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Full text of "A book called Our ancestors the Stantons"

\ 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC UBRABY 




pf:YNC 






DSi-'. 3 1833 01429 6419 



Gc 

929.2 
St27s 
1135800 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/bookcalledourancOOstan 



A Book called 



OUR ANCESTORS 

THE 

STANTONS 

Bv WILLIAM HENRY STANTON 



These are Deeds 

Which Should not Pass Away 

And Names 

That Must not Wither 




PHILADELPHIA 

Privatelv Printed for William Henry Stanton 

' MCMXXIt 



Copyright, 1922 
William Henry Stanton 



Press of 
Innes & Sons 
Philadelphia 



1135S00 



TO 

OUR PARENTS 

THOSE BRAVE HEARTS WHO 

GUWET> OUR TINY FEET - ^ 

CORRECTE'D OUR WAYWART> 

STE9S ANT> LOVET> US TILL 

THE LAST - - THIS LITTLE 

VOLUME IS AFFECTIONATELY 

<DET>ICATED 



Now FULL AND HIGH AND BRIGHTLY BURNING LIKE LIFE 

IN YODTH, BUT AS WE PASS ALONG LIFE'S HIGHWAY OR 

FONDER o'er THE PAGES OF THIS BOOK, IT SHORTER 

GROWS UNTIL THE END. 



INTRODUCTION 



MY FIRST thought concerning this work was 
to record, perhaps in pamphlet form, some 
of the stories toki by my parents and rela- 
tives of the early history of our ancestors, 
which, if not done, would largely be lost with 
the passing of the present generation. Accordingly I 
began collecting material, but soon found that there 
was much more available than I at first thought, and 
it seemed best to enlarge the scope of the work. 

It was not intended to be of interest to the public, 
but rather that the personal history and intimate re- 
lationships told will be more valuable and more appre- 
ciated by the relatives, than a general history suitable 
for the public would have been. 

In the prosecution of the work 1 ha\ c been impressed 
with the innate qualities, strong character, and loving 
service of our ancestors, and I feel sure I voice the 
sentiment of us all when I sa\' that we, who are li\ing, 
have failed to fully appreciate the true worth of our 
parents and relatives, who ha\e tt^iled, achic\ed, and 
passed away. These people left their homes in the old 

ct)untry 
7 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



country and settled in a new and little-known land. 
That they were hardy and self-reliant is not ques- 
tioned. The land they cleared, the homes they built, 
the businesses they conducted, and the impressions 
they made upon the sections where they lived, com- 
pel our admiration and respect. 

Our present generation, instead of boasting of our 
ancestors, feel a deep sense of obligation to make of 
ourselves worthy followers of such a noble ancestry 
that worked under great difficulties and accomplished 
admirable results. If this little record, even to a slight 
degree, expresses our appreciation, I shall feel amply 
repaid. The work of collecting the items for the book 
has been one of pure pleasure. Every one has been so 
ready to help in any way possible, although each one 
has said that he knew nothing of value. However, 
the results prove otherwise. 

It has been earnestly desired that the work should 
be authentic and it is hoped that no mistakes have 
crept in. On account of the nature of the early his- 
tory, some of it so dim and little known, only frag- 
ments can be offered, but it was thought better to 
take the little rather than none at all. To give a fuller 
view, some contemporary pioneer experiences have 
been taken. It is believed that a record in detail of 
the home life of some early settlers would be valuable 
as giving an idea of the actual living conditions of the 
members of our family who were pioneers. 

With thankfulness for such a noble ancestry and 
trusting that those living now will value it more as 
they know it better, this book is presented. 
Ridley Park, 
Pennsylvania, 



1922. 





IN APPRECIATION 



EDNA MACY STANTON, of Lansdowne, 
Pennsylvania, who collected and prepared 
the genealogy of the Stanton family, aided 
in the editing of much of the text and con- 
tributed several articles, contracted, after 
a serious operation, the dread influenza and was 
called, on the Twenty-fourth of Second month, 1920, 
to leave the work she had so well carried along. Her 
loss was most keenly felt. Some appreciation of her 
character is expressed in a separate article by one of 
her friends. 

It seemed most fitting that her twin sister, Ellen 
Stanton Pennell, should take up the unfinished work. 
Her services in the completion of the task begun bv 
her sister have aided greatly in carrying, throughout 
the book, the original thought and spirit. 

Their brother, William Macy Stanton, of Lansdowne, 
Pennsylvania, has arranged the engraving, the com- 
position of the book, greatly assisted with the work 
during its progress, and attended to the printing and 
binding. 

Many 



10 



Our Ancestors — The Staxtoxs 



Many other members ot the family have offered 
vahiable suggestions. Several of the recent pictures 
were taken by Alfred L. Bailey, of Tacoma, Ohio. 
The land-title data and maps have been prepared by 
WilHs y. Webster, of Columbus, Ohio. 

It is my desire to express my hearty appreciation ot 
the kindness of all who have assisted in any way and 
especially to the above-mentioned persons who have 
eiven so much of their time. 



RU/ey Park, 
Pennsylvania, 
1922. ' 






STILLWATER VALLEY 

View north from the home of Joseph Stanton showing residence of 

liENJAMIN ClENDENON. 



THE STANTON FAMILY 

THE primary object of this article is to review 
briefly the history of the Stanton family, to 
stress points of particular interest and to 
trace the line back to the earliest known 
ancestors. No claim is made that the state- 
ments herein presented are infallible, but they are 
as correct as the data now available permits. It is 
hoped that an exhaustive study ot Stanton genealogy 
will sometime be made, both in this country and in 
Europe, as such would be of value, not alone to this 
family, but to the searcher for detailed history of the 
first two centuries of life in America. 

Beginning with our branch in southeastern Ohio in 
1922, we find that they came from southwestern Penn- 
sylvania in 1800. They stopped there for only a few 
months while on their way from Beaufort, Carteret 
County, North Carolina, to Ohio. After a residence in 
North Carolina of about seventy-five years, they left 
that section of the country on account of slavery, 
rhey came to Beaufort from Newport, Rhode Island, 
ifter residing in that section of country for about 

eighty 
11 



|T Our Ancestors— The Stantons 

eighty years. We find our earliest ancestor, Robert 
Stanton, was living in Newport in 1645. He was born 
in England in 1599 and was one of the settlers of 
Portsmouth, Rhode Island, in 1638. This much we 
may claim as fairly well established, but anything 
earlier than this is traditional and mostly conjectural. 



The Stanton (Staunton) Arms. 




Amu : Argent, two cbeverons sable within a bordure engrailed the same. 
Crest : Fox statant proper. 

Mottoes : Below the arms, " En Dieu ma foy." i 

Above the crest, "Moderata durant,"' 

THE STANTON ARMS ! 

The Stanton Coat of Arms was derived from Albini or Albencitjs who 

receh'ed the castle from todeni. 
The arms of Albini of Belvoir was a shield with a gold background upon 

WHICH were two chevrons AND A RED BORDER. He GAVE TO THE LORD OF StANTON ' 

A SHIELD WITH A SILVER BACKGROUND UPON WHICH WERE TWO BLACK CHEVRONS 
WITHIN A CURVED OR INDENTED BLACK BORDER. LaTER A HELMET CREST WAS 

adopted and was a fox standing and of the natural color. 
There are two mottoes. The one below the arms is "En Dieu ma foy" (In 
God my rArrn); the other, above the crest, is "Moderata durant" (Moderate 

acquisitions are lasting). 
The arms thus described is to be found in Burke's Heraldic Illustrations 

AND is now borne BY THE STAUNTONS OF LoNGBRIDGE, WHO ARE A BRANCH OF 
THE StAUNTONS OF StAUNTON IN NOTTINGHAM. ThIS IS UNDOUBTEDLY THE BASIS 

OF ALL Stanton Arms and represents the original family. 

Regarding the name Stanton, it is traced to Anglo- 
Saxon origin and is formed of two words — stan (stone) 
and ton (town) or Stonetown. Now since the sur- 
name, sire-name or father name, originally came from 
the place of residence, occupation, characteristic of the 

individua] 



The Stanton Family 13 

individual or some notable event in his life, we may 
conclude that some remote ancestor took the name of 
his town Stanton (Stonetown) for his surname. 

In early times when writing was much less common 
and orthography not so well established, and when there 
was much less communication between neighborhoods 
and far more difference in pronunciation, we find 
writers spelling more by the sound of the name, and 
hence we have our name spelled Stanton, Staunton, 
Stainton, and Steynton. But we must remember that 
almost certainly all of the Stantons, however their 
names are spelled, came from one common an- 
cestor. 

It may be of interest, also, to note that the historic 
origin of the Stantons was in the eleventh century, in 
the southeast corner of Nottinghamshire, England, and 
in the northern end of Leicestershire. Here there lived 
a Sir Malgerus, or Mauger, Lord of Stanton. Little is 
known of him except that he appears to have been a 
Saxon. 

Five miles southeast of this lordship we find Belvoir 
Castle, of much interest to the Stantons. It is believed 
to have been built by Robert de Todeni in the eleventh 
century. The "Lordship of Staunton" is five miles 
from Belvoir and seven from Newark. It is said to 
have been in the, family of the name of Stanton or 
Staunton for more than thirteen hundred years, or 
about the date of the Saxon conquest, and we may inter 
that the family came with the Saxons. 

The tower defended by Sir Malgerus against William 
the Conqueror at the time of his conquest in 1066 has 
ever since been known as "Staunton Tower." 

Referring very briefly to the principal races that 

have 








Tk o Makers of ihe I^ook: 




The Stanton Family- [£ 

have occupied England in historic times, we find that 
at the beginning of history the Britons were largely in 
possession of the island. Their possession continued 
up to the close of the first century when the Romans 
began their conquest. They occupied parts ot the 
country until about the middle of the fourth century, 
and were followed by the great Germanic invasion ot 
which the Jutes from Slesvig were probably the first. 
Later came the Saxons from the countries lying near 
the southwest shore of the Baltic Sea, and in turn were 
followed by the Angles from Slesvig, a corner of which 
is still known as Anglen. 

Some of the original inhabitants were driven to the 
hill country and remote parts, such as Cumberland, 
Cornwall and the mountains of Wales, while many in- 
termarried with the invaders and lost their nationality 
and distinctive character. The Angles gave their name 
to the countr)' — Angles' Land, or England — and under 
Egbert (827) united many of the smaller countries into 
the Kingdom of England. 

Li the eighth century the Northmen or Norsemen, 
a race of vigorous self-reliant men, left the shores ot 
Norway and Denmark, probably because ot overcrowd- 
ing and scarcity of food, and repeatedly robbed the 
southeast coast of England and the western coast of 
the continent ot Europe, even going as tar as the 
eastern end of the Mediterranean, but finally settling 
In large numbers in northern France, where for some two 
centuries they mixed with the Gauls, the ancestors ot 
the modern French. Here they gave to the Gauls a 
vigor, hardihood and self-reliance which these people 
did not possess, and in turn received trom them a cul- 
ture and refinement which they did nor have up to this 

time. 

Such 



1^) OiR Ancestors — The Stanton 

Such was the ancestry of the Normans who, in 1066 
under William the Conqueror, invaded and subduec 
England, bringing to the inhabitants many very de 
sirable qualities, among which may be mentioned th' 
executive and administrative ability which the EnglisI 
had not previously had in any marked degree. 

Again, we find an amalgamation of the various races- 
Britons, Jutes, Saxons, Angles, Gauls and Norsemen- 
giving to the English many very desirable qualitie, 
not before possessed by any one of the races alone. 

Such, then, was the blood of our ancestors who, in th( 
seventeenth century, came to America for freedom, re 
ligious and otherwise, no doubt unconsciously urged or 
by a trace of the old Norse spirit of adventure and tht 
quest for better homes for themselves and their children 

With regard to Robert Stanton of Newport — ouj 
earliest known ancestor — about all we know of him is 
that he was born in England in 1599, married Avij 

, had a son Robert, born in England, 1627, 

His two daughters — Sarah, born 1640, and Mary, born 
1642, were most likely born in Portsmouth, Rhode 
Island, for we find he was one who settled Portsmouth 
in 1638; and later he lived in Newport and had a son 
John, born there Eighth month, 1645. 

From the birth of his son Robert in England to the 
settlement of Portsmouth is eleven years, during which 
time he came to America, but the port from which he 
sailed and the date are unknown, and place of landing 
and his first place of residence are also unknown. 

Many points in the lives of Robert Stanton of New- 
port, and Thomas Stanton of Connecticut, seem to in- 
dicate that they were connected, and, if not brothers, of 
quite difl^erent age and temperament, probably uncle 

and 



The Stanton Family 



and nephew. Then there is Paul Stanton of Maine, 
and Robert's brother John, who came with him, who 
should be studied, as also the much larger number in 
the next few generations. 

We may note that Robert was born in 1599, Thomas 
born 1616 and came to America in 1635. From the age 
and character of Robert, he seems to have been a quiet 
and steady-going sort of person. He probably inclined 
toward Quaker belief even if not a member,and probably 
landed in Massachusetts, as it was the older and better 
known colony. Later, finding the religious intolerance 
out of harmony with his views, he would naturally move 
to more liberal Rhode Island; and as Quakers and 
Quaker sympathizers were ostracized, he would live a 
quiet and little-known life; this may account for our 
finding no record of visits between Robert and Thomas. 

Thomas, being seventeen years younger and prob- 
ably unmarried, came to America in any vessel that 
was convenient, and landed in Virginia. His relig- 
ious views seem to have been different from those 
of Robert, even if not antagonistic. We see Thomas 
taking part in public affairs in \^irginia, associ- 
ating with the Indians and learning their language, 
which we would expect a young man to do, especi- 
ally if he was inclined to deal with men, as he did 
very largely in the public life which he led afterward. 
But he left Virginia in a short time and went to Con- 
necticut. If connected with Robert, he probably found 
the Puritan or Quaker type of mind more to his liking 
than that of the Cavaliers of Virginia, and so worked 
his way back to people of his own kind, not going to 
Massachusetts, where there was so much religious in- 
tolerance, but to a section where more liberal views 
could be comfortably held. 

So 



IS Ou r An'cestors — The Staxtoxs 

So far as we know, he was not a Quaker and tew it 
any of his descendants seem to have been members ot 
that rehgious society, while a very large part ot the 
descendants of Robert have been Quakers. 

William Alonzo Stanton, a descendant of Thomas 
Stanton of Stonington, Connecticut, did much research 
work and in 1891 published a large volume entitled 
"Thomas Stanton of Connecticut and His Descend- 
ants." His work is so good that the liberty is taken of 
reprinting from his book some intormation applying to 
both our families as now known. 

The following traditions give interesting possible 
connections between the early branches of Stantons in 
this country and also the family's origin in England: 

^ ^ ^ ^ «!• 

"The Welsh Traditiox. — The best documentary evidence 
for this is a record written in an old family Bible belonging to 
the Gere family of Syracuse, N. Y. This Bible was the property 
of Sophia Stanton, whose parents were both Stantons, and whose 
inother's parents were both Stantons. Sophia's Bible and her 
mother's Bible bear record that Thomas Stanton was born in 
Wales. 

"The mother, Anna Stanton, was born m 1758, at Stonington. 
It is safe to say that Anna was informed as to this tradition by 
her father, Phineas, who was born in 1719, forty-two years after 
Thomas died. 

"Half a century is not time enough for history to go very far 
astray, and I am inclined to think that either he or his wife, Ann 
Lord (alias Laward), was born in Wales. Even if this be true, 
however, he was not of Welsh ancestry, for 'Stanton' is a Saxon 
name. Wales is bounded on the east by Herefordshire and Shrop- 
shire. In Hereford are the following places: Staunton Park, 
Staunton-on -.Arrow, and Staunton, all near the Welsh borders. 
In Shropshire are to be found the towns of Stanton, Stanton 
Lacy and Long Stanton. 

"Would it be strange that a Thomas Stanton should be born 

only 






I')) E Stanton Family 1_2 

only a few miles at the farthest from some of these places, and if 
west of them his birthplace would easily be in Wales. 

"Since writing the above I have had correspondence with 
William J. Stanton of North Danville, Vt., who was born in 1808. 
He says that his grandfather, Isaac Wheeler Stanton, often 
affirmed in a most positive manner that Thomas Stanton was 
born in Wales. His grandfather was born in 1743 at Stonington. 

"Now what opportunity did Isaac W. have of knowing this? 
His grandfather was Joseph Stanton, who was born before Thomas 
died, and lived after Isaac W. was eight years old. 

"Wm. J. Stanton then has his information fnjtn his grand- 
father, who was contemporaneous with those who in their youth 
had personal knowledge of Thomas, and whose parents were 
children of Thomas. This is even more tlirect testimony than in 
the case of Sophia Stanton's Bible. In atldition to the above 
testimony is the following: Isaac Wheeler Stanton, when he 
moved from Connecticut to New Hampshire and Vermont, took 
an old desk with him in which was found a genealogical outline 
of Stantons, descendants of Thomas. It was written on coarse, 
dark-colored paper, in old-fashioned letters anil style of writing, 
and testified that Thomas was born in Wales. Wm. J. Stanton 
says 'it looked to be a century old.' The tlesk was mov^ed in 
1784. I believe the Welsh tradition is true." 

"The Lancashire Tradition. — John Stanton ot Hope \ alley, 
R. I., has in his possession records received trom his father, John 
Stanton, who was for some time town clerk of Charlestown, 
R. I., antl who wrote quite a record of historical and genealogical 
information as to the Stanton family. These records assert 
that Thomas of Stonington, Ct., and Robert ot Newport, K. I., 
were brothers, and came from Lancashire, Kng. This same 
tratlition is found now among descendants ot Robert ot Newport. 
It does not necessarily conflict with the Welsh tradition, tor 
Thomas may have been in Wales, then nio\ed northward to 
Lancashire and come thence to America. Mr. Stanton can pro- 
duce no authority tor this record and docs not know where his 
father got it. I have followed up this tratlition far enough ro 
learn that there are Stantons now living in Lancashire, :\nd that 
the family is an oKl one there. Members ot the family now in 

Preston, 



20 Our AtJCESTORS — The Stanton' 

Preston, the county seat of Lancashire, have testified to me thai 
they can find no record of a Thomas who came to America. (Pres 
ton, Conn., is built on land that belonged to Thomas Stantor 
Query: Was it named for Preston, Eng., by Thomas in memor 
of his boyhood home?)" 

* * * * 

"The Longbridge Tradition. — The Hon. John D. Baldwin 
of Worcester, Mass., in 1883, printed his incomplete notes of 
Thomas Stanton and his descendants. Baldwin says of Thomas' 
'It is supposed, with strong probability, that he was the son o 
Thomas and Katherine (Washington) Stanton, of the Long! 
bridge family.' This supposition was suggested to Mr. Baldwir- 
by Mr. B. L Stanton, then of Albany, N. Y., but now of St. Paul 
Minn. Mr. B. L Stanton for years has been preparing genealogie; 
of the descendants of Robert Stanton of R. L and of Paul Stantor 
of Maine. He is a descendant of Paul. In his search amont 
English records he found a Thomas Stanton, born 1616, in Wolver 
ton, Warwickshire, Eng., son of Thomas and Katherine (Wash 
ington) Stanton. 

"Thomas, the father, was born 1595 and was in turn the son 
of Thomas Stanton, who was the son of John and Elizabeth 
(Townsend) Stanton of Longbridge, Warwick Co. No further 
record of Thomas, born 1616, has ever been found than the one! 
made in the Visitation of the County of Warwick in 1619. He' 
was then three years old. 

"xMr. B. I. Stanton thought this might be Thomas Stanton of 
Connecticut. Mr. Baldwin adopted the suggestion and so printed 
it. 

"It may be true, but it is not proven. If this was our Thomas 
he would have been 19 when he embarked at London in 163^^ 
but he gave his age as 20. This could be explained, however, bv 
the existence of a law forbidding emigration, without parent or 
guardian, under 20 years of age. It was not uncommon, there- 
fore, for young men to 'borrow time,' as they termed it, and add 
a necessary year or two to their true age. Thomas may have 
borrowed time' to make himself 20 years old in 1635. 

"This family of Stantons came to Wolverton from Long- 
bridge near the city of Warwick, in 1576, and became extinct 
m the first half of the 18th century." 

Thf 



The Stanton Family 



The Stauntons of Staunton 

"Malgerus' son and heir was Galfridus de Stanton who married 
Beatrice de Muschamp and had Sir William whose wife was 
Atheline de Musters. Their son was Sir Geoffery, his, Sir William 
who married Isabel Kirketon and died in 1326. These five were 
all Knights. The next one was Sir Geoffery de Staunton who was 
Sheriff of Nottingham. Soon after this the 'de' was dropped 
and when we come to later times we find the heir to be Colonel 
William Staunton who served in the army of Charles I. and who 
married Anne 'Waring. His son was Harvey Staunton, Esq., 
'who was the last male heir of this ancient family after a con- 
tinued male succession of five hundred years. Harvey's daughter 
and heiress was Anne Staunton who married Gilberto Charlton, 
Esq. Their son and heir was Job Staunton Charlton who married 
Mary Greenwood and whose daughter and heiress was Anne 
Staunton Charlton. In 1703 she married Rev. J. Aspinshaw, 
LL.D., rector of Elton Super-montem. In 1807 he, with wife 
and children, assumed by Royal License the surname and arms 
of Staunton. Their son and heir was Henry Charlton Staunton 
of Staunton Hall in 1858.' 

"This is undoubtedly the original Stanton family. From them 
have sprung numerous branches. In the 15th century a Sir 
George Stanton went from this family to Ireland and became the 
progenitor of a numerous Irish posterity. The following, from 
the Boston (Mass.) Pilot of May 5, 1888, shows a still earlier 
departure into Ireland: 

" 'In England the name de Staunton dates from the Norman 
conquest, while in Ireland it appeared with the English Invasion. 
In 1220 Adam de Staunton granted lands to Christ Church, 
Dublin, and in 1373, in a summons to a great council to meet in 
Cork, Milo Staunton and Daniel Fitz-Thomas Roche were re- 
turned from County Cork. The attainders of 1691 include one 
Patrick Stanton, Great Island, County Cork.' 

"Another branch of the Stauntons of Staunton settled in War- 
wick Co. prior to 1450 and bore the arms of the Nottingham 
family. Their hall is at Longbridge, a few miles from the city of 
Warwick, and they are known as 

The 



Our Axcestors — The Stantons 



The Stauntons of Longbridge 

"The Encyclopedia Brirannica (^^'th edition) says, 'Of families 
holdina knightly rank in Warwickshire before the commence- 
ment of the 16th century there now exist only ten, viz., vStaunton 
of Longbridge,' etc. 

"This famil)' as a distinct branch runs thus: Thomas, John, 
Thdnias, John, Thomas, Humphrey, John, John, John, John, 
William, John, William, the heir in 1858. 

"I.et us look a little into some interesting facts concerning 
|(jhn Staunton of Longbridge. He married Elizabeth, daughter 
(.f Townsend of Wales, they had three sons and two daughters. 
The eldest son was Thomas. Thomas had a daughter Judith 
Stanton who married Shakespere's friend and patron Hamnet 
SatUer. Shakespere's twin children, Judith and Hamnet, were 
named for Hamnet Satller and his wife Judith Stanton. Sadler 
was a subscriber to Shakespere's will and was bequeathed a 
mourning ring. 

"See also The Life of Wm. Shakespere (Duyckinck edition, 
P. \x\i) further reference to Mr. Staunton of Longbridge House 
and to Thomas Stanton, the English sculptor, as sculptor of 
Shakespere's bust in the church at Strattord-on-Avon, placed 
there between 1616 and 1623. 

".An interesting description of this bust will also be found 
in Irving's Sketch Book. 

"It was in 1576, at the time of the aliove John Stanton, that 
another son of his moved to Wolverton, between W'arwick citv 
and Stratford-on-Avon. He married Maria Pudsey and had five 
children. The eldest of these was Thomas Stanton who 30th 
July, 1616, married Katherine, daughter of Walter Washington 
of Railway, and had Thomas, born 1616 in Wolverton, who is 
thought by Baklwin to be the Thomas Stanton who came to 
America in 1635. This Wolverton branch became extinct in the 
male line during the first half of the 18th century and the estate 
reverted to John Staunton of Longbridge, who was born in 1704 
anil died in 1748. 

"The last record of said Ihomas Stanton, born. 1616, in Wolver- 
ton, Warwick Co., Eng., is to be found on p. 277 of the Visitation 
of the County of Warwick in the year 1619. Taken by William 

Camden, 



The Stant on Family 23 

Camden, Clarencieux King of Arms. (Harl. Mss. 1167.) Edited 
by John Fethcrstone. 

"The above book is Vol. 12 of the publications of the Harlian 
Society, established in 1869." 

Miscellaneous English Notes 

"These notes are printed here as a jiossible clew to future 
research, and as facts of family and historic interest. 

"1. In March, 1635, the pastor of The Church of St. xMary, 
Aldermanbury, London, was a Rev. Dr. Stanton (see N. K. Hist. 
and Gen. Reg., Jan. 1X19). 

"2. In Aug., 1635, Jo: Staunton, aged 27, sailed from London 
for \'irginia, in ship George — Jo: Severne, master. 

"3. heb. 18, 1657, a Thomas Stanton of Mowlton, Suffolk 
Co., witnessed the will of Samuel Moody. 

"4. In 1610, near Wolverton, Warwick Co., there was born a 

Thomas, son of Henry Stanton, who married • Rogers, 

Feb. 6, 1608. 

"5. There was a Thomas Stanton at Little Eastcheap, London, 
in 1^)57. M. Middlebrooke, of Leeds, writes a letter to his nephew 
Rev. Michael Wigglesworth, at Maiden, Mass., and orders it 
left at Mr. Thomas Stanton's in Little Eastcheap, to be conveyed 
to America. Said Wigglesworth was born in Hedron, East Riding, 
Yorkshire, Eng., in 1631, and in 1638 came to Quinnipiac, Conn. 

"6. Dorothy Stanton, widow of Richard Wiseman, of Wig- 
borough, Essex Co., about 1625 married John Rogers, of Ded- 
ham, Essex. Their grandson was Rev. John Rogers, D.D., who 
came to America with his father, Nathaniel, in 1636, and in 1682 
became president of Harvard. 

"7. In the northwest part of Leicestershire, some thirty miles 
from Belvoir Castle, is Staunton Harold. Its former owner was 
John DeStaunton, whose daughter and heiress, Margaret, mar- 
ried Ralph Shirley, and thus transferred the Staunton estate to 
the Shirley family. The present owner is Sir Sewallis Edward 
Shirley, 10th Earl of b'errers ami Viscount Tamworth. For further 
history of this family, see Timb's 'Abbeys, Castles and Ancient 
Halls of England aiul Wales,' Waren i\: Co., LcMulon. 

"S. In 



24 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



"8. In Oxfordshire, about five miles west of Oxford, is Stanton 
Harcourt. Here is the ancient manor of Stanton. It was among 
the vast estates that fell to the lot of the Bishop of Bayeux, a 
half-brother to William the Conqueror. Queen Adeliza, second 
wife to Henry, granted the manor of Stanton to her kinswoman, 
Milicent, wife of Richard de Camville, whose daughter married 
Robert de Harcourt. Since then the manor has been called 
Stanton Harcourt. 

"9. An examination of Wflls and Records at Bury St. Edmunds, 
Suffolk Co., shows in 1370 an Ada, widow of Henricus de Stanton, 
and their son Henry. In 1499 is mentioned a Robert, in 1504 
a Roff, and in 1554 a Walter Stanton." 

These extracts, then, give possible connections be- 
tween the families of the early Stantons. Whatever 
the real connection, the truth remains that the family 
antidates our American colonies and had a worthy 
name and staunch tradition long before the Mayflower 
sailed. 



Ridley Park, 

Pennsylvania, 

1922. 



W. H. S. 




THE WYATT WINDMILL 

One of the few old windmills yet standing and operateid by wind power. 
It is typical of the mills of the early American period which were fauiuar 

to the older Stantons. 

This mill was built at Bristol, Rhode Isl.\nd, about 1750. It was later 

moved several times, and now stands in Middletown, Rhode Island. 



ROBERT STANTON 



R 



OBKRT STANTON, the oldest member of 
our family in direct line ot whom we have 
record,* was horn in Elngland in 1599. 
He married Avis, whose maiden name is 
unknown, anci to them a son Robert was 
born in 1627. 

Robert and Avis emigrated to America some time 
between 1627 and 1638. The family account states 
that their son Robert accompanied them. 

Boylie's history ot New Plymouth names John and 
Robert Stanton as among the earliest settlers there. 
John is believed to have been a brother of Robert. 
Arnold, the historian, says concerning Robert:"!' "In 
1638 Portsmouth, then calleii Pocasset, was settled by 
William Coddington and others who left Massachusetts 
to ax'oid persecution on account of their religious 

opinions. 

* In ;i clipping troiii an old Newport jiapcr we read: "Copies of family record 
in my possession sa\' that the Father of Robert of Newport was Thomas — ami 
that he tiled at his son's house, very aged — Thomas Stanton of Stonington pmb- 
ably brother of Robert. (Signed) A. A. W." 

t Arnold's histor\- of Rhode Island, Page 13j. 



27 



opinions. . . . Robert Stanton was one of the 
names signed to the compact tor forming the colony. 
Robert was Hving in Newport in 1645 and either 

accompanied 




AN OLD HOUSE IN NEWPORT 

It is thought that this house was in existence at the time Robert Stanton 

lIved IN Newport. If it was not. it is typical of the Domestic Architecture 

OF his time. 



Robert Stanton 



29 



accompanied or soon followed Governor Coddington 
when he went to Portsmouth. 

George Fox began to preach about 1643. In 1655 
the first Friends arrived from England, and persecu- 
tion began. Mary Stanton, a young woman from 
Rhode Island, quite young at the time, was whipped 
in Massachusetts in 1658 for being a Friend. Mary, 
the daughter of Robert and Avis, was sixteen years 
old and doubtless the one who suffered for her religious 
belief. Whether Robert Stanton joined the Society 
or not is unknown, but he appears to have sought 
freedom of religious belief in coming from Massachu- 
setts to more liberal Rhode Island. If Robert was 

not 




,.jr*--*i»Bk5?fc:*»>.;- : .:.Aiiui^JdKS;"i«^vt:f 19Wit.SW^HR^W!H852: 



OLD STONE MILL, NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND 

This tower is thoucht to bk thk ruins of a windmill bi-ilt for Arnold. 
GovKRNOR OF Rhode Island, 1615-1678. The tower was i ndoibtedly a familiar 
'sir.HT to thf. oider Stantons. 



M) 



Our Ancestors — The SrAXTOiVs' 



not a Friend, some members of his family were,* and 
a large number of his descendants are members at the 
present time. Robert Stanton died at Newport, aged 
seventy-three, and was buried Eighth month Twenty- 
ninth, 1672. 

Children of Robert and Avis Stanton: 



In England 

m. 12-1661 Henry Tibbits d. 1708 



Robert b. 1627 

Sarah b. 1640 

Marv b. 1642 

John b. 8-1645 In Newport, Rhode Island d. 10-3-1713 

Daniel b. 1648 In Newport, Rhode Island m. Elizabeth 
Lived in Barbados, West Indies, d. 1690. 

Prudence b. 1649 



The Daniel Stanton (born 1708, died 6-29-1770), 
who was a prominent minister of the Society of Friends 
in Philadelphia, and was very active in urging Friends 
to liberate their slaves and take a stand against slavery, 
is said to have been a grandson of Daniel, the son of 
Robert. 

* A record of Friends' Meeting at Newport mentions John, son of Robert and 
Avis, as the first Stanton to join Friends. 

Sarah or Mary or both may have joined before the family moved to Newport, 
and so Newport Friends had no record of Mary's persecution. 




A LIGHTHOUSE ON LOWER NARRAGAN- 

SETT BAY. SOUTHEAST OF NEWPORT, 

RHODE ISLAND. 



JOHN STANTON 




lOHN STANTON, son of Robert and A\i^, 
was born at Newport, Rhode Island, Eighth 
month, 1645. He married Mary Horndalc, 
his first wife, in 1667, in Friends' Meeting. 
His second wife, Mary Clarke (b. 1641, d. 
4-7-1711), was the widow of Governor John Cranston 
and daughter of Jeremiah and Frances (Latham i 
Clarke. John Stanton was a prominent man in 
Newport, Rhode Island, where he died Tenth month 
Third, 1713. 

The children of John and Marv Horndale Stanton: 



Mary li. 1W)S 

Hannah b. 1670 

Patience b. 1672 

John, Jr. b. 1674 

Content b. 1675 

Robert b. 1677 

Benjamin b. 1684 



d. 1747 
d. 1712 



ni. John Couge.^hall. 
ni. Kehvard Carr. 



ni. Kliz. Chirke. Died in Richmond, Rhode Islan^;. 



d. 1712 
d. 1760 



m. Penelope 

m. Martha Tibbits. 



B)' his second wife, Mar\- (Clarke) Cranston, John 
Stanton had a son Henry born in Newport, Rhode 
Island, Fifth month T\\ent>-second, 1688. 




ScALK ,', 



!•< let 

2 Miles 




A 



fl a r. J S. 






'H'^l 



•D'N 
'AINROO J.3d31IIV9 
UIUVJ N01NV18 JO dVN 



Henry Stanton 



33 



His children by his second wife, Lydia Albertson, 
were: 



Benjamin 
Sarah 
Avis 
John 



b. at Beaufort, North Carolina 



Henry Stanton, Sr., Henry Jr., and Benjamin, his 
sons, and three of the sons of Henry Jr., Benjamin, 
Joseph and John Howard, were ministers of the 
Society of Friends. 




A SCHOONER OFF NEWPORT, 
RHODE ISLAND, 1921 





y^ 








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jHenry 


Stanton 












33 


His 

were: 


children 


by 


his 


second 


wife, 


Lydia 


Albertson, 



Benjamin 1 

^.^^.^^ b. at Beaufort, North Carolina 

Avis ' 

John J 



Henry Stanton, Sr., Henry Jr., and Benjamin, his 
sons, and three of the sons of Henry Jr., Benjamin, 
Joseph and John Howard, were ministers of the 
Society of Friends. 




A SCHOONER OFF NEWPORT, 
RHODE ISLAND, 1921 




THE STANTON CLOCK 

TmS CLOCK CAME BY A LONG LINE OF DESCENT FROM THE ORIGINAL StANTON 

OWNER TO Byron Stanton of Cincinnati, by w-hom it is now possessed. 



1133300 



THE OLD STANTON CLOCK 



THE old Stanton clock is ticking away in the 
room in which I am now writing, as faith- 
fully and as correctly as it has for the last 
two hundred years or more. 

I am not able to give the full early history, 
but according to tradition the clock was brought to 
this country from London by a seafaring descendant of 
Robert Stanton, the first one of our family to come to 
America. The only descendants of Robert Stanton 
who were mariners were Robert's son Robert and his 
grandson Henry. As Robert never married, it is not 
probable that he brought the clock to America, but 
Henry was a man of family and possessed of a large 
estate. It seems, therefore, probable that he was the 
original purchaser. As Robert, Jr., died in 1712 and 
Henry abandoned his seafaring life before the year 
1736, the clock was, no doubt, brought to this country 
before or early in the eighteenth century, so there 
can be no question as to its early Americanization. 

Henry was born in Newport, Rhode Island, May 
twenty-second, 1688, and removed to Carteret County, 

North 
35 



36 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

North Carolina, before 1736, for the records of the 
Monthly Meeting of Friends of Newport River, North 
Carolina, for that year, show that the meetings were 
"to be held at the house of Henry Stanton until other- 
wise ordered." He, no doubt, took the clock with 
him on his removal to North Carolina, where it de- 
scended to my grandfather, Benjamin Stanton, after 
whose death it was the property of his widow, Abigail 
(Macy) Stanton, by whom it was brought to Harris- 
ville, Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1800. On her death, 
June fifth, 1825, the clock was left to my father, Ben- 
jamin Stanton, of Salem, Ohio, who died in 1861, and 
by him was left to me. 

It was made by Joshua Wilson, who, I have learned 
from a book on horology in the Boston Public Library, 
was a clockmaker in London before the year 1700. 
From the fact that Joshua Wilson was of sufficient 
prominence to be mentioned in works on horology as 
a clockmaker, in London, in 1700, it would seem prob- 
able that he had been there a number of years before 
that time, so there is httle doubt that my clock ante- 
dates the year 1700, and as the pendulum was not used 
for the regulation of timepieces until the year 1662, 
it is evident that no pendulum clock in the world is 
forty years older than the one in my possession. 

The works, which are of brass, the weights, and the 
pendulum are the same as in the original. The pinions 
are of brass and the verge of steel. As Abigail Stanton 
and her family came north in ox-carts, the clock case, 
owing to its size and weight, was left in North Carolina, 
and from 1800 to 1825 the clock "hung on the old 
cabin wall." 

After the death of Abigail Stanton, the clock was 
taken to Salem, Ohio, where Dr. Benjamin Stanton 

caused 



Ihe Old Stanto.v Clock 



37 




Edith Cooper, a (jreat-orandchild of Dr. 
Kfnjauin Stanto.v. Thk Photograph was 
taken in 1889, just before the clock was 

REMOVED TO THE HOME OF Dr. BvRON StANTON, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Through generations the clock has stood, 
"Through days of sorrow and of uirth. 
Through days of death and days of birth." 

If its swinging pendulum could but talk, what tales it could 
tell of those for whom it long ago ticked out the last hour. 
The little maid gazes earnestly at the clock of her ancestors 
and her heart beats faster as the unreal past is made revVL and 
linked with the present. 



caused a new case to be made as nearly like the oriLjinal 
as he was able to draw it. It is of poplar, paintcti black, 
and is seven and one half feet high; the hood lifts off; 
the hice is ot brass, twelve inches by twehe inches. 
Within the polished brass hour circle are black Hijures 
to indicate the hours, and between these are black 
arrow heads to show the half-hours, and the days of 

the 



38 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

the month are shown in a small square opening below 
the hands. In the corners outside the hour circle were 
brass fretwork ornaments, which were lost many years 
ago, so that the entire face is of polished brass except 
within the hour circle, where it is of unpolished brass 
of dark color. 

The pendulum is thirty-nine inches long, of apple 
wood, which is but little affected by atmospheric con- 
ditions. Unfortunately it has been broken more than 
once, but as it would be difficult to replace with so 
good material, it has been fastened together and still 
does duty as well as ever. It hangs by a steel spring, 
which allows it to swing without friction, and carries a 
heavy iron bob. 

The long pendulum and the brass wheels, which 
have borne the wear of two centuries, have made the 
clock an unexcelled timekeeper. 



Cincinnati, 

Ohio 

1919 




Ohio, ^ /::^T -/■ — - 



BENJAMIN STANTON 



BENJAMIN STANTON, son of Henry Stan- 
ton and Lydia Alhertson, was born in Car- 
teret County, North Carolina, Seventh 
month, 1746, and died Twelfth month 
Twelfth, 1798. He lived and died in the 
house in which he was born. The house was on Ware 
Creek, which flows into Newport River, about tour miles 
north of the town ot Beautort, the terminus of a rail- 
way. He was a minister of the Society of Friends. 

The first wife of Benjamin Stanton, Elizabeth 
Carver, died young. Their one child, James, born 
Tenth month Ninth, 1770, married Rebecca Chaddock; 
they had no children. On Ninth month Twenty- 
ninth, 1773, Benjamin married Abigail Macy in 
Friends' Meeting, at New Garden, North Carolina, 
and they lived the remainder of his life at his home 
in Carteret County, where all their children were born. 



Children of Benjamin and Abigail (Macy) Stanton; 
David b. 11-3-1774 died in infancy 
Elizabeth b. 12-24-1775 m. Joshua Scott 
Sarah b. 1-12-1778 m. Richard Williams 



39 



.Avis 



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w S 




Benjamin' Stantox 



41 



Jesse Thomas 
Aaron Brown 
Clara Patterson 
Benjamin Mitchner 
Lucy Norman 
W illiam Lewis 
Martha Townsend 
Marv Townsend 



Benjamin acquired a large landed estate in Carteret 
and Craven counties. The large ordnance used dur- 
ing the Rebellion for taking Fort Macon on Bogue 
Banks and commanding Beaufort harbor was planted 
on Shackleford's Banks, which had been owned by him. 



Avis 


b. 


12-1-1779 


m. 


Anna 


b. 


6-12-1782 


m. 


Henry 


b. 


2-25-1784 


m. 


Abigail 


b. 


3-23-1786 


m. 


David 


b. 


5-1-1788 


m. 


Lydia 


b. 


10-11-1790 


m. 


Benjamin 


b. 


7-28-1793 


m. 


Joseph 


b. 


1-2-1797 


m. 




OLD FORT MACON 

Located on south end of Bogue Banks, Beaufort, North Carouna. Built 
to defend the citv. 

He owned a shipyard and was engaged for a 
while in ship-building. He had inherited slaves 
from his father, but these he had emancipated 
about the year 1787 when members of the So- 
ciety of Friends in North Carolina followed the 
example of Friends in the more ninthern states and 

manumitted 



42 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



a 



:^l 



/\ 



T.'^L^^-^ 















HUMMOCK FIELD 

Owned by Benjamin Stanton, Sr., and willed to his sons, Benjamin and 
Joseph. The soil is black with a large per cent of shells. 




CORE SOUND GRAVE YARD 

This is probably the blrl^l place of m,any of the older Stantons. There 

IS not a M.'iRKER OF ANY DESCRIPTION TO INDICATE THE IDENTITY OF THE GRAVES. 
MOCH OF THE GROUND IS COVERED WITH HEAVY TIMBER AND A DENSE UNDERGROWTH. 



■if 



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p-7 ^-^^•X.rfW 







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42 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




'r 



iC" '-'ii**- ■ k 






HUMMOCK FIELD 

Owned by Benjamin Stanton, Sr., and willed to his sons, Benjamin and 
Joseph. The soil is black with a large per cent of shells. 




CORE SOUND GRAVE YARD 

This is probably the burial place of many of the older Stantons. There 
IS not a marker of any description to indicate the identity of the graves. 
Much of the ground is covered with heavy timber and a dense undergrowth. 



Oi R Ancestors — The Stantons 



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Reproduction of tj ; //'itf of Ben-jamin Stanton, Cartaret Colntv, North Carolina. Dateu 11-5-1798 



44 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



manumitted and cast him or her into prison, and pro- 
viding that on proof being made that such person of 
color had been manumitted, he or she should be sold 
at auction. Notwithstanding this barbarous enact- 
ment, Benjamin Stanton, and after him his widow and 
children, succeeded in protecting the slaves set free by 
him and some of them emigrated to Ohio with the 
family in 1800. 

One of the slave women set free by Benjamin 
Stanton once saved the life of his son Benjamin, then 
a very small child. A boat had been pulled upon the 
beach and into it the child had clambered. At high 
tide the boat had floated and when the tide began to 
recede the boat started out to sea, but fortunately 
not so far but that the colored woman, who dis- 
covered the child's danger, was able by wading almost 

her 




OLDEST HOUSE IN BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 

This house is no doubt typical of those standing during the lifetime of 
Benjamin Stanton, Sr. 



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Benjamin Stanton ' 7; 

' " tl 

her full depth into the water to catch the boat and 
pull it ashore. 

Some of the colored people set free by Benjamin 
Stanton took the family name and their descendants 
still bear the name of Stanton. 



* * 



* * 



When Benjamin Stanton was twenty-one years old 
and living in North Carolina, about forty-five years after 
his father left the old home town of xVewport, Rhode 
Island, and when his future wife, Abigail iMacy was 
fourteen years old, living in Nantucket, there vvas a 
little social held in Newport that gives an insight into 
the hfe of that day. The description is taken from 
'Newport Illustrated," published in 1854. 

"From the Newport Mercury, of 1767, we 
extract the following, as giving a lively picture 
of the manner in which a clergyman's salary 
was paid when money was scarce and only to 
be obtained by the few: 

"'Last Wednesday thirty-seven voung ladies of this 
town made the Rev. Dr. Stiles' lady a visit. Thev 
sent their wheels and carried flax enough for a moderate 
days spmnmg, having agreed to have no trial who 
should spin most but to spin good, fine yarn, and as 
much as they could without fatiguing themselves, and, 
accordingly, they spent the day in a very agreeable 
industrious manner, and at sunset made Mr. Stiles a 
present of about one hundred fifteen-knotted skeins of 
yarn fine enough for shirts for the best gentleman in 
America. 



Records of the Stantons in 
North Carolina 



Showing a List 
OF Purchases and 
Sales of Land. 









'»i ".r^»*;' 



VIEW FROM BOGUE BANKS 

Carrot Islands, Benjamin Stanton's Fishery at left. 
Shackelford Bank, on right, owned by him. 



LIST OF PURCHASES AND SALES OF LAND BY THE 
STANTONS IN CARTERET CO., NORTH CAROLINA 

As found by Willis V. & Thomas 
Webster, 6- -1921. 

Joshua Porter & wife to Henry Stanton, 1992A. near Bogue Inlet, 4-28-1721. 

George Cogdell to Henry Stanton Shipweight, 150A. on the north side of New- 
port river, 3-6-1732. 

Geo. Cogdell to Henry Stanton Shipweight, 440A. between Eastman's & Bell's 
Creeks, and known as the "Swimming Poynt," 3-6-1732. 

Carey Godby & wife to Henry Stanton, 437A. on Core Sound, on the east side of 
Broad creek on Newport river, 1-13-1732. 

George 2nd to Cap. Henry Stanton, 380A. east side of Newport river, south of 
Powell's creek, 3-8-1736. 

George 2nd to Cap. Henry Stanton, 480A. on the headline of Captain Henry Stan- 
ton, between Ware & Russells creeks, 9-25-1741. 

George 2nd to Henry Stanton, 640A. on north west side of Black creek, on north 
side of Newport river, 8-4-1740. 

Henry Stanton Sr. to Son Henry Stanton Jr. 300A. on N. E. side of Newport river, 
between Powell & Ware creeks, 9-27-1745. 

John Small to Joseph Stanton, 122A. on W. side of Harlows creek, 7-15-1759. 

John Bell to Henry Stanton, 80A. on head of Harlows creek, 5-14-1754. 

Joseph Borden to Joseph Stanton, 500A. E. side of Core creek, 3- -1764. 

John Russell to Benj. Stanton, 80A. uppermost tract on North river, 11-18-1767. 

Robert Williams to Henry Stanton, lA. on W. side of Black creek. Saw & Grist 
mill, 2-6-1771. 

George P. Lovick to Henry Stanton, 400A. on N. side of Newport river, on Black 
creek, 6-17-1771. 

David Shepard to Henry Stanton, lA. on Black creek, including Stanton's mill, 
5-7-1773. 

David Shepard to Henry Stanton, an island below the mill, on Black creek, 6-24- 
1774. 

Hope Stanton to Benj. Stanton, one half of 300A. on W. side of Core creek, part of 
my father, Benj. Borden's land, 3-20-1779. 

Thos. Bratchard to Benj. Stanton Jr. lOOA. on N. side of Newport river, between 
Powell and Ware creeks, on Core creek, 2-21-1785. 

David Hall to Benj. Stanton Jr. lOOA. on N. side of Newport river, on Core creek, 
4-1-1785. 

James Peartree to Benj. Stanton Jr. lOOA. on N. E. side of Newport river, on E. 
side of mouth of Core creek, between Powell 6t Ware creeks, 9-7-1785. 

Diedrich Gibble to Benj. Stanton, lOOA. on N. side of Newport river, 3-22-1786. 

James Bell to Benj. Stanton Sr. & Jr. one fourth part of 300A. near head of Har- 
lows creek, 11-30-1785. 

James Bell to Benj. Sr. & Jr., 50A. on head of Harlows creek, 11-30-1785. 

Nehemiah Harris to Benj. Stanton, 50A. Carrot island, 3-25-1790. 

John Stanton to Benj. Stanton, 200A. on W. side of North river, 11-14-1791. Part 
of 300A. patent to Richard Russell. 

State to Benj. Stanton Jr. 50A. east of Core creek & north of Eastman creek, 1789. 

State 

48 



Sales of Land 4'f 

State to Benj. Stanton Jr. 50A. joining Core creek, & \. of Eastman creek, Patent 

issued 11-17-1789. 
JosephjjW. Davis to Benj. Stanton 50A. of Banks land, between Old Topsail inlet 

& Drum inlet, 10-7-1792. 
Francis Mace to James Stanton, 50A. on Bogue Banks, between Old Topsail inlet 

& Bogue inlet, 10-31-1796. 
Joseph^King to James Stanton, K Lot & House in Beaufort 8-23-1800. 
Joshua & Elizabeth Scott and Richard & Sarah WiHiams to James Stanton their 

interest in land on North river, willed to unborn child by Benj. Stanton, 
_ 11-10-1801. 
Benj. Stanton Jr. to Benj. Stanton Sr. & Dedrich Grebble, 480 A. on east side of 

Newport river, between Ware & Russell creeks, the land pat. by Capt. 
i Henry Stanton, 9-25-1741, but never taken out and costs paid until Benj. 

Stanton Sen. finished the work and obtained it by heirship &: purchase and 

now owns the most of it, 6-1-1785. 
State to Owen Stanton, 200A. on North river, west side, 3-8-1817. 
Owen Stanton to Otway Burns, land on Core creek whereon I now live & 200.A. 

on North river, joining the land of Otway Burns, 12-15-1820. 
Adm. of Abram Pigott to James Stanton, one negro boy named Isaac, 1- -1813. 

Consideration 275.00 dollars. 
State to Benj. Stanton Sr. & Lemrick Harris, on W. side of Parrots bay, 1788. 
State to Benj. Stanton Sr. 50A. on W. side of North river, by his own entry, 3-13- 

1788. 
State to Owen Stanton 120A. within the reputed bounds of the lands he now lives 

on, patented by Thos. Austin, including vacant land at N. end, 4-7-1788. 
State tol^Benj. Stanton Jr. 80A. on E. side of Core creek, joining his own land, 

3-29-1788. 
State to Benj. Stanton, lOA. on Ware creek just above my shipyard, 5-22-1792. 
James Stanton to Stephen Fulford, house & }^2 lot, Beaufort, 12-1-1804. 
Henry Stanton to Silas Carpenter, 300A. on which I now live, between Powell & 

Ware creeks on Core creek, N. of Newport river, 3-13-1745. 
Henry Stanton to James Easton, 437A. on Core sound, on the E. side of Broad creek, 

on Newport river, 1-13-1732. 
Henry Stanton to Son Richard Russell, lOOA. near Core creek, 3-11-1737. 
Henry Stanton to Isaac White, 150.A. on N. side of Newport river, 11-7-1751. 

(Isaac White married Catherine Stanton.) 
Henry Stanton Jr. executor of Henry Stanton Sr. to Henry Chew Sr. 640.A. on N. 

side of Newport river, on Black creek, 3-7-1753. 
Benj.Stanton to John Russell, 50A., 11-18-1767. 

Benj. Stanton to John Shepard, 80A. near head of North river, 6-17-1772. 
Benj. John & Sarah Stanton to Peter Starkev, 266A. part of 800.A. on Bear bank, 

1-25-1769. 
Henry Stanton to Isaac Scriven; 80A. near head of Harlows creek, 11-4-1768. 
Henry Stanton to Wm. Borden, 200.A. on Bogue banks, 6-17-1776. 
Henry Stanton to Son John Stanton, by will, 5-1-1751, 190A. on N. side Newport 

river. 
John Stanton to Henry Dickson, 190.A. on N. side of Newport river, 1-23-1773. 
Henry Dickson to Henry Stanton, 190.A. N. side of Newport river, 11-6-1775.^ 
Benj. & Hope Stanton to James Scrivens, 80.-^. E. side of Harlow creek, 12-17-1779. 
Hope Stanton, widow & sole Executrix of Henry Stanton, deceased, and Benj. 

Stanton eldest son of Henry Stanton to Robert Williams, \.\. & all the Saw 

mill & M of the Grist mill purchased of David Shepard, also a piece of marsh 

land below the mill, between the tail race and mam creek, also 400.A. above 

the mill on both sides of Black creek, 9-24-1777. 
Benj. Stanton to Elizabeth Tomlinson, 75.A. adjoining Beaufort, 6-17-1783. 
Benj. Stanton Sr. to Nehemiah Harris, a part of old patent whereon Benj. Stanton 

now lives, 3-17-1790. 
Owen Stanton to Peter Piser, 120.-\. on west side of Harlow creek, 3-29-1793. _^ 
Benj. Stanton to Joseph W. Davis, 2CX1.A. between Powell & Ware cks., 1-22-1794. 

Benj. 



50 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Benj. Stanton to Jonas Small, 150A. W. side of Core creek, 6-1-1793. 

Benj. Stanton to Wm. Gardner, 24A. N. side Newport river, near Deep creek, 

11-22-1796. 
Benj. Stanton to Edward Kennedav, 300A. on N. side of Newport river W. of Little 

Deep creek, 2-20-1798. 
Benj. Stanton to Jonas Small, 150A. on N. side of Core creek (pt. of Wm. Borden 

patent of 1747), 2-17-1796. 
Abigail Stanton, by Atty. lease to Ludwig Roberts, 300A. her homestead, 10-27- 

1800. Yearly rental of $50.10 for seven years beginning 1-1-1801. 
Abigail Stanton to Benj. Cheney, Power of Atty., 5-7-1800. 
Benj. Cheney appoints George Read Atty. in his stead, 12-1-1804. 
Abigail Stanton to J. W. Davis, her right in land willed her by her father, Benj. 

Stanton. 
Henry Stanton to J. W. Davis, his right in land willed him by his father, Benj. 

Stanton, including the Hummock field and Shipyard, 9-2-1805. 
Benj. Stanton, son of John, to Jacob Davis, lOOA. (part of 300A.) on west side of 

North river, 12-12-1807. 
David Stanton to J. W. Davis, 50A. willed me by father Benj. on E. side of Core 

creek & S. side of Ware creek, 1-8-1810. 
David Stanton to Benj. Thomas, Power of Atty., 11-1-1809. 
Benj. Stanton, by Bryant Hellen Atty. to J. W. Davis, on east side of Newport 

river, yi the plantation on which father last lived, & my interest in North 

river farm willed to the unborn child, 2-5-1816. 
John Stanton to Wm. Davis, lOOA. (part of 300A.) on west side of North river, 

3-10-1814. 
Henry Stanton to Quakers, 3A. for a pasture south of Quaker meeting house, 

9-23-1737. (At Powell creek & the public road.) 
Nicholas Briant to Quakers, the land upon which stood Core Sound meeting house. 

(Just north of the 3A. for pasture.) 
State to Benj. Stanton et. al. lOA. being a cockle shole on the east side of Newport 

Channel on the west point, running down the said channel including a 

small island marsh, 8-27-1793. 
State to Jonathan Stanton, 90A. Bounded on west by Mallard Dickerson's land & 

on south by Wm. H. Dickerson's land, 12-31-1847. 
State to Horton Howard, 75A. Lying near or joining Benj. Stanton's land and in 

or opposite the mouth of Core creek and joining the east side of the channel 

of said creek including the Green Bank. 9-7-1789. 
State to Benj. Stanton, 50A. of marsh land, being an island on the west side of 

Newport channel & on the east point of the Great shole opposite to his 

own landing near David Coopers & Enoch Wards entry, 4-1-1784. 
State to Benj. Stanton, 7A. on the east side of Newport river, at the south side of 

the mouth of Core creek, joining his own land including his shipyard, 4.-1- 

1784. 
State to Benj. Stanton & Didrich Gibble, — A. on west side of North river joining 

their own land, 5-17-1785. 
State to Benj. Stanton Jr. 30A. marsh land, being part of sundry small islands 

adjoining each other on the west side of Newport channel & on the north 

east point of the Great shoal opposite Benj. Stanton Sr. landing joining his 

entry, 12-8-1786. 
State to Benj. Stanton Jr. lOA. marsh land, on the east side of the main channel in 

Newport river, being two small islands joining each other Iving opposite the 

mouth of Island creek, 12-8-1786. 
State to Benj. Stanton Jr. lOA. on the east side of Core creek, joining the lands of 

John Easton & his own, 12-8-1786. 



I 



Records of the Stantons in 
North Carolina 



Showing an Abstract 

FROM THE Minutes of 

Core Sound Monthly 

Meeting. 




TREES OPPOSITE SITE OF CORE SOIM) 
MONTHLY MEETING HOUSE 



ABSTRACT OF MINUTES OF CORF SOUND MONTHLY 

MEETING 

Taken from the original minute book 
by Willis V. Webster, 8-3-1921. 

8-1-1733. Core Sound Meeting organized. Monthly meeting every first third day 
in the month successively for time to come, and that the first day before the 
monthly meeting shall be a representative meeting and to be kept at the 
house of Henry Stanton till the meeting orders it other ways. Nickolas 
Briant for men, and Mary Stanton for women, to inquire into the order of 
Friends in resf>ect to the minute of our yearly meeting held at Perquimans, 
North Carolina. 

1739. Record book ordered made. 

1742. 50 shillings per year for care of the meeting house and yard. 

1742. Henry Stanton and wife given certificate to visit their friends in the other 
county. 

1742. Henry Stanton, Senior appointed clerk of the monthly meeting. 
11- -1742. Certificate to Henry Stanton Junior. 

1743. Received a certificate for Henry Stanton, Senior. 

7-3-1745. Henry Stanton Senior and Lydia Albertson laid their intentions of 

marriage before the meeting. 
1746. Henry Stanton and Henry Stanton Junior sign the wedding certificate of 

John Small and Elizabeth Small. 
4-12-1750. Henry Stanton son of Henry antl Mary his former wife, and Hope 

Borden daughter of Benjamin Borden and Ruth his wife, late of, and from 

Boston in New England, now of Carteret County, North Carolina, married. 

Witnesses — Lydia, Mary, Catherine, Benjamin, Henry and Joseph Stanton 

and 21 others. 
3-7-1751. Henry Stanton Senior, lays a plan to visit Rhode Island before the 

meeting. 
9-10-1752. Henry Stanton gives up his plan to visit Rhode Island. 

1754. Henry and Hope Stanton sign a wedding certificate. 

1755. Joseph Stanton and Meriam Small declare their intentions of marriage. 
1758. Henry and Joseph Stanton to help find shingles to repair the meeting house 

roof. 
6- -1759. John Tomlonson and Henry Stanton desire a certificate to visit Rhode 
Island. 

1760. Hope, Joseph and Henry Stanton and others appear on a marriage certificate. 
1-28-1761. Henry Stanton appointed clerk. 

1761. Henry and Joseph Stanton with others sign marriage certificate. 
11-24-1761. Henry Stanton returns from a visit to Nantucket and Rhode Island. 

1762. Henry and Joseph Stanton mentioned in meeting records. 
1762. A meeting is proposed for Clubfoot's creek by Bishops bridge. 
3-17-1762. Joseph, Henry, Miriam and Hope Stanton sign papers. 
1-19-1763. Henry and Joseph Stanton ami John Tomlinson appoint,\l Trustees 

of meeting house, bur\ing ground and yard. 

1764. Henry Stanton requests a certificate to visit Rhode Island. 

1765. Miriam, Hope and Joseph Stanton sign papers. 

2-29-1766. 
53 



54 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

2-29-1766. William Britton and Alice Stanton publish intentions of marriage. 
7-9-1766. Henry Stanton's name appears. 

1767. Sarah, Avis. Hannah, Henry, Hope, Joseph and Benjamin Stanton appear 
on Bartholomew Howard and Ruth (Stanton) Howard's marriage certificate 
as witnesses. 

10-18-1767. Two certificates were produced for Benjamin and Sarah Stanton. 

1768. Henry and Joseph Stanton mentioned. 

2-12-1769. James Newby and Sarah Stanton announce their intention of marriage. 

7-11-1769. James Newby and Sarah Stanton married. Witnesses, Miriam, Han- 
nah, Benjamin, John, Henry and Joseph Stanton et. al. 

1771. Henry Stanton and Parmenas Horton should wait upon the Governor in 
regard to church matters. 

6-12-1771. Joseph and John Stanton and John Mace representatives to Quarterly 
meeting. 

4-7-1771. John Tomlinson and Elizabeth Albertson (widow) married. Wit- 
nesses, Owen, Benjamin Junior, Hannah, Henry Junior, Joseph, Henry and 
Benjamin Stanton et. al. 

3-11-1772. John Stanton applies for a certificate. Joseph and Benjamin ap- 
pointed to make inquiry. 

6-10-1772. Henry Stanton requires a certificate. 

1-13-1773. Benjamin Stanton having requested a few lines by way of a certificate 
to New Garden monthly meeting, the same is ordered to be got ready ag. 
next first meeting. 

7-14-1773. Robert Williams and Benjamin Stanton son of Henry appointed rep- 
resentative to Quarterly meeting. 

7-14-1773. Benjamin Stanton requests a certificate to New Garden Monthly 
meeting. Ordered that Joseph Stanton and William Britton make inquiry. 

8-11-1773. Certificate ordered signed. (Benjamin Stanton and Abigail Macy 
married at New Garden 9-27-1773.) 

1774. Henry, Benjamin and Joseph Stanton et. al. sign the denial papers of Robert 
Williams. 

1-10-1776. James Bishop and Hannah Stanton declare intentions of marriage and 
were married. Witnesses, Abigail, Abigail, Joseph, Henry, Benjamin, 
Benjamin Junior and Owen Stanton. 

8-14-1776. Benjamin Stanton son of Henry and John Tomlinson appointed rep. 
to Quarterly meeting. 

10-8-1776. Henry Stanton Junior requests a certificate to Pasquotank Monthly 
meeting. John Tomlinson appointed to prepare it with Henry Stanton. 

1-8-1777. It was ordered that John Tomlinson prepare a certificate for Henry 
Stanton signifying his parents and friends approbation of his intentions of 
marriage to Hannah Nixon of Little River. 

11-12-1777. At a Monthly meeting, Owen and Benjamin Stanton Junior, ap- 
pointed to represent the state of the meeting to Quarterly meeting. Ben- 
jamin Stanton Senior is appointed to prepare certificate for William Bishop. 
Benjamin Stanton Junior appointed clerk. Also Joseph and Benjamin 
Stanton Senior to visit those who want membership with us. 

1-14-1778. Henry Stanton is requested to record births and deaths as collected 
by our members. (Only a few pages of this record remains.) 

2-11-1778. Joseph Bishop and Abigail Stanton declare their intentions of mar- 
riage. Married 3-22-1778. Witnesses, Joseph, Benjamin, Benjamin 
Junior, William, Henry, Borden, Henry, and Hope Stanton and Ruth 
Howard, Abigail Stanton and Lydia Bishop. 

5-13-1778. Benjamin Senior and Junior Stanton appointed to attend Quarterly 
meeting. 

6-10-1778. Owen Stanton and Elizabeth Bishop declare intentions of marriage. 
Benjamin Stanton clerk, 8-7-1778, they did not know the meeting approved 
on account of sickness. 

6-12-1778. 



Abstract of Minutfs 55 

6-12-1778. Joseph Bishcjp and William Stanron to attend Quarter!}- meeting. 
Owen Stanton and Elizabeth Bishop married. Witnesses, Joseph, Henry, 
Benjamin, Benjamin Junior, William, Borden, Mary, Hope, Abigail Stanton 
et. al. 

6-9-1779. Benjamin Stanton Junior returns his certificate given him Third month. 

7-14-1779. Benjamin Stanton Senior and Joseph Bishop appointed representatives 
to Quarterly meeting. John Tomlinson and Benjamin Stanton Junior are 
appointed to draw papers recommending Benjamin Stanton .Senior as min- 
ister to the select meeting. Representatives ask for Quarterly meeting to be 
settled at Contentney. 

8-11-1779. Recommendation for Benjamin Stanton signed. 

8-22-1779. William Stanton and Lydia Bishop married. Witnesses, Benjamin, 
Joseph, Borden, Henry, Owen, Hope, Abigail Stanton and Ruth Howard 
et. al. 

12-8-1779. Benjamin Stanton Senior, to visit Adams creek meeting. Benjamin 
Stanton Junior and Jesse Thomas to go with him. 3-8-1780. They give an 
account of visit. 

4-12-1780. Benjamin St;mton Junior, and Alice Macy (or Mace) declare inten- 
tions of marriage. 

9-13-1780. Benjamin Stanton Junior, recommended minister. Is accepted. 

5-9-1781. Henry Stanton son of Henry being about to move to Contentney, 
requests a certificate. 

3-13-1782. Jesse Thomas marries Huld Bell. Witnesses, Owen, Benjamin, Ben- 
jamin, Junior, W^illiam and Abigail Stanton et. al. 

8-14-1782. Henry Stanton produced a certificate from Contentney Monthly meet- 
ing which was read and accepted and he and Nelly Melton declare their 
intentions of marriage. Benjamin Stanton Junior et. al. are appointed to 
inquire, etc. Susannah Stanton also proiluced a certificate and was accepted. 

10-9-1782. Friends appointed to attend report the marriage accomplished. .As 
the last named Henry Stanton died some one or more years before this 
transcript was made out we think this notice of marriage sufficient. 

11-13-1782. Boundary line between Contentney and this as follows: Begin at 
head of Dawson Swamp; along said swamp to Trent River, and down Trent 
River to the mouth of Resolution branch, and up the said branch to the 
head and said boundaries are agreed to by Contentney monthly meeting. 

1-8-1783. Benjamin Stanton the younger wants to take a trip to some northern 
Counties. 

2-12-1783. Benjamin Stanton Senior and Owen Stanton are appointed to labor 
with such as have slaves. 

5-14-1783. Benjamin Stanton wants to visit meetings. 6-11. Returned from 
visit. Monthly meeting sometimes at Core Creek and sometimes at meeting 
house on the Neuse Ri\er. 

3-11-1784. Benjamin Stanton, Junior, son of Henry Stanton late of Carteret 
County and Hope Stanton his wife, married to Mary Moore, daughter of 
John and Mary Moore of Mattamuskeet, of Hyde County. Witnesses, 
Benjamin Senior, Owen and Elizabeth Stanton et. al. 

1-1-1785. Owen and Benjamin Stanton appointed to visit families. 

6-4-1785. William Stanton appointed overseer. .Appoint a committee to see about 
building a shed to accommodate the women for preparative and monthly 
meeting. 

8-7-1785. Joseph Bishop and Elizabeth Bundy marry. Witnesses, Joshua Bundy. 
Borden, Owen, Benjamin, William, Hope, Susannah and .Abigail Stanton 
and Ruth Howard et. al. 

9-3-1785. Owen Stanton and Jesse Harris to procure a workman and material and 
construct a partition in the meeting house. 

1-7-1786. Benjamin Stanton Junior wishes to visit Trent and other meetings. 

1786. Benjamin Junior, Borden, Owen, Benjamin, William, Mary and Susannah 
Stanton are mentioned. 

4-1-1786. Monthly Meetiniz held at Clubfoot Creek upon Neuse River. 

3-4-1737. 



56 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

3-4-1787. Josiah Bundy son of Moses Bundy and wife, Jane, marries Methia 

Owen. Witnesses, Owen, Benjamin Junior, Benjamin, Hope, Abigail, 

Lydia and Nellie Stanton. 
8-4-1787. Benjamin, Owen, and Borden Stanton appointed to attend Quarterly 

Meeting and Benjamin Stanton Junior, if he is able to go desires to visit 

Friends meetings generally. 
10-6-1787. At a Monthly Meeting held for Core Sound upon Neuse, Benjamin 

Stanton, Junior, informs this meeting that he visited and had meetings at 

all the meeting houses in Pasquotank, and Perquimans Counties. Also 

Contentney Monthly meeting. Also Tar River and Jack Swamp meetings 

and Northampton Monthly meeting, and that it was considerable to his own 

mind. 
11-14-1787. Benajah Steele marries Sarah Bundy, daughter of Joshua Bundy of 

Craven County. Witnesses, Borden and Susannah Stanton, Abner Hall 

and Hannah Bundy et. a). 
5-3-1788. Our last yearly meeting held at Guilford. 
7-5-1788. Owen Stanton appointed to collect subscriptions instead of Benjamin 

Stanton who desires to give up. 
10-12-1788. Daniel Frazier Junior, marries Nellie Stanton widow of young Henry 

Stanton deceased. Witnesses, Benjamin Junior, Owen, William, Ben- 
jamin Senior and Joseph Stanton. 
1-3-1789. Appoint Benjamin Senior, Borden and Owen Stanton and William Mace 

representatives to First Quarterly Meeting, to be held on Contentney the 

Third Seventh day of this month. 
3-7-1789. Owen Stanton requests to be released as overseer. 
11-8-1789. Jesse Thomas of Jones County upon Trent marries Martha Briant. 
3-6-1790. Last Yearly Meeting held at Center, Guilford County. James Stanton 

accused of fornication which he doth not deny. 
2-5-1791. Friends of the lower First day meeting on Trent conclude on a place to 

build a meeting house on north side of Trent River near the mouth of Buck 

Horn branch. 
3-5-1791. Yearly Meeting alternately at Symons creek and New Garden meeting 

houses. 
2-6-1791. Aaron Brown marries Mary Howard. Witnesses, Owen, Benjamin, 

Senior and Junior, Borden, William, Elizabeth, and Sarah Stanton et. al. 
1-1-1791. Meeting adjourned to 1-5 on account of a severe snow storm. Very few 

Friends met. 
1-5-1791. Friends meeting house built on Buck Horn branch. 
4-7-1792. William Stanton has removed to Trent. Abigail Stanton recommended 

as an elder. 
1-5-1793. Josiah Bundy goes to Trent (Certificate 4-6-1793). 
3-2-1793. Hepsibah Stanton assists with the meeting. 
6-1-1793. Benjamin and Owen Stanton et. al. to select a site for a meeting house 

at Mattamuskeet, agreed it should be located at the lower end of James 

Hall's plantation near a grave yard, by a large mulberry tree. This meeting 

concurs. 
1-5-1794. Joshua Scott, son of Adam and Hannah Scott, and Elizabeth Stanton 

daughter of Benjamin and Abigail Stanton marry. Witnesses, Benjamin, 

Owen, Sarah, Avis, Anna Stanton et. al. 
6-7-1794. Benjamin and Owen Stanton et. al. appointed to devise some means so 

women friends can have more conveniences for holding business meetings. 
10-4-1794. Benjamin Stanton et. al. appointed representative to Quarterly 

meeting. 
3-7-1795. Benjamin Stanton informs this meeting that he expects to go to Phila- 
delphia on account of his outward business and requests a few lines to friends, 

he being a minister. The clerk is directed to furnish the same. Jesse 

Thomas was disowned for marrying a woman not of our society in less than 

two weeks after the death of his wife. 
5-2-1795. Benjamin Stanton returns from his voyage. 

1-2-1796. 



Abstract of Minutes 57 

1-12-17%. Benjamin and Owen Stanton et. al. appointed to attend Quarterly 
meeting. 

2-6-1796. Horton Howard appointed clerk. 

3-5-1796. Benjamin Stanton expects to go to Philadelphia on outward business 
and requests a few lines. He got them. Quarterly meeting at Contentncy, 
Wayne County, and Yearly Meeting at New Garden. 

4—2-1796. Owen Stanton and Horton Howard representatives to Quarterly meeting. 

11-6-1796. Richard Williams, son of Robert Williams and his wife, deceased and 
Sarah Stanton daughter of Benjamin and Abigail Stanton married. Wit- 
nesses, Benjamin, James, Owen, Owen Junior, Abigail, Avis, Anna Stan- 
ton, Horton Howard, J[oshua Scott, Jesse Thomas and Elizabeth Scott. 

9-3-1797. Jesse Thomas Junior, son of Jesse Thomas of Jones County, marries 
Avis Stanton daughter of Benjamin and Abigail Stanton. Witnesses, Ben- 
jamin, Abigail, Owen, Anna, Miriam, Elizabeth Stanton et. al. 

1798. Yearly meeting at Little River and Piney Woods. 

2-25-1798. Horton Howard marries Mary Dew. Witnesses, Elizabeth Scott and 
Avis Thomas, etc. 

3-31-1798. Benjamin Stanton and Horton Howard representatives to Quarterly 
Meeting. 

5-3-1798. Enoch Harris marries Lany Dew. Witnesses, Benjamin, Owen, Eliza- 
beth Stanton, Horton Howard, Sarah Williams, Elizabeth Thomas et. al. 

3-30-1799. Horton Howard given a certificate as he expects to travel into the back 
parts of Virginia, Pennsylvania and Northwest Territory. 7-27. Back 
from trip. 

8-31-1799. Certificate to Horton Howard and two sons Henry and Joseph to 
Westland Monthly Meeting, Pennsylvania. Josiah Bundy and three sons, 
Benjamin, Moses and Stanton, same place. 

9-29-1799. Aaron Brown, son of Edward Brown and Sarah, of Jones County, 
North Carolina, marries Anna Stanton daughter of Benjamin and .Abigail 
Stanton, Carteret County. Witnesses, Borden, Owen, Henry, Owen Junior, 
Abigail, Miriam, Abigail Junior, Hannah, Elizabeth Stanton, Elizabeth 
Scott, Avis Thomas, Sarah Williams et. al. 

3-29-1800. The sons of Abigail Stanton request certificates to western Pennsyl- 
vania and Northwest Territory. 

2-8-1801. Owen Stanton Junior, son of Owen Stanton Senior, and wife Elizabeth 
marries Abigail Davis, daughter of Joseph W. Davis and wife Susuhenna. 

3-30-1804. Owen Stanton and Jesse Harris representatives to Quarterly Meeting. 

1805. Great Contentney became Contentney. 

6-28-1807. Abigail and Owen Stanton appear on a marriage certificate. 

5-1-1808. Jacob Davis, son of Joseph Wicker Davis, marries Mary Stanton, 
daughter of Owen and Elizabeth Stanton. Witnesses, Rebecca, Owen, 
Elizabeth, Junior, and .Anna Stanton et. al. 

3-26-1809. Aaron Lancaster, son of William marries Miriam Stanton, daughter 
of Owen Stanton. Witnesses, Ruth, Elizabeth, Owen, Elizabeth, David, 
Owen Stanton Junior et. al. 

1810. Owen Stanton representative to Quarterly meeting. 

1810. Owen Stanton and James Stanton are witnesses to a marriage. 

7-31-1814. Elijah Harris marries Ruth Stanton, daughter of Owen and Elizabeth 
Stanton. Witnesses, Owen, Elizabeth, Anna Stanton et. al. 

1818. Elizabeth and -Anna Stanton et. al. witnesses to marriace. 

1819. Same. 

1820. Contentney Quarterly Meeting to be held once a year at Core Sound. 
9-27-1828. Jonathan Mace marries Susannah Stanton, daughter of Owen Stanton. 

Witnesses, Jonathan ani.1 .Abigail Stanton et. al. 
3-28-1829. Jonathan Stanton disowned for selling slaves and liquor. 
7-8-1829. Abigail Stanton's name appears on a marriage certificate. 
10-30-1841. Core Sound Monthly Meeting laid down. 




a °: 



THE STANTON BIBLE 




T""^"*^ HE original Stanton Bible was given to me 
in 1893 by my aunt Mary P. Dawson, who 
had had possession of it from her father's 
death in 1863. 

The Bible was handed on to me because of 
the "Macy" in my name. It seemed proper to my aunt 
that I should have this family treasure, since I was 
named for the Macys and was the youngest Stanton 
in her family who was a descendant of Abigail (Macy) 
Stanton, to whom the Bible at one time belonged and 
who brought it in a cart when she moved from North 
Carolina to Ohio in 1800. 

The Bible is a heavy volume and somewhat out of 
true book proportion on account ot trimming the 
pages when the book was rebound. It is, of course, 
impossible at this time to determine its original size 
or the kind ol material in which it was originally bound. 
It is conclusively known that Henry Stanton had the 
Bible rebound in St. Clairsville, Ohio, and us present 
size and appearance would indicate that previous 
rebindings had been necessary. The present cover 
is of natural colored leather that is still in good con- 
dition. 
59 



60 



Our Ancestors — The Stantoxs 



dition. The leather is stamped on one side with an 
**H" and on the other with an "S" — Henry Stanton's 
initials. The 






: ,ol4».iiwan,aDdBivbfeaforibtot»os: then «t4_1 

i wa I in his tya a one. that fouud t ^ro"'- <''«'• _j_^ ^^ 4,,^ fi» tlK -. 
J:,«0I4- 1 1 Sokwioo fad a yincyaid at Baal-hamcm, 1 9 Thou ,^*l^'^„^a : 
'^+'**- ht l« out tte vin=V3ri unto tetpere : every ont compuupM haiten to tuy vwa . ^ 

»-" fo. the fruit tlfcrcof Tras to bring a thou&nd to ^»-, ^^^^ ^^ „y bd<„^, »nd H«« 

^ri M^^i^ard which i. tni^, .V "f ^ ^^ t^^f-ft^" " ^ '""' "^ "^ '*" ^ ' 
OK : Ihou, O Solomon, -mji hm -i tbouOnd, mouriuitis of Jpicts. 



^ The Book ofthc Prophet IS ^ I ^^- :^ 

ru XV \ kn I of Sodom; giw en tmto^K kw of out ^^d^V 

,_,,,■ . , B . God. vepeopk of Gomorrah. .. E«*. ."■ 

1 Kulth em^htth if ?«Jji fir htrnhSua. ^ \o ^ purpofe U the mukitua««(W i'j-v 

^BrUm^u'!bkri<ai,v„m>:iofbn^«i- ^j^^is^s onto me ? faith the Lord :!jr*-«' "^ 




ar. 



fHA. 






* Dm!- 



^""HraeiTah , fet4» "f " ,4 Yoot new-moons, and y«lir 

fCdalT fafcmyi-oulhatcth: thevarca- 

2 b Hear, O heavens,' and me, » I am weary to bear <*«««. 

.,„, „, rv«,rh • foe the Lord hath fpoken, ., And ° when ye Iprtad fortli yom 

rSvl^loSi^i^^'tJ^upchtM^c,, and , wi,^^^^ 

*7 !^'«tefh."tw«r. and the a6 CK^faul ^Tw^. . ^^ ^ -. * 
U-' ^<w-.^^., ^Tlfaeldoth nJtknow, my ,6 ^ Waft ye, nukeyw^u P?*.**? 
h» tnaAeis cnbs iw itraei Qotn uDi , ^ ^^f of your deings fiom befiat «une ~~ 

„,oll,fiedw.thHomt««n ■ I^;'°,^:\5:'^rthe feitWul pfy. 

7 ' ^Tfi^v^u Urd ftSn^S^ d^our it harlot? it was M of judgment' ngto 
bomt with fire, yoaf .';'"°.";' * + „ over- Inrfcedinit: but now murdtieis. .. 












, in your prdence, aiKi « u dtialatc T «» ""^ iT' Thy fJvct is become drofi, »|r 

vsr^^^"-^. -fl^'' i^j"*" f"'*^'^^'' "t^ a««*'««««^*°™«.] 

l^bS^.«i we Qwuldhavtbten like unto «*« umo itan. ^ ^^^. ...,„-■, .i;.^^; 
Gomorrah. . r^ ^ . „*. jSlT.V.VV'Ji"-"-"''*-''-'^'' ' "^ 

'^T? H«t the wed rf the I5.P, |en»^ r^T^ ■•.>^'- 

'-■ "' ■ ,. ..• . ■■■ '■*•' "•■ 



SPECIMEN OF TYPE PAGE 

A REPRODUCTION OF A PAGE FROM THE SlANTOM BiBLE SHOWING THE KIND OF TYPE 
USED, THE WOOD-CUT INITIAL LETTER, AND THE WORN CONDITION OF THE PAGe'S EDGE. 



The S'ianton Hiiu.k 



f>] 



The paper on which the text is printed is a hand-made 
paper similar to the book paper so often used in the 
early part of the eighteenth century. Many of the 

pages 



TifsOfZ.:'--^ 



THE N 



iJESTAMENTi 



Lord and Saviour i-lh 
JESUS CHRIST^ ^^ 

Newly* Translated out of the 

'I O R*i G I N A L 'G R E E K, 

* " And witlr the former . 

T R^ N S L A T I O N S§ | f 

Diligently Compared and Rbvisbd. 



T?p l>« ail>i)eflii'* ^pecal Command. 



Appc 



ed to 



W^ 



* E fj J y Ji u 
iPrtntcd byRoBBRT Frkebaia 

i Mijdly's Printer*. M.IJCC. 




NEW TESTAMENT TITI.K PAC;K 

A REPRODUCTION OF THE TITLE PACE FOR THE NkVV TESrAUENr PORnOV OF TUt 
bTANTON UlBLE. TllIS PACE SHOWS THE UU) WOOD-OIT LETTERS OF VARVINO SUES 
THAT WERE USED IN THE SAUK LINE OK TYPE, ALSO THE TIME AND PLACE OF PRINTING. 



62 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



pages are badly worn, and a few completely gone 
from the book. The book's edges are brown from age 
and ragged from continuous use. It is easy to discern 

from 







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PAGE FROM FAMILY RECORD 

A REPRODUCTION OF ONE OF THE MANY FLY-LEAVES THAT HAVE BEEN DSED TO RECORD 

THE FAMILY HISTORY. ThIS PARTICUL.i\R PAGE SHOWS THE RECORD OF THE BIRTHS OF 

SEVERAL OF THE SLAVES OF THE FAMILY. 



The Stantom Biblk 6.3 

from the pages' worn edges the favorite selections 
of our sires. Some portions of the text have unstained 
and unwrinkled pages, while in other parts of the 
Holy Writ the fingers of the devout have worn the 
paper thin and sear. 

An attempt was once made to reinforce the tattered 
paper by pasting a transparent paper over the entire 
page. The idea was excellent, and the intent beautiful, 
but the materials, although the best at the time, were 
unsuited for a perfect result. The paper used was 
heavy and stiff and somewhat obscures the printing 
underneath. 

The Bible, although now in one volume, was origi- 
nally composed of two. The Old Testament was 
printed in London in 1712, and the New Testament 
in Edinburgh in 1731. In addition to the Old and 
New Testaments, the Bible contains the Apocrypha. 
The text is bold and plain and all the large type and 
the illuminated initial letters are from wood cuts. 

Some of the family records have been written in the 
Bible from time to time, and a very interesting part 
of the information recorded is the birth-date and 
names ot the slaves. 

There is no record that establishes the identity 
of the original purchaser, or of the names of any pos- 
sible owners before Benjamin Stanton. As there is a 
record of Benjamin Stanton's first marriage, and ot 
the death oi his first wife, it is reasonable to conclude 
that the Bible belonged to the Stanton and not the 
Macy family. 

Notwithstanding the uncertainty that obscures the 
early history of this Bible, suffice it to say that it is a 
precious and venerable treasure whose identity is 

established 



64 



Our Ancestors — The Stantoxs 



established with Benjamin and Abigail Stanton, and 
whose hereditary existence in our family is due to 
the devout thought and reverent love for the better 
things in life, which held Abigail (Macy) Stanton to 
the Bible's possession through her long, widowed life 
and to bequeath the Bible to her son Henry for his use 
when she was past the vale of its teachings. 



Lansdowncy 

Pennsylvania, 

1921. 



y^^^^^^&^^M- '^^^^^,,-<2^^^X^:^^^ 




THE OPEN BIBLE 



A 



The Sea Captain 

STORY told me when a small hoy hy 
my father, Eli Stanton, was of "an Old 
Uncle" who was captain of a vessel. 
He did not say this "uncle" was a 
Stanton, but gave me that impression. Nor did 
he say whether the vessel was a fishing vessel or 
a merchantman, but the story seems to fit the 
practice on board a fishing vessel. It was cus- 
tomary to keep a man on watch tor schools of 
fish or for whales and when one was sighted to 
endeavor to secure the catch. 

One day when this old uncle, the captain, was 
high up on the mast in the "lookout," there was 
a cry of "Man overboard'." As soon as the 
captain learned who it was, he knew the man 
could not swim, so watched for him to come up 
and then dived trom the lookout, cleared the side 
of the vessel, caught the drowning man, brought 
him aboard, and thus saved his life. Such ac- 
tion must have required a brave heart as well 
as a "strong arm." T have often wondered how 
many of us now living would attempt a deed 

so heroic. 

W. H. S. 




■^ 
V 



w 



< % 



B 



THOMAS MACY 

EFORE his embarkation for America Thomas 
Macy lived in the parish of Chilmark, near 
Salisbury, England. The date of his arrival in 
this country is not known, but it was probably 
in 1635. He is known to be the ancestor of 
all the Macys in America, for no other had a male 
descendant. The first record of Thomas Macy in this 
country is dated September sixth, 1639, when he took 
the freeman's oath at Newbury, Massachusetts. In 
this same year a number of the citizens of Newbury 
decided to move a short distance to a more open space 
which they named Salisbury, after Salisbury in Eng- 
land. Thomas Macy's name appears sixty-sixth on 
the list of first settlers of this little town. 

The laws made in Massachusetts in regard to Friends 
in 1656-7 and those in regard to all who did not attend 
the Puritan Church, in 1658, explain why a determined 
and energetic man like Thomas Macy concluded to 
find a place, if possible, where there was unlimited re- 
ligious liberty. He had been fined for not attending 
the Puritan Church and for giving shelter to some 

Quakers 
67 



Thomas Macy 69 

Quakers during a storm. The latter incident, however, 
occurred after he had decided to move. Thus, he was 
driven from Massachusetts by the same persecuting 
spirit that drove the Pilgrims from the shores of 
England. 

On July second, 1659, he and nine others concluded 
the purchase of the Island of Nantucket from Thomas 
Mayhew. Later that same year Thomas Macy with 
his family and two or three others embarked in a small 
sailboat and started for Nantucket. They found there 
about three thousand Indians, who received them 
kindly, but no white settlers were there. After occu- 
pying temporary quarters for the winter, at the west 
end of the island, he selected for a permanent home, 
land near Reed Pond, called Wattacomet, a mile and 
a half northwest of the present town of Nantucket. 

He died April nineteenth, 1682, aged seventy-four, 
and was buried on his place. His wife, Sarah (Hop- 
cott) Macy, was also a native of Chilmark, England. 
She died in 1706, aged ninety-four years. 



JOHN MACY 

|OHN MACY, son of Thomas and Sarah 
Macy, was born July fourteenth, 1655. He 
married Deborah Gardner, daughter ot Rich- 
ard Gardner and Sarah Shattuck. He was 
but four years old when his father moved 
to Nantucket. He was the only son who married, and 
all the Macys in ^America are descended from him, as 
well as from his father, Thomas Macy. He died Oc- 
tober fourteenth, 1691. 




JOHN MACY 



|OHN MACY, second of the name, 1675-1751, 
married Judith Worth, daughter of John 
Worth and Miriam Gardner. He and his 
wife were the first of the family to join the 
religious Society of Friends. The first Friends 
Meeting established on the Island of Nantucket dated 
from 1708, and they joined in 1711. Many other mem- 
bers of the family joined soon afterwards. 




DAVID MACY 




D" AVID MACY, born September Twelfth, 
1714, son of John Macy and Judith Worth, 
married Dinah Gardner, daughter ot Solo- 
mon Gardner and Anna Coffin. Among 
those who went to North Carolina, in 1771, 
on account of the decline in whale fishing at Nantucket, 
were David Macy and many ot his family. He left 
Nantucket April Twenty-eighth, 1771, for New Garden, 
Guilford County, North Carolina. Died October 
Thirteenth, 1778. 



SETH MACY 

This story of Seth Macy was contributed by Dr. Byron 
Stanton. Seth Macy was a brother of David Macy and an 
uncle of Abigail (Macy) Stanton. 

