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Full text of "The book of menus, 1876"

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THE 




OOK OF 




ENUS. 



1876. 
By FIN-BEC, 

AUTHOR OF 

THE EPICURE'S YEAR-BOOK," 



Tout se fait en dinant dans le siecle ou nous sommes, 
Et c'est par les diners qu'on gouverne les hommes." 



LONDON :' ' ', ' ;-■ \ , ' . ■ • ; ; ' 
GRANT & CO., 72 TO 78, TUllNMILL* STR'EE'T.'^M^ 



1876. 



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LONDON : 
GRANT AND CO., PRINTERS, TURNMILL STREET, E.C. 



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CONTENTS. 



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PAGE. 

Introduction . . . i 

The Epicure's Almanack : 
January — 

Dinner given by the Prefect of the Seine to the Lord Mayor of 

London .......... 12 

Epicurean Calendar 12 

Theophile Gautier's Reply to an Invitation . . . .13 

February — 

Menu Poetique de la Vogue . . . . . . .15 

Banquet Hippophagique— Paris 15 

Mr. Walker's Plain Choice Dinner 16 

March — 

Fin-Bee chez Philippe 18 

Fin-Bee's Banquet 18 

Macaroni a la Nicolo . . . , 19 

Inaugural Dinner of the Patent Cork Company, Limited . . 19 

April — 

Horse, Mule, and Donkey Banquet . . . . . .21 

Two .Spring Menus . . . . . . . . .22 

Whitebait : Blanchaille or Blanquette ..... 23 

Hot Plates in Paris ......... 23 

m. 





IV 



CONTENTS. 



May— PAGE. 

The Inaugural Dinner of the BurHngton 25 

International Horticultural Exhibition and Botanical Congress 

Banquet at Guildhall 26 



yune — 

The Trafalgar, Greenwich 
City Banquet to Her Majesty's Judges 
South Kensington . . . . 
Park Street ..... 




yuly- 

Menus by the "Way ....... 

, Dinner given by the Great Western Railway Directors 
"The World." Menu du Diner .... 



August — 

Banquet to Her Majesty's Ministers at the Mansion House 
Menus by the Way 



September — 

Dinner to the Municipality of Cherbourg 
The Montreuil Peach Crops of 1874-75 . 

Dinner given by the Emperor of Germany to the Emperors of 
Russia and Austria ....... 

Dinner in honour of Michael Angelo — Florence 

October — 
Dinner to the President of the French Republic 
Dinner given by the Duke de Tremouille to the Prince of Wales 

Dinner to Madame Adelina Patti 

Menu of the Balaklava Commemoration Banquet, 1875 

November — 

Inaugural Dinner of the St. James's Restaurant, Piccadilly 

The Paris Hunting Club— St. Hubert Dinner . 

First Fin-Bee Dinner ..... 

M. Thiers' Opening Diplomatic Dinner 

Dinner by Marshal MacMahon to the Czarewitch 

Grand Souper at the Opening of the Suez Canal 

Complimentary Dinner to Francis Bennoch, Esq. 



28 
29 
30 
31 

33 
35 
36 

38 
39 

41 

42 

42 
43 

45 
45 
46 

47 

49 
50 
50 
51 
51 
52 
53 





CONTENTS. 




December — page. 

First Horse Banquet in England 55 

The late Lord Dalhousie's "Wines 56 

Brie Cheese 56 

Of Dinners and Dinner-Giving 59 

Order of Service 76 

Wines . . . . . . . . . . -77 

The Wine Cellar 81 

Of Decanting Wines 87 

The Chymistry of Wines . . . . . , . .90 

Royal Menus : 

Famille Royale d'Angleterre ....... 105 

Her Majesty's Dinner ........ 106 

Famille Imperiale de France . . . . . . .107 

Famille Royale de Prusse . . . . . . .108 

Famille Royale de Danemark, ....... ic8 

Presidence des Etats Unis d'Amerique . . . . .109 

Shakspere Dinners : 

Shakspere Annual Commemoration, Philadelphia : Apostles, 

Dec. 30, 1857 113 

Twentieth Annual Dinner of the Shakspere Society of Phila- 
delphia, April 23, 1872 ....... 117 

Twenty-third Annual Dinner of the Shakspere Society of Phila- 
delphia,' April 23, 1875 128 

Ceremonial Entertainments : ' 

Menu de 20 Converts . . . . . . . • 131 

Menu de 60 Couverts . 132 

Bal d'Enfants — 80 Couverts . . ... , . 133 

Menu de Dejeuner — 40 Couverts . . . ." . '134 

Menu de 20 Couverts . . . . . . . '135 

Menu de 15 Couverts . . . . . . . .136 

City Menus : 

Mansion House Menus : — 

Banquet to Her Majesty's Ministers, 1864 .... 139 

The Right Hon. Benjamin S. Phillips, Lord Mayor . . 140 




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VI 



CONTENTS. 



^^1 

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The Ri<,'ht Hon. Thomas Gabriel, Lord Mayor 

Baiu[uct to Her Majesty's Judges ...... 

Dinner to the Bishops, 1873 . . . . . . 

Bancjuet to the Mayors and Provosts of the United Kingdom, 1874 

Banquet to the Representatives of Literature, Art, and Science 

Dinner to Her Majesty's Ministers, 1874 

Sherifls' Banquets : — 

Inaugural Banquet of Mr. H. N. Nissen . 

Dejeuner at Salters' Hall 

Inauguration Banquet of Mr. Sydney H. Waterlow, 1866 

Bancjuet at Salters' Hall, 1866 

City Companies' Menus : — 

Goldsmiths' Hall 

Merchant Taylors' Hall, 1866 . , 

Merchant Taylors' Hall, 1865 .... 

Merchant Taylors' Hall, 1864 .... 

The Worshipful Society of Apothecaries . 

Salters' Hall 

Banquet to H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh 

The Worshipful Company of Salters 

The Worshipful Company of Fruiterers . 

The Worshipful Company of Leathersellers 

Cordwainers' Hall ....... 

The Worshipful Company of Weavers . . 

The Worshipful Company of Distillers . 

The Worshipful Company of Brewers 

Dinner to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales . 

Dinner to Prince Ai'thur 

Ball to the Prince and Princess of Wales — Supper Menu 

Banquet to the Patriarch of Antioch 

Banquet to Her Majesty's Judges, 1874 

Whitebait Menus : 

The Cobden Clul), 1868 

"The Lancet " ....... 

June 

May 31st . . 



PAGE. 

141 
142 

143 
144 

145 
146 

147 
149 

150 

153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 

159 
160 
161 

162 

163 
164 

165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 



174 
174 
175 
176 



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CONTENTS. Vll 



PAGE. 

The Ship, Greenwich, May 31st, 1876 . . . . -177 

The Trafalgar, Greenwich, May, 1874 178 

The Trafalgar, Greenwich, June, 1874 • • • • -179 

Sir E. R. and Lady Jodrell 180 

The Worshipful Company of Brewers 181 

Manchester, Sheffield, and Lincolnshire Railway Company . 182 
The Chairman and Directors of the Imperial Fire and Life 

Insurance Company . 183 

Diner Maigre 187 

For Twenty .......... 190 

Menus for All the Year Round : 

January — 

Diner pour Dix Personnes 196 

The London Tavern 197 

February — 

Famille Royale d'Espagne 202 

Service a la Russe . . . . . . . . . 205 

March — 

Reform Club, March, 1854 . . . . . , . 209 

Reform Club, March, 1^70 210 

April— 

"Visit of the Prince of Wales to Crossness Point . . .220 

Great Western Hotel, Birmingham 221 

May — 

Royal Literary Fund, 1872 226 

July— 

Dejeuner par le Sultan a S. A. I. le Prince Jerome Napoleon . 243 

August — 

Diners Maigres 250 

September — 

Diners Maigres 254 

October — 

Coronation Banquet of the King and Queen of Prussia . . 260 

Opening Dinner of Her Majesty's Theatre .... 261 

London Hospital College Club 262 





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CONTENTS. 



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PAGE. 

City Board of Cuardians to the Chairman, James Abbiss, Esq. 263 

Complimentary Bancjuet to the Duquc de Saldanha . . 264 

Xo-j'tmbt'r — 

Farewell Bantjuct to Charles Dickens 268 

Vingt Couverts 272 

December — 

Diners Maigres . . -274 

Fin-Bkc's Scrap Book : 

The Red Herring 281 

The Dinner Table of the Nouveau Riche 282 

Bog Butter . . .282 

Canvas-Back Ducks 283 

I-'usion ........... 283 

Sir Theodore Mayerne's City of London Pie .... 286 

Gravy ........... 287 

Two Cooks .......... 290 

A Duck Pie 290 

Prince Napoleon's Kitchen ....... 290 

Prices in the Good Old Times .291 

A Snail Market 291 

The Fate of a Pieman . . . . . . . . 292 

Sparkling Hock . 292 

A Siere Dinner . . . ' . . . . . . 296 

Lion Ham as the Piece de Resistance 297 

Shot in Bottles 298 

How the Pope Lives 299 

Noyes Browne on the Closing of Philippe's in January, 1875 . 301 




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INTRODUCTION. 




AREME, in his day, was deemed a neces- 
sary presence at the congresses of Aix- 
la-Chapelle, Laybach, and Verona. Who 
shall say that he exercised no influence 
at these diplomatic gatherings r After a 
dinner conceived and cooked by a Careme the mind 
is disposed to calm judicial action ; for, be it ob- 
served, the epicure abhors excess, and rises from his 
dinner as calm as a judge from the bench. Cooking 
for a congress, to whose hands the fate of nations 
is committed, is a solemn duty. A bad dish may 
twist a protocol ; a tough ' bird may make an un- 
yielding plenipotentiary. It was in this way that 
Careme, among others, understood his art, and 
practised it. When he was in the service of the 

B 




Prince Regent, his master observed to him one 
morning : — 

" Careme, the dinner yesterday was succulent. I 
find everything you offer, me delicious; but you will 
make me die of indigestion." 

Careme replied, "Prince, my duty is to , tempt, to 
flatter your appetite, and not to regulate it.'' 

Such an eater as the finest gentleman in Europe was 
not worthy of Careme. He preferred the delicacy 
and moderation at table of such masters as Talley- 
rand and Rothschild. He was in Rothschild's house 
for five years, and he observed of it : — " There only 
people know how to live ! And Madame the Baroness 
Rothschild, who does the honours of this magnificent 
hospitality, deserves to be reckoned among the women 
who make you love to contemplate wealth, because 
of the charm and happiness she makes it yield to 
others, of the dignity of her habits, and of the delicate 
luxury of her table." 

The Epicure is the antithesis of the glutton: 
it is to the Epicure this book is addressed. He is 
simply the moderate, cultivated man who knows what 
to eat, and how to eat it. He is an economist also, and 
a hater of waste. He is to be found not only in great 



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INTRODUCTION. 



houses or West End clubs (where, by the way, the 
culinary art has been in a woeful state of decline the 
last few years), but in very humble quarters indeed, 
living with refinement on some little pension, which, 
in gross hands, would provide little better than 
a journeyman's fare. 

I remember a gentleman of the, fine old formal 
school, who had spoken to Napoleon, and known 
Louis Philippe well. He had been in Lafitte's 
house, and subsequently a banker on his own ac- 
count in, Brussels. The Revolution of 1830 ruined 
him, and he fled to London. He was a philosopher, 
and a gay one. He had the manners of an old 
French marquis, and they gave a grace to his thread- 
bare coat and rusty velvet waistcoat. He lived in a 
narrow street by Covent Garden, and in an attic. 
Yet, when he received you, he did the honours of his 
mansarde with the ceremony that had become second 
nature to him. He was too proud a man to apologise 
for the more than homeliness of his surroundings. 
They were accidents of fortune, which in no way 
affected the intercourse of gentlemen. They were 
just something to philosophise upon pleasantly, 
and to put in their place, which was far away from, 

M . ZJ 



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THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



and below the serious consideration of, a cultivated 
man. 

But my friend looked his best — ^when he was 
cooking ! He was a tall, spare man — very like De 
Lamartine in the face ; and he wore a black skull cap, 
an embroidered dressing-gown (which a marquis of 
historic name had given him many a long year ago), 
and a deep Regency stock. I have talked of Castle- 
reagh and Talleyrand, and the bad conduct of the 
Duke of York (who was the ruin of my friend's father), 
while this stately personage has whipped eggs for his 
omelette; and I have known him to pause with an 
, egg-shell in either hand, while he related a conver- 
sation that occurred between him and the Citizen 
King. Draining a shell, he would say : — 

" As empty, sir, as the pockets of His Royal High- 
ness the Duke of York.'' 

And in a minute there would be the music of the 
omelette in the pan. Presently the omelette, golden 
brown, and cooked a pointy would be upon the table. 
The old gentleman was great on salads, and had one, 
as he would relate, for a few pence, all the year round. 
It would be such a salad as no spendthrift was eating 
in Pall Mall that evening'. The arrangements for 

■ ^15 " \^C^ ] 

^ M. ' ^^ 




INTRODUCTION. 



^H 



coffee-making were of a learned kind. The old 
gentleman was for the biggin ; and he would throw off 
very eloquent periods on the loss of aroma, the too 
much roasting, the misuse of chicory. He had inven- 
ted a mustard, of which he was very proud; and he 
would carry a jar of it off with him when he dined en 
vzlle, and present it with many courtly phrases to his 
host. He dealt with the best shops in London, and 
he lived in as refined a manner in that Covent Garden 
back street as he had lived in his prosperous days 
when a chef worked for him. Yet his income was 
barely one hundred pounds a year.. 

Let it not be imagined for a moment that my 
venerable friend gave an undue time to the pleasures 
of the palate. He was a studious man. He used to 
frequent the great reading-room of Gliddon's divan, 
where he played his game of chess (he kept a set 
of dominoes in his room), and devoted his afternoons 
to solid reading, and to the writing of his experiences. 
I had arranged to help him in the preparation of his 
papers for publication, but death gently overtook 
him before the work was begun, and I could never 
discover where he had laid his treasures. Just enough 
remained to bury my friend. He had arranged it so, 




'^ 



"and he begged that his funeral should not exceed the 
money set aside for it by one shilling. 

" His late Royal Highness," he used to say, but not 
bitterly, " lies in Genoa velvet, but plain cloth will do 
for the son of his creditor." 

That noble old man was one for whom a Careme 
would have worked for nothing : he was such a , 
gentleman as I should be glad to find among those 
who will turn over this Book of Menus. It is, per- 
haps, in the hope, among others, of coming across 
other gentlemen similarly cultivated, who can receive 
the blows of fortune with a bow, and show their high 
breeding even under the slates of a mean lodging- 
house, that I have spread my menus for rich and 
poor, and that I have undertaken to discourse a little 
of that branch of refinement which has only of late 
years (1 niay say it without undue self-laudation, since 
I issued my Epicure's Year Book) received much 
attention in this country. The tendency towards the 
refinements (which are also the economics) of the table, 
that has recently manifested itself, has tempted me 
forth once more. For the last year or two I have been 
watching others steal and deface my ideas and pro- 
positions. I should not have broken silence again had 



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INTRODUCTION. 



these been only purloined, but I rebel a little at the 
disfigurement. 

And now I place myself in direct permanent 
communication with the public. I shall be glad to 
receive communications on all subjects referring even 
remotely to gastronomy. I promise that they shall 
receive my earnest attention, from season to season. 
I beg all readers who may be interested in my subject 
to communicate to me any gastronomic hints, reflec- 
tions, or menus that the season of 1876 may produce 
within their experience, in order that I may make 
my Book of Menus for the season of 1877 worthy 
of their attention. 







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THE epicure's ALMANACK. 



JANUARY. 



2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

' 7 
8 

9 

lO 

II 

12 

13 
14 
15 
i6 

17 
i8 

19 

20 
21 

22 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 
28 

29 

30 
31 



Henri Heine b. 1800. Grimod de la Reyniere founded the Almanach 
des Gourmands, 1803. 



Cardinal Fesch b. 1763. 

A Lion Banquet at the Restaurant Magny, Paris, 1875. See " Scrap- 
Book." 

Twelfth Cake Day. 

" Philippe's," in Paris, closed, 1875. 

Dinner given by the Prefect of the Seine to the Lord Mayor of 
London, 1875. 

Partridge shooting ends in Ireland. 

Felix, the confectioner, b. 

Talleyrand-Perigord b. 1754. 



St. Vincent, Patron of the Wine Grower. 

Prince SoltikofF b. 

Sir T. N. Talfourd b. 1795. 

Dr. Veron d. 1867. 







) 



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i 12 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



DINNER GIVEN BY THE PREFECT OF THE SEINE TO 
THE LORD MAYOR OF LONDON. 

January ()th, 1 875. 



Potages. 
Consomme a la Fran^aise. Bisque d'Ecrevisses. 



Petits Coulibiacs a la Russe. Caisses de Laitances a la Princesse. 

Turbots a la Normande. 



Dindes trufFes a la Perigord. Filets de Boeuf a la Macedoine. 

, Supremes de Volaille. 

Alouettes a la LucuUus. Aspic d'Homard a la Ravigote. 

Punch a la Romaine. 

Sorbets. 

Chevreuil, sauce venaison. Foie-gras de Strasbourg a la Bellevue. 

Salade Royale. Petits pois ^ I'Anglaise. 

Madeleines a la Parisienne. Gelee ^ la Marechale. 



EPICUREAN CALENDAR. 



January : Marrongla9aire. 
February : Harengsauridor. 
March : CEufalacoquidor. 
April: Petitpoisidor. 
May : Aspergial. 
June : Concombrial. 

^ (Proposed to the Rappel by the Evenement.) 

j,^ ■ ^x 



July: Melonial. 
August: Raisinose. 
September : Huitrose. 
Octobj:r: Becassinose. 
November : Pommedetaire. 
December : Boudinaire. 



•^^ 



THEOPHILE GAUTIER'S REPLY 

To AN Invitation to Dinner, sent to him by M. Garnier, the 

Architect of the New Opera in Paris. 



Garnier, grand maitre du fronton, 
De I'astragale et du feston, 
Mardi, lachant la mon planton, 
Du fond de mon lointain canton 
J'irai cliez toi, tardif pieton, 
Aidant mes pas de mon baton 
Et precede d'un mirliton, 
Duilius du feuilleton, 
Je viendrai, portant un veston 
jfadis couleur de hanneton, 
Sous mon plus ancien hoqueton. 
Les gants et le col en carton, 
Les poitrails a la Benoiton 
Et les diamants en bouton 
Te paraitraient de mauvais ton 
Pour ce fraternel gueuleton 
Qu'arrosera le piqueton. 
Que ce soit poule ou caneton, 
Perdrix aux choux ou miroton, 
Pate de veau froid ou de thon, 
Nids d'hirondelle de Canton 
Ou gousse d'ail sur un crouton, 
Faisan ou hachis de mouton, 
Pain bis, brioche ou paneton, 
Argenteuil ou Brane-Mouton, 
Cidre ou pale-ale de Burton, 
Chez LucuUus ou chez Cat on 
Je m'emplirai jusqu'au menton, 
Avalant tout comme un glouton 
Sans laisser un seul rogaton 



Pour la desserte ou marmiton. 
Pendant ce banquet de Platon, 
Melant Athene a Chareriton, 
, On parlera de "Wellington 
Et du soldat de Marathon, 
D'Aspasie ou de Mousqueton 
Et du saint-pere et du santon ; 
Chacun lancera son dicton. 
AUant du char de Phaeton 
Aux locomotives de Crampton, 
De Vlliade a VOncle Tom 
Et de Babylone a Boston. 
A tres grand'peine saura-t-on 
Si c'est du basque ou du teuton, 
Du Sanscrit ou du bas-breton... 
Puis', vidant un dernier rhyton, 
Le tenor ou le baryton. 
Plus faux qu'un cornet ^ piston, 
Sur Pair de : Tontaine, tonton, 
Chantera Philis ou Gothon 
Jusqu'a I'heure o\x. le vieux Titon 
Chasse I'Aurore au frais teton. 
Mais il faut finir ce centon 
A la maniere d' Hamilton, 
Oil j'ai, pour mieux rimer en ton. 
Fait de la muse Jeanneton, 
Dans mon fauteuil a capiton, 
En casaque de moUeton, 
CoifFe d'un bonnet de coton, 
Je m'endors et je signe : Ton... 




Ami de coeur et de plume, 

TnfeOPHILE Gautier. 






T< 



^ 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



FEBRUARY. 



1 Salmon fishing begins. Partridge and Pheasant shooting ends. 

2 Le Gastronome founded by P. L. Jacob and Charles Lemesle, 1830. 

Only complete copy in the National Library, Paris. Brillat- 
Savarin d. 1826. 

3 

4 
5 

6 Banquet Hippophagique, Grand Hotel, Paris, 1865.- 

7 ^ 



9 

10 Rabelais, b. 1483. , 
n 

12 Banquet to Her Majesty's Judges, Fishmongers' Hall, 1874. -^^^ 
" City Menus." 

13 Partridges pair. 

14 Very b. 

15 
16 

17 Henri Heine d. 1856. 

18 Charles Lamb b. 1775. 
19 

'20 Chinese banquet to cigar-makers at San Francisco, 1875. 
21 Prevost, the inventor of galantine, b. 
22 

23 

24 The monk Chabot, inventor of the omelette puree-de pintade, b. 

25 Pancake day. 

26 Dr. Kitchiner, author of "The Cook's Oracle," d. 

27 Hare hunting ends. 

28 Veuve Clicquot b. 
29 

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THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 



15 




MENU POETIQUE DE LA^ VOGUE. 

BECASSES A LA PAMELA. 



Trois becasses assez " faites.^' 
Pour bien saisir I'odorat 
(Fumet qui les rend parfaites) 
Par leur dos on ouvrira : 
Des "intestins " on fera, 
Avec trufFes epicees, 
Une farce qu'on rendra 
Aux becasses qui, lacees 
(Chacune a I'aide du bee), 
Et sur un feu vif placees, 
Cuiront au Madere sec 

Les trois becasses dressees 
Contre un pain frit, couleur d'or. 



Comme trois caryatides 
Soutiendront trois pyramides 
De truffes du Perigord ! 



De ce fin mets, I'origine 
Vient des temps ou se mela 
Aux modes, a la cuisine 
(En succes on fait cela), 
Le nom de quelque heroine : 

Tout fut " « la Pamela ! " 

Puisqu'aujourd'hui Ton raffine, 

Servons "becasses a la 

" Miss Multon ou Seraphine ! " 
J. ROUYER. 



BANQUET HIPPOPHAGIQUE, GRAND HOTEL, PARIS.* 
February 6, 1865. 

POTAGE. 

Vermicelle au Consomme de Cheval. Hors-d'CEuvre de table varies. 

RELEVES. 

Saumon, sauce hoUandaise. 

Culotte de Cheval bouillie, garnie de Choux. 

Cheval en Boeuf a la Mode. 

ENTREES. 

Hachis de Cheval a la Menagere. Poularde, sauce supreme. 

ROTS. 

Sorbets Mousseux au Kirsch. ^Sorbets Mousseux au Kirsch. 

Filets de Cheval Bigarres (sauce Xeres a part). 

Salades de Saison. 

Pates de Foie de Cheval aux TrufFes. 

ENTREMETS. 

Petits Pois a la Frangaise. Abricots a la Portugaise. 

GLACE. 

Parfait au Cafe. 

DESSERT. 

VINS. 

Madere. Bordeaux de table. Sauterne. Beaune superieur. 

CAFE ET LIQUEURS. 

* One hundred and thirty-two doctors, professors, savants, and journalists sat 
down to dinner. ^The price per couvert was fifteen francs. 



V^S 



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1 6 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



MR. WALKER'S PLAIN CHOICE DINNER. 

By way of illustration of what I have said on the subject of plain choice 
dinners, I give an account of one I once gave in the chambers of a 
friend of mine in the Temple, to a party of six, all of whom were accus- 
tomed to good living, and one of whom was bred at one of the most 
celebrated tables in London. The dinner consisted of the following 
dishes, served in succession, and with their respective adjuncts carefully 
attended to. First, spring soup from Birch's (now Ring and Br3aner's) 
on Comhill, which, to those who have never tasted it, I particularly 
recommend in the season, as being quite delicious ; then a moderate-sized 
turbot, bought in the City, beautifully boiled, with first-rate lobster-sauce, 
cucumber, and new potatoes ; after that, ribs of beef from Leadenhall 
Market, roasted to a turn, and smoldng from the spit, with French 
beans and salad ; then a very fine dressed crab ; - and lastly some jelly. 
* * * The dessert, I think, consisted only of oranges and biscuits, 
followed by occasional introductions of anchovy toast. The vdnes were 
champagne, port, and claret. I have had much experience in the dinner 
way, both at large and at small parties, but I never saw such, a vividness 
of conviviality, either at or after dinner, which I attribute principally to 
the real object of a dinner being the only one studied ; state, ornament, 
and superfluity being utterly excluded. * * * The party consisted 
of Lord Abinger, then Sir James Scarlett; Sir John Johnstone, the present 
member for Scarborough; Mr. Young, private secretary to Lord 
Melbourne ; Mr. R. Bell, of the firm of Bell Brothers, who occupied the 
chambers and acted as caterer; and lastly, my excellent friend, the late 
honourable George Lamb, whose good-humoured convivial qualities were 
held in high estimation by all who knew him and who on this occasion 
outshone himself. — The Original^ 1835.* 

* The Original. By Thomas Walker, M.A. Edited by Blanchard Jerrold. (Grant 
and Co., 1874). Vol. II., page 204. 



^ M 



MARCH. 



2 Horace Walpole d, 1797. Fin-Bee's Banquet at the Pall Mall 
Restaurant, 1872. 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 Chef Plumerey b. Reform Club Dinner to Vice- Admiral Sir C, 
Napier, 1854. 



10 
II 
12 

13 
14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 
20 
21 
22 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sir T. N. Talfourd d. 1854. Woodcock last seen. 



Dinner given by the Goldsmiths' Company to the Prince of Wales, 
1873. ,5"^^ "City Menus." 

Antonin Careme b. Inaugural Dinner of the Patent Cork Company, 
Limited, 1872. 



Prince de Soubise b. 
Lady Day. 



Lampern fishing ends. Fin-Bee Dinner chez Philippe, 1869. 



V' 



-y 



T 




^*^ve^ 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




a< 



FIN-BEC CHEZ PHILIPPE. 

Huitres Marennes. 
Chablis Moutonne. 



Radis. 



Crevettes. 



Hi 






Potage Printanier. 

Saucisson de Lyon. 

Medoc. 



Hareng de Hollande. 



Cotelettes a la Maintenon. 

Ris de Veau Financiere. Poulet Gras du Mans. 

Nuits. 



Petits Pois a la Fran9aise. 

Parfait au Cafe. Camenbert. 

Moet et Chandon. 



Fraises. 
Grande Chartreuse. 



Kiimel. 



FIN-BEC'S BANQUET. 

Pall. Mall Restaurant. March 2nd, 1872. 

Les Huitres. 



Printanier. 
Bisque aux Homards, 



Filets de Saumon a la d'Aumale. 
Coquilles de Filets de Soles. 



Kromeskie de Foie-gras. 

Ris de Veau pique aux Epinards. 

Snipes a la Fin-Bee. 



9 



Pommes nouvelles au four. 
Asperges. Artichauts. 



Poulets farcis a TAllemande. 

Jambon d'York braise. 

Salade de laitue Francaise. 



Savarin au Kirsch. 

Bombe glace. 
Fondu de Pai-mesan. 
Dessert de Fruits. 





MACARONI A LA NICOLO. 

Extrait d'un livre de cuisine deterre par Gyges et que je prends la liberie 
de dedier a M. Hippolyte de Villemessant, redacteur-expert assermente 
pres la cour des Hau'ts-Fourneaux : — , 

Macaroni a la Nicolo. 

Votre macaroni etant cuit ^ point et convenablement egoutte, ayez une 
petite seringue et injectez chaque tuyau de moelle de boeuf, ajoutez-y des 
^ petits morceaux de foie-gras et de truftes. 

Ce plat demande a etre mange lentement et une main sur les yeux, pour 
eviter les distractions. 

Une main sur les yeux ! Figaro. 



INAUGURAL DINNER OF THE PATENT CORK COMPANY, 
LIMITED. 

Pall Mall Restaurant. March iph, 1872. 

Bisque d'Homard. 
Printanier. 



Truite. 



Filet pique au Beurre d'Anchois. 



Foie de Caneton aux trufies. 
Cotelettes de Veau a la Bechamel. 



Poulet a I'AUemande. 
Asperges en branches. 



Croute ^ 1' Ananas. 
Ponding a la Nesselrode. 






c 2 





20 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



APRIL. 



I Trout fishing in Thames begins. 
2 

3 Horse, mule, and donkey banquet at the Grand Hotel, Paris, 1875. 

4 Dr. Gastaldy b. — Game licence expires. — Dinner to the Prince of 

Wales, on his visit to Crossness Point, by the Metropolitan 
Board of Works, 1865. 

5 

6 • 

7 Tortoni b. 
8 

9 Rabelais d. 1553. 
10 
II 
12 The famous Trois Freres Proven^aux finally closed, 1872. 

13 

14 

15 Grey plover appears. 

16 

17 
18 

19 Liebig d. 1873. 

20 Eel fishing begins. 

21 Judgment of the jury of Gourmands delivered on the Abbevile eel pies 

of M. Richard, 1807. 
22 

23 Shakespeare dinners in England and America. 
24 

25 

26 

27 Prince de Metternich, proprietor of the Johannisberg cru, b. 

28 

29 

30 Brillat-Savarin b. 



T 




*^ 



M 



THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 






21 



HORSE, MULE, AND DONKEY BANQUET. 

April 3, 1875. 

Grand Hotel, Paris. 

MENU. 

POTAGE. 

Le consomme aux Trois Animaux DifFames. 

HORS d'ceuvre. 
Les Saucissons de Cheval aux Piments des Anglais. 

releves. 

Le Tnrbot a la sauce algerienne. 

Le Filet de Cheval Bor^k roti a I'Orientale. 

L'Aloyau de Coursier a la Phebus. 

entrees. 

Les Langues de Cheval, de Mulct, et d'Ane a la Cosaque. 

Le Fricandeau d'Oreilles d'Ane braise. 

Le Filet de Mulct a la Gelee Obstinee. 

ROT. 

Poulardes truffees. 
Salade a I'Huile Chcvaline. 

entremets. 

Les Cepes sautes a I'Entente Cordiale. 

Les Asperges en branches a la sauce presidente. 

Les Sylphides a la Reine des Fleurs. 

Les Croutes Triomphales. 



Longchamps. — Pons Asinorum. — Chantilly. 
Les Sorbets aux Grands Mulcts du Mont Blanc. 

DESSERT ASSORT!. 



VINS. 

Haut-Sauteme. — Pomard. — Saint-Emillion. — Medoc vieux en carafe. 
Champagne frappe. — Madere. 






/ 



^ 



^ 



m 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




TWO SPRING MENUS, 

RECOMMENDED BY 

CHARLES MONSELET. 



Le Potage Chantilly (petits pois nouveaux). 

Le Hors d'oeuvre. 

La Tmite saumonee. 

Le Poulet a la diable. 

Sorbets a ralkermes. 

Le Gigot de pie-sale. 

Le Jamb on d'York aux epinards. 

Les Haricots verts a la maitre d'hotel. 

Les Celeris frits. 

La Charlotte russe au the.* . 

Dessert. 



Le Potage a I'aurore. 

Les radis en decoupure, 

Les Poles de canard, sauce madere. 

Les Cotelettes d'Agneau, aux violettes grillees.f 

Le Chapon. 

La Salade de Laitue aux oeufs. 

Les Guocchi au Parmesan. 

Les Asperges en. branche. 

La Bombe a I'Espagnole. 

Dessert. 



* A most delicate entremet. — Fin-Bec. 

t Charles Monselet, who ate this dinner last April, explains that the potage is a 
puree of carrots ; and that the grilled violets were a pleasant excursion away from 
the flat road of routine. 




n 



-i) 



^ 



«-: _ , . "■ ->.- T 

-^OTTT* \ \ ' ' '^TTTOH* 

m 



THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 23 



WHITEBAIT : BLANCHAILLE OR BLANQUETTE. 

"The Pall Mall Gazette, \xv reviewing M. Esquiros' ' Guide to Great Britain 
and Ireland,' notices that the author, in speaking of whitebait, gives it the 
French name of bla?iquette, whilst on the English-French bills of fare it is 
always called blanchaille. If this is so, and if we may rely on the authority 
of the best French lexicons, the' Greenwich hotelier has been all the while 
doing a shameful injury to the fair fame of this most delicate lilliputian fish, 
for blanchaille is not the name of an animal sui generis, but a mere 
synonym oi fretin (fry!) According to the Academy, Bescherelle, &c., 
the true appellation is blanquet or blanquette. In Flanders, where white- 
bait are caught in the Scheldt near the mouth of the Durme, they bear the 
French provincial name of mange-tout, a very appropriate expression too : 
the Flemish name is pin, as an allusion, perhaps, to the diminutiveness of 
their form. The way to prepare pin in those localities is quite primitive, 
though the only one agreeable to the taste of the country ^oi^r?;?^^^; — Of 
every little fish the tail is clipped off with scissors ; boiling water is kept 
ready on the fire, and the whitebait cast into it ; at the first bubbling 
of the water, which happens in an instant, the fish are strained and dished 
up. Melted butter is the only sauce. Some people consider pin to be 
young smelt, but the fishers hold a contrary opinion." — J. Van DE 
Velde. — Notes and Queries. 

HOT PLATES IN PARIS. 

M!r. Disraeli once observed that the best dinners in Paris were spoiled 
owing to the absence of hot plates. The observation was true : but now 
in some good houses and restaurants hot plates are to be had. 




:t 



^-ffi- 



^^ 



:;:;;^ 



^^ 



K 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



MAY. 



9 

10 

II 

12 

13 
14 
15 
i6 

17 

i8 

19 
20 

21 
22 

23 

24 

25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Trout fishing begins. 

Colnet (author oi UArt de diner en Ville) b. 

Baron Brisse b. Opening dinner of the Burlington, 1864. 

Pheasants lay. 

6'^^Dunan b. 

S oyer's diner Lucullusien a la Sampayo, Reform Club, 1846. 



Nestor Roqueplan b. 

Cardinal Fesch d. 1839. Partridges lay. 



Camerani b. 



The first number of " The Original " by Thomas Walker appeared, 
1835.— Talleyrand-Perigord d.— Balzac b. 1799. 

International Horticultural Exhibition and Botanical Congress 
Banquet, at Guildhall, 1866. 



Alexandre Dumas b. 1802. 
Marquis de Bechamel b. 



Honey bees swarm. 



Berchoux (author of La Gastronomie) b. 



4=w 






THE EPICURE* S ALMANACK. 25 



THE INAUGURAL DINNER OF THE BURLINGTON. 

Wednesday, May \th, 1864. 

POTAGES. 

A la Tortue claire et liee. Printanier aux Quenelles. 

A la Du Barry. 

POISSONS. 

Le Saumon, sauce hoUandaise. 

Le Turbot, sauce homard. Les Rougets a I'ltalienne. 

Les Filets de Soles ^ la Vert Pre. 

ENTRIES. 

Les Boudins ^ la Richelieu. 

Les Petits P^tes aux Huitres. Les Petits Pains a la Dumanoir. 

Les Ris de Veau ^ la Parisienne. 

Les Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Les Supremes de Volaille a I'Ecarlate. 

RELEVES. 

La Selle de Mouton. 

Le Sirloin de Boeuf, Les Quartiers d'Agneau. 

Les Poulardes %. la Maillot. 

ROTS. 

Les Canetons. Les Poulets. 

Les Aspics d'Homard: 

Les Petits Pois. Les Asperges en Branches. 

ENTREMETS. 

Les Gel^es au Kirsch. Les Poudings a la Coburg. 

La Charlotte Russe. 

Les Cremes Diplomatiques. Les Meringues ^ la Creme. 

Les Tourtes au Citron. Les Savarins au Marasquin. 

Les Bombes ^ la Maximilien. 

Glaces. Dessert. 



vHs m) 

■ — -^.-^..-^ , ^ 

. ' — . — »_— ^ 



■«r 



r" 



I 



■^ 



26 



THE 3OOK OF MENUS. 



INTERNATIONAL HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITION AND 
BOTANICAL CONGRESS. 



BANQUET AT GUILDHALL. 

22^2^ May, 1866. 

Turtle. Clear Turtle. 



Cotelettes de Saumon a I'Indienne. 



Turbot and Lobster Sauce. 



Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 
Supremes de Volaille aux Pointes d'Asperges. 
Cailles en Petites Caisses aux TrufFes. 



Capons braises aux Champignons. Jambons sautes au Vin. 

Baron of Beef. 



Haunch of Venison. 



Ducklings. 



Gelees au Vin. Cremes a la Vanille. Plum Pudding. 

CEufs de Pluviers en buisson. Meringues a la Fran9aise 

Brioches au Fromage. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 



WINES. 

Sherry — Vino de Pasto. Champagne— Ruinart's Carte Blanche. 

Hock— Steinwein. Claret— Chateau La Rose. 

Port— Sandeman. Sauteme— Chateau Yquem. 



Marascjhino* 



LIQUEURS, 

Curagoa. 



Brandy. 



Dessert and Ices. 



K 
^ 



m 



®-* 



f\9$ 



i i 



THE EPICURE'S ALMANACK. 






27 



JUNE. 



2 De Montmaur b. 

3 Robert (inventor of the sauce) b. ; buried in Pere la Chaise ; note 

epigraph. 

4 

5 Pheasants hatch. 

6 

7 Siraudin, dramatist and confectioner, b. 

8 

9 
10 
II 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 Maille (inventor of the Moutarde Maille) b. 

23 
24 

25 Show of Dinner Table Decorations at Birmingham, 1872. 
26 

27 " Our Club " Dinner. The Trafalgar, Greenwich, 1874.— Sir J. Ben- 

nett's and Sir F. W. Truscott's Banquet to the Judges, 18-2. 

28 ' ' 
29 



30 Aime Picot (the great truffle eater) b. 



V 



M 







THE TRAFALGAR, GREENWICH. 



Samedi, Juin 27, 1874. 



OUR CLUB. 



POTAGES. 



Lord Marcus Hill. 



Printanier. 



POISSONS. 

Souchets. 
Carrelets, Saumon. 

Fritures. 

Rissolettes d'Homard. Anguilles a la Diable. 

Petites Soles. Carrelets, 

Entrees, 

Anguilles etuvees a la Bordelaise. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a la Trafalgar. Raie en Kari au Riz. 

Omelette a la Trafalgar. Truite ^ la Tartare. 

Saumon ^ la Norvegienne. Les Ablettes. 



Second Service. 

Cailles en Compote aux TrufFes. Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Pois Verts. 

Selle de Mouton. Canetons. 

Beans and Bacon. 

entremets sucr^s. 

patisserie Fran9aise. Gelee au Vin. 

Gateaux fondant. Ponding glace a la Macedoine. 

GLACES. 

L'Eau d'Orange. Creme aux Praises. 

DESSERT. 








SIR JOHN BENNETT'S AND SIR FRANCIS W. TRUSCOTT'S 
BANQUET TO HER MAJESTY'S JUDGES, 1872. 



Tortue claire. Tortue liee. 

Consomme a la Royale. 



Saumons a la sauce homard. Turbots Hollandaise. 

Epigrammes de Rougets. Ablettes Frites. 



Croustades a la Moelle aux Fines Herbes. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. Ris de Veau Piques. 

Pointes d'Asperges. Salmis de CaiUes aux Olives, 



Chapons si la Perigueux. Jambons aux Feves. Langues. 

Poulets Printaniers aux Choux-Fleurs. Hanches de Venaison. 

Haricots Verts. Pommes de Terre NouveUes. 



Second Service. 
Canetons. Pintades. Oisillons. Asperges. Pois Verts. 



Macedoines de Fruits. Charlottes Celestines. Tartelettes d'Abricots. 

Gateaux d'Ambroisie. Croutes a 1' Ananas. 

Gelees de Peches. Tourtes de Cerises. Bavarois a la Cintra. 

Poudings glaces. 



Pines. Peaches. Apricots. Nectarines. Grapes. 

Strawberries. Cherries. 

Zephyrs. Polonaises. Venuses. Cupids. 

Coffee granito. Cherry Water Ice. Strawberry Ice Cream. 



Iced Punch. T. E. Madeira. Sauterne. Chablis. 

Liebfraumilch. Piper Sec. Piper tres Sec. 

Moet. Perrier-Jouet. St. Marceaux. Burgundy. Amontillado. 

Gold Sherry. Volnay. Chdteau Yquem. 



Chateau Margaux, 1857. Port, 1847. E. T. Sherry. 



>1 


4l|^,;r __« 


— -^1 


__3 


/ 


'm 


"^ 




L 

1 


30 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 


. ) 






SOUTH KENSINGTON. 








yune 15, 1875. 








POTAGES. 








Tortue et Tortue claire. 




1 




POISSONS. 






1 
1 


Saumon, sauce homard. Les Rougets a I'ltaUenne. 
Whitebait. 








ENTRIES. 






<\ 


. Petits Pates de Foie-gras. 
Ris de Veau piques aux pointes d'Asperges. 
Salmi de CaiUes, a la Portugale. 




1 




RELEVES. 
Chapon a la Plessy. Selle de Mouton. 








ROTS. 


• 






Canards. Levrauts. 








ENTREMETS. 








Mayonnaise d'Homard. Boudin a la Tedworth. 

Gelee de Marasquin. Creme d' Ananas. 

Les Fraises k la Creme glace. 




i 
1 

1 




RELEVfS. 




J. 




Souffle glace ^ la VaniUe. Ramequins de Fromage au Parmesan 








GLACE. 








Napolitaine. 




i 


\ 


( ■ " 


W 

M. 


—JL 


'^ 


T^^ ; 




■=? 



H} 



^:ZL 



i^r^if 



€H 



THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 



31 



PARK STREET. 



Menu du 2^ Juin. 



Tortue claire. 



POT AGES. 

Creme de Petits Pois a la Princesse. 
POISSONS. 



Saumon froid, sauce genoise. Filets de Soles a la Cardinal. 

Whitebait. 

ENTREES. 

Filets de Volaille aux Tmffes. Ris de Veau en Artichauts. 

Cailles a 1' Aspic. 

RELEVES. 

Les Petits Poulets et Langue. 
Handle de Venaison. 



Punch a la Romaine. 



Canetons au Cresson. Ortolans. Asperges, sauce hollandaise. 

Jambon froid. Petits Pois a I'Anglaise. 

ENTREMETS. 

Gateau a la Napolitaine. Gelee au Champagne. 

Souffle d'Ananas glace. 



Tcs Tartelettes de Fromagc, Caviar au Pain. 

DESSERT. 

Glaccs Napolitaincs. 






■ ' ^-^CB - 

THE BOOK OF MENUS. 
JULY. 



2 Haberdashers' Company's Dinner to Prince Arthur, 1873. See 

" City Menus." 

3 Vefbur b. 

4 Prince de Soubise d. 1787. — Ball given to the Prince and Princess 

of Wales by the Goldsmiths' Company, 1873. See " City Menus." 

5 

6 Dejeuner offered by the Sultan to Prince Jerome Napoleon, 1868. — 
Young partridges fledged. 



9 
10 First Dinner of "The World," 1875. 
II 

12 The Acclimatisation Society of Great Britain's Dinner, Willis's 

Rooms, 1862. 

13 Dinner given by the Great Western Railway Directors to the Mon- 

mouthshire Railway Directors, 1875. 

IS 

16 The Rouher Dinner, 1862. See *'The Epicure's Year-Book," by 
Fin-Bee. 

17 

18 

19 
20 

21 Lord Mayor Lusk's Banquet to representatives of Literature, Art, 

and Science, 1874. 
22 

23 

24 

25 Prince de Conde (Potage Conde) b, 

26 

27 • 

28 

29 

30 Samuel Rogers b. 1763, 

31 



V 



^- ' — s ' — T 



I 



* 






THE epicure's ALMANACK. S3 

MENUS BY THE WAY. 
Hotel de l'Univers, Brussels. 



I. — Menu du 9 Juillet. 
Potage Pres Vertes. 
Turbot HoUandaise. Bouchees Crevettes, 



Gigot Haricots Verts. Salmi Canard Sauvage. 

Macaroni au: Gratin. 



Noix de Veau, sauce tomate. Poulet roti. Salade 

Homard, sauce mayonnaise. Gateau Duchess e. 

Abricots, Reine Claude. 



2. — Menu du 10 Juillet. 
Potage Vermicelle. 



Salade Hareng. Maquereau Maitre d'Hotel. 

Filet, puree Pomme de Terre. Cotelettes Pore, sauce Robert. 

