(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The book of nursery rhymes complete : from the creation of the world to the present time"

\.'-^ 



■fXltgj^ PUBLISHED ^^ 

^ THEODORE BLISS &Go. 

Y 





THE 



BOOK 



OP 



NURSERY RHYMES 

COMPLETE. 



FROIM THE CREATION OF THE WOTxLD TO THE 
PRESENT TIME. 



. / PHILADELPHIA: 
THEODORE BLISS & CO, 
1846. 



THE NEW .York" 
PUBLIC IIBMR^ 

306019B 



ASTOR, LENCX ^\r, 
5 1045 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846, by 

Theodore Bliss & Co., 

in the office of the clerk of the district court of the United 
States, in and for the eastern district of Pennsylvania. 



E. B. MEARS, STEREOTYPE 
C. SHERMAN, PRINTER. 



PREFACE. 



The editor of the following work has col- 
lected, as the intelligent reader will at once 
perceive, all that is really valuable in nursery- 
literature, from the time of Adam to that of 
David Crockett. For this purpose it has been 
necessary of course to consult all the great li- 
braries in the world, as for example, the Bod- 
leian Library, the Library of the British Muse- 
um, the Royal Library at Paris, the Library of 
the Escurial, of Harvard College, of Meadville 
College, and the private Library of Tom Thumb, 
Esq. 

The editor has, of course, been under the ne- 
cessity of reading through a great many thou- 
sand volumes ; and he now with a feeling of 
what he hopes may be considered pardonable 
pride presents the result of his labours, which he 

(7) 



VIU 



PREFACE. 



verily believes may be justly considered the quint- 
essence of Nursery Literature — the very JVe 
plus ultra of Infant Poetry. 

The pictures will be recognised by the Cog- 
noscenti as a selection from the first galleries in 
Rome, Florence, and London, including the most 
celebrated works of Ratfaelle, Guido Reni, and 
George Cruikshanks. The editor would speak 
in commendation of particular pictures in the 
book, but he apprehends that any thing said by 
himself in commendation of the work might be 
considered inconsistent with that shrinking mod- 
esty which has in fact always been his chief 
fault. 




CONTENTS. 



Class Page. 

1. HISTORICAL RHYMES 13 

2. LITERAL RHYMES 23 

3. TALES 29 

4. PROVERBS 53 

5. SCHOLASTIC RHYMES 57 

6. SONGS 61 

7. RIDDLES 85 

6. CHARMS 95 

9. GAFFERS AND GAMMERS .... 99 

10. GAMES Ill 

(9) 



X CONTENTS. 

11. PARADOXES 137 

12. LULLABIES . .... 141 

13. JINGLES 147 

14. LOVE AND MATRLMONY .... 155 

15. NATURAL HISTORY 169 

IG. ACCUMULATIVE STORIES .... 183 

17. LOCAL 195 

18. RELICS , 199 

19. MISCELLANEOUS 217 




(11) 



HISTORICAL RHYMES. 15 

3. 

[The following song relating to Robin Hood, the celebrated outlaw, 
is well known at Worksop, in Nottinghamshire, where it constitutes 
one of the luirsery series.] 

Robin Hood, Robin Hood, 
Is in the mickle wood ! 
Little John, Little John, 
He to the town is gone. 

Robin Hood, Robin Hood, 

Is telling his beads. 
All in the green wood, 

Among the green weeds. 

Little John, Little John, 

If he comes no more, 
Robin Hood, Robin Hood, 

He will fret full sore ! 



[The following lines were obtained in Oxfordshire. The story to 
which it alludes is related by Matthew Paris.] 

One moonshiny night 

As I sat high. 

Waiting for one 

To come by ; 

The boughs did bend. 

My heart did ache 

To see what hole the fox did make. 



16 NURSERY RHYMES. 



[The foIlowin<; perhaps refers to Joanna of Castile, who visited the 
court of Henry the Seventh, in the year 1506.] 

I HAD a little nut tree, nothing would it bear 
But a silvej- nutmeg and a golden pear ; 
The King of Spain's daughter came to visit me, 
And all was because of my little nut tree. 
I skipp'd over water, I danced over sea, 
And all the birds in the air couldn't catch me. 

6. 

[From a MS. in the old Royal liibrary, in the British Museum, the 
exact reference to which is mislaid. It is M^ritten, if I recollect right- 
ly, in a hand of the time of Henry VHI., in an older manuscript. 

We make no spare 

Of John Hunkes' mare ; 

And now I 

Think she will die; 

He thought it good, 

To put her in the wood. 

To seek where she might lie dry ; 

If the mare should chance to fail. 

Then the crowns would for her sale. 

7. 

[From MS. Sloane, 14S9, fol. 19, written in the time of Charles I.] 

The King of France, and four thousand men. 
They drew their swords, and put them up again. 



HISTORICAL RHYMES. 17 

8. 

[In a tract, called " Pigges Corantoe, or Newes from the North," 
4to., Lond. 1G42, p. 3, tliis is called " Old Tarlton's Song." It is per- 
haps a parody on the popular epigram of " Jack and Jill." I do nrit 
know the period of the battle to which it appears to allude, but Tarlton 
died in the year 1588, so that the rhyme must be earlier.] 

The King of France went tip the hill, 

With twenty thousand men ; 
The King of France came down the hill, 

And ne'er went up again. 

9. 
The King of France, with twenty thousand men. 
Went up the hill, and then came down again ; 
The King of Spain, with twenty thousand more, 
Climb'd the same hill the French had chmb'd 
before. 

10. 

[Another version. The nurse sings the first line, and repeats it, time 
nfter time, until the expectant little one asks, what next ? Then comes 
the climax.] 

The King of France, the King of France, with 

forty thousand men. 
Oh, they all went up the hill, and so — came back 

again ! 

11. 

At the siege of Belle-isle, 
I was there all the while, 
All the while, all the while, 
At the siege of Belle-isle. 



18 NURSERY RHYMES. 



12. 

[The tune to the following may be found in the " English Dancing 
Master," 1651, p. 37.] 

The rose is red, the grass is green, 

Serve Queen Bess our noble queen ; 
Kitty the spinner 
Will sit down to dinner, 

And eat the leg of a frog ; 
All good people 
Look over the steeple. 

And see the cat play with the dog. 

13. 

Please to remember 
The fifth of November, 

Gunpowder treason and plot ; 
I know no reason 
Why gunpowder treason 

Should ever be forgot. 

14. 

[Taken from MS. Douce, 357, fol. 124. See Echard's "History of 
England," book iii., chap. 1.] 

See saw, sack-a-day ; 
Monmouth is a pretty boy, 

Richmond is another, 
Grafton is my only joy. 
And why should I these three destroy. 



To please a pious brothe 



HISTORICAL RHYMES. 19 

15. 

Over the water, and over the lee, 
And over the water to Charley. 
Charley loves good ale and wine. 
And Charley loves good brandy, 
And Charley loves a pretty girl, 
As sw^eet as sugar-candy. 

16. 

[The following is partly quoted in an old song in MS. Ashmole, 36, 
fol. 113.] 

As I was going by Charing Cross, 
I saw a black man upon a black horse ; 
They told me it was King Charles the First; 
Oh dear ! my heart w^as ready to burst ! 

17. 

High diddle ding. 

Did you hear the bells ring? 

The parliament soldiers are gone to the king ! 

Some they did laugh, some they did cry. 

To see the parliament soldiers pass by. 

18. 

High ding a ding, and ho ding a ding, 
The parliament soldiers are gone to the king; 
Some with new beavers, some with new bands. 
The parliament soldiers are all to be hang'd. 



20 NURSERY RHYMES. 



19. 

[The following is a fragment of a song* on the subject, which was 
introduced by Russell in the character of Jerry Sneak. Mr. Sharpe 
showed me a copy of the song with the music to it.] 

Poor old Robinson Crusoe ; 
Poor old Robinson Crusoe ! 
They made him a coat, 
Of an old nanny goat, 

I wonder how they could do so I 
With a ring a ting tang, 
And a ring a ting tang. 

Poor old Robinson Crusoe ! 



20. 

[Written on occasion of the marriage of Mary, the daughter of James 
Duke of York, afterwards James II., with the young Prince of Orange. 
The song from which these lines are taken may be seen in " The Ja- 
cobite Minstrelsy," 12mo. 18-23, Glasgow, p. 28.J 

What is the rhyme for porringer? 
The king he had a daughter fair, 
And gave the Prince of Orange her. 

21. 

[The following nursery song alludes to William III. and George, 
Prince of Denmark.] 

William and Mary, George and Antie, 
Four such children had never a man : 
They put their father to flight and shame. 
And call'd their brother a shocking bad name. 



HISTORICAL RHYMES. 21 



22. 

[From MS. Sloane, 1489, fol. 19, written in the time of Charles I. It 
appears from MS. Harl. 390, fol. 85, that these verses were written in 
162 >, against the Duke of Buckingham.] 

There was a monkey climb'd up a tree, 
When he fell down, then down fell he. 

There w^as a crow sat on a stone. 
When he was gone, then there was none. 

There was an old wife did eat an apple. 
When she had eat two, she had eat a couple. 

There w^as a horse going to the mill. 
When he w^nt on, he stood not still. 

There was a butcher cut his thumb, 
When it did bleed, then blood did come. 

There w^as a lackey ran a race. 
When he ran fast, he ran apace. 

There was a cobbler clowting shoon, 
When they were mended, they were done. 

There was a chandler making candle, 
When he them strip, he did them handle. 

There w^as a navy went into Spain, 
When it return'd, it came again. 



22 NURSERY RHYMES. 



23. 

[The following may possibly allude to King George and the Pretender.] 

Jim and George were U\o great lords, 

They fought all in a churn ; 
And when that Jim got George by the nose. 

Then George began to gern. 

24. 

Little General Monk 

Sat upon a trunk 
Eating a crust of bread ; 

There fell a hot coal 

And burnt in his clothes a hole, 
Now General Monk is dead. 

Keep always from the fire : 

If it catch your attire, 
You too, like Monk, will be dead. 



25. 

[From the "Westmoreland and Cumberland Dialects," p. 89, Svo 
Lond.lS39.] 

Eighty-eight wor Kirby feight. 

When nivver a man was slain; 
They yatt their meaat, an drank ther drink, 

An sae com merrily heaam agayn. 



LITERAL RHYMES. 



25 



32. 

[Tom Thumb's alphabet.] 

A was an archer, and shot at a frog, 

B was a butcher, and kept a bull-dog. 

C was a captain, all covered with lace, 

D was a drunkard, and had a red face. 

E was an esquire, with insolent brow, 

F was a farmer, and followed the plough. 

G was a gamester, who had but ill luck, 

H was a hunter, and hunted a buck. 

I was an innkeeper, who lov'd to bouse, 

J was a joiner, and built up a house. 

K was King William, once governed England, 

L was a lady, who had a white hand. 

M was a miser, who hoarded up gold, 

N was a nobleman, gallant and bold. 

O was an oyster wench, and went about town, 

P was a parson, and wore a black gown. 

Q was a queen, who was fond of good flip, 

R was a robber, and wanted a whip. 

S was a sailor, and spent all he got, 

T was a tinker, and mended a pot. 

U was an usurer, a miserable elf, 

V was a vintner, who drank all himself. 
W was a watchman, and guarded the door, 
X was expensive, and so became poor. 

Y was a youth, that did not love school, 
Z was a zany, a silly old fool. 

c 



26 NURSERY RHYMES. 

33. 

A was an apple-pie ; 

B bit it ; 

C cut it ; 

D dealt it; 

E eat it; 

F fought for it ; 

G got it; 

H had it; 

I inspected it ; 

J joined it ; 

K kept it; 

L longed for it ; 

M mourned for it ; • 

N nodded at it ; 

O opened it ; 

P peeped into it ; 

Q quartered it ; 

R ran for it ; 

S stole it ; 

T took it; 

U upset it ; 

V viewed it ; 

W wanted it ; 

X, Y, Z, and &, all wish'd for a piece ni hand 

34. 
Miss one, two, and three could never agree. 
While they gossipped round a tea-caddy. 



LITERAL RHYMES. 
35. 

One, two, 
Buckle my shoe ; 
Three, four, 
Shut the door ; 
Five, six, 
Pick up sticks ; 
Seven, eight. 
Lay them straight ; 
Nine, ten, 
A good fat hen ; 
Eleven, twelve. 
Who will delve? 
Thirteen, fourteen, 
Maids a courting ; 
Fifteen, sixteen, 
Maids a kissing; 
Seventeen, eighteen, 
Maids a waiting ; 
Nineteen, twenty. 
My stomach 's empty. 

86. ' 

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man I 
So I will, master, as fast as I can : 
Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with T, 
Put in the oven for Tommy and me. 



27 



28 NURSERY RHYMES. 

37. 

A, B, C, and D, 

Pray playmates agree. 

E, F, and G, 

Well, so it shall be. 

J, K, and L, 

In peace we will dwell. 

M, N, and O, 

To play let us go. 

P, Q, R, andf S, 

Love may we possess. 

T, U, and V, 

I hope will agree. 

W, X, and Y, 

Will not quarrel or lie. 

Z, and &, 

Go to school at command. 

38. 

Apple-pie, pudding, and pancake, 
All begins with an A. 




TALES. 

39. 

[Tlie following stanzas are founded on the well-known Scotch talc] 

Bessy Bell and Mary Gray, 
They were two bonny lasses : 

They built their house upon the lea, 
And covered it with rashes. 



Bessy kept the garden gate, 
And Mary kept the pantry : 

Bessy always had to wait, 
While Mary lived in plenty. 



(29) 



30 NURSERY RHYMES. 

40. 

There was a lady all skin and bone, 
Sure such a lady was never known : 
This lady went to church one day, 
She went to church all for to pray. 

And when she came to the church stile. 
She sat her down to rest a little while: 
When she came to the churchyard, 
There the bells so loud she heard. 

When she came to the church door, 
She stopt to rest a little more ; 
When she came the church within, 
The parson pray'd 'gainst pride and sin. 

On looking up, on looking down. 

She saw a dead man on the ground : 

And from his nose unto his chin. 

The worms crawl'd out, the worms crawl'd in.* 

Then she unto the parson said, 
Shall I be so when I am dead ? 
Oh yes ! oh yes ! the parson said, 
You will be so when you are dead. 

* This line, slightly altered, has been adopted in Lewis's ballad of 
" Alonzo the Brave and fair Imogine." The version given above was 
obtained from Lincolnshire, and differs slightly from the one in " Gam- 
mer Gurton's Garland," 8vo., Lond. 1810, pp. 29-30. 



TALES. 31 

41. 

[A tale for the 1st of March.] 

Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief; 
Tatfy came to my house and stole a piece of be^f ; 
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was not at home ; 
Taffy came to my house and stole a marrow-bone. 

I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was not in ; 
Taffy came to my house and stole a silver pin : 
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bed, 
I took up a poker and flung it at his head. 

42. 

[The tale of Jack Horner has long been appropriated to the nursery. 
The four lines which follow are the traditional ones, and they form 
part of " The pleasant History of Jack Horner, containing his witty 
Tricks and pleasant Pranks, which he plaied from his Youth to his 
riper years," limo.; a copy of which is in the Bodleian Library, and 
this extended story is in substance the same with " The Fryer and the 
Boy," 12mo. Lond. 1617, and both of them are taken from the more 
ancient story of " Jack and his step-darae," which has been printed by 
Mr. Wright.] 

Little Jack Horner sat in the corner, 

Eating a Christmas pie : 
He put in his thumb, and he took out a plum, 

And said, " What a good boy am I !" 

43. 
Doctor Foster went to Glo'ster, 

In a shower of rain ; 
He stepp'd in a puddle up to his middle, 

And would'nt go there again. 



32 NURSERY RHYMES. 

44. 

THE STORY OF CATSKIN. 

[As related by an old nurse, aged eighty-one. The story is of oriental 
origin ; but the song, as recited, was so very imperfect that a few ne- 
cessary additions and alterations have been made.] 

There once was a gentleman grand, 

Who lived at his country seat ; 
He wanted an heir to his land, 

For he 'd nothing but daughters yet. 

When another daughter was born 

The father to anger gave place ; 
And declared to the mother forlorn. 

That he never would look on her face. 

She sent her away to be nurs'd. 

Without seeing her gruff papa ; 
And when she was old enough, 

To a school she was packed away. 

Fifteen summers are fled, 

Now she left good Mrs. Jervis ; 
To see home she was forbid, — 

She determined to go and seek service. 

Her dresses so grand and so gay. 

She carefully rolled in a knob ; 
Which she hid in a forest away, 

And put on a Catskin robe. 



TALES. 33 

She knock'd at a castle gate, 

And pray'd for charity ; 
They sent her some meat on a plate, 

And kept her a sculHon to be. 

My lady look'd long in her face, 

And prais'd her great beauty ; 
I 'm sorry I 've no better place, 

And you must our scullion be. 

So Catskin was under the cook, 

A very sad life she led. 
For often a ladle she took. 

And broke poor Catskin's head. 

There is now a grand ball to be, 
When ladies their beauties show ; 

" Mrs. Cook," said Catskin, " dear me. 
How much I should like to go !" 

" You go with your Catskin robe. 

You dirty impudent slut ! 
Among the fine ladies and lords, 

A very fine figure you 'd cut." 

A basin of water she took. 

And dash'd in poor Catskin's face: 

But briskly her ears she shook. 
And went to her hiding-place. 



34 NURSERY RHYMES. 

She washed every stain from her skin, 

In some crystal waterfall ; 
Then put on a beautiful dress. 

And hasted away to the ball. 

When she entered, the ladies were mute, 
Overcome by her figure and face ; 

But the lord, her young master, at once 
Fell in love with her beauty and grace ; 

He pray'd her his partner to be, 

She said " Yes I" with a sweet smiling glance 
All night with no other lady 

But Catskin, our young lord would dance. 

" Pray tell me, fair maid, where you live ?" 
For now was the sad parting-time; 

But she no other answer would give. 
Than this distich of mystical rhyme, — 

'' Mm) ^k, if 1|? trwtfi) 1 mi%t Ml 

Then she flew from the ball-room, and put 

On her Catskin robe again; 
And slipt in unseen by the cook. 

Who little thought where she had been. 

The young lord, the very next day. 
To his mother his passion betrayed. 

And declared he never would rest. 

Till he 'd found out this beautiful maid. 



TALES. 35 

There's another pjrancl ball to be, 
Wh(>re ladies their beauties show ; 

" Mrs. Cook," said Catskin, " dear me. 
How much I should like to go I" 

" You go with your Catskin robe, 

"^u dirty impudent slut ! 
Among the fine ladies and lords, 

A very fine figure you 'd cut." 

In a rage the ladle she took. 

And broke poor Catskin's head ; 
But off she went shaking her ears, 
4» And swift to her fiDrest she fled. 

She washed every blood-stain off 

In some crystal waterfall ; 
Put on a more beautiful dress. 

And hasted away to the ball. 

My lord, at the ball-room door, 

Was waiting with pleasure and pain; 

He longed to see nothing so much 
As the beautiful Catskin again. 

When he asked her to dance, she again 
Said " Yes !" with her first smiling glance ; 

And again, all the night, my young lord 
With none but fair Catskin did dance. 



36 NURSERY RHYMES. 

" Pray tell me, said he, where you live ?" 
For now 't was the parting-time ; 

But she no other answer would give, 
Than this distich of mystical rhyme, — 

<^mh5) ^k, a ti2 feiitij 1 mm uii 

Then she flew from the ball, and put on 

Her Catskin robe again ; 
And slipt in unseen by the cook, 

Who little thought where she had been. 

My lord did again the next day. 
Declare to his mother his mind. 

That he never more happy should be. 
Unless he his charmer should find. 

Now another grand ball is to be. 
Where ladies their beauties show ; 

" Mrs. Cook," said Catskin, " dear me, 
How much I should hke to go !" 



" You go with your Catskin robe, 
You impudent dirty slut! 

Among the fine ladies and lords, 
A very fine figure you 'd cut." 

In a fury she took the skimmer. 
And broke poor Catskin's head ; 

But heart-whole and lively as ever, 
Away to her forest she fled. 



TALES. 37 

She washed the stains of blood 

In some crystal waterfall ; 
Then put on her most beautiful dress, 

And hasted away to the ball. 

My lord, at the ball-room door, 

Was waiting with pleasure and pain ; 

He longed to see nothing so much 
As the beautiful Catskin again. 

When he asked her to dance, she again 
Said " Yes I" with her first smiling glance ; 

And all the night long, my young lord 
W^ith none but fair Catskin would dance. 

" Pray tell me, fair maid, where you live ?" 

For now was the parting-time ; 
But she no other answer would give, 

Than this distich of mystical rhyme, — 

^t t^2 gip of lie 5ir0feCTi=§MmOT$c 1 htodl" 
Then she flew from the ball, and threw on 

Her Catskin cloak again; 
And slipt in unseen by the cook, 

Who little thought where she had been. 

But not by my lord unseen, — 

For this time he followed too fast; 

And, hid in the forest green. 

Saw the strange things that past. 



38 NURSERY RHYMES. 

Next day he took to his bed, 

And sent for the doctor to come ; 

And begg'd him no other than Catskin, 
Might come into his room. 

He told him how dearly he lov'd her, 
Not to have her his heart would break : 

Then the doctor kindly promis'd. 
To the proud old lady to speak. 

There 's a struggle of pride and love, 
For she fear'd her son would die ; 

But pride at the last did yield, 
And love had the mastery. 

Then my lord got quickly well. 

When from her he w^as not to be torn; 

And just a twelvemonth from that time 
A sweet little baby was born. 

To a wayfaring woman and child. 
Lady Catskin one day sent an alms; 

The nurse did the errand, and carried 
The dear little lord in her arms. 

The child gave the alms to the child, 
This was seen by the old lady-mother; 

" Only see," said that wicked old w^oman, 
" How the beggars' brats take to each other !" 



TALES. 39 

This throw went to Catskin's heart, 
She flung herself down on her knees, 

And pray'd her young master and lord 
To seek out her parents would please. 

They set out in my lord's own coach; 

They travelled, but nought befel 
Till they reach'd the town hard by. 

Where Catskin's father did dwell. 

They put up at the head inn. 

Where Catskin was left alone ; 
But my lord went to try if her father 

His natural child would own. 

When folks are away, in short time 

What great alterations appear ! 
For the cold touch of death had all chill'd 

The hearts of her sisters dear. 

Her father repented too late. 

And the loss of his youngest bemoan'd, 
In his old and childless state, 

He his pride and cruelty owned. 

The old gentleman sat by the fire. 
And hardly looked up at my lord ; 

He had no hopes of comfort 
A stranger could afford. 



40 NURSERY RHYMES. 

But my lord drew a chair close by, 

And said, in a feeling tone, 
" Have you not, sir, a daughter, I pray, 

You never would see or own ?" 

The old man alarm'd, cried aloud, 

" A hardened sinner am I ! 
I would give all my worldly goods. 

To see her before I die." 

Then my lord brought his wife and child 
To their home and parent's face, 

Who fell down and thanks returned 
To God, for his mercy and grace. 

The bells, ringing up in the tower. 
Are sending a sound to the heart; 

There 's a charm in the old church-bells. 
Which nothing in life can impart! 



45. 

The man in the moon. 

Came tumbling down. 
And ask'd his way to Norwich. 

He went by the south, 

And burnt his mouth 
With supping cold pease-porridge. 



TALES. 
46. 

St. Dunstan, as the story goes, 

Once pulled the tempter by the nose, 

With red-hot tongs, which made him roar, 
That he was heard ten miles or more. 