ETH was among those who never married. He was a sea 
captain. I remember hearing my father relate as a 
tradition which came down to him in the Macy family, 
a story of Seth Macy, which I have recently seen in 
print. In the summer of 1754 the ship Grampus, Seth 
Macy, Captain, left Nantucket for London with a cargo of oil. 
Her owner, Jethro Coffin, was on board. Both owner and 
Captain were Quakers, as also were most of the crew. Never- 
theless, as England and France were then at war, Seth urged 
Jethro to arm the vessel. But Jethro, true to his non-resistance 
principles, refused. The voyage was about two-thirds accom- 
plished when, as Seth had feared, they fell in with a French 
privateer which gave chase. Jethro directed Seth to yield with- 
out resistance, but Seth was not that kind of Quaker. "Go 
thou below, Jethro, I am commander of this vessel." 

Macy so managed his vessel as to give the Frenchmen the 
impression that he was about to" bring her to" in order to sur- 
render, when, suddenly changing the course of the ship, she 
bore down on the privateer, whose officers discovered Macy's 
design too late to prevent its execution. 

"If thou dost intend to run her down," said Jethro, "ease 
thy helm a little and give them a chance for their lives." 

"Stand by to lower the boats," thundered Macy. A groan 
of horror escaped his own crew, for not until this moment had 
they really seen the design of their Captain, and the swarthiest 
cheek grew pale. . . . The schooner lay in the trough of the 
sea, her decks covered with confusion, and the huge bulk of the 
Grampus poising on the last high wave above her. . . . "Down 
with the boats from the quarter deck; launch the long boats!" 
The command could not have been uttered or executed sooner 
with safety, but it came too late. The aim of Seth had been too 
fatally sure. His own boat narrowly escaped being sucked into 
the whirlpool made by the sinking schooner. Not one of the 
Frenchmen's crew rose or again saw the light of day. 



Will of Dinah Macy 

Whereas I Dinah Macy widow, of the county of Gilford and 
State of North Carolina well knowing the uncertainty of life and 
certainty of Death and being aged but of sound mind and memory 
do leave the following lines as my last will and Testament relat- 
ing to such Temporals as I am posysed of — First it is my will 
that all my Just debts and funeral expenses be paid up and dis- 
charged by my Executors here after named in due time. 

2 ly. I give unto my Daughter Anna Macy my large looking 

glass and my large puter platter with my small tin Comister 
and small leather trunk with my large stone pitcher and 
stone jug and large walnut chair. 

3 ly. I give unto my Daughter Abigail Stanton my woosted 

gound and my dark coulored huey coat, two new hanker- 
chiefs checked also one coperas coulord and three checked 
also cloth of a checked apron. 

4 ly. I give unto my Grand Daughter Dinah Macy my hand- 

irons, fire shovel and tongs with my Surred History and 
EUwoods history and my two chairs. 

5 ly. I give unto my Daughter in law Hannah Macy my Duffed 

blanket one toe sheet my Round table my pillows. 

6 ly. I give unto my Grand Daughter Anna Ozment one garlick 

sheet also I give her one checked apron and my warming 
pan. 

7 th. I give unto my Grand Son Thadeus Macy one black heiter 

four years old. 

8 th. I give unto my Grand Daughter Hyrybuck Russell one 

half of the feathers out of my bed with one bolster and one 

fillow also one sheet apron, 
give unto my Grand Daughter Miriam Swaine one sheet 
apron. 

10th 
73 



74 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

10 th. I give unto my two Grand Sons Isaac Macy and David 

Macy all my carpenter tools and farming tools with all 
the remainder of my letters to be equally divided between 
them, also I give my large chest and David my small one 
with my coverlid. 

11 th. I give unto my two Grand Daughters Abigail Macy and 

Anna Macy each one large silver spoon with one feather 
bed and the remaining part of the other feather bed, my 
iron stand, my bucket and large tea pot to be equaly divided 
between them with my two bed steads and cord. 

12 th. I give unto my Grand Daughter Sarah Macy my point 

puter cup. 

13 th. I give unto Daughter Anna Macy and my Daughter in law 

Hanna Macy all the remaining part of my wearing apperal 
and house hold furniture to be equally divided between 
them, and lastly I constitute and appoint my son in law 
Enoch Macy and Daughter in law Hanna Macy my whole 
and sole executor and executrix of this my last will and 
testament Ratifying and allowing what so ever they may 
lawfully do or cause to be done in witness where of I have 
here unto set my hand and affixed my seal this 18th day 

(1796) 
of the 5th mo. and year of One thousand seven hundred 
and Ninty Six. 

Signed, sealed and acknowledged to be Dinah Macy's last 
will and testament in the presence of us 
Thadeus Macy Dianah Macy (Seal) 

Dianna Joy 

State of North Carolina\ February Court 1797 

Gulford County j 

Thadeus Macy proved the execution of the with in will in 
open court and on motion let it be recorded. Then came 
in Enoch Macy and Hannah Macy and qualified as Execu- 
tors agreeable to law. — Test. 

John Hamilton elk. 



Brnut 
point 




Map of Nantucket Town and Vicinitv. Nantucket Isl.\m>. 



Abigail (Macy) stanton 




ABIGAIL STANTON (1753-1825), wite ot 
Benjamin Stanton, was a native ot Nan- 
tucket. When nineteen years ot age, in 1772, 
she emigrated with her parents, David and 
Dinah Macy, to New Garden, North Carohna. 
After a residence of nearly two years, she was married 
to Benjamin Stanton, of Carteret County, that state, 
where she resided during the twenty-five years ot her 
married life, and occupied as a dwelling the house 
where her husband was horn and lived through lite, and 
which was therefore the birthplace of all their children. 

Abigail 

75 



76 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




NEW GARDEN MEETING HOUSE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Photograph taken 187S. 




THE HOUSE OF ALBERT PEEL 

The lumber of the old New Garden Meeting House was purchased and portions 

OF it used in building this house. The ceiling boards and doors are of yellow poplar 

and are said to be from the Meeting House whose weatherboarding was re-used 

ON the central portion of the dwelling. 



Abj(;aii. 



Mac 




THE LOCATION OF NEW GARDEN MEETING HOUSE 

The FOtIR SQUARE STONES WITH INCLINED TOPS MARK WHERE THE FOfR CORNERS OF 
THE HOUSE STOOD. BENJAMIN StANTON AND AbIC.AIL MaCY WERE MARRIED HERE 

9-29-1773. 



TllK LETTERED STONE 

tablet which stands 
on the site of the 
New CiArden Meeting 
House and marks for 



S 



ALL TIMF THE SPOT 

WHERE OCR ANCrsrO«S 

WOKSHIPEO AND UEKE 

MARRIED 



Our Ancestors^The Stantons 



UkA ■-'^' 




THE HOMESITE OF DAVID MACY 

North of Guilford College, North Carolina. 



Abigail Stanton, after the death of her husband, 
which occurred in December of 1798, soon determined 
to emigrate to Jefferson County, Ohio, with her six 
minor children. Accordingly, in the Spring of- 1800, 
accompanied by her son-in-law and his wife, Aaron and 
Anna Brown, she left her old home with all its endear- 
ing ties, in order to escape the great evil, with its 
blighting effects, that overshadowed all — taking a part | 
of her husband's former slaves with her, and leaving 
behind her three oldest married daughters, Elizabeth 
Scott, Sarah Williams, and x4.vis Thomas, with their 
husbands and children. After crossing the Allegheny 
Mountains, she remained some three or four months 
near Brownsville, Pennsylvania, awaiting the coming 
into market of the land where she designed settling, 
and in the fall of that year, she purchased land from 
the Government, one mile west of where Mount 

Pleasant 



Abk;aii, (Macv) Stanton 



79 



Pleasant was subsequently located, paying tor all 
squatter improvements thereon, including two log 
cabins, one of which she occupied a short time. In 
1802 she erected a more commodious cabin and occu- 
pied it. She was one of the first pioneers in that vicin- 
ity. Though her family consisted of six minor chil- 
dren — the eldest being her son Henry, who was but 
sixteen years old — she kept pace with her neighbors in 

the 




THE HOME OF DAVID MACV 

The SMALtKR PORTION OF THK nl'ILDINC. SHOWN WAS PROnAniA STANPlNi; PIRISG 
UIS LIFETIME, AND IF SO. ABIGAIL MaCY LIVED HERE AT THE TIME OF HER MARRIAUE 

TO Benjamin Stanton. 









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Scale 



Our A>jcestors- — The Stantons 




Map of Mount Pleasant and Vicinitv, Jeff rson County, Ohio, Showing the Early Land Holdings of the Stantons 



MAP OF MACY FARM 

GUILFORD COUNTY, 
N.C. 




80 



ArufiAii, (Macv) Stanton 



the improvement of her farm, and hers was among 
the first bearing orchards. Within two years, her 
three eldest daughters left the South and came and 
settled in her vicinity. 

If the property in the South belonging to the heirs 
of Benjamin Stanton had been in a land of freedom, it 
would have been of great value; but surrounded by 
slavery and abandoned by all the kindred, only a 
small sum was realized for it. 

For the first ten or twelve years following 1802, 
Abigail Stanton's children were all located within two 
miles of her residence, and her house was the great 
resort of her children and grandchildren. She sold her 
farm after occupying it for seventeen years, and dur- 
ing the last years of her life, though her home was with 
her youngest daughter, Lydia Lewis, in Harrisville, she 
spent much of her time with her daughters Avis Thomas, 
at Mount Pleasant, and Abigail Mitchner, near Cadiz. 

Her three younger sons, David, Benjamin, an^l 
Joseph, studied medicine and became successful prac- 
titioners. Sixty grandchildren were numbered among 
her descendants. All her children, ten in number, 
arrived at maturity and were married, making twenty 
in all, and not a death had crossed her threshold. 

Her grandson, the son of Dr. David Stanton, the 
late Edwin M. Stanton, the great war secretary, in 
performing such conspicucnis part in putting down the 
Rebellion and sweeping slavery from the land, showed 
conclusively that the old blood ot the exiles was not 
extinct in her posterity. 

She was a member of the Society of Friends by 
birthright, had strong faith in the doctrines of that 
jsect, and for many years was an Elder in the Society. 

She 



82 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



She died at Harrisvllle, in the month of June, 1825, 
in the seventy-third year of her age. Her funeral was 
attended by a large number of relatives and friends. 
She was buried in Friends' burying ground, at Harris- 
vllle, Harrison County, Ohio. 

The above article was compiled 
from one written by N. M. Thomas 
in June, 1881. 




The Kettle ant) Craxe in the EooR-YARn 



The Matron 

Abigail Siantox 

A Tale of the Days That are Gone 

There was a rime wlien all men li\eii in huts 

And cabins made ()t logs amongst the woods, 

And chopped down trees and split them up with gluts, 

And did almost without cash, or goods; 

Then women cared little for caps or hoods; 

But they were ever full of mirth and glee. 

And children sported round in mirthful brood.s 

As happy as such urchins well can be, 

Or sporting o'er the lawn, or couched on ]->arent's knee. 

And there was one I knew among the train, 

A widowed matron with a little Hock, 

Who sought with ardent eH'orts to maintain 

A steady course beneath misfortune's shock. 

Watching with steady eye, each dangert)us rt)ck 

On which the incautious bark is often ilriven. 

Stemming like mariner the waves that broke 

Along the channel, craggy anil une\ en, 

Till some safe port be gained on earth — perhaps in heaven. 

For she was cradled on yon rugged isle 

Where men catch vigor from the foaming wave. 

And freedom from the wind, and strength trom toil, 

And patience from misfortune, and grow brave 

In combating the wrong — still wont to lave 

The limbs of freemen in the briny Hood; 

b'or in that rugged spot I ween no slave. 

E'er crouched beneath a haughty tyrant's rod. 

Nor man superior owned, save when he bowed to God. 

83 



84 Our i\NCESTORS — The Staxtoxs 

But there with frantic tumult to the shore 

The waves came sweeping o'er the driven sand 

When swelled with wind to full majestic roar, 

And booming onward, wild, sublime, and grand. 

As urged by some unseen all potent hand, 

Spurning resistance and defying bound. 

Till checked their fury by the opposing strand, 

They shrink, retiring with a sullen sound 

Back to their coral caves and ocean depths profound. 

Such was her birthplace, and her pedigree 

Was of that hardy stock by Whittier sung. 

Who ever scorned to bow the supple knee. 

Or bend the neck to priest who urged the wrong. 

But sought a residence the wilds among 

That crowned this little isle in former day. 

Where free in thought, in deeds of virtue strong. 

Scorning each bigot power's tyrannic sway, 

He whiled a long, long life in virtuous deeds away. 

And from his hardy line there sprung a race 

Of sturdy seamen, daring, bold and brave, 

Whose chief delight has ever been to chase 

The huge sea monster in the icy wave, 

Mounting the foaming surges still that lave 

From frozen Greenland to the southern pole. 

Braving the fury of the storms that rave, 

And toss old ocean with tumultuous roll, 

With heart unawed by fear, with an undaunted soul. 

Nantucket! such thy sons have ever been. 
And such heaven grant that they may still remain; 
And such thy daughters, too — and such I ween 
Was she, the heroine of this simple strain, 
Dauntless in peril, ardent to maintain 
A life of virtue in this world of wrong. 
With prayerful efforts seeking to retain 
Patience in suffering and temptation strong. 
Fostering all virtuous traits to women that belong. 

There was she nurtured on that little spot. 

Nor was she anxious for a wider sphere. 

But who so wise to scan man's future lot. 

Or say on earth where ends life's strange career.^ 

For some short space perhaps we linger here. 

Veering and changing, tossing to and fro; 

Child of mutation — bard, nor sage, nor seer. 

Can tell what change his lot may undergo. 

Careering through this world of mingled joy and woe. 



Ihk Maikon sf 

Her lot was cast upon a sunny strand, 

Where southern zephyrs breathe through myrtle groves, 

And flowery bowers, by fragrant breezes fanned, 

Seemed formed for fit retreats of joy and love. 

Where clustering vines on gay magnolias move 

Their graceful tendrils to each passing wind, 

And fawns and lambs in sportive circles rove 

'Mid verdant groves with flowery woodbine twined, 

All like some fairy scene for perfect liliss designed. 

And there the gentle wave with graceful swell 

Came rippling shoreward o'er its pearl-clad bed, 

And many a coral wreath and sparkling shell. 

Their beauteous tints and burnished luster shed. 

And sportive schools of finny tenants sped 

In playful gambols through the briny flood, 

And flocks of swans along the margin fed. 

Or on the swelling wave majestic rode. 

Where playful sea fowls sport in many a noisy brood. 

And there she lived in that enchanting land, 

By nature's bounty decked for blessed abode. 

But, ah! it was not blessed, for despot hand 

Its rosy walks with poison thorns hail strewed. 

And Tyranny there sat enthroned in blood. 

The cruel master and the crouching slave, 

And crusheil humanity poured out a flood 

Of bitter tears, such as are wont to lave 

The oppressor's cruel path, while none bedew his grave. 

There vice and ignorance triumphant reign, 

And pomp and poverty stalk side by side, 

And lust and vanity and all the train 

Dragged by the car where powers despotic ride. 

And whips and implements of torture dyed 

In human blood, and altars, too, and throne 

Were built of skeletons of those who died, 

As millions trodden down and crushed have ilonc, 

\'ictims on slavery's shrine, unpitied and unknown. 

Alas, my native land! Is tiiis thy state? 

And thus forever, ever, must it be? 

Ah! would to Providence that cruel fate 

Hail ne'er discovered, or had kept thee free! 

Oh, that in the long future I could see 

Some hope that thou wouldst break the galling chain 

That binds alike thy shackled slave and thee 

In degradation, where you must remain 

While men their fellow-men in bondaee base retain. 



86 Our Ancestors — The Stantoxs 

Land of the sunny south, — land of my birth, 
Land of my childhood and my father's tomb — 
Of all the spots on this delightful earth, 
There's none on which I would so blithely roam 
As on thy flowery plains, could I but come 
And find thee free trom that o'ershadowing cloud, 
That hovers o'er thee, like impending doom. 
Where murmuring thunders mutter long and loud — 
Oppression covering all with one impervious shroud. 

Oh, strike that bloody banner, crimson red! 

Undo the fetter and unbind the chain! 

Nor let the voice of mercy ever plead. 

Plead for the bondman still, and plead in vain. 

From thy broad scutcheon wipe that gory stain. 

So shall thy groves once more with peace abound. 

And in thy courts the full harmonious strain 

Of hope, and joy, and gladness shall resound. 

And plenty pour her horn and comfort flow around. 

How widely have I wandered from my theme! 

I fain would sing of one as yet unsung — 

But all before me, like some fleeting dream. 

The visions of the past career along, — 

Could I but catch and pour them forth in song, 

With what strange transport would my sonnet glow 

From pictures of the past, drawn bright and strong, 

The sympathizing soul should quickly know 

To smile for others' joy — to weep for others' woe. 

The matron, with the partner of her lot. 
There lived and loved and was beloved in turn. 
For in the stately hall or in the cot, 
. 'Mid those who banquet, or 'mid those who mourn. 
She held her court — and ever prompt to earn 
The bliss, the consciousness of doing good. 
She caused the sinking lamp of hope to burn, 
■ Misfortune's thorny track with comfort strewed. 
And votaries, of vice to paths of virtue, wooed. 

Beneath the shelter of their friendly dome 

No unpaid bondman spread the costly board, 

But there the needy ever found a home — 

A shelter for the vassal and the lord. 

The hardy sailor with misfortune scarred. 

And ministers of peace together joined, 

Nor Jew, nor Turk, nor husbandman, nor bard. 

E'er asked protection which he did not find. 

For all were brethren there, who represent mankind. 



The Matron 



And there the matron watched the little flock 

That clustered round her, with maternal care, 

And strove to teach their youthful feet to walk 

In paths of virtue, and to shun the snare 

That vice still spreads for footsteps unaware 

Of her insidious charms; and of their store 

To want and misery to yield a share — 

For "He," she taught, "who giveth to the poor 

But lendeth to the Lord, and shall receive the more" — 

In the strict paths of justice still to tread, 

To shun vile falsehood as the gate to death, 

The woe-worn wanderer on his way to lead. 

To strive to copy "Him of Nazareth," 

In prayer and praise to spend their earliest breath, 

Nor censure erring man with word severe. 

To trust in Providence with constant faifh, 

To mercy's voice to lend an open ear, 

And strive from every eye to wipe off every tear. 

As some strong archer, conscious of his power. 

With deadly arrow seeks the brightest shield. 

As strongest bulwark and the loftiest tower, 

Are, by the invader, first compelled to yield, 

Even so the heights of human bliss have reeled 

Beneath thy shafts, oh. Death! Thus, by one stroke, 

Low smitten to the dust, and scathed and peeled, 

Were the rich comforts of that little fl(jck — 

Their safeguard — -snatched away, their arm of safety broke. 

In yon lone churchyard now with pines o'ergrown, 

Fast by that house whose courts he loved to tread. 

To bend the knee to sue the Eternal Throne, 

Or litt in humble thanks his reverend head, 

'Mid those who erst his friendly counsel led, 

He lies in calm repose — his labor done. 

No restless spirit haunts his peaceful bed, 

And by no monument the spot is kncnvn. 

Save a green, grassy mound, and an unlettcrct.1 stone. 

Now, all forsaken is that lonely spot. 

And silent as the mansions of the tomb. 

Save where the owlet pours its solemn note. 

From midst the lofty Hr tree's shady gloom; 

Save that some pensive wanderer here may roam, 

'Mid the cool grove, or by the gentle rill. 

To listen to the drowsy beetle's hum. 

Or catch with startled ear the piercing thrill. 

That issues frotii the throat of the lone whippoorwill. 



88 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

As some tall ship before a lively gale, 

Dashed by misfortune on a desert coast, 

'Mid cheering speed beneath her swelling sail. 

Scarce sees the danger till by breakers tossed. 

Her hull all shattered and her pilot lost, 

So seemed the matron now, tossed to and fro. 

Sorrow and care at once her mind engrossed. 

Ah! who hath ever known a widow's woe, 

Or felt an orphan's loss, save they who shared the blow? 

She stood astonished on the barren shore, 

Amid the remnant of her helpless crew, 

And heard the sea with angry tempests roar, 

Whose snares and dangers, oh! too well she knew. 

O'er it the winds of disappointment blew, 

And vice and ruin haunted every coast, 

The wrecks of ruined hopes its shores bestrew. 

And honor forfeited and virtue lost. 

And many a righteous aim amid temptation tossed. 

And on the other side there lay the land, 

And such a land! Oh, Heaven! where hast thou seen? 

For there oppression ruled with iron hand, 

And spread out darkness where the light had been; 

For chattled slavery blighted all the scene. 

Where once the garden grew there sprang a thorn. 

And o'er the cultured fields erst clothed in green. 

There fell a mildew; and the rosy morn 

By superstitious reign was turned to night forlorn. 

"Oh, Thou, the father of the fatherless," 

'Twas thus e'en now methinks I hear her pray, 

"Support in want, and succor in distress. 

The orphan's shelter, and the widow's stay, 

Be Thou in mercy pleased to send a ray 

Of light to guide through this terrene abode; 

Permit not Thou the unskilled feet to stray, 

But guide them safely in the peaceful road, 

That leads through Nature's temple, up to Nature's God." 

The matron spake and sunk to soft repose. 

When, in the airy vision of the night, 

On wild imagination's wing she rose. 

And stood upon the mountain's lofty height 

That skirts the Atlantic plain, bounding the sight 

Of civilized abode. Beyond there lay 

A vast extended region, where the light 

Of science scarce had sent a wandering ray 

To announce the rising morn, the approach of social day. 



ThK Ma'I RON Wj 

Beside her feet there sprang a little rill 

That running westward o'er its rocky bed. 

Grew wide and deep, until it seemed to fill 

A long extended valley where it sped 

Onward with gentle current, till it led 

A thousand streamlets from their mountain source. 

Which, with their cool and crystal waters, fed 

And added to its majesty and force, 

As far, and farther still, it swept its boundless course. 

Far to the north as visioned eye could reach, 
A silvery lake extends its bright expanse, 
Cool sylvan groves along its borders stretch 
And playful wavelets on its margin dance; 
The quivering lightbeams from its surface glance. 
Reflecting sky, and bank, and bush, and tree, 
Which, all invert, in sportive eddies pranced, 
So broad, so bright, so clear, it seemed to be, 
As 'twere the mirror of some sylvan deity. 

And from its eastern margin poured a flooil 

Of waters, terrible, sublime and dread — 

It seemed as if the forming hand of God 

Had reared the mountains, and scooped out the bed 

To hold the mighty deep, and then had sped 

To fill old ocean to his farthest shore, 

And opening wide the floodgates, all that led 

From Heaven's great reservoir, had thence let pour 

A foaming cataract, in all its wild uproar. 

On the steep slopes and vales beyond the stream 
An unpierced forest reared its tangled head; 
So thick and dark its wild recesses seem. 
As though a sunbeam scarce could pierce its shade. 
The wolf and wild deer in its shelter strayed, 
And through its haunts the untaught Indian trod, 
The wild flower here the craggy cliff arrayed, 
And there the panther held his dread abode, 
All wild as fire created by the hand of God. 

So still, so wild, so wide, the scene appeared, 

That solitude might here erect her throne. 

To cottage in this widespread forest reareil, 

The world of vice and crime might ne'er be known. 

In that new soil the seeds of virtue sown 

Might grow unstifled by the thorns of wrong, 

The seeds of slavery's mildew were not sown. 

Nor chains, nor fetters in these wilds belong. 

But Freedom there might pour her sweetest, wildest song. 



90 



Our Ancestors^The Stantons 



The dream departed, and the matron woke — 
Fresh rays of hope, like morn, illumed her soul, 
As though a joyful day again had broke. 
And from her heart did clouds of sorrow roll. 
Reason and fortitude assumed control 
Once more in her uncrushed, heroic mind, 
And, constant as the needle to the pole. 
Her powers and energy were all combined, 
In that wild wilderness a resting place to find. 

Like bird of passage that collects her brood 

When burning sun or wintry storms arise, 

And seeks amid some distant solitude, 

For milder clime and more congenial skies. 

So seeks the matron now, with purpose wise. 

To fly the impending storms that gather round, 

She combats danger, want and toil, and flies 

To seek a home amidst the wilds profound. 

And here, amid the wilds, a home at length she found. 



Written about 1845 
at Salem, Ohio 



— D?: Benja77iin Stanton. 



The ginger jar of 
Abigail Stanton, 
vvho brought it 
TROM North Caeo- 
IINA TO Ohio in 
1800. 




The jar was filled 

with GINGER TO BE 
USED AS A MEDICINE. 
Now IN THE HOME OF 

Robert Smith 



ANECDOTES 
CONCERNING ABIGAIL (MACY) STANTON 



SOON after her husband's death, Abigail 
(Macy) Stanton turned her face towards 
the remote and almost unexplored wilderness 
west of the Ohio River. She made the jour- 
ney with a considerable body, all members 
ot the Society of Friends, who, like herself, felt the gall 
ot slavery's presence too keenly to remain under its 
shadow. They crossed the river at Portland, now known 
as Rayland. The trees had to be felled before the 
teams could proceed. Abigail Stanton's wagon is 
said to have been the first to enter this section of 
the country. They got to Concord, now called Colerain, 
by First-day. Here they stopped, rolled some logs 
together, sat down, and felt the>- hael a very good 
meeting. 

The Stantons located one mile west of Mount 
Pleasant, Ohio, on a tract of land containing four 
hundred and eighty acres. Surrounded by the ditti- 
culties ot pioneer life, Abigail established a home under 
an administration so wise that as her children grew 

and 
91 



92 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



and passed out into the world, it was to positions of 
honor and usefulness. 

She was a member of the Society of Friends by 
birthright, had strong faith in the doctrines of that 
sect, and for many years was an Elder in the Society. 

Her son Henry was the first person to do his harvest- 
ing in Mount Pleasant Township, Jefferson County, 
Ohio, without furnishing his men with liquor. He 
told them one morning that he felt that he could not 
do it. They all left, but two of them came back the 
next morning and with some other help he got his 
harvesting done more easily than usual. 



Barnesville, 

Ohio, 

1919. 







ROBERT SMITH 



Abk;aii, (Mac^'j StaxtoiV 



9,3 



^ Hi :{c :>: :|c 

Of the children of Benjamin and Abigail Stanton 
all except David married members ot the Society of 
Friends. 

At the time ot the division in that Society, Sarah 
Williams and Henry Stanton and their families sided 
with the branch called Orthodox and the others with 
the branch known as Hicksites. 

Of the eighty-two grandchildren of Benjamin and 
Abigail Stanton, sixty-eight arrived at the age of 
majority, fourteen died between the age of a few months 
and seventeen vears. 



Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 

1919. 



BvRON' Stanton 




THE RAYLAND FERRY SHE 

Ohio River just abovk thk moi'th ok Short Creek wtiere Abigail uMacv) 
Stanton crossed witu her waoon when she came to Ohio in 18(X>. 



^'""o.,. 



'''c^ii '«,. 




To AdeKO. 



z 

o 

gi 

^ Z 

< 



ti 



Z 

2 o 
So 

O W 

o 



AniGAii, (Macv) S'ian'ion 



'y> 




thp: site of the first friends' meeting 

The fiourk in riir. tf.ntf.r of tiif photograph m \rks thf. place whkkk the 
FIRST Mketini; in (Jhio was hklu. I'm; worshipers sat on logs. 

Abigail (Macy) Stanton was a widow twenty-seven 
years. She had in her time hv^e broken bones, the first 
when thirty years old. She, with her husband and other 
Friends, were going on horseback to New Garden to 
attend their Yearly Meeting, a distance of two hundred 
miles. When they were about half-way there, her 
creature stumbled and threw her off and broke her 
wrist. They splintered it with oak lea\cs a!id she 
put it in a sling and went on, rather than be left alone 
or have her husband stay from meeting. About the 
year 1794 she fell at the doorstep and broke her ankle 
very badly. Then, soon atter she came to Ohio, she 
was going to a neighbor's and went to get o\er the 
fence and the top rail rolled of\' and threw her back 
and she fell on her wrist and broke it. Some 
time between that and 1810 she got on horseback 
and the horse reared and threw her ot^", breaking 
both bones ot one leg below the knee, which always 
remained crooked, so she used a crutch or crutches 
as long as she lived. The summer o\ 1810 she was 
walking in the yard and fell and broke her thigh, 

but 



96 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



but with all her cripplements she rode on horseback. 
I well remember seeing her and father start off to 
ride eight miles to Harrisville about three weeks 
before her death. She rode on one creature and he 
on another, he carried her crutch and in a pair of 
leather saddle bags on the saddle under him was her 
wardrobe, a very common way of transportation in 
those days. Author Unknown. 

"THE STOLEN BONNET" 

Great-great-great-grandmother Abigail (Macy) Stan- 
ton, when she and her children were moving from 
North Carolina to Ohio, camped at night. Grand- 
mother, to make her Quaker bonnet safe for the night, 
pulled down a limb of a nearby tree and tied her 

bonnet 




THE BURIAL PLACE OF ABIGAIL (MACY) STANTON 

Harrisville, Ohio. The identification of the grave is not known. 



Abigail (Macv) SrAXiox 



97 




A PKAR TREE PLANTtD BV ABI- 
GAIL 'MaCY) StANTO.V at iJKK 
HOME NEAR Ml. PLEASANT. 

Ohio. This tree was top- 
grafted IN the 18SOs bv 
Richard Roberts. 



An apple tree planted uy 
Abigail (Macy) Stanton at 

HER UOME NEAR Mt, PlEASAXT, 

Ohio. 'I'he varh:ty of Tin: 

TREE IS KNOWN as "I'.RANll- 

uotuer apple." 




98 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




THE LOCATION OF THE SPRING AT THE HOME OF 

ABIGAIL (MAGY) STANTON 

The spring has been covered up, and the water piped to a nearby spring 
HOUSE. The spring was perhaps twenty-five feet inside the corner of this 

YARD. 




FOUNDATION STONES OF THE HOUSE OF 

ABIGAIL (MACY) STANTON 

The house was burned in 1877 and a new one was erected, a part of the old 
foundation being used. 



Abigail (Macv) Staxton- 



99 



bonnet to it. During the night the bonnet wus stolen 
and she had to continue her journey without one. 

Debora H. Webster. 




A HAND-MADE CHEST OF DRAWERS 

Formerly ownkd dy Aiiuiail {M.\cv> Sr\MTo>c who c.we it to hfr 

DAUGHTER AviS. IN' 1848, PROBABLY AT TIIK SALE OK HOISEHOLU GOODS OF 

Jesse At^v Avis Thomas, it was purchased by Ezekikl Roberts, and 
remained in his home until 190' when it came into the home ok rlchard 
E.Jand Mira G. S. Roberts, of Emerson, Ohio. In 1921 it came into the 
POSSESSION OF William H. Stanton. 



Sect/or; I 




' cV»pe S^can Orisr Mill 



Scale 



/0-B-/92 / 



THE LOCATION OF BORDEN STANTON'S MILL 
NEAR COLERAIN, OHIO 




BORDEN STANTON'S MILL 

RUILT IN 1801 AND OPERATED AS A WATER-POWF.R MILL FOR SEVENTY-FIVE YEABS. 
Now USED AS A STABLE. THE MODERN STEAM-POWER MILL CAN BE SEEN AT THE 

RI(;HT. 



BORDEN STANTON 



—^ ORDEN STANTON, a half-nephew, came out 
f^ with Abigail (Macy) Stanton in the tall of 
1800, and the following year built a water- 
power grist mill on (ilenn's Run about four 
and one-half miles southeast of the home 
of Abigail (Macy) Stanton. Antl thus undertook as 
early as possible to furnish the pioneers with power 
to grind their wheat and corn and other grains for 
food. 

The 
101 



102 



Our Ancestors— The Stantons 









1^ Hftiflit?!! M III •1?fM"'Jit1#i'ri*-inirir--iiiliTrini7tTT^ 




• ■'-'■•^ 

DOWN-STREAM VIEW OF BORDEN STANTON'S 
MILL DAM 

Thus dimmed by nature's growth since the wheel was stilled by time. 




THE WHEEL-END OF BORDEN STANTON'S MILL 

Where the primitive power plant stood. 



Borden Stanton 



103 



The fall of water secured was sixteen feet, and an 
overshot water wheel of this diameter was used. The 
dam breast was built of stone and earth; and the race 
followed the northeasterly bank of the stream down a, 
few hundred feet to the mill. This was a large and 
substantially built hewn log structure, and is in quite 
good condition today, although used only as a stable. 
The business is now being conducted in a steam-driven 
mill a short distance below. There are in existence 
several pieces of machinery belonging to the original 
water-power mill, such as conveyors, wooden gear 
wheels and similar parts. The heavy timbers used to 
support the machinery indicate very good workman- 
ship, and are sound after more than one hundred years. 

Borden 




THE ENTRANCIE TO TIIK R ACX 

UoRDF.N Stanton's mill ham. 



104 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 




THE SITE OF BORDEN STANTON'S RESIDENCE 

Located across the stream and road from the mill. 



^i^^ .1 :- 




BORDEN STANTON'S MILL AND MILLER'S HOME 

View from down stream "Bv the waters that are passed." 



Borden Stanton 



105 



Borden Stanton lived just across the stream and 
roadway from the grist mill. There we find one of the 
old mill-stones used now as a well-curb. There were 
formerly two sets of burrs in the mill. He sold this 
mill to Joseph Cope in 1813. It was run as a water 
mill for many years, but on account of the growing 
scarcity of water was abandoned and the steam mill 
erected. It is now known as the Hanes mill. 




A MILL-STONE FROM BORDKN STANTON'S 
MILL 

Now USED AS A \VEI.L-Ct'RB AT THE SITE OF HIS FORMER HOME. 



106 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




WOOD COGWHEELS AND CONVEYOR FROM BORDEN 
STANTON'S MILL 

The large wheel is of black walnut wood. 



■ 
f 
1 ■■ 

^ Tti 


' 1 . 

! 



HANES-THE MILLER 
OF TODAY 



ANECDOTE 
CONCERNING BORDEN STANTON 



R' EGARDING Borden Stanton, the valued 
minister among Friends, who built the water- 
power grist mill on Glenn's Run, William 
Stanton, of Pasadena, relates a story told him 
by his father. Dr. Benjamin Stanton, of 
Salem : — 

When Borden Stanton emigrated from North 
Carolina he went to what is now, and perhaps was 
then, Belmont County, Ohio, just across the Ohio 
River from what is now West Virginia, but was then 
a part of "Ole Virginny." 

Soon slaves began to disappear from that part of 
Virginia, and it became known that if a "Virginny 
nigger" fell under the guidance of Borden Stanton's 
sons it was difficult for his pursuer to get further 
trace of him. So the Virginians "put up a job" on the 
Stanton boys. They caused word to be given to the 
Stantons, privately, that on a certain night a skirf 
would cross the river with one or more runaway slaves, 
but there were no runaways. Instead there were some 
rough Virginians who sought to abduct the young 
Quakers and carry them across to Virginia. My 
father did not give the particulars for which I was so 
eagerly listening, but he did say that the Virginians 
were glad to go home without the young Stantons. 



;^X^ 6^fe=7t::: 



The Move From Carolina 
AND THE New Settlement in Ohio 

(Taken from Friends' Miscellany.) 



A brief account of the regular movements of the Carolina 
Friends who went to settle over the Ohio River in the year 
1800: to which is prefixed a copy of Borden Stanton's letter 
to Friends of Wrightsborough Monthly Meeting in Georgia, 
on the proposal of their also removing to settle in what was 
then called The North Western Territory; dated the Twenty- 
fifth of the Fifth month, 1802, being as follows: 




EAR friends: Having understood by William Patten and 
William Hodgin from your parts, that a number among 
you have had some thoughts and turnings of mind re- 
specting a removal to this Country; and, as I make 
no doubt, you have had much struggling and many reasonings 
about the propriety of it; and also, considering the undertak- 
ing as a very arduous one, that you have been almost ready 
at times to be discouraged and faint in your minds; under 
a sense of which I have felt a near sympathy with you. As 
it has been the lot of a number of us to undertake the work 
a little before you, I thought a true statement (for your in- 
formation) of some of our strugglings and reasonings concerning 
the propriety of our moving: also of our progress on the way, and 

the 
108 



The Stanton P'amilv 109 

the extension of Heavenly regard to us-ward; together with the 
progress of Friends, both temporally and spiritually, since we 
have got here, might afford strength and encouragement to you 
in the arduous task you have in prospect. 

"I may begin thus, and say that for several years Friends had 
some distant view of moving out of that oppressive part of the 
land, but did not know where until the year 1799; when we had 
an acceptable visit from some travelling Friends of the Western 
part of Pennsylvania. They thought proper to propose to Friends 
for consideration, whether it would not be agreeable to best wisdom 
for us unitedly to remove north-west of the Ohio river — to a 
place where there were no slaves held, being a free Country. This 
proposal made a deep impression on our minds; and it seemed as 
if they were messengers sent to call us out, as it were from Egyptian 
darkness (for indeed it seemed as if the land groaned under 
oppression) into the marvellous light ot the glory of God. 

"Nevertheless, although we had had a prospect of something of 
the kind, it was at first very crossing to my natural inclination: 
being well settled as to the outward. So I strove against the 
thoughts of moving for a considerable time; yet the view would 
often arise that it was in accordance with pure wisdom for Friends 
to leave that part of the land, but I had often to turn the fleece, 
as Gideon did, and to ask Counsel of the Lord, being desirous to 
be rightly directed by Him: more especially as it seemed likely 
to break up our Monthly Meeting which I had reason to believe 
was set up in the wisdom of Truth. 

"Thus I was concerned many times to weigh the matter as in the 
balance of the sanctuary; till, at length, I considered that there 
was no prospect of our number being increased — by convincement, 
on account of the oppression that abounded in that land. 

"I also thought I saw in the light, that the minds of the people 
generally were too much outward, so that 'there was no room in 
the inn' of the heart for much religious impression; being tilled 
with other guests: and notwithstanding they have been visited 
with line upon line and precept upon precept, yet they remain 
in too much hardness of heart. 

"Under a view of these things, I was made sensible, beyond 
doubting, that it was in the ordering of wisdom for us to remove; 
and that the Lord was opening a way for our enlargement, if 

found 



110 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

found worthy. Friends generally feeling something of the same, 
there were three of them who went to view the country, and one 
worthy public Friend. They traveled on till they came to this 
part of the Western Country where they were stopped in their 
minds, believing it was the place for Friends to settle. So they 
returned back, and informed us of the same in a solemn Meeting; 
in which dear Joseph Dew, the public Friend, intimated that he 
saw the seed of God sown in abundance, which extended far 
north-westward. This information, in the way it was delivered 
to us, much tendered our spirits, and strengthened us in the 
belief that it was right. So we undertook the work, and found the 
Lord to be a present helper in every needful time, as He was sought 
unto; Yea, to be as 'The pillar of Cloud by day and the pillar of 
fire by Night:' and thus we were led safely along until we arrived 
here. 

"The first of us moved west of the Ohio in the Ninth month, 
1800; and none of us had a house at our command to meet in to 
worship the Almighty Being. 

"So we met in the woods, until houses were built, which was 
but a short time. 

"In less than one year. Friends so increased that two prepara- 
tive Meetings were settled; and in the last Twelfth month a 
Monthly Meeting, called Concord, also was opened, which is now 
large. Another preparative Meeting is requested and also 
another first and week-day Meeting, Four are already granted 
in the territory, and three Meeting-houses are built. Way 
appears to be opening for another Monthly Meeting; and I 
think, a Quarterly Meeting. 

"Having intimated a little of the progress of Friends in a religious 
line, I may say that as to the outward we have been sufficiently 
provided for, though in a new Country, Friends are settling fast 
and seem, I hope, likely to do well. Under a sense of these things, 
and of the many favours the Lord has conferred on us, I have 
been ready, and do at times cry out, 'Marvelous are Thy works, 
Oh Lord God Almighty! just and true are all Thy ways.' And 
Oh! that we may ever be sufficiently thankful, and ascribe the 
praise to Him alone to whom it is due. 

"Now I may inform you a little of the nature of this Country. 
It is in the main, very hilly; though most of the land may be 

profitably 



The Stanton Family 



profitably cultivated, and produces abundantly. Corn, from 
thirty to forty bushels per acre, ploughed twice. Sometimes more 
when well worked. Some places have produced from fifty to 
sixty bushels per acre. Wheat, from twenty to twenty-five 
bushels. The soil appears to be very natural to grass of the 
best quality: and we make plenty of good sugar. Salt Works 
are being erected, and in some places considerable quantities are 
made so that I think people may live here as independent of 
European Trade as in any country. 

"Feeling my mind clear of apprehended duty towards you, and 
not desiring to enlarge, I bid you farewell. Commending you to 
God and to the word of his grace, that is able to make a way for * 
you where there may seem to be no way, and to direct you aright 
in all things, yea, to make you wise unto salvation, ami to build 
you up in that most holy faith, without which I believe you will 
not journey safely along. I conclude with unfeigned love. 

Your friend, 

Borden Stanton. 



"It appears by a copy of the minutes of a Monthly Meeting 
on Trent river, in Jones' County, North Carolina held in the 
Ninth and Tenth months, 1799, that the weighty subject of the 
members thereof being about to remove unitedly to the territory 
north-westward of the Ohio river, was and had been before that 
time, deliberately under their consideration and the same pro- 
posal was solemnly laid before their Quarterly Meeting held at 
Contentney the Ninth of the Tenth month; which on weighing 
the matter and its circumstances, concluded to leave said Friends 
at their liberty to proceed therein, as way might be opened k'>r 
them, yet the subject was continued till their next Quarter. 
And they having (before the said Monthly Meeting ceased) 
agreed what certificates be signed therein tor the members, to 
convey their rights respectively to the Monthly Meeting nearest 
to the place of their intended Settlement, showing them to be 
members whilst they resided there; — such Certificates tor each 
other mutually were signed in their last Monthly Meeting held at 
Trent aforesaid, in the Mrst niotuli, ISOO; whieh was then solemnly 

and 



112 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

and finally adjourned or concluded; and their privilege of holding 
it together with the records of it, were delivered up to their Quar- 
terly Meeting held the Eighteenth of the same month, 1800. 

"They removed accordingly; first to the Settlement of Friends 
on each Side of the Monongahela river, in Fayette and Washing- 
ton Counties, in Pennsylvania, to reside a little while, in order to 
prepare for beginning their intended new settlement over the 
Ohio. Having brought their Certificates with them, they laid 
their circumstances, with extracts from the minutes of their 
former Monthly and Quarterly Meetings in Carolina, before 
Redstone Quarterly Meeting held the Second of the Sixth month, 
1800, and received the advice and assistance of Friends there. 

"Thus they proceeded and made their Settlement in the year 
1800; and were remarkably favoured with an opportunity to be 
accommodated with a quantity of valuable land, even at the 
place which was chosen for their settlement by the Friends who 
went to view the Country, before the office was opened for grant- 
ing lands in that Territory. And thus they were allowed to enter 
for, and secure divers sections (so called) or tracts of land, con- 
taining square parcels of about six hundred and forty acres each 
even as some of the first purchasers, before many others came in 
to interfere with them; which appeared as a marvellous affair to 
themselves and others." 



"The following notes are taken from the memorandums of a 
Friend who visited those new Settlements in the Tenth month, 
1802. 

"Crossing the Ohio river, we rode about twelve miles to Ply- 
mouth. The next day being first of the week, we attended 
Friends' Meeting there, at which about fifty persons were 
assembled under a degree of Solemnity. 

"At this meeting we met with our valued friend Borden Stanton, 
one of those lately removed to this new country, under an appre- 
hension of duty, from North Carolina. His residence is at a place 
called Concord, a few miles distant; where we attended the pre- 
parative Meeting on the Thirteenth, at which were about thirty 
grown persons. A number of sensible valuable Friends belong 
here, towards whom near sympathy and unity were left. 

"Hence 



The Stanton Family 1 13 

"Hence we went home with our Friend Joseph Dew to Short 
Creek, and next day were at preparative Meeting there. 

"About sixty Friends attended, besides some chiKlren: and it 
was a satisfactory season. 

''Sixteenth — We attended Concord Monthly Meeting, which 
had been established by Redstone Quarterly Meeting about ten 
months before; being the first Monthly Meeting held on the west 
side of Ohio river. About forty-five of each sex attended; and 
it was a uniting and satisfactory opportunity. Our friend Joseph 
Dew was favoured in a brief, lively testimony on the baneful 
effects of covetousness, as destructive to the prevalence of pure 
religion. 

"On first-day we were again at Concord, where they have a 
comfortable Meeting-house, newly erected. It was nearly filled 
with Friends and neighbours, and Truth was measurably in 
dominion. 

"After visiting a number of families, we turned homewards, 
riding along a crooked path much of the way towards the river, 
about seven miles, and crossed the Ohio at Zane's Island to 
Wheeling, in Virginia. 

"In a letter from Borden Stanton, dated on the Fifth of the 
Eleventh month, 1803, he says, T am now on my way to pay a 
religious visit to Friends and others in some of the Southern 
States. As to the situation of Friends in this land (Ohio) they 
are still increasing very fast. There is a monthly meeting estab- 
lished at Bull Creek, by the name of Middleton, and another at 
the Miami's, by the name of Miami Monthly Meeting; also several 
meetings indulged within the limits of Concord Monthly Meeting, 
some of which are about to be established. 

"Our numbers have so much increased, that we have unitedly 
agreed to divide Concord Monthly Meeting, and referred the 
subject to Redstone Quarterly Meeting; and I have no doubt the 
division will take place in its season.' " 



Westland Meeting House Ground 

JOSEPH TOWNSEND & SARAH, HIS WIFE 

To 

James Crawford, 
"Nathan Heald 
Abraham Smith 
John Townsend 
John Heald & 
Isaac Jinkinson. 

Recorded in Book 1, Vol. 1, Paee 355. 
Dated 12th day of 4th Month, 1792. 
Recorded 4th day May, 1792. 

Consideration, twenty (20) pounds. 

"Whereas the said Joseph Townsend obtained a patent for a 
tract of land situate on the drains of Monongahela River and 
Two Mile Run, in said County of Washington, called 'Fecund 
Valley' containing 186 Acres of land, and the allowance of six 
per cent, dated the 8th day of the sixth month (called June), 1790 
and inrolled in the Roll's Office of said Commonwealth in Patent 
Book No. 15, Page 291. 

"And whereas the Society of the people called Quakers of 
Westland Meeting did nominate and appoint the said James 
Crawford, Nathan Heald, Abraham Smith, John Townsend, 
John Heald and Isaac Jinkinson as Trustees tor the purpose ot 
securing a certain lot of ground, included in said survey, tor the 
purpose of a meeting house, burying grountl antl other necessary 
proposed for the only particular use and behoot ot said Society, 
Now this indenture witnesseth, & etc. 

"For the only particular use and behoof of the said Society, 
of the people called Quakers of Westland Meeting aforesaid and 
their successors forever; the following described and bounded 
part of the aforesaid tract of land, beginning at a sumc corner in 
James Powell's line and runniim thence bv said Joseph Townsend's 
land N 86, W 33 p to a stone,\s 30 W, 31 J., p to a stone, S 48 E 
47)4 p to a stone and hickory bush, thence by the same and land 
of James Powell and N 13 E 57 p to the place of beginning, c(M1- 
taining 7\'}i Acvi's (10), be the same more or less. 

"To have and to hold unto the said Trustees tor the only proper 
use and behoof of the Society of the people called Quakers i>t 
Westland Meeting aforesaid and their successors torever." 




rr.-l-^S^TTr^lii 



A CABIN IN THE WOODS 

Frou Howe's "History of Ohio." 

"Our Cabin, or Life in the Woods" 



The following description of the life of the earl)' settlers is 
taken from Howe's "History of Ohio." The article was written 
by John S. Williams, editor of the American Pioneer, and pub- 
lished in that journal in October, 1843. 

John S. Williams was a half-brother of Richard Williams, 
who married Sarah Stanton, the third child of Benjamin and . 
Abigail (Macy) Stanton, in North Carolina. They moved to 
Belmont County, Ohio, in 1802. Richard was a half-brother 
of Elizabeth (Williams) Garretson, the grandmother of Joseph 
W. Doudna, of Barnesville, Ohio. 

This John S. Williams left North Carolina with his mother, 
a widow and her family, in 1800 and settled on Glenn's Run, 
about six miles northeast of Saint Clairsville and about four 
and a half miles from Abigail (Macy) Stanton. 

The experiences of the Williams family seems to h.ive been 
typical of those of the pioneers of that time and place, and 
this account is given here to show the conditions under which 
Abigail (Macy) Stanton started her home, at the same time 
and only a short distance from the location of the Williams' 
cabin. 

"Emigrants poured in from different parts, cabins were put 
up in every direction, and women, children and goods tumbled 
into them. The tide of emigration flowed like water through a 
breach in a mill-dam. Everything was bustle and confusion, 

and 
116 



Our Cabin 1 17 

and all at work that could work. In the midst of all this, the 
mumps, and perhaps one or two other diseases, prevailed and 
gave us a seasoning. Our cabin had been raised, covered, part 
of the cracks chinked, and part of the floor laid when we moved 
in on Christmas day. There had not been a stick cut except in 
building the cabin. We had intended an inside chimney, for we 
thought the chimney ought to be in the house. We had a log 
put across the whole width of the cabin for a mantel, but when 
the floor was in we found it so low as not to answer, and removed it. 
Here was a great change for my mother and sister, as well as the 
rest, but particularly my mother. She was raised in the most 
delicate manner in and near London, and lived most of her time 
in affluence, and always comfortable. She was now in the wilder- 
ness, surrounded by wild beasts; in a cabin with about half a 
floor, no door, no ceiling overhead, not even a tolerable sign for 
a fireplace, the light of day and the chilling winds of night passing 
between every two logs in the building, the cabin so high from 
the ground that a bear, wolf, panther, or any other animal less 
in size than a cow, could enter without even a squeeze. Such 
was our situation on Thursday and Thursday night, December 
25th, 1800, and which was bettered, but by very slow degrees. 
We got the rest of the floor laid in a very few days, the chinking 
of the cracks went on slowly, but the daubing could not proceed 
till weather more suitable, which happened in a few days; door- 
ways were sawed out and steps made of the logs, and the back 
of the chimney was raised up to the mantel, but the funnel of 
sticks and clay was delayed until spring. . . . 

"Our family consisted of my mother, a sister of twenty-two, 
my brother, near twenty-one and very weakly, and myself, in 
my eleventh year. Two years afterwards Black Jenny followed 
us in company with my half-brother, Richard, and his family. 
She lived two years with us in Ohio, and died in the winter of 
1803-04. 

"In building our cabin it was set to front the north and sc)uth, 
my brother using my father's pocket compass on the occasion. 
We had no idea of living in a house that did not stand square 
with the earth itself. This argued our ignorance of the comforts 
and conveniences of a pioneer life. The position of the house, 
end to the hill, necessarily clevatcil the lower end, and the deter- 
mination 



118 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

mination of having both a north and south door added much 
to the airiness of the domicil, particularly after the green ash 
puncheons had shrunk so as to have cracks in the floor and doors 
from one to two inches wide. At both the doors we had high, 
unsteady, and sometimes icy steps, made by piling up the logs 
cut out of the wall. We had, as the reader will see, a window, 
if it could be called a window, when, perhaps it was the largest 
spot in the top, bottom or sides of the cabin at which the wind 
could not enter. It was made by sawing out a log, placing sticks 
across, and then, by pasting an old newspaper over the hole, 
and applying some hog's lard, we had a kind of glazing which 
shed a most beautiful and mellow light across the cabin when the 
sun shone on it. x^ll other light entered at the doors, cracks and 
chimney. 

"Our cabin was twenty-four by eighteen. The west end was 
occupied by two beds, the center of each side by the door, and 
here our symmetry had to stop, for on the opposite side of the 
window, made of clapboards, supported on pins driven into the 
logs, were our shelves. Upon these shelves my sister displayed, 
in ample order, a host of pewter plates, basins, and dishes, and 
spoons, scoured and bright. It was none of your new-fangled 
pewter made of lead, but the best London pewter, which our 
father himself bought of Townsend, the manufacturer. These 
were the plates upon which you could hold your meat so as to 
cut it without slipping and without dulling your knife. But, 
alas, the days of pewter plates and sharp dinner knives have 
passed away never to return. To return to our internal arrange- 
ments. A ladder of five rounds occupied the corner near the 
window. By this, when we got a floor above, we could ascend. 
Our chimney occupied most of the east end; pots and kettles 
opposite the window under the shelves, a gun on hooks over the 
north door, four split-bottom chairs, three three-legged stools, 
and a small eight by ten looking-glass sloped from the wall over 
a large towel and combcase. These, with a clumsy shovel and a 
pair of tongs, made in Frederick, with one shank straight, as the 
best manufacture of pinches and blood-blisters, completed our 
furniture, except a spinning-wheel and such things as were neces- 
sary to work with. It was absolutely necessary to have three- 
legged 



Our Cabint 1 1^ 

legged stools, as four legs of anything could not all touch the 
floor at the same time. 

"The completion of our cabin went on slowly. The season 
was inclement, we were weak-handed and weak-pocketed; in 
fact, laborers were not to be had. We got our chimney up breast 
high as soon as we could, and got our cabin daubed as high as 
the joists outside. It never was daubed on the inside, for my 
sister, who was very nice, could not consent to 'live right next to 
the mud.' My impression now is that the window was not con- 
structed till spring, for until the sticks and clay were put on the 
chimney we could possibly have no need of a window; for the 
flood of light which always poured into the cabin from the fire- 
place would have extinguished our paper window, and rendered 
it as useless as the moon at noonday. We got a floor laid over- 
head as soon as possible, perhaps in a month, but when it was laid, 
the reader will readily conceive of its imperviousness to wind or 
weather, when we mention that it was laid of loose clapboards 
split from a red oak, the stump of which may be seen beyond the 
cabm. That tree grew in the night, and so twisting that each 
board laid on two diagonally opposite corners, and a cat might 
have shook every board on our ceiling. 

"It may be well to inform the unlearned reader that clap- 
boards are such lumber as pioneers split with a frow, and resemble 
barrel staves before they are shaved, but are split longer, wider 
and thinner; of such our roof and ceiling were composed. Punch- 
eons were planks made by splitting logs to about two and a half 
or three inches in thickness, and hewing them on one or both 
sides with the broadaxe. Of such our floor, doors, tables and 
stools were manufactured. The eave-bearers are those end logs 
which project over to receive the butting poles, against which 
the lower tier of clapboards rest in forming the roof. The trapping 
IS the roof timbers, composing the gable end and the ribs, the 
ends of which appear in the drawing, being those logs upon which 
the clapboards lie. The trap logs are those of unequal length 
above the bearers which form the gable ends, and upon wW\ch 
the ribs rest. The weight poles are those small logs laid on the 
roof, which weigh down the course of clapboarLls on which thev 
lie, and against which the next course above is placed. The 
knees are pieces of heart timber placed above the butting poles, 
successively, to prevent the weight poles from rolling oflf 

''The 



120 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

"The evenings of the first winter did not pass off as pleasantly 
as evenings afterwards. We had raised no tobacco to stem and 
twist, no corn to shell, no turnips to scrape; we had no tow to 
spin into rope-yarn, nor straw to plait for hats, and we had come 
so late we could get but few walnuts to crack. We had, however, 
the Bible, George Fox's Journal, Barclay's Apology, and a number 
of books, all better than much of the fashionable reading of the 
present day — from which, after reading, the reader finds he has 
gained nothing, while his understanding has been made the dupe 
of the writer's fancy — that while reading he had given himself 
up to be led in mazes of fictitious imagination, and losing his 
taste for solid reading, as frothy luxuries destroy the appetite 
for wholesome food. To our stock of books was soon after added 
a borrowed copy of the Pilgrim's Progress, which we read twice 
through without stopping. The first winter our living was scanty 
and hard; but even this winter had its felicities. We had part 
of a barrel of flour which we had brought from Fredericktown. 
Besides this, we had a part of a jar of hog's lard brought from old 
Carolina; not the tasteless stuff which now goes by that name, 
but pure leaf lard, taken from hogs raised on pine roots and fat- 
tened on sweet potatoes, and into which, while rendering, were 
immersed the boughs of the fragrant bay tree, that imparted 
to the lard a rich flavor. Of that flour, shortened with this lard, 
my sister every Sunday morning, and at no other time, made 
short biscuit for breakfast — not these greasy gum-elastic biscuit, 
we mostly meet with now, rolled out with a pin, or cut out with a 
cutter; or those that are, perhaps, speckled by or puffed up with 
refined lye, called saleratus, but made out, one by one, in her 
fair hands, placed in neat juxtaposition in a skillet or spider, 
pricked with a fork to prevent blistering, and baked before an 
open fire — not half-baked and half-stewed in a cooking stove. 

"In the ordering of a good Providence the winter was open 
but windy. While the wind was of great use in driving the smoke 
and ashes out of our cabin, it shook terribly the timber standing 
almost over us. We were sometimes much and needlessly alarmed. 
We had never seen a dangerous looking tree near a dwelling, 
but here we were surrounded by the tall giants of the forest, 
waving their boughs and uniting their boughs over us, as if in 
defiance of our disturbing their repose, and usurping their long 

and 



Our Cabin 121 

and uncontested rights. The beech on the left often shook his 
bushy head over us as if in absolute disapprobation of our settling 
there, threatening to crush us if we did not pack up and start. 
The walnut over the spring branch stood high and straight; 
no one could tell which way it inclined, but all concluded that 
if it had a preference, it was in favor of quartering on our cabin. 
We got assistance and cut it down. The axeman doubted his 
ability to control its direction, by reason that he must neces- 
sarily cut it almost off before it would fall. He thought by felling 
the tree in the direction of the reader, along the chimney, and 
thus favor the little lean it seemed to have, would be the means 
of saving the cabin. He was successful. Part of the stump still 
stands. These, and all other dangerous trees, were got down 
without other damage than many frights and frequent deser- 
tions of the premises by the family while the trees were being 
cut. The ash beyond the house crossed the scarf and fell on the 
cabin, but without damage. 

"The monotony of the time for several of the first years was 
broken and enlivened by the howl of the wild beasts. The wolves 
howling around us seemed to moan their inability to drive us 
from their long and undisputed domain. The bears, panthers, 
and deers seemingly got miffed at our approach or the partiality 
of the hunters, and but seldom troubled us. One bag of meal 
would make a whole family rejoicingly happy and thankful 
then, when a loaded East Indiaman will fail to do it now, and is 
passed off as a common business transaction without ever once 
thinking of the Giver, so independent have we become in the 
short space of forty years! Having got out of the wilderness 
in less time than the children of Israel, we seem tt) be even more 
forgetful and unthankful than they. \\ hen spring was fully come 
and our little patch of corn, three acres, put in among the beech 
roots, which at every step contended with the shovel-plough 
for the right of soil, and held it too, we enlarged our stock of 
conveniences. As soon as bark would ruti (peel off), we could 
make ropes and bark boxes. These we stood in great need of, 
as such things as bureaus, stands, wartlrobcs or even barrels, 
were not to be had. The manner ot making ropes of linn bark 
was to cut the bark in strips of convenient length and water- 
rot it in the same manner as rotting flax or hemp. When this 

was 



122 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

was done, the inside bark would peel off and split up so fine as 
to make a pretty considerably rough and good-for-but-little kind 
of a rope. Of this, however, we were very glad, and let no ship 
owner with his grass ropes laugh at us. We made two kinds of 
boxes for furniture. One kind was of hickory bark with the out- 
side shaved off. This we would take off all around the tree, the 
size of which would determine the calibre of our box. Into one 
end we would place a flat piece of bark or puncheon cut round 
to fit in the bark which stood on end the same as when on the 
tree. There was little need of hooping as the strength of the bark 
would keep that all right enough. Its shrinkage would make the 
top unsightly in a parlor now-a-days, but then they were con- 
sidered quite an addition to the furniture. A much finer article 
was made of slippery-elm bark, shaved smooth, and with the 
inside out, bent round and sewed together where the ends of the 
hoop or main bark lapped over. The length of the bark was 
around the box and inside out. A bottom was made of a piece 
of the same bark dried flat and a lid like that of a common band- 
box made in the same way. This was the finest furniture in a 
lady's dressing room, and then, as now, with the finest furniture, 
the lapped or sewed side was turned to the wall and the prettiest 
part to the spectator. They were usually made oval, and while 
the bark was green were easily ornamented with drawings of birds, 
trees, etc., agreeably to the taste and skill of the fair manufacturer. 
As we belonged to the Society of Friends, it may be fairly pre- 
sumed that our bandboxes were not thus ornamented. . . . 

"We settled on beech land which took much labor to clear. 
We could do no better than clear out the smaller stuff and burn 
the brush, etc., around the beeches which, in spite of the girdling 
and burning we could do to them, would leaf out the first year 
and often a little the second. The land, however, was very rich 
and would bring better corn than might be expected. We had 
to tend it principally ^i/'ith. the hoe, that is, to chop down the 
nettles, the water-weed, and the touch-me-not. Grass, careless, 
lambs-quarter, and Spanish needles were reserved to pester the 
better prepared farmer. We cleared a small turnip patch, which 
we got in about the tenth of August. We sowed timothy seed, 
which took well, and the next year we had a little hay besides. 
The tops and blades of the corn were also carefully saved for our 

horse. 



Or II Cabin 123 

horse, cow, and the two sheep. The turnips were sweet and good, 
and in the fall we took care to gather walnuts and hickory-nuts, 
which were very abundant. These, with the turnips which we 
scraped, supplied the place of fruit. I have always been partial 
to scraped turnips, and could beat any three dandies at scraping 
them. Johnny-cake, also, when we had meal to make it of, helped 
to make up our evening's repast. The Sunday morning biscuit 
had all evaporated, but the loss was partially supplied by the 
nuts and turnips. Our regular supper was mush and milk, and 
by the time we had shelled our corn, stemmed tobacco, and 
plaited straw to make hats, etc., the mush and milk had seemingly 
decamped from the neighborhood of our ribs. To relieve this 
difficulty, my brother and I would bake a thin Johnny-cake, 
part of which we would eat and leave the rest till morning. At 
daylight we would eat the balance as we walked from the house 
to work. 

"The methods of eating mush and milk were various. Some 
would sit around the pot, and every one take therefrom for him- 
self. Some would set a table and each have his tin cup of milk, 
and with a pewter spoon take just as much from the dish or the 
pot, if it was on the table, as he thought would fill his mouth or 
throat, then lowering it into the milk, would take some to wash 
it down. This method kept the milk cool, and by frequent repeti- 
tions the pioneer would contract a faculty of correctly estimating 
the proper amount of each. Others would mix mush and milk 
together. 

"To get grinding done was often a great difficulty by reason 
of the scarcity of mills, the freezes in winter and the droughts 
in summer. We had often to manufacture meal (when we had 
corn) in any way we could get the corn to pieces. We soaked 
and pounded it, we shaved it, we planed it, and, at the proper 
season, grated it. When one of our neighbors got a hand-mill, 
it was thought quite an acquisition to the neighborhood. In 
after years, when in time of freezing or drought, we could get 
grinding by waiting for our turn no more than one day and a 
night at a horse mill, we thought ourselves happy. To save meal 
we often made pumpkin bread, in which, when meal was scarce, 
the pumpkin would so predominate as to render it next to impos- 
sible to tell our bread from that article, cither by taste, looks, 

or 



124 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



or the amount of nutriment it contained. Salt was five dollars 
per bushel, and we used none in our corn bread, which we soon 
liked as well without it. Often has sweat ran into my mouth, 
which tasted as fresh and flat as distilled water. What meat 
we had at first was fresh, and but little of that, for had we been 
hunters we had no time to practice it. 

"We had no candles and cared but little about them except 
for summer use. In Carolina we had the real fat light-wood, 
not merely pine knots, but the fat straight pine. This, from the 
brilliancy of our parlor, of winter evenings, might be supposed 
to put not only candles, lamps, camphine, Greenough's chemical 
oil, but even gas itself to the blush. In the West we had not 
this, but my business was to ramble the woods every evening 
for seasoned sticks, or the bark of the shelly hickory, for light. 
'Tis true our light was not as good as even candles, but we got 
along without fretting, for we depended more upon the goodness 
of our eyes than we did upon the brilliancy of the light." 




A HIGH CHAIR 

Bought in 1851 by Joel Dawson for his daughter 
Anna, First wife of Nathan W. Bundy. 




BENJAMIN STANTON, M. D. 



Benjamin Stanton, M. D. 



-^ lENJAMIN STANTON, son of Benjamin Stanton and 
Wm Abigail Macy, was horn in Carteret County, North 
^^3 Carolina, Second month Twenty-eighth, 17^3. His 
HHSil tather tiied when Benjamin was five years old. His 
mother moved to the Territory of Ohio in the year 18CX), taking 
all her minor children with her. He spent his boyhood on his 
mother's farm near Mount Pleasant, Ohio. He studied medicine 
at Mount Pleasant and removed to Salem, Columbiana County, 
Ohio, in the year 1815, where he married Martha Townsend on 
Eighth month Twenty-hrsr, 1816. 

125 



Some 



126 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



Some months after their marriage Benjamin and Martha 
Stanton moved into a frame house, still standing (1885), near 
the corner of Main and Chestnut Streets, Salem, Ohio, and there 
all their children were born. They lived there until 1854, when 
they moved to a brick house he had just built at the corner of 
Green and Chestnut Streets, where he died Second month Twenty- 
seventh, 1861, in his sixty-eighth year. 

He was a skilful physician; a student not only in his profes- 
sion but also in other branches of learning. He was a member 
of the Society of Friends (Hicksite). He was a public-spirited 
and highly-esteemed citizen, prominent in all good works. He 
was quiet and reserved, retiring and domestic in his habits, but 
hospitable and fond of his family and friends. 

He was one of the earliest Abolitionists at a time when Aboli- 
tionists were but a handful of people, hated and despised, and 
when to be an i\bolitionist required a degree of moral as well as 
physical courage. His home was a place of rest and refuge for 
many a fugitive slave on the way to Canada. He died just at 
the beginning of the struggle which was to result in the over- 
throw of slavery — a struggle he had often predicted. He often 
said he had no hope that the slavery question would ever be 
settled in America, except through war between the North and 
South; he did not expect to live to see it, but sooner or later it 

must come. 

Of 



Lance for bleeding used by Dr. Benjamin Stanton about 1860. The sixteen little knives 

WERE revolved and HELD OUT OP ACTION BY A TRIGGER. ThE LANCE WAS THEN SET OUT ON THE SKIN 
WHERE IT WAS RELEASED. A SPRING REVOLVED THE KNIVES ANT) 
MADE SIXTEEN LITTLE PARALLEL CUTS OF THE LENGTHS AND 
DEPTHS DESIRED. A CUPPING GLASS WAS THEN APPLIED AXD THE 
BLOOD DRAWN 





Dr. Benjamin Stanton 



127 



Of his father's family, some were tall and slender and others 
short and sttjut. They were familiarly spoken of as "the long 
Stantons" and "the short Stantons." His sisters Avis and 
Lydia and his brother Henry were of "the long Stantons," as 
was also Benjamin himself, his height being six feet and two 
inches, as also was that of his son Joseph. Three other sons 
were five feet eleven and one-half inches to six feet in height. 

The foregoing accounts were mostly furnished by WilHam 
Stanton, of Pasadena, California, which were in turn furnished 
to him some years ago by the late Benjamin I. Stanton, Esq., 
then of Albany, New York. 



DAUGHTERS OF DR. BENJAMIN STANTON 




LAURA BARNABY 



REBECCA WEAVER 



^ 


« 


jU 


V" 


1 


il 









128 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



An Anecdote 

William Stanton, of Pasadena, relates a story 
about his niece, Loretta Barnaby. She often 
had at her house some school friends who were 
the daughters of an old Quaker farmer who lived 
about two miles from Salem, Ohio. On one occa- 
sion she accepted an invitation to go home with 
the young ladies. They introduced her to their 
father and added that she was a granddaughter 
of Martha Stanton: "Oh!" said the old man, "I 
have known Martha Stanton for a great many 
years. Martha is an old woman, and so am I." 
"No, Father," said one of his daughters, "thee 
is not an old woman, thee is an old man." 
"Yes," said the old Friend, "I am an old man, 
and so is Martha." 




MEDICINE MORTAR 

This belonokd to James Bailey, a great-uncle 
OF Lindley p. Bailey. The doctors in that day 

POUNDED AND GROUND HERBS AND ROOTS FOR 
MEDICINE. 



Dr. Benjamin Stanton 



129 




SPRING LANCE 

Used by Peter Sears, Sr., now in the F^\^ILY of'his 

GRANDDAUGHTER MaRY ii. (SEARS) NiBLOCK. ' 




OLD TOOTH PULLER 

Used in Barnesville. Ohio, about 1850. They were 
called "pullicans." 




OLD TOOTH TWISTER 

One of the instruments of early days used to re- 
move A double tooth." The hinged hook was placed 
over the tooth, then by a strong twist the tooth was 
pulled over and out. 




WILLIAM STANTON 



William Stanton, of Pasadena, California 




ILLL^M STANTON, fourth son of Benjamin and Martha 
(Townsend) Stanton, began his professional life as a civil 
engineer in 1851, a profession he pursued for about 
three years. On account of financial disturbances, 
railroad building ceased for a time and he turned his attention 
to the study of medicine, entering the Cleveland Medical Col- 
lecre in 1854 and pursuing his studies at his home in Salem, 
Ohio, until October, 1855, when he entered the Miami Medical 
College, at Cincinnati, and graduated therefrom in the sprmg 
of 1856. After graduation he went to New Brighton, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he engaged in practice with his brother David 

while 
130 



William Stanton ]3j 

while the latter went to Philadelphia to attend a post-graduate 
course in the Medical Department of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. In October, 1857, William returned to Cincinnati and 
accepted an appointment as Intern in the St. John's Hospital, 
where he remained until the spring of 1858. 

Thinking the practice of law preferable to the practice of 
medicine, he took up that study, matriculated at the Cincinnati 
Law School in October, 1858, graduated from that school in 1859 
and began the practice of law in Cincinnati, where he succeeded 
in doing a good business. He represented Hamilton County in 
the Ohio legislature from 1862 to 1868. 

In 1875 he retired from the practice of law and removed to 
New Brighton, Pennsylvania, and in 1878 to Sewickley, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he remained until 1888. 

In 1870 he married Ellen K. Irish and they had one daughter, 
who is now the wife of Oliver S. Picher, of Winnetka, Illinois. 
Ellen Stanton died in 1897, and in 1903 he married Sophronia 
H. Nevin, daughter of the late William Harbaugh, of Sewickley, 
Pennsylvania. 

In 1888 he removed to Pasadena, California, which has been 
his home ever since. 

Cincinnati, Bvron Stanton. 

Ohio, 

1920. 




BYRON STANTON 



Byron Stanton 



B 



YRON STANTON, M.D., son of the late Dr. Benjamin 
and Martha Stanton, of Salem, Ohio, was born at 
that place August 14, 1834. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools and Friends' Academy of 
Salem, and for a short time followed the profession of civil en- 
gineering. He then studied medicine for eighteen months with 
his father and entered Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
graduating from that college in 1857. He served as interne at 
the St. John's Hospital for one year and then began the practice 
of medicine with his father at Salem, Ohio. 

In October, 1861, he entered the army as Assistant Surgeon 
of the First Regiment, Ohio Light Artillery. In December, 1862, 
he was promoted to the rank of Surgeon and assigned to the 
120th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he served 

(except 
132 



Byron Stanton 133 

(except for two months when he was a prisoner in a Confederate 
prison, and for four months when Acting Surgeon of the 11th 
New York Cavalry) until May, 1865, when he was appointed 
by the President Assistant Surgeon U. S. Volunteers and assigned 
to duty at the U. S. General Hospital at Cleveland, Ohio, and 
after the closing of that hospital in July, 1865, to the charge 
of the U. S. General Hospital (Harper Hospital) in Detroit, 
Michigan. 

After the close of the war and while still in the service of the 
United States, he was appointed Superintendent of the Northern 
Ohio Lunatic Asylum, at Cleveland, where he remained for nearly 
four years and then resigned the position to resume the practice 
of his profession in Cincinnati (1869), since which time he has 
been in continuous practice in that city. 

In 1877 he was appointed Professor of Diseases of Women and 
Children in the Miami Medical College, a position he resigned 
in 1900. Since that time he has held an emeritus professorship 
in that college and in the Medical Department of the University 
of Cincinnati. He served one year as President of the Cincinnati 
Medical Society, one year as President of the Cincinnati Obstetrical 
Society and one year as President of the Academy of Medicine 
of Cincinnati. He has been Consulting Obstetrician to Christ 
Hospital since 1889, was one of the founders of the American 
Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and now holds 
an honorary life membership in that society. 

He served the city for two years as a member of the City Council, 
two years as a member of the Board of Aldermen, and four years 
(1886-1890) as Health Officer. For six years he was a member 
■of the Board of Medical Advisers of the Cincinnati Hospital 
and from April, 1893, to January, 1911, was a member of the 
Ohio State Board of Health, and for three years its President. 
He was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Associated 
Charities of Cincinnati from 1887 to 1911. 

At the annual meeting. May, 1921, of the Ohio Commandery 
of the Loyal Legion Byron Stanton was elected Commander. 
This is the only time that this great honor has been conferred 
by the Ohio Commandery upon a medical officer and comes as a 
fitting tribute to the respect and esteem in which he is held. 
He realizes the responsibility and appreciates the high honor. 

A 



134 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



A short time before entering the army, he was married to 
Edith M. Weaver, of Salem, Ohio, whose demise occurred while 
he was still in the service; and in October, 1866, he married Harriet 
A. Brown, of Cleveland, Ohio, with whom he lives on Savannah 
Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Lansdowne, 

Pennsylvania, 

1921. 



Edna Macy Stanton. 
Ellen Stanton Pennell. 




OHIO'S JEWELS 

A GROUP OF BRONZE FIGURES DESIGNED FOR AND FIRST ERECTED AT THE 

World Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. Now standing near the 

Capital Building, Columbus. The figure in front and facing the 

SOUTH IS Edwin M. Stanton. The others are: Garfield, Hayes, 

Chase, Sherman, Grant and Sheridan. 




Edwin McMasters Stanton 

T is not possible here to do justice to such a character, 
but it is earnestly hoped that some one will collect and 
record the facts concerning this great man. However, 
we cannot pass without noting some selections from 

"Edwin McMasters Stanton," by F. A. Flower, giving some 

glimpses of his character, 

"William H. Whiton, who was chief clerk in the office of Mili- 
tary Railways during the Rebellion, and knew the inner workings 
of the War Department intimately, relates this incident: 

"1 went to the War Office after 10 o'clock, one night, to consult 
Mr. Stanton. I found the mother, wife, and children of a soldier 
who had been condemned to be shot as a deserter, on their knees 
before him pleading for the life of their loved one. He listened 
standing, in cold and austere silence, and at the end of their heart- 
breaking sobs and prayers answered briefly that the man must die. 
The crushed and despairing little family left and Mr. Stanton 
turned, apparently unmoved, and walked into his private room. 
My own heart was wrung with anguish. It seemed to me that 
Mr. Stanton inust be a demon — the very incarnation of cruelty 
and tyranny. 

"I was so dazed that, forgetting myself, I followed him into his 
office without rapping. I found him leaning over a desk, his face 
buried in his hands and his heavy frame shaking with sobs. 'Ciod 
help me to do my duty; God help me to do my duty!' he was 
repeating in a low wail of anguish that I shall never forget. I 
quickly withdrew, but not until I had seen a great light. 1 ha\o 
loved, almost reverenced Edwin M. Stanton ever since. His own 

heart 

135 




/.■M 



^^1 



EDWIN McMASTERS STANTON 

The great Civil War Secretary. Born 12-19-1814. Died 12-24-1869. 



Edward McMastrrs Stanto.v ^ ^y? 

heart perhaps was suffering more intense agonv than the hearts of 
his humble petitioners, but he was compelled to steel his outward 
face for the bloody duties of war, while within, his soul was warm 
with sympathy and sorrow for its victims. 

"Whenever Lincoln moved away from the White House he knew 
of It and provided one or more trustworthy officers to watch and 
protect him; he sent warnings to him by telegraph to keep away 
from the missiles of battle at the front; he frequentlv advised 
almost commanded, Grant to avoid exposure to death- while 
watching Lincoln's life-blood ebb away at midnight he lifted him- 
self out of the confusion of the hour to telegraph precautions for 
the safety of Grant, when en route from Philadelphia to Wash 
ington; he created time to visit or write to every sick or wounded 
officer and, when battles were in progress, stood at the teleRraph 
instruments night and day urging extra energy in bringing awav 
and caring for the wounded. ' & & . 

"Adjutant-General Townsend remembers that soon after 
hostilities ceased he laid before Stanton the findings of a court 
martial which condemned a soldier to be shot. 'Usually ' savs 

t'rU Tu\"^''^ ^''' ^'"' commanders such great st'rengih 
in tfie field, the Secretary never reversed the findings of his officers- 
but this time he drew back in horror. 'Blood enough, blood 
enough, was all he said, and the man was not shot.' In armed 
conflict he was the ideal embodiment of aggressive ferocitv, of the 
spirit of war, but 'in peace shuddered at the sight or thought of 
blood and his heart was wrung by the pains and sorrows e^en of 
strangers. 

An attractive picture of the real Stanton is drawn bv Mrs 
General Rufus Saxton, of Washington, as follows: 

''Secretary Stanton was our guest at Beaufort, North Carolina 
m January, 1865. On arriving he said that fatigue would compel 
h.m to retire early; but after dinner, entering our bare, uncarpeted 
sitting-room, with its few dim candles but a large wood fire on 
the broad hearth, he sat down in front of the blaze and chatted 
brightly. Lxamining the books on the table, his face crew ani 
mated and he exclaimed: 'Ah, here are old friends,' and taking 
up a volume of Macaulay's poems, he turned to mc saving- 'I 
know you love poetry. Pray read us something-anvthing. 
Poetry and this fire belong together.' I read -Horatius'at the 

Bridge,* 



138 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Bridge,' and returning the book to him said: 'I know you love 
poetry, Mr. Stanton; please read to us.' He at once complied, 
reading finely 'The Battle of Ivry' and other poems. 

"He was in his most genial mood. Every nerve seemed relaxed, 
and as one after another of the numerous guests departed, he still 
sat in front of the dying embers till long after midnight, repeating 
snatches of poetry or indulging in that 'leisurely speech or the 
higher power of silence — the quiet evening shared by ruminating 
friends.' 

"The next morning we drove him out on the 'Shell Road,' where 
the live-oaks were draped with graceful gray moss, the birds sing- 
ing and the air was soft and bland. His capacity for enjoyment 
seemed intense. He leaned back silent in the carriage, gazing at 
the blue sky, seeming in spirit to 'soar with the bird and flutter 
with the leaf.' The Titan War Secretary was replaced by the 
genial companion, the man of letters, the lover of nature — the 
real Stanton, who expressed again and again his rapturous enjoy- 
ment of the surroundings. 

"He was racked by asthma from childhood; denounced and 
assailed incessantly during his entire career as Secretary of War; 
crowded out of office after a stormy but patriotic struggle in which 
he prevented President Johnson from seizing the army, shackling 
Congress, and renewing the war; and, then, worn out, poor, and 
broken-hearted, laid down to die — only 55 years old." 



Edwin McMasters Stanton 



139 



M 



A Near Stanton Connection 

ARY (Sears) Niblock relates: "In the earlier days often 
the suitor would visit with all the family and would some- 
times propose in their presence to the one he loved. 
It happened one day as David Stanton (father of 
Edwin M. Stanton, the Great War Secretary) was visiting Orand- 
mother Sears (Anna Doudna) that he saw her trying to cut some 
goods with the scissors, which were very dull, and he said to her: 
'Anna, if thee will be my wife I'll promise always to keep thy 
scissors sharp'; but she could not accept him, and answered, 'I 
am engaged to Peter Sears.' " 







mt 



STATUE OF EDWIN M. STANTON 

By the Court-house in Stecbenville, Ohio. 
Unveilkd in 1911. 




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HENRY AND CLARY (PATTERSON) STANTON 

AS grandfather and grandmother, Henry and 
Clary Stanton, grew older, grandfather was 
much troubled with shaking palsy and needed 
more care than grandmother could give him, 
so after the death of their son Edmund, who 
ihen owned the home place a mile south of Speidel, Bel- 
nont County, Ohio, they had their home with their 
;on Joseph until his death, when they moved to our 
lome near the Sandy Ridge Road, two miles east of 
parnesville, Ohio. Here they spent their declining 
'^ears kindly cared for by my father, Joel Dawson, and 
ly mother, Mary Patterson Dawson, who was their 
aughter. 

I was a young boy when they came, but I remember 
jhem very distinctly. Grandfather Henry was tall and 
lender, looked very much like Benjamin Stanton 
whose picture is shown on page 125). He had blue 
yes, rather thin sandy hair and a very heavy sandy 

beard. 
141 



J42 Ou r Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

beard. In his later years he walked with a cane, and 
was much stooped. On account of his palsy, he could 
not shave himself and after my father's death it was 
my duty to do it for him. After I learned to keep the 
razor sharp it seemed to please him, for he said that I 
was the best barber he had found. I became quite 
expert and at a test shaved him in just one minute. 
At another time when some one was paying him some 
money, he handed me a five-dollar bill and said, "Take 
this, Henry. Thee has been very good in shaving me." 
I mostly did it twice a week. First- and Fourth-day 
mornings. 

He often wore a knit jersey coat, which was warm 
and soft and much praised by him. It had the usual 
small rolling collar. A Friend, commenting on this, 
remarked that he was surprised to see him wearing a 
rolling collared coat. Grandfather replied, "It must be 
worrying thee more than me, for I did not know that it 
had a collar." And he continued to wear it. 

At 




HENRY STANTON'S SHAVING 
BRUSH AND WOODEN "MUG" 

Used until 1863. 






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Henry and Clary (Patterson) Stanton 



143 



At the beginning of the Civil War, people were gen- 
erally asked to contribute clothing, bedding and such 
articles as were needed for wounded soldiers. In due 
time two men called and, knowing that grandfather 
was a plain and consistent Friend, opposed to war, ac- 
quainted him with the object of their visit, fearing'lest 
they offend him. He heard them through 
and without comment said, "There is a 
basket under the bed. Take what you 
want." They selected what they wanted, 
thanked him, and left. 

On account of his nervousness he 
could not drink from an open cup, so 
father had a tin cup made for him with 
a tight cover and a small tin tube fastened 
in it at an angle. His drink was placed 
in this pint cup from which he could take 
It without spilling it or shaking it out. 
He always took his cup with him when 
he went visiting. 

As his palsy grew worse he could not 
lie down, but sat in an armchair which 
he had made soon after he was married, 
and leaned his head forward on a small 
support or stand made for the purpose, 
and thus secured his rest and sleep. 
Grandmother was a very small person with blue eyes, 
skin as white as a lily, in later years her hair as white as 
snow and lots of it, and sharp nose and chin. She was a 
very pretty little old woman, always ready to meet you 
with a smile. When she and grandfather walked together 
they looked more like father and daughter. She wa^s very 
ptrong and wiry and a great worker. For niany years she 

had 




ONE OF CLARY 

STANTON'S 

WEDDING 

GLOVES 



144 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




THE ROCKING CHAIRS OF HENRY AND CLARY 
(PATTERSON) STANTON 

These chairs he had made by a "chair maker" about two miles east 
OF HIS home soon after moving to Goshen Township, Belmont County, 
probably in 1810. 

had no teeth, but her gums were remarkably hard and 
she took pride in showing how she could bite a crust 
of bread. 

Grandfather always kept his own horse and carriage 
to carry them to meeting and any place they wished to 
go. I generally harnessed the horse and had her ready 
for them to get into the carriage and go, but many, 
many times I went with them to drive and take care 
of the horse. Poll was her name. She was a very 
faithful animal and seemed to know when she was 
hitched to their carriage. When they got in she would 
just pace off with them a mile to the meeting house, 
always turning at the proper place and stopping at the 
porch to let them out without a word or touch of the 
line. She raised a colt almost every year, so that 
there was usually one trotting beside her when she was 
on the road. She died on our place several years after 
they had passed away. The carriage, I think, was sold 
at a sale. 

Grandfather 



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Henry and Clary (Patterson) Stanton 



145 



Columbus, 

Ohio, 

1919. 




Grandfather and grandmother occupied the large 
down-stairs sitting-room, which was furnished with 
their own furniture and bedding. They ate at our 
table, but always contributed financially for their care. 
They both passed away in this room, grandmother a 
few years first. ^ ^ 

ANECDOTE 

RELATED BY CHALKLEY DAWSON 
RECORDED BY EMMA C. WEBSTER 

Once in grandfather Henry Stanton's boyhood days, 
he and Rebecca Updegraff were walking from Wheeling 
Creek up the hill to Mount Pleasant with a small com- 
pany of young people. The overflow of mischief, 
which at times comes to all young people, prompted 
them to exchange head-gear. As they walked along, 
they met one of the older men of the meeting. He 
observed this exchange, thought it unbecoming to 
Friends, and reported it to the overseers. 




HI Ri; l>L ACK AM) N! A N 1 1 L IN 
THE HOME OF HENRY STANTON 

Thk gratk was Ai>in:i> latkr. 



146 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton; 




SPECTACLES AND CASE USED BY 

HENRY STANTON 

His granddaughter, Sarah I. (Dawson) French had them in her pos- 
session UNTIL A FEW years BEFORE HER DEATH, WHEN SHE PRESENTED 

THEM TO William Henry Stanton. 




BLACK WALNUT "PEGS" 

From the porch of the Henry Stanton House. The "pegs" 

USED for clothes "HOOKS." 



I 




WASH BOWL AND PITCHER OF HENRY AND CLARY 

(PATTERSON) STANTON 

Reputed to h.we been brought from North Carolina. Now in the possession of 
Elizabeth (Smith) Livezey. 



Henry and Clary (Patterson) Stanto.v 





POCKET BOOK USED BY 
HENRY STANTON ABOUT 

1860 

It was later used by Eli Stanton and is 

NOW IN THE POSSESSION OF WlLLIAU HeNRY 

Stanton. 



ANECDOTE 

related by CHAUKLEY DAWSON 
RECORDED BY DEBORAH WEBSTER 



RANDFATHER at- 
tended the funeral of a 
colored man at the 
Stillwater Meeting 
House. As was customary, 
the bodies were laid in rows in 
the cemetery. This colored 
man was laid outsitie in the 
unused ground. After the 
burial, grandfather went to 
one of the overseers and said, 
"It I live until the rows are 
filled, I wish to he laid beside 
this coloretl man." 



A CORNER OF THE HENRY 
STANTON HOUSE 

It IS or interest to note the nicely dresseo 

SAND-STONE FOUNDATION, THE lO».;S AT THE 

LEFT EDGE, THE NAIUNG STRIPS ON THE LOGS 

AND THE WIDE lAV WEATUERBUAROINl'.. 



148 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



ANECDOTE 

Grandfather Henry Stanton once made the remark, 
"The time will come when a bushel of salt can be 
bought for a bushel of wheat." This shows the scarcity 
of common articles and the difficulty in obtaining 
them at that time. — Related by Chalkley Dawson. 




I 



A SYRUP CRUET OF HENRY AND CLARY 
(PATTERSON) STANTON 

Used between 1810 A^fD 1860. 



Henry and Ci.ary (Patterson) Stanton 



149 



Henry Stanton one 

IriME GAVE A SILVER- 
SMITH SIX SILVER 
pOLLARS FROM WHICH 
rO MAKE SIX TEA- 

iPOONS. The silver 




LEiT OVER WAS TO 

1-ay the silversmith 
for his labor. 
Three of the 
spoons are now in 

THE HOME OF MaRIA 

H. Smith. 



^ - 






Co. 



fc 2.0 







M 



A REPRODUCTION OF A NOTE-BOOK RECORD MADE 
BY HENRY STANTON 



150 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




X-. >,,-,., O^bi^a. 4\a'ftt&^- 



SAMPLER 

Made by Anna Stanton 




REBECCA (STANTON) SMITH'S BUREAU 

Now IN THE HOME OF HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH (SMITH) LiVEZEY. 




