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Full text of "The Book of the discipline : (Vinaya-pitaka)"

©ulumc XV 



WOVEN CADENCES 

OF 

EARLY BUDDHISTS 
(SUTTA-NIPATA) 



WOVEN CADENCES 

OF 

EARLY BUDDHISTS 



TRANSLATED BY 

E. M. HARE 

Translator of Gradual Sayings, Vol. Ill & IV. 



LONDON 

GEOFFREY CUMBERLEGE 

OXFORD UNIVFRSITY PRESS 



BL 
V.I5 



FIRST PUBLISHED 1^45 

REPRINTED ig^j 




'-^^'^i%s. 



r 



903797 



^0^. 



1) 



Printed in Cejylo 



PREFACE 



The present translation, as far as I am aware, is the third com- 
plete translation of Sutta-Nipata into English. In 1874 Sir 
Muttu Cumaraswamy's translation of 30 suttas was published by 
Messrs. Triibner ot London as Sutta-Nipata or Dialogues and 
Discourses of Gotama Buddha; this was followed by h'ausboirs com- 
plete prose translation The Sutta-Nipata, A Collection of Discourses, 
published at the Clarendon Press, Oxford, in 1880, in the Sacred 
Books of the East Series, vol. X, a revised second edition appearing 
m 1898; and in 1932 the late Lord Chalmers' metrical rendering 
'Buddha's Teachings,' was published in America in the Harvard 
Oriental Series vol. 37. 

Undoubtedly the Sutta-Nipata is an old and important antho- 
logy of early Buddhism. It forms in the Pali Buddhist Canon the 
fifth book of the fifth Nikiiya, the Khuddaka-Nikaya, ( the'small- 
ish* or 'minor' collection, though in fact the most bulky) of the 
Sutta Pitaka. It has been largely commented on, thus : — 

(i) The third sutta of chapter i, and chapters 4 and 5, have 
canonical comment in Maha-Niddesa and Culla-Niddesa, these 
works themselves forming part of the Khuddaka-Nikaya, — 
some 800 printed pa^es. 

(2) Buddhaghosa in his Paramatthajotika comments on the 
whole of it in 600 pages, but perhaps less expansively on those 
parts dealt with by the Niddesas. 

(3) Both Niddesas are themselves commented on in the work 
Saddhammapajjotika in some 600 pages. 

and (4) Professor Helmer Smith provides ' Indexes and 
Appendix' of some 300 pages, superseding FausboU's 'Glossary,' 
380 pages. 

This present translation was undertaken at the suggestion of 
the late Mrs. Rhys Davids who had very kindly agreed to write 
an Introduction ; but alas ! the work has gone to the printers 
too late, I have added some indexes and an 'afterwordt' 



As to the English title ' Woven Cadences/ this is a suggested 
translation of the two words siitta nipata, though not in 
accordance with Buddhaghosa's rendering which may be read at 
the begjinning of the PaH Text Society's edition of the text 

, I hold the opinion that a reader must have some knowledge of 
the Vedanta, the philosophy of the Upanishads, to appreciate 
properly the replies to the brahmans who come and question. It 
seems certain that the compiler knew their doctrines and, I suggest, 
often indulged m word-play, putting new wine into old bottles. 
It IS desirable that some scholar, competent in both languages and 
philosophies, should .n\TStigate this. For the \'edanta, none can 
do better, I suppose, than to read Deussen's ' Philosophy of the 
Upanishads,' the English translation of \^'hich was published by 
Messrs. T. & T. Clark in 1906. 

Finally, I acknowledge my indebtedness to FausboU, first 
editor and first translator of Sutta-Nipata, and at the same time 
record thanks to the late Mrs. Rhys Davids and Mr. F. L. 
Woodward who read and commented on mv translation verse by 
verse, the one in Engjland and the other in Tasmania. 



Colombo, Ceylon, 

1944. ' E. M. HARE. 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER 

1. THE CHAPTER OF THE SNAKE 
11. THE MINOR CHAPTER 

III. THE GREAT CHAPTER 

IV. THE CHAPTER OI EIGHTS 
V. THE WAY TO THE BEYOND 



PAGE 
I 

35 
6i 

115 
143 



INDEXES 



III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 



I. (a) PROPER NAMES 

(b) WORDS AND SUBJECTS . . 

II. SIMILES, CREATURES, ETC. 

TITLES OF SUTTAS 

A CONCORDANCE OF THE GATHAS 
THE translator's 'aFTERWORd' 
SOME 'word-play' IN THE GATHAS 
SOME PALI WORDS IN THE NOTES 



A TABLE OF ALLITERATION AND ASSONANCE 
IN THE GATHAS . . 



169 
172 
181 
183 
184 
212 
218 
220 

220 



WOVEN CADENCES 

OF 

EARLY BUDDHISTS 

(Sutta-Nipata) 



HONOUR TO HIM, THE MASTER, MAN-OF-WORTH, ALL-AWAKENED. 



Chapter I. — The Chapter of the Snake 

The Table of Contents 

Here woven are the Snake and Dhaniya, 

Rhinoceros, Farmer Bharadvaja, 

Cunda, of Suffering, the Outcast man, 

Qu icken ing of Am ity , Satag i ra , 

Alavaka, of Mastery, the Sage : 

These twelve are called the Chapter of the Snake. 

(i) The Snake 

Who checks the spread of risen wrath 

As salves the venom of a snake, 

That monk quits bounds both here and yon 
As snake his old and worn-out skin. 



Woven Cadences [ Sn. i 



Who passion wholly cutteth off 2 

As gatherer lake-grown lotus blooms, 

That monk quits bounds both here and yon 

As snake his old and worn-out skin. 

Who craving wholly cutteth off ^ 

And dries its swiftly flowing stream, 
That, &c. 

Who pride doth wholly sweep away 4 

As flood a fragile bridge of reeds, 
That, &c. 

Who in ' becomings ' finds no pith 5 

As seeker in fig-trees no flowers. 
That, &c. 

In whom there inly lurk no spites, 6 

Freed from becoming this or that, 
That, (jy-f. 

In whom uncertainty is quenched, 7 

Cut short within, so none remains, 
That, &c. 

Who neither hastes nor lags behind, 8 

Hath all this hindrance overcome, 
That, &c. 

Knows of the world ' All is unreal,* 9 

Knows without greed * All is unreal,' 10 

Knows without passion ' All is unreal/ n 

Knows without hate * All is unreal/ 12 

Knows undeluded * All is unreal,' 13 
That, &c. 

In whom no leanings lurk whatever, 14 

Who roots of wrong hath rooted out, 
That, &c. 



The Chapter of the Snake 



In whom no yearnings lurk whatever, 
Cause of return to these bounds here, 
That, &c,, 

In whom no longings lurk whatever, 
Forces that forge becommg's bonds, 
That, &c. 

Who of five obstacles is rid, 

Gone stir, doubt crossed and barb-immune, 
That monk quits bounds both here and yon 
As snake his old and worn-out skin. 



J 

16 

17 



(2) Dhaniya 

Dhaniya " I've boiled my broth, Tve drawn the milk/* 
Thus spake the herdsman Dhaniya, 
** I dwell with mates beside Mahi, 
Roofed is my hut, the fire burns bright : 
So if thou wish, rain, deva, rain ! " 

The Master " I've foiled my wrath, I've fertile mmd,'* 
Thus spake the Master m reply, 
** I dwell one night beside Mahi, 
Open my hut, cooled down my fire : 
So, &c," 

Dhaniya " No gnats, no gadflies here are found,** 
Thus spake the herdsman Dhaniya, 
" In rich grass meads my cattle roam. 
Well can they brave what storm may come : 
So, &€." 

The Master ** Well fashioned was the bonded raft,** 
Thus spake the Master in reply, 
** But none's the need of raft for him, 
Crossed and yon-fared, the flood-tide ridden: 
So, &c,*' 



x8 



19 



20 



21 



w 



oven 



Cadences 



[ Sn. 4 



Dhaniya " Obedient is my wife, no trull,'* 
Thus spake the herdsman Dhaniya, 

Long hath she been a loving mate, 
No rumoured wrong I hear of her : 

So if thou wish^ rain, deva, rain ! " 

The Master " Obedient is my mind and freed," 
Thus spake the Master in reply, 

Long hath it been well quickened, tamed, 
No ill is found or known in me : 

So, G-c.'* 

Dhaniya '* By earnings I support myself," 
Thus spake the herdsman Dhaniya, 
Hale sons and I together dwell, 
No rumoured wrong I hear of them : 
So, &c." 

The Master " Servant to none whate'er am I," 
Thus spake the Master in reply, 
** I fare the world with wages won 
Nor find nor know the need to earn : 
So, (sfC." 

Dhaniya " See here are goodly cows and calves," 
Thus spake the herdsman Dhaniya, 
/ " And here are breeders great with calf, 

And here the bull, lord of the herd : 
So, &€." 

The Master ** No goodly cows and calves are here," 
Thus spake the Master in reply, 

Here are no breeders great with calf, 
Here is no bull, lord of the herd : 
So, &c." 

Dhaniya " The stakes are sunk unshakable," 
Thus spake the herdsman Dhaniya, 

The rush-made cords are woven new. 
Truly no calves can break out now : 
So, &c/' 



22 



2? 



24 



25 



26 



27 



28 



^^] 



The Chapter of the Snake 



" As bull asunder bursts his bonds," 
Thus did the Master then declare, 

As tusker rends his rotten bands, 
I go no more to bed-of-womb ; 

So if thou wish, rain, deva, rain ! 

Then burst a mighty cloud of rain, 
Flooding the hollows and the land, 
Whereat the herdsman spake this thing, 
Hearing the storm and deva-roar : 

Dhaniya ** O gain indeed I No small gain this, 
We who have seen the Master here ! 
Unto thy refuge, seer, we go ; 
Be thou our teacher, mighty sage ! 

*' Obedient, the wife and I 
Will fare Wellfarer's godly life : 
Yon-farers over birth-and-death, 
Enders of ill will we become ! 



^9 



30 



51 



}i 



Mara ** Whoso hath sons delights in sons," 
Thus Mara spake, the Evil One, 
" The cowherd too delights in kine : 
Affections^ are delight to man, 
Th' alfection-less hath no delight." 

Whoso hath sons grieves over sons," 
Thus spake the Master in reply, 
" The cowherd too grieves over kine : 
Affections are sore grief to man, 
Th* affection-free hath never grief." 



33 



34 



Upadhij considered the basis of rebirth. 



Woven Cadences [ Sn. 6 



(3) The Rhinoceros 

Put by the rod for all that lives, 35 

Nor harm thou any one thereof ; 
Long not for son — how then for friend ? 
Fare lonely as rhinoceros. 

Love Cometh from companionship ; ^ 36 

In wake of love upsurges ill ; 
Seeing the bane that comes of love, 
Fare, &c., 

In ruth for all his bosom-friends, 37 

A man, heart-chained, neglects the goal : 
Seeing this fear in fellowship, 
Fare, &c., 

Tangled as crowding bamboo boughs 38 

Is fond regard for sons and wife : 
As the tall tops are tangle-free. 
Fare, G-c, 

The deer untethered roams the wild 39 

Whithersoe'er it lists for food : 
Seeing the liberty, wise man. 
Fare, &c.j 

With friends one is at beck and call, 40 

At home, abroad, on tour for alms : 
Seeing the liberty none want, 
Fare, &c,j 

With friends there's mirth and merriment, 41 

And love for sons is very great : 
Full loath to serve the ties of love, 
Fare, &c.. 



3 ] The Chapter of the Snake 7 



42 



Free everywhere, at odds with none, 
And well content with this and that : 
Enduring dangers undismayed, 
Fare^ &c., 



Some home-forsakers ill consort, 43 

As householders who live at home : 
Indifferent to other folk, 
Fare, &c,, 

Casting aside the household gear, 44 

As sheds the coral tree its leaves, 
With home-ties cut and vigorous,^ 
Fare, (src, 



If one find friend with whom to fare, 45 

Rapt in the well-abiding,^ apt. 
Surmounting dangers one and all, 
With joy fare with him mindfully. 

Finding none apt with whom to fare, 46 

None in the well-abiding rapt, 
As rajah quits the conquered realm, 
Fare lonely as rhinoceros. 



Surely we praise accomplished friends ; 47 

Choose thou the best or equal friends : 
Not finding these and loving right, 
Fare, &c., 

^ Vxro, see note on verse 531 ; herein rendered so. 

2 Sadhuvihari-dh'tram ; dhtra, a muser, a dhyanin, rendered * rapt ' herein. For 
sadhu as 'goal ' see note on verse 1102. Verses 45, 46 recur at Dh. 328, 329, Vin. 1, 
350, M. Hi 154, J. in 488. Cf. too (verse 960 below) parissaya . . . gacchato amatam disam 
with here abbibhuyya . . . parissaydni. 



Woven Cadences [ Sn. 8 



Seeing how glittering bangles o' gold, ^8 

Tho' finely wrought by goldsmith's art, 
Jangle when twain on arm are set, 
Fare lonely as rhnioceros. 

Bethink thee, "Thus with others joined, 40 

What wordy talks, what scolds for me I" 
Seemg this fear lies in the way, 
Fare, &c,, 

Gay pleasures, honeyed, rapturous, 50 

In divers forms churn up the mind : 
Seemg the bane of pleasure's brood, 
Fare, &-:., 

They are a plague, a blain, a sore, 51 

A barb, a fear, disease for me !" 
Seeing this fear in pleasure's brood, 

Fare, &c., 

The heat and cold, and hunger, thirst, 52 

Wind, sun-beat, sting of gadfly, snake ; 
Surmounting one and all of these, 
Fare, &c., 

As large and full-grown elephant, 53 

Shapely as lotus, leaves the herd 
Whenas he lists for forest haunts, 
Fare, &c,, 

*Tis not for him who loves the crowd 54 

To reach to temporal^ release : 
Word of Sun's kinsman heeding right, 
Fare, ^c, 

^ Samayikam vimuttim, release in time, " here now " ? 



*' 3 ] The Chapter of the Snake 9 

Leaving the vanities of view, 55 

Right method won, the way obtained : 
"1 know .' No other is my guide ! "^ 
Fare, &c,, 

Gone greed, gone guile, gone thirst, gone grudge, 56 

And winnowed all delusions, faults, 
Wantless in all the world become, 
Fare, &c., 

Shun thou the evil friend who sees 57 

No goal, convinced in crooked ways ; 
Serve not at will the wanton one, 
Fare, &c,, 

Seek for thy friend the listener,^ 58 

Dharma-endued, lucid and great ; 
Knowing the needs, expelling doubt. 
Fare, &c., 

Play, pleasures, mirth and worldly joys, 59 

Be done with these and heed them not ; 
Aloof from pomp and speaking truth, 
Fare, &c,, 

Son, wife and father, mother, wealth, 60 

The things wealth brings, the ties of kin : 
Leaving these pleasures one and all. 
Fare, &c., 

They are but bonds, and brief their joys, 61 

And few their sweets, and more their ills. 
Hooks in the throat ! — this knowing, sure, 
Fare, &c., 



1 Ananfianeyyo, no brahmanic rite of upanayanam necessary. 
'^ Bahussutam, herein rendered so ; cf verses 316 — 323 below, also verse 385, dhara ; 
endued, cf. verse 10 10 as co use. 



lO 



Woven Cadences [ ^n. lo 



Snap thou the fetters as the snare 62 

By river denizen is broke : 
As fire to waste comes back no more, 
Fare lonely as rhinoceros. 

With downcast eyes, not loitering, 63 

With guarded senses, warded thoughts. 
With mind that festers not, nor burns, 
Fare, (-/c, 

Shed thou householder's finery, 64 

As coral tree its leaves in fall : 
And going forth in yellow clad. 
Fare, 6-^, 

Crave not for tastes, but free of greed, 65 

Moving with measured step from house 
To house, support of none, none's thrall, 
Fare, &€., 

Rid of the mind's five obstacles, 66 

Void of all stains whate'er, thy trust^ 
In none, with love and hate cut out, 
Fare, ^c, 

And turn thy back on joys and pains, 67 

Delights and sorrows known of old ; 
And gaining poise and calm,^ and cleansed,^ 
Fare, &•€., 

Astir to win the yondmost* goal, 68 

Not lax in thought, no sloth in ways, 
Strong in the onset, steadfast, firm, 
Fare, &c., 



^ Anissito, nissita, asita, herein rendered in like terms. 

2 Samathanit upasanta, etc., thus throughout. 

^ Visuddharp, suddhi, etc., thus. 

* Farama, para, para, etc., thus similarly herein. 



*♦ ^ 1 The Chapter of the Snake 



II 



Neglect thou not to muse apatt, 69 

'Mid things by Dharma faring aye, 
Ahve to all becomings'^ bane, 
Fare, &c., 

Earnest, resolved for craving's end, 70 

Listener, alert, not hesitant, 
Striver, assured, with Dharma summed. 
Fare, (sfc, 

Like lion fearful not of sounds, 71 

Like wind not caught within a net, 
Like lotus not by water soiled, 
Fare, G-c, 

As lion, mighty- jawed and king 72 

Of beasts, fares conquering, so thou ; 
Taking thy bed and seat remote, 
Fare, &c,, 

Poise, amity, ruth and release 73 

Pursue, and timely sympathy ; 
At odds with none in all the world, 
Fare, &c,, 

And rid of passion, error, hate, 74 

The fetters having snapped m twain. 
Fearless whenas life ebbs away, 
Fare, &c., 

Folk serve and follow with an aim : 75 

Friends who seek naught are scarce today : 
Men, wise in selfish aims, are foul : 
Fare lonely as rhinoceros ! ^ 

1 Bhavesu, (existences'), so throughout. 

- This sutta has a canonical comment at the end of Niddesa; SnA. has a story (uppatti) 
about each verse, besides word-comment. Khaggaxisana — , here rendered "rhinoceros," 
is perhaps more properly " horn of rhinoceros," its singleness {eko) being contrasted 
no doubt with the two horns of other ammals. 



12 



Woven Cadences [ Sn. 13 



(4) Farmer Bh'^radvaja 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master was staying 
among the Magadhans near South Hill at the brahman village 
of Ekanala, the brahman, farmer Bharadvaja, had in yoke five 
hundred ploughs, it being sowing time. 

Now early one morning the Master, having dressed and 
taking bowl and robe, approached the farmer at work ; and it was 
the time of food distribution ; and the Master drew near and 
stood at one side. 

And farmer Bharadvaja saw the Master standing there for 
alms and said to him : ** Recluse, I plough and I sow : and 
when I have ploughed and sown, I eat ! You, recluse, should 
plough and sow too ; for, having done so, you may eat." 

** Brahman, I too plough and sow ; and when I have ploughed 
and sown, I eat." 

** But we see not Master Gotama's yoke and plough, nor 
his ploughshare, goad, nor oxen ! Yet Master Gotama speaks 
so . . ." 

Then the farmer addressed the Master thus in verse : — 

Bharadvaja " Thou dost profess to be a ploughman^ yet 76 

Thy ploughing see we not ; 
Tell us who ask what ploughing's thine ? Of that 
We fain would learn from thee." 

The Master " Faith is the seed, austerity the rain, 77 

Wisdom my yoke and plough ; 
My pole is modesty, mind is the strap, 

And I have mindfulness 
For share and goad. Warded in act and word, 78 

In eating temperate. 
With truth I clear the weeds ; and full of bliss 

Is my deliverance. 



^' ^ ] The Chapter of the Snake 



13 



**To a security from moil doth draw 79 

Vigour, my team in yoke ; 
And on it goes, nor turns it back ; it goes 

Where is no sufFermg. 
And thuswise is this ploughing ploughed, and thence 80 

There comes the deathless fruit ; 
And whoso hath this ploughing ploughed, set free 

Is he from every ill.'* 

Then farmer Bharadvaja caused a massive copper bowl to be 
filled with rice milk and offered it to the Master, saying : ** Let 
Master Gotama eat this rice milk ! A ploughman indeed is the 
Master since he ploughs a ploughing for deathless fruit." 

The Master *' Not mine t'enjoy fare won from chanting; hymns ; 81 

' Tis not the thing for seers, O brahmana ! 
Fare won from chanting hymns the Wake reject ; 
Where Dharma reigns, this, brahman, is the rule. 

** Nay, thou must offer other food and drink 8^ 

To a great rishi wholly consummate, 
The cankerless, untroubled man of calm : 
Sure field is that for merit-seeking man I " 

" Then, Master Gotama, to whom shall I give this rice 
milk?" 

" Brahman, I see no one in the world with its devas, Maras 
and Brahmas, or on earth with its recluses and godly men, devas 
and men by whom that milk rice, if eaten, could be wholly 
digested, save by the Man-thus-come^ or by his disciple. Where- 
fore, brahman, cast that rice milk where there is but little green 
grass, or throw it into water without creatures." 

And the brahman poured the rice milk into water where 
there were no creatures. 

And the rice milk, thrown into the water, seethed and hissed 
and sent forth steam and smoke. Just as a ploughshare, heated 

^ Tathagata. 



14 



Woven Cadences l^^- ^5 



the livelong day, when thrown into water, seethes and hisses 
and sends forth steam and smoke ; even so that rice milk seethed 
and hissed and sent forth steam and smoke. 

And farmer Bharadvaja, alarmed, with hair standing on end, 
approached and fell with his head at the Master's feet and cried: 
"It's amazing, Master Gotama, it's marvellous, Master Gotama! 
Just as a man might set up a thing overturned, reveal the hidden, 
show the way to the blind, bring a lamp into the darkness so 
that those with eyes could see forms ; even thus Dharma has been 
declared in many a way by Master Gotama. Lo ! I go to Master 
Gotama for refuge, to Dharma, and to the order of the monks. 
I would go forth nigh Master Gotama, I would obtain full 
acceptance." 

And brahman Bharadvaja went forth nigh to the Master and 
obtained full acceptance. 

Now not long after his acceptance, the venerable Bharadvaja, 
dwelling alone, apart, earnest, ardent, resolute, ere long entered 
and abode in that supreme end of the godly life — for the goal of 
which clansmen's sons rightly go forth from home to homeless- 
ness — and by his own knowledge did he realize it, here and now ; 
and he knew ' Birth is destroyed, lived is the godly life, done is 
what had to be done, there is no more of this state.' 

And the venerable Bharadvaja became a man-of- worth. ^ 

(5) Cunda 

Cunda Cunda the smith spake thus : 83 

** Still sage of wisdom wide, 
Awake, ^ with craving gone, 
Master of Dharma, man 
Supreme, chief charioteer : 
About recluses here 
I ask : How many be ? 
I beg him tell me that.'* 

1 Arahan. 

2 Buddha, bujjhamana, so rendered herein. 



1. 5 



The Chapter of the Snake 



15 



** Four, Cunda, without fifth ! " 
The Master thus replied, 
** Them I reveal to thee 
As testament when asked : 
Way-conqueror, Way-herald, 
Wayfarer, fraud-of-Way." 

Cunda Cunda the smith then said : 

" Way-conqueror whom call 
The Wake ? Way-muser how 
Incomparable ? When asked 
Wayfarer limn to me ; 
Fraud of the Way reveal ! '* 

** Immune to barbs, doubt crossed. 
Delighting in the cool,^ 
Naught coveting, the guide 
Of world and gods : the Wake 
Call him Way-conqueror. 

** Who yondmost as yondmost 
Here knows, who Dharma here 
Proclaims, explains : still sage, 
Doubt-cutter, him they call 
Way-herald, second monk. 

*' Who liveth in the Way, 
The well-taught Dharma-path, 
Alert, restrained, and treads 
The blameless paths : third monk, 
Wayfarer him they call. 

'• Who, cloaked in piety, 
Is froward, boaster, cheat 
Of clansmen, unrestrained, 
A babbler, masked in mode : 
They call him fraud-of-Way. 



84 



85 



86 



87 



88 



89 



^ Nihhana, nibbutat etc., so. 



i6 



Woven Cadences 



Sn, 18 



*' And the shrewd householder, 
Wise Ariyan listener, 
Perceiveth them, knows all 
As such ; and seeing this 
His faith wanes not : for how 
Could he confound no fraud 
With fraud, cleansed with unclean ? 



90 



(6) Of Suffering 

Thus have I heard: — Once, when the Master was dwelling 
near Savatthi in Anathapindika's Park at Jeta Grove, a devi of 
surpassing beauty, lighting up the whole of Jeta Grove, approached 
him as night waned ; and drawing near, she saluted him and stood 
at one side. Thus standing she spoke this verse to the Master : — 



Devt ** About man's suflering 

We question Gotama : 
We ask the Master now 
The source of suffering/' 

The Master " Plain is the weal in life, 

Plain is the suffering : 
Prospers who Dharma loves, 
Suffers who Dharma hates." 

Dcv'i " 'Tis truly so we know 

Firstly of suffering : 
Sir, tell us secondly 
The source of suffering." 

The Master " Who hath bad men as friends, 

Nor maketh friends with good, 
Who chooses bad men's ways : 
A source of suffering that." 

Dev't '* 'Tis truly so we know . . . 

Tell us the third ..." 



91 



92 



93 



94 



95 



1. 6 



The Master 



The Chapter ot the Snake 



When man loves companv 
And sleep, when he is lax 
And slack and known for wrath 
A source of suffering that." 



17 
96 



Devi 



' Tis truly so we know . 
Tell us the fourth . . ." 



97 



The Master 



Devi 



Who being rich supports 
Nor parents in their age, 
W^hen gone is all their youth 
A source of suffering that." 

'Tis truly so we know . . . 
Tell us the fifth ..." 



98 



99 



The Master 



Who with false words deceives 

A brahman or recluse 

Or other mendicant : 

A source of suffering that." 



1 00 



Devi 



'Tis truly so we know . . . 
Tell us the sixth ..." 



10a 



The Master " When man of wealth and means, 

Of gold and property. 
Enjoys its sweets alone : 
A source of suffering that." 



■102 



Devi 



'Tis truly so we know . 
Tell us the seventh . . . 



103 



The Master 



When man is proud of birth 
And purse and family, 
And yet ashamed of kin : 
A source of suffering that." 



304 



i8 



Woven Cadences 



Devi '' 'Tis truly so we know . 

Tell us the eighth . . ." 



lO 



The Master 



When man on woman dotes, 
On drink and dice alike, 
And all his savings wastes : 
A source of suffering that." 



Devi 



*Tis truly so we know . . . 
Tell us the ninth ..." 



The Master 



Who, not content with his, 
Is seen with others' wives, 
Is seen with harlots too : 
A source of sufferine that." 



Devi 



*Tis truly so we know . . . 
Tell us the tenth ..." 



The Master ** When man, passed youth, doth wed 

A maid with rounded breasts 
Nor sleeps for jealousy : 
A source of suffering that." 



Dev't 



*Tis truly so we know . . . 
Tell us the eleventh . . ." 



I I I 



The Master 



When woman or when man, 
A spendthrift or a sot. 
Is placed in sovran power : 
A source of suffering that." 



I 12 



Devi '' 'Tis truly so we know 

Th' eleventh suffering : 
Now tell us, sir, the twelfth, 
The source of suffering." 



7 J The Chapter of: the Snake 19 



The Master ** When born of noble clan, 114 

A man is poor and craves 
For much and longs to rule : 
A source of suffering that. 

These sufferings in the world 1 1 5 

The wise discern, and blest 

With vision Ariyan, 

They seek the world of bliss." 



(7) The Outcast Man 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master was dwelling 
near Savatthi in Anathapindika's Park at Jeta Grove, he dressed 
early in the morning and took bowl and robe and entered Savatthi 
for alms. 

Now at that time the brahman Bharadvaja, a fire-worshipper, 
was tending the sacrificial fire in his house, and had raised the 
oblation aloft. And the Master, going from house to house, 
came to the brahman's abode. 

And brahman Bharadvaja saw him some way off, as he came 
along, and called to him, saying : *' Hi I you shaveling ! Hi ! 
you little recluse ! Be off, you outcaste^ ! " 

At these words the Master said to hmi : '* But do you know 
an outcast,^ brahman, and the things that make an outcast ? " 

" No, mdeed. Master Gotama, I know not an outcast nor 
the thmgs that make an outcast. It were well for me if Master 
Gotama were to teach me so that I may know these things." 

" Then listen, brahman, give heed to what is well ; I will 
speak' ! " 

Yes, sir," replied the brahman fire-worshipper. 

1 Vasalaka and vasala. 



20 Woven Cadences [Sn. 21 

And the Master spake thus :— 

The Master " The evil, angry man, i 16 

Man of ill-will and cant. 
Deceitful, base in view : 
Know him as outcast vile ! 

Know him as outcast too i i 7 

Who harms a bird or beast 

Or any creature here, 

And mercy shows to none : 

The noted brigand who 1 1 8 

Besieges and lays waste 



119 



The villages and towns : 

The man who takes unbid 
By stealth from forest land 
Or village others' goods : 

Who debt incurs, and pressed, 120 

Makes off with 'By my faith, 
I say naught's due to thee ! 

Who, coveting some gaud, 1 2 i 

Kills bagman in a lane 

And with the gaud decamps : 

Know him as outcast too 122 

Who for himself, for sake 
Of wealth, or other's sake, 
As witness falsely speaks : 

And he who's seen about 1 2 3 

With wives of kin or friends, 
By force or with consent : 

Who, being rich, supports 124 

Not parents in their age. 
When gone is all their youth : 



i. 7 ] The Chapter of the Snake 



21 



And he who parents strikes, 125 

Doth brother vex with words, 
Wife's mother, sister too ; 

Who, asked about the goal, 126 

Teaches not of the goal, 
Counsels concealing it : 

Who doing evil deeds, 127 

Hopes none may know of them, 
Who acteth covertly : 

Who goes to other's house 128 

And eats of his choice food 
Nor honours him in turn : 

Who with false words deceives 129 

A brahman or recluse 
Or other mendicant : 

Who brahman or recluse 130 

Vexes with words, and gives 
Them naught when food they beg ; 

Know him as outcast too 1 3 1 

Who in delusion wrapt 
Telleth of things untrue, 
Eager to get a fee : 

And who exalts himself, 1 3 -^ 

Despising other folk. 
Smug in his self-conceit : 

The mean and quarrelsome, 1 3 3 

Sham, envious, malign, 
Shameless, not fearing blame : 



22 Woven Cadences 



He who reviles the Wake, 
His listener, or those 
Gone forth, or householders : 
Know him as outcast vile. 

Who is no man-of-worth 
And maketh claim to be, 
Thief of all worlds is he, 
Lowest of outcasts he ! 
Such are all outcasts called. 
This I declare to thee. 

No outcast is by birth, 
No brahman is by birth : 
By deeds an outcast he, 
By deeds a brahman he ! 

Then know it too by this, 
As my example shows : 
Matanga was 'tis known 
Dog-eating low-caste man, 

Yet yondmost fame, so hard 
To win, Matanga won ; 
And to him came to serve 
Noble and brahman hosts. 

Mounting the deva-car^ 
He rode the dustless path, 
And from lust's passions loosed 
Came to the world of Brahm : 
Birth was no bar for him 
To rise to world of Brahm ! 



^ Devayana: ''way of the gods" of the Vedanta, 



The Chapter ot the Snake 23 



*' Yet there are brahmans born, 140 

In Veda -mantras versed, 
Who oft-times may be seen 
Amid their evil deeds : 

Theirs is disgrace here now, 141 

Gone hence the Ill-bourn theirs : 
By birth they're not debarred 
iTom Ill-bourn or disgrace ! 

No outcast is by birth, 142 

No brahman is by birth : 
By deeds an outcast he, 
By deeds a brahman he ! 

And when he had thus spoken, brahman Bharadvaja, the fire- 
worshipper, said to the Master : 

It's amazing, Master Gotama ; it's wonderful, Master 
Gotama J Just as a man might set up something overturned . . . 
even so Master Gotama has declared Dharma in many ways. Lo I 
I go to Master Gotama for refuge, to Dharma, to the order of the 
monks. Accept me as a lay-disciple. Master Gotama, gone to the 
refuge from this day forth to life's end ! " 



(8) The Quickenino of Amity 

This by one ready tor the goal must be, 143 

As nigh unto that bourn of calm he draws : 
He must be able, straight, yea, truly straight, 
Gentle in speech and mild, without conceit : 

And he must be content, soon satisfied, 144 

Be of few needs and frugal in his ways, 

Calm in the faculties of sense, and apt. 

Not coveting, nor bold within men's homes : ^ 

Kulesu. 



24 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 26 



And he must never in a mean way act, 145 

So others who are shrewd may censure him. 
May beings all be happy and secure, 
And come at last to happiness-of-self ! * 

And all in whom the breath of life exists : * 146 

The feeble and the strong, the tall and large, 
The short and middle-sized — omitting none — 
The little creatures and the very great : 

All creatures who are seen, all those unseen, 147 

Those that dwell far away, those that dwell near, 
Those that are here and those that seek to be : 
May all come unto happiness-of-self ! 

Let not another e'er mislead another, 148 

Nor anyone despise in any place ; 
From quarrel or from enmity let none 
Wish ill to any other one whatever. 

Like as a mother wardeth her own son, 149 

Her only son, as long as she doth live ; 

So, verily, for every creature here 

Quicken a heart to boundless thoughtfulness. 

Quicken a heart of boundless amity 1 50 

For all the things and creatures in the world. 
Upwards and downwards and athwart the world. 
Unhindered, free of hate and enmit)-. 

And as one stands or walks or sits or hes, 151 

Till overcome by drowsiness, let him 
Devote himself unto this mindfulness : 
* Godly abiding ' here this state is called. 



1 Sukhitatta, cf. thitatta used at verse 359), Mrs. Rhys Davids renders at S. B. B. 
yii. 157, ••becoming they-for-whoni-rhe-self-is- wel]." 



I. 9 



The Chapter oi the Snake 



And when man takes not to hinisell a view, 
With virtue dwells, with insight is endowed, 
And hath all greed for pleasures here expelled, 
Then goes he to the bed-of-womb no more. 



^5 

152 



Satagira 



Hemavata 



Satdgira 



Hemavata 



Satagira 



(9) Satagira 

** Today, the fifteenth festal day," 
Thus spake the spirit,' Satagira, 
'* Sparkles the night celestially : 
Come, let us seek out Gotama, 
Called the supernal teacher here ! 

Say, is the mind of such as he," 
Thus spake the spirit, Hemavata, 

For creatures all benignly set ? 
Say, as to lures and loathly things, 
Are his designs well in control ? 

Yea, is the mind of such as he," 
Thus spake the spirit, Satagira, 

For creatures all benignly set : 
Yea, as to lures and loathly things, 
Well in control are his designs." 

Say, doth he take what is not givn ? " 
Thus spake the spirit, Hemavata, 
** Hath he restraint for all that breathes ? 
Is he aloof from wantonness ? 
Say, doth he not neglect to muse ? 

Nay, he takes not what is not giv'n," 
Thus spake the spirit, Satagira, 
** He hath restraint for all that breathes ; 
Always aloof from wantonness, 
The Wake neglecteth not to muse." 



155 



'54 



155 



m6 



157 



1 Yakkha. 



z6 
Hemavata 



Satugira 



Hemavata 



Satagira 



Hemavata 



Satagira 



Hemavata 



Woven Cadences 

" Say, doth he never speak false words ?" 
Thus spake the spirit, Hemavata, 
** Doth he not use provoking speech ? 
Say, IS his talk not slanderous ? 
Speaketh he never emptily ? 

Nay, he doth never speak false words,'* 
Thus spake the spirit, Satagira, 
** Nor speaketh he provokingly ; 
His talk is never slanderous ; 
With insight speaks he of the goal." 

** Is he by pleasure never moved ? 
Thus spake the spirit, Hemavata, 
** Say, is his mind disquieted ? 
Hath he delusion overcome ? 
Say, hath he vision into things ? 

Never by pleasure is he moved/' 
Thus spake the spirit, Satagira, 
'* Nor is his mind disquieted ; 
He hath delusion overcome ; 
The Wake hath vision into thnigs." 

** Is he in lore accomplished ? " 
Thus spake the spirit, Hemavata, 
** Say, fareth he here fully cleansed ? 
Are all his cankers wholly quenched ? 
Is there no coming back for him ? " 

*' He is in lore accomplished," 
Thus spake the spirit, Satagira, 
" Yea, fareth he here fully cleansed ; 
Wholly are all his cankers quenched ; 
There is no coming back for him." 

Fashioning well in all he doth, 
Mind by the sage accomplished is : 
Accomplished in conduct, lore, 
Him dost thou justly magnify ! 



Sn. 28 



158 



159 



160 



161 



16. 



163 



163a 



t, 9 



The Chapter of the Snake 



27 



Satagira 



The twain 



Htniavata 



The twain 



Hemavata 



The Master 



Hemavata 



" Fashioning well in all he dorh, 163b 

Mind by the sage accomplished is : 
Accomplished in conduct, lore, 
In him thou justly findest joy I " 

Fashioning well in all he doth, 164 

Mind by the sage accomplished is : 
Come, let us now seek Gotama, 
Accomplished in conduct, lore ! " 

** Lean, vigorous, limbed like a deer, 165 

Naught coveting, the frugal one : 
Come, let us now seek Gotama, 
Still sage who museth in the glade I 

** Him faring lion-like alone, 166 

Sinless, and pleasures heeding not, 
Him we'll approach and question thus : 
Is there release from toils of death ? 

Him the proclaiming, him th' expounder, 167 

Him the yon-farer of all things. 
Awake and passed all fear and hate. 
Him we now question, Gotama ! 

" When what prevails rises the world ? " 168 

Thus spake the spirit Hemavata, 

" When what prevails comes intimacy ? 

What is th' attachment of the world ? 

When what prevails is the world oppressed ? " 

** When SIX prevail rises the world, 169 

Hemavata," the Master said, 

" When six prevail comes intimacy : 

Six are th' attachments of the world : 

When six prevail the world's oppressed." 

'' What are th' attachments which prevail 170 

Whereby the world is sore oppressed ? 
Tell me the sure way out when asked, 
How is man here released from ill ? 



28 



Woven Cadences 



The Master '' Five pleasure -strands^ are in the world, 

The mind of man is called the sixth : 
By banishing desire for these 
Thuswise is man released from ill. 

** That's the sure way out of the world, 
Proclaimed to you as very truth : 
'Tis this I now proclaim to you, 
Thuswise is man released from ill." 

Hemavata ** Say, who here crosses o'er the flood ? 

Who crosses here the torrent's swirl ? 
Who sinks not in the dread abyss, 
Where no support or stay is found ?" 

The Master " In virtue all accomplished, 

With wisdom filled, with mind composed, 
Thought inly turned, alert : 'tis he 
Who crosses flood so hard to cross. 

** Abstainer from the heeds of sense, 
All fetters having overcome, 
With pleasure and becoming quenclied, 
'Tis he who sinks not in th' abyss." 

Hemavata ** Him deeply wise, seer of the subtle goal, 

The man-of -naught,- caught nor in lust and life ; 
Behold that man, in all ways all -released, 
Great rishi treading the celestial path ! 

** Supernal named, seer of the subtle goal, 
The wisdom-giver, caught not in lust's grooves : 
Behold him, all-discerning, all-discreet. 
Great rishi treading in th' Ariyan path ! 

*' O fair the sight for us this day, 
O fair uprising dawn of light ! 
For we have seen the All-awake, 
Flood-crosser and the cankerless. 



171 



1 Of the five senses. 

^ Akincanam, so rendered herein, see below v. 1070, SnA. not having any passions etc. 



1, lo] The Chapter of the Snake 



29 



** These thousand spirits gathered round, 179 

Of psychic power and high renown, 

Now all unto thy refuge go, 

Our teacher thou beyond compare ! 

'* From village to village, hill to hill, 180 

Come, let us wander far and wide, 
Praising the All-awakened One, 
And praising Dharma's excellence ! " 

(10) Alavaka 

Thus have I heard :— Once, while the Master was dwelling 
near Alavi in the haunt of the spirit Alavaka, the spirit approached 
and said '' Get out, recluse I 

" Very well, sir," the Master replied and went out. 

'' Get in, recluse I " said the spirit. 

** Very well, sir," said the Master and went in. 

And a second and a third time the spirit spake in like 
manner ; and a second and a third time the Master did as he 
was bade. 

And a fourth time, too, the spirit addressed the Master, 
saying : " Get out, recluse ! 

'* No, sir, I'll not go out for you ; do as you will ! " 

** I'll ask you a question, recluse. If you don't reply, I'll 
addle your wits, split your heart, and catch you by the feet and 
throw you the other side of the Ganges ! 

'* Well, sir, I see no one in the world of devas, Brahmas and 
Maras, or on earth with its recluses, brahmans, devas and men, 
who could do any of these things ; but ask, sir, as you desire." 

Then the spirit, Alavaka, spake this verse to the Master : — 

Alavaka '* What wealth here, pray, is best for man ? 181 

What well pursued brings happiness ? 
What taste is sweet beyond compare ? 
How lived the Hfe they say is best ? " 



30 



W 



oven 



Cad 



ences 



The Master " Faith is the wealth here best for man 
Dharma pursued brings happiness ; 
And truth is sweet beyond compare ; 
Life wisely lived they say is best.'* 



i8 



Alavaka 



How shall man cross the flood ? 
How shall he cross the sea ? 
How shall he get by ill ? 
How shall he cleansed be ? " 



18^ 



The Master '' By faith the flood is crossed ; 

By earnestness the sea ; 
By vigour ill is passed ; 
By wisdom cleansed is he." 



Alavaka 



How may man wisdom win ? 
How may he riches find ? 
How may he fame acquire ? 
How to himself friends bind ? 
How grieve not when hence he 
To yonder world hath gone ? 



185 



The Master 



With faith that men-of-worth 
By Dharma cool attain, 
He earnest, fain to hear, 
With wit shall wisdom gain. 



186 



Who fitly acts and toils 
And strives shall riches find ; 
By truth shall fame acquire ; 
By giving, friends shall bind. 



87 



And lovers of the home 
Who hold in faith these four, 
Truth, Dharma, firmness, gift, 
Hence gone shall grieve no more. 



188 



II ] The Chapter of the Snake 



M 



** With brahman and recluse, 189 

Prithee, at large this sift : 
Be there here better than 
Restraint, truth, patience, gift /* 

Alavaka ** With brahman and recluse 190 

Why should I now this plumb ? 
For I have learnt today 
Weal here and weal to come. 

*' 'Twas weal for me the Wake 191 

To Alavi came to stay, 
For where a gift bears fruit 
That too I've learnt today. 

** From village to village I'll fare, 192, 

From city to city thence. 
Praising the All-awake, 
And Dharma's excellence." 



(11) Of Mastery 

If man but walk or stand or sit or lie, 193, 

If he relax or stretch, this body stirs : 

This body — mass of sinew, bone, and daubed 194 

With membrane, flesh, and clad in skin — in truth 

Is never seen. 'Tis but a bag for belly, 195 

Intestines, liver-lump, heart, bladder, lungs ; 

For kidneys, spleen, snot, spittle, sweat and lymph ; 196 

For blood, synovia, for bile and fat. 

Ever from its nine streams the unclean flows : 1 97 

Eye-soilure from the eye, ear-dirt from ear, 

Snot from the nose ; now from the mouth comes bile, 198 

Now issues phlegm ; from limbs come sweat and dirt. 

Its hollow slotted skull bestuflFed with brains 199 

The fool thinks fine, misled by ignorance ; 



32 Woven Cadences [Sn.35 

But when it's dead and swollen blue, lies cast 200 

In cemetery, kin regard it not. 

Then pismires eat it, jackals, wolves and dogs, 201 

Vultures and crows, ay ! whatso creatures be. 

Wise is the monk who hears the Wake's word here ; 202 

He knows the body, sees it then in truth. 

He thinks : ' As this, so that ; as that, so this ! ' 203 

And fades desire for it within, without. 

As fades desire and passion, that wise monk 204 

Attains the deathless calm, cool lot eterne. 

They deck this foul, two-footed, fetid thing, 205 

Mere carrion compost, dripping here and there ! 

With such a body, who can be elate, 206 

Or who despise another ? -- save in blindness ! 



fiz) The Saoe 

f-ear springs from intimacy, 207 

Dust from a life at home : 
No home, no intimacy, 
Mirrors the silent sage. 



Whoso uproots a growth would not resow't. 
Nor would he ever let it grow again : 
They call him silent sage, lone wayfarer ; 
That rishi hath beheld the bourn of calm. 

Whoso surveys the grounds discerns the seed 
And never lets desire encroach again : 
He, the true silent sage, seer of birth's end 
And rid of doubt, goes to what none can sum. 

He who knows all the harbours of the mind, 
Nor longing hath for any one of them, 
He, the true silent sage, gone want and greed, 
Toils not for he indeed hath yonder fared. 



08 



'•^^] The Chapter of the Snake 



33 



211 



The all-discreet who all hath overcome, 
All found and known, by all thuigs is unsoiled, 
Him, rid of all, released in craving's end. 
Him the rapt musers know as silent sage. 



Whose strength is wisdom, won in rule and way, 212 

Alert, intent, whose joy in musing lies. 
Him free of bonds, not barren, cankerless, 
Him, 67-^., 

The earnest wayfarer, lone, silent sa^e, 213 

Unshaken by the touch of blame or praise, 
And like a lion fearful not of sounds, 
And like the wind not caught within a net, 
Like lotus-bloom by water, never soiled, 
The guide of others, one whom none can lead : 
Him, &c,. 

Who bears himself as post in bathing pool, 214 

When folk speak words about the brmk^ of yon, 
Him passion-free with faculties composed, 
Him, ^c, 

Who, truly poised-of-self,^ as shuttle straight, 215 

Holdeth in loathing every evil deed 
As studies he the crooked and the straight : 
Him, &c.t 

Who here, restrained-of-self,* no wrong commits 216 

In youth, mid-age, the still sage, curbed-of-self,^ 
The unprovokable, provoking none : 
Him, &c., 

^ Pariyantani, cf. note on verse 964 ; cf. simantanam of verse 484. 
2 Thitatto^ cf. verse 359 ; cf. abbinibbutattQ of verse 343. 

^ Sarinatatto and yatutto^ 



34 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 37 

Who lives on alms of others and gets fare 217 

From top of pot, from middle, or remainder, 
Not meet for praise, yet murmurs not thereat : 
Him the rapt musers know as silent sage. 

Who fares as silent sage, from intercourse 218 

Aloof, who in his youth was never bound. 
Aloof from pride and wantoning, released : 
Him, &c., 

Who knows the world, the seer of yondmost goal, 219 

The type, the crosser of the flood and sea, 
With trust in none, knot-cutter, cankerless : 
Him the rapt musers know as silent sage. 

Twain, not alike, discrete in life and way, 220 

Are wedded worldling and *mine'-less devour: 
The worldHng, unrestrained, takes others' life, 
The silent sage, curbed, ever wardeth life. 

Like as the painted peacock, crested gay, 221 

Never the swiftness of the swan attains, 
E'en so the worldling matches not the monk, 
Lone, silent sage, the muser in the wood.* 



1 Vmamhi, cf. last 2 lines of verse 1 1 j i , 



Chapter II. — The Minor Chapter 



The Table of Contents 

The Jewel and Flesh-savours, Modesty, 

The Greatest Luck and Sucilomas talk, 

And Dharma-faring, woven with these are 

Brahman-Dharma, the Boat, What virtue his? 

Arousing, Rahula, Vangisas talk, 

On Faring rightly, lastly Dhammika : 

These fourteen are the Minor Chapter called. 

(i) The JeweP 

Spirits of earth and sky here gathered round, 222 

Ye spirits all, be ye with goodwill filled, 
And heed ye now and hearken to the word ! 

Come then, ye spirits all, attend ye now ! 223 

Work amiry on all the race of men 
Who here day in day out bring offerings : 
Come then, and ward ye them now zealously ! 

Whatever wealth that here or hence may be, 224 

Or jewel splendid in the heavens lie, 
None is there equal to the Man-thus-come : 
This in the Wake is e'en the jewel splendid. 
And by this truth let happiness prevail ! 

^ See S.B.B. vii, 147 ; Some Sayings, 58, 



36 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 39 

The ceasing, end of passion, deathless, splendid, 225 

Which here the Sakyan sage, intent, attained. 
None is there equal to that thin^ whate'er : 
This e'en in Dharma is the jewel splendid, 
And by this truth let happiness prevail ! 

That state of pure and clear intent, proclaimed 226 

Continuous, limned by the peerless Wake, 
None equal to that state is found or known : 
This too in Dharma is the jewel splendid. 
And, &c,, 

The persons eight, four pairs, praised by the good, 227 

Are gift-worthy, Well-farer's listeners. 
The fruit of gifts to them is very great : 
This in the order is the jewel splendid, 
And, &c., 

They who without desire, with dauntless will 228 

Well-yoked, set out as bade lord Gotama, 
They winning, entering the deathless lot. 
Freely obtain and of the cool partake : 
This in the order is the jewel splendid, 
And, &c.. 



As Indra's city-post in earth well sunk 
Cannot be shaken by the four great winds. 
Like that I say are righteous men who see 
Truths Ariyan by wholly reaching them : 
This in the order is the jewel splendid, 
And, &c,, 

Who make truths Ariyan more clearly known. 
Truths so well taught by him profound and wise, 
Tho' they become exceedingly remiss, 
They take no birth beyond a seventh time '} 
This in the order is the jewel splendid, 
And, &c., 



29 



^ They do nor have an eighth birth, see Points of Controversy, 267. 



ii« I ] Tl-je Minor Ck 



ptet J7 



And verily in winning vision comes 231 

The riddance of three things : Belief that self 
Is body, doubt, that rule and rite suffice 
Be what they may^- the freedom from four hells : 
To do six great misdeeds is not for him : 
This in the order is the jewel splendid, 
And, &c,, 

And tho' he do some shameful evil deed, 232 

Be it by act or word, or else in thought, 
He is incapable of hiding it, 
Seer of the bourn, he cannot, it is said : 
This in the order is the jewel splendid, 
And, &c., 

Fair are the flowering tops of woodland trees 233 

In the first summer month of summer's heat : 
Fair is the noble Dharma that he taught. 
For yondmost blessing, leading to the cool : 
This in the Wake is e'en the jewel splendid, 
And, &C.J 

Noble himself and knowing noble things, 234 

He brought the noble and the noble gave. 
The peerless One of noble Dharma taught : 
This in the Wake is too the jewel splendid. 
And, &c., 

* Spent is the old, the new comes not to be ! * 235 

With mind not set upon some future state, 
The seed decays and faileth all desire, 
And, as this lamp, rapt musers cool become : 
This in the order is the jewel splendid, 
And by this truth let happiness prevail ! 

Spirits of earth and sky here gathered round, 236 

Praise ye the Wake, the Man-thus-come,^ adored 
By devas, men ! Let happiness prevail ! 



^ See below, verses 1079-83. 
^ Tathagata. 



38 Woven Cadences [ S"- 4^ 

Spirits of earth and sky here gathered round, 237 

Praise Dharma that hath now thus come/ adored 
By devas, men ! Let happiness prevail ! 

Spirits of earth and sky here gathered round, 238 

Praise th' order that hath now thus come,^ adored 
By devas, men I Let happiness prevail ! 



(2) Of Flesh-savours 

Brahman "The holy men who eat swart millet seed, 239 

Grasses and woodland pulse and tender herbs. 
Creepers and ripened roots gleaned lawfully, 
Are not for pleasures fain nor vainly speak. 

*' But who eats alms of folk, in honour served, 240 

Ample, well made and garnished daintily. 
Enjoying greatly richest mess of rice, 
Enjoyeth, Kassapa,^ savours of flesh ! 

*' Kinsman of Brahm, 'tis thus thou hast declared : 241 

* Never of fleshly savours I partake ! 
Yet richest mess of rice thou dost enjoy. 
Tastily curried, stewed with flesh of fowls. 
I ask thee, Kassapa, the meaning o't : 
Prithee, do thou define ' savours of flesh ' ! " 

Kassapa "Taking of life, torturing, maiming, bonds, 242 

Stealing and telling lies, deceit and fraud, 
Pretence to lore, consorting with folk's wives : 
Such are flesh-savours and not eating meat. 

**When men are in their pleasures unrestrained, 243 

Greedy in tastes, promiscuous, impure. 
Believers in naught, crooked and perverse : 
Such, &C.J 

^ Tathagata. 

2 Buddha Kassupa, SnA. 



"' ^ ] The Minor Chapter ^g 

*' When men are rough and harsh and backbiters, 244 

Betrayers of friends, ruthless, arrogant, 
Uncharitable folk who give to none : 
Such, 6-^., 

** Anger, conceit, self-will, contumacy, 245 

Envy, hypocrisy, pretentious talk. 
Pride of opinion, evil intercourse : 
Such, &c,, 

** When folk default, inform, and wrongly act, 246 

Deal falsely, and are counterfeiters base. 
When criminals commit here foulest deeds : 
Such, &c., 

** When men t* wards creatures here are unrestrained, 247 

When some they rob and others seek to harm, 
Are wicked, cruel, hard, respecting none : 
Such, &c.f 

** The greedy, hostile folk who seek to hurt, 248 

On evil always bent, beings who hence 
To darkness go and headlong fall to hell : 
Such are flesh-savours and not eating meat. 

