born in 1802. When a 350 
young woman she removed from New Haven to Norwich, 
Conn., and opened a school, in which she was assisted 

by her sister Harriet. She married, Jan. 21, 1822, Capt. 
Francis Wells Bushnell of Norwich, and they went to 
housekeeping in what is known as the " Spooner House," 
opposite Breed's Hall on Church Street. He was born in 
May, 1796. He was bred a cabinet-maker, but turned 
hotel keeper, and was the proprietor of a hotel known as 
the Thames House, by the water-side. He afterwards 
owned and commanded vessels coasting between Norwich 
and New York. Mrs. Bushnell died Sept. 28, 1833, and 
Capt. Bushnell again married. He died in Norwich of 
consumption, Aug. 22, 1859. 

137 V. Harriet Augusta Benham, baptized July 8, 
1-S04. She was remarkable for her small size when an 
infant: her father's finger-ring could be slipped over her 
hand and up to her shoulder; but she attained to ordinary 



SIXTH GENERATION. 93 

size as she became older. She assisted her sister Louisa 
in the care of a school at Norwich. She never married, 
and died at Smithfield, Va., Sept. 3, 1844. 

CHILDREN OF AMOS AND ELIZABETH (bONTECOU) 40 

HALL. 

138 I. Eliza Ann Hall, born Sept. 21, 1804. She mar- 355 
ricd, June 16, 1824, William Pritchard, son of David and 
Anne (Hitchcock) Pritchard of Waterbury, Conn., where 

he was born, March 20, 1800. He was brought up a 
farmer and stock dealer. In 1831 they removed to Can- 
andaigua, N. Y. ; the next year to Ohio, where he bought 
a farm in Brunswick, Medina County. He continued to 
deal in stock, shipping to New York by lake and canal, and 
sometimes driving through on foot. Mrs. Pritchard died 
in Brunswick, Aug. 18, 1857. After his wife's death he 
removed to Iowa, and married, Aug. 25, 1859, in Des 
Moines, Mrs. Delia E. Gordon, as her third husband. He 
was a member of the Congregational Church. He died in 
Jefferson, Iowa, Oct. 27, 1884. 

139 II. Charles Hall, born in the western part of the 364 
town of Cheshire, Conn., Oct. 12, 1806. He was brought 

up on his father's farm, and married, Sept. 13, 1830, Amy 
Moss, daughter of Asahel and Amy (Andrews-Hitchcock) 
Moss. She was, through lier father, a descendant of John 
Moss, one of the first English settlers of Wallingford, 
Conn., who died at tlie age of 103. In May, 1834, Mr. 
Hall and his wife joined the Congregational Church. In 
the fall of 1838 he removed with his family to Bruns- 
wick, Ohio, and in connection with his brother Amos 
bought a tract of nearly wild land, which they were 
obliged to clear of heavy timber before they could put in 
their first crop of wheat. During his stay in Brunswick 
he was clerk of the Congregational Church, and connected 



94 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

with the Sabbath School as teacher. In the fall of 1843 
he returned to Cheshire and settled on the old homestead, 
where he now resides. In 1832 Mr. Hall was commis- 
sioned by Governor Peters of Connecticut as a captain in 
the 22d Regiment of Militia. He has always been highly 
respected in the community, and known as an industrious 
and upright man. At the age of 79 he enjoys good health. 
Mrs. Hall died Aug. 13, 1875. 

140 III. Nancy Hall, born in November, 1808; mar- 373 
ried in 1829 Hiram Bradley of Cheshire, Conn., a manu- 
facturer of wagon materials. He was born in Cheshire, 

Oct. 3, 1809, and died April 1, 1876. She died May 4, 
1873. They are both buried in Cheshire cemetery. 

141 IT. Amos Hall, Jr., born Feb. 18, 1811. He was 374 
a farmer. He married, March 31, 1834, Arpatia Doo- 
little, daughter of Enos and Millie (Preston) Doolittle of 
Cheshire. She was born in 1811, and died Jan. 1, 1876. 

He died Aug. 16, 1861. Both are buried in Cheshire 
cemetery. 

142 V. George Anson Hall, born in Cheshire, Jan. 377 
31, 1814. He married, June 6, 1838, Sarah Merriams, 
daughter of Bufus and Sarah (Hotchkiss) Merriams of 
Prospect, Conn. She died Oct. 18, 1867. He has always 
been a farmer, residing at Cheshire, Prospect, Hunt- 
ington, and now (1883), in Trumbull, Conn., with his 
daughter Mrs. Baldwin. 

143 VI. Snsan Salina HaH, born in Cheshire, Oct. 13, 379 
1817. She married, Oct. 12, 1839, Henry Livingston of 
Brunswick, Ohio, son of Henry G. Livingston, Jr., who 
served in the War of 1812, and grandson of Henry G. 
Livingston, a major in the Continental Army during the 
Revolution. His maternal grandfather was Nathan Swift, 

who also served in the Continental Army, and fought in 



SIXTH GENERATION. \)) 

the battle of Bunker Hill. Mr. Livingston was born 
in Schodack, Rensselaer County, N. Y., Sept. 18, 1818 ; 
at the age of 16 removed to Ohio with his father and set- 
tled in Brunswick, where he now resides, engaged in farm- 
ing. Mrs. Livingston died May 5, 1885. 

144 Til. Henrietta Elizabeth Hall, born April 30, 384 
1821. She married Edward Terrell of Waterbury, died 
Feb. 5, 1870, and is buried in Riverside cemetery. He 

was born in Waterbury, Jan. 16, 1820. By trade he is 
a designer and tool-maker, and has been in the employ 
of the Scoville Manufacturing Company for forty years, 
having charge of the button-chasing department. He is 
a member of the Baptist Church, its treasurer, and mem- 
ber of the church committee. 

CHILDREN OF DANIEL AND POLLY (bONTECOU) BENE- 43 
DICT. 

145 I. George Rice Benedict, born in St. Albans, Vt., 385 
July 8, 1802. When a lad of 14 he emigrated to Genesee 
County, N. Y. ; in 1824 removed to Niagara County and 
settled in the town of Royalton, of which place he con- 
tinued a resident until his death. He married, Sept. 17, 
1827, Laurinda, daughter of Elias Safford of Royalton. 

She was born Dec. 24, 1808, and in 1882 was still living. 
Mr. Benedict was one of the earliest settlers of South 
Royalton, having followed the Indian trail there. In 
1837 he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and was always one of its strong friends and supporters. 
For twenty years he held the office of assessor in Royal- 
ton. He died Dec. 31, 1872. 

146 II. Julius Hoyt Benedict, born in St. Albans, Vt., 391 
Aug. 5, 1804, where he lived until about twenty years of 

age, when he removed with his parents to Niagara County, 
N. Y. He purchased land in Royalton, and owned and 



96 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

cleared several farms. He married, June 12, 1831, Olive 
Crego, daughter of Kuluf D. and Elsie (Strenihen) Crego 
of Clarence, Erie County, N. Y. She was born Jan. 9, 
1810. In 1839 he left New York State for Michigan, 
and after temporarily stopping at Brest, Monroe County, 
and Franklin, Oakland County, he settled in Lenawee 
County, and engaged in farming about four miles north of 
Adrian. In the spring of 1845 he moved into the vil- 
lage, and engaged in the grocery trade. He was an 
active, energetic man, and one of the first to engage 
in the fur trade, doing a large business with the hunters 
and trappers of his region, and journeying as far north- 
west as St. Paul, mingling with the Indians, and pur- 
chasing of them at one time 120,000 worth of furs. He 
was a man of sterling integrity and probity, and until 
old age and feeble health came upon him, his time was 
spent in active business pursuits. He died in Adrian, 
April 19, 1876. His wife died Feb. 1, 1871. 

147 III. Nancy Rice Benedict, born in St. Albans, Vt., 396 
Oct. 14, 1810. She married, Oct. 16, 1827, George Hay- 
norUtleyof Connecticut. He died Dec. 23, 1880. She 

was living in 1882, at Rapids, Niagara County, N. Y. 

148 IV. Amanda Benedict, born in St. Albans, Vt., 405 
Oct. 17, 1812. She married, Feb. 10, 1830, George Clin- 
ton Crego of Clarence, N. Y., and died in Adrian, Mich., 
Nov. 11, 1871. Mr. Crego resides (1882) in Adrian. 

CITILDEEN OF THADDEUS AND NANCY ( BONTECOU ) RICE. 44 

149 I. Alvin Bontecou Rice, born in St. Albans, Vt., 414 
in 1803. He married Cornelia Smith, daughter of Sam- 
uel M. and Theodosia (Waterman) Smith of Vermont, 

who was born in 1799. He removed to Erie County, 
N. Y., in 1834, and in 1857 to Grand Rapids Township, 



SIXTH GENERATION. 97 

Mich., where he died, January, 1862. He was a farmer. 
Mrs. Rice died there, Sept. 18, 1872. 

150 II. Charles Benham Rice, born in St. Albans, Vt., 419 
in 1805, and was baptized in Trinity Church, New Haven, 
Conn., July 5, 1812. Somewhere between 1835 and 1840 

he removed to Buffalo, N. Y. He married Mrs. Alma 
Augusta Brooker of Buffalo (born in 1800), widow of 
Phipps Waldo Brooker. Her maiden name was Williams. 
Mr. Rice served as clerk and steward on Lake steamers. 
He died at his home on Delaware Avenue (present number 
867), July 26, 1863. Mrs. Rice died in Buffalo, April 23, 
1879, aged 79. 

CHILD REJSr OF JAMES AND CLARISSA (bONTECOU) DOU- 45 
GREY. 

151 I. Hannah Dongrey, born Dec. 13, 1806. She mar- 420 
ried, Oct. 5, 1831, James Nichols. He was a native of 
England ; came to America when a young man, and estab- 
lished himself in the grocery business in Lansingburg, 

N. Y. He died suddenly, Sept. 26, 1851. She died July 
30, 1872. 

152 II. James Dongrey, Jr., born July 13, 1808. He 424 

married, Oct. 4, 1831, Prances Elizabeth Moulton, daugh- 
ter of Howard and P]lizabeth (Turner) Moulton of Troy, 
N. Y. Mr. Dougrey has always resided in Lansingburg 
(with the exception of a short time in New York when 
a young man), in the same house for seventy-five years; 
has been actively engaged in mercantile business ; and 
has held various positions of trust in his native town, as 
assessor, supervisor, justice of the peace, etc. He and 
his wife are both living. 

153 III. Clarissa Ann Dougrey, born Nov. 16, 1809. 430 
She married. May 6, 1834, Charles Dikeman Smith of 



98 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Lansingbiirg. Mr. Smith pursued various lines of busi- 
ness there. He removed to Michigan at an early day in 
its history, purchased a large tract of land on which the 
city of Marshall now stands, and built the first frame 
house there. He held many positions of public trust: 
county clerk, postmaster, justice of the peace, etc. He 
afterwards removed to Chicago, and died there, May 3, 
1870. Mrs. Smith died at Turner Junction, near Chicago, 
Aug. 6, 1853. 

154 IT. Joliii Doiigrey, born Oct. 26, 1811 ; died Nov. 
14, 1825. 

155 V. Mary EUzabetli Dougrey, born May 23, 1818. 435 

She married, May 9, 1839, James Norman Barker, a 
druggist of Lansingburg. She died in Chicago, 111., Jan. 
24, i880. He resides (1883) in Lansingburg. 

156 VI. JiUia Dougrey, born March 1, 1821. She mar- 439 
ried, Dec. 24, 1845, William Brownell Cory of Lansing- 
burg, a native of Cambridge, N. Y. He was the proprie- 
tor of a line of omnibuses running between Lansingburg 

and Troy, and was at one time in the hotel business. 
He died Oct. 10, 1854. 

CHILDREN OF ANTHONY AND JULIA (bONTECOU) 47 

BRISTOL. 

157 I. JiiHa Ann Bristol, born Dec. 7, 1811. She mar- 441 
ried, Nov. 30, 1830, Andrew Winton French. He was 
born in Milford, Conn., Nov. 11, 1811, where he lived until 
1867, when, after two years spent in Florida, he settled 

in Athens, Pa., where he now (1883) resides. He learned 
the shoemaker's trade, but has been chiefly engaged in 
clerical duties. His wife died in Milford, June 5, 1868. 

158 II. Henrietta Eliza Bristol, born Aug. 28, 1813. 445 
She married, Aug. 21, 1842, John Sanford, a merchant of 



SIXTH GENERATION. 99 

Milford, Conn. He was a descendant of one of the early 
settlers of the town; was born there in 1811, and died 
there, April 2, 1862. Mrs. Sanford died there, Jan. 19, 
1885. 

159 III. William Boutecou Bristoll (so he spelled his 448 
name) was born in Milford, Conn., April 3, 1815. He 
learned the coach-trimming and harness-making trade, 

and remained in the vicinity of Milford and New Haven 
until 1837, when he removed to Charleston, S. C, and 
engaged in the shoe trade. He married, Oct, 11, 1838, 
Sarah A. Merrick, daughter of Harvey Josiah and Me- 
litta (Downs) Merrick of Seymour, Conn. Mr. Bristoll 
remained at Charleston until the firing upon Fort Sum- 
ter, at the beginning of the war, when he returned to 
Milford, where he died June 28, 1883. He was greatly 
interested in this genealogical work, and to his energy 
and enterprise the compiler is indebted for much relating 
to the Bristol line. 

160 IV. Timothy Mason Bristol, born Dec. 15, 1816. 454 
He married, Aug. 15, 1841, Jane Matilda McDonough, 
daughter of Cornelius and Sarah (De Vere) McDonough. 

She died in New York City, Feb. 24, 1883. Mr. Bristol 
is engaged in the shoe business at 250 King Street, 
Charleston, S. C, but the family home is at 165 West 
22d Street, New York. 

161 y. Mary Hanford Bristol, born Nov. 12, 1818. 461 
She married, Aug. 13, 1837, Charles G. Newton, who was 
born in New Haven in 1816. He removed to Missouri 
with his father when six years old, but returned to New 
Haven at the age of 18, and there served an apprentice- 
ship to the carriage-making trade. After his marriage 

he removed with his wife to the Indian Territory, settling 
in Tahlequah, the capital of the Cherokee Nation, and 



100 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

engaged in trade with the Indians. In 1847 they crossed 
the border into Washington County, Ark., remaining but 
a short time, however, before removing to near Dallas, 
Texas. In 1849 or 1850 they removed to Austin, where 
she died March 5, 1852. After her death he moved back 
to Dallas, and again married. He improved a farm and 
lived on it two years, and then moved into the city and 
took up his trade. He was a member of the reserve 
corps of the Confederate Army during the Civil War, and 
detailed to operate machinery in the government shops 
in Dallas, receiving no pay for his services. In civil life 
he held the office of justice of the peace. Mr. Newton 
was originally a Presbyterian, but after his second mar- 
riage removed his relations to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He died in Dallas, Jan. 9, 1872. 

162 TI. Nancy Boiitecoii Bristol, born Jan. 3, 1821. 468 
She married, June 23, 1850, Stephen Sears of New Haven, 

as his second wife. He was born in Monroe, Conn,, Sept. 
5, 1815. He engaged in the blacksmith's trade, but after 
pursuing it a year or two, met with a severe accident 
which deprived him of his left hand, and incapacitated 
him from further following the business. He then learned 
the coach-painting trade, which he still follows. He re- 
sides at 24 Prince Street, New Haven. Mrs. Sears died 
in New Haven, Aug. 31, 1885. 

163 yil. Thomas Bristol, born in Milford, Conn., Dec. 470 
15, 1822. In 1838 he joined his brothers William and 
Thomas in Charleston, and remained in their employ 
about three years. He then returned to the North, and 
commenced the shoe business for himself (William hav- 
ing an interest in it), at 55 Catharine Street, New York. 

He married, Aug. 29, 1850, Sarah Brooks, daughter of 
Alexander and Sarah (Holgate) Brooks of Factoryville, 
Tioga County, N. Y. Their present address is 359 Sixth 



SIXTH GENERATION. 101 

Avenue. ]\Ir. Bristol has been a deacon in the Allen 
Street Presbyterian Church, but both he and his wife are 
now connected with the Fourth Avenue Presbyterian 
Church. 

164 Till. A daughter, born and died June 4, 1825. 

165 IX. Joliii Doiigrey Bristoll, born July 17, 1826. 
He commenced his business life in his brother Timothy's 
shoe store in Charleston, but returned North and finally 
settled in Athens, Pa., where he now (1883) resides. He 
is not actively engaged in business, and is unmarried. 

166 X. James Anthony Bristoll, born March 2, 1829. 472 
He married, June 20, 1860, Ellen Martha Page, daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Anne (West) Page of Athens, Pa. 

He was employed when a young man by his brother 
William, in Charleston. From there he removed to 
Athens, and engaged in the grocery and general store 
business ■<\'ith his brother-in-law F. N. Page. He is at 
present in the iron trade, and was employed in the erec- 
tion of one of the elevated railroads in New York. His 
home is at Athens. 

167 XI. Jane Augusta Bristol, born Dec. 25, 1830. 
She married, May 3, 1881, Anon Clark of Milford, Conn., 
as his second wife. Mr. Clark was born in Milford, Feb. 
14, 1808. He w^as a merchant in that town, and always 
resided there ; represented it in the State Legislature in 
1846, 1869, and 1870; and died there, Sept. 21, 1884. 
He was a member of the Baptist Church. 

168 XII. Charles E(hvard Bristol, born April 22, 1834. 478 
He married. May 15, 1858, Grace Ann Stowe, daughter 

of Capt. Elisha Hopkins and Susan (Davidson) Stowe of 
Milford. He was originally employed by his brothers in 
the shoe business in Charleston, S. C, but is now a hat 
maker, and resides in Danbury, Conn. 



102 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CniLDREISr OF RICHARD AND POLLY (bONTECOU) 49 

HANFORD. 

169 I. Mary Inn Hanford, born Oct. 22, 1814. She 486 
married, May 19, 1834, Francis Wright Jesup, and died 

Oct. 31, 1863. He died Nov. 22, 1876. Their place of 
residence was Westport, Conn. 

170 II. Richard Bontecon Hanford, born Feb. 24, 
1816 ; died May 9, 1851, unmarried. He was employed 
as a clerk in his father's business. 

171 III. JnUa Bristol Hanford, born Oct. 23, 1819. 491 
She married, April 25, 1839, Horace White Day. He is 

a native of Saratoga County, N. Y., and in early life set- 
tled in Lansingburg, and commenced his business career 
as a clerk in the dry-goods business ; became a merchant, 
and is still in business with his son Hanford. For many 
years he was connected with the bank of Lansingburg, 
as director, vice-president, and president. He is one of 
the wardens of Trinity Church. Mrs. Day died in April, 
1885. 

172 IV. Harriet Pynclion Hanford, born Nov. 16, 1830. 493 
She married, April 28, 1851, George Abbott Lally, a suc- 
cessful merchant of Lansingburg. He died June 27, 1881. 
Mrs. Lally resides in Lansingburg. 

173 V. Levi Cooley Hanford, born in Lansingburg, July 496 
5, 1833. He married, Oct. 11, 1861, Margaret Good- 
man, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Wool) Good- 
man of Lansingburg, born Nov. 22, 1837. They reside 

at Norwalk, Conn., where he is superintendent of the Gas 
Light Company. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 103 

CHILDREN OF ANSON AND HENRIETTA (bONTECOU) 50 
SMITH. 

174 I. Richard Haiiford Smith, born July 11, 1823; 
died in 1846, at Saltillo, Mexico, where he was in the 
service of his country as a soldier. 

175 II. James Dougrey Smith, born Aug. 17, 1825; 
drowned Oct. 6, 1834. 

176 III. Francis Smith, born in New Haven, Nov. 19, 500 
1827. He married, April 10,1851, Mary Jane Prindle, 
from whom he was afterwards divorced. She was the 
daughter of Isaac and Mary R. (Riggs) Prindle of Sims- 
bury, Conn. Mr. Smith is a mason by trade, and a life- 
long resident of New Haven. For several years he filled 

the office of lieutenant of police. He enlisted in the 12th 
Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, and was mustered in 
as a sergeant in Company F, Nov. 19, 1861. Sept. 20, 
1862, he was promoted to the second-lieutenancy of the 
same company, and Dec. 9, 1868, was appointed first lieu- 
tenant of Company H, of which he became captain Dec. 
2, 1864. He was wounded in the thigh at the battle of 
Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. He married (2d), Feb. 
26, 1875, Mrs. Julia Maria Allen of New Haven, widow 
of Charles Allen, and daughter of Benjamin Tyler and 
Julia Ann (Baldwin) Henry. Her father was the in- 
ventor of the Henry rifle. There are no children by the 
second marriage. 

177 IV. Clarissa Anu Smith, born Sept. 12, 1829; died 
Aug. 29, 1830. 

178 V. Clarissa Ann Smith, born March 3, 1831. She 502 
married, May 19, 1851, Charles Edwin Stannard, and 

died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 16, 1864. Mr- Stannard 
was born in Guilford, Conn., Jan. 24, 1828. He learned 



104 BONTECOU FAMILY, 

the bookbinder's trade in New Haven, and remained in 
that city until 1851, when he removed to New York, and 
two years later to Brooklyn, E. D., where he now resides 
at 168 Lee Avenue. He married (2d), May 1, 1879, Miss 
Sarah Jane Viele. 

179 VI. George Smith, born Sept. 30, 1832; died July 
30, 1851. 

180 VII. Mary Jesup Smith, born March 19, 1834. 504 
She married, Oct. 8, 1855, Charles William Strong of 
Milford, Conn., a shoemaker. He died Oct. 18, 1857. 

She resides in Milford. 

181 VIII. Hannah EHza Smith, born Dec. 19, 183i3. 505 
She married, Nov. 30, 1854, George R. Munson, who was 
born in Milford, Conn., Nov, 27, 1831. They reside in 
Cincinnati, Ohio. He. is a merchant. 

CHILD OF WILLIAM B. AND NANCY (bONTECOu) TII03IAS. 53 

182 I. Jnlia Ann Thomas, born Jan. 7, 1824 ; died Feb. 
12, lb32. 

CHILDREN OF MENEMON AND IIAREIET (bONTECOu) 57 
SANFORD. 

183 I. Thomas Bontecou Sanforcl, born in New Haven, 
Oct. 25, 1816. He married, June 3, 1846, Elizabeth Pren- 
tice Taylor, daughter of Abner and Anna (Hammond) 
Taylor of Bangor, Me. She was born in Bangor, Sept. 
18, 1819, and died Sept. 5, 1876. Mr. Sanford was en- 
gaged in steamboating, first as clerk and afterward as 
master. After his marriage he settled in Bangor. He 
died March 4, 1858. They had no children. 

184 II. Susan Bontecou Sanford, born in New Haven, 

Sept. 5, 1818 ; died July 13, 1875, unmarried. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 105 

185 III. Asa Meiiemon Sanford, born in New Haven, 507 
March 19, 1821. He married, April 10, 1842, Lucinda 
Kidder, daughter of Samuel and Harriet Kidder of New- 
York. He commenced steamboating as clerk, and became 
master at the age of 21. He resided in New York until 

the spring of 1849, when he removed his residence to 
Chelsea, Mass. On tlie 9th of September of the same 
year he died in Bangor, Me. Mrs. Sanford is living 
(1883). 

186 IT. Edward Huiitiiigtoii Sanford, l)orn in New 510 
Haven, June 1, 1823. He married, Dec. 19, 1840, Marv 
Foster, daughter of John and Nancy (Dillaway) Foster 

of Boston. She was born Nov. 5, 1827. He became 
master of a steamboat when about twenty-one years old, 
having previously served as clerk. After his marriage 
he settled in Boston. He died in St. Catharines, Out., 
Sept. 27, 1865. Mrs. Sanford died in October, 1862. 

187 y. William Higby Bontecou Sanford, bom in New 

Haven, July 11, 1825. Like his brothers he entered the 
steamboat service, and became master at the age of 21. 
He resided in New York. June 10, 1864, he sailed 
as passenger in the ship " Blenheim," bound on a voyage 
to the Pacific. The ship was spoken June 20, but was 
never heard from subsequently. He had previously made 
voyages to California in 1849, Europe in 1858, and China 
in 1859 and 1862. He was unmarried. 

188 TI. Charles Benjamin Sanford, born in New 511 
Haven, May 23, 1828. He married, June 23, 1850, 
Frances Pomeroy Taylor, daughter of Abner and Anna 
(Hammond) Taylor of Bangor, and sister of his brother 
Thomas's wife. She was born April 18, 1829, and died 
July 20, 1858. He married (2d), Nov. 28, 1860, Marie 
Taylor French, daughter of George Smith and Anna 



106 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Sophia (Taylor) French. She was born Aug. 18, 1836, 
and died in Brooklyn, N. Y., June 15, 1874. There were 
no children by this marriage. Charles B. Sanford com- 
menced as a steamboat clerk, and became master in 1850, 
continuing as such until 1876, when he retired. After 
his first marriage he settled in Bangor, Me., but in 1852 
removed to Brooklyn, N. Y. In 1859 he returned to 
Bangor, remaining until 1857, when he removed to Fort 
Point, Me., where he now resides. 

189 Til. Maria Huiitiugtoii Sanford, born in New 
Haven, Aug. 2, 1830; died in New York, Oct. 8, 1857, 
unmarried. 



190 



Till. Harriet Ami Sauford, born in New Haven, 
Oct. 23, 1832 ; resides (1883) at Oakland, Cal. 

191 IX. James Thompson Sanford, born in Hartford, 
Conn., June 10, 1835. He resided in New York for many 
years, as manager of Sanford's lines of steamers, between 
Boston and Bangor, and New York and Philadelphia. 
Some years ago he removed to California, Avhere he was 
interested in coal-mining operations, and died May 2, 
1885, in San Francisco. He was unmarried. To him 
the compiler is indebted for most of the data relating 
to this branch. 

192 X. George Washington Sanford, born in Hartford, 
Jan. 9, 1839; died at Flushing Bay, L. I., Aug. 11, 1870. 
He never married, and was never engaged in active 
buiginess. 

193 XI. Josephine Leonora Sanford, born in Now 
York, Feb. 13, 1841 ; resides (1883) at Oakland, Cal. 

194 XII. David Stehins Sanford, born in New York, 
July 8, 1843 ; died Oct. 19, 1845. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 107 

CHILDREN OF ZACHEUS AND ELIZABETH (hOOD) MAPLES. 62 

I. Elizabeth Hood Maples, born Feb. 12, 1821 ; died 
Feb. 27, 1821, in New Haven, Conn. 

II. Sarah Elizabeth Maples, born Dec. 17, 1822 ; 

died Sept. 22, 1846, in New Haven, unmarried. 

III. Adaline Sale Maples, born Feb. 14, 1824. She 
has never married. 

IT. Maria Louise Maples, born Nov. 23, 1827 ; died 
Jan. 24, 1869, in Brooklyn, N. Y., unmarried. 

y. James Bixby Maples, born May 22, 1829; died 
in Kingston, N. C, Aug. 3, 1855. He was a carriage 
trimmer. 

YI. Charles Reese Maples, born April 1, 1832. He 
learned the trade of machinist at the Secor Iron Works, 
New York. In 1862 he entered the United States Navy, 
and was attached to the gunboat " Gertrude " as chief 
engineer ; served about a year, and then resigned and 
accepted a position as manager of the Columbia Iron 
Works, at Columbia, Pa., where he remained for twelve 
or thirteen years. He married, in Columbia, Mrs. Ann 
Mack. They had no children. His present place of 
residence is unknown. 

VII. Edward William Maples, born June 25, 1836. 513 
He married, Oct. 21, 1858, Ellen Agnes Gillen, daughter 
of Hugh and Ann Gillen of Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. Maples 
partly learned the machinist's trade, but abandoned it, 
and became a salesman in the window-shade line, in 
which he still continues. In June, 1863, he entered the 
United States Navy,' and was attached to the United 
States gunboat "luka" as third assistant engineer; par- 
ticipated in the battle of Mobile Bay, and resigned on 



108 BONTBCOU FAMILY. 

account of ill health, in February, 1864. He resides at 
162 Adelphi Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CHILD OF EOS WELL AND ABBT MEEKER ( BEACH ) HOOD. 67 

202 I. James Bontecou Hood, born Feb. 5, 1840. He 
married, May 21, 1864, Harriet Searles, daughter of 
Julius P. and Mary (Wright) Searles of New Haven. 
She died Dec. 31, 1865. He married (2d), May 22, 
1871, Mrs. Maria Kingsbury Scranton, widow of John H. 
Scranton, and daughter of Chancelor and Lucy (Rowe) 
Kingsbury of Fair Haven, Conn. No children by either 
marriage. Mr. Hood is not actively engaged in business. 
His home is at 77 William Street, New Haven. 

CHILD OF CHAELES IIUBBAED AND SAEAII (kEELEr) 68 
BONTECOU. 

203 I. Margaret Pyiiclioii Bontecou, born March 14, 
1827 ; resides in Lansingburg, N. Y. /) i i Ji /J I 9 

CIIILDEEN OF EBEN NOETON AND SARAH PARMALEE 80 
(mERRIMAN) THOMSON. 

204 I. Sarah Cornelia Thomson, born Oct. 8, 1818. 516 
She married, Oct. 8, 1838, George Eice of New Haven, 

a dry-goods merchant. She resides at 40 Elm Street. 

205 II. JuHet Mayer Thomson, born April 10, 1821. 520 
She married, July, 1843, William North, a lawyer of 
Elmira, N. Y. He was born in Goshen, Conn., in 1816 ; 
removed to Elmira with his parents in early life. He 
died Sept. 21, 1844. She married (2d), June 2, 1860, 
Horatio Nelson Lyman of New Haven, as his second wife. 

He is the son of Erastus Lyman, and was born in Goshen, 
Conn., May 2, 1804. He was a mercliant there for many 
years, but subsequently removed to Waterbury, Conn., 
and finally to New Haven, where they now reside, at 209 
Orange Street. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 109 

206 III. William Sparks Thomson, born March 22, 523 

1823. He married, Jan. 8, 1850, Jane Lewis, daughter 
of Henry and Martha (Nash) Lewis of Farmington, 
Conn. They reside in London, England. 

207 IV. Mary Nicholsou Thomson, born Aug. 19, 1825 ; 
died in New Orleans, Sept. 11, 1847. 

208 V. Charles Thomson, bom June 18, 1827; died Jan. 
10, 1828. 

209 VI. Eliza Lyman Thomson, born April 21, 1831. 526 
She married, June 8, 1858, William Nettleton of Stock- 
bridge, Mass, He was educated at Williams College, but 

left before graduation on account of ill health. He is 
engaged in the manufacture of corsets. They reside in 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

210 VII. Charles Henry Thomson, born in New Haven, 530 
Dec. 5, 18S6. He married, Nov. 23, 1858, Cecile Lewis, 
daughter of Henry and Martha (Nash) Lewis of Farm- 
ington, Conn. She died Dec. 4, 1860. Mr. Thomson was 
brought up to the dry-goods trade. At the age of eight- 
een' went into business with his brother William, and con- 
tinued in the partnership, both in America and Europe, 
until 1868, at which time he retired from mercantile 
business. Mr. Thomson has been an extensive traveler, 

and for many years resided in England, France, and Ger- 
many. His home is now in New Haven, at 40 Elm Street. 

CHILDREN- OF GEORGE AND POLLY (sTOREK) MILES. 85 

211 I. George Washington Miles, born Nov. 24, 1807; 
died at Erie, Fa., Feb. 27, 1826. 

212 II. Mary Angnsta Miles, born July 16,1809. She 531 
married at Erie, June 10, 1831, Thomas McConkey. He 

was deputy L^nited States collector of the port of Eric, 



110 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

and was drowned May 14, 1834, by the upsetting of a sail- 
boat, by which seven out of nine were lost ; his brother- 
in-law, Thomas H. Miles, being one of the saved. Mrs. 
McConkey died in Erie, June 4, 1872. 

Extract from Miss L. Sanford's History of Erie County, 
Pa.: — "The morning of the 14th of May, 1834, was 
very bright and balmy, and it bade fair to be a day 
unusually pleasant. The steamer 'New York,' com- 
manded by Capt. Miles (father-in-law of young Mr. 
McConkey) anchored at the outer pier. The yacht 
belonging to the collector of customs was immediately 
put in readiness. Previous to this, Capt. James Maurice, 
a very intimate friend of Mr. McConkey, said to him 
(perhaps at the breakfast table), ' Don't be afraid, Tom, 
of drowning : a man born to be hung will never be 
drowned.' Just before he started, a woman came to see 
him, and said she wanted to go aboard the boat and take 
some clothing to her husband, who was one of the crew of 
the 'New York'; but he refused, and she then said, 'If 
it is safe for you to go, it is safe for me.' This woman 
accompanied Mr. McConkey ; and the yacht started with 
eleven on board. There was a gentle breeze from the 
west. This was between eight and nine o'clock. When 
she had proceeded about half-way, the sky became sud- 
denly dark, and there arose one of the most terrific 
storms known on the lake. The waves lashed in i-elent- 
less fury, the boat capsized, and all but two found a 
watery grave. The snow came down in sheets, as it were ; 
and a gentleman informed the writer that when he heard 
of the accident he hurried to the bank : the storm was 
raging furiously, and by the time he got there, there were 
six inches of snow on the ground. Thomas (son of 
Capt. Miles) was saved by clinging to the boat, and when 
rescued, life was nearly extinct. The body of Thomas 
McConkey was not recovered for eleven days afterward. 



SIXTH GENERATION. Ill 

Capt. James Maurice was appointed deputy in his place, 
and while proceeding in his official capacity discovered 
an elbow out of the Avater, and immediately recognized 
the body as that of Capt. McConkey." 

III. John William Miles, born in October, 1811. 532 
He married, Oct. 21, 1834, Catharine Donnell, daughter of 
John and Frances Donnell of Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. Miles 
was for many years an engineer on lake steamers running 
between Buffalo and Chicago. His residence was at Erie, 
Pa. He died very suddenly, of cholera, at Buffalo, Aug. 
18, 1850, being perfectly well at six o'clock, and dead 
before midnight. He was engineer of the steamer " Loui- 
siana" at this time. His widow is living (1883) at 17 
Second Street, Erie, Pa. 

IT. Thomas Henry Miles, born Feb. 14, 1815, in 539 
New Haven, in the midst of the rejoicing over the news 
that peace with England had been declared. When he 
was two years old his parents removed to Pennsylvania, 
but he remained with his grandfather in New Haven until 
the death of the latter, when he was 12. At the age of 
16 he repaired to Buffalo, N. Y. (from Erie, Pa., where 
his parents lived), and spent two years learning the watch- 
making business. He then tried a sailor's life on the 
Lakes for two seasons, and in May, 1834j was nearly 
drowned in Erie Bay. In November of that year he 
sailed from New York on board the ship " Panama," for 
a voyage to China. He writes : " Coasting in the China 
Sea forty-eight years ago was not as pleasant as it might 
have been, having to look out for the Ladrone pirates on 
one hand and typhoons on the other." He reached New 
York again in 1836, and after a period spent in coasting 
out of New York and New Haven, returned again to the 
Lakes, and from 1837 to 1850 was engaged in steamboat- 
ing. The latter year he retired from the business; and on 



112 BONTECOU FAMILY. • 

Jan. 3, 1856, was married to Henrietta Miner Brown, 
daughter of Jacob and Henrietta (Miles) Brown, and 
settled down to a farmer's life. They reside at New 
Richmond, Pa. 

215 V. Susan Storer Miles, born in New Richmond, Pa., 541 
May 4, 1818. She married, Oct. 25, 1840, Elias Handy 
Halliday. He was born in Canastota, Madison County, 

N. Y., Sept. 2, 1815 ; removed to Erie, Pa., in 1836, and 
lived there, and at Cleveland and Massillon, Ohio, en- 
gaged in mercantile business, until the fall of 1843, when 
he removed to Lafayette, Ind., and after ten years spent 
in mercantile business there, engaged with others in a 
contract to build a portion of the Toledo and Wabash 
Railway. During the progress of this work he died, Nov. 
20, 1857. His widow died in Cleveland, Ohio, May 12, 
1876. 

216 YI. Harriet Elizal)et]i Miles, born in New Rich- 
mond, Pa., Oct. 9, 1821. She married, July 18, 1861, 
Rev. Nathaniel Peck Chariot. He was born in Morris- 
town, N. J., in 1810, from which place he removed with 
his parents to Pennsylvania, and when he was about 
eleven years old, to the eastern part of Ohio. He grad- 
uated from Franklin College, Ohio, in 1835, and in 1837 
was ordained to the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, 
and was settled at Sharon, Ohio. In 1847 he went as a 
missionary to Texas, and labored at different points for 
about five years, when lie left the Presbyterian and united 
with the Protestant Episcopal Church. After his ordina- 
tion in this, he became rector of St. Paul's Church, Cold 
Springs, Texas, and afterwards of St. Matthew's, at Rich- 
mond in the same State, where he was laboring when 
the War of the Rebellion broke out, and he was obliged 
to seek safety at the North, which he accomplished with 
no little difficulty. In a few months after reaching the 



SIXTH GENERATION. 113 

State of Indiana, he was appointed chaplain of tlie 22d 
Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, and served with them 
through the war. At its close he became rector of St. 
Paul's Church, Collamer, Ohio, and later of St. Matthew's, 
East Plymouth, Ohio; from which, in 1877, he removed to 
Preemption, 111., and accepted the rectorship of St. John's 
Church. In July, 1882, they removed back to Collamer. 
They have had no children. 

217 Til. George Washiiigtou Miles, born in Erie, 549 
Pa., Aug. 10, 1829. He married, Oct. 10, 1856, Maria 
Louise Kendrick, daughter of Stewart Brown and Maria 
(Houghtaling) Kendrick of Glens Falls, N. Y. They 
resided at Logansport, Ind., where he was engaged in the 
banking business. He died there, Aug. 11, 1861. Mrs. 
Miles resides (1883) at Saratoga, N. Y. 

CHILDKEN OF. PETER AND HANISrAH ELIZA (wOODRUFf) 86 
STORE R. 

218 I. Nathaniel Storer, born April 11, 1814; drowned 
in crossing the Sacramento River. Cal., July 8, 1850. He 
was unmarried, 

219 II. Joliu Peter Storer, born June 4, 1817 ; died 
Sept. 20, 1827. 

220 III. Timothy Storer, born May 25, 1818 ; married 
Augusta A. Hyde of Baltimore, Md. At one time he was 
United States collector at the port of Benicia, Cal. He 
now (1883) resides at Virginia City, Nevada. 

221 IT. Susan Storer, born Feb. 2, 1820. She married, 551 
Oct. 21, 1840, Frederick Borie Hedge of Chatham, Conn., 

who was born Nov. 2, 1817. He is a ship-carpenter. 
They reside in Brookhaven, L. I: 

15 



114 ^ONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF CHAUNCEY AND HANNAH AUGUSTA 88 
(stoker) IVES. 

222 I. Elizalbeth Mary Ires, born Nov. 5, 1821. She 
resides at 146 Livingston Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

223 I. James Merritt Ives, born March 5, 1824. ' He 557 
married, June 24, 1846, Caroline Clark, daughter of Dr. 
Nathan Satterlee and Beulah (Sterns) Clark of Clinton- 
ville, N. Y. Mr. Ives is a publisher of popular pictures, 

at 115 Nassau Street, New York. He held a captain's com- 
mission in Company F, 23d Regiment, New York State 
National Guard ; served a brief period in Pennsylvania 
at the time of Lee's invasion of that State during the 
Rebellion ; was on the march to Gettysburg when Lee 
commenced his retreat, and followed his forces to Falling 
Waters, where he crossed to Virginia. He resides in Rye, 
Westchester County, N. Y. 

224 III. John Heury Ives, born April 20,1826; died in 
infancy. 

225 IV. George Henry Ives, born in New York, May 2, 564 
1830. He married, Jan. 24, 1851, in New York, Mar- 
garet Gibbens, daughter of John and Margaret (Ryan) 
Gibbens of Waterford, Ireland. Mr. Ives removed to 
Philadelphia when quite a young man, and established 
himself in the stationery business, in which he contin- 
ued until his death, which occurred March 1, 1871. His 
widow resides at 2127 Aubrey Place, Philadelphia. 

226 V. Augustus Chauncey Ives, born April 29, 1835 ; 
died in infancy. 

CHILDREN OF GROVE AND LYDIA (sTORER) SMITH. 89 

227 I. George Miles Smith, born Jan. 12, 1824 ; died 
March 13, 1845. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 115 

228 II. Henry Wilson Smith, born Aug. 20, 1826; 
died June 2, 1831. 

229 III. Edward Grove Smith, born June 16, 1827 ; 
died Aug. 30, 1818. 

230 lY. Mary Augusta Smith, born Dec. 25, 1829. 
She resides at 146 Livingston Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES PARSONS AND JANE (bONTECOU) 01 
BISHOP. 

231 I. James Bontecou Bishop, born in New Haven, 
July 17, 1834. He married, Nov. 16, 1875, at Long 
Branch, N. J., Marie Baldwin DeKlyn, daughter of John 
B. and Rhoda (Little) DeKlyn. They reside at No. 11 
Fair Street, New Haven, Conn. He is a jeweler. They 
have no children. 