I 



A Visit to Henry and Clary Stanton in 1846 

REMEMBER going with my father and mother once 
when they visited Uncle Henry Stanton. As nearly 
as I can remember, I was fourteen years old, in 
which case it must have been over seventy years 'ago. 
l^he first night we stopped at Dearman Williams'.' 
His mother was a Stanton and he was a nephew of mv 
father. He had a son about my own age. This son was deter- 
mined that I was to see all there was to be seen in Salineville. 
So, after supper when it was quite dark, he took me a short dis- 
tance from the house, rolled a sand bag off the top of an iron 
pipe, applied a lighted match and the flames shot up twenty 
feet or more. The well was bored for salt, but they struck gas. 
The value of natural gas was then unknown and the gas well 
was useful only as a curiosity. 

My young cousin then took me into a coal mine that belonged 
to his grandfather, James Farmer. Being voungsters, and the 
vein of coal being thick, we were able to walk without stooping. 
We came at last to the floor where the miners had been at work. 
There he put down his candle, the only one we had, to show 
me how the coal was mined. He had taken but two or three 
strokes with the pick when the candle turned over and went out. 
He groped about until he found it, only to discover that he had 
no matches. He reassured me by telling me that the water in 
the mine had no outlet but the mouth of the mine and that if 
we would follow this stream, which was flowing at our feet, it 
>vould take us out of the mine. So, taking me bv the hand and 
occasionally stooping to feel which way \he water flowed, we 
[Stumbled along until at last we saw starlii^ht. 

We were two days and a half going from^Salem to Uncle Henry's 
arm in Belmont County. Part of the road was fearful— I cannot 
inderstand how we traveled over it without breaking the springs. 
50 far as comfort goes, and about as far as time goes, it is not so 
lard to travel from Chicago to California now^as it was from 
5alem to Belmont County then. It seems absurd in these days of 
•ailroads and automobiles — to say nothing of flying machines — 
hat that distance, ninety miles, should keep those two brothers 
ipart. I am afraid to trust my memory, but it seems to me thev 
lad not met for thirty years. The meeting between these two 
lid brothers was very aflecting to see. Uiicle Henry was con- 
iderably older than father, who must have been somewhere near 
ifty-five at that time. There was, nevertheless, a strong likeness 
•etween the two men. 

Cincinnati, 

'"^0, BvRON- St.wto.v. 

P/P. 




THE RESIDENCE OF JOEL AND MARY P. 

(STANTON) DAWSON 

Mary Dawson's parents, Henry and Clary (Patterson) Stanton, spent their last 

DAYS IN this house IN THE FIRST-FLOOR FRONT ROOM AT THE LEFT OF THE ENTRANCE. 



A VISIT TO HENRY STANTON 




N this house in the late winter of 1862 and 
1863 I saw Great-grandfather Henry Stanton. 
This is the only time that I remember see- 
ing him, but that visit made a vivid impres- 
sion on me. He was sitting in his favorite 
armchair, with his long cane with a round knob on top 
resting between his knees. I was sitting on a small table 
or stand close to the left-hand side of the fireplace. 
Some young man, probably Henry S. Dawson, leaned 
against the table with his arm back of me, and as I 
leaned against it, I remember how strong and solid it 
seemed. There were a number of friends and relatives 
in the semi-circle about the soft-coal fire in the grate. 
A bed stood in the corner of the room to the left and 
near it was an open door to the kitchen. There was 
the light from a candle or lamp there and some of the 
family were busy with the after-supper work. The 

sitting 

152 



A Visit to Henry Stanton 



53 



I sitting-room was dark except for the light from the 

open fire. I noted Great-grandfather's smooth-shaven, 

rather thin, oval face, sandy complexion, light thin 
I hair, his stooped back and his round shoulders. He 

wore a dark-brown knit blouse or "jersey." His 

attitude was very kindly but quiet. His conversation 

was in subdued tones. 

Recently I had the pleasure of visiting this room for 

the first time since I saw Great-grandfather there. Hav- 
I ing endeavored on my way to the house to recall just 
I; what I would see, and standing upon my arrival where 

I formally sat, I was astonished to see how accurate my 
j memory had been. The length, width and height of 
I the room; the number, position and size of windows 
I and doors; the place for the bed; the kitchen— all 
I were exactly as I had remembered. The chimney was 

built in the room instead of flush with the wall as I 

had thought. 
The first visit was made when I was about two and a 

half years old, the second, fifty-seven and one-half 
1 years later. 

Rid/ey Park, 
Pennsylvania, 
' 1921. 




HENRY STANTON'S BIBLE 

In possession of Myra Dawson Bundy in lOZl 



ANECDOTES 
ABOUT HENRY STANTON 

Related by Henry Dawson. 

RANDFATHER told me that he attended the first 
Friends' Meeting for worship held in the Concord 
neighborhood, near Mount Pleasant, Ohio. Logs were 
rolled to a suitable position for seats, and here under the 



open sky they worshipped God. 



Early in the Nineteenth Century Friends' Quarterly Meeting 
held at Stillwater met once during each year at Pennsville, Morgan 
County, Ohio. On one of these occasions when several friends 
were spending the night at a home in Pennsville, the conversa- 
tion drifted to the propriety of Friends wearing buttons on the 
back of their coats. Grandfather Henry Stanton listened to the 
discussion in silence, then said, "I do not know whether there 
are buttons on my coat or not. Ell go see." 



When Edwin ]\E Stanton finished his law course and had been 
admitted to the Bar, he asked his Uncle Henry Stanton to patronize 
him. Grandfather replied in words to this effect: "Thee may 
rest assured I will do all I can to keep from needing thy help." 



Grandfather Henry Stanton collected a number oi articles 
advocating the principles of Friends concerning war. He in- 
tended to send them to his nephew, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary 
of War, but before they were mailed Secretary Stanton sent out 
his great declaration, "If any soldier is found deserting or showing 
cowardice, shoot him on the spot." The articles were not sent. 

* * * * 

When the time came to take leave of Grandmother Clary 
at the funeral. Grandfather said, "Come, look upon her, as others 
shall soon look upon us." 

154 




MARY P. (STANTON) DAWSON 

For eighteen years she was contined to a wreel-chair. 

MARY P. (STANTON) DAWSON 

NE of the earliest recollections oi my child- 
hood is of Grandmother Dawson, as we 
called her, whom my mother cared for dur- 
ing the last years of her life. Many valuable 
lessons I then learned at her knee. She sat in 
wheel-chair all day, for she could not walk a step 

d urine 
155 




156 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



during the last eighteen years of her life. When night 
came, my mother put straps under her arms and about 
her back and then hooked them to a swinging crane 
that my father rigged up and by means of a windlass 
he hoisted her up in the air and swung her around and 
down on the bed where she lay with a pillow under her 
knees, for she was unable even to straighten them. 
This was, of course, a very interesting process to me 
as a child. 

Her chair had a foot-board on it and she would get 
me to stand up on this board at her knee and spend a 
part of her time teaching me and telling me Bible 
stories. By the time I was old enough to start school 
she had taught me so that I could read through the 
First Reader and could write some, too. This all came 
in very handy in after life. She was without doubt the 
most patient and peaceful person to be so badly 
afflicted whom I have ever known. The lessons she 
taught me from books, however, were no more impor- 
tant than the ones she taught me from her every-day 
life by her example of meekness and gentleness and by 
not complaining of her hard lot in life. 

The 



MARY P. (STANTON) DAW- 
SON'S PITCHER 

Now IN THE HOME OF MyRA DAWSON 

Bundy's family. 




Mary P. (Stanton) Dawsont 157 

The rheumatism had stiffened her joints and knotted 
her hands so that about all she could do was to feed 
herself and write a little once in a while. During her 
stay with us she wrote a good bit of poetry. I remem- 
ber one piece in particular that she wrote about my 
first pair of trousers that my mother had made for me 
and of which I was so proud. She wrote it in a humor- 
ous strain and I wish I could have kept it, but in our 
moving from one place to another it was lost. How- 
ever, I discovered among some old pictures a fairly 
good one of the house in which she spent the last few 
years of her life and in which she died. 

Her two daughters. Aunt Myra Bundy, of Kansas, 
and Aunt Sarah French or Aunt "Sis," as we called 
her, from Columbus, Ohio, used to come to visit her and 
I would look forward to their coming with great antici- 
pation, for I was just a little country boy and did not 
jtravel much from home. Aunt "Sis" could tell such 
iwonderful stories of life in a big city which were very 
[interesting to me, but now that I have grown up and 
jlive in the midst of the hurry and bustle of one, the 
glamor has passed away and I wish that I could be a 
|boy again at Grandmother's knee in the peaceful quiet- 
ness of that old country home. I visited that spot just 
last summer and it did not seem that over twenty 
>^ears have passed since I lived there. Nothing was 
left of the old home but the foundation, and I had only 
ithe memories of the happy days spent there. One 
ijcene in particular stands out most vividly on the can- 
l/as of the past, and that was at Grandmother's death- 
oed. It was the first death that I had ever witnessed 
ind it made a great impression on my boyish mind. 
She had been failing for some time and gradually the 
md came, and while we were all gathered around her 

bedside 



158 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



bedside she passed quietly into that great Beyond where 
there is no more suffering and pain, there to dwell 
forever with her Master whom she always loved so 
well. She was a lifelong member of the Society of 
Friends and always kept strictly to the teachings and 
beliefs of that faith. 



Steubenville, 

Ohio, 

1920. 



Warren C. Bundy. 



Mary P. Dawson was confined to her wheel-chair eighteen 
years. For seven years she was with her daughter, Myra 
Bundy, two vears with Ruanna Bundy, and the last nine 
years of her life she lived in the home of Nathan W. and 
Agnes H. Bundv, at Tacoma, Ohio. 

Warren C. Bundy is a son of Nathan Bundy and his 
second wife, Agnes Hanson. Nathan W. Bundy 's first wife 
was Anna Dawson, daughter of Joel and Mary P. (Stanton) 
Dawson. 




JOEL DAWSON 

Photographed about 1850. 



Marv p. (Stanton) Dawson 



IS'J 




MYRA f DAWSON) BUNDY 



JEPTHA BUNDY 




The Poem Referred to i\ the Article ox Marv 

P. Dawson, by Warren C. Bundv, Has Been 

Found Since the Receipt of His Contribution 

and is Reproduced Below. 

It is in the handwriting of Mary P. (Stanton) Dawson. 



^^ ^^>.^<^^ 



cZKeAJi 









/ 



=^ *^^y 



160 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 



^ ^o^'y^^y^-y^ j^-^^-^ /L-*^ A..r^^e^ .*^ 









I 



Mar^- p. (Stantox) ]).\\\s()\ 



An early and unfinished sampler 
BY Mary P. Stanton. The initials 

J. P. M. P. ARE PROnABLY FOR HER 

GRANDPARENTS, JoSEI'H PATTER.Sf)N 

AND MaKY PaTTEKSOV. 




fc.J»J 




S'C:. 'J ■: p i ,' ',. V ■> . . V , i. 



'.:l llliHl l M IW ii l»WI»WIWW»WW — Wi>«ili« i , .I | I I 







I: 




A SVMPLER PROnvBLY MADE BV M ABV 

P. Stanton. I'ossiuly lTw\.su\t>i: 

HV HER 0U)ER sister. Ann\ TiIE 
INITIAISH.S, (• S J S .ET.-.IVMBT- 
LESS ARE FOR HER PARENTS. Me.NRY 
ANDClARY SrANroNAND THEIR l-HIL- 

PREN. I AMES. Joseph, Ansa. Komi no. 
JiiRDEN. Mary Pvpterson. Menrv 
ANi> DvNiEi.. It is not so evident 

FOR WHOM the initials R S *ND 
IV S. WERF M\OF. 



162 



Our Ancestors — The Stantoxs 




CON'CH SHELL USED AS A HORN BY 

Mary P. Dawson to call the 

UEN 0.\- THE farm TO DINXER 






The chair on- which Mary P (Stanton) 
Dawson sat ditring a trip to Kansas 
She was unable to walk and was carried 

BY TWO BCEN when IT WAS NECESSARY TO 
CHANGE CARS. 





Hand-made slaw cutter used by Mary P 
(Stanton) Dawson. 



Mary P. (Stanton) Dawson 



163 




KNITTING MACHINE 

Mary P. fSxAKro.) Dawsox "ade^v pau^s of socks am> .rocKixcs os- rms wachixx 

YEARS AGO AND SOLD THEM TO THE STORES. "ALUiNE 




MARY P. (STANTON) 
DAWSON'S NECKTIE 

Now IV THK POSSESSION Of 

Eva T. Stanton. 



MEMORIES 

By Mary P. Dawson 

Written after her seventieth birthday. Tacoma, Ohio, 1891 

As by my window I lonely sit, 
Pondering o'er the bygone years, 

Crowded scenes o'er memory flit 

Of joys and sorrows, hopes and fears. 

And the place I loved so well, 

Where my thoughts oft unbidden roam, 
Is the scene of my early childhood, 

My old familiar, happy home, 




Where we children, young and old, 
Altogether numbered eight. 

With father and mother at the head. 
All sat beside our cup and plate. 




164 



b 



BMORIKS 




Wc all enjoyed the greatest wealth— 
That which nature gives to busy hands- 

Ihe rosy cheek and blooming health, 
Acquired in new ami forest lands. ' 

Daily as we grew to mature age, 
Guarded around with loving care 

Our parents read aloud the Sacred Paaf 
And breathed for us a silent prayer^ 




Ihey arrived at manhood one bv one, 
And assumed life's burden and care'; 

One bv one they passed away, 

Leaving now and then a \acant chair 




166 Our Ancestors — The Stanton 

They all are gone! gone long before me 

To the happy, bright beyond. 
Oft methinks they are watching o'er me, 

And their spirits hovering around. 

Oft in my dreams I see their faces, 
While I am slumbering on my bed, 

In their old familiar places, 

But awaken, alas! they all have fled. 

There are only four of my parents' connections. 
And only two near, to speak a word. 

That ever met at our collections 
Around that ample family board. 

May I through mercy all unmerited 

Some time enter the happy throng, 
And meet the loved ones gone before 

And sing with them the mystic song. 

When here below my journey ends 

And leaves the place by loved ones trod, 

May I be permitted to lie beside them 
And our dust mingle beneath the sod. 





HENRY STANTON DAWSON 



r w wlENRY STANTON DAWSON, son of Joel and Mary 
I JLl I Patterson (Stanton) Dawson, was born Thirtl month 
r^5^S Nineteenth, 1847, in the old house, which stood on 
•Uii'Sffl' their farm two miles east of Barnesville, Ohio. He 
vas married Third month Third, 1870, to Ellen Castello, from 
juernsey County, Ohio. They lived most ot their married life in 
Columbus, Ohio, where he was engaged in the nursery and 
ruit-tree business for over twenty years. There two sons were 
)orn to them — Stanley French and Clarence. 

Clarence is now clerking in Columbus, Ohio, and French is 
n the theatrical business. His work has taken him from home 
nost of the time for several years, but no difference where he is, 
le always remembers his parents and has written them a letter 
r a card every day. Surely he is keeping the commandment, 
Honor thy father and thy mother." 

W. H. S. 




ELLEN CASTELLO DAWSON 



WHEN mother was not very strong, Ellen Castello 
came to help in our house and soon won our hearts. 
She was bright and cheery. It seemed that she knew^ 
just what little folks liked. When we did not wash 
quite clean— a way little folks have of doing — she would say 
she guessed we left that for a starter, or else maybe we would 
never get dirty any more. 

She had travelled in Europe and lived in Philadelphia, and en- 
tertained us with stories and songs. There was one song about 
"Old Mr. Grumble" that we liked especially and wanted her to 
sing it every day, but she said that she could only sing that one on 
ironing day. It ran like this: 

"Old Mr. Grumble he did say and said it to be true, true, 
That he could do more work in one day then his wife could 
do in two, two." 

His wife traded places with him and ploughed, while he at- 
tempted to milk, feed the pig, wind the yarn and churn. Difficulties 
met him at every turn and his face was long when she came in to 
help him. Then the last stanza: 

"And when he saw where she had ploughed the furrows so 

straight, straight. 
He said a woman could do more work in one day than a man 

could do in eight, eight." 

While working on one of the buildings, father fell from the 
roof and was badly hurt. He crawled to the kitchen door, but 

could 
168 



Ellen Castello Dawson- 




could get no farther Ellen, who was rather below average height 
and slender heard h,m call and found him lying on the ground 
She picked him up and carried him into the house. How she did 
It she could not tell, as father was about five feet ten inches tall 
of medium weight. A doctor was called, who said that two ribs' 
were broken In those days there were no trained nurses in the 
neighborhood but, as was customary, the relatives and friends 
arranged to take turns "sitting up" with him to relieve the family 
who cared for him during the day. Our cousin, Henrv Dawson 
then a young man volunteered to help and came several nights' 
Of course he met Ellen and seemed to enjoy her as much as we 
children did. 

One night she prepared a midnight lunch for him, placed it 
on the table, and covered it with a table cloth. Henrv did not 
hnd It, but ate some cold buckwheat cakes he found in the cup 
board. In the morning Ellen complained to father that he had 
eaten all her chicken feed, but Henry replied, "Well, a 'hen' got 
It anyway." ^ 

Henry was a good nurse, and seemed to enjoy coming so much 
that father told Ellen that at first he came to sit up with him 
but now to see her. Ellen was delightful, everv one liked her- 
especially Henry. Their acquaintance changed to friendship 
then to love, and later they were married. 



W. H. S. 



IN REMEMBRANCE 



W 



HEN I was a girl and dependent on mv own resources 
I spent several years in the homes of Eli and William 
Stanton, helping in the rearing and caring for the 
children. While thus occupied I had manv very 
appy experiences and remember distinctlv the deep impression 
the character of the men and women of those immediate families 
inade upon me, and I now look back with gratitude for their as 
^ociation during the time I strived to lighten their burdens and 



ihr 



St)C 

:ares 



4M^Q. 




CHALKLEY DAWSON 



HALKLEY DAWSON was a son of Joel and Sarah 
(Bundy) Dawson. His father, Joel Dawson, later 
married Mary Patterson Stanton. The history of his 
life appears in the following extract from an article 
written by him on his eighty-second birthday: 

"I was born near Barnesville, Ohio, on the first day of Second 
month, 1836, and have now completed my eighty-second year. 
My father and mother were both born and raised near Barnes- 
ville, Ohio. My grandparents came to this state from North- 
Carolina in the early days of its settlement. They were Quakers 
and left New England in the time of the religious persecution 
there and went to the South, where they could worship God an^| 
not be molested on account of religious views. Quakers and ■ 
slavery never did go together, hence they were compelled to move 
again. 

"I was raised on a farm and went to school in the winter months 
and worked on the farm during the summer season, except for two 
years, one of which I attended Friends' Boarding School at Mount 
Pleasant, Ohio, and one at Westtown Boarding School, West- 
town, Pennsylvania. My earlier education was from the common 
schools, but I was reared strictly under the Quaker rule. 

"I was 
170 « 



Chalkley Dawson 

■ ■ . . 1 1 J 

"I was married to Martha Garretson, of Barnesville, on the -"Sth 
of Ninth month, 1859, and settled on a small farm. As I could not 
raise much and as there was but little market for what I did raise 
I concluded to go West and grow up with the country. Conse- 
quently I sold my farm and moved to Keokuk, Iowa' There I 
found I was up against another hard proposition— the land had 
to be broken up and lay over one year before it could be farmed 
I went to work and in five years had a pretty good farm of eighty 
acres and was making some money, when my greatest loss came 
I lost my wife. She was called away in 1867, leaving me four small 
children, in a new country amongst strangers. In the spring of 
1868 I was compelled to return east to my kindred to get my 
Ichildren so placed among them that they could be properly cared 
for, and I succeeded in getting them settled to my entire satis- 
faction. 

"With my children all cared for, I applied myself to my pro- 
fession, that of an engineer and surveyor. For seven years I worked 
It laying out the pikes in Belmont County and had the care of 
:he construction of the same. I laid out and constructed over 
ifty miles of pikes in Belmont County. 
"On completing the pikes in 1873, on the tenth of Eighth month 
married my second wife, Rebecca Ann Branson, of Flushing, 
)hio. With a new wife and a new home, I also started a new 
msiness, forming a partnership with my cousin, Nathan Bundy, 
o go into the coal business. We sank a shaft one hundred and 
pventy-five feet deep at Barnesville, but on account of the limited 
larket for coal, it was not a success. My second wife died 
ourth month 18th, 1877. It seemed as if the whole world was 
•owning on me. I was left with five children, and a large debt 
Ranging over my head. 

"On January 16th, 1883, 1 married my third wife, Margaret T. 
Japper, of Barnesville, Ohio. We came to Bellairc and%tarred 
ousekeeping, I bringing my family with mc. Once more I began 
1) get ahead in the world and have fairly well succeeded. Now in 
d age I have the assurance of a competence and some to spare to 
iorthy causes, when I am done with things here. 
"During my life I have buried all my children, six in number, 
id three wives. My third wife was stricken with paralvsis, and 
ed October 19th, 1914, and was buried at Bellaire, Ohio. 

"One 



172 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

"One of the most important steps of my life was when I was 
made a Mason, and I have been one for over fifty-nine years. 
I have made many a friend through its influence, and through its 
social and festival occasions I have spent many an enjoyable time. 

"In a business way, I have been connected with the electric- 
light plant and helped to manage its affairs for five years. I helped 
to organize the Farmers' National Bank and have been a director 
and vice-president ever since its organization. For three terms I 
served Belmont County as surveyor. 

"As to my church life, I will say that I was born a Quaker and 
attended that church until some time after 1883, when I began to 
attend the Presbyterian church and later became one of its mem- 
bers. 

"A few days before my wife was stricken and died, I was stricken 
with paralysis and have not been well since. I was forced to give 
up the active duties ot life, and now my work is finished and I 
await His coming. Many loved ones are waiting to greet me on 
the other shore, for which my eyes are now watching. Second 
month, First, 1918." 

Chalkley Dawson was married for the fourth time on August 
13, 1919, aged 83>^ years, to Mrs. Lohr, of Columbus, Ohio. 

Anecdotes 

RELATED BY CHALKLEY DAWSON. RECORDED BY EMMA C. WEBSTER 

John Sullivan, the first president of the Central Ohio Division 

of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, told me of an epidemic of 

cholera in Wheeling, West Virginia, about 1832. It was fatal. 

"There was no sound of tools in the town except those used in 

making coffins, and no business except hauling out the dead." 
* * * * 

Some years ago I attended a^ reunion at Westtown Boarding 
School, but found no one there I knew. A friend very kindly 
offered to try to find some of my old schoolmates. Finally I was 
introduced to a man as Chalkley Dawson, but he did not seem 
to remember me and repeated the name several times, ''Chalkley 
Dawson." Then his face lighted up — "Oh, Chalk Dawson; cer- 
tainly I remember thee," and we had a pleasant time talking over 
old school days. 

Anecdotes 



Chalkley Dawson 173 

Anecdotes 
pioneer life in iowa 

RELATED BY CHALKLEY DAWSON 
RECORDED BY EMMA C, MARY L., and DEBORAH H. WEBSTER 

Many privations and hardships were experienced in pioneer 
life in Iowa in the early sixties. We bought eighty acres of prairie 
land, of which only ten acres were broken. I continued to break 
ten acres at a time, thus having new land each year. The first 
year I plowed with a double ox team and planted corn by lifting 
the dirt at the edge of each furrow and dropping a few grains every 
few feet. This produced a very poor grade of corn, but it was good 

enough for cattle food. 

* * * * 

One day when I was plowing, the oxen shied and I saw a rattle- 
snake. A fifteen-foot whip, which I carried in order to touch up 
the front oxen, proved to be very useful in killing the snake. A 
second rattler was encountered one evening on my way to Ann 
Gibon's house. I pulled off my boot, took it by the strap and killed 

the snake. 

* * * * 

We attended a marriage one evening. There was a little snow 
on the ground, but not enough to cover the trail, which consisted 
of wagon tracks across the prairie. We spent a pleasant evening, 
ignorant of the fact that more snow had fallen, entirely obliterating 
our trail. As far as eye could see, the ground laid as one white 
sheet. I knew that the tendency of man is to move in a circle, 
so I decided to trust to the oxen I was driving. They brought us 
safely to our door. As we looked back, we could see our track a 
long straight line. 

We were not always able to keep the cold out of our houses. 
I remember one morning, on waking, we found the baby's hair 
frozen to the pillow, her mother's breath having caused the 

moisture. 

* * * * 

The house was guarded by a fire-break, which was made by 
plowing three furrows a little way from the house, then leaving 
about two rods and plowing three more furrows and burning the 
grass between. This was usually a safe protection, but some- 
times, when there was a high wind, the fire would come across the 
break. 






"iL^^^^^^^iy 




JOSEPH AND MARY (HODGIN) STANTON 

)SEPH STANTON, son of Henry and Clary 
Stanton, and Mary Hodgin, daughter of 
Stephen and Elizabeth Hodgin, were mar- 
ried Ninth month Twenty-seventh, 1832, at 
Stillwater Meeting House. They lived for a 
short time in Goshen Township, a half mile east of 
the Henry Stanton home four miles east of Barnesville, 
and later bought a farm on Stillwater Creek, about 
two miles north of Stillwater Meeting House, where 
they lived the remainder of their lives. 

Thev 




COMBINATION PEN AND PENCIL 



USKO BV JOSEPH STANTOM ABO.T ,855 WBE. C.E.K OP ShIXWATHR Uo^. MEETI.C. 

175 



176 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



I 




THE OLD JOSEPH STANTON HOUSE 



Located about half a mile east of the Hexrv Stanton home. In this house Joseph and Mary 
(Hodcin) Stanton started housekeeping and here their son Eli was born. Iheir other 

CHILDREN were BORN IN THEIR I ATER HOME ON StILLWATER CRKEK. 




SPRING AT THE OLD JOSEPH STANTON HOUSE 



The spring was near the house and furnished all the water used. We would think it a 

HARDSHIP TO HAVE TO CARRY WATER AS FAR AS IT WAS NECESSARY HERE, BUT THERE WAS MORE TIME 

AND MUCH LESS WATER USED. It IS OVERGROWN WITH FLOWERS AND IVY NOW IN 1920, BUT THE ROUGH 

STONE WALL IS STILL GOOD AND THERE IS AN EXCELLENT FLOW OF WATER. 



v^ 



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\-l 



i%^ 



K^K 



\ ^^^«^ 



^^■kk §1^ 



J^ "^ 



^; 






N^ 



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I I- k ^ ^ X 5 



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'f^^ 

^ 



^ 



li 



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is. 






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[osEPH AND Mary (Hodgin) Stanton 



177 




JOSEPH STANTON'S 
BIBLE 

Now IN THE POSSESSION OF 

Joseph Eli Stanton. 



They were prominent 
members of the Society 
of Friends. Both were 
Elders in the Meeting for 
a number of years. Jo- 
seph was appointed Clerk 
in 1852 and served the 
Meeting in that capacity 
for seven years, until his 
death in 1859. Mary 
Stanton was granted a 
minute as companion to 
Rebecca Mitchner, a min- 
ister, to Philadelphia 




ROBERT PLUMMER, JR. 

1813-1894 
Son of Robert, who donateo the 

ACRE of ground FOR THE ORAVK- 
YARD AND FrIENDS' MEFTINO HoUSK, 
A HALF MILE NORTH OK STILLWATER 

MEnTiN-c. HinsE. 



178 Our Ancestors — The Stanton, 



serving. At butchering time they saw that those ir 
need had a good meal of spareribs and sausage, and 
when they butchered a beef, many of the neighbon 
would get a small portion of it, a custom that waj 
common in those days. 

One time Joseph and Mary Stanton were calling or 
their near neighbors, Robert and Jane Plummer, wher 
Robert called Joseph's attention to the large stock o: 
cook-stove wood he had prepared. Joseph remarked 
"One hickory log will do my wife a year." Jane com- 
mented, ''Well, Mary Stanton does not have to cook aji 
much as I do." All enjoyed the inference that Rober 
had a good appetite. 

In those days people were mostly ahead of thei:! 
work; for example, they would have their year's suppb 
of wood cut. They did not let their work push them a; 
it does so many of us nowadays. 

Mary Stanton's father, Stephen Hodgin, was ven 
much annoyed by a neighbor's turkeys. One day whei 
they got into his garden, he threw a stick to drive then 
away and accidentally struck one and knocked it over 
He immediately picked it up, cut off its head, and pre 
pared it for roasting. Then he invited the owners dowi 
to help eat it and the matter was settled withou 
further trouble. 

Joseph and Mary Stanton had five children: Eli 
Anna, William, Eunice and Elizabeth. All lived to b 
married and to have families except Eunice, who die( 
when about six years old. 

About the year 1856 Mary began to notice a weak 
ness in her ankles and knees, which gradually gre^ 
worse, until she could not walk or turn herself in bed 
She spent the days in an armchair on castors, so sh 

coul( 



Joseph and Mary (Hodgin) Stanton 



179 



could be pushed around. She was in that condition 
several months, when she took a heavy cold which 
affected her lungs. She lived about a week after that 
and passed quietly away just twenty-five years, to the 
day and hour, after they were married. The family 
was very lonely after that. Eli was married to Mary 
p. Bundy before his mother's death. Joseph and his 
three remaining children kept house the following 
ivinter. In the spring, Third month Thirtieth, 1859, 
i^nna was married to Nathan Bundy. As carriages 
^ere scarce then, Joseph and his twelve-year-old 
daughter Elizabeth went to the wedding on horseback. 
William was in the wedding company. It was a double 
ivedding; Nathan Bundy's brother, Caleb Bundy, and 
Deborah Hanson were married at the same time. 
Pontrary to custom, the marriage reception was at the 

home 




INNA STANTON BUNDY. WILLIAM STANTON. ELIZABETH STANTON BAILEY 

IViotoirarh jit Hit 1912 



180 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

home of the man's father, Ezekiel Bundy. The next 
day they were at Elijah Hanson's and the next at 
Joseph Stanton's. From the second reception the 
Stantons had to go home early to make sponge for 
bread, and prepare for the '*infair" dinner. The 
neighbors were very good to come in and help and 
when the day came, everything was in readiness. 

Joseph had a housekeeper, who stayed with him, doing 
good service until his death, Seventh month Twenty- 
sixth, 1859, two years, lacking two months, after his 
wife's death. 

After her father's death Elizabeth lived with her 
brothers and sisters, doing what she could to help them. 
She very much felt her loneliness, but every one was 
very kind to her and made her feel less the loss of a 
father and mother who had been so inspiring and so 
exemplary not only to her but to her brothers 
and sisters and who had stood as staunch pillars in 
the Meeting which they loved and as beacon lights for 
good in a community which they strived to serve. 

1919. ^ ^ 




JOSEPH STANTON'S WATCH 

Now IN THE POSSESSION OF 

Joseph Eu Stanton. 



OSEPH AND Mary (Hodgin) Staxton 



181 




I 



HAT WORN BY JOSEPH STANTON ABOUT 1858 

Typicat, of the hats worn by older Friends of that period. 




THE KIND OF BONNET WORN BY MARY (HODGIN) 
STANTON 

This one belonged to Asenath Rau.ey, the mother of Lindlf.y V. Bailey, 

AND WAS WORN BY HER ABOllT 1900. 



182 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton: 




JOSEPH STANTON'S SPECTACLES 

Now IN POSSESSION OF ELIZABETH StANTON BaILEY 




BUREAU FROM THE HOME OF JOSEPH 
AND MARY (HODGIN) STANTON 

The one with which she began housekeeping 

IN 1832. Now in the home or Elizabeth 

Stanton Bailey. 



Joseph and Mary (Hodgin) Stanton 



183 




STONEWARE JAR 

This jar filled with lard was given by Henry Stanton 
TO his son Joseph at the time of his uarriage in 1832. 




THE INVALID CHAIR OF MARY 
(HODGIN) STANTON 

This chair was made for her when, on AccorxT or spine 

TROUBLE, SHE COULD NOT WALK. It WAS 0RIGINAU.Y PROVIDED 
WITH A FOOT-REST AND CASTORS. 1t WAS USED IN THE HOME OP 

Eli Stanton about thirty years and now is in the possessiom 
OF Elizabeth Stanton Bailey. 



184 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 





VINEGAR CRUET 

Used by Joseph and Mary (Hodoin) 
Stanton between 1832 and 1857. 



A SPLINT-BOTTOM 
CHAIR 

a genuine specimen in the home of 
Albert and Mary B. Niblock. 




a few of the apple trees that are still standing of the orchard planted by 
Joseph Stanton in front of his home on Stillwater Creek in 1857. 




PRESERVING FRUIT BEFORE THE DAYS OF 
CANNING 

REMEMBER in 1853 or 1854 mother doing 
our first canning. Until that time we had 
always dried our fruit, only making a small 
amount of apple butter and sometimes a 
little peach butter. These we cooked long 

enough to make them so rich they would keep without 

sealing. 

Mother boiled sweet apples until they were tender, 
put them in a press until all the juice was out, then 
boijed down the juice until it was molasses. This we 
ite with cream and, as I remember, it was most 
ieliciouL\ 



Tacoma, \ 
Ohio, ^ 



Elizabeth Stanton Bailev 



186 



Our Ancestors— The Stanton s 





SUGAR BOWL AND MUG 

Left- This sugar bowl was bought by Joseph Stanton at his Uncle J.-uies 

Stanton's sale and was used in his family until his death in 1859. 
Right- Tms MUG was kept in the corner of Mary fHoDciN) Stanton's cup- 
' board as a "catch-all" for sm.\ll things of. importance. 





TIN PLATE AND JELLY JAR 



Tfft- Tin pl^te presented by Henry Stanton to his granddaughter 
Elizabeth Stanton (Bailey) and used by her when a little girl. 

Right Jar USED for jelly by Mary (Hodgin) Stanton. Mary M Colpitts 
has IT NOW (1921) filled with the jelly 'svhich her grandmother 

MADE AND PUT IN IT IN 185o OR 1856. 








TEAPOT AND PITCHER 



Left- Te^^pot used by Mary (Hodgin) Stanton. 
Right: Pitcher owned by Mary (Hodgin) Stanton ^^^^EN she was married in 
1832 and ttsed in her home for thirty years. It was left with tea in it one 

WINTER evening AND DURING THE NIGHT THE TEA FROZE AND CRACKED THE BOTTOM 
OF THE PITCHER. SiNCE THAT TIME IT HAS BEEN VALUED AS A KEEPSAKE. 



s 



SOFT SOAP 

OAP-MAKING was one of the various duties 
of the housewife, when I was a little girl. 



The ash hopper in which the lye was made 
was located in the door yard. It consisted 
of four posts about five feet high set in the 
ground; inside of these and supported by them was a 
conical wood box or hopper about three feet square at 
the top and a foot square at the bottom. It rested on 
an inclined board with grooves cut near the outside to 
conduct the lye to one end and into a vessel set to 
receive it. Four or five bushels of wood ashes were 
thrown on top of the straw and a bucket of water was 
poured into a hollow formed in the ashes. As the water 
soaked into the ashes more water was added at intervals 
for three or four days. When the liquid commenced 
to seep through, a kettle was placed to receive the lye 
and when there was a big iron kettle full, it was put 
over the fire and the lye boiled until it was strong 
enough to "eat" a feather. Then the grease and meat 
rinds were put in and when they were acted upon by the 
lye the solution was boiled again until it roped from 
the stick with which it was stirred. The process 
was now finished and when the liquid cooled it was 
pronounced to be good soft soap and was kept in a 
barrel. Mother made enough soap in the spring to 
last tor a year. 

Elizabeth Stanton Bailey. 
Tacoma, 
Ohio, 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




ASENATH (HODGIN) EDGERTON 



Born 7-21-1823. Died 1-30-1905. Married John Edgerton 
3-31-1857. An older sister of John E. Hodgin. 




FOUR GENERATIONS 

Tamer D. Hodgin, Rachel H. Coppock, Ada J. Bowles 
Elsie R. Bowles. Ages 85 to 3 years. 



I 




JOHN E. AND TAMER D. HODGIN 

Born 11-12-1830 and 8-6-1836. He is a nephew of Mary 
(Hodgin) Stanton. 

M' ANY of the Friends living in Georgia wanted to leave 
that state on account of trouble from the Indians, 
and also that they might live in a country free from 
slavery. 

William Hodgin and William Patten investigated conditions 
ti Belmont County, Ohio, In 1802. In 1803 they brought out 
heir families, and with them came Stephen Hodgin, a brother of 
Villiam ; also the Williams, Todd, Vernon, Sidwell, Millhouse, 
^hildrey, Hayes, Stubbs and other families. 

William Hodgin died in North Carolina in 1820 when on a trip 
Georgia on a visit. 



190 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 




f* il.Wtliiter. 

MAP OF THE JOSEPH STANTON, STEPHEN HODGIN, 

BENJAMIN CLENDENON FARMS AND THE 

CLENDENON AND HODGIN MILLS 




RED ROOSTER WEATHER VANE 

Found in the old Hosea Doudna house. 



THE BEAR STORY 

An account of the narrow escape that Alphonsus and Abigail 
Kirk's family had from a hungry bear, as recorded by their 
granddaughter, Rachel Price, who was a cousin of Mary 
(Hodgin) Stanton. 



A 



LPHONSUS and Abigail Kirk were married in 1695 and 
settled on a farm near Wilmington, Delaware. One morn- 
ing a beef had been killed, and soon after Abigail Kirk 
was left alone with two younger sons. A large bear, 
attracted by the smell of fresh meat, came near the door of the 
cabin before he was noticed. Upon seeing him the mother ran 
to close the door. It was a double door, the kind used before 
windows with glass were in general use. When the bear reared 
iand placed his paws on it, thus making it impossible to close the 
upper half, she held it against his paws while she called to her 
son to hand her the rolling pin, and with it she beat the bear's 
paws until it jumped down and she could fasten the door. The 
bear then climbed on to a shed roof and tried to enter a second- 
story window. The mother sent her two little boys to the cellar 
^nd told them to climb into a chest there and shut down the lid 
all but a small crack for air, while she went upstairs to prevent his 
entering through the window. The shed roof gave way and he 
Ifell to the ground. She then threw him some pieces of the fresh 
meat which he ate eagerly and started off. 

The next morning the men tracked the bear through the snow, 
by bloodstains from injuries received from his fall, and killed 
dim. 

Edna Macv Stantox, 



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AMY (HODGIN) CLENDENON 

Born in Savannah. Gkorgia, in 1800. Died 

AT Coal Creek, Iowa, in 1868. She was a 

SISTER OF Mary (Hodgin) Stanton. 



UNT AMY!"— father's aunt— I have 
heard him speak cf her as long ago as 
I can remember; she seems to have 
hekl a very warm place in his heart, 
and indeed in the hearts of his brother 
and sisters. As she lived on the next farm below, 
we may be sure there were many visits to "Aunt 
Amy's"; and doubtless the name was often asso- 
ciated in mind with sweet cakes, "turn-over pies", 
cherries — eaten in the trees, — peaches, apples and 
nuts. And too, such good meals, which seemed 
much better than the ones at home — just because 
they were at "Aunt Amy's". 

What a pleasure it was to him to remember 
her, and to live over again those happy days! 

W. H. S. 



194 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 







STEPHEN CLENDENON 

Born S-28-1833. Died 5-4-1913. Married 
Elizabeth Branson 3-25-1859. Photograph 

ABOUT 1871. 



ELIZABETH BRANSON 
CLENDENON 

Born 3-29-1834. Died 8-4-1913. Married' 
Stephen Clendenon 3-25-1859. Photograph 

ABOUT 1871. 



i 




LYDIA CLENDENON 
SMITH 

Daughter op Benjamin and Amy Clendenon. 
Photographed about 1862. 



HANNAH CLENDENON 
STANLEY 

Born about 1835. Died 12-00-1867. Marriee 
Isaac Stanley 12-00-1866. Daughter of 
Benjamin and Amy Clendenon. 



HE Clentdenont Familv 



195 




AN OLD IRON TEA-KETTLE 

Hanna Elizabeth Clendenon, of Oskai,oosa. Iowa, gives its history as 
follows: "When I was a little girl I was presented vmu a little iron 

TEA-KETTLE AND THIS STORY WAS TOLD TO ME: 

"'In 1813 Stephen AND Elizabeth Hodgin went from Ohio to Pennsylvania 
onIhorseback. While there great-grandmother was presented with this 
tea-kettle filled with seed potatoes, and she was told that the tea-kettle 
belonged to her great-grandmother.' I still have this relic of early times 

IN A perfect state OF PRESERVATION." 




THE RESIDENCE OF BENJAMIN CLENDENON 

Located on Stillwater Creek about two miles northeast of Barnesville, 
Ohio, and a little above and on opposite side of valley from his water-power 
SAW MILL. The house was built abih'T 1840. The we.\therboardinc is 
MODERN. The chimney is of dressed stone. At one time a colony of bees 

MADE nS home in THK GARRET AND ENTERED THROUGH THE LOWER PART OF THE 

left-hand gable window. "Uncle" Benjamin frequently took a supply of 
honey from its stores. 



196 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




STEPHEN CLENDENON'S HOUSE ON STILLWATER 
CREEK 

Located across the road from the saw mill. Stephen moved to Iowa in 1864. 




SPLINT BOTTOM CHAIR 

Used by Amy (Hodgin) Clendenon about 1850. Now in the 
home of Sarah B. Hall. 




THE LOCATION OF BENJAMIN CLENDENON'S SAW MILL 



BENJAMIN CLENDENON'S SAW MILL 



T 



HIS was a water mill located on Spencer branch of 
Stillwater Creek about two and one-quarter miles 
northeast of Barnesville and a half mile below Joseph 
Stanton's residence. It stood in a depression in the 
bank across the road from his son Stephen Clen- 
denon's house. The dam was about eight hundred feet up the 
stream, as shown in the map. The race followed the bank near 
the roadway to the mill, which was located about where the person 
is standing in the picture. There was a tall of about eight teet, 
giving power to an over-shot water wheel. The saw was ot the 
vertical reciprocating type. 

Father told me years ago that one very cold day when Uncle 
Benjamin Clendenon was running the mill, his wife, Aunt Amy, 
kept the tea-kettle boiling all day so he could have hot water to 
melt the ice on the wheel— one of the bearings probably. 

Henry S. Dawson recently told me that once when Stephen was 
sawing in severe weather his hands were numb from the ctild, and 
as he rode on the carriage with his hand on the log he tailed to 
notice that the saw was approaching his fingers until the end ot 
one had been taken off. He stopped the saw, went into the house 
where his wife wrapped up the finger — then back to sawing. 

\V. H. S. 



198 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton s 




THE LOCATION OF BENJAMIN 
CLENDENON'S MILL DAM 

The arrow indicates where the mill 
STOOD. The race ran along the edge of 

THE valley below THE ROAD. 





"HIGH MILL" 

Typical of the larger old-time water 

grist mills. Located near Massillon 

Ohio. 



AN OVER-SHOT WHEEL 

A SPECIMEN OF THE LATER TYPE SHOWING 

CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUCKETS. LOCATED 

NEAR BARBERTON, OhIO. 




WOODEN WHEEL SHAFT 

The remains of the wooden shaft at the 
"high mill." The shaft is almost two' 

FEET IN diameter. 




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ELI AND MARY P. (BUNDY) STANTON 

E NEVER allowed his horses to be driven 
with a whip" is an index to the character 
of Eli Stanton. A gentle, loving, sympa- 
thetic man, he worked ardently for a pleas- 
ant home, and for advancement and im- 
provement in his surroundings. He was ever readv 
with a word of encouragement and with a helping 
hand to the needy. 

This eldest son of Joseph and Mary (Hodgin) Stanton 
was by nature of good mechanical ability, and early in 
life contemplated taking up some line of cabinet mak- 
ing for a profession. He made several pieces of furniture 
tor his home. A bookcase ot black walnut made by 
him is still in the possession ot his daughter Sarah. 
However, having been raised on a farm and educated 

in 

199 



200 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




A BLACK-WALNUT BOOKCASE MADE BY ElI StANTON WHEN 
A YOUNG MAN, AND A BUREAU USED IN HIS FAMILY FOR MANY 

YEARS. Both in possession of Sarah B. Hall. 

in agriculture, when his father, a successful farmerj 
offered him opportunities in that line, he accepted an( 
enjoyed the preparation of the soil, the planting of the" 
seeds, the raising and the harvesting of the crops on 
his father's farm on Sandy Ridge two miles east of 

Barnesville, 



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Our Ancestors — The Stantons 










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Eli and Marv P. (Bundv) Stanton- 



201 




EM AND MARY P. STANTON 

Taken' aboi-t 1868. 

Barnesville, Ohio. He became a progressive agricul- 
turist, and stock raising was added to his interests. 
.Cattle were a specialty, he being among the first to 
introduce thoroughbred Shorthorns into his vicinity. 
He was an active member of the Grange. 
j On a farm not far from the Stanton home li\'ed 
John and Ruth (Patten) Bundy. On the Ninth of 
Twelfth month, 1857, Eli Stanton married their dautjh- 
iter, Mary P. The waiters at their marriage were: 1st, 
Caleb Bundy, Hannah Clendenon; 2d, Nathan Bundy, 
jAnna Stanton; 3d, William P. Bundy, Tabitha 
Doudna. This little woman, for she could walk under 
ler husband's outstretched arm, was always a good 
example to others. Her method of disciplining her 
^phildren was to ever set them the right example and 

then 



Eli and Mary P. (Bundy) Stanton 203 




A VIEW SOUTHEAST FROM THE RESFDENCE OF ElI StANTON, LOOKING TOWARDS THE 

OLD Goshen Friends' Meeting House. Part of the farm formerly owned 
BY Henry Doudna is shown at the right and the farm of James Stanton at the 

LEFT. 

Photographed in 1884 by W. H. S. 

then gently and patiently see that they followed it. 
Kindness to every one was characteristic of her. She 
was careful never to wrong any one in thought or deed, 
believing that whoever robs others with evil suspicions 
robs himself of his own peace of mind. She was indus- 
trious and happy, doing what she could for the up- 
lifting of humanity. The motto by which she lived 
was, "Life is given for noble deeds that we may pro- 
mote our own happiness in proportion as we contribute 
to the comfort of others." 

Eli and Mary Stanton went to housekeeping in an 
old log house on Sandy Ridge, erected by Jesse Bailey. 
No photograph remains of the house, but a sketch has 
been made, which faces page 215. The present road 
passes directly over its foundation. In this old house 
with its whitewashed walls, rag carpets and green 
paper window shades, three children were born to this 
happy couple. 

William 



204 Our Ancestors — The Stantoxs 

William Henry (8-2-1860). Will was an energetic 
little boy, who dearly loved his family and his home. 
With the mechanical turn inherited from his father, he 
enjoyed everything mechanical and the study of science. 
After a year at Friends' Boarding School, Barnesville, 
and three years as apprentice to the machinist trade 
and four years as instrument maker and four years 
at DePauw University, while studying at Rose Poly- 
technic Institute, he was offered a position with the 
Philadelphia Quartz Company, to have charge of the 
building and development of new factories. While 
with that company he lived for twenty years at Ander 
son, Indiana, where he met and married, on Sixt 
month Fifteenth, 1898, Miss Louise Smith. Since the 
he has lived in Buffalo, New York, Robinson, Mary- 
land, and for the last seven years in Ridley Park, 
Pennsylvania. Now, in his sixtieth year, he has retired 
from active work. 

Sarah B. (11-23-1861). This eldest daughter, witl 
black curly hair and blue eyes, brought much happi 
ness into her parents' home. She was educated a 
Friends' Boarding School, Westtown, Pennsylvania 
For a number of years she taught in her home neigh 
borhood and there met and married, on the Twenty 
eighth of Tenth month, 1890, Wilfred T. Hall, son o 
Thomas P. and Rebecca Hall. They went to house 
keeping on his mother's farm, near the house wheri 
Nathan and Anna (Stanton) Bundy first hved afte 
their marriage. Dairying and farming have claimec 
Wilfred's attention. In 1898 they bought a part ot 
the Robert Plummer farm near Tacoma, Ohio, and in 
1907 moved there, living in the house built by William 

Bundy. 



Eli and Mary P. (Bundy) Stanton 205 

Bundy. This, with additional land, is their present 
farm. 

To them three daughters were born, all of whom 
attended Friends' Primary School and Friends' Board- 
ing School near Barnesville, Ohio. Eva (9-26-1891). 
On the Twenty-fifth of Sixth month, 1914, Eva married 
Guy Woodward, of Plainfield, Indiana. They located in 
Anderson, Indiana, where he was manager of the plant 
of the Philadelphia Quartz Company. While there, 
Eva gained the love and esteem of all who knew her 
and again when Guy was transferred to the plant at 
Buffalo, New York, her influence was felt. To be a 
helpmate to her husband, to set an example of "the 
things worth while" in their daily lives was her ambi- 
tion. Hers was an energetic, buoyant life with a deep 
interest in relatives and friends, yet above all was her 
great love for her husband and home. Into their short 
married life they crowded more of joy and happiness 
than many do in long years. On the Twenty-sixth of 
Second month, 1919, she died of influenza. Thus early 
called "Home," she left a void hard to All. Bertha 
i Rebecca (12-16-1892). Bertha married Albert W. 
Guindon of Bristol, Vermont, on the Twenty-sixth ot 
Ninth month, 1918. They went to the beautiful Green 
Mountain state to live. There they follow the business 
of farming for which ^Albert prepared himself at Cor- 
nell University, New York. Helen E. (6-13-1899). 
On the Fifteenth of Second month, 1919, Helen mar- 
ried Harold L. Holloway of Barnesville, Ohio. He is 
a mechanic of unusual ability and has been trained 
under expert instructors. On the Twenty-first of 
Twelfth month, 1919, a son, Paul W., was born. 

Emma 



206 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Emma C. (10-5-1864). This second daughter, in 
looks resembhng her father, came to add, in her quiet 
manner, joy to the happy household. She was edu- 
cated at Friends' Boarding School, Barnesville, Ohio, 
and at Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1888, on the Twenty-third of Eighth 
month, she married Willis Vail Webster, son of Thomas 
and Lydia P. (Richardson) Webster, of Quaker City, 
Ohio. They built a small house near Quaker City and 
there established their home. Willis taught school for 
a number of years, then led a busy life as a surveyor. 
In 1914 his health was poor and he retired from busi- 
ness. The family then and since that time has lived 
at 838 Wilson Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. Five chil- 
dren came to bless their home. Harlan Stanton (9-6- 
1889). Harlan received his education in the Quaker 
City, Cambridge and Columbus Public Schools, with 
two years at Friends' Boarding School near Barnes- 
ville, Ohio. Like many other boys, he found elec- 
tricity and wireless very attractive and after patient 
perseverance installed a station that gave wonderful 
results for that early day of wireless. He says: "The 
best results I have had with my wireless outfit were in 
the years 1910 and 1911. My station was located at 
the rear of our home, 838 Wilson Avenue, Columbus, 
Ohio, and at this time was well equipped. My antenna 
was two hundred and fifty feet long, comprised of four 
aluminum wires suspended from one end on a pole 
about seventy-five feet high, and at the other end 
from a pole about ninety-five feet high. With this 
station I could pick up messages from the English 
Government Station at Nova Scotia, stations at Cape 
Cod, Key West, Florida, and the naval station at 

Norfolk. 



Eli and Mary P. (Bundy) Stanton 207 

Norfolk. I often heard the United Fruit Company 
station at New Orleans giving orders to their boats and 
to their office at Colon, Panama. At one time I 
heard the Government Station at Seattle, Washing- 
ton, talking to a station at Katalla, Alaska. They 
were inquiring about a boat that had been wrecked. 
In a day or so the papers contained an account of a 
shipwreck near Katalla." He married Mary Avis 
Smith, then of Estherville, Iowa, on the Third of Ninth 
month, 1912. They have one son, Willis William, born 
Seventh month eighth, 1914. Their home is in East 
Canton, Ohio, where Harlan has a position as chemist. 

Raymond Nathan (7-27-1893). Raymond, like his 
brother, received his education in the public schools of 
Quaker City, Cambridge, and Columbus, Ohio, and at 
the Friends' Boarding School near Barnesville, Ohio. 
Durmg vacation he secured employment as engineer in 
a plant in Columbus, where art glass for automobiles 
was prepared. While on duty, his clothing was caught 
in the machinery, throwing him backwards. His head 
struck the floor, causing instant death on the Fifth of 
Ninth month, 1912. Interment was made in the family 
lot in Green Lawn Cemetery, Quaker City. Raymond 
was of a cheerful, studious disposition. Wherever he 
went, he made friends. Our great loss we trust was his 
eternal gain. Thomas (6-25-1897), at Quaker City, 
Ohio. Thomas was educated in the public schools of 
Cambridge and Columbus, Ohio, and at the Friends' 
Boarding School near Barnesville. Since leaving school 
le has been employed as a draftsman. Mary Lydia 
^6-11-1904), at Cambridge, Ohio. Debora Harriet 
7-6-1906), at Columbus, Ohio. Both girls are attend- 
ng the public school in Columbus. 

The 



208 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

The winter of 1871 brought sadness to the home of 
Eh Stanton. The devoted wife and mother, after an 
illness of about six weeks, was called to her Heavenly 
Home, leaving a heart-broken husband and three chil- 
dren under twelve years of age. What a void, what 
an utter loneliness was felt in that home only those of 
us who have lost the mainstay of our lives can know. 
Not only in the home, but among the relatives and 
neighbors was this loss keenly felt, for she had taken 
an active interest in the affairs of the neighborhood and 
her quiet, gentle life had touched and inspired the 
lives of many. A cousin, Sarah Clendenon, came and J 
made her home with the stricken family. The aunts 
did all in their power to make happy those motherless 
chikiren. William has happy recollections of his joy 
and pride in a suit made by Aunt Jennie in which she 
stitched the name W'illiam H. Stanton in the lining of 
the coat, and the frequent visits of Aunt Annie and 
Aunt Lizzie to their home were red-letter days. 

On the thirtieth of Seventh month, 1873, Eli 
Stanton married Deborah H. Bundy, daughter of 
Elijah and Eliza Hanson, of Stillwater, Ohio. She 
brought to his home her little daughter, Mary C. 
Bundy, and her step-daughter, Mary E. Bundy. 

This was an unusual home, where five children lived 
happily together representing three different families 
and all treated like own children by each of the step- 
parents. On the Twenty-sixth of First month, 1875, a 
son was born, Nathan Eli. Together they all worked 
and played harmoniously for twelve years, when the 
home was again visited by the unseen messenger, who 
called the father, Eli Stanton, to the mansions above 
the sky. His going left his wife a widow for the third 

time 




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ELI STANTON DEBORAH H. B. STANTON 

Photographs taken in 1874 in Clarksburg, West Virginia. 

me and his three oldest children, now between the 
;es of twenty and twenty-five years, without parents, 
It with the love of a step-mother which has enriched 
eir lives. 

Nathan Eli, the only other child, now a bov ot ten 
ars, was educated in the district school and later 
-nt to Westtown Boarding School for a short time, 
the summer of 1893, when he was eighteen vears 
i, he, accompanied by his mother, went to Iowa 
lere he engaged in farming. From that time, except- 
\ one year spent in Houston Countv, Minnesota 
til Third month, 1920, he lived in Iowa. For sev- 
l1 years he devoted himself to grain farming and ho^ 
sing, then turned to dairy work, retailing bottled 
Ik and supplying hotels, dining cars and resnuirants. 
n 1914 a silver medal was awarded him bv the Dairy 
ttle Congress held in Waterloo, Iowa, and both a 
-er and a gold medal by the Agricultural College 
Ames for market milk tested from samples taken at 
'■ four different seasons of the vear. 

On 



210 



Our x-^ncestors — The Stantons 



On the Twentieth of Sixth month, 1907, he married 
at Barnesville, Ohio, Sarah E. Stanton, daughter oi 
Daniel and Rebecca Bundy Stanton. To them three 
children were born: Edith Rebecca (4-15-1908), Mervir 
Daniel (2-13-1910), William Hanson (1-8-1914). 

They have all three attended the city schools ir 
Estherville, Iowa. On Third month first, 1920, the) 
moved to a large farm near Rush City, Minnesota 
where they now reside. His mother, Deborah H. B 
Stanton, makes her home with them. 

In closing, the words of Thomas Carlyle seem mo! 
fitting to apply to such a man as Eli Stanton: 

'The work an unknown good man has done is 
like a vein of water flowing hidden under ground, 
secretly making the ground green." 



Lansdowne, 

Pennsylvania, 

1919. 









Rocking-chair used 
BY Eli Staxton un- 
til 1885. 




A GREAT COl 
TO HIM DURINOB : 
YEAR OF HIS 
CLINING HEALl 



i 



Eli and Deborah H. B. Stanton 



211 



Eli Stanton's silk 
wedding hat worn 
1873 at the time 
of his marriage to 
Deborah H. Bundy. 





Watch bought and used by Eli Stanton. Later given by him to bis son, 
William H., when the latter went to Philadelphia in 1880. 



The original knob to open the case was lost. The one now on the watch 
was made by William H. Stanton while working for James W. Queen & Co. 




BULLET MOLD FOR SQUIRREL RIFLE 

Two HUNDRED BULLETS TO THE POUND. 




Small squirrel rifle bought in 1865 and used by Eli Stanton. Made by 
the local "Gunsmith," William Folger, Barnesville, Ohio. 

"I FIRST SAW it lying ACROSS FATHER'S KNEES AS HE SAT IN THE KITCHEN OF THE 
OLD LOG HOUSE." 

W. H. S. 



212 



Our Ancestors — The Stantoxs 




Reader used by Ruth Patten, and dated by her 8th of 2nd Month, 1826. 



^ \'^ 








Fly-leaf of Ruth Patten's reader showing her signature and that of her 
daughter, Mary Patten (Bundy) Stanton. 




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^ r 



^ 



ill 






^ 



? 



h? 



^.^^|4'#t 












A ,^> 






r AND Deborah H. B Stanto: 



213 




Made at Mount Pleasan-t Boarding Schooi.. 




A WORK BOX GIVEN TO MaRY P. RuNDY BY Eli StaNTON 
THKIR MARRIAGE. 

XOW OWNED BY THEIR DAUGHTER, SaRAH B. HaLI. 



ABOUT 185fi, BEFORE 



;ARLV Ql'KENSWARE FRUIT JAR USKD HY 

Y P. Stanton about 1860. .\ tin cap 

PLACED 0\ER THE OPENING AND THE 
• SEALED AIR-TIGHT BY MELTED ROSIN. 



:ellar USED BY Eli and Mary P. 
roN FOR many years. Now owned 
BY Emma C. VVeb.ster. 





214 



Our Ancestors — The Staxton 




'T^^V^^ 






. 1 






MARY P. STANTON'S WHITE SILK WEDDING SHAWL 




Wooden work-box used for many vear^ 
Mary P. Stanton. Now owned by 
daughter, Emma C. Webster. 



Odilt pieced by mother, Mary P. 
Stanton, in 1867, from Aunt Sarah 
(Bundy) Mott's dresses (the aunt 
for whom I WAS named). The pink 
square in each block WAS made 
from a little sack of mine. The 

QUILT has been GREATLY PRIZED BY 

me for over fifty-five years. 

Sarah B. Hall. 










■» J* ■ .- 








■ THE OLD LOG HOUSE 

OME! How shall one describe it? Home and 
Mother! Seems to me that a word describes 
it better than sentences and paragraphs. 
Childhood's home! When details and effi- 
ciency did not intrude — cares and responsi- 
)ilities were unknown. The sun was always shining or 
:he fire burned brightly. The cold was not noticed, 
Dut rather the cheer of the open fire. Meals were very 
;imple, but how good and satisfying. Father knew 
.everything and could do anything; Mother cured every 
ill, mental and physical. Father was tall, strong and 
nanly; Mother "petite," cheery and lovable. And 
vhen I wanted to go with Father to town or on an 
errand his answer was, "Go ask Mother." After the 
linner was over and Mother was dressing tor the 
ifternoon, if I asked where she was going — "To Eli 
Jtanton's"; or, at another time, "Who's coming?" her 
inswer would be "Father." 

True, the house was old for a log house — nearly 
;ixty years. There was moss on the north side ot the 
'oof, the big chimney was cracked and ragged, a part 

of 
215 
hi 



216 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton 



of the cellar wall had fallen down, and a new house wa 
being talked about. How well I remember the weath 
ered gray logs, the white lime mortar that filled th 
cracks between; the small windows with the littL 
lights of glass; the low, but wide, front door; the white 
washed walls; the beams of the ceiling with the board 
of the floor above; the very wide, open fireplace whicl 
Father had divided, using one end for cook stove am 
the other for a coal grate; and the partition separatinj 
the two bedrooms from the living room. The board 
of the partition were wide, yellow poplar with thi 
edges beaded and placed vertically, and not paintedi 
but kept scoured and clean. At the left end of the rooni 
was the narrow three winding-step stair to the seconc^ 
story and again to the garret. In the bedroom were th 

bi! 




TRUNDLE BED 

The four-post and trundle beds were used by most of the pioneers. This 
one is in the home of william f. gibbons. 



The Old Log House 



217 




ELI STANTON'S CLOCK 

USKI) IN HIS HOME ALL OF HIS MARRIED LIFE. XOW IN THE POS- 
SESSION OF Harlan S. Webster. 



big reel tour-post beds and under one our "trundle 
bed," to be pulled out tor use; the rag carpet; looking 
glass and comb case on the wall over the little square 
stand; green paper window blinds rolled up and tied 
with brown braid; a corner cupboard; and on the nar- 
row mantelpiece the clock and a brass candlestick. 

Through the big door at the left of the fireplace we 
entered the kitchen — a big, square room with such a 
big fireplace for wood. There was a plain built-in 

cupboard 



218 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



cupboard and a little shelf for the water bucket and 
"tin," and a stair in the corner to the loft. At the left 
hand of the fireplace the "Triumph" cook stove stood 
in summer, but in winter it was moved to the living 
room because the kitchen was too cold for cooking. 

Here in the living room, in the cold days of winter, 
the sausage, with sage in it, was fried for breakfast and 
the big buckwheat cakes were baked and turned with 
the big maple paddle Father made "before they were 
married." These cakes were often served with apple 
butter and real cream. 

And what a delightful odor when Mother opened the 
oven door and took out the mince pies with the rope 

formed 




BRASS CANDLE STICK 

Used in the home of Eli and Mary P. (Bundy) Stanton in their early married life. 



The Old Loc; House 219 

formed on the edge and a couple of fern leaves drawn 
on the brown-tinted crust. 

As the days grew shorter and the sun set gray, we 
gathered the last of the peaches and apples and made 
cider, and then sorghum molasses down by the spring. 
There they ground the cane. Can't you hear the feeder 
"hollerin'" "Git up, git up!" and hear the crunching 
of the cane and the rushing out of the light-green juice, 
and see the smoke from the low stone chimneys of the 
furnace curl over the roof, and the shed filled with 
sweet-scented steam? 

Then the call of the wild came, and on a warm after- 
noon following a trost we laid in a supply of nuts — 
walnut, chestnut, hickory, beech and butternut — al- 
ways so much in demand in winter. 

At evening time who has not watched the flicker of 
the firelight on the windowpane and the men coming 
in with lanterns from work or from feeding at the barn r 
Heavy wraps were laid off and the news of the after- 
noon was discussed. 

For supper we often had cornbread, shortened with 
"lard cracklings" finely ground, and well cooked. This, 
with rich milk, made a full meal and satisfied every 
desire. 

Sometimes on a cold First-day e\'ening Father would 
rattle the ashes from the grate, leax^ng hot coals above 
and below, then set one of the mince pies under the 
grate to warm. That was our supper, and hcnv good it 
was — never a bad dream. 

How we enjoyed the visitors when they came! No 
announcement; they just drove up to the horse block 
and unloaded and put the horses in the stable. There 
was lots to talk about — news about the families and the 

neighborhood 



220 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



neighborhood; the 'phone had not told everybody every- 
thing. Then there was always plenty of fresh meat on 
hand— just a call, "Chickee, chickee!" a handful of 
feed, and some rooster would slip out of his feathers into 
the pot and on to the table before a particle of flavor 
had been lost. Then came the gravy and mashed pota- 
toes — we never got enough, just stopped for lack of 
space. ^ 

Back of the house and not far from the corner was 
the well, with a "sweep" weighted with a chunk of wood 
and a couple of plow points to help balance the bucket 
and water. At the other end a long black walnut lath 
was attached to the sweep with a small rope and to 
the old oaken bucket by a few feet of chain. The water 

was 




A WELL SWEEP 

Used in the early days to draw water from shallow wells. It was easy 
TO make and when a pole was used instead of a chain it required very 

LITTLE material THAT COULD NOT BE FOUND ANYWHERE IN THE WOODS. 



Thk Old Log Holse 



221 



was always cool and, maybe, sanitary. Beyond was the 
cave which answered for cellar and refrigerator. When 
we heard the inclined cave door slam we knew that it 
was time to come for dinner or supper — and obeyed 
promptly. 

The garden lay between the house and road. It was 
large and fenced with black-walnut palings about six 
feet high. Inside, everything good and beautiful grew. 
At the side of the yard next to the garden were lilacs, 
snowballs, old-hundred roses and maiden blush; at 
the right-hand end of the yard was the split chestnut 
log woodhouse and the big cedar tree that could be seen 
from long distances in many directions. 

But now all are gone — not a stick nor stone remains 
— only happy memories and a grateful heart to those 
who made that home. 



Ridley Park, 

Pennsylvania, 

1921.' 




// 




A CAVE DOOR 

Located near Fox Chase, Penn- 
sylvania. 



11") 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




THE HOME OF PETER AND ANNA (DOUDNA) SEARS 



Built by Thomas Williams in 1807 or 1808. It was the first hewn log house in that 

SECTION AND WAS LATER PURCHASED BY MaTTHEW BaILEY. He WAS THE GREAT-GRAND- 
FATHER OF Edwin W. Sears and Mary B. Niblock, who have furnished so many 
relics with their history. 




SPRING-HOUSE AT PETER SEARS' HOME 



The house was covered by a shaved clapboard roof. The boam)S were split 
shaved and put on by Matthew Bundy over fifty years ago. It is of interest to 
note the well-preserved logs and the excellent workmanship. Photograph, 1920. 



The Old Log House 



223 



,,^'■''^>i. _,,:,,•: l^v^-i^ 



A WOODEN HINGE 

From thk south door in the Peter Sears 
HOUSE. It has been in use about OhfE 

HUNDR£D AND TWELVE YEARS. 



OUTSIDE CHIMNEY 
BREAST 

From the Peter Sears house. The brick 

CHIMNEY IS MODER.N. 




224 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 





LOGS FROM THE ELI STANTON LOG HOUSE 

he house was bought by andrew blowers, torn down in 1869 
and re-erected by him on his farm about two miles below on 
"Sandy Ridge." Here it served as a dwelling for about thirty 
years and was replaced by a new building. "i went to the old 

house IN 1907, BUT FOUND ONLY A PILE OF LOGS. In 1919 I WENT 
AGAIN TO SEE THE LOGS AND IF POSSIBLE TO GET A SOUVENIR, BUT 
COULD NEITHER SEE NOR LEARN OF ANY PIECE OF THE LOGS ABOUT THE PRESENT 
HOME. JUST AS I WAS LE.AVING I DECIDED TO VISIT A NEARBY TOBACCO HOUSE WHERE 
TOBACCO WAS BEING STRUNG AND PLACED IN THE HOUSE. THIS WAS INTERESTING, 
AS I HAD NOT SEEN GREEN TOBACCO FOR FORTY-FIVE YEARS, SINCE I WORKED IN IT 
ON THE HOME FARM. AS I LOOKED ABOUT THE HOUSE AND NOTICED THE ROUND 
LOGS, THE NOTCHING AT THE CORNERS AND THE 'CHINKING' AND 'DAUBING' BETWEEN 
THE LOGS, I GLANCED UP AT THE EAVES AND INSTANTLY RECOGNIZED THE OBJECT 
OF ALL MY SEARCH. THERE WERE SEVERAL LARGE, BEAUTIFULLY HEWN AND WELL- 
PRESERVED LOGS IN THE TOP COURSES. A LITTLE INQUIRY OF MRS. E. L. PhILLIPS 
CONFIRMED MY BELIEF THAT THEY WERE PART OF THE LOG HOUSE IN WHICH I WAS 

BORN. Mr. Phillips kindly consented to cut out a section of one of the 

LOGS AND SHIP IT TO ME." THE ORIGINAL OLD LOGS ARE MARKED WITH AN "X." 

W. H. S. 




THE LOG FROM THE ELI STANTON HOUSE 

The SECTION of a log cut from the tobacco house REFERRED TO ABOVE AND 
FROM WHICH the SPECIMEN ON THE SAMPLE PAGE WAS MADE. 



The Old Log Housk 



225 



A 

< 


B] 


c 


D 


E-l 


F 


ai 


he 


4 




Reproductions of some 
of the packs from the 
primer vsf.p hy wiluau 
H., Sarah H.. and Kmma 
C Stanton. Koight 
ABOIT 1866. 



226 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




ROSEA AND MARY DOUDNA 




A TYPICAL EARLY STAIRWAY 

Chimney, closet and stairway in the house owned by Horace Smith, 
Emerson, Ohio. 




A TOBACCO HOUSE 



TOliACCO HOUSES WERE \ERY COMMON IN THE EARLY DAYS IN SOUTH- 
EASTERN Ohio. The tobacco was stripped from the stalk just 
HKFORE the FROST IN THE FALL, WAS THEN STRUNG ON STICKS ABOUT 
KOUR FEET LONG, PLACING A COUPLE OF LEAVES ALTERNATELY ON EACH 
SIDE OF THE STICK. IT WAS THEN HUNG BETWEEN POLES IN THE YARD 
UNTIL IT HAD WILTED, THEN WAS HUNC. BETWEEN SIMILAR POLES IN THE 
HOUSE AS CLOSE TOGETHER AS POSSIBLE AND FROM THE TOP TO WITHIN A FEW FEET 
FROM THE ('.ROUND. A STONE FLUE WAS BUILT THE LENGTH OF THE HOUSE, WITH 
OPENINGS IN THE COVERING STONE. A WOOD FIRE IN THIS FLUE FILLED THE 

HOUSE WITH SMOKE AND HEAT AND SO CURED THE TOB.ACCO. THE FURNACES ARE 
NOW ARRANGED SO THAT THE HEAT ONLY ENTERS THE HOUSE, THE SMOKE BEING 
DELIVERED OUTSIDE, WHU H RESULTS IN PRODUCING A MUCH MILDER TOBACCO. 





THE SUGAR TREE 

One that stood beside the spring. For many 

YEARS IT furnished SAP FOR TWO TO THREE GALLONS 
OF MAPLE SYRUP. 

THE SUGAR TREE BY THE SPRING 

OR nearly sixty years I knew the sugar trci 
by the spring. And what a wonderful tre^ 
it was, with its great roots sunk deep in th^ 
rich, moist soil, its shapely gray trunk and 
graceful branches! What a pleasure it wasj 
to see its first tender-tinted shoots of early spring,' 
the unfolding leaves, the winged seed pods fluttering 
down or blown to leeward in every wind, the luxuriant 
foliage of summer with its dense cool shade, the gor- 
geous mass of autumn color — tints so rich that no 
artist's brush could have done them justice and which 
faded so gradually that none could mark a time to 
sigh for the loss of their beauty. And as the ground 
grew cold and frosty, with what royal prodigality did 
the old tree fling down a finer carpet than the rarest 
tapestry! Surely the kindness of nature is exemplified 

in 

228 



The Old Log Housf, 



229 





ELI STANTON'S SPRING 

Located near the old log house. The sugar tree stood 
A little to the left. 

in the old sugar tree which in the coming and going 
bf the seasons yielded such wealth of beauty and 
jsweetness. 

Doubtless this tree was of goodly size when the 
elder Jesse Bailey lived nearby. Throughout the whole 
of Father's life it stood, and doubtless it saw more than 
ifour generations come and go ere the coming of that 
spring when the rays of the kindly sun failed to stir 
lit from the long winter's sleep. 




THE SUGAR TREE 

The noble trtnk that liktkd the iree and 

GIVES IT food and LIFE. 



230 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 



A GOURD DIPPER 

The kind used by the early settlers. 

Photographed at the home of James and 

Eunice (Smith) Henderson. 





I 



N THE EARLY DAYS CANE SUGAR 
WAS VERY EXPENSIVE AND OFTEN 
COrrLD NOT BE BOUGHT, SO THE 
PIONEERS MADE MAPLE SUGAR AND 
SYRUP BY BOILING DOWN THE SAP 

OF THE SUGAR OR HARD MAPLE. 

As SOON AS THE GROUND THAWED IN EARLY 
SPRING THEY BORED USUALLY TWO THREE- 
QUARTER-INCH HOLES IN THE TRUNK OF THE 
TREES NEAR THE GROUND AND DROVE A SPILE 
OR TUBE ABOUT A FOOT LONG TO CARRY THE 
SAP INTO THE WOODEN TROUGH OR BUCKET 
PLACED TO RECEIVE IT. MONEY WAS SCARCE 
AND TRANSPORTATION DIFFICULT, SO OUR FIRST 
SETTLERS MADE EVERYTHING THEY COULD 
WITH THEIR SIMPLE TOOLS. ThE SPILES WERE 
SPLIT FROM SOFT WOOD, SUCH AS WHITE WALNUT, 
SHAVED DOWN WITH A "dRAWING-KNEFE," A 
HOLE BORED IN THE END WITH A HAND "GIM- 
LET" AND A GROOVE CUT BY POCKET KNIFE TO 
THE OTHER END TO CONDUCT THE SAP. THE 
TROUGHS WERE CHOPPED OUT ENTIRELY BY A 
COMMON CHOPPING AX. ThE SAP WAS COL- 
lected at frequent intervals and hauled 
in barrels or tubs on a sled to the simple 
shed near the center of the "sugar 
Camp" and boiled down in big iron kettles 

OVER OPEN FIRE. ThEN THE SYRUP WAS TAKEN 
TO THE HOUSE TO BE FINISHED OFF, OR RE- 
DUCED TO SUGAR. 



HAND-MADE MAPLE SUGAR 
TUB 

With double-locked hoops . Made by Henry 

DOUDNA probably MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED 

YEARS AGO. Now owned by Edwin W. Sears. 



SAP TROUGH 

Made by Nathan W. Bundy. 




THE BUILDING OF ELI STANTON'S BARN 
AND HOUSE 



^ 



WE WERE living in the old log house in the 
winter of 1866-67, which was a busy one in 
our home. The kitchen in the east end was 
too cold to be occupied in winter, so father 
built a dividing wall in the fireplace in the 
iving-room. He set a coal grate in the left end and 
placed a cook stove in the other half. Coal was used 
or fuel in the grate as well as in the stove, but wood 
A^as burned in the large kitchen fireplace. The house 
A^as in need of extensive repairs to make it comfort- 
ible; even when repaired, as a log house it would always 
lave its disadvantages. The house was too small and 
leither house nor barn was properly located, so it was 
iecided to erect new buildings. The barn must neces- 
;arily be built first, as the old one would have to be 
noved before completing the new house. 

During the winter, timber was cut in the various 

voods on the farm and hauled to a portable saw mill 

Dn the farm of William Bundy about a mile northeast 

)f our house. The logs were sawed into posts, stringers, 

nail-ties, 
231 



The Old Log House 233 

nail-ties, joists, and rafters. Oak was used for 
flooring boards and weatherboarding. The shingles 
were made of white oak rived with froe and hand-maul; 
then with "shaving horse" and "draw knife" were 
shaved and jointed by hand. On one section of the 
roof, ten feet square, black walnut shingles were used. 
When the roof was removed by Anderson and Dough- 
lass in 1906, they found the black walnut shingles in a 
better state of preservation than the oak. 

When the warm days of spring came, great piles of 
lumber and timbers were located near the site for the 
new barn. One bright morning we children were 
greatly excited by hearing some one remark, "The car- 
penters are coming." We rushed out to see and hear 
Aaron Frame and some of his helpers driving down the 
stony hill of the lane. They drove to the old barn and 
there a large chest of tools was unloaded and placed 
inside. They also brought several axes, a cross-cut 
^aw, boring machine, trussels and other tools. They 
^hen went away in the direction of the north woods, 
^oon we heard chopping and occasionally a tree fall. 
Of course, I, a small boy, was anxious to know what 
they were doing and at the first opportunity went over 
to where the men were at work. 

The barn was to measure forty-five by fifty feet, 
and eighteen feet six inches from the main floor to the 
eaves, with the stable story eight feet six inches high. 
The largest posts in the stable story were twelve by 
Ififteen inches, the main floor sills ten by twelve inches; 
ithe girder over the main floor nine by thirteen inches, 
and forty-five feet long. Some of the timbers were so 
long, they could not be sawed by the portable mill. 
]In order to make these long timbers, the carpenters 
had to select a sound tree of sufficient height, and 
i lariie 



234 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

large enough and yet not too large to make a timber of 
the proper size. When the tree was down it was 
trimmed to the required length and cut off. The log 
was rolled, or pried up, and placed on blocks a few 
inches from the ground. It was then "laid off" in 
order to get the finished timber to the best advantage. 
A strong cord was immersed in Venetian Red water- 
paint and the surplus paint raked off on the edge of 
the can as the line was carefully withdrawn. At one 
end of the log the line was held down to the point 
where the side of the timber was to be formed, while 
at the other end the line was held tight, then raised 
up about a foot and snapped down, spattering a line 
of red paint from end to end of the log. The work- 
man, with a common chopping-ax, stood on the log. 
and beginning some two feet from the end chopped a 
series of V-shaped vertical notches about two feet 
apart, just into the line, then split off the long "jug- 
gles" between the cuts. This left the surface more or 
less rough, according to the grain of the timber. Again 
he chopped notches a few inches apart, until the wholes 
surface had been carefully cut down to the line. Next 
came the man with the broadax. He stood on the 
ground at the side of the log and started at one end 
chipping off the high spots and leaving a fairly flat,| 
smooth surface. With only the line to start by, he< 
must use his eyes and plumb-bob to guide him in keep- 
ing the surface vertical. When two sides of the log 
had been finished, it was turned on to one finished side 
and two more lines made; then these sides were dressed 
in the same way as the first one. The weight of the 
log was now reduced to perhaps half. This reduction 
in weight was quite an item in hauling the timber to 
the location for the barn. 

Aaron 



Eli Stanton's Barn and House 



235 




BROAD AX 



Aaron Frame, the head carpenter, probably had a 
drawing of the proposed building, but I am sure he 
had no such detailed drawings as would be used to- 
day. He seemed to have a mental picture of the plans 
and to remember everything that had to be done. 

The barn was to be of the style known as a "bank 
barn." It was built against a bank, so that teams could 
be driven up the bank and over a short bridge on to the 
second or main floor of the building. 

When the real construction work was started on the 
barn, the posts and other timber were cut to length, 
"boxed" to size, morticed, tennoned and drawbored 
for wooden pins. Such a number of mortices and ten- 
nons! What a quantity of braces! I think four bushels 
of pins were required. The pins were one inch in 
diameter by eight inches in length, shaved to an octag- 
onal shape and pointed at one end. They were made 
from the toughest seasoned white oak fence rails. 

The 



I 



236 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



The site had been graded by the farm plow and the 
surplus earth removed by a big wooden "scoop" made 
and loaned to us by grandfather John Bundy. This 
scoop was made of white oak boards with a steel cut- 
ting edge and iron straps over the bottom and sides to 
take the wear. Indeed, it was a "man's sized" tool, and 
with the oxen. Buck and Berry, a good-sized boy to 
drive and a strong man at each handle of the scoop, 
one had the nearest approach to the modern steam 
shovel which I have ever seen. 

Stone for the piers was quarried on the farm. The 
piers were set and leveled off. Stone was so near the 

surface 




ox YOKE 

A GOOD SPECIMEN OF THE EARLY TYPE OF YOKE. ThE "HUSKY " BOVS OF OUR ANCES- 
TORS KNEW HOW TO CARRY THE YOKE WITH ONE BOW OUT AND PUT IT ON BeRRY — 
IF HE COULD. Then remove the other bow, hold up the OTHER END OF THE 

yoke and, swinging the bow, call out, "come under, buck, come under. 

Buck," and old Buck — the faithful old animal that he was — would obey. 

In the POSSESSION of Clarevce Fawcett, Concordville. Pennsylvania. 



Eli Stanton's Barn and House 237 

surface of the ground that every pier rested firmly on 
solid bed-rock. After the frame was completed, the 
site graded and foundations in, we were ready for the 
"raising." Pike poles had been borrowed and pre- 
pared for use in raising the barn. There were no hoist- 
ing engines or windlass, nor do I remember a rope 
being used. The pike poles were small saplings about 
three inches in diameter with the small end encircled 
by an iron band and a sharp, thick iron spike set in the 
centre. The lower end was provided with a couple of 
stout cross-pins to serve as handles. The poles were 
of various lengths from about six to twenty-four feet 
long. 

Now came the test of all the carpenters' plans and 
work. If a mistake had been made, it certainly would 
show when the frame was put together. 

The stable frame was first assembled by "bents" or 
a series of posts, stringers, main floor sill, and braces 
running across the building. These were assembled 
and pinned together as they lay on the ground, with 
the base of the bent at its future place on the stone 
piers. When this bent was finished, the top was raised 
by hand and set on trussels; then raised again and 
set on short pike poles. These poles were raised higher 
and as the side of the bent rose, longer poles were 
used until the bent was lifted into a vertical position. 

The most perfect individual work, as well as team 
work, was required. Each piece had to be carried from 
the yard to the building and put in place, then the 
complete bent raised by hand and held in place until 
it was secured. The timbers were so heavy that the 
united eflforts of all were required to raise the frame. 
The other bents were assembled and raised in a similar 

way 



238 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

way, but as they neared the vertical, the ties, connect- 
ing them with the ones standing, were put in place 
and the pins "driven home," making all rigid and 
secure. 

When the frame of the first story was finished, the 
main floor joists were put in place and covered by loose 
planks on which men could walk while assembling and 
raising the remaining bents. 

The second story was higher than the first, but the 
timbers were not so large. The centre bent had a 
girder nine by thirteen inches spanning the width of the 
building so that the floor would be free from posts. 
This girder was supported in the centre by a king bolt 
and braces, which transferred the weight to the ends 
of the girder and to the side posts. 

When all the bents were in place, the building was 
"up to the square," then the plates to support the 
lower ends of the rafters had to be erected. Last came 
the purlines with their posts and braces to support 
the centre of the long rafters. These two bents run- 
ning across the top of the other bents were particularly 
hard to handle on account of their height and the 
absence of a floor underneath. By afternoon all the 
frame was in place and thoroughly rigid and secure. 

Among Aaron Frame's helpers I remember his son 
Amasa, and William Hoyle. Joel Bailey, the neigh- 
borhood blacksmith, made, by hand, in his shop nearly 
a mile south on Sandy Ridge Road, the big king bolt, 
the long strap hinges and the lightning rods. 

It is with pleasure I remember the willingness of the 
helpers and the neighborhood men to obey and carry 
out the instructions of the head carpenter. To the 
genuine workman, there was so great a pleasure in 

caring 



Eli Stanton's Barn and House 239 

caring for and using his simple tools, that the work was 
easily and economically done and each piece finished 
exactly as desired. 

Relatives and friends for miles around had been 
invited to the "raising." About one hundred were 
present. At such neighborhood affairs as raisings and 
huskings each one gave his services free. In fact, it 
was as much a social as a business affair. The spirit 
of kindness and friendliness was marked. With no 
daily paper, no telephone and little communication 
with the outside world there developed a neighborhood 
sociability that was delightful. Many of the wives and 
daughters came and helped to prepare and serve the 
excellent dinner. There were no tropical fruits nor 
after-dinner mints, but a substantial meal well cooked, 
which satisfied every want. 

The barn was finished by fall and proved to be in 
every way satisfactory. 

;|; ^ ;i; ^ ^ 

The following winter T remember father and mother 
sitting before the open fire, one First-day afternoon, 
laying out the floor plans of the house. 

Building a country home in 1868 was quite a different 
matter from building a house today. So many parts 
of the house were made or prepared on the tarm and 
comparatively few things bought. Father had been 
collecting from time to time yellow poplar tor the door 
and window frames and inside trim and selecting white 
oak for the floors. 

Stone was quarried from large sandstone rocks on 
the farm. The mason with his heavy stone pick dug 
a series of small holes a few inches apart and a couple 
of inches deep along the line where he wanted to split 

the 



240 Our Ancestors— The Stantons 

the large stone. In each hole he placed a small iron 
wedge, then lightly hit each wedge in rapid succession 
until the stones split in two. When the stones were 
broken into the size required for the foundation wall, he 
knocked off the rough edges with a "stone hammer." 
They were then hauled to the location for the house. 
Here the stone placed on a trussel was laid off to the 
proper size. The surplus material was knocked off by 
chisel and mallet or picked away by a heavy stone 
pick. This rough surface was then finished by a "bush 
pick," which resembled an ax; the edge was made up 




«*i 



WEDGES FOR SPLITTING STONE 

of a series of small square steel bars pointed as a 
pick. Soon the surface was quite smooth and the stone 
ready to be laid in the wall. 

Samuel Williams, the head carpenter, first erected a 
shop where they made the door and window frames 
and most of the doors. The window sash, shingles, 
weatherboarding, newel post, stair rail and balusters 
were bought ready to be put in place. 

When the cellar and foundation were done the sills 
were morticed and tennoned and put in place, the 
joists put on and the frame morticed, tennoned, braced, 

erected 



Eli Stanton's Barn and House ^ 

erected and pinned in the regular way. The carpenters 
used a hand-boring machine, but often used the old- 
style auger for medium and large-sized holes. They 
ripped the mouldings out of poplar boards and planed 
them by hand. The flooring boards were made in the 
ibarn where a rip saw driven by horsepower had been 
set up. The white oak boards were ripped to about 
four or five inches in width. The saw was then re- 
moved and a head put on in its place to "tongue" and 
"groove" the edges of the boards. This saved much 
time and work, but the boards were not straight or 
of uniform width. However, most of the floors were 
laid of such boards and "straight nailed." When the 
boards varied too much in thickness, the projecting 
edges were "adzed off" and thus made less noticeable. 

Lime for the plaster had been made in a little ravine 
on the north end of the farm. The limestone dug from 
the edge of the ravine was piled in a round heap in 
alternate layers with fire-wood and the whole pile 
covered with sod. Small holes were left for the en- 
itrance of air and the exit of smoke. The fires were 
started and sufficient heat produced to drive off the 
carbon dioxide and change the limestone to quick 
lime. Due to the slow and imperfect combustion, 
great quantities of smoke poured out, so I well under- 
stood the origin of the old saying, "smoking like a 
lime-kiln." After the wood had burned out and the 
pile cooled, the sod was cleared away and the pile ot 
lime was ready to haul to the house. Sand for the 
mortar and plaster came from the lane where it had 
washed from the soft sandstone of the hills. 

The linseed oil for the paint was bought "raw," then 
boiled in a large iron kettle back of the house. This 
made a "boiled" or quicker drying oil. 

Each 



242 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Each room downstairs had an open coal grate. Up- 
stairs there was no provision for heating the rooms, 
except an opening made in a chimney, so a stove could 
be used in case of sickness. 

The raising of the house was a simple matter com- 
pared with the raising of the barn. So before the first 
cool winds of autumn came we were snugly settled in 
our new house. 

Credit and respect were richly deserved by the men 
and women of that time for their kindness and for 
their willingness to help others, with no thought of 
recompense other than the joy of service. 

One cannot but compare these carpenters and their 
helpers with the structural steel men as reported in 
the papers of today — the character of the men, the 
quality of the work, the great pleasure they took in 
whatever they did, to say nothing of the wages and 
hours. The buildings still speak for the good design 
and careful work. They are today plumb, level and 
square. The roofs do not "sag" nor do the doors "drag" 
after fifty-three years of service. 