** Not flesh of fish, nor fasting, nakedness, 249 

The shaven head, the matted hair, nor sweat. 
Nor rough-skin garb, nor solemn celebration 
Of sacrificial fire, nor signal penance 
Of those who here seek immortality : 
Not hymns, oblations, rites, feasts of the season. 
Will cleanse a man with doubt not overcome. 

" With guarded senses, governed faculties, 250 

Fareth the poised^ in Dharma finding joy. 
Mild, upright, bondless, rid of every ill : 
Things seen or heard soil not the muser rapt." 

» Jhito. 



40 



Woven Cadences "^ [Sn. 45 



And thus the Master oftwise taught this thing, 2 5 1 

And he who yonder fared by mantra-lore, 

That found and knew. The tamtless sage, detached^ 

And hard to serve, taught it in many a verse. 

And when the good word of the Wake he heard, 252 

ExpeUing ill, anent the taintless lot, 

Then lowly to the Man-thus-come he bowed 

And begged that he might there and then go forth. 



(3) Of Uoiesty 

Who scorns and o'ersteps modesty, 253 

And saying thus : * I am thy friend,* 

Stirs not to do the deeds he can, 

Know this : * He is no friend of mine.* 

Who to his friends speaks fair but acts not so, — 254 

* A talker not a doer ' deem the wise. 

He is no friend who eager e'er 255 

Suspects a breach, thus sees a flaw : 
Who stays as son at mother's breast, 
He is the friend whom none can part. 

Who looks for fruit works soil that yields him joy, 256 

Weal that brings praise, bearing the yoke of man : 
Who tastes the sweets of solitude and calm, 257 

Gone fear and fault, tastes Dharma's sweetest bliss. 



(4) The Greatest LucP 

Thus have I heard : — Once, while the Master was dwelling 
near Savatthi in Anathapindika's park at Jeta Grove, a devi of 
surpassing beauty, lighting up the whole of Jeta Grove, approached 



^ Asito, see above, page 10, note i. ^ 5^^ S.B.B. vii 143 ; Some Sayings, 56. 



». 4l The Minor Chapter 41 

him, as night waned ; and drawing near she saluted and stood 
at one side. Thus standing she spoke this verse to the Master : — 

Devi " Devas and many men have thought 258 

On luck, in hope of happiness : 
Tell me the greatest luck ! 

The Master " Serving the wise, not serving fools, 259 

The worship of the worshipful, 
This is the greatest luck. 

In a fair land to dwell, good wrought 260 

In past, to have high aims for self : 
This, &c., 

Learning and skill and being trained 261 

In discipline, words spoken well : 
This, &c., 

Service to parents, care of son 262 

And wife, a peaceful livelihood : 

This, &c., 

Gifts and by Dharma wayfaring, 263 

The care of kin and blameless deeds : * 

This, &c., 

To cease and to abstain from wrong, 264 

Restraint in drink and zeal for things : 
This, &c., 

Reverence, joy, meekness, gratitude, 265 

Dharma to hear in season due : 
This, &c., 

Patience, kind words, to see good men, 266 

Duly on Dharma to converse : 
This, &'c., 

Ardour and godly life, to see 267 

Truths Ariyan, to know the cool : 
This, &€., 



4^ Woven Cadences -- [ 5"- 47 

♦* With mind unmoved when touched by the world, 268 
To be grief- freed, dust-freed, secure : 
This is the greatest luck. 

They who live thus see no defeat, 269 

And happily go everywhere : 
Theirs is the greatest luck." 



(5) Siiciloma 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master dwelt near 
Gaya at Stone-couch, the haunt of the spirit Suciloma, 
the spirits, Khara and Suciloma, passed near by him. And Khara 
said to Suciloma : ** That's a recluse ! " 

" No," said he, ** That's no recluse, that's a mere shaveling ! 
But I'll soon find out whether he's a recluse or a mere shave- 
ling I " And he went up to the Master and pressed his body against 
him. And the Master bent his body away. 

Then said the spirit Suciloma to the Master: "Dost fear me, 
recluse ? ' ' 

** No, sir, I fear thee not, though thy touch be evil." 

** Well, ril ask thee a question, recluse ; and if thou answerest 
me not, I'll addle thy wits, split thy heart, and catching thee by 
the feet, throw thee the other side of the Ganges ! " 

"But I see none, sir, in the world ... or on earth . . . 
who could do so ... ; but ask, sir, as thou desirest." 

Then the spirit Suciloma said this to the Master : — 

Suciloma " From whence do hate and passion come ? 270 

Where born are terror, love, dislike ? 
Whence risen mmd-perplexities 
Drag down as boys will drag a crow ? " 



^* ^ ] The Minor Chapter 4^ 

The Master ** From hence do hate and passion come, 271 

Hence born are terror, love, dislike, 
Hence risen mind-perplexities 
Drag down as boys will drag a crow. 

Lust-born, begot of self, 272 

As trunks of banyan tree. 
Many are pleasure's snares 
That spread as jungle vines. 

They who discern whence these arise, 273 

Expel them wholly. Spirit, learn : 
They cross this flood so hard to cross, 
Before not crossed, to come no more.** 



(6) Dharma-faring 

Faring by Dharma, godly faring, this 274 

They call best rule for one gone forth from home ; 

Yet if he love to hurt, harsh brutal man, 275 

Worse grows his life and heaps he dust o'er self. 

That quarrel-loving monk, from folly blind, 276 

Knows not the teaching, Dharma of the Wake. 

He, harming those who self have quickened here, 277 

Misguided man, sees not that baneful way 

Leads but to hell. And to the downfall come, 278 

From womb to womb h€ goes, from gloom to gloom : 

Truly that monk hereafter suffers woe ! 

As cess-pit may be filled in course of years, 279 

So heaped with filth is he : as hard to clean ! 

Monks, when ye see one still with trust in home, 280 

Wrong in designs, desires, and habits, haunts, 

With one accord avoid him utterly ; 281 

Cast out those sweepings, throw away that dirt. 



44 



Woven Cadences t S"- 5<^ 



And drive such tattlers ofF, sham-seeming monks ! 282 

Oustmg men wrong in habits, haunts, desires. 
Dwell with the cleansed, mindful and cleansed yourselves, 283 
Then apt, harmonious, all ill ye' 11 end. 



(7) Brahman-Dharma 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master dwelt near 
Savatthi, at Anathapindika's park in Jeta Grove, a company of 
wealthy brahmans approached him. They were aged and venerable, 
well stricken in years, and had attained to seniority. And on arrival 
they greeted the Master with the usual complimentary words, 
and then sat down at one side. And so seated, they said to him : 

*' Master Gotama, are there any brahmans now who are seen 
following the Brahman-Dharma of ancient brahmans ? "- 

** No, truly, none are now seen ..." he said. 

** Then, if it be not too much trouble for him, let Master 
Gotama tell us that ancient thing." 

" Therefore listen, brahmans, give heed to what is well ; I will 
speak." 

** Yes, sir! "they replied. And the Master spake thus: — 

The Master " Rishis of old, austere, restrained-of-self, 284 

Quit of five pleasures, fared to goal-of-self.^ 
Then brahmans had no cows nor gold nor corn ; 285 

Lore was rich wealth, they guarded godly store. 
Meet alms they deemed the common door-step fare, 286 
In faith prepared, for earnest seekers set. 
And rich of realm and province honoured them 287 

With couches, multi-coloured cloths, demesnes. 
Inviolable were the brahmans then, 288 

Invincible, by Dharma warded well ; 
None on his threshold ever hindered them. 



Attadattham. 



"•7] The Minor Chapter 45 

** Brahmans of old from youth to forty-eight 289 

Fared the god-faring, seeking lore and way. 
They went not with another caste nor bought 290 

Their wives ; but wed thro' love, in concord dvvelt. 
Save near the time of season-abstinence, 291 

Brahmans elsewise had never intercourse. 
They praised god-faring, virtue, rectitude, 292 

And lervent ardour, mildness, gentleness, 
And harmlessness they praised and patience too. 
Tho' strong in brahmic puissance, the chief 293 

Of them had not in sleep e'en intercourse. 
His practice sane men here did emulate 294 

And godly faring, virtue, patience praise. 
Meetly they sought and gathered rice and ghee 295 

And oil and bed and cloth, then sacrificed ; 
But in its furnishing they killed no cows. 

Like as our mother, father, brother, kin, 296 

Cows are our greatest friends from whom balm comes ; 
They give us food and strength, and beauty, joy ! ' 297 

They saw the truth of this and killed no cows. 
Comely and fine, renowned, and large in frame, 298 

Eager in all the things they had to do, 
Prospered this race in happiness while here. 
Then came a change ; here now, there now, they looked 299 
On kingly splendour ; then on women's charms ; 
On well-made chariots yoked with thoroughbreds, 300 

Gaily caparisoned ; on homesteads too, 
Houses partitioned, quartered, cubicled ; 
Droves of fat oxen ; throngs of women fair : 301 

And the gross v/ealth of men they coveted. 
Intoning hymns they to Okkaka came: 302 

* Thine is abundance, thine great opulence ; 
Make sacrifice for thou much substance hast I 
Make sacrifice for thou great riches hast ! ' 
Thereat the royal lord of wains, won o'er, 303 

Offered the sacrifice of horse, of man, 
Peg-throwing, drink of strength, the bolts-withdrawn. 



46 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 54 

'* And to the brahmans riches gave : Cows, beds, 304 

And clothes, fair women, shapely carriages 
Harnessed with steeds in gay caparison ; 
Homes well-partitioned, roomy, amiable, 305 

With divers treasures hlled : he gave them wealth. 
Wealth won, they set their hearts on hoardmg wealth : 306 
Greed gratified, their craving waxed the more. 
Again with hymns they to Okkaka came : 
* As water, land, gold, treasure, corn, are cows 307 

To man, food necessary tor his life : 
Make sacrifice for thou much substance hast I 
Make sacrifice for thou great riches hast ! ' 
Won o'er again, the royal lord of wains 308 

A hundred thousand cows and more had slain 
In sacrifice, seized by the horn and slain 309 

With sword — milch kine, pail-fillers, lithe as goats, 
That ne'er by hoof nor horn did hurt a man : 
And devas, Indra, demons, ghosts and ghouls, 3 1 o 

As fell the sword cried out : ' This is not right ! ' 
Three ills there were of yore : Desire, decay, 3 1 1 

And dearth — by butchery came ninety-eight. 
Come down from ancient times this cruel crime : 312 

The guiltless bleed, the priests from Dharma fall. 
And this fell thing wise men of old have blamed, 3 1 3 

And when they see the like, folk blame the priest. 
And thus with Dharma brought to naught, the serfs 3 1 4 
With traders strove, nobles with nobles strove, 
And wife did hold her husband then in scorn ; 
And nobles, Brahm's kin, and all fenced by caste, 3 1 5 
Their breed forgotten, fell in power of lust." 

And when he had thus spoken, those rich brahmans said 
to the Master : ** It's amazing. Master Gotama ; it's wonder- 
ful. Master Gotama ! Just as a man might set up something 
overturned. . . , even so Master Gotama has declared Pharma 
in man)' ways. 



"• 8 ] The Minor Chapter 



47 



**We go to Master Gotama for refuge, to Dharma, to the 
order of the monks ; accept us as lay-disciples, Master Gotama, 
from this day forth to life's end, gone to the refuge." 



(8) The Boat' 

Let man revere, as devas king, 3 1 6 

Him from whom he doth Dharma learn ; 

Then that great listener revered. 

With faith in one, makes Dharma plain : 

Who heedful, rapt, makes that his goal, 317 

Dharma by Dharma practismg, 
A knower, clear and full, becomes. 
Who follows such a man with zeal. 

But whoso serves the little fool, 318 

Jealous, who hath not reached the goal, 
Dharma not having quickened here,^ 
Dies without crossing over doubt. 

The man who plunges in the spate, 3 1 9 

Flooding and turgid, swift of flow. 
He, borne along the current's way. 
How can he others help to cross ? 

Who Dharma hath not quickened here, 320 

Nor heeds the goal of listeners great. 
Himself not knowing, doubt not crossed, 
How can he others help to muse^ ? 

As one who boards a sturdy boat, 3 2 i 

With oars and rudder well equipt. 
May many others then help cross, — 
Sure, skilful knower of the means : 

^ Navasutta, SnA: Dbamma Sutta. ^Avibhavayitvi, 

3 Nijjhapetum, SnA : pekkba^ctum. 



48 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 56 



So the self-quickened lore-adept, 522 

Listener imperturbable, 

By knowledge may help others muse, 

The eager-eared adventurers. 

Hence surely follow men-of-sooth,^ .323 

Great listeners of lucid mind : 

Who moves with knowledge to the goal 

And Dharma knows, he joy obtains. 

(9) What virtue his ? 

Sariputta^ ** What virtue and what conduct his, 324 

What deeds be they which rightly man 
Should cherish and be wedded to, 
So he may win the goal supreme ? " 

The Master " At peace, ^ he should the elders reverence ; ^25 

The time to look for teachers"* he should know. 
And know the instant Dharma-talk begins, 
And listen to the goodly words with care. 

** And timely near the teachers he should go, 326 

With stubbornness put by, m humble mien, 
With thought on Dharma set, the goal, restraint, 
And godly living, — thus comport hmiself. 

** His pleasance Dharma, Dharma his delight, 327 

Who, poised in Dharma,* Dharma's judgments knows,® 
He would not fare so Dharma tell his guilt," 
But guided be by truthful, goodly words. 

*' And rid of laughter, chattering, laments, 328 

Ill-will, deceit, hypocrisy and greed, 
Pride, quarrels, harshness, bitterness and vice, 
He would fare unelated, poised-of-self.^ 

^ Sappurisa. 2 Sq 5^^ :i jinusuyyako, cf. Sk.. asuya. * Carunam. 

5 JDhamme thito. ® Dhammavinicchayanhu. ~ Dhammufandofavadam. ^ ThitattQ, 



"•i°] The Minor Chapter 



49 



*' Goodly are words when one harh grasped their pith ; 329 
To grasp the heard is pith of mind-intent^: 
But in the violent and slothful man 
No wisdom and no hearing ever grows. 

" Peerless in word, in thought, in deed, they who 330 

Delight in Dharma, known to Ariyans, 

They, poised^ in calm and bliss of mind-intent, 

The pith of hearing^ and of wisdom win.'* 



(10) Of Arousing 

Arise and sit alert ! 331 

What goal is yours in dreams ? 
What sleep is there for sick, 
Pierced by the dart of grief? 

Arise and sit alert ! 332 

Train ye with strength for calm, 
Nor let death find you slack, 
Nor fool you to his realm I 

The hopes and wants by which 333 

Both men and devas stay,* — 

Cross over this foul mire, 

Nor let the time slip by I 

Time gone, men suffer sore 

In purgatory doomed. 

Dusty is indolence, 334 

Dust is the wake of it : 
With knowledge, diligent, 
Draw out the dart from self. 

^ Samddhisaram. - Samadbisanthita. 8 Sutassa. 

* litthanti : they stay in * becoming,' see verse 1055. 



50 



Woven Cadences 



Sn. 58 



(11) Rahula 



The Prologue 

The Master *' From living constant,* say, 

Dost thou the wise man scorn ? 
The torch-bearer to men, 
Is he revered by thee ? '* 

Rahula " From living constant, nay, 

The wise man scorn I not : 
The torch-bearer to men 
Is aye revered by me.'* 



335 



336 



The Master 



The Teaching 

Loosed from five pleasure-strands, 
Dear forms that charm the mmd, 
In faith renounce thy home, 
Ender of ill become. 

Seek thou for lovely friends I 
Seek bed and seat remote. 
Lone and of little noise. 
Frugal in fare become I 

Robes, alms and requisites, 
Thy bed and seat : for these 
Beget no craving, nor 
Turn to the world again ! 

Curbed by observance-rule, 
Curbed in the senses five, 
Mark thou thy body's ways 
And be awearied o't ! 



337 



33S 



339 



340 



' AbhinhasamvasUj v./. abhinham samvasa, see note on verse 1058. 



"•'2^] The Minor Chapter 51 

** Shun thou the things of sign, 341 

Attractive, passion-fraught : 
On foul things quicken mind, 
One-pointed and intent ! 

Quicken what hath no sign,^ 342 

Be rid of warping pride : 
Then mastering thy pride, 
Thou shalt wayfare in calm.'* 

In this wise the Master constantly^ instructs the venerable 
Rahula< 

(12) Vangisa^ 

Thus have I heard : — While the Master was once dwelling 
near Alavi at the shrine of Aggalava, the venerable Vangisa's 
teacher, the elder Kappa of the Banyan by name, had recently 
passed away completely to the cool at that shrine. 

Now there arose in the mind of the venerable Vangisa, as 
he abode apart and in solitude, this reflection: " Has my teacher, 
I wonder, passed completely away to the cool or not?" 

Then in the evening, coming forth from solitude, he approached 
the Master, and having come, sat down at one side. And so 
seated, the venerable Vangisa said this to him : ** Sir, as I 
abode apart and in solitude, this reflection came to me : * Has 
my teacher passed completely away to the cool or not?' " 

Then the venerable V^angisa got up, threw his upper robe 
over one shoulder, and with joined hands saluted the Master 
and spake these verses : — 

Vangisa ** Sage o' the supernal, teacher, him we ask 343 

Who here and now razeth perplexities : 
Here at Aggalava hath died a monk. 
Famous, renowned, exceeding cool-of-self. 

^ Animittanca hhavehi, SnA. vipassanam hhdvehi, i.e. insight. 
-. 2 Abhinhwn ovadati, see note on verse 1058, cf. Thig. 2, and 20, where the phrase recurs. 
r »See Brethren, 408-11. 



L 



52 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 60 

** Kappa of the Banyan (they say by thee, 344 

O Master, that this brahman thus was named.) 
Revering thee, O seer of Dharma's might, 
He sought release and fared with energy. 

Of him, thy Hstener, we all here long 345 

To know, O Sakya who dost all things see ! 
Attentive are our ears and bent to hear, 
Thou art our teacher, art incomparable I 

Cut thou away our doubt, O quickening sage ! 346 

Thou know'st : tell me that he is wholly cool ! 
Thou seest all ; speak in the midst of us 
As Sakka, thousand-eyed, to devas speaks I 

All trammels here : grounds for perplexity, 347 

Deluding ways, the scope of ignorance, — 
These are not when the Man-thus-come they reach, 
For he hath eye that sees beyond man's eye. 

In sooth, if no man came to scatter ill, 348 

E'en as the wind scatters the lowering clouds, 
Darkling enveloped all the world would be. 
Nor would indeed illustrious men shine forth. 

For musers rapt are bringers of the light, 349 

And thee, rapt muser, thee I deem as such ; 
To the clear-seeing knower we are come, 
To us assembled here Kappa reveal I 

Swiftly, fair melody, as winging swans, 350 

Lift up thy lovely throat and softly flute 
Thy call in liquid notes melodious ! 
For all alert now listen unto thee. 

Him fully quit of all of birth-and-death, 3 5 1 

The Washen One, I beg, bid Dharma tell ! 
For average folk hope in its promise fails, 
But reason for the Men-thus-come abides. 



"•'^] The Minor Chapter 



53 



** Whole will thine exposition be of it, 352 

Wholly accepted, wholly upright sage .' 
Lowly inclined this last salute I make : 
Delude us not, supernal sage who know*st! 

Thou who didst Ariyan Dharma find and know, 353 

Who knowest all the yon and nigh of things. 

Delude us not, supernal energy I 

As one for rain, wearied by summer's heat, 

I languish for thy words; rain down thy lore^ 1 

The godly life with goal as end led Kappa, 354 

Apt wayfarer : say it was not in vain ! 
Passed he out cool or with attachment left ? 
How was he freed ? 'Tis that we long to hear/* 

The Master ** For name-and-form he cut off craving here, 355 

That lingering stream of dark propensities. 
And he hath crossed outright both birth and death." 
Thus spake the Master, best in all the world.^ 

Van^tsa ** Blithely I hear thy word, 356 

O rishi without peer I 
Not vainly did I ask. 
The brahman duped me not. 

Listener to the Wake, 357 

He did as he declared. 
And cut away death's net, 
Deceitful, strong, outspread. 

Kappa, the capable,^ 358 

Saw, sir, attachment's source : 
Kappa, apt wayfarer,* 
Passed death's realm hard to cross." 

* Reading sutam pavassa; v. I. sutassavassa: of the far-famed man. 
2 Pancasettho : best of the five, see Brethren , 410, note 4. 
^ Kappiyo, ^ Kappayano. 



54 



Woven Cadences 



[ Sn. 63 



(13) On Faring Rightly 

Questioner ** I ask the sage of wisdom wide, 359 

Crossed o'er, yon-gone, cool,^ poised-of-self : 
How would a monk, forsaking home 
And purging lusts, fare rightly here ? 

The Master in reply spake thus : — 

The Master "Who hath uprooted faith in luck, 360 

And faith in omens, dreams and signs ; 
He, rid of all the bane of luck. 
Rightly he in the world would fare. 

The monk who passion curbs for things 3 ^ ^ 

That men and devas love, who hath 
Acquiring- passed, hath Dharma reached, 
Rightly, &c., 

The monk who slander casts behind, 362 

Is rid of meanness, rid of wrath, 

Rid of compliance and dissent, 
Rightly, &C.J 

Who, rid of both dislikes and likes, 363 

Is unattached, nowhere puts trust, 
He, from all fetters wholly freed. 
Rightly, &c,, 

Who in affections seeks no pith, 364 

Curbs wish and passion to possess, 
He, trusting not, whom none can lead, 
Rightly, &c., 

The foe of none in word, thought, deed, 365 

Who Dharma rightly finds and knows, 
He, for the cool lot resolute, 
Rightly, &c,j 



^ Parinibbutum. 



'■^ Bhuvu, 



"''3] The Minor Chapter 55 

*' The monk, with homage not elate, 366 

Who, if reviled, is not downcast, 
Nor thrilled with food from others^ got, 
Rightly, ^c, 

Rid of acquiring,^ rid of greed, 3^7 

Aloof from causing harm or hurt, 
That monk, doubt crossed, with dart drawn out, 
Rightly, G-c, 

Who finds and knows all like to self, 368 

A monk who harms naught in the world, 
Who Dharma finds and knows as truth, 
Rightly, &c.y 

In whom no leanings lurk whate'er, 369 

Who roots of wrong hath rooted out, 
Who hopeth not, who longeth not, 
Rightly, (sj'C, 

With cankers quenched and rid of pride, 370 

Transcending far all passion's ways. 
Tamed, wholly cool and poised-of-self. 
Rightly, ^c, 

Believer, listener, seer of way, 371 

No party-man in strife but rapt, 
Curber of greed, ill-will and hate : 
Rightly, &c,j 

Cleansed, victor, lifter of the veil, 372 

Moulder of things, yon-farer, still, 
Knower, expert to end this moil : 
Rightly, &c., 



1 Parabhojanam na majje, so SnA., but cf. the compound paraloka. 2 Bhav^. 



56 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 65 

** Time's web transcending, future, past, 373 

In wisdom, cleansing, far excelling, 
From every sphere emancipate : 
Rightly he in the world would fare. 

Who knows the lot, hath Dharma reached, 374 

Seen the disclosed, seen cankers end. 
He who hath all affections quenched ; 
Rightly he in the world would fare." 

Questioner *' Surely, O Mnster, this is so : 375 

That tamed monk who dwelleth thus, 
Who hath all fetters overcome. 

Rightly he in the world would fare." 



(H) Dhammika 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master was dwelling 
near Savatthi, at Anathapindika's park in Jeta Grove, the lay- 
disciple, Dhammika, with five hundred lay-disciples approached 
him and saluted and sat down at one side. 

So seated, he spake to the Master in these verses : — 

Dhammika " I ask thee, Gotama, O quickening sage, 376 

What action best becomes the listener : 
For him who goes from home to homelessness, 
And for the home-abiding devotees ? 

For thou dost know man's faring thro' the world 377 

And deva-realm, ay ! and the way beyond ; 
And none's thy match, thou seer of subtle goal, 
Truly they call thee * man awake, elect.' 

All knowledge in thy ken, thou hast revealed 378 

Dharma in thy compassion for mankind : 
Veil-lifter art with eye that seest all 
And stainless dost the world illuminate. 



"•M] The Minor Chapter 



57 



" To thee drew nigh the king of Nagas, called 379 

Eravana ; * Victor ' he heard thou wert : 
And coming, he sage counsel sought of thee, 
And listening, spell-bound cried : ' How good it is ! ' 

Came, too, Kuvera, king Vessavana, 380 

On Dharma many questions asking thee ; 

And thou, rapt sage, thus asked didst speak to him, 

And listening, he too became spell-bound. 

Course-setters come there, disputative folk, 381 

Naked ascetics and the 'unbonded' Jain, 

But not in wisdom one outpaceth thee : 

As standers they to him who swiftly walks. # 

And there come disputative brahmans too, 382 

Ay, the most venerable of them come, 

But all become in thee bound- to-the-goal :^ 

Yea, e'en the talkers proud in self-conceit .' 

Subtle and lovely is this Dharma, lord, 383 

This which by thee hath been so well declared : 
That is the thing which all men long to hear. 
Tell us when asked, O best of wakened men I 

For all these monks and lay-disciples sit 384 

Around to hear just that. Let them now hear 
Dharma awakened by the stainless One,^ 
As devas hear good words of Vasava I " 

" Hear me, O monks, and I will make you hear 385 

Dharma astir ;^ be all endued with that! 
The path of life befitting one gone forth, 
The thoughtful seer oi goal should follow that. 

1 Atthahaddha. - Dhammatn vimalenunHbuddham, 

^ Savayami vo dhammarn dbutam tan ca dbaratba sahh(. 



58 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 68 

** Let not the monk untimely fare abroad, 386 

But timely to the village go for alms ; 
For snares enmesh untimely wayfarers, 
Hence not untimely fare awakened men. 

Shapes, sounds and savours, touches, things that smell, 387 
These are the things by which men are enthralled : 
So let a monk curb his desire for such, 
And enter timely for his midday meal. 

And when with gotten alms in season due, 388 

Returned alone, let the monk sit apart, 

Braced for self-quickening^^ turn inwardly 

His thought, nor let his mind rove outwardly. 

If with a listener he should converse, 389 

Or other whomsoever or with a monk, 
Let him then speak of Dharma's excellence, 
Not slander talk nor others vilify. 

For some there are who warfare wage in talk, 390 

Men low in wisdom whom we do not praise ; 
Bonds tangle them in talking this and that, 
And hence indeed they scatter thought afar. 

The noble wisdom's listener, he who 391 

Hath Dharma heard by the Well-farer taught. 
With care should use alms, dwelling, bed and seat, 
Water to rinse his dusty upper robe. 

Nor should a monk be soiled by things as these : 392 

The food he gets, the bed and seat he owns. 
The water whence to rinse his dusty robes : 
But be as water-bead on lotus leaf. 

The rule for householders now will I tell, 393 

What action best becomes such listeners ; 
For busied much, none can attune himself 
Wholly unto the thing required of monks. 

^ San^ahttattabhav9, 



•^4] The Minor Chapter 



59 



Let him no creatures kill and none incite 394 

To kill, nor sanction others taking life, 

But put by violence for all that lives, 

For stout of heart and those who tremble here. 

Then let the listener awakening^ 395 

Wholly refrain from taking things not giv'n, 
And none incite to steal nor sanction theft ; 
Let him refrain from every form of theft. 

Let him refrain from all unchastity, 396 

As wise men shun the burning charcoal pit ; 

If powerless to live in continence, 

Let him not with another's wife transgress. 

Come to th' assembly hall or gathering, 397 

Let him not to another falsely speak. 
And none incite to lie nor sanction lies ; 
Let him refrain from all that is not truth. 

Let him not of intoxicants partake, 398 

The householder who doth this Dharma choose, 
And none incite to drink nor sanction drink, 
Knowing that madness is the end of it. ^ 

For verily drunken fools commit ill deeds, 399 

And other people gird to wantoning : 
Let him avoid this sphere of wrongful deeds, 
Maddening, deluding, the delight of fools. 

Let him not kill nor take a thing not giv'n, 400 

Let him not lie nor drink intoxicants, 

Let him eschew ungodly practices, 

Let him not eat untimely food at night, 

Let him not garlands wear nor perfumes use, 401 

Let him lie on a mat spread on the ground : 
This eightfold is indeed th' observance called. 
Made known by the Awake, to ill's end gone. 



55vaAo bujjhumam. 



6o Woven Cadences [ Sn. 70 

While the observance days he keeps : the eights 402 

Of each half month, the fourteenth, fifteenth days, 
The signal feasts : serene in faith, he keeps 
This full and comely eightfold abstinence. 

So keeping the observance, morning come, 403 

The wise, serene in mind, in gratitude 
Should serve the order of the monks with food 
And drink, according as his means allow. 

And he by Dharma should his parents serve, 404 

And in accord with Dharma ply his trade : 
The householder who lives thus earnestly 
Goes to the devas called self-lummanc/* 



Chapter IIL— The Great Chapter 



The Table of Contents 

The Going Forth, the Striving, Goodly Words, 

Bharadvaja, with Maghas, Sabhiyas 

And Sela's quests are woven with the Dart, 

Vasetthas talk and him of Kokali, 

And Nalaka, with Dual View-points last : 

These woven twelve are the Great Chapter called. 

(0 The Going Forth 

Ananda^ Til sing the going forth 405 

Such as the seer went forth, 
Such as, on studying, 
He chose for going forth : 

" Cramped is this life at home, 406 

Dusty indeed its sphere ; 
Open the going forth ! " 
He saw this and went forth. 

Gone forth, he wholly shunned 407 

In body evil deeds. 
And rid of wrongful talk, 
He cleansed his way of life. 

Came to Giribbaja 408 

The Wakened One, besprent 
With all the noble signs, 

1 So SnA. 



62 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 72 



Seeking in Magadhan 

Rajagaha for alms. 

Him Bimbisara, in 409 

His palace standing, saw 

And marked those lofty signs, 

And in this manner spake : 
Bimbisara " Note ye, good sirs, this man, 410 

His beauty, majesty, 

How fair and full his gait ! 

But plough's length far he looks 

With gaze cast down, alert ; 411 

Not from low clan his like ! 

King's messengers send out 

And see where goes the monk." 

Bidden, those messengers 412 

Pursued hard after him : 
*' Where will he go?" they thought, 
** Where will his dwelling be ? " 

Faring from house to house, 4 1 3 

Sense-warded, well restrained, 

Swiftly he filled his bowl, 

Mindful and self-possessed. 

His alms-round made, the sage 414 

Turned from the city and 

Ascended Pandava, 

Here would his dwelling be. 

They saw him enter there, 4 1 5 

Those messengers, and paused ; 

And one unto the king 

Returned, relating thus : 
Messenger ** This monk sits at the east 416 

Of Pandava, great king ; 

A very tiger, bull, 

A lion in hill lair ! " 

The noble heard his tale 417 

And in his goodly car 

With utmost haste set out 



Ill, 2 



The Great Chapter 63 



Towards Mount Pandava. 

Along the road he drove, 418 

Then getting from his car, 
On foot the noble went 
And, drawing near, sat down. 

Sitting, the king did greet 419 

Him customarily 
And compliments exchanged. 
Then in this manner spake : 
nsara *' Tender art thou and young, 420 

A youth in heyday-prime 
With finely moulded form, 
Like high-born warrior 

Adorning armed array 4 2 i 

Before assembled chiefs ! 
Enjoy the goods I give, 
And prithee, tell thy birth ! '* 
** On Hiniavant's snow-slopes 422 

Yon dwells a people, king, 
Of wealth and energy, 
Settlers in Kosala, 

Lineal kin o' the Sun, 423 

Sakyans by birth ; gone forth 
Have I, king, from that clan 
And pleasures covet not. 

In pleasures I see bane, 424 

And in renouncing them 
I see security. 
And I will go to strive, 
Therein my mind delights.** 



(2) The Striving 

As by the stream Neranjara I strove, 425 

Self-resolute,^ in ardent musing bent 



^ -Pahitattam. 



64 



Woven Cadences 



[ Sn 75 



To win security from moil, approached 
Namuci, speaking words in pity thus : 426 

Natnuci ' Lean art thou, pale, and nigh thee hovers death ; 

Thy life's a shred, a thousandth part is death's : 427 

Live, sir, better is life ! Alive, thou canst 
Work merit. As thou farest godly faring 428 

And feed' St the sacrificial fire, heaps up 
Abundant meed ; by striving what is wrought ? 
O hard is striving's way to tread, t' endure ! ' 429 

These verses Mara spake, standing beside 
The Wake. To these the Master thus replied; 430 

The Master ' O wanton's kin, O evil One ! Why needst 

Come here ? No jot of merit is a need for me ! 431 

Mara should speak to them who merit need ! 

Here's faith, thence energy; and wisdom's mine : 432 

Why bidst me thus self-resolute to live ? 

See how this wind dries up the rivers' flow ! 433 

Shall not blood dry in me, self-resolute ? 

While dries the blood, my bile and phlegm dry up, 434 

While wastes the flesh, mind more serene becomes, 

Steadier awareness, wisdom, mind-intent. 

While thus I live, enduring utmost pain, 435 

Mind seeks not pleasures ! See a being cleansed ! 

Lust's thy first force, thy second's termed dislike, 436 

Thy third thirst-hunger, fourth is craving called, 

The fifth is torpor-sloth, the sixth named fear, 437 

Doubt is thy seventh, thy eighth self-will and cant ; 

Gains, favours, flattery, honours ill-won, 438 

Exalting self, despising other folk : 

Namuci, such thy force, black scourge of man ! 439 

No craven conquers that ; who does, wins bliss. 

See, I bear munja grass !^ A fig for life ! 440 

Better to fight and die than lose and live ! 

Some votaries, engulfed here, go astray, 441 

^ Munja, a kind of bulrush ; the wearing of a munja girdle denoted a vow, \rata, 
for brahmans ; here perhaps the reference is to the way of the ' pious,' subbata. Sec 
Dr. Schrader's Note J. R. A. S. 1930, p. 107. 



"^' 3 ] The Great Chapter 65 

Nor know the way by which the pious fare. 
Mara, high-mounted, legion-girt, I see 442 

And go to fight ! He shall not loose my hold. 
Thy force which devas nor the world can crush 445 

By wit ril break, as stone an unbaked pot. 
With purpose bent, with mindfulness well set, 444 

ril fare from realm to realm and listeners train ; 
Those earnest, resolute, in my behest — 445 

Tho* will ye nay — shall go where none do grieve.' 
Namuci ' For seven years I've dogged the Master's steps ; 446 

I'll find no fault in the alert Awake ! 

There circled round a fat-hued rock a crow, 447 

* Maybe it's soft,' he thought, ' Maybe it's sweet ! * 
Finding no sweetness there the crow flew off: 448 

As balked stone-pecker I leave Gotama.' 
O'ercome with grief his lute his armpit slipt, 449 

And that dejected spirit disappeared.'' 



(3) Goodly Words 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master dwelt near 
Savatthi ... in Jeta Grove, he said: "Monks, when a word has 
four qualities, it is well-spoken, not ill-spoken, it is not blame- 
worthy, nor blamed by the wise. What four ? Herein a monk 
speaks goodly words, not evil words; speaks Dharma, not other- 
wise; speaks kindly, not unkindly; speaks the truth, not what 
is false. Monks, when a word has these four qualities, it is 
well-spoken, not ill-spoken, it is not blameworthy, nor blamed 
by the wise." 

Thus spake the Master ; and when he had thus spoken, the 
Wellfarer spake again as teacher : 

rhe Master "The goodly word calm men proclaim supreme ; 450 

And second, speaking Dharma, not elsewise ; 
Third, speaking kindly, not unkindly words ; 
And speaking truth, not speaking false, is fourth." 



66 Woven Cadences [Sn. 79 

Then the venerable Vangisa, placing his robe on one shoulder, 
with joined hands saluted the Master with these words : "It 
has come to me, Wellfarer ! '* ** Declare this thmg, Vangisa,'' 
replied the Master. And the venerable Vangisa praised the 
Master before his face in these seemly verses : — 

Vangisa ** Oh, one should speak the word 451 

That seareth not himself, 
Nor yet another harms : 
That is the goodly word ; 

Should speak the kindly word, 452 

Words that make others glad, 
Words that bear ill to none, 
O^ others kindly speak. 

Truth is the deathless word, 453 

'Tis ancient Dharma this : 
They say calm men stand fast 
In Dharma, goal and truth. 

The Wake proclaims the word 454 

Security, to win 

The cool and ill to end : 

That is of words supreme ! " 

(4) Bharadvaja 

Thus have I heard : — Once the Master dwelt among the 
Kosalese on the banks of the river Sundarika. And then, too, there 
brahman Bharadvaja of Sundarika fed the sacrificial fire and 
worshipped the fire-oblation. And when he had finished, he 
rose from his seat and looked round the four quarters, thinking, 
** Who, pray, should eat the remains of the sacrifice ? 

And the brahman saw the Master hard by, seated at the foot 
of a tree, with his head covered. Thereat, with the remains 
of the sacrifice in his left hand and the water-pot in his right, 
he approached him. And at the sound of the brahman's foot- 
steps the Master uncovered his head. 



tiu 4 



The Great Chapter 



67 



" Why," thought the brahman, " this man's shaven, a mere 
shavehng ! " and he thought to return thence, but considering 
further, that even some brahmans are shaven here, he approached 
the Master thinking, *' 'Twere good if I go and ask his birth," 
and said : ** What is your birth, sir ? " And the Master replied 
to the brahman in these verses : — 

The Master ** No brahman I nor yet a rajah's son, 455 

No peddhng trader nor of any breed : 
I know the Hneage of average folk, 
And, man-of-naught, fare in the world a sage. 

Robed in the wanderer's garb, I homeless fare 456 

With shaven head, exceeding cool-of-self. 
Untroubled here by youths attending me : 
Unmeet thou askest of my lineage." 

Braht7tim " But brahmans, sir, of brahmans always ask: 457 

Art brahman, friend ? " ** If as thou say'st, thou art, 
The Master And call'st me none, chant me the Savitri^ 

With phrases three and twice twelve syllables ! " 

Brahman " Trusting in what did rishis, Manu's breed, 458 

Nobles and brahmans offer sacrifice 
Unto the devas often in the world ? " 



The Master 



When an adept in lore and end receives 
The offering at the time of sacrifice. 
That sacrifice doth prosper then, I say." 



Brahman ** Then prosper shall this sacrifice indeed, 
For here we see the type, the lore-adept I 
Had we not seen the very signs in thee, 
Another man had the oblation got." 



* Ri^-Vedj, Hi, 62, 10 



459 



" May we attain that excellent 
Glory of Savitri the god, 
That he may stimulate our thoughts." 

[ A. A. MacDonell's Sanskrit Literature p. 79 ] 



68 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 82 

The Master " Since thou, O brahman, in thy need dost come 460 

With goal in view, I prithee ask of him, 
Calm man, gone fume and stir and hope alike : 
True sacrificial wisdom here may'st find." 

Brahman " In offering is my delight, dear sir, 461 

I long to make an offering, Gotama ! 
Teach me who know not, teach me, reverend sir, 
Where prospers an oblation ? Tell me that ! 

The Master " Wherefore, brahman, bend low thine ear, and Dharma 
I will teach : — 

Ask not of birth but of the faring ask! 462 

From wood is awe-inspiring fire^ begot : 
From lowly clan noble becomes the sage 
Who steadfast and by modesty restrained, 

Truth-tamed, endued with temperance, adept 463 

In lore and end, has the god-farmg fared : 
Timely on him let brahman seeking merit 
In sacrifice his offering bestow. 

On them who, lusts forsaking, homeless fare, 4^4 

The well controlled-of-self, as shuttle straight : 
Timely on them let brahman seeking merit 
In, &c,j 

The passionless with faculties composed 4^5 

And freed as moon from Rahu's dark eclipse : 
Timely on them let brahman seeking merit 
In, &C.J 

Those unattached who wayfare in the world, 4^6 

The ever mindful, quit of thoughts of 'mine': 
Timely on them let brahman seeking merit 
In sacrifice his offering bestow. 

* Jltaveia, 



"''4] The Great Chapter 69 

He who is pleasure-quit, as conqueror fares, 467 

Hath found and known the end of birth-and-death, 
Cool man, cool as the waters of a lake, 
Oblation-worthy is the Man-thus-come .' 

Peer with his peers, aloof from crooked men, 468 

Of boundless wisdom is the Man-thus-come, 
Unsoiled by anything of here or hence, 
Oblation-worthy, &c., 

In whom abideth neither guile nor pride, 469 

He who is free of greed and * mine ' and hope, 
Void of all wrath, exceeding cocd-of-self, 
A brahman he, with stain of sorrow razed. 
Oblation- worthy, &c., 

He who hath razed all harbours of the mind, 470 

In whom abides no claim to things whate'er. 
He, unattached to things of here or hence. 
Oblation- worthy, (src, 

He who with mind-intent hath crossed the flood 471 

And Dharma in the yondmost vity/ hath known. 
The cankerless who his last body bears, 
Oblation-worthy, ^c, 

In whom acquiring,^ cankers, all harsh speech, 472 

Are quenched, gone to their end, and are no more, 
He, lore-adept, released in every way, 
Oblation-worthy, &c., 

'Mid men of pride, no man-of-pride himself, 475 

Bond-overcomer who hath no bonds left. 
Who understandeth ill, its base and scope, 
Oblation- worthy, &c.y 

Seer of the lone, not trusting here to hope, 474 

Who view and lore of other- men hath passed, 
He in whom no supports whate'er exist. 
Oblation-worthy is the Man-thus-come ! 

^ Bhiivdo ^ Paravediyam, or is it * what can be known of yon ' ? 



70 Woven Cadences 



He who hath reached the yon^ and nigh of things, 
So all are ended, quenched and are no more, 
Calm man, and in attachment's end released, 
Oblation-worthy is the Man-thus-come ! 

Seer of the end and term of bond and birth, 
Who passion's ways hath wholly left behind, 
The cleansed, the spotless, tamtless, without liaw, 
Oblation-worthy, 6'^., 

He who perceiverh not self by the self,* 
Intent-of-mind, straight-goer, poised-of-self. 
He truly still, the vital, doubt-free man, 
Oblation-worthy, &c., 

He with no room for error whatsoe'er, 
The seer of knowledge as to all that is, 
He who his final body beareth now, 
Won to the full awakening, utter bliss, 
(Such is the cleansing of that spirit** here) 
Oblation-worthy is the Man-thus-come I " 

Brahman *' Then is my offering true offering. 

For we have found the type, the lore-adept ! 
Brahm is my witness ! Sir, receive from me. 
Eat, sir, this sacrificial ofi^ering ! 

The Master " Not mine t' enjoy fare won from chanting hymns ; 
'Tis not the thing for seers, O brahmana ! 
Fare won from chanting hymns the Wake reject ; 
Where Dharma reigns this, brahman, is the rule. 

Nay, thou must offer other food and drink 
To a great rishi wholly consummate, 
The cankerless. untroubled man of calm : 
Sure field is that for merit-seeking man ! " 



^ Farovara . . . dkamtna. 

2 Yo attana attanam nanupassati, cf. the Vedcinta view: Atmanam atmana pasya. 
Self by the Self." ( Max Muller, CoUe(t(d Worh xv. 8i.) 
® Yakkhassa, 



»"• 4 ] The Great Chapter 71 

Brahman ** Well is it, sir, that thuswise I should know ! 482 

But who should eat the gift of such as I, 
Which at this sacrifice I seek to give ? 
Thy bidding, sir, I would obtain herein." 

The Master "Him th' unprovokable, 483 

Him of unclouded mind, 
Freed of all lustfulness, 
Void of all indolence, 

Guide of those on the brink,* 484 

Master of birth-and-death, 
Type of the silent sage. 
Perfect in silent lore. 
Come to the sacrifice : 

Him with thy brows unknit 4^5 

Venerate with joined hands, 
Worship with food and drink, 
Thus prosper holy gifts." 

Brahman ** Thou art the Wake, oblation- worthy, lord I 486 

Thou art the field for merit unsurpassed ! 
Most meet recipient of all the world ! 
Great is the fruit of gifts to thee, O lord ! " 

Then brahman Bharadvaja of Sundarika said this to the 
Master : '' 'Tis amazing. Master Gotama ; 'tis wonderful, 
Master Gotama ! Just as a man might set up something over- 
turned . . . even so Master Gotama has declared Dharma in 
many ways. Lo ! I go to Master Gotama for refuge, to Dharma 
and to the order of the monks. I would go forth nigh to Master 
Gotama ; I would obtain full acceptance. 

And brahman Bharadvaja did so . . . and became a man-of- 
worth. 



1 Simnntanam, Sn4. ' with passions ' ( kilesa ) ; cf. pariyanta, note on verse 964. 



72 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 87 

(5) Magha 

Thus have I heard : — Once, while the Master dwelt 
near Rajagaha on Mount Vulture Peak, the young brahman 
Magha came and visited him ; and after greeting him and 
exchanging the usual compliments, he sat down at one side. 
So seated, the young brahman spake thus to the Master : — 

" Master Gotama, I am a liberal giver, bountiful, genial, 
easy to beg of. I seek wealth rightly, and then I ^ive from 
wealth rightly gotten, rightly acquired, to one, to two, three, 
four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten ; I give even to twenty, 
to thirty, forty, fifty ; I give to a hundred even ; ay ! and to more. 
Prithee, Master Gotama, in so giving, so bestowing, do I beget 
much merit ? " 

" Certainly, young man, in so giving, so bestowing, from 
wealth rightly gotten, rightly acquired ... a man begets much 
merit." 

And Magha spake to the Master in this verse : — 

Magha ** I ask sooth-speaking* Gotama, 487 

Who homeless fares in yellow robe : 
Goodman who merit needs and seeks, 
The ready almoner who here 
Gives unto others food and drink, 
Wherein lies fair prosperity 
For that oblation-offerer?" 

The Master ''Goodman who merit needs and seeks, 488 

Magha," the Master made reply, . . . 
*' He should make offerings prosperous 
By giving to gift- worthy ones." 

Magha *' Sir, tell me of gift- worthy ones," 489 

Said the young brahman Magha then. 

^ Vadannum, 



'"' 5 J The Great Chapter 73 

The Master " Who fare not clinging in the world, 490 

Whole, men-of-naught, and curbed-of-self : 
To them meed-eager brahman should 
In season due oblation make. 

Who with all ties and fetters cut 491 

Are tamed, released, gone stir and hope : 
To, &c., 

Who from all bonds emancipate 492 

Are tamed, released, gone stir and hope : 

To, &c,, 

Who, quit of passion, error, hate, 493 

With cankers quenched, have godly lived : 
To, 6rc,, 

In whom dwells neither guile nor pride, 494 

Greedless and *mine'-less, done with hope : 

To, dfC, 

Who never unto cravings fall, 495 

Flood-crossers, faring free of 'mine': 
To, &:,, 

Who crave for nowhere in the world, 496 

Here, hence, becoming^ this or that : 
To, G-c, 

Who pleasures quit and homeless fare, 497 

Restrained-of-self, as shuttle straight : 
To, &c., 

Who, passionless and sense-composed, 498 

Are freed as moon from Rahu's grasp : 
To, &c,, 

Men calmed, wrath gone and passion-free, 499 

Without a future^ here to quit : 
To, &c., 

^ BhayMavaya^ to become this i^n4 no; (ha;. ^ Gdti, 



74 



Woven Cadences [ Sn. 89 



** Men wholly loosed from birth-and-death, 500 

O'ercomers of all ' how ? * and * why ? ' : 
To them meed-eager brahman should 
In season due oblation make. 

Who wayfare in the world, all-freed, 501 

With self as island,^ men-of-naught : 
To, &c., 

Who here know this as so: 'This is 502 

The end: there is no more to come ' : 

To them meed-eager brahman should 

In season due oblation make. 

Ay, to the lore-adept, alert, 503 

Rapt muser fain, awakening won, 
(The haven here for many men) : 
To him meed-eager brahman should 
In season due oblation make." 

Magha ** Surely my quest was not in vain ; 504 

Of the gift- worthy thou hast told I 
Indeed thou knowest this as so, 
For thine's this Dharma, found and known ! " 

Then spake the brahman once again : 505 

'* Goodman who merit needs and seeks. 
The ready almoner who here 
, Gives unto others food and drink, 

Pray tell me, sir, wherein for him 
Lieth success in offermg." 

The Master *' Magha, make offering," he said, 506 

*' But in so doing, cleanse thy heart 
In all its ways. To th* offerer 
The offering is the help ; by this 
Supported, he doth then quit hate. 

^ AttadipS, 



The Great Chapter 75 



" With passion gone and hate expelled, 507 

Let him in boundless measure then 
Quicken a heart of amity, 
E'er day and night with zeal suffuse 
All quarters to infinitude." 

MTioha ** Pray, who is cleansed, awoken,* freed? 508 

How to Brahm's world goes man by self? 
Tell me who know not ; tell me, sage, 
Thus asked ! Thou art my witness, lord ! 
Brahm have I seen today ! For us 
Thou truly art * the peer of Brahm ' I 
How rises man, O shining One, 
Unto the very world of Brahm ? " 

The Master " Who offers, Magha," he replied, 509 

** The offermg threefold*"^ endowed. 
He would make offerings prosperous 
By giving to gift-worthy men ; 
And rightly minded, offering thus. 
The ready almoner doth rise 
Unto the world of Brahm, I say.'* 

And when he had thus spoken, brahman Magha said : " It's 
amazing, Master Gotama ! . . .We go to Master Gotama for refuge 
from this day forth to life's end." 



(6) Sabhiya 

Thus have I heard: — The Master was ar one time staying 
near Rajagaha in Bamboo Grove at the Squirrels' Feeding- 
ground. Now about that time a devi pur certain questions to 
the mendicant Sabhiya, saying : " The recluse or brahman, 
Sabhiya, who explains these questions to thee, when asked, 
fare thou the godly faring near him." Now in days gone by 
the devI was a blood-relation of Sabhiya. 



1 Heading bujjhati for bajjhati, *$c? G. 5, in. 2^6 (^A Hi. ^S^). 



76 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 92 

And when he had learnt these questions of the devi, the 
mendicant Sabhiya approached all the famous and renowned 
recluses and brahmans, course-setters with orders, flocks and 
followings, well-esteemed by many folk, that is to say: Purana- 
Kassapa, Makkhali-Gosala, Ajita-Kesakambali, Pakudha- 
Kaccayana, Sanjaya-Belatthiputta and the Jam, Nataputta. 
And he put these questions to them, and they, thus asked, did 
not succeed in solving them ; and not succeeding, they showed 
anger, hate and ill-will. And in turn they asked Sabhiya 
questions. 

Then thought he : " All these reverend men, famous and 
renowned, . . . have not succeeded in solving these questions 
of mine . . . but question in return. What if I turn to low thmgs 
and enjoy pleasures ? " 

Then again he thought : ** There is still the recluse Gotama 
who is famous and renowned, a course-setter with an order, 
flock and followers, well-esteemed by many folk. What if I go 
and ask him ? " And he thought : ** These reverend recluses and 
brahmans ... are aged, venerable, old, ripe in years, ancient, 
time-honoured elders, gone forth long smce, yet they do not 
solve my questions ... I wonder whether the recluse Gotama 
will explain them. The recluse Gotama is both young in age 
and newly gone torth." 

And again he thought : "A recluse is not to be disregarded, 
nor to be despised, because he is young. If he be young, he'll 
be of great power and might. What if I approach and ask the 
recluse Gotama these questions ? " 

And the mendicant Sabhiya set out to walk to Rajagaha ; 
and in due course, as he wayfared, he came to Rajagaha, to the 
Squirrels* Feeding-ground in Bamboo Grove. And he approached 
the Master, greeted him and exchanged the usual compliments 
and sat down at one side. Thus seated, he spake these verses 
to the Master : — , 

Sabhiya ** In doubt, perplexed, I come to thee," 510 

Said Sabhiya the mendicant, 



I 



lii, 6 



The Great Chapter 77 



Fain to put questions unto thee, 
The solver of them be for me : 
Explain the things I ask of thee 
In gradual and ordered mode ! " 

The Master ** From far art come, O Sabhiya," 511 

Thus spake the Master m reply, 
* Fain to put questions unto me ; 
The solver I will be of them 
And will explain to thee, when asked, 
In gradual and ordered mode. 

Question me, Sabhiya, 512 

Howe'er thy mind desires, 
For of thy questioning 
*Tis mine to make an end." 

Then thought the mendicant Sabhiya : " It's wonderful, 
amazing ! I never got such a chance from the other recluses and 
brahmans as this one made for me by the recluse Gotama ! " 
And pleased, delighted, elate, and filled with joy and happiness, 
he asked the Master a question : — 

Sabhiya ** What wins for man the name of 'monk*?'* 513 

Said Sabhiya the mendicant, 
" Whence 'ruthful' is he called, how 'tamed* ? 
Say how proclaimed 'awake' ! Thus asked, 
Explain this Master, unto me." 

The Master "Who by a path made by the self, 514 

Sabhiya," thus the Master spake, 
*' Hath gone to utter cool, crossed doubt, 
Quit of becoming and decay, ^ 
Hath lived the life and made an end 
Of coming more : he is a 'monk.' 

