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Full text of "Boswell's Life of Johnson, including Boswell's Journal of a tour of the Hebrides, and Johnson's Diary of A journal into North Wales"

STATE TEACHER'S C L t 
SA.:TA BARBARA, CALiFoRMIA 




JAMES HOSWELL, ESQ. 

From an original sketch by George Langton, Esq. 



Bo SWELL'S 

Life of Johnson 



INCLUDING BOSH'ELVS JOURNAL OF A TOUR TO THE HEBRIDES 
AND JOHNSON'S DIARY OF A JOURNEY INTO NORI H IVALES 



EDITED BY 



GEORGE BIRKBECK HILL, D.C.L. 

PEMBROKE COLLEGE, OXFORD 



IN SIX VOLUMES 

VOLUME VI. 

ADDENDA, INDEX, DICTA PHILOSOPHI. &c. 



BIGELOW, BROWN & CO., Inc. 
NEW YORK 



THE COLONIAL FHESS 
C. H. 8IMOMDS CO., BOSTOX, U. B. A. 



rR 






CONTENTS OF VOL. VI. 



PACB 



Titles of Works Quoted in the Notes . . . vii 

Addenda (Autograph Letters, etc.; xxi 

Index i 

Dicta Philosophi 289 



TITLES OF MANY OF THE WORKS 
OUOTED IN THE NOTES. 



In my notes I have often given but brief references to the authors whom I quote. 
The following list, which is not, however, so complete as I could wish, will, I 
hope, do much towards supplying the deficiency. Most of the poets, and a 
few of the prose writers also, I have not found it needful to include, as my 
references apply equally well to all editions of their works. The date in 
each case shows, not the year of the original publication, but of the edition 
to which I have referred. 

Addison, Joseph, lVor/:s, 6 vols., London, 1862. 
AlKiN, J. and A. L., Miscellaneous Pieces in Prose, 1773. 
Albemarle, Earl of, Memoirs of the Marquis of Rockingham. 2 vols., 

London, 1852. 
Almox, John, Correspondence, etc. of John Wilkes, 5 vols., London, 

1805. 
Arrighi, a., Histoire de Pascal Paoli, 2 torn., Paris, 1843. 
Bacon, Francis, Philosophical Works, edited by Ellis, Spedding, and 

Heath, 7 vols., London, 1857-62; Lzfe and Letters, edited by 

Spedding, Ellis, and Heath, 7 vols., London, 1869-74. 
Bain, Alexander, Life of James Mill, London, 1882. 
Baker, David Erskine. Biographia Dramafica. See Reed, Isaac. 
Barbauld, Anna Letitia, JForks, 2 vols., London, 1825; Lessons for 

Children, London. 1878. 
Barclay, Robert, An Apology, London, 1703. 
Baretti, Joseph, Account of Manners and Customs of Ltaly, 2 vols., 

London, 1769; Journey from Lofidon to Genoa, 4 vols., London, 

1770; Tolondron, London, 1786. 
Barry, James, IVorks, 2 vols.. London. 1809. 
Beattie, James, Life. See Forbes, Sir William. 
Bellamy, George Anne, An Apology for the Life of George Anne 

Bellamy, 5 vols., London, 1786. 
Berry, Miss, Journal and Correspondence, 2, vols., London, 1865. 
Best, Henry Digby, Personal and Literary Memorials, London, 1829. 
Blackie, C, Etymological Geography, London. 1875. 
Blackstone. Sir William, Commentaries, 4 vols., Oxford. 1778. 



viii Titles of many of the 



Blair, Hugh, A Critical Dissertation on the Poems of Osstan, the son 
of Fingal, London, 1765. 

BOLINGBROKE. Lord Viscount, Works, with Life by Dr. Goldsmith, 8 
vols., London, 1809. 

Bookseller of the Last Century, being some account of the Life of John 
Newbery. By Charles Welsh, London, 1885. 

BOSWELL, James, British Essays in favour of the brave Corsicans, 
London, 1769; Correspondence with the Honourable Andrew Ers- 
kiiic and a Journal of a Tour to Corsica, edited by George Birk- 
beck Hill, D.C.L., London, 1879; The Cub at Newmarket, 1762; 
An Elegy on the Death of an Amiable Young Lady, with An Epis- 
tle from Menalcas to Lycidas, 1761 ; The Ilypochondriack, pub- 
lished in the London Magazine, from 1777 to 1783 ; Journal of a 
Tour to Corsica : see above under Correspondence with the Hon. 
Andrew Erskine ; Journal of a Tour /o the Hebrides, first and 
second editions, 1785; third, 1786; fourth, 1807; A Letter to the 
People of Scotland on the Present state of the Nation, Edinburgh, 
1783 ; A Letter to the People of Scotland on the Alarming Attempt 
to infringe the Articles of the Union and introduce a Most Per- 
nicious Innovation by Diminishitig the Number of the Lords of 
Session, London, 1785 ; Letters of James Boswell addressed to the 
Rem. W. J. Temple, London. 1857; Ode to Tragedy, 1661 (1761). 

Boswelliana, The Common-place Book of James Boswell, edited by Rev. 
C. Rogers, L.L.D., London, Grampian Club, 1876. 

Boulter s Monument, Dublin, 1745. 

BowEN, Emanuel, A Complete System of Geography, 2 vols., London, 

1747- 
Brewster, Sir David, Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and Discai'erics 

of Sir Isaac Newton, 2 vols., Edinburgh, i860. 
Bright, John, M.P., Speeches, edited by James E. Thorold Rogers, 

2 vols., London, 1869. 
British Museum MSS., Letters by Johnson to Nichols, Add. MS. 

5159- 
Broome. Herbert, Constitutional Law, London, 1885. 

Browne, Sir Thomas, Works, 4 vols., London, 1836. 

Brydone, Patrick. Tour through Sicily and Malta, 2 vols., London, 
1790. 

Burke, Edmund, Correspondence of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke, 
4 vols., London, 1844. See Payne, E. J., and Prior, Sir James. 

Burnet, Gilbert, Bishop of Salisbury. History of his own Time, 4 vols., 
London, 181 8; Vindication of the authority, &^c. of the Church 
and State of Scotland, Glasgow, 1673. 

Burnet. James (Lord Monboddo), Origin of Languages, 6 vols., Edin- 
burgh, 1773-9-- 



Worl'S quoted in the Notes. ix 

Burnet, Thomas, Sacred Theory of the Earth, 2 vols., London, 1722. 
BURNEY, Dr. Charles, Present State of Music in France and Italy, 

London, 1771 ; Present State of Music in Germany, 2 vols., London, 

1773; Memoirs: see D'Arblay, Madame. 
BuRNEY, Francis, Evelina, 2 vols., London, 1784. Sec D'Arblay, 

Madame. 
Burns, Life of. By James CuRRiE, in Works of Burns, i vol., 1846. 
Burton, John Hill, Life and Correspondence of David Hume, 2 vols., 

Edinburgh, 1846; Reign of Queen Anne, 3 vols., Edinburgh, 1880. 
Butler, Samxi^X, Hudibras, 2 vols., London, 1806. 

Calderwood, Mrs., of Polton, Letters and Journals, Edinburgh, 1884. 
Cambridge Shakespeare. See Shakespeare. 
Camden, William, Remains, London, 1870. 
Campbell, John, Lord, Lives of the Chancellors, 8 vols., London, 1846 ; 

Li7>es of the Chief Justices, 3 vols., London, 1849-57. 
Campbell, Dr. John, Hermippus Redivivus ; or. The Sage's Triumph 

over Old Age and the Grave, London, 1744. 
Campbell, Thomas, Specimens of the British Poets, London, 1845. 
Campbell, Rev. Dr. Thomas, Diary of a Visit to England in 1775 by 

an Irishman, Sydney, 1854; A Philosophical Survey of the South 

of Ireland, 1777. 
Carlyle, Rev. Alexander, D.D., Autobiography, Edinburgh, i860. 
Carlyle, Thomas, French Revolution, 2 vols., London, 1857 ; Ohver 

Cronruiell's Letters and Speeches, 3 vols., London, 1857; Miscel- 
lanies, London, 1872. 
Carstares, Rev. William, .State Papers, Edinburgh, 1774. 
Carte, Thomas, History of the Life of James, Duke of Ormonde, 

3 vols., London, 1735-6. 
Carter, Elizabeth, Memoirs of her Life, by Montagu Pennington, 

2 vols., London, 1816. 
Carter and Talbot Correspondence, 4 vols., London, 1800 
Cavendlsh, H., Debates of the House of Commons, 1 vols., London, 

1841-2. 
Chalmers, Ale.xander, General Biographical Dictionary, 32 vols., 

London, 181 2-1 7; British Essayists, 38 vols., London, 1823. 
Chalmers, George, Life of Ruddiman, London, 1794. 
Chambers, Ephraim, Cyclopcedia, 1 vols., London, 1738. 
Chambers. Dr. Robert, ///i-/<?r)' of the Rebellion in Scotland in 1745, 

1746, Edinburgh, 1827; Traditions of Edinburgh, 1 vols., Edin- 
burgh, 1825. 
Chapone, Mrs. \i(tiXt.r, Letters on the Improriement of the Mifid, with 

the Life of the Author, London, 1806 ; Posthumous Works, 2 V0I5.. 

London, 1807. 
Chappe d'AuteROCHE, Voyage en Sib^rie, 2 torn., Paris, 1768. 



Titles of many of the 



Charlemont, Earl of, Memoirs. See Hardy, Francis. 

Chatham, Earl of, Correspondence, 4 vols., London, 1838. 

Chesterfield, Earl of, Letters to his Son, 4 vols., London, 1774; Mis- 
cellaneous Works, \ vols., London, 1779. 

Cheyne, Dr. Q^or^t, English Malady, or a Treatise of Nervous Dis- 
eases of all Kinds, London, 1733. 

Churchill, Charles, Poems, 2 vols., London, 1766. 

Clarendon, Edward, Earl of. History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars 
in England, 8 vols., Oxford, 1826. 

COCKBURN, Henry Thomas (Lord). Life of Lord Jeffrey, 2 vols., Edin- 
burgh, 1852. 

Collins, Arthur, The Peerage of England, 5 vols., London, 1756. 

COLiNlAN, George, Comedies of Terence, 2 vols., London, 1768 ; Prose on 
Several Occasions, 3 vols., London, 1787. 

COLM.A.N, George, Junior, Random Records, 2 vols., London, 1830. 

Contemplation, London, 1753. 

Conway. Moncure, Thomas Carlyl'e, London, 1881. 

COOKK, William, Memoirs of Charles Macklin, London, 1806. 

CouR TENAY, John, A Poetical Review of the Literary and Moral Char- 
acter of the late S. Johnson, London, 1786. 

COWPER, William, Life. See under SouTHEY. 

CoxE, Rev. William, Memoirs of Sir Robert Walpole, 3 vols., London, 

1798. 

Crabbe, Rev. George, Life and Poetns, 8 vols., London, 1834. 

Cradock, Joseph, Z/Vi-r^r)' Memoirs, 4 vols., London, 1828. 

Croker, Right Hon. John Wilson, Bosiueirs Life of Johnson, i vol. 
8vo., London, 1866; Correspondc7ice attd Diaries, edited by Louis 
J. Jennings, 3 vols., London, 1884. 

Cumberland, Richard, Memoirs, 2 vols., London, 1807. 

Dalrymple, Sir David (Lord Hailes), Remarks on the History of Scot- 
land, Edinburgh, 1773. 

Dalrymple, Sir John, Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland, Edin- 
burgh and London, 177 1-8. 

D'Arblay, yS.^di'Am^, Diary and Letters,'] xoXs,., London, 1842 ; Memoirs 
of Dr. Burncy, 3 vols., London, 1832. 

Davies, Thomas, /Jr^wrt-Z/r Miscellanies, 3 vols., London, 1785; Me- 
moirs of the Life of David Garrick, 2 vols., London, 1781 ; Miscel- 
laneous aftd Eugitive Pieces, 3 vols., London, 1773-4. 

Dean, Rev. Richard, Essay on the Future Life of Brutes, Manchester, 
1767. 

Delany, Dr., Obser7>ations on Siuift, London, 1754. 

De Quincey, Thomas, JVorks, 16 vols., Edinburgh, 1862. 

Dicey, Professor Albert Venn, Lectures introductory to the Study of 
the Law of the Constitution, London, 1885. 



Works quoted in tfie Notes. xl 

Diderot, Denys, CEuvres, Paris, 1821. 

D'ISRAELI, Isaac, Calamities of Authors, 2 vols., London, 1812 ; Curiosi- 
ties of Literature, 6 vols., London, 1834. 

DOBLE, C. E., Thomas Hearne's Remarks atid Collections, vol. i., Oxford, 
1885. 

DODD, Rev. Dr. William, The Convict's Address to his Unhappy Breth- 
ren, 1777. 

DODSLEY, Robert, A Muse in Livery ; or. The Footman s Miscellany, 
London, 1732; Collection of Poems by Se7)eral Hands, 6 vols., 
London, 1758. 

Drummond, William, of Hawthorne-denne, Flowers of Sion, Edin- 
burgh, 1630; Poleino-Middinia,OxioTd, 1691. 

DRYDEN.John, Comedies, Tragedies, and Operas, 2 vols., London, 1701. 

Dumont, Etienne, Recollections of Mirabeau, London, 1835. 

Duppa, R., Diary of a Journey into North Wales in the year \T]\,by 
Samuel fohnson, London, 1816. {Sec ante, vol. v. p. 487.) 

Edinburgh Revieru, Edinburgh, 1755. 

Eldon, Lord Chancellor, Zz/c. See Twiss, Horace. 

Elwall, E., The Grand Question in Religion Considered, London. 

^K\?,M\J^, Adagiorum Chiliades, 1559; Colloquia Familiar ia, z vols., 
Leipsic, 1867. 

Farm and its Inhabitants, with some Account of the Lloyds of Dolobran, 
by Rachel J. Lowe, privately printed, 1883. 

Field, Rev. William, Memoirs of the Re7>. Samuel Parr, LL.D., 2 vols., 
London, 1828. 

Fielding, Henry, Works, 10 vols., London, i8o6. 

Fitzgerald, Percy, The Life of David Gar rick, 2 vols., London, 
1868. 

FiTZMAURlCE, Lord Edmond, Life of William, Earl of Shelburne, 3 
vols., London, 1875. 

Forbes, Sir William, Life of James Peattie, London, 1824. 

FORSTER, John, Historical and Biographical Essays, 2 vols., London, 
1858; Life and Times of Oliver Goldsmith, 2 vols., London, 1871. 

FOSS, Edward, Lives of the Judges of England, 9 vols., London, 1848-64. 

Foundling Hospital for fF//, London, 177 1-3. 

Franklin, Dr. Benjamin, Memoirs, 6 vols., London, 1818. 

Frederick \\ (the Great), of Prussia, QLuvres, 3otom., Berlin, 1846-56. 

Froude, James Anthony, Thomas Carlyle, vols. i. and ii., London, 1882 ; 
vols. iii. and iv., 1885. 

Garden, F. (Lord Gardenston), Miscellanies, Edinburgh, 1792. 

Garrick, David, Private Correspondence, 2 vols.. London, 1831 ; Life: 
see Davies, Thomas ; Fitzgerald, Percy ; and Murphy, Arthur. 

Gibbon, Edward, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, 12 vols., 
London, 1807; Miscellaneous Works, 5 vols., Ix)ndon, 18 14. 



xii Titles of many of the 

Goldsmith, Oliver, History of the Earth and Animated Nature, 8 
vols., London, 1779; Miscellaneous Works, 4 vols., London, 1801 ; 
Works, edited by Cunningham, 4 vols., London, 1854. 

Gray, Thomas, Works, ivith Memoirs of his Life, by the Rev. William 
Mason, 2 vols., London, 1807; Works, edited by the Rev. John 
Mitford, 5 vols., London, 1858 ; Works, edited by Edmund Gosse, 
London, 1884. 

Greville, Charles C. F., Greville Memoirs, edited by Henry Reeve, 
3 vols., London, 1874; second part, 3 vols.. London, 1885. 

Grimm, Baron, Correspondance Litteraire, 1829. 

Hall, Robert, Works, 6 vols., London, 1834. 

Hamilton', Right Hon. William Q^xz.rdi, Parliamentary Logtck,\s>n- 
don, 1808. 

Hamilton, William, of Bangour, Poems, Edinburgh, 1760. 

Hardy, Francis, Memoirs of the Earl of Charlemont, 2 vols., London, 
1812. 

Hargrave, Francis, An Argument in the Case of fatnes Sommersett, 
London, 1772. 

Harwood, Rev. Thomas, History of Lichfield, Gloucester, 1806. 

Hawkesworth, John, Voyages of Discovery in the Southern Hemi- 
sphere, 3 vols., London, 1773. 

Hawkins, Sir John. Life of Samuel Johnson, London, 1787 ; Johnson's 
Works: .yr<r Johnson, Samuel. 

Hawkins, Laetitia Matilda, Memoirs, Anecdotes, &^c., 2 vols., London, 
1824. 

Hayward, Abraham, Mrs. Piozzi's Autobiography, 2 vols., London, 
1861. 

Hazlitt, William, Conversations of Jatnes Northcote, R.A., London, 
1830. 

Hearne, Thomas, Remains, edited by Philip Bliss. 3 vols., London, 
1869; Remarks and Collections, e.6\\.G.6. by C. E. Doble, vol. i., Ox- 
ford. 1885. 

Herodotus, edited by Rev. J. W. Blakesley, 2 vols., London, 1854. 

Hervey, Rev. James, Afeditations, London, 1748. 

Hill, George Birkbeck, Z>r. Johnson: his Friends and his Critics, 
London, 1878; BoswelTs Correspondence ivith the Hon. Andrew 
Erskine, and Journal of a Tour to Corsica, London, 1879. 

WOGG, James, facobite Relics, 2 vols.. Edinburgh. 1819. 

Holcroft. Thomas, Memoirs, 3 vols.. London, 1816. 

Home. Henry. See Kames, Lord. 

Horne, Dr. George. Bishop of Norwich. A Letter to Adam Smith, 
Oxford. 1777 ; Essays and Thoughts on Various Subjects, London, 
1808. 

HoRNF, Rev. John. .SV^- Tooke, Horne. 



Woj'l's quoted iii the Notes. xiii 

HORREBOW, Niels. Natural History of Jcelafui, London, 1758. 

House of Lords, Scotch Appeal Cases, vol. xvii. 

Howell, James, Ept'stolce, London, 1737. 

Howell, T. B. and T. J.. State Trials, 33 vols., London, 1809-1826. 

Hume. David, Essays, 4 vols., London, 1770; History of England, 
8 vols., London, 1802; Prh>ate Correspondence, London, 1820; 
Life : see BURTON, John Hill. 

Husbands, J., A Miscellany of Poems, Oxford, 1731. 

HUTTON, William, History of Derby, London, 1791 ; Life, London, 
1816. 

James, Robert, M.D., Dissertation on Fcoers, London, 1770. 

Jeffrey, Lord, Life. See Cock-BURn. H. J. 

JOHXSOX, Samuel, Annals of Johnson, being an Account of the Life of 
Dr. Samuel Johnson from his Birth to his Ele^'enth Y'ear, London, 
1805; Diary of a Journey into North IValcs: j-<r Duppa, R. ; Dic- 
tionary, first edition, London, 1755 ; fourth edition, London, 1773; 
Abridgment, London, 1766; Letters, published by Hester Lynch 
Piozzi, 2 vols., London, 1788; Life, printed for G. Kearsley, Lon- 
don, 1785; Memoirs of the Life and IVritings of the late Dr. 
Samuel Johnson, printed for J. Walker, London, 1785 ; Prayers 
and Meditations composed by Samuel Johnson, second edition, 
London, 1785; Rasselas, edited by the Rev. W. West, London, 
1869; Works, edited by Sir John Hawkins, 13 vols, (the last two 
vols, by the Rev. Percival Stockdale), London, 1787-9: vol. xi. 
contains a collection of Johnson's Apopihegms ; Works, 9 vols. ; 
Parliamentary Debates, 2 vols, (i I vols, in all), Oxford, 1825. 

Johnsoniana, published by John Murray, London, 1836. 

Johnstone. John. See Parr, Samuel. 

JONF.S, Sir William. See Teignmouth, Lord. 

JONSON, Ben, Works, 7 vols., London, 1756. 

K.-VMES, Lord (Henry Home), Sketches of the History of Man,/^ vols., 
Edinburgh, 1788. 

Kino, Dr. William, Principal of St. Mary Hall, Anecdotes of His Own 
Times, London, 1819. 

Kino, William, Archbishop of Dublin, Essay on the Origin of Evil, 
edited by Bishop Law, 1781. 

Knight, Charles, English Cychpcedia (^Biography), 6 vols., London. 
1856-1858. 

Knox. Rev. Or, Vicesimus, Works, 7 vols., London. 1824. 

L.\MB, Charles, Works, edited by Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd, London, 
1865. 

Landor, Walter Savage, Works, 8 vols., London, 1874. 

Lanc.ion, \\cr\ne.X.,Collection of Anecdotes of Dr. Johnson, ante, '\w. 1-39. 

Law, Bishop Edmund. See Kino, Archbishop. 



xiv Titles of vtany of the 

Lecky, W. E. W,, History of Efigland in the Eighteenth Century,^ 

vols., London, 1878-82. 
Leslie, Charles Robert, R.A., Autobiographical Recollections, London, 

i860. 
Leslie, Charles Robert, R.A., and Tom Taylor, Life and Times of 

Sir Joshua Reynolds, 2 vols., London, 1865. 
Lexiphajies : a Dialogue, hondon, 1767. 
Littleton, Dr. Adam, Lingjtce Latince Liber Dictionarius, London, 

1678 and 1703. 
Locke, John, Works, London, 1824. 
LOCKHART, J. Q., Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., 10 

vols., Edinburgh, 1839. 
LOFFT, Capel, Reports of Cases, London, 1776. 
London and its Environs, Dodsley, 6 vols., London, 1761. 
Lowe, Charles, Prince Bismarck ; an Historical Biography, 1 vols., 

London, 1885. 
Lowndes, William Thomas, Bibliographer s Manual, 4 vols., London, 

1871. 
Macaulay, Rev. Kenneth, History of St. Kilda, London, 1764. 
Macau LAY, Thomas Babington, Critical and Historical Essays, 3 vols., 

London, 1843, and 4 vols., 1874; History of England, 8 vols., 

London, 1874; Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches, London, 

1871 ; Life : see Trevelyan, George Otto. 
Mackenzie, Sir George, Works, Edinburgh, 1716-22. 
Mackenzie, Henry, /.z/i" of John Home, Edinburgh, 1822. 
Mackintosh, Sir James, Memoirs of his Life, 2 vols., London. 

1836. 
Macklin, Charles, Life. See Cooke, William. 
M'^Neill, p., Traneftt and its Surroundings, 2nd ed., Edinburgh and 

Glasgow, 1884. 
Madan, Rev. Martin, Thoughts on Executive Justice, London, 1785. 
Mahon, Lord, See Stanhope, Earl. 
Maine, Sir Henry Sumner, Lectures on Early History of Institutions, 

London, 1875. 
Maittaire, M., Senilia, London, 1742. 
Mandeville, Bernard, Fable of the Bees, 1724. 
Marshall, William, Minutes on Agricidture, London, 1799. 
Martin, M., A Description of the Western Islands, London, 17 16; 

Voyage to St. Kilda, London, 1753. 
Mason,. William, Life of Gray. See Gray, Thomas. 
Maxwell, Rev. Dr. William, Collectanea, ante, ii. 133-154. 
MiCKLE, William Julius, The Lusiad, Oxford, 1778. 
yi\\A.,]2Lm&?,, Histoiy of British India, London, 1840; Life: j^^ Bain, 

Alexander. 



IVorks quoted m the Motes. xV 

Mill, John S>\.wzxX., Autobiography, London, 1873; Principles of Politi- 
cal Economy, 2 vols., London, 1865. 

Afodern Characters from Shakespeare, London, 1778. 

MoNBODDO, Lord. vSV^ Burnet, James. 

