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Full text of "Book of biographies : this volume contains biographical sketches of leading citizens of Beaver County, Pennsylvania"



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BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



THIS VOLUME CONTAINS 



Biographical Sketches 



OF 



Leading Citizens 

OF 

BEAVER COUNTY, 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

" Biography is the only true history."— Emerson. 



BIOGRAPHICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

George Richmond, Pres.; S. Harmer Neff, Sec'y-; C R. Arnold, Treas. 

BUFFALO, N. Y., CHICAGO, ILL. 

1899. 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

419701 

k^TCP. L:nOX and 
''.'- CATIONS. 

1 SOS L 




r 



P R K F A C E 



"AVING brought to a successful termination our labors in Beaver Count}^ in 
compiling and editing the sketches herein contained, we desire, in presenting 
this Book of Biographies to our patrons, to make a few remarks neces- 
sarily brief, in regard to the value and importance of local works of this natm"e. 
We agree with Ralph Waldo Emerson that "Biography is the only true History," and 
also are of the opinion that a collection of the biographies of the leading men of a nation 
would give a more interesting, as well as authentic, historj' of their country than any 
other that could be written. The value of such a production as this cannot be too highlj' 
estimated. With each succeeding year the haze of Obscurity removes more and more 
from our view the fast disappearing landmarks of the past. Oblivion sprinkles her dust of 
forgetfulness on men and their deeds, eSectually concealing them from the pobHc eye, 
and because of the man)' living objects which claim our attention, few of those who have 
been removed from the busy world linger long in our memory. Even the glorioos achieve- 
ments of the present age may nqjf insure it from being lost in the glare of greater things 
to come, and so it is manifestfy a duty to posterity for the men of the present time to 
preserve a record of their lives and a story of their progress from low and humble begin- 
nings to great and noble deeds, in order that future generations may read the account of 
their successful struggles, and profit bj' their example. A local history affords the best 
means of preserving ancestral historj?, and it also becomes, immediateh' upon its publica- 
tion, a ready book of reference for those who have occasion to seek biographical data of 
the leading and earl}' settled families. Names, dates, and events are not easily pemem- 
bered by the average man, so it behooves the generations now living, who wish to live 
in the memory of their descendants, to write their own records, making them full and 
broad in scope, and minute in detail, and insure their preservation by having them put 
in printed form. W^e firmly believe that in these collated personal memoirs will be found 
as true and as faithful a record of Beaver County as may be obtained anj'where, for 
the very sufi&cient reason that its growth and development are identified with that of 



iv PREFACE 

the men who have made her what she is to-day — the representative leading men, whose 
personal sketches it has been a pleasure to us to write and give a place in this volume. 
From the time when the hand of civilized man had not yet violated the virgin soil with 
desecrating plough, nor with the ever-ready frontiersman's ax felled the noble, almost 
limitless forests, to the present period of activity in all branches of industry, we may 
read in the histories of the country's leading men, and of their ancestors, the steady growth 
and development which has been going on here for a century and a half, and bids fair 
to continue for centuries to come. A hundred years from now, whatever records of the 
present time are then extant, having withstood the ravages of time and the ceaseless war 
of the elements, will be viewed with an absorbing interest, equalling, if not surpassing, 
that which is taken to-day in the history of the early settlements of America. 

It has been our purpose in the preparation of this work to pass over no phase or 
portion of it slightingly, but to give attention to the smallest points, and thus invest it 
with an air of accuracy, to be obtained in no other way. The result has amply justified 
the care that has been taken, for it is our honest belief that no more reliable production, 
under the circumstances, could have been compiled. 

One feature of this work, to which we have given special prominence, and which we 
are sure will prove of extraordinary interest, is the collection of portraits of the represen- 
tative and leading citizens, which appear throughout the volume. We have tried to 
represent the different spheres of industrial and professional activity as well as we might. 
To those who have been so uniformly obliging and have kindly interested themselves in 
the success of this work, volunteering information and data, which have been very helpful 
to us in preparing this Book of Biographies of Beaver County, we desire to express our 
grateful and profound acknowledgment of their valued services. 

Chicago, III., November. 1899. THE PUBLISHERS. 



NOTE 

All the biographical sketches pubHshed in this volume were sub- 
mitted to their respective subjects, or to the subscribers, from whom 
the facts were primarily obtained, for their approval or correction 
before going to press; and a reasonable time was allowed in each 
case for the return of the type-written copies. Most of them were 
returned to us within the time allotted, or before the work was 
printed, after being corrected or revised; and these may therefore 
be regarded as reasonably accurate. 

A few, however, were not returned to us; and, as we have no 
means of knowing whether they contain errors or not, we cannot 
vouch for their accuracy. In justice to our readers, and to render 
this work more valuable for reference purposes, we have indicated 
these uncorrected sketches by a small asterisk (*), placed imme- 
diately after the name of the subject. They will all be found on the 
last pages of the book. 

BIOGRAPHICAL PUBLISHING CO. 



Book of Biographies 
beaver county, 

PENNSYLVANIA. 




CAPT. CHARLES C. TOWNSEND. 



Book of Biograpbies 



BEAVER COUNTY 



^^APT. CHARLES C. TOWNSEND, 
I j/ whose portrait we take pleasure in pre- 
^^— ^senting on the opposite page, is 
senior member of the well-known firm of 
C. C. & E. P. Townsend, manufacturers of 
wire, rivets, and wire nails. This is one of 
the oldest enterprises in Beaver county, and 
was established by the grandfather of Charles 
C, in 1828. The plant is located on the west 
side of the Beaver River in the village of 
Fallston, ai;d it has been gradually enlarged 
from lime to time until it is recognized as 
one of the largest enterprises of its kind west 
of the Alleghanies. Capt. Townsend is a son 
of William P., a grandson of Robert, and a 
great-grandson of Benjamin Townsend, and 
was born in Allegheny, Pa., although he has 
been a resident of New Brighton since he 
was ten years of age. 

Robert Townsend was born on a farm near 
Brownsville, Washington county. Pa., April 
9, 1790. He was engaged in the wire busi- 



ness at Baltimore, Md., until 1816, and then 
established a similar business on Market 
street, between First and Second avenues, 
Pittsburg. In 1828, he started the first wire 
plant west of the Alleghanies, at Fallston, Pa., 
— it also being the first iron business in Bea- 
ver county. The machinery of this plant was 
run by water, though a large part of the work 
was done by hand. In his latter years, he re- 
tired from active business, and erected a hand- 
some residence on Third avenue. New Brigh- 
ton ; this property is now owned by his grand- 
son, Edward P. Townsend. Mr. Townsend was 
of Quaker stock, — a very liberal and charita- 
ble man, — and enjoyed the friendship of a 
host of acquaintances. He passed from this 
life at the age of seventy-seven years. His 
wife was Deborah Colman. who was born in 
England, and came to the United States when 
a girl of sixteen years ; she died aged eighty- 
five years. They were the parents of eight 
children: William P.; Mary; Sabina; Eliza- 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



beth ; John M. ; Caroline ; Lydia, and George. 

William Penn Townsend, the father of the 
subject hereof, received his education in the 
schools at Pittsburg, and at an early age en- 
tered the employ of his father, — beginning as 
a clerk. In 1840, he and his cousin were 
taken in as partners, the firm name becoming 
R. Townsend & Company; in 1864, he be- 
came sole proprietor. He enlarged the plant, 
gave employment to many more hands, and 
put in new and improved machinery. Mr. 
Townsend delighted in traveling and spent 
many years in journeying throughout the 
United States and Europe. He entered the 
haven of rest at the age of seventy-eight years. 
He was joined in marriage with Sarah A. 
Champlin, a daughter of Matthew F. Champ- 
lin, of New York State; she still resides in 
New Brighton, has passed the eightieth year of 
her life, and is surrounded by many old friends 
and neighbors, who hold her in tender es- 
teem. She is the mother of five children: 
Charles C. ; Edward P.; Amelia; Elizabeth, 
and Helen. Although Mr. Townsend was 
reared a Quaker, he and his wife became 
members of the Presbyterian church. 

Charles C. Townsend attended Pittsburg 
University, and at the age of fifteen years be- 
came a clerk in his father's office. When the 
War of the Rebellion broke out, he enlisted as 
a private in the Ninth Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, but was shortly afterward 
transferred to the First Pennsylvania Cav- 
alry, with the rank of adjutant. After serving 
two years in the Army of the Potomac, he was 
discharged on account of poor health. Re- 



turning home, he and his brother, Edward 
P., were taken in as partners with their father, 
and in 1894 the sons became sole proprietors 
of the establishment, the firm name being 
changed to C. C. & E. P. Townsend. They 
have enlarged the plant, have added the man- 
ufacture of wire nails of all sizes, and give 
employment to about one hundred hands. 
This is one of the largest enterprises in Beaver 
county, as well as one of the first. Captain 
Charles C. Townsend's sons, who now assist 
in running the plant, are the fourth genera- 
tion of Townsends who have been interested 
in this factory. Mr. Townsend is very enter- 
prising, gives his hearty support to those 
measures which tend to promote the general 
welfare and bring prosperity to the com- 
munity, and is recognized by his many 
friends and acquaintances as a good neighbor 
and loyal citizen. He resides in the old Brad- 
ford residence in New Brighton. He has 
served as vice-president of the National Bank 
of New Brighton since 1896, and has also 
represented this district in the Fifty-first Con- 
gress, from 1889 to 1891. 

Capt. C. C. Townsend was married to Miss 
Juliet Bradford, a daughter of Benjamin Rush 
Bradford, and they are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Juliette; Gertrude, who 
died aged twenty-two years; William P., Jr., 
superintendent of the company warehouse; 
Vincent Bradford, clerk for the company; 
Charles C, Jr., of the mechanical department; 
Benjamin Rush, and John M., an assistant 
clerk in the company's office. Religiously, Mr. 
Townsend is a member of the Presbyterian 



BEAVER COUNTY 



13 



church, in which he is ruling elder. Socially, 
he belongs to Edwin M. Stanton Post, No. 
208, G. A. R., of which he is past commander. 
In his political affiliations, he is a stanch Re- 
publican. 




RED N. BEEGLE, secretary and 
treasurer of the Union Drawn Steel Co., 
of Beaver Falls, Pa., is a thorough bus- 
iness man and understands all the details of 
the steel business. Largely through his en- 
ergy, the business has increased to its present 
volume. The firm now enjoys a splendid for- 
eign, as well as a large domestic, trade. The 
subject of this sketch was born at Millersburg, 
Ohio, May 21, 1863, and received his schol- 
astic training in the puljlic schools of his na- 
tive town, taking a finishing course at the 
High School of North Manchester, Indiana. 
At the age of sixteen, he began life for him- 
self, and in April, 1880, located in Beaver 
Falls, where he was clerk in a grocery store 
for a few months, subsequently entering the 
employ of the Western Union File Works, 
of the same place. He remained with the lat- 
ter company about five months, as "tester" 
of files, and then began business on his own 
account. Opening a wholesale and retail pro- 
duce business, he continued that very success- 
fully for a couple of years, then sold out to ex- 
cellent advantage, and spent the following 
year traveling in the West. Returning to 
Beaver Falls, Mr. Beegle became manager of 
a grocery store for B. B. Todd for about two 
and a half years. He then accepted a posi- 



tion as order clerk for the Hartman Steel 
Co. of the same place ; during his three years' 
service with that company he worked himself 
up to the position of assistant chief clerk. 

At the close of that time, the Hartman 
plant was purchased by Carnegie, Fipps & 
Company, and Mr. Beegle became chief ship- 
ping clerk. One year later he was transferred 
to their Thirty-third street mill in Pitts- 
burg. This change, however, did not prove 
a satisfactory one to Mr. Beegle, and he re- 
signed after a few months' service. Very 
soon afterwards, on November 16, 1899, he 
entered the employ of the Union Drawn Steel 
Co., of Beaver Falls, as assistant superintend- 
ent. About one year later the company was 
re-organized, and Mr. Beegle became a stock- 
holder, being also elected secretary and treas- 
urer of the concern. When our subject first 
became associated with the company, the ca- 
pacity of the plant was only 2,000 tons per 
year, of cold drawn steel. Under Mr. Beegle's 
able management of the business end the out- 
put has constantly increased, and every sec- 
ond year a new building has been added and 
the capacity of the plant at the present time 
is 30,000 tons annually. 

In 1880, Mr. Beegle was united in mar- 
riage with Nellie Heath, a daughter of Rev. 
Mr. Heath, of Oberlin, Ohio. They have one 
son, Clifford, in whom all their hopes are cen- 
tered. In his political views, the subject of 
this record is a Republican, and takes great 
interest in party successes, but is too busy a 
man to take an active part in politics or to 
have political aspirations. He is a son of 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Benjamin and Lucinda (Corns) Beegle. 

Benjamin Beegle was born in Bedford 
county, Pa., and was a cabinet maker by 
trade. He went to Millersburg, Holmes 
county, Ohio, in 1846, and lived there the re- 
mainder of his days. His death occurred in 
1882, at the age of seventy-two years. Lu- 
cinda Corns, a charming lady and a native of 
Lancaster county. Pa., became his wife, but 
laid down the burden of life at the early age 
of thirty-six. She left the following children 
to mourn her demise : Benjamin F. ; Joseph ; 
Thomas (deceased) ; Rollin A. ; John ; Ed- 
ward; Lucy M. (Brady), deceased; and Fred 
N., the subject of this brief sketch. The elder 
Mr. Beegle was a firm believer in the Jack- 
sonian principles of Democracy. He was a 
tiue gentleman, intelligent, courteous, and 
refined, just the kind of a man to make a 
lasting impression of good on all societies, 
which were fortunate enough to number him 
among their members. He favored the Luth- 
eran church. 

Fred N. Beegle is a live, enterprising busi- 
ness man, and merits the success which he is 
meeting in all his endeavors. He is an honest 
and straightforward citizen and has made 
many friends both in private and commercial 
life. 




■ILLIAM G. ALGEO, Sr., of 
Beaver Falls, enjoys the distinction 
of being the oldest undertaker of 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He was born 
in Allegheny City, Pa., May 14, 1830, and 



is a son of Gregg- Algeo, who was also born 
in Allegheny City, where he was reared and 
received his intellectual training. He em- 
barked in mercantile pursuits at Pittsburg, 
Pa., and followed that occupation until cut off 
by death at the age of fifty years. 
He was joined in marriage with Sus- 
anna Gibson, a daughter of Rev. Robert 
Gibson. Mrs. Algeo was a native of 
New Jersey and departed this life at 
the age of forty-five years. They were 
Covenanters in their religious views, and 
reared six children, all of whom are now de- 
ceased except Wiliam G., the subject of this 
sketch. The following are their names : Re- 
becca; WilHam G. ; Margaret (Pasco); Sarah 
J. (Robinson) ; William G., subject of this 
sketch; and Elizabeth. 

William G. Algeo, Sr., obtained his educa- 
tion in the institutions of his native city. After 
leaving school, he began to learn the cabinet 
maker's trade with T. B. Young & Co., in 
1846, remaining with that company until 
1850. After working at his trade as a jour- 
neyman for a brief period, Mr. Algeo began 
business on his own account as a furniture 
dealer in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He con- 
tinued in that business with a great deal of 
success until i860, when he became associated 
with Robert Fairman in the undertaking busi- 
ness. In 1864, they established the first cof- 
fin factory west of the Alleghany Mountains, 
and manufactured for the trade exclusively. 
The firm was then known as the Excelsior 
Coffin & Casket Works and was composed of 
Hamilton, Algeo, Arnold & Co. That firm 




HON. JAMES SHARP WILSON. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



continued to do business until 1870, when it 
was dissolved and Mr. Algeo formed a new 
company, locating a factory for the manu- 
facture of cofifins at Rochester, Pa., and oper- 
ating under the firm name of Algeo, Scott & 
Co. This company continued in business un- 
til 1875, and was sold out. Mr. Algeo went to 
Beaver Falls and established a cofhn factory 
there, having his son, William G., Junior, as 
a partner. In 1876, they closed out the man- 
ufacturing department, and embarked in the 
undertaking business, which Mr. Algeo still 
follows, being the only man in the county 
who has continued for so long in that busi- 
ness. 

In 1853, our subject was joined in the holy 
bonds of matrimony with Sarah A. Huff, a 
daughter of Mrs. Rosanna Huff, of Pittsburg. 
Mrs. Algeo passed to the world beyond in 
1894 aged fifty-three years, lea\ ing three chil- 
dren as a legacy to her husband. Their names 
are: William G., Jr., who is master me- 
chanic of the Union Drawn Steel Co., of 
Beaver Falls, and, who was joined in marriage 
with Nora Clayton, a charming lady of Bea- 
ver Falls ; Mary E. ; and Fairman, who led 
Anna Latham to the altar, and now has two 
daughters, Viola and Sarah. 

Mr. Algeo has, by strict principles of in- 
tegrity and honor, built up a splendid repu- 
tation as a man of push and energy, and has 
amassed a comfortable fortune that is now of 
service to him in his declining years. He is a 
member of Lodge No. 45, F. & A. M. of Pitts- 
burg; of Zerubbabel Chapter, No. 162, R. A. 
M. ; of the A. O. U. W. and the Royal Arca- 



num. In his political attachments Mr. Algeo 
was first a Whig but is now a Republican, and, 
although he has never sought political dis- 
tinction, he served as burgess of Beaver Falls 
in 1886-1887. The subject of our sketch is 
an earnest and zealous worker in the Episco- 
palian church and is very charitable. He is 
a very prominent man, and one universally 
liked by all who have the pleasure of his ac- 
quaintance. 




ON. JAMES SHARP WILSON, the 
highly esteemed president judge of 
the Thirty-sixth Judicial District of 
Pennsylvania, whose portrait appears on the 
opposite page, is an honored and talented at- 
torney and a respected citizen of Beaver. 
Rarely do we find in the state or even in the 
United States, a man so young as Judge Wil- 
son occupying so important a position, or one 
so mature in his profession. Judge Wilson 
has not yet reached his thirty-seventh mile- 
stone in age, but he comes from a distin- 
guished family, and has inherited the power of 
leadership to a marked degree. It is said by 
some, that he is now the youngest member of 
the Pennsylvania judiciary. 

Like many of our best men, he was born on 
a farm. His birth occurred in Franklin town- 
ship, Beaver county, November 10, 1862. 
Early in life, he displayed his ambition for 
knowledge, and soon matured not only men- 
tally, but physically. As a student in the 
public schools, he was ambitious, and at the 
early age of fifteen years, he began teaching 
a district school, and was very successful in 



18 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



this task. While teaching he was also a stu- 
dent, preparing for a college course. He en- 
tered Geneva College at Beaver Falls, from 
which he graduated in 1885, receiving the de- 
gree of A. B. Since then the degree of A. M. 
has been conferred upon him by the same in- 
stitution. After his graduation, he became a 
law student under Hon. Henry Hice, of Bea- 
ver, and while pursuing that study, he taught 
at intervals in the academy at Harmony, 
Pennsylvania. Judge Wilson was admitted to 
the bar of Beaver county, June 4, 1888, and 
with his active brain and ambitious spirit, he 
rapidly becani,e a leader in the political organ- 
ization of his favorite party, which was the 
Republican. 

In 1895, he received the nomination for 
president judge of the Thirty-sixth Judicial 
District, and although the conflict was a close 
one, he was victorious, and as usual, carried 
off the honors. He fills the chair with dignity 
and his numerous friends predict for him as 
brilliant a career on the bench as he has had 
in political leadership. By his ability and suc- 
cess he proves himself to be a worthy scion of 
the Wilson family, so noted for its prominent 
men. Judge Wilson is genial, cheerful, kind- 
• hearted, and obliging, and ever ready to do a 
charitable act. In his religious views, he was 
reared a Presbyterian, and steadfastly ad- 
heres to its faith, being a member of the 
church of that denomination. 

Judge Wilson was united in marriage with 
Sarah I. Hazen on December 25, 1888. Mrs. 
Wilson is a daughter of Nathan Hazen, whose 
sketch is found elsewhere in this volume, and 



a granddaughter of Samuel Hazen, of both 
of whom mention is made in the sketch of 
Christopher C. Hazen. Judge and Mrs. Wil- 
son have a handsome modern home, with the 
Judge's private office adjoining it, on the cor- 
ner of Market and Second streets. This fine 
residence was built in 1890, and is surrounded 
by spacious lawns, broad walks, and handsome 
and ornamental shade trees. This home is 
rendered truly happy by the presence of the 
following little ones who surround the fire- 
side: John Howard, born February i, 1890; 
James Sharp, Jr., born June 5, 1894; Hugh 
Hazen, born March 9, 1898, and Mary Eliza- 
beth, born June 5, 1899. The Judge is in- 
cluded among the membership of many fra- 
ternal societies, is past master of the F. & 
A. M. ; past grand of the I. O. O. F. ; the Elks, 
and others. Judge Wilson is a son of the late 
John H. Wilson,,grandson of Thomas Wilson, 
Jr., great-grandson of Thomas Wilson, Sr., 
and great-great-grandson of Hugh Wilson. 

Hugh Wilson was born in County Cavan, 
Ireland, in 1689, and was a son of Hugh Wil- 
son, who was an officer in King William's 
army, and was one of the three men who 
crossed the River Boyne, July i, 1690, — fac- 
ing great danger. For tliis act of heroism, he 
was rewarded with a tract of land containing 
one hundred and sixty acres at Cootehill, 
County Cavan, Ireland, where he established 
a country seat. His son, Hugh, married Sarah 
Craig, and in 1728 came to America (history 
says), to escape religious persecution, settling 
near Bethlehem in Northampton county, 
Pa., in what was knov^n as the "Irish Settle- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



ment," and was composed entirely of Old 
School Presbyterians. Hugli, Wilson was one 
of the commissioners selected to locate a site 
for the court house and jail, which was built 
at Easton. He was also one of the first jus- 
tices of the peace, and assisted in holding the 
first court held in Northampton county, 
Pennsylvania. He purchased seven hundred 
and thirty acres of land, and received his title 
for the purchase in March, 1737. With his 
son Thomas, he was interested in flouring 
mills. On retiring from active business, he 
settled with his sons in Bufifalo Valley, Pa., 
where he spent the last days of his 
life dying in 1773, and being buried 
in the churchyard at Lewisburg. The 
following are his children's names: \A'iI- 
liam, who was born in Ireland, and became a 
merchant at Philadelphia, but was later lo- 
cated in the West Indies; Mary Ann, wife of 
Francis McHenry ; Elizabeth, wife of Captain 
William Craig; Thomas, who married Eliza- 
beth Hayes; Charles, who married Margaret 
McNair ; Samuel ; James ; Margaret, wife of 
William McNair; and Francis, who returned 
to Ireland, became an Episcopal minister, and 
was later appointed tutor for the family of 
General Lee, of Virginia. 

Thomas Wilson, great-grandfather of the 
subject hereof, was the next in line, and was 
born in Allen township, Northampton county, 
Pa., in 1724. When he attained the age of 
twenty-one years, he erected a flouring mill, 
with his father, and, by contract, furnished 
flour for the continental army ; he received his 
pay in continental money, and in doing so 



lost almost his entire property. Selling what 
little remained, he took the proceeds and, 
with his family, located in Bufifalo Valley, 
Union county, in 1792. There he purchased 
a tract of forest land, and cleared some in 
order to cultivate the soil. This was about 
one mile from Lewisburg, where the county- 
fair grounds and buildings are now situated. 
Thomas died in 1799, at the age of seventy- 
four years. He married Elizabeth Hayes, a 
daughter of John and Jane (Love) Flayes. 
Mrs. Wilson, in 1803, some years after her 
husband's death, sold the property, and with 
her sons, William and Thomas, removed to 
Beaver county. Pa., where her death occurred, 
in 1812. Their children were: Hugh, born 
October 21, 1761, and married to Catherine 
Irwin ; Sarah, wife of Richard Fruit ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of James Dunken ; William, who 
married Ann White ; Thomas, Jr., grandfather 
of the subject hereof, who will be mentioned 
later herein ; Mary, wife of Jonathan Coulter ; 
Jane, who was unfortunately drowned while 
young; James; and Margaret, wife of John 
Thomas. 

Thomas Wilson, Jr., grandfather of James 
Sharp, was born June 17, 1765, and settled 
in Beaver county, in 1803. He purchased a 
tract of land in Franklin township, built a 
log cabin and engaged in clearing the land. 
In those early days, as there was little or no 
chance to market the timber, the first clearing 
was done by felling and burning the trees, so 
that a place might be prepared in which to 
raise grain and vegetables for household sub- 
sistence. The chief aim of the pioneers and 



20 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



settlers of that period was to establish a home 
and rear a family. They were happy with 
children around the old and spacious tireside. 
Game was plentiful, the creeks were alive with 
fish, and wild animals abounded. Here 
Thomas V\'ilson, Jr., spent the remainder of 
his days, and saw much of the forest of his 
youth, turned into blossoming fields under a 
good state of cultivation. 

He was an active, energetic man, proud of 
spirit, and austere in business relations, yet 
kind and charitable to his neighbors. He was 
I united in marriage with Agnes Hemphill, Oc- 
tober 7, 1806, and reared a family whose 
names are as follows: James, born Septem- 
ber 19, 1807, and married to IMargaret Mor- 
ton; Nancy B., born December 25, 1808, and 
joined in wedlock with David Frew; Jane, 
born March 31, 1810, unmarried; Eliza, born 
June 5. 1812, who became the wife of Robert 
Fullerton; Thomas, born November 26, 1813, 
whose life partner was Mary Davidson ; Mary 
A., born February 6, 1816, who died single; 
William, born May 7, 1818, who is also sin- 
gle; Col. Joseph H., who was born May 16, 
1820, and died May 30, 1862; John, father of 
the subject hereof, whose career will be men- 
tioned later; Francis S.. born July 2, 1824, 
and wedded to Caroline Wallace; and Craig 
B., born December 24. 1827, and joined in 
matrimony with Elizabeth Pontius. The old 
homestead formerly owned by Thomas Wil- 
son, Jr., grandfather of James Sharp, is now 
owned by the heirs of Francis S. Wilson. 

John H. Wilson, father of the subject here- 
of, was born Mav 22, 1822. He was reared a 



farmer, and chose that vocation for his life 
work. He was a man of sterling qualities, and 
of a notably energetic disposition. From the 
very start, his life was successful ; little by lit- 
tle he accumulated property. His home was 
in Franklin township, where he passed the 
closing years of his life. Mr. \\'ilson was 
looked upon as one of the leading men of 
his vicinity; a man who was not only thor- 
ough in his agricultural operations, but in all 
his actions as well, — taking great pride in im- 
proving and beautifying his place. He served 
one and one half years as county commis- 
sioner. At the time of his death, June 16, 
1892, Mr. \Mlson owned several farms in the 
eastern part of the county. 

IMarch 18, 1849, the elder Mr. Wilson led 
to the hymeneal altar, Mary E. Mehard, 
daughter of James Mehard, who came from 
Ireland to America and located near Wurtem- 
burg, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Wilson was of 
Scotch-Irish descent. She preceded her hus- 
band to the grave more than three years, — 
passing away to her final rest on April 28, 
1889, at the age of fifty-nine years. This 
highly respected couple reared a family of six 
children, viz. : Nancy Jane ; Christiana Orr ; 
William L. ; Omar T. ; James Sharp ; and Loyal 
W. Nancy Jane was born December 26, 1849, 
and was twice married, her first husband be- 
ing Dr. J. M. Withrow, and the second being 
James A. Jackson; she now resides in North 
Sewickley township, Beaver county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Christiana Orr, wife of J. G. McAulis, 
of Lawrence county. Pa., was born February 
17, 1852. William L. was born ]May 2, 1854; 




HON. JAMES J. DAVIDSON. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



he wedded Anna Hilman, and resides on the 
homestead farm. Omar T. was born March 4, 
1857; he was joined in matrimony with Vir- 
ginia West Hon. James Sharp is the subject 
of this review. Loyal \V., M. D., was born 
March 25, 1866. He chose for his wife, Emma 
Weitz, and now practices medicine in New 
Castle, Pennsylvania. 




"ON. JAMES J. DAVIDSON, de- 
ceased. It is a matter of profound 
-regret that death should intervene to 
cut short a life in its very dawn of great prom- 
ise, a life so efficiently equipped for usefulness 
to the community in which that life unfolded 
from childhood to noble manhood — a life 
gemmed with rare acquirements and high 
capacities, — full of encouragement to the 
many, who in their weakness, lean upon oth- 
ers. Such was the life of the most worthy 
subject of this memoir, Hon. James J. David- 
son, who, although he lived but a few short 
years, did not live in vain. It is a sacred 
pleasure for those who mourn, to cherish the 
mem.ory of his manly virtues and beneficent 
deeds. Eminent lives, independent of years, 
command the homage of mind and heart. 

James J. Davidson was born in Connells- 
ville, Fayette county. Pa., November 5, 1861. 
He was a son of the late Col. Daniel R. Dav- 
idson, and grandson of Hon. William David- 
son. Birth and environment are the supreme 
forces that mainly determine the success or 
failure of human beings. These forces acting 



in concert as uplifting factors, success is al- 
most assured ; if operating adversely, life often 
ends in failure. The influences, which give 
them direction and potency, date far back in 
ancestral history. These elements, in their 
most helpful form, as character builders, gave 
to James J. Davidson his high standing in 
business circles and his initial success in polit- 
ical affairs. 

The grandfather of our subject hereof, Wil- 
liam Davidson, was favored with large prac- 
tical ability, and was a noted iron master in 
the infancy of that great industry. He was 
several times a member of the Pennsylvania 
Legislature, and served as senator and as 
speaker of the House. He was appropriately 
looked upon as one of the foremost men of the 
county of his adoption. 

Colonel Daniel R. Davidson, father of the 
subject of these memoirs, was richly en- 
dowed with mental capabilities that would 
have secured eminence in any of the learned 
professions, had the bent of his mind led in 
that direction, but he chose to deal with great 
commercial enterprises. His keen foresight 
and power of analysis secured for him large 
wealth, and constituted him a leader in de- 
veloping the vast mineral resources, which 
have made the county of Fayette famous in 
the industrial world. The mother of James 
J. Davidson belonged to a family which 
ranked among tlie best of Western Pennsyl- 
vania, and was a woman of rare intellectual 
attainments and cultivated taste, who made 
home hfe a school. of moral and mental train- 
ing. Such were the marked and conspicuous 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



antecedents of that life which it is the aim of 
these brief lines to record. 

In the sixth year of Mr. Davidson's life, he 
removed with the family to Beaver county, 
his future home, and the theater of those 
early and brilliant achievements which gave 
such prominence to his short life. His prep- 
aratory education was obtained at the Beaver 
public schools and at Beaver Seminary. In 
1878, he entered Bethany College, West Vir- 
ginia, and afterward spent three years at the 
University of Lexington, Kentucky, graduat- 
ing therefrom, in 1883. He returned to Bea- 
ver and spent the following two years in the 
study of law in the office of Hon. John J. 
V/ickham, now of the Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania. This fitted Mr. Davidson for 
the subsequent activities which made him a 
power in the political and industrial move- 
ments of the county and state, as it was not 
his intention to engage in the practice of the 
legal profession, but to qualify himself with 
most thorough business acquirements. This 
was the height of his ambition, and he made 
a study of practical matters among his first 
mercantile enterprises. 

In 1886, Mr. Davidson commenced his 
business career by entering the oil trade as a 
new member of the firm of Darrah, Watson 
& Co., oil producers; he was subsequently in- 
terested in several kinds of enterprises. In 
the course of a few years, he became presi- 
dent of the Union Drawn Steel Works, of 
Beaver Falls, Pa., one of the most prosperous 
manufacturing plants of the Beaver Valley. 
Mr. Davidson was one of the largest stock- 



holders of that organization, and was 
its president at the time of his 
death. Early in life the subject of 
this biography became actively engaged 
in politics, and was soon recognized as 
an influential leader in the Republican party, 
supervising partisan pohcies and giving direc- 
tion to local and national campaigns. He 
served seven years as a member of the Beaver 
Council and was an ardent supporter of the 
public improvements, which in these later 
years have made Beaver so attractive for fam- 
ily residences. 

In 1894, Mr. Davidson received the 
unanimous nomination of Beaver county, for 
Congress, but at the congressional confer- 
ence held at Beaver Falls, he withdrew m 
favor of T. W. Phillips, of Lawrence county. 
In 1896, Mr. Davidson was again the unan- 
imous choice of Beaver county, and at the 
congressional conference held in Butler, he 
was nominated on the first ballot. The nom- 
ination of so young a man in a district com- 
posed of four counties, with numerous as- 
pirants, is proof of a phenomenal ability to 
control political forces, and was prophetic of 
a successful future, paralleled by but few in 
the history of our nation. After his election 
to Congress in 1896, Mr. Davidson went 
west to regain his fTealth, but death pre- 
vented him from taking the oath of office, and 
his first year's salary was paid to his bereaved 
widow. 

Toward the close of 1895, Mr. Davidson 
suffered an attack of "la grippe," which in 
after months developed into lung disease. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



His ambitions were beyond his constitution, 
and his energetic disposition kept him from 
taking much needed rest. The failure of 
medical skill to master this lung ailment, 
finally induced him to seek relief in change of 
climate. In July, 1896, he left his home in 
Beaver, and accompanied by his wife and two 
children, went to Salt Lake City. A month's 
sojourn in that city failing to bring any 
special relief, he changed his location to 
Colorado Springs. After a six weeks' stay 
there he removed to Phoenix, Arizona; but 
change of climate and the most careful nurs- 
ing and loving attention were powerless to 
arrest the waste of physical forces, and he suc- 
cumbed to quick consumption. On January 
2, 1897, at the age of thirty-five years, the 
struggle ended, leaving a grief-stricken wife, 
two interesting children, and a host of friends 
to mourn his departure. 

Mr. Davidson was a thirty-second degree 
Mason and was past officer of that fraternity ; 
he was a member of the Tancred Command- 
ery. Knights Templar, and of Syria Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S." His Masonic brethren met 
his remains at the home depot, and had charge 
of the memorial services, which were very 
imposing. Mr. Davidson was also a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F. lodge, the Knights of 
Pythias, the American Mechanics, and the 
Americus Club of Pittsburg, whose members 
came in a body to his funeral. 

January 31, 1889, James J. Davidson was 
united by the holy bands of matrimony with 
Emma Eakin, an accomplished daughter of 
John R. Eakin, noted as one of the solid men 



of Beaver county. This most happy union re- 
sulted in the birth of three little ones: Philip 
James; Margaret, who died when only three 
months old ; and Sarah Norton. It was the 
most earnest desire of Mr. Davidson to build 
a handsome home for his beloved ones in 
some attractive spot, and to surround them 
with every convenience and comfort. But 
his unusually busy life left him no time to at- 
tend to this matter before being cut ofif by 
death, with this wish unfulfilled. 

Mrs. Davidson and her two children are 
now residing in a pleasant home located on 
the south side of Park street, and it is her 
desire to rear and educate her little son and 
daughter in a fitting manner, that they may in 
the future add other laurels to the honored 
name of their father, a further account of 
whose ancestors may be found in the sketch 
of Frederick Davidson, of Beaver Falls, to be 
found in this volume. 

The publishers of this work take pleasure 
in announcing that a portrait of Mr. David- 
son accompanies this work, being presented 
on a preceding page. 



C^Tr-LEXANDER DUFF, Esq., justice of 
i^a the peace of New Brighton, Pa., has 
^«~ in his life time covered a wide range 
of experience, and has known much of men 
and afifairs in many fields of progress. He has 
been directly and indirectly connected with 
several lines of business which have called 
forth the most earnest effort and steady in- 
dustry. In every one of these interests which 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



have claimed his time and attention he has 
m.anifested the qualities that lead to success. 
At the present writing, he is enjoying the 
results of his own thrift, and tlie rewards of a 
life well and usefully spent. Our subject was 
born in Mercer, now Lawrence, county, Pa., 
July 21, 1832, is a son of James and Jane 
(Boies) Duff, and grandson of William Duf¥. 

William Duff was a native of County Down, 
Ireland. His parents died when he was very 
young, and he accompanied his step-mother 
to America, and settled at Turtle Creek, 
where he lived until he reached manhood. 
Sarah Dufif, a cousin of his, became his wife, 
and the young folks settled in Mercer, now 
Lawrence, county, Pa., where they purchased 
a tract of land, for the most part heavily tim- 
bered. When he decided to build a house, he 
could nol5 get a team in the county with which 
to move the logs, so the house was built by 
carrying the logs, by main strength, to the 
place desired. Later, Mr. Dufif built a large 
log barn, which is still standing. He owned 
about 400 acres of land, about 200 of which, 
together with the homestead, is now the prop- 
erty of his grandson, D. G. Dufif. "Giandpa" 
Dufif died at the age of about eighty-five years 
and his good wife passed away at the age of 
Mghty-seven. Their children's names are: 
James; Oliver; Alexander; William; Mrs. 
Kildoo; Mrs. Small; Mrs. Struthers; and Mrs. 
Caldwell, — all now deceased. 

James Duff, the eldest of the children, was 
the father of the subject of this sketch. James 
was born in Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, 
Pa., in 1792, and his wife was born the same 



year. Mrs. Duff's maiden name was Jane 
Boies. She was the daughter of James and 
Elizabeth (Wilson) Boies. Her grandfather, 
Col. Wilson, served in the Revolutionary 
War. James Duff received 80 acres of land 
from his father, and after building a log house 
and barn upon it, and clearing a portion of 
the land, he sold his farm, and purchased an- 
other one, again engaging in farming, which 
was his sole occupation during life. He was 
an active, enterprising man, and served in 
township offices, also rendering valued ser- 
vices to our country in the War of 181 2, 
especially in connection with the struggle on 
Lake Erie. He died in 1876, at the age of 
eighty-five years, his death occurring only a 
few miles from his birthplace. The beloved 
mother only lacked two months of being 
ninety-nine years old at the time of her death, 
and was quite active up to the time of her last 
illness. On her ninety-eighth birthday her 
son, Alexander, and his sister gave a re-union 
for her benefit. That day she rode six miles 
and back. She loved company, and every- 
body loved her. Her home was always a 
pleasant place to all, — her disposition always 
happy. Hundreds of relatives and fiiends ac- 
cepted the invitation and attended the re- 
union, — the first of its kind ever held in Law- 
rence county, — and a most joyous occasion. 
This worthy and highly honored old couple 
were Associate-Reformed Presbyterians, and 
reared the following children : William, who 
was twice married, — his first wife being Han- 
n.ah Sherrer, and his second wife Jane Mc- 
Clellan ; Eliza, who was also twice married, — 



BEAVER COUNTY 



27 



lier first husband being Cyrus Williams, and 
iier second husband James Kildoo; James, 
who wedded Lucinda Brown; Sarah, wife of 
Jrhn Poak; Jane, wife of Calvin Reed; John, 
who was also twice married, — his first wife 
being Eunice Sherrer, and his second wife 
Mrs. Small ; Matthew, who married Eliza 
Clark ; Mary, wife of B. F. Junkin ; Alexander, 
the subject of this sketch; Lydia, wife of Cy- 
rus Field; and Samuel, who was killed at the 
Battle of Fredericksburg. He was a private 
in Cooper's Battery. 

Alexander Dufif received his intellectual 
training in the public schools, and started out 
in life as a farmer. He bought a part of his 
father's farm, which was partly improved, 
built a new house upon it, and otherwise en- 
hanced its value, and then sold out to excel- 
lent advantage. This occurred in 1863; Mr. 
Duff then purchased a better and more desira- 
ble farm in North Beaver township, Lawrence 
county. Pa., and carried on farming and 
threshing, — following the latter business fully 
twenty years. He cnjo)ed the distinction of 
owning and operating the first Massillon 
thresher in Lawrence county. Later in Hfe, 
our subject entered the mercantile world by 
conducting a general merchandise store at 
Moravia, where he a'so became station agent. 
As his farm was located near by, he was en- 
abled to oversee it and a'so give his personal 
attention to his store. In addition to all this, 
he began dealing in grain, which he continued 
for five years, dv^ring which he handled over 
100,000 bushels each year. 

In 1891, Mr. Duff fold his store to 



his son. C. W. Duff, and, renting his 
farm, he removed to New Brighton, 
where he purchased a handsome resi- 
dence on Fifth avenue. On his farm, 
Mr. Duff not only made many improve- 
ments but rebuilt the house and barns, and 
carries on a stock and poultry business. He 
has 14 fine grade and full bred Jerseys, and 
a hennery 64x20 feet. He makes a specialty 
of fancy stock, and eggs, having all his eggs 
stamped with date of laying, thus insuring a 
fancy price. He rents his farm on shares and 
practically conducts it himself. From 1872 
to 1877, Mr. Duff served as justice of the 
peace, and has also served as school director 
and in other offices of his township. In 1895 
he was elected justice of the peace of New 
Brighton, and for the sake of having some 
light business to attend to, he handles a fine 
line of wall papers. 

Mr. Duff was united in marriage with Al- 
key S. Fulkerson, an attractive daughter of 
Richard Fulkerson, of Lawrence county. She 
died at the age of fifty-nine years, after having 
reared the following children : William O., 
who is a coal dealer at New Castle, Pa., and 
wedded Rhoda Witherspoon, who bore her 
husband one child, Iva, whom they lost ; Alice 
C, wife of James Young, of New Castle; 
Richard H., a graduate of the Cleveland Med- 
ical College, and now a practicing physician 
of Erie county. Pa., who married Ella 
Burwell, and has two children, Harold and 
Gail; Ella A., wife of Dodds Campbell, a 
farmer of Lawrence county. Pa. ; Edwin E., 
a prominent druggist of New Castle, who 



1 



28 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



married Annetta McCreary, — one child, 
Dorothy, having blessed their union ; 
Charles W., a shoe merchant of New 
Castle, Pa., who married Laura Gwin, 
and has three children — Mabel, Fred, 
and Florence; Robert Frank, who was 
killed in 1887, at the age of twenty 
years, by falling from a wagon; and Harry G., 
a druggist of New Castle, who married Maree 
Jeckel, of Bufifalo, New York. After the 
death of his first wife, our subject contracted 
a second matrimonial alliance, this time with 
Maggie E. Stuart, a daughter of John Stuart, 
of Lawrence county. No issue resulted from 
this marriage. 

Mr. Duff, since' his residence in New 
Brighton, has identified himself with the 
town's progress and development. He is a 
m.ember of the First Presbyterian church of 
that place, and is also an elder. In 1891, Mr. 
Duflf took a trip across the continent, visiting 
all the principal places of interest, and spend- 
ing about four months en the journey. 



iILTON TOWNSEND, real estate 
dealer and retired merchant, is one 
of New Brighton's most es- 
teemed citizens. He is spending the sunset 
of life, in his beautiful home, upon the knoll 
at the lower end of Third avenue, enjoying 
every convenience and comfort that could be 
desired. His residence is one of the finest 
sights in Beaver county. Pa., being sur- 
rounded by spacious lawns, lovely driveways 
and walks overlooking the valley below, and 




overshadowed by towering mountains, sub- 
lime in their grandeur. The subject of this 
sketch was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, 
November 3, 1820, and can trace his ancestors 
back to the sixth generation, the family being 
of English origin. He is a son of Talbot and 
Edith (Ware) Townsend, and grandson of 
Francis and Rachel (Fallett) Townsend. 

Francis Townsend was born on April 15, 
1740, was a son of Joseph Townsend, Jr., 
grandson of Joseph Townsend, Sr., and great- 
grandson of William Townsend, a native of 
Berks county, England. Francis Townsend 
wedded Rachel Fallett on July 8, 1762. They 
belonged to that good old class of people, the 
Quakers, who were such important factors in 
the settlement and early history of Pennsyl- 
vania. In 1786, Francis Townsend and his 
family entered the western part of Pennsyl- 
vania, settling at Brighton, which is now 
known as Beaver Falls. Mr. Townsend at 
once engaged in business by establishing an 
iron foundry and blast furnace for the manu- 
facture of pig iron. He was so successful in 
this venture for many years, that in time he 
became the owner of considerable land and 
much valuable property in that vicinity. Like 
most of his creed, he was a fine old man, actu- 
ated by just and upright principles, and lived 
a life worthy of imitation by his sons. In the 
year 1800, he retired from active business pur- 
suits and removed to Fallston, where he spent 
his last years with his sons, who had erected 
mills there. His death occurred at Fallston. 
He and his good wife were parents of the fol- 
lowing children : David : Benjamin J. ; Isaac ; 



BEAVER COUNTY 



29 



Francis; Talbot; Lydia, wife of Evan Pugh; 
and one more daughter whose name cannot 
be recalled. 

Talbot Townsend, father of Milton, was 
bom in Chester county, Pa., and accompa- 
nied his parents west to Beaver county. In 
iSi6, he went down tb.e Yellow Creek to Jef- 
ferson county, Ohio, and engaged in the 
manufacture of sa't for some time. In 1837, 
he located at New Brighton, Pa., where he 
built a stone flouring mill, and carried on 
quite an extensive business for those days. 
His mill was run by a splendid water power. 
In dry seasons, people came twenty-five or 
thirty miles to have their grain ground at 
his mill, coming, also, many miles by canoe. 
Much of their flour was shipped to the Pitts- 
burg market, and further down the Ohio 
River. Mr. Tov/nscnd was a very successful 
miller, and acquired much property in the vi- 
cinity of New Brighton. He lived to the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-seven years, and his 
most worthy wife lived to be seventy-seven 
years old. She was, before marriage, Edith 
Ware, a daughter of Asa Ware, of Salem, 
Ohio. Both Mr. and Mrs. Townsend be- 
longed to the Society of Friends. Their 
children were : Milo, who married Elizabeth 
Walker; Eliza, wife of John Gammal; Milton, 
subject of this sketch; Alfred, who died un- 
married; Lydia, wife of Edwin Morlan; Caro- 
line, wife of Ebenezer Rhodes; and AHce, wife 
of Samuel Junkins. 

Milton Townsend succeeded his father in 
the milling business for several years, until 
the mill burned. He then went into the trans- 



portation business, owning some boats and 
leasing others, and doing a large freight busi- 
ness up and down the canal for years, until 
the railroads became so numerous that boat- 
ing was done away with. He next became 
agent for the Pittsburg & Cleveland R. R., 
after which he was clerk of the post office in 
Pittsburg for a period of two years. Return- 
ing to New Brighton, he conducted a shoe 
store very successfully for years, after which 
he retired, and built a handsome brick busi- 
ness block on Third avenue, where his father 
form.erly resided. Mr. Townsend then began 
dealing in real estate, — buying and selling. 
He purchased the Abel Townsend estate, 
which consisted of a fine orchard ca'led 
"Knob Lot," a round knoU at the lo\ver end 
of Third avenue. He first built a round ten- 
ement house in the center of an orchard which 
contained the finest and largest variety of 
fruit in that vicinity. Later he had the house 
remodeled into a handsome dwelling, which 
he now occupies. 

The subject of this sketch was united in 
marriage with Lavinia Oakley. Mrs. Town- 
send was a daughter of John M. Oakley, of 
Brighton, formerly of Baltim.ore, Maryland. 
She was born in 1823, and passed to her final 
rest in 1892. She bore her husband three 
children, two of whom were sons who died 
in infancy. The daughter, Emily O., became 
the wife of Ernest Mayer, one of the two own- 
ers of the Mayer Pottery Company, of New 
Brighton, Pennsylvania. In his political opin- 
ions, Mr. Townsend first belonged to the old 
line Whigs, was later an anti-slavery man and 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



now votes the Republican ticket. la his 
younger days, he was connected with both the 
Masonic fraternity and the Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Townsend has closed a long career of 
toil and is now enjoying that calm that comes 
after the struggle, untroubled by anxious 
thoughts of what the future may bring forth. 
His age has already gone far beyond that 
allotted to the average man, and he is f.nst 
approaching the octogenarian mark, but he 
still retains much of his youthful vigor. He 
has been identified with every enterprise 
worthy of note since his residence in New 
Brighton, and justly deserves the esteem of 
all. 



CDGAR FREDERICK HOPE has 
been interested in the advancement 
'and prosperity of Beaver Falls since 
the year 1890, in which year he established 
himself in mercantile business, and is now 
recognized as one of the leading and substan- 
tial merchants of that borough. His native 
town is Manchester, England, and his ances- 
tors have resided for many generations in 
Preston, England. He is a son of Isaac and 
grandson of Thomas Hope. 

Thomas Hope was a hfe-long resident of 
Preston, England, and was an expert machin- 
ist, conducting a machine-shop and foundry 
many years. He was called from earth when 
eighty-three years old. Isaac Hope was also 
born in Preston, and there also received his 
mental training; he was also a mechanic by 
trade and followed the same business that 



occupied his father's attention for so long a 
period. Mr. Hope was joined in marriage 
with Miss Easterby of Bcnthem, England, and 
they reared a family of four children : Daniel, 
who wedded a Miss Bradley; Joseph; Edgar 
Frederick, the subject hereof; and Eleanor. 
The father of Edgar Frederick Hope died, 
aged seventy-two years. The subject of t'lis 
sketch obtained his primary education in the 
public schools of his native town, and early 
in life began to learn the trade of an iron- 
molder; desiring to seek a home and for- 
tune in the new world, he decided to come to 
the United States, and accordingly sailed for 
New York City in 1880; upon his arrival there 
he found employment on the foundry work of 
the great Brooklyn Bridge. In 1890, he be- 
came a resident of Beaver Falls, Pa., and there 
established a general store, which he still con- 
ducts. Mr. Hope began at the bottom of the 
ladder, and, with meager advantages for 
education and no material assistance, has 
gradually worked his way up to the status of a 
substantial business man. His business inter- 
ests are not confined to Beaver Falls alone, 
for he also has three stores in New Brighton. 
Our subject's store in Beaver Falls is located 
on the principal business thoroughfare, and 
he pays special attention to the lines of stoves 
and tin ware, glass and queensware and furni- 
ture. Mr. Hope by his wonderful determina- 
tion and energy, coupled with good judg- 
ment, has made a decided success in all his 
business undertakings ; he is popular and es- 
teemed in both business and social circles, and 
is an intelligent and well-to-do citizen. 




COL. JACOB WEYAND. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



33 



Mr. Hope formed a matrimonial alliance 
with Miss Frances Bailey, and their home has 
been blessed with three children: Charles J. ; 
Harry, and Olive. Politically, he is a Re- 
publican, whilst in religious views he favors 
the Methodist church. 



^OL. JACOB WEYAND, a, retired pub- 
lisher of Beaver, Pa., whose portrait is 
shown on the opposite page, enjoys 
the distinction of being the only living mem- 
ber of the convention that participated in the 
formation of the Republican party 
at Lafayette Hall, Pittsburg, Pa., 
February 22, 1856. He first saw 
the light of day on March 22, 1828, 
near Mount Jackson, Lawrence county, then 
a part of Beaver county. He worked on a 
farm until he attained manhood, and then at- 
tended Beaver Academy. In 1854 he became 
part owner of the Argus, and assisted in 
editing and publishing that paper until the 
winter of 1857 and 1858. Selling his interest 
in the Argus, he purchased the Free Press, at 
Carrollton, Ohio, where he was busily en- 
gaged at the breaking out of the Civil War. 
Catching the martial spirit of the times, Mr. 
Weyand sold the Free Press, and raised a 
company of volunteers. He was chosen cap- 
tain, and marched the company to Camp 
Mingo, near Steubenville, Ohio, where it was 
at once attached to the 126th Reg., Ohio Vol. 
Inf., and mustered into service in 1862. Dur- 
ing his service, Capt. Weyand was noted for 
sturdy courage and coolness in the midst of 



great danger, and although twice wounded in 
battle, he had no fears for his personal safety, 
but thought rather of the duty to be per- 
formed. He participated in nearly all the bat- 
tles of the Potomac campaign. In the battle 
of Monocacy, Md., fought July 9, 1864, Capt. 
Weyand was placed in command of his regi- 
ment, and an officer on the stafif of the com- 
manding general that day, in writing a his- 
tory of the battle, made use of the following 
language : 

"Capt. Weyand, who was commanding the 
126th Ohio Vol., was on the extreme right 
of the line, with the right of his regiment rest- 
ing near the Monocacy bridge. After the 
battle had progressed a short time, he was 
directed by General Wallace to set fire to the 
bridge, then face the regiment to the left, 
double quick it to the extreme left of the Hne, 
throw it across the pike, and hold the posi- 
tion as long as he could. The bridge was 
fired and the regiment started ofif on its peril- 
ous movement. It had almost reached the 
desired destination, when, as it came abreast 
of the line of the 'hundred day men,' it met 
a most unexpected obstruction. Immedi- 
ately in its front was a farm ditch about six 
feet wide and the same depth, through which 
a sluggish stream of water was running. A 
few feet further was a board fence five or six 
feet high — both running at right angles with 
the line of battle. Just beyond the ditch and 
fence was the Washington pike. The ditch 
was literally alive with 'hundred day men,' 
who, totally unused to the sort of treatment 
they were receiving at the hands of the 



34 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



enemy, had taken shelter there from the 
raking fire which the Confederates had opened 
on the pike. With the view of keeping that 
thoroughfare open, the enemy were in Hne 
of battle on an elevation of about four hun- 
dred yards in our front, and every missile 
known to warfare seemed to be coming down 
that hard, dusty road ; plowing shot, screech- 
ing shells, rattling grape and canister were 
hurled out, with sharp volleys of musketry, 
sending up puffs of dust, or tearing up great 
rifts of the highway. No one could com- 
mand calmness enough to considerately be- 
hold the scene, yet this had to be done; the 
General had ordered it. Here Captain Wey- 
and leaped the ditch, climbed to the top of 
the fence, and pointed forward. In an instant 
every file was moving after him, led by the 
gallant McPeck. Under the galling fire the 
men were falling like leaves before an autumn 
blast, and, realizing the dreadful havoc that 
was being made in the ranks, Capt. Weyand 
broke the battle line, and hurriedly moved 
his regiment some seventy-five yards forward, 
where a rise in the ground partly sheltered 
the men from the merciless storm they had 
just passed. Every officer came out of the 
conflict bleeding, and every man not hit or 
killed had his clothes riddled with bullets." 

In the eleven preceding battles in which 
the regiment had borne an honorable part, 
its splendid discipline and fighting qualities 
had never shown to greater advantage than in 
this field. Its brilliant conduct was the theme 
of ofificers and men who had no connection 
with it, and Captain Weyand, who had already 



been complimented highly by his superior 
officers for gallantry at Cold Harbor, was now 
honored with a recommendation to the Sec- 
retary of War for promotion as major and 
brevet lieutenant-colonel.,, Col. Fox, in his 
book, entitled, "The Three Hundred, Fighting 
Regiments of the War," includes the 126th 
Ohio Vol. Infantry (Col. Weyand's) regiment 
as one of that number. After the war, our 
subject returned to Beaver, Pa., repurchased 
the Argus, and conducted it until 1874, when 
he consolidated it with the Radical, publish- 
ing both under the firm of Weyand & Rutan. 
From that time Col. Weyand practically re- 
tired from business, with the exception of 
dealing in real estate to some extent. He pur- 
cliased the David Hall property of fifteen 
acres at Beaver, but just within the line of 
Eridgewater borough, and built a handsome 
residence. In 1893, Col. Weyand was elected 
to the legislature; two years later he was re- 
elected, and the duties of a legislator were 
performed by him in a very creditable and 
capable manner. 

The subject of this sketch was twice mar- 
ried. In 1857, Victoria Adams, a charming 
young lady of Beaver county, became his wife, 
and shared his joys and sorrows until 1892, 
when he was deprived of her pleasant com- 
panionship by death. She was born in 
1837, and bore her husband the following 
children:] Emma; Romulus and Remus, 
twins ; Milo Adams ; Edwin Stanton ; Blanche, 
and Paul. Emma is the wife of Harry W. 
Reeves, of Beaver ; Romulus and Remus died 
in infancy; Milo Adams is deceased; Edwin 



BEAVER COUNTY 



35 



Stanton is an attorney-at-law in Beaver. He 
was a law student under ex-Judge Wickham, 
now deceased, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1 895 ; he married Wilhelmina Thompson, 
of Marion, Ohio, who has borne him two 
children, Dorothy, and "baby," not yet 
named. Blanche is a stenographer, and Paul 
is a Methodist minister. He was educated at 
the Beaver High School and at Allegheny 
College, Meadville, Pennsylvania. He is now 
Superintendent of City Missions, at Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

Some time after the death of his first wife. 
Col. Weyand formed a second matrimonial 
alliance — this time with Mary E. Cooke, a 
daughter of Maj. William Cooke. Col. Wey- 
and is a member of the U. V. L. and the 
G. A. R. He worships at the M. E. church. 
He is a son of Henry and Mary M. (Ginder) 
Weyand, and a grandson of Jacob Weyand, 
who was born in Alsace, Germany, and came 
to America about the year 1738, settling at 
Somerset, Pennsylvania, where he and his 
good wife both lived to a good old age. So 
far as is known, their children were as fol- 
lows: Michael; Jacob; John, and Henry, 
father of the subject of this memoir. 

Henry Weyand was born July 31, 1791, in 
Somerset county. Pa., and there his marriage 
occurred. He wedded Mary Magdalena Gin- 
der, a daughter of George Ginder. The 
young folks settled near Mount Jackson, and 
purchased a farm now known as the William 
Patterson farm. In his younger day, Henry 
Weyand taught schools during winters — 
teaching both German and English — and de- 



voted his summers to working his farm. He 
was a man of prominence in his community, 
and served many years as constable. His 
death occurred at the age of fifty-two years, 
three months, and nine days. His devoted 
wife died in August, 1863, aged seventy-three 
years and eight months. Their family con- 
sisted of the following children: Agabus; 
Mary Ann; Michael; Jacob, and Elizabeth. 
Agabus died young; Mary Ann is the wife of 
Jacob Bender; this worthy couple recently 
celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary, 
at Mahoningtown, Pa.; Michael is the editor 
of the Beaver Times; Jacob is the subject of 
this biography, and Elizabeth is the wife of 
Joseph Strouck. 



§OHN ELLIS, a highly respected and 
enterprising citizen of Beaver Falls, en- 
joys the distinction of being director of 
the Co-operative Flint Glass Co. of that place 
and was one of the organizers of that com- 
pany in 1879, at which time he located in 
Beaver Falls. Ever since the organization of 
the company, Mr. Eliis has been in its em- 
ploy; he is careful, shrewd, and trustworthy. 
His work is always done in a way that will 
stand the closest scrutiny. The subject of this 
sketch was born January 9, 1852, and ob- 
tained his education in Pittsburg. He subse- 
quently served an apprenticeship with Bryce 
Brothers, and went to Beaver Falls in 1879. 
In 1887, Annie Davis, a daughter of John 
Davis of Pittsburg, agreed to share the for- 
tunes of Mr. Ellis by becoming his wife. This 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



union was blessed with three children : How- 
ard; Mabel; and Clifford B. Mr. Ellis and 
his family are willing workers of the Presby- 
terian church. In politics, Mr. Ellis has al- 
ways been a Republican, but has refrained 
from accepting official positions. He is a 
member of the I. O. O. F. organization, and 
also of the Royal Arcanum. He has been a 
director of the Flint Glass Co. of Beaver Falls 
since 1896. He is a son of William and Jane 
(Owen) Ellis. 

William Ellis was born in Cardiganshire, 
Wales, February 8, 1815, and was reared and 
educated at that place. He learned the 
trade of a hatter, which occupation he con- 
tinued to follow until July 4, 1846, when he 
started for America. After a five weeks' voy- 
age on board a saiUng vessel, he landed at 
New York, going to Pittsburg by way of 
Utica, Buffalo, and the canal. After his arrival 
in Pittsburg, Mr. Ellis engaged in mining 
for a number of years, then began working in 
a glass factory, where he found employment 
for a period of twenty years, the last eight 
years of which were spent in Beaver Fails, 
where he died February 25, 1888. He chose 
for his life partner, Jane Owen, a daughter of 
Stephen Owen, of Wales. Mrs. Ellis departed 
this life September 10, 1897, at the age of sev- 
enty-nine years. This worthy couple favored 
the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist church. Mr. 
ElHs was an ardent Republican, fearless in his 
ideas, and in the expression of them. He 
took a deep interest in church affairs, and was 
very generous and kind hearted, often visit- 
ing the sick and poor and needy, relieving 



their wants or ameliorating their suffering 
whenever he could. He was a valued mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows organization. He 
was also a member of the Ivorites, a Welsh 
order. 

Our subject was one of four children. 
James, the eldest, died at the tender age of 
seven years. John is the subject of this 
sketch. Mary J., born February 14, 1854, 
became the wife of David D. Evans, of Pitts- 
burg, and has six children, namely: Blanche; 
William, now deceased; Howard; Elmer; 
Ethel ; and Iris. David Ellis, the youngest 
of the family, and only surviving brother of 
the subject of this sketch, was born September 
26, 1856, at Pittsburg, Pa. He is one of the 
prominent and hard working members of the 
American Flint Glass Workers' Union, No. 
38. David commenced his trade of flint glass 
worker in the factory of Bryce, Walker & 
Co. ; he afterwards worked for Campbell, 
Jones & Co. He has been a resident of Beaver 
Falls since 1879, being employed in the Co- 
operative Works. David Ellis joined the 
Union of his trade in 1876, when the "Flints" 
were affiliated with the K. of L., and remained 
a member of that organization until the 
American Flint Glass Workers' Union of 
North America was organized, when he 
joined the latter body. Besides being a 
staunch union man, he is very prominent in 
the ranks of the Odd Fellows, having served 
as di-strict deputy of the order in Beaver 
county, and district deputy grand patriarch of 
the Encampment in the same county. He 
is, also, a member of Beaver Valley Lodge 




CHRISTOPHER C HAZEN. 



iJEAVER COUNTY 



89 



No. 478, F. & A. M., Beaver Fa!ls, Pa. 

Mr. Ellis is a self-made man ; having learned 
self-reliance and habits of industry in his 
youth, he was not slow to make the best of 
every opportunity offered. He has won his 
way to an enviable position, and is esteemed 
for his many excellent traits and his well- 
known rectitude of character. 



TT^HRISTOPHER C. HAZEN, the pop- 
l J[ ular secretary for S. Barnes & Co. 
^^ -^ (Limited), manufacturers of all 
kinds of fire brick, of Rochester, Pa., is a resi- 
dent of New Brighton, Pa., and besides fol- 
lowing the occupations of teaching, farming, 
and stock-raising, for, perhaps, a quarter of 
a century, he has occupied important posi- 
tions of trust in Beaver county — such as 
county auditor and county treasurer. Our 
subject boasts of English origin, and can trace 
his ancestors back for two hundred and fifty 
years; he is a descendant of Edward Has- 
sen, which was the original family name. 

Edward Hassen was born in England, Sep- 
tember 18, 1649, ^^^ with his wife, Elizabeth, 
came to America, settling at Rowley, Massa- 
chusetts. There he served as selectman, 
overseer, and as judge of delinquents ; he 
owned a large quantity of real estate, includ- 
ing seven gates, or cattle rights, which was 
considered an extensive ownership. His es- 
tate at death was valued at ^404 7s. 8d. He 
was twice married. Little is known of his 
first wife, Elizabeth. His second wife was 
Hannah Grant, a daughter of Thomas and 



Hugh Grant. Edward Hassen died at Row- 
ley, Mass., in 1663, leaving the following 
children : Elizabeth ; Hannah ; John ; Thomas ; 
Edward; Isabella; Priscilla; Edna; Richard; 
Hepzibah; and Sarah. 

Thomas Hassen, from whom the subject of 
this sketch is descended, was born February 
29, 1657 or 1658, and died at Norwich, Conn., 
April 12, 1735. He was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, and settled upon what was known as the 
Westfarms, and with his sons was among the 
petitioners for its incorporation as a parish, in 
1 716. This tract is now known as Franklin. 
Thomas was united in marriage, January i, 
1682, with Mary Howlet, a daughter of 
Thomas Howlet. Their children were as fol- 
lows: John; Hannah; Alice; Edna; Thomas; 
Jacob; Mary; Lydia; Hepzibah; Ruth; and 
Jeremiah. 

John Hazen was born March 23, 1683, and 
was twice married. His first wife was Mercy 
Bradstreet, daughter of John and Sarah 
(Perkins) Bradstreet. Mrs Hazen laid down 
the burden of life in 1725. John Hazen chose 
for his second wife, Elizabeth Dart. He 
reared the following offspring: John; Sam- 
uel; Simon; Margaret; Caleb; Sarah; Daniel; 
Elizabeth; Mary; Hannah, the first, and Han- 
nah, the second. 

John Hazen, Jr., was born February 21, 
171 1 or 1712. He was joined in matrimony 
with Deborah Peck, of Lyme, Connecticut, 
who bore him nine children, namely : Mary ; 
John; Mary, second; Deborah; Nathaniel; 
Eunice; Joseph; Lydia; and Samuel. 

Nathaniel Hazen, was born March 17, 1745, 



40 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and was joined in marriage with Mary Bell. 
History says that Nathaniel was first 
located in the state of New Jersey, from 
which he removed to Washington county, 
Pa., and shortly afterward went to North Se- 
wickley, now Franklin, township, Beaver 
county, and settled upon a tract of land where 
S. M. Hazen now resides. A patent for this 
land, issued from the Government to the eld- 
est son of Nathaniel Hazen, bears date 1790. 
Nathaniel possessed considerable means, own- 
ing two hundred acres of land, and becoming 
a man of prominence in his day. Having 
very fertile land, he made a specialty of rais- 
ing timothy seed, which he carried over the 
mountains on horseback, and exchanged for 
salt and merchandise. He conducted a small 
store, and was the proud owner of the first 
buggy ever seen in these parts. The house 
occupied by him as a residence was built of 
logs, as was the barn — the former containing 
only one door and one window. Nathaniel 
Hazen set out an orchard, a portion of which 
is yet bearing. Among the children reared 
by him and his excellent wife were the fol- 
lowing: Samuel ; Nathan ; and James. They 
also reared others, whose names are not re- 
membered. 

Samuel Hazen, grandfatb.er of the subject 
hereof, was born at Peter's Creek, Washing- 
ton county (now Allegheny county) Pa., 
August 27, 1791. He wedded Eliza McDan- 
iel, a daughter of Jelhro McDaniel. "Grand- 
ma" Hazen was born in 1798, and passed 
away at the age of forty-nine years. Samuel 
Hazen began his career by working on his 



father's farm. He subsequently built a woolen 
mill at Wurtemberg, and carried on the manu- 
facture of woolen goods in connection with 
farming. So successfully did he manage this 
enterprise that before his death he became 
the owner of several farms. He assisted in 
organizing the Baptist society, of which he 
was a member. His homestead farm was 
early known as the "Leverance Farm." His 
death occurred September 7, 1855, having 
been previously deprived of his beloved com- 
panion, in 1847. Their most happy union 
was blessed with the following children : Na- 
thaniel; Mary Ann, wife of H. K. Alter; Re- 
becca, wife of A. Gavin ; Hannah, wife of J. C. 
Thompson ; Margaret, wife of John Thomas ; 
Nathan, father of the subject hereof; Samuel, 
who died at the age of twenty-two years ; and 
Smith M., who married Mary A. Ney. After 
the death of his first wife, Samuel Hazen con- 
tracted a second matrimonial alliance, in this 
instance with Elizabeth Ann Thompson, who 
bore him one daughter, Ruth, and who died 
September 7, 1855, the same day upon which 
her husband died. 

Nathan Hazen, father of Christopher C, 
was born in North Sewickley, now" Frank- 
lin, township, December 15, 1829. He won 
for his wife, Mary Judith Zeigler, a daughter 
of Abraham Zeigler. Mrs Hazen still sur- 
vives her husband, whose death occurred 
July 29, 1898, at the age of sixty-eight years. 
Christopher C.'s father purchased a farm, that 
upon which Thomas J. Powell now resides, 
which he afterwards sold, and purchased an- 
other in North Sewickley township. This 



BEAVER COUNTY 



latter farm was only partially improved, and 
is still a portion of the estate. Upon this farm 
the elder Mr. Hazen replaced the old log 
house and barns with convenient and sub- 
stantial buildings, in 185 1, and six years later 
he built a handsome, large house. After 
clearing the land, he was occupied in farm- 
ing until about 1875, when he purchased the 
Dr. Withrow property, in North Sewickley 
township. He then practically retired from 
active labor, with the exception of keeping 
a store and ofificiating as postmaster. He also 
served as supervisor and as auditor. He was 
a very active, energetic man, accumulating 
a fine property, and upon his death left a large 
estate for distribution among his children, 
who are as follows : Christopher C, the sub- 
ject hereof; Elizabeth Eliza, who became the 
wife of Stewart Thompson, and is now de- 
ceased ; Mary, wife of Dr. W. O. IMorrison, 
of Struthers, Ohio; Maggie H., wife of Dr. 
C. H. Knoblett, of Ohio; Ida, wife of Hon. 
J. Sharp Wilson, of Beaver; and F. Lily, who 
is devoting her life to her aged mother. 

Christopher C. Hazen was born in North 
Sewickley township, Beaver county. Pa., De- 
cember 20, 1 85 1. After attending public school 
he took a course at North Sewickley Acad- 
emy. He graduated from Lewisburg Univers- 
ity, now known as Bucknell College, in 1874. 
He assisted in working his way through col- 
lege by teaching a part of the time, which 
profession occupied his attention before and 
after his graduation. After his marriage, the 
subject of this record conducted his father's 
farm for some time, making a specialty of 



stock-raising, breeding some very fine horses, 
and keeping a choice dairy. Mr. Hazen be- 
gan his public Hfe in 1885, when he was 
elected county auditor of Beaver county, 
serving six years. In 1891, he was elected 
county treasurer of the same county, serving 
in that capacity for three years. In 1897, Mr. 
Hazen became a stockholder in, and secre- 
tary for, the S. Barnes Manufacturing Com- 
pany, which responsible and lucrative posi- 
tion he still retains and seems especially fitted 
for. 

Mr. Hazen engaged in farming for a period 
of twenty-one years, discontinuing it in 1896, 
when he purchased a fine residence in New 
Brighton. This residence was known as the 
Judge Andrew Dufif place, having been built 
by that gentleman. It is a fine, modern 
house, surrounded by beautiful, spacious 
lawns, and is picturesquely situated on the 
heights overlooking the business portion of 
the city. Our subject was joined in wedlock 
with Laura H. De Frain. Mrs. Hazen is a 
daughter of Jacob and Susan (Boon) De 
Frain, and formerly resided in Lewisburg, 
Union county, Pennsylvania, being a gradu- 
ate of a young ladies' grammar school of that 
place. Mr. and Mrs Hazen are rearing a large 
and exceedingly interesting family, of whom 
they are very proud. Their children's names 
are as follows : Edith Irene, born November 
13, 1875, who served as assistant to her father 
while he filled the office of county treasurer; 
Mabel Edna, born March 12, 1877; Edna 
Blanche, born June 6, 1879; Clara Floy, born 
June 7, 1881 ; Amy Anna, born July 10, 1883 ; 



42 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Harry Wilford, born October 19, 1885 ; Frank 
Harrison, born November 23, 1887; Nathan 
De Frain, born December 5, 1889; Harold 
Herbert, born October 20, 1872, and whose 
little life flickered out on July 21, 1873; 
and Thomas Ross Hennon, born June 18, 
1898. 

Christopher C. Hazen and his family are 
active members of the Baptist church, of 
which denomination Mr. Hazen has served as 
deacon. Socially, our subject is a member 
of St. James Lodge, No. 457, F. & A. M., is 
past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, 
and attended the Grand Lodge sessions for 
two years ; he is also a member of the Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics. Mr. 
Hazen is a most pleasant and agreeable gen- 
tleman, numbering his friends by the score, 
and it is with pleasure that we are able to an- 
nounce that his portrait accompanies the fore- 
going outline of his life. 



(^ OHN WYLIE FORBES. The family 
of which the gentleman whose name 
heads this biography is a worthy rep- 
resentative, have resided in Beaver county for 
more than a century and have contributed 
their share toward the building up and main- 
tenance of its present flourishing condition. 
Mr. Forbes is well known throughout this vi- 
cinity as a man of high business principles, a 
dutiful citizen, and enjoys the confidence and 
esteem of a host of acquaintances. He was 
born near Moravia, Lawrence county, then 
Beaver county, — the date of his birth being 



December 29, 1835, — and he is a son of David 
and Elizabeth (Wylie) Forbes. 

On the paternal side of Mr. Forbes' ances- 
tors, the family was of Scotch-Irish extraction, 
and William Forbes, his grandfather, was the 
first of the Forbes family to locate in this 
vicinity, which he did about 1798. He took 
up a large tract of land and pursued the voca- 
tion; of a farmer. The father of the subject of 
this sketch was born in 1798, and was but six 
months old wlsen his parents moved to this 
county. He at first carried on farming but 
later began dealing in grain, his field of oper- 
ation being along the old Erie canal. He died 
in February, 1861. In politics, he was a Dem- 
ocrat of the Jeffersonian type and took an 
active part in local aff'airs. He was a member 
of the United Presbyterian Church, of which 
he was also an elder. His union with Eliza- 
beth Wylie resulted in the birth of nine chil- 
dren: William, deceased; John W., Rebecca, 
Elizabeth, Benjamin, Nancy, Robert and 
Alice, all deceased ; and Amanda. On the ma- 
ternal side of the family, the ancestors of John 
Wylie Forbes were Scotch, and his grand- 
father was John Wylie. 

The subject of this narrative was elemen- 
tarily trained in the schools of his native dis- 
trict and further pursued h's studies at West- 
minster College, after which he spent a year 
and one-half teaching school in the state of 
Kentucky. Owing to his father's illness, he 
returned home and took charge of his busi- 
ness. His mother died in 1861. In 1870 he 
settled in Beaver Falls, where he worked at 
different vocations. He embarked in mercan- 




HON. IRA F. MANSFIELD. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



tile pursuits, and in 1888 sold out, and oper- 
ated a foundry. The latter enterprise he con- 
tinued until 1892, when the Standard Gauge 
Steel Company was organized and he was 
made vice-president of the plant, a position 
he occupies at the present time. Mr. Forbes 
is a director and treasurer of the Champion 
Saw and Gas Engine Company of Beaver 
Falls. In February, 1865, the subject of our 
sketch enlisted in the cause of the Union in 
Company G, 78th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf., and 
served throughout the remainder of that ter- 
rible struggle. 

Socially, Mr. Forbes is a prominent mem- 
ber of Post No. 164, G. A. R. 




ON. IRA F. MANSFIELD, an ex- 
tensive owner of coal mining interests 
about Cannelton, Pa., whose active 
furtherance of many well-known enterprises 
places him among the foremost of the prom- 
inent and progressive business men of Beaver 
county, resides in a handsome home in Bea- 
ver, at the corner of Elk and First streets. 
He is a son of Kirtland and Lois (Morse) 
Mansfield, and was born in Poland, Ohio, 
June 2"], 1842. 

He is descended from Revolutionary stock, 
being a great-grandson of Captain Jack 
Mansfield, who served through that war as a 
captain, and after its close lived in retirement, 
— having served sixty years in the Second, 
Fourth and Sixth Connecticut regiments. His 
son, Ira Mansfield, was the grandfather of the 
gentleman whose name appears at the head of 
this sketch. 



Kirtland Mansfield, the father of Ira F., was 
born in ^Vallingford, Conn., and early in life 
went to Poland, Ohio, where for many years 
he was engaged in mercantile pursuits. Later 
he removed to Philadelphia, Pa., where he 
lived the remainder of his life. He was joined 
in the bonds of wedlock with Lois Morse, a 
daughter of Elkanah Morse, an early settler 
of Poland, Ohio, where he built the first oil, 
woolen and grist mills. In 1849, he, moved to 
California, where he died. After the demise 
of her husband, Mrs. Mansfield returned to 
Poland, Ohio, with her son, where he was 
reared under the influence of a kind mother's 
love. 

Ira F. Mansfield received a good mental 
training in the common schools of his native 
place, and in Poland College, where he was 
a schoolmate of President William McKinley. 
At the early age of fifteen years he went to 
Pittsburg and learned the trade of a molder, 
but returned to Poland, and in August, 1862, 
enlisted in Company H, 105th Reg., Ohio 
Vol. Inf., — being the first to sign the roll. He 
was promoted to be orderly sergeant, then ist 
lieutenant, and for conspicuous bravery at the 
battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary 
Ridge he was breveted captain and was as- 
signed as a quartermaster of the Fourteenth 
Army Corps. He was with Sherman in his 
memorable March to the Sea and up through 
the Carolinas, and participated in the grand 
review at Washington, in May of 1865. He 
is a man of very methodical ways and of a 
very observing nature, and during his service 
kept a diary, and a record of his many inter- 



46 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



esting and exciting experiences. This he has 
written out, and, being an artist of superior 
talent, he has finely illustrated it with pen 
pictures, and also with many fine photo- 
graphs, taken in recent years, — all of which 
make a beautiful and valuable volume. In 
October, 1865, he leased of Mrs. Edwin 
Morse, the Cannel coal mines of Cannelton, 
Beaver county, Pa., and in 1870 bought them 
outright. He has since owned and operated 
them, and now owns 357 acres, through which 
veins run which are from ten to fifteen feet 
thick. The daily output varies from one hun- 
dred to two hundred and fifty tons, and the 
facilities for shipping are of the best, — the 
mines being located on a branch of the Penn- 
sylvania railroad. Mr. Mansfield also built a 
general store there and operated it for a num- 
ber of years, but it is now managed by C. W. 
Inman and known as the Cash Store. He 
also erected a fine opera house and furnished 
it in elegant style. The postofifice, which was 
established in the town in 1872, is located on 
the first floor of his building, and for many 
years he served in the capacity of postmaster. 
He bought and rebuilt the Morse homestead, 
and possesses a very fine farm, one hundred 
and eighty acres of which is devoted to fruit 
raising; he has 5,000 peach trees and a large 
number of pear, cherry and quince trees. He 
is also interested in the Gulf Company, the 
Bituminous Company, and the Captain A. 
Hicks Company, — coal operators. He is a 
man of wonderful energy and general business 
ability and his many ventures have resulted 
in great financial success. In 1887, ^^ moved 



to Beaver, purchasing the Hum and Singleton 
property at the corner of Elk and First streets, 
and there he has erected a very handsome 
modern brick home, which overlooks the 
beautiful valley and the Ohio River. 

Mr. Mansfield has traveled extensively 
throughout the United States and is well 
versed in the current events of the day. He has 
a fine collection of mounted speciments in bot- 
any, especially ferns and orchids — from Bea- 
ver county, — and all are illustrated on sep- 
arate pages, in natural colors, — this being the 
work of his mother. In politics, Mr. Mans- 
field is a stanch Republican, and was elected 
a member of the state legislature from Bea- 
ver county in 1880, 1893, 1895, and 1897, — 
serving his constituents faithfully and well. 
He was a school director of Cannelton and 
Eeaver, and takes an earnest interest in all 
matters of an educational nature. He is vice- 
president of Beaver College, and Beaver Musi- 
cal Institute, and is president of the board of 
trustee^ of Greers College of Darlington. He 
is vice-president of the First National Bank of 
Rochester, is a stockholder and director of 
three building and loan associations, and of 
several bridge and street railway companies; 
he is a director of the P., L. & W. R. R., of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, and of the Valley 
Electric Plant. 

The subject of this memoir was united in 
marriage with Lucy E. Mygatt, a daughter of 
Dr. E. Mygatt, who was born in Danbury, 
Conn., and was a practicing physician and sur- 
geon of Poland, Ohio, when Mr. Mansfield 
was married, in 1872. Three children have 



6EAVER COUNTY 



47 



blessed this union, as follows: Kirtland My- 
gatt, Mary Lois, and Henry Beauchamp. So- 
cially, he is a member, and commander of, 
Post No. 473, G. A. R. ; past master of the 
following lodges of the Masonic order, being 
a thirty-second degree Mason ; F. & A. M., 
R. A. M., and K. T. ; is past grand of the Odd 
Fellows Lodge; and past commander of the 
Knights of Pythias ; he served as aide-de-camp 
on Gen. H. H. Cummings' staff. In a relig- 
ious connection, he is a member and elder 
of the Presbyterian church, and has served as 
superintendent of the Sunday School. A por- 
trait of Mr. Mansfield is presented, in connec- 
tion with this sketch. 




^RS. MOLLIE F. RANDOLPH, 
who sprang from a very prominent 
family of Beaver county, is the 
widow of George F. Randolph, who, it will 
be remembered, was drowned in the disas- 
trous flood at Johnstown in 1889, whither he 
had gone upon a visit. He was one of the 
most highly respected men of Beaver Falls, 
and his sad death came as a severe shock not 
only to his family but to the citizens of the 
borough, among whom he had a large circle 
of friends. 

Mrs. Randolph was born in Allegheny, Pa., 
February 14, 1863, and is a daughter of Major 
F. and Sally K. (Smith) Scott. Major Scott, 
who during his life was probably one of the 
best known men of the country, was born near 
Uniontown, Fayette county. Pa., September 
21, 1832, and after receiving an education, he 



learned the trade of a saddler and harness 
maker. In 1856, he removed to Allegheny, 
Pa., and accepted a position as passenger 
conductor on the Fort Wayne R. R., where 
he remained for many years, thus becoming 
acquainted with nearly all the prominent busi- 
ness men of Western Pennsylvania. Discon- 
tinuing the railroad business, he bought the 
St. Charles Hotel in Pittsburg and conducted 
it for one year, but finally disposed of it and 
bought the Sourbeck Hotel in New Brighton. 
Later he retired from the hotel business, and 
engaged in the wholesale candy business in 
Beaver Falls, being very successful. When 
the Fort Wayne R. R. Company built their 
new depot in Beaver Falls, he was ofifered 
the position of passenger agent to take effect 
upon the completion of the building. This 
he accepted and was so arranging his busi- 
ness affairs that he might take charge, when 
he was taken sick and died, just one week 
prior to the opening of the new depot. Major 
Scott married Sally K. Smith, who was born 
in Uniontown, Pa., October 2^, 1832, and five 
children blessed their union, Mrs. Randolph 
being the only child now living. 

Mollie F. Scott was one year old when in 
1864, her parents moved to New Brighton, 
and five years old when they located at Bea- 
ver Falls, where she was gi\ en a good educa- 
tion. She has always taken an active interest 
in educational and church matters, and was a 
member of the church — the choir, and organ- 
ist, for nine years. She is an entertaining 
conversationalist and an accomplished musi- 
cian and singer, and has always been popular 



48 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



in social circles. She possesses exceptional 
business qualifications and very cleverly man- 
ages the property in which she and her 
mother live on Ninth street, and the brick res- 
idence adjoining, these being the estate left 
to her care by her father. On the maternal 
side of the family, she is descended in the 
fourth generation from General Douglas, 
who attained fame in the Revolutionary War. 
Her father was a Democrat in politics and 
served as school director. He was a member 
of the Methodist Protestant church, and fra- 
ternally belonged to the Franklin Lodge, F. 
& A. M. 

George F. Randolph, the deceased husband 
of the subject of this sketch, was born in 
Johnstown, Pa., and was a son of Richard 
Fitz and Emma A. (Boggs) Randolph. He 
was descended from Edward Randolph, cap- 
tain in the Revolutionary War, who was a 
farmer in the heart of Philadelphia. His 
land was situated on Fifth and Randolph 
streets, the latter street being given his name 
because it cut through his farm. He was a 
strict adherent to the Quaker faith. He 
reared thirteen children. 

George F. Randolph, a son of Edward, was 
born in Philadelphia and during his active 
business career operated a general store there, 
but in his latter days, lived in retirement. He 
was the father of Edward Randolph, the 
grandfather of our subject, who was a gradu- 
ate of Harvard University. For a time he de- 
voted himself to the practice of medicine, but 
at a later dgte read law and was a successful 
attorney. He was united in marriage with 



Frances McShane, a daughter of a prominent 
Philadelphia merchant and they reared three 
children : George Fitz ; Richard Fitz ; and 
Charles Fitz. 

Richard Fitz Randolph, the father of our 
subject's husband, was educated at a private 
academy in Chester county. Pa., but when 
seventeen years old, he went to Cambria 
county, to learn the steel trade with the Cam- 
bria Steel Company. He remained with 
them until 1884, when he moved to Beavei 
Falls and accepted a position in the steel and 
wire nail-miil, a part of the time being assist- 
ant manager. He subsequently accepted a 
position with the Beaver Falls Saw Company, 
with whom he continued for six years. He 
was united in marriage with Emma A. Boggs, 
a daughter of Senator Boggs of Hollidays- 
burg, Blair county, where she was born, 
and they reared five children, as follows : 
George F. ; Francis Fitz ; Harry Fitz ; Richard 
Fitz; and Charles Fitz. Mr. Randolph is a 
Republican, and in religious faith is an Epis- 
copalian. 

George F. Randolph, deceased, was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Johnstown, and 
also took a course of study in a private insti- 
tution. After completing his education, he 
went to work in the offices of the Cambria 
Iron Company and gave satisfaction to his 
employers. Resigning in 1883, he was of- 
fered and accepted a position in Beaver Falls, 
with the Carnegie Company, and was given 
entire charge of the nine-inch mill, including 
the rollers and men. In 1889, while still in 
thein employ, he paid a visit to his birth place, 



BEAVER COUNTY 



4d 



and it was while there that the calamity oc- 
curred which startled the whole world, in 
which he with hundreds of others lost their 
lives. He was a loving husband and a fond 
father, and it was indeed a sad bereavement 
to his devoted wife and their children. His 
union with Mollie F. Scott resulted in the 
birth of two children : Mary F., born Novem- 
ber 17, 1885; and Helen F., born December 
I, 1886. Politically, he v.as a supporter of 
the Republican party. In a religious con- 
nection he was an attendant of the Method- 
ist Protestant church. 



W3 



jOGER COPE is one of the persever- 
ing, enterprising and successful law- 
yers at the bar of Beaver county. 
He has, by virtue of his energy and ability, 
impressed himself upon the borough of Beaver 
Falls, and has achieved marked success for a 
young man. He was admitted to the bar in 
1 88 1 and took up his permanent residence in 
Beaver Falls, where he opened an office for 
the practice of law. He was born in Fairfield 
townsliip, Columbiana county, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 8, 1850, and is a son of Samuel D., grand- 
son of Jesse, great-grandson of John, great- 
great-grandson of John, who was a son of 
Oliver Cope, the first representative of the 
family in this country, he having emigrated 
from England. 

Jesse Cope was born in Fayette county. 
Pa., and in 1802 located in Columbiana 
county, Ohio, where he followed farming. 
He was a Quaker. His wife was Margaret 



Dixon, and they became the parents of eight 
children: Ellis; Samuel; Hiram; Elizabeth 
(Irwin) ; Mary (Taylor) ; Ann ; Hannah, and 
Lucinda. Jesse died aged fifty-six years. 
Samuel D. Cope was born in Fairfield town- 
ship, Columbiana county, Ohio, May 5, 181 5, 
and was reared and trained to agricultural 
pursuits, which he followed throughout his 
active career. In 1878, he retired to Leetonia, 
Ohio, where he has since resided. He was 
joined in marriage with Alice Rogers, a 
daughter of John and Phoebe Rogers of 
Columbiana county, and she passed from this 
earth in 1864 aged forty-eight years. Their 
children were named as follows: Rufus is 
practicing law in Chicago, 111. ; Mary Etta 
(Piersol), deceased ; E. Cyrena (Rogers) ; F. 
Eudora, who resides at Leetonia, Ohio; 
Roger; Emma A., deceased; Jeanette, de- 
ceased; Amanda F., who lives at Oakland, 
Cal. ; and Alice, who also resides at Leetonia, 
Ohio. Roger Cope's father was formerly a 
Republican, but is now a Prohibitionist; dur- 
ing the Civil War he was a strong anti-slavery 
man. 

Roger Cope attended the public school of 
his native town and Mt. Union College, Ohio; 
he then taught one year in his native county 
and one term at Georgetown, Illinois. Having 
a desire to fit himself for the bar, he began 
studying with his brother Rufus, who was 
practicing in that town ; subsequently he took 
a course of lectures at the University of Michi- 
gan, from which institution he was graduated 
in 1881. During his legal studies he applied 
himself with intelligence, vigor and energy, 



50 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and thoroughly familarized himself with the 
theory and practice of law, as his subsequent 
progress well testifies. Upon graduation, Mr. 
Cope immediately established himself in busi- 
ness at Beaver Falls, and he has many influ- 
ential and valuable clients, whose interests 
are looked after with fidelity and a great 
amount of success. 

Mr. Cope was wedded June 28, 1894, to 
Mary C. Mercer, a native of Columbiana 
county, Ohio, and they have one child, — 
Rue Alice. In politics, the subject of our 
sketch is a stanch Republican ; socially, he 
is a K. of P. 



§AMES H. WELCH, proprietor and 
general manr.ger of the Welch Fire 
Brick Company of Monaca, Pa., one of 
the oldest, best equipped and busiest of the 
manufacturing plants in Beaver county, is a 
man of great energy and enterprise. His 
career has been one of the greatest activity, 
having worked his v> ay from a lowly station in 
life to a position among the most prominent 
business men of this section of the state. 

In 1878, Mr. Welch started the Welch Fire 
Brick Company at Monaca, soon after the 
opening of the P. & L. E. R. R., and began 
the manufacture of the celebrated "W" 
fire brick, fire bricks of all kinds for mills, 
furnaces, locomotive tile, cupolas, and buff- 
building brick, — being the first in the vicinity 
to turn out that style of brick. He ships the 
product to every section of the country, and 
the buff brick used in Madison Square 



Garden in New York City, was procured from 
this establishment. He has also owned works 
at Vanport, Pa., and is a member of the firm 
of Welch, Gloninger & Maxwell of Welch, 
Pennsylvania. 

James H. Welch was born in Red Brook, 
Monmouth, Eng., in 1846, on the 7th of June, 
and received his intellectual training in the 
public schools of Monmouth, which he attend- 
ed until he reached the age of twelve years. 
He then went to work in a grocery store 
and continued until he was seventeen years 
old. Being an intelligent appearing youth of 
fine physique, he was appointed platform in- 
spector and ticket collector at Ross Station, 
and later joined the Cheltenham police force. 
This comprised his occupation until within 
two days before he left England, in 
1867, when he came to America set- 
tling in Pittsburg, Pa., where he se- 
cured a position as assistant yard- 
master on the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
roaS. He subsequently entered the employ 
of the PittsburgJ Gas Company and worked in 
the retort house for three months, when he 
was appointed weighm.aster. After a time, 
he resigned, bought a team of horses and en- 
gaged in.' contracting. He worked very hard, 
and his business was flourishing, v.'hen he sold 
out to Minesinger Brothers eighteen years 
later. In the meantime he had become inter- 
ested in the brick works at Vanport, and he 
continued there until he removed to Monaca 
and, in partnership with h:s brotlier, operated 
the Welch Fire Brick Company. His brother, 
however, disposed of, his interest and was sue- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



ceeded by Mr. J. H. Gloninger. He started 
with the old square kihis, but he has made 
improvements and added modern apphances 
until the concern outclasses all others in the 
locality. He was the first in the county to 
possess one of the celebrated English continu- 
ous kilns, having i6 chambers and a capacity 
of 500,000 bricks. It is a great saving and is 
distinguished from all others in that while one 
part is under full heat, the others can be 
cooled off, emptied and filled. In connection 
with the works are 135 acres of clay land, to 
v/hich an incline leads by way of a side entry. 
A new engine has just been put in to operate 
the incline, and the heavy grinding and crush- 
ing machines for manufacture. This firm 
makes a specialty in shapes, one contract call- 
ing for as many as forty different shapes. Be- 
sides the extensive grounds which they have 
under cover, there is a bui'.ding 175x90 feet, 
another three-story building 1 12x60 feet, with 
dry tunnels carrying 90,000 bricks in the dry 
room, and having a capacity of 25,000 per 
day. The office at the works is located near 
the railroad, and the general offices 
and salesroom are located at Pittsburg. Fifty 
men are in the employ of the com- 
pany, and when the capacity of the 
worksi is doubled as is contemplated, the force 
of workmen will be largely increased. Mr. 
Welch is also a member of the firm of Welch, 
Gloninger & Maxwell of Welch, Pa., the 
town, which is named after our subject, being 
supported by the works. 

He owns a fine residence in Monaca, which 
stands upon an elevation above the town and 



is called Welchmont. It is a very handsome 
b.ome, being constructed of buff brick after 
the owner's own plans, and it commands an 
excellent view of the surrounding country. 
Mr. Welch also owns a fine dairy farm of 354 
acres in Borie township, containing 40 head 
of good Jerseys and registered Holsteins, and 
sells milk in Beaver Falls. He raises consid- 
erable grain and hay, but it is all fed to the 
stock. Politically, Mr. Welch is a strong Re- 
publican, but has never had the time to de- 
vote much attention to pa' ty affairs. In reli- 
gious attachments he is a Baptist, and, 
socially, is a Royal Arch Mason. 



ENJAMIN FRANKLIN, the subject 
of this sketch, is a prominent educa- 
tor of Beaver county, Pa., and has 
grown gray in, the active service of that noble 
profession. He is a son of George and Jane 
(West) Franklin, and was born August 25, 
183 1, in Sherburne, Chenango county, New 
York. His mother died when he was very 
young, and the young lad was reared by a 
Connecticut family. The name of his foster- 
father was Orrin Harmon, who removed to 
Ohio when Benjamin was still very young. 
Mr. Harmon was a surveyor by trade and 
was in the employ of the Connecticut Land 
Company. Upon going west to Ohio, he 
settled at Ravenna, where the subject of our 
sketch obtained his primary education. This 
was supplemented by a three years' course at 
the academy at Ashtabula, Ohio, after which 
young Franklin completed the high school 



52 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



course at Ravenna, and then took a finishing 
course at Tappan Seminary, his foster-father 
having a scholarship in that institution. 

Mr. Frankhn then began his life work for 
which he had spent many years in diligent 
preparation. He taught school two years, and 
then went to Beaver county, Pa., in 1856. 
After locating permanently in Industry town- 
ship, where he purchased property, he has fol- 
lowed his chosen calling almost uninterrupt- 
edly ever since. After teaching in Industry 
township for four years, he taught one year 
in Ohio township. In i860, he was elected 
principal of the Fallston schools, where he re- 
mained four years by contract. At the close 
of that time, he was offered a larger salary 
at North Bridgewater and remained there four 
years. The people of Fallston then came for- 
ward and desiring his services, persuaded 
Mr. Franklin to return to Fallston by giving 
him a very substantial increase in salary over 
that received at North Bridgewater. So he 
returned to Fallston, and remained there for 
six years, but as it was his intention to be a 
candidate for county superintendent of Bea- 
ver County the following year, he did not ac- 
cept the Fallston school, but taught one term 
in Brighton township as involved a period of 
effort which would terminate before election 
time. 

In May, 1875, Mr. Franklin was elected 
county superintendent over M. L. Knight, the 
incumbent at that time. At the close of his 
first term of three years, he was elected again 
to the same position. After his second term 
had closed, Mr. Franklin did not teach for 



some time, but purchased a store in Fallston, 
and engaged in mercantile pursuits, with the 
assistance of his sons, for a period of five 
years. At the end of that time, Mr. Frank- 
lin accepted a school at Smith's Ferry, being 
offered special in lucemenls to take it and dis- 
cipline it. After spending one year there, he 
taught at Freedom for a year, at College Hill 
near Geneva College, for two years, at West 
Bridgewater for two years, in a graded school 
at Pulaski, in an independent school district 
for two years, and then returned to West 
Bridgewater for two terms. Subsequently he 
retired to his farm in Brighton township and 
superintended its affairs until 1898. In the 
autumn of that year he accepted the charge of 
the school which he is now teaching in 
Brighton township. For thirteen years, Mr. 
Franklin served on the board of examiners, 
and assisted in examining applicants for 
teacher's certificates. In 1876, he conducted 
the examination of the Phillipsburg Soldiers' 
Orphan's School for the state. He also made 
a creditable showing of school work at the 
Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia in 
1876, receiving the strong commendation of 
the authorities who passed upon the work. 
Mr. Franklin has assisted in examinations at 
the State Normal, at Edinboro, and also at 
Indiana State Normal Schools. Politically, 
our subject is a Republican and has always 
followed that party to victory or defeat. 

Mr. Franklin chose for his life partner, 
Martha Reed, a lady of rare intellectual at- 
tainments, who bore him two sons, Orrin H., 
a successful dentist, a sketch of whose life is 




SAMUEL M. KANE. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



55 



also found in this publication ; and Milo O., a 
machinist in the employ of the Union Drawn 
Steel Works. The subject of this narrative 
and his wife are devout worshippers in the 
Presbyterian church. Mr. Franklin has been 
elder and trustee of that denomination for fif- 
teen years. He is still serving in that official 
capacity, and for nine years was superintend- 
ent of tlie Sabbath School. 



§OHN C. BATES, a gentleman who has, 
for years, been one of the most enter- 
prising citizens of Rochester, Beaver 
county. Pa., has for a long period been iden- 
tified with the Rochester Tumbler Works. 
He is a son of William and Mary Jane 
(Thompson) Bates, and was born in Steuben- 
ville, Ohio, in 1848. 

William Bates, the father of John C, was 
also born at Steubenville, Ohio, and through- 
out his entire life was engaged as a brick con- 
tractor. He died in his native town at the 
age of sixty-five, years. His union with Mary 
Jane Thompson, who was born at West 
Brownsville, and is now living at the ad- 
vanced age of seventy-four years, resulted in 
the birth of three children: John C, whose 
name heads these lines ; William, and George. 

John C. Bates, the subject hereof, learned 
the trade of glass making when a boy, at Steu- 
benville, and from there he went to Wheeling, 
West Virginia, where he continued at that oc- 
cupation until he removed to Pittsburg. He 
plied his trade in the latter city until 1877, 
when he came to Rochester, which has since 



been his home. He assisted in the Rochester 
Tumbler Works, and still efficiently serves in 
that capacity. He is a man of excellent judg- 
ment, and has so conducted his affairs that 
he is rated among the prosperous citizens of 
the community. He bought a vacant lot on 
Penn street, known as the Lloyd property, 
and upon this he erected a handsome, modern 
house. In this he resided for years, but he 
now makes his home with his daughter, Mrs. 
S. M. Kane, whose residence is on the oppo- 
site side of the same street. 

John C. Bates was united in marriage with 
Ida Cotton, of Pittsburg, and four children 
blessed their home, namely: Virginia, the 
widow of Samuel M. Kane, a record of whose 
life follows this paragraph ; Bertha, deceased ; 
John Emmett, and Georgella. Mr. Bates is 
liberal in his religious views. Socially, he is 
a member of the Odd Fellows' Lodge and 
Encampment, and the A. O. of M. 

SAMUEL M. KANE, deceased, who was a 
man of sterling worth, and one of the influen- 
tial citizens of Beaver county, was an organizer 
of the Rochester Tumbler Works, and general 
manager thereof up to the time of his demise. 
He was born May i, 1839, in Steubenville, 
Ohio, and as his father died when he was a 
child, Samuel was thrown upon the world to 
battle for himself at an early age. Being of 
an energetic disposition, he grasped what op- 
portunities were his to obtain an education, 
at the same time finding employment at glass 
manufacturing. He was ambitious and in- 
dustrious, and progressed rapidly, acquiring 
great skill as a workman. Early in life he 



56 



fi'OOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



went to Pittsburg, as many of his associates 
did, and accepted a larger and more profit- 
able position. He availed himself of every 
opportunity for advancement, with foresight 
and sound judgment, and became one of the 
organizers of the company which built and 
operated the Rochester Tumbler plant, of 
Rochester, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Kane became its general manager, and under 
his skillful guidance, the business increased to 
a wonderful extent, and the works were soon 
shipping to every state in the Union, and to 
foreign markets. Today this concern is the 
largest establishment of its kind in the world 
— for which development much credit is due 
to Mr. Kane. He possessed a keen insight 
in business affairs, and identified himself with 
numerous enterprises which not only bene- 
fited him in a financial vvay, but were of mate- 
rial advantage to the borough and county. 
He was a director of the First National Bank 
of Rochester, president of the Rochester Im- 
provement Company, a stockholder and di- 
rector of the Rochester Electric, Light Plant, 
and a supporter of other business ventures. 
He erected an attractive home on Pennsyl- 
vania street in Rochester, overlooking the 
beautiful Ohio Valley, and being one of the 
finest in that locality. It is well arranged and 
chastely furnished, and its interior appoint- 
ments reflect much credit upon the refined 
taste of Mrs. Kane. 

On January 17, 1895, while crossing the 
railroad near the factory, Mr. Kane was run 
down by an engine and killed. It was the 
saddest accident that ever befell the borough 



of Rochester, and cast a heavy gloom over the 
entire community. Every citizen mourned 
as for a brother, and there was universal com- 
miseration. He had been a kind, loving hus- 
band, and a true and faithful friend. 

Fraternally, Samuel M. Kane was a thirty- 
second degree Mason ; a member of the 
Knights Templar and Scottish Rites lodges 
of Pittsburg; the R. A. M. of Rochester; a 
charter member and past grand master of the 
Lodge and Encampment, I. O. O. F. ; a 
Woodman of the World ; Royal Templar ; he 
belonged to the Junior Order of United Amer- 
ican Mechanics, of which he was an honorary 
member. He was also the organizer of the 
Order of Rebecca, at Rochester. Religiously, 
he was a devout member, and trustee, of the 
Baptist church. A portrait of Mr. Kane pre- 
cedes this sketch. 




TEPHEN MOLTHRUP, an organ- 
izer of the Standard Gauge Steel 
Works, one of the most prosperous 
and important of the industries of Bea- 
ver Falls, is efficiently serving as super- 
intendent of the plant. He was born in 
Loudonville, Ohio, December 10, 1863, 
and is a son of James C. and Rosanna (Rust) 
Molthrup, and grandson of William Molth- 
rup. 

William Molthrup was of Scotch-French 
descent and was born in Vermont, where he 
lived for some years, having acquired an edu- 
cation and a knowledge of the trade of shoe- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



57 



making there. He removed to Erie, Pa., 
where he followed his trade for some time, and 
then went to Ohio where he spent the balance 
of his life. He married a Scotch lady and 
they had two children : Amanda, who was 
single; and James C, the father of Stephen. 

James C. Molthrup was born in Vermont, 
April 4, 1822, and received his education in 
the public schools there and at Erie, Pa., 
where he was taken by his parents when very 
young. He learned the trade of a founder 
and machinist and worked for many years in 
the shops of the Pennsylvania R. R. at Al- 
liance and Crestline, Ohio, continuing in their 
employ until after the close of the War, when 
he went into business for himself at Loudon- 
ville. Remaining there until 1887, he moved 
to Beaver Falls and after following the busi- 
ness of a pattern maker for some little time, he 
went to live a retired life at the home of our 
subject until his death. He was married to 
Rosanna Rust, who was born in Onondaga 
county, N. Y., March 30, 1829, and was a 
daughter of Stephen Rust. The following 
children blessed this union : Amanda ; 
Stephen, who died in infancy; Helen (Bea- 
vers) ; Ida (Underwood) ; Mary (Chapel) ; 
Stephen, the subject hereof; James, who died 
young ; and William, whose trade is that of a 
machinist. Before the War Mr. Molthrup 
was a Democrat, but at that time joined the 
ranks of the Republican party, of which he 
was an unswerving supporter until his death. 
Religiously, he was a Methodist and was a 
trustee of the church. 

Stephen Molthrup received his educational 



training in the public schools of Loudonville 
and Perrysvillc, Ohio, after which he entered 
the shops of his father and learned the trade 
of a machinist. He moved to Beaver Falls 
in 1886, to accept a position in the shops of 
the Carnegie Steel Company, and for six years 
he continued in their employ, after which he 
was employed by the Union Drawn Steel 
Company. One year later he went to Pitts- 
burg, Pa., but after a short stay returned to 
Beaver Falls and re-entered the service of 
the Carnegie Steel Company. In company 
with nine others, he was active in the incor- 
poration of the Standard Gauge Steel Com- 
pany and became a charter member of the 
concern. He was chosen as one of the direc- 
tors and accepted a position as machinist. Be- 
ing a man of many years' experience and 
possessed of excellent business qualifications, 
he was the man above all others to superin- 
tend the work of this plant, and he was soon 
placed in charge. The firm has an estab- 
lished reputation for the excellency of its 
work, for which much credit is due Mr. 
Molthrup, and it ranks to-day among the 
leading business enterprises of Beaver Falls. 
The works covers an area of 300x100 feet, and 
they employ a large force of men. The offi- 
cers are as follows : A. Rasner, president ; and 
J. W. Forbes, vice-president; and the direc- 
tors are: Messrs. Stephen Molthrup, Ray- 
mer. Dinger, Gilland, Bevin, Forbes, Reed, 
and William Molthrup. 

Mr. Molthrup was joined in marriage with 
Ellen M. Miller, a daughter of Philip Miller, 
and they have a daughter, Helen. Politically, 



58 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Mr. Miller is a Republican. He is a member 
of the Methodist Church. Fraternally, he is 
a member of the Odd Fellows' Lodge. 




,RS. MARY ANN BALDWN is 
the esteemed widow of the late 
Marcus M. Baldwin, who was for 
several years one of the prominent business 
men of Beaver Falls. He was born in New 
York City in 1821, and was the son of Gabriel 
Baldwin, whose parents came to this country, 
from England. 

Marcus M. Baldwin received his education 
in New York City, and learned the trade of a 
ship carpenter. He moved to Pittsburg, and 
went to work at his trade on the river, re- 
maining there for some years, when he moved 
to Fallston, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 
There he took up the carpenter trade, work- 
ing as a journeyman for some time. In part- 
nership with another man, he accepted a con- 
tract, and after they had completed the work, 
found that there was a profit of forty dollars 
to each. With this small capital of $80, they 
decided to continue, and with hard work, 
good business ability, and untiring energy, 
they at last worked Jhemselves to the top, 
and were known as reliable business men. 
Their first office was on Sixth street, and the 
partnership beginning under such peculiar 
circumstances lasted until the death of Mr. 
Baldwin, which occurred in 1886. He was a 
man of splendid abilities and of sterling integ- 
rity, and was highly respected by all who 
knew him. He served in the Civil War, 



answering to the call for volunteers, and was 
a member of Battery B, Pittsburg Artillery. 
He was a firm Republican, and took an active 
interest in the party, serving as a member 
of the council, and as school director. He 
was one of the first business men in the 
county, and a member of the Presbyterian 
church. 

The subject hereof, Mary Ann Baldwin, is 
a daughter of Henry and Harriet Mortley. 
Henry Mortley was born in Kent, England, 
in 18 1 2, and learned the trade of a marble 
cutter, following this until his marriage, when 
he came to America, in 1834. He settled in 
New York City, and remained there for sev- 
eral years. He was a very good workman, 
having served seven years' apprenticeship in 
England, where he was always given a high 
grade of work. During his later life, he 
moved to Ohio and continued working for 
some time, when he met death in a very sad 
manner, accidentally drowning in the Hock- 
ing River. His wife, Harriet Mortley was 
born in Hastings, Sussex County, England, 
and came of a good English family. She was 
married when but nineteen years old, and 
although she lived to be eighty-one years of 
age, she never ceased to mourn her husband's 
untimely death. 

Mrs. Baldwin, the subject of this biography, 
was mentally trained in the public schools and 
later learned the trade of dress-making, an 
occupation which she followed until her mar- 
riage. She became the mother of eight chil- 
dren, as follows : Harriet (Pratt) ; Victoria 
(Pritchard) ; Bessie ; Caroline ; Charles, a con- 




HON. HARTFORD PERRY BROWN. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



tractor; Ralph Vernon, a contractor; Doro- 
thy; and Marcus R., a clerk. She is greatly 
loved by all and has hosts of warm friends. 
She is a member of the Episcopal church, and 
is ever willing to lend aid to any worthy 
cause. 




ON. HARTFORD PERRY 
BROWN, whose portrait is shown on 
• the opposite page, is one of the most 
prominent and enterprising citizens of the 
town of Rochester, and takes an unusual 
amount of interest in the growth and pros- 
perity of his adopted town. He is interested 
in many local enterprises, being president and 
general manager of the People's Electric 
Street Railway, secretary and general man- 
ager of the Beaver Valley Traction Company, 
and secretary and treasurer of the Rochester 
Heat & Light Company; he is also identi- 
fied with several other important undertak- 
ings. He was 5orn on a farm in Raccoon 
township, Beaver county. Pa., August 7, 
1851, and is a son of Oliver Hazard Perry 
Brown, and a grandson of Amasa Brown. 

The original emigrant of the Brown family 
was Peter Brown, who was of English origin, 
and who came to America on the Mayflower 
in 1620. His grandson, George Brown, was 
born in 1696, and was a farmer by occupa- 
tion ; he died in Colchester, Conn., February 
5, 1765. He married Elizabeth Wells, April 
12, 1730, and they reared the following chil- 
dren: Elizabeth, born in 1731; Darius, born 
in 1733; Charles, born in 1734; Lydia, born 



in 1736; Hannah, born in 1738; two who 
died in their infancy; Ezra, born in 1744; 
Jesse, born in 1746; Oliver, born in 1748; 
and Amasa, born in 1750. The next in Hne 
was Jesse Brown, who was born in Col- 
chester, Conn., February 2, 1746, but in early 
life went to Utica, N. Y., where he owned and 
operated a saw-mill; he was also a builder 
of boats. In 1770 he was first married to Abi- 
gail Parke, a native of Norwich, Conn., and 
to them were born nine children, namely: 
Bernice, born in 1772; Levi, born in 1773; 
Nathaniel, born in 1775; Amasa, the grand- 
father of Hartford Perry; Jeremiah, born in 
1780; one who died in infancy; Jesse, born 
in 1784; Parke, born in 1786, and George, 
born in 1792. His second union was with 
Mrs. Marion Drew, by whom he reared two 
children, Abigail, born in 1808, and John, 
born in 1812. Amasa Brown was also born 
in Colchester, Conn., the date of his birth 
being September 12, 1777. He worked with 
his father, learning the trade of a boat builder, 
in which he became a skilled mechanic. As 
an agent of Aaron Burr, he went to Beaver 
county, and, in 1806, was made master builder 
at Bridgewater. Large flatboats were built, 
which were used to convey produce down the 
Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Amasa Brown 
was killed, in 1829, while launching one of 
these boats. He wedded Eleanor Vankirk, 
and to them were born six children : Milton ; 
John; Hannah; Oliver H. P.; Mary; and 
Jesse. 

Oliver Hazard Perry Brown was born in 
Phillipsburg, Pa., now called Monaca, June 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



lo, 1820. He learned the boat building 
trade, which he followed for many years, and 
after accumulating wealth, he moved to Rac- 
coon township, Beaver county, where he be- 
gan the life of a farmer. This latter occupa- 
tion he continued for eighteen months, and 
then returned to boat building, settling at 
Freedom, Pennsylvania. He built three 
large boats; the first was named Commo- 
dore Perry, which was at that time the best 
boat on the river; the second was Parthenia; 
and the third was known as Hardtimes, 
which, singularly, earned more money than 
any boat which plied the river at that time. 
The latter vessel was used in conveying cot- 
ton from the valley of the Chattahoochee 
River to Apalachicola Bay. In 1865, he gave 
up boating, and, in 1866, he bought the prop- 
erty of J. Ranson, on the corner of Vermont 
and West Adams streets, Rochester, Pa. 
There he resided, until his death, 
on November 18, 1892. His wife 
was Mary McCombs, who was born July 9, 
1820, and whose death occurred June 20, 
1889. The following children were born to 
this happy union : Hartson Philmore, born in 
1840, and died in 1841 ; Amanda Eleanor, 
born in 1842, and married to Samuel R. 
Campbell, of Beaver Falls; Mary, born in 
1844, and died in 1846; Amasa, born in 1848, 
and died in 1849; Hartford Perry; and Par- 
thenia, born in 1856, and died in 1863. Cap- 
tain O. H. Perry Brown was one of the found- 
ers of the banking house of John Conway & 
Co., in 1871; he was a charter member of 
the Rochester Heat & Light Company, and 



one of its directors until his death. 

The subject of this memoir was born in 
Freedom, Pa., and received his early mental 
training in the schools of that town, and at 
Rochester Academy, and Beaver Seminary. 
He prepared himself for Yale College under 
the private instruction of Drs. C. C. Riggs 
and J. W. Scott — the latter having been pres- 
ident of Jefiferson College, Washington, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1872, Mr. Brown accepted a po- 
sition as bookkeeper in the Second National 
Bank at Pittsburg, and was subsequently pro- 
moted to be teller; resigning his position in 
the bank, however, he entered West Point 
Military Academy as a cadet from that dis- 
trict. He afterward became a partner in the 
general mercantile business of Hon. Samuel 
J. Cross — the firm name being known as S. 
J. Cross & Co. In 1878, Mr. Brown sold 
his interest therein to John Davis. Then, in 
company with James Rees and Simpson 
Homer, he built the steam boat called Car- 
rier, but in 1884, sold his interest in this boat, 
and embarked in mercantile pursuits alone. 
In 1886, he was elected to the legislature 
from this district, and consequently relin- 
quished his store. In 1888, he was re-elected 
to the legislature; in 1888, and while a mem- 
ber of the House, he introduced the Ship 
Canal bill, secured its passage and an appro- 
priation of $10,000, with a commission, which 
made a survey of the Lake Erie and Ohio 
River Ship Canal, in 1889. In May, 1887, 
he assisted in the organization of the Roch- 
ester Heat & Light Company, of which he 
was made secretary, and, later, treasurer. The 



BEAVER COUNTY 



63 



gas of this company is nearly all produced in 
Beaver county, and during the winter of 1898, 
a million cubic feet per day was used. Mr. 
Brown was one of the promoters of the Peo- 
ple's Electric Railway, which was opened to 
the public in August, 1892 ; the line is four 
miles in length, extending from the Rochester 
junction of the Traction Company to Free- 
dom and St. Clair, and running four cars 
daily. He was elected president of this en- 
terprise, and, July i, 1897, he was made man- 
ager. He is a stockholder in the Beaver 
Valley Traction Company Railway, and 
in 1892, was made secretary and general 
manager, a position which he resigned in 
1895, but was re-elected in 1899. He is also 
a stockholder in the Sharon Bridge Com- 
pany, the People's Insurance Company of 
Pittsburg, and was formerly a stockholder in 
the J. Conway banking house. 