Poulet a la Dauphine. 



Celeri au Jus. Pluvier Dorg. 



Compote de Poire. Gateaux. 

Dessert, Raisin. 



3. — Menu du II Juillet. 
Potage Julienne. 



Boucbees a la Reine. 



Saumon, sauce capres. 



Filet, sauce beamaise. Pommes de Terre Duchesse. 

Ris de Veau Napolitaine. Chevreuil, sauce venaison. 

Poulet roti. ► Salade Romaine. 



Creme Bavaroise. 



Dessert, Raisin. 

D 



^~ — . ; J ^ ^ 



•5-© 
/ 



Tl 



.^i 



t. 



3+ 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



) ,, 



MENUS BY THE WAY. 

4. — Menu du 12 Juillet, 
Potage Macaroni. 



Raie, Beurre Noir. 



Roast Beef ^ I'Anglaise with Pickles, 

Hareng Sale^ Haricots Verts. 

Cotelettes de Veau ^ I'Allemande. Poulet Chasseur, 



Choux-Fleurs, sauce blanche. 
Canard Sauvage. Salade Romaine. Gdteau Punch. 



Dessert, Prunes. 



Restaurant Saulnier, Brussels. 

5. — Menu du 13 Juillet. 
Potage pate d'ltaHe. 



Bouchees a la Reine. 
Turbot, sauce hollandaise. Chateaubriand Beamaise. 



Cotelettes Mouton aux Petits Pois. 



Snipe. 



Lobster, sauce mayonnaise. Salade. 

Dessert, Poires, Gateaux, Abricots, etc. 

Rudesheimer, St. Julien, 



Hotel de Hollande, Bade. 



Truite au Bleu. 
Salmi de Caneton. 

Poularde. 
. Ponding. 



6. — Menu du 20 Juillet, 

Potage Vermicelle. 

Gigot Bretonne. 



Mauerwein. 



Soubise. 
Artichauts. 

Glace. 

Dessert. 

Apfenthaler. 



Filet de Boeuf. 

Salade. 
Patisserie. 

Assmanhaiiser. 



i. 



■t 



Mi 



©^ 



THE epicure's ALMANACK. 35 



DINNER GIVEN BY THE 

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY DIRECTORS TO THE 

MONMOUTHSHIRE RAILWAY DIRECTORS. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue liee. Tortue claire. 

Consomme h la ChifFonade. 

POISSONS. 

Saumon bouilli, sauce homard. 

Filets de Truite k la Genevoise. 

BlanchaiUe frite. 

ENTRilES. 

Rissolettes de Foie-gras. 

Ris de Veau piques ^ la Diad^me. 

C6telettes d'Agneau aux Haricots verts. 

Supreme de Poulet a I'Ecarlate. 

RELEVfS. 

Hanche de Venaison. 

Chapons braises a la Milanaise. 

Tranches de Jambon au Vin de Champagne. 

Filet de boeuf pique' aux Legumes. 

ROTS. ^ 

Canetons. CaiUes. Levraut. 

Fends d'Artichauts h I'ltalienne. Petits Pois. 

ENTREMETS. 

Salade h. la Russe. Chartreuse de Fraises. 

Pouding a la Victoria. Gelee aux Framboises. 

Vol au Vent aux Abricots. Gelee au Marasquin. 

RELEVfS. 

Savarin aux Cerises. Baba au Rhum. 

Pouding glace. 

Charlotte Russe au Gingembre. 

Croutes a ITndienne. 

Batons de Fromage. 

GLACES. 

Ananas k la Creme. Cerise a I'Eau. 

D 2 

^m . m 



■«■ 



^ 




MENU DU DINER 
Du Juillet 10, 1875. 



POTAGES. 



Crecy aux Croutons. 
Printanier. 



POISSONS. 

Saumon boulli, sauce hbmard. 
Filets de Soles a la Joinville. 
Whitebait. 

ENTRIES. 

Supreme de Volaille a I'Ecarlate. 

Gotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Cailles en Aspic. 

RELEVfiS. 

SeUe de Mouton. 
Bacon and Beans. 

r6t. 
Caneton. 






ENTREMETS. 

Baba au Rhum. 
Ponding glace. 






■©-* 



4- 



.. ( 



r¥^7 



THE epicure's ALMANACK. 



37 



AUGUST. 



Count d'Orsay d. 1852. — Banquet at Mansion House to Her Majesty's 

Ministers, 1875. 
Oyster season opens^for those who can eat oysters in any condition. 



7 Oysters reached London — ^instead of the 4th — 1872. 



9 
10 
II 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 

18 



Grouse shooting begins. 



Horace Raisson (author of the Code Gourmand) b. 



20 Balzac d. 1850. — Blackcock shooting begins. 

21 

22 

24 Theodore Hook d. 1841. — ^Lampem fishing begins. 

25 Saint Louis — Fete of the cooks. 
26 

27 Jules GoufFe's " Livre des Soupes " appeared, 1875. 

28 

29 

30 

31 First arrivals of oysters at the Central Markets, Paris, 1872. 



"( 



♦K^ 



TT 



®-5- 




•t 



~ ^ — -^ 

THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



BANQUET TO HER MAJESTY'S MINISTERS AT THE 
MANSION HOUSE. 



August 4, 1875. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue et Tortue claire. 

POISSONS. 

Rougets au Vin de Bordeaux. 

Cotelettes . de Saumon d, I'Hindoustan. 

Saumon de Gloster ^ la Tartare. 

Turbot, sauce d'homard. 

ENTRIES. 

Petites Bouchees de Crevettes. ' 
Filets de Cailles au Vinde Bourgogne. 
Ris d'Agneau aux Petits Pois. - 

Petits Poulets au Macedoine, • ■ -^ " 

Poularde a la Perigueux. Jambon d'York. 

RELEVfS. 

SeUe de Mouton. Quartier d'Agneau. 

ROTS. . : 

Canetons. Oisons. Dindonneaux piques. 

ENTREMETS. ' 

Chaudfroid a la Strasbourg. 

Meringues a la Creme. Gelees claires. 

Gateaux aux Amandes a la Princesse. 

Suedoise ^ la Modeme. J ' 

Beignets aux Ananas. 

RELEVfS. 

Plombieres a la Regence. Souffles glaces. 

Ramequins. 




THE EPICURE'S ALMANACK. 




MENUS BY THE WAY. 

Hotel des Trois Rois, Bale. 
J. — Menu du 21 Aout. 

Potage Crecy. 

Ferra, sauce hollandaise. 

Rosbif a F Anglais. 

Petits Pates a la Bourgeoise. 

Poulet Marengo. 

Lard au Chou. 

Chevreuil Salade. 

Tourre au Pomme. 

Compote. Patisserie. Dessert. 

Neuchatel (Cru de la Ville). Vin du, Glacier. 



2. — Menu du 22 Aout. 

Potage Tapioca. 

Saumon Grille Maitre d'Hotel. 

Boeuf a la Mode. 

Timbale de Riz ^ la Milanaise. 

Fricandeau a I'Oseille. 

Haricots Verts. 

Poulet. Salade. 

Creme a la Vanille. 

Compote. Dessert. 



Hotel de l'Europe, Lyon 

3. — Menu du 30 Aout. 

Potage Vermicelle. 

Saumon, sauce genevoise. 

Volailles a I'lvoire. 

Boeuf a la Portugaise 

Epinards aux Croutons. 

Pigeons roti aux cressons 

Salade. 

Gdteaux de Semoule. 

Compote de Poires, Dessert. 




£1 



J 



•®T^ 



i( 



40 



Ix 






THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



SEPTEMBER. 



Partridge shooting begins. Oysters appeared in abundance in the 

Halles, Paris, 1875. 
Peaches ripe. An extraordinary crop at Montreuil 1875. 



Statue of Chateaubriand unveiled at St. Malo, 1875 ; on which day 
all Paris ate his dish — the filet Chateaubriand. 



Dinner given by the Emperor ot Germany to the Emperors of Russia 
and Austria, 1872. 



9 
10 
II 
12 

13 

14 

15 
16 



18 

19 
20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Salmon and Trout fishing ends. 



Fete des Serrures,* at Lamarre, 1875. 

Dinner given to the authorities of Cherbourg, &c., by the Mayor and 

Council of Poole, 1865. — Dinner given by the Prince deCarignan 

in honour of Michael Angelo. 
The Mayors of the Department of the Seine ordered to protect snails 

as valuable articles of food. 

The first snipe appeared in Paris market, 1872. — Bouvalet b. — Buck 

hunting ends. 
The King of the Pumpkins for 1872, baptised Rabagas, and crowned 

at the Central Market, Paris, and sold for 80 francs. 



Fin-Bee's Russian Dinner in Paris Exhibition, 1867. 
Partridge shooting begins in Ireland. 
Theodore Hook b. 1788. 

Philippe b. 



Fifth Somerset Butter and Cheese Exhibition held at Frome, 1875. 



* Serrures are cakes peculiar to the fete of Lamarre ; and first made in honour of 
a visit of Jean Jacques Rousseau. 



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THE epicure's ALMANACK. 



41 



DINNER GIVEN TO THE MUNICIPALITY AND OTHER 
AUTHORITIES OF CHERBOURG 

BY THE 

MAYOR OF POOLE, 
Wednesday f, Septemh er i"^-, 1865. 

Bill of Fare. 

Turtle and Clear Turtle. 

Escalopes de Volaille a la Zingara. Petits Bouchees a la Reine. 

Ris de Veau en petites Caisses. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau glacees aux Champignons. 

COLD, ETC. 

Tranches de Saumon en Mayonnaise. Roast Chickens. 

Capons en galantine. Capons a la Reine. Ribs of Lamb 

Tongues. Hams. Perigord Pies. Raised Pies, 

Lobster Salads. Charlottes a la Turque. 

Suedoise aux fraises. Crevettes en Bouquets. Feuilletage I. I'Espagnole. 

Tourtes a la Creme, Meringues ^ la Suisse. 

Patisserie ^ la Florentine. 

Petits Pains a la Duchesse. Petits Nouilles ^ la Marmalade. 

Gelees au Marasquin. Petits Gateaux a la Royale. 

Cremes a la Victoria. 



Partridges. 



REMOVES. 

Grouse. 



Leverets. 



WINES. 

Claret. Beaujolais. Chablis. 

Burgundy. Sparkling Hock, Champagne. Madeira. 

Port. Sherry, 

DESSERT. 

Pines. Peaches. Strawberries, Hothouse Grapes. 

ICES. 



I., 



•K^ 



'y 



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THE MONTREUIL PEACH CROPS OF 1874-5. 

The peach season of Montreuil in 1874 was extraordinarily productive. 
The value of the fruit gathered was estimated at ^^80,000 ! It was even 
greater in 1875. There are 600 peach growers at Montreuil; and in 
1874 they sent sixty millions of peaches to the Paris market at the rate 
of half a million per diem. M. Alexis Lepere sent a new variety to the 
Halles Centrales, some samples of which measured thirty-two centimetres 
in circumference. 



DINNER GIVEN BY THE EMPEROR OF GERMANY TO THE 
EMPERORS OF RUSSIA AND AUSTRIA, 

At His Majesty's Palace, Berlin, September 7, 1872. 

Menu— /f? English, 

Turtle Soup. 
Gravy Soup with forcemeat baUs. 



Salmon, sauce genevoise. 
Turbot, shrimp sauce. 



Fillet of Beef k la Jardiniere. 

Saddle of Veal a la Financiere. 

Haunch of Venison, Cumberland Sauce. 



Mayonnaise of Lobster. 



Poultry and Game. 



Artichokes a I'ltalienne. 
Asparagus, Hollandaise. 



-^ 



Champagne Jelly, with Pineapple. 
Charlotte Parisienne, with Peaches. 



Cheese. ICeS. Preserves. Dessert. 



^^M 



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HB- 



^ 



THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 




DINNER GIVEN BY THE PRINCE DE CARIGNAN, 

AT THE PITTI PALACE, FLORENCE, 

IN HONOUR OF MICHAEL ANGELO. 



September 13, 1875. 



WINES. 

Chateau Yquem. 



Grand Vin 
Chateau Lafitte. 



Rudesheimer 
Hinterhseuser. 



Champagne 

Cremant 

{lisez: Mousseux). 



Teint d' Alicante. 



Huitres. 
Potage a la genoise. 

Bouchees au Chasseur, AiguiUettes en Villeroy. 

Poisson de Mer, garni sauce homard. 

Noix de Veau ^ la provencale. 

Supreme de Poulardes ^ I'Ambassadrice. 

Ortolans en croustades a la Perigord. 

Chaudfroid de CaiUes ^ la Lucullus. 

Petits Pois i, la fran9aise g. fleurons. 

Hors-d'oeuvre. 

Petits Canetons et foie-gras a la gelee. 

Punch ^ la Romaine. 

ROT. 

Faisans piques et Dindon aux salades cresson. 

Ponding diplomate au frontignan. 

Gdteaux d' Amiens gamis de peches. 

Patisserie melangee. 

DESSERT. 

Glaces Creme a la Vanille. 
Fraise au Citron. 



The silver included some of Benvenuto Cellini's finest works. 



J 



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^__ » — ..^^ 

44 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



OCTOBER. 



1 Pheasant shooting begins. 

2 Snipe appear. 
3 

4 

5 Horace Walpoleb. 1717. 

16 

7 

8 

9 Dinner given to M. Thiers by M. Leon Say. See '■'■ Menus." 
10 Thomas Walker, author of ''The Original," b. 1784. 
II 
12 

13 

14 Alexis Soyer b. 

15 Banquet to James Abbiss, Esq., chairman of the Board, by the 

Guardians of the Poor of the City of London Union, 1867. 

16 

1 7 Fox hunting commences. 

18 Dinner given to the Prince of Wales at Rambouillet, 1874. — Corona- 

tion Banquet of the King and Queen of Prussia, 1861. 

19 
20 

21 Jullien, pastrycook, b. — New truffles appeared in Paris markets, 1872. 
22 

23 Funguses plentiful. 

24 Dinner given by the Governor of Moscovir to Madame Adelina Patti. 

25 Golden plover appear. — First Balaklava Banquet of all the Survivors, 

1875. 
26 

27 Eel fishing ends. 
28 

29 Hare hunting commences. 

30 Thackeray b. 18 11. Opening Dinner of Her Majesty's Theatre, 1863. 

31 CompHmentary Banquet to the Duque de Saldanha, by the Cadiz 

ODorto, and Light Wine Association, 1864. 




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i ( 



THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 




45 



DINNER TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC 
OFFERED BY THE PREFECT OF THE SEINE, 

October 9, 1872. 

Potages : Bisque d'ecrevisses ; Printanier aux quenelles. 

Bouchees ^ la Monglas. 

Turbot ^ la HoUandaise. 

Quartier de Chevreuil, sauces poivrade et groseille. 

Poulardes a la Toulouse. 

Homards a FAmericaine. 

Filets de Boeuf Jardiniere. 

Chaudfroid de Mauviettes. 



Sorbets au EJium. 

Perdreaux et Cailles rotis. 

Jambons d'York ^ la Gelee, 

Fonds d'Artichauts glaces. Haricots Flageolets au Beurre. 

Timbale de Fruits ^ la Parisienne. Glaces Sultane, Gaufres. 



DINNER GIVEN BY THE DUKE DE TREMOUILLE TO THE 
PRINCE OF WALES. 

Rambouillet, October 18, 1874. 

Potages : Bisque d'ecrevisses ; Consomme ^ la Royale. 

Tartelettes a la Talle5a-and. 

Roast Beef; Pommes de Terre Dauphine. 

Poulardes Regence ; sauce supreme. 

Filets de Lapereaux. 

Puree de Gibier. 

Mayonnaise d'Homard. 

Faisans a la Bohemienne. 

Ramequins au Fromage. 

Epinards au Veloute. 

Glaces ^ 1' Orleans. 

The dinner lasted fifty minutes, after which the guests stayed en partie 
to taste some of the unrivalled wines from the Duke's cellars. 





46 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



DINNER GIVEN TO MADAME ADELINA PATTI 

BY ' 

PRINCE DOLGOROUSKI, GOVERNOR OF MOSCOW. 
Moscow, October 24, 1872. 

POTAGES. 

A la Patti. 
Le Consomme aux pointes d'Asperges. 

^ HORS D'CEUVRE. 

Les Petits Vol au Vent ^ la Puree de Gibier, 
Les Croquettes ^ I'lndienne. 

RELEV^S. 

Les Sandres au Gratin ^ la Bordelaise, 
Les Longes de Veau a la Bouxgeoise. 

ENTRfeES. 

Les C6telettes de CaiUes ^ la Duchesse. 

Le Riz,a I'ltalienne. 

Les Foies-gras ^ la Financiere. 

Punch a la Richelieu. 

ROTS. 

Les Faisans, doubles Becasses et Perdreaux. 
Les Salades de Concombres et de Laitues. 

ENTREMETS. 

Les Haricots Verts et Artichauts h. la Barigoule. 

Les Poudings a la Cowley. 

La Moscovite ^ I'Ananas, gamie d'un Pain de Fraises. 

tl 

^j^L^ ^ ^ ^ ^r^ 



THE epicure's ALMANACK. 47 



mF 



MENU OF THE BALAKLAVA COMMEMORATION BANQUET, 



Monday, October 25, 1875. 

St)UPS. 



Mock Turtle. Game. Clear Ox Tail. 

FISH. 

Crimped Cod, oyster sauce. ^ 

Boiled Turbot, lobster sauce. Stewed Eels. 

Red Mullets. Fried Eels and Fillets, of Soles. 

entriSes. 

Sweetbreads larded, tomato sauce. 
Chicken Saute, with Mushrooms. 
Lamb Cutlets, Puree of Chicoree. 

RELEVfS. 

Roast Saddles of Mutton. Sirloin of Beef. 

York Hams. Glazed Tongues. 

Roast and Boiled Capons. Baron of Beet. ' 

Roast Pheasants. Hares. Partridges. 

ENTREMETS. 

Maraschino JeUy. Punch JeUy. Pineapple Creams, 

French Pastry. Bomb of Fruitsl 

Hot Plum Puddings. Balaklava Puddings. 

DESSERT. 

M. : , — I 






K^^O H 



/ 
..I 



48 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



I 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 
II 
12 
13 
14 



'5 
16 



17 

18 

19 
20 
21 



22 

23 

24 

25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 




NOVEMBER. 



Woodcock arrive. 

Farewell Banquet to Charles Dickens, 1867. 

Charles Monselet b. 

A new economic oven was opened, Rue Pierre-au-Lard, Paris. 

Inaugural Dinner of the St. James's Restaurant, 1875. — The annual 
St. Hubert Dinner of the Paris Hunting Club. See "Menus." 



M, Thiers' Opening Diplomatic Dinner, 1872. 



First Fin-Bee Dinner, St. James's Hotel, Piccadilly, 1867. 



The time for a canvas-back dinner or supper — when you can get it. 
Mr. H. L. Bateman was the greatest authority on the subject 
Fin-Bee ever met in England. 

The verdict of the grand jury on the wines of Burgundy and Bordeaux 
of the 1872 vintage given in favour of Clos-Vougeot as the finest 
wine of the year. 

Grand Supper given at Ismailia, on the opening of the Isthmus of 

Suez, 1869. 
Teal arrive. 
Fieldfare arrive. 
Mr. Quartermaine, of the Ship Tavern, Greenwich, d. 1867. — ^M. Jules 

GoufFe's Dinner to his colleagues, in Paris, on the completion of 

his great cookery book. 



Dinner given by Mr. Cyrus Field to Mr. Gladstone. 
Dinner given by Marshal MacMahon to the Czarevntch, 1874. 
Dinner given to Mr. Francis Bennoch, 1875; nienu by Francatelli. 
Scottish Corporation Dinner, 1872 ; the Right Hon. R. Lowe 
chairman. 




<-® 



am 






THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 



4Q 



INAUGURAL DINNER OF THE ST. JAMES'S RESTAURANT, 
Piccadilly, W., November 6, 1875. 



Printaniere. 



Menu a la Russe. 

POTAGES. 
Bisque d'Ecrevisses a la Benoiton. 
Consomme de Volaille a la Royale. 

HORS D'CEUVRES CHAUDES. 

Boucliees a la Douglas. Cromesquis a la Polonaise. 

POISSONS. 

Turbot a la HoUandaise et Genoise. 
Rougets de la Mediterranee en caisse. Eperlans frits. 

RELEVfS. 

Filet de Boeuf a la Joinville. 
Cotelettes dfe Mouton a la Maintenon. 

ENTREES. 

Jambon d'York aux Epinards. 

Poulardes de Bresse en demi-deuil. 

Perdreaux en Salmis trufFes. Timbales a la Milanaise. 

ROTIS, 

Truites du Rhin au bleu. 

Chapons fins du Mans, Cresson. Faisans trufFes, Flanques de Cailles. 

Buissons d'Ecrevisses. 

l:egumes. 

Haricots Verts a I'Anglaise. 

Asperges en Branches. Croutes aux Champignons. 

Salade a la Russe. 

entremets. 

Puree de Marrons a la Gauloise. 

Croutes d'Ananas a I'Americaine. 

Fromage glace a la Vanille. Patisseries assorties, 

DESSERT. 

Fromages, Fruits assortis, etc., etc. 



Proprietor, Mr. John Grieve. Manager, M. Duret. 



^ 

.. 





50 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




THE PARIS HUNTING CLUB.— ST. HUBERT DINNER. 

November 6, 1872. 

POTAGES. 

A la Reine. Bisque. 

RELEVfiS. 

Turbot, Saumon. 

ENTRIES. 

Bouchees d'Alouettes. Perdrix aux Choux. 

Filet de Boeuf Madere. 

Lievre Royale. 

ROTS. 

Faisan tnifFe. Cuissot de Sanglier. 

ENTREMETS. 
Haricots Verts. Croutes aux Fruits. Glaces. 

DESSERT. 



FIRST FIN-BEC DINNER 

November 12, 1867. 

Les Huitres. 



POTAGES. 

La Puree de Gibier a la Chasseur. 



A la Julienne. 



POISSONS, 

Les Epigrammes de Rougets a la Bordelaise. 
Le Saumon a la Tartare. 

ENTRIES. 

Les Mauviettes a la Fiorenza. Les Cotelettes a la Duchesse 

Les Medallions de Perdreaux a la St. James. 

La Selle de Mouton rotie. 
Legumes. Salade. 

Second Service. 
Le Faisan truffe a la Perigueux. 

La Mayonnaise de Prawns. 
Les Choux-Fleurs au Parmesan. 
La Charlotte de Pommes. Le Gateau a la Cerito. 

Cooked by Francatelli. 



^ 



^1^ 
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m 






THE epicure's ALMANACK. 51 



M. THIERS' OPENING DIPLOMATIC DINNER. 

Y:ersaili.es, November g, 18^2. 

Potage Printanier aux CEufs poches. 

HORS d'ceuvre. 
Petites Caisses de Foie-gras. 

RELEVfiS. 
Turbots, sauces crevettes et hollandaise. 
Filets de Boeuf Jardiniere, sauce madere, 

ENTRlfeES. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Soubise. 
Timbales a la Bontout. Chaudfroid de Mauviettes. 

Punch a la Romaine. 
Salade de Legumes.' 

ROTIS. 

Quartiers de Chevreuils, sauce poivrade. 

Faisans rotis en Canapes. 

ENTREMETS. 

Cardons a la Moelle. Tomates Farcies. 

Glaces Japonaises. Mousse a la Pistache: 



DINNER GIVEN BY MARSHAL MacMAHON TO THE 
CZAREWITCH. 

November 28, 1874. 

Creme de Volaille a la Reine. Consomme a la Colbert. 

Petits Coulibiacs a la Polonaise. 

Vol au Vent aux huitres. 



Filets de Truites a la Regence. 
Selle de Chevreuil Venaison. 



Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Marechale. Pains de Volaille a ITmperiale. 

Mayonnaise d'Homard a la Russe. 
Sorbets. 
Cailles en Canape. Pates de Foie-gras de Strasbourg. 



Haricots Verts au Veloute. Fonds d'Artichauts a la Lyonnaise. 

Biscuit Mousseline a I'Orange. Glaces Ceiito. 



^ ■ , ^' ^ 



C T 



^ 



jScj: 



/, 




\ 

THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



GRAND SOUPER DONNE A ISMAILIA, 
AU BAL DE L'INAUGURATION DU CANAL DE LTSTHME 

DE SUEZ. 



Ze i8 Novemhre 1869. 



GRANDES PIECES. 

Poisson a la reunion des deux mers. 

Roast Beef a I'Anglaise. 

Galantine de Dinde a la Perigueux sur socle. 

Jambon historic id. 

Grand Pain de Gibier en bastion id. 

Galantine de Faisans a la Voliere id, 

ENTREES. 

Pates de Gibier a la Dorsey. 

Langues de Boeuf a I'Anglaise. 

Aspics de Nerac. 

Galantine de Caillcs en Bellevue. 

Filets a I'lmperiale. 

SALADE. 

Crevettes de Suez au Cresson. 
TrufFes au Vin dc Champagne. 

Salade russe. ■ 
Asperges d'ltalic a I'huile viergc. 

ROTIS. 

Cuissot de Chevrcuil a St. Hubert. 

Dindonneaux trufFes. 

Faisans au Cresson. 

Chapons garnis de C allies, 

ENTREMETS. 

Macedoines au Kirschwasscr. 

Pouding diplomate a 1' Ananas. 

Biscuits de Savoie decores. 

Napolitain historie. 



Glaces. Pieces Montees. Dessert Assorti. 







m' 



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^ 



m 



THE EPICURE S ALMANACK. 



53 



COMPLIMENTARY DINNER TO FRANCIS BENNOCH, ESQ. 



Iced Punch. 
E. J. Madeira. 



Chablis. 



Montebello. 

Piper Sec. 

Pommery Greno. 

Amontillado. 



Hermitage. 



Chateau Yquem. 



Sherry. 
Champagnes, 



Margaux, 1858. 

Port, 1847. 

E. J. Sherry. 

Liqueurs. 



m. 



Friday, November iZth, 1873. 



LES APPETISSANTS. MENU. 



POTAGES. 



Tortue li^e. 



Tortue claire. 



POISSONS. 

Turbot, sauce homard. 

Cabillaud, sauce aux huitres. 

Cotelettes d'Homard a la Cardinale. 

Eperlans a la Tartare. 

ENTREES. 

Mauviettes en Caisses aux Fines Herbes. 

filets de Volaille Regence. 

Cotelettes de Perdreaux a la Rachele. 

' RELEVES. 

Dinde truffee a la Perigueux. 
Jambon aux Petits Feves. Selle de Mouton rotie. 

Second Service. 

Faisans. Becassines. Pommes de Terre rubanees. 

Salade a la Francaise. 

ENTREMETS. 

Gelees de Peches au Noyeau. 

Croutes a 1' Ananas glaces. Mince Pies. 

Fondans au Parmesan. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 



Vases de Fleurs. 
Poires. Pommes. 
Compotes. 

Fraises a 1 Eau. 



DESSERT. 

Ananas. Muscatelles. 

Oranges. Noix. Avelines. 
Gateaux de Fantaisie. 

CrLACES. 

Diavolini a la Creme. 






m 



@-^ 



54 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



DECEMBER. 



I The month of good cheer. 



9 

10 

II 

12 

13 
14 
i.S 
i6 

17 
18 

19 
20 
21 
22 

23 
24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Vattel b. 



Grouse and black game shooting ends. — Banquet to the Patriarch of 
Antioch, Fishmongers' Hall, 1874. -^^^ " ^i^y Menus." 



Sale of Lord Dalhousie's wines, 1874. 



Izaak Walton d. 1683. 

William Bosville, of Gunthwaite, hon vivant, d. 18 13. 

Samuel Rogers d. 1855. 

First Horse Banquet in England, 1867, at the St. James's Hotel. 



Fin-Bee b. 

Christmas Day. 

Charles Lamb d. 1834. 

Mr. Bateman's canvas-back duck dinner, 1863. — Char fishing ends. 



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THE epicure's ALMANACK. 



FIRST HORSE BANQUET IN ENGLAND. 

St. Jai^es's Hotel, Bee. 19, 1867. 



55 




Pale Sherry. 

Rudesheimer 

and 
Amontillado. 

Sherry. 

Amontillado. 
Champagne. 

Moet. 

Beaune. 

Amontillado 

and 

Liqueurs. 

Larose, 



POTAGES. 

Le Consomme de Cheval aux Quenelles. 
A la Puree de Faisans. 

POISSONS. 

Le Turbot a la Hollandaise. 

Les Filets de Saumon a la Tartare. 

HORS D'CEUVRES. 

Les Saucisses de Cheval aux Pistaches. 
Les Crepinettes de Cheval aux Truffes. 



ENTRIES. 
Ordinaires. 
Les Quenelles de Volaille a la 

Valen9oy. 

Les Cotelettes a la Duchesse. 

Les Filets de Perdreaux a la 

Puree de Chataignes. 



Cheval. 

Les Petites Croustades a la 

Moelle. 

Les Escalopes aux Fines 

Herbes. 
L'emincee a la Polonaise. 



RELEVES. 



Ordinaires. 
La Dinde a la Perigueux. 

Le Jamb on aux Feves. 
La Selle de Mouton roti. 



Cheval. 

Le Filet pique roti a la 

Poivrade. 

La Culotte de Cheval braisee 

aux choux. 



Second Service. 

Les Canards Sauvages rotis. Les Faisans rotis. 

Les Choux-de-Mer a la Sauce. 

Les Mayonnaises de Homard a I'Huile de Cheval. 

Les Gateaux de Compiegne. 

Les Macedoines de Fruits. 

Les Bombes Glacees, 



DESSERT. 

Les Raisins. Les Poires. 

Les Oranges. Les Noix. 

Les Gdteaux. 



Les Pommes. 
Les Avelines. 
Les Compotes, 



GLACES. 

De Fraises a I'Eau. D'Oranges a la Cintra. 



Given by A. S. Bicknell, Esq. Cooked by FrancatelH. 186; 



■^*- 






THE LATE LORD DALHOUSTE'S WINES. 

This rare old cellar of wines was sold by auction at Mr. Dowell's rooms, 
George-street, Edinburgh, on the 12th of December, 1874. Among the 
more prominent lots sold were : — Lot 4, pale sherry, from Lord Ruther- 
ford's cellar, bottled in 1845, at ^^5 5s. per dozen; lot 9, " Lady Holland's 
sherry," a rich old brown wine, at_,^5 per dozen ; lot 17, sherry, " King of 
Spain," cellared in 1841, at ;i^8 per dozen ; and lot 18, the same wine in 
pints, at £2, 1 6s. per dozen. The most interesting part of the sale was the 
spirited competition for the " Stag sherry," a dark brown wine, bottled in 
1837, and presented to Lord Dalhousie (then the Hon. Fox Maule) by the 
late Marquis of Breadalbane. This curious wine was sold at £"] 5s. per 
dozen. Lot 29 port, 1840 vintage, bottled in 1844, was sold at £^ 14s. 
per dozen; the "Tappit hen," holding one gallon of 184 1 claret, fetched 
;^5 ; lot 34, imperial magnums of Chateau Lafitte, 1851 vintage, cellared 
in 1855, was sold at _^20 per dozen; lot 35, Chateau Lafitte, 1851, 
was sold at £^ per dozen; lot 36, Chateau Latour, 1858 vintage, at 
£6 5s. per dozen.; lot 37, Chateau Latour, 1862 vintage, at £/[ 12s. per 
dozen; lot 38, magnums of 1864 Chateau La litte, at ;!^ro per dozen; lot 
39, Chateau Lafitte, 1864 vintage, at £^ 15s. per dozen; and lot 40, 
Chateau Lafitte, 1865 vintage, was sold at the same price. Some of the 
rare hocks of Johannisberg, Steinberg, and Rauenthal, of vintage 1846, 
were knocked down at low prices of ^5, &c. The sale w^s altogether a 
very interesting one, and, vidth the exception of a parcel of "Lady Hol- 
land's sherry" {£^ per dozen), some of the " Stag sherry" (;i^7 per dozen), 
and some of the 1846 hocks, which were bought by Messrs. Lionel Strauss 
and Co., of Leith and London, most of the wines were bought by friends 
of the late earl. 



BRIE CHEESE. 

The French papers announced (December 1874) that Brie cheese was fast 
disappearing from the Paris Halles, in consequence of the demand for 
milk, which was leading the farmers to give up cheese-maldng. Not more 
than twenty real Brie cheeses appeared in the maxk^t per diem. 





4 



^ 



Y 

I.. 



OF DINNERS & DINNER-GIVING. 




I" 



■^^ 



rV6H 




OF DINNERS & DINNER-GIVING. 




JULES GOUFFE was the first chef of 
high repute who approached the reform 
of the cuisine from the right point of 
■^ view. In his Livre de Cuisine he 
went from the cuisine de menage — the 
homely, every-day kitchen — to the grande cuisine, 
the region of the bisques and supremes. He began 
with the pol-au-feu, and proclaimed that the bouillon 
of beef was the soul of the household kitchen ; and he 
made war against the idea that good cookery — as the 
epicure understands it — is to be had only from the 
grande cuisine. The object of his practical book, 
written upon a corner of his kitchen dresser, as he 
tells us, is to disseminate in the most modest house- 
holds a knowledge of the proper preparation of the 



•K* 



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'M. 



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.. ( 



60 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




food of the family; aqd at the same time to show the 
world how the triumphs of his art are achieved. 
He is the eke/ for every day, as well as for coronation 
day.* We see him in his little kitchen, throwing all 
his art into harieots of mutton, or blanquettes, or 
sautes, and showing his readers how the housewife of 
the most moderate means may afford exquisite little 
daily menus to her friends; and then we find him 
proud and superb, rearing trophies of salmon en 
mayonnaise or a la Chamhord, or perfecting a monu- 
ment of poulardes a la Godard for the table of a 
Sovereign or an Ambassador. We recognise in him 
the true artist who could really achieve the reform, in 
which the South Kensington authorities have been 
meddling, and which Sir Henry Cole and Mr. Buck- 
master have been zealously muddling — the latter 
knowing, to judge from his lectures as reprinted, 
nothing whatever of a fundamental kind about the 
art of Careme, Francatelli, and the Gouffes. 

If the reader is desirous of effecting a thorough 
reform in his kitchen, and of being able to substitute 
for the abominations of an ordinary English cuisine 

* He descends to the minutest particulars, telling the cook to keep the' 
goose fat, because it is excellent for cabbage, onion, or other vegetable 
soup. 

Ik J\ 



the delicacies and economical luxuries which emanate 
from a well-ordered cuisine hourgeoise in Paris, let him 
select the simpler menus that are to be found in this 
book, and then turn for a knowledge of the component 
parts of them to M. Gouffe's Livre de Cuisine^ or to 
Francatelli's " Modern Book, or to, Urbain Dubois' 
Cos77iopolitan Cookery and his Household Cookery Book^ 
or to Durand, or to Jules Breteuil's Le Cuisinier 
Europeen. The cookery book will show him how 
each dish should be made : the Book of Menus will 
give him ideas on happy combinations of dishes, as 
arranged by various illustrious epicures and chefs. 
These he can vary according to circumstances and 
tastes; and such a guide as Gouffe is invaluable for 
suggestions. Does a host want a simple entremet, for 
instance ? he has a list of flans before him ! In a 
hurry for a last dish, what could be better than the 
Totfait ? 

The golden rule in the elaboration of a menu is 
that the simple dishes and the simple and the light 
wines should come first; and that there should be no 
repetitions of flavour, or sauces, or dressing. A 

* The English edition of this book contains a translation of the names 
of French dishes. 




M 
^ 




second rule is that the menu laid before the guest 
should be strictly adhered to; and that every item of 
it should be submitted to each guest — the object of 
laying a menu before a guest being to enable him to 
select his dinner. In order that there may not be 
disappointments on the part of his guests, the host 
should insist that his cook shall not finally write out 
the menu until he has all the necessary parts of it 
under his hand, and is quite certain that it contains 
not a single item which may fail at the last moment. 
Inattention to this precaution leads to the failure of 
many dinners. The guest who has been disappointed 
of a favourite dish, and has passed others waiting for 
it, is disturbed, and enjoys nothing. M. Gouffe says — 
warning cooks against raising false hopes in menus: — 
" Quoi de plus souverainement deplaisant qu'un menu 
qui ne tient pas ses promesses, qui leurre les convives 
en leur mettant sous les yeux des titres de mets qu'ils 
attendront vainement et qu'on sera dans Timpossibilite 
de leur offrir!" 

Although it has been said by a high authority that 
it is not necessary to dwell on the manner of laying 
out a dinner table, since a well-dressed dinner will 
always be a well-served one, and it cannot matter 







how a bad dinner is put upon the table; caution 
against over-loading the table on the one hand, and 
against crumpled and imperfect linen and slovenly 
accessories on the other, is necessary in this country. 
The plentifulness and purity of table linen in the 
poorest public and private establishments of France, 
strike every traveller. "In England abundant snowy 
linen is not the invariable rule. It should be every- 
where ; for every table is in excellent taste that has 
a speckless damask, spotless silver, and glass without 
a flaw. Our tendency in England is to over orna- 
ment; we have too lavish a display of silver: too 
many flowers : over-bearing epergnes, over-lofty can- 
delabra, a redundancy of glasses and knives and forks, 
an over-bountiful dessert blocking all the central lines 
of the table. • The French host gives you little fruit 
— but this of the most exquisite kind. M. Urbain 
Dubois says of the dining room and table: — 

The whole serving of the table, in a house where comfort is 
the standing rule, necessitates a great variety of corresponding 
cares, for all the details are mutually dependent, and combine to 
form one connected whole. Accordingly, to serve a dinner 
irreproachably, before all, is required a comfortable dining- 
room, in every sense of the word: nothing should be wanting ; 
neither the due measure of light, nor a certain appropriate style. 
To eat in a room adequately lighted, warmed without excess in 



winter, cool and fresh in summer, is one of the conditions in- 
dispensable for the enjoyment of a satisfactory repast. 

The table at which the guests are seated to be served ought, 
proportionally to the number, to be rather over-spacious than 
too narrow ; the same also may be said of the room in which the 
repast is taken : hardly anything can be more distressing for the 
attendance than the scantiness of the dining-room. Nor can 
anything be more disgusting to the guests, than to be seated 
round a table where, while incommoding themselves, they are 
constrained quite unintentionally, and unconsciously, to in- 
commode their neighbours, at the table. 

The table linen, the glasses, the requisites for each cover, the 
porcelain or the plate, ought always to be in consistent harmony 
with the style of the dinner. If the wines are choice and old, 
the glasses ought to be as fine. For all dishes that are not 
served cold, the plates ought to be warmed. The covers ought 
not only to be of the utmost cleanliness, but also in sufficient 
number to admit of the most frequent changes that can be 
desired ; in fact, they should be changed with every dish pre- 
sented. 

But he who requires many of the above directions ^ 

is unworthy of the position of host. That there are 

thousands of dinner-givers in this country who have 

not mastered even the elementary principles of 

epicurism is a fact unfortunately known to all who 

are diners-out. People who have not conveniences 

for the perfect production of a little dinner a la 

Fran^atse do not hesitate to spread menus a la Russe, 

and to include in them dishes which only a master 

hand can produce. The first rule is to calculate 



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OF DINNERS AND DINNER-GIVING. 65 



your forces. "Stretch not your- legs beyond your 
carpet " says the Persian proverb. A perfect plain 
dinner is far better than a muddled array of what 
the Briton calls "made dishes." On this head let 
the reader consult Mr. Walker's Original. In it 
he will find the cKquisite epicurism of a wise, 
moderate, and most refined gentleman ; and direc- 
tions by which the table of the man of small means 
may outshine the overloaded buffet and board of the 
nouveau riche. 

I have said elsewhere of this distinguished epicure : 

We have before us, then, a man so schooled and practised in 
the rules which govern health as to be almost beyond the reach 
of temptation to excesses of any kind. Is he not to enjoy the 
good things in the world, he who is best disciplined wholly to 
enjoy them ? Surely he has a right to enjoyment as well as 
health. His palate is cool and delicate, and is he not to taste 
the pleasure which it is capable of affording him ? " The different 
products of the different seasons, and of the different parts of the 
earth, afford endless proofs of bounty, which it is as unreasonable 
to reject as to abuse." The epicure is not to suffer for the sins 
of the glutton. Because there have been men who have given up 
the greater part of their life to the pleasures of the table, and who 
have indulged in these pleasures to excess, giving them a place 
before and above the higher purposes of life, is the true epicure, 
the moderate man of highly cultivated tastes, who, his daily 
round of duties finished, can savour with dehght the infinite 
delicacies of flavour which nature has laid under the skilled 
human hand — is he to be condemned as paying undue homage to 




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66 



THE BOOK OF ^lENUS. 






the flesh ? Mr. Walker maintains that there is a happy mean ; 
and as upon the due regulation of the appetite assuredly depends 
our physical well-being, and upon this our mental energies, it 
seems to me that gastronomy is worthy of attention, for reasons 
of very high' importance. Some attention may be given to the 
pleasures of the table, if only to promote the content and the 
agreeable emotions which conduce to the healthy assimilation of 
the food with the body. It is healthy to have that which is 
agreeable to the palate. Variety is wholesome, content is a 
medicine, and hence, as our own philosopher has it, " it is sound 
practicable philosophy to have mustard on the table before the 
arrival of toasted cheese." * 

It is many years since Thomas Walker made the 

following observation : " It is a pity one never sees 

luxuries and simplicity go together, and that people 

cannot understand that woodcocks and champagne 

are just as simple as fried bacon and small beer, or 

a haunch of venison as a leg of mutton ; but with 

delicacies there is always so much alloy as to take 

away the true relish." This same master of refined 

simplicity divides dinners into three categories or 

classes : — 

There are three kinds of dinners — solitary dinners, every-day 
social dinners, and set dinners ; all three involving the con- 
sideration of cheer, and the last two of society also. Solitary 
dinners, I think, ought to be avoided as much as possible, 
because solitude tends to produce thought, and thought tends 



* The Original. ■ Bv Thomas Walker, M.A. Edited by Blanchard 
Jerrold. (Grant & Co. ' 1874.) 



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OF DINNERS AND DINNER-GIVING. 



67, 




to the suspension of the digestive powers. When, however, 
dining alone is necessary, the mind should be disposed to cheer- 
fulness by a previous interval of relaxation from whatever has 
seriously occupied the attention, and by directing it to some 
agreeable object. As contentment ought to be an accom- 
paniment to every meal, punctuality is essential, and the diner 
and the dinner should be ready at the same time. A chief 
maxim in dining with comfort is, to have what you want when 
you want it. It is ruinous to have to wait for first one thing and 
then another, and to have the little additions brought when what 
they belong to is half or entirely finished. * * * Indeed, I 
recommend an habitual consideration of what adjuncts will be 
required to the main matters ; and I think an attention to this, 
on the part of females, might often be preventive of sour looks 
and cross words, and their anti-conjugal consequences. There 
are not only the usual adjuncts, but to those who have anything 
of a genius for dinners, little additions will sometimes suggest 
themselves, which give a sort of poetry to a repast, and please 
the palate to the promotion of health. As our senses were made 
for our enjoyment, and as the vast variety of good things in the 
world were designed for the same end, it seems a sort of impiety 
not to put therh to their best uses, provided it does not cause us 
to neglect higher considerations. The different products of the 
different seasons, and of the different parts of the earth, afford 
endless proofs of bounty, which it is as unreasonable to reject, as 
it is to abuse. It has happened that those who have made the 
gratification of the appetite a study have generally done so to 
excess, and to the exclusion of nobler pursuits ; w^hilst, on the 
other hand, such study has been held to be incompatible with 
moral refinement and elevation. But there is a happy mean, and 
as upon the due regulation of the appetite assuredly depends our 
physical well-being, and upon that in a great measure our 
mental energies, it seems to me that the subject is worthy ot 
attention, for reasons of more importance than is ordinarily 
supposed. 



m 



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a 






Simple dinners and simple attendance mean com- 
fort : what - are called "set" dinners, even when 
exquisitely managed, are generally wanting in this 
first essential. Mr. Walker describes the manner 
in which a friendly dinner of eight is, and should 
be, conducted. 

See a small party with a dish of fish at each end of the table, 
and four silver covers unmeaningly starving at the sides, whilst 
everything pertaining to the fish comes, even with the best 
attendance, provokingly lagging one thing after another, so 
that contentment is out of the question ; and all this is done 
under the pretence that it is the most convenient plan. This 
is an utter fallacy. The only convenient plan is to have every- 
thing actually upon the table that is wanted at the same time, 
and nothing else ; as for example, for a party of eight, turbot 
and salmon, with doubles of each of the adjuncts, lobster-sauce, 
cucumber, young potatoes, cayenne, and Chili vinegar, and let 
the guests assist one another, which, with such an arrangement, 
they could do with perfect ease. This is undisturbed and visible 
comfort. I am speaking now only with reference to small 
parties. As to large ones, they have long been to me scenes 
of despair in the way of convivial enjoyment. * * * 

I remember once receiving a severe frown from a lady at the 
head of her table, next to whom I was sitting, because I offered 
to take some fish from her, to which she had helped me, instead 
of waiting till it could be handed to me by her one servant : and 
she was not deficient either in sense or good breeding ; but when 
people give in to such follies, they know no mean. * * * 
State, without the machinery of state, is of all states the 
worst. 