41 




47. 

There was a crooked man, and he went a 

crooked mile, 
He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked 

*^ stile: 
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a 

crooked mouse, 
And they all lived together in a little crooked 

house. 

D* 



42 NURSERY RHYMES. 

48. 
Little blue Betty lived in a den, 
She sold good ale to gentlemen: 
Gentlemen came every day, 
) And little blue Betty hopp'd away. 
She hopp'd up stairs to make her bed, 
And she tumbled down and broke her head. 

49. 
My lady Wind, my lady Wind, 
Went round about the house to find 

A chink to get her foot in : 
She tried the key-hole in the door. 
She tried the crevice in the floor. 

And drove the chimney soot in. 

And then one night when it was dark. 
She blew up such a tiny spark, 

That all the house was pothered : 
From it she raised up such a flame. 
As flamed away to Belting Lane, 

And White Cross folks were smothered. 

And thus when once, my little dears, 
A whisper reaches itching ears. 

The same will come, you'll find : 
Take my advice, restrain the tongue. 
Remember what old nurse has sung 

Of busy lady Wind! 



TALES. 43 



50. 

Old Mother Goose, when 
She wanted to wander, 
Would ride through the air 
On a very fine gander. 

Mother Goose had a house, 
'T w^as built in a wood, 
Where an owl at the door 
For sentinel stood. 

This is her son Jack, 
A plain-looking lad. 
He is not very good, 
Nor yet very bad. 

She sent him to market, 
A live goose he bought, 
Here, mother, says he. 
It will not go for nought. 

Jack's goose and her gander 
Grew very fond. 
They 'd both eat together, 
Or swim in one pond. 

Jack found one morning, 
As I have been told. 
His goose had laid him 
An egg of pure gold. 



44 NURSERY RHYMES. 

Jack rode to his mother, 
The news for to tell, 
She call'd him a good boy, 
And said it was well. 

Jack sold his gold egg 
To a rogue of a Jew, 
Who cheated him out of 
The half of his due. 

Then Jack went a courting 
A lady so gay. 
As fair as the lily, 
And sweet as the May. 

The Jew and the Squire 
Came behind his back, 
And began to belabour 
The sides of poor Jack. 

The old Mother Goose, 
That instant came in. 
And turned her son Jack 
Into fam'd Harlequin. 

She then with her wand, 
Touch'd the lady so fine. 
And turn'd her at once 
Into sweet Columbine. 



TALES. 45 

The gold egg into the sea 
Was thrown then, — 
When Jack jump'd in, 
And got the egg back again. 

The Jew got the goose, 
Which he vow'd he would kill, 
Resolving at once 
His pockets to fill. 

Jack's mother came in. 
And caught the goose soon, 
And mounting its back, 
Flew up to the moon. 

51. 

[The following lines slightly altered, occur in a little black-letter 
book by "W. Wagner, printed about the year 15G0 ; entitled, "A very 
merry and pythie commedie, called, the longer thou livest, the more 
foole thou art." See also a whole song, ending with these lines, in 
Ritsoii's "North Country Chorister," 8vo. Durham, 1802, p. 1.] 

Bryan O'Lin, and his wife, and wife's mother, 
They all w^ent over a bridge together : 
The bridge was broken, and they all fell in, 
The deuce go with all ! quoth Bryan O'Lin. 

52. 

There was a rat, for want of stairs, 
Came down the rope to say his prayers. 



46 NURSERY RHYMES. 

53. 

The lion and the unicorn 

Were fighting for the crown ; 
The lion beat the unicorn 

All round about the town. 
Some gave them white bread, 

And some gave them brown ; 
Some gave them plum-cake, 

And sent them out of town. 

54. 

There was a jolly miller 
Lived on the river Dee, 
He looked upon his pillow, 
And there he saw a flea 
Oh! Mr. Flea, 
You have been biting me. 
And you must die : 

So he cracked his bones 

Upon the stones, 
And there he let him lie. 

55. 

I'll tell you a story 
About Jack a Nory, — 

And now my story 's begun : 
I '11 tell you another 
About Jack his brother, — 

And now my story 's done. 



TALES. 



47 



• 56. 

[The '< foles of Gotham " are mentioned as early as the fifteenth cen- 
fury in the " Townley Mysteries; " and at the commencement of the 
sixteenth century, Dr. Andrew Borde made a collection of stories 
about them, not however including the following, which rests on the 
authority of nursery tradition.] 

Three wise men of Gotham 
Went to sea in a bowl : 
And if the bowl had been stronger, 
My song would have been longer. 

57. 

[The following two stanzas, although they belong to the same piece, 
are often separated from each other.] 

Robin and Richard were two pretty men; 
They laid in bed till the clock struck ten; 
Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky, 
Oh ! brother Richard, the sun 's very high : 

The bull 's in the barn threshing the corn. 

The cock 's on the dunghill blowing his horn, 

The cat 's at the fire, frying of fish. 

The dog 's in the pantry, breaking his dish. 

58. 

Tom, Tom, the piper's son. 

Stole a pig, and away he run ! 

The pig was eat, and Tom was beat, 

And Tom went roaring down the street. 



48 



NURSERY RHYMES. 




59. 

Punch and Judy 

Fought for a pie; 
Punch gave Judy 

A knock of the eye. 

Says Punch to Judy, 

Will you have any more ? 

Says Judy to Punch, 
My eye's too sore. 



60. 

[The tale of Simple Simon forms one of the chap-books, but the fol- 
lowing verses are those generally sung in the nursery.] 

Simple Simon met a pieman 

Going to the fair: 
Says Simple Simon to the pieman, 

" Let me taste your ware." 



TALES. 49 

Says the pieman to Simple Simon, 
"Show me first your penny." 

Says Simple Simon to the pieman, 
" Indeed I have not any." 

Simple Simon went to town, 

To buy a piece of meat: 
He tied it to his horse's tail, 

To keep it clean and sweet. 

Simple Simon went a fishing 

For to catch a whale : 
All the water he had got 

Was in his mother's pail. 

Simple Simon went to look . 

If plums grew on a thistle : 
He pricked his fingers very much, 

Which made poor Simon whistle. 

61. 

On Christmas eve I turn'd the spit, 

I burnt my fingers, I feel it yet ; 

The cock-sparrow flew over the table ; 

The pot began to play with the ladle ; 

The ladle stood up, like a naked man, 

And vow'd he 'd fight the frying-pan ; 

The frying-pan, behind the door. 

Said he never saw the like before ; 

And the kitchen clock, I was going to wind, 

Said he never saw the like behind ! 



50 NURSERY RHYMES. 

62. 

The Queen of Hearts 
She made some tarts, 

All on a summer's day : 
The Knave of Hearts, 
He stole the tarts, 

And took them clean away. 

The King of Hearts 
Caird for the tarts^ 

And beat the Knave full sore : 
The Knave of Hearts 
Brought back the tarts. 

And vow'd heM steal no more. 

63. 

Robin the Bobbin, the big-bellied Ben, 
He eat more meat than fourscore men ; 
He eat a cow, he eat a calf, 
He eat a butcher and a half; 
He eat a church, he eat a steeple. 
He eat the priest and all the people I 

A cow and a calf. 
An ox and a half, 
A church and a steeple. 
And all the good people. 
And yet he complain'd that his stomach wasn't 
full. 



TALES. 61 

64. 

Solomon Grundy, 
Born on a Monday, 
Christened on Tuesday, 
Married on Wednesday, 
Took ill on Thursday, 
Worse on Friday, 
Died on Saturday, 
Buried on Sunday : 
This is the end 
Of Solomon Grundy. 

65. 

Jack Sprat 

Had a cat, 
It had but one ear ; 

It went to buy butter, 
When butter was dear. 

66. 

There was a king, and he had three daughten-, 
And they all lived in a basin of water ; 

The basin bended, 

My story 's ended. 
If the basin had been stronger, 
My story would have been longer. 



52 NURSERY RHYMES. 

67. 

I SAW a ship a-sailing, 

A-sailing on the sea ; 
And, oh ! it was all laden 

With pretty things for thee ! 

There were comforts in the cabin, 

And apples in the hold ; 
The sails were made of silk, 

And the masts were made of gold : 

The four-and-twenty sailors, 

That stood between the decks, 
Were four-and-twenty white mice, 

With chains about their necks. 
W 
The captain was a duck, 

With a packet on his back; 
And when the ship began to move, 

The captain said, " Quack ! quack ! 



155 




PROVERBS. 



68. 

St. Swithin's day, if thou dost rain, 
For forty days it will remain : 
St. Swithin's day, if thou be fair, 
For forty days 'twill rain na mair. 

69. 

To make your candles last for a', 
You wives and maids give ear-o ! 

To put 'em out 's the only way. 
Says honest John Boldero. 

E * (53) 



54 NURSERY RHYMES. 



70. 

[The fullowing is quoted in Miege's " Great Fronch Dictionary," fol 
Lond. 1687, 2d part.] 

A SWARM of bees in May 
Is worth a load of hay ; 
A swarm of bees in June 
Is worth a silver spoon ; 
A swarm of bees in July 
Is not worth a fly. 

71. 

They that wash on Monday 

Have all the w^eek to dry ; 
They that wash on Tuesday 

Are not so much awry ; 
They that wash on Wednesday 

Are not so much to blame ; 
They that wash on Thursday, 

Wash for shame ; 
They that wash on Friday, 

Wash in need ; 
And they that wash on Saturday, 

Oh! they're sluts indeed. 

72. 

Needles and pins, needles and pins. 
When a man marries, his trouble begins. 



PROVERBS. 55 

73. 

[One version of the following som<j, which I believe to be the grenuine 
one, is written on the last leaf of MS. Ilarl. (JoSO, between the line^of 
a fragment of an old charter, originally used for binding the book, i)i a 
hand of the end of the seventeenth century, but unfortunately it is 
scarcely adapted for the " ears polite "' of modern days.] ' 

A MAN of words and not of deeds ^ 

Is like a garden full of weeds ; 

And when the weeds begin to grow, 

It 's like a garden full of snow ; 

And when the snow begins to fall, 

It 's like a bird upon the wall ; 

And when the bird away does fly, 

It 's like an eagle in the sky ; 

And when the sky begins to roar, 

It 's like a lion at the door ; 

And when the door begins to crack. 

It 's like a stick across your back ; 

And when your back begins to smart, * 

It 's like a penknife in your heart ; 

And when your heart begins to bleed. 

You 're dead, and dead, and dead, indeed. 

74. 

He that would thrive 

Must rise at five ; 

He that hath thriven 

May lie till seven ; 

And he that by the plough w^ould thrive, 

Himself must either hold or drive. 



56 NURSERY RHYMES. 

75. 

See a pin and pick it up, 

All the day you '11 have good luck ; 

See a pin and let it lay, 

Bad luck you '11 have all the day ! 

76. 

Go to bed first, a golden purse ; 

Go to bed second, a golden pheasant ; 

Go to bed third, a golden bird I 

77. 

When the wind is in the east, 

'T is neither good for man nor beast ; 

When the wind is in the north, 

The skilful fisher goes not forth; > 

When the wind is in the south. 

It blows the bait in the fishes' mouth ; 

When the wind is in the west, 

Then 'tis at the very best. 

78. 

[The following proverb is alluded to in Clarke's " Phraseologia 
Puerilis," 12mo. Lond. 1655, p. 21. See also Brand's '' Popular Antiqui- 
ties," vol. i., p. 266, and the " Archaeologist," p. 182.] 

Bounce Buckram, velvet 's dear ; 
Christmas comes but once a year. 







SCHOLASTIC RHYMES. 



79. 

Doctor Faustus was a good man, 

I^^Lhipp'd his scholars now and then ; 

V\HP he whipp'd them he made them dance 

Out of Scotland into France, 

Out of France into Spain, 

And then he whipp'd them back again! 



80. 

A Donkey walks on four legs, 
And I walk on tw^o ; 

The last donkey I saw 
Was very like you. 



(57) 



&-1 



58 NURSERY RHYMES. 

81. 

Cross patch, 

Draw the latch, 
Sit by the fire and spin; 

Take a cup. 

And drink it up, 
Then call your neighbours in. 

82. 

When I was a little boy my mammy kept me in. 
But now I am a great boy I 'm fit to serve the 

king; 
I can hand a musket, and I can smoke a pipe. 
And I can kiss a pretty girl at twelve o'clock 

at night. 



83. ^1^ 



Cry, baby, cry, 

Put your finger in your eye, 

And tell your mother it wasn't I. 

84. 

Instead of " muscles " in the last line, other copies have columbines, 
and some cowslips.'] 

Mistress Mary, quite contrary. 
How does your garden grow ? 

With cockle-shells, and silver bells. 
And muscles all a row. 



SCHOLASTIC RHYMES. 59 



85. 

A DiLLER, a dollar, 

A ten o'clock scholar, 

What makes you come so soon ? 

You used to come at ten o'clock, 

But now you come at noon. 



86. 

Tell tale, tit I 
Your tono;ue shall be slit, 
And all the dogs in the town 
Shall have a httle bit. 



87. 

[The joke of the following consists in saying it so quick that it can- 
not be told whether it is English or gibberish. For the version now 
printed, which is more complete than, the one given by Chambers, I 
am indebted to Professor de Morgan, who has heard it in Dorsetshire. 
It is remarkable that the last two lines are quoted in MS. Sk)an. 4, of 
the fifteenth century, as printed in the '• Reliq. Antiq.," vol. 1. p. 334.] 

In fir tar is. 
In oak none is. 
In mud eel is, 
In clay none is, 
Goat eat ivy, 
Mare eat oats. 



60 NURSERY RHYMES. 



8* 



[An older version of the following, from a MS. dated 1570 is printed in 
Davies's " Key to Hutton's Mathematics," 1840, p. 18.] 

Multiplication is vexation, 

Division is as bad ; 
The Rule of Three doth puzzle me, 

And Practice drives me mad. 

89. 

[The following memorial lines are by no means modern. They oc- 
cur, with slight variations, in an old play, called " The Returne from 
Parnassus," 4to. Lond. 1606 ; and another version may be seen in AVin- 
ter's " Cambridge Almanac" for 1635. See the " Rara Mathematica," 
p. 119.] 

Thirty days hath September, 
April, June, and November ; 
February has twenty-eight alone. 
All the rest have thirty-one. 
Excepting leap-year, that 's the time 
When February's days are twenty-nine. 

90. 

Three straws on a staff. 

Would make a baby cry and laugh. 




SONGS. 



91. 

I This is the version generally given in nursery collections, but is some- 
what different in the " Pills to Purge Melancholy/' 1719, vol. iv. p. 148.] 

One misty moisty morning, 

When cloudy was the weather, 

There I met an old man 

Clothed all in leather ; 

Clothed all in leather, 

With cap under his chin, — 

How do you do, and how do you do, 

And how do you do again I 

F (Sn 



62 NURSERY RHYMES. 

92. 

There was a man in our toone, in our toone, 

in our toone, 
There was a man in our toone, and his name 

was Billy Pod ; 
And he played upon an old razor, an old razor, 

an old razor, 
And he played upon an old razor, with my 

fiddle fiddle fe fum fo. 

And his hat it was made of the good roast beef, 
the good roast beef, the good roast beef, 

And his hat it was made of the good roast 
beef, and his name was Billy Pod ; 

And he played upon an old razor, &c. 

And his coat it was made of the good fat tripe, 
the good fat tripe, the good fat tripe, 

And his coat it was made of the good fat tripe, 
and his name was Billy Pod ; 

And he played upon an old razor, &c. 

And his breeks were made of the -bawtro baps, 
the bawbie baps, the bawbie baps. 

And his breeks were made of the bawbie baps, 
and his name was Billy Pod ; 

And he played upon an old razor, &c. 



SONGS. 63 

And there was a man in tither toone, in tither 

toone, in tither toone, 
And there was a man in tither toone, and his 

name was Edrin Drum ; 
And he played upon an old laadle, an old laadle, 

an old laadle, 
And he played upon an old laadle, with my 

fiddle fiddle fe fum fo. 

And he eat up all the good roast beef, the good 

roast beef, &c. &c. 
And he eat up all the good fat tripe, the good 

fat tripe, &c. &c. 
And he eat up all the bawbie baps, &c. and his 

name was Edrin Drum. 



93. 

John Cook had a little gray mare ; he, haw, 

hum ! 

Her back stood up, and her bones they were 

bare ; he, haw, hum ! 

John Cook was riding up Shuter's bank ; he, 

haw, hum ! 
And there his nag did kick and prank ; he, 

haw, hum! 



64 NURSERY RHYMES. 

John Cook was riding up Shnter's hill ; he, 

haw, hum ! 
His mare fell down, and she made her will ; 

he, haw, hum ! 

The bridle and saddle were laid on the shelf; 

he, haw, hum I 
If you want any more you may sing it yourself; 

he haw, hum I 



94. 

A CARRION crow sat on an oak, 

Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do, 

Watching a tailor shape his cloak ; 
Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, 
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. 

Wife, bring me my old bent bow, 

Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. 

That I may shoot yon carrion crow ; 
Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, 
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. 

The tailor he shot and missed his mark, 
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do ; 

And shot his own sow quite through the heart 
Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, 
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. 



SONGS. 65 

Wife, bring brandy in a spoon ; 

Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do, 
For our old sow is in a swoon. 

Sing heio;h ho, the carrion crow, 
Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. 




9o. 

[Another version from MS. Sloan, 1489, fol. 17, written in the reign of 
Charles I.] 

Hic hoc, the carrion crow, 

For I have shot something too low : 

I have quite missed my mark, 

And shot the poor sow to the heart ; 

"Wife, bring treacle in a spoon. 

Or else the poor sow's heart will down. 

F* 



66 NURSERY RHYMES. 

96. 

[The original of the following is to be louiid in '• Deuteroraelia, or 
the second part of Musicks Melodie," 4lo. Lond. 1609, where the music 
is also given.] 

Three blind mice, see how they run ! 
They all ran after the farmer's wife, 
Who cut off their tails with the carving-knife, 
Did you ever see such fools in your Kfe? 

Three blind mice. 



97. 

[The music to the following song, with diiTerent words, is given in 
"Melismata," 4to. Lond. 1611. See also the "Pills to Purge Melan- 
choly," 1719, vol. i. p. 14. The well known song, " A frog he would a 
wooing go," appears to have been borrowed from this. See Dauney's 
"Ancient Scottish Melodies," 183S, p. 53. The story is of old date, 
and in 1580 there was licensed " A most strange weddinge of the frogge 
and the mouse," as appears from the books of the Stationers' Company, 
quoted in Warton's Hist. Engl. Poet., ed. 1840, vol. iii. p. 360.] 

There was a frog liv'd in a well, 

Kitty alone, Kitty alone ; 
There was a frog liv'd in a w^ll, 

Kitty alone, and I. 
There was a frog liv'd in a well. 

And a farce* mouse in a mill, [*merry. 

Cock me cary, Kitty alone, 

Kitty alone and I. 

This frog he would a wooing ride, 

Kitty alone, &c. 
This frog he would a wooing ride, 
And on a snail he got astride. 

Cock me cary, &c. 



67 



He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse hall, 

Kitty alone, &c. 
He rode till he came to my Lady Mouse hall, 
And there he did both knock and call, 

Cock me cary, &c. 

Quoth he, Miss Mouse, I 'm come to thee, 

Kitty alone, &c. 
Quoth he. Miss Mouse, I 'm come to thee, 
To see if thou canst fancy me, 

Cock me cary, &c. 

Quoth she, answer I '11 give you none, 

Kitty alone, &c. 
Quoth she, answer I '11 give you none. 
Until my Uncle Rat come home. 

Cock me cary, &c. 

And when her Uncle Rat came home, 

Kitty alone, &c. 
And when her Uncle Rat came home. 
Who 's been here since I 've been gone ? 

Cock me cary, &c. 

Sir, there 's been a worthy gentleman, 

Kitty alone, &c. 
Sir, there 's been a worthy gentleman, 
That 's been here since you 've been gone, 

Cock me cary, &c. 



68 NURSERY RHYMES. 

The frog he came whistling through the brook 

Kitty alone, &c. 
The frog he came whistling through the brook, 
And there he met with a dainty duck. 

Cock me cary, &c. 

This duck she swallowed him up with a pluck, 

Kitty alone, Kitty alone ; 
This duck she swallowed him up with a pluck, 
So there 's an end of my history book. 

Cock me cary, Kitty alone, 

Kitty alone, and I. 

98. 

[Song of a little boy while passing his hour of solitude in a corn field.] 

Aw a' birds, away ! 

Take a little, and leave a little, 

And do not come again; 

For if you do, 

I will shoot you through, 

And there is an end of you. 

99. 
If I 'd as much money as I could spend, 
I never would cry old chairs to nvsnd ; 
Old chairs to mend, old chairs to mend ; 
I never would cry old chairs to mend. 

If I 'd as much money as I could tell, 
I never would cry old clothes to sell ; 
Old clothes to sell, old clothes to sell ; 
I never would cry old clothes to sell. 



SONGS. 69 



100. 



[A song of the fifteenth century, somewhat similar to the following-, 
is printed in the " Reliquice AntiqucB," vol. i., p. 4, from a MS. at Cara- 
briiige.] 

The fox and his wife they had a great strife, 
They never eat mustard in all their whole life ; 
They eat their meat without fork or knife, 
And loved to be picking a bone, e-oh ! 

The fox jumped up on a moonlight night ; 
The stars they were shining, and all things 

bright ; 
Oh, ho ! said the fox, it 's a very fine night 
For me to go through the town, e-oh ! 

The fox when he came to yonder stile. 
He lifted his lugs and he listened a while ! 
Oh, ho! said the fox, it's but a short mile 
From this unto yonder wee town, e-oh ! 

The fox when he came to the farmer's gate, 
Who should he see but the farmer's drake ; 
I love you well for your master's sake, 
And long to be picking your bone, e-oh ! 

The gray goose she ran round the hay-stack. 
Oh, ho ! said the fox, you are very fat ; 
You'll grease my beard and ride on my back 
From this into yonder wee town, e-oh! 



70 NURSERY RHYMES. 

The farmer's wife she jump'd out of bed, 
And out of the window she popped her head: 
Ohj husband ! oh, husband ! the geese are all 
dead, 
For the fox has been through the town, e-oh ! 

The farmer he loaded his pistol with lead. 
And shot the old rogue of a fox through the 

head ; 
Ah, ha, said the farmer, I think you're quite 

dead ; 
And no more you '11 trouble the town, e-oh ! 



101. 

I 'll sing you a song : 

The days are long, 

The woodcock and the sparrow: 

The little dog has burnt his tail, 

And he must be hanged to-morrow. 

102. 

A PRETTY little girl in a round-eared cap 

I met in the streets t'other day; 

She gave me such a thump. 
That my heart it went bump; 

I thought I should have fainted away ! 

I thought I should have fainted away ^ 



SONGS. 71 



103. 



[The following lines are part of an old song, the whole of which may 
be found in "Deuteromelia," lii09, and also in MS. Additional, 5336, 
fol. 5.J 

O^ all the gay birds that e'er I did see, 
The owl is the fairest by far to me ; 
For all the day long she sits on a tree, 
And when the night comes away flies she. 

104. 

I LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence, 
I love sixpence better than my hfe ; 

I spent a penny of it, I spent another, 
And took fourpence home to my wife. 

Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence, 
I love fourpence better than my life ; 

I spent a penny of it, I spent another, 
And I took twopence home to my wife. 

Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence, 
I love twopence better than my life ; 

I spent a penny of it, I spent another. 
And I took nothing home to my wife. 