Mr. Brown was joined in marriage to Miss 
Sue T. Cross, a daughter of Samuel J. and 
Frances E. (V/ells) Cross. Hon. S. J. Cross 
was born in Washington township, Rhode 
Island, January 6, 1828, and came to Beaver 
county in 1855. For twenty years he was 
the leading merchant of Rochester. He 
passed from this life September 27, 1875. 
His wife now resides with the subject of 
this sketch. Their children were named as 
follows : Sue Thurston, the wife of Hartford 
Perry Brown ; Julia Frances ; Samuel Joseph ; 
Emma Wells; George Herbert; Thomas 
Wells;- and May, who died in her infancy. Mr. 
and Mrs. Brown are the parents of six chil- 
dren: Hartford Perry, Jr., who was born 



February 5, 1875, and died in 1889; Frances 
Mary, born October 19, 1876; Emily Edna, 
born November 11, 1878; Sue Thurston, 
born October 27, 1880, and died in 1893; 
Julia Parthenia, born March 2y, 1887; and 
Stanley Quay, born February 17, 1889. Mr. 
Brown and family are members of the Bap- 
tist church. In 1880, Mr. Brown erected a 
handsome brick residence on West Adams 
street, which he makes his home. 



IT" 



ILLIAM G. ALGEO, Jr., master 
mechanic of the Union Drawn Steel 
Works, has won an enviable reputa- 
tion as master of his craft and is a highly es- 
teemed and respected citizen of Beaver Falls, 
Pa., being also well-known through Beaver 
county. He was born February 4, 1854, in 
Pittsburg, Pa., where he was also reared and 
schooled; his educational advantages, how- 
ever, were extremely limited, and he obtained 
only a slight knowledge of the common 
branches. At the age of fifteen years, he quit 
school to learn the trade of a machinist in 
Pittsburg. After completing his trade, he 
went to Rochester, Pa., where he learned the 
trade of a cabinet maker with his father, and 
remained in that line of business until 1878. 
Entering the service of the Western File 
Works of Beaver Falls he remained with them 
two years, as a journeyman. At the end of 
that time, Mr. Algeo was employed by the 
Love Sewing Machine Co., at Rochester, Pa., 
and was occupied in the manufacture of sew- 
ing machines for the next three years. He 



64 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



was subsequently engaged by the Standard 
Horse Shoe Nail Works at Fallston, then by 
the Great Western File Works, and then by 
the Hartman Steel Company, where he re- 
mained four years, three of which found him 
in charge of the machine department. Later, 
Mr. Algeo entered the service of the Union 
Drawn Steel Company, being the first man 
hired by the company. The plant, though 
small at first, has gradually been improved, 
and enlarged until it has become one of the 
largest and most substantial enterprises of the 
town. Mr. Algeo's position is that of master 
mechanic and there is hardly a detail in the 
whole range of the plant but what he can 
attend to with accuracy and skill. When 
work has passed his expert and trained hand 
and eye, it is sure to have been done right. 

Our subject is a stanch Republican, but has 
never sought nor held office. He was at one 
time a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
the Jr. O. U. A. M., the I. O. of H., and the 
Maccabees. Like his honored father, William 
G. Algeo, Sr., whose sketch also appears in 
this publication, he is a member of the Epis- 
copal church. Our subject was joined in 
marriage by the beautiful and impressive 
Episcopal service, with Nora Clayton, a lady 
of rare accomplishments. Two children, Ma- 
bel and Alice, blessed their home for a short 
time, but were taken away by the "grim 
reaper." 

Our subject is a prominent citizen, public- 
spirited, generous, and liberal, and has ever 
labored zealously to promote the welfare and 
prosperity of his town and county. In his busi- 



ness sphere, he is everywhere known as a man 
of indomitable spirit, extreme integrity, and 
correct method. The growing and valuable 
interests he directs show tlie impress of a 
master mind. They are of the utmost import- 
ance not only to the people of Beaver Falls, 
but to the manufacturing world as well. Mr. 
Algeo is recognized as a moving spiiit of the 
business and is accordingly esteemed and re- 
spected. 



§OHN MARTIN, a young man who has 
always been engaged in the manufac- 
ture of bricks, holds the important posi- 
tion of foreman of the Pennsylvania Clay 
Manufacturing Company, of Monaca, Pa., in 
which capacity he has efficiently served since 
1897. 

This is one of the six large plants con- 
trolled by Park Brothers, with general offices 
at Rochester, Pa., and it is one of their best. 
It is known as "No. 4," and is devoted to the 
manufacture of paving brick exclusively, the 
output being 25,000 finished bricks per day. 
This yard was established many years ago, but 
did not come into possession of the present 
firm until 1895. There are forty acres of clay 
of a superior quality, and the mine is a 12 ft. 
vein sunk through a 72 ft. shaft, the material 
being conveyed from the mines to the works 
on a train road. It is dumped into a set of 
rolls and crushed, then carried by an auto- 
matic elevator into a mill where it is ground 
and mixed for the brick machine. When it 
comes from the brick machine which has a 




UR. SAMUEL DIXON STURGEON. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



capacity of 35,coo per day, it is ready for the 
dry kilns, a double deck affair with a capacity 
of 100,000, and from there it is taken to the 
kiln. Of these they have ten of the round, 
down draught variety, each one of them hold- 
ing from 47,000 to 70,000 bricks. Facilities 
for shipping are of the be^t, being located on 
the P. & L. E. R. R. The firm have a Cokim- 
bia engine of 125 horse power, and ship all 
of the product to local, Western Pennsylvania 
and Eastern Ohio markets. Mr. Martin has 
complete charge of the operation of these 
works, and as he has been engaged in that line 
of work all his life, he conducts them in the 
most efficient manner. He has 35 men in his 
employ, with whom he is exceedingly popular 
and they, one and all, accord him the greatest 
respect. 

John Martin was born in Clarion county, 
Pa., July 29, i86g, and attended the public 
schools until he was thirteen years old, when 
he accepted a position in a brick yard. His 
first engagement was with the Climax Fire 
Clay Company, with which he remained for 
ten years, learning his trade in the most thor- 
ough manner. He then moved to Bea- 
ver county, and for five years faithfully 
performed similar duties in the employ 
of Barnes & Company. In 1897, he re- 
signed his position to accept that of 
foreman of the plant he now operates, 
one of the substantial concerns of 
Monaca. He has taken a deep interest in 
the progress of this little borough, and has 
made many friends since locating there. 

On July 4th, 1895, Mr. Martin was united 




in marriage with Lillie Mennall, a native of 
Beaver county, and a daughter of Richard 
Mennall, and they are the parents of two 
children: William, who was born in 1896; 
and Melvin, who wasi born in 1898. Mr. Mar- 
tin has dealt some in real estate, but has now 
discontinued that business; he bought his 
present residence in 1899. He is a member 
and steward of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Politically, he is a sturdy supporter 
of the Republican party. He is a member of 
the Woodmen of the World. 



R. SAMUEL DIXON STUR- 
GEON, a leading physician of New 
Galilee, Pa., whose portrait appears 
on the opposite page, has been located in that 
thriving little town since 1891. He enjoys 
quite an extensive practice, considering the 
short time he has been there, and is frequently 
obliged to take long drives in the country on 
professional duty. He is patronized by many 
well-to-do citizens, and owns a fine modern 
residence. Shortly after purchasing this 
home. Dr. Sturgeon built a large and con- 
venient barn to comfortably shelter his driv- 
ing horses. Dr. Sturgeon was born at No- 
blestown, Allegheny county. Pa., July 7, 185 1. 
He is a son of Henry P. and Miriam L. 
(Ewing) Sturgeon. When Samuel was five 
years old, his parents removed to Ashland 
county, Ohio, where he lived until he had 
attained the age of sixteen years. His acade- 
mic schooling was received at Greersburg 
Academy and Beaver College. He taught 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



school eight years in Beaver county, first at 
Oakdalc, one term, then at Brush Run, one 
term, South Beaver, one term, Brighton town- 
ship, three terms, Bridgewater, one term and 
at Darlington public school, one term. 

He then decided upon a professional 
career, and entered the Western Reserve Uni- 
versity of Cleveland, Ohio, where he pursued 
a course of medicine. He graduated from 
that institution with a degree of M. D., in the 
class of 1884. In May of the same year. Dr. 
Sturgeon opened an office as general prac- 
titioner at Darlington. His pleasant, courte- 
ous manner and agreeable ways soon made a 
favorable impression on the people, and 
brought him patients. He remained in Dar- 
lington for seven years and then sold out, 
locating next at New Galilee, where he still 
remains. 

Dr. Sturgeon married Fanny K. Tyler, an 
accomplished daughter of Moses W. Tyler. 
Mrs. Sturgeon was born in Brattleboro, Vt., 
and moved to Erie, Pa., with her parents, 
when quite young. It was there that she ob- 
tained her primary education. Her classical 
training was received in Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 

Besides his property in New Galilee, the 
Doctor has several outside investments. Po- 
litically, he affiliates with the Republican 
party, and has served a number of years as a 
member of the county executive committee. 
In addition to this, he has held all the town- 
ship offices. He takes a keen interest in local 
afifairs, — being on the school board and in the 
borough council. The church relations of Dr. 



and Mrs. Sturgeon are with the Presbyterian 
denomination, of which church the Doctor 
has been a trustee for many years. Socially, 
our subject is a valued member and past mas- 
ter of Meridian Lodge, No. 411, F. 81 A. M. 




OBERT S. IMBRIE, real estate dealer 



and insurance agent of Beaver, Penn- 
sylvania, is a gentleman whose, life 
has been spent wholly in Beaver county, Pa., 
with the exception of three years passed in 
Franklin county, in the same state, and, al- 
though he appears to be a man of middle age, 
is to-day in his seventy-first year. He ob- 
tained his elementary education in the public 
schools of his native place, taking a finishing 
course at Beaver Academy, and afterwards 
following the profession of teaching for a pe- 
riod of five years. He next engaged in mer- 
cantile pursuits by conducting a branch store 
with his brother at Mercersburg, Franklin 
county. Pa., for about two and one-half years. 
Later he went into the same business alone, 
keeping a general store at Loudon, Franklin 
county, until 1861, when he sold out and 
started a new store at Darlington, Beaver 
county. Upon the death of his father, in 1864, 
he again sold out his business and went upon 
the homestead farm, which he conducted and 
managed for his mother until it was sold a 
year later. Mr. Imbrie then accepted a posi- 
tion with the Wheeler & Wilson Sewing Ma- 
chine Co., at Beaver, and continued as their 
general agent for a period of nine years, being 
very successful at that business, and selling 



BEAVER COUNTY 



hundreds, of sewing machines. He subse- 
quently severed his connection with that firm 
and dealt for some time in agricultural imple- 
ments, that he might have occupation at home 
where he could share domestic pleasures and 
companionships. But the machine compa- 
nies sought his services again, and he was 
finally induced to enter that sphere once more, 
engaging Vvith the White Sewing Machine 
Co. for one year, and with the American for 
three years. 

Our subject then abandoned that business 
entirely, and turned his attention to fire insur- 
ance, associating with the firm of Hurst & 
Imbrie. Later, at the death of Mr. Hurst, fire 
insurance v\-as dropped and life insurance was 
taken up in its stead. Since then Mr. Imbrie 
has been connected with the "Mutual Life, of 
New York," the "Manhattan" and the "Equit- 
able." The latter is the one in which he is 
now mainly interested. Some years ago, our 
subject built a residence on Third street, 
which is now owned by Mr. Shoemaker, but 
later, purchased his present residence on 
North Park street. This is a large, handsome 
structure of brick, built by his brother De- 
lorme, in 1859; it is a beautiful place, and is 
finely located, making an ideal homestead. 

In 1859, Nancy E. Scott, a favorite daugh- 
ter of William Scott, a highly respected resi- 
dent of New Brighton, Beaver county, be- 
came the wife of Mr. Imbrie, and is said to be 
a very attractive and entertaining lady. To 
them were born the following children : Mary, 
who died in her fourth year; J. Maurice, a 
molder, deceased at the age of thirty years. 



who wedded Ella Morgan and had three chil- 
dren, Martha, Robert, and Paul; Nannie S., 
wife of Joseph Irons, of Beaver Falls, who 
has two children, Lorain and Helen ; Nettie, 
a stenographer, of Pittsburg; Mabel, a music 
teacher, of Pittsburg; Grace, who is still at 
home, and is a fine musician ; and Jessie, also a 
stenographer, of Pittsburg. 

In his political views our subject has ever 
been a Republican, and although he has never 
sought office or political distinction, he has 
served as school director and as member of the 
borough covmcil. In business he is careful, 
shrewd, and trustv.-orthy. Enjoying the pat- 
ronage of the best class of people, his work is 
executed with facility and dispatch. As a 
neighbor, he is kind and obliging, and his 
enterprising spirit has been felt in all move- 
ments to advance the welfare of his commu- 
nity. In his religious convictions, Mr. Imbrie 
is a devout Christian and a member of the 
United Presbyterian church ; he has served 
many years as elder and as superintendent of 
Sunday School. 

Robert S. Imbrie was born in Big Beaver 
township, Beaver county. Pa., August 12, 
1829. He is a son of John and Nancy (Ran- 
kin) Imbrie, and grandson of David and Mary 
Imbrie. David Imbrie was a native of Scot- 
land, and while still a single man came to the 
United States. He was a tanner by trade. 
He became the owner of a tannery in West- 
moreland county. Pa., and conducted it for 
many years. Late in life he retired from that 
business and spent his closing years upon a 
farm previously purchased by him. Both he 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and his good wife Mary lived to a good old 
age. Their children were : David ; Robert ; 
James; John, father of Robert S. ; George; 
Mrs. Catherine Slone; Mrs. Mary Fleck; and 
Mrs. Jane Maloney. 

John Imbrie was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pa., where he early learned the trade 
of a tanner in his father's tannery. Some 
years after arriving at manhood, he removed 
to Big Beaver township, Beaver county. Pa., 
and purchased a farm of io6 acres, heavily 
timbered. Erecting a tannery upon his land, 
he carried on that business for several years, 
but later turned his attention to farming. He 
bought 50 acres quite near his former pur- 
chase, and upon it passed the remainder of 
his life. This farm was commonly known as 
the Economite farm, and upon it his death 
occurred at the age of seventy-three years. 
He was joined in wedlock with Nancy Ran- 
kin, daughter of James Rankin. She survived 
her husband until she readied her eighty- 
eighth year. 

John Imbrie rendered eminent services 
to our country during the War of 1812, being 
stationed at Fort Erie. He was looked upon 
as an influential citizen, and above all a man 
who could be trusted, and enjoyed the love 
and esteem of all who knew him. Possessed 
of good judgment, and richly endowed with 
perseverance, he carried through to a success- 
ful termination his every undertaking. He 
served as justice of the peace, and as county 
commissioner, many years. He was a Se- 
ceder, and later, a United Presbyterian. He 
and his much beloved wife reared the follow- 



ing family (all of whom are now deceased 
except Robert S. Imbrie and his brother 
John) : Addison ; Delorme ; Mary, wife of J. 
P. Martin, whose life history is found else- 
where in this volume; Nancy, wife of James 
L. Ansley; Robert S., subject of this biogra- 
phy ; Minerva, who died at the age of eighteen 
years; John, still single; Jeremiah R. ; and 
David. The last two served in the Civil War 
in the loth Reg. Pa. Reserves, and both died 
from the effects of the exposure and hard- 
ships of campaigning. 

The subject of our sketch is a gentleman 
who is intelligent, courteous, and refined, — 
just the kind of a man to make a lasting im- 
pression for good on all societies, who are 
so fortunate as to number him among their 
members. 



§OHN F. FERGUSON has been a 
prominent citizen of the borough of 
Beaver Falls for the past ten years and 
is the proprietor of one of its leading livery 
stables. He has been engaged in various en- 
terprises in this locality, all of which have 
proved successful, and he is a popular and 
well-to-do citizen. He was born in this 
county, December 8, 1850, and is a son of 
John and Janiza (Elliott) Ferguson. 

John F. Ferguson's great-grandfather was 
a life-long resident of his native country, Ire- 
land. John Ferguson, the grandfather of John 
F., was also a native of Ireland, and was a 
tallow-candle maker by trade ; he was the sole 
member of the family who came to this coun- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



71 



try. He settled in Beaver county, where he 
spent his remaining days in carrying on agri- 
cultural pursuits. He built a house, which 
still stands on the premises. He was the 
father of a son and four daughters, — John, 
Mary, Maria, Ann, and Sarah, all of whom 
are deceased with the exception of Mary. 

John Ferguson was born on the homestead 
March 31, 18 14, and resided there all his life, 
pursuing the vocation of a farmer. As a re- 
sult of his marriage with Janiza Elliott, a fam- 
ily of two sons and three daughters was 
reared, as follows: Agnes, who is the wife 
of Henry Sloan oL New Brighton, Pa. ; John 
F. ; Sarah Jane, who is the wife of Elisha Bax- 
ter of Beaver Falls; Mary E., who was united 
in marriage with Abram Berry and resides in 
New Brighton; and Thomas B., who has 
charge of the old homestead. 

John F. Ferguson possesses a common 
school education and spent his boyhood days 
assisting his father at home ; he continued to 
remain on the home farm until thirty-five 
years of age, when he decided to go into busi- 
ness on his own account; he began contract- 
ing and teaming in Beaver Falls and New 
Brighton, and followed that occupation until 
1888. In that year he opened a livery busi- 
ness in Beaver Falls, and has successfully 
conducted it up to the present time. He has 
established a fine trade and is well worthy 
of the large patronage he receives. For many 
years he was engaged in the ice business, but 
sold out in 1893. He is an enterprising and 
progressive citizen, and possesses the esteem 
and good-will of his many acquaintances. 



Mr. Ferguson formed a matrimonial alli- 
ance with Miss Jeannetta L. Anderson, a 
daughter of Frank Anderson, of Beaver Falls, 
the nuptials occurring August 31, 1896. In 
religious belief he favors the Methodist de- 
nomination. In politics, he is a RepubHcan. 



R. WILLIAM S. COOK is a young 
dentist who has built up a large 
practice in the short time he has re- 
sided in Beaver Falls, and is likely to become 
one of the most prominent and successful den- 
tists of his time. Dr. Cook was born in Dar- 
lington, Beaver county, May 31, 1868, and 
was educated at Greersburg Academy, an in- 
stitution of learning established in Darling- 
ton, in 1802. Immediately after his gradua- 
tion therefrom, June 11, 1886, young Cook 
entered upon the noble profession of teaching, 
following that calling for a period of three 
years in his native county. At the close of 
that time, he began the study of dentistry, 
and in 1889 entered the Philadelphia Dental 
College, from which he graduated February 
26, 1891. Immediately after his graduation, 
Dr. Cook located in Beaver Falls, where he 
established an office and engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession. He has been located 
since October ist, 1898, at the corner of Sixth 
avenue and Twelfth street, where his many 
patrons seek him both early and late. 

Dr. Cook is a member of the Odontological 
Society of Western Pennsylvania and Eastern 
Ohio. The doctor has a rare literary talent 
which, coupled with a thorough knowledge of 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



his profession, has given him a chance to dis- 
tinguish himself. He has read papers, pre- 
pared in an intelligent and able manner, be- 
fore the above mentioned society. Among 
his most noted papers are "The Cleft Palate," 
"The Repair of the Cleft Palate by Means of 
the Obturator." He has also written and read 
other papers of less importance than those 
above noted. Dr. Cook is an enthusiastic 
Republican, and never fails to do his duty 
toward that party when election day arrives. 
He has served as a member of the council 
from the third ward of Beaver Falls and, fra- 
ternally, is a member of the Woodmen of the 
World. 

Miss Jane E. Anderson became the 
Doctor's bride on December 27, 1893. 
Although he and his accomplished wife 
have no family of their own, they greatly 
dehght in and admire the little "fairies of 
light." They are both willing members and 
workers of the United Presbyterian Church 
and are known throughout the community as 
kind hearted, charitable people. Dr. Cook is 
a son of Thomas and Margaret (Dufif) Cook, 
and grandson of James Cook. 

James Cook was a native of Ireland and 
was of Scotch-Irish descent. He came to 
America when young and shortly afterward 
located in Darlington, Beaver county, Pa., 
where he purchased a farm and engaged in 
clearing it for the purpose of utilizing the rich 
soil. He lived upon that farm the remainder 
of his life, engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
Upon this old homestead near Darlington, 
Thomas Cook, t!ie father of William S., was 



born, January 16, 1845, and was reared and 
educated in the same locality, remaining there 
until 1861, at the breaking out of the Civil 
War. He enlisted in the Union Army as a 
member of Company D, looth Reg. Pa. Vol., 
known as "The Round Head" regiment. Mr. 
Cook served with that regiment until his dis- 
charge, the latter part of November, 1862. 
The most important battles in which he par- 
ticipated were, James' Island, Hilton Head, 
S. C, and Chantilly, Va., in which last en- 
gagement he was wounded, and was taken to 
a hospital at Point Lookout, Md., where he 
was confined from the first of September until 
he received his discharge in November. 

Returning from the war, he learned the 
blacksmith's trade, completing his apprentice- 
ship in 1865. He then began working as a 
blacksmith in Darlington, where he also en- 
gaged in the manufacture of carriages and 
wagons in connection with his trade. He re- 
mained in Darlington until 1889, when he 
went to Beaver Fails, and has since followed 
the same line of business. In his political 
views, Mr. Cook is a Republican, and has al- 
ways taken an active interest in the success of 
that party, although he has never sought po- 
litical distinction. He is a member of Beaver 
Falls Lodge, F. & A. M., also of Harmony 
Chapter, No. 206, R. A. M., at Beaver Falls, 
and is a past colonel of the Union Veteran 
Legion, No. 4, of Beaver Falls. He is also a 
member of the L. A. W. and a charter mem- 
ber of Beaver Valley Cycling League No. 88, 
which was organized in the early part of 1893, 
with fourteen members and, at the present 



BEAVER COUNTY 



73 



writing, has a membership of one hundred 
and twenty-six, and occupies the entire sec- 
ond story of the Martsolf building, on 
Seventh avenue. He has been one of the 
board of directors since its organization, and 
is now serving as its president; he has been 
twice a delegate. 

Dr. Cook is known to be a conscientious 
and honorable man ; by his pleasant manner 
and courteous bearing, he at once gained the 
good will of the citizens of Beaver Falls, while 
his close application to his profession and the 
painstaking care he exercises in the cases that 
have fallen to liis share, have won him the 
confidence of the entire community. The 
marvelous rapidity with which he has built 
up his present practice is almost incredible to 
one unacquainted with the doctor's push and 
energy. 



§OHN B. WILSON. Among the enter- 
prising and reliable business men of 
Beaver, Pa., is the gentleman whose 
name appears at the opening of this biogra- 
phy, who is the senior member of the well 
known firm of J. B. Wilson & Son, the largest 
hardware merchants in the community. Mr. 
Wilson also deals largely in real estate, own- 
ing several houses and lots out in the east 
end of Third avenue, which is now considered 
the most beautiful residence portion of 
Beaver. His ancestors were of Scotch-Irish 
descent, and his grandfather was pioneer of 
tiie family in this country. Industry town- 
ship, Beaver county. Pa., is the birthplace of 



our subject, his birth occurring on February 
2, 1839. He is a son of Thomas and Jane 
(Burnsides) Wilson. 

George Wilson, grandfather of John B., 
v^as a native of the northern part of Ireland 
and was of Scotch ancestry; in 1819, he came 
to this country with his family of five children, 
and took up a tract of fifty acres in Industry 
township. He sold this property, which is 
now the James Jackson farm, and then bought 
two hundred and forty acres of timber land. 
He erected a log house and had resided upon 
his newly purchased land but a short time 
\^ hen death claimed him ; he was then 
about sixty years of age. He was 
married to Elizabeth Lindsey, also a 
native of Ireland, and their children 
were as follows: Thomas; James, set- 
tled in Hannibal, Mo. ; George, deceased ; 
Margaret, wife of William Sutherland of Han- 
nibal, Mo. ; and Catherine, who was wedded to 
William Humphrey. George Wilson and his 
wife were buried in the old Beaver cemetery. 

Thom.as Wilson was born in Ireland in 
1808, but was reared to manhood on his 
father's farm in Beaver county, and upon his 
father's death he took charge of the home- 
stead ; after attaining an advanced age, his 
son, George Wilson, took charge of the farm, 
and is still in possession of it. He was wedded 
to Jane Burnsides, also a native of Ireland, 
and a daughter of John Burnsides, who came 
to this country and located in Dresden, Ohio, 
where he carried on farming. Mr. Wilson 
died when eighty-three years old, while his 
wife departed this life in 1872, aged fifty-five 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



years. They reared the following four chil- 
dren : George, who has the homestead ; John 
B. ; Margaret, the wife of C. A. Bowers of 
Beaver; and Eliza. Religiously, the family 
were Presbyterians; politically, Mr. Wilson 
was a Republican. 

John B. Wilson was reared on the old 
homestead and received his mental training 
in the public schools of that district; after 
teaching school two years, he went to Beaver 
to learn the plasterers' trade ; he then en- 
gaged in contracting for about eight years, 
after which he located in Youngstown, Ohio, 
where he embarked in the grocery business 
for a period of ten years ; on disposing of this 
he returned to Beaver and began the sale of 
agricultural implements; this was in 1875. 
The continual increase of his patronage made 
it necessary to seek large accommodations, 
and accordingly, in 1883, 'le bought the old 
Clark Hotel property, which is located on 
Third street. He turned the old building 
around and rebuilt it, putting on an additional 
story, and also building barns and a large 
warehouse. He stocked the concern with a 
complete line of hardware goods, and the bus- 
iness progressed satisfactorily until March 2, 
1888, when the entire building was destroyed 
by fire. Mr. Wilson immediately built a 
brick building 30 by 100 feet, and also erected 
a warehouse. The other half of the lot he sold 
to Mr. Anderson. An extensive stock of 
hardware goods and implements was then put 
into the new structure and Mr. Wilson con- 
ducted the largest and best equipped store of 
its kind in the county. In 1897, the subject 



of our sketch took in his son as a partner, and 
the firm name was afterwards known as J. E. 
Wilson & Son ; the capital stock of the firm 
has been increased to $10,000. Mr. Wilson 
purchased a square on Third and Wilson ave- 
nues, and on the corner lot erected a hand- 
some brick residence; he has also built a 
double-house adjoining his home, and has 
sold many lots in the block. He is a progres- 
sive and loyal citizen; intelligent and well- 
read; and he has a host of acquaintances in 
the vicinity. 

Mr. Wilson and Matilda Eakin, a daugh- 
ter of J. R. Eakin, were united in 
marriage, and they are parents of three 
children: Mary E. ; Genevieve C.; and 
Royal Q. ; the latter is connected with 
his father in the hardware business, and 
is one of the most promising young business 
men in Beaver; like his father, he has won the 
esteem and confidence of all. Mr. Wilson and 
family are all members of the Presbyterian 
church, the former having been a trustee of 
the church for the past twenty years; politi- 
cally, he is a Republican. 




ILLIAM G. HARKER. One of 
ji^^ the prominent and successful indus- 
tries of Beaver Falls, Pa., is that of 
Knott, Harker & Company, — manufacturers 
of fire-grates, hardware novelties and castings 
of all kinds ; the gentleman whose name ap- 
pears at the opening of this biography is the 
superintendent of the above enterprise and 
much of the success of the plant is due to his 



\ 




EDWARD JAMES ALLISON. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



77 



good judgment and untiring efforts. He was 

born on the Conoquenessing Creek, Beaver 
county, April 15, 185 1, and is a son of Wil- 
liam and Mary Ann (Peatling) Harker. 

\^'i liam G. Marker's parents were both 
born in Lancastershire, England, and shortly 
after their marriage they came to the United 
States, in 1846, and located on a farm in 
Beaver county; until 1854 he was engaged in 
farming, but in that year he settled in New 
Brigh.ton, and worked in a saw-mill. He after- 
wards entered the employ of W. P. Townsend 
& Co., remaining in their employ until death 
claimed him. He was a Republican in poli- 
tics; religiously, he was an active and con- 
sistent member of the Methodist Protestant 
church. He was married in his native coun- 
try and became the father of the following 
children : Mary Ann, the wife of J. W. Gra- 
ham of New Brighton; Charlotte, the de- 
ceased wife of W. H. Elverson of the New 
Brighton Pottery Works; William G. ; Lizzie, 
wedded to J. H. Rice, a farmer in Michigan; 
Charles E., a machinist residing in New 
Brighton; Carrie, wedded to Sheldon Roat, 
a farmer living in Michigan; and Albert P., 
a machinist, of New Brighton. 

William G. Harker attended the common 
schools of New Brighton and at an early age 
served an apprenticeship to the molders' 
trade; he then accepted the superintendency 
of the Beaver Falls Car Works Foundry, in 
which capacity he continued to serve for a 
period of eight years. Upon the organiza- 
tion of the Knott, Harker & Company enter- 
prise, the subject of our sketch was made 



superintendent, — a position he has faithfully 
filled up to the present time. The company 
is engaged in the manufacture of fireplace- 
grates, hardware novelties, and all kinds of 
castings; it a'so operates a machine shop and 
gives employment to some 60 skilled hands. 
Mr. Harker is an expert mechanic and is 
greatly respected by the employees under his 
charge; he is an intelligent and loyal citizen, 
commanding the good-will of all who know 
him. 

Politically, Mr. Harker is a RepubHcan, 
although in local matters, he always supports 
the one whom he considers best qualified for 
the position. He is a member and trustee of 
the Methodist Protestant church of New 
Brighton ; socially, he is a member of the K. 
of P., and a director of the Y. M. C. A. of 
New Brighton. On October 26, 1875, Mr. 
Harker was joined in matrimonial bonds with 
Miss Irene Wilson, a daughter of Joseph Wil- 
son of New Brighton, and they are the par- 
ents of the following children : Joseph, de- 
ceased; Ernest Ira, deceased; Clyde; and 
Elsie. 



CDWARD JAMES ALLISON, 
whose portrait is shown on the pre- 
' ceding page, is cashier of the First 
National Bank of Beaver, Beaver county. Pa., 
and is one of the most enterprising and highly 
esteemed citizens of the county He has dis- 
tinguished himself in business circles as a 
shrewd, practical and conservative man, 
whose judgment has not failed him in critical 
moments. His record has been honorable, 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and his integrity is unquestioned. He has 
ever been quick to see the main chance in 
business, and has accumulated a handsome 
competency by the most open methods. Mr. 
AlHson, who is a descendant of one of Beaver 
county's most noted men, was born at Bridge- 
water, in February, 1852, and is a son of 
Thomas and Emily (Logan) Alhson, and 
grandson of Hon. James Allison. 

Hon. James Allison, attorney-at-law, of 
Beaver, was born in Virginia or Maryland, 
where his father, James Allison Sr., owned a 
very large plantation and numerous slaves. 
Hon. James Allison chose the profession of a 
lawyer, and was educated at a law school at 
Washington, D. C. About 1794, he located 
in Beaver, Pa., and engaged in the practice of 
his profession. As there were few lawyers there 
at that early date, he had more business at 
times than he could attend to ; he was con- 
sidered one of the ablest lawyers of his day, 
making a specialty of clearing up land titles. 
After he succeeded in establishing a large 
and well-paying practice, he was twice elected 
to Congress, but resigned during his second 
term, to resume his practice, which was far 
more remunerative. He accumulated a hand- 
some competency, and was esteemed by all 
who knew him. He lived to the good old 
age of eighty-three years, and his companion 
departed from his side in her sixty-seventh 
year. His wife, who was a Miss Bradford, 
bore her husband the following children: 
John; Samuel; William; James; Thomas; 
Sarah ; Margaret ; Juliette ; and two who died 
in early childhood. , 



Thomas Allison, the father of Edward 
James, was a pupil in Beaver Academy, and 
early in life began a mercantile career at 
Bridgewater, conducting a store for a period 
of twenty-two years, at the same stand now 
occupied by R. S. Ranger. Mr. Allison sub- 
sequently removed his business to Beaver, 
where he was similarly engaged for fourteen 
years, on the corner of Third street and Col- 
lege avenue. In 1892, Mr. Allison retired 
from business pursuits, and one year later his 
death occurred, at the age of seventy-six 
years. He was united in marriage with Emily 
Logan, a daughter of Joshua and Sabina 
(Swift) Logan, respected citizens of Beaver 
county. The maternal grandmother of Mr. 
Allison, Sabina Swift, was a granddaughter of 
Lucy Eliot, a lineal descendant of Rev. John 
Eliot, "the apostle to the Indians." In 1646, 
the legislature of Massachusetts passed an 
act for the propagation of the gospel among 
the Indians, and in the same year John Eliot 
began his labors at Nonantum, of forming 
churches and translating the Bible and other 
Christian books. The beloved mother of the 
subject of this record is still living, and re- 
sides at Beaver. 

Edward James Allison was the only child 
of his parents, and received his finishing edu- 
cation at Beaver Academy. He began his 
career by working in his father's store, where 
he continued until he was appointed teller of 
the First National Bank of Rochester, Penn- 
sylvania. This position he occupied for five 
years, resigning to become cashier of the First 
National Bank of Beaver, Pa., his present 



BEAVER COUNTY 



responsible position. 

The First National Bank was established 
March 31, 1888, with a capital of $50,000, 
Edward B. Dauglierty being president, Hon. 
John M. Buchanan, vice-president, and Ed- 
ward J. Allison, cashier. At the death of E. 
B. Daugherty, in 1897, Hon. J. M. Buchanan 
became president, and Dr. J. H. Wilson, vice- 
president. The bank is located in the Ander- 
son block, and is one of the handsomest and 
best ordered business places in Beaver Valley. 
The building is centrally located, and its 
rooms are well lighted by one of the finest 
plate glass fronts in the county. Its interior 
is newly decorated, and its construction and 
arrangement are thoroughly adapted for the 
purpose for which it was intended. It con- 
tains a beautiful ofifice, finely decorated, and 
private offices for the president and directors. 
It is heated throughout with steam, and con- 
tains one of the best vaults of modern date, 
with time-lock, etc. The bank is considered 
not only proof against fire and burglars, but 
is conducted on safe lines. In evidence of 
the careful and conservative management of 
its business, is the fact that within the ten 
years since it was chartered, it has placed to 
the credit of the surplus account the sum of 
$50,000, or an amount equal to its capital, 
and has paid dividends at the rate of six per 
cent., since April i, 1888. The average de- 
posits are $225,000; the average loans are 
$265,000. This bank has recently placed in 
its building one of the largest and best con- 
structed safety vaults, with deposit boxes, in 
Western Pennsylvania. It is not necessary 



to say that the First National Bank embraces 
in its management and directorship some of 
the best and most substantial citizens of 
Beaver Valley, that it is considered one of the 
finest banking houses in Western Pennsyl- 
vania. Its present officials are: John M. Bu- 
chanan, president; Jefferson H. Wilson, vice- 
president; Edward J. Allison, cashier, and 
Robert F. Patterson, teller. Its board of di- 
rectors are : John M. Buchanan, Jefferson H. 
Wilson, Alfred S. Moore, David A. Nelson, 
Alfred C. Hurst, Samuel Moody, John I. Mar- 
tin, John T. Taylor, and Joseph L. Holmes. 

Edward James Allison, whose name heads 
this biography, was united in marriage with 
Margaret McGaughey, a daughter of the late 
Rev. Alexander McGaughey, who during life 
was a much beloved pastor of Salem, Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Allison have a hand- 
some modern residence on Beaver street, 
built in 1889. This home is rendered much 
happier by the presence of two little sons and 
one daughter, whose names are as follows : 
Dwight M., born in February, 1891 ; Marga- 
ret M., born September 12, 1895; and James, 
born September 11, 1898. Mr. Allison also 
owns considerable other valuable real-estate 
in Beaver. Like his honored ancestors, he is 
a Republican in politics. He worships in the 
Presbyterian church, of which he is a member 
and a trustee. He has held minor offices in 
the borough and takes a lively interest in the 
promotion and progress of Beaver. He is a 
gentleman with a wide range of experience 
in the financial field, where he is an important 
factor, and his thoroughness and methodical 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ways stand him in good stead. The subject 
of this biography is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity of high standing, and easily ranks 
as one of the best citizens of Beaver county. 



R. GEORGE S. BOYD, a popular 
and successful physician of Beaver 
Falls, Pa., is one of the most promi- 
nent Homeopathic practitioners in Beaver 
county. He has been practicing at his pres- 
ent location for nearly twenty years, and con- 
trols a large business. Dr. Boyd has worked 
hard and earnestly for his success, and de- 
serves the reputation and confidence with 
which he has been rewarded. 

Dr. Boyd was born at New Sheffield, Pa., 
on May 6, 1850. He received his primary 
mental training in both public and select 
schools, afterwards taking a collegiate course 
at Curry Institute in Pittsburg. After receiv- 
ing special tuition in that school, he followed 
the profession of teaching for a period of nine 
years, chiefly in Beaver county. He decided 
to fit himself for the medical profession, and 
with that object in view, he studied medicine 
with his brother, John S. Boyd, after which 
he took the required course of lectures at the 
Cleveland Homeopathic Hospital College, 
and graduated with the class of 1880. Dr. 
Boyd immediately established himself in 
Beaver Falls and has remained ever since, 
even occupying the same office, refitted, how- 
ever, from time to time, with the most mod- 
ern appliances used by the most progressive 
medical men of to-day. His practice, small at 



first, has increased with each succeeding year 
until now the Doctor has all he can attend to. 

In 1881, Dr. Boyd was united in marriage 
with Emma J. Laird, an affable daughter of 
Alexander Laird of New Scottsville, Penn- 
sylvania. Dr. Boyd is an influential member 
of the State Medical Association, and also of 
the Homeopathic Medical Society of Beaver 
county. He was one of the organizers of the 
Beaver Falls Board of Health in 1893, and has 
been president and secretary of that organ- 
ization. His interest in educational matters is 
not lacking, and is proved by his having 
served on the school board. In politics, the 
subject of this sketch is a Republican, but his 
practice is not confined to his Republican 
friends and their families ; indeed, the Doctor 
never allows politics to interfere with his pro- 
fessional duties whatever. He is also a mem- 
ber of the medical and surgical staff of the 
Beaver Valley General Hospital. Dr. Boyd 
is a son of Samuel and Martha (Maratta) 
Boyd, and grandson of John Boyd. 

John Boyd was a native of Ireland, coming 
to America and settling in Allegheny town- 
ship, Allegheny county. Pa., where his son 
Samuel was born. Samuel Boyd was reared 
and educated in his native county, and learned 
the trade of a cabinet maker. After living a 
number of years in Bridgewater borough, he 
removed to New Sheffield, Beaver county, 
where he followed farming in connection with 
the undertaking business. His last years were 
spent in Beaver Falls, where he died, aged 
seventy-nine years. His widow, the beloved 
mother of our subject, still survives her hus- 



THE 
NEW YORK 

[PUBLIC Li&RARY| 

\Ast6r, LeMx anS Tilden / 

Foundations. 

1908 




LEWIS \V. REEU. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



83 



band and resides in Beaver Falls. Mrs. Boyd 
was, before mairia^^e, Miss Martha Maratta. 
She was born in 1820 in Hopewell township, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. The Doctor's 
brothers and sisters are John S., of New 
Brighton; Sarah (Todd), of Washington, 
Iowa ; and Frank, of Beaver Falls. The highly 
respected father was an earnest RepubHcan, 
and took a decided interest in the success of 
his party. He was honored by the confidence 
of the people, and served as postmaster before 
and during the Civil War. 

Dr. Boyd is, at this writing, a very active 
man. His constitution has been of that sort 
that has enabled him to go through all kinds 
of weather to attend to his practice, without 
any bad effect upon himself. His affluent cir- 
cumstances arei due to thrift and careful atten- 
tion to his professional duties, and his stand- 
ing in the community is certainly well mer- 
ited. 



Y^ EWIS W. REED, the efficient and ac- 
IJI commodating postmaster of Beaver, 
"^^—"^ Pa., where he is also an active at- 
torney, is one of the most enthusiastic Demo- 
crats in the whole of Beaver county. Ever 
since arriving at maturity, he has been par- 
ticularly zealous in, the interests of his favorite 
party, and has officiated as chairman of the 
Democratic committee for several years, hav- 
ing long been a member of that organization 
and having served for seven years as its secre- 
tary. Although he never sought office, he 
has been repeatedly offered political prefer- 



ment. Mr. Reed was born in Raccoon town- 
ship, Beaver county, Pa., and after attending 
the public schools of New Sheffield, took an 
academic course at Woodlawn Academy. He 
then became assistant editor of the "Beaver 
Star," and while engaged in that capacity, also 
studied law under the preceptorship of Hon. 
J. M. Buchanan. He was admitted to the bar 
February 4, i88g, and, opening an office in 
Beaver, he engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession for two years. At the close of that 
time, he became associated with J. M. 
Buchanan and continued to be a law partner 
of that noted attorney for five years. On ac- 
count of failing health, Mr. Reed was obliged 
to discontinue his professional duties, having 
already had several hemorrhages. Although 
reluctant to do so, he gave up his practice, 
intending to make his home in a warmer ch- 
mate, but after a few months of exercise in 
the open air, his health rapidly improved, and 
he was able to resume his work. His office is 
now located in the Buchanan Block, at rooms 
214 and 216. 

Mr. Reed is secretary and a stockholder of 
the Star Publishing Co., a director of the 
Farmer's National Bank of Beaver Falls, and 
has served as school director of the borough, 
for three years. He was appointed post- 
master of Beaver, February 8, 1896, and im- 
mediately appointed Miss Lfzzie J. Hepting, 
assistant;, and Miss Martha H. Morgan as 
clerk. The office, which is also located in the 
Buchanan block, is a handsome one, and is 
fitted up in the most modern style. The post- 
office of Beaver was established as early as 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



1802, and was called Beaver Town, until 1829, 

since which time it has been known as Beaver 
postoffice. The first postmaster was James 
Alexander, who was appointed January i, 
1S02; he was succeeded by the following: 
Joseph Hemphill, July i, 1803; James Alex- 
ander, August 9, 1804; James C. Weiser, 
January i, 1816; James Alexander, January 
II, 1818; Andrew Logan, April 29, 1832; 
Charles Carter, May 28, 1838; James Lyon, 
June I, 1841J Miss E. D. Carter, December 
27> 1855 ; Miss Margaret J. Anderson, July 23, 
1861; Mrs. S. J. McGafiick, November i, 
1866; Miss May McGaffick, January 23, 1867 ; 
Mrs. Sophia C. Hayes, February 12, 1868; 
Miss May McGaffick, February 15, 1869; 
Miss N. B. Imbrie, March 19, 1875; Miss 
Mary E. Imbrie, January 29, 1883; Daniel M. 
Donehoo, March 17, 1887; A. G. White, De- 
cember 23, 189 1 ; and Lewis W. Reed, Febru- 
ary 8, 1896. 

Lewis W. Reed was united in marriage with 
Lizzie Hall, a daughter of William B. Hall, a 
prominent farmer of Raccoon township. 
William B. Hall was a descendant of Robert 
Hall, of English and Scotch descent. Robert 
Hall was born in Lancaster county. Pa., and 
went to Beaver county, where he purchased 
four hundred acres of land, and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. His last days, how- 
ever, were spent in Freedom. The worthy 
subject of this sketch and his amiable wife 
find it a pleasant duty to rear and educate 
their family, which consists of one son and 
two daughters, as follows: Lewis G., bom 
January 10, 1883; Vera, born November 26, 



1887; and Helen^ born June 29, 1891. 

Mr. Reed built a fine modern residence, in 
1890, on Beaver street, his present handsome 
home. In 1892, he also built a residence for 
his beloved mother on Laura street, and in 
addition to these, he owns two attractive tene- 
ment houses. He has always taken a lively 
interest in the development and progress of 
Beaver, and, like his forefathers, is an active 
member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Reed is also a valued member of the Masonic 
fraternity. 

Thomas Reed, great-grandfather of the 
subject of this record, was a native of Scot- 
land, whence he came to America, settling 
near Baltimore, Maryland. He left two sons, 
one whose name was James and another 
whose name has not been preserved. James 
Reed, grandfather of Lewis W., was born 
near Baltimore, Md., and in early manhood 
went to Beaver county, settHng first in Rac- 
coon township, where he purchased a farm, in 
1837. This farm is, today, owned by his son, 
John Reed. Upon this farm, James Reed 
pursued the calling of an agriculturist until 
cut of? by death at the age of sixty-seven 
years. He was joined in marriage with 
Agnes Baker, a daughter of Michael Baker. 
Mrs. Reed lived to attain the age of sixty-nine 
years, and with her husband, belonged to the 
Old School Presbyterian denomination. 
James Reed was known as a very progressive 
farmer, and the old homestead, built by hiin 
in 1837, is still standing as a monument to his 
thrift and economy. To him and his beloved 
companion were born the following children : 



BEAVER COUNTY 



85 



Harriet, wife of Daniel Baker; Jane, wife of 
Cornelius Weigrandt; Washington B., (father 
of Lewis W.), who will be mentioned later; 
John, who wedded Ruth Allen ; Rosanna, wife 
of Robert Potter; Elizabeth, wife of Dr. John 
Bryan; and Jesse, who wedded Martha 
Kennedy. 

Washington Baker Reed, father of the sub- 
ject of this biography, was born on the old 
homestead, January 14, 1820. He received 
a good scholastic training, for those days, and 
began life as a farmer. Upon the death of his 
father in 1868, he bought out the other heirs 
of the homestead of two hundred acres. Later, 
he sold fifty acres, and had one hundred acres 
under a state of high cultivation. He was a 
public-spirited man and a stanch Democrat, — 
serving in many township offices. He was 
a trustee of the Presbyterian church, and was 
highly esteemed by all who knew him. He 
died July 20, 1890, aged sixty-five years. He 
led Eliza Kerr to the altar, in 185 1, and she 
bore him the following children : Lizzie, wife 
of Sheridan Knowles, of Beaver; John A., 
who married Mary Deming, of Beaver; Lewis 
W., the subject of these Hnes; Cornelius W., 
who was united in marriage with Ella Shoe- 
maker, and resided at McKeesport; Sampson 
K., who wedded Sarah Baker, of Beaver; 
Harriet, wife of David G. Hood, of McKees- 
port; and Agnes, wife of Hugh Orr, of 
Beaver. 

Sampson Kerr, the maternal grandfather of 
Lewis W., was born in Raccoon township, 
and was a son of John Kerr, a surveyor by 
trade, who was granted a tract of land con- 



taining four hundred and four and two-thirds 
acres, — obtaining a patent for the same. This 
tract bordered along the Ohio River in Rac- 
coon township, Beaver county, Pa., and upon 
it John Kerr settled prior to the year 1800. 
He built a house, where George Fox now 
lives, and here his two sons w-ere born. Their 
names were, — Sampson and James. In 1836, 
the homestead, containing two hundred and 
ninety-eight acres, was deeded to Sampson. 
John Kerc was one of the founders and elders 
of the Presbyterian church, which stood at the 
same place where Bethlehem Church is now 
located. He was a justice of the peace for 
m.any years, the office at that time being a 
much more important one than at the present 
day. After filling this station in a most ac- 
ceptable and capable manner, he passed to his 
final rest at about the age of eighty years. 
Sampson Kerr was looked upon as a well-to- 
do man, of his day. After selling the home- 
stead, he went to Beaver, and conducted a 
hotel on Third street for many years, where 
the Wade building now is. Later he kept 
the Keystone hotel of Pittsburg. After re- 
tiring, he died in Allegheny City at the age of 
seventy-seven years. He was twice married. 
His first wife was Agnes Reed, a daughter of 
John Reed, who was a settler adjacent to the 
Kerrs, where he owned four hundred acres of 
the finest land bordering on the Ohio River. 
Their home was built on the rear end of the 
Samuel Clear farm. Mrs. Kerr died in 1842, 
at the age of thirty-four years, leaving one 
daughter, Eliza, the mother of Lewis W., 
who was then twelve years old. Her father 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



was married again, his second wife being 
Maria Blackburn. Of this union were born 
the following seven children : Morris, Har- 
riet, Frank, James, Albert, Josephine, and 
William. 

Sampson Kerr led an exemplary life, and 
was a leading figure in many avenues of busi- 
ness, where his cheery presence is now missed. 
He belonged to the Old School Presbyterian 
denomination, and was a devout Christian 
man. 

The publishers of this work take pleasure in 
announcing that a portrait of Mr. Reed ac- 
companies this sketch, being presented on a 
preceding page. 



TTJ EDGAR MYERS, an energetic and 
i jr , prominent young business man of 
— 'Beaver county, has charge of the 
Singer sewing machine business in this 
county, and makes his headquarters at Beaver 
Falls. He is a native of Forest county, Pa., 
and is a son of R. W. Myers. 

R. W. Myers was born and educated at 
Youngstown, Ohio, and is a graduate from 
Raines Grammar School. At Franklin, Pa., 
he learned the trade of a jeweler, and after 
working in the bank of Wick Brothers a short 
time, he became associated with his father-in- 
law, Willard Lindsey, in the wholesale and re- 
tail jewelry business. After being in the jew- 
elry business several years, he accepted a posi- 
tion with the Singer Sewing Machine Com- 
pany which he retained until recently, when 
he became traveling salesman for the Consoli- 



dated Lamp and Glass Company. Mr. Myers 
introduced the Singer sewing machines in 
Beaver county and had his office at 1017, 
Seventh avenue, Beaver Falls; he was among 
the first to locate in his present business vicin- 
ity, and added a jewelry department to his 
establishment. He was joined in marriage 
with Miss Olive D. Lindsey, and their home 
has been blessed by the birth of two children, 
namely: C. Edgar; and Mary S., born at 
Clear Lake, Wis., December 25, 1880. She 
was educated in Beaver Falls, Pa., and is now 
assisting our subject in the machine business. 
Politically, R. W. Myers is a strong Repub- 
lican ; socia'ly, he is a member of the K. of P., 
and a chartered member of the A. O. U. W. 
Religiously, he is a Presbyterian. 

C. Edgar Myers was but a child when his 
parents moved to Beaver Falls, Pa., and his 
primary education was obtained in the schools 
at that place. He also graduated from a bus- 
iness col'ege, and then accepted a position as 
clerk in his father's office; he was afterwards 
appointed collector of this county by the 
Singer Sewing Machine Company, a position 
he held but a short time when he was trans- 
ferred to the central office at Pittsburg. Two 
years later, he was promoted to the responsi- 
ble position of traveling auditor, and was said 
to be the youngest man who ever held that po- 
sition. Mr. Myers, in the fall of 1898, re- 
signed his position to accept the vacancy left 
by his father; he has handsome office rooms, 
located on Seventh avenue, and the great 
success of the Singer Sewing Machine agency 
in this vicinity is due largely to his energetic 




F. EDWARD UKILMAN. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



efforts. Mr. Myers is a very courteous and 
affable gentleman, and has won for himself 
the esteem and good-will of hosts of acquaint- 
ances throughout the country. He is a well- 
read, popular and good business man. Reli- 
giously, he is a member of the Methodist 
church; politically, he is a supporter of the 
Republican party. On June 28, 1899, Mr. 
Myers was united in marriage with Miss 
Blanche R. Shuster, a daughter of Henry 
Shuster, of Beaver Falls. 



r I*"" " EDWARD BEILMAN. Beaver 
K| county numbers among its citizens many 
•men who started life under the most dis- 
couraging circumstances, but who, through 
their own persevering industry, struggled on 
to better things and finally attained positions 
of prominence. Such, briefly told, are the 
conditions which existed in the life of the gen- 
tleman above-mentioned, who is today 
reckoned as the foremost business man of this 
section of the state, — being owner and pro- 
prietor of a large department store at Beaver 
Falls. Twelve years was the age at which 
he set out to do, battle with the world at large, 
as cash boy in the large department store then 
known as that of Barnes, Hengerer & Co., 
of Buffalo, New York. His action was con- 
trary to the wish of his parents. Ambitious 
by nature, bright of intellect, and situated as 
many another boy was, he won favor in the 
eyes of his employers, who were seemingly 
cold a«d austere men of business. Having 
gained their good will by taking every oppor- 



tunity to serve them as best he could, he was 
from time to time advanced until he was their 
trusted head cashier at the age of twenty- 
four years, — a very young man for a position 
of such responsibihty. This was the only firm 
by whom he was ever employed, and in 1889, 
he severed his connection with them and re- 
moved to Beaver Falls, Pa., where he has 
since been one of the most active and pros- 
perous citizens. 

F. Edward Beilman was born in Buffalo, 
Erie County, N. Y., June 21, i860, and is 
a son of Jacob and Catherine (Speiser) Beil- 
man. Jacob, the father of our subject, was 
born in Bavaria, Germany, and came to this 
country with his parents at the age of seven 
years, first settling in New York City. When 
the Erie Canal was opened, they traveled 
by that route to Buffalo, N. Y., which was 
then an unimportant place. The union of 
Jacob Beilman with Catherine Speiser was 
blessed with eleven children, as follows: An- 
thony; Mary; Josephine (Lechleiter) ; James; 
Adeline; Edward; Catherine; F. Edward; 
Helen (Schneider) ; Frank, and Elizabeth 
(Triller). Anthony is a resident of Chicago. 
Mary, James, Adaline and Edward are de- 
ceased. Catherine married E. G. Burns, who 
is charity agent in Buffalo, and about whom 
there is an interesting bit of history. He was 
one of seven pair of brothers who enlisted 
in the Civil War, all being in the same com- 
pany and the best of friends. Singular to re- 
late, one of each pair of brothers fell in bat- 
tle. F. Edward is the gentleman to whom 
this record pertains. Helen's husband has 



90 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



held a responsible position with the water 
works for the past fifteen years. Frank is a 
civil engineer. 

The subject of the present writing received 
his early mental instruction in the parochial 
schools of Buffalo, and, in 1872 (as before 
stated), entered the employ of Barnes, Hen- 
gerer & Co. as cash boy, and, by native 
shrewdness and perseverance, worked his way 
up to the place of ofBce boy, and then to that 
of assistant cashier, which he held for six 
years. He had gained the entire confidence 
of his employers and they offered him the 
position of head cashier. It was by no means 
a small undertaking for one so young, but 
possessing unlimited confidence in his ability 
he accepted it and performed its duties with 
credit, — ^justifying the faith reposed in him. 
Alive to the fact that his future depended 
upon himself, he saved his money and in- 
vested it in real estate in Buffalo, which he 
subsequently sold at a good round profit. 
This he repeated several times and in a few 
years was the fortunate possessor of a respect- 
able bank account, and some very valuable 
realty. At this time he began to deal more 
extensively in lands, forming companies, 
which bought up tracts and laid them out into 
building lots, which they put upon the mar- 
ket. In this manner he Mas largely instru- 
mental in building up the suburban districts 
of the city, and realized largely on his invest- 
ments. That he is shrewd and gifted beyond 
the ordinary, is evidenced by the fact that he 
has never lost on any of these transactions. 
He was seemingly gifted with the Midas 



touch, and having once acquired property its 
value increased with wonderful rapidity. 
Upon one occasion he bought a lot in one of 
the residence districts, and before eight 
o'clock the next morning, disposed of it at a 
profit of $350. At another time he bought a 
tract of land in an obscure part of the town 
for $700, and shortly after sold it for $1,500. 
Soon after the year 1880, his attention was 
attracted to the oil business, and journeying 
to McKean county, near Bradford, he in- 
vested in oil to good advantage. He began 
to look for other investments, and in 1889 he 
resigned his position with Barnes, Hengerer 
& Co., and, removing to Beaver Falls, formed 
a five years' partnership with William Rowan, 
starting a large dry goods business. Dispos- 
ing of his interest in this firm to his partner, 
in 1894, he built his present store, the largest 
and finest in the borough ; it is a two-story, 
iron-front building and covers a lot 100x40 
feet in dimensions. It has steel, sixteen feet 
high ceilings. The large assortment of stock 
is carefully systematized and arranged in or- 
derly fashion. The basement is the salesroom 
for carpets, linoleum, lace curtains, mattings 
and oil cloths, and also contains the carpet 
workshop. Upstairs is carried a comprehen- 
sive line of general dry goods, notions; ladies' 
suits and cloaks, millinery, gentlemen's fur- 
nishings, and the thousand and one other 
things which go to make up a department 
store. Mr. Beilman is a man who through 
his great enterprise has attracted public at- 
tention, and is universally held in high esteem. 
He has identified himself with many paying 



BEAVER COUNTY 



ventures, being an organizer, the principal 
stockhold^, and a director, of the Keystone 
Store Service Company, manufacturers of a 
computing scale, an invention far superior tQ 
any other on the market. This company have 
had considerable litigation with a Dayton 
concern, but have beaten them at every point. 
Mr. Beilman is a prominent stockholder in 
the People's Water Company; a stockholder 
and director of the Riverview Electric Street 
Railway Company; and is a member of the 
executive committee of the Beaver Falls Im- 
provement Company, in which he has been an 
indefatigable worker. He was one of the 
most faithful workers in securing $50,000 re- 
quired, and was made a special representa- 
tive, to bring the EcHpse Bicycle Company 
to Beaver Falls. He is an earnest advocate 
for free bridges, a city charter and a "Greater 
Beaver Falls." Politically, he is independent 
and although frequently importuned to accept 
office, he has always declined. 

Mr. Beilman was united in marriage with 
Matilda M. Doll, who was born in Buffalo, 
N. Y., in May, 1865, the nuptials occurring 
September 19, 1887; they have two children: 
Louise, born August 9, 1889, and Norman 
A., born in February, 1892. Mrs. Beilman 
was called to her reward on February 20, 
1892, just eight days subsequent to the birth 
of her second child, and was interred at Buf- 
falo. The subject of this biography formed 
a second union, with Margaret McDunn, who 
was born March 30, 1870, and is the daugh- 
ter of Patrick B. and Margaret McDunn of 
Cambria county. Pa., their union being 



blessed with three children: Homer J., born 
in August, 1893, and died in January, 1894; 
Melvin J., born December 25, 1895; and 
Martha, born April i, 1897. In a religious 
connection Mr. Beilman is a member of the 
Catholic church. He is also a member of the 
order of the R. A. For many years he was a 
member of the Buffalo City Guard Cadet 
Corps, one of the crack organizations of Buf- 
falo, from which came many brave ofificers of 
the late war. Mr. Bellman's portrait, executed 
from a photograph, taken in the fall of 1899, 
is shown in connection with the above ac- 
count of his successful career. 




R. WALTER F. RAYLE, a leading 
^£) If dentist of Beaver Falls, Pa., where 
he is recognized as a man well 
versed in his profession, is a scholarly, refined 
gentleman and has never been known to neg- 
lect his duty. It is characteristic of the man, 
that when he takes up a project or advocates 
new procedures in his profession or in busi- 
ness, he throws his who'e soul into the affair 
in hand, and does all that can be done to 
bring matters to a successful conclusion. This 
very characteristic has won for him a host of 
patients and loyal friends whom he serves 
faithfully. Dr. Rayle was born July 31, 1849, 
in South Beaver township, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, is a son of John and Jane 
(Wells) Rayle and grandson of William Rayle. 
Receiving quite an ordinary education in the 
common schools, he then took a most thor- 
ough course at the Worcester High School, in 



92 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Ohio. After choosing the profession of den- 
tistry as his life work, he endeavored to fit 
liimself by studying in the office of Dr. Jones 
of Worcester, a leading practitioner in that 
profession. 

Walter F. Rayle passed the examination, in 
1867, successfully, and at once located in 
Darlington, where he established an office 
and by his pleasant, courteous manner and 
good habits, won the respect of the people 
in general, who soon began to need his pro- 
fessional services. Leaving quite a nice little 
practice in Darlington in 1870, Dr. Rayle re- 
moved to New Wilmington, where he pur- 
sued the same calling for six years. In 1876, 
he located in Beaver Falls, where he is still 
to be found. In his political views, he is a 
Republican, and steadfastly supports the 
measures and men of his party through vic- 
tory or defeat. Dr. Rayle is a member of the 
McKinley Pioneer Club of Beaver Falls, and 
is chairman of the executive committee. The 
Doctor is also a school director, elected by the 
first ward, and has served in other local 
offices. He is responsive to charitable ap- 
peals, and occupies an important position as a 
man of standing in the community. He has 
been a faithful member of the Presbyterian 
church ever since he attained the age of 
eighteen years, and has led an industrious, 
useful and eminently successful life, unsullied 
by deeds of wrong. 

Dr. Rayle was joined in marriage with 
Josephine Murray, who has borne him three 
children, namely: Amy Pearl, who is still at 
home; Bessie Jean, a teacher in the pubhc 



school; and Charles Clifton. Bessie Jean 
graduated from the high school with highest 
honors in a class of 16, and is also a graduate 
of Slippery Rock Normal School. The Doc- 
tor is a prominent member of Walnut Camp 
No. 2, Woodmen of the World, and has been 
secretary of the camp for a period of seven 
years. 

William Rayle, the paternal grandfather of 
our subject, was one of the pioneer settlers 
of Beaver county, where he pursued the 
peaceful occupation of a farmer all his active 
days. He was an old line Whig and served 
one term as county commissioner; in fact he 
was filling that office at the time of his death, 
which occurred at the age of fifty-four years. 

John Rayle, the father of Walter F., was 
born in Beaver county, Pa., December 3, 
1805. He spent his entire life as a resident of 
the same county, and died July 13, 1882. He 
was also a farmer by occupation and, in con- 
junction, conducted a blacksmith shop on his 
farm. In a religious connection he was iden- 
tified with the Free Presbyterian denomina- 
tion at Darlington, of which church he was 
an elder. He chose for his Hfe partner Jane 
Wells, a daughter of Joseph Wells. She bore 
her husband seven children, viz: Jane Belinda, 
widow of John Kerr; Ann Matilda, wife of 
Josiah Long, who resides on College Hill, 
where Mr. Long carries on farming; William 
D., who lives in Columbiana county, Ohio, 
where he is known as a progressive farmer; 
Joseph Wells, who lives at Canal Fulton, 
Stark county, Ohio, and is engaged in mer- 
cantile pursuits; John B., who is also a mer- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



chant at Beaver Falls; Susanna B., wife of 
John Barclay, of Alliance, Ohio, also a mer- 
chant; and Waiter F., the subject of this 
sketch. 

The maternal grandfather of our subject, 
Joseph Wells, was an old settler of Beaver 
county, and owned a large farm, which in- 
cluded nearly all of the land now occupied by 
Patterson Heights. In connection with his 
agricultural pursuits, Mr. Wells conducted a 
hotel, and was an enterprising, public-spirited 
citizen. 



(^^ AMES TAYLOR, a mechanical genius, 
who has brought himself into wide 
prominence in the western section of 
Pennsylvania, is well-known as the superin- 
tendent of the establishment of Emerson, 
Smith & Co., of Beaver Falls, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. He was born in Fallston, Sep- 
tember 9, 1 85 1, and is a son of Samuel 
and Nancy (James) Taylor, and grandson of 
James Taylor. 

James Taylor, the grandfather, was born 
in Sheffield, England, in 1785, and 
received his mental training in the pub- 
lic schools, after which he engaged in 
coal mining for some time. Upon 
coming to America, he bought a large tract of 
land in an unimproved condition in Gales- 
burg, Illinois, and to this he added until he 
had acquired some 370 acres. He began the 
improvement of his tract, erected good, sub- 
stantial buildings, and lived there until his de- 
mise in 1858, aged seventy-three years. He 



reared seven children, as follows: Joseph, 
who never came to this country ; Samuel, the 
father of the subject of this personal history ; 
Thomas, a successful coal operator in Wash- 
ington county, Pa., who is also interested in 
silver mining; Sarah (Bailey); Martha, de- 
ceased; Jonathan, also a coal operator; and 
John, who now resides upon the old home- 
stead at Galesburg, Illinois. Politically, he 
was a staunch Democrat. Religiously, he was 
an Episcopalian. 

Samuel Taylor was born in Sheffield, Eng- 
land, July 4, 1 82 1, where he was sent to the 
public schools, in addition to which he took 
a special course in geometry and freehand 
drawing, becoming an expert designer and 
pattern maker. He came to this country with 
his parents, and in 1842 accepted a position as 
cabinet maker with the Kennedy Keg Fac- 
tory, designing and making patterns for all 
of the machinery used in the factory. He then 
engaged in pattern making in Pittsburg and 
New Brighton. He afterwards became 
superintendent for Minor & Merrick, 
New Brighton. He acquired wonderful 
skill and was unexcelled at his profes- 
sion, some of the patterns which he made 
being still in existence. He was connected 
with the Kennedy Keg Factory many years, 
but held interests in other firms, and in the 
latter part of his life was engaged in business 
for himself at Fallston. He formed a matri- 
monial alliance with Nancy James, a daughter 
of Benjamin and Margery (Williams) James, 
coming of sturdy Quaker stock. Benjamin 
James served in the War of 181 2 with General 



94 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Jackson, being under him at the Battle of 
New Orleans. He was a farmer in early life, 
but later undertook mercantile pursuits, hav- 
ing a store at what is now Hoytdale, Beaver 
county. He married Margery Williams, 
whose father, Thomas Williams, was one of 
the very first white men to settle in Beaver 
county, locating there in 1793. Besides farm- 
ing he did a large distilling business. This 
union resulted in seven children : Sarah A. 
(Craven); Joseph J., now in Spokane, Wash. ; 
Nancy, the mother of James Taylor ; Howard ; 
Benjamin ; Amelia (Murray) ; and Eliza. 
Nancy James was a pupil in the district 
schools, and lived at home until her marriage. 
Samuel Taylor and his wife were the parents 
of the following : Joseph, who was first a pat- 
tern maker, then a millwright, and is now a 
farmer in Beaver county; Elizabeth (Brad- 
ley) ; James, the subject hereof; Franklin, who 
died at the age of three years; John F., a 
machinist who is assistant to his brother 
James; Jason R., station agent on the P. & 
L; E. R. R. at Beaver, Pa. ; Thomas W., who 
died at the age of three years; and Orrin P., 
a pattern maker, who died at the age of 
twenty-three years. Mr. Taylor was an active 
Democrat in politics and filled most of the 
borough offices, having been burgess, justice 
of the peace, a member of the town council 
and president of the school board. Reli- 
giously, he was an Episcopalian. He died in 
1892, at the age of seventy-one years, and his 
wife stiil survives him at the age of seventy- 
four years. 

James Taylor attended the public schools of 



Fallston and New Brighton, after which he 
learned the trade of a keg maker with M. T. 
&; C. Kennedy, with whom he remained until 
1870, when he learned the trade of a machin- 
ist, for which he showed great aptitude. He 
worked for M. & S. H. Darrah for four years 
ami two months, three years of this period as 
an apprentice, and the remainder of the time 
as a journeyman. Upon being offered a posi- 
tion with Emerson, Ford & Company as a 
journeyman, he accepted and continued for 
a few months, when he went to New Castle, 
Pa., to work on large blast-furnace en- 
gines. After being thus engaged for three 
months, he returned to Fallston and worked 
for Darrah & Company for some years. 
In January, 1876, he re-entered the 
employ of Emerson, Ford & Com- 
pany. That firm dissolved partnership and 
Mr. Taylor became a dye maker, and was 
so employed until February of the following 
year. Then the firm for which he had pre- 
viously worked was re-organized under the 
name of Emerson, Smith & Co., and as he 
was at the time possessed of many years' ex- 
perience and a wide reputation, he was offered 
the place of master mechanic and given 
charge of eighty-five men. He has since been 
promoted to the office of superintendent, a 
position he still fills with credit to himself 
and satisfaction to his employers. This firm 
was the first to manufacture band-saws in this 
country, and in addition to this they make 
cross-cut saws, shingle-saws, metal and stone 
saws, gang-saws, a specialty of the inserted 
tooth-saw, knives and other edge tools, odd- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



95 



shape mold cutters, and other experimental 
work. Besides being an exceptional me- 
chanic, Mr. Taylor is an inventor of no mean 
ability and numerous labor and expense sav- 
ing devices now used by saw manufacturers 
throughout the country are products of 
his skill. The plant under his super- 
intendence covers an entire square, is 
two stories high, and in addition has 
its offices and engine room. The firm 
employ 125 men, and although they are 
under the constant supervision of Mr. Taylor, 
he stiil finds time to do a little of the mechan- 
ical work himself. He has been awarded sev- 
eral valuable patents, one of the most import- 
ant being a saw sharpener and setter which 
will be invaluable to any firm using saws. He 
is engaged on several other inventions which 
he expects to have patented. Mr. Taylor has 
been decidedly successful in life in a business 
way, and is one of the most substantial citi- 
zens of the borough. He owns some real 
estate on Seventh avenue, in Beaver Falls. 

On December 10, 1878, he was joined in 
wedlock with Maud Kerr, a daughter of 
Mathew Kerr. She was born in Ireland, be- 
ing of Scotch-Irish extraction, and received 
her mental training in the public schools of 
her native place, and at Butcher's Business 
College in Beaver Falls, having come to 
America in 1871. This union resulted in the 
birth of the following children : Roy ; James, 
who is a sophomore in the High School, took 
first honors in his class during the year 1899, 
is a debater of ability, giving promise 
of future brilliancy, and is preparing 



himself for admittance to the bar; 
Stanley B. ; and Olive E. In politics, 
Mr. Taylor is a firm supporter of the 
principles of Democracy, and for years served 
on the county committee. Religiously, he 
is a member of the Presbyterian church. So- 
cially, he is a member of the Royal Arcanum. 




^ILLIAM A. P. GRAHAM, secre- 
Ygm I tary and treasurer of the American 
Porcelain Co. of New Brighton, Pa., 
is one of the leading and most enterprising 
citizens of that town. The American Porce- 
lain Company, of which he is a member, was 
incorporated November 24, 1894, by Thomas 
Craven and Thomas R. Marshall. They pur- 
chased the Scott Brothers' Tile Factory, 
which was located near Allegheny street, and 
remodeled it for the manufacturing of solid 
porcelain ware of all kinds, for kitchens and 
pantries, tubs, sinks, and all porcelain articles. 
They have built up a reputation for fine qual- 
ity o^ work, and have many orders for special- 
ties in porcelain ware. They have four kilns, 
two of which are 12 feet in diameter, and two, 
18 feet in diameter, having a capacity to man- 
ufacture the largest tanks and tubs, of natural 
clay, in western Pennsylvania. The plant cov- 
ers nearly three acres of ground, which in- 
cludes kilns, engine house, storage and ware- 
house, and shipping house. They employ 
thirty men, most of whom are skilled mechan- 
ics. The porcelain enamel, which was Mr. 
Craven's own conception, is the best on mar- 
ket to-day. 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



William A. P. Graham, the subject of this 
biography, was born in Allegheny City, Pa., 
January 29, i860, is a son of Nathan, and 
grandson of Charles, Graham, who was of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. Nathan Graham was 
born in Chambersburg, Franklin county. Pa., 
and early in life learned the trade of coach 
building. In 1845 he moved to Allegheny 
City, where he became connected with the 
firm of Park & Phelps, wagon and coach 
manufacturers. He remained with that firm 
until 1872, when he. retired. He was elected 
alderman and justice of the peace of the sec- 
ond ward of Allegheny, and later was notary 
public. He dealt quite extensively in real estate 
during his active life, but retired from business 
a few years before his death, which occurred 
in 1897, at the age of seventy-seven years. He 
married Elizabeth Doubler, a native of Cham- 
bersburg, Pa., and she died in 1895, at the 
age of seventy-five years. The children which 
resulted from this union were: Emma, who 
married Matthew Eyster; Amelia, who mar- 
ried William Duval; Mary L., who married 
A. B. Hay; Ida, who married Thomas E. 
Marshall, and has one child, Etta; Etta H., 
deceased, who was the wife of William Righ- 
ter; and William A. P., the subject of this 
sketch. Thomas E. Marshall, who is 
president of the American Porcelain Co. 
is very popular, and a thorough busi- 
ness man. He was for several years 
the leading merchant of New Brighton, 
but in February, 1898, his store, which was 
located in the Opera House Block, burned, 
and since that time he has devoted his entire 



attention to the American Porcelain Com- 
pany. Nathan Graham was a Republican, 
and a member of the Lutheran church. 

William A. P. Graham attended the high 
school of Allegheny City, and then pursued 
the study of photography for three years, but 
as his eyes failed him, he was obliged to aban- 
don it. He accepted the clerkship at Ray- 
mond Bros.' wliolesale house in Allegheny, 
and remained with them until 1889, when he 
went to New Brighton, and became clerk and 
bookkeeper for the Pittsburg Clay Manufac- 
turing Company. When the American Por- 
celain Co. was incorporated, he became one 
of the stockholders, as well as secretary and 
treasurer. He married Lillie M. Farmer, a 
daughter of Thomas Farmer. 

Thomas Farmer was born in Birmingham, 
England, a son of William Farmer, who was a 
skilled mechanic in wire drawing, especially 
in silver and gold metal. His services were 
sought by New England manufacturers, and 
he came to this country, but soon went back 
to England. There for many years he manu- 
factured iron screws for wood work. Later in 
life, after retiring, he came to America in 
1857, and died at his son's home in Wheeling, 
West Virginia, at the age of ninety years. He 
was; married twice, first to Miss Coleman, who 
died early in life. Their children were as fol- 
lows : Ann ; Edward ; William ; Mary A. ; and 
Thomas. His second marriage was with Ann 
Piatt, and she bore him three children, 
namely : John P. ; David J. ; and Samuel. 
Thomas Farmer early in life became a portrait 
painter, and came to America in 1855, locat- 




HENRY ENGLEHART COOK. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



ing in Pittsburg. His brother came to this 
country in 1857, and Thomas gave up paint- 
ing, and went into business with his brother, 
John P., at Philadelphia. They manufactured 
carriage boUs, and after a few years moved to 
Newark, N. J., and later, to Wheeling, West 
Va. After selling out there, they moved to 
Canton, Ohio, and two years later, located at 
New Brighton, Pa., where they carried on a 
general machine shop for a few years. They 
then began the manufacture of rivets at Pen- 
3an. New York. Here Mr. Farmer retired 
from business and moved once more to New 
Brighton, Pa., where he still resides. He mar- 
ried Jane Chivers, a daughter of Joshua 
Chivers, and their children are as follows: 
Agnes ; Howard ; Ella ; and Lillie, the wife of 
the subject of this sketch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Graham have one child, Wil- 
liam A. Mr. Graham is a firm Republican, 
and is a member of the Royal Arcanum and of 
the Woodmen of the World ; he belongs to 
the Episcopal church. He is highly respected 
in the community, and is always willing to 
give aid to anything which is for the good of 
the people of his town. 




ENRY ENGLEHART COOK, the 
superintendent and general manager 

■ of the Beaver Valley Electric Light 
& Power Co., of Beaver Falls, Pa., a highly 
esteemed citizen and ex-sherifif of Beaver 
county, was born in Bridgewater, Pa., July 
31, 1843, and is a son of Henry and Margaret 
(Reiter) Cook. 



Henry Cook was born in Weingarten, Ger- 
many, January 15, 1807. He was joined in 
marriage, in March, 183 1, with Margaret Rei- 
ter, who was also born at the same place. 
Mrs. Cook is a daughter of Ferdinand and 
Margaret (Hurst) Reiter, and is still living at 
Beaver, Pa., enjoying the best of health. 
Much valuable information, data, etc., for this 
sketch were generously and cheerfully fur- 
nished by her, and were obtained from a Bible 
she carried to school when a child, being in- 
scribed on the pages reserved for family rec- 
ords, in a well written German hand. She 
was born August 13, 18 10. 

Henry Cook had a brother in Johnstown, 
Pa., who persuaded him to come to America. 
With his wife and three eldest sons, he started 
from the old country in June, 1838, taking 
passage on a sailing vessel ; meeting with 
much bad w-eather, they did not arrive at New 
York until the following September. After 
landing, they proceeded by wagon and stage 
to Philadelphia, Pa., thence by canal to Har- 
risburg and Johnstown. Arriving there, they 
learned of a great boom in the Beaver Valley, 
where a canal was in operation and villages 
were built. They left Johnstown for Pittsburg, 
and traveled in wagons to Monaca, Beaver 
county, which was then called Phillipsburg. 
At that place, Mr. Cook followed the trade of 
a stone mason for some time, removing later 
to Bridgewater, and still later settling in Bea- 
ver, Pa., where he built a fine residence on 
Fourth street, now owned by his widow. 
While working upon this residence, he was 
taken ill with cholera, caused by drinking cold 



^J. 



100 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



water, while overheated from work. This ill- 
ness terminated in death July 14, 1845. He 
was a man who possessed a strong constitu- 
tion and was unfortunately cut ofif in the very 
prime of life, and did not live to enjoy what 
he had planned, a haven of earthly rest. 

Mr. Cook built much of the masonry of his 
day, in and around Beaver. He also built the 
reservoir now standing back of Henry E. 
Cook's residence. He was born and christened 
with the name of Koch, as the family for- 
merly spelled their name. Upon getting his 
naturalization papers made out, he was asked 
his name, and omitted to tell the authorities 
how it should be spelled. Upon the comple- 
tion of the papers, he accepted them, suppos- 
ing them to be correct. Later, upon discover- 
ing the mistake, he thought it would make 
no material difference and did not have them 
changed; this course he afterward regretted 
very much as, by voting under the name of 
Cook^ he soon became known by that name, 
until the family finally adopted that method 
of spelling it. He built his home on Fourth 
street in 1844, and there his death occurred. 
His good wife was left to rear and educate 
the family, which she did as few mothers have 
done, — devoting her whole life to that task. 
She is now esteemed by all and revered by her 
children, whose names are as follows : Jacob 
Frederick, born in Germany, January 19, 
1832, died February 14, 1847, ^"^ lies buried 
in the Lutheran burial ground of Pittsburg; 
John Francis, who was born in Germany, 
February 23, 1834, and died October 18, 
1855; Christian Frederick, who was born in 



Germany, January 10, 1838, and was killed 
May 12, 1864, in the battle of the Wilderness, 
being a member of Company F, 140th Reg., 
Pa. Vol. Inf. ; Christine Louise, born August 
10, 1 84 1, who became the wife of D. M. Miller 
of Beaver, and is the mother of five children ; 
and Henry Englehart, the subject of these 
lines. 

Henry Englehart Cook attended the public 
schools, and with a careful mother's training 
grew to be a boy who was respected and 
trusted by all who knew him. At the age of 
thirteen years (in 1856), he was appointed un- 
der James Buchanan, to carry mail on horse- 
back from Beaver to New Lisbon, Ohio; this 
duty occupied two days every week, in all 
kinds of weather, and involved a trip of 28 
miles. In addition to this, he carried the mail, 
four days each week, from Beaver to Roches- 
ter, Pennsylvania. In accomplishing this task 
he never failed, and his reliability and punc- 
tual habits won him a reputation which deter- 
mined his future. At the age of eighteen 
years, he enlisted in the Union Army, October 
9, 1861, on the first call for volunteers. He 
was a private in Company F, loist Reg., Pa. 
Vol. Inf., and served three years. In the bat- 
tle of Plymouth, N. C, he was taken prisoner 
and confined in the Andersonville prison, in 
Georgia, being removed thence to Charleston, 
and then to Florence, S. C, where he was ex- 
changed December 13, 1864. Returning to 
parole camp at Annapolis, Md., he was grant- 
ed a thirty days' furlough on account of his 
poor health, and went home to recuperate, 
and relieve an anxious mother's fears. He 



BEAVER COUNTY 



101 



went back to his regiment and received an 
honorable discharge March i8, 1865, al- 
tliough his papers bore date of December, 
1S64. 

On tlie termination of the war, Mr. Cook 
returned to his home, and, after following the 
carpenter trade for a short time, he became 
interested in the lightning-rod business. Sub- 
sequently he was elected constable of Beaver, 
serving three consecutive years, until 1881, 
when he was elected sherifif by the Democratic 
party by over two hundred majority. He 
served three years as sheriff, during which the 
great riot at Beaver Falls took place, in which 
some twenty rioters were placed in his cus- 
tody, four of whom were convicted, — sentence 
being suspended. At the close of his term, 
Mr. Cook was appointed deputy revenue col- 
lector of the twenty-third district of Pennsyl- 
vania, serving four years and three months. 
He then became superintendent and manager 
of the Beaver Valley Electric Light & Power 
Co., of Beaver Falls, which position he is still 
filling in an eminently satisfactory manner. 
In 1873, h^ purchased about one acre of land 
on Fifth street, and built a fine residence 
thereon, grading the lawns surrounding it, 
and setting out an abundance of small fruit 
and shade trees. In addition to this he re- 
built his mother's residence, adding another 
story ; he also owns a fine tenement house on 
Fourth street, built by his uncle, Jacob, in 
1844. His possessions include a number of 
choice building lots, he having purchased, in 
1890, a tract of land 120 by 300 feet. This 
tract is knovvu as the Mark estate, and is sit- 



uated on Beaver street. Mr. Cook divided a 
portion of it into five fine lots, one of which 
he sold to each of the following persons : E. 
J. Allison, James Reed, Lewis Reed, and the 
purchaser of the premises where J. I. Martin 
now lives. These are among the best resi- 
dents of Beaver. 

The subject of this writing has been twice 
married. His first wife was Sarah K. Shel- 
drake, a daughter of Joshua and Elizabeth 
(Shoemaker) Sheldrake. She was born in 
1845, ^nd passed to her final rest, leaving five 
children, namely: Frederick H., a contractor 
and carpenter of Beaver; Carrie Louise, still 
unmarried; Charles O., an electrician of Bea- 
ver Falls, who married Ollie Miller, and had 
two children, Lloyd and Henry; Henry W., a 
carpenter; and Mary E., also enjoying single 
blessedness. 

Mr. Cook contracted a second matrimonial 
alliance, this time with Mary E. Matheny, a 
daughter of John and CaroHne (Shoemaker) 
Matheny. No issue resulted from this union. 
The family worship with the Presbyterians, 
and contribute liberally toward the support 
of that denomination. Mr. Cook's portrait 
accompanies this sketch. 



fOSEPH W. KNOTT, the secretary and 
treasurer of the firm of Knott, Harker 
& Co., of Beaver Falls, Pa., has lived 
a varied and useful life, every act of which has 
been marked by some innate honesty of pur- 
pose, and by such strict adherence to the 
highest principles of probity, that his name is 



102 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



honored and his influence is felt throughout 
his chosen community. Mr. Knott has occu- 
pied his present responsible position ever 
since the organization of the firm of Knott, 
Harker & Co., in 1884. The company was 
formed for the purpose of manufacturing fire- 
place grates, and hardware novelties, but quite 
recently, extensions have been made, machine 
shops added, etc., and castings of all descrip- 
tions are now manufactured. When the plant 
is running full time, about 60 men are 
employed. 

Mr. Knott is also a director in the First 
National Bank of Beaver Falls and takes a 
fitting and appropriate interest in the progress 
of the town, being classed among its most 
progressive citizens. The subject of our 
sketch was born near Manchester, England, 
April 4, 1844, and is a son of Moses and Ann 
(Whitworth) Knott. His parents came to 
America in 1849, when he was only five years 
old. They crossed the Alleghany Mountains 
by way of the Ohio Canal and the Pittsburg 
R. R. going first to Lawrence county, and 
later to Beaver county. His father had 
learned the trade of a cotton spinner while 
living in England, and followed that business 
in this country for many years. In 1853, he 
located in Fallston, Pa., where he secured 
a situation in a cotton mill, but subsequently 
went to the town of Brighton, now Beaver 
Falls. Some time after locating at the latter 
place, he embarked in the grocery business, 
keeping a little store stocked with staple gro- 
ceries ; and at same time holding the position 
of postmaster of Brighton. The office was 



discontinued while he was in charge, under 
Buchanan's admini-tiaticn, and the p'ace was 
without a postoffice until about the year 1865, 
when the town took new life under the name 
of Beaver Falls. 

Moses Knott was a man of quiet, unassum- 
ing manner and gentle disposition. He was 
for many years a member of the Methodist 
church. His death occurred in August, 1894, 
at the age of eighty-five years. His sterling 
qualities secured for him the esteem and love 
of a large circle of friends, and made his name 
honored throughout his locality. 

Joseph W. Knott was primarily educated in 
the public schools of New Brighton. After 
leaving school, he accepted a position in a dry 
goods store at that place, where he remained 
from 1865 to 1870. In 1870 he held a position 
with an iron firm in Sharpsville, Mercer 
county, after which he was employed as book- 
keeper and cashier for the Beaver Falls Cut- 
lery Works until 1884. covering a period of 
fourteen years. In 1884, he became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Knott, Harker & Co., and 
was chosen secretary and treasurer of the 
same, — his present position, — which he has 
filled in a highly creditable manner, satisfac- 
tory to all concerned. 

The subject of our sketch chose for his wife 
and life partner, Martha Brierly. Mr. and 
Mrs. Knott have only one child now living, 
and that is Lois, who is a prominent teacher 
in the schools of the state of New York, and 
of whom they are exceedingly proud. Mr. 
Knott is a gentleman who has traveled life's 
road, attending strictly to the matters whicli 



iJBLIC LIBRAI^V 




DR. ORRIN H. FRANKLIN. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



105 



have confronted him along his path. His ex- 
perience is filled with a record of labors well 
done. Wherever his duties have led him, all 
branches of service have received his atten- 
tion, and he has tried to discharge all the obli- 
gations of his citizenship with a fidelity which 
has borne to him the merited good will of his 
fellow men. 



R. ORRIN H. FRANKLIN, whose 
portrait is presented on the opposite 
page, is a leading and successful 
dentist of Beaver Falls, where he has been en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession for 
many years; he is a practical man and has a 
shrewd eye for improvements and new adap- 
tations in his profession. Almost his entire 
time not devoted to practice, is spent in study, 
and his friends and admirers are satisfied that 
he will yet win a name that will rank high in 
the world of science; even the few that are 
slow to take up with any new thing, no mat- 
ter how meritorious, concede that his success 
is something wonderful. Dr. Franklin is a 
son of Benjamin and Martha (Reed) Franklin, 
and was born in Industry township, Beaver 
county, Pa., February 3, 1859. He received a 
good common school training; after leaving 
school he learned the trade of a cooper and 
keg maker, commencing at about the age of 
fifteen years, with the firm of M. T. & U. S. 
Kennedy. 

Young Franklin was quick and handy with 
tools, having much natural ability in that di- 
rection, and soon became an expert keg 



maker; he worked at that trade for four or 
five years, receiving at first but 30 cents per 
day. It was his amibition to fit himself for 
something better, and to this end he applied 
himself with an ardor that has been followed 
by very successful results. By strict attention 
to business and by economy, he saved enough 
money while in the cooper business to carry 
him through college. After studying for two 
years with Dr. A. M. Whisler, of New Brigh- 
ton, one of the oldest practitioners of the 
county, he entered the Pennsylvania Dental 
College of Philadelphia, completing the 
course February 25, 1882. Immediately after 
his graduation, Dr. Franklin located in New 
Brighton and practiced dentistry there for 
four years, securing a liberal patronage. In 
the meantime. Dr. Franklin had opened up a 
branch office at Beaver Falls, where he also 
practiced dentistry a part of his time. At the 
end of his fourth year he had opportunity to 
sell the business at New Brighton for a satis- 
factory consideration, and was induced to dis- 
pose of his interests at that place and devote 
his whole attention and time to the practice 
of his profession in Beaver Falls, which, by 
that time, had increased to extensive propor- 
tions. 

Dr. Franklin is a conscientious gentleman 
and is very highly regarded wherever he is 
known. His professional ability is recognized 
and the high position he occupies in the esti- 
mation of the citizens of Beaver Falls is well 
merited. He is a, member of the Odontologi- 
cal Society of Pittsburg. 

Dr. Franklin was married to Lucy Thorn- 



106 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ley, an accomplished lady, September 30, 
1885. One son, Benjamin, resulted from this 
union. 

Benjamin Franklin, father of the subject of 
these lines, was a native of the state of New 
York, and was reared and educated in Ohio, 
whither he had been taken. He subsequently 
located in Beaver county, Pa., and adopted 
the profession of teaching, to which he has de- 
voted his energies since that time ; he now 
has the distinction of being the oldest teacher 
in Beaver county. He is spending his declin- 
ing years at New Brighton, in charge of a 
school. He ranks high among the ablest in- 
structors in Western Pennsylvania and has 
served two terms of three years each, as super- 
intendent of schools of Beaver county. He 
has always taken a leading part in the educa- 
tional development of the county, being an 
advocate of good schools and competent 
teachers as the best means of suppressing 
lawlessness, and making honorable citizens, 
and true men and women. He and his good 
wife were blessed with two children, the elder 
of whom is the subject of this biography, and 
the younger, Milan O., resides with his father, 
in New Brighton, and occupies a position in 
the Union Drawn Steel Works. 



r" HOMAS L. MINESINGER is a 
prominent and well-to-do resident of 
Beaver Pa., and is one of the successful 
oil producers of the county. He is a native 
of Ohio township, Beaver county. Pa., his 
birth occurring April 12, 1844; he is a son of 



Godfrey and Sarah (Laughlin) Minesinger, 
and grandson of Jacob Minesinger. 

Jacob Minesinger was born in Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, though his parents were orig- 
inally from Italy. Jacob learned the stone- 
mason trade in his native country, and in 1798 
came to the United States; he bought four 
hundred acres of timber land in Green town- 
ship, Beaver county, which is now the home 
of Mr. Robert Sweney. He made many im- 
provements upon the farm, besides clearing a 
large portion of it, he and his sons built a 
large stone house. Jacob and his wife Cath- 
erine were buried in the family ground on the 
homestead farm. He and his family were 
members and regular attendants of the Pres- 
byterian church. His children were : David ; 
Jacob; James; John; Joseph; Godfrey; and 
Elsie. 

Godfrey Minesinger was born on his 
father's farm and his boyhood days were spent 
in learning the masonry trade and aiding hi;; 
father in cultivating the farm ; he bought one 
hundred and fifty-five acres of new land, upon 
which he built a fine set of buildings; as his 
boys grew up they operated the farm while 
he worked at his trade as a mason. He built 
the stone abutment for the suspension bridge 
at Wheeling, West Virginia, and contracted 
for railroad masonry for many years. His 
farm is now the property of Charles Brooker. 
He owned a considerable amount of other 
property in this county, including the George 
Brown estate. He died in the latter part of 
1874, aged sixty-eight years. His wife was 
Sarah Laughlin, a daughter of Thomas 



BEAVER COUNTY 



107 



Laughlin; she was born in 1800 and died in 
1886; their children were three: John and 
Joseph, deceased; and Thomas L., the subject 
hereof. Mr. Minesinger was well-read, intelli- 
gent, and public-spirited; he was a man who' 
delighted in debates and for the sake of an 
argument he would often support the side of 
a question contrary to that which he really 
believed ; being a man of superior judgment, 
he was often called upon for advice in various 
business transactions. He was a consistent 
Presbyterian. 

Thomas L. Minesinger attended the district 
school and assisted his father during his 
youthful days, and at seventeen years of age 
he was apprenticed to the blacksmith trade; 
after three years of that labor he sought the 
river life and in 1862 he started as striker's 
engineer on the Ohio River, but the last four 
years of his river life were spent as engineer. 
Returning home, with his brother John he 
followed farming five years, when he accepted 
a position as station agent at Smith's Ferry; 
he afterwards spent twelve years as a mer- 
chant, and was also postmaster of the village. 
Selling out to S. J. Fair in 1894, he settled in 
Beaver and became associated with S. P. & 
D. H. Stone, also of Beaver, in the production 
of oil, — working in Ohio township and other 
places in the county. Mr. Minesinger owns a 
neat residence on the corner of Bank and 
Commercial avenues, which he makes his 
home. 

The subject of this sketch was first united 
in marriage with Narcisse B. Smith, a daugh- 
ter of Jesse Smith of Smith's Ferry ; she died 



aged thirty years ; three children were born to 
their union: John L., a graduate from West- 
ern Pennsylvania Medical College of Pitts- 
burg, now practicing at Bellaire, Ohio; Jesse, 
deceased; and Eddie S., who is now in his 
second year in the above named medical 
school. Mr. Minesinger's second wife is Mary 
Ecofif, a daughter of J. Ralph Ecofif of Roch- 
ester, Pa., and they have one child, Thomas 
L., who is now attending school in Beaver. 
Mr. Minesinger is a Republican in politics; 
socially, for the past twenty years he has been 
a member of the Glasgow Lodge, No. 485, F. 
& A. M., of which he has also been past 
master; and of the I. O. O. F. In religious 
views, he is a prominent member, and a trus- 
tee, of the Presbyterian church of Bridge- 
water. 



CDWARD L. DAWES, whose pro- 
nounced success as a member of the 
' firm of Dawes & Myler has brought 
him into wide prominence, is a man gifted 
with extraordinary ability. He is a young man 
in the prime of life, but in all his transactions, 
he has displayed shrewdness and foresight far 
beyond his years. He is a son of John L. and 
Charlotta Jemima (League) Dawes, grandson 
of Jonathan Dawes, and was born in Alle- 
gheny City, Pennsylvania. 

His father, John L. Dawes, was born in 
Nottingham, England, and came to America 
a single man. He followed the trade of a 
painter in Trenton, N. J., and afterward in 
Pittsburg and Allegheny -City. In the last 



108 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



named city he was engaged in contracting 
for painting and continued thus until he be- 
gan the manufacture of glass in the line of 
drug supplies and sundries. He conducted a 
wholesale house in that line until his demise 
at the age of sixty-one years. He was united 
in marriage with Charlotta Jemima League, 
who was born in Virginia but is now living irt 
Allegheny, and their union resulted in the 
following offspring: Harriet; Mary; Martha, 
deceased; Edward L., the subject of this bio- 
graphical record ; and John L. 

Edward L. Dawes was reared and educated 
in Allegheny City, and at the age of thirteen 
years entered into active employment as tru- 
ing boy for his father. Upon reaching man's 
estate he became a partner in his father's busi- 
ness, continuing as such with good results un- 
til he was twenty-seven years of age. He then 
became bookkeeper of the Standard Manufac- 
turing Co. of Pittsburg, and ten months later 
was chosen as manager of that concern, re- 
maining in that capacity until 1888. Having 
gained largely in practical business experi- 
ence, he was qualified to enter into business 
on his own behalf, and in that year he removed 
to New Brighton and formed a partnership 
with W. Albert Myler, under the firm name of 
Dawes & Myler. This firm is now proprie- 
tor of one of the largest establishments in 
this section of the state. 

Messrs. Dawes and Myler, both men in the 
prime of life and possessed of considerable ex- 
perience, located at New Brighton, Beaver 
county, in 1887, ^"d purchased four acres of 
land at Allegheny street and Block House 



Run, on which they built a brick plant and 
engaged in the manufacture of porcelain lined 
bath-tubs and sanitary specialties, and also of 
plumbers' supplies. They employed about 
eighty men of experience during the first year, 
and in March, 1889, placed their product on 
the market. Being of a superior quality, no 
difificulty was experienced in selling all that 
could be produced, and in time it was seen 
that the plant must be enlarged to meet the 
requirements of the demand. In 1892, an ad- 
ditional three acres of land was purchased, 
and now six acres are covered with buildings, 
all of which are of brick but the foundry, 
which is a substantial frame building. It is 
heated by hot air and lighted by electricity 
from their own plant. The works are run by 
steam and are in operation day and night, as 
many as 425 men being employed daily, and 
the pay roll per day being not less than $1 ,000. 
It is a fact worthy of mention that ever since 
the firm was first organized the plant has been 
in full operation and has not missed a single 
pay day. It can readily be seen that in addi- 
tion to bringing industrious men and estab- 
lishing new homes in the town, the large 
amount of money put in circulation by the 
employees has resulted in material benefit to 
the borough of New Brighton. The goods of 
their manufacture have a wide reputation and 
are sold in the markets of all the countries 
of Europe, in Australia, Japan, Cuba, and the 
Hawaiian Islands, as well as in every state in 
the Union. 

Mr. Dawes bought a desirable lot, a part of 
the Bradford estate, in New Brighton, and in 




WENZEL A. MIKSCH. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



111 



1887, erected an elegant modern brick home 
at No. 1332 Third avenue, which is complete 
in every detail and convenience. He was 
joined in hymeneal bonds with Katherine Tor- 
rance, a daughter of Francis Torrance, of Al- 
legheny City, and she died young, leaving two 
children : Frances L. ; and Martha, deceased. 
Mr. Dawes formed a second alliance with Jean 
W'addell, a daughter of Thomas Waddell, of 
Jacksonville, Illinois. In religious belief he is 
a conscientious member of the Presbyterian 
church. He takes a deep interest in the af- 
fairs of New Brighton and has been identified 
with a number of worthy enterprises, being at 
the present time a director of a bank, and 
vice-president and director of the Beaver Val- 
ley Hospital. He is a man of pleasing person- 
ality and possesses a large circle of friends 
throughout the community. 



V^ /^ENZEL A. MIKSCH, a member 
V^/ of the American Glass Specialty 
^ ^ Company, and a prominent citizen 
of Monaca, Beaver county, Pa., is a glass 
decorator of wide reputation, and has in re- 
cent years invented a new process which 
promises in time to revolutionize the art of 
glass decorating. 

Mr. Miksch is a native of Bohemia, and re- 
ceived a good mental training in the public 
schools of that country. That being the 
greatest glass manufacturing center of Eu- 
rope, he adopted the trade of a glass worker, 
and learned every detail of the business in 
the most thorough manner. At the age of 



twenty-one years, he came to America, in 
1881, stopping first at East Liverpool, Ohio, 
for two months, and then removing to Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. After remaining there 
for a period of eight months, he located at 
Monaca, and followed his trade there for three 
years. In 1885, he returned to Pittsburg, 
and for thirteen years was foreman of the 
Thomas Evans Company, in the glass decor- 
ating department. In the meantime, in 1889, 
he purchased ten acres of land in Monaca, 
Beaver county, and erected what is probably 
the finest house in that section, reflecting 
great credit upon his good judgment and ar- 
tistic taste. Since that time he has made his 
home there, although for some years his work 
was in Pittsburg. It was while working on 
paper weights that he made a remarkable dis- 
covery, and for a considerable period was en- 
gaged in developing it. In 1897, having per- 
fected his invention for the decoration of 
glassware, he became one of the organizers 
of the Metropolitan Glass Company of Mon- 
aca,, manufacturers of advertising specialties — 
a concern with which he was connected until 
1898. He then severed his connection with 
that firm and started his present venture, the 
American Glass Specialty Company, in part- 
nership with his brother, Charles Miksch. It 
is a novel invention, and marks a decided ad- 
vance in the art of decorating glass. As yet 
the invention is but two years old, and is 
meeting with great success. There are but 
two firms of this character in this country 
and our subject has the proud distinction of 
having started both. The building he now 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



occupies was completed in 1898; it is a two- 
story affair, 26x90 feet, and embraces the 
main works, the furnace room, printing room, 
transfer room, and enamel room. The ar- 
ticles which they make require most pains- 
taking effort, and Mr. Miksch has attained a 
skill which approaches perfection. They 
have two kilns operated by natural gas, and 
a small test oven. Their goods find a ready 
market all over the world, and bid fair to 
supersede the old style of glass decorating. 
They have no trouble in disposing of their 
product, and have sales agents in all the large 
cities. Mr. Miksch is possessed of excellent 
business qualifications and has been very suc- 
cessful, owning his present location, the build- 
ing occupied by the Metropolitan Glass Com- 
pany, and the house in which he lives. 

Politically, the subject of this writing is an 
aggressive Democrat, and has been president 
of the council for the past six years, but has 
now retired from active politics. He is a 
member of Germania Blue Lodge, No. 509, 
and Duquesne Chapter, F. & A. M., both of 
Pittsburg. A portrait of Mr. Miksch accom- 
panies this sketch of his life, being presented 
on a preceding page. 



Wi 



ILLIAM R. GALEY, of the firm of 
Galey Brothers, extensive oil pro- 
ducers, is a highly respected citizen 
of Beaver, Pa., and is well and favorably 
known throughout Beaver county. He was 
born in Porter township. Clarion county, De- 
cember 5, 1848, receiving in his youth an ex- 



ceptionally thorough mental training in the 
public school. He began his career by work- 
ing upon his father's farm until he attained 
the age of twenty years, v.hen he became an 
oil driller at Pleasantville, Pennsylvania. He 
has spent his entire life in the oil and gas bus- 
iness, being now quite extensively engaged in 
that capacity. He has operated oil wells in 
many counties not only in Pennsylvania, but 
also in Ohio, sometimes alone, and sometimes 
in partnership with others. He drilled the gas 
wells for, and helped to establish the Bridge- 
water Gas Co., in the Sheffield district, but 
subsequently sold his interest therein. He is 
one of the stockholders of the Beaver Na- 
tional Bank and was one of the prime factors 
in its organization. In 1891, Mr. Galey set- 
tled in Beaver, where he purchased a brick 
dwelling from A. Moore, and has since made 
his residence there, taking an active interest 
in the progress of his adopted town. 

Mr. Galey was joined in matrimony with 
Ida Nicholas, an accomplished lady of great 
force and sweetness of character. Mrs. Galey 
is a daughter of Charles and Isadore (How- 
ard) Nicholas. Her father was born in Ohio, 
and died in early manhood, leaving a widow 
and one little daughter, Ida, to mourn his 
untimely death. Mrs. Nicholas contracted a 
second matrimonial alHance, this time with 
Obi Olds, by whom she had one son, Herbert, 
now deceased. A second time she was de- 
prived of her companion and after a suitable 
period, married a third time, becoming the 
wife of V/illiam Fenton, to whom she bore 
three daughters : Minnie M. ; Miranda I. ; and 



BEAVER COUNTY 



lis 



Lydia A. Mrs. Fenton departed this life at 
the age of fifty-eight years. 

To our subject and his estimable wife have 
been born two sons and two daughters, whose 
names are: Herbert Edgar; Willie; Etta 
Irene; and Charlana Mabel. The two sons 
died in infancy, and Etta Irene became the 
wife of Howard Atha, of Allegheny, Penn- 
sylvania. Charlana Mabel is the darling of 
the household, which she rules at will. She 
was born as recently as July 24, 1897. Mr. 
and Mrs. Galey are active members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. The subject 
of this sketch is a son»of Robert and Margaret 
(Rogers) Galey, and grandson of Daniel and 
Margaret (Fulton) Galey. Daniel Galey was 
a native of Ireland and came to America in 
1819, landing at Philadelphia, Pa., and set- 
tling in Maryland, along the Chesapeake Bay. 
There he accepted a position as manager of 
an extensive plantation, and was overseer of 
a large number of slaves. He continued to 
work in that capacity until cut ofif by death at 
about forty years of age. He was joined in 
matrimony with Margaret Fulton, who sur- 
vived him until she attained the advanced age 
of seventy-eight years. After the death of her 
husband Mrs. Galey and her children removed 
to Belle Vernon, Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Their son, Robert, is the father of the 
subject of this sketch. 

Robert Galey was born in the Prov- 
ince of Connaught, Ireland, in 181 1, 
and accompanied his parents to Amer- 
ica, when only eight years old. At the 
age of fourteen years, he was appren- 



ticed to learn the blacksmith's trade, 
which he mastered in all its details, serving a 
full apprenticeship. He became quite skilled 
as a workman, made axes by hand and was 
considered an expert pattern maker. He 
started a small shop for himself, and by strict 
attention to his business accumulated quite a 
sum of money for those days. In 1835, he 
removed to Cherry Run, Clarion county, Pa., 
and purchased 100 acres of new land, which 
he cleared into fields for farming purposes. 
Later he sold out and purchased a larger tract 
of timber land at Red Bank, in the same 
county. He busied himself cutting his timber, 
which he sold to the operators of a charcoal 
furnace. Iron ore was also discovered on his 
land, in such paying quantities that by its sale, 
he not only paid off all his indebtedness, but 
was enabled to purchase three good farms 
along the Allegheny River in Perry township, 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania. During the 
Civil War, Mr. Galey was largely interested 
in raising sheep upon these farms ; at one time 
he and his sons owned as many as 800 fine 
specimens. In 1867, oil was discovered on his 
farm, after which, for several years, he was 
largely interested in numerous oil wells. In 
company with his son John, he purchased 
Kink's Island, and put down a well that 
yielded an average of 75 barrels of crude oil 
per day for a period of four years. Another 
deal which was considered among his best 
investments, was the purchase of the Captain 
Clark farm in Washington county, for $17,- 
000. Four years later he sold it for manufac- 
turing purposes, for the round sum of $40,000. 



114 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Since then the place was sold for $100,000. 

Robert Galey possessed a strong constitu- 
tion and was an active, energetic man with 
nerves of iron. He was a self-made man in 
the truest sense of the word, not only accumu- 
lating a large fortune but loaning considerable 
amounts of money and being very charitable. 
He was highly esteemed by all who knew 
him, and spent his last days at Belle Vernon, 
where his death occurred in June, 1895. He 
was twice married. His first wife, whose 
maiden name was Rachel Sparr, a daugh- 
ter of John Sparr, died at the early 
age of thirty-two years, leaving three 
sons as a legacy to her husband. Their 
names are: John H., who is a member of the 
firm of Guffey & Galey at East End, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. ; Thomas F., of Beaver; and Robert, 
also of Beaver. Some time after the death of 
his first wife, Mr. Galey married again. This 
tim.e he was wedded to Margaret Rogers, who 
is still living. She is a daughter of Samuel 
and Margaret (Cook) Rogers, and was born 
December 25, 1822. Her father was bom in 
Donegal, Ireland, was a son of George Rog- 
ers, and grandson of Oliver Rogers, who was 
born in England, but settled in Ireland, and, 
in his day, was said to be the tallest man in 
Europe. His son George visited America, but 
stayed only a short time, returning to Ireland, 
where he died. The latter's son, George Rog- 
ers, came to America in 1832, settling in Cla- 
rion county. Pa., where he engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits, near Parker's Landing. HFs 
life was terminated by death at the age of 
sixty-six years, while his wife lived to be sev- 



enty-two years of age. Their children were : 
Elizabeth; Jane; Sally; Margaret, mother of 
William R. ; Rebecca; Letitia; William; and 
Mary. 

Robert Galey's second marriage resulted in 
the birth of the following offspring: William 
R., subject of this sketch; Samuel, a dealer in 
oil at East End, Pittsburg; Daniel, also a 
dealer in oil, residing at Parker, Pa. ; Rachel, 
wife of Thomas Grant; James G., of Beaver, 
also in the oil business; David H., superin- 
tendent of the Sewickley Gas Co. ; and Laura 
G., wife of Lieut. Charles Farnsworth, — Mrs. 
Farnsworth is now deceased, and left one son, 
Robert. 

Our subject is a man of sterling worth, of 
upright dealings, and is a useful member of 
the community, who has contributed his shai e 
to the enterprise and thrift of Beaver. He 
gives liberally of his means to worthy chari- 
ties, and assists in many ways to elevate the 
moral and social life of his community. 




RANCIS L. BANKS, deceased, was 
well known in Beaver Falls as a valuable 
and enterprising citizen, and he was 
worthy the respect and esteem accorded him 
by the residents of that borough. He was a 
machinist by trade, and for many years served 
in the capacity of superintendent of the hard- 
ening department of the Great Western File 
Works of Beaver Falls. He was a son of 
Francis and Maria (Barton) Banks, and was 
born in New York City, July 19, 1825. 

On the Banks side, the family is of English 



BEAVER COUNTY 



115 



origin, and the grandfather, William Banks, 
was a native of London, England. His son 
Francis resided in New York City and was 
there engaged in business all his life. On the 
maternal side, the great-grandfather was 
Henry Barton of Hollandish extraction, and 
he was a soldier in the War of Independence, 
lived in Hackensack, N. J., and owned a num- 
ber of slaves. 

Francis L. Banks was reared in New York 
City and there also obtained his elementary 
training; in his younger days he was engaged 
in the book-binding business in that city, but 
subsequently drifted into the file business. 
Upon coming to Beaver Falls he was ten- 
dered the position of superintendent of the 
hardening department of the Great Western 
File Works, which position he accepted and 
faithfully performed the duties of that respon- 
sible ofifice until his retirement about the year 
1 89 1. Mr. Banks was prominently connected 
with different fraternities ; he was at one time 
grand templar of Pennsylvania, was a mem- 
ber and secretary of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, and was also a member and 
secretary of the Royal Arcanum. Politically, 
Mr. Banks took an energetic part in the 
organization of the Republican party in this 
vicinity, but though active in party affairs, he 
never sought political distinction. In his re- 
Hgious action he was a consistent member of 
the Episcopal church, and was also a senior 
warden many years; he was also a great 
worker in the Brotherhood of St. Andrews. 
His demise took place at his home in Beaver 
Falls, February 18, 1899, and his death was 



deeply deplored by his family and his friends, 
who knew him as a dutiful citizen and friend, 
a kind neighbor, and a loving father and hus- 
band. 

Mr. Banks was joined in marriage with 
Miss Mary Culver; she was born April 3, 
1827, and died January 20, 1889. She was a 
daughter of Daniel Culver, a native of New 
York City, and he traces his ancestral history 
back to 1632; the Culver family is one of the 
oldest families in New England, and her 
grandfather was in the Revolutionary War. 
Mr. and Mrs. Banks were the parents of one 
daughter, Gertrude Kendall, the wife of Wil- 
liam H. Chandley. Mr. Chandley is engaged 
in plumbing, gas and steam fitting, and also 
contracts for the laying of water works sys- 
tems. He is located in Beaver Falls, where 
he has already established a large patronage. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Chandley have been born a 
family of seven children: Henry Banks; 
Gertrude May; Sarah Winifred; Mary Ivy; 
Anna Drusilla ; Georgia Caroline ; and George 
Francis, deceased. 



I'gl EZEKIAH HULME is the efficient 
|[— 'I and well-known sexton of Grove Cem- 
V — - etery. New Brighton, Pa., and he 
has been in charge of the same for the past 
score of years. He was born in Lancaster- 
shire, England, February 23, 1844, and is a 
son of Mark and Mary (Flindle) Hulme. 

Mark Hulme was born in England, and 
there he continued to reside until his death in 
1863, pursuing his vocation as a hat maker, 



116 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



which he had learned during his boyhood 
days. 

Hezekiah Hulme also learned the hatter's 
trade, and upon his arrival in the United 
States in 1868, he remained in Lewiston, 
Maine, a short time, and there took up his 
former occupation. He then made a trip to 
Denver, Colo., and after prospecting in the 
West, he returned East and first located in 
Mercer county, Pa., and later, in Beaver 
county, where he has ever since continued to 
reside. He first settled in Beaver Falls, where 
he worked at cutlery, but in 1879, he was 
given charge of his present position. The 
Grove Cemetery was incorporated March 19, 
1859, and the grounds were dedicated to the 
purpose of burial October 13, 1859; thirty- 
two acres were first purchased adjoining 
Block House Run, and later, twenty-seven 
acres were added thereto. The cemetery is lo- 
cated on the east side of New Brighton, near 
Braeburn Hillside stream, and is commonly 
known as Oak Hill ; beautiful drives and walks 
are laid out through the grounds, which con- 
tains many fine oak, hickory, ash, and elm 
trees. There is also an attractive variety of 
shrubbery, which is always kept in excellent 
trim by Mr. Hulme and his assistants ; there 
are two entrances to the cemetery, one on 
Grove avenue and the other on Nineteenth 
avenue, better known as the north entrance. 
Mr. Hulme occupies a neat cottage near the 
Grove street entrance, and his assistant also 
resides near that entrance. By the faithful 
performance of his duties the subject of this 
sketch has gained for himself the esteem and 



good-will of not only the members of the cor- 
poration, but of the citizens of New Brighton 
and vicinity. 

Mr. Hulme was first united in marriage 
with Sarah Chadwick, a daughter of George 
Chadwick, and a native of England ; she died 
at the age of twenty-five years, leaving one 
son, George, who is also deceased. His sec- 
ond wife is Matilda Swift, a daughter of James 
Swift, of Liverpool, England, a contractor and 
builder, who died at the age of fifty-five years, 
in Cheshire, England. Mr. Hulme is a faith- 
ful member of the I. O. O. F., of which he is 
also past grand ; and a member and past chief 
patriarch of the Encampment. In religious 
views, he is inclined to favor the Episcopal 
church. In politics, he is a Republican. 






ICHARD SMITH HOLT, a leading 
attorney-at-law of Beaver, Pa., and 
one of the ablest lawyers in Beaver 
county, is a member of the law firm of Wilson 
& Holt. Mr. Holt was a pupil in the public 
school and in Peirsol's Academy at West 
Bridgewater, after which he attended the 
State Normal course at Edinboro, Pa., work- 
ing his way through college by teaching, 
which profession he followed for some time 
after his graduation. After teaching for six 
years, he began to study law under the late 
Samuel B. Wilson, Esq. After his admission 
to the bar in 1888, he entered upon the prac- 
tice of his profession, and after the death of 
his preceptor he became a law partner of 
George Wilson, the son of Samuel B. Wilson. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



Since then tlie firm has been Wilson & Holt. 

For a man whose life has been as busy as 
his, I\Ir. Holt has done much outside of his 
regular duties. He is now serving his sixth 
year as a member of the city council. He is 
deeply interested in educational matters, and 
has served as a member of the school board. 
He is a prominent and active member of the 
American ^Mechanics. 

Mr. Holt purchased a vacant lot near the 
corner of Fourth and Market streets upon 
which he built a handsome residence in 1892 
and 1893. When his day's work is done, and 
he retires to his home, he is pleas- 
antly greeted by his accomplished wife, and 
five unusually bright and interesting little 
ones, of whom both Mr. and >.Irs. Holt are 
extremely proud. Mrs. Holt was, before her 
marriage, Sarah Eveline Brunton, a daughter 
of William A. Brunton, a sketch of whose life 
will be included as a part of this narrative. 
Their children's names and ages are as fol- 
lows: Beulah G., born January 20, 1886; 
Mary Jane, born January 19, 1888; Elizabeth 
Vv'ilson, born April 6, 1890; Margaret Anna, 
born September 22, 1892; and Sarah Eveline, 
born in May, 1898. 

Richard Smith Holt is a son of Samuel J. 
and Mary Ann (Taylor) Holt, a grandson of 
William Holt, a great-grandson of Thomas 
Holt, Jr., and a great-great-grandson of 
Thomas Holt, Sr. The family is of English 
origin. 

Thomas Holt, Sr., removed from the east- 
ern part of Pennsylvania to Miflflin county. 
Pa., settling at McVeytown, Oliver township. 



where he owned 600 acres of land. He was 
joined in wedlock with Elizabeth Mitchell, a 
daughter of John and Jane (Ross) Mitchell. 
Their union was blessed with numerous ofif- 
spring, namely: Thomas, Jr., who married 
Elizabeth Walker; John, who married Sarah 
Mellikin; William; Elizabeth, wife of John 
Magee ; Mary, wife of Jacob Yost ; Jane, wife 
of John McClintock; Dorcas, wife of Mr. 
Stackpole ; Eleanor, wife of Francis Windell ; 
and James, who was killed by the Indians. 