While some repairs and replacements have been 
necessary to the outside, these buildings still stand 
monuments to honest materials and the conscientious 
workmanship of those who built them. 

Ridley Park, William Henry Stanton. 

Pennsylvania, 

1921. 




Door latch from the house in which 
Joseph and Mary Stanton began house- 
keeping. 



f 



Behind This Latch Are Some Bits 
OF What They Used— Our Ancestors— The Stantons 




I 




**^'-l-»-i 

'^S^ 



COVEKI.ET 
Woven by Chabity Bunoy. 





SAjytri.ES OF DRESSES WORN BY MART P. STANTON 

Thi^'center one is from hkr- wedding dress of changeable »1LK. 
l~ater dyed black. 




UOLTINO Cr.OTH 

Full size bbpboduction or tki 

CLOtU FHUM THE GRIST MILL BUILT 

BY Isaac Patten, on Captina Creek 

AND UkTER KNOWS ^S COLt'S MlLL. 



r 



■■.'..■'■.•:V:i:'ii 






•m 



ii-imii 



HOMESPUN LINEN 
TOWEL 

Mask by Maria (Ekgle) 
bundy about 1848. 




HOMESPUN UNBN 
THKBAD 

Madb from boms grown 

FLAX BY Anna (Edger- 

ton) Bundy when shb 

was a girl. 



HOME AVOVEN 
FLANNEL 

Made by Dbborah H. B. 

Stanton in 1874. In use 

forty-five years. 




WHITE OAK VEXEEK 

Cot from one of thb l()gs of Eli Stanton's 

"OLB log HOUSl." 



I 



N the oldest buildings hand-made nails 

or spikes were used. These were often 

made by the local blacksmith. The one 

shown is from the Ezekiel Bundy Barn, 

built about 1840, burned down 1880. 

The small nail is from the first Joseph Stanton 
house. It appears to have been cut from sheet 
metal like our common cut nail, but the head is 
fjrmed by "pinching" or contracting the wide 
part of the "blank" and making a tapered por- 
tion immediately under the head at right angles 
to the lower portion. Pt)ssibly the larger part 
was heated to form the head. Since the nail 
tapers two ways there is a tendency to split the 
timber any way the nail is "set" in reference to 
the grain of the wood. 

The screw is from a door hinge in the same 
house. Note that it has no "point." It was 
necessary to have a hole the full depth of the 
screw. It is said a boy invented or suggested the 
"gimlet-pointed" screw now iini\ersally used. 




THE GRAIN CRADLE AND SICKLE 

This sickle belonged to Chalkley Bundy and was used as early as 1840. 



THE SICKLE 



THE SICKLE HAS A FINE BEARDED EDGE TO BETTER CUT THE SMOOTH HARD STRAW OF 
WHEAT, OATS AND OTHER GR.4IN. ThE SICKLE WAS BEST ADAPTED TO THE ROUGH STUMPY 
GROUND OF THE PIONEER, WHERE THE GRAIN GREW VERY RANK ON NEW RICH GROUND 
AND OFTEN FELL DOWN AND TANGLED BADLY. THE REAPER GATHERED A SMALL QUAN- 
TITY OF GRAIN BY THRUSTING IN THE POINT AND SEPARATING A PORTION, THEN GRASP- 
ING IT BETWEEN THE THUMB AND MIDDLE FINGER SLIPPED THE SICKLE DOWN AND 
TOW.\iU« THE HEEL. ThEN WITH A RAKING STROKE FROM HEEL TO POINT, CUT OFF THE HANDFUL, 
WHICH WAS LAID DOWN TO BE BOUND INTO SHEAVES. It WAS AN OLD SAYING THAT "A BOY WOULD 

not learn to reap until he had cut his little finger." 
Where the grain stood well and with fairly smooth ground the grain "cradle" did much 

FASTER AND EASIER WORK. It IS USED MUCH AS THE MOWING SCYTHE, EXCEPT AT THE END OF THE 
STROKE THE UPPER END OF THE "SNATH" OR HANDLE IS ELEVATED, BRINGING THE FINGERS HORI- 
ZONTAL ON THE stubble; THEN A BACKWARD MOTION WITHDRAWS THEM, LEAVING THE CUT STALKS 
OF GRAIN THAT WERE GATHERED ON THE "FINGERS" LYING IN A ROW, RE.\DY TO BE RAKED TOGETHER 
AND BOUND INTO A SHEAF. ThE FIRST HORSEPOWER "REAPERS" CARRIED A MAN TO RAKE THE SHEAF 
OFF, AS SOON AS ENOUGH GRAIN HAD BEEN CUT TO MAKE ONE. THEN CAME THE "DROPPERS," WHERE 
THE BUNCH OF GRAIN WAS DROPPED OFF BY THE FOOT, AND THEN THE SELF-BINDERS AND THE "HEAD- 
ERS," WHICH CUT, THRASHED AND SACKED THE GR.\IN AT ONE OPERATION. EaCH TOOL FIT THE CON- 
DITION. The "header" would have been just as useless to the pioneer as the sickle is 
NOW TO the great "Wheat Kings" of the northwest. i 



THE FLAIL 

Before the days of Power Thrashing machines grain, such as wheat, oats, rye. barley, 

CRASS and vegetable SEEDS, WERE THRASHED FROM THE STRAW BY SPRE.\DING IT IN A CIRCULAR ROW 
AND DRIVING HORSES OR OXEN OVER IT TO "TRAMP OUT" THE GR.4IN. ThE STRAW WAS FREQUENTLY 
TURNED SO AS TO BRING ALL PARTS UNDERNEATH THE ACTION OF THE FEET OF THE ANIMALS. SMALL 
AMOUNTS WERE ARRANGED IN A PILE AND THE GRAIN BEATEN OUT BY A "FLAIL" OR HINGED CLUB. 

This consisted of a convenient handle about six feet long; attached to the end by a 
leather strap or stout cord was the flail or wooden club about three feet long and of 

larger diameter. 

In USE THE HANDLE WAS RAISED WITH A SWINGING MOTION AND DIRECTED DOWNWARD WITH A QUICK 

BLOW, SO THAT THE CLUB STRUCK THE STRAW HORIZONTALLY AND WITH SUCH FORCE THAT THE GRAIN 

WAS QUICKLY BEATEN FROM THE STRAW. ThE GRAIN WAS THEN SHAKEN FROM THE STRAW, SWEPT 

UP AND SIFTED WITH A HANTi-SIEXE TO REMOVE THE CHAFF. 



Eli Stanton's Barn and House 



24: 




THE GRAIN FLAIL IN USE 



fill m 



HAND-MADE HORSESHOE 
NAILS 

Probably made by Joel Bailey. 



JOEL BAILEY'S BLACKSMITH SHOP 

From about 1858 to 1876 Joel Bailey conducted a bl.\cksuith A>n) wagon shop on, the Sandy 
Ridge Road nearly three miles east .from Barnesville and served that section of the 

country. 

He was a skilled mechanic and made much of the hardware and made or kepaireo maw or 
the tools and implements used in that neighborhood beside shoeing the BORSrs. 

His farm adjoinfj) that of Peter Sears' and is now owned by EIdwin W. Sfars and sistkr. 
Many of these illustrations were made from articles in their home. 



246 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 






These specimens of hand-made hinges were found in the blacksmith shop 
OF Joel Bailey and were probably made by him. They represent the type 

OF HARDWARE GENERALLY USED BY THE EAiaY SETTLERS. 




HAND-MADE NAILS 

From the Joel Bailey blacksmith shop. The 
building was erected about 1855 and torn 

DOWN IN 1921. 



Elt Stanton's Barn and Hocsf. 





HAND-MADE WOODEN RAKE GRAIN FLAIL 

AND FORK Hanging on the road door of Joel Bailey's 

USKU IN BINDING AND THRASHING GRAIN. SHOP. THE DOOR APPEARS TO BE THE ORIGINAL 

ONE AND IS MORE THAN FITTY YEARS OLD. 




A PAIR OF HAND-MADE HAMES 



FORKING THE STRAW 

In THRASHING. 

PASTERN LOCK 

In the DAYS OF HORSE THIEVES SUCH A LOCK WAS PUT ON A HORSES FOOT AND W^S 

NOT UNCOMFORTABLE TO THE HORSK WHILE IN THE STABLE. BUT THE HORSE SCX>N 

BECAME L/\ME IF IT WALKED ANY DISTANCE. 






QUILT PIECED BY 
MARY P. BUNDY 

Now OWNED BY WaLIAM H. StANTON. 

THE QUILTING 

Klizabeth Stanton Bailey says that Joseph and Mary (Hodgin) Stanton's 
Quilting Frame, shown opposite, was made probably by Edwin Wilson, 
and that she remembers it in 1856 or '57. After the death of Joseph Stanton 
IT became the property of Nathan and Anna Stanton Bundy. It was often 
loaned to Eli and Mary P. Stanton, and later given to Lindley P. and 
Elizabeth Stanton Bailey, who now have it in their home. The quilt shown 
WAS pieced recently by Elizabeth Stanton Bailey. 

N mid-summer, '68, Father said to Mother 
that in a few days the carpenters would 
be ready to raise the frame of the new 
house and that some extra help would be 
needed; so it was arranged that they should 
invite a few relatives and friends — the men would help 
with the raising and their wives and daughters would 
help prepare and serve the dinner — a nice combina- 
tion of business and pleasure. But as our good neigh- 
bor "Betty" Hall on the next farm south says, "It 
was not idle pleasure, to sit with empty hands was a 
disgrace; every one worked, and while we talked and 
laughed we had a quilt in the quilting frame. The 

floor 

:4^j 




250 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




BEDSPREAD 

White muslin knotted with cotton in an 
all-over design. used in the h01£e of 
Eli Stanton in the Sixties. Made by 

Ruth (Patten) Bundy. 

Now IN the POSSESSION OF Sarah B. 

(Stanton) Hall. 



floor in the sitting-room was covered with a rag carpet 
and there were chairs, painted to represent rosewood 
and striped in yellow and stenciled with gold. The 
soft wind from the south and the songs of the birds 
came in through the open door. There we sat, some 
on one side of the frame, some on the other, and 
with the left hand under the quilt and the right on 
top we stitched in the rope and shell pattern which 
had been laid out and which was carried along from 
one strip to the next. How the needles clicked on 
the thimble! and Mary Doudna talked just as short 
and fast and laughed just as cheery as she has done 
for the fifty odd years since that day. Such a good 
time we had! Every one knew every one else and 
meetings were not so frequent but that there was 
much to be talked about that was new and of interest. 
There were the children, a subject never old; dress- 
making, new dishes and new butters and jellies for 
the almost endless cooking and preserving and maybe 
just a dash of kindly gossip to provide a little spice 

for 



The Quilting 




OLD-STYLE BEDSPREAD 

Made warm by a layer of cotton- between* the two 
covers, which were quilted in ma>fy ant) varied de- 
signs, a style quite common in pioneer days. 



for an occasion so pleasant that it was dinner time 
almost before we knew it." Mother was not well — 
had not been for some years, so the help was even 
more generous than was usual and was greatly appre- 
ciated. Aunt Lizzie was busy in the big log kitchen 
helping "Lib" Duvall, our "girl," thus taking the 
burden from Mother, and with her helpers she set the 
dinner tables together and arranged to seat all the 
men at once. It was a wholesome, jolly company 
that sat down that day, and if "a good appetite is 
the best of sauce" the ciinner must have tasted very 
good to all. 

After this hearty meal the men went back to work 
and the women reset the table and had dinner them- 
selves. Then more quilting, and by late atternoon 
the house was raised, the quilt finished and all with 
the most delightful and stimulating social intercourse. 

Such kindly neighbors and such sincere triends 
were a real blessing to us, and we \alued them very 
highly. 

So 



252 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

So far as we know not one of the men who helped 
us that day is Hving now, and only three of the women 
— Aunt Lizzie (Stanton) Bailey, "Aunt" Betty Hall 
and "Aunt" Mary Doudna. 

Ridley Park, William Henry Stanton. 

Pennsylvania, 

1921. 




EIGHT-POINT STAR QUILT 

Pieced by Elizabeth Stanton Bailey. 
Dark part made of her mother's last 

DRESS, light part MADE OF THE LAST DRESS 
HER FATHER BOUGHT FOR HER. 




OLD LOG PUMP 

Located in Loydsville. Ohio. 



PUMP MAKING IN THE EARLY DAYS 



A HOUSE, in the early days, was always lo- 
cated near a spring, because this spring was 
the sole source ot water tor the house and 
from this supply the water nuist be carried. 
Somewhat later wells were dug close to the 
houses and were considered great conveniences. I he 

water 
k 253 



254 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

water was at first drawn from these wells by means of 
a sweep and bucket. Later this method was replaced 
by a wooden pump. I remember such a pump being 
made at the home of my father, Eli Stanton. 

Alpheus Blowers came in a one-horse wagon to 
build our pump, bringing with him a big chest of tools, 
high trestles and long iron boring rods. The upper 
part of the pump was made from a mulberry log cut 
in our own woods, hewn to size and to an octagonal 
shape. This was placed on trestles four feet high and 
secured in place by angle-iron hooks driven in the 
trestle and the log. Small iron pins were driven in the 
top of the log at each end to sight by while boring. A 
third trestle with an adjustable bearing was used to 
support the outer end of the boring rod. A hole two 
inches in diameter was bored through the center of the 
log. This hole was reamed out to about three and a 
half inches from the top to where the bucket, or the 
lower valve, was to be set. The lower end was reamed 
to about five inches, then the end of the next lower 
section was shaved down to fit this hole. A heavy iron 
band encircled the upper section to prevent splitting, 
when put into the well, and the sections were driven 
tightly together. 

The augers were of shell type, the smaller one had a 
pointed thread or screw to pull it in, as with the com- 
mon auger. The other end of the boring rod had an 
auger handle about four feet long. All the boring was 
done by hand. 

The pumpmaker brought with him the ironwork for 
the handle of the pump and made and fitted it to the 
pump. He also made the piston or sucker, with its 
valve, and the lower valve. The bucket had an iron 

bale 



Pump Making 



bale with which to pull it up when necessary. It was 
served with a few layers of small twine and covered 
with a soft wax to make the joint water tight. 

Quite a little artistic taste was displayed in the 
design of the pump, with its top cover, handle, spout 
and necessary ironwork. It was large and rather 
heavy, but was a very reliable pump which gave good 
service for many years. 

W. H. S. 




BROOM -CORN COMB 

Used to scrapk thk skk.i> kkom bkoou-coen 

WHEN I'REr.VRl.NG IT FOR ISE. 




THE REEL 

TBLE yarn after being spun was wound into SKEISS ON 

THIS REEL. Formerly in the home of 
Robert H. Smith, Sr. 



RECOLLECTIONS OF SPINNING AND 
WEAVING 



SPINNING Wool. "White as wool" is a com- 
parison that surely could not have been 
meant for wool that had not been sub- 
jected to a cleansing process. In the days 
when we prepared the wool for spinning 
we used to think the quantity of oil in it was almost 
limitless. It was necessary to wash it in two sudsey 
waters and rinse it through as many clear waters before 
spreading it on boards or short grass in the sunshine 
to dry. After it was dry we picked it apart by hand 
in order to dislodge any bits of litter or burs that 
might be lods;ed in the fibers. 

The 
256 



Spinninc; and Weaving 




WOOL CARDS 

Used by Peter Sears' family about 1850. 



The next step in the preparation of the wool was 
the carding. This was done by hand with two wool 
cards. These cards had rows of steel wires set in a 
wooden or leather back and somewhat resembled 
the currycomb of the present day. They were held 
by means of handles at the sides; one ot them was 
taken in the left hand, a piece of wool placed on it, 
and with the right hand the other card was drawn 
down over it repeatedly until the strands oi the wool 
were straightened out. The wool was then lightly 
rolled into rolls an inch or slightly more in diameter. 
Later on the carding mills took the labor of carding 
out of the homes, the wool being sent to the mills 
and there made into rolls. These rolls were longer 
and smaller in diameter than the home-carded rolls. 

After the carding came the spinning. The spinning 
wheel was constructed with a long, low standard sup- 
porting at one end the great wheel; at the other end 
the head, with a spindle. Spinning was \ery interest- 
ing; it required close attention to learn to pull just 
enough on to the roll with the left hand and at the 
same time turn the great wheel with the right hand 
just enough to make an e\cnl\' twisted thread o\ wool. 

The 



258 



Our Axcestors — The Staxtoxs 




THE LARGE— OR WOOL— SPINNING WHEEL 

Mary (Hodgixi Siaxtox h.ad a wheel similar to this oxe ox -n-sicH she spux the 

YARN FOR THE FAMTT.Y STOCEEXGS. ThE "FIXGER " SHOWN" BELOW WAS USED BY HER TO 
'SPIX'' THE WHEEL AXD SAXT; HER HANT). 

Wheel from the Daxxel Staxtox home. 
FrxGER owxed by Eliz.\beth Staxtox Bailey. 



The spinner took hold of the roll about five or six 
inches from the spindle and stepped backward, pull- 
ing out the roll and turning the wheel at the same time. 
As the great wheel turned it made the spindle revolve 
very rapidly and the wool, being held out at an angle 
from the end of the spindle, slipped off and was twisted 

tightly. 



Si'INXING AND WeAVINC, 259 

tightly. After a length had been twisted the spinner 
held the roll at right angles to the center of the spindle, 
turned the wheel, and the woolen thread was wound 
on to the spindle. Then another length was spun, 
until there remained only two or three inches on the 
roll attached to the thread spun, then the spinner 
placed an end of another roll on it and the fibers of 
the wool readily twisted together. Thus were the rolls 
added and a continuous thread produced until the 
spindle was filled with thread. The yarn was then 
reeled from the spindle on to a clock reel. This reel 
had a six-spoke wheel, not with a rim, but with six 
pegs on which to wind the yarn, and was so constructed 
that at every fortieth revolution it clicked for the 
purpose of measuring one tie or knot. After a thread 
was looped around these forty threads another knot 
was begun. The practice was to reel tour of these 
knots on to the reel and make a loop with a strand 
of yarn to avoid the tangling of the threads. This 
was then called a skein of yarn and was slipped otf 
the reel and another skein begun; and so on until the 
spinning was done. If the yarn was intended for 
blankets or for cloth for clothing, it was now ready 
to be prepared for the loom; if for knitting or crochet- 
ing, something more was necessary. 

The coloring was done either in the wool or when 
the yarn was in the skein. 

Spinning Flax. The spinning of tiax was an impor- 
tant branch of domestic industry. The flax or lint 
was procured from the fibers of the inner bark o\ the 
flax plant and was spun on a small wheel. This wheel 
had an attachment for holding the distafl^, upon which 

a bundle 



260 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




DISTAFF 



a bundle of flax was loosely wound, and was operated 
by foot in order that the spinner might 
have both hands free to manage the flax 
fiber as it came from the distaff. 

After spinning a fine thread we reeled 
it from the spindle; then, placing two 
skeins of single thread on the swifts and 
taking the ends of the skeins, we wound 
them two-double into balls which were 
then twisted together on the spindle of 
the wheel. This was our linen sewing 
thread used to make garments from home- 
woven woolen and linen material, and all 
these garments were made by hand, since 
we had no sewing machines. The ability to spin the 
fine flax fiber into sewing thread and thread to be used 
in fine linen web was considered an accomplishment. 

Weaving. Since cloth- 
ing is one of the first ne- 
cessities of civilized man 
the loom for weaving must 
have been one of his earl- 
iest inventions. The loom 
we used consisted of a 
square wooden frame, 
supported on four posts, 
to which the working 
parts of the loom were 
attached. The center 
beam at the back was the 
warp or chain beam and 
beneath this was the 
wooden cylinder on which 
the warp or chain was 
wound. 




SMALL SPINNING WHEEL 

This type of wheel was used to spin flax 
for sewing thread and for linen cloth, 
a woman was considered expert when 
she could spin fine. even sewing thread. 
From the Daniel Stanton home. 




DETAIL OF HAND-LOOM 

Showing batten, reed, and the shuttle ready to be thrown. 



ISC FOR CLOTB, 

TBC LARGE FOR 

CARPET. 




HAND-LOOM 

Used for weaving rag CARi'Kr. LixrArKn in Chester, Pennsylvania. 



262 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




REED FOR HAND-LOOM 

The reed carried the warp or chain and was used to beat up the woof or filling. 

This reed was very fine and carried 640 threads. The coarsest reed carries 300. 

In use about 1865. 

Owned by Pharaby Bundy Sears. 

wound. The beam extending across this a little 
below the center was the breast beam which sup- 
ported the weaver. Beneath this was the cylinder 
upon which the web was wound as it was woven. 
The top of the frame supported the batten, which 
was attached to a movable horizontal bar by two 
vertical pieces, one at each end. Another bar across 
the top of the frame supported a set of pulleys and 
the heddles. The heddles consisted of two frames 
from which cords were attached to the loop or eye of 
each thread in the warp; usually each alternate thread 
was attached to one heddle and the other thread to 
the other heddle. The heddles were connected by 
cords, which passed over the pulley in the top of the 
frame, with treadles operated by the weaver. The 
batten contained a reed through which the threads of 
the warp passed. The weaver pressed on the treadle 
and raised the alternate threads of the warp while 
depressing the others, thus forming an angle for the 
thread of the weft or filling, which was placed in posi- 
tion by throwing the shuttle; the other treadle was 
then pressed by the foot and the thread "beaten up" 
as the batten struck it. 

Weaving consisted of three operations: (1) setting 
the warp threads for the web; (2) working the weft 
threads into the warp, to and fro, by means of a shuttle; 

and 



1 



Spinning and Weaving 



263 



and (3) beating up weft threads by means of the 
batten. 

Cloth was woven for household needs and for cloth- 
ing for the family: blankets and both single and 
double coverlets for bedding; cassinette and jeans for 
the men and boys, flannel and linsey for the women 
and girls. 

The one-strand flax thread spun on the small foot- 
operated wheel was woven on the hand-loom into 
hnen material for clothing, sheets, table linen, towels, 
pocket handkerchiefs, etc. The coarse part of the 
flax, called tow, was used in making material for 
bagging, matting, etc. 

Truly, a few score years ago the term "busy house- 
wife" was not a mere name given by custom, but a 
title faithfully earned by long hours of painstaking 
toil. 



Rush City, 
Minnesota, 
1921. 




^r^-:^2^^27-?^ 



SPINNING JENNY 

In tbe home of Lydia P. Webster, Qvaker Cirv 
Ohio. 



264 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




DICKY— A CAMOUFLAGE 



In the early days, when linen was scarce 

and expensive, some of our ancestors used 

this false white shirt-front. 

In THE POSSESSION OF Mary B. Niblock. 





LINEN TOWEL 

Hand-woven by Pharaby Bundy Sears. 



LINEN SOCK 

Homespun and hand-knit. 
Made in the family of Peter Sears. 




MAKING COLORED STOCKINGS 

N THE days of homespun stuffs the dyeing 
of the fabrics was also done at home. The 
process became the periodic forerunner of 
the knitting season. After the wool had 
been picked over carefully and the boys had 
brought some walnut bark to the house, mother would 
put a layer of bark, then a layer of wool into a halt- 
barrel. When the barrel was almost full, she would 
cover the wool and bark with water, weight down the 
cover, and allow the barrel to stand for several days. 
The wool was then wrung out and aired, and, if it was 
not dark enough in color, it was put back in the dye 
and the operation repeated. When the wool was dyed 
to the desired shade, it was washed and dried and then 
sent to be carded and made into rolls. When this wool 
came home mother would spin it into yarn ready to 
be knitted into stockings for us. I remember many 
times lying on the floor listening to the hum of 
mother's spinning wheel. 

Taconiay Elizabeth Stanton Baii.ey. 

Ohio, 

1921. 




iKmmfB^ 



FIVE- INCH TELESCOPE AND 
EQUATORIAL MOUNTING 

Made by Wiluam H. Stanton in 1901. 



w 



WILLIAM HENRY STANTON 

ILLIAM HENRY STANTON, son of Eli 
and Mary P. (Bundy) Stanton, spent his boy- 
hood years on a farm two miles east of Barnes- 
ville, Ohio. His father was a good farmer 
and desired that his son should follow the 
same occupation. But William at a very early age 
showed a decided inclination for mechanical work 
and was never so happy as when using tools or con- 
structing machinery. His father's toolshed was his 
workshop, in which much of his time was spent, often 
to the detriment of the farm work. With a few crude 
tools and material that he was able to pick up about 
the place he constructed a small steam engine and 
boiler that developed sufficient power to run small ma- 
chines. 

I, an interested uncle, felt discouraged about the 
boy's future, thinking all farm boys should show an 
inclination for farm work or if they did not, there 
was little chance for success in any line. But his 
lather, a wise, foreseeing man, felt he should be allowed 
to do the work for which he had a natural liking and 
talent. 

When 
267 



268 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



When William was through the Friends' Primary 
School and had had three terms at Friends' Boarding 
School, he worked a few months in the blacksmith 
shop of Joseph Kennard, then was bound apprentice 
for two years at the machinist's trade with Charles 
Kugler, of Barnesville, Ohio. Here he was very happy, 

for 




TURNING LATHE 

The iron turning lathe which was in the shop of Charles Kugler in Barnesville 

AND his successors FOR SO MANY YEARS WAS PURCHASED BY WlLLIAM F. GlBBONS A FEW 
YEARS AGO, AND HAS BEEN CHANGED TO A WOOD LATHE. It HAD THE USUAL SIMPLE HEAD 
AND TAIL STOCK AND WAS BACK-GEARED. ThIS WAS THE ONE ON WHICH WlLUAM H. StANTON 
SERVED HIS APPRENTICESHIP IN 1878 AND 1879. ThE IRONWORK WAS MADE PROBABLY 
BEFORE 1870 BY THE BLANDY MACHINE COMPANY, ZaNESVILLE, OhIO. "THE ShEARS" 
WERE MADE IN BARNESVILLE AND ARE ABOUT 6 X 16 INCHES IN SECTION AND 16 FEET LONG 
AND ARE OF SOLID BLACK WALNUT. A PORTABLE SIDE-REST WAS USED, HELD IN PLACE BY A 
STIRRUP EXTENDING OVER THE BASE AND BELOW THE SHEARS AND FASTENED BY A SUITABLE 
BLOCK AND LARGE WOODEN WEDGE. ThE REST WAS SET PARALLEL BY GUESS AND AFTER A 
TRIAL WAS KNOCKED A LITTLE RIGHT OR LEFT UNTIL THE TOOL TURNED PARALLEL WITH THE 
CENTERS. A HANDY TOOL IN ITS DAY, BUT NO MATCH FOR THE MODERN HIGH-SPEED LATHE. 



William Hknry Stantox 269 




TURNING LATHE FOR WOOD 

"I WORKED ON THIS LATHE WHILE BOUND APPRENTICE TO CHARLES Kl'(;LER TO 
LEARN THE MACHINIST'S TR.VDE IN 1878 AND 1879. IT STILL RUNS AND LOOKS AS 
GOOD AS IT DID FORTY YEARS AGO. I HAVE SELDOM ENJOYED A!^ WORK MORE THAN 
OPERATING THIS LATHE. It WAS A RARE PLEASURE TO CUT AWAY THE UATERUL 
AND SHAPE THE GRACEFUL CURVES, TO MAKE THE SURFACE SMOOTH, TO POLISH ANT) 
BRING OUT THE BEAUTY OF THE GRAIN AND COLOR OF THE WOOD. I TURNED EVERY- 
THING — CHESSMEN, BASEBALL BATS, NEWEL POSTS, STONE CUTTERS* MALLETS, OR 
WHATEVER WAS WANTED. It WAS REAL FUN TO LEARN A TRADE." — W. H. S. 

for he had a splendid opportunity to learn about the 
various metals, woods and other materials used and 
about the different kinds of machines made and re- 
paired in the shop. 

When the two years had passed he felt he wanted 
greater opportunities to develop his talent, so applied 
for a position in the shop of James W. (^ueen and 
Company, of Philadelphia, manufacturers ot optical, 
mathematical and philosophical instruments. When 
he started there, in 1880, he found the work 
lighter than the work in the machine shop but 
much more accurate and intricate, so he had a chance 
to exercise all the skill he possessed. \ Ic made it a 
rule to try to understand the principle and use ot every 
instrument he made or repaired. He realized that 
future efficiency depended on close application and 
intelligent work, so naturally he made rapid progress 
and won the esteem of the heads of departments and 
of the members of the firm. While there he made for 
Professor George F. Barker, of the University ot 

Pennsvlvania, 



270 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Pennsylvania, the first secondary electric battery 
made in the United States and the first Toepler- 
Holtz induction electric machine made in the country. 

William attended the Franklin Institute night school 
but realized he needed a better education and, as an 
opportunity was presented, he entered De Pauw 
University, Greencastle, Indiana. He started in the 
preparatory school and earned money to pay his way 
by teaching Physics and by making apparatus for the 
University. At various times he traveled with Professor 
John B. De Motte and operated the instruments and 
apparatus used in his scientific lectures. After spend- 
ing about four years at De Pauw he felt it would be an 
advantage to add some studies at a technical school. 
Dr. W. V. Brown, of the University, kindly offered to 
help him prepare to enter Rose Polytechnic Institute 
at Terre Haute in the fall of 1889. He greatly enjoyed 
the work at this school as well as the care of the scien- 
tific instruments of which he was in charge. He 
made rapid progress but was soon offered a position 
as manager of a plant for the manufacture of silicate 
of soda established by the Philadelphia Quartz Com- 
pany in Anderson, Indiana. This was probably as good 
an offer as he could expect to receive after completing 
the course at the technical school, so he left his school 
work and took the position. 

When saying good-bye to some of his professors, 
C. A. Waldo, Professor of Mathematics, said to him, 
"Now, Stanton, when you get out, don't just read a 
little here and there, have a hobby, take up one line 
of reading or study and follow the subject until you 
feel you are through with it; then take up another." 
This advice William remembered and followed. He 

now 



William Hkxrv Stantox 271 

now admits he has been interested in sixteen different 
subjects: 



Landscape Gardening Electric Power 

Bees Wage Systems 

Weather Geology 

Natural Gas Earth and Rock t^x- 

Coal Mining cavation 

Smokeless Combustion South American Trip 

Astronomy and Spanish 

Corporation Law Finance 

American Law Family History 



As manager of the Anderson Plant of the Quartz 
Company he keenly felt the responsibility he had 
assumed, but with his determination to win he placed 
the plant on a profitable basis from the first. The 
success of this plant induced the Company to build 
other plants in different parts ot the United States, 
for most of which he had the planning and oversight 
in building. In 1904 he was put on the executive 
board of the Company and in 1913 made General 
Manager of all their plants, which are now located 
at Anderson, Indiana; Buffalo, New York; Chester, 
Pennsylvania; Kansas City, Kansas; and Rah way, 
New Jersey. 

His duties as General Manager required him to live 
near the executive office in Philadelphia, so in 1913 
he moved to Ridley Park and built the home where 
he now lives. In 1919 he was made \'ice-President 
of the Company. After thirty years of service devoted 
to their interests he gave up acti\'c duties and now 
holds a position as Consultant to the Company. 
All through this period of years it seemed he had no 
thought of pecuniary compensation, but rather a 
nobler incentive — "What can 1 do to advance the 

interest 



272 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




WILLIAM H. STANTON'S HOME 
ANDERSON, INDIANA 

Built 1892. 



interest of the Quartz Company?" This certainly 
would be a profitable attitude for all ambitious young 
men to assume. 

William has ever been interested in movements for 
the uplift of the community in which he lived. While 
in Anderson he was made President of the Maplewood 
Cemetery Association. He was interested in laying 
out the driveways, locating the trees and shrubbery 
with pleasing results. He was also made president 
of the Union Coal Company, which opened a shaft 

mine 




WILLIAM H. STANTON'S HOME 

RIDLEY PARK, PENNSYLVANIA 

BuitT 1913. 



William Hknry Stanton- 273 

mine in Sullivan County, Indiana, with a capacity of 
2,000 tons per day. He served four years in the city 
council and was active in many of the business enter- 
prises of the city. 

He possessed remarkable tact in getting alcjng with 
his employees. Notably, he installed a large steam 
whistle by which the weather forecast was signalled 
daily. This, with many similar things, created a 
spirit of superiority and pride on the part of his work- 
men. 

As one passes through the factory at Anderson there 
can be seen the following mottoes where they are con- 
stantly before the eyes of the workmen: 

"Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle." 

"Every useless move costs you money." 

"When all treasures are tried, truth is best." 

"Keep up to date; keep an open mind." 

"You help to pay for everything that is wasted." 

"TIME — that's the stufl^life is made of — save it." 

"Industry is the handmaiden of Wealth." 

In 1898 William married Louise Smith, of Anderson, 
Indiana. She has traveled with him wherever his 
duties have called him, being able to easily adapt 
herself to whatever surroundings in which she was 
located. She has been an active church worker, a 
leader in the woman's clubs, and has made a host of 
friends wherever she has li\cd. 1 ha\e a strong sus- 
picion that many young men and young women have 
Will and Louise Stanton to thank for a college course 
br a summer's outing, although very little has ever 
been said about it. 

I William has known the struggle to make ends meet, 
the toil to gain knowledge, the busy active life of a 

successful 



274 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



successful business man, and best of all the respect 
and admiration of relatives and friends. Through 
these experiences he has gained a kindly feeling for all 
mankind, a feeling which can only grow and ripen 
in a man who has met the problems of life with his 
hand outstretched for the Holy Grail. 



Tacoma, 

Ohio, 

1920. 



^,,;^^^^W<5I^^^ 




COMPASS 

Made by William H. Stanton in 1882 while working in 

THE INSTRUMENT SHOP OF JaMES W. QUEEN AND COMPANY, 
AND PRESENTED TO MaRY C. BUNDY. 



William Henry Stantont 



i/:) 




LITTLE STEAM ENGINE 

Made by William H. Stanton when fifteen years old. 




FOOT-POWER TURNING LATHE FOR WOOD 

It was on this l\tiie that William H. Stanton first rRACTisia> tirninx and 
made most of the i'arts of the uttle stkam f_\-ol\e. 

the lathe was MiU3E BY IsAAC TaTTEN, THE BllUlER OF CoLE's MiLL. It HAS 

BEEN OWNED BY JOHN BvNDY. Eli StANTON, DanIEL StaNTON. WiLUS AND LewIS 

BUNDY AND IS NOW OWNED BY FrED R. BvnDY. 



276 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 




ELECTRIC 
WIND VANE 
INDICATOR 

Made by William H. Stanton 
IN 1896. 



THE 

SQUARE-SHAFTED 

WHEEL 

■ ■~~ ^F.FORE THE DAYS 
W,M WHEN IRON TURNING 

1 'B LATHES CAME INTO 

n^BBBi^ GENERAL USE, A LIT- 
ife^^^ TLE IRON WAS TURNED 
^SB^jy^l BY HAND SOMEWHAT 
SIMILAR TO WOOD TURNING; THERE- 
FORE, WHEELS WERE CAST WITH 
SQUARE HOLES AND SECURED TO 
THEIR SHAFTS BY WOODEN WEDGES, 
UNTIL THEY RAN APPROXIMATELY 

TRUE. Iron wedges were then 

DRIVEN FROM BOTH SIDES, FILLING 
THE SPACE BETWEEN THE WHEEL 
AND THE SHAFT. GrEAT CARE WAS 
NECESSARY TO KEEP THE WHEEL 
TRUE, DRIVE THE WEDGES SUFFI- 
CIENTLY TIGHT TO HOLD THE 
WHEEL IN PLACE, AND YET NOT 
BURST THE HUB WHEN THE WEDGES 
WERE DRIVEN HOME. THE OUTER 
ENDS WERE CUT OFF BY A SEIARP 
COLD-CHISEL AND A BURR TURNED 
OVER FROM THE SHAFT TO PREVENT 
THE WEDGES FROM COMING OUT. 
Far MORE SKILL WAS REQUIRED 
THAN TO TURN A SHAFT, BORE A 
WHEEL AND KEYSEAT THEM TO- 
DAY. Of COURSE MUCH MORE TIME 
WAS REQUIRED AND THE WORK WAS 
NOT AS SATISFACTORY. 




THE FALL BUTCHERING 

LONG in the early winter when the ground 
froze 'most every night and we had had some 
snow, when the pigs began to walk slow 
and waddle from eating too much corn, then 
it was time to "kill hogs" and lay in the 
y^ear's supply of pork. So the men hauled a couple of 
oads of big firewood to the barn lot and made a "log 
keap"; big logs were placed on two sides and smaller 
stuff between; scattered through the center was a small 
load of soft sandstones and heavy scraps of iron; 
kindling was prepared, but kept in the dry. The big 
logshead was brought from the cellar and the hoops 
tightened. A sled was placed convenient to the fire and 
"he hogshead set in a hole in the ground and leaned 
igainst the sled. The hogshead was now filled nearly 
ull of water. Tomorrow was to be a great day. 

Long before daylight there was an unusual stir 
ibout the house — small boys felt that rhey were 
leeded, then if ever, to see what was going on. Kind- 
ing was brought out and placed in the windward end ot 
:he pile; then a match — and the smoke began to curl 

up 
277 



278 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 



up and soon the blaze, then the whole pile caught fire — 
how it lighted up the yard! Such popping and snap- 
ping! Great sparks were shot out — sometimes in our 
direction, and smaller ones went up with the smoke 
and drifted off across the fields. There were weird and 
flickering shadows all around and so much heat that 
we had to back off. Daylight was coming and the 
fire seemed to lose itself in the day. 

Then father came with his rifle — with the bullet 
pouch and powder horn slung across his shoulder. He 
scattered a little shelled corn in the lot where the hogs- 
were, and as a pig faced him there was a 
sharp crack of the rifle and the pig dropped 
with a little depression between his eyes. 
No disturbance, no pain — only arrested 
development. Then father measured out 
a little powder, poured it into the gun, 
then a patch and bullet, and he set the 
rifle by his side and under the left arm 
so he could hold the hickory ramrod with 
both hands and push the bullet down; 
then a "cap" from the little, round, green 
paper box, a little more corn and — the 
same result. When enough pigs for the 
year's supply had been selected they 
were brought up to the fire, which had 
burned down, leaving the stones and iron 
red hot. Now the big two-hand tongs 
from the wash-house fireplace — and the 
hot stones were soon transferred to the 
hogshead and the water heated to near 
boiling. A neighbor or two had come in — 
and now the real business began. 

Two 



T he Fall Butchering 7^ 

Two of the men grabbed a pig by the hind teet— 
the only convenient handles which nature put on a hog 
—and soused him in the bath, head foremost, up and 
down, rolled him around and then out, turned him end 
for end— and launched him stern foremost and rolled 
him over, then out on the sled, and such a scraping, 
scouring, scrubbing, washing and rinsing he got, that 
his mother would not have known him. Now' they 
sHpped a stout pointed club between his legs and hung 
him on a strong pole so he swung free from the ground. 
Here he 'Most heart" and liver, too; his stomach was 
"all upset" and he changed from pig to pork. 

The surplus fat was collected, cut in small pieces and 
leated in a big iron kettle over a wood fire, then ladled 
nto a sack and squeezed between great wooden 
mincers or clamps, and the lard caught^ in big stone- 
ware jars and set away to cool. The best of the 
:racklmgs were saved and ground in the sausage grinder 
:o make "crackling corn bread." The other cracklings, 
;ome of the livers and the various scraps were boiled 
ip later with small potatoes and corn meal and made 
'scrapple" for the chickens which, they confided to me, 
asted mighty good on a cold morning. 

There were spareribs and back bones cut out and 
>ur good neighbors and friends were remembered with 

'mess" of them or a heart, some sausage, etc., which 
/as very real proof of friendship. 

Next day the hams, shoulders and sides were trimmed 
Ip and the scraps worked into sausage; only the best 
f the side meat was saved, the rest worked into lard 
nd sausage. Then came the serious discussion as to 
ow much salt and pepper and sage shouki be mixed 

with 



280 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

with the sausage before grinding; it ended by guessing 
that about so much would be right, and it was. 

The meat was now rubbed over with salt and 
stacked up to be smoked in the early spring, unless 
some unreliable citizen with more appetite than moral 
character reduced our supply. Some of the sausage 
was fried, packed in crocks and covered with melted 
lard to preserve it for later use. 

In the spring when the sun shone warm and the 
snow melted rapidly on the roofs it was time to smoke 
the meat. You remember the little house, the little 
old stove in the center, no pipe to it, the hickory wood- 
fire that burned slowly and smoked, how it made the 
eyes smart, how you held your breath? And don't 
you remember the sweet aroma of the smoke-house, or 
is it the thought of smoked country ham and gravy, 
light-cakes and the delightful visits when our friends 
came to see us and stayed to supper, that we remember? 

William Henry Stanton. 
Ridley Park^ 
Pennsylvania^ 
192 L 




SAUSAGE GRINDER 

One of the early-day type. Used by Daniel Stanton. 



UP TO TOWN WITH A LOAD OF GRIST 



^T^^^NE day Mother said the flour in the bin 
I %^ J I was getting low and Father said he guessed 
■•ffffffM he would have to take a grist to mill, but 
y^^^J added, "I would rather go to mill than go 
for the doctor." They said I could go along 
if I would be a good boy. 

A little later, in the barn, we picked out five two- 
bushel grain sacks that were strong and had not been 
snagged nor eaten by the mice. Then we went to the 
middle bin in the granary on the south side ot the 
barn — the wheat bin where I had caught many a 
mouse by setting a little "figure-4" trap under a brick 
— and there, with the old black half-bushel measure, 
we put ten bushels of real Red Mediterranean wheat 
into the sacks. My job was to hold the sack so Father 
could hold the half-bushel on his knee, catch a side 
with each hand and pour the wheat in while I held 
out the front of the bag. When the sacks were filled 
some straw was spread on the bottom of the bed of 
the wagon which stood on the same floor. The sacks, 
two bushels of wheat in each, were shouldered and 
carried to the wagon. That was a "man's job." 

Two 
281 



282 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

Two of our horses, Trim and Nellie, were harnessed 
and then we went to the house to *Vash up and dress." 
After this was done, I did not feel so comfortable, 
but it had to be. We now backed the wagon out, 
hitched up and were off. Mother had some butter 
and several dozen eggs to "take to the store." These 
had to be watched and the egg basket held in hand 
when the road was very rough, for there were no springs 
to the wagon. 

Our progress was not rapid, for Father said, ''Don't 
trot the team down hill, it is too hard on the horses' 
front feet." On the level there was frequently deep 
sand and the hills were so stony and steep that a slow 
walk was "high speed." 

Out of our lane and on to the Sandy Ridge Road 
there was always plenty to see. We did not travel 
this road very often, so everything was new and 
interesting. The rail fences seemed so high, the cuts 
so deep. The birds, the trees and an occasional ground 
squirrel were all of interest and suggested plenty 
of questions. Yes, some of Hosea Doudna's apples 
were getting ripe — Aaron Frame was plowing that 
hill field for wheat. We could see away across country 
— Grandfather Bundy was plowing, too; the woods 
were beginning to color a little, soon frost and cool 
nights would come. They were threshing at Robert 
H. Smith's. We met and spoke to Dr. J. W. Judkins 
and wondered who was sick out our way. Barclay 
Smith was plowing, too, and the ground seemed dry 
and lumpy. I hoped the train would come along 
while we were in sight of the track, so I could see it, 
but no such good luck. Soon we passed the "Brick 

Kiln," 



Up to Town with a Load of Grist 283 

Kiln," a never-ending source of interest to me — how 
they dug the clay, mixed the mud by horse power, 
molded the brick, dried them in the yard, "hacked 
them up," covered them with "boards" to keep off 
the rain; then set them in the kiln, made the flues 
for the fire, burned them and at last opened the kiln. 
Here was the spot where Dr. Kemp brought some of 
his friends who wanted to see a "bat's nest." 

Near town the rail fences were replaced by board 
ones along the road and we could read "S. B. Piper 
& Brother, Dry Goods, Hats and Caps, Boots and 
Shoes" — "H. Vance, Groceries and Queensware." At 
the east end of Main Street we passed the Masonic 
Hall with the queer sign, a big G with compass and 
square, over the door. 

i Once in town, the team began to put on city airs 
and grew a little "skittish," hunting for something 
at which "to scare" and sometimes succeeding. There 
was the office sign, "Drs. Williams and Judkins, 
Physicians and Surgeons" — Francis Davis lived there 
— Ely's Drug Store — The Bank — the Frazier House — 
the Enterprise Office — Reed's Shoe Store — Bradfields 
— then we turned down Chestnut Street, stopped at 
the railroad crossing to listen for "the cars," passed 
Reed's Tan Yard, that did not always smell good, 
saw the great piles of tan-bark; then "Smoky Row" — 
the Darkey Street — and there on the left was Hilles' 
Mill. It was a big square, four-story frame building 
with gambrel roof and a shed at the back with a square 
brick smoke-stack. We could hear the muffled rumble 
of the heavy gearing and see the clouds of black 
smoke roll away. There was a big beam projecting 

from 



284 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

from the top of the mill with a rope hanging down, 
and big double or "Dutch doors" on each floor. 

We drove up under the rope and stopped. "Skip" 
Hilles came to an upper door, with his cheery, "Good 
morning, Eli." He pulled on a rope with his left 
hand and the rope from the beam, with chain and 
hook on the end, came slowly down. Father hooked 
the chain around a sack, "Skip" pulled on the other 
rope and the sack was taken up to the floor above. 
When a couple of sacks had been taken up, there 
was some delay, but soon "Skip" appeared again 
and asked father if he wished to sell the wheat, saying 
that he would exchange in flour, giving him flour 
from wheat just as good, and pay us a dollar ten for 
this when the regular price was a dollar. He said 
he wanted to sell our wheat for seed, because it was so 
plump and clean — no weed seeds, rye nor cockle. The 
exchange was accordingly made and the flour filled 
into our sacks and we did not have to wait for the 
wheat to be ground. Generally from the wheat that 
was delivered, the miller took out one-eighth toll for 
grinding, the remainder being ground and the flour 
put into sacks. The middlings and bran were put 
into other sacks and were taken home for stock feed 
along with the flour when the grist was called for a week 
later. 

How well I remember "Skip" — short, stocky, dark 

hair, full beard of moderate length. He generally 

wore a neat, closefitting cap. He was always quiet, 

but inspired confidence — a pleasant man of known 

integrity with whom it was a satisfaction to have 

business dealings. 

After! 



Up to Town with a Load ok Grist 2X5 

After we left the mill and drove up town, the team 
was tied to a hitch-rack in front of the store and the 
butter and eggs were traded for sugar and coffee 
and sometimes for goods to make clothing. I remem- 
ber the stores had very small show-windows, and the 
inside was equally plain; some shelving along the 
wall, counters with inclined front, barrels ot crackers, 
sugar, coffee, molasses and vinegar. All of the articles 
had to be weighed or measured out for you and the 
dry stuff wrapped in heavy brown paper, and liquids 
filled into vessels brought by the customer. 

After we were through at the store. Father said, 
"Let's get the team and go home." This pleased 
me for my shoes pinched and my collar chafed my 
neck, and I was hungry and thirsty and wanted a 
drink from the big pump on the north porch. 

And Now After Fifty Years — 

I remember Father often took me to places ol 
interest when we went to town, whether because he 
wanted to go or because he knew I wanted to see the 
machinery, I do not know. 

One time we went to the McCartney Grist Mill 
and down into the engine room where there were four 
cylinder boilers being fired by two very black colored 
men. It was a hot day and this was a hot vnom lull 
of noise and hissing steam. The fire doors under the 
boilers were red hot ft-om such a furious fire in the 
furnace. I was glad to get out. 

At another time we went to Watts' Foundry and 
Saw Mill. Their engine was one of the old type in- 
stalled about 1850. The cylinder of this engine was 
seven inches in diameter with a thirtv-six inch stroke. 

The 



286 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

The connecting rod was made of wood, diamond 
shaped in section, with iron straps bolted on the 
edges, and ended in journal boxes at each end which 
were provided with gib and cotter. The steam chest 
was set off to the side of the cylinder with pipes run- 
ning to the cylinder. This great length of port wasted 
much steam. 

Many will remember the old woolen mill near 
Arch and Church Streets and its unusual engine 
exhaust. The engine was of similar design to the 
one at Watts, but the slide valve was not set properly 
and leaked very badly, so that instead of giving regular 
short puffs it let out great long and short wheezes 
that could be heard all over the neighborhood. They 
used two or three cylinder boilers and burned great 
quantities of coal. 

The engine at Charles Kugler's Machine Shop — 
The Belmont Machine Works — was of much the same 
design, but had been rebuilt and was in good repair. 
The cylinder was, I think, eight by twenty-four 
inches. The piston was packed with platted hemp. 
I later on had two years' experience with it. I was 
chief engineer, oiler and fireman, too; when there was 
heavy work to be done, I would add an extra ring of 
hemp or screw up the "follower ring" as was needed. 
This was done by a long socket wrench and the square 
nut on the end of the piston rod. You can guess 
there was some "clearance," perhaps several inches. 
The cylinder head was held on by four one-inch left- 
hand thread bolts. The nuts were hand-forged. 
I was told of an old engine in the neighborhood that 
wasted so much steam the boiler could not supply 
enough, so they bolted a block of wood, eight inches 
thick, on the piston to fill some of the "clearance" 

and 



Up to Town with a Load of Grist 287 

and then there was plenty of steam. "Charlie" 
Kugler's engine had a wooden "bed plate," the usual 
wooden connecting rod, a cast-iron shaft, octagonal 
in shape, and a crank. It was made of white iron 
and almost as hard as flint. The fly wheel consisted 
of a cast-iron spider, wedged on the shaft with wooden 
spokes bolted to it, and a cast-iron rim. This rim 
was made up of several sections and bolted on each 
side of the spokes. There was always a squeak about 
the wheel when running, so I suppose it was loose at 
some point. Fly-ball governor and butterfly throttle 
were used. The usual speed was about sixty revolu- 
tions per minute, which varied greatly according to 
the steam pressure and load. 

I was not annoyed by oil or grease cups when work- 
ing on the Kugler engine. Some of the old engines 
had to be stopped to oil the valves, but ours had a 
"lubricator" with bulb and two stop-cocks so that 
we could introduce oil when the stop-cocks did not 
leak enough to blow all the oil out. One kind oi oil 
was used for both engine and cylinder. The boiler 
was of the single-flue type and was supposed to carry 
sixty pounds; with no insurance and "home-made" 
inspection. The lever safety valve was supposed to 
be set at sixty pounds; but one time, after several 
months, we found it "stuck with lime," so that it might 
have held down several hundred pounds. This was 
of small moment, as we generally ran at forty to fifty 
pounds. Only on special days did I carry sixty-pounds 
pressure when some of the big machines were in use. 

It was a great old power plant — not very economical, 
to be sure, but it was reliable and gave no trouble. 
No one knew how old it was, but "Lev" Ellis said 

it 



288 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



it was old in 1844. Just recently I wanted to see 
the old engine, but could not find even a scrap of it. 

When we think of these old engines and compare i 
them with the modern turbine of some fifty thousand 
kilowatts or, say, over sixty-five thousand horse power, || 
we can but wonder how it will be possible to make as, 
great improvement in the next fifty or seventy-five 
years. Doubtless, however, the improvement will be 
beyond our imagination, for the future will hold even 
greater opportunities than marked the period between 
the present and the time when Father used to take 
me to these places that meant so much to me and 
the memory of which still lingers pleasantly in my 
mind. 



Ridley Park, 
Pennsylvania, 
1921. ' 



William Henry Stanton. 




HAND-MADE BOTTLES 

Of amber glass. Probably brought from Virginia 
ABOUT 1810 BY Matthew Bailey. 



I 




DEBORAH H. B. STANTON 

DEBORAH H. B. STANTON 



D 



EBORAH H. B. STANTON, daughter of 
Elijah and Eliza Hanson, was born on the 
Twenty-sixth of First month, 1839, at the 
old Hanson homestead about a mile and a 
half southeast of the present railroad station 
at Speidel, Ohio. 

The Hanson family went to Goshen Meeting and 
belonged to that Preparative meeting. Their monthly 
and quarterly meetings were at Stillwater. 

When Deborah was five years old she started to 
school, walking, in company with her brothers, about 
a mile to a little log schoolhouse. She particularly 

liked 
289 



?^2 . Our Ancestors— The Stanton 



liked spelling and always found it very easy. Al 
through life she has memorized poems and from thi; 
vast store often repeats very fitting lines, whatever th( 
occasion may be. 

At the age of eighteen she attended Friends' Boarding 
School at Mount Pleasant, Ohio. She then taught foi^ 
two years at "Flat Rock," a district school in Somer- 
set Township. It was located not far from the 
Friends' meeting house at "The Ridge." 

On Third month Thirtieth, 1859, she married Caleb 
L. Bundy, son of Ezekiel and Maria (Engle) Bundy. 
This was a double wedding. Caleb's brother, Nathan, 
married Anna Stanton, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
Stanton. 

Caleb and Deborah (Hanson) Bundy went to house- 
keeping on a small farm south of Barnesville, not far 
from the district schoolhouse at "Sugar Grove." That 
autumn Caleb Bundy bought from the Government 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Wyandotte 
County, Kansas, and expected to move there the fol- 
lowing spring. 

On the Fifteenth of Twelfth month, 1859, Caleb 
died of typhoid fever, a young man not yet twenty- 
one years of age. The young widow went back to her 
father's home and there on the Third of Second month, 
1860, Mary Caleb was born. 

In 1862 Deborah again taught school, her work this 
time being in Warren Township, District No. 1, where 
Chalkley Bundy was one of the directors. Six of his ' 
children went to school to her. On the Sixth of Twelfth 
month, 1864, she was married to Chalkley Bundy. His 
youngest child, Mary E., was about four months : 

younger 



)eborah H. B. Stanton 291 

ounger than her daughter, Mary C, who was not yet 
iVe years old. These two Httle girls were treated in 
he home as twins. 

Chalkley Bundy died on the First of Twelfth month, 
,866, of typhoid fever. For the next four years Deb- 
rah kept the home together for his six children, her- 
elf and little girl. In those years four had married 
nd one entered boarding school. So, with Mary C. 
nd Mary E., she went back again to her father's home 
ind later taught school in District No. 2, where the 
wo Mary Bundys went to school to her. Among her 
ther pupils were William H., Sarah B. and Emma C. 
tanton, the three children of Eli Stanton. On the 
thirtieth of Seventh month, 1873, she was married to 
Lli Stanton. 

I It is interesting to note that her own child and her 
line step-children had all been to school to her. 

To her new home she took with her Mary C. and 
-lary E., now about thirteen years old. On First 
lonth Twenty-sixth, 1875, Nathan Eli was born. His 
ntrance into the family circle made four families rep- 
esented in one. This was a beautiful, happy home 
ntil in 1885 Eli Stanton was called from works to 
eward and Deborah H. B. Stanton was left, for the 
hird time, a widow, her age at this time being forty-six. 

Her three marriages were all solemnized in Still- 
/ater Meeting, and during her whole life, whether liv- 
ag among Friends or people who knew nothing about 
hem, she has lived in conformity with Friends' prin- 
iples. 

In 1891 and 1892 Deborah Stanton was nurse for 
he boys of Westtown Boarding School, where her son 

Nathan 



292 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




PEWTER SPOON 

Made by Benjamin Hanson out of a platter belonging to 
The Hanson Family. 



Nathan was a student. After leaving Westtown they 
went to Iowa to join Mary C. and her husband, Thomp- 
son Smith. From this time until Nathan's marriage in 
1907, his mother made a home for him at different 
points in Iowa where he was in business with Thomp- 
son Smith. 

She was always a great lover of flowers and enjoyed 
gathering, with the children, those which grew wild on 
the prairies. 

From the age of twenty on through life, Deborah 
H. B. Stanton has been unusually capable in nursing 
sick people. So many, many times she has been sent 
for by relatives, neighbors and friends. When sixty 
years old she could count twenty-one cases of typhoid 
fever she had nursed. The number of children whom 
she was first to hold upon their entrance into life is too 
numerous to count, but it can be stated that she is, as 
it were, godmother to four sets of twins, namely: 
Bernice and Beatrice Hanson, Edna and Ellen Stanton, 
Elma and Everett Hall and Elva and Melva Bundy. 

From girlhood Deborah was a neat, competent 
seamstress, and now at fourscore years she still cuts, 
fits and makes her own clothing. 

In spite of her eighty years, Deborah H. B. Stanton, 
having lived a usefu], active life, is wonderfully pre- 
served. 



[lEBORAH H. B. STANTOr 



293 



srved. The curly, wavy hair is white, but the mental 
owers are clear and able. All who meet her can but 
iel the richness and beauty that have come through a 
)ng life of service to others. 



'anion ^ 

hio, 

920. 





DICTIONARY 

Owned by Elijah Hanson. 



A JOURNEY IN A PRAIRIE SCHOONER 

/ ^^ %N APRIL 10, 1896, my grandmother, Deborah H. B 

I ^^ I Stanton, together with her son Nathan and nephe\' 

IW^gl Caleb Hanson, left Caledonia, Minnesota, in a prairi' 

»^^^" schooner for Esterville, Iowa, a distance of abou' 

two hundred and fifty miles. Grandmother insisted upon makin; 

the trip and Uncle Nathan only consented after she promise 

to take the train any time she became tired of the wagon. Th 

greatest danger which might confront them during the journe' 

was an encounter with a prairie fire. These fires were frequen 

and very dangerous, as the high winds, which were characteristi 

of the western prairies, rapidly spread the flames over a larg 

area. Fortunately they saw no fires. Regular roads were scare' 

in that part of the country, and a wagon track or more often . 

compass made by William H. Stanton was their guide across tb 

unbroken prairie. At night the boys slept in the wagon, bi 

always succeeded in finding a place for Grandmother in soir| 

farm house. Everyone was very kind to them along their lir 

of travel, and Grandmother enjoyed the entire trip, which laste, 

about a week. l 

Mary Avice S. Webster. | 




CANDLE SNUFFERS 



NOTES BY DEBORAH H. B. STANTON 



M 



Y Grandfather Hanson was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War. He died soon after my father was 
born in 1797. In 1805 grandmother moved with her 
family from North Carolina to Belmont County, 
Ohio. The mode of travel then was in covered wagons drawn 
;by horses. Their wagoners were hired and, as was customary, 
|had bells on their horses. Before entering the mountains the 
'bells were muffled and hidden in the wagon. Later they came 
|upon some other wagoners, who were stalled in the mountains; 
they hauled them out and stripped them of their bells, that being 
their trophy for the help given. 

1 My mother came from Georgia and settled near Stillwater 
Meeting, Ohio. My father and mother were married in that 
meeting and lived in that neighborhood the remainder of their 

lives 












>i>^'v.-5. 



AN ARMY DISCHARGE 

Of Eujah Hanson aftkr the Revolutionary War. 



295 



296 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

lives. My father's wedding pantaloons were, as he called them, 
"buckskin breeches" and he made his shoes of what he called 
"upper leather." He wore no gloves, and I do not know of what 
material his coat and hat were made. Mother's wedding dress 
was of white material, and she wore a white shawl and white 
silk bonnet to match. 

They went to housekeeping in the woods on the Leatherwoodj 
hills west of Barnesville. Mother had inherited forty acres of wood- 
land and father cleared the land as fast as he could. They hadj 
a log house, barn, and other buildings. The floors of the house' 
were split logs — puncheon floors, as they were called — one side^ 
as smooth as could be hewn with an ax. Nevertheless, mother i 
often had to pick splinters out of the little boys' feet. The house! 
was covered with clapboards. ' 

The newly cleared cornfields, surrounded as they were byj 
timber, were almost overrun with squirrels. In order that theyi 
should not have too big a share of the crop, cow-bells were tied 
to the little boys and they were sent around the fields to frighten 
away the squirrels and the birds. This was a combination of 
work and play for the boys. The woods, thick with pea vines 
and undergrowth, made it necessary also to "bell the cows," 
so that they could be located at milking time. 

My father was a good marksman and often brought home 
wild turkey, squirrels, pheasants, and sometimes a doe or a buck. 

In those early times much of the materials used were manu- 
factured at home. They carded the wool on hand-cards and 
spun it on spinning wheels. My mother, who did not have a 
loom for weaving at home, walked a mile to a neighbor's to use 
her loom. In these trips she carried a baby on her arm and led 
little brother. They also grew much flax, which the men would 
break, scutch, and hackle all the coarse from the fine. The women 
would spin it on small spinning wheels into sewing thread or 
weave it on looms into linen for table and bed linen and for hand- 
kerchiefs. My mother was a good needlewoman and a very 
rapid knitter. She could knit a pair of men's socks in the twenty- 
four hours. 

In order to clear the land for cultivation, the men cut splendid 
chestnut and walnut trees, split some into rails for fencing and 

rolled 



Notes by Deborah H. B. Stantox 



29: 



^' 




THE DOUBLE STAKED AND RIDER FENCE 



,H1S TYPE OF FENCE 
AS USED VERY GEN- 
'lALLY IN BARNES- 

[lle neighborhood 

bR SEVENTY-FIVE 
jiARS AFTER THE AR- 
VAL OF THE FIRST 

iTTLERs. The Mule 

;NCE WAS SOMETIMES 
iED, IN WHICH THE 
'AKES AND DOUBLE 
IDERS WERE REPLACED 
K LONG POLES LAID 
NGTHWISE OF THE 




FENCE AND HELD IN 
PLACE BY SM.\LL STAKES 
LOCKED IN THE COR- 
NERS. This type was 

NOT SO SUBSTANTIAL 
AS THE OTHER NOR 
WOULD IT STAND SO 
WELL ON SLOPING 
GROUND. As DURABLE 
TIMBER BECAME SCARCE 
AND MORE VALU.VBLE, 
WIRE FENCES TOOK THE 
PLACE OF THE R.AIL 
ONES. 



SWEDE OR HILLSIDE FENCE 

Built on the farm of Peter Sears. Condition after 
forty years. 

oiled the rest into piles and burned them to get rid of" them. 
Today such would make very vakiable kimber. 

These 



298 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 



These kinds of employment were general in farm life then. 
My parents were the next generation from pioneers. They 
lived in comfortable homes in a simple way. I have heard my 
mother say that she remembered when there were but three 
houses in Barnesville, Ohio. 

I remember when we had no cookstoves, only open fireplaces 
with cranes attached to the side of the wall of the fire chamber. 
A crane was pulled forward to hang our cooking vessels on 
the hooks or chains suspended from its arm, and then swung 
back over the fire. These cooking vessels were of three kinds, 
kettles, skillets, and Dutch ovens, all of which had legs two or 
three inches long on the bottom. In these we also baked our 
wheat and corn bread, pies and cakes. We would mould our bread 
dough into loaves and put it into the ovens and skillets to raise. 
The lids, which fitted them as neatly as our sugar-bowl lids fit 
today, were placed on the red-hot embers to heat. When the 
bread was light enough and the lids the right temperature, they 
were placed on the vessels and hot embers shoveled on top of 
them. Today I can almost hear mother saying, "Lift the lid 
and see how the bread is baking," for to me this was an actual 
experience. 

I have heard my father tell of a circumstance that happened 
while he was yet a boy in his widowed mother's home: 

A stranger stopped at his mother's door and asked for lodging 
for the night. The request was granted and directions given 
for the care of his horse. When he came to the door with his 
saddlebags in hand he said, "Madam, take charge of my saddle- 
bags until morning." Grandmother took hold of them and they 
dropped to the floor with a bang. She then said to the stranger, 
"I have a mind that I will not care for the bags and the contents." 
He replied, "When you gave me leave to stay over night in your 
house that was also a guarantee of protection to my belongings." 
The bags were heavy with money with which to buy a new home, 
for the man was a prospector. She was a frail woman, but she 
picked them up, carried them across the room, took a key hanging 
at her side, unlocked a large chest, dropped the bags into it, 
locked it and went about her duties. The next morning when 
the stranger was ready to depart, she presented the bags and 
said, "Thee had better examine them and see if all is right." 

He 



kil 



Notes by Deborah H. B. Stanton 299 

He replied, "I have no need to, with you they were safe. You 
are a Quaker." 

The early settlers often had wild turkey or venison, but in 
turn for these choice bits of meat procured from the forest, they 
had their enemy in the bears and wolves. 

The bears molested the pig pens and the wolves the young 
calves and sheep. 

Once Uncle Isaac Stubbs found, from tracks seen in a light 
snow, that a bear was molesting his premises. He and his dog 
started in pursuit with father close behind them. The latter 
lost sight of them after a half mile, but followed the tracks and 
found scattered along the way, first uncle's hat, then his " wammus " 
(blouse), his vest, and his shoes. Then he heard the report of a 
gun and soon came upon his brother and the dog with "bruin" 
lying dead at their feet. 

Deborah H. B. Stanton. 




SADDLE BAGS 

They were the satchel, suitcase and trunk of the days when 

everybody traveled by horseback. 

Property of James Walton. 



EARLY SCHOOL LIFE 

The following article was written by Deborah H. B. Stanton. 
A modern building, called Goshen Schoolhouse, now stands a 
mile farther south on the same road on which the schoolhouse 
stood that she first attended. 




EARLY in the Nineteenth Century when my ' 
parents were going to school they said the 
greatest concern of parents and those inter- 
ested in education was to get a teacher for 
their children. After much attention was 
given to the subject, someone would finally report the 
name of a man or woman who for a small compen- 
sation would undertake to give lessons to the children 
for eight or nine weeks. Then another individual 
would decide that he would be able to take the school 
for a while, and so the task went from one to another. 

Small children attended school in the summer and 
older boys and girls in the winter months. The school 
usually occupied a room in the home of some Friend's 
family who felt they could spare a room for that pur- 
pose. As time went on the interests of education de- 
manded a building for a schoolhouse. The community 
joined together and erected a log schoolhouse. The 

cracks 
300 



Early School Life 301 

cracks between the logs were chinked in with bits of 
timber and the space between filled in with mortar. 
In one side of the room there was built a very large 
fireplace. The men hauled with their oxen great logs 
and limbs of trees for the open fire. Father has said, 
"We boys thought it fine fun to cut this timber into 
lengths to burn in the big fireplace in our schoolroom." 

In 1844 I started to school. The schoolhouse was 
half a mile from home and most of the distance I had 
to walk through the forest. I crossed the creek on a 
foot-log, which was a big oak tree cut down and trimmed 
of its branches. The top of the log was hewn off, mak- 
ing a fiat surface on which to walk. When the water 
was low in summer I waded the stream, which per- 
formance I much enjoyed. The log schoolhouse had 
only one room, with five windows. The interior was 
lined with boards or paper and in the center of the room 
was a large stove. The room was kept, as I remember, 
at a very pleasant temperature in Vv^inter, and in sum- 
mer with the door and five windows open we had 
plenty of fresh air. 

On entering the schoolroom we girls turned to the 
right and hung our bonnets and shawls on wooden pegs 
driven into the wall. The boys disposed of their hats 
in a similar way. To the left of the door was the 
teacher's desk. Around three sides of the room were 
heavy boards fastened to the wall with the front edge 
supported by narrow boards reaching to the fioor. 
This arrangement was called "the desks." Under the 
desks was a shelf on which we placed our books, copy- 
books, inkstands and slates. Around the front of this 
continuous huge desk was a birch bench on which the 
larger pupils sat during school hours and where we all 
went for our writing lessons. I remember for several 

years 



302 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons' 

years I was not tall enough for my feet to reach thej 
floor when sitting at this desk to write. We faced the I 
wall with our backs to the center of the room. The, 
teacher passed around behind us giving instructions asi 
to how to hold the pen and making copies for us. Our! 
writing pens were made from goose quills. The teacher; 
or some of the older boys shaped and sharpened them; 
with a penknife. With these quills we did our best toi 
become good penmen, imitating the copy our teacher] 
made for us in our copy-books. 

There were two or three rows of lower benches around] 
the stove on which the younger children sat most of! 
the time. 

School work began at eight o'clock in the morning 
and closed at three in the afternoon. We had one hour: 
for noon, but no morning nor afternoon recess. We had! 
no blackboards in the schoolroom, so "ciphered" on; 
our slates and carried them to the teacher to be cor-| 
rected or approved. 

The first book I used was a primer that was badly 
worn by older members of the family. From that I 
soon passed on to an Electric Speller. We spelled 
through this book a number of times. There were 
columns of words to spell and define; these we kept re- 
viewing until we almost committed them to memory — 
really that was the object in the teacher's mind. Next 
we had what was called United States Reader. This' 
was not easy to read. Then McGuffey's readers were 
introduced, also McGuffey's spelling-book and Web- 
ster's dictionary. McGuffey's readers were not diffi-i 
cult, and after them we had an English reader with a. 
sequel. Frequently we had reading lessons from the 
Scriptures. 

We 



Early School Life 303 

We had many handicaps in school hfe in those days, 
but, oh, the beauty of the surroundings of those old log 
schoolhouses which were mostly in the woods! In 
their season the wild flowers were at our feet and we 
were surrounded by the beautiful dogwood, wild cherry 
and crabapple trees. By the old fallen trees covered 
with lichen and green moss we built our playhouses 
and decorated them with the wild flowers and fruits 
around us. But time has moved onward and brought 
imany changes. Our rustic surroundings, wild fruit, 
iflowers and childhood pleasures are all things of the 
past. 




CANDLE MOULDS 

To MAKE CANDLES. THE WICKS WERE TWISTICK AND DOl liLKD. 
THE ENDS WERE TAPERED TO A POINT AND RUN THROUGH THi; 
SMALL HOLES IN THE LOWER CONICAL ENDS OF THE TUBES. A 
SMALL WOOD ROD WAS THEN RUN THROUGH THE LOOPS AT THE 
UPPER ENDS OF THE WICKS. ThE WICKS WERE THEN SPACED 
IN THE CENTER OF THE UPPER ENDS OF THE TUBES AND DRAWN 
DOWN TIGHT. ThE MOULDS WERE THEN FILLED WITH MELTED 

tallow and set out to cool. a good cold - weather job 

to be repeated often. 

Used by Nathan W. Bundy. 




OPEN FIRE SKILLET 



A PIONEER SUPPER 




WAS born at a time when there were still 
remnants of pioneer days in our section of the 
country. At this interesting time much ol 
the pioneer life was still well known and 
many of the tools, implements, and goods 
were yet in existence. 

I shall never forget a visit I made, when a boy, td 
the home of Elijah Hanson, my step-grandfather, otK 
his farm in Goshen Township, Belmont County, Ohio. 
All their children were married, and he and step- 
grandmother, Eliza Hanson, had given the use of their 
large frame house to their son Benjamin and they were 
living in a small house on the farm. It was a one-story 
frame house with three rooms joined end to end. In^ 
the first room and in the end of the house was an open 
fireplace, which would take wood about four feet long. 
This room was used as a living-room and as a kitchen.j 

In 
304 



|\ Pion eer Supper 305 

'n it were several chairs, a stand, a cupboard, a table, 
,ind the bed which they used. The next room was a 
ipare room with two beds. The third was a store room. 

Their life here was simple, even primitive. They 
ised many pieces of furniture and utensils that were 
;imilar to those used by their parents in pioneer days. 
)ome of the household articles were the same ones that 
:heir ancestors had handed down to them. It was cold 
veather, but grandfather had a big wood-fire in the 
ireplace and as night came on there was plenty of 
ight and cheer, but only on one side, as the corners 
vere dark and cold and there were chills around the 
pine. It seemed one was never warm all over at once. 

After a little while, when the fire had burned down 
nd there were plenty of hot coals, grandmother lighted 

tallow candle, with a splinter, at the fire, and pro- 
Seeded to make biscuit. She cut them and placed a 
ayer of them in the bottom of the old-fashioned baking 
ikillet. Grandfather shoved the "fore stick" back and 
[aked some hot coals forward and set the baker with 
In iron cover on it on them, then he raked some more 
oals, banking them up around it and on the lid. 
rrandmother got a "crock" of sausage, made some 
akes, placed them in another skillet, and grandfather 
ut it also on some hot coals. 

The coffee was now put in the big tin coffee pot, and 
randfather, swinging out the crane, hung the pot on 
ne of the iron hooks, then pushed the crane back so 
nat the pot would hang over the remainder of the fire, 
oon it was boiling and set off on the hearth, and an 
on teakettle of water put on to heat for dishwashing, 
frandmother set the table and put on butter and jam. 

he sausage, "all pork," was browned, turned and 
; taken 



306 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton 




OPEN FIREPLACE WITH CRANE 

In the home of Hezekiah and Elizabeth (Bundy) Bailey. 
Built about 1848. 

taken up and real gravy made in the skillet. Soot 
everything was ready and grandfather and I wen 
asked to ''draw up our chairs." The biscuits weri: 
taken from the baker nicely browned and cracked oper 
"way deep" and the coffee poured "piping hot." 
think I had been getting more hungry every minutt; 
since grandmother began to make the biscuit, and th( 
fragrant odor of the sausage with "sage" in it only mad( 
matters worse. 

Such a supper! The biscuit and gravy disappearec 
and the sausage followed suit, with never a thought oi 
headache or indigestion. Supper over, grandfathei 
put more wood on the fire. Grandmother soon hac 
the dishes washed and the simple cooking things put 

in 



\ Pioneer Supper 



307 



n order and had sat down to knit. Grandfather talked 

i)ver some of the old days and lapsed into silence as the 

fire burned low. 

Now it was bedtime and the same candle lighted 

ne to the next room. There was no heat, but a great, 

;iigh feather bed. No ceremony about undressing in 

,his cold room, only a scramble to get up and in. 

Vhat a fine bed! The feathers came up on both sides 

nd the covers seemed to lie straight across. Only a 

linute until I was good and warm and then dreamless 

leep. 

W. H. S. 





CANDLESTICK WITH EXTINGUISHER AND 
SNUFFER 

Formerly in the home of Demsey Bundy. 



PIONEER FOODS AND THEIR PREPARATIOl 



ABOUT the time the State of Ohio wH 
admitted to the Union our forefathers cam 
from North Carolina to hew out their home 
in the unbroken forest of this new state 
They built their houses of logs, sometime 
hewn logs, but more often of the round timbers jus 
as they were cut from the forest trees. 

All around their homes there grew in abundanc 
wild grapes, raspberries, plums, gooseberries and crab 
apples, all of which made excellent dishes whei 
properly cooked. These were used and enjoyed b; 
our ancestors not only while in season, but were pre 
served and dried by them for winter use. 

In the course of fifty or sixty years splendid orchard 
of peaches, apples and many other fruits were growr, 
These fruits were also put away for winter use, some 
times by preserving, but more often by drying in th 
sun. Apples were cut in quarters, strung in Ion 
strings, and hung on a rack suspended from the ceij: 
ing or hung on pegs that jutted around the large opeh 
fireplace. 



I 



308 



Pioneer Foods 309 

It was the custom in those early days to invite the 
neighbors to the various homes, and while the men 
gathered, cut and hauled many cords of wood, the 
women pared, cut and strung apples to be dried. 
These parties were known as "a wood hauling and an 
apple paring." 

The log houses in these early days were all built 
with large fireplaces and the cooking was done over 
or by these open wood-fires. From the wall of the 
fireplace extended an iron crane upon which hung 
hooks and chains. The cooking pots were suspended 
by these over the fire. Meats were broiled or fried 
and the coffee boiled by drawing a mass of red-hot 
coals out on to the stone or earthen hearth and placing 
the cooking utensil on this red-hot bed. 

To bake bread the "Dutch oven" was placed upon 
one of these beds of hot coals, the dough put into the 
oven and an iron lid placed over it, then live coals 
Keaped upon the lid. If the first coals brought out 
3n to the hearth or put on top the oven died out before 
[the bread was sufficiently baked, more coals were 
[brought from the fire with a long-handled shovel. 

The griddle for pancake baking was a round, flat 
ron over twelve inches in diameter with short legs 
ind a long bale with a hook and a swivel so the cakes 
ould be turned and evenly baked. 

The "Dutch oven" above mentioned was of iron 
ibout twelve inches in diameter and four inches deep. 
There was another oven which was also often called 
I "Dutch oven " or an "out-oven," or sometimes it 
Vas called a "clay oven." This oven was generally 
ised for baking bread, pie and cake. It was built 
)f stone or sometimes of brick and clay, either in one 

corner 



310 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



corner of the house or out of doors. Ovens of this 
type are in use by some bakers today and occasionally; 
one is found in a private home. This kind of oven 
is made very hot by building a fire in the oven itself, 
and when sufficiently hot, the coals are drawn out 
and the bread and pastry put in to bake. 

Mary C. (Bundy) Smith. 




THE OUTSIDE OVEN 

None could be found about our old home in Ohio, but there are many in Eastern 

Pennsylvania; seldom used now, however. 

Upper rigSt — One photographed in Los Andes, Chili, S. A., 1912, by W. H. S. 

Lower left— Back view of another type, showing the shape and the "squirrel tail" flue. 

Lower right — Another type, of which the owner says: "I've baked many a hundred loaves 

OF bread in that old oven." 

The Chili oven more nearly represents the oven built and used 

BY the pioneers IN OhIO. 




■^ 



>^ 




K 



^ 



^5 



K^...y^^^^'^^-^csi''-*'f^cy^i^:,<^ 



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NATHAN AND ANNA STANTON BUNDY 

Anna Stanton Bundy, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
Stanton, was born at the old Stanton home a tew miles north 
of Barnesville, Ohio, on Stillwater Creek, Eighth month 
Eighth, 1837. On the thirtieth day of the Third month, 
1859, she was married to Nathan Bundy, son of Ezekiel and 
Maria Bundy. He was born Eighth month Twent)--second, 
1837, at the old Bundy home about three miles east of Barnes- 
ville. 

The following article was written by their daughter, Mary 
Bundy Colpitts, Eighth month Twenty-fourth, 1919. 

ATHER and Mother were both educated at 
the Friends' School near Stillwater Meeting 
House and at Mount Pleasant, Ohio, Boarding 
School. Father also attended Westtown 
School, Westtown Pennsylvania. It is said by 
those who knew mother in her girlhood days that she 
was of an unusually gay and happy temperament, enjoy- 
ing to the fullest the innocent pleasures of life. Father 
was a great student and lover of knowledge. At one 
time he was a surveyor, laying out the Barnesville and 
Somerton Pikes; the Warnock and St. Clairsville Pike; 
the plot of the Southern Cemetery at Barnesville, and 
much other work ot the kind. He was an enthusiastic 
member of the Masonic Lodge, living according to the 
high principles for which it stands, a true Christian, 

unselhsh, 
311 




312 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




HOME OF ANNA STANTON BUNDY 

Built by William Hoyle. 

unselfish, loving his fellow men to the extent that he 
was sometimes the loser in this world. 

Father and Mother lived for a short time on Sandy 
Ridge in what was probably the first house built by 
Henry Doudna, for his home. When Grandmother 
Stanton died, they moved back to the old home. Here 
the following children were born to them: Joseph S. 
(1-19-1860); Caleb L. (12-12-1862); Mary M. {1-1- 
1864); and some years later, while living in Barnes- 
ville, Clara Elma (11-7-1871). Clara died at about 
eighteen months. 

In 1865 we moved to the edge of Barnesville, where 
my father and his cousin, Chalkley Dawson, put down , 
a coal shaft, which they operated for a few years. 
About 1870 we moved up on East Main Street when 
Father purchased a men's tailoring store. Not long 
after this his health began to fail. From young man- 
hood 



Nathan and Anna Stanton Bundy 



313 




CUPS AND SAUCERS 

Left — Mary P. (Hodgin) Stanton's. 

Right — Her mother's (Elizabeth Hodgin). Probably brought frou Georgia by 

Stephen Hodgin. These were so much admired by Anna Stanton Bundy that 

Stephen Hodgin gave her the set after his wife's death. 



hood he had not been strong. In the fall of 1873 he 
went to Oregon, thinking that the change to that 
climate might be of benefit to one with lung trouble. 
It was only a temporary relief. While he was gone, 
Mother took us to the country to the home of her 
brother, Eli Stanton. Uncle Eli did so much for us 
then and a few years later. His was a home to which 
we always loved to go and in childhood we spent many 
happy hours there. Father returned in the spring 
and we went back to our home, but his health con- 
tinued to fail until late in the summer of 1874 he passed 
quietly away at the age of thirty-seven. 

Mother took us then to her sister's, Elizabeth Stan- 
ton Bailey. Uncle Lin and Aunt Lizzie were so good 
to us. We lived with them that winter and in the 
spring purchased a little home near them and close to 
Tacoma Station, near also to Uncle Will Stanton's. 

We children went to District School No. 2, and each 
in turn taught there for a short time. We each attended 
Barnesville School and Lebanon, Ohio, Normal School. 
Joseph also attended Normal School at Valparaiso, 
Indiana. 

I He was an apt and studious scholar. Being the 
pldest, he soon developed manly traits, influencing and 

encouraging 



314 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

encouraging us so much for the good. Deprived of a 
father at the age of fifteen, he was the comfort and 
pride of a noble mother and loving brother and sister. 
After he had taught in Barnesville a year he wanted 
us to move back there. So we rented the William 
Hoyle property on South Lincoln Avenue and moved 
there the Spring of 1883. A few years later, Mother 
purchased this property and lived there the remainder 
of her life. Brother Joseph as a teacher was very 
successful, winning the hearts of his pupils by his 
kindly nature, generosity and forbearance. He taught 
several terms at No. 1 School and from 1880 to 1884 
he taught in Barnesville High School. Later in the 
year 1884 he entered into a partnership with T. W. 
Emerson, for the purpose of furnishing abstracts of 
titles of Belmont County lands. At the same time, he 
attended to considerable surveying, which occupation 
he had followed for some time. He was Deputy County 
Surveyor at the time of his death. Stricken with 
typhoid fever when twenty-five years old, at the very 
beginning of a useful and prosperous life, his death i 
seemed doubly sad. About two weeks before he came 
home from St. Clairsville, where he was engaged in 
business, he expressed a firm belief in the Christian 
religion and was willing to answer the call. His life was 
above reproach. Firm in purpose, always guided by a 
clear conscience, he set an example which others might 
well follow, thus illustrating "It is not how long, but 
how well we live." 

My brother, Caleb L. Bundy, after teaching for a 
short time in our home district, decided to study teleg- 
raphy. About 1882 he went to Paralto, Iowa, where 
he studied with *'Cade" Plummet. After holding posi-i 
tions as operator in various parts of the West, he was 

located ; 



Nathan and Anna Stanton Bundy 



315 



located at Sabula, Iowa, as operator and agent at the 
"Y," a responsible position. There he was married in 
1890 to Miss Kate Snyder, a popular and worthy 
young lady of that place. She was so well suited to 
fight life's battles with him, but alas! in a little less 
than a year their happy home was broken up. He was 
taken with typhoid pneumonia and lived only a few 
weeks, passing away at the early age of twenty-eight 
years. Mother was with him. She had gone West for 
an extended visit about two months before, expecting 
to spend the winter with them. His was a character 
of worth, delighting in doing well that which he saw 
as his duty, and at all times ready to help a weaker 
brother, leaving all things to Him who is the just 
rewarder of good deeds. 

Cale's wife came back and lived with us for a few 
years and was a great comfort to Mother. In the sad 
days that followed, her little grandson, my only son, 
who was then a babe of a few months, helped to occupy 

her 









PEACOCK FEATHER BRUSH 

Bought by Joseph S. Bundy for use in his mother's houe and now in- possession 
( of his sister, Mary M. Colpitis. These brushes were in common use in 1875 for 

KEEPING flies from THE DINING TABLE. ThIS ONE WAS MADE BY AbBY KeNNARD. 



316 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




WOODEN BUTTER BOWL 

Given to Ajjna Stanton Bundy by her mother with the understanding that 

HER ownership CEASED IF SHE DID NOT KEEP THE BOWL SCOURED. ShE OWNED 
AND USED THE BOWL THE REST OF HER LIFE. 

her mind and alleviate her sorrow. Her home was with 
us. My husband, John Colpitts, was as good and kind 
to her as an own son could be, taking pleasure in 
making her happy. 

Mother's friends were numerous. To her 

"No life is so strong and complete 
But it yearns for the smile of a friend." 

Our friends she was able to make her friends. Her 
relatives were very dear to her. "To love and to be 
loved is the greatest happiness of existence" to her 
especially was true. She was good company, having a 
gift of humor. Not being a good sleeper, she complained 
of lying awake many hours in the night, but she would 
get sleepy early in the evening. One evening after 
trying in vain to keep awake, she suddenly arose from 
her chair and said, "I'll go to bed, I know I can keep 
awake there." Many times she had a witty answer 
ready in conversation. A great lover of flowers, she 
spent ma-ny happy hours in her flower garden. An- 
other interest was in the culinary department. Some- 
times she surprised us with new dishes, or she would 
slip quietly to the kitchen and in a short time ask us 
out to a nice meal with such delicious, flaky, hot 

biscuits, 



Nathan and Anna Stanton Bundv 



317 




QUILT PIECED BY ANNA STANTON BUNDY 

Made about 1890 from Mary P. (Bundy) Stanton's dresses. Now 

IN THE possession OF SaRAH B. (StANTON) HaLL. 



biscuits, along with other good things. She enjoyed 
these Httle surprises as much as any one. She was able 
to do this up to within a year or two of her death. It 
was her pleasure to have some interesting work to fill 
the spare moments. Sometimes it was knitting or 

crochet, 



a chair from the 
first set with which 
Nathan and Anna 
Stanton Bundy began 

HOUSEKEEPING. ElI 

lAND Mary P. Stanton, 
! William and Jane D. 
iStanton, and Caleb 
AND Deborah U . 




Bl'NDV ALL BEGAN 
WITH THE SAME KIND 
OF CHAIRS. AND NOW, 
AFTER SIXTY YE.VRS OF 
USE, THERE ARE M.\XY 
OF THE CHAIRS WHICH 
ARE IN VSE AND AL- 
MOST AS good AS 
WHEN NEW. 



318 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

crochet, and many times piecing quilts. Of late years 
she pieced many quilts for the Needlework Guild, of 
which she was a director and very much interested 
member. She was never so happy as when doing some- 
thing for someone who needed her help. 

Her last sorrow, and in a way her greatest, because 
she was older and less able to bear it, was the passing 
from earth of her only grandson, Clifford B. Colpitts, 
on Ninth month Fifth, 1911, from tubercular menin- 
gitis. His life was a short period of twenty-one years. 
He had been in Cleveland, Ohio, where his aunts, the 
Misses Colpitts, had a millinery store. He was em- 
ployed by Pike, Richmond & Company, a wholesale 
millinery firm, as city salesman. By pleasing and 
courteous manner and uprightness he was making a 
great success. He was a member of the First M. E. 
Church, joining when a child with his parents. We 
are speechless when we think that one so young and fair 
and so much wanted and needed to brighten up a little 
corner of this sad earth, has gone. Where are these 
loved ones? 

"I know not where His islands lift 
Their fronded palms in air; 
I only know I cannot drift 
Beyond His love and care." 

Mother's grief was pitiful; even in her last years she 
was not to escape sorrow. It was not long after this 
great blow until she began to decline. She had been 
afflicted with asthma for many years. This caused 
heart trouble, and although she had been in poor health 
for two years, she did not become worse until within 
two weeks of her death, which occurred Tenth month 
Fifth, 1917. She was eighty years of age. In the fall 
time, when the flowers she loved so well lay down to 

sleep, 



I 

Nathan and Anna Stanton Bundy 319 

sleep, she passed to the Great Beyond, and we laid her 
to rest in the Southern Cemetery, at Barnesville, be- 
side her loved ones. 

A lifelong member of the Society of Friends, she 
lived a life of simplicity, never wavering in her faith 
and striving to make each year of her long life more 
useful than the ones that had gone before. It was a 
pleasure to make her comfortable and happy. To me 
she was not only a mother — who in her patience and 
loveliness forgave so promptly all our errors — but 
many times filling the place of a sister. 