^ Vibhavan ca hhavan ca. 



78 Woven Cadences t ^"- 95 

" Who, ever balanced and alert, 5 1 5 

Harms not a creature in the world, 
Crossed, calm, unclouded, with no thoughts 
Of 'prominence':^ 'ruthful' is he. 

Whose faculties are quickened 516 

Within, without, in all the world, 
Who plumbs this world and yon, and bides 
His time, he quickened, he is * tamed.' 

Who webs-of-time discerns in full, 517 

The faring-on, twin rise and fall, 
Him, dustless, fleckless, fully cleansed. 
Won to birth's end, they call ' awake.' " 

Then the mendicant Sabhiya, giving praise and thanks for 
the Master's words, pleased, delighted, elate, and filled with joy 
and happiness, asked the Master a further question : — 

Sabhiya *' What wins for man the * brahman's ' name ? " 518 

Said Sabhiya the mendicant, 
*' Whence called 'recluse,' how * washen ' he ? 
Say, why the 'sinless' called ! Thus asked, 
Explain this. Master, unto me." 

The Master "Who bars out evil, Sabhiya," 519 

The Master said, " One free of stain, 
Intent-on-well'^ and poised-of-self. 
Passed faring-on, whole, with trust gone : 
The type is called the ' brahmana.* 

Open-to-calm,* passed right-and-wrong, 520 

Dustless, who knows this world and yon, 
• O'ercomer of all birth-and-death : 

As such the type is called ' recluse.' 



^ Vssaiia, see below, verse 855. ^ Sadhu-samahito, cf. note on verse 45. 

^ Samitavi in opposition to bahetva, so : satnana and brahmana. 



"''^] The Great Chapter 79 

* Who hath all evils washed away, 521 

Within, without, in all the world, 
Who goes not to time's weaving,^ web 
Of devas, men, is 'washen' called. 

Who in the world commits no sin, 522 

Who, loosed from every fetter, tie, 
Is nowhere caught, is wholly free : 
As such the type is 'sinless'^ called." 

Then Sabhiya, giving praise and thanks, . . . asked a further 
question : — 

Sabhiya " The Wake call whom 'field-conqueror* ? " 523 

Said Sabhiya the mendicant, 
** Whence is man 'expert' called, how 'wise' ? 
Why called a ' silent sage * ? Thus asked, 
Explain this, Master, unto me." 

The Master " Who fields-of-sense discerns m full, 524 

And conquers, Sabhiya," he said, 
** Deva and human, field ol Brahm, 
Is free of all their roots and bines : 
As such the type's 'field-conqueror.' 

Who doth the sheaths® discern m full, 525 

Deva and human, sheath of Brahm, 
Is free of all their roots and bines : 
As such the type is 'expert* called. 

Who the twm warring* states discerns, 526 

Within, without, by cleansing wise, 
O'ercomer of the dark and bright : 
As such the type they say is 'wise.' 



* Kappiyesu kappan n'eti. * N^ga. ^ Kosani, in Vedanta the three enveloping 

the soul; so kusala: 'expert' in that. ■* Pandarani, cf. bhandati, panda, phandati; Sk : 

spanda, Monier- Williams, 5^. Diet,: ' Some derive pandita from this.* 



I 



8o Woven Cadences [ ^n- 9^ 

'* Who knows the real* and unreal, 527 

Within, without, in all the world, 
Worshipped by men and devas, he, 
Passed bond and snare, is * silent sage/ " 

Then Sabhiya, giving praise and thanks, . . . asked a further 
question: — 

Sahhiya " What wins the name of ' lore-adept ' ? " 528 

Said Sabhiya the mendicant, 
" How * visioned * called, why * vigorous ' ? 
What is it to be * thoroughbred ' ? 
Thus asked, explain this, sir, to me." 

The Master " Who lores of men discerns in full 529 

And conquers, Sabhiya," he said, 
" Alike of brahman and recluse, 
Unmoved by aught they feel and know,^ 
Passed lore : he is the 'lore-adept.' 

Who sees as hindrance name-and-form, 530 

Within, without, as root of ill. 

Is free of all ill's roots and bines : 

As such the type is ' visioned ' called. 

Who from all evils here abstains, ' 531- 

Passed pain of hell, lives strenuous, 

He strenuous, and resolute : 

As such the type is * vigorous.'^ 

Who truly* bursting all the bands, 532 

Within, without, the root of bonds. 
Is free of all bonds' roots and bines : 
As such the type is * thoroughbred.' " 

^ Satam (^hammatn ^—Vedanasii. ^Reading v'tro, hut text 3ind SnA., dhiro. In the 
question it is viriyava. See Nid. i. s.v. v'lro. Our text runs Virato (!) . . . - papukeki . . . 
viriyavdso . . .dhiro. Niraya, hell, is perhaps here, ' going on and on to death.' * Assu. 



^ 1 The Great Chapcer gi 



Then Sabhiya, giving praise and rhanks, . . . asked a further 
question : — 



533 



Sabhiya " What wins the name of listener' ? " 

Said Sabhiya the mendicant, 
** Whence 'Ariyan,' how 'wayfarer/ 
Who is a 'mendicant' ? Thus asked, 
Explain this, Master, unto me." 

The Master " Who unto all things listeneth 534 

And understands all in the world, 
Things blameless, elsewise, what may be, 
Him conqueror, doubt-free, released, 
Gone stir, they call a 'listener.' 

Who cuts away all cankers, grooves, 535 

Who knows, enters no bed-of-womb ; 
Who clears the triple' swamp of sense, 
Nor serves time's web, is 'Ariyan.' 

Who wins the winning faring here, 5 5 6 

Expert in all, who Dharma knows, 
He, caught in nothing, fully freed. 
At odds with none, is ' wayfarer.' 

Who shuns the deed which bears ill fruit, 537 

Above, below, across, between ; 

Who faring, understands and ends 

Deceit and pride and greed and wrath 

And name-and-form, 'tis him they call 

A 'mendicant,' the winning won." 

Then Sabhiya, giving praise and thanks for the Master's 
word, pleased, delighted, elate, and filled with joy and happiness, 
rose from his seat, and placing his upper robe over one shoulder, 

^ SnA: 'pleasures etc.', but cf. verse 842. 



82 Woven Cadences 



with joined hands saluted the Master and chanted these verses 
in his presence : — 

Sahhiya " O quickening^ sage who didst 538 

Dispel the heresies 
Of mendicants' disputes, 
Those three and sixty points,^ 
Figments'^ of inference 
And term, and dark flood cross : 

Thou to ilTs end art gone, 539 

Yon-tarer, man-ot-worth ! 
Thou art the All-awake 1 
I deem thee cankerless. 
Vision and Hght are thine, 
Thine wisdom wide ! Thou hasr, 
Ill-ender, helped me cross, 

Grasped my perplexity 540 

And borne me o'er my doubt. 
To thee be worship giv'n, 
Kin of the Sun, goal-won, 
Sage of the silent ways, 
Vital, compassionate ! 

My former doubts, O seer, 54 ^ 

Thou hast explained : in sooth 
Thou art a sage awake ! 
For thee no obstacle 

Remains, for thee all moil 5 4-^ 

Is stilled and blotted out ; 
And thou art cool and tamed, 
Persistent, active truth. 

O sinless energy, 54 3 

At thy words Narada 
And Parvata rejoiced 
And all the deva hosts. 



^ BhuripariTui. '^ SnA. refers to the Brahmajala sutta (D. ii. 12 ff., Dial, ii z6 tf.), 

where the number is sixty-two, and says ' sakkayaditthi' is to be added. 

*^ Heresies = sitani ; figments = nissitani ; See .ibove page 10 note I. 



"^•^] The Great CKaptcf 83 

" O thoroughbred of men, 544 

O noblest of mankind, 
Peerless in all the worlds, 
To thee be worship giv'n ! 

Thou art the Wake ; thou art 545 

The teacher ! Thou, the sage 
O'er Mara triumphing, 
Hast cut all leanings off, 
And, crossed thyself, dost help 
Mortality to cross. 

By thee are cankers crushed, 546 

Affections overcome, 
And banished fear and dread : 
Thou lion unattached I 

As water^ soileth not 547 

The lovely lotus bloom, 
E'en so thou art unsoiled 
By merit or ill deeds. 
Hero, stretch forth thy feet ! 
Sabhiya salutes the lord ! " 

Then the mendicant Sabhiya fell with his head at the feet 
of the Master, saying : — " It's amazing, sir, ... 1 would go forth 
near the Master ; I would obtain full acceptance ! " 

" Verily, Sabhiya, whoso formerly followed another course- 
setter and now wishes to go forth in this teaching and discipline, 
to obtain acceptance therein, he serves four months. At the 
end of four months the monks, being satisfied in their hearts, 
may allow him to go forth, may grant him full acceptance, for 
the quickening of monkhood ; yet in this case I acknowledge a 
difference in persons." 

'* If, sir, they who formerly followed another course-setter . . . 
must serve four months . . . and thereafter the monks . . . may 
allow him to go forth . . . , I will serve four years. At the end 
of four years let the monks, being satisfied in their hearts, allow 
me to go forth, grant me full acceptance, for the quickemng of 
monkhood." 



84 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 103 

And the mendicant Sabhiya went forth near the Master, 
obtained full acceptance . . . and in due course the venerable 
Sabhiya became a man-of-worth. 

(7) Sela 

Thus have I heard : — Once, while the Master toured with a 
large number of monks, twelve hundred and fifty, among 
the people of Anguttarapa, he came to the market-town of 
Apana belonging to them. 

And mat-haired Keniya heard thus : ** *Tis said the Sakyan 
recluse Master Gotama, gone forth from the Sakyan clan, is on 
tour among the people of Anguttarapa with about twelve hundred 
and fifty monks, and has arrived at Apana. Now of that same 
Master Gotama this fair fame is gone abroad : * He is the Master, 
man-of-worth, the all-awakened One, perfect in lore and virtue, 
well-farer, world-knower, unsurpassed, charioteer for tamable men, 
teacher of devas and men, the Wake, the Master ! He, realizing 
it by his own knowledge, makes Dharma known to this world 
with its devas, Maras and Brahmas, to mankind with its recluses 
and godly men, devas and men. He teaches Dharma, lovely at 
the beginning (of life), lovely in the middle, lovely at the end, 
both in goal and means thereto. He proclaims a godly faring, 
which, when wholly fulfilled, is all-cleansing.' Verily, well 
it is to see such men-of-worth ! 

And mat-haired Keniya approached the Master, and on 
arrival greeted him and exchanged the usual compliments and 
sat down at one side. And the Master taught, advised, roused 
and gladdened mat-haired Keniya, thus seated, with talk on 
Dharma ; and he so gladdened . . . spake thus to the Master : — 

** Let Master Gotama with the company of monks accept 
food from me tomorrow .' " And when he had thus spoken 
the Master said : — 

* Great is indeed the company of monks, Keniya, twelve 
hundred and fifty ! Moreover, thou art a follower of the 
brahmans." 



"^' ^ The Great Chapter 85 

A second time mat-haired Keniya spake, saying : " Master 
Gotama, though the company be Jarge ... let Master Gotama 
with the monks accept food from me tomorrow ! " And a 
second time the Master repHed as before. 

A third time Keniya spake and said : " Though the company 
of monks be large, even twelve hundred and fifty, and though 
1 am a follower of the brahmans, yet let Master Gotama with 
the company of monks accept food from me tomorrow ! " 

And the Master accepted by silence. 

Then mat-haired Keniya, perceiving that the Master had 
accepted, arose and went to his hermitage. 

And having come, he called together his friends and well- 
wishers, kith and kin, saying : " Hark ye, good sirs, friends, 
well-wishers, kith and kin ! I have invited the recluse Gotama 
with the company of monks to a meal tomorrow, so would ye do 
me personal service ? " 

" Yes, sir ! " they all replied . . . And some set about 
digging fire-pits, some chopping wood, some cleaning pots, some 
getting ready jars of water, and some arranging seats, but the 
preparing of the pavilion mat-haired Keniya undertook himself. 

Now there was dweUing in Apana at that time the brahman 
Sela. And he fared yonder by way of the three Vedas with the 
indices and rituals, sound-analysis and fifthly the legends ; he 
was skilled in metre and grammar, proficient in metaphysics 
and the signs of a great man ; and he taught hymns to three 
hundred brahman pupils. And mat-haired Keniya was a follower 
of his at that time. 

And brahman Sela surrounded by three hundred brahmans 
was stretching his legs and wandering about, and came to Keniya's 
hermitage. And Sela saw some folk digging . . . others clean- 
ing pots ... in the hermitage, and Keriiya himseli preparing the 
pavilion ; and seeing all this he said to him : " Pray, is there to be 
a marriage or a givuig in marriage at Master Keniya's ? Or is a 
great sacrifice being made ready ? Or has the warlike Bimbisara, 
king of Magadha, been mvited with his army tomorrow ? " 



86 Woven Cadences [Sn. io6 

** Nay, Sela, there's no marriage or giving in marriage 
coming off here, nor indeed has king Bimbisara with his army 
been nivited, but a great sacrifice is at hand. The recluse 
Gotama . . . with a large company of monks . . . has arrived at 
Apana; and of that same Master Gotama it is said : ' He is the 
Master ... he is the Wake ! ' And he and the monks have been 
invited by me to come tomorrow." 

" Master Keniya, did you say 'the Wake ' ? " 

** Master Sela, I said 'the Wake.' " 

** Master Keniya, did you say 'the Wake ' ? " 

** Master Sela, I said 'the Wake.* " 

Then thought brahman Sela : " The Wake ! that is a sound 
heard seldom in the world .' The thirty-two signs of a great man 
have come down to us in our hymns ; and tor the great man, so 
endowed, there are t\\ o courses and no other. If he live the home- 
life, he becomes a rajah Wheel-turner, a just and righteous king, 
conqueror of the four ends of the earth, bringing stability to the 
country, and he is possessed of the seven jewels. And his seven 
jewels are these : the jewel of the wheel, the elephant, the horse, 
the precious stone, the woman, the householder, and the jewel 
of a minister is the seventh. And he has more than a thousand 
sons, valiant, vigorous, crushers of foes. And conquering the 
sea-girt earth, he dwells there ruling justly without rod or sword. 
But if he go forth from home to homelessness, he becomes a 
man-of-worth, all-awakened, veil-lifter for the world." 

"And where, Master Keniya," he said, " dwells Master 
Gotama, the man-of-worth, the all-awakened ? " 

And when he had thus spoken, mat-haired Keniya stretched 
forth his right arm and said : " There, Master Sela, by that 
blue line of forest trees." 

Then Sela with the three hundred brahmans set out for the 
place where the Master dwelt ; and as they went he said to 
them : " Come quietly, good sirs, and place your teet carefully 



"^' 7 ] The Great Chapter 87 

step by step, for verily these reverend men are as hard to approach 
as lone-faring lions ! And when I take counsel with the recluse 
Gotama, do not interrupt me, good sirs, but wait until I've 
finished talking." 

And brahman Sela approached the Master, and on arrival, 
greeted him, exchanged the usual complimentary talk, and sat 
down at one side. And so seated, he looked for the thirty-two 
signs of a great man. And Sela saw all the thirty-two signs save 
two. And about those two signs he was in doubt, perplexed, 
nor was his mind clear nor satisfied about them, that is to say, 
whether what was cloth-hid was sheath-cased, and whether 
his tongue was large. 

Then thought the Master : ** This brahman Sela sees in me the 
thirty-two signs of a great man, all save two ; and about those 
two he is in doubt, perplexed ; nor is his mind clear and satisfied 
about them." 

And the Master performed an act of psychic power so that 
the brahman saw that which the Master had cloth-hid was 
sheath-cased. Then, too, the Master put forth his tongue and 
touched and stroked both ears, touched and stroked both nostrils, 
and he covered the whole breadth of his forehead with his tongue. 

Then thought the brahman : " In sooth the recluse Gotama 
is possessed of all the thirty-two signs of a great man and not with 
some only, yet I know not this : Is he awake or not ? Now I 
have heard it said by brahmans of old, venerable teachers of 
teachers, that those who have become men-of-worth, all-awakened, 
manifest the self when praise is uttered about them. What 
if I were to chant seemly verses in the presence of the recluse 
Gotama ! " 

Then verily brahman Sela chanted these verses in the presence 
of the Master : — 

Sela '* Thy form is full and comely, finely bred, 54^ 

Goodly to see and golden ; gleam thy teeth ; 
And thou art vigorous, O Master, to0. 



88 Woven Cadences [Sn. no 



" In sooth thy body bears all marks of men 549 

High-born : the very signs of superman. 
Clear-eyed, full-mouthed, majestic, upright, strong, 550 
Thou in recluses' throng as sun dost shine, 
Lovely to see, a monk with skin of gold I 551 

What use such glory in recluse's life ? 

Worthy art thou to be a king, to roll 552 

The Wheel, the lord of warns, the conqueror 
Of the four Isles, lord of Rose-apple Grove. 
Wealthy and warrior-rajahs shall become 5 5 3 

Thy followers : rajah of rajahs, king 
Of men be thou and rule, O Gotama ! '* 
The Master " I am a rajah, Sela," said the lord, 554 

** Rajah of Dharma and without a peer ; 
I roll the Wheel by Dharma, ay, the Wheel 
Which none can backward roll ! " Said Sela then : 
Sela ** Wholly awake thou dost profess to be, 555 

Rajah of Dharma and without a peer ; 
Thou say'st : ' By Dharma do I roll the Wheel/ 
But who's thy marshal, Gotama, thy squire, 556 

The master's man ? Who keeps a roll for thee 
This Wheel of Dharma thou hast set aroll ? " 
The Master " The Wheel by me set rolhng," said the lord, 557 

" The Wheel of Dharma, Sela, without peer, 
'Tis Sariputta who keeps that aroll, 
He is the heir born to the Man-thus-come. 
All things meet to be known are known by me, 55S 

Meet to be quickened quickened are by me. 
Relinquished by me relinquished are ; 
Therefore I am awake, O brahmana ! 

Dispel thy doubt in me, incline thy heart! 559 

Full rare and seldom are the Wakened seen. 
Of those rare men, seen seldom in the world, 560 

Lo ! I am one, physician without peer. 
Wholly awakened, brahmana, become 
As Brahm. beyond compare ; all foes are quelled, 561 

Crushed Mara's hosts, and fearless I rejoice," 



'"•7] The Great Chapter 89 

Sda " Heed ye to this, good sirs ! The hero, seer, 562 

Physician speaks as roars the forest lion. 
Crusher of Mara's hosts, become as Brahm, 563 

Beyond compare, who could see him indeed 
And disbelieve ? Nay ! not a base-born black ! 
Who wishes, follow me : go who doth not .' 564 

Here I go forth nigh to the noble sage." 

Brahmans "If to you, sir, this bidding of the Wake 565 

Most high seems good, we too will fare nigh him." 

Sela '' With upraised hands three hundred brahmans beg 566 

To fare the godly faring nigh thee, lord." 

The Master " Sela, the godly faring, well proclaimed, 567 

For here and now and not anon," he said, 
" For earnest learner's no vain going forth." 

And brahman Sela and his company were allowed to go forth 
near the Master and obtained full acceptance. 

And mat-haired Keniya at the end of that night, having 
had plenty of hard and soft food prepared at his own hermitage, 
sent word to the Master that it was time : " It is time. Master 
Gotama ; the meal is set." And the Master, robing early, took 
bowl and cloak and came to Keniya's hermitage ; and on arrival, 
he sat down on the seat prepared, surrounded by the order of the 
monks. 

Then mat-haired Keniya with his own hand served and 
satisfied the order of the monks, with the Wake at their head, 
with plenty of hard and soft food. And when the Master had 
finished eating, and had taken his hand from his bowl, Keniya 
took a low seat and sat down at one side; and the Master with 
these verses gave thanks to him, thus seated : — 

The Master "Chief sacrifice is fire-offering, 568 

Chief hymn is Savitri, 
Chief person here a rajah-king, 
Chi^f water i^ the J^ea ; 



Woven Cadences [Sn. m 



Chief star of heaven is the moon, 569 

Chief radiance the sun, 
But chief the order for the boon 

Of merit-seeking one." 

Then the Master, having thanked mat-haired Keniva in these 
verses, arose from his seat and departed. 

And the venerable Sela and his company, dwelHng alone, 
apart, earnest, ardent, self-resolute, ere long entered and abode 
in that supreme end ot godly living — for the goal of which 
clansmen's sons rightly go forth from home to homelessness — 
and by their own knowledge here and now realized it ; and thev 
knew : * Birth is destroyed, lived is the godly life, done is what 
had to be done, there is no more of this state.' And the venerable 
Sela and his company became men-of-worth. Then went they to 
the Master, and approaching him, placed the upper robe over the 
shoulder, and with upraised hands addressed him in these verses: — 



Sela with *' Eight days ago, O seer, 570 

his company We to thy refuge came : 

Lord, in thy bidding we 

Are tamed in seven days. 

Thou art the Wake ; thou art 571 

The teacher ! Thou, the sage 

O'er Mara triumphing. 

Hast cut all leanings off. 

And, crossed thyself, dost help 

Mortality to cross. 

By thee are cankers crushed, 57^ 

Affections overcome, 

And banished fear and dread : 

Thou lion unattached ! 

Poised, stand three hundred monks 575 

With joined hands upraised : 

Hero, stretch forth thy feet ! 

Sinless, salute the lord I " 



Ill, 



The Great Chapter 91 



(8) The Dart 

How insignificant is man's lot here, 574 

How brief, obscure, how troubled, fraught with ill ! 

There is no means whereby man shall not die : 575 

Death follows on decay : such is life's course. 

The early ripening fruit hazards the fall : 576 

Ever death's hazard haunts the lives of men. 

Just as the potter's earthen vessels end 577 

In shards, so too man's life. Young and mature, 

The fool and sage, come all within the power 578 

Of death : death is for all the common lot ; 

And of death's victims passing to yon world, 579 

No father saves his son, no kith his kin. 

See ! while they crowd and gaze and weep, their kin 580 

Are one by one, as ox to slaughter, borne. 

Thus smitten is the world by eld and death, 581 

The wise world-plight discern, lamenting not. 

Thou knowest not the 'whence' or 'whither* way 582 

And, seeing neither course, grievest in vain. 

If one by grief and foolish self-affliction 583 

Could ease his pain, the wise would surely do't. 

One wins not calm of mind by tears and grief; 584 

111 grows the more ; the body languishes 

And lean and pale becomes ; self hurts the self; 585 

The dead are not helped thus : fruitless is woe I 

Who yields to grief the deeper sinks in ill : 586 

Who wails the dead falls further in grief's power. 

See how men pass according to their deeds ; 5^7 

How, come within death's power, folk tremble here ! 

Men hope for this and that but other things 5^^ 

Befall : just thus is separation. See 

The world's plight ! For a hundred years or more 589 

A man may live, but separation comes 

From kith and kin : then he too leaves this life. 

Since thou hast heard the man-of-worth, oust grief; 59° 

Seeing one dead and gone, know him a$ lost ! 



92 Woven Cadences [Sn. ii6 

As fire of burning house by water's quenched,* 591 

So seer-of-sooth, wise man, rape, expert, swiftly 

As wind-blown cotton seed, scatters grief's surge. 

Who seeks self-happiness from self draws out 592 

The dart : laments, vain longmgs, pains self-bred. 

Who draws the dart wins calm of mmd not based 593 

On trust, and, grief o'ercome, is gnefless, cool.* 



(9) Vasettha 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master dwelt near 
Icchanankala in the woodland glade, there lived m Icchanankala 
many well-known and wealthy brahmans, for instance brahman 
Cankin, brahman Tarukkha, brahman Pokkharasarin, brahman 
Janussonin, and brahman Todeyya ; and there were many others 
besides. ~^^ 

Now while the young brahmans, Vasettha and Bharadvaja, 
were walking up and down and stretchmg their legs, this chance 
talk arose : ** How does one become a brahman ? " And 
Bharadvaja spoke thus : ** When, sir, one is well born on both sides, 
pure in descent lor seven generations both of mother and father, 
unchallenged and without reproach in point of birth, then is one 
a brahman." And Vasettha said : " When one is virtuous and 
of good conduct, then one is a brahman." But Bharadvaja was 
nor able to convince Vasettha, nor Vasettha Bharadvaja. 

Then Vasettha said to Bharadvaja: "This recluse. Gotama 
the Sakyan, gone forth from the Sakyas, Bharadvaja, lives near 
Icchanankala in the woodland glade, and of that same Master 
Gotama this good report is noised abroad : . . . He is the Wake, 
the Master ! Let us go, Master Bharadvaja, to the recluse Gotama, 
and having approached, we will ask him o( this matter ; and as 
Master Gotama explains to us, that we will accept." 

" Very well, sir," assented Bharadvaja. 



farinihhaye, 2 l^^hhutQ, 



The Great Chapter 93 



And rhe two brahmans went off to the Master and, on arriving, 
greeted him with the usual complimentary talk and sat down at 
one side. So seated, brahman Vascttha addressed the Master 
in these verses : — 

Vasettha " We both profess to be Three- Veda versed : 594 

Of Pokkharasatin a pupil I, 
Oi Tarukkha's this youth. Whole-hearted we 
In all that's taught thereof: in scansion apt, 595 

In grammar trained, as masters we recite I 
Yet 'twixt us, Gotama, contention lies 596 

On point of birth. Bharadvaja says thus : 
* By birth is man a brahman ' — but I say : 
' By deeds ! ' Conceive the matter so, O seer. 
Since neither's able t'other to convince, 597 

We come to ask the Master, famed awake. 
Lo ! as the people with clasped hands salute 598 

The moon from dark retirement newly ris'n, 
So in the world folk honour Gotama ; 
And Gotama, the risen world-seer, this 599 

We ask : * Is man by birth a brahmana 
Or thus becomes by deeds ? ' Tell us this thing 
Who know not, that a brahman we may know ! 

The Master " Vasettha," he replied, " I will expound 600 

To you in gradual and very truth 
Division in the kinds^ of living things ; 
For kinds divide. Behold the grass and trees ! 601 

They reason not, yet they possess the mark 
After their kind : for kinds indeed divide. 
Consider then the beetles, moths, and ants : 602 

They after their kind too possess the mark . . . 
And so four-footed creatures, great and small ... 603 

The reptiles, snakes, the long-backed animals ... 604 

Fish and pond-feeders, water-denizens ... 605 

Birds and the winged creatures, fowls o* the air, 606 

They after their kind all possess the mark ; 



94 Woven Cadences t Sn. no 

For kinds divide. Each after his kind bears 607 

His mark : in man there is not manifold. 

Not in the hair or head or ears or eyes, 608 

Not in the mouth or nose or Hps or brows, 

Not in the throat, hips, belly or the back, 609 

Not m the rump, sex-organs or the breast, 

Not in the hands or feet, fingers or nails, 6 1 o 

Not in the legs or thighs, colour or voice, 

Is mark that forms his kind as in all else. 

Nothing unique is in men's bodies found : 611 

The difference in men is nominal. 

The man forsooth who earns his livelihood 612 

By minding cows and fields, know, Vasettha, 

He is a farmer, not a brahmana ! 

Who works at diverse crafts, know him to be 613 

An artisan and not a brahmana ! 

Who plies a trade for livelihood, know him 614 

To be a trader, not a brahmana ! 

Who toils in service for another man, 615 

Know as a servant, not a brahmana ! 

Who lives by taking things not giv'n, know him 6 i 6 

To be a thief and not a brahmana ! 

Wlio lives indeed by archery, know him 617 

To be a soldier, not a brahmana ! 

Who fives by priestly craft, know him to be 618 

A celebrant and not a brahmana ! 

And he who owns the \'illage, country-side, 619 

Know him as rajah and no brahmana ! 

I call none ' brahman ' from mere parentage, 620 

Tho' he be 'Sir'-ed and wealthy too : the man 

Of naught, who grasps not, brahman him I call ! 

Who cuts all fetters, thirsting not, fears not, 621 

Fetter-free, bondless, brahman him I call. 

Who cuts thong, halter, strap, and cord, throws ofl 622 

The bar, has woken, brahman him 1 call. 



The Great Chapter 95 



Who, blameless, bears blows, bonds, abuse, well armed 625 

Wirh strength of patience, brahman him I call. 

Him wrathless, spotless, moral, free of pride,* 624 

Last body bearing, tamed, I brahman call. 

As water on a leaf, as seed on awl, 625 

Who to lusts clings not, brahman him I call. 

Who knows here now that ill for self is quenched, 626 

Burden-dropped, bondless, brahman him I call. 

Him of deep wisdom, sage, skilled in all ways, 627 

Won to the goal supreme, I brahman call. 

Who not with homeless nor householder sorts, 628 

Frugal, resort-less, brahman him I call. 

Who rod lays by 'gainst weak and strong, slays not, 629 

To slay incites none, brahman him I call. 

Him cool mid violence, mid foes no foe, 630 

Mid grasping grasping not, I brahman call. 

From whom hate, passion, pride, and guile liave falTn, 631 

As seed from needle, brahman him I call. 

Who teaches gently, utters words of truth, 632 

And none olfendeth. brahman him I call. 

Who here takes naught, long, short, small, Inr^e, ^ood, bad, 6 3 5 

Nothing not given, brahman him I call. 

In whom no hopes are found for here or )'on, 634 

Fetter-free, hope-free, brahman him I call. 

In whom no grooves are found, gone doubt, who knows, 6 3 5 

Won to depths deathless, brahman him I call. 

Who here hath passed bond of both good and ill, 656 

Grief less, cleansed, dustless, brahman him I call. 

Him spotless, cleansed, unclouded, clear as moon. 637 

With ' life "'^ and pleasure quenched, I brahman call. 

Who hath this bog, false, painful round, passed o'er, 638 

Crossed and yon-fared, a muser, doubt gone, still. 

Cool in detachment, brahman him I call. 



* Anussadam. ^ Bhava : ' becoming. 



96 Woven Cadences 



Sn. T2i 



Who pleasures here forsakes and homeless fares, 639 

Lust and ' hfe '^ ended, brahman him I call. 

Who craving here forsakes and homeless fares, 640 

Craving, * Hfe '^ ended, brahman hmi I call. 

Him rid of human yoke, passed deva-yoke, 641 

Fetterless, free of yokes, I brahman call. 

Him rid of likes and dislikes, cool, detached, 642 

Vigorous, world-conqueror, I brahman call. 

Who knows m whole man's rise and fall, uncauaht, 645 

Awake, uell-faring, brahman him I call. 

Whose lot men, devas, gandharvas know nor, 644 

Cankerless, worthy, brahman him I call. 

Him for whom present, future, past, holds naught, 645 

Who grasps not, man-ot-naught, I brahman call. 

The bull, elect, the hero, victor, sage, 646 

Awake, still, washen, brahman him I call. 

Who knows his former lite, sees heav'n and hell, 647 

Won to birth's ending, brahman him I call. 

What the world holds as 'name' and 'lineage' 648 

Is indeed nominal, terms risen here 

And there by popular opinion, 

Adhered to long, views of the ignorant I 649 

The ignorant declare : *A brahman is 

By birth.' None is by birth a brahman ; none 650 

By birth no brahmana : by deeds is one 

A brahmana, by deeds no brahmana ! 

By deeds one is a farmer and by deeds 6 5 1 

An artisan, by deeds a trader too ; 

By deeds one is a servant and a thief, 652 

By deeds a soldier and a celebrant, 

And even so a rajah is by deeds. 

'Tis thus in truth the wise perceive the deed, 653 

Seers of the origin by way of cause. 

Men expert in results of deeds. The world 



1 Bhava : * becoming.' 



^"' ^°1 The Great Chapter 



97 



" Revolves by deeds, mankind revolves by deeds : 654 

As pin holds fast the rolling chariot's wheel, 
So beings are in bondage held by deeds. 

A brahman one becomes by godly life, 655 

By temperance, austerity, restraint : 

This IS indeed supreme for brahmanhood. 

Who by three Vedas is accomplished, 656 

With no more commg here, and man-of-calm, 
Know thou, Vasetrha, even thus of him : 
He is of knowers Sakka^ and Brahma ! " 

And when he had thus spoken, the brahmans, Vasetrha and 
Bharadvaja, addressed the Master, saying : " It's amazing, Master 
Gorama ! . . .We both go to Master Gotama as our refuse . . . 
May Master Gotama accept us as lay-disciples from this day 
forth to life's end, as refuge-gone." 



(10) The Kokalikan 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master was dwelling 
near Savarthi, m Anathapindika's park at Jera Grove, rhe Kokahkan 
monk approached him, and on arrival, sat down at one side. So 
seated, Kokaliya said this to him : ** Full of wicked desires, sir, 
are Sariputta and Moggallana, ruled by wicked desires." 

Then said the Master : " Say not so, Kokaliya, say not so ! 
Put thy trust in Sariputta and Moggallana ; very friendly are 
SSriputta and Moggallana ! " 

A second time Kokaliya spoke to the Master, saying : 
" Although, sir, in the Master is my faith and hope, yet full of 
wicked desires are Sariputta and Moggallana, ruled by wicked 
desires." 

And a second time the Master spoke to Koklliya and replied 
as before . . . 



1 Sn. Index suggests word-play; so perhaps ' best possible of knowers.' Tthi vijjUi 
may refer to the ' triple lore' given in verse 647 above, see K,S. i. 208 and C.5. i. 149. 



98 Woven Cadences [^^- i^5 

And a third time Kokaliya spoke in like manner . . . and a 
third time the Master repHed as before . . . 

Then Kokaliya arose from his seat, saluted the Master and 
departed, passing him by on the right. 

Now not long after departmg, Kokaliya's whole body was 
covered with boils the size of mustard seeds. And these grew to 
the size of a bean, then of a pea, then oi^ a jujube-stone, then 
of a jujube-fruit, then of a myrobalan, then of a vilva hun, and 
then of a quince ; whereupon they burst and discharged pus 
and blood. And the monk Kokaliya died of that disease, and 
beinedead, arose in the Lotus hell, because he bore illwill towards 
Sariputta and Moggallana. 

At the waning of the night, Brahma Sahampati of surpassing 
beauty, lighting up the whole of jeta Grove, approached the 
Master, and on arrival, saluted him and stood at one side. 
Thus standing, he addressed the Master, saying : " Sir, the monk 
Kokaliya is dead, and m death he has arisen in the Lotus hell, 
because of his illwill towards Sariputta and Moggallana." Thus 
spake Brahma Sahampati, and having spoken, he saluted the 
Master, and passing him by on the right, he disappeared thence. 

Now at the end of that night, the Master summoned the 
monks, saying : '* Monks, this night Brahma Sahampati of surpass- 
ing beauty . . . told me of Kokaliya's death . . . and then dis- 
appeared.*' 

And when he had spoken, a certain monk said to the Master : 
** Sir, how long is the term of life m the Lotus hell ? " 

" Long, monk, is the term of life in the Lotus hell. It is not 
easy to reckon it by so many years, so many thousands of years, 
and by so many hundreds of thousands of years." 

"Is it possible to give a simile, sir ? " 

"It is possible, monk," replied he. " Suppose there were 
twenty Kosalan cartloads of sesamum seed and at the end of every 
hundred years a man were to take out a seed, just one; well, 
sooner, monk, would those Kosalan cartloads oi: sesamum seed be 



"i» ^o] The Great Chapter 



99 



used up and exhausted in chat way — and that's not one Abbuda 
hell ! Monk, as twenty Abbuda hells are one Nirabbuda hell, as 
twenty Nirabbuda hells one Ababa hell, as twenty Ababa hells 
one Ahaha hell, as twenty Ahaha hells one Atata hell, as twenty 
Atata hells one Kuniuda hell, as twenty Kumuda hells one Sogan- 
dhika hell, as twenty Sogandhika hells one Uppalaka hell, as 
twenty Uppalaka hells one Pundarika hell, and twenty Pundarika 
hells are one Lotus hell. Verily, monk, the monk Kokaliya arose 
in the Lotus hell because of the illwill he bore towards 
Sariputta and Moggallana." 

Thus spake the Master, and when he had thus spoken the 
Well-farer spoke again as teacher :— 

The Master " In sooth to every person born 657 

An axe is born within his mouth, 
Wherewith the fool doth cut himself 
Whenas he speaketh evilly. 

And they who praise the blameworthy, 658 

And they who blame the praiseworthy, 
Cull with the mouth the seeds of woe 
Nor from the seeds raise happiness. 

Who with the dice-seeds loseth wealth, 659 

Little his woe : greater for him 
The seeds of woe, alike for wealth, 
Alike for self, should he beget 
Illwill in heart for well-farers. 

For a hundred thousand periods, 660 

Thrice twelve, and five, he goes to hell, 
Whoso with lU-intent in word 
And thought reviles the Ariyans. 



The liar and who does and says, 66 

* I did not do it ! ' go to hell ; 
Degraded both by deeds, in death 
Hereafter they become alike. 



loo Woven Cadences [ Sn. 127 

" Who wrongs the man who doth no wrong, 662 

Him cleansed, full-grown, the fleckless man, 
That evil turnerh on the fool 
Even as fine dust wmdward thrown. 

Whoso is prone to covering 663 

Will speak of others in dispraise — 
Mean miscreant, ill-mannered man, 
Jealous and set on slandering. 

O foul-mouthed, false, ignoble man, 664 

Truth's murderer, ill-doer, vile : 

Thou ill-born, least of men, woe's seed, 

Speak here not much ! Hell's man art thou ! 

Thou spreadest dust unto thy loss, 665 

Transgressor, who the good revil'st, 
Thou who hast fared most evilly, 
For long hast gone to steepy pit. 

For perishes the deed o'i none, 666 

Nay ! it becomes his taskmaster ; 
Both dullard and transgressor see 
Themselves hereafter writhe in pain. 

They go where strike the iron rods, 667 

Where bites the tdgc of iron stake, 
Ay, where the very food they eat 
Is like to red-hot iron balls ! 

And softly speak no speakers there 66S 

Nor haste to come and succour them. 
They reach the fiery flaming plain ; 
They lie on burning ember-mats. 

With nets the warders cover them 669 

And thrash them there with iron flails. 
Into the dark abyss they pass, 
That spreading waste of endless fog. 



^o] The Great Chapter 



lOI 



They come to fiery flaming plain 670 

Of copper cauldrons and for long 
Are cooked therein ; now up, now down 
They bubble on those flaming plains. 

There too the vile transgressor stews, 671 

Caught in a mash of blood and pus ; 
Tho' turn he here or thither turn, 
He rotteth at the very touch. 

In worm-infested water then 672 

Stews the transgressor, nor can flee ; 
Tho' there are sides, the jars are globes, 
All surfaces concavities. 

There looms the sharp-edged Sword-leaf Grove ; 675 
They enter and their limbs are mauled, 
Warder on warder catch their tongues 
With hooks and then belabour them. 

Into Vetaranl they plunge, 674 

Biting and bladed, hard to breast : 
There headlong down the foolish fall, 
The evil doers evil done. 

Then while they wail, the mottled flocks 675 

Of ebon ravens them devour ; 

Jackals and dogs, great vultures, hawks 

And crows, rend them and raven there. 

O miserable is that mode 676 

Which for the sinner there prevails ! 
Wherefore let man till life end here 
Well-doer be and loiter not. 

Who know, reckon the term of those 677 

Brought to the Lotus hell in loads 

Oi sesamum, five myriads 

Of lakhs and twice six hundred lakhs. 



102 Woven Cadences [Sn. 131 

** Thus are hell's many ills here told, 678 

And term that thus must there be spent : 
Wherefore m pure, fair, friendly ways 
Ward word and thought unceasingly." 



(^0 Nalaka 

The Prologue 

At noon the rishi Asita beheld 679 

The thrice-ten heavenly throng and deva-hosts 
In joy and mirthful mood attending Indra ; 
And clad in vesture white, with kirtie-dance 
They chanted hymns of praise and thanksgiving. 

And gazing on their high felicity, 680 

With heedful reverence thus there he said : 
Asita '* Whence are the devas filled with joyfulness ? 
Why circle they around in kirrle-dance ? 

Lo ! when the battle with the demons raged 681 

And the gods won, the demons then confounding, 
There was not then the like astounding joy. 
What marvel have the whirlwind devas seen 

To be so blithe ? How jubilant they sing 682 

And music make and clap their hands and dance ! 
I prithee, gentles of high Meru's Mount, 
Swiftly dispel my mazed perplexity ! " 

Devas ** Near Lumbini, where dwell the Sakyan folk, 683 

Is born for weal and bliss of all the world 
One wakening, rare gem beyond comp>are ; 
Hence comes our gladness and festivity. 

For he, out-topping all, the man supreme, 684 

Peerless in all the world, the bull o'i men, 
Shall cause the Wheel to turn in Rishi-Grove, 
Like roaring lion, mighty lord oi beasts." 



in, 1 1 



The Great Chapter 103 



He heard that voice, and down in haste then came, 685 

And to Suddhodana's abode he went ; 
And seated, to the Sakyans thus he spake : 
Asita " Where is the prince, him whom I long to see ? " 

To Asita the Sakyans shewed the child, 686 

A prince fashioned as tho' of gleammg gold 
By well-skilled hands in fiery crucible. 
Burnished and lustrous m supernal hue. 

And when he saw the prince — a crested flame, 687 

Serene as bull of stars in heavenly course, 
Bright as the sun on cloudless autumn days — 
Upleapt his heart with wondrous joy and zest. 

And in the sky the storm-gods bore a canopy 688 

Of countless spokes and arched a thousandfold. 
Fanned him with golden handled yak-whisks — yet 
None saw who held the whisks and canopy. 

And when the mat-haired sage. Black- Lustre called, 689 
Saw that gold figure on the yellow cloth 
And the white canopy borne o'er his head — 
Happy with heart elate, he took the child. 

And holding thus the foremost Sakyan male, 690 

That eager seeker, faring yon by hymn 
And sign, gave utterance in rapture thus : 
Asita " 'Tis he, the unsurpassed, supreme of men I " 

But mindful of his early passing on, 691 

Saddened his heart and tears welled up. Whereat, 
Seeing the weeping sage, the Sakyans cried : 
Sakyans "Shall peril then beset our prince's path?" 

And answered he, perceiving their dismay : 692 

Asita " Naught for the prince untoward do I foresee ; 
Nay, and no peril shall beset his path : 
No mean prince this I Hearken to what I tell ; 



104 Woven Cadences [Sn. 134 

*' This prince shall reach awakening's topmost peak, 693 

As seer of utter purity shall turn 
The Dharma- Wheel in ruth for weal of man, 
And world-spread shall his godly life become. 

But brief remains the span of my life here, 694 

Death comes the while or ever I shall hear 
Dharma from him of peerless energy ; 
Hence is my grief, dejection and distress." 

Thus in the Sakyans did he joy instil, 695 

Then left the palace for the godly life. 
But he in ruth did rouse his sister's son 
Concerning Dharma from that peerless force : 

Asita " When thou shalt hear the voice from yonder say : 696 

* The Wake, won to full waking, treads the peak 
Oi Dharma 's way.' Thyself way-seeking, go 
Thou there and fare the god-life nigh that man ! " 

Thus counselled by that tender heart, the type, 697 

The seer-to-be in utter purity, 

Did Nalaka, with merit garnered and up piled, 

Pass his long days with faculties reined in, 

In expectation of the Conqueror. 

And when the Conqueror turned the noble Wheel, 698 

In rapture did he hear the voice, and came 

And saw the bull of rishis, and did beg 

The noble sage for the still wisdom's crown : 

As bade sage Asita when they communed. 

( The prologue is ended ) 

Nalaka " Those words of Asita 699 

I see were very truth ! 
Hence to thee, Gotama, 
We come to question thee, 
Yon-far er of all things. 



"''Ji] The Great Chapter 105 

** Eager I homeless come 700 

To fare as almsman-monk : 
Tell me still wisdom, sage, 
Tell me the lot supreme ! " 

The Master ** The wisdom I reveal," 701 

Thus spake the Master then, 
** Is hard to get, is hard 
To put mto eifect. 
Lo ! I declare it thus : 
Stiffen thyself, be strong I 

Induce the quiet state 70^ 

Of a recluse — mocked at 
And praised alike by folk ; 
Debar illwill from mind ; 
Fare calm, and unelate. 

High thoughts and base* fly up 703 

As log-fire crests of flame ; 
And women tempt a sage. 
But by them be not snared. 

Abstain from carnal things, 704 

Leave pleasures pure or low ; 
To weak and strong be thou 
Gentle, dispassionate. 

With them identify 705 

Thyself : ' As I, so they : 
As they, so I ! ' and kill 
None, nor have any killed. 

Be rid of want and greed, 706 

Where average folk are caught ; 
Asj seer step forth and cross 
Man's purgatory here. 

Lean-bellied, spare in food, 7o7 

Greedless, be few thy wants ; 
Stilled in his want, indeed, 
The wantiess cool becomes. 



io6 Woven Cadences [Sn. 136 

'* The sage, his alms-round made, 708 

Should move to woodland-edge ; 
There come, prepare hmiself 
And at some tree-root sit. 

The rapt on musing bent 709 

Would love that woodland-edge, 
Would at the tree-root muse 
Unto his heart's content. 

The night thus spent, at dawn 710 

To village he would go. 
Nor be o'erjoyed by alms, 
Offered or borne away. 

The sage to village come, 7 1 1 

Hastes not ^from house to house, 
Cuts talk of seeking food, 
Nor speaks a word thereon. 

* What's gotten, that is good : 712 

Naught's gotten, that is well ! ' 
The type thinks both aUke 
And to his tree returns. 

Faring with bo^^'l in hand, 7 1 3 

Not dumb, yet seeming so. 
Scorn not the little gift 
Nor slight the almoner. 

A high path and a low 714 

By the recluse is taught : 
They fare not yon by twain, 
Yet single deem it not. 

In whom no craving spreads, 7 1 5 

In monk who cuts the stream, 
Rid of all toils and tasks. 
No tret is found or known," 



iii. u ] The Great Chapter 107 

The Master spake again : 716 

** Behold, still wisdom I 
Reveal to thee ! As keen 
As razor's edge become ! 
With tongue on palate pressed 
Govern the belly's greed ! 

Be free of sloth of mind, 7 '7 

Think not of worldly things : 
Yon-way in godly life 
Is taintless, not of trust, 

In lonely sitting train, 7^^ 

Recluses' mystic seat : 
The self-at-one* is called 
The wisdom of the still. '^ 
And if c6ntent alone, 

Thou shalt the ten realms light ! 7^9 

My man, when he doth hear 

The voice of musers rapt 

And rid of pleasure, strives 

The more because of that 

In faith and modesty. 

Learn this from rivers' flow 720 

In mountain cleft and chasm : 

Loud gush the rivulets, 

The great stream silent moves. 

Loud booms the empty thing, 721 

The full is ever calm : 
Like pot half-full the fool. 
Like full pool is the sage. 

When the recluse speaks much, 722. 

'Tis of and on the goal : 
Knowing, of Dharma tells, 
Knowing, he speaketh much. 



1 Ikattam, ' >^fnA see Brethren p. 1 32, note 3. 



io8 Woven Cadences [Sn. 139 



Who knows and curbed-of-self, 723 

Tho' knowing, speaks not much : 
Thac sage still wisdom worths, 
That sage still wisdom wins." 



(11) Of Dual View-points 

The truth, ^ alfectwns, ignorance, are grouped 
With moulding elements, fikh mind- at -work,' 
Touch, feeling, cravino, and attachment, then 
Zest-to-do, sustenance, and stir-and-moil. 
Trust, form and truth and /// : sixteen in all. 

Thus have I heard : — Once, when the Master was staving 
near Savatthi, in East parlv at the storeyed house of Migara's 
mother, he sat in the open, surrounded by the order ot the 
monks ; and it was the fifteenth night of the Observance day 
and the moon was at full. And the Master, after gazing round 
on the order of monks as they sat in perfect silence, addressed 
them, saying : — 

" Monks, if there should be questioners, asking : ' What 
is the reason'* for listening to these good teachings that are 
Ariyan, lead onwards and reach to awakening ? ' — it would be 
proper to say to them : * It is to know as such the extent of dual 
teachings.' And if you should say what dual? — 'This is ill, 
this IS ill's coming to be.' That is the first view-point. ' This 
is ill's end, this is the going thereto.' That is the second view- 
point. 

Verily, monks, when a monk dwells earnest, alert and 
resolute, viewing the dual thus rightly, one of two fruits is to be 
expected : Knowledge here and now ; or, if attachment remain, 
the state of a Non-returner." 



In the Uddana: saccam. * VinTiitiiii, herein so rendered, ' UpuniM, 



"i«i2] The Great Chapter 109 

Thus spake the Master, and having thus spoken, the Wcll- 
farer spoke again as teacher : — 

Who know not ill nor how ill comes to be, 724 

Nor where ill ceases wholly, utterly, 

Nor know the way that leads to calming ill, 

Lackmg release by wisdom, mind's release, 725 

They cannot end, but go to birth and eld. 

But they who know ill, how ill comes to be, 7^6 

And where ill ceases wholly, utterly. 

And know the way that leads to calming ill, 

They in release by wisdom, mind's release, 727 

Can make an end, nor go to birth and eld. 

Monks, if there should be questioners, asking, ' May one 
even in another way view the dual rightly ? ' — it would be proper 
to say, ' One may.' And how ? * Whatsoever ill comes to be, all 
that is caused by affections.'^ That is the first view-point ; ' By 
the utter ending and ceasing of affections, there is no coming to 
be of ill.' That is the second view-point. Verily, monks, when 
a monk . . . views the dual thus ... he may attain . . . 

Caused by affections ever grows 728 

The multitude of worldly ills ; 

The fool who here unwittingly 

Affection forms, meets ill again. 

Hence wisely no affection form, 

Perceiving thence grows birth and ill. 

. . . ' May one in another way view the dual rightly ? ' . . . 
One may : * Whatsoever ill comes to be, all that is caused by 
Ignorance.' That is the first view-point ; * By the utter ending 
and ceasing of ignorance, there is no coming to be of ill.' That 
is the second view-point . . . 

Who run the round of birth and death and run 729 

A^am, becoming here or otherwhere. 

Run long m leash from erring ignorance : 73° 

But beings, come to knowledge, come no more. 

1 Upadhi 



110 Woven Cadences t Sn. 143 

. . . ' May there be another way ...?'...* Whatsoever ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by moulding elements.' That is 
the first view-point ; ' By the utter ending and ceasing of the 
moulding elements, there is no coming to be of ill.' That is the 
second view-point . . . 

All ill that comes is caused by elements 73 1 

That mould ; by ending them, there comes no ill : 

Knowing this bane : * The moulders cause the ill,' 732 

Knowing this truly : ' By perception's end 

All moulding ceases, thus is ill destroyed ! ' 

Great seers, wise by right knowledge, lore-adepts, 73 3 

Victors o'er Mara's bondage, come no more. 

♦ . . * May there be another way ...?'...* Whatsoe\er ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by mind-at-work.'^ That is the 
first view-point ; * By the utter ending and ceasing of mind-at-work, 
there is no coming to be of ill.' That is the second view-point . . . 

All ill that comes is caused by mind-at-work, 754 

By ending mind-at-work there comes no ill ; 
Knowing this bane : * Ill's caused by mind-at-work,' 73 5 
A monk, completely calming mind-at-work, 
Becomes from yearning free and wholly cool. 

. . . ' May there be another way ...?'...' Whatsoever ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by touch.' That is the first view- 
point ; * By the utter ending and ceasing of touch, there is no 
coming to be of ill.' That is the second view-point . . . 

Who fall to touch, follow becoming's stream, 736 

Fare the false way, are far from fetters' end : 

But they who fathom touch, touch mastering, 737 

By knowledge come into the bliss of calm. 

Become from yearning free and wholly cool. 

... * May there be another way ...?'...* Whatsoever ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by feeling.' That is the first view- 
point ; * By the utter ending and ceasing of feeling, there is no 
coming to be of ill.' That is the second view-point . . . 



^ cf note on verse 1037 



iiu ^^] The Great Chaptet 111 

Both ease and ill, with neither-ill-nor-ease, 738 

Within, witliout, whatever there be felt, 

Knowing all that as ill, rottnig and false, 739 

Seeing all touch decays and loathing it, 

A monk by quenching every feeling here 

Becomes from yearning free and wholly cool. 

... * May there be another way ...?'...' Whatsoever ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by craving.' That is the first 
view-point ; * By the utter ending and ceasing of craving, there is 
no coming to be of ill.' That is the second view-point . . . 

Long stretch the rounds of man who craving mates, 740 
Becoming this or that, he passes not : 

Knowing this bane : ' From craving cometh ill,' 741 

Gone craving, grasping, moves the mindful monk. 

... * May there be another way ...?'...' Whatsoever ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by attachment.' That is the first 
view-point ; ' By the utter ending and ceasing of attachment, 
there is no coming to be of ill. That is the second view- 



poin 



Attachment forms becoming ; man, become, 74 ^ 

Fares ill ; death follows birth ; this is ill's cause : 
Hence by right knowledge, by attachment's end, 74 3 

Wise men, by knowing end of birth, come not. 