Thomas Holt, Jr., was a farmer, and lost 
his beloved wife not many years after their 
marriage. He went to Trumbull county, 
Ohio, where his death is supposed to have 
occurred, as all trace of him was lost. Only 
tvro children were born to him and his wife, 
and they were twins: William Humphrey and 
Dorcas, — born in 1806. Dorcas became the 
wife of James Critchlow. 

William Humphrey Holt located in Brigh- 
ton township, Beaver county, Pa., about 1833, 
as the tax receipts of 1834 show that he paid 
taxes on a farm previously purchased by him. 
This farm is now the property of S. R. Work- 
man. Later, Mr. Holt sold that farm and 
bought one which Samuel Johnson now owns. 
Still later, he purchased a farm just west of 
the Samuel Johnson farm, and upon it he 
spent his closing years. Upon all his farms 
he made improvements, and the last one pur- 
chased by him is still owned by his heirs. He 
laid down the burden of life in 1877, while his 
wife lived until 1896, when, at the age of 
ninety-three years and two months, she passed 
away. Mr. Holt was a very puBlic-spirited 



118 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



man and served as supervisor of his tovi^nship 
and as school director, and was elder and class 
leader of the M. E. church. Six children 
were born to him and his worthy wife, 
namely: Mary, who first became the wife of 
Socrates Small, and after his death wedded 
George Triess; Thomas Fritz, who married 
Margaret J. Fritz ; John Wesley, who died in 
infancy; Samuel Jacob, the father of our sub- 
ject; Dorcas, who also died in infancy; and 
Rachel Ann, wife of John Hogue. 

Samuel Jacob Holt, father of our subject, 
was born in Brighton township, Beaver 
county, and was reared on a farm. When 
grown, he followed the occupation of teaming 
until he purchased a farm in Brighton town- 
ship, upon which he lived until 1898, when 
he abandoned farming and retired to Beaver, 
Pennsylvania. His whole life has been spent 
in agricultural pursuits, in which he has been 
successful to such a marked degree that he 
not only still owns his farm, but also property 
in Beaver and Vanport. In his political 
views, the elder Mr. Holt follows the leader- 
ship of the Republican party. He was united 
in marriage with Mary Ann Taylor, whose 
life was terminated by death in 1898, at the 
age of sixty years. Their children were : Wil- 
liam H., who married Carrie R. Hamilton, 
and is a prosperous farmer of Brighton town- 
ship; Richard Smith, the subject of this life- 
review ; Thomas Fritz, who was twice married, 
— Annie Merton being his first wife, and Re- 
becca McCollough the second one, and who 
is a stone mason at New Castle; Elizabeth 
Jane, and Jefiferson, were the next two, who 



both died in infancy ; Mary, wife of Dr. James 
H. Shoemaker of East Liverpool, Ohio; 
Frank R., D. D. S., a successful dentist of 
Beaver, Pa. ; and Clyde, a teacher and law 
student of Beaver. 

Richard Smith Holt first saw the light of 
day in Borough township, Beaver county, 
Pa., on December 15, i860. He is still a 
young man and his friends predict great 
things for him in the future. 

William A. Brunton, father-in-law of our 
subject, was born in Green township, Beaver 
county. Pa. He is a son of John and 
Margaret (Alexander) Brunton. and grandson 
of William Brunton. William Brunton was of 
German nationality, and was a farmer by oc- 
cupation. Little is known of him except that 
he located in Green township, and lived to be 
about seventy-five years of age. His wife, 
Barbara, lived to be about eighty-five years 
old, and bore her husband eleven children, as 
follows: John; Joseph; Thomas; Henry; 
William ; Elizabeth ; Sarah ; Rachel ; Rebecca ; 
Nancy; and Mary Ann. 

John Brunton, father of William A., inher- 
ited a part of the homestead farm, and fol- 
lowed the quiet and peaceful life of a farmer 
all his days. He died at about fifty years of 
age, but his wife, who was a daughter of 
Stephen Alexander, lived about seventy-seven 
years. Their children were : Mary ; William, 
father of Mrs. Holt; Elizabeth; Sarah; and 
Barbara. 

William A. Brunton bought out all the 
heirs and became owner of the homestead, 
which he sold later and embarked in the gro- 




JACOB PFLUG. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



121 



eery business at Shippingport. This he con- 
ducted for twelve years, and then returned to 
farming, which he continued until 1887, when 
he removed to Beaver, Pennsylvania. Since 
then he has been interested in other pursuits. 
He was joined in marriage with IMary J. 
Vazey, a daughter of Francis Vazey. One 
son and six daughters blessed their union. 
They were named: John; Sarah E., wife of 
Richard Smith Holt; Margaret; Lalla Belle; 
Estella E. ; Daisy F. ; and Barbara E. 

William A. Brunton enlisted in 1862 in 
Company H, 140th Reg., Pa. Vol., as a pri- 
vate. The principal battles in which he took 
part were: Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. 
At the latter he was wounded in the knee and 
leg, which prevented his walking for three 
years. He now draws a pension from the U. 
S. Government, and is a valued member, of the 
G. A. R., Post No. 47; he also belongs to the 
I. O. O. F. Few men so completely have 
rhe confidence of the public as has Mr. Brun- 
ton, and his standing is certainly well merited. 



§ACOB PFLUG, a gentleman who for 
many years has been a prominent and 
influential farmer of Marion township, 
Beaver county, Pa., is now living on his farm 
of one hundred and forty acres, which is 
known as the old Pflug homestead, and en- 
joying the benefits of his early toil. He is a 
son of George and Dorothy (Martzolf) Pflug, 
and was born on May 28, 18 17, in Germany, 
about ten miles from where the first battle of 
the Franco-Prussian War was fought. 



George Pflug, the father of Jacob, came to 
America on March 16, 1830, with his entire 
family, and after a voyage of sixty-four days 
landed in Baltimore, Md., on the 9th of June 
following. They next moved to Pittsburg by 
means of a six-horse team, arrivint^ on July 
4th, and there George Pflug obtained employ- 
ment in a nail factory, although his trade was 
that of a carpenter. When he landed in that 
city he had but $100, but by hard and con- 
scientious work, in September of the year 
1830, he was enabled to buy forty acres of wild 
land at a cost of $135. In the fall he moved 
his family to Marion township, Beaver county, 
where the property was located, and there he 
built a log house. The next year, leaving his 
family at home, he went to Phillipsburg, Pa., 
and worked at boat building for a man named 
Phillips, continuing thus for three years. In 
1833, he erectecf a small house at Freedom, 
Pa., it being the first one built in that town, 
and sold his first purchase at a price of $1,100. 
He then bought the land on which the house 
of Jacob Pflug is now located ; at that time it 
was all timber land, but prior to his death it 
was mostly cleared. He lived upon this prop- 
erty the remainder of his life and at the time 
of his death in July, 1850, owned one hundred 
and forty acres. Late in hfe he replaced the 
original log cabin with a handsome residence 
now occupied by his son Jacob. He married 
Dorothy Martzolf, and they had the follow- 
ing children: Dorothy (Dedrick), deceased; 
Magdaline (Repe), deceased; Salama (Sche- 
ny) ; Jacob, the subject hereof ; Mary, who 
first married Abraham Burry, and is now the 



122 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



wife of Frederick Householder; Frederick, a 
farmer in Butler county, who first married a 
Miss Garvich, and later wedded Catherine 
Klein; Barbara, the wife of Michael Veiock; 
and Philip, deceased. 

Jacob Pflug was thirteen years of age when 
he came to this country with his parents, and 
after arriving in Pittsburg he worked in a 
hotel at the corner of Wood and Fourth 
streets, as porter. When his father bought 
his first tract of forty acres, he moved to 
Marion with him, and he and his mother 
cleared four acres the first year. His mother 
was a very industrious woman and an excel- 
lent help-meet to her husband. Before com- 
ing to this country she worked upon a farm 
and was accustomed to plowing with two 
cows. Jacob Pflug always remained at home, 
but was at times engaged at working out at 
the carpenter's trade with his father. He also 
made shingles and took contracts for roofing 
houses. After coming into possession of the 
old homestead he made many improvements, 
and has since made additions to the house and 
erected a fine barn. He also greatly added to 
the property, increasing it to about three hun- 
dred and ninety acres, but all excepting the 
original tract of one hundred and forty acres 
he has given to his son. He is now engaged 
in general farming and his advancing years 
are being spent in the peace and quiet of farm 
life. He is a well read man, takes a sensible 
view of all subjects coming to his attention, 
and is deeply interested in the progress being 
made by his fellow workmen. He is highly 
thought of and has friends far and near. 



In 1840, Mr. Pflug was joined in wedlock 
with Salama Householder, by whom he had 
the following issue : Jacob, the husband of 
Caroline Herrman ; Salama, the wife of Henry 
Schramm; Caroline, the wife of John Geoh- 
ring ; Frederick, deceased ; Plenry, whose wife 
is Caroline Miller; Mary, the wife of Henry 
France ; George, deceased ; Elizabeth, the wife 
of Frederick Harmon ; Amelia, the wife of 
William Caterrer; Daniel, who married Eliza- 
beth Gettman ; and Matilda, whose first hus- 
band was Elmer Geohring, and who was mar- 
ried a second time to Albert Hartzel. The 
subject of this sketch after the death of his 
first wife, was united in marriage with Ver- 
nelia Geohring, and they have one son, Albert, 
who resides at home. Politically, he is a 
Democrat and has held all of the township 
offices excepting fhose of justice of the peace 
and constable. Religiously, he is a devout 
Lutheran. His portrait is presented on a 
preceding page, in proximity to this. 




ALBERT MYLER, a gentleman 
who has made his home in Beaver 
county for little more than a decade, 
has established a reputation for general busi- 
ness ability which entitles him to be ranked 
among the leading men of Western Pennsyl- 
vania. His start in life was an inauspicious 
one, but with a degree of energy such as but 
few possess, he strove for success, and to-day 
is a member of the firm of Dawes & Myler, 
owners and proprietors of one of the largest 
manufacturing establishments in the county. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



123 



Messrs. Dawes and Myler, both men in the 
prime of life and possessed of considerable 
experience, located in New Brighton, Beaver 
county, in 1888, and purchased four acres of 
land at Allegheny street and Block House 
Run, on which they built a brick plant and 
engaged in the manufacture of porce'^in lined 
bath-tubs and sanitary specialties, and also of 
plumbers' supplies. They employed about 
eighty men of experience during the first year, 
and in March, 1889, placed their product on 
the market. Being of a superior quality, 
no difficulty was experienced in sell- 
ing all that could be produced, and in 
time it was seen that the plant must be 
enlarged to meet the requirements of the de- 
mand. In 1892, an additional three acres of 
land was purchased, and now six acres are 
covered with buildings, all of which are of 
brick but the foundry, which is a substantial 
frame building. It is heated by hot air and 
lighted by electricity from their own light 
plant. The works are run by steam and are in 
operation day and night, — as many as 425 
men being employed daily, — and the pay roll 
per day being not less than $1,000. It is a 
fact worthy of mention that ever since the firm 
was first organized, the plant has been in full 
operation and has not missed a single pay day. 
It can readily be seen that in addition to bring- 
ing industrious men and establishing new 
homes in the town, the large amount of money 
put in circulation by the employees has re- 
sulted in material benefit to the borough of 
New Brighton. The goods of their manufac- 
ture have a wide reputation and are sold in 



the markets of all the countries of Europe, 
in Australia, Japan, Cuba, and the Hawaiian 
Islands, as well as in every state in the Union. 
Mr. Myler was born in Pittsburg, Pa., and 
is a son of John A. Myler, who during his 
early life was engaged at merchant tailoring 
and attained a high degree of success. He 
retired from that line of business and became 
president of the National Bank for Savings. 
For eighteen years he served as postmaster of 
Allegheny with credit. W. Albert Myler was 
reared in his native city and obtained a good 
intellectual training in the schools there. En- 
ergetic and ambitious as a boy, he early 
sought employment and was engaged in the 
wholesale mercantile business until 1878, 
when he became bookkeeper for the Standard 
Manufacturing Company of Pittsburg. He 
remained in that connection until 1888, when 
he removed to New Brighton, and engaged in 
business for himself as a member of the firm of 
Dawes & Myler. He has since evinced an 
earnest interest in all that pertains to the 
growth and development of the borough, and 
is one of its most dutiful citizens. He pur- 
chased a fine lot which was a part of the old 
Metz orchard at one time, and in 1897 built 
thereon an elegant brick residence, modern in 
design and in all its conveniences. Surround- 
ed on every side by a beautiful and well- 
graded lawn, with its drives and walks, it pre- 
sents a very attractive appearance . and is 
always greatly admired. 

W. Albert Myler was united in marriage 
with Mary I. K. Dennison, a daughter of Prof. 
David Dennison of Youngstown, Ohio. Prof. 



124 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Dennison was one of the early academy teach- 
ers in New Brighton, Allegheny City, and 
Pittsburg. This union was blessed with two 
children ; Mary Gertrude and Jean Hay. 



R. ADDISON S. MOON. Pre- 
iiff) a eminent among the young physi- 
cians and surgeons of note, so nu- 
merous in Beaver county, Pa., stands the sub- 
ject of this sketch. There is no cause more 
noble than that of relieving sufifering human- 
ity, no life more nobly spent than in faith- 
fully fulfilling the duties incident to the Hfe 
of a physician and surgeon. Dr. Moon was 
born at Hookstown, Beaver county, Pa., on 
October 25, 1859. He is a son of Robert 
Allison and Sarah (Sterling) Moon, and 
grandson of William Sterling, of Ireland. 

William Sterling came to America from his 
native land, locating in Green township, 
Beaver county, where he finally settled per- 
manently and followed the peaceful occupa- 
tion of a farmer. He thought little of the 
dangers which were to be met and overcome 
in a new and undeveloped country, and it is 
largely due to the bravery of such men as he, 
that the Keystone State owes her prosperity 
today. He lived to a good old age, passing 
away in the same community where he had 
spent so many happy years. 

Robert Moon, father of Addison S., was 
born in Rensselaer county, N. Y., where he 
was also reared and educated. After reach- 
ing manhood, he desired to fit himself for 



something better than an ordinary life, and 
decided in favor of the profession of medicine 
as his future sphere of effort. Accordingly he 
went west and studied medicine with his 
brother, Arnold C. Moon, of Knoxville, Ohio. 
After completing his studies and taking the 
required course of medical lectures, he went 
to Hookstown, Pa., in 1845, ^"d opened an 
office. His genial and pleasant manners won 
many favorable comments among the resi- 
dents of that p'ace. Soon fortune smiled on 
his endeavors, and his practice, small at first, 
increased to great proportions, during the 
thirty years of his stay there. But there came 
a time when he desired a change of location, 
and April 6, 1875, he removed to Beaver 
Falls, where he spent his closing years, ac- 
tively engaged in the duties of his profession, 
and being looked upon as a very skillful phy- 
sician. He crossed the river of death to the 
light beyond, on October 26, 1892. More 
than half a century was passed by him in do- 
ing good to others. Who shall say that he 
has not received his just reward? In early 
life he led pretty Sarah Sterling to the hyme- 
neal altar, and she proved to be a most tender 
and solicitous companion; when returning 
from some long, tiresome journey, weary and 
exhausted, he was greatly cheered and re- 
freshed by her sweet companionship. Mrs. 
Moon was born February 2, 1829. Two 
children blessed their happy union, Helen M. 
and Addison S., the subject of this sketch. 
Helen M. was twice married; her first hus- 
band was Rev. James S. Brandon, a minister 
of the United Presbyterian church. She is 




JOHN IMBRIE MARTIN'. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



127 



now the wife of William A. McCormick, an 
attorney-at-!aw, of Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

Addison S. Moon received his primary 
education in the schools of Hookstown and 
Beaver Falls. Later, he attended Beaver 
Seminary, and spent two years at Westmin- 
ster College. In addition to this, he took 
private instruction for some time, being am- 
bitious to obtain the best possible education. 
He then studied medicine in the office of his 
father, wlio was desirous of leaving his large 
practice to his only son. After studying dili- 
gently for some time, young Moon took a 
three years' course in the medical department 
of the Western Reserve College at Cleveland, 
Ohio, from which he graduated with high 
honors in 1884. On February 27th of that 
year, he returned to Beaver Falls, and prac- 
ticed his chosen profession, but after two 
years, being ambitious to become more thor- 
ough in his calling, he went to New York 
City, where he took a special course in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. He also 
took a course in Polyclinics in New York. 
Returning again to Beaver Falls, he has prac- 
ticed there ever since, with even greater suc- 
cess than he anticipated. 

Dr. Moon is a member of the American 
Medical Association and is secretary of the 
Beaver County Medical Society of wfiich he 
has been a member since locating in Beaver 
Falls. Politically, he is a Republican, but 
never sought nor desired office. The Doctor 
is also a member of numerous beneficiary 
societies; being examiner for the Prudential 
Life Insurance Company and also for the 



Western Mutual Life Association of Chicago. 
On May 17, 1888, Lulo A. Perrott became 
his bride and this union has augmented his 
pleasures and soothed his sorrows. Their 
home was brightened by two children, but 
the grim messenger, Death, recalled one pre- 
cious treasure. The names of their children 
are: Merl P., born March 4, 1891, and Alta 
Sterling, born June i, 1894, and died July 12, 
1894, being deprived of life by a sad acci- 
dent. 

Dr. Moon is a self-made man according to 
the common significance of tlie term. As a 
physician, he is well and favorably known 
throughout a large circ'e of patrons, a repu- 
tation he has won by a degree of energy, de- 
termination, and skill, that have secured for 
him an extensive field of practice and have 
fairly given him a place among the leading 
men of his profession. 



§OHN IMBRIE MARTIN, whose por- 
trait is shown on the opposite page, is 
a substantial and capable citizen of the 
town of Beaver, with which community he 
has been prominently identified for many 
years. He has served as deputy sheriff, and 
as sheriff, of Beaver county, but is now en- 
gaged in the real estate business. He was 
born on the old homestead in DarHngton 
township, Beaver county, and is a son of 
James Powers Martin, and a grandson of 
James Martin. 

Major Hugh Martin was the great-grand- 
father of the subject hereof, and although 



128 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



born in the North of Ireland, he was of 
Scotch-French extraction; he came to this 
country in 1770, and was an Indian scout and 
captain of a reconnoitering party during the 
War of Independence; he met with many 
thriUing adventures while in that capacity, 
which he was wont to relate with pleasure. 
Before the close of the war he was commis- 
sioned a major. About the year 1798, he 
took up a tract of fifteen hundred acres of 
land, a portion of which was near Greensburg, 
Westmoreland county. Pa., and the rest ex- 
tended into Darlington township, Beaver 
county. His three sons, William, John, and 
James inherited the estate upon his death. 

Mr. iVIartin's grandfather received the 
homestead and one hundred and seventy-five 
acres, as his portion of the estate; he greatly 
improved the property by supplanting the old 
set of log buildings with a new set of brick 
and stone buildings, which are still in use by 
the heirs of his son, James P. He reared 
a family of children, and those who grew to 
maturity were: Hugh, Daniel, Leasure, 
Jesse, Robert, John, James P., Eliza J., and 
Maria. He died aged seventy-two years, 
and his wife, Elizabeth Leasure, also attained 
an advanced age. 

James Powers Martin was born in 1828, on 
the homestead, and upon the death of his 
father, bought out the interests of the heirs 
to. the homestead ; the greater part of his life 
was devoted to farming, in which he was very 
successful. He was at one time connected 
with an oil refinery, which was built on his 
farm, the oil being manufactured from cannel 



coal. From January i, 1876, to 1879, he 
served as sheriff of this county, being elected 
on the Republican ticket. At about seven 
o'clock on Christmas Eve of 1892, he was 
struck by an engine while walking down the 
railroad track, from the result of which he 
died the next day at one o'clock. He had 
just left the railway station after accompany- 
ing his daughter there, and was on his return 
home, when the accident occurred. His death 
was deeply lamented both by his family and 
relatives, and by his host of friends. He was 
married, in 1850, to Mary Imbrie, a daughter 
of John Imbrie, a prominent farmer of Big 
Beaver township, Beaver county, and they 
were the parents of the following children : 
James R., a lawyer of Beaver; John I., the 
subject hereof; Rose, the wife of A. DuflF, of 
Beaver Falls; Mary I., the wife of Isaac Hall; 
William H., a real estate dealer of Beaver 
Falls; De Lorma E. ; Lilla J., the wife of Dr. 
J. R. McQuaid, of Leetsdale, Pa. ; and 
Jere C. 1 

John Imbrie Martin was reared on the farm 
and attended the Darlington Academy ; he 
continued to work on the homestead until he 
became associated with A. Duff in the dry 
goods business at Beaver Falls. Four years 
later he sold out and returned to farming, 
which he followed four years. He was then 
deputy sheriff under Sheriff A. J. Welsh, for 
one term, and in 1890 he was elected sheriff, 
— his term beginning January i, 1891, 
and ending January i, 1894. During 
this period, he erected dwelling houses on 
Fourth street, also one on Beaver street, in 



BEAVER COUNTY 



129 



which he made his home; in 1898, he erected 
his present handsome residence opposite the 
college, on College street. Mr. Martin de- 
votes much of his time to real estate ; he is also 
interested in other enterprises in the 
borough. 

Mr. Martin was joined in matrimonial 
bonds with Griselda Best, a daughter of 
Charles L. Best of Lawrence county, and ona 
child has blessed their home, — Norman I., 
born June 28, 1894. Politically, the subject 
of this biography is an active Republican ; he 
has been elected a director of the schools for 
several terms. Religiously, he is a Presbyte- 
rian. Fraternally, he is a member and past 
master of St. James Lodge, No. 457, F. & 
A. M. Mr. Martin is a prominent member of 
the Beaver County Agricultural Society, of 
which he has been treasurer for the past three 
vears. 



§ERE C. MARTIN is conspicuous 
among the prominent and influential 
members of the Beaver County Bar, — 
being a partner of his brother, J. R. Martin, 
with the firm name as Martin & Martin. His 
popularity and executive ability have been ap- 
preciated by the citizens of Beaver, to the ex- 
tent that he has been honored with the office 
of chief burgess of his adopted town, and he 
is at present officiating in that capacity. He 
was born in Darlington township, Beaver 
county, April 11, 1867, and his ancestors have 
been residents of this county for more than a 
century. He is a son of ex-Sheriff James 



Powers Martin, grandson of James Martin, 
and great-grandson of Hugh Martin. 

Major Hugh Martin was born in the north 
of Ireland and was of Scotch-French origin ; 
he came to America in 1770 and served dur- 
ing the Revolutionary War as an Indian scout 
and captain of a reconnoitering party, in 
which capacity he met with many thrilling ad- 
ventures, which he often related with pleasure. 
He was commissioned major during the latter 
part of the war. About the year 1798, he set- 
tled in Westmoreland county, Pa., near 
Greensburg, and there he took up a tract of 
fifteen hundred acres of land; the larger part 
of it extended into Beaver county, Darlington 
township. Upon his death his estate was di- 
vided among his three sons, William, John 
and James. 

James Martin received the homestead and 
one hundred and seventy-five acres of choice 
land ; the first set of buildings was made of 
logs, but James Martin built large brick and 
stone buildings, all of which are still in con- 
stant use, and are owned by the heirs of his 
son, James P. Martin. James Powers Martin 
was one of a family of twelve children ; those 
who grew to maturity were Hugh, Daniel, 
Leasure, Jesse, Robert, John, James P., Eliza 
J., and Maria. James Martin died aged sev- 
enty-two years, leaving a large estate ; his wife, 
Elizabeth Leasure, also died at an advanced 
age. 

The father of Jere C. Martin was born on 
the homestead in 1828, and bought out the 
heirs of his father's estate upon the latter's 
death ; his entire life was principally devoted 



130 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



to agricultural pursuits, but he was at one 
time associated with an oil refinery built on 
his farm, — the oil being manufactured from 
cannel coal. He was elected sheriff of Beaver 
county on the Republican ticket and served 
from January i, 1876 to 1879. On the even- 
ing of December 24, 1892, Mr. Martin accom- 
panied his daughter, Mrs. A. Duff, and family, 
to the railway station in a conveyance, and, 
upon their departure, he started on his way 
home, walking down the track, but just before 
leaving the track he was struck by an engine. 
This occurred about seven o'clock in the even- 
ing, and on the next day at one o'clock he 
departed from this world. He was popular, 
widely known throughout the county, a good 
citizen and friend, and his many excellent 
qualities and courteous bearing gained for him 
the esteem and respect of all who knew him. 
He was married in 1850 to Mary Imbrie, a 
daughter of John Imbrie, a prominent farmer 
of Big Beaver township, this county. She was 
born in 1831, and died in 1877. They were 
the parents of the following children : James 
Rankin, a partner in the law firm of Martin 
& Martin; John Imbrie, ex-sheriff of this 
county; Rose, the wife of A. Duff of Beaver 
Falls; Mary I., the wife of Isaac Hall; Wil- 
liam H., a prominent real estate dealer of 
Beaver Falls; De Lorma E. ; Lilla J., the wife 
of Dr. J. R. McQuaid, of Leetsdale, Pa. ; and 
Jere C. 

The subject of this sketch was intellectually 
trained in the public schools, in Greersburg 
Academy, and in Washington and Jefferson 
College at Washington, Pa.; from 1891 to 



1893 he served as deputy sheriff under Sheriff 
John Imbrie Martin, his brother, and during 
this period he devoted his spare time in the 
study of law, having access to his brother's 
law library. September 19, 1894, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar and immediately became a 
partner with his brother, J. R. Martin. Since 
January i, 1897, he has served as chief bur- 
gess of Beaver, being elected on the Republi- 
can ticket. The borough of Beaver is located 
on the north bank of the Ohio River and near 
the mouth of Beaver River. Under the ad- 
ministration of Hon. Thomas Martin, then 
Governor of Pennsylvania, in 1791, the town 
was surveyed and laid out. Martin & Martin, 
attorneys-at-law, have a fine office in the Daw- 
son Block on Third street, and also one in 
Beaver Falls. Jere C. Martin has only 
been practicing a little over four years, but is 
recognized as exceedingly bright, of excel- 
lent address, quick to see the point and appli- 
cation of law, of unusually good judgment, 
accurate in the preparation of legal papers or 
causes for trial, and as having a clear legal 
mind and giving promise of standing high in 
the ranks of his profession. His partner, J. R. 
Martin, is a hard and conscientious worker, 
thoroughly equipped for his profession, and 
he has merited the confidence reposed in him, 
his progress having been deservedly rapid. 

Jere C. Martin was wedded in 1894 to Miss 
Rose Best, a daughter of Charles L. Best of 
Enon, Lawrence county, Pa., and two chil- 
dren have been born to them, Dorothea and 
Griselda. He is the owner of a fine home in 
Beaver. Socially, he is a member and past 



1908 .-:^ 




JOSEPH T. PUGH. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



133 



master of St. James Lodge, F. &. A. M. ; and 
is also a member of the Elks ; and the K. of P. 



fOSEPH T. PUGH, whose portrait ap- 
pears on the opposite page, is, perhaps, 
the oldest living resident in Beaver 
county, Pa., his birth occurring at Fallston, 
January 6, 1809; he has for many years made 
his home in New Brighton. He has the ap- 
pearance of a man of sixty years, being still 
strong and active, with mind unimpaired; he 
has fine eye-sight, — as he still reads without 
glasses, — and he may be considered an 
authority on the early history of this county. 
His father, John Pugh, was a son of Jonathan 
Pugh, and a grandson of John Pugh. 

John Pugh was of Welsh origin, and was 
among the early Quaker settlers of Philadel- 
phia. Jonathan was born in Limerick town- 
ship, Philadelphia county. Pa., and his wed- 
ding with Naomi Evans was solemnized at a 
meeting held at Gwynedd, in that county, 
September 27, 1759; our subject has the cer- 
tificate of the marriage framed and in good 
condition; it was signed by thirty-two wit- 
nesses. They settled in Chester county. Pa., 
where he bought two plantations. His death 
occurred March 8, 1798. His children were: 
Elihu, Evan, Jesse, John, Ruth, Sarah, Jesse, 
(2), and Mary. 

John Pugh , was born near Pughtown, 
Chester county, August 20, 1779; his brother 
Evan was also born there November 13, 1765. 
In May, 1804, John and Evan Pugh came to 



Beaver county, and as both had learned 
the milling trade, they erected mills at Falls- 
ton. Their mill was not only patronized by 
the farmers of the neighborhood, but many 
came from distant points to have their 
wheat ground. They shipped extensively 
to Pittsburg, — the flour and feed being taken 
to that city on boats. Later a carding and 
cloth dressing factory was added, and still 
later they began to manufacture cotton goods. 
Evan Pugh withdrew from the business 
a number of years later and the father of 
Joseph T. continued alone until 1858, when he 
rented the mills. He also conducted a gro- 
cery store at Fallston and operated a linseed 
oil mill. His mills were all destroyed by fire, 
in which he suffered heavy losses. He built 
the handsome brick residence now occupied 
by Mr. McKibben, and resided there until 
death claimed him in May, i860. He mar- 
ried Sarah Townsend; she was born January 
13, 1777, and died July 16, 1826. They were 
the parents of the following children: Jona- 
than ; Caroline ; Mary Ann ; and Joseph T., the 
subject hereof. Jonathan died young; Caro- 
line died in 1831, — she was the wife of John 
Minor, and the mother of one daughter, Caro- 
line, who married David Critchlow; Mary 
Ann, who died in 1881, was first married to 
Warren Seely, M. D., and later, to John 
Minor, — she is the mother of Henry, John F., 
and Henrietta. John Pugh, father of our sub- 
ject, formed a second union, with Mrs. Ann 
Peck. He was president of the branch of the 
LTnited' States Bank, located at New Brighton. 
The subject of this record attended such 



134 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



schools as were held in his native district, and 
early in life learned the machinists' trade at 
Fallston ; he did not pursue his chosen occu- 
pation to any great extent, however, as he 
began the manufacture of barrels and window 
sashes, which he continued until he retired 
from active business life. He also became 
interested in various other enterprises in the 
village. 

Mr. Pugh wedded Nancy, a daughter of 
Robert and Nancy McCreary of Fayette 
county, Pa., and she died aged fifty-six years. 
They reared the following children : John ; 
Sarah Ann ; Evan ; Mary ; Caroline Cecelia ; 
Irene Ida; and Henry. John is a dentist of 
Philadelphia, and wedded Amelia Blanchard. 
Evan, deceased, was married to Catherine 
Price, by whom he had two children. 
Mary first married H. C. Torrey, and, 
secondly, was wedded to George Post. 
Caroline Cecelia married Eugene Pierce, and 
one child, Mary E., was born to, them. Henry 
married Fannette Line and they have three 
children: Harry, Fred, and Helen. Mr. 
Pugh was reared a Friend and has always ad- 
hered to that faith. He has taken a promi- 
nent part in promoting the growth and pros- 
perity of the town and county, and his kind 
and genial disposition has made him a popu- 
lar and much respected citizen ; he has proved 
himself a good neighbor, and a kind and lov- 
ing husband and father; now while passing 
through the sunset of life, and enjoying the 
fruits of a laborious past, he is surrounded by 
a host of warm friends who will always cher- 
ish and honor his name. 






EWIS GRAHAM, the efficient sheriff 
of Beaver county. Pa., who was elected 
to that office in 1897 by over 1,200 
majority (the largest majority ever received 
by any candidate in the history of Beaver 
county), is a large, splendidly built and well- 
proportioned man, and an ideal sheriff. He 
was born in Freedom, Beaver county, June 26, 
1850, is a son of John and Sarah (Feazell) 
Graham, and grandson of Adam and Nancy 
(Bell) Graham. 

After attending public school at Freedom, 
Lewis was a pupil in the New Brighton school. 
While still a lad, he became messenger boy 
for the Western Union Telegraph Co., at New 
Brighton. Being an ambitious boy, he sought 
a position where he could do manual labor 
and earn money. Next he accepted a job as 
water boy on the railroad a short time, after 
which he enlisted as an orderly during the 
Civil War, serving in the construction corps 
and being engaged in rebuilding railroads. 
He thus spent seven months in the states of 
Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. He next 
obtained a position as cabin boy on a steamer 
plying on the Ohio River from Pittsburg to 
Omaha, Nebraska. He proved to be so capa- 
ble and worthy a lad that he was offered a 
better position with Kensley & Whisler of 
New Brighton, as clerk, and worked later in 
the same capacity for William Kennedy. He 
then accepted the appointment of first bag- 
gage master for the Fort Wayne R. R., and 
occupied that position for two years, serving 
as a clerk in Pittsburg the following eight 
years. But, longing for his home surround- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



135 



ings and friends, he returned and engaged in 
the cutlery business for two years. He then 
became connected with the Singer Sewing 
Machine Co., remaining in their employ for 
ten years. Accepting a more lucrative posi- 
tion as clerk in the Lake Erie depot at Beaver 
Falls, he worked there for some time, and 
then took charge of the Bridge Station for a 
period of six years. He served three years 
and then became a candidate for the ofifice of 
sheriff. He resigned to become deputy sherifY 
and the result was most gratifying to him, as 
he simply exchanged places with his former 
employer by becoming sherifif, while ex- 
Sheriff Molter now occupies the position of 
deputy. 

Mr. Graham built a handsome residence on 
Patterson Heights, which he still owns. He 
moved his family to Beaver when elected, 
however, and resides in the residence portion 
of the Beaver county jail. This is a model 
structure, beautifully located on the south side 
of the public park on the corner of Market 
street, and nearly facing the court house. The 
county jail is built of sandstone from Beaver 
county, and was constructed in 1856. It con- 
tains thirty-six cells, fourteen of which were 
added in 1898. It is of modern construction 
throughout, being heated by a hot air furnace, 
and is kept in the best of order by Sheriff 
Graham and his able wife and assistants. The 
sheriff also has an office in the court house. 

Adam Graham, grandfather of our subject, 
followed the occupation of boat building 
nearly all his life, constructing many steam- 
boats for the Ohio River and also for the 



canal. His life was practically spent in Free- 
dom, where both he and his wife died. He 
married Nancy Bell, an attractive lady, and 
they reared the following children : John, 
now deceased, who was the father of Lewis ; 
Addison, who settled in Kentucky, and is also 
deceased ; Theodora, who resides in Freedom ; 
Minerva (Cooper) ; May (Marcus) ; and Emily 
(Hooper). 

John Graham, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in Freedom, Beaver county. 
Pa., and spent his early life in assisting his 
father in boat-building. He was cut off by 
death just in the prime of life, dying in 1855 
at the age of about forty years. His widow, 
who was Miss Sarah Feazell before her mar- 
riage, still survives him and resides at Beaver 
Falls. Their children are : John B., a car- 
penter of New Brighton ; Lewis, the subject of 
this sketch ; Wilham, also a carpenter by 
trade, and residing in New Brighton ; Helen, 
wife of T. M. Elliott of Beaver Falls; Zetta. 
wife of John Webster of New Brighton ; and 
one daughter who died in early childhood. 
Our subject wooed and won for his life com- 
panion Elizabeth Carter, an accomplished 
daughter of William Carter. Mr. and Mrs. 
Graham have been blessed with a family of 
seven children, namely : Adelaide Victoria 
Carter; Orin Palmer, who died young; Mar- 
garet Carter; Lewis Edward; Sarah Eliza- 
beth; Oscar Lawrence Jackson; and John 
Reeves. 

William Carter, father-in-law of our subject, 
was born at Morristown, Westmoreland 
county. Pa., is a son of Charles and Jane 



136 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



(Anderson) Carter, grandson of London Car- 
ter, and great-grandson of King Carter, who 
was given a large grant of land in Virginia. 
London Carter rendered valuable services to 
our country during the Revolutionary War. 

Charles Carter was born in the eastern part 
of Virginia, and was engaged in the manu- 
facture of iron, locating in Westmoreland 
county, where he conducted a furnace. Later, 
he removed to Butler county, and later still, 
to old Brighton, now Beaver Falls, where he 
also owned a furnace. He was united in mar- 
riage with Jane Anderson, who bore him the 
following children: Charles; William; James; 
George; Charlotte; Jane; and Elizabeth. 
William Carter in early life followed the pro- 
fession of teaching. Subsequently he was an 
engineer, after which he worked in the cut- 
lery business at Beaver Falls, and owned an 
interest in the paper mills there. His death 
occurred in his seventy-fifth year. At the time 
of his death, he owned valuable prop- 
erty. Mr. Carter was joined in matri- 
mony with Valeria Reeves, a daughter 
of Daniel Reeves. Mrs. Carter died 
at the age of fifty-two years, leaving the fol- 
lowing six children as a legacy to her hus- 
band : Charles, who resides in the West ; Ce- 
lesta, now deceased ; Adelaide, widow of John 
Scott; Margaret, wife of T. R. Galton; John, 
also deceased ; and Elizabeth, wife of the sub- 
ject of this review. 

Sheriff Graham has always taken a deep 
interest in educational affairs, and has served 
as a member of the school board for three 
years. Socially, he is a member of the K. of 



P., and is a charter member of Social Lodge 
of New Brighton. Mr. Graham has truly been 
the architect of his own fortune. Starting out 
with an humble beginning, by steady perse- 
verance and strict adherence to his purpose, 
he has risen step by step, to a position where 
he is conspicuous in the public gaze. Sheriff 
Graham is a general favorite and performs the 
duties of his ofifice in a highly capable manner. 
He is a member of the Elks. In religious 
feeling the family favors the Methodist 
church. 




ON. JOHN FLEMING DRAVO, 
of Beaver, Pa., ex-member of 
the legislature, and surveyor and 
revenue collector for years in Pittsburg, Pa., 
was also prominently connected for a long 
period with the coal and coke interests of that 
place. He was at various times president of 
the coal exchange. No man has held more 
positions of trust and more completely won 
the confidence of the people, or done more to 
develop the commercial interests of that busy 
city, than Mr. Dravo. He has been a director 
in the Tradesmen's National Bank, and the 
People's Insurance Company, and has been 
variously connected with other corporations 
of note. He was one of the prime organizers 
of the Pittsburg & Lake Erie R. R., and took 
an active part in the construction of this line, 
which has paid satisfactory dividends to the 
original stockholders from the first year of 
its existence. In educational work our subject 
has always taken a deep and fitting interest, 



BEAVER COUNTY 



and, as trustee of the Allegheny College at 
Meadville, and as president of the Beaver Fe- 
male College, he has won distinction by his 
earnest and intelligent labors. For four years 
he rendered valuable services as president of 
the State Reform School, and for eight years 
served as director of the Allegheny County 
Home, one of the most worthy of local chari- 
ties. It is said that Mr. Dravo is honest to a 
fault, and no citizen of Allegheny or Beaver 
county stands higher in the estimation of 
the people. Every position held by him has 
been faithfully and honestly guarded, and 
upon retiring, he has left no stain or suspicion 
attached to his good name. 

John Fleming Dravo was born in the village 
of West Newton, Westmoreland county. Pa., 
October 29, 1819, and was reared in Alle- 
gheny, attending the public schools, and after- 
ward entering Allegheny College, where, after 
two years of diligent study, his health failed 
and he was compelled to cut short his college 
career. He assisted in the office of his father, 
who was an extensive and successful coal mer- 
chant, and thereby gained a practical knowl- 
edge of business methods. Upon arriving at 
manhood's state, young Dravo went to Mc- 
Keesport, Allegheny county, Pa., and en- 
gaged in mining and shipping coal, in which 
venture he acquired prominence and fortune 
and became the owner of a large amount of 
real estate. He planned and founded the 
town of Dravosburg, on the Monongahela 
River, less than a dozen miles from Pittsburg. 
In 1868, Mr. Dravo disposed of his extensive 
coal interests and engaged in the manufacture 



of coke. After establishing large plants at 
Connellsville, Pa., he organized the Pittsburg 
Gas, Coal & Coke Company, of which he be- 
came general manager and treasurer, and, 
later, executive; head. This latter corporation 
began operations with 40 ovens and upon the 
resignation of Mr. Dravo in 1883, its plant 
comprised 300 ovens, and its monthly output 
was almost half a million bushels. A man of 
strict integrity and high character, with a gen- 
tle and considerate regard for the interests of 
the large force kept constantly employed un- 
der him, our subject made many friends 
among the laboring classes, among whom he 
is extremely popular. 

In .i860, he was elected to the presidency of 
the Pittsburg Coal Exchange, and held that 
conspicuous position until his resignation in 
1870. In 1884, he was chosen president of the 
Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburg, succeed- 
ing Hon. J. K. Moorehead, whose lamented 
death created a vacancy in this position. Mr. 
Dravo labored with a single eye to the ad- 
vancement of the commercial interests of the 
city. With a solicitude born of a thorough 
knowledge of the subject, he labored inces- 
santly for years to secure needed improve- 
ments in the Monongahela Valley, and along 
the Ohio River. He wrote and spoke in favor 
of the work on any and all occasions. His 
letters and speeches referring to this subject 
alone, if published, would make a good sized 
volume. No small share of his efiforts was 
put forth at the national capital, whither he 
was repeatedly sent to represent and defend 
the cause of his fellow citizens. Master of the 



138 



BOOK OP BIOGRAPHIES 



situation, and arguing his favorite measure 
with great earnestness, he made a profound 
impression on the House Committee on Riv- 
ers and Harbors, and secured substantial rec- 
ognition of his claims and demands, gaining 
many advantages which a less enthusiastic 
advocate might have failed to obtain. 

Mr. Dravo's earlier political efforts were 
in opposition to slavery ; this institution he 
opposed on principle, and he loudly de- 
nounced it, in season and out of season, in ac- 
cordance with the manner of the anti-slavery 
advocates of those days. He polled his first 
vote as a "Henry Clay" Whig, and an avowed 
enemy of slavery. In 1848, he was nominated 
in Allegheny county as a candidate for the 
state legislature by the supporters of the Buf- 
falo platform adopted at Utica, N. Y., June 
22, 1848, who had for their motto "Free 
Men." Prominent and active among clear 
seeing and resolute citizens who radically sev- 
ered their connections with the old parties for 
the sake of principle, Mr. Dravo stood, and 
worked in harmony with the movement which 
culminated, in his state, in the virtual organi- 
zation of the Republican party, at the La- 
fayette Hall convention in Pittsburg, Febru- 
ary 22, 1854. When the party sprang full- 
fiedged into the field in 1856, Mr. Dravo was 
at once acknowledged a leader, and has since 
never forsaken its cause. In that and all 
subsequent political campaigns his splendid 
oratorical powers have assisted materially in 
the support of the party's principles, and the 
vigor with which he has carried on his work, 
together with his unflinching adherence to the 



men and measures of the party, have earned 
for him the title of "Stalwart." 

Few political orators equal Mr. Dravo in 
the open discussion of the finance or tariff 
question of our nation, and although these 
are his chief themes of late, he has abundant 
information and an eloquent vocabulary al- 
ways on hand to suit any occasion. A beau- 
tiful illustration of this was afforded in his 
address on the death of General Grant, pro- 
nounced July 25, 1885, at the memorial ser- 
vices held at Beaver Falls, and also at a special 
meeting of the Pittsburg Chamber of Com- 
merce, held July 23, 1885, for the express pur- 
pose of taking suitable action in view of the 
nation's great loss. Calling the meeting to 
order. President Dravo said: "The sad in- 
telligence of General Grant's death has made 
it necessary that this Chamber should be con- 
vened that appropriate action may be had, 
touching an event of national import. I do 
not use extravagant language when I say the 
most eminent citizen of the Republic has 
passed away, and the people are moved to the 
expression of sorrow at the death of him who, 
when living, they delighted so much to honor. 
General Grant's record is emblazoned on ev- 
ery page of our country's history for the past 
quarter of a century. In health, on the battle- 
field, he proved himself the greatest com- 
mander of the age ; in civil life he was crowned 
by a grateful people, with the highest honors ; 
and as president of the United States, he dis- 
played the sterling virtues of integrity and 
unswerving devotion to the best interests of 
the nation he did so much to serve; in sick- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



139 



ness, long continued and marked by extreme 
suffering, he evinced a patience and charity 
befitting the closing scenes of an illustrious 
life. It is for this Chamber to take such action 
as you in your wisdom may deem most appro- 
priate." 

One of the secrets of Mr. Dravo's power of 
oratory is that he speaks from the heart, and 
by his own earnestness and enthusiasm sways 
tlie emotions of his hearers and seldom fails to 
carry conviction. Although a hearty advo- 
cate and supporter of his favorite cause, he 
declined to appear as a candidate for of^ce. 
Notwithstanding this fact, in 1886, he was 
made the Republican nominee for the state 
legislature to represent Beaver county. Pa., 
in which he resides, and having almost uni- 
versal indorsement, he was elected. His tal- 
ents and abilities found immediate recognition 
at Harrisburg by his appointment on the com- 
mittees of "ways and means" and "constitu- 
tional reforms," tv,-o of the most important 
committees of the legislature. Serving as sec- 
retary of both, and as a vv^arm friend of tem- 
perance reform, he introduced the "Constitu- 
tional Prohibitory Am.endment," which was 
successfully passed. He likewise m.ade an elo- 
quent speech nominating Col. Matthew Stan- 
ley Quay for U. S. Senator. 

In 1 88 1, our subject's name was brought 
forward by his party friends as a candidate 
for the office of collector of customs, and sur- 
veyor of the port of Pittsburg, and he was 
appointed to that office by President Gar- 
field. At that time, the senate was not unani- 
mous in the matter of appointments, and 



there was some delay in confirming his nomi- 
nation. At this juncture, the political strength 
and great popularity of Mr. Dravo were em- 
phatically demonstrated by unanimous voice. 
The business men of Pittsburg, without regard 
to party views, demanded his confirmation, 
and the entire press of Beaver county sup- 
ported the demand, and was loud in its praise 
of his fitness and qualifications for the posi- 
tion. On all sides and frequently from the 
most unexpected sources, came warm advo- 
cacy of his claims. These appeals were suffi- 
ciently powerful to overcome all opposition, 
and his appointment was confirmed by the 
senate May 20, 1881, when he was duly com- 
missioned. His services as collector covered 
a period of four years, which was marked by 
a most efificient and capable administration 
of that ofifice. Upon the accession of a Dem- 
ocratic administration, Mr. Dravo resigned. 
In the business life of Pittsburg, he has been 
for many years a conspicuous and honored 
factor, and has frequently lent his personal 
and material aid towards building up the city 
institutions. Our subject is a descendant ot 
Anthony Dravo, whose original name was 
Anthony Dreaveau. 

Anthony Dravo, grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was one of the early settlers of 
Pittsburg. He came from France over 
a century ago under the following inter- 
esting circumstances. In 1789, the year the 
Bastile fell, the Marquis De Lussiere was the 
owner of a beautiful estate in one of the su- 
burbs of the city of Paris. There lived with 
him a young florist, who had so gained his 



140 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



confidence, that he was looked upon as a con- 
fidential friend and companion. At the be- 
ginning of that terrible chapter of history 
known as the French Revolution, the Mar- 
quis and his young friend whose name was 
Dreaveau, sought refuge in America. In the 
Monongahela Valley opposite the mouth of 
Turtle Creek, and in full view of the scenes 
where Washington had won his fame as a sol- 
dier, De Lussiere, with the aid of his faith- 
ful friend, made for himself a home and sur- 
rounded it with things of beauty, a faint re- 
minder of the loved estate from which a cruel 
fate had driven them. This home, built by 
the French marquis, is known as Hamilton 
Hall, and has since been the property of the 
Von Bonnhorsts, Swartwelders, Riddles, and 
others. 

The young friend who stood by the Mar- 
quis in the great crisis of his life, and accom- 
panied him over the sea in 1794, located in 
the village of Pittsburg, Pa., and is now 
called the pioneer florist. The garden of An- 
thony Dravo just outside of Fort Pitt, pur- 
chased from Gen. O'Hara, quarter-master of 
that fort, occupied one-half of the square of 
what is now the central business portion of 
the city. There for many years, our subject's 
grandfather pursued his calling, for which 
both training and taste had peculiarly fitted 
him. When this country was in its "teens" 
there was no other spot in Pittsburg so pretty 
and attractive as Dravo's flower and fruit gar- 
den on Hay street, extending from Pennsyl- 
vania to Liberty streets. In those early days, 
Anthony Dravo was authority on all things 



pertaining to flower or fruit culture. The 
florist was never happier than when enter- 
taining visitors from his native France. Many 
noblemen from that country were entertained 
in the Dravo home, bringing letters of intro- 
duction from the Marquis De Lussiere to his 
Pittsburg friend. When Lafayette visited the 
city, he went to greet the friend of his friend, 
and talk over with him the scenes both had 
witnessed in Paris, a generation before. 

With the growth of Pittsburg industries 
called for the grounds he occupied in Liberty 
street. Anthony Dravo purchased larger 
grounds at East Liberty, and there his busi- 
ness flourished until his death, nearly halt a 
century ago. Michael Dravo, father of our 
subject, was the eldest son of Anthony Dravo. 
He was born at Pittsburg and was united in 
marriage with Mary Fleming, a daughter of 
John Fleming, Sr. After marriage, the 
young folks settled in Westmoreland county, 
Pa., where our subject was born, but later in 
life they returned to Pittsburg and lived to 
a good old age. 

In 1868, our subject went to Beaver county 
and purchased a home on First street, over- 
looking the Ohio River, and its beautiful 
scenery. In 1891, this home was destroyed 
by fire, but was replaced by a handsome mod- 
ern home of stone and brick. November 23, 
1843, ^'"- Dravo was united in marriage with 
Eliza Jane Clark, an accomplished daughter 
of Robert and Margaret Clark of Allegheny 
county, with whom he has spent over half a 
century. Ten children have been born to 
them, namely: Cassius M. Clay, born in 1844, 




STEPHEN P. STONE. 




DAN H, STONE. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



145 



and died in 1845; Margaret J., born January 
2, 1846, wlio is the widow of Robert Wilson 
and resides with her parents; Josephine M., 
born June 5, 1848, who was joined in mar- 
riage with J. H. McCreery, a prominent attor- 
ney of Beaver, and is the parent of the fol- 
lowing children, — John D., Thomas, Mary, 
Caryl, and Vankirk; Mary Emma, born in 
185 1, and died in 1869; Annie Maria, born 
1854, and died the same year; Ida Clark, born 
1858, and died in 1861 ; John S., who was born 
March 9, 1861, is a prominent oil dealer, and 
wedded Sadie McClerg, who bore him one 
cliiid, Eliza J. ; Lida, who is at home ; and 
Etta S., who was born March 30, 1865, and 
died in 1888. 

John S. Dravo and his family are consistent 
and active members of the M. E. church, of 
which denomination Mr. Dravo has been a 
member since he attained the age of eighteen 
years. He was also Sabbath School superin- 
tendent, and has been a local preacher for 
many years. He is beloved and respected by 
all who know him and his relations in and 
out of the family are what all good and honest 
men endeavor to sustain, in order to make 
their lives above reproach or criticism. 




STEPHEN P. and DAN H. STONE, 
Jr., prominent and progressive busi- 
ness men of Beaver, Pa., whose 
portraits accompany this sketch, are scions 
of one of the pioneer families of Beaver 
county. The family was established here 
when this section of the state was little 



more than a wilderness, principally inhabited 
by the Indian race, and infested by beasts of 
the forest. This region has furnished good, 
substantial men to the community, who have 
zealously promoted the rapid growth and de- 
velopment of the country. 

Stephen P. Stone, grandfather of the gen- 
tlemen named above, was born in Derby, 
Conn., April 21, 1759, and was for some years 
a sea captain. In 1804, he went to Western 
Pennsylvania where he purchased twenty- 
four hundred acres of land for $1,200, it 
being located in Franklin and Marion town- 
ships, Beaver county. He returned to his 
native state for his family, and incidentally 
disposed of one-half of his purchase at $1 
per acre, — thus paying for the whole. He 
established a home in Marion township and 
erected a set of log buildings, which included 
a house, store and barn. It became known 
as the "Stone place," and is now owned by 
J. D. Boots. He next built a large eight- 
room brick house, with spacious and conven- 
ient rooms, and this was considered the finest 
residence in the township. It is still standing- 
and in good condition, — being owned by Mrs. 
Mary A. Leyda. He subsequently purchased 
a large tract of land where Harmony is now 
situated, and in 1805 bought the point of land 
lying north of the Beaver and Ohio rivers, 
known since as Stone's Point. He built a resi- 
dence there, now belonging to August Myers, 
and established a landing and warehouse for 
supply boats, — both being swept away in 
the flood of 1832. He also kept a tavern 
there, mainly for the accommodation of boat- 



BOOK OF BOIGRAPHIES 



men. He purchased pig iron from the Bas- 
senhem furnace, — it being delivered by wagon 
and shipped on keel boats, for it was before 
the day of railroads and steamboats. These 
boats were "poled" up the river by 
men, or drawn by horse where they 
could be, and were carried down the 
river by the current to the different 
ports Upon reaching their destination 
many of the boats were sold, and the men, 
who had received fifty cents per day for their 
work, were compelled to walk home. The 
boats not sold were stocked with various kinds 
of goods, and "poled" up stream again. Mr. 
Stone continued at this branch of work all of 
his life, and was a very prosperous man. He 
died in the last residence which he built (now 
owned by the heirs of Margaret Davidson), on 
October 2, 1839. Religiously, he was a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal church. He was first 
joined in wedlock with Caty Hull, January 5, 
1795, and they had nine children, namely: 
Stephen; Eliza, who married Elihu Evans; 
Mary J., the wife of Joseph McCombs; Dan 
H. ; Sherlock ; Charles ; Catherine, the wife of 
Henry W. Smith; Adelia; and Henry L., who 
died at the age of two niionths and one dav. 
Mrs. Stone died September 18, 1825. Mr. 
Stone formed a second marital union with 
Sarah Fuller, November 4, 1829, after he had 
attained the advanced age of seventy years. 
His widow was again married, to Samuel Col- 
ter; as a result of her second union three chil- 
dren were born : George H., Marshal P., 'md 
William E. 

Dan H. Stone, Sr., the father of 



Stephen P. and Dan H., Jr., was born in 
Derby, Conn., September 27, 1802, but was 
very young when his parents removed to 
Pennsylvania. During his younger days he 
assisted his father and was charged with many 
duties of a very responsible nature. When 
but eighteen years of age, he was sent on 
horseback to Columbus, Ohio, to collect a 
bill for his father, amounting to $2,000. His 
first day's work for himself was in assisting 
to pole a boat eighteen miles, working from 
sunrise to the first star of evening and then 
walking home, — his salary being fifty cents 
per day. Like his ancestors he was very fond 
of the water, and as this was one of the prin- 
cipal employments of the day, he followed it 
for many years. Later, in connection with 
his brothers, Stephen and Charles, he owned 
ar;d operated several steamboats, which ran 
to Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Louisville, and New 
Orleans. They had the contract for carry- 
ing the United States mail, and this yielded 
them large profits. Mr. Stone was very 
successful and accumulated considerable 
wealth ; before the war he disposed of his in- 
terest in the business. Having inherited a 
portion of the old homestead in Marion town- 
ship, he built saw mills and engaged very ex- 
tensively in lumbering. His business was in- 
jured largely by the panic of 1873, and as he 
was of a generous nature, he gave assistance 
to others, which almost resulted in his finan- 
cial ruin, and left him again a poor man. His 
health failed and he died on March 25, 1879. 
July 14, 1853 was the date of his marriage to 
Mary Patterson, a daughter of James Patter- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



147 



son, who was an early settler of Beaver county 
and a resident of Beaver Falls, — then known 
as Brigiilon. She was born November 
5, 1830, and is still living at Beaver, and en- 
joying the best of health. Their union re- 
sulted in the birth of seven children, as fol- 
lows : Stephen P. ; Elizabeth, the widow of 
D. F. Robinson; Dan H., Jr.; James P., who 
is engaged in the real estate business in Bea- 
ver Falls; Mary J.; Charles H. ; and Sally P., 
a resident of Beaver. 

Stephen P. Stone was born in Beaver, 
Beaver county. Pa., September 17, 1854, and 
attended the public schools and Beaver 
Academy, but as his father had met with re- 
verses, he was obliged to seek work at an 
early age. He entered a saw mill when four- 
teen years old, and from then until 1877 he 
did whatever work he happened to find. He 
was very ambitious and applied himself with 
a will, and in 1877 he received the appoint- 
ment of deputy prothonotary of Beaver 
county. He gave satisfaction, and was elected 
prothonotary of the Court of Common Pleas 
in 1879, serving in that capacity for six years, 
when he was made assistant cashier of the 
Beaver Deposit Bank. Fie was subsequently 
promoted to be cashier, and now discharges 
the duties of that responsible position. He is 
a man of tried business ability, is progressive 
and enterprising, and is held in the highest 
esteem by his employers and his townsmen. 
The Beaver Deposit Bank was established in 
1871 by M. S. Quay; J. S. Rutan; D. Mc- 
Kinney, M. D. ; and J. R. Harrah. Mr. Quay 
was president, and upon his retirement, was 



succeeded by S. P. Wilson. Business was 
first transacted in the Barkley Building, where 
the Buchanan Block now stands, but in July, 
1887, the bank was removed to the James 
yVllison building, where it has since been lo- 
cated. The subject of this sketch is one of 
the stockholders, and was an organizer, of the 
Bridgewater Gas Company of which he be- 
came treasurer ; he is treasurer of the Beaver 
\'alley Traction Company, of which he was 
one of the organizers, and is financially inter- 
ested in the People's Electric Street Railroad 
Company. 

On May 12, 1887, Stephen P. Stone was 
married to Louise M. Knox, a daughter of 
George W. Knox of Carlisle, Pa., a promi- 
nent, retired lawyer, of Philadelphia, and they 
are the parents of three children : Joseph K., 
born March 5, 1888; Stella Louise, born Oc- 
tober 22, 1889; and Virginia K., born August 
24, 1894. Politically, Mr. Stone is a Repub- 
lican and has served as a delegate to the state 
convention, and on the county committee. He 
is a member of the Odd Fellows' lodge, of 
which he is a past grand ; of the Masonic 
order, from F. & A. M. to K. T. ; of the 
Junior Order United American Mechanics; 
and of the Elks. In 1887, he built 
a very fine residence opposite the depot, 
graded the lawn and set out shrubbery and 
fruit, making it one of the most desirable 
homes in the borough. It is excellently 
located and commands a beautiful view of the 
villages and mountains along the Beaver and 
Oliio rivers. 

Dan H. Stone, Jr., was born in Beaver, 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Pa., September i, i860. He attended the 
public schools and the U. P. Seminary until 
1875, and in January, 1880, received the ap- 
pointment of deputy prothonotary under his 
brother, Stephen P. Stone, continuing thus 
for two terms of three years each. In 1885, 
he was elected prothonotary of the Court of 
Common Pleas (assuming his trust in Janu- 
ary, 1886), and was re-elected in 1888. He 
discharged his duties to the complete satisfac- 
tion of his constituents. During his incum- 
bency of the ofifice, he became desirous of 
entering the legal profession, and as a result, 
he studied law with Hon. J. M. Buchanan 
and Hon. M. F. Mecklem, — being admitted 
to the bar on September 19, 1892. Imme- 
diately after he began practicing, and by dint 
of hard and conscientious labor, he has es- 
tablished a good reputation and a large clien- 
tage. Intuitively, he applies the theoretic 
principles of law to the common affairs of 
every day life, and it is to his practical faculty 
that his success is mainly due. He is a stanch 
Republican and has been an active worker 
in party affairs. He has taken great interest 
in the progress of Beaver, and has been iden- 
tified with the Beaver Valley Traction Com- 
pany; was an incorporator, and, formerly, 
attorney, of the High River Bridge Company; 
and of the People's Electric Street Railroad 
Company. He has been attorney for several 
railroads in Western Pennsylvania. He is a 
member of the Masonic lodge, and of the Odd 
Fellows' lodge, of which he is past grand. 
He owns some valuable real estate in Beaver, 
and is one of its most substantial citizens. 



Charles H. Stone, the youngest son of 
Dan H. and Mary (Patterson) Stone, was 
born in Beaver, Pa., where he attended the 
public schools. He became assistant to his 
brother, Dan H., when the latter was protho- 
notary, and also studied law with him, — being 
admitted to the bar on December 6, 1896. He 
also served as assistant clerk under his 
brother, Stephen P., in the Beaver Deposit 
Bank. He is a very popular young man in 
the borough, and has worked up quite a 
lucrative practice. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. 



TT^HARLES RUN YON, manager of the 
I J| Keystone Tumbler Co., of Rochester, 

^*~— -^ Pa., is one of the enterprising and 
energetic men of that borough, and is 
well known throughout the county as 
fully worthy of the esteem in which 
he is held. He was born in Jeffer- 
son county, Ohio, and is a son of Philip 
Runyon. He came to Rochester, in 1875, 
and started a grocery store on New York 
street; this business he continued with much 
success for three years. He then entered the 
employ of the Rochester Tumbler Co., and 
so won the confidence of the firm that he soon 
worked himself up to the position of assistant 
manager of the plant. When the Keystone 
Tumbler Co. was organized, he was one of its 
promoters and stockholders, and was made 
general manager of that company. The com- 
pany was organized, in 1897, and the plant 
was built on the site of the old Agnes brick 



THE 

NEW YORK 
(PUBLIC library] 

\^Attcr, Lenox and rilden// 
Foundations. /,' 
1 908 ^y^ 




OLIVER Me)LrEK. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



ISI 



yard on Railroad avenue. It is a three- 
story building, 360x110 feet, with basement, 
and the company employ upwards of three 
hundred men. They manufacture blown and 
pressed glass tumblers, plain and decorated. 
Their work is of a superior quality, and they 
ship direct to jobbers throughout the United 
States, South America, Cuba, Mexico, and 
Europe. Since the company's organization, 
they have run a night and day force, and the 
work has gone on steadily, 

Mr. Runyon married Mary Wickham, a 
daughter of Jarvis Wickham, of Rochester, 
Pa., and they are the happy parents of three 
children, namely: Ethel; Laura Belle; and 
Charles Edwin. The subject of this sketch 
has been a member of the borough council for 
six years; and he is also a member of the 
I. O. O. F. He has always been a faithful 
attendant of the Episcopal church. Mr. Run- 
yon has a bright future before him, as he is 
a young man with great determination and 
energy, and will make a success of anything 
which he undertakes. 



LIVER MOLTER, ex-sherifT, and 
now deputy sheriff, of Beaver county. 
Pa., is one of the popular and re- 
spected citizens of Beaver, where he has re- 
sided all his life. He was born in Beaver, 
October 15, 1841, and is a son of Jonas 
Christopher and Fanny (Kemp) Molter, and 
grandson of John Molter, who was the family 
emigrant from his native country. He re- 



sided in Beaver many years, but, in the 
"forties," he settled in Stark county, Ohio, 
where he spent his remaining days, — dying at 
the age of eighty years. He was the father 
of a large family of children, of whom the 
following grew to maturity: John; Peter; 
Jonas C; Margaret, and Elizabeth. 

Oliver Molter's father was a brick-maker 
by trade and followed that occupation during 
his early days, but afterward engaged in coal 
mining, which he continued until he was 
elected justice of the peace of West Bridge- 
water, and faithfully discharged this trust until 
death claimed him. His wife was Fanny 
Kemp, a daughter of John Kemp, of Beaver, 
Pa., and she died at the age of sixty-nine 
years. Their children were named as follows : 
Henry, who is now a resident of Missouri; 
Peter J., deceased; Christopher, who resides 
in Chicago, 111.; Oliver, whose name heads 
this brief memoir; Margaret, who is the wife 
of Thornton Harn, of Bridgewater, Pa.; 
Fanny, who is deceased ; Mary, who was wed- 
ded to J. Kaszer, of Rochester; Eliza, who is 
the wife of James Olcott; and Martin L., who 
is a prominent citizen of New Brighton. 

Oliver Molter was intellectually trained in 
the public schools, and in the academy at 
Beaver; starting out in life, he was employed 
at coaling and canaling, which occupations he 
continued until August, 1864, when he en- 
listed in Company B, 204th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf. 
On the termination of the war, he returned 
home and became the owner of several mines, 
which he operated for several years; in 1877, 
he opened a fine livery stable in New 



152 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Brighton; he has since greatly enlarged this 
until it is now one of the best and most com- 
pletely equipped in the county. His son is 
now in charge of the stable. 

Mr. Molter first wedded Margaret B. 
Parris, a daughter of J. P. Parris, and she 
passed from this life aged fifty-six years. This 
union resulted in the birth of four children : 
William, deceased; Nora and Ida, — twins, — 
the former being the wife of E. O. Lindsey of 
New Brighton, and the latter, of Dr. Z. C. 
Laberge ; and Frank, who married Edith 
Smith. The second union of Mr. Molter was 
with Ada Laney, daughter of Samuel and 
Elizabeth Laney, and they were blessed by the 
following children : James, who married 
Christina Hair; Grace, who is the wife of 
Harry Lockhart; Bertha; Herbert; and 
Ralph. Mr. Molter is a strong Republican 
and has served as school director, assessor, 
and in the town council. He is president 
of the Beaver Signal Manufacturing Com- 
pany. Socially, he is a member of the F. & 
A. M.; K. of P.; Elks; A. O. U. W., and 
the Senior Order of United American Me- 
chanics. In religious views, he is a Metho- 
dist. His portrait accompanies the foregoing 
account of his life. 



(^„ PLYSSES S. STROUSS, M. D., one of 
iCfi '■^^ most active and energetic physi- 
^"'^ "^ cians and surgeons of Beaver, Pa., 
where his name is identified with many enter- 
prises of magnitude and note, has been ac- 



tively engaged in his profession at that place 
alone since 1884. Dr. Strouss was born in 
Hanover township, June 5, 1848, and was 
reared on a farm, thoroughly learning what 
constitutes a day's work. In gaining an edu- 
cation, he was ably assisted by his father, who, 
after sending him to the public school, con- 
sidered him able to "hoe his own row." Later, 
Ulysses took a finishing course at Mansfield 
Academy, and after graduating therefrom, he 
engaged in teaching school, being then only 
seventeen years of age. 

But our subject was not content with that 
profession, but had higher aspirations in life. 
He desired to fit himself for the medical pro- 
fession, and studied medicine under the pre- 
ceptorship of Dr. R. L. Walker of Mansfield, 
while teaching school at that place. Latter, 
he continued his studies in the office of 
Dr. C. McConnell of Service, and after- 
ward entered the medical department of the 
Western Reserve College of Cleveland, Ohio. 
Entering this college in 1870, he graduated 
therefrom in the class of 1872, and began the 
practice of his chosen profession with Dr. 
R. A. Moon at Hookstown, continuing there 
until 1874. At that time, he made a change 
of location, by going to Fairview, where he 
succeeded in building up a large and remu- 
nerative practice. He remained there until 
1884, when he sold out his business interests 
in that place to Dr. J. S. Louthan. Dr. Strouss 
had gained more confidence in his own ability 
and skill by this time, and now looked about 
tor a larger field. He found his heart's de- 
sire at Beaver, one of the most beautiful 



BEAVER COUNTY 



153 



boroughs of Western Pennsylvania, and 
located there shortly after leaving Fairview. 
From the beginning of his practice in Beaver, 
his knowledge and skill, his promptness and 
strict attention to business gained for him the 
respect and confidence of the people in gen- 
eral. His patronage has increased to such 
dimensions that its requirements can only be 
met by v^^orking early and late. Upon locat- 
ing in Beaver in 1884, Dr. Strouss purchased 
a residence and office at the corner of 
Third and Beaver streets, also buying the land 
and building adjoining on Beaver street. In 
1892, he purchased his present residence on 
the corner of Beaver and Turnpike streets. 
He built a business block on Third street, 
which he rented, and has at different times 
sold lots from his land, until now that portion 
of the borough is covered with beautiful resi- 
dences occupied and owned by some of the 
best people of Beaver. He has also built 
other houses in different parts of the town. 

Although Br. Strouss is a close student and 
keeps himself up-to-date in his profession, he 
has not been indifferent or idle as to the 
progress of his adopted home. Rather it may 
be said that he has been actively and finan- 
cially interested in many enterprises worthy 
of note during the last fifteen years in Beaver. 
He was one of the original stockholders of the 
Beaver National Bank, and is one of its direc- 
tors; he is also a stockholder of the Rochester 
Electric Light Company; a stockholder and 
director of the Beaver Loan Association, and 
a stockholder in various other enterprises. He 
served as U. S. pension examiner under 



Cleveland's administration, and is a valued 
member of the Beaver County Medical Soci- 
ety. Socially, he is a member and past master 
of St. James Lodge, No. 457, F. & A. M. ; of 
Eureka Chapter, No. 167, R. A. M. ; Pittsburg 
Commandery No. i, K. T. ; Syria Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S., besides which he is district 
deputy grand master of the Thirty-seventh 
District, and also a member of the Royal 
Arcanum. 

In 1870, Dr. Strouss was united in marriage 
with Esther M. Hartford, a daughter of James 
M. Hartford of South Beaver township, Bea- 
ver county, where he was known as a leading 
and progressive farmer. Two children, both 
daughters, have been born to our subject and 
his wife: Jane M., a graduate of Millersville 
State Normal School, and Martha E. Both 
are accomplished young ladies, and are still at 
home, where they entertain their many friends 
frequently in a truly hospitable manner. In 
the beginning of the present year, Dr. Strouss 
enlarged his residence, adding a fine commo- 
dious office and an attractive reception room. 
Previous to this improvement the Doctor's 
office was on the corner of Third and Beaver 
streets. Dr. Strouss is a son of the late David 
and Emily (Woodrough) Strouss and grand- 
son of John Strouss. 

John Strouss was born in Germany and 
with his two brothers came to America, 
where they all became American citizens. 
John Strouss settled in Lancaster county, 
Pa., but subsequently purchased a farm near 
Clinton, in Allegheny county, where he lived 
until the time of his death. He was known 



154 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



as a very progressive farmer, and owned con- 
siderable property. John Strouss erected a 
flouring or grist mill upon a farm known as 
the Potato Garden. He was a practical 
farmer and went west in search of wheat land ; 
instead of buying near Allegheny City, which 
was then only a small village, he sought land 
on a higher elevation and away from the river 
and fog. Here upon this farm, he lived hap- 
pily and attained the advanced age of ninety- 
six years. He was thrice married. The name 
of his first wife is not known, but her children 
were: Jonas, John, David, Simon, Hannah, 
Martha, Elizabeth, and Mary. Sometime 
after the death of his first wife, Mr. Strouss 
wedded Mrs. McCoy, who bore him three 
sons : William, James, and Henry. After the 
death of his second wife, Mr. Strouss again 
felt the need of a companion, and was joined 
in wedlock with Ann Cloud, — there being no 
issue to this union. 

David Strouss, father of our subject, was 
born in Allegheny county, Pa., and when 
grown to manhood, conducted his father's 
mill and also learned the tanner's trade, which 
was one of the best trades in practical use in 
his day. He leased Hood's tannery in Alle- 
gheny county, which he operated for some 
time, but, later, leased a tannery in Washing- 
ton county. After running that very success- 
fully for years, and accumulating some capital, 
Mr. Strouss discontinued working at his 
trade, and invested some of his surplus cash 
in a farm situated in Hanover township, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. This farm is 
today owned by his sons, William and David 



M. Besides this farm, David Strouss owned 
otlier farming property. He was a man of 
sterling qualities and knew the value of every 
cent; he arose at break of day and all his chil- 
dren were on hand, also, to accomplish a good 
day's work. His motto was "strike while the 
iron is hot," — and everything was done by 
rule and in due time. In this way, progress 
was the natural result. Although he was am- 
bitious, Mr. Strouss was also kind and chari- 
table, and he was respected and looked upon 
as an exceedingly careful, prudent, indus- 
trious, and worthy man, whose life is quite 
worthy of imitation. At the age of sixty-six 
years, he took down the gun which alwavs 
hung over the door, with the intention of 
cleaning it for the purpose of protecting his 
sheep from the ravages of dogs. As the gun 
had not been used in a long time, it was no' 
■iipposed to be loaded, Mr. Strouss raised 
the hammer and blew in the gun, when it was 
discharged into his face, causing his death, — 
a sad ending to a noble life. How many sad 
accidents occur in exactly the same way 1 

His life companion was Emily Woodrough, 
of English ancestry. She survives her hus- 
band, having attained the advanced age of 
four score years and six. They reared eleven 
children, viz.: John W., now deceased; Eliz- 
abeth, widow of J. R. McKinzie ; Josiah, also 
deceased; William J., residing on the home- 
stead farm ; Jane, deceased ; Junius, who was 
killed in the Civil War while fighting for our 
country; Martha (deceased), wife of William 
Keefer; Melissa, wife of C. Swearengen ; 
Ulysses S., subject of this sketch; Mary, wife 



THE N\ 

NEW YORK V' 

[public LIBRARYJ 

Vi, Aslor, Lbikix and Tilden /; 
Foiirdat'nns. // 




GEORGE DAMDSON. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



157 



of George Henderson ; and David, also resid- 
ing on the homestead. 

The subject of our sketch and his family are 
consistent and valued members of the Pres- 
byterian church, working willingly in behalf 
of its interests, and ever giving liberally of 
their means. In business circles, the name of 
Dr. Strouss stands exceedingly high all over 
the county. At home as a citizen, no one is 
more popular or has more friends. 



/^>^EORGE DAVIDSON, a recent 
I •^-p portrait of whom appears on the fore- 
going page, is a man of much promi- 
nence in the borough of New Brighton, Pa., 
and since February, 1888, he has been cashier 
of the National Bank, of that place. This in- 
stitution is one of the most progressive and 
substantial banks in \A'estern Pennsylvania, 
having been organized October 29, 1884, to 
succeed the old National Bank of Beaver 
County, which had its origin November 12, 
1864, as the successor of the Bank of Beaver 
County, a state institution established in 1857. 
The last named concern occupied the quarters 
of the late United States Bank, and its offices 
were situated where Dr. Simpson's are 
now located. Its officers were: S. Merrick, 
president and E. Hoops, cashier. On No- 
vember 12, 1864, the National Bank of Beaver 
County was chartered with a capital of $200,- 
000; a fine brick block was erected, the front 
of which was of pressed brick, purchased in 
Philadelphia at $100 per thousand, it being 



the iirst brick of the kind ever used in the 
Beaver Valley. The building was of three 
stories; on the first floor were the bank 
offices; while on the second and third floors 
were dwelling rooms. The banking apart- 
ments were finished in the best of material, 
and had two large safes. S. Merrick, who 
was its first president, was later succeeded by 
John Miner, and upon the organization of the 
National Bank of New Brighton, M. T. Ken- 
nedy was made president, serving until his 
death, in November, 1884, when John Reeves 
became his successor. In August, 1893, 
Robert S. Kennedy was chosen president and 
C. C. Townsend, vice-president, to succeed 
Robert S. Kennedy. From the time the bank 
was organized until April 6, 1883, Mr. Ed- 
ward Hoops served as cashier; he was suc- 
ceeded by C. M. Merrick, who in turn was 
succeeded by the subject hereof. H. R. Ross 
is teller, and Clarence E. Kennedy is book- 
keeper. The officers of this organization are 
among the most prominent and capable men 
in this part of the state, possessing high busi- 
ness ability, and being fully competent to fill 
the important positions they hold. 

George Davidson was born in Fayette 
county. Pa., October 13, 1859, and is a son 
of Daniel R. Davidson. At the age of eight 
years, his parents moved to Beaver, Beaver 
county. Pa., and there he obtained his primary 
education ; he afterwards attended college in 
West Virginia from 1877 to 1880. Owing to 
ill-health, he spent several years in traveling 
through the western states, and, upon his 
return to Beaver county, became deputy pro- 



158 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



thonotary under Dan H. Stone. On leaving 
this position, he entered the National Bank of 
New Brighton, as cashier, which office he now 
holds. Mr. Davidson is greatly interested in 
the progress of his adopted borough and 
county, and is ever ready to give his support 
to those measures which, in his opinion, tend 
to promote the welfare of the community. His 
popularity and sterling worth are shown by 
the fact that he is now serving his sixth term 
as treasurer of New Brighton, and is manager 
of the clearing house of the associated banks 
of Beaver county, which association he helped 
to form. 

The subject of this record married 
Mary Wilson, daughter of Samuel B. Wilson, 
a prominent resident of Beaver, and this union 
has been blessed by the birth of the follow- 
ing children: Daniel R. ; Samuel K. ; Eliza- 
beth; Margaret; William, and Mary, — the two 
last named being deceased. Mr. Davidson 
owns a beautiful home on the corner of Third 
avenue and Fifteenth street. 



fOHN BURTON ARMSTRONG, 
M. D., ranks among the leading physi- 
cians and surgeons of Beaver county, 
Pa., having been actively engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine in Beaver since 1893. His 
strict attention to his professional duties, as 
well as his peculiar success in treating many 
difficult cases, have brought him into promi- 
nence in the best families of the vicinity, in 
addition to which he has many patients in 



the surrounding counties. Being a man of 
iron nerve and ambitious spirit, he delights in 
keeping abreast of the times in his profession, 
and thus is prepared to grasp the most com- 
plicated cases and treat them according to the 
best and most modern methods. It is said 
that some very critical cases have been 
attended by Dr. Armstrong with marked 
success. 

The Doctor also has quite a large office 
practice. His office, which is in close proxim- 
ity to his residence on West Third street, is 
often filled to overflowing with patients await- 
ing their turn in the consultation room. Dr. 
Armstrong is of Scotch ancestry, and was 
born in Brighton township, Beaver county, 
within one miie of Beaver, on January 15, 
1868. After attending the district school, he 
completed a high school course at Beaver, 
chose medicine as his profession, and endeav- 
ored to fit himself by becoming a medi- 
cal student under Dr. Jas. McCann of Pitts- 
burg. He then attended the Western Penn- 
sylvania University (now known as the 
Medical Department of Western University), 
from which he graduated in March, 1891. 
Soon after graduation, he practiced his pro- 
fession for a year at Allegheny City, for a 
short time at New Kensington, Westmore- 
land county, and at Rochester, Pa., for one 
year. Although his success was encouraging 
considering the short duration of his stay in 
each of the above places, neither location 
suited him, and he looked about for another 
locality where he could settle permanently. 
His thoughts naturally reverted to the home 



BEAVER COUNTY 



of his youth, in close proximity to v/hich was 
the beautiful little borough of Beaver, which 
he always admired and where he had many ac- 
quaintances and friends. After deliberating for 
some time, he decided to locate in Beaver, and 
his success has been even greater than he 
anticipated, thus proving the wisdom of his 
selection. 

Dr. Armstrong wooed and won for his wife, 
Anna Mary Eraser, an accomplished daughter 
of Alexander Eraser. The Doctor and his 
estimable spouse have one son, a bright little 
boy, born January 6, 1895, and named 
John Alexander, in honor of both his mater- 
nal and paternal grandfathers. The subject 
of our sketch is a zealous Republican and has 
served as school director in the borough. He 
is also a member of the F. & A. M. lodge, 
and of the Knights of Pythias. Both he and 
Mrs. Armstrong are active communicants of 
the M. E. church, of which the Doctor is 
now steward. 

Dr. Armstrong is a son of John and Isabella 
Margaret (Adams) Armstrong, grandson of 
John and Nellie (Dillon) Armstrong, and 
great-grandson of John Armstrong, who was 
born in the eastern part of the Keystone State, 
probably in Chester county, or in Phila- 
delphia. Tradition tells us that the family 
originated in Scotland, and belonged to the 
old Scotch Presbyterians. The founder of the 
American branch of the family came to 
America from the north of Scotland previous 
to the year 1800. The grandfather of 
Dr. Armstrong crossed the mountains of Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania and settled in Allegheny 



county, in 1805. In addition to this informa- 
tion little is known of him except that he fol- 
lowed the occupation of a farmer, and his 
remains lie buried in the Concord churchyard 
near Baden, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He 
was one of four sons, whose names are : John ; 
Samuel and James, who both died single; 
and Robert. 

John Armstrong, the grandfather of our 
subject, was born in Chester county, Pa., in 
the year 1800; when but five years of age, he 
was brought by his parents to Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. He was reared on a farm, and 
spent his life following that occupation on 
farms near Darlington and Baden, where his 
death occurred at about the age of fifty years. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Nellie 
Dillon, lived until she had passed her eightieth 
rnile-stone. Their children were: John, the 
Doctor's father ; Samuel, now deceased ; Ruth, 
wife of Daniel Emerick of Ogle, Pa. ; Esther, 
deceased ; and Mary, also deceased. 

John Armstrong, father of the subject of 
our narrative, was born August 27, 1831, near 
Greersburg (now Darlington) Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. Early in life, he learned the 
shoemaker's trade, and began working at it 
on the old homestead. But that occupation 
was not congenial to him ; his active mind 
and equally active body required the broader 
field of business pursuits. He abandoned 
shoemaking and went to Warren county, near 
Tidioute, where for seven years he was inter- 
ested in the lumber business. During that 
time, he accumulated a small capital, which 
he desired to invest wisely. With keen fore- 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



sight he purchased a tract of land along the 
Allegheny River, at Henry's Bend, near 
Oil City, paying for the tract $450 of hard- 
earned cash. Upon this land he carried on 
farming until oil was discovered in that vicin- 
ity. The first oil well drilled on the banks of 
the Allegheny River was on his farm, 
and, while the excitement was 'at 
its height, Mr. Armstrong sold the 
farm for the fabulous price of 
$31,000. After dealing in oil for some time, 
he retired to Rochester, Pa., and. soon after, 
purchased the Jackson farm, near Beaver, con- 
taining 105 acres of choice farming land, 
upon which he has enjoyed a happy life as one 
of Beaver county's prominent farmers. He 
has made many improvements on his land, 
and has built handsome and substantial build- 
ings. In 1898, his large barn, with contents, 
was completely destroyed by fire, but it was 
re-built as soon as possible. 

Mr. Armstrong is a public-spirited man, a 
stanch Republican, and has served as super- 
visor and school director. He was joined in 
wedlock with Isabella Margaret Adams, a 
daughter of John and Jeannette Adams, who 
formerly resided in Northumberland county. 
Pa., and removed later to Parkersburg. Mrs. 
Armstrong was born March 26, 1841; she 
bore her husband the following children : 
Calantha Abigail, still single; Jeannette, wife 
of Dr. J. J. Allen of Monaca, Pa. ; Annie M., 
deceased; John Burton, to whom this sketch 
pertains and who is commonly known as 
"J. Burt Armstrong"; and Vienna Isabella. 

Alexander Fraser, father-in-law of our sub- 



ject, was born January i, 1840, near Inver- 
ness, Scotland. He is a son of Alexander 
Fraser, who was descended from Scotch nobil- 
ity, and came to America with his wife, Mary, 
and his family, in 1845, — settling in the 
Scotch settlement near Wellsville, Ohio. 
There he followed, for many years, the occu- 
pation of a farmer, and is now enjoying the 
ripe old age of eighty-seven years. He was 
deprived of his wife and beloved companion, 
however, who died at about the age of seventy 
years. They came to America on a sailing 
vessel which was six weeks in crossing the 
ocean; they landed at New York City, taking 
the tedious route to Ohio by way of Hudson 
River, Erie Canal, and Lake Erie. Although 
a true Scotchman, "Grandpa" Fraser loves 
America. To him and his worthy consort 
were born ten children, seven of whom grew 
to maturity, namely: Alexander, Jr.; 
William ; Margaret ; Isabella ; Hannah ; Mary ; 
and Jeannette. 

Alexander Fraser, Jr., arrived at manhood 
just in time to respond to our country's call 
for brave men during the Civil War. He en- 
listed from Wellsville, Ohio, in the 3rd Reg., 
Ohio Vol. Inf. and, later, re-enlisted in the 
navy and went down the river from Pitts- 
burg, serving until the close of the war, and 
receiving an honorable discharge at Nev/ 
York City. After the war, for a period of 
twenty-five years, Mr. Fraser sensed as bag- 
gage master on the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
During the repair of that road, his train was 
sent over the Fort Wayne R. R. through 
Alliance, and at Wellsville, Ohio, his home, a 



BEAVER COUNTY 



161 



terrible collision occurred, in which Mr. 
Fraser was so badly injured that he died the 
same evening, October 17, 1893. He left a 
wife and six children to mourn his unfor- 
tunate demise; Mrs. Fraser was, before mar- 
riage. Miss Emma Hayes, a daughter of 
Thomas C. Hayes. She was born in old 
Brighton, now Beaver Falls. The names of 
their children are : Annie M., wife of our sub- 
ject; Margaret H., now deceased; Charles 
W. ; Chauncey M. ; Grace E., deceased; and 
Alexander D. 



/'k^T'^EORGE M. HEMPHILL. The 
I -ST gentleman whose name heads this 
sketch is the efficient and well-known 
postmaster of Bridgewater, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. He was born in Rochester, 
Beaver county, and is a son of Captain Sharp 
and Abbie (Bloss) Hemphill. 

The great-grandfather, Moses Hemphill, 
was born in Northampton county, Pa,, of 
English ancestry. His life was spent in his 
native county, and he reared : Joseph, James, 
Thomas, Mrs. Kerr, and Mrs. Nogle. The 
grandfather of George M., Joseph Hemphill, 
was born in Northampton county, and became 
a civil engineer and surveyor. Before the 
year 1800, he went to Beaver county. Pa., and 
became one of the commissioners to form 
Beaver county. He served as associate judge, 
county treasurer, and county commissioner, 
and the first surveys and deeds of Beaver 
county were signed by him. He kept a gen- 
eral store in Beaver county, and was well 



known throughout its limits. His death oc- 
curred in 1834, at the age of sixty-two, and 
his wife, who was formerly Jean Hay, died at 
the age of seventy-seven. They were both 
buried in Beaver county. Their children 
were as follows : James W. ; Cynthia, who 
married Dr. Smith Cunningham ; Jane, who 
married John English ; Nancy, who married 
Samuel R. Dunlap; Thomas; Ellen, who mar- 
ried Alex Scott ; Mary, who married Joseph 
Moorehead; Margaret, who married Thomas 
Cunningham ; and Captain Sharp, the father 
of the subject of this sketch. 

Captain Sharp Hemphill was born in 
Beaver county, in the town of Beaver, and was 
educated in the old Beaver Academy. For a 
short time, he was interested in mercantile 
business, and then he went on the Ohio River 
as a steamboat clerk. He continued work on 
the river for forty-five years, and was, for 
many years, captain of steamboats running 
from Pittsburg to New Orleans, and also from 
St. Louis to Fort Benton. Often, in the pio- 
neer days, when he was on the Missouri River, 
the boats were shot at by Indians. He served 
in the loist Reg. of Pa. Vol., in the reserve 
corps, and was a Mason. He became para- 
lyzed in his later life, and died at his home in 
Bridgewater, Pa., at the age of seventy-two. 
He married Abbie Bloss, a daughter of Ches- 
ter W. Bloss, of Peacham, Vt., and she is still 
living at the age of seventy-two. The chil- 
dren which resulted from this union are as fol- 
lows : Emma, who married John Coleman, of 
Bridgewater, Pa.; George M., the subject of 
this sketch ; Clarence, a glass worker at 



162 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Rochester, Pa. ; Jean, deputy postmistress of 
Bridgewater, Pa. ; Mary ; Joseph, who married 
Annie Brunell, and lives in Pittsburg, — hav- 
ing two children, — Grace and Edith ; Alice, 
who married John Thornely, of Beaver Falls, 
and has two children, — Arthur and Mildred ; 
and Edith, who married H. B. Twitmyer, of 
Pittsburg. 

George Hemphill, the subject of this biogra- 
phy, attended the schools of Rochester, Pa., 
and was employed at glass houses in Roches- 
ter and Monaca for nineteen years. He also 
spent several years on the river, and has been 
engaged in various occupations. He settled 
in Bridgewater, and June i, 1897, was selected 
as postmaster to succeed L. F. Weyman. Mr. 
Hemphill is a member of the K. of P. 
He is well known in the vicinity, and takes 
an active interest in all affairs which are for the 
good of the community. 



m- 



|OBERT B. ROSE. It is always of 
great interest to trace various indus- 
tries from their beginning to the 
status existing at the present day. This is 
true of transportation on the rivers, for, before 
railroads came into existence, this was the 
principal means of carrying produce from the 
fields of operation to the points of disposition. 
In the first instance, rudely constructed boats 
served the purpose of the pioneer settlers of 
Western Pennsylvania, as it was the only way 
in which they could send the lumber cleared 
from their lands to a market. Next in use 
were the flat and keel boats, which, laden with 



produce, were floated down the river. Up to 
this time all transportation had been attended 
with great difficulties, but soon the invention 
of Robert Fulton, which excited the wonder 
of the entire civilized world, was put to a prac- 
tical test on the Ohio River. Steam barges 
were built and also steam packets, which 
pushed boats up stream, that formerly being 
done by hand, v\ith long poles. W^hen the 
steamboat plied up and down the river, it was 
thought that facilities for traffic were com- 
plete, but this, in turn, has been partially su- 
perseded by the iron horse, owing to its great 
expedition. Nevertheless the steamboats are 
still extensively used for the transportation 
of freight, for they have attained a high rate 
of speed and are enabled to transport material 
at a much less cost than railroads. Among 
the prominent residents of Western Pennsyl- 
vania is an interesting and influential class of 
people, composed of men who have spent 
years of their lives as boatmen on the river. 
Robert B. Rose, one of the most enterprising 
business m.en of Rochester, Beaver county, 
Pa., is one of these. He is the proprietor of 
the Rochester wharfboat, and also deals 
largely in eggs, poultry, grain, etc. 

Mr. Rose was born in Adams county, Ohio, 
and is a son of Smith Rose, who was at one 
time a merchant, but later became a steam- 
boat agent at Rome, Ohio, continuing thus 
until his death. The subject of our sketch 
passed his early life in his native state, and at 
an early age was employed at work on the 
river, which he has always followed. He first 
found employment at Rome, Ohio, 



BEAVER COUNTY 



163 



wlien he purchased his first wharfboat; 
disposing of that, he moved to Vance- 
burg, Ky., wliere he purchased an- 
other. He gained a wide knowl- 
edge of the boat business, and, being of an 
industrious nature, continued to better his 
condition. He removed to Rochester, Bea- 
ver county, Pa., and there bought the prop- 
erty and wharfboat of George Lukens. This 
was the first boat operated at Rochester, be- 
ing originally owned and run by John Mc- 
Dowell, who disposed of it to Mr. Lukens and 
his son. When Mr. Rose purchased the busi- 
ness of George Lukens, the boat had become 
too old to use and he sold it ; he then bought 
another which he continued to use until 1891, 
when he built one of the finest wharfboats on 
the Ohio River. It is 158 feet long, 32 feet 
wide, and has a capacity of about 500 tons. 
On the second floor is a suite of seven fine 
rooms, and on the first floor is a large office 
and waiting room and the storage space. The 
borough of Rochester has never made any 
effort to improve the landing there, and much 
could be done to further the enterprise of 
river shipments, which would result in much 
benefit to the borough itself. Our subject 
has his boat so arranged that it moves with 
the rise and fall of the river, which varies 
over thirty feet, — the landing being on Water 
street at the foot of James street. Mr. Rose 
is prepared to give shipping rates to all points 
south and west, and to many points east. A 
large proportion of the products of the manu- 
facturers of Rochester and other Beaver val- 
ley towns is shipped from his wharf, and it is 



a frequent sight to see a long string of teams 
and dray wagons, waiting to unload their 
goods. One of the most delightful trips in 
the central portion of the United States is on 
the steamers of the Ohio River, going down 
that river to the Mississippi, thence to Ne\\r 
Orleans, and back. Mr. Rose is a man of pleas- 
ing personality, and his friends are almost 
without number. 

He was united in wedlock with Elizabeth 
H. Blair, a daughter of William D. Blair, of 
Stout, Ohio, as the postoffice is called, though 
the river designation of the place is Rome. 
This union resulted in the birth of two chil- 
dren : Luella W. ; and Eva Marie, who died at 
the age of two years. 



R. JOHN C. McCAULEY. The 
borough of Rochester, as regards her 
practitioners of medicine, is unsur- 
passed by any other in the state of Pennsyl- 
vania. There are located within its limits, 
men who have practiced for many years and 
who have attained far more than local dis- 
tinction, being classified with the leading men 
of the district. Standing prominently to the 
front is the gentleman whose name heads 
these lines, a representative of the younger 
generation of physicians. He is young in 
years, but hard and continued study in a re- 
nowned medical institution, combined with a 
natural bent for the profession, has given him 
that skill which ordinarily requires years of 
experience to acquire. He is in high stand- 
ing in Rpchester, and among his large num- 



164 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ber of patients are numbered men of 
prominence throughout this section of the 
state. He is a native of Rochester, and is a 
son of Leander and Martha M. (Andrews) 
McCauley. 

David McCauley, the great-grandfather of 
our subject, was born in County Armagh, 
Ireland, and lived there until his death. His 
wife, Jane (Corran), with her son Robert and 
her other children, came to America in 1819, 
settling in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Robert 
McCauley, who was the grandfather of the 
subject hereof, was twenty-one years of age 
when he came to this country. He possessed 
a superior education, and lijs vocation in life 
was that of an instructor, teaching in Pitts- 
burg and in Sewickley township, Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania. In 1825, he purchased 
a farm of 250 acres in New Sewickley town- 
ship, which is now owned by his children, and 
there resided until his death at the age of sev-" 
enty years. He married Mary Mitchell, a 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Patterson) 
Mitchell, who died at the age of eighty-two, 
and their children were : John ; David C. ; 
Leander; Robert P.; James; Elizabeth, the 
wife of James Mathews; Mary, who became 
the wife of Dr. S. H. Andrews ; Emiline ; and 
Martha, who married Joseph Briggs. Mr. 
McCauley was an active Democrat in his day, 
and served as assessor and in other township 
offices. Religiously, he was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Leander McCauley attended the public 
schools and Freedom academy, after which 
he engaged as a teacher in the schools of 



Beaver county and also in the state of Ohio. 
In 1857, he removed to Williams county, 
Ohio, where he purchased a saw mill, and 
operated it for a period of five years. He then 
took up carpentering and pattern making, and 
later carried on farming on the old homestead 
for twenty-one years. In 1897, he retired to 
the town of Rochester, where he erected him 
a fine home and has since lived. He married 
Martha M. Andrews, a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Harnit) Andrews, of Enon Valley, 
Lawrence county, Pa., and four children were 
born to them, as follows: Wilfred James, 
who died in infancy; John C, the subject 
hereof; Mary M., who died at the age of six- 
teen years; and E. S. H., a physician and 
surgeon, of Beaver. Religiously, the family 
are Presbyterians. 

Dr. John Corran McCauley, after complet- 
ing his preliminary education in the pubHc 
schools, began the study of medicine with J. 
S. Boyd, M. D., of New Brighton, Pennsyl- 
vania. He entered into his work with char- 
acteristic energy, and in 1890 was graduated 
from the Homeopathic Medical College, of 
Cleveland, fully qualified for his chosen pro- 
fession. He immediately located at Rochester, 
where he succeeded to the practice of Dr. G. 
H. Smith. He has built up an extensive 
patronage, and enjoys the confidence and 
good will of his fellow-citizens to the fullest 
extent. In 1893, he built a fine residence in 
Rochester, with an ofiice in connection. He 
is a member of the Beaver County Homeo- 
pathic Medical Society; the State Homeo- 
pathic Medical Society; and the American 




PAULUS E. KOEHLER. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



Institute of Homeopathy. He is also a mem- 
ber of the board of censors of the Cleveland 
Homeopathic Medical College. He is also on 
the stafif of the Beaver Valley Hospital. 

Dr. McCauley was united in marriage with 
Jennie C. Parks, a daughter of Theodore 
Parks, of New Sewickley township, Beaver 
county, and they have one child, Mary E., 
born March 28, 1B97. 




vAULUS E. KOEHLER, who owns 
an elegant four-story hotel in Mon- 
aca, and also has extensive real estate 
interests there, is a prosperous citizen of that 
place, where he has resided for a great many 
years. A portrait accompanies this biog- 
raphy. 

Mr. Koehler was born in Prussia, April 10, 
1856, where he attended the public schools. 
He was also a pupil of the high school, and 
pursued the study of theology, with the in- 
tention of becoming a missionary. He was 
a brilliant scholar, and gained the honors of 
his class, but he never took orders, as he pre- 
ferred a business career. He learned the trade 
of a decorator of porcelain under the talented 
E. Schledmich, the celebrated Prussian ex- 
porter, and was with that gentleman until 
1 88 1, acquiring the highest degree of skill in 
his art. He then came to America, and lo- 
cated at East Liverpool, Ohio, and took 
charge of the decorating shop of George 
Homlichhaus, also doing contract jobs for 
other firms. One year later, he accepted a very 



good position with the Phoenix Glass Com- 
pany of Monaca, Pa., and had the honor of 
decorating the first piece of work ever turned 
out by that firm, which is the largest glass 
firm in the world in that line of business. Mr. 
Koehler built two kilns, and remained in their 
employ until 1884, when the factory was 
burned to the ground, and he then started a 
shop of his own in Monaca, do- 
ing work for various glass firms. 
He has always been a very fine work- 
man, and some of his productions show a per- 
fection of finish which is hard to surpass. 
When the Phoenix works were rebuilt, the 
firm prevailed upon Mr. Koehler to accept 
his old position, although his business was in 
a flourishing way. He built the first clay kiln 
ever constructed for firing decorated glass, 
those in use previous to that time being of 
steel. He is a very clever and ingenious man, 
and made a number of discoveries which have 
proved of great value to him. Upon return- 
ing to the Phoenix Glass Company, he took 
the work on contract, and with good results. 
He held this position until 1897, when he gave 
up the business on account of failing health, 
after a satisfactory connection of almost 
twenty years. 

In 1883, Mr. Koehler first began to deal in 
real estate, and since that time he has handled 
over $100,000 worth of property in Monaca. 
Being convinced that the borough had a 
bright future before it, he purchased a piece 
of property in 1883, and has erected several 
houses, all of a class which are an improve- 
ment to the town. He was one of the or- 



168 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ganizers of the Citizens' Improvement Com- 
pany, which has been active in developing the 
interests of the community. There is a lar?e 
tract of land on Dorchester Heights 
for manufacturing and residence sites, 
all nicely laid out, and in it the 
subject of this sketch owns twenty- 
one lots, individually, besides holding an 
interest in the company. He was also in the 
business of developing gas, and bought gas 
lands quite extensively. He owns ten acres 
of building lots in the borough, and is a direc- 
tor and local representative in the Building 
& Loan Association. In 1898, he built the 
Hotel Monaca, a fine four-story building of 
bufif brick, and it is undoubtedly the finest 
in Beaver county, on the south side 
of the Ohio River. The interior is 
in keeping with the beautiful exterior, hav- 
ing fine, lofty rooms and ofifices, with 
appointments complete in every particular. 
It contains fifty large rooms, its dimensions 
being 86x46 feet, and is a iirst-class hotel, 
enjoying the patronage of all the high-grade 
transient trade. Mr. Koehler's confidence in 
the future of Monaca remains unshaken, and 
he contemplates the erection of a business 
block, similar in style to the hotel, imparting 
a metropolitan air to the town. He was ac- 
tive in his efforts to secure a bridge across the 
Ohio River, and is now a stockholder of the 
bridge company. 

In 1876, Mr. Koehler was united in mar- 
riage with Marie Schilling, and they have nine 
children: Anna (Betts); Henry, a graduate 
of Butcher's Business College, who is a mold- 



maker by trade; Louisa; Otto M., a decor- 
ator, who is also a graduate of Butcher's Bus- 
iness College ; Howard ; Amelia ; Elsie ; Ed- 
ward; and Sophia. They had also four who 
died in infancy. Religiously, he is a liberal 
supporter of churches. He is a Republican in 
poHtics, and has been a member of the council 
since 1896 (having been re-elected in 1S99), 
and has served on the county committee. 
Socially, he is quite prominent, and belongs 
to a number of orders. He has been grand 
district deputy of R. A. ; past chancellor, K. 
of P. ; a member of the Woodmen of the 
World; B. P. O. E. ; Syria Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S. In the ]\Iasonic Order he is a mem- 
ber of Rochester Lodge, No. 229; Record 
Chapter, No. 167; Ascalon Commandery, No. 
59; and the Consistory of the Scottish Rites, 
No. 320. 



fOIiX M. KELSO, a veteran of the 
Civil War, is the proprietor of one of 
the finest general merchandise stores 
in Beaver county, and resides at New Galilee. 
He was born in Noblestown, Pa., August 31, 
1843, ^"d is a son of Mark and Mary (Bor- 
land) Kelso. 

John Kelso, the grandfather of John M., 
was born in Franklin county, Pa., in 1750, 
and obtained his education in the East. Upon 
the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, he 
volunteered his services to the cause of In- 
dependence, and, in all, served seven years 
and six months, holding the rank of sergeant 
major when he retired from the army. He 



BEAVER COUNTY 



169 



was a brave soldier and has an honorable war 
record. At the close of the war he removed 
to Allegheny county and took up a large tract 
of wild land, which he cleared, and upon this 
he erected log buildings. He married Miss 
McCormick, who was born in Allegheny 
county, an-d they reared six children : George ; 
John ; Benjamin ; Mark, the father of John 
M. ; Jennie (Ormond) ; and Mary (Cook). 
Politically, he was a Whig. Religiously, he 
was a member of the Associate Reformed 
church. He passed to the world beyond, in 
the year 1810. 

Mark Kelso was born in Allegheny county. 
Pa., in 1802, and, notwithstanding the many 
difficulties he encountered, obtained a good 
education. He assisted his father in cultivat- 
ing the farm, and upon the latter's death suc- 
ceeded to the possession of the old home- 
stead. He was a large sheep-raiser and wool- 
grower, and was proud of the quality of his 
stock. He was a Whig and later a Repub- 
lican. He was a faithful member of the 
United Presbyterian church, and was an elder 
therein for years. He died in 1865, and his 
wife survived him many years, dying in 1889, 
at the age of eighty-one. His union with 
]\Iary Borland, a daughter of ?^Iatthew Bor- 
land, of Allegheny county, Pa., resulted in 
the following issue : Margaret (Nesbit) ; 
Mary A. (Woods); John M., the gentleman 
whose name heads these lines ; Matthew B., 
who died in infancy; George H., a farmer; 
and Joseph A., a merchant, who, prior to his 
death, in 1898, was a partner of the subject 
of this sketch. 



John J\I. Kelso received his mental training 
in the public schools of Allegheny county, 
and was engaged as a teacher until 1883, 
Vvhen he moved to the borough of New Gali- 
lee. It was a very small place at that time, 
there being but three stores located there, 
but our subject predicted its future growth, 
and, in partnership with his brother, Joseph 
A. Kelso, bought out the store of A. F. Reed. 
There they did business for five years, at the 
end of which time they bought a building of 
I\Ir. Porter. In a very short time they ac- 
quired a large and lucrative trade, and at the 
present time John M. Kelso is the leading 
merchant of the town. The building in which 
i:e is located consists of one story, a basement 
and a stock room, and is without doubt one 
of the most completely stocked stores in 
Beaver county, carrjang a full line of dry 
goods, boots and shoes, hats and caps, cloth- 
ing, notions, hardware, crockery, house fur- 
nishings, jewelry, drugs, confectionery, to- 
bacco and cigars. He is a man of great energy 
and enterprise, and the manner in which he 
caters to the wants of his customers has 
brought him into public favor. 

John ]\I. Kelso, fired with the patriotism of 
an American citizen who loves his country, 
enlisted, in 1864, in Company I, 112th Reg., 
Pa. Vol. Inf., near Pittsburg. After doing- 
garrison duty around Washington, D. C, he 
was sent to the seat of war and took part in 
som.e of the hardest-fought battles, such as 
the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, 
Weldon Railroad, and Chapin's Farm. He 



170 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



was taken prisoner, and was forced to endure 
the tortures of Libby Prison, Belle Isle, 
and Salisbury, being confined in these no- 
torious places for about six months. He was 
then exchanged, but the harsh treatment to 
which he had been subjected, and the lack of 
proper food, had undermined his robust con- 
stitution, and he was stricken with typhoid 
fever, from which he did not recover until 
after the close of the war. 

Mr. Kelso formed a marital union with 
Caroline H. Imbrie, a daughter of Rev. David 
R. Imbrie, and a granddaughter of Rev. David 
Imbrie. Her great-grandfather was a native 
of Scotland, who came to New York City, 
where he remained for a short period, and 
then returned to his fatherland. Upon again 
sailing for this country, he was shipwrecked 
and lost most of his valuables and personal 
effects, — in fact, the proceeds of most of his 
property. He settled in Service, Pa., buying 
a large tract of land, which he cleared, and 
then erected houses and barns. He was a suc- 
cessful stock-raiser. He married Miss Flack, 
and they had two children : David ; and John, 
who engaged in farming, in Beaver county. 

Rev. David Imbrie was educated at Canons- 
burg, studied for the ministry, and was 
licensed to preach in the Associate Reformed 
church. He preached for many years at 
BeTTiel, Lawrence county, Pa., and at Darling- 
ton. His death came very suddenly and in 
a very dramatic manner. He died one Sab- 
bath morning as he was entering the pulpit. 
His son, Rev. David R. Imbrie, received his 
collegiate or theological education at Canons- 



burg. He was pastor of a church at New 
Wilmington, Pa., for more than twenty-five 
years, and was held in the highest esteem. 
He married Nancy R. Johnston, who was 
born in Franklin county. Pa., and they had 
eight children, four of whom are now living, 
namely : Rev. J. J., who was educated at New 
Wilmington and in Westminster College, is a 
graduate of the Allegheny Theological Sem- 
inary, and now holds two charges in Butler 
county; Rev. D. R., who received the same 
educational training as his brother, and is 
chaplain of the Allegheny County Work- 
house; Nannie I., the wife of R. S. Clark, a 
well-known farmer; and Caroline H., who at- 
tended the public schools at Ottawa, Kansas, 
and Bridgewater Academy, Pa. She taught 
school for three years and was then united in 
marriage with the subject of this biography. 
They are the parents of four children : Fred- 
erick L. ; George N. ; Joseph A. ; and Nannie 
I. Religiously, Mr. Kelso is a member of the 
U. P. church and has been an elder since 1888. 
lie is a Republican in politics, and held the 
office of school director for six years. 



§AMES T. CONLIN may be classed 
among the self-made men of Beaver 
county, having begun at the foot of the 
ladder and worked up to his present position ; 
he is public-spirited, a man of fine business 
qualities, and enjoys the respect and good 
will of a multitude of acquaintances. He was 
born at Freedom, Pa., June i, 1855, ^"^ is a 
son of John and Mary /Carroll) Conlin. 




HENRY SEPP. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



173 



Mr. Conlin's parents were born near Castle 
Bellingham. County Louth. Ireland, and after 
their marriage, in 1845. they came to the 
United States, first locating in Baltimore, re- 
maining there three years, and then moving 
to Rochester. He worked on the railroad at 
Freedom, Baden, and Rochester, and passed 
his latter days in Rochester, dying in 1881, at 
the age of seventy-six years. His wife died 
in 1876. aged fifty-five years. To them was 
bom the following family of children : Mar- 
garet, who was married to M. Maloney, both 
of whom are now deceased : Catherine, who is 
the wife of J. Gildernew, of Pittsburg ; Annie, 
who is the widow of Charles O'Donald; 
Joseph P., a resident of Alliance, Ohio, who 
was wedded to Miss Man,- Hogan ; and 
James T. 

When Mr. Conlin was three years of age, his 
parents moved to Baden and there he ob- 
tained his primarj' education; at twenty-one 
years of age, he began railroading as a section 
man. He was promoted next to tie inspector, 
then to baggage master, and September i, 
1889, he was appointed assistant ticket agent 
at Rochester and July 17, 1899, was appointed 
ticket agent to succeed W. G. Masten, — in 
which capacity he is at present sers-ing. Mr. 
Conlin bought a small residence on Washing- 
ton street, which he later sold, and built a 
large house on Pinney street; in 1897, he sold 
the latter place to Benjamin PfeifTer, and pur- 
chased a lot of J. J. Hoffman, on the comer 
of Hinds and Penn streets, where he erected 
a handsome dwelling, which he makes his 
home. Mr. Conlin is secretarv of the Central 



Building & Loan Association ; a director of 
the Keystone Tumbler Co., Limited; a direc- 
tor of the First National Bank of Rochester; 
and a partner in the S. ^L Hervey & Com- 
pany Insurance Company, the largest insur- 
ance agency in the county. 

^Ir. Conlin has served three terms in the 
council. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Catholic church, while socially, he belongs 
to the Woodmen of the ^^'orld, is a member 
and collector of the Royal Arcanum, and has 
passed through all the chairs of the Elks 
lodge. The subject of this sketch was joined 
in marriage with Miss Annie Huering, a 
daughter of Theodore and Mary Huering, 
and they are the parents of five children, 
namely: Elizabeth; Theodore; Theodora; 
Mary; and James. Mrs. Huering resides in 
Rochester, Pennsylvania. Mr. Huering died 
in June, 1898, and at the time of his death, 
v.-as residing in Rochester. 




'^"TEXRY SEPP, whose wholesale liquor 
establishment is the largest and best 
in \^'estern Pennsj'lvania, is located 
in Beaver Falls where he is numbered among 
tlie foremost business men. He is a son of 
Bernard and Martha (Hahn) Sepp, and was 
born in Hessen. Germany, May 27, 1849. ^^''• 
Sepp's portrait accompanies this sketch. 

The grandfather of Henrj' Sepp was Henry 
C. Sepp, a prosperous farmer living in Ger- 
many, whose father was a man of education 
and a surveyor by profession. The instru- 



174 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ments by which the latter earned a livehhood 
are treasured heirlooms of the family. Ber- 
nard Sepp, the father of the gentleman whose 
name heads these lines, followed an agricul- 
tural life, owning and working a fine farm of 
sixty-six acres, and making a specialty of cat- 
tle raising and dairying. He married Martha 
Hahn, who was born and schooled in Ger- 
many, and they had five children : Conrad, 
a baker of Braddock; Anna M., who died in 
infancy; Henry, the subject of this personal 
history; Lizzie A. (Eppel), whose husband is 
a butcher at Braddock; Mary (Marx) of Chip- 
pewa township; and Adam C, deceased. 

Henry Sepp received his schooling in Hes- 
sen, Germany, spending his youth on the 
farm. When sixteen years of age, in 1865, 
he came to America, locating in Allegheny, 
Pa., where he learned the trade of an axe 
polisher, accepting a position with Joseph 
GrafY, doing work by contract. The fact 
that this is the only firm for which he 
worked in this country, — continuing with him 
for twenty-six years, — speaks volumes for the 
steadiness and perseverance of Mr. Sepp. 
When the concern was removed to Beaver 
Falls, in 1871, he accompanied it and con- 
tinued in its employ until he went into the 
liquor business at the corner of Fifteenth 
street and Fourth avenue, renting a building 
for that purpose. He remained in that store 
for four years, when he erected his present 
building, which he has since occupied. He 
has one of the most complete stores and bot- 
tling plants in Western Pennsylvania, it being 
large and roomy, and equipped with the most 



approved machinery. The bottling and wash- 
ing are done by machinery, which is driven by 
a gas engine, and the capacity is 200 dozen 
bottles per day. Next to these rooms is the 
large cooling room, for keeping the liquor in 
condition for use at all times, — the plans for 
this room being devised by our subject. It 
IS double-walled, and filled with paper. Next 
to this is the sale room, in which he has a large 
line of expensive liquors, including rare old 
wines of ancient vintage, both domestic and 
imported. Across the yard is another store 
room, a wagon shed, and stables. In fact his 
facilities for this line of business are unex- 
celled, and the business has grown to such 
proportions that he finds it necessary to keep 
three delivery wagons going at all times. 
Three men are employed in the bottling de- 
partment, and the cooler has a capacity of 
two carloads. He has an extensive line of 
goods for medicinal purposes, in which his 
trade is very large. Although a man of the 
greatest enterprise, his honesty and conscien- 
tiousness are unquestioned, and he has refused 
to give credit in all cases in vvhich he thinks it 
will encourage debt and shiftlessness. 

Mr. Sepp was joined in the bonds of wed- 
lock with Elizabeth Theis, who was born in 
Hessen, Germany, and they reared nine chil- 
dren : Henry, Jr. ; Elizabeth, who died at the 
age of five years; Mary (Roy); William, who 
is assisting his father; Bertha; Lena; Katie, 
an accomplished musician ; Eddie, who died 
at the age of five years ; and Edna. The four 
youngest children are students, and contem- 
plate entering college. In political aftilia- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



175 



tions, ^r. Sepp is a strong Republican, whilst 
in religious faith and fellowship, he is a mem- 
ber of the German Lutheran church. Frater- 
nally, he is a member and past master of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, past 
chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, and a 
member of the German Druids. 

Henry Sepp, Jr., the oldest child born to 
his parents, was born in Beaver county, June 
22, 1 87 1, and received his mental instruction 
in the public schools. He then learned the 
trade of a glass maker and followed that un- 
til his twenty-first year, when, after complet- 
ing a course in Rand's Business College, he 
engaged as bookkeeper for his father. He 
has continued in that capacity up to the pres- 
ent time, and is a man of tried business quali- 
ties. When he was but thirteen years old, he 
began studying music, taking lessons on the 
violin ; he is now an accomplished musician 
and the leader of Sepp's orchestra, one of the 
most favorably known musical organizations 
in this section of Pennsylvania. Mr. Sepp 
was united in marriage with Clara Stauffer, 
who was born in Canada and moved with her 
parents to "Brownstone," Michigan, where 
she attended school. She later moved to 
Beaver Falls, Pa., where she was mar- 
ried to the son of Henry Sepp. 
Henry Sepp, Jr., is an aggressive Republi- 
can, and although he has often been urged 
to accept office in the borough, he has uni- 
formly declined. Religiously, he is a Luth- 
eran. He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias; Nonpareil, A. C. ; and the Beaver 
Falls Turnverein. The residence he now oc- 



cupies is a two-story frame building, adjoin- 
ing his father's home, which he bought in 
February, 1897. 



(^Jr-LFRED P. MARSHALL. Among the 
fjA eminent lawyers of Beaver county, is 
^ the gentleman whose name appears 
at the opening of this brief biography. Slowly, 
but continuously, from a briefless attorney, he 
has attained, by conscientious and unremitting 
labor, a large and lucrative practice. As a 
lawyer, he is careful, painstaking and of calm, 
judicial temperament. His ability to grasp 
large and intricate problems of law, his sound 
judgment in business matters, and his untir- 
ing energy are some of the factors which have 
made him successful. He was born in Perry 
township, Lawrence county, Pa., May 17, 
1850, and is a son of Joseph A. and grandson 
of James Kyle Marshall. 