"Mother! We all have known her. Not all of us in 
the same person, but the same glory framed each sepa- 
rate face in the aureole of its own divinity." 

"Because thy loving kindness is better than life, my 
lips shall praise thee." Psahn 63 : 3. 

Ohio, Ma^ (JJa^.^cUi S(ri//uMl^ 

1919. 



d 



320 



Our Ancestors — The Stanto 




WATER PITCHER 

From a set of dishes in the home of Ezekiel Bundy. 

The dishes were used at the double wedding dinner 

ofJNathan Bundy and Anna Stanton and Caleb Bundy 

AND Deborah Hanson. Married 3-30-1859. 



Waiters at the Marriage of 



Nathan Bundy 

and 
Anna Stanton 



1st Hosea Dondna 

Hannah Clendenon 
2nd Chalkley Dawson 

Martha Garretson 
3rd WilHam Stanton 

Eunice Doudna 



Waiters at the Marriage of 

1st 



Caleb Bundy 

and 
Deborah Hanson 



Robert Smith 
Rebecca Stanton 

2nd William Hodgin 
Lydia Hanson 

3rd William E. Bundy 
Rebecca Doudna 



THE SONG OF THE COOKIES 



Written by William Macy Stanton for his Aunt's (Anna 

Stanton Bundy) Birthday, Eighth month Eighth, 

1910. 



Poets may sing of the babbling brook, 

Or the blue of the summer sky, 
Or even more of the tempting look 

Of the crust of a country pie; 
But this one song do I prefer, — 

A song so dear to me, — 
Which now is sung alone for her 

Who today is seventy-three. 





Others may sing of golden curls, 

And eyes of tempting blue. 
Or the graceful forms of charming girls, 

Or drops of sparkling dew; 
But in my mind the Muses stir 

To life a song so free, 
A song of cookies baked by her 

Who today is seventy-three. 




Each cooky's crust of brown was spread 

With sugar sprinkled fine; 
And O more sweet than daily bread, 

Those cookies that were mine! 
Oft in my memory does recur 

Those cookies baked lor me, — 
The cookies rolled and baked by her 

Who today is seven tv-three. 

The 



322 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




The taste was sweet, but sweeter yet 

The thought she always had; 
For why should not an aunt forget 

What pleased a little lad? 
Some pleasure though it did incur 

For some one else but me 
Which twinkled in the eyes of her 

Who today is seventy-three. 




Lansdowne, 

Pennsylvania^ 

1910. 



So from my heart I sing this song 

For one to me so dear, 
Who helped my youthful days along 

With cookies and good cheer. 
And now to wish as I prefer, 

I wish that there may be 
Still many happy years for her 

Who today is seventy-three. 



Il 



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WILLIAM AND JANE DAVIS STANTON 



w 



ILLIAM STANTON, son of Joseph and 
Mary (Hodgin) Stanton, was born Ninth 
month Fifteenth, 1839, in their Stillwater 
Creek home in Belmont County, Ohio. He 
was always a great lover of nature. As a boy 
he enjoyed fishing and hunting squirrels and rabbits, and 
he continued to be a good marksman as long as he could 
manage a gun. His business likewise showed the nature 
lover— nurseries, fruit growing, farming, and some dairy- 
ing. The fruit was always carefully, even fondly, 
picked and packed, and his rare trees were admired by 
all who saw them. As an active member ot the State 
Horticultural Society, he traveled to all parts of the 
State to attend the meetings. A close observer of 
atmospheric conditions made him a good weather- 
prophet. His wife, who depended upon his judgment 
in this matter, never had to take her clothes from the 
line on account of rain. He could tell fairly accurately 
the time of day by the position of the shadows ot the 
ihouse or trees. 

When a boy he walked two miles to school and 
njoyed watching the building of the first railroad — the 

Baltimore 

323 



324 



Our Axcestors — The Staxtovs' 




THE RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM AND JANE 
DAVIS ST.\NTON 

Built by Francis Davis. 




VIEW OF STILLWATER VALLEY 

From the home of William and Jane Davis Stanton, showing the 
roRMER home of Eli Hodgin and the location of Joseph Stanton's 

HOME. 



William and Jane Davis Stanton 325 

Baltimore and Ohio — to pass through that part of the 
State. When the station was opened at Tacoma, he 
I was appointed the first Station Agent and Postmaster, 
' which offices he held for nearly twenty years. 

Mathematics was one of his strong points. Excep- 
I tional ability in that line enabled him to solve intricate 
i problems without pencil or paper while conversation 
I was going on about him, in which he often took part. 
I He used many of the "short cuts," which have only 
recently been introduced into our schools. 

Delicate and frail all his life, he was gentle and 
loving and beloved. He was an active member of the 
Society of Friends, serving as clerk of the meetings for 
about twenty years and for many years an Elder in 
Stillwater Monthly Meeting, of which he was a life- 
long member. 

Until the death of his wife he lived within sight of 
the place where he was born. Then at the age of sixty- 
eight he went to live with his married daughter, Anna 
Stanton Palmer, at Westtown, Pennsylvania, where he 
attended the meetings for worship at the School. 

He passed quietly away Fifth month Fifth, 1918, in 
his seventy-ninth year. His remains were laid beside 
his wife's in Stillwater Burying Ground, near Barnes- 
ville, Ohio. 

Soon after his death, George L. Jones, Principal of 
Westtown School and a minister, spoke of him in their 
neeting. It was a fitting tribute, and as nearly as 
:ould be remembered at the close of meeting, what he 
iaid follows: 

"There has recently been called from our midst one 
jvho was perhaps unknown to many of us, except as 
ve saw him in our meetings. He came here and sat 

down 



326 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

down quietly amongst us, but he had a real influence 
upon us. I feel that in a measure the words of our 
Saviour said of himself, apply to our aged friend, 'If I 
go not away, the Comforter will not come.' And so, 
though we will never again see him walk slowly into 
this room, never again have his kindly smile and his 
friendly handshake, he is here in spirit with us today- 
And as we gather here from time to time, we will feel 
his spirit as a benediction resting upon us. As we go 
to visit in the home where he lived and took such a 
keen interest in all that went on about him, we shall 
feel his spirit there as a benediction upon it and upon 
us, pointing us the way to higher things." 

Jane Davis Stanton, daughter of Francis and Mary 
Davis, was born Seventh month Fifteenth, 1846, at 
Flushing, Ohio. She attended both Mount Pleasant 
and Westtown Boarding Schools, and many of the 
friendships formed while at these schools were life- 
long. She was a beautiful girl, with black hair, fair 
skin, delicate coloring, and regular features. She had 
a strong character and stood up for the right as she 
saw it, in spite of popular opinion. She was a devoted 
wife and mother, doing all a woman could for her 
delicate husband and large family of children. 

Even though she had a large family, she was never 
too busy to minister to those about her. Her reputa- 
tion for skill with babies was known for miles around 
and she had frequent calls, day and night, to come to 
a sick child. Her family physician said to his patients 
when a child was sick, "Better send for Mrs. Stanton, 
she knows more about babies than I do." She did 
not limit her ministrations to babies, however, but was 
always ready to lend a helping hand to any who needed 
it, whether white, foreign, or colored. There were 

whole 



William and Jane Davis Stanton 



327 




JANE S. DAVIS 

Taken while a student at 
Westtown Boarding School. 

whole families she looked out for for years, visiting 
them often, especially in the fall to see that they had 
what was needed for the winter. 

Her guild garments were often boys' pants. "Be- 
cause," she said, "others won't want to make them and 
the boys will need them." This was characteristic of 
her, never sparing herself, but doing what others did 
not want to do. She was particularly fond of boys 
and doing for them was a pleasure to her. 

Her heart was greater than her strength and at sixty- 
three her health began to fail. Soon after the begin- 
ning of the year 1910 she left home and came to 
Philadelphia for treatment. While here she was taken 

suddenlv 



328 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

suddenly ill and, after five days, died Third month 
Eighth, at her daughter's, Anna Stanton Palmer's, at 
Westtown, Pennsylvania. Her remains were taken back 
to Stillwater for burial, where they were laid beside 
those of her four children who had preceded her to the 
Land Beyond. She had expressed the hope that she 
might not outlive her day of usefulness. This wish 
was granted her, for she was active and doing for 
others until within a few weeks of her death. 

When Jane was quite a young girl, her parents 
moved to Sandy Ridge, in the Stillwater neighborhood, 
where her father became active in the business inter- 
ests of Barnesville, serving as president of the First 
National Bank of that place, and later took part in 
building construction. He superintended the building, 
in 1875, of Friends' Boarding School, near Barnesville, 
Ohio; Friends' Meeting House, at Stillwater, in 1878, 
and the Belmont County Children's Home, and lastly j 
a large residence for himself at Tacoma, Ohio. 

It was while living in the Sandy Ridge home that a 
young man called to see her brother John. He was 
not at home and Jane entertained William Stanton on 
the porch until John returned, thus meeting for the 
first time the man she married on First month Twenty- 
seventh, 1864. On her wedding day she was dressed 
in an ashes-of-roses silk dress, white silk bonnet, and 
white kid gloves. He wore a broadcloth coat, velvet 
vest, and high silk hat. Then, as now, emergencies 
had to be met at the last moment. William had 
depended upon a Barnesville merchant to get his gloves 
in Philadelphia. The time came for the marriage, but 
the gloves did not come, and he had to wear a pair of 
Jane's black kid ones. That morning it was also dis- 
covered that the man who was to have been first 

waiter, 



William and Jane Davis Stantont 



329 



waiter, Seth Shaw, had developed measles during the 
night. 

They went to housekeeping about a half mile south 
of his birthplace. Jane Stanton's brother, John Davis, 
and his wife occupied half of the house. These two 
young married couples had lively times. One after- 
noon the girls went visiting and thought their hus- 
bands would come for them. It grew late afternoon 
and no sign of the men, so they walked home and then 
decided to play a joke on their husbands by hiding 
and not letting them know of their arrival. The men 
did the milking, came to the house, and not finding 
their wives decided to play a joke on them, and forth- 
with strained the milk into small bowls and cups and 
left them on the kitchen table. In the morning the 

girls 




VIEW OF STILLWATER VALLEY 

The house in which Wiluam aot Jane Davis Stanton started housekeeping 

IS SHOWN IN THE FOREGROUND. The ARROW INDICATES THE LOCATION OF THE 
HOUSE IN WHICH WiLUAM SXANTON WAS BORN— THE JOSEPH StaNTON HOVSE 



330 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



I 



girls strolled out of the guest room to surprise their 
husbands and were themselves surprised to find the 
milk. 

The summer after they were married, William 
Stanton had a serious case of typhoid fever and was 
never very strong afterwards. He measured about 
five feet, ten inches and weighed one hundred and ten 
pounds. After living a few years in this valley home, 
they moved up on the hill where they lived in an old 
brick house, near the present Tacoma Station, until 
their family outgrew it about ten years later. From 
there they moved to a frame house only a few hundred 
yards away. In 1891, soon after the death of her father, 
they gave up their home and moved into the house 
he had built in order that they might care for her 
mother. This large house was in proportion to their 
hospitality and they entertained a great deal, especially 
at Ohio Yearly Meeting time when they have had as 
many as thirty-seven persons over night and to break- 
fast. 

Shortly before Jane Stanton's death, plans were 
made to close the Tacoma home and move to Phila- 
delphia, because all their children had interests in this 
vicinity. A house was already rented in Lansdowne 
at the time of her sudden death. So the plans were 
promptly carried out, and all their possessions except 
some household goods were disposed of. The next 
day, after they left Ohio, the Boarding School took 
possession of the place in order to continue school for ( 
the rest of that session. The School building was 
burned Third month Thirty-first, 1910. 

To William and Jane D. Stanton eleven children 
were born: 

Eva T. (7-25-1868). She was a delicate child, 

slight 



William and Jane Davis Stant on 231 

slight and dainty, but precocious. After completing 
her education, she remained at home, to aid her mother 
in rearing her large family. In 1898 she came to Phila- 
delphia and was still here at the time of her mother's 
death in 1910. Then she made a home for the family 
in Lansdowne and generally took her mother's place. 
Now she has her own home in Lansdowne. Following 
the example of her parents, she is an active member of 
the Society of Friends, having her membership at 
Fourth and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, where she 
serves on many committees. She also takes an active 
I interest in charitable organizations. She is a member 
rof the Board of Managers for Aimwell School and has 
ij been for ten years on the Board for the Shelter for 
Colored Orphans. In 1897 she attended a reunion in 
Steubenville, Ohio, the birthplace of Edwin M. Stanton, 
and was the only person there whose name was then 
Stanton. 

Mary Davis (4-24-1870). This second daughter's 
life on earth was a short one. At fourteen she was 
taken with typhoid fever and lived but a few days. 
She died Tenth month Fourth, 1884, and was buried at 
Stillwater. The last term she was at school she thor- 
oughly enjoyed her work in Botany, tracing more than 
one hundred flowers. 

Joseph E. (8-26-1872). He learned the nursery 
business from his father and followed that line of work 
after coming to Philadelphia. Of later years he has 
been connected with Westtown School, where he has 
aided in the direction of the mechanical upkeep and 
running of the school property. He is a well informed 
man, always having been a great reader. In 1900 he 
I attended the Paris Exposition with his cousin Edmund 
C. Stanton. 



Fra 



ncis 



332 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Francis Wilson (4-5-1875). This unusual child had, 
like his father, marked mathematical ability, but his 
span of years was even shorter than his sister Mary's. 
When only eleven he, too, had typhoid fever, but 
apparently recovered and went to spend the day with 
his cousin Nate Stanton. They had been playing 
marbles in an upstairs room, and decided to go out- 
side for some air. They went down and just as Francis 
reached the front door he fell over dead. Thus on 
Eighth month Eighth, 1886, he suddenly left his loved 
ones. He was laid beside his sister. 

John Lindley (4-17-1877). Lin was a popular 
young man and a great lover of horses. He had them 
beautifully trained and could manage even the most 
spirited. He took great pride in a noble black stallion 
which he owned. No one else could manage "Sandy." 
His horses all knew him and loved him. A fine looking 
young man, tall, well built, and strong, he seemed the 
staff upon which his parents could lean as they grew 
older. But, alas! at twenty, with the brightest of 
prospects for the future, he was suddenly called from 
them Third month Twentieth, 1897, after a short 
illness from la grippe. His mother never ceased to 
mourn for this son. 

Benjamin (3-16-1879). He lived but five days. 
His death on Third month Twenty-first, 1879, was the 
first break in the family circle. 

"No little child has ever come from God and stayed 
a brief while in some human home — to return to the 
Father — without making glad that home and leaving 
behind some trace of heaven. A family had counted 
themselves poorer without * * * * ^h^t soft 
touch, that sudden smile. This short visit was not 

an 



William and Jane Davis Stanton 



333 



an accident: it was a benediction. The child de- 
parts, the remembrances, the influence, the associ- 
ations remain." — Ian Maclaren. So it was in this case. 

Elwood Dean (8-20-1880). For twelve years Dean 
has been connected with Westtown School, first as 
Electrician and now as Business Manager. He is tall 
and slight and looks much as his father did at his age. 
His voice and actions are also much the same. He 
was married Seventh month Twenty-eighth, 1909, to 

Esther 




WILLIAM STANTON AND 
EVA STANTON PALMER 

Taken at Westtown, Pa. 



334 



OCK AN(.KS;fjkS — THK S'lANTO.VS 



Ksthcr S. Fawcctt, fjf Salem, (Jhio. They now have 
four (hiughters: Jane Davis (9-27-1910), Sidney Faw- 
cetf rS-8-1912j, Ruth Klizabeth (7-14-1915), and 
Kj.therine iMacy (11 24 1919). 

Anna Clara (4 9 1883). She did secretarial work 
and taught one year at Harnesville School before she 
rn.'irried Charles W. Palmer, of Media, Pennsylvania, 
on Sixth month 'I'wcnty-fifth, 1908. He was for fifteen 
years a teacher at Westtown School and that is where 
they lived until this last year, when they bought a 
farm near there and moved on to it. In 1911 they^ 
traveled in fMirf>pe. N(;w they have two daughters- 
l",va Stanton (6 26 1912), and Mary Anna (10-20-j 
19 M). It was with this daughter that William Stantoni 
made his home after his wife's] 
death and her little girls helped toj 
make the last years of their Grand- 
father's life more cheerful, and his 
influence (;ver them has made them 
l)articularly gentle and thoughtfulJ 
Fxlna Macy and Fllen ]3avis, 
twitis (4-26-1886). Kdna is a grad- 
uate of the University of Penn- 
sylvania and has taught for a num- 
ber of years. I\llen, after studying 
;i! the S(h()()l of Industrial Art, married S. Howard 
Peiinell, ol Lansdowne, Petinsylvania, on Ninth month 
I'oinlli, I'>i5. Ill- is a graduate of the University of 
Peniisyivniiia in Methanieal iMigineering and is em- 
pl<»\((| ii) Phihidelphia. 'I'lu') are living in their new 
home, (lesiL!,ne(l b\' her biolher Macy, in Lansijowne, 
Pennsylv;mi;i. 

William M;iev (') IS ISSS). This youngest child 
was born on his lather's forty-ninth birthda)'. lie was 

a delicate 




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Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




Charles W. Palmer 
Anna Stanton Palmer 
William Stanton 
Jane Davis Stanton 
Jane S. Warner 
Beulahl Palmer 
T. Chalkley Palmer 
H. Jane Palmer 
Eva T. Stanton 
Joseph E. Stanton 
E. Dean Stanton 
Edna M. Stanton 
Ellen D. Stanton 
William Macy Stanton 
Edith L. Palmer 
Walter Palmer 
Louis Palmer 
Anna S. Bundy 
Elizabeth S. Bailey 
Lindley p. Bailey 
Mary Davis 
William C. Davis 
John Colpitts 
Mary B. Colpitts 
Oscar J. Bailey 




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26. Mary' Anna Bailey 

27. Clarence R. Patten 

28. Anna B. Patten 

29. Frederick R. Bundy 

30. Clara B. Bundy- 

31. Alva C. Bailey 

32. Laura E. Bailey 

33. Jesse S. Bailey * 

34. WiLFORD T. Hall 



35. Sarah B. Hall 

36. Seth Shaw 

37. Martha Shaw 

38. Abram Plummer 

39. Mary P. Doudna 

40. James Walton 
4L SiNA Walton 

42. Tabitha S. Davis 

43. William G. Steer 



Louisa Steer 
Elizabeth Pickett 
Henry Palmer, Jr. 
Mary Negus 
Wallace Doudna 
Rose Doudna 
Mary H, Thorpe 
Ethel Blowers 
Florence Hoge 
Lydia Hoge 
Phoebe Steer 
Effie Beymer 
Benjamin J. Thomas 
Esther S. Fawcett 
Thomas Branson 
Rebecca Branson 
Mabel Cameron 
Joseph Henderson 
Sarah Pickett 
Ogden Bracken 
Rachel Bracken 
Elizabeth Davis 
Sarah Bailey 
Helen W. Bell 



Guests at the Wedding Reception of Charles W. and Anna Stanton Palmer, Married 6-^5-1908 



William and Jane Davis Stanton 



335 



a delicate baby, but has developed into a strong man. 
He studied architecture at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, where he took both a bachelor's and master's 
degree. He was traveling in Southern Europe in the 
study of architecture when the war broke out in 1914 
and shortened his trip. He then taught architecture 
at the University of Illinois, and when our country 
entered the war, he taught for a while at the University 
of Pennsylvania and then worked for the Government 
in a shipyard, and later with the Emergency Fleet 
Corporation of the United States Shipping Board, 
where he is still employed. On Ninth month Second, 
1916, he married Edith M. Cope, of Woodbury, New 
Jersey. To them two children have been born: Su- 
sanna Morris (7-23-1917) and William Macy, Jr. (5- 
31-1919). They now live in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. 

All this large family was educated entirely in private 
schools. All who lived to be old enough attended 
school at the "Little Brick" at Stillwater, and Barnes- 
ville Boarding School. Six also attended Westtown 

School 




THE RESIDENCE OF S. HOWARD AND 

ELLEN STANTON PENNELL. 

LANSDOWNE, PA. 



336 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



School and the four youngest are graduates of that 
institution. All are members of the Society of Friends 
and all who are married, married Friends. 

William and Jane Davis Stanton lived happily to- 
gether, surrounded by their children, for forty-six years. 
The last wedding anniversary they celebrated together 
was their forty-fifth. Before the forty-sixth Jane had 
left home for the last time. The following is copied 
from the "Barnesville Enterprise," January, 1909: 

"The forty-fifth Anniversary of the marriage of 
William and Jane D. Stanton will long be pleasantly 
remembered by those who were so kindly entertained 
at their home on the twenty-seventh inst. 

"On 




WILLIAM STANTON AND FAMILY 

Back row — Esther Sidney Stanton, Edith Cope Stanton. William Macy 

Stanton. 
Middle row — Elwood Dean Stanton, Jane Davis Stanton, William Stanton, 
Ruth Elizabeth Stanton, Joseph Eli Stanton, Eva Stanton Palmer, Mary 
Anna Palmer, Samuel Howard Pennell, Ellen Stanton Pennell, Sidney 

Fawcett Stanton. 

Lower row— Edna Macy Stanton. Eva T. Stanton, Anna Stanton Palmer, 

Charles Warner Palmer. 

Photograph taken in 1916. 



VVlLLIAM AND JaNE DaVIS StANTONT 



337 



"On returning from the mid-week religious meeting, 
"hey were surprised to find that a few of their relatives 
md friends had preceded them and were comfortably 
seated in the living-room. Of a large family of chil- 
dren, only the youngest son, Macy, and Edna, one of 
:he twin daughters, are at home at present. 

"The dinner which was soon announced was still 
nore of a surprise. So quietly and cleverly had it been 
nanaged in all its details, as to give no hint that any- 
thing unusual was forthcoming. While most boun- 
|:eous, it was daintily served, and the young people had 
imple reason to believe that their efforts were appre- 
:iated by every one. That the absent children were all 
present in thought was shown in various ways. Remi- 
liscences of days gone by frequently brought up the 
[lames of dear ones long since departed. 

"Upon 




AN OLD HODGIN CHAIR 



It was brought in an ox cart from Georgia to Barnesville, 

Ohio, by Stephen Hodgin in 1803. Now in the possession of 

Joseph E. Stanton. 



338 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton! 



"Upon request the marriage certificate was brougl" 
forth and the names thereon were read. Of the sixt) 
five guests, who signed their names, only twenty wei 
living, and forty-five of the number had died withi 
the forty-five years." 

It is the earnest desire of their surviving childre 
that they may so live as to be a credit to the parent 
who worked and sacrificed for them, and who set thei'' 
such an unquestionable example in uprightness an 
altruism that its attainment is a lofty aim. 

Lansdowne, Edna Macy Stanton. 

Pennsylvania, 

1919 




A FULL-SIZE reproduction OF AN INVITATION TO THE WEDDING 
RECEPTION AFTER THE MARRIAGE OF WILLIAM STANTON AND 
JANE S. DAVIS 




WOOD POPPING 

AS William Stanton sat before the open fire 
in our home at Westtown he was often 
annoyed by the wood "popping" and throw- 
ing sparks out on the carpet. Most people 
are satisfied with the use of a screen to over- 
:ome the difficulty, but in his characteristic wav he 
jet himself the task of finding out a better method than 
:his. By long observation and repeated experiments 
le found that this "popping" always throws the sparks 
:owards the center of the tree. If a split stick is placed 
n the fire with the heart toward the back of the fire- 
place, the sparks will all fly towards the back, and the 
iifiiculty is entirely overcome. 

This seemed such an interesting discovery that I 
lave sought an explanation from one of the professors 
n the Yale School of Forestry and from the head of 
he Botanical Department at the University of Penn- 
ylvania, and I find it is a fact that they did not 
)reviously know, much less could they offer any explana- 
lon. It will remain, therefore, a scientific discovery 
o the credit of a man who throughout a long life 
chooled himself by his deep interest in and his keen 
•bservation of all that went on about him. 

Charles \V. Palmer. 



33 0-A.IlI>IJNr<3^ SClHOOXj. 




REGISTER OF RECITATIONS, 



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A MOUNT PLEASANT REGISTER 

A REPRODUCTION OF A RECORD OF STUDIES OF WlLLIAM StANTON WHILE A STUDENT 

AT Mount Pleasant Boardlng School. 




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A MOUNT PLEASANT REGISTER 

A REPRODUCTION OF A REGISTER OF JaNE DaVIS STAXTON. 




3^ 



PIONEER "SQUIRREL" OR LONG RIFLE AND 
POWDER HORN 

The kind used by William Stanton. 




THREE GENERATIONS 

Elwood Dean Stanton, Jane Davis Stanton, William Stanton. 
Photographed in 1912. 




T was our parents' love which strengthened 
their guiding hands and gave to us a heritage 
upon which our characters formed and grew. 
This parental love in turn dictates the course 
of our own development to build monuments that will 
sing for them their worthy praise and prolong the 
bright and lighting influence of their lives. 




WILLIAM STANTON'S CANES 



T^^"" HE two canes used by William Stanton during 
___^ his later life. The left-hand one was made by 
^^^ John Bundy from a cherry tree that grew in 
his yard in Barnesville, Ohio. The other cane 
was purchased in Rome, Italy, by his son, William 
Macy Stanton, and presented to his father in 1914. 
These canes were very much appreciated because they 
were strong and at the same time very light in weight. 




AN APPRECIATION OF EDNA MACY STANTOl 

Alice Clark Struck, the author of this article, was Edna's 

closest friend. They met while attending Teachers' College, 

Columbia University, New York City. 

T IS indeed with pleasure that I welcom 
this opportunity to testify to the richnes: 
■^ of blessing which has been, and is, min 
through the friendship of that dear one 
Edna Stanton; and yet I undertake to d' 
so with trepidation, for it takes a master-pen to expres 
at all adequately these deeper things of the heart 
while mine is all too halting even in ordinary matters. 

Edna's character, as it was unfolded to me througl 
eight years of close friendship, was a constant sourc( 
of admiration and inspiration. Although she sufferec 
a constant strain upon her physical system througl 
ill health almost all the time I knew her, she neve; 
exhibited irritation or the effects of over-wrough' 
nerves to those about her. She was always sympa- 
thetic toward the troubles of her associates and family 
ready to give unsellishly of her time and energy (almost 
too much so for her own good), yet always hiding 
her own burdens from others and trying to bear them 

as 

U4 



Edna Macy Stanton 345 

as much as possible alone, in so far as mortal help 
was concerned. The last year, when she was so help- 
less and suffering so much, her chief worry was that 
she was causing anxiety and care to the members 
of her family. Her beautiful, pure, unfaltering faith 
was the source of her strength, and she accepted the 
misfortune that came time after time to her, as the 
chastening hand of God. She had much to bear 
that only those of us near to her realized. She shared 
with me, perhaps, more because I was strong and 
had so few worries of my own. She called me her 
"safety valve," because so often when her heart 
cried out for human sympathy it eased the tension 
to write me about it (for six years of our friendship 
we were separated by space but close in love). She 
knew I would understand — we seemed always in such 
perfect sympathy and talked so freely of the sacred, 
deeper things of life concerning which we found our- 
selves in wonderful accord with each other. 

It always grieved me that I could not be nearer 
to Edna physically, to share with her a little ot the 
blessings that came my way. Vain regrets arise to 
mock me now when I think that I might have helped 
her with more frequent letters. Our love and friend- 
ship, however, fiowed on, independent of our letters. 
It is wonderful to have a friend like that. I feel as 
sure that she loves me still, although in that unknown 
land, as I am that my love for her can never ciie. 
I am most grateful to the Author of all blessings for 
this priceless pearl, Edna's love. 

No matter how overwhelming her own troubles, 
Edna always considered others first. The measure 
of unselfishness which was hers was greater by far 
than that found in the average one of us. To be of 

use 



346 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

use or comfort to others, to be of use to Christ in the 
furtherance of His Kingdom, were the guiding desires 
of her Hfe. In her college days she would go out of 
her way time after time to aid others. In her teach- 
ing, her heart and soul were wrapped up in the welfare 
of those under her guidance. Often she wrote me 
in those days of how she was suffering because some 
one of her charges must be punished. I am sure it 
was far more painful to her tender heart (and remem- 
bered longer) than to the youthful victim. It seemed 
as though the very strength of her yearning love 
should hold back the erring girl or boy from the way- 
ward path, but she often felt discouraged — that the 
results were too meager and that it was all in vain. 
The loving Father alone knows what seeds for good 
were planted by her patient hands in those young 
lives. Many testimonials have come from parents 
of former pupils and from pupils themselves telling 
of the good influence she exerted upon their char- 
acters. In the last year and a half, when she was too 
ill to teach regularly, she was able to do quite a good 
deal of tutoring and she also did considerable work 
on this book. It comforted her, too, that she was 
able to knit for the soldiers; sweaters and scarfs, 
helmets and more sweaters her busy fingers turned 
out, and many and many a letter went out to cheer 
the far-away soldier boys of her acquaintance. When 
the war was over, there still were many things she 
found to do for others. I doubt if she was ever idle 
when her strength permitted her to be doing any- 
thing. Her skilful needle made many things of use 
for her family and friends. Her last Christmas gifts 
were all the work of her hands; for months previously 
she had been working on them. I wish I could re- 
member 



Edna Macy Stanton 347 

member how many she said she had made, her love 
going into each stitch. I feel sure no one was left out. 

We cannot omit, in a testimonial of this kind, a 
word about Edna's unusual intellectual ability. Her 
instructors and classmates in secondary school and 
in college and her associates everywhere acknowledged 
her superior reasoning power. Her quick mind traveled 
surely and quickly to the conclusion or heart ol a 
matter, to which the most of us arrived only alter 
slow and arduous work. Not only was she quick in 
seeing through things, but she retained in her memory 
an enormous store of knowledge about many different 
subjects, always ready as needed to bring light to 
bear on some related matter which might come up. 
It was a pleasure for men, as well as for women, to 
converse with her; her quick-wittedness, her sweet 
consideration for others' opinions, her original and 
I deep-probing thought about things made her com- 
Ipanionship valuable to the most keen intellects. 
She won many honors in her school and college work, 
gaining the bachelor's degree at the University of 
Pennsylvania just the spring before her last illness 
ibegan, but a good deal of her finest work went unac- 
knowledged because of her modesty. She was never 
one to thrust herself or her opinions forward, and 
sometimes her work went unrecognized because its 
merit was not noted by the professor whose time and 
attention were monopolized by the more aggressive 
ones. This did not discourage Edna's inciomitable 
spirit, however, but rather spurred her on to further 
I effort. 

I And now I have left the most wonderful thing about 
Edna's personality till the last — at least it seemed to 
me the most wonderful characteristic. That was her 

I, courage, 



348 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

courage, her unsurpassed "grit," to use a common 
but expressive term. She often called to my mind 
the well-known lines, whose authorship I do not know: 

"It is easy enough to be pleasant 

When life flows along like a song; 
But the man worth while is the one who will smile 
When everything goes dead wrong," 

I have seen Edna time after time in college days, ; 
going about her daily work and hiding behind her 
brave smile the suffering and pain from which she 
was so seldom free. Nothing could daunt her ambi- 
tion. It was never the easier path she chose if the 
other offered more opportunity to help or to fit her- 
self for future helpfulness in the world. And the 
tortures she suffered the last years, with teeth and ! 
treatments, operations and weakness! Her attitude 
through it all was expressed in a letter she wrote me 
just before she went to the hospital for the last opera- 
tion. She did not shrink from it, thinking of the 
long time of suffering she had experienced only a feW; 
months before when for weeks following the operation 
she could not stir from the one position, fiat on her 
back in bed. No, her thought was this: "I do not 
dread the pain so much — the thing that worries me 
is that it causes so much anxiety to my family, and 
expense." It eases the grief of our loss to know that 
our dear Edna is now where pain and sorrow cannot 
trouble her, and where, we feel sure, she is reaping 
the reward of her brave struggle while here. The 
thought and infiuence of her love, her beautiful faith, 
her unselfish life and her wonderful courage will con- 
tinue to live on after her in the lives of those who knew 
and loved her. ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 3^^^^^^ 

State College, 

Pennsylvania, 

1921. 



OUR ANCESTORS 

Our sires were filled with souls so free 
That naught could bid them stay; 

No parent ties 

Or counsel wise 
Could bar their westward way. 

They sought the light of virgin lands. 
They longed to live and be 

In nature's home 

Where they could roam 
At will and with their God be free. 

They pushed their way with spirits brave 
Across the sea where they could live 

With fellow-kind, 

Who left behind 
The reign that these restrictions give. 

They paused near the coast of the western land, 
They toiled at the trades they knew, 

They lived in the love 

Of the God above 
And the grace of His servants, too. 

The freedom they found was a lure so strong 
That they faced the unknown west, 
And pushed their way. 
Like the night the day. 
While their souls dreamed of the quest. 

O'er 
349 



350 Our Ancestors — The Stanton: 



* 



O'er mountain and river through forest dark, 
O'er a road with a thousand thrills, j 

By the light of day i 

They led the way 
To a ridge in the Belmont hills. 

Their homes were hewn from the trunks of trees. 
Their food was the hunted game, 

The soil was tilled 

And garners filled, 
And thanks was said in the Master's name. 

They lived and loved in the great out-doors, 
They gave and received their share; 

The life they led, 

As the ancient said 
Was sweet like a breath of heavenly air. 

They lived and gave of life's sweetest dream 
That our lives should be noble and strong; 

So let their memory cling 

As the phantom thing 
That leads us on in the earthly throng. 

But wherever we are or whatever we do 
Let all praise and all credit go 

To the ones who gave 

Of their hearts to save 
Us from the strife it was theirs to know. 

Urbana, ■ William Macy Stanton. 

Illinois^ 

1921. 



FRANCIS AND MARY DAVIS 

F^RANCIS DAVIS, son of John and Ann Spar- 
row Davis, was born on the Ninth of Seventh 
month, 1819, in Belmont County, Ohio, about 
three months after his parents came to this 
country. The parents of John Davis seriously 
objected to their eldest son leaving their comfortable 
home in the north of Ireland, but John and his wife 
being young and ambitious sailed away to America 
and gave up their families and their share of the family 
fortunes. 

When they had been in this country but a few years 
John Davis died and left his young son Francis the 
sole support of his Mother and two sisters. Francis 
Davis thus came face to face early with the stern reali- 
ties of life. He worked hard and denied himself a 
thorough education, never going to school more than 
Ithree months in the year. He was genial, kind-hearted 
iind of a cheerful disposition, winning the admiration 
ind respect of his neighbors. Responsibility thrown 
-ipon him by necessity developed in him sound busi- 
jiess principles and an unusual amount of executive 
ibility. 

At 
351 



352 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




FRANCIS AND MARY DAVIS 



At the age of twenty-one Francis Davis married 
Mary Smith, daughter of Jesse and Anna Smith, of 
Smyrna, Guernsey County, Ohio. Their early married 
Hfe was spent near Flushing, Ohio. Before the rail-, 
road was built Francis Davis did general hauling and 
made regular trips with a six-horse team from Wheel- 
ing, West Virginia, over the old National road to 
Cumberland, Maryland. He had many experiences 

that 



iRANCIS AND MaRV DaVIS 



353 




FRANCIS DAVIS' WATCH AND CASE 

Now IN THE POSSESSION OF EVA T. StANTON. 




THE WORKS OF FRANCIS DAVIS' WATCH 

An OLD-STYLE CASE AND MOVEMENT SHOWINC. THE CROWN WllEEl., CVLINUKR ESCAPE- 
MENT AND THE FUSEE. ThIS CHAIN, WINDING ON A CONICAL DRl'M, WAS ARRANGED TO 
COMPENSATE FOR THE VARYING STRENGTH OF THE MAINSPRING AND THEREBY SECl'RE 
MORE REGULAR RUNNING. THIS WATCH WAS MADE BEFORE THE INVENTION OF DE/\D- 
BEAT ESCAPEMENT. 



354 



Our Ancestors — The Stantoi 



that were characteristic of those trans-mountain tean 
sters, and was well versed in their traditions. 

After a few years they moved to a farm near Barne 
ville, Ohio, and from there he went several times t 
Iowa to take up Government land. He had to tal^ 
the money in gold to pay for the land and I remembti 
seeing the belt into which the money had been sewi] 
This belt was worn around his waist under his clothing 
The land rapidly increased in value and his interest 
were of such proportions that it was often necessary k 
him to go to Iowa, and frequently his wife acconr. 
panied him. I remember hearing him say he had crossei 
the Mississippi River forty-two times. 

At one time he was interested in a planing-mill ii 
Barnesville, and was engaged in the 
wholesale grocery business with Milton 
Lewis. With his business interests thus 
located the family moved to town. 
While living there Francis Davis was 
active in the affairs of the town and was 
President of the First National Bank for 
many years. In 1874 they moved again 
to the country, where building and con- 
tracting claimed part of his time. He 
built the Friends' Boarding School and 
the Stillwater Meeting House. He as- 
sisted with the building of the Belmont 
County Children's Home and acted as its 
superintendent for a few months. 

For almost half a century Francis and 
Mary Davis lived and labored together 
and gave to the community the strength 
that was theirs — serving as they saw and ^^LStoS^' 

understood 



ipRANCIS AND MaRY DaVIS 



355 




A DAVIS-STANTON SECRETARY 

Joel Dawson had this secretary made and used it for a number of ve.\rs. At 

HIS sale it was purchased by Francis Davis, who used it during his lifetime. 

It was then used by Jane Davis Stanton and now is in the possession of 

Ellen Stanton Pennell. 



356 



Our Ancestors — The Stantonj! 



understood and striving ever to brighten the path o] 
their influence — and left a goal set up that has in- 
spired and led forward lives that have followed. Both 
were active members of the Society of Friends. Nine 
children were born to them, only three of whom reachec 
maturity. While they lived on the farm near Barnes- 
ville their daughter Jane became acquainted with Wil- 
liam Stanton, and on the Twenty-seventh of First month 
1864, they were married at Stillwater Meeting, thuj 
connecting two of the prominent families of the com 

munity. 

r J Eva T. Stanton. 

Lansaowne, 

Pennsylvania, 

1921. 




A DAVIS TEA POT 

From the home of Mary (Smith) Davis. It is 
probably from her father's family. 



THE WEDDING CERTIFICATE OF JOHN DAVIS 



Whereas John Davis son of Francis Davis, of Eumiscorthy 
in the County of Wexford, and Elizabeth his wife and Ann Spar- 
row, daughter of WilHam Sparrow, late of Growtown, in said 
County, and Martha his wife, both deceased, having declared 
their intentions of taking each other in marriage, before the 
monthly meeting of Friends, commonly called Quakers of the 
County of Wexford, the proceedings of the said John Davis and 
Ann Sparrow after due enquiry and deliberate consideration 
thereof, were allowed by the said Meeting their intentions having 
been twice published in the Meeting to which they belong, and 
they appearing clear of all others and having consent of parents. 
Now these are to Certify that for the accomplishing of their said 
marriage this Ninth day of the Sixth month in the Year of our 
Lord, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fourteen they the 
said John Davis and Anne Sparrow appeared at a publick Meeting 
for Worship of the aforesaid People in their Meeting House at 
Forest and he the said John Davis taking the said Ann Sparrow 
by the hand, declared as foUoweth: Friends, I take Anne Spar- 
row to be my wife, promising thro Divine assistance to be unto 
her a loving and faithful husband, until death shall separate us 
. . . and the said Anne Sparrow did then and there in the said 
Assembly declare as followeth: Friends, I take John Davis to be 
my husband, promising thro divine assistance, to be unto him a 
loving and faithful wife until death shall separate us and the 
said John Davis, and Anne — as a further confirmation thereof 
did then and there to these presents, set their hands as Husband 
and Wife 

John Davis 
Anne Davis 

and we who were present at said Marriage, have also subscribed 
our names as witnesses thereunto the day and year above written 



Elizabeth Cockarill 
Rebecca GofF 
John Brenam 
Susan Diggin 



Jacob Poole 
John Poole 
Mary Poole 



Margaret (Mar) tin 
Elizabeth Gooch 
Sarah Baker 
Anne Baker 
Mary Sparrow 
Hannah Martin 
Catharine Martin 
Ebin Martin 
Sam'l Martin 
Tane Davis 



Francis Davis 
Deborah Sparrow 
Thos. Sparrow 
Sally Davis 
Margaret Sparrow, Jr. 
Francis Bassett 
Rich'd Poole 
Mary GofF 
Sarah Davis 
Mary Martin, Jun. 
Samuel Davis 
Williams Davis 

Hannah 

Deborah Davis 




THE OTHA FRENCH HOUSE 

Built by Otha French, Sr., about 1844 and occupied by William Stanton 
FROM about 1867 TO 1877. 



n^T was on the front wall of this house that Otha 
French had written in large black letters on 
J a white sign, "Hold on to the Maine law 
forever." It was his admonition for pro- 
hibition, and this proverb, emblazed on his 
dwelling place, was incised on his tombstone. Almost 
seventy years elapsed before the country came to the 
full meaning of his conviction. 



THE CLAY PIKE 



THE clay pike, as it was known, was a state road 
between Zanesville, Ohio, and the Flats of Grave 
Creek, West Virginia, built for the purpose of driving 
stock from the West to the markets of the East. 
The national road could not be used for this purpose 
because the McAdam or stone road made the animals' hoofs 
unfit for travel. 

The clay pike passed through Senecaville, Salesville, Quaker 
City, and Spencer Station in Guernsey County and through 
Barnesville, Tacoma, and Burtons Station in Belmont County. 

The road was sixty-six feet wide and all kinds of stock were 
driven over it, but cattle predominated. In the spring of the 
year the road would become very bad from the cattle ridging 
the mud from side to side of the road between their steps. 

Many of the farmers along the pike made a practice of taking 
care of the droves over night and received a generous remunera- 
tion. Some interesting stories are told of these drovers by the 
people in whose homes they spent the night. An instance I 
have heard my father relate happened at Grandfather Thomas 
Webster's, one mile west of Quaker City. One spring day a 
large drove of mules came along about dark. The "boss" wanted 
to get lodging for the men and animals for the night. He applied 
to grandfather and was assigned a pasture separated from an 
oat field by a good, substantial eight-rail stake-and-ridered fence. 
The boss inspected the fence thoroughly and declared it would 
not turn the mules, so he detailed three of his men to sit on the 
fence and guard the mules all night. 

Another instance happened at the home of John Hall, just 
west of Spencer Station. Among the drovers was a small boy. 
The women, thinking the boy rather timid and backward, had 

taken 

359 



360 



Our Ancestors — The Stantoks 



taken special care to see he was well helped at the table — driving 
gave them all a good appetite. When the pie was passed, the 
boy refused a second piece, the women insisted, and he said, 
"Well, if I stand up, maybe I can eat another piece," and suited 
the action to the word. 

It is related in the History of Belmont County that in 1849 
a drover called at the home of Otha French and asked to 
stay over night. Mr. French put his usual question, "Has any 
of your stock been fed at a still house?" and was answered in the 
negative. The drove was turned in and fed and the hands had 
all washed, ready for supper, which was on the table. Mr. French 
had found out by some means that the hogs, for the greater 
part, had been fattened at the Waverly distilleries. He instantly 
ordered the drove to be taken out of his field and would not let 
even the drover or his men have their supper. 



Columbus^ 

Ohio^ 

1920. 



Willis V. Webster. 





?^ 






I 



^ 




^^ 






LINDLEY PATTERSON AND ELIZABETH 
STANTON BAILEY 




ELIZABETH S. Bx^ILEY, youngest daughter 
of Joseph and Mary Stanton, was born the 
Twenty-fourth of Twelfth month, 1846, on a 
farm a short distance northwest of her 
present home at Tacoma, Ohio. Her Uncle 
i,li Hodgin lived on one side of her home and on the 
)rher side was the home of her Aunt Amy Clendenon. 
VI any happy times did the children ol the three 
amilies have together. Alter a morning or afternoon 
pent at play, when her cousins started home Elizabeth 
vould always "go a piece" with them — "to the 
)eechnut tree" with Aunt Amy's girls and "to the 
pple tree" with LIncle Eli's. Those days ha\e lingered 
i, fresh 



362 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



fresh in her memory and she loves to tell her children 
and her grandchildren of those happy times when 
she was a little girl. 

Grief came early to little Elizabeth, for at the age 
of eleven years her invalid mother died. Her father's 
death followed two years later. Thus, at thirteen 
she was left without parents, but her brothers and 
sisters welcomed her to their firesides and were so 
good to her that she felt she had three homes. Most 
of the time until her marriage was spent with her 
sister Anna, who was always kind and thoughtful 
and helped her to feel less the loss of father and mother. 

She was educated at Friends' Primary School at; 
Stillwater and at Mount Pleasant Boarding School. In' 
those days the rules of boarding-school life were very 
strict. Boys and girls were not allowed to mingle;! 
together. One day Elizabeth and one of her girl 
friends were out in the yard and, seeing some boys 
on the roof, stopped to see what they were doing. 
But, alas, a watchful teacher saw this "misdemeanor" 
and their registers were "marked." She had to explain 
to her sister Anna that her report was marked for 
"looking at the boys." After leaving school Elizabeth 
was invited to attend the wedding of Lindley Bundy 
and Ruanna Frame and to be a "waiter" with Lindley 
P. Bailey, almost a stranger to her at that time. This 
meeting was the beginning of a friendship that resulted 
in their marriage. 

In 1871 she married Lindley Patterson Bailey, born 
Third month Eighth, 1850. He was the third son of 
Jesse and Asenath Bailey. His mother was a minister 
in the Society of Friends. Her life had been full of 
hardships, with very little education, yet she was 

possessed 



■^TNDi.EY Patterson and Elizabeth Staxton Bailev 



36: 




JESSE AND ASENATH BAILEY 

1815-1898 1820-1905 



possessed of a wonderful mind. While on a religious 
\ns\t she spoke to the convicts in Iowa State Prison. 
So feelingly and so forcibly did she speak to those 
'•.in-hardened men, that there was scarcely a dry eye 
•n the room when she finished. She was a woman 
iill of energy and with a bright look ahead, giving 
:o her sons her best in life. Knowing she had missed 
nuch by her lack of school training, she did every- 
thing she could in order that her sons should have as 
i^ood an education as possible. Lindley lived with his 
parents on their farm about four miles east ot Barnes- 
Ville, Ohio, and attended the district school nearby. 
Being a great lover of debate, he was one of the lead- 
' crs in 



364 Our Ancestors — The Stanto 

ers In organizing a debating club where they met ar 
discussed the leading questions of the day. Often 1 
would go out on the farm by himself, get upon 
stump, and speak to an imaginary audience. Th 
practice gave the youthful orator a training that w; 
useful to him in later life. After completing the coun 
at the district school,he attended Mount Pleasant Boan 
ing School for four years, following this with a year i 
Normal School in Barnesville. He then started t 
teach in his home district. 

After their marriage on Seventh month Twent) 
sixth, 1871, they lived for a while in "the weanin? 
house" — a little house on his father's farm. From thii 
home they went to an adjoining farm, where 
worked during the summer and taught school durin 
the winter. While living on this farm their eldest sor 
Edwin M., was born Seventh month Eighteenth, 187^ 
In 1873 they bought a farm of one hundred and six 
teen acres, which proved to be a heavy burden durin 
the financial panic of 1873.^ 

Lindley continued the combination of farming am 
school teaching during the six years that they livec 
on this farm, in which time three children were born; 
Oscar J., Twelfth month Fifth, 1874; Anna, Eightl 
month Sixteenth, 1876; Clara, Sixth month Twenty 
fifth, 1878. 

In 1878 they sold the home and fifty acres of the lane 
and rented a farm near Speidel,Ohio, in 1880 and livec 
there for six years. While in this home their two youngest 

sons 

* The rate of interest was eight to ten per cent., and prices of all farm product! 
rapidly decreased. Wool dropped from sixty cents to twenty cents per pound 
hogs dropped down to two or three cents a pound; cattle, two and a half to four;; 
wheat at fifty cents a bushel; corn, twenty-three to thirty cents a bushel; but-; 
ter, ten to twenty cents a pound. The best horses were selling for one hundred 
dollars or less. 



LiNDLEY Patterson and Elizabe'ih Stantox Bailk^' 365 




THE SQUIRE WHITE LOG HOUSE NEAR SPEIDEL, OHIO 

It was occupied for six years by Lindley P. and Elizabeth S. Bailey. Their 
SONS Alva and Jesse were born in this house. It is known to have been 
standing in 1845. The chimney was of beautifully dressed sandstone. There 

were wood fireplaces on the first and second floors. 

Elizabeth, holding Jesse on the porch, Anna and Clar.\ on the steps, and 

.\lva, with the little wagon. 



sons were born: Alva C, Fourth month Twenty-sixth, 
11880; Jesse S., Fourth month Fifteenth, 1884. 

These years were full ones for the family. Six 
hearty children had to be fed, clothed and sent to 
ischool. The nearest school was over a mile away. 
They were taught to work as well as to play and many 
happy days were spent here. 

While living on this farm Elizabeth had a ver\' 
severe illness. For a few days her condition was 
critical, but she had a mission yet imfilled and 
iwas spared for her family. Dr. Kemp, the tamily 
'physician, attended her. He was a familiar figure 
in those days as he rode along on his old gray horse, 
humming a tune or talking to himselt. Dr. Kemp 
was an unusual character and man>' families owe him 

a debt 



366 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

a debt of gratitude for his services to their loved ones. 

During the year 1883 Lindley engaged in a side 
venture and left the details of the business to a partner, 
only to find himself, as a result, under heavy financial 
obligations. 

In the early spring of 1886 they rented the John 
Bundy farm, containing 181 acres, near Tacoma, Ohio, 
and in 1888 bought it, where they have since made 
their home. The farm having been rented for a 
number of years had lost much fertility and was in 
bad condition when they bought it. The barn 
was good, but the house poor. The kitchen and sitting- 
room chimneys had fallen down and the roof of the: 
kitchen was broken in. Undaunted, they went to 
work to fix things up the best they could. One side: 
of the kitchen roof did not leak. The table stood on 
this side, and with boards hung over the stove to 
keep out the rain, the good wife and mother managed 
to feed her flock until better things came. 

Their children, after finishing at the district school, 
were sent to the Friends' Boarding School at Barnes- 
ville, Ohio. The boys each spent two years there, 
and if they chose they could have later had one year 
at agricultural or business college. 

Elizabeth had a natural liking for cows. She made 
high-class butter, commanding a premium price in the 
village. Lindley had no natural inclination for dairy 
cows, preferring beef cattle and sheep, but he finally 
discovered that Elizabeth's cows brought better returns 
than the other farm interests. James Edgerton, 
a few years before, had imported from Rhode Island 
three registered Jersey cattle, said to be the first 
ever shipped across the Allegheny Mountains. Eliza- 
beth 



LiNDLEY Patterson and Elizabeth Stanton Ba ilev 367 

beth had a great desire to own some, so she persuaded 
Lindley to trade a threshing machine — which he was 
running somewhat against her wishes — for a Jersey 
bull, a cow and a heifer calf. Lindley soon became 
interested in dairying and especially In Jersey cows. 
Elizabeth's children feel they can justly call their 
mother the sponsor of the Jersey cattle interests In 
Ohio. Ohio now ranks highest in number of Jersey 
cattle of all the states In the Union except Texas. 

Elizabeth made a twenty-pound tub of butter and 
sent it to the first National Dairy Show held In Madi- 
son Square Garden, New York City, In 1887, and placed it 
in competition there with over two hundred entries of 
famous New England and Eastern States' dairy butter. 
Lindley attended the show, mingling with the fancy 
buttermakers of the East and getting acquainted 
with their methods, but he did not let them know 
he had butter in the competition. When the awards 
were made, Elizabeth's little tub of butter, made 
on a rented farm in Ohio, came out third best, winning a 
thirty-dollar prize. Since then the farm has exhibited 
dairy products — milk, cream and butter — at nearly 
all the National Dairy Shows, universally winning a 
prize and many times "gold medals" and "First 
Prizes." A Second Prize was won with two thousand 
exhibitors on cream at the Panama-Pacific Exposition, 
1915. The cream, shipped three thousand miles, 
from Ohio, arrived in good condition without re-Icing 
on the way. 

It is conceded now that Belmont Stock Farm, two 
iles east of Barnesvllle, Ohio, holds more medals and 
rand prizes for Dairy Products than any other farm in 
America. There is on this farm of two hundred and fifty 

I acres an average herd of one hundred Registered Jersey 
cattle. 



368 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




THE HOME OF LINDLEY P. AND ELIZABETH STANTON 
BAILEY 

Formerly the home of John and Anna E. Bdndy. The frame addition to the 

house, the dairy barn and numerous other buildings were built by 

Lindley p. Bailey. 

cattle. The three modern dwelHng houses and two large : 
barns are supplied with city water and electricity. Here 
in 1888 was built the first creamery in Belmont County. , 
Cream and milk from the neighboring farms were 
brought in and the creamery was run on the co-opera- 
tive plan. Thus, a dairy interest was started in the 
community that has been gradually developing ever 
since. 

Lindley and Elizabeth adopted new methods when- 
ever they believed them to be helpful to their interests. 
Lindley allied himself with state and national organi- 
zations pertaining to agriculture, livestock and dairy- 
ing. For eight years he was on the directory of the 
American Jersey Cattle Club. He assisted in organiz- 
ing the Ohio State Dairymen's Association in 1894, 
then served as Secretary for six years and as Pres- 
ident for ten years, and is now Honorary President. 
During this time he became active in legislative 
work, often being called to appear before Con- 
gressional Committees in Ohio and Washington, 
D. C, in the interest of agricultural legislation. He 

was 



LiNDLEV Patterson and Elizabeth Stanton Bah.e^' 



369 



was for live years a member of the State Board of 
Agriculture, serving as President in 1907, for five 
years a member of Ohio Live Stock Commission, 
for four years Vice-President of American Dairy 
Farmers' Association, for six years on the Agricultural 
Extension Lecture force of Ohio State University, 
ictive in lecture work for the American Jersey Cattle 
Club, and of the Ohio State Grange, calling him to 
different States of the Union. 

At the Panama-Pacific International Exposition 
leld at San Francisco, California, the summer of 1915, 
i Lindley 




LINDLEY P. AND ELIZABETH STANTON BAILEY AND 
FAMILY 

Top row— Frederick R. Buntjy, Clara Hailey Bi>n)Y, Clarence R. Patten, 

Anna Bailey Patten. 
Center row— Edwin M. Bailey, Lillian D. Bailey. Lindley P. Bailey, Eliza- 
beth Stanton Bailey, Oscar J. Bailey, ^Lvry .\nna Bailey. 
Lower row— Laura E. Bailey, Alva C. Bailey, Lvdia H. Bailey, Jesse S. 
Bailey. 



370 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



Lindley Bailey was one of the Commission chosen to 
have charge of Ohio's exhibition. He, accompanied 
by his wife, spent a month in the Ohio Building on' 
the Exposition grounds. After leaving California 
they spent some time traveling in Oregon, Washington 
and Canada. 

In 1917 Governor Cox of Ohio appointed Lindley 
Bailey Food Commissioner for Belmont County to 
serve during the war. 

He was always Republican in politics, but actuated 
from principle rather than partisanship. While often 
solicited to become a candidate for office, he always 
refused, except twice — he was once a candidate for 
Congress and one time a candidate for Ohio Con- 
stitutional Convention. He was defeated both times. 

In the summer of 1893 their oldest son, Edwin M., 
married Lillian M. Doudna, daughter of Josiah W. 
and Ruth B. Doudna, who lived on an adjoining farm.i 
After their marriage Edwin managed a creamery 
near home, then went to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
where he has become one of the leading milk dealers 
of the city. They have one son, Herbert J. (6-8-1899). 

Oscar J., the second son, married Mary Anna 
Brackin, of Colerain, Ohio, in 1896. To them five 
sons were born: Alfred L. (3-16-1897), Oliver B. 
(6-14-1901), Joseph O. (7-5-1903), Edward F. (1-30- 
1907), Lindley P., Jr. (8-9-1911). In 1914 Mary 
Anna died, leaving a motherless home where five boys 
and their father mourned the loss of one who had 
taken a high place in the hearts of the whole com- 
munity and to whom everyone looked for counsel in 
those things that are high and noble. She was a 
devoted companion and a mother of the choicest 

love 



LiNDLEY Patterson and Elizabeth Stanton Bailkv 




LAVADA S. BAILEY 

love and inspiring confidence for her children, and 
her memory lingers now in their hearts and the heart 
of their parent who has lived to carry on her life- 
giving parental message. 

Three years later Oscar married Sara Lavada Stock- 
dale, of Fairview, Ohio, a graduate of Mt. Union 
College. Oscar has a dairy farm at Tacoma, Ohio. 
In 1919 Alfred married Anna Bundy, of Tacoma, Ohio. 
To them one daughter was born : Dorothy L. (4-7-1920). 

Anna, the eldest daughter, married Clarence R. 
iPatten, of Whittier, Iowa. Their home is now at 
jTacoma, Ohio, where they manufacture Patten's 
Baby Nests. To them three children were born: 
fBertha E. (6-1-1903). Bertha graduated at Friends' 
(Boarding School, Barnesville, Ohio, in 1920, at West- 
itown Boarding School, Westtown, Pennsylvania, in 
" 921. Beulah L. (2-23-1907). Oscar M. (3-20-19(^). 

Clara married Frederick R. Bundy. They have a 
ome at Tacoma, Ohio, where they are giving special 

attention 



372 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

attention to high-class poultry. Two sons came to 
bless their home: Willard L. (4-2-1906), J. Stanton 
(1-28-1911). 

Alva married Laura E. Steer, of Colerain, Ohio, 
in the summer of 1901. To them were born seven 
children: Harmon E. (7-14-1902), Mary E. (9-20- 
1904), Raymond C. (6-28-1907), RoUand A. (6-28- 
1909), David B. (12-29-1912), Nathan C. (9-29-1914),.! 
Ralph W. (2-21-1921). They have a dairy farm near ' 
Fairview, Ohio. [ 

Jesse, the youngest of the family, married Lydia M. ' 
Hoge in 1908. They live with his father and mother, , 
sharing the care and management of the home and li 
farm. They have four children: Elizabeth S., Jr. 
(5-16-1911), Florence E. (6-27-1913), Lester W. 
(11-22-1915), Charles Lloyd (3-20-1918). 

This completes the circle of twenty- two grand- 
children and one great-grandchild. All are ever glad 
to go to Grandfather's and are always sure of a welcome 
there. 

Elizabeth has always been greatly devoted to her 
family interests. System in all things enables her to 
discharge her various duties timely and with ease, 
leaving her time to advise with her family, to have 
sympathy with all and to lend a helping hand to the 
needy. In community affairs she is an active leader; 
her counsel is often sought. Always has she been 
the confidant of her children, helping and guiding 
them in their most intimate affairs. This confidence 
and influence extends to her twenty-two grandchildren. 

^N "Who ran to help me when I fell, 
And would some pretty story tell, 
Or kiss the place to make it well — 
My mother." 

Now, 



LiNDLEV Patterson and Elizabeth Stanton- Baii.ev 



373 



Now, though Lindley and Elizabeth Bailey are past 
seventy years of age, they still have the confidence of the 
family. Never do their children or grandchildren take 
a step of importance without first asking their advice, 
being assured of receiving loving sympathy and sound 
judgment. 

It is a great satisfaction to this couple that their 
children, except Edwin in Pittsburgh, are living near 
them and all have a common business interest. They 
frequently meet together in a family reunion, rejoicing 
as but few families can rejoice. 

Tacoma, Anna Bailey Patten. 

f920. 








A PIONEER LANTERN 

Made of tin and burned a tallow candle. In the hojie 
OF Lindley P. and Elizabeth Stanton Bailey. 



374 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton 




GOLD, SILVER AND BRONZE MEDALS 

Won on dairy products, by L. P. Bailey and Sons, at national and inter-national 
EXPOSITIONS 1907 to 1918 



THE STRAWBERRY REUNIONS 

LONG IN 1900 and for many years after, when the straw- 
berry season was at its height, it was the custom for 
THE Stanton Family connections around Tacoma to hold 
a reunion. The families rotated in giving the enter- 
tainment, BUT THE MENU WAS ALWAYS THE SAME — BeLMONT 

County strawberries and Jersey ice cream. 
The combination was not to be excelled, and the pleasant 
memories of those feasts prompts the writing of this and a long- 
ing for their re-occurrence. 

W. M. S. 




p 



LiNDLEY Patterson and Elizabeth Stanton Bailev 



375 




SILVER CUPS— FIRST PRIZE 

Ohio Dairysten's Association 1907, awarded L. P. Bailey and Sons 

ON MARKET MILK AND MARKET CREAM 




I 




THE CIRCULATING LETTER 

desire to bind MORE CLOSELY TIIK SCATTERING FAMIUES, 

PROMPTED Jane Davis Stantc)n. in 1900, to start a circu- 
lating LETTER THAT CARRIED THE NEWS FROM ONE HOME TO 
ANOTHER IN REGULAR ROTATION. ThE LETTER WAS A WEL- 
COME VISITOR AND ITS READING AROUND THE FAMILY FIRE- 
SIDE BECAME AN ANTICIPATED OCCASION AND KEPT ALIVE A 



FAMILY INTEREST THAT WAS WHOLESOME AND WORTH WHILE. 



\\. M. S. 




A FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

ROOKING forward, fifty years seems a very 
long time, but to those looking backward, 
only a little while, and yet what changes 
such a period brings, for when we gathered 
on Seventh month Twenty-sixth, 1921, for 
the fiftieth anniversary of the marriage of Lindley P. 
and Elizabeth Stanton Bailey, we traveled by auto- 
mobile, some of us a two-days' trip over the mountains, 
covering a distance of four hundred miles. Fifty years 
ago horse-back riding was the popular mode of travel, 
but of the hundred and thirty-seven guests not one 
came in a horse-drawn conveyance. Messages of con- 
gratulation came by telephone, telegraph, and wireless 
telegraphy could have been used. 

The day of the anniversary was beautiful, as was the 
wedding day fifty years before. It seemed the sun- 
shine, the grass, the trees and the flowers alone were 
unchanged and that love that made this happy occa- 
sion was unchanged too, only broadened and deepened 
|as it reached out and enfolded their little flock even 
to the fourth generation. 

The bride and groom of fifty years were seated at 

the 

377 



378 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




ANNIVERSARY BOUQUET 

A DUPLICATE OF THE BRIDE's BOUQUET AT THE WEDDING. ARRANGED 
FROM MEMORY BY WlLLUM H. STANTON. 



the table with most of their original wedding guests> 
who were present this day. Many jests on their youth- 
ful frolics were passed and, too, the thought came of; 
faces that were missing. 

It was a bountiful chicken dinner that was served, 
similar to the one on the bridal day — but the bride 
and groom no doubt were in a better position to enjoy 
this one. Gold and white were predominant in the 
decorations and in the preparation of the meal to the j 1 
point that there was white brick ice cream with a 
golden heart, golden cake with white icing, white 
cake with golden icing. 

There 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




3. 


S. Olive Boyd 


4. 


LEMUiiL Bailey 


5. 


Barbara Bailey 


6. 


William Boyd 


7. 


FiNLEY Howell 


K. 


Mildred Bailey 


•;, 


Virginia Bailey 


1(). 


Ruth Bailey 


11. 


Elizabeth Stanton 


12. 


William H. Stanton 


13. 


WiTLARD Bailey 


14. 


Louise S. Stanton 


I.S. 


Laura S. Bailey 


16. 


Robert Smith 


17. 


Joseph E. Stanton 


I«. 


Vivian Bailey 


19. 


Ernest Bailev 


20. 


Ross Bailey 


21. 


Ralph W. Bailey 


22. 


Nora Bailey 


23. 


Delbert Bailey 


24. 


Alva C. Bailey 


2S. 


Emma C. Webster 


2ft, 


Beulaii L. Patten 


27. 


Anna B. Patten 


2K. 


Mary L. Webster 


29. 


Ruanna Bundy Ste 


30. 


Hattie Bailey 


31. 


Martha Bailey 


32. 


Lester W. Bailey 


33. 


Robert Bailey 


34. 


Cora Bailey 


35. 


Lindley Steer 


36. 


Debora H. Webste 



(^ ^ r^ ® ® rail ®^.->. 

^@@@®^ @@ ^^®_^® @ ^^^rtB 



^ ®€®®®®®® ® ® ®@@© ® ® @®@% 

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37. Helen Bailey 

38. Herbert J. Bailey 

39. Clarence R. Patten 

40. Edna B. Taber 

41. Paul Taber 

42. Eva L. Bailey 

43. Sarah B. Hall 

44. David B. Bailey 

45. Nathan S. Bailey 

46. Francis Taber 

47. Wilford T. Hall 

48. Allen Bailey 

49. Lydia Bailey 

50. I.ouis J. Tabrr 



11. 


Mary E. Baile 


v; 


Joseph 0. Bail 


53. 


Oscar M. Patt 


S4 


Clara B. Bund 


is 


Jesse S. Bailei 


S6, 


C. Lloyd Baile 


sv. 


Harmon E. Bai 


ss. 


Frederick R. I 


S9. 


Raymond C. Ba 


611. 


Lindley P. Bai 


61. 


Mary Wright 


62 


Lowell N. Bai 


63 


Stanley Bailey 



65. Frederick Bailey 

66. Elizabeth S. Baile 

67. Edward F. Bailey' 

68. Edwin M. Bailey 

69. Holland A. Bailey 

70. Bertha E. Patten 

71. Oliver B. Bailey 

72. J. Stanton Bundy 

73. Lillian M. Bailey 

74. Jane D. Stanton 

75. Lindley P. Bailey 

76. Anna B. Bailey 
77..CAMPSIE Bailey Spi 
78. Florence E. Baile' 



79. Martha Chancy 
SO. Acnes B. Cunnin 
81. Dorothy L. Bail 



84. Eva T. Stan 



88. Oscar J. Baili 

89. Eli Miller 

90. Sarah E. Bail 



92. Charles W. Palme 



EvaS 


. Palmer 


Mary Anna Palmer 


Anna 


S. Palmer 


Wii.s 


)N Bailey 


Mary 


M. CoLPirrs 


Laur 


^ B. Clark 


Maria Smith 


Jessie Miller 


fo.si» 


h W. Doudna 


FSTH 


:r S. Stanton 


SlDNF 


y F. Stanton 


Haul 


NE Stanton 


Ruth 


E. Stanton 


Katherine M. Stanton 


E. D 


an Stanton 


Ruth 


B. Doudna 


Agne 


s H. Bundy 


Abiga 


iL Steer 


Char 


LEs Clark 


Earl Clark 


Flor 


.NCE HOGE 


Mary 


E. Patterson 


Nathan W. Bundy 


Chal 


KLEY Dawson 


Edith C. Stanton 


Cora Howell 


DORI 


Howell 


Alma 


B. Stanton 


Arth 


jR E. Stanton 


W. K 


ACY Stanton 


REBt.ccA W. Hall 


Will 


am R. GUINDON 


Kebt 


,A H. GUINDON 


Albe 


(T GUINDON - 



Cimertr at the Goldev JVedding Reception of Lindley P. and Elizabeth Stanton Bailey, Held j-2.6-ig2i . 




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Fiftieth Anniversary 



379 



There were flowers everywhere, both indoors and out. 
They varied from the bouquet of old-fashioned flowers 
in vogue fifty years ago to the large basket of roses 
in modern artistry. Fifty years ago the one bouquet 
had to be moved from the table, as one Friend felt it 
was too frivolous. 

In the afternoon we gathered on the lawn and had 
our pictures taken and listened while anecdotes were 
told of the days that are gone. A song was sung and 
Uncle Lin gave a little appreciation of the love and 
service of his helpmate. 

Lansdowne,^ Edith Cope Staxton-. 

Pennsylvania, 
1921. 




FOUR GENERATIONS 

LiNDLEY P. AND ELIZABETH StANTON' HaILEY, OsCAR J. AND 

Lavada Bailey, Alfred L. and Anna Bailey and Dorothy 

Louise Bailey. 

Photographed at the Golden Wedding anniversary. 



FOR FIFTY YEARS 

The bleak cold breath of winter's winds, 
Whipped snow flakes through the dell, 
The stars stood out in the wintry sky, 
The giant oak-trees wreathed a sigh — 
The country-folk slept — and all was well 
As a child was born. 

A maid it was, who came to bless, 

The home that winter's night. 
Just as the bells of Saint Nicholas rang — 
After the carols the children sang. 

Just as a ray of Bethlehem's light. 
The babe came to dwell. 

For years she lived with girlish glee, 

Four seasons of child-like joy, 
When over the hills, not far away — 
In another home one warm spring day, 

Life first breathed in a little boy. 
And he joined the march of years. 

They lived in their spheres with each one apart, 

Nor saw what the future held. 
They learned in school the laws of man. 
They learned to live in Him who can 
The hearts of two forever weld. 
The twain as one. 

That 
380 



For Fiftv Years ;,X J 

That spark of their love first shone on the day, 

That another was wed of the folk: 
Of the joy of love to give and grow 
Their hearts left always an overflow, 
To lighten the sting of another's yoke, 
As through toil the world has passed. 

They gave to the world of their precious kind, 

And filled each heart with love, 
That came of toil they won through prayer, 
That they be helped to do their share. 

To give them life. All praise above. 
Where dwells the Master. 

The childish love for each has grown 

More pure as the years have fled. 
The rays of youth have changed to gold, 
And days of life sweet pleasures hold. 

As silvery strands bedeck each head. 
Once of a youthful hue. 

They live in light that all should know. 

The light of precious life. 
The years have fled to fifty now 
Since love sealed firm the wedding vow, 

But strong of heart and staunch in strife, 
They now live on. 

The years will bring them work to do — • 

His task is not yet o'er, 
So may they stand in azure bright 
With us, until that golden light 

Shines on their souls, as those before 
And calls them home. 

Uinsdowne, William Macv Stanton. 

Pennsylvania. 

921. ' 



QUAKER WEDDINGS OF YESTERYEAR 



F' RIENDS' weddings during the Nineteenth 
Century were conducted much the same as 
they are today, except that some of the prac- 
tices accompanying them were typical oft 
that period. 

The bride and groom were attended by three couples 
of their friends called "waiters." After the marriage 
at the Meeting House a reception was held at the home 
of the bride's parents and the following day another 
reception was given at the home of the groom's parents. 
There was usually a serenade the evening following the 
marriage. After the noise was stopped by the appear- 
ance of the bride and groom, a general good time J 
was enjoyed. 

After the serenaders had gone and it was bedtime ^ 
the custom was for the bridesmaids to put the bride to 
bed, then the groomsman or first waiter to accompany' 
the groom to the room, enter with him carrying the oib 
lamp and place it on the old bureau, then to aid him in 
taking off his coat and pulling off his boots. 

When I was first waiter for Benjamin Stanton when! 

he 
382 



Quaker Weddings of Yesteryear 383 

he married Elizabeth Plummer in 1870 the bridesmaids 
played a joke on us and had much fun at our expense. 
When bedtime came Benjamin and I went to the room 
designated. There we found a large feather bed with 
the covers as smooth as the carpet on the floor and the 
pillows standing up unruffled. We backed out and 
went into several other rooms thinking they had pur- 
posely misdirected us. The members of the wedding 
company downstairs were having a good laugh, but 
finally Rachel Frame called to us, from the foot of the 
stairs, that Elizabeth was in the big feather bed in the 
first room. We found out later that the girls had made 
a hollow in the feather bed, put Elizabeth in, smoothed 
the covers out straight and put the pillows over her 
face so the bed gave an undisturbed appearance. It 
was a long time before we heard the last of that 
experience. 

So far as I can learn, Ruanna and Elizabeth Stanton 
were the two girls who decided to break this custom in 
11870 and since that time it has not been practiced. 

The wedding company always had such good times 

that it was said jokingly that one wedding always 

caused a second one and this proved true with Lindley 

(Bundy and Ruanna Frame's wedding, for a year later 

Elizabeth Stanton, who was my company at their 

wedding, became my wife. 

Taconia, Lindley P. Bailey. 

Ohio, 

1921. 




THE PIONEER'S FUN 

URING the pioneer days of the nineteenth 
century the country folks were a hard- 



working, industrious people. The clearing J 
of the forests, the preparing for farms, and 
the plowing and cultivating the land, among | 
many stumps and stones, developed a sturdy manhood >' 
and womanhood. This strenuous labor increased rather 
than weakened their desire for amusements and i'J 
entertainments. There developed, therefore, combina- 
tions of work and play that were very delightful, such 
as the ''husking bee," the "apple cutting," the ''quilt- 
ing" and "sewing" parties for the women, and "log 
rollings" for the men. The "taffy pulling," the If 
"spelling school," the "literary and debating society" j. 
and "sled riding" party were functions of a more 
purely social nature. 

Most prominent among the country people during 
the fall season was the "husking bee." When the 
corn was ready to be gathered the farmer, with the help 
of his neighbor, "jerked" the ears from the stalk, hauled 
them to the barn and piled them in a row a hundred or 
more feet long on the large floor or just outside the 

barn. 
384 



Phe Pioneer's Fun 385 

)arn. Then a general invitation was given to all the 
leighbors. In the evening when they arrived the 
nen and women alternating lined up on one side of 
he long pile of corn. They pulled the husks from the 
tar of corn, threw the husks behind them and the 
!ars over the pile, as jokes and laughter filled the air. 
t was a most hilarious company. 

"The red-ear privilege" was a custom prevailing at 
hese "husking bees." When a young man found a 
ed ear of corn he was privileged to kiss the girl next 
o him — a custom it is said that was allowed among 
carried folks as well as single. If a young lady found 

red ear she slipped it over to the young man next 

her and it is said that the young men often searched 
heir fathers' corncribs for red ears and if they found any 
hey hid them in their capacious hunt-shirts — outer 
arment common in those days — and pulled them out at 
he husking bee and demanded a forfeit. 

Refreshments consisting of pie, cake, fruit, sweet 
ider and sometimes a popular non-intoxicating drink 
ailed "spruce beer" were served. Apple cuttings 
'ere common and came next in order of popularity, 
he young people of the neighborhood assembled at 
jiiie farm house, where a good supply of apples had 
een gathered for drying or for apple butter. The 
oung men took off the peelings and some of the young 
omen quartered and cored the apples, while some 
■.rung the quartered apples on a twine string with a 
arning needle and hung them near the stove or the 
pen wood fire to dry. After about an hour of this 
ind of work the floor was cleared by removing the 
ibles and placing the chairs and benches around the 
Litside of the room. The fun for the evening now 
egan. It consisted of the various games that were 

1 popular 



386 Our Ancestors — ^The Stanton< 

popular at that time. A common play was for one 
couple to start marching around the room singing 

"We are marching down to old Quebec, 
Where the drums are loudly beating, 

The Americans have gained the day, | 

And the British are retreating. 

So we'll take another roar; ' 

He that delights in a pretty little wife, ; 

Go bring her on the floor." 

This was responded to by other couples joining until 
the room was filled with couples marching. Then the 
singing would suddenly change to some song, con 
sidered appropriate for suggesting the closing scene, as:^ 

"The higher up the cherry tree. 
The sweeter grows the cherry. 
The more you kiss a pretty girl, 
The more you want to marry." 

Every young man was privileged then to kiss his 
partner. There was no dancing or card playing, but 
many games similar to the one given were enjoyed. 

Spelling schools, literary and debating societies were 
common during the winter season. Most of the young 
people attended and took part. These societies main- 
tained a high standard of work and were beneficial in 
developing the talents of the young people. 

When it came time to go home after the meetings, a 
common practice was for the young men to line up 
near the door where the young ladies would pass out. 
Each young man stood with the left arm akimbo and ' 
when the girl of his choice was passing he would say: 

"The moon shines bright, 
Can I go home with you tonight.^" 

If she wished to consent she would say: 

"The stars do, too, 
I don't care if you do." 

If 



pHE Pioneer's Fun 387 

If unwilling, she would lightly slap him in the face 
md he dropped out of line and was laughed at by all. 

Log rollings and quiltings were enjoyed by the 
|)lder people. These were mostly held at the same 
jime — the women doing the quilting and preparing the 
efreshments, while the men were in the clearing piling 
ogs and brush, preparing the land for plowing. The 
eading timber was oak, sugar, beech, poplar, ash 
nd walnut. Those pioneers were no respecters of 
timber, all kinds were consigned alike to the log heap 
b be burned. 

During the long winter evenings, when snow was on 
he ground, there was much "bedtime" visiting. A 
v^hole family would start out huddled down in the 
jtraw in the sled-bed, all covered with tanned animal 
jkins and comforts and go to visit friends. Sometimes 
jwo or more families would go together. No invitation 
lad been received and no notice sent to the family 
isited, yet it was understood that all should have 
upper. 

Sled-riding parties were very popular. Often fifteen 

twenty young people would go in one large sled. 
Nhen the snow was deep the driver often delighted in 
psetting the whole load of people into t-he snow. 

1 I cannot recall any young man of my acquaintance 
wning a buggy up to 1870, so when there was no snow, 
/eople went on horseback or walked. The young 
jieople became expert riders. Great numbers ot boys 
|nd girls would go on horseback, always in couples. 
i)ften the boys preferred, when taking their "best 
iirls" for a ride, to take only one horse. Then the girl 
{.^ould ride behind. The men wore large spurs on the 
ieels of their boots, with which they goaded the horse in 

the 



388 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

the side to make it move faster and sometimes to try 
to make it kick, and then how the girl would hold on! 
The modern boy's hold of the "wheel" is not to be com- 
pared with the pioneer boy with spurs on his heels. 

I am sure all will agree that the young people of the 
pioneer days had plenty of fun. With their simple 
forms of amusements, they experienced all the thrills 
and genuine pleasures that are needed to round out a 

wholesome, happy life. 

LiNDLEY P. Bailey. 



FLINT-LOCK GUN 



[w 



hen loading the gun a charge of powder was put in with ball or shot. 
Then a little powder was poured in the pan, the gun rolled to one side 
to fill the touch-hole, the hammer drawn back one notch and the striker 
or anvil pulled down, covering the pan and preventing the powder from 

SPILLING OUT. When ready to shoot, the hammer was DRAWN BACK TO THE 
SECOND NOTCH AND ON PRESSING THE TRIGGER THE FLINT IN THE HAMMER STRUCK 
THE ANVIL A GLANCING BLOW, KNOCKED OFF A HOT SPARK OF STEEL WHICH DROPPED INTO 
THE PAN, SET OFF THE POWDER AND THROUGH THE TOUCH-HOLE EXPLODED THE CHARGE IN 

THE GUN. 

Many of olti Pioneer quotations came from this instrument, for instance to 

"Go off half-cocked," referring to the ACTION OF THE HAMMER BEFORE SUFFICIENTLY 

ready; TO "Flash in the pan" and not set off the charge in the gun. 
This also prompted Cromwell's famous saying: 
"Trust in God, but keep your powder dry," very necessary when using flint- 
lock guns. Another saying, "Quick on the trigger," referred to a gun which 

was discharged BY A VERY SLIGHT PRESSURE ON THE TRIGGER. 




1 tijoHsifl 







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T 



THE BUNDY ^AMILY 

HE Bundy family, from its close and many 
connections with the Stanton family, is one 
of special interest. 

It is hoped that some one will make a 
thorough investigation, and record the full 
istory and genealogy of the Bundy family, which 
annot be attempted here. 

Tradition indicates that the family was in France in 
he Eleventh Century and probably takes its name 
rem, or gave its name to the Forest of Bondy; and 
hat some members came to England in 1066, with the 
Normans under William the Conqueror, as the name 
Jandy appears on the battle rolls of some of the chiefs, 
t is probable that due to carelessness or difference of 
renunciation, the spelling was changed to Bundy. 

It appears they settled first in the rugged hills of 
Vales and later moved to Yorkshire, England. Tradi- 
ion also says that five brothers emigrated from York, 
England, and landed on the coast of Virginia or North 
'arolina, and that one of these brothers became dis- 
atisfied and moved north to what is now known as 
'lew York State, and never returned. A family of 
lundys now located there resembles those from North 
Carolina and seems to confirm this tradition. 

While some of the early members were fierce warriors 
nd while several members volunteered for service in 
he Rebellion, the large majority of the family has fol- 
3wed agriculture and the members earned their living 
1 peaceful ways. 

The family has generally occupied the middle walk 
f life — no great wealth and no members in poverty. 
rhe industry and thrift practiced and their artistic, 
/ell-kept and substantial homes, seem to point to a 
•"rench ancestry, or at least to a strong admixture of 
hat blood. 

Compiled largely trom notes 
bv Thomas Clarkson Bundv. 




CABIN ON BUNDY LAND, NORTH CAROLINA 



4 



WILL OF DEMSEY BUNDY 



1st my will and desire is that all my just debts be paid in due 
time after my decease. 

Then I give to my loving wife Mary Bundy all the land and 
plantation whereon I now live above that given to my son David 
Bundy during her life and after her decease for my son Wm. 
Bundy to have the above mentioned land and Plantation to him 
and his heirs forever. 

I give to my son Zadock Bundy a piece of land bounded as 
follows — beginning at the head of my son Wm's land is my son 
David's line thence with his line to Joseph Hollowell's line thence 
with his line to the corner a post oak thence along a line of marked 
trees to a black gum is Forts line thence up Forts line to my son 
Wm's line and with his line to the beginning to him and his heirs 
forever. 

I give to my son John Bundy the remainder part of my land 
to him and his heirs forever. 

I give to my loving wife Mary Bundy all the movable part of 
my estate to her disposal. 

Lastly I nominate and appoint Mary Bundy Exec, and my two 
sons David and Zadock Bundy Execs, of this my last will and 
testament 9th 4 mo. 1798. 

David and Zadock Bundy qualified as Exec. — April term 1798. 



THE INVENTORY OF DEMSEY BUNDY 



1 horse 

8 head of cattle 
30 hogs 
3 geese 

1 chest 

2 tables 
10 chairs 

1 couch 

3 pots 
1 skillet 
1 frying pan 
1 pr. fire tongs 
1 set of flatirons 
1 pr. iron wedges 
1 frow 

1 set coopers tools 
7 axes 

3 grubbing hoes 

4 weeding hoes 
3 plows 

1 scythe 

2 quart bottles 

3 reap hooks 

2 hammers 
1 hand saw 

1 whip saw 

3 augers 1 

2 chisels 
2 gimlets 

1 curry comb 
1 saddle & bridle 
1 case knives & forks 
1 pr. sheep shears 
1 pr. cloth shears 
1 set cart wheel boxes 

1 flower tub 
6 gums 

2 bbls. 
1 hhd. 

1 parcel bbl. timber 

2 drawing knives 
I pepper box 

3 porringers 

A parcel of pu — ? 
1 knife box 
Some packed pork 
Some flax tow 

1 tablecloth 

Some salt, pepper 6i ginger 

2 pr. pot hooks 

1 spooling wheel 
Also his wearing apparel the 
day & date first mentioned 



1 case and bottles 
1 griddle 

1 coffee mill 

2 pr. steelyards 

1 loom & gear 

2 flax wheels 
1 wool wheel 

3 basins 
!0 plates 

3 dishes 

4 cups 
3 bowls 

1 cofl^ee pot 

1 milk pot 

8 spoons 

1 tub 

3 piggins 

1 half bushel 

3 wheat selves 

6 baskets 

1 chamber pot 

1 glass tumbler 

1 dram glass 

1 looking glass 

1 pr. traces 6c other gear 

3 pr. cords 

3 books 

3 pamphlets 

1 X saw file 

I candlestick 

1 cart &: wheels 

2 combs, a parcel of cotton 

1 stack of fodder fit some loose 
Some corn 
1 bucket 

1 cowhide 

2 sides of leather & some 
pieces of leather 

A parcel of hogs lard 
A parcel of bacon 

1 cann 

1 reel 
10 yds. cloth 

Some spun cotton 

1 rope 

1 ox yoke 

Small quantity of iron and 
steel 

1 killing hoe 

1 iron spoon 

1 meal sifter 

3 joiners planes 
£7-1 s-3d 
in and — .' 



April Term 
1798 



WILLIAM BUNDY, SENIOR 



w 



ILLIAM BUNDY, Senior, was born prob- 
ably in Wayne County, North Carolina, 
First month First, 1780. He was the sixth 
child of Demsey and Mary Bundy. He was 
a man of much energy and ability and very 
:areful and exact in all his business methods. 

In 1804, when twenty-four years old, he settled his 
nother's estate. Six years earlier, his older brothers, 
David and Zadock, had, with their mother, settled their 
"ather's estate. 

In 1806, two years after his mother's death, he 
Tioved to Belmont County, Ohio. He first lived on 
Zlaptina Creek, under government permit, in the 
southeast quarter of Section Six, Somerset Township, 
vhere he built a small cabin and made some improve- 
nents. Eighth month Second, 1806, he entered the 
lorthwest quarter of section thirty-six. This piece of 
jround was the first of his several purchases of land 
rom the government. 

The land office which issued the grant for this land 
n Somerset Township, was located at Marietta, Ohio, 
.bout seventy-five miles south, to which he rode on 
lorseback through the almost unbroken forest. He 

carried 
. 393 









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Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



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(FRONT) 



Reprodtctton of the \fiirritige Certijicatt' ok Willi..^ 










l^.vsj* /f^^/^^^y 



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Sarah Overman Bundv. Married q-ll-liOT, 



William Bundv, Sr. 



395 




LAND OFFICE OF THE OHIO LAND COMPANY 
MARIETTA, OHIO 

William Bundy came here to enter lant) in Somerset Township. The build- 
ing WAS erected in 1788 and was still standing in 1921. The oldest house 
IN Ohio. 

carried the silver in his saddle bags with which to pay 
for the land. He lett his young wite and small children 
in the cabin home on Captina Creek, expecting to be 
gone two weeks, but there was a lull month ot waiting 
and suspense before he was heard of or seen again. 

For land in Warren Township, he had to go to the 
office at Steubenville, Ohio. We cannot easily under- 
stand the hardship of such trips. There were no roads, 
scarcely trails, no hotels and but little protection from 
the weather. Food would have to be carried for several 
days at a time and the progress would be very slow 
)ver the rough ways and in the primeval torest. 

As we have no record of permits, except ft)r one year, 
le probably moved to one of the parcels of land bought, 
ind between the years 1811 and 1815, built the famous 
''Red House." Thomas Marshall greatly admired this 

property, 



■ ' .-/'f 




■J 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

lAND-OFFICE at MARIETTA. 

IN conformity with the provifjons of the Ad of Congrefs, er.- 
titled *' An Adt to prevent Settlements being made on Land* 
ceded to the United State^until authorized by Law/' permifliori 
js hereby giveti to ^^J^f^^O^rf}^ (^4tyr>M^ ■■ . now fettled 
on a certain Tra<a of Land bel^^ing to t^ United States, lying 
'^^\%Ui{ix\iSL.,>\i^ of Sedtion 

No. ^ in Tcwnfliip No. y ' f^"^ Range No. ^ containing 
1 60 acres, to retjUain thesepn as.Tenant at Will^ on condirion of 
doing no Wafte or Damage on ftie Land, and on the other con- 
dition expreffed in the A<5t above mentioned 

'i ^ 4ctinff for. the Rt'i]ijtt: 




(FRONT) 



1 DO hereby declare, that I db not lay anyclaim to the within 
clefcribed Trad of Land; and tiat I do not occupy the fame by 
virtue of any claim, or pretended claim» derived or pretended to 
be 4erived frona any other ^erfa^^r perfgns^-^^-^T^l-^^ / .^ 

In preseyice of //^-C*--^^ -0^-*--^ ^^ **f^ ^^r^.J '*^^-^ "^ x^ 



7 




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{BACK) 



Reproduction of Permit to William Bundy to Settle-on Government Land. Dated 12-31-1807 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



STATE or NORTH-CAROLINA. 