... * May there be another way ?'...* Whatsoever ill comes 
to be, all that is caused by zest-to-do.' That is the first view- 
point ; ' By the utter ending and ceasing of zest-to-do, there is 
no coming to be of ill.' That is the second view-point . . . 

All ill that comes is caused by zest-to-do, 744 

By ending zest-to-do, there comes no ill : 

Who knows this bane : ' Ill's caused by zest-to-do,' 74 5 

Rid of all zest and zestless in release. 

Calm monk, with craving and becoming cut, 74^ 

Crossing the round of birth, cometh no more. 



til Woven Cadences [ Sn. 146 



... * May there be another way ...?'...* Whatsoever ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by sustenance/ That is the first 
view-point ; ' By the utter ending and ceasing oi sustenance, there 
is no coming to be of ill.* That is the second view-point . . . 

All ill that comes is caused by sustenance, 747 

By ending sustenance there comes no ill : 
Who knows this bane : * Ill's caused by sustenance,' 748 
Perceiving sustenance, with trust in none. 
With cankers quenched, health by right knowledge won, 749 
Discerning follower in Dharma poised, 
That lore-adept goes to what none can sum. 
. . . ' May there be another way ...?'...* Whatsoc\er ill 
comes to be, all that is caused by stir and moil.' That is the 
first view-point ; * By the utter ending and ceasing of stir and moil, 
there is no coming to be of ill.' That is the second view-point . . . 

All ill that comes is caused by stir and moil, 750 

By ending stir and moil there comes no ill : 
Knowing this bane : * Ill's caused by stir and moil,* 751 
Ejecting moil, the moulding forces held, 
Still and detached moveth the mindful monk. 
. . . ' May there be another way ...?'...' Whoso trusts, 
trembles.' That is the first view-point ; ' Whoso trusts not, 
trembles not/ That is the second view-point . . . 

Whoso hath trust in naught, he trembles not ; 752 

Who trusteth, is attached, he passes not 
The round, becoming here or otherwhere : 
Knowing this bane : ' Danger abides in trust,' 753 

Detached, with trust in naught, moves mindful monk. 
... * May there be another way . . . ? ' ... * The formless is 
a calmer state than form.' That is the first view-point. ' Ending 
is a calmer state than the formless.* That is the second view- 
point . . . 

Beings form-bound, and formless dwellers too, 7 54 

Not knowing * ending,' come again, again : 

But all who forms do comprehend, well poised 75 5 

In formless things, in * ending ' all-released, 

They are the folk who have left death behind. 



'^] The Great Chapter 



"3 




... * May there be another way . . . ? ' . . . ' What the 
world with its devas, Maras, Brahmas, recluses and brahmans, 
the earth with its devas and men, hold to be truth, that is well 
seen by Ariyans, by right wisdom, as it is, to wit, as false.' That 
is the first view-point. * What the world . . . and men hold 
to be false, that is . . . seen by Ariyans ... as truth.' That is 
the second view-point . . . 

See how the worlds, content with what is not \ 756 

The self, convinced by name-and-form, hold it 

As true ! By this and that they hold it so — 757 

Thereafter otherwise. Herein, forsooth, 

Its falseness lies, false, fleeting thing it is ! 758 

'Tis no false thing the cool ! That Ariyans 

Find true, and as they surely master truth, 

Become from yearning free and wholly cool. 

Monks, if there should be questioners, asking, ' May one 
even in another way view the dual rightly ? ' — it would be 
proper to say, * One may.' And how ? * What the whole 
world . . . considers as bliss, that is . . . well seen by Ariyans as ill.* 
That is the first view-point; 'What the whole world . . . con- 
siders as ill, that ... is well seen by Ariyans as bliss.* That 
is the second view-point. 

Verily, monks, when a monk dwells earnest, alert and 
resolute, viewing the dual thus rightly, one of two fruits is to be 
expected : Knowledge here and now ; or, if attachment remain, 
the state of a Non-returner.'* 

Thus spake the Master, and having thus spoken, the Well- 
farer spoke again as teacher : — 

" How sweet and dear are winsome forms, sounds, tastes, 7 59 
Scents, touches, thoughts, — all while one says, 'They're here*; 
And all the world agrees, * How blissful they ! ', 760 

And when they pass away, ' How sad is that ! *. 
'Tis bliss, think Ariyans when body*s frame 761 

Is seen to end : * Alas I * sigh worldly-wise. 



114 



Woven Cadences [ S"- H^ 



The ' bliss * of others Ariyans call * ill ' : 762 

The * ill * of others Ariyans find ' bliss/ 

Behold how hard is Dharma to be learnt. 

Confounding those who see not clear therein ! 

Gloom wraps the shrouded, darkness wraps the blind; 763 

But for the wise there is an opening, 

A very light for those with eyes, tho* dolts, 

Unskilled in Dharma, know it not as nigh. 

In those o'ercome by lust of life, who drift 764 

Along life's stream, to realm of Mara gone, 

This Dharma wakeneth not easily. 

Who, verily, save Ariyans are ripe 765 

To waken wholly to that lofty bourn, 

That bourn which when they rightly come to know, 

They wholly cool become and cankerlcss ? 

Thus spake the Master. And those monks uplifted, rejoiced 
in the word of the Master. Now while this exposition was 
being spoken, tlic minds of more than sixty monks became 
without attachment, freed from the cankers. 



Chapter IV. —The Chapter of Eights 

The Table of Contents 

Of Pleasures, on the Cave, lll-vcill, the Cleansed, 

The Yondermost , Decay, Metteyya's quest, 

Talks to Pasura and Magandiya, 

Then Ere he crumble up, Contentions, then 

Two Issues, the Quick Way, of Violence, 

Last Sdriputtas quest : sixteen in all, 

Which woven form the Chapter of the Eights, 



(0 Of Pleasures 

Whoso for pleasure longs 766 

And therein hath his will, 
How happy is that man 
With all he wished for won. 

But when those pleasures fade, 767 

The wanton wight, thus steeped 
In pleasures, craving-born. 
Suffers as pierced by dart. 

Who pleasure shuns, as one 768 

With foot the hooded snake, 
Watchful, he shall escape 
The world's entanglement. 

Who craves for pleasure's brood : 769 

Fields and demesnes and gold, 
Horses and cows and slaves, 
Retainers, women, kin : 



ir 



Woven Cadences 



§n. 151 



Him weaknesses o'erpower, 
Him troubles dominate, 
And on him closes dl 
As sea on vessel split. 
Hence, ever watchful, man 
Should pleasures shun ; thus rid, 
Their vessels baling out, 
Yon-farers cross the flood. 



770 



771 



(2) The Cave 
The man who in his cave stays cleaving to*t, 
Clouded by many moods, in error steeped, 
Is from th* aloof state surely far removed, 
For hard to leave are pleasures in the world. 
Who scan the past and future longingly 
And yearn for pleasures now, for pleasures gone. 
Tied by desire and bound by life's delights, 
Are hard to free — another cannot do't ! 
Such blind and greedy folk on pleasures bent. 
Mean men whose ways are set in crookedness, 
When ill besets them grievously bewail : 

* Oh ! what shall we become when we go hence 
So let a man herein just train himself : 

* I know what things are crooked in the world 
And hence I will not fare in crookedness,' — 
And short, indeed, rapt musers say this life ! 
Lo! in the world I see a trembling race 
Caught by this craving for becoming's^ ways, 
Poor folk lamenting at the mouth of death, 
Thirsting about becoming this or that. 

See how they stir about their cherished aims 
Like fish in shallow pool of river-bed ! 
And seeing this, let him then * mine-less ' fare. 
Nor form attachment for becoming's ways. 



r 



772 



773 



774 



775 



776 



777 



^Bha\ 



'^' 3 ] The Chapter of Eights 



H7 



And curbing all desire for either course,* 778 

Let him nor covet, but touch comprehend, 
Committing nothing that the self would blame : 
Unsoiled by seen and heard are musers rapt. 
The sage who fathoms all surmise, not soiled 779 

By laying claim^ to thmgs, would cross the flood ; 
He, earnest wayfarer, with dart withdrawn, 
Longs not for this world or a world beyond. 

(3) Of IlU^^;tll 

Lo ! some there are who speak with ill-intent, 780 

And some there are who speak mtent on truth : 

Come talk what may, the sage is unconcerned, 

Yet nowhere barren is the silent sage. 

How could a man, led by desire, convinced 781 

Thro' wilfulness, escape that view of his. 

When he had firmly formed his own ideas ? 

He would declare, indeed, just as he knew. 

The man who boasts unasked to other folk 782 

Of practices and virtues o^ his own, — 

* That is unariyan,' the experts say, 
' If he should boast himself about himself.' 
The monk, grown calm, exceeding cool-of-self, 783 
In praising virtues says not, ' Such are mine/ 

* That way is Ariyan,' the experts say, 

,0/^''"^*'^^ * There are no thoughts of * prominence ' for him.' 

Whose views are predetermined, fully formed, 784 

And prejudiced, nor washen of dispute, 

When profit in assumption he beholds, 

His trust is on that calm-on-quaking built. 

'Tis hard indeed to loose opinion's hold, 785 

By studying what men accept in views. 

And hence a man amid such harbourage 

This thing now scouts and now again adopts. 

1 Sec below verse 8qi, ^ Pari^^ahesn, 



ii8 Woven Cadences [Sn. 154 



The \Vashen nowhere in the world hath view 786 

Preformed about becoming this or that ; 
That washen, quit of guile and pride, by what 
•) ( Then goeth he ? He is without concern. 

Who hath concern concerns himself with talk 787 

Of^thuigs : how tell the unconcerned, by what ? 
^^^^Tn him is naught assumed, rejected naught, 
i^ Washed hath he here indeed all views away. 



^ 



(4) Of the Cleansed 

I see the cleansed, the yondermost, the well, 788 

By seeing comes there cleansing of a man ! 

Who, thinking thus, knows this as yondermost, 

Deems knowledge to be seeing ot the cleansed ! 

If from mere sight comes cleansing to a man, 789 

Or he by knowledge may be quit of ill, 

He, tho' infected,* is by other cleansed : ■ \ 

But see, his views belie him as his words ! 

No brahman from another cleansing claims, 790 

Be it by things seen, heard, felt, rule or rite ; 

Alike unsoiled is he by good and bad. 

Rid of assumption, he doth none here form. 

Men quit the old to trust another view 791 

And in distraction do not cross the bog ; 

As apes let go a branch to grasp a branch, 

So seize they on a thing to let it go. 

A man will pledge himself to practices 792 

And hither-thither run, caught in surmise : 

Not hither-thither runs the quickened sage 

But, reaching, knows a thing by verities. 

Whoso hath fought his fight in all life's ways, 793 

Whate'er may be of things seen, heard or felt, 

He faring, very seer of the disclosed, 

How could he of the world be here misled ? 



Sopadhtko ; infected by aflfections ; see above verse 728, 



'^'5] The Chapccr of Eights 119 

They fashion not, they predetermine not, 794 

Nor say : * This is the final cleansing now ! ' : 
Loosed from the trammel, from the ' grasping ' bond, 
They form a hope for nowhere in the world. 

And for the brahman, passed beyond the bound,* 79 5 

Who knows, who sees, there's no accepted view ; 
Unmoved by passion, by disgust unstirred, 
For him there is naught further to accept. 



(5) Of the Yonder most 

When man, confined by views, holds in the world 796 

A thing in worth and as the yondermost, ' ^u^i 
Then doth he say all else is lacking worth, ' 

And hence he hath not passed beyond disputed. 



M 



When profit in assumption he beholds, 797 

Be It from things seen, heard, felt, rule or rite, 
'Tis by acceptance just of all therein 
That he doth see all else as lacking worth. 

That is indeed a bond the experts say, 79^ 

When, trusting, he sees all else lacking worth ; 
Hence, verily, let no monk place his trust 
In things seen, heard or felt, in rule or rite. 

Let him not fashion in the world a view 799 

From knowledge even, or from rule or rite ; 

Nor on ' equality ' concern himself. 

Nor deem things * lacking worth ' nor ' notable.' 

Rid of assumption and to naught attached, 800 

In knowledge even places he no trust : 
No party-man amid assumptions"* strife, 
Unto no view at all hath he recourse. 



i Stmati^o, see nore on verse 484 above, - Viyattesu, (^attd). 



I20 Woven Cadences [Sn. 157 



Who here directs his thought to neither course, 801 

Becoming this or that, or here or hence,— 
For him there is no harbourage whate'er, 
By studying what men accept in views. 

For him about things seen or heard or felt 802 

There is not even formed the least surm.ise : 
That brahman who adopteth not a view. 
How could he of the world be here misled ? 

They fashion not, they predetermine not, \ ^-^ 803 
And not a single view do tney receive : X^y^ 
No brahman can be led by rule or rite,f i/trwy. -^ r^ "^^ 
The type, fared yonder, holdeth not with 'such.' 



(6) Of Decay 

How short indeed is life ! 804 

Within a hundred years 
One dies ; who longer lives 
Dies surely of decay. 

Folk grieve o'er thoughts of ' mine/ 805 

For wealth lasts not for aye 
And fortune veers about : 
See this and homeless dwell ! 

'Tis left behind in death, 806 

Yet man thinks, ' It is mine ! '. 
The wise know this ; and nor 
To * mine ' should stoop my friend. 

As one awake sees not 807 

I'he things he met in sleep, 

So too he seeth not 

The dear friend dead and gone. 

Now folk are seen and heard 808 

And thus are called by name : 
To dead men only shall 
Remain a name that's told. 



IV, 7 



The Chapter of Eights 



121 



Greedy for * mine,' they quit 
Not envy, grief, laments : 
Hence sages fare claim-free,^ 
Seers in security. 

For monk who fares withdrawn, 
Lone-minded, lone of seat, 
* 'Tis right,' they say ' for him 
To show not self at home.'^ 

In naught the sage puts trust, 
Makes none a friend or foe ; 
As water soils no leaf, 
Envy, laments, not him. 

No rain the lily soils, 
No water lotus blooms ; 
Unsoiled is thus the sage 
By thrills of sight and ear. 

Hence not of thrills of sight 
Or ear the washen thinks, 
For cleansing looks to none, 
Not moved nor yet unmoved. 



809 



810 



811 



812 



813 



(7) Tissa MetUyya 

Tissa MetUyya Said reverend Tissa Metteyya : 

'' Speak, gracious sir, of the offence 
Of one sunk low in venery ; 
For when thy bidding we have heard, 
We'll for th' aloof state train ourselves .' 

The Master ** Metteyya," said the Master then, 
" When dwelleth one in venery. 
Forgetful of the bidding, he 
Pursues his way in wickedness : 
In him that is unariyan. 



814 



815 



^ Pariggakam, 



2 ^havane, SnA. & Nid. regard as bha\(. 



122 Woven Cadences [ Sn. i6o 



** Who wayfared formerly alone 8i6 

And now is sunk in venery, 
They call that common worldly man 
Bad as a lurching chariot. 

The fame, renown, he had before, 817 

Now verily is lost to him. 
Indeed, let him who seeth this 
Train to be rid of venery. 

And overcome by wilful ways, 8 1 8 

As miser broodeth^ he thereon ; 
He hears the voice of others''^ then 
And downcast he thereat becomes. 

Then makes he swords against himself, 8 1 9 

Urged by the words of others thus : 
A greedy swamp lies m his way. 
He plunges into falsehood vile. 

Wise IS he called when he sets forth 820 

Upon his lonely wayfarmg ; 
But being yoked to venery, 
Sore harassed is he as a tool. 

The silent sage who knows this bane 821 

As foremost and last thing herein. 
In the lone wayfaring would strive, 
Be strong, nor dwell m venery. 

Ay, for th' aloof state he would train, 822 

That thmg supreme for Anyans ! 
Nor for that think hmiself the best, 
Tho* he be nigh the cool mdeed. 

The sage who fares in continence 8 2 3 

And seeks not after carnal things, 
Flood-crosser he ! They envy him, 
Folk who are tied to carnal things." 

^Jhayati. ^ Fausam, 



iv. 8 ] Xhc Chapter of Eights 123 



(8) Pasura 

Some say, 'Herein the cleansing Hes ; 824 

In others' views no cleansing lies ! 
They say, * Wherein they trust is liglit/ 
Convinced is each of his own truths. 

To gatherings these glib folk descend 825 

And all and sundry brand as fools ; 
With trust in others, bandy words ; 
As experts talk in hope of praise. 

In issue joined as wrangle they, 826 

One longs for praise but fears to lose, 

And in defeat downcast becomes : 

He seeks for flaws but quails at blame. 

And when the question-testers say 827 

His talk is worthless, faulty found, 
The worthless talker grieves, laments, 
And moans, * They have defeated me ! . 

Among recluses such disputes 828 

Arise, and thence come wrangles, broils : 
So seeing this avoid debates, 
For praises won are profitless. 

If in debate a man wins praise 829 

From wit in talk as wrangle they, 
Elate and happy he becomes, 
Wmning that weal as was his mind. 

His downfall that elation proves, 830 

For on he talks with vaunting pride : 

So seeing this with none dispute ; 

Not thence comes cleansing experts say. 

Like as the brave fed royally 8 3 1 

With roar seeks out a rival brave, 
So, brave, go thou where one abides 
Who hath as yet not fought his fight ! 



124 



Woven Cadences 



r Sn. 16^ 



who argue o'er their chosen view 
And swear that that alone is truth, 
Say unto them when talk begins, 
'' There's none to battle with you here I 

For they who fare with battle o'er. 
Who do not counter view with view, 
Pasura, what wilt gain from them, 
For whom there is no more t'accept ? 

In deep reflection didst thou come, 
Pond'ring view-issues in thy mind. 
As yoke-mate of the washen cam'st, 
Yet canst not step m pair with him I 



83Z 



833 



834 



(9) Magandiya 

The Master ** On seeing craving, passion and disgust, 835 

Even desire for intercourse then failed : 
And pray ! what bag of excrements is this ? 
I had as lief not touch her with my foot ! 

Magandiya ** If such a gem as this thou wantest not, 836 

A woman much sought after by great kings, 
Tell me what view is thine, thy rule and rite, 
Thy way of life ; tell me becoming's source ! 

The Master "Magandiya," the Master then replied, 837 

For such as I there is no * This I say,' 
From studying what men accept in views : 
Into all views I looked accepting none, 
And seeking, saw calm of the self within." 

Magandiya "Thou speakest, sage," rejoined Magandiya, 838 

Of formal theories accepted not : 
This goal termed thus, 'calm of the self within,' 
How by rapt musers, pray ! is that made known ? " 



The Chapter of Eights 



ti5 



The Master Then spake the Master thus : " Mlgandiya, 839 

'Tis not from view, tradition, knowledge won, 
From rule or rite that cleansing comes, they say : 
Yet not from lack of view, tradition, lack 
Of knowledge, rule and rite ! Rejecting these, 
By not accepting them nor trusting them, 
The man-of-caliTiyearneth not to become." 

Magandiya " If then," he said, " 'tis not indeed from view, 840 

Tradition, knowledge, rule or rite, they say 
Full cleansing comes, nor yet from lack of such ; 
Methinks this thing is just mere foolishness, 
Because some deem that cleansing comes from view." 

The Master "But trusting still on view thou questionest, 841 

Magandiya," the Master made reply, 
" And thro' accepted views to error com'st ; 
From here thou learnest not the least surmise, 
Therefore thou seest all as foolishness. 

Who ' equal,' * notable,' or ' lacking worth' 842 

Deems things, he just for that would then dispute : 
Who by this three-fold is unmoved, for him 
There are no thoughts of ' equal,' 'notable.' 

Why should that brahman say, 'This is the truth!'? 843 
Or whence should he contend, * That is a lie ! ' ? 
In whom no * equal ' nor * unequal ' bides, 
Wherefore would he in wordy issue join ? 

The silent sage who leaves the sheltered home 844 

And homeless fares, making no village friends, 
Remote from pleasures, with no preference, 
Would not have talk and argument with folk. 

From things he in the world would fare aloof 845 

And not accept, the sinless speaks not of. 

From soggy bed the lotus on its stalk 

Rises unsoiled by water or by mud : 

Proclaiming calm, the sage uncoveting 

Abides, unsoiled by pleasure or the world. 



126 Woven Cadences [ Sn. i66 



Not from things felt nor view the lore-adept 846 

. ^, Opinion forms — he hath no part in that : 

(Sy^ Not by things done nor heard can he be led, 

Nor led is he to harbours of the mind. 



w^ 



v^. 



There are no knots for him loosed from surmise, 847 

There are no errors for the wisdom-freed : 

But they who both surmise and view accept, 

They wayfare in the world at odds with folk." . , ', 

U 

(10) I.rt ht crwnhle up 

Questioner " How visioned is the man-of-calm declared, 848 

How virtuous ? Tell me, O Gotama, 
When asked, the best of men! ". The Master said : 

The Master " Who conquers craving ere he crumble up, 849 

Who trusts not first things nor the last, nor counts 
The middle things : he hath no preference. 

Gone wrath, gone fear, gone boasting, gone remorse, 850 
Sooth-speakmg, mild : that sage doth curb his talk. 

Hoping for naught to come, he mourns no past ; 851 

Seer of th' aloof 'mid touch, views lead him not. 

Guileless, apart, not fond nor envious, 852 

Not loth nor forward, not to slander giv'n ; 

Not fain for pleasures nor to pride inclined, 853 

Gentle yet quick, no dupe, dispassionate ; 

He traineth not in hope of gain, nor moved 854 

Is he at getting none ; no craving stirs 
His placidness ; he hankers not for tastes. 

Poised, e'er alert, he deems not in the world 855 

Things 'equal,' 'notable,' nor 'lacking worth,' 
For him there are no thoughts of ' prominence.' 

Who trusteth not, knows not a thing on trust, 856 

Thirsts not about becoming or decay. 



IV, II 



The Chapter of Eights 



t27 



I call him man-of-calm ; not heeding lusts, 857 

Without a knot, he hath the foul mire crossed. 

No sons, kine, fields, nor property are his ; 858 

Naught to assume or to reject he finds. 

Between folk's words, or brahman or recluse, 859 

No choice hath he, hence talk doth move him not. 

Gone envy, greed, the sage speaks not of ' high,' 860 

'Low,' 'equal,* seeking not time's web, weaves none. 

Who here hath naught, nor grieves o'er loss, nor goes 861 
To views, he truly man-of-calm is called." 



(11) Of Contentions 

Questioner " From whence arise contentions and disputes, 862 

Grief with laments and envy in their train. 
Pride and conceit with slander's tongue in wake ? 
Whence uprise these ? I prithee tell me that." 

The Master " From dear things rise contentions and disputes, 863 

Grief with laments and envy in their train. 
Pride and conceit with slander's tongue in wake : 
Contentions and disputes are envy-linked. 
And slander's tongues are born amid disputes." 

Questioner " Whence pray, the source of dear things in the world 864 
And all the greed that in the world prevails ? 
The hoping and fulfilment, whence their source. 
Which bring man to the common lot beyond' ? 

The Master " Desire's the source of dear things in the world 865 

And all the greed that in the world prevails : 
From that is hoping's and fulfilment's source, 
Which bring man to the common lot beyond." 



^ Samparayaya, SnA. samparayanava ; perhaps ' going with others to the next world ' 
in opposition to the sage's ekattam, lone state. 



12. 



W 



oven 



Cad 



ences 



[ Sn. 169 



Questioner " Whence hath desire its source, pray, in the world 866 

And all the theories whence rise they up. 
Anger and falsehood and perplexity, 
Those things indeed declared by the recluse ? 

The Master ** * *Tis pleasant, 'tis unpleasant ! ' says the world ; 867 

From trust in such there riseth up desire : 
Man sees in forms becoming and decay 
And shapes his theories about the world. 

Anger and falsehood and perplexity, 868 

These things prevail when those twin states exist ; 
Let doubter in the path of knowledge train ! 
These things by the recluse are taught — he knows." 

Questioner " The pleasant and unpleasant, whence their source ? 869 

What being absent, come not these to be ? 
This matter of * becoming and decay,' 
Tell me the source and whence they come to be ? 

The Master ** Touch is the source of pleasant and unpleasant ; 870 

Touch being absent, these come not to be : 
This matter of ' becoming and decay,' 
I say to thee these have their source from that." 

Questioner " Whence is the source of touch pray ! in the world, 871 
And whence arise the multitude of claims ? 
What being absent, come not thoughts of ' mine ' ? 
When what decays, do touches touch no more ? 

The Master *' Touches exist because of name-and-form, 872 

The source of laying claim to things is wish, 
When wish is absent, thoughts of ' mine ' are not, 
When form decays, touches do touch no more." 

Questioner " What state is his so form decays for him? 873 

And how indeed decayeth ease and ill ? 
I prithee tell me as to the decay ! 
Fain would we know — this ever is my thought." 



IV, 12 



The Master 



Questioner 



The Master 



Tlie Chapter of Eights 



CU(^Ji^ tft^/1 n ( 



!^ ;'5 9. 



When there is no perceiving of perceptions, 
Nor the perceiving of things not perceptions, 
And there is still no not-perceiving then, 
Nor hath perceiving altogether ceased, — 
When thus his state, then form decays^ for him: 
Reckoned a hindrance is perception's source." ^ 

Thou hast declared to us all that we asked ; 
Yet one thing more we ask ; pray ! tell us this : 
Say not some wise men that the highest thing 
Is e'en the cleansing of the spirit here ? 
Or say they there is something after that ? " 

Ay, some wise men declare the highest thing 
To be the cleansing of the spirit here ; 
Again, some experts on ' the unattached 
Where naught remains ' say it's to pass away. 

The silent sage knows such as trusting still, 
He studies and knows where they put their trust ; 
Knowing, released, the rapt seeks no dispute, 
Seeks not about becoming this or that." 



tig 



87. 



875 



876 



877 



(12) Of Minor Issues 

Questioner " The experts, each confined by his own view, 878 

In arguing on divers points, declare : 

* Whoso holds thus, hath found and known the thing ; 
Whoso revileth this, he is not whole.' 

And thus they argue and dispute and say : 879 

* Yon fellow is no expert but a fool ! 

The word of which of them, pray ! is the truth ? 
Or are they expert talkers one and all ? 

The Master "If to agree not with another's view 880 

Dubs one a fool and dolt and weak in lore. 
Then all are fools and sadly weak in lore, 
For all of them are by a view confined! 



1 Cf. below verse 1037 note. 



^{'t^ ^^o^t^ 



Or 






V-XjL^ 



L Gyv^^ ) 



t3o 



Woven Cacienccs 



[Sn. 171 



** And then if each be washen by his view 
And thereby expert, cleansed and wise and sage, 
Well ! none of them in wisdom lacks a whit 
And so just perfect is the view of each. 

Nay, verily, I say it is not true 
What fools in turn of one another say : 
Each by his own view hath determined truth 
And hence each brands the other fellow fool." 

Questioner ** What some proclaim as very truth and fact, 
Others declare but vanity and lies ; 
And thus indeed they argue and dispute : 
Pray ! why do not recluses say the same ? 

The Master ** Single indeed is truth nor is there twain 

On which the wise may with the wise debate ; 
The divers truths they praise are just their own, 
And hence recluses do not sav the same." 



881 



882 



883 



Questioner " Then, prithee ! why speak they of divers truths, 
These expert talkers as they bandy words ? 
Surely these many divers things are trutlis, 
Or follow they the twistin^js ol^ their mind ? 

The Master ■' Indeed there are not many divers truths, I ^ 

I Save from surmise on 'lasting* in the world : ^ ' 
They formulate ^ reason from their views , . ^ 

And claim a dual Imding : truth and lies. 

Things seen or heard or felt or rule and rite — 
In such these self-opinioned seers put trust ; 
Fixed in their theories, they grin and say ; 
* Yon fellow is no expert but a fool ! ' 

'Tis just because he brands another fool 

He calls himself an expert and so thmks ; 

Expertly talking in his own esteem, 

On t'other he looks down and thus holds forth. 



iv, 1 3 ] 



The Chapter of Eights 



131 



And when proficient in some ultra-view 889 

He's puffed with pride and deems himself elect, 
Himself anoints himself 'the master-mind,* 
So perfect are those views of his indeed ! 

If, forsooth, one rep(^rt that he's a *nit,* 890 

Why, then with him he is a * nit-wit * too I 
But if himself be 'lore -adept and sage' — 
There's not a fool among recluses found ! 

'Tis thus indeed course-setters oft declare : 891 

* All who proclaim another view from this 
Have failed in cleansing, nor have been made whole I * — 
Fanatics they, demented by their views ! 

Some say just this: ' Herein the cleansing lies, 892 

In others' views there is no cleansing whole ! 
Thus are course-setters, one and all, convinced, 
Big talkers there about their special way. 

If one talk big about his special way, 893 

Would he another therein brand a ' fool ' ? 
He would indeed bring trouble to himself. 
Called he him ' fool, without a cleansing view.' 

Who with fixed theory metes all by his, 894 

Seeks in the world disputes for later times : 

Whoso is rid of every theory, 

That man stirs up no trouble in the world.'* 



(13) Of Major Issues 

Questioner " All who abide confined within these views 895 

And thus dispute : ' This is the very truth!', 
Do they bring always blame upon themselves, 
Or do they also praises gain thereby ? " 

The Master " 'Tis but a trifle this, nor leads to calm. 896 

The twain are but fruits of dispute, I say ; 
And seeing this, dispute no more, and know 
* Security * is no ground for debate. 



132 



Woven Cadences [ ^"- I75 



7W^ 



" Whatever these diverse opinions be, ' 897 

He who hath found and known, turns not to one : 
Why should the unconcerned seek the concerned } 
Why give accord to things of sight and ear ? 

Who hold rule as supreme^say by restraint 898 

Comes cleansing here, and serve observing rites : 
Herein let's train, for this his cleansmg is.' — 
Mere expert talkers to becoming led ! 

And if he stumble o'er some rule and rite, 899 

He trembles, having failed to do some act ; 
And, longing here lor cleansmg, he laments 
As one left home and caravan hath lost. 

Hence let a man renounce all rule and rite, 900 

And all the acts that draw down blame and praise, 
^^^ Au.<-; Long not for 'cleansing' won from this or that, 
Fare free of such, accepting not that ' calm.* 

Some trust in penance, some in loathsomeness, 901 

And some in things they see or hear or feel : 
Tall talkers they, who harp on cleansing here, 
Thirsting about becoming this or that. 

Indeed, who dwells on yearnings longingly, 902 

Trembles forsooth about his preformed view? : 

For whom there is no rise and fall of things, 

Why should he tremble and for what would yearn?" 

Questioner " The thmg that some declare as yondermost, 903 

Others declare to be just lacking worth : 
Pray, which of them is it that speaks the truth ? 
Or are they expert talkers, one and all ? 

For each declares his view as consummate, 904 

Declares the other's view as lackmg worth : 
And thus indeed they argue and dispute, 
Each saying his opinion is the truth." 



»^'n] The Chapter of Eights 133 

The Muster ** If view were worthless from another's blame, 905 

Then would no view at all be notable ! 
The many say another's view lacks worth, 
While talking big about the views they hold. 

And just as each doth honour his own view, 906 

So likewise each doth praise his special way : 
And all their words become for them true words. 
And there is cleansing too, each for himself ! 

For brahman there's no lead from other folk, 907 

From studying what men accept in views : 
Hence, having passed beyond disputes, indeed 
He seeth not another's view as best. 

They say * I know, I see, this is just so! ', 908 

And then, ' Some deem that cleansing comes from view ' : 
If he hath seen, what then is view to him ? 
They cleansing win and say from t'other that ! 

The man with eyes will see both * name ' and * form,' 909 
And having seen, will know them just as such : 
Let him see much or little as he lists. 
No cleansing comes by that the experts say. 

No guide to cleansing is the talker sure 9 i o 

Who giveth preference to preformed view : 
Where is his trust, there is the ' light ' he says. 
He, the cleansed talker, there hath seen it so I 

No brahman treads a web that man can sum, 9 1 1 

No lackey he of views, no pedant's heir : 
All the diverse opinions other folk 
Accept he understands and poised abides. 

Loosed here from knots, the sage is in the world Q12 

No party-man among disputes that rise ; 
Poised^ is he 'mid the restless and at peace, 
Accepting not what other folk accept. 

1 Upekkhah, 



134 



Woven Cadences 



r Sn. 176 



*' of olden cankers rid, not making new, 
Not governed by desire, no talker sure, 
He, muser rapt, from view-issues released. 
Is by the world unsoiled, not blamed by self. 

He who hath fought his fight in everything. 
What views arise from things seen, heard or 
That sage, his burden laid, is wholly freed, 
No web, no let, no hankering remains." 

Thus spake the Master. 



felt, 



913 



914 



, .^"1>^'^j 



(14) The Quick Way 

Questioner '' I ask that rishi, kinsman of the Sun, 

About th' aloof state and the bourn of calm : 
How, when a monk hath seen, becomes he cool 
And unattached to any worldly thing 

The Master " Let him by insight break the root of this,' 

Reckoned as hindrance : all the thoughts 'I am * ; 
Whatever craving there may be within. 
Let him train ever mindful that to oust. 

,> .^ Whatever thing he comes to know in full, 

^ Be it a thing within or thing without. 

Let him not firmily be convinced by that : 
Not that is called the cool state of calm men. 

Let him not think by that, ' 'Tis better this,' 
* 'Tis lacking worth,' nor yet ' 'Tis equal this' : 
Touched by the contact of diversity. 
Let him not stay^ therein, misleading self. 

Then should the monk indeed grow calm within ; 
Let him not from another seek that calm : 
And verily as he grows calm within. 
Naught is assumed, how then rejected aught ? 



9^5 



916 



917 



918 



919 




UfV- 



C-'y? c 



t-%— y) 



rxt^- j 



iv, 14] 



The Chapter of Eights 



135 



Questioner 



The Master 



As in the mighty ocean's midmost depth 920 

Riseth no wave but all stays ever poised,* 

So let the monk stay poised nnd ever still 

And nowhere then form thoughts of ' prominence.' 

O thou of open eye who hast declared 921 

Dharma seen inly which expelleth fear, 
Tell me, I beg thee Master, now the way, 
What to observe, and then the state intent^!" 

Let not a monk be found with greedy eyes, ^ 922 

Let him turn ear away from village-talk, 

Let him not hanker after things ot taste. 

Let him not hold as * mine ' aught in the world. 

When stricken by the touch of circumstance, 923 

Let not a monk for any where lament. 
Nor for becoming elsewise greatly yearn, 
Nor tremble, fearful, over dangers here. 

Let him not make a store of what he gets, 924 

Whether it be of food or things to drink, 
Or things to bite and chew or things to wear : 
Let him not be afraid at getting naught. 

Let him a muser be, no loiterer, 925 

Let him abstain from fret, not idle be : 
Where sounds are few, there let a monk abide, 
There let him have his lodging and his bed. 

And let him not be given much to sleep, 926 

Let him alertly wayfare wide awake. 

Let him refrain from laughter, sloth, deceit, 

From sport, sex-intercourse, adorning self. 

Let him not use Atharva Vedic spells, 927 

Nor things foretell from dreams or signs or stars, 
Let not my follower predict from cries, 
Cure barrenness nor practise quackAy. 



Thit9, 



2 $miUki, 



136 Woven Cadences [Sn. 180 

" Let not a monk quake at the sound of blame, 928 

Nor be elated by the sound ot praise ; 
Let him oust covetmg with envy linked, 
And angry thoughts with slander in their train. 

Let him not undertake to buy or sell, 929 

Nor let a monk find fault in any place ; 
Let him abuse none when to village come, 
Nor let him preach to folk for sake of ^ain. 

Let not a monk speak in a boastful way, 930 

Nor let him speak a word with ^ain as end ; 
Let him not train with show and frowardness, 
Nor let him utter words provokingly. 

Let him not into speaking false be led, 931 

Nor consciously do anything that's sham ; 

Let him no other man despise for way . • , v^<t> 
Of life, for wisdom, or for rule and rite.J '-r^^' 

When he is sorely vexed at listening 932 

Unto recluses' talk or talks of folk. 
Let him not harshly unto them rejoin : 
For men of calm do not retaliate. 

And let the monk who comes to know this thing, 933 

Train with discernment ever mindfully ; 
Knowing the cool is called the state of calm, 
Let none be lax in Gotama's behest. 

For he, th' unconquered conqueror, did see 934 

A Dharma inly seen, not lore come down : 
Hence in the Master's bidding let a man 
Train ever earnestly and honour it." 
Thus spake the Master. 

(15) Of Violence 
The Master " Lo ! see the folk at strife, 935 

How violence breeds fear ! 
I'll tell of the dismay, 
The terror felt by me. 



i^' ^5] The Chapter of Eights 137 

As fish in shallow pool 936 

I saw man floundering : 

I saw rhe feuds 'rwixt men, 

And in me entered fear. 

All worthless was the world, 937 

All quarters seemed to quake : 
Fain for a home, I saw 
No shelter for myself. 

Feuds as the only end 938 

I saw — and rose my gorge ! 
Then lo ! I saw the barb, 
Heart-prop»pmg, hard to see. 

From realm to realm runs he 939 

Who by that barb is pierced : 
But he who draws that barb, 
Runs not nor sinketh down." 

The ways of training here are told : — 

The Master '' Whate'er the worldly ties, 94° 

Let none be held thereby ; 
Wholly impale the lusts 
And train for cool of self ! 

Truthful, not blunt, gone guile, 94 1 

Gone wrath, from slander far, 

The silent sage must cross 

All greed and wrong and craze. 

The man who minds rhe cool 94^ 

Must conquer torpor, sloth 
And sleep; not idle dwell ; 
Not walk in arrogance ; 

Not into falsehood fall ; 94 3 

Not dote on things of form ; 
Pride he must understand, 
Fare free of violence, 



138 Woven Cadences [Sn. 184 

Nor must he love the old, 944 

Nor fondness form for new, 

Nor grieve o'er what is not, 

Nor to the garish^ *^ii"g- 

Greed's the ' great flood ' I say, 945 

Yearning I call its 'scum,' 
Its * bed ' a shifting view ; 
Hard going is lust's bog ! 

The sage turns not from truth, 946 

Firm based the brahman stays, 
And he, forsaking all. 
Is truly man-of-calm. 

Who truly finds and knows, 947 

He is true lore-adept : 

Who Dharma knows, gone trust. 

He rightly moves thro' life, 

And here doth envy none. 

Who here hath lusts crossed o'er, 948 

Bond in the world so hard 

To pass, grieves not nor longs, 

Stream-cutter, tie-less he. 

Then wither what is gone ! 949 

Be naught what is to come ! 
If now thou wilt not grasp, 
In calm thou shalt wayfare. 

Who hath no thought of ' mine * 950 

In all ot name-and-lorm, 
Nor grieves o'er what is not. 
Loses naught in the world. 

^ Akasam na sito ; SnA., ' craving.' Perhaps we could read okasam and resolve it into 
oka-asam, cf. verse 474 asam anissaya and verse 280 ^ehanissitam : ' Nor trust in hoin*' 
or hope,' 



»v. 16] The Chapter of Eights 139 

Who thinketh not of aught 9 5 i 

' 'Tis mine ! *, * Another's this ! ', 
Nor holdeth aught as ' mine,' 
Grieves not * This is not mine ! '. 

Not jealous, coveting, 952 

Unmoved, all days the same : 

That is the wealth, I say, 

Of doughty men, when asked. 

The man unmoved, who knows, 95 3 

Moulds naught (that beareth fruit) ; 
Aloof from zest, he sees 
Security all ways. 

The silent sage speaks not 9 54 

Of * equal,' ' low,' or ' high ' : 
Passed envy, man-of-calm, 
He naught adopts or scouts. 
Thus spake the Master. 



(16) Sariputta 

Sariputta Said reverend Sariputta :— 95 5 

'* Erst have I never seen 
Nor heard of one with voice 
So sweet as his who came 
From Tusita to teach, 

Devas and men to lead. 9 56 

Lo ! he as seer appears : 
The one who routing gloom 
Outright in rapture dwelt, 

Awake, trust gone, true type, 9 57 

And come to lead, — to him 
I come to ask the goal 
For all his servants here. 




140 Woven Cadences [Sn. 186 

** For monk who, sick at heart, 958 

Taketh his seat afar 
In lodgings lair or foul : 
The cemetery or 

Tree-root or mountain cave, — 9S9 

What perils may befall 
In his still, silent haunt 
Whereat he should not quake ? 

What worldly dangers his 960 

Which in that haunt remote 
A monk must rout as treads 
He to the deathless realm ? 

What topics should be his, 961 

And what his dailv round ? 
What rule and duty be 
For monk self-resolute ? 

What training undergo, 962 

So he intent, alert 
And apt, may purge the self 
As silversmith the dross ? 

)e Master ** Ssriputta," replied the Master then, 96^ 

*' What's comfortable for one sick at heart, 
Whenas he taketh seat and bed afar, 
Fain for awakening and in accord 
With Dharma, that I'll tell — as one who knows. 

The monk alert, rapt farer on the edge,' 964 

Should have no fear of these five fears : 
Gadflies and stinging bees and things that creep. 
Attacks of men and of four-footed beasts. 

Nor should he be afraid of others' views, 965 

When the great perils o{ them he hath seen ; 
So should the expert seeker overcome 
All other troubles that may here befall. 

"^ Pariyantacart , cf. above verse 214; /. iv. 340, Ptucekahwidho . . . hbavapafiyantt 
thitc, see ChiUns' Diet. ; SnA. & SU., STliJisu aituiu etc., sec FED ; perhaps herein 
mesning on the brink of beyond cf. Th'x^. 354. 



i^' ^6] The Chapter of Eights 



141 



When stricken by disease or hunger's pangs, 966 

Cold and excessive heat should he endure ; 
When stricken sore by them, that homeless man 
Must stir up energy and strive with strength. 

Let him not steal nor let him tell a lie, 967 

Let him show amity to weak and strong ; 
And when he knows disquiet of the mind,* 
Let him expel that as dark Mara's gloom. 

Nor must he fall a prev to wrath and pride, 968 

But digging up their roots, let him stay poised ; 
And, as he wrestles, let him overcome 
All that is dear to him, all that repels. 

With joy in what is lovely, wisdom-led, 969 

Let him then put to flight these troubles here, 
Conquer dislike for his lone lodging place. 
Conquer the four that cause him discontent : 

* Alack ! what shall I eat, and where indeed ? 970 

How ill I've slept ! Whcje shall I sleep today ? 
Whosoe'er trains and leads the homeless life. 
Must oust these thoughts that lead to discontent. 

With food and clothing timelv gotten, he 971 

Must therein measure know lor his content ; 
He, faring thus, restrained and curbed, would speak 
In village no harsh words, tho' vexed indeed. 

Then let him loiter not, but eyes downcast, 972 

Be ever bent on musing, much awake ; 
Then let him strive for poise, intent-of-self* 
Cut doubt and hankering and fretful ways. 

Alert, let him rejoice when urged by words, 973 

Break fallowness in fellow-wa)farers, 
Utter*^ in season due the expert word, 
Not ponder on the views and talk of folk. 



Avilattam. '^ Samahitutto. * Famunce. 



142 Woven Cadences [^"- ^^7 

'* Alert, then let him train to discipline 974 

Those things which are the five dusts in the world : 
To conquer lust for forms and sounds and tastes, 
To conquer lust for scents and things of touch. 

When he hath disciplined desire for these, 975 

Alert, with mind released in full, that monk 
As studies he the thing aright, in time 
Alone, uplifted,* may the darkness rend." 

Thus spake the Master. 



Ekodibhutc. 



Chapter V. — The Way to the Beyond 



The Prologue 

From a fair city of the Kosalcse 976 

South went a brahman, faring yon by hymns, 

Resolved to reach the state of man-of-naught ; 

And dwelt by the Godhavari, between 977 

The realm of Assaka and Mulaka's 

Homesteads ; and there on fruits and gleaning lived. 

And all around stretched fertile village lands, 978 

Whence of their foison a great sacrifice 

He made, thereafter oflered sacrifice ; 979 

Then to his hermitage returned. And as 

He entered, lo ! another brahman came. 

Tottering, with swollen feet and grimy teeth 980 

And dusty hair ; and as he came he begged 

Five hundred pence. Whereat, when Bavarin 981 

Beheld him, straight he bade him sit and asked 

About his weal and health, and spake these words : 

Bdvarin " The gifts of faith, once mine, I've all renounced ; 982 

Believe me, brahm, I've not five hundred pence ! " 
Brahman " Sir, if thou wilt not give me what I ask, 983 

Thy head shall sevenfold split in seven days I " 
And weavmg spells, the rogue did chant his curse. 984 

And ill at ease thereat was Bavarin, 

Parched, nor could eat, pierced by the dart of grief, 985 

Kor was his mind, thus tasked, for musing fain. 
And seeing his alarm and pain, there came 986 

A friendly devi and in this sort spake : 
D^vf " The rogue seeks wealth ; naught knows he of the head, 987 
Nor knowledge hath of head and head-cleaving ! " 

Bavarin " Lady, if thou dost know, tell me of head 988 

And head-cleaving, v/hen asked ; thy words we'ld hear." 



144 



W 



oven 



Cad 



aacnces 



[ Sn. 192 



989 



990 



991 



992 



Devi " Nay, but I know not this, nor knowledge have 

Thereof. In sooth, the Conquerors* vision that I 
Bavarin " Then who within this earth's great orb doth know 
Of head and head-cleaving ? Devi, pray say I " 

Devi ** From out Kapilavatthu came of late 

A leader bringing light to all the world, 
Scion of king Okkaka, Sakya's son, 
The All-awakened One : he, brahman, is 
Yon-farer of all things ; all knowledge he 
Hath won and power ; hath eyes that into all 
Things see ; hath to the end of all things won ; 
He by th' affections' end is wholly freed. 
The Master, that awakened seer, doth teach 
Dharma to all the world : if thou shouldst go 
To him and ask, he will explain this thing." 
And when the words, '* the All-awakened One *' 
He heard, elate was Bavarin, lessened 
His grief, and joy exceeding filled his heart. 

Elate, enraptured, awe-inspired, 

Then Bavarin that devi asked : 
Bavarin *VPray, in what \illage, countryside 

Or town doth the world-leader dwell ? 

Where should we go to honour him, 

The All-awakened, first of men ? " 
Devi " At Savatthi in Kosala 

The Conqueror dwells, of wisdom wide, 

Sage of the noble quickening* 

That Sakya's son, the bull of men. 

The burden-rid and cankerless, 

Knows of the cleaving of the head." 
Then summoned he his pupils, brahmans who 
Bavarin Yon-fared by hymns, and said : " Come, brahman-sons,' 
For I will speak ; mark ye these words of mine ! 

^ Varahhurimedhaso. 

2 Manava, generally ' young brahman.* Benfey's Sk. Diet, adds : 'A necklace of 
sixteen strings,' i.e. pearl ornament, from mani. It is noteworthy chat there are 



993 



994 



995 



996 



997 



V] 



The Way to tlie Beyond 



145 



Brahmans 



Bavarin 



One hard to meet, seen seldom in the world, 

Already hath aiisen in the world, 

Famed is he as one all-awake I Go swift 

To Savatthi and see this foremost man." 

How shall we know at sight it is the Wake ? 

Tell us who know not, sir, so we may know." 

Verily in hymns are handed down the signs 

Of a great man, revealed as thirty-two, 

Sequent, complete. Whose limbs do bear these signs, 

He hath two courses only and no third : 

If the home-life he live, conquering the earth, 

He rules by Dharma without rod or sword ; 

If he go forth from home to homelessness, 

Veil-lifter, all-awakened, man-of-worth. 

And peerless he becomes. Go ! ask with mind 

My birth and breed, my marks and mantra-hymns, 

My pupils ; ask of head and head-cleaving ! 

If he shall be the Wake, of vision clear. 

By word he'll answer questions put by mind." 

Those goodly words of Bavarin they heard. 

The sixteen brahman pupils : Ajita 

And Tissa-Metteyya and Punnaka, 

Mettagu, Dhotaka, Upasiva, 

Nanda and Hemaka, both Todeyya 

And Kappa and the wise Jatukannin, 

Bhadravudha, Udaya, Posala, 

Sage Mogharajah and the great rishi 

Pingiya : each with a following, famed 

Thro' all the world, musers who musing loved, 

Each bearing imprint of his former life. 



998 

999 
1000 

lOOI 

1002 
1003 

1004 
1005 
1006 

1007 

1008 
1009 



1 6 manavas mentioned here ( hence 1 6 ' questions ' ) ; the Vcdic sacrifice required 1 6 
assistant brahman priests, sec Griffith's trsl. of RV. p. 19. F. L. Woodward gives a 
hsr of Mahabh. references to this number at G.S. v. 240. It often occurs in Buddhist 
texts ; the Chapter of Eights contains 16 suttas ; at D. i. 3 1 there are said to be r6 ways of 
disputing about atta. 



146 Woven Cadences [Sn. 192 

Then all saluted Bavarin and passed 1010 

Him on the right. And clad in skins, their hair 

In braids, northwards departed they, first thro* 

Patitthana of Mulaka and thence 101 1 

On to Mahissati ; to Ujjeni 

They went, to Gonaddha and Vedisa, 

To Vanasavhaya and Kosambi, 

To Saketa ; and came to Savatthi, 10 12 

Chief of all cities she ! ( But learning there 

The lord had left, they passed ) to Setavya, 

Kapilavatthu, Kusinara's burg, 

Thro' Pava, Bhoga and thro' Vesali, 10 13 

Unto the Magadhan metropolis,^ 

Where fair and lovely rose the Black Rock shrine. 

As one athirst for cooling streams, as one 10 14 

Forspent by summer's heat for shade, in haste 

They climbeti the mount, as merchants after gain. 

What time the lord before the Order sate 1015 

And, like a roaring lion in a glade. 

Taught Dharma to the monks, saw Ajita 

The All-awakened One : all golden-rayed 1016 

He seemed, and luminous as the full moon 

On festal fifteenth night ; and saw his Hmbs, 

His perfect form : and standing by in joy, 1017 

Within his mind he asked the Master thus : 

Ajita " Make known our teacher's age ; declare his clan, 10 18 

His marks ; fell of his yondmost^ reach m hymns ! 
How many can the brahmana recite ? " 
The Master " Six score his years ; his clan is Bavarin ; 1019 

Three signs his limbs do bear ;^ yon-farer he 
In Vedas three, the legends and the marks, 
The expositions and the rituals ; 1020 

Five hundred mantra-hymns can he recite ; 
In his own teaching he hath yondmost reached."* 

Ajita " Tell us, great man, each mark of Bavarin, 1021 

Cutter of thirst, leave us not thus in doubt ! 



^ Sixteen places. ^ Paramim. ^ Paragu. * Sadhanime parjimim gato. 



^] The Way to the Beyond 



ay to tne oeyona 147 



The Mtister ** He covers mouth with tongue ; between his brows 1022 

Grows hair ; what's hid beneath his cloth is cased 
Within a sheath : know thus, O brahmana ! " 
Now none there heard the questions asked, but all 1023 
The answers heard ; whereat the people awed, 
Upraising joined hands, did reason thus : 
People " What deva asked in mind these questions, pray, 1024 

To which the Master answered thus ? Was it 
Brahma or Indra or Sujampati ? " 
Ajita " Of head and head-cleaving asked Bavarin : 1025 

Explain this. Master ! Rishi, clear our doubt." 

The Master " Discern the muddled head as ignorance ; 1026 

The cleaving of the head as knowledge, linked 
With faith and mindfulness and mind intent, 
With ardent striving and with energy." 
Rigid the brahman scholar stood in awe 1027 

Profound. Then placed he on one shoulder cloak 
Of skin and fell with bowed head at his feet. 
Ajita " Brahmana Bavarin, his pupils too, 1028 

Joyous, elate in mind, O gracious One, 
Salute thy feet, O thou who seest all ! " 

The Master " All happiness to brahman Bavarin 1029 

And to his pupils ! Happiness to thee, 
O brahman scholar, and long life to thee ! 
On all the many doubts of Bavarin 1030 

And thine and of thy friends, pray ! question me 
As is thy heart's desire, for now's the time ! " 
Thus, from the all-awakened One leave got, 103 1 

Ajita sitting there with joined hands 
Asked this first question^ of the Man-thus-come : 



( The prologue is ended) 



1 That brahmans went to consult Kshatriyas for knowledge is well known, see 
Deussen's PMosopby of the Upanishads {English translation) pp.17 and 91, quoting the 
Upanishads. 



14S 



Woven Cadences 



.Sn. 197 



(i) Brahman Ajitas questions 

Ajita " Covered by what, pray ! is the world ? '* 1032 

Thus spake the reverend Ajita, 
" Why clearly shineth not the world ? 
What callest thou its plastering ? 
What hath it, pray I in greatest dread ? ** 

The Master "Covered by ignorance is the world, 1033 

Ajita," thus the Master spake, 
" The world shines not from craze* and sloth, 
Yearning I call its plastering. 
And ill it hath in greatest dread.'' 

Ajita ** The streams are flowing everywhere," 1054 

Thus spake the reverend Ajita, 
** What is the dam for all the streams ? 
Tell me the flood-gate for the streams ; 
Tell me how may the streams be closed." 

The Master ** Whatever streams flow m the world, 1035 

Ajita," said the Master then, 
** The dam for them is mmdfulness ; 
It is their flood-gate too, I say ; 
By wisdom may the streams be closed." 