Montagu, Mrs. Elizabeth, Essay on the Writings of Shakespear, Lon- 
don, 1769; Letters, \ vols., London, 1810. 

Montague, Lady Mary Wortley, Letters, London, 1769. 

Moore, John, M.D., Journal during a Residence in France, 2 vols., 
London, 1793 ; Life of Smollett, 1797 ; View of Society and Man- 
ners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, 2 vols., London, 1789. 

Moore, Thomas, Life of R. B. Sheridan, 2 vols., London, 1825. 

More, Hannah, Life attd Correspondence, 4 vols., London, 1834. 

Morris, William, ^Encids of Virgil done into English verse, London, 
1876. 

Morrison, Alfred, Catalogue of the Collection of Autograph Letters, 
&^c., formed by Alfred Morrison, edited by A. W. Thibaudeau, 
printed for private circulation, London, 1883. 

M UNK, William, The Roll of the Royal College of Physicians of London, 
3 vols., London, 1878. 

Murphy, Arthur, is".y.j(rt/ ott the Life and Genius of Samuel Johnson, 
London, 1792; Life of David Garrick, Dublin, 1801. 

Murray, John, Guide to Scotland, London, 1867, 1883; Johnsoniana, 
London, 1836. 

Napier, Rev. Alexander, Boswell's Life of Johnson, 5 vols., London, 
1884. 

New Foundling Hospital for Wit, 3 vols., London, 1769. 

Newman, John Henry, History of my Religious Opinions, London, 
1865. 

Newton, Rev. John, An Authentic Narratii'e of some remarkable and 
interest i7tg particulars in the Life of, London, 1792. 

Newton, Thomas, Bishop of Bristol, Works, 3 vols., London, 1782, 

Nichols, John, Literary Aiiecdotes of the Eighteenth Century, 9 vols., 
London, 1812-15; Literary History, 8 vols., London, 1817-58. 

Ninth Report of the Couimissiotiers of the Post-Office, London, 1837. 

NoRTHCOTE, James, Life of Sir Joshua Reynolds, 2 vols., London, 
1 8 19. See Hazlitt, William, for Northcote's Cottversations. 

A'ouvelle Biographic Generate, 46 vols., Paris, 1855-1866. 

O'Leary, Rev. Arthur, Retnarks oti the Rev. Mr. Wesley's Letters, 
Dublin, 1780. 

Orrery, John, fifth Earl of Orrery and Corke, Remarks on the 

Life and Writings of Dr. Swift, London, 1752. 

Orton, Job. Memoirs of Doddridge, Salop, 1766. 

Oxford during the Last Century [by G. Roberson and J. R, Green], 
Oxford, 1859. 



xvi Titles of many oj the 

Paley, Rev. William, D.D.. Principles of Philosophy, London, 1786. 

Parliamcntivy History of ling land, 33 vols., London, 1 806. 

Parr. Samuel, LL.D., Works, %uith Memoir, by John Johnstone, M.D., 

8 vols., London, 1828. See Field, Rev. William. 
Paterson, Daniel, British Itinerary, 2 vols., London. 1800. 
Pattison, Mark, Memoirs, London, 1885. See Pope, Alexander. 
Payne, E. J., Select Works of Burke, 2 vols., Oxford, 1874. 
Pennant, Thomas, Literary Life, London, 1793; Toicr in Scotland, 

London. 1772. 
Penny Cyclopccdia, 27 vols., London, 1833. 

Pepys, Samuel, Diary and Correspondence, 5 vols., London, 1S51. 
Philipps, Erasmus. Diary, published in Notes and Queries, second 

series, x. 443. 
PlLKINGl'ON. James, A View of the Present State of Derbyshire, 2 

vols., Derby, 1789. 
PiNKERTON, John, Voyages, 17 vols., London, 1808-1814. 
PlOZZi, Hester Lynch, Anecdotes of the late Samuel Johnson, fourth 
edition, London, 1786; Autobiography : see under Hayward, 
Abraham; British Synonymy, 2 vols., London, 1794; Journey 
through France, Italy, and Germany, 1 vols., London, 1789. 
Piozzi Letters. See under Johnson. Samuel. 

Pope, Alexander, Works, edited by Rev. W. Elwin and W. J. Court- 
hope, 10 vols., London, 1871-86; Satires and Epistles, edited by 
Mark Pattison, Oxford, 1872. 
Porson, Richard, Tracts and Miscellaneous Criticisms, London, 181 5. 
Priestley, Joseph, Works, 25 vols., London, 1817-31. 
Prior, Sir James, Life of Edmund Burke (Bohn's British Classics), 
London, 1872; Life of Oliver Goldsmith, 2 vols., London, 1837; 
Life of Edmund M alone, London, i860. 
Probationary Odes for the Laureateship, London. 
Psalmanazar, George, Historical and Geographical Description of 

Formosa, London, 1704; Memoirs, London, 1764. 
Radcliffe, John, Some Memoirs of his Life, London, 171 5. 
Ranke, Professor, The Popes of Rome. Translated from the German 

by Sarah Austin, 3 vols., London, 1866. 
Recreations and Studies of a Country Clergyman of the Eighteenth 

Century. See Twining, Rev. Thomas. 
Reed, Isaac, Baker's Biographia Dramatica, 3 vols., London, 1812. 
Reynolds, Sir Joshua, /,//>.- see under Leslie and Northcote; 

Works, 3 vols., London, 1824. 
Richardson, Samuel, Correspondence, 6 vols., London, 1804; One 
hundred and sez'enty-three Letters written for particular Friends 
on the most important occasions, seventh edition, London, no 
date. 



Works quoted in the Notes. xvii 



RiTSON, Joseph, English Songs, 3 vols., London. 1813. 

Robinson, Henry Crabb, Diary, Reminiscences, and Correspondence, 3 

vols., London, 1869. 
Rogers, Samuel, Table Talk, London, 1856. 
Rolliad, The, London, 1795. 

ROMILLV, Sir Samuel, Memoirs of his Life, 3 vols., London, 1840. 
Rose, Hugh James, New General Biographical Dictionary, 12 vols.. 

London, 1 840-1 848. 
RuSKiN, John, Zrr/wr^'j on Architecture and Painting, London, 1854: 

Prceterita, Orpington, 1886. 
SaCHEVERELL, W., An Account of the Isle of Man, with a Voyage to 

I-Columb-Kill, London, 1702. 
Savage, Richard, Works, 2 vols., London, 1777. 
ScoTT, Sir Walter, Life of Swift, London, 1834; Novels, 41 vols., Edin- 

burg, i860; Life : see under Lockhart. 
Selwvn, George, Life and Correspondence. By J. H. Jesse, 4 vols., 

London, 1843. 
Session Papers of Old Bailey Trials for 1758, London. 
Seward, Anna, Elegy on Captain Cook. London, 1781 ; Letters, 6 vols., 

Edinburgh, 181 1. 
Seward, William, Anecdotes of Distinguished Persons, 4 vols., London, 

1798 ; Biographiana, 2 vols., London, 1799. 
Shakespeare, edited by W. G. Clark and W. Aldis Wright, 9 vols., 

Cambridge, 1864-66. 
Shelburne, Earl of. Life. See FiTZMAURiCE, Lord Edmond. 
Shenstone, William, Works, 3 vols., London, 1773. 
Smart, Christopher, Poems on Several Occasions, London, 1752. 
S.mollett, Tobias, History of England, 5 vols., London, 1 800 ; Travels 

through France and Italy, 2 vols., London, 1766. 
SouTHEV, Robert, Life and Correspondence, 6 vols., London, 1849; 

Life and Works of Williajn Cowper, 15 vols., London, 1835 ; Life 

of John Wesley, 2 vols., London, 1846. 
Spence, Rev. Joseph, Anecdotes, London, 1820. 
spiritual Quixote, 3 vols., London, 1773. 
Stanhope, Earl, History of England, 7 vols., London, 1836-1854; 

History of the War of the Succession in Spain, London, 1832-3; 

Life of William Pitt,\ vols., London, 1861. 
Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn, Historical Memorials of Westminster 

Abbey, London, 1868. 
Steele, Sir Richard, Apology for Himself and his Writings, London, 

1714. 
Stephens, Alexander, Memoirs of Home Tooke. 2 vols.. London, 

1813. 
Sterne, Lawrence, Sentimental Journey, 2 vols., London, 1775. 

VI.— 2 



xviii Titles of many of the 

Stewart, Dugald, An Account of the Life and Writings of Thomas 
Reid, Wi/ham Robertson, and Adam Smith, Edinburgh. 1811; 
also Life of Reid, Edinburgh, 1802 ; Life of Robertson, Edinburgh, 
1802. 

Stockdale, Rev. Percival, Memoirs, London, 1809; The Remon- 
strance, London, 1770. 

Story, Thomas, foumal of his Life, 2 vols., Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 

1747- 

Swift, Jonathan, PF^T/^j, 24 vols., London, 1803; Life: see Scott. 
Sir Walter. 

Sydenham, Thomas, Works, London, 1685. 

Taylor, Jeremy, Works, 10 vols., London, 1864. 

Taylor, Tom, Life of Sir Joshua Reynolds. See under Leslie, C. R. 

Teignmouth, Lord, Memoirs of the Life of Sir William Jones, Lon- 
don, 1815. 

Temple, Sir William, Works, 4 vols., London, 1757. 

Thackeray, W. M., English Hionourists, London, 1858. 

Thicknesse, Phillip, ^ Year's Journey through France afid part of 
Spain, 2 vols., Bath and London, 1770. 

TiCKELL, Richard, Epistle frotn the Hon. Charles Fox to the Hon. 
Johti Tcnvnshe?id, 1779. 

TiLLOTSON, John, Sermons preached upon Sez'eral Occasions, London, 

1673. 

TiMMlNS, Samuel, Dr. Johnson in Birmifigham : a Paper read to the 
Archceological Section of the Birmingham aftd Midland histitute, 
Nov. 22, i?,j6,and reprinted from Transactions (12 copies only), 
quarto, pp. viii. 

ToOKE, Home, Diversions of P-urley, London, 1798; Life: see Ste- 
phens, Alexander; A Letter to John Dunning, Esq., London, 1778. 

Tour throttgh the Whole Island of Great Britain, originally begun by 
De Foe, 4 vols., London, 1769. 

Trevelyan, George Otto, Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay, 2 vols., 
London, 1877. 

Twining, Rev. Thomas, Recreations and Studies of a Country Clergy- 
man of the Eighteenth Century, London, 1882. 

Twiss, Horace, Z//> of Lord Chancellor Eldon, 3 vols., London, 1844. 

Tyerman, Rev. Luke, Life of George Whitefeld, 2 vols., London, 
1876-7. 

Victor, Benjamin, Original Letters, London, 1776. 

Voltaire, CEuvres Completes, 66 tom., Paris, 1819-25. 

Walpole, Horace, Jotirnal of the Reig?t of King George III, 2 vols., 
London, 1859; Letters, 9 vols., London, 1861 ; Memoirs of the 
Reign of George II, 3 vols., London, 1846 ; Memoirs of the Reign 
of King George III, 4 vols., London, 1845. 



Wor/cs quoted in the Notes. xix 

Walton, Izaak, Lives, London, 1838. 

Warburton, William, Divine Legation of Moses, 5 vols., London, 

1765. 
Warner, Rebecca, Original Letters, Bath and London, 1817. 
Warner, Rev. Richard, A Tour through the Northern Comities of 

England, Bath, 1802. 
Warton, Dr. Joseph, Essay on Pope, London, vol. i. 1772 ; vol. ii. 1782 ; 

Life : see under WOOLL. 
Warton, Rev. Thomas, Poetical Works, 2 vols., Oxford, 1802, 
Watson, Richard, Bishop of Llandaff, A Letter to the Archbishop of 

Canterbury, London, 1783. 
Wesley, John, Journals, 4 vols., London, 1827; Life: see under 

SOUTHEY. 

Westminster Abbey, with other PoeJiis, 1813. 
Whyte, Samuel, Miscellanea Nova, Dublin, 1800. 
Wilkes, John, Correspondence. See Almon, John. 
Williams, Kvlws., Miscellanies, London, 1766. 
Williams, Sir Charles Hanbury, Odes, London, 1775. 
Windham, William, Right Hon., Diary, London, 1866. 
Wood, Robert, The Ruins of Palmyra, London, 1753; The Ruins of 

Balbec, London, 1757. 
,WooLL, John, D.D., Biographical Memoirs of Dr. Joseph Warton, i 

vol. (vol. ii. never published), London, 1806. 
Wordsworth, William, Works, 6 vols., London, 1857. 
>Vraxall, Sir Nathaniel William, Bart., Historical Metnoirs of My 

Own Time, 1 vols., London, 181 5; also edited by H. B. Wheatley, 

5 vols., London, 1884. 
Young, Arthur, Six Months Tour through the North of Efigland, 4 

vols., London, 1770-1. 



ADDENDA. 

Last .^ummer Messrs. Sotheby and Wilkinson sold some very 
interesting autograph letters written by Johnson to William Stra- 
han, the printer. 

I was fortunate enough to find that the purchasers, with but 
one exception, were mindful of what Boswell so well describes as 
'the general courtesy of literature'," and were ready to place their 
treasures at my service. To one of them, Mr. Frederick Barker, 
of 43, Rowan Road, Brook Green, 1 am still more indebted, for he 
entrusted me not only with the original letters which he had just 
bought, but also with some others that he had previously pos- 
sessed. His Johnsonian collection is one of unusual interest. I 
have moreover to acknowledge my obligations to Mr. Fawcett, of 
14, King Street, Covent Garden : to Messrs. J. Pearson and Co., 
of 46, Pall Mall : to Messrs. Robson and Kerslake, of Coventry 
Street, Haymarket; to Mr. Frank T. Sabin, of 10 and 12, Garrick 
Street, Covent Garden : and to Mr. John Waller, of 2, Artesian 
Road, Westbourne Grove. Those of the letters which are undated, 
I have endeavoured to assign to their proper places by internal 
evidence. The absence of a date is in itself very strong evidence 
that they belong to a comparatively early period (see ««/<?, i. 141, 
«• 2). 

I. 

A letter about a projected Geographical Dictionary by Mr. Bathurst, 
with Bathurst' s Proposal; dated March 22, probably written in 
1753'- 
'Sir, 

' I have inclosed the Scheme which I mentioned yesterday in 
which the work proposed is sufficiently explained. 

^ Ante, iv. 285. 

* In the possession of Mr. Frederick Barker, of 43, Rowan Road, 
Brook Green. 

'The 



xxll Addenda, 

'The Undertaker, Mr. Bathurst, is a Physician of the Univer- 
sity of Cambridge, of about eight years' standing, and will perform 
the work in such a manner as may satisfy the publick. No advice 
of mine will be wanting, but advice will be all that I propose to 
contribute unless it should be thought worth while that I should 
write a preface, which if desired I will do and put my name to it. 
The terms which I am commissioned to offer are these : — 

' I. A guinea and half shall be paid for each sheet of the copy. 

'2. The authour will receive a Guinea and half a week from 
the date of the Contract. 

'3. As it is certain that many books will be necessary, the Authour 
will at the end of the work take the books furnished him in part 
of payment at prime Cost, which will be a considerable reduction 
of the price of the Copy ; or if it seems as you thought yesterday 
no reduction, he will allow out of the last payment fifty pounds for 
the use of the Books and return them. 

' 4. In two months after his first demand of books shall be sup- 
plied, he purposes to write three Sheets a week and to continue 
the same quantity to the end of the work, unless he shall be hin- 
dered by want of Books. He does not however expect to be al- 
ways able to write according to the order of the Alphabet but as 
his Books shall happen to supply him, and therefore cannot send 
any part to the press till the whole is nearly finished. 

' 5. He undertakes as usual the Correction. 

' I am. Sir, Your most humble servant, 

' Sam. Johnson.' 
' March 22nd. 

' To Mr. Strahan.' 

' Proposal. 
' There is nothing more apparently wanting to the English 
Literature, than a Geographical Dictionary, which, though its use 
is almost every day necessary, not only to Men of Study, but of 
Trade or publick employment, yet has been hitherto, not only un- 
performed, but almost unattempted among us. Bohun's Diction- 
ary, the only one which has any pretension to regard, owes that 
pretension only to its bulk ; for it is in all parts contemptibly de- 
fective and is therefore deservedly forgotten. In Collier's Dic- 
tionary, what Geography there is, can scarcely be found among 
the crowd of other subjects, and when it is found, is of no great 
importance. The books of Eachard and Salmon, though useful 

for 



Atttograph Letters, xxiii 

for the ends proposed by them, are too small to be considered as 
anticipations of this work, which is intended to consist of two vol' 
umes of the same size and print with Harris's Dictionary, in which 
will be comprised the following particulars : 

* The situation of every Country with its Provinces and depen- 
dencies according to its present state, and latest observation. 

' The description of all remarkable Cities, Towns, Castles, Fort- 
resses, and places observable for their situation, products or other 
particulars. 

' An account of the considerable Rivers, their Springs, Branches, 
Course, Outlets, how far navigable, the Produce and Qualities of 
their waters. 

' The course of Voyages, giving directions to sailors for navi- 
gating from one place of the World to another, with particular 
attention to the Traffic of these Kingdoms. 

' An account of all the principal Ports and Harbours of the 
known World, in which will be laid down the Pilotage, Bearings, 
depth of water, danger from Sands or Rocks, firmness or uncer- 
tainty of Anchorage, and degree of safety from particular Winds. 

'An exact account of the Commodities of each Country, both 
natural and artificial. 

* A description of the remarkable Animals in every Country, 
whether Beasts, Birds or Fishes. 

' An account of the Buildings, whether ancient or modern, and 
of Ruins or other remains of Antiquity. 

' Remarks upon the soil, air, and waters of particular Places, 
their several qualities and effects, the accidents to which every 
Region is exposed, as Earthquakes and Hurricanes, and the dis- 
eases peculiar to the Inhabitants or incident to strangers at their 
arrival. 

' The political State of the World, the Government of Countries, 
and the Magistracy of Cities, with their particular Laws, or Privileges. 

' The most probable and authentic Calculations of the number 
of Inhabitants of each place. 

' The military state of Countries, their Forces, manner of mak- 
ing War, Weapons, and naval Power. 

' The Commercial State, extent of their Trade, Number and 
strength of their Colonies, quantity of Shipping. 

' The pretensions of Princes with their Alliances, Relations and 
Genealogies. 

' The 



xxiv Adde7ida. 

' The customs of Nations with regard to Trade, and receptions 
of strangers, their domestic Customs, as Rites of Marriage and 
Burial. Their particular Laws. Their habits, recreations and 
amusements. 

' The religious Opinions of all Nations. 

' These and many other heads of observation will be collected, 
not merely from the Dictionaries now extant in many Languages, 
but from the best Surveys, Local Histories, Voyages, and particu- 
lar accounts*, among which care will be taken to select those of 
the best authority, as the basis of the Work, and to extract from 
them such observations as may best promote Knowledge and 
gratify Enquiry, so that it is to be hoped, there will be few remark- 
able places in the known World, of which the Politician, the Mer- 
chant, the Sailor, or the Man of Curiosity may not find a useful 
and pleasing account, of the credit of which the Reader may al- 
ways judge, as the Authours from whom it is taken will be regu- 
larly quoted, a caution which if some, who have attempted such 
general works, had observed, their labours would have deserved, 
and found more favour from the Publick.' 

This letter must have been written about the year 1753, for 
Bathurst is described as a physician of about eight years' stand- 
ing. He took his degree as Bachelor of Medicine at Peterhouse, 
Cambridge, in 1745, and did not, it should seem, proceed to the 
higher degree. In 1757 he was at the Havannah, where he died 
{ante, i. 280, «. 2). He was Johnson's beloved friend, of whom 
' he hardly ever spoke without tears in his eyes ' {ante, i. 220, n. 2). 
The Proposal, I have no doubt, was either written, or at all 
events revised, by Johnson. It is quite in his style. It may be 
assumed that it is in Bathurst's handwriting. 

* That this is done will appear from the authours' names exactly 
quoted. 

IL 

An apologetical letter about some work that was passing through the 
press ; undated, but probably written about the years 1753-5'. 

' Dear Sir, 

' What you tell me I am ashamed never to have thought on 

* In the possession of Mr. Frederick Barker. 

— I wish 



Autograph Letters. xxv 

— I wish I had known it sooner — Send me back the last sheet ; 
and the last copy for correction. If you will promise me hence- 
forward to print a sheet a day, I will promise you to endeavour 
that you shall have every day a sheet to print, beginning next 
Tuesday. 

' I am Sir, Your most, &c. 

*Sam. Johnson.' 
' To Mr. Strahan.' 

In all likelihood Johnson is writing about the Dictionary. The 
absence of a date, as I have already said, is strong evidence that 
the letter was written comparatively early. As the first edition of 
the Dictio7iary was in folio a sheet consisted of four pages. John- 
son writing on April 3, 1753, says, ' I began the second vol. of my 
Dictionary, room being left in the first for Preface, Grammar, and 
History, none of them yet begun ' {ante, i. 296). As the book was 
published on April 15, 1755 {ante, i. 335, 71. 3), the printing must 
have gone on very rapidly, when a start was once made. By copy 
he means his manuscript for printing. 



Ill, IV. 

Two undated letters about printing the Dictionary.^. 

'Dear Sir, 

' I must desire you to add to your other civilities this one, to 

go to Mr. Millar and represent to him the manner of going on, 

and inform him that I know not how to manage. I pay three and 

twenty shillings a week to my assistants, in each instance having 

much assistance from them, but they tell me they shall be able to 

pull better in method, as indeed I intend they shall. The Point 

is to get two Guineas. 

' Sir, Your humble servant, 

' Sam. Johnson.' 
(Address on back.) ' To Mr. Strahan.' 

'Sir, 

' I have often suspected that it is as you say, and have told 
Mr. Dodsley of it. It proceeds from the haste of the amanuensis 

« In the possession of Mr. John Waller, 2. Artesian Road, West- 
bourne Grove. 

to 



XX vi Addenda. 

to get to the end of his day's work. I have desired the passages 
to be clipped close, and then perhaps for two or three leaves it is 
done. But since poor Stuart's time I could never get that part of 
the work into regularity, and perhaps never shall. I will try to 
take some more care but can promise nothing ; when I am told 
there is a sheet or two I order it away. You will find it some- 
times close ; when I make up any myself, which never happens 
but when I have nobody with me, I generally clip it close, but one 
cannot always be on the watch. 

* I am Sir, Your most, &c. 

' Sam. Johnson.' 

These letters refer to the printing of the Dictionary, of which 
Dodsley and Millar were two among the proprietors, and Strahan 
the printer. Francis Stuart or Stewart was one of Johnson's aman- 
uenses {ante, i. 216). In 1779 Johnson paid his sister a guinea for 
an old pocket-book of her brother's {ante, iii. 475), and wrote on 
April 8, 1780 {ante, iii. 478) : — 'The memory of her brother is yet 
fresh in my mind ; he was an ingenious and worthy man.' In 
February 1784 he gave her another guinea for a letter relating to 
himself that he had found in the pocket-book {ante, iv. 302). A 
writer in the Gent. Mag. for 1799, p. 1171, who had been employed 
in Strahan's printing-works, says that ' Stewart was useful to John- 
son in the explanation of low cant phrases ; all words relating to 
gambling and card-playing, such as All-Fours, Catch-honours [not 
in Johnson's Dictionary], Cribbage [merely defined as A game at 
cards\ were said to be Stewart's corrected by the Doctor.' He 
adds that after the printing had gone on some time ' the proprie- 
tors of the Dictionary paid Johnson through Mr. Strahan at the 
rate of a guinea for every sheet of MS. copy delivered. The copy 
was written upon quarto post, and in two columns each page. 
Johnson wrote in his own hand the words and their explanation, 
and generally two or three words in each column, leaving a space 
between each for the authorities, which were pasted on as they 
were collected by the different amanuenses employed : and in this 
mode the MS. was so regular that the sheets of MS. which made 
a sheet of print could be very exactly ascertained.' The same 
writer states that Stewart in a night ramble in Edinburgh with 
some of his drinking companions ' met with the mob conducting 
Captain Porteous to be hanged ; they were next day examined 

about 



Autograph Letters. xxvii 

about it before the Town Council, when, as Stewart used to say, 
" we were found to be too drunk to have any hand in the busi- 
ness." He gave an accurate account of it in the Edinburgh Mag- 
azine of that time.' 