By the yujiices of the County Court of Fleas and ^{arter-SeJjjons for Wayne 
Y/r7co4i<^ County y L^L<^t^^ cc^ / Term^ \%(T^4^ 

XT having l5een certified to us tliat <:'>^^d/t^ /^u^4'^^^^^- ■ — late of the faid 



County, is dead, and hath not made any Laff Will and Teftamenl ; an^having ap|med to us 
for Adminiftration upon the Eftate of the faid Deceafed, and ^haying entered into Bond, with 
Security, as the Law in fufh Cafe direfls: Thefe are therefore toauthorife and empower 
the faid /^^^^ ^z^l^t^ /^.^^^^-^ <^ ~-~- f^ enter into, and 



^^ 



upon all and fingular the Goods and Chattels, Rights and Credits, ©f the faid Deceafed, and 
the fame into h poffeffion take wherefoever in this State, to be found, and an In-\^entory 
thereof to render, and all the juft Debts of the Deceafed to ^txJ^ and the Refidue thereof 
to diftribute as the Law in fuch Cafe direfts. 

Witnefs, James SassKr, Clerk of faid Court, at fy^^ fv^^O^Ty^^t ^ ^ 



Day of L^LycLJ^COJ 2-- 



A. D. i%(J~/^ 




Reproduction of William Bundy's Letters of Administration upon the Estate of 
His Mother, Mary Bundy. Dated 8-22-1804 



William Buxdv, Sr. 



V>7 







"RED HOUSE" IN 1920 



WILLIAM BUNDY built this house and moved to it from his "squatter 
permit on Captma Creek, about three miles southeast. 
The house was torn down, moved to the farm of William McCoy in 1865 
and re-erected. It seems the weather-boarding was left off, and also onlv 
he mam part of the building rebuilt. The near view shows the cood state of 
'reservation of many of the logs. Note how nicely the logs are hewn and how 

accurately they are notched 
at the corner. Note also 
the large "gain" near the 
left where the wall of an 
additional room or rooms 
has been joined to the 
main building and fast- 
ened to it by two wood 
pins through each log. Ver- 
tical rows of smaller pin 
holes will be noticed on 
each side of the corner and 
again two or three feet dis- 
tant. These were no doubt 
to secure the vertical "nail- 
ing strips" to which the 
weather-boarding was fast- 
ened and which was painted 
red, giving the house its 
name. 

The notching or dove- 
tailing of the corner, which 
is generally used in this 
section of Ohio, is more 
liifficult, but better than 
often seen in the eastern 
section of the countrv. 




398 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 




THE ORIGINAL LOCATION OF THE "RED HOUSE" 

It was located as shown by the arrow in the picture ANT) ABOUT FIVE HUNDRED FEET 

east of the west line and 1150 feet north of the south line of the west one-half 
of the northwest, one-quarter of section thirteen, township eight, range six of 
Congress land, Warren township, Belmont County. Ohio, about twenty feet south 
OF the present roadway and fronting the present residence of Albert McGill. 
The front entrance gate was hung between two trees used as posts. 



property, and in 1815 William Bundy sold it to him, 
and bought from him for twenty-seven hundred dol- 
lars the north half of Section Four, Township Eight. 
Range Six. Here he erected a log cabin. When th( 
big brick house was built, the foundation of whicl 
was laid in 1824, this cabin was moved and used as 
"loom shop" where cloth was woven for the family us( 
from home-grown wool and flax. 

He died suddenly Sixth month Twenty-first, 1828, oj 
apoplexy or heart failure. In company with his wife] 
he was attending Friends Quarterly Meeting held ai 
this time at Chesterfield, Morgan County, Ohio. He 
died as he was seated at the breakfast table of his 
daughter, Mary French. He was buried at Elliott's 
Crossroads Burying Ground, six miles west of Chester- 
field. 

His wife Sarah (Overman), who had accompanied 
him on horseback, had to ride the lonely three-day 

trip 






H of the Onto, a\ 



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Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




y////^ /(U^cu<^^*^^J^red^J^^ the United States of America^ 



-#6 ALL to WHONf THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME, GREETING: 




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^^^/ ^^' '^^y 1: . • "^eL ^a?J<> clirecieJto L^oM ai c^^ll^^^^^-i-f/^ — Z;^ 'f^^ aot of Con^re,6f^enii^icd 

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;„ _ ._^-U-^ of land ^^o4c dc^crkd CO fjaUC a!i^t0 tjOlD ^^ .^.i/ c;!'..^£^ ^^ — /o^or lection,. . -;^,..— - 

of land y7uUhth& afiftarUna'n^e^, unto ifiG^aicL //^ /U.i^r^' l/ ^ ^/rz^iy , ,/z* - ^. ^ V^- ^'■' 

2f^ u--e-nb.rt,u7ito o/jvrtd. 




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Cn 'inder m.f jCmd at iU Citu, of'^iP^aJUn^on^deV/i^^-^^i^<>'i'^'^'jf^ai^ " 

in t/te 'ucar cf our '^ord one e/iou4a7id e^/tt Auitdr&d and^H'TULand of tie KJndcfiendencc cf 



Ur THE PRESIDENT, 



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'yecrctai'u cf <utat' 



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Reproduction of Government Land Grant Transferring Title for a garter Section of Land to William Bundv. Dated 3-27- 



William Buxm-, Sr. 



99 




THE CHALKLEY BLNDV HOUSE 

Residence of Chalkley and Sarah (Doudna) Buntdy and Chalkley and Deborah 
(Hanson) Bundy and later of his son, Lindley Bundy. Photo. 1S84, William H. 
Stanton. Built 1811 by William Hodgin and believed to have been the first 
BRICK house in Warren Township. The d.\te 1811 was cut in one of the blaci: 

WALNUT JOISTS OVER THE SECOND STORY AT THE TOP Of THE STAIRWAY. IT WAS TORN 

DOWN IN 1901. 




CHALKLEY AND SARAH (DOl DNA) BUNDY 






400 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

trip back to her home, leading the riderless horse. Her 
younger children, Chalkley and probably Demsey and 
Elizabeth, played under the shade of a big tree and 
watched for the return of their parents. We can think 
of the delight with which they recognized the familiar 
figure of their short, plump little mother, riding her 
horse; and the race down the road to meet her; and the 
query as to the riderless horse; then no doubt reading 
in their mother's face the first sad news of their father's 
death. j 

Her son, Ezekiel, who was now twenty-one, led in 
the care of the farm, and with his mother, settled his 
father's estate and later occupied the brick home. 

Sarah (Overman) Bundy is described as short, stout, 
with dark complexion, gray eyes, low forehead, black 
hair and large nose, possibly the original of the "Bundy 
Nose." She stood erect, walked briskly, was hospitable 
and was greatly beloved by all who made her acquaint- 
ance. She lived twenty-five years after her husband's 
death. She died Fifth month Eighth, 1853, age sixty- 
eight, and was buried at Stillwater. 

Compiled largely from notes 
by Dillwyn C. Bundy. 




A Pioneer Stone Jug. 






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Our Ancestors^ — The Stantons 



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' y^^^t^ -jyZt^^t^ .:^ C^^*^/^u:/^ ^^/^^ £Cy?<,rr^^^^ 






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Reproduction of the Contract of Christopher Rivers to C/^ar a Certain Piece of Ground 
FOR William Bundy. Dated 7-25-1823 



William Bundv, Sr. 



4<>1 





EZEKIEL BUNDY 

1807-1866 



SARAH fHOYLE STANTON) 
BUNDY, 1821-1885 




ELIZABETH BUNDY BAILEY MARY CALEB (BUNDY) SMITH 

18^6- Io9I Granddaughter or Ezeciel Busdv 



402 



Our i\NCESTORS — ^The Stantons 




WHITE WOOLEN BOOTEES 

White woolen bootees knit by Sarah (Overman) Bundy in 1850 for Lucinda 
(Bundy) Hanson. They were also worn by her eldest daughter, Cora (Han- 
son) von Hofsten. The outside bands are blue — the centre, orange. 




CRADLE 

Cradle made by Stephen Doudna, son of Joel and Rebecca, probably about 
1840. The wood is black walnut. Originally quite fancy in design, had 

CORNER posts AND HOOD. THE YOUNGER CHILDREN OF JOEL AND ReBECCA DoUDNA 
WERE ROCKED IN IT AND ALL THE CHILDREN OF ChaLKLEY AND SarAH (DOUDNA) 

Bundy. It was repaired in about 1852 and altered to its present form. 
Now owned by Nathan W. Bundy. 



V 




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Our Ancestors — The Stantons 







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OR THE ftone Wor/t ;n <2 5mi //ok« Bu 



JuNDV. Dated i-iz-iS^j 




HOLLOW ROCK 



Mentioned in the contract of William Bundy a.vd Christopher Rivfr, 
Note the pipe from the spring and the watering troich 




PEWTER TEAPOT 

Bought early in the 19th century by Sarah ^Overman) 

-, Bundy. 

now in the possession of Dillwyn C. Bindy. who 

REMEMBERS USING IT WHEN A SMALL UOY TO INHALE STEAM 
FROM HERBS TO CURE A COLD. 



404 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

COPY OF A RECEIPT 

18th of 4th Mo., 1806 Reed of Joseph Cox William Bundy & 
John Colyer the sum of two hundred & fifty Dollars in full for the 
carriage of their property from Carolina to the State of Ohio in 
Belmont County I say reed by us for Edmund Lane. 
Test Hedar Nutt 

James Edgerton. his 

Eldred x Allum 
mark 

Waggoners. 



COPY OF CONTRACT FOR WORK 

Artiele of Agreement made & concluded between Wm. Bundy 
and Giles Brooks both of the County of Belmont & State of Ohio 
— Witnesseth — that the said Brooks for & in consideration of the 
property hereafter mentioned doth agree to do the carpenter 
& joiner work of a house for said Bundy which he is preparing 
to build in a good & workman like manner & in every respect 
as the said Bundy shall dictate, the said Bundy is to furnish 
all the materials for said work & board & lodge said Brooks & 
what hands he may have employed during the time he is doing 
the same which is to be completed in two years from this date - 
provided the material is found as fast as said Brooks is able to/ 
go on with the work, but it is understood if the said Bundyj 
should fail in providing the materials the said Brooks is to have 
a reasonable time to complete the work after they are providec 
for which work when completed the said Bundy binds himseli 
his heirs & assigns to make or cause to be made to said Brooks 
or Assigns a good and lawful deed of conveyance for the East halj 
of the Northwest quarter of Section No. Twenty Seven Townshij 
No. Eight in range* Six in the Steubenville distric. but if the 
work when done shall amount to more than Five Hundred Dollar^ 
according to what is called the old prices the said Bundy is tc 
pay to Brooks the overplus in trade at the old price but it is like] 
wise understood that if the work doth not amount to Five Hundrec 
Dollars that the said Bundy agrees to take it as full satisfactior 
for the land, in witness whereof we have hereunto set our hand^ 
& seals this Twentyeth day of the First mo. 1824. 

Witness William Bundy (se) 

Isaac Stubbs Giles Brooks (sed) 



Of 



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Our Ancestors — The Stantons 







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Reproduction of a Letter Written by. Aaron Overman /e //w 6'«» aw;/ Daughter, 
William anu Sarah Overman Bundy. Dated 2-3-1811 



William Bundv, Sr. 405 

COPY OF AGREEMENT 

Article of Agreement between Richard McPeak of the one part 
and William Bundy of the other part witnesseth, that the said 
Richard McPeak doth agree to work one year for the said William 
Bundy, days that the law requires excepted, and to begin the 
Thirteenth day of the First month next, and the said William 
Bundy doth agree to give the said Richard McPeak Fifty Dollars 
in specie and ten in Davenport's Store at the expiration of the 
time— 28th of 12th mo 1822. 



ANECDOTES OF THE BUNDY FAMILY 

W'hen great-grandfather, William Bundy, became owner ot the 
old home farm, it was almost an unbroken forest and the wolves 
howled all around. When he was building the first house, which 
was of logs, he came over from Somerton to work at it and 
brought his daughter, Mary, and son, Ezekiel, to cook for 
and help him. At night great-grandfather would go back to 
great-grandmother and the smaller children and leave Mary 
and Ezekiel to guard the new (to be) home. Aunt Mary 
was very industrious and would sit till late at night to knit, 
while she kept a fire burning all the while so as to keep the howling 
wolves from entering the room. Part of the time they only had a 
quilt to answer for a door shutter. Grandfather Ezekiel was a 
lively boy and would play and romp around his sister till she 
bade him go to bed and to sleep. 

East Canton, Mary C. (Bundy) Smith. 

0/iio, 

1920. 



In order to procure a fine white lime to finish the plastering 
for a house he was building William Bundy, Sr., had men haul 
mussel shells from the Ohio River, twenty-eight miles away, 
and burn them in a kiln made of logs. In order to keep the shells 
free from dirt they were picked out o\ the ashes by hand and 
slaked, yielding a finish for the walls that remained hard and 
smooth for many years. While this work was in progress one of the 
neighbors came by on an errand and stopped to talk as neigh- 
bors will, and began to help pick out shells. After a time he re- 
marked, "Well, Mr. Bundy, you are stronger in the faith than I 
am to go to all that trouble." William Bundy's reply, charac- 
teristic of the blunt frankness of the man, was, "George, thee is 
just as strong in the faith as I am, but thee is too lazv to work 
for it." 



406 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Some of William Bundy, Sr.'s, boys found a fawn in the 
woods near the house, so they took it home and fed it. It grew 
to be a great pet, but it would trespass on the neighbors' gardens. 
Finally, a man shot it, causing great grief among the children. 
The man became quite abusive and told them he would have 
shot the fawn if it had been in their own dooryard. Among 
other things he spoke of the mother as "a dirty squaw." Grand- 
mother said afterwards, "I expect I was dirty, as I was digging 
potatoes." * * * * 

A favorite way of catching wild turkeys was to build a rail 
pen, provided with a sliding door in one side held up by a trigger 
to which a string was attached. The hunter would hide behind 
a log to leeward and wait until the turkeys followed the trai 
of corn into the pen. He would then pull the string and catch 
the birds at his leisure. Ezekiel Bundy one time caught so many 
turkeys that the family had to divide with the neighbors in order 
to get them used before they spoiled. 




WILLIAM BUNDY 

"Black Bill" 1819-1905. 



William Bundy, Jr., has said that he never shot at any garni'' 
in his life, except at a pheasant sitting on a limb, and that hi 
did not think he came anywhere near hitting his mark that time 



William Bundy, Sr. 



407 



M^ 



Our Ancestors — The 

8eliool Exatmli 
f JfHhmngton^ Clin 

//^/yifi^'a.^*.^ J^ ^^'T^ This day ni.idc>piil 
Exainilicrs bi' CLINTON COUNTY, for a certificate 
SCtlOOL, and said BoaUd being fully saiisfied that M *: 
is competent to leucli Reading, Writixo, A urcruiKTic, E.nglisu 



satisfied tliat <^-c- possesses a good moral character, a ckktifi 
tyy^'>^ ^h-^A^,^ ^^--^^^^^- . tote^ 

Learning for the term of ^/.c^t^-^^ y^ *£^e^^ from the 



driven lender my Hand, y ,3^ f^ 



Of the 
I ^^, P. Drake, Fr.— |F/«^ Office., i 

5" VVVWVVVNVV^'V^lrt.'V* uVn-%V'VVV'VVV''*\-y'^'V*'^/%'Vb/V\'VV'V^V\^ S 



Reproduction of a Certificate to Teach School Grantei 
(Son of William and Sarah Bundy). Datt 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



Sell®©! Exiiiiiiiier% Offiee, 
t WHinmmfftGm €Untom €o. OMo* 

M,>: /y^.J^^t-^.^tg^ ^i^z*-i^^«^ Tliis day niado]app!ication tu the Buaud'of iSchooI 
£xaillill€l*§ of CLINTON C6UNTY, for a oertificatb> teach a COMMON ENGLISH 
SCBOOLj and said Board being fully saiisiied that M t>': ^c^^i^^g.^i.^^j >^- 




is competent to teacii Keading, VVritino, A urrroiETto, E.\ghsu Gkam.iiar, GEooRArav,, 



..«-«•- *-» c^^.. 



It n<-^ 



and are also 



satisfied that -:;C<_ possesses a good moral character, a certificatjb is accordiagly ^granted said 
t^p^-^i, /^-<:!^rla.-ju4-<y' a3 -f^^^^^j-" - , -' to teach the above uomed branches of 
Learning for the term of t/-<t*^^-*^ / ^^^.-tM from the date above written. 



Crimen Under my Hand, 



\K Drake, Pr.— |F/jtg- Office^ \ 



• CLERK, 
O/" the Board of ,School Examiwrs 



Reproduction of a Certificate to Teach School Granted to William Bundy 
(Son of William and Sarah Bundy). D^/^-*^ 3-26-1840 



William Bundv, Sr. 407 

One time the Bundy boys had cleaned and oiled their guns 
ready for a hunting trip, when a great flock of turkeys came and 
settled in the dead trees of the clearing, but the boys had put so 
much tallow in the locks of their guns that they could not shoot, 
and before the locks could be cleaned the turkeys had all taken 
flight and did not return. 

* * * * 

Sarah (Overman) Bundy was a woman of strong character, 
even though her education was extremely meager when measured 
by modern standards, but she bravely took up the work, after 
her husband's death, of conducting the home and caring for her 
brood of eleven children, though some of them were grown men 
and women. Her home was noted for its hospitality. In the 
slavery controversy she was no neutral figure. Her stable loft 
more than once concealed runaway slaves on their way to Canada 
and freedom. 

It was not strange that sons who grew from such stock and in 
such surroundings were ready to take their part in the public 
aff"airs of the community and state. One of the sons, William 
Bundy, Jr., was especially active in the anti-slavery agitation. 
He was for a number of years a conductor on the underground 
railway by which runaway slaves traveled. There was no regular 
station on the farm and his ciuty was to take the passengers after 
dark, from the next man to the south, and conduct them as far 
north as he could, and yet return before daybreak. He would 
be found the next morning in the harvest field, it might be, as 
though he had been in bed all night. To be discovered by the 
officers of the law would draw a heavy penalty, not only of fine 
but also of imprisonment. The infirm slaves and children were 
conveyed in vehicles and the others marched after the conductor. 
In this work William Bundy, Jr., claims never to have lost but 
one passenger and that one strayed away in the dark and became 
lost. One bright moonlight night he passed a country church 
just as the worshipers were coming out. The road was tull ot 
men and women who knew him, but so general was the sentiment 
against slavery that no one reported him. On account ot the 
long distance they had to travel, parallel to the N'irginian shore 
of the Ohio River, most of the runaways were taken by a route 
further west, but some of the old hiding places in Belmont County 

mav still be seen. 

* * * * 

There appears to have been some special affinity between the 
Bundy and Doudna families, as three Bundy brothers married 
Doudna sisters at first or second marriages, and two nephews 



For any one especially interested in the escaping slaves, the book " Bonnie 
Belmont," by John S. Cochran, contains many interesting anecdotes and incidents. 



408 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

and two nieces married Doudnas. Joel Doudna boasted at one 
time that he had three William Bundys for sons-in-law and four 
daughters and two sons who married Bundys. The fact that 
this family was once so numerous in Stillwater Meeting illus- 
trates the changefulness of nature, as only five of the grand- 
children of William and Sarah Bundy are now identified with 
Stillwater community at Barnesville, Ohio. 

DiLLWYN C. Bundy. 



Grandmother Sarah (Overman) Bundy lived about twenty-five 
years after grandfather's death. She had a favorite old riding 
horse named Jack. She was very short and stout and when 
perched in her side saddle reminded me of a snow ball. She rode 
old Jack wherever she went, and often visited her youngest 
daughter Elizabeth, who married Hezekiah Bailey. Frequently 
on such occasions she would take the saddle from old Jack and he 
would run back home, a distance of some four miles, but one time 
he must have run too hard, for next morning he was found dead in 
the field. 

Chalkley Daavson. 



When William Bundy, Sr., and his wife Sarah were leaving 
home to attend Quarterly Meeting at Chesterfield, Demsey and 
Elizabeth went out to the gate with them. Sarah said to her son 
Demsey, "Be a good boy until I come back," but William said, 
"I cannot say that — Till I come back." 

He died while on this visit in Morgan County. 



COPY OF A RECEIPT 

Received Twenty Five Cents of William Bundy Treasurer of 
Stillwater Meeting for Paper for the Clerk. 

1st Mo., 27th, 1828. Henry Stanton. 



William Bundy, Sr. 



409 







oJZ^^ 



The following poem was composed by Demsey Bundy about 
1870, on the occasion of accidently killing a snow bird while 
moving a shock of corn. — Eunice H. Henderson. 

Poor little bird, I mourn thy early fate, 

An inadvertent stroke of mine deprived thee of thy mate. 
Sweet warbler! Oh, I truly sighed, 

When I perceived thy mate had died. 

With poignant grief, I viewed thy dead, 

When I perceived that life had fled, 
I smoothed his wings, arranged his crest. 

And stroked the down upon his breast. 

With heartfelt grief and tearful eye, 

I saw thy dear companion die. 
And now, my friend, don't censure me 

For all the pain I brought on thee. 

This is a world of grief and woe, 

Where dearest friends must part we know, 
Submit thyself and be resigned. 

Thou mayst yet sweet comfort find. 

Thine is a bitter cup of woe, 

I drank it many years ago. 
Though months have past and years gone by 

As yet my breast doth heave a sigh. 

For memory still recalls to view 

The friends I mourned with sorrow true. 
But lenient time hath eased the wound. 

And round mv heart new friends are found. 




Q 
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JOHN BUNDY 



T 



HE fifth child of WilHam and Sarah (Over- 
man) Bundy, was born Second month 
Seventeenth, 1813, most probably in the 
"Red House." He was only a small boy 
when the brick home was being built. He 
has said that he and his little brothers used to run up 
and down the inclined runways like squirrels, also that 
he had a small board on which he carried a tew bricks 
at a time to the masons. He naturally felt he had quite 
a little part in the building of the house. 

He has related how his parents came over the 
mountains from Wayne County, North Carolina, in a 
cart; how the goods were hauled by wagoners — how 
his father brought with him a "piggin" of silver, prin- 
cipally Spanish quarters and halves, with which to 
buy the land. The "piggin," he said, was a small 
wooden bucket or dipper without a bail but with one 
long stave projecting above the others to use as a 
handle and held about as much as an old-fashioned 
bell-crown hat. 

He married first, Tenth month Thirtieth, 1833, 
Ruth Patten, daughter of William and Sall\- Patten. 

So 
411 



412 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




ASHER MOTT 



SARAH (BUNDY) MOTT 



Daughter of John and Ruth Patten Bundy and twin sister of William P. 
BuNDY and sister OF Mary p. Stanton. 



So far as can be learned, John and Ruth went to house- 
keeping in a small log house which stood about three 
hundred yards west of "Number Two" district school 
on the farm of William Patten. To John and Ruth 
were born five children, Sarah and William P., twins; 
Mary P., Martha and Charity. Sarah married Asher 
Mott, William P. married Tabitha Doudna, and 
Mary P. married Eli Stanton, Twelfth month Ninth, 
1857. Martha and Charity died young. 

John Bundy's daughter, Doctor Elizabeth B. Frame, 
says: "Soon after they were married, father was 
going to have a corn husking and a company of men to 
dinner and there was no meat in the house. He did 
not know where any was to come from, but he started 
out early in the morning with his gun, and in a big tree, 
not far from the house, he sighted a large wild turkey. 

He 



|OHX BUNDV 



413 




WILLIAM P. BUNDY TABITHA (DOUDNA) BUNDY 

Taken about 1865. 



He took aim and fired, the turkey fell to the ground 
and they had all the meat they needed. I recall 
hearing him say that he felt that the turkey was 
'providentially provided' for him. " 

At the time of William Patten's death, he bought the 
farm and took care of the "blind mother" Sally, until 
she died. He says of Sally Patten: "She was a very 
hale and hearty woman, but was blind the last sixteen 
years of her life. I cannot remember her exact age, but 
it was between eighty and ninety years. She died ot 
old age. Ruth Bundy died at the age of twenty-seven, 
from disease consequent of childbirth. She was a 
strong woman, although of slender build." 

John Bundy married second, Sidney (Wood) Tipton. 

Their children were Thomas W. and Ephraim, the 

latter died young. 

His 




^ 



u-b C^- i ^ 



Our Ancestors 

THE 

Stantons 




vl ^^ X- ''' ^ ■ 



OHN BUNDY 415 

His third wife was Anna Edgerton, who survived 
im several years. Their children were Ruth, who 
larried Josiah W. Doudna; Jesse, who moved to the 
^est coast and married; Elizabeth, a graduate in 
steopathy, who married Ira S. Frame and with him has 
racticed that profession for many years; Rebecca 
nd Wilson, who died young. 

John Bundy took great interest in whatever kind of 
'ork in which he was engaged. We find that his farm 
ad no superior in Belmont County. He used "up-to- 
ate" methods, and endeavored to have each thing 
rst-class of its kind. He thoroughly enjoyed devoting 
me and energy to bringing about these results. 

In 1854—55 he built a very remarkable barn for that 
me. It was sixty by seventy feet. The outside was 
nished as nicely and painted as well as a dwelling. 
:aiah Fields was the head carpenter, and Mason 
(homas made the iron work in his country blacksmith 
lop. Wilford T. Hall states that it was generally 

)orted that all the iron work was made for one 
mdred dollars and that the long timbers were pur- 

ased, hewn and hauled from near Dora, about four 

les southeast. The inside was well planned and 
lually well built. The carpenter work is admired by 
' who see it. 

He will be remembered as a man rather below average 
' ight and weight, who stood erect, walked with a 
lick, firm step, had blue eyes and black hair. He 
ways shaved smooth and cut his hair around even 
id combed down straight. He had a characteristic 
d:)it when he removed his hat, of stroking his hair 
3wn with both hands. 

Many 



416 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



Many of his sayings were likewise characteristic of 
him, as when he was sure of something, he would 
often say, *'Di-pend upon it," or when somethmg was 
not fully disclosed, 'There's something behind the 
curtain," and when something did not go right, he 
would exclaim *'Tut! tutl" 

He thoroughly enjoyed mechanical work of almost 

every 




INTERIOR OF JOHN BUNDY'S BARN 

Showing one op the long hand-hewn oak timbers spanning the barn in one piece 



jJOHN BUNDY 



417 



'every kind, and usually succeeded in whatever he 
undertook, but was very ready to concede a point to 
others when such action was deserved. 

In 1876 he gave up the management of the farm 
and built a new home on East Main Street, Barnes- 
ville. John Colpitts relates that he wanted a slab of 
sawed sandstone for a hearth and bought one from 
Colpitts Brothers. The slab had to be cut to size. 
This he tried to do, but broke the stone. He bought 
another and borrowed the proper tools for cutting 
such stone, but this stone broke also. He bought a 
third one and said: "I guess thee had better cut it — 
I cannot get the proper 'wiggle' to the chisel." Those 
who know the motions of mallet and chisel will under- 
stand how apt was his expression and how difficult a 
job he had undertaken. 

He died Ninth month Twentieth, 1898. During 
his life of more than fourscore and four years, he had 
seen the country change from almost unbroken forest 
to one of very well-tilled farms with comfortable 
homes. He had seen modern transportation, public 
schools, government mail, electric lights, telephones 
and other modern conveniences come into use, and had 
taken great interest in these changes. 




BARN-DOOR HINGE FROM JOHN BUNDY'S BARN 

Made by Mason Thomas. 



A SHEEP-SHEARING 



A ^NEIGHBOR boy, "Si" Doudna, and I went over to 
g"Uncle John" Bundy's, two miles away, to shear sheep. 
^There were one hundred sheep to be sheared at eight 
^cents "a head." We each sheared fifty and went home 
before night, "Uncle John" paid us four dollars each 
and remarked, "Boys, this is making money pretty fast." And 
it was for those days, when a day's work on the farm was from 
sun to sun and the pay fifty cents a day. My father paid one 
dollar a day for mowing grass and a little more for cradling wheat 
and oats. 

Henry S. Dawson. 



'iVa\ t. 






'"^""Z 



WXYZi 




SAMPLER MADE BY RUTH PATTEN 

She married John Bundy in 1833. 



John Bund^', 



419 




JOHN BUNDY'S POCKET KNIFE 

Presented to his grandson, William H. Stanton. 




KNIFE USED BY JOHN BUNDY 

Presented by him to his great-grandson, Harlan 
Webster, in 1892. 




FOLDING RULE USED BY JOHN BUNDY 

Presented «y him to his grandson, William H. Stanton. 



1^ 




HAMMER USED BY JOHN BUNDY 

Presented by him to his c.REAr-GRANDSON Harlan 
Webster, in IS^J. 



420 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




BASKET USED BY ASENATH 

(DOUDNA) BUNDY 

This kind of basket was used about 
1860 as a traveling bag is used today. 



CANDLESTICKS USED BY 

WILLIAM AND ASENATH 

BUNDY IN 1869 

Typical of the better type of candlesticks 

USED before the DAYS OF KEROSENE LAMPS. 

Now in the home of Dillwyn and Elizabeth 
(Steer) Bundv. 





WOOD KNOT MAUL 

Made by John Bundy before 1898. Now in 
THE possession OF Rebecca W. Hall. 





THOMAS W. BUNDY 



ABIGAIL (DOUDNA) BUNDY 



THOMAS W. BUNDY 

HOMAS W. BUNDY enlisted in the Civil War the twen- 
tieth of December, 1863, in Company F, Fiftieth Regi- 
ment of New York Engineer Volunteers. He was with 
Grant's Army of the Potomac much of the time that 
he was in the service. The greater part of his work was 
in the construction and laying of pontoon bridges. The Fiftieth 
New York Regiment had the record of constructing a pontoon 
bridge across the Anticosta branch, three-quarters of a mile in 
length, in just seventeen minutes and fifteen seconds by the 
watch. Once in a violent storm on Chesapeake Bay their com- 
pany was the only one that got through. The brigade had shops 
in Washington where one company or more always remained tor 
building new pontoons. Such a company was always taken from 
the Fiftieth Regiment. During the war, under the direction of 
Captain M. H. McGrath, Company F, Fiftieth Regiment, the 
engineer troops built a little church near Meade's headquarters. 
It was in the Gothic style, and was constructed entirely of poles 
with the bark on, placed vertically like a batten house. The 
badge of the engineer brigade was a castle and it was worked in 
the front of the church about the center of the second story of the 
steeple. 

A picture of the church came out in the National Tribune, 
February twenty-seventh, 1890, and was at once recognized by 
Thomas Bundy as the one he hail helped to build. He was dis- 
charged from the service of the I'nited States the thirteenth day 
of June, 1865, at Fort Barry, Virginia. 

Abigail (Dound.a) Bundy. 




HOUSE BUILT BY HENRY DOUDNA ABOUT 1810 

The First Home of Wilford T. and Sarah B. (Stanton) Hall. 

THE DOUDNA FAMILY 



T'"^^^HE earliest history we have of the Doudna family 
is of Henry and Elizabeth Doudna living in England. 
^^^^ Their son John, when a little boy, was kidnapped 
i=iisSI and kept on shipboard until he was about twenty- 
six years old. The ship was wrecked and John, with two 
companions, reached a small barren island on pieces of the 
ship. After eight days without food and very little water they 
succeeded in signaling a sailing vessel and were taken on board. 
The vessel in three or four days landed them on the coast of 
North Carolina. John determined he would never go to sea 
again and started out to find work. He met a little girl, Sarah 
Knowis, on her way to school, who told him that her father could 
probably give him work. She was the first girl he met in this 
country and her kindness made a deep impression on him. He 
worked for the Knowis family for two years, then married Sarah; 
he was twenty-eight years old and she fourteen. He and his 
young wife settled in Edgecomb County, North Carolina, where 

they 
422 



The Doudna Famii.v 



423 



they lived in peace and happiness. In 1804 they, with most of 
their children, moved to Belmont County, Ohio, where they 
lived the remainder of their days. John Doudna probably helped 
to build the first Friends' Meeting House in Warren Township. 

It is said that while on shipboard John Doudna was not allowed 
to acquire an education, so when he married he did not know his 
A B C's. In later life he acquired a wide knowledge of the Scrip- 
tures and was said to have no equal in this respect in the neigh- 
borhood. His wife survived him several years; both were buried 
in Stillwater Burying Ground. At her death in her ninety-ninth 
year she had four hundred and fifty children, grandchildren and 
great-grandchildren. 

One of their sons, Henry, lived two and a half miles east of 
Barnesville, a few hundred yards north of the Sandy Ridge Road. 
Here he built a very remarkable barn. It was of good size and 
yet no power was used in the preparation of the lumber. 
All the large timbers were hewn 
out by hand. The braces and 
weather-boarding were split 
from large logs; the chestnut 
shingles were pinned on with 
wooden pegs. Nails were not 
used about the building except 
to fasten the weather-boarding, 
and these he made by hand. 
The barn was blown down 
about 1902. 

He also built a residence 
somewhat nearer the road. 
The space between the weath- 
er-boarding and plaster in the 
trame construction was filled 
with brickwork, adding 
greatly to the warmth of the 
building. The doors were 
furnished with big "strap" or 
"barn-door hinges." The 
"pins" were provided with 
a square 




IIOSKA DOLDNA. SR. 

He came with his parf.nvs. John and Sarah 

(KnOWIS) DOI'DSA, FROM XORTH CaROUNA 

LN 18U4. 



424 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

a square shank which was driven into the door post, while the 
strap hinges were riveted to the door by several hand-made 
flat-head rivets. 

So far as is known, Henry came to Belmont County with 
his father in 1804 and probably had the building completed by 
1810. After Henry's death the farm was owned and the house 
occupied by Peter Sears, Sr., whose grandson, William H. 
and wife, Mary (Naylor) Sears, have very kindly given me the 
above data regarding the work of Henry Doudna and the remark- 
able buildings he erected. The farm was later owned by George 
Tatum and sold to Thomas P. Hall. His son, Wilford T., and 
wife, Sarah B. (Stanton) went to housekeeping in the house in 
1890. 

A small house stood about twelve rods northeast from the 
barn. This was probably the first house built on this site and 
used by Henry Doudna during the time he was building the new 
barn and house. In this older house Nathan and Anna Stanton 
Bundy began housekeeping in 1859. The well which they used 
may still be seen. 

Hosea Doudna, Sr., a younger brother of Henry, was a familiar 
figure to many persons of Stillwater neighborhood. Many re- 
member the broad-brimmed, light-gray silk hat, the gray suit 
and heavy cape that he wore and the dun horse he rode for so 
many years. Late in life he was quite deaf, but all who knew 
him remember his kindly greetings, which showed plainly that he 
realized the handicap of dull hearing. He died in 1888 at the 
age of ninety-five years. 

W. H. S. 




ALL THAT IS LEFT OF THE FIRST 
HENRY DOUDNA HOME— THE WELL 

The house was occupied by Nathan and Anna Stanton 

Bundy when they first went to housekeeping on 

Sandy Ridge in 1859. 



The Doudn^a Famii.'v 



425 






I 
\ 



;^ 



t 'S>/^//C r.^^yr/~ 



TWENTY-FIVE CENT POSTAGE 

Those who DEMAhro one -cent postage should consider the postage our an- 
cestors HAD TO PAY AND THE SCARCITY OF MONEY IN THOSE DAYS. 




RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM E. AND REBECCA ^DOUDNA^ 

BUNDY 

Erected about 1855 by Joel Doudna. It is built of one-by-six-inch boards laid flat 
with edges overlapping nearly an inch alternately, and each course of boards 

NAILED TO THE ONE BELOW. THE CORNERS WERE INTERLOCKED. It WAS HIS INTENTION TO 

COVER IT WITH STUCCO OITSIDE, BUT LAP WEATHER-BOARDING WAS USED INSTEAD. IT WAS 

PLASTERED INSIDE. PHOTOGRAPHED IN 1884 BY \V. H. S. 



426 



Our Axcestors — The Stanto 



NS 




CANDLE BOX 

This box was made before 1850 by Stephen Doudna for 
HIS SISTER, Sarah (Doudna) Bundy. During the Civil 
War at the time of "Morgan's Raid" Chalkley Bundy 
placed his money and valuable papers in it and buried 
it in his tobacco house. 




MARY P. DOUDNA'S TEAPOT 

It BELONGED TO HER MOTHER, JaNE PlUMMER. OnE EVENING 

IT WAS LEFT ON THE EIARTH TOO CLOSE TO THE FIRE AND ONE 

LEG MELTED OUT OF SHAPE, NEVERTHELESS IT STOOD MANY 

YEARS OF SERVICE. 




POT HOOKS 

When the cooking was done over the open 

FIRE, the BAILS OF THE POTS WOULD GET TOO 
HOT TO TAKE IN HAND, AND A PAIR OF HINGED 
HOOKS WERE USED TO LIFT THE POT OR KETTLE 
FROM THE FIRE. THESE WERE FOUND AT THE 
FORMER HOME OF ROBERT PlUMMER NOW THE 

HOME OF Carver and Evelyn (Plummer) 
BuNDY. They are of unknown age. 



PLUMMER SPOONS 

They ^\^re wedding presents given to 
Robert, Sr., and Rachel Plummer at their 
marriage in Calvert County, Maryland, 
IN 1793. Now in the possession of Mary 
Plummer Doudna. 




BACK COMB 

It belonged to Anna Doudna Sears and 

WAS worn by her when a girl before 

coming from North Carolina in 1804. 



The Doudxa Family 



427 




NECK HANDKERCHIEF 

Belonging to Sarah (Doudna) Bundy. 






vi 



CAP WORN BY REBECCA 
(HODGIN) DOUDNA 

She was the wife of Joel Doudna. 




CAPE WORN BY SARAH (DOUDNA) BUNDY 

She was the wife of Chalklky IUndy. Tiik cate is of the same material 
as the last dress she wore. 




MARY PLUMMER DOUDNA 



ROBERT PLUMMER'S FIRST STOVE 



mm 



ALL our cooking was done on the open fire 
until about 1845. We used the crane, iron 
pots, the long-legged and long-handled 
skillets, the Dutch oven and other pioneer 
cooking utensils. One day, when I was 
about eight years old, a man drove up to the house with 
a stove in his wagon, which he wanted to sell to 
father. Father did not feel inclined to buy, but just 
then I had to go on an errand to Polly Warricks', who 
lived a short distance west of us. I was much interested 
in the stove and made the trip as quickly as possible, 
but when I returned the stove was setting on the hearth. 
It was a Buck's Patent. At first it seemed very strange 
to cook on it, but soon we learned to like it very much. 

Tacoma, 

Ohio, 

1920. 



I 



^m^M (P ^^Q<>t^--^?^^^-i^^^ 





ROBERT PLUMMER'S SMOKE HOUSE 

A PIONEER SMOKE HOUSE 

N the early days It was generally necessary 
at the approach of winter to provide, store 
and preserve the family food. The hogs 
were butchered, lard rendered, sausage 
ground, and the hams, shoulders and some 
of the side meat hung in the smoke house, which was 
usually a small building separated from the main 
house. When early spring came a small hre of green 
wood was kept burning in the smoke house for several 
days. The surface of the meat absorbed the creosote 
from the wood smoke, which thoroughly preserved 
the meat until used. The smoke-cured ham with its 
gravy was too delicious to be soon forgotten. 

Mary Plummer Doudna says that the smoke house 
here illustrated, located on her father's farm, was built 
by her Grandfather Robert Plummer, Sr., before 1840. 
The logs are of split chestnut and show how well they 
have weathered all this time, and look now, in 1920, 
capable of lasting several more years. 

\V. H. S. 




AN INDIAN STORY 

HOSE of our ancestors who were early settlers came 
in close touch with the Indians, and the tales of these 
people were of great interest to pioneer children. 

There has come down to us one of these stories, of 
which there are several versions. Lucinda (Bundy) 
Hanson, a daughter of Chalkley and Sarah Bundy, relates the 
following: 

Stolen by the Indians 

"My great-grandmother, Agnes Childrey Hodgin, I think, was 
born in Georgia. When a little girl five years old, she, with her 
sister, who was seven years of age, went in search of a cow. They 
did not return, i:\fter a long search their parents gave them up 
for lost, thinking some wild beast or the Indians had killed them. 
But the Indians had only stolen them and carried them off to 
their camp. A council was held by the Indians to consider what 
to do with the girls and the old chief decided to adopt them as 
his own. The Indians took good care of them, so far as Indian 
care goes, and kept them fifteen years. The sisters knew they 
were not Indians and, as they grew older, they became dissatisfied 
and longed for their own people, so they planned to run away and 
try to find their family. For days the girls wandered in the 
woods, living on berries and roots, until they came to a white 
settlement. Here no one knew them nor did they know any one. 
They did not even know their names, only the names the Indians 
called them. The white people in the settlement took them in 
their homes and did all they could to help them find their own 
people. The older sister, a few days after they reached the 
settlement, died, no doubt from exposure in the woods, x'^gnes 
finally found her relatives, but not until after her mother's death. 
Agnes married William Hodgin and moved to Ohio, where, in 1811, 
he built the brick house in which I was born. William and 
Agnes Hodgin were my great-grandparents. Joel and Rebecca 
(Hodgin) Doudna my grandparents and Chalkley and Sarah 
(Doudna) Bundy my parents. I have grandchildren now and 

am 
430 



An Indian Stor^- 4)1 

am writing this so they may know and remember a little of the 
history of one of their relatives." 

****** 

Mary C. (Bundy) Smith writes concerning this story: "Agnes, 
the younger of the two girls, was of a happy disposition, while 
her sister fretted and worried. Agnes played jokes on the Indians 
and they thought she liked them, so they trusted her. Sometimes, 
when she had cooked her meat on a sharp-pointed stick before the 
fire, she would hold the sharp point near the cheek of an Indian 
and call to him, so when he turned his head he would jab his 
cheek on the stick; then she and the other Indians would laugh 
at him. So they thought she was happy to be with them. When 
it came time for the tribe to move, they put Agnes on a pony 
with her sister on behind her. They followed along with the 
Indians until they came to a stream, when Agnes stopped to let 
her pony drink. As soon as the Indians were out of sight, she rode 
in another direction and at last found a white settlement." 
****** 

T. C. Bundy, a great-grandson of Agnes, writes: "Great- 
grandmother was stolen by the Indians in about 1790. In 
Georgia the Indians raided the settlement and killed all the family 
except Agnes and one sister, girls of about twelv^e and fifteen years 
of age, whom they carrietl into captivity. Their father was killed 
in the yard and fell across the path where the girls had to step 
over his dead body. After traveling a while, some of the Indians 
wanted to kill the girls and some wanted to save them. Finally 
they seated them on a log and drew their bows to shoot them, 
when one Indian, who was determined to save the girls' lives, 
knocked the arrows out of the bows. The Indians then decided 
to keep them and take them to their town. On the whole, they 
were well treated until they were grown. Then the Indians 
decided it was time for them to marry. The girls made no objec- 
tions to this, but told the Indians it was customary tor the white 
people to make certain preparations tor marriage, such as storing 
fruit and berries. The Indians assented to this preparation and 
the girls went out into the woods to gather and dry berries. Every 
day they would go a little farther and stay a little longer, until 
finally they made the break ami ran away. .After traveling many 
days, they met two young white men on ln^rscback; the young 
men put the twirls on their horses and started tor the settlement, 

but 



432 



Our x^ncestors — The Stantons 



but before reaching home the younger girl was taken sick and died. 
One of the young men was WiUiam Hodgin. • He later married 
Agnes, my great-grandmother, and moved to Ohio in 1803. In 
1811 he built the Chalkley Bundy brick house, probably the first 
brick house in Warren Township." 

Mary B. (Sears) Niblock writes concerning the Indian Story 
and Agnes Childrey: 

"As I remember what her daughter Aunt Rebecca Doudna 
and also my grandmother Sears told me as a child she, Agnes 
Childrey, was playing in and near a big hollow stump when she 
saw some Indians coming. She hid in the stump till they left, 
so escaped being found and carried away as her sisters were. 
I do not remember clearly what she did afterwards nor in regard 
to her parents. I have a faint recollection that aunt and grand- 
mother said the girl's parents were from home. I well recall 
how sister Sarah and I wondered what the stump was like and 
how she could see the Indians taking her sisters away without 
the Indians seeing her. There was a large, hollow chestnut stump 
on our home place that we decided must be similar to the one 
where she hid and we would play around and in it with that idea 
in mind, of course I know we may have had the wrong thought, but 
it is the one that has stayed with me." 

It is not surprising that the story should vary when repeated 
so many times, and we can readily believe that when told to small 
children, certain portions were wisely omitted. There seems little 
doubt that all the stories refer to the one occurrence. 

The principal settlement of Friends in Georgia was nearWrights- 
borough, McDuffie County. This settlement was made in 1770 
and ended in 1803. Although they tried to live peaceably with 
the Indians, there was much trouble experienced, and finally the 
Friends moved away. 

William Hodgin was born in 1766. He, with William Patten, 
visited Ohio in 1802. In 1803 they returned and brought their 
families. William Hodgin died in North Carolina in 1820 when 
on a visit. 



w 



I 



THE FOX SKIN 

HF^N I was a boy going to school, about 1857, I otten 
noticed fox tracks in the snow. At a certain place 
in the road the tracks showed where two foxes had 
crossed and recrossed it many times going from one 
ridge to another. Oh, how I wanted to catch those foxes! I 
thought if only I had a gun I could hide nearby and watch for 
them. But I had no gun, so that thought was abandoned. I 
had a fine shepherd dog, but I knew he couldn't catch them, so 
that method was also abandoned. Then I had a happy thought, 
"I will borrow a neighbor's steel trap and set it in their path 
and maybe one will step on it." I did this, but the sly foxes 
walked around my trap instead of stepping on it. 

I knew that foxes were fond of chicken, so I decided to take 
one of my mother's chickens and bait the trap with it. So I 
killed the chicken, took it over to the trap, built a pen by driving 
sticks in the ground close together in a circle about three feet 
across, leaving an opening on one side just large enough to fit 
the trap, set the trap in the opening anil placed the chicken in 
the pen. The foxes could not get the chicken without passing 
over the trap. For several mornings as I went to school I would 
peep over to see if the fox was there. Everything was just as 
I had left it and I began to get discouraged, when one morning, 
to my surprise, there he stood with one toot fast in the trap! 
I at first thought it was our neighbor's big yellow dog, but when 
he saw me he jumped the length of the chain and then I got a 
glimpse of his big bushy tail and knew I had the tox all right. 

I ran 
433 



434 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

I ran home in great excitement and shouted to everyone I met, 
"I've caught a fox! I've caught a fox!" They just laughed at 
me and said, "I'll bet Henry has caught someone's yellow dog." 
"No," said I, "he has a great bushy tail." Whereupon grand- 
father, Henry Stanton, remarked, "Now, maybe the boy has a 
fox." I called Frank, my dog, and we started for the trap. As 
soon as Frank caught sight of the fox, he jumped upon it and 
killed it. It was, indeed, no yellow dog, but a genuine large, red 
fox. When I got it home, with some effort, I'll grant, everyone 
wanted to see it. Grandfather and I took it into the old wash- 
house and skinned it, then tacked the skin up on the outside to 
dry. I think I went hundreds of times to see if it was drying all 
right. After a long and impatient wait, I pronounced it ready for 
market. I took it down, rolled it up, and started for town. 

Now, Isaac Hawkhammer, a Jew of the type who never paid 
a cent cash for anything if he could help it, kept a large miscel- 
laneous store and bought furs, such as fox, mink, skunk, and 
muskrat. I was surprised at the pile he had and wondered how 
so many were caught. W^hen I went in he said, "Well, son, 
what have you there?" "A fox skin for sale," I replied. He 
took it, unrolled it, examined it and said, "I can't buy that. 
You let the dog kill it. Here is a hole and a part of the tail is 
gone." He showed me some beautiful ones for which he had 
paid a big price — three dollars. I felt discouraged and began 
wrapping mine up, when he said, "I will take it and give you a 
due bill for fifty cents. You can bring it in next time and I'll 
pay you." Disheartened, I took the due bill which, by the way, 
I could not read. 

I went from there to the shop where I had left my shoes to be 
mended and they asked me there how much I got for the skin. 
I told them the whole story and they said it was just like him to 
beat a boy out of fifty cents. 

I took the due bill home, put it in a drawer and promptly 
forgot it until I heard of his death some time later. Then I gave 
it up as lost. Nearly two years later, I was again in the shoe- 
shop, when one of the shoemakers asked, "Well, did you ever 
get your fox skin money?" He asked if I still had the due bill 
and when I told him I had, he said to take it to Squire Meeks, 
who was administrator for the Hawkhammer estate, and he would 
pay me. 

The 



The Fox Skin 435 

The next time I was in town I took it and handed it to Squire 
Meeks. He read it and asked why I had not presented it sooner. 
I told him that I knew Mr. Hawkhammer had died and thought 
that ended it, until I was recently told to take it to him and I 
would be paid. He then said he would have to write out an 
affidavit and for me to come in again in a few days, when he 
would be ready for me to sign and be sworn to the affidavit before 
he could pay me. I tell you I was scared when he said I would 
have to swear to something, for mother had always told me never 
to say a swear word and I could not remember that I ever had. 
However, the next time I went to town I took my due bill, with 
fear and trembling, back to the Squire. When I handed it to 
him for a second time, he re-read it, walked over to his desk, 
opened it and took out a roll of foolscap paper, perhaps three 
or four sheets, all closely written over. How well I remember to 
this day how I wondered what this all meant and how I was to 
swear. Then he said, "Son, I have here a written affidavit in 
regard to that bill which you hold against the Hawkhammer 
estate. You will have to swear to it." (How scared I was!) 
"Please hold up your right hand." I did it quickly and he read 
the affidavit and then said a lot about it and finally said, "Is 
this the truth, the whole truth," etc. I told him it was and he 
said, "That is all," and I had not said a bad word! He then 
opened a drawer, took out fifty cents and gave it to me. I hurried 
to the shoemaker's shop and told them all about it and one said, 
"Didn't I tell you you could get it that way!" 

Thus, after much work, long waiting, a persistent effort, and 
a big scare, I got my fifty cents for a genuine red fox skin. 

Columhns, Henry S. Dawson'. 

Ohio, 

1919. 



FRIENDS' MEETINGS 



THE first Friends' meeting for worship in 
Warren Township was held in 1803 in a 
log cabin erected by James Vernon near the 
present location of the "Township Grave- 
yard." In the spring of 1804 the Friends of 
the neighborhood erected a log meeting house near the 
middle of "Section Nine" on ten acres of land purchased 
later of Richard and Ann Croy. The location of this 
meeting house was within the boundaries of the present 
Stillwater burying ground and near the northeast 
corner. This was the first building erected in the town- 
ship for the purpose of holding religious meetings. 
Another room was added to this building in 1805, in 
which business meetings were conducted. 

This log house was replaced about 1812 by a brick 
building which was enlarged in 1823 or 1824 to a size 
about thirty-eight feet wide by ninety-seven feet 
long with a twelve-foot story. This building remained 
in constant use until the spring of 1878, when it was 
demolished, so the present meeting house, measuring 
sixty by one hundred feet, could be built on the same 
location. This new house cost nine thousand dollars. 

In 
437 



438 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

In the spring of 1805 a Preparative Meeting was 
established at Stillwater, followed on the twenty-ninth 
of Third month, 1808, by a Monthly Meeting. On 
Eleventh month Twenty-eighth, 1821, there was estab- 
lished by an order of Ohio yearly meeting, Stillwater 
Quarterly Meeting, to be composed of Plainiield, 
Stillwater, Alum Creek (Delaware County, Ohio), 
and Somerset Monthly Meetings. 

The following information concerning the estab- 
lishment of other meetings under Stillwater Monthly 
Meeting was taken from the minutes of that Meeting 
and establishes the fact that: In Sixth month, 1808, 
an "indulged meeting" was granted to Friends "living 
down Captina Creek," which privilege was continued 
until the establishment of Captina Preparative Meet- 
ing in 1816. — In Second month, 1809, a request was 
granted for an indulged meeting for Friends "living 
down Leatherwood Creek," which continued until 
the establishment of Richland Preparative Meeting 
in 1816. — In 1811 Ridge indulged meeting was granted 
and the Preparative Meeting established in 1815. — 
In 1818 Somerset Monthly Meeting was established 
and consisted of Somerset and Ridge Preparative 
Meetings. 

Thus many meetings were established within a com- 
paratively short period of time and shows the rapid 
spread of the established Friends' families throughout 
the western part of Belmont County soon after Ohio 
was admitted to the Union. Most of these meetings 
continue today, some with increased membership, 
while others report a decreasing attendance. 

Barnesvilk, Mary B. Niblock. 

Ohio, 

1921, 



THE OLD MEETING HOUSE 

STILLWATER, OHIO 

By SARAH D. (DOUDNA) SEARS 

Barnesville, Ohio 
9-17-1S78. 

Our dear old meeting house is gone; 

We've torn it all away: 
The walls, which stood the storms of years, 

Were levelled in a day; 
We've built a new one in its place, 

'Tis nicer, well we know: 
With longer aisles and easier seats. 

And ceiling white as snow. 

We do not doubt but it is best 

The new was built, and yet 
We think upon our dear old house 

With feelings of regret: 
For there in childhood's early years 

Were many family bands 
Into the house of God first led 

By loving mothers' hands. 

While more than threescore years rolled by, 

Through man and womanhood, 
To this same house their steps were bent 

To seek the Fount of good. 
And when gray hairs have silvered o'er 

Each once-fair, youthful brow. 
Some laid them down in peace to sleep, 

Some see our new house now. 

And holy influence there was cast 

Upon the hearts around, 
Until it seemed we almost deemed 

That spot was hallowed ground. 
Oh! could those walls a record give 

Of all the truths there heard, 
How would "our hearts within us burn" 

At holy memories stirred. 

But let us leave our treasured house, 

And trust that in the new 
Will fall upon our waiting hearts 

Refreshing Heavenly dew. 

439 



440 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

The New House 

I am thinking of the new one, 

Now as from the old I part; 
And with longings for our welfare, 

I have questioned in my heart: 

Will we be more true and faithful. 

When within the new we meet? 
Will we be as meek disciples, 

Sitting at the Saviour's feet? 
Will our meeds of praise rise sweeter 

Than they did within the old? 
Will each heart in deep contrition 

Seek the depths of Love untold? 

Can we yield earth's dearest treasures? 

Lay its "weights and burdens down?" 
Will we count no cross too heavy 

For the gaining of a crown? 
Can we yield our all, in reverence, 

To the Holy Spirit's power? 
Will the sleepers learn to waken? 

Can we "watch with Him one hour?" 

Will we imitate more closely 

Quakers of the olden time — 
"Sons and daughters of the morning," 

Children of a faith sublime? 
And, should God see meet to prove us, 

Could the aged and the youth 
Suffer cruel persecution. 

To procure the cause of Truth? 

Well we know, the new house never, 

One stained heart can make more pure, 
And God's mercy is not greater 

Just because our house is newer. 
But I would, oh, Heavenly Father, 

That we might more faithful be; 
That "this house which we have builded" 

We might dedicate to Thee. 

Not with formal words and phrases. 
Not with worldly pride and show; 

But that, from each heart, sweet praises 
_^ Daily to Thy throne might flow; 

That we might when there assembled, 
Bow more meekly 'neath Thy rod; 

Strive to be more humble followers; 
More a people serving God. 




A BENCH FROM THE OLD STILLWATER 
MEETING HOUSE 




THE benches from the old meeting house which 
was torn down in 1878 were apparently en- 
tirely hand-made. The top, bottom and 
front rails were dovetailed to the end piece 
in addition to secure nailing. The top rail is 
held by a hand-made rivet through a diamond-shaped 
washer. Both are characteristic of the okl days ot' hand- 
wrought hardware. All of the benches were of poplar 
wood. 



442 



Our Ancestors — The Stantoxs 




STILLWATER MEETING HOUSE— EAST SIDE 

The machine work on the iron supports of the backs of the seats was done by William 
H. Stanton. He also helped with much of the mill- work, which was done at the 
Belmont Machine Works, Barnesville, Ohio. The meeting house was built in 1878. 




MEMBERS ATTENDING OHIO YEARLY MEETING 

At Stillwater Meeting House, 1921 
Porch posts are black walnut, from the interior of the Old Meeting House. 



Friends' Mee'iix(,.s 



443 




STILLWATER MEETING HOUSE— VIEW FROM NORTH SIDE 

Location of first log meeting house, built is the sprimg of 1834, is shown by the 

WHITE SQUARE IN THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE PRESENT BURYING GROUND. 



■jjprrt*^ 


!!W*>ij^«ii^ 


ij» 






fi 


1 , 


>'' ^^^^B^7^3H^^I 


Rl 


11 


^|^^fc^^''-''^^B ■ 




^^^^^■mk'^^m^^^^^^^^^Si^hv _*^ 


HB^HHttii 



HORSE SHED USED BY ELI STANTON 

It PROTECTED HIS TEAM DURING MEETING HOURS. THE SUED WAS 
BUILT BEFORE 1860 AND TORN DOWN IN 1921. 



444 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




MOUNT PLEASANT YEARLY MEETING HOUSE 

Built in 1815-16. It is sdctv-two by ninety feet. 




MOVEABLE SHUTTER 

Mount Pleasant Yearly Meeting House. 



Friends' MERTiNf;.s 



44-' 




MACHINERY FOR RAISING AND LOWERING SHLTIER 

Mount Pleasant Yearly Meeting House. 



'M(fM 



HK shutter separating the men's and women's rooms of 
the Mount Pleasant Yearly Meeting House was of large 
dimensions and was arranged to be wound up on a drum 
located above the ceiling. This drum had five sides, and 



the shutter was hinged so that as it revolved and increased in 
size the panels between the hinges were increased a correspond- 
ing amount; on the end of the drum was a large wheel carrying 
several coils of heavy rope; this rope in turn was attached to a 
vertical shaft with hand-bars by which it was turned as the men 
walked around the circular track; the windlass was provided with 
a ratchet wheel and pawl. The design is very ingenious and the 
workmanship on the wood parts very well done. The iron work 
may be considered good when we remember the very primitive 
tools and supplies which they had in 1815 and 1816. 



446 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




GOSHEN MEETING HOUSE 

All that is left of a once well-filled meeting house. 




DETAIL OF GOSHEN MEETING HOUSE 

Showing the way log houses in general were "chinked and daubed." The 

BLOCKS OF wood WERE SAWED AND SPLIT AND FILLED INTO THE SPACE BETWEEN THE 
LOGS WITH A LAYER OF CLAY MUD — IN THE BETTER HOUSES LIME MORTAR — BETWEEN 
THEM. The INTERIOR WAS FINISHED BY PLASTERING ALMOST FLUSH WITH THE SUR- 
FACE OF THE LOGS. On THE OUTSIDE THE PLASTER WAS APPLIED AT A SLIGHT ANGLE 
TO CATCH LESS WATER AND DIRECT THE WATER OUT OF THE JOINT. 



I^'riknds' Meetixgs 



447 




SITE OF CAPTINA MEETING HOUSE 

Stone base of chimney is all that remains. Aaron and Thomas Dewees 

STANDING in THE GRAVEYARD. 

Photograph taken in 1907. 




SHUTTERS FROM SHORT CREEK MEETING HOUSE 

Ili-.NRY Stanton and (."laky rAiriKsoN weke m\kkied in this house j-.H>-1809. 








STILLWATER MEETING HOUSE IN WINTER 

Photographed about 1910. 




FRIENDS' MEETING HOUSE, 
LANSDOWNE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Built 1830. 




LITTLE BRICK SCHOOL HOUSE 



THE LITTLE BRICK SCHOOL HOUSE 



THE little brick school house was built some 
time prior to 1833 and was in continuous 
use from that time until 1899, when it was 
torn down and the new frame school house 
erected. During these years, many generations of 
Friends in Stillwater neighborhood attended school in 
this almost primitive brick structure that has en- 
deared itself to all who have started their lite's educa- 
tion within its walls. 



450 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




SAMPLER OF MOUNT PLEASANT BOARDING SCHOOL 

Made by Mary Smith (Davis) about 1837 or '38. Now in the possession of 
Ellen Stanton Pennell. 




MOUNT PLEASANT BOARDING SCHOOL 

Built 1835-36. 
From a water-color drawing by J. Hervey Binns, 1872. 



Our / 




F 



1. Anna C. Stanton 

2. Rachel Binns 

3. Ellen D. Stanton 

4. Everett G. Hall 

5. Emily Frame 

6. Ida Stanton 

7. Elma Hall 

8. Lewis J. Taber 

9. E. Dean Stanton 

10. Lura Frame 

11. Elsie Hall 

12. Selma Taber 

13. William Taber 



\nvr\i A i> o 



•fnyryfi 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




1. Anna C. Stanton 

2. Rachel Binns 

3. Ellen D. Stanton 

4. Everett G. Hall 

5. Emily Frame 

6. Ida Stanton 

7. Elma Hall 

8". Lewis J. Taber 
9. E. Dean Stanton 

10. Lura Frame 

11. Elsie Hall 

12. Selma Taber 

13. William Taber 




14. Chalkley Bundy 

15. Alice Edgerton 

16. Esther Edgerton 

17. Carl Edgerton 

18. Ethel Blowers 

19. Mary Stratton 

20. Walter Stratton 
2K Emma Edgerton 

22. Edna M. Stanton 

23. Bertha BundV 

24. W. Macy Stanton 

25. Anna Taber, Teacher 



The Scholars Attending the "Little Brick,'' Winter 18^4-5. 




A LAMP FROM MOUNT PLEASANT 
BOARDING SCHOOL 

Now IN THE POSSESSION OF AnXA STAXTON' PaLMER. 



FRIENDS' SCHOOLS 



SINCE the foundation of the Society, Friends 
have been systematic and thorough in edu- 
cation, and as they moved and settled in 
new sections of the country, the school 
house was among the first buildings to be 
erected. In some cases school was held in the Meet- 
ing House until it was possible to construct a sepa- 
rate building. 

The Friends who settled the western part of Belmont 
Countv chose Samuel Barrv as their first teacher. 

The 
451 



452 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




WESTTOWN SCHOOL— 1810 

From a crayon drawing. 



The school was taught in the Stillwater Meeting House 
in the winter 1805-1806. The following summer the 
first school house in Warren Township was erected 
by Friends in Section One on the Ridge between the 
Hezekiah Bailey farm and the present Number One 
District School. As this school house was a little 
distance from the Meeting House, school was also 
held in the Stillwater Meeting House for a number 
of years until some time prior to 1833 a school house 
called "The Little Brick" was built near the Meeting 
House. In 1899 "The Little Brick" School House 
was torn down and replaced by a frame building. 

On account of the scattered population due to the 
rural districts in which Friends lived, it became neces- 
sary that the .higher branches of education should 
be taught in a centrally located school. The limited 
modes of travel necessitated a school at which the 
pupils could live. Therefore, in 1836, a large brick 

boarding 



Friends' Schools 



453 




WESTTOWN SCHOOL, 1870 

Boys' 15u[lding. 




WESTTOWN SCHOOL, 1S70 
Girls' Uiuluinc. 



454 



Our Axcestors — The Stantons 




NEW WESTTOWN SCHOOL 

Girls' End. 



boarding school was completed at Mount Pleasant in 
Jefferson County, Ohio, near the Ohio Yearly Meeting 
House. 

After the separation in the society in 1854, Mount 
Pleasant Boarding School remained under the control 
of the Wilbur branch, but in 1874 the courts ruled 
that the property rightfully belonged to the other 
branch. The Wilburs accordingly gave up the property 
and decided to build a boarding school at Stillwater. 
The necessary funds were raised by popular subscrip- 
tion and the building erected and opened for school 
on New Year's Day, 1876. The school was known as 
"Barnesville" or "Olney Boarding School" and con- 
tinuous sessions were held in the building until the 
Thirty-first of Third month, 1910, when the building 
was destroyed by fire. The brick walls of the burned 

building 



Krie\ds' Schools 



45^ 




FRIENDS' BOARDING SCHOOL, BARNESVILLE, OHIO 

As ORIGINALLY BUILT IN 1875 AND OPENED 1-1-1876. 



I 




FRIENDS' BOARDING SCHOOL. BARNESVILLE, OHIO 
Rebuilt after the tire on 3-31-1910. 



456 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

building were found to be in perfect condition after 
the conflagration, so that a new structure was erected 
within the walls similar to the former building with 
the exception of the reduction in the number of stories 
to comply with the State school law. Separate cottage 
dormitories were constructed, together with other 
buildings, forming a modern school plant. 

After the middle of the nineteenth century many 
of the young Friends, after attending Mount Pleasant 
or Barnesville, continued their studies at Westtown 
Boarding School in Pennsylvania. 

The many families which made their homes in that 
section of Ohio, of which Stillwater is the center, have 
sent their children to some of these schools in which 
they were taught the fundamentals of education that 
fortified them against the problems of daily life and 
fitted them better to live that the community felt the 
influence of their lives. 

Barnesville, ^ary B. Niblock. 

Ohio, 
1921. 




VASE MADE FROM RAFTER 
OF LITTLE BRICK SCHOOL 




*'COLE'S MILL" 

N 1804 there came from North Carolina to 
Ohio a colony of Friends, most ot whom 
settled in Belmont County, Ohio. Among 
these was Richard Edgerton, whose daughter 
Anna was the third wife of John Bundy. 
He settled on a tract of land some iive miles southeast 
of Barnesville, Ohio. This farm was known tor many 
years as the Archie Cole farm. 

After becoming settled in his primeval home, Richard 
Edgerton built a grist-mill on the north side ot Captina 
Creek. This stream of water flowed through his land 
and furnished an abundant supply of water to fill the 
long race that conducted the water to the old-time 
overshot water-wheel, 

Isaac Patten, a half-brother of Ruth Patten, the 
first wife of John Bundy, bought, probably about 1825, 
the farm and mill of Richard Edgerton anil made many 
changes in the building, also improving the mill-race; 
but he was not content until he had the old mill torn 
down and a larger structure erected in which he in- 
stalled the best equipment of those days tor making 
choice buckwheat flour, corn meal and wheat flour. 

He 
457 



458 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

He also put in a sawmill which did good work in 
sawing out boards of various dimensions, frame tim- 
ber, studding, etc., as well as hundreds of cords of 
fire wood, as late as the year 1882. 

The carpenter work on this new mill was done or 
overseen by Joseph Williams, who also directed the 
putting in of all of the machinery, he being in the full 
sense of the word a "millwright." 

After Isaac Patten's death his son, Mahlin Patten, 
controlled and operated the mill until it was bought 
and run by a Mr. Bierd. It was then known as Bierd's 
Mill until about 1864, when it was purchased by 
Archibald Cole, Senior, who owned it the remainder of 
his life or until about 1910. 

Cole's Mill, as built by Isaac Patten, was a five-story 
building one hundred feet by sixty feet. The over- 
shot water-wheel was twelve feet in diameter and eight 
feet across its rim. It was a good wheel and did ex- 
cellent work until that day in 1883 when a workman 
turned the full volume of water on to it at a time when 
not only the wheel itself, but all of the machinery, was 
standing still. The sudden great demand on the wheel 
to move all the machinery caused it to break. 

A. G. Cole, a grandson of Archie Cole, says: 

''This was one of the best — in fact, the best built 
mill that I ever saw in eastern Ohio. The frame was 
made of select white oak, hewed with broadax as 
smooth as the average carpenter would dress today with 
a plane. The building showed that it was the work of 
an expert. It was five stories high, counting the upper 
part where there was quite a -little machinery. 

"The part of the old mill that is still standing was 
what we called the wagon shed — in fact, it was not used 

for 



"Cole's Mill" 45^ 

for any of the machinery, it was just the north end of 
the old mill. 

"When I was a small boy the water-wheel broke, 
and grandfather Cole did not think that it would pay 
him to rebuild it, owing to the fact that he could only 
run the mill very little of the time because of the lack 
of sufficient water. After the white oak forests were 
cut the water soon ran off those old hills and the dam 
would not hold water enough to run very long at a 
time. I just remember seeing the old mill run and 
can remember seeing the people come on horseback 
with their two-bushel sacks of wheat or corn to be 
ground, and I can see the old miller taking out one- 
eighth for what he called "toll," then dumping the 
remainder of the grain into the hopper and grinding out 
the grain that the customer brought. Each man got 
flour from the grain that he brought. 

"The mill-dam was three-quarters of a mile west of 
the mill and there was always quite a little trouble in 
keeping the race in shape. The dam also gave a great 
deal of trouble, and soon after they quit using the mill 
the channel of the creek changed and made it almost 
impossible to bring the water back into the race. 

"There was also a sawmill, which was about one 
hundred feet west of the mill. A great deal of lumber 
was sawed at this mill. I can just remember seeing 
Thompson Smith sawing there when he was a young 
man. 

"I am very sorry that these properties were not kept 
up, for they were built so well that they would have 
lasted centuries if they had been kept properly roofed. 
I have never seen such foundations as were under both 
these mills — all built of the best of cut stone." 

East Canton, Marv C. (Bundv) Smith. 

Ohio, 

1921. 




COLE'S MILL 

The Old Wagon Shed — all that now remains of the mill. 




OW I wish we could again drive 
down the winding road into the 
old mill, receive the hearty 
greetings of the dusty miller, 
feel the cool shade of the big building, 
hear the mighty splash of the water — 
the rumble of the great gears and the 
whir of the machinery — but the dam is 
dry, the race filled up, the miller gone 
to his long home and not a sound in 
the little that remains of "Cole's Mill." 

W. H. S. 



BOBBIE" PETERS, COOK 



WHEN Friends, leaving the South on account of slavery 
came to Ohio, many of them brought with them freed 
S^^^ colored people, among whom was "Bobbie" Peters, who 
^^•f^'^i came with Jesse Bailey, Sr., from Dinwiddie County, 
Virginia, in 1811. 

Evidently this same "Bobbie" Peters occupied a cabin, later 
part of the tobacco house which stood across the hollow south of 
our old log house, for Father told me that an old colored man of 
that name once lived there. The cabin was probably erected by 
Jesse Bailey, Sr., and occupied by him while he was building the 
hewed log house that many years later became our home. There 
were four apple trees planted near this cabin, one of which had 
blown down but still bore apples — a variety that was green and 
flat, very hard in the fall, and a very late keeper. 

"Bobbie" was a small man and wore a "spade tail" coat which 
came down almost to his boot tops. It is said that he was the 
only colored man who was ever a member of Stillwater Quarterly 
Meeting. At one time he lived on the farm of Robert H. Smith, 
Sr., and "kept" the Meeting House. He was a famous cook and 
cake baker as well. No wedding dinner was quite right unless 
"Bobbie" cooked it. 

Robert Smith says, "He kept his cooky box well filled tor the 
boys of the neighborhood and if he was not on hand when they 
called they would sometimes climb down the stick chimney of 
his cabin to get them, though they knew the door was never 
locked, just to hear him scold about them 'ornery' boys that 
would steal his cookies; but it pleased him and was just what he 
wanted and expected them to do." It is surmised that Robert 
Smith was a competent judge of good cookies when he was a boy. 

At last, no longer able to work, "Bobbie" went to live near 
Stanton and Ann (Nancy) Bailey Bundy and was cared for by 
them and their family while he lived, the meeting paying some- 
thing towards his support. He died sometime in the forties and 
was laid to rest in Stillwater burying ground by those whom he 
had faithfully served, far from his sunny south, but in a land of 
peace and freedom. 

\V. H. S. 



PIONEER CLOTH 



THE present generation knows but little of the 
inconvenience and hardships our forefathers 
had to endure while making their homes in 
the wilderness and clearing up our now 
beautiful land, once the home of Indians, 
wild beasts and venomous reptiles. In these days, when 
we are in need of food and raiment we may step into 
a store and be supplied with them ready for immediate 
use, but in pioneer days many of our forefathers had 
to prepare the grain for food by grinding it on hand- 
mills or horse-mills or by cooking it whole, until water- 
mills could be provided, and had to raise flax and wool 
and make it into clothing and bedding by hand — a 
slow process, since the spinning was done on a machine 
with one spindle and the weaving on hand-looms. 

Flax was grown for its seed and fiber — the seed 
being used to make linseed oil and the fiber for thread, 
clothing, linen table cloths, etc. After the seed was 
cleared ofl*, the flax was laid out on the ground, some- 
what as grain is laid from the grain cradle, in swaths 
to rot in order to make the woody part of the stems 
tender as a preparation for the break. The fall of the 

year 
462 



Pioneer Cloth 463 




FLAX NEEDLES 

The needles were hand-made from hard wood by 

Joseph W. Doldna's grandfather about the year 

1812 and were lsed in making harness for looms used 

to weave flax. 



year was considered the best time for this work. The 
breaking process broke and loosened the woody part 
of the stems for the swingling process, which in turn 
took out any part of the woody substance left by the 
break. And lastly came the hackling or combing, 
which prepared the long fiber and tow for spinning. 
The long, straight fiber was wound on the distaff; 
the tow was not wound on the distaff, but was spun 
from a bunch lying on the lap of the operator. 

The wool was carded into rolls, either b\' hand or 
at the woolen mills, and the rolls spun into yarn tor 
filling the web on the large woolen spinning-wheel. 
Stocking yarn was made in the same way except that 
the strands were doubled and then twisted again on 
the same wheel. This wheel required the operator 
to be all the time on foot and do much walking to 
and fro, while the flax spinning-wheel cmild be operated 
only in a sitting posture. 

Let 



464 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




DIAGRAM OF A FLAX SPINNING-WHEEL 

Showing detail of "fliers" and the course of the thread. 



Pioneer Cloih 465 

Let A represent the uprights upon which the fliers 
are supported, B the spindle, C the fliers, D the spool, 
E the whirl. On the right end of the spindle is the 
whirl with two or three channels for one of the bands 
to run in. At the right end of the spool there is another 
channel a little smaller in diameter than the channels 
on the whirl for the other band to run in. The band, 
which should be of wool and about 3^ inch in diameter, 
is made just long enough to reach from the wheel to 
the spindle twice. The channel on the spool is a 
little smaller in diameter than the channels of the 
whirl, thereby making the spool run the faster, and 
that is the reason it winds the thread on the spool 
while twisting. If it inclines to take up the thread 
too fast it is an easy matter to hold on to the thread 
until it is twisted enough, and while the spool is not 
allowed to run any faster than the fliers, the band 
running in the spool channel slips until the spinner 
slackens her grip on the thread, when it immediately 
begins to wind upon the spool. 

The flax fiber, after it is nicely combed or hackled out, 
is taken in one hand and the distafl-' in the other; the 
fiber is placed sideways to the distafl" and is wound on 
with the ends of the fiber parallel to the distaff, with 
the ends hanging down. Spinning is begun by pulling 
out just the right amount while twisting to make the 
thread the proper size, and this operation continues 
until all is spun off the distafl" or the spool is filled. 
When the spool is full the band running in the spool 
channel is lifted off to one side in order that the spool 
may run free and the thread is reeled off the spool. 

The end of the spindle where the thread is ted in 
is hollow, with an opening in the side near the point 
where it enters the fliers, through which the thread 

comes 



466 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



comes out and runs along over the hooks on the fliers 
and down to the spool. In order to ensure an even 
filling of the spool from end to end the thread has to 
be moved back and forth along the hooks as the spin- 
ning goes on. 

The spinning-wheel for flax could also be used for 
spinning wool after the wool was carded into rolls, 
and for spinning long fiber wool into stocking yarn 
right out of the fleece; this last could not be done 
on the large wool spinning-wheel unless the wool was 
first carded into rolls. The chief use of this wheel, 
however, was for spinning flax — the long, straight, 

strong 




FLAX BREAKER 

Built by Joseph W. Doudna in 1859, and has been in his family 
ever since. 



PioxEER Cloth 



467 



HACKLINt; FLAX 




TO COMB OUT 

THK TANGLED 

I H READS 




FLAX HACKLE 

USED BY 
MARY DAVLS, 



JOSEPH W, 
DOUDNA 




THE MOTHER 
OF JANE D. 
STANTON 



SCITCHING 
FLAX 



468 



Our Ancestors — The Stanton s 



Strong fibers into thread for sewing, and thread or 

yarn for weaving into cloth for linen handkerchiefs, 

towels, cloth for clothing and household use. It was 

used also to spin the tow or coarser, weaker fiber of 

the flax plant into a thread or yarn usually a little 

coarser than the flax thread. This tow thread or yarn 

was used as a woof or filling with linen warp or chain 

and made the cloth for the tow linen shirts and pants 

of pioneer days. 

History tells us that as soon as Abraham Lincoln 

saw his parents and their children comfortably settled 

in their new home in Illinois, and had struck out for 

himself, the first thing he did was to split three thousand 

rails for enough walnut-dyed jeans for a suit of clothes. 

This same jeans was doubtless dyed in the very same 

kind of dye the writer of these lines (now in the eightieth 

year of his age) used to help prepare. The bark was 

stripped from white walnut trees and an ooze made 

with which the woolen yarn was colored after it was 

spun and ready for weaving. 

"How wondrous are the changes 
Since one hundred years ago, 
When the girls wore linen dresses 
And the boys pants of tow!" 



Barnesville, 

Ohio, 

1921. 



Jo^^A/^ WT^O-^-^^^^^T-tXi^ 




FLAX READY PREPARED FOR SPINNING INTO THREAD 



Pioneer Cloih 



■i'VJ 




FLAX READY FOR BREAKING 




FLAX READY FOR SCUTCHING 




TOW MADE BY HACKLING OR COMBING FLAX 

Ready to be spun into filunc. 



470 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




^,C_«'«W»'-i 




JOSEPH W. DOUDNA 

Covering a distaff with flax 
preparatory to spinning. 



FLAX SPINNING-WHEEL 



Pioneer Ci.oth 




SPINNING FLAX IN THE HOME OF 
JOSEPH VV. DOUDNA 



*:• >^ 



^ 



r,-^vfl^-^^L^ 




FLAX THREAD READY FOR USE 




An Old Wool Wheel 



WHO made the wheel? Who used it? Maybe grandmother 
or a great aunt. And now, as I look, who is the spinner 
whose sturdy figure is at the wheel? She is plainly clad 
in material somewhat heavy and coarse but simply cut 
and made. Her face is strong but very kindly — one 
you could trust. Her hands are muscular and hardened, but how 
many things they know how to do! 

With what pleasure she showed her new wheel to the visitor, 
and the neat rolls of yarn she had made and colored — the skeins 
twisted, then doubled and one end slipped in the loop of the 
other. How they admired the simple colors, the soft texture and 
the evenly spun and twisted thread. 

Where is the yarn spun on the old wheel — and the cloth — the 
coverlets — the stockings — mitts — pulsewarmers? All are gone, 
not a single piece is definitely known. Gone, too, is the musical 
tone of the wheel — beginning so low, then increasing under each 
impulse of the hand, and dying down again, then a few revolu- 
tions backward, and several forward to wind upon the spool the 
length of yarn spun and twisted. 

All are gone, and even memory fails us. How we would prize 
some samples of her handiwork, or her picture — what pleasure to 
hear the kindly sayings of this lovable ancestor of ours! 

472 




LAP-SHINGLE ROOF 

This style of roof was used before the day of shaved 

and jointed shingles, but perhaps not quite so early 

as the clapboard roof. 

From the horse sheds at Stillwater Meetinc. 



s 



EARLY SHINGLE ROOFS 

INCE part of the purpose of this history is 
to inform the younger generation concern- 
ing the events of pioneer days, and to 
turn the mind of the older back to pleasant 
memories of the past, a few details might 
be added in regard to the roofing of the cabins and 
early homes. 

Three kinds of shingles came into use, and which 
were preferred and required hand-work about in the 
order named — clapboard, lap-shingle, and jointed 
shingle. The clapboard was easiest to make, but the 
jointed shingle made a roof more nearly tight, especially 
against fine, driving snow, and is the one in general 

use now. 

In 

473 



474 Our Ancestors — The Staxtons 

In those days the settlers had no difficulty in getting 
plenty of roofing material, for there was the greatest 
abundance of all kinds of good timber. They were 
generally provided with the hand-tools to work this 
timber into the kind of shingle wanted. Ax and saw 
to cut the tree down and saw the trunk into "cuts" 
the length of the shingle, then maul and wedges to 
split the cuts into the blocks, and frow and drawing- 
knife to split the blocks into shingles and to shave 
them. 

The clapboards were usually cut three to four feet 
long. The manner of laying the clapboard was to 
begin the course by laying two boards with their 
edges together, then one over the joint, continuing 
in this way until that course was finished. Each 
course that followed covered the joints in the course 
already in place. In the new country nails could 
not be bought, so many roofs were pinned on with 
wooden pegs. 

Another kind of wooden roof which came into use 
soon after the clapboard, was the lap shingle. These 
shingles were generally made twenty-eight inches 
long, with one edge thick and the other thin. They 
were laid showing twelve inches to the weather, and 
in courses of three or four shingles in width from the 
eaves to the comb, instead of horizontally from end 
to end of the roof. 

Jointed 



AN AX HANDLE PATTERN 

The pioneers sought out the best shape and made patterns frou them which 
they kept as guides. 



Early Shingle Ro(ns 



475 



Jointed shingles were made ahcnit eighteen inches 
long, of equal width and about one-half inch thick 
at one end and tapered down to a feather at the other. 
They were laid edge to edge across the roof showing 
about five, or six inches to the weather and making 
the roof three courses in thickness. 

Clapboard and lap-shingles were usually made from 

white oak; the jointed shingles were made from 

chestnut, walnut, cedar, and poplar. Both kinds of 

roof have been known to last about fifty years. 

Barnesvilley Joseph \V. Doudxa. 

Ohio, 

1921. 




CLAPBOARD ROOF 

One of the earliest kinds ok roof iskd bv thk Pioneer. 
From a building at the uoue of Uriah Bailey. 



476 



Our Ancestors — The Staxtons 



BEFORE the days of power saw mills 
and good roads, our ancestors used 
small tools to make many articles of 
wood. The ax, saw, frow, and draw- 
ing-knife were most essential. After 
the tree had been cut down and trimmed up by 
the ax, short sections were sawed off, and these 
split into smaller blocks. Jesse I.Doudna is here 
shown splitting a block into clapboards to be 
used as shingles. 

The frow is driven into the center of the block 

by the mallet, 





HAND-SPLIT PLASTER LATH 



and the piece 
split in two. 
When the 
block has 
been reduced 
so thin that 
there is a ten- 
dency of the 
crack to run 
out of cen- 
ter, making 
one side thin 
and the other 
thick, the 
block was 
inserted in 
the forks of a 
log, the thick- 
er part down. 

Then the 
operator, by 
springing the 
lower half 
with his 
weight, at the 
same time 

bearing down on the handle of the frow, would 
draw the crack toward the center of the block, 
thus making the two pieces of equal size and 
uniform thickness. 

These early workers possessed very great skill 
in the use of their simple tools and by means of 
them made very beautiful clapboards, palings, 
lath, tobacco sticks and many similar articles, 
which were later made on the power saw mills. 

The good work of those days depended on the 
skill of the workman, and he took great pride in 
doing fine work, whereas today much of the best 
work is due to the excellence of the machinery 
and tools used in its manufacture. 




WILLIAM GIBBONS 




THE WAGONER 

HE old-time wagoner has crossed the last 
ridge and gone down out of sight. About 
all we know of him is what "father said" 
or what may be learned from a few things 
he left, now treasured as relics oi the 
early days. His was a sturdy manhood; his faithtul, 
willing horses were of good blood, and his wagon strong 
and dependable. Truly an outfit to challenge our ad- 
miration. 

To learn something of these old-time wagons let's 
drive over to W. F. Gibbons', a mile or so west of 
Somerton, Ohio, whose father, William Gibbons, was 
one of the old-time wagoners and lived in that big 

brick 
477 



478 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




LEVER BRAKE AND CHAIN 

Used on the old wagons. 



brick farm house on the hill. 
William's father, Homer 
Gibbons, born in Loudon 
County, Virginia, was a 
wagoner also, and William 
began driving for him when 
seventeen years old. | 

The wagon he bought 
and used when in business 
for himself had been built 
in Winchester, Virginia, for 
a man by the name of 
Williams for use in through 
hauls from Baltimore and 
the east to as far west as 
civilization extended. The 
rear wheels were six feet 
four inches high, the tires four inches broad. It was 
fitted with the old English or "scoop" bed and with 
the top box would hold one hundred bushels of ear 
corn. 

The regular outfit consisted of two full feeds of 
grain for six horses, a heavy wool blanket for each 
horse, feed trough, water buckets, body chains, ice 
cutters, tar bucket and two jack-screws. As there 
were six horses to pull and only two that could hold 
back it was very necessary to have reliable "rubbers" 
or "brakes." For moderate grades and bare roads the 
lever brake was pulled down and the chain hooked 
over a pin in the brake bar, but on steep grades and 
on icy roads the ice cutters were set under the wheels 
and held by chains so that they would cut into the 
ice and prevent slipping. 

The 



The Wagoner 



479 



The jacks were used to raise an axle when greasing 
the wheels and at night were placed one under the 
center of each axle, to take the heavy weight oif the 
axles and wheels. Such an outfit traveled hundreds of 
miles from home, carrying all kinds of freight and in 
all kinds of weather. 

Six horses were always driven to the wagon; out- 
fitted as above, it weighed 4,4(X) pounds and carried 
a load of 10,000 pounds on the National Road and a 
smaller one on country roads, the number of pounds 
depending on the condition of the road. It was generally 
used on hauls about Barnesville, as they paid better 
than the long hauls from the east. Its last use was 
in hauling stone to build the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad arch under Main Street in Barnesville. 

But who shall tell us about the Wagon Maker of 
the early days — that "white-oak artist" — and his 
"wagon studio" decorated about the door with splotches 
of "red lead," green, 
blue and yellow paint? 
Often an unpretentious 
building, time had 
trimmed the inside in 
harmonious tones of 
brown and gray. Along 
the wall stood the bench 
with straight, solid, 
heavy, wood top; there 
was the wooden screw 
and lever, both polish- 
ed smooth by long use, 
and such a heavy vise! 

On the wall the racks 
for tools — and such a 




ICE CUTTER AND WAGON LOCK 

Used on steep grades. 



lot 



480 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




WAGONER'S BELLS 

The prize given to the rescuer when a team had to be pulled 
OUT OF the mud, in the days of long wagon hauls. The bells 

WERE WORN attached TO THE HORSE'S HAMES. 

Owned by Willl^m F. Gibbons. 



lot of them: planes, saws, chisels, bits of all sizes, 
draw knives, spoke shaves, gauges, squares and many 
more. All showed signs of long use, but were bright, 
well ground and sharp; it would have been less danger- 
ous to strike the wagon maker's child or kick his dog 
than to "nick" one of those tools. Farther along were 
wood patterns for hounds, fellies, bolsters, axles, 
spokes and the various parts of the wagon. Out on 
the floor was the chopping block, a section of a log 
set on end, with a hand-ax sticking in it — no one ever 
laid a hand-ax down ! Farther toward the rear was the 
old round stove with cracks in the fire bowl and the 
crooked pipe that seemed ready to fall down. 

Then there was the wagon maker himself — a man 
of medium height, all bone and muscle; dressed in 
gray, with gray beard and gray hair, too, but a clear, 
sharp eye nevertheless; and a soft felt hat, one time 
black, but now gray with dust, the right brim rolled 

up 



The Wagon kr }sl 

up from many handlings, the band soaked many times 
with honest sweat; and such hands — horny palms and 
knotty knuckles, but no matter, they fitted the tool 
handles and that was all that was necessary. 