Oh, my Httle nothing, my pretty little nothing, 
What wall nothing buy for my wufe ? 

I have nothing, I spend nothing, 

I love nothing better than my wife. 



72 



NURSEHY RHYMES. 




105. 

LParl of this is in a song called " Jockey's Lamentation," in the " Pilli 
to Purge Melancholy," 1719, vol. v., p. 317.] 

Tom he was a piper's son, 
He learn'd to play when he was young, 
But all the tunes that he could play, 
Was " Over the hills and far away ;" 
Over the hills, and a great way off, 
And the wind will blow my top-knot off. 

Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise. 
That he pleas'd both the girls and boys, 
And they stopp'd to hear him play, 
" Over the hills and far away." 



TALES. 



73 



Tom with his pipe did play with such skill, 
That those who heard him could never keep 

still ; 
Whenever they heard they began for to dance, 
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him 

prance. 



As Dolly was rnilking her cow one day, 

Tom took out his pipe and began for to play; 

So Doll and the cow danced " the Cheshire 

round," 
Till the pail was broke and the milk ran on the 

ground. 



He met old dame Trot with a basket of eggs, 
He used his pipe and she used her legs; 
She danced about till the eggs were all broke. 
She began for to fret, but he laughed at the 
joke. 



He saw a cross fellow was beating an ass, 
Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes, and glass ; 
He took out his pipe and played them a tune. 
And the jackass's load was lightened full soon. 

G 



^- 



74 NURSERY RHYMES. 



106. 

As I was going up the hill, 

I met with Jack the piper, 
And all the tunes that he could play 

Was "Tie your clothes up tighter." 

I tied them once, I tied them twice, 
I tied them three times over; 

And all the songs that he could sing 
Was " Carry me safe to Dover." 

107. 
There were two birds sat on a stone. 

Fa, la, la, la, lal, de ; 
One flew away, and then there was one. 

Fa, la, la, la, lal, de ; 
The other flew after, and then there was none. 

Fa, la, la, la, lal, de ; 
And so the poor stone was left all alone, 

Fa, la, la, la, lal, de I 

108. 

As I was going along, long, long, 

A singing a comical song, song, song. 

The lane that I went was so long, long, long, 

And the song that I sung was as long, long, long, 

And so I went singing along. 



SONGS. 75 

109. 

London bridge is broken down, 

Dance o'er my lady lee ; 
London bridge is broken down, 

With a gay lady. 

How shall we build it up again? 

Dance o'er my lady lee ; 
How shall we build it up again? 

With a gay lady. 

Silver and gold will be stole away, 

Dance o'er my lady lee ; 
Silver and gold will be stole away, 

With a gay lady. 

Build it up again with iron and steel, 

Dance o'er my lady lee ; 
Build it up with iron and steel, 

With a gay lady. 

Iron and steel will bend and bow, 

Dance o'er my lady lee ; 
Iron and steel will bend and bow, 

With a gay lady. 

Build it up with wood and clay. 

Dance o'er my lady lee; 
Build it up with wood and clay. 

With a gay lady. 



76 NURSERY RHYMES. 

Wood and clay will wash away, 

Dance o'er my lady lee ; 
Wood and clay will wash away, 

With a gay lady. 

Build it up with stone so strong, 

Dance o'er my lady lee; 
Huzza ! 't will last for ages long, 

With a gay lady. 

110. 

The north wind doth blow, 
And we shall have snow, 
' And what will poor Robin do then ? 

Poor thing ! 

He'll sit in a barn, 
And to keep himself warm, 
Will hide his head under his wing. 
Poor thing! 

111. 

[From W. Wager's play, called " The longer thou livest, the more 
foole thou art," 4to., Lond.] 

The white dove sat on the castle wall, 

I bend my bow and shoot her, I shall ; 

I put her in my glove, both feathers and all; 

I laid my bridle upon the shelf. 

If you will any more, sing it yourself. 



SONGS. 77 

112. 

WooLEY Foster has gone to sea, 
With silver buckles at his knee, 
When he comes back he '11 marry me. 
Bonny Wooley Foster. 

Wooley Foster has a cow. 
Black and white about the mow, 
Open the gates and let her through, 
Wooley Foster's ain cow. 

Wooley Foster has a hen, 
Cockle button, cockle ben. 
She lays eggs for gentlemen. 

But none for Wooley Foster. 



113. 

IThe following catch is found in Ben Jonson's " Masque of Oberon,' 
and is a most common nursery song at the present day.] 

Buz, quoth the blue fly, 

Hum, quoth the bee, 
Buz and hum they cry, 

And so do we : 
In his ear, in his nose. 

Thus, do you see ? 
He ate the dormouse. 

Else it was he. 



78 NURSERY RHYMES. 

114. 

Johnny shall have a new bonnet, 

And Johnny shall go to the fair, 
And Johnny shall have a blue ribbon 

To tie up his bonny brown hair. 
And why may not I love Johnny? 

And why may not Johnny love me? 
And why may not I love Johnny, 

As well as another body ? 
And here 's a foot for a stocking. 

And here is a foot for a shoe, 
And he has a kiss for his daddy, 

And two for his mammy, I trow. 
And why may not I love Johnny ? 

And why may not Johnny love me ? 
And why may not I love Johnny, 

As well as another body ? 



115. 

As I was walking o'er Uttle Moorfields, 
I saw St. Paul's a running on wheels. 

With a fee, fo, fum. 
Then for further frolics I '11 go to France, 
While Jack shall sing and his wife shall dance. 

With a fee, fo, fum. 



SONGS. 79 

116. 

It 's once I courted as pretty a lass, 

As ever your eyes did see ; 

But now she 's come to such a pass, 

She never will do for me. 

She invited me to her own house, 

Where oft I 'd been before, 

And she tumbled me into the hog-tub. 

And I ^11 never go there any more. 



117. 

From " Histrio-mastix, or the Player AVhipt," 4to., Lond. 1610. Mr. 
Rimbault tells me this is common in Yorkshire.] 

Some up, and some down. 

There 's players in the town, 
You wot well who they be; 

The sun doth arise. 

To three companies, 
One, two, three, four, make wee! 

Besides we that travel. 

With pumps full of gravel, 
Made all of such running leather . 

That once in a week. 

New masters we seek. 
And never can hold together. 



80 NURSERY RHYMES 

118. 

[Douce, in his MS. Additions to Ritson's '' Gammer Gurton's Gar- 
land," gives one version of the following song, in which Jack Straw is 
introduced in the chorus.] 

My father he died, but I can't tell you how, 
He left me six horses to drive in my plough: 

With my wing wang waddle oh, 

Jack sing saddle oh, 

Blowsey boys bubble oh. 

Under the broom. 

I sold my six horses and I bought me a cow, 
I 'd fain have made a fortune, but did not know 
how : 

With my, &c. 

I sold my cow, and I bought me a calf; 
I 'd fain have made a fortune, but lost the best 
half: 

With my, &c. 

I sold my calf, and I bought me a cat ; 
A pretty thing she was, in my chimney corner 
sat : 

With my, &c. 

I sold my cat, and bought me a mouse ; 
He carried fire in his tail, and burnt down my 
house : 

With my, &c. 



SONGS. 81 



119. 



Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep, 

And can't tell where to find them ; 
Leave them alone, and they 'II come home 

And bring their tails behind them. 

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep, 

And dreamt she heard them bleating ; 

But when she awoke, she found it a joke, 
For still they were all fleeting. 

Then up she took her little crook, 

Determin'd for to find them ; 
She found them, indeed, but it made her heart 
bleed, 

For they 'd left all their tails behind 'em. 

It happen'd one day, as Bo-peep did stray, 

Under a meadow hard by : 
There she espy'd their tails side by side, 

All hung on a tree to dry. 

She heav'd a sigh and wip'd her eye. 
And over the hillocks went stump-o ; 

And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should, 
To tack again each to its rump-o. 



82 NURSERY RHYMES. 



120. 



About the bush, Willy, 
About the bee-hive. 

About the bush, Willy, 
I '11 meet thee alive. 

Then to my ten shillings, 
Add you but a groat, 

I '11 go to Newcastle, 
And buy a new coat. 

Five and five shillings. 
Five and a crown ; 

Five and five shillings. 
Will buy a new gown. 

Five and five shilHngs, 

Five and a groat ; 

Five and five shillings. 

Will buy a new coat. 



SONGS. 



83 



r 







121. 

[The first line of this nursery rhyme is quoted in Beaumont and 
Fletcher's " Bonduca," Act v. sc. 2. It is probable also that Sir Toby 
alludes to this song in " Twelfth Night," Act ii. sc. 2, when he says> 
" Come on ; there is sixpence for you ; let 's have a song." In " Epu- 
lario, or the Italian banquet," 1589, is a receipt " to make pies so that 
the birds may be alive in them, and flie out when it is cut up," a mere 
device, live birds being introduced after the pie is made. This may be 
the original subject of the following song.] 

Sing a song of sixpence, 

A bag full of rye ; 
Four and twenty blackbirds 

Baked in a pie ; 



When the pie was open'd, 
The birds began to sing ; 

Was not that a dainty dish 
To set before the king? 



y4 NURSERY RHYMES. 

The king was in his counting-house 
Counting out his money ; 

The queen was in the parlour 
Eating bread and honey ; 

The maid was in the garden, 

Hanging out the clothes, 
There came a little blackbird, 

And snapt off her nose. 

• 
Jenny was so mad, 

She didn't know what to do ; 
She put her finger in her ear, 

And crack'd it right in two. 




> 



122. 



There was a girl in our towne, 

Silk an' satin was her gowne, 

Silk an' satin, gold an' velvet, 

Guess her name, three times I 've tell'd it. 



86 NURSERY RHYMES. 

123. 

[a coffin.] 

There was a man made a thing, 
And he that made it did it bring ; 
But he 't was made for did not know 
Whether 't was a thing or no. 

124. 

[a hedgehog.] 

As I went over Lincoln bridge, 
I met Mister Rusticap ; 
Pins and needles on his back, 
A going to Thorney fair. 

125. 

[OaVe leg is a leg of mutton ; two legs, a man ; three 

LEGS, A stool ; FOUR LEGS, A DOG.] 

Two legs sat upon three legs, 

With one leg in his lap ; 

In comes four legs, 

And runs away w4th one leg. 

Up jumps two legs. 

Catches up three legs, 

Throws it after four legs. 

And makes him bring back one leg. 



RIDDLES. 87 

126. 
[a bed.] 

Formed long ago, yet made to-day, 
Employed while others sleep; 

What few would like to give away, 
Nor any wish to keep. 

127. 

[a cinder-sifter.] 

A Riddle, a riddle, as I suppose, 
A hundred eyes, and never a nose. 

128. 

[a well.] 

As round as an apple, as deep as a cup, 
And all the king's horses can't pull it up. 

129. 

[a cherry.] 

As I went through the garden gap. 
Who should I meet but Dick Red-cap ! 
A stick in his hand, a stone in his throat, 
If you '11 tell me this riddle, I '11 give you a 
groat. 



88 NURSERY RHYMES. 



130. 

Elizabeth, Elspeth, Betsy, and Bess, 
They all went together to seek a bird's nest. 
They found a bird's nest, with five eggs in. 
They all took one, and left four in. 

131. 

As I was going to St. Ives, 

I met a man with seven wives. 

Every wife had seven sacks, 

Every sack had seven cats. 

Every cat had seven kits : 

Kits, cats, sacks, and wives. 

How many were there going to St. Ives ? 

132. 

[the holly tree.] ; 

\ HiGHTY, tighty, paradighty clothed in green, ; 

The king could not read it, no more could the { 

queen ; 
They sent for a wise man out of the East, 
Who said it had horns, but was not a beast ! 

133. 

See, see ! what shall I see?*- 

A horse's head where his tail should be. 



RIDDLES. 89 

134. 
[an egg.] 
HuMPTY DUMPTY sate on a wall, 
Humpty dumpty had a great fall ; 
Three score men and three score more 
Cannot place Humpty Dumpty as he was before. 

135. 

[The allusion to Oliver Cromwell satisfactorily fixes the date of this 
riddle to belong to the seventeenth century.] 

[a rainbow.] 
Purple, yellow, red, and green, 
The king cannot reach it nor the queen ; 
Nor can old Noll, whose power's so great: 
Tell me this riddle while I count eight. 

136. 

PEASE-porridge hot, pease-porridge cold, 
Pease-porridge in the pot, nine days old, 
Spell me that in four letters. 

137. 

As I was going o'er Westminster bridge, 
I met with a Westminster scholar; 

He pulled off his cap an' drew off his glove, 
And wished me a very good morrow. 
What is his name? 

3000191} 



90 % #^ NURSERY RHYMES. 

'■^ 138. 

[From MS. Sloan, 1489, fol. 16, written in the time of Charles I.] 

There were three sisters in a hall, 
There came a knight amongst them all ; 
Good morrow, aunt, to the one. 
Good morrow, aiint, to the other, 
Good morrow, gentlewoman, to the third, 
If you were my aunt. 

As the other two be, 

I would say good morrow," 

Then, aunts, all three. 

139. 

[From the same Manuscript.] 

Congeal'd water and Cain's brother. 
That was my lover's name, and no other. 

140. 

[teeth and GUMS.] 

Thirty white horses upon a red hill, 
Now they tramp, now they champ, now they 
stand still. 

141. 
[coals.] 
Black we are, but much admired ; 
Men seek for us till they are tired. 
We tire the horse, but comfort man 
Tell me this riddle if you can. 



RIDDLES. 91 

142. 

[The man had one eye, and the tree two apples upon it.] 

There was a man who had no eyes, 

He went abroad to view the skies : 

He saw a tree with apples on it, 

He took no apples off, yet left no apples on it. 

t , '^- , 

■^ [CLEOPATRA.J 

The moon nine days old, 
The next sign to cancer, 
Pat rat without a tail. 
And now, sir, for your answer. 

144. 
[a candle.] 
Little Nancy Etticoat, 
In a white petticoat, 
And a red nose ; 
The longer she stands. 
The shorter she grows. 

145. 

[pair of TONGS-l 

Long legs, crooked thighs. 
Little head and no eyes. 



92 NURSERY RHYMES. 

146. 

[a horse-shoer.] 
What shoe-maker makes shoes without leather, 
With all the four elements put together? 
Fire and water, earth and air, 
Ev'ry customer has two pair. 

[currants.] jk 
HiGGLEDY piggledy .r 

Here we lie, 
Pick'd and pluck'd. 

And put in a pie. 
My first is snapping, snarling, growling, 
My second's industrious, romping, and prowling. 
Higgledy piggledy 

Here we lie, 

r 

Pick'd and pluck'd. 
And put in a pie. 

148. 

Thomas a T*attamus took two Ts, 

To tie two tups to two tall trees. 

To frighten the terrible Thomas a Tattamus ! 

Tell me how many Ts there are in all that. 

149. 

King Charles walked and talked 

Half an hour after his head was cut off. 



RIDDLES. 93 

1-30. 

[a star.] 
I HAVE a little sister, they call her peep, peep, 
•She wades the waters deep, deep, deep. 
She climbs the mountains high, high, high, 
Poor little creature she has but one eye. 

151. 

Twelve pears hanging high, 
Twelve knights riding by ; 
Each knight took a pear, 
And yet left eleven there ! 

152. 

[a needle and thread.] 
Old mother Pitcher had but one eye, 
And a long tail which she let fly ; 
And every time she went over a gap, 
She left a bit of her tail in a trap. 

153. 
[an egg.] 
In marble walls as white as milk. 
Lined with a skin as soft as silk ; 
Within a fountain crystal clear, 
A golden apple doth appear. 
, No doors there are to this strong-hold, 
Yet things break in and steal the gold. 



I 
94 NURSERY RHYMES. 

154. 
There was a king met a king 

In a narrow lane, 
Says this king to that king, 

"Where have you been?" 

"Oh! I've been a hunting 
With my dog and my doe." 

" Pray lend him to me. 
That I may do so." 

" There 's the dog take the dog." 
" What 's the dog's name ?" 

"I^e told you already." 
" Pray tell me again." 

155. 
[a plum-pudding.] 
Flour of England, fruit of Spain, 
Met together in a shower of rain ; 
Put in a bag tied round with a string. 
If you '11 tell me this riddle, I '11 give you a ring. 

156. 
Every lady in this land 
Has twenty nails upon each hand, 
Five and twenty hands and feet, 
All this is true without deceit. 



CHARMS. 97 

162. 

[From Dr. AVallis'.s •' Grammatica Liiigune Anglicanrr," 12mo., Oxon. 
1674, p. ](>4. This and ihe following are said to be certain cures for the 
liiccup if repeated in one breath.] 

When a twister a twisting, will twist him a 

twist ; 
For the twisting of his twist, he three times 

cloth intwist ; 
But if one of the twines of the twist do untwist, 
The twine that untwisteth, untwisteth the twist. 
Untwirlinof the twine that mitwisteth between, 
He twirls, with the twister, the two in a twine : 
Then twice having twisted the twines of the twine 
He twisteth the twine he hath twined in twain. 
The twain that, in twining, before in the twine. 
As twines were intwisted ; he now doth untwine : 
'Twixt the twain inter-twisting a twine more 

between. 
He, twirling his twister, makes a twist of the 

twine. 

163. 

A THATCHER of Thatchwood went to Thatchet a 
thatching, 

Did a thatcher of Thatchwood go to Thatchet a 
thatching ? 

If a thatcher of Thatchwood went to Thatchet a 
thatching. 

Where 's the thatching the thatcher of Thatch- 
wood has thatch'd ? 



98 NURSERY RHYMES. 

164. 

[Sometimes "off a pewter plate" is added at the end of each line.] 

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper ; 
A peck of pickled pepper Peter Piper picked ; 
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper, 
Where 's the peck of pickled pepper Peter Piper 
picked ? 

165. 
My father he left me, just as he was ab.e, 
One bowl, one bottle, one lable, 
Two bowls, two bottles, two lables, 
^^hree, &c. [^And so on ad. lib. in one breath.^ 

166. 

[A charm somewhat similar to the following may be seen in the 
" Townly Mysteries," p. 91. See a paper in the " Archgeologia," vol. 
xxvii. p. 253, by the Rev. Lancelot Sharpe, m. a. See also MS. Lansd. 
231, fol. 114, and Ady's "Candle in the Dark," 4to. London, 1650, p. 58.] 

Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, 
Guard the bed that I lay on I 
Four corners to my bed, 
Four angels round my head ; 
One to watch, one to pray, 
And two to bear ray soul away ! 

167. 

[Said to pips placed in the fire ; a species of divination practised by 
children.] 

If you love me, pop and fly ; ^ 

If you hate me, lay and die. 



GAFFERS AND GAMMERS. 101 

171. 

There was an old woman sat spinning, 

And that 's the first beginning ; 

She had a calf, 

And that's half; 

She took it by the tail, 

And threw it over the wall, 

And that's all. 

172. 

There was an old woman, her name it was Peor : 
Her head was of wood, and she wore a cork-leg. 
The neighbours all pitch'd her into the water. 
Her leg was drown'd first, and her head follow'd 
a'ter. 

173. 
A LITTLE old man of Derby, 
How do you think he served me ? 
He took away my bread and cheese, 
And that is how he served me. 

> 174. 
There was an old woman in Surrey, 
Who was morn, noon, and night in a hurry ; 

Call'd her husband a fool, 

Drove the children to school. 
The worrying old woman of Surrey. 



\ 



102 NURSERY RHYMES. 

175. 

Old mother Widdle Waddle jumpt out of bed, 
And out of the casement she popt out her head ; 
Crying, the house is on fire, the gray goose is dead. 
And the fox he is come to the town, oh! 

176. 

There was an old woman. 

And she sold puddings and pies: 

She went to the mill. 

And the dust flew^ in her eyes : 

Hot pies and cold pies to sell! 
Wherever she goes, — 

You may follow her by the smell. 

177. 

There was an old woman 

Lived under a hill; 
And if she 's not gone, 

She lives there still. 

178. 

There was an old man of Tobago, 
Who lived on rice, gruel, and sago ; 
Till, much to his bliss. 
His physician said this — 
" To a leg, sir, of mutton you may go." 



GAFFERS AND GAMMERS. lOo 

179. 

[From " Infant Institutes," 8vo., London, 1797, p. 15.] 

There was an old woman toss'd up in a basket, 
Nineteen times as high as the moon ; 

Where she was going I couldn't but ask it, 
For in her hand she carried a broom. 

Old woman, old woman, old woman, quoth I, 
O whither, O whither, O whither so high ? 

To brush the cobwebs off the sky ! 
Shall I go with thee ? Ay, by and by. 

180. 

There was an old man who liv'd in Middle Row, 
He had five hens, and a name for them, oh ! 
Bill and Ned and Battock, 
Cut-her-foot and Pattock, 
Chuck, my lady Prattock, 
Go to thy nest and lay. 

181. 

There w^as an old woman of Lee»'s, 
Who spent all her time in good deeds; 

She worked for the poor. 

Till her fingers were sore. 
This pious old woman of Leeds! 



104 NURSERY RHYMES. 

182. 

There was an old man, 
And he had a calf. 

And that 's half ; 
He took him out of the stall, 
And put him on the wall ; 

And that 's all. 

183. 

Old Mother Hubbard 
Went to the cupboard, 

To get her poor dog a bone ; 
But when she came there 
The cupboard was bare. 

And so the poor dog had none. 

She went to the baker's. 
To buy him some bread ; 

But when she came back. 
The poor dog was dead. 

She went to the joiner's, 

To buy him a coffin ; 
But when she came back, 

The poor dog was laughing.* 



* Probably loffing or login, to complete the rhyme. So in Sliakspeare's 
"Mids. Night's Dream," act ii., sc. 1 : 

"And then the whole quire hold their hips, and Zo^e." 



I 



/ 
GAFFERS AND GAMMERS. 107 

She went to the sempstress, 

To buy him some linen ; 
But when she came back, 

The dog was spinning. 

She went to the hosier's, 

To buy him some hose ; 
But when she came back, 

He was dress'd in his clothes. 

The dame made a curtsey, 

The dog made a bow ; 
The dame said, your servant, 

The dog said, bow, wow. 

184. 

There was an old woman called Nothing-at-all, 
Who rejoiced in a dwelling exceedingly small : 
A man stretched his mouth to its utmost extent, 
And down at one gulp house and old woman 
went. 

185. 

There was an old woman of Norwich, 
Who Uved upon nothing but porridge ; 

Parading the town. 

She turned cloak into gown, 
This thrifty old woman of Norwich. 



108 NURSERY RHYMES. 

186. 

Old Betty Blue 

Lost a holiday shoe, 
What can old Betty do? 

Give her another 

To match the other, 
And then she may swagger in two. 

187. 

[The fiillowingispart of a comic song called "Success to the Whistle 
and Wig," intended to be sung in rotation by the members of a club.] 

There was an old woman had three sons, 
Jerry, and James, and John : 
Jerry was hung, James was drowned, 
John was lost and never was found ; 
And there was an end of the three sons, 
Jerry, and James, and John I 

188. 

[The first two lines of the following are the same with those of a song 
in D'Urfey's " Pills to Purge Melancholy," vol. v., p. 13.] 

There was an old woman 

Lived under a hill. 
She put a mouse in a bag, 

And sent it to mill ; 
The miller did swear. 

By the point of his knife. 
He never took toll 

Of a mouse in his life I 



GAFFERS AND GAMMERS. 109 

189. 

[The tale on which the following story is founded is found in a MS. 
of the fifteenth century, in the Chetham Library, at Manchester, and 
printed in the Reliq. Antiq. vol. ii., p. 196.] 