V. 

A letter about Miss Williams^ taxes due, and a journey ; undated^ but 
perhaps written at Oxford in 1754'. 
'Sir, 

' I shall not be long here, but in the mean time if Miss Will- 
iams wants any money pray speak to Mr. Millar and supply her, 
they write to me about some taxes which I wish you would pay. 

' My journey will come to very little beyond the satisfaction of 
knowing that there is nothing to be done, and that I leave few ad- 
vantages here to those that shall come after me. 

' I am. Sir, &c, 

' Sam. Johnson,' 
' My compliments to Mrs. Strahan. 

' To Mr. Strahan.' 

Miss Williams came to live with Johnson after his wife's death 
in 1752 {ante, \. 269). The fact that Strahan is asked to supply 
her with money after speaking to Mr. Millar seems to show that 
this letter was written some time before the publication of the 
Dictionary in April 1755. Millar ' took the principal charge of 
conducting its publication,' and Johnson 'had received all the 
copy-money, by different drafts, a considerable time before he had 
finished his task ' {ante, i. 332). 

His 'journey' may have been his visit to Oxford in the summer 
of 1754. He went there, because, 'I cannot,' he said, 'finish my 
book [the Dictionary] to my mind without visiting the libraries ' 
{ante, i. 314). According to Thomas Warton 'he collected nothing 
in the libraries for his Dictionary' (ib. n. 4). It is perhaps to this 
failure that the latter part of the letter refers. Johnson's visit, 
however, was one of five weeks, while the first line of the letter 
shows that he intended to be away from London but a short time. 

' In the possession of Mr. Frederick Barker, 

VI. 



xxviii Addenda. 



VI. 

A letter about ^ Rasseias,' dated jFan. 20, 1759'. 

'Sir, 

' When I was with you last night I told you of a story which 
I was preparing for the press. The title will be 

" The Choice of Life 

or 

The History of Prince of Abissinia." 

' It will make about two volumes like little Pompadour, that is 
about one middling volume. The bargain which I made with Mr. 
Johnson was seventy five pounds (or guineas) a volume, and twenty 
five pounds for the second edition. I will sell this either at that 
price or for sixty', the first edition of which he shall himself fix 
the number, and the property then to revert to me, or for forty 
pounds, and 1 have the profit that is retain half the copy. 1 shall 
have occasion for thirty pounds on Monday night when I shall 
deliver the book which 1 must entreat you upon such delivery to 
procure me. 1 would have it offered to Mr. Johnson, but have no 
doubt of selling it, on some of the terms mentioned. 

' I will not print my name, but expect it to be known. 

' I am Dear Sir, Your most humble servant, 

' Sam. Johnson.' 
'Jan. 20, 1759. 

' Get me the money if you can.' 

This letter is of unusual interest, as it proves beyond all doubt 
that Rasselas was written some weeks before Candide was published 
(see ante, i. 396, n. 2). Baretti, as I have shewn (i. 395, n. 3), says 
that ' any other person with the degree of reputation Johnson 
then possessed would have got ;{^4oo for the work, but he never 
understood the art of making the most of his productions.' We 
see, however, by this letter that Johnson did ask for a larger sum 
than the booksellers allowed him. He received but one hundred 
pounds for the first edition, but he had made a bargain for one hun- 
dred and fifty pounds or guineas. Johnson, the bookseller, seems 

' In the possession of Mr. Frederick Barker. 

' ' Fifty-five pounds ' written first and then scored over. 

to 



Autograph Letters. xxix 

to have been but in a small way of business as a publisher. I do 
not find in the Gentleman s Magazine for 1758 any advertisement 
of books published by him, and only one in 1759 (p. 339). Cow- 
per's publisher in 1778 was Joseph Johnson of St. Paul's Church- 
yard. (Cowper's Works by Southey, i. 285 ; see also Nichols' 
Literary Anecdotes^ iii. 461-464.) 

By ' little Pompadour ' Johnson, no doubt, means the second 
and cheaper edition of The History of the Marchioness de Pompa- 
dour. The first edition was published by Hooper in one volume, 
price five shillings {Gent. Mag. for October 1758, p. 493), and the 
second in two volumes for three shillings and sixpence (Gent. Mag. 
for November 1758, p. 543). 

Johnson did not generally ' print his name.' He published anon- 
ymously his translation of Lobe's Voyage to Abyssinia; London; 
The Life of Savage ; 'The Rambler and The Ldler, both in separate 
numbers and when collected in volumes ; Rasselas ; The False 
Alarm ; Falkland's Islands ; The Patriot ; and Taxation no Tyr- 
anny ; (when these four pamphlets were collected in a volume he 
published them with the title of Political Tracts, by the Authour of 
the Rambler). He gave his name in The Vanity of Human Wishes, 
Irene, the Dictionary, his edition of Shakespeare, the journey to the 
Western Islands, and the Lives of the Poets. 



vn. 

A letter about George Strahan's election to a scholarship at University 
College, Oxford, and about William Strahan^s '^ affair with the 
University •' dated October 24, 1764'. 

'Sir, 

' I think I have pretty well disposed of my young friend 
George, who, if you approve of it, will be entered next Monday a 
Commoner of University College, and will be chosen next day a 
Scholar of the House. The Scholarship is a trifle, but it gives 
him a right, upon a vacancy, to a Fellowship of more than sixty 
pounds a year if he resides, and I suppose of more than forty if 
he takes a Curacy or small living. The College is almost filled 
with my friends, and he will be well treated. The Master is 

• In the possession of Mr. Frederick Barker. 

informed 



XXX Addenda, 

informed of the particular state of his education, and thinks, what 
I think too, that for Greek he must get some private assistance, 
which a servitour of the College is very well qualitied and will be 
very willing to afford him on very easy terms. 

' I must desire your opinion of this scheme by the next post, for 
the opportunity will be lost if we do not now seize it, the Scholar- 
ships being necessarily filled up on Tuesday. 

' I depend on your proposed allowance of a hundred a year, 
which must the first year be a little enlarged because there are 
some extraordinary expenses, as 

Caution (which is allowed in his last quarter) . .700 

Thirds. ( He that enters upon a room pays two 

thirds of the furniture that he finds, and receives 

from his successor two thirds of what he pays ; 

so that if he pays ^20 he receives £it, 6s. M., 

this perhaps may be) 1200 

Fees at entrance, matriculation, &c., perhaps . .200 
His gown (I think) 2 10 o 

£22, 10 o 



* If you send us a Bill for about thirty pounds we shall set out 
commodiously enough. You should fit him out with cloaths and 
linen, and let him start fair, and it is the opinion of those whom I 
consult, that with your hundred a year and the petty scholarship 
he may live with great ease to himself, and credit to you. 

' Let me hear as soon as is possible. 

' In your affair with the university, I shall not be consulted, but 
I hear nothing urged against your proposal. 

' I am, Sir, 

' Your humble servant, 

'Oct. 24, 1764. 'Sam. Johnson.' 

' My compliments to Mrs. Strahan. 

' To Mr. Strahan, Printer, in New Street, Shoe-lane, London.' 

My friend, Mr. C. J. Faulkner, Fellow and Tutor of University 
College, has given me the following extracts from the College 
records : — 

'Oct. 30-31, 1764. Candidatis examinatis electi sunt GuHelmus 
Jones et Georgius Strahan in vacuas Exhibitiones D"' Simonis Benet 
Baronetti.' 

Gulielmus 



Autograph Letters, xxxi 

Gulielmus Jones is the famous oriental scholar, Sir William 
Jones, whose portrait adorns the Hall of his ancient College {ante^ 
ii. 28, «. 2), 

On April 16, 1767, is found the election of 

' Georgium Strahan, sophistam in perpetuum hujus Collegii Socium.' 

He vacated his fellowship in 1773. 

The value of a Bennet scholarship in 1764 was ten pounds a 
year, with rooms added, the rent of which was reckoned as equal 
to two pounds more. A fellowship on the same foundation was 
worth about twenty pounds, with a yearly dividend added to it 
that amounted to about thirty pounds. 'Fines' {ante^ iii. 368) 
and other extra payments might easily raise the value to more 
than sixty pounds. 

The ' caution ' is the sum deposited by an undergraduate with 
the College Bursar or Steward as a security for the payment of 
his 'battells' or account. Johnson in 1728 had to pay at Pem- 
broke College the same sum (seven pounds) that George Strahan 
in 1764 had to pay at University College. Ante, i. 67, n. 2. 

Johnson wrote four letters to George Strahan, when he was a 
boy at school, and one letter when he was at College. (See Cro- 
ker's Johnson, pp. 129, 130, 161, 168.) In this last letter, dated 
May 25, 1765, he writes : ' Do not tire yourself so much with Greek 
one day as to be afraid of looking on it the next; but give it a cer- 
tain portion of time, suppose four hours, and pass the rest of the 
day in Latin or English. I would have you learn French, and 
take in a literary journal once a month, which will accustom you 
to. various subjects, and inform you what learning is going forward 
in the world. Do not omit to mingle some lighter books with 
those of more importance ; that which is read remisso animo is 
often of great use, and takes great hold of the remembrance. How- 
ever, take what course you will, if you be diligent you will be a 
scholar.' 

George Strahan attended Johnson on his death-bed, and pub- 
lished the volume called Prayers and Meditations composed by Sam- 
uel Johnson. Ante, i. 272, n. 2 ; iv. 434, n. 2. 

William Strahan's 'affair with the University' was very likely 
connected with the lease of the University Printing House. From 
the 'Orders of the Delegates of the Press,' 1758, I have been 

permitted 



xxxii Addenda. 

permitted to copy the following entry, which bears a date but six 
days later than that of Johnson's letter. 

' Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1764. At a meeting of the Delegates of the Press. 

' Ordered, 

' That the following articles be made the foundation of the new 
lease to be granted of the moiety of the Printing House ; that a copy 
of them be delivered to Mr. Baskett and Mr. Eyre, and that they be 
desired to give in their respective proposals at a meeting to be held 
on Tuesday the sixth of November.' (P. 41.) 

The chief part of the lease consisted of the privilege to print 
Bibles and Prayer Books. I conjecture that Strahan had hoped 
to get a share in the lease. 



VIII. 

A letter about a cancel in jfohnson^s ' jfourney to the Western Islands 
of Scotland,^ dated Nov. 30, 1774'. 
'Sir, 

' I waited on you this morning having forgotten your new en- 
gagement ; for this you must not reproach me, for if I had looked 
upon your present station with malignity I could not have forgot- 
ten it. I came to consult you upon a little matter that gives me 
some uneasiness. In one of the pages there is a severe censure 
of the clergy of an English Cathedral which I am afraid is just, 
but I have since recollected that from me it may be thought im- 
proper, for the Dean did me a kindness about forty years ago. 
He is now very old, and I am not young. Reproach can do him 
no good, and in myself I know not whether it is zeal or wanton- 
ness. Can a leaf be cancelled without too much trouble ? tell me 
what I shall do. I have no settled choice, but I would not wish 
to allow the charge. To cancel it seems the surer side. Deter- 
mine for me. 

' I am, Sir, Your most humble servant, 

. XT -., ' Sam. Johnson.' 

' Nov. 30, 1774. ■' 

'Tell me your mind : if you will cancel it I will write something 
to fill up the vacuum. Please to direct to the borough.' 

' In the possession of Messrs, Pearson & Co., 46, Pall Mall. 

Mr. Strahan's 



Autograph Letters. xxxiii 

Mr. Strahan's ' new engagement ' was in the House of Com- 
mons at Westminster, to which he had been elected for the first 
time as member for Malmesbury. The new Parliament had met 
on Nov. 2g, the day before the date of Johnson's letter {Pari. Hist. 
xviii. 23). 

The leaf that Johnson cancelled contained pages 47, 48 in the 
first edition of his journey to the IVestern Islands. It corresponds 
with pages 19-20 in vol. ix. of Johnson's Works (ed. 1825), begin- 
ning with the words 'could not enter,' and ending 'imperfect con- 
stitution.' The excision is marked by a ridge of paper, which was 
left that the revised leaf might be attached to it. Johnson describes 
how the lead which covered the Cathedrals of Elgin and Aberdeen 
had been stripped ofif by the order of the Scottish Council, and 
• shipped to be sold in Holland. He continues: — 'Let us not 
however make too much haste to despise our neighbours. Our 
own cathedrals are mouldering by unregarded dilapidation. It 
seems to be part of the despicable philosophy of the time to de- 
spise monuments of sacred magnificence, and we are in danger of 
doing that deliberately, which the Scots did not do but in the un- 
settled state of an imperfect constitution.' 

In the copy of the first edition in the Bodleian Library, which 
had belonged to Gough the antiquary, there is written in his hand, 
as a foot-note to 'neighbours': 'There is now, as I have heard, a 
body of men not less decent or virtuous than the Scottish Council, 
longing to melt the lead of an English Cathedral. What they shall 
melt, it were just that they should swallow.' It can scarcely be 
doubted that this is the suppressed passage. The English Cathe- 
dral to which Johnson refers was, I believe, Lichfield. ' The roof,' 
says Harwood [History of Lichfield, p. 75), 'was formerly covered 
with lead, but now with slate.' Addenbroke, who had been Dean 
since 1745, was, we may assume, very old at the time when Johnson 
wrote. 1 had at first thought it not unlikely that it was Dr. Thom- 
as Newton, Dean of St. Paul's and Bishop of Bristol, who was cen- 
sured. He was a Lichfield man, and was known to Johnson (see 
ante. iv. 329, //. 3). He was, however, only seventy years old. I 
am informed moreover by the Rev. W, Sparrow Simpson, the 
learned editor of Documents illustrating the History of St. FauPs, 
that it is ver\' improbable that at this time the Dean and Chapter 
of St. Paul's entertained such a thought. 

My friend Mr. C. E. Doble has kindly furnished me with the 
VI. — 3 following 



xxxiv Addeitda. 

following curious parallel to Johnson's suppressed wish about the 
molten lead. 

' The chappell of our Lady [at Wells], late repayred by Stilling- 
ton, a place of great reverence and antiquitie, was likewise defaced, 
and such was their thirst after lead (I would they had drunke it 
scalding) that they tooke the dead bodies of bishops out of their 
leaden coffins, and cast abroad the carkases skarce throughly pu- 
trified.' — Harington's Nugce Antiguce, ii. 147 (ed. 1804). 

In the postscript Johnson says ' Please to direct to the borough.' 
He was staying in Mr. Thrale's town-house in the Borough of 
Southwark. (See ante, i. 570.) 



IX. 

A letter about apprenticing a tad to Mr. Strahan, and about a presen- 
tation to the Blue Coat School, dated December 22, 1774'. 

' Sir, 

' When we meet we talk, and I know not whether I always 
recollect what I thought I had to say. 

' You will please to remember that I once asked you to receive 
an apprentice, who is a scholar, and has always lived in a clergy- 
man's house, but who is mishapen, though I think not so as to hin- 
der him at the case. It will be expected that I should answer his 
Friend who has hitherto maintained him, whether I can help him 
to a place. He can give no money, but will be kept in cloaths. 

' I have another request which it is perhaps not immediately in 
your power to gratify. I have a presentation to beg for the blue 
coat hospital. The boy is a non-freeman, and has both his parents 
living. We have a presentation for a freeman which we can give 
in exchange. If in your extensive acquaintance you can procure 
such an exchange, it will be an act of great kindness. Do not let 
the matter slip out of your mind, for though I try others I know 
not any body of so much power to do it. 

' I am. Sir, Your most humble Servant, 

' Sam. Johnson.' 
'Dec. 22, 1774.' 

' In the possession of Messrs. Robson and Kerslake, 25, Coventr}'- 
Street, Haymarkct. 

The 



Autograph Letters. xxx\ 

The apprentice was young William Davenport, the orphan son 
of a clergyman. His friend was the Rev. W. Langley, the master 
of Ashbourne School. Strahan received him as an apprentice 
{ante^ ii. 370, n. 3). See also Nichols' Literary Anecdotes, vol. iii. 

P- 387- 

The ' case ' is the frame containing boxes for holding type. 



A letter about suppressions in ' Taxation no Tyranny^ dated March 

i> 1775'- 
' Sir, 

' I am sorry to see that all the alterations proposed are evi- 
dences of timidity. You may be sure that I do [? not] wish to 
publish, what those for whom I write do not like to have published. 
But print me half a dozen copies in the original state, and lay them 
up for me. It concludes well enough as it is. 

' When you print it, if you print it, please to frank one to me 
here, and frank another to Mrs. Aston at Stow Hill, Lichfield. 

'The changes are not for the better, except where facts were 
mistaken. The last paragraph was indeed rather contemptuous, 
there was once more of it which I put out myself. 

' I am Sir, Your humble Servant, 

' Sam. Johnson.' 
'March i, 1775.' 

This letter refers to Taxation no Tyraufiy, which was published 
before March 21, 1775, the date of Boswell's arrival in London 
{ante, ii. 355). Boswell says that he had in his possession 'a few 
proof leaves of it marked with corrections in Johnson's own hand- 
writing ' {ib. p. 338). Johnson, he says, ' owned to me that it had 
been revised and curtailed by some of those who were then in 
power.' When Johnson writes 'when you print it, if you print it." 
he uses, doubtless, prifit in the sense of striking off copies. The 
pamphlet was, we may assume, in type before it was revised by 
'those in power.' The corrections had been made in the proof- 
sheets. Johnson asks to have six copies laid by for him in the 

' In the possession of Mr. Frank T. Sabin, 10 & 12, Garrick Street. 
Covent Garden. 

state 



xxxvi Addoida, 

state in which he had wished to publish it. It seems that the 
last paragraph had been struck out by the reviser, for Johnson 
says 'it was rather contemptuous.' He does not think it needful 
to supply anything in its place, for he says ' it concludes well 
enough as it is.' 

Mr. Strahan had the right, as a member of Parliament, to frank 
all letters and packets. That is to say, by merely writing his sig- 
nr.<:ure on the cover he could pass them through the post free of 
chi.rge. Johnson, when he wrote to Scotland, used to employ him 
tc frank his letters, ' that he might have the consequence of ap- 
pearing a parliament-man among his countrymen' {ante, iii. 415). 
It was to Oxford that a copy of the pamphlet was to be franked 
to Johnson. That he was there at the time is shown by a letter 
from him in Mrs. Piozzi's Collection (vol. i. p. 212), dated 'Univer- 
sity College, Oxford, March 3, 1775.' Writing to her, evidently 
from Bolt Court, on February 3, he had said : ' My pamphlet has 
not gone on at all ' {ib. i. 211). Mrs. Aston (or rather Miss Aston) 
is mentioned ante, ii. 534. 



XI. 

A letter about ' copy ' and a book by Professor Watson, dated Oct. 1 4, 

1776'. 
'Sir, 

* I wrote to you about ten days ago, and sent you some copy. 
You have not written again, that is a sorry trick. 

' I am told that you are printing a Book for Mr. Professor Watson 
of Saint Andrews, if upon any occasion, I can give any help, or be 
of any use, as formerly in Dr. Robertson's publication, I hope you 
will make no scruple to call upon me, for I shall be glad of an op- 
portunity to show that my reception at Saint Andrews has not been 
forgotten. ' I am Sir, Your humble Servant. 

' Sam, Johnson.' 
•Oct. 14, 1776.' 

The 'copy' or MS. that Johnson sent is, I conjecture, Proposals 
for the Rev. Mr. Sha^v's Analysis of the Scotch Celtick Language 
{ante, iii. 122). This is the only acknowledged piece of writing of 

' In the possession of Mr. H. Fawcett, of 14, King Street, Covent 
Garden. 

his 



Autograph Letters. xxxvii 

his during 1776. The book printing for Professor Watson was 
History of the Reign of Philip J J, which was pubUshed by Strahan 
and Cadell in 1777. This letter is of unusual interest, as showing 
that Johnson had been of some service as regards one of Robert- 
son's books. It is possible that he read some of the proof-sheets, 
and helped to get rid of the Scotticisms. ' Strahan,' according to 
Beattie, ' had corrected (as he told me himself) the phraseology 
of both Mr. Hume and Dr. Robertson ' {ante, v. 104, n. 3). He is 
not unlikely, in Robertson's case, to have sought and obtained 
Johnson's help. 

xn. 

The following letter is published in Mr. Alfred Morrison's ^Collection 
of Autographs,' vol. ii. p. 343. 

' To Dr. Taylor. Dated London, April 20, 1778.' 

' The quantity of blood taken from you appears to me not suffi- 
cient. Thrale was almost lost by the scrupulosity of his physi- 
cians, who never bled him copiously till they bled him in despair; 
he then bled till he fainted, and the stricture or obstruction imme- 
diately gave way and from that moment he grew better. 

' I can now give you no advice but to keep yourself totally quiet 
and amused with some gentle exercise of the mind. If a suspect- 
ed letter comes, throw it aside till your health is re-established ; 
keep easy and cheerful company about you, and never try to think 
but at those stated and solemn times when the thoughts are sum- 
moned to the cares of futurity, the only cares of a rational being. 

' As to my own health I think it rather grows better ; the con- 
vulsions which left me last year at Ashbourne have never returned, 
and I have by the mercy of God very comfortable nights. Let me 
know very often how you are till you are quite well.' 

This letter, though it is dated 1778, must have been written in 
1 780. Thrale's first attack was in June, 1779, when he was in ' e.x- 
treme danger ' {ante, iii. 45 1, //. 2, 478). Johnson had the remission of 
the convulsions on June 18,1779. Herecordedon June 18, 1780: — 

' In the morning of this day last year I perceived the remission of 
those con\'iilsions in my breast which had distressed me for more than 
twenty years. I returned thanks at church for the mercy granted me, 
which has now continued a year.' — Prayers and Meditations, p. 183. 

Three 



xxxviii Addenda. 

— — — ■ ■ -, , -■ , , „ I. , , ■■ % 

Three days later he wrote to Mrs. Thrale : — 

' It was a twelvemonth last Sunday since the convulsions in my 
breast left me. I hope I was thankful when I recollected it ; by re- 
moving that disorder a great improvement was made in the enjoy- 
ment of life.' — Piozzi Letters, ii. 163. (See atite, iii. 451, «. i.) 

He was at Ashbourne on June 18, 1779 {ante, iii. 514). 
On April 20, 1778, the very day of which this letter bears the 
date, he recorded : — 

' After a good night, as I am forced to reckon, I rose seasonably. 
... In reviewing my time from Easter, 1777, I found a very melan- 
choly and shameful blank. So little has been done that days and 
months are without any trace. My health has, indeed, been very much 
interrupted. My nights have been commonly not only restless, but 
painful and fatiguing. . . . Some relaxation of my breast has been 
procured, I think, by opium, which, though it never gives me sleep, 
frees my breast from spasms.' — Prayers and Meditations, p. 169. See 
ante, iii. 360, ;/. i. 

For Johnson's advice about bleeding, see ante, iii. 172 ; and for 
possible occasions for 'suspected letters,' ante, i. 546, n. 4; and ii. 
232, n. 2. 



Mr. Mason's ' sneering observation in his " Memoirs of Mr. William 

Whitehead:' ' 

(Vol. i. p. 36.) 
I had long failed to find a copy of these Afemoirs, though I had 
searched in the Bodleian, the British Museum, and the London 
Library, and had applied to the University Library at Cambridge, 
and the Advocates' Library at Edinburgh. By the kindness of Mr. 
R. H. Soden Smith and Mr. R. F. Sketchley, I have obtained the 
following extract from a copy in the Dyce and Forster Libraries, 
in the South Kensington Museum : — 

' Conscious, notwithstanding, that to avoid writing what is unneces- 
sary is, in these days, no just plea for silence in a biographer, I have 
some apology to make for having strewed these pages so thinly with 
the tittle-tattle of anecdote. I am, however, too proud to make this 
apology to any person but my bookseller, who will be the only real 
loser by the defect. 