232 II. Grace Caroline Bishop, born in New Haven, 575 
Sept. 11, 1837. She married. May 7, 1867, Dr. Edward 
Bulkeley, son of Edward and Lucy (Mansfield) Bulkeley 

of New Haven, where he was born May 15, 1833. Dr. 
Bulkeley graduated from the medical department of Yale 
College in 1856, and practiced his profession in New 
Haven until 1861, when he received the appointment of 
assistant surgeon in the 6tli Regiment Connecticut Vol- 
unteers. After three years' service he was appointed vol- 
unteer acting assistant surgeon in the United States 
Army, and assigned to duty on the hospital transport 
" Cosmopolitan," from Charleston to New York. Remain- 
ing in this service six months, he was then assigned to 
hospital duty at Hare wood General Hospital, Washington, 
with Dr. R. B. Bontecou, where he served nearly a year. 
He then returned to New Haven and resumed the practice 
of medicine. He died there Nov. 5, 1880. Mrs. Bulkeley 
resides in New Haven. 



116 BONTECOU FAMILY. 



92 



CHILDEEIS' OF ELISHA AND GRACE ( BONTECOU ) PECK 

233 I. Evelina Peck, born in New Haven, Oct. 5, 1834. 580 
She married, Nov. 19, 1857, Capt. William Whittemore 
Low of the United States Navy. He was the son of 
Henry Somes and Mary Ann Low, and was born in Bos- 
ton, Mass., April 16, 1825. He entered the navy as a mid- 
shipman in 1841, and spent thirty-six years in the service, 
twenty-one of them at sea. He was actively engaged 
dui'ing the Civil War, principally in the operations against 

the city of Mobile, in command of the gunboat " Octo- 
rara " ; the fire from this vessel caused the evacuation 
of Forts Huger and Tracy. In all Capt. Low's naval 
career, no one act secured for him so much commendation 
as his destruction of the piratical steamer " Forward," on 
the coast of Mexico, in the year 1870. While in com- 
mand of the United States gunboat "Mohican," in going 
from San Francisco down the coast of Mexico, Capt. 
Low learned that the " Forward " had sacked the town 
of Guaymas and taken captive an American citizen, and 
was on its way down the coast to plunder other cities, and 
it was reported also to capture, if possible, the Panama 
steamer, then heavily laden with treasure. Having made 
international law a study, he decided that according to the 
law of nations the "Forward" was a pirate; and acting 
on his own responsibility, pursued, captured, and destroyed 
her. Capt. Low was in command of the United States 
ship " Tennessee," on the coast of China, when he con- 
tracted the disease which eventually resulted in his death. 
He returned to the United States on sick leave in July, 
1876, and died at Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, June 
24, 1877. Mrs. Low resides at 129 Wooster Street, New 
Haven. 

234 II. Joanna Bontecon Peck, born in New Haven, 584 
March 1, 1837. She married, June 24, 1863, Captain 



SIXTH GENERATION. 117 

James Madison Whittemore of the United States Army. 
He is the son of Dr. James M. Whittemore, and was 
born in Brighton, Mass., March 4, 1836. He entered the 
United States Military Academy at West Point in June, 
1855, and graduated in July, 1860. He served through 
the War of the Rebellion, at first as lieutenant of artil- 
lery, but was transferred to the ordnance department, 
Sept. 27, 1861. He was stationed at Fort Pickens, Fla., 
from Feb. 7 to Oct. 25, 1861, being engaged in repelling 
the Confederate night attack on Santa Rosa Island, 
Oct. 9. From thence he was transferred to Washington 
Arsenal as assistant ordnance officer, Oct. 28, remaining 
in that position until Jan. 27, 1862. From the latter 
date till April 18 he assisted in covering the defenses of 
Washington, and then was at Frankford Arsenal, Phila- 
delphia, till Aug. 29. He was then assigned to duty at 
the Military Academy at West Point, as assistant pro- 
fessor of mathematics, and May 3, 1863, received his 
commission as captain of ordnance. He remained at 
West Point until Jan. 27, 1864, wli-^n he was appointed 
to the command of the Indianapolis Arsenal, remaining 
in that position till Sept. 15, 1866, From there he was 
transferred to the Watervliet Arsenal' at West Troy, N. Y., 
wliich place he left in November, 1868, for the Watertown 
(Mass.) Arsenal, leaving there in 1869 to take command 
of the Kennebec Arsenal at Augusta, Me. June 23, 1874, 
he received his commission as major. In 1876 he was 
transferred from Augusta to the Frankford Arsenal at 
Philadelphia. Aug. 2, 1879, he was commissioned lieu- 
tenant-colonel, and in 1880 was assigned to duty in the 
office of the chief of ordnance at Washington, where at 
this time (1883) he still remains, 

235 III. Henry Lewis Peck, born in New Haven, Jan. 
4, 1839. He enlisted in 1861 in Company G, 7th Regi- 
ment Connecticut Volunteers, and took part in the cap- 



118 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

ture of Fort Pulaski, the battle of Pocotaligo, the opera- 
tions on Morris Island resulting in its capture and the 
destruction of Fort Sumter, and the battle of Olustee, 
Fla. In the spring of 1864 the regiment joined the 
Army of the James and engaged in the battle of Drury's 
Bluff, and the battles and skirmishes of that summer on 
the Bermuda Hundred front, north of the James River, 
and before Petersburg. His term of service in the army 
having expired, he entered the navy as captain's clerk, 
and was on blockade duty in Mobile Bay till the close of 
the war. After the war he engaged in various pursuits, 
being five years in the navy, mostly in Asiatic waters, 
on board the United States flag-ship " Tennessee," Capt. 
William W. Low (his brother-in-law), and making the 
tour of the world. He has never married, and resides 
(1883) at 129 Wooster Street, New Haven. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND REBECCA ( TROWBRIDGE) 94 
TOWNSEND. 

236 I. Henry Alouzo Townseiid, born Oct. IT, 1833 ; 
died March 1, 1841. 

237 II. Charles Timothy ToAviiseiid, born Oct. 17, 585 
1833, in New Haven. He married, Oct. 25, 1855, Eliz- 
abeth Augusta Ford, daughter of Harvey and Bessey 
(Coutes) Ford of Hamden, Conn. She died, April 17, 
1861, aged 27, without children. He married (2d), May 

20, 1863, Adella Josephine Barnes, daughter of Zerah 
and Abigail S. (Donns) Barnes of New Haven. Mr. 
Townsend served an apprenticeship to the carriage-mak- 
ing trade, and at the age of 22 engaged in business 
for himself, in which he has since successfully continued. 
His factory is on Charles Street, and his residence at 246 
Dixwell Avenue, New Haven. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 119 

238 III. James Edwin Townsend, born Dec. 10, 1835 ; 
died Feb. 18, 1853. 

239 IV. Emily Rebecca Townsend, born Oct. 20, 1837 ; 
died Feb. 5, 1844. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES AND CHARITY ( CANNON ) TROW- 95 
BRIDGE. 

240 I. Marcus Henrj- Trowbridge, born in New Haven, 586 
March 27, 1827. He married. May 7, 1854, Harriet Gunn, 
daughter of Medad Hunt and Anne (Decker) Gunn of 
Windham, N. Y. Mr. Trowbridge removed to Catskill, 

N. Y., with his father, and learned the printer's trade. 
In 1845, when only eighteen years of age, he took up the 
publication of the Catskill Examiner, and still continues 
it. He is a prominent man in his community, and has 
frequently been solicited to accept public office, but has 
always declined, preferring to devote his time to the pub- 
lication of his paper. 

241 II. Sarah Rebecca Trowbridge, born May 19, 1829. 
Resides in Catskill. 

242 III. Imogene Trowbridge, born Jan. 3, 1835. Re- 
sides in Catskill. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES AND EMILY (sCOTT) TROW- 97 

BRIDGE. 

243 I. Sarah Malinda Trowbridge, born Sept. 23, 1831 ; 
died Aug. 10, 1856. 

244 II. Emily Trowbridge, born June 15, 1834. Re- 
sides in Catskill, N. Y. 

245 III. Hobart Trowbridge, born in Catskill, Sept. 588 
1, 1837. He married, April 5, 1868, Katharine V. W. 



120 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Miller, daughter of Cornelius and Mary (Van Wagenen) 
Miller of Hudson, N. Y. He- died at Hudson, Nov. 9, 
1869. He held clerical positions in various lines of busi- 
ness at Catskill and Albany, and had established himself 
in the general grocery trade at Hudson a short time be- 
fore his death. 

246 IV. Charles Trowbridge, Jr., born in Catskill, 589 
Sept. 24, 1840. He married, Nov. 19, 1873, Mary Joes- 
bury, daughter of Joseph and Eliza (West) Joesbury of 
Birmingham, England. He learned the business of watch- 
making, but never practiced it. He was for a short 
time established in the grocery trade at Catskill, but 
abandoned it and entered the employ of his father in 

the chandlery business, and at his father's death became 
his successor in the business. 

247 V. Caroline Louisa Trowbridge, born March 8, 
1845. Resides in Catskill. 

248 VI. Harriet Augusta Trowbridge, born April 3, 
1847. Resides in Catskill. 

CHILD OF PETER a:n^d semantiia (beockway) Bcwsr- 99 

TECOU. 

249 I. Reed Brockway Bontecou, born in Troy, N. Y., j ^^ 
April 22, 1824. He married, July 18, 1849, Susan North- 

rup, daughter of Moses and Susanna (Bontecou, 101) 
Northrup. She was born Jan. 11, 1828. "He received 
his education in the public schools of Troy, Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute (Troy), and Poultney, Vt., Academy ; 
attended the medical department of the University of 
New York; graduated from the Castleton, Yt., Medical 
College, in May, 1847, and at once entered into practice 
with Dr. Brinsmade of Troy, with whom he had at one 
time studied his profession. He has always resided in his 



SIXTH GENERATION. 121 

native city. In 1846 he made a voyage up the Amazon 
River, passing the whole of that year exploring that 
region in the interests of natural science. He is a mem- 
ber of the Rensselaer County Medical Society, the New 
York Medical Society, and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. For several years he held the offices of coroner 
and examining surgeon for pensions ; also acting assist- 
ant United States surgeon at Watervliet Arsenal, in West 
Troy. Dr. Bontecou held the office of surgeon of the 
Second Regiment New York Volunteers, from its organ- 
ization in April until September, 1861, when he was 
commissioned surgeon of volunteers, and given charge 
of the Hygiene United States Army General Hospital at 
Fortress Monroe, Va., where he remained until its destruc- 
tion in September, 1862. He was then ordered to the 
Army of the Potomac and placed on duty in the Surgeon- 
General's office for a short time, after which he was given 
charge of one of the hospitals at Beaufort, S. C, and 
subsequently appointed chief medical officer of all the 
hospitals there. He afterwards had charge of the hos- 
pital steamer 'Cosmopolitan,' lying off Charleston dur- 
ing the siege of that city. In October, 1863, he was 
ordered to Washington, D. C, to take charge of the 
Harewood United States Army General Hospital, where 
he continued on duty until its discontinuance in May, 
1866 ; and in June of the same year he was mustered 
out of the service. He was brevetted colonel of volun- 
teers, March 13, 1865, for faithful and meritorious ser- 
vices during the war. Dr. Bontecou was one of the largest 
contributors to the Surgical History of the War, and to 
the army medical museum." 

CITILDREX OF PETER AND SOPHIA (Tno:MPSON) BOX- 99 
TECOU. 

I. James Bontecou, born July 19, 1829. He re- 
moved to the far West in 1852, and after various vicisr 

16 



122 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

situdes found himself in Gibbonsville, Idaho Territory, 
where he remained until his death, which occurred Oct. 
31, 1882. He was a bright, companionable man ; a fine 
linguist, being proficient in the use of four or five lan- 
guages. He was unmarried. 

251 II. Seniantha Brockway Bontecou, born in Tro}, 595 
N. Y., Aug. 21, 1831. She married there, Jan. 9, 1854, 
James Keeler Selleck, born in Troy, Aug. 21, 1831. He 

was engaged in mercantile business in his native city 
until 1861, when he removed to Hudson County, N. J., 
and engaged in the purchase, improvement, and sale of 
real estate. In 1873-4 he represented the Eighth District 
of Hudson County in the State Legislature. His wife 
died at Homestead, N. J., Dec. 5, 1873. Mr. Selleck 
subsequently married Miss Kate Curtis, daughter of 
Stiles Curtis of Norwalk, Conn. They reside in New 
York, where he is engaged in the interests of silver 
mining in California. 

252 III. David Boiitecou, born July 7, 1833, died Dec. 
17, 1836. 

253 IV. Julia Boiitecou^ born in Troy, Sept. 17, 1835. 605 

She married, June 23, 1856, Wilbur F. Goss, son of a 
Methodist clergyman. He died in Troy, in May, 1869. 
She died there, Dec. 13, 1877. 

254 V. George Bontecou, born Dec. 14, 1837 ; died June 
23, 1841. 

255 YI. David Bontecoii, born Oct. 5, 1839 ; died Oct. 

3, 1872, unmarried. 

256 YH. Elizabeth Bontecou, born in Troy, Nov. 2, 609 
1841. She married, June 18, 1863, John William Alfred 
Cluett, born in Wolverhampton, England, June 10, 1834. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 123 

His father was a book dealer in Wolverhampton and 
Birmingham, and in 1850 emigrated with his family to 
America, and established himself in the same business 
in Troy. In 1858, Mr. Cluett, who had for some years 
been employed as clerk in a linen-collar manufactory, 
became a partner in his father's business ; but in 1863 
both father and son gave up the book business, and 
were admitted into the collar business with George B. 
Cluett, a brother of John. The business has been very 
successful, and their present factory is one of the largest 
in the trade. J. W, A. Cluett is the inventor of sev- 
eral valuable and well-known improvements in the man- 
ufacture of shirts, collars, and cuffs. He is a hard stu- 
dent, and his time away from his business is devoted to 
books and music. He has composed and published a 
number of hymns, anthems, and popular songs. For sev- 
eral years he conducted the music of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church in Troy, of which he was a member for 
twenty years, and for many years a trustee. In 1877 
he severed his connection with the Methodist Church, 
and became a member of Christ (Episcopal) Church, of 
which he is now a vestryman. 

257 Till. Charles Sherman Bontecou, born Feb. 4, 
1814 ; died Dec. 3, 1848. 

258 IX. Susan Bontecou, born Aug. 1, 1846 ; died July 
12, 1848. 

CHILDREN" OF MOSES AND SUSANNAH (bONTECOU) NOR- 101 
THRUP. 

259 I. John Northrup, born in New Baltimore, N. Y., 616 
July 16, 1821. He married, Sept. 25, 1844, Louisa Abi- 
gail Gregory, daughter of John and Abigail (Huntington) 
Gregory of Ithaca, N. Y. She was born Sept. 21, 1822. 



124 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

They reside at Ithaca. He was a harness - maker and 
carriage -trimmer until 1865, since which time he has 
carried on the spring-bed, mattress, and sewing-machine 
business. He was for twenty-seven years a trustee of the 
Baptist Church. Town and county offices have repeatedly 
sought him, but he has accepted only one, that of over- 
seer of the poor. 

260 II. James Northriip, born in New Baltimore, N. Y., 621 
March 3, 1823. He married, March 21, 1844, Mary 
Gillett, daughter of Horatio and Marilla Gillett, who was 
born in Scott, N. Y., Aug. 4, 1826. She died Dec. 18, 
1844. He married (2d), April 29, 1847, Elsina S. Ben- 
nett, daughter of Cephas and Stella (Kneeland) Bennett 

of Utica, N. Y. She resides at Homer, N. Y. He was 
a carriage-trimmer and patent-rights agent, and died Aug. 
6, 1884. 

261 III. Elizabeth Nortlirup, born Feb. 26, 1825 ; died 
Feb.'lO, 1834. 

262 IV. Charles Northrup, born Jan. 7, 1827; died 
March 14, 1827. 

263 Y. Susau Northrup, born Jan. 11, 1828. She mar- ) 590 
ried, July 18, 1849, her cousin. Dr. Reed B. Bontecou ) 630 
(249) of Troy, N. Y. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES CLARK AND ABBY (cONNABLE) 102 
BONTECOU. 

264 I. Joseph Connable Bontecou, born in Bristol, R. I., 635 
Nov. 5, 1838, and removed with his parents to Ohio in 
1840. At the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion, 

he was an undergraduate of the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, but enlisted under the President's first call for troops 
in the 2d Kentucky Infantry, which, being disowned by 



SIXTH GENERATIOiN. 125 

the State on the ground of the State's neutrality, were 
accepted by the general government as three -years troops, 
and sent into West Virginia in June, 1861. He took 
part in all the operations of that campaign, being pro- 
moted to a lieutenancy and assigned to staff duty. The 
following winter he joined with his command the Army 
of the Cumberland, and accompanied it on the forced 
march it made to support Grant on the Tennessee. On 
the second day of the battle of Pittsburg Landing, Lieut. 
Bontecou commanded his company, losing more than half 
his men in killed and wounded. In the advance on Cor- 
inth, he led the forlorn hope which charged the log bridge 
and causeway on Tishemingo Creek, and in this bloody 
conflict lost the greater part of his small command. Af- 
ter the fall of Corinth, he was sent with Nelson's divi- 
sion to occupy Murfreesboro ; and while guarding a rail- 
road bridge south of Nashville, was captured by Gen. 
N. B. Forrest. For many months afterward he endured 
the miseries of a prisoner of war. While confined at 
Macon, Ga., he was engaged in several unsuccessful 
attempts to escape. With health broken, he was trans- 
ferred to Salisbury, and at last into Libby Prison, where 
he was finally paroled as being effectually spoiled for 
further service against the Confederacy. He rejoined 
his command in 1863, but shortly afterward resigned his 
commission and returned home. His health being in a 
measure re-established, he enlisted in the 10th Ohio Inde- 
pendent Battery, and joined his new command at Vicks- 
burg in December ; was promoted to corporal, sergeant, 
quartermaster-sergeant, and lieutenant during the follow- 
ing six months, and accompanied Sherman in the Atlanta 
campaign, taking part in all the battles from Resaca to 
Peach Tree Creek. On the fall of Atlanta, the Battery 
was sent with Thomas to defend Nashville, and after the 
crushing defeat of Hood before that city, was stationed 



126 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

in East Tennessee. In August, 1865, lie was mustered 
out of the service at Camp Dennison, Ohio. After the 
war he prepared for the bar; but abandoning the pro^ 
fession, engaged in business, traveliug for a number of - 
years, and afterwards becoming interested in manufac- 
turing enterprises. Since 1876 he has been active in the 
temperance work in the West, particularly in Michigan, 
where, as chairman of the State central committee of the 
various temperance organizations, and the general agent 
of the State Alliance, he has been prominently identified 
with the movement for the constitutional prohibition of 
the liquor traffic. In the spring of 1883, having pur- 
chased the Petosky Herald, he removed to that town, a^id 
devotes his time to the conduct of his paper. He mar- 
ried in Macon, Mich., June 1, 1870, Maria Priscilla Oven, 
daughter of John and Margaret (Eckley) Oven of Shob- 
den, Herefordshire, England. Her parents removed to 
Detroit, Mich., in 1850, and settled in Macon in 1856. 

265 II. Sarah Celestia Bontecoii, born in Circleville, 
Ohio, Dec. 29, 1842. Resides at Xenia, Ohio. 

266 III. Abl)y C. Bontecou, born in Athens, Ohio, May 
20, 1846 ; died in Xenia, July 8, 1846. 

CHILDREN OF GILBERT DEAN AND SARAH (bONTECOU) 103 
GOLDEN. 

267 I. Elizabeth Golden, born in Troy, N. Y., Jan. 6, 
1835. She married, Jan. 11, 1872, Sidney Tuttle Gary, 
son of Wolsey Gary. He was born in Goeymans, N. Y., 
Nov. 18, 1838, and is a salesman. They reside at 84 
Fifth Street, Troy. They have no children. 

268 II. Maria Frances Golden, born Jan. 26, 1837; 
died Dec. 31, 1837. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 127 

269 III. Sarah Bontecou Golden, born in Troy, Sept. 636 
26, 1839. She married, Sept. 15, 1863, George Bywater 
Cluett, whose brother, J. W. A. Cluett, married Elizabeth 
Bontecou (256), her cousin. He is the son of William 
Cluett, and was born in England in 1838 ; is a manu- 
facturer of collars, etc., at Troy. Mrs. Cluett died in 
Troy, Aug. 1, 1864. 

270 IT. Gilbert Golden, born Sept. 19, 1841 ; died April 
5, 1842. 

271 T. James Golden, born Dec. 27, 1842; died April 

1, 1874, unmarried. 

272 VI. Mary Anna Golden, born Feb. 17, 1845 ; died 
Jan. 11, 1852. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE AND LYDIA ANN ( WHIPPLE) 106 
BONTECOU. 

273 I. Mary Hannah Bontecou, born in Troy, N. Y., 637 
Aug. 19, 1839. She married there. May 8, 1862, Rev. Ira 
Glazier Bid well. He was born in Willington, Conn., Feb. 

22, 1835, and died in Syracuse, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1878. 

Mrs. Bidwell resides at No. 5 Allen Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

From the Northern Christian Advocate^ Syracuse, Jan. 

2, 1879 : — "The home of his childhood was blessed with 
the influence of parental piety. From his birth he was 
consecrated to the Lord, and to the fulfillment of the 
vows of that consecration he attributed the most salu- 
tary molding influences of his early life. His time during 
his youth, when he was not in school, was divided between 
employment in a factory and work on a farm. At the 
age of 16 he entered the Seminary at Wilbraham, Mass. 
Having finished there his preparation for college, he 
entered the Wesleyan University [Middletown, Conn. J, 
where he remained one year. He afterwards went to 



1^8 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Union College, Schenectady, N. Y., where he was gradu- 
ated in 1^59. He stood high in his classes as a student, 
and during his college course was noted for his manly and 
Christian character, . . . The history of his ministry 
cannot be written. It may be briefly characterized as a 
series of remarkably successful — in some cases almost 
marvelously successful — pastorates. He possessed many 
of the characteristics of genius. He seemed to achieve 
success without effort. His spirit seemed to be that of 
restful activity. Though abundant in labor, he never 
appeared to be anxious, confused, or in haste. His self- 
possession was Christ-like. His courage, though manifest, 
was without noise or bluster. He met emergencies with 
a promptness and ease which often made great difficulties 
seem like trifles. Hence he was readily accepted and 
trusted as a leader. When duty was presented he acted 
without hesitancy, and with such quiet firmness as to 
put an end to all controversy. These qualities, connected 
with great modesty, with entire absence of self-seeking, 
with gentleness of manner, with quick, warm sympathy, 
and with uniform cheerfulness, gave him great personal 
influence over all who enjoyed his acquaintance. As a 
preacher he was simple, earnest, convincing, always in- 
structive, and often eloquent. His hearers never tired 
while listening to him, and few men preach sermons so 
easily remembered as his. His rhetoric was of a high 
order, and always honest; the tricks of sensationalism 
he utterly despised. Few preachers were less open to 
criticism, but few probably ever made less effort to be 
faultless : he was simply himself. As a student he was 
diligent and accurate ; as a thinker he was broad and 
charitable ; as a Christian he was sincere and devout." 

Mr. Bidwell filled, during his ministry, the following 
pastorates : Portland, Conn., one or two years ; State 
Street Church, Troy, N. Y., two years ; Lansingburg, 



SIXTH GENERATION. 129 

N. Y., two years ; Hudson Avenue Church, Albany, three 
years; Chestnut Street Church, Providence, R. I., two 
years ; (then taught a year in Auburndale, Mass. ;) Har- 
vard Street Church, Cambridgeport, Mass., two years; 
Trinity Church, Worcester, Mass., two years ; Bromfield 
Street Church, Boston, one year ; (he then went abroad 
for six months for the benefit of his health ;) Delaware 
Avenue Church, Buffalo, N. Y., three years; First Church, 
Syracuse, N. Y., where, after a pastorate of three months, 
he died at the close of a brief illness. 

A friend said of him : " Born on the birthday of the 
Father of his Country, and dying on the birthday of the 
Saviour of the World, there was much in him to remind 
us of the two characters so prominent in history." 

274 II. William Whipple Boutecoii, born Aug. 17, 
1841; died Oct. 14, 1842. 

275 III. Susan Boiitecou, born in Troy, May 29, 1843. 639 
She married, Jan. 22, 1863, Frederick Webster Pickering 

of that city. He was born in Beckingham, England, 
April 15, 1841, the son of George Smith and Ann Pick- 
ering. The family emigrated to America in 1846 and set- 
tled in Troy, on a farm near which his early life was spent. 
Soon after his marriage he went South, and for a while 
was employed as sutler's clerk in the army ; w^as sub- 
sequently in the employment of the Freedmen's Bureau, 
and given charge of farms in the vicinity of Norfolk, Va. 
In the spring of 1865 he left the employ of the Bureau 
and rented the farm upon which his family had been liv- 
ing, and in the summer of 1866 purchased a farm near 
Portsmouth, Ya., and engaged in raising fruit and vegeta- 
bles for the market. In 1867 he was appointed a justice of 
the peace, and served over two years, when he was elected 
by the people for a further term of two years. In 1868 
Mrs. Pickering's health began to fail, and she went North 

17 



130 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

for change of scene, but died at her father's home in 
Vineland, N. J., May 20, 1869. In November, 1872, he 
married Virginia C. Stoakes of Portsmouth, Va., and now 
resides in Troy, N. Y. 

276 IV. William Wright Whipple Bontecou was born 642 
in Troy, June 19, 1845, and passed his early life in that 
vicinity. Aug. 30, 1862, he enlisted as a private in 
Company G, 169th Regiment New York State Volunteers, 
and did duty in and near Washington, D. C, until April, 
1863, when his i-egiment was ordered to Suffolk, Va., and 
on the 21st engaged in their first fight, on the Edenton road. 
A portion of June and July was passed on the "Penin- 
sula," raiding and destroying railroads and bridges and 
some of the enemy's supplies. The regiment was then 
transported to Folly Island, S. C, and took part in the 
capture of Fort Wagner and the reduction of Fort Sum- 
ter. In September Mr. Bontecou (now corporal) was or- 
dered on detached service on the hospital steamer " Cos- 
mopolitan," remaining there until March, 1861, when he 
rejoined his regiment at West Point, Va., taking part 
with it in the battle of Cold Harbor and various other 
fights before Petersburg and Richmond. In December 
the regiment was ordered to South Carolina, arriving on 
Christmas Day, just in time to take part in the capture of 
Fort Fisher, at the mouth of the Cape Fear River. Re- 
maining there until the middle of the following February, 
they then advanced on Wilmington, N. C, capturing the 
city, and shortly afterward marched to Raleigh, where 
they were mustered out of the service, July 10, 1865, and 
Mr. Bontecou returned to Troy. The following year he 
went to Vineland, N. J., whither his father had removed, 
and assisted him on the farm. He married there, Dec. 
23, 1868, Florence C. Ncalc, daughter of James and Mary 
Ann (Lake) Neale of Vineland, born Feb. 22, 1850. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 131 

In 1870 they removed to Minnesota, and in April, 1871, 
settled in Spring Valley, where they now reside, and 
where he is employed in charge of a lumber business. 

277 V. Elijah Whipple Bontecou, born in Troy, June 646 
27, 1847. He married, Oct. 20, 1873, Clara Holland, 
daughter of Dr. Charles and Sophronia Brown (Cobb) 
Holland of Chicago, 111. She was born in Springfield, 
Mass., Aug. 22, 1^50. He is employed as a salesii^an in 

the wholesale millinery business. Their residence is at 
331 Center Street, Chicago. 

278 TI. George Henry Boiitecou, born in Troy, May 648 
17, 1849. Aft(y some business employment in that city, 
part of the time as errand boy in his Uncle Peter's shoe 
store, he obtained a situation on a steam-tug plying on 

the Hudson River. In 1856 he attempted fruit culture at 
Vineland, N. J. ; but this did not suit his roving disposi- 
tion, and the following year he began railroading, serving 
as a locomotive fireman on the Hudson River Railroad. 
In August, 1868, he started out to seek his fortune at the 
West, having, after purchasing his ticket, a capital of just 
thirty-seven cents. He reached La Crosse, Wis., and se- 
cured employment with the Southern Minnesota Railroad 
as telegraph operator at Houston ; was shortly afterward 
appointed station agent at Lanesborough, and a year later 
was transferred to Fountain Station. He married, April 
27, 1870, at Sing Sing, N. Y., Anna Nevins, daughter 
of Morgan and Ellen (Nelson) Nevins of Sing Sing. She 
was born Jan. 24, 1852, and died April 2, 1872. After 
the death of his wife Mr. Bontecou returned to the East, 
and was appointed telegraph operator in Sing Sing prison. 
In August, 1872, he received the appointment of terminal 
agent for the Newburg, Dutchess & Connecticut Railroad 
at Dutchess Junction, N. Y.; and in August, 1880, in con- 
junction with his other duties, became station agent of 



132 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad. He is 
also agent of the American Express Company, and in 
1880 was appointed United States postmaster at Dutchess 
Junction. In all of these positions he has been found 
honest, trusty, and capable, filling them to the entire sat- 
isfaction of all concerned. March 24, 1875, he married 
(2d) Emma Mase, daughter of Sylvester Howell and Al- 
mira (Cornwell) Mase of Matteawan, N. Y. She was born 
Jan. 22, 1855. Mr. Bontecou enlisted as a bugler, Jan- 
uary, 1865, in the 21st regiment New York State Cavalry, 
and with a detachment of recruits joined the regiment near 
Washington, but could not "pass muster," and shortly 
afterward returned home. He is a member of the Meth- 
odist Church at Matteawan, and served for two years as 
vice-president of the Young Men's Christian Association. 
He is also a member of the order of Freemasons. 

279 VII. Philip Dorlou Bontecou, born in Troy, Jan. 651 
23, 1853. His early life was spent chiefly in Troy, and 
on his father's farm in Yineland, N. J. In the fall of 
1869 he passed a short time in the employ of his uncle 
Francis, in the lumber business, in New York City ; but 
the following year went West " to seek his fortune," and 
shortly after entered the employ of his brother William, 
who had charge of a lumber business in Spring Yalley, 
Fillmore County, Minn. June 15, 1876, he married Ada 
Florence Ewing, daughter of William R. and Achsah Eliza 
(White) Ewing of Spring Valley. She was born in Ham- 
let, Chautauqua County, N. Y., Feb. 17, 1858. In February, 
1878, he removed to Armstrong, Minn., and engaged in the 
lumber business, holding at the same time the position of 
agent of the Southern Minnesota Railroad. July 1, 1881, 
he removed to Ortonville, and purchased a half interest in 
the Lake House, a new hotel just opened ; but not satisfied, 
he sold out and went back to the railroad, being located 



SIXTH GENERATION. 133 

first at Dexter and then at Brownsdale, remaining but a 
short time, when he was obliged to resign on account of 
ill health. He returned to Ortonville, purchased an inter- 
est in the livery business, and continued in this pursuit 
until the health of his wife compelled removal to Colo- 
rado, where he obtained the position of station agent 
for the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad at Mears, Chaffee 
County, and was also appointed United States postmaster 
there. He has recently removed to Percy, Carbon County, 
Wyoming Territory. 

280 YIII. Abby Whipple Boiitecoii, born April 12, 
1856 ; resides in Buffalo, N. Y., with her sister, Mrs. 
Bidwell. 

281 IX. Reed Bontecoii, born Dec. 26, 1858. He en- 
tered the railroad service at 19, and in 1878 was appointed 
baggage-master on the Freehold & New York Railroad, 
and shortly afterward conductor. July 19, 1879, while 
in the perforniiance of his duty, he was killed near Marl- 
borough, N. J. He was a consistent member of the 
Methodist Church, and respected by all his associates as 
an honest, upright young man. His pastor said of him : 
" He was a young man of rare mental ability ; his con- 
duct spoke well of his early training ; he proved to be 
a most excellent young man, and was fast growing in 
the esteem of all with whom he became acquainted." 

282 X. Frauds Bontecou, twin with Reed ; died July 
24, 1859. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE AND MARGARET (dUSTIN) BON- 106 
TECOU. 

283 I. Lydia Ann Bontecou, born April 5, 1870. 

284 II. John Bontecou, born Feb. 20, 1876 ; died April 
4, 1879. 



134 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF EDWARD AND CORNELIA (kEIFER) 107 
BONTECOU. 

285 I. Sarah Maria Bontecou, born in Coeyraans, N. Y., 654 
June 17, 1843. She married, June 7, 1876, James Covil 
Archibald, son of Thomas Archibald of Troy, born there, 
May 28, 1845. In 1871 he obtained a clerkship with E. 

A. Burrows, in the wholesale house-furnishing business, 
and a year later became his partner. In February, 1884, 
he sold his interest in this business, and became a partner 
in the house of Fellows & Co., manufacturers of collars 
and cuffs, and tlie oldest establishment in this line in 
Troy. He is a prominent member of the State Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church in Troy. 

286 II. Helen Maria Boiitecou, born in 1845 ; died in 

1850. 

287 III. David Francis Bontecon, born in Coeymans 
Hollow, N. Y., Dec. 11, 1852. In 1869 he entered the 
jewelry trade in New York City, and in 1878 became 
cashier and head salesman for Jacques & Marcus, Union 
Square. Feb. 1, 1880, he became a member of the firm 
of E. A. Burrows & Co., 209 River Street, Troy. He is 
unmarried. 

CHILDREN OF FRANCIS AND CLARISSA MARIA (lANDON) 108 
BONTECOU. 

288 I. Alvin Francis Bontecon, born in Troy, N. Y., 
Dec. 30, 1846. He married, Dec. 14, 1870, Lucy Wood 
Bowker, daughter of Gustavus G. and Henrietta (Saun- 
ders) Bowker. He served in the 37th and 71st Regi- 
ments New York State Militia for nearly eight years, 
doing post duty with the former, during the war, at the 
fortifications at the entrance to New York Harbor. He 
has been engaged in the dry-goods, provision, and lumber 



SIXTH GENERATION. 135 

trades during the past jfifteen years, mainly in the latter, 
and at present conducts a box-making business at 87 
Walker Street. They have no children 

289 II. Gardner Laiidou Boiitecou, born in Troy, | [j^g 
March 25, 1849. He married, Oct. 10, 1872, Mary Eliza- 
beth Northrup (617), daughter of John (259) and Louisa 

A. (Gregory) Northrup of Ithaca, N. Y. He was for- 
merly engaged with his father in the lumber business in 
New York, and removed with him to Toronto, Kan., and 
engaged in stock-raising, in 1878. In the spring of 1883 
he removed to Emporia, Kan., and engaged again in the 
lumber trade, and later moved to Eureka, Greenwood 
County, in the same State. 

290 III. Mary Kate Bontecou, born in New York, Feb. 658 
10, 1852. She married, Dec. 26, 1877, Ambrose Ryder 
Adams, who was born in Putnam County, N. Y., Oct. 9, 
1851. In 1861 his parents removed to New York City, 

and in 1865 he commenced his business life in the hosiery 
commission house of Kibbe, Chaffee, Shreve & Co., 71 
and 73 Worth Street, and has ever since remained in their 
employ. 

291 IV. Helen Estelle Bontecou, born in New York, 
July 29, 1859 ; resides with her parents in Toronto, Kan. 

292 V. Fannie Louise Bontecou, born in New York, 
Nov. 2, 1861. She resides in Toronto, Kan. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN PECK AND CAROLINE STARR 110 
(rayner) BURRITT. 

293 I. CorneHa Eliza Burritt, born March 20, 1828 ; 
died Sept. 7, 1828. 

294 II. Joseph Burritt, born June 21, 1829 ; died Jan. 
24, 1833. 



136 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

295 III. Mary Jane Burritt, born Jan. 9, 1831. She 
married, Oct. 31, 1867, Lucius Bonaparte AUyn, son of 
Nathan Alljn of Hartford, Conn., and former husband of 
her aunt, Mary Martha Rayner (117). He died in 
Washington, D. C, Aug. 7, 1876. She resides at 610 M 
Street, N. W., in that city. She has no children. 

296 IV. Charlotte Caroline Burritt, born Sept. 26, ' 660 
1832. She married, March 3, 1852, Oilman Fay. They 
reside in Westborough, Mass. 

297 V. Miriam Rayner Burritt, born Jan. 11, 1835; 
died April 27, 1844. 

298 VI. Frances Cornelia Burritt, born July 7, 1836 ; 
died April 20, 1837. 

299 VII. John Menzies Burritt, born June 21, 1837. 663 
From 1855 to 1860 he was engaged with his brother Frank 

in the grocery business in New York City. In the latter 
year he removed to Wisconsin. He married March 
6, 1859, Harriet Muir Knapp, daughter of David and 
Ellen (Boyce) Knapp of New York. They were after- 
wards divorced, and he married (2d), October, 1867, Kate 
Morrison of Stoughton, Wis. They reside at Clear Lake, 
Minn. 

300 VIII. Frank Duffle Burritt, born in Newtown, 665 
Conn., Sept. 23, 1840. He married, Dec. 3, 1867, Harriet 
Muir Burritt. When he was two years old his father died, 

and the family removed to New York. In 1855, when 
he was only 15, he went into the grocery business with 
his brother John, at 171 Second Street, and in 1857 they 
opened another store at 49 Avenue C. They continued 
together in the business until 1860, when they sold out 
the business and removed to Stoughton, Wis., where. he has 
ever since resided, engaged in farming. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 137 

CHILD OF BENJAMIN LESTER AND NANCY (mERRILl) 112 
RAYNER. 

301 I. Beiijamiu Stuart Rayiier, born in Troy, N. Y., 667 
March 31, 1836. He removed with his parents, when an 
infant, to New York, in which city he has ever since 
resided. He graduated from the College of the City of 
New York in 1853, taking the second place in his class. 

He entered the Tradesmen's Bank in 1853, and has 
served in various capacities, having been paying teller 
since 1867. He married, June 4, 1857, Julia Maria 
Harden, daughter of John W. and Jane Maria. (Smith) 
Harden of New York. She died Sept. 24, 1881. Mr. 
Rayner is connected with the South Unitarian Church of 
New York, and has filled the positions of trustee, treas- 
urer, and Sunday-school superintendent. 

children of DANIEL OLCOTT AND FRANCES (cASe) 114 
RAYNER. 

302 I. James Chauncey Rayner, born Sept. 1, 1836; 
died March 20, 1844. 

303 II. Carrie Francis Rayner, born Aug. 26, 1849. 
She married, Feb. 6, 1871, Charles Vincent. They reside 
at Sioux Falls, Dakota, where he is engaged in the hard- 
ware business. They have no children. 

children of MENZIES and ANN ELIZABETH (STEVENs) 116 
RAYNER. 

304 I. Ann Elizabeth Rayner, born in Portland, Me., 
Oct. 18, 1834; died in Trenton, N. J., Aug. 7, 1855, un- 
married. 

305 II. Caroline Ellen Rayner, born in New York, Feb. 
19, 1840; died Sept. 1, 1855. 

18 



138 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

306 III. Peter Cooper Rayner, born in New York, Oct. 
20, 1841 ; died March 26, 1842. 

307 IV. Mary Margaret Rayner, born in New York, 
Oct. 18, 1843 ; died Dec. 24, 1843. 

CHILDREN OF MENZIES AND SUSAN (nODINe) RAYNER. 116 

308 I. Sarah Emma Rayner, born in New York, June 9, 670 
1845. She married, June 9, 1864, William Henry Long, 

who was born in Mercer County, N. J., Jan. 1, 1843. 
Mr. Long served an apprenticeship to the machinist trade 
in Trenton, N. J., and followed the business of machinist 
and engineer, in that city and in Bordentown, N. J., re- 
maining in the latter place about six years ; next in Janes- 
ville, Appleton, and Kaukauna, hi Wisconsin ; then in Bur- 
lington, N. J., remaining five years ; then again in Tren- 
ton, but returning to Burlington in February, 1880, he 
took charge of the engine of the National Bureau of En- 
graving and Manufacturing Company, He is a deacon in 
the Presbyterian Church. 

309 II. Susan Rebecca Rayner, born in Trenton, N. J., 674 
July 22, 1848. She married, Dec. 24, 1868, William 
Henry Carrick. He was preparing for college when the 

war broke out, but enlisted in the 23d Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, for three months, and afterwards in 
the 46th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers ; was then 
transferred to the 214th Regiment as sergeant-major ; was 
advanced to first lieutenant, and acting assistant adjutant- 
general on the staif of Brig.-Gen. David B. McKibbin. 
His service was with the armies of the Potomac and the 
Shenandoah. He is now (1883) engaged with his father in 
the manufacturing baking business, at 118 and 120 North 
22d Street, Philadelphia. He resides at 112 North 21st 
Street. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 139 

310 III. Menzies Bontecoii Rayiier, born in Trenton, 
N. J., Sept. 23, 1856; died in Janesville, Wis., Jan. 11, 
1873. 

CHILD REN OF GEORGE GILMAIST AND JANE ELIZABETH 118 
BARRY (rAYNEr) WARNER. 