This is a golden maxim ; and the remark which 






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OF DINNERS AND DINNER-GIVING. 69 

follows upon it should be borne in mind by every 
host : — " I think the affluent would render themselves 
and their country an essential service if they were 
to fall into the simple, refined style of living, dis- 
carding everything incompatible with real enjoyment; 
and I believe that if the history of overgrown luxury 
were traced, it has always had its origin from the 
vulgar-rich — the very last class worthy of imitation/' 
Then Mr. Walker passes to an example of a good 
dinner which he saw at Lovegrove's at Blackwall. 
It may be imitated by any reader in the season, 
at the Trafalgar or Ship at Greenwich. 

I will give you, dear reader, an account of a dinner I have 
ordered this very day* at Lovegrove's, at Blackwall, where if you 
never dined, so much the worse for you. This account will serve 
as an illustration of my doctrines on dinner-giving better than a 
long abstract discourse. The party will consist of seven besides 
myself, and every guest is asked for some reason — upon which 
good fellowship mainly depends ; for people brought together 
unconnectedly had, in my opinion, better be kept separate. 
Eight I hold to be the golden number, never to be exceeded 
without weakening the efficacy of concentration. The dinner 
is to consist of turtle, followed by no other fish but whitebait, 
which is to be followed by no other meat but grouse, which are 
to be succeeded simply by apple-fritters and jelly; pastry on 
such occasions being quite out of place. With the turtle of 
course there will be punch, with the whitebait champagne, and 




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THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



with' the grouse claret : the two former I have ordered to be 
particularly well iced, and they will all be placed in succession 
upon the table, so that we can help ourselves as we please. I 
shall permit no other ^wines, unless, perchance, a bottle or two 
of port, if particularly wanted, as I hold variety of wines a great 
mistake. With respect to the adjuncts, I shall take care that 
there is cayenne, with lemons cut in halves, not in quarters, 
within reach of every one, for the turtle, and that brown bread- 
and-butter in abundance is set upon the table for the whitebait. 
It is no trouble to think of these little matters beforehand, but 
they make a vast difference in convivial contentment. The 
dinner will be followed by ices and a good dessert, after which 
coffee and one glass of liqueur each, and no more ; so that the 
present may be enjoyed rationally without inducing retrospective 
regrets. If the master of a feast wishes his party to succeed, he 
must know how to command, and not let his guests run riot, 
each according to his own wild fancy. 

The author of The Original insists again and again 
that a dinner party should never exceed eight per- 
sons. And he is right. 

For complete enjoyment a company (especially at the table) 
ought to be One ; sympathising and drawing together, listening 
and talking in due proportions — no monopolists, nor any ciphers. 
With the best arrangements, much will depend upon the chief 
of the feast giving the tone, and keeping it up. Paulus ^milius, 
who was the most successful general and best entertainer of his 
time, seems to have understood this well; for he said that it 
required the same sort of spirit to manage a banquet as a battle, 
with this difference, that the one should be made as pleasant to 
friends, and the other as formidable to enemies, as possible. I 
often think of this excellent saying at large dinner-parties, where 
the master and mistress preside as if they were the humblest of 



T'1 






m ' W 

^ " OF DINNERS AND DINNER -CtIVING. 7 1 



the guests, or as if they were overwhelmed with anxiety respect- 
ing their cumbrous and pleasure-destroying arrangements. 

Mr. Walker's description of a fashionable London 
dinner-party, although written forty years ago, is tme 
in most particulars to the present bad rules : — 

It appears to me that nothing can be better contrived to 
defeat its legitimate end than a large dinner-party in the London 
season — sixteen, for instance. The names of the guests are 
generally so announced that it is difficult to hear them, and in 
the earlier part of the year the assembling takes place in such 
obscurity that it is impossible to see.* Then there is often a 
tedious and stupefying interval of waiting, caused perhaps by 
some affected fashionable, some important politician, or some 
gorgeously decked matron, or it may be by some culinary 
accident. At last comes the formal business of descending into 
the dining-room, where the blaze of light produces by degrees 
sundry recognitions ; but many a slight acquaintance is pre- 
vented from being renewed by the chilling mode of assembling. 
In the long days the light is more favourable, but the waiting is 
generally more tedious, and half the guests are perhaps leaving 
the park when they ought to be sitting down to dinner. At 
table, intercourse is prevented as much as possible by a huge 
centrepiece of plate and ilowers, which cuts off about one-half 
the company from the other, and some very awkward mistakes 
have taken place in consequence, from guests having made 
personal observations upon those who were actually opposite 
to them. It seems strange that people should be invited to be 
hidden from one another. Besides the centrepiece, there are 
usually massive branches to assist in interrupting communis 

* We have destroyed this perplexity by makin<:^ our dinner hours a trifle 
later than the supper hour of our ancestors. 

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72 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



cation ; and perhaps you are placed between two persons with 
whom you are not acquainted, and have no community of 
interest to induce you to become so for, in the present over- 
grown state of society, a new acquaintance, except for some 
particular reason, is an incumbrance to be avoided.* When the 
company is arranged, then comes the perpetual motion of the 
attendants, the perpetual declining of what you do not want, and 
the perpetual waiting for what you do, or a silent resignation to 
your fate. To desire a potato, and to see the dish handed to 
your next neighbour, and taking its course in a direction from 
you round an immense table, with occasional retrograde move- 
ments and digressions, is one of the unsatisfactory occurrences 
which frequently take place ; but perhaps the most distressing 
incident in a grand dinner is to be asked to take champagne, 
and, after much delay, to see the butler extract the bottle from 
a cooler, and hold it nearly parallel to the horizon, in order to 
calculate how much he is to put into the first glass to leave 
any for the second. To relieve him and yourself from the 
chilling difficulty, the only alternative is to change your mind, 
and prefer sherry, which, under the circumstances, has rather 
an awkward effect. These and an infinity of minor evils are 
constantly experienced amidst the greatest displays, and 
they have, from sad experience, made me come to the con- 
clusion that a combination of state and calculation is the horror 
of horrors. Some good bread and cheese, and a jug of ale, 
comfortably set before me, and heartily given, are heaven on 
earth in comparison. 

Some of these evils have disappeared — but the prin- 
ciple of " a combination of state and calculation " 
remains, making the English "set" dinners still 



* What would the epicure of 1835 say of the hurly-burly of the society 
of 1875 ? 



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OF DINNERS AND DINNER-CtTVING. 73 



almost as painful an ordeal for the epicure to con- 
template as a surgical operation. 

A round table spacious enough, but not too spa- 
cious, for comfortable conversation,* with low-lying 
fruit and flowers in the centre, and eight guests, and 
not more than eight dishes in all (on this point all 
epicures of authority are, I think, agreed, from old- 
fashioned Thomas Walker to the present illustrious 
eke/ of the Paris Jockey-Club) — this, if the eke/ be 
cool and practised and the guests be chosen well, is 
the perfect way of dining. 

Touching on the choice of dishes, which should 
have, if -possible, some relation with the tastes of the 
guests, Mr. Walker makes some excellent general 
observations — not the less valuable because they have 
an old-fashioned complexion. 

In whatever style people live, J>rom'ded it is good in its kind, 
they will always have attractions to offer by means of a little 
extra exertion well directed within their own bounds, but when 
they pass those bounds they forego the advantages of variety 
and ease. It is almost always practicable to provide something 
out of the common way, or something common better than 
common ; and people in different situations are the most likely 

* *' Utque fluat sermo feliciter ' ore rotundo,'' 
De more Arthuri, mensa ' rotunda placet.' " 
Unpublished. Ars Ccenandi. Auctore Carolo Delap?yme, M.A. 



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74 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



to be able to produce an agreeable variety. The rule generally 
followed is to think what the guests are accustomed to, whereas 
it should be reversed, and what they are not accustomed to 
should rather be set before them, especially where the situation 
of the entertainer or his place of residence affords anything 
peculiar. By adopting such course, persons of moderate in- 
comes may entertain their superiors in wealth without incon- 
venience to themselves, and very much to the satisfaction of 
their guests — much better than laboured imitations of their own 
style. Contrast should be arrived at, and men used to state 
and luxury are most likely to be pleased with comfort and 
simplicity. We all laugh at the idea of a Frenchman in his 
own country thinking it necessary to treat an Englishman with 
roast beef ; but it is the same principle to think it necessary to 
entertain as we have been entertained, under different circum- 
stances. There are people in remote parts of the country, who 
having the best trout at hand, and for nothing, send for turbot 
at a great expense to entertain their London guests ; and in- 
stances of the like want of judgment are innumerable. In 
general it is best to give strangers the best of the place ; they 
are then the most sure to be pleased. 

I remember two illustrious men of letters who 
were called upon to entertain two noblemen. The 
first turned his house inside out ; threw out con- 
servatories, raised awnings, hired exotics, laboured 
over a bill pf fare fit for a coronation banquet, and, 
in the end succeeded in giving his grace an enter- 
tainment a few degrees inferior to that which the 
guest could command on any day of the week, by 
a few minutes' conversation with his steward and his 




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OF DINNERS AND DINNER-GIVING. 



75 



chef. The second man of letters, who kept a simple 
house in perfect order, received his nobleman as 
he received his ordinary friends. Some spring soup, 
friture from the Thames hard by, some perfect ham 
and peas, a sweetbread, a bird, and an apricot tart. 
Good wine and a noble dish of strawberries from 
the garden preceded a cigar in the tent under the 
mulberry tree, and — which was the best commentary 
on the cottage fare^many a happy dinner afterwards. 

This latter was the true and more refined course ; 
and ' the apricot tart was in better taste than any 
strange and pretentious dish the host could have . 
found had he toiled through, the Reverend Richard 
Warner's Antiquitates CulinaricB and every modern 
cookery book, French, English and Italian — and let 
me add American, for our cousins include some 
notable " geniuses for victuals ; " and had he weighed 
the merits of every dish from the cheese, garlic, and 
eggs of the Greeks (the progenitor of our omelette aux 
fines herhes) to the latest culinary mot of Gouffe, 
Dubois, or Francatelli. Had the peer who consumed 
with delight the English author's friture and tart 
been privileged to enter the house of Rossini on 
intimate terms, he would have had little more than 









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fer ^ "^^ 

76 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



macaroni — but this, cooked by the unerring hand of 
the illustrious Maestro. Had he been permitted to 
the intimacy of Alexandre Dumas, he would have 
been invited to a pot-au-feu : but to a perfect po^ f 
And these great men would have shown themselves 
to be worthy the company of peers, princes, sove- 
reigns, and the most redouhtahle oifourchettes. 

With these preliminary remarks, I submit my 
menus to the indulgent reader. 

ORDER OF SERVICE. 

The Soup. 

Hors d'CEuvre {melon should immediately follow the soup.) 

The Releves of Fish. 

The Releves of Meat. 

The Entrees of Meat, Fowl, and Game. 

The Cold Entrees. 

Punch a la Romaine between the last Entrees and the R8ts. 

The Rots of Fowl and Game. 

Salad. 

Entremets of Vegetables. 

Sweet Entremets. 

After these the table should he cleared for the Dessert, Cheese being offered 
before the Ftuits, and then the Cakes, Confectionery, and Ices. 

Coffee and Liqueurs. 



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OF DINNERS AND DINNER-GIVING. 



77 



THE WINES.* 

Champagnes tnay be served from the beginning to the end of Dinner. 

After the Soup : — 

Madeira, Sherry, and Vermouth. 

With the Releves and the Entrees : — 

Burgundy : Beaune, Volnay, Pomard, &c. 
Bordeaux : Mouton, Leoville, Laroze, &c. 

Between the Services, after the Releves, and before the Rots : — 
Chateau Yquem, and Hocks. 

With the Rots and after : — 

Burgundy : La Romance Conti, Clos Vougeot, Chambertin, &c. 
Bordeaux : Chateau Lafitte, Margaux, Latour, and Haut-Brion. 

With the sweet Entremets : — 

Sherrv. 



* See "The Wine Cellar," p. 8] 



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HE Historia. V^inarta^ which Bacon indicated 
^^ to future writers, has yet to be written. 
Fin-Bee has long kept notes for such a 
work; and in due time his History of the 
Grape shall be laid before his countrymen. 
But, while this great work lies in so many disjecta 
memhra in an empty wine bin, lacking the adjust- 
ments and the breath which shall presently give them 
life, he begs to submit to the intelligent epicure a 
few observations on wine, that may be useful in the 
direction or control of a butler, or by way of aide- 
memoire to that better epicure who holds jealously 
the key and mastery of his own cellar. 

Between 1770 and 1780 Sir Edward Barry issued 
a dissertation on the history of wine, which had 

(i 



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ry" 







82 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 

obtained a marked repute in the Regency, and which 
was then superseded by Dr. Henderson's History of 
Aficient and Modern Wines, published in 1824. A 
copy of this work, ornamented with proofs of William 
Harvey's classical drawings, lies before me ; and it 
justifies both the pretension of the preface and the 
richness of its page. Henderson is under obligations 
to Bacci and fifty other writers on his subject, and he 
acknowledges his obligations, while he proves that 
he knows how to use them to the reader's profit. He 
takes wine, ab ovo — from the ^^'g of the vine. He 
reviews the ancient and modern methods of vine 
culture and of wine making ; marshals the authorities 
of France, Germany, and Italy ; and eulogises the 
Enologia of Count Dandolo (published about 18 12) 
as the only considerable practical treatise on the 
fermentation of the grape which had come under his 
notice. The result is an exhaustive account of the 
ancient and modern art of wine making, as developed 
exactly half a century ago. 

Since Dr. Henderson's time a whole library of 
books has been produced on the tempting subject. 
We have scientific, technical, purely historical, whim- 
sical, rhapsodical treatises, reports, essays, and jeux 




'J-®- 



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*-^&r77 



THE WINE CELLAR. 




d' esprit without number. The book- worm and the 
chymist have prosed, and the poet has sung : we have 
had Redding, Messrs. Griffin and Druitt, Dr. Gaubert 
Lenoir, and Beckwith (whose Pi^actical Notes on Wine 
I strongly advise the epicure to keep at hand), and 
Moore, Barry Cornwall, Beranger, and Monselet, 
among hosts of others. 

The altered condition of the public taste may be 
seen by a comparison of the wine importation of 
1822 with that of last year. In the former year we 
imported 27,454 tons of wine, and of this quantity 
14,814 came from Portugal (it was the good old port 
time), and only 1,193 from France. Nous avons 
change tout ceta, and have become once again, as in 
the olden time, claret drinkers, to the great advantage 
of our heads and manners. My brilliant and de- 
lightful friend — so seldom seen abroad now — G. H. 
Lewes (who knows his France well) has observed : — 

Englishmen, who, in France, Germany, Italy, and Greece, 
drink and enjoy the light, fragrant wines of the country, have a 
strange prejudice against these very wines in England, as not 
suited to our climate. They forget that our climate has remained 
unchanged from what it was when port and sherry were unknown, 
and when the wines of France were universal. 

They had forgotten it years ago ; but of late they 

^W^ : ML 



r-« ' — -r "^C^IB -^ 

84 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



have turned very much to our philosopher's way of 

thinking, and have learned to prefer the various 

wholesome and pure wines of France and Germany, 

Greece, Hungary, and Italy, to the abominable 

spirituous chymical tnixtures for which Cette has a 

bad pre-eminence. That wittiest of living epicures, 

Monselet, has observed of the wine manufacturing of 

our day, " On fait du vin avec tout — 7)teine le raisin." 

It will .be well for the stomachs of men when the sting 

shall have disappeared from the sarcasm, and even 

Cette shall have been reduced to the honest course of 

bottling only the juice of the grape. Gustave Nadaud 

has sung : — 

L'estomac gouverne la tete, 

Et la pensee est un ruisseau, 

Qui prend sa source dans la bete, 

Pour se filtrer dans le cerveau. 

The perfect larder and wine cellar are the fittest 
antechambers to the library, the studio, the court of 
justice, and the senate. My old and much esteemed 
friend, the late Cyrus Redding, in his preface to the 
1 85 1 edition of his work, observes : — 

There is considerable alteration in the taste of those who take 
the better classes of wine since this work went first to the press. 
Wines artificially strengthened and skilfully adapted to the tastes 
of all orders of consumers, with the same name and quality 




* 




^ 



THE WINE CELLAR. 



) i 



ascribed to all, are now rejected for natural growths, which are 
cooler and more exhilarating. The tendency of all refined 
persons of the present day is to the purer and better growths, 
and of such wines new varieties have been introduced by the 
best merchants. The long interval of peace enjoyed in Europe 
has made individuals of competent means better acquainted with 
the choice wines of Europe, and among such less of some of the 
old and customary kinds has been taken. The same circum- 
stance has probably tended to a less consumption of every kind 
at the table. People do not now sit as long as their fathers, and 
in both the foregoing respects lean towards an imitation of their 
continental neighbours. * * * xhe author is gratified to find 
that some of his prognostications on the subject of changes in 
the public feeling in regard to wine have been fulfilled in the 
advance of a purer taste. 

Within the last twenty years the advance has con- 
tinued ; and now light and delicate wines, as dis- 
tinguished from heavy and full-flavoured vintages, 
are preferred everywhere — save, perhaps, among old- 
fashioned, iron-built squires. 

Let us now descend to the cellar in Cyrus Redding's 
company : — 

It should, if possible, face the north, and in England consist of 
two divisions, one of which should be some degrees warmer than 
the other, for there are many wines which do best in a cellar of 
high temperature. Madeira, sherry, Canary, Malaga, Syracuse, 
Alicant, Cyprus, and some others keep better in warm than in cold 
cellars. The wine of Portugal is so hardy that even the cellars 
under the streets of the metropolis will little injure its quality;* 

* If this were not so London wine merchants would be in a grave 
difficulty.— F. B. 

f-»» ^ ^ -^^- 



86 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



but this is not the case with other kinds. The wines of Bor- 
deaux, Champagne, and the Rhone should be kept in cellars 
where no motion can affect them, far from the vibration — or 
rather trembling — of the earth from the traffic over granite 
pavements. They should be as far removed from sewers and the 
air of courts, where trades of a bad odour are carried on, as 
possible. These in wet weather do not fail to affect the wine 
and give a tendency to acetous fermentation. 

No Vinegar must be kept in a Wine Cellar, and the 
temperature ought tc be unchanged throughout the year. 

The Fermentation of Wine in close cellars is very apt to 
affect the atmosphere around to a considerable degree, and this 
is an additional reason why they should be well aired. The 
vapours which are formed in similar cases produce sometimes 
distressing effects upon those who encounter them. Intoxication, 
vertigo, vomiting, deadness of the limbs, and sleepiness are 
frequently experienced, but these disappear upon returning into 
the fresh air, and taking repose after swallowing an infusion of 
coffee or acidulated water. There have been instances, how- 
ever, in which dangerous paralysis has occurred from too long 
exposure to the carbonic acid gas, and even death has ensued. 
It is proper, therefore, always before entering a closed cellar 
some time shut up, and when the wine is thought to be in a state 
of fermentation, to halt a moment, when the peculiar odour of the 
gas will be perceived. A lighted candle is a good test, by the 
diminution or extinction of its flame. Upon first perceiving the 
flame to diminish in intensity and burn fainter, it is a sufficient 
warning to retreat until the cellar is purified. 

The Quantity of Wine in a Cellar must be regulated by 
the rate of consumption in each class, so that too large a stock 
may not be kept of such as is least durable. This, in a large 
establishment, where a curiosity in wines is indulged, is a matter 
of much importance. 



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THE WINE CELLAR. 87 



These details depend of course not only on the rela- 
tive quantities, but also on the vintages of the various 
wines. 

Artificial Heat may be introduced into cellars which hold 
the wines of the South, in very cold weather, with considerable 
advantage. This maybe done by means of a chafing-dish. The 
cellar should be kept clean and swept as often as convenient. In 
this cHmate a cellar should have an ante-room, and be entered 
through two doors, closing one before the other is opened, and 
keeping, by artificial means, if natural ones will not do, the same 
temperature throughout the winter and summer, judging by a 
thermometer. 

Of Decanting Wines and Cellar Manage- 
ment Mr. J. L. Denman has observed * : — 

In decanting wines, great care should be taken not to disturb 
the deposit or crust, for all improving wines must of necessity 
continue to precipitate their tartar, tannin, &c. When any wine 
ceases to deposit, it ceases to improve and begins to deteriorate. 
All natural wines ripen more quickly than those that are fortified 
(or made up), as the action of the spirit retards improvement, and 
ultimately tends to destroy its vinous character. 

For Drawing Corks, • Lund's lever corkscrew is recom- 
mended, as it is both easy and safe, and does not disturb the 
wine if care is used. 

To fully develop the flavour and bouquet of any wine a little 
gentle warmth is necessary, and it is therefore advisable that the 
wines intended for immediate use should be placed in a warmer 

* What should we Drink ? an Inquiry suggested by Mr. E. L. Beck- 
with^s " Practical Notes on Wine." By James L. Denman, author of 
<' The Vine and its Fruit." 1868. (Longmans, Green, & Co.) 




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S8 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



temperature than that of the cellar* (which should be dry and of 
a uniform temperature, rarely exceeding 56° or falling below 46° of 
Fahrenheit). 

All Sparkling Wines should be kept in the very coolest part 
of the cellar, cork downwards ; all other kinds should be laid 
down horizontally that the cork may be kept moist and the air 
thereby excluded. 

Francatelli insists, and justly, that the different 
kinds of sherries, ports, Madeira, and all Spanish and 
Portuguese , wines are improved by being decanted 
several hours before dinner. 

During winter (he remarks in his Coo/^'s Gmde) their aroma 
is improved by the temperature of the dining-room acting upon 
their volatile properties for an hour or so before dinner-time. By 
paying due attention to this part of the process, all the mellow- 
ness which good wines acquire by age predominates to the delight 
of the epicure's grateful palate. The lighter wines, such as Bor- 
deaux, Burgundy, and most of the wines of Italy, should be most 
carefully handled, and decanted an hour before dinner-time. In 
winter the decanters should be either dipped in warm water or 
else placed near the fire, to warm them for about ten minutes 
previously to their being used. In summer use the decanters 
without warming them, as the genial warmth of the atmosphere 
will be all-sufficient, not only to prevent chilling the wines, but to 
develop their fragrant bouquet. Moreover, let these and all 
delicate wines be brought into the dining-room as late as may be 
consistent with convenience. 



* The dining-room is the proper place. As a rule the wine should be 
of the temperature of the room. Strong wines, as Madeira, must be 
uncorked a couple of hours before use, and left in open decanters. 



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THE WINE CELLAR. 




The length of time , that should elapse between 
decantering, that is exposing a wine to warmth and 
air, depends on the wine; the fuller the body the 
longer should be the exposure : thus, Madeira requires 
the longest time in its passage from the cellar to the 
epicure's lip, of any wine. It is impossible to lay 
down a hard and fast rule; but the above may be 
taken as general principles on which a man may pro- 
ceed to acquire a sound knowledge of the manner of 
presenting his wines in good condition to his guests. 

Francatelli has his own ideas about the order of the 

wines at dinner; I have already given mine. He 

says : — 

When it happens that oysters preface the dinner, a glass of 
Chablis or Sauterne is their most proper accompaniment ; genuine 
old Madeira, or East India sherry, or Amontillado proves a wel- 
come stomachic after soup of any kind — not excepting turtle — after 
eating which, as you value your health, avoid all kinds of punch, 
especially Roman punch. During the s,ervice of fish, cause any 
of the following to be handed round to your guests : — Amontillado, 
Hock, Tisane champagne, Pouilly, Meursault, Sauterne, Arbois, 
vin de. Grave, Montrachet, Chateau- Grille, Barsac, and generally 
all kinds of dry white wines. 

With the entrees the same authority presents a series 

of Bordeaux and Burgundies ; with the second course, 

red wines, as Pomard, Volnay, Nuits, Clos Vougeot, 

Chambertin, Rhenish wines, Tavel (a greatly neglected 

fe. . ^ 



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■ SijrTr '• • — n, ^j^ 

90 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



] 




wine in England), Chateau Neuf du Pape, and red 
champagnes, &c., and white wines, as Grave, Sauterne, 
Ai p^tillant, and other champagnes ; with dessert, 
Muscats, Madeira, Malaga, Tokay, &c. M. Franca- 
telli has some pertinent observations on suiting the 
wines to the guests ; a company of sanguine tempera- 
ments will affect the genuine champagnes and flasks 
of Rhenish, while a phlegmatic company must be 
moved by the capiteux vintages of Burgundy, the Alto 
Douro, Spain, and Madeira. 

A word as to dessert wines, or those to accompany 
the entremets de douceur . " Let iced-creaming, spark- 
ling champagne or Moselle be handed round ; but 
far superior to them, I would recommend a trial of 
A'i petillant, Arbois, Coudrieux, Rivesaltes, Malaga, 
Frontignan, Grenache, Malmsey Madeira, and East 
India sherry.'' 

The Chymistry of Wines. 

In conclusion I would draw the attention of the 
reader to an admirable, exhaustive article on the 
chymistry of wines, which appeared in the Times 
of April 1 8th, 1872; being a critical commentary 
on A Treatise on the Origin, Nature, and Varieties 

lis ^ 






'M ^<^^ 



THE WINE CELLAR. 



0/ Wine, by Drs. J. L. W. Thudichum and Auguste 
Dupre, published by Messrs. Macmillan in 1870. 
The tendency of these learned and laborious 
chymists was to show not only that wine is 
ceasing to be the natural produce of the grape 
and becoming a chymical compound, but that the 
laboratory was as good a wine-producer as the vine- 
yard — a conclusion against which the critic protested 
energetically. 

We need not trace back the history of the adultera- 
tion of wine to the time when Falstaff was angry at 
the lime in his sack : let us take up the subject where 
it affects us. 

So long ago as in 1776 experiments were tried which have 
resulted in carrying back adulteration to an earlier stage, and 
which were commenced as attempts to improve the quality and 
afterwards to increase the quantity of wine, by operating upon 
the- must prior to fermentation. In October of that year the 
chymist Macquer gathered sufficient white grapes, of the varieties 
;pineau and Tnelier, in his garden in Paris, to make from 25 to 
30 pints of wine. He selected grapes which he described as 
mere refuse, '' raisin de rebut,"" and so imperfectly ripened that 
it was impossible to make drinkable wine from them by any 
ordinary method. • Separating only those which were absolutely 
rotten, he crushed the rest with the stems, and expressed the 
juice, which he describes as very turbid, of a dirty green colour, 
and so sour it could not be tasted without a grimace. To this 
juice be added sufficient raw sugar to render it distinctly sweet, 

ik^ rf 



92 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



and then placed the mixture in a vessel that he suffered to stand 
in a summer-house in the garden. Fermentg-tion commenced in 
three days, and continued for eight days, producing a new wine 
of penetrating vinous odour and rather harsh taste, from which 
all vestige of sugar had disappeared. It was suffered to remain 
during the winter undisturbed, and in the following March was 
found bright and clear, with its flavour improved. It was then 
bottled, and in October, 1777, one year from the fermentation, is 
described by the maker as — " Clair, fin, tres brillant, agreable au 
gout, genereux et chaud, et, en un mot, tel qu'un bon vin blanc 
de pur raisin, qui n'a rien de liquoreux, et provenant d'un bon 
vignoble, dans une bonne annee." In the following year M. 
d'Arcet made wine by boiling down a portion of his must, 
sweetening it, adding some extract of absinthe, and pouring the 
hot liquid into the remaining bulk of the must, the whole being 
then set aside for fermentation. He expressed himself as being 
well pleased with the results, and the examples thus set were 
followed, more or less, by many other growers, until it became a 
general practice in some way to doctor the must,, and in m^any 
cases to dilute it freely with water, adding sugar to increase the 
capacity for fermentation. 

In 1852 Petiot introduced a more advanced m.ethod of treat- 
ment, by not only mixing the expressed juice of grapes with an 
equal measure of sugar and water, but by adding successive 
quantities of sugar and water to the squeezed husks, and 
squeezing again and again, to the fifth time, until he obtained, 
from grapes which should have yielded 60 hectolitres of genuine 
wine, 285 hectolitres of a product which he describes as " wine 
in the full sense of the word." His method was followed by the 
chymists Thenard, father and son, and was introduced into 
Germany, according to Drs. Thudichum and Dupre, by Thil- 
' many, general secretary of the Agricultural Society of Rhenish 
Prussia, who lectured upon the subject in 1858, at Bonn. Dr. 
Gall, of Treves, who had experimented in the same way, even 

M ¥^ 







THE WINE CELLAR. 93 




before Petiot, published a pamphlet on the subject in 1862 ; and 
in 1868 Dr. Hussman, of Missouri, wrote a book warmly advo- 
cating- the employment of the new process in America, and 
giving full and minute instructions for conducting it. We do not 
know how far he has succeeded in making converts in the 
country of his adoption ; but the practical outcome of the method 
has been that a very large proportion of the "wine " of France 
and Germany has ceased to be juice of the grape at all, and is a 
product of the fermentation of sweetened water in which husks 
have been steeped. A Cologne paper thus writes upon the 
subject, and is quoted with approval in the Heidelberg Annalen 
fur CEnologie : — 

"In the district of Neuwied things have come to a sorry 
pass indeed. The evil has been imported by wine dealers from 
abroad, who come in numbers every autumn, and, whether the 
vintage promises well or ill, buy up the growing grapes, and 
make from them five or six times the quantity of wine which 
the press of an honest vintner would produce. The reader will 
ask, how is that possible ? Here is the explanation. 

" During the vintage, at night, apd when the moon has gone 
down, boats glide over the Rhine freighted with a soapy sub- 
stance manufactured from potatoes, and called by its owners 
sugar. This stuff is thrown into the vats containing the must, 
water is introduced fro'm pumps and wells, or, in case of need, 
from Father Rhine himself. When the brewage has fermented 
sufficiently it is strained and laid away. The lees are similarly 
treated three, four, or five times over. When the dregs are so 
exhausted that further natural fermentation has become impos- 
sible, chymical ferments and artificial heat are applied. This 
cooking, or stewing, is continued often until midwinter, pro- 
ducing wines of every description for the consumption of every 
class. The noble fluid is sent away by land and water to its 
places of destination ; and the dealers are seen no more until the 
next vintage season. Their business lies in the most distant 



yi^ J 



"i^ — ^ %r 



Q4 THE BOOK OP^ MENUS. 



parts to which the beverage can be carried, where, of course, 
there is no end to their praises of its purity, its sources, and of 
the rustic simplicity of its producers. 

"The example thus set by strangers has been only too closely 
followed at home. The nuisance is largely on the increase, and 
the honest vintner is the greatest sufferer. He rarely succeeds 
in selling his entire vintage at once, partly because the quantity 
of grapes required by the manufacturers is constantly diminish- 
ing, and partly because the practices described have driven away 
desirable purchasers from the localities. The * Gallisation ' of 
wine benefits none but the professional adulterators, and the 
poorest class of small growers, who are indebted to it for a sure 
market for their small and inferior crops. Some grapes are still 
required for the fabrication of wine, although an infinitely small * 
quantity is sufficient." 

This unwholesome state of things is rather encou- 
raged than discouraged by Drs. Thudichum and 
Dupre. To the chymical palate potato brandy diluted 
and flavoured may be made equal to the grandest 
vintage Nature ripens in her most favoured clos. 
Thus the doctors discourse on the point : — 

What must surprise every one is that each one of these 
chymists and experimenters admits that the sugar infusion wines 
retain the perfect bouquet of the natural ones. The amount of 
acidity or of tartrate of potash in them is less than in the natural 
wines. The circumstance that they contain so little tartrate 
makes them much more like old wines, for it is well known 
that wines by age deposit their tartar, and become milder to the 
taste. The infusion wines resemble natural wines in all essential 
qualities : they contain all the essential ingredients, and almost 
in the same proportions, as the natural product. The non- 

.^^^ ^ ^ ^ 





THE WINE CELLAR. 



95 



essential ingredients, or those which are frequently hurtful to the 
natural wines, are diminished in the infused wines to such an 
extent that their absence is a favourable circumstance. The 
method promises to increase the quantity of cheap beverage, and 
affords to the less opulent classes the means of making for them- 
selves a cheap, wholesome beverage, even from grapes from 
which wines could not be obtained fit for commerce or transport. 

To which the angry critic tartly replies : — 

It is fortunate that the absurdities and inconsistencies of the 
foregoing paragraph are so glaring that it is hardly necessary to 
point them out. The opening assertion about perfect bouquet is 
one that the authors do not seem to adopt ; and we confess that 
we should find it hard to believe them if they did. The lessened 
amount of natural acid or tartrate in the infusion wines would 
prevent them from ever assuming that character of age which 
depends upon the full development of ether ; and the admission 
that the " acidity or tartrate '' in them is less than in the natural 
wines contradicts the assertion of the next sentence, that they 
contain all the essential ingredients of the natural product ; 
" almost " in the same proportions. We do not know what the 
" non-essential and hurtful ingredients " are, unless grape-juice 
be one of them ; but it is new to speak of an evil being dimi- 
nished " to such an extent " that its absence is a favourable cir- 
cumstance. If our remarks should diminish the next brew of the 
Neuwied beverage by only a single cask, we should regard the 
absence of that cask as a very favourable circumstance indeed. 

We must, however, do justice to our authors in one particular. 
They give directions, mainly taken from Dr. Gall, for making the 
infusion wines, and also for the dilution and sweetening of grape 
juice before fermentation, so as to adjust the proportions of sugar, 
acid, and water to some supposed normal standard, and to render 
the grower independent of the vicissitudes of seasons, and of the 
degree of ripeness of his grapes. In these directions they say, 





i 



yr ■ "^^^ 

i « 

96 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



**The sugar must always be pure white cane sugar, for grape 
sugar so called, or sugar made by the itifluence of sulphuric acid 
upon starch, is always objectionable." On the ground of this 
statement they may demur to the charge of supporting the 
Neuwied doings, and may feel their consciences unsoiled by 
potato whisky. We refer rather to the principle than to the 
details of their advice, and it unfortunately happens that the 
chief authority on the subject is directly opposed to them on this 
point. Dr. Hussman says : — '* Dr. Gall recommends grape sugar 
as the best to be used for the purpose. This is made from potato 
starch, but it is hard to obtain here, and I have found crushed 
loaf sugar answer every purpose." 

From a practical point of view, of course, the whole question 
admits of an edisy reductzo ad absurdum. We have not hitherto 
made wines in England, because we have only a small growth of 
grapes, and cannot depend upon their ripening in our climate. 
If Drs. Thudichum and Dupre are right, these circumstances 
need no longer stand in our way. We may, in spite of the 
niggardliness of nature, make all the wine we want, and render 
ourselves independent of duties and treaties of commerce. The 
quantity of grapes employed has only an insignificant bearing 
upon the quantity of wine produced, which is chiefly determined 
by the supply of water and of artificial sugar. Unripe grapes are 
better than ripe ones, for' they yield a must which will admit of 
more free dilution. In fact, there seems to be no reason, save 
want of knowledge or want of enterprise, why the proprietor of a 
single bunch should not use them as a sort of talisman with 
which to supply the cellars of the world. There are certain chy- 
mical substances which possess the property of inducing, by their 
mere presence, changes in which they do not participate ; and 
this, according to the new light now shed upon us, is the true 
relation of the fruit of the vine to the beverages of man. The 
function of the grape is to induce fermentative changes in solutions 
of potato sugar ! It is impossible not to regret that scientific 




ir^- 




men should put forward such statements, which will admit of 
being used to justify any amount of sophistication that vintners 
or wine-dealers may think it profitable to practise. We do not 
care to drink chymical messes under the name of wine ; and we 
fully believe that these messes, even if undistinguishable from 
wine in the laboratory, would be distinguished with extreme 
promptitude and certainty by the stomach and the brain. We 
have heard with pleasure that a recent attempt to chymicalise the 
making of wine in Spain, although undertaken with much confi- 
dence and carried on under conditions favourable to success, has 
resulted in a failure which was indeed signal, but which, in the 
interests of the public, we cannot bring ourselves to call disas- 
trous. 

Fin-Bee heartily agrees with the critic in his con- 
cluding remarks on the learned doctors, and on all 
who are engaged in an endeavour to manufacture 
wine. When an artificial rose shall have been made 
equal to that of the garden, and the lilies of the field 
shall have been shamed by those of the factory, shall 
I begin — and only begin — to believe that chymical 
wine is not a bad and a base thing, unworthy to figure 
at good men's tables. 

Another question upon which the authors express an opinion 
that is, we hope, unsound, is with regard to the effect of added 
alcohol. It is well known that the addition of a very small 
amount of alcohol to an otherwise pure wine is at once detected 
by a practised taster, and it has been stated and believed that 
the natural alcohol exists in a somewhat different state, either of 
molecular distribution or of. chymical combination, from that 
which is added artificially. Mr. Flagg quotes some experiments 

IT 





THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



by Mr. Delarue to show that added alcohol is disengag-ed at a 
much lower temperature than that which is natural; but the 
conditions of these experiments are not stated with sufficient 
precision to enable us to judge of their value. Drs. Thudichum 
and Dupre go to the other end of the scale, and show, on grounds 
probably not to be disputed, that there is no discoverable physical 
or chymical difference between the natural and the fortified wine. 
They hence infer that there is no difference ; and in doing so 
they probably go too far. They are opposed to the general ex- 
perience of mankind, which teaches us that wine is a different 
agent from brandy and water, and which leads us to employ one 
or the other under different circumstances, and for the pro- 
duction of different effects. 

If we waive this point, as being, after all, a secondary one, 
the chief lesson to be learnt from the elaborate work before us is 
that the consumers of wines are in an evil case. It is bad 
enough to have wine fortified, and sweetened, and plastered into 
the legitimate port and sherry of the middle-class festivities of a 
dozen years ago. But these proceedings were guided by a rule 
of thumb, in hands comparatively unskilful, and could not be 
carried beyond very definite limits. What we now see in France 
and Germany is a prostitution of scientific knowledge to the 
accomplishment of wholesale adulteration on the largest scale — 
adulteration by which we shall buy as, wine a purely artificial and 
factitious compound, a medicated dilution of alcohol, and nothing 
more. No amount of chymical knowledge that Drs. Thudichum 
and Dupre may possess can shut our eyes to the essential wrong- 
doing of the processes which they describe, and in some degree 
advocate ; and our confidence in their work is still further shaken 
by the fact that a curious error in a pamphlet published by well- 
known wine merchants is repeated in the pages before us, and 
that another pamphlet, which was issued as an advertisement 
some time ago, is absolutely reprinted in them almost word for 
word. 




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THE WINE CELLAR. 



99 



% 




The whole history of the sugar infusion " wines" may, perhaps, 
be taken to show that France, Germany, and the Peninsula have 
too long enjoyed a practical monopoly as wine-producing 
countries, and that their area under grape cultivation is too 
small for the demands upon them. If this be so, it is manifestly 
time for English merchants to seek the markets of such countries 
as Hungary and Greece, where wine is too plentiful to render 
adulteration profitable, and where the fermented juice of the 
grape may still be obtained in its purity, with the wholesome and 
pleasant subacid freshness of its youth, and with a capacity to 
develop fragraiit ethers in its progress towards a glorious old 
age. The small demand in these countries has hitherto pre- 
vented their produce from being brought even near to the fuli 
perfection of which it is capable ; but the faults thence arising 
would be speedily corrected by the enlightened criticism of large 
purchasers. There is wine enough in Southern and South- 
Eastern Europe to supply the wants of the present generation, 
even though the chymical manufacturers of France and Germany 
were left in the undisturbed enjoyment of their own concoctions. 
English chy mists could render no better service to their country- 
men than by devising processes by which the nature of these 
concoctions might be detected and exposed, and by which pur- 
chasers might learn to beware of those who introduce and sell 
them. 

There is a well known, quaint, and pleasant work, 
Ce quil y a dans une Bouteille de Vin^ over which I have 
spent some pleasant hours, and which I can cordially 
recommend jto the reader. In this volume the simple 
author appears unaware of all the chymists' mischief 
which is doing in the wine districts of Europe. We 
should be under deep obligations to him if he would 

JI 2 




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^^?^ 






I GO THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



devote a second speculative volume to this subject. 
The title might be Ce qu'il y aura dans ttne Bouteille de 
Vin. 

At the pace we are travelling now, in the days of 
our children — Qu'y aura-t-il^ wion Dieu ? The Clos 
Vougeot will be a turnip- field, and the vineyards of 
Burgundy will grow pptatoes for the chymists. 

Mr. James L. Denman gives us the equivalents of 
French and German wines, for a dinner, in Greek 
wines : — 

Brillat-Savarin's idea of a feast (he remarks) is a little too 
elaborate for ordinary indulgence ; but such as it is I give it, 
substituting the various vintages of Greece for the wines on his 
list. With soup, a glass of St. Elie or Thera,; with fish, or the 
hors d'oeuvre, white Kephisia or Patras. At, between, and 
with the first and second courses, red Kephisia or Patras. With 
the entremets offer any of the aforesaid vintages, but principally 
the red, finishing up before the dessert with sparkling Kephisia 
or Patras. At the beginning of dessert introduce old red 
Kephisia, Patras, Sautorin, or Como ; and as white wines, 
St. Elie, Calliste, and Thera. During dessert, with dried fruits 
or nuts, a glass of Cyprus, Lachrymae Ghristi, or Visanto will be 
found agreeable. Brillat-Savarin remarks that, to serve the 
wines with " une certaine ^om^e " eight glasses are necessary : 
ist, the large ordinary drinking glass ; 2nd, the Bordeaux, or 
Burgundy glass ; 3rd, the glass for Madeira, a little smaller than 
the last ; the green glass for Rhine wine (an abomination — for 
any grape should be seen through pure crystal, F.B.); 5th, the 
brilliant cut glass, to show the beautiful '' couleur d'or^^ of 



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THE WINE CELLAR. 




Johannisberg ; 6th, the tall glass for sparkling wine ; 7th, the 
cup {la cou^e) for iced sparkling wine; and 8th, at the finish, 
the liqueur glass. Three glasses, according to him, should be 
placed on the table " avec le couvert :'' the large glass for 
diluted wine, the ;^ordeaux or Burgundy glass, and the Madeira 
glass. At the second course these are to be removed, and 
replaced by the others that should remain during the dinner. 

The light Spanish tumbler is the pleasantest glass 

for light wines or wine and water. 






w 



ROYAL MENUS. 




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V 



ROYAL MENUS. 



[See also The Epicure's Almanack. 



FAMILLE ROYALE D'ANGLETERRE. 

POTAGPS. 

A la Tortue. Consomme aux Quenelles. 

POISSONS. 
Turbot bouilli, Eperlans frits. 
^ Soles a la Matelotte Normande. 

RELEVfiS. 

Filet de Boeuf aux Nouilles. 

Poulardes a la Royale. 

ENTREES. 

Rissoles de Volaille a la d'Artois. 

Mauviettes farcies au Gratin. Cotelettes de Mouton a la Soubise. 

Epigrammes de Volaille aux Haricots Verts. 

Fi-icandeau a la Chicoree. 

Boudins de Brochet, sauce homard. 

ROTS. 

Faisans. Ptarmigans. Ortolans. 

RELEV:^S. 

Beignets de Griesz, Ponding Nesselrode. 

ENTREMETS. 

Salsifis frits. Croquembouche. 

Creme de Riz au Jus. 

Galantine de Poulets. Petits Babas Chaud. 

Bavarois au Chocolat. 



Side Table. 
Roast Beef. Roast Mutton. 



Dinner served at Windsor Castle, by Mr. Aberlin, etc. 



v: 






f] 



06 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



^?r 



U 



HER MAJESTY'S DINNER. 



Puree de Volaille a la Reine.. 
Consomme aux Pates. 

POISSONS. 

Tranches de Cabillaud. Eperlans frits. 

RELEVES. 

Cuissot de Chevreuil, sauce poivrade. 
Poulardes et Langues, aux Choux-Fleurs. 

ENTREES. 

Troufons d'Anguilles a la Perigord. 

Rissolettes de Volaille a la Pompadour. 

Saute de Filets de Perdreaux. Noix de Veau a la Chicore 



Grouses, au Jus. Poulardes," bread sauce. 

RELEVES. 

Ponding de Cabinet. Gaufres a la Flamande. 