' Those readers, who believe that I do not write immediately under 

his 



Notes. xxxix 

his pay, and who may have gathered from what they have already 
read, that I am not so passionately enamoured of Dr. Johnson's bio- 
graphical manner, as to take that for my model, have only to throw 
these pages aside, and wait till they are new-written by some one of 
his numerous disciples, who may follow his master's example ; and 
should more anecdote than I furnish him with be wanting (as was the 
Doctors case in his life of Mr. Gray), may make amends for it by those 
acid eructations of vituperative criticism, which are generated by un- 
concocted taste and intellectual indigestion.' — Poems by William 
Whitehead, York, 1788 (vol. iii, p. 128). 

With this ' sneering observation,' which Boswell might surely 
have passed over in silence, the Memoirs close. 



Michael Johnson as a bookseller. 

(Vol. i. p. 42, n. 2.) 

Mr. R. F. Sketch ley kindly informs me that in the Dyce and 
Forster Libraries at the South Kensington Museum there is a book 
with the following title : — 

6". Shaw's ' Graminatica Anglo - Romana,'' London., printed for 
Michael yohnson, bookseller: and are to be sold at his shops in Litch- 
field and Utioxiter in Stafford-shire ; and Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Leicester- 
shire., 1687. 

Mr. C. E. Doble tells me that in the proposals issued in 1690 
by Thomas Bennet, St. Paul's Churchyard, for printing Anthony 
a Wood's AthencB Oxonienses dind Fasti Oxonienses., among ' the book- 
sellers who take subscriptions, give receipts, and deliver books 
according to the proposals ' is ' Mr. Johnson in Litchfield.' 



The City atid Coimty oj Lichfield. 
(Vol. i. p. 42, n. 3.) 

' The City of Litchfield is a County of itself, with a jurisdiction 
extending 10 or 12 miles round, which circuit the Sheriff rides 
every year on Sept. 8.' — A Tour through the Whole Island of Great 
Britain, ed. 1769, ii. 419. 

Balliol College has a copy of this work containing David Gar- 
rick's book-plate, with Shakespeare's head at the top of it, and the 
following quotation from Mcnagiana at the foot : — 



XI Addenda. 

'La pr cm fere chose qu'on doit fairc quand on a cmfiruntd un livre, 
c'est de le lire, afin de pouvoir Ic rendre plutot ' (sic). 



Felixmarte of Hircania. 

(Vol. i. p. 57.) 

' " He that follows is Fiorismarfc of Hyrcania," said the barber. 
"What! is Signor Florismarte there?" replied the priest; "in good 
faith he shall share the same fate, notwithstanding his strange 
birth and chimerical adventures ; for his harsh and dry style will 
admit of no excuse. To the yard with him, therefore." " With 
all my heart, dear Sir," answered the housekeeper ; and with 
joyful alacrity she executed the command.' — Dott Quixote, ed. 
1820, i. 48. 

Boswell speaks of Felixmarte as the old Spanish romance. In 
the Bibliografia dci Rotnanzi e Poemi Cavallcreschi Italiani (2nd ed,, 
Milan, 183H), p. 351, it is stated that in the Spanish edition it is 
called a translation from the Italian, and in the Italian edition a 
translation from the Spanish. The Italian title is Historia di Don 
Florismante d'Ircania, tradotta dallo Spagnuolo. Cervantes, in an 
edition of Don Quixote, published in 1605, which I have looked at, 
calls the book Florismarte de Hircania (not Florismante). It should 
seem that he made his hero read the Italian version. 



Palmerin of England and Don Belianis. 

(Vol. i. p. 57, n. 3 ; and vol. iii. p. 2.) 

'"Let Palmerin of England he preserved," said the licentiate, 
"and kept as a jewel; and let such another casket be made for 
it as that which Alexander found among the spoils of Darius, ap- 
propriated to preserve the works of the poet Homer There- 
fore, master Nicholas, saving your better judgment, let this and 
Amadis de Gaul be exempted from the flames, and let all the rest 
perish without farther inquiry." " Not so, neighbour," replied the 
barber, "for behold here the renowned Don Belianis^ The priest 
replied, " This with the second, third, and fourth parts, wants a 
little rhubarb to purge away its excessive choler ; there should be 
removed too all that relates to the castle of Fame, and other im- 
pertinencies of still greater consequence ; let them have the benefit, 

therefore, 



Notes. xli 

therefore, of transportation, and as they show signs of amend- 
ment they shall hereafter be treated with mercy or justice ; in the 
meantime, friend, give them room in your house ; but let nobody 
read them." ' — Don Quixote, ed. 1820, i. 50. 



Mr. Taylor, a Birmingham manufacturer. 
(Vol. i. p. loo.j 
'John Taylor, Esq. may justly be deemed the Shakspear or 
Newton of Birmingham. He rose from minute beginnings to 
shine in the commercial hemisphere, as they in the poetical or 
philosophical. To this uncommon genius we owe the gilt button, 
the japanned and gilt snuff-box, with the numerous race of enam- 
els ; also the painted snuff-box He died in 1775 at the 

age of 64, after acquiring a fortune of ;^2oo,ooo. His son was a 
considerable sufferer at the time of the riots in 1791.' — A Brief 
History of Birmingham, 1797, p. 9. 



Olivia Lloyd. 
(Vol. i. p. 107.) 

I am, no doubt, right in identifying Olivia Lloyd, the young 
quaker, with whom Johnson was much enamoured when at Stour- 
bridge School, with Olive Lloyd, the daughter of the first Sampson 
Lloyd, of Birmingham, and aunt of the Sampson Lloyd with whom 
he had an altercation {ante, ii. 524, and post, p. 569), ' A fine like- 
ness of her is preserved by Thomas Lloyd, The Priory, Warwick,' 
as I learn from an interesting little work called Far7n and its In- 
habitants, with some Account of the Lloyds of Dolobran, by Rachel J . 
Lowe. Privately printed, 1883, p. 24. Her elder brother married 
a Miss Careless ; ib. p. 23. Johnson's 'first love,' Hector's sister, 
married a Mr. Careless {ante, ii. 526). 



Henry Porter, of Edgbaston. 
(Vol. i. p. 109, ;/. 3.) 
In St. Mary's Church, Warwick, is a monument to — 
' Anna Norton, Henrici Porter 
Filia 
Nuper de Edgberston in Com. Warw. Generosi ; 

Vidua 



xlii Addenda. 

Vidua Thomae Norton .... 
Haec annis et pietate matura vitam deposuit. 
Maii 14, 1698.' 

A Brief Description of the Collegiate Church of St. Mary in War- 
wick, published by Grafton and Reddell, Birmingham ; no date. 



Mrs. Williams'' s accoufit of Mrs. jfohnsoyi a?id her sons by her former 

marriage. 

(Vol. i. p. no.) 

The following note by Malone I failed to quote in the right 
place. It is copied from a paper, written by Lady Knight. 

' Mrs. Williams's account of Mrs. Johnson was, that she had a 
good understanding and great sensibility, but inclined to be satir- 
ical. Her first husband died insolvent [this is a mistake, see ante, 
i. i\\,n. i] ; her sons were much disgusted with her for her second 
marriage ; . . . . however, she always retained her affection for 
them. While they [Mr. and Mrs. Johnson] resided in Gough 
Square, her son, the officer, knocked at the door, and asked the 
maid if her mistress was at home. She answered, " Yes, Sir, but 
she is sick in bed." " Oh," says he, " if it's so, tell her that her 
son Jervis called to know how she did ;" and was going away. 
The maid begged she might run up to tell her mistress, and, with- 
out attending his answer, left him. Mrs. Johnson, enraptured to 
hear her son was below, desired the maid to tell him she longed 
to embrace him. When the maid descended the gentleman was 
gone, and poor Mrs. Johnson was much agitated by the adventure ; 
it was the only time he ever made an effort to see her. Dr. [Mr.] 
Johnson did all he could to console his wife, but told Mrs. Will- 
iams : " Her son is uniformly undutiful ; so I conclude, like many 
other sober men, he might once in his life be drunk, and in that 
fit nature got the better of his pride." ' 



yohnsons application for the mastership of the Grammar School at 
Solihull in Warwickshire. 

(Vol. i. p. 1 12.) 
Johnson, a few weeks after his marriage, applied for the master- 
ship of Solihull Grammar School, as is shown by the following 

letter. 



Notes. 



Xllll 



letter, preserved in the Pembroke College MSS., addressed to Mr. 
Walmsley, and quoted by Mr. Croker. I failed to insert it in my 
notes. 

' Solihull, y 30 August, 1735. 
Sir, 
'I was favoured with yours of y*^ 13th inst. in due time, but 
deferred answering it til now, it takeing up some time to informe 
the Fceofees of the contents thereof; and before they would re- 
turn an Answer, desired some time to make enquiry of y^ caracter 
of Mr. Johnson, who all agree that he is an excellent scholar, and 
upon that account deserves much better than to be schoolmaster 
of Solihull. But then he has the caracter of being a very haughty, 
ill-natured gent., and y' he has such a way of distorting his Face 
(w'' though he can't help) y^ gent, think it may affect some young 
ladds ; for these two reasons he is not approved on, y*^ late master 
Mr. Crompton's huffing the Fceofees being stil in their memory. 
However, we are all exstreamly obliged to you for thinking of us, 
and for proposeing so good a schollar, but more especially is, 
dear sir, 

' Your very humble servant, 

' Henry Greswold.' 



yohnsoii s knoivledge of Italian. 
(Vol. i. p. 133, 134.) 
Boswell says that he does not know 'at what time, or by what 
means Johnson had acquired a competent knowledge of Italian.' 
In my note on this I say ' he had read Petrarch "when but a boy." ' 
As Petrarch wrote chiefly in Latin, it is quite possible that Johnson 
did not acquire his knowledge of Italian so early as I had thought. 



yohiisons deference for the general opinion. 
(Vol. i. p. 233.) 
Miss Burney records an interesting piece of criticism by John- 
son. ' There are,' he said, ' three distinct kinds of judges upon 
all new authors or productions ; the first are those who know no 
rules, but pronounce entirely from their natural taste and feelings, 
the second are those who know and judge by rules ; and the third 
are those who know, but are abo\c the rules. These last are 

those 



\llv Addenda. 

those you should wish to satisfy. Next to them rate the natural 
judges; but ever despise those opinions that are formed by the 
rules.' — Mmc. D' Arblays Diary, i. i8o. Later on she writes: — 
'The natural feelings of untaught hearers ought never to be 
slighted; and Dr. Johnson has told me the same a thousand 
times ;' ib. ii. 128. 



yohnson in the Green Room. 
(Vol. i. p. 233.) 

Mr. Richard Heme Shepherd, in Walfourd's Antiquarian for 
January, 1887, p. 34, asserts that the actual words which Johnson 
used when he told Garrick that he would no longer frequent his 
Green Room were indecent; so indecent that Mr. Shepherd can 
only venture to satisfy those whom he calls students by informing 
them of them privately. For proof of this charge against the 
man whose boast it was that ' obscenity had always been repressed 
in his company ' («;//(?, iv. 341) he brings forward John Wilkes. The 
story, indeed, as it is told by Bos well, is not too trustworthy, for 
he had it through Hume from Garrick. As it reaches Mr. Shep- 
herd it comes from Garrick through Wilkes. Garrick, no doubt, 
as Johnson says {ante, v. 446), was, as a companion, ' restrained 
by some principle,' and had 'some delicacy of feeling.' Never- 
theless, in his stories, he was, we may be sure, no more on oath 
than a man is in lapidary inscriptions (ante, ii. 466). It is possi- 
ble that he reported Johnson's very words to Hume, and that 
Hume did not change them in reporting them to Koswell. What- 
ever they were, they were spoken in 1749 and published in 1791, 
when John.son had been dead six years, Garrick twelve years, and 
Hume fourteen years. It is idle to dream that they can now be 
conjecturally emended. But it is worse than idle to bring in as 
evidence John Wilkes. What entered his ear as purity itself might 
issue from his mouth as the grossest obscenity. He had no deli- 
cacy of feeling. No principle restrained him. When he comes to 
bear testimony, and aims a shaft at any man's character, the bow 
that he draws is drawn with the weakness of the hand of a worn- 
out and shameless profligate. 

Mr. Shepherd quotes an unpublished letter of Boswell to 
Wilkes, dated Rome, .April 22, 1765, to show 'that the two men 
had become familiars, not only long before Wilkes's famous 

meeting 



Notes. xlv 

meeting with Dr. Johnson was brought about, but even before the 
friendship of Bosweil himself with Johnson had been consoli- 
dated.' It needs no unpublished letters to show that. It must 
be known to every attentive reader of Bosweil. See ante. i. ^57, 
and ii. 13. 



Frederick III, King of Prussia, 

(Vol. i. p. 357.) 
Bosweil should have written Frederick II. 



BoswelFs Visit to Rousseau and Voltaire. 

(Vol. i. p. 503 ; and vol. ii. p. 13.) 

Bosweil to Andrew Mitchell, Esq., His Britannic Majesty's Minister 

at Berlin. 

' Berlin, 28 August. 1764. 
. . . ' I have had another letter from my father, in which he con- 
tinues of opinion that travelling is of very little use, and may do 
a great deal of harm. ... I esteem and love my father, and I am 
determined to do what is in my power to make him easy and happy. 
But you will allow that I may endeavour to make him happy, and 
at the same time not to be too hard upon myself. I must use you 
so much with the freedom of a friend as to tell you that with the 
vivacity which you allowed me I have a melancholy disposition. 
I have made excursions into the fields of amusement, perhaps of 
folly. I have found that amusement and folly are beneath me, 
and that without some laudable pursuit my life must be insipid 

and wearisome My father seems much against my going to 

Italy, but gives me leave to go from this, and pass some months 
in Paris. I own that the words of the Apostle Paul, " I must see 
Rome," are strongly ^>orne in upon my mind. It would give me 
infinite pleasure. It would give taste for a life-time, and I should 
go home to Auchinleck with serene contentment.' 

After stating that he is going to Geneva, he continues : — 
' I shall see Voltaire ; I shall also see Switzerland and Rous- 
seau. These two men are to me greater objects than most statues 
or pictures.' — Nichols's Literary History, vii. 318. 

Superficiality 



xivi Addenda. 

Superficiality of the French Writers. 
(Vol. i. p. 526.) 

Gibbon, writing of the year 1759, says : — 

' In France, to which my ideas [in the Essay on the Study of 
Literatures^ were confined, the learning and language of Greece and 
Rome were neglected by a philosophic age. The guardian of 
those studies, the Academy of Inscriptions, was degraded to the 
lowest rank among the three royal societies of Paris ; the new ap- 
pellation of Erudits was contemptuously applied to the successors 
of Lipsius and Casaubon ; and I was provoked to hear (see M. 
d'xAlenibert, Discours preliminaire a lEncycIopedie) that the exer- 
cise of the memory, their sole merit, had been superseded by the 
nobler faculties of the imagination and the judgment.' — Memoirs 
of Edward Gibbon^ ed. 1827, i. 104. 



A Synod of Cooks. 

(Vol. i. p. 544.) 

When Johnson spoke of 'a Synod of Cooks' he was, I conject- 
ure, thinking of Milton's 'Synod of Gods,' in Beelzebub's speech 
in Paradise Lost, book ii. line 391. 



Johnson and Bishop Percy. 
(Vol. i. p. 562.) 

Bishop Percy in a letter to Boswell says : — 'When in 1756 or 
1757 I became acquainted with Johnson, he told me he had lived 
twenty years in London, but not very happily.' — Nichols's Literary 
History, vii. 307. 

Barclay s Anstver to Kenriclis Revieiv of Johnson^ s ' Shakespeare.'' 

(Vol. i. p. 576.) 

Neither in the British Museum nor in the Bodleian have I been 
able to find a copy of this book. A Defence of Mr. Kenrick's Re- 
vie^v, 1766, does not seem to contain any reply to such a work as 
Barclay's. 

Mrs, PiiKzi's 



Notes. xl 



VI 1 



Mrs. Piozzi's ' Collection of yohnsoris Letters* 

(Vol. ii. p. 49, ft. I.) 

Mr. Boswell to Bishop Percy. 

' Feb. 9, 1788. 
' I am ashamed that I have yet seven years to write of his life. 
.... Mrs. (Thralej Piozzi's Collection of his letters will be out 

soon I saw a sheet at the printing-house yesterday. ... It 

is wonderful what avidity there still is for everything relative to 
Johnson. I dined at Mr. Malone's on Wednesday with Mr. W. G. 
Hamilton, Mr. Plood, Mr. Windham, Mr. Courtenay, &c. ; and Mr. 
Hamilton observed very well what a proof it was of Johnson's 
merit that we had been talking of him all the afternoon.' — Nich- 
ols's Literary History, vii. 309. 



yohnson on romantic virtue. 
(Vol. ii. p. 87.) 

' Dr. Johnson used to advise his friends to be upon their guard 
against romantic virtue, as being founded upon no settled princi- 
ple. "A plank," said he, " that is tilted up at one end must of 
course fall down on the other." ' — William Seward, Anecdotes of 
Distinguished Persons, ii. 461. 



' Old ' Baxter on toleration. 
(Vol. ii. p. 290.) 

The Rev. John Hamilton Davies, B.A., F.R.H.S., Rector of St. 
Nicholas's, Worcester, and author of The Life of Richard Baxter of 
Kidderminster, Preacher and Prisoner (London, Kent & Co., 1887), 
kindly informs me, in answer to my inquiries, that he believes that 
Johnson may allude to the following passage in the fourth chapter 
of Baxter's Reformed Pastor : — 

' I think the Magistrate should be the hedge of the Church. I am 
against the two extremes of universal license and persecuting tyranny. 
The Magistrate must be allowed the use of his reason, to know the 
cause, and follow his own judgment, not punish men against it. I am 
the less sorry that the Magistrate doth so little interpose." 

Fjigland 



xlviii Addenda. 

England barren in good historians. 
(Vol. ii. p. 271, «. 2.) 

Gibbon, writing of the year 1759, says : — 

' The old reproach that no British altars had been raised to the 
muse of history was recently disproved by the first performances 
of Robertson and Hume, the histories of Scotland and of the 
Stuarts.' — Memoirs of Edward Gibbon, ed. 1827, i. 103. 



An instance of Scotch nationality. 
(Vol. ii. p. 351.) 
Lord Camden, when pressed by Dr. Berkeley (the Bishop's son) 
to appoint a Scotchman to some office, replied : ' I have many 
years ago sworn that I will never introduce a Scotchman into any 
office ; for if you introduce one he will contrive some way or oth- 
er to introduce forty more cousins or friends.' — G. M. Berkeley's 
Poems, p. ccclxxi. 

Mortality in the Foundling Hospital of London. 
(Vol. ii. p. 457.) 
'From March 25, 1741, to December 31, 1759, the number of 
children received into the Foundling Hospital is 14,994, of which 
have died to December 31, 1759, 8,465.' — A Tour through the 
Whole Island of Great Britain, ed. 1769, vol. ii. p. 121. A great 
many of these died, no doubt, after they had left the Hospital. 



Mr. Planta. 

(Vol. ii. p. 457, n. 4.) 
The reference is no doubt to Mr. Joseph Planta, Assistant-Li- 
brarian of the British Museum 1773, Principal Librarian 1 799-1827. 
See Edwards's Lives of the Founders of the British Museum, pp. 517 
sqq. ; and Nichols's Illustrations of Literature, vol. vii. pp. 677-8. 



^Unitarian.'' 
(Vol. ii. p. 468. n. I.) 
John Locke in his Second Vindication of the Reasonableness of 

Chn'stia'iif^' 



Notes. xlix 

Christianity quotes from Mr. Edwards whom he answers : — ' This 
gentleman and his fellows are resolved to be unitarians : they are 
for one article of faith as well as One person in the Godhead.' — 
Locke's Works, ed. 1824, vi. 200. 



The proposed Riding School for Oxford. 
(Vol. ii. p. 485.) 

My friend, Mr. C. E. Doble, has pointed out to me the follow- 
ing passage in Collectanea, First Series, edited by Mr. C. R. L. 
P'letcher, Fellow of All Souls College, and printed for the Oxford 
Historical Society, Oxford, 1885. 

' The Advertisement to Religion and Policy, by Edward Earl of 
Clarendon, runs as follows : — 

' " Henry Viscount Cornbury, who was called up to the House of 
Peers by the title of Lord Hyde, in the lifetime of his father, Henry 
Earl of Rochester, by a codicil to his will, dated Aug. 10, 1751, 
left divers MSS. of his great grandfather, Edward Earl of Claren- 
don, to Trustees, with a direction that the money to arise from the 
sale or publication thereof, should be employed as a beginning 
of a fund for supporting a Manage or Academy for riding and 
other useful exercises in Oxford ; a plan of this sort having been 
also recommended by Lord Clarendon in his Dialogue on Educa- 
tion. Lord Cornbury dying before his father, this bequest did not 
take effect. But Catharine, one of the daughters of Henry Earl 
of Rochester, and late Duchess Dowager of Queensbury, whose 
property these MSS. became, afterwards by deed gave them, to- 
gether with all the monies which had arisen or might arise from 
the sale or publication of them, to [three Trustees] upon trust for 
the like purposes as those expressed by Lord Hyde in his codicil." 

'The preface to the Life of Ed-auird Earl of Clarendon, written 
by himself, has words to the same effect. (See also Azotes and 
Queries, Ser. L x. 185. and xi. 32.) 

' From a letter in Notes and Queries, Ser. H. x. p. 74, it appears 
that in i860 the available sum. in the hands of the Trustees of the 
Clarendon Ijequest, amounted to ;{^ 10.000. The University no 
longer needed a riding- school, and the claims of Physical Science 
were urgent; and in 1872 the announcement was made, that by 
the liberality of the Clarendon Trustees an additional wing had 
VL — 4 been 



1 Addenda. 

been added to the University Museum, containing the lecture- 
rooms and laboratories of the department of Experimental Philos- 
ophy.' Vol. i. p. 305. 



Boswell and Mrs. Riidd. 
(Vol. ii. p. 515, n. I.) 

In Mr. Alfred Morrison's Collection of Autographs, vol. i. p. 103, 
mention is made among Boswell's autographs of ' verses entitled 
Lnrgan Clanbrassil, a supposed Irish song.' 

I have learnt, through Mr. Morrison's kindness, that ' on the 
document itself there is the following memorandum, signed, so far 
as can be made out, H. VV. R. : — 

' " The enclosed song was written and composed by James Bos- 
well, the biographer of Johnson, in commemoration of a tour he 
made with Mrs. Rudd whilst she was under his protection, for 
living with whom he displeased his father so much that he threat- 
ened to disinherit him. 

' " Mrs. Rudd had lived with one of the Perreaus, who were tried 
and executed for forgery. She was tried at the same time and 
acquitted. 

' " My father having heard that Boswell used to sing this song at 
the Home Circuit, requested it of him, and he wrote it and gave 
it him. H. W. R." 

'"Feb. 1828.'" 

Christopher Smart. 
(Vol. ii. p. 520, n. 2.) 

Mr, Robert Browning, in his Parleyings jvith Christopher Stnart, 
under the similitude of ' some huge house,' thus describes the gen- 
eral run of that unfortunate poet's verse : — 

' All showed the Golden Mean without a hint 
Of brave extravagance that breaks the rule. 
The master of the mansion was no fool 
Assuredly, no genius just as sure ! 
Safe mediocrity had scorned the lure 
Of now too much and now too little cost, 
And satisfied me sight was never lost 
Of moderate design's accomplishment 
In calm completeness.' 

Mr. Browninsr 



Notes. \\ 

Mr. Browning goes on to liken one solitary poem to a Chape' 
in the house, in which is found — 

' from floor to roof one evidence 
Of how far earth may rival heaven.' 

Farleyvigs with certain People of Importance in their Day (pp. 
80-82), London, 1887. 



yohnsons discussion on baptism with Mr. Lloyd, the Birmingham 

Quaker. 

(Vol. ii. p. 524.) 

In Farm and its Inhabitants {ante, p. 559), a further account is 
given of the controversy between Johnson and Mr. Lloyd the 
Quaker, on the subject of Barclay's Apology. 