311 I. William Rayner Warner, born in Walpole, N. H., 677 

May 6, 1842. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company 
K, 13th Regiment Massachusetts Vohmteers ; was pro- 
moted to second lieutenant May 1, 1863, and to first lieu- 
tenant March 10, 1864; participated in the battles of 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilder- 
ness, and Petersburg. He was mustered out of service 
July 16, 1864, and married, May 1, 1865, Ellen Maria 
Henry, daughter of Dr. Samuel G. and Nancy D. (French) 
Henry of Westborough, Mass. After his return from the 
war, he engaged in the grocery and general merchandise 
business, in Westborough, until 1867 ; afterwards in Bos- 
ton and Hyde Park, Mass., and in October, 1875, removed 
to Fail River, Mass., where they now reside. 

312 II. Elizabeth Gilman Warner, born in Walpole, 679 
N. H., July 1, 1844; she married, in Westborough, Mass., 
July 6, 1865, William Augustus Prickitt, who was born in 
Monmouth County, N. J., March 20, 1839. Mr. Prickitt 
enlisted, Aug. 9, 1862, as a private in Company G, 14th 
Regiment New Jersey Volunteers ; was promoted to cor- 
poral in September, and in August, 1863, to sergeant. 
Participated in the battle of Locust Grove at Mine Run, 
Va., Nov. 29, 1863, where one-fourth of his company were 
killed or wounded. In January, 1864, he passed examina- 
tion before Corey's examining board and was promoted 

to captain, and attached to Company G, 25th Regiment 
United States colored troops, passing the greater part of 
the time at Fort Barrancas, Fla., until mustered out of ser- 



140 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

vice in December, 1865. In 1868 he engaged in insurance 
and banking at Trenton, N. J., in 1872 purchased a 
membership in the New York Stock Exchange, which he 
sold in 1876 and removed to Farmingdale, N. J., where 
they still reside. He is engaged in farming. 

CHILDREN OF WELLS AND CATHARINE RHODES (bON- 120 
TECOU) LATHROP. 

313 I. Elizabeth Lathrop, born April 28, 1821. She 684 
married, Aug. 23, 1842, George Bliss Morris, son of Hon. 
Oliver B. and Caroline (Bliss) Morris of Springfield, 
Mass. He was born Nov. 12, 1818; graduated from 
Amherst College in 1887, and later from the Cambridge 
Law School. " He was admitted to the Hampden County 

Bar in 1840 ; appointed clerk of the courts of Hampden 
County in 1853. In 1856 the office was made an elective 
one, and he was chosen by the people to fill it, and was 
thrice re-elected to terms of five years each. He died 
July 7, 1872, when about one year of his last term of 
office had expired. His courtesy and efficiency in the 
transaction of the business of his office made him popular 
with the people and the bar." His widow resides in New 
York City. 

314 II. James Latlirop, born Aug. 7, 1823. He mar- 687 
ried, Aug. 23,. 1848, Harriet Angeline Day, daughter of 
Almon and Betsey (Ashley) Day of South Hadley Falls, 
Mass. She was born Oct. 25, 1827. He was educated as 

a civil engineer, but served the greater part of his business 
life as a book-keeper in Boston and New York. During 
the Fourth Avenue improvements in the latter city he oc- 
cuj)ied the position of confidential clerk to the contractor, 
Sidney Dillon. Mr. Latlirop suffered much from ill health 
during the later years of his life, and died in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Sept. 29, 1884. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 141 

315 III. Catharine Boiitecou Latlirop, born Dec. 23, 689 

1826. Slie married, Oct. 22, 1863, Oliver Ellswortli 
Wood, son of Hon. Joseph and Fanny (Ellsworth) Wood, 
whose first wife, Martlia Potter Bontecou (123), was her 
aunt. Mr. Wood died in Westport, Conn., Dec. 18, 1883. 
She resides in New York. i/a ,/ 

316 IV. Daniel Bontecou Lathrop, born June 16, 1829. 
He was of a restless, adventurous temperament. He was 
one of the California "forty-niners," and one of "Fili- 
buster Walker's " men, in his raid upon Sonora and after- 
wards in the Nicaragua campaign. He returned from the 
Isthmus in the summer of 1857, much broken in health, 
and remained quietly at his father's house in South Had- 
ley, Mass. Aug. 16, 1858, he crossed the river to Holyoke 
in a row-boat, and when about to return was assaulted 
without cause by a ruffian, horribly beaten about the head 
with a club, and on attempting to escape in his boat, 
forced into the water by the scoundrel's companions who 
had collected, and drowned. 

childreisr of oliver ellsworth and martha potter 123 
(bontecou) wood. 

317 I. Frances Ellsworth Wood, born June 24, 1838; 
died April 9, 1842. 

318 II. Catliarine Bontecou Wood, born April 20, 1843. 
She is a resident of New York City, and engaged in liter- 
ary work. 

children of eichaed daeius and sybil pease 124 
(bontecou) moeris. 

319 I. Richard Bontecou Morris, born in Springfield, 690 
Mass., Aug. 3, 1833. He was educated to the profes- 
sion of civil engineer, and first pursued this business in 



142 BONTECOtJ FAMILY. 

Ohio ; was subsequently engaged in railroad construction 
in Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, Mississippi, 
Illinois, and Missouri. He married, June 20, 1859, Mary 
Ripley, daughter of John B. and Mary (Durant) Ripley 
of Adrian, Mich. In 1866 they removed to Kansas, and 
now reside at Atchison. He is a Democrat in his politi- 
cal affiliations, and for many years served as a member of 
the State central committee ; also as delegate to the na- 
tional conventions of 1872, 1876, and 1880. In 1883, he 
was appointed by the Governor to the office of Superin- 
tendent of Insurance of the State of Kansas, which office 
he now holds. He is a vestryman in Trinity Church, 
Atchison. 

320 II. Edward Morris, born and died in February, 1837. 

321 III. Harriet Boiitecou Morris, born in Springfield, 694 
May 19, 1840. She married, Dec. 25, 1862, Ransom 
Williams Dunham. He was born in Savoy, Mass., March 

21, 1838 ; was educated at the common school, and the 
high school in Springfield ; was employed in a clerical 
capacity in the office of the Massachusetts Mutual Life 
Insurance Company from 1855 to 1860, and in August of 
that year removed to Chicago, and became a grain and 
provision commission merchant. Has been piesident of 
the Board of Trade of Chicago. In 1882 he was elected 
to Congress as Representative from the first district of 
Illinois, and has since been re-elected. 

322 IV. Catharine Sybil Morris, born in Springfield, 695 
Nov. 8, 1851. She married, Feb. 24, 1870, Frank Reed, 

son of Edwin W. Reed of Springfield. He was born in 
1848, and is a merchant; they reside in Chicago. 

CHILD OF HENRY AND HARRIET (bONTECOu) MORRIS. 127 

323 I. John Emery Morris, born in Springfield, Mass., 698 
Nov. 30, 1843. He married. May 15, 1867, in Hartford, 



!l 



SIXTH GENERATION. 143 

Conn., Mary Pamelia Felt, daughter of Festus C. and Sarah 

King (Lincohi) Felt of New York, who was born in New 

York City, Jan. 1, 1848. They reside in Hartford. His 

£ business life was begun in 1860 in the Charter Oak Bank 

^ of Hartford. In 1864 he obtained a clerical position in 

•s^ the Travelers Insurance Company, then just commencing 

^ business, of which company he has been assistant sec- 

X retary since May, 1874. Sept. 20, 1862, he enlisted in 

"^^^ Company B, 22d Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, and 



,5^, ^^^^^"^^^i::^ served as corporal until mustered out, July 7, 1863. 

*^ CHILDREN OF WILLIAM ELY AND CAROLINE CODDING- 128 

TON (tHAYEr) BONTECOU. 

324 I. Daniel Boiitecou, born in Springfield, Mass., Sept. 
14, 1851. Graduated from the College of the City of New 
York in 1871. He married, Oct. 7, 1885, at Falmouth, 
Mass., Nathalie Holdrege, who was born Oct. 8, 1857. 
He is a civil engineer by profession, and for a number of 
years was engaged on the public works of New York City. 
He now resides in Kansas City, Mo., and is chief engineer 
of the Kansas City Belt Railway Company. /i<£ci /j^*-<!it I^U'^i 



325 II. Frederick Thayer Boiitecoii, born in Spring- 
field, Oct. 29, 1856 ; died Nov. 17, 1856. 

326 III. Nathaniel Frederick Thayer Bontecon, born 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., March 1, 1860. Resides in New York 
City. He is a stock broker. 

ClU~ itrm iM. JfotJCi Cot 



SEVENTH GENERATION 



CHILDREN OF GEORGE SHEERING AND MARTHA (bATS- 129 
ley) EONTECOU. 

I. Harriet Elizabeth Bontecou, born Jan. 6, 1828. 701 
She married, Jan. 28, 1849, James Hook, who was born 

in New York City, Oct. 31, 1815. In 1836 Mr. Hook 
removed to Mobile, Ala., and pursued his business as a 
mason ; he also had charge of the fire department of that 
city. In 1840 he returned North, and settled in New- 
burg, N. Y., removing to Dunkirk in 1852, where he still 
resides, and where his wife died, Feb. 20, 1878. He is 
the proprietor of a steam bakery. 

II. Mary Louisa Bontecou, born March 1, 1831; 
died June 27, 1841. 

III. Josephine Bontecou, born in Newburg, N. Y., 705 
Sept. 24, 1833. She married, Oct. 15, 1853, Eugene Os- 
car Warring, who was born Sept. 25, 1831. He was a 
railroad bridge builder. She died Jan. 20, 1858. He is 

said to have died in Illinois about 1869. 

IT. Walter Henry Bontecou, born in Newburg, 706 
Oct. 12, 1836. He was a baker. He married, July 1, 
1862, Mary Mosher, who was born Sept. 5, 1841. He 
died Aug. 7, 1868, in Newburg. His widow married, April 
24, 1869, George Bell, and resides (1883) at 13 Mill 
Street, Newburg. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 145 

CHILD OF GEORGE WASHINGTON AND MARY (bONTE- 131 
COU) BRADLEY. 

331 I. Lois Bradley, born in East Haven, Conn., Aug. 2, 
1826 ; died there, May 7, 1882, unmarried. 

CHILDREN -OF JAMES AND HARRIET (bONTECOu) HAM- 132 
ILTON. 

332 I. Robert Joliii Hamilton, born in Newburg, N. Y., 709 
March 11, 1837. He learned the machinist's trade in 
New York ; but being of an adventurous disposition, joined 

in 1856 the forces commanded by William Walker, and 
engaged with them in the noted filibustering expedition 
against Nicaragua. On his return he was employed for 
a time in his father's store in Newburg, and in 1858 
removed to New York. He married, Jan. 25, 1858, Ellen 
Jane Sullivan, daughter of James and Margaret (Sulli- 
van) Sullivan of Brooklyn, N. Y. He enlisted. May 16, 
1861, in Company B, 36th Regiment New York Volunteers, 
and. participated in every fight that the Army of the 
Potomac was engaged in during his two-years' term of 
service, including of course the battles of Fredericksburg, 
Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, the seven-days' fight at Malvern 
Hill, South Mountain, Antietam, and Chancellorsville. 
On his return from the war he obtained employment at 
the Washington Iron Works, in Newburg, and on Oct. 3, 
1863, was very severely injured by the explosion of the 
boiler of the United States gunboat " Lenape," which was 
being tested ; his left arm was broken, and the bones never 
united, rendering the member nearly useless. He after- 
wards learned the painter's trade, and became foreman of 
painters at the iron works. In 1872 the Washington 
works suffered failure and were closed, and Mr. Hamilton 
removed to Astoria, L. I., where he still resides, following 
his trade of painter. 



146 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

333 II. Agnes Jane Hamilton, born in Newburg, Jan. 719 
18, 1839. She married, Oct. 15, 1861, Charles Frederick 
Chapman, who was born in Newbm-g, Aug. 5, 1835. He 

has been engaged in the grocery business, but now (1883) 
is clerk in a bakery establishment. They reside at 169 
Lander Street. 

334 III. Elias Pitts Hamilton, born March 2, 1841 ; 

died Aug. 22, 1841. 

335 IT. Margaret Anna Hamilton, born in Newburg, 
Oct. 22, 1843. She married, Oct. 8, 1862, Charles Wil- 
liam Brooks, born in Glenham, Dutchess County, N. Y., 
Sept. 9, 1837. He removed to Newburg when quite young, 
and remained there, engaged in the grocery business, 
until his death, which occurred in March, 1871. Mrs. 
Brooks died Aug. 19, 1863. They had no children. 

336 Y. Mary Louisa Hamilton, born in Newburg, Feb. 721 
10, 1845. She married, Sept. 6, 1864, Arthur Wilson, 

a native of Matteawan, Dutchess County, N. Y., who 
was born Sept. 4, 1842. His early childhood was passed 
in Foughkeepsie, but since 1848 he has resided in New- 
burg. He is the cashier of the Highland National Bank. 
They reside on Grand Street. 

337 YI. James Ranwick Hamilton, born March 18, 
1847. He was a printer in Newburg. He died at War- 
wick, N. Y., Dec. 2, 1878, to which place he had removed 
three years before. 

338 YII. William Henry Hamilton, born Sept. 1, 1849 ; 
was drowned at Newburg, July 4, 1859. 

339 A'lII. Samuel Hamilton, born June 18, 1854; died 
at Newburg, March 10, 1872. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 147 

CHILDREN OF NORMAN AND JULIA ELIZABETH (bEN- 133 
ham) HAYDEN. 

340 I. Charles Beuliam Hayden, born March 17, 1815; 
died Feb. 29, 1816. 

341 II. Charles Benhani Hayden, born in New Haven, 723 
Conn., Jan. 21, 1817. When he was eight years old his 
widowed mother removed to Smithfield, Isle of Wight 
County ,Va. He was thrice married: (1st,) Aug. 12, 1840, 

to Louisiana Susan Cocke, daughter of Lieutenant Wil- 
liam H. Cocke, United States Navy, and Eliza Woddrap 
Johnson of Smithfield. She died at Abington, Ya., July 
18, 1843. (2d,) To Mary Elizabeth Kilby, Aug. 21, 1844, 
daughter of John Thompson and Ann Newton (Jones) 
Kilby. She. was born May 19, 1819, and died Dec. 27, 
1861. (3d,) To Mrs. Julia Ann Wilson, Nov. 11, 1867, 
who was the widow of James Wilson, and daughter of 
George and Ann Matilda Banks (Hening) Cabaniss. She 
is living in Smithfield. Mr. Hayden entered William and 
Mary College in 1834, and took his academic degree in 
1836. He attended one session at the University of Vir- 
ginia and graduated in several of its schools, intending 
to return and complete the law course, but was persuaded 
by Prof. William B. Rogers to engage with him in the 
geological survey of the State of Virginia, which occupied 
four years. From 1840 to 1843 he engaged in teaching 
in Smithfield and Abington, Va. Having at the same 
time prepared himself in the law, he was admitted to the 
bar, Nov. 25, 1843, and attained distinction in the courts 
in which he practiced. For many years he was attorney 
for the Commonwealth. He died in Smithfield, Jan. 28, 
1883. The following extract is taken from the published 
Resolutions of the Isle of Wight County Bar: 

" Superbly learned in law, profoundly skilled in science, 
thoroughly read in literature, widely and extensively ex- 



148 BONTECOU- FAMILY. 

perienced in business, with a judgment and common-sense 
as conspicuous and luminous as his talents, he daily sur- 
prised those with whom he came into contact with the 
great extent, the vast variety, and surprising minuteness 
of his knowledge, and made it difficult if not impossible 
for them to say in what department of knowledge or of 
life he most excelled. 

" Coming into the bar when law was a science and not a 
trade, he brought to its practice a profound and varied 
knowledge, and delighted his judge with his respectful 
deference and his brethren at the bar with a ready and 
exquisite courtesy. 

" Falling in our midst, we cannot fail to feel and to 
lament the loss of his guidance, his companionship, his 
talents, his influence, and his example." 

342 III. Norman Edward Brockling Hay den, born 

July 8, 1819; died Jan. 27, 1820. 

CHILD OF SAMPSON AND JULIA ELIZABETH (hAYDEn) 133 
WHITE. 

343 I. Julia Augusta Todd White, born May 20, 1834 ; 
died Aug. 30, 1844. 

CHILDEEN OF CLEVELAND JARMAN AND SUSAN C. 134 
(bENIIAM) SALTER. 

344 I. Julia Rebecca Salter, born in New Haven, 732 
Conn., Feb. 24, 1819. She married, June 12, 1843, Wil- 
liam Homes of St. Louis, Mo., son of Henry and Isabella 
(Porter) Homes of Boston, Mass., and grand-nephew of 
Hon. Rufus King. He died Jan. 19, 1869. Mrs. Homes 
resides in Waverly, 111. 

345 II. Mary Louisa Salter, born in New Haven, Feb. 739 
24, 1819 (twin with Julia R.). She married, July 8, 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 149 

1841, Charles Roger Welles of Springfield, 111., son of 
Hon. Martin Welles of Wethersfield, Conn. He grad- 
uated from Yale College in 1834; died July 23, 1854. 
Her was a lawyer. Mrs. Welles resides in Elwyn, Pa. 

CHILDREN OF ELISHA MANDEYILLE AND ABBY (kIM- 135 
BERLY) BENHA:\r. 

346 I. Susan Beiiham, born Jan. 22, 1823. She mar- 745 
ried, Aug. 28, 1848, Washington Holmes Bardwell of 
Whately. Mass. They removed to New Haven, Conn., 
then to Springfield, Mass., and now reside in Monsonville, 

N. H. He is a chair-maker. 

347 II. Louisa Waters Beuham, born Jan. 27, 1825. 748 
She married, April 16, 1844, Ralph Childs, a native of 
Deerfield, Mass. He served as a private in the 2d Bat- 
tery, 8th Massachusetts Artillery ; enlisted Sept. 6, 1864, 

and was discharged at Vicksburg, Miss., June 11, 1865, 
being at the time sick in hospital. He never regained 
his usual health, and died in Whately, Mass., Dec. 12, 
1867. He was a carriage-maker. She resides in Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

348 III. Francis Kimberly Benham, born in Orange, 756 
Conn., Sept. 13, 1827. He learned the trade of carriage 
blacksmith, and worked at that and gun-making until 
about 1870. He married, Nov. 30, 1848, in Hamden, 
Conn., Emily Jane Leek, daughter of Henry and Martha 
(Beecher) Leek of New Haven, He is now engaged in 

the grocery business, and is a member of the firm of 
Smith & Co., 7 Broad waTy, New Haven. They reside at 
324 George Street. 

349 IV. Robert Alexander Benham, born June 10, 762 
1831, in Orange. When sixteen years of age he removed 

to New Haven, and learned the carriage-trimming busi- 



150 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

ness, continuing in it until 1867. He married, July 25, 
1852, Delia Delight Leek, sister of his brother Francis's 
wife. In 1867 he opened a boot and shoe store, in wliich 
business he still continues, at 814 Chapel Street, New 
Haven. His residence is at 93 Lyon Street. 

CniLDEEN OF FRANCIS W. AND LOUISA WALTER (eEN- 136 
ham) EUSIINELL. 

350 I. WilHam Edward Bushiiell, born Dec. 27, 1821. 763 
He married, Dec. 22, 1857, Rose Linda Clark, daughter 

of Silas and Hannah Atwell (Tenant) Clark of Chicago, 
111. He went to sea at an early age, but finally settled 
in California, and is now in the employ o^ the Central 
Pacific Railroad Company, in command of one of their 
steamers plying between San Francisco and Oakland. 
His home is at 14 Turk Street, San Francisco. 

351 II. Douglas Ritchie Bushiiell, born in Norwich, 764 
Conn., June 17, 1824. He received a thorough education, 

and adopted the profession of civil engineer. He mar- 
ried, Sept. 16, 1849, at Highgate, Vt., Emily Juanna Cath- 
arine Edson, daughter of Captain John and Emily Perlee 
(Clement) Edson of Highgate. In 1850 they removed 
to Illinois, and settled at Sterling. He was prominently 
connected there with several railway lines, among them 
what is now the Chicago & Northwestern, of which he 
was chief engineer. In the spring of 1861, when the call 
was made for troops to defend the Union, he was one of 
the first to respond, and was elected captain of Company 
B, 13th Illinois Infantry. The early part of his campaign 
was passed in Missouri and Arkansas; but in December, 
1862, the regiment was ordered to Vicksburg, Miss., and 
engaged in the fights of the 28th and 29th ^of that month. 
Here he was promoted to be major, and highly distin- 
guished himself by his coolness and courage. On the 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 151 

10th and 11th of January, 1863, he displayed the same 
heroic devotion at the assault and capture of Arkansas 
Post. In Sherman's operations against Johnston after 
the fall of Vicksburg, Major Bushnell acted as lieuten- 
ant-colonel until the return to quarters in August. He 
passed safely through the fierce contests of Lookout 
Mountain and Missionary Ridge, on the 21th and 25th of 
November. On the morning of the 27th, in the advance 
of his regiment over an open field, before Ringgold, Ga., 
in the face of a hot fire from the enemy, he was killed. 
"Death found him where it might have found him at any 
moment of his career as a soldier, — at his post." His 
body was sent home under military escort, and was impres- 
sively buried, with Masonic ceremonies, in the presence 
of a large number of sympathizing friends and citizens. 
In 1864 Mrs. Bushnell was appointed postmistress of 
Sterling, and held the office for seven years. She married, 
Oct. 12, 1871, Hon. Miles S. Henry, lawyer, railroad presi- 
dent, major and paymaster during the war, and at the 
time of his death, which occurred Nov. 26, 1878, mayor 
of the city. Mrs. Henry is still living in Sterling. 

III. Francis Haydeii Bushnell, born in Norwich, 768 
June 10, 1827. He graduated from Trinity College, Hart- 
ford, in 1850, and from Berkeley Divinity School, Middle- 
town, in 1853. He was ordained to the Diaconate, Dec. 
19, 1852, by Right Rev. T. C. Brownell, D. D. In 1853 
he became assistant minister of Christ Church, Louis- 
ville, Ky., and in April, 1854, was ordained to the priest- 
hood by Right Rev. B. B. Smith, D. D. In 1855 he be- 
came rector of Grace Church in that city. He married, 
Aug. 2, 1858, Mary Virginia Breeden, daughter of John 
N. and Jane (Keller) Breeden of Louisville. She died 
there. May 28, 1860. He again married, Feb. 2, 1863, 
Theodosia Coxe Cumming, daughter of Samuel T. and 
Theodosia H. (Coxe) Cumming of Hunterdon County, 



152 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

N. J. In 1866 he removed to Philadelphia and became 
rector of St. David's Church ; but resigned his pastorate 
in 1875, to take the position of general agent of the 
Board of Missions of the Diocese of Pennsylvania. In 
1877 he resigned this position and became rector of the 
Church of the Messiah in Philadelphia, where he now 
remains. 

353 IV. Henry Harrington Bnshnell, born May 18, 
1828; died Dec. 29, 1850. 

354 V. Bicliard Wells Buslinell, born in Norwich, 769 
Aug. 10, 1830. He married, Sept. 19, 1853, Mary B. 

y^u^tA^ WTum e^ of Norwich. She died in Chicago in 1863. He 
married (2d), May 5, 1869, Mary Sophia Thomas, daugh- 
ter of Ozro and Mary (Hurd) Thomas of New Hamp- 
shire. He is master mechanic of the Burlington, Cedar 
Rapids & Northern Railroad^and resides in Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND ELIZA ANN (hALL) 138 
PRITCHARD. 

355 I. Caroline Uretta Pritchard, born March 28, 1826. 776 

She married, Sept. 16, 1845, in Ohio, Anson Munson Du- 
rand, who was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., July 6, 1822. 
He followed the life of a farmer in New York, Ohio, Wis- 
consin, and Iowa ; and in 1870 removed with his family 
to Missouri and settled in Carthage, where he engaged in 
the sale of agricultural implements. He enlisted in a 
Wisconsin regiment during the Civil War, but failed to 
pass the medical examination on account of impaired 
health caused by a sun-stroke, from the effect of which 
he never fully recovered. He was a member of the Con- 
gregational Church, and a justice of the peace. He died 
in St. Joseph, Mo., Jan. 21, 1881. Mrs. Durand resides 
in Des Moines, Iowa. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 163 

356 II. William Wicks Pritcliard, born in Waterbury, 785 
Conn., Oct. 28, 1827. He removed with his parents to 
Brunswick, Medina County, Ohio, when about five years 

old. He married, Oct. 28, 1851, Mary Clarinda Stebbins, 
daughter of Hervey and Julia (Robinson) Stebbins of 
Brunswick, who was born March 31, 1832, and died Nov. 
10, 1882. Mr. Pritchard died March 7, 1873. He was a 
printer by trade, and held the office of deacon in the 
Congregational Church. 

357 III. Charles Frederick Pritcliard, born Oct. 31, 789 
1829. He married, March 29, 1856, Mary Susan West- 
cott, daughter of Jesse and Lucy (Mason) Westcott of 
Buffalo, N. Y. She was born in Buffalo, May 4, 1836, 

and died Feb. 9, 1882. Mr. Pritchard is a farmer, and 
resides at Blue Mills, Jackson County, Mo. 

358 IV. George Auson Pritcliard, born in Liverpool, 795 
Ohio, May 5, 1832. He left school at the age of eleven 
years, and was employed by his father in the business of 
buying and selling cattle. During the first year of his 
work in this line, he personally superintended the trans- 
fer of a drove of 260 head from ^Madison County, Ohio, to 
Cleveland. He continued in his father's employ until lie 
became of age, when he engaged in the same business on 

his own account, and has ever since followed it. He mar- 
ried, Oct. 10, 1854, Jane Elizabeth Freese, daughter of 
'Abram and Jane (Deming) Freese of Des Moines, Iowa. 
She was born April 14, 1832, and died August 8, 1878. 
He married (2d), March 1, 1880, Mrs. Florence Agnes 

' Abram Freese came from Lee, Mass., in 1813, and settled in tlie 
Western Reserve district of Oliio. He bore tlie commission of sur- 
veyor to the new Connecticut colony, and arrived in the first sail-hoat 
that crossed Lake Erie, — a rude barge fitted with canvas and called 
"The Little Mayflower." The greater part of the surveying of this 
new country was done under his supervision. 
•20 



154 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Maulsby Duncan, daughter of Rev. John and Mary C. 
(Kimmerle) Maulsby of Indiana. Mr. Pritchard re- ■ 
moved to Des Moines, Iowa, in 1862, and to Denver, Col., 

in 1883. 

359 V. Henry Harrison Pritchard, born May 31, 1835. 797 
He married, Oct. 16, 1870, Cornelia Harrison, daughter 

of Lawson Nourse and Mary Jane (Oilman) Harrison of 
Des Moines. They reside in Des Moines, Iowa. He is 
engaged in the cattle business. He and his brother 
Oeorge were the first to ship cattle from the Rocky 
Mountains, East, and were also the first to ship hogs by 
rail from Iowa to San Francisco. 

360 TI. Elizabeth Adelaide Pritchard, born in Madi- 802 
son, Ohio, May 24, 1837. She married, Oct. 4, 1863, 
John Franklin Rollins, son of Richard Rollins, who was 
born in Lebanon, Me., Oct. 4, 1838. He removed to Des 
Moines in 1856, and has ever since resided there except 
during the year 1870, which he passed in Pittsburg, Pa. 

He was engaged for a few years in the drug business, but 
is now a wholesale paper merchant. 

361 Til. Susan Henrietta Pritchard, born June 20, 806 
1840. She married, Oct. 20, 1869, Oscar Cornelius Rose, 

who was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., Sept. 1, 1841. He 
removed when thirteen years of age to Dane County, 
Wis., with his parents, and remained there on a farm till 
1864, when he enlisted in the 43d Wisconsin Volunteers, 
became a corporal in Company I, and served one year. 
During this time his health became impaired, and on his 
discharge from the army, removed to Iowa. After his 
marriage they lived, until 1879, in Sciola, Montgomery 
County, and now reside in Carbon, Adams County. He 
is a coal dealer ; also president of the school board of 
Carbon. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 155 

362 Till. Eliza Frances Pritcliard, born April 1, 1843 ; 
died at Des Moines, March 21, 1871. Unmarried. 

363 IX. Mary Ellen Pritcliard, born Nov. 15, 1845 ; 
died at Brunswick, Ohio, Sept. 16, 1847. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES AND AMY (mOSs) HALL. 139 

364 I. Celia Eliza Hall, born in Cheshire, Conn., Sept. 
12, 1831 ; died Aug. 13, 1835. 

365 II. Willis Charles Hall, born in Cheshire, March 808 
16, 1833. When he was five years old his parents re- 
moved to Ohio, but returned to Cheshire in 1843. In 
1848 he entered the grocery trade as a clerk, in Cheshire, 
subsequently removing to Waterbury, and in 1882 sold 

his interest in the business to his partner, and retired 
from trade. He married, May 26, 1857, Elizabeth Heatly, 
daughter of William Heatly of England, whose ancestor 
served under William of Orange at the battle of the 
Boyne. She was born near Dublin, Ireland, in January 
1833, and died in Waterbury, Conn., Nov. 20, 1873. He 
married (2d), June 13, 1876, Orinda Daniels, daughter 
of Joseph B. and Eleanor (Miller) Daniels of Waterbury. 
She was born in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., May 29, 1843. 

366 III. Ellen Mary Hall, born in Cheshire, Jan. 12, 812 
1835. She married, May 23, 1858, Seth Eliada Frost, 
who was born in Wolcott, Conn., Feb. 24, 1832. His father 

was Sylvester Higby Frost, and his mother Philinda Tut- 
tle, both of Wolcott. In 1844 he removed to Southington, 
Conn., and since 1861 has been engaged in farming. He 
is a member of the Baptist Church, and has three times 
been elected justice of the peace. 

367 lA^. Emma Celia Hall, born in Cheshire, Aug. 11. 815 
1837. She was married, Dec. 25, 1860, by Rev. John S. 



156 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

C. Abbott, to Elmer William Hitchcock, son of Benjamin 
Truman and Julia (Frisbie) Hitchcock of Waterbury. 
They reside in the western part of Cheshire, where he is 
engaged in farming. 

368 V. Gardner Moss Hall, born in Brunswick, Ohio, 816 
Jan. 11, 1841. When three years old his parents re- 
moved to Connecticut. He commenced his business life 

as a peddler of ice in Waterbury, and gradually built uj) 
a large business. He became a member of the firm of 
Upson & Hall of Waterbury, and was also president of 
the Naugatuck Valley Ice Company of Bridgeport. He 
married. May 10, 1870, Georgiana Elizabeth Mullings, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Brooks) Mullings. He 
died in Waterbury, Oct. 13, 1880. The local paper said 
of him : " The deceased was highly esteemed a/ud had 
a large circle of friends. He was of a retiring disposi- 
tion, but was a business man of strict integrity and 
applied himself closely to the interests of the firm and 
Company he was identified with." His widow resides in 
Waterbury. 

369 VI. Fraukliu Amos Hall, born in Brunswick, Ohio, 818 
Aug. 1, 1843 ; removed in infancy to Cheshire, Conn., 
where his boyhood was spent on his father's farm. When 

19 years of age he enlisted in Company H, 20th regiment, 
Connecticut volunteers, and at the battle of Chancellors- 
ville, Va., May 3d, 1863, was captured and confined for a 
time in Libby Prison, Richmond. After his return from 
the war he traveled for several years in the grocery trade, 
and then removed to Holyoke, Mass. where he opened a 
hotel, remaining there about two years. He then became 
the proprietor of the Earl House, Waterbury, Conn., 
which he kept until his death. He married, Oct. 9, 1867, 
Adelaide Ulissa Munger, daughter of Daniel Tuttle, and 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 157 

Eliza Ann (Russell) Munger of Waterl)ury. He died in 
"Waterbiuy, Feb. 20, 1879. "He was greatly beloved by 
his comrades and friends, and endured with cheerful 
patience the years of suffering occasioned by the disease 
which ended his life." — Waterhury imper. 

370 Til. Denisoii Asahel Hall, born in Cheshire, Conn., 
Jan. 18, 1847. He was a book-agent, and traveled through 
Maine and the British Provinces. He died, Dec. 2, 1875; 
unmarried. 

371 Till. Adelaide Eliza Hall, born in Cheshire, Sept. 819 
17, 1849. She married, June 14, 1871, George Britain 
Lawton of Waterbury, son of Richard Carlisle and Eliza- 
beth (Hibbin) Lawton. He is a die sinker at the Scoville 
Manufacturing Company, Waterbury. 

372 IX. Warren Leander Hall, born in Cheshire, May 8211 
21, 1856. He married, Dec. 14, 1881, Etta Louisa An- 
drews, daughter of Samuel M. and Amelia (Thompson) 
Andrews of Naugatuck, Conn. They reside in Nauga- 
tuck. He is an importer and dealer in foreign and do- 
mestic fruits at 258 Washington Street, New York. 

CHILD OF IIIRA:yr and nancy (hall) BRADLEY. 140 

373 I. Orilla Elizabeth Bradley, born January, 1834; 
died June 9, 1834. 

CHILDREN OF AMOS, JR., AND ARPATIA (dOOLITTLE) 141 
HALL. 

374 I. Louisa Elizabeth Hall, born Sept. 10, 1835. She 822 

married, June 7, 1869, Aimer B. Hitchcock, son of Gains 
and Betsey (Brown) Hitchcock of Waterbury. He was 
born in Waterbury, March 23, 1835. By trade he is a 
clock-maker, and is employed in a clock factory at Wa- 
terbury as a "pinion turner." 



158 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

375 II. Leander Wilson Hall, born March 15, 1837 ; 
died in Brunswick, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1840. 

376 III. Nancy Orilla Hall, born June 26, 1842. She 823 
married, Oct. 30, 1872, George Hauxhurst. Tliey reside 

in Southington, Conn. He is a harness-maker.. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE ANSON AND SARAH (:\IER- 142 
RIAMS) HALL. 

377 I. Sarah Jane Hall, born April 7, 1840. She mar- 
ried, Jan. 9, 1872, Joseph Scott. He was a baker. They 
lived in Waterbury, where he died, Jan. 29, 1877. She 
married (2d), Sept. 4, 1877, Joseph Baldwin. Tliey re- 
side in Trumbull, Conn. He is a farmer. She has no 
children. 

378 II. Nancy Orilla Hall, born June 5, 1841. She 824 
married, Nov. 21, 1871, John David Benham of Middle- 
bury, Conn. She died in Westville, Conn., Nov. 20, 1872. 

Mr. Benham is a stage-driver and proprietor of the stage 
route between Middlebury and Southbury, Conn. 

CHILDREN OF HENRY AND SUSAN SALINA (haLL) 143 
LIVINGSTON. 

379 I. Emma Eliza Livingston, born Oct. 10, 1841 ; 825 

married, Feb. 28, 1862, William Peebles, who was born 
in Hinckley, Ohio, Nov. 22, 1840, and died April 28, 1872: 
Mr. Peebles was a farmer, a resident of Hinckley, and en- 
listed in 1862 as a minute-man for the defense of Cincin- 
nati, at the time it was menaced by the Confederate forces 
during the War of the Rebellion. She married (2d), July 
27, 1881, Horace Carpenter, who was born in Strongsville, 
Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Nov. 20, 1830. He has resided 
in Brunswick, Ohio, since 1855, engaged as farmer and 
cattle broker, and has held a number of town offices. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 159' 

380 II. Amos Livingston, born Dec. 27, 1843. He 827 

married, May 6, 1869, Carrie Retteg. Tliey reside in 
Weymouth, Medina County, Ohio, where he is engaged in 
the dry-goods business. 

381 III. Mary Elbertine Livingston, born Sept. 24, 
1848 ; married, June 14, 1864, William Gay, who was 
born in East Bloomfield, Ontario County, N. Y., April 18, 
1833. He removed to Hinckley, Medina County, Ohio, in 
1836, and is a farmer and fruit-grower. They have no 
children. 

382 IV. Frederick Charles Livingston, born Feb. 14, 
1852. He married. May 13, 1878, Ida Bell Moody, 
daughter of Asahel Wright and Paulina (Culver) Moody 
of Brunswick, Ohio. They reside in Brunswick, where 
he is a farmer. No children. 

383 V. Hiram Edward Livingston, born March 24, 829 
1855; married, May 12, 1881, Hattie Curtis Ellis, 
daughter of George Otis and Clarissa R. (Dunbar) Ellis, 

of Middlebury, Conn. He is engaged in the grocery 
business in Waterbury, Conn. 



CHILD OF EDWAED AND HENRIETTA ELIZABETH (hALl) 144: 
TERRELL. 

I. Mary Elizabetli Terrell, born Dec. 2, 1852. She 830 

married, Oct. 17, 1878, Isaiah Alexander Uffendale, who 
was born in Williamsburg (Brooklyn, E. D.), N. Y., June 
15, 1854. In 1870 he removed to Waterbury, where he 
now resides. He has charge of the soldering department 
at Holmes, Booth & Hayden's brass goods manufactory. 



160 BONTECOD FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF GEOEGE RICE AND LAURINDA (sAFFORD) 145 
BENEDICT. 

385 I. Oeorge Thaddeiis Benedict, boni Aug. 19, 1828 ; 
died Oct. 25, 1828. 

386 II. Charles Laurens Benedict, born in Niagara 832 
County, N. Y., Dec. 30, 1829. He married, Dec. 30, 
1856, Julia Adelaide Lusk, daughter of Alfred and 
Martha (Parker) Lusk of Edwardsville, 111., who was 
born Jan. 24, 1839. Mr. Benedict was a miller by trade, 

but from 1866 to 1869 was engaged in merchandising, 
at which time he resided in Gillespie, 111. He then 
removed to Edwardsville, 111., and engaged in railroading 
until his death, which occurred Dec. 22, 1875. 

387 III. George Rice Benedict, Jr., born at South 835 
Royalton, Niagara County, N. Y., June 17, 1832. He 
remained at home on the farm until twenty-four years of 

age, when he entered upon the profession of a teacher, and 
followed it until 1862, having lived during this time at 
several places in the West, his last residence being in Ne- 
maha County, Kan. He enlisted as a private in Company 
1, 13th Regiment Kansas Volunteers, serving until Novem- 
ber, 1863, when he was detached from that regiment and 
assigned to the 2d Kansas Colored Volunteers as sergeant- 
major. In January, 1864, he was promoted to be second 
lieutenant, and in April, at the battle of Jenkins Ferry, 
Saline River, Ark., received a bullet wound in the left arm 
which retired him to hospital at Little Rock, and from 
the effects of which he did not recover for a year, 
although he rejoined his regiment in July. He was dis- 
charged from the service Dec. 23, 1864, having partici- 
pated in the battles of Kane's Hill, Ark., Nov. 27, 1862 ; 
Prairie Grove, Dec. 7, 1862 ; Van Buren, Dec. 28, 1862 ; 
and Jenkins Ferry, April 30, 1864, besides many skir- 



SEVENTH GENERATION, 161 

mislics and reconnoissances. During the years 1864 and 
1865 he made a number of trips by wagon across the 
plains to the Rocky Mountains, a distance of 650 miles. 
In the winter of 1866-7 he taught school at Granada, 
Kan., and the following spring commenced breaking prairie 
for a farm. He married, March 12, 1868, Sarah Isabel 
Hart, daughter of William Jewett and Mary E. (Collings) 
Hart of Granada, who was born in Putnam County, Ind., 
July 16, 1849. Mr. Benedict continued as a farmer until 
January, 1873, when, having been elected to the office of 
clerk of the District Court for Nemaha County, he entered 
upon its duties, and served in this capacity until 1880. 
He is now a real-estate and loan agent ; is and always has 
been a total abstainer from the use of spirituous liquors, 
and an advocate of prohibition. He is justly proud of his 
adopted State, her soil, climate, schools, churches, laws, 
and her undeveloped resources. 

388 IT. Henry Liiiiijeus Benedict, born Aug. 18, 1834 ; 
resides at Royalton, N. Y., unmarried. 

389 V. Emily Safford Benedict, born April 4, 1837. 
She married, June 17, 1866, Charles L. Fisk. They re- 
side in Royalton, N. Y., and have no children. 

390 YI. Edward C. Delavan Benedict, born March 25, 
1842 ; died Jan. 28, 1843. 

CHILDEEN OF JULIUS HOYT AND OLIVE (CREGO) BENE= 146 
DICT. 

391 I. Daniel Benedict, born in Rutland, N. Y., April 838 
2, 1832. He removed to Michigan with his parents in 
1839, and followed all the business pursuits in which his 
father was engaged. With liis brothers he built a large 
stone-front store on Maumee Street, Adrian, in which he 
now continues in the clothing business. He served four 

21 



. 162 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

years as deputy sheriff, and one term as alderman from 
the fourth ward of Adrian. He married, Dec. 26, 1872, 
Margaret Elizabeth Thompson, daughter of Charles and 
Sarah Adaline (YanFosson) Thompson of Ypsilanti, Mich. 
She was born in Conway, Shiawassee County, Mich., Oct. 
19, 1846. 