ENTREMETS. 

Celeri a I'Espagnole. Salade de Homards. 

Flan de Pommes Meidnguees. 

Biscottes glacees. 



Side Table. 
Roast Beef. Roast Mutton. 



Served at London, by M. PlERRE MuRET, etc., etc. 



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ROYAL MENUS. 



107 



V 



FAMILLE IMPERIALE DE FRANCE. 

POTAGES. 

Pot-au-P^eu. Pates d'ltalie. 

HORS D'CEUVRE. 

Petits Pates au Naturel. 

GROSSES PifeCES. 

Saumon a la Genevoise. 

Piece de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Rosbif garni de Croquettes. 

ENTREES. 

Tete de Veau en Tortue. Petites Timbales a la Lavalliere. 

Grenadins a la Chicoree. 

Supreme de Volaille aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Chauxfroix de Foie-gras. 

Salade de Filets de Soles a la Ravigotte. 

ROTS. 

Faisans et Chapons au Cresson. 

Artichauts frits. 

Choux-Fleurs, sauce au beurre. 

Haricots Verts sautes. 

Epinards au Veloute. Charlotte Russe au Chocolat. 

Timbale de Poires a I'ltalienne. 

Gelee Macedoine de Fruits. Pains la Mecque. 

Dessert. 



Served by M. Benoit, etc., etc. 



i860. 



f 



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io8 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




FAMILLE ROY ALE DE PRUSSE. 

Potage Riz a I'Indienne. CEufs de Vanneau, Beurre Frais. 

Filets de Soles k la Normande. 

Noix de Veau et Jambon, sauce madere. 

Epinards. Legumes. 

Crepinettes de Foie-gras a la Perigueux. 

Salade de homard, a la Gelee. 

Gelinottes roties, Cresson. 

Asperges Sauce, au Pain frit. 

Peches a la Conde. 

Meringues du Roi. 

Fromage. Salade. Compote. 



Served at Berlin, by M. N. Dubois, etc., etc. 



FAMILLE ROYALE DE DANEMARK. 

Chateau-Kirvan. Potage Tortue a FAnglaise. 

Melon. 
Porto. Petites Croustades a I'AUemande. 

Sherry. Gros Cabillaud, sauce aux huitres. 

Vin Vieux du Rhin. Cimier de Daim Pique. 

Ris de Veau en B ordure, aux Truffes. 
Chateau Larose. Homard a I'Indienne. 

Vieux Madere. Pate de Foie-gras de Strasbourg. 
Cote-Rotie. Petits Pois au Naturel. 

Choux-Fleurs a la Hollandaise. 

Punch a la N^politaine. 

Champagne-Gremant. Dindonneaux rotis, aux Jus. 

Compote. Salade. 

Ponding Glace a la Royale. 

Gelee au Vin de Sauterne. 

Malvoisie. Gateaux decores aux Fruits. 

Glaces. Dessert. 




Served by M, VlALE, 1867. 




PRESIDENCE DES ETATS-UNIS D'AMERIQUE. 

Potage Tortue Verte. 

HORS d'ceuvre. 

Petites Croustades a la Reine. 

POISSON. 

Filets de Basse Rayee au Gratin. 
RELEVES. 

Langues de Veau a la Bechamel. 
Dinde Sauvage a la Regence. 

ENTREES. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Soubise. 

Boudin de Perdreaux k la Richelieu. 

Supreme de Volaille aux TrufFes. Pain de Gibier a la Bellevue. 

Sorbets a I'Araericaine. 

ROTS. 

Canvas-back Ducks. Faisans Bardes au Jus. 

ENTREMETS. 

Petits Pois et Asperges. 

Charlotte Russe. 

Macedoine de Fruits. Abricots a la Conde. 



Served to President Buchanan, at Washington, by 
M. Adolphe Hardy. 



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SHAKSPERE DINNERS. 



J 



TT^ 



*-^ 







I. 

A DINNER WITH HAMLET. 

Fin-Bec dedicates this Hamlet Menu, sent to him from Philadelphia by 
that distinguished American Shaksperian scholar, Mr. Horace Howard 
FuRNESS, to Henry Irving, the noblest interpreter of Shakspere's 
masterpiece it has been his lot to see. 



"I 






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SHAKSPERE DINNERS. 



113 



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en 



** 



SHAKSPERE ANNUAL COMMEMORATION, 

APOSTLES. 

Wednesday, Dec. 30, 1857. 

EXERCISES. 
USUAL READING— HAMLET, Act v. , 

Subjects for Discussion. 
The Earlier Editions of Shakspere. Shakspere's Visit to Kenilworth. 



[800. 



Before Dinner. 
Brandenburg Brandy, 1820. Hines Chalopin, 
Sherry with Wine Bitters. 

Dinner. 

Chintoteague Oysters on Shell. 

Wine — Chablis. 

Soup a la Reine. 
Wine — Amontillado Sherry, 185 1. 

Fish — Boiled Cod, with anchovy sauce. 
Wine— Sherry, Mosel, Muscatel. 

Roast Saddle of Southdown Mutton. Baked Potatoes. 
Wines — Moet Champagne, Chateau Margaux, 1840, Dom-Dechanel. 

Broiled Oysters. Fillet, with Mushrooms and Truffles. Roast Potatoes. 

Plain Salad. 

Wines — Moet Champagne, Dom-Dechanel, Steinberger Cabinet, 1846, 

Zeres Sherry, 1851. 

Canvas-back Ducks. Potatoes, plain. 

Wines — Chateau-Margaux, 1840, Chateau Montrose, 1846, 

Clos de Vougeot, 1851. 

Terrapin. Roast Potatoes. 

Wines — Messchert Madeira, Fish Madeira, 1811, Kane Madeira. 

Roman Punch, Savarin. 

Liqueurs — Apostle's Punch, Oxford Punch, Brandy of 1800, 

Brandy of 1820. 

Dry Fruits. Stilton Cheese. 

Coffee. Cigars. 






" We adjourn." 



Hen. VIII., Act ii., Scene 4. 

I 



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ij 



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114 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 





TOASTS. 
i. — William Shakspere, Gentleman. 

Stratford Parish Register, Anno 1616. 

2. — Our Annual. 

" Of all, the fair resort of gentlemen." 

Two Gent. Ver., Act i., Scene 2. 

3.— Absent Apostles. 

" a gap in our Great Feast." 

Macbeth, Act ill., Scene 2. 

4. — Present Apostles. 

" great friends 

Did feast together." 

2 IIe7t. IV., Act IV., Scene 2. 

5.— Our Medical Brothers. 

" Ghost unlaid, forbear thee." 

Cymheline, Act ly., Scene 2. 

■\ 
6.— Our Legal Brothers. 

"Well, Time is the Old Justice that examines all 
such offenders, and let Time try them." 

As You Like It, Act iv., Scene i. 

7.— Our Bachelor Brothers. 

" I do much wonder, that one man seeing how much 
another man is a fool, when he dedicates his behaviour 
to love, will, after he hath laughed at such shallow 
follies in others, become the argument of his own scorn, 
by falling in love." 

Much Ado, Act 11., Scene 3: 

8.— Our Benedick Brothers. 

" Honour, ricl^es, marriage blessing, 
Long continuance and increasing, 
Hourly joys be still upon you." 

Tempest, Act iv., Scene i.— Song. 



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SHAKSPERE DINNERS. II5 


1 






DISPUTED PASSAGES IN "HAMLET." 


i 




Ham, 


, Saw ! Who ? Act i., Scene 2. 


1 




Pol. 


Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, 

But not express'd in fancy ; rich, not gaudy ; 

For the apparel oft proclaims the man ; 

And they in France, of the best rank and station, 

Are of a most select and generous chief in that. 

Act I., Scene 3. 


i 

1 




Ham. 


The King doth wake to-night, and takes his souse. 
Keeps wassel and the swaggering upspring reels ; 

Act I., Scene 4. ; 






Ham. 


And thus the native hue of resolution 

Is sicldied o'er with the pale cast of thought ; 

And enterprises of great pith and moment, ' 

With this regard, their currents turn away. 

And lose the name of action. 

Act III., Scene i. ; 






Ham. 


Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice, 

And could of men distinguish her election. 

She hath sealed thee for herself. 

Act III., Scene 2. 






Queen. 


This is the very coinage of your brain ; ^ 
This bodily creation ecstasy 
Is very cunning in. 

Act III., Scene 4. 






Ham. 


That monster, custom, who all sense doth eat 
Of habit's devil, is angel yet in this : 
That to the use of actions fair and good 
He likewise gives a frock, or livery, 
That aptly is put on. 

Act TIL, Scene 4. 


1 


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4. 





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ii6 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 






First Clown. A pick-axe and a spade, a spade 

For and eke a shrouding sheet. 

O, a pit of clay for to be made 
For such a guest is meet. 



^S 



*^ 



f 



Act v.. Scene 2. 



Ham. Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well, 

When our deep plots do pall : and that teach us 

There's a Divinity that shapes our ends, 

Rough-hew them how we will. 

Act v.. Scene 2. 

Ham. For by the image of my cause, I see 

The portraiture of his ; I'll count his favours. 

Act v., Seene 2. 

Ham. Sir, his definement suffers no perdition in you ; 

though, I know, to divide him inventorially would 
dizzy the arithmetic of memory ; and yet but raw 
neither in respect of his quick sail. 

Act v.. Scene 2. 

Ham. O God ! Horatio, what a wounded name, 

Things standing thus unknown, shall live behind me ? 

Act v., Scene 2. 

Friar. ,0, so hght a foot 

Will ne'er wear out the everlasting flint. 
A lover may bestride the gossamers 
That idle in the wanton summer air, 
And yet not fall. 

Rom, dr* Jul., Act 11., Scene 6. 



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SHAKSPERE DINNERS. II7 



II. 

MDCCCLXXII. 

[564, April 26, Gulielmus Filius Johannes Shakspere. 

16 16, Will Shakspere, Gent. 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL DINNER 

OF 

THE SHAKSPERE SOCIETY OF PHILADELPHIA. 

Tuesday, April 23, 1872. 



Con. this day, 

it in golden letters should be set 

Among the high tides in the Kalender ? — III. i. 85. 
Fran. The yearely course that brings this day about. 

Shall never see it, but a holyday. — III. i. 81. 
Sal. beshrew my soule 

But I do love the favour, and the forme 

Of this most faire occasion. — V. iv. 49. 
Dolph. feasts. 

Full warm of blood, of mirth, of gossipping : — V. ii. 58. 

Bill of I^are. 
Con. The Canon of the Law is laide on him. — II. i. 180. 
Dal. let this be coppied out, 

And keepe it safe for our remembrance. — V. ii. i. 
Penib. This acte, is an ancient tale new told. — IV. ii, 18. 

Dinner 6 p.m. 
John. repaire 

To our solemnity. — II. i, 554, 
John. Here once againe we sit ; once again crown'd 

And look'd upon, I hope, with chearefull eyes. — IV. ii, I. 
John. the fat ribs of peace 

Must by the hungry now be fed upon. — III. iii. 9. 
Bast. Cry hauocke kings. — II. i. 356. 
Bast. Bell, Booke, and Candle, shall not driuve me back. — III. iii. 

St. Augustin's. 
John. to the Abbey. — V. iii. 6. 




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ii8 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




Bast. 

Dolph. 
Fran. 

Huh. 
Huh. 
Bast. 
Huh. 

John. 

John. 

Aust. 
jfohn. 



Sal. 
Sal. 
P. 
Pemh, 



at mine Hostesse dore. — II. i. 288. 
at home 
At your den sirrah. — II. i. 289. 

Benedicite. 
To give us warrant from the hand of hcauvcn, 
And on our actions set the name of right 
With holy breath.— V. ii. 66. 
Be pleased then 
To pay that dutie which you truly owe, 
To him that owes it. — Hi i. 246. 

Oysters, on the Half Shell. 

The mouth of passage shall we fling wide ope, 

And give you entrance. — II. i. 449. 

a faire divided excellence, 

Whose fulnesse of perfection lyes in him. — II. i. 438. 

Leave them as naked as the vulgar ayre. 

Wine; La Tour Blanche 1865. 

If lustie love should go in quest of beautie, 

Where should he find it fairer than in Blanch : 

***** 
Wh,ose veines bound richer love than Lady Blanch ? 

— II. ii. 424 — 43 1 . 

Runnes tickling vp and downe the veines. — III. iii. 44. 

SOUPE A LA ReINE. 

Wine : Amontillado Sherry 1857. 
Is all too wanton, and too full of gawdes. — III. iii. 37. 

California Salmon boiled, with Lobster Sauce. 

that utmost corner of the West 
Salute thee for her King. — II. i. 29. 

I was amaz'd 
Vnder the tide ; but now — 
Aloft the flood.— IV. ii. 137. 
Neptune's armes clippeth thee about. — V. ii. 34. 
What is he lyes heere } 
Made proud with pure and princely beauty. — IV. iii. 33. 
Cut him to pieces. — IV. iii. 93. 



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SHAKSPERE DINNERS. II9 



Underloin of Beef larded, with Mushrooms and Truffles. 
Pemb. So sole and so vnmatcheable.— IV. iii. 52. 
Mel. we swore to you 

Deere amity, and everlasting love. — V. iv. 19. 
French Peas. 
Bast. Feast vpon whole thousands of the French. — V. ii. 1 78. 
Dolph. What is that peace to me ? — V, ii. 92. 

Bermuda Potatoes. 
Con, Crooked, swart, prodigious. — III. i. 46. 
Bast. Out of his ragges. — II. ii. 457. 
Bast. He smoake your skin-coat. — II. i. 139. 
Sal. The anticke, and well noted face 

Of plaine old foime. — IV. ii. 21. 

Wine: Chateau Yquem 1861. 
Con. Of nature's guifts, thou mayst with Lillies boast, 

And with this half-blowne Rose.— III. i. 53. 
John. The blood and deerest valued bloud of France. — III. i. 343. 

Pate a la Financi^re. 
John. within this wall of flesh 

There is a soule. — III. iii. 20. 
Bast. Turn thou the mouth of thy artillerie. 

As we will ours, against these sawcie walles. — II. ii. 403. 

Wines: Sillery Sec, Moet et Chandon 1867. 
Chat. a brauer choyse of dauntlesse spirits — 

Did neuer flote vpon the swelling tide. — II. i. 72. 
Con. with these christall beads heaven shall be brib'd. — II. i. 171 . 

Henkell's Sparkling Scharzberg 1867. 
Huh. Both are alike, and both alike we like. — II. i. 331. 
Mes. Be of good comfort : for the great supply. — V. iii. 9. 
Fran. A popsure out. — I. i. 68. 

Wines: Rudesheimer Berg 1857, Liebfrauenmilch aus 
Kloster Garten 1862. 
John. Our Abbies and our Priories shall pay. — I. i. 48. 
John. Of hoording Abbots, imprisoned angclls 
Set at libertic.— III. iii. 8. 



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120 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



m.\ 



Huh. O two such silver currents when they joyne 

Do glorifie the bankes that bound them in. — II. ii. 441. 

Sorbet. 
John. kisse my parched Hps, 

And comfort me with cold. — V. vii. 39. 
John. winter come 

To thrust his ycie fingers in my maw. — V. vii. 36. 

Terrapin a l'Augustin. 
Bast. not alone in habit and deuice, 

exterior forme, outward accoutrement. — I. i. 210. 
John. I loue thee well, 

And by my troth I think thou lou'st me weU. — III. iii. 54. 

Wine : SchLoss Johannisberg. 1862. 
Bast. Needs must you lay your heart at his dispose. — I. i. 263. 

English Snipe Larded : Saratoga Potatoes. 
John. of England's breed. — II. ii. 275. 

Bast. well wonne is stiU weU shot ■ 

And I am I.^I. i. 174. 
Bast. Sparrow — 

Sir Robert might haue eat his part in me 

Vpon good Friday, and nere broke his fast. — I. i. 231. 

Wines: Schloss Johannisberg 1869, Queen's Madeira 1819. 
John. I am almost asham'd 

To say what good respect I haue of thee. — III. iii. 27. 
Bast. Ha! Majesty: how high thy glory towers 

When the rich blood of Kings is set on fire. — II. i. 350. 

Dressed Lettuce. 



Pan. 
Sal. 



Old Qii. 



How green you are, and fresh in this old world ! — III. iv. 145. 
The heigth, the crest : or crest vnto the crest. — IV. iii. 45. 

Lobster Salad. 

yon greene boy shall haue no sun to ripe the 
bloome. — II. ii. 472. 






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SHAKSPERE DINNERS. 



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121 



Basi. as red as new enkindled fire. — IV. ii. 163. 

Sal. Be of good comfort — for you are borne 

To set a forme vpon that indigest. — V. vii. 25. 

LiMBOURGER ChEESE. 

John. sullen presage of your owne decay. — I. i. 28. 

Sal. I am stifled with this smell. — IV. iii. 113. 

Frozen Coffee. 

Bast. Sweet, sweet, sweet poyson for the ages tooth. — I. i. 213, 
Art. the instrument is cold. — IV. i. 104. 

Omelette au Rhum.. 

John. bullets wrapt in fire. — II. ii. 227. 

Bast. fire, and smoake and bounce.— II. ii. 462. 

Fresh Fruits. 

Con. Giue yt a plum, a cherry, and a figge. — II. i. 161. 

Wine: White Port 1847. 

Cigars. 

John. They burn in indignation.- — IV. ii. 103. 
Mel. whose blacke contagious breath 

Already smoakes about the burning Crest. — V. iv. 33. 
Fran. and thou shalt turne 

To ashes. — III. i. 344. 
Art. There is no malice in this burning cole. 

The breath of heauen hath blowne this spirit out, 

And strew'd repentant ashes on its head. — IV. i. 109. 
Art. make it blush 

And glow with shame of your proceedings. — IV. i. 113. 

The Secretary's Pipe. 

Hub. stealing that sweete breath 

Which was embounded in this beauteous clay. — IV. iii. 136. 
John. folded vp in smoake. — II. i. 129. 



^^ 



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V 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




Bast. 



Dolph. 
Pemh. 

Huh. 



Black Coffee. 
Ha ? I'le tell thee what. 
Thou'rt — as black, nay nothing, is so blacke. — IV. iii. 

Liqueur : Kirschwasser. 
cull'd these fiery spirits. — V. ii. 113. 
allay the burning qualitie 
Of that feU poison.— V. vii. 8. 

they say fine Moones were seene to-night : 
Foure fixed, and the fift did whirle about 
The other foure, in wondrous motion. — IV. ii. 182. 



Members Present. 
Bast. This is worship full society. — I. i. 205. 



Richard L. Ashhurst. 
Henry Armitt Brown. 
J. M. Da Costa. 
Samuel Dickson. 
Asa I. Fish. 
Horace Howard Furness. 



Charles Hare Hutchinson. 

Charles P. Krauth. 

John G. R. McEh-oy. 

James Parsons. 

Alfred Vezin. 

George W. Woodward. 



191. 



Adjournment. 

Bast. forrage, and runne. — V. i. 59. 

Dolph. we bid good night. — V. v. 6. 

Bast. My knightly stomacke is suffis'd.— I. i. 

John. The mid-night bell 

Did with his yron tongue, and brazen mouth 

Sound on into the drouzie race of night. — III. iii. 37. 

All the citations this year are from our Winter's study - 

KING JOHN. 

FoL. 1623. 



Philadelphia : 

One Hundred Copies privately printed for the Shakspere Society 

by Ring and Baird, Printers to the Society. 



«-^^ 



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SHAKSPERE DINNERS. 



123 



V 



III. 

MDCCCLXXV. 

1564, April 26, Gulielmus Filius Johannes Shakspere. 
1616, April 25, Will Shakspere, Gent. 

Laer. he is the Brooch indeed, 

And lemme of all our Nation. — IV. vii. 94. 

Ham. A Combination, and a forme indeed, 

Where euery God did seeme to set his Seale, 

To giue the world assurance of a man. — III. iv. 55. 



THE 

Hor. 

Ham. 

Hor. 

King. 
King. 

Mar. 

Fra. 
Ham. 

Pol. 



Hor. 
Oph. 
Cour. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL DINNER 

OF 

SHAKSPERE SOCIETY OF PHILADELPHIA. 

It is a custome ? 

I marry ist ; — I. iv. 12. 

some Enterprize 
That hath a stomacke in't : — I. i. 98. 
wee'l Feast together. — II. ii. 84. 
Set me the Stopes of wine vpon that table : — V. ii. 278. 

Friday, 23rd April. 
So hallow' d, and so gracious is the time. — I. i. 164. 

Dinner at 6 p.m. at the Merchants' Club. 

come most carefully vpon your houre. — I. i. 6. 
This heauy headed reueale east.— I. iv. 17. Quarto 1604. 

Members Present. 
Looke you Sir, 
Enquire me first * * * 

And how, and who ; what meanes ; and where they keepe : 
What company, at what expence : — II. i. 7. 

a list of lawlesse resolutes 
For foode and diet. — I. i. 98. Quarto 1604. 

Courtiers, Soldiers, SchoUers : Eye, tongue, sword. 
Th' expcctansie and Rose of the faire State. — III. i. 159. 
ful of most excellent differences. — V. ii. 112. Quarto 1604. 



■3 



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T^ 







124 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




Asa I. Fish. 

Horace Howard Fumess. 
Victor Guillou. 
Charles P. Krauth. 
John G. R. McElroy. 
M. Huizinga Messchert. 
Alfred Vezin. 



George Allen. 
Richard L. Ashhurst. 
A. Sydney Biddle. 
Henry Armitt Brown. 
J. M. Da Costa. 
T. De Witt Cuyler, 
Samuel Dickson. 

Henry Galbraith Ward. 

The Dean in the Chair. 
Laer. Hee may not, as vnuallued persons doe, 

Came for himselfe ; for, on his choyce depends 

The sanctity and health of the weole State. 

And therefore must his choyce be circumscrib'd 

Vnto the voyce and yeelding of that Body, 

Whereof he is the Head. — I. iii. 19. 
King. Heere in the cheere and comfort of our eye, 

Our cheefest.— I. ii. 106. 

Bill of Fare. 
Ham. Here's the Commission, read it at more leysure : —V. ii. 26. 
Ham. Words, words, words. — II. ii. 193. 
Hor. heere and there, 

Shark'd vp. — I. i. 98. 
Ham. Excellent Ifaith, of the Camelions dish : I eate. the Ayre 
promise-cramm'd. — III. ii. 89. 

Little Neck Clams. 
Laer. your chast Treasure open 

To his vnmastred importunity. — I. iii. 31. 
Clo. dig'd ;— V. i. 42. 

Hor. Harbindgers preceading. — I. i. 122. Quarto 1604. 

Hor. And prologue to the Omen comming. — I. i. 123. Quarto 1604. 

Wine: Chablis 1865. 
Pol. Giue first admittance to — II. ii. 51. 

Soup: Bisque aux Ecrevisses a la Royale. 
Harn. a Crab. — II. ii. 207. 

Hor. away with the shell. — V. ii. 19-1. 




Wine : Topaz Sherry. 
Ham. Pale, or Red ? 
Hor. Nay, very pale. — I. ii. 233. 
Ham. look you how pale he glares. — III. ii. 125. 

Delaware Shad X la Chambord. 
Queen. a creature Natiue, — IV. vii. 180. 

Wine: Marcobrunner Cabinet 1865. 
Ham. draughts of Rhenish. — I. iv. 10. 

Bermuda Potatoes. 
Hor. in Russet mantle clad, — I. i. 166. 

Cucumbers. Radishes. 

Rosin. the indiiferent Children of the earth. — II. ii. 227. 

Saddle of Southdown Mutton. 
Ham. the Parragon of Animals ; — ^11. ii. 321. 

Ham. ouer-done, is fro the purpose — III. ii. 23. 

ToMATEs Farcies. 
King. you must not thinke 

That we are made of stufFe, so flat and dull, — IV. vii. 30. 

Wine : W. Roederer frappe ; Pommery Sec. 
Ham. presentment of two Brothers : — III. iv. 54. 

Pol. The flash and out-breake — II. i. 33. 

Ham. The Bubbles are out. — V. ii. 202. 

Petits Pois au Naturel. 
Laer. in the Morne and liquid dew of Youth, — I. iii. 41. 

Asparagus. 
Hor. once me thought 

Laer. It lifted vp it head. — I. ii. 215. 

the Infants of the Spring — I. iii. 39. 

Metternich's Schloss Johannisberger 5S62. 
Ham. a delicate and tender Prince, 

Whose spirit with diuine ambition puft. 

— IV. iv. 149. Quarto 1604. 



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126 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



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Pol. 



Supr^;me of Spring Chicken A. la Pompadour. 
excellent white bosome, these.— II. ii. 113. 



Plain Celery. 
Be??i. stalkes. — I. i. 50. 

Wine: Chateau Lafitte 1868, Perrier Jouet 1872. 
Hajn. married * * * 

but no more like * * * 
Than I too Hercules. — I. ii. 153. 
Pol. in France of the best ranck and station. — I. iii. 73. 

Sorbet a la LACHRYMyECHRisTi. 

Hai7i. Like Niobe, all teares,— I. ii. 149. 

Fra. For this releese much thankes : — 'Tis bitter cold. — 1. i. 7. 

Laer. Occasion smiles vpon a second leaue. — I. iii. 54. 

Clo. Too't agame, Come.^V. i. 56. 



Pol. 



Ham. 

Oph. 
Ham. 



Cigarettes. 

these. blazes, Daughter, 
Giuing more light than heate : — I. iii. 



17. 



English Snipe sous Canape. 

I haue that Within, which passeth show ; 
These but the Trappings, — I. ii. 85. 
Larded all. — IV. v. 37. Quarto 1604. 

fit and season'd for his passage ? — III. iii. 85. 



Wine: Chambertin 1868. 
Laer. A Violet in the youth of Primy Nature ; — I. iii. 8. 

Potatoes X la Parisienne. 
King. praise your excellence, 

And set a double varnish on the fame 
The Frenchman gaue you, — IV. vii. 134. 

Wine : Clos Vougeot 1868, Chevalier Montrachet 1868. 
King. In equall Scale weighing Delight — I. ii. 12. 



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Terrapin X la Maryland. 
Mar. Wliat, ha's this thing appear'd againe to-night. — I. i. 21. 
Ham. A beast that wants discourse of Reason — I. ii. 150. 
Ham. crawling betweene Heauen and Earth. — III. i. 130. 
Clo. hath clawed me in his clutch. — V. i. 80. Quarto 1604. 

Wine : Madeira 1829. 
Oph. of so sweet breath compos'd, 

As made the things more rich, — III. i. 98. 
Ham, For you yourselfe Sir, should be old as I am, — II. ii. 206. 

Salad. 
Laer. Collected from all the Simples that haue Vertue 

Vnder the Moone, — IV. vii. 144. 
Ham. Sallets in the lines, to make the matter sauoury ; — II. ii. 461. 

Madeira 1819. 
Gho. I am thy Father's Spirit, — I. v. 9. 

Omelette Soufflee a la Maraschino. 
Oph. puft, — I. iii. 49. 

Guild. A thing my Lord ? 
Ham. Of nothing : IV. ii. 3 1 . 
Laer. Sweet not lasting 

The suppliance of a minute ? No more. — I. iii. 9. Folio 1623. 
Dessert. 
Ice Cream Mont Blanc. 
Ham.. as chast as Ice, as pure as Snow, — III. i. 140. 

Oph. White his Shro-w'd as the Mountaine Snow. — IV. v. 35. 

Wine: Port 1825. 
King. Tirrie qualifies the sparke and fire of it : — IV. vii. 117. 

Fruits. 
Pol. shall be the fruite to that great feast. — II. ii. 52. Quarto 1604. 
Ham. as wholesome as sweet.— II. ii. 466. Quarto 1C04. 

Cheese : Limburger. 
Ham,. you shall nose him as you go vp,~IV. iii. 37. 

Gruyere.' 
King. The most vulgar thing to sence, — I. ii. 100. 








28 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




Black Coffee. 
Ham. roasted in wrath and fire, — II. ii. 483. 

Ham. did the night resemble — II. ii. 475' 

Liqueurs. 
Clo. fetch me a stoupe of Liquor. — V. i. 68. 

Hor. Of vnimprouved mettle, hot and full, — I. i. 96. 

TOKAY-I-AZUBOR. 

Ham. too deare a halfepeny; — II. ii. 281. 

Absinthe. 
Ham. Wormwood, Wormwood. — III. ii. 191. 

Cigars. 
Lucian. Midnight Weeds — III. ii. 268. 
I Player. with the whiffe and winde — II. ii. 495. 

Secretary Emeritus his Pipe. 
Ham. Will you play vpon this Pipe ? — III. ii. 366. 
Ham. there is much musicke, 

in this little Organe,— III. ii. 383. 

Adjournment. 

Gho, My hower is almost come, — I. v. 2 

Ham. What hower now .? 

Hor. I thinke it lackes of twelve. 

Mar. No, it is strooke. — I. iv. 3. 

Hor. then, the Morning Cocke crew loud ; — I. ii. 218. 

Ham. farewell. — I. ii. 254. 

All. Exeunt.— I. ii. 253. 

All the citations this year are from our Winter's study "Hamlet," 
and have been verified by the copy of the First Folio 1623 and a copy 
of the Quarto of 1604 Ashbee's Facsimile in the Library of the Members. 



Philadelphia : 
One Hundred and Fifty Copies privately printed for the Shakspere Society. 

MDCCCLXXV. 



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CEREMONIAL 
ENTERTAINMENTS. 



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CEREMONIAL 
ENTERTAINMENTS. 



MENU DE 20 COUVERTS. 
Service a la Fran^aise. 

PREMIER SERVICE. 

Potage a la Palatine. 
Consomme aux Quenelles de Volaille. 

Barbue, sauce hoUandaise. 

PUNCH IMPERIAL. 

Gigot de Mouton braise. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Puree de Celeri. 

Ris de Veau a la Toulouse, en Croustade, 

Becassines a la Marechale. 

Timbale de Homards a la Bechamel. 

DEUXll^ME SERVICE. 

, Quartier de Chevreuil, sauce poivrade. 
Dindonneaux rotis. 

Souffle aux Pommes. 

Cardons ^ I'Espagnole. Fonds d'Artichauts a la Barigoule. 

Gelee d' Oranges a la Mandarine. 

Croquante de Genoise a la Creme Frambois^e. 



Glaces et Dessert. 



Urbain Dubois. 
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MENU DE 60 COUVERTS, SERVI PAR SIX. 

S twice a la Russe. 

Huitres. Citron. Beurre. 

SOUPIERES. 

3. Potage a la Windsor. 
3. Consomme de Gibier, Regence. 

HORS d'ceuvre. 

3. Petites Bouchees ^ la Reine. 

3. Petites Croustades de Grives. 

POISSONS. 

3. Grosse Truite, sauce bordelaise. 
3. Soles frites, sauce colbert. 

RELEVES. 

3. Longe de Veau rotie, sauce tomate. 
3. Quartier de Chevreuil, Poivrade. 

ENTREES. 

3. Filets de Volaille, sauce supreme. 

3. Quenelles de Faisan aux Truffes. 

3. Mayonnaise de Homards. 

3. Chauxfroix de Foie-gras. 

ROTS. 

^ 3. Poulardes au Cresson. 

3. Becasses aux Croutes. 

LEGUMES. 

3. Petits Pois a la Fran^aise. 

3. Cardons, sauce madere. 

ENTREMETS. 

I 3. Beignets de Creme aux Fruits. 

3. Ponding de Riz aux Am andes. 3. Gelee de Fraises au Champagne. 
3. Gateau Napolitain Historic. 

FLANCS. 

3, Corbeille en Nougat, garnie, 
3, Croquembouche de Genoise. 

Urbain Dubois. 



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CEREMONIAL ENTERTAINMENTS. 133 



BAL D'ENFANTS, 80 COUVERTS. 



(Les mets chauds sont places sur la table.) 

SERVICE CHAUD. 

Riz au Lait d'Amandes. Sagou au Consomme. 

2. Rissoles de Legumes. 2. Bouchees a la Bechamel. 

Filets de Volaille aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

(Sei-vis sur 40 assiettes.) 

Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Puree de Marrons. 

(Servies sur 40 assiettes.) 

SERVICE FROID. 

2. Petits Canetons de Volaille a la Gelee. 

4. Galantines de Mauviettes en caisses. 

2. Sandwiches varies. 

2. Petits Pains a la Fran^aise. 

I. Arbre en Nougat portant des Fruits glaces. 

I. Croquembouche orne de Sucre file. 

2. Poisson en Gateau Punch. 

I. Jambon imite a la Gelee. 

2. Blanc-manger. 2. Charlotte Russe. 

2. Paniers d'Oranges a la gelee. 

2. Pots de Creme au Chocolat. 

3. Corbeilles de Fruits. 

4. Assiettes montees, garnies de Bonbons. 

4. Tambours garnis de Petits Fours, 



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134 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 

xMENU DE DEJEUNER POUR 40 COUVERTS. 

HORS D'CEUVRE. 

2. Beurre Frais. 

2. Radis Nouveaux. 

2. Crevettes. 

2. Olives Farcies. 

2. Salami de Bologne. 

2. Sardines a I'liuile. 

Pate de Foie-gras de Strasbourg. 

2. Croquettes de Volaille. 

2. Andouilles truffees. 

2. Maquereaux ^ la Maitre d'Hotel. 

2. Cotelettes de Veau aux Petits Pois. 

2. Homards ^ la Mayonnaise. 

2, Becassines roties. 

2. Souffle aux Ponrmes. 

2. Tartelettes de Cerises. 

Baba au Madere. 




the. 



Fromage. 



Fruits. 



Dessert. 



Cafe. 



Urbain Dubois. 






■^ 



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CEREMONIAL ENTERTAINMENTS. 



MENU DE 20 COUVERTS. 

Service a la Franqaise. 

PREMIER SERVICE. 

Potage a la Palestine. 
Consomme aux Quenelles de Volaille. 

Barbue, sauce hollandaise. 

PUNCH IMPERIAL. 

Gigot de Mouton braise. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Puree de C^leri. 

Ris de Veau a la Toulouse, en Croustade. 

Becassines ^ la Marechale. 

Timbale de Homards a la Bechamf*, 



DEUXIEME SERVICE. 

Quartier de Chevreuil, sauce poivrade. 

Dindonneaux rotis. 

Souffle aux Pommes. 

Cardons a I'Espagnole. 

Fonds d'Artichauts a la Barigoule. 

Gelee d'Oranges a la Mandarine. 

Croquante de Genoise a la Creme Framboisee. 

Glaces et Dessert. 



135 




<-*■ 






Urbain Dubois. 



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a, 




13^-) 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




MENU DE 15 COUVERTS. 

Service a VAnglaise. 

PREMIER SERVICE. 
2 SOUPIERES. 

Potage aux Moules. Consomme a la Roy ale. 

2 RELEVES. 

Truite grillee, a la Maitre d'Hotel. 
Boeuf sale, aux Legumes. 

4 ENTREES. 

Pate de Poulets a I'Anglaise. 
Cotelettes d'Agneau ^ la Villeroi. 
Filets de Chevreuil au Macaroni. 
Paupiettes de Soles ^ I'ltalienne. 




DEUXIEME SERVICE. 
2 ROTS. 

Grouses bardees. 
Chapon au Cresson. 

2 BOUTS. 

Dampfnouilles a la Vanille. 
Pommes a la Richelieu. 

4 ENTREMETS. 

Chicoree aux CEufs poches. 
Salade de Queues d'Ecrevisses. 
Bavarois aux Noix Fraiches. 
Jambonneaux au Biscuit. 

Side-Table. 
Noix de Veau. Langue. Pate de Gibier. 

Urbain Dubois 




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139 



MANSION HOUSE MENUS. 



BANQUET TO HER MAJESTY'S MINISTERS. 
Mansion House, July 27, 1864. 

THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM LAWRENCE, LORD MAYOR. 



Tortue a I'Anglaise. Filets de Truite a la Tartare. 
Perches a la Varsovie. Cotelettes de Saumon a ITndienne. 

Filets de Soles a la Sultane. Rougets au Vin d'Oporto. 

Saumon de Gloster bouilli. Turbot, sauce de homard. Merlans frits. 



Balotines de Volaille a la Princesse, 
Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Gratin de Pigeons aux Chasseurs. 

Escalopes de Ris de Veau a I'Oseille. 

Kremouskis a la Polonaise. Petites Grenadines a la Tomate. 



Chapons farcies aux TrufFes. Poulets aux Petits Pois. 

Jambons sautes au Vin de Madere. Pdtes a la Maitre d' Hotel. 

Poularde au supreme. Langues de Boeuf aux Epinards. 

Vol au Vent aux Champignons. Pates a la Francaise. 

Cote de Boeuf a la Napolitaine. Selles du Mouton rotis. 

Quartiers d'Agneau rotis. Hanches de Venaison. 



Canetons. Levrauts. Oisons. 

Dindonneaux piques. Homard en Gelee d'Aspique. 

Crevettes en buissons. Salades de Homard. 

Charlotte a la Russe. Cremes a la Martinique. Poudings Moelleux. 

Tourtes de Fruits a la Creme. Gelees claires aux Millefruits. 

Suedoises aux Fraises. Meringues glacees a la Parisienne. 

Ponding Diplomatique. Poudings de Savoie. 

Patisserie a la Florentine. GSteau.de Genoise aux Amandes. 

Petits Giteaux meles aux Conserves. Beignets aux Ananas. 

Poudings a la Nesselrode. Petites Soufflees glacees Marasquin. 

Ramaquins au Parmesan. 







H} 



140 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



THE RIGHT HON. BENJAMIN S. PHILLIPS, LORD MAYOR. 

Mansion House, February 28, 1866. 



Tortue a 1' Anglaise. 

Cotelettes de Saumoii a la Calcutta. 

Filets de Soles a la Provencale. Perches a la Varsovie. 

AnguiUes k la Perigord. Saumon en Tranches bouilli. 

Turbot, sauce de homard. Merlans frits. 



Kremouskis a la Polonaise. Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 
Gratin de Rees aux TrufFes. Fricandeau de Veau a I'Oseille. 
Filets de Pigeons a la Bigarade. Chartreuse a la Fran9aise. 

Petites Bouchees au Vermicelle. 



H^ 



Dinde braisee aux TrufFes. Petits Poulets rotis. 

PStes h la Maitre d'Hotel. Langues de Bceuf glacees a la Moderne. 

Chapons farcies aux Champignons: 

Poulardes aux Pointes d'Asperge. Jambons d'York glaces. 

Pates de Perigord. Quartiers d'Agneau rotis. 

Hanches de Mouton rotis. 

Paons piques. Dindonneaux piques. 

Oisons. Pluviers. CerceUes. 



Poudings Moelleux. Tourtes a la Creme. 

Gelees claires a la Martinique. Chartreuse d' Orange. 

Mayonnaises de Homard. AnguiUes en Gelee d'Aspique. , 

Poudings aux Conserves a la Suisse. - Gateau glace a la Marmalade. 

Gelees aux Millefruits. Cremes aux Ananas. 

Croquettes aux Oranges Tangeriennes. Patisserie melee a la Royale. 

Charlottes a la Russe. Meringues glacees a la Vanille. 

Petits Pains a la Reine. 

Beignets a 1' Orange. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

Petites Soufflees glacees. 



< 







CITY MENUS. 141 




THE RIGHT HON. THOMAS GABRIEL, LORD MAYOR. 
Mansion House, March 19, 1867. 



Tortue. 

Rougets au Vin de Bordeaux. Soles a la Normandie. 

Jean Dore a I'ltalienne. 

Filets de Truite a la Tartare. 

Saumon de Gloster bouilli. Turbot au sauce de homard. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 

Ris d'Agneau a la Villeroi* Escalopes de Volaille aux Truifes. 

Petites Croquettes au Vermicelle. 

Charti-euse de Homard au Cardinal. 



Chapons farcies aux Champignons. Jambon saute au Vin. 

Pate a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Langues de Boeuf aux Epinards. 

Poularde a la Montmorenci. 

Petits Poulets a la Reine. P^tes de Perigord. 

Selle de Mouton. Quartier d'Agneau. 



Olsons. Paons piques. Dindonneaux piques. 

Crevettes en buissons. 

Salades de Homard. 

Patisserie a la bonne femme. Meringues a la Venise. 

Gelee aux Millefniits. Suedoises aux Raisins. 

Croques en bouche aux Fruits. Tourte a la Creme. 

Croutes aux Peches. 

Gateau a la Danoise. 

Creme a la VaniUe. Gelees a la Seville. 

Petits Gateaux aux Conserves. 



Petites Soufflees glacees au Marasquin. 
Ponding a la Nesselrode. Bcignets a I'Orangc. 



^^ j't^o ^M\f 



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142 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



BANQUET TO HER MAJESTY'S JUDGES. 
Mansion House, May 28, 1867. 

THE RIGHT HON. THOMAS GABRIEL, LORD MAYOR. 



Tortue. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a la Calcutta*. Anguilles a la Broche. 

Rougets ^ la HoUandaise. Soles a la Normandie. 

Filets de Truite a la Tartare. 

Saumon de Gloster bouilli. Turbot au sauce de homard. 



Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 

Ris de Veau aux Pointes d'Asperge. 

Escalopes de Volaille a la Zingara. ' Gratin de Rees aux TrufFes. 

Filets de Cailles au Vin de Madere. 



Chapons farcies aux TrufFes. Jambon saute au Vin. 

PMe a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Langues de Boeuf aux Epinards. 

Poularde aux Petits Pois. 

Petits Poulets au supreme. Pites de Perigord. 

Selle de Mouton. Quartier d'Agneau. 



Olsons. Canetons. Paons piques. Dindonneaux piques. 

CEufs de Pluviers en Bouquets. 

Crevettes en buissons. Foie-gras en Gelee d'Aspique. 

Chartreuses aux Raisins. 

Patisserie a la bonne femme. 

Meringues a la Venise. Suedoises aux Fruits. ^ 

Ponding de Figues au Rheims. Tourte a la Creme. 

Croutes aux Peches. Giteau & I'Espagnole. 

Creme a la Vanille. Gelees a la Seville. 

Petits Gdteaux aux Conserves. 



Petites Soufflees glacees au Marasquin. Pouding a la Nesselrode. 
Fondu au Parmesan. 



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CITY MENUS. 



143 






DINNER TO THE BISHOPS. 
Mansion House, July 2, 1873. 

THE RIGHT HON. SIR SYDNEY H. WATERLOW, LORD MAYOR. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue et Tortue claire. 



POISSONS. 

Truite de Spey a la Tartare. 

Filets de Soles a la Marechale. 

Saumon de Gloster bouilli. Turbot, sauce de homard. 

ENTREES. 

Vols au Vent a la Financiere. 

Quenelles de Pigeons i la Dreux. 

Escalopes de Ris de Veau ^ la Carlton. 



Petits Poulets a la Reine. 

Poularde aux Champignons. ' Jambon d'York. 

Petits Poulets rotis. 

RELEVtS. 

Selle de Mouton. Quartier d'Agneau. 

ROTS. 

Canetons. Olsons. Pintades piquees. 

ENTREMETS. 

Crevettes en buissons. Bavarois aux Conserves. 

Ponding Moelleux. Meringues a la Creme. 

Gelees claires. , Patisserie a 1' Alexandre. 

Petits Pains I. la Royale. 



RELEVfs. 

Plombieres a la Regence. 

Caviare. 



Soufflees glacees. 



S 



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A 



m 



m 



Tf^T" — *T^** 

144 THE BOOK OF MENU3. 



j BANQUET TO THE MAYORS AND PROVOSTS OF THE 

' ^ UNITED KINGDOM. 

Mansion House, ^une 3, 1874. 

THE RIGHT HON. ANDREW LUSK, M.P., LORD MAYOR. 



POTAGES. 
Tortue et Tortue claire. 

POISSONS. 

Filets de Truite a la Verte. 

Soles de Torbay a la Bellevue. 

Saumon a la Tartare. 

ENTREES. 

Filets de Rees a la Chasseur. 
Vols au Vent a la Financiere. 

RELEVES. 

Petits Poulets a la Regence. 

Langues de Boeuf braisees. 

Jambon d'York. SeUe de Mouton. 

Quartier d'Agiieau. 

ROTS. 

Oisons. Dindonneaux piques. Canetons. 

ENTREMETS. 

Crevettes en buissons. 

Croutes de Cerises ^ la Reine. 

Gelees claires. Bavarois a la Moderne. 

Ponding a la MUitaire. 

Meringues a la Creme. 

RELEVES. 

Poudings a la Nesselrode. Petites Soufflees glacees. 

Caviare. 

,J ' _M , 

' i [ii \^ , ' ' v ' ' ' V " "'' J If] t 



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CITY MENUS. 



45 



BANQUET TO THE REPRESENTATIVES OF LITERATURE, 
ART, AND SCIENCE. 