Ajita " This wisdom and this mindfulness," 1036 

Thus spake the reverend Ajita, 
" And name-and-form, — explain to me 
This thing, O gracious One, when asked : 
Where do these things all cease to be ? " 

The Master ** This question that thou now hast asked, 1037 

Ajita, I'll explain to thee : 
Where cease to be both name and form ? 
( For thus thy question is ) in full : 

1 Veviccha, SnA. macchariyahetu; cj. above verse 941. 



^] 



The Way to the Beyond 



When ended is the mind-at-work,^ 
Then here all that doth cease to be." 

Ajita *' And they who here have Dharma summed, 
And they, the many who here train : 
Tell me about their way of life, 
O wise and gracious One, when asked." 

The Master " None ever would for pleasures crave ; 
The mind of none would be perturbed ; 
Each would be expert in all thmgs ; 
With mmdfulness a monk would move." 



149 



1038 



1039 



(2) Brahman Tissa Metteyyas questions^ 

Tissa Metteyya "Who is content here in the world?" 1040 

Asked reverend Tissa Metteyya, 
** In whom do turmoils never rise ? 
Who, understanding either course, 
By insight sticks not 'twixt the two ? 
And pray, whom callest thou ' great man ' ? 
Who hath the sewing here passed by ? " 

The Master ** The man who lives the godly life 1041 

'Midst pleasures, Metteyya," he said, 
** The ever mindful monk who, cool 
From gauging things, doth craving end, 
In him no turmoils ever rise : 

He, understanding either course, 1042 

By insight sticks not 'twixt the two ; 

Him verily I call * great man,' 

He hath the sewing'' here passed by." 

^ Vinruinassa nirodhcna, recurs above verse 734 ; I suppose, the merging of 'name' 
and 'form' ( subject and object of individuality ) and the consequent ceasing of intellec- 
tion, cf. Hindu 'standpoint' referred to by Deussen o^.cit. 97 ; cf. too above verse 874 
of sAtim. 

* Cf. CS. ni. 284 where this sutu is quoted. 

• Sihhani, Nid^ craving. 



150 



w 



oven 



Cad 



enccs 



rsn. 



[99 



(3) Brahman Punnakas questions 

Punriaka " Unto the still, seer of root-cause," 

Thus spake the reverend Punnaka, 
** I've come with questions on the goal :^ 
What trust caused rishis, Manu's breed, 
Nobles and brahmans in the world 
To sacrifice to devas oft ? 
I ask thee, Master, tell me that." 

The Master *' Those rishis and all Manu's breed, 

Punnaka," thus the Master spake, 
*' Nobles and brahmans in the world 
Who sacrificed to devas oft. 
Did so in their decay : they longed 
For life here now, O Punnaka." 

Punnaka " But they who here oft sacrificed," 

Thus spake the reverend Punnaka, 
" Earnest in sacrificial rites, 
Surely, O gracious Master, they 
Thus crossed beyond birth and decay ? 
I ask thee, Master, tell me that." 

The Master " Folk long, laud, yearn and sacrifice, 

Punnaka," then the Master said, 
" And when they get, for pleasures yearn 
They more ! Those fain to sacrifice 
Loved, too, the lusts of life : they crossed 
Not o'er birth and decay, I say," 

Punnaha " If those tho' fain to sacrifice," 

Thus spake the reverend Punnaka, 
** Crossed not by gifts birth and decay, 
Then who in man-and-deva world 
Hath o'er them crossed, O gracious One ? 
I ask thee. Master, tell me that." 



043 



1044 



1045 



1046 



1047 



Atthi panhena^ SnA. 572, atthikg, 



V.4] 



The Way to the Beyond 



The Master ** Who gaugeth low and lofty here, 
Punnaka," thus the Master said, 
" In whom is turmoil nowhere here, 
He calm, gone lume, gone^ stir, gone hope. 
Hath crossed birth and decay, I say." 



151 



1048 



(4) Brahman Mcttagiis questions 

Mettagu " I ask thee, Master, tell me this," 1049 

Thus spake the reverend Mettagu, 
** For thou, I deem, art lore-adept, 
Art he who here hath quickened self : 
Whence, pray I arise these many ills 
Which are so varied in the world ? " 

The Master *' Well hast thou asked ill's origin, 1050 

Mettagu," thus the Master spake, 
** And I will tell thee as I know : 
Caused by affections ever grow 
The ills so varied m the world. 

The fool who doth unwittingly 
Affections form, meets ill again : 
Hence wisely no affections form, 
Perceiving thence grow birth and ill." 

Mettagu " This thing we asked thou hast declared. 
Again I ask ; pray ! tell me this : 
How do rapt m users cross the flood. 
Birth and decay and grief and woe ? 
That, silent sage, explain in full, 
For thine's this Dharma, found and known." 

The Master "Dharma, I will declare to thee, 1053 

Mettagu," said the Master then. 
** A thing seen here, not lore come down, 
The which who finds and knows, and fares 
Alert, may cross the world's foul mire." 



051 



1052 



152 



Woven Cadences 



■[ Sn. 202 



Mettagu ** And I shall find delight therein, 

In Dharma's lofty state, great sage, 

The which who finds and knows, and fares 

Alert, may cross the world's foul mire." 

e Master " All that thou here dost contemplate, 
Mettagu," thus the Master said, 
" Midmost, athwart, above, below, — 
Oust^ pleasure and oust harbourage 
In such ; that done, the mind-at-work^ 
Would then not in becoming stay.^ 

Abiding thus, the monk alert, 
Earnest and faring rid of * mine,* 
Would quit birth and decay, grief, woe 
And ill, when here he finds and knows." 

Mettagu ** Rishi, I love thy words ; well limned, 
Gotama, is th' affection-freed ! 
Master, thou surely hast quit ill, 
For thine's this Dharma, known and found ! 

They too, O sage, all ill would quit 
Whom thou shouldst constantly* instruct : 
Hence have I come, O sinless One, 
To worship thee ; perchance the lord 
Would me too constantly instruct." 

" Whom thou shouldst know as ' lore-adept. 
He, brahman, man-of-naught, not caught 
In lust and life, hath crossed this flood. 
Hath crossed to yon, vital, doubt-free. 



1054 



1055 



1056 



1057 



058 



1059 



1 Fanujja, SnA., both panudehi and panuditva. 

2 Vinnanam, SnA., abhisahkhara- : intellection, see note ro verse iv^>7. 
^ Bhave na titthe, see below note to verse 1058. 

* Aithitam, SnA. & Nid., sakkaccam or sad:i, followed by Sn Index di CPD. But 
perhaps it is connected with bhave na tittle of verse 1055, ( d. roo antipadhtkam of verse 
1057, SnA. nibbana), thus in meaning: about that which does not stay in becoming, 
so ' about the constant,' Nid. glosses abhinham, cl. prose following verse 342 above ; 
imuki gathaki abhinham ovadati. 



5] 



The Way to the Beyond 



Who finds and knows, that man is here 
The ' lore-adept ' : loosed from this bond 
For aye becoming this or that,* 
He, craving passed, gone stir and hope, 
Hath crossed, I say, birth and decay." 



153 



1060 



Dhotakc 



Ths Master 



Dhotaka 



The Master 



DhotaL 



(5) Brahman Dhotaka^s questions 

" I ask thee, Master, tell me this," xo6i 

Thus spake the reverend Dhotaka, 
" I long, great rishi, for thy word ; 

And when I've heard thy utterance,* 

Then wilJ I train for cool of self." 

'* Wherefore stir up thy ardour now, 1062 

Dhotaka," thus the Master spake, 
*' Be here indeed alert and apt ! 

When thou hast heard the utterance 

From here, train for the cool of self." 

" Lo ! in this man-and-deva world I see 1063 

The living brahman, man-of-naught ! 
Thee ! thee I worship, seer of all ! 
Oh, free me, Sakya, from my doubts I " 

*' Whoso hath doubts here, Dhotaka, 1064 

Not him I come to liberate : 
When Dharma thou dost know supreme. 
Then mayest thou thus cross the flood." 

*' In thy compassion teach me, Brahm, 1065 

Dharma 's aloof state I would know, 
So, trusting naught, I here may fare. 
Unclouded as the spacious sky." 



^ hhav'ahhavt. 

- S'i^^hoia, d above verse 959, * still,' ' silent,' so here perhaps, 
w>f vhy (phirmz,.' ci. verse 719 above ; und fhosam . . . ^arato verse 696. 



still low voice 



154 



Woven Cadences 



Sn. 205 



** The calm I will declare to thee, 1066 

Dhotaka," said the Master then, 

" A thing seen here, not lore come down, 
The which who finds and knows, and fares 
Alert, may cross the world's foul mire." 

Dhotaha ** And I shall find delight in that, 1067 

Great rishi, in the calm supreme, 
The which who finds and knows, and fares 
Alert, may cross the world's foul mire." 

** All that thou here dost contemplate, 1068 

Dhotaka," thus the Master said, 

** Midmost, athwart, above, below. 
That find and know as worldly bond, 
Nor thirst about becoming this or that." 



(6) Brahman Upastva^s questions 

Upasiva '* Unaided, Sakya, and alone, " 
The reverend Upasiva said, 
** I'll never cross the mighty flood : 
Tcli me the means, O seer of all, 
How I with aid may cross this flood ! " 

'c Master " Alertly, Upasiva, seek 

The state of man-of-naught,"* he said, 
** And aided by the thought 'naught is,'^ 
Thou'lt cross the flood ; and day and night, 
Lust-rid, doubts gone, see craving end." 

Upasiva " Who passion for all pleasures ends," 
The reverend Upasiva said, 
** Helped by the state of man-of-naught, 
Rid of all else, in yondermost 
Release of sense^ released, would he 
Stay poised untrammelled* in that stare ? 



1069 



X070 



1 07 1 



^ Ikincafinam see note to verse 176 above. 
•* SarffiSvimokhe, or perception, see verse 874. 



2 S"atthi-tu 

* Aninuyayi, 



V.7] 



The Way to the Beyond 



55 



The Master ** Ay, Upasiva," then he said, 

" Who passion for all pleasures ends. 
Helped by the state of man-of-naught, 
Rid of all else, in yondermosi 
Release of sense released, he would 
Stay poised untrammelled in that state." 
Upastva " If he stay poised untrammelled then 
An age of years, O seer of all, 
Would he in that release be cooP ? 
Would mind-at-work become^ for such ? 

The Master ** Lo, Upasiva," he replied, 

" As flame flung^ on by force of wind 
Flees to its end, reaches what none 
Can sum ; the silent sage, released 
From name-and-form, goes to the goal, 
Reaches the state that none can sum." 
Upastva " And he who wins the goal, is he 
No more, or truly ever well ? 
That to me, sage, in full explain, 
For thine's this Dharma, found and known. 

The Master ** Know, Upasiva," then he said, 
There is no measuring of man, 
Won to the goal, whereby they* Id say 
Mis measure's so : that's not for him ; 
When all conditions are removed, j 
All ways of telling"* are removed." ' 

(7) Brahman Nanias questions 

Nanda Then spake the reverend Nanda thus : 

" Folk say there're sages in the world ; 
Pray, how is it : do they declare 
A man's a sage from knowledge won, 
Or is it from his mode of life? " 



072 



1073 



1074 



^^rL^ 



1075 



1076 



AU^ 



H 



077 



^ Slti, SnA., nibbana. ^ Bhavetha virinanatp, v.L cavetha, see hUd. ; 

cf. note to verse 1037 above. Does vinndna persist ? see verse 1055. ^ KhittQ, 

•* Words cannot 4esc|:ibc the v;ncon4iuoncd. 



156 



Woven Cadences 



[ Sn. 207 



" Experts call none ' sage,* Nanda, here 1078 

From view, tradition, knowledge won. 
I call them sages who have fought 
Their fight and fare, gone stir and hope." 

Nanda '* Recluses, brahmans, both alike," 1079 

The reverend Nanda then rejoined, 
** Say cleansing comes from seen and heard, 
Say cleansing comes from rule and rite, 
Say that it comes in many ways : 
Prithee, in faring thus, crossed they 
Birth and decay, O gracious One ? 
I ask thee, Master, tell me that." 

** Nanda," replied the Master then, 1080 

" Recluses, brahmans, who alike 
Say cleansing comes from seen and heard. 
Say cleansing comes from rule and rite, 
Say that it comes in many ways, — 
Altho' they fare thus here, I say 
They cross not o'er birth and decay." 

Nanda Then answered reverend Nanda thus: 1081 

** If, sage, thou say est none who hold 
Such views as these cross o'er the flood, 
Then who in man-and-deva world 
Cross, gracious One, birth and decay ? 
I ask thee, Master, tell me that." 

" Nanda," the Master said, " I say 1082 

Nor all recluses, brahmans all. 
Are shrouded in birth and decay : 
Who here are rid of things seen, heard 
And felt ; rid of all rule and rite ; 
Rid of the many practices ; 
Who craving plumb, are cankerless — 
Flood-crossers are those men, I say." 

Nanda " Rishi, I love thy words ; well limned, 1083 

Gotama, is th' affection-freed ! 



^' ^ 1 TKe Way to the Beyond 157 

Who here are rid of things seen, heard, 
And felt ; rid of all rule and rite ; 
Rid of the many practices ; 
Who craving plumb, are cankerlcss — 
Flood-crossers I, too, call those men." 



(8) Brahman Hemaka^s questions 

Hemaka Said reverend Hemaka : 1084 

" Ere I to Gotama's 
Hest came, 'twas thus of yore 
They answered me : ' Thus hath 
It been ; so will it he ! * — 
All on tradition based, 
All adding to my doubt : 

And there I found no joy. 1085 

So teach me Dharma, sage : 
Dharma that craving ends, 
The which who finds and knows 
And fares alertly may 
Cross o'er the world's foul mire." 

TkUasUr "The end here, Hemaka, 1086 

Of passion and desire 
For all the dear forms seen 
And heard and felt and known 
Is the cool lot eterne : 

The mindful knowing this 1087 

Are cooled exceedingly 
By Dharma-vision* then, 
And, evermore grown calm, 
Have crossed the world's foul mire." 



» DittbadhamtnMinibbuta, generally translated : Nirvana here and now ; cf. above 
verse 343 of Kappa's state. 



15^ 



Woven Cadence^ 



i Sn. 21 i 



(9) Brahman Todeyya^s questions 

Todeyya Said reverend Todeyya : 

** In whom no lusts abide, 
In whom no craving is, 
And who hath crossed o'er doubt : 
How far is his release ? " 

The Master ** In whom no lusts abide, 

In whom no craving is. 
And who hath crossed o'er doubt : 
No-yonder's his release." 

Todeyya " Leans he on none, or longs he still ? 
Is wisdom his, or gets he that ? 
Sakya, that I may know a sage, 
Tell me this thing, O seer of all ! '* 

The Master " He leans on none ; he longs no more ; 
Wisdom is his ; the getting's done : 
Know, Todeyya, the sage as man 
Of naught, caught not in lust and life." 



1088 



1089 



1090 



1091 



(10) Brahman Kappa's questions 

Kappa Then reverend Kappa spake : 

** For those who mid-stream stay 
In the flood's fearsome surge, 
Bowed by decay and death. 
For them, O gracious One, 
Proclaim the isle ; and tell 
Me of the isle where such 
As this shall be no more ! " 

The Master *' For those who mid-stream stay, 

Kappa," the Master said, 
** In the flood's fearsome surge, 
Bowed by decay and death, 
The isle I will proclaim 



1092 



1093 



TKe Way to the B 



evonc 



159 



To thee : Where there is naught, 
Where naught is graspt, that is 
The isle of no-beyond ; 
That is the cool where end 
Decay and death, I say. 
The mindful, knowing this, 
Are cooled exceedingly 
By Dharma-vision then, 
Nor fall m Mara's power. 
Nor serve in Mara's train." 



1094 



1095 



(11) Brahman Jatukannins questions 

]atiikannin Reverend Jatukannin thus spake : 1096 

** Lo ! I did hear the muser rapt 
Who flood hath strode nor lists for lusts ; 
And to the lust-freed I am come 
With quest. Tell me the bourn of calm, 
O wisdom's eye innate ! Tell me, 
O Master, that in very truth, 

For with lust vanquished lives the lord ! 1097 

As radiant sun with glory lights 
The earth, blazon the word for me 
But little wise, O quickening sage ! 
So I may understand the way 
How here to leave birth and decay." 

The Master "Expel all greedy lusts, 1098 

Jatukannin," he said, 
** And in renouncing them 
Behold security ; 

And find and know thou naught 
T'accept or to reject. 

Widier thou all that's gone, 1099 

Be naught what is to come, 
If now thou wilt not grasp, 
In calm thou shalt wayfare. 



i6< 



W 



oven 



Cad 



encefi 



[ $n. 2I4 



Who greed for name-and-form 

Hath wholly passed, in him 

No cankers, brahmana, 

Are found or known whereby 

He'ld come withm death's power.' 



I 100 



(12) Brahman Bhadravudhas questions 

Bhadravudha Reverend BhadrSvudha then spake : 

'* I beg the home-forsaker speak, 
Who hath cut craving and is still, 
Flood-crosser loosed from pleasure's lure, 
Quit of time's web, released and sage ! 
These crowds, come here from countryside, 
Long for thy words, O energy ! 
And when they've heard the sinless speak, 
They'll go from here, thee worshipping. 
Do thou explain to them in full,^ 
For thine's this Dharma, found and known." 

The Master " Expel all craving here to grasp, 

Bhadravudha," the Master said, 
** Things up or down, across, between. 
For what man cleaves to in the world. 
By that e'en Mara tracks him down. 
Hence, knowing this, the mindful monk 
Would cleave to naught in all the world. 
Beholding those caught in death's realm. 
This breed who cling to ' graspmg' here." 



1 lOI 



1 102 



1 103 



1 104 



(13) Brahman Udaya^s questions 

Udaya In this wise spake the reverend Udaya : 
** To him the dustless muser seated here. 
To him who hath done all there was to do, 



I 105 



* Sddhu viyakarobi, SnA. dhamwam desehi ; perhaps in meaning ' about the well,* ? 
cf. ThiJg. 1 14, satnanasadhuta ; cf. above verse 1058 note, verse 45 note. 



^♦Hj The Way to the Beyond i6i 

The cankerless, yon-farer of all things, 

I come to ask the goal. Declare release 

By knowledge and the breach oi ignorance ! " 

The Master " 'Tis getting rid of lust and all desires, 1106 

Udaya," thus the Master made reply, 
** 'Tis getting rid of grief both ( thought and felt ), 
'Tis ousting sloth and barring out all fret. 
*Tis poised alertness in its purity 1107 

With the forerunner, rightful reasoning : 
Such is release by knowledge, I declare, 
Such is the breaking up of ignorance." 

Udaya " Pray, say, what binds the world ? What are its ways ? i 1 08 
By getting rid of what, they say, is cool ? " 

The Master " Pleasure doth bind the world ; distraught its ways ; 1 109 
Called cool is getting rid of craving here." 

Udaya " For mindful farer how ends mind-at-work ? 11 10 

The Master's word we've come to ask and hear." 

The Master " Net fain for feelings from within, without, — 1 11 1 

For farer, mindful thus, ends mind-at-work." 



(14) Brahman Posala^s questions 

Posala Reverend Posa la said : 11 12 

'* The still who cutteth doubt 
And tells the past,^ to him 
Yon-farer of all things, 
I come to ask the goal :* 

1 Atttam adisati, SnA. & Nii. ' past births/ followed by CPD, but perhaps it is 
of tkiti, thus in meaning about that which is passed the halt (or station) of conscious- 
ness for mind-at-work] in becoming, cf. above verse 1058 note. 

2 Atthi panha, SnA., Nid. & CPD. as from attha, but might it possibly be a 
question about ' is,' what is ? 



i6i Woven Cadences [ Sn. 216 



** In whom perceiving forms * 1 1 3 

Hath ceased, him quit of all 
The body-bounds, who sees 
Within, without, there's naught, 
The knowledge, Sakiya, 
Of him I ask, and how 
Can such as he be led ? " 

The Master "All halts of: mind-at-work, 11 14 

Posaia," he replied, 
" Knoweth the Man-thus-come ; 
He knows halt's end of him 
Released in that beyond. 

Whenas man knows * a bond i 1 i 5 

Is pleasure* to the rise 
Of state of man-of-naught, 
Discerns it so. then there 
He clearly sees the state : 
That's the true knowledge of 
Brahman of holy life." 



(15) Brahman Mogharajah's questions 

Mogharajah Said reverend Mogharajah then: 11 16 

" Twice^ have I sought with Sakya speech ; 
Not yet to me the seer hath spake ; 
But I have heard, when three times asked, 
That godlike rishis speak ! This world 1 1 1 7 

And yon, the deva-world of Brahm,— 
On these I know not fully of 
The view of far-famed Gotama : 

So I am come to question him, 1 1 1 8 

Seer of supernal, on the goal. 
Pray, how should one regard the world 
So that death's king do see him not ? " 



^ SnA. says before both Ajita and Mette^ya. 



V, i61 



The Way to the Beyond 



.63 



The Mashz^' Regard the world as voidj and e'er 

Alert, uproot false view of self. , ^4' 

Thus, Mogharajah, rhou wouldst be 
Death's crosser ; and, regarding thus 
The world, death's king doth see thee not." 






1 1 19 



N 



i?- 



(16) Brahman Fingiyas questions 

Pingiya " I'm worn with age and weak and wan," 
Thus spake the reverend Pingiya, 
** My eyes are dim, my hearmg's hard ; 
Let me not die the while confused ! 
Blazon the word so I may know 
How here to leave birth and decay ! " 

The Master ** Lo ! see these folk sore vexed by forms, 
Pingiya," thus the Master spake. 
Gay wantons weavmg woe with forms I 
So be thou earnest, Pingiya : 
Be quit of form to come no more." 

Pingiya " The quarters four, the four between, 
Above, below : these realms are ten, 
Yet in the world naught is not seen 
Or heard or felt or known by thee : 
Blazon the word so I may know 
How here to leave birth and decav ! " 

The Master "Behold mankind by craving caught, 
Pingiya," then the Master said, 
** And by decay burnt up and bowed ! 
So be thou earnest, Pingiya : 
Be craving-quit to come no more." 

This the Master said while dwelling at the Black Rock shrine 
among the Magadhans when he replied to the questions of the 
sixteen attending brahmans ( of Blvarin ) as they begged and 
besought him. 

Verily, if a man, knowing the goal and knowing the Dharma of 
each question, should walk by Dharma in Dharma, he would surely 



20 



1 121 



1 122 



123 



164 Woven Cadences [Sn. zic) 

go beyond decay and death. These things lead to the beyond, hence 
the name of this Dharma-teaching is even ' The Way to the 
Beyond.' 

Thus to the rishi, him the wakened One, 1124 

AccompHshed wayfarer, came Ajita 

And Tissa-Metteyya and Punnaka, 

Mettagu, Dhotaka and Upasiva, 

Nanda and Hemaka and Todeyya 1125 

And Kappa too : came wise Jatukannin, 

Bhadravudha, Udaya and Posala, 

Sage Mogharajah, rishi Pingiya : 

Came asking subtle questions of the first 1126 

Of wakened men. And the Awake, thus asked, 

Answered their questions as is very truth. 1127 

And with his answers the sage gladdened them. 

And gladdened by the seer, kin of the Sun, 1128 

Awake, they fared the godly wayfaring, 

Those brahmans, nigh to wisdom's noblest man. 

Whoso should walk as taught the Wake to each 1 129 

Who sought, would from this shore to yonder go : 
And quickening the way supernal here, 1130 

They to the yonder from this shore would go. 

Such is the way to ^o to the beyond, 
Hence called " Parayana : Way to Beyond." 



(And the reverend Pingiya thereafter returned to the Ccdh&vari and 
told brahman Bavarin all that had taken placed) 

ingiya Said reverend Pingiya : 1 1 3 1 

** The way to the beyond 
I'll sing to thee ; the way 
The stainless, quickening seer 
Beheld and so proclaimed. 

1 So SnA. 



The Way to the Beyond 165 



** And why should he speak false, 

Thar leader leaving lust 

And jungle for the cool ? 

Yea, I will praise the word, 11 32 

That thing so fair ! of him 

From srain and error loosed, 

Loosed from deceit and pride ! 
Ouster of darkness, seer of all, 1133 

Awake, gone to world's end, passed all 
Becoming : hmi I serve whose name 
Is truth, the cankerless, ill-quit. 

As birds fly from the wilderness 11 34 

To haunt a fruitful woodland glade ; 
So seers of little worth I leave, 
Won swan-like to the mighty lake. 

Ere I to Gotama's 11 35 

Hest came, 'twas thus of yore 

They answered me : ' Thus hath 

It been : so will it be ! ' — 

All on tradition based, 

All adding to my doubt. 

But he who ousted gloom, 1136 

Lone dweller bringing light, 

That noble Gotama, 
■ Sage of the quickening, 

Seer of the quickening, 

Taught me the thing for here 11-37 

And now, not for anon. 

For craving's end, for weaP 

Which nowhere hath a peer." 

BSvarin *' How canst thou, Pingiya, 1138 

A moment stay from him, 
Sage of the quickening, 
Seer of the quickening, 



1 Anttikam^ SnA. & Md. from 'Ui: ill: but perhaps here in meaning ' not- thus- ish, 
( an-iti-ka ), so, ' not in becoming ' ; ( neti ntti of the I'duntu.) 



i66 Woven Cadences [ Sn. 221 

From Gotama, who taught 1139 

Thee Dharma for both here 

And now, and not anon, 

For craving's end, for weal 

Which nowhere hath a peer ? " 
Pingiya *' I stay not, brahmana, 1140 

One moment e'en from him, 

Sage of the quickenmg, 

Seer of the quickening. 

From Gotama, who taught 1141 

Me Dharma for both here 

And now, and not anon. 

For craving's end, for weal 

Which nowhere hath a peer ! 
With mind I see him as by eye, 1142 

In earnest, brahman, day and night ; 
I brighten night in praising him ; 
Hence not as absence deem I that. 

With faith and joy and heart alert 1 143 

Naught turneth me from his behest : 
Unto what realm the quickening sage 
Doth move, to that then I am drawn. 
Since I am frail and worn with age 1144 

Thither my body goeth not, 
But with strong purpose e'er I move 
And so my heart is linked with him. 

Gnce lay I in the swamp 1145 

Afloundering : I swam 

From isle to isle : and lo ! 

I saw the All-awake, 

Flood-crosscr, canker less ! '* 

( Now while they thus spake, the Master appeared^ and said : ) 
The Master "As Vakkalin, Alavi-Gotama, 1146 

And eke Bhadravudha by faith did win 



^ So StiA., but he may have heard the word of the silent sage in another way, 
cf. above verse 698. 



▼ ] The Way co the Beyond 1 67 

*' Release, so e'en by faith rhou roo shalt win 
Release : and thou, O Pingiya, shair go 
To the beyond across the realm of death." 

Pingiya ** The sage's word I hear 1147 

And greater grows my faith ! 

With teeming, lucid thought 

The All-awake rolled back 

The veil; the deva-heights 1148 

He plumbed, and found and knew 

The all of nigh and yon : 

The quests of those who doubts 
Confessed the teacher solved. 

To that which naught can shake 1149 

To that which naught can move,^ 

Which nowhere hath a peer : 

Lo ! thither I shall go 

And there my doubt shall end. 

Think thus of me : a man 
Intent on heart's release."* 



» $nA. nihham, '^ Adbimuttacitum. 



INDEXES 



!.(«) — PROPER NAMES IN WOVEN CADENCES 
(Numbers refer to verses except where p. stands for page number) 



Ababa, hell, p. 99. 
Abbuda, hell, p. 99. 
Aggajava, shrine, p. 51. 
Ajita-Kesakambali, person, p. 76. 
Ajita, brahman, 1006, 1015, 1032^, 

1 124. 

Ahaha, hell, p. 99. 

Ajavi, place, p. 29, 51. 

Alavaka, spirit, p. 29^^. 

Alavi-Gotama, person. 1146. 

All-awake, -ened, samhuddha, 539, 994, 
995, 178, 180, 1145. 

Apana, town, p. 84, 86. 

Ariyan (s), listener 90, vision 115, path 
177, truths 229, 267, Dharma 353, 
defined 535; 330, 660, 761. 

Asita, rishi, 679, 699. 

Assaka, place, 977. 

Atata, hell, p. 99. 

Atharva Ytdic spells, 927. 

Bamboo Grove, p. 75. 
Bavarin, brahman, 981^. 
Bhadravudha, brahman, 1008, iioiff, 

1 125, 1 146. 

Bharadvaja, farmer, p. I2jf; firewor- 
shipper, p. 19; of Sundarika, p. 66, 
71; brahman, p. 92 _^. 

Bhoga, town, 1013. 

Bimbisara, king, 409, p. 85/. 

Black-Lustre, sage, 689. 

Black Rock shrine, 1013. 

Brahm, world of 1 39. witness 479, 508, 
kin 315, become as 561, 563. 

Brahma 1024, 656. 

Brahmas, devas, p. 84, 113. 

Brahman-Dharma, p. 44^. 



Cankin, brahman, p. 92. 
Conqueror, jina, 698, 989, 996. 
Cimda, smith, p. 14^. 

Dhammika, lay-disciple, p. 56^. 

Dhaniya, herdsman, 18^. 

Dharma, dhamma, -endued 58, 
summed 70, reigns 81, 480, pro- 
claims 87, loves 92, hates 92, 
refuge p. 14, 23, 47, 71, praising 
180, 192, pursued 182, noble 233, 
come 237, jewel, ratana, 225, 226, 
bliss 257, -path 88, wayfaring by 
263, 274, to converse on 266, of the 
Wake 276, Brahman- p. 44^, warded 
by 288, brought to naught 314, 
learn 316, practising Dharma by 317, 
quickened 318, 320, -talk 325, 
thought on 326, pleasance 327, 
poised in 327, 749, judgments 327, 
tell guilt 327, delight in 330, seer 
of 344, reached 361, 374, Anyan 
353, finds and knows 365, 368, 504, 
asking on 380, subtle 383, astir 385, 
excellence 389, taught 391, 993, 
10 1 5, choosing 398, serving by 404, 
speaking 450, ancient 453, stand 
fast in 453, in yondmost view 471, 
knows 323, 5^6, rajah of 554/, roll 
wheel by 5 54 f, lovely in beginning 
p. 84, wheel of 557, -wheel 69^, 
hearing 694, way 696, telling 722, 
learnt 762, wakeneth 764, inly seen 
934. rules by 1002, in accord with 
963, found and known 1052. 1057, 
1075, lofty stare 1054, supreme 



169 



lyo 



Ind 



exes 



1064, aloof state 1065; not lore come 
down 1053, ends craving 1085, 
-vision 1087, 1095, walk by p. 163. 
See thing as dhamma. 
Dhoraka, brahman, 1007, 1061 J", 1124. 

East Park, p. io3. 

Ekanala, brahman village, p. 12. 

Eravana, spirit, 379. 

Ganges, p. 29, 42. 

Gaya, place, p. 42. 

Giribbaja, place, 408. 

Godhavari, river, 977. 

Gonaddha, place, loii. 

Gotama, Master hho p. 12 J, ig, z^, 44, 
46/, 71/, 75, 84/, 89; let us seek 153, 
164/, question 167, set out as bade 
228, I ask thee 376, Namuci leaves 
448, teach me 46 1 , recluse p. 76 /, 
young p. 76, honour 598, world-seer 
599, to thee we come 699, sage 1136, 
1 1 38, J 141, tell me 848, rule 553. 

Hemaka, brahman, 1007, 1084 /f, 1125. 
Hemavata, spirit, i 54^. 
Himavant, Himalaya, 422. 

Icchanankala, p. 92. 

Indra, spirit, 229, 310, 679, 1024. 

Isles, the four, 552. 

Jain 381, p. 76. 
Janussonin, brahman, p. 92. 
Jatukannin, brahman, 1007, 1096 jf, 

1125. 
Jeta Grove, p. 16, 19, 40, 4^, 56, 65. 

Kapiiavatthu, place. 991, 1012. 
Kappa, of the Banyan p. 51. 344, 358; 

brahman 1007, 1092 /f, 1125. 
Kassapa, buddka, 240 f. 
Keniya, hermit, p. 84^. 
Khara, spirit, p. 42. 
Kin of the Sun, Gotama, 540, 423. 



Kokalikan, -iya, monk, p. 97. 

Kosala, -an, -ese, country &c., 996, 422, 

p. 98, 66. 
Kosambi, place, 1011. 
Kusinara, place, 1012. 
Kuvera, deva, 380. 

Lotus hell, p. 98. 
Lumbini, place, 683. 

Magadha, -ans, country &c., 408, p. 12, 

Magandiya, person, 837^. 

Maeha, brahman, 488, 506, 509. 

Mani, river, 18/. 

Mahissati, place, loii. 

Makkhali-Gosala, person, p. 76. 

Man- thus-come, tatha^ata, p. 13; none 
equal 224, praise ye 236, bowed to 
252, trammels are not for 347, obia- , 
tion-worth.y 467-78, of boundless 1 
wisdom 468, heir to 557, reason 
abides for 351, questioned 1031, 
knows of mind-at-work 1114. 

Manu's breed, manuja, 458, 1043 f. 
Mara, evil one, 33,431,442,545,561 f, 

571.733- 
Maras, spirits, p. 13, 84, 113. 
Master, the, hhagavan, almost every page. 
Matanga, low-caste man, 137. 
Meru's Mount, mythical, 682. 
Mcttagu, brahman. 1007, 1049 J^, 1124. 
Metteyya, see Tissa. 
Moggaliana, p. Q7 f- 
Mogharajah, brahman, 1008, 1116^^, 

1125. 
Mount Vulture Peak, p. 72. 
Mulaka, homestead, 977, loii. 

Nagas, spirits, 379. 

Nalaka, person, 697. 

Namuci, evil one, 425, 439. KV. v. :?o. 

8. 
Nanda, brahman, 1007, 1077^. 1124. 



Proper Names 



171 



Narada, deva, 543, AV. v. 19, 9. 
Narapurta, Jain, p. 76. 
Neranjara, river, 425. 
Nirabbuda, hell, p. 99. 

Okkaka, mythical king, 302, 306. 

Pakudha-Kaccayana, person, p. 76. 

Pandava, hill, 414, 416. 

Parvata, spirit, 543, RV. i, 122, 3. 

Pasura, person, 833. 

Patitthana, place, loii. 

Pava, place, 101 3. 

Pihgiya, brahman, 1009, 1 120/, 1 125, 

1131, 1146. 
Pokkharasatin, brahman, 594. 
Posala, brahman, 1008, 11 12/, 1125. 
Punnaka, 1 006, 1 04 3 /, 11 24. 
Purana-Kassapa, person, p. 76. 

Rahu, spirit, 465, 498. 
Rahula, Gotama's son, p. 50. 
Rajagaha, place, 408, p. 72, 75/. 
Rishi-Grove, 684. 
Rose-apple Grove, 552. 

Sabhiva, mendicant, p. 75^. 

Sahampari. Brahma, p. 98. 

Saketa, town, 1012. 

Sakka, spirit, 346, 656. 

Sakya(s), -an(s), sage 225, recluse p. 84. 

Gotama p. 92, folk 683, foremost 

690, thou 345, by birth 423; 991, 

1063, 1090, 1 113. 
Sanjaya-Beiatthipucta, p. 76. 
Sariputia, heir to Tathagata 5 57; p. 97/; 

his quest 95 5 Jf. 
Satagira, spirit, ly^^ff. 
Savatthi, city, p. 16, 40, 44, 56, 65, 97. 

108; 998, chief of cities 1012. 
Savitri, chant me 457, chief hymn 568. 
Sela, brahman, p, 85 Jf; 554, 557, 567. 
Self-luminant, dcvas, 404. 
Setavy^, place, ioi2» 



Sogandhika, hell, p. 99. 
South Hill, p. 12. 
Squirrels' Feeding Ground, p. 75/. 
Stone-couch, spirit-haunt, p. 42. 
Suciloma, spirit, p. 42. 
Suddhodana, Gotama's father, 685. 
Sujampati, spirit, 1024. 
Sun's kinsman, Gotama, 54. 
Sundarika, river, p. 66. 
Sword-leaf Grove, in hell, 673. 

Tarukkha, brahman, p. 02, 594. 
Tissa-Metteyya, 814^; braliman, 1006, 

1040^, 1 124. 
Todeyya, brahman, p. 92; 1007, lO&Sff, 

1125. 
Tusita, heaven, 955. 

Udaya, brahman, 1008, 1105^, 1125. 
Ujjeni, place, 1011. 

Upasiva, brahman, 1007, 1069^, 1124. 
Uppalaka, hell, p. 99. 

Vakkalin, person, 1146. 

Vanasavhaya, place, loii. 

Vangisa, monk, p. 51, 66. 

Vasava, deva, 384. 

Vasettha, brahman, p. 92. 600. 

Veda, -mantras 140, three p. 85, 656, 

10 19, 594; Atharva 927. 
Vcdisa, place, ion. 
Vesali. place. 1013. 
V^assavana, spirit, 380. 
VetaranI, river in hell, 674. 

Wake, the, -ened. buddha, reject fare for 
chanting 81, 480; 85; outcast reviles 
134. muses 157, has vision 161, 
weal from 191, word of 202, 252, 
jewel in 224, 233/, peerless 226, 
Dharma of 276, listener to 357, 
Mara speaks to 430, proclaims 
security 454, thou art 486, 545, 



172 



Ind 



exes 



571, rare 559, bidding of 565, 
treads Dharma's peak 696, with noble 
signs 408. 
Washen One, the, dhona, tell Dharma 
351, without view 786, unconcerned 
786, thinks not of thrills 813, not 
his voke-matc 834; nhataka, hath evil 
washed 521, awake, still 646. 



Way-conqueror, magga-jina; -herald 
-desaka; -farer jtvati; -fraud -dusin, 
84; -muser -jhayin 85. 

Wellfarer sugata 32, 227, 391, p. 65, 
66, 84. 

Wheel-turner, p. 86. 

Wheel, the, 552, 557, of Dharma 557. 



I. (^) _ WORDS AND SUBJECTS IN WOVEN CADENCES 



Abiding, well- 45, godly 151. 
acceptance, the, upasampada, p. 14, 71, 

83, 89. 

adept 463, see lore- Vedantagu: Vedanta- 

affections upadhi, grief to man 33, no 

pith in 364, -freed 1083, overcome 

546, 572, cause ills 728, 1050, end 

992, form thou none 105 i. 

aims, selfish 75, high 260. cherished 

777. 

all-cleansing, the faring p. 84. 

alert, -ne&s, -ly, sati, -a, -mat, listener 
70, wayfarer 88, flood-crosser 174, 
515, muser 212, 503, Gorama4ii, 
446, intent 962^, cross 1066, 1053. 
1056, seek 1070, fares 1085, release 
by knowledge 1107, crosser 11 19, 
heart 1143, see mindfulness. 

aloof state viveka, far from 772, train for 
814, supreme 822, seer of 85 i. what 
it is 915; 845. 

amity metta, pursue 73, heart of 150. 
507, show 967; 223. 

anger, -ry, vile 116, 'flesh-savour' 245, 
why prevail 868, oust 928. 

apt nipaka, in well-abiding 45, for the 
goal 144, to end ill 283. 

ardent, -our afapin, for goal p. 14, 90, 
lucky 267, praised 292; viparakkama 
musing 425; chanda striving 1026. 



assum -ption, -ed attan--Sk. atta of views 
784, naught to be 787, 858, 919, 
results in disputes 797, 800. 

attach, -mcnt;s), -ed upadana, from 
senses 170/, source seen 358, end of 
475, ill from 742/, to naught 800. 

austere, -iry tapas, in 'ploughing' 77. ol 
rishis 284, of brahmans 655. 

awake, -ened, -ening, huddha, the sage 
83, 167, whom they call 377, how 
they fare 386, listener 395, full 478. 
won 50^. how proclaimed 513, 517, 
profess to be 555, famed as 597. 998, 
brahman 643, peak of 693, teachings 
lead to, p. 108, who is ? 508, fain for 
963, see Proper Name^. 

awareness sati 434, see alertness, mind- 
fulness. 

Balanced upehhaka, 515. 

bane, from love 36, becomings' 69, in 
pleasures 424, in venery 821. 

barb salla, -immune 17, 86, in pleas- 
ures 50, heart-propping 9^8, see dart. 

barren, not, 212, 780. 

becoming's) hhava, no pith 5, free from 
etc., 6, 175, 361, 367.472, 5 4' 729. 
bonds 16, bane 69, (not) craving tor 
etc.. 496, 776, 856, 923, 1068. not 
thinking of 801 , source of 836, led to 
898, and decay 869, passed ail 1133. 



Words and Subjects 



173 



bed-of-womb gahhhaseyya, go not to 29, 
152, 535. 

beyond, parciyana the way 377; samparuya 
common lot 864/ ; isle of no- 
anupara 1094; released in tapparayana 
1 114; parayana Ch. v, I'll sing the 
way to 1 1 3 1 . See yon. 

bidding sasana, obtain 482, tamed in 
570, hear 814, train in 934. 

birth jdti, destroyed etc., p. 14; 476, 
517, proud of 104, none outcast by 
136, how quit 1056, contention on 
5.96, and decay -jara, 1080, 1097; 
hbava, not an eighth 230. 

birth-and-death jatimarana, yon-farers 
over 32, quit of etc., 351, 355, 467, 
500, master of 484, overcomer of 
520. 

blame, not fearing 133, unshaken bv 
etc., 213, 928; -less 623; quails at 
826, views bringing 895, 900, 
understands 534. 

bliss, soracca deliverance is 78, sivan 
seek 115, won to 478, piti Dharma's 
257, sukha winning 439, born for 
man's 683, body's end is 761. 

bonds, becoming's 16, pleasures arc 61, 
II 15, -overcomer 473, root of 532; 
29, 242, 390, 476, 623, 948; -less, 
212, 250, 492, 621, 626; bandhana, 
sahga, samyojana. 

bounds, ora quits i Jff; sima passed 
beyond 795. 

bourn pada. of calm 143, 208, 915, 
1096, seer of 232, wakening to 765, 
see lot. 

breach, of ignorance 1 105 /. 

body-bounds, quit of 1 11 3, -hayapahayin. 

Calm, santa, -i, upa-, satna, upa-, -atha, 
etc., 67, 515, man 82, 450, 453, 
460, 475, 499, 952, 1048, bourn of 
143, 915, deathless 204, on quaking 
built 784, sweets of 257, poised on 
330, of mind 584, 593, rare 702, 



949, 1099, the full is 721, -ing ill 
724 J", grown 783, 1087, proclaim- 
ing 845, 1066, not leading to 896, 
not from rite 900, cool is the state of 
9^3, supreme 1067, see man-of- 
calm. 

canker(s), -less -asava, 82, 163, 178, 
212, 219, 370. 472. 481, 493, 535, 
539, 546, 644, 749, 765, 996, 1082, 
iioo, 1105, 1133, 1145. 

clean, -sed, -sing, 67, 372, faring 163, 
by wisdom 184, none with doubt 
249, hard to 279, his life 407, see a 
being 435, is such 478, who is ? 508, 
called awake 517, is brahman 636, 
of the 788 _ff, look to none for 813, 
whence it comes not 824 J, 878 jt, 
89 5 J^, lojqf, of the spirit 478; 
suddha, -i, pari-, v/-, etc. 

claim(s) pariggaha, no 470, not soiled 
by 779, source of 872, -free 809. 

comfortable phasu what is 963. 

compassion, -ate, 378, 540, 1065. • 

composed 174, 214. 

conceit mdna, self- 132, without 
245, whence arise S6zJ[. 

concern 787, 897. 

content 42, 144, who is ? 1040 f. 

continence 396, 823. 

controlled-of-self sannatatta 464, 
restrained. 

convinced nivittha, by name-and-form 
756, of his own truth 824, of special 
way 892; 781; in crooked ways 57. 

cool, -ed, mhbana, -buta, -butt, -bati, pari- 
etc, my fire is 19, delighting in 86, 
attaming 186, eternal 204, 1086, 
partake of 228, leading to 233, to 
know 267, wholly 346, 370, passed 
out 354, crossed 359, to win 454, 
man 467, utter 514, thou art 542, 
grief less 593, in detachment 638. 
642. wantless becomes 707, calming 
mind-at-work 735, knowledge 737, 
quenching feeling 739. mastering 



143. 



see 



174 



Ind 



exes 



truth 758, from knowing the bourn 
765, 915, nigh 822, of self 106 1, 

940, mind 942, from gauging things 
1 04 1, exceeduigly 1087, ^095. 
death's end 1094, craving-rid is 
1109; 1 131. 

cool-oi-self abhinibbutatta, 343, 456, 

469, 783, -exceeding, 
coveting, (not), 86, 121, 144, 165, 423, 

778, 928, 952. 

craving tanha, cut off, gone, etc., 3, 70, 
83, 211, 355, 640, 1070, 1085, 1089, 
waxed 306, beget no 339, fall not to 
495, spreads not 715, Mara's force 
436, comes ill 741, ^not) for pleasure 
769, 1039, to become 776, seeing 
835, conquer 849, plumb 1082, quit 
to come no more 1 1 2 3 . 

cross, -ed, -ing, -er, tinna, etc., doubc 
17, 86, 318, 367, 514, 1089, flood 
21, 173/ 183/, 219,495, 53^.771, 

779, 823, 1059, 1064, 1069/, 1082, 
foul mire 333, 791, 857, 1053/, 
1066, 1085/, birth and death 355, 
358, 746, birth and decay I047f, 
1052, 1060, death's 1 1 19, purgatory 
706, over 359, 515, 545, 571, 638, 

941, 948. 

cuvhcd-of-stli yatatta 216, 490, 723. 

Darkness tamas, enveloped 348, go 
to 248, wrap.^ 763, rend 975, ouster 
of 1 1 3 3; as 'gloom' 278, 956, 1 1 36. 

dart salla, see barb, draw(n) 334, 367, 
574/. 767, of gnef 985. 

death maccu, is there release from ? 160, 
let it not fool you 332, its net 357, 
hazard 576, left behind 755, king 
1 1 18, crosser 11 19, across 1146. 

deathless amata, fruit So, calm 204, 
lot 228, word 453, won to depths 
635, realm 960 (Sariputta's quest). 

decay vibhava, -bhoti, -bhuta, as oppo- 
site of bhava, quit of 514, not 



thirsting about 856, form theories 
from seeing 867, its source 869^, 
tell of 873^; jara, a disease 311, how 
to cross 1052, of 804 J^, quit 1056, 
bowed by 1092, where ends 1094, 
how to leave 1 1 20. 

deceit, -ful, 116, 242, 357. 537, 1132. 

deed(s), 136, 596, 6501^, perish not 
666. 

delusion(s) moha 56, 131, 160, 347, see 
error. 

desire^s) chanda 171, 235, 387, 835, 
865, 913, 1086; sineha 209, Kama 228, 
see lust, pleasure; iccha, 280, 311, 
p. 97; 773. 

detach, -ment, -ed, cool in 638, 642; 
753- 

disclosed vivata, seer of 793, seen 374, 
as ' open, -ing,' 19, 763, 921. 

dispassioiiate 704, 853. 

dispute;^ s), pavada 538, 784; vivdda, 
passed beyond 796, with none 830, 
how arise 862 jf, seek f^none; 877; 
fruits of 896; 894, 904. 

dust, -less raja, vr-, path i 39, freed 
268, 517, 636, home-life is 207, 4o(% 
indolence is 3 34; 662; heaps on self 
275, for thy loss 665, the hve 974, 
muser 1 105. 

doubt kathamkatha (saying how ? ), 
crossed 17*, 86, 1088, free 534. gone 
638, -er 868; hmkha (uncertain 
expectation, doubting-desire ?) expell- 
ing 58, 559, cutter 87, leave us not m 
1 02 1, overcome 249, cross, -ed, -ing. 
318, 514, 367, in 510, p. 87; -free 
477; takka (twisting) rid of 209, 
replies that add to 1084, 11 35' 
vicikiccha (perplexity), rid of 231, cut 
away 346, Mara's force 437, hast 
borne me over 540; samsaya ( un- 
certain ■) question me on 1030, cutteth 
1 1 12. See DhS. trsL para. 425 n. 



Words and Subjec.t:> 



175 



Earnest, -iy, -ness, p. 14, 90, 108, 11 3; 
70, 186, 213, 286, 445, 934, 1045, 
1056, be 1 121, 1 123. 

energy viriyij, fared with 344, supernal 
353, wealth and 422, faith thence 
432, stir up 966, knowledge linked 
with 1026; vtra sinless 543; 1102; 
see hero; dhura peerless 694. 

end, -mg, khaya 70, 992, 1070, 1139; 
atthagata 475, 1074; nirodka 755, 
731/, 372, 1037; ant a j^one to world's 
1133. 

entanglement 768, see mire. 

envy, -ious, 133. 245, 811, 823, 852, 
928, 862/. 

error(s) moha, 74, 478, 493, 772, 847, 
1 1 32, see delusion. 

evil(s), 140, 430, 519, 531, 665, 674. 

cxpert(s) kusala, to end moil 372, why 
called 525, in all 336, scatters grief 
591, in ariyan and not 782/, of bonds 
798, talk as 825, 888, 898, 903. of 
cleansing 830, on the unattached 876, 
view-confined SjSff, utter the word 
973, call them sages 1078. 

Faculties ituiriya, quickened 516, reined 
in 697, governed 250, composed 
214, see senses. 

faith saddha, is the seed 77, wanes not 
90. is wealth 182, flood is crossed by 
184, alms prepared in 286, renounce 
home in 337, here it is 432, in the 
Master p. 97, strive in 719, with 
mind-intent 1026, with joy 1 143; 
release by 1 146; pasanna 316, 402, 
I 147. 

false, -hood, -ly, iig, 159, 758, 819, 
931, 943, 866. 

faring, see way-, rightly here 3 59jf, 
377, god-faring 463, passed 519, 
unclouded 1065. 

fear, -less, 37, 49, 167, 207, 257, 437, 
654, 561, 850, 921, 935, 964. 



fetter(s), -free, -less, 62, 74, 491, 522, 

621, 634, 641, 736. 
fight, better to 440, who has fought 

his 793, 914, 1078. 
find and know, found etc., vtjju etc., 

no ill 23, all III, none equal is 226, 

the goal 251, Dharma 365, 368. 504, 

1085, I 102, the end 467, who hath 
897, may cross io66_ff, naught to 
accept 1098. 

fire, 18, 62, p. 19; 249, p. 66. 

flesh-savours 240^. 

flood cgka, sweeps bridge away 4, 
crossed 21, 174, iS^, 219, 471, 538, 
771, 1064, 1069, loyzf., -crosser^Sy 
178, 495, 823, 1082, iioi, mid 
1092/, strode 1096, greed is 945. 

fool's), 199, 259, 399, 825, 105 1. 

form, -bound, 754, -less 754, dear 

1086, how decays 873^, see name- 
and-form. 

fraud 90, 242. 

free, -cd, vitnutta 23, 354, 522, 536, 

992; piwiutta 465, 498; inuccati 508; 

vippaniutta 363; see released. 
friend(s) 37, 45/, 57, 75. 94' \^5^ -i55-' 

kalyi^n.i 338 see Childers' Diet. s. v. 

and Max Mullet's Dhammapada S.B.E. 

X. p. 23 note. 

Gift's) 188/", 227, 263, -worthy 227, 
488, 504. 

goal atthii, neglects 37, sees not 57. 
ask»d of 126, ready for (kusala expert) 
143, speaks of 159, 722, subtle 176/, 
377, not reached 318. moves to 323, 
what ? 33 1, as end 354. stand fast in 
453, in view 460, Dharma as p. 84. 
termed calm of self 838, bound to 
382, come to ask 957, 1 105, ilii, 
1 1 18, goes to 1074, no measuring ot 
one won to 1076; parani to win 68. 
seer of 219; uttani won to 627; attad' 
(atma) rishis fared to 284. 



176 



ina 



exes 



god-, -ly, life, hrahmacariya 32, p. 14, 
90; 267, 326, 354, 493, 655, 1041; 
-faring, 274, 289, 428, 463, 566, 
1 128, p. 84; -store nidhi, 285. 

grasping an-adana, not, 620, 630, 741, 
794, 1 104. 

greed, -less, 56, 65, 152, 243, 248, 306, 
328, 469, 707, 809, 922, 945. 

grief, -less 34, 268, 449, 583/, 694, 
809, 862. 

guide, 55, 86, 213, 484. 

guile, -less, 56, 469, 494, 631, 786, 
852, 941. 