He did not talk much unless you said "wagon," 
then the words just rolled along in endless procession. 
For the small boy he ran out his choice conundrum, 
"Over the hills and over the hills and always has its 
tongue out?" He went to church on Sunday because 
he wanted to do right, and he roused up when the 
minister mentioned "chariots and horses" or the 
"oaks of Bashan"; anyhow it helped to fill in the 
time until Monday morning when he could live his 
normal life and carve out those wooden works of art 
in his shop. He knew wagons, could see one around 
the corner and tell who made it before it came in 
sight! He knew timber, too, thought God never made 
a better tree than the white oak and he would not 
have cared if He had not made any other. He picked 
out his timber "on the stump," chopped the tree 
down, cut off the logs, and had it sawed in great thick 
boards or slabs, then "stuck them up" in the yard on 
good foundation with sticks between and shaded from 
the sun so they could dry or "season" slowly and not 
crack. A year or two later they were brought into 
the shop for the finishing course in seasoning. 

When the timber was ready tor use a piece was 
carefully selected, and here the "cub" or apprentice 
was called in — that husky boy of undeveloped mind 
who was expected to have a well-developed back, 
a boy ready to work and anxious to learn. Here 
he was allowed to do a man's part and carry on^ 
end of the heavy plank to the stout trestles on the 

rioor. 



482 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



floor. Several layers of dust were swept off and the 
piece very carefully inspected. Then the patterns 
were laid down and placed to cut to the best advantage. 
Around each pattern the wagon maker cut a mark 
with a gouge scribe, which made a little round groove 
which he could see plainly. The patterns were then 
laid aside, and now his interest began to grow, for 
though the plank was dark and unattractive he knew 
the beauty on the inside and was impatient to get it 
out. The rip-saw and meat rind came down and he 
began. Think of sawing by hand a dry, hard plank 
some three inches thick; but evidently he enjoyed the 
work and each time he moved his trusty saw he sent 
it just that much farther through the wood. Generally 
he chewed tobacco — if the wood was extra hard more 
was required. Soon that piece was out and turned 
over to the "cub" to chip off some parts with the hand- 
ax, and woe betide him if he cut "below the line." 

Over on the bench, the side from 
which to lay out the work was 
planed down straight and out of 
"wind" — no need for a straight- 
edge or square, he had them both 
in his clear eye, and when he held 
the piece up to get the proper 
light and took a "squint" at it 
even his critical exactness could 
find no need for a tool. 

Then the piece was carefully and 
accurately "laid off" and other 
sides were worked down; much of 
the work was done with "draw" 
knives of various sizes. As a sur- 
face 




AN OLD WAGON HUB 

Showing the notch for taking 
out the linch pin. 



The Wagoner 



483 




TAIL NUT 

Before tools were so common it 
was customary to make nuts for 
bolts with a tail or handle, so 
that they could be tightened or 
loosened with any convenient 

HAMMER. 



face was finished what beau- 
tiful "grain" was exposed, and 
such delicate tints — it was gen- 
uine white oak, not red oak, 
nor chestnut, nor Spanish oak, 
nor any other one of the two 
dozen varieties that now pass 
for "oak," neither was it 
"dead" and worm eaten — 
worms do not work in "live" 
timber! It was tough, very 
tough, and hard and had the 
peculiar satin gloss that indi- 
cates great strength and long 
life. 

How the wagon maker en- 
joyed his chosen task! He 



knew the timber was reliable 
and he put into the work the 
best skill he possessed. He 
rounded out the most beau- 
tiful curves, circles and ovals 
and tangents to them — every 
cut he made seemed so easy, 
the piece just changed shape 
as a flower develops in a movie 

picture. 




■yW^-O*!* ■>_aiT«iT»B»»«^-««»* * 



WING NUT 

With li-.ft-hanu thrfad 



484 Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 

picture. How he enjoyed his work! It was all good, 
honest labor. The "fits" were all fits, — "glue joints" 
that would "pinch a hair." What did he care for 
"more wages, shorter hours, and better working 
conditions," work was pleasure and the consciousness 
of work well done was good pay. 

So one piece after another was carved out. Now 
a new pleasure — to fit these pieces together to make the 
whole complete. The wheel was given the propei 
"dish" — an arch effect, the tire was the "shew back* 
and the hub the "keystone," thus giving greatei 
strength to the wheel to carry the greater strain wher 
on the low side of the road; the axles were tapered s( 
that the spokes would stand vertically from the hul 
down and carry the load and all the angle given fron 
the hub upward; also the wheels were given sufficien 
"lead" to prevent the hubs from running hard agains 
either the collar or the linch pin. When all was com 
plete, the wagon maker with many fears trusted hi 
treasure to the blacksmith to be "ironed." Ther 
was a perennial quarrel on between the two — th 
ironwork was not so good as the woodwork, and th) 
woodwork was not so good as the ironwork, but an 
impartial judge would have admired both. Th 
iron in the hands of the blacksmith seemed to tur 
just the way he wanted it to, or to flatten out an' 
round itself off at the corner; he did not "beat" : 
into shape, but just tapped a little here and there anrj 
trimmed it off a little, patted it "easy like" with h: 
hammer and behold the pieces were fitted for th 
woodwork, in size and curve nicely matching th 
parts of the wood. The tires were bent and welde 
after careful trials with his "traveler" wheel to g<i 

the] 



The Wagoner 



485 



them just the right size, not too loose nor yet too 
tight, as this would injure the fellies. They were 
then heated in a circular wood-fire in the yard and 
when just hot enough were slipped on the wheel and 
quickly cooled — to burn the fellies was the "unpardon- 
able sin" in the mind of the wagon maker. There 
was indeed a friendly rivalry as to who should do the 
best work, and make a heavy edition of that famous 
one-horse shay, every piece of which you remember 
was made equally good and strong so that no one 
part gave out before the other. 

At 




TAR BUCKET 

Every wagoner carried a woodkm ihtket filikd with t\r rv-)R 

CREASING HIS WAGON. It WAS USIJALLV lIlNi; ON THK. COlTLINi". 
POLE UNDER THE WAGON. TlNE TAR WAS IN GKNKRAL ISE AS A 
LUBRICANT. FoUND AT THK HOME OF ROBERT PlLMMF-R, SOW 

OWNED UY Carver Bi'ndy. 



486 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

At last the wagon was finished; then came the 
painting — the best of linseed oil and "red lead" for 
the running gears, with the body finished in green or 
blue and the name, maybe, Isaac Perry, or Uriah 
Bailey, plainly painted on the side. Every effort was 
made to make the best; neither labor nor material 
was spared to secure this result. And when one day 
some farmer drove away from the shop with "the 
best wagon ever made" the artist heaved a sigh and 
felt as if he had parted forever from his long-time 
friend, but he wisely hid his sorrow, and — began 
carving out another masterpiece. 

Ridley Park^ William H. Stanton. 

Pennsylvania, 
1921. 




ImhmIi 




COBBLER'S TOOLS 

Shoemaking and repairing tools used for keeping the family footwear in 
repair and sometimes making a pair of boots or shoes, and mending the har- 
NESS AS NEEDED. USED IN THE HOME OF PeTER SeARS. 



i 




"CAMEL-BACK" FREIGHT ENGINE 

Designed for mountain grades on the Baltimore and Ohio. Some of these 

ENGINES were later USED ON THE CENTRAL OhIO DIVISION THROUGH BARNESVIU.E. 

Engineers liked this design because of its height and because they could 

EASILY see the TRACK AHEAD. NOTICE THE BOILER FEED-PLTIP CONNECTED TO THE 
REAR WHEEL. CaLEB STARBUCK STANDING ON STEPS. 



RAILROADS 



T 



MB 



HE first acquaintance of many of our relatives about 

Barnesville with railroads was with the Baltimore 

and Ohio. A half century has made a great change 

in the Central Ohio Division of this road, one of the 

early roads in the Middle West. 

Father told me that in 1856, when the road began running 
trains, they would sit on the porch at his home and listen for the 
whistle as the train passed the numerous grade crossings. There 
were almost no factories in those days and the sound of a sr^-am 
whistle was very rare. 

It must have been about ten years later when I saw rhc first 
locomotive that I can remember. Father took me to the '\ic[X)t" 
at Barnesville. I recollect holding his left hand as we walked 
out the wood platform to the engine. The train was headed 
east. The engine seemed as high as a house, with its Intiler covered 
with gray sheet iron, the joints of which were re-covered by brass 

bands 



487 



488 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

bands about three inches wide. There was much brasswork on 
the engine and all was kept beautifully polished, and the whole 
engine was kept neat and clean. The enginemen of those days 
took great pride in their work and in the machine in their care; 
it was a thing of life to them and they cared for and ran the same 
engine for years. There are numerous instances where a man 
has quit the railroad because his engine was wrecked or because 
he was asked to run any engine the company wanted to take 
out the train. Under such circumstances, we may be sure, the 
engine was kept in repair and handled carefully. 

Wood was generally used for fuel. The smoke-stacks were 
made conical, about thirty inches in diameter at the top, and 
covered with fine wire screen to prevent the light wood sparks 
from being blown out and setting fire to the cars and material 
along the roadway. At each station there were long ricks of 
cordwood, and it was a common sight to see the engine uncouple 
and run on a siding to take on a supply of fuel. The passenger 
cars were small in proportion to the engine, perhaps one-third 
to one-half the capacity of the coaches used now. They had little 
windows almost square, no vestibule or automatic coupler, no 
gas or electric light, no air-brakes, steam heat, or water-cooler. 
There were no chair, dining or sleeping-cars; just the simplest 
kind of accommodations, which included coal-oil lamps, and 
few of them; wooden cars that too frequently took fire in case of 
accident; and a little stove in one end of the car — when you were 
too hot or too cold, you changed your seat if you could. 

Water tanks to supply the engine were located at points along 
the road where water was easily available. When the engine 
stopped for water, the brakeman brought in a supply in a can 
like a florist's watering pot, without spray nozzle, but with four 
drinking glasses in a rack in front, and he proceeded to water 
the passengers, and you waited for a fresh drink until the engine 
got thirsty again. 

There were no air-brakes, so on approaching a station the 
engineer whistled a long blast for the station and, if the train 
was to stop there, ended with two short ones for "down brakes," 
and the brakeman ran through the car to set the hand-brakes 
to stop the train. Generally he carried a stout club to give him 
greater leverage on the hand-wheel. In the case of freight trains 

you 



Railroads 489 

you may guess that running over a string of cars on a windy, 
sleety night to set the brakes was not exactly a soft job; but the 
brakemen were a husky lot of fellows, perhaps because they got 
so much exercise and fresh air. 

Instead of automatic couplers, the old link and pins were used, 
and many a brakeman lost a first finger while lifting one end of 
the link to enter the coming coupler and not getting out quickly 
enough. The little freight cars carried about ten or twelve tons, 
while now our standard cars have a capacity for fifty-five tons. 

The roadbed was a mixture of the best and the poorest. The 
ballast was broken stone, and the cross-ties, while not "quarter 
sawed," were of fine native white oak. The rails were about one- 
half as heavy as the ones in use today and they were wrought 
iron, not steel. The splice bars consisted of a small flat bar about 
two feet long placed on the inside of the rail, and a wooden bar, 
about three by five inches, six feet long for the outside; there were 
four bolts through both the iron and wood splice and two through 
the rail and wood bar. This wooden piece was spiked down to 
the ties on which it lay. Any schoolboy who has walked the ends 
of the ties barefooted will remember the sharp threads and the 
ragged corners of the big square washers of the splice bolts. 

Many slivers of iron were mashed off the ball or top of the 
rail by the flange of the wheels, and sometimes the ball would be 
mashed down on each side of the web, which very soon necessitated 
taking the rail out for repair. The joints or ends of the rails 
naturally gave out first. 

Repairs were made in a blacksmith shop which stood on the 
southerly side of the track a little east of the "depot" building. 
Here a flat bar of iron, usually from six inches to two feet long, 
was shaped to fit the depression in the rail, then laid in place and 
both subjected to a welding heat in a big blacksmith's coal fire; 
then raised out of the fire and run on an overhead trolley to an 
anvil, sometimes out of doors, and four men with sledges beat 
it into place, welding it thoroughly and shaping it similar to the 
other parts of the rail. Blowing the fire and handling the rail, 
in fact, all the work was done by hand. You may readily believe 
that anyone who was constitutionally opposed to perspiring 
was not eligible for this job. That "one-armed" pest, the cigarette 
smoker, had not arrived. Workmen were men. They expected 

to 



490 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 



to work and knew how to work; they took pride in whatever 
they did, and the operation of the road and development of the 
equipment, considering the tools and material at their command, 
shows the mechanical ability they possessed and the effort they 
made to develop the business in which they were engaged. 

Many of the engines were not provided with the "Stevenson 
link" to reverse the motion, but used the "V." The "forward" 
and "reverse" eccentrics were each provided with an inverted 
V, one of which was dropped on the valve rod connection and 
ran the engine forward or backward at the will of the engineer. 
There was no "variable cut-off" and much steam was wasted. 

Injectors and steam pump boiler feeders had not come into 
regular use. The boiler feed-pump was attached to the crank 
of the rear drive wheel and could not be used except when the 
locomotive was running. It was no unusual sight to see an engine 
stop at the depot after coming up the heavy grade from the west, 
cut loose from the train and run out to the "Rocky Cut" and 
back a few times to pump sufficient water into the boiler to last 
until the train was ready to go on. 

Uncle William Stanton related some years ago that some of 
the early engines were named for towns on the line — the "Zanes- 
ville" ran on the Central Ohio Division. Others were named for 
animals, such as "Lion," also "Barney," "Buck" and "Berry," the 
names often given to a yoke of oxen. We may readily believe that 
such names created a very personal interest in the machines 
which were so far in advance of the times in that new country and 
which gave a quick and easy communication with the outside world. 

Ridley Park, William Henry Stanton. 

Pennsylvania, 

1921. 




THE LOCOMOTIVE OF 1922 



THE MAKING OF THE BOOK 



^m 



WITH the book almost finished, let us look back 
over the time in which the material has been 
gotten together. Let us in a light vein pic- 
ture the methods used and the hardships 
endured, so that in years to come the reader 
can look back and realize the conditions under which 
this book was conceived. In order that a true por- 
trayal may be given, strict conventionalities will be 
waived, and intimate and familiar terms used. 

Early in the winter of 1918-1919 "Cousin Will" 
came to Lansdowne for a visit, saying he had a "con- 
cern" that he wished to talk over with us. It was then 
that he made known his life-long desire to record, in 
a permanent way, some of the instances and anecdotes 
connected with the Stanton family. He feared with the 
passing of the present generation much would be for- 
gotten of the old folk-lore and traditions which had 
been told and retoki around the open tires of our parents 
and grandparents. During the conversation concern- 
ing the possibilities of enough material so many tales 
were told and remembered and things brought to 
light, that he was encouraged and believed that there 

would 
491 



492 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

would be enough of interest, if each would only tell a 
story or two. 

The regret was felt generally that a similar under- 
taking had not been started one generation further back 
so that we might profit for ourselves and the coming 
generations by the wealth of information that could 
have been supplied by our grandparents. But, with the 
firm conviction that an undertaking is better late than 
never, "Cousin Will" resolved to begin the collection 
of what material he could find. 

At first the process was slow and the work moved on 
with but few tangible results. As time went on, how- 
ever, and the interest of various members of the 
family increased, material of the greatest interest came 
to light — facts and things not known to exist uncov- 
ered themselves and came to join the then ever- 
accumulating wealth of material. 

The vision of the little pamphlet that "Cousin Will" 
had in mind at first now came up to a volume com- 
parable to Webster's Dictionary for size and to a 
volume of ^sop's Fables for interest. So much mate- 
rial poured in that he now felt encumbered by the 
magnitude of this treasured story and asked my sister, 
Edna Macy Stanton, and me to help him with the 
assembly and compilation of his "Stanton History," 
as it was then called. 

Through the following months Edna busied herself 
with the bringing together of the actual family line and 
charting the genealogy of our family, from Robert of 
Newport to William Macy Stanton, Junior, of Lans- 
downe; while I investigated the possibilities concern- 
ing the physical appearance and makeup of the book. 

Many visits were made by "Cousin Will" to Lans- 
downe and many hours of consultation were very 

happily 



The Making of the Book 4'y3 

happily spent by the three of" us, in which we dis- 
cussed and formulated the whole conception of "the 
book" and of what would be of interest. No (jne but 
"Cousin Will" and myself will ever know the profound 
and genuine pleasure that the three of us enjoyed, 
gathered as we did in the very atmosphere of our fore- 
fathers and seeing again the pure and unpretentious 
lives they led and breathing again a breath of that life 
that did all for them in their contented sphere ami 
made them and their lives the glorification of our ideal, 
that has led us in the past, and now, with this touch 
of dynamic love that was ours by this re-living, as it 
were, for a brief period, their lives will billow us on with 
a power that remains untold because it is so manifold. 
It was a joy to Edna, it is a joy to us, and our fondest 
hope is that you who read the pages we have made 
may feel the pulse of love they had for us and that you 
also will feel the joy. 

In order to secure and bring together the material 
for the book, letters were written to all we thought 
would be likely to have any interesting information. 
The recipients of these letters were not confined to the 
Stanton family, but were to be found among the mem- 
bers of all of the families with which our ancestors came 
in contact while they were establishing themselves in 
pioneer days in the neighborhood where their descend- 
ants are now found. 

The responses to the letters were most gratifying; 
everyone contributed all that was asked for and a 
large part of the book is made up of these contribu- 
tions, which were brought together and edited b> us 
to bring them into the style or trend which had been 
adopted for the book. Wc took great care to preserve 

as 



494 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

as much as possible the contributor's own handiwork, 
but to make the book a finished, comprehensive and 
co-related one, certain adaptations were necessary. 

At first we concentrated our work around the an- 
cestors and children of Joseph and Mary Stanton; and 
most of the articles concerning their ancestors and 
several other members of the family had been pre- 
pared or edited by Edna, when she died. Her death 
caused us to lose interest, and to hesitate to take up 
the unfinished work of the book that she had so care- 
fully and ably started. But to stop would be to defeat 
a well-established undertaking and to destroy her con- 
ception of the whole proposition. 

Within a few weeks, therefore, the work was re- 
sumed and "Cousin Will" asked Edna's twin sister, 
Ellen, to go on with the work that our sister had under- 
taken. Ellen felt some hesitancy in undertaking the 
work, but it was felt that a twin sister was the nearest 
one to Edna and the logical one to finish her task. 

The collection of material and the preparation of the 
articles were well under way before any thought was 
given to the title; we just referred to it as "the book." 
"Cousin W^ill" in time made a list of suggested titles 
and we debated for some time which we should adopt. 
Strange to say we agreed on the last on his list. Some 
of the others considered were: 

"A little history of the Stanton family, for the relatives," 
"Personal reminiscences of the Stantons, for our relations," 
"Our ancesters — a little history and anecdotes for the relatives." 

When we were assured of the book's reality, the next 
question was — What kind of book and who should 
we get to print it? After considerable investigation 

we 



1 



The Making of the Book 



VjS 



we selected the firm of Innes & Sons, of Philadelphia, 
to print the book under the direction of Austin C. 
Leeds. We soon decided on the size of the page and 
the consequent size of the printed page form. By this 
time photographs were available of heirlooms and we 
soon had some of the engravings made. The first cut 
for the entire book was the one shown on the bottom 
of page 186, the last cut, the lighthouse shown on back 
of cover. We decided that all illustrations were to be 
zinc etchings, half-tones or photogravures. We have 
held to this and the majority of the illustrations are 
half-tone engravings on copper plates, having been made 
through a 133-screen. The eight portraits showing the 
children of Joseph and Mary Stanton are photogra- 
vures, and were made in Boston, Massachusetts. All 
the cuts that are in "line" are zinc etchings. One 

ton 




THE PRINTING HOUSE 

The office or Innes * Sons, Printers, TwF.umi asp riir«»t SrRri t>, 
Philadelphia, whkrk tiii; iuH>k was pRivnuv 



496 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

ton of 90-pound Alexandra Japan paper was required. 
The folded paper is the finest grade imported Japanese 
Vellum and is especially tough and suited to a folded 
sheet. The type selected is the Caslon, and is as near 
like old letters as we can find in modern printing. 
The majority of pages are printed in 12-point type. 
The type was set on a machine that moulds each let- 
ter separately and is known as a monotype machine. 

When a photograph was obtained that we desired 
to insert in the book we discussed the size that would 
be desirable for the finished illustration and marked it 
with lines showing the portion of the view to be re- 
tained and the size to which it was to be reduced or 
enlarged. The photographs thus marked were sent to 
the printers, who, in due time, sent us a proof of the 
cut to which was attached the original photograph. 
These proofs were numbered so that we could identify 
them and not lose track of any during the period of 
collecting the material, as the cuts were not all made 
at the same time, but covered a period of almost three 
years. In point of size, the cuts varied from the 
smallest line engraving, one-half by three-quarters of 
an inch to the largest half-tone engraving, eighteen by 
eighteen inches. 

When the written articles were finally revised they 
were typewritten and four copies made; the original 
was kept as a permanent file, the second copy for the 
printer, the third copy for the person writing the 
article and the last for the office copy. The printer's 
copy was sent and the type set, the galley proofs of the 
type were presented to us. These were corrected and 
cut up into the pages and pasted on a "dummy" 
showing the location of the cuts in the respective 
printed pages. This "dummy" was given to the 

printers 



The Maki.\'(; of thk B(jok 



497 



printers and they submitted a page proof which 
showed the pages as they would appear. When this is 
corrected the book will be ready ff)r the final printing. 

The family charts were made up from the informa- 
tion obtained, and arranged in a preliminary way, 
after which the charts were carefully lettered by hand 
on "tracing linen," from which the zinc cut was made. 
The frontispiece, title page, dedicati(jn and record 
pages in the back of the book were arranged and 
hand-lettered, after which zinc plates were made. The 

familv 




READING Tin: PROOF 

"Aunt I.izzik" tKLirAiiKni SrvNruN H\ii.isi Kriiusii some s«Km or 

THE OALLKY PRllOr IN IIKR IIOUK AT rAl\>U*. 1>1II». tHE StST DAt ATTT* 

THK rirriKTH annivkrsary iir Hr« »«A«tiAi-.t. 



The Making ok the Book 



Y/) 



family groups were also separately hanu-niaue, the 
pictures inserted and a half-tone made from which the 
printing will be done. The sample pages of cloth were 
made by having the card printed with the titles and 
guide lines, several months before the rest of the bfx)k, 
and the little samples cut on a trimming machine. 
When these were ready "Cousin Will" glued by hand 
each separate piece to the card. We calculated that 
he made over one million separate motions in order to 
accomplish the task. 

There have been many pleasant experiences that 
have gone hand in hand with the real work of getting 
up "the book." In the ViiW of 1920, "Cousin Will" 
and Ellen went to Ohio, in an automobile, and carried 
on a "collecting campaign" among the different 
families. They visited many of the old places. This visit 

aroused 




'OLD DODCIN" 
"Cousin Wnx's" BncK Aotomoihi.k in «iiu-ii mas'* trips wkhk uKf>t. 

INCLUDING TIIREK TO OlllO, TO liAFlIlK MATl.RIAL TOR •'TUK BOOK." 



500 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 













A SHEET FROM THE PRESS 

The final printed sheet which folds into the book size and makes 
TWO "signatures" of sixteen pages. 



The Making of the Hook 



501 



aroused still further interest in "the b(j(jk" among the 
relatives in Ohio, and the material which came in dur- 
ing the following winter and spring, added greatly to 
the completeness of the undertaking. 

During the winter, I was in Illinois and many 
letters were sent back and forth between Ridley Park 
and Urbana. 

In order to exhaust all sources o[ the early informa- 
tion the Friends' Meeting and County records in North 
Carolina and Rhode Island were carefully examined by 
Sara W. Heston, Germantown, Pennsylvania, who 
secured much valuable data and many pictures. 

Willis V. Webster, and his son Thomas, undertook 
to look up the land titles in North Carolina and 

Ohio, 




A SHEET FROM THE "DUMMY" 

Each page was arrangkh in this way by crrnso the oallky proof into pages 

AND FITTING THE ILLUSTRATIONS TO THK PAGES. DIRECTIONS FOR THE PRINTER 
WERE WRITTEN ON EACH SHEET. ThE "PACE PROOF" WAS MADE FROU THIS. 



502 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 




THE HOME OF WILLIS 
WEBSTER 

Columbus, Ohio. 
Where all the maps were made. 



Ohio, and to prepare the 
maps. They also made 
many photographs. While 
examining old records 
they unearthed the original 
will of Benjamin Stanton, 
of Beaufort, and the in- 
ventory of his property, 
signed by the executrix, 
his wife, Abigail Stanton. 
This was indeed a great 
find — a photographic re- 
production is shown. 

The greatest care was 
given to the proof-reading 
to make sure that there 
were no mistakes in the 

text. 




AT WORK ON "THE BOOK" 

'Cousin Will" .^nd myself busy at oun de.sk. Takrn during the summer or 
1921 in the offick at 1310 Arch Street, Philadelphia. 



The Making of the Book 



503 



text. A great portion (4 this work v, as done by Sarah 
G. Yocum, of Ridley Park, Pennsylvania. 

It was decided early in the formative period that 
photographs of all the descendants of Joseph and 
Mary Stanton would be published in family groups. 
This has been followed out with all pictures that are 
available, which have been arranged to show the 
families, or descendants, of Grandfather Joseph. 

Where no photographs of buildings that had been 
of especial interest to the family existed, reconstructed 
drawings of them were prepared and presented; with 

the 




WIIKRK I 111, IU)OK" WAS MADE 

Our OFKll'K WAS ON THE TOl> KLOOR OF THE WHITE STONE BriLDlNC, 1310 ArCU 

STREliT, I'HILADELPHIA. TUK.RE WAS NO KLEVAfOR AND WK TOOK MANY STEPS IN 

GIVING YOU "THE BOOK." 



504 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



the thought that, although not exactly accurate, they 
will give the best possible idea of the building, the 
record of which is forever lost. 

When the summer of 1921 came, we decided to 
combine the trip to Ohio to celebrate Uncle Lin's and 
Aunt Lizzie's Golden Wedding Anniversary with the 
final collection of the remaining material in Belmont 
County. While in Ohio many interesting side trips 
were made to collect material and many photographs 
taken of things that were of interest to our family. 

No 




BOOKBINDING 

C^FWTXir THF "signatures" TOGETHER BY HAND. IN THE BINDERY OF ALFRED SmITH 

I FoMPA™ THE BE^ LINEN THREAD WAS USED AND THE BINDING IS LINEN BUCKRAM 

IMPORTED FROM ENGLAND. 



The Makin(; of the Book 



^05 



\(; stone was lett 
unturned to find 
some of the old 
relics that were 
very much want- 
td, and pictures (jf 
which we had not 
so far succeeded 



STARTING UNDER THE MEETING HOUSE in obtaining. We 




Oscar Patten half-way under to look for the stump. u/pnt tri rnnnv f»v 
Clarence BuNDY GUARDING THE ENTRANCE. The STUMP WAS WCIIL LOIIltlll^ CA- 

NOT FOUND, BUT THE REWARD WAS PAID AN^'WAY. 

tremes to secure 
photographs and information. An example of this is 
shown by our desire to locate a stump over which it 
was said the first Stillwater Meeting House was built 
(1811-12) and now covered by the second Stillwater 

Meeting 




"ALL ABOARD" 

One of the trains upon which work w\s i>onk on "the dock." The brief 
case carried dook material many milks. 



506 Our Ancestors— The Stantons 

Meeting House. Rewards were offered and a thorough 
investigation was made, but no remnant of the stump 
was found. It had boubtless been removed when pre- 
paring the site for the present house, erected in 1878. 

The last winter of the preparation, I was again in 
lUinois doing considerable traveling. While on the 
trains I did a great portion of making the "dummy" 
and correcting the page proofs. I worked under all 
conditions and with all kinds of environment, from 
a comfortable writing desk in the observation car of 
the "Panama Limited" out of Chicago to a single seat 
in a stuffy Big Four day coach running out of Indian- 
apolis. But whether I worked to the tune of crying 
babies or to the incoherent conversation of my in- 
toxicated western seat mate I have enjoyed it all and 
as the pages are read perhaps another interest will be 
added when some of the conditions under which "the 
book" was made are realized. 

This semi-technical dissertation is given as a record 
of how "the book" was published and may be of inter- 
est to small boys as well as large ones in years to come, 
when this book is read, and the conditions and ways of 
book-making are greatly changed and the methods we 
used have joined many things herein shown, now so 
interesting to us. 

Urbana^ William Macy Stanton. 

Illinois, 

1922. 




When now the paces all are turned 
as on the sunset slope of life we find 
our candle hurninc low with only 
memories to lichtkn and to cheer. 



AN9 NOW WITH STOW 
TOW WE TWRNTO 



THING5 - RECORD 

IN CHART AND 
TYPE AND IMGE 



PHOTOGRAPHIC RECORD OF THE 
DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH AND MARY 
(HODGIN) STANTON. THE PHOTO- 
GRAPHS ARE ARRANGED IN FAMILY 
GROUPS IV HERE THE DESCENDANT 
WAS MARRIED AND HAD CHILDREN. 




A SCHOONER 
lygb 



i 




MARY R STANTON 
1837 — 1871 



LOU I SE 5M ITH 
STANTON - 1869 



WILLIAM HENRY 
STANTON 
I3 60 

^^ * '' ' 



511 




1869 
WtLFORD T. HALL 



SARAW B. HALL 



GUY WOODWARD 
1891 



EVA H. WOODWARD 




^^'_.^a^-. .. . 



512 




WILLIAM RAYMOND GUINDON I92t 




514 




515 



HARLAN STANTON WEBSTER 
1889 



MARY AVICE l 

WEBSTER 'l 

1891 




i 



516 




317 




518 




519 



JANE DAVIS 

STANTON. 

84-6- l9iO 




520 




521 




522 




523 




EDITH COPE STANTON 
1888 







WILLIAM MACY STANTON 
1888 



1917 1919 

SUSANNA MORRIS STANTON WILLIAM MACY STANTON JR. 




524 




ELIZABETH STANTON 
BAILEY 



525 




526 




527 




DOROTHY LOUISE BAILEY I 9 20 



ALFRED L. BAILEY 
1897 



ANNA B. BAILEY ^ 
1894- 4 



528 




msMn 



529 




ALVA CALEB BAILEY 
I880 



LAURA ELIZABETH BA1LEY-| 
J8T7 



1902 
HARMON EUGENE BAILEY 



I9P4- 
MARY ELIZABETH BAlLEYl 




530 




531 




FREDERICK R.BUNDY 
S73 




906 

WILLARD BUNDY 



CLARA BAILEY BUNDY 

isrs 



191 I 
JOSEPH STANTON BUNDY 




532 




CENTRE 
LESTER W 
BAILEV 
1915 



533 



'Arrived too late 
EOR Classification'' 



MARY AGNES BAILEY 

Daughter of Alfred L. and Anna B. Bailey. 
5-6-1922. 




ELWOOD DEAN STANTON, JR., 

Son of Elwood Dean and Esther Sidney Stanton. 
5-8-1922. 



EDNA STANTON PENNELL 

Daughter op S. Howard and Ellen Stanton Pennell. 
9-22-1922. 




INTRODUCTION TO 
OUTLINE FAMILY CHARTS 

Connected and Related Families. 

N making a little record of our branch 
of the Stanton family, there are so 
many other families closely connected 
in relationship, association or busi- 
ness that it seems best to give a brief 
outline of some of these for a better 
understanding of their connections with our 
family. We are not attempting to make a com- 
plete record, but only to show a few of those 
families closely connected with our direct line, 
and of the ones shown, generally the older 
members. To include all is entirely beyond the 
scope of the present work. 

The complex relationship existing among the 
families of Stillwater neighborhood was caused 
by the settlement there early in the Nineteenth 
Century of many Friends' families from \'irginia. 
North Carolina and Georgia. The rules of the 
Society of Friends discouraged marriage with non- 
members, which virtually encouraged intermar- 
riage to perhaps an undesirable degree. 

When tracing the history of the families more 
directly connected with the Stanton family, it is 
seldom possible to get definite information farther 
back than that they came from a certain state 
about a given year. There is a rare opportunity 
for each family to work up and record its history 
as far back as possible, before any more has been 
forever lost. 



THE STANTON FAMILY 



SO much has been said of 
this family in the preced- 
ing pages that suffice it 
to say that the folded 
chart gives the descendants and 
Stanton ancestors of Joseph and 
Mary (Hodgin) Stanton. 

The chart was completed by Edna 
Macy Stanton in 1919 and has been 
brought up to 1922 since her death. 






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BAILEY FAMILY 




T seems clear that Edmund and Elizabeth 
Bailey (maiden name not known) came 
from England to America, perhaps near the 
middle of the Eighteenth Century, and 
settled in Virginia, probably in Dinwiddie 
County. 

Tradition tells us that all their children were born 
in Virginia and the records of wStillwater Monthly 
Meeting, which was established 3-29-1808, state that 
a certificate of membership was received on 7-28-1808 
for Stephen Bailey of Dinwiddie County, Mrginia, and 
in 1811 (month not known) certificates were received 
for Jesse Bailey, his wife, two sons and tour daughters 
from Dinwiddie County, Virginia. No certain know- 
ledge as to when Micajah, Matthew and James Bailey, 
Sr., came to Warren Township, but evidently before 
1808, as all were members of Friends, and Micajah's 
name occurs as a member of a committee in one of 
the first Monthly Meetings held at Stillwater. I have 
the above information relative to the Meeting Minutes 
from an article written by Jonathan Schofield for the 
"History of Belmont County, Ohio," published in 1880. 

537 



THE BHILEY FHNILY 

fln axc&rp-f- from the- ge-nea/oou of f his 
■familu showinq its connections mth 



nilu 



"3' 



THE STANTON FAMILY 



EDWUND 

b 10-2-1734 



b 2-2- 1764 
d TIS-im 
'crritd F,rs* 

PHRRIBR 

JOHNSON 

b 

d i-n-iiio 



EDMUND 

SRILEY 



EUZ8BETH 



1 -i - Ii73 
Morriid 

tnRRGflRET 
DOUDNR 

S- 21 -1799 
5 -11-1173 



tllarried 

ELI PRTTERSON 



BENJAMIN 

BUNDY 



VJILUatn 

PIERPONT 



GEORGE 

STRRBUCK 



mflRY JflNE 

BUNDY 



CRLE3 

J CLINTON 

CLYDE 

CLRRfl 

RDELBERT 

EDITH 



NIEL \sflRRH 

fINN 5TRRHL {OEmEY BFtlLEY 



BENJflMIN 
STANTON SEFIRS 



^C'.^ {EDOAR C 

'"'HmPTON 1"^'^" ^'^^^^ 



CHARLES 
tnflRGARET 



[FRED R 

i rHarntd 



(yVILLPRD L 



NFIYLOR \f^^'^'^ BHILEY [J STANTON 



'LYOm r ..,.,-_ p {bertha E 

narmd CLARENCE R 

RICHARD {'^orr.^d \8EULAH L 

PATTEN Kwfl BAILEY [^^^^^ „ 



A5ENRTH 

PATTERSON 

b 7-4-I3Z0 
d II -ZB- 1905 



LINDLEY P 

flamed 

ELIZABETH 
STANTON 



EOniN M 

married 

LILLIAN DOUDNA 



OSCAR J 

f7arriad Firs^ 

IflARY ANNA 
BRACKEN 



ANNA M 

CLARENCE R 
PATTEN 



[HERBERT J 
'ALFRED L 

learned 

ANNA BUNDY 
OLIVER B 
JOSEPH 
EDWARD F 

lindley p 
'bertha E 

BEULflH L 
OSCFIR M 



CLARA fwiLLARD L 

l^arritd \ 

FRED R BUNDY[J STANTON 

'HARtflAN £ 
mARY E 
RAYmOND C 
ROLLAND Fl 
DAVID 8 
NATHAN C 
RALPH W 



fJLVR C 

morritd 

LAURA E STEER 



JESSE S 
LYd'a m HOGE 



ELIZABETH 
STANTON 

FLORENCE E 

LESTER W 

C LLOYD 



538 



EDMUND 

BPILEY 



PHftRtBB 

JOHNSON 



JESSE 

flSENRTH 

PmTERSON 



f^LLEN 

£Vfl L 

PfTTTERSON 



flimuR e [ff^uur'E a 
stunton 



SUSflNNffH 

LFINE 



d S-S- itll 

tarritd 

STANTON 

BUNor 



\PHRRIBP 



BUNOy [^^^^'^ ^f"''^ •^'^ 



n/fRY a 

VyiLUflM fl 

NIBLOCK 

SBRRH 

BENJAMIN 

STANTON 

ELLEN 

PATTERSON 



SALLIE LRNE 



ELISHA m 

WOOD 



ROBERT 

LOUISA 
CLENDENNON 

ELIZABETH ANN 

CLARKSON 

HODGIN 



'SINA M 

EDMUND C 
STANTON 



iHENRY e 

[alpreo 



MICPIJAH 
» i-n-nis 
d 

MARY 

HUNNICUTT 



BORDEN 

STANTON 



JANE 



ROBERT 

PLUMMER 



HEZEKIAH 



ELIZABETH 

BUNOY 



EDMUND 



ABRAM 

Marntd 

MIRIAM CREW 



MARTHA ANN 
BUNOY 



BENJAMIN 

STANTON 



ZARVER T 

BUNOY 



W LEROY 
HOWARD A 



IDA J 
WILMER HALL 



DOROTHY L 
HO\SARO S 
GERTRUDE M 



ARTHUR E , 

•v-^"* {PAULINE B 

ALMA BAILEY ^ 



MARY 

HENRY STANTON 



SARAH BAILEY 



TALITHA 

PATTERSON 



RACHEL 

t I- 1) -Itll 



LEWIS NAYLOR 



MARGARET 
CHARLES BUNOY 



WILLIAM H 

SEARS 



539 



THE BUNDY FAMILY 



w 



ILLIAM BUNDY, SEN- 
IOR, with his wife, Sarah 
(Overman), and daughter, 
Mary, came from Wayne 
County, North Carolina, 
in 1806 and settled temporarily on 
Captina Creek, in Somerset Town- 
ship, Belmont County, Ohio. 



THE BUNDY FflNILY 

Rn Q,Kcerpi- from tha qeneofoaa of fhi3 
■fximifu sho^inq i^S connecf^/ons with 



""H 



"3 ' 



THE STANTON FAMILY 



E.IEKIEL 

■2t-IUi 

ftiirritd Ftrtt 

ATflRM 

ENGLE 



SftRRH 
VERNON 



JAMES N '^'•■''"•" 
STANTON 



JOHN 

RUTH 

PATTEN 



CALEB 

b i-l! 

d 

narr..d 

EUZftB 


-mi 


DEmSEY 

d d-io-n^t 
rr^rr.td 
MAR-Y 


d l-il 


nsz 


d 2-ZI-liO* 



wiLUflm 

6 1-/ -nio 
d 6-ii-iHS 

^rr,,d 

SARAH 
OVERMAN 



NATHAN 
b ttiitsi 

d l-tOItU 

ANNA 
STANTON 

i itt-iS)' 

d IO-S-13'T 



'MARY m 

JOHN {CUffORO 

C0LPITT5 



WILLIAM C 



EDITH 
STANTON 



{ELLA 

[henry 



niLUAm H 
LOUISE SMITH 



d i!-i -ini 

ELI 

STANTON 
t i-n-uss 
d i-is-iits 



WILFORD T 
HALL 



WILLIS V ' 
WEBSTER 



DEMSEY 
b i-i-mi 
d 4-il-!$-r; 

'drr.td St«y^ 

ANN CREW 

b 4- i -tin 
d 7-lO-IIH 



CHALKLEY 
b !-:4iaii 

d It- 1 ■ iu( 

narr.,d 

SARflK 
DOUDNA 



ELIZABETH 
b sunt* 



HEIEKIAH 
BAIUEY 



JEPTHA 
4 4-;<-'WJ 
d 3- $-1910 

MYRA 
DAWSON 
b l-l9/iS4 



HENRY 
REID 



GUY WOODWARD 

BERTHA R , 

^,r.„4 [WILLIAM 

ALBERT riS^ RAYMOND 



HELEN 

HAROLD L l'^"'- "' 
^HOLLOWAY 

HARLAN 

STANTON (niUJS 
MARYAVICe. '^"■(."'M 
SMITH 

RAYMOND NATHAN 
THOMAS 
MARY LYOIA 
DEBORA HPRiflET 

'RflNDALL J 

RUSSELL L {HELEN 6 

GRACE BUNT[RUSS£LLJR 

1NNA m (^^^fl j_„ 

CLAUD MARQUANO 

GAILM 

HAROLD D 

KARL B 

WANOA lCE 



REBECCA 

bl2-li-iHi 
d 

DANIEL 
STANTON 

b fttHK 
d 4-lS-HH 



SARAH e 

NATHAN E 
STANTON 



EDITH REBECCA 
MERVIN DANIEL 
W/U.(AM HANSON 



" ^JHENRY EOMU'iO 



HENRY 
STANTON 
b «•«•■*»' 
d l-ts-it'l 



541 



THE CLENDENON FAMILY 



SAAC and Hanna (Wor- 
ral) Clendenon came to 
Stillwater neighborhood, 
Barnesville, Belmont 
County, Ohio, from Penn- 
sylvania, probably the southeastern 
part, about 1803. 




THE CLENDENON EHMILY 


/?n excerpf from fhe jenealogu cff this -familtj 


ihowino some related comecfions with 


THE STANTON FF.I^ILY 


ISffftC 'SENJRMIN 


SRRRH 


CLENDENON "Jarntd 


Livt^5if>glt 


i^crritd [flMYHODeiN 




HRNN8 \NORRflL 


LYDIft 


fll^Y 




flarnmd 


RCBCCCI1 r 




EUSHB T 


EUfi 




SM/TH 


NCTTIC 




STEPHEN „„, , „ 




'krr,.d^,r,, SJiUfiH LOWSfi 




■ rja''r,%d 




mVLDR OmSOH ^oBci^T wooo 




doughHr of 
Jo*l Da^'ion 








mflTILDfi JRNE 






florritd 






SMITH H nOTT 






IS fine WILSON 






»arr,td 






HELL BARNES 






MfiKY L 






Morritd 






SfiRKCTTPIM 




'^arritd Stcond 






EUin&ETrt F 


SMITH 




BRANSON 


nay COOPER 

HflNN/t 

ELIZABETH 

flftY HODOI'I 
l^orntd 

LEVI GREEN 

LYDin f 
!^mad 
EDMUND SfilLEY 




HflNNfl 




f^rritd 




ISflK, E STflNUf 




In /orvo 



543 



THE DAVIS FAMILY 

|OHN and Anne Sparrow 
Davis left the north of 
Ireland in the spring of 
1819 and settled in Bel- 
mont County, Ohio, in 
order to secure better business oppor- 
tunities. Here Francis Davis was 
born Seventh month Ninth, 1819. 




THE onvis rm/LY 

f^n ^xcQ.rp-h from fhi. aenca/oau of this 
famifu showina ifs connecfions with 

THE STANTON FHMILY 



FRANCIS DflVIS 
WZPBtTH 



ANNE SPflRROn 

wiluptn 

MflRTHFI 

SPflRROM 



{FRftNCIS 



d 1910 



HNNft SMITH 



TflBITHfl 

STftNTON 



niLLmrn 

STANTON 



mELVINR 
r ZD6AK 
H CLINTON 



fVfl T 

I^RR-i DP'JIS 
JOSEPH CLI 
FRPNCIS WILSON 
JOHN LINDLEY 
BENJAMIN W 



EL»OOD DEAN 



JANE DAVIS 
SIDNEY FAftCETT 
^^'^%^^^^^\rUTH ELIZABETH 
iKflTHERINE MACY 



ANNA CLARA 

CHARLES W 
PALMER 



ELLEN DAVIS 

irc'r..<i 

S HOWARD 

PEN NELL 



WILLIAM MACY 
EDITH M COPE 



\eva stanton 
\mary anna 



SUSANNA 

MORRIS 

WU.IAM MACYJR 



HANNAH 
JOSIAH 
LINDLCY 
SMITH 



WILLIAM 
m,,...d 
SARAH 6IFFIN 



545 



THE DAWSON FAMILY 



VERY little is known of the 
ancestors of this family. 
They left New England 
on account of religious 
persecution and settled in 
North Carolina. When Friends left 
that section to live in free territory 
they came to live in Stillwater neigh- 
borhood. Jesse Dawson married 
Elizabeth Doudna who was born in 
North Carolina 12-17-1784. 



THE DRWSON FHNILY 

fln excarpi from fh» oento/oqu of this 
fomilu ihoK/inq li's connections mfh 

THE STANTON FflMlLY 



CHnLKLEY 



jessE DfinsoN 

eUIPBETH 

DOUDNfl 

JOHN 

5HRHH KNO»tS 
DOUDNfl 



JOEL 

SflRftH BUNDY 

tiiyi^jfifmr of 

wiLUfim 

BUNDY 



MflRTHI^ 

GRRRETSON 



MARY 



MELVINB 

EusHff Gflmeu 



fl/VNfl BRANSON [MffRTHfl 



THERESSfl 

HOPPER 



MRS LOPR 



ELI 
JESSE 



JHNE [vCRNON] 
SRY»NT 



TRtnER. JANE 
OflNIEL HODQIN 







HARRY 


RUTH 




CLIFFORD 






'sf^R/lH IRENE 


r^arritd 

LOUISE 

MINNINGER 


^I^ff (VIRGINIA 
ROY S MEAD { LOUISE 




ISRAEL ERftSmuS 






FRENCH 




THELMA 






KARL ERASMUS 


KATHERINE 






n,rr,,d 


.ro". J 






LOUISE J BALI 


HERBERT L 




' 


TAYLOR 






CLARENCE J 






KITTIE 8 EBB 




HENRY 






norri.J 






ELLEN CASTELLO 


STANLEY 


Mammd Second 




fi.rr.,j '''^^^'^^ [cLARA LOUISE 


mnRY p 




EDNA DOYLE 


STANTON 


CLARY 


HENRY 








ORA \R»NO»LL N 


anj 




rarr.td ir^r...i 


CLARY 


ANNA 


LEWIS EDITH {RONALD ALBCKT 


STANTON 


NATHAN YV 


EMMONDS [ THORNBERS 




BUNDY 


RUSSELL 






EUA DENNIS 





JEPTHA BUNDY 



ELVIRA 
JOEL 



ALVIN J 



CLARA L 
HENRY D REIO 



RANDALL 



RANDALL J 

RUSSELL L (HELEN S 

GRACE BUNT \RUSSELL JR 

ANNA m 

«.~.a {MONA LEE 

CLAUD MARQVANO 

GAILM 

HAROLD 

KARL B 

WANDA LEE 



547 



THE DOUDNR FBNILY 

Rn excerpi- from ihe qemaloau of this famila 
showing some rtlaicd connections nifh 

THE STANTON FAMILY 



HENRY 

mflRTHfl 
DFINIELS 



HENRY 
DOUDNR 

EUZflBETH 



JOHN 
KNOWIS 



EDMUND 
Bfl/LEY 



JOEL Tft. e(oc».m« 
RUTH PATTERSON 



DflVID 
PflTTERSON 



GEORGE ■ 
STRRRUCK 



PLLEN 
BfllLEY 



>< for ELI STfiNTON Bern 

n[r^rid (mURJORIE 



CLIFFORD 

ERNEST {VIRGINIR 

f^arrizd 

CORR WWflN 

m'burney\^obert 

"pRTHURE [PWUNIB 
STHNTON 

WILSON 

rrorr„d 

EmriR EICHORN 

DOROTHY 

WILLI Rtn HNDERSON 



mRTHH 

HBNER 
. FfmCETT 



RBISFIIL 

MRRGRRET 

LUCINDH 



mflRY E 
BUNDY 



MflRY JRNE 
BUNDY 



MILTON C 

TflC Y T 
FRRME 



CLARENCE E 

MARY 

NEGUS 



CLIFFORD J 

ncrrUd 

FLORENCE 
STEER 



CALEB 

J CLINTON MD 

LOu'lSA W {JOHN CLINTON 

PARKER 
CLYDE P 
CLARA L 
DELBERT W 
EDITH 

MARGARET DEBORflH 
ANNA MARY 
LAURA 
MARTHA 

CLARENCE ARTHUR 
EDWARD GILBERT 
DAVID CLIFFORD 
RICHARD STANTON 
'PHILIP JASON 
MARY ANNA 
RUTH ELLEN 
LUCINDA REBECCA 



JOSEPH W 

ROSETTA ' 
HALL 



JOHN 

flamtd Firxt- 

MIRIAM 
HALL 



JOHN JR 

ASENPTTH ■ 
GARRETSON 



MARTHA D 

WALTER A 
SHAW 

MARY 1 

Y TWINS 
SARAH J 

ELMA norn.d IRVING E BAILEY 

MARGERY H 

WANNETA R 

J SILVESTER 

RUTH VIRGINIA 

ELMA mAY 

ELIZABETH r 

"''fH^, Aluella 
hartley'^ 



EDITH 
CARTER 



548 



JOHN 

' SftRfl 
KNOVVIS 



JOHN 

M„ri;,,l r,r,t 
MIRIflM 

HALL 



JAMES 

mflRY in^rr..d ISRflC HALL 

KNOniS Mcrrud HANNHH VVE8STE.R 

SPRPH marr.td FRRtntR 

ELIZABETH (jOEL M„rr„d f,r>f SARAH BUNDY 
JESSE OAnSON\ "'-■"' "'■""' '^""^ '' STANTON 

ANNA n„rr,.d PETER SEARS S4t sein o^rt 

ALBERT itor...i BLANCH HALL 
d JOHN LYLE 



ASENATH 
GARRCrSON 



ROSITTA 

HALL 



NORA £ 
HARTLD 



tnARY C 
CARTER 



RUSSEL J 
CHESTER E 
ALrRED A7 
DELBERT H 
'BEULAH M 
STANLEY J 
KENETH LLOYO 



m^rr„d f,r,t I A8BY l^^r,, 

!AARY mATILDR 
PICKETT 



THOMAS tV 8UN0Y 
rr„d AMOS HOOaiN 



Sf oniiOH Of* 



PEOOY 
PENIAH «a 
HOSEA 



MARY 
FARMER 



JOSEPH 

BELINDA ' 
HOBSON 

rr„d 5-:ond 

ANNA EU2fl 
niLSON 



LILLIE it,r,..„ £DmN M BAILEY 
JOSIAH VH \ERNESTit,r..,^ GERTRUDE KIRK 
RUTH BUNDY [ALICE «<,-,.*/ EARL SMITH 
MARY /n<,rr„d SIMEON HOYLE 
EDtyiN n<,rr„d LIZZIE PLUMLEY 

[RUTH Mi,rr.,d HI8BS 

ZILPAH i^orn.d JOHN EDOERTON 
ASENATH n^rntd BENJAMIN BOSWELL 

'SARAH M„rn.d CHALKLEY BUND^ S4, eunor Oyy^ 

prudence 

'hovjard 



REBECCA 
, HODSIN 



CLARKSON 

RACHEL 
CRE^ 



WILLIAM 
BUNDY 



MARY 

BUNDY 

ROBERT 

r^rr<td firsf 

ESTHER 
BUNDY 

Marntd Saic^d 

RACHEL 

WOOD 



WILLIAM 
MARY 
ELVA 
MELVft 



JOEL 

ALMEDA 

EVAUNE 

CHARLES , 

CHARLES ELLIS 

AMY 

WALTER PLONIO 

MARY t 

MARGARET fl 

ANNA REBECCA 

REBECCA Mjrr,.„ JOHN CADWALADER 



DILnYN 

ELIZABETH 
STEER 



Zrr^ fSRRA LOUISA 

EUNICE 
STEPHEN 
WILLIAM Mon 



REBECCA 

narntd 

WILLIAM E 
BUNDY 

ACNES 
JOEL 



„a MARY JANE DAVIS 
ELMER E 
AGNES M 
BERTRAM 



549 



THE DOUDNA FAMILY 



T 



HIS family, of English an- 
cestry, after stopping sev- 
eral years in Edgecomb 
County, North Carolina, 
came to Warren Town- 
ship, Belmont County, Ohio, in 1804. 
It was a large family and there were 
many marriages into the Bundy fam- 
ily and several into other families 
connected with the Stantons. 



THE HODGIN FAMILY 



T 



w^m^ 



HIS Family with many 
others came to Warren 
T o w n s h i p , Bel m o n t 
County, Ohio, fro m 
Georgia in 1803. They 
had experienced much trouble in 
that state from the Indians and all 
were anxious to live in a free coun- 
try and away from the evil influence 
of slavery. 



THE HODGIN FflfllLY 

fin a>^cerpf from the gen^/o^i/ of this 
family show,nj <^S connec^'OnJ «">'' 

THE STANTON FfftniLY 



HODGIN 



flSNtS 

CHiLDney 



JOHN 

WILLIfft^ 

MflRTHP 

LflBfIN 

ROBEPT 

tuNICE STHJ^BUCK 



lnl,ant ,t ct-ldho^ 



fll^rtd^ flrwSk '«9«*J« 



R£B£CC» 
,JOEL. DOUDNfl 
STZPHtN 

pprrrf 

flSN£S 



Jt4 OCiJO'*^ 0*9^ 



STEPHEN 
SAMUEL 
flSENfTTH 
EU 



Names of 
PARENTS 
No+ Knertn 



RSENRTH 

SRMUEL 
STflPBUCKl 



EUZfl 
TH0M8S K 

smiTH 



Mflpy 



Bf^RTLETT 



ccroE 

WRIGHT 



fQENE 
RUTH 
flWY 

msoH 

CLYDE 



NETTIE 

DOLPH 

SPCR/ilER 



HARRIET 
THEODORE FROST 



LUCY 
flMv {STEPHEN 

IBENJAMIN Ur^.<,s.c^ „„^.,c/,M 

CLENDENON [EuZflBETH F BRANSON 

(EU 

\MflRY P BUNDY 
,Var^*d Stayed 

DEBORAH H BUNDY 



Sit CUSt*0€HOH Cxarf 



U€ STI^NTOH i>»^ 




STEPHEN 
HODGIN 

l-.arr.,^ 

£LIZflB£TH 

wiLLinms 



WILLIflM 
HARRIET 

mooKE 



THOMAS 

flOflLINE 
ARNOLD 



ELZA 
ROBERT 

uzzie 

VERNON 
ELISHA 
BETSY ANN 
'flSENfTTH 



LIZZIE 

OSBORNE 

SMITH 

OlENA 

SYLVANUS 
SmiTH 



HARRY 

ulX (""^ 

HOPKINS 
THOMAS 



{l FRA^K 



WILLIAM 



ROBERT 

JENNIE VANLAW 



FRANK 
MAMIE L CREVV 



[earl flemins 



(ANNA MARV 
WILLIAM PATTERSON 



ELI 

MARY ENSLE 



STEPHEN 

SfiRflH 
MILLHOUSE 



Reaeccfl 

[0RH3^] 
SMITH 



CLflRKSON 

ELIZABETH 
WOOD 



SINA 

EDMUND C STANTON 
CHARLES EARL 
RACHEL HEALD 



CLARKSON EMUN 

MILDRED PATTON 
WILSON «»"..j MARIA B^iQQS 
MARY ESTHER r-^.^ JOSEPH BKANTINSHAFI 
AMY 1','^^ CARSON JAMES 

JESSE 



JOHN E 

TAMER D 
VERNON 



'MARY E 

THOMAS 
THOMASSON 



SIMEON 



RACHEL 

BARTON 
COPPOCK 



ALTHEA 
THOMAS 

^AL'TER 

_£U<VO0O 

'FLORENCE L 

DEAN 

HAWORTH 

ADA J 

ANDREW 

BOWLES 



HESTOR 
ROY 
ULUAN G 



JESSE 



'PAUL 

WILFORD 

VERNE 

ffLS/f * 
[hEllEN E 



DANIEL W 

TAMER J 
DAWSON 



ALFRED 
ELZA ir,^t SARAH POLLARD 
eOGAR (mEllEN 

MAY MAQUIRTER [jOHN EDOAR 
WILLIAM 

HARRIETT -^^ EdBERT C COLLAR 
ARTHUR 

ALONZO A r.-^sw FLORA RLAHCHARO 
EDWIN ["—« '•- C^*** ^CHWELL 

STANTON [-_w *»^ IDP WOOOWO^TH 
CARRIE «—. * GEORGE JOHNSON 



WILUAM 



SARAH 
\yERNON] 
BUNDY 



f JENNIE 
MIRIAM BALDERSTOn\cLARENCE LAMB 

ELI \'^'-"^£ 

MARY mORRIs\wiLLlAFI ROBINSON 
AMOS [ERNEST 

MATILDA DOUDNA \EARL 



553 



THE PATTEN FAMILY 



w 



ILLIAM PATTEN came 
from Georgia to Belmont 
County, Ohio, in 1802 
with William Hodgin, and 
returning brought out his 
family in 1803, and settled in Still- 
water neighborhood. 



THE PHTTEN FHNILY 

fln €v-C€rpi from fh€ atntaloau of ^hu 
'farnilu sho^mq lis connections wifh 

THE STF1NT0N FAMILY 



WILURM 

PBTTEN 

RKHEL 

BROWN 



ELEPNOR DflVIS 

Bu't* M« Mill ltr*%r 
k„or.n oi COiCS M.ll 



REBECCB 

STUB5S 



PRICE SMITH 



Th*ir Orondton 



THOtnpson 

Sr^iTH 

mfiRy c Butwr 



ZLERNOR 

i^orr.td \JOHN FLETCHER 

JOHN tniLLS [ tflcy 



LYOm 

PIERPOINT 



RACHEL jflSENflTH 



WILUPM 
PHEBE 



EUPHPMIE 

SMITH 



BMOS VERNON 



ROBERT 

VERNON 



BENPJftH 

PRRKER 



EU QRIFFITH 



JOHN 

THOMPSON 



TflBITHP 

DOUDNP 



FISHER MOTT 



Yeungtsf Son 

CLPRENCE 



PNNP BfllLEY 



ELIZPBETH 

STPNTON 



i« B^IL[r Cf'cr* 



JOHN BUNDY 



J»i BVUDy O^eri 



^ILUtrt F ond SflltnH ntrt Ti,t<i Ofd 
nam4d icr bv*h J«*J of Grv^por^n^s 



S^nxH rorrtH 



EU STANTON 

MPRTHP 

CHARITY 



S41 eUNDY Ovrt 



555 



THE PATTERSON FAMILY 



w 



ILLIAM and Kaziah Pat- 
terson came from North 
Carolina to Belmont 
County, Ohio, in 1805. 



THE PHTTERSON FHMILY 

Rn eicctrpi from iht qtnaoloau of fhis 



fomilu ihom 



"3 ' 



is conntcfionj 



THE STANTON FAMILY 



WZFtBETH 



WILLIflM 

PBTTERSON 

b 1734 



W!i/» morritd in 
Norfh Carolina 

'fmOMrf fo Btlmon 

Cou/i»y 0*10 in 110! 



JtREtnifih 

FfllTH 



fiNSum 

tnRRY 
UIZfiBETH 



RSeNPTH 

morr„d 



EUZHOETH 

'Hunt us' 



LINDLEY P 

ELliflBETH ^ »*'^' «*•'♦ 

STflNTOrJ 



S^^ 5THNT0N Chart 



RACHEL 

STRRBUCK 



CLBRY 

HENRY 

STflNTON 



RCHSR 
JORDAN 



IRA 

ARNOLD (CHARLES 

narn.a Stc<y>d \„ . '"■'* CMd 

[ tnORRIS 

MAHLON 

EDWIN 



JOSEPH S 

ELKINTON 



SARAH 

LINDLEY 

BEDELL 



CARL 

EDITH 

SCHOFIELD 



6E0RSE 

ARNOLD 

JOHN 

SCHOFIELD 



TILmON 

t^arri.d 

RACHEL 

ED6ERT0N 



REBECCA 

JOHNS 

HAINES 



DEBORAH 

ntrri.J 

EDWARD 

LOWRY 



557 



THE SEARS FFIMILY 

fin cxcerpf- from the qcneologu of this 

■fami/u shoninq some conntcfion with 

THE BUNDY FAMILY 



n.fl.NIBLOCK 



SfiUflH 



PETER 

PHBRIBR BUNDY 

dough f€J- af 

BENJfimiN 

mRY BfllLEY 
BUNDY 



BUTLER sflRflH P£EBLES'-marr,.</ 

=" /JNNft DOUDNFI 

PEOPLES dau)l<*tr af 

JOHN 
and 

SflRBH KNOWIS 
DOUDNft 



BENJRmiN 

STANTON 

ELLEN 

PATTERSON 

ELI 

TABITHP BPILEY 
PATTERSON 



HALLECK 

STANLEY 

AUCE 

DALLAS E 

mARGERY 

TABITHA 

ed"brassfield 
nellie irene 
will davis 

CLARA B 

flamed 

F W LEUENBER6ER. 



EDWIN WILSON 



ESTHER S 

BRIGGS 



JOSEPH J 

RUTH ELLEN 
SHRY 



niLLiAn 

HENRY 

fflARY K 

NAYLOR 

LEWIS 

o-d 

RACHEL BAILEY 
NAYLOR 



CORA ALICE 

r^orritd 

J H PALMER 
LILLIE £ 

ROSCOE P 

ir<,r^,,d 

JENNIE THOMPSON 

NORA M 

RALPH WALLACE 



FREDERIC L 
LONA WARRICK 
WALTER 8 
DESSIE GALLOWAY 
ALICE E 
ETHEL R] 
EDNA m 



558 



THE SEARS FAMILY 



r 



OUR sons of Paul Sears 
(name of his wite not 
known), named Paul, 
Richard, Reeder and 
Daniel, came to America 
from France early in the eighteenth 
century. Settled in Prince George 
County, Virginia; the land records 
show that Paul bought land there 
in 1730. Paul and Richard married. 
Reeder went to the Indian War, and 
was gone a long time; returned to 
Virginia, stayed awhile, went West 
again and was not heard ot after- 
wards. Daniel bought land in 
Prince George County, \'irginia; 
served in the Revolutionary Army, 
and was not heard of after. 

Peter Sears, Senior, came to War- 
ren Township, Belmont County, in 
1806; spent the summer; returned to 
Virginia; came again in 1809; was 

559 



560 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

married the following spring to Anna 
Doudna. They located in Somerset 
Township, made three separate 
improvements, each time selling out 
to a newcomer; they moved, then, 
to Warren Township, located first 
near "Slab Town," where he oper- 
ated a sawmill; from there to what 
used to be Chalkley Bundy place 
(the brick house); from there to 
Henry Doudna's place (the old house 
below W. H. Sears). 



THE VERNON FAMILY 



T 



HE Vernon Family is be- 
lieved to have come from 
Louden County, \'irginia, 
in 1805, and settled near 
Barnesville. James Ver- 
non erected a cabin about two miles 
northeast of Barnesville and a few 
rods from the township, or French 
graveyard. In this cabin was held 
the first Friends meeting in Warren 
Township. 



THE VERNON FHNILY 

fin excerpt from Hie gtnealoqu of fhis 
fomilu shovving i+i conntc+ions wiih 

THE STANTON FAMILY 



Nomts ef 
PARENTS 
Not Known 



JAMES 

VERNON 

TRtnER DftVIS 
s-5-n9e 

Morrnd a* Friends 
Mt%*tnff Houi* 
CAw^trf Crt*k Vo 



BRYANT 



framed Stcond 

JESSE 

DflWSON 



THEODRTE 

wfiuAM 
M'LflIN 

pTninr 

STANTON 

ELIZABETH 

BARACH 

BAILED 

Amos 



JAMES 

Married 

ELIZA 

STEWART 



EUZA 

HANSON 



TAMER JANE 

P7arri»d 

DANIEL W 
HODGIN 



Set hODSIN Chert 



CHARLES 

morr,td 

ABBIE 
THOMASSON 

JAMES 



JOHN E 

HODGIN 



muiAM 

WORRALL 



St* HODGIN Chart 



DEBORAH H 

ISAAC 

MONROE 



JOHN 

JANE 

IDA 

SARAH 

mLLIAM 



f^Orritd Stcand 

STEPHEN 
BALLIETTE 



JANE W 

DANIEL 
SHELHAMMER 



ELIZABETH 

WILLIAM 

RACHEL 

JOSEPH 

BENJAMIN 



562 



Nom%a of 
A/of Known 



JffMES 

VERNON 

Tflt^ER DflVIS 



ELI 


MONOfiM 




morfd 


EUZP 


LUCINDfl R 


\ HANSON 


FERNEY 



ANNIE 

JOHNSON 



PLVERDA 

WILLS 



FRANCES 
TOWN SON 



mPRWIN 

EDITH 

BERTHA 

MERLIN 

IRENE 

EDITH 

FRANK 

JESSE 

ERNEST 

LILLIAN 



ROBERT 

VERNON . 

ANN PATTEN 



l^crr.td Second 

DEBORAH 
STUBBS 



AMOS 

VERNON . 

rnmy 



DEBORAH 
HANSON 



WILUAm 2 
KING 



SARAH 

■ltd r,r,i 

ELI BUNDY 



■ td Stcund 

ELI HODOIN 



S— BUNDY Char* 



t KDOSIN Chart 



ISAAC 

SARAH 

STUBBS 



JOEL BUNDY 

MATILDA 

ELISHA 

HODGIN 

HENRY 



ELISHA 

HODGIN 



JAMES 



MORRIS 

SMITH 



ANNA 

WILLIAM 
BEDELL 

LAURA 
JOHN HOGE 



LUCY 

HTr.*d 

EMMIT HOOE 



563 




As THE WATER OF THE STREAM FALLS WITHOUT 

CEASING AND FLOWS AWAY, SO THE LIFE OF MAN 

TURNS ON IN GENERIC CYCLES. 



Genealogies 



Children of 
BENJAMIN AND ABIGAIL STANTON 

Descendants of 
HENRY AND CLARY STANTON 

Partial Genealogy of the 
BUNDY FAMILY 



j^rif* 12 5r "" Honour thy father and thy mother : 

Dwt'**' ^*^ *^y ^^y^ "^^y ^ ^°"? "p°" ^^^ ^*^^ which 

z^l\ ^be Lord thy God ^iyeth thee* 

The Fifth Commandment. A photographic reproduction 

FROM THE OLD StaNTON BIBLE. 



Sarah 


b. 


Avis 


b. 


Anna 


b. 


Henry 


b. 


Abigail 


b. 


David 


b. 


Lydia 


b. 


Benjamin b. 


Joseph 


b. 



CHILDREN OF BENJAMIN AND 
ABIGAIL (MACY) STANTON 

Copied from Byron Stanton's notes 
on the Stanton Family. 

David b. 11- 3-1774 died in infancy. 
Elizabeth b. 12-24-1775 m. Joshua Scott. ' 

1-12-1778 m. Richard Williams. 
12- 1-1779 m. Jesse Thomas. 

6-12-1782 m. Aaron Brown. 

2-25-1784 m. Clary Patterson. 

3-23-1786 m. Benj. Mitchner. 

5- 1-1788 m. Lucy Norman. 
10-11-1790 m. William Lewis. 

7-28-1793 m. Martha Townsend. 

1- 2-1797 m. Mary Townsend. 

Benjamin Stanton, married, first, Elizabeth 
(Carver) Jorden, the daughter of James and Eliza- 
beth Carver, and the widow of Robert Jorden. 
They had one son, James, born 10-9-1770, who 
married Rebecca Craddock. They had no children. 

Elizabeth Stanton, married Joshua Scott in North Carolina.! 
They moved to Ohio about 1802 or 1803 and lived for some years i 
near Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, in Jefferson Co. They afterwards moved \ 
to Logan Co., Ohio, where many of their descendants now live.' 
She and three of her sisters (Avis, Anna, and Abigail) are buried 
in the Friends' burying-ground near Zanesfield, Logan Co. Their 
children were — Job, who married Meriba Straught; Jesse, who' 
married Hannah Watson; Hannah, who died, aged 8 years; Anna,; 
who married John Hall; Rebecca, died unmarried; Stanton, whol 
married Esther Edmundson; Enoch M., who married Rebecca' 
Brown {nee Rea); Elizabeth W., married John Fuson or Fewson;; 
Joshua, who married Sarah Harris; Benjamin S., who married 
Eliza Ann Harris — ten in all. 

Sarah 

see 



'hildren of Benjamin' and Abigail (Macv; Siamon 5^j7 



Sarah Stanton, married Richard Williams in North Carolina, 
•emoved to Jefferson Co., Ohio, in 1802. I remember Uncle 
■lichard as a bright, jovial old man, fond of jokes and full of 
mecdotes. Their children were — Robert, who died in childhood; /^ 
iliza, who married, 1st, Micajah Dillingham, 2nd, Axia Jonston; 
\bigail, who married, Jehu Fawcett, of Salem, Ohio, and died 10- 
10-1835; Dearman, who married Mary Farmer; Deborah, who 
narried Daniel Osborn; Asa, who married Edith Cadwallader; 
Vlary, who married Joseph Emmons; Benjamin, died unmarried; 
Lydia, married Joseph Stanley; David, married Hannah Young; 
Kdward, married Hanna Bruff" — eleven in all, of wh(jm all are j 
deceased. / 

A son of Micajah and Eliza Dillingham died some years since 
in the Tennessee penitentiary, to which he had been sentenced for 
assisting a fugitive slave. The descendants of Richard and Sarah 
Williams are scattered throughout the West, chiefly in Ohio and . 
Iowa. y 

Avis Stanton, married Jesse Thomas in North Carolina, removed 
to Ohio about 1802. He was one of the persons I remember to 
Ihave seen who wore knee-breeches; he wore to the last the costume 
iworn by Friends at the close of the last century and wore his 
ibroad-brimmed hat even at the table. He died at Mt. Pleasant, 
Ohio, (about 1845), and Aunt Avis went to live with one of her 
children in Logan Co., where in the burying-ground ol Goshen 
Meeting House, near Zanesfield, she lies buried. Their children 
were — Abigail, who married, 1st, Nimrod Hogue and, 2nd, Joseph 
Lawrence and died at Bellefontaine, Ohio, aged some years over 
eighty; William, died in childhood; Nathan NL, married Pamela 
Brown, died at Schoolcraft, Michigan, his wife was from New 
England, he is the author of the memoir of Abigail Stanton 
cited above; Jonathan, married Sarah Cowgill; Gulielma, died 
unmarried; Jesse, married Minerva D. HoUenback; David, un- 
married; Ann Eliza, married Joseph Rotf; Joseph, married 
Minerva Roff — nine children in all. Some of the descendants ot 
Jesse and Avis Thomas live in Logan Co., Ohio, others in and 
about Schoolcraft, Michigan, 

Anna Stanton, married Aaron Brown in North Carolina. They 
came to Ohio with grandmother Stanton in 1800 and lived for 
some years in or near Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, removing afterwards to 
Logan Co., Ohio. Their children were — Benjamin S., who was a 
physician in Bellefontaine, Ohio, who married Rebecca Shaw. 
Their only daughter died soon after arriving at maturity. Mar\ , 
who died unmarried; Zaccheus, married Hannah Marmon; Ira, 
married Rebecca Rea, who, after his ileath, married his cousin, 
E. M. Scott; Ezra, twin brother of Ira, died in infancy; .\sa, 
married Hannah Sands, he is deceased, she and her children live 
near Zanesfield, Ohio; Anna, married John Outland; James, married 
Elizabeth Ann Willis; Davis, married Susanna Marmon; Martha 

died 



568 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

died unmarried; Elma, married Edward Kenton — eleven children 
in all. Many, perhaps most, of their descendants reside in Logan 
Co., Ohio. 

Henry Stanton, married Clary Patterson, of Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, 
3-30-1809. They lived on a farm in the southern part of Belmont 
Co., Ohio, not far from Barnesville, where Clary died, May 25, 
1860, in the 73rd year of her age. She was born in North Carolina, 
probably in Guilford Co. 

Their children were — James, who married, 1st, Rachel Schofield, 
2nd, Charity Bundy; Joseph, married Mary Hodgin; Anna died 
unmarried; Edmond, married Sarah Hoyle; Jordan, died unmar- 
ried; Mary, married Joel Dawson; Henry, died unmarried; David 
died, aged 17 years. Some of their descendants live in Belmont 
Co., Ohio, others in Iowa and Nebraska. All of the children of 
Henry and Clary Stanton are deceased except Mary Dawson, who 
lives (1885) in Barnesville, Ohio, and who writes in June, 1897 — 
"I have been the lone and only surviving one of father's children 
tor 34 years and I can truly say that goodness and mercy have 
followed me through a long and chequered life." 

Abigail Stanton, married Benjamin Michener. She is buried at 
Goshen Meeting House near Zanesfield, Ohio. Their children 
were — Levi, who died young; Susanna, who married John Brown 
and died June 24, 1888, at Zanesfield, aged 78 years and 38 days; 
John, married Mary Ann Brown; Lydia, married Kersey Graves; 
Henry, married Lydia Warner; David married Elizabeth Mich- 
ener; Isaac, married Martha P. Gause; Edwin, married Eliza Anne 
Smith; Martha, married 1st, William Taylor, 2nd, Allen Williams; 
Elma, died unmarried. Many of their descendants live in Logan 
Co., Ohio. 

David Stanton, married Lucy Norman. He was a physician in 
Steubenville, Ohio. She was from Virginia. She was a daughter 
of Thomas and Mildred Tutt Norman. 



Children : 




Edwin McMasters 


; b. Dec. 19, 1814 


Darwin Erasmus 


b. July 17, 1816 


Lucretia 


b. Nov. 30, 1818 




died Aug., 1820 


Lucy 


b. Apr. 13, 1820 




lived only one day 


Oella 


b. May 4, 1822 


Theophilus 


b. Nov. 27, 1824 




lived 12 hours 


Pamphila 


b. Feb. 20, 1827 




died Feb., 1899 



I 



David Stanton came with his mother to Ohio when a boy of 
12 years. W'ith his brothers Benjamin and Joseph he studied 

medicine 



^Children of Benjamin and Abi(;ail (Macv; Stamon 569 

! [ 

medicine in Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, with Dr. Hamiltcm, married and 
iwent to Steubenville, where he practiced his profession. 
j In 1897 his daughter Pamphila writes: "Their first home was 
[on the south side of Market St., above Fifth. Here their sons 
Edwin and Darwin were born. The house on the south side of 
Third St., between Market and Washington." 

David Stanton was greatly loved and admired both as a physi- 
ician and as a man. His son Darwin is said to have resembled him 
in appearance. 

Lucy Norman came to Ohio with friends of her mother by the 
name of Starr, whose daughter was her intimate friend, and a 
widow of the Rev. David McMasters. They probably arrived not 
[earlier than 1813. Lucy Norman was a Methodist and the mar- 
iriage was opposed by the Friends and was the cause of David 
iStanton leaving the Society. They were married by the Rev. 
■David McMasters, a warm personal friend for whom they named 
their eldest son, but substituted the name of Edwin for David. 

The day Dr. Stanton was buried the schools were dismissed 
that the children might attend the funeral as a mark of the respect 
in which he was held. 

Lydia Stanton^ married William Lewis of Washington Co., Pa. 
They had six children, five of whom died in infancy. 
Children: 

Morris, died aged 3 years. 

Mary Anne, m. Burns and had one daughter. 

Essie, who married Marsh. 

Lucinda, died aged 5 years. 

Susanna, died aged 3 years. 

Lucinda Susanna, dieti aged 1 year. 

David, died an infant. 

William and Lydia Lewis lived for many years on a farm in 
Hennipen Co., 111. 

Benjamin Stanton, married Martha Townsend, who was born in 
Washington Co., Pa., 4-18-1794, died 1-12-1885, aged 91 years. 
Children: 
Rebecca b. 1- 9-1819 m. Chas. Weaver. 
Laura b. 9-20-1820 m. Barnabv. 
Oliver b. 7-26-1822 unm., d. 11-1-1898. 
Joseph b. 5-30-1824 m. Marv H. Fry, died 1885. 
Caroline b. 6-28-1826 m. Geo. W. Addams. 
David b. 6- 9-1829 m. Lydia M. Townsend. 
William b. 8-28-1832 m. Ellen Irish. 
Dalton b. 8-14-1834 d. aged 10 years. 
Byron b. 8-14-1834 m. fst, Edith M. Weaver, 

2nd, Harriet Alice Brown. 
Benjamin Lundy b. 10-19-1839, d. 2-0-1841, 

aged 16 months. 



570 Our x'\ncestors — The Stantons 

Joseph Stanton, married Mary Townsend. If related to Martha 
Townsend, who married Benjamin Stanton, the relationship was 
distant. 

Children: 

Thomas Townsend, unm. Died 1857. 

Joseph Stanton was a physician and lived in Springboro, War- 
ren Co., Ohio. 

About 1832 or 1833 he went as one of a committee of the Warren 
Co. Medical Society to Wheeling, Va., to investigate the nature 
and treatment of Asiatic Cholera then prevailing there. He took 
the disease and died, leaving a widow with one son, Townsend. 
The latter, after his mother's death, went to California, where he 
died unmarried. 



DESCENDANTS OF HENRY STANTON, 1784- 
1863, AND CLARY PATTERSON, 1788-1860 

Married 3-30-1809. 

1. James, b. 1811, d. 1-20-1851. 

m. 1st, Rachel Schofield, 2nd, Charity Bundy. 

2. Joseph, b. 1-19-1812, d. 7-26-1859, 

m. 9-26-1832 Mary Hodgin, b. 4-10-1810, d. 9-27- 
1857, daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth Hodgin. 
A. Eli, b. 2-12-1835, d. 3-25-1885, 

m. 12-9-1857 Mary P. Bundy, b. 12-18-1837, d. 
12-6-1871, daughter of John Bundy and Ruth 
Patten. 

1. William Henry, b. 8-2-1860, 

m. 6-15-1898 Louise Smith, b. 1-11-1869. 

2. Sarah, b. 11-23-1861, 

m. Wilford T. Hall, b. 8-29-1869. 
{a) Eva, b. 9-26-1891, d. 2-26-1919, 

m. Guv Woodward, b. 2-5-1891. 
{b) Bertha R., b. 12-16-1892, 

m. Albert W. Guindon, b. 5-7-1893. 
(1.) William Ravmond Guindon, b. 4-14-1921. 
(f) Helen, b. 6-30-1899, 

m. Harold L. Holloway, b. 12-28-1895. 
(1.) Paul W., b. 12-21-1919. 

3. Emma Clara, b. 10-5-1864, 

m. 8-23-1888 Willis Veil Webster, b. 3-1-1861. 
{a) Harlan Stanton, b. 9-6-1889, 

m. 9-3-1912 Mary Avice Smith, b. 11-12-1891. 
(1.) Willis William, b. 7-8-1914. 



Descendants of He.vrv St.wicj.v wu Ci.arv Pa ii kkson 57 

{b) Raymond Nathan, b. 7-27-1893, d. 9-5-1912. 

{c) Thomas, b. 6-25-1897. 

id) Mary Lydia, b. 6-1 1-1904. 

le) Debora Harriet, b. 7-6-1906. 
Eli Stanton m. 7-30-187.3. 2nd, Deborah Hanson 

Bundv, b. 1-26-1839. 
4. Nathan E., b. 1-26-1875, 

m. 6-20-1907 Sarah E. Stanton, b. 8-4-1873. 

{a) Edith Rebecca, b. 4-15-1908. 

{b) Mervin Daniel, b. 2-13-1910. 

(>) William Hanson, b. 1-8-1914. 

B. Anna, b. 8-8-1837, d. 10-5-1917, 

m. 3-30-1859 Nathan Bundy, b. 8-22-1837, d. 8-20- 
1874, son of Ezekiel and iSIaria Bundv. 

1. Joseph S., b. 1-19-1860, d. 12-20-1885. 

2. Caleb L., b. 12-12-1862, d. 11-28-1890, m. Kate Snvder. 

3. Mary M., b. 7-7-1864, 

m. John Colpitts, b. 7-12-1851. 
{a) Clifford B., b. 7-5-1890, d. 9-5-1911. 

4. Clara Elma, b. 11-7-1871, d. 4-19-1873. 

C. William, b. 9-15-1839, d. 5-5-1918. 

m. 1-27-1864, Jane S. Davis, b. 7-15-1846, d. 3-8- 
1910, daughter of Francis and Marv Davis. 

1. EvaT., b. 7-25-1868. 

2. Mary Davis, b. 4-24-1870, d. 10-4-1884. 

3. Joseph E., b. 8-26-1872. 

4. Francis Wilson, b. 4-5-1875, d. 8-8-1886. 

5. John Lindley, b. 4-17-1877, d. 3-20-1897. 

6. Benjamin W., b. 3-16-1879, d. 3-21-1879. 

7. Elwood Dean, b. 8-20-1880, 

m. Esther S. Fawcett, b. 9-23-1882. 
{a) Jane Davis, b. 9-27-1910. 
{b) Sidnev Fawcett, b. 5-8-1912. 
{c) Ruth 'Elizabeth, b. 7-14-1915. 
{d) Katherine Macv, b. 11-24-1919. 
{e) Elwood Dean, Jr., 5-8-1922. 

8. Anna Clara, b. 4-9-1883, 

m. Charles W. Palmer, b. 8-9-1879. 
{a) Eva Stanton, b. 6-26-1912. 
{b) Mary Anna, b. 10-20-1914. 

9. Edna Macv, b. 4-26-1886, d. 2-24-1920. 

10. Ellen Davis, b. 4-26-1886, 

m. S. Howard Penncll, b. 8-17-lS^M. 

11. William Macv, b. 9-15-1888. 

m. Edith M. Cope, b. 8-16-1888. 
{a) Susanna Morris, b. 7-23-1917. 
{b) William Macv, Jr., b. 5-31-1919. 

D. Eunice, b. 10-19-1843, d. 9-6-1849. 



572 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

E. Elizabeth, b. 12-24-1846, 

m. 7-26-1871 Lindley P. Bailey, b. 3-8-1850. 

1. Edwin M., b. 7-18-1872, 

m. Lillian M. Doudna, b. 6-22-1874. 
(a) Herbert J., b. 6-8-1899. 

2. Oscar J., b. 12-5-1874, 

m. 1st, Mary Bracken, b. 2-5-1876, d. 1-24-1914. 
{a) Alfred L., b. 3-16-1897, 

m. Anna Bundy, b. 8-24-1894. 

(1) Dorothy Louise, b. 4-7-1920. 

(2) Mary Agnes, b. 5-6-1922. 
(^) Oliver B., b. 6-14-1901. 

(f) Joseph O., b. 7-5-1903. 

(d) Edward F., b. 1-30-1907. 

(e) Lindley P., b. 8-9-1911. 

3. Anna, b. 8-16-1876, 

m. Clarence R. Patten, b. 6-27-1881. 

(a) Bertha E., b. 6-1-1903. 

(b) Beulah I-., b. 2-23-1907. 

(f) Oscar M., b. 3-20-1909. 

4. Clara, b. 6-25-1878, 

m. Frederick R. Bundy, b. 9-30-1873. 
(a) Willard, b. 4-2-1906. 
(^) Joseph Stantcn, b. 1-28-1911. 

5. Alva C, b. 4-26-1880, 

m. Laura E. Steer, b. 11-1-1877. 
(a) Harman E., b. 7-14-1902. 
{l>) Mary E., b. 9-20-1904. 
{c) Ravmond C, b. 6-28-1907. 
{d) Rolland A., b. 6-28-1909. 
(e) David B., b. 12-29-1912. 
(/) Nathan C, b. 9-29-1914. 

(g) Ralph Warren, b. 2-21-1921. 

6. Jesse S., b. 4-15-1884, 

m. Lydia M. Hoge, b. 9-13-1883. 
(a) Elizabeth Stanton, b. 5-16-1911. 
(i?) Florence E., b. 6-27-1913. 

(c) Lester W.,b. 11-22-1915. 

(d) Charles Lloyd, b. 3-20-1918. 

3. Anna, b. 4-1-1814, d. 12-2-1836. 

4. Edmond, b. 10-14-1816, d. 12-14-1850, 

m. 7-1-1840 Sarah Hoyle, b. 1-11-1821, d. 1-16- 
1885, daughter of Benjamin Hoyle and Tabitha 
Grimshaw. 

A. Ephraim, b. 8-2-1841, d. 8-15-1841. 

B. Rebecca, b. 7-5-1842, d. 4-18-1904, 

m. 9-26-1 860 Robert Smith, b. 3-1 1-1 838. 



Descendants of Henry Stanton and Clarv Patterson 573 

1. Edmunds., b. 9-18-1861, 

m. Eliza D. Hall, b. 4-23-1853 
(a) Helen R., b. 9-23-1893. 

2. Elizabeth W., b. 1-7-1863, 

m. Charles Livzey, b. 3-7-1861. 
(a) Robert S., b. 11-27-1894, d. 3-7-1895. 
(/?) Albert J., b. 3-6-1897. 

(c) Walter C, b. 1-24-1899. 

(d) Jesse K., b. 1-31-1901. 

(e) William E.,b. 8-11-1903. 

3. Maria H., b. 1-9-1868. 

C. Tabitha, b. 3-13-1845, d. 2-13-1920, 

m. John F. Davis, b. 1-0-1842, d. 12-12-1899. 

1. Melvina, b. 4-2-1865, d. 1867. 

2. Francis Edgar, b. 12-12-1871, d. 8-27-1889. 

3. Henry Clinton, b. 8-26-1884, d. 5-21-1885. 

D. Henrv, b. 6-25-1847, d. 5-23-1912, 

m. Mary Bailey, b. 11-16-1848. 

E. Benjamin, b. 4-22-1849, d. 8-6-1898, 

m. Elizabeth Plummer, b. 9-17-1850. 

1. Wilford LeRoy, b. 12-10-1872. 

2. Howard A., b. 2-24-1876, d. 11-1-1898. 

3. Ida Jane, b. 1-26-1881, 

m. Wilmer Hall. 
(a) Dorothy L., b. 2-2-1906. 
(^) Howard S., b. 8-26-1908. 
(c) Gertrude M., b. 2-22-1912. 
4. Arthur, b. 9-6-1891, 

m. Alma Bailey, b. 9-14-1892. 
(a) Pauline B., b. 12-23-1917. 

F. Daniel, b. 8-28-1850, d. 4-25-1919, 

m. Rebecca Bundy, b. 2-2-1844. 

1. Sarah E., b. 8-4-1873, 
m. Nathan E. Stanton, b. 1-26-1875. 

(a) Edith Rebecca, b. 4-15-1908. 
(i>) Mervin Daniel, b. 2-13-1910. 
(c) William Hanson, b. 1-8-1914. 

2. Edmund C, b. 9-17-1877, 
m. Sina M. Hogdin B., 3-11-1883. 

(a) Henry E., b. 7-22-1910. 
(^) Alfred H., b. 10-15-1912. 

5. Jordan, b. 12-0-1818, d. 12-16-1839. 

6. Mary Patterson, b. 5-8-1821, d. 3-23-1901, 

m. Joel Dawson, b. 2-27-1814, d. 2-10-1859. 
A. Sarah Irene, b. 12-18-1844, d. 1-13-190_6, 

m. Israel Erasmus French, b. 5-7-1843, d. 5-8-1876. 



574 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



il 



1. Harry Clifford, b. 1-28-1867, 

m. Louise Minninger. 
(a) Ruth, b. 9-22-1891, d. 3-12-1892. 
i^b) Ethel, b. 12-24-1895, 

m. Rov S. Mead. 
(1.) Virgin'ia Louise, b. 12-3-1918. 

2. Karl Erasmus, b. 9-19-1868, 

m. Louise J. Balz. 
{a) Thelma Katherine, b. 3-5-1893, 
m. Herbert L. Taylor. 

B. Henry Stanton, b. 3-19-1847, d. 1-10-1920, 

m. Ellen Castello, b. 9-18-1851. 

1. Clarence J., b. 1-18-1871, 

m. Kittie Bebb. 

2. Stanley French, b. 12-12-1876, 

m. Edna Doyle. 
{a) Clara Louise, b. 8-19-1900. 

C. Anna, b. 6-26-1852, d. 6-6-1879, 

m. Nathan W. Bundy, 10-6-1869, b. 6-11-1848. 