There was an old man, who lived in a w^ood, 

As you may plainly see ; 
He said he could do as much work in a day, 

As his wife could do in three. 
With all my heart, the old woman said, 

If that you will allow ; 
To-morrow you '11 stay at home in my stead, 

And I '11 go drive the plough : 

But you must milk the Tidy cow. 

For fear that she go dry ; 
And you must feed the little pigs, 

That are within the sty ; 
And you must mind the speckled hen, 

For fear she lay away ; 
And you must reel the spool of yarn ^ 

That I spun yesterday. " 

The old woman took a staff in her hand. 

And went to drive the plough : 
The old man took a pail in his hand, 

And went to milk the cow ; 
But Tidy hinched, and Tidy flinched. 

And Tidy broke his nose ; 
And Tidy gave him such a blow. 

That the blood ran down to his toes. 

K 



110 NURSERY RHYMES. 

High ! Tidy ! ho ! Tidy ! high I 

Tidy ! d6 stand still ; 
If ever I milk you, Tidy, again, 

'T will be sore against my will I 
He went to feed the little pigs. 

That were within the sty ; 
He hit his head against the beam, 

'And he made the blood to fly. 

He went to mind the speckled hen. 

For fear she 'd lay astray ; 
And he forgot the spool of yarn 

His wife spun yesterday. 

So he swore by the sun, the moon, and the stars, 
And the green leaves on the tree. 

If his wife didn't do a day's work in her life. 
She should ne'er be ruled by he. 

190. 
Oh, dear, what can the matter be ? 
"tTwo old women got up in an apple tree ; 
One came down, 
And the other staid till Saturday. 




/. - 



GAMES, 



191. 



[Rhymes used by children to decide who is to begin a game. 

One-ery, two-ery, 

Ziccary zan ; 
Hollow bone, crack a bone, 

Ninery, ten : 
Spittery spot, 

It must be done ; 
Twiddleum twaddleum, 

Twenty-one. 

(Ill) 



f 



112 NURSERY RHYMES. 

192. 

One old Oxford ox opening oysters ; 

Two tee-to-tums totally tired of trying to trot to 

Tadbury ; 
Three tall tigers tippling tenpenny tea ; 
Four fat friars fanning fainting flies ; 
Five frippy Frenchmen foolishly fishing for flies ; 
Six sportsmen shooting snipes ; 
Eight Enghshmen eagerly examining Europe ; 
Nine nimble noblemen nibbhng nonpareils ; 
Ten tinkers tinkling upon ten tin tinder-boxes 

with ten tenpenny tacks ; 
Eleven elephants elegantly equipped ; 
Twelve typographical typographers typically 

translating types. 

193. 

Gay go up and gay go down, 
To ring the bells of London town. 

Bull's eyes and targets, 

Say the bells of St. Marg'ret's. 

Brickbats and tiles. 

Say the bells of St. Giles's. 

Halfpence and farthings. 
Say the bells of St. Martin's. 



GAMES. 113 

Oranges and lemons, 

Say the bells of St. Clement's. 

Pancakes and fritters, 

Say the bells of St. Peter's. 

Two sticks and an apple. 
Say the bells at Whitechapel. 

Old Father Baldpate, 

Say the slow bells at Aldgate. 

You owe me ten shillings, 
Say the bells of St. Helen's. 

Pokers and tongs, 

Say the bells at St. John's. 

Kettles and pans, 

Say the bells at St. Ann's. 

When will you pay me ? 
Say the bells at Old Bailey. 

When I grow rich, 

Say the bells at Shoreditch. 

Pray when will that be ? 
Say the bells of Stepney. 

I am sure I don't know, 
Says the great bell at Bow. 

Here comes a candle to light you to bed, 
And here comes a chopper to chop off your head. 



114 NURSERY RHYMES. 



194. 

Intery, mintery, cutery-corn, 
Apple seed and apple thorn ; 
Wine, brier, limber-lock. 
Five geese in a flock, 
Sing and sing by a spring, 
0-u-T, and in again. 

195. 

[The game of water-skimming is of high antiquity, being mentioned 
by Julius Pollux, and also by Eustathius, in his commentary upon Ho- 
mer. Brand quotes a curious passage from Minucius Felix; but all 
antiquaries seem to have overlooked the very curious notice in Higins' 
adaptation of Junius's " Nomenclator," 8vo., Lond. 1585, p. 299, where 
it is called " a duck and a drake, and a halfe-penie cake." Thus it is 
probable that lines like the following were employed in this game as 
early as 1585 ; and it may be that the last line has recently furnished a 
hint to Mathews in his amusing song in " Patter v. Clatter."] 

A Duck and a drake, 

A nice barley-cake. 
With a penny to pay the old baker; 

A hop and a scotch. 

Is another notch, 
Slitherum, slatherum, take her. 

196. 

See, saw, Margery Daw, 

Little Jackey shall have a new master ; 
Little Jackey shall have but a penny a day. 

Because he can't work any faster. 



GAMES. 



115 



197. 
Margery Mutton-pie, and Johnny Bopeep, 
They met together in Grace-church street ; 
In and out, in and out, over the way, 
Oh I says Johnny, 't is chop-nose day. 



1 am 
I am 
I am 
I am 
I am 
I am 
I am 
I am 
I am 
I am 



198. 

a gold lock, 
a gold key. 
a silver lock. 
a silver key. 
a brass lock, 
a brass key. 
a lead lock, 
a lead key. 
a monk lock, 
a monk key! 



199. 
Jack be nimble, 

And Jack be quick : 
And Jack jump over 

The candle-stick. 



200. 

[The following is used by schoolboys, when two are about to run a race.] 

One to make ready. 

And two to prepare ; 
Here goes the rider, 

And away goes the mare. 



116 NURSERY RHYMES. 

201. 

[Used ill Somersetsliire in counting out in the game of pee-wip or 
pee-wit.] 

One-ery, two-ery, hickary, hum, 
Fillison, foUison, Nicholson, John, 
Quever, quauver, Irish Mary, 
Stinkarum, stankarum, buck ! 

202. 

Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-cross, 
To see what Tommy can buy ; 

A penny white loaf, a penny white cake, 
And a twopenny apple-pie. 

203. 

Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-cross, 

To buy little Johnny a galloping-horse ; 

It trots behind, and it ambles before, 

And Johnny shall ride till he can ride no more. 

204. 

Whoop, whoop, and hollow. 
Good dogs w^on't follow^. 
Without the hare cries " pee wit." 

205. 

Tom Brown's two little Indian boys. 

One ran away. 

The other wouldn't stay, — 
Tom Brown's two little Indian boys. 



GAMES. 117 

206. 

There were two blackbirds, 

Sitting on a hill, 
The one nam'd Jack, 

The other nam'd Jill , 
Fly away, Jack I 
Fly away, Jill ! 
Come again, Jack ! 
Come again, Jill! 

207. • 

Tip, top, tower, 

Tumble down in an hour. 

208. 

1. I WENT up one pair of stairs. 

2. Just like me. 

1. I went up two pair of stairs. 

2. Just like me. 

1. I went into a room. 

2. Just like me. 

1. I looked out of a window. 

2. Just like me. 

1. And there I saw a monkey. 

2. Just like me. 

209. 

Number number nine, this hoop 's mine ; 
Number number ten, take it back again. 



118 NURSERY RHYMES. 

210. 

[This is acted by two or more girls, who walk or dance up and down, 
turning, when they say, " turn, cheeses, turn." The " green cheese,'' 
as I am informed, are made with sage and potato-tops. Two girls are 
said to be " cheese and cheese."] 

Green cheese, yellow laces, 
Up and down the market-places, 
Turn, cheeses, turn ! 

211. ^ 

Ride a cock-horse to Coventry-cross ; 

To see what Emma can buy ; 
A penny white cake I '11 buy for her sake, 

And a twopenny tart or a pie. 

212. 

Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-cross, 
To see an old lady upon a white horse. 
Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes. 
And so she makes music wherever she goes. 

213 

To market ride the gentlemen, 

So do we, so do we ; 
Then comes the country clown, 

Hobbledy gee, Hobbledy gee ; 
First go the ladies, nim, nim, nim : 
Next come the gentlemen, trim, trim, trim ; 
Then come the country clowns, gallop-a-trot. 



A 



GAMES. 119 

214. 

[Song set to five toes.] 

1. Let us go to the wood, says this pig; 

2. What to do there ? says that pig ; 

3. To look for my mother, says this pig ; 

4. What to do with her ? says that pig ; 

5. Kiss her to death, says this pig. 



115. 

[A number of boys and girls stand round one in the middle, who re- 
peats the following lines, counting the children until one is counted 
out by the end of the verses.] 

Ring me (1), ring me (2), ring me rary (3), 

As I go round (4), ring by ring (5), 

A virgin (6) goes a Maying (7), 

Here 's a flower (8), and there 's a flower (9), 

Growing in my lady's garden (10), 

If you set your foot awry (11), 

Gentle John will make you cry (12), 

If you set your foot amiss (13), 

Gentle John (14) will give you a kiss. 

[The child upon whom (14) falls is then taken out and forced to select 
one of the other sex. The middle child then proceeds.] 

This [lady or gentleman] is none of ours, 
Has put [him or her] self in [the selected child's] 

power, 
So clap all hands, and ring all bells, and make 

the wedding o'er. \Jill clap hands.^ 

[If the child taken by lot joins in the clapping, the selected child is re- 
jected, and, I think, takes the middle place. Otherwise, I think, there 
is a salute.] 



120 NURSERY RHYMES. 



216. 

[Another game, played exclusively by boys. Two, who are fixed 
apon for the purpose, leave the group, and privately arrange that the 
pass- word shall be some implement of a particular trade. The trade is 
announced in the dialogue, and then the fun is, that the unfortunate 
w^ig-htwho guesses the "tool," is beaten with the caps of his fellows till 
he reaches a fixed goal, after which he goes out in turn.] 

" Two broken tradesmen, 

Newly come over, 
The one from France and Scotland, 

The other from Dover." 
What 's your trade ?" 

[Carpenters, nailors, smiths, tinkers, or any other is answered, and 
on guessing the instrument, "plane him, hammer him, rasp him, or 
solder him," is called out respectively during the period of punish- 
ment.] 

217. 

This is the key of the kingdom. 
In that kingdom there is a city. 
In that city there is a town. 
In that town there is a street. 
In that street there is a lane. 
In that lane there is a yard. 
In that yard there is a house. 
In that house there is a bed. 
On that bed there is a basket. 
In that basket there are some flowers. 
Flowers in the basket, basket in the bed, bed 
in the room, &c. &c. 



GAMES. 121 



218. 



Clap hands, clap hands, 

Hie Tommy Randy, 
Did you see my good man ? 

They call him Cock-a-bandy. 

Silken stockings on his legs. 
Silver buckles glancin', 

A sky-blue bonnet on his head. 
And oh, but he is handsome. 

219. 

[A song set to five fingers.] 

1. This pig went to market; 

2. This pig staid at home ; 

3. This pig had a bit of meat ; 

4. And this pig had none ; 

5. This pig said. Wee, wee, wee I 
I can't find my way home. 

220. 

[Children hunting bats.] 

Bat, bat, {clap hands,) 
Come under my hat, 

And I '11 give you a slice of bacon ; 
And when I bake, 
I *11 give you a cake. 

If I am not mistaken, 

L 



122 NURSERY RHYMES. 

221. 

[A game at ball.] 

Cuckoo, cherry tree, 
Catch a bird, and give it to me ; 
Let the tree be high or low, 
Let it hail, rain, or snow. 

222. 

[Two of the strongest children are selected, a and B ; a stands within 
a ring of the children, b being outside.] 

A. Who is going round my sheepfold? 

B. Only poor old Jacky Lingo. 

A. Don't steal any of my black sheep. 

B. No, no more I will, only by one. 

Up, says Jacky Lingo. [Strikes one.) 

[The child struck leaves the ring, and takes hold of b behind ; b in 
the same manner takes the other children, one by one, gradually in- 
creasing his tail on each repetition of the verses, until he has got the 
whole : a then tries to get them back ; B runs away with them ; they 
try to shelter themselves behind b ; a drags them off, one by one, setting 
them against a wall, until he has recovered all. A regular tearing gamej 
as children say.] 

223. 

HiGHTY cock O ! 

To London we go, 

To York we ride ; 
And Edward has pussy-cat tied to his side ; 
He shall have little dog tied to the other, 
And then he goes trid trod to see his grand- 
mother. 



rnvi 



GAMES. 123 

224. 

Children stand round, and are counted one by one, by means of this 
lyme. The child upon whom the last number falls isow<, for " Hide or 
Seek," or any other game where a victim is required. A cock and bull 
story of this kind is related of the historian Josephus. There are other 
versions of this, and one may be seen in " Blackwood's Magazine" for 
August, 1821; p. 36.] 

Hickory (1), Dickory (2), Dock (3) 
The mouse ran up the clock (4), 
The clock struck one (5), 
The mouse was gone (6) ; 
O (7), u (8), T (9), spells out. 

225. 

HiNK spink, the puddings clink, 

The fat begins to fry, 
Nobody at home, but jumping Joan, 

Father, mother, and I. 
Stick, stock, stone dead. 

Blind man can't see. 
Every knave will have a slave, 

You or I must be he. 

226. 

[From " Bracebridge Hall," 8vo., London, 1822, vol. ii. p. 37. A Fox. 
In a children's game, where all the little actors are seated in a circle, the 
following stanza is used as question and answer :] 

Who goes round my house this night ? 

None but bloody Tom ! 
Who steals all the sheep at night? 

None but this poor one. 



124 NURSERY RHYMES. 

227. 

See-saw, jack a daw, 

What is a craw to do wi' her ? 

She has not a stocking to put on her, 

And the craw has not one for to gi' her. 

228. 

[The following: lines are sung by children when starting for a race.] 

Good horses, bad horses, 

What is the time of day ? 
Three o'clock, four o'clock, 
Now fare you away. 

229. 

[The following is a game played as follows : A string of boys and girls, 
each holding by his predecessor's skirts, approaches two others, who 
with joined and elevated hands form a double arch. After the dialogue, 
the line passes through, and the last is caught by a sudden lowering of 
the arms — if possible.] 

How many miles is it to Babylon? — 

Threescore miles and ten. 

Can I get there by candle-hght ? — 

Yes, and back again ! 

If your heels are nimble and light, 

You may get there by candle-light. 

230. 
See-saw sacradown, 
Which is the way to London town? 
One foot up, and the other down. 
And that is the way to London town. 



GAMES. 125 



231. 



[a stands with a row of girls (iier daughters) behind her ; b, a suitor, 
advances.] 

B. Trip trap over the grass : If you please will you 
let one of your [eldest] daughters come, 
Come and dance with me ? 
I will give you pots and pans, I will give 

you brass, 
I will give you anything for a pretty lass. 

A. says " No." 

B. I will give you gold and silver, I will give 

you pearl, 
I w^ill give. you anything for a pretty girl. 

A. Take one, take one, the fairest you may see. 

B. The fairest one that I can see 

Is pretty Nancy, — come to me. 

[b carries one off, and says :] 

You shall have a duck, my dear, ^ 
And you shall have a drake. 
And you shall have a young man apprentice 
for your sake. 

[Children say.] 

If this young man should happen to die. 
And leave this poor woman a w^idow, 

The bells shall all ring, and the birds shall all 
sing, 
And we '11 all clap hands together. 

[So it is repeated until the whole are taken.] 



126 



NURSERY RHYMES. 




232. 

[The " Three Knights of Spain » is a game played in nearly the same 
manner as the preceding. The dramatis personcp. form themselves in 
two parties, one representing a courtly dame and her daughters, the 
other the suitors of the daughters. The last party, moving backwards 
and forwards, with their arms entwined, approach and recede from the 
mother party, which is stationary, singing to a very sweet air. See 
Chambers' "Popular Rhymes," p. 66.] 

Suitors. 

We are three brethren out of Spain, 
Come to court your daughter Jane. 



Mother. 

My daughter Jane she is too young, 
And has not learned her mother- tongue. 



GAMES. 

Suitors. 



127 



Be she young, or be she old, 
For her beauty she must be sold. 
So fare you well, my lady gay. 
We'll call again another day. 

Mother, 
Turn back, turn back, thou scornful knight ; 
And rub thy spurs till they be bright. 

Suitors. 
Of my spurs take you no thought. 
For in this town they were not bought. 
So fare you well, my lady gay, 
We'll call again another day. 

Mother. 
Turn back, turn back, thou scornful knight, 
And take the fairest in your sight. 

Suitor. 

The fairest maid that I can see 
Is pretty Nancy,— come to me. 

Here comes your daughter safe and sound. 
Every pocket with a thousand pound ; 
Every finger with a gay gold ring ; 
Please to take your daughter in. 



128 NURSERY RHYMES. 

233. 

[A string of children, hand in hand, stand in a row. A child (a) stands 
in front of them, as leader ; two other children (b and c) form an arch, 
each holding both the hands of the other.] 

A. Draw a pail of water, 
For my lady's daughter ; 

My father 's a king, and my mother -'s a queen, 
My two little sisters are dress'd in green. 
Stamping grass and parsley. 
Marigold leaves and daisies. 

B. One rush, two rush. 

Pray thee, fine lady, come under my bush. 

[a passes by under the arch, followed by the whole string of children, 
the last of whom is taken captive by b and c. The verses are repeated 
until all are taken.] 

234. 

[The following seems to belong to the last game ; but it is usually 
found by itself in the small books of children's rhymes.] 

Sieve my lady's oatmeal. 

Grind my lady's flour, 
Put it in a chesnut. 

Let it stand an hour ; 
One may rush, two may rush, 
Come, my girls, walk under the bush. 

235. 

Queen Anne, Queen Anne, you sit in the sun. 
As fair as a lily, as white as a wand. 
I send you three letters, and pray read one, 
You must read one, if you can't read all, 
So pray, Miss or Master, throw up the ball. 



GAMES. 



129 



236. 
Is John Smith within?— 
Yes, that he is. 
Can he set a shoe ?— 
Ay, marry, two. 
Here a nail, there a nail. 
Tick tack, too. 

237. 
There were three jovial Welshmen, 

As I have heard them say, 
And they would go a-hunting 

Upon St. David's day. 
All the day they hunted. 

And nothing could they find 
But a ship a-saiUng, 

A-saiUng with the wind. 
One said it was a ship, 

The other he said, nay ; 
The third said it was a house, 

With the chimney hlown away. 
And all the night they hunted. 
And nothing could they find 
But the moon a-gliding, 

A-gliding with the wind. 
One said it was the moon. 
The other he said, nay ; 
The third said it was a cheese. 
And half o't cut away. 



130 NURSERY RHYMES. 

23S 

those whoiauVhpa;£:rrf:^^^^^^ 

Buff says Buff to all his men, 
And I say Buff to you again ; 
Buff neither laughs nor smiles, 
But carries his face 
With a very good grace, 
And passes the stick to the very next place ! 
239. 

[A song- to a nursery dance.] 

Hey, the dusty miller. 

And his dusty coat, 
He'll earn a shilling, 

Or he 'II spend a groat. 
Dusty was the coat, 

Dusty was the colour, 
Dusty was the kiss 

That I got from miller. 
240. 

[Game with the hands.] ^ 

Pease-pudding hot. 

Pease-pudding cold. 
Pease-pudding in the pot, 

Nine days old. 
Some like it hot. 

Some like it cold, 
Some like it in the pot, 

Nine days old. 



GAMES. 131 

241. 

[A game on the slate.] 

Eggs, butter, cheese, bread, 
Stick, stock, stone, dead ! 
Stick him up, stick him down. 
Stick him in the okl man's crown! 

242. 

[Ill the following childish amusement, one extends his arm, and the 
other in illustration of the narrative, strikes him gently with the side 
of his hand at the shoulder and wrist ; and then at the word "middle," 
with considerable force, on the flexor muscles at the elbow-joint.] 

My father was a Frenchman, 

He brought to me a fiddle, 
He cut me here, he cut me here, 

He cut me right in the middle. 

243. 

[The game of the confessional, as shown in shadows on the wall.] 

'' GooD-MORRow to jou, father, 

I 'm come to confess." 
" Good-morrow to you, child, 

Pray what have you done ?" 
" Last night I bought some fish, 

And I put it in a dish. 

And the cat stole the fish, 

And I killed the cat 

For doing of that." 
" Oh ! that was a sad crime, indeed. 

You must do penance for that." 
" Pray, what must I do ? 

Kiss your old father," &c. 



132 NURSERY RHYMES. 



244. 

[The two following are fragments of a game called " The Lady of the 
Land," a complete version of which has not fallen in my way.] 

Here comes a poor woman from baby-land, 
With three small children in her hand : 
One can brew, the other can bake. 
The other can make a pretty round cake. 
One can sit in the garden and spin, 
Another can make a fine bed for the king ; 
Pray, ma'am, will you take one in ? 

245. 

I CAN make diet bread. 

Thick and thin ; 
I can make diet bread, 

Fit for the king. 

246. 

Here we come a piping. 
First in spring, and then in May, 
The queen she sits upon the sand. 
Fair as a lily, white as a wand : 
King John has sent you letters three. 
And begs you '11 read them unto me. — 
We can't read one without them all. 
So pray. Miss Bridget, deliver the ball ! 



! 



GAMES. 



247. 



133 



[This game begins tlms : Take this— What's this? — A gaping, wide- 
mouthed, waddling frog, &c.] 

Twelve huntsmen with horns and hounds, 

Hunting over other men's grounds ! 

Eleven ships saiUng o'er the main, 

Some bound for France and some for Spain : 

I wish them all safe home again : 

Ten comets in the sky, 

Some low and some high ; 

Nine peacocks in the air, 

I wonder how they all came there : 

I do not know, and I do not care ; 

Eight joiners in joiner's hall. 

Working with the tools and all : 

Seven lobsters in a dish, 

As fresh as any heart could wish ; 

Six beetles against the wall. 

Close by an old woman's apple-stall ; 

Five puppies and our dog Ball, 

Who daily for their breakfast call ; 

Four horses stuck in a bog, 

Three monkeys tied to a clog ; 

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog, 

With a gaping, wide-mouthed, waddling frog. 

M 



134 NURSERY RHYMES* 



248. 



The first day of Christmas 

My mother sent to me 

A partridge in a pear-tree. 

The second day of Christmas 

My mother sent to me 

Two turtle-doves and a partridge in a pear-tree. 

The third, &c. 

Three French hens, two turtle-doves, and a par- 
tride in a pear-tree. 

The fourth, &c. 

Four canary birds, three French hens, two turtle- 
doves, &c. 

The fifth, &c. 

Five gold rings, &c. 

The sixth, &c. 

Six geese a-laying, &c. 

The seventh, &c. 

Seven swans a-swimming, &c. 

The eighth, &c. 

Eight ladies dancing, &c. 

The ninth, &c. 

Nine lords a-leaping, &c. 

The tenth, &c. 

Ten ships a-sailing, &c. 



GAMES. 135 



The eleventh, &c. 
Eleven ladies spinning, &c. 
The twelfth, &c. 
Twelve bells ringing, &c. 



[Each child in succession repeats the gifts of the day, and forfeits for 
each mistake. This accumulative process is a favourite with children ; 
in early writers, such as Homer, the repetition of messages, &c. pleases 
on the same principle.] 



249. 

Dance, Thuinbkin, dance, 

\^Keep the thumb in motion. 
Dance, ye merryraen, every one : 

\^All the fingers in motion. 
For Thumbkin, he can dance alone, 

[The thumb only moving, 
Thumbkin, he can dance alone. 