"Tradition states that, losing his temper, Dr. Johnson threw the 
volume on the tioor, and put his foot on it, in denunciation of its 
statements. The identical volume is now in the possession of G. 
1!. Lloyd, of Edgbaston Grove. 

' At the dinner table he continued the debate in such angry 
tones, and struck the table so violently that the children were 
frightened, and desired to escape. 

' The next morning Dr. Johnson went to the bank [Mr. Lloyd 
was a banker] and by way of apology called out in his stentorian 
voice, " I say, Lloyd, I'm the best theologian, but you are the best 
Christian."' p. 41. It could not have been 'the next morning' 
that Johnson went to the bank, for he left for Lichfield on the 
evening of the day of the controversy {ante, ii. 528). He must 
have gone in the afternoon, while Boswell was away seeing Mr. 
Boulton's great works at Soho (///. p. 525). 

Mr. G. B. Lloyd, the great-grandson of Johnson's host, in a let- 
ten written this summer (1886), says: 'Having spent much of my 
boyhood with my grandfather in the old house, I have heard him 
tell the story of the stamping on the broad volume.' 

Boswell mentions {ib. p. 524) that ' Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd, like 
their Majesties, had been blessed with a numerous family of fine 
children, their numbers being exactly the same.' The author of 
Farm and its Inhabitants says (p. 46) : ' There is a tradition that 
when Sampson Lloyd's wife used to feel depressed by the care of 
such a large family (they had sixteen children) he would say to 

her. 



Hi Addenda. 

her, " Nl, ■ cr mind, the twentieth will be the most welcome." ' His 
fifteenth child Catharine married Dr. George Birkbeck, the founder 
of the Mechanics' Institutes {ib. p. 48). 

A story told (p. 50) of one of Mr. Lloyd's sons-in-law, Joseph 
Biddle, is an instance of that excess of forgetfulness which John- 
son called ' morbid oblivion ' {ante, v. 77). ' He went to pay a call 
in Leamington. The servant asked him for his name, he could 
not remember it ; in perplexity he went away, when a friend in the 
street met him and accosted him, " How do you do, Mr. Biddle ?" 
" Oh, Biddle, Biddle, Biddle, that's the name," cried he, and rushed 
off to pay his call.' 

The editor is in error in stating (p. 45, n. i) that a very poor 
poem entitled A bone for Friend Mary to pick, is by Johnson. It 
may be found in the Gent. Mag. for 1791, p. 948. 



Lichfield in 1782. 
(Vol. ii. p. 528.) 

C, P. Morifz, a young Prussian clergyman who published an ac- 
count of a pedestrian tour that he made in England in the year 
1782, thus describes Lichfield as he saw it on a day in June : — 

' At noon I got to Lichfield, an old-fashioned town with narrow 
dirty streets, where for the first time I saw round panes of glass in the 
windows. The place to me wore an unfriendly appearance ; I there- 
fore made no use of my recommendation, but went straight through 
and only bought some bread at a baker's, which I took along with 
me.' — Travels in England in 1782, p. 140, by C. P. Moritz. Cassell's 
National Library, 1886. 

The ' recommendation ' was an introduction to an inn given 
him by the daughter of his landlord at Sutton, who told him ' that 
the people in Lichfield were, in general, very proud.' Travelling 
as he did, on foot and without luggage, he was looked upon with 
suspicion at the inns, and often rudely refused lodging. 



Richard Baxter s doubt. 
(Vol. ii. p. 548.) 
The Rev. J. Hamilton Davies' informs me that there can be no 

' See ante, p. xlvii, 

doubt 



Notes. liii 

doubt that Johnson referred to the following passage in Rdiquict 
BaxteriatiiZy folio edition of 1696, p. 127 : — 

' This is another tiling which I am changed in ; that whereas in my 
younger days I was never tempted to doubt of the Truth of Scripture 
or Christianity, but all my Doubts and Fears were exercised at home, 
about my own Sincerity and Interest in Christ — since then my sorest 
assaults have been on the other side, and such they were, that had I 
been void of internal Experience, and the adhesion of Love, and the 
special help of God, and had not discerned more Reason for my Re- 
ligion than I did when I was younger, I had certainly apostatized to 
Infidelity,' &c. 

Johnson, the day after he recorded his ' doubt,' wrote that he 
was 'troubled with Baxter's scruple' {ante, ii. 477). The 'scruple' 
was, perhaps, the same as the 'doubt.' In his Dictionary he de- 
fines scruple as doubt ; difficulty of determination ; perplexity ; gener- 
ally about minute things. 



Oxford in 1782. 
(Vol. iii. p. 15, n. 2.) 

The Rev. C. P. Moritz {ante, p. Hi.) gives a curious account of 
his visit to Oxford. On his way from Dorchester on the evening 
of a Sunday in June, he had been overtaken by the Rev. Mr. 
Maud, who seems to have been a Fellow and Tutor of Corpus 
College,' and who was returning from doing duty in his curacy. 
It was late when they arrived in the town. Moritz, who, as I have 
said, more than once had found great difficulty in getting a bed, 
had made up his mind to pass the summer night on a stone-bench 
in the High Street. His comrade would not hear of this, but said 
that he would take him to an ale-house where ' it is possible they 
mayn't be gone to bed, and we may yet find company.' This ale- 
house was the Mitre. 

' We went on a few houses further, and then knoc'iced at a door. 
It was then nearly twelve. They readily let us in ; but how great was 
my astonishment when, on being shown into a room on the left, I saw 
a great number of clergymen, all with their gowns and bands on, sit- 
ting round a large table, each with his pot of beer before him. My 
travelling companion introduced me to them as a German clergyman, 

• No such person appears in the Cata/oi^^ire of Graduates. 

whom 



II V Addenda. 

whom he could not sufficiently praise for my correct pronunciation of 
the Latin, my orthodoxy, and my good walking. 

' I now saw myself in a moment, as it were, all at once transported 
into the midst of a company, all apparently very respectable men, but 
all strangers to me. And it appeared to me extraordinary that I 
should thus at midnight be in Oxford, in a large company of Oxonian 
clergy, without well knowing how I had got there. Meanwhile, how- 
ever, I took all the pains in my power to recommend myself to my 
company, and in the course of conversation I gave them as good an 
account as I could of our German universities, neither denying nor 
concealing that now and then we had riots and disturbances. " Oh, 
we are very unruly here, too," said one of the clergymen, as he took 
a hearty draught out of his pot of beer, and knocked on the table 
with his hand. The conversation now became louder, more general, 

and a little confused At last, when morning drew near, Mr. 

Maud suddenly exclaimed, " D — n me, I must read prayers this morn- 
ing at All Souls !" " D — n me " is an abbreviation of " G — d d — n 
me," which in England does not seem to mean more mischief or harm 
than any of our or their common expletives in conversation, such as 
" O gemini !" or " The deuce take me !".... I am almost ashamed 
to own, that next morning, when I awoke, I had got so dreadful a 
headache from the copious and numerous toasts of my jolly and rev- 
erend friends that I could not possibly get up.' — Travels in England 
in 1782, by C. P. Moritz, p. 123. 



Dr. Lettsom. 

(Vol. iii. p. 78.) 

Boswell in an Ode to Mr. Charles Dilly, published in the Gent. 
Mag. for lygi, p. 367, says that Dr. Lettsom 'Refutes pert Priest- 
ley's nonsense.' 

William Vachell. 
(Vol. iii. p. 95. n. 3.) 

Mr. George Parker of the Bodleian Library informs me that 
William Vachell had been tutor to Prince Esterhazy, and that for 
many years he held the appointment of ' Pumper,' or Lessee of the 
baths at Rath. In 1776 and 1777 he paid as rental for them to 
the Corporation ;i^525. He died on November 26, 1789. Accord- 
ing to Mr. Ivor Vachell {Notes and Queries, 6th S. vii. 327), it was 
his eldest son who signed the Round Robin. 

jfohnum 



Notes. Iv 

jfohnson and Baretti. 

(Vol. iii. p. 109, «. 6.) 

Baretti in his lolomiron, p. 145, gives an account of a difference 
between himself and Johnson. Johnson sent to ask him to call 
on him, but IJaretti was leaving town. When he returned the 
time for a reconciliation had passed, for Johnson was dead. 



' English pulpit eloquence. 

(Vol. iii. p. 282.) 

* Upon the whole, which is preferable, the philosophic method 
of the English, or the rhetoric of the French preachers ? The first 
(though less glorious) is certainly safer for the preacher. It is 
difficult for a man to make himself ridiculous, who proposes only 
to deliver plain sense on a subject he has thoroughly studied. But 
the instant he discovers the least pretensions towards the sublime 
or the pathetic, there is no medium ; we must either admire or 
laugh ; and there are so many various talents requisite to form the 
character of an orator that it is more than probable we shall laugh.' 
— Memoirs of Edward Gibbon, ed. 1827,1. 118. 



Bishop Percy's cotnmunicafions to Boswell relative to Johnson. 

(Vol. iii. p. 316, n. i.) 

'James Boswell to Bishop Percy. 

' " 9 April, 1790. 
'"As to suppressing your Lordship's name when relating the 
very few anecdotes of Johnson with which you have favoured me, 
I will do anything to oblige your Lordship but that very thing. I 
owe to the authenticity of my work, to its respectability, and to the 
credit of my illustrious friends [? friend] to introduce as many 
names of eminent persons as I can. . . . Believe me, my Lord, 
you are not the only bishop in the number of great men with which 
my pages are graced. I am quite resolute as to this matter." ' — 
Nichols's Literary History, vii. 313. 

Sit 



Ivi Addenda. 



Sir Thomas Brown's remark * Do the danls liel No; for thm Hell 
could not subsist.' 

(Vol. iii. p. 333.) 

This remark, whether it is Brown's or not, may have been sug- 
gested by Milton's lines in Paradise Lost, ii. 496-9, or might have 
suggested them : — 

* O shame to men ! devil with devil damn'd 
Firm concord holds, men only disagree 
Of creatures rational.' 



yohnson on the advantages of having a profession or business. 
(Vol. iii. p. 351, n. i.) 

' Dr. Johnson was of opinion that the happiest as well as the 
most virtuous persons were to be found amongst those who united 
with a business or profession a love of literature.' — Seward's Bv 
ographiana, p. 599. 

Johnson's trips to the country. 
(Vol. iii. p. 514.) 
I have omitted to mention Johnson's visit to 'Squire Dilly's man- 
sion at Southill in June, 1781 {ante, iv. 137-152). 



Citations of living authors in Johnson's Dictionary. 
(Vol. iv. p. 5, ;/. I.) 
Johnson cites Irene under impostures, and Lord Lyttleton under 
tjvist. 



Dr. Parr's evening with Dr. yohnson. 
(Vol. iv. p. 18.) 

The Rev. John Rigaud, B.D., Fellow of Magdalen College, Ox- 
ford, has kindly sent me the following anecdote of the meeting of 
Johnson and Parr : — 

' I remember 



Notes. Ivii 

' I remember Dr. Routh, the old President of Magdalen, telling 
me of an interview and conversation between Dr. Johnson and Dr. 
Parr, in the course of which the former made use of some expres- 
sion respecting the latter, which considerably wounded and offend- 
ed him. " Sir," he said to Dr. Johnson, " you know that what you 
have just said will be known in four-and-twenty hours over this 
vast metropolis." Upon which Dr. Johnson's manner altered, his 
eye became calm, and he put out his hand, and said, " Forgive me. 
Parr, I didn't quite mean it." " But," said the President, with an 
amused and amusing look, '* /never could get hbn to tell me what it 
was Dr. Johnson had said T He spoke of seeing Dr. Johnson 
going up the steps into University College, dressed, I think, in a 
snuff-coloured coat.' 

Dr. Martin Joseph Routh, who was President of Magdalen Col- 
lege for sixty-four years, was born in 1755 and died on December 
22, 1854. __^ 

' Solamen miseris socios habuisse dolor is. ^ 

(Vol. iv. p. 209, n 2.) 

Malone's note on The Rape of Lucrece must have been, not as I 
conjectured on line iiii, but on lines 1581-2 : — 

' It easeth some, though none it ever cured. 
To think their dolour others have endured." 

With these lines may be compared Satan's speech in Paradise 
Regained, Book i. lines 399-402 : — 

' Long since with woe 
Nearer acquainted, now I feel by proof, 
That fellowship in pain divides not smart. 
Nor lightens aught each man's peculiar load.' 



Richard Baxter's rule of preaching. 
(Vol. iv. p. 213.) 

The Rev. J. Hamilton Davies' has furnished me with the fol- 
lowing extract from Religuice Baxteriance, ed. 1696, p. 93, in illus- 
tration of Johnson's statement : — 

'And yet I did usually put in something in my Sermon which was 

' See ante, p. xlvii. 

above 



Iviii Addenda. 

above their own discovery, and which they had not known before ; 
and this I did, that they might be kept humble, and still perceive 
their ignorance, and be willing to keep in a learning state. (For when 
Preachers tell their People of no more than they know, and do not 
shew that they excel them in knowledge, and easily overtop them in 
Abilities, the People will be tempted to turn Preachers themselves, 
and think that they have learnt all that the Ministers can teach them, 

and are as wise as they ). And this I did also to increase 

their knowledge ; and also to make Religion pleasant to them, by a 
daily addition to their former Sight, and to draw them on with desire 
and Delight.' 

Opposition to Sir jfosliua Reynolds in the Royal Aeadetny. 

(Vol. iv. p. 254, //. I.) 

'James Boswell, Esq., to Bishop Percy. 

' 12 March, 1790. 
' Sir Joshua has been shamefully used by a junto of the Acade- 
micians. I live a great deal with him, and he is much better than 
you would suppose.' — Nichols's Literary History^ vii. 313. 

Richard Baxter on the possible salvation of a Suicide. 
(Vol. iv. p. 260. j 

The Rev. J. Hamilton Davies writes to me that ' Dr. Johnson's 
quotation about suicide must surely be wrong. I have no recol- 
lection in any of Baxter's Works of such a statement, and it is in 
direct contradiction to all that is known of his sentiments.' Mr. 
Dauies sends me the following passage, which possibly Johnson 
might have very imperfectly remembered : — 

'The commonest cause |of suicidej is melancholy, &c. Though 
there be much more hope of the salvation of such as want the use of 
their understandings, because so far it may be called involuntary, yet 
it is a very dreadful case, especially so far as reason remaineth in any 
power.' — Baxter's Christian Dictionary, edited by Orme, part iv. p. 138. 



Hazlitfs report of Baxter'' s Sermofi. 

(Vol. iv. p. 261, ;/. 2.) 

The Rev. J. Hamilton Davies tells me that he ' entirely disbe- 
lieves that Baxter said, "Hell was paved with infants" skulls." 

The 



Notes. 



I IX 



The same thing, or something very like it, has been said of Cal- 
vin, but I could never,' Mr. Davies continues, ' find it in his Works.' 
He kindly sends me the following extract from Reliqiiice Baxteri- 
ance, ed. 1696, p. 24 : — 

' Once all the ignorant Rout were raging mad against me for preach- 
ing the Doctrine of Original Sin to them, and telling them that Infants 
before Regeneration had so much Guilt and Corruption, as made them 
loathsome in the Eyes of God : whereupon they vented it abroad in 
the Country, That I preached that God hated, or loathed Infants ; 
so that they railed at me as I passed through the streets. The next 
Lord's Day, I cleared and confirmed it, and shewed them that if this 
were not true, their Infants had no need of Christ, of Baptism, or of 
Renewing by the Holy Ghost. And I asked them whether they durst 
say that their Cliildren were saved without a Saviour, and were no 
Christians, and why they baptized them, with much more to that pur- 
pose, and afterwards they were ashamed and as mute as fishes.' 



yohnso7i on an actor's transformation. 

(Vol. iv. p. 281, 282.) 

Boswell in his Retnarks on the Profession of a Player (Essay ii), 
first printed in the London Magazine for 1770, says : — 

' I remember to have heard the most illustrious author of this 
age say : " If, Sir, Garrick believes himself to be every character 
that he represents he is a madman, and ought to be confined. 
Nay, Sir, he is a villain, and ought to be hanged. If, for instance, 
he believes himself to be Macbeth he has committed murder, he 
is a vile assassin who, in violation of the laws of hospitality as 
well as of other principles, has imbrued his hands in the blood of 
his King while he was sleeping under his roof. If, Sir, he has 
really been that person in his own mind, he has in his own mind 
been as guilty as Macbeth." ' — Nichols's Literary Lfistory, ed. 1848, 
vii- 373- 

Sir yohn Floyer ' On the Asthma.' 

(Vol. iv. p. 408.) 

Johnson, writing from Ashbourne to Dr. Brocklesby on June 20, 
1784, says: 'I am now looking into Floyer who lived with his 
asthma to almost his ninetieth year.' Mr. Samuel Timmins, the 

author 



]x Addenda. 

author of Dr. Johnson in Birmingham, informs me that he and 
two friends of his lately found in Lichfield a Lending Book of the 
Cathedral Library. Among the entries for 1784 was: ^ Sir John 
Floyer on the Asthma, lent to Dr. Johnson.' Johnson, no doubt, 
had taken the book with him to Ashbourne. 

Mr. Timmins says that the entries in this Lending Book unfortu- 
nately do not begin till about 1760 (or later). ' If,' he adds, 'the 
earlier Lending Book could be found, it would form a valuable 
clue to books which Johnson may have borrowed in his youth and 
early manhood. 

BoswelVs expectations from Burke. 
(Vol. iv. p. 257, ;;. 5 ; and p. 298, //. i.) 

Boswell, in May 1783, mentioned to Johnson his 'expectations 
from the interest of an eminent person then in power.' The two 
following extracts from letters written by him show what some of 
these expectations had been. 

'James Boswell, Esq., to James Abercrombie, Esq., of Philadel- 
phia. 

'July 28, 1793. 

' I have a great wish to see America ; and I once flattered my- 
self that I should be sent thither in a station of some importance.' 
Nichols's Literary History, \\\. 317. Boswell had written to Burke 
on March 3, 1778: 'Most heartily do I rejoice that our present 
ministers have at last yielded to conciliation (ante, iii. 250). For 
amidst all the sanguinary zeal of my countrymen, I have professed 
myself a friend to our fellow-subjects in America, so far as they 
claim an exemption from being taxed by the representatives of the 
King's British subjects. I do not perfectly agree with you ; for I 
deny the declaratory act, and am a warm Tory in its true consti- 
tutional sense. I wish I were a commissioner, or one of the sec- 
retaries of the commission for the grand treaty. I am to be in 
London this spring, and if his Majesty should ask me what I would 
choose, my answer will be to assist at the compact between Brit- 
ain and America.' — Burke's Correspondence, ii. 209. 



BosweWs 



Notes. Ixi 



Boswcll's intention to attend on yohnson in his illness, and to publish 

' Praises ' of him. 

(Vol. iv. p. 306.) 

'James Boswell, Esq.. to Bishop Percy. 

' Edinburgh. 8 March, 1784. 

'. . . . I intend to be in London about the end of this month, 
chiefly to attend upon Dr. Johnson with respectful affection. He 

has for some time been very ill I wish to publish as a regale 

\ante, iii. 350, n. 2 ; v. 395, //. ij to him a neat little volume, The 

Praises of Dr. yohnson., by eontemporary Writers Will your 

Lordship take the trouble to send me a note of the writers you 
recollect having praised our much respected friend? .... An edi- 
tion of my pamphlet \antc, iv. 298] has been published in Lon- 
don.' — Nichols's Literary History, vii. 302. 



The reported Russian version of the ' Rambler.' 
(Vol. iv. p. 319, ;/. 2.) 

I am informed by my friend, Mr. W. R. Morfill, M.A., of Oriel 
College, Oxford, who has, I suppose, no rival in this country in 
his knowledge of the Slavonic tongues, that no Russian transla- 
tion of the Rambler has been published. He has given me the 
following title of the Russian version of Rasselas, which he has 
obtained for me through the kindness of Professor Grote, of the 
University of Warsaw : — 

* Rasselas, printz Abissinskii, Vostochnaya Poviest Sochinenie 
Doktora Dzhonsona Perevod s'angliiskago. 2 chasti, Moskva. 

1795- 

' Rasselas, prince of Abyssinia, An Eastern Tale, by Doctor 
Johnson. Translated from the English. 2 parts, Moscow, 1795.' 



' /t has not wit enough to keep it sweet.' 

(Vol. iv. p. 369.) 

* Heylyn, in the Epistle to his Letter-Combate, addressing Baxter, 
and speaking of such " unsavoury pieces of wit and mischief " as 
" the Church-historian,'" asks, " Would you not have me rub them 

with 



Ixii Addenda. 

with a little salt to keep them sweet ?'' This passage was surely 
present in the mind of Dr. Johnson when he said concerning l^hc 
Rehearsal that ' it had not wit enough to keep it sweet." ' — J. E. 
Bailey's Life of 2'homas Fuller, p. 640. 



Pictures of Johnson. 

(Vol. iv. p. 485, ;/. 3.) 

In the Common Room of Trinity College, Oxford, there is an 
interesting portrait of Johnson, said to be by Romney, I cannot, 
however, find any mention of it in the Life of that artist. It was 
presented to the College by Canon Duckworth. 



The Gregory Family. 

(Vol. V. p. 53, ;/. 4.) 

Mr. P. J. Anderson (in Notes and Queries, 7th S. iii. 147) casts 
some doubt on Chalmers's statement. He gives a genealogical 
table of the Gregory family, which includes thirteen professors ; 
but two of these cannot, from their dates, be reckoned among 
Chalmers's sixteen. 



The University of Si. Andrews in 1778. 
(Vol. V. p. 71, n. 2.) 

In the preface to Poems by George Monck Berkeley, it is recorded 
(p. cccxlviii) that when ' Mr. Berkeley entered at the University of 
St. Andrews [about 17 78], one of the college officers called upon 
him to deposit a crown to pay for the windows he might break. 
Mr. Berkeley said, that as he should reside in his father's house, 
it was little likely he should break any windows, having never, that 
he remembered, broke one in his life. He was assured that he 
would Ao it at St. Andrews. On the rising of the session several 
of the students said, " Now for the windows. Come, it is time to 
set off, let us sally forth !" Mr. Berkeley, being called upon, en- 
quired what was to be done ? They replied, " Why, to break every 
window in college." " For what reason ?" "Oh! no reason ; but 
that it has always been done from time immemorial." ' The Ed- 
itor goes on to say that Mr. Berkeley prevailed on them to give up 

the 



Notes. Ixlii 

the practice. How poor some of the students were is shown by 
the following anecdote, told by the College Porter, who had to col- 
lect the crowns. ' I am just come,' he said, 'from a poor student 
indeed. I went for the window croon ; he cried, begged, and prayed 
not to pay it, saying, " he brought but a croon to keep him all the 
session, and he had spent sixpence of it ; so I have got only four 
and sixpence." ' His father, a labourer, who owned three cows, 
' had sold one to dress his son for the University, and put the 
lamented croon in his pocket to purchase coals. All the lower 
students study by fire-light. He had brought with him a large 
tub of oatmeal and a pot of salted butter, on which he was to sub- 
sist from Oct. 20 until May 20.' Berkeley raised 'a very noble 
subscription ' for the poor fellow. 

In another passage (p. cxcviii) it is recorded that Berkeley 
' boasted to his father, " Well, Sir, idle as you may think me, I 
never have once bowed at any Professor's Lecture." An explana- 
tion being requested of the word bowing, it was thus given : " Why, 
if any poor fellow has been a little idle, and is not prepared to 
speak when called upon by the Professor, he gets up and makes a 
respectful bow, and sits down again." ' Berkeley was a grandson 
of Bishop Berkeley. 

Johnson's unpublished sermons. 

(Vol. V. p. 75, 71. 2.) 

•James Boswell, Esq., to James Abercromeie, of Philadelphia. 

' June u, 1792. 
' I have not yet been able to discover any more of Johnson's 
sermons besides those left for publication by Dr. Taylor. I am 
informed by the Lord Bishop of Salisbury, that he gave an excel- 
lent one to a clergyman, who preached and published it in his own 
name on some public occasion. But the Bishop has not as yet told 
me the name, and seems unwilling to do it. Yet I flatter myself I 
shall get at it.' — Nichols's Literary History, vii. 315. 