392 II. Julius Benedict, born in Royalton, N. Y., June 839 
30, 1834. He settled with his father in Adrian, Mich., 

and for many years has been a successful merchant there. 
He married, Aug. 17, 1859, Harriet Munger, daughter of 
Algernon S. and Adeline (Crego) Munger of Bay City, 
Mich., born Oct. 1, 1842. 

393 III. Oscar Benedict, born March 9, 1837 ; married, 
April 26, 1877, Mattie Mirick, daughter of Hiram T. and 
Rowena (Gardner) Mirick of Lyons, Wayne County, N. Y. 
She was born in Lyons, Nov. 17, 1853. They have no 
children. Mr. Benedict is a merchant in Adrian. 

394 IT. Mortimer Benedict, born May 16, 1842; died 
March 25, 1843. 

396 y. George Benedict, born June 2, 1851 ; died Aug. 
2, 1851. 

children of george haynor and nancy rice 147 
(benedict) utley. 

396 I. Laurinda Utley, born July 20, 1828 ; died young. 

397 II. Daniel Palmer Utley, born June 11, 1880. He 841 
married, July 25, 1871, Eunice Elderkin, daughter of 
Jedediah and Emily (Andres) Elderkin of Pendleton, 

N. Y. He is a farmer, and resides in Flint, Mich. 

398 III. Julia Ann Utley, born Oct. 25, 1832. She 
married, Feb. 6, 1856, Horace Browning, son of Rev. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 163 

Crawford Browning of Royalton, N. Y. They reside in 
Wolcottville, N. Y., and have no children. He is a farmer. 

399 IT. Emily Eliza Utley, born in Royalton, N. Y., 842 
May 26, 1835 ; married, Nov. 1, 1854, George Washing- 
ton Van Valkenburgh, son of William A. and Rosanna 
(Worden) Van Valkenburgh of Lockport, N. Y. He 

was born in Lockport in 1842 ; was brought up to 
the harness-making trade, but became a farmer, and in 
1858 purchased a farm at Davison Center, Genesee 
County, Mich. He enlisted in 1861 in the 23d Regi- 
ment Michigan Volunteers, and was appointed corporal 
in Company H. At the battle of Resaca, Ga., he was 
the color-bearer of his regiment, and was killed in that 
action, May 14, 1864. He is buried in the National 
Cemetery at Chattanooga, Tenn. She married (2d), July 
5, 1877, Lafayette Riddle, a native of Elba, Genesee 
County, N. Y., as his second wife. At the age of 16 Mr. 
Riddle settled in Niagara County, N. Y., and has ever 
since resided there, his present home being in Rapids. 
He is a farmer. 

400 V. Oscar Enoch Utley, born Sept. 8, 1837. He 
married, Oct. 12, 1866, Cordelia Elderkin, daughter of 
Jedediah and Emily (Andres) Elderkin of Pendleton, 
N. Y. They reside in Franklinmouth, Mich. He is a 
farmer. They have no children. 

401 TI. Timothy Franklin Utley, born April 19, 1840. 
He married, April 30, 1863, Maria Freelove Van Valken- 
burgh, daughter of William A. and Rosanna (Worden) 
Van Valkenburgh of Lockport, N. Y. He is a merchant 
in Lockport. They have no children. 

402 Til. Morris Engene Utley, born May 14, 1845. 844 
He married, March 31, 1866, Desdemona Stimson, daugh- 
ter of Walter and Amanda M. (Walters) Stimson of Pen- 



164 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

dleton, N. Y. He is a farmer, and resides in Clarence 
Hollow, N. Y. 

403 VIII. Alma Augusta Utley, born Nov. 18, 1848; 846 
married, Sept. 30, 1872, Aimer W. Mitchell, son of Horace 

W. and Dollie (Crego) Mitchell of Royalton, N. Y. They 
reside in Rapids, N. Y. He is a merchant. 

404 IX. George Benedict Utley, born June 29, 1853 ; 847 
married, Feb. 28, 1877, Emma Jane Laraway, daughter 

of Joseph and Cordelia (Cummings) Laraway of Clarence, 
N. Y. He is a farmer at Rapids, N. Y. 

* CHILDREN OF GEORGE CLINTON AND AMANDA (bENE- 148 

dict) crego. 

405 I. Julius Francelo Crego, born March 28, 1831. 850 
He married, February, 1853, Amy Gallup, daughter of 
Hiram and Eliza (Striclen) Gallup of Erie County, N. Y. 

She died in May, 1859. He married (2d), Nov. 18, 1862, 
Caroline M. Chandler, daughter of William A. and Fannie 
M. (Green) Chandler of Lenawee County, Mich. They 
reside near Traverse City, Mich. He is a farmer. 

406 II. Martha Ann Crego, born May 2, 1840. She 853 
married, June 29, 1862, Harrison Ostrander. They 
reside in Adrian, Mich. He is a cattle dealer. 

407 III. Nancy Laurinda Crego, born Dec. 24, 1842. 
She married, Dec. 10, 1868, William Martin Duryee, who 
was born Dec. 31, 1845, in Livingston County, N. Y. 
Mrs. Duryee died in Adrian, April 12, 1870. She had 
no children. Mr. Duryee again married, and resides in 
Michigan Center. He is a market gardener. 

408 IV. George Clinton Crego, born in 1844; mar- 855 
ried. May 30, 1868, Mary Eleanor Lawrence, daughter of 

* These are probably not arranged in order of age. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 165 

Hiram and Hannah (McCaulay) Lawrence of Rome, Lena- 
wee County, Mich. He was a cattle dealer, and died in 
Adrian, June 13, 1876. His widow married, Oct. 24, 1882, 
Isaac Mortimer Dean, and resides in Adrian. 

409 V. James Henry Crego, born in Clarence, Niagara 857 
County, N. Y., June 8, 1850. He married, June 22, 1870, 
Anna Scott, daughter of Giles and Anna Scott of Rome, 
Mich., who died in September, 1874. He is a stock-drover, 

and resides in Adrian. 

410 YI. Nancy Jane Crego, died at the age of seven 
years. 

411 Til. Thaddeus Crego, died in infancy. 

412 Till. Polly Lavinia Crego, died when twenty years 
old. 

413 IX. Sherman Crego, died at eleven years of age. 

CHILDREN OF ALVIN BONTECOU AND CORNELIA (sMITH) 149 
RICE. 

414 I. Nancy Elizabeth Rice, born March 25, 1830. 859 
She married, Aug. 14, 1849, James Noah Finch, son of 
Noah Finch of Athol, N. Y., where he was born May 27, 
1824. They removed to Michigan in 1855, and now 
reside in Solon Township, Kent County. He is a lum- 
berman and farmer. 

415 II. Charles Benham Rice, born Nov. 6, 1832. He 864 

removed from New York State to Michigan in 1854, and 
later to Illinois, where he now resides in Limestone, Kan- 
kakee County. He married, June 3, 1863, Mrs. Lois 
Mariette Shear, widow of DeWitt Clinton Shear of Put- 
nam, Washington County, N. Y., and daughter of James 
Lawson and Sallie A. (Beck with) Smith of Orwell, Vt. 
Mr. Rice is a farmer. 



166 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

416 III. Ebeu Smith Rice, born Nov. 19, 1831. He 867 
removed to Michigan from New York State in 1855. 

He married, Oct. 15, 1857, Cinderella Burt, daughter of 
Justus and Betsey (Hill) Burt of Ada, Kent County, 
Mich. He died at Ada, March 30, 1863. Mrs. Rice is 
living in Ada. , 

417 IV. Theodosia Phebe Rice, born April 18, 1836. 869 
She married, March 12, 1863, John Conley of Ada, Mich., 

a farmer. She died in Grand Rapids, April 24, 1875. 
Mr. Conley's place of residence is unknown. 

418 y. Thaddeus Rice, died in infancy in Erie County, 
N. Y. 

child of chaeles benham and alma augusta 150 
(bkooker) rice. 

419 I. Alma Augusta, born in 1841 ; died October, 1843, 
at Buffalo, N. Y. 

children of JAMES AND HANNAH (dOUGREY) NICHOLS. 151 

420 I. Jane Nichols, born Sept. 8, 1832. Resides in 
Lansingburg, N. Y. 

421 II. Anna Nichols, born April 21, 1834. Resides in 
Lansingburg. 

422 III, John Dougrey Nichols, born Dec. 30, 1837. 872 
Married, March 20, 1859, Elizabeth Van Zandt, daughter 

of Barent V. and Maria (Houghtaling) Van Zandt of New 
Scotland, Albany County, N. Y. He is engaged in the 
wholesale drug business in Albany. His residence is at 
Lansingburg. 

423 IV. Thomas Marris Nichols, born Dec. 7, 1840; 
died Auff. 1, 1866. 



seventh generation. 167 

children of james, jr., and frances elizabeth 152 
(:\ioulton) dougrey. 

424: I. John Doiigrey, born Aug. 9, 1832. He married, 875 
May 8, 1858, Isabel Mary Montgomery, daughter of John 
and Mary (Hallowell) Montgomery of Stockport, CoUim- 
bia County, N. Y. She was born in Stockport, March 
10, 1840. They reside in Lansingburg. He conducts a 
local express business between Lansingburg, Troy, and 
Albany. 

425 II. James Doiigrey (Sd), born Oct. 23, 1834. He 879 
married, July 15, 1859, Jane Amanda Jones, daughter of 
Nahum P. and Sarah Ann (Alexander) Jones of Lansing- 
burg. She was born March 21, 1840. James Dougrey, 

in early life, opened a livery establishment in Saratoga 
Springs, N. Y., and afterwards conducted a similar estab- 
lishment at Troy. He built and occupied the Park House, 
on Whipple Avenue, between Lansingburg and Troy. In 
1875 he was appointed by the State to the office of sec- 
tion superintendent on the Champlain Canal, and held it 
for four years. He now resides in Stillwater, Saratoga 
County, where he owns a fine farm, and makes a specialty 
of blooded stock. 

426 III. Elizabeth Moultou Dougrey, born Feb. 1, 
1837 ; died Jan. 9, 1872, unmarried. 

427 IT. Howard Moultoii Dougrey, born Sept. 1, 1839. 
Resides in Troy, unmarried. He holds a responsible posi- 
tion in the office of the National Express Company. 

428 Y. George Moultou Dougrey, born Oct. 12, 1841 ; 
died Feb. 17, 1842. 

429 YI. Clarissa Boutecou Dougrey, born June 1, 1834. 882 
She married, Dec. 22, 1869, Chandler Hezekiah Loomis of 
Syracuse, N. Y. He was born in Ponipcy, N. Y., Jan. 



168 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

28, 1836. Since 1858 he has been engaged in contracting 
in New York, Pennsylvania, and Canada, and is now super- 
intendent of the Union Dredging Company of New York. 
They reside at 432 West 20th Street. 

children of charles dikeman and clarissa ann 153 
(dougrey) smith. 

430 I. David Reeves Smith, born in Marshall, Mich., 884 
April 26, 1835. He is a civil and mechanical engineer. 

In his professional capacity he has conducted operations 
in many States of this Republic, and in South and Cen- 
tral Americas ; his residence in different parts of Spanish 
America aggregating eighteen years. He married, April 
23, 1861, in Copiapo, Chile, S. A., Juana Carrasco, daugh- 
ter of Tadeo and Martina (Guerra) Carrasco of Santiago. 
Their present place of residence is in Cohoes, N. Y., where 
he fills the position of secretary to the Folded Filter Man- 
ufacturing Company. Mr. Sniith is the author of a work 
entitled Ownership and Sovereignty, published in Cohoes, 
1883. 

431 II. James Dougrey Smith, born in Marshall, Mich., 
Nov. 6, 1837. He married, April 15, 1868, Ellen Living- 
ston, daughter of James and Christina (McDougal) Liv- 
ingston of Chicago, 111. Mr. Smith graduated from Mon- 
mouth College, 111., in 1866, and from the United Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary of the Northwest, Monmouth, 
in March, 1870. He entered upon the work of the ministry 
in the Presbyterian communion, as pastor of the church 
in Hanover, Jo Daviess County, 111., in May of the same 
year, and was installed Oct. 17. He remained in charge 
of this church until Nov. 9, 1878, when failing health 
compelled rest for a few months. In August, 1879, he 
recommenced preaching, at Red Oak, Iowa ; then labored 
from Oct. 1, 1879, to the end of 1880, at various places 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 169 

in Western Pennsylvania, nnder appointment of the Gen- 
eral Assembly. He resides at present at Lodi, Columbia 
County, Wis., having entered this field Jan. 1, 1881. 
They have no children. 

432 III. Auiia Mary Smith, born in Marshall, Mich., 895 
March 31, 1840. She married, in Pulaski, 111., Dec. 21, 
1859, Albert Jacob Mitchell of Du Quoin, III. He is a 
native of Manchester, N. H., and at one time resided in 
Grand Rapids, Mich., where he was a music dealer. He 

is now agent of the C, R. I. & P. R. R., at Englewood, 
near Chicago, 111. 

433 IV. Day Kellogg Smith, born in Chicago, 111., Jan. 899 
16, 1845. He married, Jan. 4, 1867, at Topeka, Kan., 
Mary Elizabeth Torry, daughter of John and Elizabetli 
(Jacobs) Torry of Lockport, 111. She died at Peoria, III., 

Oct. 20, 1868. He married (2d), at Peoria, Sept. 19, 
1870, Margaret Virginia Donlevy, daughter of Owen and 
Clarissa (King) Donlevy of Peoria. Mr. Smith com- 
menced his business life in 1858, as a telegraph operator, 
and remained in this employment until 1865, during a 
portion of the time in the military telegraph service in 
Tennessee. In the fall of 1865 he removed to Peoria^ 
and became train dispatcher and superintendent of tele- 
graph for the T., P. & W. R. R., and in 1868 was appointed 
superintendent of the road. In 1876 he went to Chey- 
enne, Wyoming Territory, as chief dispatcher of the 
Union Pacific Railroad ; then to Port Huron, Mich., as 
a general ticket agent ; next to Paris, III., as superintend- 
ent of the Illinois Midland Railway; to St. Paul in 1880, 
and to Crookston, Minn., in 1882, as division superintendent 
of the St. Paul, Minneapolis <fe Manitoba Railroad; and 
later to Como, Col., as division superintendent of the Mis- 
souri Pacific Railroad. July 1, 1885, he was appointed 
superintendent of the Kansas City Belt Railroad Company, 

22 



170 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

and removed to that city, where he resides at 2102 Wood- 
land Avenue. 

434 V. Clara Frances Smith, born July 29, 1850. She 904 
married, in Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory, in March, 
1877, Edgar W. Nye, better known as " Bill Nye," the 
humorist. He was born in Shirley, Me,, Aug. 25, 1850. 
His father was Franklin Nye, a direct descendant of the 
French Neys^ a family to which Marshal Ney belonged. 
His mother was Eliza Mitchell Loring, a descendant of 
the famous brothers of France, whose names were given 
to the Province of Lorraine. At the age of three years 
he removed to the West with his parents, and has ever 
since lived in that section, and is a thoroughly Western 
American. In politics he is a strong Republican. By 
profession he is a lawyer, but by practice has become 
known to the world as the "king bee of humorists." 
For a number of years he was the editor of the Laramie 
Boomerang^ and clippings from that paper could be found 
in every sheet published in this country. Mr. Nye was 
an office-holder in Wyoming Territory for seven years. 
" He had a narrow escape from being elected a member 
of the Wyoming Legislature in 1877, and only eluded his 
pursuers by a lucky stratagem." At one time he won 
fame as postmaster at Laramie City, and his letter of 
acceptance of the appointment (a copy of which is here 
given) to Second Assistant Postmaster-General Hatton, 
was copied by the press throughout the land, asd editori- 
ally commented on by the London News, in a grave way : 

The Daily Boomerang, ( 

Laramie City, Wy., Aug. 9, 1882. \ 
My Dear General: — I have received the news by tele- 
graph of my nomination and confirmation as postmaster 
at Laramie, and wish to extend my thanks for the same. 
I have ordered an entirely new set of boxes and post-office 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 171 

outfit, including new corrugated cuspidors for the lady 
clerks. I look upon the appointment myself as a triumph 
of eternal truth over error and wrong. It is one of the 
epochs, as I may say, in the Nation's onward march to- 
ward political purity and perfection. I don't know when 
I have noticed any stride in the affairs of state which so 
thoroughly impressed me with its wisdom. Now that we 
are co-workers in the same department, I trust that you 
will not feel shy or backward in consulting me at any 
time relative to matters concerning post-office affairs. Be 
perfectly frank with me, and feel perfectly free to just 
bring anything of that kind right to me. Do not feel re- 
luctant because I may appear cold and reserved. Perhaps 
you think I do not know the difference between a general 
delivery window and a three-m quad, but that is a mistake. 
My general information is far beyond those of my years. 
With profoundest regard, 

I remain sincerely yours, 

Bill Nye, P. M. 

Mr. Nye is the author of several books, prominent 
among them being Bill Nye and Boomerang, and The 
Forty Liars. In the winter of 1882-3 he suffered from 
a severe illness. His recovery was very slow and tedious, 
and he gave up literary work for a time; he also left 
Laramie, and removed to Hudson, Wis., where he now 
resides. As a fair specimen of his vein of humor, the 
following letter to the Boston Crlohe is subjoined: 

Hudson, Wis., March 10, 1885. 

To the Editor of The (^Zo6e: — Referring to the matter 
of life insurance and its benefits, I can hardly give the 
Glole a very extended experience so far as I am individu- 
ally concerned. 

I carry an insurance of 17,000 only ; and though that 
may look small to you, Mr. Taylor, I am sure that if you 



172 BONTECO^ FAMILY. 

could see me and converse with me you would say it was 
plenty large enough. If I were to die suddenly to-morrow, 
I should be almost ashamed to claim the full amount of 
the policy. I am trying now to lead such a life that by 
next fall I would have no hesitation in asking the compa- 
nies to raise my insurance to '|!lO,000. 

I look upon life insurance as a great comfort, not only 
to the beneficiary, but to the insured, who very rarely 
lives to realize anything pecuniarily from his venture. 
Twice I have almost raised my wife to affluence and cast 
a gloom over the community in which I lived ; but some- 
thing happened to the physician for a few days so that he 
could not attend to me, and I recovered. For nearly two 
years I was under the doctor's care. He had his finger 
on my pulse or in my pocket all that time. He was a 
young Western physician, who attended me on Tuesdays 
and Fridays. The rest of the week he devoted his medical 
skill to hoi'ses that were mentally and physically broken 
down. He said he attended me largely for my society. 
I felt flattered to know that he enjoyed my society, after 
liaving been thrown all the week among horses that had 
had much greater advantages than I. 

My wife at first objected seriously to an insurance on 
my life, and said she would never, never touch a dollar 
of the money if I were to die ; but after I had been sick 
nearly two years, and my disposition had suffered a good 
deal, she said that I need not delay the obsequies on that 
account. But the life insurance slipped through my fin- 
gers somehow, and I recovered. 

I have built up two life-insurance companies and placed 
them on their feet since that. I hope they will not forget 
it when I come to call on them for a favor. One of them 
is an "old-liner" and the other is an assessment company, 
I took a policy in the assessment company because I had 
been in politics some, and when I went out 1 missed my 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 173 

assessment sadly. I had become a slave to the assessment 
habit, and so had to do something in order to supply its 
place. I now feel first-rate. When I get my assessment 
notice I imagine that I am an office-holder and that it is a 
billet-doux from the central committee, so it is like old 
times almost. 

Life insurance is a good thing. I would not be without 
it. My health is greatly improved since I got my new 
policy. Formerly I used to have a seal-brown taste in my 
mouth when I arose in the morning, but that has dis- 
appeared entirely. I am more hopeful and happy, and 
my hair is getting thicker on top. I would not try to 
keep house without life insurance. Last September I was 
caught in one of the most destructive cyclones that ever 
visited a republican form of government. A great deal 
of property was destroyed and many lives were lost, but 
I was spared. People who had no insurance were mowed 
down on every hand, but aside from a broken leg I was 
entirely unharmed. 

Since insuring my life I sleep better nights, and my 

neighbors are getting more reckless about leaving their 

watermelons and clothes-lines out over night. If I had a 

voice that could be heard on the other side of the Soudan 

it would still be for good, solid life insurance. In these 

days of dynamite and roller rinks and the gory meat-axe 

of a new administration, we ought to make some provision 

for the future. 

Bill Nye. 

children of .james norman and mary elizabeth 155 
(dougrey) barker. 

435 I. Calvin John Barker, born March 18, 1840. He 906 
married, June 3, 1863, Celia Frances Curran, daughter of 
Thomas and Hannah (Burbank) Curran of Lansingburg. 
He is a brushmaker. They reside in Lansingburg. 



174 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

436 II. Irene Hawley Barker, born Feb. 22,1842. 

437 III. Agnes Burton Barker, born Oct. 9, 1843. 

438 IV. Clara Dougrey Barker, born Dec. 16, 1844 ; 
died Sept. 1, 1846. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM BROWNELL AND .JULIA (dOU- 156 
grey) CORY. 

439 I. William Julius Cory, born in Lansingburg, July 
31,1848. He is unmarried. He has long held the position 
of shipping clerk in a large bakery establishment in Lan- 
singburg ; is one of the village trustees, and a strong tem- 
perance advocate. 

440 II. Alice Magdalene Cory, born Sept. 21, 1850. She 910 

married, Feb. 15, 1881, James Albert Whittaker, a native 
of Fall River, Mass. They reside in Lansingburg. He is 
a tinsmith. 

children of andrew winton and julia ann 157 
(Bristol) frencii. 

441 I. Martha Sackett French, born Sept. 22, 1831; 
died in 1870, unmarried. 

442 II. Maria Dickinson French, born Nov. 17, 1834. 911 
She married, Aug. 30, 1854, Frederick North Page, 
who was born in Athens, Bradford County, Pa., Dec. 5, 
1832. At about the age of 20 Mr, Page engaged in 
mercantile business in Atliens, continuing fifteen years. 

In 1867 he removed to Williamsport, Pa., and with the 
exception of a year or two in Philadelphia has ever since 
lived there, engaged in the manufacture of furniture. 
While in Athens he was a vestryman in Trinity (Episcopal) 
Church, and has held the same office both in Christ and 
Trinity Churches, Williamsport. Mrs. Page died in Wil- 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 175 

liamsport, Oct. 21, 1875, and he again married, June 5, 
1877, Martha White of that city. 

443 III. Mary Gleimey French, born Aug. 1, 1838. 921 
She married, Oct. 12, 1857, John M. Ackerman of Mil- 
ford, Conn., a tinsmith and plumber. He died in 1878. 

She married (2d), Aug. 1, 1881, Sidney Buckingliam of 
Sterling, 111. He formerly lived in Milford, and was 
brought up to the shoemaking business; but went West, 
and made a fortune in mining operations. They removed 
to Creston, Iowa, in 1882, and later to Oakland, Cal. . 

444 IV. JuHa Cassandaiia French, born Jan. 8, 1846. 923 

She married, July 5, 1866, Fountain Thomas Page, who 
was born in Athens, Pa., Jan. 1, 1842. He is the son of 
Thomas and Anna Page. In 1862 he commenced a mer- 
cantile career in Athens, and by untiring energy, strict 
integrity, and honorable dealing has won the confidence 
of the entire community. He still continues as a mer- 
chant, and is also express agent. He has served several 
terms as a councilman, and twice filled the office of 
burgess. 

CHILDREN OF .JOHN AND HENRIETTA ELIZA (bRISTOL) 158 
SANFORD. 

445 I. John Ferdinand Sanford, born in Milford, Conn., 927 
Oct. 8, 1843. At the age of 16 he went to New York 

as clerk in his uncle Thomas Bristol's shoe store. In the 
spring of 1862 he enlisted for three months' service in 
the 71st Regiment New York State Militia; soon after 
the expiration of this term he enlisted in the 27th Regi- 
ment Connecticut Volunteers, and with it partAipated 
in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and 
Gettysburg. His term of service having expired, he 
again enlisted, this time in the First Connecticut Heavy 
Artillery; but having received a commission as second 



176 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

lieutenant in the 30th Connecticut (colored) Volunteers, 
he did not join the former body. He was afterwards 
transferred to the 31st United States colored troops, and 
served with them in the Armies of the Potomac and the 
James until the close of the war, being promoted in the 
mean time to a first-lieutenancy. He was sent to Texas 
in the summer of 1865, and was mustered out of the 
service in October of the same year at Brownsville. 
Shortly after this he went to Charleston, S. C, and entered 
the employ of his uncle Timothy M. Bristol, in the slioe 
trade. From there he removed to Marshall, Mich., and 
entered the grocery business ; then to Topeka, Kan., in 
the grocery and drygoods business ; and shortly after- 
wards assumed a position as salesman in the wholesale 
shoe trade at 122 Duane Street, New York. At present 
he is employed as salesman in the umbrella and parasol 
trade, at 299 Broadway. He married, Dec. 25, 1867, 
Sarah Buckingham, daughter of John and Sarah Ann 
(Clark) Buckingham of Milford. They reside at 432 
Van Buren- Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

446 II. Julia Isabella Sauford, born March 9, 1845. 
Resides in Milford, Conn. 

447 III/ Helen Sanford, born Sept. 22, 1849. She 
resides in Milford. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM BONTECOU AND SAKAII A. (^lER- 159 
rick) BRISTOLL. 

448 I. William Merrick Bristoll, born in Milford, 
Conn., Sept. 3, 1^39. The greater part of his childhood 
until 1851 was passed in Charleston, S. C. In that' year 
he was sent North to his native place, and the next few 
years were spent in preparation for college ; and in 1 860 
he graduated from Yale. He entered upon the profession 
of a teacher, and the breaking out of the Civil War found 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 



177 



him located at Charleston. On attempting to escape to the 
North witli such portion of his father's property as he could 
transport, he was arrested and the property confiscated. 
He finally gained the North by a circuitous route through 
Georgia, Tennessee, and Kentucky, after a hard journey 
of three weeks, much of it on foot, some of the time 
prisoner of guerrillas, and later under arrest as a spy in 
the Federal lines. He resumed his occupation as teacher, 
and in January, 1862, became principal of a public school 
in Milwaukee. In July, 1863, he enlisted in the 13th 
Wisconsin Battery, of which he became junior second 
lieutenant Jan. 5, 1861, senior second lieutenant Oct. 
22, 1864, and junior first lieutenant Jan. 30, 1865. The 
battery was stationed at Baton Rouge, La., in January, 
1864, and Lieut. Bristoll was detailed on general court- 
martial ; on Board to examine commissioned officers ; on 
Board of Survey ; also as member of a military commis- 
sion. He was detailed as depot ordnance officer at Baton 
Rouge, Sept. 29, 1864, and served until the close of 
February, 1865. He was appointed depot ordnance offi- 
cer at New Orleans, March 24, 1865 ; and at the time 
of his discharge from the service, Jan. 14, 1866, was 
assistant chief of ordnance of the military division of 
the Gulf. In September, 1866, he entered the Andover, 
Mass., Theological Seminary, and remained two years of 
the course, intending to finish in the Chicago Seminary ; 
but in 1868 was called to be professor of Latin in Ripon 
College, Wis. He served five years, and resigned to take 
the same chair in Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga. He 
married, Dec. 1, 1870, Rosa Olds, daughter of Leavitt 
Ira and Rhoda Ann (Randall) Olds of Afton, Washington 
County, Minn. They have had no children. Mrs. Bris- 
toll was a graduate from Ripon College in 1870, with the 
highest honors of her class. During his stay in Ripon, 
Mr. Bristoll was deacon of the Congregational Clmrch. 

23 



178 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

In Atlanta he was librarian of Graves Library and 
treasurer of the University, in addition to his professor- 
ship, and Mrs. Bristoll was secretary of the Faculty. 
Owing to Mrs. Bristoll's failing health they were obliged 
to leave the South, and removed to Yankton, Dak., where 
he became principal of Yankton Academy, his wife also 
being a teacher. This institution became merged in the 
public-school system of Yankton in 1875, and Mr. Bris- 
toll was elected secretary of the Board of Education, and 
ex officio Superintendent of Schools. He resigned this 
position Aug. 31, 1882, and accepted that of professor of 
Latin and principal of the preparatory department in 
Yankton College. Subsequently he gave up these posi- 
tions, and after a few months spent in Minneapolis, 
entered upon educational work in connection with the 
freedmen's interest in Charleston, S. C, where he now 
is. During his residence in Yankton he was organist of 
the First Congregational Church ; always connected with 
Sunday-school work, and the latter part of the time 
deacon in the church. 

449 II. Julia Bristoll, born Dec. 12, 1844; died the 
same day. 

450 III. Julia Alice Bristoll, born Sept. 5, 1846. She 
married, Sept. 5, 1873, Lucien White Stilwell, who was 
born in Manlius, Onondaga County, N. Y., March 24, 
1844. He is the son of Lorson and Mary K. Stilwell. 
In 1846 his parents removed to Wisconsin, settling near 
Ripon. He obtained his education in the district school 
and Ripon College, and at the age of 19 removed to Cairo, 
111., where he obtained a clerkship in the post-office, which 
was then actively engaged in handling mail for the army. 
Finding this occupation too confining, he leased a stall in 
the market-house and dealt in produce, and subsequently 
formed a partnership in the grocery business, in which ho 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 179 

continued with increasing success for ten years. In 1874 
he sold his interest to his partner and embarked in the 
commission floar and grain trade, which owing to the strin- 
gency of the times proved a faihire. From this time for 
a number of years he was sometimes employed as a travel- 
ing salesman, and at others as book-keeper. In 1878 he 
removed his family from Cairo on account of the yellow- 
fever scourge then prevailing, and after a short resi- 
dence in St. Louis, Chicago, and Elgin, 111., settled, in 
June, 1879, in Deadwood, Dak., where he became book- 
keeper in the First National Bank, a position he still holds. 
Mr. Stilwell is a member of the* Methodist Church, and 
has filled most of its lay offices, being particularly active 
in Sunday-school work. 

451 IV. Edward James Bristoll, born March 20, 1851. 
Resides in Milford, Conn. Unmarried. 

452 T. Charles Bristol!, born Nov. 10, 1855; died Oct. 
18, 1869. 

453 YI. Mary Haiiford Brlstoll, born May 29, 1857 ; 932 

married, March 15, 1879, Arthur Henry Davidson, a shoe 
manufacturer of Milford. 

ciiildrelsr of timothy mason^ an^d .jane matilda 160 
( Mcdonough) Bristol. 

454 I. Ella Bristol, born May 18, 1845. She married, 933 
March 31, 1869, Henry Dunham of Abington, Mass., 

an inventor of leather machinery. He died Sept. 22, 
1884. 

From the Abington Herald : — " In the death of Henry 
Dunham, which occurred Monday morning at his home on 
Center Avenue, of inflammation of the bowels, the town 
of Abington loses one of its most prominent, widely 
known, and esteemed citizens. Mr. Dunham was one of 



180 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

twelve children. His father was Gen. Henry Dunham, 
son of Ezra, whose grand-father was Cornelius Dunham, 
born in Plymouth in 1724. The name is among the 
oldest and most distinguished of the Old Colony names. 
The mother of the deceased, still living at the age of eighty- 
one, was Mary Cushing, daughter of Col. Brackley Cush- 
ing — another old and honored Old Colony family name. 
Mr. Dunham began business life as a shoe manufacturer 
in the large factory on Lake Street that bears his name. 
He retired in 1873, and turned his attention to shoe 
machinery, and has given to the world some very impor- 
tant inventions and' improvements in this direction. The 
three most important are the Dunham riveting machine, 
the toe nail machine, and the Dunham quilting machine ; 
a detailed description of all these appeared in the Herald 
of Sept. 5. Mr. Dunham made the first quilting nail 
ever produced, and is believed to be the originator of 
the idea of inserting nails into the sole while off the boot. 
The funeral took place at his late residence Thursday 
afternoon. Rev. Messrs. Pettee and Warren officiating, with 
music by the new church choir. The esteem in which the 
deceased was held was attested not only by a profusion 
of flowers, but also by the presence of many prominent 
citizens of this and other towns. Mr. Dunham leaves a 
wife and three children, two boys and a girl." 

455 II. Julia Bristol, born Sept. 30, 1846 ; died Nov. 
10, 1846. 

456 III. Ida Bristol, born Aug. 21, 1848; married, Oct. 937 
4, 1871, Hugh Bradford Jackson. He died April 7, 1874. 
Mrs. Jackson resides in New York City. 

457 IV. Frauk Jessiip Bristol, born Aug. 16, 1850. 
Resides in Charleston, S. C, and is engaged with his 
father in the shoe business. He is unmarried. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 181 

458 T. Arthur LeKoy Bristol, born Sept. 25, 1853. 
He is with his father in the shoe business, in Charleston, 
and is unmarried. 

459 yi. Henry Herbert Bristol, born Feb. 2, 1859. 

460 Til. Floreuce Marie Bristol, born March 1, 1865. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES G. AND MARY HANFORD (bRIS- 161 
TOl) NEWTOjST. 

461 I. Charles. Samuel Newton, born in Tahlequah, 938 
Cherokee Nation, Aug. 11, 1838. In 1847 he removed 
with his father to Texas, and lived chiefly in Dallas until 
1872, when he settled in Yalley View, Cooke County, 
where he now resides. He married, April 22, 1866, Ken- 
tucky Ann Thomas, daughter of Isham and Adah (Hart) 
Thomas of Dallas. She died Nov. 12, 1869. He mar- 
ried (2d), Aug. 9, 1871, Mary Elizabeth Jones, daughter 

■ of Robert Deggs and Martha Eliza (King) Jones of Dal- 
las. Mr. Newton is a wheelwright by trade, but for many 
years past has been engaged in milling, being one of the 
proprietors of " Newton's cotton elevator " ; he is also occu- 
pied in farming and stock-raising. Mr. Newton served in 
the Confederate Army through the Civil War, as a private 
in Douglas's Texas Battery: was engaged in the battle 
of Pea Ridge, Mo., and in nearly all the engagements of 
the Army of the Tennessee ; was with Kirby Smitli at 
Richmond, Ky., his battery opening the fight, and closing 
it by a charge through the streets of Richmond; took 
part in the battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, 
Murfreesborough, the retreat through Georgia, Resaca, 
New Hope, Kenesaw, and other places; was in Hood's 
charge on Peach Tree Creek, July 22, 1864, and at several 
other points around Atlanta. His battery opened the fight 
at Jonesborough, and then took up the march for Ten- 
nessee ; forced the passage of the Tennessee at Florence, 



182 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

Ala. ; went in advance to Franklin ; was in the front line 
oj3posite the cotton gin, where a very large number of the 
Texas troops fell ; was in the line around Nashville, and 
in the engagement there the battery was taken. After 
the Confederate forces fell back to Mississippi, Mr. New- 
ton received his first furlough, Feb. 28, 1865, of ninety 
days, and walked from Columbus, Miss., to Dallas, Texas, 
a distance of six hundred miles. On the expiration of his 
furlough he started to join his company at Mobile, Ala., 
but was ordered back from Natchitoches, La., to await 
further orders, which up to the present time have not 
been received. During this long and arduous war service 
he did not receive a scratch. Mr. Newton holds the office 
of ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church, and is school 
trustee of Valley View. 

462 II. Mary Alice Newton, born March 21, 1841. She 

married, Jan. 29, 1862, Armenius Wright, of Sulphur 
Springs, Johnston County, Texas. He was the son of a 
Methodist clergyman, and was born Dec. 23, 1838. He 
entered the Confederate Army in the spring of 1862, and 
served until his death, which occurred Nov. 30 of the 
same year. She married (2d), July 17, 1864, John Clark 
Becker, who was born in Davidson County, N. C, Nov. 3, 
1828. Mr. Becker was brought up on a farm, but left it 
when a young man, and engaged in a vari'ety of occupa- 
tions, residing in different places until the fall of 1859, 
when he located in Texas and established himself as a 
miller. He enlisted in Parsons's Regiment of Texas Cav- 
alry, and became quartermaster-sergeant, but owing to 
impaired health was employed chiefly on detached duty. 
After the war he carried on the mill and grocery business, 
but is at present engaged in gardening. There have been 
no children. 

463 III. William Frederick Newton, born Dec. 11, 945 
1842, at Cone Hill, Ark. He followed the fortunes of 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 183 

his father's family, residing in Dallas, Texas, and other 
places, until 1872, when he settled in Yalley View with 
his brother Charles, and engaged in milling, farming, and 
stock-raising. He is the inventor and one of the proprie- 
tors of "Newton's cotton elevator." By trade he is a 
carriage-maker; in the order of Freemasons he holds the 
office of Master, and is a deacon in the Presbyterian 
Church. He enlisted during the war in Company A, 31st 
Texas Regiment, but was employed on detached service 
most of the time, the last eighteen months in the engi- 
neers' department, and engaged principally in the wood- 
work department of the government shops at Shreveport, 
La. He married, April 6, 1869, Reufina Effire King, 
daughter of Rev. Finns and Sarah Angeline (Weir) King 
of Orilla, Ellis County, Texas. She died March 2, 1871. 
He married (2d), June 10, 1877, Nancy Elizabeth Kendal, 
daughter of William Adison and Mary Catherine (Daily) 
Kendal of Pilot Point, Denton County, Texas. 

464 IV. George Ella Newton, born Dec. 2-^, 1845; died 
Oct. 27, 1847. 

465 V. Jane Eliza Newton, born at Dallas, Texas, April 947 
9, 1849. She married, Dec. 29, 1869, Edward Alexander 
Bullock, who was born in Pike County, Miss., Sept. 22, 
1845. When sixteen years of age he joined the 33d Mis- 
sissippi Regiment, and served in Company H. In March, 
1862, at the battle of Corinth, was wounded in the hip by 

a minie ball. He was engaged in the fight near Vicks- 
burg ; at Champion Hill, in the rear of Vicksburg, during 
the siege; next at Jackson, Miss.; then at the battle of 
Resaca, Ga., and from there back to Atlanta, fighting at 
different points on the way ; was in the engagement at 
Peach Tree Creek, and wounded in the lower part of the 
abdomen by a minie ball while charging the Federal 
works, and was unable to rejoin his regiment until the 



184 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

night of the battle of Franklin, Tenn. ; was with the army 
on the retreat from Tennessee, and engaged in the several 
fights. At one time he served for three months as courier 
for Gen. Featherstone. Mr. Bullock removed to Texas 
in 1866, and at present resides in Valley View. He is a 
practical engineer by profession, a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, and holds the rank of Master in 
the order of Freemasons. Mrs, Bullock died April 9, 1880. 

466 VI. Julia Augusta Newton, born Dec. 25, 1851 ; 
died in April, 1852. 

467 VII. Julius Augustus Newton, born Dec. 25, 1851 ; 

died in August, 1852. 

CHILDREIsr OF STEPHEN AND NANCY BONTECOU (bRIS- 162 

tol) sears. 

468 I. George Edward Sears, born Jan. 7, 1852; died 
Dec. 2, 1856. 

469 II. James William Sears, born April 19, 1857. He 
was for seven or eight years a clerk in the drug business 
in New Haven, and in the fall of 1882 entered the med- 
ical department of Yale College. He graduated June 24, 
1885, with the degree of M. D., and resides in New Haven, 
at 21 Prince Street. 

children of THOMAS AND SARAH (bROOKs) BRISTOL. 163 

470 I. Walter Brooks Bristol, born Dec. 10, 1859; 
died July 8, 1860. 

471 II. Thomas Levering Bristol, born Aug. 31, 1863. 

children of JAMES ANTHONY AND ELLEN MARTHA 166 
(page) BRISTOLL. 
473 I. Clara Bristoll, born Dec. 16, 1861. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 185 

473 II. Anna Page Bristoll, born Sept. 26, 1863 ; died 
Sept. 15, 1866. 

474 III. Elizabeth Bristoll, bom Aug. 3, 1865. 

475 IV. Ellen May Bristoll, born May 12, 1868. 

476 Y. Thomas Page Bristoll, born Jan. 29, 1871. 

477 TI. Julia Boutecou Bristoll, born April 6, 1876. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES EDWARD AND GRACE ANN 168 
(sTOWE) BRISTOL. 

478 I. Wallace Spear Bristol, born April 25, 1859 ; died 
April 8, 1860. 

479 II. William Reed Bristol, born Sept. 27, 1860. He 
is a silversmith, and resides at Beaufort, S. C. He mar- 
ried there, July 14, 1885, Grace Whitman. 

480 III. John Seymour Bristol, born Oct. 23, 1862. 

481 IT. Susan Stowe Bristol, born June 5, 1867. 

482 V. Henry Boutecou Bristol, born Nov. 13, 1869. 

483 TI. Walter Hopkins Bristol, born Feb. 5, 1873 ; 
died June 27, 1876. 

484 Til. Lena Augusta Bristol, born Aug. 5, 1874; 
died March 19, 1876. 

485 Till. Charles Marcus Bristol, born Sept. 2, 1876. 

CHILDREN OF FRANCIS WRIGHT AND MARY ANN (hAN- 169 
ford) JESUP. 