[Ditto. 

Dance, Foreman, dance, 

[The first finger moving. 
Dance, ye merrymen, every one ; 

[The whole moving. 
But Foreman, he can dance alone. 
Foreman, he can dance alone. 

[And so on with the others— naming the 2d finger Longman— ihe. 3d 
finger Ringman — and the 4th finger Littleman. Littleman cannot dance 
alone.] 



136 NURSERY RHYMES. 



250. 

[An exercise during which the fingers of the child are enumerated.] 

Thumbikin, Thumbikin, broke the barn, 

Pinnikin, Pinnikin, stole the corn, 

Long-back'd Gray 

Carried it away. 

Old Micf-man sat and saw, 

But Peesy-weesy, paid for a'. 

^ 251. 

HrcKERY, dickery, 6 and 7, 
Alabone Crackabone, 10 and 11, 
Spin span muskidan ; 
Twiddle 'urn twaddle 'urn, 21. 




PARADOXES. 



252. 

[The following is quoted in Parkin's reply to Dr. Stukeley's second 
number of " Origines Roystonianse," 4to. London, 1748, p. vi.] 

Peter White will ne e'r go right ; 

Would you know the reason why ? 
He follows his nose where'er he goes, 

And that stands all awry. 

253. 

O THAT I was where I would be, 
Then would I be where I am not ! 
But where I am I must be. 
And where I would be I cannot. 

M * (137) 



138 NURSERY RHYMES. 



254. 

[The following was sung to the tune of Chevy Chace. It was taken 
from a poetical tale in the " Choyce Poems," r2mo., London, 1G62, the 
music to which may be seen in D'Urfey's " Pills to Purge Melancholy,'' 
1719, vol. iv., p. 1.] 

Three children sliding on the ice 

Upon a summer's day, 
As it fell out, they all fell in, 

The rest they ran away. 

Now had these children been at home. 

Or sliding on dry ground. 
Ten thousand pounds to one penny 

They had not all been drown'd. 

You parents all that children have, 
And you that have got none. 

If you would have them safe abroad, 
Pray keep them safe at home. 

255. 

There was a man of Newington 

And he was wondrous wise, 
He jump'd into a quickset hedge. 

And scratchM out both his eyes ; 
But w^hen he saw his eyes were out. 

With all his might and main 
He jump'd into another hedge, 

And scratch'd 'em in again. 



PARADOXES. 139 

256. 

If all the world was apple-pie, 

And all the sea was ink, 
And all the trees were bread and cheese, 

What should w'e have for drink ? 



[The following occurs in a MS. of the seventeenth century in the Sloane 
collection, the reference to which I have unfortunately mislaid.] 



257. 

of the s 
vhich I 

The man in the wilderness asked me, 
How many strawberries grew in the sea? 
I answered him, as I thought good. 
As many as red herrings grew in the wood. 

258. 

[The conclusion of the follo\\'ing resembles averse in the nursery his- 
tory of Mother Hubbard.] 

There w^as an old woman, and what do you 

think ? 
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink : 
Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet ; 
This plaguy old woman could never be quiet. 

She went to the baker, to buy her some bread. 
And when she came home her old husband w^as 

dead ; 
She went to the clerk to toll the bell. 
And when she came back her old husband was 

well. 



140 NURSERY RHYMES. 

259. 

There was an old woman had nothing, 
And there came thieves to rob her ; 

When she cried out she made no noise, 
But all the country heard her. 

260. 

There was a little Guinea-pig, 
Who, being little, was not big ; 
He always walked upon his feet. 
And never fasted when he eat. 

When from a place he ran away, 
He never at that place did stay ; 
And while he ran, as I am told. 
He ne'er stood still for young or old. 

He often squeak'd, and sometimes vi'lent. 
And when he squeak'd he ne'er was silent 
Though ne'er instructed by a cat. 
He knew a mouse was not a rat. 

One day, as I am certified. 
He took a whim and fairly died ; 
And, as I 'm told by men of sense, 
He never has been living since. 




LULLABIES. 



26L 

HusHY baby, my doll, I pray you don't cry, 
And I '11 give you some bread and some milk 

by and bye ; 
Or, perhaps you like custard, or may-be a 

tart,— 
Then to either you 're welcome, with all my 

whole heart. 

(141) 



142 NURSERY RHYMES. 

262. 

Danty baby diddy, 

What can a mammy do wid'e, 

But sit in a lap, 

And give 'un a pap ? 
Sing danty baby diddy. 

263. 

RocK-A-BYE, baby, thy cradle is green ; 
Father 's a nobleman, mother 's a queen ; 
And Betty 's a lady, and wears a gold ring ; 
And Johnny 's a drummer, and drums for the 
king. 

264. 

Bye, O my baby ! 

When I was a lady, 
O then my poor baby did'nt cry ! 

But my baby is weeping, 

For want of good keeping, 
Oh, I fear my poor baby will die ! 

265. 

Hush a bye a ba lamb. 

Hush a bye a milk cow. 
You shall have a little stick 

To beat the naughty bow-wow. 



LULLABIES. 143 

266. 

Hush thee, my babby, 
Lie still with thy daddy, 

Thy mammy has gone to the mill, 
To grind thee some wheat, 
To make thee some meat. 

And so, my dear babby, lie still. 

267. 

Hey, my kitten, my kitten. 

And hey, my kitten, my deary ; 

Such a sweet pet as this 
Was neither far nor neary. 

Here we go up, up, up. 

And here we go down, down, downy ; 
And here we go backwards and forwards, 

And here we go round, round, roundy. 

268. 

I won't be my father's Jack, 

I won't be my mother's Gill, 
I will be the fiddler's wife. 
And have music when I will. 
T' other little tune, 
T' other httle tune, 
Pr'ythee, love, play me 
T' other little tune. 



144 NURSERY RHYMES. 



269. 

Ride, baby, ride I 

Pretty baby shall ride, 
And have a little puppy-dog tied to her side, 
And little pussy-cat tied to the other, 
And away she shall ride to see her grandmo- 
ther. 

To see her grandmother. 

To see her grandmother. 

270. 

Hush a bye, baby, on the tree top. 
When the wind blows, the cradle will rock ; 
When the bough bends, the cradle will fall, 
Down will come baby, bough, cradle, and all. 

271. 
Bye, baby bunting. 
Daddy 's gone a hunting. 
To get a little hare's skin. 
To wrap a baby bunting in. 

272. 

Whiskum whaskum, 

over the knee ; 
Thank you, mamma, 

for slapping of me. 



LULLABIES. 145 



273. 



Dance, little baby, dance up high, 

Never mind, baby, mother is by ; 
Crow and caper, caper and crow. 

There, little baby, there you go ; 
Up to the ceiling, down to the ground, 

Backwards and forwards, round and round ; 
Dance, little baby, and mother will sing, 

With the merry coral, ding, ding, ding! 

274. 

[The following is quoted in Florio's "New World of Words," fol. 
London, 1611, p. 3.] 

To market, to market. 

To buy a plum-bun : 
Home again, come again, 

Market is done. 

275. 

Dance to your daddy, 
My little babby. 
Dance to your daddy. 
My little lamb. 

You shall have a fishy 
In a little dishy ; 
You shall have a fishy 
When the boat comes in. 



146 NURSERY RHYMES. 



276. 



Tom shall have a new bonnet, 
With blue ribands to tie on it, 
With a hush-a-bye and a lull-a-baby, 
Who so like to Tommy's daddy ? 

277. 

Bye, baby bumpkin. 
Where 's Tony Lumpkin ? 
My lady 's on her death-bed, 
With eating half a pumpkin. 

27S. 

[From " The Pleasant ComcEilie <'f Palieiit Grissell," 1603] 

Hush, hush, hush, hush I 
And I dance mine own child, 
And I dance mine own child. 
Hush hush, hush, hur-h ! 

279. 

Give me a blow, and I '11 beat 'eiu.. 

Why did they vex my baby ? 
Kissy, kiss, kissy, my honey. 

And cuddle your nurse, my dear 




JINGLES. 



280. 

[The first line of the following is the burden of a song in the " Tem- 
pest," act i., sc. 2. and also of one in the " Merchant of Venice," act 
iii., sp. a.] 

Ding, dong, bell, 

Pussy 's in the well ! 

Who put her in? — 

Little Tommy Lin. 

Who pulled her out? — 

Dog with long snout. 

What a naughty boy was that, 

To drown poor pussy-cat, 

Who never did any harm. 

But kill'd the mice in his father's barn. 

(147) 



148 NURSERY RHYMES. 

281. 

Hey ding a ding, what shall I sing ? 
How many holes in a skimmer? 
Four and twenty, — my stomach is empty ; 
Pray, mamma, give me some dinner. 

282. 
Cock a doodle doo I 
My dame has lost her shoe ; 
My master 's lost his fiddhng stick, 
And don't know what to do. 

Cock a doodle doo ! 

What is my dame to do? 

Till master finds his fiddhng stick, 

She '11 dance without her shoe. 

Cock a doodle doo ! 

My dame has lost her shoe. 

And master 's found his fiddhng stick, 

Sing doodle doodle doo I 

Cock a doodle doo I 
My dame will dance with you. 
While master fiddles his fiddling stick. 
For dame and doodle doo. 

Cock a doodle doo I 

Dame has lost her shoe ; 

Gone to bed and scratch'd her head, 

And can't tell what to do. 



JINGLES. 149 

2S3. 

Little Tee Wee, 
He went to sea 
In an open boat ; 
And while afloat, 
The little boat bended, 
And my story 's ended. 

284. 

Sing, sing, what shall I sing ? 

The cat has eaten the pudding-string ! 

Do, do, what shall I do ? 

The cat has bit it quite in two. 

285. 

[I do not know whether the following may have reference to the 
game of handy-dandy, mentioned in " King Lear," act iv., sc. 6, and in 
Florio's " New ^Vorld of Words," 1611, p. 57.] 

Handy Spandy, Jack-a-dandy, 
Loved plum-cake and sugar-candy ; 
He bought some at a grocer's shop. 
And out he came, hop, hop, hop. 

286. 

TiDDLE liddle lightum, 

Pitch and tar ; 
Tiddle liddle lightum. 

What 's that for ? 



150 NURSERY RHYMES. 



287. 

Sing jigmijole, the pudding-bowl, 

The table and the frame ; 
My master he did cudgel me 

For kissing of my dame. 

288. 

DiBBiTY, dibbity, dibbity, doe, 
Give me a pancake, 

And I'll go. 
Dibbity, dibbity, dibbity, ditter, 
Please to give me 

A bit of a fritter. 

289. 

Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John 
Went to bed with his breeches on ; 
One shoe off, the other shoe on, 
Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John. 

290. } 

Feedum, fiddledum fee. 

The cat 's got into the tree. j 

Pussy, come down, | 

Or I '11 crack your crown, I 

And toss you into the sea. 3 



JINGLES. 151 

291. 

GiLLY Silly Jarter, 
Who has lost a garter? 

In a shower of rain, 
The miller found it, 
The miller ground it. 

And the miller gave it to Sally again. 

292. 

Hub a dub dub, 

Three men in a tub ; 
And who do you think they be? 

The butcher, the baker. 

The candlestick maker. 
Turn 'era out, knaves all three ! 

293. 

Hyder iddle diddle dell, 
A yard of pudding 's not an ell ; 
Not forgetting tweeddle-dye, 
A tailor's goose will never fly. 

294. 

Hey diddle, dinkety, poppety, pet. 
The merchants of London they wear scarlet ; 
Silk in the collar, and gold in the hem. 
So merrily march the merchantmen. 



152 NURSERY RHYMES. 

295. 

FrDDLE-DE-DEE, fiddle-de-dee, 

The fly shall marry the humble-bee. 

They went to the church, and married was she. 

The fly has married the humble-bee. 

296. 

Hey, dorolot, dorolot ! 

Hey, dorolay, dorolay ! 
Hey, my bonny boat, bonny boat, 

Hey, drag away, drag away ! 

297. 

A CAT came fiddling out of a barn. 
With a pair of bagpipes under her arm ; 
She could sing nothing but fiddle cum fee, 
The mouse has married the humble-bee ; 
Pipe, cat, — dance, mouse. 
We '11 have a wedding at our good house. 

298. 

Hey ! diddle diddle. 

The cat and the fiddle, 
The cow jumped over the moon ; 

The little dog laugh'd 

To see such craft. 
While the dish ran after the spoon. 



I 



JINGLES. 153 



299. 



Come dance a jig 

To my Granny's pig, 

With a raudy, rowdy, dowdy ; 

Came dance a jig 

To my Granny's pig, 

And pussy-cat shall crowdy. 

300. 

DooDLEDY, doodledy, doodledy, dan, 
I 'II have a piper to be my good man ; 
And if I get less meat, I shall get game, - 
Doodledy, doodledy, doodledy, dan. 

301. 

PussicAT, wussicat, with a white foot. 
When is your wedding ? for I '11 come to 't. 
The beer 's to brew, the bread 's to bake. 
Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, don't be too late. 

302. 

Ding, dong, darrow. 

The cat and the sparrow ; 

The little dog has burnt his tail. 

And he shall be hang'd to-morrow. 



154 NURSERY RHYMES. 

303. 

Little Dicky Dilver 

Had a wife of silver. 

He took a stick and broke her back, 

And sold her to the miller; 

The miller wouldn't have her, 

So he threw her in the river. 

304. 

To market, to market, to buy a fat pig. 
Home again, home again, dancing a jig ; 

Ride to the market to buy a fat hog. 
Home again, home again, jiggety-jog. 

305. 

RuMPTY-iDDiTY, row, row, row, 

If I had a good supper, I could eat it now. 

306. 

(Magotty-pie is given in MS. Lansd. 1033, fol. 2, as a Wiltshire word 
for a magpie. See also "Macbeth," act iii. sc. 4. The same term oc- 
curs in the dictionaries of Hollyband, Cotgrave, and Minsheu.) 

Round about, round about, 

Magotty-pie, 
My father loves good ale, 

And so do T. 



I 




LOVE AND MATRIMONY. 



307. 

As I was going up Pippin-hill, 

Pippin-hill was dirty, 
There I met a pretty miss, 

And she dropt me a curtsey. 



Little miss, pretty miss, 
Blessings light upon you! 

If I had half-a-crown a day, 
I 'd spend it all on you. 



(105) 



156 NURSERY RHYMES. 

308. 

Tommy Trot, a man of law, 
Sold his bed and lay upon straw : 
Sold the straw and slept on grass, 
To buy his wife a looking-glass. 

809. 

" John, come sell thy fiddle, 
And buy thy wife a gown." 

" No, I ni not sell my fiddle. 
For ne'er a wife in town." 

310. 

Up hill and down dale; 
Butter is made in every vale ; 
And if that Nancy Cook 
Is a good girl. 
She shall have a spouse, 
And make butter anon. 
Before her old grandmother 
Grows a young man. 

311. 

Rowley Foley, pudding and pie. 
Kissed the girls and made them cry ; 
When the girls begin to cry, 
Rowley Foley runs away. 



LOVE AND MATRIMONY. 157 

312. 

What care I how black I be, 
Twenty pounds will marry me ; 
If twenty won't, forty shall, 
I am my mother's bouncing girl ! 

313. 

" Where have you been all the day, 

My boy Willy?" 
" I 've been all the day, 
Courting of a lady gay : 
But oh ! she 's too young 
To be taken from her mammy." 

"What work can she do, 

My boy Willy ? 
Can she bake and can she brew, 

My boy Willy ?" 
" She can brew and she can bake. 
And she can make our wedding-cake : 
But oh ! she 's too young 
To be taken from her mammy." 

" What age may she be ? What age may she be ? 

My boy Willy ?" 
" Twice two, twice seven, 
Twice ten, twice eleven : 
But oh, she 's too young 
To be taken from her mammy." 

o 



,158 NURSERY RHYMES. 

314. 

Master I have, and I am his man, 
Gallop a dreary dun ; 
Master I have, and I am his man, 
And I '11 get a wife as fast as I can ; 
With a heighly gaily gamberally, 

Higgledy piggledy, niggledy, niggledy, 

Gallop a dreary dun. 

315. 

A cow and a calf, 

An ox and a half, 
Forty good shillings and three; 

Is that not enough tocher 

For a shoemaker's daughter, 
A bonny lass with a black e'e? 

316. 

As Tommy Snooks and Bessy Brooks 
Were walking out one Sunday, 

Says Tommy Snooks to Bessy Brooks, 
" To-morrow will be Monday." 

317. 

Little Jack Jingle, 

He used to live single; 
But when he got tired of this kind of life. 
He left off being single, and liv'd with his wife. 



LOVE AND MATRIMONY. 159 



318. 

[This is part of a little work called " Authentic Memoirs of the little 
Man and the little Maid, with some interesting particulars of their lives," 
which I suspect is more modern than the following. Walpole printed 
a small broadside containing a different version.] 

There was a little man, 

And he woo'd a little maid, 
And he said, " Little maid, will you w^d, wed, wed, 

I have little more to say, 

Than will you, yea or nay, 
For least said is soonest mended-ded, ded, ded." 

The little maid replied, 

Some say a little sighed, 
" But what shall we have for to eat, eat, eat? 

Will the love that you 're so rich in 

Make a fire in the kitchen ? 
Or the little god of Love turn the spit, spit, spit?" 

319. 

O, the Httle rusty, dusty, rusty miller ! 

I '11 not change my wife for either gold or siller. 

320. 

Did you see my wife, did you see, did you see. 
Did you see my wife looking for me ! 

She wears a straw bonnet, with white ribands 
on it. 
And dimity petticoats over her knee. 



160 



NURSERY RHYMES. 




321. 

Jack Sprat could eat no fat, 
His wife could eat no lean ; 

And so, betwixt them both, you see, 
They lick'd the platter clean. 



322. 

Little Jack Dandy-prat was my first suitor. 
He had a dish and a spoon, and he'd some 

pewter ; 
He 'd linen and woollen, and woollen and linen, 
A little pig in a string cost him five shilling. 



LOVE AND MATRIMONY. 161 

323. 

Curly locks ! curly locks ! wilt thou be mine ? 
Thou shalt not wash dishes, nor yet feed the 

swine ; 
But sit on a cushion and sew^ a fine seam, 
And feed upon strawberries, sugar and cream. 

324. 

Giles Collins he said to his old mother, 
" Mother, come bind up my head ; 

And send to the parson of our parish, 
For to-morrow^ I shall be dead, dead. 
For to-morrow I shall be dead." 

His mother she made him some water-gruel, 
And stirred it round w4th a spoon ; 

Giles Collins he ate up his w^ater-gruel, 
And died before 't w^as noon, noon, 
And died before 't was noon. 

Lady Anna was sitting at her window, 
Mending her night-robe and coif; 

She saw the very prettiest corpse. 
She 'd seen in all her life, life. 
She 'd seen in all her life. 

" What bear ye there, ye six strong men, 

Upon your shoulders so high ?" 
" We bear the body of Giles Collins, 

Who for love of you did die, die. 
Who for love of you did die." 



162 NURSERY RHYMES. 

" Set him down ! set him down !" Lady Anna 
she cried, 
" On the grass that grows so green ; 
To-morrow before the clock strikes ten, 
My body shall lie by his'n, his'n. 
My body shall lie by his'n." 

Lady Anna was buried in the east, 
Giles Collins was buried in the west ; 

There grew a lily from Giles Collins 
That touch'd Lady Anna's breast, breast, 
That touch'd Lady Anna's breast. 

There blew a cold north-easterly wind, 

And cut this lily in twain ; 
Which never there was seen before. 

And it never will again, again, 
And it never will again. 

325. 

On Saturday night, 
Shall be all my care 
To powder my locks 
And curl my hair. 

On Sunday morning 
My love will come in, 
When he will marry me 
With a gold ring. 



LOf E AND MATRIMONY. 163 

326. 
" Little maid, pretty maid, whither goest thou?" 
" Down in the forest to milk my cow." 
" Shall I go with thee ?" " No, not now ; 
When I send for thee, then come thou." 

327. 

Birds of a feather flock together, 

And so will pigs and swine ; 
Rats and mice will have their choice, 

And so will I have mine. 

328. 

[The practice of sowing hempseed on Allhallows Even is often alluded 
to by early writers, and Gay, in his " Pastorals," quotes part of the fol- 
lowing lines as used on that occasion.] 

Hemp-seed I set, 

Hemp-seed I sow. 
The young man that I love. 

Come after me and mow ! 

329. 
Oh ! mother, I shall be married to Mr. Punchinello. 
To Mr. Punch, 
To Mr. Joe, 
To Mr. Nell, 
To Mr. Lo, 
Mr. Punch, Mr. Joe, 
Mr. Nell, Mr. Lo, 
To Mr. Punchinello. 



164 NURSERY RHYMES. 

330. 

Dusty was the coat, 
Dusty was the collar, 
Dusty was the kiss 
Of my charming miller. 
If I had my pockets 
Full of gold and siller, 
I would give it all 
To my charming miller. 
If I had, &c. 

331. 
" Madam, I am come to court you, 
If your favour I can gain." 
" Ah, ah !" said she, " you are a bold fellow. 
If I e'er see your face again !" 

" Madam, I have rings and diamonds, 
Madam, I have houses and land, 
Madam, I have a world of treasure. 
All shall be at your command." 

"I care not for rings and diamonds, 
I care not for houses and lands, 
I care not for a world of treasure. 
So that I have but a handsome man." 

" Madam, you think much of beauty, 
Beauty hasteneth to decay, 
For the fairest of flowers that grow in summer 
Will decay and fade away." 



LOVE AND MATRIMONY. 165 

332. 

[This nursery song may probably commemorate a part of Tom Thumb's 
liistory, extant in a little Danish work, treating of " Swain Tomlijig, a 
man no bigger than a thumb, who would be married to a woman three 
ells and three quarters long." See Mr. Thorns' preface lo " Tom a 
Lincoln," p. xi.] 

I HAD a little husband, 

No bigger than my thumb, 

I put him in a pint pot. 
And there I bid him drum. 

I bought a little horse. 

That galloped up and down ; 

I bridled him, and saddled him. 
And sent him out of town. 

I gave him some garters. 

To garter up his hose. 
And a little handkerchief. 

To wipe his pretty nose. 

333. 

Can you make me a cambric shirt. 
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme ; 

Without any seam or needlework ? 

And you shall be a true lover of mine. 

Can you wash it in yonder well. 

Parsley, &c. 
Where never sprung water, nor rain ever fell ? 

And you, &c. 



166 NURSERY RHYMES. 

Can you dry it on yonder thorn, 

Parsley, &c. 
Which never bore blossom since Adam was born ? ^ 

And you, &c. 

Now you have ask'd me questions three, 

Parsley, &c. 
I hope you '11 answer as many for me, 

And you, &c. 

Can you find me an acre of land, 

Parsley, &c. 
Between the salt water and the sea sand? 

And you, &c. 

Can you plough it with a ram's horn, 

Parsley, &c. 
And sow it all over with one pepper-corn? 

And you, &c. 

Can you reap it with a sickle of leather, 

Parsley, &c. 
And bind it up with a peacock's feather? 

And you, &c. 

When you have done and finish'd your work. 

Parsley, &c. 
Then come to me for your cambric shirt, 

And you, &c. 



LOVE AND MATRIMONY. 167 

334. 

Little Tom Dandy 

Was my first suitor, 
He had a spoon and dish, 

And a little pewter. 

335. 

Little John Jiggy Jag, ' 
He rode a penny nag, 

And went to Wigan to woo : 
When he came to a beck, 
He fell and broke his neck, — 

Johnny, how dost thou now ? 