The father of James Kyle Marshall was a 
native of Ireland, and he came to this country 
and settled in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania. James Kyle Marshall was supposed to 
have been born on the vessel while en route 
for America ; he lived on the farm now owned 
by Josiah Blythe, located in Washington 
county. He wedded a Miss Andover, and 
they reared a family of children; those who 
grew to maturity were : John, James, Joseph, 
Nancy, Mary, Margaret, and Susanna. 

Joseph A. Marshall was a native of Wash- 
ington county, but spent the greater part of 
his life in Perry township, Lawrence county, 
Pa., where he was the owner of a fine farm, 



176 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



which he put under a high state of cultivation. 
He was married to Delilah Houck, to whom 
was born a family of twenty children as fol- 
lows : James Kyle, deceased ; Sarah, who was 
wedded to J. W. Hyde; Jonathan D., who is 
a farmer in Franklin township, Beaver 
county; William B., deceased; John C, who 
is a farmer in Butler county ; Rebecca, who is 
the wife of A. L. Vangorder ; Amanda ; Lina 
A., who wedded W. I. Scott; Lucinda, who is 
the wife of James Duncan ; Mary Agnes, who 
was the wife of Rev. T. L. Scott, and died in 
India; Alfred P., to whom this sketch relates; 
Clinton B., who is a farmer of Perry town- 
ship, Lawrence county, Pa.; Frank B., who is 
a farmer of Allegheny county; Matilda, de- 
ceased, who was the wife of J, M. Scott; 
Joseph, who is a farmer of Perry township; 
Margaret, deceased; and four others, who 
died in infancy. Politically, Mr. Marshall was 
first a Democrat, but being opposed to slav- 
ery, he became a Republican. He was elected 
to many township offices, which tends to 
prove his popularity and the esteem in which 
he was held by his fellow-citizens. He was 
a member of the United Presbyterian church. 
He departed from this life in his sixty-seventh 
year. 

Our subject attended the public schools, 
Westminster College, Pa., and Mount Union 
College, Ohio, and spent his leisure hours on 
his father's farm. Being very ambitious to 
acquire a thorough education, he attended 
college during the summer months, while in 
the winter he taught school, and in that way 
secured ample funds to carry him through an 



educational course. This he continued for a 
period of seven years and then he entered the 
law office of Hon. John G. Hall, of Ridgway, 
Pennsylvania. He subsequently entered the 
office of Samuel B. Wilson, of Beaver, Pa., 
and was admitted to the bar of Beaver county, 
in April, 1876. He immediately began prac- 
ticing in Beaver, where he has remained 
ever since. Later, he took Mr. McCoy as a 
partner under the name of Marshall & McCoy, 
but since the latter's death, in 1890, he has 
continued the practice of his profession alone. 
Mr. Marshall has won an enviable promi- 
nence as a business lawyer and man of af- 
fairs ; since his admission to the bar he 
has been actively engaged in the practice of 
law, meeting with exceptional success. His 
well-known studious habits, and the conscien- 
tious, thorough and exhaustive manner in 
which he deals with all matters undertaken by 
him, assures a continuous and ever increasing 
professional prosperity. 

Mr. Marshall was united in the bonds of 
matrimony with Miss Cora F. Bentel, a daugh- 
ter of Charles H. Bentel, and granddaughter 
of Philip and Margaret (Smith) Bentel. 
Three children have been born to them: 
Annie B., Charles B., and Lillian C. Philip 
Bentel, the great-grandfather of Alfred P. 
Marshall's wife, was a native of Wurtemberg. 
Germany, and came to Beaver county. Pa., 
with the Economites, locating in Economy. 
His wife was Margaret, by whom he had one 
child, PhiHp. Philip Bentel, after attaining 
his manhood, opened a general store in the 
house he erected in 1832, in the village of 



NEW YORK 
fpUELIC LIBRARY ' 

I Ailor, Lenox and Tilden ;j 
Foundations. // 
1 908^^:^ 




DONALD C. ALLEN. 



MRS. DONALD C. ALLEN. 



DONALD C. ALLEN, Jr 



BEAVER COUNTY 



179 



Freedom. He conducted the store for a pe- 
riod of thirty years, and in addition, started 
the bank of Philip Bentel & Com- 
pany, of which he served as presi- 
dent. This bank is still in exis- 
tence, and since its establishment, in 1872, 
it iias been known by the above name. Philip 
Bentel was a very enterprising and successful 
man, and served in his district as a school 
director and as a councilman. He was a 
Lutheran, and a devoted member of that de- 
nomination. He was joined in marriage with 
Margaret Smith, a daughter of Tobias Smith, 
and she died in 1881, at the age of seventy- 
five years. Mr. Bentel died in 1883, aged 
seventy-seven years. They were the pareijts 
of the following children : Thalia, the wife of 
John Conway; Mattie, wedded to Joseph 
Leadley ; John, married to Mary Batey ; and 
Charles H. 

Charles H. Bentel was reared and educated 
in Freedom, and started in life as a store 
keeper at Alliance, Ohio ; one year later, he 
returned to Freedom, and succeeded his father 
in the mercantile business, continuing thus 
for a period of seventeen years. When the 
bank was established, in 1872, he became 
cashier, and upon the death of his father, he 
abandoned the mercantile business ; he is pres- 
ident of the bank, as well as owner. Mr. 
Bentel is a prominent and well-to-do citizen 
of the village, and possesses the confidence 
and esteem of a multitude of acquaintances. 
He is a stanch member of the Presbyterian 
church, while socially, he has been a member 
of the Masonic order for the past thirty years. 



Mr. Bentel was wedded to Miss Amanda 
Clark, a daughter of Captain Samuel, and 
Minerva (Reno) Clark; they are the parents 
of five children^ namely: Annie; Cora F., the 
wife of the subject of this sketch, who was 
born in West Virginia, but reared in Pitts- 
burg, Pa. ; Thalia ; Mattie, who is the wife of 
J. G. Mitchell, and Philip, who is bookkeeper 
of the Keystone Lumber Works. 




ONALD C. ALLEN is a dealer in 
flour and feed in the borough of 
Beaver Falls, Pa., and is among its 
most enterprising merchants. He was born 
near Prospect, Butler county. Pa., August 13, 
i860, and is a son of William and Penelope 
(Lambie) Allen, and grandson of Robert and 
Jane (Cochran) Allen. 

Robert Allen was born in County Down, 
Ireland, and in 1832, with his wife and family, 
came to the United States; he settled on a 
farm in Mercer county. Pa., which had been 
purchased for him by his son William. There 
he continued to reside until overtaken by 
death, which was at the age of eighty-four 
years. His wife, Jane Cochran, also died at 
about that age. They were the parents of a 
family of six children, namely: Margaret 
(Montgomery); Mary (Stewart); William; 
Robert; Samuel; and Cochran. William 
Allen, the father of Donald C, was born in 
County Down, Ireland, in the year 1815, five 
years previous to the arrival of his parents in 
this country, and spent several years on his 



180 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



father's farm in Mercer county. He then went 
to Pittsburg, Pa., and worked in a wholesale 
grocery store at No. 196 Liberty street, for a 
period of ten years. He then engaged in the 
grocery business in the village of Prospect, 
Butler county, Pa., successfully continuing 
thus for ten years; he then sold out his store, 
bought a saw and grist mill three miles south 
of that village ; rebuilt the mills, and continued 
in the milling business until death claimed 
him, — which was in 1879. ^^ was united in 
the bonds of wedlock with Miss Penelope 
Lambie, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, and 
a daughter of William Lambie; she passed 
from this earth, in 1897, aged seventy-four 
years. Their union was blessed by the birth 
of the following children : Robert, deceased ; 
Agnes, who died aged seventeen years; 
Marion (McCandless) ; Jeannette R. (Crabbe) ; 
Penelope, the wife of James Balph, a'medical 
missionary, and prominent resident of La- 
takia, Syria; Margaret, a school teacher: 
William L., deceased; Donald C, the subject 
of this brief memoir; and John G., v,-ho is in 
the grocery business in Beaver Falls. Re- 
ligiously, he was connected with the Reformed 
Presbyterian church. 

Donald C. Allen obtained a good schooling 
in his native district, and spent his boyhood 
days in helping his father in the work about 
the mill; in 1884 he began work at lumber- 
ing, but in 1889, he went into the grocery 
business with his brother, John G. Allen. He 
continued thus until 1897, when he sold his 
interests and bought out R. A. Bole, who was 
engaged in the flour and feed business. Mr. 



Allen is well deserving of the large patronage 
he has already secured, and his genial man- 
ners and straightforward business methods 
have secured for him hosts of friends. 

Mr. Allen formed a matrimonial alliance, in 
1896, with Miss Mary E. Heiser, a daughter 
of Daniel Heiser, of Lewisburg, Pa., and their 
home has been blessed by the birth of one son, 
Donald C., Jr. Mr. Allen is an active mem- 
ber of the Reformed Presbyterian church ; he 
was the prime mover in establishing the Mis- 
sion Sunday School at PattersoiT Heights, and 
is still a leader in the school. He is a deacon, 
and a trustee, of the church. On a preceding 
page is shown the family group, of Donald C. 
Allen, his wife, and his son, Donald C., Jr. 



rMARTLN WHITE, one of the 
successful and popular agriculturists 
' of Darlington township, Beaver 
county. Pa., is one of the oldest Masons in the 
district. He is a prominent member of 
Meridian Lodge, No. 411, F. & A. M., and 
also of the Chapter and Commandery. Mr. 
White is a man of considerable intellectual 
ability. He is not only a sound thinker, but 
is also an interesting conversationalist, and 
expresses his views in a clear and concise 
manner. In politics, he is an ardent Demo- 
crat and assumes the aggressive, but could 
never be prevailed upon to accept ofifice. 

Mr. White was born in Allegheny county, 
Pa., October 28, 1828. He is the eldest son 
of the late John White, and grandson of 



BEAVER COUNTY 



181 



Thomas White. Thomas White was a native 
of the north of Ireland, where he was reared 
and educated. He came to America just 
previous to the breaking out of the Revolu- 
tionary War. He took an active part in that 
long and bloody struggle, and after its suc- 
cessful termination, began trading in Mexico. 
Upon one of his trips to that country he was 
captured by bandits. All his earnings were 
seized, and he was imprisoned for six months. 
He subsequently purchased land in Ken- 
tucky and also along the Monongahela River, 
in the vicinity of Pittsburg, Pa., the present 
site of which city was then all farming land. 
After making some improvements on his land 
Mr. White sold it, and purchased another 
tract in Beaver county, whither he removed 
during the later part of the eighteenth cen- 
tury. 

Thomas White was united in marriage 
with a Miss Martin, and to them were born 
the following children : James, of Mexico ; 
John, father of the subject hereof; Joseph; 
Jane (Duncan) ; Nancy, wife of Judge 
Caruthers ; and Susan (Burns). 

John White, father of the gentleman to 
whom this writing pertains, was born in Al- 
legheny county, Pa., in January, 1802. He 
attended the public schools of his native 
county, and, although the opportunities 
for his mental culture Vv-ere limited, he 
made the most of what he could ob- 
tain and became a fairly good scholar. He 
learned the art of tilling the soil and assisted 
his father for many years. A four-hundred- 
acrq farm fell to him, as his heritage. To this 



he added eight hundred acres of land which 
he purchased in Beaver county. The latter 
was only partly improved. John White re- 
moved to his Beaver county farm in 1850. 
He further improved his place by building 
spacious and convenient barns. Besides car- 
rying on general farming, he was a very suc- 
cessful sheep-raiser for many years, and made 
a great deal of money. But after some years 
the foot-rot caused much loss among his sheep 
and that branch of farming was discontinued 
entirely. 

T. Martin White's father was public- 
spirited and generous. He was one of the 
men prominent in building railroads from- 
New Galilee to the cannel coal mines. But 
his efforts in that direction were not ap- 
preciated. He failed to receive the support 
such an enterprise deserved, and lost heavily. 
He was quite prominent in political and 
church matters, and his opinions and advice 
were frequently sought by his neighbors and 
associates. He served many years as justice 
of the peace. Five children were bom to 
him and his excellent wife. Their names are : 
T. Martin, the subject of this biography; John 
B. ; Duncan, who was burned to death ; Mary 
(W'aterbury) ; arrd James, who died at the age 
of twenty-one years. 

T. Martin White obtained a fair primary 
education in the public schools, which was 
supplemented by a thorough course at Hooks- 
town Academy, from which he graduated. 
Later he worked on the farm for some years, 
but discontinued that line of work to engage 
in contracting. He went to New York City - 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and engaged in business quite successfully as 
a street contractor. He was one of the first 
men who ever did wood block-paving in that 
great city. One large contract secured by 
him was for the paving of Fourteenth street, 
but he faithfully executed others as large. He 
did a very successful business. His success 
was all the more marked from the fact that he 
had lived most of his life on a farm, and, in a 
city so important as New York, he was suc- 
cessful in competing with men who had been 
born and reared there, and possessed the cus- 
tomary shrewdness of city contractors. 

Mr. White continued this life for eight 
years, and was then urged by his parents to 
return to Beaver county. With a sense of 
filial duty he gave up fine business prospects 
and returned home to brighten the declining 
years of a much-loved father and mother. He 
at once took charge of the farm, and faith- 
fully fulfilled the obligations devolved upon 
him until the death of his parents. He and 
his brother, John B., succeeded to the estate. 
The subject of our sketch received as his share 
two hundred and twenty-five acres of the old 
homestead farm, where he still resides. This 
is conceded to be one of the best farms in 
Beaver county. It is almost an assured fact 
that if crops are poor on this farm there are 
no good crops in the county. 

Mr. White has been twice married. His 
first union was with Elizabeth Hall, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Hall, who was a well known 
boat builder of Freedom, where the birth of 
Elizabeth occurred. Her death took place in 
1890. Mr. White's second marriage was con- 



tracted with Emma Blair, of sturdy Pennsyl- 
vania-German stock. She was born in 
Clarion county, and has presented her 
husband with one son, T. M., born in 1898. 
Mr. White is justly regarded as a representa- 
tive farmer of Darlington township, and lib- 
erally supports all religious denominations, 
having no favorite one. 




ON. MILLARD F. MECKLEM. 
There are but few counties in the 
state of Pennsylvania that can 
boast of as many brilliant lawyers as Beaver. 
They are a class of citizens which, more than 
any other class, has the power to attract pub- 
lic attention to a community, thus materially 
aiding in its growth and development. The 
gentleman, whose name appears above, is one 
of the most conspicuous members of the bar 
of the county, and resides at Rochester, where 
he has an extensive practice. Profound in 
his knowledge of legal principles and gifted 
with the power of eloquence, he has long been 
a prominent figure in the public eye, — serving 
for some time as president judge of the dis- 
trict. 

Mr. Mecklem is a son of Archibald M. and 
Margaret (Thompson) Mecklem, and was 
born in Pittsburg, Pa., October 15, 1851. His 
grandfather was Samuel Mecklem, who, in the 
year 1800, came from the state of New Jersey 
to North Sewickley (now Marion) township, 
Beaver county, Pa., being one of the pioneers 
of that section, lying in the beautiful valley of 
Brush Creek. He purchased a tract of land 



BEAVER COUNTY 



183 



covered with timber, and in the wild state in 
which it was left by the hand of nature. 
Stately trees fell before the onslaught of civ- 
ilization, and a wonderful transformation took 
place. A log house and barns were erected 
and the wild lands became fertile fields of pas- 
ture and grain. The nearest neighbors were 
far distant, but there this hardy old pioneer 
lived in happiness with his wife and children 
until fiis death. He married Rachel McDon- 
ald, who was of Scotch ancestry, and their 
children were as follows : Jethro ; John ; Eli ; 
Samuel ; Archibald M. ; Gideon ; Sarah, the 
wife of Joseph Wolf; and Eliza, who became 
the wife of James Jones. 

Archibald McDonald Mecklem was born 
on the old farm in 1806, and as he grew up 
aided in clearing it. At that early day, money 
was little used as a medium of exchange, and 
the produce of the farm was bartered for any 
article which was desired. It was not easy to 
obtain an education at that day, and books 
were very scarce. Ambitious, and not afraid 
of work, Archibald and his brothers made 
some spBnt brooms by taking a green ash 
tree, pounding the wood, peeling it up from 
one end, a distance of fifteen inches, and then 
cutting the balance down to a handle. Happy 
in the thought of the books these would buy, 
they made their way to the store, several miles 
through the snow, and were dismayed to find 
that their product was rejected, as the market 
was flooded with just such articles. As the 
kind merchant noted their disappointment, he 
asked what it was they wished to buy, and 
upon being informed that it was books, his 



heart went out to them and the exchange 
was efifected. Archibald's diligent search for 
knowledge led him to abandon the backwoods 
and seek the culture and refinement of city 
.lie. He was yet in his teens, when he went 
to Pittsburg, and there applied his hand to 
mything he could find to do. Energetic and 
saving, he laid by as much of his wages as he 
could, and in time was enabled to enter the 
grocery business, which he conducted for 
n:any years on Liberty street, near where the 
'Union Station now is. In 1855, he sold out 
and opened a general merchandise store at 
Darlington, which he operated for fourteen 
years, with the best of results. In 1869, feel- 
ing the weight of years, he decided to lessen 
his business cares, and, accordingly, sold out, 
and kept a small store at North Sewickley. 
A few years later he died aged six- 
ty-eight years, and was buried in the 
North Sewickley Cemetery. His first mar- 
riage (with Rachel Barris) resulted in 
the birth of several children, all of 
whom died in infancy. She died at a very 
early age, of consumption. Mr. Mecklem 
formed a second matrimonial alliance with' 
Margaret Thompson, a daughter of Joseph 
Thompson, a pioneer farmer of North Sewick- 
ley, and they had the following issue : Rose, 
the wife of C. T. Crawford, of Esplin, Pa. ; 
Millard P., the subject of this personal his- 
tory; Joseph T., a farmer of Franklin town- 
ship, Beaver county; Jane, the wife of S. S. 
Bennett, of Rochester; and Ross D., who died 
in infancy. Mrs. Mecklem died at the age of 
fifty-nine years. Mr. Mecklem was very 



184 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



strongly opposed to slavery, and assisted in 
the working of the old "underground rail- 
road." Religiously, he was a faithful adher- 
ent to the faith of the Baptist church. 

Millard F. Mecklem received a good intel- 
lectual training and made the best of his ad- 
vantages, attending the public schools of Dar- 
lington, the North Sewickley Academy, and 
a private school at the latter iplace. He 
taught for several years in the public schools, 
and then, having decided upon a professional 
career, registered as a law student in the ofifice 
of Chamberlain & Pearsol, of New Brighton. 
He was admitted to the bar on March lo, 
1882, and in the fall of tliat year located at 
Rochester, where he has since practiced his 
profession. In 1883, he was elected burgess 
of Rochester and served with such satisfactory 
results, that he was five times re-elected. Be- 
ing a careful and faithful student, and withal, 
clear minded, he has acquired a fair knowl- 
edge of the law, and has secured a large clien- 
tage. He rose rapidly in his profession and 
was chosen district attorney, an office he held 
for five and one-half years, when he resigned 
to accept the position of president judge. He 
succeeded president judge John I. Wick- 
ham (who had resigned), and was appointed 
by Gov. Hastings, being the unanimous 
choice of the county. i\Ir. Meckiem then ap- 
pointed D. M. Twiford, Esq., as his successor 
as district attorney. He meted out justice in 
an honest and impartial manner, obtaining 
favor with the public and the lawyers who 
practiced in his court. Upon the expiration 
of his term, 'before anyone had left the court 



room he was presented with a beautiful gold- 
headed cane by W. B. Cuthbertson, Esq., and 
other well-known attorneys made remarks as 
to his ability and the esteem in which he was 
held by all. The Judge accepted in a fitting 
manner, and with his characteristic, unassum- 
ing style. In 1895, he became a director of 
the First National Bank, of Rochester. 

In 1 88 1, Judge Mecklem was united in mar- 
riage with Ella Jackson, a daughter of Robert 
and Eliza (Thompson) Jackson, of North 
Se-.vickley township, and their children are: 
Erie Homer, Norman Jackson, Ella and Mar- 
garet Millard. Fraternally, he is a member 
of the Royal Arcanum and the Order of Elks. 
He is a member of the Baptist church, and 
his wife is a consistent member of the Pres- 
byterian church. In 1890, Mr. Mecklem sold 
tlie home in which he lived, on Pennsylvania 
street, and built a handsome residence and 
office at the corner of Madison and Connec- 
ticut streets. 




ILLIAM CARR, one of the most 
prosperous and substantial citizens 
of Rochester, Beaver county. Pa., is 
the proprietor of a large boot and shoe store 
in that borough, and is prominently identified 
with many other business enterprises. He is 
a son of Robert and Mary (Haw) Carr, and 
Vi'as born in Steubenville, Ohio, October 12, 
1848. 

Robert Carr, the father of our subject, was 
born in County Down, Ireland, and after his 
marriage came to America in 1831, landing 



BEAVER COUNTY 



185 



in the city of Philadelphia. He moved to 
Pittsburg, Pa., where he learned the trade of 
a glass blower, and from there went to Wash- 
ington county and became a farmer, and sev- 
eral years later moved to Steubenville, Ohio. 
He took up the trade of a metal v^orker and 
followed it with much success until his death, 
which occurred early in life. His wife was 
I\Iary H^aw and she attained the ripe old age 
of ninety-fiye years, being a hale and hearty 
woman all her life. Their children were as 
fo!!ov\-s: Jane, the wile of John ^IcCowen; 
Mary, the v.ife of Lloyd Parks; Nancy, the 
wife of Samuel Irvin ; John, deceased, whose 
union with ^lahala Campbell resulted in the 
birth of two children, Thomas and Georgia; 
Thomas, of Rochester; Robert, also of 
Rochester; and William, the subject of this 
writing. 

William Carr, the youngest child of the 
family, attended the public schools, but as 
his father died leaving a family of small chil- 
dren, he sought employment at an early age. 
He was an ambitious youth, and while not in 
school did outside jobs. — at the age of six 
years acting as firer of glassware. He spent 
much of his time in the glass factory and ac- 
quired such skill that he was later enabled to 
demand a good position, when he went to 
Pittsburg. He was employed as finisher for 
J. B. Lyons, and continued in that capacity 
until 1872, when the Rochester Tumbler 
Company was organized. He became a stock- 
holder in this company and helped to build 
the plant, after which he started the business 
and continued in it as an active partner until 



1895. He then retired from that business, 
although he is still a stockholder and director, 
and purchased the store of James Ing in the 
Darr building. He is one of the leading 
boot and shoe merchants in Beaver county, 
and has built up an excellent trade, enjoying 
the patronage of the leading citizens of the 
community. He is as honest as he is sagacious 
in his transactions, and he has made many 
friends by his upright dealings. He is a stock- 
holder and director of the Rochester Im- 
provement Company, and has built four resi- 
dences in Rochester, one on Brighton street, 
and three on Jackson street. His home is on 
the latter street, and is one of the best in the 
town. 

William Carr was united in marriage at 
Steubenville, Ohio, with Mary E. Aldridge, 
who was born in 1848 and died in 1892, and 
was a daughter of Rodney Aldridge. Their 
children were: Carrie, deceased, the wife of 
Henry J. Miller; Edward, who is associated 
in business with his father; and Nellie, who 
was united in marriage with Lewis Gilien, of 
New Brighton. Mr. Carr was again married 
to Mrs. Annie Newman, v>"ho by her first 
union had five children : Minnie ; Eva ; Will- 
iam; Frank; and Annie. Mrs. Newman is a 
daughter of William Boswell. Politically, 
Mr. Carr is a Republican and served in the 
borough council three years. He was a dele- 
gate to the county convention. He is chairman 
of the Rochester Centennial to be held in 1900. 
Fraternally, he is a member of Blue Lodge, 
No. 229, F. & A. M. ; of Eureka Chapter, 
R. A. M., of Rochester; of Ascalon Command- 



186 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ery, No. 59, K. of T., of Pittsburg; of Penn- 
sylvania Consistory, S. P. R. S., and of Scot- 
tish Rites of Pittsburg (being a thirty-second 
degree Mason) ; of Rochester Lodge, I. O. 
O. F. ; and of the Elks. Religiously, he is a 
member of the Episcopal church. He was 
president of the M. S. Quay club when that 
organization was in a flourishing condition. 



R. WALTER A. ROSE. The gen- 
tleman, whose name appears at the 
opening of this sketch, stands high 
in his profession, and is known throughout 
Beaver county as one of the most popular 
and efficient physicians in the vicinity. A 
man of commanding appearance and genial 
presence, he has won for himself many warm 
friends, and his many excellent qualities of 
mind, and skill in his profession, have gained 
for him a large and lucrative practice. He 
was born in Elgin county, Ontario, Canada, 
April 17, 1842, and is a son of Alexander and 
Catherine (Monroe) Rose. 

Alexander Rose, the father of our subject, 
was born near Edinburgh, Scotland, and emi- 
grated to Canada, which was his home the 
rest of his life. He was a mechanic by trade, 
but became a speculator. He was among 
those to start the reformation in Canada, and 
was closely identified with William Lyon Mc- 
Kenzy and George Lawton. He met death 
early in life, being drowned in a small lake. 
He married Catherine Monroe, and their chil- 
dren were as follows: Isabelle, widow of the 



late John Warburton. living in New York 
City; Jeannette. deceased, who was married 
to Elihu Moore : Catherine, who married 
Colin McDougall, and lives in St. Thomas, 
Ontario; Margaret, who married Edward 
Capsey, of Illinois: RachaeL who died in 
youth; and Walter A., the subject of this 
biography. 

Walter A. Rose attended the public schools 
of his native town and also the schools at St. 
Thomas, and registered as a medical student 
under Dr. Robert L. Sanderson, of Sparta, 
Ontario. Being of a studious turn of mind, 
and naturally bright and quick to learn, he 
made rapid progress, and entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, remaining there for two 
years. He then attended the university at 
Buffalo, N. Y., and graduated from that in- 
stitution with the class of 1867. He chose 
Rochester, Pa., for his future home, and be- 
gan practicing there. It was not long until 
his fine abilities were recognized, and though 
he entered the town a complete stranger, he 
acquired a large practice in a very short time. 
It is one of the largest in this part of the 
state, and while it is general, he makes a spe- 
cialty of the throat and nose. He is spoken of 
by everyone in the highest terms, and is 
greatly loved by all in the community. In 
1887, he bought a vacant lot, and erected a 
large and elegant three-story brick building, 
which is known as the Rose Block, and is on 
the corner of New York and Brighton streets. 
The first floor is devoted to his ofifice and re- 
ception rooms, and to the First National 
Bank, and one of the best restaurants in the 



THE 
NEW YORK 

(PUBLIC library' 

\A«tor, Lerw>: and fiiden 
1908 -y 




JOHN B. YOUNG. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



189 



town. The second and third floors are finely 
fitted up for family use. The building is lo- 
cated in the heart of the borough, and is a very 
handsome and commodious structure. 

Dr. Rose is division surgeon for the Penn- 
sylvania R. R. Company. He owns extensive 
oil interests in Ohio, and has dealt largely in 
real estate in Rochester. He has done all in 
his pov/er to further the progress and business 
interests of Rochester, and we find his name 
associated with the incorporators of the 
Rochester Street Railway, the Keystone 
Tumbler Company, and with the directorship 
of the Second and Third National Building 
Associations of Rochester. He is a member 
and past grand of Rochester lodge, F. & A. 
M., No. 229, and R. A. M. and Ascalon Com- 
mandery. No. 59, K. T., Allegheny, Pa., and 
of the Scottish Rites Masonic Commandery 
of Pittsburg, No. 320, and the Syria Temple, 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of Pittsburg. He 
is examining physician of the Maple Leaf 
order, Woodmen of the World. 



§OHN B. YOUNG. A history of Beaver 
county would be quite incomplete 
without a sketch of the oldest member 
of the Beaver county bar. Such is the gen- 
tleman whose name appears at the head of 
these lines, whose important legal connec- 
tions and recognized ability have placed him 
in the front rank of distinguished lawyers of 
this county. He is a resident of Beaver, and 
is at present serving his third term as justice 



of the peace of that borough. He was born 
at Achor, Columbiana county, Ohio, August 
25, 1834, and is a son of Jacob Young, and 
a grandson of Baltzer Young. 

Baltzer Young was born in Germany, but 
in his early manhood, he came to the United 
States, and first settled in Philadelphia; he 
subsequently traveled west on the Little 
Beaver River to Columbiana county, Ohio, 
and there took up a tract of land. He erected 
saw, grist and (later) carding mills, and the 
place was known as Young's Mills ; these were 
destroyed by fire, and he built other mills, 
which have since been removed to Negley by 
his grandson, and are still in use, although 
their running power has been changed from 
water to steam. He also operated a large 
farm in addition to milling. He passed from 
this life, aged eighty-five years. His wife 
was Susanna Boose, by whom he reared a 
large family of children. Those who grew to 
maturity were : Jacob ; John ; Peter ; Samuel ; 
George; David; Mary; Elizabeth; Margaret; 
and Rachel. 

Jacob Young was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
and succeeded his father in the mills ; he also 
kept a store many years, but in his fondness 
for the farm, he sold out, bought a large tract 
of land, and began tilling the soil. He also 
engaged in sheep raising, and once owned 
several hundred sheep. At the time of his re- 
tirement at Achor, Ohio, he owned eleven 
hundred acres of land. He died there, aged 
sixty years. He wedded Susanna Brown, a 
daughter of George and Alice Brown, and 
she also died in her sixtieth year. They were 



190 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



the parents of the following children: 
George ; Alice ; Jacob Boose ; Sarah G. ; 
Rachel ; Matilda Jane ; Rebecca ; Mary Ann ; 
Peter B. ; John B. ; Caroline A. ; and Emily. 
John B. Young obtained his elementary 
education in the public schools, and in 
Beaver Academy, .and in the meantime de- 
cided to adopt the profession of a lawyer. In 
order to pursue his studies in that direction, 
he entered the law office of Hon. Thomas 
Cunningham, and was subsequently admitted 
to the bar, in 1858. He immediately opened 
an office in Beaver, where he has continuously 
practiced up to the present time, and the great 
ability and keen judgment displayed in the 
handling of his cases have not only made him 
well known before the Beaver county bar, 
but have placed him in the ranks of the fore- 
most attorneys in Western Pennsylvania. 
Since 1861, in addition to the regular practice 
of the law, he has also served as pension at- 
torney. Besides being prominent as a law- 
yer, he is equally prominent as a man of af- 
fairs; he has been honored with the office of 
district attorney of Beaver county, trustee of 
Beaver Academy, chief burgess of Beaver, and 
is now serving his third term as justice of the 
peace. In 1864, he enlisted in Company H, 
5th Reg., Pa. Heavy Artillery, and was hon- 
orably discharged in 1865, ^t the close of the 
war. 

Mr. Young married Anna Bocking, a 
daughter of Adolph and Mary Bocking, — 
both natives of Prussia ; her parents came to 
this country in 1849. Mr. Bocking was a 
landscape artist of great talent, and many 



of his pictures have taken the highest awards 
in New York City, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, 
and many other large cities. Mr. and Mrs. 
Young reared the following children: Elma 
Jennett, who is the wife of G. W. McGraw, of 
Pittsburg, Pa., and has four children (Ethel, 
George W., Elizabeth A., and John B.) ; Louis 
A., who is a harnessmaker and grocer, at 
Denver, Colorado, and married Ida Mans- 
field (by whom he reared John B., and Louis 
A., Jr.); Annie C. ; Maude E., who wedded 
L. L. Mosher, attorney-at-law, at Indianola, 
Iowa, and had five children (Lee, Wendell P., 
Donovan, Edith and Hugh); Amelia B., who 
wedded Charles L. Sheets, of Beaver Falls, 
Pa., and has one son (Oliver Byron); Will- 
iam T., who is a harnessmaker living at Mer- 
cer, Pa.; Alice; Pearl; and Anna Melinka. 
The subject of this sketch v/as a strong anti- 
slavery man, and supported the Republican 
ticket from the holding of the first Republican 
conference at Pittsburg, Pa., until after Presi- 
dent Grant's first election, since which time 
he has been a radical reformer, — advocating 
municipal and governmental ownership, co- 
operation in the production and distribution 
of wealth as distinguished from competition, 
the necessity of the initiative and referendum, 
and the "single tax," as one of the coming re- 
forms. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Baptist church, while his wife is a member of 
the Presbyterian denomination. Mr. Young 
is a man of fine appearance and popular man- 
ners, and is a favorite with all who know him ; 
his courteous deportment and genial ways 
have gained for him the confidence, esteem 



BEAVER COUNTY 



and good-will of a host of acquaintances. His 
portrait appears on a preceding page. 



rITUS M. WELSH is superinten- 
dent of the Union Water Company 
of Beaver Falls, Pa., in which capac- 
ity he has efificiently served since the first of 
January, 1895. He is a prominent and well- 
to-do citizen and is always interested in the 
growth and prosperity of his adopted 
borough ; his birthplace was in Chippewa 
township, in this county, and he is a son of 
John W. and Jeannette (Garwood) Welsh, and 
a grandson of Andrew Welsh. 

The great-grandfather of the subject here- 
of was James Welsh, who was of Welsh ex- 
traction. His son, Andrew, the grandfather 
of Titus M., was the member of the family 
who came to this country, and he is classed 
among the old settlers of Chippewa township, 
Beaver county, Pa., having taken up a large 
tract of land there ; his occupation was farm- 
ing. Politically, he was an Old Line Whig, 
and later a Republican ; he served as justice of 
the peace of Chippewa township, and was pop- 
• ularly known as "Squire" Welsh. He was a 
soldier in the War of 1812, and was at Erie 
when Commodore Perry overwhelmingly de- 
feated the British squadron. He was married 
to Keziah Newkirk and they reared a family 
of children, one of whom was John W. 

John W. Welsh was born on his father's 
farm in Chippewa township, in 1826, and there 
spent his entire life tilling the soil ; he passed 



from this earth in 1894. In politics, he was 
a Republican, while religiously, he was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. His union with 
the mother of the subject hereof resulted in 
the birth of the following children : Titus M. ; 
Moses B., deceased; Franklin P., a resident 
of Beaver Falls; Ira E., who is a farmer living 
in Erie county, Pa. ; Phoebe, who is the wife 
of Ollie J. Wallace, of Honiewood, Beaver 
county ; Andrew Morris, deceased ; Lucius 
Wright, deceased; Lizzie J., who is the wife 
of William Wallace of Thompson, Beaver 
county; Addie K., who was wedded to 
Chauncey Robinson, of Connellsville, Pa. ; 
Richard W., who resides at Mahoningtown, 
Pa. ; and one who died in its infancy. 

Titus M. Welsh obtained a thorough intel- 
lectual training in the public schools of Chip- 
pewa township and at Beaver Academy, but 
the practical portion of his education was re- 
ceived through actual business experience. 
He worked on the homestead until a year after 
his marriage, in 1867, and then moved to 
Beaver Falls, where he accepted a position as 
file hardener in the file works of that borough. 
After continuing in that capacity for two 
years, he went to Conneautville, Crawford 
county. Pa., where he spent one year, as a 
partner in a carriage wheel factory, which was 
subsequently destroyed by fire, — Mr. Welsh 
thus sustaining a severe loss. Returning to 
Beaver Falls he took up his former position 
in the file works, but in 1880, he entered the 
employ of Emerson, Smith & Company as 
steam engineer; after remaining in their serv- 
ice ten years he lost his position during a 



192 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Strike, but afterwards accepted a like situation 
with the Carnegie Company. In September, 
1894, Mr. Welsh resigned from this connec- 
tion, and, at the beginning of the following 
year, entered upon his present work as super- 
intendent of the Union Water Company of 
Beaver Falls. 

In politics, Mr. Welsh is a Republican, and 
served three years as a member of the council 
from the sixth ward, and also as a congres- 
sional delegate. Socially, he is a member of 
the I. O. O. F., also of the Encampment of 
Beaver Falls; and of the Woodmen of the 
World. His marriage to Miss Lizzie J. In- 
man, a daughter of Azariah and Jane Ininan, 
was blessed by the birth of five children: 
Frank I., who is employed in the American 
Steel Works of Beaver Falls; Albertice A., 
who died aged two years; Lorena M., who 
died aged seven years; Clyde W., who works 
in the same mill as does his brother, Frank I. ; 
and Wilber L., who is engaged with L. D. 
Clark, wholesale confectioner, Beaver Falls. 



'EORGE F. WEHR is one of the 
^ I substantial and prominent citizens of 
the town of Rochester, Pa. He is 
president of the borough council, and takes a 
deep interest in the growth and welfare of his 
adopted town. Besides being interested in 
various enterprises in Rochester, he is also 
superintendent of the etching and cutting de- 
partment of the Phoenix Glass Company, of 
Monaca, Pennsylvania. He was born near 




Lancaster, Butler county. Pa., February 19, 
1864, and is a son of Frederick and Elizabeth 
(Martsolf) Wehr. 

George F. Wehr's father was born in Ger- 
many, and upon coming to the United States, 
he located in Butler county. Pa., where he be- 
came the owner of a fine farm ; he successfully, 
followed farming all his life, and passed away 
at the age of eighty-four years. His first wife 
died leaving a family of four children: An- 
drew; Michael; Lizzie; and Kate. The sub- 
ject of our sketch was the only child born of 
the second union, and his mother is now liv- 
ing at Monaca, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Wehr was eleven years of age when 
he entered school at Allegheny, and remained 
there until he was fourteen. At that age he 
began clerking for George Bechtell, at 
Monaca, but a year later he accepted a posi- 
tion with the Rochester Glass Manufacturing 
Company, working in the punch department, 
of which he afterwards became foreman. He 
later became manager of the coloring depart- 
ment in the Phoenix Glass Company, of 
Monaca, but at the present time he is superin- 
tendent of the etching and cutting depart- 
ment. Mr. Wehr has been a member of the 
council during the past three years, and, since 
1897, has served as president of that body. 
The council of Rochester was established by 
an act of the legislature, March 20, 1849, 
which was signed by Gov. William F. John- 
ston and town clerk George St. Clair Murry. 

September 16, 1884, Mr. Wehr was united 
in marriage with Miss Emma Stiles, a daugh- 
ter of Atlas Stiles, of Rochester, and she died 



THE 
NEW YORK 

(public library 1, 

'{' \%Mir, Loi'O ana Tilden // 




ALFRED M. WHISLKR, U. I). S. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



195 



leaving two children : Willie Atlas, born June 
5, 1885; and Martha Elizabeth, born June 23, 
1887. February 13, 1890, he wedded Mrs. 
Emma R. Marshall, a daughter of George 
Young, also of Rochester, and from this union 
the following children have resulted, namely: 
George Frederick, born July 21, 1894, died 
January 6, 1895; and Annie Marie and An- 
drew Howard, twins, born April 7, 1896. The 
subject of this sketch occupies a neat resi- 
dence on the corner of Vermont and Jefferson 
streets, which he erected in 1893. He for- 
merly resided where A. Neidergall now lives 
on Jefferson street. Mr. Wehr was reared a 
Lutheran but is a member, trustee and stew- 
ard of the Methodist church. Socially, he is 
a member of the I. O. O. F. ; Rebecca Lodge; 
K. of P. ; Jr. O. U. A. M. ; Elks Lodge ; Pro- 
tective Home Circle ; and the Fidelity Mutual 
Life Association. 



(^f-^ LFRED M. WHISLER, D. D. S., 
^A the oldest practicing dentist in New 
■^ \^ Brighton, Beaver county, Pa., has 
for many years occupied a high position in the 
town, and is greatly esteemed by all his fellow- 
citizens. He was born in Rochester, Pa., 
October 13, 1839, and is a son of John H. and 
Agnes (Jackson) Whisler. 

Jacob Whisler, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was a son of Christian Whisler. Jacob 
was born in Virginia, whence he moved to 
Lancaster county. Pa., about 1814, and after- 



ward came to the vicinity of Beaver county, 
where he settled, in Pulaski township. There 
he bought and cleared up a farm, — a govern- 
ment tract consisting of 160 acres, — which is 
now owned by Mr. Stuber, and is said to be a 
very valuable piece of land. Jacob Whisler 
served in the Revolutionary War, and died 
when more than seventy years old. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Catherine Hart, died 
at the age of eighty. Their children were: 
Benjamin, Jacob, Andrew, Joseph, and John 
H. John H. Whisler was born near Carlisle, 
Cumberland county, Pa., in 1802, and in 
early manhood taught school during the win- 
ter. He apprenticed himself as boat-builder 
to John Boles, of Bolesville, Beaver county, 
and later became Mr. Boles' partner in busi- 
ness. He then bought Mr. Boles' share in 
the business and followed boat building for 
the remainder of his active life. He made 
principally cotton and canal boats. In his 
later years, he was a silent partner of S. 
Barnes & Co., clay manufacturers. He mar- 
ried Agnes Jackson, a daughter of James 
Jackson, one of the pioneer settlers of Pulaski 
township. Agnes Jackson was a relative of 
General Andrew Jackson, her father being a 
cousin of the general. Mr. Whisler died at 
the age of eighty-two, andi his wife died at the 
age of eighty. Their children were as fol- 
lows: Jackson, deceased; Leander, of Sioux 
City, Iowa; John H., living in Rochester; 
Jeremiah ; Alfred M., the subect of this biogra- 
phy; Addison W., a reporter, of Rochester, 
formerly a boat builder, who married Rebecca 
Q. Brobeck; Amanda J., deceased; Charles 



196 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



F., deceased; and Mary Ellen, who was the 
wife of the late R. H. Kerr. Mr. Wheeler's 
father was an active politician, and held sev- 
eral minor offices. He helped to build the 
Presbyterian church at Bridgewater, Pa., and 
was an elder therein. At the time of his 
death, he was the only living original 
member. 

Alfred M. Whisler became a student of den- 
tistry with James Murray, of Bridgewater, and 
practiced his profession in Rochester, with 
T. J. Chandler, from 1862 to 1867. He then 
moved to New Brighton, and located in the 
office which he now occupies. He could not 
stand higher in the profession than he does, 
and he has worked up a large and lucrative 
practice. For many years he has made a 
specialty of gold crown work, bridge work, 
and the like. His patrons are from the oldest 
and best families, and his practice is ever in- 
creasing. He married Mamie M. Marquis, 
a daughter of Dr. D. S. Marquis, of Rochester, 
Pa., and their children are as follows: Gracie 
S., who died at the age of eight years ; Edward 
B., a clerk in the auditor's office of the P. & 
L. E. R. R. ; Frazier, who married E. Kinney 
Lowe, of Washington, D. C, and has one 
child, William R. The subject of our sketch 
is a Democrat. He attends the Presbyterian 
church ; is a member of Union Lodge, No. 
259, F. & A. M.. of New Brighton, Pa., and 
served as worshipful master in 1877, '78, '79 
and '86. He was high priest of Harmony 
Chapter, No. 206, in 1889. Dr. Whisler's 
portrait accompanies the above account of his 
life. 



m 



ICHARD J. MARLATT, who is a rep- 
resentative of the younger generation 
of farmers of Beaver county, culti- 
vates a fine farm of one hundred and fifty-two 
acres located in Chippewa township. He is 
a man of enterprise, quick to adopt all modern 
and improved methods of farming, and has 
attained a degree of success which is surpris- 
ing in one so young. He is a son of Michael 
and Abbie (Allison) Marlatt, and was born 
in Beaver county, September 7, 1875, on the 
old homestead, where he now lives. 

His grandfather was Richard Marlatt, who 
was born in New Jersey, where he was edu- 
cated and learned the trade of a carpenter, 
this he followed there for some years and 
also after his removal to Sewickley, where he 
died at an advanced age. 

Michael Marlatt, the fatlier of Richard J., 
was born in New Jersey in 1830, and, although 
his educational advantages were limited, he 
acquired a good mental training. The school 
terms were of but three months' duration, 
and he was able to attend but a short time. 
He was an accurate mathematician, a discrim- 
inating reader, and a profound thinker, and 
had he had but the opportunity presented to 
the student of today, he would undoubtedly 
have created a name for himself along profes- 
sional lines. He was obliged to adopt 
a mechanical career, and it was 
but natural that he should clioose 
the trade of his father, that of a car- 
penter. He assisted his father and then fol- 
lowed the business for himself for some time, 
after wliich he hired out as a farm hand by 



BEAVER COUNTY 



197 



the day. He then bought a small farm near 
Leetsdale, Pa., and did a general market- 
gardening business, hauling to Pittsburg. He 
had to haul the produce the entire way. and it 
was by working and sleeping out of doors that 
he lost his hearing, a very sad affliction for 
one of such intelligence. Selling his Leets- 
dale property, he went to Beaver Falls, 
bought building lots and worked at his trade ; 
but owing to his wife's poor health, he traded 
his city property for the farm on which the 
subject of this record now lives, and in addi- 
tion gave a money consideration. It is an 
improved farm of 152 acres, one-half of which 
is cleared, and has a good house. He erected 
new barns and did a general gardening busi- 
ness, — retailing in Beaver Falls. He set out 
three) elegant orchards, and engaged in dairy- 
ing and stock-raising. In 1898, in the sixty- 
ninth year of his age, he died very suddenly 
while engaged in work upon his farm. His 
wife was Abbie Allison, who was born in Al- 
legheny county, in 1836, and they reared the 
following children: Joseph, a pastor of the 
M. E. church in Tacoma, Washington, and a 
graduate of Meadville Academy; Amy 
(Hendrickson) ; Charles, superintendent of 
Morado Park ; Sadie (Wells), deceased ; Rob- 
ert, a farmer; Rev. Wesley, a graduate of 
Geneva College and formerly a successful at- 
torney, who received the degree of D. D. from 
the University of Michigan, and died while 
pastor of the M. E. church at Johnstown, Pa. ; 
William, a farmer who now assists the subject 
hereof; and Richard J., whose name heads 
these lines. Politically, Mr. Marlatt was a 



Republican and served as school director and 
supervisor. He was a trustee of the M. E. 
church. 

Richard J. Marlatt received a good intel- 
lectual training in the district schools, and 
has lived his entire life upon the old home 
farm. Upon his father's death, the farm 
descended to his heirs, and our subject has 
since had its management. Self-reliant and 
industrious, he has cultivated the farm in the 
most approved style, and his efforts have 
been attended by the greatest success. He 
follows closely the footsteps of his father, do- 
ing a large general market business, and also 
has the place stocked with good cattle and 
horses. He has a wide knowledge on the sub- 
ject of farming, and his opinions are respected 
to a degree not usually accorded one so 
young. He is very popular with his fellow- 
citizens, having a large circle of friends 
throughout the township. Politically, he is 
a Repubhcan, but does not aspire to office. 
He is a faithful member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



y"^ RNST H. SEIPLE, the genial and 
k| efficient cashier of the Union Na- 

tional Bank of New Brighton, Pa., 
has occupied that important position since 
1894. The bank is finely located at the cor- 
ner of Ninth street and Third avenue in the 
Merrick building, which was purchased and 
especially fitted up with suitable equipments 
for the purpose. The interior is finely fur- 



198 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



nished with a superb set of modern fixtures 
and contains office, director's and president's 
rooms, with burglar and fireproof safe of the 
most modern design. The bank has a capital 
stock of $50,000, and is doing a substantial 
business, conducted on safe lines. C. M. Mer- 
rick was the first president. The first vice- 
president was E. Autenreith, who was suc- 
ceeded by J. F. Miner. E. H. Seiple, cashier, 
C. C. Keck, assistant cashier, and H. R. Boots, 
messenger, complete the force. 

Ernst H. Seiple was born in New Hamburg, 
Mercer county, Pa., in 1864. He is a son of 
Joseph H. and Sarah (Beil) Seiple. Joseph 
H. Seiple was also a native of Mercer county. 
Pa., and early in life, engaged in merchandiz- 
ing at New Hamburg, Pa., and later at 
Greenville. He subsequently retired from 
mercantile pursuits to a farm, which he had 
previously purchased. The remainder of his 
days was spent in the uneventful quietude of 
agriculture, — a life which he thoroughly en- 
joyed until called away by death, at the age of 
seventy years. His faithful wife was Sarah 
Beil, a lady of many estimable qualities. She 
died at the early age of forty-two years, leav- 
ing the following children: Elizabeth, wife 
of Charles T. Bortz, of Kent, Ohio; David 
A. ; Clara A. ; Milton S., of Greenville, Pa. ; 
Ernst H., the subject of these lines; Mary, 
wife of J. W. Long, of Youngstown, Ohio; 
and Nevin Deha, of New Brighton, Pa. Mr. 
Seiple attended the public schools, after which 
he took a finishing course at Tiehl College. 
He then began his career in life, accepting a 
position as clerk in the Greenville National 



Bank, where he remained from 1882 to 1884; 
he then v,as a clerk for four years, at the Na- 
tional Bank of Beaver County. For the fol- 
lowing two years, he was teller in the First 
National Bank at Rochester, Pa. After this 
lie was with the auditor, the treasurer, and 
the purchasing agent, in the general offices of 
tlie Pittsburg & Lake Erie Railroad, at Pitts- 
burg. When the Union National Bank of 
New Brighton was established, April 20, 1891, 
Mr. Seiple was elected assistant cashier, which 
position he filled in a highly capable manner. 
Since his residence in New Brighton, he has 
taken a very active interest in the progress 
and development of that town. He purchased 
the Merrick homestead at the corner of Four- 
teenth street and Third avenue, and fitted it 
up handsomely for his family. He is a stock- 
holder of the Standard Horse Nail Company, 
tl'.e Beaver Valley Traction Company, and is 
treasurer of the Beaver County and New 
Brighton Building and Loan Association. 

On July 9, 1894, the subject of this sketch 
was joined in marriage with Charlotta Weber, 
a daughter of Henry Weber, of Meadville, 
Pa., and their home is brightened by the 
presence of one daughter, Elizabeth. Mr. 
Seiple was reared in accordance with the doc- 
trine of the German Reformed church, but 
is now a supporter of the Presbyterian de- 
nomination. Socially, he is a member of the 
Union Lodge, No. 259, F. & A. M., and also 
of the Harmony Chapter, No. 206, of the 
R. A. M. Mr. Seiple has shown himself in 
all his experience in life, to be capable of con- 
ducting his individual business with equally 



vORK N 
USRARY 




HENRY C. FRY. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



201 



as great success as he has served the pubHc 
interests. It is needless to sa)', that our sub- 
ject is justly entitled to the appreciation of 
his friends. Unaided, when little more than 
a youth, he began, in this land of equal oppor- 
tunities, to achieve that success, which energy 
and perseverance assure, and to exert that 
influence which ability and fidelity command. 
He is the advocate of every cause considered 
worthy, and has the courage to proclaim his 
convictions. 



^T" ENRY C. FRY, whose portrait is 




^=^ shown on the opposite page, to whom 
much credit is due as the principal 
organizer of the Rochester Tumbler Com- 
pany, the most extensive manufacturers of 
pressed and blown tumblers in the world, is 
a man of thorough business qualifications, 
and, through his connection with numerous 
enterprises, has attained a wide reputation. 
He has done much to aid in the progress of 
Rochester, as the tumbler works, of which he 
is president, constitute the principal industry 
of the borough. He was also the chief or- 
ganizer of the First National Bank, of 
Rochester, of which he has been president 
since its incorporation. He has always 
evinced the deepest interest in the welfare of 
his fellowmen, alleviating their distress when- 
ever he could do so, and encouraging them 
by gentle and sympathizing counsel ; for these 
little kindnesses of word and deed, he will be 
long remembered by the citizens of the com- 



munity after his demise. He is respected and 
loved in Rochester as but few of its residents 
are. Mr. Fry was born in Lexington, Ky., 
September 17, 1840, and is a son of Thomas 
C. and Charlotte Fry. 

John Fry, his grandfather, was born in the 
North of Ireland, and, with his brother, Will- 
iam, emigrated from Dublin to New York 
City, locating at Wilkesbarre, Pa., soon after, 
and still later in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania. The brothers were possessed of am- 
ple means and invested extensively in real es- 
tate. They were descended from a prominent 
Irish family, and had, each, an excellent edu- 
cation, for that day. In the early part of the 
nineteenth century, John Fry moved to Lex- 
ington, Ky., and bought a large tract of land, 
upon which he built a handsome brick man- 
sion. There he resided until his death, at the 
age of almost ninety years, and was buried in 
a cemetery on a portion of his own land. The 
city of Lexington is built on his land, with 
the exception of some two hundred acres, 
and the old homestead known as the "Elms" 
is owned by his descendants. He married 
Elizabeth Miller, a lady of Scotch birth, and 
they had three children : William, Eliza and 
Thomas C. 

Thomas C. Fry, the father of Henry C, was 
born in the city of New York, and during 
his early years was connected with the firm 
of Curling, Robinson & Co., glass manufac- 
turers, of Pittsburg. He spent the remainder 
of his life at the "Elms," at Lexington, Ky. 
He married Charlotte Fry, who died at the 
age of fifty-six years, and among their large 



202 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



family of children, was Henry C, the subject 
of this record. 

Henry C. Fry, endowed with superior tal- 
ents, a sturdy constitution, and an ambitious 
temperament, at an early age sought activity 
in the business world. He was sixteen years 
old when he went to Pittsburg, bearing good 
recommendations, and obtained employment 
as a shipping clerk for the firm of William 
Phillips & Co., manufacturers of glass. He 
continued in their service until 1862, when he 
enlisted in the 15th Reg., Pa. Vol. Cav., as a 
private. Upon being mustered out of serv- 
ice in 1864, he became a member of the firm 
of Lippencott, Fry & Co., manufacturers of 
glass, which was afterward changed to Fry & 
Scott, and still later, to Fry, Semple & 
Reynolds. In the spring of 1872, he, with 
others, went to Rochester and purchased the 
Lacock property of ten acres, which had for- 
merly been a beautiful maple grove, and a por- 
tion of which was, at a later period, the brick- 
yard of G. Agner. The Rochester Tumbler 
Company was formed by these gentlemen, and 
they built a plant on this property, — all of 
the members of the company taking an active 
interest inl the work. The company comprised 
the following well-known business men : H. 
C. Fry, G. W. Fry, S. M. Kane, William 
Moulds, S. H. Moulds, Thomas Carr, Will- 
iam Carr, Thomas Matthews, John Hayes, J. 
H. Lippencott, and Richard Welsh. Two 
years later their establishment was burned to 
the ground, but was immediately rebuilt, the 
following men being then added to the firm: 
George Searles, Robert Carr, and John Carr. 



They manufactured both pressed and blown 
glass tumblers, and their work met with such 
success that they have been obliged to enlarge 
the plant and increase their facilities from time 
to time, so that it is now the leading establish- 
ment of its kind in the world. They ship di- 
rect to all parts of the United States, Eng- 
land, and other portions of Europe, South 
America, Africa, Australia, China and Japan, 
— sending out from three to ten carloads per 
day. A switch runs through the middle of 
the plant, and thus the loading is all done 
under cover. They do not depend upon others 
for the material they use m the factory, but 
make their own barrels, boxes and crates for 
shipping; they grind clay and make pots, and 
also manufacture their own molds. They 
have a private electric light plant, using 1,000 
incandescent, lights daily ; they have their own 
water works, and a tank with a capacity of 
3,100 gallons, which is also connected with 
the city water works ; they have an ice house 
for drinking purposes. They employ a per- 
manent force of twelve hundred men and 
women, and have an output of 150.000 dozen 
of blown goods per month, and 150,000 dozen 
of pressed goods. Each department of the 
works is kept at a high state of efficiency, — 
nearing perfection, — as the most skilled men 
in the business are in their employ. While the 
best of order is maintained throughout their 
establishment, each employee, from the skilled 
cut-glass worker to the apprentice, feels free 
from constraint, and wears a contented ex- 
pression upon his countenance. The firm has 
been considerably changed since it was first 



BEAVER COUNTY 



203 



organized, and as it exists today, is: H. C. 
Fry, president; William Moulds, general 
manager; S. H. Moulds, assistant manager; 
J. H. Fry, secretary ; and Clayton Vance, 
treasurer. 

In June, 1883, Henry C. Fry actively as- 
sisted in the organization of the First Na- 
tional Bank, of Rochester, with a capital of 
$50,000, and it has been a successful institu- 
tion from the start, — having at the present 
time a surplus of $40,000. The subject of this 
writing has served as president since its in- 
ception, and his skilful management has been 
a prime factor in its prosperity. I. T. Mans- 
field is vice-president, and T. H. Fry is cashier. 
Henry C. Fry is also a director and stock- 
holder of the Olive Stove Works, and of the 
Rochester Electric Light Company, of which 
he was at one time president. In 1876, Mr. 
Fry built his residence on a part of the orig- 
inal Pinney estate, one of the most desirable 
locations in the borough, situated on the cor- 
ner of New York and West Jackson streets. 
At one time he owned the adjoining lots, hav- 
ing a large and beautiful lawn, and also the 
corner property opposite his residence, on 
which there is located a noted spring which 
furnishes his house with an abundance of pure 
water. The spring has quite a history, and is 
well remembered by the early settlers in that 
vicinity. Indians were wont to camp about 
it, and it was known as the "Cure All." It is 
now under cover, and a beautiful lawn and 
vineyard add to the delightful spot. Mr. Fry 
is a man of pleasing personality and great 
strength of character, one of his chief char- 



acteristics being to make others happy. 

The subject of this biography formed a 
matrimonial alliance with Emma Matthews, 
of Pittsburg, a woman attractive in her many 
virtues, who, by her kindliness of heart, made 
friends with everyone. She was a loving wife 
and mother, and their home was one of the 
greatest happiness until she closed her eyes 
in final sleep, in 1884. Five children resulted 
from this union: Harry C, associated with 
the Rochester Tumbler Company, who mar- 
ried Rachel Power; Clara, the wife of H. J. 
Sage; Gertrude, who married A. M. Jenkin- 
son; J. Howard, who is also identified with 
the company; and Mabel, who is attending 
Vassar College. Mr. Fry formed a second al- 
liance, with Belle McClintock, a woman be- 
loved for her many excellent traits of char- 
acter. He is a faithful member, and a liberal 
financial supporter, of the Baptist church, in 
which he has served as a trustee and deacon. 
For the past twenty-four years he has served 
as superintendent of the Sunday School. 




ILLIAM R. HAZEN, who is 
widely known throughout Western 
Pennsylvania as superintendent of 
the Beaver Valley Traction Company, has effi- 
ciently served that company since 1885, when 
horse cars were still used. He is a son of 
Isaac and Mary (dinger) Hazen, and was 
born in North Sewickley township, Beaver 
county. Pa., in 1862. 

James Hazen, the grandfather of William 



204 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



R., was one of the pioneers of Beaver county, 
moving here when it was a complete wilder- 
ness and settling in North Sewickley town- 
ship. Clearing a place, he built a log house 
and barns, and lived there the remainder of 
his life. Among the children born to him and 
his wife Jerusha, was Isaac, father of the sub- 
ject of this writing. 

Isaac Hazen was born in North Sewickley 
township and received his intellectual train- 
ing in the public schools. He learned the 
occupation of a farmer and assisted his father 
upon the farm for some time ; he then pur- 
chased a tract of eighty acres for himself, 
clearing it and constructing thereon good 
substantial buildings. He improved the place, 
placing it under a high state of cultivation, 
and lived there throughout his life. His wife's 
maiden name was Mary dinger, and by her 
he had seven children, as follows: Amariah 
(Fogle) ; William R. ; Laura (Thompson) ; 
Nettie (Nye); Violetta (Miller); Lizzie 
(Smith) ; and Howard. Politically, Mr. Hazen 
was a Democrat and served as school di- 
rector. He was a Baptist in his religious 
views. 

William R. Hazen was given a common 
school education and spent his younger days 
in assisting his father upon the farm, but in 
1880 he removed to Beaver Falls and adopted 
a mechanical career. He was naturally 
adapted to this and acquired a high degree of 
skill at it. He was first employed in the cutlery 
works, then in the axe factory, and later in 
the file factory. He continued in the file 
works until 1885, when he became interested 



in the street car company at Beaver Falls, 
and after being connected with the road for 
one year he was given charge of the stables. 
He continued in that capacity until 1892, 
when the horses were supplanted by elec- 
tricity, and the road was transformed into an 
electric road. Until the road was placed in 
good working order he served as conductor 
for two months, and as such met with a very 
serious accident which compelled him to lay 
off for one year. Upon his return to duty, 
he was appointed to the post of car dispatcher 
and served in that position until 1898, when 
he was promoted to the office of general su- 
perintendent of the road. The responsibilities 
of the position are many and arduous, but he 
has ever discharged the duties of his trust to 
the best of his ability, and to the entire satis- 
faction of the officials of the company. The 
lines over which he has supervision extend 
from Morado Park to the lower end of Beaver, 
Pa., being mostly double track and contin- 
uous rails. There are fifty-five men in his 
employ. The power-house is in Beaver Falls, 
a one-story brick structure, with dimensions 
of 120x60 feet, and was built in 1892. It is 
equipped with two very powerful Buckeye 
engines of 140 and 125 horse power respec- 
tively, with four dynamos of immense power, 
and is fitted with the Thompson-Houston 
equipment. It also supplies power for the 
Patterson Heights Inclined Electric Road, 
and for the Beaver & Vanport line. The car 
barn is located in Rochester township in a very 
pretentious building of vitrified brick, the 
dimensions being 260x120 feet, and besides 



BEAVER COUNTY 



205 



Storing all of the cars, it contains the super- 
intendent's office, the general offices and the 
mess room for employees. Mr. Hazen resides 
in a very desirable home at No. 2715 College 
avenue, which he owns. He is a man of pleas- 
ing character and his nature abounds in good 
will toward his employees and his fellow- 
citizens, by whom he is held in the highest 
esteem. 

William R. Hazen was united in marriage 
with Irene Jackson, who was born in Beaver 
Falls, where she attended the public schools. 
She was graduated from the Beaver Falls 
Fligh School, and then taught school until her 
marriage. They became the parents of three 
children, namely : Earle and Lyle, twins, 
born in 1891 ; and Fern, who was born in 
1892. PoHtically, Mr. Hazen is a Democrat, 
and is a member of the council from College 
Hill Borough, and also a school director. In 
religious views he is a Baptist. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Knights of the Golden 
Eagle, and the K. of L. 



/'k5^*^'AWN WARD, a very prominent 
I -^T citizen of Beaver Falls, Beaver county, 
^Pa., was for many years one of the 
m.ost active business men in that locality, be- 
ing proprietor of a hardware store just prior 
to his retirement on January i, 1899. He 
came to the borough when its population 
numbered less than three thousand, but hav- 
ing entire confidence in its future, he bought 
considerable property in what is now the heart 



of the town, and conducted the first store in 
the section. He became a promoter of var- 
ious industries, and has ever striven for the 
best interests of Beaver Falls. It is to the 
efforts of such men that the prosperity of the 
borough is due. 

Mr. Ward is a son of James and Margaret 
(Cleland) Ward, and was born in County 
Down, Ireland, in 1836. His grandfather was 
Robert Ward, who was born in England and 
m.oved to the North of Ireland when a young 
man, buying fifty acres of rich farm land. He 
engaged in general farming and devoted ten 
acres to the culture of moss. He was the 
father of two children by his first marriage, 
James and Arthur. 

James W^ard was born in County Down, 
Ireland, and was instructed in the common 
schools, after which he bought a small farm 
of twenty acres. He married Margaret Cle- 
land, a daughter of Gawn and Agnes Cleland, 
members of an ancient Scottish family which 
settled in the North of Ireland, and they had 
ten children, as follows: Robert; Hugh; 
Arthur; WilHam; John; Agnes; one who died 
unnamed; Gawn; Thomas; and Matthew. All 
the boys took to farming and the two girls 
died in infancy. In 1844, James Ward came 
to America with his family, locating in New 
York City, where for sixteen years he con- 
ducted a bakery and grocery store with con- 
siderable success. In i860, he removed to 
Allegheny City, Pa., where he kept a grocery 
store for the balance of his life. His death 
occurred in 1887, and in him the city lost a 
man prominently identified with its business 



206 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



interests, and one who was by everybody 
highly esteemed. He was a Republican in 
politics, whilst in religious attachments, he 
was formerly a Presbyterian, but at the time 
of his demise, a Methodist. 

Gawn Ward was instructed in the public 
schools of New York City, after which he 
assisted his father in the store, thus at an early 
age acquiring a thorough knowledge of busi- 
ness methods. When he moved to Allegheny 
City with his father, he conducted a store on 
his own account, and with good results, for a 
period of nine years. In 1871, he located at 
Beaver Falls, which was then a flourishing 
place of about 3,000 inhabitants. With re- 
markable foresight, Mr. Ward noted the di- 
rection in which the town would grow, and 
purchased a piece of ground in the heart of 
the present business district, being the first 
man to open up business there. Merchants 
in the lower end of the town were accustomed 
to joke him about being located in the coun- 
try, but to the intense satisfaction of Mr. 
Ward, the wisdom of his choice was brought 
home to them. The men who laughed began 
to regret that they had not likewise invested, 
when they saw the center of business grad- 
ually move in that direction, and they were 
reluctant to pay prices much in advance of 
former valuations. Mr. Ward started in a 
frame building on Main street, now Seventh 
avenue, between Tenth and Eleventh streets, 
and there were only two or three other houses 
in the vicinity, including the Economy Bank. 
Almost immediately the town began to build 
up, new factories were located there, and busi- 



ness was enlivened throughout that section of 
the county. The axe manufacturing establish- 
ment was started, also the Emerson, Smith & 
Co. Saw Works ; the P. & L. E. R. R. came 
through, and numerous other enterprises 
started. Mr. Ward became a promoter, and 
was for nine years treasurer, of the Co-opera- 
tive Stove Foundry, during which time he 
also kept a general store. The grade of the 
street was cut down and he erected a brick 
store building, which he still owns, and which 
is occupied by a drug store. He then dropped 
the general store and conducted a grocery 
store exclusively, but a short time subsequent 
thereto, he, in partnership with J. D. Perrot 
and Jacob Ecki, bought the Howard Stove 
Works. After running that for some years, 
he sold his interest to his partners and en- 
gaged in the hardware business, having a very 
large trade. He dealt in builders' supplies, 
house furnishings, hardware and stoves, 
paints and glass, and for many years was a 
special agent in the territory, for Baldwin & 
Graham's supplies, Frankie steel ranges, and 
Alaska refrigerators. On January i, 1899, 
after a most active career, in which he ac- 
quired a handsome competency, including 
considerable valuable property, he retired to 
spend the remaining years of his life in the 
enjoyment of a well-earned rest. He there- 
fore sold his stock, rented his store, and took 
up his residence in his beautiful house located 
on Eighth avenue, above Twelfth street, 
which he built in 1896. It is one of the most 
striking residences in Beaver Falls, and is built 
from plansi of his own. Mr. Ward owns most 



BEAVER COUNTY 



207 



of the stores on one side of Seventh avenue, 
between Tenth and Eleventh streets, — 
among the best known being the ofifices of the 
Union Water Compan}', the Western Union 
Telegraph office, Schaefer's jewelry store, 
Nye's barber shop, a drug store and a tailor 
store. He also owns a corner dwelling with 
an adjoining office, the hardware store which 
he conducted for so many years, a building 
on Twelfth street between Ninth and Tenth 
avenues, and some very choice building lots 
in Sewickiey borough, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. 

In New York, Mr. Ward was united in 
matrimonial bonds with ^largaret Orr, a 
daughter of William and Dorothy Orr, who 
was born and educated in the North of Ire- 
land, and they became the parents of ten chil- 
dren, as follows : Dorothy ; Thomas W., who is 
engaged in business with his father; Mar- 
garet (Barnes), now deceased; Charles, a ma- 
chinist by trade; James G., who is connected 
with the Heat & Light Company, of Alle- 
gheny City; William H., who was also in 
business with his father ; Arthur, who is in the 
employ of the Union Drawn Steel Company ; 
John E., wfho follows the trade of a machinist ; 
and Agnes (Walters), whose husband was a 
prominent jeweler of Beaver Falls, and is now 
deceased. Politically, our subject is a Repub- 
lican, and has been a member of the council 
for seven years, but has declined all other 
offices. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and is a trustee, 
steward, and treasurer of the board. He be- 
longs to the A. O. U. W. 




ILLIAM M. DONALDSON, one 
of the foremost business men of Big 
Beaver township, Beaver county, 
Pa., has for some years discharged the multi- 
tudinous duties of general manager of the 
firm of H. Donaldson's Sons, manufacturers 
of white lead kegs, and general coopers, and 
in this capacity he has displayed unusual abil- 
ity. He is also a member of the firm and the 
plant under his control is quite an extensive 
one, the daily output numbering 700 kegs of 
various sizes. He is a son of Henry and 
Ann (Proctor) Donaldson, and Was born in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., January 25, 1849. 

His grandfather was Arthur Donaldson, 
who was of Scotch parentage. He was a 
cooper by trade and made that his life work. 
He died at an early age of cholera, when that 
dread disease was epidemic. Hq reared four 
sons: Joseph, a cooper by trade, who was a 
tank builder for war vessels during the war, 
but spent his last days in Connecticut in agri- 
cultural pursuits, dying in 1890; Henry, who 
was the father of William M. ; George, who 
was engaged in coopering ; and Elisha, also a 
cooper, in the employ of the Atlantic White 
Lead Company. 

Henry Donaldson was born in New York 
in 181 6, and was educated in the public 
schools, receiving a good mental training de- 
spite the fact that his opportunities were very 
limited. Like his father and brothers, he un- 
dertook coopering and entered the employ 
of Christopher Tyler, a New York refiner, 
who established a refinery in Beaver county, 
having been given entire charge of the cooper 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



plant. He held this position until the com- 
pany was absorbed by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany, and in 1878 he started in business for 
himself as a manufacturer of white lead kegs, 
which were then made entirely by hand. He 
was a very progressive man, and as new im- 
provements appeared, he was among the first 
to adopt them and test their merit. He 
started a steam plant in 1879, and as his sons 
grew up they were instructed in the art of his 
trade, becoming as thorough workmen as 
himself. He died in 1890, after a long and 
prosperous life. His wife was Ann Proctor, 
who was born in England, and accompanied 
her parents to this country when she was yet 
a young girl. This union resulted in the fol- 
lowing offspring: Henry M. ; Edwin Miller; 
Jane A.; William M., the subject hereof; 
Emma F. (Piper) ; Theresa E. ; Marcus W. ; 
and Edgar; the three last named are de- 
ceased. Henry M., who is a mem- 
ber of H. Donaldson's Sons, was born in 
Brooklyn, in 1845, ^^^^ h^s always been en- 
gaged at his present occupation. He is a Pro- 
hibitionist, but was formerly a supporter of 
the Republican party. He is a school director 
and a member of the borough council. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of the Masonic and 
Odd Fellows orders, and also of the Knights 
of Pythias. He married Ella McCowin, a 
daughter of Thompson McCowin, of Enon 
Valley, and they have four children: Harry, 
aged tv^^enty years, who works in the shops; 
Maud, Ethel, and Hazel. Edwin Miller, an- 
other member of the firm of H. Donaldson's 
Sons, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1847, 



and was instructed in the public schools. He 
married Mary Davis, and they have three 
children : Gertrude, Charles, and Byron. Re- 
ligiously, he is a member of the M. E. church. 
He is a Republican in politics, and is a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows order, and of the 
Knights of Pythias. Henry Donaldson was a 
very devout Christian and was connected with 
the Congregational church until 1873, when 
he became a member of the Darlington Pres- 
byterian church and so continued until his 
death. He was an Abolitionist and a Repub- 
lican, serving as burgess two terms, as school 
director, and as a member of the borough 
council. He was a member of the Odd Fel- 
lows order. 

William M. Donaldson removed to New 
Galilee in 1861, with his parents, and attended 
the public schools of New Castle, after which 
he entered the cooper shops of his father, with 
whom he was associated until the death of the 
latter. The works were left to the children, 
the three sons purchased the interests of their 
sisters, and the name was changed to H. Don- 
aldson's Sons. William M. attends to the 
financial affairs of the firm, does the buying 
and selling, and has entire charge of the af- 
fairs of the plant. A great deal of responsi- 
bility attaches to the position, but he has been 
equal to its requirements as the prosperous 
condition of the establishment indicates. The 
business was first carried on in a little shop 
across the street from where the main build- 
ing is now located, and the work was all done 
by hand. What a wonderful change has been 
wrought ! The main building is a two-story 




CHARLES W. KLEIX. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



affair, and is so equipped with machinery that 
it is a difficult matter to pass through it. Its 
dimensions are 40x25 feet. On the second 
floor is the mac'.iinery for cutting, planing 
and manufacturing heads. The kegs for white 
lead are made of white oak and mostly con- 
tain 25, and 100, pounds; the firm also make 
kegs for cider, pickles and vinegar. The 
boiler room is an annex to the main building, 
and contains a 25-horse power boiler; on the 
first floor are machines for sawing to length, 
ripping to width, planing and jointing. The 
kegs are set up by hand and after the hoops 
are put on, they are taken to the pressing- 
machine for drawing together. They are then 
put in lathes to be turned smooth, and are 
headed up and finished. The 100-pound kegs 
are made in the building across the road, 
whose dimensions are 26x16 feet. A portion 
of this building is used as a store house. The 
firm employs a force of twenty men and turn 
out 700 kegs per day, shipping mostly to the 
Sterling White Lead Company, of New 
Kensington, Pa., and the W. W. Lawrence 
Paint and Enamel Company, of Pittsburg. 

Mr. Donaldson was united in marriage with 
Jemima Piper, a daughter of Edward and 
Emma (Proctor) Piper, both of whom were 
natives of England. Jemima was born in 
Brooklyn, N.. Y., and her union with our sub- 
ject resulted in the birth of the following chil- 
dren: William H.; Lillie M.; Elsie P.; NelHe 
P. ; and Gladys M. William H. is an accom- 
pHshed musician, and a graduate of Dana 
Musical Listitute, of Warren, Ohio. He has 
superior talent in that line, and expects to 



make music his profession, a field in which 
he gi\'es promise of attaining prominence as 
a director and composer. Lillie M. is a 
student of Darlington Academy, and Gladys 
M. was born in 1897. Religiously, Mr. Don- 
aldson is a member of Darlington Presby- 
terian church, of which he was a trustee for 
six years. He is an independent Republican, 
and is auditor and also a member of the coun- 
cil and of the school board. 




HARLES W. KLEIN, the genial and 
Y efficient secretary and treasurer of the 
'' Co-operative Flint Glass Company 
of Beaver Falls, Pa., whose portrait appears 
on the opposite page, is another notable ex- 
ample of what ma}' be accomplished by per- 
severance and strict attention to business. The 
duties that have fallen to his lot during his 
unusually useful life, have been performed 
with a cheerfulness and steadiness of purpose 
that have made his career a source of en- 
couragement to others, an example for imi- 
tation. Charles W. Klein was born in Alle- 
gheny City, Pa., November 15, 1862, and was 
educated in the schools of Beaver Falls, and 
at Iron City College, in Pittsburg. While 
still attending school, he began to learn the 
trade of a stove mounter, by working in the 
evenings, on Saturdays, and during vacations. 
In 1878, young Klein became bookkeeper for 
the Howard Stove Company, remaining with 
that company about three months, when he 
was offered a better situation as bookkeeper 
of the Co-operative Flint Glass Company 



212 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



(Limited), which he at once accepted. He 
continued thus until the fall of 1886, — accept- 
ing at that time a position as business man- 
ager for the Columbia Glass Company, of 
Findlay, Ohio. In 1888 the Findlay Flint 
Glass Co. was organized, and Mr. Klein was 
made secretary of the organization. In June, 
1 89 1, the factory of that company was de- 
stroyed by fire, and was not rebuilt. 

After closing up the business of the com- 
pany, Mr. Klein became secretary and treas- 
urer of the Co-operative Flint Glass Co., of 
Beaver Falls. That change occurred Janu- 
ary 18, 1892, and the position is still retained 
by him. He has charge of all the business 
of the company, and manages all their affairs. 
In business life, Mr. Klein is regarded as a 
man of extremely good judgment. He real- 
izes fully the many responsibilities which rest 
upon his shoulders, but performs the many 
daily duties incumbent upon him with a tact 
and ease that result only from long expe- 
rience. November 4, 1886, Marguerite Mc- 
Clelland, a daughter of William McClelland, 
of Shoustown, Pa., became the wife of Mr. 
Klein, and their union is blessed with three 
children, whose names are: Leta, now de- 
ceased; Madeline, born January 4, 1893; and 
Gretchen, also deceased. 

Charles G. Klein, father of the subject of 
this record, was born in Baden, Germany, 
June 17, 1833. Early in life, he became ap- 
prenticed and learned the blacksmith's trade, 
which occupation he followed for some years. 
In 1853, Mr. Klein came to America, and 
located in Pittsburg, where he began working 



at the trade of stove mounting, in Bradey & 
Sons Foundry, and remained with them until 
1868. He then removed to Beaver Falls, Pa., 
and engaged with the Howard Stove Com- 
pany, where he is still busily employed. He 
was united in marriage with Catherine Kirsch, 
a native of Wurtemberg, Germany. Six chil- 
dren blessed their union, namely : Catherine, 
now deceased; Charles W., the subject of this 
sketch; Louis F. ; Elizabeth, wife of Joseph M. 
Vanderwort, of Beaver Falls; Walter G. ; and 
Lillian. 

Charles G. Klein is foreman of the mount- 
ing department of the Howard Stove Com- 
pany. In his political views, he is in accord 
with the Republicans, but although an active 
worker for his party, he has never cared to 
accept office. In a religious connection, he is 
identified with the German Lutheran church. 

For a man whose life has been as busy as 
his, the subject of this narrative has done 
much outside the sphere of his regular duties. 
It is a matter of general knowledge that in 
his official capacities, he has ever been all that 
the public could desire. By the corporation 
which he represents, he is trusted implicitly. 
On the social side of his nature, he possesses 
all those traits which win and hold the friend- 
ship of all who come within their influence. 
Mr. Klein is president of the Dime Savings 
& Loan Association of Beaver Falls, and 
has been one of the directors ever since its 
organization; he has been, since 1894, the sec- 
retary of the board of directors of the Colum- 
bian Building & Loan Association ; he is also 
president of the local board of the Union 



BEAVER COUNTY 



213 



Dime Permanent Loan Association of Roch- 
ester, New York. Mr. Klein is an active 
member, and a trustee, of the United Presby- 
terian churcli. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
order of Elks. In politics, he is a stanch Re- 
publican. He was elected to the council in 
1896, and re-elected in 1899. In 1898, he 
was chairman of that body. 



(JOSEPH H. EVANS. This leading and 
representative citizen of Beaver, Pa., is 
well known as one of the most exten- 
sive oil producers in Western Pennsylvania, 
and has built up by energy and strict integrity 
an excellent reputation, and amassed a hand- 
some fortune. Mr. Evans is truly the archi- 
tect of his own fortune, and his present en- 
viable position is due wholly to his thrift, fore- 
sight, and good business methods. Few men 
so completely hold the confidence and esteem 
of the public as he, and his standing is de- 
servedly high. He was born May 16, '1851, 
in Venango county, Pa., and is a son of John 
and Mary (Kiser) Evans. 

John Evans left Westmoreland county. Pa., 
while still a young man, and located in Clarion 
county, where his marriage with Mary Kiser 
occurred. Mrs. Evans is a daughter of Joseph 
Kiser and has proved herself a valuable aid to 
her husband in his various business enter- 
prises. John Evans was a very industrious 
man and for many years followed lumbering 
and rafting, becoming an expert river pilot. 
After amassing a considerable sum of money, 



he purchased a tract of timber land and en- 
gaged in clearing it, — making the most he 
could from the lumber. This tract was situ- 
ated along the banks of Paint Creek, Clarion 
county, where Mr. Evans also built a saw mill 
and was occupied not only in manufacturing 
lumber from his own timber, but in doing 
similar work for his neighbors. His mill was 
largely patronized and he continued to oper- 
ate it until 1869, when he sold out and re- 
moved to Elk River, Sherburne county, 
Minn., where he purchased a fine farm and 
followed agricultural pursuits the remainder 
of his life. There his death took place at the 
age of sixty-five years. His widow still sur- 
vives him, and now resides in Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Evans in his business ven- 
tures prospered even beyond his expectations, 
and at the time of his death, the large and val- 
uable estate he left insured a competency to 
the family of loved ones left behind. The fol- 
lowing children were born to him and his de- 
voted wife, and they all grew to manhood and 
womanhood: Mrs. E. A. Clelland; Mrs. 
Emily Deekey; Mrs. Sarah J. Shaw; Mrs. 
Susan J. Wallace, deceased; Bradford; John 
Henry; Joseph H., the subject of this sketch; 
Charles Wesley, deceased ; and Harrison Lin- 
coln, also deceased. 

Joseph H. Evans attended public school 
until he attained the age of sixteen years. 
Then he began manual labor by drawing oil 
in barrels, from Shamburg, to Pithole. Sub- 
sequently he went to Minnesota with his 
father, and engaged in the lumber business, 
as a partner in the firm of Chase & Pillsbury, 



214 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



of Minneapolis. The company contracted for 
lumber jobs and continued in that line of work 
until 1876, when Mr. Evans withdrew and re- 
turned to the Keystone State, settling in 
Elk City, where he formed a company, styled 
Kiser & Evans, leased his grandfather's farm, 
and began putting down oil wells. His first 
well yielded 125 barrels per day, bringing 
$4.25 per barrel, and proved to be one of the 
best wells in Clarion county. In 1877, Mr. 
Evans sold his interest in this enterprise and 
operated oil wells at Bradford, McKean 
county. Pa., until 1886. The following three 
years he was associated with Mr. Fitzgibbons, 
since which period he has been a member of 
the Devonian Oil Co., which consists of the 
following men : C. B. Collins ; J. R. Leonard ; 
J. D. Downing; and J. H. Evans. The com- 
pany owns some 300 wells in Ohio, Indiana, 
West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, all in suc- 
cessful operation. In 1882, Mr. Evans be- 
came associated with the Bradford Exchange, 
and speculated in oil some four years. He is 
a member of the Victor Oil & Gas Co. ; the 
Superior Oil Co. ; he is also a stockholder of 
the Beaver Mining Company. 

Mr. Evans can be found at his office on the 
corner of Vv'ood and Fourth streets, in Pitts- 
burg, where all his business is transacted. In 
1890, he went to Beaver, Pa., and purchased 
a fine residence on College avenue. This res- 
idence was built by Mr. Tallow. After vis- 
iting many places in Western Pennsylvania, 
Mr. Evans wisely decided that the borough oi 
Beaver, with its convenient location, its fine 
streets and splendid school, was the most suit- 



able location to be found for a permanent 
home. In 1895, he purchased the corner lot 
of Wilson avenue and Third street, a very de- 
sirable location, and built one of the finest 
modern brick residences in this part of the 
state. The brick for this dwelling was manu- 
factured by the Alluma Shell Brick Com- 
pany, of which company Mr. Evans is a stock- 
holder; it does quite an extensive business in 
manufacturing all kinds of pressed brick. In 
addition to the property above described, Mr. 
Evans owns several lots and tenement houses 
in Beaver, and has taken an active interest in 
the progress and development of his adopted 
town. 

The subject of this sketch sought and won 
for his life partner, Jennie Donaldson, a 
charming lady, of Knox, Pennsylvania. This 
happy union was blessed with one son, Harry 
C, and one daughter, May D., both of whom 
are students. Mr. Evans is a stanch Repub- 
lican, but never sought office; he is a Mason 
of high degree, being a member of Beaver 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; a R. A. M., of No. i 
Commandery, Knights Templar, of Pitts- 
burg; of the Consistory; and of Syria Tem- 
ple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Pittsburg. His 
beautiful home ever extends a hearty wel- 
come to his many friends, and all his circum- 
stances and surroundings are of the most de- 
sirable kind. In personal relations Mr. Evans 
is exceedingly genial and enjoys the utmost 
popularity. As a business man, he is broad 
and liberal, yet slirewd and far-seeing, as well. 
He is a good financier and manager, as his 
notable prosperity clearly evidences. 




GEORGE \V. MACKALL. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



217 




1^) ^EORGE W. MACKALL, who has 

■^p acted in the capacity of prothonotary 
"of Beaver county, Pa., for many years, 
is an active citizen of the borough of Beaver. 
He is interested in various enterprises in the 
town, including the well-known Beaver Sig- 
nal Manufacturing Company, and other con- 
cerns of equal note. He is of sturdy Scotch- 
Irish extraction, and was born in Green town- 
ship, Beaver county, July 12, 1842, — his par- 
ents being James and Mary (Foster) Mackall. 
George W. Mackall's grandfather was Ben- 
jamin Mackall, a native of northern Ireland, 
who, at the age of twenty-one years, was com- 
missioned a captain in the Colonial Army, and 
served throughout the major part of the War 
of Independence. He came to Georgetown, 
Beaver county, in 1802, and was there en- 
gaged in farming ; his wife was Miss Rebecca 
Dawson, by whom he reared a family of six 
children, as follows: Jane; James; Thomas; 
Nellie ; John D. ; and Samuel. James Mackall 
was born at Point-of-Rocks, Md., January 16, 
1788. In 1 81 7, he bought two hundred and 
forty-four acres of land and began agricultural 
pursuits; he made all the present improve- 
ments upon this land, and was recognized as 
an enterprising anl progressive farmer. He 
was a Whig and a Republican in politics, and 
served as county commissioner. Religiously, 
he was a member of the Episcopal church. 
In 1815, he married Mary Foster, a daughter 
of Thomas Foster; she was born November 
7, 1797, and died November 22, i860, — her 
husband dying August 20, 1874. Their union 
was blessed by the following children: 



Thomas; Rebecca; Benjamin; Phoebe; Jane; 
John D. ; Mary ; Samuel ; James ; Sarah Ellen ; 
and George Washington. Rebecca married 
Jesse Kinsey ; Benjamin wedded Mary Dolby; 
Phoebe was the wife of Milton Calhoun ; Jane 
was joined in wedlock with James Mackall ; 
John D. married Harriet A. Cornell; Samuel, 
a farmer of Green township, Beaver county, 
married first Sarah Harvey and had three chil- 
dren, — she died and he married Jennie Daw- 
son; James, of Georgetown, Pa., married Sid- 
ney A. Miller; Sarah Ellen wedded Harrison 
Dawson ; and George Washington is the sub- 
ject hereof. He has but two brothers living, — 
James and Samuel. 

George W. Mackall attended the public 
schools, and at fourteen years of age became 
a clerk in a store at Hookstown, Beaver 
county, for John Sterling; he later accepted 
a like position with Joseph Hall, and then with 
M. L. Christler. Like many other boys of his 
day, he was fond of river life, 
and accepted a position as cabin 
boy on one of the boats that plied 
up and down the Ohio River; after several 
years of this hfe, he became a second-mate, 
but becoming tired of that life, he engaged in 
boating coal down the river, for a period of six 
years; he then became a contractor for oil 
drilling in Ohio township and vicinity, after 
which he conducted a store at Glasgow, Pa., 
and also served as justice of the peace of that 
village for five years. In 1887, he went to 
New Brighton, Pa., and became connected 
with the publication of the Tribune. In 
August, 1892, he was elected to the office of 



218 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



prothonotary of Beaver county, which made 
it necessary for him to come to Beaver, where 
he has since resided. Mr. Mackall discharged 
the official duties of that position in such a 
tliorough manner tliat he was re-elected. 
Since the closing of his term, he has been liv- 
ing in retirement. He is a stockholder in the 
Beaver Signal Manufacturing Company; he 
resides in a fine house, situated at the end 
of Fourth street. The subject of this sketch 
participated in the War of the Rebellion, hav- 
ing enlisted, in 1863, in Company H, 56th 
Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf.; at the expiration of his 
term he became a member of Company H, 5th 
Reg., Heavy Artillery; at the close of the war, 
he had been promoted to be a sergeant. 

Mr. Mackall was wedded to Miss Mary 
Jane Calhoun, who was born in 1845, — a 
daughter of James and Eliza (Gamble) Cal- 
houn. Her father was a ship carpenter, and 
was born in Allegheny county, Pa., but spent 
most of his life in Beaver county, building 
boats. He was the father of the following 
children: Seraphina S., the wife of D. S. 
Hamilton ; Nancy Ann, deceased ; Ellen, first 
wedded to J. McKee, and later to D. A. Jolly; 
Lucinda, the wife of Abner Martin ; Priscilla, 
wedded to John Laughlin; Peggie Ann, de- 
ceased; Isabella, deceased, and Elizabeth, 
twins, — the latter wedded to John Strain ; Wil- 
liam G., deceased; Mary Jane, the wife of the 
subject hereof; and Arvilla, the wife of S. L. 
Dawson. Mr. and Mrs. Mackall are the par- 
ents of three children : Howard C. ; Mary 
Eliza; and George Raymond. lioward C. 
served as deputy prothonotary for his father. 



and was married to Roberta Waterson ; one 
child, Mary Addie, has been born to them. 
Mary Eliza is the wife of Wilbert W. Knowles, 
clerk for the P. & L. E. R. R., and has a son, 
Duane M. George Raymond is attending 
Beaver College. Mr. Mackall is a member 
of the E. M. Stanton Post, G. A. R., No. 208, 
of New Brighton ; of the Sr. O. U. A. M., No. 
301 ; and of the Elks, of Rochester, No. 283. 
Religiously, Mr. Mackall and family are mem- 
bers of the Methodist church. Mr. Mackall's 
portrait is shown on the opposite page. 




LEXANDER F. REID, a very promi- 
nent merchant of Beaver county, has 
an excellent store at New Galilee, 
carrying a complete line of groceries, 
hardware, boots and shoes, hats and 
caps, household furnishings, drugs, agri- 
cultural implements, and, in fact, almost 
any article for which there is a de- 
mand. He is a man of enterprise, and 
his continued efforts to accommodate the citi- 
zens of the borough, and the courtesy which 
he extends to his patrons, have won for him 
public favor. He is a native of Ireland, having 
been born in Belfast, November 15, 1838, and 
is a son of William and Maria (Findlay) Reid. 
William Reid, the father of Alexander F., 
was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1797, and there 
he received his intellectual training and 
adopted the occupation of a farmer, which he 
followed throughout his life. He was joined 
in the holy bonds of matrimony with Maria 



BEAVER COUNTY 



219 



Findlay, a daughter of William Findlay, of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry, and they reared the fol- 
lowing children: Eliza (Reed) deceased; 
John, whose business was that of a linen ship- 
per; William, who is living a retired life in 
Pittsburg; Jane (Little), deceased; Anna 
(Williams); Maria, deceased; Alexander F., 
the gentleman whose name heads these lines ; 
Charles, who has charge of a department in a 
linen manufacturing establishment ; and Rus- 
sell, whose death occurred at the early age of 
ten years. Religiously, Mr. Reid was a Pres- 
byterian. He was called into the unknown 
world, in 1857, at the age of sixty years. 

Alexander F. Reid, after completing his 
mental training in the public schools of Ire- 
land, served a four years' apprenticeship in a 
grocery and hardware store. In the year of 
1863, he came to America and landed in New 
York City ; but a short time thereafter, he re- 
moved to Pittsburg. He subsequently worked 
in Sharpsburg about two years, and in 1870 
located in New Galilee, Beaver county, Pa., 
where he engaged in business for himself, — 
renting a place for about eight years. In 1878, 
he built his present store, a two-story build- 
ing, with dimensions of 80x24 feet, in addi- 
tion to which there is a warehouse and a base- 
ment. In this he conducted his store in a 
very successful manner until 1883. His wife's 
health having failed in that year, Mr. Reid re- 
moved with his family to California, and re- 
mained there two years, during which time 
he became a competent druggist and con- 
ducted a drug store. Upon returning to 
New Galilee, in 1885, he resumed business in 



his former location, and has since conducted 
one of the neatest and best arranged stores 
in that section. Being a man of exceptional 
business qualifications, and having had wide 
experience in his business, he realizes the 
wants of his customers and satisfies them in 
every way consistent with his own interests. 
He is a stockholder in the Rochester National 
Bank. He has the respect of his fellow-citi- 
zens to a high degree, and they are proud to 
acknowledge themselves his friends. 

In 1865, at Sharpsburg, Alexander F. Reid 
was united in marriage with Mary E. Henry, 
a daughter of Wilson and Eliza (Garvin) 
Henry, and a granddaughter of \\'illiam 
Henry. William Henry was born in Ireland, 
and when a child, came to this country with 
hia parents, where they bought a tract of land 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. They 
cleared this land of its timber, and erected 
log houses and barns. William acquired prop- 
erty of his own, engaged in lumbering and 
also worked on the river. He followed that 
and farming all of his life. He married Miss 
Borland and they reared five children, of 
whom Wilson was the second. Wilson Henry, 
the father of Mrs. Reid, attended the schools 
of Westmoreland county. Pa., and dur- 
ing his youthful days worked in the mines and 
on the river. He rented a farm near Sharps- 
burg for some years, and then bought one of 
two hundred acres, in 1863. He moved upon 
it in 1870, and was extensively engaged in 
dairying, fruit growing and general farming, 
which he continued throughout his active life, 
and became a very prosperous man. He was 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



a Republican in politics. Religiously, he was 
a Presbyterian, and was ruling elder for a 
number of years. Mr. Henry married Eliza 
Garvin, a daughter of Joseph Garvin, and they 
reared eleven children, as follows: Samuel, 
an insurance agent at Beaver ; Joseph G. (de- 
ceased), a railroad agent all of his life; 
William (deceased), a farmer and mis- 
sionary of West Virginia; Sarah J. 
(Hodil); Mary E., the wife of the 
subject hereof; Rev. Benjamin €., D. D., 
who was graduated at Washington and Jefifer- 
son College, and received the degree of D. D. 
from Princeton University, and who has been 
a missionary to China for twenty-five years, — 
returning home but twice; Nancy G. (Wet- 
zig) ; Eleanor (Brown) ; Wilson, a fruit 
grower in California ; James S., a journalist in 
Washington, D. C. ; and Anna M., who is now- 
living at home. 

Mrs. Reid was born at Turtle Creek, Pa., 
attended the schools of Sharpsburg, and was 
a pupil of Sharpsburg Academy. She was mar- 
ried in 1865, and they reared eight children, 
as follows: Anna M. ; Jane E. ; William H.; 
Charles W. ; Agnes Eleanor ; Alexander R. ; 
James McArthur; and Benjamin Clair. Anna 
M. (Schueler) was born September 12, 1866, 
graduated at Geneva College, and finished 
her education in a private institution in Cali- 
fornia, under Prof. Conklin. Jane E., born 
January 29, 1869, attended the public schools 
and also completed her intellectual training 
under Prof. Conklin ; she married a Mr. Mil- 
ler. William H. was born April i, 1871, and 
died in February, 1877. Charles W. was 



born August 13, 1874, and died February 9, 
1877. Agnes Eleanor was born June 10, 
1876, attended the public schools, and then 
took a course in Slippery Rock Normal 
School, from which she was graduated, in 
1895. She then taught for two years in the 
borough schools, and entered the School of 
Designing, where she had the honor of win- 
ning the class medal, — a high testimonial to 
her skill and talent. In 1896, she was obliged 
to give up her studies on account of ill-health. 
Alexander R. was born July ig, 1878, and is 
studying medicine, being a member of the 
graduating class of 1901. James McArthur 
was born May 20, 1881, and is a student in 
the preparatory department of Geneva Col- 
lege. Benjamin Clair was born October 16, 
1884, and is attending the public schools. 

The subject of this biography is a devout 
Presbyterian, and is very active in church 
work, having been a ruling elder since 18S3. 
He is a trustee of the church. Politically, he 
is a Republican. 



V» Vi U,,r. 



ALTER C. JONES is one of the 
most prominent and popular young 
business men of Beaver county, and 
is esteemed and much respected by the citi- 
zens of Beaver Falls, where he is recognized 
as a valuable member of that community. He 
has always been connected with various iron 
and steel industries, and has gradually worked 
his way up to his present high position, — that 
of general superintendent of the American 




DR. JOHN J. ALLEN. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



223 



Steel & Wire Company, in which capacity 
he has efficiently served since April, i8g8. 

Mr. Jones was born in Zanesville, Ohio, and 
obtained his elementary education at Newark, 
Ohio, which was supplemented by a 
course of study in the schools of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. In 1888, he accepted a posi- 
tion as general shipping clerk and assistant to 
the superintendent of the old Braddock Wire 
Company, of Rankin, Pa., — living in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He remained in the 
service of that company until the year 1895, 
when he was transferred to the position of 
secretary of the Consolidated Steel & Wire 
Company at Beaver Falls, Pa., which company 
was the owner of both plants. Mr. Jones 
occupied that position until April, 1898, when 
he was promoted to general superintendent of 
both the office and the mills, and now has 
charge of all the business transacted at the 
great plant in Beaver Falls. This immense 
plant covers twenty-three acres of ground, 
upon which are five main buildings, with the 
following departments, — rod, wire, barbed- 
wire, galvanizing, and nail, — and when in full 
operation, gives employment to about nine 
hundred men. Mr. Jones commands the re- 
spect and good-will of the many employees 
under his supervision, as well as the confi- 
dence and esteem of his superior officers; he 
is a very energetic young man, full of busi- 
ness, thoroughly understands all lines of the 
iron industry, and is fully competent to fulfill 
all the duties of his present high position. 

Mr. Jones formed a matrimonial alliance 
with Miss Ruth Mattern, of Pittsburg, Pa., 



and their home has been blessed by the birth 
of one son, Robert. He is a faithful member 
of the Royal Arcanum and of the Heptasophs. 




R. JOHN J. ALLEN, a gentleman of 
high educational attainments, and a 
well-known educator for many 
years, has achieved particular success in the 
field of medicine, having a large and lucrative 
practice in Monaca and vicinity. He is a son 
of Robert and Elizabeth (Wiley) Allen, and 
was born in County Meath, Ireland, February 
22, 1859. 

Robert Allen, the father of John J., was 
born in County Antrim, Ireland, and was the 
youngest son of a family of thirteen children. 
He was fortunate in his boyhood, as he was 
given a good education to fit him for the sta- 
tion of a country gentleman. After his mar- 
riage and the birth of the subject of this 
sketch, the family met with reverses, and he 
came to the United States, settling in Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania. He was joined in 
marriage with Elizabeth Wiley, v/ho was born 
and educated in County Meath, Ireland, and 
they became the parents of three children: 
John J., the gentleman whose name appears 
at the head of this narrative; Robert H., a 
farmer by vocation; and Emily K. W. 
(Moore). The two last named were born 
after Mr. Allen moved to this country. 

Dr. John J. Allen, who was three months 
old when he was brought to this country by 
his parents, has risen to a high station in life 



224 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



entirely through his individual efforts. A 
series of adverse events prevented his family 
from giving him an education, and at the im- 
mature age of eight and one-half years, he 
left home to seek a livelihood, obtaining a 
position on the farm of D. ^V. Scott. He 
was very ambitious and remained with him 
until he was nineteen years of age, working 
upon the farm during his summer months 
and attending school during, the winter. Dis- 
satisfied with the life he was leading, and feel- 
ing confident that better things were in store 
for him if he would but strive for them, he 
became impressed with the necessity of a good 
education. He gave up farming and entered 
Piersol's Academy, taking a normal course 
in order to fit himself for a teacher's work. 
He was subsequently a teacher in the New 
Sewickley township schools, for one year, 
principal of the schools of Industry, for two 
years, and then principal of the North Ward 
School of New Brighton, for two years ; at the 
same time he was instructor in the night 
school, — working hard and conscientiously. 
Giving up teaching for the time being, he 
entered Geneva College, at Beaver Falls, tak- 
ing an eclectic course, during which time he 
competed for a permanent state certificate, 
and was successful. He was elected principal 
of the Glenfield schools of Allegheny county, 
Pa., and at the same time finished a business 
curriculum in Curry University of Pitts- 
burg, — also serving as bookkeeper in the 
music store of Mellor & Holme. This is but 
one evidence of the industrious life he has 
led, but with eyes fixed upon the distant goal. 



which he was slowly but surely approaching, 
he would allow no obstacle to stop him. He 
was re-elected principal of the Glenfield 
schools and also of the Bellevue schools, and 
chose the latter connection as being the more 
desirable of the two. For three years he was 
the incumbent of that position, also teaching 
night school in New Brighton. During the 
latter part of this period, he desired to sat- 
isfy his ambition to become a physician, and 
read medicine under the tutelage of Dr. James 
McCann. He then entered the medical de- 
partment of the Western University of Penn- 
sylvania, and after his graduation in 1890, be- 
gan practice at Phillipsburg, now Monaca. 
His choice of fields was a wise one as there is 
no borough in the state in a more flourishing 
condition or one which gives more promise 
of future growth. He has since been located 
there and his practice has grown apace with 
the town, his patients including many of the 
best citizens of the community. As he was 
eminently successful as an educator, so has 
he been as a doctor. He at once won the 
confidence of the citizens in a professional 
way, and they have since become his friends. 
Dr. Allen was joined in hymeneal bonds 
with Jeannette N. Armstrong, a native of 
Beaver county, and a daughter of John Arm- 
strong, of Brighton township. She is an ac- 
complished musician and art student, having 
pursued a course at the Pittsburg School of 
Design. They have two children : Harold 
A., born December 24, 1895 ; and Jeannette 
Juay, born December 26, 1898. The residence 
in which the Doctor lives is the finest on the 



BEAVER COUNTY 



225 



south side, and is a feature of the town. It 
is a handsome tliree-story buildinj^ of fourteen 
rooms, being constructed of buff brick. Its 
interior is beautiful, — finished in hardwood 
and equipped with all modern arrangements 
for comfort and fine appearance. The Doc- 
tor's office is on the Eighth street side of the 
building. He is a public-spirited man and is 
anxious to see the town progress, — taking 
an active interest in all its affairs. He was 
one of the hardest workers in obtaining the 
bridge across the Ohio, and he is now a stock- 
holder in the bridge company. In politics, 
he is an ardent Republican, and has been a 
member of the school board for seven years. 
He is borough physician, holds a position on 
the poor board, and is a member of the stafif 
of the Beaver Valley Hospital. Religiously, 
he is a Presbyterian and has been an elder ever 
since he has been in the borough. Fraternally, 
he belongs to the following orders: Royal 
Arcanum ; Woodmen of the World ; Knights 
of Pythias ; and Rochester Lodge, F. & A. M. 
His portrait, in connection with this sketch, 
is shown on a foregoing page. 



rEORGE WILSON. Conspicuous 
among the successful attorneys who 
devote their whole attention to the 
active practice of their profession, stands 
George Wilson, the subject of this brief biog- 
raphy. Mr. Wilson attended the Beaver High 
School, and after completing its course, he 
began the study of law with his father. After 



diligently pursuing his studies for some time, 
he was admitted to the bar, March 4, 1889, 
soon after the death of his father. He began 
the practice of his chosen profession by enter- 
ing into partnership with R. S. Holt, under 
the firm name of Wilson & Holt, of which he 
is still a partner. Mr. Wilson's undivided 
attention is given to his chosen profession, 
and like his father, he has built up a splendid 
reputation. 

Sarah Cummings, an attractive daughter of 
David and Sarah Cummings, of Freedom, Pa., 
became the wife of Mr. Wilson. Their home 
is brightened by the presence of four 
children namely: Marion, Caroline, Sam- 
uel B., and Richard. In his poli- 
tical attachments, Mr. Wilson is a stanch 
Democrat, and, although he labors zeal- 
ously for the success of his party, he has 
never sought office nor cared for political dis- 
tinction, being very much like his honored 
father in that respect. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity of Beaver. 

Our subject is a direct descendant of 
Samuel Wilson, who was of Scotch origin, 
and his wife w^as a descendant of the early 
Knickerbockers. Early in the eighteenth 
century, he married Mary Van Wier, who was 
born in Holland. This worthy couple owned 
and occupied a farm along Marsh Creek, near 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. There he engaged 
in tilling the soil, and spent a peaceful and 
happy domestic life, and there they both died, 
leaving two sons: Samuel, and Marmaduke, 
who was the great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject. 



226 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Marmaduke Wilson was bom upon his 
father's homestead, and in 1744 was united in 
marriage with Susan Beatty. The young 
folks started out in life at the homestead, car- 
ing for the old parents very lovingly until the 
death of the latter. They then removed to 
Westmoreland county. Pa., and continued to 
follow agricultural pursuits for many years. 
The names of their children were : Patrick ; 
Samuel ; Rachel (McFarlan) ; Jane (Dunlap) ; 
Susan (Marshall) ; Easter (Rambo) ; Martha 
(Gibson) ; Sarah (Mitchell) ; and Elizabeth 
(Byers). 

About 1801, Patrick Wilson located in Bea- 
ver county, the part now called Lawrence 
county. There he followed mercantile pur- 
suits, and in 1804 his marriage with Rebecca 
Morehead, a daughter of William Morehead, 
occurred. They had the following children : 
William; Marmaduke; John; Susan (Phil- 
lips) ; Nancy (Chriss) ; Sarah (Harper) ; and 
Samuel. 

In. 181 1, Mr. Wilson purchased a farm near 
New Castle, where he spent many happy 
years, and finally died in 1866. This farm is 
still owned by his descendants. Samuel B. 
Wilson, father of George, was born February 
20, 1824, and from early childhood his aspira- 
tions were beyond those of his playmates. He 
was a faithful student in the district schools, 
from which he entered Jefferson College at 
Cannonsburg, Pa., graduating therefrom in 
June, 1848, with about the highest honors of 
his class. He enjoyed the distinction of be- 
ing a noted linguist, and his mas- 
tery of the English, Latin, and Greek 



languages was never questioned by either his 
fellow students, or the professors. More- 
over, he not only kept up with his studies 
when the college course was ended, but 
greatly increased his knowledge of the ancient 
classics by daily reading and timely reviews. 
Soon after leaving college, he was chosen 
principal of Darlington Academy, a position 
which he held until the fall of 1849, when he 
went to Somerset county, and became a law 
student in the office of the Hon. Jere- 
miah S. Black, who was then president judge 
of the Sixteenth Judicial District of Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. Wilson was admitted to the bar, 
November 12, 1850, and immediately there- 
after went to Beaver, where he practiced in 
the several courts of the county, and in due 
time acquired a lucrative practice, which oc- 
cupied his time for more than a quarter of a 
century. He was engaged in the interests of 
the most important legal business that has 
been transacted in Beaver county. His re- 
ceipts for professional services have perhaps 
been greater in amount than that of any other 
resident lawyer who has at any time practiced 
at the Beaver county bar. 

Samuel B. Wilson, although an active poli- 
tician in the interest of the Democratic party, 
never sought office. The height of his ambi- 
tion was to become a thorough scholar, and 
an honest and successful lawyer; he loved jus- 
tice, law, and peace. In the practice of his 
profession, he outlived the ambition of display 
before courts and juries, he learned to bear 
criticism without irritation, censure without 
anger, and calumny without retaliation. He 



THE 

,, NEWVORK \J, 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



founiJat'''"s. 
1908 




^SAMUEL HK^'RV MuLLDS. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



229 



learned how surely all schemes of evil bring 
disaster to them that support them, and that 
the granite shaft of a noble reputation "can not 
be destroyed by the poisoned breath of 
slander. 

In 1856, he purchased of Judge Agnew, the 
Susan Cochran estate, one of Beaver's oldest 
homes, and a substantial building for its day, 
located on the north side of the Park, on 
Turnpike alley. Here Samuel Beatty Wilson 
had his office and reared his family around 
the old-time fireplace. This handsome old 
estate is today owned by the subject of this 
sketch, as his father left it later in life, and 
purchased a handsome brick residence on the 
adjoining lot, which was built by Senator 
Quay. There Mr. Wilson spent the re- 
mainder of his days, passing to the life beyond 
the grave in January, 1889. His widow is 
still living, and occupies the same home in 
which he left her. Mr. Wilson was a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, and passed all the 
degrees from the F. & A. M., to the Knights 
Templar. April 11, 1854, he led to the hyme- 
neal altar, Elizabeth Robinson, a daughter of 
George Robinson, who was then sheriff of 
Beaver county. As a scholar, a student, and 
an assistant, Mrs. Wilson had been of great 
assistance to her husband, besides being a 
kind and loving mother, who reared a family, 
and is loved and esteemed by all. Their 
children were : Sarah, now deceased ; Anna, 
wife of A. R. Whitehill, a professor of physics 
in the University of West Virginia; Mary, 
wife of George Davidson; and George, the 
subject of this sketch. 



George Wilson is held in high repute in his 
community, and is a man whom all respect 
and honor. He has a pleasing address and is 
liberal in his sentiments. His genial disposi- 
tion and reputation for honesty have made 
him a favorite not only with his brother prac- 
titioners, but among all classes. 




AMUEL HENRY MOULDS, un- 
der whose personal supervision and 
direction as foreman and assistant 
manager, the Rochester Tumbler Company 
has been operated since its organization, is a 
man who understands the business of manu- 
facturing glass from beginning to end. Since 
he was ten years old he has been connected 
with such work, and the high state of effi- 
ciency in his office has rendered it possible 
for the company to lead all others in the world 
at that particular industry. He is also a stock- 
holder and director of many of the most suc- 
cessful enterprises in the borough, — being a 
man of great shrewdness and foresight. He 
was born near Milltown, County Antrim, Ire- 
land, December 9, 1845, and is a son of John 
and Nancy (Henry) Moulds. 

John Moulds, the father of Samuel Henry, 
was born in County Antrim, Ireland, and 
after his marriage removed to America with 
his family, — landing in the city of New York. 
He located at Steubenville, Ohio, where his 
wife had a brother and a number of friends, 
and there became a glass worker, which con- 



230 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



tinued to be his employment until within a 
short time of his death. He then was engaged 
in packing, working until the last. He was a 
man of remarkable dexterity for his age, and 
shaved himself, as was his custom, up to 
within three days of his death, which occurred 
in 1890, at the age of seventy-five years. He 
married Nancy Henry, whose father was Will- 
iam Henry, and the following ofifspring re- 
sulted: Jane, who married Joseph S. Mellor, 
employed in the Rochester Tumbler Works, 
and a stockholder in the company; William, 
whose biography appears elsewhere in this 
work; Samuel Henry, the subject of this rec- 
ord; Annie, the widow of Albert Albin, of 
Columbus, Ohio; Sarah, the wife of Eli Cap- 
ers, of Steubenville, Ohio ; Robert, who lives 
at Rochester; John, also a resident of 
Rochester; and Elizabeth, who makes her 
home at Steubenville, Ohio. 

At the age of ten years, Samuel Henry 
Moulds entered the glass manufacturing es- 
tablishment at Steubenville, being employed 
in the press department until 1868, when he 
went to Pittsburg and continued in the same 
line of business until 1872, when he became 
an organizer, and one of the original stock- 
holders, of the Rochester Tumbler Company. 
He has also been one of the directors from the 
first. Owing to his well-known skill and 
thorough knowledge of every detail of the 
work, he was chosen as foreman and assistant 
manager, and has since remained in that posi- 
tion. They manufactured both blown and 
pressed tumblers, and the demand for their 
product increased with amazing rapidity, com- 



pelling them to increase their facilities and 
enlarge the business, until now it is the largest 
of its kind in existence, and the most im- 
portant industry in the borough of Rochester. 
They ship to all parts of the globe, sending 
out from three to ten carloads per day. Their 
capacity is 150,000 dozen blown tumblers, 
and 150,000 dozen pressed, per month, twelve 
hundred skilled workmen being employed the 
year around. They make their own boxes, 
barrels and crates for shipping, grind the clay 
and make pots, and also make their own 
molds. They have a large water tank contain- 
ing 3,100 gallons, and have private water 
works and a private electric light plant. They 
also have an ice house for drinking purposes. 
The place is kept in the best of order, and 
reflects great credit upon the work of the gen- 
tlemen in charge. Our subject exacts the best 
work from each man under him, yet treats him 
with the greatest consideration and kindness, 
thereby retaining his good will to the high- 
est extent. Mr. Moulds is a stockholder and 
director of the Rochester & Monaca Sus- 
pension Bridge Company, of the Rochester 
Electric Plant, and of the Rochester Daily 
Star. In 1885, he built a fine residence at 
No. 103 West Washington street, on the cor- 
ner of New York street, which was burned 
down and rebuilt in 1886. 

The subject of this writing was united in 
marriage with Belle Krewson, a daughter of 
Horace Krewson, and they have two children : 
Horace Fuller, who is engaged in the insur- 
ance business at Rochester; and Agnes K. 
Mr. Moulds has served as school director and 



BEAVER COUNTY 



231 



held various other borough offices. His por- 
trait accompanies this sketch, being presented 
on a foregoing page. 




,EV. R. MORRIS SMITH, a gentle- 
man of high educational attainments, 
is pastor of the Baden Lutheran 
church, the Rehoboth church, the House of 
Mercy, and the Trinity church, of Freedom, 
Pa., and resides in the borough of Baden, 
where he is iield in the highest esteem by his 
parishioners and fellow citizens. The exten- 
sive duties of his charges are very confining, 
but being a man of unusual energy and ability, 
and deeply absorbed in the work of Christ, he 
has performed them faithfully, as the increased 
membership will indicate. 

Mr. Smith was born in Easton, Northamp- 
ton county, Pa., January 25, 1862, and is 
descended from a long line of distinguished 
ancestors. The first of the family of whom 
there is any record extant is his great-great- 
grandfather, who was a professor of dogmatic 
theology at Copenhagen University. His 
son, the great-grandfather of our subject, was 
a minister of the Gospel in the Lutheran 
church, of Denmark and was the first mem- 
ber of the family to come to America, prior 
to which he was united in marriage with a 
woman of German birth. He was the first 
Lutheran minister to preach in the old town 
of Easton, Pa. His son, P. F. B. Smith, 
grandfather of the subject of this record, was 
born seventeen days after the arrival of his 



parents in this country ; he also studied for 
the ministry. He preached in Easton until 
his health failed him, when he resigned. His 
popularity is shown by the fact that he was 
immediately elected to the office of register 
and recorder of the county, — a position he 
held for a period of nine years, — when he 
retired and was then elected justice of the 
peace. Being a very fine penman, he had 
plenty to do in the way of writing wills and 
deeds. He and his wife had seventeen chil- 
dren, three of whom are still living. 

George O. F. Smith, the father of the sub- 
ject hereof, was the oldest son, and was born 
January i, 1825, at Easton, Pa., and was in- 
tellectually trained in the Easton public 
schools. He became a merchant tailor and 
very successfully followed that vocation all of 
his active life, becoming quite prominent, but 
is now living a retired life in Stockertown, 
Pennsylvania. He is a Repubhcan in politics, 
and, although he has been a hard worker for 
the party's success, he has never accepted of- 
fice other than that of school director. Re- 
ligiously, he is an active member of the 
Lutheran church, and has held all of the 
church offices. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order. Knights Templar, and the Jr. 
O. U. A. M. Mr. Smith was united in mar- 
riage with Mary A. Millar, who was born at 
Mt. Bethel, Northampton county. Pa., and 
they have five children : Emma C. (Uhler) ; 
Millard Fillmore ; Mary E. (Sandt) ; Amanda 
A. (Kiefer) ; and R. Morris, the subject of this 
biographical record. 