Tillotson's argument against the doctrine of transxibstantiation. 

(Vol. V. p. 80.) 

Gibbon, writing of his reconversion from Roman Catholicism 

to 



Ixiv Addenda. 

to Protestantism in the year 1754, after allowing something to the 
conversation of his Swiss tutor, says : — 

' I must observe that it was principally effected by my private 
reflections ; and I still remember my solitary transport at the dis- 
covery of a philosophical argument against the doctrine of tran- 
substantiation — that the text of scripture which seems to inculcate 
the real presence is attested only by a single sense — our sight ; 
while the real presence itself is disproved by three of our senses — 
the sight, the touch, and the taste.' — Memoirs of Edward Gibbon, 
ed. 1S27, i. 67. 

yean Pierre de Crousaz. 
(Vol. V. p. 90.) 

Gibbon, describing his education at Lausanne, says : — 
'The principles of philosophy were associated with the exam- 
ples of taste ; and by a singular chance the book as well as the 
man which contributed the most effectually to my education has a 
stronger claim on my gratitude than on my admiration. M. de 
Crousaz, the adversary of Bayle and Pope, is not distinguished by 
lively fancy or profound reflection ; and even in his own country, 
at the end of a few years, his name and writings are almost oblit- 
erated. But his philosophy had been formed in the school of 
Locke, his divinity in that of Limborch and Le Clerc ; in a long 
and laborious life several generations of pupils were taught to 
think and even to write ; his lessons rescued the Academy of Lau- 
sanne from Calvinistic prejudice ; and he had the rare merit of 
diffusing a more liberal spirit among the clergy and people of the 
Pays de Vaud.' — Memoirs 0/ Edward Gibbon, ed. 1827, i, 66. 



7^e neiv pavement in London. 

(Vol. V. p. 95. n. 3.) 

' By an Act passed in 1766, For the better cleansing, paving and 
enlightning the City of London and Liberties thereof, &c., powers are 
granted in pursuance of which the great streets have been paved 
w ith whyn-quarry stone, or rock-stone, or stone of a flat surface.' — 
A Tour through the whole Island of Great Britain, ed. 1769, vol. ii. 
p. 121. 

Boswelts 



Notes. Ixv 



BosweWs Projected Works. 

(Vol. V. p. 103, 11. 2.) 

To this list should be added an account of a Tour to the Isle 
of Man {antc^ iii. 91). 

A cancel in the first edition of Boswelfs ' yournal of a Tour to the 

Hebrides.' 
(Vol. V. p. 172.) 

In my note on the suppression of offensive passages in the sec- 
ond edition of Boswell's journal of a lour to the Hebrides (ante, v. 
168), I mention that Rowlandson in one of his Caricatures paints 
Boswell begging Sir Alexander Macdonald for mercy, while on the 
ground lie pages 165, 167, torn out. I have discovered, though 
too late to mention in the proper place, that in the first edition the 
leaf containing pages 167, 168, was really cancelled. In my own 
copy I noticed between pages 168 and 169 a narrow projecting 
slip of paper. I found the same in the copy in the British Muse- 
um. Mr. Horace Hart, the printer to the University, who has 
kindly examined my copy, informs me that the leaf was cancelled 
after the sheets had been stitched together. It was cut out, but 
an edge was left to which the new one was attached by paste. 
The leaf thus treated begins with the words ' talked with very 
high respect' {ante, v. 170) and ends 'This day was little better 
than a blank' (ante, v. 172). This conclusion was perhaps meant 
to be significant to the observant reader. 



Bosweirs conversation with the King about the title proper to be given 
to the Young Pretender. 

(Vol. V. p. 211, n. 2.) 
Dr. Lort wrote to Bishop Percy on Aug. 15, 1785 : — 
'Boswell's book \The Tour to the Hebrides\ I suppose, will be 
out in the winter. The King at his levee talked to him, as was 
natural, on this subject. Boswell told his majesty that he had an- 
other work on the anvil — a History of the Rebellion in 1745 [ante, 
iii. 184); but that he was at a loss how to style the principal per- 
son who figured in it. " How would you style him, Mr. Boswell?" 
VI. — s " I was 



Iwi Addenda. 

" I was thinking, Sire, of calling him the grandson of the unfortu- 
nate James the Second." "That I have no objection to ; my title 
to the Crown stands on firmer ground — on an Act of Parliament." 
This is said to be the substance of a conversation which passed at 
the levee. I wish I was certain of the exact words.' — Nichols's 
Literary History^ vii. 472. 



Shakespeare'' s popularity. 
(Vol. V. p. 277. //. 6.) 

Gibbon, after describing how he used to attend Voltaire's pri- 
vate theatre at Monrcpos in 1757 and 1758, continues : — 

' The habits of pleasure fortified my taste for the French thea- 
tre, and that taste has perhaps abated my idolatry for the gigantic 
genius of Shakespeare, which is inculcated from our infancy as 
the first duty of an Englishman.' — Memoirs of Edward Gibbon, ed. 
1827, i. 90. 

Archibald Campbell. 
(Vol. V. p. 406.) 
Mr. C. E. Doble informs me that in the Bodleian Library ' there 
is a characteristic letter of Archibald Campbell in a Life of Fran- 
cis Lee in Rawlinson, J., 4°. 2. 197 ; and also a skeleton life of him 
in Rawlinson, J., 4°. 5. 301.' 



Cocoa Tree Club. 
(Vol. V. p. 440, ;/. I .) 
Gibbon records in his Journal on November 24, 1762, a visit to 
the Cocoa Tree Club : — 

' That respectable body, of which I have the honour of being a 
member, affords every evening a sight truly English. Twenty or 
thirty, perhaps, of the first men in the kingdom in point of fashion 
and fortune, supping at little tables covered with a napkin, in the 
middle of a coffee-room, upon a bit of cold meat or a sandwich, 
and drinking a glass of punch. At present we are full of king's 
counsellors and lords of the bed-chamber, who, having jumped 

into 



Notes. Ixvii 

into the ministry, make a very singular medley of their old princi- 
ples and language with their modern ones.' — Memoirs of Edward 
Gibbon, ed. 1827, i. 131. 



jfohnsorHs use of the word ' big.' 

(Vol. V. p. 485.) 

On volume i. page 545, Johnson says : ' Don't, Sir, accustom 
yourself to use big words for little matters.' 



Atlas, the Duke of Devonshire's race- horse. 
(Vol. V. p. 490.) 

Johnson, in his Diary of a fourney into North Wales, records 
on July 12, 1774 : — 

'At Chatsworth. . . . , Atlas, fifteen hands inch and half.' 

Mr. Duppa in a note on this, says : ' A race-horse, which attract- 
ed so much of Dr. Johnson's attention, that he said, "of all the 
Duke's possessions I like Atlas best." ' 

Thomas Holcroft, who in childhood wandered far and wide with 
his father, a pedlar, was at Nottingham during the race-week of the 
year 1756 or 1757, and saw in its youth the horse which Johnson 
so much admired in its old age. He says : ' The great and glori- 
ous part w-hich Nottingham held in the annals of racing this year, 
arose from the prize of the King's plate, which was to be contend- 
ed for by the two horses which everybody I heard speak consid- 
ered as undoubtedly the best in England, and perhaps equal to 
any that had ever been known, Childers alone excepted. Their 
names were Careless and Atlas There was a story in circula- 
tion that Atlas, on account of his size and clumsiness, had been 
banished to the cart-breed ; till by some accident, either of play- 
fulness or fright, several of them started together ; and his vast 
advantage in speed happening to be noticed, he was restored to 
his blood companions Alas for the men of Nottingham, Care- 
less was conquered. I forget whether it was at two or three heats, 
but there was many an empty purse on that night, and many a sor- 
rowful heart.' — Memoirs of Thomas Holcroft, i. 70. 

Sif 



Ixviii Addenda. 



Sir Richard Clough. 

(Vol. V. p. 4';7) 
There is an interesting note on Sir Richard Clough, the founder 
of Bach y Graig, in Professor Rhys's edition of Pennant's Tours in 
Wales (vol. ii. p. 137). The Professor writes to me : — ' Sir Richard 
dough's wealth was so great that it became a saying of the people 
in North Wales that a man who grew very wealthy was or had be- 
come a Clough. This has long been forgotten ; but it is still said 
in Welsh, in North Wales, that a very rich man is a regular clwch, 
which is pronounced with the guttural spirant, which was then (in 
tiic 1 6th century) sounded in English, just as the English word 
ilriiui^ht (of drink) is in Welsh dracht pronounced nearly as if it 
were German.' 



Evan Evans. 

(Vol. v. p. 505.) 

Evan Evans, who is described as being ' incorrigibly addicted to 
strong drink,' was Curate of Llanvair Talyhaern, in Denbighshire, 
and author of Some Specimens of the Poetry of Antient Welsh Bards 
translated into English. London, R. & J. Dodsley, 1764. My 
friend Mr. MorfiU informs me that he remembers to have seen it 
stated in a manuscript note in a book in the Bodleian, that ' ?^van 
Evans would have written much more if he had not been so much 
given up to the bottle.' 

Gray thus mentions Evan Evans in a letter to Dr. Wharton, 
written in July, 1760: — 

' The Welsh Poets are also coming to light. I have seen a dis- 
course in MS. about them (by one Mr. Evans, a clergyman) with 
specimens of their writings. This is in Latin ; and though it don't 
approach the other [Macpherson], there are fine scraps among it.' 
— The Works of Thomas Gray, ed. by the Rev. John Mitford. Lon- 
don, 1858. vol. iii. p. 250. 



INDEX 



INDEX TO THE ADDENDA. 



Abercrombie, James, Ix, Ixiii. 

Addenbroke, Dean, xxxiii. 

Atlas, the race-horse, Ixxvii. 

Barclay's Answer to Kenrick's Re- 
view of Johnson's Shakespeare, 
xlvi. 

Baretti, Joseph, Iv. 

Baskett, Mr., xxxii. 

Bathurst, Dr., Proposal for a Geo- 
graphical Dictionary, xxi. 

Baxter, Richard, on toleration, xlvii; 
his doubt, Hi; rule of preaching, Ivii; 
on the possible salvation of a suicide, 
Iviii; on the portion of babies who 
die unbaptized, lix. 

Berkeley, Dr., xlviii. 

Berkeley, George Monck, Ixii. 

Big, Ixvii. 

Boswell, James, Bishop Percy's Com- 
munications, Iv; Cancel in theyifw;- 
ual of a Tour to the Hebrides, Ixv; 
conversation with the king, Ixv; ex- 
pectations from Burke, Ix; inten- 
tion to attend on Johnson in his last 
illness, and to publish ' praises ' of 
him, Ixi; Lurgan Clanbrassil, 1; pro- 
jected works, Ixv; Remarks on the 
profession of a player, lix; visit to 
Rousseau and Voltaire, xlv. 

Browne, Sir Thomas, Ivi. 

Browning, Mr. Robert, 1. 

Burke, Edmund, Ix. 

Camden, Lord, xlviii. 

Campbell, Archibald, Ixvi. 

' Caution ' money, xxxi. 

Clarendon, Edward. Earl of, xlix. 



Clarendon Press, xxxi. 

Clough, Sir Richard, Ixviii. 

Cocoa Tree Club, Ixvi. 

Crousaz, Jean Pierre de, Ixiv. 

Davenport, William, xxxv. 

Davies, Rev. J. Hamilton, xlvii, liii, 
Iviii. 

DODSLEY, Robert, xxv, xxvi. 

Don Belianis, xl. 

England barren in good historians, 
xlviii. 

English pulpit eloquence, Iv. 

Evans, Evan, Ixviii. 

Eyre, Mr., xxxii. 

Fann and its Inhabitants, xli, li. 

FelixDiarte of Hiixania, xl. 

Floyer, Sir John, lix. 

Foundling Hospital, xlviii. 

Franking Letters, xxxvi. 

Frederick IL of Prussia, xlv. 

French Writers, their superficiality, 
xlvi. 

Fuller, Thomas, Life, Ixii. 

Garrick, David, xxxix, xliv, lix. 

Gibbon, Edward, xlvi, Iv, Ixiii, Ixvi. 

GoUGH, Richard, xxxiii. 

Gray, Thomas, Ixviii. 

Gregory Family, Ixii. 

Harington's Nugiz Antiques, xxxiv. 

Hazlitt, W^illiam, Iviii. 

History of the Marchioytess de Pompa- 
dour, xxix. 

HOLCROFT, Thomas, Ixvii. 

Hume, David, xliv. 

' It has not wit enough to keep it 
sweet,' Ixii. 



Ixx 



Index to the Addenda. 



Johnson, Michael, xxxix. 

Johnson, ^^r., a bookseller, xxviii. 

Johnson, Mrs., xlii. 

Jo"HNSON, Sanuiel, advantages of hav- 
ing a profession or business, Ivi; ad- 
vice about studying, xxxi; anonymous 
publications, xxviii; application for 
the mastcrshii) of Solihull School, xlii; 
citation of living authors in the Dic- 
tionary, hi; critics of three classes, 
xliii; diflerence with i3aretti, Iv; 
discussion on baptism with Mr. 
Lloyd, li; knowledge of Italian, xliii; 
Letters to William Strahan: — Apol- 
ogy about some work that was pass- 
ing through the press, xxv; appren- 
ticing a lad to Mr. Strahan, and a pre- 
sentation to the Blue Coat School, 
xxxiv; IJathurst's projected (JiOi^niph- 
ical Dictionary, xxi; cancel in the 
Joiinicy to the Western Islands of 
Scot/and, \\\\i; 'copy' and a book 
by Professor Watson, xxxvi; George 
Strahan's election to a scholarship, 
xxix; Miss Williams, taxes due, and 
a journey, xxvii; printing the />/<- 
tionnry, xxv-xxvii; A'asse/as, xxviii; 
Suppressions in 'J'a.xation no Tyr- 
anny, XXXV ; letter to Dr. Taylor, 
xxxvii; portraits, Ixii; public interest 
in him, xlvii; romantic virtue, xlvii; 
transformation of an actor, lix; trips 
to the country, Ivi; unpublished ser- 
mons, Ixiii; use of the word big, 
Ixvii. 

Jones, Sir William, xxxi. 

Kenrick, Dr. William, xlvi. 

LanglEV, Rev. W., xxxv. 

Lettsom, Dr., liv. 

Lichfield, Cathedral, xxxiii; City and 
County, xxxix; described by C. P. 
Moritz, lii. 

Lloyd, Olivia, xli. 

Lloyd, Sampson, xli, li. 

Locke, John, xlviii. 

London P.we.ment, Ixiv. 



LoRT, Dr., Ixv. 

Mascj.n, Rev. William, xxxviii. 

Maid, Rev. Mr., liii. 

Millar, Andrew, xxv, xxvii. 

Mitchell, Andrew, xlv. 

Moritz, C. P., Travels in England in 
1782, lii, liii. 

Morrison's, Mr. Alfred, Collection of 
Autographs, xxxvii, 1. 

Newto.n, ISishop Thomas, xxxiii. 

Oxford — The proposei KidingSchool, 
xlix; in 1782, liii; University Col- 
lege, xxix. 

Palmerin of England, xl. 

Parr, Dr., Ivi. 

Percy, Bishop, xlvi, Iv, 

Piozzi's, Mrs., 'Collection of John- 
son's Letters,' xlvii. 

Planta, Joseph, xlviii. 

PoR teuus. Captain, xxvi. 

Porter, Henry, xli. 

Pretender, Young, Ixv. 

Priestley, Dr. Joseph, liv. 

Rambler, reported Russian version, 
Ixi. 

Reynolds, Sir Joshua, Iviii. 

Robertson, Dr. William, xxxvi. 

Rousseau, J. J., xlv. 

RoUTH, Dr., Ivii. 

RUDD, Mrs., 1. 

Scotch Nationality, xlviii. 

Shakespeare's Popularity, Ixvi, 

Shaw, Rev. Mr., xxxvi. 

Shei'HERD, Mr. R. H., xliv. 

SiMi'soN, Rev. W. Sparrow, xxxiii. 

Smart, Christopher, 1. 

Solaincn iiiiscris socios habuisse doloris, 
Ivii. 

St. Andrews University, Ixii. 

Stewart, Francis, xxvi. 

Strahan, George, xxix. 

Strah.vn, William, xxi, xxvi, xxxi, 
xxxiii, xxxvi, xxxvii. 

Synod of Cooks, xlvi. 
T.VYl-dK, Dr. John, xxxvii. 
Tayluk, John, of Birmingham, xli. 



Index to the Addenda. 



Ixxi 



Thrale, Henry, xxxvii. 
TiLLOTSON, Archbishop, Ixiii. 
' Unitarian,' xlix. 
Vachell, William, iiv. 
Voltaire, xlv, Ixvi. 



IValford's Antiquarian, xliv. 
Watson, Rev. Professor, xxxvi. 
\Vhitehead, William, xxxviii. 
W^ILKES, John, xliv. 
Williams, Miss, xxvii. 



INDEX, 



INDEX. 



Abbreviating Names. 



Adams, George. 



A. 

Abbreviating Names, Johnson's hab- 
it of, ii. 296, n. I. 

Abel Drugger, iii. 40. 

Abercrombie, James, ii. 237, 277, n. 2. 

Aberdeen, second Earl of, v. 148. 

Abernethy, Dr., iv. 314, n. 3. 

Abernethy, Rev. John, v. 77. 

Abingdon, fourth Earl of, iii. 494, «. 3. 

Abington, Mrs., her jelly, ii. 400 ; 
Johnson at her benefit, ii. 367, 371, 
378 ; She Stoops to Conqjier, ii. 239, 
n. 2. 

Abjuration, oath of, ii. 367, n. 4. 

Abney, Sir Thomas, i. 570, 11. 4. 

Abreu, Marquis of, i. 408. 

Abridgments, defended by Johnson, 
i. 162, w. 4 : iv. 441 n. ; like a cow's 
calf, V. 81. 

Abroad, advice to people going, iv. 

383- 

Abruptness, i. 466. 

Absolute Princes, ii. 424. 

Abstemious, Johnson, not temperate, 
i. 542. 

Absurdities, delineating, iv. 20. 

Abud, — , v. 289 n. I. 

Abuse, coarse and refined, iv. 343. 

Abyssinia, A Voyage to, i. 100. 

Academia della Crusca, i. 345, 513. 

Academy, Mr. Doble's notes on the au- 
thorship of The Whole Duty of 
Man, ii. 275, n. I. 



Accommodate, v. 353, n. 3. 
Account of an Attempt to ascertain the 
Longitude, i. 319, n. \, 349, 351, n. 
I ; ii. 144, n. i. 
Account of the late Revolution in 

Sweden, iii. 323. 
Account of Scotland in 1702, iii. 275. 
Account-Keeping, iv. 204. 
Accuracy, requires immediate record, 
ii. 249, n. 4 ; and vigilance, iv. 416 ; 
needful in delineating absurdities, 
iv. 20 ; Johnson's sayings not accu- 
rately reported, ii. 381. See Bos- 
well, authenticity. 
Acham, v. 518, n. I. 
Achilles, shield of, iv. 39. 
Acid, ii. 415. 

Acis and Galatea, iii. 274, n. 2. 
Acquaintance, should be varied, iv. 

203 ; making new, iv. 432. 
Acting, iv. 281, 282 ; v. 42. 
Action in Speaking, ridiculed, i. 387; 
useful only in addressing brutes, ii. 
242. 
Actors. See Players. 
Ad Lauram parituram Epigramma, i. 

181. 
Ad Ricavdum Savage, i. 188, «. 3. 
Ad Urbanum, i. 131. 
Adam, Robert, Works in Architecture, 

iii. 182. 
Adamites, ii, 288. 

Adams, George, Treatise on the Globes, 
ii. 50- 



Index to 



Adams, John. 

Adams, John, the American envoy, ii. 
46, n. 2. 

Adams, Rev. William, D. D. , BoswcU, 
letter to, i. 9 ; everlasting punish- 
ment, on, iv. 345; Hume, answers, 
i. 9, w. I ; ii. 505 ; iv. 434, «. a ; dines 
with him, ii. 505 ; Johnson awed by 
him, i. 86; — and BoswcU visit him 
in 1776, ii. 505 ; in June, 1784, iv. 
329 ; — well-treated, iv. 359 ; — and 
Chesterfield, i. 305-9; — and Dr. 
Clarke, iv. 480, «. 2 ; — Dicliona>y, i. 
215 ; — hypochondria, i. 559; — last 
visit, iv. 433; — nominal tutor, i. 92; 

— Pfavt'rs and Mtu/itatious, iv. 434, 
n. 2 ; projected book of family pray- 
ers, iv. 339 ; — and Dr. Price, iv. 501 ; 

— projected Bibliotheque, i. 329 ; — 
projected Life of Alfred, i. 204 ; — un- 
dergraduate days, i. 30, w. i, 66-68, 
85 ; ii. 505 ; — will, not mentioned, 
in, iv. 463, n. 3 ; Master of Pembroke 
College, v. 519, n. i ; rector of St. 
Chad's, Shrewsbury, v. 519 ; men- 
tioned, i. 154, 155; v. 139, 71. 2. 

Adams, Miss, defends women against 
Johnson, iv. 336 ; describes him in 
letters, iv. 174, n. 2, 352, n. i; his 
death, iv. 433, «. 2; his gallantry, iv. 
337; mentioned, iv. 329. 

Adams, Mrs., iv. 329, 346. 

Adams, the brothers, the architects, ii. 
372. 

Adams, William, founder of Newport 
School, i. 153, «. I. 

Adbaston, i. 153, n. i. 

Addison, liohn's edition, iv. 219, «. 2; 
borrows out of modesty, v. 105, n. i; 
Boswell's projected work, i. 261, n. 
I ; Budgell's papers in the Spectator, 
iii. 53; Epilogue to The Distressed 
Mother, ib. ; Cato, Dennis criticises 
it, iii. 46, n. 3; Johnson, i. 230, «. 5; 
Parson Adams praises it, i. 569, n. i; 



Addison. 

Prologue, i. 35, n. i; eight quota- 
tions added to the language, i. 230, 
n. 5; quotations from it, ' Honour's 
a sacred tie,' v. 93; ' Indifferent in 
his choice,' iii. 77, n. i; The Nu- 
midian's luxury, iii. 320; ' obscurely 
good,' iv. 159, n. 3; ' Painful pre- 
eminence,' iii. 94, n. 2; ' the Romans 
call it Stoicism,' i. 386; ' Smothered 
in the dusty whirlwind,' v. 331; 
'This must end 'em,' ii. 62, «. i; 
Christian religion, defence of the, 
V. loi, n. 4; conversation, ii. 294; 
iii. 386; death of a piece with a 
man's life, v. 452, n. 3; death-bed 
described by II. Walpole, v. 306, n. 
2; dedication of Rosamond, v. 429, 
n. 2; encouraged a man in his ab- 
surdity, V. 276; English historians, 
ii. 271, n. 2; familiar day, his, iv. 
105, n. 2; Freeholder, i. 398, n. 4; 
ii. 70, n. 2; 364, n. 2; Freeport, Sir 
Andrew, ii. 243; v. 373; French 
learning, v. 353; general knowledge 
in his time rare, iv. 251, «. 3; ghosts, 
iv. no; Italian learning, ii. 397; v. 
353; Johnson praises him, i. 492; 
judgment of the public, i. 232, n. i; 
Latin verses, i. 71, n. i; Leandro 
Alberti, ii. 397; Life by Johnson, iv. 
61-65; 'mixed wit,' i. 207, n. 3; 
Newton on space, v. 327, «. i; 'nine- 
pence in ready money,' ii. 294; no- 
tanda, i. 237; party-lying, ii. 215, 
n. 4; Pope's lines on him, ii. 97; 
procerity, i. 357; prose, iv. 6, «. 2; 
Remarks on Italy, ii. 397; v. 353; 
Socrates, projected tragedy on, v. 
loi, n. 4; Spectator, his half of the, 
iii. 38; — dexterity rewarded by a 
king, iii. 262; — knotting, iii. 274, 
n. 3; — pamphleteer, iii. 362, «. 2; — 
portrait of a clergyman, iv. 89; — 
preacher in a country town, iv. 213, 



Boswelfs Life of yolmson. 