Mansion House, July 2\, 1874. 

THE RIGHT HON. ANDREW LUSK, M.P., LORD MAYOR. 



POTAGES. 
Tortue et Tortue claire. 

POISSONS. 

Souche de Carrelets. 

Rougets aux Fines Herbes. 

Saumon de Gloster bouilli. 

Blanchaille. 

ENTREES, 

Vols au Vent a la Financiere. 
Cailles en caisses a la Pingueur. 

RELEVES. 

Petits Poulets rotis. 

Jambon d'York. Selle de Mouton. 

Quartiers d'Agneau. 

Hanche de Venaison. 



Olsons. 



Cane tons. 



Dindonneaux piques. 



ENTREMETS. 

Chauxfroix de Foie-gras. 

Meringues a la Creme. 

Gelees aux Conserves. Macedoine au Fruits. 

Petits Pains de Fontainebleau. 

Creme a ITtalienne. 

Beignets aux Ananas, 

RELEVfS. 

Poudings a la Nesselrodc. 
Anchois au Canape. 



•Kft 






^ 




^ 






46 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 






DINNER TO HER MAJESTY'S MINISTERS. 
Mansion House, yzily 22, 1874. 

THE RIGHT HON. ANDREW LUSK, M.P., LORD MAYOR. 



POTAGES. 
Tortue et Tortue claire. 

POISSONS. 

Truite de Spey a la Parisienne. 
' Supremes de Soles a la Bellevue. 
Saumon a la Tartare. Blanchaille. 

entr:ees. 

Chartreuse de Macaroni a la Perigord. 
Epigrammes de Ris de Veau a la Bayonne. 
Cotelettes de Homard glacees a la Norwege. 



Petits Poulets au Macedoine. 
Langiie,s de Boeuf braisees. 
Jambon d'York. Quartier d'Agneau. 

Handle de Venaison. 



ROTS. 

Dindonneaux piques. 

entremets. 



Canetons. 



Crevettes en buissons. Croutes aux Ananas. 

Gelees au Vin. Bavarois a la Moderne. 

Pouding Diplomatique. Meringues a la Creme. 

Creme a la Victoria. 

RELEVJES. 

Poudings a la Nesselrode. 
Petits Biscuits glaces. 

Fondus au Parmesan. 



•* 



^ 



CITY MENUS. 



147 



SHERIFFS^ BANQUETS. 



THE INAUGURATION BANQUET 

Of H. N. NissEN, Esq., and Thomas Gave, Esq., Sheriffs for London 
and Middlesex.— London Tavern, Thursday, October 22, 1863. 



Service a la Russe. 



Glear Turtle. 
Ailerons de Tortue a la Londres. 
Turtle Patties. 



First Course. 

Turtle. 
Ailerons de Tortue en Matelote. 
Tortue Grasse. 




FISH. 

Turbots. Cod Fish. ■ 

Mullets en Papillote. Stewed Eels. 

Boudins de Merlans a la Princesse Alexandra. 

Saute de Merlans aux Huitres. 

Filets of Sole a I'Orly. 

Smelts. 

Seco7zd Course. 

entrees. 

Saute de Filets de Volaille aux TrufFes. 

Ris de Veau a I'Egyptienne. Casserolettes au Salpi9en. 

Filets de Levraut piques aux Tomates, 

Salmis de Pluviers aux Champignons. 

releves. 
Haunches of Venison. Saddles of Mutton. 

Rump of Beef, 

Roast Chickens. Braised Chickens a la Royal e. • 

Roast Geese. York Hams. Tongues. 

Cotes de Boeuf aux Concombres. Oisons braises a la Soubisc 

Carres de Venaison a la Jardiniere. 

L 2 



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148 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



The Inauguration Banquet of H. N. Nissen, Esq. 
Thomas Cave, Esq. — {continued.) 



Third Course. 

rots. 

Partridges. 
Woodcocks. 



Pheasants. 



Snipe. 



entremets. 

Mayonnaise of Chicken. Game Pies. 

Tomates au Gratin. ' Prawns. 

Oysters au Gratin. Mushrooms a la Bordelaise. 



Apricot Jellies. Pineapple Jellies. 

Suedoise de Pommes. Gelee a la Macedoine. Gelee d'Or. 

Vanilla Creams. Gateaux de Pommes. 

Boudins a la Saint Clair. 
Flans de Cerises. Puits d' Amour. Mirlitons. 

Fanchanettes. Florentines. Canapes. Petites Meringues. 

Cheesecakes. Puffs. 

Gateau a la Genoise. Gateau a la Celestine. 

Souffle glace. Souffle de Citron. Plombieres. 

Apple Fritters. Plum Puddings. 

Ices. Dessert. 



WINES. 



Dining Dinner. 

Iced Punch. Fine Pale Sherry. Fine Amontillado. 

Old East India Madeira. Steinberger Hock. 

Sauterne ChMeau Yquem. Madame Cliquot Champagne. 

Nonpareil Sparkling Moselle. Liqueurs. 

Dessert Wines. 
Old Dry Sheiry. Port, Vintage 1840. Claret, Lafitte 1854. 



S 







., (1 



CITY MENUS. 149 






Hj 



DEJEUNER AT S ALTERS' HALL, 

Given by Sills John Gibbons, Esq., Alderman, and James Figgins, 
Esq., Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, Thursday, Sept. 28, 1865. 



Potages a la Reine, Jiilienne, &c. 

entrees. 

Escalopes de Volaille a la Zingara. 

Petites Bouchees a la Reine. 

Ris de Veau en petites caisses. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau glacees aux Champignons. 

COLD, ETC. 

Petits Poulets rotis. Perdreaux, Coqs de; Bruyere. 

Chapons en galantine. Chapons a la Reine. 

Tongues. York Hams. Perigord Pies. Raised Pies. 

Mayonnaises de Homard. Charlottes a la Turque. 

' Suedoise aux fraises. 

Crevettes en bouquets. 

Feuilletage a I'Espagnole. Tourtes a la Creme. 

Meringues a la Suisse. Patisserie a la Florentine. 

Petits Pains a la Duchesse. 

Petites Nouilles a la Marmalade. 

Gelees au Marasquin. Petits Gateaux a la Royale. 

Cremes a la Victoire. 



Champagne — Ruinart's Pale Dry Cremant. 

Claret — Chateau Margaux. 

Sherry — Pale Dry. Amontillado. 

Port — Sandeman & Co. 

Sauterne— Chateau Yquem. 





tt^ 



150 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



THE INAUGURATION BANQUET 

Of Sydney Hedley "Waterlow, Esq., Alderman, and Francis 

Lycett, Esq., Sheriffs of London and Middlesex. — Stationers' 

Hall, October 18, 1 866. 



Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

Rougets au Vin de Bordeaux. Jean Dore a la Hollandaise. 

Filets de Soles a la Pompadour. 

Gratin d'Eperlans aux Huitres. 

Turbot, sauce de homard. Cabillaud bouilli en Tranches. 



Rissoles de Foie-gras a la Russe. 

Chartreuse de Perdreaux a la Franc^-aise. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 

Olives de Becassines aux Truifes. 

Escalopes de Volaille a la Reine. 

Ris de Veau a la Dauphine. 

Ponding de Coq de Bruyere. Dinde braisee aux Truffes. 

Chapons bouillis aux Huitres. Jambon saute au Vin. 

Pate a la Maitre d' Hotel. Petits Poulets au Supreme. 

Selles de Mouton. Hanches de Venaison. 

Perdreaux. Faisans. Coqs de Bruyere. Levrauts. 

Mayonnaises de Homard. 

Crevettes en buissons. 

Poudings a la Savoie. Feuilletage a I'Espagnole. 

Meringues glacees a I9. Napolitaine. 

Petits Gateaux de Genoise aux Macarons, 

Gelees claires aux Millefruits. Suedoises aux Raisins. 

Patisserie melee a la bonne femme. 

Cremes au Gingembre. Poudings Moelleux. 

Gateau a la Roy ale. 

Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

Petites Souflflees glacees au Marasquin. 

Caviare a la Russe. 





S( 



T^ 



BANQUET AT SALTERS' HALL, GIVEN TO 

HER MAJESTY'S JUDGES, 

By Sills John Gibbons, Esq., Alderman, and James Figgins, Esq. 

Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, June 20, 1866. 



POT ages. 
Tortue et Tortue claire. 

POISSONS. 

Truites de Spey a la Chambord. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a ITndienne. 

Jean Dore a la Hollandaise. Filets de Merlans a I'Empereur. 

Turbot, sauce de homard. 

Saumon de Gloster a la Tartare. 

ENTREES. 

Supremes de Volaille a la Zingara. 

Cotelettes de Mouton braisees aux Champignons. 

Cailles en Croustade au Vin de Madere. 

Petites Bouchees a la Princesse. Chartreuse de Homard au Cardinal. 



Chapons bouillis aux Petits Pois-. Jambons sautes au Vin. 

Pdtes a la Maitre d'Hotel. Langues de Boeuf aux Epinards. 

Petits Poulets rotis. Hanches de Venaison. 



Canetons. Dindonneauic piques. Cailles. 

Crevettes en buisson, Homard en Gelee d'Aspique. 

Mayonnaise de Homard. 

Patisserie a la Florentine. Croutes aux Abricols, 

Croquettes aux Cerises en Caramel. 

Gelees claires aux Fraises. Creme a la Martinique. 

Suedoises aux Millefruits. Gateau de Genoise a la Royale. 

Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

Petites Soufflees glacees aux Macarons. 

Ramaquins au Parmesan. 

WINES. 

Sherry— Amontillado. Hock — Steinwein. Scharlachbcrg. 

Sauteme — Chateau Yquem. Champagne — Ruinart. 

Port — Sandeman. Claret — Margaux. 




Mi 




152 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




CITY COMPANIES' MENUS. 



GOLDSMITHS' HALL, 



POTAGES. 

Tortue a I'Anglaise. Consomme a la Printanier. 



Cotelettes de Saumon a la Calcutta. 

Petites Escalopes d'Anguilles a la PieiTe le Grand. 

Filets de Turbot Contis aux Truffes. 

Truites de Lochleven a la Tartare. 

Saumon de Gloster aux Capres. Turbot, sauce de homard. 

Merlans frits. 



Ortolans en petites caisses aux Pointes d'Asperge. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau glacees aux Artichauts. 

Filets de Poularde a la Princesse. Petites Timbales a la Chesterfield. 

Ris d'Agneau blancs a la Bohemienne. 

Filets de Cercelles a la Provencale. 

Petits Poulets aux Langues de Veau. Pate a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Fricandeau de Veau pique a I'Oseille. 

Jambon saute au Vin de Madere. 

Chapons braises aux Champignons. 

Poulard bouilli aux Petits Pois. Langues de Boeuf aux Epinards. 

Pate k la Fran9aise. 



Hanche de Mouton roti. Quartier d'Agneau. Boeuf roti. 



Cailles piquees. Canetons. Dindonneaux piques. Oisons. 

Salade de Homard en Mayonnaise. Crevettes en buissons. 

CEufs de Pluviers en bouquets. 

Patisserie a la Florentine. Suedoise de Raisins a la Creme. 

Gelee claire aux Millefruits. Petits Gateaux a la Marmalade. 

Croques en bouche a P Orange. Gelee a la Seville. 

Meringues de Fommes aux Pistaches. 

Giteau de Compiegne aux Amandes. Creme au Marasquin. 

Petits Pains a la Duchesse. Tourte de Fruit a la Creme. 

Poudings Moelleux. 

RELEVES. 

Petites Soufflees glacees aux Macarons. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

Beignets au Parmesan. Caviare a la Russe. 





H^ 



■* 



CITY MENUS. 



53 



MERCHANT TAYLORS' HALL. 

Thursday, January 25, 1866. 



POT AGES. 

Tortue et Tortue claire. 



POISSONS. 

Filets de Soles a la Pompadour. Anguilles a la Tartare. 

Perches a la Varsovie. 

Jean Dore ^ la HoUandaise. Cabillaud, sauce d'huitres. 

Turbots, sauce de homard. Eperlans frits. 

ENTREES. 

Mauviettes en Cerises aux Truffes. 

Rissoles de Foie-gras a la Russe. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Soubise. 

Ris de Veau a la Tomate. Champignons en Croustade. 



^B- 



Dindes farcis aux Truffes. 

Petits Poulets au Celeri. Pate de Perigord. 

Ponding de Mauviettes a I'Anglaise. 

Petits Poulets rotis. Jambon saute au Vin de Madere. 

P^tes a la Maitre d'Hotel. Langues de Boeuf aux Epinards. 

Selles de Mouton rotis. 

Boeuf roti. Hanches de Mouton rotis. 



Becasses et Becassines. 
Crevettes en buissons. 

Tourtes a la Creme. 
Petits Pates de Noel. 

Suedoise aux Oranges. 



Perdreaux et Faisans. 
Homard en Mayonnaise. 
Poudings Moelleux. 

Gelees claires aux Raisins. 
Cremes aux Ananas. 



Meringues a la Venitienne. 

Gateaux d' Orleans aux Amandes. 

Croquettes aux Fruits en Caramel. Patisserie a la Florentine. 

Petites Soufflees glacees au Marasquin. 

Beignets a 1' Orange. Poudings ^ la Nesselrode. 

Caviare a la Russe. 



.« 



a 



4 



■^^ 



54 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



MERCHANT TAYLORS' HALL. 

Wednesday, May 24, 1865. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue a I'Anglaise. Consomme a la Princesse. 

POISSONS. 

Cotelettes -de Saumon a la Calcutta. 

Perches a la Varsovie. Truites de Spey a la Tartare. 

Rougets au Vin d'Oporto. Saumon de Gloster aux Capres. 

Turbots, sauce de homard. 

ENTREES. 

Cailles en caisses aux Petits Pois. Olives de Rees aux TrufFes. 

Cotelettes glacees aux Artichauts. 

Ris d'Agneau a la Villeroi. Timbale de Macaroni a la Napolitaine. 



Chapons a la Zingara. Poulardes braisees aux TrufFes. 

Jambons sautes au Vin de Madere. 

Pates de Perigord. Noix de Veau a I'Oseille. 

Cote de Boeuf a I'Espagnole.- 

Pate a la Maitre d'Hotel. 



Quartier d'Agneau. 
Cailles piquees. 



Selle de Mouton. 



Canetons, et Paons piques. 



CEufs de Pluviers en bouquets. 
Crevettes en buissons. Mayonnaises de Volaille. 

Gelees claires au Marasquin. Baba a la Polonaise. 

Gateau de Genoise a la Danoise. 

Suedoise aux Millefruits. Meringues a la Vanille. 

Patisserie a la Florentine. 

Charlotte a la Russe. Gelees a la Seville. 

RELEVfiS. 

Petites Soufflees glacees aux Macarons. 

Beignets a 1' Orange. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

Caviare a la Russe. 



•^ 






■^ 




w. 



CITY MENUS. 



^55 






MERCHANT TAYLORS' HALL. 

Saturday, June 1 1, 1864. 



PREMIER SERVICE. 

Tortue et Tortue claire. 

Truites de Spey a la Tartare. Perches a la Varsovie. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a I'lndienne. 

Anguilles a la Perigord. Filets de Soles a la Proven9ale. 

Saumon de Gloster aux Capres. 

Turbot, sauce de homard. Merlans frits. 

' SECOND SERVICE. 

Cailles en caisses aux Truffes. Timbale de Macaroni au Supreme. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Legumes Printaniers. 

Ris d'Agneau a la Villeroi. Filets de Boeuf piques a la Sicilienne. 

Escalopes de Volaille a la Zingara. 

Handles de Venaison rotis. 



Petits Poulets du Printemps rotis. Chapons en Galantines. 

Dindonneaux piques. Poulardes a la Bechamel. 

Pates a la Francaise. Salades de homard. Crevettes en buissons. 

Pates de Perigord. " Jambons d'York glaces. 

Langues de Boeuf a la Moderne. Quartier d'Agneau. 

TROISIEME SERVICE. 

Cailles. Canetons. Oisons, 

Gelees au Marasquin. Cremes aux Ananas. Tourtes a la Creme. 

Suedoises aux Fruits meles. 

Gateau glace a la Danoise. Meringues a la Francaise. 

Mayonnaise de Volaille. 

Anguilles en Aspique ^ la Beurre de Montpcllier. 

Patisserie a la Florentine. 

Petits Gateaux de Genoise aux Conserves. 

Poudings a la Savoie. 

Beignets a la Princesse. 

Petites Soufflees glacees. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

Cavihre. 





>-H 



%H 



56 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



THE WORSHIPFUL SOCIETY OF APOTHECARIES. 
October g, 1867. 



PREMIER SERVICE. 



Haie Soup. Mock Turtle. Oxtail. Mulligatawny. 

POISSONS. 

Crimped Cod. Turbot. Cod au Gratin. 

Dories a la Hollandaise. 

Mullets. Eels a la Genoise. Fried Whitings. Smelts. 

ENTREES. 

Ris de Veau aux Epinards. Kari de Lapereau. 

Perdreaux aux Choux a I'Espagnole. 

Cotelettes de Levraut. Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 

RELEVES. 

Chapon braise a la Chapolata. 

Roast Turkey. Boiled Turkey. 

Roast and Boiled Chickens. 

Hams. Tongues. Roast Geese. 

Cote de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Rolards de Veau aux Petits Pois. 

Saddles of Mutton. Haunch of Mutton. 

ROTS. 

Pheasants. Partridges. Grouse. Leverets. 

ENTREMETS. 

Crevettes. Huitres au Gratin. 

Pommes de Terre frits. 

Gelee a I'Ananas. Gelee au Noyeau. Gelee au Vin. 

Gateau de Pommes. 

Gelee d' Orange. Boudin St. Clair. 

Cheesecakes. Giteaux d'Artois, 

Petites Meringues. Canapes. Beignets. 

Plum Pudding. Ice Pudding. 

ICES. DESSERT. 



The London Tavern. 



VM 



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>-© 






CITY MENUS. 



157 






SALTERS' HALL, 

Friday, May 12, 1865. 



Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

Truites a la Tartare. Rougets a I'ltalienne. 

Dory a la Hollandaise. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a I'lndienne. Anguilles en Matelote. 

Saumon de Gloster bouilli. Turbot, sauce de homard. 

Merlans frits. 



Petites Croquettes au VermiceUe. 

Ris d'Agneau en petites caisses. Champignons en Croustade. 

Filets de Volaille aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Filets de Concombres. 

Chapons a la Reine. Jambons d'York aux Epinards. 

pates a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Petits Poulets au Supreme. Petits Poulets rotis. 

Langues de Boeuf glacees. Pates de Perigord. 

Cote de Boeuf a I'Espagnole. 

Quartiers d'Agneau. Selles de Mouton. 



Canetons. 



Oisons. 



Paons piques. 

Dindonneaux piques. 

Crevettes en bouquets. CEufs de Pluviers en bouquets. 

Gelees a la Seville. Tourtes de Fruit a la Creme. 

Poudings Moelleux. 

Cremes aux Ananas. Meringues a la Fran^aise 

Beignets a 1' Orange. Gelees claires aux Raisins. 

Croquettes aux Fruits en Caramel. 

Petits Gateaux de Genoise en Pyramide. 

Gateaux aux Amandes a la Creme. 

patisserie a la Florentine. Pouding de Figues au Rheims. 

Trifles. Charlotte a la Russe. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

.Ramaquins au Parmesan. 



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58 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




BANQUET TO H.R.H. THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH, K.G. 

Salters' Hall. 

Wednesday, June 13, 1866. 



Tortue et Tortue claire. 

Filets de Turbot a la Normandie. Rougets au Vin d'Oparto. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a la Calcutta. 

Saumon de Gloster bouilli aux Capres. 

Truites de Spey a la Tartare. Turbot, sauce de homard. 



Ortolans en croustades aux Petits Pois. 

Cailles en gratiji au Vin de Madere. Kremouskis a la Russe. 

Supremes de Volaille Contis aux Truffes. 



•I-© 



Poulardes aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Chapons braises aux Truffes. 

Petits Poulets rotis. 

Pdtes a la Maitre d'Hotel. Jambon saute au Vin. 

Handles de Venaison. 

Cailles. Canetons. Oisons. 

Dindonneaux piques. 

Salades de Homard au Mayonnaise. 

Truffes de Perigord a la Champagne. 

Crevettes en buissons. 

Ponding a la Savoie. 

Meringues a la Fran9aise. Petits Gateaux aux Conserves. 

Patisserie melee a la Genoise. Gelees claires aux Fraises. 

Suedoises aux Millefruits. 

Beignets aux Ananas. Poudings a la Nesselrode. 

Petites Soufflees glacees au Marasquin. 

Fondu au Parmesan. 



I 




** 









CITY MENUS. 



159 



THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF S ALTERS. 

November 16, 1864. 



PREMIER SERVICE. 

Tortue a I'Anglaise. Tortue claire. 

POTSSONS. 

Crimped Cod. Turbots. 

Mullets a I'ltalienne. Dories a la Hollandaise. 

Merlans a la Regence. Cabillaud au Gratin. 

Eels a la Genoise. Fried Whitings. Smelts. 

ENTREES. 

Perdrix aux Clioux sc. Espagnole. 

Faisan braise sc. Soubise. 

Levraut braise sc. Napolitaine. Ris de Veau aux Epinards. 

Fricandeau aux Tomates. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 

RELEVES. 

Pork Griskins. Cotes de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Dindon a la Chapolata. Roast Turkeys. 

Boiled Turkeys. Lark Puddings. 

Boiled Fowls. Roast Fowls. Hams. 

Haunches of Mutton. Sirloin of Beef 

Saddles of Mutton. 



Snipes. Woodcocks. 



ROTS. 

Wild Ducks. 

ENTREMETS. 



Pheasants. 



Leverets. 



Salades de Homard. Scolloped Oysters. Pdtes de Gibier. 

Gelee a la Macedoine. Creme a la Vanille. 

Gelee au Vin. Gelee a 1' Ananas. 

Gelee aux Oranges. Mirlitons. Petites Meringues. 

Genoises decorees. Canapes. Gateaux de Pommes. 

Flans de Groseilles. Puits d'Amour. 

Pates de Noel. Boudins a I'Anglaise. Ice Puddings. 

DESSERT. ICP:S. 

The London Tavern Company, Limited. 



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THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF FRUITERERS. 
St. Paul's Day, January 25, 1867. 



Service a la Russe. 



Tortue claire. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue a I'Anglaise. 



POISSONS. 

Saumon. Turbot a Teau. Cabillaud bouilli. 

Dory a la Hollandaise. 

Anguilles a la Genoise. Sole a I'Orly. 

ENTREES. 

Quenelles de Levraut a I'Ecarlotte. Poulet a la Marengo. 

,Noix de Veau aux Tomates. Cotelettes de Homard au Persil frit. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Portugaise. 
Kremouskis a la Polonaise. 

RELEVES. 

Dindon braise aux Champignons. Dindons rotis. 

Dindons bouillis. Poulets rotis. 

Poulets en bechamel. Jambons d'York. 

Lanfjue de Boeuf. Boudins de Mauviettes. Echine de Mouton. 



Pluviers. 



ROTS. 

Faisans. 



Canards sauvages. 



ENTREMETS. 

Huitres au Gratin. ' Pate de Gibier. 

Pommes de Terre frits. Gelee au Vin. 

Gelee aux Oranges. Gelee a I'Ananas. 

Gelee a la Macedoine. Boudins a la St. Clair. 

Talmouses. Flans d'Abricots. Meringues a la Nicholas. 

Boudin a I'Anglaise. Boudins glaces. 



GLACES. 



DESSERT. 



The London Tavern. 



•^ 



M 




m 

CITY MENUS. l6l 



*^ 



THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF LEATHERSELLi:RS. 
October 2, 1867. 



POTAGES. 

Clear Turtle. Thick Turtle. 

POISSONS. 

Turbot. Cod Fish. 

Mullets a I'ltalienne. 

Dory a la HoUandaise. 

Eels a la Genoise. Fried Whitings. 

Smelts. 

ENTRIES. 

Ris de Veau aux Epinards. 

Kari de Lapereau. 

Salmi de Coq de Bruyere aux Champignons. 

Perdreaux aux Choux a I'Espagnole. 

RELEv:g;s. 

Dindon braise aux Champignons. 

Boiled and Roast Fowls. 

Roast Goose. Ham. 

Cote de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Saddle of Mutton. 





ROTS. 




Pheasants. 


Leverets. 

ENTREMETS. 

Huitres au Gratin. 
Pommes de Terre frits 


Partridges. 


Gelee au Vin. 


Boudin St. Clair. 


Gelee d' Orange. 


Canapes. 


Talmouses. 


Meringues. 


Beignets de Pommes 


Ice Puddings, 


Plum Puddings 


ICES. 


DESSERT. 



The London Tavern. 

M 



x^T.-: 



m if 






CORDWAINERS' HALL, 

July 27, 1865, 



Turtle. 

Filets de Soles a la Reine. Truite a la Tartare. 

.Cotelettes de Saumon a I'lndienne. 

Salmon, Turbot, Stewed Eels, Whitings. 



Chartreuse de Homard au Fumet. Carres de Venaison aux Petits Pois. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Grenadines de Tortue a POseille. 

P'etites Bouchees a la Reine. Ris de Veau a la St. Cloud. 

Boiled Chickens ^ la Supreme. Capons braised and mushroom sauce. 

Roast Chickens. Hams. Warden Pies. Venison Pasties. 

Tongues. 

Pigeon Pies. Haunches of Venison. 



Ducks. Leverets. Goslings. Turkey Poults. 

Fruit Tarts. Clear and Noyeau JeUies. Marrow Puddings. 

Italian and Pine Creams. Charlotte a la Russe. 

Lobster Salads. Prawns. 

Trifles. Maids of Honour. 

Meringues a la Creme. Patisserie a la Bonne Femme. 

Gateau a la Royale. Nesselrode Puddings. Pine Fritters. 

M^ . 4^ 




THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF WEAVERS. 
July 25, 1867. 



SOUPS. 

Pur^e de Pois. Julienne. Mock Turtle. 

FISH. 

Salmon. Turbot. Mullets ^ I'ltalienne, 

Salmon Cutlets. Eels a la Genoise. 

Fried Whitings. Truite a la Tartare. Whitebait. 

ENTRIES. 

Ris de Veau aux Epinards. 

Canetons braises aux Petits Pois. Levraut braise aux Tomates. 

Balontines de Volaille aux Champignons. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

RELEVfS. 

Roast Fowls. Hams. Tongues. Boiled Fowls. 

Cote de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Bacon and Beans. Saddles of Mutton. 

Quarters of Lamb. 

ROTS. 

Turkey Poults. Goslings. Ducklings. 

ENTREMETS. 

Pdte de Gibier. Crevettes. 

Gelee a I'Ananas. Gelee a la Victoria. 

Gel^e au Vin. Gelee d'Orange. 

Boudins St. Clair. Canapes. Talmouses. 

Genoises decorees. Tartelettes. 

Puffs. Meringues. 

Ice Puddings. 

ICES. DESSERT. 



The London Tavern. 



'' ' AY 






■^^ 



w 



i J 



164 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



■SH- 



THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF DISTILLERS. 
October 15^ 1867. 



Hare Soup. 



POT AGES. 

Ox Tail. Mock Turtle. 

Mulligatawny, 

POISSONS. 



Cod. Turbot. 

Rougets en Papillote. Roularde de Merlans. 

Anguilles a la Genoise. 

Fried Whitings. Smelts. 

entiuIes. 
Perdreaux aux Choux a I'Espagnole. 

Ris de Veau aux Epinards. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Tomates. 

Salmi de Coq de Bruyere aux Truffes. 

RELEVi^S. 

Dindon a la Chapolata. 

Roast Turkey. Roast Goose. Roast and Boiled Fowls. 

Ham. Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Saddles of Mutton. 



Pheasants. 



ROTS. 
Partridges. 



Plovers. 



ENTREMETS, 

Huitres au Gratin. Pommes de Terre frits. 

Gelee ^ 1' Ananas. Gateaux de Pommes. 

Boudin St. Clair. * Gelee au Yin. Gelee d' Abricots. 

Talmouses. Tartelettes. 

Canapes. Genoises decorees. Fritters. 

Plum Puddings. Ice Puddings. 

DESSERT. 






The London Tavern. 




THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF BREWERS. 
Aldenham Visitation Dinner, October 8, 1867. 



PREMIER SERVICE. 

Tortue claire. Tortue a I'Anglaise, 

Ailerons de Tortue aux Fines Herbes. 

Tortue grasse. Petits P^tes de Tortue. 

POISSONS. 

Sauchy de Carrelets. Cabillaud aux Huitres. 

Turbot a I'Eau. Rougets a ITtalienne, Omelette de Merlans. 

Eperlans frits. 

ENTRIES. 

Filets de Coqs de Bruyere aux TrufFes. 

Cotelettes de Levraut a I'Ecarlotte. 

Perdreaux aux Choux a I'Espagnole. 

Filets de Pigeons a la Londres aux Champignons. 

RELEVES. 

Hanche de Venaison. Dindonneaux ^ la Chapolata. 

Poulets rotis. Selle de Mouton. 

Jambon d'York. 

r6ts. 
Faisans. Perdreaux. Coqs de Bruyere. 

ENTREMETS. 

Crfevettes. Pommes de Terre frits. 

Gelee d'Abricots. Gateaux de Pommes. 

Creme de Parfait- Amour, 

Meringues a la Creme. Talmouses. 

Canapes. Soufflee ^ la Glace. Boudin glac6. 

Plum Puddings. 

GLACES. DESSERT. 




The London Tavern. 






SH 



^"T^t^T"^" ^ ^^^ 



•K^ 



\ 



1 66 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



DINNER TO H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES. 

Goldsmiths' Hall, March 15, 18.73. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue. Tortue claire. Brunoise. 

POISSONS. 

Filets de Truite a la Verte. 

Rougets en Papillotes a la Bourgogne. 

Saumon a la Tartare. Whitebait. 

ENTRIES. 

Epigrammes de Cailles a la Strasbourg. 
Ris de Veau pique a la Carlton. 

RELEV3&S. 
Ponding de Becassines au Naturel. Dinde a la Chapolata. 

Petits Poulets au Beurre d'Ecrevisses. 

Jambon saute au Vin de Champagne. Selles de Mouton. 

Quartiers d'Agneau. 

ROTS. 

Cailles bardees, Canetons, &c. 

ENTREMETS. 

Foies-gras de Strasbourg en pite. Flan de Peches a la Reine Claude, 

Genoises a la Grande Chartreuse. 

Bavarois de Conserves a la Moderne. 

Gelees d' Oranges a la Malte. 

RELEVfS. 

Petites Soufflees glacees au Marasquin. 
Petits Fondus au Parmesan. 



^ 



H 



w 



CITY MENUS. 



i^ 



167 



^4\ 



DINNER TO PRINCE ARTHUR. 

Haberdashers' Hall, yuly 2, 1873. 



POTAGES. 

Tortiie et Tortue claire. 



POISSONS. 

TrUite de Spey a la Reforme. 

Filets de TUrbot a la.Marechale. Saumon a la Tartare. 

Turbot, sauce de homard. Whitebait. 

ENTRIES. 

Ortolans en caisses aux TnifFes. 
Escalopes de Ris de Veau a la Sultane. 

Chartreuse a la Moderne. 

RELEVtS. 

Poularde a la PerigUeux, Petits Poulets a la Princesse. 

Jambons sautes au Vin de Madere. 

Handles de Venaison. 



\] 



U 






ROTS. 

Cailles bardees. Canetons. 

Dindonneaux piques. 

ENTREMETS. 

Pate de Foie-gras. Crevettes en buissons. 

PoUdings a la Sevigne. Gelees a la Victoria. 

Bavarois aux Conserves. 

Meringues a la Creme. Croutons de Peches. 

RELEVlilS. 

Pou dings a la Nesselrode. 
Petites Soufflees glacees. Anchois en Canape. 

DESSERT. ICES. 



M 



^^ 



1 68 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



BALL TO THEIR R.H. THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF 

WALES. 

Goldsmiths' Hall, July 4, 1873. 



Supper Menu, 



POTAGES. 

Brunoise. A la Princesse. 

ENTRIES. 

Ortolans en Croustade aux TrufFes. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Petits Pois. 

Epigrammes de Ris de Veau a la Perigueux. 

RELEVfS. 

Saumon au Beurre de Montpelier. 

Mayonnaise de Volaille a la Danoise. 

Chaudfroid de Foie-gras en Aspique. 

Jambon de Bayonne a la Gelee. Cailles a la Creme. 

Pate de Perigord. 

Salades de Homard. Galantine de Chapon. 

Petits Poulets rotis. 

ENTREMETS. 

Macedoine aux Fruits. Meringues a la Creme. 

Gateaux d'Amandes a I'lmperiale. 

Compote d'Abricots. Gelees a la Victoria. 

Plombiere aux Ananas. 



CITY MENUS. 169 



BANQUET TO THE PATRIARCH OF ANTIOCH. 
Fishmongers' Hall, December 10, 1874. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

Iced Punch. Hock — Steinberg Cabinet. 

Fins de Tortue en Matelote. 

Madeira. 

POISSONS. 

Soles en Matelote a la Perigord. 

Saumon ^ la Tartare. Eperlans frits. 

Chateau Yquem. Sherry. Punch a la Romaine. 

ENTRIES. 

Ponding d'Huitres a la Creme. Vol au Vent a la Financiere. 

Filets de Becassines a la Bordelaise. 

Champagne— Montebello. Perrier Jouet extra quality. 

RELEVES. 

Dinde au Celeri. Jambons braises au Vin. 

Selles de Mouton. Baron of Beef. 
Burgundy — Chambertin. Champagne. / 

ROTS. 

Becasses. Becassines. Perdreaux. Faisans. 

Madeira. Sherry. Champagne. 

ENTREMETS. 

Terrines de Foie-gras. 

Gelees a la Seville. Poudings de Castille. 

Souvenirs de Byzance. Giteaux fran9aises aux Avelines. 

Cognac. Cherry Brandy. 

RELEVfiS. 

Poudings a la Nesselrode. Biscuits glaces. 

Caviare. 

Liqueurs — Manaschino, Cura9ao, Kumel, Kirschenwasser. 

DESSERT, ETC. 

Port 1844. Lafitte 1862. Madeira 1821. 

Sherry. Montilla. 

% ' ^< 




I70 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



BANQUET TO HER MAJESTY'S JUDGES. 
Fishmongers' Hall, February 12, 1874. 




POTAGES. 

Tortus a I'Anglaise. 

Iced Punch, Madeira, 182 1. Sherry. 

Fins de Tortue en Matelote. Cotelettes de Tortue au Fumet. 



Saumon a la Tartare. 



POISSONS. 

Filets de Barbues Contis aiix Tniffes. 
Blanchaille. 
Hock— Steinberg Cabinet. Chateau Yquem. 

Punch a la Romaine. 

ENTRIES. 

Timbales d'Huitres a la Biarritz. 

Fpigrammes de Volaille aux Petits Pois. 

MaUviettes en Casserole a la Czarevna. 

Champagne — Montebello. Monopole. 

RELEVfS. 

Chapons a la Printaniere. Jambons braises au Vin. 

Selles de Mouton. Quartier d'Agneau. 

Baron of Beef. 

Burgundy — Chambertin. Champagne. ' 






ROTS-. 

B^casses. B^cassines. 

Pluviers. 
Madeira . Sherry. 



Canards sauvages. 
Champagne. 



ENTREMETS. 

Terrines de Foies-gras. Gel6es aux Fruits. 

. Bavarois a la Moderne. Creme a la Victoria, 

Croutons aux Ananas. 
Cognac. Cherry Brandy, 

RELEV^S. 

Plombieres d'Abricots. 

Fetites Soufflees glacees. Anchois en Canape. 

Liqueurs —Maraschino, Cura9ao, Kumel, Kirschenwasser. 

DESSERT, ETC. 

Port 1847. Lafitte 1864. Madeira 1821. 
Sherry — Vino de Pasto and Dry. Duke Montilla. 




"W 



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■H$i 



u 



WHITEBAIT MENUS. 






f 



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■U" J (S ^ 



0^ 




WHITEBAIT MENUS. 



THE COBDEN CLUB. 

Mercredi, Juin 24, 1868. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue claire. Bi3qiie d'Ecrevisses a la Duchesse. 

Gras de Tortue au Vin de Madere. Calipash de Tortue a la Dalhousie, 

SOUCHETS. 

Carrelets. Saumon. 

FRITURES. 

Croquettes de Homard. Petites Soles. Anguilles. 

entr:ees de poisson. 

Quenelles de Merlans a la Richelieu. 

Croustades de Laitances de Maquereau. Rougets a ITtalienne, 

Omelette de Merlans aux Fines Herbes. 

Truite a la Tartare. Saumon a la Norvegienne. 

WHITEBAIT. 

Jambon braise au Vin de Bordeaux. Pois verts. Feves. 

entries. 

Supreme de Volaille aux TrufFes. Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Macedoine. 

RELEVES. 

Hanche de Venaison. Selle de Mouton. 

SECOND SERVICE. 

Cailles rotis. Terrines de Foie-gras. Crevettes. 

ENTREMETS. 

Gelee a la Grande Chartreuse. Eclairs glaces au Chocolat. 

Eventail de Cerises. 

RELEVf. 

Soufflee glacee Vanille. 

GLACES. 

Creme au Pain brun. Eau d'Ananas. 



Creme aux Fraises. 



DESSERT. 

Old E. T. Madeira.— Punch.— Chateau Yquem 1858.— Steinberg Cabinet 
Hock 1857.— Champagne.- Chambertin 1848.— Fine old Sillery. — 
Liqueurs. —Lafitte 1848. — Sherry 1820.— Thompson & Croft's Port, 
vintage 1834. 



^ 



^ 



m 







"THE LANCET." 

Samedi, Juin 27, 1868. 



Potage ^ la Tortue plein-clair, 

Souchge de Carrelets et Saumon. ' Turbot a la Parisienne. 

Chartreuse de Filets de Soles ^ I'Alexandra. 

Roulardes de Merlans ^ la Perigord. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a I'lndienne. Carrelets frits. 

Anguilles frites,. Omelette de Merlan. 

Croquettes de Homard. Truite a la Tartare. 

Saumoa a la Norvegienne. 

WHITEBAIT. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Ris de Veau aux Petits Pois. n 

Vol au Vent a la Financiere. 

Poulets bouillis. Cauetoijs rotis. 

Quartier d'Agneau.. Jambon. 

Gelee a la Grande Chartreuse.. 

Creme a la Bohemienne. 

Patisserie variee. Gateau a la Victoria. 

, Pouding Nesselrode. 

LES GLACES.. 

Cremes aux Fraiises.. Eau de Citron. 

Madeira. Punch. 

Sherry — Capdepon's. Hockheimer. 

Champagne — Perrier Jouet's. 

Claret. Old E. T. Sherry. 

Port— Taylor's 1844. 



^^ 



^ 



V'T^ 






WHITEBAIT MENUS. 



u 



175 



JUNE. 

Potage aux Asperges. 

Potage Printanier. Souchee de Carrelets. 

SoTichee de Saumon. 

Chartreuse Sole a I'Alexandra. 

Roulardes de Merlan a la Sefton.. 

Cotelettes de Homard a la Royale. 

Anguilles a la Regence. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a I'lndienne. 

Kari de Raie. 

Auguilles et Carrelets frits.. 

Truite a la Tartare. 

Omelettes de Merlan. 

WHITEBAIT.. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Ris de Veau aux Tomates., 

Petits Pates de Foie-gras aux TruiFes. 

Poulets et Canetons rotis. 

Langue de Boeuf. 

Mayonnaise de Homard. 

Gtteau a la Victoria. 

Gelee a la Grande Chartreuse. 

Creme a I'ltalienne. Patisserie variee. 

MERINGUES. 

Ponding Luxembourg. 

Crtme aux Fraises glacees. 

Eau de Citron glacee. 



'^^^ 



*f^ 






; ^ 



176 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 






MAY 31. 

Potage Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

Potage Tortue claire. 

Sliss's Water Souchee. Truite a la Tartare. 

Filet Merlan a la Ristori. 

Saumon. Turbot. 

WHITEBAIT. 

Ris de Veau a la Lucullus. 

Mazarine a la Norvegienne. 

Poulet a la Royale. 

Carre de Venaison a la Jardiniere. 

Selle de Mouton roti. 

Quartier d'Agneau. 

Jambon a 1' Albion aux Petits Pois. 

Cailles rotis.. 

Canetons rotis. Asperges en Tranches. 

Celestine de Fraises a la Creme. 

Gelee au Vin. 

Creme au The vert.. 

Gelee a la Macedoine. 

Patisserie a la Fran9aise. 

Pouding glace aux Oranges. 

GLACES. 



THE SHIP, GREENWICH. 

July. 

Diner a la Russe. 
Green Pea and Julienne Soups. 



Souchee of Flounders and Salmon. 



Lobster Rissoles. Fried Eels. 

Quenelles of Whiting a la Richelieu. 

Turbots ^ la d'Orsay. 



Trout a la Tartare. 



Salmon a la Noi-vegienne. 



Mullet Italienne. 



WHITEBAIT. 



Croquettes de Volailles aux TrufFes. 
Lamb Cutlets and Cucumbers. 



u 



^^ 



Haunches of Venison. Saddles of Mutton. 

Hams. Roast Fowls and Ducks. 

Peas. French Beans. Broad Beans. 

Jellies a la Eugenie. Pastry. 

Bavaroise of Apricots. 



Nesselrode Puddings. 
ICES. 

Strawberry Cream. 
Lemon Water. Pineapple Cream. 

Currant Water. 



N 



1% 



•^=l-* 





"It 




^^ky^ 




H* 


l' 178 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 

1 


5^ 


\ 




J, 


THE TRAFALGAR, GREENWICH. 






Lundi, Mai 18, 1874. 




• 


POTAGES. 




Tortue claire. Tortue liee. 






Gras Vert au Jus. 






POISSONS. 






Souchets. 






Tniite. Carrelets. 






Fritures. 




1 


Rissolettes de Homard. Carrelets frits. 




1 


AngTiilles a la Diable. 






Entrees. 




1 


aupiettes de Filets de Sole a la Cardinale. 






Boudins de Merlans a la Creme. 






Cotelettes de Saumon a la Trafalgar. 






Releves de Poissons. 






Truite a la Tartare. Rougets a I'Epicurienne. 






Turbot a la Vatel. 






Les Ablettes. 

i 






1 

ENTREES. 






Les Supremes de Volaille aux TrufFes. 






Les Ris de Veau a la Monarque. 






! 

Second Service. 






Quartier d'Agneau roti. Les Canetons rotis. 




i 


Mayonnaise de Homard. 






ENTREMETS. 




j 


! Gelee ^ la Dantzic. Tartelettes de Cerises. 






Tasse d'Amande a la Chantilly. 






Ponding glace a la Nesselrode. 






GLACES. 






L'Eau de Citron. Creme aux Fraises. 




1 


DESSERT. 




i 


Pines. Strawberries. Grapes. 






Conserves, &c. 




! 


i * 




J 


^^ ' 


M' 


. r T1^ 


j^^ jr ^ 








■^ 




fe 

^ 



THE TRAFALGAR, GREENWICH. 
Vendredi, Juin 19, 1874. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue claire. Tortue liee. 



Gras Vert au Jus. 



Ailerons aux Fines Herbes. 



POISSONS. 

Souchets. 
Carrelets. Perche. Saumon. 

Fritures. 
Rissolettes de Homard, Anguilles a la Diable. 

Petites Soles. 
Entrees. 
Boudins de Merlans a la Cremiere. 
Cotelettes de Saumon a la Trafalgar. 
Flancs. 
Rougets a PEpicmienne. Turbot a la Normandie. 

Releves. 
Omelette a la Trafalgar. Saumon a -la Norvegienne. 

Les Ablettes. 

Second Service. 

ENTRIES. 

Ris de Veau pique a la Monarque. 

ROTS. 

D'Agneau grille, Jambon grille. 

Cailles aux Feuilles de Vigne. 

Canetons. Beans and Bacon. 

Plat de Separation. 

Mayonnaise de Homard. 

ENTREMETS SUCR^S. 

' Gelee au Marasquin. Gateau fondant glace. 

Patisserie Fran9aise. Ponding glace aux Millefruits. 

GLACES. 

L'Eau d' Orange. Creme aux Fraises. 

DESSERT. 

N 2 



^(5 



*^^ 



* 







. Tit Afj ^ 



1 80 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



SIR E. R. AND LADY JODRELL. 

Friday, July \o, 1874. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue claire. Tortue liee. 

POISSONS. 

Souchets. 

Carrelets. Saumon. 

Fritures. 

Rissolettes de Homard. Anguilles a la Diable. 

Petites Soles. Spitchcock Eels. 