R. Morris Smith received his primary edu- 



232 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



cation in the public schools of Easton, after 
which he took a classical course at Trach's 
Academy and entered Muhlenberg College. 
He graduated from that institution in 1883, 
with the degree of A. B., and three years later 
with the degree of A. M., taking third honors 
in his class. He then went to Texas, where he 
was given charge of the Mission Valley 
Academy, but in 1884 he entered the Luth- 
eran Theological Seminary, from which he 
was graduated in 1887, being ordained in 
June of that year. He was then called to 
Baden to accept his present charges, as suc- 
cessor of the Rev. Dr. Passarant, who, assisted 
by his son, had been established there for 
twenty-one years. It is the oldest church in 
Baden and he is its second pastor. Faith- 
fully and well is he discharging the multifar- 
ious duties of these charges, and that his ef- 
forts have not been without their reward, we 
need but mention that the congregation of 
the Baden church has increased to double its 
size when he went there. He also erected a 
handsome new church edifice at Freedom, and 
is deeply interested in its future. Besides his 
pastoral duties, Rev. Mr. Smith has com- 
pleted a post graduate course in the Chicago 
Theological Seminary, in the study of 
liturgies. He is at present engaged in 
literary work, and has several pamphlets on 
this subject, in the press. He is a member of 
the college fraternity, Alpha Tau Omega. 

On October 13, 1887, Mr. Smith was 
united in marriage with Minnie Balliet Trum- 
bower, a daughter of Harrison and Josephine 
(Balliet) Trumbower, who was born in 



Hokendauqua, Pa., and obtained her educa- 
tion in the public schools of Allentown, grad- 
uating from the high school in 1886. Two 
children were born to bless their home, 
namely: Phillip M., deceased; and Mary J. 
Mr. Smith is a Republican in politics, and, 
although he does not desire ofifice, believing 
they should be filled by the laity, he con- 
.sented to accept the place of school director. 




EORGE GOULD, superintendent 
of the Butts Cannel Coal Company, 
and a resident of East Palestine, Ohio, 
was born near Bath, England. He accom- 
panied his parents to this country, when but 
seven years old. He received his educational 
training at East Palestine. After leaving 
school he determined to learn the business of 
coal operating, and started in at the bottom 
of the ladder as a digger in the coal fields of 
Pennsylvania. He gradually worked his way 
up, and his first appointment to a position 
of responsibility was as superintendent under 
Captain Hicks in his mine at Bagdad, West- 
moreland county. About fifty men found em- 
ployment in this mine, and most of the mine's 
product was sold to the railroads. 

After retaining that position for three 
years, Mr. Gould resigned. In 1888, he 
bought an interest in the Sterhng Mining Co., 
producers of coal and clay, at Cannelton, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He was super- 
intendent of the company's mines for five 
years, having under him one hundred men. 




DR. CONSTANTIXE T. GALE. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



235 



Later he sold his interest to Mr. Heilman. 
Mr. Gould had also been manager for the 
Butts Cannel Coal Co., but finding the duties 
of i)oth positions too arduous, he decided to 
give his entire attention to the Butts Com- 
pany, and consequently resigned the superin- 
tendency of the Sterling Company. He 
opened and developed the Butts Company's 
mines. They are producers of very fine can- 
nel coal. 

They employ fifty-two men and have a nine- 
foot vein of cannel coal. This coal is very 
fine for making gas and is found in few places 
in this country. Two other places where it is 
found in paying quantities are at Falling 
Rock, West Virginia, and Bear Creek, Ken- 
tucky. The products of the Butts Co.'s 
mines are shipped to all parts of the United 
States and Canada. 

Mr. Gould married Belle Atchison, of East 
Palestine, Ohio, and resides in a handsome 
residence a short distance from the mines, to 
which he drives daily. Mrs. Gould is a native 
of East Palestine, where she also received her 
scholastic training. Four children bless the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Gould, namely: Wil- 
liam, aged eleven ; Charles, aged seven ; Ellen, 
three years old; and George, Jr., a baby of 
eight months. 

Mr. Gould is a stockholder of the Elk Run 
Mining Co., miners of soft coal, and is presi- 
dent of the same. Other members of the 
company are Messrs. Lanor, Flynn and By- 
croft, — the first named being also secretary 
and treasurer. The offices of the company 
are at Lisbon, Ohio. The subject of these 



lines is a Republican. He is a member of the 
town council, a school director, and is serving 
on the board of education. He belongs to 
the M. E. church, of which he is a trustee. 
He is a member of the Palestine Lodge, F. & 
A. M., also of the L O. O. F. 




R. CONSTANTINE T. GALE. The 
well known physician and surgeon 
whose name heads this sketch, and 
v.hose portrait we present on the opposite 
page, has one of the largest practices in Bea- 
ver county, and his ability as a physician is 
undoubtedly of the highest. His patronage 
extends over New Brighton, his present 
home, and through Beaver county, and the 
counties adjoining, and he is held in high es- 
teem by all who know him. Dr. Gale is a 
son of the late well known physician. Dr. 
George W. Gale, and was born at Newport, 
Washington county, Ohio, January i8, 1850. 
The paternal grandfather, George Gale, was 
born in Ireland and came to America prior 
to the year 1800. On the way over, he met 
on the ship a Miss McKernan, whom he af- 
terward married. They located in Hamp- 
shire county, in what is now West Virginia, 
and followed farming, until they were well 
along in life, when they sold their property, 
and went to what is now Pleasant county. 
West Virginia, and, a few years later, moved 
to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where they both 
died at the advanced age of eighty years. 
Their children were, as follows: Thomas; 



236 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



James; McKernan ; George; W., M. D. ; Rob- 
ert ; John ; Constaiitine ; William ; Bridget ; 
Catherine; Ellen; Maria; and Theresa; all 
of whom grew to be men and women, and at- 
tained an old age. Three of the oldest sons 
served in the War of 1812. 

George W. Gale, the father of Constantine 
T., was born in Hampshire county, West Vir- 
ginia, and was educated in Cumberland, 
Maryland. He chose medicine as a profes- 
sion, and was one of the most successful prac- 
titioners of the time. He was a self-made man 
in every respect, and won for himself a name 
which time cannot efface. He began his pro- 
fessional life in Tyler county. West Virginia, in 
1 83 1, and then located at Newport, Washing- 
ton county, Ohio, and obtained a large prac- 
tice on both sides of the Ohio River. His 
career as a physician started in the saddle-bag 
days, when there were but few roads to reach 
tile pioneers' homes with wagons. Dr. Gale 
rode many miles on horseback, and in those 
days a physician had to take grain, provisions, 
and even timber, for services, as money was 
very scarce. Good physicians were not to 
be found within many miles of each other, 
therefore the Doctor was kept very busy. Be- 
ing a lover of nature, he purchased a large 
farm, and spent many happy hours in having 
it improved, for he was a man of fine tastes 
and a progressive disposition, and in a short 
time, he had in his possession a very fine farm- 
ing property. 

He died in September, 1871, aged eighty- 
one, but although he had given up his long 
rides several years previous to his death, he 



was called on at his home and office, 
to the very last days of his sickness. 
His name is known in every house- 
hold in the vicinity of his former home, 
and his memory will ever be warmly 
cherished. He assisted four of his sons to 
become doctors. Dr. Gale married Catherine 
Wells, a daughter of Nicholas Wells, of Tyler 
county. West Va., and she died at the age 
of seventy. They were both faithful mem- 
bers of the Catholic church. Their children 
were: John W., M. D. ; Mary; Alcinda B. ; 
Rachel; Ellen; Nicholas W., a farmer; Ver- 
onica; Constantine T., the subject hereof; 
George T., M. D. ; Samuel Hammett, 
D. D. S. ; Adah L. ; and C. Bernard, M. D. 

Dr. Constantine T. Gale, whose name heads 
this personal biography, attended the public 
schools of his native town, and also the St. 
Thomas Seminary, and began reading medi- 
cine with his father at the age of twenty. He 
then entered the Jefferson Medical School at 
Philadelphia in 1876, and graduated in 1878. 
He began practice at Parkersburg, West Va., 
and in 1880 went to New Brighton, where he 
has since lived. He was an entire stranger 
there, but it was not long until he had a most 
promising beginning, and his services were 
soon sought by many residents of New 
Brighton. He rapidly rose in the profession, 
and has proven himself to be a complete mas- 
ter of the science of medicine. His practice 
is a large and lucrative one, and he is greatly 
loved by all in the vicinity. The Doctor has a 
fine home at Eleventh street and Fifth avenue, 
where is, also, his office. This place was 



BEAVER COUNTY 



237 



formerly the residence of Dr. Simpson. Dr. 
Gale was united in wedlock with Lucy L. Ste- 
phenson, a daughter of Hon. James Stephen- 
son, of Parkersburg, West Virginia. He has 
served several years on the stafif of the Beaver 
County Hospital, is a member of the Beaver 
County Medical Society, State Medical Asso- 
ciation, and American Medical Association. 
He is a stanch Democrat, but has never 
sought political distinction. He is also a 
member of the order of Elks, of Rochester, 
Pennsylvania. 



R. WILLIAM S. GRIM, a leading 
practitioner of Beaver Falls, Pa., is 
a pleasant, companionable gentle- 
man, with a liking for company, and a genial 
manner that wins him large numbers of 
friends. Dr. Grim has been actively engaged 
in the practice of medicine ever since his grad- 
uation from the medical department of the 
Western University of Pennsylvania, at Pitts- 
burg, in 1888, when he located immediately in 
Beaver Falls. He makes a specialty of dis- 
eases of the nose, throat, ear, and chest. Fie 
was first assistant surgeon of the loth Reg. of 
Pennsylvania Militia for a period of six years. 
He is a member of the Beaver County Medical 
Society and also of the Pennsylvania State 
Medical Society. He acted as delegate from 
the latter to the State Medical Society of New 
Jersey in 1889. He is also a member of the 
Pittsburg Obstetrical Society. Politically, the 
Doctor is an ardent Democrat, but has never 



sought nor held office, being too busily occu- 
pied with his professional duties. 

The subject of this article is a son of Dr. 
William and Lucinda (Spangler) Grim, and 
was born August 26, 1864, in Rockville, 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. He received 
an excellent scholastic training m the com- 
mon schools of Beaver Falls, which was sup- 
plemented by a course at Piersoll's Academy 
at Bridgewater, and a finishing course at 
Geneva College in Beaver Falls. He received 
the degree of B. S. in 1885, and the degree of 
M. S. in 1889. For his future life work he 
elected to become a physician, like his hon- 
ored father. With him, he began the study of 
medicine in 1885; after studying diligently 
for some time he attended the Western Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, at Pittsburg, grad- 
uating in 1888, as previously mentioned. His 
energy, determination, and skill have won for 
him a high reputation as a physician, and have 
secured for him an extensive field of prac- 
tice, besides having fairly given him a place 
ainong the leading practitioners of his profes- 
sion. Dr. Grim is a past master of Beaver 
Falls Lodge, No. 478, F. & A. M., and is also 
a member of Harmony Chapter; a member 
of Valley Echo Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; Lone 
Rock Lodge, K. of P. ; and Schuyler Grove, 
No. 8, United Ancient Order of Druids. 

Louis Philip Grim, the great-grandfather of 
the subject hereof, was a native of Germany, 
and, on coming to the United States, settled 
in York county, Pa., at an early date. His 
son, Michael Grim, was the grandfather of 
William S. and was born in York county, 



238 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Pa., — settling in Beaver county, about the be- 
ginning of the present century. He located 
near Unionville, where he followed agricul- 
tural pursuits, and spent the remainder of his 
life. He rendered valuable services to our 
country during the War of 1812, being under 
the command of Captain Henry, in the battle 
of Lake Erie, under Commodore Perry. 

William H. Grim, father of William S., was 
born in Beaver county, Pa., about 1833. He 
was a pupil in tlie common schools, and at 
Beaver Academy. He then read medicine 
with Dr. W. W. Simpson, of Rochester, Pa., 
after which he entered the Cincinnati Medical 
College, from which he graduated. 

After practicing a few years in Lawrence 
county, and at Rockwell, Dauphin county, he 
took a special course at Jefferson Medical 
College in Philadelphia, graduating therefrom 
in 1869. He 'then went to Beaver Falls, 
where he practiced until his death, April 29, 
1897. He was a member of the Beaver 
County Medical Society, and the Pennsyl- 
vania State Medical Society. He made a spe- 
cialty of surgery, and when in active practice, 
was considered by many to be the leading 
surgeon in Beaver county. He was a Demo- 
crat in his party affiliations, took an active 
part in politics, and was vice-president of the 
State Democratic league. He took a deep 
interest in the educational institutions of his 
county, and served as a school director for 
(^perhaps) twenty years. He was appointed 
postmaster under the administration of Benja- 
min Harrison, and served faithfully in that offi- 
cial capacity. In the Episcopalian church, he 



v.as recognized as one of the prominent mem- 
bers, and had a record for piety of the most 
earnest character. He was twice married. His 
first wife was Lucinda Spangler, mother of the 
subject of this biography. She was a native 
of Lebanon county, and was a daughter of 
Levi Spangler. Some time after the death of 
his first wife, Dr. William H. Grim re-married, 
his union in this instance being with Amelia 
Ann Robinson, a daughter of Hon. Archie 
Robinson, who was state senator of the 
Beaver-Lawrence district in the early days. 
Dr. William H. Grim was a very prominent 
man in the Masonic fraternity. He was past 
master of the Beaver Valley Lodge, No. 478 ; 
a member of Harmony Chapter; Pittsburg 
Commandery ; and of Syria Temple, A. A. O. 
X. M. S. 

Levi Spangler, maternal grandfather of the 
subject hereof, was an extensive coal operator 
at Tremont, Pennsylvania. His grandfather 
settled in Philadelphia in 1737, in what is now 
known as the First Ward, but later in life 
went to what is now Myerstown, in Lebanon 
county. There he built a stone house which 
was called "Stone Fort." In this the people 
of that vicinity took refuge at times to protect 
themselves against the Indians. Levi Spang- 
ler and his brother Christian, were engaged 
many years in coal operating at Tremont, 
Pennsylvania. Christian Spangler was a 
prominent man of his day. He was one of 
the thirteen original directors of the Pennsyl- 
vania R. R. Company, and continued to be 
an ofiicer of that road up to the time of his 
death, being the last of the thirteen to die. 




OLIVER B. ELLIOTT. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



241 



LIVER B. ELLIOTT. Among the 
most important public institutions of 
Beaver county is the Home for the 
Poor and Infirm, a fact which is largely due to 
its successful management by the gentleman 
named above. It is situated on a tract of one 
hundred and thirty acres in Moon township, 
on the banks of the Ohio River, and com- 
mands a beautiful view. The place was for- 
merly known as the Stone farm, and a part 
of the old farm house is now used as the 
superintendent's residence. A large brick 
building was erected for the use of the inmates 
which is a model of convenience in its ar- 
rangement, being heated and lighted with 
gas, equipped v/ith numerous fire escapes and 
extinguishers, and a 250-barrel tank to insure 
safety from fire ; its sanitary equipments are of 
the finest. There are thirty-two large, airy 
sleeping rooms for the accommodation of 
from eighty to one hundred and ten inmates, 
and the lower floor is given to separate parlors 
for the males and females ; these are fitted up 
in comfortable style, and good literature is 
supplied. The pest house is placed in an 
isolated position on the farm, but, fortunately, 
owing to the absolute cleanliness of every 
portion of the place, this is but little used. The 
cellars and every out-of-the-way corner are 
scrupulously clean, — and all of these condi- 
tions received due praise from the state super- 
intendent. The building is surrounded by 
beautiful grounds, and a greater part of the 
farm is under cultivation, the product being 
used upon the table, leaving nothing but flour 
and meat to be bought for daily use. The 



inmates are well cared for and are provided 
with an abundance of good, wholesome food, 
and treated on holidays to special dinners. In 
addition to this, entertainments are frequently 
given for their benefit, and they are allowed 
plenty of freedom. The inmates are very 
useful in the kitchen, laundry and bakery, and 
elsewhere ; one man is placed in charge of the 
chicken coops, — 500 fowls being kept. About 
1,400 dozen eggs per annum are gathered, of 
which 1,000 eggs are kept for setting and the 
remainder are used for home consumption. 
The young inmates are instructed in useful 
ways, and are taught to lead a life of indepen- 
dence and self-reliance. As soon as possible 
they are placed in good honfes, and in many 
instances have become useful and honored cit- 
izens. Mr. Elliott is eminently fitted for the 
position he holds, and it is to be hoped that, 
for the advantage of the inmates and the ben- 
efit of the county, he will be retained for many 
years to come. He has made a study of 
human nature, and seems to comprehend 
every desire and want of his charges ; these he 
endeavors to satisfy, if reasonable, and within 
his power. Kind and considerate, he has 
their respect, without exception. 

Oliver B. Elliott was born in Moon town- 
ship, Beaver county, June 20, 1857, and at- 
tended the district schools until he reached 
the age of sixteen years, after which he as- 
sisted his father on the farm until he was mar- 
ried. He later purchased a portion of his 
grandfather's old estate, — in all eighty-four 
acres. It was partially improved land, but 
Mr. Elliott improved both land and build- 



242 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ings Still further, — setting out excellent or- 
chards and vineyards. He raised six tons of 
grapes annually, besides large quantities of 
berries, cherries, apples, plums, etc. He also 
engaged in general farming. His place was 
Avell stocked with good horses, registered Jer- 
seys and Holsteins, and sheep. He continued 
at this until he was appointed superintendent 
of the County Home, in 1897, since which 
time the place has been rented. 

Mr. Elliott was united in marriage with 
Ellen Dunn, a daughter of Walter and Ellen 
Dunn, of Scotch birth, and they have three 
children: Bertha A., born in January, 1883, 
a student of Beaver High School of the grad- 
uating class of 1901 ; Frank W., born in Aug- 
ust, 1885 ; and one who died in infancy. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Elliott is a Republican, and served 
as assessor and collector for a long time. He 
v,'as also constable until 1897, and has filled all 
the township offices except that of justice of 
the peace. Religiously, he is a member and 
elder of the Presbyterian church. Socially, he 
is a member of the K. of P. ; Jr. O. U. A. M. ; 
Woodmen of the World ; and Rochester 
Lodge, B. P. O. E. Mr. Elliott's portrait 
accompanies this sketch. 




ILLIAM-DELOSS HAMILTON, 

county, Pa., is one of that town's 

- postmaster of Freedom, Beaver 

most active and popular business men, was 

born in Freedom, March 24, 1863, and is a 

son of Oliver James Hamilton. His great- 



grandfather, James Hamilton, was born in 
Ireland, and on coming to America, settled 
among the early pioneers of the western town- 
ships of Beaver county. While assisting the 
sherifif to make an arrest, he was shot by 
some one who supposed him to be the sheriff. 
He was the first white man shot in Beaver 
county. His children were: James; Oliver; 
and Martha. 

James Hamilton, the grandfather of the 
subject of this record, went to Beaver, where 
he learned the trade of a tailor, and afterward 
settled in Moon township, where he followed 
farming the rest of his life. He was born 
March 22, 1789, and died October 12, 1870. 
He married Elizabeth W^eigle, a daughter of 
John Weigle. She was born December 6, 
1799, and died May 7, 1866, at the age of 
sixty-six. Their children were, as follows: 
John, born January 16, 1824; Oliver James, 
born April 4, 1825; Caroline J., born August 
3, 1826, and married to Daniel Irwin; Oscar, 
born April 20, 1828; Eleanor, born June 28, 
1830, and married to Mi'o Jones; Susannah, 
born June 24, 1832; Sibeam, born Novem- 
ber I, 1834; Juliana, born October 14, 1837, 
and married to Milfred Webb; Samuel, born 
November 3, 1839; and Martha, born 
October 16, 1843. Oliver James Hamilton, 
the father of William Deloss Hamilton, fol- 
lowed farming early in life, and then learned 
ship carpentering, and became one of the 
members of the Freedom Barge Building 
Co., which built boats for many years. Then 
^Ir. Hamilton followed house carpentering, 
and built himself a home on Fourth street. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



243 



which he sold later. At present, he is retired 
from active life. He married Lovina Minor, 
a daughter of James Minor, of Hookstown, 
Beaver county. Mrs. Hamilton died August 
15, 1853, at the age of thirty-four years, and 
eleven months. Their children \Yere as fol- 
lows: B. Deloss, deceased; James Oscar, 
born August 31, 1851, married to Cynthia 
Davis, and having six children, as follows : 
Elmer; Fay; Eva; James; and Adam and 
Nancy J., both deceased. Mr. Hamilton was 
married again, this time to Mary Jane Calvert, 
a daughter of James Calvert, of Allegheny, 
who was born in County Down, Ireland. Miss 
was born in County Down, Ireland. Miss 
Calvert was born July 13, 1827. The second 
union resulted in seven children, as follows : 
Lizzie L., born March 14, 1859, now de- 
ceased; John C, born October 19, i860, and 
married to Lydia Cuppo, whose children 
were, — Lizzie, Ruble, John O., and Gertrude; 
William Deloss, the subject of this biography ; 
Milo J., born November 25, 1864, and mar- 
ried to Joanna Lopp ; Frank S., born April 8, 
1867, and married to Clara Harshman; Alex- 
ander O., born May 19, 1869, married to 
M. Cronk, and having one child, — J. Earl; 
and Thomas, born April 23, 1871. Mr. Ham- 
ilton is a Republican in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the M. E. church. 

William Deloss Hamilton, whose name 
heads this sketch, was educated in the schools 
of Freedom, and as early as twelve years of 
age, began work in the Rochester Tumbler 
Works, — spending several years also as a 
glass blower, in Pittsburg. When the Key- 



stone Tumbler W^orks were established in 
Rochester, he was one of the organizers and 
stockholders, and is at present a stockholder. 
He worked there until January, i8g8, when 
he was appointed postmaster of Freedom. 
The postofifice of Freedom was established 
about May 28, 1832, with Stephen Phillips 
as post-master. The officials who preceded 
him in that capacity were as follows: Will- 
iam Smith, May 9, 1836; T. F. Robinson, 
March 6, 1840; Henry Bryan, April 30, 1844; 
Frederick Schumacker, September 25, 1845; 
William P. Phillips, February 18, 1850; John 
Graham, June 16, 1853; William Kerr, March 
13, 1861; William D. Fisher, May 26, 1871; 
T. C. Kerr, September 6, 1880; Francis M. 
Grim, February 15, 1886; J. L. Conner; and 
G. W. Jack. The assistant is Miss Annie C. 
Lewis. Miss Elizabeth Wright served as as- 
sistant from 1880 until 1898. 

Mr. Hamilton built, on Fourth avenue, a 
beautiful residence, which he occupies. He 
was united in marriage with Margaret Fehr, 
a daughter of Conrad and Mary Fehr. She 
was born in Pittsburg, but was reared in 
Freedom. The children which have blessed 
this union are : Clyde D. ; Milo S. ; 
Mary G. ; Harry C, and an infant son, un- 
named. Mr. Hamilton is a member of the I. 
O. O. F., of the Woodmen of the World and 
is a member, and ex-steward, of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. His present position 
he has filled to the entire satisfaction of all 
the citizens, and he has fully demonstrated 
that he is worthy of all the trust and con- 
fidence reposed in him. 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 




REDERICK DAVIDSON, vice- 
president of the Union Drawn Steel Co., 
of Beaver Falls, Pa., is among the most 
prominent citizens of his town. His career 
gives evidence of careful training in early- 
youth. When young, he moved to Beaver, 
where he received his primary education, and 
later took an academic course at Chester Mili- 
tary School. His business tact and abilities 
attracted the attention of an ofHcial of the 
National Bank of New Brighton, and he ob- 
tained a situation as clerk in the bank, which 
he held for three years. He then accepted 
the responsible position of cashier of the 
Beaver National Bank. At the death of his 
brother, James J., he became president of the 
Union Drawn Steel Co., of Beaver Falls. His 
life has been a steady, onward and upward 
advance in every field of usefulness to which 
he has been called, in which respect his career 
is suggestively similar to that of his father. 
Socially, Frederick Davidson is afifiliated with 
St. James Lodge, No. 457, F. & A. M., of the 
borough of Beaver, where he now lives. His 
political preference is with the Republican 
party. The subject of this writing is the 
youngest son of Daniel R. and Margaret C. 
(Johnston) Davidson, and a grandson of Wil- 
liam and Sarah (Rogers) Davidson. 

Hon. William Davidson was of Scotch- 
Irish origin, and was born in Carlisle, Cum- 
berland county, Pa., February 14, 1783. He 
was a very prominent man of his day, both 
in religious and political circles. He was a 
clergyman of the Christian church and a very 
active worker in that denomination; he was 



equally influential in the political arena, hav- 
ing served as a member of the State Legisla- 
ture, as state senator, and as speaker of the 
House. He died at the age of eighty-five 
years. 

Daniel R. Davidson, father of Frederick, 
was an active business man of Beaver, Pa., 
and was born in Fayette county, Pa., January 
12, 1820, where he was a pupil in the select 
schools. He was a man of notable commer- 
cial tact and ability; his business relations 
were varied and extensive. Fie dealt largely 
in coke and coal, and owned valuable mines. 
For many years, he was a successful and in- 
fluential railroad oi'ficial, having built the B. & 
O. R. R. from Pittsburg to Connellsville, Pa., 
in connection with \vhich he held various of- 
fices, and for a time was president of that 
branch. After severing his connection with, 
that road, he was the main promoter of the 
Fayette county branch of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. At the time of his death, he was 
president of the Commercial National Bank, 
of Pittsburg, having been one of the organ- 
izers of that institution. He was also one of 
the board of directors of the National Bank of 
Commerce, of Pittsburg, from the time of its 
organization. He was the owner of two 
plants in the coke regions, and was president 
of the Love Manufacturing Co., of Rochester, 
Pa., during its existence. In politics, he was 
a Republican, and gave the weight of his in- 
fluence to the advancement of the principles 
of that party, believing his own, as well as the 
public interests, were best advanced by Re- 
publican policies. 




WILLIAM HENRY WAGONER. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



Daniel R. Davidson was married in Fayette 
county, Pa., in 1846, to Margaret C. Johnston, 
daughter of Alexander Johnston, who was of 
Scotch-Irish descent. Seven children blessed 
this union, and were named as follows: 
Charles, who lives in Connellsville, Pa. ; 
Sarah, William J., and Elizabeth, deceased; 
George, who is cashier of the National Bank 
of New Brighton; James J., deceased; Louis 
R. ; and Frederick, the subject of this sketch. 
Daniel R. Davidson died March 18, 1884, and 
with his death ended a very useful and exem- 
plary life. 



W: 



'ILLIAM HENRY WAGONER, 
noted machinist, whose portrait is 
presented on the opposite page, has 
been a resident of Beaver Falls since 1883, 
when he accepted a position with the Hart- 
m.an Steel Company, but subsequently en- 
gaged with the American Steel & Wire Com- 
pany. He learned the trade of a rod roller, 
— becoming quite an expert at that business. 
On December 22, 1892, he was promoted 
to the position of a boss roller 01 that mill. 
The plant is an important one, and, when 
running full time, night and day, furnishes 
employment to 151 men, many of whom are 
under the direct supervision of Mr. Wagoner. 
August 24, 1899, Mr. Wagoner accepted a 
more responsible position with the same com- 
pany, at Rankin, Pa., and has charge of the 
company's works there, as boss roller. 

Besides the important position he occupies 



with the above-mentioned firm, Mr. Wagoner 
is also interested in various other enterprises 
of minor note. In the many years he has 
exercised his right of suffrage, Mr. Wagoner 
has always voted with the Republican party, 
and takes an unusually active part in politics. 
He is a thorough advocate of good systems 
of public instruction and was elected to the 
office of school director from the sixth ward ; 
he has taken a deep interest in affairs under 
consideration by the directors, and has served 
on some of the most important committees. 
Our subject is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, in good standing, — being a past mas- 
ter of that order. He is also a member of 
Lodge No. 225, Knights of Pythias; of Lodge 
No. 311, Royal Arcanum, and is a member of 
Sr. O. U. A. M., Council No. 385. 

William Henry Wagoner was born January 
7, 1867, in Sewickley, Allegheny county, Pa., 
and is a son of Andrew and Sarah 
Jane (Marlatt) Wagoner, and grandson 
of Joseph Wagoner. Joseph Wagoner 
was a Pennsylvanian by birth, and v/as 
one of the pioneer settlers of Sewick- 
ley, Allegheny county, Pa., where he 
lived many years, and finally died. He was a 
carpenter by trade, and a steamboat builder. 
He assisted in building many boats on the 
Ohio River, and was an excellent workman. 
Andrew Wagoner, father of William Henry, 
was born in Sewickley township, December 
16, 1832. He was reared in the same locality, 
and attended the district schools, remaining 
there even after attaining his majority. Like 
his father, he also engaged in carpenter work 



248 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and steamboat building, and is now located 
in Van \Vert, Ohio. 

He was joined in matrimony with Sarah 
Jane Marlatt, a daughter of Joseph Marlatt. 
She was also a native of Allegheny county, 
and bore her husband eight children, four of 
whom are now deceased. The names of the 
children are : Elias, who resides in Little Chip- 
pewa township, where he follows the occupa- 
tion of a farmer; Cecelia, deceased; William 
Henry, the subject of this sketch; Frank L., 
who died at the age of twenty-two years; 
James and Joseph, twins, who died young; 
Mary Luella, wife of W. J. Harris, of Beaver 
Falls; and Alfred. William Henry Wagoner 
was the recipient of a practical education ac- 
quired in the public schools of Sewickley.. 
After leaving school his first position was with 
the Bentley & Goehring Works, of New 
Brighton, w'here he remained until 1883, when 
he went to Beaver Falls, as before mentioned. 

The subject of this record was joined in 
marriage with Elizabeth A. Tucker, an at- 
tractive young lady. Their home was bright- 
ened by the presence of four children, one of 
whom is now deceased. Their names are : 
Winifred M. ; Samuel Anderson ; Warren 
Henry, deceased ; and Merle Edwin. Besides 
his cares and duties, Mr. Wagoner has time to 
devote to other affairs, and takes much inter- 
est in the progress and welfare of his commun- 
ity. He is abundantly qualified to fill his pres- 
ent, or any similar, position, for his life has 
been spent in factories and in following me- 
chanical arts. He is found ready and willing 
to undertake new projects, but is still conser- 



vative enough to withhold his support from 
visionary and wild cat schemes. He is broad 
and liberal in his ideas, and is esteemed and 
respected by his many acquaintances ; he per- 
forms the varied duties which fall to his lot 
with a ready tact and ease that come only 
from thorough experience. 




ENRY SECHRIST, a progressive 
dairyman, and stock and feed farmer, 
of Big Beaver township, ranks 
among the most up-to-date agriculturists of 
Beaver county. Pa. Mr. Sechrist commenced 
the dairy business about 1872, when he pur- 
chased the homestead farm from his father. 
Previous to that, he had followed farming 
ever since leaving school, and the complete 
management of the farm had been left to him 
for several years. He removed to Beaver 
county, when nineteen years of age. Having 
good business ability he was quick to realize 
that money was to be made in the dairy trade. 
He started with only twelve cows, but has 
since had as many as thirty-five. At first, he 
kept only the short-horn variety, but later 
changed to the Holstein breed, and now keeps 
only Jerseys. The dairy products of his farm 
were formerly shipped to Allegheny and Pitts- 
burg. Later, he purchased a retail route in 
Beaver Fahs. Disposing of that, Mr. Sechrist 
now ships to Beaver Falls. He also raises 
hogs and horses, and large quantities of grain 
and hay. Most of the latter is, however, feed 
for his stock. Soon after purchasing it, our 



BEAVER COUNTY 



249 



subject built a new house on his farm; this 
house was destroyed by fire in 1894. In 
March, of the same year, was begun the erec- 
tion of his present handsome residence, which 
was constructed from plans drawn by himself. 
He also built fine, large barns, equipped with 
all modern conveniences. Only the latest and 
most improved farming implements are to be 
found on his farm, and when not in use, these 
are carefully sheltered under neat sheds pre- 
pared for the purpose. Everything about his 
place goes to show the superior ability and 
management of its owner, the entire premises 
being a model of neatness and convenience. 
Besides keeping up the old orchards on the 
farm, Mr. Sechrist has recently planted a fine, 
large peach orchard containing the choicest 
varieties to be found. 

Henry Sechrist was born in Johnstown, Pa., 
July 18, 1840. He is a son of Henry, Sr., and 
Nancy (Flinchbaugh) Sechrist, and comes of 
good German stock. Henry Sechrist, Sr., 
was born in York county, Pa., in 1806. He 
was instructed in the public schools, and after- 
ward learned milling. He subsequently built 
a mill, which he conducted himseif, carrying 
on a successful business for twenty years. He 
then moved to Cambria county, Pa., and 
rented a farm for a brief period. Removing 
to Indiana county, he rented another farm, but 
did not like the country, and moved again. 
This time he located in Allegheny county, 
where he followed agricultural pursuits for 
eleven years. 

In i860, he purchased a farm in Beaver 
county, and immediately occupied it. This 



is the identical farm now occupied by the sub- 
ject of our sketch. It was then an improved 
farm of 140 acres, with a frame house and 
barns. It was much deteriorated, however, 
— with buildings out of repair. Henry Se- 
christ's father rebuilt the house and barns and 
set about enriching the land. He set out fine 
fruit orchards and put many modern improve- 
ments on the place. His marriage was cele- 
brated in New York City, where he espoused 
Nancy Flinchbaugh. Mrs. Sechrist was a na- 
tive of York county, Pa., where she received 
a good scholastic training. She proved a 
worthy helpmeet to her husband in every 
way. Eight children were born to them, 
namely : Sarah (Scott) ; William ; Jacob ; 
Henry, the subject of this sketch ; Susan (Mil- 
ler) ; Annie, who died in infancy; Mary, who 
never married; and Sylvester, who also died 
young. Henry Sechrist, Sr., was a prominent 
Democrat. He served as supervisor and as 
school director. Early in life he embraced 
the faith of the Methodists, but subsequently 
became a member of the United Presbyterian 
church, of which he served many years as trus- 
tee and steward. 

The subject of this record was the recipient 
of a practical education while yet in Allegheny 
county. In 1887, he wedded Lizzie M. Dil- 
lon, a charming daughter of James and Bar- 
bara Dillon. Mrs. Sechrist was born, reared, 
and educated in Beaver county. One son, 
William L., born July 11, 1895, blesses their 
home and renders life more happy. In poli- 
tics, Mr. Sechrist is an ardent Democrat. He 
has served as school director and supervisor. 



250 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



has held many of the township offices, — 
among them, that of treasurer. He favors 
the Methodist religion, and is trustee and 
steward of the church of that denomination. 
In fraternal associations, he is an active mem- 
ber of Meridian Lodge, No. 411, F. & A. M., 
and of Harmony Chapter, of Beaver Falls. 
Such men as Mr. Sechrist are valuable acquisi- 
tions to any community. 



TT^APT. FRANK MARATTA is one of 
I J| the oldest and most respected men in 

^ 'Beaver county, and makes his home 

at Rochester. He has owned many steamers 
during his life time, and has undoubtedly 
served as captain on more boats on the Ohio 
River than any other man in that section of 
Pennsylvania. He is a son of James and 
Elizabeth (Walker) Maratta, and was born in 
Beaver county, October 25, 1819. His 
lather was also born in that county, but his 
grandparents were natives of France. 

James Maratta, the father of Frank, took 
up the trade of a carpenter and later became 
a contractor, settling at Bridgewater, where 
his father before him had lived. He lived 
there the remainder of his life and died at the 
age of sixty-two years. His union with Eliz- 
abeth Walker resulted in the birth of the fol- 
lowing children : Caleb ; Margaret ; Mahala ; 
Peter; Frank, the gentleman whose name ap- 
pears at the head of this sketch ; Cynthia ; 
James ; Ann ; Mary ; Hines ; Daniel ; and three 
others who died in infancy. Those who grew 



to maturity are all respected citizens of the 
various communities in which they reside. 

Capt. Frank Maratta started life as a pilot 
on the river, and became very skillful in that 
capacity on keel boats. He subsequently en- 
gaged as cook on a steam packet, run between 
Pittsburg and New Castle, Pa., but a man of 
his ability and ambitious nature does not re- 
main down long. He bettered his position 
as the opportunity presented itself, and be- 
came a captain of steamboats. He became 
owner of many boats and was interested in 
others. He built the Forest Rose at Cali- 
fornia, Pa., and the Paris and Princess at 
Freedom, all of which he ran a few years, and 
then disposed of to the government. He 
built the Champion, at Freedom, the Sunny 
Side, at Brownville, and the Mansfield. His 
next two boats, the Henry A. Jones and the 
Belle of Texas, after crossing the Gulf of Mex- 
ico, he sold at Galveston, Texas. He then 
built the Forest Rose No. 2, and the Leoni- 
das, which he ran before selling them. He 
was also part owner and captain of Scotia 
Packet; Ironsides; and was captain of the 
Alaska; Golden Eagle; Robert Burns; Bos- 
tonian No. i ; Bostonian No. 2 ; and the Alice 
Dean. After many years of the greatest ac- 
tivity, in 1890, he retired from the river, but 
is still financially interested in a number of 
enterprises. He was an organizer and a 
stockholder of the Conway Bank, and is pres- 
ident of the Big Beaver River Bridge Com- 
pany, and a director of the Brighton Bridge 
Company. He also served as councilman of 
the borough. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



253 



Captain Maratta was united in marriage 
with Lydia Ransom, who was born in Jeffer- 
sonville, Ind., and was a daughter of James 
Ransom. She died in 1893, at the age of 
seventy-three years. The subject of our 
sketch formed a second marital union witli 
MiUie P. Seidell, a daughter of J. G. Seidell, 
of Scioto county, Ohio. In 1890, he built 
his present handsome residence in Rochester, 
having previously built what is known as the 
Dr. A. L. Shallenberger residence. He then 
erected another residence which he sold to 
William Moulds. At the advanced age of 
eighty years. Captain Maratta is enjoying ex- 
cellent health, having never been sick in his 
life until the spring of 1899, when he suffered 
from an attack of "la grippe." He is a man 
of good habits, never using tobacco or liquor 
in any form, and to this may be attributed 
more than anything else his Vv'onderfully 
strong constitution. He is a man of pleasing 
personality, a clever conversationalist, and 
stands high in the estimation of his fellow 
men. 




^ILLIAM MOULDS, who has at- 
tained prominence throughout 
Western Peimsylvania as the general 
manager of the Rochester Tumbler Company, 
a firm employing the largest number of hands 
in the service of any concern in the borough, 
has been engaged in the manufacture of glass 
in various departments of the work for almost 



a half century. He is a man of tried business 
ability, which, coupled with his years of ex- 
perience, has been an important factor in the 
thriving condition of the establishment with 
v.hich he has been connected since its incep- 
tion. It is, unquestionably, the largest enter- 
prise of its kind in the world. Mr. Moulds 
is also president of the Olive Stove Works 
of Rochester, which occupies an important 
place among the manufacturing industries of 
that community. He was born near Milltown, 
County Antrim, Ireland, December 9, 1842, 
and is a son of John and Nancy (Henry) 
Moulds. 

John Moulds was also born in County 
Antrim, Ireland ; upon coming to the United 
States he landed in New York City, but sub- 
sequently located at Steubenville, Ohio, where 
his wife had a brother and friends. On ar- 
riving here he was without a trade, but soon 
learned the art of glass blowing, which he 
followed nearly all of his life. During his last 
days he was engaged in packing, and was a 
man of remarkable activity up to the end, — 
dying in 1890, at the age of seventy-five years. 
He was a man of sturdy constitution and en- 
joyed fine health, having shaved himself just 
three days prior to his demise. He married 
Nancy Henry, a daughter of William Henry, 
and their children were as follows : William, 
the subject of this personal history; Samuel 
H., a record of whose life also appears in this 
work; Annie, the relict of Albert Albin, of 
Columbus, Ohio; Sarah, the wife of Eli 
Capers, of Steubenville, Ohio; Robert, who 
lives at Rochester; John, also a resident of 



254 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Rochester; and Elizabeth, who makes her 
home at Steubenville, Ohio. 

WilHam Moulds left school at an early age, 
being eight years old when he was instructed 
in the art of mold-making for the use of blow- 
ing glass. He became a very skilled mechanic, 
and followed that line of work at his Ohio 
home until 1866, when he removed to Pitts- 
burg and there engaged at his trade. In 1872, 
he assisted in organizing the Rochester Tum- 
bler Company, which comprised the follow- 
ing prominent business men: H. C. Fry; G. 
W. Fry; S. M. Kane; William Moulds; S. 
H. Moulds; Thomas Carr; William Carr; 
Thomas Matthews; John Hayes; J. H. Lip- 
pencott; and Richard Welsh. Mr. Moulds 
and H. C. Fry went to Rochester and there 
purchased the ten-acre estate of A. Lacock, 
which was at one time a fine maple grove, 
and, later, partly used as a brick yard. They 
immediately broke ground and soon a fac- 
tory was built and in full operation, their suc- 
cess being manifest from the start. Misfor- 
tune (through fire) overtook them when they 
had been running for two years, but they re- 
built without delay and made many valuable 
improvements which greatly facilitated manu- 
facture, and greatly increased the output. At 
that time three new members were added to 
the firm, namely: George Searles, and Rob- 
ert and John Carr. The plant has grown to 
be the largest enterprise of its kind in the 
world, their shipments being directed to all 
parts of the United States, Canada, England 
(and other parts of Europe), South America, 
Africa, Australia, Mexico, China and Japan. 



They ship from three to ten carloads per day, 
and have a monthly output of 150,000 dozen 
of blown goods and 150,000 dozen of pressed, 
giving employment to twelve hundred per- 
sons, i'hey have their own dynamos, and the 
factory is equipped with 1,000 incandescent 
lights. They also have their own ice house 
and water works, containing a tank with a 
capacity of 3,100 gallons. The firm at the 
present time is organized as follows : H. C. 
Fry, president ; William Moulds, general 
manager; S. H. Moulds, assistant manager; 
J. H. Fry, secretary; and Clayton Vance, 
treasurer. Mr. Moulds has also been closely 
identified with other business interests about 
Rochester, — prominent among them being 
the Olive Stove Works, of which he is presi- 
dent. He has taken an active interest in the 
progress of the borough, and has made many 
friends throughout this section by the honor- 
able manner in which he conducts his affairs. 
He was united in matrimony with May 
Jane, a daughter of Captain John Wallace, of 
Steubenville, Ohio, and they have three chil- 
dren : Mary W., widow of H. B. Shallen- 
berger, of Rochester; John W., deceased; and 
Jessie Agnes. Mv. Moulds resides in a fine 
home on West Adams street, and has served 
in the council for two years. Fraternally, he 
is a member of the Odd Fellows and Masonic 
orders. He served in the Civil War, enlisting 
in 1864, as a corporal in Company C, 157th 
Reg., Ohio Vol. Inf. Religiously, he is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. We present a por- 
trait of Mr. Moulds on another page, in 
proximity to this. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



255 




(IIARLES M. HUGHES is the pres- 
ent popular and efficient cashier of the 
Beaver National Bank ; he has had 
a broad and useful experience in this line of 
business, as he has been connected with 
various banking institutions almost contin- 
uously since his early manhood. Our subject 
is a man of fine business ability, is a favorite 
in both business and social circles, and he al- 
ways lends his influence in favor of such enter- 
prises and measures as he deems best for the 
advancement and prosperity of the borough, 
count}-, state and country at large. He was 
born in Lima, Ohio, May 24. 1856, and is a 
son of Richard T. Hughes. Richard T. 
Hughes was a farmer in early life, but later 
conducted a mercantile store at Lima. He 
was county treasurer of Allen county, Ohio, 
for a period of four years. He died March 7, 
1879, at the age of fifty-one years. 

Charles M. Hughes was intellectually 
trained in the public and high schools of 
Lima; at the age of eighteen years, he ac- 
cepted his first bank position, thi; of clerk 
in the First National Bank, of Lima, Ohio; 
two years later he became assistant cashier 
of the Allen County Bank, of Lima, — remain- 
ing in that capacity until 1881. In that year 
he returned to the First National Bank, of 
Lima, and became cashier of that institution. 
Having spenB a life of indoor occupation up to 
this time, Mr. Hughes decided to seek some 
open air exercise, and accordingly, in 1894, 
he resigned his position in the bank and en- 
tered the employ of the Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company as traveling agent out of 



Cleveland, Ohio. In 1896, Mr. Hughes re- 
turned to his former occupation, — accepting 
a position as cashier of the Beaver National 
Bank, succeeding cashier Fred Davidson. 
This bank is practically a new institution, hav- 
ing thrown open its doors to the public July i, 
1896; it has a capital stock of $100,000.00 and 
is one of the most solid banks in the county. 
The officers of the Beaver National Bank are 
J. R. Leonard, president; E. K. Hum, vice- 
president; C. ]M. Hughes, cashier; and Will- 
iam P. Judd, assistant cashier. In 1895, a 
liandsome brick and stone building was 
erected for the bank ; in the center of the 
building is the large safe and vault, and also 
the deposit drawers ; in the rear is the di- 
rectors' room, while in the front is a private 
office; the interior is finished with quartered 
oak, presenting a very neat appearance, and 
the building throughout is heated with hot 
water and lighted by both electric lights and 
gas. 

Mr. Hughes was married June 18, 1878, to 
Miss Katherine M. Colbath, a daughter of J. 
.\. Colbath, of Lima, Ohio, and they are the 
proud parents of three children, namely : 
Clarence L., corresponding clerk in the 
Columbia National Bank, of Pittsburg, Pa. ; 
Margaret, who is a student at Beaver College ; 
and Dorothy. Fraternally, our subject is a 
member of the F. & A. M., of Lima, Ohio, 
No. 205 ; Chapter No. 49 ; Shawnee Com- 
mandery, No. 14, and is past commander of 
the same ; he is also a member of the K. of P. 
lodge, of Lima, Ohio. Religiously, he and 
his family are Presbyterians. During the 



254 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Rochester; and Elizabeth, who makes her 
home at Steubenville, Ohio. 

William Moulds left school at an early age, 
being eight 3'ears old when he was instructed 
in the art of mold-making for the use of blow- 
ing glass. He became a very skilled mechanic, 
and followed that line of work at his Ohio 
home until 1866, when he removed to Pitts- 
burg and there engaged at his trade. In 1872, 
he assisted in organizing the Rochester Tum- 
bler Company, which comprised the follow- 
ing prominent business men: H. C. Fry; G. 
W. Fry; S. M. Kane; William Moulds; S. 
H. Moulds; Thomas Carr; William Carr; 
Thomas Matthews; John Hayes; J. H. Lip- 
pencott; and Richard Welsh. 'Mv. Moulds 
and H. C. Fry went to Rochester and there 
purchased the ten-acre estate of A. Lacock, 
which was at one time a fine maple grove, 
and, later, partly used as a brick yard. They 
immediately broke ground and soon a fac- 
tory was built and in full operation, their suc- 
cess being manifest from the start. Misfor- 
tune (through fire) overtook them when they 
had been running for two years, but they re- 
built without delay and made many valuable 
improvements which greatly facilitated manu- 
facture, and greatly increased the output. At 
that time three new members were added to 
the firm, namely: George Searles, and Rob- 
ert and John Carr. The plant has grown to 
be the largest enterprise of its kind in the 
world, their shipments being directed to all 
parts of the United States, Canada, England 
(and other parts of Europe), South America, 
Africa, Australia, Mexico, China and Japan. 



They ship from three to ten carloads per day, 
and have a monthly output of 150,000 dozen 
of blown goods and 150,000 dozen of pressed, 
giving employment to twelve hundred per- 
sons, i hey have their own dynamos, and the 
factory is equipped with i.ooo incandescent 
lights. They also have their own ice house 
and water works, containing a tank with a 
capacity of 3,100 gallons. The firm at the 
present time is organized as follows: H. C. 
Fry, president ; William Moulds, general 
manager; S. H. Moulds, assistant manager; 
J. H. Fry, secretary; and Clayton Vance, 
treasurer. Mr. Moulds has also been closely 
identified with other business interests about 
Rochester, — prominent among them being 
the Olive Stove Works, of which he is presi- 
dent. He has taken an active interest in the 
progress of the borough, and has made many 
friends throughout this section by the honor- 
able manner in which he conducts his affairs. 
He was united in matrimony with May 
Jane, a daughter of Captain John Wallace, of 
Steubenville, Ohio, and they have three chil- 
dren : Mary W., widow of H. B. Shallen- 
berger, of Rochester; John W., deceased; and 
Jessie Agnes. Mr. Moulds resides in a fine 
home on W^est Adams street, and has served 
in the council for two years. Fraternally, he 
is a member of the Odd Fellows and Masonic 
orders. He served in the Civil War, enlisting 
in 1864, as a corporal in Company C, 157th 
Reg., Ohio Vol. Inf. Religiously, he is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. We present a por- 
trait of Mr. Moulds on another page, in 
proximity to this. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



255 



|HARLES M. HUGHES is the pres- 
ent popular and efficient cashier of the 
Beaver National Bank; he has had 
a broad and useful experience in this line of 
business, as he has been connected with 
various banking institutions almost contin- 
uously since his early manhood. Our subject 
is a man of fine business ability, is a favorite 
in both business and social circles, and he al- 
ways lends his influence in favor of such enter- 
prises and measures as he deems best for the 
advancement and prosperity of the borough, 
county, state and country at large. He was 
born in Lima, Ohio, May 24. 1856, and is a 
son of Richard T. Hughes. Richard T. 
Hughes was a farmer in early life, but later 
conducted a mercantile store at Lima. He 
was county treasurer of Allen county, Ohio, 
for a period of four years. He died March 7, 
1879, at the age of fifty-one years. 

Charles M. Hughes was intellectually 
trained in the public and high schools of 
Lima; at the age of eighteen years, he ac- 
cepted his first bank position, tb^t of clerk 
in the First National Bank, of Lima, Ohio; 
two years later he became assistant cashier 
of the Allen County Bank, of Lima, — remain- 
ing in that capacity until 1881. In that year 
he returned to the First National Bank, of 
Lima, and became cashier of that institution. 
Having spent a life of indoor occupation up to 
this time, Mr. Hughes decided to seek some 
open air exercise, and accordingly, in 1894, 
he resigned his position in the bank and en- 
tered the employ of the Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company as traveling agent out of 



Cleveland, Ohio. In 1896, Mr. Hughes re- 
turned to his former occupation, — accepting 
a position as cashier of the Beaver National 
Bank, succeeding cashier Fred Davidson. 
This bank is practically a new institution, hav- 
ing thrown open its doors to the public July i, 
1896; it has a capital stock of $100,000.00 and 
is one of the most solid banks in the county. 
The officers of the Beaver National Bank are 
J. R. Leonard, president; E. K. Hum, vice- 
president ; C. ]M. Hughes, cashier ; and Will- 
iam P. Judd, assistant cashier. In 1895, a 
liandsome brick and stone building was 
erected for the bank ; in the center of the 
building is the large safe and vault, and also 
the deposit drawers; in the rear is the di- 
rectors' room, while in the front is a private 
office; the interior is finished with quartered 
oak, presenting a very neat appearance, and 
the building throughout is heated with hot 
water and lighted by both electric lights and 
gas. 

Mr. Hughes was married June 18, 1878, to 
Miss Katherine M. Colbath, a daughter of J. 
A. Colbath, of Lima, Ohio, and they are the 
proud parents of three children, namely : 
Clarence L., corresponding clerk in the 
Columbia National Bank, of Pittsburg, Pa. ; 
Margaret, who is a student at Beaver College ; 
and Dorothy. Fraternally, our subject is a 
member of the F. & A. M., of Lima, Ohio, 
No. 205 ; Chapter No. 49 ; Shawnee Com- 
mandery, No. 14, and is past commander of 
the same ; he is also a member of the K. of P. 
lodge, of Lima, Ohio. Religiously, he and 
his family are Presbyterians. During the 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



short period Mr. Hughes has been a member 
of the community, he has, by his courteous 
manners and superior business abihty, won 
hosts of friends, who greatly esteem and re- 
spect him for his sterling worth; he is well 
read and intelligent, and fulfills all the obliga- 
tions of a dutiful citizen. 



tLEXANDER T. FORSYTH, a prom- 
inent citizen of the borough of Baden, 
^.— -Beaver county, Pa., is a contractor 
of wide reputation, and has built many of the 
principal buildings in that section of the 
county. He was born in Allegheny county, 
Pa., in 1829, and received the ordinary in- 
struction of the public schools. 

Although his educational advantages were 
limited, he made the best of his opportun- 
ities, and has acquired a good degree of prac- 
tical knowledge by close observation and 
reading. He was taken from school at an 
early age to learn a trade, but continued to 
learn what he could in private. There were 
six children in the family, and they all studied 
out of the same old arithmetic. He adopted 
farming and followed that line of work until 
he reached his twentieth year, when he 
learned the trade of a carpenter, which he fol- 
lowed until 1852. He then removed to 
Beaver county, and subsequently to Wheel- 
ing, West Virginia, where he worked in a sash 
and door factory until 1861. Owing to the 
central situation of Wheeling, there was a 
division of sentiment on the war question, 



which resulted in a depressing effect on all 
kinds of business. He then began contract- 
ing for himself at Baden, Beaver county. Pa., 
and has since been one of the most prominent 
men of that place. His first contract was to 
build the Lutheran church, in which he has 
always been a most earnest worker, and he 
has since had the contracting of all the prin- 
cipal buildings in that locality. He recently 
completed a church in Braddock, Pa., and 
now has a school building in course of con- 
struction at Remington, Pa. He is also agent 
for Dr. Daly, of Pittsburg, and has the man- 
agement of his real estate interests in this dis- 
trict. He has always been a popular citizen 
of the borough, and served in the first council 
after its incorporation. He has since served 
as school director and councilman, and was 
burgess for four years. He was then elected 
justice of the peace, an office he is now filling 
for his third term. He has always given good 
satisfaction in this capacity, his aim being 
rather to keep people from litigation than to 
increase his own revenues by promoting it. 
That his policy is appreciated was forcibly 
demonstrated at the last election. He ran on 
the Democratic ticket, and out of a voting list 
of 100, he only received an opposing vote of 
seven. This is all the more remarkable when 
the fact is taken into consideration that the 
county is strongly Republican. 

Mr. Forsyth was united in marriage with 
Sarah J. Romigh, and they became the par- 
ents of three children, namely: James F., a 
foreman in the tin-plate mill ; William Taylor, 
now working in the oil fields ; and Walter A., 





REV. WILLIAM G. TAYLOR, D. D. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



who is with Jones & Company, of Pittsburg. 
Mrs. Forsyth died on her thirty-eighth birth- 
day, and the subject of our sketch subse- 
quently formed a second union, with Mary J. 
Sickles, to whom have been born three chil- 
dren: George, weigh master in the tin-plate 
mills; Alma; and Margaret. Mr. Forsyth is a 
very active member of the Lutheran church 
and for thirty-seven years was superintendent 
of the Sunday School. He is also a deacon 
of tlie church. 




|EV. WILLIAM G. TAYLOR, D. D., 
of Beaver, Pennsylvania, whose por- 
trait appears on the opposite 
page, has done as much to advance the edu- 
cation, elevate the morals, and give prosperity 
to the people under his charge as any other 
man in Western Pennsylvania. It is appro- 
priately and truly said of him that "he loves 
to undertake things others are afraid to touch, 
and with pluck, tact, labor, patience and per- 
severance, succeeds." His intellectual facul- 
ties are uncommonly clear, forcible, and pow- 
erful, rendering him a superb organizer; his 
reasoning is clear and right to the point. He 
possesses the happy faculty of making deep 
thoughts so plain that even the uneducated 
think them simple truths ; he is preeminently 
adapted to treat of moral and religious sub- 
jects, and is a natural theologian, minister, 
Sabbath school and Bible class teacher. In 
fact, he is an expounder of moral truths, and 
is peculiarly fortunate in making appro- 
priate and happy illustrations. These char- 



acteristics of Dr. Taylor make him a natural 
educator of the young. He is not a bargain 
driver, but is capable of prompt and instant 
comprehension of the facts involved in active 
business matters of any kind, and is most 
likely to succeed. He is a keen judge of 
human nature, and can lay plans and think for 
others, attending to a great variety of afifairs 
simultaneously, with rapidity and ease, and 
apparently without the least confusion. Dr. 
Taylor is of Scotch-Irish origin, and is a son 
of James and Margaret Taylor. He was born 
at Pittsburg, Pa., March 3, 1820, and had nine 
brothers, six of whom died in infancy. The 
other three lived to advanced age ; one, a half 
brother, was Rev. J. B. Walker, D. D., an 
author of note ; the other two were successful 
and prominent manufacturers and merchants 
of Pittsburg, for over forty years. Dr. Taylor 
also had three sisters who reached old age. 

The father of the subject hereof was one of 
the Irish patriots who settled in Pittsburg, in 
1798. He was a druggist, and was most 
anxious to have Wiiliam G. succeed him in 
that business, and began training his son while 
yet in childhood for that purpose. James 
Taylor was ambitious, however, beyond his 
strength; and his career was cut short by 
death in August, 1827. Thus the education 
and training of William G. was left entirely 
to his mother. 

Mrs. Taylor, although a woman who pos- 
sessed only the common education of those 
days, had a vigorous and poetical mind, plenty 
of good common sense, devout piety, and im- 
plicit trust in God. She was a strict discipli- 



260 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



narian, and rigidly enforced the rules of obe- 
dience, industry and study. She believed that 
the youth sliould have plenty of work, study, 
and play, — leaving no time for idleness, and 
bad habits. These inculcations developed, in 
time, into the fixed habits, the untiring in- 
dustry and studiousness and the unconquer- 
able energy, which characterized Dr. Taylor 
in his manhood. During the intervals be- 
tween school-terms he was kept at work in 
some business house from the time he was 
nine years old, and at a later period in life 
he always found employment readily in such 
concerns, during his college and seminary va- 
cations. He loved to teach and excelled in 
discipline; his versatility of talent, education, 
and training, fitted him for the ministry, tlie 
educator's task, and for the arena of business. 

Dr. Taylor left the manufacturing and mer- 
cantile life in Pittsburg, in which he was en- 
gaged as a partner and business manager, to 
finish his education, and to prepare himself 
for the ministry, with the view of laboring 
among the churches which were unable to pay 
a full salary or were broken down, or involved 
in some kind of difliculty. For this unusual 
department of church work he felt that he had 
an especial adaptation, and his invariable suc- 
cess proved that he was not mistaken in his 
calling. 

The subject of this biography graduated at 
Jefiferson College (now Washington and Jef- 
ferson) in 1847, sn<^ took a full course in the 
Western Theological Seminary, from which 
he graduated in 1849. He was licensed to 
preach the Gospel by the Presbytery of Pitts- 



burg, in April, 1848, and was ordained by the 
same presbytery as an evangelist in April, 
1849, with a view of laboring among the 
broken down, feeble churches, or those un- 
able to support a pastor, or working in new 
fields. 

He was invited to become assistant-editor 
of the Prairie Herald Publishing Company, 
of Chicago, Illinois. This company published 
two religious weeklies, and worked off on 
their small power press two dailies, and one 
monthly, and two quarterly, journals. In 
connection with the company was a book- 
store, in which Dr. Taylor found additional 
employment ; he also assisted the pastor of 
the Third Presbyterian church in his pastoral 
duties as the latter was in feeble health. The 
intense labor occasioned by his various duties, 
together with an attack of chills and fever, 
finally broke down his health and he sought 
rest in assuming charge of a small New Eng- 
land congregation ; but the chills and fever 
continued and at last compelled him to go 
back to Pittsburg, his native city. 

On his return, he commenced his work on 
unbroken ground, at Mt. Washington, on the 
hill above South Pittsburg, assuming charge 
of that field, in April, 1851. Thei-e a good 
Sabbath school was organized, and the foun- 
dation laid for a flourishing church. About 
that time, the Presbyterian church of Beaver, 
having declined from one hundred and ninety- 
six members to forty-two, gave Dr. Taylor a 
call, for half time. He accepted the charge, 
devoting his full time, however, as that was 
necessary in order to insure success. A 



BEAVER COUNTY 



261 



neighboring church of three hundred mem- 
bers, all active, zealous workers, was gath- 
ering into its folds, as many as possible who 
formerly belonged to the Presbyterian church. 
But vmder the labors of Dr. Taylor and his 
faithful few, a reaction took place in favor of 
the old church, its edifice was handsomely re- 
paired, and in the course of four years its con- 
gregation and membershp were increased one- 
half, and a good Sabbath school was organ- 
ized. The church of Tarentum had been in 
trouble for several years, and needed special 
labor; there was some discord, and difficulty 
in raising the salary, although for only half 
time, as the Bull Creek church raised the 
other half, — the same minister serving both 
flocks. The calls for Dr. Taylor to assume 
these charges being unanimous, were ac- 
cepted by him,^ and he entered upon his work. 
Soon harmony was restored and a missionary 
point at Natrona was added to this field. In 
four and a half years, each of these churches 
was enabled to command the full services of 
a pastor, and one of them was able to build a 
parsonage. This ended the necessity for Dr. 
Taylor's labors in that sphere. 

His next field was at Mount Carmel, Penn- 
sylvania. This church had been without a 
pastor for twenty years, and lacked unity, 
and ability to support a pastor half of the 
time. Commencing in May, 1861, Dr. Taylor 
gave his full attention to this charge, restoring 
harmony, and very soon bringing the church 
into better condition; he remained there for 
four years. In 1865, the pastor of North 
Branch church left, and Dr. Taylor took that 



place for his extra service, in order to unite 
the two churches in one pastoral charge to 
support a pastor. Soon these churches were 
prepared to make a call for full time, and, his 
work in them being done, were placed in the 
hands of Rev. R. J. Cummings, D. D., with 
a salary of $1,000. Soon the church was able 
to build a fine new church edifice at New Shef- 
field, near the old church. 

His next field of labor was the old dis- 
banded church of Concord, on Southern ave- 
nue, now Pittsburg, Pa. With eleven 
Christian workers and no Sabbath school, 
he commenced work and succeeded in build- 
ing and paying for a new church and Sabbath 
school rooms, and establishing a Sabbath 
school which enrolled two hundred and fifty 
pupils in four years, with a good library. 

For ten and one-half years, Dr. Taylor was 
principal and chaplain to the Soldiers' Orphan 
School, and preached twice every Sunday. 
This was the great work which has made him 
famous as an organizer, educator and char- 
acter builder, and was done in connection 
with the Phillipsburg Soldiers' Orphan 
School, an institution practically established 
by his efforts. The labors performed by him 
in connection with this school will be briefly 
described at the close of this sketch. 

On April 15, 1849, Dr. Taylor was united 
in marriage with Charlotte Thompson, a 
daughter of John and Mary Thompson, of 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania. This estimable and 
thoroughly educated lady and devoted wife, 
has been a valuable companion and assistant 
to him in filling his various charges. Their 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



home was rendered doubly attractive and 
happy by the addition of the following chil- 
dren : Mary M. ; Charlotte E. ; James W. ; El- 
len S. ; John T., and Harvey J. Mary M. is 
the widow of C. Martin, a lawyer. They had 
three children, namely: WilHam T., Erwin 
S., and Charlotte E. Charlotte E., the second 
daughter, now deceased, was the wife of T. L. 
Kerr. James W. is a machinist, of Beaver, 
Pa. Ellen S. is the wife of William J. Stewart. 
They have three children: William J., Her- 
bert T., and Ethel T. Mr. Stewart is a stock- 
holder and superintendent of the Fallston Fire 
Clay Company. John T. is a capitalist and 
real estate dealer, of Monaca. He married 
Ida M. McDonald and has four children : 
Jean K., Vera, William G., Jr., and Ida M. 
Harvey J. married Hester L. Potter, and has 
two children: James S., and Harold A. Dr. 
Taylor owns, perhaps, the finest modern 
house in Beaver. It was built in 1897 and 
1898, and is situated on East Third street. 
His former home was built in 1854, and is near 
his present residence. He also owns several 
other houses in Beaver. He values money 
for its use only; he is regarded as a man of 
great wealth, all of which has been made in 
a legitimate business way, and not by spec- 
ulation, or the neglect of his professional call- 
ing. As early as 1847, he commenced mak- 
ing investments in real estate, and his close 
economy gave him means for any good in- 
vestment which his keen foresight pronounced 
good. He has always been a liberal giver, is 
public-spirited, and has assisted others to pros- 
perity. It was principally in this way that 



his handsome competency was secured. His 
observation and experience are to the effect 
that moral character, integrity, temperance, 
courtesy, industry, economy, value of time, 
and public spirit are the highest way to suc- 
cess in Hfe. 

From boyhood. Dr. Taylor took strong 
grounds on the temperance, the Sabbath, and 
anti-slavery, as well as religious, questions. 
He felt from his anti-slavery views, as well as 
for the unity of the government, a deep inter- 
est in the Civil War, and immediately after the 
firing upon Fort Sumter (in fact, the same 
evening), he commenced recruiting for the 
conflict. He was deeply interested in the 
great work of the Christian commissions at 
home and in the field. The Beaver county 
commission, of which ex-Chief-Justice 
Agnew was chairman, placed Dr. Taylor in 
charge of the work in Beaver county. Dr. 
Boardman, the United States secretary of the 
commission, made the statement that Beaver 
county was the banner county of the Union 
in the ratio of its population to the amount 
raised. Dr. Taylor's labor in this capacity 
was entirely gratuitous. His enterprising 
spirit, courage and foresight prepared him 
to take the risk of progress and improvement. 

The subject of this biography was one of 
the seven who met at the call of Mr. Nelson 
to organize the Beaver County Agricultural 
Society. He was also one of the principal 
organizers of the Beaver Female College and 
Musical Institute. With Prof. Blees, he was 
the first to publicly advocate the necessity for 
a county superintendent of public schools, 



BEAVER COUNTY 



263 



and conducted the first teachers' institute for 
Hon. Thomas Nicholson, the first county 
superintendent of Beaver county. He and 
Mr. Mair, of Rochester, Pa., were the orig- 
inators of the Sabbath School Institute, and 
held the first institute in Rochester, and the 
second in the East Liberty Presbyterian 
church, Pittsburg. These annual institutes 
are now generally held. He was for years a 
member of the Prison Society of Western 
Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Taylor served as director of the Third 
National Bank, and also of the Germania 
Savings Bank, of Pittsburg, and is a trustee 
of the Western Theological Seminary, of Alle- 
gheny, Pennsylvania. He earnestly pressed 
the necessity for, and the claims of, the Pitts- 
burg & Lake Erie R. R., when that company 
was securing the right of way and stock sub- 
scriptions. He was also a director of the 
Freedom & Beaver Street Railway. 

Dr. Taylor has a very large and well select- 
ed library; books on theology, biblical criti- 
cism, commentaries, practical religion, con- 
troversial, a large reference library, works on 
metaphysical subjects, on science and philoso- 
phy, physiology, biography, history and many 
miscellaneous works. He has given at vari- 
ous times over 1,000 volumes to other libra- 
ries and individuals. 

HISTORY OF PHILLIPSBURG SOLDIERS' ORPHAN 
SCHOOL. 

This was a new and most difficult field 
which opened for the labors of Dr. Taylor. 
The county superintendents of Beaver, Alle- 



gheny and Washington counties, together 
with Colonel Quay, recommended Dr. Tay- 
lor's appointment as principal, to open the 
first regular and exclusively soldiers' orphan 
school in Western Pennsylvania. Many 
friends of the Union and of the soldiers' 
orphans, knowing the Doctor's fitness for 
work of the kind, urged him to accept the 
trust. But there were very serious difficul- 
ties in the way, namely : The state would 
provide neither ground, buildings, books nor 
furniture ; the uncertainty of the necessary ap- 
propriations was another obstacle; it would 
require $20,000 for the purchase of farm, 
buildings, furniture, house supplies, school 
room, books, and apparatus, etc. ; the small 
amount allowed each orphan for board, cloth- 
ing, schooling, books, etc., was insufficient. 
This amount was according to age, — for those 
under ten years of age, $115 per year, and for 
those from ten years of age to sixteen, $150 
per year. This was all the allowance made to 
meet all demands, including those of teachers, 
employees and medical attention. The work of 
caring for one hundred and fifty orphans 
would require twenty assistants, to be paid, 
also, out of this amount. 

These obstacles made considerable risk in 
the undertaking, but Dr. Taylor took the risk 
and succeeded. It was difficult to obtain a 
suitable location in the congressional district. 
At last the former "Water-cure," later used 
as a summer resort, was purchased. It was 
repaired and refurnished throughout, and was 
enlarged by a dwelling 34 by 44 feet; girls' 
hall, 20 by 41 feet, with high ceiling, — the hall 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



including laundry, bakery and additional 
cook room; an additional building, a school 
room, 27 by 44 feet; a boys' hall, 24 by 46 
feet ; and a chapel, 26 by 46 feet. In addition 
to this, 210 acres of land was purchased, — the 
plant costing in all $48,000. This amount 
was all furnished by Dr. Taylor. This made 
literally a family home. 

The next difficulty was to obtain and train 
teachers and help for this new and peculiar 
work, which required some time and changes. 
All the buildings were handsomely and taste- 
fully furnished, as taste is essential to culture 
in girls and boys. Tlie music rooms were 
carpeted with Brussels carpet and furnished 
with chairs, and a piano and organ, and the 
chapel was provided with an organ. 

EDUCATIONAL. 

The state prescribed eight grades as the ex- 
tent of the educational course. To this Dr. 
Taylor found he could add four grades of a 
matliematical and scientific course, and one- 
fourth of the orphans were able to finish these 
four grades. The average annual progress of 
the school, on examination of the state com- 
mittee, was one and five-eighths grades, while 
one-third made two grades, and an average 
standing of from 92 to 95. No one was pro- 
moted unless his or her standing was at 
least 75. 

HYGIENE. 

The laws of health and life were practically 
understood and carried out by Dr. Taylor, 
as the result shows. Food was given for bone- 



making, muscle, nerve, and brain. All cloth- 
ing was fitted and adapted, perfect cleanliness 
of body, house, school rooms and work houses 
was required, and out-houses were thoroughly 
ventilated and supplied with an abundance 
of light. The following regulations were en- 
forced : Nine hours of regular sleep ; two 
hours of moderate, but diligent, work on fixed 
details; two hours of exercise, play or amuse- 
ment, and, for boys, one hour of military 
drill, morning and evening; clean, warm feet; 
good shoes with common-sense heels, fitted 
by Dr. Taylor personally. Thus six hundred 
orphans were cared for, and it may be men- 
tioned that two hundred of them required 
medical attention, on being received. Only 
four of the six hundred died in ten years, and 
three of these were incurables. All the rest, 
on examination by the state surgeon at the 
time of their discharge when sixteen years old, 
received the grading of "100," as to health, — 
with the exception of one thought to be in- 
curable, who was marked "95," — and she is 
now in perfect health. 

INDUSTRY. 

With the aid of his excellent and well edu- 
cated wife, his constant and efficient assist- 
ant, who was the recipient of a remarkable 
domestic training in all the branches of house- 
keeping and household economics, Dr. Taylor 
was able to originate a system of industrial de- 
tails of labor, and to have recitations daily in 
classes under competent teachers, for thirty 
days in each department. By this method 
each ijirl in the institution, without losing a 



BEAVER COUNTY 



265 



recitation in school, acquired an intelligent 
system and practical knowledge of the do- 
mestic work, such as scrul^bing, washing, 
ironing, house-cleaning, dining-room work, 
cooking, baking, mending, darning, plain 
family sewing and fine dressmaking, all of 
which work was subject to the daily inspec- 
tion of either Mrs. Taylor or the Doctor. 
Every room and department was open for 
the scrutiny of visitors daily, except Sunday, 
from 8 a. m. to 5 p. m., and all visitors were 
furnished with a guide to accompany them. 
All the surroundings and training in the work 
department were designed to form and con- 
firm habits of system, to instil industry, refine 
the tastes and manners, and give beauty and 
ease to the person. These results can not be 
secured without regular habits of industry. 
The effects of this culture and training mani- 
fested themselves everywhere — in private, in 
public, at church, and in their success and in- 
fluences in after-life. 

MORAL, RELIGIOUS, AND GENERAL 
INSTRUCTION. 

Dr. Taylor had a Bible class of all the 
scholars and employees of the institution, and 
also of his own family. He preached Sabbath 
morning, he taught the Sabbath school in 
the afternoon, and lectured in the evening on 
religious biography, Bible history, and archae- 
ology. During the week, he also gave table 
talks each day, — talks about ten minutes in 
length on some subject, historical, moral, or 
economical, — on government, on passing 
events, or on incidents that occurred in school. 



In addition to this, teachers of the institu- 
tion were required, in evenings and on the 
Sabbath, to read, for the benefit of the schol- 
ars, an average of seventy-five volumes per 
year. By this method, their intelligence was 
increased, and their conscience educated to 
become the guiding and controlling motor of 
their lives and conduct. Dr. Wickersham, 
state superintendent of public instruction in 
Pennsylvania, in writing to Dr. Taylor about 
the institution, said : "I read, twice a year, the 
history of the fifty boys and girls you wrote 
at my request, and it seems to me you have 
found out the true secret of elevating our 
race." Each teacher was required to be a 
model to the scholars. Dr. Taylor's success 
in giving education, culture, self-control and 
good habits to his scholars, is commented on 
in the report of Prof. Beamer's lecture in the 
M. E. church ; he said, in conclusion : "In my 
entire experience as a public lecturer, travel- 
ing through the United States, Canada, and 
Europe, I have never seen such perfect de- 
velopment of the physical organization as 
there is in the entire body of the children of 
the Phillipsburg Soldiers' Orphan School, un- 
der the care of Dr. Taylor, and as is presented 
tonight by the one hundred and fifty boys 
and girls here present. I have never seen in 
my experience on both continents, such per- 
fect discipline and order as is here shown to- 
night by these attentive children, whose happy 
countenances testify that this discipline is the 
result of proper government, and not of fear. 
As a soldier of the war that made them 
orphans, I am happy to meet them, and 



266 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



thrice happy in seeing their home, their train- 
ing, their education, and their preparation and 
prospects for usefulness in life." 




jATTHEW NICKLE. The Book of 
Biographies of Beaver County 
would certainly be incomplete if 
mention were not made of the gentleman 
named above, a highly respected citizen and 
one of the wealthiest farmers in the county. 
His life has been one of industry, and he is 
now spending its declining years in the happy 
enjoyment of the fruit of his toil, on the old 
family homestead in Green township. He 
was born on July 7, 1822, in Hanover town- 
ship, Beaver county, and is a son of David 
and Mary (Morrow) Nickle. David Nickle, 
the father of Matthew, came from Scotland, 
in 1820, and located in Hanover tov.nship, 
Beaver county, Pa., upon the farm on which 
the latter was born. He purchased that prop- 
erty and lived upon it two years, and then 
for a time rented another farm. He bought 
a farm in the northern corner of Hanover 
township, consisting of one hundred acres, 
which was left to his son, David, and is now 
owned by a son of the latter. He erected a 
fine house and barns, and cleared most of the 
land, devoting the closing period of his life 
to sheep-raising. He died in March, 1847, 
aged sixty-six years, and his wife died in 1872, 
at the age of seventy-two. While a resident 
of Scotland he married Mary Morrow, and 
five children were born to them before com- 



ing to this country, namely : James ; George ; 
William ; David ; and Elizabeth. Thereafter 
three children were born: Matthew; Alex- 
ander; and Margaret. They are all deceased 
but the subject hereof. 

Matthew Nickle was born on the first land 
purchased by his father and continued to live 
with his parents until he reached the age of 
twenty-three, although previously to that time 
he rented and cultivated a farm ov/ned by his 
father. Upon his father's demise he became 
possessed of a portion of his estate, and has 
since made his home upon it. During the oil 
excitement, he leased his property, and 
realized large returns. He is a self-made man 
in every particular, as a boy being industrious 
and ambitious. He improved his condition 
in life steadily and grew to be one of the most 
influential agriculturists in the district, own- 
ing at the present time some five hundred 
and fifty acres of rich farm land. In 1867, he 
erected a handsome residence, which is well- 
arranged and appropriately furnished, and 
also put up fine barns and out-buildings. 
While he has attained more than ordinary 
success in his life's work, he has at all times 
been most liberal with his money, — lifting 
many of his less fortunate fellow men tO' their 
feet when in distressing circumstances. He is 
of a modest and retiring disposition, and 
would have his charitable acts overlooked, 
but his numerous friends, who have known 
him so well for many years, delight in telling 
of his generosity. Being a man of good char- 
acter and pleasing habits, and a clever con- 
versationalist, he is very popular. 




WILLIAM IRWIN BEBOUT. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



In 1847, lie married Margaret Patterson, by 
whom he had nine children, four of whom are 
now living, namely : Thomas F., who lives on 
the home farm ; Alexander, who lives in Liver- 
pool, where he is employed as a clerk in Rob- 
ert Hall's lumber yard; Margaret R., who 
lives with her father ; and William, who, when 
an infant, was adopted by Alexander and 
Mary Scott, of Ohio. Mrs. Nickle was called 
to her eternal home in 1868, and Mr. Nickle 
formed a second union, with Jane Hall, nee 
Bigger, who is also deceased". Politically, Mr. 
Nickle was formerly a Democrat, but is now 
a supporter of the Prohibition party. He is 
an elder of the U. P. church, and it was 
through him that the present fine church of 
that denomination was erected. 



^^rjN /^ILLIAM IRWIN BEBOU' 
Vfey prietor of a large general sti 
'^ '^ Darlington, Pa., whose portr; 



JT, pro- 
store in 
portrait we 

present on the preceding page, has been found 
at the same stand for the past twenty-seven 
years. He deals in drugs, hardware, gro- 
ceries, harness, paints, house furnishings, tin, 
granite, and enamel ware. Mr. Bebout was 
born in Mercer county. Pa., July 25, 1843. He 
is a son of Ellis and Olivia (Campfield) Be- 
bout, and grandson of Peter Bebout. 

Peter Bebout was a native of Green county, 
Pa., but at an early dale removed to Mercer 
county, where he bought two hundred acres 
of wild land. After clearing a portion of it, 
he built a house and barn, and followed farm- 
ing all his life. 



Ellis Bebout, father of the subject hereof, 
was born in Mercer county, where he received 
his scholastic training. He afterward assisted 
his father on the farm ; one hundred acres of 
the homestead farm were given him as his 
share of the estate. He married Olivia Camp- 
field. Olivia was born in Mercer, where she 
was also educated. The following seven chil- 
dren were born to them : John C, who was 
killed in the army when twenty-one; Wesley 
S., a merchant in Mercer county; William 
Irwin, the subject of these lines; Al- 
fred S., a retired merchant ; Andrew 
J., a merchant, of Pittsburg. Pa. ; Eliz- 
abeth Jane (Hewett) ; and Mary A. Ellis 
Bebout was a Whig. He was a member of 
the M. E. church, of which he was Sunday 
school superintendent for years. He died 
in 1852, at the early age of thirty-eight years, 
and was survived by his widow until 1896 
when she, too, crossed the river of death. 

William Irwin Bebout was mentally in- 
structed in the public schools, which he at- 
tended constantly until he attained the age 
of seventeen years. He then enlisted in the 
Union Army, September 2, 1861 ; he entered 
Company B, 76th Reg., Pa. Zouaves, and 
participated in the following battles : Pocotal- 
igo, Fort Wagner and Strawberry Plains. He 
was engaged in the siege of Petersburg, in 
Butler's and Grant's campaigns in Virginia, 
in connection with the Mine Explosion, and 
other historical events. He was honorably 
discharged November 30, 1864. He was 
severely wounded by a gun shot at Fort 
Wagner, July 11, 1863. He was in the hos- 



270 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



pital at Hilton Head for about nine months. 
While there, he was treated not only for his 
wound, but for lung and heart ailments and 
for neuralgia. At Botany Bay Isle, he was 
treated for laryngitis for several weeks. Mr. 
Bebout's brother, John C, was in the same 
company, and was killed while on picket duty 
at James Island, June 15, 1862. 

Mr. Bebout was joined in marriage April 2. 
1872, with Margaret M. McConnell. Mrs. 
Bebout was a native of Mercer county. Pa., 
where she was born, February 8, 1847. She 
was a daughter of Henry and Julia A. (Bruce) 
McConnell. Her primary education was re- 
ceived at her native place. Afterward, she 
entered Edinboro State Normal School, from 
which she hoped to graduate. Ill-health pre- 
vented this, however, compelling her to leave 
the institution. To Mr. Bebout and his ami- 
able wife, one child, Anna Maude, was born ; 
her birth occurring in Darlington, in Sep- 
tember, 1873. After preliminary schooling 
she took a finishing course at Darlington 
Academy. From the time of the death of her 
beloved mother, in 1889, Anna Maude kept 
house for her father until her marriage with 
Mr. S. S. Leiper, of Darlington. 

After the war, the subject of this sketch 
engaged in farming for one year and then 
for several years was a carpenter. He subse- 
quently clerked awhile for his brother, who 
was a druggist. In 1872, he purchased Dr. 
Ball's business and started a drug store at his 
present location in Darlington. At a late 
date he added the lines previously mentioned, 
and enjoys a liberal patronage. As a business 



man he is exceedingly popular. In politics, 
Mr. Bebout is a Republican. He has served 
in the borough council for several terms, and 
is still a member of that honorable body. He 
is in accord with the United Presbyterian 
church. Fraternally, he is enrolled as a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F., of Sharpsville, Penn- 
sylvania. 




J. FAIR, the genial proprietor of a 
large general store at Smith's Ferry, 
Ohio township, has perhaps one of 
the best arranged and splendidly stocked 
country stores in Beaver county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Some time ago, Mr. Fair purchased 
the general store of T. L. Minesinger, at 
Smith's Ferry, and has since carried on a very 
successful business. This store is orderly in 
all its arrangements, and contains a large and 
very complete stock of groceries, hardware, 
house furnishings, cutlery, patent medicines, 
feed, dry goods, notions, boots and shoes, 
hats and caps, clothing, gent's furnishings, 
crockery, harness, ploughs, liarrows, and all 
kinds of farm implements. Mr. Fair is spe- 
cial agent for Johnston's Harvester Com- 
pany's machinery, and carries in stock a 
thousand and one things necessary in a coun- 
try store. 

S. J. Fair was born in Armstrong county, 
Pa., in September, 1866. He is a son of 
Philip and Nancy J. (Gregg) Fair, and grand- 
son of John and Susannah (Christman) Fair. 
John Fair was born in Armstrong county, 
Pa., in 1804. He was a descendant of a prom- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



211 



inent German family, that settled in Arm- 
strong county in early days. They bought a 
good-sized farm of forest land. After making 
a clearing, they built a log house and barns: 
a part of this farm, — 240 acres of improved 
land, — was left to the different members of 
the family. John Fair was instructed in the 
schools of his native county, but, as was un- 
avoidable in those early days, his schooling 
was limited. However, he made the most of 
Ids opportunities. He learned the art of till- 
ing the soil on the old homestead, which he 
eventually owned. His^ marriage with Susan- 
nah Christman resulted in the birth of four 
children, namely: William; Philip; Cham- 
bers, who was killed in the Civil War, while 
serving as drummer; and Susannah (Yerty). 
John Fair followed general farming until his 
death, in 1888. 

Philip Fair, father of the subject of this 
biography, was born February 26, 1832, in 
Armstrong county, Pa., one-half mile from 
the birthplace of S. J., his son. He became a 
very fair scholar and after leaving school, 
learned the trade of a stone mason. He 
worked for his father until he attained the age 
of twenty-four years. He then bought a farm 
of sixty-five acres which he cultivated, but still 
continued to live with his parents until his 
marriage, in i860. He was joined in matri- 
mony with Nancy J. Gregg. Nancy was 
born May 2, 1840, and was a daughter of 
George Gregg. Eight children resulted from 
this union, viz: Harvey, a blacksmith; 
George, a merchant; Annie (Hellam) ; S. J., 
subject of this sketch; Charles, an engineer; 



Ross, Barney, and Claude, the last three be- 
ing engaged in mercantile pursuits. After 
his sons grew up, Philip Fair left the care of 
the farm to them, and worked at his trade as 
stone mason. He followed that business as a 
contractor for about fifteen years. He was a 
Republican, but had no ambition for office. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church, of 
v.-hich he was an elder for fifteen years. His 
death occurred May 4, 1898. 

S. J. Fair attended public school and be- 
came quite proficient in all studies required in 
a business course. He assisted his father on 
the farm during summers, and acted as clerk 
in the general store of his uncle, John Fair, 
during the winter months. This was con- 
tinued until his twenty-first year. He then fol- 
lowed contracting and building at Leechburg, 
Pa., in partnership with one of his brothers. 
For two years they were very successful. Mr. 
Fair then sold his interest to his brother and 
retired from this line of work. In company 
with his brother George, he bought property 
and started a bakery and confectionery store. 
One year later, our subject sold his interest 
to his brother. Mr. Fair then went to Wil- 
liamsport, Lycoming county. Pa., and started 
a similar store, which he conducted for three 
years. In 1892, he sold his store in Williams- 
port and moved to New Brighton, Pa., where 
he opened a grocery store. He did a success- 
ful business there for over two years, but fin- 
ally sold out. He then invested in a dwelling 
house in New Brighton, which he rents. 
Soon after he purchased his present store and 
removed to Smith's Ferry. 



272 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Mr. Fair married Wildia McCracken. She 
was born in Armstrong county, in 1867, and is 
a daughter of James McCracken. One child, 
Margie Ethel, now brightens their home. She 
was born October 22, 1893. The subject of 
this narrative is a prominent stockholder in 
the Iron City Building & Loan Association. 
He is a Republican, but is too busy for poli- 
tical ambitions. He favors the Presbyterian 
church. Socially, he is allied with the 
Knights of Pythias. He is also a member of 
Glasgow Lodge, No. 485, F. & A. M., and is 
now passing through the chairs. 



,AVID G. PATTERSON, a progres- 
sive farmer of Beaver county. Pa., 
was born in Darlington township, in 
this county, on November 26, 1859. He is 
a son of Rev. Samuel Patterson, who was a 
native of Ireland, but came to America in 
company with his brothers, when fourteen 
years old. He located in Allegheny, Pa., and 
there received his primary education. Fie pur- 
sued a clerical course in Allegheny Theologi- 
cal Seminary, and was ordained a minister in 
the United Presbyterian church. He was 
given a pastorate at New Galilee, in 1849, ^ 
charge he held all his life. He took advan- 
tage of the opportunities of the locality, and 
purchased a farm, which he also managed in 
connection with his professional duties. He 
had one of the best farms in the county, and 
raised considerable stock, making a specialty 
of sheep and dairying. The tract he bought 




contained two hundred and seventy acres. 
Soon after purchasing, he made extensive im- 
provements, — tearing down the old house and 
replacing it with a fine country home, — a 
large brick residence, which commands one 
of the finest views of the Little Beaver Val- 
ley. The out-houses are in keeping with the 
nice dwelling, and speak volumes for the in- 
dustry and progressive nature of the family. 
The buildings are large and constructed on 
modern plans, presenting an ornamental as 
well as comfortable appearance. 

Mr. Patterson was always a busy man. In 
his younger days he taught school at the Dar- 
lington Academy; he also conducted a school 
in the basement of his church at New Galilee, 
and had a private school on his own farm. 
His business interests extended beyond that 
of farming; he was a large stockholder in the 
Little Beaver Woolen Co., and was for many 
years president of the company. His politi- 
cal belief was on the side of the Republican 
party, but he constantly refused to accept any 
ofifice. He was a public-spirited man and 
took an active interest in all things pertaining 
to the welfare of the community. He mar- 
ried Eliza J. Gilliland, a daughter of David 
Gilliland, a pioneer of Beaver county. They 
reared seven children : Jennie (McCready) ; 
John ; David G. ; Isabella ; Robert ; Samuel ; 
and Ada. 

David G. Patterson was a pupil of Darling- 
ton and Bridgewater academies. After re- 
ceiving his intellectual training, he returned 
to the farm and assisted his father in its man- 
agement. In a few years he and his brothers 




GEORGE W. DIXON. 



iBEAVER COUNTY 



275 



assumed the full care of the place, and he has 
continued in that connection until now. After 
his father's death the property was left to the 
heirs, but as yet the shares have not been al- 
lotted. The brothers operate a large dairy, — 
having at times as many as forty-five cows. 

Mr. Patterson is a member of the U. P. 
church. His poHtical affiliations are with the 
Republicans, and he has satisfactorily served 
as assessor, collector, and constable, for his 
townsmen. He is a stockholder in the cream- 
ery of his native place. 




^] ^EORGE W. DIXON, road master, 

^|- master mechanic, and train master of 

"the Pittsburg, Lisbon & Western R. 

R., whose portrait is shown on the opposite 

. page, resides in a pleasant cottage in New 

Galilee, Pa., and has spent the whole of his 

active life in railroad service. 

Mr. Dixon was born in Dalton, Luzerne 
county. Pa., March 26, 1852. He received a 
limited schooling there, being taken from 
school when ten years old. At that early age, 
he began to work on the railroad, carrying 
water for the section gang. When large 
enough, he commenced work on the section, 
and continued in that capacity until April, 
1869. After spending one year on the steam 
shovel, he was employed the year following 
on the D., L. & W. R. R. ; June 11, 1871, he 
was placed in charge of the track gang on the 
New Jersey Midland R. R. The track under 
his care was thirty-seven miles long. A short 



time afterward, he was appointed assistant 
road master on the same line. 

In June, 1874, Mr. Dixon commenced work 
on the New York Central R. R. and had 
charge of laying the tracks of the third and 
fourth lines on the Rochester and Syracuse 
division. The following year, however, he 
was induced to return to the New Jersey Mid- 
land R. R., where he was placed in charge of 
87 miles of track. He remained on that road 
until 1881; at that time he went to Warren, 
Pa., and accepted a position as superintendent 
of a construction train on the Western New 
York & Pennsylvania R. R., between War- 
ren and Salamanca. He held that important 
post until 1882. His next move was to en- 
gage with the road with which he is still con- 
nected. He was first superintendent of track- 
laying and overseeing the building of the road. 
When the road was completed, he was ap- 
pointed superintendent, which position he 
held until 1887. Later, the road changed 
hands and Mr. Dixon remained as conductor. 
In 1893, he was appointed to his present im- 
portant position as roadmaster, and has the 
entire charge of building tracks, bridges, loco- 
motives, and everything outside of general of- 
fice work. He is also master mechanic and 
train master. The subject of this record is a 
son of B. D. and Ruth A. (Calvin) Dixon, 
and grandson of John and Christiana (Ire- 
land) Dixon. 

John Dixon descended from an old Con- 
necticut family. When a young man he lo- 
cated in Luzerne county. Pa., where he bought 
100 acres of land. He followed farming all 



276 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



his life. His union with Christiana Ireland 
resulted in the birth of a large family of chil- 
dren, of whom Mr. Dixon's father was the 
second born. B. D. Dixon, this gentleman, 
was born in Dalton, Luzerne county. Pa., in 
October, 1826. After attending the public 
school, he learned how to till the soil, and 
followed that line of occupation until 1857, 
when he began railroad work. After working 
in the carpenter gang for a short time, he was 
promoted to be section foreman, and then to 
be supervisor, in charge of the track-laying 
gang. Ruth A. Colvin became his wife. She 
was a daughter of George Colvin, and was 
also born in Luzerne county, in 1824. Seven 
children resulted from this union. They are : 
Mary, now deceased ; Caroline (Waldron) ; 
Emily M. (Latimer) ; George W., the subject 
of this biography; Florence A. (McCullom) ; 
Frank; and John, who died in infancy. In 
poHtics, B. D. Dixon was a Democrat. Re- 
ligiously, he was an active member of the 
Baptist church. He died in 1885, but is still 
survived by his widow. 

George W. Dixon was joined in marriage 
with Margaret A. Poole, a fascinatine daugh- 
ter of \Mlliam Poole. Mrs. Dixon was born in 
Morris county, N. J., May 10, 1856. and re- 
ceived her mental training in the public school. 
Her marriage resulted in the birth of eight 
children, namely: Caroline A. (Beeson); 
Georgiana (Harris); Frank D. ; Mary (Mc- 
Cowin); Howard G. : Irene, a student; Nellie; 
and Cornelius. Mr. Dixon is faithful to the 
interests of the Republican party. He has 
served as school director and as a member of 



the council. He is a faithful member of the 
M. E. church. Socially, he is a member of 
Meridian Lodge, No. 411, F. & A. M., at 
Darlington, Pennsylvania. 



fOHN LAUGHLIN, a prosperous gro- 
cery merchant in the little town of 
— Glasgow, Beaver count}'. Pa., is justly 
regarded as a power in that place. During 
the whole of his active business career in their 
midst, the citizens of Glasgow have felt his 
enterprising spirit in all movements to ad- 
vance the welfare of the community. Mr. 
Laughlin is a native of Beaver county, where 
his birth occurred in 1834. He is a son of 
Robert Laughlin, a native of the same county, 
and grandson of Thomas Laughlin, a worthy 
pioneer. His great-grandfather was Thomas 
Laughlin, who married Sarah Simpson in 
1765, and they had five sons, as follows: 
Thomas ; James ; Robert ; John ; and William. 
After receiving a limited education in the 
pubhc schools, the gentleman whose name 
heads this sketch entered upon his career as 
cabin boy on the river. Shortly afterward, 
however, he rose to the position of steward, 
and was employed in that capacity with 
Charles Hurst, the well-known steamboat 
man of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In 1856, he 
resigned his position and went west to seek 
his fortune in California. After locating in 
Sacramento City, he established claims of his 
own and engaged in gold mining. In this 
venture, his fortune varied, although on the 



BEAVER COUNTY 



277 



whole he was fairly successful. After working 
his claims diligently for three years, Mr. 
Laughlin returned to the Keystone State, and 
invested considerable money in the Laughlin 
Steamboat Company. He acted as steward 
on one of the numerous boats owned by that 
company, and his brother was captain of the 
same boat. Our subject subsequently sold his 
interest in that company, resigning his posi- 
tion at the same time. He then accepted a 
position with the Brown Company, and re- 
mained in their employ until I073. Mr. 
Laughlin then retired from ri\er life, having 
followed that occupation fully twenty-five 
years. 

In 1887, the subject of our sketch built his 
present store in Glasgow, and started a gro- 
cery. Glasgow is located on the C. & P. 
R. R. near the Ohio River, and is 
the terminus of the C. & P. branch 
railroad, recently constructed to New 
Lisbon, Ohio. Mr. Laughlin went into busi- 
ness there during the oil excitement, and the 
place at that time boasted of five hundred 
inhabitants. The oil interests of the place 
were, however, then on the decline, and the 
town has gradually gone back to its present 
state. It is simply another illustration of the 
rise and decline that has characterized so 
many oil towns. But during all the fluctuat- 
ing fortunes of the town, our subject has re- 
mained at the same old stand where he has 
ever enjoyed a fair patronage. In addition 
to handling a fine line of staple and fancy 
groceries, he has also a choice stock of no- 
tions, patent medicines, hardware, confection- 



ery, flour and feed ; he deals also in tobacco 
and cigars. 

Jul}^ 19, i860, Mr. Laughlin was united 
in marriage with Priscilla Calhoun, a charm- 
ing daughter of James Calhoun, a well-known 
boat builder. Priscilla was born in Beaver 
county, where she also received her scholas- 
tic training. 

To the subject of this biography and his 
esteemed wife, have been born five children, 
all of whom received a practical education in 
the district schools. Their names are : 
Charles D., a plumber; James O., a ganger in 
the employ of the Standard Oil Co. ; Bertha 
M. (Childs) ; William, a prominent plumber 
in Rochester, Pa. ; and Abner L., who is also 
an expert plumber. Mr. Laughlin takes an 
active interest in the affairs of his town and 
is a prominent member of the Republican 
party. He has served as councilman and as 
school director. He resides in a fine resi- 
dence, beautifully located on the bank of the 
Ohio River. Mr. Laughlin worships at 
the M. E. church of which he is steward. He 
is exceedingly popular. 



f^AMES R. CAUGHEY, a miller resid- 
ing in Darlington, Pa., on the ances- 
tral homestead, was born in the same 

house which he now occupies, March 22, 

1 83 1. Lie is a son of James Caughey and a 

grandson of Samuel Caughey. 

Samuel Caughey was born in the eastern 

part of Pennsylvania, and went west to Bea- 



278 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ver county, settling near Hookstown, about 
the beginning of the present century. In 
1810, he moved to the farm where the subject 
of this memoir now Hves. About that time 
the Land Population Company began their 
attempt to dispossess the settlers of their land. 
This, naturally, caused alarm and indignation 
among the people. Finally, one member of 
the Company was shot by an irate settler, 
and when the Company realized what a 
hornet's nest they had brought about 
their ears, they were forced to sus- 
pend operations. When Samuel Caughey 
settled in Darlington, that place con- 
tained only one or two buildings. It was 
then called Greersburg, and is the oldest town 
in that section of the Keystone State. The 
old academy, which was built in 1802, was 
then only eight years old. It is now used as 
a depot by the P. L. & W. R. R. Company. 
Few settlers had then located in the district, 
and roads were far from numerous. The one 
extending in front of the residence of the 
subject of these lines was then the old stage 
line between Pittsburg and Cleveland, long 
before the advent of railroads in that vicinity. 
Mr. Caughey owned forty acres of land and, 
in 1812, built a grist mill, run by water power. 
This was one of the first mills in Beaver 
county, and was in the family for three gener- 
ations. It was operated until 1870, James 
R. Caughey's grandfather having spent all his 
life as a miller. He and his good wife reared 
five children, namely : Betsy (McGeorge) ; 
Polly (Hanna); Hetty (Duff); Samuel; and 
James. 



James Caughey, father of James R., was 
born in Octoraro, Pa., in 1782, and received 
the greater portion of his mental instruction 
in the eastern part of Pennsylvania. After 
leaving school, he assisted his father until the 
War of 1812 broke out. He took an active 
part in that conflict, serving under General 
Harrison at Fort Meigs. On returning from 
the war, he assisted his father in the milling 
business. Upon the death of that beloved 
parent, the mill became the property of James 
and his brother Samuel. They operated it in 
partnership until James purchased the inter- 
est of his brother. At first the mill was of the 
old-fashioned stone process type, and later had 
the Burr process. All kinds of grain and feed 
were ground. The capacity of the mill was 20 
barrels of flour and 150 bushels of chop daily. 
James Caughey was largely self-educated, but 
made the most of his opportunities, and was 
known to be a well-informed man. He was 
a discriminating reader and a clear thinker. 
He enlarged and enriched the library left him 
by his father. He was an Abolitionist of the 
most intense type. He was executor and ad- 
ministrator for several estates in the district, 
and served as school director and supervisor. 
He and his family were in accord with the 
Reformed Presbyterian faith. Margaret 
Johnston became his wife. She was reared 
and educated in Beaver county, and bore her 
husband four children, namely : S. G. ; James 
R., the subject of this sketch; Margaret, de-; 
ceased; and Jane, who still prefers single 
blessedness. 

James R. Caughey received his primary in- 




WILLIAM A. GARTSHORE. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



281 



struction in the public schools, and later grad- 
uated from the academy at Darlington. lie 
then assisted his father in the milling busi- 
ness and became an active partner. His pro- 
gressive nature made him quick to note and 
take advantage of any improvement in ma- 
chinery. He put in steam power in 1856, and 
doubled the capacity of the mill. August 28, 
1861, he enlisted in the "Roundhead," or 
looth Reg., Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was sec- 
ond lieutenant of his company, and was as- 
signed to duty in South Carolina, under Gen- 
eral Sherman. Exposure and the southern 
climate, caused him to contract malarial fe\-cr, 
and he was sent home as unfit for further 
service. As soon as he recovered his health 
he again, assumed his duties at the mill, which 
he continued to operate for years afterward. 
In 1876, he sold this mill and purchased a 
portable saw mill. For ten or twelve years 
he conducted that successfully, but finally sold 
it and started a chop mill, which he still runs. 

In 1865, Mr. Caughey was joined in mar- 
riage with Mary A. Johnston, an attractive 
daughter of Andrew Johnston. She was born 
in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. Three chil- 
dren, Paul, James G., and George, blessed this 
union. Paul learned blacksmithing, and is 
now working in the silver mines of Idaho. 
James G. is a competent engineer, and holds 
a good position in the silver mines in New 
Mexico, being employed in a stamping mill. 
George died at the age of twenty-one years. 

The old house occupied by the subject of 
this sketch was built in 1820, and is still in 
a good state of preservation. He built the 



present barns, and now does a little farming 
also. In politics, he works hard for the suc- 
cess of the Republican party, and has been 
supervisor for three terms. He cares noth- 
ing, however, for political distinction, and is 
not an office-seeker. He is an ex-member 
of the G. A. R., and unites in worship with 
the Reformed Presbyterians. 




ILLIAM A. GARTSHORE, a 
progressive and enterprising citizen 
of Aliquippa, Pa., whose portrait is 
shown on the preceding page, is superintend- 
ent of the J. C. Russell Shovel Company, one 
of the most flourishing establishments in 
Beaver county. It was one of the first plants 
to locate at Aliquippa, which is admirably sit- 
uated in the famous Beaver Valley and on the 
Ohio River, — extending to the tracks of the 
P. & L. E. R. R. It was organized in 1892 
by the gentleman named above, with others. 
The following are the officers : J. L. Cooper, 
president; William A. Gartshore, vice-presi- 
dent; E. H. King, secretary ; and J. J. McKee, 
treasurer. They manufacture shovels and 
drain tools of all kinds, which are shipped to 
all parts of the country. 

The process of shovel manufacturing is a 
very interesting one, and these works are of a 
modern type, the latest machinery and im- 
proved methods being employed under the 
personal supervision of Mr. Gartshore, who 
has had many years of experience in that line. 
In the main building, whose dimensions are 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



240x80 feet, all of the shovels are made. A 
solid bar of steel is heated and passed between 
rollers of great power, and there the first 
rough shape is made ; it is then pickled, placed 
in proper dies, where it is cut and trimmed to 
the proper shape, and then taken to the ma- 
chine which forces the handles on, and rivets 
them in place. They are then poHshed, taken 
to the shipping room, and thence sent to all 
parts of the world. While this meagre de- 
scription makes the process appear simple, the 
opposite impression is conveyed upon a visit 
to the factory. There the ponderous machin- 
ery with its immense fly wheels, rapidly revolv- 
ing rollers, gigantic presses, and intricate ma- 
chinery of various kinds, compels a respect for 
the shovel, which was not felt before seeing 
this useful implement in the course of manu- 
facture. Adjoining the mill is the machine 
shop, with its full equipment, and on its other 
side is the drying room which is used to dry 
handles. Mr. Gartshore, the gentleman in 
charge of this important plant, is a man of 
wide experience in his business. He is held in 
the highest esteem by the men under his su- 
pervision, and by his associates, and he de- 
ports himself toward everyone with the great- 
est kindness and consideration. 

The subject of this sketch was at one time a 
trusted employee of Hubbard & Company, of 
Pittsburg, Pa., and had charge of their shovel 
works, for a period of eight years. He faith- 
fully discharged his duties to the best of his 
ability, and it was with regret that they per- 
mitted him to resign, in 1892, when the J. C. 
Russell Shovel Company was organized. He 



became vice-president, and a director, of the 
company, and has put forth his every efifort 
to make the venture a successful one. 

In September, 1888, Mr. Gartshore was 
united in marriage with Miss Laura Dunhorn, 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. They have two 
children, — Laura and Park. 




AMUEL LEVINE, a gentleman 
who by means of the superior facul- 
ties with which he is endowed by na- 
ture, has worked his way from a lowly sta- 
tion in life to one of prominence in his com- 
munity, is proprietor of the leading general 
store in Aliquippa, Hopewell township, Bea- 
ver county, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Levine was born in Poland, Russia, in 
1 86 1, and got his education there in the public 
schools, after which he assisted his father, who 
was a commission merchant, until he was old 
enough to go into business for himself. He 
came to this country in 1886, landing in the 
city of New York with but twenty cents. 
Thrifty and ambitious, he immediately set to 
work, and what he has since acquired has been 
due exclusively to his own industrious efforts. 
It is a boast which he may well feel proud to 
make, that he has never worked for another, 
but has always been his own "boss." Re- 
maining in New York City but two months, 
he went to Troy, N. Y., and purchased a horse 
and wagon, — becoming an itinerant mer- 
chant. He carried the thousand and one 
things for which there is a demand in the 



BEAVER COUNTY 



283 



country, and worked up a very successful bus- 
iness, at which he continued until he settled in 
Aliquippa, when that town was first started. 
He has a splendid business and the most com- 
plete line of merchandise carried by any dealer 
in the county. He purchased the two-story 
building which lie now occupies, and has di- 
vided it into three departments. The left 
wing is a fully stocked shoe store in the front, 
and the rear is used as a ware room. In the 
rear of the main store is the grocery depart- 
ment, and in front, the dry goods department. 
He is a man of great enterprise, and has en- 
deavored to equip his store with every article 
which his customers may demand, having a 
comprehensive line of dry goods, clothing, 
boots and shoes, hats and caps, hardware, 
house furnishings, notions, carpets, oil cloth, 
jewelry, tobacco and cigars, feed and seeds, 
millinery and gentlemen's furnishings, china 
and glassware, wall paper and tinware. He 
built his store seven years ago, and added the 
shoe store annex later. His efforts to please 
the people are being rewarded, as his patron- 
age is steadily increasing, and he is rapidly 
earning for himself the title of the most pro- 
gressive merchant in the borough. Besides 
this business, in which he employs five hands, 
he owns valuable building lots in Aliquippa. 
He has erected another two-story frame build- 
ing adjoining the old one, — the first floor, 50X 
20 feet, being used as a dry goods store, and 
the second floor, 58x24 feet, being devoted to 
tlie purposes of a public hall. 

In 1889, Mr. Levine and his wife, Rebecca, 
were married, and they have five children, two 



of whom are attending school. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the order of Odd Fellows. 
In politics, he is always ready to exercise his 
privilege as a citizen, but has never sought 
office. 



§OHN CONWAY, president of the John 
Conway Banking Co. ; president of the 
Keystone Tumbler Co., and at one time 
a leading dry goods merchant of Rochester, 
Beaver county. Pa., is, today, one of the most 
influential men in that thriving borough, and 
is notable for sound judgment and sterling in- 
tegrity. He has been a very successful busi- 
ness man, and his opinion in all matters per- 
taining to business and financial questions, is 
of great worth. Mr. Conway was born in 
Economy township, Beaver county, Pa., 
March 27, 1830, and is a son of Michael and 
Mary (O'Brien) Conway. 

Michael Conway was born in County 
Kerry, Ireland, and came to America in 1825. 
He located in Economy township, and 
bought 230 acres of partially cleared land on 
the bank of the river. There he built a log 
cabin, and later a frame house. The farm is 
now owned by John Conway and his sisters. 
He made many improvements on the place, 
and it became one of the best kept and most 
prosperous farms in that section. He mar- 
ried Mary O'Brien, who died at the age of 
seventy-eight, her husband dying when sixty- 
six years old. Their children were as follow: 
Abigail, deceased, who was the wife of James 
McGuire; Tliomas, deceased, who was a 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



farmer; James, attorney, who married Jane 
Sheldon, served as captain in Company H, 
139th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf., was wounded in the 
battle of the Wilderness, and later died from 
the effects of the wound ; John, the subject of 
this biography ; Joanna, who married Peter 
Ivory, of Perrysville ; and Mary, the widow of 
William Emery, of Indiana. 

John Conway, whose name heads this 
sketch, was reared on the farm, and attended 
the common schools and the college of Vin- 
cennes, Indiana, and then returned home, and 
became a clerk in a dry goods store at Pitts- 
burg, where he remained for one year. He 
was then a clerk for eight years on a steam- 
boat on the Ohio River when he returned to 
Rochester. In 1856, he opened a dry goods 
store in New Castle, Pa., and after two years 
spent in that place again came to Rochester 
and bought the building at 749 West Madison 
street, which was built, in 1848, by Bonbright 
and Irwin. There he started a dry goods store, 
in 1857, and was very successful, continuing in 
the business until 1871. His store was the 
principal one in Rochester at that time. In 
1871, he closed out, and established a general 
banking business, the company being com- 
prised of the leading men in Rochester. Grad- 
ually Mr. Conway bought out the interests 
of his partners, until, at this time, he is the sole 
owner of it. The bank was built by Bon- 
bright and Irwin, but purchased from J. H. 
Whisler. The subject of this sketch has built 
and sold many fine residences in Beaver 
county, and has dealt quite extensively in real 
estate. He has always taken an active in- 



terest in the progress of Rochester, and was 
one of the original promoters and stock-hold- 
ers of the Olive Stove Works and of the Heat 
& Light Company. He is president of the 
Keystone Tumbler Co., of which a descrip- 
tion is given elsewhere. 

Mr. Conway married Thalia Bentel, a 
daughter of Philip Bentel, of Freedom, Bea- 
ver county, and to them have been born two 
children, namely: Lilian M., married to N. 
F. Hurst, of Rochester, Pa.; and Charles B., 
who is his father's assistant, — he married 
Emma PfeifTer, a daughter of Benjamin 
Pfeififer, of Rochester, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Conway is widely known throughout the 
county, and wherever he goes he makes 
many friends, and keeps them. In politics, 
he is an active Democrat, and has served in the 
borough council and as school director. He 
is a Mason, and a member of the Presbyterian 
church. He was one of the promoters of the 
project to build the Masonic block at 
Rochester. 



TICTC 
COX 
man r 



ICTOR MANUFAC TURING 
COMPANY. Another of the many 
m.anufacturing establishments for 
which Beaver county is noted is that of the 
Victor Mfg. Co., where cast-iron, enameled 
bath-tubs are made. 

There are but about a dozen concerns of 
this character in the country, the principal 
ones being in Pittsburg and vicinity. The 
officers of the Victor Mfg. Co. are : J. F. 
Bruggeman, president; John Rebman, Jr., 




HERMAN F. DILLON. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



287 



secretary and treasurer; and F. D. Cook, 
manager of the works. The works are lo- 
cated in Aliquippa, Beaver county, Pa. 

The company lias a fine site of 3}4 acres of 
land lying between the P. & L. E. R. R. tracks 
and the Ohio River. Their plant comprises 
foundry, pickling and cleaning shop, enamel- 
ing boiler and engine rooms, and warehouse 
and office. They have had success in mar- 
keting their product, and have always had suf- 
ficient orders to keep the works running 
steadily. Their plant, with exception of ware- 
house and office, was destroyed by fire in 
May, 1898, since which time the manufactur- 
ing has been carried on in temporary 
buildings. 

The Victor Mfg. Co. was organized in 1896, 
through the agency of William C. Degelman., 
of Pittsburg, who for two years was general 
manager. Mr. Cook, the present manager, is 
from New York, and, before engaging in the 
bath-tub manufacturing business, had been 
interested in the making of enameled adver- 
tising signs. Mr. Cook is an independent 
Republican, in politics, and, fraternally, a 
member of the Royal Society of Good 
Fellows. 




■ERMAN F. DILLON. The gentle- 
man whose name heads this sketch, 
and whose portrait is shown on the 
preceding page, has for many years been one 
of the active and influential residents of 
Beaver Falls, Pa., and it is in terms of highest 
praise that his fellow-citizens speak of him. 



Having long been one of the leading business 
men of that thriving borough, he has done 
much to promote high business standards, and 
in every sense of the word has been an exem- 
plary citizen, one of whom the people are 
justly proud. Mr. Dillon was born in Beaver, 
November 2, 1856, and is a son of Henry 
N. Dillon. 

Henry N. Dillon, the father of Herman 
F., was born in Big Beaver township, Beaver 
county, Pa., in 1824. He was a pupil in the 
district schools of Beaver county, and after 
farming for a time upon his father's estate, 
moved to Beaver and engaged in the teaming, 
hauling and general contracting business. In 
1884, he removed to Beaver Falls, and went 
into the wholesale oil business, which he fol- 
lowed during the remainder of his active life. 
In early years he was a Whig, but on the 
formation of the Republican party, he cast 
his vote with that organization, and gained 
quite a local fame by virtue of his personal 
association with Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Dil- 
lon was an active and aggressive worker in 
his party, but never sought office. He was a 
liberal supporter of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He was united in marriage with 
Mary A. Supplee, a daughter of the late Will- 
iam Supplee, who was for many years a resi- 
dent of Beaver county, having come from 
Chester, Pa., in 1839. 

The father of the subject hereof died in 
March, 1892, and his death was greatly 
mourned by all in the community. The Dil- 
lon men are all of large size, and are well- 
known for that physical trait. 



288 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Herman F. Dillon received his early mental 
training in the common schools of Beaver, 
and in Beaver Academy, and when fourteen 
years of age removed, with his parents, to 
Ohio township, his education being com- 
pleted in that district. When but sixteen 
years old, he went to Pittsburg, where he was 
placed in full charge of a milk depot and 
route, owned by Jesse Smith, of Smith's 
Ferry, Pennsylvania. After two years he re- 
turned to Beaver county and went into the 
oil business at Island Run, where he be- 
came a general contractor. He remained 
there until January i, 1882, and then accepted 
a position with the Beaver Falls Gas Com- 
pany, for which he worked until 1885, when 
he was appointed superintendent of the entire 
plant. He continued with this company un- 
til 1897, when other business interests and 
political duties made it necessary for him to 
resign. 