Addison. 



Akerman. 



w. 3; — Sir Roger de Coverley's in- 
cipient madness, i. 74, n. i; ii. 425; 
death, ii. 425; story of the widow, 
ii. 425; Thames ribaldry, iv. 31; 
The Old Mans Wish sung to him, 
iv. 22, n. 3; Stavo bene &c., ii. 396; 
Steele, loan to, iv. 61, 106; style, i. 
259, 260, n. 2; Swift, compared with, 
V. 49; wine, love of, i. 416; iii. 175; 
iv. 62, w. 4, 459; V. 306, «. 2; warm 
with wine when he wrote Spectators, 
iv. 105. 

Address of the Painters to George III, 
i. 408. 

Address to the Throne, i. 371. 

Addresses to the Crown in 1784, 
i. 360; iv. 306. 

Adelphi, built by the Adams, ii. 372, 
n. 3; Beauclerk's ' box,' ii. 433, n. 3; 
iv. 115; Boswell and Johnson at the 
rails, iv. 115; Garrick's house, iv. 11 1. 

Adey, Miss, i. 45; ii. 534; iii. 468; iv. 
164. 

Adey, Mrs., ii. 445; iii. 447. 

Admiration, ii. 413. 

Adoption, ancient mode of, i. 295. 

Adriani niorientis ad animam suam, 
iii. 477, n. 2. 

Adultery, comparative guilt of a hus- 
band and wife, ii. 63; iii. 462; con- 
fusion of property caused by it, ii. 63. 

Advent-Sunday, ii. 330. 

Adveytturer, started by Hawkesworth, i. 
271; contributors, i. 292, n. 3, 293-4; 
V. 270; Johnson's contributions, i. 
292-5; his love of London, i. 371; 
papers marked T., i. 240. 

Adventures of a Guinea, v. 313. 

Adversaria, Johnson's, i. 237. 

Adversaries. See Antagonists. 

Advice to the Grub-Street Verse- Writ- 
ers, i. 165, n. I. 

Advisers, the common deficiency of, 
iii. 413- 



yEgri Ephemeris, iv. 439. 

.(^SCHYLUS, Darius's shade, iv. 19, «. 
2; Potter's translation, iii. 291. 

ALsop at Play, iii. 217. 

Affairs, managing one's, iv. loi. 

Affectation, distress, of, iv. 82; dy- 
ing, in, V. 452; familiarity with the 
great, of, iv. 72; rant of a parent, iii. 
169; silence and talkativeness, iii. 
296; studied behaviour, i. 544; bursts 
of admiration, iv. 32. See Singu- 
larity. 

Affection, descends, iii. 444; natural, 
ii. 116; iv. 243. 

Agamemnon, v. 89, 93, n. 3. 

Agar, Welbore Ellis, iii. 134, «. 3. 

Age, old. See Old Age. 

Age, present, better than previous ones, 
ii. 390, n. 4; except in reverence for 
government, iii. 4; and authority, iii. 
297; not worse, iv. 333; querulous 
declamations against, iii. 256. 

Agis, Home's, v. 233, n. i. 

Agriculture, Memoirs of, by R. Dossie, 
iv. 13. 

Agutter, Rev. William, iv. 331, n. i, 
344, «. 2, 487. 

AiKiN, Miss. See Barbauld, Mrs. 

Air, new kinds of, iv. 274. 

Air-bath, iii. 191. 

AjACCio, i. 138, n. I. 

Akenside, Mark, M.D., Gray and Ma- 
son, superiorto, iii. 37; Life, by John- 
son, iv. 66; medicine, defence of, iii. 
25, «. 5; Odes, ii. 188; Pleasures of 
the Imagination, i. 416; ii. 188; 
Rolt's impudent claim, i. 416; Towns- 
hend, friendship with, iii. 3. 

Akerman, — , Keeper of Newgate, 
Boswell's esteemed friend, iii. 489; 
courage at the Gordon riots, and at an 
earlier fire, iii. 490; praised by Burke 
and Johnson, iii. 491 ; profits of his of- 
fice, iii. 490, n. I ; mentioned, iii. 165. 



Index to 



Albemarle. 

Albemarle, Lord, Memoirs of Rock- 
ingham, iii. 522; V. 128, n. 2. 

Ai.HKRTi, Leandro, ii. 397; V. 352,353. 

Albin and the Daughter of Mey, v. 195. 

Alcmymy, ii. 432. 

AUiat's Embletns, ii. 332, n. 3. 

Alcibiaues, his dog, iii. 261; alluded 
to by William Scott, iii. 303. 

Aldrich, Dean, ii. 215, //. 2. 

Aldrich, Rev. S., i. 471, n. 2. 

Aleppo, iii. 419 ; iv. 26. 

Ale.xa.nder the Greai, i. 290; ii. 
223; iv. 317. 

.Ilexandreis, iv. 209, n. 2. 

Alkrei), Life, i. 204; will, iv. 154, n. 2. 

Alias, iv. 250. 

Alkerington, iv. 386, «. 3. 

All for Love, iv. 132, ti. 2. 

Allen, Edmund, the printer, dinner at 
his house, i. 544; Dodd, kindness to, 
iii. 160, 165; Johnson's hirth-day din- 
ners, at, iii. 178, tt. 3; iv. 156, w. i, 
276,//. 2; — imitated, iii. 306; iv. 107; 
— landlord and friend, iii. 160,306; — 
letter from, iv. 263; — loan to, i. 594, 
M. I ; — pretended brother, exposes, v. 
336; — grieves at his death, iv. 408, 
415, 422, 425, 437. Marshall's Min- 
utes of Agriculture, iii. 356; Smart's 
contract with Gardner, ii. 395; men- 
tioned, iii. 433. 

Allen, Ralph, account of him, v. 91, 
M. 2; Warburton married his niece, 
ii. 41, n. 3. 
Allen, H., of Magdalen Hall, i. 3S9. 

Allen, — , i. 42, n. i. 

Allestree, Richard, ii. 275, n. i. 

Almack's, iii. 26, n. 2. 

Alman.\c, history no better than an, ii. 

419. 
Almon's Memoirs of John Wilkes, i. 

404, n. I. 
Almost nothing, ii. 510, n. 5; iii. 174, 
K. 3- 



America. 

Alms-giving, Fielding, condemned by, 
ii. 137, n. 2, 243, n. 2; Johnson's 
practice, ii. 137; ib. n. 2; money 
generally wasted, iv. 4; better laid 
out in luxury, iii. 65; Whigs, con- 
demned by true, ii. 243. 

Alnwick Castle, Johnson, visited by, 
iii. 309, M. 3; Pennant, described by, 
iii. 309, 310; mentioned, iv. 135, n. 3. 

Alonso the Wlse, ii. 273, n. 2. 

Althorp, Lord (second Earl Spencer), 
iii. 483. 

Althorp, Lord (third Earl Spencer), 
iii. 4S2, «. 2. 

Ambassador, a foreign, iii. 467; Wot- 
ton's. Sir H., definition, ii. 196, n. i. 

Ambition, iii. 45. 

Amelia. See Fielding. 

Amendments oh a Sentence, iv. 45. 

America; Heresford, Mrs., an Ameri- 
can lady, iv. 327; Hoston Port Hill, ii. 
336, «. I ; Burgoyne's surrender, iii. 
404, ;/. 3; Carolina library, i. 358, n. 
i; Chesapeak, iv. 162, «. i; City ad- 
dress to the King in 1781, iv. i6r, w. 
4; Clinton, Sir Henry, iv. 162, n. 1; 
Concord, iii. 357, n. 6; Congress, ii. 
356, 469, 551 ; Constitutional Society, 
subscription raised by the, iii. 357, n, 
6; Convict settlements, ii. 357, n. i; 
Cornwallis's capitulation, iii. 404, «. 
3; iv. 162, n. i; discovery of, i. 527, 
«. 2; ii. 550; dominion lost, iv. 300, 
«. 2; emigration to it an immersion 
in barbarism, v. 88: see Emigration, 
and Scotland, emigration; English 
opposition to the American war, iv. 
94; France, assistance from, iv. 25; 
Franklin's letter to W. Strahan, iii. 
414, w. i: see Dr. Franklin; Georgia, 
i. 105, «. I, 147, n. 4; V. 341; Hume's 
opinion of the war, iii. 54, n. 2; iv. 
224, n. I ; independence, chimerical, 
i. 358, n. i; influence on mankind, 



BoswelCs Life of Johnson, 



America. 



Annihilation. 



i. 358, n. i; Irish Protestants well- 
wishers to the rebellion, iii. 464, n. 3; 
Johnson ' avoids the rebellious land,' 
iii. 494, w. 3; — feelings towards the 
Americans, ii. 549-51; iii. 228; iv. 
327 ; — calls them a ' race of convicts, ' 
ii- 3571 — ' wild rant,' ii. 360, n. i; 
iii. 329; — abuse, iii.358; — parodyof 
Burke on American taxation, iv. 367; 
— Patriot, ii. 327; — relicks of, in 
America, ii. 237; — Taxation no Tyr- 
anny, ii. 356; Lee, Arthur, agent in 
England, iii. 78, n. 2; Lexington, iii. 
357, «. 6; libels in 1784, i. 134, n. 2; 
life in the wilds, ii. 262; literature 
gaining ground, i. 358, «. i ; Lou- 
doun, Lord, General in America, v. 
424, n. I ; Mansfield, Lord, approves 
of burning their houses, iii. 487, n. i ; 
Markham's, Archbishop, sermon, v. 
40, n. 3; money sent to the English 
army, iv. 121; New England, iv. 413, 
n. 2; v. 361; North's, Lord, concilia- 
tory propositions, iii. 250; objects for 
observation, i. 425; peace, negotia- 
tions of, iv. 182, n. 3; preliminary 
treaty of, iv. 325, n. 3; Pennsylvania, 
ii. 238, n. I ; Philadelphia, i. 358, n. i ; 
iii. 414, n. I ; iv. 244, n. 3; planters, ii. 
31; population, growth of, ii. 359-60; 
Rassclas, reprint of, ii. 238; Saratoga, 
iii. 404, n. 3; slavery, England guilty 
of, ii. 551; Susquehannah, v. 361; 
taxation by England, ii. 357; iii. 233- 
235; iv. 298, n. 2; Virginia, ii. 31, n. 
I. 551; war with America popular in 
Scotland, iv. 298, n. 2; war with the 
French in 1756-7, i. 356, «. 4; ii. 551; 
iii. 10, n. 3; Walpole, Horace, on the 
slaveholders, iii. 228, «. 2; Wesley's 
Calm Address, v. 39, m. i; York 
Town, iv. 162, n. i. 

Amherst, Lord, iii. 425, n. 4. 

Amiens, ii. 461, n. 2. 



Amory, Dr. Thomas, iii. 198, n. 2. 
Amusements, key to character, iv. 365,- 

public, keep people from vice, ii. 195. 
Amwell, ii. 387. 
Amyat, Dr., i. 437, n. i. 
Ana, V. 354, n. 2, 473. 
Anacreon, Baxter's edition, iv. 188, 

278, 306; V. 429; mentioned, ii. 232. 
Anaitis, the Goddess, v. 248-51. 
Anatotny of Melancholy, ii. 138. 
Ancestry, ii. 176, 299. 
Ancient Times worse than Modem, 

iv. 251. 
Ancients, not serious in religion, iii. 12. 
Anderdon, J. L., iii. 221, n. 2. 
Anderson, John, Nachrichten von 

Island, iii. 317, n. i. 
Anderson, Professor, of Glasgow, iii. 

135, V. 420, 422. 
Andrews, Francis, i. 566. 
Anecdote, ii. 12, n. 3. 
Anecdotes, Johnson's love of, ii. 12; 

V. 43- 
Anecdotes of distinguished persons, iii. 

140, n. I. 
Anfractuosity, iv. 4. 
Angel, Captain, i. 404. 
Angell, John, Stenography, ii. 257-8; 

iii. 306. 
Anger, unreasonable, but natural, ii. 

432. 
Animal, noblest, v. 456. 
Animal Substances, v. 246. 
Animals. See Brutes, 
Animus ^quus, not inheritable, v. 434. 
Animus irritandi, iv. 150. 
Aningait and A jut, iv. 485, n. 3. 
Annals of Scotland. SeeL,OViD Hailes. 
Anne, Queen, 'touches' Johnson,!. 

50; grant to the Synod of Argyle, iii. 

151; writers of her age, i. 492. 
Annihilation, Hume's principle, iii. 

173; worse than existence in pain, 

iii. 336; V. 205, 



Index to 



Annual Register. 



Argfyle, John. 



Annual Register, Barnard's verses 

on Johnson, iv. 497-500. 
Anonymot.s Writings, iii. 428. 
Anson, Lord, i. 135, m. 3; iii. 425. 
Anstey, Christopher, AV.f Rath Guide, 

i. 449, M. 3. 
Anstruther, J., ii. 210, M. 2. 
Ant, 'J'lie, ii. 2g. 
Antagonists, how they should be 

treated, ii. 505-6; v. 32. 
Antholoi^ia, Johnson's translations, iv. 

442. 
Anti-Artt'inoniiis, i. 170, n. 5. 
Anli^allican, i. 371. 
Antimosaical Remark, ii. 535. 
Antiqucr I.insi^iKT Rritannica 'J'/trsau- 

rus, 1. 215, « 3. 
ANiigiTARiAN Researches, iii. 379, 

471- 
Antiquarian Society, iv. 504. 
Antiquarians, iii. 315. 
Apartment, ii. 456, n. i. 
Apelles's Venus, iv. 120. 
Apicius, ii. 511. 
Apocrypha, ii. 218, n. I. 
Apolhntii ptigna Betricia, ii. 302. 
Apollonius Rmodius, i. 334. 
Apophthegms of Johnson, i. 221, n. i; 

iv. 374. 
Apostolical Ordination, ii. 119. 
Apotheosis of Milton, i. 162. 
Apparitions. See Spirits. 
Appeal to the public k^ etc., i. l6l. 
Appetite, riding for an, i. 541, n. i. 
Appius, in the Cato Major, iv. 431. 
Applause, iv. 38. 
Apple DuMrLiNGs,»ii. 152. 
Appleby School, in Leicestershire, i. 

96, n. i; 153, n. i. 
Application, to one thing more than 

another, v. 38. 
Apprehensions. See Fancies. 
Arabic, iv. 33. 
Arabs, v. 143. 



Arbuthnot, Dr. John, Dunciad, an- 
notations on the, iv. 354, n. 2; His- 
tory of fohn Bull, i. 524, n. i; v. 
49. «• 3; illustrious physician, an, ii. 
427; Memoirs of Martin us Scrih- 
lerus, i. 524, n. i; v. 49, n. 3; uni- 
versal genius, i. 492; v. 31, n. 3; 
superior to Swift in coarse humour, 
v. 49. 

Arbuthnot, Robert, v. 31, 35. 

Archaological Dictionary, iv. 186. 

Archbishop, Johnson's bow to an, iv. 
229, 230. 

Arches, semicircular, and elliptical, i. 
406. 

Architecture, ornamental, ii. 502-3. 

Areskine, Sir John, v. 334. 

Argenson, — , ii. 448. 

Argonauts, i. 530. 

Argui.ng, good-humour in, iii. 13. 

Argument, compared with testimony, 
iv- 325; getting the better of people 
in one, ii. 543; opponent, introduc- 
ing one's, ii. 545. 

Argyle, first Marquis of, v. 406, n. 3. 

Argyle, ninth Earl of, v. 406, n. 3. 

Argyle, tenth Earl (first Duke) of, v. 
259, «. I. 

Argyle, John, second Duke of. Beg- 
gar s Opera, sees the, ii. 423, n. 2; 
Elwall, challenged by, ii. 189, n. 2; 
Walpole as sole minister, attacks, ii. 
407, n. 2. 

Argyle, Archibald, third Duke of, li- 
brarian, neglects his, i. 216; a narrow 
man, v. 393; Wilkes visits him, iii. 
83. 

Argyle, John, fifth Duke of, at Ash- 
bourne, iii. 235, n. i; Boswell calls 
on him, v. 402-3; estates in Col, v. 
334; Tyr-yi, v. 356; lona, v. 381; 
Gordon riots, rumour about him at 
the, iii. 489, «. 3; Johnson dines with 
him, v. 405-9; is provided by hira 



BoswelVs Life of fohnson. 



Argyle. 



Athenaeum. 



with ahorse, v. 409, 413; corresponds 
with him, v. 413, 414; lawsuit with 
Sir A. Maclean, ii. 436, n. 2; iii. 
116. 

Argyle, Duchess of (in 1752), i. 285. 

Argyle, Elizabeth Gunning, Duchess 
of, account of her, v. 402, n. i ; at 
Ashbourne, iii. 235, n. i ; dishkes 
Boswell, V. 402; slights him, v. 403, 
408; he drinks to her, v. 405; John- 
son undertakes to get her a book, v. 
406, 413; is ' all attention ' to her, v. 
409, 413; calls her 'a Duchess with 
three tails,' v. 409. 

Arian Heresy, iv. 38. 

Ariosto, i. 322; V. 419, n. I, 

Aristotle, Barrow, quoted by, iv. 123, 
n.\ difference between the learned 
and unlearned, iv. 16; friendship, on, 
iii. 439, M. 3; Lydiat, attacked by, i. 
225, n. 2; lying, on, ii. 254, w.i; purg- 
ing of the passions, iii. 45, 

Arithmetic, Johnson's fondness for 
it, i. 83; iv. 197, n. 2, 313; principles 
soon comprehended, v. 157, n. 3. 

Arkwright, Richard, ii. 525, w. 3. 

Armorial Bearings, ii. 205. 

Arms, piling, iii. 404. 

Armstrong, Dr., iii. 133. 

Army. See Soldiers. 

Arnauld, Antoine, iii. 395. 

Arne, Dr., V. 144, n. 3. 

Arnold, Thomas, M.D., Observations 
on Insatiity, iii. 200, n. i. 

Arran, Earl of, i. 325. 

Arrighi, a. , Histoire de Pascal Paoli, 
ii. 3, «. 2; V. 57, n. 3. 

Art of Living in London, i. 122, w. i. 

' Art's Corrective,' v. 341. 

Artemisia, ii. 87. 

Arthritick Tyranny, i. 206. 

Articles. See Thirty-nine Arti- 
cles. 

Artificially, iii. 58, n. 4. 
VI.— 6 



Artists, Society of. See Society of 
Artists. 

Ascertain, iii. 457, n. i. 

Ascham, Roger, bachelor's degree, 
takes his, i. 67, «. 3; Life by John- 
son, i. 537; quoted, i. 354, n. 3. 

Ash, Dr., iv. 455, n. 2. 

Ashbourne, church, iii. 205; earth- 
quake, iii. 154; Green Man Inn, iii, 
236; Johnson's visits, iii. 512-15; — 
and the Thrales visit it in 1774, v. 
490 ; — and Boswell in 1776, ii. 
542-5; in 1777, iii. 154-237; school, 
ii. 370, w. 3; iii. 156; two convicts of 
the town hang themselves, iv. 414; 
waterfall, iii. 217. 

Ashby, i. 42, n. 2, 92, «. 2. 

Ashmole, Elias, iii. 195; iv. 113, n. i. 

Asiatic Society, ii. 144, n. i. 

Assent, a debt or a favour, iv. 370. 

Assyrians, ii. 203; iii. 42. 

ASTLE, Rev. Mr., iv. 359. 

Astle, Thomas, letter from Johnson, 
iv. 154; mentioned, i. 179; iv. 359. 

ASTLEY, the equestrian, iii. 465. 

Astocke, i. 92, n. i. 

AsTON, Catherine (Hon. Mrs. Henry 
Hervey), i. 97, w. i. 

Aston, Margaret (Mrs. Walmsley), i. 
97, «. i; ii. 534. 

Aston, Miss (Mrs.), ii. 534, 538; iii. 
150, 240, 469, 470; iv. 167, n. 2. 

Aston, ' Molly ' (Mrs. Brodie), account 
of her, i. 96; ii. 536; interest of mon- 
ey, on the, iii. 387; Johnson's epi- 
gram on her, i. 96, n. 6; 162, «. 3; iii. 
388, n. i; her letters to, iii. 388, n. i; 
— quoted by, iii. 388, n. i; Lyttel- 
ton, Lord, preference for, iv. 66. 

Aston, Sir Thomas, i. 96, 123, n. i. 

Aston Hall, ii. 522, n. 2. 

Atheism, v. 53. 

Athelstan, ii. 150, n. 4. 

Athenaum, The, Boswell's letters of 



Index to 



Athenaeum. 

acceptance as Secretary of the Royal 
Academy, iii. 420, n. 3; mistake in 
Forster's GoLismith, ii. 239, n. 2. 

Athenian Letters, i. 52, n. 2. 

Athenians, barbarians, ii. 196; brutes, 
242. 

Atmui., Earl of, ii. 8; family of, v. 267. 

Athol forriiii^e, iv. 91. 

Atlantic, Johnson on the, v. 186. 

Atonement, The, v. 99. 

Attacks on Authors; attack is the 
reaction, ii. 384; i)etter to he attacked 
than unnoticed, iii. 426; v. 311; i)art 
of a man's consefiuence, iv. 487; 
•fame is a shuttlecock,' v. 456; very 
rarely hurt an authi>r, iii. 481 ; useful, 
in subjects of taste, v. 313; felt by 
authors, it>. n. i; Addi-son, Hume, 
Swift, Young on them, ii. 70, n. 2; 
Bentley, ii. 70, «. 2; v. 312, ti. 4; 
Boerhaave, ii. 70, «. 2; Fielding, v. 
313, //. i; Rambler, Vicar of Wake- 
Jield, Hume, and Hoileau, iii. 426, n. 
3; John.son's solitary reply to one, i. 
363-4; ii. 70, ib. n. 2. 

Atterbury, Bishop, elegance of his 
English, ii. log, n. 2; Funeral Ser- 
mon on Lady Cutis, iii. 258; Ser- 
mons, iii. 2S1; mentioned, i. 181. 

Attorney-Gener.vl, Diabolus Regis, 
iii. 89. 

Attorneys converted into Solicitors, 
iv. 149, n. 2; Johnson's hits at them, 
ii. 145, ib. n. 3; iv. 362. 

AUCHINLECK, Lord, account of him, 
v. 427-8, 435, H. 3; Baxter's Anacre- 
on, collated, iv. 278 ; attentive to 
remotest relations, v. 149; Boswell's 
ignorance of law, ii. 24, n. 4; v. 123, 
n. i; Boswell, his disposition tow- 
ards: see BOSVVELL, father; content- 
ment, iii. 273; v. 434; death, iv. 177; 
' in a place where there is no room 
for VVhiggism,' v. 439; described in 



Author. 

a Ilypochondriack, i. 493, w. 4; Doug- 
las Cause, ii. 57, n. 2; entails his es- 
tate in perpetuity, ii. 474; Gillespie, 
I)r. , honorarium to, iv. 303; heirs 
general, preference for, ii. 474-5; 
calls Johnson a dominie, i. 1 12, n. i ; 
v. 435, M. 3; a Jacobite fellow, v. 428; 
Ursa Major, v. 437; a brute, ii. 436, 
«. 4; v. 437, «. 3; — proposes to send 
him the Lives, iii. 423; — visits him, 
v. 427-438; — three topics in which 
they dilR-r, v. 428; — contest, v. 435- 
7; — polite parting, v. 438; Knight 
the negro's case, iii. 245; Laird of 
Lochbuy, trial of the, v. 391; loves 
labour, ii. 114; planter of trees, iii. 
118; V. 433; respected, v. 103, 149, 
154; second wife, ii. i6i,>i. i; v. 427, 
«. 4; Boswell on ill terms with her, 
ii. 432, n. I ; iii. gi, «. 4; tenderness, 
want of, iii. 207; windows broken by 
a mob, V. 402, n. i; mentioned, ii. 5, 
236, 332, 333; iii. 146. 

Auchini.eck I'lace. i'.r Scotland, 
Auchinleck. 

ArcTiONEEKS, long pole at their door, 
ii. 400. 