486 I. Louisa Hauford Jesup, born May 24, 1835 ; died 
Dec. 12, 1839. 



186 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

487 II. Emma Jesiip, born Jan. 24, 1837. She married, 951 
June 7, 1866, William Gay Sheldon of Memphis, Tenn. 

He died Sept. 12, 1868. He was engaged in the carriage 
business. Mrs. Gay resides at 414 Macon Street, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

488 III. Ebeuezer Jesup, born June 15, 1839 ; died Jan. 
20, 1840. 

489 IT. Louisa Hauford Jesup, born Oct. 10, 1841; 952 
married, June 12, 1865, Edward Henry Cuddy, wholesale 
dry-goods merchant in New York. He died Feb. 20, 
1876. She resides in Brooklyn. 

490 T. Frauds Wright Jesup, Jr., born Jan. 14, 1844. 953 
He married, June 4, 1879, Effie Crook, daughter of Rufus 

and Mira (Hibbard) Crook of Brooklyn. He is engaged 
in the iron business, and resides in Brooklyn. 

childrelsr of iioeace white and julia bristol 171 
(hanford) day. 

491 I. Hanford Day, born Dec. 16, 1839. He married, 954 
June 20, 1866, Annie Maria Tator, daughter of Henry 

and Elizabeth S. (Disbrow) Tator of Troy, N. Y. She 
was born May 26, 1843. They reside in Lansingburg, 
N. Y., where he is a dry-goods merchant. 

492 II. Horace Day, born Dec. 16, 1839 ; died in infancy. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE ABBOTT AND HARRIET PYNCHON 172 
(hanford) LALLY'. 

493 I. George Hauford LaHy, born March 4, 1852 ; re- 
, sides in Chicago, 111., unmarried. 

494 II. Frederick Lally, born Nov. 13, 1855. Resides 
in Lansingburg, N. Y., unmarried. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 187 

495 III. Fannie Lally, bom Dec. 27, 1857 ; died Feb. 

27, 1860. 

CniLDRElSr OF LEVI COOLEY AND MARGARET (gOOD- 173 
man) HANFORD. 

496 I. Robert Goodman Hanford, born Jan. 1, 1863. 

497 II. Mary Ann Hanford, born Aug. 14, 1865; died 
June 3, 1879. 

498 III. Horace Day Hanford, born Oct. 22, 1867. 

499 IV. Harry Norman Hanford, born April 23, 1870. 

CHILDREN OF FRANCIS AND MARY JANE (pRINDLE) 176 
SMITH. 

500 I. Emma Martha Smith, born Dec. 21, 1851. 

501 II. Lillia Frances Smith, born June 17, 1853. She 955 
married, April 3, 1880, Charles Gustavus Wilson of New 
Haven, Conn. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES EDWIN AND CLARISSA ANN 178 
(smith) STANNARD. 

502 I. Ella Mary Stannard, born Feb. 25, 1853, in New 
York City. She resides in Brooklyn, E. D. 

503 II. Jnlia Henrietta Stannard, born Dec. 23, 1858, 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. Resides with her father in Brooklyn. 

CHILD OF CHARLES WILLIAM AND MARY JESUP (SMITIl) 180 
STRONG. 

504 I. Martha Henrietta Strong, born Aug. 29, 1856 ; 956 
married, Oct. 27, 1880, Charles Henry Fowler, who was 
born March 18, 1852. They reside in Milford, Conn. He 

is employed in a straw-goods manufactory. 



188 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE E. AND HANNAH ELIZA (SMITIl) 181 
MUNSON. 

505 I. George Francis Mimsou, born Jan. 19, 1857. He 957 

married, April 16, 1879, Clara M. Matthews, daughter 
of William Thomas and Clarissa (Corson) Matthews of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. They reside in Cincinnati. He is a 
salesman. 

506 II. William Lewis Munsou, born Aug. 5, 1859. 

CHILDREN OF ASA MENEMON AND LUCINDA (kIDDER) 185 
SANFORD. 

507 I. Susan Harriet Sanford, died in infancy. 

508 II. Maria Elizabeth Sanford, born May 4, 1845. 958 

She married, Oct. 23, 1867, Touro Robertson of New 
York, a vice-president of the American Bank Note Com- 
pany. They reside at 13 East Fifty-sixth Street. 

509 III. Asa Menemon Sanford, Jr., born October, 
1847. 

CHILD OF EDWARD HUNTINGTON AND MARY (fOSTEr) 186 
SANFORD. 

510 I. John Edward Menemon Sanford, born Nov. 15, 961 
1847. He married, June 3, 1869, Martha Clark Taylor, 
daughter of Thomas Augustus and Nancy (Clark) Taylor 

of Bangor, Me. She was born in Bangor, March 20, 1851. 
They reside at 29 Shepard Street, Cambridge, Mass. He 
is connected, editorially, with the Boston Evening Star. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES BENJAMIN AND FRANCES POM- 188 
EROY (tAY'LOR) sanford. 

511 I. Charles Edward Sanford, born in Bangor, Me., 963 
April 16, 1851. He married, Jan. 23, 1873, Kate Laim- 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 189 

beer, daughter of Richard Harper and Katharine (E,ad- 
cljff) Laimbeer of Brooklyn, N. Y. She was born March 
13, 1849. He is in the commission flour business in New 
York, and is the inventor of " Sanford's improved watch- 
man's register." They reside at 7 First Place, Brooklyn. 

512 II. Kittie Sanford, born in Brooklyn, Jan. 24, 1854; 
died Oct. 19, 1855. 

ciiildeen of edward william and ellen agnes 201 
(gillen) maples. 

513 I. Edward William Maples, Jr., born Aug. 30,1859; 
died Aug. 30, 1859. 

514 II. Benjamin Hood Maples, born Aug. 17, 1860. 
He is a clerk in the brokerage business in New York. 

515 III. Lillieus Adela, born April 3, 1866 ; died May 
4, 1868. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE AND SARAH CORNELIA (tHO:M- 204 

son) rice. 

516 I. George Rice, born March 2, 1840; died Nov. 10, 

1840. 

517 II. William Forbes Rice, born Feb. 6, 1843 ; died 

in St. Louis, Mo., May 8, 1866. 

518 III. Mary Hutton Rice, born Dec. 4, 1846. She 964 
married, Oct. 25, 1871, Sherman F. Foote, who was born 

in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 27, 1841. He has always 
resided in that city, and was engaged in the boot and shoe 
trade until 1870. He is now secretary and treasurer of 
the Seamless Rubber Company. 

519 IV. Lillie Cornelia Rice, born May 2, 1855. 



190 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDEEN OF HORATIO NELSON AND JULIET MAYER 205 
(north) LYMAN. 

520 I. William Thomson Lyman, born March 5, 1851; 
died Feb. 15, 1853. 

521 II. George Nelson Lyman, born Aug. 29, 1852; 
died in Goshen, Conn., Feb. 19, 1853. 

522 III. Edward Norman Lyman, born July 1,1855; 
died in Waterbiiry, Conn., Oct. 29, 1855. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM SPARKS AND JANE (lEWIS) 206 
THOMSON. 

523 I. William Thomson, born Jan. 14, 1855. 

524 II. Annie Lewis Thomson, born July 28, 1857. 

525 III. Charles Ernest Thomson, born Dec. 2, 1861. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND ELIZA LYMAN (tHOMSON) 209 
NETTLETON. 

526 I. Mary Eliza Nettleton, born Aug. 28, 1859 ; died 
Jan. 10, 1879. 

527 II. Walter Eben Nettleton, bom June 19, 1861. 

528 III. Anne Thomson Nettleton, born June 16, 1865. 

529 IV. Grace Langdon Nettleton, born Nov. 9, 1871. 

CHILD OF CHARLES HENRY' AND CECILE (lEWIS) THOM- 210 
SON. 

530 I. Arthur Cecil Thomson, born March 19, 1860. 

CHILD OF THOMAS AND MARY AUGUSTA (mILES) MCCON- 212 
KEY. 

531 I. Thomas McConkey, Jr., born Aug. 9, 1834. He 966 
married, May 20, 1861, Mary Alasebia Bennett, daughter 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 191 

of Gates Abiatha and Caroline (Starr) Bennett of Erie, 
Pa. He removed from Erie to Toledo, Ohio, where he 
now resides at 109 Locust Street. He is a book-keeper. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN WILLIAM AND CATHARINE (dON- 213 

nell) miles. 

532 I. John Leonard Miles, born July 17, 1835 ; died 
Jan. 6, 1881. He was never married. 

533 II. Charles Franklin Miles, born Sept. 14, 1836. 
He was drowned in Erie Bay, July 20, 1848. 

534 III. George Washington Miles, born Nov. 25, 1838. 
He is unmarried and resides in Buffalo, N. Y. Conductor 
on Canada Southern Division of Michigan Central Rail- 
way. 

535 IV. Thomas Henry Miles, born in Erie, Pa., Dec. 969 
5, 1840. AVhen a boy he was taken to Lafayette, Ind., to 

live with his uncle, E. H. Halliday, remaining there 
three years ; then returned to. Erie, and at the age of 15 
shipped on the Lakes and followed them as a sailor for 
several years. He subsequently became a telegraph oper- 
ator in the employ of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad, and served in this capacity at Conneaut, Paines- 
ville, and Cleveland, being promoted to be superintendent 
of telegraph and chief train dispatcher. After eight years 
of this service he removed in 1872 to Portsmouth, N. H., 
remaining there seven years as chief train dispatcher of 
the Eastern Railroad, and then removed to Boston, where 
he holds the same position. He married, Nov. 30, 1865, 
Teresa Maria Finn, daughter of Anthony and Catharine 
Ann (Shooma) Finn of Erie, Pa. She was born in New 
York City, Oct. 10, 1843. They reside at 30 Pinkney 
Street, East Somerville, Mass. 



192 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

536 V. William Pitt Miles, born June 18, 1844. Re- * 
sides in Erie, Pa., unmarried. He is a sailor on the Lakes. 

537 yi. Mary Augusta Miles, born Sept. 21, 1846. Re- 
sides in Erie, Pa. 

538 YII. Charles Edward Miles, born in Erie, May 9, 975 
1850. He married, Aug. 6, 1873, Ellen Rice Harton, 
daughter of John and Catharine F. (Vanansdol) Harton 

of Seymour, Ind. She died July 20, 1874. He married 
(2d), Dec. 10, 1879, Anna Louise Harton, daughter of 
John and Millison (Sparks) Harton of Seymour. He is 
a conductor on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, and re- 
sides in Seymour. 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS HENRY AND HENRIETTA MINER 214 
(brown) MILES. 

539 I. George Washington Miles, born Dec. 25, 1856. 

540 II. Willie Bryan Miles, born May 25, 1868; died 
July 18, 1868. 

CHILDREN OF ELIAS HANDY AND SUSAN STORER (mILES) 215 
HALLIDAY. 

541 I. Samuel Miles Halliday, born in Massillon, Ohio, 
April 25, 1842; died in Erie, Pa., Aug. 11, 1843. 

542 II. Mary Adelaide Halliday, born in Lafayette, Lid., 
■ April 25, 1844. Resides in Cleveland, Ohio. 

543 III. Sarah Francis Halliday, born in Lafayette, 
Ind., Aug. 14, 1846 ; died there, July 21, 1849. 

544 IV. George Miles Halliday, born in Lafayette, Lid., 977 
Aug. 16, 1848. He became a telegraph operator, and in 

this capacity entered the employ of the Lake Shore & 
Michigan Southern Railroad, being stationed principally 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 193 

at Madison, Ohio. He married there, Dec. 29, 1870, Fleta 
Alvira Allen, daughter of Abner and Serene (Kemp) Al- 
len of Madison. After his marriage he removed to Col- 
lamer, Ohio, where his mother was living, and worked 
upon the farm for a time; then obtained a clerical po- 
sition in Cleveland, but his employers failed in business 
and he resumed his old occupation of operator, and is 
now stationed at Cleveland, serving the Lake Shore <fe 
Michigan Southern Railroad as train dispatcher. He re- 
sides at 48 Putnam Street. 

545 V. Susan Halliday, born in Lafayette, Ind., Aug. 978 
26, 1850. She married, Jan. 24, 1872, Darwin Brainard 
Beers, son of Benjamin Pitney and Evalina Beers of Colla- 
mer, Ohio. He was born in East Cleveland, Sept. 21, 
1849. For eight years he held positions of trust in the 
First National Bank of Cleveland, and in 1881 entered the 
employ of the Ohio Building and Grindstone Company, 

but subsequently (1883) changed to the Cleveland Na- 
tional Bank, where he holds the position of teller. Mrs. 
Beers died in Cleveland, Dec. 31, 1872. He married (2d), 
Jan. 26, 1875, Laura Marion Phillips of Ravenna, Ohio. 
They have two children. 

546 VI. Edward Handy Halliday, born in Lafayette, 
Lid., March 6, 1853; died there, June 29, 1853. 

547 Til. Elias Handy HaUiday, Jr., born in Lafayette, 
March 4, 1854 ; died there, April 14, 1859. 

548 Till. Samuel Halliday, born in Lafayette, Jan. 12, 
1857 ; died in Cleveland, Ohio, Aug. 28, 1877. 

CHILDllEN OF GEORGE WASHINGTON AND MAEIA 217 
LOUISE (kENDRICk) MILES. 

549 I. George Miles, born March 25, 1859 ; died March 
16, 1860. 



194 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

650 II. Warren Miles, born March, 1861 ; died Nov. 8, 
1881. 

CHILDEEN OF FEEDERICK BORIE AND SUSAN" (sTOEER) 221 
HEDGE. 

651 I. John Storer Hedge, born Ang. 17, 1841. He 
resides in Westville, Conn., where he is clerk in a hard- 
ware manufactory. 

552 II. Alblbie Hedge, born Jan. 8, 1843. She married, 979 
Aug. 2, 1865, John Seaman of Brookhaven, L. I., a painter. 
She died Aug. 13, 1879. 

663 III. Frederick Blydon Hedge, born March 6, 1844. 
He is a clerk in a restaurant in New York. 

664: IT. Hannah Augusta Hedge, born Oct. 2, 1846 ; 
died Sept. 9, 1847. 

655 Y. David Harvey Hedge, born Aug. 1, 1848. He 
is a hotel clerk in Chicago, 111. 

656 TI. Charles Timothy Hedge, born Nov. 14, 1854 ; 
died March 30, 1856. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES MERRITT AND CAROLINE (cLARK) 223 
IVES. 

557 I. Chauncey Ives, born July 28, 1847. He married, 986 
Nov. 18, 1868, Elizabeth Taylor Van Baskerk, daughter 
of Abraham Taylor and Mary (Birdsall) Van Baskerk 
of Brooklyn, N. Y. He is an importer of diamonds and 
precious stones, at 26 Maiden Lane, New York. 

658 II. Augusta Beulah Ives, born July 29, 1849. 

559 III. James Merritt Ives, Jr., born Aug. 21, 1851 ; 
died Feb. 8, 1853. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 195 

560 IT. Caroline Clark Ives, born Dec. 29, 1854. 

561 V. Elizabeth Mary Ives, born Jan. 16, 1857. She 988 

married, Sept. 13, 1876, Hobart John Park, who is en- 
gaged in the grocery business at 917 Broadway, New York. 
They reside at 10 West Forty-ninth Street. 

562 VI. Jeuiiy Strong Ives, born Aug. 17, 1859. 

563 VII. Frederic Dana Ives, born Aug. 16, 1862. 

CHILDRElSr OF GEORGE HENRY AND MARGARET (gIB- 225 
bens) IVES. 

564 I. Henry Ives, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., April 21, 
1852. He married, Jan. 14, 1885, in Grand Rapids, Mich., 
Abbie Rebecca Nelson, daughter of James Madison and 
Abba Gray (Bridge) Nelson of that city. He is a real- 
estate broker. They reside in Grand Rapids. 

565 II. James Ives, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., June 10, 

1853 ; died Oct. 14, 1853. 

566 III. Alouzo Ives, born in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 6, 

1854 ; died Sept. 20, 1859. 

567 VI. George Ives, born in Philadelphia, Dec. 19, 
1855. He married, July 3, 1883, Blanche Watson, daugh- 
ter of John Davis and Caroline (Wilkins) Watson of 
Philadelphia. , They reside at Grand Rapids, Mich. He 
is a hotel clerk, 

568 V. Edward Ives, born in Philadelphia, Nov. 6, 1857. 
He resides at 2127 Aubrey Place, Philadelphia, and is a 
salesman. 

569 VI. Charles William Ives, born in Philadelphia, 
Nov. 1, 1860. He is a salesman, and resides at 2127 
Aubrev Place. 



196 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

570 yil. Emma Margaret Ives, born in Philadelphia, 
Sept. 4, 1863. 

571 YIII. Merritt Walstrom Ives, born in Philadelphia, 
Feb. 16, 1865 ; died at Hainesport, N. J., Aug. 18, 1865. 

572 IX. Katie May Ives, born in Philadelphia, Sept. 10, 

1866 ; died there, May 24, 1867. 

573 X. Chaiincey Ives, born in Philadelphia, Sept. 18, 

1867 ; died there, March 4, 1882. 

574 XI. Clara Augusta Ives, born in Philadelphia, 
March 15, 1870 ; died in Hainesport, N. J., July 20, 1870. 

CHILDREN OF EDWAED AND GRACE CAROLINE (BISIIOP) 232 
BULKELEY. 

575 I. Jane Bontecou Bulkeley, born May 24, 1868. 

576 II. Lucy Mansfield Bulkeley, born March 19, 1870. 

577 III. Grace Chetwood Bulkeley, born Nov. 26, 1872. 

578 IV. Edward Bulkeley, born March 12, 1875. 

579 y. Sarah Chauncey Bulkeley, born May 7, 1878. 

children of william whittemore and evelina 233 
(peck) low. 

580 I. Geraldine Wliittemore Low, born Aug. 9, 1862. 

581 II. Grace Bontecou Low, born Jan. 3, 1867. 

582 III. William Wliittemore Low, Jr., born May 19, 
1869. 

583 IV. Theodore Henry Low, born Aug. 26, 1870. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 197 

CHILD OF JAMES ]VrADISO]Sr AND JOANNA BONTECOU 234 
(peck) WIIITTEMOEE. 

584 I. Grace Bontecou Wliittemore, born Feb. 14, 
1865 ; died at West Point, N. Y., Feb. 24, 1865. 

CHILD OF CHARLES TIMOTHY AND ADELLA J. (bAENES) 237 
TOWNSEND. 

585 I. Charles Edwin Townsend, born July 1, 1867. 

CHILDREN OF MAECUS HENEY AND HAEEIET (gUNn) 240 
TEOWBEIDGE. 

586 I. Adelaide Trowbridge, born March 7, 1855. She 989 
married, June 2, 1875, Rev. Algernon Sidney Crapsey. 

He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, served in the army dur- 
ing the Civil War, and afterward settled in New York 
city, where he became a book-keeper. Later he became a 
student at St. Stephens College, Annandale, N. Y., and 
after graduation passed a three-years' course in the Gen- 
eral Theological Seminary in New York. He was ordain- 
ed to the diaconate and priesthood in St. Paul's Church, of 
which he became assistant minister ; afterwards removed 
to Rochester, N. Y., and took charge of the Episcopal 
Church of St. Andrew's, which under his ministry has 
grown into and maintained a very flourishing condition. 

587 II. Arthur Hunt Trowbridge, born Oct. 24, 1858 ; 
died in Catskill, N. Y., Aug. 3, 1883. " Arthur H. Trow- 
bridge was a young man of good character and abilities, 
and of fine promise for the future. As local editor and 
business assistant in the Examiner office for the past five 
years, his services had contributed materially to the in- 
creasing business of the office, and his loss there will be 
severely felt. Always courteous, honorable, and even- 
tempered, he made and held friends of all political 
parties." — Catskill Recorder. 



198 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILD OF HOBAET AND KATHARINE V. W. (mILLER) 245 
TROWBRIDGE. 

588 I. Coruelius Miller Trowbridge, bom Jan. 21, 1869. 

CHILD OF CHARLES, JR., AND MARY (jOESBURY^) TROW- 246 
BRIDGE. 

589 I. Frank West Trowbridge, born Sept. 20, 1874. 

CHILDREN OF HEED BROCKWAY AND SUSAN (nORTHRUp) j 249 
BONTECOU. ( 263 

590 I. Joaiiua Boiitecoii, born April 13, 1850 ; died Jan. 
11, 1852. 

591 II. Anna Louise Bontecou, born May 5, 1851 ; died 
Jan. 19, 1872. 

592 III. Josephine Bontecou, born Nov. 17, 1856. 

593 II. Horatio Brinsmade Bontecou, born Nov. 17, 
1861; died April 19,1862. 

594 V. Reed Briusmade Bontecou, born Dec. 1, 1864. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES KEELER AND SEMANTHA BROCK- 251 
WAY (bontecou) SELLECK. 

595 I. Eeed Bontecou Selleck, born in Troy, N. Y., 
Oct. 4, 1854 ; died there, Nov. 19, 1856. 

596 II. Frederick Dabney Selleck, born in Troy, Aug. 994 
7, 1856. He married, Sept. 19, 1878, Nellie Egan of 
Chicago, 111. They reside in Chicago. 

597 III. Charles Bontecou Selleck, born in Troy, Jan. 
24, 1859. He married, Dec. 27, 1879, at Port Chester, 
N. Y., Isabel S. Hanford. He is a stock broker in New 
York. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 199 

598 IV. James Keeler Selleck, Jr., born in Troy, Aug. 
19, 1861 ; died in Bergen, N. J., Aug. 30, 1865. 

599 T. Wilson Waddiiigham Selleck, born in Bergen, 
Dec. 8, 1864 ; died at North Bergen, Nov. 23, 1873. 

600 YI. Clara Frances Selleck, born in Bergen, Jan. 
11, 1867. 

601 Til. Florence Thompson Selleck, born in Bergen, 
March 12, 1869. 

602 Till. Josephine Keeler Selleck, born in North 
Bergen, Feb. 18, 1871 ; died there, Sept. 18, 1871. 

603 IX. Engenia Selleck, born in North Bergen, Feb. 
18, 1871 ; died there, Sept. 9, 1871. 

604 X. Jonathan Howard Selleck, born in North Ber- 
gen, Nov. 7, 1872. 

CHILDKEN OF WILBUE F. AND JULIA (bOISTTECOU) GOSS. 253 

605 I. Alice Bontecou Goss, born June 26, 1858. 

606 II. Isahel Newlands Goss, born July 14, 1860. 

607 III. George Goss, born April 23, 1862; died March 
17, 1864. 

608 IT. Peter Bontecou Goss, born April 11, 1867. 

CHILDEEN OF JOHN W. A. AND ELIZABETH (bONTECOU) 256 
CLUETT. 

609 I. Robert Cluett, born June 12, 1865. 

610 II. Jessie Cluett, born May 28, 1867. 

611 III. Minnie Cluett, born May 28, 1867. 



200 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

612 IV. David Ediiioiid Cluett, born Oct. 7, 1868. 

613 V. Stanley Bywater Cluett, born Feb. 4, 1871. 

614 YI. Louise Bontecou Cliiett, born Sept. 25, 1873. 

615 VII. Joseph Mulford Cliiett, born Dec. 19, 1876. 

CIIILDEEN OF JOHN AND LOUISA ABIGAIL (GREGORY ) 259 
NORTIIRUP. 

616 I. George Huntington Northrup, born Nov. 16, 996 
1845 ; married, Jan. 18, 1872, Adelaide Bruice, daughter 

of Mathias D. and Martha (Van Vleck) Bruice of Dauby, 
Tompkins County, N. Y. He is engaged with his father 
in the spring-bed and sewing-machine business, at Ithaca, 
N. Y., and is also Treasurer of Tompkins County, having 
been twice elected to that office. 

617 II. Mary Elizalbetli Nortlirup, born Sept. 9, 1848 ; j 657 
married, Oct. 10, 1872, Gardner Landon Bontecou (289), 1 998 
son of Francis (108) and Clarissa Maria (Landon) Bon- 
tecou. They reside in Eureka, Kan. 

618 III. Harriet Louisa Nortlirup, born July 6, 1852. 999 
She married, Oct. 8, 1874, Lewis Kelmond Thurlow, who 

is a wholesale chandler and grocer at 38 South Street, 
New York. They reside at 152 Gates Avenue, Brooklyn. 

619 IV. Henry Gregory Northrup, born Aug. 19, 1854. 

620 V. Jennie Nortlirup, born April 20, 1863. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES AND ELSINA S. (bENNETT) NOR- 260 
TIIRUP. 

621 I. Mary Stella Northrup, born Sept. 3, 1849; died 
March 1, 1870. 

622 II. Ellen Maria Northrup, born June 7, 1851 ; died 
March 9, 1869. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 201 

623 III. Charles Bontecou Northrup, born May 12, 
1853 ; died July 18, 1864. 

624 IT. Elizabeth Northrup, born May 2, 1855 ; died 
May 2, 1875. 

625 V. Charlotte Kidder Northrup, born May 25, 1857 ; 

died Aug. 31, 1873. 

626 TI. Sarah Eliza Northrup, born July 15, 1859. 1002 
She married, Aug. 4, 1880, Augustus A. Lines. He is 

a wagon maker and carriage trimmer. They reside in 
Homer, N. Y. 

627 Til. Cephas Moses Northrup, born April 20, 1862. 

628 Till. Alfred Beunett Northrup, born April 3, 1864; 
died Nov. 29, 1884. 

629 IX. Edward James Northrup, born Nov. 1, 1867. 

CHILDREN OF KEED BROCKWAY AND SUSAN (nOR- j 249 
THRUP) BONTECOU. ( 263 

630 I. Joanua Bontecou, born April 13, 1850 ; died Jan. 
11, 1852. 

631 II. Anna Louise Bontecou, born May 5, 1851 ; died 
Jan. 19, 1872. 

632 III. Josephine Bontecou, born Nov. 17, 1856. 

633 IT. Horatio Brinsmade Bontecou, born Nov. 17, 
1861 ; died April 19, 1862. 

634 V. Reed Brinsmade Bontecou, born Dec. 1, 1864. ^^^/ 

CHILD OF JOSEPH CONNABLE AND MARIA PRISCILLA 264 
(oven) BONTECOU. 

635 I. Margaret Celia Bontecou, born in Jackson, Mich., 
Feb. 27,1871. 



202 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILD OF GEOEGE BYWATEK AISTD SARAH BONTECOU 269 
(golden) CLUETT. 

636 I. George Golden Cluett, born in 1864; died, aged 
11 days. 

children of IRA GLAZIER AND MARY HANNAH (bON- 273 
TECOU) BIDWELL. 

637 I. Charlton Bontecou Bidwell, born May 13, 1863. 

638 II. Lydia Kate Bidwell, born Feb. 27, 1865. 

CHILDREN OF FREDERICK WEBSTER AND SUSAN (bON- 275 
TECOU) PICKERING. 

639 I. Frederick Bontecou Pickering, born Jan. 8, 

1864. 

640 II. William Pickering, born Nov. 19, 1866; died 
Sept. 9, 1867. 

641 III. Edith Annie Pickering, born Dec. 29, 1867. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM WRIGHT WHIPPLE AND FLOR- 276 

ENCE C. (nEALE) bontecou. 

642 I. Infant, not named, born Jan. 23, 1871 ; died Feb. 
21, 1871. 

643 II. Charles Neale Bontecou, born Nov. 18, 1871. 

644 III. Clara Lydia Bontecou, born July 23, 1873. 

645 IV. Mary Edith Bontecou, born April 1, 1879. 

CHILDREN OF ELIJAH WHIPPLE AND CLARA (hOLLAND) 277 
BONTECOU. 

646 I. Charles Holland Bontecou, born Aug. 1, 1874 ; 
died April 7, 1875. 

647 II. Mary Lillian Bontecou, born Nov. 8, 1875. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 208 

CHILD OF GEORGE IIENEY AND ANNA (nEVINS) BON- 278 
TECOU. 

648 I. George Nelson Bontecou, born March 25, 1872. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE HENRY AND EMMA (mASE) BON- 278 
TECOU. 

649 I. Howell Bontecou, born Jan. 23, 1877. 

650 II. Edna Bontecou, born Feb. 27, 1881. 
650a III. Pierre Bontecou, born Oct. 18, 1884. 

CHILDREN OF PHILIP DORLON AND ADA FLORENCE 279 
(EWINg) BONTECOU. 

651 I. Frank Foster Bontecou, born in Spring Valley, 
Minn., Jan. 27, 1877; died in Armstrong, Minn., Sept. 12, 

1878. 

652 II. Athol Reed Bontecou, born July 26, 1879; died 
in Armstrong, Sept. 10, 1879. 

653 III. Gladys Achsali Bontecou, born in Spring Val- 
ley, Nov. 12, 1881. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES COVIL AND SARAH MARIA (bON- 285 
TECOU) ARCHIBALD. 

654 I. Grace Bontecou Archibald, born Feb. 19, 1879. 

655 II. Frances Gertrude Archibald, born Sept. 6, 
1880. 

656 III. James Wentworth Archibald, born Dec. 29, 

1882. 

CHILD OF GARDNER LANDON AND MARY ELIZABETH j 289 
(nORTHRUP) BONTECOU. ( 617 

657 I. Frederick Finch Bontecou, born in New York, 
July 29, 1873. 



204 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDEEN OF AMBEOSE EYDEE AND MAEY KATE (bON- 290 
TECOUj ADAMS. 

658 I. Mabel Estelle Adams, born Nov. 18, 1880. 

659 II. Ella Adams, born April 11, 1882 ; died same day. 

CHILDREN OF GILMAN AND CHARLOTTE CAROLINE (bUR- 296 

ritt) fay. 

660 I. Edward Prescott Fay, born in Westk)rough, 
Mass., Nov. 27, 1852; died in Washington, D. C, July 9, 
1873. 

661 II. Arthur Burritt Fay, born in Westborough, Oct. 
12,1860; died July 23, 1871. 

662 III. Miriam Starr Fay, born in Westborough, Aug. 
17,1862; died Aug. 11, 1871. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN MENZIES AND HARRIET MUIR (kNAPP) 299 
BURRITT. 

663 I. Ida Florence Burritt, born in New York, March 
21, 1860 ; died May 30, 1860. 

664 II. Elinor Louise Burritt, born in Stoughton, Wis., 
March 3, 1864. 

CHILDREN OF FRANK DUFFLE AND HARRIET MUIR (bUR- 300 

ritt) burritt. 

665 I. Jessie Allyn Burritt, born Nov. 27, 1868. 

666 II. Harry Rayner Burritt, born May 12, 1874. 

children of benjamin stuart and julia maria 301 
(harden) rayner. 

667 I. Ida Louisa Rayner, born March 31, 1861. 

668 II. Clinton Leicester Rayner, born July 22, 1862. 

669 III. Stella Gertrude Rayner, born Feb. 7, 1864. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 205 

CIIILDEEN OF WILLIAM HENRY AND SAEAH EMMA (rAY- 308 

nee) long. 

670 I. Florence Pauline Long, born in Bordentown, 
N. J., May 3, 1865. 

671 II. Henry Carrick Long, born in Bordentown, Nov. 
14, 1868. 

672 III. Lulu Hester Long, born in Janesville, Wis., 
Dec. 29, 1871 ; died in Trenton, N. J., Nov. 25, 1879. 

673 IV. Sarali Emma Long, born in Burlington, N. J., 
April 2, 1880. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM HENEY AND SUSAN EEBECCA 309 
(rAYNEr) CARRICK. 

674 I. Thomas Carrick, born in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 
16, 1874. 

675 II. Yernon Rayner Carrick, born in Philadelphia, 
Jan. 1, 1879. 

676 III. Allyn Barclay Carrick, born in Philadelphia, 
Jan. 21, 1881. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM RAYNER AND ELLEN MARIA 311 
(henry) WARNER. 

677 I. Charles Henry Warner, born in Westborough, 
Mass., June 18, 1868. 

678 II. George Menzies Warner, born Feb. 3, 1870. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AUGUSTUS AND ELIZABETH GIL- 312 
MAN (wARNEr) PRICKITT. 

679 I. Jennie Warner Prickitt, born in Westborough, 
Mass., March 8, 1868. 



206 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

680 II. William Augustus Prickitt, Jr., born in Tren- 
ton, N. J., May 2, 1871 ; died in Westborough, Mass., Sept. 
19, 1871. 

681 III. Lizzie Alice Prickitt, born in Trenton, May 
2, 1871; died there, July 24, 1871. 

682 IT. Annie Grilman Prickitt, born in Farmingdale, 



683 V. Louise Eugenie Prickitt, born in Farmingdale, 
Oct. 11, 1875. 

childee:n^ of george bliss and Elizabeth (lathrop) 313 

MORRIS. 

684 I. George Bliss Morris, Jr., born in Springfield, 
Mass., ^ov. 5, 1843. Graduated from Hap vard College, 
1864, and^ Cambridge Law School, 1867. He is unmar- 
ried, and resides in New York City, where he is engaged 
in the practice of his professibn. 

685 II. Robert Oliver Morris, born in Springfield, Oct. 
18, 1846. He is a lawyer, and succeeded his father as 
Clerk of the Courts of Hampden County in 1872, which 

office he still holds. He married, Nov.. 27, 1872, Efecia- ^A.^V 
^lifitlJ Cadwell, daughter of George G. and Pamelia (Ball) Jv 
Cadwell of Springfield, who was born March 27, 1850. 
They reside in Springfield, at 72 Temple Street. They 
have no children. 

686 III. Caroline Morris, born in Springfield, Sept. 18, 
1848. She resides in New York City, and conducts a 
private school. 

CHILDRET^ of JAMES AND HARRIET ANGELINE (dAY) 314 
LATHROP. 

687 I. Edward Flint Lathrop, born Sept. 16, 1849. He 1003 
married, Oct. 13, 1873, Nancy Lane, daughter of Benja- 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 207 

min and Maria L. (Powell) Lane of Queens, L. I., who 
was born May 31, 1851. He is a railroad contractor, 
and resides at 632 Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

688 II. James Bontecou Lathrop, born July 4, 1855; 
died Feb. 5, 1870. 

CHILD OF OLIVEE ELLSWOETH AND CATHAEINE BON- 315 
TECOU (lATHEOP) WOOD. 

689 I. Winthrop Wolcott Wood, born Jan. 27, 1865 ; 
died Sept. 14, 1871. , 

CHILDEEN OF ElCHAED BONTECOU AND MAEY (eIPLEy) 319 
MOEEIS. 

690 I. Richard , Hunt Morpis, born in Adrian, Mich., s 
April 4, I86O1. He received his education at ©acine 
(Wis.) College. He married, Feb. 16, 1885, NeUre-Krown 

of Atchison, Kan., and is engaged ift tile wholesaleJiard-J ] > 

ware business in ji^tchison. ■■ '" ■ . '■ ■>/•-' ' 

. '-^ '^^ ^ ,■■ J'^ ■' ' . \ '-r:- 

691 II. Edward Ei^lBj I Mp^idsv bbrh in S,priij^g^el'a,{ 

Mass., Nov. 207*1^61'. 'He is.£ajnplojedjas -i bl'M-^^^^^ the 
post-office at Atchison. .; • r •' '^' ■■''■'' *. j ' ■ \ 

•.,^)V\\ •'''.: I .^. ..-:. :■-'■-. : ^ \ 

692 III. John Baifewell Mojrri^/B^ri^'in " Atctiisoii,^ ^fQ^ V ■ ^ ^■- 

17,1868.' .. ., .^ )) ^' ' f^^f-''^'^ 

V ■ r /; ;- \_ . 

693 IV. Mary Lee MlorrSs^ ,bp|5ii Oct. 6^;T870„.in Atchi^* . 

son. • ' ^ ' ' ■ ^T ' ' . ' 

. *- ; -^ ...• :/' \r] -^ ■ ' ,: 

CHILD OF EANSOM WiLLIAlkie A^TD HAEEIET BONTECOU 321 
(moEeIs) DUNHAM. 

694 I. William Dunhamj3orn Ocii, 13, l^^j ' 



i 

J 



CHILDEEN OF FEANK AND CATHAEINE STPML (.MOEEIS ) 322 
EEED. ■ \ '■ 



695 I. Raymond Reed, born July — , 1871. 



208 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

696 II. Kitty Reed, born Dec. 31, 1875. 

697 III. Charles Bliss Reed, born Feb. 1, 1882; died 
July 30, 1882. 

CHILDEEN OF JOHN EMERY AWD MARY PAMELIA (fELt) 
MORRIS. 

698 I. Henry Lincoln Morris, born in Hartford, Conn., 

Feb. 6, 1868. 

699 II. Edward Bontecou Morris, born in Hartford, 

Aug. 16, 1875. 

700 III. Jolin Felt Morris, born in Hartford, Oct. 29, 
187T. 



/v. 



EIGHTH GENERATION 



CIIILUREN OF JAMES AND ITATiIIIP:T ELIZABETH (bONTE- 327 
COU) HOOK, 

701 I. Martha Esther Hook, bora June 22, 1851; died 
Oct. 12, 18G0. 

702 II. George Henry Hook, born Oct. 21, 1852; died 

Jan. 28, 1853. 

703 III. Mary Eiiiiua Hook, bora Sept. 3, 1855. Re- 
sides in Dunkirk, N. Y. 

704 IV. Ida Anna Hook, born Oct. 11, 1857. She mar- 1006a 
ried, Nov. 29, 1883, Frank E. Williams, son of Ebenezer 

B. and Hannah Mary (Clark) Williams of Hartford, Conn. 
He was born in New London, Conn., Aug. 1, 1860. 
They reside in Hartford, where he is engaged in the 
clothing business. 

CHILD OF EUGENE OSCAR AND JOSEPHINE (bONTECOu) 329 
WARRING, 

705 I. George Bontecou Warring, born Oct. 15, 1855. 

CHILDREN OF WALTER HENRY AND MARY (mOSHER) 330 
BONTECOU. 

706 I. Walter Wright Bontecon, died Dec. 5, 1863. 

707 II. Angustus Tan Rensselaer Bontecon, born April 
14, 1866. 

708 III. Mary Emma Bontecou, born Jan. 2, 1869. 

27 



210 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF EGBERT JOIIN AND ELLEN JANE (SULLI- 332 
van) HAMILTON. 

709 I. Harriet Bontecoii Hamilton, born April 1, 1859. 1007 
She married, June 15, 1882, Charles Henry Jones of Dun- 
kirk, N. Y. He is a temperer of steel tools, and is em- 
ployed in the locomotive works at Dunkirk. 

710 II. WiHiam Henry Hamilton, )jorn Feb. 6, 1801. 

711 III. Infant, not named, born Dec. 29, 1864; died 
Jan. 18, 1865. 

712 lY. Agnes Jane Hamilton, born Feb. 7, 1866. 

713 V. Robert John Hamilton, Jr., born May 12, 1868. 

714 VI. James Hamilton, born Aug. 25, 1870 ; died May 
8, 1875. 

715 VII. Mary Lonisa Hamilton, born Oct. 11, 1872. 

716 VIII. Ar|;linr AVilson Hamilton, born Aug. 4, 1875. 

717 IX. Bontecon Hamilton, born March 5, 1878. 

718 X. Samuel Hamilton, born Feb. 23, 1881. 

children of charles frederick and agnes .tank 333 
(Hamilton) chapman. 

719 I. Charles Frederick Chapman, Jr., born Nov. 13, 
1862. He is a clerk, and resides in New York City. 

720 II. Frank Oerard (hapman, born Jan. 3, 1868 ; died 
Sept. 6, 1877, in New York. 

CHILDREN OF ARTHUR AND MARY LOUISA (HAMILTON ) 336 
WILSON. 

721 I. Ida May Wilson, born Feb. 27, 1866. 

722 II. Margaret Anna Wilson, born April 27, 1868. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 211 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES BENHAM AND LOUISIANA SUSAN 341 
(cocke) HAYDEN. 

723 I. Irene Haydeii, born Aug. i^ 1841. 

724 II. Louisiana ('ocke Ha.yden, born June 10, 1843. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES BENHAM AND MARY ELIZABETH 341 
(kILBY) HAYDEN. 

725 I. Mary Susan Hayden, born Jan. 5, 1846. 

726 II. Julia White Hayrten, born Sept. 18, 1847. 

727 III. Ann Thompson Hayden, born Sept. 25, 1848; 
died June 10, 1850. 

728 IT. Norman Bontecou Hayden, born Sept. 8, 1849. 
He was for a number of years assistant librarian of the 
Public School Library of St. Louis, Mo., but left that posi- 
tion to attend upon his father during- his last sickness, 
and later was engaged in teaching at Randolph Depot, 
Charlotte County, Yix. 

729 Y. Nancy Jones Hayden, born Nov. 0, 1854. 

730 VI. Charles Benham Hayden, Jr., born Dec. 10, 
1856. He is a book-keeper, and resides in Smithfield, Va. 

CHILD OF CHARLES BENHAM AND .JULIA ANN (wILSON) 341 
HAYDEN. 

731 I. Eliza Yirginia Hayden, born March 15, 1871. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND JULIA REBECCA (sALTER) 344 
H0j\[ES. 