Mr. Dillon was one of the promoters of the 
Beaver Falls Improvement Company, a so- 
ciety formed of public-spirited men, whose 
object was to attract manufacturing interests 
to that town. He is a promoter and director 
of the River View Street Railway Company 
and also a promoter and director of 
the People's Building & Loan Association, — 
a most substantial organization which had 
its inception in 1884, — and is also a mem- 
ber of the Tribune Publishing Company, 
printing a daily and weekly newspaper at 
Beaver Falls, and doing also a large business 
in job printing. Mr. Dillon is one of the 
stockholders in the Beaver Falls Water Com- 



pany, which was started by several public- 
spirited men for the purpose of supplying the 
town with pure water at a much lower rate 
than had previously prevailed. Too much 
credit can not be accorded to this company, 
as the relief from the oppression of the old 
water company has been a great blessing to 
the people of Beaver Falls. Mr. Dillon is a 
Republican of the strongest type, and was 
elected to the council, the first term, in 1893, 
and served until 1897, when he resigned his 
seat to accept the office of register and 
recorder. The subject of this sketch cast his 
first vote for President Garfield, and has been 
active in politics ever since. For many years 
he was a member of the county committee, 
serving as its secretary and treasurer, and 
was also chairman of its executive committee. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which he has always been a most 
faithful supporter. He is a member of sev- 
eral fraternal organizations, namely : Glas- 
gow Lodge, No. 485, F. & A. M., of which 
he has been a member twenty-one years; Har- 
mony Chapter, of Beaver Falls ; .Pittsburg 
Commandery, No. i, of Pittsburg; Beaver 
Falls Lodge, No. 293, K. of P. ; Rochester 
Lodge, No. 283, B. P. O. E. ; Walnut Camp, 
of Beaver Falls, Woodmen of the World ; 
Beaver Falls Tent, No. 53, K. O. T. M. 

Mr. Dillon married Jennie M. Kerr, a 
daughter of John Kerr, of Darlington. She 
was born at Darlington, in 1853, and pursued 
a course of study in Darlington Academy, 
afterwards teaching school until her marriage. 
The children which resulted from this union 



BEAVER COUNTY 



289 



are : Herman Ross, born in Beaver Falls, 
who is now a student; Blanche V., born in 
Ohioville ; and Walter E., a student, born in 
Beaver Falls. 



m 



lOBERT G. YOUNG, a well known 
lumber merchant of Beaver county, is 
located at New Galilee and deals in 
all kinds of building materials, sashes, doors, 
blinds, mantels, inside finishings, shingles, 
agricultural implements, barbed and galvan- 
ized wire fencing, and also does considerable 
business as a slate-roofer. He is one of the 
substantial business men of that section and 
is everywhere respected as a citizen of worth 
and influence. He is a son of Robert and 
Jane (McAnlis) Young, and was born April 4, 
1845, 'i^ Big Beaver township, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. 

Peter Young, his grandfather, was born in 
Ireland, where he was educated and spent the 
early part of his life. He came to America, 
located east of Pittsburg, Pa., and entered the 
employ of Captain Crawford, a hero of the 
Revolutionary War. He subsequently went 
to Saw Mill Run, and in the year 1800 re- 
moved to Beaver county, where he purchased 
from Mr. Wylie, the original patentee, a farm 
of 100 acres of wild land. He built log sheds 
and a log house, and at that time there were 
but three white families in the district. 
Indians were very numerous, and many in- 
teresting stories are related in connection 
with adventures and encounters with them. 
Mr. Young remained on the farm the re- 



mainder of his life and successfully confronted 
the many difficulties and hardships to which 
the early pioneers were subjected. He reared 
the following children : John, a farmer ; W^il- 
liam; Algeo; Nancy (Wright); Elizabeth; 
Rebecca; James, a practicing physician of 
Westmoreland county; and Robert, father of 
the subject hereof. 

Robert Young was born in Beaver county. 
Pa., in 1803, and was reared on the old home- 
stead farm, receiving such an education as cir- 
cumstances would permit. He learned farm- 
ing and assisted his father until the latter's 
death, when he succeeded to the home prop- 
erty. This he greatly improved by erecting 
new buildings, clearing the land and raising 
an orchard. He was an Abolitionist, and then 
a Republican, in politics. He was a consist- 
ent member of the Presbyterian church, and 
for twenty years served as elder. He died in 
1862, at the age of fifty-nine years. His union 
with Jane McAnlis resulted in the following 
issue : James M., who died at the age of fif- 
teen years; Margaret; Susan (Patterson); W. 
J., a farmer; Robert G., the subject of this 
biographical record; Hamilton A., a farmer; 
and Lizzie. 

Robert G. Young obtained his elementary 
education in the schools of Beaver county and 
received an excellent business training in the 
Iron City Business College, of Pittsburg, in 
1867. He learned the trade of a carpenter 
after spending some time as a bookkeeper in 
New Castle, Pa. He plied his trade in the 
states of Iowa and Missouri, until 1870, when 
he returned to Beaver county and became a 



290 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



contractor. In 1882, he started in business 
as a lumber dealer, being the first in the 
locality to take up that line of trade. His 
yard is located near the Ft. Wayne tracks at 
New Galilee, and there he carries all kinds of 
sawed lumber, in addition to the articles 
enumerated above. He is also an exporter in 
walnut logs, selling to various foreign mar- 
kets. He owns a fine home, and a small farm 
in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania. 

In 1876, Robert G. Young formed a matri- 
monial alliance with Lucy Wallace, who was 
born in Lawrence county, and is a daughter of 
John and Margaret Wallace. Seven children 
were born to them, as follows : Clarence, who 
is in partnership with his father, and is a grad- 
uate of the Beaver Falls high school ; Maggie ', 
Rutherford J.; William Harvey; Mary E. ; 
James G. ; and Kenneth W. Personally, Mr. 
Young is a genial man, of public spirit, and is 
very popular locally. He is an earnest church 
worker, having built the Presbyterian church, 
and has been an elder since 1894. He is very 
liberal in his contributions toward its sup- 
port. He is, politically, a Republican. 



Y^ORENZO C. KIRKER, a veteran of 
IJT our Civil War, is a much respected citi- 
^" " "^ zen of Beaver Falls, where he has 
been engaged in the carpentering business 
for many years. He is a son of John S. and 
Elizabeth (Rutter) Kirker, and was born in 
that part of Beaver county which now forms 
a part of Lawrence county, August 21, 1843. 



His grandfather was Robert Kirker, a na- 
tive of this county, but his entire life was 
spent in Butler county, Pennsylvania. The 
father of Lorenzo C. was born in Butler 
county. Pa., but came to Beaver county early 
in life, where he resided during his remaining 
days. His occupation was that of a shoe- 
maker, at which he was quite successful. He 
belonged to the old state militia, in which he 
was a major. 

The subject of this writing was reared in 
Lawrence county. Pa., and obtained his ele- 
mentary education in the public schools of his 
native district, and then took up the carpen- 
tering trade, which he made his principal oc- 
cupation. Prior to 1880, he resided in New 
Castle, Pa., where he was employed in a plan- 
ing mill, but in that year he became a resident 
of Beaver Falls, where he has since lived. He 
engaged in the grocery business soon after 
coming there, but gave it up and resumed his 
former occupation. Mr. Kirker is quite 
prominently known throughout this vicinity, 
and enjoys the reputation of an honest, up- 
right and conscientious citizen. When the 
Civil War broke out, our subject laid aside all 
plans for the future, and went to the aid of the 
Union, enlisting July 14, 1861, in Company 
H, 9th Reg. Pa. Reserves for a term of three 
years. He was wounded at the battle of An- 
tietam, in September, 1862. and was taken to 
the German Reformed Church Hospital at 
Frederick, Md., where he remained six 
months ; upon recovering, he again joined his 
regiment, with which he remained until he 
was honorably discharged at Pittsburg, Pa., 



THE 
NEW YORK 

fP"8Llc L.-eRARYJ 

fourrisfions, 
'503 . 




ABRAHAM WEST. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



293 



May 12, 1864. While with his regiment, he 
took part in the battles of Dranesville; Me- 
chanicsville ; Miner's Hill ; Savage Station ; 
Malvern Hill; Second Bull Run; South 
Mountain; Antietani; Gettysburg; and in 
many small skirmishes. 

Politically, Mr. Kirker is a prominent Re- 
publican of the community, and is now serv- 
ing as judge of elections. February 5, 1865, 
he was joined in marriage with Miss Jean- 
nette Cunningham, and they reared six chil- 
dren : Evelyn L., the wife of C. B. Jolley, of 
Beaver Falls ; Cecilia, the wife of Charles D. 
Garrett, also of Beaver Falls; Flora A., the 
wife of John Richards, of Beaver Falls ; 
Harry V. (wedded to Jeannette Craig, of 
Afton, N. Y.), who is engaged in carpenter- 
ing with the subject of our sketch ; Rosa, who 
is the wife of A. C. BeUis, of Beaver Falls ; and 
Edward L., who also works with his father at 
the carpenter's trade. 




(g^BRAHAM WEST, deceased, who was 
for many 3''ears one of the foremost 
farmers of Marion township, was 
a descendant of an old and highly respected 
family of Beaver county. He was a son of 
Peter and Agnes (Boyd) West, and was born 
in New Sewickley township, Beaver county, 
Pa., in 1825. 

Peter West, the father of Abraham, was 
born in West Virginia and, in 1805, removed 
to Beaver county, Pa., with his parents. He 
rented a farm in Franklin township, but later 
bought one known as "The Knob," in New 



Sewickley township, where he lived and 
farmed for a period of twelve years. He then 
purchased a tract of four hundred acres in 
Marion township, — a portion of which is now 
owned by Mrs. West, — and upon this he 
erected a fine brick residence. He died there 
in 1865, and his wife, whose maiden name was 
Agnes Boyd, died in the year of 1879. 

Abraham W^est, the subject of this sketch, 
always lived upon the home farm, the original 
property being divided upon the death of his 
father, and Abraham receiving two hundred 
and fifty acres. He carried on farming and 
was extensively engaged in sheep-raising and 
dairying, — in late years shipping the milk to 
Allegheny. He died on July 30, 1897, and 
his death was universally mourned, as he was 
everywhere respected as a man of true worth 
and influence in the community. Since his 
demise, Mrs. W^est, aided by two of her sons, 
has carried on the farm with good results. 
They still continue to ship the milk to Alle- 
gheny, and have a herd of twenty-two cows. 
Their farm is mostly flat land, and is very 
productive, being unexcelled in that vicinity. 

Abraham West, on March 6, i860, was 
joined in wedlock with Mary Jane Sowash, 
who was born in Brighton township, Beaver 
county, and is a daughter of Frederick So- 
wash. The latter came from Mercer county 
to Beaver county when a young man, and was 
a stone mason by trade. This union resulted 
in the birth of seven children, as follows : Vir- 
ginia (Wilson); William B., a fireman on the 
Fort Wayne R. R., who lives at Allegheny; 
Clinton P., a farmer in Butler county; Joseph 



294 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



F., deceased; Abraham G., who is Hviiig at 
home; Charles, who hves in Zehenople, But- 
ler county ; and John F., who is at home. Poli- 
tically, our subject was an active supporter 
of the Democratic party. We take pleasure 
in presenting his portrait, which appears on 
a preceding page. 



fOHN HENRY LOWRY. As one of 
the representatives of the agricul- 
tural class of citizens of Beaver county, 
we take great pleasure in presenting the life 
record of the gentleman named above, one of 
the most progressive and influential farmers 
in North Sewickley township. He was born 
on Main street in Allegheny City, Pa., and is 
a son of John and Sarah (Wagoner) Lowry. 

John Lowry, the father of our subject, was 
born in the vicinity of Harrisburg, and was 
a young man when he removed to the city of 
Pittsburg. He was a bridge blacksmith by 
trade, and many old landmarks are stand- 
ing, today, as monuments of his skill. The 
old covered bridge at Beaver Falls, and, in 
fact, nearly all of the covered bridges built 
in that region during his time, are the result 
of his workmanship. In the spring of 1857, 
he moved to North Sewickley township, 
where he bought a farm of one hundred acres. 
Prior to this, however, he had given up his 
trade, and for some years had been a station- 
ary engineer in the city of Allegheny. After 
his removal he devoted all his time to farm- 
ing, and when he purchased his property it 
was an unbroken piece of timber, but before 



his death most of it was cleared. He was a 
very industrious man and at the time of his 
death was in comfortable circumstances, finan- 
cially. He was united in marriage with Sarah 
Wagoner, and their happy home was blessed 
by the birth of eight" children, as follows : 
David E. ; Martha Jane, the widow of A. J. 
Steele; Elizabeth Ann, deceased; John Henry, 
the subject hereof; Lucinda V., the wife of 
William Chaney, who resides at Conway, Pa. ; 
William J., who resides at the home of John 
Henry Lowry ; and two who died in early 
childhood. Politically, Mr. Lowry was a 
stanch supporter of the Democratic party, and 
was elected to a number of the township 
offices. 

The subject of this writing was but nine 
years of age when he removed with his father 
from Allegheny, where he had attended the 
common schools, to North Sewickley town- 
ship. He continued to attend the public 
schools, acquiring a good intellectual train- 
ing, and has lived on the farm, coming into 
full possession of it upon his father's demise. 
He has very successfully managed his affairs, 
and since buying an additional hundred acres 
of land, has as fine a property for agricultural 
purposes as Beaver county contains. He em- 
ploys only the most approved methods of 
farming and has more than one thousand dol- 
lars' worth of improved machinery. His land 
is exceedingly rich with coal, having a five- 
foot vein, but is mined by outside parties, this 
being a source of considerable income to Mr. 
Lowry. He is a man of exceptionally strong 
character, a true friend and a devoted hus- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



295 



band and father. He has many friends and 
acquaintances throughout this section of the 
state, who respect him as a man of influence 
and true worth to the community. 

On September 2, 1882, Mr. Lowry was 
united in marriage with Elzena Fombell, of 
North Sewickley township, and three children 
are the issue of their union, as follows : Myr- 
tle; Lulu; and John Roy. Politically, Mr. 
Lowry is a Democrat of the sturdiest type, 
and has been the incumbent of all the town- 
ship offices. In a religious connection, he and 
his wife are conscientious members of the 
Presbyterian church. 



/^^^ENERAL J. S. LITTELL, ex- 
I JT sherifif of Beaver county, now a 
representative farmer of Big Beaver 
township, Beaver county. Pa., is a descendant 
of 'Squire William Littell, an old Revolu- 
tionary hero, and one of the early settlers of 
Beaver county. 'Squire William Littell was 
born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1740. He attended 
the pubHc schools of Belfast and came to 
America while still a young man. He wedded 
Elizabeth Walker, who was also a native of 
Ireland. They reared nine children, namely: 
Elizabeth (Reed) ; Jane, now deceased ; Mary 
(Todd); Alice (Sharp); Agnes; James; Will- 
iam, father of the subject hereof; David; and 
Thomas. 

At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, 
General Littell's grandfather held a clerkship 
in the army (being private secretary to Gen- 



eral George Washington), and served in that 
capacity throughout the war. His brother, 
James, was a soldier, and served under the 
illustrious Washington until the war was 
ended. A letter written in Fort Mcintosh in 
I779- t)y James to William, is still in the pos- 
session of the subject hereof, and is in a good 
state of preservation. It proves James to 
have been a good scholar. After the war, 
William went to Beaver county. Pa., where 
he took up a large tract of land in Hanover 
township. This tract was all wild land. Set- 
tlers were few, and wild game was abundant. 
William Littell made a clearing and built a 
large hewed-log cabin upon it, — also building 
a barn. He was appointed "Squire" by the 
governor of the state, — a position which he 
filled until the time of his death, in 1819. He 
died aged seventy-nine years. 

William Littell, Jr., father of General Lit- 
tell, was born upon the old homestead in 
Hanover township, in 1794. He attended 
the district schools, after which he taught for 
several years. He was joined in marriage 
with Cynthia Smith, a daughter of John and 
Nancy (McClure) Smith. Mrs. Littell was 
born in Adams county. Twelve children were 
the result of this happy union. Their names 
are: J. S., the subject of this sketch; Eliza 
(Robertson) ; Rebecca (Calhoun) ; Maria (Ew- 
ing); Nancy (Ewing); Cynthia, wife of J. Mc- 
Henry; William M., who died in infancy; a 
second William M. ; David; Washington; 
James M. ; and Henry. The wife of William 
Little, Jr., died in 1853. Our subject's father 
was a farmer by occupation, and lived many 



296 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



years on the old homestead farm. He sold this, 
however, and bought 155 acres near Beaver. 
His farm products were disposed of in Beaver 
and vicinity. He served in the War of 1812, 
and was ordered to duty on Lake Erie. While 
crossing the Ohio Swamps, he contracted the 
measles which nearly proved fatal. In poli- 
tics, he was first a W^hig and later a Repub- 
lican, but had no aspirations to office. He 
belonged to the Seceders' church. 

General Littell was the recipient of a good 
scholastic training, which he obtained by at- 
tending district school. He subsequently 
learned surveying, although he never followed 
that profession. He taught school for three 
terms in Beaver county. In 1845, his mar- 
riage with Mary Calhoon was solemnized. 
Mary was born in Raccoon township in 182 1, 
and was a daughter of Richard and Sarah 
(MofTet) Calhoon. She was called away 
from her earthly home, August i, 1897. 
Seven children were born of this union, viz. : 
Richard W. ; William P. ; Robert C. ; Isidore 
S. (White) ; Harriet (Rhodes) ; Joseph ; and 
Isabell. Richard W. served three and one- 
half years in the 76th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf., as 
drummer boy (this being his father's regi- 
ment). William enlisted in the 6th Reg., Ohio 
Cavalry, and had some narrow escapes. On 
one occasion he was sent to the hospital. 
Joseph, the youngest son, resides on the farm 
with his father. 

After his marriage, General Littell engaged 
in blacksmithing for ten years. He then 
bought the first portable saw mill ever used 
in Beaver county, which he operated for one 



year. In 1853, he joined a mihtia company, 
of which he was elected captain. He was 
afterward appointed brigade inspector of the 
19th division. In the fall of 1861, he re- 
cruited a company for the 76th Reg., Pa. Vol. 
Inf., and was chosen captain, and was ordered 
to the South. From a volume entitled "Mar- 
tial Deeds of Pennsylvania," the following 
extract is taken: "Brig. Gen'l. J. S. Littell 
fought with his company of the 76th Pa. Vol. 
Inf., at James Island, and a few days later at 
Morris Island. He also took part in the first 
and second assaults on Fort Wagner, where 
he led his company with great bravery." On 
Morris Island, General Littell had charge of 
the entire regiment for thirty days. On the 
first of July, 1862, he was severely wounded, 
but continued to fight and would not give 
up, although suffering great pain. The next 
morning, he received a serious wound in the 
right arm and side. 

The attack on Fort Wagner was very dis- 
astrous, as it resulted in the loss of almost 
one-half of the regiment. On May 31, the 
subject of our sketch was promoted to be 
lieutenant colonel. The very next day he 
was again wounded, a ball passing through 
both thighs. After remaining in the hospital 
for some time, he was removed to his own 
home. His recovery was slow. On August 17, 
he was promoted to a colonelcy, and, the fol- 
lowing January, sailed with the expeditions 
under Generals Butler and Weitzel, and later 
served under General Terry in the attacks on 
Fort Fisher, which commanded the approach 
to Wilmington. In the midst of an engage- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



297 



ment, while gallantly leading the assault, Gen- 
eral Littell was again wounded by a ball. This 
ball struck him in the left thigh, passed 
through a pocket-book, and lodged in his 
body. While a disastrous day for him, it was 
a glorious one for the Union Army. Although 
suffering severely, General Littell was able to 
exult in the splendid victory. He was re- 
moved to Fortress Monroe, the ball having 
been extracted while on the field. Later, he 
was sent to his home. Upon the recommenda- 
tion of General Terry, as a merited recogni- 
tion of his distinguished valor, he was created 
a brevet-brigadier general. While recovering 
from the wounds received at Cold Harbor, 
a party of inferior ofificers tried to secure the 
General's discharge from the army. This was 
done to better their own chance of promo- 
tion. Rumors of the situation reached the 
General before their plans had finally matured, 
however, and, with his wound still running, he 
returned to his command. It is a fact worthy 
of note that of all the commissioned officers 
who went out with the regiment, the subject 
of our sketch and one other alone returned. 

After such a notable war record. General 
Littell was urged to be a candidate for sheriff, 
and was elected by a large majority, in 1866. 
Immediately after the expiration of his first 
term, he settled upon the farm where he still 
lives. This farm contains 233 acres of fine, 
improved land and was purchased from Har- 
rison Power. The General erected another 
house and built better barns, and his farm is 
conceded to be one of the best in his section. 
For many years he operated a dairy. He was 



one of the organizers of the creamery in Dar- 
lington, of which he is still a stockholder. 
He was president of the same until he declined 
to serve longer, but is still retained on the 
board of directors. He now makes a specialty 
of raising early lambs for the market. He is 
a Republican, and has served as school di- 
rector and as supervisor. He is also an elder 
of the United Presbvterian church. 




,LYDE W. INMAN, a manufacturer 
and merchant of Cannelton, Pa., was 
born in Chippewa township, Beaver 
county, in 1867. He received his scholastic 
training in the schools of his native town, and 
in Darlington Academy. After leaving school, 
he began to work in a coal mine, doing the 
work of a bailer. This he followed for a short 
time, and then commenced work on the N. Y., 
P. & C. R. R., which was during the construc- 
tion of the road. After a few months, he 
again returned to the mines as a coal digger 
for Mr. Mansfield, a well-knov>-n operator. 
In 1884, he made another change, this time 
entering the carpenter department of the Al- 
legheny car shops. One year later, he re- 
turned to work for Mr. Mansfield as a car- 
penter, to do the wood work in the manu- 
facture of the Grimm drill. In 1886, he 
opened a general store in Cannelton in part- 
nership with his father and brother. Fifteen 
months later, he bought out the interests of 
his partners, and has since conducted the 
store alone. He also bought the plant of, 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and the right to manufacture, the Grimm 
drill. In 1893, he built a new work shop 
and put in new machinery. He has an up- 
right engine and boiler, two screw-cutting 
lathes, a large drill press, forges, and nu- 
merous jigs, and labor-saving devices. 

In connection with his factory, Mr. Inman 
operates a general blacksmith shop, wheie he 
manufactures picks, sledges, wedges, bars, 
etc. The market for his goods extends 
through the states of Virginia, \A'est Virginia, 
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Alabama, Illinois, and 
Michigan. The Grimm drill is a tool sub- 
jected to years of actual test, and has been 
demonstrated to be the most durable, effec- 
tive, and economical drill in the market. It 
finds a sale in every land, and has everywhere 
been crowned with the higliest competitive 
honors. These drills bore one and one-half 
to three inch holes, and eight feet deep at 
any angle, in coal, fire clay, rock, and slate. 

Mr. Inman keeps a stock of general goods 
in his store, varying from groceries to hard- 
v\are. He has a large warehouse and is well 
equipped to satisfy the demands of miners 
and farmers. He is also a member of the farm 
of Inman Brothers, miners and shippers, his 
partner being his brother, G. W. Inman. 
Their coal trade is local, but they ship a clay, 
v>-hich is like Cannel coal, peculiar, and as 
fine a quality as can be found in any part of 
the world. 

The subject of this sketch married Laura 
E. Hays, daughter of Charles Hays, the well 
known blacksmith, of South Beaver town- 
ship. They have three children : Lena W. ; 



Zoe M. ; and Hannah E. Mr. Inman is a 
strong Republican, and a member of the 
county committee. His fraternal associations 
are with the I. O. O. F. and Meridian Lodge, 
No. 411, F. & A. M. He also belongs to the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
His sympathies are with the church of the 
Seceders. 




R. JAMES S. LOUTHAN, a prom- 
1^ B inent physician and surgeon of 
Beaver Falls, Pa., has, by his per- 
severance and strict attention to professional 
duties, placed himself in the foremost rank 
of physicians in Beaver county, and has built 
up a large practice in the home of his adop- 
tion, where he has been located since 1890. 
Dr. Louthan was born in South Beaver town- 
ship, Beaver county. Pa., April 28, 1856. He 
received his early scholastic training at Dar- 
lington Academy, after which he followed 
the profession of teaching for four years, sub- 
sequently attending Westminster College. 
He began the study of medicine under Dr. 
Moon, and later studied with Dr. Strouss. 
He took the required course of lectures at 
Cleveland Medical College, graduating in the 
class of 1882. Dr. Louthan began the prac- 
tice of his profession immediately after his 
graduation, locating at Fairview, Beaver 
county. Pa., where he remained until 1890, 
jwhen he located in Beaver Falls, and is still 
=to be found there. 

'" Dr. Louthan is a quiet, unassuming gentle- 
man of a very pronounced, studious nature. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



299 



To him it is a pleasure to keep in step with 
the wonderful advances made of late in his 
profession. No new thing escapes his atten- 
tion, and he is quick to grasp and utilize any 
modern discovery, which may be used to the 
advantage of his patients. Careful and con- 
servative, he is a strict adherent to the ethics 
of his craft, and possesses the traits of a true 
professional worker. Dr. Louthan descended 
from one of the first families of Virginia. He 
is a son of James Louthan, Jr., grandson of 
James Louthan, Sr., and great-grandson of 
JMoses Louthan. 

Moses Loutlian v/as a native of Scotland. 
and his parents were tlie first representatives 
of the family in America. They settled in Vir- 
ginia, where their son ?\Ioses, in early man- 
hood, engaged in farming. Later in life, how- 
ever, he removed to South Beaver township, 
Beaver county, Pa., being one of the earliest 
settlers of that county. He was a member of 
the Salem church congregation, and was one 
of its first elders. Moses Louthan lived to 
be over eighty years of age. His wife, Betsy, 
bore him seven children, as follows: James; 
George; William; Samuel; Henry; and Betsy. 
James Louthan, the next in line, v.as born 
m Beaver township and received his mental 
training in the vicinity of his home. Like 
his father, he followed the occupation of a 
farmer, settling on a farm adjoining the old 
homestead, where he remained a few years, 
and then sold it and moved to the state of 
Ohio, settling near Worcester. There his 
death took place, in his forty-third year. 

He was joined in wedlock with Anna Brad- 



shaw, a daughter of Robert Bradshaw, of 
South Beaver township. Mrs. Louthan died 
at tiie advanced age of eighty-three years. 
As her husband died early in life, the rearing 
of the family fell mostly upon her shoulders. 
Two sons and three daughters w-ere the off- 
spring of this w'orthy couple, named as fol- 
lows: Moses; Sarah (Sebring); Eliza; Susan 
(McConnell); and James, Jr., father of the 
subject hereof. They are now deceased, ex- 
cept James, the youngest. 

James Louthan, Jr., was born near 
Worcester, Ohio, but obtained his schooling 
in South Beaver township, Pa., whitlier his 
motlier had removed soon after the death of 
her husband. At the time of his father's death, 
James was but six years old. Upon reaching 
manhood, James became apprenticed, and 
learned the carpenter's trade in New 
Brighton. In that capacity he worked upon 
the first brick building in that flourishing 
borough, and followed his trade almost unin- 
terruptedly for over forty years, making his 
home in South Beaver. He was an indus- 
trious, enterprising citizen, with a love for 
work and a capacity for achieving success in 
whatever he undertook to accomplish. He 
also followed agricultural pursuits, and was 
respected by all men of character and position. 
Purchasing twenty acres of woodland, he 
cleared some, and built a home, very soon add- 
ing sixty acres more. In 1838, he wedded 
Nancy Strain, a daughter of James Strain, of 
Chippewa township. Mrs. Louthan passed 
away from her earthly h.ome in June, 
1879, after assisting in rearing a family 



300 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



of ten children. Mr. Louthan sold the 
homestead, and removed to Darlington, 
remaining there until 1896, when he 
went to Beaver Falls, and is now 
spending the sunset of life in retirement. 
One remarkable fact concerning this family 
is their general good health ; neither the 
father nor any of the children ever had any 
serious illness. Mr. Louthan was first a Whig, 
then a Free-soiler, and later a Republican, in 
his political attachments. He is strong in his 
belief, and is intensely interested in the gov- 
erning policy of the nation. In his religious 
views, he is a Covenanter. His children's 
names are: Mary A. (Craig); Asa (Martin); 
Rebecca (Rayle) ; Susan M. (Hartzell) ; Eliza- 
beth W. (Cox); Bradford; Allie (Bradshaw) ; 
James S. (subject); Nancy (Patterson); and 
John. 

Dr. J. S. Louthan was united in marriage 
with May Johnson, an entertaining daughter 
of Joseph Johnson, who now resides in Beaver 
Falls. Their nuptials were consummated in 
1884, and their home is brightened by the 
presence of two daughters: Ethel Zoe; and 
Elizabeth Gemiska. 

Dr. Louthan is a Republican, and takes a 
fitting interest in party affairs. He is a mem- 
ber of the Beaver County Medical Associa- 
tion. Aside from his professional duties, he 
is a very energetic gentleman in the town and 
county. He was one of the organizers of the 
Dime Savings & Loan Association, of 
Beaver Falls, and is one of its directors. He 
is also a director of the Farmers National 
Bank. 



'^YO. BROWN is the junior member of 
the firm of Stefifler & Brown, manu- 
' facturers of paving brick, in Darling- 
ton, Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown was born in 
Armstrong county, in October, 1867. After 
receiving a practical education in the public 
schools of his native county, he learned the 
trade of a carpenter, working as a journey- 
man in Armstrong county, and later in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. He went to the latter 
place in 1885, and entered the employ of Mr. 
StefiBer, a prominent contractor and builder 
of that city. He remained in the employ of 
Mr. Steffler for a period of ten years, and 
became an expert workman. 

In 1896, in company with Mr. Steffler, Mr. 
Brown purchased the plant of the Darlington 
Fire Brick Company, then owned by Messrs. 
Cook, Sturgeon & CDok, and since then busi- 
ness has been carried on under the firm name 
of Stefifler & Brown. Their plant is strictly 
up-to-date, and covers about three acres of 
ground. Adjacent to it is a bed of fine clay 
and coal. The clay from this district is as 
fine as may be obtained in any part of the 
world. Large quantities of the raw and 
ground clay are shipped to all parts of the 
United States. At the works are five large 
draught kilns and three large dry tunnels. 
Each kiln holds 60,000 brick. The kilns are 
kept going all the time. 

The engine house adjoins the machine 
room, and is equipped with two 100 horse 
power boilers and an 80 horse power engine. 
This large engine runs the crusher and dry 
pan for grinding clay, also the wire cutting 




WILLIAM H. FOX. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



303 



machine, the soft mud macliine and the re- 
pressing machine. One brick-making ma- 
cliine has a capacity of 20,000 bricks per day. 
A smaller engine operates the fan for the 
dry tunnel. 

The company owns its own raih'oad siding, 
and a network of train and trestle roads for 
th.e transportation of clay and coal from the 
banks to the works. The main offices of the 
company are in Pittsburg. About twenty 
men are constantly employed, and the 
products of the p'ant are shipped to Pittsburg 
and tl'.roughout the West. 

Mr. Brown was united in marriage with 
Lily Stefifler, the accomplished daughter of 
his business partner. Their marriage took 
place in Pittsburg. Mrs. Brown was born in 
Lawrence county, in 1872. One son, Harry, 
born June 8, 1896, is the result of this most 
happy union. Mr. Brown is a stanch Repub- 
Hcan, but has given his attention strictly to 
his business interejSts, having no time for 
political campaigning. Both Mr. and AL's. 
Brown are faithful attendants of the United 
Presbyterian church, and contribute gener- 
ously towards its support. They also assist 
worthy charitable institutions. Both are well 
and favorably known in social and religious 
circles throughout Beaver county. 




'ILLL\M H. FOX, whose portrait 
is shown on the opposite page, is the 
leading blacksmith of Beaver Falls, 
and he is recognized as having no superior in 
Beaver county, Pa., in the line of shoeing 



horses. He owns a large, brick shop and 
gives employment to several skilful hands who 
are constantly kept busy in order to meet the 
demands of his large patronage ; he is also a 
prominent and industrious citizen, command- 
ing the respect and good-will of a host of ac- 
quaintances. He was born in Lawrence 
county. Pa., in 1862, and his parents are 
David and Rachael (Van Horn) Fox. 

His grandfather, Peter Fox, was born in 
Westmoreland county. Pa., where he followed 
his trade as a millwright during his active 
life. His wife was Miss Saddler by whom 
he reared five sons and three daughters: 
Joseph; Michael; John; Peter; David; Mrs. 
Morrison ; Mrs. Kennedy ; and Mrs. Ryhel. 

David Fox was born in Lawrence county. 
Pa., in 1818, and was reared to agricultural 
pursuits, which occupation he successfully 
followed throughout his active career. He 
was joined in marriage with Miss Rachael 
Van Horn, who was born in Lawrence county. 
Pa., in 1825, and they became the parents of 
seven children, as follows: William H., the 
subject of this narrative ; Abram V. ; Rebecca 
J. (McCurdy); Mary M. (Dick); Katie (Gol- 
den) ; Emma (Williams), and Agnes (Cam- 
eron). 

William H. Fox received a common school 
education, in Venango county. Pa., and at the 
age of sixteen years, he began life on his own 
account. Leaving his father's farm, he 
sought to learn the trade of a blacksmith; 
after mastering the trade, in 1884 he located 
in Beaver Falls, where he has since established 
the reputation of being the most expert and 



304 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



competent blacksmith in the county. His 
patronage increased to such a large extent 
that it was necessary for him not only to en- 
large his shop but also to employ more hands 
to cope with the growing demands. Accord- 
ingly, he erected a fine two-story shop facing 
Third avenue on the corner of Eighth street, 
and he is now able to accommodate his pa- 
trons. Mr. Fox is well deserving of the suc- 
cess that has met his efforts; he is enter- 
prising and progressive, and supports all 
measures that tend to promote the welfare 
of the community. 

Mr. Fox was joined in the bonds of matri- 
mony with Miss Mary A. Hitchin, a native of 
England. Socially, he is a member of the 
Order of Maccabees, Woodmen of the World, 
and Independent Order of Good Templars. 
In politics, he is a Republican, while in relig- 
ious views he favors the Methodist church. 



§AMES S. WILSON, who is a prom- 
inent and independent farmer of North 
Sewickley township, Beaver county. 
Pa., is a veteran of the Civil War and bears an 
excellent record for honorable and valiant 
service. He is a son of James and Barbara 
(Showalter) Wilson, and was born November 
27, 1833. 

James Wilson, the father of James S., was 
born on Hickory Creek in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. His father died when he was 
a young man and his mother was again mar- 
ried to a Mr. Ralston, and he soon after went 



to Butler county, where he; remained for some 
time. He moved to Beaver county at an 
early day, and worked as a farm hand until 
1832, when he bought the farm now owned 
by the subject of this sketch. It consisted of 
one hundred and seven acres of wooded land, 
and he worked early and late until he cleared 
all but twenty acres, upon which the timber 
still stands. He was one of the prosperous 
and substantial men of the township, and was 
everywhere held in the highest esteem. He 
died in 1891, aged eighty-six years. He mar- 
ried Barbara Showalter, and they became the 
parents of twelve children: Salina, the 
widow of H. M. Biddell, who lives in Beaver 
Falls; Nancy, who died at the age of thirty 
years; William F., who moved West; James 
S., the subject of this personal history; Joseph 
F., who lives in New Brighton; Harrison, 
who died at the age of nineteen years; Mary 
Jane, deceased ; Jefiferson ; Aaron, a dry goods 
merchant and Baptist minister, who lives at 
Rochester ; John, who died in the army during 
the Civil War ; Thomas, who is engaged in the 
grocery business at Rochester, Beaver county ; 
and one who died in infancy. In political be- 
lief, Mr. Wilson was a Republican. Re- 
ligiously, he was a devout Christian and at- 
tended the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. 
Wilson died in 1893. 

James S. Wilson was born on the farm on 
which he now lives, and received a first-class 
scholastic training in the common schools and 
in North Sewickley Academy, and pursued a 
course in Duff's Business College at Pitts- 
burg. He spent his time working on the farm 



BEAVER COUNTY 



305 



until the Civil War was in progress, and then, 
in answer to the call for volunteers, he en- 
listed, August 23, 1 861, in Company C, 63d 
Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf., as a private. He saw 
much hard and continued fighting, but was 
ever willing and even eager to perform his 
full share of the work, and more. He is of a 
cool and even temperament, and in times of 
danger was undisturbed, and always to be 
seen in the very thickest of the fight. In 
1863, he was promoted to a first lieutenancy. 
He took part in the following important en- 
gagements: The siege of Yorktown; Will- 
iamsburg; Fair Oaks; Seven Days Battle; 
second battle of Bull Run; and Chantilly. 
He then went home on recruiting service, re- 
maining six months, and upon returning to 
the regiment, participated in the battles of 
Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, following 
Lee to Manassas Gap, where an engagement 
took place. He fought in the battles of Mine 
Run, Kelly's Ford, and in the battle of the 
Wilderness, where, on May 5, he was severely 
wounded in the thigh and hip. He was com- 
pelled to go to the hospital for three months, 
and upon going home, used a pair of crutches 
for two years. He then resumed agricultural 
pursuits, his farm being under a high state of 
cultivation, and one of the best in that sec- 
tion. It is supplied with good substantial and 
convenient outbuildings, which are so essen- 
tial to success in farming, and the house in 
which he resides is a large brick dwelling. He 
is a man of pleasing personality, a clever con- 
versationalist, and has a host of friends. 

On July 24, 1866. Mr. Wilson was joined in 




wedlock with Miss Jemima A. McCreary, a 
daughter of William and Mary McCreary, of 
North Sewickley township, and six children 
were born to them: Mary E., the wife of E. 
U. McDaniel ; Sarah Jane, the wife of Henry 
Bonzo; Cecelia N., who married Jefferson 
Kinney; and Anna, Aaron, and George, who 
live with the parents. Religiously, the fam- 
ily are Presbyterians. 



ENRY M. CAMP is one of the most 
active and prominent business men in 
the borough of Rochester, Beaver 
county, Pa., where the Camp family has re- 
sided and contributed to its growth and pros- 
perity since its early days. Our subject is in- 
terested in many of the local enterprises, and 
since 1887 he has acted in the capacity of 
superintendent of the Rochester Heat & Light 
Company. He was born in Rochester in 1850, 
and is a son of Michael Camp and grandson of 
Michael Camp, Sr. 

Michael Camp was born in Hanover, Ger- 
many, and, with his brother John, came to 
the United States in 1832, first locating in 
Philadelphia, then in Butler county, and fin- 
ally in Beaver county, where he spent his re- 
maining days. They crossed over the moun- 
tains in a wagon, and at Rochester made a 
stop, and there John erected the old National 
Hotel on Water street; he later owned the 
one now adjoining, known as the Farmer's 
Hotel. Michael Camp was engaged in the 
making of shoes, the work being all by hand ; 
the leather was purchased from near-by 



306 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



tanners and much of the work was let out to 
men who would complete it at their homes. 
His home and shop were located in Beaver, 
near where Mr. Frank Laird now resides. 
During his latter days he retired to Rochester, 
where he passed from this life, aged seventy- 
five years. His wife was Annie Barbara 
Schlesman, and they became the parents of 
the following children : Elizabeth, who died 
in Germany; Catherine, who married John 
Frick ; Michael ; Mary, who was born while 
her parents were crossing the ocean, and who 
is the wife of John Miller; Christian and Mar- 
tin, who are twins ; Margaret, who was mar^ 
ried to Benjamin Dawson ; Henry ; John ; and 
Barbara, who is the wife of James Robinson. 
Michael Camp was born in Hanover, Ger- 
many, in 1827, and upon coming to this coun- 
try, learned the trade of a brickmaker, but 
soon discontinued that occupation and ac- 
cepted a position as clerk in the National 
Hotel. John Buchler was proprietor, and 
died the second day after taking possession 
of the hotel. Mr. Camp continued as clerk in 
the hotel, and later married Mrs. John Buch- 
ler, whose maiden name was Magdaline 
Weise. She died in 1877, aged sixty-four 
years, and had been married three times. Her 
first husband was Mr. Zerker, by whom she 
reared three children: Magdaline, Mary, and 
John. Her second husband was John Buch- 
ler, and four children were born to them: 
Frederick, \\'illiam, Caroline and Emma. 
Her third union was with Michael Camp, and 
their only child was Henry M., the subject of 
this sketch. Mr. Camp formed a second union, 



with Mrs. Catherine (Mauser) Smith, widow 
of John Smith. Mr. Camp owned and con- 
ducted the Pavilion liotel, now known as the 
St. James, from 1861 to 1886; in the latter 
year he sold out to C. H. Clarke, and moved 
on the farm formerly owned by William John- 
son, which is located on the east side of Adams 
street. Mr. Camp still resides there, and is 
spending his latter days in comfort and hap- 
piness. He has always been a stanch Demo- 
crat, and has served in the council, as assessor 
and in many minor ofifices. Mr. Camp was 
one of the promoters, and is a large stock- 
holder, of the Rochester Insurance Com- 
pany; he is a stockholder in the Rochester 
Flint Vial & Bottle Works, — now known as 
the Point Bottle Works, — a stockholder in the 
Olive Stove Works, a member of the 
Rochester Heat & Light Company, a di- 
rector in the Big Beaver Bridge Company, 
and a stockholder in the Keystone Tumbler 
Company. He built his present residence and 
has also erected many houses for tenement 
use. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
schools of Rochester until he attained the age 
of seventeen years, when he went to Pitts- 
burg to learn the machinists' trade, and fol- 
lowed it for five years. Returning to 
Rochester, he went into the hotel business 
with his father, but upon the organization of 
the Rochester Heat & Light Company, he 
became superintendent and a stockholder. 
This company is composed of two hundred 
stockholders and has a capital stock of $18,- 
000. The gas used is furnished from Beaver 




JOHN BEUTER. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



309 



and Allegheny counties, and the company lias 
not only been a success, bnt a means of great 
saving to the residents of Rochester. Our 
subject is a stockholder in the Rochester In- 
surance Company, the Flint Vial & Bottle 
Works, the Big Beaver Bridge Company, the 
People's Electric Railroad, and the High 
River Bridge Company. In 1883, he erected 
a handsome brick residence on the corner of 
Jefferson and Connecticut streets, and has re- 
sided there ever since. 

Mr. Camp was joined in marriage with 
Miss Tillie E. Scheinder, a daughter of Louis 
E. Scheinder, of Rochester, and this happy 
union has been blessed by the birth of three 
children : Charles A. ; Marl Etta, and Emma 
Maria, deceased. Our subject is a solid Demo- 
crat, and has served as a councilman. Re- 
ligiously, he is a member of the Lutheran 
church; socially, he is a member and past 
master of the Masonic fraternity; and mem- 
ber and past regent of the Royal Arcanum. 
Mr. Camp is a man of high business principles, 
is respected by all who know him, and is al- 
ways active in advancing the prosperity of 
his adopted town and county. 



§OHN BEUTER, a prosperous and suc- 
cessful pharmacist of Beaver Falls, Pa., 
whose portrait is shown on the opposite 
page, wants it distinctly understood that he 
is a Republican of the deepest dye, and always 
has affiliated with that party ever since he 
was old enough to vote. He has been one of 
its most active members in Beaver county, 



and was one of the three Republican delegates 
to the state convention, held in Harrisburg, 
in 1898, and the only one of the three from 
Beaver county, who supported William A. 
Stone for governor, and had the satisfaction of 
seeing his man not only nominated, but 
elected. 

John Beuter was born January 29, i860, 
and is a son of John and Pauline (Tyfel) Beu- 
ter. His father was a native of Germany, 
and came to America with his parents when 
but twelve years of age. He located in 
Wheeling, West Virginia, where he followed 
the retail liquor business for a period of forty 
years. He laid down the burden of life, in 
1894, and entered into rest. 

John Beuter received his scholastic train- 
ing in the public schools and afterward at- 
tended St. Vincent's College in Wheeling, — 
from which he graduated. After leaving col- 
lege, young Beuter entered the employ of 
Logan List & Co., wholesale and retail drug- 
gists of Wheeling, and remained with that 
firm for a period of eight years. He then 
took a course in the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy in the autumns of 1879, 1880 and 
1881. As these courses included only the fall 
months, he improved his unoccupied time by 
taking a special course in chemistry in the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

After he became a full-fledged pharmacist, 
he took charge of the laboratory of the whole- 
sale drug business of Bailey & Porter, of 
Zanesville, Ohio. Leaving Zanesville, he 
went to Pittsburg, where he entered the em- 
ploy of George A. Kelley & Co., having com- 



310 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



plete charge of their second floor shipping 
department, where he remained for a short 
period. He then went to Beaver Falls, and 
was for some time a clerk for W. H. Hamil- 
ton. On seeing an opportunity to better his 
condition, he went to Pittsburg and took 
charge of the Twenty-fourth street drug store 
of Emil G. Stookey, — the same business now 
being conducted by N. B. Stookey. Mr. 
Beuter remained there until 1894, and then 
went into the drug business for himself at 
619 Seventh avenue, Beaver Falls, where he 
conducts a first-class drug store. 

In connection with his regular line of drugs, 
he is the patentee and manufacturer of the 
celebrated medicine known as "No-Dys-Pep" 
compound, having a large sale throughout 
the country. 

The subject of this biography won for his 
bride, Hattie W. Hays, daughter of Charles 
Hays, of New Brighton, PennS3'lvania. Mrs. 
Beuter has a kind and sweet disposition and 
is a great favorite in all classes of society. 
She is well and favorably known throughout 
Beaver county. Mr. Beuter is a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
of Rochester, Pa. ; of Beaver Falls Lodge, No. 
293, Knights of Pythias, and of Walnut Camp, 
No. 2, Woodmen of the World, of Beaver 
Falls. 

John Beuter has worked hard and earnestly, 
and with a determination that is bound to be 
rewarded by success. He believes in doing 
thoroughly everything that is required of him ; 
he keeps a fine line of pure drugs for his cus- 
tomers, and also makes a specialty of filling 
prescriptions with promptness and care. 



CDWARD KNOX HUM. The Beav- 
er National Bank, of Beaver, Pa., 
'was fortunate in having as an orig- 
inator and promoter the gentleman whose 
name heads these lines, who now serves effi- 
ciently as vice-president of that institution. 
He is a man of thorough business ability and 
a sturdy supporter of all enterprises tending to 
improve the interests of the community, — his 
name being one familiar to the residents of 
Beaver county. He was born in Beaver, 
August II, 1858, and is a son of James W. 
and Margaret (Briggs) Hum. 

His great-grandfather, who established the 
Hum family in this country, was Jacob Hum, 
a native of Germany, who settled in Ohio and 
there followed the trade of a hatter. His 
business was first located at Columbiana, 
Columbiana county, Ohio, but he thereafter 
engaged in a similar line of business at Salem, 
Ohio. He married a lady of Scotch birth, 
who bore him the following children : David ; 
John ; Jacob ; Adam ; Margaret ; and George. 
He died at the age of eighty-three years. 

David Hum, the grandfather of Edward 
Knox Hum, was born in Cokimbiana county, 
Ohio, and early in life undertook the trade of 
a hatter, but, later, became a merchant of 
Lisbon, Ohio, where he died at the age of 
eighty years. He was four times married, 
and by his first wife, Mary Ann Hickox, who 
died at the age of thirty-six years, he had 
the follov, ing offspring : Angelina (Hatcher) ; 
Jam.es Winnard, who married Margaret 
Briggs; Richard Winchester, an early set- 
tler of Lowellville, Ohio; Columbus C, who 



BEAVER COUNTY 



311 



lives near Toledo, Ohio; Martha (Throne), of 
East Palestine, Ohio; and Elizabeth, deceased. 
His second union, with Rebecca Thorn, was 
blessed by the birth of a son, John. His third 
wife's given name was Esther, and his fourth 
union was with Mary Silverthorn. 

James W. Hum, a record of whose life ap- 
pears elsewhere, and the father of the subject 
of this sketch, was born in Deerficld township, 
Columbiana county, Ohio, February i6, 1827. 
He left home at the age of ten years to live 
with his uncle, John Hum, with whom he re- 
mained four years. He then began to shift for 
himself and received employment on a steamer 
on the Ohio River as a cabin boy, and later 
learned the trade of boat carpenter. He mani- 
fested considerable natural ability in this line, 
and, after leaving the river, manufactured an 
ingenious machine known as a fanning mill. 
Threshing was at this time all done by hand, 
and this machine was used to clean the grain. 
It m-et with marked success on the market 
and his business increased rapidly, resulting 
in the employment of a goodly number of 
men. He subsequently became interested in 
the lightning rod business, and in 1849 was 
one of the founders of the American Light- 
ning Rod plant at Philadelphia. The west- 
ern section of the country was assigned to 
him, and he established a large wholesale and 
retail store at No. 19 Market street, Pitts- 
burg. In 1882, he was joined in the business 
by his son, E. K. Hum, and together they con- 
tinued until the father retired from active busi- 
ness duties in 1892. He built the home resi- 
dence, in which Mrs. Hum now lives, in 1868, 



and he was also possessed of considerable real 
estate in Bridgewater and Beaver at the time 
of his demise, March 17, 1895. James W. 
Hum's faithful companion in the pathways of 
life was Margaret Briggs, a daughter of Henry 
and Mary (Westcoat) Briggs. Henry Briggs 
was born in Dighton, Mass., and was a son of 
Matthew and Cecelia (Reed) Briggs, and 
grandson of Matthew Briggs, a blacksmith by 
trade, who came to this country from Eng- 
land. Matthew, Jr., was born in Dighton, 
Mass., and was also a blacksmith, following 
that occupation all of his active days. By 
his first wife he had three children, as fol- 
lows: Matthew, Elizabeth, and Deliverance. 
He formed a second union with Cecelia Reed 
and they had five children : Henry, Nancy, 
Mary, Joseph, and Cecelia. Henry Briggs, 
the father of Mrs. Hum, learned the trade of 
a blacksmith, and, in 1836, removed to South 
Beaver township, Beaver county. Pa., where 
he purchased a farm. In addition to general 
farming, he was engaged at his trade all of 
his active life, but spent his last days in re- 
tirement, dying at the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Hum, in the eighty-fourth year of his 
age. His wife survived him several years, and 
died at the remarkable age of eighty-nine 
years. She had made several trips to her na- 
tive state, Massachusetts, and had returned 
from one of these trips but two months prior 
to her death. Their children were : Henry, 
who died young ; Mary ; Julia ; William ; Eliza- 
beth ; Margaret ; and Spencer. 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Hum were the par- 
ents of the following: Henry Thornton, now 



312 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



of Pike county, 111., who first married Jose- 
phine Blake, by whom he has one child,' 
Harry C, and secondly married Elizabeth 
Hughes, by whom he has one child, Carl D. ; 
Edward Knox, the subject of this personal 
history; Mary Elizabeth, deceased, the wife of 
Frank Robinson, by whom she had one child, 
Lois; James Weston, a farmer of Columbiana 
county, Ohio, who married Matilda Hineman, 
and had the following children,- — Edward K., 
Guy H., Mary A., Martha T., James VV., 
and Wayne A. ; Fred Cook, deceased, who 
married Florence King, by whom he had a 
son, Forrest, deceased; Arthur Westcoat, an 
electrical engineer, of Bridgewater, who mar- 
ried Mary Doing, deceased; and Margaret 
Mott, the wife of Samuel P. Provost, a flour 
manufacturer and merchant, of Pittsburg. 
Fraternally, he was a member of the Masonic 
lodge at Beaver, being one of its charter 
members. 

Edward K. Hum attended Beaver College, 
and while a young man became associated in 
business with his father, under the firm name 
of J. W. Hum & Son, wholesale and retail 
dealers in lightning rods and fixtures, at Pitts- 
burg. Some twelve years later, after the death 
of his father, he formed a partnership with 
W. M. Leatherman, the firm name being Hum 
& Leatherman, at No. 8 Market street, Pitts- 
burg. The subject of this sketch was the 
leading spirit in the organization and build- 
ing of the Beaver National Bank, of Beaver, 
Pennsylvania. It has a capital of $100,000, 
and its officers, who are among the most sub- 
stantial and public-spirited citizens of Beaver 



county, are as follows: Jesse R. Leonard, 
president ; Edward K. Hum, vice-president ; 
Charles M. Hughes, cashier; and W. P. Judd, 
assistant cashier. The directors are : Jesse R. 
Leonard ; Edward K. Hum ; U. S. Strouss, 
M. D. ; Thomas F. Galey; Joseph H. Evans; 
Winfield S. Moore, and Agnew Hice. 

The Beaver National Bank is one of the 
prettiest specimens of business architecture in 
W^estern Pennsylvania, being constructed of 
Cle\'eland sandstone and having large plate- 
glass windows. It is richly finished, furnished 
in elegant style, and its arrangement is most 
conxenient for the transaction of business. 
The bank has shown its patrons the greatest 
courtesy, and by their enterprise its officials 
ha\'e made it one of th.e leading financial in- 
stitutions in the county. 

Mr. Hum, although his business was for 
many years located at Pittsburg, has always 
been a loyal citizen of Beaver, and when not 
attending to business afifairs he is always to be 
found enjoying the companionship of his 
family at his elegant home. In 1885 he built 
a residence on Third street, in which he re- 
sided until 1896, when he disposed of it to 
James Galey and built his present dwelling, a 
fine brick structure supplied with all modern 
conveniences for the highest enjoyment of 
life. He also owns considerable real estate 
in Beaver. On September 26, 1882. Edward K. 
Hum was joined in the holy bonds of wedlock 
with Emma L. Young, a daughter of Jacob 
and Lucinda M. Young, of Columbiana 
county, Ohio, and they have two children, 
namely: James Winnard and Anna. Era- 




THOMAS M. FITZGERALD. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



315 



ternally, Mr. Hum is a member of St. James 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Beaver; Em-eka Chap- 
ter, R. A. M., of Rochester; Pittsburg Com- 
mandery, No. i, Knights Templar, of Pitts- 
l)urg; and Syria Temple of the Mystic Shrine, 
I'ittsburg. A man who has ever faithfully en- 
deavored to be of benefit to his fellow-citizens 
of Beaver county, the subject of our sketch is 
held in the highest esteem, and numbers his 
friends by the score. 



/rrr*-^ HOMAS M. FITZGERALD, a re- 
4 1 cent portrait of whom is shown on the 
opposite page, is descended from a line 
of ancestral gardeners, and is very fond of 
the culture of flowers, which he has made his 
like-work. He conducts one of the most 
beautiful gardens in Beaver county, situated 
in the borough of Beaver, and he has estab- 
lished a reputation as one of the best artists 
in his profession. He was born in Hulton 
township, Allegheny county. Pa., February 
2y, 1868, and is a son of Thomas and Mary 
(Healey) Fitzgerald. 

The father of Thomas M. was born in Lis- 
towel, County K^erry, Ireland, and when a 
boy, learned the trade of a gardener and be- 
came an e.xpert in the culture of flowers ; for 
nine years he managed the grounds and hot- 
house of Lord Colliss, of Tarbert township, 
County Kerry, Ireland ; he then engaged with 
Dr. Barrington, of Glin, County Limerick, Ire- 
land, for fifteen years. He subsequently went 
to Hamilton, Canada, where he spent two 



years, and, as he had many friends and ac- 
quaintances in Pittsburg, Pa., he located there 
in 1866, and worked for many prominent men 
of that city, who owned large and handsome 
properties;, he was employed by Mr. Mur- 
dick, Mrs. Deeny, and Mr. Charles McGee; 
he now has charge of Mr. M. C. Miller's 
grounds at Turtle Creek. While working in 
the employ of Lord Colliss, he made the ac- 
quaintance of his present wife. Both being 
poor and not able to buy a home in their 
native country, Thomas decided to come to 
America in the effort to seek home and for- 
tune; his plans being crowned with success, 
three years later he wrote for his intended 
wife, and, upon her arrival here, they were 
happily united in marriage. A few years later 
the health of Mr. Fitzgerald's mother began 
to fail, and he sent his wife and five children 
to his old home in Ireland, where they re- 
mained four years, — returning in much bet- 
ter health and spirits. Mr. and Mrs. Fitz- 
gerald are the parents of eight children: 
Joseph, deceased; John; Thomas M.; James; 
Annie ; Mary ; Edward, who served at Manila 
in Company B, loth Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf.; and 
William, deceased. 

The subject of this memoir attended school, 
four years, at Tarbert, Ireland, and in this 
country, at New Castle, Pennsylvania. While 
a mere boy, he assisted his father in the culti- 
vation of flowers and improved every oppor- 
tunity to gain a thorough knowledge of the 
art; in 1889 he came to Beaver to take charge 
of the beautiful grounds and hothouse of Hon. 
J. F. Dravo, but a year later he leased the 



316 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



hothouse, and a part of the grounds, of his 
employer, and now keeps one of the finest 
displays of flowers ever seen. The beds and 
plants are artistically arranged, and the choice, 
blooming flowers present an exquisite appear- 
ance; he is prepared to furnish flowers, on 
short notice, for funerals, weddings, and other 
occasions, and he also ships largely to other 
points. Mr. Fitzgerald is well deserving, and 
worthy of his large patronage, and he has 
shown the people of the vicinity that they 
always have at their command the most se- 
lect assortment of floral beauties. He is 
genial and accommodating to all, and his 
pleasant manners and honest business 
methods, have won for him the esteem and 
good will of all who know him. He has not 
only adopted Beaver as his place of business, 
but likewise as his home, and he owns two 
fine lots on Commerce street, upon which he 
erected a handsome residence in 1893. In 
July, 1899, he purchased the Campbell estate, 
consisting of six and one-half acres on Fifth 
street, on which he will erect a large range of 
greenhouses to better accommodate his grow- 
ing business. 

Mr. Fitzgerald wedded Nora, a daughter of 
Jeremiah Minihan, of County Cork, Ireland, 
and three children have resulted from their 
union: Mary Catherine, born July 16, 1896; 
John Leo, born February 23, 1898; and 
Joseph Thomas, the last two being twins. Re- 
ligiously, our subject is a member of the 
Catholic church; politically, he is independent 
in his views. 



fOHN R. EAKIN, who owns a controll- 
ing interest in the Olive Stove Works, 
at Rochester, Pa., of which he is secre- 
tary and treasurer, is one of the most es- 
teemed citizens of Beaver, Pa., and, although 
in the seventieth year of his age. he is today 
as active a man as can be found in Beaver 
county. He has seen Beaver grov>' from the 
little settlement called Beaver Town, to its 
present stage of development, as one of the 
finest and most prosperous boroughs in 
Western Pennsylvania. John R. Eakin was 
born July 20, 1829, in Beaver, Pennsylvania. 
He is a son of James and J.Iary (Quail!) 
Eakin, and grandson of John Eakin, who 
was of Scotch-Irish descent. 

James Eakin, father of John R., was born 
in County Derry, Ireland, within fourteen 
miles of Londonderry. He was reared under 
the old Presbyterian methods, and took a 
great dislike to the controlling element of Ire- 
land. In 1808, at the age of sixteen years, 
he packed liis few belongings and started for 
"free America." Plaving a fine education for 
that day, and being active and energetic, he 
had no fear of meeting v.ith failure in the new 
world, but looked eagerly forward to the time 
when he could make a home for himself, and 
rear a family in accordance with his own ideas. 
Upon his arrival in the United States, he 
drifted to Philadelphia, Pa., where he began 
working at the trade of a chandler, which con- 
sists of candle making. He remained at that 
place for about fourteen years, removing, in 
1822, west to Pittsburg, and followed the same 
occupation with B. C. Sawyer, of that city. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



317 



Later, he began teacliing school ; being a fine 
scholar and a splendid writer, he experienced 
no diiiiculty in obtaining a desirable situation. 
He went to Beaver, Pa., where he taught in 
the old academy which stood there many 
years ago. Mr. Eakin also opened a store 
on the same site where the Quay business 
block was later erected. Still later, he built a 
residence and store on the corner of Third 
street and College avenue. There his death 
occurred, in 1847, at the age of sixty-four 
years. In politics, he was a Whig, and served 
many years as justice of the peace, and as 
burgess of Beaver. He also owned a fine 
farm, which v.'as subsequently the property 
of Mr. Hardy. 

James Eakin was united in marriage with 
Mary Quaill. She v>'as born in Washington 
county. Pa., in 1804, ^nd passed av/ay from 
her earthly home in 1892. Their union was 
prolific of the following children : Mary Jane ; 
John R. ; Eliza Ann ; Sarah ; James Q. ; Mar- 
garet; Victoria; Emma; and Matilda. Mary 
Jane is the wife of Daniel Risinger, a prom- 
inent blacksmith of Beaver. John R. is the 
subject of these lines. Eliza Ann is the widow 
of John D. Davidson ; she resides in Middle- 
sex, Pennsylvania. Sarah is the wife of 
Abraham Wolf, of Beaver. James Q. is de- 
ceased ; he married Elizabeth Strock, who still 
survives him, and resides in Bridgewater. 
Margaret is the wife of J. M. Dunlap. Vic- 
toria is the wife of H. H. Newkirk, of 
Rochester, Pennsylvania. Emma, who is de- 
ceased, was the wife of Jacob M. Johnson. 
Matilda is the wife of J. B. Wilson, of Beaver. 



John R. Eakin pursued a course of study at 
Beaver Academy, and, like his honored 
father, he adopted the profession of instruct- 
ing youthful minds. But upon the death of 
his father, who left a widow with a fam- 
ily of small children, it devolved upon 
John, the eldest son, to assist his mother in 
rearing the smaller ones. He realized this 
to be his first duty, nor was that duty shirked ; 
rather may it be said that it was performed in 
a faithful manner, quite worthy of emulation 
by those similarly situated. He accompanied 
his bereaved mother and the family to the 
farm which the father's thrift and prosperity 
had provided. This farm he conducted and 
managed to the best of his abilit}^ and as- 
sisted his mother in every possible way to 
rear and educate the children. After eight 
years upon the farm, he felt free to seek other 
pursuits, and became a steamboat clerk on the 
Ohio River ; he followed river life for a period 
of twelve years, during all of which time he 
held the position of either clerk or captain. 
Desiring to settle down in order to be more 
with his family, he then accepted a place as 
clerk in the county commissioner's office, and 
also became deputy treasurer, serving two 
years. Later, he was interested in the manu- 
facture of glass at Beaver Falls, for five years. 
In 1875, he was elected county treasurer of 
Beaver county, serving one term. Subse- 
quently, in company with others, he pur- 
chased the Olive Stove Works in 1879. This 
plant was established in 1872, and was sold at 
sheriff's sale, in 1879. Mr. Eakin was at once 
appointed secretary, treasurer, and general 



318 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



manager of the works, and under his careful, 
judicious management, the business took an- 
other turn, and has since been a very progres- 
sive and prosperous plant. The original works 
have been enlarged, in addition to which new 
buildings have been added; with increased 
facilities and capacities, the plant now turns 
out as fine a line of stoves and ranges as any 
plant of its size in America. It is located 
on Railroad street, and the cpntrolling interest 
is now owned by Mr. Eakin. In addition to 
his business interests, Mr. Eakin also owns 
the premises on Third street, formerly belong- 
ing to his beloved father, and his present resi- 
dence on College avenue, which is a beautiful, 
modern brick dwelling. 

John R. Eakin was joined in the holy bonds 
of matrimony with Margaret Mitchell. This 
most happy union resulted in the birth of two 
daughters and one son, whose names are : 
Annie M., Emma E. and Joseph Mitchell. 
Annie M., the eldest daughter, is the wife of 
J. Rankin Martin, a leading attorney of 
Beaver Falls, whose sketch also appears in 
this volume. Emma E., the second daughter, 
is the widov/ of James J. Davidson, whose life 
history appears elsewhere in this volume of 
biographies. Joseph Mitchell, the third child, 
and only son, is in business with his father, 
being a partner and bookkeeper in the Olive 
Stove Works. He pursued a course of study 
in the Beaver high schools, and at Beaver 
Falls, and, when seventeen years of age, be- 
came interested in the plant to which his 
whole life has been devoted. He is fast as- 
suming' the heavier duties of the works. He 



wedded Minnie White, and they have a son, 
v.diom they call John Mitchell. Joseph M. 
Eakin is a Knight Templar Mason, a Shriner, 
an Odd Fellow, and a Knight of Pythias. 

Our subject and his family are of the Pres- 
byterian faith. Mr. Eakin is a member of the 
borough council, and has always been a pub- 
lic-spirited man, having done much to further 
the progress of Beaver. He is spending the 
sunset of life, surrounded by loving friends 
and many comforts, and is reaping the just 
reward of earnest and well-directed efforts. 

Joseph Mitchell, father-in-law of John R. 
Eakin, was born in Ireland and came to the 
United States in 1822, at the age of thirty - 
four years. He located at New Brighton, 
Pa., and engaged in agricultural pursuits, re- 
moving in 1826 to Beaver, where he went 
into mercantile pursuits. He was very suc- 
cessful in this line, and purchased ground ad- 
joining Beaver on the north and west, until 
he was the owner of much valuable acreage. 
He built a handsome brick residence at Van- 
port, now known as the Purdy farm. He 
continued to prosper until he had accum- 
ulated a nice property. He served as a justice 
of the peace and as a school director. He 
did business at the Pittsburg Bank, and at 
the advanced age of eighty-seven years, just 
as he was about to start to Pittsburg on busi- 
ness, he slipped and fell, breaking his leg, 
which caused his death shortly afterward, in 
1876. He was joined in marriage with Anne 
McCreary, a daughter of James McCreary, 
of Beaver county, Pennsylvania. She died m 
1846 at the age of thirty-six years. Their 



BEAVER COUNTY 



319 



children were: Eliza, deceased; Sarah, wife 
of Jesse Cruthers, of Beaver county; Mar- 
garet, wife of the subject of this sketch; 
Esther, wife of H. M. Cunningham, of Ohio; 
Maria L., wife of the late T. B. Cunningham, 
of Ohio ; James, who married Lucinda Green- 
lee, of Vanport, Beaver county ; and Shannon 
R., who married Annie E. Stokes. 



R. JOHN D. COFFIN, deceased, 
was for many years a most distin- 
guished physician of Beaver Valley. 
Having an established reputation before locat- 
ing there in 1865, he soon acquired an ex- 
tensive practice. His profound knowledge 
of therapeutics and his most thorough man- 
ner of diagnosing, first gained for him the con- 
fidence of the people in a professional way, 
and as closer relationships sprang up he be- 
came the honored friend of his patients. In 
the latter years of his life he lived in partial 
retirement in Beaver Falls, just retaining suf- 
ficient practice to employ his time. The Cof- 
fins are an old English family with genealogi- 
cal records dating back to the twelfth century. 
The family is one of the most prominent in 
New England, and includes many bankers 
and men of mark in all professions. At the 
family reunion held at Nantucket in 1884, 
there were about eight hundred names regis- 
tered as descendants of a common ancestry, 
who were then living. The first of the line 
in America was Tristam Cof^n, who came 
from Devonshire, England, early in the seven- 



teenth century and settled at Nantucket 
Island, Massachusetts. In the course of time 
one branch of the Cof^n family went over to 
Newburyport, Mass., and settled there. It 
is from this latter branch that Dr. Cofifin is 
descended. He was born in Newburyport, 
Mass., in 1809, and was a son of Nathan E. 
and Eunice (Emory) Cofifin. 

Nathan E. Cofifin was a well-known ship 
builder of Newburyport, Mass., but about the 
year 1820, he relinquished that occupation and 
moved to New Lisbon, Ohio, where he be- 
came a contractor. Upon moving to Alle- 
gheny, subsequently, he retired to enjoy the 
benefits of his industrious past. His wife died 
there, of cholera, and he survived her some 
years, dying in 1854. Their children were: 
Charles, at one time a celebrated judge of 
the Cincinnati courts; Emory, deceased, who 
was a practitioner of medicine ; Gardiner, who 
became a wealthy manufacturer ; Harrison, at 
one time president of the Des Moines Loan 
& Trust Company, who was succeeded by 
his son ; Carey, a merchant ; Emeline McMil- 
lan, whose husband is a printer of Pittsburg ; 
Harriet (Nesbit) ; and John D., the gentle- 
man whose name heads these lines. 

John D. Coffin received his intellectual 
training in the common schools of Newbury- 
port, Mass., and after his parents removed to 
New Lisbon, Ohio, he began the study of 
medicine under Dr. McCook. After thor- 
oughly mastering the science, he began 
to practice at New Lisbon in 1830, 
remaining there for five years, and 
moving to Petersburg, Ohio, in 1835. 



320 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



After practicing there for a period 
of fifteen years' duration, he located in West- 
moreland county, Pa., where he continued 
with much success until 1865. He then se- 
cured a good practice in Rochester, Beaver 
county. Pa., where he remained for ten years. 
Possessing some property at Homewood, he 
then betook himself there to follow his pro- 
fession. These years of hard and continuous 
labor resulted in placing him in good financial 
circumstances, and in September, 1882, he 
decided to retire, as he was getting old, and 
moved to Beaver Falls. But inactivity was 
not suited to one of his energetic nature, and 
we soon find him again caring for a limited 
practice, a few old patients, just enough to 
keep him moderately busy. The Doctor was 
called to his final rest in August, 1893, aged 
eighty-four years. 

Doctor Coffin was united in marriage, in 
1851, with Margaret Harrah, who came of one 
of the pioneer families of Western Pennsyl- 
vania, and was a daughter of William and 
Eliza (Stewart) Harrah. Her grandfather 
was also William Harrah, who was born in 
Massachusetts, in 1767. and followed the oc- 
cupation of a farmer. He later moved to 
Petersburg, Ohio, in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century, and became one of the 
very early pioneers. He bought a farm of 
four hundred acres of wild land, on which, 
after making a clearing, he built a log house. 
He then built a fine frame house, in which 
he lived the remainder of his days. He was 
a devout Presbyterian and served as elder a 
great many years. He left the following chil- 



dren : William ; Hugh ; Samuel ; John ; Nancy 
(Nesbit) ; Margaret (Adams) ; and Mary (Wat- 
son). William Harrah, the father of Mrs. 
Coffin, was born in Massachusetts and re- 
moved to Petersburg, Ohio, with his parents, 
making the trip by wagon. They did their 
own cooking and lived in the wagon, and at 
the end of six weeks they arrived at the end 
of their journey. He received his educational 
training in the schools of Beaver county, and 
took up the occupation of a miller, building 
what was probably the fi.'-st mill in the county, 
on Beaver Creek, near Enon Valley. He fol- 
lowed that until he reached his declining 
years, and then opened a small grocery store, 
from which lie realized a sufficient amount to 
spend his last days in easy circumstances. He 
married Elizabeth Stewart in 1826, and they 
had seven children, namely: Harvey; Jane; 
Alargaret ; Mary (>,Iagee) ; James Ritner of 
Beaver, Pa.; Stewart; and Laura (Fowler), of 
V^anport, Pennsylvania. Harvey died young. 
Jane (Saltsman) is deceased; her husband was 
a very successful merchant of Saltsman Sta- 
tion, Jefferson county. Pa., and also a wealthy 
land ov.-ner. Stewart is a physician residing 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Mar- 
garet was born near Enon Valley, in Law- 
rence county, Pa., and was a pupil in the 
public schools. At the early age of 18 years, 
she was married to Dr. Cofhn, and they had 
the following children : Lizzie ; Jennie E. ; 
Ella (Strock), whose husband is a real estate 
and insurance agent; Matilda; Anna M. ; John 
W. ; and Laura M. 

Lizzie Coffin was born in 1853, in Peters- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



321 



burg-, Pa., is a graduate of Beaver College and 
Edinboro State Normal School. Prior to her 
marriage she taught school in New Brighton 
and is now teaching in the public schools of 
Chicago. Slie married \V. Fitch, who, after 
graduating from Oberlin College, was prin- 
cipal of a Chicago high school. He died in 
Honduras while representing the Honduras 
Land i^ Fruit Company. They had one 
child, Alice. 

Jennie E. (Sunderlin), whose husband read 
law and then took up teaching, lives at Teka- 
mah, Nebraska, where J\Ir. Sunderlin is prin- 
cipal of the Tekamah public schools. He is a 
native of Michigan. She was graduated from 
the Edinboro State Normal School and taught 
at New Brighton for some years. 

Matilda (Ford), who enjoys a national rep- 
utation as an educator and a lecturer on in- 
stitute Vi'ork, was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pa., in 1861, and attended Beaver Col- 
lege and the Edinboro State Normal School. 
She taught two years at New Brighton and 
one year in the Beaver Falls High School, 
after which she took a course of study in the 
Cook County Normal School under Col. F. 
W. Parker. She held a position as instructor in 
that institution for three years, when she ac- 
cepted a similar position in Millersville (Pa.) 
State Normal School; still later she w-as em- 
ployed as principal of the Model School, for 
three years. Becoming interested in insti- 
tute v.ork, she lectured in every state in the 
Union, and establislied a high reputation 
throughout the country, which brought her 
many handsome ofifers at a high salary. She 



became assistant principal of the public 
schools of Detroit, and continued thus for five 
years, having three hundred teachers under 
her direction. In 1897, she was united in 
marriage v»ith Franklin Ford, a member of a 
well-known comm.ercial agency firm in the 
city of New York. She was offered the posi- 
tion of assistant principal of the schools of 
that city at a salary of $4,000, but this she 
declined. She is a successful lecturer on 
geography and reading, and, with one excep- 
tion, she has been offered the highest salary 
ever offered to a woman. She contemplates 
a public career and her future certainly has a 
brilliant outlook. 

Amia M., who was educated in the Edin- 
boro (Pa.) State Normal and the Cook County 
(111.) State Normal schools, is now attaining 
considerable success as a teacher in the public 
schools of Chicago. 

John W. Comn was born in Greensburg, 
Pa., and obtained his primary education in 
the schools of Beaver Falls and in the high 
school of that place. He then studied medi- 
cine at Cleveland, and was graduated from 
the Western Reserve University in 1889, re- 
ceiving the degree of I\I. D. He built up an 
excellent practice in Beaver Falls, being lo- 
cated at No. 1402 Seventh avenue. He was 
appointed surgeon with the rank of lieu- 
tenant, in the National Guards, by Gov. Pat- 
tison, and, on May i, 1898, he enlisted in the 
same grade in the loth Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf., 
and accomipanied the regiment to Manila, 
helping to establish its brilliant record, there 
i made, Dr. Coffin is also interested in con- 



322 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



siderable realty. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order and of the Elks. 

Laura M. Cofifin, who was born in 
Rochester, Pa., October 23, 1870, attended 
the public schools of Beaver Falls, and grad- 
uated from the high school there. She took 
a course of study under Col. Parker in the 
Cook County (111.) State Normal School, 
after which she taught for one year in the 
Beaver Falls public schools. She is a young 
woman of many admirable traits of character, 
and her friends and acquaintances in the vicin- 
ity of Beaver Falls are numberless. 

Dr. John D. Coffin, deceased, was an inde- 
pendent Democrat in politics, but respectfully 
declined all offices. Religiously, he was a con- 
scientious member of the First Christian 
church. Socially, he was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Masonic order. 




;AMUEL THOMAS, deceased, was 
for many years an extensive farmer 
and sheep-raiser of Beaver county, 
in which he lived all his life. A man of ex- 
ceedingly strong character and excellent 
habits, he was greatly respected by all with 
whom he was acquainted, and his friends were 
without number. He was born in Chippewa 
township, Beaver county, March 6, 18 18, and 
was a son of Elam and Barbara (Baker) 
Thomas. 

Elam Thomas, the father of Samuel, was a 
native of Wales, and after coming to this 
country spent most of his life in Beaver 
county, in that section which is now Lawrence 



county. As a result of his union with Bar- 
bara Baker, eight children, all of whom are 
now deceased, were born,— the youngest of 
them being our subject. 

Samuel Thomas spent ten years of his early 
life with an uncle, during which time he ac- 
quired the money with which he bought a 
farm of one-hundred acres in Beaver county, 
the one on which Mrs. Thomas now lives. 
The farm was partially cleared and he leased 
it until after his marriage, when, on April 3, 
1S48, they moved upon it. He had taught 
school prior to his marriage, and continued 
so to do for two terms thereafter. They lived 
in a rude old log house until about twenty 
years ago, when he erected the one which 
now stands. In addition to the home farm, 
he owned a property of one hundred and 
tv. enty-three acres, which he cultivated, but 
since his death, it has been sold. He was a 
great sheep-raiser, having some 300 head of 
the finest in the county. Mr. Thomas was 
called to his final rest in 1883, and his widow 
has since very successfully managed the farm, 
which is worked by her brother, William T. 

On December 7, 1847, he formed a matri- 
monial alliance with Eliza Jane Crans, a 
daughter of James and Elizabeth (Thomas) 
Crans, and a granddaughter of John Crans, 
who was a native of New York State, but 
moved to Ohio in early life. Mrs. Thomas 
was born December 8, 1824, and was one of a 
family of ten children, eight of whom now 
live, as follows: Eliza Jane, the wife of Sam- 
uel Thomas ; Mary Ann ; John J. ; Ellen J. ; 
Laura ; William T. ; Elizabeth ; and James. 




ALliERT M. JOLLY. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



325 



Those deceased are David R. and Julius L., 
both of whom were taken ill and died while 
serving in the army during the Civil War. 
After the death of her husband, Mrs. Thomas, 
who has no children of her own, adopted 
Maggie E. Ruby, whose family lives in 
Franklin township. She is a woman of sym- 
pathetic and charitable disposition, and has 
many friends who love her for her excellent 
traits of character. She is a remarkably well 
preser\'ed lady, for one of her years. 

Mr. Thomas was what may be termed a 
home man, a good husband, and very fond 
of the society of his v.ife. He had excellent 
habits, using neither tobacco nor intoxicating 
liquors. In politics, he supported the Repub- 
lican party, but favored the cause of Prohibi- 
tion. He was not an aspirant to office, yet 
served as supervisor. Religiously, he was a 
faithful member of the Baptist church, as is 
his widow, and for forty years was a deacon 
in the church. 




LBERT M. JOLLY, whose portrait is 
presented on the preceding page, has 
for many years been recognized as 
one of Beaver county's most substantial and 
enterprising business men, and is an esteemed 
resident of Beaver Falls. He is connected 
with one of the largest contracting concerns 
in Western Pennsylvania, — that of A. J. Jolly 
^t Sons, his association with this prominent 
firm dating back to 1877. He was born in 
December, 1855, at what is now known as 
Monaca, Beaver county, and is a son of An- 



drew J. Jolly, and grandson of Kenzie Jolly. 

Mr. Jolly traces his family line back to 
Colonel Henry Jolly, of Revolutionary War 
fame, who after that eventful struggle moved 
to Marietta, Ohio, where he became a promiT 
nent citizen. He presided as judge over the 
first court ever held in that state. His wife 
was a Miss Ghriest, who was scalped and tom- 
ahawked by the Indians, and, though the 
wound never healed, she survived this barbar- 
ity for forty-three years, dying at an advanced 
age. Colonel and Mrs. Jolly were the parents 
of the following children : William, Kenzie, 
Albert, and Siddy, the wife of Vashel Dick- 
erson. 

Kenzie Jolly was born in Washington 
county, Ohio, in 1778, and there resided all 
his life engaged in agricultural pursuits. He 
married Elizabeth Dickerson, a daughter of 
Thomas Dickerson ; she was born in 1795 and 
died aged one hundred years and five months. 
She was the mother of the following children : 
Rachel, the wife of John Ankron, of New Or- 
leans, La. ; Rebecca, wife of Abner Martin, 
of Washington county, Ohio ; Henry, also of 
Washington county, Ohio; Dickerson and 
Andrew Jackson residing in Phillipsburg, Pa. ; 
Alpheus B., a resident of Keokuk, Iowa; Wil- 
liam M., who died in his infancy; Electa M., 
the wife of James Hutchinson, of Washington 
county, Ohio; and Owen F., a resident of 
Dayton, Kentucky. 

Andrew Jackson Jolly, father of the sub- 
ject hereof, was born in Washington county, 
Ohio, May 28, 1828, and continued to reside 
there until 1844. He accepted the opportu- 



326 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



iiities afforded by the primitive schools for an 
education, and at the age of sixteen years, he 
came to Pittsburg; there he embarked as a 
boatman on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 
iieginning as a deck-hand and advancing 
through various grades until he became cap- 
tain. This river Hfe was continued until 
1866, when he engaged in prospecting and 
drilling for oil in Beaver county, but soon re- 
sumed the life of a boatman, which business 
he followed until 1872. In that year he en- 
tered upon his present business of furnishing 
stone for building and street-paving. Like 
many other great enterprises the business of 
A. J. Jolly & Sons has developed from small 
beginnings, and is the outgrowth of hard 
labor, perseverance, and indomitable energy. 
It required a great amount of work to secure 
the cobble stone from the river banks, but the 
greatest task was to meet the opposition of 
the older firms in the same business; this was 
happily done, and the present firm now ranks 
among the foremost and most successful con- 
tractors of the state. Their first contract was 
with the Pittsburg & Lake Erie Railroad 
Company, for whom they still continue to 
furnish stone and to do masonry work; they 
also supply other railroads with stone, and the 
stone for the court house and custom house 
at Pittsburg was supplied by them. They 
erected a bridge across the Ohio River at 
Point Pleasant, West Va., one and one-half 
miles long and 103 feet high; they erected the 
bridge at Parkersburg in the same state and 
furnished the stone for lock Number 4, on the 
Monongahela River, and for the bridge at 



Cold Centre, Pa., on the B. & O. R. R. Poli- 
tically, Mr. Jolly is a stanch supporter of the 
Democratic party. He was wedded Septem- 
ber 26, 1850, to Miss Sarah Srodes, a daugh- 
ter of John M. Srodes, of Beaver county, and 
they are the parents of the following children : 
William A., deceased ; John K. ; Albert M. ; 
Marillai E., the wife of David Anderson; 
Eddie, deceased; and Frank L. 

Albert M. Jolly acquired his primary educa- 
tion in the district schools of his native town 
and, in 1874, was graduated from Duff's Mer- 
cantile College of Pittsburg. Returning to 
Phillipsburg in 1877, he became interested in 
contracting, and was made secretary and 
treasurer of the firm of A. J. Jolly & Sons; 
at that time the business was chiefly confined 
to quarrying, but at the present day they do 
all kinds of contracting. The subject of this 
biography gives much attention to the details 
of the business, and is frequently to be found 
in the various localities where the work is 
progressing, — West Virginia having recently 
been his base of operations. Of the many im- 
portant contracts completed by this firm were 
ihe Government lock on the Muskegon River, 
the construction of which occupied nearly one 
year; the large bridge that spans the river at 
Wheeling, West Va. ; several bridges across 
the Beaver River; the firm built the railroad 
from Point Pleasant to Huntington, Pa., and 
also the Twelfth street inclined plane at Pitts- 
burg, one of the first of its kind to carry street 
cars. They have accepted large contracts 
from the P. R. R., the B. & O. R. R., and the 
P. McK. & Y. R. R. The other members of 



BEAVER COUNTY 



327 



the firm are J. K. and F. L. Jolly. Aside from 
his interests with the above firm, our Mr. 
Jolly is interested in many other enterprises, 
among which are the Beaver Valley Street 
Railway Company, of which he was vice-presi- 
dent seven years and is now a stockholder and 
a director. He was, five years, manager of 
the Wheeling Street Railway Company; is 
president of the Sharon Street Railway Com- 
pany; with other members of his family, he 
built the Bellaire, Bridgeport and Martin's 
Ferry Railroad, which was consolidated with 
the Wheeling lines in the fall of 1898; he is a 
director of the Ohio River Bridge Company, 
which owns the bridge which connects Roch- 
ester and Monaca, of which company his 
father is president ; he is president of the Peo- 
ple's Water Company, a corporation formed 
to supply the residents of Beaver Falls with 
pure water at a low rate, and to relieve them 
from the oppression of the old company (one 
of the greatest blessings the borough now 
enjoys) ; he is a director in the National Bank, 
a director in the Home Protective Bank & 
Loan Association, and a director of the 
Columbia Building & Loan Association. 
Mr. Jolly has built many dwellings in the vil- 
lage of Beaver Falls, including the handsome 
residence he has occupied for the past few 
years. 

Mr. Jolly was united in marriage March 23, 
1882, with Miss Jennie E. Small, a daughter 
of Elmira Small, and to this union two chil- 
dren have been born: Clarence D., a stu- 
dent in the Chester, Pa., Military Academy; 
and Leila V., a student in the district school. 



Socially, Mr. Jolly is a member of the F. & 
A. M., Valley Echo Lodge, No. 622; Pitts- 
burg Commandery, No. i, of Pittsburg, Pa., 
— which is next to the largest comman- 
dery in the United States; the L O. 
O. F., of Beaver Falls; Lone Rock Lodge, 
No. 222, K. of P. ; Royal Arcanum ; and the 
Beaver Falls Mechanics' Lodge, No. 28, A. O. 
U. W. Religiously, he belongs to the Metho- 
dist denomination. 

The father of Mr. Jolly's wife is one of the 
oldest residents of the county, the date of his 
birth occurring in March, 1822, and his birth- 
place being Bridgewater, Pennsylvania. He 
was a son of Boston Small, who was born in 
1 78 1. Boston was one of six brothers who 
came to Beaver county about the year 1800, 
at which time the place was a vast forest 
filled with roaming Indians and wild animals. 
Those of his family who accompanied Boston 
to this vicinity were Jacob, a gunsmith ; Fred- 
erick, a blacksmith ; and John, Henry and 
Peter, farmers. They were the sons of Jacob, 
who was born in Germany, and who came to 
America many years prior to the War of In- 
dependence. Boston Small was educated in 
Pittsburg, Pa., and at an early age came down 
the Beaver valley to the sugar camps, and be- 
ing favorably impressed with the appearance 
of the place, he decided to locate there; later 
he was followed by his five brothers. They 
bought large tracts of land, which was cov- 
ered with great quantities of black, red and 
white oak, and hickory. Boston moved to 
Bridgewater in 1833, and there he spent his 
remaining days, being suddenly cut oflf by 



328 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



an attack of apoplexy, in 1858. He was mar- 
ried, in 1809, to Margaret Graham, who was 
born Septeinber 6, 1788, and was a daughter 
of Hughey Graham, a soldier of the Revolu- 
tionary War. Mrs. Small was born at Fair- 
view, and received her mental training in the 
old log school in that district. Five children 
were born to them: Catherine (Calhoon), 
born in December, 1809; Jane (May), born in 
181 1 ; Maria (Swager), born in 1817; Martin, 
born in 1819; and Socrates J. Boston Small 
was a devout Christian, a member of the Pres- 
byterian church, and assisted in the building 
of the churches at Bridgewater and Beaver. 
He never allowed a morning or evening to 
pass without having family prayers. He was 
a Whig, and served as supervisor and school 
director. 

Socrates J. Small was mentally instructed 
in Brighton township, in the old log school 
house, and was obliged to walk three and one- 
half miles daily during the terms; when sev- 
enteen years of age, he learned the trade of a 
cabinet-maker. He built the first hearse in 
the county ; at that time the cofifins were made 
of cherry wood, and the undertakers were 
compelled to take the rough wood, cut it into 
necessary shapes and boil it in whisky in order 
to get the requisite color; then the cofifin was 
covered with beeswax melted with a hot iron 
and poHshed with a cork. There was no 
rough box, no handles on the coffin, no cere- 
mony, and it was difficult to secure anything 
but a wagon to convey the corpse to its final 
resting place. The coffins were sold for one 
dollar a foot. Mr. Small had many strange 



orders to fill while in the undertaking busi- 
ness; one was to furnish a steel casket of pol- 
ished metal, that weighed three hundred and 
fifty pounds. Mr. Small first engaged in the 
business in 1842, with his brother Martin, in 
the town of Bridgewater, but three years later 
he sold out and worked for Robert Gilmore 
and Milton Swager, with whom he had 
learned the trade. In 1846, he returned to 
the furniture and undertaking business, — buy- 
ing out the stock of Mr. Johnson, — and suc- 
cessfully conducted the establishment 
throughout his active life, — retiring in 1887. 
A few years prior to 1875, he was in business 
at Beaver but in that year he moved to Bea- 
ver Falls. Mr. Small wedded Elmira Swager, 
a native of Mercer county, Pa., who came to 
Beaver county when she was but eight years 
of age. Eleven children were born to them : 
Ursula (Johnson), an artist now in the treas- 
ury department at Washington, D. C. ; 
Hiram; Margaret (Coleman), of Rochester; 
George, a farmer; J. Emma (Jolly), wife of 
the subject hereof; Ann M. (Jolly); Maria 
(Allen); Kate (Sterling); Eliza (Owery); 
Frank; and Charles, who died in infancy. 




R. HENRY C. ISEMAN is a skilful 
physician residing in the town of 
Beaver Falls, Pa., and his exceed- 
ingly large practice and wide experience have 
placed him in the foremost ranks of the pro- 
fession in Beaver county. The Doctor makes 
a specialty of hemorrhoids and has been called 
to various cities to treat some of the most 




p. M. WALLOVER. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



331 



prominent men in Western Pennsylvania and 
Eastern Ohio. He was born in Westmore- 
land County, Pa., August i6, 1839, and is a 
son of Christopher and Maggie (Sober) Ise- 
man. His parents were both natives of West- 
moreland county, Pa., and his father was a 
veterinary surgeon and resided in Burrell 
township. 

The Doctor obtained a common school ed- 
ucation in his native district, and having de- 
cided upon the medical profession, he entered 
the oflice of Dr. George Wallace of West- 
moreland county, and subsequently com- 
pleted the required study with Dr. Charles 
Jarvis. In 1869, he opened an office in Alle- 
gheny City, Pa., but after a year had elapsed 
he located in Beaver for six months ; he then 
made Petersburg, Ohio, his headquarters, in 
the vicinity of which he successfully practiced 
his profession for a period of twelve years. 
At the expiration of that time, he returned 
to Beaver, — remaining there ten years. Since 
then he has been practicing in Beaver Falls 
and vicinity. Dr. Iseman realizing the great 
prevalence of hemorrhoids, early began to 
give special attention to the study and treat- 
ment of this disease; in addition to his own 
investigation along that line, he spent one 
year under the instruction and tutelage of that 
well-known specialist. Dr. Wendman. Cer- 
tainly the Doctor has shown a wonderful skill 
in the treatment of hemorrhoids, and counts 
among the patients that he has successfully 
treated, many of the prominent business and 
professional men throughout this part of the 
state, and Eastern Ohio. Dr. Iseman is pop- 



ular as a business man and citizen, and is held 
by his many acquaintances in profound re- 
spect and esteem. When the crisis of the 
Civil War was upon us, true to the patriotic 
instincts of his nature, Dr. Iseman volun- 
teered his services in defense of the Union. 
In 1861, Dr. Iseman was joined in marriage 
to Annie E. Edger, daughter of "Squire" I. 
A. W. Edger, of Darlington, Beaver county, 
Pa., and unto them have been born four chil- 
dren, as follows: Maggie, who married J. C. 
Naugle, of Wampunij Pa. ; William, who mar- 
ried and settled in Miduga, — the maiden name 
of his wife not being known; Alice E., un- 
married ; and Frank. In religious belief the 
family are Presbyterians. In political action, 
he casts his vote for the man best qualified, re- 
gardless of party or creed. 




is 



M. WALLOVER, an extensive oil 
producer and refiner of Smith's 
* Ferry, Beaver county. Pa., whose 
portrait appears on the opposite page, 
was born near Philadelphia, Pa., in 
1824. Several generations of the Wall- 
over family were born in that vicin- 
ity. The birth of his father, William H., 
and of his grandfather, after whom he was 
named, also occurred in that part of the state. 
His grandfather, M. P. Wallover, was the son 
of a well-known sea captain. He was reared 
and educated in the city of Philadelphia, and 
at an early age became interested in the manu- 
facture of paper. In those pioneer days all 
the work was done by hand, and to do an ex- 



332 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



tensive business required considerable cap- 
ital. He was successful in his operations and 
established two mills, one on Mill Creek, th« 
other on Wissahickon Creek. He became 
very wealthy. At that early day, only wealthy 
people could afford to buy a piano, and he 
bought one of the finest instruments shipped 
to this country. The whole family became 
expert players on this instrument. 

He reared a family of six children, namely : 
Peter; WilHam H.; Harry, who went to 
Mexico, and there formed a partnership with 
a Mr. Bellfield (both of whom showed their 
patriotism by offering their place to the gov- 
ernment for a garrison) ; Harriet, who became 
the wife of a Mr. Duckett, a wealthy paper 
manufacturer ; Margaret (Shee) ; and Mary 
Ann. 

William H. Wallover, father of the subject 
of this sketch, obtained his intellectual train- 
ing in Philadelphia, and, although the ad- 
vantages were meagre, he received a fair edu- 
cation. His first business relations were those 
with his father, whom he assisted in the paper 
mills. He was interested in that business dur- 
ing all of his active career. He married Har- 
riet Mervine, and tliey reared three children : 
P. M., the subject of this sketch; Anna, the 
wife of General Daniel Dare ; and Henry, who 
died at the age of six years. 

William H. Wallover died in 1829, and his 
widow married a Mr. Stott, a mechanic of no 
mean ability. He it v.as who put the ma- 
chinery in the United States steamship Prince- 
ton. He was superintendent of the Phoenix- 
ville Iron Works for many years, and retained 



this position up to the time of his death, which 
occurred very suddenly. 

P. M. Wallover received his education un- 
der private tutorship. He learned the trade 
of a machinist, but, although he never followed 
it, he has found his knowledge of mechanics 
very useful during his business life. His first 
work was in a paper mill of his uncle, near 
Philadelphia, where he labored for eight 
months; he was then given the management 
of the estabhshment. Afterwards he became 
interested in two mills, working them on 
sliares, — and continued thus until 1854, when 
he came to Beaver county to manage a mill 
opened by a relative on Little Beaver Creek. 
This mill was operated for three years. Mr. 
Wallover purchased property near Smith's 
Ferry, and on February 9, i860, he began 
to drill for oil. March i, of that year, he 
struck a five-barrel well. This gave him en- 
couragement, and he leased more properly 
and struck a well which produced $60,000 
worth of oil. He has drilled and operated 
twenty-eight Vv'ells, and all of them were good 
producers. 

In 1863, he started an oil refinery, — it be- 
ing the first one in this district. He at oncc- 
began to experiment in the oils, and his efforts 
were crowned with success. He made the 
first signal oil used on the Ohio River; he 
also made the first brand of wool oil used in 
the woolen mills, and got several brands of 
fine machinery oil. In those days the war 
tax was twelve cents per gallon, and one dol- 
lar per barrel. The firm name of the refinery 
v.-as the Wallover Oil Co., but there were three 



BEAVER COUNTY 



333 



parties interested in it. Two of them were 
railroad men, and when the railroad was put 
through that section, the railroad partners 
had to withdraw from the Wallover Oil Co., 
as it was against the rules of the railroad com- 
pany for any of its stockholders to hold out- 
side interests. Consecjuently Mr. Wallover 
purchased their shares and continued the busi- 
ness alone. 

Our subject was joined in the bonds of 
wedlock with Margaret Arthur. She was 
also born in Philadelphia. They have a family 
of eight children: Charles A., now engaged 
in paper manufacturing; William H., who is 
in the oil business, in Indiana; Robert A., 
who is with his father; Joseph D., a contractor 
for drilling oil wells; Bert S., deceased; Ed- 
win S., a salesman and teacher of music; 
Katie, deceased ; and Laura (Boyd). J.Ir. 
Wallover is a Republican, and has served 
in minor ofifices of his town. The family is 
in accord with the M. E. church, of which 
he is a liberal supporter. 



§AMES W. HUM, deceased, an early 
resident of Beaver, Beaver county. Pa., 
was for many long years a very prom- 
inent business man of Western Pennsylvania, 
conducting a large wholesale and retail light- 
ning-rod house at No. 19 Market street, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. He was born in Deerfield town- 
ship, Columbiana county, Ohio, February 16, 
1827, and was a son of David and Mary Ann 
(Hickox) Hum, and grandson of Jacob Hum. 
Jacob Hum, with a brother, early in life 



emigrated from their native country, Ger- 
many, and settled in Ohio, where he worked 
at his trade, that of a hatter. He established 
a business at Columbiana, Columbiana 
county, Ohio, but subsequently engaged in 
the same line of work at Salem, Ohio. He 
formed a matrimonial alliance with a lady of 
Scottish birth, and those of their children who 
grew to maturity were named as follows: 
David ; John ; Jacob ; Adam ; Margaret ; and 
George. Mr. Hum lived to reach the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-three years. 

David Hum, the father of James W., was 
born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and at 
Columbiana followed his father's business for 
some years. Later in life, however, he be- 
came a merchant of Lisbon, Ohio, where he 
died when eighty years old. His first wife's 
maiden name was Mary Ann Hickox, who 
died at thirty-six years of age, leaving the 
following offspring: Angelina (Hatcher); 
James Winnard, who married Margaret 
Briggs; Richard Winchester, an early settler 
of Lowellville, Ohio; Columbus C, who re- 
sides near Toledo, Ohio; Martha (Throne), of 
East Palestine, Ohio ; and Elizabeth, deceased. 
By his second wife, Rebecca Thorn, Mr. Hum 
had one son, John. His third wife's given 
name was Esther, and his fourth union v/as 
with Mary Silverthorn. 

James W. Hum left home at the age of ten 
years to live w-ith his uncle, John Hum. He 
remained with him until he reached the age 
of fourteen years, when he obtained employ- 
ment on a steamboat on the Ohio River, as a 
cabin boy. Later he learned the trade of boat 



334 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



carpenter, a vocation for which he was 
naturally well qualified. Subsequently he es- 
tablished himself at Bridgewater, and dis- 
played considerable genius by manufacturing 
fanning mills, by the means of which grain, 
then threshed by hand, could be cleaned. His 
business became very prosperous, and he em- 
ployed a large number of hands, as his 
product was extensively used in Western 
Pennsylvania. The lightning rod business 
next claimed his attention, and he was one of 
the founders of the American Lightning Rod 
Company, of Philadelphia, in 1849. The 
western section of the United States was his 
exclusive territory, and he established a whole- 
sale and retail store at No. 19 Market street, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Under successful 
management the business expanded, and, in 
1882, he took his son, Edward Knox Hum, 
into partnership with him, and they contin- 
ued together until 1892, when the subject of 
this sketch retired from active labors. It was 
in 1868 that he built the handsome residence 
in which his widow now lives, and he also 
owned considerable valuable realty in Bridge- 
water and Beaver at the time of his death, 
which occurred March 17, 1895. He was a 
man of high principles, a loving husband and 
a fond father, and his friends throughout the 
state were very numerous. 

James W. Hum formed a marital union with 
Margaret Brigg-s, a daughter of Henry and 
Mary (Westcoat) Briggs. Henry Briggs was 
born in Dighton, Mass., and was a son of 
Matthew and Cecelia (Reed) Briggs, and a 
grandson of Matthew Briggs, a blacksmith 



by trade, who came to this country from 
England. Matthew, Jr., was born in Digh- 
ton, Mass., and was also a blacksmith, follow- 
ing that vocation all of his active days. By 
his first wife he had three children, as fol- 
lows : Matthew ; Elizabeth ; and Deliverance. 
By a second marriage, with Cecelia Reed, he 
had five children, namely : Henry ; Nancy ; 
Mary; Joseph; and Cecelia. Henry Briggs, 
the father of our subject's wife, learned the 
trade of a blacksmith, and, in 1836, removed 
to Western Pennsylvania, locating in South 
Beaver township, Beaver county. He pur- 
chased a farm, and, in addition to general 
farming, was engaged at his trade all of his 
active life, but lived his last days in retire- 
ment, dying at the home of his daughter, Mrs. 
Hum, in the eighty-fourth year of his age. 
His wife survived him several years, and died 
at the remarkable age of eighty-nine years. 
She had made several trips to her native state, 
Massachusetts, and had returned from one of 
these trips but two months before her death. 
Their children were : Henry, who died young ; 
Mary; Julia; William; Elizabeth; Margaret; 
and Spencer. 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Hum were the 
parents of the following: Henry Thornton, 
now of Pike county, 111., who first married 
Josephine Blake, by whom he had one child, 
Harry C, and second, married Elizabeth 
Hughes, by whom he had one child, Carl D. ; 
Edward Knox, whose life is also recorded in 
this Book of Biographies; Mary Elizabeth, 
deceased, the wife of Frank Robinson, by 
whom she had one child, Lois ; James Weston, 




PETER J. HUTH. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



337 



a farmer of Columbiana county, Ohio, who 
married Matilda Hineman, and had the fol- 
lowing children, — Edward K., Guy H., Mary 
A., Martha T., James W. , and Wayne A.; 
Fred Cook, deceased, who married Florence 
King, by whom he had a son, Forrest, de- 
ceased; Arthur Westcoat, an electrical engi- 
neer, of Bridgewater, who married Mary Do- 
ing, deceased; and Margaret Mott, the wife of 
Samuel P. Provost, a flour manufacturer and 
merchant, of Pittsburg. Politically, our sub- 
ject was a Democrat, and was a public-spirited 
man. He was also a Mason, and was a char- 
ter member of St. James Lodge, F. & A. M., 
at Beaver. 




19 



f^sETER J. HUTH, an enterprising and 
energetic business man of Rochester, 
Pa., whom we are pleased to represent 
with a portrait on the opposite page, is secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Point Bottle Works, 
Limited, one of the most flourishing estab- 
lishments in Western Pennsylvania. He was 
born in Baltimore, Md., in 1859, and is a son 
of Charles and Veronica (Becker) Huth. 

Charles Huth, the father of our subject, was 
born in Lomborn, near Hanan, Germany, 
and was a single man when he came to Amer- 
ica, locating in the city of Baltimore. After 
his marriage he removed to Pittsburg, and 
later to Freedom, Beaver county, Pa., in 1864, 
and, being a cooper by trade, was employed 
in that line of work. Upon moving to 
Rochester, in 1865, he operated a cooper 
shop, and, in connection with this, he opened 
a store for raftsmen and boatmen, located on 



Water street. He also purchased what had 
formerly been a river warehouse, rebuilt it 
into a residence, and lived there the remainder 
of his days, dying at the age of fifty-eight 
years. His union with Veronica Becker re- 
sulted in the following issue : Adam, a grocer 
on Water street, in Rochester; Peter J., the 
subject of this biographical record; Lizzie, 
the wife of John Schies, of Anderson, Ind. ; 
Josephine, the wife of Henry Heuring, a rec- 
ord of whose life appears elsewhere in this 
volume; Andrew, a printer, of Cleveland, 
Ohio; Kate, the wife of Michael Kinney, of 
Anderson, Ind. ; John, a glass blower, of 
Rochester, Pa. ; Caroline ; George, a glass 
blower of Rochester ; and Annie, a bookkeeper 
in the office of the Point Bottle Works. 
Veronica Becker, mother of Peter J., was 
born January 22, 1832. She is a daughter of 
Henry and Barbara Becker, natives of 
Bruckenau, Bayeru, Germany. She came to 
this country in 1852, and settled in Baltimore, 
Maryland. She married Charles Huth in 
1853, she having previously met him in the 
Old Country. Since the death of her husband, 
she has resided on Water street, in a com- 
fortable home, surrounded by many friends 
and acquaintances. 

Peter J. Huth attended the public schools 
of Rochester until he reached the age of four- 
teen years, when he began work in the pressed 
glass department of the Rochester Tumbler 
Works, continuing there until he entered the 
cutting department of the Phoenix Glass 
Company, of Monaca. He serxed in that ca- 
pacity for four years, and then in the main 



a38 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



office, for a like period, as custodian, clerk, 
and paymaster. In 1887, the Point Bottle 
Works, Limited, was re-organized, and he 
became one of the stockholders, as well as 
secretary and treasurer, in which capacity he 
is still officiating. This plant was established 
in 1879, as the Rochester Flint Vial & Bot- 
tle Works, and was located at the present site 
on the lower end of Water street, by David 
McDonald, its president, and C. I. McDonald, 
vice-president and manager. The estate v.-as 
subsequently sold at sheriff's sale, and was 
bought by the following business men : J. 
M. Buchanan, S. B. Wilson, J. C. Cunning- 
ham, J. C. Irwin, and P. McLaughlin, v/ho 
served as president. In 1887, it was purchased 
and re-organized with the name of Point Bot- 
tle Works, Limited, and Henry Heuring was 
made president. The subject hereof was se- 
lected as secretary and treasurer, and per- 
formed his duties with such satisfaction that 
he was again chosen in 1897, when C. A. 
Dambacher was made president. The di- 
rectors are C. A. Dambacher, P. J. Muth, 
William O'Leary, R. Rodke, John Flint, J. 
R. Dougherty, and L. Hollander. The main 
building of the plant is 60x120 feet; on the 
lower floor are located the mold room, the 
mixing room, and the engine and boiler 
rooms. On the second floor are the packing 
and warehouse rooms. The second building 
is 64x64 feet, fitted with a twelve-pot fur- 
nace, eighteen ovens, and four glory holes. 
They give daily employment to 125 men, and 
manufacture all kinds of bottles, the yearly 
output amounting to $90,000. 



Peter J. Huth was united in marriage with 
Grace O'Leary, a daughter of John and An- 
nie (Ingles) O'Leary, and she died at about 
tlie age of thirty years. They had two chil- 
dren : Charles and Lavvrcnce, — both of 
whom died in infancy. Mr. Huth formed a 
second marital union, with Mary Emery, a 
daughter of William F. and Mary A. (Con- 
way) Emery, and they had three children : 
the first born being a son, who died in infancy ; 
the next, Alexander, who died at the age of 
one year; and Peter Eniery. Mr. Huth buiit 
a handsome home on Hull street, but resides 
on Dees Lane. "Religiously, the family are 
devout members of the Catholic church. Mr. 
Huth is a man of strong personality, and has 
gained many friends throughout this section 
of the state. 



r ^ ^RAXK SMITH READER, journal- 
K] ist. New Brighton, Pa., was born in Coal 
Center, V-,'ashington county, Pa., No- 
vember 17, 1842. His father, Francis Reader, 
was a native of \\"arwickshire, England, — his 
parents removing from there to \\'ashington 
county, Pa., in 1802. His mother, Ellen 
Smith Reader, of the same county, was of 
Scotch-Irish descent. Her paternal grand- 
father, Rev. John Smith, was a prominent 
minister of his day, and her maternal grand- 
father, Lieut. \\'illiam Wallace, was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary War. 

The subject of this sketch worked at farm- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



339 



ing and carpentering, and acquired at the 
schools of his town, and at Mount Union Col- 
lege, Ohio, an academic education. He lived 
among the scenes of the jMonongahela Val- 
ley, Pa., until i86i, when he enlisted as a sol- 
dier, on April 2^, 1861, serving in Company 
I, 2nd Reg., Va. Inf., in the commands and de- 
partments of Generals Rosecrans, Reynolds 
and Milroy, until April, 1862, in Western Vir- 
ginia; he took part in the campaign of Gen. 
John C. Fremont in the Shenandoah Valley, 
and in that of Gen. Pope in Eastern Virginia, 
in 1862. His regiment returned to Western 
Virginia in October, 1862. June i, 1863, the 
regiment was changed to the Fifth West. Va. 
Cavalry. He was ofYered a promotion in his 
company but declined it, and was assigned to 
duty at Gen. W. W. Averill's headquarters, 
July I, 1863, and afterwards to the headquar- 
ters of Gen. Franz Sigel and Gen. David 
Hunter in the Shenandoah Valley, taking part 
in their campaigns. After the victory under 
Gen. Hunter, at Piedmont, Va., June 5, 1864, 
he was one of the first Federal soldiers to 
enter Staunton, Va., and there had charge of 
paroling five hundred wounded Confederates. 
He was captured on this expedition, June 20, 
1864, and after being thirty days a prisoner, 
made his escape from a train, with three com- 
rade,s, twenty miles south of Bunkersville 
Junction, Va., while on the way to Anderson- 
ville prison. Having undergone eleven days 
and nights of great suffering, hardships and 
hunger, hiding in the woods by day and trav- 
eling by night, he reached Gen. Grant's head- 
quarters at Petersburg, Va., June 30, 1864, 



having passed through the right wing of Gen. 
Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army. His 
term of service having expired July 10, 1864, 
and being so broken in health that further 
duty was impossible, he was discharged in 
August of that year. He taught school the 
following winter, and in July, 1865, accepted 
a position in the U. S. Civil Service, in which 
he served at diflferent periods for over ten 
years; he was chief deputy collector of inter- 
nal revenue nearly eight years, and acting col- 
lector for some months. 

On December 24, 1867, Mr. Reader was 
united in marriage with Miss Merran F. Dar- 
ling, of New Brighton. Her father, Joseph 
Darling, was a native of Vermont, his pater- 
nal grandfather serving in the Revolutionary 
War, and her mother, Rebecca Cobb Darling, 
was a native of Chautauqua county. New 
York. Two sons were born to the couple, 
Frank Eugene Reader, attorney-at-law, and 
Willard Stanton Reader, journalist. Mr. 
Reader became a member of the Methodist 
r,piscopal church December 15, 1865, and 
entered the North Missouri Conference of the 
church, in 1868, as preacher in charge of a 
circuit of nine appointments, but owing to 
the failure of his voice, he was compelled to 
retire after one year's service. He has held 
an official relation in the church ever since, 
and has been Sunday school superintendent 
for over twenty-two years. Mrs. Reader is 
a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Reader is the author of a life of Moody and 
Sankey, the noted evangelists, — and also of 
the history of the Fifth West Va. Cavalry, be- 



340 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



sides historical sketches of the Harmony Soci- 
ety, Economy, Beaver county, Pa., of New 
Brighton, Pa., and the Beaver Valley, in 
which his paper is published. On May 22, 
1874, he and IMajor David Critchlow estab- 
lished the "Beaver Valley News," at New 
Brighton; on January i, 1877, he bought the 
major's interest in the paper, and on Febru- 
ary 4, 1883, he began the publication of the 
first daily paper in the county, — "The Daily 
News." He was secretary of the Republican 
county committee for several years; while in 
that office he prepared and presented in the 
state legislature the first law enacted in Penn- 
sylvania for the government of primary elec- 
tions; he was alternate to the Chicago con- 
vention which nominated James G. Blaine for 
president in 1884; he was suggested as a can- 
didate for congress and for the state senate, 
but declined to be a candidate ; he served in 
the council and school board of his borough, 
and held other positions of trust, but never 
solicited any public position. 

Frank Eugene Reader, attorney-at-law, 
x\^ew Brighton, Pa., son of Frank S. and Mer- 
ran D. Reader, was born at Greencastle, Mo., 
December 15, 1868. He attended school at 
New Brighton, Geneva College, Beaver Falls, 
Pa., and entered Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, Md., in the fall of 1885, from 
which he was graduated in 1888, second in a 
large class, with the degree of B. A. He 
studied law with Brown & Lambie, a promi- 
nent law firm, of Pittsburg, Pa., and was ad- 
mitted, on examination, to the bar of 
Allegheny county. Pa., in 1891, and 



later was examined and admitted to 
the bar of Beaver county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He became a partner of the law firm 
of Moore Bros., Beaver, Pa., in 1892, the new 
firm being Moore, Moore & Reader. In 
April, 1892, he was elected solicitor of the 
Beaver County Building & Loan Association, 
New Brighton. In 1896, he retired from the 
law firm and opened an office of his own in 
New Brighton. He was elected secretary 
of the council of New Brighton in March, 
1899. On June 3, 1896, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Jennie B. Nesbit, a 
daughter of Rev. Samuel H. Nesbit, D. D., 
one of the most prominent, able and influen- 
tial members of the Pittsburg Conference of 
the M. E. church; he was, for twelve years, 
editor of the Pittsburg "Christian Advocate" ; 
presiding elder, and pastor of some of the best 
charges in the conference. A daughter, — 
Dorothy Nesbit, — was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Reader, the date of her birth being May 8, 
1897. They are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Willard Stanton Reader, journalist, was 
born at New Brighton, Pa., September 28, 
1 871; he attended the public schools of his 
native town, and was a pupil in Geneva Col- 
lege, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. He en- 
tered the office of the Beaver Valley News as 
an apprentice, and in 1889 was appointed the 
New Brighton reporter of the paper. Septem- 
ber 28, 1892, on his twenty-first birthday, he 
was admitted to partnership in the business, 
and has since held the position of city editor. 
In addition to the duties of this position, he 



BEAVER COUNTY 



34l 



has written for leading papers in Pittsburg and 
other cities; has served on the Republican 
county committee, and is now secretary of 
the board of health of his native town. He 
united with the Methodist church, in January, 
1885. 

Mr. Reader was united in marriage with 
Miss Lily Robinson, a daughter of Thomas 
and Mary Robinson, March i, 1897. Mr. 
Robinson was a soldier in the Civil War, 
serving his country with fidelity and courage. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Reader are members of the 
Methodist Protestant church. They have one 
child, a son, Willard Donald Reader, born 
December 20, 1897. 




TLLIAM A. PARK is treasurer of 
the well known firm, the Park Fire 
Clay Company, and is a respected 
citizen of Rochester, Pa., where the main of- 
fice of the company is located. He is a man 
of extraordinary business capacity, and ener- 
getic and honest in the methods which he 
pursues. He is a native of New Sewickley 
township, Beaver county. Pa., where he at- 
tended the public schools and assisted his 
father in the lumber business. He continued 
to do so until he entered the general merchan- 
dizing business with his brother, John H., at 
Park Quarries. He afterward became identi- 
fied with the Park Fire Clay Company as 
treasurer, and has since served in that con- 
nection. The other officers are : J. I. Park, 
president; J. H. Park, superintendent. The 
capacity of the works is 250,000 bricks per 



day, and three hundred and fifty men are em- 
ployed. They have filled paving contracts in 
Pennsylvania and adjoining states, and have 
an established reputation, shipping their 
product to all points in the United States 
and Canada. In 1884, he, with his brother, 
John H. Park, built a line connecting their 
establishment with the main line of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company, at Conway, but 
this they have since disposed of to the Ohio 
River Junction Railroad Company of which 
Mr. Park is treasurer. Mr. Park has been 
located in Rochester for many years, and has 
conscientiously endeavored to further the in- 
terests of the town. He is widely known 
throughout the district, and has many 
friends. 

William A. Park is of Irish ancestry, being 
the great-grandson of William Park, who was 
born in Cookstown, County Tyrone, Ireland, 
where he received an education. He was a 
man of good character and of high standing in 
that country, as is shown by papers which 
are now in the possession of the subject of this 
sketch. These papers are evidence of the fact 
that he became a member of Lodge No. 479, 
F. & A. M., at Tullaghoge, County Tyrone, 
Ireland, December 3, 1783. In 1791, on 
April 26, he was given a demit from that 
lodge, together with one from the Knights 
Templar, of which he was also a member, — 
accompanied by testimonials as to his char- 
acter. He landed in Philadelphia, Pa., in 
May, 1 79 1, where he remained for about four 
years, in the meantime learning the trade of 
stone mason, and then located in Wilkins- 



342 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



burg, Allegheny county, Pa., where he insti- 
tuted what was, for many years, the only 
Masonic lodge in that section of the state. 
He followed his former vocation there and 
many houses now remain standing in that vil- 
lage as the result of his work. He lived to 
reach the advanced age of eighty-eight years, 
and was buried in the Beulah burial grounds. 
He married Mary McGahey, wlio died at the 
age of ninety-four years, and they had the fol- 
lowing issue: John, who married Margaret 
Dufif; David, whose v.ife was Ann Hamilton; 
Jane ; William, who married Nancy Johnson ; 
Robert, v,ho married Elizabeth Loney; and 
Thomas from whom our subject's wife is 
descended. 