Harmlessness avihimsa 292. 

harbour, -age, nivesana, of views 785, 
801, not led to 846, oust 1055, 
razed 470, knows 210. At 300, 
305, as 'home(steads)'. 

hate 12, 74, 167, 270, 371, 493, 506, 
631, p. 76. 

health arogya by knowledge 749. 

hear, -ing, -d, siita etc., words of deva 
988, 273, 384, Dharma 385, with- 
out words 1023, to grasp 329, grows 
not 329, pith of 330, the sage's 
word 1147, see listen. 

hell(s) 231, 248, 278, 531, p. 99. 

hero vira 547, 562, 646, see energy. 

hindrance 8, 530, 874, 916. 

homeless, -ness, p. 14; 376, 456, 487, 
p. 86; 966. 

hope(s), -ing, nir-asa, -ya, 369, 460, 
469, 492, 634, 1060, 1048, 1078; 
sit a 3 3 3, see trust. See Ch. Up. vii. 14, 
S.B.E. i, 119. 

hymn(s) manta (mantra), 249, p. 86, 
690, 302, 306, 976, 1000, 1004, 
10 1 8; gatha 81, 480; chandas'd 568 
the Savitri. 

Ignorance, 199, 347, 730, 1033, 1105/ 
ill(s), 23, 32, 61, 148, 183, 252. 337, 

399, 452, 530, 626, 724/, 770. 873; 

-bourn 141; -intent 660, 780, -ender 

539, origin of 1049 J*. 



ill-will, 116, 328, 371, 702, p. 76, 98, 
immortality, seeking, 249. 
indolence 334, 483. 
insight mantUt 159, 916, 1040/. 
intent, samahita 212, 225, 341, 471, 

477, 519, 972; ekodi 962, see 975 

note; samadhi 434, 1026; adhimutta 

1 149. 
isle, of no-beyond iO(^i^; 1145. 
Joy, fiti p. 77, 969, 1 143, 687, 695. 

994; sukha 59, 67, 256, 297, 323; 

rata 250; santutthi 265; anandajata 

679. 
jealous(y), no, 318, 663, 952. 

Knowledge, ahhinT.d p. 14, 90; 992; 
anna, -ya 323, p. 108; 733/, 1 105, 
1107; nana 378, 788, 799/, 987, 
1077/, 1 1 13, 1 1 15; pajana 322; 
vijja 334; knower 349, 372; see find 
and know. 

Laments, 328, 862/. 

lasting, surmise on 886, niccani SnA. 
gahitagahandni, Nid.tiiccagaha, P^yl. quot- 
ing Sn. sacc'ani. 

lean, -ings, 14, 369, 571, 1090/. 

liberty scrita 39. 

lie(s) 397. 883. 

life, hhava 176, 639, 1091, see be- 
coming; jivita how short, 775, 804, 
ebbs 74; itthahhdva 1044. 

lifter of the veil vivattacchadda ^Ji, 378, 
1003, cj. 1 148. 

light, bringers of 349, 1136, vision and 
539, when his trust is there 910, for 
the wise 763, uprising dawn of 178. 

listen, -ing, -er, suta, sdvaka, seek a 58, 
alert 70, 350, ariyan 90, the Wake's 
134, 357, goal of 320, lucid 32s, seer 
371, what becomes ^7^ff> I ^^'i^^ 
train 444, who is 534, see hear. 

lone, -ly, eka, wayfaring 208, 816, SioJ, 
fare 35/, sitting 71^8, dweller 11 36; 
vivitta sage 221, minded 810, as 
'aloof 845, and of little noise 338. 



Words and Subjects 



177 



longing(s), 16, 210, 369. 

lore(s) vijjcit veda etc., 162/, 289, 463, 
474, 529; an'ttiha 1053; cijjhena, etc. 
242, 285; sxita 353; moneyya 484; 
panm 880. 

lore-adept vedngit, we see 479, 459, 
released 472, alert 503, who is 529, 
1059 f, come no more 733, goes to 
what none can sum 749, the true 

947. . , 

lot padih supreme 700, tauitiess 252, who 

knows 374, cool 204, 1086, see bourn; 

the common 578, 864. 
iust(s) 139' ^77^ 315. ^59' 43^. 4^4^ 

483, 625. 857, 940, 945, 1088. 

Man-of-calm snnta, comes no more 656, 
yearns not 839, how visioned 848^, 
truly 946, passed envy 954. 

man-of-naught akincana, seer 176, fares 
as 455, 490, 501, who grasps not 
620, 645, I see 1063. state of 976, 
1071/, 1 1 15; 1091. 

mian-of-sooth sappwisa, follow 323. 

man-of-worth arahan, becomes p. 14, 
71. 90, who is no 135, attain cool 
186, yon-farer 539, the Master p. 84, 
veil-lifter p. S6, thou hast heard 
590; 1003. 

mantra(s), 140, 251, 1004, 1020, see 
hymn. 

mark lihga 601^. 

mean, -ness, 133, I45' S^-- 

mendicant, 100, 129, p. 75. 

merit, 428/, 463/, 487/, 547, 569- 

mild, -ness, 250, 292, 850. 

*mine', -less a-mama, devout 220, quit 
of, etc., 466, 469, 494, fare 777, 
greedy for 809, from wish 871, hold 
naught as 951; 922. 

mind, citta obedient 23, churn up 50, 
disquieted 160, quicken 341, serene 
434, unclouded 483, released 975, 
also rendered thought, heart; manas, 



strap 77, benign 155, pleasure- 
strand 171, charm 337, not to rove 
388, delights 424, harbours of 470, 
perplexities lyo, elate 829, desires 
512, not fiiin for musing 985, pond- 
ering 834, disquieted 967, questions 
put by 1005, also rendered heart and 
thought; 19, 210, 323. 

mindful, -iy, -ness, pati-, sati, -mat, fare 
45, 41 3, 466, as goad 78, devoted to 
151, well set 444, knowing 1087, 
1095, dwell 283, move 751, 1039, 
train 916, 933, and mind-intent 
T026, as dam 1035; see alert. 

mind-intent 329, 434, 471. 

mind-at-work vinmna, ill from 734, 
when ended 1037, not stay in be- 
coming 1055, how ends ? 1 1 10/. 

mire, foul, visattika 333, 1053, 1085/". 

moil, security from 425; stilled 542. 

monk(s) i /, 87, 280, 359, 514, 960. 

moulding elements sahkhara V^iff; 953. 

muse, -cr,jhdna neglecting not 69, 156/, 
in glade 165, 221, how help 320/, 
ardent 425, fain 503, 985, crossed 
638, bent 709, 972, voice of 719; 
dhira know lii_ff, cling not 250. 
light- bringers 349, say life is short 
775, how term the goal 838, released 
913, cross flood 1052, I did hear 
1096; who musing loved 1009, see 
rapt. 

Need(s) attha 21, 58, 431, see goal. 

name-and-form namarupa, craving for 
355, hindrance 530, make an end 
537, convinced by 756, eyes will 
see 909, no 'mine' 950, no greed 
for 1 100, touches exist from 872, 
cease when mind-at-work vinmna ends 
1037; nUmakaya released from 1074. 

non-returner anagamita state of p. loSjff. 



178 



Ind 



exes 



notable visesin 799, 842, 855, 905. 

Oblation, p. 19, 66; 249, 459, 490 J"; 

-worthy 467^, 486; -offerer 487. 
obstacle, 17, 66, 541. 
observance, 401; -day p. 108; -rule 340. 
offering 461, 488jf. 
one-pointed ekagga 341. 
opinion ditthi 785, 846, 904, 911; see 

view, 
outcast 116^. 

Passion, -less, -rdga, 11, 74» ^39' -04» 
214, 225, 270/, 341, 361, 465. 476, 
493, 507, 631, 795, 835, 1072. 

path(s), patha 139. 176, 177, 385, 868; 
pada 88. 

patience, 189, i66, 292, 623. 

perplexity, -ies, -ed, vicikiccha etc., 343, 
347, 510, 540, p. 87; 682, 866. 

perception, -ceiving, sama 732, 874, 
I II 3; see surmise. 

pith sdra, in becoming 5, ol mind- 
intent 329, of hearing 330, i" affec- 
tions 364, of words 329. 

pleasure(s), kdtna 50, 59, 152, 160, 166, 
171, 239, 272, 284, 337, 4^3' 497, 
639, 704, 768, see lust; nandi 637, 
1055, 1109, 1 1 15. 

pleasant, source of 869/. 

poise, -ed, upckka gaining 67, pursue 
73, alert 855, mid restless 912, 
strive for 972; -thita etc., fares 250, 
in Dharma 327, in calm 330, stand 
573, in formless things 755, as 
ocean's depth 920, stay 1073. 

poised-oi-sclf thitatta is sage 215, should 
fare 328, cool 359, 370, intent-of- 
mind 477, intent-on-well 519. 

power, psychic, 179, p. 87; 992. 

praise(s), 213, 828, 895, 928. 

preference purekkhardna, etc. 844, 849, 
910. 

pride 4, 218. 245, 328. 342, 370, 469, 



494, 537, 624, 786, 830. 853. 863, 

889, 968. 
purgatory niraya 333, naraka 706. 
purpose sankappa 444, i 144. 

Quest(s) 504, 1 148. 

quicken, -ed, -bhdv, -eti, etc., mind 23, 
341, heart 149/, 507, self 277, 388, 
322, 1049, Dharma 318/, faculties 
516, things meet 558, the way 11 30; 
quickening hhuri-, sage 346, 376, 
538, 792, 996, 1097, 1143, II 36/, 
seer 1 1 3 1 _^. 

Rapt (musers) dktra, in well-abiding 
45/, heedful 317, no party-man 371, 
sage 380, expert 5QI, on musing 
bent 709, say life is short 775, seeks 
no disputes 877, released from views 
913, cross flood 1052; see muser. 

real 527. 

reason, -ing, sankheyya for Men-thus- 
come 351, takka formulate 886, 
rightful 1 107. 

recluse(s) p. 12, 19, 42; 83, 100, why 
called 520, passim. 

refuge, sarana thy 31, 570, to Gotama 
for p. 23, 71; as house 591; as haven 
503. 

release, -ed -mutt a etc., temporal 54, 
pursue 73, from death 166, from 
ill 170/, all- 176, sought 344, in 
every way 472, in attachment's end 
475, tamed 491, doubt-free 534, 
by wisdom 725, knowing 877, of 
sense 1071, from name-and-form 
1074, by knowledge 1107. 

resolute pahitatt a, p. 14; 425, 433. 445. 
961; 365, 531. 

resort-less 628. 

restrain, -ed, -t, sain-yata, alert S8, set 
on 326, a brahman by 655, cleansed 
by 898: 971, 189, 413, 462. 



Words and Subjects 



179 



restrained-of-seif samatatta zi6, 284, 

.497. 
rite(s) vata 249, 790, 898, 1045. 
rishi 82, 176, 208, 284, :}56, 458, 679, 

915. i044- 
rule 81, 212, 274, 393, 790, 961. 
ruth, -less, -ful, 37, 73, 244, who is 

515; 695. 

Sacrifice, -ial, yahm etc., brahman 
295, 979, kingly 302^, to devas 
458, 1043/, rites patha 1045, great 
p. 85 ; ahuti, etc., fire 249, 428, 568, 
p. 66, when prospers 458, 462/; 
-medha and -a wisdom 460. 

sage, muni (silent) 31, 83, 87, 163a, 
207/, 225, 251, 414, 462, 484, 527, 
700/, 723, 779_^, 811, 821, 860, 
877, 912; panna (wise) 343, 346, 
352, 359, 376, 538, 564, 578, 721, 
792; dhtra (rapt) 380; 627, 646, 996, 
1058. 

secure, -ity, khcma, from moil 79, 425, 
happy and 145, in renouncing 424, 
1098, the Wake proclaims 454, 
greatest luck 268, seers in 809, no 
ground for debate 896, all ways 953. 

seeker, -ing, 5, 286, 690, 696, 965. 

seer, cakkhutnat 31. 405, 541, 570, 596, 
956; dassin, dittha, dasa 176/, 209, 
371, 377, 385>* 474' 47^, 693, 697, 
793, 232, 733; sampassa 81, 480. 

self attan, begot of 272, draw dart from 
334, 592, exalting 438, not perceiv- 
ing 477, as island 501, to Brahm's 
world by 508, path made by 514, 
manifest when praised p. 87, self 
hurts self 585, ill for 626, woe for 
659, content with what is not 756, 
the self would blame 778, not blamed 
by 913, purge 962, quickened 1049, 
false view of 11 19; -affliction 583, 
-bred 592, -happiness 592, -at-one 
ekatta 718; calm of inner ajjhatta 837; 
-utta -resolute 425, 433, p. 90. 



sense(s), indriya 63, 144, 250, 340. 498; 

sanria 535, 1071; 175, 413. 
serene pasidati 434. 
sheath(s) 525, 1022. 
signs, lakkhana 360, 408, 549, 927. 

1000, p. 86; nimitta 341/. 
silent 207, 484, 540, 780, 1074. 
sinless naga 166, 522, 543. 573, 845, 

1 102. 
slander, -ing, 362, 389, 663, 852, 862. 

928. 
solitude 257, p. 51. 
stain(s), -less, 66, 378, 384, 469, 519, 

1131. 
still aneja 87, 372, 477, 638, 646, 751 

920, 1043, iioi, 1 1 12. 
stir anigha 17, 460, 491, 534, 1048, 

1060, 1078. 
stir-and-moil ihjita 75o_^. 
straight 143, 464, 477. 
stream(s) of becoming sota 764, 355^ 

715, 736, 94^' ioH/ 
strenuous 531. 
strive, -er, -ing, 70, 424, 966, 972, 

1026. 
sympathy 73. 
surmise sahnTi 779, 792, 802, 886, see 

perception. 

Tamtlcss 251, 476, 717. 

tamed datita 23, 370, 491. how one is 
516; 624, 542. 

teacher 31, 153, 179, 343, 345, 571* 
1 148. 

theory, -ies, vinirchaya, whence arise 
866/, fixed in 887, rid of 894, 
formal 838; as 'judgment' 327. 

thing(s) dhamma, amid 69, taught 868, 
found and known 878, fought in 
914, within or without 917, comes 
to know 933, as he studies 975, 
yon-farer of etc. 992, expert in 
1039, scouts and adopts 785, talk of 
787. seen, heard or felt 793, just 
foolishness 840; see Dharma and view. 



i8o 



Indexes 



thought(s), -fulness, 63, 149, 326, 390, 
970, 1 147. 

thrills muta 813, generally rendered 
things felt. 

thirst, pipasa 52, 56, 436; tanha etc. 
776, 856, 901; see craving. 

ties 41, 60, 491, -less 948. 

touch, -ed, phcissa etc., fall to 736, 
comprehend 77^' ^^o^f amid 851, 
source of what 869, why exists 872, 
by diversity 918, of circumstance 
923, conquer 974. 

trust, -ing, a-nis-sita ('leaning on'), m 
none 66, 219, 363, 519, 593, 7i7» 
748, 856, 957, T065, in home 280, 
not to hope 474, not m things 798, 
839, 849, 867, not in knowledge 
800, in others 824 J^, on view 841, 
in penance 901, his is 'light' 910, 
causing sacrifices 1043; 877. 

truth(s), -ful, sacca speaking 59, 450, 
632, I weed with 78, hold in faith 
188, nothing better 189, happiness 
from zi^f, ariyan 267, deathless 
word 453, active 542, master 758, 
intent on 780, vitw as 832, 'this is' 
843, who speaks ? 879, single is 884/, 
sages turn not from 946; taccha etc. 
327, 1096, 368, 699; a-hhuta etc. 
397, 664. 

Ultra-view attsaramditthi 889. 

unariyan 782, 815. 

unattached 363, 466, 470, 546, 572, 

876, 915. 
unconcerned 780, 787. 
unclouded 515, 637, 1065. 
unmoved 795, 813, 953. 
unprovokable 216, 48 3 . 
unsoiled 468, 547, 812, 845. 

Veil-lifter 378, 1003, 1 148, p. 86. 
venery 814^. 
victor 372, 379> 646, 733. 
view(s), ditthi vanities of 55, not 
taking 152, yondmost 471, of the 



ignorant 649, escape 781, washed 
away 787, belie him 789, confined 
by 796, 878, 895, misled by 802, 
chosen 832, counter view with view 
833, -issues 834, 913, what is thy 
836, looked uito 837, cleansing from 
840, forms no opinion from 846, 
who accept 847, a reason for 886, 
demented by 891, preformed 910, see 
opinion; dhamma wJiat men accept in 
801, 837, 907, do not accept So^, goes 
not to 861, another's SSo, 904, 907, 
others' 892, consummate 904. not- 
able 905, see rhnig and Dharma. 

view-points p. 108^. 

vigour, -ous, vira, viriya, 44, 79, [65, 
184, 531, 548, 642, see energy. 

violence 394. 630, 935, 943. 

virtue sila etc. 152, 174. 294, ^24, 
782, 848, p. 84, 92. 

vision, -ed, 115, 16 r, 231, 530, 539, 
848, 1087. 

Wakening hodhisatta One 683. 

want(s), -less, 56, 2[o, 333, 706. 

way, magga obtained 55, liveth in 88, 
baneful 277, by which pious fare 
441, the whence or whither 582, 
striving's 429, quickenmg the 1 1 30, 
to calm ill 724, false 736, Dharma's 
696, all ways 627, deluding 347, 
called Way to Beyond 1 1 30; see Proper 
Names; various: e.g. carana, patha, 49, 
68, 144, 94, 170, 172, 212, 289, 340, 
370, 377. iH^ 892. 

wayfare(r), -ing, car am etc. 208, 263, 
342, 386, 466, 536. 

weal, hhava 92; atthn 190, 829; sukha 
256; hita 683. 

web(s), of time, kappa 517, 521. 535, 
860, 91 1, 914. 

well, abiding 46, faring 643, the 7^^, 

wise, -ly, -dom, pandita, pama etc. 
my yoke 77, wide 83, 996, list- 
ener 90, discern 115, 581, deeply 



Similes, Creatures. Etc, 



i8i 



176, -giver 177, life lived 182, how 
CO win 185/, is the monk 202, 
strength is 212, when grows not 329, 
do you scorn 335, not outpaced in 
381, low in 390, serve the order 403, 
energy and 432, boundless 468, how ? 
526, thine is 539, brahman 627, 1 
reveal 716/, worldly- 76 1 , wise 
with wise debate 884, -freed 847, 
crown 698, and mindfulness 1036, 
it is his 1 09 1. 

whole, -ly, loosed 500, passed faring on 
519, not m.ade 891. 

woken htiddha is brahman, 622. 

word(s), vacana the Wake's 202; su- 
hhcisita the Wake's 252, goodly are 
329, of devas 384, what is 451; gira 
so fair 1 132. 

worthy arahan 644. 

wrath, -less, J, 19, 96, 362, 469, 499, 
537. 850. 

wrong 14, 22, 264, 280, 369. 

Yon, -der, para quits bounds here and 



I J[, brink of 214 see note, faring 
690, fare not by two paths 714, from 
this shore to 1 1 29/; para thou 
knowest 353, reached 475, plumbs 
516, passing to 579, no hopes for 
634, world 185, voice from 696, 
found and knew 1 148. 

yon-der-farer(s), -ed paragatu etc.. 
crossed and 21, 638, -gone cool 
359, toils not 210, the type 803. 
by mantras 251, 976, 997, of all 
things 167, 699, 992, victor 372, 
man-of- worth 539, cross 771, in 
the Vedas 1019. 

yon-d-der-most parama, goal 68, 219, 
fame 138, blessing 233, view 471, 
knows as such 87, the cleansed 788, 
holds as 796, declare as 903, reach in 
hymns 1018 f see note, release 1071; 
see beyond. 

yon- way parayami 717. 

Zeal, -ous, -ly, 223, 264, 317, 5^7- 
zest 687, to do, 744 # 



IL— SIMILES, CREATURES. ETC. 



Similes : apes 791, awl 625, axe 657, 
bamboo 38, banyan tree 272, birds 
1134, boat 321, brave, the 831, bridge 
4, bull 29, 687, caravan 899, cess-pit 
279, charcoal-pit 396, chariot 816, con- 
queror 467, coral tree 44, 64, crow 270, 
448, dart 767, deer 39, 165, dust 662, 
empty thing 721, fig-tree 5, fire 62, 
462, 591, fish 777, 936, flame 703, 
J 074, flood 945, full thing 721, gold 
686, Indra 229, lake 467, lamp, p. 14; 
2^15, Hon 71, 213, p. 87; 562, 684, 



1013, lotus, 2. 71, 213, 547, 81 -i. S45r 
merchants 1014, moon 598, 10 16, 
mother 149, ocean 920, ox 580, pea- 
cock 221, ploughing 76 J^, ploughshare 
p. 13, pool 721, pot 443, 721, potter 
577, Rahu 465, 498, rhinoceros 3 5j^» 
river 720, salves i, seed 591, sesamum 
p.98, shuttle 464, 497, silversmith 962, 
sky 1065, sleep 807, snake iff, 768. 
snare 62, son 255, spate 319, standers 
381, stream(s) 3, 1014, 1034, sun 550^ 
687, 1097, thing overturned p. 14, 25 » 



l82 



Ind 



exes 



46, 71, tusker 29, vessel 771, vines 272, 
water 392, 625, wheel 654, wind 71, 
213. 

Creatures: ants 602, apes 791, beasts 
117, bees 964, beetles 602, birds 117, 
606, 1 1 34, cattle 20, 26/, 33, 285, 580, 
612, 769, crows 201, 270, 448, 675, 
deer 39, 165, dogs 137, 201, 675, ele- 
phant 29, 53, fish 249, 605, 777, 936, 
fowls 241, 606, gadflies 20, 52, 964, 
goats 309, gnats 20, hawks 675, horse 
300, 544, 769, jackals 201, 675, lion 
71, 166, 213, 416, 546, 562, 572, 684, 
moths 602, pismires 201, peacock 221, 
ravens 675, rhinoceros 35^, reptiles 604, 
snakes i, 52, 604, 768, swan 221 , 1 1 34, 
tiger 416, vultures 201, 675, wolves 
201, worms 672, yak 688, 

Colours : blue p. 86, white 679, 689, 
yellow 64, 689. 

Clothing ; cloth(s) 287, 295, 1022, 
clothes 304, finery 64, garb 249, 456, 
kirtle 679, robe p. 12, 19, 66 ; 391, 
487, vesture 679. 

Food : broth 18, curried 240, corn 285, 
307, drink 106, 398, fare 286, flesh 
240, fish 249, food 297, 392, p. 89, 
fowls 241, ghee 295, intoxicants 400, 
meat 242, milk 18, rice 240, 295, 
ricemilk p. 13. 

Gear ; awl 625, axe 657, bangles 48, 
bar 622, barbs 86, 938, boat 321, 771, 
bowl p.13 ; 413, 713, cauldrons 670, 
cord 622, crucible 686, dart 334, 593, 
767, dice 106, 657, dam 1034, flails 
669, floodgate 1034, gaud 121, gem 
683, goad 78, halter 622, hooks 61, 673, 
jars p.85 ; 672, jewels 224^", p. 86, 
lamp p.14 ; 235, lute 449, leash 730, 
mats 401, 668, needles 631, net 71, 
213, 357, 669, oars 321, pails 309, pin 
654, plough 77, 410, pole 77, pot 217, 



443, p.85 ; 721, raft 21, razor 716, rod 
p. 86, 629, 667, rudder 321, sword p.86; 
819, 1002, thong 622, vessel 577, 
whisks 688, yoke 77, 641. 

Metals : copper 670, p.13, gold 48, 
102, 285, 307, 689, 769, iron 667, 
silver 962. 

Occupations: artisan 613, bagman 121, 
boat(man) 321, brave 831, brigand 118, 
celebrant 618, charcoal (burner) 396, 
charioteer 83, cowherd 33 f, farmer 612, 
goldsmith 48, herdsman 18^, king 836, 
merchants 1014, messengers 411, 415, 
physician 560, 562, ploughman 12, 
potter 577, rajah 619, retainer 769, 
servants 25, 615, slaves 769, soldier 6 1 7, 
silversmith 962, thief 616. trader 455, 
614, warders 669, warrior 420, 553. 

Spirits : see index of Proper Names ; 
demons asiira ^10. 681, devas p.29 ; 
258, 310, 384, 404, 1024 & passim, 
devi devata p. 16, 40 ; 986^, ghosts 
pitaro 310, ghouls rahkhasa 310, gan- 
dharvas 644, gentles of Meru marisa 
682, gods stira 681, sY>iv.'\t yakkha I53_^, 
p.29, 42 ; 449, 478, hhuta lllf, storm- 
gods maru 688, thrice-ten tidasa 679, 
whirlwind devas mam 68 1 . 

Vegetation : bamboo 38, banyan 272, 
344, bean p. 98, branch 791, bines 524, f, 
coral tree 64, cotton seed 591, creepers 
239, fig-trees 5, flowers 5, fruit ^o, 
576, grass 20, p.13; 239, 440, 601. 
herbs 239, jujube p.c)8, leaf 81 1, hly 
121, lotus 2, 53, 71. 213, 392. 547i 
812, millet 239, mustard seed p.98, 
myrobalan p.98, pea p.98, pulse 239, 
quince p.98, reeds 4, roots 239, 5-4/' 
rush 28, seeds 77, 239, 625, 658, sesa- 
mum p.'98; 677, trees 233, 601, \'\U^ 
p.98, vines 272, weeds 78. 



Titles 



183 



III.— TITLES OF SUTTAS 



PAGE 



Alavaka, 


. 


. 29 


Bharadvaja, 


. 66 


Brahman-Dharma, 


. 44 


Brahman Ajita's questions, 


. 148 


,, Bhadravudha's ,, 


160 


,, Dhotaka's ,, 


. 153 


,, Hemaka's ,, 


. 157 


Jatukannin's ,, 


. 159 


Kappa's ,, 


. 158 


,, Mettagu's ,, 


. 151 


Mogharajah's ,, 


. 162 


,, Nanda's ,, 


. 155 


,, Pingiya's ,, 


. 163 


Posala's 


. 161 


,, Punnaka's ,, 


. 150 


,, Tissa Metceyya's 


. 149 


Todeyya's 


. 158 


Udaya's ,, 


. 160 


,, Upasiva's ,, 


. 154 


Cunda, . . 


14 


Dhaniya, . . 


2 


Dhammika, 


. 56 


Dharma-faring, 


. 43 


Ere he crumble up, 


, 126 


Farmer Bharadvaja, 


12 


Goodly Words, 


. 65 


Magandiya, 




. 124 


Magha, 




. 72 


Nalaka, 




. 102 


Of Arousing, 




. 49 


Of Contentions, 




. 127 


Of Decay, 




. 120 


Of Dual View-point 


s, 


. 108 


Of Flesh-savours, . 




. 38 


Of Ill-will, 




. 117 



Of Major Issues, 

Of Mastery, 

Of Minor Issues, 

Of Modesty, 

Of Pleasures, 

Of Suffering, 

Of the Cleansed, 

Of the Yonder most 

Of Violence, 

On Faring Rightly, 

Pasura, 

Rahula, 

Sabhiya, 

Sariputta, 

Satagira, 

Sela, 

Suciloma, 

The Boat, 

The Cave, 

The Dart, 

The Going Forth, 

The Greatest Luck, 

The Jewel, 

The Kokalikan, 

The Outcast Man, 

The Quickening of Amity 

The Quick Way, 

The Rhinoceros, 

The Sage, 

The Snake, 

The Striving, 

Tissa Metteyya, 

Vangisa, 

Vasettha, 

What virtue his 



PAGE 

131 

31 

129 

40 

16 
118 



i84 



Indexes 



IV.— BOOKS CONCORDED WITH SUTTA-NIPATA GATHAS 





ABBREVIATIONS 


OF BOOK-TITLES 


Vin 
D 

M 
S 
A 
Khp 


Vinaya-Pitaka, 

Digha-Nikaya, 

Majjhima-Nikaya, 

Samyutta-Nikaya, 

Ariguttara-Nikaya , 

Khuddaka-patha. 


quoted by volume and page. 

>♦ 

canto and verse. 


Dh 
Ud 
It 
Sn 


Dhammapada, 
Udana. 
Itivuttaka, 
Sutta-nipata, 


verse, 
page, 
page, 
verse. 


Vv 


Vimana-vatthu, 


canto and verse. 


Pv 


Peta-vatthu, 


section, canto and verse, 


Thag 
Thig 


Theragatha, 
Therigatha, 


verse, 
verse. 


J 

Ndi 


Jataka & Commentary, 
Maha-Niddesa, 


volume and pa^e. 
page. 


Ndi 


Culla-Niddesa, 


page. 


Ps 

Ap 


Patisambhidamagga, 
Apadana, thera-, 
then-, 


vokmie and page, 
canto and verse ; 
ii, canto and verse. 


Bv 


Buddha vamsa, 


canto and verse. 


DhS 
Vbh 
Dhk 


Cariyapitaka, 


section, canto and verse. 


Dhammasangani, 

Vibhanga, 

Dhatukatha, 


page, 
page, 
page. 


Pug 
Kvu 


Puggala-paniiatti, 
Kathavatthu, 


page, 
page. 


Yam 
Pth 


Yamaka, 
Patthana, 


page, 
page. 


VinA 

DA 

MA 

SA 

AA 


Samantapasadika (Vin. Corny.), 
Sumangalavilasini (D. Corny.), 
Papancasudani (M. Corny.), 
Saratthappakasini (S. Comy.), 
Manorathapurani (A. Corny.), 


vokmie and page. 



Concordance 



185 



KhpA 

DhA 

UdA 

ItA 

SnA 

VvA 

PvA 

ThagA 

ThigA 

NdiA 

NdiA 

PsA 

BvA 

CpA 

\'ism 

Nett 

Pgdp 

Davs 

Jina 

Divy 

Mil 



Paramatthajotika (Khp. Corny.), 

Dhammapada-atthakatha (Corny.), 

ParamatthadipanI (Ud. Corny.), 
ditto. (It. Corny.), 

Paramatthajotika (Sn. Corny.), 

ParamatthadipanI (Vv. Corny.), 
ditto. (Pv. Corny.), 

ditto. (Thag. Corny.), 

ditto. (Thig. Comy.), 

Saddhammapajjotika (Maha-Nd. Corny.), 
ditto. (Culla-Nd. Corny.), 

Saddhammappakasini (Ps. Corny.), 

Madhuiatthavilasinl (Bv. Comy.), 

ParamatthadipanI (Cp. Comy.), 

Visudddhimagga, 

Nettipakarana, 

PancagatidipanI, 

Dathavanisii, 

Jinacarita, 

Divyavadana, 

Milindapanha, 



page. 

volume and page. 

page. 

\ 01 lime and page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

page. 

verse. 

canto and verse. 

verse. 

page. 

page. 



Note.— Reference are to the romajt editions of the works.) 



OTHER BOOKS REFERRED TO IN THE NOTES ETC. 



S.B.E. 

S.B.B. 

Some Sayings 

Points of Controversy 

Brethren 

RV. 

AV. 

G.S. 

Dial. 

K.S. 

P.E.D. 

C.P.D. 

Mahabh. 



Sacred Books of the East Series. 

Sacred Books of the Buddhists Series. 

Some Sayings of the Buddha— The World's Classics. 

Trsl. of Kathavatthu, P.T.S. 

Psalms of, trsl. of Theragatha, P.T.S. 

Rig Veda, Griffith's trsl. Lazarus & Co. 

Atharva Veda, ditto. 

Gradual Sayings, trsl. of Aiiguttara, P.T.S. 

Dialogues of the Buddha, trsl. of Digha, S.B.B. 

Kindred Sayings, trsl. of Samyutta, P.l.S. 

Rhys Davids— Stede Pali English Diet. 

Trenckner- Andersen-Smith Critical Pah Diet. 

Mahabharata. 



1 86 



Ind 



exes 



SUTTA-NIPATA 

A TABLE OF 
IDENTICAL, COMPARABLE, AND QUOTED PASSAGES. 



I 

la 

id 



3 
4b 

6a 
^ab 

6b 

yab 

8a 

9 

lO 
T I 
12 

13 

I4ab 

15 
i6 
lya 



i8c 

i8d 

19a 

19b 

20 

21 



I. URAGAVAGGA 
(i) Uragasutta 
VinA. iv, 760. 
Dh. 222. 

Pv. i, 12, i; J. iii, 164; iv, 
341; V, 100; vi, 361; Ap, 
394, i^; Bv. ix, 28; BvA. 
181. 



Iliag. 7. 

AA. iii, 76. 

Vin. a, 184; Ud. io;DA,i 

34- 

CpA. 20. 
Ud. 71. 

Sn. g-M. 



Sn. 369. 

A. iii, 354; Thag. 171. J 
Sn. 1-16. 

(2) Dhaniyasutta J 
J hag. 1, 51-4, 325; Thag A. 
i, 26. 

Sn. 19-29; Thag. 51-4, 325. 
Mil. 186, 187. 
Ap. 481, 6. 



23 
24 

26 

27 
28 

29 
29a 



Z9b 

29c 
30a 

3od 
31C 

32c 

32d 

3 3-4 
34c 



35-37 

35ab 
35^^ 
36 
36a 

37b 
37c 
^8b 

39 



Mil. 369. 

Thig. 301; Cp. iii, 3, 9; Ap. 

60, 10; 337, 12; 342,7; 371, 

5 passim, 

Thag. 1 1 84. 

Dh. 238; Sn. J 52; J. iii, 434. 

S. i, 100; A. iii, 34; It. 66; 

Thag. 991; Pv. a, 9, 46. 

Sn. 409; Thag. 338. 

Thig. 53; Ap. 20, 10; J. iv. 

291. 

S. iv. 71; Ir. 41; Thag. 1022. 

Sn. 337. 

S. i, 6, 107-8; Nett. 34- 

ItA. ii. 81. 

(3) Khaggavisanasuttii 
Ap. pp. 8-13. 
M. ii, 99; Sn. 394; Dh. 142; 
J. iv, 452; V, 148, Divy, 339. 
UdA. J. 

Dh. 330; MA. iv. 128. 
Divy. 294. 

S. ii, 158; It. 70; A. iii, 67, 
259. 

J. i, 251, 252. 
S. i, 2, 3, 55, 63; A. 1, 155. 
S. i, 77;Dh. 345; Thag. 187: 
J. ii, 140. 
UdA. 163. 



Concordance 



1S7 



40 
41a 

42' 

42ab 
42 b 
43b 
44b 
45-6 

47c 
48 

49 
50a 

5oab 

5oabc 

50b 

50c 

5iab 

52a 

52ab 

52b 

53 
54a 
54b 
54c 

55 
56b 

57a 
57b 
58a 



/ 



59a 
60c 

6Tb 

62a 

62b 

62c 

63a 

63c 

64a b 

65 



Sn. 59. 

DA. i, 207; MA. 11, 21 3; AA. 

iii, 197; Nd2A. 11 1. 

KhpA. 147; It A. il [48. 

Thag. 922; Mil. 395. 

S. I, 42. 

A. iv. 118. 

Vin. i, 3 50; M. in, i 54; Dh. 

328-9;J.m, 488;nhA.i, 52. 

J. iv. 453. 



rhag. 1 112; A. 111,41 1. 

SnA. 509; VvA. II. 

M. ii. 74; Thag. 787. 

S. iv, 210. 

J. iv, 313; V, 176. 

A. iii, 311; iv, 290. 

J. iii, 262. 

Vin, ii, 147. 164; j. i, 93. 

5. i, 106; J. iii, 262. 

Thag. 84. 

It. 115. 

J. i, 188; iv. 449. 

Dh. 10. 

Dh. 269. 

J. vi, 213. 

A. ii, 8; Thag. 373, 1030, 

1047, 1048; Thig. 280; Ap. 

6, 102; Vism. 48; Pgdp. 106. 
J. VI. 258. 

J. vi, 258. 

J. iii, 381; iv, 487; V. 392, 

Vin. ii, ly, M. i, 130; A. iii. 

97; Dh. 186; Divy. 224. 

Sn. 74. 

S. i, 52. 

A. V, 337. 

Sn. 972. 

Dh. 39. 

Sn. 44. 



66a 

67ab 

68 

69b 

70c 

7iabc 

72c 

73 
74a 

74b 
74d 

75c 



76-82 

77a 

77c 

78 
79ab 



79ci 



Sod 



8ia 

8ib 
82c 



83a 
83d 

84a 

85 
86 

87 
88a 



Sn. 17. 
Thag A. i, 27. 

Dh. zo; rhag. 373. 

Sn. 1038. 

Sn. 213. 

S. i, 154; Thag. 142; Mil. 

371, 402. 

S. i, 184; DU. 10: Sn. 493. 
Sn. 62. 
Dh. 331. 
J. Ill, 495. 

(4) Kasibharadvajasutta 

S. i, 172-3. 
AA. iv, 57. 

S. v, 6. 

Ap. 9, 13; 18, 14; 31, 15; 
404, 37; 484' 33.* ii' 8, 16, 
Vin. ii, 283; A. 130; Dh. 
225; Thag. 138; Sn. 445; Vv. 

33. 192- , . 

S. i, 18, 38, 57; ii, 278; Dh. 
189, 192, 361; It. 52; i, 97; 
Ap. 397, 30; Divy. 164. 
S. 1, 167, 168; Sn. 480-1; 
Mil. 228. 

MA. i, 4; S.A. 1, 5; KhpA. 
10 1, • ItA. 22; UdA. II. 
J. iii, 492; V. 100. 
D. ii, 272: J. iv. 399. 

(5) Cundasiitta 

Sn. 359. 

Ap. 542, 6; Bv. 1, 23. 
Sn. 862, 875; J. iii, 492; iv, 
97. 459: v, 23, 146. 
S. i, 15. 

Sn. 17. 367. 

Dh. 44, 45. 



i88 



Indexes 



89 


J. n\ 281. 




(7) Vasalasutta 




89b 


Dh. 244; ). iu 3-^' 


116 


Ps. 160.' 




90 




1 1 6a 


Vin. V, 161; Tha^. 502, 
J. in, 260. 


952 




(6) Parahhavasutta 


1 17b 


Dh. 270. 








ii8b 


J. iv, 362. 




91b 


Sn. 167, 599. 


J 19a 


S. i, 69; A. I, 281; Dh 


98 


9IC 


S. i. 34, 43. 47; Sn. 597, 
I no. 




Thag. 991; J. n, 80; iii. 


169 






229," 231; Ap. 402, 51, 


59 


92 




1 20a 


A. iii, 352. 




93 




121 






94a 


Thag. 994. 


122 






94b 


Dh. 217. 


123 






94c 


J. iv, 53- 


1 24abc 


Sn. 98. 




95 




I2 5ab 


J. ti, 299. 




96 




126 






97 




127a 


S. i, 209. 




98abc 


Sii. 124; J. iv. 184. 


128 






98a 


S. i, 182; Sn. 125. 


1 2 9a be 


Sn. 1 00. 




98c 


KhpA. 207. 


130b 


f. iv, J 78, 471. 




99 




13' 






1 ooabc 


Vv. S2, 14. 


i32ab 


Sn. 438. 




1 00a 


7 ' *T_ 

Sn. 130; J. iv, 178. 


133b 


Dh.262; A. IV, 172. 




looab 


Sn. 129; S. i, 96; J. iv, 320; 


133c 


A. iii, 354- 






vi, 502. 


I34abc 


Vv. 52, 26. 




100c 


Pv. in, 4, 2. 


135 
136 


Sn. 650. 




101 
1 02c 


J, III, SS; VI, 286. 


136b 


S. i, i66. 
A 7 ■ 






137a 


Vin. 11, 203. 




103 




138 






104 




i39cd 


A. iii, 373; J. Uh 501 


iv. 


105 
T o6ab 


A. iv, 287; J. ii'u 58; iv, 255. 


1 39d 


471; Kvu, 114. 

A. iv, 150; V, 342; Pv. n, 


M» 


107 






19. 




108a 


A. iii, 213. 


i39f 


D. n, 246; Pv. 11. M. 19' 


Ap. 


109 






398. 2. 




1 10 




140 






1 1 1 




1 4 1 ab 


Vin. li, 162. 




112 




142 


Sn. 136. 




114b 


J. li, 340. 




(8) Mettasittta 




115b 


It. ^0. 


143-52 


Khp. ix, I- 10. 




115c 


Thag. 45, 173. 


144a 


A. iii, 120. 




I i5d 


A. iv, 245. 


145a 


UdA. 236. 





Concordance 



89 



146 

i47d 

148 

149a 

i49ab 

i5oab 

151 

I52d 

153a 

153-4 

155 

156 

157 
i58Lx-i 

159 
160 

161 

162 

163c 

163d 

7 63 Ac 



164c 

i65ab 

165b 

165c 

i66abc 

i66b 

i66d 

167b 

167c 

168 

i68b 

169 

i69ab 

i7od 

171 
I7id 



SnA. 87. 

S. 1, 44. 

D. ii, 89; A. IV, 93; Thag. 3 ]. 

Thag. 648. 



Sn. 29, 



S. i, 

574- 
S. 1, 
AA. 



(9) Hemavatasutta 
191; Thag. 1234; J- ^^' 

^35- 
I, 239. 



D. in, 175. 



Thag. 629, 1 179; Thig. 209 

S. 1,200; Sn. 502.746. 

D. iii, 196-9, 202; M. i, 358 

S. i, 166; ii, 284; A. iv, 238 

V, 327-8; J. V, 267; Bv. 1,2 

Sn. 164. 

D. iii, 97. 

S. 1, 16. 

Ap. 404, 4. 

Dh. 395; Sn. 221; Ap. 151,2. 

S. i, 16. 

S. 1, 77; a, 281; Sn. 823, 857. 

A. 11, 37. 

Thag. 66; Sn. 699, 992. 

S. u 121; A. in, 31 1; It. 57; 

M. Hi, 187; A. i, 142. 

S. i, 41. 

S. i, 17. 

S. i, 41. 

UdA. 224; ItA. ii, 128. 

S. i, 16, 62. 

S. i, 16; Kvu, 367. 

S. i, 16, 209. 



172 

173a 

173c 

i73cd 

1 74a bd 

I74ab 

I74d 

175 

175a 

175b 

175c 
i75d 
176a 
176b 
176c 

177 

178a 

i78ab 

178c 

i78cd 

I78d 

179b 



179c 

179^ 
1 8oab 
1 80c 
i8od 



181-92 
181-2 
i8ia 
182b 

182c 

183 

184 

184a 

1850 

i85ef 

186-7 



S. i, 53. 

J. V. 70. 

S. i, 53. 

Vism. 3. 

S. i, 53. 

S. i, 53; Nett. 146. 

Nett. 146. 

S. I. 53- 

A. Hi, 346; S.i, 1 12. 

S. i, 2, 53; Sn. 637. 

S.i, 53- 

Thag. 372. 

Vin. i, 36; Sn. 1059, ^^9'- 

D. Hi, 196; S. i, 4, 50, 51; 

Dh. 90; Sn. 472, 501. 

s. 1, 33. 

Ap. 80, 23. 

Vv. 33, 191. 

S. i, 196; Thag. 287. 

Sn. 1 145. 

Ap. H3. ^> 346, 1; 39-' 4- 

D. ii, 259; A. iv. 90; Thag. 

1082, 1 178; J. vi, 219, 439; 

BvA. 86. 

Dh. 188; Divy. 164. 

Vin. 1, 8. 

Pv. ii, 13, 18. 

Vv. 21, 4. 

D. ii, 208, 211, 221, 227; 

Sn. 192; Thag. 24. 

(10) Alavakiisutta 
S. 1, 214-5. 
S. i, 42. 

MA. i, 16; ii, 47; SA. ii, 4. 
Thag. 303; J. i, 31; iv, 54. 
496; MA. i. 17; BvA. 1 ^ 
UdA. 77; SnA. ^99. 

Mil. 36. 

AA. iv, 57. 

Dh. 220; Tha^. 237. 

J. vi, 286. 

Nett. 146-7. 



190 



Indexes 



1 86a 
1 86b 
1 86c 
i86d 

iSyab 
187c 
188 
1 88a 
1 88b 

1 88c 



i88cd 

i88d 

i89ab 

189b 

189c 

i89cd 

i89d 
I god 

191a 

igicd 

igid 



192 



192b 

192c 
I92d 

i93ab 

193b 
I94ab 
194-9 
^95 



It. 112. 

S. i, 48. 

KhpA. 221. 

Thag. 4, 741; J. vi, 240, 286, 

297. 

KhpA. 1^9. 

Thag. 35; J. ill, 302; iv, 301. 

PsA. 18, 

J. I, 280; ii, 206; CpA. 230. 

A. lii, 354; iv, 285,322, 325; 

Pv. a, 9, 28. 

J. i, 280; ii, 206; iv, 435; V, 

80; MA. i, 17; KhpA. 221: 

CpA. 230; BvA. 13. 

ItA. 37. 

Thag. 502-6. 

SA. i, 26. 

Sn. 190; J. Hi, 128. 

J. VI, 244. 

MA. V, 85; SA. ii, 374; 

KhpA. 221. 

S. i, 222, 223, 226. 

S. i, 87, 89; A. Hi, 49; It. 17; 

DA. i, 32. 

DhA. i, 407. 

DhA. i, 407. 

S. i, 21; A. i. 63; It. [9; Sn. 

486: Vv. 34, 20, 22; Pv. ii, 

9, 74; J'iv, 361-5, 373, 387; 

DhA. lii, 221. 

Ap. 6, 152; 415, 17; DA. i, 

232; MA. i, 133; AA. ii, 1 10; 

ItA. ii, 46. 

Thag. 1253; Ap. 405, 34; S. 

i, 196. 

Thag. 513. 

D. ii, 208, 211. 

(11) Vijayasutta 
A. ii, 14; It. 82, 117; AA. i, 
364. 
Ud. 61. 
Dh. 150. 
J. i. 14^^. 



196 

I97ab 

197c 

198 

i99d 

200c 

201c 

202b 

203 

203ab 

203c 

203d 
204cd 

204d 



205 

205ab 

206c 



207 
207a 

207c 

208 

209c 

210C 
2iod 
2 1 1 abc 



2iia 
211C 
212a 
212b 

213b 

2i3cde 

2i3e 

214b 

214c 



Thag. 279, 1 1 5 i; A. iv, 386. 
MA. ii, 129. 

A. lit i^; Sn. 277. 

Thag. 393. 

J. vi, 246, 

Sn. 204. 

Ap. ii, 18, 68. 

Thag. 396; Thig. 83, Ap. ii, 

25, 48; 36, 1 6; DhA. Hi, 117. 

Sn. 738, nil, II 13, Thag. 

172, 337, 439' 

Thig. 14. 

Vv. 50, 21. 

Thig. 97; Ap. I, 153; 424, 

11; 132, 3; 390, 23; Sn. 

1086. 

Thag. 453. 

J. i, 146. 

Sn. 438. 

(12) Munisutta 
Mil. 211, 212, 385. 
Dh. 212-5; S"- 93 5» J- ^^'' 
312. 
J. vi, 61. 

S. V, 168, [86; It. 41; J. iii, 

434- 

It. 92. 

S. i, 48. 

S. ii, 284; Dh. 353; M. i, 

171; Vin. i, 8. 

Sn. 177. 

A. i, 236; ii, 42; It. 32. 

It. 80; Thag. 12. 

S. i, 53; It. 40, Thag. 12; J. 

V, 150. 

Dh. 81. 

Sn. 71. 

Ap. 547, 12. 

Thig. 354. 

Sn. 465, 498; Thag. 56. 972; 

Thig. 56. 



Concordance 



191 



215a 


Sn. 464; ThagA. i, 7. 


248c 


J- ». 233; iv, 103; vi, 100 


216 
217 


DhA. IV. 99. 


249b 


DhA. i. 447; S. i, 48. 
Dh. 141. 


218 




249f 


Dh. 141. 


219c 


S. i, 1.2, 2 ^ 


250a 


Sn. 971. 


220 




250b 


Sn. 327;]. iv, 303; V. 17, 33. 


22ia 


Thag. 22, 1 136. 


250c 


Dh. 347. 


22 id 


Sn. 165. 


25od 


Sn. 778. 




11. CULAVAGGA 


251C 
252a 


J. Ill, 245. 349.' iv, 470. 
Thag. 26. 




(i) Ratanasutta 


252b 


Vin. n, 148, 164; D. iiu 196 


222-38 


Khp. vi, i-17. 




A. iii, 41,43;]. i, 94; Ap. I 
145; DA. i. 304. 


222a 


Sn. 236-8; MA. i, 31. 






223 


* ' ' J ' 




(3) Hirisutta 


224 


MA. V, 39. 


253-7 


J. iii, 196. 


224c 


SnA. 402. 


254b 


J. ni, 253. 


225a 


ThagA. i, 201. 


254cd 


S. i, 24; Thag. 226; J. iii, 69 


226 


MA. V, 39. 




253- 


226b 


Vism. 675. 


254d 


S. IV, 206, 218; J. iv, 175 


227 


MA. V, 40. 


255 


}. iii, 192-3. 


228 




256a 


It. 108. 


229 




257 


Dh. 205. 


230 




257a 


Thag. 85. 


231 
232b 


S. i, 93, 102; A. i, 63. 




(4) Mah'dmafigalasutta 


233b 


J. V, 63. 


258-69 


Khp. V, I- 1 2. 


^34 




258a 


S. 1, 235. 


235 , 




259c 


S. i; 175; Thag. 186. 


23600 


ItA. 1 17. 


260c 


ThagA. i, 8. 


237cd 


It A. 117, 137; UdA. 153. 


261 


J. iii, 369. 


238cd 


ItA. 117, 137; UdA. 153. 


262 
263 
264 






(2) Amagandhasutta 




239 




265 




240 




266 




24ie 


Vin. i, 36; J. 83; vi, 221. 


267a 


S. i, 38, 43. 


242b 


J. iv, II. 


267b 


SnA. 105; Nd2A. 1 34. 


242b 


J. iv, II. 


268c 


A. iii, 354. 


243a 


A. ii, 6, 19; Sn. 247. 


269c 


J. ii, 112; V, 253. 


244 
M5 


D. ii, 243. 




(5) Sucilotnasutta 


246c 


J. V. 69. 


270-3 


S. i, 207-8; Nett. 147. 


247c 


A. iv, 93; J. ii, 349. 


271 


Ndi. 16; Nd2. 201.. 



igz 



Indexes 



272 




293 b 


Thag. 1 56, 979. 


273d 


Ud. 74; Nett. 143. 


294 
295, 






(6) Dhammacariyasutta 


296b 


Dh. 43. 


274ab 


DhA. iv, 42. 


297c 


Dh. 289. 


274d 


S. I, i2o.i85;Thag.48, 107, 


298b 


D. 11, 256-61; S. Hi, 86. 




136, 605, 645, 688, 1209; 


298f 


S. i, 208, 217, 218; Thag. 




Thig. 92, 226. 




236, 746; J. 11, 432. 


275b 


Thag. 958, 989. 


299ab 


It A. 94. 


276d 


Vin. ii, iSy, Thag.9 1,548. 


299d 


Sn. 304; J. iv, 352; Ap. I, 


277b 


Sn. 199. 




106; 6, 38; 22, 40; 406, 41; 


278c 


Vin. ii, 202; V, 165; A. iv, 




426, y passim; Bv. 12, 20; 13, 




196; It. 68; Thag. 502. 




22; J. vi, 503. 


278d 


M. i, 337, 3^8; Dh. 69; Sn. 


3ooab 


Sn. 304; J. vi, 218. 




586. 


300b 


J. iv, 395. 


281-3 


A. iv, 172; MA. ii, 1 19; SA. 


30od 


Vv. 6, 2, 10; 7, 2; 8, 2, 10; 




11, 49- 




44, 10; Pv. ii, 7, 13; Hi, 


28icd 


Mil. 414. 




2, 22; iv. 3, >5: J- V. 266; vi, 


282 


Mil. 414. 




46, 47. 


282ab 


SnA. 165. 


301a 


J. vi, 27. 


2S^ 


Mil. 41 1. 


302ab 


ItA. 94. 


283ab 


Mil. 414. 


302c 


y. i, 3; Hi, 367; Pv. ii, 6, 1 1; 


283d 


S. i, 7. 61, 157, -^03; Dh. 




Bv. 2, 5; Ap. 6, i; 408, 18; 




275, 376; It. 29, 34; Thag. 




543. 9' 547. 5; ii. 24, -^4- 




84, 257; Thig. 167; Ap. 23, 


302de 


Sn. 307. 


/ 


24; 146, 3; 407, 40.* i^^ 17. 


303 cde 


S. i, 76; A. ii, 42; iv, 151; It. 


y 


189; Mil. 380; Divy. 68. 




2 I. 






304b 


Bv. 2, 209; 3, 27. 




(7) Brahmanadhammikasutta 


305a 


]. vi, 27. 


284b 


Pv. u, 6, 14; Ap. 328, 6. 


3o6d 


Dh. 349. 


284c 


Sn. 337. 


307 
308 




285b 


J. V, 100. 




286 




309 




287c 


J. V. 100. 


3 IOC 


y. vi, 90, 502. 


288b 


J. vi, 47. 


3 nab 


i:). iii, 75. 


289b 


Ap. ii, 18, 3 1; 19,49; 20,17; 


313 






21, 18 passim, A. iii, 11^. 




290 




314 




291b 


A. Hi, 226. 


315 




292a 
292b 


Sn. 294. 
J. Ill, 274. 




(8) NavasHtta 


292c 


A. in, 346; Thag. 693. 


316a 


Dh. 392. 


292cd 


]. ni, 274. 


317 




292d 


Sn. 294. 


3i8d 


M. ii, 73. 



Concordance 



«9J 



]. iv, 260, 440. 