732 I. Frederic Cleveland Homes, born May 18, 1844. 1008 
He married, July 5, 1871, Myra A. Wadhams, daughter 

of Orlando and Martha J.. (Pickett) Wadhams of Waverly, 
DI. They reside in Waverly. He is a farmer. 



212 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

733 II. William Frauds Homes, born Aug. 1, 1846; 
died Sept. 23, 1857. 

734 III. Henry Billiard Homes, bom Oct. 18, 1848 ; 
died Sept. 7, 1850. 

735 IV. Fraiicis King Homes, born Sept. 30, 1850 ; died 
Jan. 14, 1857. 

736 V. Julia Bacon Homes, born Nov. 29, 1854; died 
Dec. 16, 1856. 

737 YI. Mary Louise Homes, born Aug. 7, 1857. She 1012 
married, Aug. 7, 1879, Horace Rollin Boynton of Waverly. 

He is proprietor of a large mill, elevator, and lumber-yard. 

738 Til. John Charles Homes, born Sept. 27, 1861; 
died March 10, 1862. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES ROGER AND MARY LOUISA (sAL- 345 
TEr) WELLES. 

739 I. Julia Norton Welles, born May 30, 1842 ; died 

Jan. 22, 1857. 

740 II. Thomas Mather Welles, born June 17, 1844; 
died Aug. 31, 1845. 

741 III. Charles Salter Welles, born Sept. 13, 1846. 1014 
He married, Oct. 19, 1871, Susannah Parrish, daughter of 

Dr. Joseph and Lydia (Gaskill) Parrish of Burlington, 
N. J. She died March 4, 1883. Mr. AVelles resides at 
Elwyn, Pa., near Philadelphia, and is not engaged in 
business. 

742 IT. Mary Frances WeUes, born Jan. 4, 1849; died 
Jan. 28, 1857. 

743 V. Helen Susan Welles, born Feb. 8, 1851 ; died Jan. 
11, 1857. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 213 

744 YI. John Martin Welles, born Feb. 4, 1853 ; died 
Anig. 22, 1854. 

CHILDREN OF WASHINGTOK IIOL^VIES AND SUSAN (bEN- 340 
IIAJl) BARDWELL. 

745 I. Frank Edgar Bardwell, bom Sept. 1, 1853. He 
is a machinist and resides in Hatfield, Mass., unraarried. 

746 II. Fred Homer Bardwell, born Oct. 24, 185G; died 
Feb. 21, 1864. 

747 III. P]lnier Ellswoitli Bardwell, born July 29, 
1861 ; died Oct. 9, 1862. 

CHILDREN OF RALPH AND LOUISA WATERS (bENHAm) 347 
CHILDS. 

748 I. Eiastns Kalpli Cliilds, Iwn Aug. 11, 1845. He 1015 
married, Oct. 24, 1866, Julia Mary Stevens, daughter of 
Robert and Mary Elizabeth (Merwin) Stevens of New Ha- 
ven, Conn. They reside in Norwich, Conn., where he con- 
ducts an advertising and news]>ai)er business. 

749 II. (Jharles Henry Cliilds, born July 17, 1847 ; died 

April 25, 1853. 

750 III. Homer Benham Cliilds, born Aug. 7, 1850; 
died April 27, 1853. 

751 IV. Ida Lonisa Cliilds, 1)orn May 11, 1854; died 
July 20, 1858. 

752 V. Isabella Jnlia Cliilds, born Nov. 13, 1856 ; died 
July 22, 1858. 

753 VI. diaries Henry Cliilds, born Nov. 12, 1858. He 1016 

married, Jan. 4, 1880, Julia Louisa Wolford, daughter of 
August A. and Christiana Wolford of Providence, R. 1. 
They reside in Providence. He is a printer. 



214 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

754 YII. Homer Beiihani Childs, born June 11, 1862. 1017 
He married, Nov. 5, 1881, Lillian Estella Hopkins, daugh- 
ter of William and Hannah (Torry) Hopkins of Provi- 
dence. He is a carpenter. They reside in Providence. 

755 Till. JiiHa Louisa ('hilds, born in Coleraine, Mass., 1017a 

Feb. 7, 1865. She married. May 1, 1880, Albert Ellsworth 
Martin of Attleborough, Mass., son of Lewis and Casdeallia 
(Bornar) Martin of Plainville, Mass. He is a jeweler. 
Mrs. Martin died in Providence, R. I., A|)ril 13, 1884. 

CHILDREN OF FHANCIS KI3IHERLY AND E3IILY .JANE 348 
(leek) HENHAM. 

756 I. Emily Frances Beuliam, born in New Haven, 1018 

Conn., June 5, 1851. She married, Dec. 30, 1868, Her- 
man Everett Smith. He is engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness, at No. 7 Broadway, New Haven. They reside at 324 
George Street. 

757 II. Leverett Haydeii Beiiham, born in New Haven, 

Feb. 27, 1853 ; died Nov. 22, 1853. 

758 III. William Webster Beuliam, born in New Haven, 1019 

Nov. 23, 1854. He married, Nov. 17, 1878, Jessie Eugenia 
Roberts, daughter of William E. and Phccbe (Hutchinson) 
Roberts of New Haven. They reside at 82 Elliott Street, 
New Haven. He is a clerk. 

759 IV. Frank Edward Benham, born Nov. 23, 1854; 

died Nov. 23, 1854. 

7G0 V. Lillian Martha Benliam, born March 24, 1861. 
Married, March 24, 1880, William Henry TurnbuU of New 
Haven. He died April 27, 1881. She resides with her 
father at 324 George Street, New Haven. 

761 VI. Alice Mary Benham, born March 24, 1861 ; died 
March 24, 1861. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. ^15 



349 



CHILD OF ROBERT ALEXANDER AND DELIA DELIGHT 
(leek) BENHAM. 

762 I. Ellen Martha Beiiham, born Nov. 17, 1862. She 1019a 
married, Oct. 3, 1883, John Greenwood, son of William 

and Agatha Greenwood. He was born in Walsden, Lanca- 
shire, Eng-., Sept. 16, 1855. They reside in New Haven. 
He is a salesman. 

CHILD OF WILLIAJt EDWARD AND ROSE LINDA (oLARK) 350 
BUSHNELL. 

763 I. WiUiam Edward Buslmell, Jr., born Jnly 5, 1874. 

CHILDREN OF DOUGLAS RITOIIIE AND EMILY J. 0. (eD- 351 
son) BUSHNELL. 

764 I. Emma Louise Biisliiiell, born June 21, 1850. She 1020 

married, Oct. 12, 1874, John Howard Lawrence, a native 
of Burlington, Yt. They reside in Sterling, 111., where he 
is engaged in the hardware business. 

765 II. William Francis Busliiiell, born Sept. 26, 1854 ; 
died Oct. 27, 1855. 

766 III. Grace Edsoii Biisliiiell, born Oct. 22, 1860. 1023 
She married, Jan. 22, 1880, Charles Noble Clark, who was 
born in Rutland, Vt. He is a jeweler. They reside in 
Sterling, 111. 

767 IV. Cora Douglas Busliuell, born Nov. 1, 1861. 

CHILD OF REV. FRANCIS HAYDEN AND MARY VIRGINIA 352 
(bREEDEN) BUSHNELL. 

768 I. Mary Louisa Busliuell, born in Louisville, Ky., 
June 3, 1859. She married at Beechland, Ky., Sept. 15, 
1880, Richard T. Coleman, a merchant, who was born in 
Frankfort, Ky., March 4, 1850. They reside in Louisville. 



216 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF RICHAED WELLS AND MARY B. (tANNEr) 354 
BUSIINELL. 

769 I. William Henry Biishiiell, born Sept. 27, 1854. 

770 II. Frank Walter Bnshnell, born in Chicago, 111., 1024 
Nov. 8, 1856. He married, Jan. 22, 1878, Ellen Darney. 
They reside in Iowa Falls, Iowa. He is a locomotive en- 
gineer on the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Rail- 
road. 

771 III. James Tanner Bnslinell, born May 25, 1859; 
died Dec. 17, 1859. 

772 IV. Donglas Ritchie Bnslinell, born Aug. 18, 1861 ; 

died Sept. 5, 1861. 

773 y. Mary (iertrmle Bushnell, borA Aug. 18, 1861. 

CHILDREN OF RICHARD WELLS AND MARY SOPHIA 354 
(tHOMAs) BUSIINELL. 

774 I. Charles Richard Bnshnell, born May 11, 1870. 

775 II. Edward WeHs Bnshnell, born Aug. 2, 1876. 

CHILDREN OF ANSON MUNSON AND CAROLINE URETTA 355 
(PRITCH ARD ) DTJR AND. 

776 I. Caroline Angnsta Dnrand, born June 19, 1846. 1025 

She married, Nov. 17, 1866, Thomas Bond Haughawort. 
They reside in Carthage, Jasper County, Mo. He is a law- 
yer, and i)rosecuting attorney for Jasper County. 

777 II. Charles Anson Dnrand, born April 1, 1850; 
died Feb. 4, 1863. 

778 III. William Rnfus Dnrand, born in Brunswick, 1032 
Medina County, Ohio, May 13, 1852. He was brought up 

on a farm, and afterwards learned the printer's trade. His 
boyhood was passed in Wisconsin; in 1870 he removed to 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 217 

Carthage, Mo., and in 1880 to Des Moines, Iowa, where 
he is now engaged as clerk in the grocery trade. He mar- 
ried, June 6, 1874, Mary Frances McCuUoch, daughter 
of William H. and Nancy Adaline (Lewis) McCulloch of 
Carthage. 

779 IT. Sarah Eliza Duraud, born May 17, 1858. She 1035 
married, Jan. 22, 1874, Albert Wells Carpenter, who was 
born in Girard, Pa., Nov. 9, 1846. He resided in Car- 
thage from 1870 to 1882, when he removed to Des Moines. 

He is a job printer and publisher. 

780 Y. Addie Louise Duraiid, born Aug. 18, 1860 ; died 
Jan. 24, 1863. 

781 TI. George Ernest Durand, born Dec. 18, 1863. 

782 Til. Mary Louise Durand, born Oct. 6, 1866. 

783 Tin. Henry Harrison Durand, born May 13, 1869 ; 
died Sept. 10, 1872. 



784 IX. Frederick Albert Durand, born April 13, 1873. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM WICKS AND MAEY CLAEINDA 
(STEBBINS) PRITCHAED. 

785 I. Frederick Pritcliard, born Oct. 3, 1853. Resides 
in Brunswick, Ohio, unmarried. 

786 II. Clarence Robinson Pritcliard, born Sept. 12, 
1858. He is unmarried, and resides in Brunswick. 

787 III. Mary Ellen Pritchard, born Dec. 23, 1861; 
resides in Brunswick. 

788 IT. Lyman Wiliston Pritchard, born July 27, 1864 ; 
resides in Brunswick. 



356 



218 BONTECOD FAMILY. 

CIIILDEEN' OF CHARLES FKEDERICK AND MARY SUSAN 357 
(westcott) PRITCIIARD. 

789 I. Ella Bell Pritcliard, born Jan. 27, 1857. She 1040 
married, Aug. 16, 1879, Congrave Jackson Tyler, a farmer. 
They I'eside in Lake City, Jackson County, Mo. 

790 II. Lewis Henry Pritcliard, born Aug. 27, 1859 ; 
died Oct. 10, 1860. 

791 III. Sarah Eliza Pritcliard, born July 14, 1864. 

792 IV. Jennie May Pritchard, born May 10, 1866. 

793 y. Mary Susan Pritchard, born March 20, 1872. 

794 YI. George Anson Pritchard, born March 10, 1881. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE ANSON AND JANE ELIZABETH 358 
(fREESE) PRITCHARD. 

795 I. George Edwin Pritchard, born Sept. 2, 1855; 
died March 29, 1865. 

796 II. Frances Elizaheth Pritchard, born in Bruns- 1041 
wick, Ohio, Nov. 27, 1858. She married, May 27, 1879, 
Frederick Donaldson Parker, who was born in Birming- 
ham, Erie County, Ohio, Sept. 1, 1850. He is the son of 

Dr. William Tell and Ann (Denman) Parker, and grand- 
son of John Denman, one of the pioneers of the Western 
Reserve of Connecticut; on the paternal side grandson of 
Rev. Daniel Parker, founder and for many years pastor 
of the First Restorationist Church in Cincinnati. He re- 
moved with his parents to Tennessee, and engaged in 
farming and teaching ; returned to the North in 1872 and 
in time settled in Des Moines, Iowa. After marriage, in 
1879, they removed to Denver, Col., where he is engaged 
in the produce and general commission business. Mrs. 
Parker is a graduate of the Hioli School of Des Moines, 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 219 

and was salutatorian of her class. She was afterwards 
engaged in teaching school and music in Des Moines and 
adjacent towns. 

CHILDREN OF HENRY HARRISON AND CORNELIA (hAR- 359 
rison) PRITCHARD. 

797 I. Willis Lawsoii Pritcliard, born March 8, 1871. 

798 II. Ida Pritcliard, born June 3, 1872. 

799 III. Josie Pritcliard, born Sept. 11, 1873. 

800 IV. George Henry Pritcliard, born Nov. 30, 1876. 

801 V. Nellie Pritchard, born June 30, 1878. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN FRANKLIN AND ELIZABETH ADE- 360 
LAIDE (pRITCHARD) ROLLINS. 

802 I. Katie Rollins, born Aug. 1, 1864. 

803 II. Marion Rose Rollins, born May 12, 1867. 

804 III. Alonzo William Rollins, born Oct. 16, 1874. 

805 IT. Rntli Rollins, born March 16, 1882. 

CHILDREN OF OSCAR CORNELIUS AND SUSAN HENRIETTA 361 
(PRITCHARD ) ROSE. 

806 I. William Cornelius Rose, born Oct. 6, 1875. 

807 II. Charles Henry Rose, born June 17, 1878. 

children of willis charles and elizabeth (lieat- 365 
ly) hall. 

808 I. Charles Edward Hall, born March 7, 1858. He 1042 

married, Sept. 11, 1879, Janette Elizabeth Warren, daugh- 
ter of Franklin and Elizabeth (Budrow) Warren of Water- 
bury, Conn. He is book-keeper and partner in the dry- 



220 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

goods business in Waterbury, also captain of the Chatfield 
Guards, Company A, 2d Regiment Connecticut National 
Guard. 

809 II. Walter Heatly Hall, born Aug. 8, 1861; died 
Aug. 6, 1864. 

810 III. Gardner Irving Hall, born Nov. 27, 1868. 

CHILD OF WILLIS CHAELES AND OEINDA (dANIELS) 365 
HALL. 

811 I. Joseph Bontecou Hall, born April 12, 1882. 

CHILDREN" OF SETH ELIADA AND ELLEN MARY (hALL) 366 
FROST. 

812 I. Minnie Carrie Frost, born Dec. 1, 1861. 

813 II. Adelaide Lourene Frost, born Feb. 8, 1866. 

814 III. Louise Amy Frost, born Dec. 4, 1872. 

CHILD OF ELMER WILLIAM AND EMMA CELIA (hALl) 367 
HITCHCOCK. 

815 I. Edson Wilbur Hitchcock, born Feb. 2, 1869. 

CHILDREN OF GARDNER MOSS AND GEORGIANA ELIZA- 368 
BETH (mULLINGS) HALL. 

816 I. Willis Mullings Hall, born April 23, 1873. 

817 II. Elizabeth Amy Hall, born Dec. 8, 1874. 

CHILD OF FRANKLIN AMOS AND ADELAIDE ULISSA (mUN- 369 

ger) hall. 

818 I. Frank Edward Hall, born April 8, 1870. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE BRITAIN AND ADELAIDE ELIZA 371 
(hall) LAWTON. 

819 I. May Hall Lawton, born May 19, 1873. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 221 

820 II. Harold Carlyle Lawton, born Nov. 2, 1875. 

821 III. Lefa Elizabeth Lawton, born Oct. 2, 1879. 
821a IT. Amy Moss Lawtoii, born March 4, 1884. 

CHILD OF WAREEN LEANDER AND ETTA LOUISA (aN- 372 
DREWS ) HALL. 

821b I. Lamont Andrew Hall, born Dec. 16, 1884, in 

Naugatuck, Conn. 

CHILD OF AL:\IER BROISTSON AND LOUISA ELIZABETH 374 
(hall) HITCHCOCK. 

822 I. Gains Arthur Hitchcock, born May 8, 1876. 

CHILD OF GEORGE AND NANCY ORILLA (hALl) HAUX- 376 
HURST. 

823 I. Wilbur Clarence Hauxhurst, born Feb. 3, 1879. 

CHILD OF JOHN DAVID AND NANCY ORILLA (hALl) 378 
BENHAM. 

824 I. Frederick Benham, born Nov. 15, 1872. 

CHILD OF WILLIAM AND EMMA E. (LFVaNGSTON) PEEBLES. 379 

825 I. Elwin Livingston Peebles, born Feb. 4, 1865. 

CHILD OF HORACE AND E.AIMA E. ( PEEBLES) CARPENTER. 379 

826 I. Etta Bontecou Carpenter, born July 14, 1882. 

CHILDREN OF AJIOS AND CARRIE (rETTEG) LIVINGSTON. 380 

827 I. Donna Bomaine Livingston, born June 26, 1872. 

828 II. Susan Gay Livingston, born May 3, 1874. 

CHILD OF HIRAM EDWARD AND HATTIE CURTIS (eLLIS) 383 
LIVINGSTON. 

829 I. Clara Ellis Livingston, born Feb. 5, 1882. 



222 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF ISAIAH ALEXATS^DER AND MARY ELIZA- 384 
BETH (tERRELl) UFFENDALE. 

830 I. Edward Terrell Uffendale, bom Sept. 14, 1879. 

831 II. Harry William Uffendale, bom Feb. 2, 1882. 

831a III. Frank Isaiah Uffendale, bora Dec. 25, 1883. 

children of charles laurens and julia adelaide 386 
(lusk) benedict. 

832 I. Charles Allen Reed Benedict, born Dec. 20, 1857. 

833 II. Jessie Maud Benedict, bora Oct. 1, 1859. 

834 III. Florence Emily Benedict, bora Jan. 31, 1861. 

children of GEORGE RICE, JR., AND SARAH ISABEL 387 

(hart) benedict. 

835 I. Mary Laurinda Benedict, bora Jan. 8, 1870. 

836 II. George Rice Benedict (3d), bora Aug. 14, 1875. 

837 III. Emily Isabel Benedict, bora Nov. 26, 1879. 

CHILD OF DANIEL AND MARGARET ELIZABETH (tHOMP- 391 

son) benedict. 

838 I. Olive Sarah Benedict, bora May 4, 1876. 

children of JULIUS AND HARRIET (mUNGEr) BENE- 392 
DICT. 

839 I. Charles Sidney Benedict, bora July 7, 1861. 

840 II. George Curtis Benedict, bora Oct. 2, 1865 ; died 
Sept. 18, 1866. 

CHILD OF DANIEL PALMER AND EUNICE (eLDERKIn) 397 
UTLEY. 

841 I. Jedediah George Utley, bora June 2, 1872. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 223 

CIIILDEEN OF GEOEGE WASHINGTON AND EMILY ELIZA 399 
(utley) van VALKENBUKGII. 

842 I. Ella Moutresor Yan Talkeubiirgli, born April 
12, 1856 ; died in 1860. 

843 II. Maria Moiitresor Van Yalkeiiburgh, born March 
14, 1861. 

children of moreis eugene and desdemona (stim- 402 
son) utley. 

844 I. Ida May Utley, born Jan. 17, 1867. 

845 II. Frank Utley, born Dec. 9, 1876. 

CHILD OF ALMEE W. AND ALMA AUGUSTA (uTLEy) 403 
MITCHELL. 

846 I. Donnie Lou Mitchell, born Aug. 3, 1877. 

children of geoege benedict and emma jane 404 
(laeaway) utley. 

847 I. Lottie Cordelia Utley, born Dec. 17, 1877. 

848 II. George Joseph Utley, born Feb. 20, 1880. 

CHILD OF JULIUS FEANCELO AND AJIY (gALLUP) CEEGO. 405 

849 I. Leona Crego, born March — , 1854. She married 1044 
George Conant, a jeweler, and resides in Hudson, Lena- 
wee County, Mich. 

CHILDEEN OF JULIUS FEANCELO AND CAEOLINE M. 405 
(cHANDLEe) CEEGO. 

850 I. Julius Crego, born Nov. 18, 1863. 

851 II. Fannie H. Crego, born Aug. 31, 1865. 

852 III. William G. Crego, born March 26, 1869. 



224 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CIIILDEEISr OF HARRISOlSr AND MARTHA ATSTN (cREGo) 406 
OSTRANDER. 

853 I. Harrison Clinton Ostrander, born May 2, 1863 ; 
died March 14, 1864. 

854 II. Harrison Clinton Ostrander, born Oct. 24, 1864. 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE CLINTON AND MARY ELEANOR 408 
(lAWRENCE) CREGO. 

855 I. George Elmer Crego, born Aug. 16, 1869. 

856 II. Lavinnie Crego, born April 7, 1874. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES HENRY AND ANNA (sCOTt) CREGO. 409 

857 I. Yerna Crego, born June 20, 1871. 

858 II. Tine Crego, born April 10, 1873 ; died Oct. — , 

1873. 

CHILDREN OF JAMES NOAH AND NANCY ELIZABETH 414 
(rice) FINCH, 

859 I. Charles Silas Fiucli, born Sept. 2, 1850. He 
married, May 12, 1879, Mrs. Dora M. Pool, widow of 
Samuel Pool of Tyrone, Mich., and daughter of Isaac 
Walker of Tyrone. She died Jan. 4, 1883. They had no 
children. Mr. Finch is a farmer, and resides in Solon 
Township, Kent County, Mich. 

860 II. James Delbert Fiucli, born July 27, 1852. He 1045 
married, Nov. — , 1874, Harriet Randall, daughter of 
Joseph and Jane (Dusenberry) Randall of Grand Rapids, 
Mich. They reside in Solon Township, Mich. 

861 III. Eben Eugene Eiucli, born Nov. 3, 1856. 

862 IV. Edgar Mead Finch, born Sept. 11, 1861 ; mar- 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 225 

ried, Oct. 4, 1883, Ann Jane Bloomfield, daughter of Henry 
and Ellen (Johnson) Bloomfield of Solon Township, Mich. 

863 y. Perry Fiucli, born Sept. — , 1865. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES BENHAM AND LOIS MARIETTE 415 
(shear) RICE. 

864 I. Carrie Rice, born Sept. 8, 1864. 

865 II. Daniel Rice, born Feb. 9, 1866. 

866 III. Emma Belle Rice, born Feb. 8, 1869. 

CHILDREN OF EBEN SMITH AND CINDERELLA (bURT) 416 
RICE. 

867 I. Ella Elmetta Rice, born Jan. 14, 1859. She 1047 
married, Oct. 1, 1876, Louis Napoleon Cole, a farmer, son 

of David Cole of Ada, Kent County, Mich. They reside in 
Ada. 

868 II. Adelaide Adelia Rice, born Feb. 6, 1862. She 1048 
married, June 25, 1880, John James Wheeler of Grand 
Rapids Township, Mich., farmer. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN AND THEODOSIA PHEBE (rICE) 417 
CONLEY. 

869 I. Mary Coiiley, born May —, 1865. 

870 II. William Couley, born March 6, 1866. 

871 III. Daniel Couley, born Oct. — , ? 

[There were other children in this family who died young.] 

CHILDREN OF JOHN DOUGREY AND ELIZABETH (vAN 422 
ZANDt) NICHOLS. 

872 I. Carrie Nichols, born Dec. 21, 1859. 



226 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

873 II. James Nichols, born June — , 1862 ; died Aug. 
3, 1863. 

874 III. Samuel IVicliols, born March 27, 1867. 

CIIILDKEN OF JOHN AND ISABEL MARY (mONTC40MERY) 424 
DOUGEEY. 

875 I. George Moultoii Doiigrey, born Sept. 16, 1859. 
He married, May 3, 1881, Margaret Gates, daughter of 
William and Elizabeth (Pier) Gates of Cohoes, N. Y. 
She was born Oct. 17,1859. They reside in Lansingburg, 
N. Y., where he is engaged with his father in a local express 
business. 

876 TI. John Montgomery Dongrey, born June 20, 
1861; died Nov. 30, 1861. 

877 III. Emma Isabel Dongrey, born July 15, 1863. 

878 IT. John Brown Dongrey, born April 17, 1867. 

CIIILDEEN OF JAMES (3d) AND JANE AMANDA ( JONES ) 425 
DOUGEEY. 

879 I. James Cragen Dongrey, born Sept. 14, 1860. 
Assists his father on his stock-farm, in Stillwater, N. Y. 

880 II. Elizal)eth Monlton Dongrey, born July 7, 1868. 

881 III. Howard Chandler Dongrey, born Feb. 24, 1870. 

CHILDREN OF CHANDLER HEZEKIAH AND CLAEISSA BON- 429 
TECOU (dOUGREY) LOOJIIS. 

882 I. Frances Elizabeth Loomis, born Sept. 12, 1870. 

883 II. Sarah Harriet Loomis, born Jan. 20, 1874. 

CHILDREN OF DAVID REEVES AND JUANA (CARRASCO) 430 
SMITH. 

884 I. Alva Clara Smith, born in Copiapo, Chile, May 
4, 1862. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 227 

885 II. Charles Boiitecou Smith, bom in El Cobota, 
Mexico, Jan. 9, 1864. 

886 III. Anna Inez Smith, born in Enriquita (Arizona), 
Feb. 21, 1866. 

887 IT. David James Smithy born in Benicia, Cal., 
Jan. 10, 1868 ; died there, Jan. 31, 1868. 

888 T. David Reeves Smith, Jr., born in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., March 19, 1869. 

889 \I. Henry Day Smitli, born in San Francisco, April 
8, 1870 ; died there, May 18, 1870. 

890 Til. Henry Day Smitli, born in San Francisco, 
April 14, 1871; died there, May 29, 1871. 

891 Till. Stella Maria Smith, born in Peoria, 111., June 
4, 1872. 

892 IX. Day Wallace Smith, born in Cali-Cauca, United 
States of Colombia, Jan. 21, 1875. 

893 X. Tida Kellogg Smith, born in New York, May 7, 
1878. 

894 XI. A daughter, born in West Troy, N. Y., Aug. 17, 
1880; died same day. 

CHILDREN OF ALBERT JACOB AND ANNA MARY (SMITIl) 432 
MITCHELL. 

895 I. Winifred Dougrey Mitchell, born Aug. 16, 1862. 

896 II. Clarissa Isahel Mitchell, born March 3, 1866. 

897 III. Paul Alhert Mitchell, born Jan. 20, 1868. 

898 IT. Charles Day Mitchell, born April 19, 1870; 
died Jan. 2, 1872. 



228 bontecou family. 

childeeisr of day kellogg and maegaeet vieginia 433 
(donlevy) smith. 

8S9 I. Day Kellogg Smith, Jr., born in Peoria, 111., Nov. 

24. 1871. 

900 II. Winifred Louise Smith, born in Peoria, Nov. 

13. 1872. 

901 III. Frederick Donlevy Smith, born in Peoria, 
Oct. 16, 1874. 

902 IV. Robert Ormshy Smith, born in Chicago, July 

27, 1878. 

903 y. Clara Helen Smith, born in St. Paul, Minn., May 
11, 1882; died there, July 22, 1882. 

CIIILDEEN OF EDGAE AV. AIS^D CLAEA FEAIS^CES (SiMITH) 434 
NYE. 

904 I. Bessie Loring Nye, born Feb. 6, 1878. 

905 II. Winifred Louise Nye, born May 25, 1879. 

CHILDREN OF CALYIN JOHN AND CELIA FEANCES (cUE- 435 
ean) BAEKEE. 

906 I. Calvin Curran Barker, born April 19, 1864 ; died 
May 6, 1864. 

907 II. Irene Frances Barker, born Jan. 16, 1868. 

908 III. Edward Gorham Barker, born Dec. 14, 1871. 

909 IV. Clara Burhank Barker, born June 17, 1878. 

CHILD OF JAMES ALBEET AND ALICE MAGDALENE 440 
(cOEY) WHITTAKEE. 

910 I. Julia Whittaker, born July 11, 1882. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 229 

CHILDRElSr OF FREDERICK NORTH ATSTD MARIA DICK= 442 
INSON (FRENCH) PAGE. 

911 I. Frederick West Page, born in Athens, Pa., July 1049 
6, 1855. He removed to Williamsport, Pa., in 1869, and 

at one time was engaged in the retail furniture trade, 
but is now secretary of the Williamsport Furniture Man- 
ufacturing Company. He married, Sept. 2, 1875, Sarah 
Virginia Weise, daughter of Henry and Sarah (Sellers) 
Weise of Hagerstown, Md. 

912 II. Mildred Anne Page, born March 26, 1857. She 1052 

married, June 15, 1880, James Wesley Maynard of Wil- 
liamsport, who was born there March 24, 1844. He is 
not engaged in business. 

913 III. Ellen Maria Page, born Aug. 12, 1859. 

914 IV. Martha French Page, born May 2, 1861. She 

married, Feb. 6, 1883, Clarence Eugene Else of Williams- 
port, born there May 24, 1857. He is a clerk. 

915 V. Sylvester John Page, born Sept. 15, 1863. 

916 VI. Joseph Albert Page, born Jan.' 23, 1866 ; died 
Jan. 26, 1868. 

917 VII. Andrew Thomas Page, born March 15, 1868. 

918 VIII. Lonis French Page, born Aug. 16, 1870; 
died June 26, 1879. 

919 IX. Ethel Page, born Oct. 7, 1872. 

920 X. Percy Rheinhold Page, born March 27, 1875 ; 
died Sept. 16, 1875. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN M. AND MARY GLENNEY (fRENCH) 443 
ACKERMAN. 

921 I. Carrie Golden Ackerman, born Aug. 27, 1866. 



230 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

922 II. Mary French Ackermaii, born Sept. 16, 1870. 

CHILDEEN- OF FOUNTAIN THOMAS AND JULIA CAS- 444 
SANDANA (fRENCh) PAGE. 

923 I. Robert Fouutaiu Page, born Oct. 28, 1867. 

924 II. Walter Thomas Page, born Dec. 5, 1869. 

925 III. Bertha Alice Page, born March 29, 1872. 
920 IV. Louis Page, born Feb. 11, 1880. 

CHILDEEN OF JOHN FERDINAND AND SARAH (bUCK 445 
ingham) SANFORD. 

927 I. Albert Latham Sanford, born May 9, 1872; 
died July 12, 1872. 

928 II. Arthur Ferdiuaud Sanford, born Jan. 4, 1875. 

CHILDREN OF LUCIEN WHITE AND JULIA ALICE 450 
(bristoll) STILWELL. 

929 I. Mary Irene Stilwell, born Sept. 26, 1874. 

930 II. Hugh Alvin Stilwell, born April 30, 1881. 

931 III. Donald Louzon Stilwell, born Dec. 7, 1883, in 
Deadwood, Dak. 

CHILD OF ARTHUR HENRY AND MARY HANFORD 453 
(bristoll) DAVIDSON. 

932 I. Florence Hope Davidson, born March 7, 1880. 

CHILDREN OF HENRY AND ELLA (bRISTOL) DUNHAM. 454 

933 I. Ida Dunham, born Jan. 18, 1870. 

934 II. Harry Bristol Dunham, born Jan. 31, 1872. 



EIGHTH GENERATION, 231 

935 III. Emma Hunt Dunham, bom Aug. 20, 1873 ; 
died April 3, 1874. 

936 IV. Arthur LeRoy Dunham, born July 10, 1880. 

CHILD OF HUGH BRADFOED AND IDA (bRISTOl) 4:56 
JACKSON. 

937 I. Hugh Bradford Jackson, Jr., born Nov. 1, 1872 ; 

died Jan. 3, 1874. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES SAMUEL AND KENTUCKY ANN 461 
(THOMAS ) NEWTON. 

938 I. WiUie Newton, born July 29, 1867; died Oct. 
3, 1867. 

939 II. Eddie Charles Newton, born Sept. 11, 1869. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES SAMUEL AND MARY ELIZABETH 461 
(jONES) NEWTON. 

940 I. Harry Newton, born July 20, 1872; died Aug. 
28, 1873. 

941 II. ■ John Becker Newton, born Oct. 20, 1874; died 
May 10, 1878. 

942 III. Merta Newton, born April 16, 1876. 

943 IV. Carl Newton, born Feb. 2, 1878. 

944 V. Clay Newton, born Dec. 23, 1879. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM FREDERICK AND NANCY ELIZA- 463 
BETH (kENDAl) NEWTON. 

945 I. Walter Kendal Newton, born March 17, 1878. 

946 II. Florence Beuflna Newton, born Sept. 29, 1879 ; 
died Sept. 3, 1882. 



232 bontecou family. 

children of edward alexander and jane eliza 465 
(newton) bullock. 

947 I. Lew Nora Bullock, born Nov. 9, 1870. 

948 II. Orastus Bullock, born May 2, 1873 ; died Oct. 
31, 1873. 

949 III. Charles Lester Bullock, born Dec. 30, 1874. 

950 IT. Willie Edward Bullock, born March 29, 1880 ; 
died Aug. 20, 1880. 

child of WILLIAM GAY AND EMMA (.JESUP) SHELDON. 487 

951 I. Mary Louise Sheldon, born June 7, 1867 ; died 
Aug. 10, 1868. 

CHILD OF EDWARD HENRY AND LOUISA HANFORD 489 
(jESUP) CUDDY. 

952 I. Louisa Jesup Cuddy, born April 14, 1868. 

CHILD OF FRANCIS WRIGHT, JR., AND EFFIE (cROOK) 490 
JESUP. 

953 I. Florence Marguerite Jesup, born Aug. 10, 1881. 

CHILD OF HANFORD AND ANNIE MARIA (tATOr) DAY. 491 

954 I. Henry Hanford Day, born July 5, 1868. 

CHILD OF CHARLES GUSTAVUS AND LILLIA FRANCES 501 
(smith) WILSON. 

955 I. Flora May Wilson, born Feb. 9, 1881. 

CHILD OF CHARLES HENRY AND MARTHA HENRIETTA 504 
(strong) FOWLER. 

956 I. John William Fowler, born Dec. 27, 1881. 



EIGHTH GENERATION, 233 

CHILD OF GEORGE FRANCIS AND CLARA M. (mAT- 505 
thews) MUNSON. 

957 I. Jennie Tyler Munson, born Nov. 0, 1880. 

CHILDREN OF TOURO AND MARIA ELIZABETH (SAN- 508 
ford) ROI'.ERTSON. 

958 I. Lizzie E(ln,i Robertson, born Nov. 26, 1868. 

959 II. Jessie Sanford Robertson, born April 16, 1870. 

960 III. William Tonro Robertson, born Nov. 18, 1871. 



CLAIilv (tAYLOR) sanford. 

961 I. Mary Sanford, born Maicli 20, 1871. 

962 II. Hnntington Sanford, born Doc. 4, 1882. 

CHILD OF CHARLES EDWARD AND KATE (lAIMREER.) 511 
SANFOL'D. 

963 I. Richard Lainibeer Sanford, born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Dec. 17, 1877. 

CHILDREN OF SHERIVIAN F. AND MARY HUTTON (rICe) 518 
FOOTl'L 

964 I. Artlinr Ellsworth Foote, born Jan. 3, 1874. 

965 II. Henry Lyman Foote, born March 11, 1881. 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS, .JR., AND MARY ALASEBIA (bEN- 531 
NETT) iMCCONKEY. 

966 I. Mary Ang'nsta McConkey, born March 16, 1862. 

967 II. Hattie Rennett McConliey, l>orn May 6, 1864. 

968 III. Grace Miles McConkey, born Jan. 21, 1874. 

30 



234 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS IIENllY AND TERESA MARIA 535 
(finn) ]\IILES. 

969 I. Cathariue Rebecca Miles, born in Erie, Pa., Oct. 
15, 1866. 

970 II. Maud Miles, born in Cleveland, Ohio, Oct. 22, 
1868; died in Portsmouth, N. H., June 3, 1873. 

971 III. Richard Benton Miles, born in Cleveland, Aug. 
24, 1870 ; died in Portsmouth, N. H., May 22, 1873. 

972 IV. Maud Mary Miles, born in Portsmouth, A])ril 
12, 1875. 

973 V. Harriet Teresa Miles, born in East Somerville, 
Mass., Feb. 21, 1880. 

974 TI. Marion Miles, born in East Somerville, Feb. 9, 
1882. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES EDWARD AND ANNA LOUISE 538 
(marton) IVIILES. 

975 I. Millison Louisa Miles, born Dee. 18, 1880. 

976 II. Thomas Harton Miles, born Aug. 17, 1882. 

CHILD OF GEORGE SMILES AND FLETA ALVIRA ( ALLEN ) 544 
HALLIDAY. 

977 I. Susan Fleta Halliday, born in Cleveland, Ohio, 
March 30, 1872. 

CHILD OF DARWIN BRAINARD AND SUSAN (hALLIDAY) 545 
HEERS. 

978 I. Benjamin Pitney Beers, l)orn in Cleveland, Ohio, 
Dec. 24, 1872; died in Cleveland, July 10, 1873. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 235 

CHILDEEN OF JOHN AND A15BIE (hEDGe) SEAMAN. 552 

979 I. Charles Seaman, born Sept. 22, 1866. 

980 II. Edgar Seaman, bom Nov. 26, 1867. 

981 III. Grussie Seaman, bom July 7, 1870. 

982 IV. Frederick Seaman, bom Aug. 27, 1872. 

983 T. Mabel Seaman, bom Sept. 19, 1874. 

984 VI. Isaac Seaman, bom Jan. 1, 1877. 

985 VII. Ada Abl)ie Seaman, bom June 30, 1879. 

CIIILDKEN OF CIIAUNOEY AND ELIZABETH TAYLOll (vAN 557 
BASKEKK) IVES. 

986 I. Angnsta Cromwell Ives, bom Sept. 22, 1869. 

987 II. Harold Ives, bom Nov. 13, 1871. 

CHILD OF IIOBART .lOHN AND ELIZABETH 3IAKY (l\ ES) 561 
PA UK. 

988 I. Mand Ives Park, bom Dec. 22, 1877. . 

CHILDREN OF KEY. ALGERNON SIDNEY AND ADELAIDE 586 

(trowbriixje) CRAPSEY. 

989 I. Philip Trowbridge Crapsey, bom March 7,1876. 
91M) II. Emily Margaret Crapsey, born March 4, 1877. 

991 III. Adelaide Crapsey, bom Sept. 7, 1878. 

992 IV. Paul Crapsey, born Aug. 24, 1880. 

993 V. Rachel Morris Crapsey, bom Aug. 14, 1882. 

CHILDREN OF FREDERICK DABNEY AND NELLIE (eGAN) 596 
SELLECK. 

994 I. James Keeler Selleck, born in Chicago, 111., July 
3, 1879. 



236 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

995 II. Edna Selleck, born in Chicago, Oct. 30, 1881. 

CIIILDKEN OF GEORGE HUNTINGTON AND ADELAIDE 616 
(bruice) NORTHKUP. 

996 I. Joliii Bruice Nortliriip, born Jnly 21, 1873; died 
Feb. 28, 1876. 

997 II. Jessie Louisa Nortlirup, born Oct. 23, 1879; 
died June 2, 1881. 

CHILD OF GARDNER LANDON AND MARY ELIZABETH \ 289 
(nORTHRUP) BONTECOU. ] 617 

998 I. Fredericli Finch Bontecou, born in NeAv York, 
July 29, 1873. 

CHILDREN OF LEWIS KEOIOND AND HARRIET LOUISA 618 
(northrup) THURLOW. 

999 I. Maik Belcher Tliurlo>v, born Oct. 12, 1875. 

1000 II. (icorge Huutinj;ton Thurlow, born June 30, 
1878; died May 28, 1881. 

1001 III. Editli Acelia Thurlow, born Sept. 6, 1880. 

CHILDREN OF AUGUSTUS A. AND SARAH ELIZA (nORTII- 626 
RUJ») LINES. 

1002 I. James Boy Lines, born Aug. 26, 1881. 
10()2a II. Alfred Northiup Lines, born Feb. 2, 1885. 

CHILDREN OF EDWARD FLINT AND NANCY (lANe) 687 
LATHIK^P. 

1003 I. Harriet Angeline Lathrop, born Nov. 1, 1874; 
died Oct. 3, 1878. 

1004 IT. Benjamin Lane Lathrop, born Dec. 7, 1877. 

1005 III. James Lathrop, born Feb. 27, 1880. 

1006 IV. Edward Flint Lathrop, Jr., born Dec. 8, 1883. 



• ]N^IISrTH GENERATIOiSr. 

CHILD OF FRANK E. AND IDA ANNA (iIOOK) WILLIA:\IS. 704 

l(K>6a I. Henry Raymoiirt Williams, bom June 2, 1885. 

CHILD OF CIIAELES IIENIJY AND IIAIIKIET BONTECOU 709 
(HAMILTON) .lONES. 