David Park, the grandfather of William A. 
Park, was born at Wilkinsburg, Pa., and there 
learned the trade of wagon-maker and v.lieel- 
wright, which he followed until he moved 
upon a farm, purchased by him in New 
Sewickley tov/nship, Beaver county. Pa., in 
1845. There, in addition to cultivating the 
soil, he plied his trade for many years, dying 
when eighty-six years old. The property is 
now owned by his son Theodore. The maiden 
name of" David's wife was Ann Hamilton, and 
she v/as born in Warren county, Ohio, in 
1806, and died at the age of seventy-nine. 
Their children were: James F., the father of 
the gentleman first named above; William; 
George, who married Mary Real; Elizabeth, 
the wife of Hiram Phillip; Mary, the wife of 
Rev. John Brown; and Theodore, who mar- 
ried Kate Campbell. 

James I. Park v.'as born at Wilkinsburg, 



Allegheny county. Pa., and adopted the trade 
of a carpenter, but early in life removed from 
liis native place to Freedom, Beaver county, 
v.here he became a contractor and lumber 
dealer. He was very successful, and now 
owns a farm near Freedom, upon which he is 
living a retired life. He married Emiline Mc- 
Donald, a daugliter of William and Rebecca 
(Magee) McDonald, who was of Scotch an- 
cestry, and she died leaving four children, as 
follows: William A.; John H., a record of 
whose life appears elsewhere herein ; Annie 
v., the widow of Milton McCullough; and 
George I., who is also identified with the Park 
Fire Clay Company. He formed a second 
rnion, — in this instance with Mary Dean, a 
daughter of Samuel Dean, and they have two 
children : Mabel D. and Nellie D. 

William A. Park was joined in the bonds 
of wedlock with Mary J. Park, a daughter of 
Thomas and Helen (Duff) Park. Thomas 
I'ark, a son of William Park, the first of the 
family to locate in this country, Vvas born in 
Wilkinsburg, Allegheny county, Pa., and set- 
tled in Penn township, where he became a 
farmier of considerable prominence. He died 
at the age of sixty-three years. His wife, 
Helen, who now resides with William A. 
Park, is a daughter of David Duff, and they 
had two children : James Graham, of Cripple 
Creek, Colo. ; and Mary J. 

Socially, the subject of this sketch is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic orders, F. & A. M., and 
R. A. M., of Rochester, Pa., and of the Com- 
mandery, of Pittsburg. He is also a member 
of the Mystic Shrine, of Pittsburg. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



343 



AVID PHILIPS ESTEP, deceased, 
a gentleman whose life was marked 
b}- years of activity in the industrial 
world, was a prominent dairyman in Chip- 
pewa township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a son of Ephraim and Susanna (Phil- 
ips) Estep, and was born in Wasliington 
county, Pa., March 9, 1822. 

His grandfather was Robert Estep, who 
V. as born in Baltimore, Md., in 1750, and was 
of Welsh parentage, — his father having come 
from \\'ales to America, in 1720, and settled 
in Baltimore, Maryland. Robert Estep, after 
reaching maturity removed to Bedford 
county, Pa., making the trip on horseback, — 
and there engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
He subsequently bought a farm in W'asliing- 
ton county, Pa., and lived there during the re- 
mainder of his life. He was a Democrat in 
politics, and served as a "squire" under the 
old laws, being appointed by the governor. 
He was also burgess of Lav,'rence\'ille, when 
that was a busy little town, entirely apart 
from Pittsburg. He was united in marriage 
with Dorcas Wells, and they became the par- 
ents of thirteen children, namely: Eliza; 
Nathan; Jemima (Dailey) ; Ruth (Potter), of 
Darlington, Pa. ; John ; James, a physician, 
and later, a minister of the Gospel; Ephraim, 
Vi hose business was that of a merchant ; Mary 
(Gaston); Elizabeth (Holmes); Thomas; Wil- 
liam, who died in infancy; Joseph; and 
William. 

Ephraim Estep, the father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born in Washington county, 
Pa., and was mentally trained in the public 



schools, after which he took up the occupa- 
tion of a farmer, but subsequently learned the 
trade of a blacksmith, — buying a place which 
was furnished with water power. He then re- 
moved to Pittsburg and became a prominent 
manufacturer of shovels and axes,^ — buying 
the old plant of Orrin W^aters. He supplied 
all the jobbers of Pittsburg, and employed 
about forty-frve men. Some time later, he 
moved to New Brighton, Beaver county, Pa., 
and built a factory in which he manufactured 
all kinds of edge tools, employing seventy- 
five men, and in 1849, h^ retired, and turned 
tlie management o\'er to two of his sons. Pie 
married Susanna Philips, a daughter of John 
Philips, who was a very successful merchant 
in Philadelphia. He was appointed an en- 
sign in Washington's army during the Revo- 
lutionary War, and the commission is highly 
prized by the subject hereof, in whose posses- 
sion it has remained. He was a man of exten- 
sive business interests, and besides conduct- 
ing his store he was an extensive weaver; for 
many years he was a "squire" of his district. 
Religiously, he was a Baptist; politically he 
was a member of the Whig party. Susanna 
Philips was born and educated in Philadel- 
phia, and as a result of her union with Eph- 
raim Estep, she became the mother of nine 
children : Mary Hall, deceased ; Joseph Phil- 
ips, manufacturer of wagons ; \Villiam C. ; 
David Philips, the subject of this sketch ; Dor- 
cas (Marquis); Elvira; Harriet; Ephraim; 
and Robert. 

David Philips Estep was mentally trained 
and educated in Washington county. Pa., in 



344 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



the public schools, and in the schools of Pitts- 
burg, and thereafter became prominently 
identified with his father's business interests. 
In 1849, he went to California, and became an 
active speculator, — being one of the first min- 
ers in that field. While in California he turned 
his attention to seine fishing in the Sacra- 
mento River and supplied the camps and 
towns with fish, — in this way doing a good 
business. In 1851, he returned to Pittsburg 
and was employed at the Lippencott axe fac- 
tory, for a time, but subsequently became 
foreman for Hubbard & Bakewell. He 
served in that capacity for thirty-two years, 
and as a workman was unexcelled. He 
seemed to possess the happy faculty of pro- 
curing the best efforts from the men under 
his direction, and yet, by showing them kind- 
ness and consideration, he gained their es- 
teem and affection. In fact, it was with great 
regret that they saw him take his departure 
from their midst in 1879, and he was pre- 
sented with what is, probably, the hand- 
somest set of engrossed resolutions ever 
drawn up in Pittsburg. It was an extraor- 
dinary exhibition of their regard for him, 
and was signed by a committee of seven, and 
by over two hundred of the employees. It 
is a gift of which any man would feel proud. 
He then removed to Beaver county, and pur- 
chased a tract of two hundred and seventy- 
one acres of land in Chippewa township, one- 
half of which was in a state of cultivation. The 
handsome brick house was then standing, and 
was known as the McKinley homestead, but 
was subsequently owned by William David- 



son and then by Mr. Hamilton, from whom 
the subject of our sketch purchased it. He 
made many important improvements on the 
place, — clearing a considerable portion of 
it, — and engaged in dairying and farming. 
He possessed fifty head of cattle, — making a 
specialty of Jersey stock, — and retailed milk, 
keeping two wagons busy in selling directly 
to the consumer. Up to the time of his death, 
he was ably assisted in the management of the 
farm by his son Edgar, who attended to all 
of the active duties incident to so extensive 
a business. He also had eleven head of fine 
horses, one of them being twenty-six years 
old, and still a very good horse, — a fact which 
speaks well for the treatment and care it has 
received. Mr. Estep made a host of friends 
after locating in Beaver county, and was 
everywhere received as a man of worth to the 
community. 

His wife was Hannah Squires, who was 
born in 1823, and received an excellent mental 
training in the schools of Pittsburg, — being 
an exceptionally bright woman. He was de- 
prived of her companionship by death in 
1892, when she was sixty-nine years old. 
They had the following children : Frances M., 
who died in infancy; Thomas S. ; Albert D., 
who died in infancy ; Susanna Catherine, who 
also died in infancy; Edgar S., who assisted 
his father; and Harry Clay, a prominent real 
estate dealer, of Pittsburg. Politically, the sub- 
ject of this memoir was a Republican. In re- 
ligious attachments he was a member of the 
Baptist church, of New Brighton. He was a 
member and past master of Pittsburg Lodge, 




REV. JAMES L. DEENS. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



347 



P'. & A. M. ; past commander of Pittsburg 
Commandery, No. i ; past commander-in- 
chief of Pittsburg consistory; and a member 
of Arsenal Lodge, No. 480, I. O. O. F., of 
which he was, for some time, deputy grand 
master of the Pittsburg district. His death 
occurred September 22, 1899, and he was 
buried with Masonic honors in Allegheny 
Cemetery, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 




j^jEV. JAMES L. DEENS, who for 
many years served in the ministry of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, 
became thoroughly identified with the inter- 
ests of Beaver county, after his retirement 
from active ministerial service, when his pref- 
erence of the freedom of country life asserted 
itself in the choice of a home here. Prior 
to a permanent residence on his farm, how- 
ever, he had served as pastor of several local 
charges, and thus strengthened his interests 
in the Beaver Valley. 

His thorough enjoyment of farm life, ex- 
empt from the strain of routine service, was 
marked by evidences of vitality and adapt- 
ability to surroundings seldom experienced by 
one of his years. 

James L. Deens was born in County Ar- 
magh, Ireland, January 3, 1820. being the only 
child of James and Margaret (Graham) Deens. 
His father, of direct Scotch descent, died 
when a young man, and the widowed mother, 
during a period of general emigration from 
Ireland, brought her infant son to America, 



locating in Pittsburg, which became to them 
a permanent home around which their inter- 
ests ever centered ; for there Mrs. Deens sub- 
sequently married John Lompre, a French 
Canadian, whose paternal interest in the boy 
was marked by a voluntary embodiment of 
the step-father's name in the boy's full name 
of James Lompre Deens, and by a close com- 
panionship in business, interrupted only by 
the sudden death of the father just as James 
was entering manhood. 

To the mother, thus left a second time with 
a family of which only Lydia Sergeant and 
Eliza Lompre Irwin attained maturity and 
established families of their own, the best trib- 
ute that can be paid is the acknowledgment of 
the respect accorded her for half a century by 
all who came under the influence of her un- 
selfish spirit, which remained young and sym- 
pathetic until the close of a long life of loving 
interest in family and friends. In 1887, at 
the age of eighty-seven, she peacefully passed 
away. 

James Lompre Deens during his early 
years was sent to both private and public 
schools, and when opportunity afforded, or 
necessity required, was reared by his father's 
side as a tobacconist, of which trade he be- 
came master. His general education was 
completed in the Western University of 
Pennsylvania, after which careful and thor- 
ough preparation for the ministry was made 
under the leading teachers of Methodism, to 
whose influence was largely due his connec- 
tion with the Pittsburg Conference in 1846. 

After traveling several circuits, he became 



348 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



pastor in charge of various stations in Ohio 
and Pennsylvania, serving as Presiding Elder 
of the Barnesville District, Ohio, during that 
period of unrest in our Nation's History — 
the Civil War — in which he was commis- 
sioned Captain of the Barnesville Company, 
Monongahela Regiment of Unattached De- 
partmental Troops Volunteers. 

Subsequently, as pastor, he was stationed 
successively at Brownsville, Pa., New Brigh- 
ton, Pa., Main street and Bingham street 
charges, Pittsburg, and at Mansfield Valley. 
His last appointments were all in Beaver 
county, at Georgetown, Homewood, Nobles- 
town, and Shoustown ; after which a super- 
numerary relation, later changed to superan- 
nuated, was taken. 

Two years after his admission to the confer- 
ence he was united in marriage with Mary E., 
daughter of Samuel McKinley, who stood 
high in the Masonic fraternity, and was also a 
prominent Methodist. 

The wife shared faithfully her husband's 
itinerant life, and still survives him in her 
home in Beaver, surrounded by her chil- 
dren, — Margaret A., who resides with her 
mother; James C, representing the pottery 
industry of East Liverpool; Anna M., en- 
gaged in scientific work in the Pittsburg High 
School. 

The three other children have established 
their own homes in Beaver: Minnie G., whose 
union with James Dowdell, a paper manufac- 
turer of Wellsburg, W. Va., resulted in the 
following issue, — Grace P., Marie E., James 
Deens, John Irwin, Anna M., and Olive S. ; 



Charles H. A. conducts his farm on the south 
side of Beaver county, but occupies a Beaver 
residence for the educational advantages of- 
fered there, — his marriage with Anna M. 
daughter of John Adams, the pioneer glass 
manufacturer of Pittsburg, has been blessed 
by the following children, — Harry Adams 
(recently deceased), Walter Lompre, Mary 
Natalie, John Adams, Charles Wilfred, Jean 
Annette, Alta Carol, and Helen Elizabeth; 
John L., a pharmacist, became united in mar- 
riage with Lydia Ferguson, to whom ha(.'c 
been born two children, Louise and Lillian. 

The paternal spirit showed itself strikingly 
in the watchful interest exercised by this 
father over children and grandchildren alike, 
and undoubtedly bore fruit in the community 
of family interests now centered in the Bea- 
ver Valley. 

It would be a depreciating familiarity 
toward a man like James L. Deens to attempt 
to sum up in a few paragraphs his life of serv- 
ice, the responsibilities faithfully met, the 
hardships cheerfully undergone, or to describe 
his life as a husband, father, friend, and citi- 
zen. Brief mention, however, of a few strik- 
ing traits may be permitted. He knew men 
as few are able to know them ; he believed his 
brethren, and with a loyal devotion he stood 
by his friends. As a preacher he knew what 
he wished to say and had unusual ability in 
making himself understood. Thoroughly 
fitted for his work, scriptural, evangelical, 
simple, fearless, though tender of heart, he 
taught his people righteousness. A despiser 
of shams, he could strip the borrowed gar- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



349 



ments from assumed humility or pretentious 
ignorance. Master alike of pathos and in- 
vective, able to see at a glance the strong 
and the weak points of an issue, capable of 
clear statement, his arguments had often- 
times a startling suddenness, always a clear- 
ness, and kindly wit, which made him in an 
age of great conference debaters easily the 
foremost ; already some of his speeches belong 
to the traditions of the conference. 

A lifelong student, when years of failing 
health came to him, he never lost interest in 
things which are and are to be. Questions 
of church polity, the civic discussions of the 
time, the welfare of the church and the work 
of his brethren were matters of living inter- 
est and constant conversation. Only the out- 
ward man grew old; mind and heart re- 
mained young. When retirement from active 
ministry became necessary, his nobleness of 
spirit was strikingly exhibited. Unwilling to 
be idle, fearful of an aimless existence, he lo- 
cated on his farm near Beaver, Beaver county. 
Pa. His children and their children always 
found this place of rest beautiful, as did also 
his old companions in the ministry, and other 
acquaintances who shared his hospitality. 
There he passed from this earth at Eastertide 
in 1892, and from the altar of home and 
church, he was borne to the Beaver Cemetery, 
and tenderly laid to rest in the beautiful Ohio 
Valley. 

The publishers of this work take pleasure 
in announcing that a portrait of Rev. James 
L. Deens is presented in connection with the 
foregoing account of his life and deeds. 



§OHN H. PARK, one of the reliable 
business men of Rochester, Beaver 
county, Pa., is superintendent of the 
Park Fire Clay Company, a prominent firm 
whose products are shipped to all parts of this 
country and Canada. He is a son of James 
I. and Emiline (McDonald) Park, and was 
born in New Sewickley township, Beaver 
county, Pa., in 1856. 

William Park, the great-grandfather of 
John H., was born in Cookstown, County Ty- 
rone, Ireland, whence, after attending school, 
he moved to Philadelphia, Pa., where he 
learned the trade of a stone mason. Papers in 
their original state, now in the possession of 
W. A. Park, show that he was admitted as a 
member of lodge No. 479, F. & A. M., at Tul- 
laghoge, County Tyrone, December 3, 1873. 
When he came to America, April 26, 1791, 
he was given a demit from that order, and 
also one by the Knights Templar, together 
with high recommendations as to his charac- 
ter. He landed in Philadelphia, in May, 
1791, but located in Wilkinsburg, Allegheny 
county. Pa., in 1796, where he instituted the 
first, and for many years the only. Masonic 
lodge in that region. He followed his trade 
the rest of his life, and there are many houses 
standing in that county today which are the 
result of his work. He died at the age of 
eighty-eight years and was laid to rest in the 
Beulah burying grounds. His wife was Mary 
McGahey, who died at the age of ninety-four 
years, and they had the following ofifspring: 
John, who married Margaret Duff; James, 
who married Betsey Dufif; David, whose 



350 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



wife was Ann Hamilton ; Jane ; Wil- 
liam, who married Nancy Johnson ; Robert, 
who married Elizabeth Loney; and Thomas, 
who married Helen Duff. 

David Park, the grandfather of the gentle- 
man whose name heads these lines, was born 
at Wilkinsburg, Pa., and early in life learned 
the trade of a wheelwright and wagon-maker. 
In 1845, ^^ removed to Beaver county, pur- 
chasmg a farm in New Sewickley township, 
where he followed his trade, and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits until his death. This 
property is now owned by his son, Theodore. 
He died at the age of eighty-six years, and was 
buried in Oak Grove cemetery, near Free- 
dom. His wife, Ann Hamilton, was born in 
Warren county, Ohio, in 1806, and died at the 
age of seventy-nine. Their children were: 
James I., the father of the subject hereof; 
William; George, who married Mary Beal; 
Elizabeth, the wife of Hiram Phillip; Mary, 
the wife of Rev. John Brown ; David ; and 
Theodore, who married Kate Campbell. 

James I. Park was born at Wilkinsburg, 
Allegheny county, Pa., and learned the car- 
penter's trade, but early in life removed to 
Freedom, Beaver county, where he became 
a contractor and lumber dealer. He was very 
successful, and is now living in retirement 
near Freedom, where he owns a fine farm. He 
was first married to Emiline McDonald, a 
daughter of William and Rebecca (Magee) 
McDonald, who was of Scotch ancestry, and 
.she died leaving four children, as follows : Wil- 
liam A., a record of whose life appears else- 
where in this Book of Biographies; John H., 



the subject proper of this sketch ; Annie V., the 
widow of Milton McCullough; and George I., 
who is also identified with the Park Fire Clay 
Company. Mr. Park formed a second union, 
in this instance with Mary Dean, a daughter 
of Samuel Dean, and they had two children : 
Mabel D. and Nellie D. 

John H. Park was reared on the farm and 
studied in the public schools. He assisted 
his father in the lumber trade and later en- 
tered the field of business on his own account, 
opening a general store at Park Quarries, 
which he conducted under the firm name of J, 
H. Park & Co. He also opened a stone 
quarry there, and in 1882 established an- 
other at New Galilee, from which he furnished 
fine sand stone for building, — shipping it to 
Pittsburg and Philadelphia. In 1885, the 
Park Fire Clay Company was organized at 
Park Quarries, with J. I. Park, president ; 
W. A. Park, treasurer, and John H. Park, 
superintendent. They have a capacity of 
250,000 brick per day, and three hundred and 
fifty men are employed. The product is 
nearly all from Beaver county. The general 
ofifice is at Rochester, Pennsylvania. They 
have filled large paving contracts in Pennsyl- 
vania and adjoining states, and ship brick to 
all parts of the United States and Canada. 
John H., and W. A. Park built a railroad 
three miles in length, connecting their es- 
tablishment at Park Quarries with the main 
line of the Pennsylvania Company at Conway, 
in 1884, and this they later sold to the Ohio 
River Junction Railroad Company. Of this 
the subject of this sketch is now president. 




DR. JAMES SCROGGS, JR. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



353 



He is a man of great energy, is sagacious 
and possessed of keen foresight. He has 
always exerted his greatest efforts in what- 
soever he has undertaken, and the fruit of his 
work is evidenced by the prosperous condition 
of the plants under his supervision. 

Mr. Park was joined in hymeneal bonds 
v.ith Jennie M. Sproat, a daughter of James 
Sproat, of Economy township, Beaver county, 
and they are the parents of three children, 
namely : Emma, aged nineteen years ; Wil- 
liam, who is seventeen ; and Lizzie, who died 
at an early age. 




[9. 



R. JAMES SCROGGS, Jr., an emi- 
nent physician and surgeon of Bea- 
ver, Pa., a recent portrait of whom 
is shown on the opposite page, has seen twen- 
ty-four years of practice in Beaver alone, and 
stands at the head of his profession in West- 
ern Pennsylvania. Especially is this assertion 
true of his position in the field of surgery, to 
which he devotes especial attention, having 
probably done more work in that line than any 
other physician in the county. Dr. Scroggs, 
Jr., was born in Allegheny county. Pa., July 
19, 1850, and is of Scotch ancestry. He ob- 
tained a good education in the Pittsburg 
schools, after which he began the study of 
medicine with his father, who was one of the 
ablest physicians of his day. The subject of 
this review then entered the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., and, after tak- 
ing a course of lectures there, he graduated 
from the Cincinnati College of Medicine and 



Surgery in 1873. Engaging in the practice of 
his profession at Fair view, Pa., for two years, 
he met with a good degree of success. From 
Fairview, he went to Beaver, Pa., and became 
a partner with his father. In 1890, he took a 
trip to Europe, where, after visiting the place 
where his ancestors came from in Scotland, he 
attended the Charing Cross Medical College 
in London, taking a special course in surgery,^ 
and visiting the leading hospitals on the Con- 
tinent. He served eleven years as surgeon of 
the Beaver County Infirmary, and contrib- 
uted some valuable articles to the press. He 
was also one of the first promoters of the 
Beaver County Hospital at Rochester, Pa., 
and is one of its charter members. 

The Doctor was united in marriage with 
Annie M. Aber, an accomplished daughter 
of John Aber, of Industry, Beaver county. 
This happy union resulted in the birth of four 
children, namely: A. Emily; James Joseph, 
at present a student of Pennsylvania Univers- 
ity; Hal E., at present a student at Geneva 
College; and Fred J. Dr. Scroggs, Jr., has 
ever taken a deep interest in the educational 
afifairs of his home, having served on the board 
of education for a period of eleven years. He 
has always taken a great interest in the prog- 
ress and development of Beaver, and is one 
of the directors of the Beaver National Bank. 

Dr. Scroggs, Jr., is a son of Dr. James and 
Emily (Seaton) Scroggs, grandson of Jame% 
and Elizabeth (Gilbraith) Scroggs, great- 
grandson of James Scroggs, and great-great- 
grandson of James Scroggs, of Scotland, who 
was found when a small child by the side of 



354 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



his dead parents, victims during the "Rebel- 
lion of the Covenanters." This child was 
named Scroggs, which in Scotch means bush. 
He was thereafter called James Scroggs, grew 
to manhood and became one of the represen- 
tatives to the Lord Chief Justice of Scotland. 
According to history. James Scroggs, the 
great-grandfather of our subject, immigrated 
to America about 1760, from near Edinburgh, 
Scotland, locating near Cumberland, Cum- 
berland county, Pa., where he settled in com- 
pany with some Scotch Covenanters. He ac- 
quired a large tract of land in that vicinity later 
in life, and was either a minister of the Gos- 
pel, or a physician, — it is not definitely known 
which. He brought eight children with hirtli 
to America, having two children born to him 
later in this country. His first wife, who was 
a Miss Jack before marriage, bore her hus- 
band the following children : James, Ebene- 
zer, John, Ellen, Polly, Reynold, Rachel, and 
Joseph. His second matrimonial alliance 
was contracted with a Miss Cowden, but the 
names of their children have not been pre- 
served. The old homestead in Cumberland is 
still known as the Scroggs estate, although it 
is now owned by a Mr. Armstrong. 

James Scroggs, grandfather of our subject, 
was born in the Cumberland Valley, Pennsyl- 
vania, and in early life moved to Washington 
county. Pa., where he came in possession of 
a large tract of land, near Midway, and, being 
an ardent lover of the beauties of nature, he 
devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. He 
was married to Annie Paxton, who bore him 
two children : Margaret ; and James Paxton, 



commonly known as J. Paxton Scroggs, M. 
D. After the death of his first wife, Mr. 
Scroggs re-married, choosing for his second 
bride, Elizabeth Gilbraith. Being determined 
to have a son who should be called James, the 
favorite name in the family for many genera- 
tions, he called the first son of his second 
marriage by that name alone. The following 
children were the result of the second union : 
James, George, Samuel, EHzabeth, Nancy, 
Joseph, Robert and Ann, and one more who 
died at birth. James Scroggs, our subject's 
grandfather, studied medicine but never prac- 
ticed it. 

James Scroggs, father of our subject, was 
born upon his father's farm in Washington 
county, Pa., studied medicine under his half- 
brother, J. Paxton Scroggs, M. D., and en- 
gaged in the practice of his chosen profession, 
at Allegheny City, and at Pittsburg, estab- 
lishing at the latter place a large and success- 
ful practice. In 1875, he decided to locate in 
Beaver, one of the finest boroughs on the 
Ohio River. There he built a home in the 
midst of beautiful scenery, in the hope of en- 
joying a more quiet life. But his valuable 
services were soon sought there also, and were 
in demand among the leading families, who 
soon discovered his knowledge in medical 
matters to be far above that of the ordinary 
physician. Although it was his earnest de- 
sire to spend his closing years in retirement 
he never found time to do so. In his seventy- 
third year he was stricken with apoplexy, and 
when able to be consulted he was even then 
called upon for his valuable judgment. As a 



BEAVER COUNTY 



355 



citizen he was higlily esteemed and as a phy- 
sician not excelled. He died in 1894, aged 
seventy-four years. He was joined in mar- 
riage with Emily Seaton, a daughter of Cathe- 
rine Seaton, whose death occurred at Louis- 
ville, Ky., at the very advanced age of nine- 
ty-seven years. Mrs. Scroggs bore her hus- 
band five children, and lived to attain the age 
of sixty-two years. Her children were : 
James, subject of this sketch; Katie, wife of 
Clark Hunter, of Beaver county. Pa. ; Joseph, 
a prominent physician of Lincoln, Neb. ; 
Mary, wife of John Scott of Beaver; and Eliz- 
abeth, who also resides in Beaver. 

Like his fore-fathers in this as well as in 
many other respects, our subject is a lover of 
nature, in all its beautiful and varied forms. 
Some years ago, he purchased the M. Graves 
farm, which is located on an elevation of splen- 
did height, overlooking the beautiful Ohio 
Valley, with its picturesque villages and bor- 
oughs, with ten minutes drive of this farm. 
Upon this splendid and desirable location. Dr. 
Scroggs built a handsome brick cottage, tene- 
ment houses, barns, etc., and set out thou- 
sands of fruit trees of all kinds both small and 
large. The broad, spacious lawns, surround- 
ing the cottage, contain many beautiful shade 
trees and fine ornamental shrubbery. Here 
the Doctor has one of the finest summer re- 
sorts in Beaver county, where he spends many 
happy hours and entertains his friends, al- 
though his profession does not allow him half 
the time he desires to enjoy the beauty and 
pleasures of such a home, where he hopes to 
spend his closing years in retirement. 



f.AMES A. IRONS, who for many years 
was a prominent contractor, stands fore- 
most among the progressive citizens of 
Monaca, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He 
is a man of public spirit, and when he deems 
an improvement necessary for the future wel- 
fare of the borough, he puts forth a strenuous 
effort for its accompHshment. His aggres- 
siveness in public afifairs has been in evidence 
for years, and it may safely be said without 
fear of contradiction, that no one man has 
done as much for the community ; for this he 
is held in the highest esteem. 

Mr. Irons comes of Irish ancestry, and is 
descended from one of three brothers, Solo- 
mon, Samuel and George, who came to this 
country from County Derry, Ireland. They 
were sons of a very wealthy man who held 
ninety-nine year leases on considerable prop- 
erty. Solomon Irons, the grandfather of the 
subject hereof settled in Washington county. 
Pa., in 1 77 1, and moved to Beaver county 
about the year 1800, taking up several hun- 
dred acres of wild land, which was almost vir- 
gin forest, and traversed by few roads. He 
made a clearing and built a log house and 
barn, — becoming a very successful farmer. 
Religiously, he was a member of the United 
Presbyterian church. He died at the age of 
seventy-six years. His marriage with Rachel 
Dickson, a lady of Scottish birth, was blessed 
with eleven children : James ; George ; John ; 
William; Andrew; Samuel; Joseph; Rachel 
(Maloney) ; Mary (Douds) ; Rosanna (Nevin), 
and Elizabeth. 

John Irons, the father of James A., was 



356 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



born in Hopewell township, Beaver county, 
in 1811, on the old homestead, and received 
his intellectual training in what schools the 
community afforded. He learned the trade 
cf a tanner under Mr. Scott, one of the first 
"squires" appointed in the county, and subse- 
quently went into the tanning business for 
himself. He was very successful, but pre- 
ferred farming, and as a result, purchased 
two hundred acres of partially improved farm 
land in 1840. He moved upon the place in 
1845, dealt considerably in horses, raised 
wheat, and carried on general farming, — be- 
ing fairly successful. He was a shrewd busi- 
ness man. He was united in marriage with 
Ann Moore, a native of Pittsburg, Pa., and 
a daughter of Joseph Moore. They became the 
parents of seven children, as follows : Joseph, 
who is now a real estate agent, and justice of 
the peace, in Greenfield, O. ; James A., the 
gentleman whose name heads these lines ; 
Elizabeth A. (Laird); Rachel J. (Peoples); 
Rosanna (Minor); John D., a farmer in Pitts- 
burg, Kas. ; and Amanda (Wallace). Reli- 
giously, he was a member, and for many years 
an elder, of the United Presbyterian church. 
He was a Whig, in political affiliations. He 
died of typhoid fever at the age of forty-two 
years, and, eight days afterwards, his wife died 
of the same disease. 

James A. Irons was born in Hopewell town- 
ship, and attended the public schools until 
he was thirteen years of age, when he be- 
came apprenticed to the blacksmith's trade, 
under George Denny and Mr. Couch. He 
then followed the trade at intervals for a 



period of eight or ten years, and in 1856 he 
entered Beaver College, which he attended 
for two years. From 1857 to 1862, he worked 
on the river, and in the latter year, on the 28th 
of April, he enlisted as a blacksmith and as- 
sistant engineer in the navy, on the steam ram 
Lioness. He participated in the fight which 
resulted in the destruction of the rebel fleet 
at Vicksburg, and has the distinction of being 
the first Union man to set his foot in Mem- 
phis at the time of its capture. He has many 
interesting relics of the war, — one of them 
being an old boarding pike in excellent condi- 
tion, which he intends presenting to the Car- 
negie museum. After his discharge, he took 
up contracting, in 1867, and during the oil 
excitement, went to Oil City and engaged 
in that business. Subsequently he became 
interested in gas lands, and leased three hun- 
dred acres in Moon and Hopewell townships. 
Upon drilling for gas he made one of the two 
best strikes in the county, and its roaring 
could be heard seven miles away. The com- 
pany disposed of this property to the Bridge- 
water Gas Company, of which he was secre- 
tary and treasurer, and it yielded him hand- 
some returns. 

Mr. Irons, since his residence at Monaca, 
has ever exerted a wholesome influence in 
public afifairs, and has fought with his utmost 
vigor for many public improvements. When 
a system of water works for the town was 
proposed, its supporters succumbed to de- 
termined opposition, one by one, until the 
subject hereof alone stood as its champion. 
Realizing the great benefit it would be to the 



THE 
NEW YORK 

[PUBLIC library! 

Aster, Lenox and rilden / 
Feundatinnj. 
190H . 




HON. HEXKV iiici:. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



359 



citizens, he would not yield, but fought to the 
bitter end, and had the satisfaction of seeing 
it established. Although for a time he was 
harshly denounced by the opposition, he is 
now accorded the respect of his gratified fel- 
low citizens. Similar were the conditions in 
his fight for grading and paving, and for the 
telephone line. He purchased the line, and 
having it in good condition, disposed of it to 
the telephone company. His energy in fur- 
thering these enterprises entitles him to rec- 
ognition as one of the progressive men of Bea- 
ver county. He is a Republican and has 
served as burgess for three terms, and on last 
May received his fifth commission as justice of 
the peace. He is a member of the G. A. R. 

James A. Irons was united in marriage with 
Margaret Quinn Srodes, a daughter of John 
M. Srodes, one of the early river pioneers, 
and for many years a pilot and captain on 
the Ohio River. They became the parents of 
four children, as follows: John E., deceased, 
who was a very successful business man; 
James C, a glass manufacturer; Anna, de- 
ceased; and B. C, chief of police of Monaca. 




ON. HENRY HICE. who enjoys a 
wide reputation as a member of the 
legal profession, has been engaged 
in practice for almost a half century, and 
for a period of eleven years was judge of the 
Thirty-sixth Judicial District of Pennsylva- 
nia. He was born in Independence town- 
ship, Beaver county. Pa., January 24, 1834, 
and is a son of William and Hannah (Eachel) 



Hice, and grandson of Henry and Catherine 
Hice. Mr. Hice was the second child born 
to his parents, and received his scholastic 
training in the public schools of his native 
county, — taking a finishing course at Beaver 
Academy. Choosing as his life-work the pro- 
fession of law, he became a law student under 
the preceptorship of Richard- P. Roberts, of 
Beaver, Pa. Mr. Roberts was a man of prom- 
inence in that section, and during the Civil 
War became colonel of the 140th Reg., Pa. 
Vol. Inf., meeting a brave but unfortunate 
death at the terrible battle of Gettysburg, 
where so many gallant defenders of the Union 
fell. Under his preceptorship, young Hice 
made rapid progress, and was admitted to the 
Beaver county bar in 1859. He was imme- 
diately taken in as a partner with Mr. Rob- 
erts, in the practice of his profession, and re- 
n.iained as such until the death of the latter. 
In 1867, Frank Wilson became associated 
with Mr. Hice, and continued to be his law 
partner until 1874, when the subject of this 
sketch was appointed judge of the Thirty- 
sixth Judicial District of Pennsylvania, which 
office was filled by him in a most acceptable 
manner, until 1885. His opinions were de- 
livered firmly and courageously, and with full 
intent to treat each case fairly and impartially. 
He vs'as courteous alike to the youngest at- 
torney and to the oldest member of the bar. 
At the expiration of his term. Judge Hice re- 
sumed his long neglected practice, and was 
joined, in 1894, by his son, Agnew Hice, — the 
firm name becoming Hice & Hice. 

Judge Hice first married Ruth Ann Rals- 



360 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



ton, a daughter of Joseph and Mary Ralston, 
of Hanover township, Beaver county, where 
Mr. Ralston was a prominent agriculturist. 
Their happy union resulted in the birth of two 
sons and two daughters, viz. : Mary, v/ho is 
unmarried; Richard, who is superintendent 
of the Fallston Fire Clay Company, and who 
married May Kells; Agnew; and Laura. 
Agnew studied law with his father, with 
whom he is now associated as partner, having 
been admitted to the bar in 1894. He is fast 
assuming the heavier duties of the firm, thus 
enabling his father to enjoy more leisure and 
the rest so richly deserved. Judge Hice was 
deprived of his much beloved companion in 
1872, when she was called to the life beyond, 
having attained the age of thirty-six years 
only. Judge Hice contracted a second matri- 
monial alliance, — in this instance with Mrs. 
Sarah H. Minis, a daughter of ex-Chief Jus- 
tice Daniel Agnew. 

Henry Hice, the grandfather of the subject 
hereof, is believed to have removed from 
New Jersey to Indiana county, Pa., whence 
after purchasing a tract of land in the forests 
of the Ligonier valley, he returned to New 
Jersey after his family, who accompanied him 
to his new home, where they lived the simple, 
unpretending lives of sturdy pioneers, — en- 
during with others the many hardships and 
privations incident to such a life. Mr. Hice 
engaged himself in felling the forest trees and 
improving the land as best he could with the 
few facilities of a newly settled country. Here 
on this farm Mr. Hice's grandparents spent 
their last years and reared their family, con- 



sisting of three sons and one daughter, whose 
names are as follows : John ; George ; Cathe- 
rine ; and William. 

William Hice, father of the subject hereof, 
was born on the old homestead in Indiana 
county, Pa., in 1793. As he grew to man- 
hood, he assisted his father in clearing the 
land, and in 1819 or 1820, he removed to the 
vicinity of Clinton, Allegheny county. Pa. 
After purchasing a farm but little improved, 
he extended the improvements by clearing 
more land, and building a set of buildings, 
which have since been replaced by new ones. 
The farm, then occupied by the elder Mr. 
Hice, is now owned by John Miller, and was 
sold by William Hice, in 1840. He then 
bought a better farm at Frankfort Springs, 
which became his permanent home during 
life. Upon this farm, known as the J. Ste- 
phenson farm, he built a vei-y substantial 
dwelling, which is still standing ; but the barn, 
then built, has long since been destroyed by 
fire. Starting out with nothing except a de- 
termined will power and a strong constitu- 
tion, by persistent and untiring efiforts, to- 
gether with successful management, he 
amassed considerable property. Although he 
was a shrewd business man, he was kind of 
heart, and a liberal neighbor, never turning 
a deaf ear to an appeal for charity. Thus he en- 
deared himself to many, and his loss was 
deeply mourned. His death occurred in 1868, 
at the age of seventy-three years. His life 
companion was Hannah Eachel, a daughter 
of Andrew Eachel, and she died when about 
fifty years old. Their children numbered 



BEAVER COUNTY 



361 



seven, five daughters and two sons, as follows : 
Mary Ann, deceased; Catherine, also de- 
ceased ; Eliza, still residing at Beaver, and un- 
married; Sarah, wife of Joseph Brown, of 
Iowa; Hannah, of Beaver, also single; Wil- 
liam, a retired farmer residing in Kansas City, 
Mo. ; and Henry, the subject of this brief 
sketch. 

Judge Hice purchased for his home the R. 
P. Roberts homestead, on the corner of Mar- 
ket and North Park streets. Removing the 
old house, in 1876, he built upon the same 
attractive and well selected spot a handsome, 
modern brick house and office. Both are ap- 
propriately and handsomely furnished. He 
has taken an active part in the progress of his 
home borough and county. Aside from at- 
tending to his practice, he has been associated 
with manufacturing, banking, and other en- 
terprises. Judge Hice worships with the 
Presbyterians, and liberally supports that de- 
nomination. His portrait is shown on preced- 
ing page. 



R. GEORGE A. CRISTLER, who 
through years of careful training in 
the intricacies of medical science, 
has attained a degree of skill which but few 
physicians of the county possess, commands 
an extensive practice in the vicinity of Hooks- 
town. He is a native of Beaver county, and is 
a scion of one of its oldest and most highly 
respected families, having been born at Ship- 
pingport, Green township, Beaver county, 
Pa., October 9, 1852. 



The early history of the Cristler family is 
one of deep interest, but our limited space 
will not permit us to give the many details. 
Michael Cristler, the great-grandfather of the 
subject of these lines, was born in Germany, 
and at an early day settled in America, in the 
western section of Pennsylvania, which was 
at the time a howling wilderness, inhabited 
only by Indians and infested by wild beasts. 
What courage must have coursed in the veins 
of these pioneers, who came from a prosper- 
ous but too thickly settled country, and en- 
dured the many hardships and trials that fell 
to their lot while endeavoring to convert the 
forest land into tillable farms ! Courage, per- 
severance, an indomitable will, were char- 
acteristic of every man of that day, else they 
would have succumbed to hunger or the hos- 
tile natives. At the time this sturdy old an- 
cestor settled in that section, the Indians were 
very troublesome, and he was employed as a 
government spy. Every two weeks he would 
make the trip from Brownsville, Pa., to 
Wheeling, West Virginia, on foot, a journey 
attended by the greatest danger, not only 
from the Indians, but also from wild animals. 
Many interesting stories have been handed 
down to the present generation of the family, 
concerning his adventures and his many 
miraculous escapes. He was a very prom- 
inent man, and bought a tract of land on 
which the village of Shippingport is now lo- 
cated. Here he toiled, and, before his death, 
the most of his four hundred acres was 
cleared, and under a high state of cultivation. 
He was married, and among his children was 



362 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



one, Samuel, the grandfather of the subject 
hereof. 

Samuel Cristler spent his youthful days 
upon his father's farm, but soon after reach- 
ing maturity, he purchased a farm of three 
hundred and fort)' acres, which is now owned 
by John and Jacob Green, and John Calhoun. 
His occupation was that of a farmer, and he 
followed it with unqualified success through- 
out his life. When the War of 1812 broke 
out he was among the first to volunteer his 
services, but they were only required for a 
term of three months, when he received an 
honorable discharge. He was united in mar- 
riage with Catherine Baker, and they had a 
family of ten children, as follows: Michael; 
Susan; Mary; Henry; Martha; Jemima; An- 
thony W. ; Elizabeth; Philip; and another 
who died in infancy. They are all now de- 
ceased. Samuel Cristler was a Democrat in 
his political affiliations. 

Anthony W. Cristler, the father of Dr. 
George A., was born on his father's farm in 
1817, and early in life learned the trade of 
a mason, at which he became one of the finest 
workmen in that section. He remained on 
the farm until 1867, when he moved to Ship- 
pingport, and there followed his trade during 
his active life, — dying January 12, 1884. He 
married Elizabeth Hayward, a daughter of 
Robert Hayward, of the state of New York, 
and today the family is one of influence and 
prominence. Her parents moved to Beaver 
county. Pa., in 1846, settling at Safe Harbor, 
opposite Rochester. Mr. Hayward died in 
the winter of 1895, and his wife is still liv- 



ing, enjoying life at the age of eighty-three 
years, at the home of a son, at Shippingport. 
Her maiden name was Hill. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cristler reared nine children, as follows: 
George A., the subject of this personal his- 
tory; Sarah A., who died at the age of eight 
years; Lucinda Jane, the wife of W. B. Ap- 
pleton, who lives at Industry, Beaver county, 
Pa. ; Amanda, who resides at the home of the 
subject of these lines; William B., who died 
in infancy; Melissa; Elmer E., who lives at 
Shippingport ; Ella, who died in infancy ; and 
Willard, who also lives at Shippingport. Mrs. 
Cristler died on July 26, 1898. They were 
both faithful members of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Cristler was an active worker in 
the ranks of the Republican party, but never 
held office. 

Dr. LiCorge A. Cristler was reared on the 
old homestead and attended the public 
schools, after which he learned the trade of 
a mason under his father. He was a journey- 
man before he was twenty-one years old, and 
followed the trade for fourteen years. During 
this time he taught school for five v/inters, 
and followed his trade in the summer. He 
tiien decided to study for the medical profes- 
sion, and began reading with Dr. Davis, of 
Shippingport. In the fall of 1887, he entered 
the Pittsburg Medical College, now called the 
Western University of Pennsylvania, and was 
graduated in the spring of 1889, — immed- 
iately thereafter locating at Murdocksville. 
After remaining there for a period of three 
months, he began practice at Shippingport, 
where he successfully continued until 1895. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



363 



He removed to Darlington. Beaver county, 
where he spent eighteen months, and then 
located at Hookstown, where, in a remarkably 
brief space of time, he has worked up a large 
and paying patronage. He has always made 
his home in Beaver county, and is widely 
known throughout its bounds, — being held in 
the highest esteem everywhere. He is also a 
member of the Beaver County Medical So- 
ciety. 

In January, 1891, Dr. Cristler formed a 
marital union with Lizzie Laughlin, a daugh- 
ter of William Laughlin, and they had one 
child, Martha, born January 12, 1894. Mrs. 
Cristler was called to her final rest on August 
16, 1896, and thus, when but little over two 
years of age, her child was deprived of a 
mother's love and careful training. Martha 
is an interesting little girl, and is receiving a 
Christian training under the guidance of lov- 
ing eyes. The Doctor is a Presbyterian in re- 
ligious belief, and has been an elder in the 
church for twelve years. He is a member of 
Smith's Ferry lodge. No. 485, F. & A. M. 




BEN COOK, stock raiser and gen- 
eral farmer, of Darlington township, 
Beaver county, Pa., has traveled 
a good deal throughout the country. On 
account of ill health he was obliged to give up 
school, but received a fair degree of instruc- 
tion in the public schools of Beaver county. 
He subsequently learned farming. He wanted 
to see something of the world, and while still 
a young man went west. He traveled through 



all the western states and was interested in 
various occupations. He remained in the 
\\'est until 1889. and then returned to Beaver 
county, where he purchased his present farm. 
This farm contains one hundred and fourteen 
acres, and is almost entirely cleared. A fine 
brick house is standing upon it and it is con- 
sidered one of the best country homes in the 
district. A large, three-story bank barn, 
built by the subject hereof, also ornaments 
the place and adds to the comfort of the stock, 
which is Mr. Cook's "hobby." The gentle- 
man of whom this narrative treats led to the 
altar Julia Morton, a favorite daughter of Dr. 
Woodson Morton. She was born, reared and 
educated in Illinois. Mr. and ^Irs. Cook 
have four children, namely: May, Howard, 
Carrie and George. All are regular attendants 
at the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Cook is a hard worker in the cause of 
the Republican party, but never accepted of- 
fice. He was born in Darlington, Pa., March 
21, 1855, is a son of A. J. and Margaret (Rob- 
inson) Cook, and grandson of Benjamin R. 
and Susannah (Johnston) Cook. Benjamin 
R. Cook was a native of Chambersburg, Pa., 
and went to Western Pennsylvania in the lat- 
ter part of the eighteenth century. He was 
a carpenter by trade and followed that occu- 
pation for many years. Later he engaged in 
mercantile pursuits in Darlington. He was 
one of the first three merchants of that place. 
The others were Andrew Leach and David 
Gilliland. After some years he sold his store 
and bought a farm east of the town. A few 
years further on he moved one mile west of 



364 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



the present home of the subject hereof. There 
he purchased eighty acres of partly cleared 
land. An old cabin then on the land still ex- 
ists. Here upon this farm Benjamin R. Cook 
remained until 1845. He then went south in 
quest of better health, but never found it, and 
died there April 6, 1845. He wedded Susan- 
nah Johnston, a native of Beaver county. She 
was a daughter of Andrew Johnston, a pioneer 
of prominence in this section of Pennsylvania. 
Six children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. Cook, 
viz: Mary; A. J., father of N. Ben; John; 
James ; Martha A. (McClure) ; and Emeline. 
Mary, the eldest of these, was a college gradu- 
ate and followed the profession of teaching 
for a number of years. She became one of the 
best educators in this country, and gained for 
herself a national reputation. Her sister 
Martha was also a successful teacher before 
her marriage. 

A. J. Cook was born at Darlington, Pa., Oc- 
tober I, 1821. After attending district school 
he finished his education at Darlington Acad- 
emy. He then learned farming. Subse- 
quently he purchased a half interest in a 
threshing machine. The other half was owned 
by John Davis. At a later period A. J. Cook 
sold his interest, and for a brief period re- 
sumed farming. He afterward bought a hotel 
in Darlington and followed the hotel busi- 
ness for seventeen years. On relinquishing 
this, he became the first permanent station 
agent of the Fort Wayne R. R. at New Gali- 
lee. He resigned that position, however, and 
opened another hotel, which he sold after 
awhile, and purchased an eighty-five acre 



farm, where his son, L. J., now lives. Mr. 
Cook continued to reside upon this farm for 
nine years, when he was deprived of his be- 
loved wife by death. Since then he has rented 
his farm, and makes his home with the sub- 
ject hereof. His wife was Margaret Robinson, 
a daughter of Andrew Robinson, of New Cas- 
tle, Pa., where Margaret was born. This 
iiappy union was blessed with eight children : 
Andrew J.; Lucinda; William; L. J.; N. Ben, 
to whom these lines pertain ; Amelia ; Caro- 
lina ; and Lizzie. The first two died in 
infancy. William Cook received his educa- 
tion at Darlington Academy, and taught 
school for some time afterward. He then 
studied medicine under Dr. Sherlock, and 
later imder Dr. Clendenning, of Cincinnati. 
He practiced medicine at Freeport, Pa., but 
was cut off by death at the early age of 
thirty-five years. L. J. Cook is a farmer of 
prominence, and is also an agent for farm 
machinery. Caroline died aged thirteen, and 
Lizzie at the tender age of two years. 



§EFFERSON WILSON, an extensive 
fruit grower and prominent farmer of 
Chippewa township, Beaver county, 
Pa., is a son of James and Barbara (Showal- 
ter) Wilson, and was born in North Sewickley 
township, Beaver county, in the year 1839. 

James Wilson, the father of Jefferson, re- 
moved to Beaver county when a very young 
man and was one of the earliest settlers. He 
located in North Sewickley township and en- 
gaged in farming, — soon after, buying a tract 



BEAVER COUNTY 



365 



of one hundred acres of wild land. He made 
a clearing, erected a log house and barn, and 
resided there with his family for a number of 
years. He subsequently built a handsome 
brick house, in which he spent the rest of his 
active days. He followed general farming and 
was successful beyond the average. He was 
a Republican in politics, and held the ofifice 
of school director, for a time. Religiously, 
he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. His marriage was blessed by the 
birth of eleven children. 

Jefferson Wilson received a limited educa- 
tion in the district school, but made the ut- 
most of his opportunities and is now consid- 
ered an intelligent and well read man. Upon 
leaving school he learned the trade of a plas- 
terer, and then moved to Nebraska where he 
engaged in that line of work. He returned 
to Beaver county, and still later went to Alle- 
gheny county, following his trade until 1868. 
Many of the oldest houses in Beaver Falls 
were plastered by him, as he was the leading 
plasterer there at that period. In 1868 he 
bought the Thomas farm of one hundred and 
six acres of partly cleared land, and as there 
were no buildings standing, except a barn, he 
erected a house and the necessary out build- 
ings. There was also a very small orchard 
upon the place, and this he enlarged, until he 
now has what is undoubtedly the equal of 
any fruit farm in the county. He has always 
been interested in that line of work, and has 
made a study of it, being a well informed man 
in matters pertaining to fruit growing. He 
has thirty acres of fruit trees, mainly apples, 



pears, peaches, plums, and cherries, and in 
addition to these he has a large tract set out 
in berries of various kinds, — a branch of the 
business which he has found very profitable. 
Besides retailing, he ships a portion of his 
produce to Pittsburg markets. He also raises 
a little stock, grain and potatoes. During his 
spare tim.e he has invented and patented a 
number of useful and valuable articles. 
Mr. Wilson is a man of pleasing characteris- 
tics, and has a large circle of friends through- 
out this section of the country. 

Jefferson Wilson was united in marriage 
with Elizabeth Couch, daughter of John 
and Mary A. (Hickman) Couch. Mrs. Wil- 
son was born and educated in Lawrence 
county. Pa., and they have eight children, a 
record of whom follows: Nanna J., a gradu- 
ate of Bucknell University, was a missionary 
to Upper Burmah and Japan, for several years. 
She returned to America and was married to 
Dr. Leroy Stephens, secretary of the Pennsyl- 
vania Baptist Educational Society. Charles 
A. attended Butler University, read law, and 
is a graduate of the University of Michigan. 
He practiced law a short time, and then en- 
tered Crozier Theological Seminary, where 
he was prepared for the ministry, and has been 
pastor of churches in the Pittsburg and 
French Creek associations. Thomas J. at- 
tended Geneva College, read law, and is a 
graduate of the University of Michigan. He 
is now a prominent lawyer in Pittsburg. 
Mamie, who attended Geneva College, in pur- 
suance of the study of music, is now at home 
with her parents. Frank G. attended school 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



at Mount Hermon, Mass., and is now a farm- 
er in Beaver county. Delia A. attended Hall 
Institute, and was married to Rev. T. J. Ed- 
wards, a prominent Baptist minister. Harry 
studied art and is now engaged in that work. 
Nora, after attending Mount Pleasant Col- 
lege, graduated in Byron King's School of 
Oratory, and then taught dramatic art. She 
was subsequently married to G. A. Johnson, a 
prominent attorney of Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

In addition to his farm land, our subject 
owns property in Beaver Falls, in the form of 
building lots and houses. Politically, he is 
an independent Republican. In reHgious be- 
lief, he is a faithful member of the Baptist 
church. 




;^AMUEL M. HERVEY, burgess and 
justice of the peace in Rochester, 
Beaver county, Pa., is one of the 
leading business men of that borough, and is 
highly esteemed by all of his fellow-towns- 
men. He is very well known throughout the 
county, and comes from an excellent family. 
He was born January 4, 1856, in Brownsville, 
Fayette county, Pa., and is a son of the late 
Rev. D. \V. C. Hervey, and a grandson of 
James Hervey, who was of Scotch-Irish de- 
scent. James Hervey was a farmer in Fayette 
county, but was a weaver by trade, and also 
conducted a cotton and woolen mill ; after the 
factory burned he retired. 

Rev. D. W. C. Hervey, the father of Samuel 
M,, became in early life a Baptist minister, 



and occupied the pulpit in Freeport, Kittan- 
ning and New Castle; he also served six years 
in the Providence church in Beaver county, 
and in Jefferson county, Pa. He then went to 
Illinois and Kansas, but in a few years retired 
to Mount Gilead, Ohio, where he lived until 
his death, which occurred at the home of his 
son at New Castle, at the age of sixty-seven. 
He married Kate McCune, who died in Illi- 
nois at the age of sixty. Their children were as 
follows: John P., principal of the fifth ward 
school of New Castle ; Hazen J., a printer in 
Illinois; Herbert B., deceased; Ella B., who 
married S. B. Skinner, of Indiana ; Kate, who 
married Mr. McCann, of Illinois ; and Samuel 
M., the subject of this sketch. 

Samuel M. Hervey attended the North Se- 
wickley Academy, and then began teaching 
school. For several years he taught at 
Hillsville, Lawrence county. Pa., where 
he met and married Annie E. Davis, 
a daughter of William Davis; they are 
the parents of three children, namely: 
Walter D. ; Nellie ; and Kate. Subsequently 
Mr. Hervey taught school in New Castle, and 
then engaged in painting. In 1886 he moved 
to Rochester, continued teaching, and carried 
on painting by contract. He also taught 
night school in Rochester until 1893. In 1894 
he formed a partnership with J. T. Conlin in 
the insurance business. They are today the 
most extensive insurance agents in the coun- 
ty, and represent the Royal, Lancaster, Amer- 
ican, Fire of Philadelphia, Providence, Cale- 
donia, Northwestern, Milwaukee, Milwaukee 
Mechanics, Netherlands, Springfield, Fire & 




WILLIAM HEXRV ANUERTOX. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



Marine, and other insurance companies. In 
February, 1893, Mr. Hervey was elected jus- 
tice of the peace, and has been re-elected; he 
was appointed burgess by the court in March, 
1898. In politics he is a stanch Republican. 
He has served as trustee and auditor of the 
Baptist church for the past three years, and 
is secretary of the Sunday School. He is a 
member of the I. O. O. F., Royal Arcanum, 
and B. P. O. E. In 1891 he built a fine resi- 
dence on New York street, which reflects 
much credit on the taste, of its owner. His of- 
fice is also on New York street. 






AM HENRY ANDER- 
secretary, treasurer and gen- 
eral business manager of the Ander- 
ton Brewing Company of Beaver Falls, Pa., 
whose portrait we present on the preceding 
page, received his primary education in the 
Beaver Falls schools, — taking a collegiate 
course at the Iron City Business College of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In 1883, he en- 
tered the employ of the Hartman Steel Co., of 
Beaver Falls, in the capacity of clerk, remain- 
ing in their employ until 1889. He was a 
prime mover in the organization of the Union 
Drawn Steel Co., and was secretary and treas- 
urer of that company, until December, 1890. 
At that date, Mr. Anderton became secretary, 
treasurer and general business manager of the 
Anderton Brewing Co., which position he still 
holds. He assisted in organizing the People's 
Water Company in 1897, and is its vice 
president. He is a believer in the principles 



of Democracy, and an active worker for that 
party. Socially, he is a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, being included among the 
members of Beaver Valley Lodge. No. 478; 
he is also treasurer of the B. P. O. E. lodge. 
No. 348. 

William Henry Anderton is one of a family 
of five children. He was born October 23, 
1866, is a son of James and Betty (Green- 
wood) Anderton, and grandson of James and 
Sarah (Morris) Anderton. His grandparents 
came to America from England in 1856, ac- 
companied by their son James, and settled 
at Fallston, Beaver county. Pa., where their 
two sons, John and Joseph, had located a fe\y 
months previously. There father and sons 
worked in the mines for some years. John 
died at Fallston, in February, 1899, but Jo- 
seph now resides in Rochester, Pa. The be- 
loved father departed this life in May, 1879, 
at the age of seventy-nine years, and was pre- 
ceded to the grave by his faithful wife and 
companion, who died in March, 1878, in her 
eighty-fifth year. 

James Anderton, the father of William 
Henry, was born in Streetbridge, Royston, 
Lancastershire, England, June 26, 1830. He 
worked for eighteen years in the mines in his 
native place, beginning at the early age of 
eight years. In his youth he had no educa- 
tional advantages whatever, — his only mental 
training being a night school organized by 
himself and his fellow miners, known as the 
"Youth's Seminary." There the boys taught 
each other, being too poor to afiford an ex- 
perienced teacher. The school organized by 



370 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



tliese lads has grown into a famous institution 
of learning, and is now known as the Literary 
Institute of Oldham, England. 

James Anderton accompanied his parents 
to America when twenty-six years of age, 
worked in the mines at Fallston, until 1866, 
and then removed to New Brighton, Penn- 
sylvania. He continued to follow this occu- 
pation at the latter place until March, 1868, 
when he removed to Beaver Falls, purchased 
his present residence, and engaged in the 
hotel business. The following year (1869), he 
went into the brewing business in a small 
frame building, situated quite near the ele- 
gant structure in which he at present offi- 
ciates. The first brewing was made Novem- 
ber 30, of the same year, and consisted of 
only nine barrels. In 1875, Mr. Anderton 
built the old part of the present structure, and 
with a much increased capacity, he continued 
to brew ale and porter until 1895, when he 
built a large brick addition, with all the mod- 
ern improvements, and began brewing beer. 
The Anderton Brewery is now one of the most 
complete up-to-date breweries in Pennsyl- 
vania, and has a capacity of 30,000 barrels per 
year. There are many larger breweries in 
the Keystone State, but none more complete. 

While still in his native land, James Ander- 
ton was united in marriage with Betty Green- 
wood, a daughter of Joseph and Mary Green- 
wood. This event took place in 1852, and 
their union is blessed with five children, vi^. : 
Jonathan ; Mary G. ; William H. ; William H., 
second ; and Sarah A. Jonathan was born June 
22, 1853 ; he is vice president of the Anderton 



Brev.'ing Company. He wedded Marga- 
ret Hart, a daughter of Hilton and Ann Hart, 
and their home is made happy by the presence 
of four sons: James, Hilton, Jonathan, Jr., 
and William H. Mary G. was born Febru- 
ary I, 1858. She became the wife of C. W. 
Rohrkaste, who is now superintendent of the 
Anderton Brewery. They have three chil- 
dren : James A. ; Mary A. ; and Florence E. 
William H., the third child, died at the tender 
age of five years, and the same name was 
given to the next child. William H., the 
fourth child, is the subject of this brief sketch. 
Sarah A., the fifth child, was born October 14, 
1869, and died in early childhood, aged three 
years. 

James Anderton is a fine illustration of a 
self-made man, which in a great measure is 
due to his progressiveness, reliability and in- 
tegrity. He ranks among the most esteemed 
citizens of Beaver Falls, and takes an active 
interest in fraternal organizations, being a 
member of Lone Rock Lodge, K. of P. ; Val- 
ley Echo Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; Mechanics 
Lodge, A. O. U. W. ; and Beaver Valley 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of which he has been 
treasurer for the past nineteen years. He was 
one of the organizers and original stockhold- 
ers of the Union Drawn Steel Co., and is one 
of the stockholders of the People's Water Co., 
of Beaver Falls. In his religious convictions, 
the elder Mr. Anderton is an Episcopalian, 
of which denomination he and his family are 
members. Politically, he is a stanch Demo- 
crat, but could never be persuaded to seek 
or accept public office. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



371 



William Henry Anderton chose for his wife 
Emma J. Bailey, a daughter of James and 
Emma Bailey. In his business ventures he 
has met with success and, like his father, he is 
known to be an upright, honorable man. His 
home bears evidence of comfort in all its sur- 
roundings, and he always lends his aid and in- 
fluence to the support of measures which he 
believes will be conducive to the general 
good. 



CTHAN HAZEN THOMAS, chief 
burgess of New Brighton, Pa., is 
'also an insurance agent of that place, 
and deals largely in real estate. New Brigh- 
ton is one of the best business towns in Beaver 
county. Pa., situated as it is in a fine loca- 
tion, and containing many beautiful homes, 
streets, walks, and shade trees. The mam- 
moth manufacturing industries operated 
within its limit, are among the best in this 
section of Pennsylvania. New Brighton is 
located upon lands known as tracts No. 91 
and 95, and was laid out in lots in 1814. About 
the same time, a bridge was built connecting 
it with Beaver Falls, and was rebuilt in 1833 
or 1834. In 1832, a canal was built around 
the falls in order to market the products of 
the first manufacturing concern located there, 
— that was the Townsend Flouring Mills, 
which were built in 1837, destroyed by fire 
about 1846 and replaced by woolen mills. 
New Brighton is situated on the banks of the 
Beaver River, which gives abundant water 
supply for various manufacturing concerns, 



and is only a few miles from the Ohio Rivef. 
It contains two railroads, — direct lines east 
and west; they are the P., F. W. & C. R. R., 
and the E. & P. R. R. In, addition to this, the 
place is supplied with a trolley line through 
the main streets, and broad walks, finely 
shaded ; it has many beautiful residences, sur- 
rounded by spacious and well-kept lawns. 

In 1838, New Brighton was made a bor- 
ough, and now has a population of 9,000. It 
contains fine stores, public halls, local banks, 
eight churches, splendid schools, a young 
men's library, building and loan associations, 
a daily paper, and is well supplied with electric 
lights and natural gas for illuminating and 
manufacturing purposes; the Vv'ater supply is 
inexhaustible. It is no small honor to the 
subject of this sketch to be at the head of such 
a prosperous and flourishing borough. Mr. 
Thomas was elected chief burgess of this en- 
terprising town on the Republican ticket in 
1897, and fills the seat of honor in a very 
creditable manner. He was born in North 
Sewickley township, Beaver county, Pa., 
February 29, 1856. He is a son of John 
Thomas, and grandson of Ethan Thomas. 
Our subject was educated in the public schools 
and in Burns' Seminary, after which he em- 
barked in the drug business, purchasing the 
store of Kennedy & Patton. He continued 
in that line for five years, selling out his busi- 
ness to H. L. Schwieppe; he then embarked in 
the feed and grain business, and conducted 
that for several years, after which he entered 
his present real estate and insurance business. 
In 1888 he added an insurance department 



372 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



to his business, representing the following 
companies : Home, of New York ; New York 
Underwriters ; National, of Hartford ; Agricul- 
tural, of Watertown, N. Y. ; Northwestern, of 
Milwaukee ; and Lloyd's Plate Glass Ins. Co., 
of New York. Mr. Thomas handles as much, 
if not more, real estate than any other man 
in New Brighton, and has established a large 
patronage by his upright dealings. He re- 
sides at the corner of Sixth avenue and Elev- 
enth street, and has an office adjoining, at No. 
602 Eleventh street. 

Ella Kilpatrick, an attractive daughter of 
Daniel and Margaret Kilpatrick, of New 
Brighton, became the wife of Mr. Thomas, 
and has borne him five children, namely: 
Edith, a student ; Edna, who died in infancy ; 
Clara Emma, who also died young; Frank; 
Carl, who is ten years old ; and an infant 
daughter. 

Mr. Thomas is a consistent member of the 
Immanuel Baptist church, and has served as 
clerk, trustee and treasurer, while his worthy 
wife worships with the Methodist Protestant 
church. Mr. Thomas served several years as 
a member of the borough council, and also as 
notary public, and is known as one of :he 
most enterprising citizens of New Brighton. 

Ethan Thomas, grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, was born in the state of Mary- 
land. He was united in marriage with Eliz- 
abeth Eads, a native of Virginia. They went 
to Beaver county. Pa., among the earliest 
settlers, — following agricultural pursuits. 
They settled first in Patterson township, but 
later removed to Chippewa township, where 



their son William now resides. Ethan 
Thomas cleared this farm, which was, at the 
time of its purchase, only a wilderness. He 
also placed many improvements upon the 
place, such as dwellings, barns, etc., and was 
a very successful farmer for his day. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas reared a family of eight chil- 
dren, six sons and two daughters. Their 
names are : Isaiah ; John ; James ; David ; 
William; Daniel; Mary, wife of Daniel Dan- 
iels ; and Elizabeth, wife of Mr. Brittain. The 
beloved father and mother now rest in the 
churchyard at Darlington, and William is now 
the only living member of their family. 

William Thomas, uncle of our subject, now 
resides upon the homestead farm, and is 
known as a successful man, respected by all. 
In his early Hfe, he was a merchant at Beaver, 
for three years. He was in business later at 
New Brighton, for three years, and then re- 
tired to the homestead farm, which he has 
since cultivated. He has served as county 
auditor one term, and as justice of the peace 
for several years. He was joined in matrimony 
with Mary A. Young, a daughter of Jacob and 
Susan Young, of Columbus, Ohio. 

John Thomas, father of our subject, was 
born at the homestead in Chippewa township, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He was a 
farmer by occupation and settled in Franklin 
township for a while, but removed later to 
North Sewickley township, where his death 
took place in 1864, in his fifty-sixth year. His 
life partner and cheerful helpmeet was, before 
marriage, Miss Margaret Hazen, a daughter 
of Samuel Hazen. She survived her husband 



THE 
NEW VORK 

(PUBLIC library! 




Astor, LdKox and Tilden y 

Fouf^daiions. 

1908 




RoilERT I)U\XL LIURXSIUE DAWSON, M. D. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



until 1889, when she, too, crossed the dark 
river, at the age of seventy-one years. Nine 
children blessed their union, viz. : James, who 
served in the Civil War as a member of Com- 
pany H, loist Ohio Vol., from 1861 to 1863, 
when he was discharged for disability, and 
who died January 28, 1869; Pamelia, who is 
the widow of Dr. James E. Jackson, and still 
resides in New Brighton ; Clara, who died, 
single, in 1871 ; Elzena, who married J. M. 
Hazen, and also died in 1871 ; Elizabeth, Jane, 
and Samuel, who all died young; Ethan H., 
the subject of this sketch; and Maggie E., 
wife of John W. Withrow. 

John Thomas was a Whig, and later, a Re- 
publican. He served as school director and 
in minor offices in the township. He was a 
deacon of the Baptist church, of which de- 
nomination both he and Mrs. Thomas were 
devout members. 



YP^obert DOYNE BURNSIDE 
I ^ DAWSON, M. D., a well-known and 
Vi-^ popular physician of Beaver 
county. Pa., a portrait of whom accompanies 
this sketch, is a descendant of one of Beaver 
county's oldest families. His great-great- 
grandfather, Benoni Dawson, was a native 
of Montgomery county, Maryland, but 
the date of his birth is not known. 
He was a descendant of an old Eng- 
lish family, who were given a large 
grant of land in Maryland, by King George; 
in recognition of this favor, the Dawsons were 
loyal to the mother country. They firmly be- 
lieved it to be to the best interest of the com- 



munity to maintain allegiance to the British 
empire. During the Revolutionary War they 
were Tories, and owing to their influence and 
the respect they commanded in their neigh- 
borhood, they proved themselves valuable 
allies of the English. 

After his marriage with Rebecca Mackall, 
the daughter of a prominent family of Mary- 
land, Benoni with his wife moved from Mont- 
gomery county, Md., to Beaver county, Pa., 
and took up a farm where the village ot 
Georgetown is now located. His son, R. D. 
Dawson, laid out the village of Georgetown 
in town lots, which he disposed of. Benoni 
lived upon his farm until his death in 1806, 
having located upon it about the year 1784. 
He and his wife were the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Thomas; Nicholas; Beno- 
ni ; Mackall ; John Lowe ; Robert D., who died 
in 1801, at the age of twenty-one years; 
George; James; Elizabeth, the wife of Charles 
Blackamore; Nancy, the wife of John Beaver; 
Mary, wife of James Blackamore ; and Rebec- 
becca, wife of William White. When Dr. 
Dawson's great-great-grandfather first came 
to Beaver county, there were few white set- 
tlers in that vicinity and no roads had yet been 
built. Indians and big game were alike plenti- 
ful. Mr. Dawson became an extensive land- 
owner, and established a comfortable home 
there. His third son also bore the name Ben- 
oni, a favorite name in the family for many 
generations. He was the next in line of an- 
cestry and was the great-grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch. 

Benoni Dawson, Jr., assisted his father on 



816 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



the new place for some time, and then began 
to look around for a location for himself. He 
n ade a trip across the river, and is supposed 
to have been the first white man who ever 
made the journey with the idea of settling 
there. He selected a place, but a Mr Mc- 
Laughlin, also, had the same locality in view, 
and the latter hurriedly built a log cabin, and 
secured "squatters' rights" to it. Benoni, Jr., 
was then obliged to withdraw and seek a new 
location. He selected four hundred acres 
near by, where Ohiovilie now stands. His 
marriage with Catherine McKennon resulted 
in the birth of the following eight children : 
Robert Doyne ; Benjamin ; James, a physician 
of prominence; Daniel; Elizabeth, who re- 
mained single as did Sarah, the next one; 
Rutii (Evans); and Mary Ann (Johnston). 
All Lhe boys, except James, became farmers. 
Their father was particularly active in road 
building. The land he took up was of course 
wild and he used every effort to make the spot 
habitable and to provide a comfortable home 
for his family. He followed farming up to 
the time of his last illness. In politics, he was 
a Whig, and religiously, was reared in the 
faith of the Protestant Episcopal church in 
which he served many years as vestryman. 

Robert Doyne Dawson, grandfather of the 
subject hereof, was born July 30, 1801. He 
received his scholastic training under Master 
Steele, a private pedagogue. Robert worked 
upon his father's farm for some time, but sub- 
sequently followed river life between Pitts- 
burg and New Orleans. He worked in that 
capacity until his marriage with Elizabeth 



Reed. Elizabeth was a favorite daughter of 
Ruel Reed. She was born in Beaver county, 
Pa., in 1803. She bore her husband ten chil- 
dren, namely: Mary Ann, Catherine and Re- 
becca, who all remained single; Benoni, Dr. 
Dawson's father; Ruel; James; Benjamin; 
Robert D. ; Daniel D. ; and William McKen- 
non. 

After his marriage, Robert Dawson relin- 
quished river life and returned to farming. 
For a short time he was located on his father's 
homestead farm. Then, for a brief period, he 
rented a place. Later, he purchased one hun- 
dred acres of land from his father-in-law. 
After farming that for some time, he sold out 
and purchased the farm where Daniel D. now 
lives. Here he prospered, and was soon en- 
abled to add three other farms to his original 
purchase. Thus he became the owner of 
tiiree hundred and forty acres, which he im- 
proved in a superior manner. He built a good 
brick residence, and his farm was considered 
one of the finest and best improved in the 
county. In addition to producing large quan- 
tities of fruit, he devoted much attention to 
stockraising. He was the first to introduce 
Durham cattle and Leicester sheep in Ohio 
township, and was among the first to intro- 
duce these breeds into the county. He dis- 
posed of his stock at Pittsburg and in local 
markets. Like his honored father, he was 
vestryman in the Protestant Episcopal 
church. In his political affiliations he fol- 
lowed the leadership of the Republican party. 
At the time of his demise, he was a compar- 
c'tively wealthy man. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



377 



Benoni Dawson, father of the subject here- 
of, was born in Ohio township, in 1830, and 
obtained the rudiments of an education in the 
district schools. He learned farming and 
bought a farm for himself in 1854. This farm 
contained one hundred and twenty acres, and 
was partly improved, having a fine log cabin 
on the premises. This was torn down and 
replaced by a convenient frame and log resi- 
dence, which is standing to this day. Dr. 
Dawson's parents were married in 1858. His 
mother was, before marriage, Rolena Bris- 
bane. She was a native of Pittsburg, Pa., 
and was educated in Allegheny City. She 
was the mother of seven children, viz. : Eliz- 
abeth (Nicholson) ; Rebecca C. (Murdock) ; 
Robert D. B., the subject of this sketch; 
Charles H., deceased; Anna F., wife of Dr. 
C. C. Taylor, of New Waterford, Ohio; 
Benoni R., a farmer; and Rolena I., now de- 
ceased. Mr. Murdock, who married Rebecca 
C, is a professor of music in Allegheny, and a 
composer of some note. He is the inventor 
of the Murdock system of guitar instruction. 

Dr. Dawson's father is still actively en- 
gaged in cultivating his fine farm. He grows 
fiuit in large quantities. He also devotes 
much time to stockraising, — selling mostly 
to East Liverpool markets. He is a stanch 
Republican, and has served as a school direc- 
tor, and in various other township offices. In 
early life he was a member of the Episcopal 
church, and assisted materially in building the 
church at Georgetown. Later in life, he 
joined the Presbyterian denomination in 
which he has been a trustee for twenty-five 
>ears. 



Dr. Dawson was born in Beaver county. 
Pa., January 13, 1864. He obtained his pri- 
mary education in the district schools, which 
he attended during the v.'inter months, until 
he attained the age of twenty years. In the 
summers, he assisted his father on the home- 
stead farm, and followed that line of work 
until his twenty-third year. He then de- 
cided on a professional career, and began the 
study of medicine. He studied one year 
under Dr. R. J. Marshall, of Fairview, merely 
as a preparatory course. In 1890, he entered 
Western Reserve University, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, as a medical student. He graduated 
with high honors in the class of 1893. Dr. 
Dawson then took a post-graduate course at 
Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, and was ap- 
pointed house surgeon, filling that position 
very creditably, for sixteen months. During 
that time, he gained valuable experience in 
surgery, and gained an enviable reputation 
for himself. Dr. Dawson is very skilful in his 
profession, and is an enthusiastic operator in 
surgical cases. He first began practice in 
East Liverpool, Ohio. After an eight 
months' stay, an opportunity occurred where- 
by he could practice in his native town. He 
purchased the propertv of Dr. George J. Boyd 
and opened his present ofiice in Fairview. 
He is a general practitioner, but devotes es- 
pecial attention to surgery. He supplies his 
own medicine to his patients, and is decidedly 
popular. By his cleverness and skill he has 
won the confidence of his clients in a very 
t:otable manner. 

Dr. Dawson was joined in matrimony 



378 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



October 4, 1893, with Eleanor Loretta Coll, a 
gifted daughter of Hugh Coll. Mrs. Dawson 
13. a native of Pittsburg, where her birth oc-> 
curred in 1862. She was educated in the St. 
Mary's Academy at Pittsburg. Dr. and Mrs. 
Dawson have one son, Robert Doyne. He 
was born July 9, 1894, and in him all their 
domestic hopes are centered. Politically, the 
Doctor is a Republican, but is too busy to ac- 
cept office. He worships with the Presbyte- 
rian denomination. 



fOHN A. CAMPBELL, junior member 
of the firm of D. Campbell & Son, con- 
tractors in heavy masonry, is one of 
the most successful and prosperous men of 
Beaver Falls. He was born near New Galilee, 
Beaver county. Pa., in 1863, and is a son of 
David Campbell, whose father was John 
Campbell, a native and life-long resident of 
Scotland. 

David Campbell, the father of John A., was 
born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and received a 
thorough mental training in the common 
schools there. He was then bound out as 
an apprentice to the trade of a mason, and 
after serving his time, worked as a journey- 
man until he came to this country. He lo- 
cated at Beaver Falls, Beaver county, Pa., in 
1864, at the age of twenty-two years, and at 
once resumed work at his trade, being em- 
ployed on the Ft. Wayne R. R. construction. 
He subsequently started in business for him- 
self, as a general contractor, and being one 
of the first business men in the district, Bea- 



ver Falls, at that time, not having a popu- 
lation of more than two hundred, he laid the 
foundations for nearly all the buildings built 
in that section of the county. He worked on 
the construction of an arch at Wallace Run. 
This was a long and difficult task, the wall 
under ground being thirty feet thick ; and it 
required three years for its completion. He 
did all the masonry work for the cutlery shops, 
built the Economy Bank and Geneva College, 
did the masonry on the File Works and 
Axe Factory, and also considerable work on 
the P. & L. E. R. R. He has for many years 
been one of the foremost business men and 
most reliable citizens of Beaver Falls. In 
1861, he was joined in wedlock with Margery 
McKim, of Scotland, and nine children re- 
sulted from this union, as follows : James, de- 
ceased ; Jeanette (Gaston) ; John A., the sub- 
ject of this personal history; Robert, a stone 
mason by trade ; Samuel, who follows the oc- 
cupation of a master plumber; Elizabeth, de- 
ceased; Jane, deceased; Margery; and Myrtle, 
a graduate of the Beaver Falls High School, 
and of Beaver College, who is now a success- 
ful teacher at College Hill school. Mr. 
Campbell is a strong supporter of the Repub- 
lican party, but has never accepted office. 
He is a member of the F. & A. M., and of the 
mother lodge in Scotland ; the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen ; and the; Odd Fellows. 

John A. Campbell received his education 
in the public schools at Beaver Falls, and 
upon completing his schooling, became asso- 
ciated in business with his father. In 1887, 
he purchased the interest of Mr. Moffit in the 




MAJOR GILBERT L. EBERHART. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



381 



firm, and has since devoted his entire time to 
its success. Although it has always been the 
leading firm of the kind in that district ; since 
our subject has been identified with it, its 
business has increased steadily until it en- 
counters some difficulty in keeping apace with 
its contracts. At the present time it has a 
contract to build the shops of the Atlantic 
Tube Company, which will cover three acres 
of ground, at Moravia, Pennsylvania. The 
subject of this sketch is an enterprising and 
energetic young man, popular with his fel- 
low citizens and he has a host of friends 
wherever he is known. 

Mr. Campbell was joined in hymeneal 
bonds with Mary C. Robel, a daughter of 
Lewis and Sophia (Cleis) Robel, of Germany, 
a native of Morgantown, West Virginia, 
where she received her education. Our sub- 
ject is a Republican in politics, and like his 
father, is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, of which he is an elder. 




AJOR GILBERT L. EBERHART, 
of New Brighton, — editor, author, 
lawyer and soldier, Interesting 
references to his life and public service. 

Some of the Eberharts came from Germany 
to Pennsylvania as early as 1727, landing at 
Philadelphia on the i6th of October, in that 
year, on a vessel named "Friendship." 

All descended in a direct line from the cel- 
ebrated "Eberhart mit ihm bart," first duke 
of Wurtemberg. 

John Adam Eberhart, duke of Elsass, Ger- 



many, had four sons (Andrew, George, Mar- 
tin and Adolphus), all of whom came to 
America in the ship "Banister," under com- 
mand of Capt. John Doyle, landing at New 
York in the fall of 1758. 

Andrew settled first in Sherman's Valley, 
Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and after- 
wards removed to Washington County, where 
he died in August, 1799, on his farm on 
which he and his wife were buried within 
three miles of the present location of the court 
house of that County. 

His wife was Catherine Elizabeth Mercer, 
a sister of Brig. Gen. Hugh Mercer, M. D., 
who fell fatally wounded at the battle of 
Princeton, N. J., on the second day of Janu- 
ary, 1777. 

Adolphus, youngest brother of Andrew 
Eberhart, served in the Revolutionary War, 
although quite young. He was the first man 
to make glass in America, and went into 
the business with Albert Gallatin in Fayette 
County, about 1786. 

His descendants have continued in the bus- 
iness in the Monongahela Valley to the pres- 
ent day. 

Andrew Eberhart was the father of two 
sons and four daughters. His eldest son, John, 
was born in Cumberland County, Pa., May 9, 
1766. He removed from Washington to 
Beaver County in the year 1804, and settled 
on a farm within sight of the court house 
where he lived till his death, November 9. 
183 1. He was the father of two sons and 
seven daughters. He called his eldest John, 
who became a man of fine attainments, al- 



382 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



though he had no collegiate training. He 
spent a part of his early life in teaching, and 
was many years an active business man. He 
learned the trade of cabinet maker, and speci- 
mens of his handiwork, made of native maple, 
cherry and walnut, are still in use in some of 
the homes of the children of the older in- 
habitants of the County. 

He was an active politician although never 
a candidate for ofifice ; and some of his articles 
written in behalf of his favorites can yet be 
found in the files of the county journals of 
"ante bellum" days. 

Although but a boy at the time, he enlisted 
and served in Capt. Thos. Henry's Company 
in the War of 1812. His wife was Sarah 
Power, second daughter of Gen. Samuel 
Power, and sister of James M. Power, who 
was one of the Canal Commissioners of Penn- 
sylvania, and Minister to Naples and the 
Kingdom of the two Sicilys. She was a sis- 
ter, also, of the late Gen. Thos. J. Power, of 
Rochester, Beaver County, who was a promi- 
nent politician and several years Adjutant 
General of the State. And as a civil engineer, 
he had much to do, in conjunction with his 
brother James, in promoting the public 
works, state and national, in Pennsylvania, 
notably in the first improvements made in 
the navigation of the Ohio River from the 
mouth of the Beaver to Pittsburg. 

Her father, Gen. Power, was sheriff of 
Beaver County from 1809 to 1812, and served 
as a major in the War of 181 2, and took a 
battalion to Lake Erie to protect our frontier 
from a threatened invasion of the British. He 



was of Scotch parentage, born in Virginia, 
and came to Beaver County, Pa., in 1804. 

Gen. Power afterwards became Adjutant 
General of the State, which office he held for 
six years. He was also a member of the 
House and Senate from 1819 to 1836, and 
while in the Legislature he took a very active 
interest in all enterprises that tended to de- 
velop the wealth of the state, and advance 
the welfare of the people. And it was mainly 
through his vigorous efforts, while a member 
of that body, that the necessary appropria- 
tions were secured to connect Pittsburg and 
the Ohio River with Lake Erie, at the City 
of Erie, by canal through the Beaver and 
Shenango Valleys; and, by means of the 
Pennsylvania and Ohio canal, through the 
Mahoning valley, to bring Pittsburg and in- 
termediate towns in closer commercial rela- 
tions with Cleveland, Ohio, some twenty-five 
years before the advent of railways into West- 
ern Pennsylvania and Eastern Ohio. 

John Eberhart, Jr., grandson of Andrew 
Eberhart and Catherine Mercer, was the 
father of five children by Sarah Power ; three 
boys and two girls. All, except the youngest, 
now are dead, the eldest, the Rev. Wilford 
Avery Power Eberhart, having died at Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, February 14, 1899. 

Gilbert Leander Eberhart, the only sur- 
vivor of the family, and the subject of this 
sketch, was born in North Sewickley town- 
ship, Beaver County, Pennsylvania, January 
i6th, A. D. 1830. His mother died when he 
was nineteen months old, and he was then 
taken into the care of his maternal grand- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



383 



father's family. 

His first instructions in letters were re- 
ceived in a select school in the Beaver Acad- 
emy, and the first public school-house built, in 
Beaver. His first Sunday school lessons were 
given him in the old Presbyterian Church 
that stood on the public square in Beaver, 
while he was a member of an infant class 
taught by the late Captain John D. Stokes. 
Later he received some very wholesome drills 
in Kirkham's Grammar, the Western Calcu- 
lator, the English Reader and the New Test- 
ament, in a log school-house which stood on 
the banks of Big Brush run in South Beaver 
township, where one of his teachers was 
George McElroy, who made quill pens for his 
pupils with a razor; and, when needed, stirred 
them up to a sense of their duty with a hickory 
"ox-gad" seven feet long, without leaving the 
chair he occupied in the centre of the school- 
room. The other was James Bliss. Both 
were thorough and efficient teachers.. In his 
later school-boy days, Mr. Eberhart was sent 
to the Academy at Mercer by his uncle, the 
Hon. Jas. M. Power, who was then a mer- 
chant and iron manufacturer at Greenville, in 
Mercer County. Finally he entered Wash- 
ington (Pa.) College, where he spent two 
years. Soon after he left that institution, he 
engaged in civil engineering on the Erie and 
Pittsburg railway of which his uncle, Gen. 
Thos. J. Power, was then President. He pur- 
sued that profession some five years, when he 
engaged in teaching in Greenville, Mercer 
County, and soon became Superintendent of 
Public Schools of that county. 



A short time prior to the outbreak of the 
Slaveholders' Rebellion, he took charge of the 
Conneautville (Pa.) Academy, but resigned 
that position, and on April 17, 1861, he en- 
listed for a term of three months as a Sergeant 
in "D" Company in Col. John W. McLane's 
Erie Regiment. 

At the expiration of that term, he enlisted 
in the 8th Regt., Pa. Res. Vol. Corps, and was 
mustered in for three years at Washington 
City, July 28, 1861, as a member of the non- 
commissioned regimental staff. He served in 
that capacity until August 21, 1862, when 
Gen. Geo. G. Meade, then commanding the 
Second Brigade of the Pa. Reserves, assigned 
him to duty on his staff as his Commissary of 
Subsistence, and he remained in the Subsis- 
tence Department of the Army of the Poto- 
mac as long as that army was in the field, and 
afterward served at Beaufort, S. C, and Jack- 
sonville, Fla., until October, 1865. 

During the Second Bull Run campaign, he 
served on the staff of Gen. John F. Reynolds, 
then commanding the third division (Pa. Re- 
serves) of the Fifth army corps ; and was hon- 
ored and highly complimented by both Rey- 
nolds and Meade for the coolness and cour- 
age by which, on August 28, 1862, he saved 
the division trains from capture and destruc- 
tion during a severe shelling by Rebel artil- 
lery. 

In that action Maj. Eberhart's horse was 
so badly injured by a shell in the left shoulder 
that he was obliged to abandon the poor .ani- 
mal to his fate. 

September 3, 1862, he received a commis- 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



sion as Quarter Master of the 8th Pa. Re- 
serves, and was mustered to rank as such 
from July ist, 1862. 

November 19, 1862, he became quite ill, 
and in a few weeks was reduced in weight 
from one hundred and forty to one hundred 
and fifteen pounds, as a result of the hard 
march through rain and snow from the battle- 
field of Antietam to Brooks Station, near 
Fredericksburg. 

Major Eberhart, however, in spite of his 
severe illness, was present on duty in the field 
at the battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 
1862, where, by the discharge of a heavy 
cannon, near the muzzle of which he was 
standing, he lost his hearing for a time. When 
it gradually, but only partially returned, it 
was discovered that the drum of his right 
ear was perforated and the hearing totally 
destroyed. 

The disease contracted in November, 1862, 
resulted in chronic disease of the digestive 
organs, and muscular rheumatism, from 
which he has been a constant sufferer to the 
present time; and not until the year 1890, did 
he regain the twenty-five punds of flesh lost 
in the winter of 1862-3. 

Under date of September 15, 1865, while on 
duty at Jacksonville, Fla., he received a letter 
from Maj.-Gen. Rufus Saxton, then Asst. 
Commissioner of the Bureau of Freedmen and 
Abandoned Lands for the states of South 
Carolina and Georgia, in which was this sen- 
tence: "I am pleased to offer you the posi- 
tion of Superintendent of Freedmen's Schools 
for the state of Georgia." Maj. Eberhart ac- 



cepted the offer, and under date at Charles- 
ton, S. C, October 2, 1865, he received Spe- 
cial Order No. 18 directing him to "report in 
person, without delay, to Brig.-Gen. Davis 
Tillson at Augusta, Ga." October 6, 1865, 
he was "assigned to duty as Superintendent 
of Freedmen's Schools for the State of Geor- 
gia." He remained on Gen. Tillson's staff 
until October, 1867, in the meantime having 
established, in the face of difificulties and 
menaces which only the military power of the 
Government could curb and resist, over two 
hundred and fifty schools for freedmen. In 
the City of Atlanta and, also, in Savannah, he 
secured the erection of a fine school-house — 
the first buildings of the kind ever erected in 
Georgia for negroes. 

On his return to civil life, he resumed 
teaching, and, in the fall of 1867, became 
Superintendent of the public schools of 
Rochester. The next year, without his seek- 
ing, he was elected Superintendent of the Kit- 
tanning Schools, where he organized the first 
graded schools that City ever had. He held 
that position four years, when he resigned to 
enter on the practice of law, having in the 
meantime read with the late Judge Brown B. 
Chamberhn. He was admitted to the Beaver 
bar June 14, 1870, and soon after to Law- 
rence, Mercer and Butler, and the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania. 

In November, 1876, he was elected to rep- 
resent Beaver County in the lov/er house of 
the General Assembly, and served during the 
sessions of 1877 and 1878. 

In 1883, he was elected without any soli- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



385 



citation on his part, to the office of Chief 
Burgess of New Brighton, and re-elected to 
succeed himself ; and, so well pleased were his 
fellow-citizens with his administration of the 
office, that they tendered him a third term, 
but his private business so engrossed his time 
he was obliged to decline the honor. 

In 1884, he was a prominent candidate for 
Congress, for which in all the counties of the 
district there were aspirants, producing a di- 
visive and somewhat bitter rivalry; and, sub- 
ordinating his own desires to the good of his 
party, he withdrew, rather than jeopardize the 
success of his party. 

In 1 89 1, he was elected a delegate to rep- 
resent the senatorial district composed of Bea- 
ver and Washington Counties in a proposed 
convention to amend the State constitution. 

His popularity in the district, as well as 
in his own County, was well attested by the 
fact that he received nine thousand, three 
hundred and fifty votes out of a total poll of 
thirteen thousand, one hundred and thirty- 
three. 

In 1879,. at the earnest solicitation of a 
number of the young men of New Brigh- 
ton, he organized a military company of 
which he was commissioned Captain and 
which was admitted to the National Guard of 
Pennsylvania as "B" Company, of the 15th 
Regiment of Infantry, in 1880, and the next 
year to the loth Regiment, — the Hawkins 
regiment, — which became famous, as well for 
being the only volunteer regiment east of the 
Mississippi in the War with Spain in the Phil- 
ippines, as for its heroism and gallant partici- 



pation in the battles about Manila after their 
capture by Admiral Dewey in 1898. 

Major Eberhart, ever since boyhood, has 
been a member of the Episcopal Church, and 
is one of the judges of the Ecclesiastical 
Court, and a trustee of the diocese of Pitts- 
burg. Among the fraternal orders, he is a 
Mason, Odd Fellow, and Knight of Pythias 
as well as a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic and the Union Vete- 
ran Legion, in all of which he has 
passed through the highest chairs. He 
has been twice President of the Law Associa- 
tion of Beaver County, and of the Soldiers 
and Sailors' Association of Beaver County. 
His wife is the youngest daughter of the late 
Dr. Peter Smith, formerly of San Francisco, 
but latterly of Wimpole street, London, Eng- 
land, where he practiced his profession the 
last ten years of his life. Their only surviv- 
ing child is the wife of Dr. H. S. McConnel, of 
New Brighton, one of the most prominent 
and successful physicians and surgeons in 
Pennsylvania. 

For some eight years Major Eberhart was 
owner and editor of the Daily and Weekly 
Tribune of Beaver Falls, and in that capacity 
distinguished himself as a brilliant writer on 
all current topics, and gave his paper a wide 
reputation. His most notable political arti- 
cles were those on Protection by invitation of 
the N. Y. World during the Blaine campaign. 
He has devoted much time to literature, and 
is the author of a large number of disquisi- 
tions on Philology and other scientific sub- 
jects. He has established a good practice 



386 



BOOK OP BIOGRAPHIES 



in his profession; and, as a public official, 
made a marked impression upon his constitu- 
ents for his fidelity to their interests, and the 
unswerving tenacity with which he adheres 
to the principles of his party. 

As a public speaker and lecturer, he is fear- 
less, as well as entertaining and instructive; 
and he has attained considerable notoriety as 
a poet, his poems entitled "The Fife," and 
"Ruth and I," having given him a very wide 
reputation. A fine collection of his poems 
appears in Herringshaw's "Poets of America," 
and many in other anthological publications. 




■ENRY HEURING, a stockholder and 
director of the Point Bottle Works, 
of Rochester, Pa., is the general 
manager of the establishment, and it is almost 
entirely due to his efficient service in that 
capacity that the plant is one of the most flour- 
ishing in Beaver county. He was born in 
Pittsburg, Pa., November ii, 1857, and is a 
son of Theodore and Mary (Renner) Heuring, 
— being of German parentage. 

Theodore Heuring, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Munster, Germany, and 
was a young man when he came to America, 
obtaining employment as a common laborer. 
After his marriage, he became a raftsman on 
the Ohio River and settled at Pittsburg, but 
later became a sawyer, and then foreman of 
the saw mill of McClintoc & Co., of Pitts- 
burg. In 1873, he removed to Rochester, 
Beaver county. Pa., where he was employed 



as foreman of the L. Oatman Mills, and later 
as foreman of the box makers of the 
Rochester Tumbler Com.pany. Pie was an 
ambitious man and a hard worker, and rose 
from the ranks of the day laborer to a pros- 
perous condition in life. He died in 1898, 
when sixty-seven years old, and his wife now 
enjoys life at the age of si.xty-five years. She 
resides in the house built by her husband on 
New York street. Her maiden name was 
Mary Renner, and she is a native of Elk 
county, Pennsylvania. Their union was 
blessed by the birth of the follov/ing off- 
spring: William, of Chicago; Henry, the 
subject of this biographical record ; Annie, the 
wife of J. T. Conlin, whose personal history 
also appears in this book ; Kate, the wife of 
John Beck, of Carnegie, Pa. ; John, deceased ; 
Frank, a boxmaker; Theodore and Charles, 
twins, both of whom work in the Rochester 
Tumbler Works ; and Andrew Packer, who 
is also employed at the Rochester Tumbler 
Works; and Joseph, a glass blov>'er at the 
Point Bottle Works. 

Henry Heuring was reared and educated in 
the borough of Rochester, and at an early age 
entered the box manufacturing department of 
the Rochester Tumbler Company. He con- 
tinued to work at that until 1887, when he 
became an organizer, stockholder and presi- 
dent of the Point Bottle Works, Limited. 
This plant was established, in 1879, as the 
Rochester Flint Vial & Bottle Works, by 
David McDonald, president, and C. I. Mc- 
Donald, vice-president. The^^business did not 
flourish as was expected, and it was later sold 



BEAVER COUNTY 



387 



at sheriff's sale, — being purchased by the fol- 
lowing : J. M. Buchanan ; S. B. Wilson ; J. 
C. Cunningham ; J. C. Irwin ; and P. Mc- 
Laughlin. The name was changed to that of 
the Point Bottle Works, the concern was re- 
organized, and P. McLaughlin was made pres- 
ident. Under this head business was con- 
tinued until 1887, when the enterprise again 
changed hands and was completely re-organ- 
ized under the name of the Point Bottle 
Works. Henry Heuring, the subject of these 
lines, was chosen president, and P. J. Huth, 
secretary and treasurer, and under this man- 
agement the plant for the first time was made 
a paying venture. Mr. Heuring continued as 
president until 1897, when he assumed the 
duties of general manager, his former posi- 
tion being filled by C. A. Darmbacher. The 
plant is one of the principal manufacturing 
establishments in Beaver county, and its 
products are shipped to all parts of the coun- 
try. The yearly output amounts to $90,000, 
and the company gives constant employment 
to one hundred and twenty-five men. The 
factory consists of two large buildings, both of 
which are well equipped with the latest of ma- 
chinery used in the business. A switch is also 
run up into the yard to the shipping housei 
making the best of facilities for shipping. Mr. 
Heuring has given his entire time and atten- 
tion to the business, and under his skilful 
guidance it has prospered and is increasing 
with great rapidity. The subject of this 
memoir was, for two years, president of the 
Central Building & Loan Association, of 
which he was one of the organizers. 




Mr. Heuring was joined in matrimonial 
bonds with Josephine Huth, a sister of P. J. 
Huth, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 
Book of Biographies, and their children were : 
Agnes, deceased; Llarry; Gracie; Marilla; 
Irene; and Richard, deceased. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Elks. 



;amuel clarence gorsuch, 

a machinist by trade, has been con- 
nected for many years with iron and 
steel works and has been a resident of Beaver 
Falls, Pa., since 1883, being, until recently, a 
heater in a plant there, which he assisted in 
building. He was born February 21, i860, 
in Springfield, Blair county. Pa., and is a son 
of Henderson and EHzabeth (Gates) Gor- 
such, and grandson of Benjamin Gorsuch. The 
first of the family who came to America, was 
the great-grandfather of Samuel Clarence, and 
was a native of Wales. After reaching Amer- 
ica, he settled in Baltimore, where he spent his 
last years. He, with his brother, was engaged 
in the cotton business. His son Benjamin, 
the grandfather of the subject hereof, was 
reared near Baltimore, where he became ap- 
prenticed to learn the trade of a blacksmith. 
After completing his apprenticeship, he en- 
gaged in that line of business on his own 
behalf, and was known as a very successful 
business man and a skilled mechanic ; he fol- 
lowed that line of business all his life. He 
removed to Huntingdon county. Pa., for some 
years, but later settled in Blair county, near 
Klopperstown. He followed blacksmithing 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



until middle age, when he went into the iron 
business. 

Henderson Gorsuch, father of the subject of 
this record, was born in June, 1833, in Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pa., where he was reared, re- 
ceiving a limited education in "book learning" 
in that county, and also in Blair county. In 
early manhood, he lived at Springfield, Blair 
county, where he, too, learned the trade of a 
blacksmith, thereby following the same in- 
clinations as his father. Henderson also 
learned the art of making axes entirely by 
hand. He held an important position at the 
Springfield furnace for a period of three years, 
as master mechanic, and subsequently ac- 
cepted a similar position at the Martha fur- 
nace. At a later period, he discontinued work- 
ing about machinery, and engaged in the 
transfer business, — taking contracts for gen- 
eral hauhng. Being frugal and industrious, 
he soon saved considerable money with which 
he purchased a fine farm. He then moved to 
Roaring Spring, and built himself a fine resi- 
dence, blacksmith and carriage shop, and con- 
ducted this business the balance of his life. 

In his political views, Henderson Gorsuch 
was, in early life, an ardent Republican, but 
later became a strong Prohibitionist and a 
great temperance worker. He was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church for the 
twenty-five years preceding his death, and 
was a class leader and trusteg of that de- 
nomination. His demise occurred February 
II, 1896, and his Hfe was considered well and 
nobly spent. His wife was Elizabeth Gates. 
She proved to be a most helpful companion, 



and assisted in rearing a family of nineteen 
children, one of whom was Samuel Clarence, 
the subject of these lines. 

Samuel C. Gorsuch attended the public 
schools, after which he partly learned the 
blacksmith's trade, and then acquired the 
trade of puddling, in the Cambria Iron Works, 
at Johnstown, Cambria county. He then 
learned heating at Tyrone, and subsequently 
went to Beaver Falls, where, after working 
for about a year and a half, he became a heater, 
and assisted in building the plant of the Amer- 
ican Steel & W'ire Co. there, from which he 
was transferred to that company's plant in 
Rankin, where he has charge of the heating 
department. 

In his political action he has always fol- 
lowed the leadership of the Republican party, 
but has had no political aspirations, whatever. 
Socially, he is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, of Beaver Falls, and also of the I. O. 
O. F. lodge. He was joined in marriage with 
Harriet McClellan, a lady with many graces. 
Their marriage occurred October 15, 1883. 
Mrs. Gorsuch is a daughter of James McClel- 
lan, and is a native of Blair county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Seven bright, attractive children came 
to bless their home ; their names and ages are 
as follows: Alpha, born March 26, 1885 ; Nel- 
lie, born January 22, 1887; Clarence, born 
September 19, 1889; ClilTford, born June 27, 
1891 ; Hazel Belle, born January 9, 1893, and 
deceased September 13, 1893 ; Olive, born No- 
vember 3, 1895; and Forest, born June 17, 
1899. 

The subject of this sketch and his family arc 




JCJHN McFARREN BUCHANAN. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



391 



regular attendants of the Methodist church 
and contribute liberally to its support. By 
careful and judicious management he has been 
able to acquire a snug competence, — due en- 
tirely to his own efforts, — while at the same 
time, he has gained for himself a reputation 
for honesty and uprightness in all his dealings. 



§OHN McFARREN BUCHANAN, 
son of Thomas C. Buchanan, and Eliza 
A. Mayhew, his wife, was born near 
Florence, Washington County, Pennsylvania, 
April 25, 185 1. His father dying of cholera, 
June 18, 1852, on the overland route to Cali- 
fornia, his mother removed to Fairview, Vir- 
ginia (now West Virginia), in 1856, near 
where her father, John Mayhew, was living. 
Our subject remained here with his mother 
and sister, Georgiana, until June i, 1858, 
when he was taken by a paternal uncle, Jo- 
seph K. Buchanan, to his home in Hanover 
township, Beaver County, Pennsylvania, 
where he attended the district school and 
worked in vacation upon the farm of his uncle. 
In the fall and winter of 1864-65, he at- 
tended The Collegiate Institute, East Liberty, 
Pennsylvania, taught by Rev. J. P. Moore, a 
brother-in-law of his uncle above-named. In 
the winter of 1866 he recited in the evenings 
to Thomas Nicholson, Esq., a famous teacher 
and well known citizen of Frankfort Springs. 
In April, 1867, he entered Washington and 
Jeflferson College, then under the presidency of 
Rev. Jonathan Edwards, D. D. Mr. Bu- 



chanan was aided in his efforts by his uncle, 
Joseph K. Buchanan, and by his mother, and 
by tutoring and teaching and the like through 
college, graduating in the class of i86g. On 
December i, 1869, Mr. Buchanan w-as en- 
tered as a law student in the law office of Sam 
B. Wilson, Esq., one of the most eminent 
lawyers that ever graced the Beaver Bar, and 
was admitted to the Bar September 2, 1872, 
the committee being Edward B. Daugherty, 
Frank Wilson and E. P. Kuhn, all now de- 
ceased. 

In November, 1874, Mr. Buchanan received 
the Democratic nomination for District Attor- 
ney in the strong Republican county of Bea- 
ver and was elected by 94 votes, and in 1877, 
was re-elected by 303 majority. During the 
six years of office, Mr. Buchanan never had 
an indictment quashed nor amended in a sin- 
gle word ; nor did he have a grand jury sit 
over two days at a time, — the Quarter Ses- 
sions Court and Grand Jury then sat at the 
same time. Since that time Mr. Buchanan 
has enjoyed a large and lucrative practice. 
He is president of the First National Bank, 
Beaver, Pennsylvania, and of the Beaver Val- 
ley Traction Company, the Beaver & Vanport 
Electric Street Railway, a director in the First 
National Bank, Rochester, Pennsylvania, in 
the Bridgewater Bridge, Sharon Bridge, New 
Brighton Water Company, The Valley Elec- 
tric Light Company and in various other com- 
panies. He is also attorney for the Pennsyl- 
vania Company. Mr. Buchanan has taken an 
active part in keeping Beaver County to thz 
front in every good work. He is a member 



392 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



of the First Presbyterian Church of Beaver 
and active in its councils. 

In 1896, Mr. Buchanan wdiS the nominee 
of the Democratic party for Judge of the 
Thirty-sixth Judicial District of Pennsylvania, 
and received the largest vote ever received by 
a Democrat in that District, but failed in the 
election in this strong Republican district. 

The ancestor of this branch of the Buchan- 
ans first in the country was Walter Buchanan, 
who was of Scotch-Irish origin, and emigrated 
to America from the northern part of Ireland, 
settling in Little Britain township, Lancaster 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1745. He was a 
farmer up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred in Lancaster County, in 1790; his re- 
mains lie buried in the Churchyard of Little 
Britain Presbyterian Church in Lancaster 
County, Pennsylvania. He was active in 
church and state, and was one of the signers 
to the petition found on page 310, Vol. 3 — 2 
Ser., Pennsylvania Archives. The home of 
Walter Buchanan was blessed with three sons 
and three daughters, namely : Gilbert ; John ; 
James ; Jeannette ; Mary ; and Sarah. Gilbert, 
the eldest, settled near Poland, Ohio, and be- 
came a tiller of the soil. John, the second son, 
settled near Paris in Washington County, 
Pennsylvania, and also followed the occupa- 
tion of a farmer. He was a member of the 
Associate Presbyterian Church, and served as 
elder of that denomination. His remains lie 
buried in the Associate Burial Ground at 
Paris, Washington County, Pennsylvania. 

James, the third son, was the great-grand- 
father of our subject. In 1791, he located in 



Hanover township, Washington County, 
Pennsylvania, about two miles from Florence. 
James was born May 23, 1761, in Little Brit- 
ain township, above-named. He served for 
some months as a member of Captain James 
Morrison's Company, Porter's Battalion, in 
the Revolutionary War, and died on the 
twenty-fifth day of November, 1823. He mar- 
ried Margaret Ross, a relative of George Ross, 
a signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Mrs. Buchanan was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, 
and was born March 23, 1769, a native of 
Chester County, Pennsylvania, a member of 
the Associate Presbyterian Church. She sur- 
vived her husband for thirty-five years, passing 
away July 20, 1854, and her remains now lie 
buried in the Presbyterian Churchyard at 
Slippery Rock, Lawrence County, Pennsyl- 
vania. This highly esteemed and worthy 
couple reared the following children : Eliza- 
beth, born April 5, 1789, and died September 
24, 1855, — she became the wife of John Mitch- 
ell, and now lies buried in the United Presby- 
terian Churchyard at Sharon, Ohio; Walter, 
born July 14, 1791, and died July 19, 1869, is 
buried at New Brighton, Pennsylvania; Han- 
nah, born October 21, 1793, and died March 
6, 1866, — she married John Smith, and is 
buried at Sheakleyville, Pennsylvania; Nancy, 
born January i, 1796, died October 26, 
1873, — she became the wife of Hugh Smith, 
and is buried at Duncanville United Presbyte- 
rian Church, Crawford County, Illinois ; John, 
grandfather of our subject, will be mentioned 
later; James, born May 29, 1800, and died 
February 19, 1840; Moses Ross, born Octo- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



393 



ber 6, 1803, and died at De Witt, Iowa, July 
22, 1878; Joseph Smith, born October 31, 
1806, a graduate of Jefferson College and a 
minister in the United Presbyterian Church 
for nearly fifty years, died March 31, 1887, at 
De Witt, Iowa; Margaret, born January 29, 
1808, and died June 17, 1876; Mary, wife of 
Mr. Caldwell, was born May 9, 1813, and died 
June 18, 1893; and George Black, born Sep- 
tember 14, 1815. 

John Buchanan, grandfather of our subject, 
was born on the twenty-eighth day of May, 
1798, in Hanover township, Washington 
County, Pennsylvania, was a farmer, purchas- 
ing a farm just across the line in Virginia, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, and 
where his death took place, May 6, 1830; his 
remains lie buried in the Presbyterian grounds 
in Fairview, West Virginia. He married 
Margaret Chambers, a daughter of Thomas 
Chambers, a native of Scotland, who came to 
America as a Scottish soldier in Cornwall's 
Army. Mr. Chambers settled in Hanover 
township, in 1789, on a farm which is now 
owned by our subject. Mrs. Buchanan sur- 
vived her husband four years, dying July 25, 
1834, at the age of thirty-one years. This 
worthy couple left four sons, orphans, to 
mourn the loss of their parents ; James, born 
in 1824 and wedded Mary A. Craig; Thomas 
Chambers, father of our subject, heretofore 
mentioned; John F., born in 1828, and twice 
married, — his first wife being Jane Greenfield, 
his second. May Elligood; and Joseph Kerr, 
born in 1830 and married Martha T. Bigger. 



^TARRY CALHOON, district attorney 




=5l of Beaver county, Pa., ranks high 
among the members of the legal 
profession of the county, and is a much re- 
spected citizen of the borough. He was born 
at New Brighton, September 15, 1862, and is 
a son of John and Nancy (White) Calhoon, 
grandson of Robert and Elizabeth (Scott) 
Calhoon, and great-grandson of Andrew 
Calhoon. 

Harry Calhoon attended the public schools 
of New Brighton, taking a finishing course 
at Geneva College. After this he began the 
study of law, reading in the office of J. R. 
Harrah in the evenings, and working through 
the day in the manufacturing department of 
the foundry of Logan & Strobridge. He fin- 
ished reading law in the office of Thompson 
& Martin and was admitted to the bar, in 
1892. He immediately began the practice 
of his profession in New Brighton. It was 
not long before his worth became known and 
brought him lucrative returns; being active 
and energetic, cases in which he is interested 
are pushed to a speedy termination, as his 
efforts are very rarely lacking in the elements 
of success. About the year 1893, he was 
elected solicitor of New Brighton; he was 
elected district attorney of Beaver county, 
Pa., in 1898, — in which capacity he now 
serves. 

In 1896, Mr. Calhoon married Florence 
Deitrick, a daughter of Frederick A. Deit- 
rick, a worthy citizen of New Brighton. He 
and his wife live in a handsome residence re- 
cently purchased by him ; it is modern in de- 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



sign, very convenient and attractive, and was 
built by R. E. Hoop. 

Andrew Calhoon, great-grandfather of the 
subject hereof, was a native of County Derry, 
Ireland. He came to America about the year 
1785, while still a single man. For the first 
few years, he lived in New York City in a 
log house, which contained one of those his- 
toric old fire-places. The usual custom was to 
draw a huge back-log to the door of the cabin ; 
after the laborious task of getting it through 
the door, it was rolled into the capacious fire- 
place, which it completely filled for a time, — 
smaller logs being gradually burned in front 
of it. Some of the back-logs were so large 
that it was not necessary to replace them for 
several days. During the latter part of his 
hfe, Mr. Calhoon used frequently to speak of 
the change in New York City, and to com- 
pare it with its early condition. He died in 
1864, at the remarkable age of one hundred 
and three years. After leaving New York 
City, Mr. Calhoon settled in Chester county, 
Pa., and later in Washington county, where 
he followed agricultural pursuits, and accu- 
mulated some money. In the year 1800, he 
purchased one hundred acres of land where 
Kennedy Calhoon now resides. There in the 
forest, he built a log house so substantially 
that it is still standing, being used as a store- 
house. He set out orchards, cleared the for- 
ests into fine fields, and spent his closing 
years upon that farm. While in the East, 
Mr. Calhoon was joined in marriage with 
Mary Kennedy, who bore him the following 
children : Robert ; James K. ; and John S. 



The young wife and mother was called from 
her earthly home before her children attained 
manhood. Mr. Calhoon contracted another 
matrimonial alliance, — his second wife being 
Mrs. Rogers of South Beaver township. No 
issue was the result of this marriage. John 
S., the youngest son, inherited the homestead, 
and it still remains in the possession of his 
descendants. 

Robert Calhoon, grandfather of Harry, in 
early life learned the carpenter's trade, and 
located in Brighton, now Beaver Falls. He 
built many houses, barns, etc., in that vicinity, 
and in adjoining counties, and also assisted in 
building the boat called the "Aaron Burr." 
He won an enviable reputation as a mechanic 
and builder, in his day. In 1848, he settled 
in New Brighton, where he served as jus- 
tice of the peace, member of the borough 
council, and as burgess. He was a member 
of the Old School Presbyterians. His death 
was caused by consumption, and occurred 
April 1st, 1859, when aged fifty-four years. 
His marriage with Elizabeth Scott, of Dar- 
lington, Pa., was celebrated in 1828. She 
survived her husband until she attained the 
age of seventy-four years. 

Their union resulted in the following off- 
spring: Mary Jane, who died at the age 
of twenty-one years; Thomas, whose death 
occurred as recently as 1898, at the age of 
sixty-five years; John C, father of the sub- 
ject hereof; and Margaret, who died young. 

John C. Calhoon attended public school 
until his fifteenth year. Just previous to his 
sixteenth birthday, he became apprenticed 



BEAVER COUNTY 



to learn the harness maker's trade. He served 
his time with James W. Baker, of New Brigh- 
ton, completely mastering the trade, and in 
1894, went into business for himself, at New 
Brighton. In 1861, he became employed in 
the Arsenal in Allegheny, and continued for 
three and one-half years, working on saddles 
and harness for the U. S. government. He 
built his present residence and shop at New 
Brighton, where he is now located, in 1859, 
and has engaged in the manufacture of har- 
ness, and in custom work ever since, keeping 
a separate salesroom of harness supplies, blan- 
kets, etc. On July 17, 1883, Mr. Calhoon 
received a patent for the "Calhoon Improved 
Truss" which he had previously invented, and 
which has been a great success. The use of 
this truss has effected many permanent cures. 
Mr. Calhoon put only the best of materials 
in these articles, and has built up quite a repu- 
tation for that line of goods, although he has 
not advertised them very extensively. The 
tidings of a cure effected by one of them are 
soon transmitted to another sufferer, and 
thereby his trade is increased. He makes 
various kinds of trusses to suit the require- 
ments of each separate case. Mr. Calhoon is 
a man of sterling worth and is esteemed by all 
who know him. His life has been unusually 
successful, from a financial standpoint. He 
was a county commissioner when the present 
court house was built, has also been a mem- 
ber of the borough council, and is now serv- 
ing his third term as justice of the peace. He 
chose for his life companion Nancy White, 
a daughter of Harvey White. Mrs. Calhoon 



was born in 1841, and died in 1867, at the 
early age of twenty-six years, — leaving the 
following children : Thomas, a prominent 
confectionery dealer in New Brighton, w-ho 
married Emma Sheehan, and has one child, 
Eleanor; Harry, whose name heads this 
sketch; Edwin, a lumber dealer, in New Cas- 
tle, Pa. ; Robert, a molder by trade, who mar- 
ried Elva Guntner ; and Harvey, who is asso- 
ciated with his brother. Mr. Calhoon married 
a second time. Miss Ellen McDaniel became 
his wife; they are both members of the 
Methodist church, of which he is a trustee and 
class leader. In politics, he is a Republican. 
Harry Calhoon, the subject of this nar- 
rative, by good management and careful 
methods has won success in his profession, 
and also has a large circle of friends in private 
life. He is a member in good standing of 
the Masonic fraternity, the American Me- 
chanics, and the Royal Arcanum. Like his 
father, he worships with the Methodists. 