M. ii, 105; Thag. 880; J. V, 4. 

J. iv, 101, 478. 
J. VI, 213. 
S. i, 141. 
J. IV, 53. 



(9) Ktmsilasutta 
Pv. ii, 9, 14; J. iii, 148, 259, 
262; V. 3; DhA. iii, 467. 
]. iv, 197, 198. 
It. 10; Sn. 627; Thag. 639; 
Thig. 171; Ap. 231, i; 271, 
i; 290, i; 300, 2. 
Dh. 109. 

D. iii, 192; A. iii, 43; ItA. 
168; NdiA. 405. 
S. i, 169. 

Dh. 364; It. 82; Thag. 1032. 
S. i, 185. 

Dh. 152. 

S. ii, 285; Dh. 79. 

J. iii, 442. 

Sn. 365. 

Dh. 12. 

(10) UtthanasHttii 
S. i, 198. 
Thag, 441. 
J. iii, 34; iv, 84. 
Pv. ii, 6, I. 

J. iii, 169; Thag. 967; Sn. 
767. 

S. IV, 158; Ud. 15; It. 58. 
It. 35. 
Ud. 78. 

A. iv, 228; Dh. 315; Thag. 
403, 1005; Thig. 5. 
S, i, 8, 9, 10; J. i, 13; ii, 57, 
58; Thag. 653, 1004; Bv. 2, 
43; BvA. 87. 



333e 
333f 
334 
3 34^ 



335c 
336 
337 
337a 

3 37ab 
337c 

3 37d 



338-9 

338a 

338b 

338c 

338d 

339c 

3 39^ 
340a 
34oab 

340c 

340cd 

341 

34iab 

341b 

341c 

34icd 

34^ 

342a 
342b 
342d 



Ap. 6, 138. 
J. iii, 43. 
rhag. 404. 
Sn. ^592. 

(11) Rakulasutta 
Ap. 57, 3. 

Thag. 195. 

Thag. 892; Sn. 284; Ap. 498, 

Ap. 482, 1, 

Thig. 341; J, IV, 33; Ap. 426, 

1. 

S. ii, 186; A. i, 131; 2; iv, 

106; It. 18; Thag. 682. 1008, 

Ap. 392, 27; 482, 9; 485. 3- 

MA. 11, 380. 

Dh. 78, 375. 

Dh. 185; D. ii, 50; Ud. 43. 

Thag. 577; Mil. 371. 

D. ii, 50; Ud. 43;Dh.8, 185; 

It. 24; Thag. 583. 

Sn. 1068. 

Thig. 14; DhA. iii, 117. 

Dh. 185, 375; Thag. 583. 

Ap. 14, 22; 56, 6; 486, 10; 

li, 37, 2. 

Thag. 6, 636; Ud. 28, 78; 

Dh. 299. 

S. i, 188; Thag. 1225; Ap. ii, 

18, 67. 

Thag. 1224-5; Vism. 38. 

S. i, 188. 

Thag. 674; J. iii, 500. 

Dh. 350; Thag. 594- 

S. i, 188; Ap. ii, 18, 67; 25, 

47; 36, 16; Thig. 19, 82. 

S. i. 188; Thag. 1226; Thig. 

20; Ap. ii, 18, 69. 

Thig. 105. 

Thag. 60. 

Thig. 14, 168; Sn. 949, 1099; 

DhA. iii, 1 17- 



194 



Ind 



exes 



58 



343 
343 
344ab 

345^ 
346a 
346d 

347 
348 

349 
350 
351a 

352 

353 

354 

355a 

355t> 

356 

357a 

357b 

357c 

357cd 

358d 



359 

359a 

359t> 

36oabc 

36iab 

361C 

362c 

363a 

364b 

364c 

365a 

366ab 

366c 

367 
368 
369ab 



(12) Vahoisasutta 
Thag. 1263-78. 

BvA. 65. 

D. ii, 288; J. V, 222; vi, 26 

J. in, 347. 

J. iv, 322. 



M. ii, 144; A. i, 162; ii, 23; 
iii, 214; Thag. 679. 



S. i, 12, 23. 
Thag. 768. 

D. iii, 135; J. iii, 89. 

S. i, 113; iv, 204; Dh. 75. 

S. i, 48; J. vi, 123. 

J. iv, 46. 

S. i, 35, 60; V, 24; Dh. 86; 

Thig. 10; J. iv, 480; DhA. ii, 

160. 

(i 3) Sammaparibbajaniyasutta 
DA. ii, 684. 
Sn. 83. 
Sn. 370. 

J- 1/ 374- 

It. 94; J. ii, 313; Thig. 350. 

Sn. 374. 

S, i, hi; a. iv, 157. 

S. i, 15; J. v, 445. 

S. i, 198. 

Sn. 55. 

Sn. 330. 

Sn. 702. 

J. iii, 88. 



Sn. 14. 



369c 

370a 

370c 

371a 

372 

373 

374a 

374c 

375 



376a 
376ab 
377 
378 

379^ 
380 

381 
382 

383 
384c 

385a 
386 

387a 

387c 

388d 

389 

390 

391-2 

391C 

392c 

393 
394a 

394c 
394d 

395 
396a 

397 
398 

399 
400-1 



Sn. 1090. 

Dh. 94; Thag. 205. 206. 
Thag. 5, 7, 8; J. iv, 303. 
S. i, 100. 



Sn. 361. 
S. i, 107. 



(14) DhatnmikasiUta 

S. i. 42, 52. 
KhpA. 125. 



Sn. 380. 



Vin. i. 5; M. i, 168. 
J. vi, 286. 

Sn. 759; Thag. 455; J. vi, 

220. 

Vin. i, 21; Sn. 778, 975. 

Vv. II, 6; Pv. iv, 1,61. 



Vism. 45. 
Dh. 285. 
Thag. 10. 

A. i, 214; J. vi, 139. 
Sn. 35. 
Sn. 629. 

A. i, 215. 



A. i, 214-5; iv. 254, 257-8, 
262. 



Concordance 



195 



402bc S. i, 208; A. i, 144. 145; J. 

iv, 320; vi, 1 18, 120-3; T^hig. 

31; Vv. 19, 9; 22, 6 passim; 

DhA. iv, 21. 
402c S. i, 206. 

403bc J. iv, 282; vi, 202. 
403c J. iv, 76. 

404a S. i, 182. 

III. MAHAVAGGA 

(i) Pabbajjasutta 

405d Thig. 322; }. iv, 471. 

406 M. i, 179; S. V. 350; A. ii, 
208. 

407 Ap. 32, 12; ii, 34, 4. 
407a Ap. 90, 3 . 

407ab J. iv, 471; Ap. 390, 21. 

407c Dh. 231. 

407cd Ap. 90, 3. 

408b Vin. i, 43; It. 17; S. ii, 185. 

409CI Thag. 483; Sn. 419. 

410a J. vi, 102; Sn. 562; ]. vi, 575- 

410C Ap. 6, 115; 385, i; 538, 10; 

Mil. 24. 
4iod Ap. 484, 10; 487, 7; Vism. 

68. 
411a Pv. iv, 3, 41. 
41 ic J. iv, 399. 
412a J. IV, 447. 
4i2cd Pv. Hi, 1,1. 
413a Thag. 579; Pv. iv. 3, 41. 
413b Thag. 116, 579, 890; Ap. 6, 

115; Pv. iv. 3, 41; Mil. 343. 
413d S. Hi, 143; D. ii, 286; It. 10; 

Thag. 20, 59, 196, 607. 

1002, 1058; Vv. 21, 11; Ap. 

10, 17; 59, 10; 394, 23; 410, 

20; 467, 3. 
414a Sn. 708. 

415 

416c Ap. 95, 3. 
4i6d Thag. 177, 108 1; Ap. 482, 
10; ii, 21, 34. 



417c 

418b 

4i8d 

419a 

4 1 9ab 

419c 

42oab 

420b 

421 

422 

423c 

423d 

424a 

424ab 

424b 



425a 
425b 
425d 



426d 
427c 
428b 
429b 
430c 

431 
432a 

433 
434d 

435 

436-7 

436-9 

436a 

438a 

439d 
44ocd 
441b 
44id 



J. IV, 85. 

J. v, 264; vi, 22^. 

Vin. iv, 203. 

VinA. i, 76. 

J. vi, 224. 

J. v, 264; Ap. 389, 66. 

J. vi. 25. 

J. Hi, 218. 



J- i» 139- 
J. vi, 16, 57, 175- 
Thag. 791; Thig. 485. 
Thig. 226; Thag. 458. 
A. iii, 75; A. i, 147; Sn. 1098. 

(2) Padbanasutta 

Thig. 212; Ap. 342, 7. 
Thag. 340; Thig. 306, 309. 
S. V, 6; A. ii, 40; Thag. 171; 
Thig. 8, 211; J. i, 275, 278; 
ii, 22; DhA. ii, 106. 
J. iv, 357; vi, 482. 
Pv. iv, I, 6. 
Dh. 392; Thag. 341. 
Sn. 701. 
S. i, 128. 

Thag. 745- 

J.i, 309; Bv. 3, 22; 4, 14; Ap. 
ii, 28, 48; BvA. 138. 

ThagA. 1, 51. 

Ndi, 96; Nd2, 253; It A. 

171-2. 

MA. Hi, 405; UdA. 50. 

J. iii, 128; iv, 222; Ap. ii, 28, 

61; 30, 48. 

J. vi, 234. 

Thag. 194; J. VI, 495. 

A. ii, 54. 

J. IV, 360. 



196 



Ind 



exes 



442b 


Dh, 175; Thag. 177, 1166; 


463b 


Vin. i, 3; S. i, 62; iv, 1 57; 




Thie. 7, 10, 56, 65; Ap. ii. 




A. ii, 6; Ud. 3; Ir. 115. 




27, 66. 


463d 


Dh. 108. 


443 




464ab 


Sn. 497. 


444 




465a 


A. iii, 373; Sn. 214. 


445d 


Sn. 79; J. u, 257; Vv. 51, 4. 


465ab 


Sn. 498; J. I, 183. 


446 


MA. Hi, 373; SnA. 37; SA. i, 


465b 


S. i, 50, 51; Thig. 2; J, iv, 




185; DA. iii, 994. 




330; V, 34. 


447-8 


S. i, 124. 


466ab 


Ud. 4. 


448c 


Ap. 336, 3; 424, 3. 


467b 


S. i, 48. 


448d 


S. I, 127. 


467c 


J. V, 84. 


449 


S. i, 122; DhA. I, 433. 


468 




449a 


J, iii, 157; Thig. 52. 


469abc 


Ud. 29. 


449cd 


M. I, 338; Thag. 1208. 


469a 


UdA. 194. 


449d 


Vin. i, 21; Ap. 121, 5. 


469b 


Ud. 32; Thag. io92;Sn. 494; 




(3) Suhhasitasutta 


470c 


J. iv, 303. ^ 
Dh. 20. 


450-4 


S. i, 189. 


471a 


Ud. 74- 


450 


KhpA. 135. 


47 1 c 


S. i, 14, 53; It. 32, 40, 50; 


45od 


Dh. 223, 224. 




Thag. 468; Bv. I, 2; Ap. 146, 


451-4 


Thag. 1227-30. 




4; J- I. 183. 


451C 
45id 
452a 


J. Hi, loi. 

Dh. 52; Thag. 323-4. 

J. I, 193. 


472b 

472c 

473 

474 

475a 

475ab 

475b 
476c 

477 


A. iv, I 57; S. iv, 2 1 0; Sn. 47 5 . 
Sn. 176; Ap. 306, I. 


453t> 


M. iii, 1 54; Dh. 5; J. vi, 528. 




453cd 
454 


UdA. 77. 
KhpA. 136. 


Nd2A. 54; PsA. 57. 
A. ii, 6. 


454b 


M. i, 227; Thig. 21, 45; Ap. 


Sn. 472. 
J. ii, 418. 


454c 


389, 65; Divy. 164. 
Thig. 206. 


455 


(4) Sundarikabharadvajasutta 


478c 


S. i, 60; ii, 278, 279, 285; It. 
36; Thag. 1022, 1 166; Thig. 


456 






7, 10, 56, 65; Vv. 5, 12; Ap. 


457e 


S. i, 13, 165. 




9. 13- 


458ab 


Sn. 1043. 


478d 


S. i, 181; It. 72, 73, 117, 


459 


S. i, 168. 




118; Thag. 335; Bv. 5, 3;J.i, 


459b 


Sn. 479. 




39; Ap. 387, 31; 542, 4; 11, 


460c 


S. i, 141; Sn. 1048; Pv. iv, 1, 




24, 4; D. ii, 267. 




34- 


478e 


Sn. 875. 


461 




479c 


J. iv, 476. 


462 


S. i, 168. 


480-1 


Sn. 81-2. 


462b 


J. vi, 206. 


482 




463ab 


S. i, 168; MA. V, 85; SA. 1, 


483b 


S. iii, 83. 




26; ii, 374. 


484c 


Ap. I, 165. 



Concordance 



^97 



485b 
485d 
486b 



486c 
486d 



487b 

488a 

488d 

490 

491 

492 

493a 

494b 

494c 

495 
496a 

496b 

497ab 

498ab 

499 

500 

501a 

501b 

502b 

503 

504c 

504d 

505 
506 
507ab 
507b 

507c 
5o8e 
509a 



]. iii, 305. 

S. i, 175- 

S. i, 220; A. ii, 35; lii, 36; 

It. 88; Thag. 1177; Thig. 

287; Ap. 6, 18; 23, 23; 43, 2; 

43, 4; 169, 2; 308, 2; passim; 

n, 10, 2. 

Thag. 565. 

S. i, 175; A. Hi, 41; iv, 292; 

Dh. 356-9. 

(5) Maj^hasiitta 

J. V, 55. 

Sn. 489, 505. 

J. iv, 381; Sn. 509. 



Sn. 74- 
J. vi, 259. 
Sn. 469. 

S. i, 107; Db. 180. 
S. i, 12; Sn. 801. 
Sn. 464; SnA. 416. 
Sn. 465. 



D. ii, 100, 1 01; S. in, 42. 

Sn. 176, 472. 
Ap. 6, 153. 

Sn. 502. 
Sn. 1052. 



J. V, 148. 

It. 21; Thag. 647; A. iv, i 50; 

J. V, 191. 

Ud. 15; J. Hi, 262. 

A. iii, 225. 

A. iii, 336. 



510 
512 
512b 

514 

515 

516 

516b 

5i6d 

517c 
518 

519 
519a 

520c 
521a 

522 

522a 

522c 

523 

5^4 

5^5 

526 

527 

527a 

528 

5-^9 
530 

531 
532c 

533 

5^5t> 

537b 



53' 



(6) Sabhiyasutta 



D. ii, 275; DA. i, 155; MA, 

ii, 274. 

J. Hi, 493, 495; iv, 10, 13, 

240, 241, 409; V, 90. 

M. ii, 144. 

Ndi. 71; Ndz. 220. 



170. 



. 12, 



Ndi. 244; Nett 
Sn. 521, 527. 
5.1,65, i87,Tt.69;Thag 
196, 607; Mil. 45 
Vin. i, 294. 



Ndi. 87; Nd2. 214. 

S.i, 182; Dh. 267, 388; Ud. 

4; Vin. i, 3; A. iv, 144. 

It. 69; J. iii, 360. 

A. iv, 144; M. i, 280. 

MA. i, 153; SA. i, 77; Ndi, 

202; Nd2. 180. 

A. iii, 346; Tha^. 693. 

Sn. 536. 



Ndi. 58. 
J. iv, 53. 

Ndi. 93, 205; Nd2. 256. 

Nd2. 255. 
J. ii, 247. 



Vv. 53, 24. 

S. i, 122; Sn. 1055, 1068. 
1103; J. ii, 61; Bv. I, 8; Ap. 
ii, 9, II. 
PsA. 438. 



98 



Jnd 



exes 



539a 


S. i, 195; Thag. 632; Thig. 


553d 




320. 


554 


540b 


Ap. 306, 1, 


554a 


540c 


Vin. iv, 54; J. ill, 453. 


554^ 


541 






542b 


M. 1, 227; A. ii, 39; J. vi, 60; 


555 




MA. i, 41; AA. ii, 183. 


556d 


542c 


Thig. 205. 




542d 


J. Ill, 19. 


557a 


543cd 


J. VI, 568, 571. 


557b 


544a 


It. 76; Ap. 133, 3. 


557cd 


544ab 


D. iii, 197, 202; S. lii, 91; A. 
V, 325, 326; Thag. 629, 1084, 
1 179; Ap. 20, 6; 1 12, 6; 128, 


558 




3; 251, 2; 316, 4; 408, 26; 


558d 




482, 25; 499, 8; 540, 9;J. vi. 


559 




82, 88; MA. i, 294; VvA. 9. 


560b 


544b 


Ap. 541, 14. 


56od 


544c 


Ap. 223, 2. 


56iab 


544cd 


M. i, 171; D. ii, 288; A. 11, 


561b 




24; It. 123; Mil. 235-6. 


561C 


545-6 


Sn. 571-2. 


56id 


545c 


A. iv, 228. 




546ab 


VvA. 9. 


562a 


546d 


S. iii, 83; Thag. 367, 864, 
1059; J- vi, 51. 


563c 


547ab 


A. ii, 39; Thag. 701, 1180; 


563cd 




A. iii, 347. 


563d 
564cd 


J 


(7) Selasutta 


564d 


548-73 


M. ii, 146 (f/). 92). 


565b 


548-67 


Thag. 818-37. 




548b 


J. iv, 482. 




548c 


MA. ii, 125; SA. i, 14; 
KhpA. I 14. 




549 




566c 


550b 


Ap. 390, 4; 405, 43; 538. 10. 


567b 


55od 


S. i, 1 13; It. 51; Bv. 14, 2; 


567d 




Ap. 122, 3. 


568-9 


551b 


Vv. 30, 2; 32, 3; 44, 20. 


569a 


552c 


Ap. 73i 3- 


569c 


552cd 


Thag. 914; Ap. 55, 7; 400, 


570-3 




11; 429, 6; 470, 7. 


57oab 


552d 


A. iv, 90. 


570c 


553c 


DA. i, 18. 


571-2 



J. iv, 195, 468; vi, 15, 27, 

Mil. 183, 184. 

ItA. ii, 146. 

A. iii, 148; Vin. i, 12; A. i, 

1 10. 

Vin. i, 8; M. 1, 171; Bv. i, 
38, 70; 7, 4; Ap. 541, 8. 
MA. ii, 27; AA. iii, 9. 
Jina. 36. 
S. i, 191. 

M. ii, 143; VinA. i, 115; 
ItA. 1, i49;UdA. 84; NdiA. 
186; PsA. 215; Vism. 201. 
M. i, 171; A. ii, 39. 

Sn. 998. 

Ap. 547, 16. 

Sn. 563. 

D. iii, 196; Ap. 547, 15. 

J. li, 208. 

Ap. 492, 5; Pv. ii, I, 21; ii, 

h 34- 
Sn. 410. 

Ap. 64, 1,2, 3, 4; 137, 3; 

466, Iff. 

A. iv, 90. 

J. V, 87. 

Thig. 326. 

Sn. 565, 1 128. 

It. 93; Thag. 181; J. vi, 124; 

Ap. 7, 4; 9, 13; 18, 14; 28, 

9> 3^ 15; 33. 4; I09' 7; 49' 

14; 52, 10; 58, 7; 146, 4; 

172, 2; 209, 2; 222, 3;ii, 1 1,5. 

S. i, 209. 

Sn. 1 1 37. 

S. i, 194; It. 103. 

Vin. i, 246. 

S. i, 67; Mil. 242. 

S. i, 18; J. iv, 64. 

Thag. 838-41. 

Thig. 38. 

Ap. ii, 9, 6. 

Sn. 545-6. 



Concordance 



199 



573^ 



574^ 
574b 
574^d 

575 

576-7 

576-81 

576 

576a 

576d 

577ab 

577cd 

577d 
578a 

578ab 

578b 

578d 

579 

58od 

581a 

58iab 

581b 

58id 

582d 

583 
584a 

584b 

585 
586b 

586d 

587c 

588ab 

589a 

590 

591 
59iab 



MA. iii, 407. 

Thag. 1083, ii78;Bv. 1,21, 

34- 

(8) Sallasutta 
DhA. i, 355. 
J. iv, 412. 
J. iv, 113; vi, 17. 

Vism. 231. 

Ndi. 121. 

J. iv, 127; vi, 28. 

M. ii, 74; Thag. 788; J. iv, 

495. 

NdiA. 1, 73; PsA. 146. 

DhA. iii, ^zo. 

DhA. Hi, 320. 

Dh. 182; J. vi, 26. 

Thag. 788; M. a, 74; J. Jv, 

495- 

J. iv, 127; DhA. lu, 320. 

J. v. 239. 

S. v. 217; J. IV, 127; V, 109; 

DhA. Hi, 320. 

A. IV, 138. 

J. vi, 26. 

S. i, 40; Thag. 448. 

S, i, 102. 

S. i, 24. 

Sn. 585. 

J. iv, 127. 

Khp. vii, 1 1; Pv. i, 4, 3; i, 5» 

10.' 

A. i, 138; Vin. ii, 156; Sn. 

593- 

J. iv, 127. 

S. i, 85; Sn. 278. 

J. iv, 121. 

Ud. 15. 

Ud. 32; Sn. 757. 

S. V, 217. 

J. iv, 127. 

Vv. 83, 8; J. iii, i57, 215. 



592d 
593!^ 



594-656 

594ab 

595c 

596c 

596f 

597 

598a 

598c 

599a 

600b 

601 

602 

603 

604 

605 b 

606b 

607a 

608 

609 

610 

611 

612 

613 

614 

615 
616 

617 

618 

619 

620-47 

620cd 

62oe 

62of 

621a 

622a 
623 
62 3ab 
62 3cd 



Sn. 334;J. iii, 157, 215. 390; 

iv, 62. 

S. i, 212; Thig. 91. 

(9) Vasctthasutta 
M. ii, 196 {ch. 98). 
VvA. 10. 

Ap. I, 36; 126, 2. 
Sn. 599. 
S. i, 166; D. ii, 285. 

D. ii, 261. 
D. ii, 267. 

Ap. 3 34» ^; 405. 3^*479' 5- 
M. i, 338. 



Vv. 51, 2. 

J. ii, 443; Hi, 255, 493,495. 

MA. Hi, 434. 



MA. Hi, 39; SA.i, 149; UdA. 
33^- 



Dh. 39M^3- 

DA. i, 246; UdA. 53. 

Sn. 645. 1094. 

Dh. 395; Ud. 4, 6. 

S. i, 212; It. 10, 18, 28, 42; 

J. i, 275. -^78; H, 22. 

S. i, 16, 63. 

Khp A. 194. 

A. iv, 93. 

Vism. 295, 



200 



Ind 



exes 



624b 


It. 97. 


638c 


Thag. 680. 


624c 


S. i, 210; Dh. 352. 


638d 


Ap. 390, m; 5-^7, 20. 


625 


VinA. i, 273; DhA. ii, 51. 


638c, 


S. ii, 279; A. i, 162; iii, 214; 


625b 


Sn. 631. 




Thig. 105. 


625c 


Vin. {{, 156; S. i, 212; A. i, 


639a 


It. 50, 96; J. V, 255. 




138. 


639b 


J. ii, 422; n\, 32, 516. 


626ab 


It. 97. 


640b 


Sn. 639. 


626c 


A. i, 162; ixi, 214; Thag. 


64ra 


Ap. 35, 19. 




1021. 


64 1 be 


Thig. 4. 


627ab 


S. i, 190; Thag. 123 1 ; Mil. 


64 1 c 


A. ii, 12; S. i, 213; Thig. 




22. 




364; DhA. iii, 233. 


627b 


A. ii, 37. 


642a 


S. i, 186; Thag. 12 14. 


6z7c 


Dh. 38(?; Ap. 50. 15; Mil.^ 


642b 


Vin. ii, 156; S. i, 212; A. i, 




22. 




138: Mil. 346. 


628 


Mil. 386. 


643-4 


AA. i, 268-9. 


629ab 


S. 1, 141. 


644c 


S. i, 13, 146, 235;]. IV, ^Sy. 


629b 


Sn. 394. 


645 


AA. i, 363. 


629c 


It. 22; J. iv, Ji. 


645b 


Ud. 79, 80; Dh. 200. 


63oabc 


S. i, 236. 


646ab 


Ap. 64, i; 230, i; 320, 1. 


630c 


]. iv, 372. 


647a 


Ap. ii, 17, 129; 17, 185. 


631a 


S. i, 13, 165; It. 57; J, 111, 


647abc 


M. ii, 144; S. i, 167, 175; A. 




404; iv, 387. 




i, 165; It. 100; Thig. 6^, 64: 


631b 


Dh. 150. 




Ap. ii, 27, 64, 65. 


632 


AA. i, 277. 


648 




633ab 


D. i, 223. 


649a 


Sn. 355. 


633c 


Dh. 246. 


650a 


Dh. 393. 


634b 


Dh. 168, 169, 242; J. i, 90; 


651 






ii, 350; iii, 10 1, 268: iv, 64; 


652 






Ap. ii, 28, 80. 


65^ 




635c 


Thag. 179, 748. 


654 


Kvu. 546. 


636 


DhA. ii, 100. 


654d 


A. ii, 32; j. V, 330. 


636a 


S. i. 182; Dh. 267; Sn. 520. 


655 


Thag. 631. 


636c 


S. iv, 210; A. iv, 157; It. 37, 


655a 


A. iii, 346. 




46, 62; Thag. 227: Thig. 361; 


655b 


Dh. 25; Khp. via, 6; Vv. 33, 




Ap. 488, 1. 




192; 52, 17; J- ii» 56, 257; iv. 


637abc 


Ap. 151, 1. 




358, 435; vi, 100, 128. 


637a 


J. V. 63; Bv. 13, 2; Ap. I, 




A. i, 165; S. i, 166; Ap. 35, 




180; ii, 22, 35. 




18. 


637b 


S. iv, 118; Dh. 82; Thag. 
1008; Vv. 3, 6; 4, 6; 10, 5; 


656b 


It. 37. 




13, 5; 14, 5; Ap. 81, i; 206, 




(10) Kokaliyasuttci 




i; 285, i; 290, 2; D. it", 255, 




V / y 


637c 


S. i, 53; Sn. 175. 


657-60 


S. i, 149, 152-3; Nett. nz; 


638 


ThagA. i, 147; A A. i, 247. 




A. V, 171. 174. 


638a 


A. iv, 290. 


657ab 


SnA. 398. 





L>onco 


rdancc 


2or 


658-60 


A. a, 3. 


691 




66od 


S. 1, 42. 


692 




661 


Dh. 306: It. 42, 43; Ud. 45; 


693a 


rt. 28, 42. 




J. ii, 416, 417. 


694 




662 


S. i, 13, 164; Dh. 125; J. iii, 


695 






203, Pv. ii, 9, 10; CpA. 160; 


696 






Vism. 301. 


697 




662b 


S. i, 205; J. iii, 309; Thag. 


698 






652, lOOI. 


699d 


A. iii, 346; Sn. 992; Thag. 


663-5 


Nett. 133. 




690; J, Hi, 19. 


663cd 


S. i, 96; Pv. ii, 7, 7. 


700 




664 




701a 


Sn. 716. 


665a 


S. i, 49, 50. 


701b 


Sn. 429; J. vi, 139, 141, 14^. 


666cd 


J. vi, 235- 




439- 


666d 


j. ii, 202. 


702b 


Sn. 366; Thig. 388. 


667cd 


Pgdp. 33. 


703b 


Vin. iii, 90; Dh. 308; J. vi. 


668d 


Sn. 670. 




105. 


669 




704a 


S. i, 36, 60; J. iv, 361, 362, 


670a 


J. V. 268. 




363, 364. 365. 367' 


671 




704b 


S. v, 24; A. v. 232-3.253-4; 


672 






Dh. SS. 


673a 


Pgdp. 22. 


704cd 


S. iv, 117. 


674a 


J. V, 269; vi, 105; Pgdp. 35. 


705cd 


Dh. 129, 130. 


674b 


Pgdp. 38- 


706b 


D. ii, 246; A. iii, 31 i;iv» 


67 5 be 


J. V. 268; vi, 106. 




290; ThIg. 35. 


676a 


Thae. III. 


707a 


J. ii, 293; Mil. 407. 


677 




707b 


J. iv, 172; Ap. I, 38. 


678 




708a 


Sn. 414. 






709a 


Dh. 181; DA. i, 28. 




(11) Nalakasutta 


709b 


Dh. 305. 


679 




710a 


Thig. 517- 


680 




71 led 


MA. i, 159- 


681 




7iid 


A. i, 199; Sn. 930. 


682ab 


Bv. I, 36. 


712 




683 




7M 


SA. ii, 109. 


684a 


Vin. v, 86; J. i, 34; Thag. 
624; Bv. 5, I. 


714 
714c 


Kvu. 89. 

MA. i, 230; UdA. 338. 


685 




715 


Nd2. 118. 


686 




7i5d 


Dh. 90; Ap. 107, 4; 388, 


687 






114. 


688 


DA. ii, 439; MA. iv, 185. 


7T6d 


Mil. 213, 214. 


688c 


MA. i, 46. 


717c 


Sn. 251. 


689c 


MA. i, 46. 


7i7d 


S. i, 234; A. i, 147; iii» 75 


689d 


Sn. 1028; Bv. I, 19. 


7i8ab 


S. i, 46; Thag. 239. 


690 




719a 


Thag. 549; Bv. i, 15. 



Ind 



exes 



720 




740-1 


A. n, 10; It. 9, 109; SnA. 64; 


721 


^,Mil. 414. 




Nd2A. 97. 


722 




740 


SnA. 17; ItA. 43; NdiA. 39. 


723 




740a 


SnA. 208; NdiA. 153. 






740b 


Dh. 207; Thag. 215; J. i, 44; 




( 1 2) Dvayatanupassanasutta 




S. V, 432; BvA. 271. 


724-27 


S. V, 433; It. 106. 


741 


J- iv, 3 54- 


724cd 


Sn. 726. 


741 c 


Dh. 352; Thag. 491, 890; 


724d 


D. 1, 223. 




Kvu. 90. 


724f 


S. lii, 86; Dh. 191; Thag. 


74id 


S. 1, 13, 53; Sn. 751, 753, 




1259; Thig. 186, 193, 310, 




1039; Thag. 39, 40, 154, 




321; Ps. if, 81. 




982; J. a, igy. Mil. 407. 


725d 


Dh. 341. 


742b 


Thag. 291; Thig. 191; Sn. 


726 






278. 


727 




742c 


S. i, 132; Thig. 191. 


728ab 


Sn. 1050. 


74 3 bed 


It. 93, 108-9. 


728b 


Sn. 1049. 


744 


NdiA. 408; PsA. 44. 


728cd 


Sn. 105 1. 


745 




728cde 


Thag. 152. 


746 


Ud. 46. 


728d 


Dh. 325; Tha^. 17, loj; J. 


746b 


Vin. 1, 185; A. lii, 378; 




in, 243. 




rhag. 642; Kvu. 90; Vism. 


728ef 


Sn. 1051. 




636; Dh. 373. 


729a 


A. iv, 228; Thag. 202. 


746cd 


It. 94; Thag. 67, S7, 90, 


729c 


It. 94; Sn. 740, 752; Thag. 




254. 3 39' 344. 908; Thig. 22, 




917; M. r, 328. 




47, 160. 


73od 


Sn. 733, 743. 


746d 


Vin. i, 231; Thag. 80, 170, 


731a 


Sn. 734^ 744. 747. 7 50.. 




202, 216, 333, 440, 546; 


73id 


Sn. 734; Ud. 33. 




Thig. 106; Ap. 80, 26; 391, 


732a 


Vin. i, 197; It. 9; Thag. 122, 




17; 398. n; 403. 19- 




i54;Sn. 735, 741, 745, 748, 


747a 


Sn. 744- 




751.753. 821; Pv. iv, 6, 7. 


748d 


Thag. 92. 


7^2C 


It. 61, 81. 


749b 


S. 1, 198. 


733t> 


It. 93, 108; Sn. 743. 


749^d 


S. iv, 206, 207, 218; It. 54. 


734c 


D. i, 223; Sn. 1037. 


750a 


Sn. 747. 


735^ 


S. iii, 26; iv, 204; Thig. 53; 


751a 


Sn. 745. 




Sn. 739. 


752a 


S. IV, 59; Ud. 81. 


736c 


A. ii, 14; It. I 17; Thig. 245; 


753a 


Sn. 751. 




J. iii, 499. 


754-5 


It. 62. 


736d 


It. 73; Dh. 253. 


755ab 


It. 45. 


737d 


Sn. 758. 


755c<i 


It. 46. 


^^^. . 


S. IV, 205. 


755^ 


S. i, 192, 195; Thag. 1177, 


739abcd 


S. iv, 205. 




1236; This. 65, 363. 


739^^ 


S. i, 112. 


756bcd 


It. 35. 


739ef 


It. 46; S. iv, 204. 


757ab 


Sn. 588. 


739^ 


It. 48, 49; Thig. 132. 


758d 


Sn. 739. 





Concordance 


203 


7 59-65 


S. iv, 127-8; PsA. 459-60. 




(2) Guhatthakasutta 


759^b 


Vin, i, 185; S. i, 113; Sn. 


772ab 


ThagA. i, 28. 




387; Thag. 455, 643, 895. 


773 


759^ 


Vin. 1 , 2 1 ; S. i, 1 1 1 , i 3 i ; A. 


774-1 


J. VI, 245. 




lii, 69, 379. 


774b 


Sn. 57. 


760a 


S. iii, 86; It. 123; Sn. 956; 


775 






Ap. I, 84; Mil. 242. 


776ab 


Sn. 936. 


760c 


S. iv, 204; It. 46, 48, 49; A. 


776d 


Sn. 901. 




\\v, 329. 


777-1 


A. iv, 290. 


761b 


S. iii, 86. 


777b 


Thag. 362, 387. 


762ab 


KhpA. 125. 


778a 


A. iii, 411; Sn. 582. 


762f 


Dh. 268. 


778b 


Sn. 737. 


763f 


S. i, 162, 163, 222, 224; J. 
in, 57; Thag. 444. 


77&d 
779J 


Sn. 250. 

S. i, 62; A. li, 49, 50; J. iv, 

1^7: V, 86. 


764a 


Vin. 1, 5. 




1— /, *, v^v^. 


764b 


S. i, I 5; Sn. 736. 




(3) Duttbattkakasutta 


764^ 


Vin. i, 5. 


_o , 




756cd 


DA. i, 304. 


700 

781 

7S2 

783d 




765d 


Vin. n, 148; A. \x\, 41, 43, 






347; iv, g8; Dh. 126; Thag. 


Vin. 1, 3; Ud. 3. 




100, 364, 672, 704; J. i, 94. 


784c 


Sn. 797. 






785b 


Sn. 801, 837, 907. 




IV. ATTHAKAVAGGA 


1 J 

786 


' J ' ' y ' 




Vin. i, 196-7; Ud. 59; UdA. 


787 




J 


312; DhpA. iv, 101-2; A. A. 




(4) Suddhatthakasiiita 


i, 241; Divy. io\ ThagA. 


788 






a^ Sona-Kutikanna. 


789c 


S. i, 166. 






790a 


S. i, 166. 




(1) Kamasutta 


790b 


Sn. 797, 887. 






790c 


S. i, 141. 


766 


J. iv, 172; Nett. 5. 


791c 


Sn. 1098. 


766-8 


Nett. 69. 


79^ 




766ab 


PsA. 50; Vism. 378. 


793ab 


Sn. 914. 


767-71 


Nett. 6. 


79^b 


A. a, 2S. 


767 


SA. i, 32; Vism. 576. 


793^^ 


Sn. Soi. 


767d 


Sn. 331. 


794a 


Sn. 803. 


768 


Thag. 457. 


795-1 


Sn. 484. 


769 
76Qab 


UdA. 120. 
J. iv, 240. 




(5) Paramatthakasutta 


770c 


Dh. i; Thag. 735. 


796 




771b 


Dh. 123; T. iv, 173. 


797-1 


Sn. 784. 


77id 


Dh. 369. 


797b 


Sn. 790. 



204 



Indexes 



798c 

799 
Soo 
801b 
Sold 

802h 

8o2d 

803 

8o^a 



804 
804a 



805 b 

8o6bd 

8o7ab 

808 

809 

810 

8iib 

812a 

8l2d 

813 



8i4d 

815 

8i6c 

817a 

8i8b 

819 

820a 

821a 

821c 

822d 



823b 



S. i, 203, 



Sn. 496. 
Sn. 785. 
Sn. 841. 

Sn. 793. 
CpA. 10. 
Sn. 794. 

(6) Jarasutta 

DhA. ill, 320; J. i, 309. 
M. ii, jy, S. i, 2, 55, 143; 
A. i, 155; It. 59, 60; J. iv, 
398; A. iv, 136^. 
S. i, 22. 
S. i, 116. 
M. i, 365. 



Vism. 666. 

Ud. 92. 

Dh. 336; It. 84; Thag. 665; 

J. vi, 595. 

Sn. 813; S. ], 186. 



(7) Tissametteyyasutta 
Dh. 87. 

Dh. 222. 

It. 89; Thag. 294; J. in, 106, 
154; iv, 451; vi, 14. 
J. ii, 190, 191. 

Vin. li, 203. 

Sn. 732. 

Dh. 61; J, iii, 73; DhA 11, 23. 

S.i, 33; iv, 74' 75' 76; A. 

iii, 331; iv, 28, 29; Dh. 32; 

It. 40; Thag. 392. 

It. 40; J. iii, 396. 





(8) Pasurasutta 


824ab 


Sn. 892. 


824c 


Sn. 910. 


825 




826 




827 




828 




829 




83od 


S. i, 169: Thao. 893. 


831 




832 




833d 


Sn. 795. 


834 






(9) Magandiyasutta 


835 


AA. i, 437: DhA. i. 202; i 




199; UdA. 383. 


835^^ 


S. 1, 124^; J. i, 469. 



835^^ 

836 

837b 


S. 1, 124^; J. i, 469. 




Sn. 785. 




838 






839a 


Sn. 1078. 




839c 


Sn. 791. 




84of 


Sn. 908. 


A 


841a 


Dh. 164. 


* 


841C 


Sn. 802. 


1 


842 


S. i, 12. 


■1 


842c 


S. iii, 84; Thag. 1076. 


J' 


843d 


S. i, 221. 


,; 


844 


S. iii, 9, 12. 


y 


844a 


Dh. 91. 




845 






846 






847 







848b 

849 

850a 

850c 
851b 

852ab 
853c 



(10) Vurahhcdasutta 
Dh. 378. 

Dh. 351. 

Dh. 363; Thag. 2, 1006; 

Thig. 281; J. ^ii, 350. 

S. 1, 5. 

S. i, 187; Thag. 12 18. 

D. iii, 192. 







Concordance 


205 


854a 


Sn. 922. 




882 




855d 


Sn. 515. 




883 




856c 


Dh. 282. 




884a 


SA. i, 329; SnA. 232. 


856d 


S. lii, 83. 




884ab 


PsA. 64. 


857b 


S. 11, 281; Thag. 
141; Sn. 166. 


600; J. i, 


885ab 


SA. i, 329; SnA. 232; PsA. 
63. 


857c 


Dh. 211. 




886 


PsA. 438. 


^57d 


Ud. 78; Sn. 333. 




887a 


Sn. 797. 


858a 


It. 7^ 




887d 


Sn. 879. 


858b 


Thag. 957. 




888 




859a 


Sn. 1076. 




889 




859b 


Sn. 441. 




890 




86obc 


A. lii, 3 59- 




891 




860c 


Sn. 954. 




8q2ab 


Sn. 824. 


86 lb 


Sn. 950. 




893 




86 id 


Sn. 846. 

(11) Kalahavh 


mdasutta 


894b 
894d 


Sn. 877- 
Sn. 867. 


862 








(13) Mahaviytt hasutta 


863ab 


UdA. 429. 




895 




863c 


J. V. 16. 




896 




864 






897c 


Sn. 786-7. 


865 






898 




866c 


Sn. 868. 




899 




867d 


Sn. 894. 




900 




868 






90 id 


Sn. 776. 


869 






902ab 


MA. i, 41; It A. 61. 


870 






903d 


Sn. 879. 


871 






904 




872 






905 




87^ 






906 




874^ 


MA. i, 25; a, 3 


29; SA. i, 


907b 


Sn. 785, 837. 




46; NdiA. 160; 


PsA. 438. 


908b 


Sn. 840. 


875ab 


Vin.v, i45;Sn. 105 


2;BvA.52. 


909 




875a 


Sn. 478. 




910 




876 






911 




877 






912 
913 




v?-»9 


(12) Culaviyu 


hasutta 


9i4ab 


Sn. 793. 


070 
879b 


Sn. SS7. 






(14) Tuvatakasittta 


879^ 


Sn. 903. 




915 




880 






9i6d 


Sn. 933. 


881 






917 





2o6 



Ind 



exes 



918 




950c 


Sn. 861. 


9I9C1 


Sn. 787. 


95icd 


Thag. 717 


920b 


Thag. 372. 


952 




921 




953 




922c 


Sn. 854. 


954ab 


Sn. 860. 


923 

924 


SA. u, T08. 




(16) Sariputtasutta 


924ab 


S. 1, 100. 


955 


DhA. Ill, 226. 


925 
926 

927 

928d 

929 

930b 




956a 


Sn. 760. 




956c 


Ap. 6, 6. 


J. V, 83. 


956d 
857d 


Mil. 402. 

Sn. 1043, 1 105, 1112, 1118. 


Sn. 711. 


958 




931a 


Sn. 943. 


959 




93^ 




960b 


Dh. 323. 


933a 


It. 91. 


96od 


J. Ill, 524- 


934b 


Thag. 331. 


96id 


Thag. 984, 983, 1066, 1067; 


934cd 


S. i, 193; It. 98. 




]. 11, 294; Mil, 366, 407. 




(15) Attadandasutta 


962 b 


S. i, 52; D. a, 267; A. iii, 


935a 


Sn. 207. 




354- 


936a 


Sn. 776; A. iv, 290. 


962cd 


Dh. 239. 


936b 


J. vi, 26. 


963d 


Sn. 1050; J. iv, 340. J 


937c 


Dh. 291. 


964 


! 


938cd 


f. iii, 157; Vv. 83,9; Pv.i, 8, 


965 




938c 


'6. 

Thag. 986. 


966d 
967 
968c 
969 


J. Ill, 7. I 

« 


938d 

939a 
94od 


Thig. 52, 131; Pv. n, 6, 17. 

S. i, 40. 

Ud. 28; Sn. 1061, 1062. 


Sn. 363; J. V, 86. 


941b 


Thag. 502, 503. 


970 




942b 


Dh. 167. 


971C 


Sn. 250. 


943a 


Sn. 931. 


972a 


Sn. 63. 


944a 


Dh. 75. 


973b 


S. i, 193; iii, 134. 


945 




974b 


S. i, 117, 118. 


946d 


Sn. 861. 


974c 


Vin. i, 36. 


947 




975a 


Sn. 387. 


948b 


Dh. 336. 


975^^ 


J. V, 55. 


948d 


S. iv, 291, 292; Ud. 76; It. 


975cd 


It. 42. 




95. 




A 


949 


DA. iii, 746; MA. i, 232; 




V. PARAYANAVAGGA 




DhA. iii, So: Sn. 1099. 






95oabc 


Dh. 367. 




[at A. iv, 63 said to have 


Q5oa 


Sn. I TOO. 




been sung by Nandamatai 



Concordance 



207 



976c 
Q76d 



977 

978 

979ab 

980a 

980b 

98id 

982 

98^d 



984c 



985b 
98 5d 

986 
987 
988b 



989 
990b 
991 
992b 



992d 

992ef 
993b 

994ab 
995a 

995f 
996ab 



(i) Vattkn^atha 
Thig. ^41; Ap. i, S9i Mil. 

342. 

Ap. 33, 14; 122, i; 122, 4; 
134, i; 135, 3; 158, i; 330, 
t6; 516, I. 



UdA. 10. 
J. V, 69. 

J. iv, 184, 362, 371, 476; Ap. 
I, 50; 409, 2 3; J. iv, 488, 532. 
Sn. 986; Mil. 24. 

D. i, 95; S. i, 50, 51; A. iv, 

378; J. iv, 320; V, 33, 87,92; 

vi, 213. 

Thag. 639, 720, 1255; Thig. 

126, 172, 187, 194, passim; 

Ap. 187, 10; 327, 10; Pv. ii, 

6, 2; J. iv, 85, 447: v, 70. 

Ap. 21, 17; 189, 2. 

Dh. 116; Thag. 580; Mil. 

S95. 



Thag. 950; J, iii, 21, 148, 

279, 338^ 339' 525. 535: iv, 
6, 1 1, 195, 222; vi, 19. 

D. ii, 267; A. iv, 90. 

Thag. 1253; Ap- 22, i; 80, 

i; 335' 3; 336, i; 407. 28; 

419, 2; passim. 

Ap. 538, t; 539' I'* 54O' !'• 

passim. 

S. i, 134; A. ii, 24; It. 123. 

S. i, 210; Ap. 52, 4; 138, 

2; 161, i; 408, 8; BvA. 169. 

Jina. 40. 

Pv. iv, I, 56; J. iv, 282; vi, 

319' 323. 

J. 1, 36, 37, 4I' 42. 

Ap. 533, 21. 



997 

998ab 

998e 

999d 

1 000b 

1000c 

1000-3 

ioo2bcd 

1 002c 



ioo2cd 

I002d 

1003c 

1004 

1005 

1006-8 

1007 

1008 

1009a 

1009c 



loiob 
1 01 od 



ion 
1012b 

1013d 

1014c 

ioi4d 

ioi5ab 

1015b 



1015c 

IOI5d 

1916b 
ioi6c 



Sn. 560. 

Ap. 407, 30. 

J. Hi, 259, 262. 

M. ii, 143. 

Bv. I, 16. 

D. i, SS; ii, 16. 

A. iv, 90. 

Vin. ii, 196; M. ii, 105; 

Thag. 878; Ap. 389, 88; J.vi, 

595- 

Thag. 914. 

S. i, 32; J. iv, 427, 428. 

Sn. 1 147; Ap. 52,7; 304, 3. 



Sn. 1 124-5. 



VinA, i, 104. 

S. i, 122; Vv. 5, 8; Ap. i, 34; 

52, 10; 404, 4; 427, 2; 43 5, 2r 

passim; Mil. 342. 

J. vi, 19. 

Ap. 5i,2;56, 5; 67, 5; 74, 2; 

95, 3; 108, 2; 113, 8; 126, 7; 

133, 6; 304, 4; 316, 5; 518, 

3; passim; J. vi, 84. 

Thag. 622; Ap. 533, 39; ii, 

38, 5. 

Thag. 58; Vv. 38, I. 

J. ii, 71. 

Ap. 402, 46. 

Ap. 304, 2; 414, 2. 

S. i, 192; Thag. 426, 622, 

1239; Thig. 108; Ap. 32, 2; 

52, 3; 70, 2; 95, 3; 123, i; 

126, 4; 137, i; 213, I, 

passim; J. vi, 27. 

S. i, 190. 

Thag. 175; Sn. 562. 

J. V, 34; Ap. 284, i; 296, i; 

305, 2; 309, i; 347, I. 

S. i, 233; Thig. 3. 



Indexes 



loiyab 


Ap. 389, 69/ 


io37cd 


^- 1. 13' 15' 35' 60, 165. 


1017c 


Ap. 541- 13- 


io37cdef 


D. i, 223. 


1018 




io37e 


A. i, 236; Sn. 734. 


7oi9d 


Thag. 1 171; Bv. 2, 6; 4, 10; 


1038 


S. u, 47, 49, 50; DhA. \ii. 




J. i, 3; Ap. I, 135; 35. 16; 




228. 




121, i; 126, 2; 127, i; 335, 


1038a 


Ud. 13; Sn. 70. 




i; 398, 23; 405,48; BvA. 67. 


io38ab 


SnA. 124; Nd2A. 147. 


1020a 


Rv. 2, 6; J. i, 3; Ap. 6, 2. 


1039 


Nett. 21. 


lozoab 


Ap. i, 36; 126, i; 479, I. 


io39d 


Sn. 741. 


io2od 


Bv.2,6;J.i, 3;Ap. i, 36; 6, 2. 






1 022c 


Ap. 389, 67. 


(3) Tissametteyyamanavapuccha (2) 


1023d 


Ap. 115, 4; 332, 4; 389. 55; 


1040 






415. 4; 476. 7; 513. ^; i'» 5. 


I 04 I be 


Thag. 1090. 




2; 8, 8; 16, 2. 


1041C 


Ud. 33. 


1024 




1042 


A. Hi, 399, 401. 


io25d 


M. ii, 143. 






1026 




(4) 


Punnakamattavapuccha (3) 


1027c 


Ap. I, 76; 31, 13; 41, 3; 318, 


1043b 


Sn. 957. 




3; 407, 35; 431, 2; /).755/m. 


I043cde 


Sn. 458. 


io28d 


S. i, 121, 193, 194. 


io43f 


Sn. 1045, 1047, 1049, 1 06 1, 


1029c 


J. li, 446. 




1079, 1 08 1. 


io29d 


Khp. vii, 5; Pv. n, 3, 34; 4. 


1044 






18. 


1045 




1030 


DA. i, 155; MA. ii, 274; 


io46d 


Sn. 1080. 




SnA. 230. 


1047c 


Vin. i, 36. 


1030C 


D. ii, 240; M. ii, 143, 144; 


1048 


A. i, 133; ii, 45-6. 




SnA. 588. 


1048a 


S. i, 182; Dh. 267. 


1031 




1048b 


Dh. 255. 


1032-7 


(2) Aiitamanavapuccha (1) 
Nett. 70-71- 


1048c 
io48d 


Pv. iv, I, 34; Sn. 460. 
Sn. 1060. 


lo;2 


Nett. 10; Nd2A. I. 






7 
1032b 


S. i, 15. 


(5) Mettagumanavapuccha (4) 


1033 


Nett. II. 


1049a 


Sn. 1061. 


1033a 


S. ii, 24; A. iv, 228; Ap. 35, 


1049b 


Sn. 322. 




8. 


io49d 


Sn. 728. 


1034-5 


Nett. 12, 13. 


1050b 


Sn. 963. 


1034a 


Dh, 340; Thag. 761. 


1050C 


Sn. 728. 


1035 


MA. i, 22; SA. ii, 253; ItA. 


1051 


Sn. 728. 




no; Nd2A. 78; PsA. 14, 


io52ab 


Sn. 875; BvA. 52. 




218, 447; SnA. 8. 


io52d 


Sn. 1056; Dh. 195. 


io35cd 


MA. i, 62. 


io52e 


Sn. 1075; J- ^'i' -44- 


1036-37 


Nett. 14. 


I052f 


Sn. 504. 


1036a 


Thag. 46. 


1053 


Sn. 1066. 


1037-9 


Nett. 17. 


io53cd 


Sn. 1054, 1067, 1085. 



Concordance 



209 



1053d Sn. 857. 

1954a S. iv, 205; Sn. J 067. 

1054b Dh. 115. 

1055a Sn. 1068. 

1055b Sn. 537. 

1056a Thag. 53. 

1056b J. V, 82, 83. 

1056c Sn. 1052. 

1057a Sn. 1083. 

io57d Sn. 504. 

1058c J. li, 33, 35- 

io58d Thig. 319. 

io59ab MA. i, 173; BvA. 68. 

1059b Sn. 176. 

io59d Sn. 477. 

io6od Sn. 1048. 

(6) Dhorakamanavapuccha (5) 

io6id Sn. 940, 1062. 
1062 
1063 

1064 Kvu. 194; Ndi. 32. 

io65d Thag. 671. 

1066-8 Nett. 166. 

1066 Sn. 1053. 

1067a Sn. 1054. 

1067b Thig. 212; Ap. 3^6, 3. 

1068c S. i, 1 17, 1 18. 

(7) Upastvamanavapuccha (6) 

1069 ^ 

1070c S. i, 12, 31. 

1071 

1072 

1073 

1074 DA. ii, 514. 

1074a J. iiu 255. 

I075d Sn. 504. 

1076a S. iv, 158. 

(8) Nandamanavapuccha (7) 
1077 

1078a Sn. 839. 
1079 



io8of Sn. 1046. 

1081 

io82g S. i, 3. 

1083a Sn. 1057. 

(9) Hemakamanavapuccha (8) 
1084 Sn. 1 1 35. 

io85de Sn. 1053. 

1086a AA. i, 7. 

io86d Sn. 204; A.p 336, 12. 

io87ab Sn. 1095. 

1087b M. in, 187; A. i, 142; iiu 311. 

io87d S. i, I, 24, 36, 54, 60, no; 

Dh. 335; Thag. 400; Ap. 

134, 6; 151, I. 

(10) Todeyyamanavapiiccha (9) 
1088 

1089 

1090a Sn. 369. 

1 09 1 

(11) Kappamanavapuccha (10) 
1092a BvA. 65. 

1093 

1094a Sn. 620. 