1007 I. Daughter, not named, boin May 15, 1883. 

CHILDREN OF FREDERIC CLEVELAND AND :\IYRA A. 732 
(WADHA:\rs) HOLIES. 

1008 I. Charles Ives Homes, born July 3, 1872. 

1009 II. Susie Welles Homes, born May 18, 1876. 

1010 III. Frederic Cleveland Homes, Jr., born Nov. 
5, 1879. 

1011 ly. Myra Wadhams Homes, born Feb. 16, 1882. 

CHILDREN OF HORACE ROLLIN AND ]\IARY LOUISE 737 
(homes) BOYNTON, 

1012 I. Mary Louise Boynton, born March 20, 1881. 

1013 II. Julia Salter Boynton, born Jan. 6, 1883. 

CHILD OF CHARLES SALTER AND SUSANNAH (PARRISIl) 741 
WELLES. 

1014 I. Susie Homes Welles, born Jan. 1, 1881. 



238 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CinLD OF EEASTUS EALPH AND JULIA MAKY (sTEVENS) 748 
GUILDS. 

1015 I. Robert Joseph (liilds, born Sept. 12, 1867. 

CHILD OF CHAKLES HENRY AND JULIA LOUISA ( WOL- 753 
ford) CHILDS. 

1016 I. Ida May Childs, born Jan. 3, 1882. 

CHILD OF HOMER BENHAM AND LILLIAN ESTELLA (lIOP- 751 
kins) CHILDS. 

1017 I. Estella Lillian Childs, born July 30, 1882. 

CHILD OF ALBERT ELLSWORTH AND JULIA LOUISA 755 
(CHILDS) MARTIN. 

1017a I. Clarence Albert Martin, l)orn Feb. 13, 1884. 

CHILD OF HERMAN EVERETI AND EMILY FRANCES (bEN- 756 
HAJl) S3HTH. 

1018 I. Minnie Cristine Smith, born in New Haven, 
Conn., Dec. 1, 1876. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM WEBSTER AND JESSIE EUGENIA 758 
(ROBERTS) BENHAM. 

1019 I. Alice Mabel Benhani, born Sept. 23, 1881. 
1019a II. Agues Louise Beuhaui, born May 10, 1885. 

CHILD OF JOHN AND ELLEN MARTHA (bENHAJM) GREEN- 76'i 
WOOD. 

1019b I. Edith Agatha Greenwood, born Nov. 19, 1884 ; 

died Dec. 17, 1884. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN HOWARD AND EMIMA LOUISE (bUSII- 764 
NELl) LAWRENCE. 

1030 I. Louise Howard Lawrence, born Nov. 23, 1876. 



NINTH GENERATION. 239 

1021 II. Ethel Douglas Lawrence, born March 27,1880. 

1022 III. Son, not named, born March 25, 1883. 

CHILD OF CHARLES NOBLE AND GRACE EDSON (miSII- '<66 
NELL) CLARK. 

1023 I. Yirginia Norman Clark, born Jnne 17, 1881. 

CHILD OF FRANK WALTER AND ELLEN (dARNEy) 770 
BUSHNELL. 

1024 I. William Frank Buslinell, born . 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS BOND AND CAROLINE AUGUSTA 776 
(durand) HAUGHAWORT. 

1025 I. Willie Hanghawort, born Oct. 12, 1867; died 
Oct. 28, 1867. 

1026 II. Grant Hanghawort, born Oct. 17,1868; died 
Dec. 1, 1868. 

1027 III. Caroline Hanghawort, borji Nov. 10, 1869. 

1028 IV. Henry Hanghawort, born Dec. 23, 1870; died 
Jan. 20, 1871. 

1029 V. Edith Hanghawort, born April 15, 1875. 

1030 YI. Nina Hanghawort, born Jaji. 23, 1878. 

1031 Til. Bond Hanghawort, born Jan. 13, 1881. 

children of william rufus and mary frances 778 
(mcculloch) durand. 

1032 I. Fonntain Edgar Durand, born March 7, 1875. 

1033 II. Charles Durand, born Oct. 22, 1876; died 
March 25, 1877. 

1034 III. Daughter, not named, born July 25, 1881. 



240 BONTECOU FAMILY. 

CniLDREN OF ALBEIiT WELLS AND SARAH ELIZA (dU- 770 
rand) CARPENTER. 

1035 I. Agnes Carpenter, born Aug. 23, 1874; died Dec. 
16, 1875. 

I03f) II. Edith Carpenter, born Jnly 4, 1876; died Dec. 

23, 1877. 

1037 III. Kittie Carpenter, born Dec. 20, 1878 ; died 
May IG, 1879. 

1038 IV. Lonise Beatrice Carpenter, born April 4, 

1880. 

1039 V. George Albert Carpenter, born Jnly 14, 1882. 

CHILD OF CONGRAYE.IACKSON AND ELLA BELL (PRITCII- 789 
ARd) TYLETi. 

1040 I. Charles Lewis Tyler, born Jan. 23, 1881. 

CHILD OF FREDERICK DONALDSON AND FRANCES ELIZA- 796 
BETH (pRITCIIARD) PARKER. 

1041 I. Kertha Margnerite Parker, born Jnly 2, 1880. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES EDWARD AND JANETTE ELIZA- 808 
BETH (warren) HALL. 



1043 II. Charles Warren Hall, born Jnne 13, 1882. 

CHILD OF GEORGE AND LEONA (OREGO) CONANT. 849 

1044 I. One child, born about 1876. 

CHILDREN OF ,JA]\rES DELP.EP.T AND HARRIET (rAN- 860 

dall) finch. 

1045 I. MIna Finch, born July 6, 1876. 

1046 II. James Edgar Finch, born March 7, 1878. 



NINTH GENERATION. 241 

CHILD OF LOUIS NAPOLEON AND ELLA ELMEl^TA (rICe) 867 
COLE. 

1047 I. Raymond Burt ( ole, born July 9, 1883. 

CHILD OF JOHN JAMES AND ADELAIDE ADELIA (kICE) 868 

wheeler. 

lOlS I. Henry Xorman Wheeler, born May 2, 1881 ; 
died Oct. 5, 1881. 

children of frederick west and sarah virginia 911 
(weise) page. 

1049 I. Robert Weise Page, born April 15, 1877. 

1050 II. Maxwell Frederick Page, born May 29, 1879. 

1051 III. Faith Page, born Jan. 24, 1888. 

CHILD OF JAMES WESLEY AND IMILDRED ANNE (pAGE) 912 
MAYNARD. 

1052 I. Lawrence Maynard, born Feb. 19, 1882. 



ADDETs^DA. 



Subsequent to the passage of the earlier pages of this 
book through the press, and tlie distribution of the type, 
a discovery was made most unexpectedly; namely, that 
Timothy Bontecou (9) Avas from 1741 to 1748 a resident 
of Stratford, Conn., and that four of his children were 
born in that town, viz. : 

Peter (12), born June 9, 1741 ; baptized July 12, 1741. 

David (14), born January (>, 1742-3; baptized March 
13, 1743. 

James (15), born March 10, 1743-4; l)aptized March 
18, 1744. 

Mary (16), born September 13, 1747; baptized Sept. 
27, 1747. 

There is no record that shows him to have been the 
owner of property there, but he probably removed thither 
from New Haven, on account of greater convenience in 
the enjoyment of his church privileges. In 1^48 he was 
again a resident of New Haven. 

It will be observed that tlie order of arrangement of 
his children, in this work, is disturbed by this discovery. 
Peter, instead of being the eldest son, gives place to 
Daniel, who was born in New Haven, Sept. 9, 1739 ; and in 
each succeeding generation the descendants of the latter 
should take precedence of those of the former. 

It will also be noticed in the case of these children, 
except Daniel, that the i/ear of birth only was given by 
the compiler. No recoi-d of births having been found, 



, ADDENDA. . 243 

this was determined by the age at death, and owing to a 
misstatement of the year of Peter s (12) death, a wrong 
conclusion reached regarding the time of his birth, result- 
ing in his being considered the eldest son. The compiler 
now considers it most probable that he died in 1781, the 
year in which his estate was admitted to probate, instead 
of in 1779. 

It will be seen also that we now have the given name 
and date of birth of Mrs. Lathrop (16). 

The compiler greatly regrets that he did not earlier 
learn these facts and record them in their proper place, 
but is pleased that the discovery was not made too late to 
be made use of even in this imperfect and somewhat 
unsatisfactorv manner. 



ERRATA. 



Page 152. No. 354 : for Maiy B. Turner, read Mary B. 
Tanner. . 

Page 164. No. 405: Julius Francelo Crego, right-hand 
reference number should be 849, instead of 850. 

Page 215. No. 762: Ellen Martha Benhani, right-hand 
reference number should be 1019b, instead of 1019a. 



INDEX 

Of De.seendaiitR and tlieir Relative?;. 

(REFERRED TO BY NUMBER.) 



Ackerman, Carrie Golden, 


921 


Ball, Pamelia, 


685 


JolmM.. 


443 


Bard well. Elmer Ellsworth, 


747 


Mar} French, 


932 


" Frank Edgar, 


745 


Adams, Ambrose Ryder. 


290 


" Fred Homer. 


746 


Ella, 


659 


Washington Holmes, 346 


Hannah, 


106 


Barker, Agnes Burton, 


437 


Mabel Estelle, 


658 


Calvin Curran. 


906 


Alexander. Sarah Ann, 


425 


Calvin John, 


435 


Allen, Abner, 


544 


Clara Burbank, 


909 


Chai-les, 


176 


Clara Dougrey, 


438 


Fleta Alvira, 


544 


Edward Gorham, 


908 


Julia Maria. 


176 


Irene Frances, 


907 


Ailing, Hannah, 


94 


Irene Hawley, 


436 


AUyn, Lucius Bonaparte, 


117 


James Norman, 


155 


Lucius Bonaparte, 


295 


Barnes, Adella Josephine, 


237 


Nathan, 


117 


Zerah. 


237 


Nathan, 


295 


Bassett, Francis, 


7 


Andres, Emily, 


397 


Beach, Abby Meaker. 


67 


Emily. 


400 


Mary, 


67 


Andrews, Amy, 


139 


Becker, John Clark, 


463 


Etta Louisa, 


372 


Beckwith, Sallie A., 


415 


Samuel M., 


372 


Beecher. Martha, 


348 


Archibald, Frances Gertrude, 


655 


Beers, Benjamin Pitney, 


545 


Grace Boutecou, 


654 


Benjamin Pitney, 


978 


James Covil, 


285 


Darwin Brainard, 


545 


James Wentworth 


656 


• ' Evalina, 


545 


Thomas. 


285 


Belden, Thankful, 


4 


Ashley, Betsey, 


314 


Bell. George, 


330 






Beuedict, Amanda, 


148 


Baisley, Martha, 


129 


Charles Allen Reed, 


832 


Baldwin, Joseph, 


377 


Charles Laurens, 


386 


Julia Ann, 


176 


Charles Sidney, 


839 



246 



INDEX. 



Bene 



edict, Daniel, 


43 


Benham, William Webster, 


758 


Daniel, 


391 


Bennett, Cephas, 


260 


Edward C. Delavan 


390 


ElsinaS., 


260 


Emily Isabel, 


837 


Gates Abiatha. 


531 


Emily Safford, 


389 


Mary Alasebia, 


531 


Florence Emily, 


834 


Bidwell. Charlton Bontecou, 


637 


Francis, 


43 


Ira Glazier, 


273 


George, 


395 


Lydia Kate, 


638 


George Curtis, 


840 


Bill, Mary. 


85 


George Rice, 


145 


Birdsall, Mary. 


557 


George Rice, Jr. , 


387 


Bishop, Charles, 


91 


George Rice, 3d, 


83G 


Charles Parsons, 


91 


George Thaddeus, 


385 


Grace Caroline. 


232 


Henry Linnaeus. 


388 


James Bontecou, 


231 


Jessie Maud, 


833 


" Phebe, 


91 


Julius, 


392 


Bissell, Mary, 


108 


Julius Iloyt, 


140 


Bliss. Caroline. 


313 


Mary Laurinda, 


835 


Harriet. 


37 


Mortimer. 


394 


Lucy. 


124 


Nancy Rice, 


147 


Moses. 


37 


Olive SaraL, 


838 


Bloomfiold, Ann Jane, 


862 


Oscar, 


393 


Henry, 


862 


Thomas, 


43 


Bontecou. Abby C, 


266 


Lam, Agnes Louise,, 1019a 


Abby Whipple, 


280 


Alice Mabel, 


1019 


Alvin Francis, 


288 


Alice Mary, 


761 


Anna Louise. 


631 


Eliakim, 


39 


Anna Louise, 


591 


Elisha Mandeville, 


135 


Athol Reed, 


652 


Ellen Martha (also 




Augustus Van Rens 


- 


page 243), 


7fi2 


selear. 


707 


Emily Frances, 


756 


Catharine Rhodes. 


120 


Francis Kimberly. 


348 


Cecelia, 


74 


Frank Edward. " 


759 


Charles Holland. 


646 


Frederick, 


824 


Charles Hubbard, 


68 


Harriet Augusta, 


137 


Charles Neale, 


643 


John David, 


378 


Charles Sherman, 


257 


Julia Elizabeth, 


133 


Clara Lydia, 


644 


Leverett Hayden. 


757 


Clarissa, 


45 


Lillian Martha, 


760 


Daniel, 


5 


Louisa Walter, 


136 


Daniel, 


13 


Louisa Waters, 


347 


Daniel. 


37 


Robert Alexander, 


349 


Daniel, 


122 


Su.san, 


346 


Daniel, 


324 


Susan Clarinda, 


134 


Daniel, Jr., 


10 



INDEX. 



247 



Boutecou, Daniel Upson, 


38 


Boutecou, Helen Estelle, 


291 


David (also page 




Helen Maria. 


286 


242), 


U 


Henrietta, 


50 


David, 


2y 


Horatio Brinsmade, 


593 


David, 


30 


Horatio Brinsmade, 


633 


David, 


35 


Howell, 


649 


David, 


104 


James (also page 




David, 


253 


342), 


15 


David. 


255 


James, 


28 


David Francis, 


287 


James, 


52 


Edna. 


G50 


James, 


350 


Edward, 


107 


James Clark, 


103 


Eleanor, 


IS 


" . Jane, 


91 


Elijah Wliippk', 


277 


Joanna. 


590 


Elizabeth. 


23 


Joanna, 


630 


Elizabeth. 


40 


John, 


19 


Elizabeth, 


75 


John, 


55 


Elizabeth, 


100 


John, 


284 


Elizabeth, 


256 


Joseph Counable, 


264 


Fannie Louise, 


292 


Josephine, 


339 


Francis, 


108 


Josephine, 


593 


Francis, 


283 


Josephine, 


633 


Francis, 


617 


Julia, 


41 


Frank Foster. 


651 


Julia, 


47 


Frederick Finch, 


657 


\ •' Julia, 


253 


Frederick Finch, 


998 


Lydia Ann, 


283 


Frederick Thayer, 


335 


Margaret Celia, 


635 


Gardner Laudon, 


389 


Margaret Pynchon, 


203 


Gardner Landon, 


617 


Marguerite, 


2 


George, 


106 


Maria, 


58 


George, 


354 


Marie, 


7 


George Anson, 


42 


Martha Potter, 


123 


George Henry, 


278 


3Iary, 


9 


George Nelson, 


648 


jNIary (also page 24i 


!), 16 


George Sheering, 


129 


Mary, 


125 


■ '• Gladys Achsah, 


653 


.Mary, 


131 


Grace, 


92 


Mary Edith, 


645 


Hamlet, 


69 


Mary Emma, 


708 


Hannah Elizabeth, 


, 51 


Mary Hannah, 


373 


Harriet, 


57 


]Mary Kate, 


290 


Harriet, 


71 


Mary Lillian, 


647 


Harriet, 


127 


]klary Louisa, 


328 


Harriet, • 


132 


Nancy, 


44 


Harriet Elizabeth. 


327 


Nancy, 


53 



248 



INDEX. 



Bontecou, Nathaniel Frederick 


Bontecou, Timothy, 


9 


Thayer, 


326 


" 


Timothy, 


48 


Peter, 


3 




Timothy, Jr. , 


11 


Peter (also page 242), 12 


" 


Timothy Prout, 


17 


Peter, 


33 


" 


Walter Henry, 


330 


Peter, 


99 


" 


Walter Wright, 


706 


Philip Dorlou, 


279 


" 


William, 


20 


Pierre, 


1 


" 


William, 


21 


Pierre. 


650a 


" 


William, 


46 


Polly, 


43 




AVilliam, 


70 


Polly, 


49 


" 


William, 


72 


Polly Augusta, 


27 


" 


William, 


126 


Rachael, 


H 


" 


William Ely, 


128 


Rebec(!a, 


36 


" 


William Henry, 


130 


Reed, 


281 


" 


William Higby, 


59 


Reed Brinsmade, 


594 


" 


William Whipple, 


274 


Reed Brinsmade, 


634 




William Wright 




Reed Brockway, 


249 




Whipple, 


276 


" Reed Brockway, 


263 


Boruar, Casdeallia, 


755 


Roswell, 


26 


Bowditch, Abigail, 


128 


Roswell, 


73 


Bowker, Gustavus G. , 


288 


Samuel, 


24 


" 


Lucy Wood, 


288 


Samuel Storcr, 


105 


Boyce, 


Ellen, 


299 


Sara, 


4 


Boy n ton, Horace Rollin, 


737 


Sarah, 


34 


" 


Julia Salter, 


1013 


Sarah. 


103 




Mary Louise, 


1012 


Sarah Celestia, 


265 


Bradley, George Washington 


131 


Saiah Maria, 


285 




Hiram, 


140 


Semantha Brock- 




" 


Lois, 


331 


way, 


251 




Orilla, 


40 


Susan, 


■ 258 




Orilla Elizabeth, 


373 


Susan, 


275 


" 


Samuel, 


131 


Susanna, 


249 


■' 


Sarah, 


131 


Susannah, 


;^5 


Brceden, John N., 


,352 


Susannah, 


31 




Mary Virginia, 


352 


Susannah, 


32 


Bridge 


Abba Gray^ 


564 


Susannah, 


39 


Bristol 


, Anthony, 


' 47 


Susannah, 


56 


" 


Arthur LeRoy, 


458 


Susannah, 


60 




Charles Edward, 


168 


Susannah, 


101 


" 


Charles Marcus, 


485 


Susanne, 


6 




Ella, 


454 


Sybil Pease, 


124 




Florence Marie, 


460 


Thomas, 


22 


" 


Frank Jessup, 


457 


Thomas, 


54 i 


" 


Henrietta Eliza, 


158 







INDEX. 




249 


Bristol 


, Henry Bontecou, 


482 


Brown 


, Hannah, 


22 


" 


Henry Herbert. 


459 




Hannah. 


27 


" 


Ida, 


456 




Henrietta Miner, 


214 




Jane Augusta, 


167 




Hester, 


116 


" 


John Seymour, 


480 


'■ 


Jacob, 


214 




Julia, 


455 


" 


Nellie, 


690 


" 


Julia Ann, 


157 


Browning, Ch'awford, 


398 


" 


Lena Augusta, 


484 


" 


Horace, 


398 


" 


Mary Hanford. 


161 


Bruice 


, Adelaide. 


610 


" 


Nancy Bontecou, 


163 


" 


Mathias D., 


616 


" 


Nathan, 


47 


Brush, 


Hannah, 


24 


" 


Susan Stowe, 


481 


Buckiu 


igham. John. 


445 


" 


Thomas, 


163 




Sarah, 


445 




Thomas Levering, 


471 




Sidney, 


443 


" 


Timothy Mason, 


160 


Bud row, Elizabeth, 


808 




Wallace Spear, 


478 


Bulkeley, Edward, 


0;'O 




Walter Brooks, 


470 


" 


Edward, 


2;>2 


" 


Walter Hopkins, 


483 


" 


Edward, 


578 




William Reed, 


47!) 


■' 


Grace Chetwood. 


577 


Bristol! 


1, Anna Page. 


473 


" 


Jane Bontecou. 


575 


" 


Charles, 


452 


" 


Lucy Mansfield. 


576 


" 


Clara. 


472 




Sarah Chauncey, 


579 


" 


Edward James, 


451 


Bullocl 


c, C'harles Lester, 


949 


" 


Elizabeth. 


474 




Edward Alexander, 


465 




Ellen May, 


475 


" 


Lew Nora. 


947 


" 


James Anthony, 


16(! 


" 


Orastus, 


948 


" 


John Dougrcy, 


105 


" 


Willie Edward, 


950 


" 


Julia, 


44!) 


Burbank, Hannah, 


435 


" 


Julia Alice, 


450 


Burritt 


, Charlotte Caroline, 


296 


" 


Julia Bontecou, 


477 


" 


Cornelia Eliza, 


2!)3 


" 


Mary Hanford, 


453 


" 


Elinor Louise. 


664 


" 


'I'homas Page, 


476 




Frances Cornelia. 


298 


" ■ 


William Bontecou, 


15!) 


" 


Frank Duffle, 


300 


" 


William Mcriick. 


448 


" 


Harriet Muir, 


300 


Brockwny, Reed, 


!)!) 




Harry Rayner, 


6(;6 


" 


Samantha. 


99 


■' 


Ida Florence, 


663 


Brooks, 


, Alexander, 


163 




Jessie Allyn, 


065 


" 


Charles William. 


335 


•' 


John Menzies, 


299 


" 


Elizabeth, 


368 




John Peck, 


110 


" 


Sarah, 


163 




Joseph, 


294 


Brookei 


r, Alma Augusta, 


150 


•' 


iVIary, 


95 


" 


Phipps Waldo, 


150 




Mary Jane, 


117 


Browu, 


Betsey, 


374 


" 


Mary Jane. 


295 


" 


Hannah, 


21 


" 


Miriam Rayner, 


297 




32 











250 



INDEX. 



Burt, Cinderelhi, 


416 


Case, Frances, 


114 


" Justus, 


416 


Harlow, 


114 


Bushnell, Charles Ricliard, 


774 


Chandler, Caroline M., 


405 


Cora Douglas, 


767 


William A., 


405 


Douglas Ritchie, 


351 


Chapman, Charles Frederick, 


383 


Douglas Ritchie, 


772 


Charles Fredk. Jr. 


, 719 


EdwardWells. 


775 


Frank Gerard, 


720 


Emma Louise, 


764 


Chariot, Nathaniel Peck, 


216 


" Francis Haydea, 


353 


Childs, Charles Henry, 


749 


Francis Wells, 


136 


" Charles Henry, 


753 


Frank Walter, 


770 


Erastus Ralph, 


748 


Grace Edson, 


766 


Estella Lillian, 


1017 


Henry Harrington, 


353 


Homer Benham, 


750 


James Tanner, 


771 


Homer Benham, 


754 


Mary Gertrude, 


773 


Ida Louisa, 


751 


Mary Louisa, 


768 


" Ida May, 


1016 


Richard Wells, 


354 


Isabella Julia, 


752 


William Edward, 


350 


Julia Louisa, 


755 


William Edward Jr 


., 763 


" Ralph, 


347 


William Francis, 


765 


Robert Joseph, 


1015 


William Frank, 


1024 


Churchill, Prudence, 


9 


William Henry, 


769 


Clark, Anon, 


167 








Caroline, 


223 


Cabaniss, George, 


341 




' Charles Noble, 


766 


Cadwell, Elizabeth, 


685 




Hannah Mary, 


704 


George G., 


685 




' Joanna, 


28 


Cannon, Charity, 


95 




Nancy, 


510 


James, 


95 




Nathan Satterlee, 


223 


Carpenter, Agnes, 


1035 




' Polly, 


35 


Albert Wells, 


779 




Rose Linda, 


350 


Edith, 


1036 




Samuel, 


28 


Etta Bontecou. 


826 




Samuel, 


35 


George Albert, 


1039 




Sarah Ann, 


445 


Horace, 


379 




' Silas, 


350 


Kittie. 


1037 


Virginia Norman , 


1023 


Louise Beatrice. 


1038 


Clement, Emily Perlee, 


351 


Carrasco, Juana. 


430 


Cluett, David Edmond, 


612 


Tadeo, 


430 


George By water, 


269 


Carrick, Allyn Barclay, 


676 


George Golden, 


636 


Thomas, 


674 


Jessie, 


610 


Vernon Rayner, 


675 


" John William Alfred, 


256 


William Henry, 


309 


Joseph Mulford, 


615 


Gary, Sidney Tuttle, 


267 


Louise Bontecou, 


614 


" Wolsey, 


267 




Minnie, 


611 





INDEX. 


251 


Cluett, Robert, 


609 


Crego, Leona, 


849 


Stanley Bywater, 


613 


Martha Ann, 


406 


■' William, 


269 


Nancy Jane, 


410 


Cobb, Sophronia Biowu, 


277 


Nancy Laurinda, 


407 


Cocke, Louisiana Susan, 


341 


" Olive, 


146 


William H., 


341 


Polly Lavinia, 


413 


Cole, David, 


867 


'• RulufD., 


146 


Louis Napoleon, 


867 


Sherman, 


413 


" Raymond Burt, 


1047 


Thaddeus, 


411 


Coleman, Richard T., 


768 


Verna, 


857 


CoUings, MaryE., 


387 


'• Vine, 


858 


Collinot, Marguerite, 


1 


'• William G., 


853 


Conant, George, 


849 


Crook, Effie, 


490 


Conley, Daniel, 


871 


Ruf us. 


490 


John, 


417 


Cuddy, Edvi^ard Henry, 


489 


Mary, 


869 


Louisa Jesup, 


953 


William, 


870 


Culver, Paulina, 


383 


Connable, Abby, 


103 


Gumming, Samuel T. , 


353 


" Joseph, 


103 


Theodosia Coxe, 


352 


Cooper, Abigail, 


80 


Cummings, Cordelia, 


404 


Cornwell, Almira, 


378 


Curran, Celia Frances, 


435 


Corson, Clarissa, 


505 


Thomas, 


435 


Cotton, Eliza, 


134 


Currier, Dorothy, 


112 


Cory, Alice Magdalene, 


440 


Curtis, Kate, 


251 


William Brownell, 


156 


Mary, 


4 


William Julius, 


439 


Stiles, 


251 


Coxites, Bessey, 


337 


Gushing, Brackley, 


454 


Coxe, TheodosiaH., 


353 


Mary, 


454 


Crapsey, Adelaide, 


991 






Algernon Sidney, 


586 


Daily, Mary Catherine, 


463 


Emily Margaret, 


990 


Daniels, Joseph B., 


365 


Paul, 


992 


Orinda, 


365 


Philip Trowbridge, 


989 


Darney, Ellen, 


770 


Rachel Morris, 


993 


Davidson, Arthur Henry, 


453 


Crego, Adeline, 


392 


' ' Florence Hope, 


932 


"^ Dollie, 


403 


Susan, 


168 


" Fannie H., 


851 


Day, Almon, 


314 


" George Clinton, 


148 


" Hanford, 


491 


George Clinton, 


408 


Harriet Angeline, 


314 


George Elmer, 


■ 855 


Henr}^ Hanford, 


954 


James Henry, 


409 


Horace, 


492 


Julius, 


850 


" Horace White, 


171 


Julius Francelo (also 




Dean, Isaac Mortimer, 


408 


page 343), 


405 


Decker, Anne, 


240 


" Lavinnie, 


856 


DeKlyn, John B., 


331 



252 



INDEX. 



De Klyn 


Marie Baldwin, 


231 


Dunham, Henry, 


454 


Demiag, 


Jane, 


358 


Henry, 


454 


Denman, 


Ann, 


796 


Ida, 


933 


" 


John, 


796 


Ransom Williams, 


321 


De Veie, 


Sarab, 


160 


William, 


694 


Dillaway 


, Nancy, 


186 


Dunwell, Lois, 


19 


Disbrow 


Elizabeth S., 


491 


Durand, Addle Louise, 


780 


Doulcvj^ 


Margaret Virginia, 


433 


Anson Munson. 


355 




Owen, 


433 


Caroline Augusta, 


776 


Doimell, 


Catharine, 


213 


Charles, 


1033 




Frances, 


213 


Charles Anson, 


777 




John, 


213 


Fountain Edgar, 


1032 


Donus, Abigail S., 


237 


Frederick Albert, 


784 


Doolittle 


, Arpatia, 


141 


George Ernest, 


781 


" 


Enos, 


141 


Henry Harrison, 


783 


Dougi-ey 


Clarissa Ann, 


153 


Mary Louise, 


782 




Clarissa Bontecou, 


429 


Sarah Eliza, 


779 




Elizabeth Moulton, 


426 


AVilliam Rufus, 


778 




Elizabeth Moulton, 


880 


Durant, Mary, 


319 


•' 


Emma Isabel, 


877 


Duryee, William Martin, 


407 




George Moulton, 


428 


Dusenberry, Jane, 


860 




George Moulton, 


875 


Dustin, Ananis, 


106 




Hannah, 


151 


Margaret, 


106 


" 


Howard Chandler, 


881 








Howard Moulton, 


427 


Eckley, Margaret, 


264 




James, 


45 


Edson, Emily Juanna Calh 






James, Jr., 


152 


arine, 


351 




James, 3d, 


425 


John, 


351 




James Cragcn, 


879 


Egau, Nellie, 


596 




John, 


154 


Elderkin, Cordelia, 


400 




John, 


424 


Eunice, 


397 




John Brown, 


878 


Jedediah, 


397 


" 


John Montgomery, 


876 


Jedediah, 


400 


" 


Julia, 


156 


Ellis, George Otis, 


383 


" 


Mary Elizabeth, 


155 


" Hattie Curtis, 


383 


Downs, 


Melitta, 


159 


Else, Clarence Eugene, 


914 


Dunbar, 


Clarissa R. , 


383 


Ellsworth, Fanny, 


123 


Duucaii 


Florence Agnes 




Fanny, 


315 




Maulsby, 


358 


Oliver, 


123 


Duuhatn 


, Arthur Le Roy, 


936 


Ewing, Ada Florence, 


279 




Cornelius, 


454 


" William R., 


279 




Emma Hunt, 


935 






'• 


Ezra, 


454 


Fay, Arthur Burritt, 


661 




Harry Bristol, 


934 


" Edward Prescott, 


.660 



53 



Fay, Gilman, 


296 


Gallup, Hiram, 


405 


' • Miriam Starr, 


662 


Gardner, Rowena, 


393 


Felt, Festus C, 


32:J 


Gaskill, Lydia, 


741 


" Mary Pamelia, 


328 


Gates, Margaret, 


875 


Finch, Cliarles Silas, 


S59 


'• William. 


875 


Eben Eugene, 


861 


Gay, William, 


381 


•' Edgar Mead, 


862 


Gibbens, John, 


225 


James Delbert, 


860 


Margaret, 


225 


James Edgar, 


1046 


Gillen, Ann, 


201 


James Noab, 


414 


Ellen Agnes, 


201 


" Mina, 


1045 


•' Hugh, 


201 


" Noah, 


414 


Gillett, Horatio, 


260 


Perry, 


863 


" Marilla, 


260 


Finn, Anthony, 


535 


Mary, 


260 


Teresa ]\Iaria, 


535 


Gilman, Mary Jane, 


359 


Fisk, Charles L., 


389 


Golden, Elizabeth, 


207 


Flynt, Mercy, 


127 


Gilbert, 


270 


Foote, Arthur Ellsworth, 


964 


Gilbert Dean, 


103 


" . Henry Lyman, 


965 


James, 


271 


Sherman F. , 


518 


" Joseph, 


103 


Ford, Elizabeth Augusta, 


237 


Maria Frances, 


268 


Harvey, 


237 


■' Mary Anna, 


272 


Foster, John, 


186 


Sarah Bon tecou. 


269 


Mary, 


186 


Goode, Mary Ann, 


102 


Fowler, Charles Henry, 


504 


Goodman, Margaret, 


173 


John William, 


950 


Thomas, 


173 


Freese, Abram, 


358 


Goodrich, David, 


9 


Jane Elizabeth, 


358 


Mary, 


9 


French, Andrew Wiuton, 


157 


Gordon, Delia E., 


138 


George Smith, 


188 


Susan, 


11 


Julia Cassandana, 


444 


Goss, Alice Bontecou, 


605 


Maria Dickinson, 


442 


George, 


607 


Marie Taylor, 


188 


Isabel Newlands, 


606 


Martha Sackett, 


441 


Peter Bontecou, 


608 


Mary Gleuney, 


443 


" Wilbur F., 


253 


Nancy D., 


311 


Gregory, John, 


259 


Frisbie, Julia, 


367 


Louisa Abigail, 


259 


Frost, Adelaide Loureue, 


813 


" Louisa Abigail, 


289 


" Louise Amy, 


814 


Green, Fannie M., 


405 


" Minnie Carrie, 


812 


Greenwood, Agatha, 


762 


•• SethEliada, 


366 


Edith Agatha, 


1019b 


Sylvester Higby, 


366 


John, 


762 






AVilliam, 


762 


Gallup, Amy, 


405 


Gunn, Harriet, 


240 



254 



Guun, Medad Hunt, 


240 


Hallidaj^, Susan, 


545 


Giierra, Martina, 


480 


Susan Fleta. 


977 






Hallowell, Mary, 


424 


Hall, Adelaide Eliza, 


871 


Hamilton. Agnes Jane, 


333 


Amos, 


40 


Agnes Jane, 


712 


Amos, Jr., 


141 


Arthur Wilson, 


716 


" Celia Eliza, 


364 


Bontecou, 


717 


Charles, 


139 


Elias Pitts, 


334 


•' Charles Edward, 


808 


Harriet Bontecou, 


709 


Charles Warren, 


1043 


James, 


132 


Denison Asahel, 


370 


James, 


714 


Eliza Ann, 


138 


" James Ranwick, 


337 


■ ' Elizabeth Amy, 


817 


Margaret Anna, 


335 


• Ellen Mary, 


366 


Mary Louisa, 


336 


Emma Celia, 


367 


Mary Louisa, ■ 


715 


Frank Edward, 


818 


Robert John, 


332 


Franklin Amos, 


369 


Robert John, Jr., 


713 


Gardner Irving, 


810 


Samuel, 


339 


Gardner Moss, 


368 


Samuel, 


718 


George Anson, 


142 


William Henry, 


338 


•• Henrietta Elizabeth, 


144 


William Henry, 


710 


John, 


40 


Hammond, Anna, 


183 


Joseph Bontecou, 


811 


Anna, 


188 


Lam ont Andrew, 


821b 


Hanford, Harriet Pynchon, 


172 


Leander Wilson, 


375 


Harry Norman, 


499 


Louisa Elizabeth, 


374 


Horace Day, 


498 


Nancy, 


140 


LsabelS., 


597 


Nancy Orilla, 


376 


Julia, Bristol, 


171 


" Nancy Orilla, 


378 


Levi Cooley, 


173 


■• Orinda Elizabeth, 


1042 


Mary Ann, 


169 


Sarah Jane, 


377 


Mary Ann, 


497 


Susan Salina, 


143 


Richard, 


49 


" Walter Heatly, 


809 


Richard Bontecou, 


170 


Warren Leander, 


372 


Robert Goodman, 


496 


" Willis Charles, 


365 


Harden, John W., 


301 


" Willis Mulliugs, 


816 


Julia Maria, 


301 


Halliday, Edward Handy, 


546 


Harrison, Cornelia, 


359 


Elias Handy, 


215 


Law son Nourse, 


359 


Elias Handy, Jr., 


547 


Hart, Adah. 


461 


George Miles, 


544 


Sarah Isabel. 


387 


Mary Adelaide, 


542 


" William Jewett, 


387 


Samuel, 


548 


Harton, Anna Louise, 


538 


Samuel Miles, 


541 


Ellen Rice, 


538 


Sarah Francis, 


543 


John, 


538 



Harton. John, 


IINU 

538 


Hitchcock, Aimer B., 


374 


Haughawort, Bond, 


1031 




Amy, 


139 


Caroline, 


1027 




Anne. 


138 


Edith, 


1029 




Benjamin Truman, 367 


Grant, 


1026 




Edson Wilbur, 


815 


Henry, 


1028 




Elmer William, 


367 


Nina, 


1030 




Gaius, 


374 


Tliomas Bond, 


776 




Gains Arthur, 


822 


Willie, 


1025 


Holdrege, Nathalie, 


324 


Ilauxburst, George, 


376 


Holgate, Sarah, 


163 


Wilbur Clarence, 


823 


Holland, Charles, 


277 


Ha-wley, Anna, 


28 


" 


Clara, 


277 


" Anna, 


35 


Homes, Charles Ives, 


1008 


Ilaj'den, Ann Thompson, 


727 




Francis King, 


735 


Charles Benhaui, 


340 


" 


Frederic Cleveland, 


732 


Charles Beuham, 


341 




Frederic Cleveland, 




Charles Ben ham, Jr 


, 730 




Jr., 


1010 


Eliza Virginia, 


731 


" 


Henry, 


344 


Irene, 


723 




Henry Bullard. 


734 


" Julia White, 


726 




John Charles. 


738 


Louisiana Cocke, 


724 




Julia Bacon. 


736 


Mary Susan, 


725 




Mary Louise. 


737 


" Nancy Jones, 


729 




Myra Wadhams. 


1011 


Norman, 


133 




Susie Welles. 


1009 


Norman Bontecou, 


728 




William. 


344 


" Norman Edward 






William Francis, 


733 


Brockling, 


342 


Hood. 


Benjamin. 


56 


Heatly, Elizabeth, 


365 




Benjamin, 


60 


William, 


365 




Charles Bontecou, 


66 


Hedge, Abbie, 


552 




Elizabeth. 


62 


" Charles Timothy, 


556 




Harriet. 


65 


David Harvey, 


555 




James. 


64 


" Frederick Blj^den, 


553 




James Bontecou, 


202 


" Frederick Borie, 


221 




Nancy, 


63 


Hannah Augusta, 


554 




Roswell. 


67 


John Storer, 


551 




Susan Maria, 


61 


Honing, Ann Matilda Banks, 


341 


" 


William. 


23 


Henry, Benjamin Tyler, 


176 


Hook, 


George Henry. 


702 


Ellen Maria, 


311 


" 


Ida Anna, 


704 


" Miles S., 


351 




James. 


327 


" Samuel G., 


311 


" 


Martha Esther, 


701 


Hibbard, Mira, 


490 1 


" 


Mary Emma, 


703 


Hibbin, Elizabeth, 


371 


Hopkins, Lillian Estella, 


754 


Hill, Betsey, 


416 


" 


William, 


754 



256 



INDEX. 



Hotcbkiss, Sarah, 


142 


Jesup, Emma. 


487 


Houghtaling, Maria, 


217 


Florence Marguerite, 


958 


" Maria, 


422 


Francis Wright, 


169 


Howell, Sibbyl, 


11 


Francis Wright, Jr. , 


490 


Hunter, Margaret, 


106 


" Louisa Hanford, 


486 


Huntington, Abigail, 


259 


Louisa Hanford, 


489 


Edward, 


58 


Joesbury, Joseph, 


246 


Hurd, Mary, 


354 


Mary, 


246 


Hurlbut, Melinda, 


97 


Johnson, Eliza Woddrap, 


341 


Hutcbinaon, Phoebe, 


758 


" Ellen, 


862 


Hyde, Augusta A., 


220 


Olive, 


57 






Jones, Ann Newton, 


341 


Ives, Augusta Buelah, 


558 


Charles Henry, 


709 


" Augusta Cromwell, 


986 


Jane Amanda, 


425 


Augustus Chauncey, 


226 


Mary Elizabeth, 


461 


Alonzo, 


566 


Nahum P. , 


425 


" Caroline Clark, 


560 


" Bobert Deggs, 


461 


Charles William, 


569 






Chauncey, 


88 


Keeler, Sarah, 


68 


Cbauncey, 


557 


Stephen, 


68 


" Chauncey, 


573 


Keifer, Baltue, 


107 


CMara Augusta, 


574 


•' Cornelia, 


107 


" Edward, 


568 


Keller, Jane, 


352 


" Elizabeth Mary, 


222 


Kemp, Serene, 


544 


" Elizabeth Mary, 


561 


Kendal, Nancy Elizabeth, 


463 


Emma Margaret, 


570 


William Adison, 


463 


Frederic Dana, 


563 


Kendrick, Maria Louise, 


217 


George, 


567 


Stewart Brown, 


217 


George Henrj, 


225 


Kidder, Harriet, 


185 


" Harold, 


087 


Lucinda, 


185 


Henry, 


564 


Samuel, 


185 


James, 


565 


Kilby, John Thompson, 


341 


James Merritt, 


223 


Mary Elizabeth, 


341 


James Merritt, Jr. , 


559 


Kimbcrly, Abby, 


135 


Jenny Strong, 


562 


Horace, 


135 


John Henry, 


224 


Huldah,' 


135 


" Katie May, 


572 


Kimmcrle, Mary C, 


358 


" Merritt Walstrom, 


571 


King, Clarissa, 


433 


" Orilla, 


40 


" Finus, 


463 






" Martha Eliza. 