I made him a hat, 
Of my coat-lap, 

And stockings of pearly blue : 
A hat and a feather, 
To keep out cold weather ; 

So, Johnny, how dost thou now ? 

336. 

Jack and Jill went up the hill, 

To fetch a pail of water ; 
Jack fell down, and broke his crown. 

And Jill came tumbling a'ter. 



168 NURSERY RHYMES. 



337. 

[The following version is taken from Donee's MS. additions to Ritson, 
but the more common one commences " When I was a bachelor I lived 
by myself."] 

There was a little pretty lad, 

And he lived by himself, 
And all the meat he got 

He put upon a shelf. 

The rats and the mice 

Did lead him such a life, 
That he went to Ireland 

To get himself a wife. 

The lanes they were so broad, 

And the fields they were so narrow. 

He couldn't get his wife home 
Without a wheelbarrow. 

The wheelbarrow broke, 

My wife she got a kick, 
The deuce take the wheelbarrow. 

That spared my wife's neck. 







NATURAL HISTORY. 



338. 

The cuckoo's a fine birH, 

He sings as he flies; 
He brings us good tidings, 

He tells us no lies. 

He sucks little birds' eggs, 
To make his voice clear; 

And when he sings " cuckoo I" 
The summer is near. 

T, (169) 



170 NURSERY RHYMES. 

339. 

The cat sat asleep by the side of the fire, 
The mistress snored loud as a pig : 

Jack took up his fiddle, by Jenny's desire, 
And struck up a bit of a jig. 

340. 

I HAD a little hobby-horse, and it was well shod, 
It carried me to the mill-door, trod, trod, trod ; 
When I got there I gave a great shout, 
Down came the hobby-horse, and I cried out. 
Fie upon the miller, he was a great beast. 
He would not come to my house, I made a little 

feast, 
I had but little, but I would give him some, 
For playing of his bag-pipes and beating his 

drum. 

341 

I HAD a little dog, and his name was Blue Bell, 

I gave him some work, and he did it very well ; 

I sent him up-stairs to pick up a pin. 

He stepped in the coal-scuttle up to the chin ; 

I sent him to the garden to pick some sake. 

He tumbled down and fell in a rage ; 

I sent him to the cellar, to draw a pot of beer, 

He came up again and said there was none there. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 171 

342. 

[The snail scoops out hollows, little rotund chambers, in limestone, 
for its residence. This habit of the animal is so important in its effects, 
as to have attracted the attention of geologists, and Dr. Buckland al- 
luded to it at the meeting of the British Association in 1841. See Cham- 
bers' " Popular Rhymes," p. 43. The following rhyme is a boy's in- 
vocation to the snail to come out of such holes.] 

Snail, snail, come out of your hole, 

Or else I will beat you as black as a coal. 

343. 

Sneel, snaul. 
Robbers are coming to pull down your wall ; 

Sneel, snaul. 

Put out your horn. 
Robbers are coming to steal your corn. 
Coming at four o'clock in the morn. 

344. 

Some little mice sat in a barn to spin ; 
Pussy came by, and she popped her head in ; 
" Shall I come in, and cut your threads off?" 
" Oh ! no, kind sir, you will snap our heads off." 

345. 

Burnie bee, burnie bee, 

Tell me when your wedding be ? 

If it be to-morrow day, 

Take your wings and fly away. 



172 NURSERY RHYMES. 

346. 

The sow came in with the saddle, 

The httle pig rock'd the cradle, 

The dish jump'd over the table, 

To see the pot with the ladle. 

The broom behind the butt 

Call'd the dish-clout a nasty slut : 
Odds-bobs, says the gridiron, can't you agree ? 
I 'm the head constable, — come along with me. 

347. 

" What do they call you ?" 

" Patchy Dolly." 

" Where were you born ?" 

" In the cow's born." 

" Where were you bred ?" 

" In the cow's head." 

"Where will you die?" 

" In the cow's eye." 

348. 

As I went over the water, 
The water WTnt over with me. 
I saw two little blackbirds sitting on a tree : 
The one called me a rascal. 
The other called me a thief; 
I took up my little black stick, and knocked 
out all their teeth. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 173 

349 

Four and twenty tailors went to kill a snail, 
The best man among them durst not touch her 

tail; 
She put out her horns like a little Kyloe cow, 
Run, tailors, run, or she '11 kill you all e'en now. 

350. 

[A Dorsetshire version.] 

'T WAS the twenty-ninth of May, 't was a holiday, 
Four and twenty tailors set out to hunt a snail ; 
The snail put forth his horns, and roared like 

a bull, 
Away ran the tailors, and catch the snail who 

wull. 

851. 

Gray goose and gander. 

Waft your wings together ; 
And carry the good king's daughter 

Over the one strand river. 

352. 

Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, where have you been ? 
1 've been up to London to look at the queen. 
Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what did you there ? 
I frighten'd a little mouse under the chair. 



174 NURSERY RHYMES. 

353. 
I HAD a little dog, and they called him Buff; 
I sent him to the shop for a hap'orth of snuff; 
But he lost the bag, and spilFd the snuff, 
So take that cuff, and that 's enough. 

354. 

All of a row, 
Bend the bow, 
Shot at a pigeon. 
And killed a crow. 

355. 
The cock doth crow 
To let you know, 
If you be wise, 
'Tis time to rise. 

356. 

There was an owl lived in an oak, 
Wisky, wasky, weedle ; ; 

And every word he ever spoke 
Was fiddle, faddle, feedle. 

i 

A gunner chanced to come that way, j 

Whisky, whasky, wheedle ; i 

Says he, " I '11 shoot you, silly bird," 
Fiddle, faddle, feedle. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 175 

357. 

A PIE sate on a pear tree, 
A pie sate on a pear tree, 
A pie sate on a pear tree, 
Heigh O, heigrO, heigh O! 
Once so merrily hopp'd she, 
Twice so merrily hopp'd she, 
Thrice so merrily hopp'd she, 
Heigh O, heigh O, heigh O ! 

358. 

Catch him, crow ! carry him, kite ! 
Take him away till the apples are ripe ; 
When they are ripe and ready to fall, 

C Tommy ) 
Home comes | Johnny > apples and all. 

( Baby ) 

359. 

[An ancient cuckoo song still sung in Suffolk.] 

Cuckoo, Cuckoo, 

What do you do ? 
In April In May 

I open my bill ; I sing night and day ; 

In June In July 

I change my tune ; Away I fly ; 

In August 

Away I must. 



176 NURSERY RHYMES. 

360. 

" Robert Barnes, fellow fine, 

Can you shoe this horse of mine ?" 

" Yes, good sir, that I can. 

As well as any other man : 

There 's a nail, and there 's a prod. 

And now, good sir, your horse is shod." 

361. 

[Ancient Suffolk song for a bad singer.] 

There was an old crow 

Sat upon a clod : 
There 's an end of my song, 



362. 

Dickery, dickery, dare. 

The pig flew up in the air ; 

The man in brown soon brought him down, 

Dickery, dickery, dare. 

363. 

Hickety, pickety, my black hen, 
She lays eggs for gentlemen ; 
Gentlemen come every day 
To see what my black hen doth lay. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 177 

364. 

Little Robin Red-breast 

Sat upon a rail : 
Niddle naddle went his head, 

Wiggle waggle went his tail. 

365. 

Little Robin Red-breast, 

Sat upon a birdie ; 
With a pair of speckle legs. 

And a green girdle. 

366. 

Johnny Armstrong kilPd a calf, 
Peter Henderson got the half; 
Willy Wilkinson got the head, 
Ring the bell, the calf is dead ! 

367. 

Hie hie, says Anthony, 
Puss in the pantry 
Gnawing, gnawing 
A mutton mutton-bone ; 
See how she fumbles it. 
See how she mumbles it, 
See how she tosses 
The mutton mutton-bone. 



178 NURSERY RHYMES. 

368. 
A long-tail'd pig, or a short-taiPd pig, 
Or a pig without e'er a tail, 
• A sow-pig, or a boar-pig, 
Or a pig with a curly tail. 

369. 
Once I saw a little bird 
Come hop, hop, hop ; 
So I cried, little bird, 
Will you stop, stop, stop ? 
And was going to the window 
To say, how do you do ? 
But he shook his little tail, 
And far away he flew. , 

370. 

[The following stanza is of very considerable antiquity and is common 
in Yorkshire. See Hunter's " Hallamshire Glossary," p. 56.] 

Lady-cow, lady-cow, fly thy way home. 
Thy house is on fire, thy children all gone, 
All but one that ligs under a stone, 
Ply thee home, lady-cow, ere it be gone. 

371. 
Riddle me, riddle me, ree, 
A hawk sate upon a tree ; 
And he says to himself, says he, 
La ! what a fine bird I be I 



NATURAL HISTORY. 179 

372. 

Pussy-cat Mole, 

Jump'd over a coal, 

And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole. 
Poor pussy 's weeping, she '11 have no more milk, 
Until her best petticoat 's mended with silk. 

373. 

As I went to Bonner, 

I met a pig 

Without a wig. 
Upon my w^ord and honour. 

374. 

There was a piper, he M a cow. 
And he 'd no hay to give her ; 
He took his pipes and played a tune, 
Consider, old cow, consider ! 

The cow considered very well, 
For she gave the piper a penny, 
That he might play the tune again, 
Of corn rigs are bonnie ! 

375. 

There was a little one-eyed gunner. 

Who kilPd all the birds that died last summer. 



180 NURSERY RHYMES. 

376. 

As titty mouse sat in the witty to spin, 
Pussy came to her and bid her good ev'n, 
" Oh, what are you doing, my little 'oman ?" 
" A spinning a doublet for my gude man !" 
" Then shall I come to thee and wind up thy 

thread ?" 
" Oh no, Mrs. Puss, you '11 bite off my head.'' 

377. 

Shoe the colt, 

Shoe the colt, 
Shoe the wild mare ; 

Here a nail. 

There a nail, 
Yet she goes bare. 

378. 

Betty Pringle had a little pig. 
Not very little and not very big. 
When he was alive he lived in clover, 
But now he 's dead, and that 's all over. 
So Billy Pringle he laid down and cried, 
And Betty Pringle she laid down and died ; 
So there was an end of one, two, and three : 
Billy Pringle he, 
Betty Pringle she. 
And the piggy wiggy. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 181 



PiTTY Patty Polt, 
Shoe the wild colt ; 

Here a nail, 

And there a nail, 
Pitty, Patty, Polt. 

380. 
How d' 'e dogs, how ? whose dog art thou ? 
Little Tom Tinker's dog I what 's that to thou? 
Hiss ! bow, a wow, wow I 

381. 

[The following song is given in Whiter's " Specimen for a Cnmmen- 
ttiry on Shakspeare," 8vo., Lon. 1794, p. 19, as common in Cambridgt- 
sliire and Norfolk. Dr. Farmer gives another version as an illustration 
of a ditty of Jacques in " As You Like It," act ii., sc. 5. See Malone's 
Shakspeare, ed, 1821, vol. vi., p. 398; Caldecott's "Specimen," 1819, 
note on " As You Like It," p. 11 ; and Donee's" Illustrations," vol. i., 
p. 279.] 

Dame, what makes your ducks to die ? 

What the pize ails 'em ? what the pize ails 'em ? 

They kick up their heels, and there they lie, 

What the pize ails 'em now ? 

Heigh, ho ! heigh, ho ! 

Dame, what makes your ducks to die ? 

What a pize ails 'em ? what a pize ails 'em ? 

Heigh, ho ! heigh, ho ! 

Dame, what ails your ducks to die ? 

Eating o' poUy-wigs, eating o' poUy-wigs. 

Heigh, ho ! heigh, ho I 



182 NURSERY RHYMES. 

382. 

Jack Sprat's pig, 
He was not very little 
Nor yet very big ; 
He was not very lean, 
He was not very fat; 
He'll do well for a grunt, 
Says little Jack Sprat. 

383. 

[The proverb of Bariiaby Bright is given by Ray and Brand as refer- 
ring to St. Barnabas.] 

Barnaby Bright he was a sharp cur, 

He always would bark if a mouse did but stir ; 

But now he 's grown old, and can no longer 

bark. 
He 's condemn'd by the parson to be hang'd by 

the clerk. 

384. 

Pussy-cat eat the dumplings, the dumplings 
Pussy-cat eat the dumplings. 

Mamma stood by. 

And cried, Oh, fie ! 
Why did you eat the dumplings ? 

385. 

Snail, snail, put out your horns, 

I '11 give you bread and barleycorns. 




ACCUMULATIVE STORIES. 



386. 

I SELL you the key of the king's garden : 
I sell you the string that ties the key, &c. 
I sell you the rat that gnawed the string, &c. 
I sell you the cat that caught the rat, &c. 
I sell you the dog that bit the cat, &c. 

(183) 



184 NURSERY RHYMES. 

387. 

[Traditional pieces are frequently so ancient, that possibility will not 
be outraged by conjecturing the John Eall ot" the following piece to be 
the priest who took so distinguished a part in the rebellion temp, of 
Richard II.] 

John Ball shot them all ; 
John Scott made the shot, 

But John Ball shot them all. 
John Wyming made the priming, 
And John Brammer made the rammer, 
And John Scott made the shot, 

But John Ball shot them all. 
John Block made the stock. 
And John Brammer made the rammer, 
And John Wyming made the priming, 
And John Scott made the shot. 

But John Ball shot them all. 
John Crowder made the powder. 
And John Block made the stock. 
And John Wyming made the priming. 
And John Brammer made the rammer. 
And John Scott made the shot. 

But John Ball shot them all. 
John Puzzle made the muzzle. 
And John Cro^vder made the powder. 
And John Block made the stock, 
And John Wyming made the priming. 
And John Brammer made the rammer. 
And John Scott made the shot. 

But John Ball shot them all. 



ACCUMULATIVE STORIES. 185 

John Clint made the flint, 
And John Puzzle made the muzzle, 
And John Crowder made the powder, 
And John Block made the stock. 
And John Wyming made the priming. 
And John Brammer made the rammer. 
And John Scott made the shot. 
But John Ball shot them all. 

John Patch made the match, 

John Clint made the flint, 

John Puzzle made the muzzle, 

John Crowder made the powder, 

John Block made the stock, 

John Wyming made the priming, 

John Brammer made the rammer, 

John Scott made the shot. 
But John Ball shot them all. 



388. 

1. This is the house that Jack built. 

2. This is the malt 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 

3. This is the rat. 
That ate the malt,- 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 



186 NURSERY RHYMES. 

4. This is the cat, 
That kill'd the rat, 
That ate the malt. 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 



5. Tliis is the dog, 

That worried the cat. 

That kill'd the rat. 

That ate the malt. 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 



This is the cow with the crumpled horn. 

That toss'd the dog, 

That worried the cat. 

That kill'd the rat. 

That ate the malt. 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 



7. This is the maiden all forlorn, 

That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn, 

That toss'd the dog. 

That worried the cat, 

That kill'd the rat, 

That ate the malt, 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 



ACCUMULATIVE STORIES. 



IS-: 



8. This is the man all tatter'd and torn, 
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn, 

That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn, 

That toss'd the dog. 

That worried the cat, 

That kill'd the rat. 

That ate the malt, 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 

9. This is the priest all shaven and shorn, 
That married the man all tatter'd and torn, 
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn, 

That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn, 

That toss'd the dog, 

That worried the cat. 

That kill'd the rat, 

That ate the malt. 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 

10. This is the cock that crow'd in the morn, 
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn, 
That married the man all tatter'd and torn, 
That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn, 

That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn, 

That toss'd the dog, 

That worried the cat. 

That kill'd the rat. 

That ate the malt, 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 



188 NURSERY RHYMES. 

11. This is the farmer sowing his corn, 

That kept the cock that crow'd in the morn, 

That waked the priest all shaven and shorn. 

That married the man all tatter'd and torn, 

That kiss'd the maiden all forlorn. 

That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn, 

That toss'd the dog, 

That worried the cat, 

That kill'd the rat. 

That ate the malt. 

That lay in the house that Jack built. 



389. 

[The original of " The house that Jack built" is presumed to be a 
hymn in Sepher Haggadah, fol. 23, a translation of which is here gi^-en. 
The historical interpretation was first given by P. N. Leberecht, at 
Leipsicj in 1731, and is printed in the " Christian Reformer," vol. xviL 
p. 28. The original is in the Chaldee language, and it may be men- 
tioned that a very fine Hebrew manuscript of the fable, with illumi- 
nations, is in the possession of George Offor, Esq. of Hackney.] 

1. A kid, a kid, my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 



2. Then came the cat, and ate the kid 
That my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 



ACCUMULATIVE STORIES. 189 

3. Then came the dog, and bit the cat, 
That ate the kid. 

That my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 

4. Then came the staff, and beat the dog, 
That bit the cat. 

That ate the kid, 
That my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 

5. Then came the fire, and burned th^ staff. 
That beat the dog. 

That bit the cat. 
That ate the kid, 
That my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 

6. Then came the luater, and quenched the fire 
That burned the staff, 

That beat the dog, 
That bit the cat, 
That ate the kid, 
That my father bought. 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 



190 NURSERY RHYMES. 

7: Then came the ox, and drank the water, 
That quenched the fire, 

That burned the staff, ; 

That beat the dog, t 

That bit the cat, ' 

That ate the kid, 

That my father bought A 

For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 

8. Then came the butcher, and slew the ox. 
That drank the water. 

That quenched the fire, 
That Iburned the staff. 
That beat the dog. 
That bit the cat. 
That ate the kid. 
That my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 

9. Then came the angel of death, and killed the 

butcher. 
That slew the ox, 
That drank the water, 
That quenched the fire. 
That burned the staff. 
That beat the dog, 
That bit the cat, 



ACCUMULATIVE STORIES. 191 

That ate the kid, 
That my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 

10. Then came the Holy One, blessed be He ! 
And killed the angel of death, 
That killed the butcher, 
That slew the ox, 
That drank the water, 
That quenched the fire, 
That burned the staff, 
That beat the dog. 
That bit the cat, 
That ate the kid. 
That my father bought 
For two pieces of money : 

A kid, a kid. 



The following is the interpretation : 

1. The kid, which was one of the pure animals, denotes the Hebrews. 
The father by whom it was purchased, is Jehovah, who represents 

tiimself as sustaining this relation to the Hebrew nation. The two 
pieces of money signify Moses and Aaron, through whose mediation the 
Hebrews were brought out of Egypt. 

2. The cat denotes the Assyrians, by whom the ten tribes were car- 
ried into captivity. 

3. The dog is symbolical of the Babylonians. 

4. The staff signifies the Persians. 

5. The fire indicates the Grecian empire under Alexander the Great. 

6. The water betokens the Roman, or the fourth of the great monar- 
hies to whose dominions the Jews were subjected. 

7. The ox is a symbol of the Saracens, who subdued Palestine, and 
>TOUght it under the caliphate. 



192 jgURSERY RHYMES. 

8. The butcher that killed the ox denotes the crusaders, by whom the 
Holy Land was wrested out of the hands of the Saracens. 

9. The angel of death signifies the Turkish power, by which tlie land 
of Palestine was taken from the Franks, aiid to which it is still subject. 

10. The commencement of the tenth stanza is designed to show that 
God will take signal vengeance on the Turks, immediately after whose 
overthrow the Jews are to be restored to their own land, and live 
under the government of their long-expected Messiah. 

390. 

" An old woman was sweeping her house, 
and she found a little crooked sixpence. ' What,' 
said she, ' shall I do with this little sixpence ? 
I will go to market, and buy a little pig.' 
As she w^as coming home, she came to a stile ; 
the piggy would not go over the stile. 

" She went a little further, and she met a 
dog. So she said to the dog, ' Dog ! bite pig ; 
piggy won't go over the stil ; and I shan't get 
home to ni^ht.' But the doer would not. 

" She WTnt a little further, and she met a 
stick. So she said, * Stick ! stick ! beat dog ; 
dog won't bite pig ; piggy won't get over the 
stile ; and I shan't get home to night.' But 
the stick w^ould not. 

" She went a little further, and she met a 
fire. So she said, ' Fire ! fire I burn stick ; stick 
won't beat dog ; dog won't bite pig,' {a?id so 
forth, alvmys repeating the foregoing words.) 
But the fire would not. 



ACCUMULATIVE STORIES. 193 

" She went a little further ; and she met 
some water. So she said, ' Water ! water I 
quench fire ; fire won't burn stick.' But the 
water would not. 

" She went a Httle further, and she met an 
ox. So she said, ' Ox ! ox ! drink water ; wa- 
ter won't quench fire,' &c. But the ox would 
not. 

" She went a little further, and she met a 
butcher. So she said, ' Butcher ! butcher ! kill 
ox ; ox won't drink water,' &c. But the butcher 
would not. 

" She went a little further, and she met a 
rope. So she said, ' Rope I rope ! hang butcher; 
butcher won't kill ox,' &c. But the rope would 
not. 

" She went a little further, and she met a rat. 
So she said, ' Rat ! rat ! gnaw rope ; rope won't 
hang butcher,' &c. But the rat would not. 

" She went a little further, and she met a 
cat. So she said, ' Cat ! cat !' kill rat ; rat won't 
gnaw rope,' &c. But the cat said to her, ' If 
you will go to yonder cow, and fetch me a 
saucer of milk, I will kill the rat.' So away 
went the old woman to the cow. 



194 NURSERY RHYMES. 

" But the cow said to her, ' If you will go to 
yonder haystack,* and fetch me a handful of 
hay, I '11 give you the milk.' So away went 
the old woman to the haystack ; and she brought 
the hay to the cow. 

" As soon as the cow had eaten the hay, she 
gave the old woman the milk ; and away she 
WTnt with it in a saucer to the cat. 

" As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk, 
the cat began to kill the rat ; the rat began to 
gnaw the rope ; the rope began to hang the 
butcher ; the butcher began to kill the ox ; the 
ox began to drink the water ; the water began 
to quench the fire ; the fire began to burn the 
stick ; the stick began to beat the dog ; the 
dog began to bite the pig ; the little pig in a 
fright jumped over the stile ; and so the old 
woman got home that night." 



* Or haymakers, proceeding thus in the stead of the rest of this para- 
graph : — '■ and fetch me a wisp of hay, I '11 give you the milk? — So away 
the old woman went, but the haymakers said to her, — If you will go to 
yonder stream, and fetch us a bucket of water, we'll give you the hay. 
So away the old woman went, but when she got to the stream, she found 
the bucket was full of holes. So she covered the bottom with pebbles, 
and then filled the bucket with water, and away she went back with 
it to the haymakers ; and they gave her a wisp of hay." 




LOCAL. 



391. 

There was a little nobby colt, 
His name was Nobby Gray ; 
His head was made of pouce straw, 
His tail was made of hay ; 

He could ramble, he could trot, 
He could carry a mustard-pot. 
Round the town of Woodstock. 
Hey, Jenny, hey I 

(195) 



196 NURSERY RHYMES. 

392. 

Driddlety drum, driddlety drum, 
There you see the beggars are come; 
Some are here and some are there, 
And some are gone to Chidley fair. 

393. 

My father and mother. 
My uncle and aunt, 
Be all gone to Norton, 
But httle Jack and I. 

A little bit of powdered beef. 
And a great net of cabbage, 
The best meal I have had to-day 
Is a good bowl of porridge. 

394. 

I LOST my mare in Lincoln lane. 
And could'nt tell where to find her. 

Till she came home both lame and blind. 
With never a tail behind her. 

395. 

Cripple Dick upon a stick. 