Entrees. 

Boudins de ISIerlans a la Cremiere. 

Cotelettes de Saumon ^ I'lndienne. 

' Flancs. 

Rougets a I'Epicurienne, Turbot a la Nonnandie. 

Releves. 

Omelette a la Trafalgar. Saumon a la Norvegienne. 

Les Ablettes, 

Second Service. 

ENTREE. 
Ris de Veau piqug a la Monarque. 

ROTS. 

Handle de Venaison. 
Canetons. Cailles. Beans and Bacon. 

Plat de Separation. 
Mayonnaise de Homard. 

ENTREMETS SUCR^S. 

Gelee au Marasquin. Gateau fondant glace. 

Patisserie Francaise. 

Pouding glace aux Millefniits, 

GLACES. 

L'Eau d' Ananas. Creme aux Fraises. 

DESSERT. 




s 



>$^ 



■e^ 






*rtH 



)^ 



t 



WHITEBAIT MENUS. 



i8i 



THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF BREWERS. 

Vendredi, Juin 26, 1874. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue claire. TortUe liee. 

Gras Vert au Jus. 

Cotelettes dc Tortue aux Fines Herbes. 

POISSONS. 



Carrelets. 
Rissolettes de Homard. 



Souchets. 
Saumon. 

Fritures. 



Tniite. 



Anguilles a la Diable. 



Petites Soles. 

Entrees. 

Anguilles etuvees a la Genoise. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a la Trafalgar. 

Raie en Kari au Riz. 

Releves. 

Truite a la Tartare. 

aumon ^ la Norvegienne. Les Ablettes. 

Second Service. 

ENTREES. 

. C allies en compote aux Truifes. 

RELEVE. 

Selle de Mouton. 

ROTS. 

Poulets de Printemps. Canetons. Beans and Bacon. 

ENTREMETS SUCR^iS. 

Gelees au Marasquin. Dames d'Honneur. 

Gateaux fondants. Patisserie Fran9aise. 

Pouding glace a la Macedojne. 

GLACES. 
Creme aux Fraises. L'Eau d'Orange. 



DESSERT. 

Pine. Melon. Peaches. 

Strawberries. Cherries, 

Apricots, &c. 



Grapes. 
Plums. 



■U< 






MANCHESTER, SHEFFIELD, & LINCOLNSHIRE RAILWAY 
COMPANY. 

Vendredi, Juin 26, 1874. 



POTAGES. 

Tortue claire. Tortue liee. 

Les Nageoires de Tortue. Gras Vert au Jus. 

POISSONS. 

Souchets. 

Truite. Carrelets. 

Fritures. 

Rissolettes de Hpmard, Angiiilles a la Diable. 

Petites Soles frites. 

Entrees. 

Matelote d'Anguilles a la Bordelaise. 

Boudins de Merlans decores. 

Cotelettes de Saumon a la Venitienne. 

I" lanes. 

Truite a la Beyrout. 

Releves. 

Omelette a la Trafalgar. Saumon a la Norvegienne. 

Les Ablettes. 

Second Service. 

ENTRIES. 

Cailles aux Truffes en compote. 
Ris de Veau pique a la Monarque. 

- RELEVfS. 

Selle de Mouton. 

Jambori braise au Vin de Champagne. Poulets de Printemps. 

Canetons. 

ENTREMETvS SUCRfiS. 

GSteaux fondants. Meringues a la Chantilly, 

Gelee a la Millionnaire. Ponding glace a la Macedoine. 

GLACES. 
L'Eau d'Orange. Creme aux Fraises. 

DESSERT. 

Pine. Grapes. Peaches. Apricots. 

Nectarines. Strawberries. Cherries, &c., &c. 



•^ 







WHITEBAIT MENUS. 



W 



THE CHAIRMAN AND DIRECTORS OF THE IMPERIAL 
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



WINES. 

Chablis. 

Punch. 

Madeira., 



Vino de Pasto, 
et Sauteme. 



Champagne cups. 

Hock. 

Mo&elle. 

Claret cup.. 



Chambertin. 



Perrier Jouet.. 

Roederer. 

Pommery and 

Greno. 

Chateau Yquem. 
Liqueurs. 



Chateau Lafitte. 

Old Port. 

East India 

Madeira. 



MENU. 
Hors d'oeuvres diversite. 

POTAGES. 

Tortue claire et liee. Consomme a la Royale. 

POISSONS. 

Souchets of Flounders and Trout. 

Filets de Soles a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Rougets a la Bordelaise. Saumon, sauce crevettes. 

Turbot, sauce hollandaise. 

Spitchcock Eels. Whitebait. 

■ENTREES. 

Ris de Veau en caisse aux TrufFes. 

Cotelettes de Mouton galloises a la Soubise. 

Croustade de Beurre a laitances de Monarque. 

RELEVfeS. 

Poularde a la Perigueux. Jambon flageolets. 

Boiled Mutton, Turnips, and caper sauce. 

Bacon and Beans. Haunch of Venison. 

Sorbet a la Napolitaine. 

ROTS. 

Canetons. Ortolans. Salade. 

Mayonnaise de Homard. 

ENTREMETS. 

Ponding Victoria, Abricots a la Conde. 

Creme au Chocolat. 

Gelee Macedoine au Fruit. 

Mocata d' Alexis. . Corbeille de Morel. 

Enterprise de Barbarel, Dames d'Honneur. 

Ponding glace a la Star and Garter. 

DESSERT. 

Ananas and Cherry Water Ices. 



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DINERS MAIGRES. 



POTAGE. 
Julienne maigre. 

• RELEVlg. 

Carpe au Bleu. 

ENTREE. 
Merlans au Gratin. 

ROTI. 

Truite, sauce genevoise. 

ENTREMETS. 

Macaroni au Parmesan. Charlotte Russe. 

DESSERT. 

Fruits of the Season. 



■^ 



u 



Science du Bien Vivre. 






-^i ^iS - 



u 



THE BOOK OF MENUS, 



POTAGE. 

Riz au Lait. 

RELEVf. 

Brochet au Bleu. 

ENTRfeES. 
Harengs frais h la Ravigote verte. Aiguillettes de Morue. 

r6ti. 
Carpe frite. Salade. 

ENTREMETS. 

Souffle de Riz. Celeri frit. 
DESSERT. 



Fruits of the Season. 



Science du Bien Vivre, 



POTAGE. 

Au Lait d'Amandes. 



RELEV6. 

Alose grillee, sauce aux capres. 

ENTRIES. 

Maquereaux 4 la Maitre d'Hotel. Raie au Beurre noir. 

r6ti. 
Eperlans frits. Salade. 

ENTREMETS. 

Petits Pois au Sucre ^ la Parisienne. Gelee d' Oranges. 



DESSERT. 

Fruits of the Season. 



Science du ien Viure. 



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DINERS MAIGRES. 



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POTAGE. 
Aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

RELEV^. 

Matelote a la Mariniere. 

ENTRIES. 

Filets de Merlans ^ I'ltalienne. 
Cotelettes de Thon en Maceddine. 

ROTI. 

Soles frites. Salade. 

ENTREMETS. 

Creme aux Amandes pralinees. 

Gelee au Rhum. 

Haricots blancs a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

, Artichauts. Fines Herbes. 

DESSERT. 

Fruits of the Season. 



Science du Bien Vivre. 



POTAGE. 

Au Poisson. 

RELEVE. 

Cabillaud a la HoUandaise. 

ENTRIES. 

Vol au Vent Bechamel de Morue. 
Anguille a la Tartare. 

ROTI. 

Soles frites, buisson d'ecrevisses. Salade. 

ENTREMETS. 

Croquettes de Riz. Charlotte de Pommes. 

Epinards au Sucre. Artichauts ^ la Barigoule. 

DESSERT. 

Fruits of the Season. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



U 



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T ( 



FOR TWENTY. 

DEUX POTAGES. 

Aux Huitres. Vermiceile aux Lait d'Amandes. 

DEUX RELEVfS. 

Turbot k la Hollandaise. Saumon a Genoise. 

SIX ENTRflES. 

Soles a la Normande. Filets de Limandes a I'Anglaise. 

Filets de Grondins panes. 

Truites a la Genevoise. Tanches aux fines herbes. 

AnguUle a la Poulette. 

TROIS ROTIS. 

Buisson de Homards, Eperlans frits. Goujons frits. 
Deux Salades. 

SIX ENTREMETS. 

TnifFes a la Serviette. Choux-Fleurs au Parmesan. 

Une Gelee au Marasquin. 
Une Gelee d'Oranges. • Un Biscuit meringue. 
Une Piece montee en Oranges. 

DESSERT. 

Une Corbeille gamie de Fruits d'Automne. 

Quatre Assiettes montees. 

Six Compotiers : deux Compotes de Poires de Bon-chr6tien, 

deux de Pommes de Reinette, deux d'Abricots. 

Deux Corbeilles d'Oranges. Deux de Raisin. Deux Ananas. 

Six Assiettes Petit-four varices. 

Deux Froraages glaces. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 






H LirfCr - 



^i^ 



DINERS MAIGRES. 






191 



Puree d'Oignons aux Quenelles de Poisson. 

Merlans au Gratin. 

Pate de Macaroni. 

Anguille a la Broche. 

Gardens au Maigre. 
Baba Chaud au Madere. 



Potage ^ux Oignons blancs. 

Saumon fume. 

Esturgeon en Matelote. 

Croquettes de Pommes de Terre a la Bechamel. 

Pilets rotis. 

Petits Pois en Conserve. 

Madeleines a la Fleur d' Granger. 



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MENUS 



FOR 



ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 






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MENUS 

FOR 

ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



M 



JANUARY. 



Oysters, 

Potage clair au Lievre. 

Turbot a la Creme. 

Ris de Veau pique a la Financiere. 

Filets de Boeuf a la Beurre d'Anchois. Saddle of Welsh Mutton. 

Saute de Faisans aux TnifFes. Fondue a la Napolitaine. 

Beignets d' Orange. 

Vegetables. Epinards au jus. 

Artichauts a la Bordelaise Concannon. 



Potage a la Londonderry, et Consomme. 

Petits Souffles au Parmesan. 

Sandres en tron^ons, sauce soya. 

Punch glace. 

Boeuf de Hambourg a la Choucroute. 

Pigeons aux Petits Pois. Petites Timbales a I'lmperiale. 

Filets de Levrauts en Chauxfroix. Dinde truffee, rotie, jus. 

Pieds de Fenouils, sauce espagnole. 

Mince-pies, sauce au punch. Bavarois printanier, garni, 

Urbain Dubois. 



O 2 



M 






^ 






'>^* 



^* 



^ 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



DINER POUR DIX PERSONNES. 



POTAGES. 
Tortue. Tortue clair. 

POISSONS. 

Saumon bouilli, sauce de homard. 

Filets de Soles en Matelote Mariniere. 

Rougets a I'ltalienne. 

REMOVES. 

Roast Saddle of Welsh Mutton. Braised Poulet a la Reine. 

Roast Fore-quarter of House Lamb. 

ENTRIES. 

Poudings de Mauviettes a I'Essence. 

Ris de Veau pique a rAllemande. Vol au Vent a la Financi^re. 

Filet de Boeuf au Lard farci. 



Faisan pique. 
Becasse. Becassines. 

ENTREMETS. 

Gelee de Maraschino aux Fruits. 

Charlotte Russe a la Noble Dame. Pomme au Riz ^ 1' Angelica. 

Ponding de Cabinet, sauce eau-de-vie. 

Choux-Fleurs au Gratin. Etuve Celeri. 

RELEVE. 

Jambon glace en surprise. 

DESSERT. 

Hot-house Grapes. Pears. Apples. Pomegranates. Pineapples. 

Orange Water Ice, Raspberry Water Ice. 

&c., &c. 



M 



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en 



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MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



197 



THE LONDON TAVERN. 



Mulligatawny. 



POTAGES. 

Hare. Ox-tail. 



Mock Turtle. 



POISSONS. 

Turbot a I'eau. Cabillaud bouilli. 

Anguilles a la Genoise. 

Merlans frits. Filets de Merlans sautes. 

Dory a la HoUandaise. Cabillaud au Gratin. 

Eperlans frits. 

ENTREES. 

Mauviettes au Gratin. Kari de Volaille. 

Tendrons de Veau aux Petits Pois. Faisan braise aux Champignons. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 

Fricandeau de Veau aux Tomates. 

RELEVfiS. 

Dindons bouillis. Dindons rotis. 

Poulet en Bechamel. Jambon. Poulets rotis. 

Roulardes de Veau aux Tomates. Cote de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Selles de Mouton. 



ROTS. 

Faisans. 
Canards sauvages, Pluviers. 



Levrauts- 



ENTREMETS. 

Gelee au Noyau. Gelee a 1' Ananas. Gelee au Vin. 

Gelee aux Oranges. Boudins a la St-Clair. 

Canapes. Gateaux Genois. Talmouses. 

Gateaux d'Artois. Beignets de Pommes. 

Plum Pudding. Boudin glace. 

DESSERT. 



V' 






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1 1 



fe 



98 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Huitres. 

POTAGES. 
Tortue. Princesse. 

POISSONS. 

Turbot a la Hollandaise. Eperlans. 

ENTREES. 

Ootelettes a la Princesse. Poulets a la Proven^ale. 

relev:e. 

Quartier d'Agneau aux Petits Pois. 

ROT. 

Becassines. 

entremets de l:]6gumes. 
Choux-Fleufs au Gratin. Salade a I'ltalienne. 

ENTREMETS SUCRES. 

Omelette aux Confitures. Nesselrode glace. 

CAFE ET CIGARES. 



Trois douzaines d'Huitres. 
POTAGE. 

Ris au gras. 

RELEVE. 

Petit Brochet au Bleu. 

ENTREE. 

Beefsteaks au Beurre d'Anchois. 

ROT. 

Poulet a la Broche. 

LEGUMES. 

Choux de Bruxelles a I'Espagnole. 

DESSERT. 

Fromage de Roquefort. Marrons. Macarons. 

Compotes de Pommes et de Poires. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



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^ 



^ 






1 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



199 



! 



Potage a la Julienne. 

Anguille a la Minute. 

Selle de Mouton gamie de Rissoles. 

Mauviettes roties. 

Choux de Bruxelles a la Puree de Marron. 

Flan de Creme meringuee. 



Croutes au Pot. 

Merlans aux Fines Herbes. 

Poulet a la Chasseur. 

Filet de Boeuf roti. 

Pommes de Terre sautees. 

Meringues a la Chantilly. 



Potage au Mouton. 

Gigot de Mouton bouilli, sauce aux capres. 

Goujons frits. 

Oie Grasse rotie. 

Ghampignons farcis. Gelee au Kirsch. 



Potage a la Puree de Navets. 

Bouchees aux Huitres. 

Brochet en Dauphin. 

Carpes frites. 

Choux-Fleurs, sauce au beurre. 

Gateau de Riz. 



Potage en Tortue. 

Eperlans frits. 

Langue de Boeuf braisee, sauce tomate. 

Gigot roti. 

Puree de Haricots ^ la Creme. 

Beignets de Pommes. 







I 



Hr^ 



200 THE BOOK OF MENUS. ' 




Potage aux Lazagnes. 
Filets de Soles a I'Orly. 

Poulet en marinade. 

Rosbif roti aux Pommes. 

Laitues a la Flamande, 

Croutes a la ormande (chaudes). 



Potage a la Puree de Pois. 

iMerians au Gratin. 

Haricot de Mouton. 

Oie farcie aux Marrons. 

Artichauts a I'ltalienne. 

Onlelette aux Confitures. 



Potage a la F'ran^aise, 

Boeuf garni de Petits Pates. 

Ris de Veau a I'Espagnole. 

Perdreaux rotis. 

Salade de Homard. Charlotte de Poires. 



Potage aux Nouilles. 

Filets de Soles a I'ltalienne. 

Noix de Veau k la Bourgeoise. 

Lievre roti. 

Fonds d' Artichauts frits. 

Bab a au Rhum. 



Potage aux CEufs poches. 

Barbue a la Sainte-Menehould. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Soubise. 

Faisan roti. 

Gratin de Pommes de Terre. 

Meringues a la Chantilly vanillees. 



^M, ^ -— -^ 



Potage au Tapioca. 

Piece de Bceuf bouillie garnie d'Oignons glaces. 

Mauviettes en Salmis. 

Gigot roti. 

Salade de Legumes. 

Pouding. 



Potage aux Petits Oignons. 

Maquereaux giilles a la Maitre d' Hotel. 

Quartiers d'Oie a la Lyonnaise, 

Filet de Bceuf roti. 

Choux-Fleurs au Gratin. Abricots au Riz, chauds. 



Potage a la Parisienne. 

Cabillaud a la Hollandaise. 

Poitrines de Mouton a la sauce piquante. 

Dinde rotie. 
Celeri au Jus, Tartelettes aux Poires. 



Riz.au Lait d'Amandes. 

Soles a la Parisienne. 

CEufs poches a I'Estragon. 

Eperlans frits. 

Macaroni au Gratin. 

Beignets aux Confitures. 



Potage au Macaroni avec Parmesan. 

Poularde a la Montmorency. 

Eperlans frits. 

Perdreaux rotis. Puree de Marrons. 

Omelette soufflee. 




c 



"HS 



M 



.. A 



202 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



■en 



m 



FEBRUARY. 



FAMILLE ROYALE D'ESPAGNE. 




POT AGES. 


Xeres Sec. 


Creme de Perdreaux a la Princesse. 




Consomme a I'lmperatrice. 




Nouilles a la Napolitaine. 


' 


HORS d'ceuvre. 


Chateau 


Petits pates a la Bechamel. 


Bryon. 






kELEVES. 


Madere de 


Saumon garni, a la Royale. 


Carpenter. 


Jambon, sauce au malaga. 



ENTREES. 

Marsala de Timbale de Foie-gras a la Montesquieu. 



Sicile. 

Priorata. 
Vin du Rhin, 



Cote Rotie. 



Supreme de Poulets, aux TrufFes. 
Salade de Homards, en Bellevue. 

LEGUMES. 

Petits Pois a la Fran^aise. 



ROTS. 

Champagne, Chapons garnis de Cailles. 

Dinde en Galantine. 



Malvoisie. 



ENTREMETS. 

Mazarine de Fruits. 
Charlotte a la Portugaise. 



Served by M. A. Blanchard. 



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MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 203 



PREMIER SERVICE. 

Tortue claire. Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

Calipee de Tortue au Vin de Madere. 

Ailerons de Tortue aux Fines Herbes. ■ Tortue grasse. 

POISSONS. 
Saumon de Gloster. Rougets a la Cardinal. 

ENTRIES. 

Petits Pates aux Huitres. Salmi de Becassines. 

Filets de Volaille aux TrufFes. 

RELEV6. 

Selle de Mouton. 
ROTS. 

Petits Pois. 

ENTREMETS. 

Charlotte de Pommes. 



Canetons. 



Asperges. 



P^te aux Abricots. 



Souffle a la Glace. 



GLACES. 



DESSERT. 



P6TAGE. 

Riz puree de Crecy. 

RELEVJg. 

Saumon k la Genoise. 

ENTRIES. 

Noix de Veau a la Chicoree. Cotelettes de Mouton piquees. 

ROT. 

Lapin de Garenne barde. Salade de Saison. 

ENTREMETS. 

Epinards au Blond de Veau. Meringues a la Chantilly. 

DESSERT. 

Une Compote de Pruneaux. Compote d'Abricots. Poires. 

Pommes. Oranges. ' Fruits Confits. 

Fromage de Conserve. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



\ 



n. 



■^^ 



POTAGES. 



Aux Huitres. 



Julienne. 



POISSONS. 

Saumon, sauce hoUandaise. Turbot a la Normande. 

Eperlg,ns frits. 

Filets de Soles a la Victoria. 

ENTRIES. 

Turban de Filet de Levrauts Chasseur. 

Ris de Veau a la Mazarin. 

Supreme de VolaiUe. Pointes d'Asperges. 

Vol au Vent a la Financiere. 

Epigramme d'Agneau Chartreuse. 

Salmi de Becassine a la Perigord. 

RELEVES. 

Selle de Mouton. 
Quartier d'Agneau, sauce men the. 

ROT. 

Poulardes au Cresson. 

ENTREMETS. 

Peche a I'lmperatrice, 

Bavarois aux Fraises. Gelee au Marasquin. 

Gelee au Sherry. 

Diplomatic Pudding. Vacherine a la Creme. 



•HB- 



Pouding glace. 
Dessert. 




SERVICE A LA RUSSE. 



Huitres. 



Potage a la Colbert. 
Potage k la Bagration. 



Turbot, sauce hollandaise, Darnes de Saumon a la Proven9ale. 



Croquettes a la d'Angouleme. 
Langue ecarlate et Poulets ^ la Maillot. 



Filet de Boeuf aux Petits Pois. Ris de Veau a la Toulouse. 



Quartiers d'Agneau roti. Jambon, sauce madere. 

Salade ^ la Russe. 



Gardens a la Moelle. Artichauts sautes a la Lyonnaise. 



Becassines. Widgeons. 



Ppires a la Florentine. 

Savarins a I'Anisette de Bordeaux. Gelee aux Pistaches historiees. 

Ponding glace a la Theroine. 



Fondus au Parmesa. 



Dessert. 



S. ^ M 




T5T+ 



2o6 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Potage au Sagou. 

Poularde au Gros sel. 

Filets de Soles a I'Orly. 

Gigot d'Agneau roti. 

Choux de Bruxelles au Beurre. 

Petits Gateaux de Riz. 



Puree aux Croutons. Merlans au Gratin. 
Poulet saute. 
Gigot de M out on roti. 
Haricots, bretonne. Compote d'Oranges 



Potage a la Puree de Pommes de Terre. 

Cabillaud, sauce hoUandaise. 

Langue de Boeuf au Gratin. Sarcelles roties. 

Champignons a la Bordelaise. 

Gelee au Marasquin. 



I Potage au Pain. 

Piece de Boeuf garnie a la Flamande. 

Ris de Veau a la Toulouse. 

Canards sauvages rotis, Salade de Homard. 

Beignets aux Abricots. 



Potage au Pain. 

Piece de Boeuf garnie d'Oignons glaces. 

Limandes frites. 

Chapons bardes rotis. Betteraves a la Creme. 

Compote d'Oranges. 



1/ 




Potage i, la Puree de Marrons.* 

Filets de Merlans au Gratin. 

Haricot de Mouton. Jambon roti. 

Epinards au Jus. 

Souffle de Riz. 



Puree de Pois verts au Riz. 

Cabillaud a la HoUandaise. 

"Choucroute aux Huitres. Canards sauvages rotis. 

Salade de Legumes garnie de Saumon fame 

Blanc-manger. 



Potage a la Puree de Haricots. Morue aux Pommes de Terre. 

Noix de Veau en Fricandeau. 

Volaille rotie. 

Choux-Fleurs au Gratin. 

Peches au Riz. 



Potage Creme de Riz. Raie au Beurre noir. 

Poulets a la Bonne Femme. 

Rosbif a I'Anglaise. Pommes sautees. 

GEufs h la Neige. 



Potage aux Laitues. Maquereaux bouillis. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Capucine. 

Canetons rotis. Laitue a la Flamande. 

Gateaux de Pistaches. 



* This potage is easily made. Chesnuts are strangely neglected in English kitchens. 
The reader is prayed o consult his cookery books on the subject. — F. R. 



. ^^M 



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■r-+- 



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M 



208 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 






Potage a la Puree d'Artichauts, 

Raie au Beurre noir, Bceuf a la Mode. 

Caneton nouveau roti. 

Choux-Fleurs en Salade. Chartreuse de Pommes, 



Potage au Pain. 

Piece de Bceuf garnie de Petits Pdtes. 

Canetons aux Navets. 

Terrine de Foies-gras. Chicorees k la Creme. 

Beignets d'Oranges, 



Potage Julienne. Morue aux Pommes de Terre. 

Jambon d'York a I'Anglaise. 

Pigeons rotis. Champignons farcis. 

Gateau a la Creme. 






Potage Crecy. FUets de Soles a I'Orly. 

Aloyau braise a la Royale. 

Poulet roti. 

Artichauts frits. Biscuit glace au Chocolat. 



J] 



REFORM CLUB. 

Dinner to Vice- Admiral Sir C. Napier, K.C.B. 

March 7, 1854. 



VINGT POTAGES. 

Dix Consomme de Volaille aux Legumes Printanieres, 
Dix Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

QUARANTE POISSONS. 

Dix Turbots, sauce de homard. 

Dix Tranches de Saumon en Matelote Mariniere. 

Sept^ Filets de Sole a la Hollandaise. 

Sept Buissons d'Eperlans. Six Filets de Meiians. 

VINGT RELEVES. 

Dix Selles de Mouton (Gallois). Dix Poulardes a la Nelson. 

SOIXANTE ENTREES. 

Dix Epigrammes d'Agneau aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Dix Filets de Volaille (piques) a la Puree de Champignons. 

Dix Jambons Westphaliens au Vin de Madere. 

Dix Petits Pdtes a la Montglas. Dix Salmi de Becasse a la Richelieu. 

Dix Boudins de Lapereau a la Financiere. 

VINGT ROTS. 

Les Pintades (piquees) et Bardees. Les Canetons. Canards sauvages. 
Les Petits Poulets Printaniers aux Cressons. 

SOIXANTE ENTREMETS. 

Cinq Gelees de Dantzic a la Macedoine aux Fruits. 

Cinq Cremes de Cafe au Cura9ao. 

Cinq Tartelettes pralinees aux Abricots. 

Cinq Pommes au Riz garnies d'Angelique. 

Dix Mayonnaises de Homard aux Anchois. 

Dix Galantines de Volaille a la Modcrne. 

Cinq Poudings a la Diplomate. Cinq Gelees d'Oranges mousscuse. 

Cinq Charlottes Prussiennes au Marasquin. 

Cinq Turbands de Meringues aux Pistaclies. 

VINGT RELEVES. 

Cinq Gateaux Britanniques a I'Amiral. 

Cinq Petits Fondus au Parmesan. 

Brioche frit au Vin de Madere. 

Cinq Bombes glaces a la St. Jean d'Arc. 



:-i(? 



W^ —^44^ 




2IO 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




REFORM CLUB. 

Samedi, 26 Mars, 1870. 

Premier Service. 
Potage Crecy a la Belle Helene. 
Consomme de Volaille a la Royale. ' 

POISSONS. • 

Truites, sauces troyenne et genevoise. 
Blanchailles a la Diable. 

entries. 
Bouchees ^ la " Vanity Fair." Cotelettes de Mouton a la Reforme. 

RELEVllS. 

Filet de Boeuf a la Renaissance. 

Second Service. 
Salade a la Romaine. 

ROT. 

Canjetons rotis an Cresson. Artichauts a I'Anglaise. 

entremets. 
Pouding a la De la Pryme.* Gelee a la Carthaginoise. 

RELEVf S DE r6tS. 

Parfait au Citron. Paillettes au Parmesan. 
Dessert et Fruits. 



* DE LA PRYME PUDDING. 



1. Juice of four fresh lemons. 

2. Ditto two oranges. 

3. Grated rind of two lemons. 

4. Ditto one oraiige. 

5. Yolk of six new eggs well whipped. 

6. White of three ditto. 

7. Half-pint of real cream. 

8. Six ounces of powdered sugar. 

9. One ounce of pounded Jordan 

almonds. 



!m 



..m. 



10. Half-ounce of grated nutmeg. 

11. Mix well with a silver whisk. 

12. Put into a dish with paste- 

border. 

13. Bake for forty-five minutes in a 

smart oven. 

14. Serve up piping hot. 

15. Greedily devour. 

16. And speedily digest. 



JT^ 






MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 211 



Premier Service. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme a la Royale. Macaroni a I'ltalienne. 

POISSONS. 

Saumon, sauce genevoise. Filets de Soles a la Dieppoise. 

HORS d'ceuvre. 
Croustades aux Huitres. 

entref.s. 

Creme de Volaille aux Pointes d'Asperges. Ris de Veau a la Monarque, 
Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Pois. 

RELEVES. 

Poulfets a la Financiere. Selle de Mouton rotie. 

Jambon d'York a la Macedoine. 

LfiGUMES. 

Choux-Fleurs. Pois. Haricots verts, 

Pommes de Terre a la Maitre d'Hotel, 

Second Service. 

ROTS. 
Olson. Pluviers dores. 

entremets., 

Gelee au Vin de Champagne. Galantine decoupee a I'Aspique. 

Creme Bavaroise au Chocolat. 

RELEVfeS. 



1^ 







Souffle glace a la Vanille. 






Brioche aux Cerises. 






GLACKS. 


1 




Creme de Framboises. Citron. Millc Fruits. 




'^- 


P 2 


'":l 









i^ 



/^ 



rail II 



^^ 



M 



212 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Bisque d'Ecrevisses. Printaniere a la Royale. 

POISSONS. 

Darne de Saumon i la Chambord. 
Turban de Filets de Soles a la Chevreuse. 

ENTRIES. 

Supreme de Volaille aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Ris de Veau ^ la Perigord. Petites Bouchees a la Montgla 

Mayonnaise de Homard a la Gelee. 

RELEVf:. 
Fore-quarter of Lamb. 

ROTS., 
Prairie. Guinea Fowls. 

ENTREMETS. 

Pommes de Terre nouvelles au Naturel. 

Petits Pois a la Fran9aise. Fonds d'Artichauts au Gratin. 

Asperges en Branches. 



Croute a I'Ananas. Gelee au Marasquin. 

Vacherine a la Creme. Creme aux Abricots. 

Charlotte aux Framboises. Boudin glace. 






DESSERT. 



-^^ 



■^ 



w 



• ^Oj '- iJH 



^^ 



H 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. .213 



Potages. 

Au Lievre. — A la Lazagne. 

Filets de Soles k TOrly. 

Filets de Maquereaux, sauce hoUandaise. 

Rissolettes de VolaUle, • 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Reforme. 

Grenadines de Veau 21, la Napolitaine. 

Langue ecarlate en Papillotes. 

Filet de Boeuf au Raisin de Malaga, 

Coqs de Prairie rotis. 

Omelette aux Huitres. 

Beignets d' Ananas, 

Tartelettes a la Frangipane. 

Potages. 

Brunoise. — Puree Palestine. 

Filets de Soles a la Colbert. 

Maquereaux a la Bordelaise. 

Croquettes a la Villeroi. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Jardiniere. 

Escalopes de Veau a la Proven9ale. 

Epigramme d'Agneau aux Champignons. 

Jambons aux Raisins de Malaga. 

Filet de Boeuf au Madera. 

Coqs de Prairie rotis. 

Omelette aux Huitres. 

Pannequettes aux Abricots. 

Gelee ou Curasao. 












214 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Potage a la Palestine. 
Filets de Maquereaux, sauce tartare. 

Pdtes de Moelle. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Bretonne. 

Langue en ecarlate. 

Entrecote saute a la Bordelaise. 

Pintade piquee braisee. 

Omelette aux Huitres. 

Ananas a la Conde. 

Gelee au Kirsch. 



Les Huitres- 



Le Potage Printanier a I'lmperatrice. 



Les Dames de Saumon, sauce hollandaise. 
Les Filets de Soles 2L la Venitienne. 



Les Bouchees a la Montglas. 

Les Rissolettes de Homard. 

Le Filet de Boeuf a la Piemontaise. 

Le Salmi de Gelinottes. 



La Selle d'Agneau. 



La Poularde aux Cressons. 



La Salade a la Cazanova. 

Les Cardons a I'Espagnol. 

Les Beignets d' Ananas. 

La Mousse a la Vanille. 



) 1 



J#. ^ : ^ 



"« 



POT AGES. 

Tortue claire. A la Reine. 

POISSONS. 

Darne de Saumon a la Chambord. 

Turban de Filet de Soles a la Joinville. 

Eperlans frits. 

ENTKilES. 

Quenelles de Volaille ^ la Pompadour. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Chartreuse. 

Ris de Veau a la Mazarin. 

Croquette de Gibier en Surprise. 



Mayonnaise de Homard. 

ROAST. 

Saddle of Mutton. 
Woodcocks. Wild Ducks. Prairie Hens. 

LEGUMES. 

Asperges en Branches. Petits Pois k la Saison. 

ENTREMETS. 

Grasse meringuee historiee. 

Bavarois a la Peche. 

Gelee a la Califomienne. Ponding de Cabinet. 

Supreme de Fruits. 

Cheval glace. 

Glaces varices. Dessert. 






^rrr? 



W\ 



fiH 



H< 



.^A 



2l6 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



POT AGE. 

A la Brunoise. 

RELEVE. 

Poularde a I'Estragon. 

ENTKEES. 

Filets d'Alose sautes. Cailles aux laitues. 



ROT. 



Gigot de Pre sale. 



Salade de Saison. 



ENTREMETS. 

Choux-Fleurs au Parmesan. Charlotte de Pommes. 

' DESSERT. 

Compote d'Oranges. Cerises a*rEau-de-vie. Pommes de Colville, 

Oranges. Une assiette montee. Deux assiettes de Petits-fours. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



Potage Brunoise aux Pates d'ltalie. 

Chateaubriand grille. 

Croquettes de Poisson. 

Canards sauvages rotis. Asperges en Branches. 

Chartreuse de Pommes. 



Potage au Vermicelle. 

Filets de Soles a I'ltalienne. 

Pluviers rotis en entree. 

Rognon de Veau roti. 

Asperges a la sauce blanche. 

Souffle de Riz. 



^a. 



*-©■ 









MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 217 



Consomme aux Croutes grillees. 

Poule au Pot. 

Saute de Lapereaux. 

Rosbif roti. 

Choux-Fleurs gratines au Parmesan. 

Creme au Chocolat. 



Potage aux Pates d'ltalie. 

Carrelets grilles 

Aloyau a la Godard. 

Volaille rotie. Celeri au jus. 

Parfait au Cafe. 



Potage a la Fran9aise. 

Boeuf bouilli, sauce robert. 

Poularde en entree de Broche. 

Pate de Saumon. 

Choux de Bruxelles au Beurre. 

Biscuit glace au Chocolat. 



n 



■*»*■ 



Riz Crecy. 

Gigot bouilli, sauce aux capres. 

Anguille a I'Anglaise. 

Vanneaux rotis. 

Celeri-rave ^ la Demi-glace. 

Beignets de Pommes a la d'Orleans. 



m- 






218 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



^^ 



Potage au Tapioca, 

Cabillaud ^ la Hollandaise. 

Poularde a la Bourgeoise. 

Gigbt d'Agneau roti. 

Champignons au Gratin, 

Gateau de Semoule a la Creme. 



Potage au Pain. 

Piece de Boeuf, sauce tom,ates. 

Anguille au Soleil. 

Sarcelles roties. 

Puree de Pommes de Terre au Gratin. 

Meringues k la Creme. 



Crecy a I'Orge. 

Moreau ^ la Maitre d' Hotel. 

Cotelettes de Pore frais grillees, sauce poivrade. 

Caneton roti. 

Asperges en Branches. 

Pains de la Mecque. 



V 



M 



**4^ 



Potage Faubonne. 

Saumon au Bleu. 

iPoularde a la Grimod, 

Filet de Bceuf roti. 

Asperges au Beurre. 

CEufs a la Neige. 






■®f^ . \ ^ ^^^ 

MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 219 . 



Consomme aux Lazagnes. 
Anguille a I'Anglaise. 
Fricassee de Poulets. 

Gigot roti. 

Haricots Bretonne. 

Gateau de Riz. 



Potage Printanier. 

Anguille au Soleil. 

Blanquette de Veau. 

Canards sauvages rdtis. 

Croute aux Champignons* 

Compote de Poires. 



Consomme ^ la ChifFonnade de Cerfeuil. 

Petites Limandes frites, sauce colbert. 

Foie de Veau a I'ltalienne. 

Quartier d'Agneau farci roti. 

Salsifis frits. 

Gateau aux Amandes. 



:i «' 



1 ( 11^^ , , ^H 



H?^ 



*^^H 



220 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



APRIL. 



VISIT OF H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES, K.G., lO 
CROSSNESS POINT. 

Tuesday^ April 4, 1865. 



*^3- 




I- 



Tortue a I'Anglaise. 



Tortue claire. 



Tete de Sanglier en Galantine. 

Mayonnaise de Saumon a la Danoise. 

Macedoine de Cailles a la Modeme. 

Anguilles en Gelee d' Aspique aux Fines Herbes. 



Petits Poulets de Printemps. 

Chapon en Galantine. 

Dindonneaux piques. Pate de Perigord. 

Langues de Boeuf 01-nees de Fleurs. 

Jambon a I'Espagnole. 

Mayonnaises de Homard a la Montpelier. 

Crevettes en buissons. 



Meringues a la Montmorenci. 

Gelee au Vin de Bordeaux. Suedoise aux Millefruits. 

Cremes au Chocolat. 

Patisserie melee a la Princesse. 

Gateaux de Bruxelles glaces au Marasquin. 



Fruits : Ananas, Fraises et Raisins. 



^ 



^Bj^- ^ '• — — ' *^^^ 

MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 22 1 



GREAT WESTERN HOTEL, BIRMINGHAM. 



HORS D'CEUVRE. 

Timbales d'Olives a la Marseillaise, 
Petits Radis nouveaux. 

POT AGES. 

Tortue a I'Anglaise. Printanier. 

Bonnes Bouches au Beurre d'Anchois. 

POISSONS. 

Les Merlans au Gratin. 
Les Cotelettes de Saumon a la Clanricarde. 

ENTRIEES. 

Vol au Vent a la Financiere. 

Les Ris de Veau aux Epinards, 

Les Cotelettes de Mouton a la Russe. 

ROTS. 

Filet de Boeuf pique aux Pommes nouvelles, 

Quartier d'Agneau a I'Anglaise, 

Mayonnaise d'Ecrevisses. 

relevjIs, 

Les Canetons aux Olives. 

Les Pigeons aux Petits Pois. 

entremets SUCRfis. 
Souffle a la Vanille. Charlotte Russe 



^ a 




^T* 



222 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



POTAGE. 

A la Julienne. 

RELEVt. 

Boeiif aux Oignons glaces. 

£Ntr:§;es. 
Darnes de Saumon, sauce aux capres. 
Cotelettes de Veau piquees et glacees. . 

ROT. 

Poulets nouveaux au Cresson. 
Salade. 

ENTREMETS. 

Asperges. Tarte aux Confitures. 

DESSERT. 

Compotes d'Oranges. Fromage a la Creme. 

Raisin de Malaga. Amandes, 

Une Asbiette montee. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



Potage au Pain. 

Boeuf garni de Legumes. 

Marinade de Volaille. 

Brochet au Bleu. 
Macaroni a la Menagere. 

Pommes au Riz. 



Potage aux CEufs poches. 

Truite, sauce au beurre d'anchois. 

Cote de. Boeuf braisee aux Petites Carottes. 

Poularde rotie.. 

Choux-Fleurs, sauce hoUandaise. 

Blanc-manger au Cafe. 



T!fT- 




MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 223 



Potage de Riz au Gras, 

Raie a la Sainte-Menehould. 

Ragout de Veau a la Bourgeoise. 

Rougets de Riviere bardes. 

Salsifis frits. 

Tarte aux Fraises. 



Potage au Vermicelle Maigre. 

Morue frite. 

Epaule d'Agneau glacee. 

Canard roti. 

Petits Pois k la Fran9aise, 

Meringues a la Creme. 



Potage au Tapioca, 

Filets de Soles au Gratin. 

Cotelettes de Mouton Jardinieres, 

Poulet roti au Cresson. 

Choux de Bruxelles au Beurre, 

Beignets de Fruits a I'Eau-de-vie. 



Potage d'Oseille a la Bonne Femme. 

Maquereaux a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Bifteck garni de Pommes de Terre. 

Canetons rotis. 

Morilles a I'ltalienne. 

Gateau d' Am ancles. 

* M 



f^ 



*-t8" 



)1A 



224 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



■tH 



u 



Potage au Macaroni. 

Soles a la Parisienne. 

Pigeons aux Petits Pois. 

Filet de Boeuf roti, sauce madere. 

Asperges au Beurre. 

Omelette soufflee. 



Potage au Riz puree de Pois, 
Brochet au Court-bouillon. 

Eperlans frits. 

Homard, sauce mayonnaise. 

Pommes de Terre sautees. 

Confitures de Cerises. 



Potage au Tapioca. 

Maquereaux a la Maitre d' Hotel. 

Poularde au Gros sel. 

Foie de Veau roti. 

Salade de Legumes. 

Gateau feuillete. 



Potage Croute au Pot. 

Jambon a la Broche aux Epinards. 

Poulets sautes Marengo. 

Anguille rotie a la sauce verte. 

Asperges en Branches. 

Ponding a la d'Orleans. 



V 

Hi 



M 



^^^ 
^ 



feH 



* 






'K 



W 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 225 



Potage Printanier. 
Morue au Beurre hoir. 
Poularde a I'Estragon. 

Filet d'Aloyau roti. 
Oignons farcis. 

Tarte aux Fraises. 



rr^ 



Potage aux Nouilles. 

Cabillaud ^ la HoUandaise. 

Poulets ^ la Chevaliere. 

Gigot roti. 

Pointes d'Asperges au jus. 

Creme au Cafe. 






•i- U t^ 



226 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



m 



^ 



MAY. 

ROYAL LITERARY FUND. 
St. James's Hall, May 8, 1872. 



Tortue claire. 



POTAGES. 
Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

POISSONS. 



A la Reine. Jardiniere. 



Darne de Saumon a la Montpelier. 

Tniites saumonees garnies a la Royale. 

Buisson de Coquillages. 

ENTRtES. 

Salade de Homard. Bastion d'Anguilles. 

Filets de Sole a la Mayonnaise. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Petits Pois. 

Ballotine de Volaille a la Perigord. CEufs de Pluviers k la Gelee. 

vSalade ^ la Russe. 

RELEV^S. 

Quartier d' Agneau. Boeuf roti. Boeuf Epicier. 

Poulets Printaniers, rotis. Galantine de Veau. 

Langue de Boeuf. 

Jambon d'York. Pates de Pigeonneaux. PMes de Foie-gras. 

HORS D'CEUVRE. 

Asperges ^ la Creme. Choux-Fleurs au Parmesan. 

Timbale au Choux. 

ENTREMETS. 

Gelee Victoria. Creme Vanille. Blanc-manger. 

Gelee h la Macedoine. Creme aux Fraises. 

Chartreuse d'Oranges. Gelee marbree. 

Charlotte Russe. Compote d'Abricots. 

Compote d' Ananas. Chartreuse aux Fraises. 

Gateaux Napolitaines. GSteaux Royales. Talmouse au Sucre. 

Tourte de Groseilles. Meringues a la Suisse. 

Meringues Fran9aises. Petits Gateaux Genoises. 

Petites Bouchees aux Confitures. 

Ponding Diplomatique. Ponding St. Claire. Ponding glace Belgique. 



DESSERT. 



If 



M 






r- 



m 






MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 227 



POTAGES. 

Puree aux Pois verts. Mulligatawny. 

Consomme aux Queues de Veau. 

POISSONS. 

Saumon, sauce de homard. Turbot, sauce hollandaise. 

Filets de Soles a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Whitebait. Whitebait a la Diable. 

ENTREES. 

Croquettes aux Homards. Cotelettes au Tomate. 

Ris de Veau aux Epinards. 



Petits Poulets Jardiniere. 

Poulardes roties aux Champignons. 

Jambon d'York au Madere. Selles de Mouton. 

Cotes d'Agneau. Pommes de Terre nouvelles. 



Canetons. 



ROTS. 

Oisons. 



Dindonneaux. 



ENTREMETS. 

Asperges en Branches. Petits Pois au Natural. 

Gelee Macedoine. Gelee Curasao. 

Gelee Citron, Creme a la Vanille. 

Petites Bouchees de Chantilly. 

RELEVfiS DES ROTS. 

Pouding de Millefruits, 
GLACES. 

Ananas et Eau de Cerise. 






Willis's Rooms. 



Q ^ 



>^(^ 



■f^^ — ^^^ 



228 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Premier Service. 

POTAGES, 

Puree de Pois. 
Consomme a la ChifFonard. 

POISSONS. 

Saumon ^ la Salade. 

Soles ^ la Parisienne. 

Blanchailles. 

ENTRIES. 

Boudins Strabane. 
Ris de Veau k la Marechale. 

RELEVlSs. 

Fricandeau h la Macedoine. 

Jambon. Gigot. 

Pois verts. 

Second Service. 

r6ts. 
Cailles bardees. 

entremets. 

CEufs de Pluviers. 

Asperges. 

Gelee de Marasquin. 

Nougats de Fruits. 

Pouding a la Nesselrode. 



favorites. 



m ■ Mi 



K, ^ ' M 



i). 



©-<• 







MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 229 



SOUPS. 

Puree de Pois. Julienne. 

Mock Turtle. 