461 


Jackson, Hugh Bradford, 


456 


" Beufina Effire, 


463 


Hugh Bradford, Jr 


. 937 


" Rufus, 


344 


Jacobs, Elizabeth, 


433 


Kingsbury, Chancellor, 


202 


Jesup, Ebenezer, 


488 


Maria, 


202 



257 



Knapp, David, 


299 


Le Boyteulx, Marquise, 


10 


" Harriet Muir, 


299 


Leek 


, Delia Delight, 


349 


Kneeland, Stella, 


260 


<< 


Emily Jane, 
Henrj^ 


348 
348 


Lake, Mary Ann, 


276 


Lewis, Cecile, 


210 


Lally, Fannie, 


495 


" 


Henry, 


206 


" Frederick, 


494 


" 


Henry, 


210 


" George Abbott, 


172 


" 


Jane, 


206 


" George Hanford, 


493 


" 


Nancy Adaline, 


778 


Laimbeer, Kate, 


511 


Lincoln, Sarah King, 


323 


" . Richard Harper, 


511 


Lines, Alfred Northrup, 


1002a 


Lambert, Annie, 


47 


" 


Augustus A., 


62G 


Landon, Clarissa Maria, 


108 


" 


James Roy, 


1002 


" Clarissa Maria, 


617 


Little, Rhoda, 


231 


" Gardner, 


108 


Livingston, Amos, 


380 


Lane, Benjamin, 


687 




Clara Ellis, 


829 


" Nancy, 


687 




" Donna Romaine, 


827 


Laraway, Emma Jane, 


404 




Ellen, 


431 


" Joseph, 


404 




" Emma Eliza, 


379 


Lathrop, Benjamin Lane, 


1004 




Frederick Charles, 882 


Catharine Bontecou 


123 




" Henry, 


143 


Catharine Bontecou 


315 




Henry G., 


143 


Daniel Bontecou, 


316 




Henry G. Jr., 


143 


Edward Flint. 


687 




Hiram Edward, 


383 


Edward Flint, Jr., 


1006 




James, 


431 


Elizabeth, 


313 




Mary Elbertine, 


381 


Harriet Angeline, 


1003 




" Susan Gay, 


828 


" James, 


314 


Long 


, Florence Pauline, 


670 


James, 


1005 


" 


Henry Carrick, 


671 


" James Bontecou, 


688 


" 


Lulu Hester, 


672 


Joseph, 


120 


" 


Sarah Emma, 


073 


" Mary (also page 243) 


, 16 




William Henry, 


308 


Wells, 


120 


Loomis, Chandler Hezekiah, 


429 


Lawrence, Ethel Douglas, 


1021 


" 


Frances Elizabeth, 


882 


Hiram, 


408 


" 


Sarah Harriet, 


883 


" John Howard, 


764 


Lorin 


g, Eliza Mitchell, 


434 


Louise Howard, 


1020 


Low, 


Geraldine Whittemore, 


580 


Mary Eleanor, 


408 


" 


Grace Bontecou, 


581 


Lawton, Amy Moss, 


821a 


" 


Henry Somes, 


233 


" George Britain, 


371 


" 


Mary Ann, 


233 


Harold Carlyle, 


820 


" 


Theodore Henry, 


583 


Lefa Elizabeth, 


821 


" 


William Whittemore, 


233 


:May Hall, 


819 


" 


William Whittemore Jr 


,582 


Richard Carlisle, 
33 


371 


Lusk 


Alfred, 


386 



Lusk, Julia Adelaide, 


IJNU 

386 


McCulloch, William H., 


778 


Lyman, Edward Norman, 


522 


McDonough, Cornelius, 


160 


" Erastus, 


205 


Jane Matilda, 


160 


" George Nelson, 


521 


McDougal, Christina, 


431 


" Horatio Nelson, 


205 


Merriams, Rufus, 


142 


William Thomson, 


520 


Sarah, 


142 






Merrick, Harvey Josiah, 


159 


Machet, Jean, 


5 


Sarah A., 


159 


" Marianne, 


5 


Merrill, Benjamin, 


112 


Machette, Charles C, 


125 


Nancy, 


112 


Macii, Ann, 


200 


Merriman, John, 


76 


Mansfield, Lucy, 


232 


Marcus Sr., 


25 


Maples, Adaline Sale, 


197 


" Marcus Jr., 


63 


Benjamin Hood, 


514 


Sally, 


77 


" Charles Reese, 


200 


Sarah Farm alee. 


80 


Edward William, 


201 


Merwin, Mary Elizabeth, 


748 


" Edward William Jr. 


, 513 


Metcalf, Abigail, 


37 


" Elizabeth Hood, 


195 


Miles, Catharine Rebecca, 


969 


" James Bixby, 


199 


Charles Edward, 


538 


Lillieus Adela, 


515 


" Charles Franklin, 


533 


" Maria Louise, 


198 


George, 


85 


Sarah Elizabeth, 


196 


" George, 


549 


" Zacheus, 


62 


George Washington, 


211 


Martin, Albert Ellsworth, 


755 


George Washington, 


217 


Clarence Albert, 


1017a 


George Washington, 


534 


Lewis, 


755 


" George Washington, 


539 


Mase, Emma, 


278 


Harriet Elizabeth, 


216 


" Sylvester Howell, 


278 


" Harriet Teresa, 


973 


Mason, Lucy, 


357 


" Henrietta, 


214 


Matthews, Clara M., 


505 


" John, 


85 


William Thomas, 


505 


" John Leonard, 


532 


Maulsby, Florence Agnes, 


358 


John William, 


213 


John, 


358 


Marion, 


974 


Maxwell, Mary, 


102 


" Mary Augusta, 


212 


Maynard, James Wesley, 


912 


" Mary Augusta, 


537 


Lawrence, 


1052 


" Maud, 


970 


McCaulay, Hannah, 


408 


Maud Mary, 


973 


McClure, Rebecca Jane, 


116 


Millison Louisa, 


975 


McConkey, Grace Miles, 


968 


" Richard Benton, 


971 


Hattie Bennett, 


967 


" Susan Storer, 


215 


Mary Augusta, 


966 


Thomas Harton, 


976 


" Thomas, 


212 


" Thomas Henry, 


214 


" Thomas Jr., 


531 


Thomas Henry, 


535 


McCulloch, Mary Frances, 


778 


Warren, 


550 



259 



Miles, 


William Pitt, 


536 


Moss, Amy, 


139 


" 


Willie Bryan, 


540 


Asahel, 


139 


Miller 


, Cornelius, 


245 


" John, 


139 




Eleanor, 


365 


Moulton, Frances Elizabeth, 


152 


" 


Katharine V. W., 


245 


" Howard, 


152 


Mirick, Hiram T., 


393 


Mullings, Georgiana Elizabeth, 368 


" 


Mattie, 


393 


" John, 


368 


Mitchell, Albert Jacob, 


433 


Munger, Adelaide Ulissa, 


369 


" 


Aimer W., 


403 


" Algernon S., 


392 


" 


Charles Day, 


898 


Daniel Tuttle, 


369 


" 


Clarissa Isabel, 


896 


Harriet, 


393 


" 


Donnie Lou, 


846 


Munson, George Francis, 


505 


" 


Horace W., 


403 


George R., 


181 


" 


Paul Albert, 


897 


" Jennie Tyler, 


957 


" 


Winifred Dougrey, 


895 


William Lewis, 


500 


Montgomery, Isabel ilary. 


434 






' 


John, 


434 


Nash, Martha, 


206 


Moody, Asahel Wright, 


383 


" Martha, 


210 


" 


Ida Bell, 


383 


Neale, Florence C, 


276 


Morga 


n, Jacob, 


17 


" James. 


276 


Morris 


, Caroline, 


686 


Nelson, Abbie Rebecca, 


564 


" 


Catharine Sybil, 


322 


" Ellen. 


278 


" 


Charles, 


137 


James Madison, 


564 


" 


Edward, 


124 


Nettlelon, Anne Thomson, 


528 


" 


Edward, 


137 


" Grace Langdon, 


529 


" 


Edward, 


320 


" Mary Eliza, 


526 


" 


Edward Bontecou, 


699 


Walter Eben, 


527 


" 


Edward Ripley, 


691 


William, 


209 


" 


George Bliss, 


313 


Nevins, Anna, 


278 


" 


George Bliss, Jr. , 


684 


Morgan, 


278 


" 


Harriet Bontecou, 


331 


Newton, Carl, 


943 


" 


Henry, 


127 


Charles G., 


161 


" 


Henry Lincoln, 


698 


' ' Charles Samuel, 


461 


" 


John Bakewell, 


692 


Clay, 


944 


" 


John Emery, 


323 


Eddie Charles, 


939 


" 


John Felt, 


700 


" Florence Reufina, 


946 


" 


Mary Lee, 


693 


George Ella, 


464 


" 


Oliver B., 


313 


" Harry, 


940 




Richard Bontecou, 


319 


" Jane Eliza, 


465 


" 


Richard Darius, 


124 


" John Becker, 


941 


" 


Richard Hunt, 


690 


" Julia Augusta, 


466 


" 


Robert Oliver, 


685 


" Julius Augustus, 


467 


Morrison, Kate, 


299 


Mary Alice, 


462 


Moshei 


, Mary, 


330 


Merta, 


942 



260 



INDEX. 



Newton, Walter Kendal, 


945 


Olds 


Leavitt Ira, 


448 


William Frederick, 


463 


" 


Rosa, 


448 


Willie, 


938 


Ostrander, Harrison, 


406 


Nichols, Anna, 


421 




" Harrison Clinton, 


853 


Carrie, 


872 




Harrison Clinton, 


854 


" James, 


151 


OveB 


, John, 


264 


" James, 


873 


" 


Maria Priscilla, 


264 


Jane, 


420 








John Dougrey, 


422 


Page, Andrew Thomas, 


917 


Samuel, 


874 




Anna, 


444 


Thomas Harris, 


423 




Bertha Alice, 


925 


Nodine, Susan, 


116 




Ellen Maria, 


913 


North, William, 


205 




Ellen Martha, 


166 


Northrup, Alfred Bennett, 


628 




Ethel, 


919 


Cephas Moses, 


627 




Faith, 


1051 


Charles, 


262 




Fountain Thomas, 


444 


Charles Bontecou, 


623 




Frederick North, 


442 


Charlotte Kidder, 


625 




Frederick West, 


911 


" Edward James, 


629 




Joseph Albert, 


916 


Elizabeth, 


261 




Louis, 


926 


Elizabeth, 


624 




Louis French, 


918 


Ellen Maria, 


622 




Martha French, 


914 


" George Huntington 


,616 




Maxwell Frederick, 


1050 


Harriet Louisa, 


618 




Mildred Anne, 


912 


Henry Gregory, 


619 




Percy Rheinhold, 


920 


' ' James, 


260 




Robert Fountain, 


923 


" Jennie, 


620 




Robert Weise, 


1049 


" Jessie Louisa, 


997 




Sylvester John, 


915 


" John, 


259 




Thomas, 


166 


" John, 


289 




Thomas, 


444 


" John Bruice, 


996 




Walter Thomas, 


924 


Mary Elizabeth, 


289 


Painter, Rebecca, 


34 


Mary Elizabeth, 


617 


Palmater, Maria, 


107 


Mary Stella, 


631 


Park 


Hobart John, 


561 


Moses, 


101 


" 


Maud Ives, 


988 


" Moses, 


249 


Parker, Bertha Marguerite, 


1041 


Sarah Eliza, 


626 


" 


Daniel, 


796 


Susan, 


249 


" 


Frederick Donaldson 


, 796 


Susan, 


263 


" 


Martha, 


386 


Nye, Bessie Loring, 


904 


•' 


William Tell, 


796 


" Edgar W., 


434 


Parrish, Joseph, 


741 


" Franklin, 


434 


" 


Susannah, 


741 


" Winifred Louise, 


905 


Pease 


, Ephraim, 

Sybil, 


13 

37 



INDEX. 



261 



Peck, Elisha, 


92 


Pritchard, Frances Elizabeth 


796 


" Evelina, 


233 


" 


Frederick, 


785 


" Henrj^ 


92 


" 


George Anson, 


358 


" Henry Lewis, 


235 


" 


George Anson, 


794 


" Joanna Bontecou, 


234 


" 


George Edwin, 


795 


Peebles, Elwin Livingston, 


825 


" 


George Henry, 


800 


" William, 


379 


" 


Henry Harrison, 


359 


Perdriau, Hosea, 


2 


" 


Ida, 


798 


" Marguerite, 


2 


" 


Jennie May, 


792 


" Stephen, 


2 


" 


Josie, 


799 


Stephen, 


2 


" 


Lewis Henry, 


790 


Phillips, Laura Marion, 


545 


" 


Lyman Wiliston, 


788 


Pickering, Ann, 


275 


" 


Mary Ellen, 


363 


Edith Annie, 


641 


" 


Mary Ellen, 


787 


" Freder'k Bontecou 


639 


" 


Mary Susan, 


793 


Frederick Webster 


, 275 


" 


Nellie, 


801 


George Smith, 


275 


" 


Sarah Eliza, 


791 


William, 


640 


" 


Susan Henrietta, 


361 


Pickett, Martha J., 


732 


" 


William, 


138 


Pier, Elizabeth, 


875 


" 


William Wicks, 


356 


Pool, DoraM., 


859 


" 


Willis Lawson, 


797 


" Samuel, 


859 


Prout, 


John, 


11 


Porter, Isabella, 


344 


" 


Susanna, 


11 


Potter, Elam, 


37 


Pyncheon, Margaret, 


68 


" Sybil, 


37 








Powell, Maria L., 


687 


Radcliff, Katharine, 


511 


Preston, Millie, 


141 


Randal 


, Harriet, 


860 


Prickitt, Annie Gilman, 


683 


" 


Joseph, 


860 


Jennie Warner, 


679 


" 


Rhoda Ann, 


448 


Lizzie Alice, 


681 


Rayner 


, Ann Elizabeth, 


304 


Louise Eugenie, 


683 


" 


Benjamin, 


36 


" William Augustus, 


312 


" 


Benjamin Lester, 


112 


" William Augustus, 




" 


Benjamin Stuart, 


301 


Jr., 


680 


" 


Caroline Ellen, 


305 


Prindle, Isaac, 


176 


" 


Caroline Starr, 


110 


Joseph, 


116 


" 


Carrie Francis, 


303 


" Mary Jane, 


176 


" 


Clinton Leicester, 


668 


Pritchard, Caroline Uretta, 


355 


" 


Cornelia Shelton, 


119a 


Charles Frederick, 


357 


" 


Daniel Bontecou, 


111' 


" Clarence Robinson, 


786 


" 


Daniel Olcott, 


114 


David, 


138 


" 


Ida Louisa, 


667 


" Eliza Frances, 


362 


" 


James Chauncey, 


302 


Elizabeth Adelaide 


360 


" 


Jane Elizabeth Barry 


, 118 


Ella Bell, 


789 


" 


IMary, 


36 



262 



Rayner, Mary Margaret, 


307 


Rice, Theodosia Phebe, 


417 


" Mary Martha. 


117 


" William Forbes, 


517 


" Menzies, 


36 


Riddle, Lafayette, 


899 


" Menzies, Jr., 


116 


Riggs, Mary R., 


176 


" Menzies Bontecou, 


810 


Ripley, John B., 


319 


Miriam Powell, 


109 


Mary, 


319 


Peter Cooper, 


806 


Roberts, Jessie Eugenia, 


758 


" Rebecca Bontecou, 


115 


William E., 


758 


Sarah Emma, 


808 


Robertson, Jessie Sanford, 


959 


Stella Gertrude, 


669 


Lizzie Edna, 


958 


" Susan Rebecca, 


309 


Touro, 


508 


William Charles, 


118 


William Touro, 


960 


William Charles, 


119 


Robinson, Julia, 


356 


Reed, Charles Bliss, 


697 


Rohde, Johann, 


13 


" Edwin W., 


322 


" Rebecca, 


13 


" Frank, 


822 


Rollins, Alonzo William, 


804 


" Kitty, 


696 


" John Franklin, 


360 


" Raymond, 


695 


" Katie, 


803 


Resseguie, Abraham, 


4 


" Marion Rose, 


803 




Alexander, 


4 


Richard, 


360 




Alexander, Jr., 


4 


Ruth, 


805 




Isaac, 


4 


Rose, Charles Henry, 


807 




Jacob, 


4 


" Oscar Cornelius, 


361 




James, 


4 


William Cornelius, 


806 




Peter, 


4 


Rowe, Lucy, 


202 


Sarah, 


4 


Russell, Eliza Ann, 


369 


Retteg, Carrie, 


880 


Ryan, Margaret, 


225 


Rice, Adelaide Adelia, 


868 






" Alma Augusta. 


419 


Saflford, Elias, 


145 


" Alvin Bontecou, 


149 


Laurinda, 


145 


" Carrie, 


864 


Sale, Eli/a, 


66 


" Charles Benham, 


150 


" William, 


66 


" Charles Benham, 


415 


Salter, Cleveland Jarman, 


134 


" Daniel, 


865 


" Daniel, 


134 


" Eben Smith, 


416 


" Julia Rebecca, 


844 


" Ella Elraetta, 


867 


Mary Louisa, 


345 


" Emma Belle, 


866 


Sanford, Albert Latham. 


927 


" George, 


204 


" Arthur Ferdinand, 


928 


" George, 


516 


Asa Menemon, 


185 


" Lillie Cornelia, 


519 


" Asa Menemon, Jr., 


509 


" Mary Hutton, 


518 


Charles Benjamin, 


188 


" Nancy Elizabeth, 


414 


" Charles Edward, 


511 


" Thaddeus, 


44 


David Stebins, 


57 


" 


Thaddeus, 


418 


David Stebins, 


194 



INDEX. 



263 



Sanford, Edward Huntington 


186 


Selleck, Charles Bontecou, 


597 


" George Washington, 


192 


" 


Clara- Frances, 


600 


" Harriet Ann, 


190 


" 


Edna, 


995 


Helen, 


447 


" 


Eugenia, 


603 


Huntington, 


962 


" 


Florence Thompson, 


601 


" James Tliompson, 


191 


" 


Frederick Dabney, 


596 


" Jolin, 


158 


" 


James Keeler, 


251 


" John Edward, 


510 


" 


James Keeler, 


994 


John Ferdinand, 


445 


" 


James Keeler, Jr., 


598 


Josephine Leonora, 


193 


" 


Jonathan Howard, 


604 


Julia Isabella, 


446 


" 


Josephine Keeler, 


602 


Kittie, 


512 


" 


Reed Bontecou, 


595 


Maria Elizabeth, 


508 


" 


Wilson Waddingham 


, 599 


" Maria Huntington, 


189 


Sellers, Sarah, 


911 


Mary, 


961 


Shear 


DeWilt Clinton, 


415 


" Menemon, 


57 


" 


Lois Mariette, 


415 


Richard Laimbeer, 


963 


Sheering, Majy, 


38 


" Susan Bontecou, 


184 


Sheldon, Mary Louise, 


951 


Susan Harriet, 


507 


" 


William Gay, 


487 


Thomas Bontecou, 


183 


Shooma, Catharine Ann, 


535 


William Higby Bon 




Smith 


Alva Clara, 


884 


tecou. 


187 


" 


Anna Inez, 


886 


Saunders, Henrietta, 


288 


" 


Anna Mary, 


432 


Scott, Anna, 


409 


" 


Anson, 


50 


" Anna, 


409 


" 


Charles Bontecou, 


885 


Emily, 


97 


" 


Charles Dikeman, 


153 


" Giles, 


409 


" 


Clara Frances, 


434 


" Joseph, 


877 


" 


Clara Hclet, 


903 


Samuel, 


97 


" 


Clarissa Ann, 


177 


Scranton, John H., 


202 


" 


Clarissa Ann, 


178 


" Maria Kingsbury, 


202 


" 


Cornelia, 


149 


Seaman, Ada Abbie, 


985 


" 


David James, 


887 


Charles, 


979 


" 


David Reeves, 


430 


Edgar, 


980 


" 


David Reeves, Jr., 


888 


Frederick, 


982 


" 


Day Kellogg, 


433 


Gussie, 


981 


" 


Day Kellogg, Jr., 


899 


Isaac, 


984 


" 


Day Wallace, 


892 


John, 


552 


" 


Edward Grove, 


229 


Mabel, 


983 


" 


Emma Martha, 


500 


Searles, Harriet, 


202 


" 


Francis, 


176 


Julius P., 


202 


" 


Frederick Donlevy, 


901 


Sears, Geoi'ge Edward, 


468 


" 


George, 


179 


James William, 


469 


" 


George Miles, 


227 


Stephen, 


162 




Grove, 


89 



264 




INDEX. 






Smith 


, Hannah Eliza, 


181 


Storer 


Hannah Augusta, 


88 


" 


Henry Day, 


889 


" 


Harriet Elizabeth, 


90 


" 


Henry Day, 


890 


" 


John, 


21 


" 


Henry Wilson, 


228 


" 


John, 


22 


" 


Herman Everett, 


756 


" 


John, 


27 


" 


James Dougrey, 


175 


" 


John Peter, 


219 


" 


James Dougrey, 


431 


" 


Lydia, 


89 


" 


James Lawson, 


415 


" 


Nathaniel, 


27 


" 


Jane Maria, 


301 


" 


Nathaniel, 


83 


" 


Lillia Frances, 


501 


" 


Nathaniel, 


87 


" 


Mary Augusta, 


230 


" 


Nathaniel, 


218 


" 


Mary Jesup, 


180 


" 


Peter, 


86 


" 


Minnie Christine, 


1018 


" 


Polly. 


85 


" 


Richard Hanford, 


174 


" 


Ruth, 


22 


" 


Robert Ormsby, 


903 


" 


Samuel, 


81 


" 


Samuel M. , 


149 


•' 


Samuel, 


84 


" 


Stella Maria, 


891 


" 


Susan, 


221 


" 


Vida Kellogg, 


893 


" 


Susannah, 


82 


" 


Winifred Louise, 


900 


" 


Timothy, 


220 


Southmayd, Sarah, 


13 


Stowe, 


Elisha Hopkins, 


168 


Sparks, Millison, 


538 


" 


Grace Ann, 


168 


Stannard, Charles Edwin, 


178 


Strenil 


len, Elsie, 


146 


'• 


Ella Mary, 


502 


Slricleu, Eliza, 


405 


" 


Julia Henrietta, 


503 


Strong 


Charles William, 


180 


Starr, 


Caroline, 


531 


" 


Martha Henrietta, 


504 


" 


Joseph, 


13 


Sullivan, Ellen Jane, 


332 


" 


Rebecca Jane, 


116 


" 


James, 


832 


Stebbi 


ns, Herve^, 


356 


" 


Margaret, 


332 


" 


Mary Clarinda, 


356 


Swift, 


Nathan, 


143 


Sterns 


, Beulah. 


223 








Stevens, Ann Elizabeth, 


116 


Tallman, Phebe, 


24 


,( 


James, 
Julia Mary, 


116 

748 


,. 




24 


" 


Tanner, Mary B. (also page 


" 


Robert, 


748 




243), 


354 


Stilwell, Donald Louzon, 


931 


Tator, 


Annie Maria, 


491 


" 


Hugh Alvin, 


930 


" 


Henry, 


491 


" 


Lorson, 


450 


Taylor 


, Abuer, 


183 


" 


Lucien White, 


450 


" 


Abner, 


188 




Mary Irene, 


929 


" 


Anna Sophia, 


188 


" 


Mary K., 


450 


" 


Elizabeth Prentice, 


183 


Stimson, Uesdeniona, 


402 


" 


Frances Pomeroy, 


188 


" 


Walter, 


402 


" 


Martha Clark, 


510 


Stoakes, Virginia C, 


275 


" 


Thomas Augustus, 


510 


Storer 


Hannah, 


21 


Tenant 


, Hannah Atwell, 


350 



Terrell, 


Edward, 


144 


Townsend, William, 


94 


" 


Mary Elizabeth, 


384 


Trowbridge, Adelaide. 


586 


Thayer 


Abraham, 


las 


" Arthur Hunt, 


587 


" 


Caroline Coddington, 


128 


Caroline Louisa, 


247 


Thomas 


, Isham, 


461 


Charles, 


97 


<< 


Jeanne, 


5 


" Charles, Jr., 


246 


" 


Jehiel, 


12 


Cornelius Miller, 


588 


" 


Julia Ann, 


182 


Emily, 


244 


" 


Kentucky Ann, 


461 


Frank West, 


589 


" 


Mary, 


12 


Harriet Augusta, 


248 


" 


Mary Sophia, 


354 


Henry, 


98 


" 


Ozro, 


854 


Hobart, 


245 


" 


Susannah, 


12 


" Imogene, 


242 


" 


William B., 


53 


" James, 


93 


Thompson, Amelia, 


372 


James, 


95 


'« 


Charles, 


391 


" Justus, 


34 


" 


MargaretElizabeth, 391 


" Marcus Henry, 


240 


" 


Sophia, 


99 


" Rebecca, 


94 


•' 


Stanley, 


99 


Sarah Malinda, 


243 


Thomson, Annie Lewis, 


524 


Sarah Rebecca, 


241 


'• 


Arthur Cecil, 


530 


" Susan, 


96 


" 


Charles, 


208 


William, 


34 


" 


Charles Ernest, 


525 


Trumbull, Elizabeth, 


116 


" 


Charles Henry, 


210 


Turnbull, William Henry, 


760 




Eben Norton, 


80 


Turner, Elizabeth, 


152 


" 


Eliza Lyman, 


209 


" Mary B. (also page 




" 


Juliet Mayer, 


205 


243), 


354 


" 


JSIary Nicholson, 


207 


Tuttle, Philinda, 


366 


<< 


Sarah Cornelia, 


204 


Tyler, Charles Lewis, 


1040 


" 


William, 


523 


" Congrave Jackson, 


789 


" 


William Sparks, 


206 






Thurlow, Edith Acelia, 


1001 


Uffendale, Edward Terrell, 


830 


" 


George Huntington 


,1000 


" Frank Isaiah, 


831a 


" 


Lewis Kelmond, 


618 


Harry William, 


831 


" 


Mark Belcher, 


999 


Isaiah Alexander, 


384 


Torry, 


Hannah, 


754 


Upson, Daniel, 


17 


«• 


John, 


433 


" Elizabeth, 


17 


" 


Mary Elizabeth, 


433 


Utley, Alma Augusta, 


403 


Townsend, Charles Edwin, 


585 


" Daniel Palmer, 


397 


" 


Charles Timothy, 


237 


Emily Eliza, 


399 


" 


Emily Rebecca, 


239 


" Frank, 


845 


" 


Henry Alonzo, 


236 


" George Benedict, 


404 


" 


James Edwin, 


238 


" George Haynor, 


147 


'' 


Timothy, 
34 


y4 


" George Joseph, 


848 



266 



INDEX. 



Utley, Ida May, 


844 


WatsoD, Blanche, 


567 


Jedediah George, 


841 


" John Davis, 


567 


" Julia Ann, 


398 


Weir, Sarah Angeline, 


463 


Laurinda, 


396 


Weise, Henry, 


911 


" Lottie Cordelia, 


847 


" Sarah Virginia, 


911 


" Morris Eugene, 


402 


Welles, Charles Roger, 


345 


" Oscar Enoch, 


400 


Charles Salter, 


741 


•• Timothy Franklin, 


401 


Helen Susan, 


743 






" John Martin, 


744 


Vanansdol, Catharine F., 


538 


" Julia Norton, 


739 


Van Baskerk, Abraham Tayloi 


•,557 


Martin, 


345 


Elizabeth Taylor, 557 


" Mary Frances, 


742 


Van Fosson, Sarah Adaline, 


391 


" Susie Homes, 


1014 


Van Valkenburgh, Ella Mon- 




Thomas Mather, 


740 


tresor, 


842 


West, Anne, 


166 


George Wash- 


" Eliza, 


246 


ington, 


399 


Westcott, Jesse, 


357 


Maria Free 




" Mary Susan, 


357 


love, 


401 


Wheeler, Henry Norman, 


1048 


" Maria Mon 




" John James, 


868 


tresor. 


843 


Whelan, Ann, 


66 


William A. 


,399 


Whipple, Lydia Ann, 


106 


William A. 


,401 


William W., 


106 


Van Vleck, Martha, 


616 


Whitbeck, Garret, 


107 


Van Wagenen, Mary, 


245 


White, Achsah Eliza, 


279 


Van Zandt, Barent V., 


422 


Julia Augusta Todd, 


343 


Elizabeth, 


422 


" Martha, 


442 


Viele, Sarah Jane, 


178 


" Sampson, 


133 


Vincent, Charles, 


303 


Whitman, Grace, 


479 






Whittaker, James Albert, 


440 


Wadhams, Myra A., 


732 


Julia, 


910 


Orlando, 


732 


Whittemore, Grace Bontecou 


, 584 


Walker, Isaac, 


859 


" James M., 


234 


Walters, Amanda M., 


402 


James Madison, 


234 


Warner, Charles Henry, 


677 


Wilkins, Caroline, 


567 


V Elizabeth Gilman, 


312 


Williams, Alma Augusta, 


150 


" George Gilman, 


118 


EbenezerB., 


704 


•' George Menzies, 


678 


Frank E., 


704 


William Rayner, 


311 


" Henry Raymond, 


1006a 


Warren, Franklin, 


808 


Wilson, Arthur, 


386 


Janette Elizabeth, 


808 


Charles Gustavus, 


501 


Warring, Eugene Oscar, 


329 


Flora May, 


955 


George Bontecou, 


705 


Ida May, 


721 


Waterman, Theodosia, 


149 


James, 


341 



INDEX. 



267 



Wilson, Julia Arm, 


341 


Wood, Oliver Ellsworth, 


123 


Margaret Anna, 


723 


" Oliver Ellsworth, 


315 


Witbeck, John, 


100 


" Winthrop Wolcott, 


689 


" Leonard, 


100 


Woodruff, Hannah Eliza, 


86 


Wolf, Eve, 


101 


Nathaniel, 


86 


Wolford, August A., 


753 


Wool, Elizabeth, 


173 


Christiana, 


753 


Worden, Rosanna, 


399 


" Julia Louisa, 


753 


" Rosanna, 


401 


Wood, Catharine Bontecou, 


318 


Worthington, James, 


125 


" Frances Ellsworth, 


317 


Wright, Armenius, 


463 


" Joseph, 


123 


" Mary, 


203 


" Joseph, 


315 







INDEX 

Of all Other ISTames Mentioned in tliis ^Work. 



(REFERRED TO BY PAGES.) 



Abbott, Rev. John S. C, 


155 


Blanchard, Cornelius, 36 


Adams, Charles Clinton, 


88 


Bobin, Jacques, 35 


" Jenny Morris, 


88 


Bongrand, Louis, 15 


" Mary, 


88 


Bonnet, Daniel, 25, 26, 27, 29, 34 


Ager, Benjamin, 


84 


Marie, 34 


Ailing, Enos, 


39,40 


Bonnin, Aman, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20 


Ancherim, Ester, 


16 


Bontecou, Catharine, 3 


" Zacharie, 


16 


Charles, 3 


Archambaud, Thimotee, 


14 


Daniel, 3 


Asbury, Bishop Francis, 


53 


Eliakim, 3 


Astor, John Jacob, 


51 


" John Francis, 3 


Aiidar, Daniel, 


14, 20 


Paul, 4 


Jeanne, 


14 


Bontekoe, Cornelius Van, 6 


" Jeanne Marie, 


14 


Guilliame Isbrand, 8 
Borrell, Matthias, 22 


Baird, Rev. Charles W., D.D., 5 


Boudinot, Elias, 15, 16 


Baldwin, Willard & Wood, 


86 


Susanna, 33 


Ballereau, Anne, 


33 


Marie Catherine, 33 


Jacques, 


22, 33 


Bourdet, Jeanne Ester, 14 


" Jeanne, 


22, 33 


Samuel, 14 


Barber, David, 


85 


Brace, Arvilla, 88 


Barberie, Jean, 15 


, 34, 35 


Brinsmade, Dr., 120 


Basset, Elizabeth, 


34 


Brock, Mrs., 29 


Francis, 


30,36 


Brown, Robert, 40 


Frederic, 


30 


Brownell, Rt. Rev. T. C, D.D., 151 


" Mary, 


36 


Burger, Gilbert, 36 


Bayeiix, Thomas, 


15, 16 


Burnet, William, 34 


Beekman, Coll, 


34 


Burrows, E. A., 134 


Berthom, Michel, 


22 


Buvelot, Jacques, 21, 29, 30, 34 


Bishop, Samuel, Jr., 


42 


Mr., 13, 26 


Blanchard, , 


27 


Carcas, Abraham, 22 



INDEX. 



269 



Carew, Joseph, 


85 


Fajet, Jean, 


15, 16 


Carle, Rev. Jean, 22, 28, 26, 30, 34 


Faneuil, Benjamin, 


17 


Carre, Pregente, 


16 


Fellows & Co., 


134 


" Catherine, 


33 


Fernald, Professor 0. M. 


84 


Cazalz, Jean, 


15, 16 


Fillow, Vincent, 


15, 16 


Chabanel, Jacob Henry, 


23, 24 


Forestier, Pierre, 


32 


Charron, Marie Ester, 


14 


" Susanne, 


33 


Cheever, Rev. Dr., 


86 


Forrest, General N. B. , 


125 


Clarke, George, 


18 


Foucaut, Andre, 


15, 16 


" Mr., 


35 


Frederic, William, 


7 


Clement, Jacques, 


9 






Colden, Cadwallader, 


34 


Gaillard, Daniel, 


15 


Doctor, 


34, 35 


Gallaudet, Pierre Elizee, 


22 


Collier, Sir George, 


40 


Garnier, Isaac, 


15, 16 


Cook, Samuel, 


39 


Garreau, J., 


15, 16 


Cooper, Peter, 


82 


Garth, Brig. -Gen., 


40 


Cornelisen, Garrit, 


22 


George III., of England 


34 


Coutau, Susanne, 


33 


Giraud, Abraham, 


15, 16 


Cox. Edward B., 


88 


Gouneau, Abraham, 


14, 19 


" Fannie Haywood, 


88 


Gourdon, Elizabeth, 


14 


Crolges, William, 


22 


Grasset, Augustus, 


15, 16 


Cuymert, William P., 


42 










Harison, Mr., 


34,35 


Daller, Rev. Pierre, 24, 25, 


26, 27, 


Hartshorne, Will., 


36 


29 


30,31 


Hastier, Elizabeth, 14, 


15, 16, 19 


Dana, Rev. James, 


49 


Jean, 15, 16, 19, 


29, 30, 34 


Daniels, Minnie, 


88 


Hatier, Elizabeth, 


34 


David, Jean, 


15 


Hatton, Frank, 2d A. P. 


M. G.,170 


" Josue, 


15, 16 


Henry III. of France, 


9 


Decker, Job an Gerard, 


6 


Henry IV. of France, 


9, 10 


De Lage, Peter. 


22 


Hood, General John B., 


125 


De Lancey, Estienne, 


15, 16 


Howard, Charles, 


84, 85 


Desbrosses, Elie, 


28 


Hubbard, Rev. Bela, 


45 


Etienne, 


27 


Hunt, Jonathan, 


57 


Jacques, 


21,28 






Deseer, Paulus, 


22 


Irving, Washington, 


10 


D'Hariette, Benjamin, 


15, 16 


Isaacs, Ralph, 


40 


Dillon. Sidney, 


140 


Israel, William, 


66 


Doolittle. Isaac, 


39 






Draugaud, John, 


22 


Jaboien, Nicholas, 


22 


Droilhet, Paul, 


15, 16 


Jacques. & Marcus, 


134 


Dumas, Alexander, 


9 


Jamain, Nicholas. 


15, 16 


Dunbar, Relief, 


84 


Jansen, Capt., 


34,35 


Du Simitifere, Pierre Eugene 


12,31 


Jaudin, Charles, 


21 



270 



INDEX. 



Jaudin, D., 


15, 16 


Morin, 


Pierre, 


Jaufrey, Marthe, 


14, 20, 33 


Morris 


Charles, 


Jay, Auguste, 


15,16 


" 


Coll., 


Jefferson, Thomas, 


81 


" 


Minnie, 


Jourdain, H., 


14, 19 


" 


Mr., Jr., 


Jouneau, P., 


14, 19 


" 


Sarah Maria, 






Moulinars, Jean Joseph, 



Kennedy, John, 61 

Kibbe, Chaffee, Shreve & Co., 135 
Kilby, Christopher, 39 

King, Hon. Rufus, 148 



Laborie, Jacques, 
Ladlay, Rev. Mr., 
Lafont, Jean, 
Lashier, Johannes, 
Lathrop, Rev. Dr. Joseph, 
" Mary, 
Paoli, 
Wells, 
Laurau, Andre, 
Le Chevalier, Jean, 
Le Conte, Ester, 
Leddel, Meri, 
Leisler, Jacob, 
Louis XIII. of France, 
Louis XIV. of France, { 

Loumain, , 

Lucy, Guillaume, 



15, 20 

26 

15, 16 

22 

84 

84 

85 

84 

15, 16 

15, 16 

16 

33 

13 

10 

10,12 

15,16 

34 

22 



Machet, Jean, 

Jeanne, 22, 33 

" Marianne, 22 

Pierre, 22 

Mansfield, Stephen, 39 

Many, Anne, 33 

Maurice, Capt. James, 110, 111 

Mayon, Jean, 15, 16 

Marie, 20, 32 
McKibbin, Brig. -Gen. David B. , 138 

Menard, Daniel, 15, 16 

Menauteau, Rev. Mr., 23 

Montels, P., 15, 16 

Moore, Sir Henry, 30 



15. 16 



34 



84, 35 



16 



Naudin, Anna, 16 

Neau, Elias, 15, 16 

Newinhuysen, Morris, 17, 18 

Nicholson, Lieut. -Gov. Francis, 13 

Noble, , 27 



Odard, Daniel, 

" Mary Anne, 
OUiyer, Joseph, 
Orcutt, Rev. Samuel, 
Osgood, Rev. Dr. Samuel, 



Paillet, Andre, 

Peiret, Pierre, 13, 14, 15, 19, 



72 



14 



16, 

15, 

13, 14, 

15, 



Pelletreau, Elie, 

" Elizabeth, 

" Jeanne, 

" Thomas, 

Perdrieau, Elizabeth, 

" Marie, 
Perlier, Jean, 
Peters, Gov., 
Phillipse, Mr., 
Piaud, Judiq, 
Pintard, Jean, 
" Louis, 
" Samuel, 
Poutreau, Daniel, 
Powell, William, 
Provoost, Rt.Rev. Bishop Sam'l 
Provoost, Col. David, 



15, 16, 33 
33 
33 
33 
19 
19 
16 
94 
34 
14 
33 
27 
33 
13 
46 
53 
35 

15 



Rezeau, Rene, 
Ribzema, Rev. Joan, 26 

Richer, Denis, 15, 16 

Rivera, Abraham Rodrigos, 22 



271 



Rivet, Mr., 


34 


Thomas, Capt. John A., 




90 


Rogers, Lydia, 


88 


Thompson, John, 




17 


William B., 


147 


Townsend, Jeremiah, Jr., 




40 


Rohde, Andrew Southmayd 


46 


Treat, Rev. Mr., 




27 


Catliarine, 


46 


Trowbridge, Thos. R., Jr., 




3 


V Frederick, 


46 


Tryon, Gov., 




40 


" John, 


46 


Tyler, Miriam, 




46 


" Joseph, 


46 


" Thomas, 




46 


" Thomas. 


46 








" William F., 


46 


Vallade. , 21, 24, 25, 


26, 


27, 


Ronde, Rev. Mr., 


27 




28 


,29 


Roorbagh, Johannes, 


22 


Van Brugh, John, 




17 


Rou, Rev. Louis, 16, 33, 


36,43 


Van Dam, Mr., 


34 


, 35 


Rutherford, John & Co., 


61 


Van Home, Cornelius, 
Van Taerlingh, Nicholas, 




43 
22 


Sacombell, Louis, 


22 


Vassar, Matthew, 




61 


Sherman, General William T., 125 


Verjereau, Pierre, 




26 


Simiti^re, Pierre Eugene du, 


12,31 


Vincent, F., 


15 


16 


Sing, Mrs., 


90 


Vincent, Madeleine, 




33 


Sloughter, Gov. Henry, 


13 








Smith, Rt. Rev. B. B., D.D 


, 151 


Walker, William, 141, 


145 


" Isaac, 


88 


Walter, Capt., 


34 


,35 


" General Kirby, 


181 


Warriner, Col. Solomon, 




57 


" Sarah Maria, 


88 


Washburne, Dr. Lewis, 




84 


Smith & Scott, 


25,26 


" Lydia, 




84 


Starr & Hoffman, 


86 


Washington, George, 




86 


Stone, Wood & Starr, 


86 


Whittlesey, Rev. Chauncey 




44 


Street, Rev. Nicholas, 


43 


William of Orange, 




155 


Stuckey, Andrew, 


15,16 


Wittmeyer, Rev, A. V., 


5 


, 22 


Tgtard, Rev. Jean Pierre, 


24, 26, 


Zenger, John, 




22 


27, 28, 


30,34 








Thomas, General George H. 


, 125 










tiJz^ ^^ 



I