And Sandy on a sow. 
Riding away to Galloway, 

To buy a pound o'woo. 



LOCAL RHYMES. 197 

396. 

At Brill on the Hill, 
The wind blows shrill, 

The cook no meat can dress ; 
At Stow in the Wold 
The wind blows cold, — 

I know no more than this. 

397. 

A MAN went a hunting at Reigate, 

And wished to leap over a high gate ; 

Says the owner, " Go round. 

With your gun and your hound, 

For you never shall leap over my gate." 

398. 

The little priest of Felton, 

The little priest of Felton, 

He kill'd a mouse within his house, 

And ne'er a one to help him. 

399. 

[The following verses are said by Aubrey to have been in his time 
sung by the girls of Oxfordshire in a sport called Leap Candle, which 
is now obsolete. See Thoms's " Anecdotes and Traditions," p. 96.] 

The tailor of Bicester, 

He has but one eye ; 
He cannot cut a pair of green galagaskins, 

If he were to try. 



198 NURSERY RHYMES. 



400. 



King's Sutton is a pretty town, 

And lies all in a valley ; 
There is a pretty ring of bells, 

Besides a bowling alley : 
Wine and liquor in good store, 

Pretty maidens plenty ; 
Can a man desire more? 

There ain't such a town in twenty. 

401. 

Dick and Tom, Will and John 
Brought me from Nottingham. 




RELICS. 



402. 



The girl in the lane, that couldn't speak plain. 

Cried "gobble, gobble, gobble :" 
The man on the hill, that couldn't stand still, 

Went hobble hobble, hobble. 



403. 

GoosY goosy gander. 
Who stands yonder ? 
Little Betty Baker ; 
Take her up, and shake her 



(199) 



200 NURSERY RHYMES. 

404. 

Goosey goosey gander, 

Where shall I wander ? 
Up stairs, down stairs. 

And in my lady's chamber ; 
There I met an old man 

That would not say his prayers; 
I took him by the left leg, 

And threw him down stairs. 

405. 

Baby and I 

Were baked in a pie. 
The gravy was wonderful hot : 

We had nothing to pay 

To the baker that day. 
And so we crept out of the pot. 

406. 

What are little boys made of, made of, 

What are httle boys made of? 

Snaps and snails, and puppy-dog's tails ; 

And that 's what Uttle boys are made of, made of. 

What are little girls made of, made of, made of, 

What are little girls made of? 

Sugar and spice, and all that 's nice ; 

And that 's what little girls are made of, made of. 



RELICS. 201 

407. 
Blow, wind, blow ! and go, mill, go ! 
That the miller may grind his corn ; 
That the baker may take it. 
And into rolls make it. 
And send us some hot in the morn. 

408. 
When Jacky 's a very good boy, 

He shall have cakes and a custard ; 
But when he does nothing but cry. 

He shall have nothing but mustard. 

409. 
The Quaker's wufe got up to bake. 

Her children all about her. 
She gave them every one a cake. 

And the miller wants his moulter. 

410. 
Who comes here ? 

A grenadier. 
What do you want ? 

A pot of beer. 
Where 's your money ? 

I 've forgot. 
Get you gone. 

You drunken sot ! 



202 NURSERY RHYMES. 

411. 

The barber shaved the mason, 

As I suppose 

Cut off his nose, 
And popp'd it in the basin. 

412. 

Peg, Peg, with a wooden leg. 

Her father was a miller ; 
He toss'd the dumpling at her head, 

And said he could not kill her. 

413. 

Parson Darby wore a black gown. 
And every button cost half-a-crown ; 
From port to port, and toe to toe. 
Turn the ship and away we go! 

414. 

Lin the following, the various parts of the countenance are touched 
as the lines are repeated ; and at the close the chiu is struck playfully, 
that the tongue may be gently bitten.] 

Eye winker, 
Tom Tinker, 

Nose dropper. 
Mouth eater. 
Chin chopper. 

Chin chopper. 



RELICS. 



2C 




41o. 

FEE-faw-fum put on his boots, 

A seven-league pair, which he kept for pursuits ; 

And as he went, he grumbled so grum. 

Fee-faw-fum, fee-fow-fum, 

I smell the blood of an Englishman, 

And whether or no, T will have some. 



4 NURSERY RHYMES. 

416. 

I HAD a little moppet, 

I put it in my pocket, 
And fed it with corn and hay ; 

Then came a proud beggar, 

And swore he would have her, 
And stole little moppet away. 

417. 

Little Tommy Tacket, 

Sits upon his cracket ; 
Half a yard of cloth will make him coat and 
jacket ; 
Make him coat and jacket. 
Breeches to the knee. 
And if you will not have him, you may let hitn 
be. 

418. 

Barber, barber, shave a pig. 
How many hairs w^ill make a wig? 
" Four-and-twenty, that 's enough." 
Give the poor barber a pinch of snuff. 

419. 

I 'll buy you a tartan boni>et. 
And some feathers to put on it. 
Tartan trews and a philHbeg, 
Because you are so like your daddy. 



RELICS. 205 

420. 

The man in the moon drinks claret, 

But he is a dull Jack-a-Dandy ; 
Would he know a sheep's head from a carrot, 

He should learn to drink water so handy. 

421. 

[A marching air.] 

Darby and Joan were dress'd in black. 
Sword and buckle behind their back; 
Foot for foot, and knee for knee, 
Turn about Darby's company. 

422. 

If all the seas were one sea, 
What a great sea that would be ! 
And if all the trees were one tree, 
What a great tree that would be ! 
And if all the axes were one axe. 
What a great axe that would be ! 
And if all the men were one man. 
What a great man he would be ! 
And if the great man took the great axe. 
And cut down the great tree. 
And let it fall into the great sea, 
What a splish splash that would be ! 



206 NURSERY RHYMES. 

423. 

My little old man and I fell out, 
I '11 tell you what 't was all about : 
I had money and he had none, 
And that 's the way the row begun. 

424. 

Around the green gravel the grass grows green, 
And all the pretty maids are plain to be seen ; 
Wash them with milk, and clothe them with silk. 
And write their names with a pen and ink. 

425. 

When I went up sandy hill, 

I met a sandy boy ; 

I cut his throat, I sucked his blood. 

And left his skin a hanging-o. 

426. 

I HAD a little castle upon the sea-side. 

One-half was water, the other was land ; 

I open'd my little castle-door, and guess what I 

found ; 
I found a fair lady with a cup in her hand. 
The cup was gold, filled with wine ; 
Drink, fair lady, and thou shalt be mine ! 



RELICS. 207 

427. 

As I went over the water, 

The water went over me, 
I heard an old woman crying. 

Will you buy some furmity ? 

428. 

Go to bed, Tom ! 
Go to bed, Tom ! 
Drunk or sober. 
Go to bed, Tom ! 

429. 

I HAD a little pony, 

His name was Dapple-Gray, 
I lent him to a lady. 

To ride a mile away ; 
She whipped him, she slashed him, 

She rode him through the mire ; 
I would not lend my poney now 

For all the lady's hire. 

430. 

Old Father Graybeard, 

Without tooth or tongue ; 
If you '11 give me your finger, 

I '11 give you my thumb. 



208 NURSERY RHYME5?. 



431. 



Bah, bah, black sheep, 

Have you any wool ? 
Yes, marry, have I, 

Three bags full : 
One for my master, 

And one for my dame, 
But none for the little boy 

Who cries in the lane. 

432. 

Rov^STY dowt, my fire 's all out, 

My little dame is not at home ! 

I '11 saddle my duck, and bridle my hen, 

And fetch my little dame home again ! 

Home she came, tritty -trot. 

She asked for the porridge she left in the pot ; 

Some she ate and some she shod. 

And some she gave to the truckler's dog ; 

She took up the ladle and knocked its head, 

And now poor Dapsy dog is dead ! 

433. 

Wash hands, wash, 

Pussey's gone to plough ; 
If you want your hands washed, 

Have them washed now. 



RELICS. 



209 




434. 

In Arthur's court Tom Thumb did live,* 

A man of mickle might ; 
The best of all the table round, 

And eke a doughty knight. 

His stature but an inch in height. 

Or quarter of a span : 
Then think you not this little knight 

Was proved a valiant man ? 



210 NURSERY RHYMES. 



435. 



How many days has my baby to play ? 

Saturday, Sunday, Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 

Saturday, Sunday, Monday. 

436. 

Daffy-down-dilly has come up to town, 
In a yellow petticoat, and a green gown. 

437. 

I CAN weave diaper thick, thick, thick, 
And I can weave diaper thin ; 
I can weave diaper out of doors. 
And I can weave diaper in. 

438. 

f 

Little Tom Tucker 
Sings for his supper ; 
What shall he eat? 
White bread and butter. 
How shall he cut it 
Without e'er a knife? 
How will he be married 
Without e'er a wife? 



RELICS. 211 



439. 

Come, let 's to bed, 

Says Sleepy-head ; \ 

Tarry awhile, says Slow : 
Put on the pot, 
Says Greedy-gut, 

Let 's sup before we go. 

440. 

To market, to market, a gallop, a trot, 
To buy some meat to put in the pot ; 
Threepence a quarter, a groat a side, 
If it hadn't been kill'd, it must have died. 

441. 

High diddle doubt, my candle 's out. 
My little maid is not at home: 
Saddle my hog, and bridle my dog, 
And fetch my little maid home. 

442. 

As I was going to sell my eggs, 

I met a man with bandy legs, 

Bandy legs and crooked toes, 

I tripped up his heels and he fell on his nose. 



212 NURSERY RHYMES. 

443. 

Hussy, hussy, where 's your horse ? 
Hussy, hussy, gone to grass ! 
Hussy, hussy, fetch him home, 
Hussy, hussy, let hhn alone. 

444. 

Shake a leg, wag a leg, when will you gang ? 
At midsummer, mother, when the days are lang. 

445. 

Little boy, pretty boy, where was you born ? 
In Lincolnshire, master : come blow the cow's 

horn. 
A half-penny pudding, a penny pie, 
A shoulder of mutton, and that love L 

446. 

Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going ? 

I '11 go with you, if I may. 
I 'm going to the meadow to see them a mowing, 

I 'm going to help them make hay. 

447. 

When I was a Httle boy, I had but little wit. 
It is some time ago, and I 've no more yet ; 
Nor ever ever shall, until that I die, 
For the longer I live, the more fool am I. 



RELICS. 



213 



448. 

We 're all in the clumps, 

For diamonds are trumps ; 
The kittens are gone to St. Paul's! 

The babies are bit, 

The moon's in a fit. 
And the houses are built without walls. 

449. 

Rain, rain, go away, 
Come again another day ; 
Little Arthur wants to play. 

450. 

What 's the news of the day. 
Good neighbour, I pray ? 
They say the balloon 
Is gone up to the moon. 

451. 

[See a similar one to this at p. 204.] 

Little Mary Ester, 

Sat upon a tester, 
Eating of curds and whey ; 

There came a little spider, 

And sat him down beside her. 
And frightened Mary Ester away. 



214 NURSERY RHYMES. 

4o2. 

Leg over leg, 

As the dog went to Dover ; 
When he came to a stile, 

Jump he went over. 

453. 

A LITTLE old man and I fell out ; 
How shall we bring this matter about ? 
Bring it about a^ well as you can, 
Get you gone, you little old man ! 

454. 

Little girl, little girl, where have you been ? 
Gathering roses to give to the queen. 
Little girl, little girl, what gave she you? 
She gave me a diamond as big as my shoe. 

455. 

Hark, hark, 

The dogs do bark, 
Beggars are coming to town ; 

Some in jags, 

Some in rags. 
And some in velvet gowns. 



RELICS. 215 

456. 

Charley Wag, 

Eat the pudding and left the bag. 

457. 

[See part of No. 225.] 

HiNK, minx ! the old witch winks, 

The fat begins to fry : 
There 's nobody at home but jumping Joan, 

Father, mother, and I. 

458. 

Girls and boys, come out to play, 

The moon doth shine as bright as day ; 

Leave your supper, and leave your sleep, 

And come with your playfellows into the street. 

Come with a whoop, come with a call. 

Come with a good will or not at all. 

Up the ladder and down the wall, 

A halfpenny roll will serve us all. 

You find milk, and I '11 find flour. 

And we '11 have a pudding in half an hour. 

459. 

If a body meet a body. 

In a field of fitches ; 
Can a body tell a body 

Where a body itches ? 



216 NURSERY RHYMES. 

460. 

Little boy blue, come blow up your horn, 
The sheep 's in the meadow, the cow 's in the 

corn ; 
Where 's the little boy that looks after the sheep? 
He 's under the haycock fast asleep. 
Will you wake him ? No, not I ; 
For if I do he '11 be sure to cry. 




MISCELLANEOUS. 



461. 
Here sits the Lord Mayor . . forehead. 

Here sits his two men . . eyes. 
Here sits the cock .... right cheek. 

Here sits the hen .... left cheek. 
Here sit the Kttle chickens . . tip of nose. 

Here they run in ... . mouth. 
Chinchopper, chinchopper, 

Chinchopper, chin ! . . . . chuck the chin 

T (217) 



218 NURSERY RHYMES. 

462. 
[A game-rhyme.] 

Trip and go, heave and hoe. 
Up and down, to and fro ; 
From the town to the grove. 
Two and two let us rove, 
A-maying, a-playing ; 
Love hath no gainsaying ; 
So merrily trip and go. 
Merrily trip and go ! 

463. 

[A storm of wind.] 

Arthur O'Bower has broken his band, 
He comes roaring up the land ; 
The King of Scots, with all his power. 
Cannot turn Arthur of the Bower ! 

464. 

[Tobacco.] 

Make three-fourths of a cross. 

And a circle complete ; 
And let two semicircles 

On a perpendicular meet : 
Next add a triangle 

That stands on two feet; 
Next two semicircles, 

And a circle complete. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 21 9 

465. 

[A swarm of bees.] 

As I was going o'er Tipple Tine, 
I met a flock of bonny swine ; 

Some green-lapp'd, 

Some green-back'd ; 
They were the very bonniest swine 
That e'er went over Tipple Tine. 

466. 

[A sunbeam.] 

HicK-A-MORE Hack-a-more, 
Hung on a kitchen-door; 

Nothing so long, 

And nothing so strong. 
As Hick-a-more Hack-a-more 
Hung on the kitchen-door! 

467. 

WHERE are you going, 
My pretty maiden fair, 

With your red rosy cheeks 
And your coal-black hair? — 

1 'm going a-milking — 

Kind sir, says she — 
And it 's dabbling in the dew 
Where you '11 find me ! 



220 NURSERY RHYMES. 

468. 

[A firebrand, with sparks on it.] 

As I was going o'er London Bridge, 
And peep'd through a nick, 

I saw four-and-twenty ladies 
Riding on a stick ! 



469. 

There was a man and he was mad. 

And he jump'd into a pea-swad ;* 

The pea-swad w^as over-full. 

So he jump'd into a roaring bull ; 

The roaring bull was over-fat. 

So he jump'd into a gentleman's hat ; 

The gentleman's hat was over-fine, 

So he jump'd into a bottle of wine; 

The bottle of wine was over-dear. 

So he jump'd into a bottle of beer ; 

The bottle of beer was over-thick. 

So he jump'd into a club-stick; 

The club-stick was over-narrow, 

So he jump'd into a wheel-barrow ; 

The wheel-barrow began to crack, 

So he jump'd on to a hay-stack ; 

The hay-stack began to blaze. 

So he did nothing but cough and sneeze ! 

* The pod or shell of a pea 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



221 




470. 

[A Christmas custom in Lancashire. The boys dress themselves up 
with ribands, and perform various pantomimes, after which one of 
them, who has a blackened face, a rough skin coat, and a broom in his 
hand, sings as follows.] 

Here come I, 

Little David Doubt ; 
If you don't give me money, 

I '11 sweep you all out. 
Money I want, 

And money I crave ; 
If you don't give me money, 

I '11 sweep you all to the grave ! 

T* 



222 NURSERY RHYMES. 

471. 

[An egg.] 

As I was going over London Bridge, 
I saw something under a hedge ; 
'T was neither fish, flesh, feather nor bone, 
And yet in three weeks it runned alone. 

472. 

RARE Harry Parry, 
When w411 you marry ? 

When apples and pears are ripe. 

1 '11 come to your wedding, 
Without any bidding, 

And dance with your bride all night. 

473. 
HicKUP, snicup, 
Rise up, right up ! 
Three drops in the cup 
Are good for the hiccup. 

474. 
Up at Piccadilly oh I 

The coachman takes his stand. 
And when he meets a pretty girl, 
He takes her by the hand ; 
Whip away for ever oh ! 
Drive away so clever oh! 
All the way to Bristol oh ! 
- He drives her four-in-hand. 



MTSCEIJ.ANEOUS. 223 

475. 

[Hours of sleop.] , 

Nature requires five, 

Custom gives seven, 
Laziness takes nine. 

And Wickedness eleven. 

476. 

[Mind your punctuation.] 

I SAW a peacock with a fiery tail, 

I saw a blazing comet drop down hail, 

I saw a cloud wrapped with ivy round, 

I saw an oak creep upon the ground, 

I saw a pismire swallow up a whale, 

I saw the sea brimful of ale, 

I saw a Venice glass full fifteen feet deep, 

I saw a well full of men's tears that weep, 

I saw red eyes all of a flaming fire, 

I saw a house bigger than the moon and higher, 

I saw the sun at twelve o'clock at night, 

I saw the man that saw this wondrous sight. 

477. 

Little Polly FHnders 

Sate among the cinders. 
Warming her pretty little toes ; 

Her mother came and caught her 

And whipp'd her little daughter 
For spoiling her nice new clothes. 



224 NURSERY RHYMES. 

478. 

If a man who turnips cries, 
Cries not when his father dies, 
It is a proof that he would rather 
Have a turnip than his father. 

479. 

Bow, wow, wow, 

Whose dog art thou? 

Little Tom Tinker's dog. 
Bow, wow, wow. 

480. 

When little Sammy Soapsuds 

Went out to take a ride ; 
In looking over London Bridge 

He fell into the tide. 

His parents never having taught 

Their double S to swim. 
The tide soon got the mastery, 

And made an end of him. 

481. 

One a penny, two a penny, hot cross-buns ; 
If your daughters do not like them, give them 

to your sons. 
But if you should have none of these pretty 

little elves, 
You cannot do better than to eat them yourselves. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



225 




482. 

Young Roger came tapping at Dolly's window, 
Thumpaty, thumpaty, thump ! 

He asked for admittance, she answered him 
" No !" 

Frumpaty, frumpaty, frump ! 

*' No, no, Roger, no ! as you came you may 



Stumpaty, stumpaty, stump I 



226 NURSERY RHYMES. 

483. 

Brave news is come to town, 

Brave news is carried ; 
Brave news is come to town, 

Jemijiy Dawson 's married. 

First he got a porridge-pot, 
Then he bought a ladle ; 

Then he got a wife and child, 
And then he bought a cradle. 

484. 

You shall have an apple, 
You shall have a plum ; 

You shall have a rattle-basket. 
When your dad comes home. 

485. 

[A Star.] 

Higher than a house, higher than a tree ; 
Oh, whatever can that be ? 

486. 

[Snuff.] 

As I look'd out o' my chamber window, 

I heard something fall ; 
I sent my maid to pick it up. 

But she couldn't pick it all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 227 

487. 

Amos, amaSy I love a lass, 

As a cedar tall and slender ; 
Sweet cowslips grace her nominative case, 

And she 's of the feminine gender. 

488. 

When shall we be married, 

My dear Nicholas Wood ? 
We will be married on Monday, 

And will not that be very good? 
What, shall we be married no sooner? 

Why sure the man 's gone wood I* 

What shall we have for our dinner. 

My dear Nicholas Wood? 
We will have bacon and pudding, 

And will not that be very good ? 
What, shall we have nothing more ? 

Why sure the man's gone wood ! 

Who shall w^e have at our wedding, 

My dear Nicholas Wood? 
We will have mammy and daddy, 

And will not that be very good? 
What, shall we have nobody else ? 

Why sure the man 's gone wood ! 



* Mad. This sense of the word has long been obsolete ; and eihi- 
bits, therefore, the antiquity of these lines. 



228 NURSERY RHYMES, 

489. 

Pit, Pat, well-a-day, 
Little Robin flew away , 
Where can little Robin be? 
Gone into the cherry tree. 

490. 

Lavenders blue, dilly, dilly, lavenders green, 
When I am king, dilly, dilly, you shall be queen ; 
Call up your men, dilly, dilly, set them to work, 
Some to the plough, dilly, dilly, some to the cart ; 
Some to make hay, dilly, dilly, some to thresh 

corn, 
Whilst you and I dilly, dilly, keep ourselves warm. 

491. 

[This should be accompanied by a kind of pantomimic dance, in 
which the motions of the body and arms express the process of weav- 
ing ; the motion of the shuttle, &c.] 

Weave the diaper tick-a-tick tick, 

Weave the diaper tick — 

Come this way, come that, 

As close as a mat. 

Athwart and across, up and down, round about, 

And forwards, and backwards, and inside, and 

out ; 
Weave the diaper thick-a- thick thick. 
Weave the diaper thick ! 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



229 




492. 

Tommy kept a chandler's shop. 

Richard went to buy a mop, 

Tommy gave him such a knock, 

That sent him out of his chandler's shop. 



493. 

The Cock. Lock the dairy door. 
Lock the dairy door ! 

The Hen. Chickle, chackle, chee, 
I haven't got the key ! 



230 NURSERY RHYMES. 

494. 

A GOOD child, a good child, 

As I suppose you be, 
Never laughed nor smiled 

At the tickling of your knee. 

495. 

[Imitated from a pigeon.] 

CuRR dhoo, curr dhoo. 
Love me, and I '11 love you ! 

496. 

Where have you been to-day, Billy, my son ? 
Where have you been to-day, my only man? 
I 've been a-wooing, mother ; make my bed soon. 
For I 'm sick at heart, and fain would lay down. 

What have you ate to-day, Billy, my son ? 
What have you ate to-day, my only man ? 
I 've ate an eel-pie, mother ; make my bed soon. 
For I 'm sick at heart, and shall die before noon ! 

497. 

HicKUP, hickup, go away ! - 
Come again another day ; 
Hickup, hickup, w^hen I bake, 
I '11 give to you a butter-cake. 





MISCELLANEOUS. 231 

498. 

Father Short came down the lane, 
Oh ! I 'm obHged to hammer and smite 
From four in the morning till eight at night, 

For a bad master and a worse dame. 

499. 
If wishes were horses, 

Beggars would ride ; 
If turnips were watches, 

I would wear one by my side. 

500. 
A LITTLE boy went into a barn, 

And lay down on some hay ; 
An owl came out, and flew about, 

And the little boy ran away ! 

501. 
Hannah Bantry in the pantry, 

Eating a mutton bone ; 
How^ she gnawed it, how she clawed it, 

When she found she \vas alone ! 

502. 
Old Sir Simon the king, 
And young Sir Simon the 'squire. 
And old Mrs. Hickabout 
Kicked Mrs. Kickabout 
Round about our coal fire ' 



232 NURSKRY RHYMES. 

503. 

RICHARD OF DALTON DALE. 

On New-Year's-day, as I 'yc heard say, 

Richard he mounted his dapple grey ; 

He put on his roast-beef clothes, 

His shoes, his buckles, and his hose. 

Likewise his hat upon his head, 

Stuck all round with ribands red ! 

Thus rode Richard of Dalton Dale 

To the parson's house to court Mrs. Jane. 

Richard he rode across the moor. 

Until he came to the parson's door. 