FISH. 

Salman. Turbot. 

, Filets de Sole a la HoUandaise. 

Fried Whitings. 

Stewed Eels. Truite a la Tartare. 

Whitebait. 

ENTREES. 

Quenelles de Levraut a la Bohemienne. 

Ris de Veau aux Epinards. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Croquettes de Homard. 

RELEVtS. 

Poulets bouiUis en Macedoine. 

Roast Fowls, . Ham. 

Quarter of Lamb. 

Cote de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. 

Saddles of Mutton. 

ROTS. 

Ducklings. Guinea Fowls. Gosling. 

ENTREMETS. 

Crevettes. Mayonnaise de Saumon. 

Jellies. Pastry. 

Boudin St. Clair. Plum Puddings. 

Groseilles a la Glace. 

DESSERT. 

*^?^v- — — — — , jm. , 






^^ 



2. so THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



POTAGES. 

Printanier vert a I'Anglaise. Ox Tail. 

Mock Turtle. 

POISSONS. 

Boiled Salmon. Anguilles en Matelote. 

Fried Soles. 

Boudins de Homard, Whitebait. 

ENTREES. 

Ris de Veau a la Montpensier. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Reforme. Petites Bouchees a la Reine. 

Compote de Pigeons a I'essence. 

Second Service. 

Chap on roti aux Champignons. Poidets bouillis. 

Poulets rotis. Langues de Boeuf. 

Jambon au Vin. 

Quartier d'Agneau. Pates chauds. 

Selle de Mouton. 

Third Service. 

Ducklings. Guinea Fowls. Ruffs and Reeves. 

Goslings. Salads. Plovers' Eggs. 

Gelees. Gateaux. 

Genoise. Compotes d' Oranges. 

Pommes a la Portugaise. Meringues. Dames d'Honneur. 

Ice Puddings. 



Julienne Soup. Mock Turtle. Turbot. 

Rissolettes of Lobster. Rognons au Vin de Mad ere. 

Fricandeau a I'Oseille. 

Mutton Cutlets. 

Roast Lamb. Ducklings. 

Mayonnaise of Fovirl. 

Jelly. Neapolitan Cakes. Chocolate Cream. 

Pudding. 



]i .i ( fi j i ' i i ^ t i I I — ' > • ui 'i I i> 



■^ 



&r* 



■;m 



u 






MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 23 1 



Puree de Volaille a la Reine. 
Julienne au Consomme. 




^ 



Les Filets de Soles a la Venitienne. 
Les Ablettes frites et a la Diable. 



Les Croustades aux Laitances de Maquereau. 

Les Ris d'Agneau aux Petits Pois. 

Les Tournedos aux Pommes nouvelles, sauce madere. 

Les Crepinettes de Motiton aux Champignons. 



Le Dindonneau pique Desosse, sauce perigueux. 

Les Asperges aU Beurre. 

La Mayonnaise de Saumon. 

La Gelee au Noyau. 

Les Sotifflets au Chocolat. 



Le Consomme aux Quenelles de VolaiUe. 

La Creme de Concombres a la Reine. 

Le Saumon grille, sauce tartare. 

Les Ablettes frites et a la Diable. 

Les Cotelettes de Horaard a la Victoria. 

Les Croustades a la Montglas. 

Les Ris d'Agneau aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Les Cotes d'Agneau. 

Les Carbonades de Mouton a la Jardiniere. 

Le Caneton braise a la Demi-glace. 

La Gelee au Cura9ao. 

Le Parfait glace a la Vanille. 

Les Tartelettes Piemontaises au Fromage. 



ML 



^" ^'1- ' -^ ■^'' ' ' ' *W^ 

2^2 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



^-t^ 



POTAGES. 
Julienne. A la Chanoinesse. 

POISSONS. 

Saumon au Naturel. 

Filets de Soles a la Chanceliere. 

Escalopes aux Huitres. 

ENTRIES. 

Cotelettes de Homard. 

Ris de Veau aux Petits Pois. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Chartreuse de Volaille. 

r6t. 
Selle de Mouton. 

RELEVtS. 

Petits Poussiris a la Langue de Boeuf. 

Canards sauvages. 

Mayonnaise. 

ENTREMETS. 

Ponding a la Prince Albert. 

Gelee. Creme au Cafe. Bavaroise a I'Orange. 

Fanchonettes a la Vanille. 

RELEVES. 

Omelette aux Champignons. 

ii ^ a 



^^ 



DEUX POTAGES. 

Printanier. Aux Pdtes d'ltalie. 

DEUX RELEVES. 

Filet de Boeuf glace. 
Brochet, sauce hoUandaise. 

ENTREES. 

Ris de Veau. Puree a rOseille. Pate chaud. 

Filets de Merlan, sauce aux truffes. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

DEUX ROTS. 

Pigeons de Voliere. Soles frites. 

Deux Salades. 

ENTREMETS. 

Haricots verts a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Petits Pois a la Creme. 

Gelee de Fraises. 

Charlotte Russe. 

DESSERT. 

Corbeille de Fleurs. 
Deux Assiettes montees. 

Quatre Compotiers. 

Confitiues. 

Fruits a I'Eau de Vie. 

Compote d' Oranges. Compote de Cerises. 

Deux Fruits Crus. 
Pommes d'Apis. Ananas. 

Quatre Assiettes de Petit-four. 

Deux Biscuits. 
Deux Meringues a la Bellevue. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 

fe. ^ 



ml/ 



Potage a la Puree de Pois verts. 

Perche grillee. 

Lapin en Gibelotte. Pate de Becassines. 

Petits Pois au Jus. 

Tartelettes aux Fraises. 



Potage Conde. 

Barbue, s^uce hollandaise. 

Cotelettes de Veau a la Singarat. 

, Canetons rotis. 

Concombres a la Demi-glace. 

Pouding k la d' Orleans. 



Potage a la Parisienne. 

Selle de Mouton braisee. Marinade de Tete de Veau. 

Saumon a I'Huile. 

Omelette aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Blanc-manger aux Avelines. 



Potage, PMes d'ltalie. 

Culotte de Boeuf bouillie, sauce tomates. 

Saumon grille. Canetons rotis. 

Petits Pois a la Francaise. 

CEufs aux Pistaches. 



Potage Paysanne. 

Piece de Boeuf bouillie, garnie de persil, 

Poulets, a la sauce tomate. 

Quartier d'Agneau roti, 

Pommes de Terre a la Parisienne. 

Meringues aux Fraises. 



-KB- 




•Hf^ ^ . 

MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 235 



Potage a la Saint-Germain. 

Turbot, sauce bechamel. Lapereaux au Chasseur. 

Pate de Cochon de Lait. 

Morilles aux Croutons. Creme au Chocolat. 




Potage a la Julienne. 

Saumon grille. 

Rosbif, garni de rissoles. 

Poulets rotis. Chicoree au Jus. 

Gelee au Citron. 



Potage a I'Oseille. 

Sole farcie aux Fines Herbes. 

Palais de Boeuf a la Lyonnaise. 

Poularde rotie. Chicore au Veloutcv 

Souffle glace aux Fraises. 



Potage Puree Crecy. 

Merlans grilles. 

Epaule d'Agneau glacee. 

Canards rotis. Pois au Jambon* 

Gelee de Fraises a la Vanille. 



Potage de Riz a la Paysanne. 

Anguille a la Tartare, 

Boeuf a la Mode. Poulets rotis. 

Artichauts a la Lyonnaise. 

Souffle a la Vanille. 



^^^^^ 



a 



^-® 



w 



236 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



n 






Brunoise aux Pois. Soles au Vin blanc. 

Toumedos aux Olives. 

Canetons rotis. 

Artichauts a I'Essence de Jambon. 

Flan meringue. 



Potage Puree de Pois verts. 

Maquereaux aux Groseilles vertes. 

Poulet Marengo. 

Langue Ecarlate. Salade de Legumes, 

Tartelettes aux Cerises, 



Potage aux Choux. Carrelets, sauce normande. 

Rosbif garni de Pommes sautees. 

Poulets rotis a la Peau de Goret, 

Haricots verts a la Maitre d'Hotel, 

Bavarois Vanille. 



H^ 



'A 



Potage aux Petits Pois. Pate chaud de Saumon. 

Cotelettes de Mouton Jardiniere. 

Langue Ecarlate. Salade de Legumes. 

Beignets de Pommes. 



W. 



•^ 






i ( 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 237 



JUNE. 



Clear Soup. White Soup a la Printaniere. 

Turbot and lobster sauce. 

Red Mullets. Whitebait. 

Chickensi and Tongue. 

Saddle of Mutton. 

Two Lamb Cutlets a la Soubise, 

Two Sweetbreads ^ la Financiere. 

Two Quail Cutlets a la Villeroi. 




Larded Turkey Poult. Ducklings. 



Curried Crab. 

Chartreuse of Strawberries.. 

Clear Jelly. 

Charlotte of Oranges. 

Ice Pudding. Cheese Straws. 



Chapons en Galantine. 

Saumons en Mayonnaise. 

Dindonneaux piques. Quartiers d'Agneau rotis. 

pates a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Poulets rotis. 

Langue de Boeuf ^ la Moderne. 

Crevettes en buisson, 

Pites de Perigord a I'Anglaise. 

Boeuf roti. Jambon d' York braise. 

Gelee au Vin de Xeres. 

Creme ^ la Vanille. Charlotte ^ la Russe. 

Gelee a I'Orange. 

Patisserie k la Florentine. Meringues a la Fran9aise. 

Gateau a la Royale. 

Croiites aux Conserves. Gateau de Savoie. 

GLACES, 

1^ \ it 



4i 



r 




2^8 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Le Potage Dubarry aux Croutons. 

Les Maquereaux au Gratin. 

Les Croustades de Laitances de Carpes. 

Les Cotelettes d'Agneau k la Toulouse. 

Le Boudin de Lapereau aux Champignons. 

Le Filet de Boeuf a la Napolitaine. 

Le Caneton roti. 

L'Omelette au Jambon. 

La Gelee de Noyau. 

Les Gauffres glacees. 



POTAGE. 

De Gros Pois nouveaux a la Jardiniere. 

RELEVE, 

Jajnbon glace aux Epinards. 

ENTREES, 

Filets de Soles. 
Cotelettes de Mouton a la Financiere. 

ROT. 

C allies. Salade. 

ENTREMETS. 

Asperges aux Petits Pois. 

Gelee de Fruits rouges. 

DESSERT. 

Une Assiette montee. 

Deux Compotiers. 
Compote de Cerises. Fromage a la Creme. 

Deux Fruits Crus. 
Bigarreaux. Fraises. 

Deux de Petit-four. 

Macarons au Chocolat. 

Biscuits au Rhura. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



^ 






*-* 



^J3 



-y®-^ 



u 



Hi 



h,^ 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 239 



Vermicelle a la Hollandaise. 

Mulct grille, sauce tartare. 

Poulet a la Marengo. 

Filet de Boeuf roti. 

Epinards k la Creme, 

Compote d^Abricots, 



Croute au pot. 
Truite a I'Espagnole. 
Pigeons en compote, 
Gigot de Mouton roti. 
Haricots verts sautes. 

Flan de Cerises. 



Potage Crecy au Riz. 

Maquereaux grilles, sauce ravigote. 

Selle de Mouton a la Fran9aise. 

Terrine de Foie-gras. 

Epinards a la Maitre d*H6tel. 

Creme brulee. 



Potage de Riz au Consomme. 

Carrelets, sauce normande. 

Poulets a ritalienne. 

Quartier d'Agneau roti. 

Asperges en Petits Pois. 

Tourte aux Abricots. 






4 



i 1 



240 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Potage au Pain. 

Piece de Boeuf, sauce tomate. 

Quenelles de Poissons, sauce italienne 

Quartier d'Agneau roti. 

Pommes sautees. 

Flan de Fraises. 



Potage Printanier aux CEufs paches. 

Petits Pates au Jus. ' 

Cotelettes de Mouton garnies de Haricots verts. 

Jambon roti. 

Epinards au Veloute. 

Flan de Fruits. 



Consomme au Macaroni avec Parmesan. 

Soles au Vin blanc. 

Oreilles de Veau a I'ltalienne. 

Lapereaux rotis. 

Artichauts, sauce au beurre. 

Tartelettes aux Cerises. 



Puree de Pois aux Croutons. 

Cote de Boeuf braisee, garnie de Tomates farcies. 

Carrelets k la Normande. 

Caneton de Rouen roti. 

Artichauts a la Barigoule. 

Gelee au Marasquin, garnie de Fraises. 



M 



eH 






0- 



r 






w 



a^. 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROtJND. 24 1 



Potage a la Julienne. 

Soles au Gratin. 

Lapereaux ^ la Chasseur. 

Tendrons de Veau en Mayonnaise. 

Macaroni a la Napolitaine. 

Macedoine de Fruits. 



Potage a TOseille, Chiifonnade de Cerfeuil. 

Maquereaux a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Chou farci.* 

Poularde rotie. 

Epinards au Jus. 

Meriilgues a la Creme. 



Consomme aux Laitues. 

Raie au Beurre noir. 

Croquettes de Palais de Boeuf. 

Gigot roti. 

Haricots panaches sautes. 

Giteau d'Amandes. 



Potage de Mouton a I'Oseille. 
Gigot bouilli, sauce aux capres. 

Marinade de Volaille. 

Langue de Boeuf ^ l'£carlate. 

Petits Pois a I'Anglaise. 

'Gelee de Cerises. 



• An admirable Italian dish, that migrht with great advantage be added to the 
■menus of the most modest households.— F. B. 

R 



■i""yj ^' 




>® 




4 



i;^ 






:42 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



JULY. 

PREMIER SERVICE. 

Consomme de Volaille a la Royale. Bisque d'Ecrevisses. 



Dry and Golden Sherry. 



Saumon bouilli, sauce Greenwich. Filets de Soles ^ a Joinville. 
Whitebait, devilled. 



Liebfraumilch. 



Sauterne. 



Ris de Veau en caisses a la Perigueux. 
Canetons sautes, sauce bigarade. 



Chateau la Grange. Chateau Pera5Tie. 



Gigots de Sept Heures a I'Ancienne. Chapon roti, farci aux Truffes. 

Champagne Sec. Punch a la Romaine. 

SECOND SERVICE. 

Hanche de Venaison, sauce groseilles. 

Cailles bardees, en Feuilles de Vigne. 

Galantine de Volaille h la Careme. Mayonnaise de Homards en Bellevue. 



Amontillado. 



Mais a PAmericaine. Fonds d'Artichauts a I'ltalienne. 



Ponding de George IV. 

Macedoine de Fruits k la Gelee. Creme au Cafe Vierge. 

Gdteau Napolitain a la Chantilly. 



Bombe panachee. Glace de Creme aux TrufFes. 



Liqueurs. 



Pichon Longueville. Old Port. Montilla Sherry. 



Langham Hotel. 



^ 



i) 



•^T 



4 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 243 



DEJEUNER OFFERT PAR S.-M. LE SULTAN A S.-A.-I. LE 
PRINCE JEROME NAPOLEON. 



Omelette trufFe.e. 
Poissons frits. 

Beurek. 

Courges farcies. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau. 

Quephte. 

Bifteck aux Pommes, 

Haricots verts. 

Pilau. 



Kiag. 



Lokmassy. 



Visnali. 



Gelee au Marasquin. 



Glaces. 



Ekmek. 



Served by M. Demitry Mavronigkalli. 






^n 



A ITtalienne. A la Reine. 

POISSONS. 

Turbot, sauce de homard. Saumon aux Capres. 

ENTREES. 

Ris d'Agneau aux Champignons. 

Cotelettes de Homard. Quenelles aux Truffes. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

RELEVES. 

Selle de Mouton. Poulets. Jambons. Langues de Rcnnc. 

Le Second SKRVicit. 

r6ts. 
Levrauts. Canetons. 

ENTREMETS. 

Boudin h la Garibaldi. Gelee aux Fruits. Meringues. 

Creme aux Framboises. Soufflct de Fromage. 

RKLRVft. 

Boudin glace a la Maccdoinc. 

R 2 



m 







Saumon, sauce aux capres. 
Anguilles au Beurre de Memphis. 



Petites Croustades k la Montglas. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Concombres. 

Ris de Veau a la Toulouse. 



Filets de Boeuf pique a la Milanaise. 
Canetons braises aux Olives. 



Gelee d'Ananas au Noyau. Glaces aux Framboises. 



Rissoles au Parmesan. 



Julienne. 

Whitebait. Filets de Saumon a la Marechal. 

Cotelettes d'Agneau a la Viscomtesse. 

Filets de Mignons a la Jardiniere. 

Vol au Vent a la Paysanne. 

Roast Leveret. Beans and Bacon. 

Omelette a la Reine-Claude. 

Beignets de Ppmmes. 



POTAGE. 

Mou de Veau a la Printaniere. 
Les Darnes de Saumon, sauce tartare. 

Les Ablettes frites et a la Roue. 

Les Petites Bouchees a la Saint-George. 

Les Cotelettes d'Agneau aux Petits Pois. 

Le Ris de Veau pique a la Toulouse. 

Les Canetons braises aux Navets glaces. 

Les Becafiques lardes sur Canapes. 

Le Petit Sale aux Feves de Marais. 

La Gelee de Peches au Maraschino. 

La Glace de Cerises a la Sainte-Cecile. 



S,__ ^ M 






H&rf^— ^ — ^ '■ — ' ^ -sa— i^..^ 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 245 



POTAGE. 

Puree aux Croutons. 

RELEVt. 

Quartier de Mouton a I'Anglaise. 

ENTREES. * * 

Matelote au Vin de Bordeaux. 
Poularde au Riz. 

ROT. 

Canetoris de Rouen. 
Salade. 

ENTREMETS. 

Petits Pois au Beurre. 
Tarte aux Fruits rouges, 

DESSERT. 

Une Assiette montee. 

Deux Compotiers. 
Compote de Cerises. ' Cemeaux. 

Deux Fruits Crus. 
Cerises. Fraises. 

Deux Petit-four. 1 

Fruits rouges glaces. Guirlandes Printanieres. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



Julienne. 
FUet de Soles ^ la Rougemont. 

Cotelettes de Homard. 

Ris de Veau aux Champignons. 

SeUe de Mouton (Southdown). 

Les Petits Pois. 

Les Cailles roties. 

Chartreuse aux Fraises. 

Ql^ACES. DESSERT. 



V^-i^ 



•H 3 ' / V — ' — . . ' . . M^^ i(ii ^ 






^Hh^ 




:^;;::;^ 



246 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Tortue claire. 
Puree de Volaille k la Jardiniere. 



Filets de Turbot a la Normande. 

Saumon froid a la Norvegienne. 

Blanchailles. 

Zephyrs de Volaille a la Macedoine. 

Ris de Veau a la Villeroi. 

Salmi de Cailles a la Lucullus. 

Poulets a la Montmorency. 

Jambon d'York. ' Selle de Mouton. 



Sorbet. 



Canetons et Ortolans. 



Pois a I'Anglaise. 



Petite Mayonnaise a la Favorita. 

Compiegnes aux Fruits. Gelees au Marasquin. 

Poudings glaces a la Cerito. 

Croutes de Crevettes. 

GLACES. 

Eau de Cerises. Creme d' Ananas. 



Pot-au-feu. 

Boeuf bouilli, sauce tomates. 

Cervelles a la Proven9ale. 

Poularde rotie. 

Haricots verts a la Maitre d' Hotel. 

Tarte aux Fraises. 



'M, 



* 



l\ 



7 



f 



*-© 






i::;^ 

^ 



^H 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 247 



Potage a la Julienne. 

Turbot, sauce au raifort. 

Poulets sautes. 

Rognon de Veau roti. 

Marinade de Choux-Fleurs. 

Mousse aux Fraises. 



Potage Printanier aux CEufs poches. 

Maquereaux a la Flamande. 

Pigeons a la Crapaudine. 

Rosbif a 1' Anglaise. 

Pommes de Terre sautees. 

Meringues a la Creme. 






Creme d'Orge gamie de Petits Pois. 

Saumon, sauce crevettes. 

Cotes de Bceuf couvertes auxRacines. 

Pigeons rotis, Cresson. 

Concombres ^ la Bechamel. 

Beignets de Patates. 



Riz au Consomme. 

Canard aux Navets. 

Quenelles de Poisson frites. 

Gigot d'Agneau roti. 

Haricots panaches. 
Omelette aux Cerises. 



4^ 



Potage a la Saint-Germain. 

Fraise de Veau au Natural. 

Lapins en Gibelotte. 

Filet de Boeuf roti. 

Pommes de Terre nouvelles sautees. 

Darioles au Riz. 



Potage Puree de Pommes de Terre. Peluche de Cerfeuil. 

Matelote Mariniere. 

Poitrines d'Agneau a la Marechale. 

Eperlans frits. 

Choux-Fleurs au Gratin, 

Abricots a la Conde. 



Consomme aux Croutes grillees. 

Escalopes de Saumon sautees. 

Langue de Boeuf k I'ltalienne. 

Canard roti. 

Concombres farcis. 

Tarte aux Fraises. 



Potage Printanier aux Quenelles. 

Poule au Riz. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Jardiniere. 

Jambon au Naturel. 

Salade de Legumes. 

Tarte de Groseilles vertes, a la Creme. 

'fe ■ ■ .M^ 



jyi 



Consomme au Tapioca. 
Saumon, sauce ravigote. 
Cotelettes de Lapereaux, a la sauce tomates. 
Dindonneau au Cresson. 
Puree de Feves aux Croutons. 
Darioles d, la P^tissiere. 



Pot-au-feu. 

Piece de Boeuf bouilli, gamie a la Flamande. 

Raie a la sauce blanche. 

Dindonneau roti. . 

Macaroni au Gratin. 

Mousse aux Fraises. 



Potage Puree de Pois verts. 

Haricot de Mouton. 

Fricot de Poulets, sauce poivrade. 

Aloyau roti. 

Omelette ^ la Jardiniere.- 

Peches a la Conde. 



^__ — ^ ^ — M, 



(BiCr 



::^ 



^H 



/ 

'J 

\ 



250 



THE BOOK OF MENUS, 



AUGUST. 



SOUPS. 

Consomme. Ox Tail. 
FISH. 

Boiled Salmon. Sole a la Creme. 

JOINTS. 

Saddle of Mutton. Roast Capons. Boiled Bacon. 

ROTS. 

Ducklings and French Beans. 

SWEETS. 

Green Gage Tart. Jelly. 



POTAGE. 

Brunoise au Blond de Veau. 

RELEVE. 

Rosbif garni de Pommes de Terre. 

ENTREES. 

Vol au Vent a la Financiere. 

Canetons aux Olives. Filets de Maquereaux. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Jardiniere. 

ROT. 

Dindonneau au Cresson. 

ENTREMETS. 

Artichauts ^ I'Espagnole. - Concombres au Veloute. 

Gelee aUx Qnatres Fruits. 

Flan de Peches. 

DESSERT. 

Une Corbeille de Fleurs. Deux Assiettes montees. 
Quatre Compotiers : Compote d'Abricots, de Prunes, Groseilles pralinees, 

Cerneaux. 

Quatre Fruits crus : Abricots, Prunes, Groseilles, Fraises. 

Quatre Petit-four : deux Gtteaux Anglais, deux Biscuits ^ la Vanille. 

Fromage glace. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



*^3-^ 



T7 



) 



Puree de Pois a la Saint-Germain. 

Poule au Riz. 

Escalopes de Saumon sautees. 

Boeuf a I'Ecarlate. 

Artichauts a la sauce blanche. 

Crepes. 



Puree de Potiron. 

Cote de Boeuf braisee gamie de Choux. 

Filets de Soles a I'Orly. 

Poularde rotie. 

Haricots panaches sautes. 

Creme fouettee aux Framboises. 



Consomme aux Lazagnes. 

Anguille a la Tartare. 

Langue de Boeuf a la sauce tomates. 

Galantine de Dinde. 

Macedoine de Legumes en Salade. 

Peches a la Richelieu. 



M 



•KB- 



Croute au pot. 

Raie au Beurre noir. 
Fricandeau de Ris de Veau. 

Gigot d'Agneau roti. 
Pommes de Terrc au Lard. 

Abricots a la Conde, 



M 



, 252 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



Potage de Riz au Gras. 

Melon. 

Matelote d'AnguiUe. 

Ramereaux marines et frits. 

Rognon de Veau roti, 

Laitues §, la Creme. 

Croute aux Fruits. , 



' Potage au Pain, 

Pi^ce de Bceuf, sauce raifort. 

Pluviers braises. 

Canards rotis. 

Epinards au JUs. 

Compote de Prunes de Reine-Claude. 



Consomme au Macaroni avec Parmesan. 

Saumon au Bleu. 

Poularde frite. Rosbif. 

Petits Pois au Lard. 

Flan de Poires. 



Potage Julienne. 

Poulets bouillis a I'Anglaise. 

Eperlans frits. Filet de Boeuf roti. 

Pommes de Terre saut^es. 

Marmelade de Verjus. 



^ : ; :„; :. ^ 



< 


- 1 ./^"Tin 




-^ r - 


1 » 


>■ 


01^ 






\ 






MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 


253 


1 

1 






Potage Paysanne. 










Bremes de Mer au Vin blanc. 










Timbales de Nouilles, Milanaise. 




1 






Eperlans a I'Anglaise. 










Pommes de Terre a la Creme. 




j 




- 


Pommes meringuees. 










Consomme aux Laitues. 










Turbot au four, sauce a volonte. 










Selle de Mouton garnie de Rissoles. ' 




i 






Pluviers rotis. 




1 






Choux-Fleurs gratines. 




i 






Tartelettes aux Prunes. 




i 
1 
1 






Lazagnes au Fromage. 




i 






Rosbif a I'Anglaise. 




t 






Cervelles au Blanc-manger. 










Langouste a la Broche. 










Tomates farcies. 






; 




Tartelettes de Groseilles rouges. 










Piuree de Racines blanches aux Croutons. 










Carrelets gratines aux Champignons. 






■ 


' 


Poulet, sauce au supreme. 
Aloyau a I'Anglaise. 
CEufs moUets, a la sauce tomates. 


* 


1 

1 


.W 




Petites Tartelettes de Peches. 




J 



t^^ 




PREMIER SERVICE. 

Tortue claire. Tortue a I'Anglaise. 

Ailerons de Tortue aux Fines Herbes. 

P^tes dfe Tortue. Tortue grasse. 

POISSONS. ' 

Souchee de Carrelets. Turbot a I'Eau. 

Gabillaud bouilli. 

Rougets a ITtalienne. Eperlans frits. 

ENTREES. 

Perdreaux aux Choux a I'Espagnole. 
Ris de Veau aux Epinards. Cotelettes de Pore aux Tomates. 

RELEVES. 

Hanche de Venaison. Chapon braise a la Chipolata 

Poulardes roties. Jambon d'York. 

Selle de Mouton. 

ROTS. 

Perdreaux. Levraut. 

ENTREMETS. 

Champignons a la Bordelaise. 

Pommes de Terre frites. Gelee a 1' Ananas. 

Gelee au Vin. Gelee de Ponnmes. 

Canapes. Talmouses. Creme de Parfait Amour 

Boudin glace. Beignets de Pommes. 

Souffle a la Glace. 



GLACES. 



DESSERT. 



*«■ 



n. 



T 



Potage aux Pates d'ltalie. 

Esturgeon, sauce fines herbes. 

Rognons de Veau, sauce tomates. 

Canetons rotis. 

Aubergines au Gratin. 

Glaces au Cafe gamies de Fondus. 



SALADE. 



DESSERT. 



^© 






POTAGE. 

Riz a la Puree de Navets. 

RELEVE. 
Filet de Bceuf braise, garni de Garottes. 

ENTRIES. 

Dames de Saumon grillees, sauce aux cypres. 
Poularde, sauce aux tomates. 



ROT. 

Gigot de Chevreuil. 



Salade. 



ENTREMETS. 

Laitues au Consomme. Beignets de Peches. 

DESSERT. 

Une Assiette montee. 

Deux Compotiers : Compote de Peches, Fromage a la Crcmc. 

Deux Fruits cms : Peches, Raisin. 

Deux Petit-four : Masscj)ains. 

Science du Bien Vivre, 






Consomme aux CEufs poches. 

Perdrix aux Choux. 

Cotelettes de Mouton Financiere. 

Lievre roti. 

Celeri au Jus. 

Macedoine de Fruits au Citron, 



Potage Puree d'Oignons aux Quenelles de Poisson. 

Matelote a la Mariniere. 

Petits Vols au Vent gamis d'une Macedoine de Legumes. 

Turbot en Mayonnaise. 

Petits Pois au Beurre. 

GSteau d^Amandes. 



Potage aux Choux. 

Chou au Lard, 

Selle de Mouton a la Puree de Navets. 

Pate d'Alouettes. 

Cardons au Jus. 

Beignets de Poires. 



•^ 






Potage Puree de Haricots. 

Anguille a la sauce verte. 

Noix de Veau braisee aux Carottes. 

Grives roties. 

Champignons farcis. 

Compote de Poires. 



f 



TT>r 




:^:;:::^ 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 257 




Potage Crecy. 

Truite, sauce diplomate. 

Civet de Lievre. 

Poulet roti. 

Haricots blancs en puree. 

Beignets de Pommes glaces! 



Potage Julienne. 

Filets de Soles a la Cardinal. 

Salmis de Becasses. 

Gigot de Mouton roti. 

Haricots panaches. 
Plumpouding Anglais. 



Potage en Tortue. 

Coquilles aux Huitres. 

Cote de Boeuf braisee, garnie de tomates farcies. 

Cailles roties. 

Chicoree au Jus. Pommes au Riz. 




Potage Julienne. 

Carre de Veau pique et braise. 

Eperlans frits. 

Becasses k I'Esprit-de-Vin. 

Salade de Legumes. 
Peches au Riz au Marasquin. 



n 

#* 



<-ffi" 



u 



258 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 






Potage aux Pates d'ltalie. 

Boulli en Matelote. 

Perdrix a I'EstoufFade. 

Brochet au Bleu. 

Chicoree au Veloute. 

Baba au Rhum. 



Potage Faubonne. 

Cabillaud, sauce hollandaise. 

Pieds de Veau frits. 

Perdreaux en Escalopes. 

Rosbif. 

Pommes de Terre sautees. 

Gateau Mille Feuilles. 



Potage Puree de Pois verts. 

Choucroute gamie. 

Saute de filets de Becasses. 

Brochet au Bleu. 

Macaroni ^ I'ltalienne. 

Brioche S la Creme. 



Potage Puree de Haricots. 
Cabillaud §. la Bechamel. 

Perdrix aux Choux. 

Filet de Boeuf roti. 

Cardons au Gratin. 

Choux ^ la Creme. 



Potage Brunoise. 

Bremes a la Maitre d'Hotel. 

Saute de Becasses a la Proven9ale. 

Gigot roti. 

Haricots panaches sautes. 

Petites PSjtisseries. 



U 



m 



v 



H^ 



■@- 




Saint-Peray. 



Sherry. 



Champagne 
de Veuve Clicquot. 



Huitres et Citrons. 

Consomme de Gibier a la Printaniere. 

Creme de Volaille a I'AUemande. 

Caviar, etc. 

Turbot bouilli, sauce d'ecrevisses et au 
raifort. 



Rosbif braise a la Duchesse. 
Ris de Veau piques aux Champignons, 
Chateau Lafitte. Hure de Marcassin farcie aux TrufFes. 

PUNCH A L' ANANAS. 

Rauenthaler Dindonneaux et Perdreaux rotis. 

1838. Salade de Chicoree. 

Artichauts a la Barigoule. 
Pouding aux Matrons a I'Anglaisc 
Muscateller. Tourte de Prunes. 



M 
» ^\^ - 



GLACBS ET FRUITS. 



S 2 



I 



f 




■$fe^ • : • ^Oiit^ 

U 

260 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



CORONATION BANQUET OF THE KING AND QUEEN 
OF PRUSSIA. 

MENU DE LEURS MAJESTiES. 

Octolre 18, i.$6,i. 



Potage d'Orge a la Princesse. Consomme Printanier Royal. 

Saumon du Rhin a la Genevoise. 

Turbot a la sauce aux huitres. 

Piece de Boeuf ^ la Flamande. Jambon glace, sauce madere. 

Poulardes a la Toulouse. 

Timbale %. la Talleyrand. Homards a la Bagration, 

Pain de Foie-gras a la gelee. 

Faisans de Boheme rotis. 

PUNCH A LA ROMAINE. 

Petits Pois ^ la Fran9aise. Asperges ^ la Hollandaise. 

Peches ^ la Maintenon. 

Ponding souffle a la Vanille. 

Gelee sultane a I'Ananas. Charlotte a la Parisienne. 

Glaces varices. 

DESSERT. 

Menu du diner servi a Konigsberg le jour du couronnement de 
Leurs Majestes le Roi et la Reine de Prusse. 

Urbain Dubois. 

WO 




^^ 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 261 



OPENING DINNER OF HER MAJESTY'S THEATRE. 
October 30, 1863. 




A la Tortue 



POTAGES. 

Printaniere a la Royale. 

POISSONS. 

Cabillaud aux Huitres. 

Filets de Soles Medicis. 

Pain de Poisson a la Richelieu. 

Anguilles a la Chambord. 

RELEVE. 

Selle de Mouton. 

ENTREES. 

Ris de Veau a la Financiere, 

Filet de Poulets a la LucuUus. 

Cotelette de Pigeon a la Gotier. 

Timbale de Perdreaux a la Moderne. 



ROTS. 



Becasses. 



Faisans. 



ENTREMETS. 

Mayonnaise des CEufs de Pluvier. Gelee d'Aqua d'Oro. 

Poire a la Conde. 

Meringues a la Chantilly. 



REMOVES. 

Pouding glace a la Royale. 



Soufflet a la Vanille. 




WINES. 

Madeira. East Indian Sherry. Sauterne. Hock. 

Moselle. Amontillado. Leoville. 

Beaune. Sparkling Moselle. Sparkling Assmanshiiuser. 

Veuve Clicquot's Champagne. 



^ 



TT 



^H 



THE LONDON HOSPITAL COLLEGE CLUB. 



POTAGES. 



Mock Turtle. 
Julienne. 



Ox Tail. 
Hare Soup. 



POISSONS. 

Crimped Cod. Turbot. Cod au Gratin. 

Dories a la Hollandaise. Fried Whitings. 

Mullets a I'ltalienne. Eels a la Genoise. 

Smelts. 

ENTREES. 

Ris de Veau aux Tomates. Kari de Lapereau. 

Perdrix aux Choux ^ I'Espagnole. 

Croquettes de Volaille. 
Cotelettes de Pore, sauce robert. 

RELEVES. 

Boiled Turkeys. Roast Chickens. 

Boiled Chickens. Hams. Tongues. 

Roast Geese. Roast Ducks. 

Cote de Boeuf a la Jardiniere. Roulardes de Veau aux Petits Pois. 

Saddles and Haunch of Mutton. 



Partridges. 



ROTS. 

Grouse. 



Leverets. 



ENTREMETS. 

Gelee a la Macedoine. Gelee au Noyau. 

Gelee au Yin. Gelee k la Victoria. 

GMeaux de Pommes. Boudins St. Clair. Cheese Cakes. 

Gateaux d'Artois. Canapes. 

Petites Meringues. Genoises decorees. Beignets de Pommes. 

Ice Puddings. Plum Puddings. 



DESSERT. 



T 





MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 263 



BANQUET TO JAMES ABBISS, Esq., 

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD, 

BY THE GUARDIANS OF THE POOR OF THE CITY OF 
LONDON UNION. 




October 15, 1867. 



Tortue claire. 



PREMIER SERVICE. 

Tortue a I'Anglaise. 



Tortue grasse. 



POISSONS. 

Cabillaud bouilli. Turbot a PEau. Rougets en Papillote. 

Anguilles a la Genoise. Dory a la Hollandaise. 

Merlans frits. Eperlans frits. 

ENTREES. 

Salmi de Coq de Bruyere aux Truifes. 

Ris de Veau aux Epinards. Quenelles de Levraut a la Bohemienne. 

Cotelettes de Mouton aux Concombres. 

Croquettes de Volaille au Persil frit. 

RELEVfS. 

Handles de Venaison. Chapon braise a la Chipolata. 

Dindons rotis. Poulardes roties. Jambon d'York. Oisons. 

Selle de Mouton. 



Perdreaux. 



ROTS. 
Coqs de Bruyere. 



ENTREMETS. 

Crevettes. Huitres au Gratin. Pommes de Terre frits. 

Gelee a I'Ananas. Gelee d'Orange. 

Creme de Parfait Amour. Gelde d'Abricots. 

Patisserie, Beignets de Pommes, 

Boudin glace. Boudin a I'Anglaise. 



GLACES, 



DESSERT. 



The London Tavern. 






!64 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




COMPLIMENTARY BANQUET GIVEN TO THE 
DUQUE DE SALDANHA. 



PREMIER SERVICE. 



Tortue claire. Tortue a I'Anglaise. Potage Julienne. 

Ailerons de Tortue aux Champignons. 

Noix de Tortue aux Fines Herbes. Pates de Tortue. 

Tortue grasse. 

POISSONS. , 

Souchee de Carrelets. ' Cabillaud bouilli. Turbot. 
Roularde de Merlans a la Royale. Rougets en PapiUote. , 
Sole a I'Orly. Eperlans frits. 

ENTREES. 

Saute Filets de Volaille aux Champignons. 

Filets de Faisan a la Bohemienne. 

Salmi de Coq de Bruyere aux TrufFes. Ris de Veau a la Financiere. 

Perdrix aux Choux, sc. Espagnole. 

Kremouskis a la Polonaise. 

RELEVES. 

Dindon braise aux Chttaignes. Poulardes roties. 

Poulardes bouillies. Jambon d'York. Culotte de Boeuf. 

Selle de Mouton. Hanches de Venaison. 



Becasses. 



Faisans. 



ROTS. 

Becassines. 



Canards sauvages. 



ENTREMETS. 

Pate de Foie-gras. Huitres au Gratin. 

Pate de Gibier. 



Suedoise Pomme. Gelee a 1' Ananas. Gelee aux Oranges. 

Creme de Parfait Amour. 

Petites Meringues a la Creme. Canapes. Talmouses. 

Souffles glaces. Boudins glaces. Petits Biscuits glaces. 

Plum Pudding. 

GLACES. DESSERT. 





■^^ 




■^H 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 265 



Complimentary Banquet given to the Duque de Saldanha. 
(Continued.) 
WINES DURING DINNER. 

Iced Punch. Fine Pale Sherry. 

Choice Amontillado. Fine Cabinet Hock. 

Magnums Perrier Jouet's Champagne, \dntage 1857. 

Nonpareil Sparkling Moselle. 

Liqueurs. 

DESSERT WINES. 

Old Dry Sherry. Old East India Madeira. 

Old Port, vintage 1840. 

Claret Chateau Margaux, vintage 1854. 

POTAGE. 
Au Potiron. 

RELEVE. 

Quartier de Chevreuil marine. 

Entrees. 
Cotelettes de Veau a la Singara. Vol au Vent a la Bechanjel. 

ROT. 

Poularde au Cresson. 

ENTREMETS. 

Haricots blancs a I'Anglaise. 
Fromage Bavarois. 

DESSERT. 

Une Assiette montee. 

Deux Compotiers. 
Compote de Peches. Gelee de Cerises. 

Deux Fruits Crus. 
Peches. Raisin. 

Deux Petit- four. 
Pate d'Abricots. Croquettes au Raisin de Corinthc. 

Sriciir.i' thi Jh'eu Viv^c. 




•K^ 






Potage Faubonne. 

Aloyau roti, garni de Pommes de Terre. 

Alouettes en Tourte. 

Eperlans frits. Celeri au Jus, 

Marmelade de P^ches. 



Potage Puree de Navets aux Croutons. 

Carre de Veau aux Carottes glacees. 

Rougets en caisse. 

Perdreaux rotis. Macaroni au Gratin. 

Beigftets de Pommes. 



Potage a la Semoule lie. 

Cabillaud, sauce aux capres. 

Chauxfroix de Perdreaux. Gigot d'Agneau roti. 

Cardons au Gras. 

Gelee au Jus de Grenades. 



Potage a la Fran^aise. 

Piece de Boeuf, garnie d'oignons glaces. 

Cailles aux Laitues. Brochet au Bleu. 

Omelettes aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Pommes glacees au Four. 






Puree de Carottes aux Nouilles. 

Dorade grillee, sauce persillade. 

Canards aux Navets. 

Gigot roti. 

Haricots panaches sautes. 

Gateaux de Riz. 





Potage au Pain. 

Piece de Boeuf garnie de Petits Pdtes. 

Poulet saute. 

Lievre en Daube. 

Salade de Legumes. 

Pommes au Beurre. 



Croute au Pot. 

Petit Sale garni de Legumes. 

Perdreaux en Souffle. 

Rubles de Lievres rotis, sauce poivmde. 

Epinards au Jus. 

Ponding de Cabinet. 



Puree d'Artichauts aux Crotitons. 

Croquettes de Semoule au Parmesan* 

Morue a I'Anglaise. 

Soles frites. 

Pommes de Terre en Puree gratinees. 

Pommes au Riz. 



Potage aux Queues de Boeuf. 

Rougets aux Fines Herbes. Cotelettes Jardiniere. 

Gelinottes roties. 

Chicoree au Veloute. Savarins a I'Ananas. 



Consomme. 

Haricot de Mouton aux Navets. 

Soles a la Colbert. Mauviettes roties. 

Artichauts a la Barigoule. 

Meringues a la Creme. 




Potage de Mouton ^ I'Oseille. 

Gigot de Mouton a I'Eau. 

Filets de Maquereaux, sauce tartare. 

Becasses roties. 

Puree de Marrons. 

Darioles. 



3i 





i; 



^^^:::^ 




THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



NOVEMBER. 



FAREWELL BANQUET TO CHARLES DICKENS, Esq. 

■Saturday, November 2, \%bl. 

POTAGES. 

Puree de Faisan ^ la Clavel. Consomme ^ la Des Clignac. 

POISSONS. 

Turbot, sauce hollandaise et homard. 

Cabillaud, sauce aux huitres. Quenelles de Merlans a la Creme. 

Eperlans frits, 

Rougets en Court Bouillon. 

ENTREES. 

Filets de Volaille aux TrufFes a la Nivernaise. 

Pluviers d'Or Conti a la Du Barry. 

Blanquettes de Ris de Veau en Miraton a la Royale. 

Second Service. 

Chapon brais e a la Romaine. Poulets rotis. 

Jambon de Westphalie au Vin. Langue de Boeuf. 

Oison, saucie de pommes. Poulets bouillis a la Remoulade. 

Selle de Mouton. Hanche de Mouton. 

Pates chauds a la Fran9aise. 

Troisieme Service. 

ROTS. 

Coqs de Bruyere. Faisans. 

Canards sauvages. Crevettes en buisson. 

Salade de Homard. 

^ entremets. 

Charlotte d'Oranges a la Creme. Gelees aux Liqueurs. 

Petites Pralines aux Amaftdes. 

Gateau de Fruits a la Chantilly. 

Petites Bouchees de Dames au Chocolat. 

Patisserie a la Fran9aise. 

Poudings glaces a la Nesselrode. 

DESSERT. 

Freemasons' Tavern. 



> ^( ^u\ ■ ' .^ 




"^A^JIJ H' 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



269 



Puree de Haricots aux Croutons. 

Filets de Vives a la Normande. 

Lapereaux sautes. 

Gigot de Mouton roti. 

Haricots a la Bretonne. 



Consomme au Tapioca. 

Cote de Bceuf braisee, garnie de Macaroni. 

Canard roti, sur un lit de Celeri. 

Goujons frits. 

Emince de Champignons, sauce bechamel. 



Consomme au Tapioca. 

Dindon aux Huitres. 

Lapin saute. 

Eperlans frits. 

Salade de Legumes. 

Pommes meringuees. 



Potage de Riz k la Puree de Pois; 

Pieds de Mouton & la Poulettc. 

Salmis de Faisan. 

Soles frites. 

Cardons au Fromagc. 

Patisserie. 







) ■ 

J 

4^ 




270 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 






Consomme au Tapioca. 

Noix de Veau braisee. 

Cailles aux TnifFes. 

Rable de Lievre a la Gelee de Groseille. 

Haricots au Beurre de Piment. 

Bavarois au Cafe. 



Consomme aux CEufs poches. 

Barbue, sauce aux huitres. 

Ragout de Foies-gras. 

Rosbif k I'Anglaise. 

Laitues h I'Espagnole. 

Compote de Marrons. 

Potage a la Puree de Navets. 

Breme grillee. 

Ris de Veau en Attelets. 

Perdreaux a la Perigueux, 

Gigot de Mouton roti. 

Haricots blancs au Jus. 