1. Ora, b. 7-10-1870, d. 6-22-1898, 

m. 1-26-1893 Lewis Emmonds. 
{a) Randall N., b. 1-23-1894, 
m. Edith Thornburg. 
(1.) Ronald Albert, b. 8-19-1918. 

2. Russell C, b. 8-22-1877, 

m. 3-17-1904 Ella Dennis. 

D. Myra, b. 8-29-1854, 

m. Teptha L. Bundy, b. 4-14-1850. 

1. Alvin J., b. 4-5-1873, d. 7-1-1873. 

2. Clara L., b. 7-18-1874, 

m. Henry D. Reid. 
{a) Randall J., b. 5-7-1894, d. 7-20-1918 (in action at 

Soissons, France, Co. B.,28 Inf., 1st. Division). 
{b) Russell L., b. 8-19-1896. 

m. Grace Bunt. 

(1) Helen G. 

(2) Russell Jr. 

{c) Anna M., b. 2-14-1899. 
m. Claud Marquand. 
(1) Mona Lee. 
{d) Gail M., b. 2-10-1902. 
{e) Harold D., b. 6-12-1905. 
(/) KarlB., b. 11-28-1912. 
(g) Wanda Lee, b. 2-13-1918, d. 11-27-1918. 

3. Randall D., b. 9-5-1883, d. 8-1-1901. 

7. Henry, Jr., b. 8-0-1824, d. 10-16-1844. 

8. Daniel, b. 6-0-1827, d. 11-16-1844. 



A Partial Genealogy of the Buxdv P\amil^' 575 



A PARTIAL GENEALOGY OF THE BUNDY 

FAMILY 

John Bundy — Parents unknown. 

Born , died 2-22-1731. 

Married, date and place unknown. 
Elizabeth , born , died 3-17-1731. 

Their children were — 

Joshua Bundy, born 4— 4-1717. 



John 

Caleb 

William 

Joan 

Benjamin 



1-12-1719, died 2-8-1745. 
5-12-1721. 
1-21-1723. 

1-12-1725, died 1-30-1735. 
12-12-1729. 



Caleb, son of John Bundv, and Elizabeth, his wife. 

Born 5-12-1721, died . 

Married , date . 

Elizabeth , born , died 5-11-1762. 



i 



Their children were — 
Demsey Bundy, born 
John 

Miriam " " 

Samuel " 
Sarah 



4-16-1746, died 4-10-1798. 
11- 1-1747, " 2-14-1762. 
8- 1-1749, « 2-13-1762. 
3-28-1756, " 2-22-1762. 
1- 9-1759. 



» 



Demsev, son of Caleb Bundy, and Elizabeth, his wife. 
Born 4-16-1746, died 4-10-1798. 

Married about 1767 

Mary, . Born , died 3-21-1804, (about the 50th 

year of her age). 
Their children were — 

Millicent Bundy, born 12-11-1769. 



1 



Marian 

Ruth 

David 

Zadock " 

William 

John 

Ruth (the 2nd) 

Marv " 



3-15-1771, 

8-22-1773. 

8-11-1775. 

9-20-1777. 

1- 1-1780, died 6-21-1828. 

5-22-1782. 

7- 4-1784. 

7-31-1786. 



576 Our Axcestors — The Staxtoxs 

William, son of Demsey Bundy, and Marv, his wife. 
Born 1-1-1780. died 6-21-1828. 

Married 9-22-1803, at Turner's Swamp, North 

Carolina. 
Sarah Overman, born probably in 1785, died 5-8-1853 (age 
68 years). 
Their children were — 

Marv Bundy, born 2-25-1805. 

Ezekiel " " 7-26-1807, died 11-21-1866. 

Eh " " 3-13-1809. 

Charity « " 3- 2-1811. 

John « " 2-17-1813, " 9-20-1898. 

Nathan " « 10-16-1814. 

Sarah " " 1-29-1817. 

William " " 10-10-1819, " 5-10-1905, 

delegate to First National Re- 
publican Convention. 
Demsey " " 8- 5-1821, died 4-28-1877. 

Chalkley " « 2-24-1823, « 12-1-1866. 

Elizabeth " " 5-28-1826, " 12-14-1891. 

The children of W^illiam and Sarah Bundy married as follows: 
Mary Bundy married William French, their children were — 

Eli Cassandra 

Sarah E. Emma 

Otho Martha 

William 
Ezekiel Bundy married Maria Engle, their children were — 

Sarah William E. 

Elizabeth Mary Jane 

Nathan Martha Ann 

Caleb Anna Maria 

Ezekiel Bundy married, second, Sarah Stanton (formerly Hoyle, 
Edmund Stanton's widow) in 1852. Their children were — 

John Chalkley C. 

Hannah Sarah Alice 

Ezekiel 
Eli Bundy married Sarah Vernon, their children were — 

WilHam C. Ruthanna 

Mary Esther 

Charity Bundy married James Stanton (no children). 
John Bundy married, first, Ruth Patten, their children were — 

^^'■^^ I ferine Mary P. 

William P./t^^"^ Charity 

Martha 

Married, second, Sydney Tipton (formerly Sydney Wood), 
their children were — 

Thomas Ephraim 



u 



\. Partial Genealogy of the Buxdy Family 577 

Married, third, Anna Edgerton, their children were — 

Ruth Wilson 

Rebecca Elizabeth 

Jesse 
Nathan Bundy married Sarah Doudna, their children were — 

Milton — in early days went to California, became wealthy 
and settled there. 

Martha Chalkley 

William H. Nathan 

Clarkson 

Sarah Bundv married Joel Dawson, their children were — 
Chalkley Eli 

Matilda 

Jesse — went to Colorado, studied medicine, was physician 
of Colorado Penitentiary and Surveyor General of the 
State. 
William Bundy married Prudence Wood, they had one child — 
Allen S. 

Married, second, Asenith Doudna, their children were — 
Prudence Evaline 

T. Clarkson Charles 

Joel Dillwyn C. 

Almeda Rebecca H. 

Demsey Bundy married Ann Wood, their children were — 
Emily Amanda 

Married, second, Ann Crew, their children were — 
Jeptha Jefferson 

Melvina 
Married, third, Rebecca Smith, no children. 
Chalkley Bundy married Sarah Doudna, their children were — 
Lindley Rebecca D. 

Joel D. Emma 

Nathan W. Mary E. 

Lucinda Chalkley 

Married, second, Deborah H. Bundy (widow of Caleb Bundy, 
deceased; Caleb Bundy was the son of Ezekiel Bundy.) No 
children. 
Elizabeth Bundy married Hezekiah Bailey, their children were — ■ 
Sarah Almeda 

Mary Adaline 

Dempsey Lucinda 

Melvina 
The children of Ezekiel Bundy and Maria Engle (his first wife) 

married as follows — 
Elizabeth to John Hoyle, their children were — 
Simeon Nathan 

Ezekiel 



578 O^'R Anxestors — The Stantoxs 

Nathan to Anna Stanton, their children were — 
Joseph S. Mary M. 

Caleb L. Clara E. 

Caleb to Deborah Hanson, their child — 

Mary Caleb 
William E. to Rebecca Doudna, their children were — 
Elmer E. Bertram 

Agnes M. 
Married, second, Eunice Tallman, no children. 
Mary Jane married Jesse Starbuch, their children were — 
Caleb Clara 

J. Clinton Adelbert 

Clyde Edith 

Martha Ann married Joseph Plummer, no children. 
Anna Maria married Stewart Watt, their children were — 
Forest William 

Olga Walter 

Daisy 
Ezekiel Bundy and Sarah Stanton (his second wife) — child — 
John H. married Mary Doudna, their children — 
Clinton Ezekiel ] 

Alice Chalkley \ all deceasec 

Hannah, deceased Sarah Alice J 

Children of Eli Bundy and Sarah (Vernon) married as follows^ 
William C. married Edith Stanton, their children were — ■ 

Henry Ella 

Mary married John Doudna, their children were — 
Eli Charles 

Clarissa Ada 

Eva Walter 

Ruthanna married Gersham Mott, their children were — 
Sarah Eleanor 

William Hester 

Hester married Robert Doudna, their children were — 
Rebecca 
Children of John Bundy and Ruth Patten (his first wife) mail 

ried as follows — 
Sarah married Ashur Mott. They had no children. 

William P. married Tabitha Doudna, their children were — 
John Wilson 

Eddie (who was drowned) Harvey 
Sarah 

(All of above died young) 
Louisa married Louis C. Steer. 
Mary P. married Eli Stanton, their children were — 
William H. Emma C. 

Sarah B. 
Children of John Bundy and Sidney Tipton (his second wife)- 



A Partial Genealogy of the Bundy Family 579 

] Thomas W. married Abigail Doudna (their children were — 
j three sons, who died while young). 

: _ Mary E. Edith, died in infancy 

i Children of John Bundy and Anna Edgerton (his third wife) — 
I Ruth married Josiah W. Doudna, their children were — 
' Albert Ernest 

Lillian Alice 

Jesse married a woman from California. 
Elizabeth married Ira Frame. They have no children. 
Children of Sarah Bundy Dawson — 

Chalkley married, first, Martha Garretson, their children 
were — 

Marv Caleb Melvina 

Willits Sina 

Married, second, Anna Branson, their child — 
Martha 

Married, third, Theresa Hopper. They had no children. 
Married, fourth, a Mrs. Lohr. 
Matilda married Stephen Clendenon, they had one child — 
Louisa 
Eli married Hester Tipton (daughter of Sidney Wood Tipton, 
the second wife of John Bundy), their children were — 
Jesse, went to Colorado, married and had one child — 
Clyde 
Children of William Bundy and Prudence Wood (his first wife). 

Allen died while a young man. 
Children of William Bundy and Asenith Doudna (his second 
wife) married as follows — 
Clarkson married Rachel Crew, their children were — 
Howard Edith Merle Mary 

William Elva and Melva (twins) 

Dillwyn Bundy married Elizabeth Steer, their children 
were — 

Ellis Mary 

Amy Margaret 

& Walter Anna 

. Rebecca married John Cadwallader. They have no children. 
Children of Demsey and Ann Wood (his first wife) married as 
follows — 
Emily married Thompson Frame, they had one child — 

Mary 
Amanda married Samuel French, their children were — 
Melvina Emily 

Fred John 

Laura Albert 

Josephine Anna 

Children of Demsey Bundy and Ann Crew (his second wife) — 



580 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

Teptha married Myra Dawson, their children were — 

Alvin J. Randall D. (Randall fell 

Clara L. from the top of a wind- 

Melvina — died, aged 5 mill tower, to which point 

he had climbed to oil 
the machinery, and was 
killed.), 
Jefferson Bundy married Jennie Smith, their children were — 
Ross Walter 

Fred Cecil 

Othol Everest — six sons 

Children of Chalkley Bundy and Sarah Doudna married as 
follows — 
Lindley married Ruanna Frame, their children were — 
Sarah Chalkley 

Carver Tacie Bertha 

Joel D. married Mary Ellen French, they had one child — 

Emma. 
Nathan W. married, first, Anna Dawson, their children 
were — 

Ora Russell 

Married, second, Agnes P. Hanson, their children were — 
Warren C. Anna M. 

Lucinda married Benjamin H. Hanson, their children were — 
Cora S. Marv E. 

Alva E. Caleb L. 

Maude E. Herman B. 

Rebecca married Daniel Stanton, their children were — 

Sarah E. Edmund C. 

Marv E. married Jason Fawcett, their children were — 
Clarence E. Clifford J. Martha D. 

Children of Elizabeth Bundy and Hezekiah Bailey married as 
follows — 
Sarah (did not marry.) 

Mary married Henry Stanton, they had no children. 
Demsey married Sadie Bailey, their children were — 
Elmer E. Daniel Anna 

Bernard Edmund Rose 

Melvina married Joseph Garretson, they had one child — Ora. 
Melvina deceased and her sister Almeda married Joseph Gar- 
retson, their children were — 
Ross Eva 

Isabel Myrtle Everett 

Adaline married Robert H. Smith, their children were — 

Lucinda Tacy 

Lucinda died when about twenty years of age, being em- 1 

ployed as teacher at Friends' Boarding School, Barnes- i 

ville, Ohio, at the time of her death. 



A GENEALOGICAL REVERIE 





w 


HEN father told 


me a little about our 




ancestors, I was \ 
let me see, moth* 
I am only — 


^lad I was a Stanto 
;r was a Bundy, the 


n, but 


[^^ 


re fore 




each 




Eli Stanton 




Mary P. Bundy 






V4 


each 




Joseph Stanton 


Mary Hodgin 


John Bundy 


Ruth Patten 




'^ 


each 




Henry Stanton 


Stephen Hodgin 


William Bundy 


William Patten 


Clary Patterson 


Elizabeth Williams Sarah Overman 


Sally Morris 




1-16 


each 




Benjamin Stanto 


n Hodgin 


Demsey Bundy 


Patten 


Abigail Macy 


Unknown 


Mary 


Unknown 


Joseph Patterson 


Williams 


Aaron Overman 


Morris 


Mary 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 




1-32 


each 




Henry Stanton 


Hodgin 


Caleb Bundy 


Patten 


Lydia Albertson 


Unknown 


Elizabeth 


Unknown 


David Macy 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Dinah Gardner 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


William Patterso 


n Williams 


Overman 


Morris 


1^ ^^ u 


Unknown 
Unknown 


Unknown 
Unknown 


Unknown 
Unknown 


jvazian 
Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 




1-64 


each 




John Stanton 


Hodgin 


John Bundy 


Patten 


Mary Clark 


Unknown 


Elizabeth 


Unknown 


Esam Albertson 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


John Macy, Jr. 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Judith Worth 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Solomon Gardner 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Anna Coffin 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Patterson 


WTW 


Overman 


Morris 


Williams 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 




1-128 


each 




Robert Stanton 


Hodgin 


Bundy 


Patten 


Avis 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 



581 



582 


Our 


Ancestors- 


—The Stantons 


Jeremiah Clark 
Francis Latham 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Albertson 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


John Macy 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Deborah Gardiner 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


John Worth 
Miriam Gardner 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Richard Gardner 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Mary Austin 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Stephen Coffin 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Mary Bunker 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Patterson 




Overman Morris 


VV llllctlllo 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 


Unknown 



But the biologist tells us that we do not 
inherit our ability or characteristics with any- 
such regular or mathematical exactness as shown 
above, but that we may receive much from one 
ancestor and little or nothing from others. If we 
examine our talents we may estimate with some 
accuracy from whom we receive certain ability 
or traits. Then do I receive my love of the 
beautiful from the old French ancestry — my love 
for the solid and substantial from the English, 
and the fondness for ships and sails and salt 
water from the early American Stantons, the 
Macys, Coffins, Gardners, and old Nantucketers? 
But on whom shall I blame my undesirable 
qualities? 

But of one thing we are very sure, each should 
exert himself to the utmost to live an honorable 
life and, if possible, be a worthy descendant of 
such ancestors. 

William Henry Stanton. 



Obituaries 



JORDAN STANTON 

son of 
Henry and Clarv Stanton. 

Born 11-25-1818 (probably.) 
Died 12-16-1839. 

From an old copy: 

The following was extracted from a letter written by James 
Stanton to a distant relation dated 1st Month 8th, 1840, to be ' 
preserved by the family for its historical contents: 

"When the storms of adversity and affliction are permitted to . 
assail, and drive us from our downy nests of earthly ease, like as 
the eagle stirreth up or destroyeth her nest, when all her wooings 
are tried in vain to entice her young away, and taketh them and 
beareth them on her wings, we are brought by Divine Love into a 
nearer union with Himself, and attachment one towards another. 
Of the uncertainty of terrestrial things and all human calculations 
we have of late had abundant evidence. 

"Dear Brother Jordan, who joined me in my ride but a few 
weeks ago, and visited your parts in full health and vigor of 
strength, has, alas! bid us a final adieu, and left his place here to 
know him no more forever. He was taken ill about the Eighth of 
last month, the disease which was the typhus or winter fever, made 
such rapid and even progress, baffling all medical skill 'applied, 
that in only eight days, on the evening of the sixteenth, his suffer- 
ings were closed, we trust forever. During the whole of his illness 
there was such a calmness and serenity of mind manifested by 
him, as to render his chamber a place of instruction. In the 
morning of the last day, when it became evident that his stay 
here could not be much longer, he signified to some of us, that 
although he had searched, he could not feel any condemnation, 
nor yet could he feel so sensibly an evidence of Divine acceptance 
as he wished, and that he knew no better way than to try to keep 
his mind composed, and see if anything would arise. In the course 
of the day he said in effect that the only convictions he had felt 
were for not having been more watchful and ardent in spirit in 
meetings for Divine Worship. In the evening he repeated in a 
clear and melodious voice the following passage: 'Great anc 
marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty, just and true arc 
all thy ways thou King of Saints.' A little after this he repeated i 
few detached or unconnected Scripture passages, which served tc 
show what had been the occupation of his mind, although tht 
organization of it was much broken; after this he said but little 
and scarcely moving hand or foot, he quietly breathed shorter anc 
shorter to the last, about seven o'clock. Aged 21 years and 2 
days." 



RUTH (PATTEN) BUNDY 

Mary P. Doudna found the following paper among her 
Mother's (Jane Plummer) letters. "Some expression to Jane 
Plummer by Ruth (Patten) Bundy when on her death bed." 

Born 3-10-1814. 
Died 2-17-1841. 

Advised her to seek and serve the Lord — that she had a family 
coming on — so that she might be prepared to bring them up to 
serve Him — that he was a merciful Father, she loved him so much 
she could not help expressing something of it, though it was 
inexpressible — she advised her to attend Meetings and to seek and 
serve Him while there and she would return with peace of mind 
which was of more value than all the world could give — and by so 
doing she might be a help to society for it needed her — she believed 
trials were coming in society — and she wanted her to stand faithful 
and if she would but serve and obey the Lord with full dedication 
of heart — although trials may be permitted to come they will be 
made easier than she had an idea of. (All that could be remem- 
bered by the one who wrote it down for her.) 



DANIEL STANTON 

Born 6- -1827. 
Died 11-16-1844. 

Barnesville, Ohio, 11/27/1844. 
Dear Brother: 

Father received thy letter of last First Day informing that thee 
had not heard from here since thee left. I wrote a letter on First 
Day the Seventeenth and mailed it so as to leave on the next 
morning. Informing of Brother Daniel's disease, there was no 
important change in him after thee left except he grew weaker 
until Seventh Day morning, * * * from that time he rapidly 
sank, but the fever rising and running to the head he became more 
restless and flighty all the day, yet not so, but that he at times 
made some sensible and touching expressions. About one or 
two o'clock he supplicated to the Lord to forgive him for he was a 
poor creature and be with him and go before him through the 
Valley and Shadow of Death and receive him into a better world. 
Then or soon after, turning to father, said, "I am prepared to go 
now." He said considerable more through the afternoon, but not 
being able to speak clearly, much of it could not be gathered. 
About four o'clock father, going to his bed (having been a few 
minutes absent), he looked earnestly at him and seemed to try to 
bid him farewell, then turning his eyes from him he fixed them 
nevermore to move and gently breathed shorter and easier to the 
last, about twenty minutes. He was buried the next day, leaving 
the house at three o'clock. 

Father and Mother are about as well as usual, seem lonesome, 
but as cheerful as could be expected. Their colored woman being 
nearly sick with cold, cough and pain in her side, left them on the 
sixteenth and has not returned and doubtful whether she will, 
although she has got better. 

We are in usual health except Lydda's eye which is worse this 
week than ever. 

I remain, with love, 

Thy brother, 

James Stantont. 



ft 



MARY STANTON 

Deceased the Twenty-seventh of Ninth month, 1857. Aged 

forty-seven years, five months and seventeen days. 
Compiled from notes written by her husband, Joseph Stanton. 

Mary Stanton enjoyed almost uninterrupted good health all 
her life until about the beginning of her last year, when her strength 
began to fail. The weakness was first perceptible in her knees 
and ankles which increased by such slow and almost imperceptible 
degrees, that she gave attention to her domestic concerns and 
attended religious meetings until about the First of Sixth month. 
By this time the weakness had so increased that she was unable 
to walk alone, but spent most of her time, until the day before her 
death, in an easy chair. She suffered little or no pain from the 
disease. Her appetite and general health were mostly pretty good 
so she was able to enjoy the family circle and the company of her 
friends who called to see her. She often spoke of this as a great 
favour. But felt her greatest privation was her inability to 
assemble with her friends for divine worship. 

The weakness continued to increase to such an extent that for the 
last six or eight weeks of her time she was unable to turn herself 
in bed at night. This necessitated frequent attention and caused 
many wakeful hours, which were often made truly heart rendering 
seasons. At these times she expressed her apprehensions that she 
should not continue long with us, and we were unitedly made 
willing to resign the event to Him who knows best what is best for 
us, and who will require no more of the humble and contrite ones 
than He will enable them to bear. 

About the Twentieth of the Ninth month, she took a cold which 
settled in a cough. This condition reduced her strength more 
rapidly, and on the Twenty-sixth she did not think she could 
last many days longer and said, "I can see nothing in my way, but 
I am afraid I have not searched every corner of my heart, as with 

a lighted 
587 



588 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



a lighted candle. I have craved that I might be favoured with 
an assurance of divine acceptance before the time arrives. I fear 
I have not been as attentive to my duty, while strength and 
ability were afforded, as I ought to have been. O! for one of the 
lowest mansions in His kingdom." On the morning of the 
Twenty-seventh, after spending a worrisome night with her 
cough, she said that she thought she could not spend another such 
night.' The same morning, she said: "I am almost gone and I 
see nothing in my way. I have endeavoured to search every 
corner of my heart as with a lighted candle and I trust the sincere 
endeavours of the humble and contrite ones will be accepted. My 
complaint has come on very gradually. I have had a great while 
to think of these things and I trust I have not been unmindful 
of them." 

Shortly after it appeared evident to those about her that she 
could not survive much longer and while her children were stand- 
ing around the bed weeping, she looked at them and said: "Dear 
children, do not fret, we have to part some time and it cannot be 
in a better time. I want you to be good children, to live in peace, 
and in the love and fear of the Lord, and try to help your father." 
A little later when it was thought by some present that she was 
not conscious of what was going on around her, someone pro- 
posed to lower her head, which had been raised on account of her 
cough, which had now entirely subsided. On hearing this, she 
shook her head and when asked if she did not want it lowered, said, 
"No." When other friends came in and wished to adjust her 
pillows, they were requested to just be quiet, to which she re- 
sponded, "Yes, be quiet." Very soon her sister came in, whom 
she had not seen that morning. She went to the bed and stood 
awhile and was about to turn away, not apprehending our dear 
one was conscious of her presence, when we heard from a clear 
voice, "Farewell! farewell! my dear and only sister. Don't hold 
me, I am going to the mansions of rest and peace." These were 
the last words she spoke. She passed quietly away about 11 
o'clock, A. M., just twenty-five years to the day and hour since 
we were united by the marriage covenant, which I trust has been 
mutually and faithfully fulfilled; a retrospect of which affords 
peace and satisfaction. 

Joseph Stanton. 



JOSEPH STANTON 

Born 1-19-1812. 
Died 7-26-1859. 

Some account of the last illness and death of my dear friend, 
Joseph Stanton, who departed this life the 26th of 7th Month, 
1859, aged 47 years, 6 months and 7 days. He was taken unwell 
about the 14th of the 7th Month and on the 16th a physician was 
called in and pronounced his disease an inflammation of the stomach 
and bowels. From this time to the 20th, some hope was enter- 
tained of his recovery, though his sufferings were very severe at 
times. His disease which had appeared to have been partially 
arrested, now became more alarming and it was not thought that 
he could survive long. At which time I was sent for and reached 
his residence on the 21st, found him very low, but thought to be 
some better. Soon after my going in to see him he said, "What 
poor shortsighted creatures we are," and remarked, "That he had 
not been able to see how it might terminate, but felt resigned to 
the Divine will, believing that He doeth all things well." At 
another time speaking of the uncertainty of his recovery he said, 
his sufferings were so great he hardly had time to think a sober 
thought, and felt as though he would have to depend on the 
mercies of his Creator and the prayers of his friends, adding, "I 
want the prayers of the righteous for I feel myself such a poor 
frail mortal." 22nd and 23rd some hopes were entertained of 
his recovery though he continued to suffer most of the time. On 
my telling him the Doctor thought he was better, he said, "Well, 
it may be so, I may be spared to thee awhile, and who knows but 
thee may be an instrument in the Divine hand in raising me up. 
I am willing for thee to do all thee can. I have not been able to 
see how it may terminate and it is right that I should not, but if I 
judge from my own feelings, from the extreme pain, weakness 
and oppression, I doubt verv much of my recoverv," and added, 

"Oh 1 

589 



I 



590 Our Ancestors — The Stantons 

"Oh! that I may never have to suffer over again," and prayed for 
patience and faith to hold out to the end. 

His sufferings were so great he could not converse much, but 
being at times tried with great poverty of spirit such expressions 
as the following were frequently uttered: "Oh! wretched man that 
I am," and at other times, "Lord, what is man that thou art mindful 
of him or the son of man that thou visitest him. Surely nothing but 
a merciful Creator could deign to notice such a poor frail mortal." 
At another time he said: "Oh! if I should become impatient at 
last." Though he did not manifest anything like impatience or 
murmuring, often when his sufferings seemed almost more than 
human nature could bear, he would say, "Oh! dear Lord, have 
mercy," and "Oh ! Lord Jehovah." He frequently expressed thank- 
fulness for favors received, saying at one time, "Oh! I always 
have been favored more than I deserved, I have had an agreeable 
and beloved companion, one in whom I could confide, who would 
sympathize with me and feel for me, but she was taken away and 
I doubt not but she is gathered to her everlasting rest. And now 
thee is here to take her place and I know thee will do all thee can 
to help me bear my burdens, for I believe there is that feeling 
between us that goes beyond bounds or limits," and referred to 
the Scripture where it says, "For this cause shall a man leave his 
father and mother," etc. And father said, that no one could 
have kinder children than he had, that they always had been, 
that it was a great comfort to him that it was so and what a favor 
it was that he had them all around him, as well as his parents and 
sister and good kind nurses, and all was done that could be done 
for him, he always complied with their wishes, saying he was 
not fit to be trusted. The 24th, a friend going into his room, he 
inquired what sort of a morning it was; being told it was very 
bright and clear, he said, "What a pretty morning it would be to 
go to Heaven." Towards evening his sufferings from extreme 
pain, restlessness and oppression together with the hiccoughs or 
spasms of the stomach became almost unsupportable. After a 
season of great conflict he very expressively said (as if already 
beginning to enjoy the foretaste), "Oh! what a happy release to be 
free from all the sufferings and cares and trials and perplexities of 
this troublesome world, and be admitted into rest and peace." 
At another time, being asked if he wanted anything, replied, "Yes, 
I want to go to Heaven." A near relative saying to him she 
hoped he felt resigned, he said, "Yes, I believe I have no choice, 
but I am willing for you to do all you can," and requested her to 
pray for him that his faith and patience might hold out to the end. 
Afterwards speaking of his approaching dissolution he said, "I 
want thee to be resigned." I replied that I would try to be, but 
It seemed hard to give him up; he said, "I know what it is. I have 
had the trial myself, and I can feel for thee, I have parted with all 
my dear brothers and a dear sister and a beloved companion. 

Oh II. 



h 



Joseph Stanton 591 

Oh ! that was more than all the rest, my tears seemed all bottled up 
for the occasion." 

About midnight the conflict of mortality appeared to be about to 
terminate; the family being called up, he inquired if they were all 
present; being answered in an affirmative, he said he had greatly 
desired that he might have a little ease before he died, and it was 
now mercifully granted, that he had never felt so comfortable in 
all his life. Then addressing himself to his children, he said to 
this effect, "that he had never seen anything more completely 
carried out, than their dear Mother's advice to them had been 
towards him in helping him along, and naming Elizabeth said 
she knew how to behave herself, and she was one he always thought 
a great deal of. That he did not want one of them to covet the 
setthng of the estate, get the money into their own hands and 
keep it, that the two oldest knew what they had, and he wanted 
the other two to have as much, and the balance to be equally 
divided; that there would be nothing worth quarreling about, and 
he wanted them to remember his dear friend who was then at his 
left hand, for you feel to me as though you were all bound up in 
one bundle. Use her liberally and care for her as long as she lives," 
and added, "Oh! I do feel for thee." After which he wished to 
know if we thought he was saying too much, said he thought his 
head was clear, and had been all the time. But the dear sufferer 
revived again and said, "I thought I was going, but my time has 
not yet come." He prayed for faith and patience to hold out to 
the end. Some time after this he underwent another season of 
apparent desertion, and speaking to a friend said, "Oh, we have 
often taken sweet counsel together, have we not." The friend 
assenting, he said, "Oh, I am so poor and weak, if thee can do any- 
thing for me in this extremity I want thee to do it, I want my friends 
to pray for me." The friend speaking encouragingly to him, he 
said, "Oh, I feel myself such a poor worm of the dust." On his 
taking leave of him, he said, "Pray for me." 

After which he appeared to be comfortable in his mind and 
entirely sensible of his situation, saying at several different times, 
that the damps of death were on him now. The 25th, in the 
evening after giving him some wine he queried whether we thought 
he would "sup the new wine of the Kingdom, with his Heavenly 
Father against morning," and being very thirsty, "Oh, tor that 
water whereof if a man drink he shall never thirst again." His 
physician coming to see him he told him to tell him just what he 
thought of him for he thought he should die, and he was willing, 
and if he thought so, not to give him anything to keep him here 
suffering, but let him go. Two friends going into his room he 
said to them, "You are old people and have seen a good many 
sicken and die." He wanted to know what they thought of him, say- 
ing they need not be afraid to tell him. Upon taking leave of 
him, one of them remarked that it had felt comfortable to be with 

him 



592 Our Ancestors— The Stantons 

him; he replied, "I have had deep wadings." He remained during 
the day without much apparent change, but evidently growing 
weaker, and several times spoke of the approaching night, earn- 
estly desiring that he might not see the dawning of another day, 
and' requesting that some of his regular attendants should stay 
with him through the night. 

In the evening his sufferings being extreme he exclaimed, "This 
is passing through Jordan," and some time after, "Oh! dear Lord 
Jesus, come and receive me." At another time, "Oh! death, where 
is thy sting. Oh! grave, where is thy victory." On asking him if 
he was willing I should lie down a while, he said "Oh! yes, dear, I 
know thee needs rest, try to compose thyself and get some sleep. 
I have nothing to do but to die, and that will not be much." I 
replied that I would; he then said, "Yes I know thee will," and bid 
me an affectionate farewell, twice repeating it, "Farewell dear." 
After this he became drowsy and did not appear to take much 
notice of what was passing around him, but knew all his friends 
and remained sensible (except at some short intervals) throughout 
all his sickness. He continued to suffer till within a few minutes 
of the last, when he quietly departed like one falling into a sweet 
sleep, about eight o'clock in the morning. 

Composed by Achsah Smith. 



AMY (HODGIN) CLENDENON 

Born 1800. 
Died 12-1-1868. 

A short account of the death of Amy Clendenon, who departed 
this life the 1st of 12th Month, 1868, in the 68th year of her age. 
She was a member of Coal Creek Monthly Meeting of Friends. 

This dear friend had from youth been a diligent attender of our 
religious meetings, attached to our principles and testimonies and 
the right maintenance of the discipline. She bore a long and 
painful illness with exemplary patience, and left her friends with 
the belief that to die was to gain. 



HANNAH CLENDENON STANLEY 

Born 

Died 11-14-1868. 

Died on the 14th of the 11th Month, 1868, at her home in 
Keokuk County, Iowa. Hannah C, wife of Isaac E. Stanley 
and daughter of Benjamin and Amy Clendenon, in the 33rd year 
of her age. A member of Coal Creek Monthly Meeting of Friends. 

She bore a short but very severe illness with much patience. 
In the early part of her sickness, being queried with respect to her 
prospects, she replied: "I have lived under the crucifying, sancti- 
fying power of Christ, which alone can save." Towards the 
latter part of her sickness she was frequently engaged in supplica- 
tion. In conversation with her husband, she said with great 
tenderness: "I know I leave thee heart-broken and alone." 
Earnestly requesting him to do right, she said: "I feel that I am 
going home to an excellent Father and my sweet babe." She soon 
quietly passed away, leaving her friends the comfortable belief 
that her end was peace. 



ELI STANTON 

Born 2-12-1835. 
Died 3-25-1885. 

From "The Republican": 

"Eli Stanton, one of our Leading Friends, a Progressive anc 
Christian Citizen, has passed away. 

"The startling news (we call it so because his serious illness wa 
not generally apprehended) of the death of Eli Stanton was brough 
to town early Monday forenoon, which sad event occurred a 
three o'clock that morning. His complaint was chronic absces 
of the kidneys, which had in different stages been troubling hin 
for twenty years, but had been rapidly developing the last year 
and, in the past four weeks, took serious form, and resulted ii 
his death. Dr. Kemp was the physician whose opinions wer 
affirmed by the autopsy made Monday night. The patient's lif 
had been wonderfully prolonged. 

"Eli Stanton was about two months past fifty years of age, am 
had been married twice — the father of three children by the firs 
wife, and one by the second wife, all living. His first wife was tb 
daughter of John Bundy of East Main Street, and his widow ij 
the daughter of Elijah Hanson. He was born on the old Henr 
Stanton farm, about three and one-half miles east of town, hi 
mother was the daughter of Stephen Hodgin, his father wa 
Joseph Stanton, his grandfather was Henry Stanton and was ; 
cousin of Edwin M. Stanton, the greatest Secretary of War thi 
country ever had. He is a brother of William Stanton, Mrs 
Anna S. Bundy and Mrs. Lindley P. Bailey, all of this section, anc 
who are mourners of a great loss. 

"The deceased was a farmer living about two miles east of town 
He made a special business of thorough-bred cattle, in which lin^; 
he was one of the earliest movers, and won a reputation not merely 
local. Of his accumulations we are not prepared to say. H< 
had a beautiful farm of about 100 acres, well improved an( 
elegantly stocked. We feel as though the Republican had los 
one of its best friends. 

"He was a quiet, industrious man; strictly honest and unassum? 
ing and one of those who do not accumulate rapidly. Eli Stantoi 
was a friend to everything that was right, a social sunlight tha, 
dealt out, intuitively, happiness and content on all sides. 

"The Society of Friends has lost an influential member, one thai 
was a power of good and one that created a Christ-like influeno; 
everywhere. The remains were taken to Stillwater burying ground 
this (Wednesday) afternoon at two o'clock, where they wer 
quietly, prayerfully, and tearfully laid away forever." 



JOSEPH S. BUNDY 

Born 1-19-1860. 
Died 12-20-1885. 
jLocal Paper: 

"A popular and esteemed Barnesville boy yields to the demands 
of the Great Conqueror. He dies, but leaves footprints on the 
I sands of time. 

' "The death of Joseph S, Bundy occurred at his Mother's resi- 
; dence on South Lincoln Avenue, Sabbath morning at three o'clock. 
The startling news was like an electric shock to the entire com- 
i munity. Scarcely two weeks before his death he came home from 
I St. Clairsville, where he had been engaged in business for the past 
i year, suffering with what he supposed to be a heavy cold, but 
which soon developed into an alarming case of typhoid fever. 
: On Thursday of last week, he was taken with a hemorrhage, which 
was followed by several more on the two following days, terminat- 
ing in his death early Sabbath morning. He bore his sickness with 
remarkable fortitude, never uttering a murmur. 

"He seemed to realize from the first that this was his last sick- 
ness, and expressed himself as being entirely ready to go, if the 
Lord so willed, and was perfectly satisfied with the hereafter. Dur- 
ing his sickness he would have repeatedly read to him Isaiah 1-18. 
The blessed promise contained therein gave him much comfort. 
He expressed a firm belief in the Christian religion, and was desir- 
ous the people should so understand. Of his character and 
habits, nothing can be said, but that which is of the highest praise. 
Few young men were so well and favorably known. Noble, gen- 
erous, cultured and agreeable, he has won and sustained the 
esteem and admiration of all who knew him. His life was above 
reproach, he undertook nothing which he did not accomplish. 
Firm in purpose, positive in action, always guided by a clear con- 
science, he set an example which others would do well to follow. 
He began his school life in the public schools here, afterwards 
attending the Friends school and the College at Lebanon, Ohio, 
Valparaiso, Ind., for several terms, and was always an apt and 
studious scholar. From 1880 to 1884 he taught in the high schools 
at this place, winning the hearts of his pupils by his kindly nature, 
generosity and forbearance. 

"In November, 1884, he entered into a partnership with J. W. 
Emerson, for the purpose of furnishing abstracts oi title ol Belmont 

County 

595 



596 Our Ancestors — The Staxton-j 

County lands, at the same time attending to considerable survey- 
ing, which occupation he had followed tor several years, he bein§ , 
Deputy County Surveyor at the time of his death. This partner- 
ship has been dissolved by his untimely death. 

"Deprived of a father at the age ot fifteen, he had been the com 
fort and pride of a noble Mother and a loving brother and sister. 
Stricken down at the age of twenty-five, at the very beginning of a 
useful and prosperous life, his death was doubly sad. We being 
only finite, may be unable to see the justice in his death, but \ 
believing in the divine wisdom of the Infinite, we bow in humble j 
submission to His will, and content ourselves with the thought i 
that one great day, when all sorrows are at an end, we will be 
enabled to see and understand. 

"The bereaved family have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire 
community in their great affliction. The funeral services and 
burial were conducted by Friends' ceremony at Stillwater Meeting 
House, Monday afternoon at two o'clock and was one of the largesi 
ever held in that Church. An affecting discourse was preached 
by Hannah Stratton and the ceremonies throughout were appro- 
priate and impressive.' 

CALEB L. BUXDY 

Born 12-12-1862. 
Died 11-28-1890. 
From local paper: 

" 'Death loves a shining mark,' and while the King of Terrors is 
always an unwelcome guest, his visitations at times are particu- 
larly sad. It was especially so in the case of Mr. Caleb Bundy, 
of Sabula, Iowa, a young man about twenty-eight years of age, 
just married, and with an apparently bright future before him. 
He was taken with typhoid pneumonia about three weeks ago, and 
notwithstanding all the care that loving hands could bestow, he 
rapidly sank into that sleep that knows no waking. His mother, 
Mrs. Annie Bundy, was with him, having gone west on an extended! 
visit about two months ago, and intended making her home with 
her son during the coming winter When it was found that the 
end was approaching, his brother-in-law, Mr. Jack Colpitts, was 
sent for, who started at once, and arrived on Friday, a few hours 
after the spirit had fied. The remains were brought to his old 
home and laid to rest in the Southern Cemetery on Monday 
afternoon. 'Cale' was a most excellent young man, and held in 
the highest esteem by those who knew him best. He was married 
only last March, and life to him seemed filled with love and 
happiness. But his plans, whatever they may have been, were 
not finished, his aspirations were not realized. The sadly bereaved 
young wife, as well as the Mother and sister, have the sympathy of 
the community in their affliction. Funeral services were held 
Monday afternoon." 

I 



FRANCIS WILSON STANTON 

Born 4-5-1875. 
Died 8-8-1886. 

."rom local paper: 

"Sunday afternoon Frankie Stanton an 11 year old boy, of 
William Stanton, the well known Nurseryman two miles east of 
town, while on a visit to his aunt Deborah Stanton, who lives 
about a mile from the Friends Church, fell dead while standing in 
the doorway of the house. He had, as was thought, about recov- 
ered from a spell of typhoid fever and was allowed to go over to 
visit his relatives. He ate a hearty dinner, after which, in a 
boyish way, he amused himself at play with his little cousin, a 
boy about the same age in an upstairs room. About three o'clock 
his Aunt passing where the boys were playing, pleasantly asked 
if they were having a good time, and received an affirmative 
answer. Shortly after this at the suggestion of his cousin the boys 
came downstairs, Frankie in the lead. He had just descended the 
stairs and stepped to the front door when he was noticed tO' 
stagger against the door frame, and then to suddenly fall to the 
portico floor. He was quickly reached by his aunt, who raised 
him up, but one gasp was the only sign of life noticed, and the 
boy was gone. The Doctor gives it as his theory that death was 
caused by a rupture of the heart, brought on by over-exercise, the 
boy being still in a weakened condition from the fever. 

"The sudden death of this bright boy is a peculiarly sad blow to 
the family, who it seems are sorely afflicted with disease. His 
father is just convalescing from a long spell of sickness, and was 
quite prostrated at the news of his son's death. 

"Funeral services were held Tuesday, and the remains of the 
boy interred at Stillwater. 

"The afflicted family have the greatest sympathy of the com- 
munity." 



JOHN LINDLEY STANTON 

Born 4-17-1877. 
Died 3-20-1897. 
From Local Paper: 

A PROMISING LIFE ENDED 

"It is with an unusual feeling of sadness that we chronicle the 
death of John Lindley Stanton, son of William and Jennie Stanton, 
which occurred at their home at Tacoma, last Saturday morning. 
He had been suffering for some weeks with the prevailing grip, j 
but was much improved and attended the Commencement I 
exercises at the close of Friends school at Olney and probably con- n 
tracted an additional cold, developing into pneumonia. The dis- 
ease was severe from the first, but there was thought to be a decided 
improvement for a day or two before his death and his parents 
were very much encouraged. A sudden relapse came on Sunday 
night and death resulted in a few hours. 

"Nearly every one in the community knew Lindley Stanton — 
knew him because he was a boy out of and beyond the ordinary. 
In early life he developed those manly traits that marked him 
among his playfellows and made him a favorite with all. At a 
very tender age he voluntarily took upon himself life's burdens, 
and applied himself to the tasks before him with a diligence and , 
perseverance that were remarkable in a boy of his years. He was 
one of the most industrious boys it has ever been our good fortune 
to know, and it seems peculiarly sad that just as he was entering 
upon the threshold of a life of usefulness and promise he should so 
suddenly be taken away. His death is a sad blow to his parents 
who had come to depend upon him in an unusual degree for one 
of his years and his going out will cause a gloom and a sadness in 
the home that the years will never efface. Funeral services were 
held at Stillwater meeting house on Monday afternoon. The 
family have the deepest sympathy of their relatives and friends 
in their bereavement." 



JOHN BUNDY 

Born 2-17-1813. 
Died 9-20-1898. 

Father had never been sick in bed but once since I can remem- 
ber, except for little attacks of what I suppose a physician would 
ihave termed "Petit Mai." These attacks seemed always to be 
associated with digestive disturbances, and as father would say, 
"My liver is out of order" and would proceed at once with "Todds 
Pills." I often used to laugh at father about him always think- 
ing when any thing was the matter with any one, that "their 
liver was out of order," but I have come to the conclusion, with 
my own experience and that of many other people, that he was 
about right; for I know the liver is where we do most of our "liv- 
ing" or "dying" as the case may be. 

A few days before father's last sickness, he and mother walked 
to Meeting. It was a beautiful September Sabbath morning, 
and as they came home, they rested by the way on some of the 
neighbors' doorsteps. We always had a man, who drove a public 
carriage, come take them to Meeting when the weather was 
inclement or they did not feel equal to the walk, but that day 
they seemed to feel well and wanted to walk. On Second day, 
father was out about as usual and after supper in the evening 
he walked across the street to George Wilson's and spent some 
time on their doorstep, talking and playing with their little child- 
ren, of whom he was very fond. Third day morning he had very 
little appetite but ate a little breakfast. At dinner time he just 
tasted his food and pushed his plate away and remarked, "he 
guessed he would go and lie down," which he did. About the 
middle of the afternoon, nature gave way and he realized his 
condition, so mother and I put him to bed and I telephoned to 
Dr. Ely. When he came and examined him he said, "This is 
the beginning of the end, just make him as comfortable as pos- 
sible." Father seemed never to want anything to eat after that, 
but would take some liquid nourishment as we gave it to him, 
and he lingered on, growing weaker till the following First day morn- 
ing, just as the church bells were ringing, his sweet child-like spirit 
took its flight for "one of the many mansions prepared for those 
who love and serve the Master." I had so often heard father 
say "he hoped he would never live to be a burden to anybody." 
I felt so thankful for him that his wish was granted. It was just 
a "quiet going to sleep here, to awaken in that country where 
sickness and sorrow are no more." 

Pasadena, Elizabeth (Bundy) Frame. 

California, 

1921. 



CLIFFORD B. COLPITTS 

Born 7-5-1890. 

Died 9-5-1911. 
From local paper: 

"Clifford Colpitts, the only son of Mr. and Mrs. John Colpitts, 
died at the family home at Lincoln Avenue, Tuesday morning. 
He had been a sufferer for over two months with tubercularl 
meningitis, that disease being the direct cause of his death. 
Clifford Colpitts was born in Barnesville, July 5, 1890, and grewj 
to manhood here. He was a young man of exceptional businessj 
ability. For quite a while prior to his sickness, he was con- 
nected with the Pike-Richmond Company, wholesale milliners, of 
Cleveland. In the capacity of city salesman he was giving most 
excellent service to his firm, was unusually popular with the trade, 
and had his life and health been spared, would no doubt in the 
years to come, have filled a prominent position in business circles 
of the town. Although quiet and unassuming, he was very popu- 
lar with his companions and the young people of the town generally, 
and was recognized by everyone, as a young man who took life 
seriously, and tried to do his duty as he saw it. Only twenty-one 
years of life were granted him, but these years were not useless 
ones, and he leaves behind him a record of honor and true worth 
that will be an enduring memory and comfort, while life shall last, 
to those who loved him. For the saddened parents, the way will 
now be lonely, and the once unbroken family circle shadowed and 
desolate, but those who sorrow, realize that the Master doeth all 
things well, and that some day we will be united with our loved 
ones. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon, con- 
ducted by Dr. Battelle McCarty, of the First Methodist Church, 
the deceased being a member of that denomination for a number 
of years. Burial in Southern Cemetery." 



MARY ANNA (BRACKEN) BAILEY 

Born 2-5-1876. 
Died 1-24-1914. 

From local paper: 

"It is with sad hearts we record the death of Mary Anna Bailey, 
First Month, 24, 1914, the beloved wife of Oscar J. Bailey of 
Tacoma, Ohio. She was born at Colerain, Ohio, Second Month 5, 
1876, daughter of Lindley M. and Anna S. Brackin. Fifth 
Month 20, 1896, she was united in marriage with Oscar J. Bailey. 
She leaves five boys between the ages of two and seventeen years 
to mourn the loss of a devoted mother. 

"Only a few days ago she was taken to a hospital at West Chester, 
Pa., where she underwent an operation for gall-stones. Every- 
thing that skill and loving hands could do was done, but the 
summons came and late in the evening of the 24th, she was called 
Beyond. She was a faithful and consistent member of the Society 
of Friends, a loving and devoted wife and mother, a true home 
maker. 

"Funeral services were held at Stillwater meeting house First 
Month 27th, attended by a large number of relatives and friends. 

"She was one of seven children and she leaves besides her hus- 
band and five boys, her parents and two brothers and four sisters 
to mourn her loss. Her death was the first break in the two 
families. It is hard to let her go, but we can but quote from the 
pen of Jesse Edgerton:" 

"As I weep o'er buried hopes. 

With tears which I may not restrain, 
A vision, beautiful and bright. 

Dawns gently on my aching brain. 



I 



A glimpse of beauty, far away, 

In that bright city of the blest. 
Where toil-worn feet no longer stray. 

And weary souls forever rest. 

And there before the throne of God, 
W'ith spotless robes and seraph wings. 

Thy hand attunes a golden harp, 

Thy voice with angel sweetness sings. 

God grant us faith to look above 
And see the glory thou hast won. 

And through our sighs and tears to breathe. 
From bleeding hearts, 'Thy will be done.' " 



ANNA STANTON BUNDY 

Born 8-8-1837. 
Died 10-5-1917. 

From Local Paper: 

"Mrs. Anna S. Bundy, an aged and beloved woman of this 
place, died Friday, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Col- 
pitis, with whom she had lived several years. 

"Mrs. Bundy was eighty years of age, and although she had been 
in poor health for two years, she did not become worse until two 
weeks prior to her death, which resulted from heart trouble, 
caused by asthma. 

"The decedent was one of the pioneer women of the town, having 
lived her entire life here. Her maiden name was Anna Stanton, 
she being a member of the family that has held an honored and 
prominent place in this region throughout the years. She was 
married in 1859 to Nathan Bundy, who died in 1874. 

"Mrs. Bundy was a member of the Society of Friends. She 
lived a life of simplicity, never wavering in her faith, and striving 
to make each year of her long life more useful than the ones that 
had gone before. Although called upon to bear more grief and 
sorrow than comes to many, she met each trial bravely, feeling 
that her duty to those about her called for cheeriness and the 
subjection of her personal troubles. During the sunset of her life 
she was most tenderly cared for by the devoted daughter who 
with her other relatives and loving friends did all that was possible 
to make her comfortable and happy. 

"Besides the daughter, she is survived by one sister, Mrs. L. P. 
Bailey, and one brother, William Stanton, of Westtown, Pa. 

"The funeral was held Monday afternoon at two o'clock. Burial 
in the Southern Cemetery." 



BENJAMIN STANTON 

Born 4-22-1848. 
Died 8-6-1898. 

From Local Paper: 

"The death of Benjamin Stanton, a prominent resident of this 
vicinity, occurred at his home east of town last Saturday evening. 
He had been complaining for a long time, but had not been confined 
to his home until about two weeks before his death, when typhoid 
fever developed which with other complications resulted in his 
death. Mr. Stanton was born in 1848, his father, Edmund Stanton, 
being a first cousin of the great War Secretary Stanton. He was 
married to Elizabeth Plummer, in 1870, who with four children, 
three boys and one girl, survive him. Mr. Stanton was a highly 
esteemed member of the Society of Friends and while not of an 
aggressive type, yet he worked faithfully and honestly for what he 
deemed to be the right and had the confidence and esteem of all 
who knew him. His early years were devoted largely to the 
raising of fine sheep, an industry in which he was eminently suc- 
cessful. In later years his attention was more particularly 
directed towards the creamery business and Jersey cattle. He 
leaves a most estimable family who have the sympathy of every 
one in their bereavement. Funeral services were held on Monday 
afternoon. Interment at Friends' burying ground at Stillwater." 

TABITHA STANTON DAVIS 

Born 3-13-1845. 
Died 2-13-1920. 

From Local Paper: 

I "Tabitha S. Davis, a beloved woman of this neighborhood, died 
at her home east of town Friday, February 13, from compli- 
cations arising from injuries caused by a broken hip. 

"The decendent was seventy-three years of age, and practically 
her entire life was spent in this neighborhood, where she was born. 
Her maiden name was Tabitha Stanton, and she was the widow 
of the late John F. Davis, who died in 1900. 

"Mrs. Davis was a grand, good woman, and noted for her cordial 
hospitality and kindness of heart. Throughout her life she was 
loving and kind and in going leaves the richest legacy earth 
affords, a pure and blameless life. 

"With a birth-right in the Society of Friends, throughout all the 
years allotted her, she remained a true and faithful Christian, and 
when the summons came was ready to go and be forever at rest 
with Him in whom she had implicit faith. 

"Services conducted in accordance with the custom of Friends, 
were held Tuesday. Burial in Friends' burying ground. 

"Mrs. Davis was the last to be called of her im.mediate family, 
and is survived only by an adopted daughter." 




FRIENDS' BURYING GROUND 

Portsmouth, rhode island. The first re- 
corded HOME OF Robert Stanton. Typical 

OF MANY SUCH GROUNDS — NO EARLY RECORDS - 
NO NAMES, AND FEW MARKERS. 



RECORDS 




THE recorded information given 
in the foregoing pages will not 
be perpetuating and must stop 
with the locking of the last page 
in the printing press. But the 
hope is held that with interest aroused in 
the history and genealogy of our ancestors 
each person possessing a copy of the 
book will record facts for future genera- 
tions. 

The following space provides for sev- 
eral families and it is hoped that each 
book will be handed down from one 
family to another, more cherished as it 
grows older and more complete as each 
family adds its contribution in the pages 
for record. 



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FINIS 



Index 




A BRIG 
FROM A CUT PRINTED IN i-jgb 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 

The border at the top and bottom of the title page was copied from 
the New Testament title page of the Stanton Bible^ a reproduction 
of which is shown on page 6i. 

* * * * 

The candle stick shown at the beginning and end of the book, with 
the long and short candles, belonged to Eli Stanton and was used in 
his home for tnany years. A larger illustration of the same candle 
stick is shown on page 218. 

* * * * 

The kettle and crane shown on page 82 is now in use at the home 
of Joseph W. Doudna, Barnesville, Ohio. 

* * * * 

The poem by Mary P. {Stanton) Dawson, printed on pages 164 to 
166, has been illustrated from the actual articles referred to in the 
poem. The doorway is the one of her childhood home — the cup and 
plate are the ones her parents used — the Bible is the one from which 
her father read to the family. {The Bible is shown in detail and 
described on pages ^8 to 64.) — The chair is the one used by her 
father and the gravestone marks her grave in Stillwater BuryingGround. 

* * * * 

The poem about the cookies, printed on pages J2i and 322, has 
been illustrated according to references in the poem. The apple pie 
was baked by Edith Cope Stanton — the cookies by Mary B. Colpitts^ 
daughter of Anna Stanton Bundy—the little girl is Susanna Morris 
Stanton — the little boy, William Macy Stanton, and the last is Anna 
Stanton Bundy, to whom the poem was dedicated. 

* * * * 

The poem on pages j8o and j8/, entitled ''For Fifty Years,'' was 
written just previous to the fiftieth anniversary of the marriage of 
Lindley P. and Elizabeth Stanton Bailey, and was read to the guests 
on Seventh month Twenty-sixth, ig2i. 

* * * * 

The waterfall, shown on page 564, is located in the Pocono Moun- 
tains, in eastern Pennsylvania. The photograph was taken by Will- 
iam Macy and Edith Cope Stanton while on their ''motor-trip" 
honeymoon in igi6. 



"^^^^^^ ^jd-^z^t^A>t^ V^ 



INDEX 



Abstracts from Minutes of Core Sound 

Meeting, 53-57 
Agreement, Copy of, 405 
Albertson, Lydia, m., 32; ch., 33 
"Ail-aboard," illus. 505 
Ancestors, poem, 349-50 
Anecdotes, 91-2, 107, 128, 145, 147-48, 

1S4, 172-3 ,405-08 
Anniversary, Fiftieth, 377-79 
Appreciation of Edna Macy Stanton, 344- 

48 
Arms, Coat of, illus. 12 
Army discharge, 295 
At work on "The Book," illus. 502 
Ax handle pattern, 474 

Bailey, Alfred L., appreciation of, 10. b., 

370; m., 371; port. 528 
Alva C., b., 365; m. and ch., 372. port 

530 
Anna, b., 364; m., 371 
• Anna B., port. 528 
Asenath, 362; port. 363 
Charles Lloyd, b., 372; port. 533 
Clara, b., 364; m., 371; port. 532 
David B., b., 372; port. 531 
Dorothy L., 371; port. 528 
Edward P., b., 370; port. 527 
Edwin M., b., 364; m., 370; port. 526 
Elizabeth Bundy, port. 401 
Elizabeth Stanton, Articles by, 175-80, 

185, 187, 265; biog. 361-73; port. 179, 

497, 525 
Elizabeth Stanton, Jr., b., 372; port. 

533 
Family, 537, chart, 538-39 
Florence E., b., 372; port. 533 
Harmon E., b., 372; port. 530 
Herbert J., b., 370; port. 526 
Jesse and Asenath, 362; port. 363 
Jesse S., b., 365; m. and ch., 372; port. 

533 
Joseph O., b., 370; port. 527 
Laura E., port. 530 
Lavada S., port. 371 
Lester W., b., 372; port. 533 
Lillian D., port. 526 
Lindiey P., articles by, 267-74, 382-83, 

384-88, port. 525 



Bailey, Lindiey P. and Elizabeth S., biog. 
361-73. Fiftieth wedding anniversary, 
377-79; family group 369. Golden 
wedding, group portrait, facing 372; 
port, facing 361 

Lindiey P., Jr., b., 370; port. 527 

Lizzie, 252 

Lydia H., port. 533 

Mary Agnes, b., 534 

Mary Anna, d., 370; obituary, 601; 
port. 527 

Mary E., b., 372; port. 530 

Nathan C, b., 372; port. 531 

Oliver B., b., 370; port. 527. 

Oscar J., b., 364; m. and ch., 370-71; 
port. 527 

Ralph W., b., 372; port. 531 

Raymond C, b., 372; port. 531 

RoUand A., b., 372; port. 531 
Barn, Eli Stanton's, 231-42 

John Bundy's, illus. 414, 416 
Barnaby, Laura, port. 127 

Loretta, story about, 128 
Barn-door hinge, illus. 417 
Basket, illus. 420 
Bear story, 191 

Beaufort, oldest house, illus. 44 
Bed spreads, illus. 250, 251 
Bells, wagoner's, illus. 480 
Belvoir castle, 13; illus. 14 
Bench from Meeting House, 441; illus. 

441 
Bibles, Stanton desc, 59-64; illus. 58, 60-2, 

153, 177, 565 
"Bobble" Peters Cook, 461 
Bogue Banks, illus. 47 
Bonnet, illus. 181 

Stolen, 96 
Bookbinding, illus. 504 
Bookcase, illus. 200 
Book plate, illus. 192 
Book, Reader, illus. Ill, 225 

Where made, 503 
Bootees, W hitc Woolen, illus. 402 
Bottles, Hand made, illus. 2SS 
Bouquet, illus. 378 
Bowles, Ada J., port. 188 

Elsie R.. port. IS8 
Bracken, Mary .Anna, m., 370 



642 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 



Brake, lever, illus. 478 
Branson, Rebecca Ann, m., 171 
Brig, preceding Index 
Broadax, illus. 23 S 
Brown, Aaron, m., 41, 78 
Brown, Anna, 78 

Harriet A., m., 134 
Bullet mold, illus. 211 
Bundy, Abigail, article by, 421; port. 421 

Agnes H., 158 

Anna, m., 371 

Anna Stanton, biog. 311-19; m., 179; 
obituary, 602; port. 179, 322, 518 

Caleb, m., 179. 290; waiter, 201 

Caleb L., b., 312; m., 314; obituary, 
596; port. 518; teacher, 314 

Chalkley, director, 290 

Chalkley and Sarah, residence, illus., 
port. 399 

Charity, b., 412 

Clara B., port. 532 

Clara Elma, b., 312 

Clarence, illus. 505 

David and Zadock, settled estate, 393 

Deborah H. B., biog. 208; 290-93 

Demsey, inventory, 391; poem by, 409; 
will of, 390 

Demsey and Elizabeth, anecdote, 408 

Demsey and Mary, 393 

Elizabeth, biog. 415 

Elva and Melva, twins, 292 

Ephraim, b., 413 

Ezekiel, 290; port. 401 

Family, 389; anecdote of, 405-08, 540; 
chart, 541; partial genealogy, 575-80 

Farms, Map facing 388 

Frederick R., m. and ch., 371; port. 532 

Jeptha, port. 159 

Jesse, b. and m., 415 

John, biog. 411-17; marriage certificate, 
facing 414; obituary, 599; port. 410 

Joseph S., b., 312; obituary, 595-96; 
port. 518; teacher, 314 

J. Stanton, b., 372; port. 532 

Kate S., port. 518 

Lindley, m., 362, 383 

Maria, 290 

Martha, b., 412 

Mary C, 208, 290 

Mary E., 208, 290 

MaryM., b., 312 

Mary P., m., 179, 201, 412 

Myra, 157; port. 159 

Nathan, biog., 311-19; coalshaft, 171; 
312; m., 179, 290; port. 518; waiter, 
201 

Nathan and Anna Stanton, 3ll-l9;port. 
facing 311 

Nathan W., 158 

Rebecca, b., 415 



Bundy, Ruth; obituary, 585 

Ruth, Jr., b. and m., 415 

Sarah, (Doudna); handkerchief and 
cape, illus. 427; port. 399 

Sarah, (Hoyle, Stanton); port. 401 

Sarah, (Overman), 398; 400-408 

Sarah, m. and port. 412 

Sarah and William P., twins, 412 

Tabitha, port. 413 

T. C, relates Indian Story, 431 

Thomas W., b., 413; enlisted Civil War, 
421; ^or<. 421 

Warren C, article by, 155; poem about, 
159-60 

Willard L., b., 372; port. 532 

William, Jr., certificate to teach, facing 
406; port. 406 

William, Sr., biog. 393-400; Contract, 
Chris. Rivers, facing 400; Contract, 
Elias Williams, facing 402; Land- 
grant, /acmg 398; Letters of Adminis- 
tration, facing 396; Permit to settle, 
facing 396; Marriage certificate, fac- 
ing 394 

William P., m., 412; port. 413; waiter, 
201 

Wilson, b., 415 
Bureau, illus. 99, 150, 182, 200 
Butchering, 277-80 
Butter bowl, illus 316 

Cabin, illus. 116, 390 

"Camel-back" freight engine, illus. 487 

Candle box, illus. 426 

Moulds, illus. 303 

SnuflPers, illus. 294, 307 

Stick, illus. 218, 307, 420 
Canes, illus. 343 
Cap, 427 
Cape, illus. 427 

Carolina to Ohio, move from, 108-13 
Carver, Elizabeth, m. and d., 39 
Castello, Ellen, biog. 167-69 
Cave door, illus. 221 
Certificate to Teach granted to Wm. 

Bundy, Jr., facing 406 
Chaddock, Rebecca, m., 39 
Chairs, illus. 124, 144, 162, 183, 184, 196, 

210, 317, 337 _ 
Chest of drawers, illus. 99 
Chimney breast, illus. 223 
Clapboard roof, illus. 475 
Clarke, Frances, 31 

Jeremiah, 31 

Mary, m., 31 
Clay Pike, 359-60 

Clendenon, Amy, article about, 193; obi- 
tuary, 593; port. 193 

Benjamin, saw mill, 197 

Elizabeth B., port. 194 



Index 



643 



Clendenon Family, 542; chart, 543 

Hannah, waiter, 201 

Sarah, 208 

Stephen, 197; port. 194 
Clocks, Stanton, brought to America, 35; 
desc. of, 36-38; illus. 34, 37, 217; 
taken to N. C, 32, 36; taken to Ohio, 
36 
Cloth, Pioneer, 462-68 
Cobbler's Tools, 486 
Coffin, Anna, 71 
Cole's Mill, 457-60 

Colpitts, Clifford B., d., 318; obituary, 
600; port. 519 

John, 316; port. 519 

Mary Bundy, article by, 311; port. 519 
Comb, illus. 426 

Broom Corn, illus. 255 
Compass, illus. 274 
Conch shell, illus. 162 
Contract for work, copy of, 404 

Between Wm. Bundy and Chris. 
Rivers, facing 400 

Between Wm. Bundy and Elias Wil- 
liams, facing 402 
Cook, "Bobbie" Peters, 461 
Cookies, Song of, 321-22 
Cope, Edith M., m., 335 
Coppock, Rachel H., port. 188 
Core Sound Meeting, abstracts from 

minutes, 53-57 
Cradle, illus. 402 
Cranston, Gov. John, 31 

Mary, 32 
Cruet, illus. 148, 184 
Cups, illus. 375 

And Saucers, illus. 313 

Davis Family, 544; chart. 545 
Francis, biog., 351-56; port. 352 
Francis and Mary, port. 352 
Jane S., b., 326; port. 327 
John, 351; wedding certificate, 357 
Mary, biog., 351-56; port. 352 
Tabitha Stanton, obituary, 603 
Dawson Anna, m., 158 

Chalklcy, anec. by, 145, 147-48, 172-73; 

article by, 170-72; coal shaft, 312; 

port. 170 
Clarence, b., 167 
Ellen Castello, article about, 168-69; 

port. 168 
Family, 546; chart. 547 
Henrv S., ancc. by, 154; articles by 

141-45, 418, 433-35; biog. 167, 197; 

port. 167 
Joel, 170; port. 158 
Mary P., Bible, 59; biog. 155-58; poem 

by, 164-66; property of, 149; port. 155 
Sarah, 170 



Dawson, Stanley V., b., 167 
Dew, Joseph, migration, 110-13 
Dicky, illus. 264 
Dictionary, illus. 293 
Dipper, illus. 230 
Distaff, illus. 260 
Door Latch, illus. facing 242 
Doudna, Anna, anecdote, 139 

Elizabeth, 422 

Family, 422-24, 550; chart. 548-49 

Henry, 422 

Henry, Jr., built barn, 423 

Hosea, Sr., biog. 424; port. 423 

Hosea and .Mary, port. 226 

John, kidnapped, 422 

Joseph W., 116; articles by, 462-68; 
473-75 

Josiah W., 370 

Lillian M., m., 370_ 

Mary Plummer, 252; article by, 428; 
port. 428 

Rebecca, 430 

Ruth B., 370 

Sarah (Knowis), m., 422 

Tabitha, m., 412; waiter, 201 

Edgerton, Anna, 415 

Asenath, port. 188 

Richard, left N. C, 457 
Engine, Steam, illus. 275 

Fall butchering, 277-80 

Family Charts, introduction to outline, 

535 
Fawcett, Esther S., m., 334 
Fences, illus. 297 
Ferry Site, illus. 93 
Fifth Commandment, 565 
Fiftieth anniversary, 377-79 
Fireplaces, illus. 145, 306 
Flax, illus. 468, 469 

Breaker, illus. 466 

Hackle, illus. 467 

Needles, illus. 463 

Spinning, illus. 471 
F"lint-lock gun, illus. 388 
Fly brush, illus. 315 
Fork, illus. 247 
Forking the straw, illus. 247 
Fort .Macon, 41; illus. 41 
Foundation stones, illus. 98 
Four generations, port. 188, 379 
Fox skin. 433-35 
Frame, Dr. Elizabeth B., 412 

Ira S., m., 415 

Ruanna, breaks wedding custom, 383; 
m., 3o: 
French, Mary, 398 

Sarah, 157 
Friends' burying ground, iliuj. 604 



644 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



Friends' Schools, 451-56 
Frontispiece, port, facing 3 
Fruit preserving, 185 

Gardner, Deborah, m., 69 

Dinah, m., 71 

Miriam, 71 

Richard, 69 

Solomon, 71 
Garretson, Martha, m., 171 
Genealogy Chart, Stanton family, facing 
536 

Charts, 536-63 

Reverie, 581-82 
Gibbons, William, article about, 477-86; 

port. 477 
Grain cradle and sickle, illus. 245 

Flails, illus. 245, 247 
Grave stones, illus. 166, 360 

Yards, illus. 42, 43, 77, 96, 604 
Grist, Up to town with a load of, 281-88 
Guindon, Albert W., m., 205; port. 513 

Bertha R., port. 513 

William R., port. 513 

Hall, Bertha Rebecca, m., 205 

Betty, 252 

Elma and Everett, twins, 292 

Eva, b., 205 

Helen E., m., 205 

Rebecca, 204 

Sarah B., port. 512 

Thomas P., 204 

WilfordT., m., 204; ^or/. 512 
Hames, illus. 247 
Hammer, illus. 419 
Hand loom, illus. 261 
Hanson, Agnes, 158 

Beatrice and Bernice, twins, 292 

Benjamin, 304 

Caleb, 294 

Deborah, m., 179 

Elijah, 208, 289, 304 

Eliza, 208, 289 

Lucinda, relates Indian story, 430 
Happer, Margaret T., m., 171 
Harbaugh, William, 131 
Hat, illus. 181, 211 
Hinges, illus. 223, 246 
Hodgin, Agnes Childrey, anec. 430 

Eli, 361 

Elizabeth, 175 

Family, 551; cAart 552-53 

John E. and Tamer D., 189; port. 188 

Mary, m., 175 

Stephen, 175; anec. 178; migration of, 
189 . 5 , 

Tamer D. and John E., 189; port. 188 
William, article about, 430; b. and d., 
432; migration, 108, 189 



Hoge, Lydia M., m., 372 
Holloway, Harold L., m., 205; port. 514 
Helen H., port. 514 
Paul W.,b., 205; /)ort. 514 
Homes, illus. 76, 79, 140, 147, 152, 174, 
176, 195, 196, 202, facing 215, 222, 
232, 272, 312, 324, 335, 358, 365, 368, 
394, 397, 399, 414, 425, 502 
Homesite, illus. 78, 104 
Horndale, Mary, 31 
Horse shed, illus. 443 
House, illus. 395, 422 

Eli Stanton's Log, illus. facing 215 
Hoyle, Benjamin, Minister, 177 

William, 238 
Hull, Mary, 32 
Hummock field, illus. 42 



I 



Ice cutter and wagon lock, illus. 479 
In Appreciation, 9 
Indian story, 430-32 
Introduction, 7 

To outline family charts, 535 
In remembrance, 169 
Inventory of Demsey Bundy, 391 

Of personal property of Benjamin 
Stanton, facing 44 
Irish, Ellen K., m. and d., 131 

Jars, illus. 90, 183, 186, 213 
Journey in a Prairie Schooner, 294 
Jug, illus. 400 

Kettle and crane, illus. 82 
Knitting machine, illus. 163 
Knives, illus. 419 
Knowis, Sarah, m., 422 



Lamp, illus. 451 

Lance, illus. 126, 129 

Land grant to Williim Bundy, facing 398 

Lantern, illus. 373 

Last writing, Henry Stanton, facing 146 

Lath, hand-split plaster, illus. 476 

Letter by Aaron Overman, facing 404 

Letters of administration, William Bundy, 

facing 396 
Lever brake and chain, illus. 478 
Lewis, Lydia, 81 

William, m., 41 
Life in the woods, 116 
Lighthouse, illus. 30 
Lock, illus. 247 
Locomotive of 1922, illus. 490 
Log house, 215-21; illus. facing 215 
Logs, illus. 224 
Lohr, Mrs., m., 172 

Macy, Abigail, m. and ch., 39 
David, biog., 71, 75 



Index 



645 



Macy, Deborah Gardiner, m., 69 

Dinah, _m., 75; will, 73-4 

John, biog. 69, 71 

Sarah, d., 69 

Seth, biog., 72 

Thomas, arrival in America, 67; biog. 
69 
Making of the book, 491-506 
Maps: — 

Abigail Stanton's Home, Location of, 94 

Borden Stanton's Mill, Location of, 100 

Bundy Farms, Wayne Co., N. C, facing 
388 

Core Sound Meeting, N. C, Location 
of, 52 

Farms and mills, Location of, 190 

Macy Farm, N. C, Location of, 80 

Mt. Pleasant and vicinity, facing 80 

Nantucket Island, 66 

Nantucket Town and vicinity, 75 

Stanton Farms, Carteret Co., N. C, 
facing 32 

Warren Township, facing 144 
Marriage certificates: — 

John Bundy, /acj'ng 414 

William Bundy, St., facing 394 

John Davis, 357 

Eli Stanton, facing 200, 208 

Henry Stanton, facing 142 

Joseph Stanton, /acj'ni: 176 

Nathan E. Stanton, facing 210 
Matron, The, poem by Dr. Benj. Stanton, 

83-90 
Maul, Wood Knot, illus. 420 
Medals, illus. 374 
Medicine mortar, illus. 128 
Meeting House, 439-40; bench from, 441; 
illus. 46, 76, 436, 441, 442, 443, 444, 
446, 447, 448 

House Ground, Westland, 115 
Meeting Houses, site of, illus. 43, 51, 77, 

95, 114,203,392 
Meetings, Friends', 437-38 
Memories, poem by Mary P. Dawson, 

164-66 
Migration, Carolina to Ohio, 108-113 
Mill, illus. 29, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 

198. 460 
"Mill, Cole's," 457-60 
Mill dam, location of, illus. 102, 198 
Mill-stone, illus. 105 
Mitchner, Abigail, 81 

Benjamin, m., 41 
Mott, Ashcr, m., 412; port. 412 

Sarah (Bundy), m., 412; port. 412 
Mt. Pleasant boarding school, 450 

And vicinity, map facing 80 
Mug, illus. 186 

Nails, illus. 243, 245, 246 



Nantucket, illus. 68; oldest house, 70 

Neck handkerchief, illus. 427 

Necktie, illus. 163 

Needles, flax, illus. 463 

Nevin, Sophronia H., m., 131 

Newport, R. I., old house, illus. 28; in 

1730, illus. 26; stone mill, illus. 29 
Niblock, Mary B., anecdote by, 139; 

articles by, 437-38; 451-56; Indian 

story by, 432 
Norman, Lucy, m., 41 
North Carolina, Purchases and sales of 

land, 48 

Obituaries, 584-603 
"Old Dobbin," illus. 499 
"Our cabin," 116-24 
Oven, outside, illus. 310 
Overman, Aaron, Letter facing 404 
Overman, Sarah, biog., 398, 400 
Ox yoke, illus. 236 

Palmer, .•\nna Stanton, ch., 334; port. 522 

Charles W., article by, 339; ch., 334; 
port. 522 

Charles W. and Anna S., group portrait 
facing 334 

Eva Stanton, b., 334; port. 522 

Mary Anna, b., 334; port. 522 
Patten, Anna Bailey, article by, 361-73; 
port. 529 

Bertha E., b., 371; port. 529 

Beulah L., b., 371; port. 529 

Clarence R., m. and ch., 371; port. 529 

Family, 554; chart, 555 

Isaac, bought farm and mill, 457 

Oscar M., b., 371; illus. 505; port. 529 

Ruth, 411 

William, migration, 108, 189 

William and Sally, 41 1, 423 
Patterson, Clary, m., 41 

Family, 556; chart, 557 
Pegs, illus. 146 
Pen and pencil, illus. 175 
Pcnnell, Edna Stanton, b., 534 

Ellen S., appreciation of, 9; article by, 
132-34; port, frontis. and 521 

S. Howard, m., 334; port. 521 
Permit to settle, issued to William Bundy, 

facing 396 
Picher, Oliver S., m., 131 
"Pipgin" of silver, 41 1 
Pike, Clay, 35^>-«) 
Pioneer cloth, 462-68 

Voods, 308-10 

Fun, 384-88 

Life in Iowa, anecdote, 173 

Samples, illus. facing, 242 

Smoke house, 429 

Supper, 304-07 



646 



Our Ancestors — The Stantons 



Pitcher, illus. 146, 156, 186, 320 

Plate, illus. 186 

Plummer, Elizabeth, m., 383 

Robert, stove, 428 

Robert, Jr., port. 177 
Pocket book, illus. 147 
Poem by Demsey Bundy, 409 

About Warren Bundy, 159 
Portsmouth, early settler, 27; Friends' 

Burying Ground, illus. 604 
Postage, 25c., illus. 425 
Pot hooks, illus. 426 
Prairie schooner, journey in, 294 
Preserving fruit, 185 
Printing house, illus. 495 

Press, illus. 498 
Pump, illus. 253 

Making, 253-55 
Purchases and sales of land in North 
Carolina, 48-50 

Quaker weddings, 382-83 
Quilts, zV/m/. 214, 249, 252, 317 
Quilting, 249-52 
Frame, illus. 248 

Railroads, 487-90 

Rake, illus. 247 

Reading the proof, illus. 497 

Receipts, copy of, 404, 408 

Records, Section for, 605-37 

"Red House," Location of, illus. 398 

Reed, Hand-loom, illus. 262 

Reel, illus. 256 

Rifle, j7/mj. 211, 341 

Rock, Hollow, illus. 403 

Roof, Clapboard, illus. 475 

Lapshingle, illus. 473 
Roofs, Shingle, 473-75 
Rule, illus. 419 

Saddle bags, illus. 299 

Saltcellar, illus. 213 

Samplers, illus. 150, 161, 418, 450 

Sap trough, illus. 230 

Sausage grinder, illus. 280 

Saw mill, 197, illus. location of, 197 

Scholars attending Little Brick, group 

port, facing 450 
School house, Little Brick, illus. 449 

Houses, illus. 450, 452, 453, 454, 455 

Life, 300-03 
Schools, Friends', 451-56 
Schooner, i7/aj. 33, 510 
Scott, Elizabeth, 78 

Joshua, m., 39 
Sea captain, 65 
Sears family, 559-60; chart 558 

Peter, engagement, 139 

Sarah D., poems by, 439-40 



Secretary, illus. 355 

Shacklesford Banks, 41 

Shattuck, Sarah, 69 

Shaving brush, illus. 142 

Shaw, Seth, 329 

Shawl, illus. 214 

Sheep-shearing, 418 

Sheet from the "Dummy," illus. 501 

From the press, illus. 500 
Shingle roofs, 473, illus. 473 
Shipyard, Location, illus. 40 
Shutter, Machinery for, illus. 445 

Movable, illus. 444, 447 
Shuttles, illus. 261 
Skillet, illus. 304 
Skin, Fox, 433-35 
Slaw cutter, illus. 162 
Smith, Achsah, article by, 589-92 

Jesse and Anna, 352 

Louise, m., 204, 273 

Lydia Clendenon, port. 194 

Mary, biog. 352 

Mary Avice, m. and ch., 207 

Mary C, articles by, 289-93, 308-10, 
457-59; Indian story by, 431; port. 
401 

Robert, port. 92 

Robert and Maria H., article by, 91-2, 

Thompson, 292 
Smoke house, pioneer, 429; illus. 429 
Snyder, Kate, m., 315 
Sock, illus. 264 
Soap, soft, 187 
Spectacles, illus. 146, 182 
Spinning and weaving, 256-63 

Jenny, illus. 263 

Wheels, illus. 258, 260, 464, 470, 471, 
472 
Spoons, illus. 149, 292, 426 
Springs, illus. 98, 176, 223, 229 
Spring house, illus. 222 

Lance, illus. 129 
Stairway, illus. 226 

Hannah Clendenon, obituary 593; port. 
194 
Stanton, Abigail, anec. about, 91-2; bible, 
59, 64; biog., 75-99; clock, 36; poem 
about, 83-90; to Ohio, 101 

Abigail, b., 41 

Abigail and Benjamin, children of, 566- 
70 

Alice, b., 32 

Anna, b., 41 

Anna, 178, 311; m., 179, 290; waiter, 
201 

Anna Clara, biog. 334 

Avis, biog., 16, 27; b., 33; b. and m., 41; 
"Long Stanton," 127 

Benjamin and Abigail, children of, 566- 
70 



Index 



647 



Stanton, Benjamin, bible, 64; biog., 39-45; 

b., 31, 33, 41; clock, 36; inventory 

personal property, facing 44; "Long 

Stanton," 127; m., 75; minister, 33; 

will, facing 42 
Benjamin, 382; obituary, 603 
Benjamin, M. D., biog., 125-27; ch., 

130-34; poem by, 83-90; port. 125 
B. I., article by, 125-27 
Bible, desc, 59-64; illus. 58, 60-2, 153, 

177 
Borden, anec. concerning, 107; biog. 

101-05 
Dr. Byron, articles by, 35-8, 130-31, 

151; biog., 132-34; clock, 32; port. 132 
Catherine, b., 32 

Clary, biog., 141-45; funeral, 154, 175 
Clary and Henry, descendants of, 570- 

74 
Clock brought to Am., 35; desc. of, 36- 

8; illus. 34, 37, 217; taken to N. C, 

32, 36; taken to Ohio, 32 
Connection, 139 
Content, b., 31 
Daniel, opp. to slavery, 30 
Daniel, 210; obituary, 586 
David, anec, 139; b., 41; m., 93 
Deborah H. B., articles by 256-63, 300- 

03; biog., 289-90; notes by, 295-99; 

port. 209, 289 
Edith, m., 134 

Edith Cope, article by, 377-79; port. 524 
Edith Rebecca, b., 210; port. 517 
Edmund, 141 
Edmund C, 331 
Edna and Ellen twins, 292 
Edna Macy, appreciation of, 9-10, 344- 

48; articles by, 132-34, 191, 199-210; 

port, frontispiece, 334 and 521 
Edwin McMastcrs, biog., 135-38; port, 

136; Sect, of war, 81; statues, 134. 

139 
Eli, 267, 313; biog., 178, 199; building 

of barn and house, 231-42; log house, 

illus. facing 215; m., 201, 208, 291, 

412; marriage certificate, /^<fin,i,' 200, 

208; obituary, 594; port. 209-511 
Eli and Mary, port. 201; port, facing 1^9 
Elizabeth, b., 39, biog., 361; 178; broke 

wedding custom, 383 
Ellen, m. and d., 131 
Ellen Davis, b. and m., 334 
Elwood Dean, biog., 333; port. 523 
Elwood Dean, Jr., port. 534 
Emma C, biog., 206, 291 
Esther S., port. 523 
Eunice, b. and d.. 178 
Eva T., biog., 330; port. S 21 
Family, 11-18; chart, facing 536 
Coat of arms, illus. and text, 12 



Stanton, Lancashire tradition, IV, 2U 

Ixjngbridgc tradition, 20 

Miscellaneous English notes, 23 

C)rigin of name, 12 

Stauntons of Longbridgc, 22 

Stauntons of Staunton, 21 

Welsh tradition, 18, 19 

Farms, Carteret Co., N. C, map facing 
32 

Francis Wilson, biog., 332; obituary 
597; port. 520 

Hannah, b., 31, 32 

Henry, biog., 31-2, 41; clock, 35-6; min- 
ister, 33 

Henry, anec. about, 154; 141-45 har- 
vesting, 92; last writing facing 146; 
"Long Stanton," 127; marriage cer- 
tificate, /ofin? 142; visits to, 151-53 

Henry and Clary, 141-45; descendants 
of, 570-74 

James, 39 

Jane Davis, biog., 326-38; port. 520, 
523; register of recitations, 341 

John, biog., 16. 17, 27, 30-1, 33 

John, Jr., b., 31 

John Howard, minister, 55 

John Lindley, biog., }}2; obituary, 598; 
port. 520 

Jordan, obituary, 584 

Joseph, biog., 32, 41, 175-80; "I-ong 
Stanton," 127; marriage certificate, 
facing 176; minister, 33; obituarv, 
589-92 

Joseph and Mary. 175-80 

ioseph E., biog., 331; port. 521 
Catherine .Macy, b., 334; port. 523 
Ix>uise Smith, port. 511 
Lydia, b., 41; m., 39; "Long Stanton," 

127 
NLiriha, anec. about, 128; biog., 126 
Mary, biog., 16. 30. 31, 32, 175-80; 

obituary, 587-88; persecution, 2'> 
Marv Davis, biog., .>31; port. 520 
Mary P.. biog.. lW-208; port. 511 
NLiry Patterson, m., 170 
Merviii Daniel, b., 210; port. 517 
Nathan Eli, biog., 20S-10; marriage cer- 
tificate Ajcing 210; port. 517; traveled 

in prairie schix^ner, 294 
Nathan V.. and Sarah F., group port.; 

wedding company, /dCiBj 212 
Patience, b., 31 
Paul, biog., 17 
I'rudence, b., 30 
Rebecca Bund v. 210 
Robert, biog.. UvlS. I'-.^O; earliest 

ancestor, 12; not original purchaser 

of clock, }> 
Robert. Ir.. biog., 16. 27. 31 
Ruth Elizabeth, b., 334; port. 523 



648 



Our Ancestors — ^The Stantons 



Stanton, Sarah, biog., 16, 30, 33, 39 
Sarah B., biog., 204-05, 291 
Sarah E., m., 210; port. 517 
Sidney Fawcett, b., 334; port. 523 
Sophronia H., m., 131 
Susanna Morris, b., 335; port. 524 
Thomas, biog., 16-18 
William, anec. bv, 107; biog., 130-31, 
178, 323-38; canes, illus. 343; port. 
130, 179, 520; register of recitations, 
340 
William Alonzo, wrote genealogy, 18 
William and Eva S. Palmer, port. 333 
William and family, port. 336 
William Hanson, b., 210; port. 517 
William and Jane Davis, 323-38; port. 

facing 323 
William Henry, articles by, 7-24, 152- 
53, 167-69, 193, 197, 215-21, 231-42, 
249-52, 253-55, 277-80, 281-88, 304- 
07, 422-24, 429, 460, 461, 477-86, 487- 
90, 581-82; at work on "The Book," 
illus. 502; biog., 204, 267-74; intro- 
duction by, 7-8; "Old Dobbin," 
Buick Auto, 499; port, frontis. and 
511; pupil of Deborah Bundy, 291 
William Macy, appr. of, 9; article bv, 
59-64, 491-506; at work on "The 
Book," illus. 502; biog., 334; poems 
by, 321-22, 349-50, 380-81; port, 
frontis. and 524 
William Macy, Jr., port. 524 
Starting under the Meeting House, illus. 

505 
Steer, Laure E., m., 372 
Stillwater Valley, illus. 10, 324, 329 
Stockdale, Sara Lavada, m., 371 
Stockings, making colored, 265 
Stolen bonnet, 96-99 
Stove, Robert Plummer's first, 428 
Struck, Alice Clark, article by, 344-48 
Stubbs, Isaac, found bear tracks, 299 
Sugar bowl, illus. 186 
Sugar tree by spring, 228-29 
Tub, illus. 230 

Tar bucket, illus. 485 

Tail nut, illus. 483 

Tea-kettle, illus. 195 

'l"ea pot, illus. 186, 356, 403, 426 

Telescope, illus. 266 

Thomas, Avis, 78, 81 

Jesse, m., 41 
Three generations, port, "i^l 
Tobacco house, illus. Ill 
Tongs, illus. 354 
Tools, Cobbler's, illus. 486 
Tooth puller, illus. 129 

Twister, illus. 129 
Towel, illus, 264 



Townsend, Joseph and Sarah, Land to 
Meeting, 115 

Martha, biog., 41, 125 

Mary, m., 41 
Trees, illus. 51, 97, 185, 228, 229 
Trundle bed, illus. 216 
Turner's Swamp, location of, illus. 396 
Turning lathe, illus. 268, 269, 275 

Vase, illus. 456 

Vernon family, 561; chart 562-63 

Visits to Henry Stanton, 151-53 

Wagon Hub, illus. 482 
Wagoner, 477 

Warren Township, map facing 144 
Wash bowl, illus. 146 
Watches, illus. 180, 211, 353 
Water falls, 564 
Weather vane, illus. 191 
Weaver, Edith M., m. and d., 134 

Rebecca (Stanton), port. 127 
Webster, Debora H., 99; biog., 207; port. 
515 

Emma C, biog., 206; port. 515 

Harlan S., biog., 206-07; port. 516 

Mary Avice S., article by, 294; port. 516 

Mary Lydia, biog., 207; port. 515 

Raymond Nathan, biog., 207; port. 515 

Thomas, biog., 207; port. 515 

Willis Vail, appreciation of, 10; article 
by, 359-60; home illus. 502; m., 206; 
port. 515 

Willis William b., 207; port. 516 
Wedding company: — 

Charles W. and Anna S. Palmer, group 
port, facing 334 

Golden: — Lindley P. and Elizabeth S. 
Baily, group port, facing 378 

Nathan E. and Sara E. Stanton, /acj'nf 
212 

Glove, illus. 143 

Guests, port. 376 

Reception invitation, illus. 338 
Weddings, Quaker, 382-83 
Wedges, illus. 240 
Well, illus. 424 

Sweep, illus. 220 
Westland Meeting House, ground, 1!5; 

illus., 114 
Wheel and shaft, illus. 276 

Water, illus. 198 

Wool, 472 
White, Isaac, m., 32 
Williams, Dearman, 151 

John S., 116 

Richard, m., 39 

Sarah, biog., 78; sided with Orthodox 
Friends, 93 
Will of Benjamin Stanton, /acing 42 

of Demsey Bundy, 390 



Index 



^49 



Will of Dinah Macy, 73-74 
Windmill, Wyatl, illus. 25 
Wind vane indicator, electric, illus. lid 
Winfj Nut, illus. 4X3 
Wood poppinjj, 339 
Woodward, I'.va II., port. 512 
Guy, m., 205; port. 512 



Wool cards, illus. 1^1 
Workbox. xllus. 213. 214 
Worth, John. 71 
Judith, m., 71 

Years, For Fifty, 380-Sl 



I 



miM 



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