Where he did knock both loud and fast, 

Till he made the company amazed at last ; 

A trusty servant let him in, • 

His pleasant courtship to begin. 

Richard he strutted about the hall, 

And aloud for Mrs. Jane did call : 

Mrs. Jane came down straightway 

To hear what Richard had got to say ; 

He scraped his leg and kissed his hand, 

I am, said he — don't you understand ? 

Mrs. Jane, I fain would know 

Whether you '11 be my bride or no ! 

Richard, if I 'ra to be your bride. 

Pray what for a living will you provide, 

For I can neither card nor spin. 

Nor e'er in my life could do any such thing? 



MISCELLANEOUS. 233 

Sometimes I reap, sometimes I mow, 

And sometimes I to the market go ; 

With Goodman's hogs, or corn, or hay, 

I addle* my ninepence every day. 

Ninepence a day will never do. 

For I wear silks and satins too; 

Ninepence a day won't keep us with meat, 

Odd zooks ! could you think of a crown a week? 

There is an old house that stands hard by, 

It '11 be all my own when my grandfather die, 

And if you '11 consent to marry me now, 

I '11 feed you as fat as my grandfather's sow. 

Richard's compliments did so delight, 

That the company set up a laugh outright; 

So Richard having no more to say. 

Mounted his keffinf and rode away. 

504. 

Whistle, daughter, w^histle, whistle daughter 

dear ; 
I cannot whistle, mammy, I cannot w^histle 

clear. 
Whistle, daughter, whistle, whistle for a pound ; 
I cannot whistle, mammy, I cannot make a 

sound. 
Whistle, daughter, whistle, whistle for a cradle, 
I cannot whistle, mammy, 'deed I am not able ; 

*Earn. A North country word. + Horse. A Cheshire word. 
U* 



234 NURSERY RHYMES. 

Whistle, daughter, whistle, whistle for a cow, 
I cannot whistle, mammy, 'deed I know not 

how. 
Whistle, daughter, whistle, whistle for a man, 
I cannot whistle, mammy ; whew ! yes, I believe 

I can ! 

505. 

[A Bee.] 

I WENT out in the garden to water my knot,* 
I saw a young lady a riding a trot ; 
With her yellow heels and her gibby hose. 
If you tell me the riddle I '11 give you my nose. 

506. 

Lend me thy mare to ride a mile ? 
She is lamed, leaping over a stile. 
Alack ! and I must keep the fair ! 
I '11 give thee money for thy mare. 
Oh, oh ! say you so ? 
Money will make the mare to go ! 

507. 

St. Thomas's-day is past and gone. 
And Christmas is a-most a-come, 
Maidens arise. 
And make your pies. 
And save poor tailor Bobby some. 

* A garden plat or parterre for flowers. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



235 




508. 

There was a fat man of Bombay, 

Who was smoking one sunshiny day, 

When a bird, called a snipe. 

Flew away with his pipe. 

Which vex'd the fat man of Bombay. 

509. 

This pig went to market. 

Squeak mouse, mouse, mousey ; 

Shoe, shoe, shoe the wild colt. 
And here 's my own doll, Dowsy. 



286 NURSERY RHYMES. 

510. 

THE KEYS OF CANTERBURY. 

Oh, madam, I will give you the keys of Canterbury, 
To set all the bells ringing when we shall be merry, 
If you will but walk abroad with me. 
If you will but walk with me. ^ 

Sir, I '11 not accept of the keys of Canterbury, 
To set all the bells ringing when we shall be merry ; 
Neither will I walk abroad with thee ; 
Neither will I talk with thee I 

Oh, madam, I will give you a fine carved comb. 
To comb out your ringlets when I am from home, 
If you will but walk with me, &c. 
Sir, I '11 not accept, &c. 

Oh, madam, I will give you a pair of shoes of 

cork,* 
One made in London, the other made in York, 
If you will but walk with me, &c. 
Sir, I '11 not accept, &c. 
If you will but walk with me, &c. 
Sir, I '11 not accept, &c. 

Madam, I will give you a sweet silver bell,t 
To ring up your maidens when you are not well, 

* This proves the song was not later than the era of chopincs, or 
high cork shoes. 

t Another proof of antiquity. It must probably have boon written 
before the invention of bell-pulls. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 237 

Oh, ray man John, what can the matter be ? 
I love the lady and the lady loves not me ! 
Neither will she walk abroad with me, 
Neither will she talk with me. 

Oh, master dear, do not despair, 
The lady she shall be, shall be your only dear, 
And she will walk and talk with thee. 
And she will walk with thee ! 

Oh, madam, I will give you the keys of my chest, 
To count my gold and silver when I am gone to 

rest. 
If you will but walk abroad with me, 
If you will but talk with me. 

Oh, sir, I will accept of the keys of your chest. 
To count your gold and silver when you are gone 

to rest. 
And I will walk abroad with thee, 
And I will talk with thee ! 

511. 

PussEY-CAT sits by the fire, 

How did she come there ? 
In walks the little dog. 

Says " Pussey ! are you there ? 
How do you do. Mistress Pussey? 

Mistress Pussey, how d 'ye do ?" 
" I thank you kindly, little dog, 

I fare as well as you !" 



238 NURSERY RHYMES. 

512. 

My dear, do you know 

How a long time ago, 
Two poor little children, 

Whose names I don't know, 
Were stolen away on a fine summer's day, 
And left in a wood, as 1 've heard people say. 

And when it was night, 
So sad was their phght, 

The sun it w^ent down. 
And the moon gave no light ! 
They sobb'd and they sigh'd, and they bitterly 

cried, 
And the poor little things, they lay dow^n and 
died. 

And when they Avere dead. 
The Robins so red 

Brought strawberry leaves. 
And over them spread ; 
And all the day long, 
They sung them this song, 
" Poor babes in the wood ! poor babes in the 

wood ! 
And don't you remember the babes in the wood ?" 




A, B, C, and D 

A, B, C, tumble down D 

About the bush, Willy 

A carrion crow sat on an oak 

A cat came fiddling out of a barn 

A cow and a calf 

A diller, a dollar 

A donkey walks on four legs 

A duck and a drake . 

A good child, a good child 

A kid, a kid, my father bought 

A little boy went into a barn 

A little old man and I fell out 

A- little old man of Derby 

All of a row . 

A long-tail'd pig, or a short-tail'd pig 

A man of words and not of deeds 

A man went a hunting at Reigate 

Amas, anias, I love a lass . 

An old woman was sweeping . 

A pie sat on a pear-tree 

Apple-pie pudding and pancake 

A pretty little girl in a round-ear'd cap 

A riddle, a riddle, as I suppose . 

Around the green gravel the grass grows green 



Page 28 

23 

82 

64 

152 

158 

59 

57 

114 

230 

188 

231 

214 

101 

174 

178 

55 

197 

227 

192 

175 

28 

70 

87 

20G 



(239; 



240 



INDEX. 



Arthur O'Bower has broken his band 

As I looked out of my chamber window . 

As I was going o'er Tipple Tine 

As I was going along, along, along 

As I was going by Charing Cross 

As I was going over London Bridge 

As I was going to St. Ives 

As I was going o'er Westminster Bridge . 

As I was going up Pippin Hill . 

As I was going up the hill . 

As I was walking o'er Little Moorfields 

As I went over Lincoln Bridge 

As I went over the water 

As I went to Bonner 

As I went through the garden gap 

As round as an apple, as deep as a cup 

As titty mouse sat in the witty to spin 

As Tommy Snooks and Bessy Brooks 

At Brill on the hill 

At the siege of Belle-isle 

A thatcher of Thatch wood went to Thatchet £ 

A swarm of bees in May 

Awa' birds, away 

A was an archer, and shot at a frog 

A was an apple-pie .... 

Baby and I . . . . 

Barnaby Bright he was a sharp cur 

Barber, barber, shave a pig 

Bah, bah, black sheep 

Bat, bat ... 

Bessy Bell and Mary Gray 

Betty Pringle had a little pig . 

Birds of a feather flock together 

Black we are, but much admired 

Blow, wind, blow ; and go, mill, go 

Bounce Buckram, velvet's dear 

Bow, wow, wow .... 

Brave news is come to town 

Bryan O'Lin, and his wife, and wife's mother 



thatching 



218 

226 

219 

74 

19 

220, 222 

88 

87 

155 

74 

78 

86 

172, 207 

179 

89 

87 

180 

158 

197 

17 

97 

54 

68 

25 

26 

200 
182 
204 
208 
121 

29 
180 
163 

90 
201 

56 
224 
226 

45 



INDEX. 



241 



Buff says Baft* to all his men 
Burnie bee, burnie bee 
Buz, quoth the blue fly 
Bye, baby bumpkin 
Bye, baby bunting 
Bye, O my baby ! 

Can you make me a cambric shirt 

Catch him, crow, carry him, kite 

Charley Wag 

Clap hands, clap hands 

Cock a doodle doo ! 

Come dance a jig . 

Come, let 's to bed 

Congeal'd water and Cain's brother 

Cripple Dick upon a stick 

Cross patch .... 

Cry, baby, cry . 

Cuckoo, cherry tree . 

Cuckoo, cuckoo 

Curly locks, curly locks, wilt thou be mine 

Curr dhoo, curr dhoo 

Cushy cow bonny, let down thy milk 

Daffy-down-dilly has come up to town 

Dame, what makes your ducks to die ? 

Dance, little baby, dance up high 

Dance to your daddy 

Dance, Thumbkin, dance 

Danty, baby, diddy . 

Darby and Joan were dressed in black 

Deedle, deedle, dumpling, my son John 

Dibbity, dibbity, dibbity, doe 

Dick and Tom, Will and John 

Dickery, dickery, dare 

Did you see my wife 

Ding, dong, bell 

Ding, dong, darrow 

Doctor Faustus was a good man 

Doctor Foster went to Glo'ster 



Z4r4 INDEX. 




Doodledy, doodledy, doodledy, dan 


153 


Draw a pail of water 


128 


Driddlety drum, driddlety drum 


196 


Dusty was the coat .... 


164 


Eggs, butter, cheese, bread . , 


131 


Eighty-eight wor Kirby feight 


22 


Elizabeth, Elspeth, Betsy, and Bess . 


88 


Every lady in this land 


94 


Eye winker . . . . . 


202 


Father Short came down the lane . 


231 


Fee-faw-fum put on his boots . 


203 


F for fig, I for jig . 


24 


Feedum, fiddledum, fee . . . 


150 


Fiddle-de-dee, fiddle-de-dee 


152 


Flour of England, fruit of Spain 


94 


Formed long ago, yet made to-day 


87 


Four-and-twenty tailors went to kill a snail . 


173 


Gay go up and gay go down 


112 


Giles Collins he said to his old mother 


161 


Gilly Silly Jarter .... 


151 


Girls and boys, come out to play 


215 


Give me a blow, and I '11 beat 'em 


146 


Good horses, bad horses 


124 


Good-morrow to you, father 


131 


Goosey, goosey, gander 


199, 200 


Go to bed first, a golden purse 


56 


Go to bed, Tom . . . . 


207 


Gray goose and gander . « 


173 


Great A, little a . . . . 


24 


Green cheese, yellow laces 


118 


Handy Spandy Jack-a-dandy . ^ 


149 


Hannah Bantry in a pantry . 


231 


Hark, hark 


. 214 


Hemp-seed I set . 


163 


Here comes a poor woman from baby-land 


132 


Here come I .... 


221 


Here sits the Lord Mayor 


217 



INDEX. 



243 



Here we come a piping 

He that would thrive 

Hey ! diddle diddle 

Hey diddle, dinkety, poppety, pet 

Hey ding a ding, what shall I sing 

Hey, dorolot, dorolot ! . 

Hey, my kitten, my kitten . 

Hey, the dusty miller 

Hie, hoc, the carrion crow . 

Hickery, dickery, six and seven 

Hick-a-more, Hack-a-more . 

Hickety, pickety, my black hen 

Hickory, dickory, dock 

Hickup, hickup, go away 

Hickup, snickup 

Hie, hie, says Anthony 

Higgledy, piggledy . 

High diddle ding 

High diddle doubt, my candle's out 

High ding a ding, and ho ding a ding . 

Higher than a house, higher than a tree 

Highly cock, O ! 

Highty, tighty, paradighty clothed in green 

Hink, spink, the puddings clink 

Hinx, minx, the old witch winks 

How d' ye dogs, how 

How many days has my baby to play ? 

How many miles is it to Babylon ? 

Hub a dub dub 

Humpty dumpty sate on a wall 

Hush a bye, a ba lamb 

Hush a bye, baby, on the tree top 

Hush baby, my doll, I pray you don't cry 

Hush, hush, hush, hush 

Hush thee, mybabby 

Hussy, hussy, where 's your horse 

Hyder iddle diddle dell 

I am a gold lock 

I can make diet bread 



244 



INDEX. 



I can weave diaper thick, thick, thick 

If a body meet a body 

If a man who turnips cries . 

If all the seas were one sea 

If all the world was apple-pie 

If I'd as much money as I could spend 

If wishes were horses 

If you love me, pop and fly 

I had a little castle upon the sea-side 

I had a little dog, and his name was Blue Bell 

I had a little dog, and they called him Buft' 

I had a little hobby horse, and it was well shod 

I had a little husband 

I had a little moppet . . . 

I had a little nut tree, nothing would it bear 

I had a little pony 

I have a little sister, they call her peep, peep 

I 'U buy you a tartan bonnet 

I '11 sing you a song . 

I '11 tell you a story 

I lost my mare in Lincoln lane 

I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence . 

In Arthur's court Tom Thumb did live 

In fir tar is 

In marble halls as white as milk 

Jntery, mintery, cutery corn 

I saw a peacock with a fiery tail 

I saw a ship a- sailing 

I sell you the key of the king's garden 

Is John Smith within ? . 

It 's once I courted as pretty a lass . 

I went out in the garden to water my knot 

I went to the toad that lies under the wall 

I went up one pair of stairs 

I won't be my father's Jack 

I would if I could 

Jack and Jill went up the hill 

Jack be nimble .... 

Jack Sprat could eat no fat . 



INDFA'. 



245 



Jack Sprat had a cat . 

Jack Sprat's pig 

Jim and George were two great lords 

John Ball shot them all 

John, come sell thy fiddle 

John Cook had a little grey mare 

Johnny Armstrong kill'd a calf 

Johnny shall have a new bonnet 

King Charles walked and talked 
King's Sutton is a pretty town 



Lady-cow, lady-cow, fly thy way home 
Lavenders blue, dilly, dilly, lavenders green 
Leg over leg .... 
Lend me thy mare to ride a mile 
Let us go to the wood, says this pig 
Little blue Betty lived in a den 
Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep 
Little boy blue, come blow up your horn . 
Little boy, pretty boy, where was you born ? 
Little Dick Dilver .... 
Little General Monk 

Little girl, little girl, where have you been? 
Little Jack Dandiprat was my first suitor 
Little Jack Horner sat in the corner 
Little Jack Jingle 
Little John Jiggy Jag 

Little maid, pretty maid, whither goest thou? 
Little Mary Ester .... 
Little Nancy Etticoat 
Little Polly Flinders 
Little Robin Red-breast 
Little Tee Wee .... 

Little Tom Dandy 
Little Tommy Tacket 
Little Tom Tucker 

Lock the dairy door .... 
London bridge is broken down 
Long legs, crooked thighs 
X* 



246 



INDEX. 



Madam, I am come to court you 

Make three-fourths of a cross 

Master I have, and I am his man 

Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John . 

Miss one, two, and three, could never agree 

Mistress Mary, quite contrary 

Multiplication is vexation 

My dear, do you know 

My father and mother . 

My father he died, but I can't tell you how 

My father he left me, just as he was able 

My father was a Frenchman 

My lady Wind, my lady Wind . 

My little old man and I fell out 



Nature requires five .... 
Needles and pins, needles and pins 
Number number nine, this hoop 's mine 

Of all the gay birds that e'er I did see 

Oh, dear, what can the matter be ? . 

Oh, madam, I will give you the keys of Canterbury 

Oh, mother, I shall be married to Mr. Punchinello 

O that I was where I would be . 

O the little rusty, dusty, rusty miller 

Old Betty Blue 

Old father Graybeard 

Old King Cole 

Old mother Goose 

Old mother Hubbard 

Old mother Pitcher had but one eye 

Old mother Widdle Waddle jumpt out of bed 

Old Sir Simon the king 

Old woman, old woman, shall we go a shearing ? 

Once I saw a little bird . 

On Christmas eve 1 turn'd the spit 

One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns 

On New Year's day, as I 've heard say 

On Saturday night 

One 's none ..... 



INDEX 

One, two 

One, two, three 

One, two, three, four, five 

One misty moisty morning . 

One nioonshiny night 

One-ery, two-ery 

One-ery, two-ery, hickary, hum 

One old Oxford ox opening oysters 

One to make ready 

O rare Harry Parry . 

Over the water, and over the lee 

O where are you going 



Parson Darby wore a black gown 

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man 

Pease -porridge hot, pease-porridge cold 

Pease-pudding hot 

Peg, Peg, with a wooden leg 

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper 

Peter White will ne'er go right 

Pitty Patty Polt 

Pit, Pat, well-a-day 

Please to remember . 

Poor old Robinson Crusoe 

Punch and Judy 

Purple, yellow, red, and green . 

Pussy-cat eat the dumplings 

Pussy-cat sits by the fire 

Pussy-cat Mole .... 

Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, where have you been 

Pussicat, wussicat, with a white foot . 



Queen Anne, Queen Anne, you sit in the sun 

Rain, rain, go away 

Riddle me, riddle me, ree . 

Ride a cock-horse to Banbury-Cross 

Ride a cock-horse to Coventry- Cross 

Ride, baby, ride .... 

Ring me, ring me, ring me, rary 



247 



248 



INDEX. 



Robert Barnes, fellow fine 

Robert Rowley rolled a round roll round 

Robin and Richard were two pretty men 

Robin Hood, Robin Hood 

Robin the Bobbin, the big-bellied Ben 

Rock-a-bye, baby, thy cradle is green 

Round about, round about 

Rowley Foley, pudding and pie 

Rumpty-iddity, row, row, row . 

Rowsty dowt, my fire 's all out 

St. Dunstan, as the story goes . 

St. Swithin's day, if thou dost rain 

St. Thomas's day is past and gone 

See a pin and pick it up 

See-saw, jack a daw 

See-saw, Margery Daw 

See-saw, sack a day 

See-saw, sacradown . 

See, see ! what shall I see ? . . 

Shake a leg, wag a leg, when will you gang ? 

Shoe the colt .... 

Sieve my lady's oatmeal 

Simple Simon met a pieman 

Sing a song of sixpence 

Sing jigmijole, the pudding-bowl 

Sing, sing, what shall I sing ? 

Snail, snail, come out of your hole 

Snail, snail, put out your horns 

Sneel, snaul 

Solomon Grundy 

Some little mice sat in a barn to spin . 

Some up and some down 

Swan swam over the sea 

Tafly was a Welshman, TafTy was a thief 

Tell tale, tit . 

The barber shaved the mason 

The cat sat asleep by the side of the fire 

The cock doth crow . 



INDEX. 



249 



The cuckoo 's a fine bird 

The first day of Christmas . 

The fox and his wife they had a great strife 

The girl in the lane .... 

The king of France, and four thousand men 

The king of France, the king of France 

The king of France went up the hill . 

The king of France with twenty thousand men 

The lion and the unicorn 

The little priest of Felton . 

The man in the moon 

The man in the moon drinks claret 

The man in the wilderness asked me . 

The moon nine days old 

The north wind doth blow 

The Quaker's wife got up to bake . 

The Queen of Hearts 

The rose is red, the grass is green . 

The sow came in with the saddle 

The tailor of Bicester 

The white dove sat on the castle wall . 

There once was a gentleman grand 

There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked 

There was a fat man of Bombay 

There was a frog liv'd in a well 

There was a girl in our towne 

There was a jolly miller 

There was a king and he had three daughters 

There was a king met a king 

There was a lady all skin and bone 

There was a little guinea-pig 

There was a little man 

There was a little nobby colt 

There was a little one-eyed gunner 

There was a little pretty lad 

There was a man in our toone 

There was a man made a thing 

There was a man of Newington 

There was a man who had no eyes 

There was a man and he was mad . 



lile 



250 



INDEX. 



There was a monkey climb'd up a tree 

There was an old crow 

There was an old man .... 

There was an old man who liv'd in a wood 

There was an old man who lived in Middle Row 

There was an old man of Tobago . 

There was an old woman 

There was an old woman, and what do you think 

There was an old woman as I 've heard tell . 

There was an old woman called Nothing- at-all 

There was an old woman had nothing . 

There was an old woman had three sons 

There was an old woman, her name it was Peg 

There was an old woman in Surrey 

There was an old woman of Leeds 

There was an old woman of Norwich 

There was an old woman sat spinning 

There was an old woman toss'd up in a basket 

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe 

There was an owl lived in an oak 

There was a piper, he 'd a cow 

There was a rat for want of stairs 

There were three jovial Welshmen 

There were three sisters in a hall 

There were two birds sat on a stone 

There were two blackbirds . 

They that wash on Monday 

Thirty days hath September 

Thirty white horses upon a red hill 

This is the house that Jack built 

This is the key of the kingdom 

This pig went to market 

Thomas a Tattamus took two T's 

Three blind mice, see how they run 

Three children sliding on the ice 

Three straws on a staft' 

Three wise men of Gotham 

Thumbkin, Thumbkin, broke the barn 

Tiddle liddle lightum 

Tip, top, tower 



INDEX. 

To market, to market . 

To market, to market, a gallop, a trot 

To market, to market, to buy a fat pig 

To market ride the gentlemen 

To make your candles last for a' 

Tom Browne's two little Indian boys 

Tom he was a piper's son 

Tommy kept a chandler's shop 

Tom shall have a new bonnet 

Tom, Tom, the piper's son . 

Tommy Trot, a man of law 

Trip, trap, over the grass 

Trip and go, heave and hoe 

'T was the twenty-ninth of May 

Twelve huntsmen with horns and hounds 

Twelve pairs hanging high . 

Two broken tradesmen . 

Two legs sat upon three legs 

Up hill and down dale . 
Up at Picadilly oh . 

Wash hands, wash 

We are all in the dumps 

Weave the diaper, tick-a-tick tick 

We are three brethren out of Spain 

We make no spare 

What are little boys made of 

What care I how black I be 

What do they call you ? 

What is the rhyme for porringer ? 

What 's the news of the day 

What shoemaker makes shoes without leather 

When a twister a twisting, will twist him a twist 

When good King Arthur ruled this land 

When I was a little boy my mammy kept me in 

When I was a little boy, I had but little wit . 

When I went up Sandy Hill '. 

When Jackey 's a very good boy 

When little Sammy Soapsuds 



251 

145 
211 
154 
118 

53 
116 

72 
229 
146 

47 
156 
125 
218 
173 
133 

93 
120 



158 
222 

208 

213 

228 

126 

16 

200 

157 

172 

20 

213 

92 

97 

14 

58 

212 

206 

201 

224 



252 



INDEX. 



When shall we be married 

When the wind is in the east 

Where have you been to-day, Billy, my son 

Where have yon been all the day . 

Whisknm, whaskum 

Whistle, daughter, whistle . 

Who comes here ? . . . 

Who goes round my house this night 

Who is going round my sheepfold 

Whoop, whoop, and hollow . 

W^illiam and Mary, George and Anne 

Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you going ? 

Wooley Foster has gone to sea 

Young Roger came tapping at Dolly's window 
You shall have an apple