/^^EORGE E. SMITH, ex-county 
\ 5!" commissioner of Beaver county, has 
seen many years of public service. He 
was formerly engaged in mercantile pursuits 
and his record as a public servant is clean and 
altogether in harmony with the integrity of 
his successful business life. Mr. Smith is es- 
teemed and respected by thousands of ac- 
quaintances, as one of nature's noblemen, and 
is a man of whom Beaver county may well 
be proud. He was born in Westmoreland 
township, Cheshire county, New Hampshire, 



396 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



February 24, 1841. In his youth, he attended 
the local schools, where he obtained a good 
practical education. He went west, to Bea- 
ver county, Pa., in 1865, and worked for a 
period of three years on the Pennsyhania 
Railroad. The following year was spent by 
the subject of this sketch in a store at Sharon, 
Pa., after which he was engaged in a similar 
way, for two years, at Beaver Falls. Mr. 
Smith then decided to discontinue business 
pursuits, and try a new venture ; accordingly, 
in 1 87 1, he began to run a general delivery, 
which he conducted very successfully for 
twenty years ; he then turned it over to his son, 
Thomas A. Smith, in order to give his atten- 
tion to the duties of the ofifice of county 
commissioner. This change occurred in 1891, 
when Mr. Smith was appointed to fill the va- 
cancy caused by the death of John Wilson. 
After filling this unexpired term of one and 
one-half years, Mr. Smith was elected to a full 
term of three years, which expired January i, 
1897. 

Mr. Smith is known as a stanch, uncom- 
promising, and aggressive Republican, to all 
who are familiar with his political views. He 
has been a hard worker in the Republican 
cause, and occupies an influential position in 
his party organization. 

Our subject is a member of the Beaver 
Valley Lodge, No. 478, F. & A. M. ; of Har- 
mony Chapter, No. 206, R. A. M. ; and of 
Lone Rock Lodge, No. 222, Knights of Pyth- 
ias. In 1868, Mr. Smith led to the altar 
Margaret White, an accomplished daugh- 
ter of Thomas White, of White town- 



ship, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. One 
son, Thomas A., blessed this union, and is 
now succeeding his father in the general de- 
livery business. The subject of this sketch, 
who is one of a family of fourteen children, is 
a son of Hiram and Olive (Arnold) Smith, 
and a grandson of Benjamin Smith. 

Benjamin Smith was a native of the North 
of Ireland, where he was also reared and edu- 
cated. In early manhood, he came to Amer- 
ica and settled in Westmoreland township, 
Cheshire county, N. H., where he spent the 
remainder of his life. 

Hiram Smith, father of the subject hereof, 
was born in New Hampshire in 1800. He 
was reared and trained to agricultural pur- 
suits, and while not in school did such work 
as usually falls to the lot of a farmer's boy. 
This discipline was just the kind needed to 
make him imderstand all the details of farm 
work, which he followed all his active days, 
spending his last three years in retirement at 
Walpole, N. H., where his death occurred, in 

1875- 

His wife was Olive Arnold, a daughter of 
Thomas Arnold, of Cheshire county. New 
Hampshire. Mrs. Smith crossed the dark 
river into the light beyond, at the age of sixty- 
three years, after rearing a family of fourteen 
children, viz.: Ralph; Caroline (Scott); Mi- 
randa (Roberts); David; Charles; Sarah 
(Hale); Phineas; Adeline (Angier) and Au- 
gusta, twins; Laura; George E., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; King; Elizabeth, and a 
child that died in infancy. Hiram Smith was 
a firm friend of education, and in his politi- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



397 



cal affiliations was a Democrat. Both he and 
his wife entertained broad, liberal views as to 
religion, but preferred the Universalist 
church. 

Our subject is a man who, wherever, he is 
known, is respected for his sterling qualities. 
He has, like all men, had opportunities, but 
unlike many men, he has made the most of 
them. He takes a broad, comprehensive view 
of life, in this respect being very similar to 
his honored father. He has knowledge of 
many other interests than those with which 
he is intimately connected, and in all matters, 
his judgment is known to be sound. He is 
heir to a good name and that good name he 
proposes to hand down to posterity without 
tarnish. 



w^. 



ILLIAM W. HAYS, a prominent 
blacksmith of Fairview, Pa., was 
born in Beaver Falls, Pa., 
November lo, 1849. He learned black- 
smithing with his father, with whom 
he worked sixteen years. He has lab- 
ored all his life at his chosen trade, — a 
trade which has been followed until the pres- 
ent day by each succeeding father and son, 
through many generations of the family. Mr. 
Hays is a son of Adams and Barbara (Lang- 
necker) Hays, and grandson of Adams and 
Sissin (Stephens) Hays. 

The grandfather of William W. was born 
in Carlisle, Eastern Pennsylvania. He learned 
blacksmithing under his father. In those 
early days all kinds of machinery were made 



by blacksmiths, and were merely fitted by ma- 
chinists. He also learned to make sickles. 
He wedded Sissin Stephens, and they reared 
a large family of children, as follows : Martha ; 
John A. ; Eliza ; Thomas Calvert ; Sissin ; Be- 
linda; Adams; Caroline; Sallie Adams; Mar- 
garet; and William. 

William W. Hays' father was one of the 
younger members of the family. After he had 
learned blacksmithing from his father, he, in 
company with two of his brothers, moved 
to Beaver county. He then started into busi- 
ness in old Brighton, which is now Beaver 
Falls. He did all kinds of smithing (includ- 
ing tool dressing), on the Ft. Wayne R. R., 
and later on C. & P. R. R. His first work 
on the railroad was done when the line was 
single-tracked. Forty years later, in 1898, 
he did similar work on the same road when it 
was double-tracked. His marriage with 
Barbara Langnecker resulted in the birth of 
twelve children. Barbara was a native of 
Germany, and was brought to America when 
only three years of age. The names of their 
children are: William W., the subject hereof; 
Charles L. ; George W. ; Fanny (Lomax) ; 
Frank, deceased; Sissin; Mary (deceased; 
Samuel B. ; Harry P. ; James J. ; John R. ; and 
Annie, who died at the tender age of nine 
years. George W. is manager for Butler & 
Jackson, in Rochester, Pennsylvania. 

The father of William W. located in Fair- 
view in April, 1859, and built a shop where 
the latter is now doing business. He carried 
on blacksmithing there until 1893, when he 
retired from active life. In 1892, the old shop 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



was torn down and was at once replaced by a 
new one, 24 by 40 feet. The elder Mr. Hays 
is a consistent member of the Episcopal 
church, which he joined in 1874. He served 
as vestryman. In pohtics, his sympathies are 
with the Republican party. He has always 
voted for that party's candidates, and has 
worked hard for its success, but would never 
accept office. The mother of the subject 
hereof died in December, 1892. The father 
still survives. 

William W. Hays learned his trade when 
nails, horse shoes, and almost everything in 
that line were made by blacksmiths. He ac- 
quired all the peculiar features of the art from 
his father. Mr. Hays has been twice married, 
and IS now a widower. His first union was 
contracted with Nancy A. Cochran. Nancy 
was a daughter of John and Jane Cochran, 
and was born at Egypt (now Midway), Wash- 
ington county. Pa., where she also received 
her primary education. This was supple- 
mented by a thorough course at Oakdale and 
at Cannonsburg, with a finishing curriculum 
at Mansfield, where she graduated. She then 
followed the profession of teaching, which 
occupied her attention for several years. She 
taught just back of Sewickley, in Allegheny 
county, and was successful to a marked de- 
gree. She bore her husband four children, 
viz. : Hallie J. (Stoner), who now resides in 
Youngstown, Ohio; Ross, who died in in- 
fancy; Oliver A.; and Edward Otto. 

Oliver A., attended Todd's school in In- 
dustry, took a preparatory course at Fair- 
view, and finished his education with a three 



years' course at Beaver Falls. He is now 
learning the blacksmith trade with his father. 
Edward Otto received the same educational 
equipment as his brother, and is also learning 
the trade which has been followed by most 
of the male members of the Hays family. 

Years ago William W. Hays went to Wash- 
ington county, as a blacksmith. He pur- 
chased a farm in Industry and did some farm- 
ing in connection with his trade. This farm 
contained one hundred and four acres, and 
was devoted to general farming, for some 
time. Subsequently, Mr. Hays engaged in 
the berry business, which he carried on suc- 
cessfully, for six years. He then sold a part 
of the farm and removed to Beaver Falls, but 
afterward returned to the property, where the 
death of his first wife took place. He then 
sold the remainder of it and purchased a house 
in Fairview, whither he removed, and vi'ent 
into business with his father. As before men- 
tioned, this partnership lasted for sixteen 
years, when Mr. Hays conducted the business 
alone. He is now assisted by his two sons. 
He does horse shoeing, wagon and carriage 
work, oil-well repairing, etc. Mr. Hays is 
also somewhat interested in oil production. 
He owns a half interest in the Esther Oil Co., 
in addition to which he has a well on his own 
place. His neat, attractive residence is situ- 
ated quite near his shops, and he owns several 
desirable building-lots in the same vicinity. 

Mr. Hays married a second time. In this 
instance, Mary A. Fowler became his wife. 
She was born on the old farm in Chippewa 
township, Beaver county, and died as recently 



BEAVER COUNTY 



401 



as June, 1899. Mr. Hays is a member of the 
Episcopal church, of which he is warden. He 
i? a Repubhcan, but is too busy for the cares 
of office. He is special representative and 
secretary for the Iron City Building & Loan 
Association. 




IMON HARROLD, a prominent 
contractor of Beaver Falls, and a 
member of the State Legislature 
from Beaver county, Pa., has been a resident 
of that borough since 1866, and it may be 
said that no man has worked more conscien- 
tiously to advance its interests than he. 

Mr. Harrold was born in Columbiana (now 
Mahoning) county, Ohio, November 3, 1840, 
and is a son of Samuel Harrold. 

His grandfather was David Harrold, a na- 
tive of Bucks county, Pa., whose father fought 
under General Washington at Valley Forge, 
and a descendant of the sturdy Saxon race. 
Samuel Harrold, the father of our subject, was 
born in Columbiana county, Ohio, August 
16, 1816. 

Simon Harrold received his education in 
the schools of Mahoning county, Ohio. Upon 
leaving school he went to Springfield, 111., 
and started in business in partnership with 
a Mr. Eberhardt as a general contractor, con- 
tinuing for three years. He then returned to 
his home and after his marriage moved to 
Beaver Falls, in 1866, becoming one of the 
first business men of that town. The popu- 
lation did not exceed 100, the borough being 
incorporated in 1868. Mr. Harrold built a 
planing mill in partnership with a Mr. Crane, 



and they procured lumber from the North and 
West. He purchased the first car load of lum- 
ber that was ever shipped to Beaver county 
from the West, the transportation charges 
from Cleveland amounting to $48. He also 
engaged in contracting alone and soon es- 
tablished a wide reputation. The planing 
mill was named the Beaver Falls Planing Mill, 
and after Mr. Crane's retirement, in 1869, our 
subject became the principal member of the 
firm and so continued until very recently, 
v/hen he retired from the active management 
of the business. They manufacture doors, 
window sashes, and all kinds of building ma- 
terial. Mr. Harrold has always been en- 
gaged in contracting and has built more 
houses than any other contractor in the dis- 
trict, and has built every hotel in the bor- 
ough. He has been awarded many large con- 
tracts throughout the surrounding country, 
including nearly every factory in Beaver Falls, 
in all or in part; the courthouses at New 
Lisbon and Coshocton; several locks and 
dams on the Monongahela and other rivers; 
street paving, — an example of which is the 
elegantly paved streets of Beaver Falls; the 
street railway from Pittsburg to Coraopolis, 
the People's line, and the Riverview; the 
waterworks at Beaver, Pa., and Leetonia, 
Ohio ; and the pump station for the; Mononga- 
hela Company at Becks Run and Esplin. 

Mr. Harrold was joined in wedlock with 
Louisa Schauweker, who was born in Colum- 
biana county, Ohio, and is a daughter of Ja- 
cob Schauweker, who was born in Germany, 
but came to America where he followed the 



402 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



trade of a tanner and leather dealer, a busi- 
ness followed by the family for many genera- 
tions. This union resulted in seven children : 
Julia E. ; Irvin C. ; Alberta A. ; Mary; Isadore; 
Katie; Alfred. They were all educated in 
Beaver county and are graduates of Beaver 
Falls High School. Politically, our subject 
is a Republican and cast his first presidential 
vote for Lincoln. He has always been an ac- 
tive party worker and although he has never 
sought office it has at times been thrust 
upon him. He helped to organize and was 
one of the first councilmen in the borough, 
and has served in all fifteen years. In 1898, 
he was elected a member of the State Legis- 
lature from Beaver county, in which body he 
has always been an active worker, doing his 
utmost to further the interests of his constitu- 
ents and those of the state. He voted regu- 
larly with the Republican party for the elec- 
tion of Quay in the senatorial contest, and the 
resulting deadlock has convinced him that the 
proper way to elect a senator is by the direct 
vote of the people. Religiously, he is a mem- 
ber of the M. P. church. Fraternally, he is 
a Mason, belonging to Valley Echo Lodge, 
F. & A. M., of Beaver Falls, Pa. Mr. Har- 
rold's portrait accompanies this sketch. 



CLLIS N. BIGGER, county solicitor 
for Beaver county, Pa., is also a 
prominent attorney of Beaver. 
After attending public school, young Bigger 
took a finishing course at Frankfort Academy, 
after which he followed the profession of 



teaching public schools and in Frankfort 
Academy, for a period of four years. He then 
registered as a law student with the late Sam- 
uel B. Wilson, then one of Beaver county's 
most prominent and able attorneys. Mr. Big- 
ger was admitted to the bar June 2, 1879, and 
soon after began the practice of his profession, 
alone, in Beaver. He continued thus until 
1882, when he entered into partnership with 
Frank Wilson. Mr. Wilson died in 1883, 
after which the firm became Bigger & Henry 
(T. M. Henry) until 1891, since which Mr. 
Bigger has practiced alone. He has been very 
successful as a lawyer, and is an able writer 
and speaker. Athough he never aspired to of- 
fice, he has served in the borough council for 
six years, and has recently been elected county 
solicitor for three years, which will make an 
incumbency of eight consecutive years in the 
latter office. The subject of this sketch is an 
ardent advocate of thorough educational sys- 
tems, being a member of the borough school 
board. He owns a fine residence on Raccoon 
street, built by J. F. Dravo, and containing 
all the modern conveniences. Mr. Bigger's 
residence is handsomely furnished, and he 
boasts of having one of the most elegant, se- 
lect libraries in the borough. He is a man 
of rare literary taste and is a lover of the best 
works. 

Mr. Bigger chose for his life partner Jean 
Blanche Love, a favorite daughter of the late 
Robert and Jane (McClure) Love, of Mercer 
county. Robert Love was a progressive mer- 
chant tailor of that place, and died when sev- 
enty-two years old, while Mrs. Love died at 



BEAVER COUNTY 



403 



the age of sixty-two years. The following 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Love: 
John, who died young; Emma, wife of A. F. 
McNair; Alfretta, single; Christopher I., who 
also died young; Catherine, deceased; and 
Jean Blanche, wife of the subject hereof. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Bigger are devout 
Christians, being willing workers in the Pres- 
byterian church, besides giving liberally of 
their means to many charitable institutions. 
Mr. Bigger is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
i'lid a member) of the Knights of Pythias. He 
is in every respect a man of force and influ- 
ence. He has a fund of experience to draw 
from, that is of a superior order. As a promi- 
nent man in his profession, his judgment and 
foresight have been brought to a keen edge 
from contact with the shrewdest of business 
men. The success which has come to him is 
but the natural result of his incessant and well- 
directed efforts. 

Ellis N. Bigger was born September 17, 
1856, in Hanover township, Washington 
county. Pa. He is a son of Thomas and Mary 
(Nicholson) Bigger, grandson of James and 
Mary (Biggart) Bigger, great-grandson of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Moore) Bigger, and 
great-great-grandson of Matthew Bigger. 
Matthew Bigger was born at a place called 
Bigger, in Scotland, and on account of re- 
ligious persecutions fled to Ireland, settled in 
County Antrim, near Belfast, where his death 
occurred. He left a widow and six children. 
The names of the latter were : John, James, 
Samuel, Thomas, Jane, and Elizabeth. The 
three eldest sons remained in Ireland, but 



Thomas and his two sisters, Jane and Eliza- 
beth, accompanied by their mother, came to 
America. 

Thomas, the fourth son, was born in 1738, 
and upon attaining manhood, he fell in love 
with Elizabeth Moore, the daughter of a 
wealthy man, who objected to their marriage 
on account of Thomas being a poor man, and 
a weaver by trade. But notwithstanding the 
father's objections, the young folks were mar- 
ried, and shortly afterward Thomas induced 
his mother and two sisters to accompany them 
to America. They landed at Baltimore, Md., 
October 16, 1773. Thomas, upon learning 
that land was cheap in the "wild west," jour- 
neyed overland to what is now Raccoon town- 
ship, Washington county, Pa., and near Rac- 
coon creek he took up a large tract of land. 
He was of a proud nature, but was a sturdy 
worker, and the height of his ambition was 
to become an extensive land owner. In his 
native country, only the wealthy had large 
landed possessions, but, by struggling hard 
against almost overwhelming difficulties, with 
the aid of his ever-faithful wife, he gratified 
his heart's desire. He built a log cabin and 
felled the forest trees, and he lived as only the 
brave pioneers did ; but he prospered, and at 
the time of his death he was a well-to-do and 
progressive farmer. His life shows that "what 
man has done, man can do." He and his de- 
voted consort reared a family of ten children. 

James Bigger, grandfather of Ellis N., 
served in the War of 181 2, as a private, be- 
ing stationed at Fort Maldon. He was 
united in marriage with Mary Biggart, 



404 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



in i8i6, and the same year purchased 
a farm in Hanover township, Beaver 
county, Pa. This farm was formerly 
owned by Magnus Tate, and contained four 
hundred acres, mostly new land. He built a 
two-story house of logs, which was later re- 
placed by a fine, large, brick residence, which 
is still standing. The farm is now owned by 
H. R. Wilson. James was one of the earliest 
men of the county to promote agricultural 
progress. It is said that he owned the first 
threshing machine ever used in the township, 
or in that vicinity. Men came many miles to 
see it. He also owned the first mower, and 
obtained many other agricultural implements 
before his neighbors did. He was very natu- 
rally regarded as a leading man in the com- 
munity. His wife bore him the following 
children : Samuel, who married Jane Fulton ; 
Jane, who was twice married, her first hus- 
band being a Mr. Hall, and her second, Mat- 
thew Nickle ; Mary, wife of Rev. J. P. Moore ; 
Thomas, the father of EUis N. ; Eliza A., wife 
of David Nickle ; Martha, wife of Joseph K. 
Buchanan; Ellen, wife of David Nicholson; 
James M., who married Margaret Morrow; 
John, who married a Miss Childs ; and Robert, 
v/ho married Ann Kieffer. 

Thomas Bigger, father of our subject, Ellis 
N., was born on his father's farm January 9, 
1826. During his youth he assisted his father 
in clearing the farm and when he attained 
manhood he still lingered there until his mar- 
riage with Mary Nicholson, which occurred 
on the second day of November, 1854. After 
his marriage he settled in Hanover township. 



Washington county, Pa., but later purchased 
a part of the old homestead farm, near the 
famous Frankfort Springs, where he has lived 
ever since, owning one of the finest farms in 
Beaver county. This farm is now in a state 
of fine cultivation, and contains a handsome 
residence, splendid barns, etc. Early in life 
Mr. Bigger devoted much time and attention 
to sheep raising, but subsequently he discon- 
tinued that branch and turned his attention 
to general farming ; he has now practically re- 
tired. He has always been a public-spirited 
man, and has served as school director for 
many years; he was one of the founders and 
original stockholders of the Frankfort Acad- 
emy. In politics he was a Democrat pre- 
vious to the formation of the Republican 
party, since which he has supported the latter. 
Both he and his aged wife are Christians, be- 
ing active members of the United Presbyte- 
rian church. This worthy and highly es- 
teemed couple, although on the shady side of 
life, are hale and hearty, and hope to welcome 
many friends at their hospitable home for 
years to come. Mrs. Bigger was born May 6, 
1834, and is a daughter of Hon. Thomas 
Nicholson. She bore her husband two sons, 
and one daughter, namely; Ellis N., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Inez J., wife of David S. 
Strouss; and James Carl, attorney-at-law in 
Steubenvillle, Ohio. 

Hon. Thomas Nicholson, the maternal 
grandfather of the subject hereof, enjoyed the 
distinction of being the first superintendent 
of schools of Beaver county. Pa. He was for 
many years a teacher of Frankfort Academy. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



405 



He was also elected to the legislature and 
served as justice of the peace. His life was 
considered among the most worthy in the an- 
nals of Beaver county. 




R. JOHN H. DAVIS. We may 
(£) a safely say that there is no physician 
and surgeon in Beaver county better 
or more favorably known to the public, than 
the gentleman whose name heads these lines, 
who commands an excellent practice in the 
vicinity of Hookstown, where he is located. 
He has made a specialty of surgery, having 
had a most thorough training in that direc- 
tion, and he is very frequently called to at- 
tend cases in Pittsburg, Beaver, and Liv- 
erpool. The profession of medicine is not 
the only sphere in which he shines, 
however, for as an impersonator he 
has almost a national reputation. Unlike 
most of the followers of the latter profession 
he recites from his ov.-n works, and is thus 
enabled to give to his renditions that peculiar 
earnestness and desired expression, which 
none but an author can give to his composi- 
tions. 

Dr. Davis comes of an old and highly re- 
spected family of Beaver county, and his 
great-grandfather, a mechanic by trade, came 
from his native country, Wales, and located 
in Western Pennsylvania. His grandfather 
was John Davis, who was born in West Eliz- 
abeth, Pennsylvania, and moved to Beaver 
county about sixty years ago. His occupa- 
tion was that of a boat builder, but after locat- 
ing in this county, he turned his attention to 



tilling the soil. He purchased 200 acres of 
land in Moon townsiiip, this becoming the 
old homestead, and in addition, owned one- 
hundred and forty acres in Independence 
township, He died in 1884, having lived a 
long and useful life. In politics, he was a 
Republican, and a prominent one, but was not 
an office seeker. 

James Davis, the father of John H., v/as 
born on the farm in Moon township in 1847, 
nnd received a good scholastic training in the 
public schools, after which he attended, and 
was graduated from, Edinboro State Nor- 
mal School. He then taught school for two 
terms, after which he bought the 140 acres of 
land owned by his father in Independence 
township, where he has since been actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has 
greatly improved his property, and has one 
of the finest farms in the county, making a 
specialty of truck gardening. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics, and is an enthusiastic sup- 
porter of that party. He was united in hyme- 
neal bonds with Susan C. Engle, who is a na- 
tive of Vanport but whose family now re- 
sides in Raccoon township, Beaver county. 
The following children blessed their home: 
Dr. John H., the subject of this record ; Frank 
F., a graduate of Cleveland University, who is 
now actively engaged in practice in East Liv- 
erpool, Ohio; Henry, who lives at home; 
Maggie; Annie; and Blanche. Mr. Davis is 
now serving as justice of the peace. 

Dr. John H: Davis was born on the old 
homestead, and after receiving a common 
school training, he took a course in Sheffield 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Academy and Slippery Rock Normal School. 
He then took an advanced course in litera- 
ture under a private tutor and a classical 
course at Cleveland. He developed excep- 
tional talent as an elocutionist and ventrilo- 
quist, and traveled two years as a public re- 
citer and impersonator. His interpretations 
of emotional lines are of a high order, and are 
rendered with much dramatic ability. With 
the cleverness of a true artist, he adapts him- 
self to the character of his piece, and at times 
shows such realistic feeling that a sympathetic 
wave sweeps over his hearers, carrying them 
beyond the afifairs of their every day life to 
the scene portrayed by the rendition. His 
humorous selections are equally well received, 
as he injects his own bright, vivacious and 
humorous spirit into the character he pro- 
duces. In such entertainments the troubles 
cf the audience are cast into the background, 
and merriment reigns supreme. He was 
everywhere well received, and has more than 
one thousand testimonials from some of the 
most learned men in the different sections of 
our country, speaking in the highest praise 
of his ability, and commenting favorably on 
his dramatic powers and keen sense of humor. 
There are but eight authors in the United 
States who recite from their own works, and 
we take great pleasure in reproducing one of 
Dr. Davis' poems. It was written when our 
country was at fever heat over the destruction 
of the battleship Maine, and when first given 
to the public at New Cumberland, West Vir- 
ginia, was enthusiastically received. It is as 
follows : 



WHEN A NATION MOURNED THE MAINE. 

Do you remember the night 

When a nation lost the Maine? 
When our jolly tars were murdered 

By the crimsoned hand of Spain? 
Their graves are decked with laurels, 

Their names are on tablets of fame 
But it counts for naught when we think of the time 

When a nation mourned the Maine. 

The Cubans sang their funeral dirge 

When they heard of that terrible blow. 
Let us sing it again as a nation, 

Oh! Sing it sweet and low. 
Let us sing it over and over again, 

Until nations catch the refrain, 
And our hearts will throb as they did at the time 

When a nation mourned the Maine. 

You remember in 1775 

When our nation was distressed; 
When we were bound down in bondage 

And by cruels tyrants pressed. 
We gave the blood of Warren 

And thousands we need not name. 
We forgive it all, but never forget 

When a nation mourned the Maine. 

Our minds go back to '61, 

When the Freedmen's hands were bound; 
We can see the blood of old John Brown 

As it "crieth from the ground." 
The heart of the nation divided, 

And our swords together came, 
But even that is not half so sad 

As when a nation mourned the Maine. 

Do you remember Admiral Dewey? 

How he to Manila went? 
How he stole right into the harbor, 

On death and destruction bent? 
And his cannons' mouths were opened 

And poured forth their deadly rain. 
Don't you think the Admiral thought of the time 

When a nation mourned the Maine? 



BEAVER COUNTY 



407 



Our glorious armies will conquer 

All the armies that Spain may send. 
Her cities may smoulder in ashes. 

Her Kingdom in fragments rend; 
Her men may fall in the cannon's glare; 

Aye! Fall like sickled grain; 
But that cannot atone the time 

When a nation mourned the Maine. 

Our hearts entwine the Maine 

As there in the mud she lies. 
Let us rear to her a monument — • 

One that will kiss the skies. 
Yes, we will raise the brazened shaft, 

And in glorious words proclaim, 
These are they who died for a nation 

That mourns the Maine. 



The silent daisies shall nod their heads 

O'er the graves of the heroes we love, 
And the God of mercy shall hide his face 

In the starry throne above. 
And the blackbird shall pipe his lay 

O'er the land where freedom came. 
Ah! little knows of the wounded hearts 

When a nation mourned the Maine. 

There is a day that will surely come. 

When justice will be shown; 
When the Son of Man shall open His court 

In front of the great white throne. 
'Tis there that a nation shall be avenged — 

Avenged of that terrible stain. 

When a nation was plunged in sorrow, 
When a nation mourned the Maine. 



Dr. Davis' success was not only a great 
pleasure, but it enabled him to secure the 
necessary funds to attend college, and satisfy 
his ambition to become a physician. In the 
fall of 1890, he entered the Cleveland Medi- 
cal College, in which he devoted one year 



to hard and careful study. The next four 
years were spent in the Cleveland University 
of Medical Surgery, where his training was of 
the best, and in 1895 he was graduated under 
H. F. Bigger. During the summer of the 
same year, he located at Georgetown, Beaver 
county, Pa., and engaged in practice in part- 
nership with Dr. M. S. Davis. One year 
later they dissolved partnership, and in i8g6, 
the subject hereof located at Hookstown, 
where he has since remained and has built up 
an enviable practice. He is very popular with 
his fellow-citizens, who repose in him the 
greatest confidence, and his success is due 
solely to his own efforts. He has kept thor- 
oughly abreast of the times in the advance 
made in the science of medicine and surgery, 
but nevertheless still devotes a portion of his 
time to literature. 

In October, 1897, Dr. Davis was joined in 
matrimony with Maggie Blackmore, a daugh- 
ter of John Blackmore, of Hookstown, and 
they have one child, James, who was born 
February 12, 1899. 

Dr. Davis is a member of the Beaver 
County Medical Society; the State Medical 
Society of Pennsylvania; the American 
Medical Society; fraternally, he belongs 
to the blue lodge, F. & A. M., of Smith's 
Ferry; I. O. O. F., of Smith's Ferry; and the 
Jr., O. U. A. M. He was a state delegate of 
the latter order at the age of eighteen, and 
enjoyed a fine trip to Washington, Atlantic 
City and Philadelphia. Politically, he is a 
stanch Republican, whilst in religious faith 
and fellowship, he is a Presbyterian. 



408 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



-r^^ILLIAM APPLETON McCON- 

\is\/ ^EL, of the law firm of Buchanan 

& McConnel, is one of the members 

of the Beaver county bar, of some prominence 

although still a young man. 

He was born in the borough of Bridge- 
water, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, October 
2^, 1866, and is a son of William Phillips and 
Lydia Ann (Stewart) McConnel, grandson of 
James and Elvira (Phillips) McConnel, and 
great-grandson of James and Rebecca (Wis- 
bie) McConnel. This latter James McCon- 
nel was of Scotch-Irish descent, and was born 
in the northern part of Ireland, from which he 
emigrated to America, locating near Green 
Garden, Raccoon township, Beaver county. 
Pa. He was described as being an exceed- 
ingly tall man, very active and exceedingly 
witty, and was familiarly known as "Uncle 
Jimmy." He was joined in wedlock with Re- 
becca Wisbie, who died while still a young 
woman, and was survived by her husband 
until he attained the age of about eighty 
years. They were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: Henry; James; John; Jane 
(Orr); and Polly (Ensley). 

James McConnel, Jr., the grandfather of 
our subject, was born in Washington county 
(now Allegheny county). Pa., and was a 
steamboat carpenter and builder. He settled 
in Freedom, Pa., where his death occurred in 
1862, at the age of sixty years. He was 
united in marriage on Sunday, February 28, 
1830, by the Rev. George Holmes, to Elvira 
Phillips, who was a daughter of Stephen and 
Rhoda (Parsons) Phillips. Stephen Phillips, 



was one of the prominent men of Beaver 
county in the early days, very largely inter- 
ested in the development of the country, es- 
pecially in the line of steamboat building. He 
and Jonathan Betz bought a large tract of 
land, on the northern side of the Ohio River, 
from William Vicary, in 1832, and laid out the 
town of Freedom as it is at present; after- 
wards, associated with John Graham, he 
bought a tract of land on the south side of 
the river from Frederick Rapp, which after- 
wards became the borough of Phillipsburg 
(named after him), and is now the borough 
of Monaca. In both places, boat-yards were 
established and the one in Freedom has been 
in operation until within very recent years. 
The panic of 1837, however, almost bank- 
rupted him, and on the 17th of November, 
1855, he was drowned off the steamboat 
Jacob Poe, at the port of Wheeling, West 
Virginia, on his passage home from Ports- 
mouth, Ohio, and his body was never recov- 
ered. His age was seventy-five years, eleven 
months and twenty-one days. His wife, 
Rhoda (Parsons) Phillips, survived him until 
March I, 1861, when she died at the age of 
seventy-eight years. 

Elvira (Phillips) McConnel was a native of 
Vermont, having been born March 28, 181 1, 
on the eastern shore of Lake Champlain, 
whence she came West with her father about 
1820. She died January 6, 1897, in the 
eighty-sixth year of her age, leaving to sur- 
vive her the following children: William 
Phillips; James, of Bridgewater, Pa.; Alonzo 
Henry, located in Pittsburg; Alcinus Clark, 



BEAVER COUNTY 



409 



of Allegheny, Pa., Hiram Smith, a leading 
physician of New Brighton, Pa. ; Emma An- 
nette, widow of Ben. J. Stephenson, of Seat- 
tle, Washington; and Omar Montague, of 
Atchison, Kansas. 

William Phillips McConnel, above-named, 
was born at Phillipsburg (now Monaca), and 
with his father became a steamboat carpenter 
and builder, engaging in this occupation for 
about ten years, during which time he assisted 
in building boats on the Ohio, Mississippi and 
Tennessee rivers. 

After that he engaged in the business of 
keeping a general store, for several years at 
Olean, Ohio, and later at Freedom, Pa. But 
river life suited him better, so he accepted a 
position as clerk on a steamer, and was soon 
promoted to secretary and treasurer of Gray's 
Iron Line of the city of Pittsburg, which posi- 
tion he held for twenty-five years. Having 
resigned his position with Gray's Iron Line, 
he became, in 1895, secretary of the Beaver 
Valley Traction Company, which position he 
still occupies. 

Mr. McConnel was twice married, his first 
wife being Elizabeth Stewart, a daughter of 
David and Catharine (Baker) Stewart of 
Bridgewater, Pa. She passed to the life be- 
yond at the early age of thirty-one years, leav- 
ing three children: Ada Annette, who died 
April I, 1896; Laura Stewart; and David 
Stewart. Mr. McConnel was married after- 
wards to Lydia Anne Stewart, a daughter of 
Charles M. Stewart of New Brighton, Pa., 
and a cousin of his first wife. She bore her 
husband the following children: William A., 



subject of our sketch ; Lillian Augusta, who, 
after graduating from Mount Holyoke Sem- 
inary, South Hadley, Mass., in 1891, and 
teaching in the high school at New Brighton, 
Pa., died on October 28, 1898; Jessie, who is 
a teacher in the Allegheny Kindergarten As- 
sociation; Richard Gray, who served during 
the War with Spain, in 1898, as an ensign in 
the U. S. Navy, and is now a lieutenant in 
the U. S. Marine Corps ; Paul George, who 
graduated in medicine at the Western Univ- 
ersity of Pennsylvania, in 1899, and is now 
on the staff of the West Penn Hospital, Pitts- 
burg; and Charles Hiram, a student at Penn- 
sylvania State College. 

William A. McConnel attended the public 
school at Bridgewater until 1882, when he 
entered the high school at Beaver, Pa. From 
there, in 1884, he went to Phillips Exeter 
Academy, at Exeter, New Hampshire. In 
June, 1886, he took his examinations at Sha- 
dyside Academy, near Pittsburg, for admis- 
sion to Yale University, which he entered that 
fall. He graduated, with a High Oration 
standing, from Yale, in 1890. 

He then studied law under the preceptor- 
ship of John M. Buchanan, Esq., of Beaver, 
and was admitted to the bar January 23, 1895. 
He was immediately taken into partnership 
by his preceptor, under the firm name of Bu- 
chanan, Reed & McConnel, which afterwards 
became Buchanan & McConnel, Lewis W. 
Reed retiring from the firm. Since then he 
has risen rapidly in his chosen profession, 
and today the firm of which he is a member 
is considered one of the best in Beaver county. 



410 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Our subject was united in marriage with 
Sarah Stokes Bruce on July lo, 1895, in the 
First Presbyterian church, Beaver, Pa., by the 
Rev. P. J. Cummings. Sarah (Bruce) Mc- 
Connel is a daughter of William H. Bruce, a 
highly respected citizen of Beaver, Pa. This 
union has been blessed with two children: 
William Bruce, born May 5, 1896; and Stew- 
art Phillips, born March 10, 1898. Mr. Mc- 
Connel is a member and trustee of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church of Beaver, Pa., a mem- 
ber of the Epworth League, and teacher in 
the Sabbath School of that church, taking 
great interest in all church work. 



)j^ FRENCH. 



AM CALDWELL 
Conspicuous among 
the young men of sterling worth in 
Beaver county. Pa., whom business or profes- 
sional work has given a wide acquaintance 
throughout the county, and whose public 
service is ever highly esteemed, is William 
Caldwell French, a rising young attorney of 
Beaver. Mr. French was born in Beaver, 
Pa., and, after graduating at the high school 
at that place, he registered as a law student 
in the ofifice of J. H. Cunningham, one of 
Beaver county's most noted attorneys. After 
pursuing his studies very diligently, young 
French was admitted to the bar, and spent 
the following three years associated with his 
preceptor in the practice of his profession. 
Since that time he has been practicing alone. 
Our worthy subject is an influential mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, and although 



an active man in the interests of Beaver 
county, he has never sought ofifice. 

William Caldwell French is a son of Capt. 
Samuel B. and Emily (Robinson) French, and 
grandson of Joseph and Martha (Newton) 
French. Joseph French was born November 
3, 1781, at Brown Mills, Burlington county, 
New Jersey, and while still a young man, 
learned the art of making shoes by hand in 
his native state. In Morristown, New Jer- 
sey, he met Martha Newton, a young 
Quakeress who became his wife. The young 
folks went west to Beaver county. Pa., shortly 
after the year 1800, locating in Brighton, 
which is now Beaver Falls. At that place, 
Mr. French began the manufacture of boots 
and shoes, giving employment to several 
hands. After following that occupation very 
successfully at Brighton for a period of eight 
years, he removed to Beaver, where he carried 
on a similar but more extensive business dur- 
ing the remainder of his life. He made fine, 
and also coarse, footwear of all kinds not 
only for the laboring classes, but for the most 
aristocratic families in Beaver, and townships 
adjoining. Shortly after moving to Beaver, 
he purchased a home on the southeast corner 
of Elk and Second streets, where he and his 
wife lived until their death. 

He was a very progressive man and made 
considerable money, nor was he content to 
deal in footwear alone ; in addition to his very 
heavy trade in that line, Mr. French also 
rented several farms, and carried on agricul- 
tural pursuits to a considerable extent. Be- 
sides rearing a large family, he was exceed- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



411 



irigly charitable and assisted many in need, — 
very often, it is said, to his own disadvan- 
tage. Thus he became extremely popular and 
was much beloved. Several years prior to 
his death, he was considered a well-to-do man, 
of his day. His death took place April 2, 
1847, ^"d the event caused universal sorrow. 
His amiable companion was born April 10, 
1786, and for nearly eleven years awaited the 
summons to rejoin hex husband, — passing 
peacefully away June 17, 1858. 

Their union was blessed with ten children, 
namely: Newton, born July 17, 1805, and 
died February 10, 1827; James, born March 
27, 1807, and died April 3, 1836; Charles M., 
born January 4, 181 1, and died March 27, 
1877; Joseph, born May 21, 1813, and died 
November 11, 1871; Thomas, born October 
4, 18 1 5, and died November 2, 1886; Samuel 
B., father of the subject hereof; Maria C, 
born November 22, 1821, and died May 10, 
1891 ; Billings O. P., born August 8, 1823, and 
died September 22, 1846; Leander, born Sep- 
tember 30, 1825 ; Caroline, born January 12, 
1828, — the only one of this numerous family 
known to be living. The honored father of 
these children was a devout member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, while his wife 
belonged to the good, old Quaker sect. 

Samuel B. French, William Caldwell's 
father, was born December i, 1818, and when 
a young man, began river life as assistant on 
a steamboat plying on the Ohio River, be- 
tween Pittsburg and New Orleans. This life 
just suited his fancy, and he rapidly rose in the 
line to be captain, and still later became part 



owner of several steamboats, among them the 
"Joseph Pierce," the "Tropic," and the "She- 
r.ango." Retiring from river life he engaged 
in the manufacture of brick under the firm 
name of French & Quay. He established 
brick yards and kilns, and was conducting that 
business at the time of his death. This plant 
was conveniently located on the south side 
of the Ohio River, directly opposite Beaver. 
Shortly after his marriage Mr. French built 
a large, substantial and handsome brick resi- 
dence on the northwest corner of Elk and 
Second streets, where he lived during the rest 
of Iiis life. This residence is, at the present 
time, the home of Hon. M. S. Quay. 

Samuel B. French was a public-spirited 
man and a Democrat of much influence and 
great prominence. His active river life pre- 
vented his accepting political ofifices. 

He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and was a charter member of St. Joseph 
Lodge, No. 457, F. & A. M., of Beaver, and 
on February 15, 1854, became a member of 
Commandery, No. i, of the Knights Tem- 
plar of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He passed 
to his final rest January 28, 1874, and was sur- 
vived by his widow for twenty years. Mrs. 
French was, before marriage, Emily Robin- 
son ; she was a daughter of Hugh Robinson, 
a native of Beaver county, and was reared in 
New Brighton, Pennsylvania. She was a 
member of the First Presbyterian church of 
Beaver. Her death occurred on September 
7, 1894, at the age of seventy years. She was 
the mother of thirteen children, ten of whom 
are still living, and all of whom grew to man- 



412 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



hood and womanhood, with the exception of 
one. Their names are : Martha, Nancy, 
Thomas, Samuel, FrankHn, EHza, Mary, 
Emily, Sarah, Katherine, Jeannette, Alice, 
and William C, the subject of this biographi- 
cal record. 




ARRY T. BARKER has made sur- 
veymg and civil engineering his 
profession, and has occupied the 
position of city engineer of New Brighton and 
Beaver Falls since 1879. He is a director of the 
Riverview Land Company, which had its 
origin in 1892. The subject of this sketch is a 
worthy representative of one of the old and 
prominent families of Delaware, his ancestors 
having settled in that state many years prior 
to the War of Independence. Mr. Barker 
was born in New Brighton, Pa., August 28, 
1849, ^"d is a son of Thomas A. and Eliza 
(Oakley) Barker. 

On the paternal side, Samuel Barker was 
the original immigrant of the family in this 
country, — he having located in Delaware as 
early as 1685 ; he received a grant of two hun- 
dred acres from the Penns. The next in line 
was Joseph Barker, who was the great-great- 
grandfather of the subject hereof, and his birth 
occurred on his father's farm in Delaware ; he 
was a strong Episcopalian, as were his par- 
ents. Samuel was the great-grandfather of 
Harry T. Barker, and he married Rachael 
Ball, by whom he reared a family of children. 
Mr. Barker's grandfather was Abner, a native 
of Delaware, who early in life located in Pitts- 



burg, Pa.; prior to 1790, he served in the fire 
department of that city. Being a man of 
means he retired at an early age, and spent 
his closing years in that city, in comfort and 
happiness. 

On the maternal side, the family is of Eng- 
lish extraction, and the Oakleys, from whom 
Mr. Barker's mother sprang, have been resi- 
dents of America since a very early period. 
The grandfather was Milton Oakley, a native 
of Baltimore, Md., but later a resident of But- 
ler county. Pa., where he was actively engaged 
in business. He died in the village of Har- 
mony, in middle age. 

Thomas A. Barker was born in Pittsburg, 
Pa., in 1823, but was reared to manhood in 
Beaver county, — he having left home to live 
with his older brother, Dr. Butler Barker, 
a practicing physician of Beaver; after re- 
ceiving a common school education in Beaver, 
he located in New Brighton, where he em- 
barked in mercantile pursuits, — continuing 
thus until his death, in February, 1859. He 
married Eliza Oakley, who was born in 1821 
and died in 1863 ; they were the parents of the 
following children : George O., who died aged 
five years; Frank A., who died in 1879, from 
an accidental gunshot wound ; Harry T. ; and 
Ellen O., the wife of Harry Brown, of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

Harry T. Barker obtained his primary edu- 
cation in the public schools of New Brighton, 
which was supplemented by a course in the 
military academy at West Chester, Pa., and 
upon his graduation therefrom, by a course 
in the Cooper Institute in New York City; 



BEAVER COUNTY 



413 



he then took an engineering course under the 
professorship of George L. Fox, then a cele- 
brated teacher in mechanics and mathematics. 
On graduating, he accepted a position in the 
ship building establishment of the Roaches, 
of New York City. Returning to New 
Brighton, in 1873, he and his brother, Frank 
A., began a banking business under the name 
of Barker Brothers, establishing a private 
bank in Beaver Falls; this business was con- 
tinued until 1878, when the subject of this 
record took up his profession as a surveyor 
and civil engineer; in the following year he 
was elected city engineer of both Beaver Falls 
and New Brighton, and has served in that 
capacity until the present time. Mr. Barker 
was one of the organizers of the Riverview 
Land Company, in 1892, and he is one of its 
directors; he has surveyed that section into 
town lots, and also surveyed the route of the 
Riverview Railroad, which is about two miles 
long, and of which company he is one of the 
directors. Mr. Barker is esteemed by his 
many friends, and possesses all the char- 
acteristics of a loyal citizen and a good neigh- 
bor. 

The subject of this narrative is a Repub- 
lican, and has served three years as county 
surveyor, having been elected to that ofifice 
in 1882. Socially, he is a member of the A. 
O. U. W. ; and of the K. of P.,— both of New 
Brighton. Religiously, he and his family are 
prominent members of the Episcopal church, 
of which the subject hereof is a vestryman. 
On May 29, 1873, Mr. Barker and Miss An- 
nie V. McClean were united in the bonds of 



wedlock, and to them have been born two 
children, George M., and Adele, both of 
whom are deceased. 



R. WILLIAM M. MILLER, who 
has an established reputation as a 
physician and surgeon, is a success- 
ful practitioner at Hookstown, Green town- 
ship, Beaver county. Pa. His family is one 
of the old and highly respected families of 
Hancock county. West Virginia, where he 
was born October 5, 1863, and he is a son of 
John and Margaret A. (Campbell) Miller. 

David Miller, the grandfather of William 
M., was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, and 
in 1775 came to this country, first locating 
near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He afterwards 
removed to Hancock county. West Virginia, 
buying a tract of land east of the village of 
Fairview, where he lived until the Indian out- 
break in that locality. He was then driven 
away and moved to Chartiers, Pa., remaining 
until peace was finally restored. Upon re- 
turning to his former home, he followed farm- 
ing until his death, in 1848, having almost 
reached the remarkable age of one hundred 
years. He married Abigail Martin, and among 
their offspring was one John P., the father 
of the subject hereof. 

John P. Miller was born on the old home- 
stead, in Hancock county, West Virginia, in 
1832, and there he has always resided. He 
has a fine farm under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, and has conducted it in a very successful 
manner. There are gas wells upon it, and at 



414 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



one time he supplied the city of East Liver- 
pool, Ohio, with gas. He is also quite an ex- 
tensive fruit raiser. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. He formed a matri- 
monial alliance with Margaret A. Campbell, 
and they had the following issue: Joseph, 
deceased; Elmer A., who now does the farm- 
ing on the old homestead; Dr. William M., 
whose name heads this sketch ; Robert S. and 
Benjamin S., twins, the former a farmer in 
Iowa, and the latter in Hancock county. West 
Virginia; Margaret Ellen, the wife of Law- 
rence Stewart, who lives near the home farm ; 
Mary Jane, the wife of Frank Mayhew, a 
farmer, of Hancock county; and Henry O., 
who is living at home. 

Dr. William M. Miller received a common 
school education, and worked upon the home 
farm until he reached the age of fifteen years, 
when he learned the trade of a painter and 
paper hanger. After continuing thus for a 
period of four years, he was clerk in a store at 
Fairview for three years; he then taught 
school four years, in the meantime taking up 
the study of medicine. In 1887 he entered 
the medical department of Wooster Univer- 
sity, now known as the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Cleveland, Ohio. Being 
graduated in the spring of 1890, he entered 
upon a successful practice at Shiloh, Ohio, 
where he remained until 1894. Wishing a 
wider field in which to follow his profession, 
he wisely, and with good foresight, saw the 
many advantages ofifered in Beaver county, 
£nd as a result located at Hookstown, Green 



township. He rapidly acquired a good paying 
practice, and now has the patronage of the 
leading class of citizens of the district. Thus 
he has worked his way up in life from the 
Icwly position of a day laborer to a prominent 
professional status, in which he ranks as one 
of the most skilled practitioners in this region. 
He was ever ambitious and energetic, and his 
advancement is the result solely of individual 
efifort. 

In 1885 Dr. Miller was joined in wedlock 
with Ama Moore, of Fairview, West Virginia, 
and three children have been born to them : 
Cecil E. ; John M. ; and Edna. In political af- 
filiations, he is a strong Republican. Reli- 
giously, he is a faithful member of the U. P. 
church. 




"pNROF. RUFUS DARR. The public 
schools are the pride of every com- 
munity, and from them may be de- 
termined the character and enterprise of its 
citizens. Citizens of an intellectual class and 
those ambitious for the future of their ofif- 
spring, always employ the best instructors ob- 
tainable, and elevate their schools to the high- 
est degree of efficiency. Thus the residents 
of Rochester, by securing the services of Prof. 
Darr, in 1892, took an important step in ad- 
vancement, the good results of which are evi- 
dent in the schools as they exist today. He 
is a man of intellectual attainments, and has 
passed through the ordeal of practical expe- 
rience, — facts which place his record as prin- 
cipal above criticism. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



415 



Prof. Rufus Darr was born in Rostraver 
township, Westmoreland county, Pa., and is 
a son of John Darr, a progressive farmer of 
that locahty. He was reared upon a farm and 
attended the public schools and Elder's 
Ridge academy. He then entered Lafayette 
College and after graduation in 1877, began 
his career as a teacher, which he has since 
followed continuously, with the exception of 
a brief period spent in farming upon the old 
homestead. Besides teaching for a time, in 
the public schools, he taught successively at 
Elder's Ridge Academy, Greersburg Acad- 
emy, at Darlington, Pa., and for several years 
at Laird Institute at Murrysville, Pennsylva- 
nia. In 1892, he accepted the principalship 
of the Rochester schools, in which he has 
since continued to the satisfaction of the board 
and the general public. He is a man of enter- 
prise, and has introduced new and approved 
methods of teaching. 

It is an interesting matter to trace the 
development of the schools of Rochester from 
their beginning to their high standard under 
the present public school system. 

The public school system of Pennsylvania 
dates back to the year 1834. Prior to that 
time schools were maintained only by private 
subscriptions, and very frequently were held 
in private houses. Singularly enough, the 
town of Rochester got its first actual start in 
that year. Early records show that two plats 
were made and recorded in 1834, — one by 
Joseph Hemphill and the other by Joseph 
Hinds. In this year the canal between 
Rochester and New Castle was completed, 



and its effect was to build up the new town, 
which was then called "Fairport." Three 
years later an early directory gives a popula- 
tion of two hundred inhabitants. The only 
school house was a log structure, located on 
what is now the corner of Jefferson and Con- 
necticut streets. There is no record as to 
when it was built or by whom. It was occu- 
pied as a school building for several years 
and was replaced by a frame school build- 
ing now occupied by the Evangelical Associa- 
tion church as a parsonage. Rochester bor- 
ough was organized March 20, 1849, ^""^ ^^^ 
first school board was named at a meeting 
held in this building, May 22, 1849. The 
board was composed of William Martin, pres- 
ident; Dr. Thomas J. Chandler, secretary; 
John Berryhill, treasurer; Robert Smith, 
George C. Speyerer and John McClung. The 
first teachers were elected May 31, 1849. 
They were Philip Grim, principal, and a Miss 
Rice, assistant. The salary of the principal 
was $28, and that of the assistant $14 per 
month. The first term of school began in 
June of that year. This building was used 
until 1862, when it was sold, the school board 
having purchased three lots on Jefiferson 
street, on which a brick building was erected, 
which was completed in the latter year. It 
was a four-room structure, but was enlarged 
in 1868, and again during the "seventies." 
The steady growth of the town made a sec- 
ond building necessary and it was erected in 
1 884- 1 885, on Adams street. In 1891, it was 
again found necessary to increase the size 
of the school accommodations, and a four- 



416 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



room addition to the Adams street building 
was begun, and completed in the following 
year. The continued increase in population, 
and with it, a corresponding increase in the 
number of children of school age, has created 
a demand for a third building, and during the 
summer of 1899 the school board purchased 
two lots on Pinney street, on which a good 
brick building of modern design will shortly 
be erected. The town will then be provided 
with three substantial, well equipped brick 
buildings, located conveniently for the pupils 
in the various parts of the borough. The 
number of pupils enrolled is over nine hun- 
dred. 

The High School department of the Roch- 
ester schools was established in 1890, under 
vhe principalship of W. F. Bliss. It was be- 
gun with a two-years' course of study, which 
was soon made a three-years' course, as it 
is at present. The attendance in the High 
School has constantly increased, until there 
is an enrolment of over sixty pupils, nearly 
equally divided between the three classes. 

The teachers under the supervision of Prof. 
Darr are : S. C. Humes and Mary Stone (in 
the High School); and Mrs. E. C. McCoy, 
assistant principal; Mary Ewing, Kathryn 
Crane; Wilda Brown; Ada Spratly; Katie 
Gebhard; Kate Nannah; Kate Torrence; 
Martha McFetridge; Louise Taylor; Nannie 
Barto; Annie McCutcheon; Annie Lockhart; 
Fay Shanor ; and Lillie Reno. 

Prof. Darr married Louisa Kelley, a daugh- 
ter of John Kelley, of St. Louis, and they have 
three children, namely: Sarah A.; John; and 



Catharine D. Religiously, the Professor is 
a member and elder of the Presbyterian 
church. Socially, he belongs to the Masonic 
order. 



-*- V—*- pc 



OBERT M. BRYAN, the leading gen- 
merchant in the southwestern 
portion of Beaver county, is located 
at Hookstown, Green township, where he is 
one of the foremost business men. He is a 
son of Jam,es and Isabella (Miller) Bryan, and 
was born in Hookstown, Pa., November 14, 
1850. 

John Bryan, the grandfather of Robert M., 
was a farmer of Independence township, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. His son 
James, the father of the subject hereof, was 
born in that township, in 1806, and at an 
early age learned the trade of a hatter. In 
those days there were no shops, and he fol- 
lowed his trade at his own home in Hooks- 
town most of his life, and in addition to that 
farmed quite extensively on land which he 
leased. He passed to his eternal reward at the 
age of eighty-two years. He was first joined 
in marriage with Margaret Veasy, and they 
had three children, as follows: Sarah, de- 
ceased ; Mary, deceased ; and Joseph, who is 
now a pilot on the lower Mississippi River. 
He formed a second alliance with Isabella 
Miller, a daughter of Col. Robert Miller, a 
soldier of the War of 1812, and a resident of 
Beaver county, and this union was blessed 
with seven children: Margaret, deceased; 
John, deceased, who served as adjutant in the 



BEAVER COUNTY 



417 



140th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf., in the Civil War, 
and later practiced medicine in Kentucky and 
Missouri, dying in the latter state in 1874; 
Sarah (Smith), who lives in Arkansas City; 
Robert, the subject of this record; Mary, de- 
ceased ; Jennie (Mercer), whose husband was 
formerly in partnership with Robert M. 
Bryan, and lives in New Wilmington, Pa. ; 
Belle (Lawrence), who removed from 
Beaver county to Red Oak, Iowa, with her 
husband, — a physician of that place. Mrs. 
Bryan died in 1892, at the age of seventy- 
three years. Mr. Bryan was a Democrat in 
politics, and was a borough officeholder. 

Robert M. Bryan obtained his education in 
the public schools of Hookstown, attending 
them until he was thirteen years old, after 
which he was a clerk for three years in a store 
at Shippingport, Beaver county, — thus early 
acquiring a knowledge of the business which 
he now follows. He then learned the trade 
of a carpenter, which he followed during the 
summer months for the succeeding fifteen 
years. In 1870, he went west to Missouri, 
and worked on a farm at his trade two years, 
but again returned to Beaver county and 
taught school for the next fifteen years. Sub- 
sequently he engaged as a clerk for A. G. Wil- 
son, and served in that capacity for five years. 
Then, in company with Mr. Mercer, he 
bought a store at Hookstown, which they 
very successfully conducted for five years. In 
August, 1898, this partnership was dissolved, 
and Mr. Bryan became sole proprietor. He is 
a man of enterprise and has endeavored to 
please his patrons by stocking his store with 



a comprehensive line of goods, including all 
articles in general use and for which there 
is a demand. He has been decidedly success- 
ful and his customers come from all over the 
surrounding country. Mr. Bryan owns con- 
siderable property, including a tract of forty- 
five acres of good farm land one mile from 
town, a house and lot in town, and six acres 
in the outskirts. 

In 1874, he was married to Isabella Swaney, 
a daughter of Thomas and Isabella Swaney, 
both of whom are now dead. This marriage 
resulted in the birth of the following off- 
spring: Mary, born in 1874, who lives at 
home; John, born in 1876; Thomas, born in 
1878; Wallace, born in 1880; Joseph, born in 
1883; Alfretta, born in 1886; Robert R., born 
in 1889; and Edward, born in 1896. Politic- 
ally, Mr. Bryan is a Democrat, and served as 
postmaster during the administration of Presi- 
dent Cleveland, and as justice of the peace for 
two terms. He was census taker of Inde- 
pendence township in 1882, and very satis- 
factorily performed his duty. He is also a 
member of the Beaver County Centennial 
Committee. Religiously, he is a faithful mem- 
ber of the United Presbyterian church. 



§AMES W. McKENZIE, of the firm of 
McKenzie Bros., leading contractors 
and builders in stone and brick, of 
Beaver, Beaver county, Pa., is a gentleman 
who has won the confidence and esteem of 
the citizens of that thriving borough. He is 
of Scotch ancestry, and was born near 



418 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



Beaver, in Brighton township, October i, 
1850, being a son of Jonathan, and grand- 
son of Joseph McKenzie. 

Joseph McKenzie was born in Scotland, 
and came to America, setthng with several 
other Scotchmen, in Vanport, which is just 
outside the corporate limits of Beaver. He 
bought a tract of land, which was almost en- 
tirely covered with timber, and, after clearing 
it, built a log house, and there reared his 
family. The farm is now owned by James 
Mitchell. Joseph McKenzie was a soldier of 
the War of 1812. He died at the age of 
eighty, and his wife also died about the same 
time. They were buried in the old cemetery, 
in Beaver. Their children were as follows : 
Maria, who married Alex Donald; Prestly; 
Hamilton ; Sally, who married Robert Mc- 
Cabe; Jonathan; Hamilton; Joseph; Kirsley; 
Albert; Ellen, who married Ralph Russell; 
Emily, who married Oscar Conrod; and 
David. Emily is the only one now living, 
although the others grew to maturity, — the 
youngest of the family living until more than 
seventy-five years old. 

Jonathan McKenzie, the father of James 
W., was born on the farm, and at the age of 
sixteen years was bound out to his brother-in- 
law, Alex Donald, to learn the tanning trade ; 
the latter's tannery being the one subse- 
quently owned by General U. S. Grant's 
father, in the Western Reserve, Ohio. After 
attaining manhood, Jonathan left this trade 
and went back to Vanport, where he manu- 
factured lime, pottery and brick, and later 
began contracting for stone and brick build- 



ings. Many of the buildings which he built 
are standing in Beaver at the present time, 
and show that the work was, for that time, of 
a high order. His sons, John and James, 
learned the trade with him, and he subse- 
quently took them in as partners, the firm 
name being J. McKenzie & Sons. Mr. Mc- 
Kenzie met with a serious accident, — falling 
and breaking his hip, — which resulted in his 
death soon afterward, at the age of eighty- 
five. He married Ann McCurdy, a daughter 
of Andrew McCurdy, and she died at the age 
of seventy-eight. They were both faithful 
members of the M. E. church, and are buried 
in the cemetery at Beaver, Pennsylvania. 
Their children were: William, who died at 
the age of sixty-three years; Joseph, of Can- 
ton, Ohio; John, of Beaver; Mary, the wife 
of J. M. Graham; James W. ; and George, 
of Beaver. 

James W. McKenzie, whose name heads 
this sketch, assisted his -father and became his 
partner, and after his father's death, he and his 
brother John conducted the. business under 
the firm name of McKenzie Bros. Lately, 
Andrew G. McKenzie, a son of John, has also 
become one of the partners, and this firm is 
known to be the largest in their line, in 
Beaver. They have erected many modern 
and valuable houses, to the entire satisfaction 
of the owners. Among these houses are those 
of Rev. Dr. W. G. Taylor; Thomas F. Galey; 
John Snyder; J. B. Kirtz; J. I. Martin; J. 
Childs; Mrs. J. S. Rutan; D. A. Nelson; A. 
S. Moore; D. W. Miller; W. S. Moore; and 
others. The subject of this sketch built him- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



4id 



self a fine residence on Raccoon street, which 
has every modern convenience. He married 
Mary French, a daughter of Captain Samuel 
B. French, of Beaver, and they have reared 
two children, the third child, Elsie, dying at 
the age of eighteen months. The others are 
Robert C, a graduate of Beaver College, and 
now a student in Effingham College, Effing- 
ham, 111. ; and Ralph, a student in the public 
school. Mr. McKenzie is a strong Repub- 
lican, and has served six years as president of 
the board of education. The family are mem- 
bers of the M. E. church. The subject of these 
lines has many friends in the county, and is 
highly spoken of by all. 



(JONATHAN TAYLOR, a representa- 
tive of the thrifty agricultural class of 
citizens of Beaver county, resides upon 
his fine farm in Chippewa township, where his 
family has lived for many years. He is a son 
of Jonathan and Elizabeth Taylor, and was 
born May 30, 1855. 

His grandfather was Joseph Taylor, who 
was born in Oldham, England, where he fol- 
lowed farming, holding several life leases, and 
owning considerable property. He came to 
this country and purchased the farm which 
forms a portion of that owned by the subject 
of this record. This he improved greatly and 
built new barns on it, one of them being 40x60 
feet, in dimensions. He raised stock and 
shipped to Fallston and Brighton, attaining 
good results in that line. He and his wife, 
Jane, reared six children, as follows: 



Jonathan, Andrew, John, Sarah, Mary, and 
Ann. 

Jonathan Taylor was born in Oldham, Eng- 
land, and after attending the public schools 
there for some years, worked in a coal mine 
until he came to America with his wife. He 
settled near Pittsburg and took up coal min- 
ing, which he followed for a period of two 
years. His father then came to this country 
with the rest of the Taylor family, purchas- 
ing the old Britain farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres in Chippewa township, and he as- 
sisted him in cultivating the farm. Upon his 
father's death, he received a one-third interest 
in the property, and later bought the entire 
place. He established an enviable reputation 
throughout the country as a stock raiser and 
prize winner; his animals, while being very 
heavy, also presented a fine appearance. This 
was attained mainly by the excellent care 
which they received, and, not as many thought 
who unsuccessfully tried it, by overfeeding. 
Many adopted his system, but never quite 
reached the same standard. One of his chief 
and most commendable characteristics was 
his systematic manner of doing everything, 
and his never-failing promptness, — it being a 
proud boast of his that no man was ever dis- 
appointed in an engagement made with him. 
He and his wife, Elizabeth, were the parents 
of seven children : Susanna (Rhodes), a na- 
tive of England; Mary (Hooker); Joseph; J. 
H. ; Jane (Smith); Elizabeth (Haley); and 
Jonathan, the subject of this biographical rec- 
ord. Politically, Mr. Taylor was a Repub- 
lican and served as road commissioner of the 



420 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



township. Religiously, he was a devout 
Episcopalian. He died in 1886, at the age of 
seventy-four years. 

Jonathan Taylor was born on the old home- 
stead in Chippewa township, Beaver county, 
Pa., and obtained an elementary education in 
the district schools, after which he took up 
farming with his father. Upon the death of 
the latter, Jonathan inherited the farm with 
his brothers and sisters, but after the prop- 
erty had been leased for a year, he purchased 
it and began to improve the place. Like his 
father, he is a thrifty, energetic, and sys- 
tematic man, and everything to which he sets 
his hand is done in the best fashion possible. 
He erected a new wagon house, and greatly 
enriched the soil and improved it in other 
ways ; he has always carried on general farm- 
ing and fruit raising, having a splendid or- 
chard of goodly size. He is a man who is 
everywhere held in the highest esteem, and 
is one of the number who have done much to 
elevate the standard of the farming element of 
Pennsylvania. 

The subject of this sketch was united in 
hymeneal bonds with Mary Reed, who was 
born and educated in Chippewa township, and 
they are the happy parents of four children, 
namely: Bertha M. (McGaffic); Carl Reed, 
who was born in 1883; Nellie B., born 
in 1888; and Lester D., born in 1895. 
In political views, he was formerly a Repub- 
lican, but is now a stanch supporter of the 
People's party. 

Mrs. Taylor is included in the membership 
of the United Presbyterian church. 



§ RANKIN MARTIN, who efficiently 
served as district attorney from 1884 
to 1890, is one of the leading practi- 
tioners of the legal profession in Beaver Falls, 
where he ranks as one of the borough's promi- 
nent citizens. He was born in Darlington 
township, Beaver county, January 14, 1852, 
and is a son of James P. and Mary C. Imbrie 
Martin, being of Scotch-Irish descent. 

He was reared on the homestead farm in 
Darlington township ; after receiving a prelim- 
inary training in the schools of his native 
township, he pursued advanced studies at 
Darlington Academy and then in Westminster 
College. He remained on the farm until 
1876, when he was appointed deputy sheriff 
under his father, serving in that capacity for 
three years. 

In 1879, he entered upon the study of law 
with Agnew & Buchanan, and after a careful 
preparation was admitted to practice, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1882. His success was immediate 
and in 1883 he was elected to the office of dis- 
trict attorney, and served with such satisfac- 
tion that he was re-elected upon the expira- 
tion of his term. He has been a constant stu- 
dent, increasing his vast store of knowledge in 
the science of law by study and practical ex- 
perience, and today he ranks among the fore- 
most of the county's attorneys. 

In 1880, Mr. Martin was married to Anna 
Eakin, daughter of John R. Eakin, whose 
biography appears elsewhere in this work. 
They are the proud parents of three interest- 
ing children: Helen, Margaret and Mary. 
In religious attachments and fellowship, they 



BEAVER COUNTY 



421 



are devout members of the United Presbyte- 
rian church. Pohtically, our subject is a 
stanch RepubHcan. 



T^HARLES W. WRIGHT, superintend- 
l J| ent of the Ahquippa Steel Works, is 
^*^ — ' the youngest man in the country oc- 
cupying a position of that kind in a plant of 
such magnitude, and has established a rep- 
utation throughout Western Pennsylvania in 
that capacity. 

The Aliquippa Steel Company was organ- 
ized in 1892, and has been the means of trans- 
forming what was a small country way-sta- 
tion into one of the most important manufac- 
turing towns in Beaver county. Although 
the town is but seven years old, it is now a 
borough ; it possesses excellent natural advan- 
tages, located, as it is, in the great Beaver 
Valley. The officers of the company are as 
follows : Joseph G. Vilsack, president ; J. C. 
Russell, vice president; C. A. Pagan, secre- 
tary and treasurer; Alexander Thomas, gen- 
eral manager; and Charles W. Wright, super- 
intendent. The general ofifices are located at 
No. 512-513 Times Building, Pittsburg, and 
the plant covers fifteen acres of land at Ali- 
quippa. They manufacture open hearth and 
crucible steel, taking the pig iron and manu- 
facturing the finished product; they make tool 
steel for all purposes, — principally for circular 
saws, disks and cross cut saws (surpassing in 
this every other firm in the country), agricul- 
tural blades, and for round and hexagonal 
tools. The plant consists of three buildings 



and a boiler house, which is constructed of 
corrugated steel, with seven immense boil- 
ers of the latest and most serviceable pattern, 
which feed the 500 horse-power engine. The 
dimensions of the three buildings are respect- 
ively as follows : 210 feet x 40, 230 x 40; and 
160 x 40. The works employ three hun- 
dred and fifty men, and run all of the time, a 
feature which is of material benefit to the bor- 
ough. They have in use the six-ton steam 
hammer, a machine of stupendous power, 
which has revolutionized the manufacture of 
steel. They also operate numerous heavy 
shearing machines, punches, and several fur- 
naces, using gas fuel from a well on the 
grounds. The subject of this biography was 
not yet thirty years of age when he was called 
to assume the responsibilities of superintend- 
ent of these works, and having had a thor- 
ough training, he understands the business in 
all of its phases. He has displayed wonder- 
ful ability in the manner of handling the large 
force of men under his direction, — not only 
getting their best efforts, but gaining their 
good will, as well. He possesses the confi- 
dence of his employers to a marked degree, 
and is held in the highest esteem by his em- 
ployees. A young man of enterprise, he has 
worked his way from the lowest step in the 
business to his present enviable position, and 
his future life presents a bright prospect. 

Charles W. Wright was born in Pittsburg, 
Pa., December 23, 1868, and was intellectu- 
ally trained in the public schools of Pittsburg, 
graduating from the high school with the 
class of 1885. He at once went to work in 



422 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



the mill of Park Bros., beginning at the bot- 
tom, and continued in their employ for eight 
years, as general mill clerk. He acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the business that 
made his services valuable, and then resigned 
to accept the position of assistant superintend- 
ent of the Aliquippa Steel Company. His 
efforts in that capacity met with such favor 
that, four years after, he was promoted to the 
general superintendency, which he now holds. 
He is gifted with the eye of an expert in judg- 
ing the quality of steel, — deciding at a glance 
with as much accuracy as a chemical test 
would determine it, — thus saving time and 
expense. Mr. Wright resides in East End, 
Pittsburg, Pa., where he has many friends. 

He was united in marriage with Catherine 
Clark, a daughter of Dr. H. H. Clark, the 
well-known physician, and they have two chil- 
dren: Bessie, born in 1893; and Catherine, 
born in 1897. Politically, he is a Republican, 
but is too busy to participate actively in parti- 
san affairs. He is a member of the order of 
the Royal Arcanum. 



ANIEL R. CORBUS, postmaster 
and tax-collector of New Brighton, 
Pa., ranks among the most promi- 
nent and popular citizens of Beaver county. 
He was born in Beaver, September 29, 1839, 
and attended public schools until he attained 
the age of twelve years, when he \7as forced to 
work out as chore-boy on a farm, for several 
years. He afterwards entered the Lownsend 



Wire Mills and learned wire-drawing, which 
!:e followed for forty-two years, with the ex- 
ception of the time spent in actual service dur- 
ing the Civil War. In 1870, Mr. Corbus was 
elected coroner of Beaver county, and held 
That office until 1876. He was also elected 
tax-collector in 1894, and has been re-elected 
e\ery year since; he is now serving his sixth 
year in that capacity. October i, 1898, Mr. 
Corbus was appointed postmaster of New 
Brighton, — succeeding William Wallace. The 
office ranks in the second class, and its earliest 
record is the appointment of B. B. Chamber- 
lain, as postmaster, March 12, 1849. He was 
succeeded by O. Waters, December 23, 1852; 
he was succeeded by C. H. Higby, July 7, 
1853; he was succeeded by John Glass, April 
16, 1857; he was succeeded by Isaac Covert, 
July 12, 1859; he was succeeded by John C. 
Boyle, March 13, 1861 ; he was succeeded by 
Mrs. E. B. Cuthbertson, January 24, 1869; 
she was succeeded by Walter S. Branden, 
March i, 1886; he was succeeded in March, 
1892, by A. J. Bingham, who was in turn suc- 
ceeded by William Wallace. 

Daniel R. Corbus was united in marriage 
v>ith Cornelia Fairman, a daughter of Cap- 
lain William Fairman, of Pittsburg. They 
have one son and one daughter, namely : Wil- 
liam, and Thankful. William is a brakeman on 
the railroad, and makes his home in Perry, 
Iowa. He married Margaret Brown, and 
new has two children, Chester and Lucian. 
Thankful is her father's able assistant in the 
postoffice. The subject of this sketch is a son 
of John S. and Eliza (Reeves) Corbus, and a 



BEAVER COUNTY 



423 



grandson of John and Betse}' (Skillinger) 
Corbus. Tlie original name of the family was 
Corbustria, and they descended from the early 
French Huguenots. John Corbus spent his 
early life in the state of Maryland, south of 
Baltimore. Later in life, he went west to 
Ohio, with Messrs. Mclntyre and Zane, and 
assisted tho.se gentlemen to survey and lay out 
the town of Zanesville, Ohio, — where he fin- 
ally settled. He conducted a hotel there for 
many years, and the building which he occu- 
pied is still standing. Tradition says his hotel 
was famous for its clean floors and its good 
meals. In those days beds were almost un- 
known in country inns or hotels, — it being 
customary for each traveler to carry his own 
blanket and, wrapped therein, to sleep on the 
floor near the old fireplace. Mr. Corbus died 
when about the age of forty-two years. His 
wife was Betsey Skillinger, of George's Run, 
near Cumberland, Maryland. She bore him 
the following children: John S., Rosa, Tina, 
and Eliza. Some time after the death of Mr. 
Corbus, the widow contracted a second mar- 
riage. She became the wife of Mr. World, 
by whom she had several children. 

John S. Corbus was born at Zanesville, 
Muskingum county, Ohio, and, while still a 
young man, went to Fallston, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. In 1824, he began learning 
the art of making scythes, under the instruc- 
tions of a Mr. Blanchard. They were then 
made by hand, but several years afterwards 
machinery took the place of the hand-work, 
and then Mr. Corbus withdrew from the busi- 
ness, and learned the trade of wire-drawing 



in the factory of Robert Lownsend, at Falls- 
ton. He followed the latter business during 
all of his active days. In 1836, or 1837, he 
purchased a lot on what is now the corner of 
Fourth avenue and Thirteenth street, and 
upon this site he built a substantial brick 
dwelling in which he spent the closing years 
of his life, — dying at the advanced age of 
eighty-five years. His remains lie buried in 
the Grove cemetery. His beloved wife, who 
was Eliza Reeves before her marriage, also 
attained a good old age, passing to the life 
beyond the grave, at the age of eighty-three 
years, and being buried by the side of her 
husband. Seven children were born to them; 
Mary J., wife of Hugh Irwin; John, of Bea- 
ver Falls; Thankful, wife of Dr. Louis Jack; 
Elizabeth, who came to her death by drown- 
ing in childhood; Margaret, wife of Richard 
Irwin; Daniel R., the subject of this sketch; 
and Jesse M., who resides at New Brighton. 

April 17, 1861, Daniel R. Corbus enlisted in 
the New Brighton Rifle Company for a short 
time, but later re-enlisted as a private in the 
Ninth Pa. (Pittsburg) Rifles, and served in the 
battle of Dranesville, the Seven Days' Battle 
before Richmond, and the second Battle of 
Bull Run. Then sickness compelled him to 
enter the hospital ; after recovering his usual 
health, he participated in the battles of Fred- 
ericksburg and Gettysburg, and was honor- 
ably discharged. May 4, 1864. He re-enlisted 
in the 17th Reg., Pa. Vol. Cavalry, and served 
until the successful termination of the war. 
]\Ir. Corbus is a member of the Union Veteran 
Legion, No. i. He is a member and past 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



grand, of I. O. O. F. lodge, and is past royal 
patriarch of the encampment, having also rep- 
resented that body in the grand lodge of the 
state; he is also a member, and past comman- 
der, of the Knights of Pythias. He has taken 
a fitting and active interest in his borough, 
serving in the council for several years, and 
having charge of the fire department. In 
1894, he was elected tax collector for a term 
of three years. 

The subject of this memoir inherited a part 
of his father's lot on Fourth avenue, and 
erected a handsome brick residence upon it, 
which he now occupies. His political affilia- 
tions are with the Republican party, and he is 
universally esteemed by all who have the 
pleasure to know him. In business life Mr. 
Corbus is worthy and straightforward; in 
social circles, he is a true and firm friend ; he 
has fulfilled the duties of his office with credit 
and honor, — having fine natural abilities 
adapting him to even a higher and more diffi- 
cult position. 




'ILLIAM H. FORBES is super- 
intendent of the Keystone Axle 
Company, which is located at Mora- 
do, Beaver county, and the offices of this large 
plant are at No. 200 Telephone Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. The method used in the mak- 
ing of axles by this company is called the roll- 
ing process, and it is the only company in the 
world that uses that method, all others using 
the hammer process. This process has at- 
tracted much attention throughout the world 



and the subject of this sketch is to give an ex- 
hibition of the process to an audience of rail- 
road and steel experts from Paris. Mr. Forbes 
was born at \\'arren, Pa., June 18, 1857, and 
is a son of William and Martha (Shaw) 
Forbes, both residents of Warren county, 
Pennsylvania. 

He attended the public schools of Warren 
and then learned the trade of a carpenter, and 
later the millwright trade. He completed his 
m.echanical trade at the Richmond Locomo- 
tive Works, at Richmond, Va., after which 
time he spent several months working in the 
round house of the Nickel Plate Railroad at 
Bellevue, Ohio. His next position was at 
Chicago, 111., where he became foreman of the 
U. S. Rolling Stock Company; when that 
plant failed in 1890, he found employment in 
the large greenhouse of G. W. Miller, the 
largest fiorist of Chicago. In the spring of 
1 89 1 he was employed by the Standard Oil 
Company as fuel expert, being engaged in 
teaching the people how to burn fuel oil. Jan- 
uary I, 1892, Mr. Forbes became master me- 
chanic of the Chambers & McKee Glass 
Works, at Jeannette, Westmoreland county, 
Pa., remaining with that company three years 
and three months. He then went into busi- 
ness on his own account as mechanical adviser 
at No. 210 Bissell block, Pittsburg. After two 
years of this line of business, sickness com- 
pelled him to make a change, and after a 
year of recuperation, on February 22, 1897, 
he accepted a position as master mechanic 
of the company with which he is now con- 
nected. July ID, 1897, he again resumed his 



BEAVER COUNTY 



425 



position with the Standard Oil Company as 
fuel expert, being assigned to the eastern 
states, and making a specialty of glass works. 
He returned to the Keystone Axle Works 
January 12, 1898, becoming superintendent 
of the works. The plant is 80 by 200 feet, 
and the company make railroad car-axles 
for the Pennsylvania Railroad and for many 
other railroads throughout the country. Al- 
though the rolling process is thought by 
many to be impossible, it has so far been pro- 
nounced by experts to be a decided success. 
Mr. Forbes is the third superintendent of this 
large plant, and is the only one who has made 
it successful. 

Mr. Forbes was wedded to Miss Eva Ran- 
dall, of Jamestown, N. Y., and six children 
have been born to them: Maude, Thomas, 
Francis, Alma, Edward, and Edna. The sub- 
ject of this sketch is a member of the Latter 
Day Saints, of which sect he is an ardent sup- 
porter, and whose headquarters are at 
Lamoni, Iowa. 



TT^HARLES A. TREIBER, the leading 
I J| plumber and contractor of Beaver 

^ — ^ Falls, Beaver county, Pa., and an 
active member of the firm of Treiber & Co., 
has for many years been one of the most prom- 
inent men of the town, and is looked upon 
by all as a man of great worth and sterling 
business principles. In all business dealings 
he is honest and upright, as the large number 
of contracts which he receives goes to prove. 
He was born in Beaver Falls, in 1861 ; is a 



son of John Treiber, and grandson of Jacob 
Treiber. 

Jacob Treiber was a native of Germany, 
and during all his active business life held an 
important position under the German govern- 
ment as inspector of forests, having a large 
territory under his supervision. John Treiber, 
the father of Charles A., was born in Germany 
in 1830, received his schooling in his native 
city, and graduated from one of the famous 
universities of the country. He came to 
America and followed the trade of paper 
bleaching, which he had learned in his native 
country. After working at this for many 
years in Latrobe, Pa., he was induced by the 
firm of Frazier & Metzger, to move to Beaver 
Falls, which he did in 1886. He was in the 
employ of this firm for twenty-five years. In 
1852 he was united in marriage with Matilda 
Day, who was born in Beaver Falls in 1830, 
and received her schooling in that town. They 
reared four children, as follows: Charles A., 
the subject of this sketch; James, baggage- 
master on the Fort Wayne R. R. ; Catherine, 
now Mrs. Elliot, living in Pittsburg; and 
Jeannie, now Mrs. Couch, of Kent, Ohio. 
In politics Mr. Treiber was a Democrat. He 
belonged to the Lutheran church. Fraternal- 
ly, he was identified with the I. O. O. F. and 
K. of P. His death occurred in 1889. 

Charles A. Treiber received his schooling in 
Beaver Falls, and learned the trade of plumb- 
ing in the shops of Chandley Bros., and be- 
came an expert workman ; the finest work in 
the shop was always given to him. He re- 
mained in the employ of this firm for twenty- 



426 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



five years, and in 1892 started in business for 
himself, under the firm name of C. A. Treiber 
& Co. His first store was located at 1404 Sev- 
enth avenue, and he then moved to temporary 
quarters on Fourteenth street. The store is 
now located on Seventh avenue, in handsome 
new quarters recently purchased by the firm. 
There is a fine display-room, sales-room, 
stock-room and work-shop. Some of the best 
and largest contracts in the county have been 
awarded to the firm, among them may be 
mentioned the buildings of John Elliot; Dr. 
Moon; F. H. Laird; J. Kurtz; Judge Wick- 
ham ; the Doncaster house ; McCoU Tube Co. ; 
Emerson, Smith & Co.; Glass Company; 
Mayer Pottery Co. ; Enamel Sign Co. ; H. M. 
Myers Co. The firm has also done a great 
deal of work for the P. & L. E. R. R. be- 
sides having numerous less important con- 
tracts. They do plumbing, gas, steam and hot 
water pipe fitting, and also do a large business 
in bath tubs. They are special agents in the 
county for the Champion beer pump, and 
Welsbach lights. They also deal extensively 
in gas stoves, and keep a large stock on hand. 
The firm can rightly be proud of their store, 
and feel that their efforts have been well re- 
warded. 

The subject of this biography married 
Annie O. Connell, who was born and educated 
in Buffalo, New York. Mr. Treiber is an in- 
dependent Democrat, is a school director; 
member of the R. A. ; past chancellor, and 
grand lodge officer of the K. of P. ; and a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F. He takes an active 
part in all political and social affairs, and is 
well known throughout the county. 



§C. McKIM,* a retired contractor and 
builder, is spending his declining years 
on his fine farm in Big Beaver town- 
ship, Beaver county. Pa., and enjoying the 
fruits of a well-spent life. He was born De- 
cember 17, 1834, is a son of William and 
Margaret (Gilkey) McKim, and a grandson 
of James and Hannah (Lewis) McKim. 

James McKim was born in Ireland, in 1744. 
When twenty-two years of age, he came to 
America. Not many years after he sought 
a home in America, the Revolutionary War 
broke out. James joined the Washington 
Life Guards and served throughout that long 
and bloody struggle, as did his brother John, 
v.'ho was in the same regiment. 

At the close of the war, James went to 
Northumberland county, where he found em- 
ployment as a furnace man in the iron works. 
He left there eight years afterwards, and en- 
gaged in similar work in the Beaver Valley. 
About the year 1800 he bought a farm of wild 
land in Beaver county. After opening a small 
area, he built a log house and barn and en- 
gaged in clearing and cultivating the rest of 
the tract. He improved his place as rapidly 
as possible, and raised general farm products. 
He died at the good old age of eighty-eight. 
Hannah Lewis, also born and reared in Ire- 
land, became his faithful wife and they reared 
six of their seven children. The names of 
their offspring are: Alexander; Thomas; 
John ; William, the father of J. C. ; Mary 
(Marshall) ; Hannah, who died aged eleven ; 
and Elizabeth. 

William McKim was born in Northumber- 



BEAVER COUNTY 



427 



lynd county, Pa., in 1790. When only ten 
years old, he accompanied his parents to Bea- 
ver county, where he attended school. After 
this he engaged in farming. When twenty- 
two years old, he enlisted in the army, and 
fought in the War of 1812, serving through 
that memorable contest. On the termination 
of the struggle he resumed work on the farm, 
assisting his father on the old homestead. At 
a period later in life, he purchased a farm of 
ninety-five acres, and upon this he built a two- 
story, hewed-log house, which was a very 
fine house, for those days. He cleared his 
land, raised a great deal of grain, and also de- 
voted much time and attention to sheep-rais- 
ing. He was a shoemaker, also, and followed 
that trade to a considerable extent during the 
winter months. 

William McKim was twice married. In 
November, 18 16, he was wedded to Letitia 
Miller, by whom he had four children, name- 
ly: Robert, Hannah, Lewis and James. Rob- 
ert was born in 181 8, was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, and was a teacher for fourteen 
years. He was a fine linguist; later in life, 
he devoted his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits. Hannah (Cochran) was born in May, 
1820; Lewis, was born January 7, 1823, and 
James was born July 14, 1825. Some time 
after the death of his first wife, Mr. McKim 
formed a second matrimonial alliance by wed- 
ding Margaret Gilkey, who was also born 
and schooled in Beaver county. This union 
resulted in five children, whose names are : T. 
W., a prominent educator; J. C, subject of 
this biography; William A., a successful 



farmer in Kansas ; Harvey M. ; and Mary J. 
(Runyon). William McKim belonged to 
the Republican party. He served as school 
director, supervisor and collector. He was a 
consistent member of the United Presbyterian 
church, of which he was a deacon for many 
years. He died in 1856, and his widow sur- 
vived him until 1879. 

J. C. McKim was born on the old home- 
stead, and was the recipient of a good prac- 
tical education obtained in the district schools. 
He learned the carpenter's trade, and followed 
that line of work until 1861. He then enlisted 
in the Union army and served nine months in 
the Civil War. His brother, Harvey M., also 
enlisted, and served three years and a half. 
After the war, J. C. McKim formed a part- 
nership with his brother, and worked at con- 
tracting and building, until 1868. He then 
bought his first farm, containing fifty-five 
acres. He carried on the double work of 
farming and contracting and was soon en- 
abled to add forty acres to his original pur- 
chase. He then discontinued carpentering 
and devoted his time exclusively to farming. 
From time to time he has added to his land 
until he now owns one of the finest farms in 
Beaver county. It contains two hundred and 
fifty-nine acres and has two fine dwelling 
houses. One is an attractive brick residence 
and the other is a new frame, recently built 
by Mr. McKim from plans and specifications 
of his own design. It is a handsome struc- 
ture and a model of beauty and convenience. 
It was built two years ago, and is now occu- 
pied by Mr. McKim as his home. The barns, 



428 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



sheds and out-buildings compare well with 
the house in the matter of modern design. 

The subject hereof carries on general farm- 
ing. He married Sabina Miller, a talented 
lady, who was born in 1840, and became Mr. 
McKim's wife, in 1864. She is a daughter of 
William and Margaret (Crawford) Miller, 
and a granddaughter of Robert and Catherine 
(Williams) Miller. Robert Miller was born 
at Northampton, and came to his death at the 
age of forty-five years, — while assisting in 
raising a barn. He married Catherine Wil- 
liams, and they had ten children, namely: 
Aaron; William; Moses; Charles, who died 
at the age of eight years; Lettie (McKim); 
Jane (Crawford) ; Ellen (Shannon) ; Mary 
(McChesney); Sidney, who remained single; 
and Elizabeth, who was twice married. Her 
first husband's name was Eckels; her second 
was a Mr. Parker. 

William Miller was born, in 1802, in Beaver 
county, where he was educated. He learned 
the shoemaker's trade, which he followed dur- 
ing the winters. When his services in this 
capacity were required he would go to the 
house where shoes were needed, and remain 
there until he had made shoes for the entire 
family, if so requested. During the summer 
he engaged in farming. He was joined in 
marriage with Margaret Crawford, a daughter 
of Robert and Martha (McClelland) Craw- 
ford. They reared six children, namely: El- 
len, born in 1828; Robert, born in 1831; 
Martha (wife of F. W. McKim), born in 1834; 
Aaron, born in 1837; Sabina (J. C. McKim's 
wife), born in 1840; and Nevin, born in 1843. 



To the subject of this biography and his 
worthy wife one son, William M. McKim, was 
born, in 1865. William M. McKim was a 
student at Bridgewater Academy, and is a 
fine scholar. He adopted, however, the peace- 
ful, independent life of a farmer. He married 
Ironette Patterson and three bright children 
now bless their home. They are Mary R., 
born in 1894; John P., born in 1896; and 
Robert G., born in 1898. 

Previous to his marriage with Miss Patter- 
son, William M. assisted his father, who then 
gave him a place of his own, as a foundation 
for his future career. Mr. McKim has been 
an elder in the United Presbyterian church for 
several years. In politics he acknowledges his 
preference for the Republican party. He has 
served as school director, and in various town- 
ship offices. 



§OHN M. HUGHES,* who is highly 
esteemed as one of the leading citizens 
of Beaver Falls, Pa., is one of the most 
extensive contractors in this section of the 
state and has erected many industrial plants, 
and constructed a large number of railroads. 
He is a son of John A. and Elizabeth (Grubb) 
Hughes, and was born in Braddock, Pa., in 
i860. 

John A. Hughes, the father of John M., was 
born in Pine Creek, Allegheny county. Pa., 
in 1822, and in 1840 removed to Braddock, 
where he followed the business of general 
contracting for thirty years. In 1870, he built 
the Grant Mills on Clarion River, which he 



BEAVER COUNTY 



429 



conducted until they were destroyed by fire. 
He then returned to Braddock, and started 
a steam saw-mill and a boat building yard. 
He bought the steamboat Kangaroo, of 
which he acted as captain for several years; 
in 1875, he moved to Beaver Falls, and en- 
gaged in general contracting. At a subse- 
quent period he took in his sons as partners, 
as he preferred the river life, which he con- 
tinued to follow until his death, on March 14, 
1898. He married Elizabeth Grubb, and 
they became the parents of eight children: 
Mary (Sloss); Elizabeth (Beams); Margaret 
(Willets); Martha (Casner); James H., who 
was killed at Edgar Thompson's steel works ; 
Olive L. (Willets); John M., the subject of 
this personal history; and E. O., who is also 
a contractor. Mr. Hughes was a Democrat 
in politics; he belonged to the Disciples' 
church. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Odd Fellows order. 

John M. Hughes obtained his primary edu- 
cation in the public schools of Braddock, and 
took an advanced course at Miss Bell's In- 
stitute, a private school. He moved with his 
family to Beaver Falls, and at once secured 
a position as office boy with the H. M. Myers 
Shovel Company ; after a while he was trans- 
ferred to the finishing and handle department. 
He was finally promoted to be inspector, — 
which speaks well for his ability and general 
knowledge of the business, — for that was a 
feature of the work which Mr. Myers had 
personally attended to for many years. Con- 
tinuing thus for three years, he, in the mean- 
while, took a course in civil engineering under 



the instruction of P. Kirkerwaugh. In 1878, 
he resigned and was taken into the partner- 
ship with his father, the firm name becoming 
John A. Hughes & Sons, with offices on 
Ninth street, between First and Second ave- 
nues. Their first work was to build the A. 
F. Wolf stove foundry, but as their reputa- 
tion grew, their business increased, and they 
completed many large contracts, — including 
large coal works in West Virginia ; the barns 
and houses of the Sewickley Dairy Company; 
the Newcastle Steel & Wire Nail Mills; the 
Beaver Falls Chemical Works ; and the Belle- 
vue school building. In 1888, John M. 
Hughes retired from the firm and started into 
business for himself, with offices at No. loii 
Seventh avenue. His first work was to erect 
a store room for J. T. Howarth, now the 
Farmers' National Bank, at the corner of 
Eleventh street and Seventh avenue. He then 
built a store adjoining this for John White, 
who occupied it with a five and ten cent 
store, — and he himself took offices over it. He 
then accepted a contract to build the Beaver 
& Ellwood Short Line R. R., and took op- 
tions on a great deal of the property, selling 
it at handsome profits; this was his first im- 
portant contract while in business for himself. 
He then went to Ellwood, while the railroad 
was in the course of construction, and drove 
the first stake, and put up the first building, 
in what is now one of the most prosperous 
towns in Lawrence county. He also built 
the tube works and the enamel factory, and 
later had charge of the entire property in the 
village. This was a very successful under- 



430 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



taking and in two years he made considerable 
money. In 1892, he returned to Beaver Falls 
and became interested in the street railways 
and other business ventures; he built the 
Shenango Valley Railway, from Sharon to 
Sharpsville, and also the pottery works. He 
then formed a special partnership with 
George C. Wareham, for the construction of 
the Pittsburg & Homestead Street Railway, 
which was completed in December, 1894, It 
might be stated here that owing to a lack of 
business ability, and the foolish and absurd 
actions of a few of the directors, this immense 
contract was almost a total loss, and was a 
severe blow to Mr. Hughes. Having once 
ascended the ladder to the top round, he was 
now forced to the ground, to begin anew. 
Everybody had the utmost confidence in him, 
and respected him for the scrupulous manner 
in which he met every obligation. In 1895, 
he went to West Virginia and built the 
Moundsville, Benwood & Wheeling R. R., 
but here again ill luck seemed to follow him, 
for it was not until after three years of litiga- 
tion, that he was able to procure his money. 
In 1897, he returned to Beaver Falls, and 
made the plans and specifications for the 
Titusville, Hydetown & Pleasantville Ry., and 
a short time afterward became a promoter 
and builder of the Riverview Street Railway. 
He employs a large force of men, the number 
ranging between seventy-five and three hun- 
dred, — over whom he exercises personal su- 
pervision. 

He was united in marriage with Ida L. Lit- 
tlefield, a descendant of two of America's most 



distinguished families, and a daughter of Dr. 
Littlefield, of North Adams, Mass. She was 
born in Sterling, 111., and after completing 
her education in Edwards Seminary, taught 
in the Sterling High School. Her union with 
Mr. Hughes has been blessed by the birth of 
two children: Homer L., who was born in 
November, 1892; and J. Mitchell, born in 
June, 1895. PoHtically, Mr. Hughes is a 
stanch Republican, but has accepted but one 
ofifice, — that of postmaster of Ellwood. Reli- 
giously, he is a liberal supporter of the Pres- 
byterian church. 




EV. ROBERT WILSON KIDD* is 
the beloved pastor of the United Pres- 
byterian church at Beaver Falls, 
Pa., which charge he has had since the year 
1892. He is a man of great strength of will 
and force of character, with brilliant mind and 
self-reliance, and by his courteous manners 
and winning address, he has not only won the 
esteem and affection of the members of his 
congregation, but also the cordial regard of 
the citizens of the borough. Mr. Kidd is a 
son of James and Sarah (Middagh) Kidd, and 
was born in 1848, in Juniata county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

James Kidd was born in Ireland, and came 
to this country in 1819; upon arriving he 
located in Juniata county. Pa., where ho 
bought a large farm and followed agricultural 
pursuits the rest of his life. He was a strong 
anti-slavery man, and always voted the Re- 
publican ticket. As a result of his union with 



BEAVER COUNTY 



431 



Sarah Middagh, seven children were born. 

Rev. Mr. Kidd received his preHminary 
education in the public schools, and after- 
wards pursued a course at Westminster Col- 
lege at New Wilmington ; in the meantime 
having decided upon entering the ministry, 
he began his studies in the theological sem- 
inary at Newburg, N. Y., in 1873, and com- 
pleted them in 1876, — when he was at once 
ordained to the ministry. A very prominent 
charge was assigned to him, — the Seventh 
Avenue United Presbyterian Church of New 
York City, and he continued to occupy the 
pulpit of that church until 1892. In that 
year, he accepted his present pastorate in 
Beaver Falls, which has ever since continued 
to flourish. The present edifice was erected, in 
1893, at a cost of $17,000, and it is one of the 
most handsome churches in the county; the 
large liability thereby incurred has been very 
nearly cleared, through the untiring efforts of 
Rev. Mr. Kidd. When the subject of this 
sketch assumed his present position, the mem- 
bership numbered only 224, which number 
has since been increased to about four hun- 
dred. The Sabbath school has about 300 
members, and all the departments of the 
church are in a flourishing condition; these 
are the Young People's Church Union, — the 
Junior Society, — the Ladies' Aid Society, 
the Women's Missionary Society, and 
the Young Women's Missionary Society. 
Rev. Mr. Kidd is an earnest Christian, a mes- 
senger of peace and good will, and manifests 
those traits of character which gain for him 
the esteem and respect of all who know him. 



Politically, Rev. Mr. Kidd is a strong Pro- 
hibitionist and interests himself in the cause 
of good government. He was united in the 
bonds of matrimony with Amanda Harper, 
a daughter of Dr. James Harper, now of 
Xenia Theological Seminary, in Ohio. This 
union was blessed by the birth of four chil- 
dren, namely : Robert Wallace ; Chester 
Buchanan ; Howard Carson ; and Gladys 
Harper. 




AMUEL J. CROSS, Jr.,* a pros- 
perous citizen and well-known busi- 
ness man of Rochester, Beaver 
county. Pa., is agent for H. T. Morris of Pitts- 
burg, with whom he has been identified for 
more than eleven years. He was born Febru- 
ary 5, 1865, at Rochester, Beaver county, Pa., 
and is a son of Samuel J., Sr., a grandson of 
Joseph, great-grandson of Samuel, and great- 
great-grandson of Samuel. 

Samuel J. Cross, Sr., the father of the sub- 
ject hereof, was born in Charlestown, Wash- 
ington county, R. I., January 6, 1828, and 
was a pupil of Greenwich Academy at Green- 
wich, R. I. He was subsequently engaged in 
teaching, which he continued until he became 
bookkeeper for Roland G. Hazzard at Peace- 
dale, R. I. In 1855, he removed with his wife 
to Rochester, Pa., where he opened a gen- 
eral store on Water street, with E. S. Gard- 
ner, under the firm name of Cross & Gardner. 
At a later period he built the block where Mr. 
Thomas conducts a clothing store, and en- 
gaged in business alone, but the firm name 



432 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



finally became S. J. Cross & Co. It was the 
leading store in the borough and was exten- 
sively patronized. Mr. Cross was one of the 
most energetic business men, who have ever 
made their homes at Rochester, and his suc- 
cess was due solely to his own enterprise. He 
took an earnest interest in public affairs, and 
was connected with many business ventures 
as promoter and stockholder. He became 
agent of the Rochester Land Company for 
Samuel Signes, a company reported on the 
verge of failure. But his keen eye for busi- 
ness and rare foresight pointed out the way to 
success in that line, and the firm soon became 
a prosperous and influential one. He was a 
man of excellent standing in the community, 
and his advice, often sought, was freely given. 
He built a fine residence, known now as the 
Vandersliel estate. Politically, he was a 
stanch Republican and served in the state leg- 
islature in 1 873- 1 874. He served as school 
director many years, and was instrumental in 
the establishment of first-class schools in the 
borough. Religiously, he was a Baptist and 
was a trustee and one of the founders of the 
church. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Frances Elizabeth Wells, is still living. They 
had the following issue: Julia F., the wife 
of B. T. Dimson; Mary E., who died in in- 
fancy ; Samuel J., the subject of this personal 
history; Emma W., the wife of C. L. Blazier; 
George H., a grocer, of Rochester; and 
Thomas W., who also resides at Rochester. 
Mr. Cross died September 27, 1875. 

Samuel J. Cross, Jr., attended the public 
schools, and after obtaining a good prelimi- 



nary training took a course of study in Beaver 
College. He then attended the Iron City 
Business College, after which he entered the 
employ of his father, with whom he remained 
until January i, 1880, when he became con- 
nected with the People's Institute, of Pitts- 
burg, as clerk and agent. He continued in 
their employ until eight years later, when he 
became identified with H. T. Morris of Pitts- 
burg. He is a thorough business man, quick 
to grasp an opportunity for advancement, and 
one in whom everybody has the greatest con- 
fidence. He has always resided at Rochester 
and, in 1895, erected a handsome home on 
Vermont street, where he now lives. 

Mr. Cross was joined in hymeneal bonds 
with Effie Jenkins, a daughter of Oscar F. 
Jenkins of VVellsville, Ohio, and they have had 
five children : Oscar Joseph, who died in in- 
fancy; Mary B., who died in infancy; Alpheus 
Jenkins; Samuel Joseph, who died in child- 
hood; and Effie Letitia. Religiously, he is a 
member of the Baptist church, while his wife 
is a faithful member of the Episcopal church. 



r^ HOMAS E. CRAVEN* is a large 
stockholder in, and superintendent of, 
the American Porcelain Manufactur- 
ing Company of New Brighton, Pa., and he 
is the inventor of a composition, which is used 
in the making of pottery, that surpasses all 
other preparations used in the making of such 
wares. He was born in New Brighton June 
3, 1856, and is the only child of John Craven, 
Jr., and grandson of John Craven, Sr. 



BEAVER COUNTY 



433 



The grandfather of Thomas E. was of Eng- 
lish extraction and spent the greater part of 
his life in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. In 
1830, he began the manufacture of threshing 
machines at Fallston, in this county, and after 
several years of success, his establishment was 
burned down, and he sustained a severe loss. 
He then applied himself to contracting in 
New Brighton, and followed that line of busi- 
ness until his death, which occurred at the age 
of seventy-eight years. His wife, Catherine, 
died when ninety-four years old, and they are 
buried in the Grove cemetery. They reared 
a family of children, all of whom grew to ma- 
turity; their names are: James, Sarah, Ben- 
jamin, Matilda, Isabella, John, William, Mi- 
nerva, Charles, and Madison. The father of 
Thomas E. was a carpenter by trade ; he died 
in the prime of life. 

The subject of this memoir was reared by 
his grandfather, and the day before he was 
twelve years of age, he entered the pottery 
works as an apprentice ; he worked in all the 
departments, and became a master of the 
trade. His inventive turn of mind led to the 
making of an enamel superior to pottery, and 
his secret process was not revealed until the 
organizing of the American Porcelain Manu- 
facturing Company, of which he is superin- 
tendent, and a stockholder. This company 
was organized November 24, 1894; they pur- 
chased the tile factory of Scott Brothers, lo- 
cated on Allegheny street, and their kilns, en- 
gine house, storage and ware house, and ship- 
ping house cover three acres of ground. 
Thirty skilled hands are employed by this 



company, who turn out a fine grade of por- 
celain ware, which consists mostly of porce- 
lain tubs, sinks, and kitchen and pantry uten- 
sils; they also have many orders for special- 
ties in the porcelain line. Much of the suc- 
cess of this company is due to the untiring 
erergy of the subject hereof, who is not bnly 
thoroughly acquainted with this line of busi- 
ness but is a man of good business ability. He 
is popularly known throughout the county 
and possesses many warm friends. 

Mr. Craven erected, and lived in, the resi- 
dence now owned by E. Liddell, on Four- 
teenth street; he now resides at No. 120, 
Tenth avenue. Mr. Craven first wedded 
Flora Hoagland, a daughter of John Hoag- 
land, of Rochester ; she died aged twenty-two 
years, leaving one child, Elva May. His sec- 
ond union was with Alice Thompson Foster, 
a daughter of Harry S. Foster, of Beaver 
Falls, and their home has been blessed by the 
birth of six children: Nellie Luzetta; Alice 
Verna; Luverne Eugene ; Harry ; Thomas H. ; 
:.nd a son who died early in life. 



~f--^-^ L. HUTCHINSON*, a progressive 
pi • business man, and highly respected 

"^^ — '' citizen, of Beaver Falls, Beaver 
county, Pa., is secretary of the Emerson, 
Smith & Co. Saw Works, an extensive plant 
covering three acres of ground and situated 
on Fourteenth street, which ships its prod- 
uct to all parts of the world. He is a son 
of William and Sarah (Lowrey) Hutchinson, 



434 



BOOK OF BIOGRAPHIES 



and was born in Pittsburg, Pa., August 28, 
1852. 

His grandfather was \\'illiam Hutchinson, 
who was born in Ireland, and was of Scotch- 
Irish descent. He attended the local public 
schools and aftenvards came to America, set- 
tling in Pittsburg, Pa., where he followed the 
trade of a mechanic throughout his life. Polit- 
ically, he was a Whig and subsequently a 
Republican, but never sought office. In a re- 
ligious sphere, he was a member of the Re- 
formed Presbyterian church. He was the 
father of five children, whose names are as 
follows : William ; Samuel, a patternmaker by 
trade; Robert, who followed the occupation 
of a machinist ; Eliza J. (Annstrong), who was 
for many years a director of public works; 
and James, a machinist. 

\\'illiam Hutchinson, father of the subject 
of this sketch, was born in Ireland, and after 
receiving a good intellectual training in the 
public schools, was brought to this country- 
by his parents. It was but natural that he 
should take up the occupation at which his 
father had been so successful. He became a 
machinist and engine builder, and was one of 
the finest workmen in Pittsburg. He was a 
member of the firm of Hartup & Co., and sub- 
sequently, of the firm of Robinson, Minnis & 
ililler, the well known manufacturers of ma- 
rine and stationar\- engines. In connection 
with his brother Robert, William Hutchinson 
has the distinction of having built the first 
steam-power fire engine ever made in this 
countrj', which was tested in Cincinnati, in 
1854, and was a pronounced success. It was 



V, hile testing this engine that he contracted a 
severe cold, which shortly afterwards resulted 
in his death, in the j-ear 1855. He was united 
in marriage with Sarah Lowrey, who was born 
and schooled in Ireland, and they were the 
parents of three children: William, a me- 
chanic by trade; E. L., the subject hereof; 
and Clifford, who was cashier of the Alle- 
gheny National Bank up to the time of his 
death. In political affiliations, he was a Whig. 
He \\'as a member of the Reformed Presbyte- 
rian church. Mrs. Hutchinson survived her 
husband six years, dying in the year 1861. 

E. L. Hutchinson was left an orphan at an 
early age, and attended the public schools but 
a short time, when he entered the employ of 
J. H, Ellerman, the hatter. He subsequently 
became a clerk in the cashier's office of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, and continued there 
for seven years, when he removed to Beaver 
Falls to accept a position as bookkeeper for 
the Emerson, Smith & Co. Saw Works. He 
continued in that capacity for about six years, 
when he was taken into the firm, and was 
elected secretary. He is also vice-president, — 
Julius F, Kurtz being president. He has 
served in that position without a break since 
his first incumbency, and has become one of 
the leading business men of the town. He pos- 
sesses good business qualifications and mani- 
fests tact and enterprise in all of his transac- 
tions. The plant is located on Fourteenth 
street, and covers an area of three acres. It 
is a large stone building, and in addition, are 
the engine rooms and office buildings. They 
turn out saws, knives and all other edged 



BEAVER COUNTY 



435 



tools, which are placed upon the market in all 
pj.rts of the world. They employ a force of 
rinety men. 

In 1881, Mr. Hutchinson was united in 
marriage with Clara Perrott, who was bom in 
Fallston, Beaver county, and attended school 



in Beaver Falls; they have two children: 
Juliet, who was bom in 1885; and Lucille, 
born in 1890. Politically, Mr. Hutchinson 
is a Republican. He is a trustee of the Pres- 
byterian church. 



k- 



m 



INDEX. 



Biograpblcal. 



Algeo, William G., Jr. 
Algeo, William G., Sr. 
Allen, Donald C. . 
Allen, Dr. John J. . . 
Allison, Edward James 
Anderton, William Henry 
Armstrong, John Burton, M. D. 

B 

Baldwin, Mrs. Mary Ann 
Banks, Francis L 
Barker, Harry T, 
Bates, John C. . 
Bebout, William Irwin 
Beegle, Fred N. 
Beilman, F. Edward 
Beuter, John 
Bigger, Ellis N. 
Boyd, Dr. George S. 
Brown, Hon. Hartford 
Brown, J. O. . . 
Bryan, Robert M. . 
Buchanan, John McFarren 



Calhoon, Harry 
Camp, Henry M. . 
Campbell, John A. . 
Carr, William . 
Caughey, James R. 
Coffin, Dr. John D. 
Conlin, James T. . 



Perry 



63 

14 

179 

223 

77 
369 
158 



58 

114 

412 

55 

269 

13 

89 

309 

402 

80 

61 

300 

416 

391 



893 
305 
378 
184 
277 
319 
170 



PAGK 

Conway, John 283 

Cook, Henry Englehart ... 99 

Cook, N. Ben 363 

Cook, Dr. William S 71 

Cope, Roger 49 

Corbus, Daniel R 422 

Craven, Thomas E 432 

Cristler, Dr. George A. ... 361 

Cross, Samuel J., Jr 431 

D 

Darr, Prof. Rufus 414 

Davidson, Frederick .... 244 

Davidson, George 157 

Davidson, Hon. James J. . . 23 

Davis, Dr. John H 405 

Dawes, Edward L 107 

Dawson, Robert Doyne Burnside, 

M. D 375 

Deens, Rev. James L. . . . 347 

Dillon, Herman F 287 

Dixon, George W 275 

Donaldson, William M. . . . 207 

Dravo, Hon. John Fleming . 136 

Duff, Alexander, Esq. ... 25 

E 

Eakin, John R 316 

Eberhart. Major Gilbert L. . .381 

Elliott, Oliver B 241 

Ellis, John 35 

Estep, David Philips .... 343 

Evans, Joseph H 213 



Fair, S.J. . . 
Ferguson, John F. 
Fitzgerald, Thomas M 
Forbes, John Wylie 
Forbes, William H. 
Forsyth, Alexander T 
Fox, William H. . 
Franklin, Benjamin 
Franklin, Dr. Orrin H 
French, William Caldwell 
Fry, Henry C. . 



Gale, Dr. Constantine T. 
Galey, William R. 
Gartshore, William A. 
Gorsuch, Samuel Clarence 
Gould, George .... 
Graham, Lewis 
Graham, William A. P. . 
Grim, Dr. Williams. . . 



H 

Hamilton, William Deloss 
Harker, William G. . . 
Harrold, Simon 
Hays, William W. . . 
Haien, Christopher C. 
Hazen, William R. . . 
Hemphill, George M. 
Hervey, Samuel M. . 
Houring, Henry 



270 

70 

315 

42 

424 

256 

303 

51 

105 

410 

201 



235 
112 
281 
387 
232 
134 
95 
237 



242 
74 
401 
397 
39 
203 
161 
366 



INDEX. 



Hice, Hon. Henry 
Holt, Richard Smith . 
Hope, Edgar Frederick 
Hughes, Charles M. 
Hughes, John M. . 
Hulme, Hezekiah . 
Hum, Edward Knox 
Hum, James W. 
Hutchinson, E. L. 
Huth, Peter J. . . 



PAGE 

369 
116 
30 
255 
428 
115 
310 
333 
433 
337 



I 

Imbrie, Robert S 68 

Inman, Clyde W 297 

Irons, James A 355 

Iseman, Dr. Henry C. . . . 328 

J 

Jolly, Albert M 325 

Jones, Walter C 220 

K 

Kane, Samuel M 55 

Kelso, John M 168 

Kidd, Rev. Robert Wilson, . . 430 

Kirker, Lorenzo C 290 

Klein, Charles W 211 

Knott, Joseph W 101 

Koehler, Paulus E 167 

L 

Laughlin, John 276 

Levine, Samuel 282 

Littell, Gen.J. S. ...'... 295 

Louthan, Dr. James S. ... 298 

Lowry, John Henry 294 

M 

McCauley, Dr. John C. . . . 163 

McConnel, William Appleton . 408 

McKenzie, James W 417 



PAGE 

McKim, J. C 426 

Mackall, George W 217 

Mansfield, Hon. Ira F. ... 45 

Maratta, Capt. Frank .... 250 

Marlatt, Richard J 196 

Marshall, Alfred P 175 

Martin, John 64 

Martin, Jere C 129 

Martin, John Imbrie 127 

Martin, J. Rankin 420 

Mecklem, Hon. Millard F. . . 182 

Miksch, Wenzel A Ill 

Miller, Dr. William M. ... 413 

Minesinger, Thomas L . . . 106 

Molter, Oliver 151 

Molthrup, Stephen 56 

Moon, Dr. Addison S 124 

Moulds, Samuel Henry ... 229 

Moulds, William 253 

Myers, C. Edgar 86 

Myler, W. Albert 122 

N 

Nickle, Matthew 266 

P 

Park, John H 349 

Park, William A 341 

Patterson, David G 272 

Pflug, Jacob 121 

Pugh, Joseph T 133 



Randolph, Mrs. Mollie F 
Rayle, Dr. Walter F. 
Reader, Frank Smith 
Reed, Lewis W. 
Reid, Alexander F. 
Rose, Robert B. . 
Rose, Dr. Walter A. 
Runyon, Charles 



47 
91 
338 
83 
218 
162 
186 
148 



S 

Scroggs, Dr. James, Jr. . . . 353 

Sechrist, Henry 248 

Seiple, Ernst H 197 

Sepp, Henry 173 

Smith, George E 395 

Smith, Rev. R. Morris ... 231 

Stone, Dan H.,Jr 145 

Stone, Stephen P 145 

Strouss, Ulysses S., M. D. . . 152 

Sturgeon, Dr. Samuel Dixon . 67 

Taylor, James 93 

Taylor, Jonathan 419 

Taylor. Rev. William G., D. D. 259 

Thomas, Ethan Hazen ... 371 

Thomas, Samuel 322 

Townsend, Capt. Charles C. . 11 

Townsend, Milton .... 28 

Treiber, Charles A 425 

V 

Victor Manufacturing Company 284 

W 

Wagoner, William Henry . . 247 

Wallover, P. M 331 

Ward, Gawn ...... 205 

Wehr, George F 192 

Welch, James H 50 

Welsh, Titus M 191 

West, Abraham 293 

Weyand, Col. Jacob .... 33 

Whisler, Alfred M., D. D. S. . 195 

White, T. Martin 180 

Wilson, George 225 

Wilson, James S 304 

Wilson, Hon. James Sharp . . 17 

Wilson, Jefferson 364 

Wilson, John B 73 

Wright, Charles W 421 

Y 

Young, John B 189 

Young, Robert G 289 



portraits. 



Allen, Donald C, Mrs. Donald 

C., and Donald C, Jr. . . 178 

Allen, Dr. John J 222 

Allison, Edward James ... 76 

Anderton, William Henry . . 368 

Bebout, William Irwin ... 268 

Beilman, F. Edward . . . 88 

Beuter, John 308 

Brown, Hon. Hartford Perry . 60 

Buchanan, John McFarren . . 390 

Cook, Henry Englehart ... 98 

Davidson, George 156 

Davidson, Hon. James J. . . 22 
Dawson, Robert Doyne Burn- 
side, M. D 374 

Deens, Rev. James L. ... 346 

Dillon, Herman F 286 

Dixon, George W 274 

Eberhart, Major Gilbert L. . . 380 

Elliott, Oliver B 240 



Fitzgerald, Thomas M. 
Fox, William H. . . 
Franklin, Dr. Orrin H. 
Fry, Henry C. . . . 
Gale, Dr. Constantine T. 
Gartshore, William A. 
Harrold, Simon 
Hazen, Christopher C. 
Hice, Hon. Henry 
Huth, Peter J. . . . 
Jolly, Albert M. . . 
Kane, Samuel M. . 
Klein, Charles W. 
Koehler, Paulus E. 
Mackall, George W. . 
Mansfield, Hon. Ira F. 
Martin, John Imbrie . 
Miksch, Wenzel A. 
Molter, Oliver . . . 



FAOB 

314 
302 
104 
200 
234 
280 
400 

38 
368 
336 
324 

54 
210 
166 
216 

44 
126 
110 
150 



PAGE 

Moulds, Samuel Henry ... 228 

Moulds, William 252 

Pflug, Jacob 120 

Pugh, Joseph T 132 

Reed, Lewis W 82 

Scroggs, Dr. James, Jr. . . . 352 

Sepp, Henry 172 

Stone, Dan H 143 

Stone, Stephen P 142 

Sturgeon, Dr. Samuel Dixon . 66 

Taylor, Rev. William G., D D 258 

Townsend, Capt. Charles C. . 10 

Wagoner, William Henry . . 246 

Wallover, P. M 330 

West, Abraham 292 

Weyand, Col.Jacob .... 32 

Whisler, Alfred M., D. D. S. . 194 

Wilson, Hon. James Sharp . . 16 

Young, John B 188 



Xl- 



SEP 4- 192S