I095ab Sn. 1087. 
I095cd S. i, 104. 

(12) ]aliikannimamvapiiccha (ii) 
1096 
io97d S. i, 143; Sn. 1120, 1122; J. 

iii, 360. 
1098b A. i, 147; ill, 75; Sn. 424. 
1098c Sn. 791. 
1099 Sn. 949. 
iiooa Sn. 950. 
I lood It. 76. 

(13) Bhadravudhamanavapuccha (12) 

IIOI 

1102b Sn. 353, 1 06 1. 
ii02d Sn. 504. 



no 



Ind 



exes 



1103b 


Sn. 537. 


II03 




1 104 




(14) Udayamanavapuccha (13) 


iio5ab 


Dh. 386. 


1105b 


A. i, 162; ii, 37; in, 214; S. 




i, 178; Thag. 541, 71 1,1061; 




Thig. 334, 336, 337, 364; 




Vv. 63, 18; Pv. ii, 6, 15; Ap. 




34, 12; 35, 18; 41, 20; 290, 




3; 389, 76; ii, 9» 21; 15, 21. 


1 105c 


M.ii, 144; A. n, 23; iii, 214, 




346; Sn. II 12. 


iio5d 


Sn. 957. 


1 106-7 


A. i, 134. 


1 108 


S. 1, 39- 


1 109 


S. i, 39, 40. 


I I IOC 


S. i, 15. 


mod 


Sn. 988. 


1 1 1 la 


S. iv, 205. 



(■5) 



1 12b 
II 2d 

113 

ii4d 
115c 
ii5f 



Pcsalamanavapucchd. ( 1 4) 
It. 96, 97, 123; Thig. 205; 
Ap. 527, 12. 
Sn. 957. 

Thag. 925. 

D. in, 1-96; A. iv, 340; Ap. 
452, I. 



(16) Mooharcjjamanavapuccha (15) 
116 

117 Ap. 537, 25. 

I I7d Vin. V. 145; A. ii, 2; iv, 106; 

D. ii, 123; Vv. 15, 9; 18, 5; 

19, 12; Bv. 3, 17; Thag. 375, 

488. 

Ap. 537, 26-8. 

Sn. 957. 

SnA. 588. 

Nett. 7; Vism. 656. 

Kvu. 64. 



1 1 8-9 
ii8b 
ii8cd 
119 
1 1 9a-f 



iii9cf Dh. 170; Vism. 644; KhpA 

83; PsA. 261. 
II 190 ThIg. 84. 



(17) Pihgiyamanavapuccka (16) 
1120a J. vi, 523. 

Sn. 1097, 1 122. 
Sn. 1 123. 
Vd. 74- 



ii2odc 
I I2icd 
1122b 
1123 



1 124 
1125 
1 126b 
1 126c 

1 1 27ab 
1128b 



I28cd 
129b 

130a 
1 30b 

I3ie 
I3if 
132 

133 
133b 

134 
135 
i36cd 
137a 

I37d 
138 



(18) 



J. V. 92. 

Ap. 466, 5; 544, 24; ii, 18, 

91; Mil. I. 

M. i, 338; Thag. 1196,1199. 

Vin. ii, 296; V, 145, 214, 

215; D. iii, 197; S. i, 186; 

A. ii, 54; Thag, 26, 158,417 

1023, 12 12, 1258; Vv. 24, 

13; 43, 5; Ap. 92, i; loi, 3; 

217, i; 247, 2; 319, 3; DA. 

i, 59; MA. i, 21; PsA. 205, 

266, 446. 

J. vi, 218. 

It. 29; Thag. 714; Thig. 21. 

45- 

Thag. 763. 

Thag. 35, 710, 767. 1115; 

Thig. 99. 

A. iii, 346; Thag. 691. 

J. lii, 87. 

MA. i, 35; BvA. II. 



Sn. 1084. 

Sn. 1 140. 

D. iii, 196; Thag. 1254; 

Thig. 136. 155, 170. 185. 

Sn. 1 139, 1 141, 1 149. 



Concordance 



211 



II39 




ii4ocd 


Sn. 1 1 36. 


1 141 




1142b 


Sn. 507; Thag. 83. 


1 144 




1145c 


Thag. 622, 912, 1253; Ap- 




416, 2; 476, 2. 


ii45cd 


Ap. 408, 4; 468, 2; 514, 2; 




Sn. 178. 


ii45d 


Ap. I, 76; 388, 51; 499, i; 




521, 3. 


1146c 


Vin. I, 7. 


ii46d 


S. i, 4, 29. 


ii47ab 


Thag. 673; Bv. 12, 15; 14, 




14; 16, 12; 17, 12. 



1147b 

ii47d 
1 148 
1 149a 

Note: 



Ap. 6, 17, 

A. a, 23. 

M. ill, 187, 190, 193, 200; 
Thag. 649; Ap. 545, 2K 

In addition to the above 
MahaNiddesa quotes twice Sn, 
vv. 776-975 (Atthakavagga) in 
full ; CullaNiddesa in the 
P.T.S. edition Sn. vv. 35-76 
and vv. 976-1149 (Parayana- 
vagga) once in full, (presum- 
ably in MSS twice). 



[Note: — Professor Franke's concordance in ZDMG, 1 909-191 2 has, unfortunately, not 
been available to me in compiling the above.] 



v. — THE TRANSLATOR'S AFTERWORD 



So much has been written about Buddhism as to make a note by a 
translator of a small work of the Sutta Pitaka seem superfluous : the 
late Mrs. Rhys Davids* books give intimate accounts and expositions of 
early Buddhism ; Professor A. B. Keith gives an immense survey of 
early and late Buddhism in his * Buddhist Philosophy ' embodying, 
in criticism, modern scholarship thereon ; and there are now annotated 
translations of the most important texts for those who wish to read. 

But a translator comes into peculiar relationship with the contents 
of his volume, and though therein he cannot survey * the progress of 
Buddhist thought '^ — from say 500 B.C. to modern times — he may 
be able to give a view {ditthi^ of what his text sought to tell. 

Very generally we may say : 
the Vedanta taught :— (1) Brahman, Atman as permanent, 

immutable ; 

(2) transmigration, reincarnation ; 

(3) the doctrine of the act, Karma ; 

(4) ill, with Brahman as bliss ; 

(5) union with Brahman as the swnmwn 

honum ; 

(6) and a way (or ways) thereto. 

the Sutta-Nipata taught: — (i) the getting rid of assumption, attan; 

(2) rebirth, punabbhava again-becoming ; 

(3) the doctrine of the act, kamma ; 

(4) ill, its cause and end ; 

(5) calm, cool, for here and now as the 

sumtmwi bonum ; 

(6) and a way thereto. 

(i) Attam may be {a) atman, (b) atta, (r) reflexive pronoun, and {d) atta 
or -tva. 

(a) As attnan, attan seems to occur here and there, thus : — (1) in the 
BrdhtJiaija-dhammika sutta verse 284, isayo . . attadattham acarisum: rishis 
fared for the goal of atman ; (2) v. 477 the Buddhist muni attanu attanam 
nanupassati : does not perceive atman by (or as) the self; (3) v. 11 19 
attanuditthim uhacca ; uproot view of atman ; (4) v. 756 anattani attamunani 

1 Professor Keith op. dt. 

Ill 



Afterword 213 



passu lokam : behold the world joyful about what is not the self ; or, 
thinking of self in what is not self — here perhaps both in the brahman 
and buddhist sense. 

(b) As atta, its most common occurrence in the Pitakas is in attamana, 
but in the Sutta-Nipata it frequently occurs uncompounded and with 
its negative nirattam, e.g. v. 787 attam nirattam na tassa atthi : to him there 
is no assumption or not-assumption. It may be word-play, stressing 
the fact that the washen, cleansed, sage, does not hold with the brahmanic 
assumption that a permanent atman is, that atman is Brahman, the self 
is God ; compare vv. 784, 797, Soo, 858, 919, also 790. It is perhaps 
significant that these verses form part of the Atthakavagga, the Chapter 
of Eights^, which is generally considered to contain some of the most 
ancient suttas. (see Fausboll's Introduction in SBE and Chalmers in HOS 
37). It may be here noted that these suttas are linked together by a 
repetition of certain lines which, it would seem, is the system adopted 
in the Rig Veda in its eighth book — see MacDonell's Sanskrit Literature 
p. 42. The Atthakavagga of the Sutta-Nipata is the fourth chapter. 

{c) As the reflexive pronoun its occurrence is generally clear from the 
context; this usage is of course closely allied to the Buddhist attan. 

(d) As atta or Sk. -tva it seems to be the empirical self, almost 
equivalent to '-hood,' ' state,' individuality as we experience it, nama- 
rupa : subject-object ; but pregnant in meaning for the teaching of the 
Sutta-Nipata, for it is to be quickened, made-become, developed, tamed, 
calmed, cooled. It usually occurs at the end of a compound giving a 
meaning : a state-of-self. Thus at : — 

V. 145 bhavantu sukhitatta: may all be they who have the self made happy ; 
V. 21 5 v^ thitatto . . . muni : the truly po'sed-of-self is a sage. 
V. 359 of the Buddha: tinnam . , parinihbutani thitattam, crossed, cool 

and poised-of-self. 
V. 477 of the Tathagata: samahito . . . thitatto, cf. v. 519, intent and 

poised-of-self. 
v. 216 santiatatto and yatatto : restrained-of-self, curbed-of-self ; 
V. 425 -pahitattam of the B. : resolved-of-self ; 
V. 7 1 8 ekattam monam : the self-at-one is the still wisdom ; 

V. 972 samdhitatto : intent-of-self ; 

V. 322 vedagu bhavitatto : lore-adept of quickened self ; 

V. 388 saiigahttattabh'avo : braced for self-quickening ; 
V. 501 attadTpa : the self-island-ed ; 

V. yyS yad attagarahi : what is blamed by the self, cf. 913. 



1 But seeJ.P.T.S. 1906- 1907, 50, on the Chinese version as artha. Miss I. B. Horner 
refers me to Divv. 20 : Cadagath^ miinigatha arthavargiyani ca sutrani. 



ii4 Ind 



exes 



(2) Rebirth: punabhhava. There is nothing in the Sutta-Nipata to 
indicate the physical and psychical process of rebirth. It is possible 
punahbhava is thus wrongly translated and the notion is simply continuity. 
Hence there would be no ending of the * persister ' by death. We 
are told why men and devas ' stay ' (tttthanti, no doubt in bhava) at v. 
333, cf. too V. 754. And we are constantly told not to ' thirst ' about 
becoming this or that bhavabhava, vv. 496, 1068. 

Is there becoming again for the Master ? asks a spirit at v. 162, 
and he learns from another, No ! he is accomplished in (or by) know- 
ledge, cleansed and has destroyed the cankers, cf. too vv. 730, 733, 743. 

At V. 1055 we learn that by expelling pleasure and harbourage for 
pleasure the vinfiam : mind-at-work, intellect, would not stay in be- 
coming, bhave na titthe. So perhaps the vimana might be the * persister,' 
continuing to become. And then in v. 1073 the question is asked. 
When one is released would one be cool ? sitisiya, {SnA. nibband), and 
would mind-at-work become for such ? bhavetha vinnanam tathavidhassa 7 
The reply comes that he has gone to the state that none c?n sum, there 
are no ways of telling vadapatha, words cannot describe the unconditioned. 

(3) The doctrine of the act, Karma, kamma. We are not told of how 
Karma operates, but that it surely does. Verse 666 states that the deed 
becomes man's taskmaster and both fool manda and transgressor 
kibbisakarl see in the other world paraloke ill dukkham in the self attani. 

The world revolves by deeds and so mankind, the wise perceive 
the origin by way of cause, vv. 653-4. ^^^ deeds that make a brahman, 
man-of-worth araham, are set forth at length in vv. 620-47; the true 
mendicant shuns the deed which bears ill fruit, v. 537; the fruit of the 
pious worldling is one thing, but not to be compared with the bliss of the 
calm sage, vv. 256-7 ; the painted peacock matches not the swiftness 
of the swan, v. 221. 

' (4) ///, its cause and end. Some reasons for the existence of ill are given 
in vv. 91-115 under the name of parabhava ; and in the sutta of Dual 
View-points, vv. 724-65, ill (dttkkha), its cause and end, is analysed in 
sixteen ways. See too vv. 1049-60 Mettagu's questions. 

(5) The swnmum bonum. In the Sutta-Nipata there is little emphasis on 
Nibbana as such, the word occurring but seventeen times, parinibbana 
once. The emphasis seems to be on the state of calm santa, upasanta 
etc. as the swnmum bonum, with the concomitant states of being without 
doubt kahkhd, hope asa, grasping adana, attachment upadana, atfccfions 
upadhi, greed lobha, ill-will dosa, delusion moha, anger kodhana, pride 
mana, the competitive spirit ussada, lust-pleasure kama, craving tanha; 
with the release from all these there is the cool state nibhana, nibhuta, 



Afterword 215 



slti, parinibbuta, the state of knowledge anna, of having found and known 
vijja, so that trust nissita, sita, is gone ; the state of the man-of- naught 
akificannam, a thing dharma for here and now and not anon sanditthikam 
akalikam ; and finally it is security khema, vv. 454, 424-5, 79. 

(6) The way thereto. There is a high path and a low one taught by the 
recluse v. 714; and there is Dharma for layman and Dharma for recluse, 
* for busied much householders cannot undertake what is required of the 
recluse ' v. 393. 

(a) Dharma, the thing for laymen. The layman suffers because of certain 
actions, vv. 91-1 1 5 ; othei actions make him an outcast vasala, vv. 1 16-42 ; 
what is best and how to get it may be read m vv. 181-92, the greatest 
luck in vv. 258-69. The rules for the householder are stated at vv. 393- 
404, how to know a friend at vv. 253-5, goodly words at vv. 450-4. 
To whom to give and how to win heaven Brahmalokam thereby are taught 
in vv. 487-509. 

Pleasures are vain, vv. 766-71; life is brief, vv. 804-13 ; grief 
is futile, vv. 574-93 ; there is a ploughing other than mere farm work, 
vv. 76-80, and some are converted, vv. 18-34. 

(h) Dharma, the thing for the recluse. The way lies in going forth 
pahhajja from home to homelessness and this the Master chose vv. 
405-24, 935-39 ; and advised others to do likewise, vv. 335-42. * Arise 
and sit alert ' vv. 331-4 and * I will make you hear Dharma astir * 
savayami vo dhammam dhutam vv. 385-92 ; * stiffen thyself, be strong ' 
to win the still wisdom mona vv. 701-23. 

' I strove by the stream Neranjara and defeated Mara,' vv. 425-49 
as * a youth in heyday-prime ' v. 420. Some hear the voice nigghosa 
vv. 698, 719, 1061. Seek as friend a listener hakussuta v. 58, and when 
found fare with him, the rapt dhira v. 45 ; if you find none, fare alone 
vv. 35-75. The lore-adept with quickened self hhavitatta may help others, 
eager-eared, to muse nijjhapaye vv. 316-23 ; there is something worth 
winning vv. 330, 567. 

But the way is long and hard vv. 359-75, 701-23, 940-54, 963-75 ; 
there is a quick way vv. 915-34 ; and there is a way for one ready vv. 
143-52. The true silent sage muni is thus vv. 207-21 ; the gift-worthy 
thus vv. 462-85, 490-503 ; the true monk, mendicant, recluse etc. 
thus vv. 514-37 ; the true brahman so vv. 620-47 ; the man-of-calm so 
vv. 848-61. 

Quit speculation and disputes vv. 772-9. 780-7, 788-95, 798-803, 
824-34, 835-47, 862-77, 878-94, 895-914. Eject the fraud vv. 274- 
83 ; and woe betide the ill-doer vv. 657-78. 



21 6 Ind 



exes 



I will tell yoiT — if you ask — why the world is out of joint and 
your remedy ; I will tell you who is content, of the vanity of ceremonies, 
why ill arises and how to end it ; I will tell you how to become cool 
and calm, to cross the flood, what makes a sage, of Dharma here and 
now, the release which is no-yonder, the isle of no-beyond, the canker- 
less man ; I will tell you how to be free of death's realm, of release bv 
knowledge, the state of a man-of-naught, so that death's king shall see 
you not : and I will tell you how to leave birth and death, vv. 10^2-1 123. 

Some not able omissions from the gat has. The well-known formulae of the 
four Nikayas are nearly all omitted in the Sutta-Nipatn. I list some of 
them : — 

The Path or Way as eightfold, atthahgikaniagga. 

The four truths : (except at 724 — 27 from S. & It.), 

The three refuges. 

The three gems : (except in the Ratana sutta from Khp.), 

The three signs, aniccam, dukkham, anatta. 

The four paths and fruits : (but see v. 227 of the Ratana sutta). 

The five khandhas. 

The five (or six) super-knowledges, ahhinna. 

The four, eight (or nine) jhanir abidings. 

There are moreover no references to nuns, as Chalmers has pointed 
out. One may well ask : why these omissions ? Is it because metre 
did not permit their inclusion, or was the original teaching free of 
them ? If the latter, have we in the Sutta-Nipata perhaps some of the pith 
sara of the Master's teaching ? 

Some indication of the reliance of the canon and commentary on the 
Sutta-Nipata is apparent from my concordance which, I here note, is 
predominantly a phrase-concordance. 

Are we justified in comparing the * progress of Buddhist thought ' 
with that of the Hindus ? 

These three thoughts (concerning the atman)," writes Deussen in 
his Philosophy of the Upanishads p. 400, "are the kernel of the Upanishad 
teaching, . . . This kernel however was eventually surrounded by a husk 
which, growing ever thicker as time advanced, concealed it in many ways, 
until finally on the one hand the kernel utterly perished and only the 
husk remained, the Sankhya ..." 

The Master, sage of the noble quickening varabhtirimedhasa. In the Sutta- 
Nipata we have some traditional * autobiography.' At vv. 422-4 he 
is made to tell of his family and where they dwelt ; at vv. 406, 935-38 
why he went forth ; at vv. 425-45 of his struggles with Mara and how he 
won ; at vv. 19-29 of his way of living, vv. 77-80 of his ' ploughing.* 



Afterword 217 



*' Son, dost thou scorn me ? " he says to Rahula, v. 3 35 ; " I am no 
brahman, rajah or trader, but man-of- naught akincanaj' v. 455, " rajah 
of Dharma," v. 554. 

Devas tell the sage Asita of his birth at Lumbini, and he is born [n 
Suddhodana's house among the Sakyans ; and there Asita foretells that 
the prince will reach awakening's topmost peak and turn the Dharma- 
Wheel, vv. 679-95. 

Brahman Sela is lost in admiration of his beauty : 
** Thy form is full and comely, finely bred. 

Goodly to see and golden . . ." vv. 548-53. So, too, king Bimbisara» 
V. 420. He is the risen world-seer v. 599 ; a leader bringing light to all 
the world, scion of king Okkaka, lately gone forth from Kapilavatthu, 
v. 991 ; all golden-rayed and luminous as the full moon, v. 1016 ; the 
quickening sage . . . compassionate, vv. 538-47. He has rolled back the 
veil and solves the doubts of all who come and confess doubt, vv. 1 147-8. 

General. As to the metres of the text, the reader is referred to 
Professor Helmer Smith's learned discourse in his Index (see my preface). 
As to the metres of my translation, I had some difficulty in rendering 
the terse Pali lines into equivalent terse English ; the ^loka couplet is 
divisible into * quarter-verses ' or padas and I found the six-syllable 
line in English the easiest to handle for these, generally reserving the 
eight and ten syllable English line for the shoiter Pali tristuhk. I found 
it impossible to be literal and terse and at the same time to rhyme. 

The reader must remember that the original was chanted not read. 
The poetry shows a love of alliteration and assonance, word-play, puns 
and puzzles, see my indexes. The prose parts do not produce much new 
matter ; there would be no difficulty in finding similar passages in the 
Canon in most cases. 

Finally, I would refer the reader to the Vedic references that occur : 
the Three Vedas, the Atharva Veda, the Savitri and such words as jataveda 
(cf. vedajata), devayana, sittha. 

Colombo, Ceylon, 

1944. E. M. HARE. 



^i8 



Ind 



exes 



VI. _ SOME WORD-PLAY (SLESA) IN 
THE GATHAS of the SUTTA-NIPATA 



i8a pakkodano duddhakhiro : 

i8b samanavaso : 

22a gopi . . . assava : 

29b nago . . dalayitva : 

45b saddhimcaram : 

45b sadhuviharidhiram : 

63b rakkhitamanasano : 

75c attatrhapanna : 

94 asant' . . . sante . . asatam : 

1 08a vesiyasu padissati : 

p. 21 vasalo : 

I35ab anaraha sanio : 

I 3 5d vasaladhamo : 

i45d satta passim 

iy6d mahesirp : 

209a pamaya : 

2iod nayuhati : 

2r4b pariyantam : 

228b nikkamino : 

228c mudha : 

244c adanaslla : 

272a attasambhuta : 

353d sutassavassa : 

358 addasa Kappiyo : 

382d mannamana : 

385b dhammam dhutam : 

424ab kamesu . . nekkhammaip . 

432a tato : 

456c alippamano . . manavehi : 

457 savittim . . . tipadam \ 

catuvisatakkharam / ' 

46od sumedham : 
p. 87 & 487a vadannu & vadafinum : 

487f sujjhe : 

507bcd appamanam . . , appamatto 

5 1 9a bahetva -papakani : 



1 9a akkodhano vigatakhilo 
19b ekarattivaso and eka-vaso 
23a cittam . . . assavam vimuttam 

& asava 
nago and n'ago 
saddhim & saddha (!) 
sadhu 6- sadhuta 
} 
") 
santa cy sat 

and padussati with v. I. 
outcast and outcaste 
and sanro araham 
and vasalo dhammo with v. /. 
sattva sakta (kamabhave, cj. v. 

176b 435a) 
isi and esi 
Vma and Vmr 
ayuhati and ayu-uhati 
para- (!) cj. simanta v. 484 
and nikkhamana 

adanasila {SnA) 
attan and atta 

SLitassava and sutam pavassa 
accaga Kappayano, see trsL 
and mana 
see jtrsL 

. khemato cJ. v. 1098 
and rapo ? with v. L 
manavehi and mana 
SnA : buddham saranam 

gacchami, etc. 
medha and medha 
vadaniya and vacanavidum (SnA) 

respectively 
SLi-ijjhati and sujjhati 
. . . appamannam 
brahma 



Word-play 219 



520a samitavi : and samita-avi in opposition to 

bahctva 

52od samano : Vsram and Vsam 

522 ag^iip ^^3. karoti : nago 

524a viceyya : and vijcyya with SnA. 

525 kosani : kusalo 

526 pandarani : pandito 

529 vedani . . . -vedanasu . . . vedam . . Nedagu 

531 virato (!) . . . viriyavaso so viriyava . . . viro (text dliiro) 

5 34 sutva . . . sottiyo : and sotthiyo with v. /. 

535d kappan n'eti : both time and web 

537 parivajjayira parinfiacaii . . . pariyantam akasi . . . paribbajakani 

538d oghatam aga : 

577-8 maccana jivitam .... maccuvasam yanti 

621b paritassati : " both thirst and fear 

656d Brahma Sakko : and brahma-sakko 

659 kali : both seed of woe and of dice 

696b dhammamaggam : and dhammam aggam (SnA) 

700b bhikkhacariyani : bhikkha and bhikkhu 

702a samanabhavam : cf. 718 samanopasanassa 

7o6d narakam imam : ! 

707 appicch'assa . . . icchaya nicchato aniccho 

715 visata : v'saiij and Vsr 

718c ekattam : 

719 sutva . . . nigghosam : the silent voice 

72 lab cam sanati . . . santam eva tarn 

763 maga : and maggamagga- (SnA) 

Kamasutta note therein macco, jantuno, -porisam and naro 

784b avivadata : vivada (!) 

787c atram nirattam : see ' afterword ' 

Sooc viyattesu : viy-atta, acta 

8o6d na mamattaya nametha mamako 

8iob bhajamanassa vivittam-asanam : vivitta-manasam 

831c palehi sura : Pasura 

849 Bhagava : Nid. 1. 111-2, cf pp. 141-3^ JJ?"*^- 

889d samatta : and sam-apta ; see Sn. Indexes s.v, 

888-9 ^°^^ words for 'self,' atumanarn, sayani, attana, samam 

935cd sarnvegani . . . sarnvijitarn 

947a sa ve vidva, sa vedagu 

996cd vidhuro anasavo . . . vidu narasabho 

1026a avijja muddha, see C.P.D. avijja 

1058b atthitam ^ see note to trsl. . 

1074 acci . . . attham asta paled : muni . . . attham artha paleti 

iioid apanamissanti : fl«i/ namassanti 



220 



Ind 



exes 



1 1 14c 
1 1 19c 
1131 
I i49d 



titthantam : 
attanuditthim uhacca 
nikkamo nibbano 
adhimuttacittam : 



titth'antam (tirtha) 
hotk atma and atta 
see trsl. 
adhi- and vi- 



VIL— SOME PALI WORDS IN THE NOTES 



Word 6- verse number 



Atthitam 

Atitam 

Anitikam 

Abhinhasamvasa 

Akasam 

Dhira ' 

Nigghosa 

Pandarani 

Parabhojanam 

Paravediyam 

Pariyantacari 



1058 


Bhuri- 


I 112 


Manava 


. II37 


Vinnana 


335 


V^iyattesu 


944 


\'iro 


45 
1 06 1 


Sampaiayaya 


526 


Sadhu 


366 


Sadhuvihari 


474 


Simantanam 


964 


Sukhitatta 



538 

997 

1037 

800 

531 
864 

1 102 

45 
484 

H5 



VIII. — A TABLE OF ALLITERATION AND 
ASSONANCE IN THE GATHAS 





A 


I26ab 


attham . . . anattham anu 


58c 


annaya atthani 




sasati 


59b 


analamkaritva anapekkha- 


133c 


ahiriko anotcapl 




mano 


165b 


appaharam alolupam 


68b 


alinacitro akusitavutti 


173c 


appacitthc analambe 



Alliteration and Assonance 



221 



184b 
197c 
207c 
273d 

284d 
32obc 

364c 
502b 
504ab 

534cd 

558a 

593a 
62oe 

628c 
63 5bc 



69iab 

75ie 
756a 
763b 
85oab 

852abc 



934ab 

952ab 

1002c 
1003b 
io59bc 

io59d 
1 148a 
1 149a 



appamadena annavam 
akkhimha akkhiguthako 
aniketam asanthavam 
atinnapubbam apuna- 

bbhavaya 
attadattham acarisum 
anisamay'attham . . . 

ajanam avitinnakamkho 
anissito anafinaneyyo 
ayam antima n'atthi 
addha amogha . . . ahu 

akkhasi 
abhibhum akathamkathim 

. . anigham 
abhinneyyam abhinfiatam 
animittam anannatam 
abbulhasallo asito 
akincanam anadanani 

: 645c : 1094a. 
anokasarim appiccham 
annaya akathamkathi 

amatogadham anup- 

pattam 
ath'attano . . . anussaranto 

akalyarupo . . . assukani 
anejo anupadano 
anattani attamanam 
andhakaro apassatam 
akkodhano asantasi avi- 

katthi akukkuco 
akuhako apihalu amac- 

chari appagabbho aje- 

guccho 
abhibhu . . . anabhibhuto 

. . . anitiham adassi 
anitthuri ananugiddho 

anejo 
adandena asatthena 
agara anagariyam 
akincanam . . . asattam 

addha . . . atari 
akhilo akamkho 
adhideve abhinfiaya 
asambiram asamkuppam 



387a rupa ca sadda ca rasa ca 

gandha 
443 d amarn . . . amhana 

749ab arogyarn -aiinaya asavanarn 

parikkhaya 

U & 
I22ab atrahetu parahetu dhana- 

hetu 
1 22c sakkhiputtho musa bruti 

247c dusslla-ludda pharusa 

428bc aggihuttanca juhato 

pa hu tarn . . . puiifiarn 
539a antagu si paragu dukkhassa 

539d jutima mutima pahuta- 

paiiiio 
627c uttamatthani anuppattarn 

86obc ussesu . . . muni . . . samesu 

. . . omesu 
87iab nu . . kutonidano . . . kuto 

pahuta 
87 id vibhute . . . phusanri 

90iac tapupanissaya jigucchitarn 

. . uddharnsara suddhim 
91 icd sammutiyo puthujja upek- 

liati uggahananta- 
996 bed pahuta- .... varabhuri . . . 

vidhuro . . . vidu 
1 1 I9acd sunfiato . . . avekkhassu . . . 

attanuditthirn uhacca 

. . . maccutaro 
E 
114b khattiye jayate kule 

1 1 5a ete parabhave loke 

790b ditthe sute sllavate mute 

: 797b : 887a. 
O 
44ab oropayitva . . . sarnsTnapatto 

. . . kovilaro 
5 1 ab gando . . . upaddavo . . . rogo 

5 6a be see under N 
63a okkhitt;^- .... padalolo 

1 14a appabhogo mahatanho 



Ind 



exes 



153a 


pannaraso uposarho . . . 




Satagiro yakkho 


261b 


vinayo . . . susikkhito 


265a 


garavo . . . nivato 


270a b 


rago ca doso ca kuto- ... 




lomahamso kuto j a 


ijocd 


kuto . . . mano . . . ossajanti 


279cd 


yo evarupo . . . dubbisodho 




. . . safigano 


3i9ab 


naro . . . otaritva ma hod 1- 




kam . . . sighasotam 


3i9cd 


so vuyhamano anusotagami 


348ab 


. . • o\J 

no . . . puriso . . . vato 


348cd 


tamo . . . nivuto sabbaloko 




. . jotimanto 


370c 


danto parinibbuto thitatto 


383a 


dhammo nipuno sukho 


429ab 


duggo . . . maggo . . . duk- 




karo durabhisambhavo 


437d 


makkho thambho . . . 




atthamo 


438ab 


labho siloko sakkaro 




-laddho . . . yo yaso 


476c 


suddho niddoso vimalo 




akaco 


477bc 


samahito ujjugato tbitatto 




anejo akhilo akamkho 


505a 


yo yacayogo . . . gahattho 




. . . Magho manavo 


593a 


see under A 


605b 


odake varigocare 


962b 


ekodi nipako sato 


1 060c 


so vitatanho anigho niraso 




K & Kh 


28a 


kbila nikhata 


82b 


khinasavam kukkuca- 




vupasantam : 481b. 


i45ac 


khuddam . . . kifici . . . 




sukhino . . . khemino 


i66ab 


ekacaram . . . kamcsu ana- 



pekhinarp 



I97cd akkhimha akkhiguthako- 

kannamha kannaguthako 
201 be vaka kimi kaka khadanti 
28icd karandavam . . . kasambum 

apakassatha 
324ab kimsilo kimsamacaro kani 

kammani 
362b kodham kadariyam 

4i2cd kuhim . . . bhikkhu kattha- 

vaso 
422d Kosalesu niketino 

424ab kamesu . . . nekkhammam 
. . . khemato : I098ab. 
5 1 3 abed kimpattinam . . . bhikkhu- 
nam . . . kena . . . kathan 
. . . vyakarohi 
5i6d kalam kamkhati 

517a kappani . . . kevalani 

52 3ab kam khettajinam . . . kusa- 

1am kena katham 
537a dukkhavepakkam . . . 

kammam 
55iab kalyanadassano bhikkhu 

kaneana- 
577ab kumbhakarassa kata 

mattikabhajana 
6o2ab kite . . . kunthakipillike 
6o8ab kesehi . . . kannehi ... 

akkhihi 
651a kassako kammana 

653d kammavipakakovida 

68 5d kuhirn kumaro . . . datthu- 

kamo 
844ab okam . . . aniketasari ... 

akubbam . . . 
844ed kamehi . . . apurekkhatano 
. . . katham . . . kayira 
848a kathamdassi kathamsllo 

92 od bhikkhu . . . kareyya 

kuhifici : 923 b : 929b. 
93od katham viggahikam . . . 

kathayeyya 
ioi2acd Kosambim . . ..Kapila- 
vatthum Kusinaranea 



Alliteration and Assonance 



225. 



G & Gh 

33b gomiko gohi : 34b. 

39b gacchati gocaraya 

43ab dussangaha . . . gahattha 

gharam 
Ii8bc gamani nigamani . . . 

niggahako 
I4id duggacca garahaya 

279ab guthakupo . . . ganavassiko 
35oab giram . . . vagguvaggum . . . 

paggayha 
371b vaggagatesu . . . vaggasari 

4i6cd vyagghusabho . . . giri- 

gabbhare 
945a gedham . . . mahogho 

C & Ch 

Sab naccasan . . . paccasari . . . 

accagama : 9, 10, 11, 12, 

39b yeniccbakam gacchati 

gocaraya 
84a caturo . . . pancamo . . . 

Cunda 
343b vicikicchanam chetta 

346a chind'eva . . . vicikiccham 

665cd ca duccaritani caritva . . . 

cirarattam 
yoybcd appicch'assa . . . icchaya 

nicchato aniccho 

J & Jh 

71b jalamhi asajjamano : 213d. 

249b jata jallam khaiajinani 

422a ujum janapado raja 

44od jive parajito 

462b jayati jatavedo • 

500a jahetva jatimaranam 

508a sujjhati . . . bajjhatl 

552cd vijjtavl jambusandassa 

553acd bhojarajano . . . rajabhiraja 

manujindo raj jam 

jGyb chandajatassa jantuno 



859ad vajJLi puthujjana . . . 

n'ejati 
926bd jagariyarn bhajeyya . . 

vippajahe 
935abd jatani janam . . sam- 

vijitarn 
945 b ajavarn . . . jappanam 

972b jhananuyutto bahu- 

jagar'assa 
999acd janemu . . . ajanatan . . . 

janemu 
io46bcd -abhijappaiiti . . . yajayoga 

. . . jatijaram 
I loiabc okamjaharn . . anejam . . . 

nandirnjaharn kapparn- 

jaharn 
Ii23abd manuje . . . santapajate 

jarasa . . . jahassu 

T & Th (with t & th) 

io4abc jatitthaddho -tthaddho 

-tthaddho . . . fiatirn 

atimafineti 
io6ab itthidhutto -dhutto 

-dhutto 
146b tasa . . thavara 

3 3iab utthahatha nisidadia . . . 

attho supirena 
3 3 3bc sita titthanti atthika 

tarath'etarn visattikarn 
377c t'atthi tulyo nipunattha- 

557cd Sariputta anuvatteti anu- 

jato Tathagatarn 
678b tattha . . . tavacitarn vasi- 

tabbarn 
I073cd tatth'eva . . sitisiya vimutto 

. . . tathavidhassa 



60b 

8icd 
88a • 



D & Dh (with d & dh) 

dhanani dhannani ca 

bandhavani 
panudanti buddha 

dhamme 
dhammapade sudesite 



224 



Indexes 



104, 106 


stt under T 


i47ab 


dittha . . . addittha . . . 




dure . . . avidure 


263a 


dananca dhammacatiya 


297ab 


annada balada . . . vannada 




sukhada 


^izacd 


adhammo dandanam . . . 


J 


adus'kayo . . . dhamma 




dhamsenti 


327abc 


dhammaramo dhamma- 




rato dhamme dhamma- 




. . . dhammasandosa- 




vadam 


351b 


dhonam vadessami 




dhammam 


385b 


dhammam dhutam . . . 




dharatha 


411C 


rajaduta v id h a vantu 


429ab 


see under 


488cd 


dadam idha aradhaye 




dakkhineyyehi tadi 


526ab 


dubhayani . . . pandarani 




. . . bahiddha . . suddhi- 




panno 


542cd 


damappatro dhitima 


559cd 


duUabham dassanani . . . 




sambuddhanam 


649ab 


dlghiM-attnm . . . ditthigatam 


671C 


disatam adhiseti 


680a 


disvana deve muditamane 




udagge 


701b 


dukkaram dutabhi- 




sambhavam 


74oab 


tanhadutiyo . . .digham 




addhana 


762ef 


dhammam durajanam . . . 




aviddasu 


938cd 


addakkhm duddasam 




hadayanissitam 


983d 


muddha . . . sattadha 


986ab 


diikkhitam disva devata 



3 3cd 



56a 



56bc 

86b 

2nf 

-57c 
326b 
41 lb 
414b 
425b 
491b 

756c 
856ab 

942ad 

1055c 
1078c 

I I 3 I d 

41 be 
55abc 
66ab 
83a 

89bcd 
9 1 abed 



N (with n) 
narassa nandana n? . . . 

nandari . . . nirupadhi 
nillolupo nikkuho 

nippipaso 
nimmakkho niddhanta- 

kasavamoho nirasayo 
nibbanabhirato ananu- 

giddho 
netaram aiiiicsam anarina- 

neyyam 
niddaro . . . nippapo 
niramkatva nivatavutti 
nayam nicakula 
nikkhamma nagara 
nadim Neraiijaram 
danta . . . anigha nirasa 

; 492b. 
nivittham namaiupasmim 
nissayata n'atthi fiatva . . . 

anissito 
santi . . . nibbutim iiatva 
niddam tandim . . nibbana- 

manaso naro 
nandifica nivesananca 
anigha nirasa 
nikkamo nibbano nacho 

P & Ph 
puttehi puttima . . . papima 

• 34^- . , 

puttcsu . . . vipularn . . . 

pemarn piyavippayogarn 
upativatto patto . . patiladdha 

uppanna- 
pahaya pafica . . . upak- 

kilese vyapanujja 
pucchami . . . pahuta- 

panfiani . . . kammara- 

putto 
pakkhandl . . .pagabbho 

. . . palapo . . . patirupena 
parabhavantarn purisam . .. 

pucchama . . . putthurn 

. . . parabhavato 



Alliteration and Assonan(!e 



11$ 



pannaraso uposatho . . . 

upatthita 
anapekhinam upasam- 

kamma pucchama . . . 

-pasa pamocanam 
pcHinaya parisujjhati 
pattapphalam -pphalam 

-pphalam 
parelii . . . payatam panitam 
parijananti pandita 
pavivekarasam picva 
puja . . . pujaniyanam 
patirupa . . . pubbe . . . 

-punfiata 
papiccham papa- papa- 
parikkharo . . . paninam 
pucchami . . . pahuta- 

pannam . . . paragatam 

parinibburam 
pesLinam ... pi parupa- 

vadam 
pasamsama parittapaiiiie 
patihariyapakkhanca 

pasanna- 
pasadasmini patitthito 
khippam pattani apuresi 

sampaiano patissato 
Pandavassa puratthato 
pamattabandhu papima 
piyavacam . . . patinandita 

. . . .papani paresam . . . 

piyam 
panjalika . . . pujetha 

annapanena 
punnatthiko . . . puiina- 

pekho :505b 
paiihe . . . puttho anu- 

pubbam : 5 1 1 d 
pahaya punnapapam . . . 

pavuccate 
pandarani . . . pandito . . . 

pavuccate 
panujja pamkam 
parivajjayita parifinacari 



5 37f 


paribbajakam . . . patti- 




pattam 


547cde 


punne . . . pape . . . lippasi 




pade . . . pasarehi 


558c 


pahatabbam pahinam 


576ab 


phalanam . . . pakkanam 




pato papatana 


585cd 


pcta palenti . . . paiidcvana 


587d 


phandante . . . panine 


588d 


passa . . . pariyayam 


592c 


paridevam pajappanca 


598b 


pecca panjalika 


6o6ab 


pakklii pi . . . pattayane 


674cd 


papatanti papakara papani 


737abcd 


phassam parifiiiaya . . . 




upasame . . . phassa- 




. . . parinibbuta 


739c 


phussa phussa . . . passam 


773^^ 


paccha pure ... pi apekha- 




mana 


776ab 


passami . . . pariphanda- 




manam pajam 


790c 


puniie . . .pape . . . anupa- 
litto 


791a 


pur imam pahaya apararn 


9i4cd 


pannabbaro . . . vippayutto 




. . . kappiyo nijparato . . . 




patthiyo 


92 3ab 


phassena . . . phutth'assa 




paridevam 


932cd 


pharusena . . . pativajja 




patisenikaronti 


936ab 


phandamanarn pajani . . . 




appodake 


945cd 


pakappanam kamapamko 


969a 


panfiani purakkhatva 




-piti 


ioi6cd 


pannarase paripurirn 




upagatam 


io24cd 


pucchi . . . paiihe . . . 




patibhasati 


io35d 


pafifiay'ete pithiyyare 


I i26cd 


pucchanta nipune pafihe 




. . . upagamum 



226 



Indexes 



ii45ab 



2ia 
25abc 

Siabc 



222bcd 

305b 

382c 

5i9ad 

558b 
657d 
693cd 

923cd 

957c 

958ab 

1028a 

I032cd 



14b 

5oab 
73ab 
84cd 

i=;oab 



pamke . . . pariphandamano 
dipa dipam upaplavim 



B & Bb 



baddli 



bhisi 



. nibbitthena 
. bhatiya 
. . abho- 
. brahmana 

bhuta . . . 
, bhasitam 



bhatako'smi . 

sabbaloke . 
gathabhigitam 

janeyyam . . 

. . . buddha 
bhummani . . 

bhavantu . . 
suvibhattani bhagaso 
sabbe . . . atthabaddha 

bhavanti 
bahetva sabba- Sabhiya . . . 

bhagava . . . brahma 
bhavetabbam . . . bhavitam 
balo dubbhasitam bhanam 
bahujana- . . . bhavissati 

brahma car iyam 
bhavaiica nabhijappeyya 

bheravesu 
bahunnam . . . baddhanani 
bhikkhuno . . . bhajato 
Bavari brahmano bhoto 
abhilepanam brusi . . . 

manabbhayarn 

M 

mula . . . samuhatase 

: 369b. 
mitte . . . anukampamano 
kama . . . madhura mano- 

rama . . . matheiiti 
mettarn . . . vimuttirn 

asevamano muditanca 
maggajino maggadesako 

. . . magge . . . magga- 

dusi 
mettanca . . . manasam . . 

aparimanam 



I98bc mukiicna vamat'ekada . . . 

semhanca vamati 
2i8ac munim . . . methunasma 

. . . madappamada . . . 

vippamuttarn 

3 32cd ma . . . pamatte . . . maccu- 

raja amohayittha 
360a mangala samuhata 

4 3 yd makkho thambho . . . 

atthamo 
484c munirn moneyya- 

sampannarn 
494ab may a . . . mano . . . amama 
545b marabhibhu muni 

56 1 bed marasena- .... sabbamitte 

, . . modami 
576cd maccaiiarn . . . maranato 
682cd Merumuddhavasine ... me 

. . . marisa 
8i5abc methunam . . . Metteyya 

. . . mussat'evapi . . . 

miccha 
SSgbcd manena matto . . . samam 

manasabhisitto . . . 

samatta 
962cd kammaro . . . niddhamc 

malam 
ioo4bcd mante . . . miiddharn . . . 

manasa 
1008c Mogharaja . . . medhavi 
1013d ramaniyarn manoramam 
io4ode majjhe manta . . . maha- 

puriso : 1 042 be 
1 1 20cd maharn . . . momuho . . . 

dhammam 
Ii32ab -malamohassa mana- 

makkha- 

Y 

482c yarn yannakalc pariycsa- 

mano 
50 5ab yo yacayogo . . yajari 
509ac yo yajati . . . yannasampadam 

. . . yajitva . . yacayogo 



Alliteration and Assonance 



227 



9 1 Sab 


seyyo . . . manneyya 


374b 


vivatarn disvana . . . 




niceyya 




asavanarn 


967a 


theyyam . . . kareyya . . . 


378cd 


vivattacchaddasi . . . viro- 




bhaneyya 




casi vimalo 




, 


4i5abcd 


disvana vasupagararn . . . 




R 




upavisurn . . . agantva 


444c 


rattha rattham vica- 


444cd 


. . . pativedayi 
vicarissarn savake vinayam 


552ab 


rissam 
raja arahasi . . . rathesabho 


463b 


vedantagu vusitabrahma- 


660c 


ariyagarahi nirayam 


472abc 


cariyo 
bhavasava . . . vaci . . . 


795c 


ragaragi . . . viragaratto 




vidhupita . . . vedagu . . . 
vippamutto 
samitavino . . . vitaraga . . . 


97id 
974acd 


rusito . . . pharusarn 

rajani . . . rupesu . . . rascsu 


499ab 




. . . ragarn 




vippahaya 






528ab 


vedagurn . . . anuviditarn 




L 




. . . viriyava 


29b 
196c 


putilatarn . . . daiayitva 
lohitassa lasikaya 


529a 
529cd 


vedani viceyya. kevalani 
sabbavedanasu vitarago . . . 


56oad 


dullabho loke . . . salla- 




vedam . . . vedagu 


katto 


542b 


viddhasta vinalikata 


929d 


labhakamya . . . lapayeyya 


562cd 
59oab 


mahaviro . . . va . . . vane 
sutva vineyya paridevitarn 


998ac 


dullabho oke . . . lokamhi 




596ab 


jativadasmirn vivado 




V 


600a 


vyakkhissarn Vasettha 




6i4bd 


vohararn upajivati ... 


7a 


vitakka vidhupita 




vanijo 


38a 


varnso visalo . . , visatto 


646a b 


pavararn viram . . . vijita- 


59c 


vibhusanatthana virato 




vinarn 




saccavadi 


668a 


vaggu vadanti vadanta 


loobc 


va . . . vanibbakarn musa- 


684c 


vattessati . . . Isivhaye vane 




vadena vanceti :i29bc 


704a b 


virato . . hitva . . . parovare 


2i4bc 


vaca . . . vadanti . . . vita- 


793cd 


evadassirn vivatarn . . . 




ragarn 




vikappayeyya 


215c 


vimarnsamano visamarn 


842cd 


vidhasu avikampamano . . . 


22ld 


vivittassa vanamhi 




visesi 


272cd 


visatta . . . maluva va vitata 


845ab 


vivitto vicareyya . . . 




vane 




vadeyya 


277ab 


vihesarn bhavitattanarn 


858ab 


pasavo va . . . vatthurn . . . 




avijjaya 




JW^^ 1, • 


329abc 


vinnata- . . . vinnatarn . . . 


899ab 


silavatato . . . vedhati . . . 




vaddhati 




viradhayitva 


348b 


vato . . . vihane 


9i2ab 


visajja . . . vivadajatesu . . . 


353abcd 


parovararn . . . viditva . . . 




vaggasari 




-viriya varirn . . , vaca- 


947ab 


ve viqva , . . vedagu natva 



228 



Ind 



exes 



97ocd 

ioo5d 
loiid 
loz^cd 
I o6oabc 

io65bc 

1 07 1 ac 
I 07 3 bed 
1 1 1 6abcd 



avilattam . . . vijafina . . . 

vinodayeyya 
vitakke paridevaneyyc 

vinayetha 
vacaya vissajessati 
Vedisam Vanasavhayam 
vicinteti . . . vedajato 
vidva . . , vedagu . . . bhava- 

bhave . . . visajja . . . 

vitatanho 
vivekadhammam . . . 



. avyapa))a- 
-vimokhe . 



vijannam 

mano 
vitarago . 

vimutto 
vassanam . . . vimutto . . . 

vinnanam -vidhassa 
dvaham . . . vyakasi . . . yava 

. . . devisi . . . vyakaroti 



3^^ 


saritam slghasaram viso- 




sayitva 


36a 


samsaggajatassa . . . sncho 


45abc 


sace . . . sahayam saddhim- 




caram sadhu- . . . sabbani 




parissayani 


47ab 


pasamsama sahayasam- 




padam settha sama 




sevitabba sahaya 


57c 


sayam . . . seve pasutam 


62a 


sandalayitva samyojanani 

:74b. 
sutava satima samkhata- 


7obc 


71a 


siho . . . saddest! asantasanto 




:213c. 


88bc 


saniiato satima . . . 




sevamano 


9obc 


sutava -savako sapanfio 




sabbe 


9of 


suddham asuddhena 




samarn 


I02bc 


sahiraniio sabhojano . . . 




saduni 



loSabc sehi . . . asantuttho . . . 

padissati dissati -daresu 

1 IOC tassa issa . . . supati- 
123c sahasa sampiyena 

144a santussako . . . subharo 

I45d sabbe satta . . . sukhitatta 

:i47d. 
152b sllava dassanena sampanno 

I74ab sabbada silasampanno . . . 

susamahito 
I78ab suddittham . . . suppa- 

bhatam suhutthitam 
I95cd hadayassa papphasassa 

vakkassa pihakassa 
197b asuci savati sabbada 

2 1 1 a sabbabhibhum sabbavidum 

sumedham 
24 id sakuntamamsehi susam- 

khatehi 
266ab sovacasspta samanananca 

dassanam 
269c sabbattha sotthim 

283a suddha suddhehi 

samvasam 
290cd sampiyena . . . samvasam 

sangantva samarocayum 
306b sannidhim samarocayum 

32 5d suneyya sakkacca subha- 

sitani 
330c santi-soracca-samadhi- 

santhita 
345c samavatthita . . . savanaya 

sota 
352b samujjupafifiassa samugga- 

hitam 
356ab esa sutva pasidami . . . 

isisattama 
389a sace ... so sallapc savakena 

444b satinca suppatitthitam 

446d sambuddbassa satlmato 

473 a saiigatigo yassa . . . santi 

sanga 
503 b sambodhipatto saranam 

5 1 5ab sabbattha . . . satima ... so 



himsati 



sabbaloke 



Alliteration and Assonance 



229 



5i5cd 


samano . . . ussada yassa .... 


944cd 


soceyya akasam . . . sito 




santi sorato so 




siya 


534ab 


sutva sabbadhammam . . . 


946cd 


sabbam so patinissajja 




savajjanavajjam 




sa . . . santo 


538c 


sannakkhara-sannanissitani 


955t» 


na-ssuto . . . kassaci 


542cd 


sitibhuto . . . saccanikkamo 


956ab 


sadevakassa lokassa . . . 


5 4 Sab 


suruci sujato carudassano 




dissati 


548cd 


suvannavanno si . . . 


96 3 be 


sayanam sevato . . . 




susukkadatho si 




sambodhi kamassa 


556ab 


senapati . . . savako satthu- 


977ab 


so Assakassa visaye 




d-anvayo 




Alakassa samasane 


597a 


sakkoma sannattum 


985ab 


ussussati . . . sokasalla- 


622b 


sandanam sahanukkamam 




samappito 


648c 


sammucca samudagatarn 


992ab 


so . . . sambuddho . . . 


662ab 


appadutthassa narassa 




sabbadhammana 




dussati suddhassa 


992cdef 


sabba . . . sabbadhammesu 




posassa 




. . . sabba- . . . upadhi- 


67 5 be 


sama sabala . . . sona 




samkhaye 




sigala 


ioo6ab 


sutva sissa solasa 


789c 


so sujjhati sopadhiko 


1 009b 


sabbalokassa vissuta 


898a 


siluttama safinamenahu 


ioi2abc 


Saketam Savatthinca . . . 




sudd him 




Setavyam 


9i6d 


sada sato sikkhe :933b. 


1030b 


sabbesam sabbasamsayam 


937ab 


samantam asaro . . . disa 


1034a 


savanti sabbadhi sota 




sabba samerita 


iii7d 


Gotamassa yasassino 



SOME REV IE WS ON THE FIRST EDITION:— 

' There is no doubt that the Sutta-Nipata is very rewarding. 
Woven Cadences throughout maintains the loftiness of thought 
inherent in the original. To those who seek to know more of 
the splendid old religion now called Buddhism, Mr. Hare has 
given a fine lead both by virtue of his eloquent translation and 
constructive Afterword.'— The Hibhert Journal. 



' In these times when in the West, interest in Buddhism is 
appreciably increasing, it is most agreeable to welcome and to 
recommend Mr. Hare's cimrming, able and stimulating trans- 
lation of the '' old and important anthology of early Buddhism." 
the Sntta-Nipata.' — Religions (Quarterly). 



' On the whole the translation will not fail to convey to the 
English readers both the sense and the beauty of the religious 
experiences of ancient India which found a significant expression 
through the utterances of the Buddlia and his immediate 
disciples.' — Indian Culture (Calcutta). 



' It is by no means an exaggeration to say that an under- 
standing of early Buddhism is hardly possible without a correct 

interpretation of the Sutta-Nipata The entire ideological 

basis of the Sutta-Nipata, with its repeated emphasis on the 
evils of sense-perception, seems to be the first formulation in 
India of philosophy which takes for its major premise the 
relative unreality of the external world, and alms at the goal 
of individual happiness by the attainment of inward peace 

( ajjhattasanti ) through Yogic contemplation Apart from 

the difficulties of interpretation of the text, the translator is 
further limited by the demands of metre and poetic diction. 
Mr. Hare, however, overcomes this difficulty well, and it must 
be admitted that the translation reads smoothly as English 
imrhymed verse.' — University of Ceylon Reviexv. 



' Now IVIr. Hare has prepared a new translation also in the 

original mixture of prose and verse The word verse must 

be used advisedly for, it is not suggested that the Pali original 

could fairly be described as poetry The ^Vest has yet to 

find a translator worthy of the Dhamma.' — 

Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society (London). 



Printed in Ceylon by 
Harrisons & Crosfield, Ltd., Colombo 



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BL Sacred books of the Buddhists 

1410 

32 



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