Gelee au Rhum. 



•i-^ 



Potage ^ la Puree de Marrons. 

Oie a la Chipolata. 

Becasses a la Minute. 

Eperlans frits. 

Salade de Legumes. 

Croquenbouche. 



m 



■^ 



*-©■ 



u 






MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 27 1 






Pasta d'ltalia. Creme d'Orge. 



Morue, sauce d'huitres. 
Eperlans frits. Anguille. 



Mauviettes en Caisse aux TnifFes. 

Poulet k la Financiere. 

Filet de Boeuf, sauce poivrade aux champignons. 



Selle de Mouton. 

Dinde farcie aux Marrons. Langue. 

Oison roti. 



Faisans. 

Gelee zi la Princesse, 

Macedoine aux Fruits. 

PMisserie Genoise. 



GLACES. 

Vanille. Fraise. 



M 



*T^ 



DESSERT. 






.i:::;;^ 







THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



VINGT COUVERTS. 



M 



DEUX POTAGES. 

A la Reine, Vermicelle Puree de Pois verts. 

DEUX RELEv:g;s. 

Longe de Veau garnie de Petits Pttes. 

Turbot, sauce cSpres. 

SK ENTREES. 

Filets de Lapereaux sautes. 
Aspicgarni de Filets de Volaille. 

Filets de Volaille. 

Filets de Soles k la Hollandaise, 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Soubise. 

Filets de Perdreaux a la Bordelaise. 

Cervelles de Veau, sauce a la ravigote. 

DEUX ROTS. 

Deux Faisans piques aux Mauviettes. Eperlans frits. 

Deux Salades. 

SIX ENTREMETS. 

Choux-Fleurs au Parmesan. Artichauts a la Barigoule. 

Gateau Napolitain. Pouding au Vin de Madere. 

Gelee au Marasquin. 

Piece montee en Oranges glacees. 

DESSERT. 

Une Corbeille garnie. Deux Assiettes montees. 

Deux Tambours garnis. 

Six Compotiers. 

Deux Compotes de Poires. Deux de Fruits a TEau-de-vie. 

Deux Compotes de Peches. 

Deux Corbeilles de Raisin. Deux Corbeilles de Poires. 

Deux Corbeilles de Pommes. Six Assiettes de Petit-four varices. 

Deux Fromages glaces. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 



Potage a la Perdrix aux Marrons. 

Maquereaux grilles, sauce beamaise. 

Marinade de Pieds de Veau. 

Filet de Boeuf roti. Pommes sautees. 

Nougat. 



Potage au Pain. 

Boeuf bouilli, garni a la Flamande. 

Brochet a la Clermont. 

Levraut a la Minute. Pate de Foie-gras. 

Croutes grillees a la Marmelade d'Abricots. 



Potage au Macaroni avec Parmesan. 

Cabillaud farci. 

Ris de Veau aux Pointes d'Asperges. 

Gigot roti. 

Chicoree a la Creme. Gateau au Rhum. 



Puree Crecy. 

Barbue, sauce aux huitres. 

Poulet saute. Mauviettes roties. 

Navets au Sucte. 

Pommes au Beurre. 



Puree de Pois Sees. 

Sole Colbert. 

Cotelettes de Pre-sale a la Jardiniere. 

Coq de Bruyere roti. 

Celeri au Jus avec Truffes. 

Creme de Sagou au Marasquin. 



Potage de Semoule a la Chiffonnadc d'Oscillc. 

Oie en Daube. 

Pctits Pates h la Bourgcoisc. 

Chateaubriand, garni de Pommes sautees. 

Champignons k I'ltalienne. 

Madeleines a la Flcur d'Orangcr. 



■HfflJ^ 







74 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




DECEMBER. 



Potage de Lievre clair aux Quenelles. 

Turbot au Vin blanc, garni d'Epei'lans. 

Croustades de Volaille a la Montglas. 

Foie-gras en caisses aux Tmffes. 

Cotelettes de Mouton a la Rachel. 

Filet de Bceuf braise a la Piemontaise. 

Perdreaux poelles au Jus d' Orange. 

Terrine de Gibier en Bellevue. 

Omelette aux Huitres a la Diable. 

Tartelettes d'Abricot a la Napolitaine, 

Gelee au Kirschwasser. 



POTAGE. 

Au Celeri. 

RELEVE. 

Filet d'Aloyau h la Montglas. 

DEUX ENTREES. 

Merlans grilles. Poulets a la Reine au Vin de Madere. 

ROTI. , 

Grives et Mauviettes bardees. 

Salade. 

DEUX ENTREMETS. 

Souffle au Riz. TrufFes a la Serviette. 

DESSERT. 

Une Assiette montee. Deux de Petit-four. 

Deux Com-potes. 
De Pommes glacees. De Pruneaux. 

Quatre de Fruits. 

Pommes d'Apis. Pommes de Calville. Deux d'Oranges. 

Fromage. 

Science du Bien Vivre. 




I 

{i 



T 



T ' 



Potage Paysanne. 

Poule au Riz. 

Mayonnaise de Cervelles» 

Cotes de Boeuf roties. 

Pommes sautees. 



Puree de Pois Sees. 

Soles Colbert. 

Lapin en Salade. 

Becasses roties. 

Betteraves a la Poitevine. 

Souffle de Riz a I'Orange. 



Puree d'Qseille a la Hollandaise. 

Blanquette de Veau. 

Perches grillees. 

Quartier de Venaison roti. 

Champignons farcis. 

Beignets de Pommes. 



Puree de Potiron. 

Anguille a la Tartare. 

Pluviers aux TrufFes. 

Eperlans frits. 

CEufs brouilles aux Pointcs d'Aspcrgcs. 

Croutes grillees a la Marmcladc d'Abricols. 



T ? 



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^-r&Jr^^ ... '-^±t^ 



m 



Consomme au Vermicelle. 

Cabillaud k la Hollandaise. 

Cotelettes de Veau en Papillotes. 

Canards sauvages rotis. 

Puree de Pois verts. 

Patisserie. 



Consomme au Riz. 

Gigot de Mouton braise. Mauviettes en Cotelettes. 

Homards k la Bordelaise. 

Epinards au Veloute. 

Glace a la VaniUe. 



Potage a la Colbert. 

Maquereaux grilles, sauce bearnaise. 

Chartreuse a la Parisienne. 

Perdreaux bardes rotis. 

Cardons a I'ltalienne. 

Bavarois au Cafe. 



^ 



Consomme aux Pates d'ltalie. 

Vol au Vent de Quenelles et de Godiveaux. 

Rognons de Mouton au Vin de Champagne. 

Faisan roti. 

Epinards a I'Anglaise. ' 

Beignets d'Abricots. 




n 



®-* 



H^ 



(. 



m 



^ ^^ ■ HJ H 



MENUS FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



277 



M 



Riz a la Puree de Pois. 

Petites Truites, sauce crevettes. 

Filets de Mouton a la Puree de Navets. 

Perdreaux en salade. 

Poulet roti au Cresson. 

Pommes de Terre sautees. 

Patisseries. 



M 



Potage a la Puree de Pois. 

Matelote d'Anguille. 

Carre de Mouton a la Ravigote. 

Mauviettes roties. 

Croute aux Champignons. 

Pommes en Croustafle. 

Consomme au Macaroni. 

Bremen en tranches, sauce mayonnaise. 

Langue de Boeuf en Gratin. 

Faisans rotis. 

Choux-Fleurs a la Hollandaise. 

Croquettes de Riz aux Amandes. 



Potage de Semoule au Lait. 

Harengs frais, sauce a la moutarde. 

Sarcelles en Salmis. 

Croquettes de Pommes de Terre a la Bechamel. 

Anguille a la Broche. 

Choux-Fleurs au Gratin. 

Gateau d'Amandes. 



H^ 



V 



^^ 



4 



278 



THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



4h 



M 



Riz a la Crecy. 
Raie au Beurre noir. 

Civet de Lievre. 
Oie farcie a la Broche. 

Salsifis frits. 
Gateau aux Amandes. 



Puree de Navets aux Croutons. 

Oie a la Choucroute. 

Rognons de Mouton a la Brochette. 

Filet de Bceuf roti. 

Pommes sautees. 

Darioles au Riz. 



Potage a la Julienne. 

Filets de Brochet a la Bourguignonne. 

Vol au Vent de Mauviettes. 

Jambon a la Broche. 

Epinards au Jus. 
Nougat aux Avelines. 




V' 



^T^ 



-7 



•* 



^ 



:il::i^ 



h 



FIN-B EC'S SCRAP BOOK. 



H^ 






M 



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4-^ 



<-© 




H¥rr^^ 



I 







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^^^ 




FIN-BECS SCRAP BOOK. 



THE RED HERRING. 

V Artiste cites in its November number the following morceau 
by M. Huymans, on the red herring : — 

" Ta robe, 6 hareng ! c'est la palette des soleils couchants, la 
patine du vieux cuivre, le ton d'or bruni des cuirs de Cordoue, les 
teintes de santal et de safran des feuillages d'automne. 

*' Ta tete, 6 hareng ! flamboie comma un casque d'or, et Ton 
dirait de tes yeux des clous rioirs plantes dans des cercles de 
cuivre. 

** Toutes les nuances tristes et mornes, toutes les nuances rayon- 
nantes et gaies amortissent et illuminent tour a tour ta robe 
d'ecailles. 

** A cote des bitumes, des terras de Judea et de Cassel, des verts 
de Scheele, des bruns Van Dyck at des bronzes florentins, des 
teintes de rouille et de feuilles mortes, resplendissent de tout leur 
eclat les ors verdis, les ambres jaunes, les orpins, lesocres de rhu, 
les chromes, les oranges de mars. 

"O miroitant et terne enfume, quandje contemple ta cotte de 
mailles, ja pensa aux tableaux de Rembrandt ; je revois ses tetes 
superbes, ses chairs ensoleillees, ses scintillements de bijoux sur 
le velours noir; j'aper9ois ses jets de lumiere dans la nuit, ses 
trainees de poudre d'or dans I'ombre, ses eclosions de soleil sous 
les noris arceaux." 




M^ 



/^ 



2^H 



f 





THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



THE DINNER TABLE OF THE NOUVEAU RICHE. 

A nation must be able to take in art at every pore, before its 
genius can become artistic; before you shall find taste at the 
plough-tail. The reason why the nouveau riche in England pre- 
sents a tasteless dinner table to his guests (albeit the worth of 
hundreds is upon it) must be sought far off. A writer in Once a 
Week on Dinner Table Art observes : ** We go out, say, to a 
large London dinner-party, where our host has expended ;^ioo or 
^120 on the service before us. It is rich in gilding, it bears his 
coat-of-arms, it is bordered with a brilliant blue or green ; yet 
what is the effect ? We look down or up the table and see nothing 
but dead white surfaces ; the white table cloth, the uncontrasting 
silver. In fact, there is no effect at all, except of a chill uni- 
formity, unworthy of an age pretending to the least cultivation in 
matters of taste." 



An unpunctual cook is, in my opinion, no cook. — Jules Gouffe. 



BOG BUTTER. 



It would appear from the Irish " Hudibras," and other publica- 
tions of the 17th century, that the Irish people deposited butter in 
bogs for the sake of the strong flavour which was thereby im- 
parted to it. These deposits sometimes were forgotten to be 
removed again, and hence the frequent discoveries of " bog 
butter." 

Interesting article " On the History and Migration of Cultivated Fruits 
in Reference to Ethnology," read to Ethnological Society by Mr. J. 
Crawfurd, President. — See^page 766, Gent.^s Mag., 1866, July-Dec. 








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FIN-BEC S SCRAP BOOK. 



283 



CANVAS-BACK DUCKS. 

" Did you ever," a tantalising friend writes to Fin- Bee from 
Philadelphia, **eat canvas-back ducks — say about November, 
picked out of fifty or a hundred, and eaten twenty-four hours after 
they were killed — cooked before a hickory (you have not the wood 
in England) fire, with hominy. * What's hominy ?' I hear you 
say." A cruel letter in short to a man who does not see his way 
straight across the Atlantic. But Fin-Bee begs to inform his 
friend, for his disappointment, that he kas eaten canvas-back 
ducks in admirable condition in London, and in admirable 
company. 



FUSION. 

II est une heure ou se rencontrent 
Tous les grands vins dans un festin, 
Heure fraternelle oh se montrent 
Le lafi&tte et le chambertin. 

Plus de querelles a cette heure 
Entre ces vaillants compagnons ; 
Plus de discorde interieure 
Entre Gascons et Bourguignons. 

On fait treve a I'humeur rivale, 
On eteint T esprit de parti, 
L'appetit veut cet intervalle. 
Cette heure est I'heure du roti ! 

Comme aux receptions royales 
Que virent les deux Trianons, 
Circulent a travers les salles , 
Ceux qui portent les plus beaux noms, 






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THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




A des gentilshommes semblables 
Et non moins armories qu'eux, 
Les grands vins, aux airs agreables, 
Echangent des saliits pompeux. 

lis ont depouille leurs astuces, 
Tout en conservant leur cachet. 

— Passez, monsieur de Lur-Saluces ! 

— Apres vous, mon cher Montrachet ! 

Pomard, en souriant, regarde 
Glisser le doux Branne-Mouton. 
Nul ne dit a Latour : ** Prends garde !' 
Pas meine le bouillant Gorton. 

Volney raconte ses mines 
Au digne Saint-Emilion, 
Qui I'entretient de ses ravines 
Et des grottes de Petion. 

Jamais les vieilles Tuileries 
Dans leurs soirs les plus radieux, 
Ne virent, sous leurs boiseries, 
Hotes plus ceremonieux. 

On cherche le feutre a panache 
Sur le bouchon de celui-ci, 
Et, sous la basque qui la cache, 
Uepee en acier aminci. 

Voici monsieur de Leoville 
Qui s'avance en habit brode, 
Et qui, d'une fa9on civile, 
Par Chablis se voit aborde. 



Musigny, que d'orgueil on taxe, 
Dit a Saint-Estephe : " Pardieu ! 
J'etais chez Maurice de Saxe 
Quand vous etiez chez Richelieu !' 




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FIN-BEC S SCRAP BOOK. 



285 






" — Moi, sans que personne s'en blesse, 
J'ai," dit monsieur de Sillery, 
*' Conquis mes lettres de noblesse 
Aux soupers de la Dubarry !" 

Un autre encore moins severe : 
"J'ai parfois deride le front 
Du fameux proconsul Barrere,.." 
Aussitot chacun I'interrompt. 

Destournel se tait et se guinde, 
Destournel, ami du flot bleu. 
Qui voyagea deux fois dans Tlnde, 
Colore par un ciel de feu. 

" Sans ehercher si loin mon bapteme, 
Prophete chez moi," dit Margaux, 
** A la duchesse d'Angouleme 
J'ai fait les honneurs de Bordeaux." 

Le jeune et rougissant Montrose, 
Ayant quitte pour un instant 
Le bias de son tuteur Larose, 
Jette un regard inquietant, 

Et cherche, vierge enfrissonnee. 
Rouge comme un coquelicot, 
Mademoiselle Romance 
Aupres de la veuve Clicquot. 

Certaine d'etre bien lotie, 
Malgre son air un peu tremblant, 
Dans un coin la Cote-Rotie 
Sourit a I'Ermitage blanc ; 

Tandis qu'avec un doigt qui frappc, 
Impatient de se montrcr, 
La fougueux Chateau-Neuf-du-Pape 
Demande si Ton peut ontrcM". 



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THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




Meursault estime I'or moins jaune 
Que Barsac ; — lorsque Richebouig 
Recommence sur ceux de ^* Beaune 
Et de Nuits " un vieux calembourg. 

Rauzan decouvre mille charmes 
Chez Mercurey, ce fin rougeaud. 
J'entends le cri de : " Portez armes !" 
On acclame le Clos-Vougeot. 

II en est du temps des cometes, 
Qui, depouilles, uses, fanes, 
Sont dans des fauteuils ^ roulettes 
Respectueusement traines. 

Un tel, souffrant qu'on le decante, 
Fat, dans sa fraise de cristal : 
" Ah !" dit-il, "plus d'une bacchante 
M'aima dans le Palais-Royal !" 

A ce rendez-vous pacifique 
Aucun ne manque, ils sont tous la. 
O le spectacle magnifique ! 
O le resplendissant gala ! 

Et quel bel exemple nous donnent 
Ces vins, dans leur rare fierte, 
Qui s'acceptent et se pardonnent 
Leur triomphante egalite ! 

Charles/ Monselet.— iV^'z/., 1872. 



SIR THEODORE MAYERNE'S CITY OF LONDON PIE. 

Take eight marrow bones, eighteen sparrrows, one pound of 
potatoes, a quarter of a pound of eryngoes, two ounces of lettuce 
stalks, forty chestnuts, half a pound of dates, a peck of oysters, a 
quarter of a pound of preserved citron, three artichokes, twelve 



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eggs, two sMced lemons, a handful of pickled barberries, a quarter 
of an ounce of whole pepper, half an ounce of sliced nutmeg, half 
an ounce of whole cinnamon, a quarter of an ounce of whole 
cloves, half an ounce of mace, and a quarter of a pound of cur- 
rants. Liquor, when it is baked, with white wine, butter, and 
sugar. 

Some half a dozen years ago, with very slight alterations, — 
only adopted after deep consideration, to suit the palates of the 
present day— a pie was made from the above recipe, which gave 
complete satisfaction to the party of connoisseurs in culinary mat- 
ters who heartily and merrily partook of it. 

Though a noted bon vzvant, Mayerne attained the advanced 
age of eighty-two years, dying in 1665, at his own house in 
Chelsea, a favourite place of residence among the physicians of 
the olden time. The immediate cause of his death Mayerne 
attributed to drinking bad wine with a convivial party at a tavern 
in the Strand. " Good wine," he used to say, " is slow poison. 
I have drunk it all my lifetime, and it has not killed me yet ; but 
bad wine is sudden death." — Chambers' s Book of Days. 



GRAVY. 

(4th S. i. 124, 207.) 

This word, spelled grave, occurs in a MS. preserved in the 
library of the Royal Society,* and printed in — 

A CoUection of Ordinances and Regulations Also 

Receipts in Ancient Cooldng. Printed for the Society of Antiquaries, 
London, 1790. 

The manuscript is without title or date, or name of the auihcH-. 
It is— 

bound up with some other treatises upon Regimen and Medicine; one 
of which is stiled, " De Regimine Salutatis ; edita a Magistro Johannc do 
rholeto, A.D. 1285." The volume contains p. i to 445. From p. 9 to 15 




is a chronicle of events, beginning a.d. 1326, and ending A.D. 1399 : and 
i t is evident from the hand [writing] that these treatises were written soon 
after that time ; but they were probably then transcriptions from originals 
which had been long before composed by persons of fame and celebrity in 
the practice of Regimen and Cookery."— Vide yi Collection of Ordinances^ 
&c., p. 424. 

Grave, written thus, occurs but ones in the manuscript— viz. : 
as the title of a receipt, " Eles in Grave," and the author or 
authoress — I almost fancy it was a kind of Dame Julyana Berners 
— has probably meant it for "the dressynge," which word is 
mentioned at the end of the receipt in question — 

Take almonde mylke, and draw hit up wdth swete wyne, or white W3nie, 

and put hit into a pot, ; and in the dressynge the culpons hole ; 

and serve hit forth. — Ibid, (verbatim), p. 468, and p. 424 of the MS. 

I tliink that ** the dressynge " forms the grave, for the latter 
word does not occur in the receipt, and altogether, as I have said 
before, but once in the manuscript. It is intimately connected, 
no doubt, with the German word Griebe, also written Grebe and 
Greve, which latter expression is perhaps the most commonly 
used. It is seldom employed in the singular, and literally means 
the small pieces of fat which remain at the bottom of vessels 
in which the leaf of pork is rendered or made into lard. ( Vide 
Heyse's Handworterbuch der deutschen S^rache, Magdeburg, 
1833, vol. i. p. 618.) The common English name is scratchings, 
but I find that the appellation graves is also used for them (vide 
Critical Dictionary of the English and German Languages, 
by F. W. Thieme. Leipzic, 1856, 6th ed. vol. i. p. 214), as well 
as greaves. ( Vide Richardson's Dictionary of the English Lan- 
guage, new ed. London, i860, p. 356.) Dr. Richardson says of 
greaves •• — 

The refuse of skin, gristle, bone, &c., of substances boiled to make 
tallow, is so called. See " Gravy."— Vide Dictionary, &c., p. 356. 

And referring to gravy itself in the same valuable lexicographi- 
cal work, we find — 

Gravy, s. The juice that flows from flesh when dressed, or while 
dressing. This word, though as old as Chapman [b. 1557, d. 1634], is not 



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FIN-BEC'S SCRAP BOOK. 289 




found in any of our old Dictionaries. Junius has Greaves, which he ex- 
plains, the juice of boiled or roast meat, remaining in the dish after the 
meat is cut into pieces. And in Swedish Gref-war is sordes ; whence 
prohahly greaves. (Vide Dictionary, &c., pp. 355, 356.) 

Thus, as I mentioned above, it literally means the small pieces 
of fat which remain in the dish or vessel after the rendering has 
taken place ; for I consider the words Griebe and Grebe allied to 
Grau;pe (English groat, groats — hulled oats — and grout, coarse 
meal, pollard ; dregs), from the old German verb giroupin, to 
break or rub to small pieces. {Vide Heyse's Handworterbuch, 
&c., vol. i. p. 616.) Dr. Richardson speaks of groats o^ grits, 
and quotes Somner's explanation of the Anglo-Saxon Gritte : 
** Bran, scurf, grit, draff, any dust or powder made by sawing, 
filing, grating, grinding," &c. {Vide Richardson's Dictionary, 
&c., p. 358.) And finally, groats ox grits are Grutze in German, 
and Grutt and Gorte in Low German or Plattdeutsch. {Vide 
Heyse's Handworterbuch, &c., vol. i. p. 631.) But I think that 
gritta, grits, grutze, grutt, gorte, grout, groats, griebe, grebe, 
greve, graves, greaves, grave, and gravy are all ** Welsh 
cousins," and that gravy is the " Sir Watkin " of them. 

Hermann Kindt. 



This word will be found in Webster if your correspondents 
consult Messrs. Bell & Daldy's edition. A.-S. greofa, pot, or 
greova, allied to Icel. grifia, pit, &c. O. E. greavie I cannot 
find in Bayley nor in any other old dictionary in my possession, 
and Webster gives no reference to any author for its use. 

J. A. G. 






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TWO COOKS. 

Alexander told the Queen of Caria that his tutor Leonidais had 

provided two cooks for him: "Hard marches all night, and a 

small dinner the next day." 

Jeremy Taylor. 



We have lived at God's charges all the days of our life, and 
have (as the Italian proverb says) sat down to meat at the sound 
of a bell, and hitherto He hath not failed us ; we have no reason 
to suspect Him for the future, etc. — Idi'd. 



A DUCK PIE. 



£e S;port of June, describing 2, fete given by Madame du Plessis 
Belliere at Moreuil, near Amiens, notes an Amiens pie carried in 
by four mait^es d^ hotel, which contained twenty ducks. The 
goose pies of the North of England are mere tartlets to this ! 



PRINCE NAPOLEON'S KITCHEN. 

A woman was pleading in June, 1869, against her husband 
before a Parisian judge. She accused him of being a lazy fellow 
who lived on what money she could earn, and did nothing himself. 
The husband handed to the judge a certificate from the head cook 
of Prince Napoleon Bonaparte, stating that on all occasions when 
banquets had been given at the Palais Royal the defendant had 
acted as ** cuisinier supplementaire." To this M. Mamerl, the 
counsel for the wife, replied that the certificate in question proved 
his case, seeing that for the last five years it was notorious that the 
kitchen fire at the Palais Royal had never been alight. 



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FIN-BEC'S SCRAP BOOK. 29 1 



PRICES IN THE GOOD OLD TIMES. 

The cost of food during the first half of the sixteenth century 
may with advantage be compared with the high price of meat 
and coals at the present time. The annual report of Mr. Basevi 
Sanders for the year 1872, addressed to the Deputy Keeper of the 
Public Records, affords in its description of the documents which 
have been copied for the third volume of " Fac-similes of the 
National MSS. of Scotland," many interesting particulars on this 
topic. Amongst the extracts from entries in the Royal Household 
Book, we find that in A.D. 1528-1529, if allowance is made for the 
difference in value of money in those days, several articles of fo'^d 
were then sold at a price much above their present market price. 
Thus one shilling apiece for teal, 3s. for a capon, and 8s. a 
stone for suet are items in the account of the Royal larder. But, 
even without taking into consideration the comparative difference 
of the value of money at that date, two articles of food— rabbits 
and partridges — are mentioned as charged for at a very high rate. 
In the entries of the Royal Household Book 109 rabbits figure as 
having cost ;^i 4 los. 8d., or 2S. 8d. apiece; while for twenty- 
nine partridges £^ 7s., or 3s. apiece, is charged. Thus in some 
respects there is matter for congratulation in looking back to the 
" good old times," and finding that we are not quite so badly off 
as we seem. One item, however, will make every one regret the 
days when steam was not— coals were 7d. a load in 15 12 ! — Tke 
Hour, March, 1874. 




A SNAIL MARKET. 



The Mayors of the department of the Seine have received orders 
to extend their protection over the snails of their respective com- 
munes — the snail having been declared a useful article of human 
food ; and it is proposed to set apart a section of the Halles Cen- 
trales as a snail market — the consumption of these creatures 
being to the average value of ;^48,ooo annually. 




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292 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



THE FATE OF A PIEMAN. 

In November, 1872, Alphonse Karr told a melancholy story 
which he had from his brother. During the Siege of Paris the 
brother met a Monsieur B., who was famous for a prodigious 
appetite. In order. to gratify it he set up as a restaurateur; and 
one day took M. Karr to dine at his establishment. After an 
excellent dinner consisting of soup, filets, langue brazsee, j}ate 
chaud, &c., the host asked his guest how he had fared. 

** Superbly !" cried M. Karr. 

"Well, it was all horse flesh. It's only the horse shoes that 
baffle me. The bridles are not bad for soup !" 

The staple of Monsieur B.'s industry was horse-beef pies. He 
employed two of the best chefs of Paris, and throve exceedingly. 
With the scraps of his trade he fed many of the poor of his neigh- 
bourhood. 

At one moment — after the siege — he was threatened by the 
authorities ; but a parcel of his most succulent pies despatched 
to influential members of the Commune saved him. When the 
army of Versailles entered, however, some neighbours who had 
received broken victuals when they wanted entire pies denounced 
him as a mad demagogue. He was, in truth, a mere talker and 
eater. But they came and led him off, and shot him in the street. 



SPARKLING HOCK. 




The Pall Mall Gazelle h3iS published (January, 1875) the fol- 
lowing interesting notes on Sparkling Hock :^- 

"For some years the great anxiety of the manufacturers of 
sparkling hocks was to render their wines as much as possible 
like champagne, which was only to be accomplished by disguis- 
ing their true flavour and dosing them largely with syrup. In 
this form they satisfied, and indeed still satisfy, their German and 





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FIN-BEC'S SCRAP BOOK. 293 



Russian consumers, but of late years the character of the wines 
for the English market has undergone a complete change. 
England has set the example of a decided preference for the drier 
kinds of sparkling wines. And in this we have shown our wis- 
dom, inasmuch as low-class wines devoid of flavour, or possessing 
a flavour that is objectionable, can have these drawbacks dis- 
guised by a liberal dose of syrup. In dry sparkling wines, on the 
contrary, the actual flavour of the original wine — the m'n bout — 
is preserved, which necessitates wines of a comparatively high 
class being employed in their manufacture. The principal dif- 
ference between champagnes and sparkling hocks designed for 
the English market consists in the former being made almost 
exclusively from red grapes, pressed immediately they are 
gathered, and not allowed to ferment in their skins, while the 
latter are made from white grapes alone. The finest champagnes 
come from the ptneau nozr, or black Burgundy ^rape, while the 
best sparkling hocks are made from the Riesling, and the com- 
moner kinds chiefly from the Klebroth variety, the latter being a 
red grape. Effervescing Rhine wines of the highest class have a 
marked and refined flavour, together with a very decided bouquet. 
Moreover, they retain their effervescent properties for a consider- 
able time after being uncorked, and appear to the taste quite as 
light, if not precisely as delicate, as the higher class champagnes, 
although in reality such is not the case : for all sparkling hocks 
possess greater body than even the heaviest champagnes, and, 
therefore, cannot be drunk with equal freedom. The process 
pursued in the manufacture of sparkling hocks is, with a single 
variation, precisely the same as that followed with regard to 
champagnes, the difference being that in the case of hocks the 
raw wine, after the fining which takes place following its first 
fermentation, has a small quantity of sugar added to it previously 
to being put into bottle. After it is bottled the wine remains in 
a cool cellar for eighteen months or a couple of years, being con- 
stantly moved during this period, in the same way as champagne 
is, to force the sediment which it forms to deposit itself near to 




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the cork. By this time the added as well as the natural sugar 
contained in the wine has become converted into alcohol and 
carbonic acid ; and after the sediment has been expelled from the 
bottle the operation of dosing, or flavouring, the wine takes place. 
According as this is required to be sweet or dry, a larger or 
smaller quantity of liqueur is added to it ; and with regard to 
sparkling hocks destined to the English market the dose is gene- 
rally of a Tniniinum description. Indeed, the finest qualities 
from such houses as Miiller, of Eltville, and Ewald, of Rudes- 
heim, which are to be obtained in England much cheaper than 
second-class champagnes, are even drier, and consequently more 
natural wines than most of the champagnes we are acquainted 
with. Foreigners cannot understand our preference for dry, 
sparkling wines. They do not consider that as a rule we drink 
them during dinner with the ;plats, and not at dessert, as they 
almost invariably do, with all kinds of sweets, fruits, and ices. 
Sparkling hocks for the home and Russian markets are frequently 
almost cloying in their sweetness. The sparkling Moselles, too, 
for Russia are largely dosed with the preparation of elder flowers, 
which imparts to them their well-known muscatel flavour and 
perfume. The manufacturers say they are doing their best to 
abandon this absurd practice of artificially perfuming sparkling 
Moselles ; but many of their customers, and especially those in 
the English provinces, stipulate for the scented varieties, possibly 
from an erroneous belief in their superiority. Great impetus was 
given to the manufacture of German sparkling wines during the 
recent war, when the Champagne was in a measure closed to the 
outside world. At this epoch the less scrupulous manufacturers, 
instigated by dishonest speculators, boldly forged both the brands 
on the corks and the labels on the bottles of the great Rheims and 
Epernay firms, and sent forth sparkling wines of their own pro- 
duction to the four quarters of the globe as veritable champagnes 
of the highest class. The respectable firms acted more honestly, 
and, as it turned out, with better policy ; for by maintaining their 
own labels and brands they extended the market for their produce, 







FIN-BEC'S SCRAP BOOK. 295 



causing German sparkling wines to be introduced under their 
true names into places where they had never penetrated before. 
The result was a considerable increase in the annual demand, 
even after the stores of Clicquot, Roederer, Moet, and Mumms 
were again open to all the world. Owing to this increased demand, 
and the deficient supply of Rhine wines at moderate price, the 
manufacturers of sparkling hocks are reduced to follow the ex- 
ample of the champagne firms, and buy much of their raw wine 
at a distance ; and this year they have had to pay double the 
price of six years ago for suitable wines of the Palatinate. Among 
the principal manufacturers of sparkling hocks are included the 
two firms already mentioned — Matheus Miiller, of Eltville, and 
Ewald and Co., of Rudesheim — together with the Hochheimer 
Association at Hochheim, and the Rheingauer Association at 
Schierstein. These four firms produce annually about a million 
and a half of bottles between them, or nearly double their produc- 
tion of eight or ten years ago. Krote, of Coblenz, and Lauteren 
and Son, of Mayence, are also pianufacturers on an extensive 
scale as well as of considerable repute. So wide-spread now is 
the manufacture of German sparkling wines — so-called hocks and 
Moselles — that it forms an important branch of industry not 
merely in the Rheingau and at Coblenz and Mayence, but also at 
Treves, where sparkling Moselles are extensively made ; in the 
Nahe valley, at Wurzburg in Bavaria, where the best vineyards 
are owned by the King ; and by far the best sparkling wine is 
made, at the Royal factory, at Esslingen in Wurtemberg, at Berb- 
heim in Alsace, and at Griineberg in Prussian Silesia. Next to 
the home the principal market for sparkling hocks is Great 
Britain. Afterwards come the North of Europe, the United 
States, Australia, China, and Japan. The cheapness of these 
wines no doubt tells largely in their favour, as the commoner 
kinds can be purchased as low as 2s. per bottle, while the higher 
qualities average no more than 4s., excepting in the single 
instance of sparkling Johannisberger, not schloss Johannis- 
berger, which is priced at 5s. 6d. the bottle." 







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THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




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In addition to the foregoing notes Messrs. H. B. Fearon and 
Son observe : — '* We may add that of late years there has been 
made at Ingelheim on the Rhine a first-class sparkling wine 
from' black grapes alone, to wh,ich has been given the name of 
Ingelheim Champagne, and which at a very moderate price 
competes with the first brands of champagne. Of this wine we 
were the first importers into this country." 



A SIEGE DINNER. 

Here is the bill of fare of a December diner de siege given by 
the Paris Jockey Club : — 

Hors d^CEuvre. Radishes, Herring marine, Onions a la Proven- 
9ale, slightly salt Butter, Gherkins and Olives. 

First Course. Soup of slightly salted Horse, with vegetables ; 
Ass flesh cutlets, with carrots ; Mule's liver 
saute aux champignons ; Horse's lights, with 
white sauce ; Carp a la matelote ; fried Gud- 
geons ; Celery heads, with seasoning. 

Second Course. Quarter of Dog braised ; leg of Dog roasted ; 

Rats cooked upon the ashes ; Rat pie, with 

Mushrooms ; Eel a la broche ; Salad of Celery 

and small Salad. 
Dessert. Dutch Cheese, Apples, Pears, Marmalade au 

kirsch. Gateau d' Italic au fromage de Chester. 

This tnenu was composed by that renowned epicure Baron 
Brisse, who, in days before the war, was wont to pubhsh one 
daily in the Liberte for the guidance oi gourmets. 

Mortimer Collins. 

[The Baron is still publishing his daily menus in the same 
paper. — Fin-Bec] 




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LION HAM AS THE PifeCE DE RESISTANCE. 

M. Constant Cheret, the well-known lion hunter, in January, 
1875, sent the editor oi La Chasse Illustree, Land and Wafer 
tells us, a magnificent quarter of a lion, which he had shot in the 
neighbourhood of Philippeville, Algeria, in the course of the 
month of December. With a view of doing all possible honour 
to the sportsman's gift, the editor invited his staff to dine with 
him at the Restaurant Magny, a house renowned for its cook 
and cellar, and well patronised by Messieurs les Chasseurs. 
On this momentous occasion the great Magny himself super- 
int-ended the dinner, and prepared the principal dishes with his 
own hands. The guests were nineteen in number, and the menu 
was one of the choicest ; indeed, Mr. Lion seems to have been 
the pretext for organising one of the prettiest and most recherche 
gastronomicaiy?/^j- that we have heard of for a long time. The 
bill of fare was as follows : — Huitres de Marennes ; Beurre et 
olives; Potages tapioca et bisque; Bouchee ala Reine ; Barbue, 
sauce hollandaise ; Filets a la Rossini ; Estouffade de Lion a la 
Meridionale ; Coeur de Lion ^ la Castellane ; Coq de Bruyere 
flanque de Becasses ; Petits Pois; Biscuit glace. Vins:— ChabHs, 
Sauterne, Roussillon's champagne, CortOn, &c. The dinner, as 
a specimen of the culinary art, was perfect ; but of course the 
great attraction was the lion ham and heart. These dishes were 
prepared by Magny himself in the following manner: — Estouffade 
de Lion a la Meridionale. Marinez the lion for a week with 
plenty of spice, oignons, carrots, thyme, bay-leaves, garlic, 
parsley, and cloves ; then pour red wine over it — some Burgundy 
or a strong Southern wine— until it is completely covered, taking 
care to add a little good cognac. At the end of the week strain 
the lion on a cloth, remove the sinews, cut it into nice filets, lard 
them, and put them into a casserole with olive oil. When the 
outside is slightly browned, remove them from the saucepan, and 
place them en couronne in a large frying pan, along with a third 
of the marinade, some butter, and the third of a quarter of 




orange. Prick a few fine olives with pins, remove the stones, and 
place them along with the filets half an hour before serving. 
Four hours' cooking is sufficient. Cceur de Lion a la Castellane. 
Chop up a pound of fat bacon and a pound of lean veal, season it 
well with salt, pepper, and spice ; pass it through a strainer, as 
you would in making di puree, after having warmed it on the fire. 
Now mix a pound of farce de volatile with it, adding a little 
cognac, some Madeira, and half a pound of mushrooms chopped 
up small. Remove the centre of the heart, fill it with the farce, 
roll it and envelope it in ^.pdte. Cook it for three hours and a 
half, and serve it up with a de?ni-glace and 2^ garniture of mush- 
room j^^raiy. When Mr. Lion was placed upon the table there 
was a religious silence, which, however, only lasted for a few 
seconds, for at the first mouthful a murmur of approbation ran 
round the table, and the guests with one accord drank to the 
health of M. Cheret and M. Magny, coupling in their admira- 
tion the valiant lion-slayer and the clever artiste who had proved 
himself able to prepare such a delicious dish out of the flesh of 
this ferocious game, which is more frequently in the habit of 
eating others than of being eaten itself. In these days of 
economy it is pleasing to find that even lions in carcase can be 
utilised, and that no longer is a live dog better than a dead 
lion. 




SHOT IN BOTTLES. 

A clergyman, who says his early training was for the medical 
profession, writes to us : — " Many years ago my fattier, who was 
a physician and whose medical pupil I then was, was called to 
see a farmer's wife whose case baffled the usual medical 
attendant. My father pronounced it to be a case of lead poison- 
ing. A miinute inquiry was at once instituted into the water, 
food-cooking utensils, &c.; but nothing was discovered which 
could in any way corroborate my father's assumption. The poor 
woman had been ill a week or two before my father was called 



,--^ 





FIN EEC's SCRAP BOOK. 29Q 




in ; she lingered some little time after and died. We attended 
the funeral, and after the funeral her husband signified a wish 
to see ray father as he had something to show him. It was a 
bottle of cider which had been half emptied, and which he had 
found in the cupboard, and of the contents of which his wife had 
partaken just before she was takei;i ill, and which fact he had 
entirely forgotten until he had seen the bottle in the cupboard 
the day before the funeral. The mystery was solved. At the 
bottom of the bottle was a quantity of shot all crusted over by the 
action of the cider, and the cause of death at once was made 
evident." 



HOW THE POPE LIVES. 




The Pope will complete his eighty-fourth year on the 13th of 
May, 1876. He comes of a long-lived family. Several of his 
ancestors, the Mastai Ferretti of Sinigaglia, were centenarians ; 
still he must have been attentive to his dietary to have thus out- 
passed the scriptural span by a decade, and still to retain his 
faculties clear and his spirits buoyant. The stomach is the 
furnace where nine out of teii of the maladies that attack 
humanity are manufactured ; and His Holiness has always had 
the good sense to take care of his stomach, and to suit his food 
to his system and to the season. He shows more intelligence in 
that than some ecclesiastics of minor rank in his own Church. 
The reputation of the late Cardinal Wiseman as a large eater 
was notorious. Stories, are told of his having devoured an entire 
leg of mutton at one sitting ; but then he had an inordinate appe- 
tite, and this excess is to be attributed less to gourmandism than 
to disease. The reputation of his successor as a small eater is 
equally notorious. We have heard that Monsignor Manning 
considers himself "riotous" when he takes a' milk-biscuit and 
a glass of sherry over and above the daily ascetic allowance he 
has apportioned to himself. The Pope has discovered the golden 



'^^rr 





THE BOOK OF MENUS. 



mean between both — he eats enough, and eats ^\. regular hours, 
and his food is properly cooked. So the Pope at eighty-four is 
a hale veteran, can crack his mild joke, and enjoy his game of 
billiards* At two o'clock he dines, and the expenses of his table, 
we are assured, do not exceed five lire a day — that is to say, in 
round figures, four English shillings. He is fond of vegetables 
and partial to fresh-water fish, but does not indulge in much 
animal food. Every one who knows Italy will agree that he is 
right in this, both because of the temperature of the country and 
of the quality of butchers' meat. Bullocks, as a rule, are not 
driven to the shambles there until they have led an industrious 
career in the traces. They fall like Macbeth, with Jiarness on 
their backs. Here is the bill of fare of the Pope's dinner on a 
day of abstinence : A bowl of vegetable soup, a plate of 
macaroni, with olive-oil and pomo-dore, two gurnets, some 
French beans, some bread and cheese, and three apples. The 
Pope makes a mistake, but he can hardly be blamed for that, as 
the traditions of his dignity compel it — he dines usually alone, 
and always at a separate table. There are y^/^- days,* however, 
when the Pontiff has his guests, and then the bill of fare is more 
luxurious. One of these is the Thursday in Holy Week, when 
thirteen poor priests of different nationalities, introduced" by 
their respective ambassadors, are invited to a little feast at the 
Vatican in commemoration of the Last Supper. We are enabled 
to reproduce the fnenu of one of these banquets :-^Potage 
maigre aux herbes. , Meunier,* sauce mayonnaise. Vol au 
Vent de Turbot de Tenere. Artichauts garnis d'epinards. Salade 
d'^crevisses. Fromage. Nefles du Japon. Praises. Cerises. 
Oranges. Ananas. Petits-fours. Vins de Velletri et Castel- 
Gondolfo, rouges et blancs. 

When appetite is brought to such a spread as that— and we 
have the convicti(on that the Pope is mindful of the Italian 
saw "La fame e il miglior intingolo" — the admission must be 

* A sort offish. 






made that the Pope does " lead a happy life," in the words of the 
song, even though he does not habitually " drink the best of 
Rhenish wine," but patriotically prefers vintage of his native 
Italy. 



NOYES BROWNE IN THE MORNING POST ON tHE 
CLOSING OF PHILIPPE'S IN JANUARY, 1875. 

** We came to the conclusion that the life, fame, and prosperity 
of a Parisian restaurant depended on the genius of one man, of 
one artistic mind, one rare inspired palate, of one chef. Of 
course, that exceptional creation of human nature must possess, 
like a great general, a variety of gifts ; he must know also how 
dinners are to be served; he must have an eagle's eye for con- 
ducting an establishment as difficult to govern with success as 
the French nation. To find all the qualities in one man is very 
rare, almost as difficult to meet with as the varied requirements 
necessary to make a great dramatic singer. Nature begins many 
great works, but leaves most of them incomplete. Pascal was 
the life and soul of * Philippe's.' A man of extraordinary grasp 
of mind, not only a cook, he understood natural humanity, he 
was master of all the caprices of appetite, and he conducted his 
establishment like an experienced statesman. The happiest 
hours of his life were when he was composing a menu for what 
he called educated diners, and he would watch the effect of a 
recommended entree on his guests with all the interest a young 
lover attaches to the approving smile of his mistress. He was 
rich in anecdote, and remembered certain historical dinners and 
breakfasts and the favourite dishes of illustrious personages. I 
recollect asking Pascal one day after a small banquet he had 
personally conducted what was the largest number of persons who 
ought to sit down to an artistic dinner in order to enjoy the feast 
to perfection. Pascal passed his hand over his massive brow, 
and then added : — * That is a subject which has long engaged 
my attention. I have come to the conclusion that no amount of 



1 




t iti lCt -" ^ ^ — ' — 

302 THE BOOK OF MENUS. 




cooks and servants can serve a dinner of more than thirty covers 
as artistic dinners ought to be placed before worthy guests. If 
you attempt a larger number you lose the more delicate flavours, 
that light and shade of refined cooking which addresses the per- 
ceptive mind.' Pascal, after a slight pause, observed (having 
been persuaded to take a seat), * There are many things to be 
observed. In the first place, no dinner is perfect unless the 
kitchen is very near the dining-room ; the most simple dishes 
begin to lose Value every five minutes after they have left the 
kitchen ; more delicately-conceived entrees are yet more suscep- 
tible ; some sauces sulk when they begin to feel cold. Ah, 
gentlemen, there is so much to think about. * * * i like my 
company to take a walk before dining, and I am a great enemy 
of cigars before and even after a feast. I don't care to have 
pretty women at table ; they often interfere with gastronomic 
appreciation. There is much to be said about wines. If I were 
a despot I would oblige nothing but Bordeaux, and perhaps a 
glass of generous wine at the end of the banquet. Sweet wines 
are my enemy. There are some people,' added Pascal with a 
sigh, * not worthy of a refined dinner.' " 



THE END. 







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9 1916