Augustan Age, flattery, ii. 268. 

Augustus, ii. 268, 539. 

AuLus Gellius, v. 264. 

AusONlus, i. 213; ii. 40, n. 3; iii. 299, 
n. I. 

Austen, Miss, Pride and Prejudice, 
iii. 340, M. I. 

Austerities, religious. See Monas- 
tery. 

Austria, House of, epigram on it, v. 
265. 

Auteroche, Chappe d', iii. 386. 

Author, an, of considerable eminence, 
'V- 373; ons o^ restless vanity, iv. 
368; who married a printer's devil, 
iv. 114; who was a voluminous ras- 
cal, ii. 125. 



Boswell's Life of Johnson. 



Authority. 



Averroes. 



Authority, from personal respect, ii. 
507; lessened, iii. 297. 

Authors, attacks on them; see At- 
tacks; best part of them in their 
books, i. 521, n. i; chief glory of a 
people from them, i. 344, n. 3; ii. 
143; complaints of, iv. 188; contrast 
between their life and writings, ii. 
295, n. i; consolation in their hours 
of gloom, ii. 79, n. 2; dread of them, 
i. 521, n. i; eminent men need not 
turn authors, iii. 207; fit subjects for 
biography, iv. 114, n. 2; flatter the 
age, V. 67; hunted with a cannister 
at their tail, iii. 364; Johnson con- 
sulted by them — ' a man who wrote 
verses,' ii. 58; — Colley Gibber, ii. 
106; — 'a lank and reverend bard,' 
iii. 425; — Crabbe, iv. 141, n. i; — 
a tragedy - writer, iv. 282, «. i; — 
young Mr. Tytler, v. 458; — adxnses 
to print boldly, ii. 224 ; — advice 
very difficult to give, iii. 364; — will- 
ing to assist them, iii. 424, n. i ; iv. 
141; V. 458; — put to the torture, 
ib. ; — Project for the employment 
of Authors, i. 355, «. i; — wonders 
at their number, v. 67; judgment of 
their own works, i. 222, n. 1 ; iv. 
290, n. i\ language characteristical, 
iv. 364; lie, whether ever allowed to, 
iv. 352-3; modern, the moons of 
literature, iii. 378-9; obscure ones, 
i- 355. "• 3; patrons, iv. 198; patron- 
age done with, v. 66; payments re- 
ceived : Adventurer, two guineas a 
paper, i. 293-4; Baretti, translation 
of some of Reynolds's Discourses 
into Italian, twenty-five guineas, iii. 
no; Blair, Sert>ions, vol. i. ;^200, vol. 
ii. ;i^300, vol. iii. ;^6oo, iii. 112; Bos- 
well, Corsica, 100 guineas, ii. 52, n. i; 
Critical Review, two guineas a sheet, 
iv. 247, n. 2 ; Monthly, sometimes 



four guineas, ib.\ Fielding, Tom 
Jones, £lQO, i. 332, n. 3; Goldsmith, 
Vicar of Wakefield, £ho, i. 480; 
Traveller, ;f 21, i. 481, k. i ; Hawkes- 
worth, ;^6ooo for editing Cook's Voy- 
ages, i. 395, n. 4; Hill, Sir John, fif- 
teen guineas a week, ii. 43, n. 2; 
Hooke, ;^5000 for the Duchess of 
Marlborough's Apology, v. 200, n. i ; 
Johnson : see Johnson, payments 
for his writings; payment by line, 
i. 224, n. i; Piozzi, Mrs., iov John- 
son's Letters, ;^500, ii. 49, n. i; 
Robertson offered ;^500 for one edi- 
tion of his History of Scotland, iii, 
380, K. 2; ;^6ooo made by the pub- 
lishers ; offered 3000 guineas for 
Charles V, ii. 72, n. i; Sacheverell, 
£100 for a sermon, i. 45, n. 2; Sheb- 
beare six guineas for a sheet for re- 
views, iv. 247; Savage, Wanderer, 
ten guineas, i. 144, n. 3 ; Whitehead, 
Paul, ten guineas for a poem, i. 144; 
pleasure in writing for the journals, 
V. 67, n. i; privateers, like, iv. 220, 
n. 2; private life, in, i. 455; public, 
the, their judges, i. 232; putting into 
a book as much as a book will hold, 
ii. 272; regard for their first maga- 
zine, i. 130; reluctance to write their 
own lives, i. 29, n. 2; respect due to 
them, iii. 353; iv. 132; sale of their 
works to the booksellers, iii. 379- 
80; styles, distinguished by their, 
iii. 318; treatment by managers of 
theatres, i. 227, n. 2; writing for 
profit, iii. 184 ; — on subjects in 
which they have not practised, ii. 
492. 

Authors by Profession, i. 135. 

Avarice, despised not hated, iii. 81: 
not inherent, iii. 366. 

Avenues, v. 500. 

Averroes, i. 218, «, 3. 



lO 



Index to 



Avignon. 

Avignon, iii. 506. 
Aylesbury, Lady, iii. 487, w. 3. 

B. 

H — D, Mr., Johnson's letter to, ii. 237. 
Baby, Johnson as nurse to one new- 
born, ii. 116. 

BaHYLO.N, i. 2QO. 

Bach, ii. 418, w. 

Bacon, Francis, Advancement of 
Learning, \. 39, w. i ; argument and 
testimony on, iv. 325; conversation, 
precept for, iv. 273; death, the stroke 
of, ii. 123, «. i; delight in superiority 
natural, iv. 189, w. i; Essays esti- 
mated by Burke and Johnson, iii. 
220, n. 3; Essay of 7'nith quoted, 
iv. 256, n. 2; Essay on I'icissittiJe, 
V. 134, n. i; healthy old man like a 
tower undermined, iv. 320; History 
of Henry I'll, v. 250; introduction 
of new doctrines, on the, iii. 12, n. 2; 
Johnson intends to edit his works, 
iii. 221; ' Kings desire the end, but 
not the means,' v. 264, n. 3; Life by 
Mallet, iii. 221 ; ' roughness breedeth 
hate,' iv. 194, n. i; Sanquhar's trial, 
V. 117, n. 2; style, i. 254; Turks, 
their want of Stirpes, ii. 482; 'who 
then to frail mortality,' &c. , v. loi; 
mentioned, i. 499, ;;. 2; ii. 60, n. 2, 
181. 

Bacon, John, R. A., Johnson's monu- 
ment, iv. 488, 513. 

Badcock, Rev. Samuel, anecdotes of 
Johnson, iv. 470, n. 2; White's 
Bampton Lectures, iv. 510, n. 5. 

Badenoch, Lord of, v. 129. 

Bagshaw, Rev. Thomas, Johnson's 
letters to him, ii. 296, n. 3; iv. 405. 

Bailey, Nathan, v. 479. 

Baily, Hetty, iv. 165. 

Baker, Sir George, iv. 190, n. 3, 410. 

Baker, — , an engraver, iv. 485, n. 3. 



Barbarossa. 

Baker, Mrs., ii. 35. 

Liakers Biographia Dramatica, iv. 

44, «• I- 

Bakers Chronicle, y. facing 13. 

Baldwin, Henry, the printer, i. 11, 18; 
ii. 38, «. 2; iv. 371; V. 2, n. i. 

Bai.koL'r, John, v. 43, n. 3. 

Baliol, John, v. 232. 

Ballads, modern imitations ridiculed, 
ii. 244. 

Ballantyne, Messrs., v. 2S9, n. i. 

Ballinacrazy, a young man of, iii. 
286. 

B.\LL00NS, account of them, iv. 410, 
«. 3; failure of one, iv. 410; first as- 
cent, iv. 412, «. 2; mere amusement, 
iv. 412; one burnt, iv. 413; paying for 
seats, iv. 414; wings, iv. 414; ' do not 
write about the balloon,' iv. 424; at 
Oxford, iv. 436. 

Ballow, Henry, a lawyer, iii. 26. 

Balmeri.no, Lord, i. 208; v. 463, n. 5. 

Bal.mlto, Lord, v. 79, n. i. 

Baltic, Johnson's projected tour, ii. 
330, w. i; iii. 152, 516. 

Baltimore, Lord, iii. 11, n. 2. 

Ba.mhaloes, v. 61, ;/. 2. 

Bancroft, Bishop, i. 68. 

Banks, Sir Joseph, admires Johnson's 
description of lona, iii. 197, «. i; v. 
381, w. I ; — letter to him, and mot- 
to for his goat, ii. 165; — funeral, at, 
iv. 484; Literary Club, i. 554; iii. 
415, 419; proposed expedition, ii. 
169; iii. 516; accompanies Captain 
Cook, V. 374, n. 2, 447, «. 4; account 
of Otaheite, v. 281. 

Banks, — , of Dorsetshire, i. 168. 

Baptism, by immersion, i. 106, n. i; 
sprinkling, iv. 334; Barclay's Apology 
on it, ii. 524. 

Bar. See Law and Lawyers. 

Barbadoes, iv. 383. 

Barbarossa, ii. 1 50, n. 4. 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



II 



Barbarous Society. 



Baretti. 



Barbarous Society, i. 455. 

Barbauld, Mrs. , Boswell, lines on, ii. 4, 
«. 2; Eighteen hundred and Eleveri, 
ii. 468, n. 3; genius and learning, on 
the want of respect to, iv. 135, n. 3; 
Johnson's style, imitation of, iii. 196; 
lessons for Children, ii. 468, n. 3; 
iv. 9, n. 5; marriage and school, ii. 
468; pupils, ii. 468, M. 3; Priestley, 
lines on, iv. 500, 501 ; Richardson 
not sought by ' the great,' iv. 135, 

«. 3- 

Barber, Francis, account of him, i. 
277, «. i; Johnson's bequest to him, 
ii. 156, n. 4; iv. 327, 462, 463, n. 3, 
508; — death-bed, iv. 479, n. i, 482; 
— devotion to, iv. 427, ». 2; — Dia- 
ry, has fragments of, i. 32; iv. 468, n. 
i; V. 487, «. i; — letters from: see 
JoHNSO.N, letters; — prays with him, 
iv. 161; instructs him in religion, ii. 
412; iv. 481; — recommends him to 
Windham, iv. 462, «. 4; — sends him 
to school, ii. 71, 132, i68; — state 
after his wife's death, describes, i. 
279; I-angton, visits, i. 550, «. i; 
Lichfield, retires to, iv. 463, n. 3; sea, 
at, i. 403; returns to service, i. 404; 
mentioned, i. 272, 275; ii. 5, 245, 323, 
431, 442; iii. 26, 51, 77, 105, 236, 251, 
421,454; iv. 164, 327; V. 59. 

Barber, Mrs. Francis, i. 275; v. 487, 
n. I. 

Barbeyrac, i. 330. 

Barclay, Alexander, i. 321. 

Barclay, James, an Oxford student, i. 
576; V. 310. 

Barclay, Robert, of Ury, ancestor of 
Barclay the brewer, iv. 137, n. i; 
Apology for the Quakers, in Paoli's 
library, ii. 70, w. i ; on infant baptism, 
ii. 524. 

Barclay, Robert, the brewer, account 
of him, iv. 137, n. i; anecdote of 



Boswell's tablets, i. 6, n. 2; buys 
Thrale's brewery, iv. 100, n. 2; holds 
money of Johnson's, iv. 463, n. 3. 

Bard, a reverend, iii. 425. 

Baretti, Joseph, account of him, i. 
350. 351; iii- 109, n. 6; Barber's de- 
votion to Johnson, describes, iv. 
427, n. 2; Boswell, dislikes, ii. Ill, n. 
3; V. 138; — calls not quite right- 
headed, iii. 154, n. i; Carmen Secti- 
lare, adapts the, iii. 424; character 
by Mrs. Piozzi, ii. 65, «. 2; at his 
trial, ii. iii, n. 3; by Miss Burney 
and Malone, iii. 109, n. 6; conversa- 
tion, ii. 65; copy-money in Italy, on, 
iii. 184; Davies, quarrel with, ii. 235; 
Dialogues, ii. 514; ducking-stool, de- 
scribes a, iii. 326, «. i; Easy Lessons 
in Italian and English, ii. 331; Eng- 
lish love of melted butter and roast 
veal, i. 541, n. i; fees in England, on, 
V. 102, n. i; Foote's conversations, 
describes, iii. 210, «. 3; ' French not 
a cheerful race,' ii. 461, n. i; French 
prisoners, i. 409, n. i; foreigners in 
London, i. 409, n. i; Frusta Lettera- 
ria, iii. 196; hatred of mankind, ii. 
9; infidelity, ii. 9; Italian and Eng- 
lish Dictiottaiy, i. 408; Italy, revisits, 
i. 418; ii. 9, «. 3; Italy, Account of 
the Manners and Customs of, ii. 65; 
Johnson, calls him a bear, ii. 75; — 
charity, i. 349, «. 2 ; — and Mr. 
Cholmondeley, iv. 399, «. 2; — de- 
light in old acquaintance, iv. 432, n. 
I ; — in France, ii. 460, m. 2 ; — hab- 
it of musing, v. 82, «. i ; — ignorance 
of character, v. 18, «. 2 ; — letters 
from, i. 418, 427, 440; — memory, 
iii. 361, «. I ; v. 419, «. I ; — payment 
for Rasselas, i. 395, «. 3; — preju- 
dice against foreigners, iv. 17, n. 3; 
— and ' Presto's supper,* iv. 400; — 
and Mrs. Salusbury, ii. 302, n. 6; — 



12 



Index to 



Baretti. 

trade was wisdom, iii. 155, n. 2; — 
vcrse-makinR, ii. 18, w. i; — want of 
toleration, ii. 28(), w. i; — want of 
observation, iii. 480, «. 2; Journey 
from London to (Jinoa, i. 418, n. 3, 
423, n. I ; lanpuaycs, knowledge of, 
i. 4I&--19; ii. 442; London, love of, 
i. 430, n. 2; Madrid in 1760, v. 24, n. 
a; Alisella's story, i. 259, n. i; New- 
gate, in, ii. Ill, n. 3; Pater Noster, 
ipiorance about the, v. 138, n. 4; 
riozzi, Mrs., attacked by, iii. 57, w. 
I, io«;, n. 6; his bnital attack on 
her, iii. 57, n. 1, icx), w. 6; portrait at 
Streatham, iv. 181, n. 3; A'asselas, 
translates, ii. 238, n. 4; Keynolds's 
Discourses, translates, iii. no; rob- 
bers, never met any, iii. 271, m. i; 
Koyal Academy, Secretary for For- 
eign Correspondence to the, ii. in, 
n. 3; Spectator, effect of reading a, 
iv. 38; Thralcs, projected tour to 
Italy with the, iii. 21, 22, 32, w. I, 
no, «. i; accompanies them to Bath, 
iii. 7; hojxjs for an annuity from 
them, iii. log, «. 6; money payments 
from them, iii. no; cjuarrels with 
them, iii. log ; apparent reconcilia- 
tion, iii. 109, M. 6; Thrale's, Mr., 
grief for his son's death, describes, 
iii. 21; his appetite, iii. 4S0, n. 2; 
Thrale, Mrs., flatters, iii. 57, n. i; 
mentions her echo of Johnson's 
'beastly kind of wit,' ii. 400, n. 4; 
Tolondron, iv. 427, w. 2 ; Travels 
through Spain, i. 442, >/. 2; tried for 
murder, ii. 108, in, 112; consulta- 
tion for the defence, iv. 374; Will- 
iams, Mrs., describes, ii. 114, w. 1; 
mentioned, i. 302, 319, 323, 389. 

Barker's Bible, v. 506. 

Barnard, Rev. Dr., Dean of Derry, 
afterwards Bishop of Killaloe, ar- 
bitrary power, in favour of. iii. 96, 



Barring^on. 

//. I ; Johnson's charade on him, iv. 
226; — double-edged wit, ii. 351; 
— draws up a Round Robin to, iii. 
96 ; — and Garrick coming up to 
London i. 117, w. 2 ; — regard for 
him, iv. 134; — writes verses on, iv. 
134, n. 2, 497-9; kept his counte- 
nance, iv. 115; Literary Club, mem- 
ber of the, i. 554; presents it with a 
hogshead of claret, iii. 269; Twalm- 
ley and Virgil, iv. 223; Wilkes, sar- 
casm on, iv. 125, n. 1. 

Barnarh, Dr. (Provost of F>ton), ac- 
count of him, iii. 483, n. 3; Johnson 
at Mr. Vesey's, meets, iii. 483, 484, 
«. 3; — breeding, does justice to, iii. 
62, M. 2; mentioned, i. 520, «. i. 

Barnard, Francis, King's librarian, ii. 
38, 46; Johnson's letter to him, ii. 
38, n. I. 

Barnard, Sir John, i. 583. 

Barnes, Joshua, attacked by Baxter, 
W., V. 429; dedication to the Duke 
of Marlborough, v. 429, n. 2; Greek, 
knowledge of, iv. 23; Homer and 
Solomon identified, iv. 23, n. i ; Mac- 
caronic verses, iii. 322. 

Barnet, iii. 5; V. 488. 

Barnewali,, Nicholas, iii. 257, n. 3. 

Barnston, Miss Letitia, iii. 469, n. 5. 

Baron, ' the Baron and the Barrister 
united,' iii. 18, «. 2. 

Baronet, story of a, v. 401. 

Baronets, rcf^ular, v. 366, n. 2. 

Barret, William, the Bristol .surgeon, 
iii. 58. 

Barretier, Philip, education, his, ii. 
467, «. 3; Johnson, resemblance to, 
i. 82, n. 2; Life, by Johnson, i. 170, 
172, «. 2; Additions to the Life, i. 
177; republished, i. 186. 

Barrington, Hon. Daines, Essay on 
the Migration of Birds, ii. 284; Es- 
sex Head Club, member of the, iv. 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



13 



Harrington. 



Batrachomyomachia. 



293, 503; Johnson seeks his acquaint- 
ance, iii. 357; Observations on the 
Statutes, iii. 357; mentioned, iv. 130. 

Barrington, Lord, v. 87, n. i. 

Barristers. See Lawyers. 

Barrow, Dr., iv. 122, n. 3. 

Barrowby, Dr., iv. 337. 

Barry, Sir Edward, M.D., System of 
Physic, iii. 39. 

Barry, James, the painter, — Burke, 
William, letter from, ii. 18, n. 2; Es- 
sex Head Club, member of the, iv. 
293, 503; French with the Irish, con- 
trasts the, ii. 461, n. i ; Johnson, 
compliments, iv. 259, n. i; — letter 
from, iv. 233; — praises his pictures, 
iv. 259; Reynolds, quarrels with, iv. 
503; women, on the employment of, 
ii. 415, n. I. 

Barry, Spranger, the actor, i. 227, n. 
3, 229; ii. 400, «. 5. 

Barter, — , a miller, ii. 189. 

Bartolozzi, Francis, iii. 126; iv. 4S5, 
n. 3. 

Barton in Yorkshire, i. 277, n. i. 

Barton, Mr. A. T., Fellow of Pem- 
broke College, V. 134, n. i. 

Bas Bleu, iii. 333, n. 5; iv. 125. 

Baskerville, John, Barclay s Apolo- 
gy, edition of, ii. 524; Virgil, ii. 77. 

Bastard, The, i. 191. 

Bastia, i. 138, n. i; ii. 5. ;/. i. 

Bat, formation of the, iii. 389. 

B.\te, Rev. Henry (Sir H. Dudley), 
account of him, iv. 342, n. 2. 

Bate, James, i. 92, n. 2. 

Bateman, Edmund, tutor of Christ 
Church, i. 89. 

Bath, account of it, iii. 52, ;/. i; Bos- 
well and Johnson visit it in 1776, iii. 
51-2; epigram on a religious dis- 
pute held there, iv. 333, n. 2; Gold- 
smith visits it, ii. 157; Gordon Riots, 
suffers from the, iii. 486, n. 4, 494, 



n. i; Harington, Dr., iv. 207, 208; 
'King of Bath,' i. 456, n. 2, 527; 
lectures, i. 456, n. 2; ii. 8, n. 2; Mil- 
ler, Lady, ii. 385; musical lessons, 
price of, iii. 480; Paoli visits it, v. i, 
n. 3; smoking in the rooms, v. 67, n, 
3; Thrale family visits it in 1776, iii. 
7; in 1780, iii. 478 ; Mrs. Piozzi in 
iSi6,v. 487, n. i; mentioned, iii. 500; 
iv. 162. 
Bath, William Pulteney, Earl of, his 
oratory, i. 176; a paltry fellow, v. 
385; ' Pulnub ' and 'Hon. Marcus 
Cato,' i. 583; Williams's, Sir C. H., 
lines on him, v. 305, n. 2; mentioned, 
iii. 271. 
Batheaston Villa, ii. 385. 
Bathiani, ii. 447. 
Baths, cold, i. 106, w. i; medicated, ii. 

115. 
Bathurst, Colonel, i. 277, n. i. 
Bathurst, Dr., account of him, i. 220, 
280, «. 2; Adventurer, wrote for the, 
i. 271, 292, 294-5 ; Barber, F., his 
father's slave, i. 277, n. i; company 
of a new person, on the, iv. 39; 
death, i. 280, n. 2, 442 ; ' hater, a 
very good,' i. 220, n. 2; Johnson, let- 
ters to, i. 280, 7?. 2; — ' recommend- 
ed ' by, i. 278, n. 5; medical practice, 
i. 280, n. 2; on slavery, iv. 33; men- 
tioned, i. 212. 
Bathurst, first Earl, Pope's friend, iii. 
395; iv. 5g; account of Vo^€% Essay 
on Man, iii. 457 ; speeches, i. 174, 
590- 
Bathurst, second Earl, Lord Chan- 
cellor; Dodd, Dr., attempts to bribe 
him, iii. 158, w. 2; writes to him, iii. 
162. 
Bathurst, Lady, iii. 158, n. 2. 
Bathurst, Ralph, verses to Hobbes, 

iv. 463, n. 3. 
Batrachomyomachia, v. 523. 



H 



Index to 



Batrachus. 

BATKAcms, iv. 514. 

Battie, Dr., iv. 186, «. i. 

Battista AN(;kloni (Dr. Shebbeare), 
iv. 131. 

Battles, fighting, for a man, ii. 543. 

Battoluuia, v. 506. 

Bauifius on Erasmus, v. 507. 

Bai/iaJ iiiiti Afiieviad, iii. 18, n. 2. 

Baxter, Andrew, v. 91, n. 3. 

Baxter, Rev. Richard, Call to the Un- 
coftvirttil, iv. 297 ; Johnson praises 
all his l)ooks, iv. 261; Kidderminster, 
sermon at, iv. 261, «. 2; Reasons of 
the Christian Kelii^ion, iv. 274; rule 
of preaching, iv. 213 ; scruple, trou- 
bled by a, ii. 549; suicide, on the sal- 
vation of a, iv. 260; toleration, on, 
ii. 290; mentioned, i. 238; v. 100. 

Ba.xier, William, Anaereon. See 
Anacreon. Barnes, the antagonist 
of, V. 429; Horace, edition of, iii. 84, 

«. 3. 

' Bayes,' character of. ii. 193; iii. 424. 

Bayle, confutation of him by Leibnitz, 
V. 327; his Dictionary, i. 492; I.i/e, 
by Des Maizeaux, i. 33, n. 3 ; Me- 
nage, hi-^ account of, iv. 494, n. 2; 
mentioned, i. 330. 

Beach, Thomas, ii. 276, «. 2. 

Beaconsfiei.I), Johnson visits it in 
1774, ii. 326, M. 3; V. 524; Mackin- 
tosh visits it in 1793, iv. 364, n. 3. 

Bear. See Johnson, bear. 

Bear-Garden ' Bruisers,' i. 129, n. i. 

Bearcroft, — , a barrister, iii. 443, «.i. 

Beaton, Cardinal, v. 71. 

Beaton, Rev. Mr., v. 258. 

Beattie, Dr. James, complains of Bos- 
well, v. 108, «. i; — correspondence 
with him, ii. 170, n. 2; v. 15, 16; 
Burns, praised by, v. 311, «. 3; ' ca- 
ressed by the great,' ii. 303; conver- 
sation, iii. 385, w. 5; iv. 373, n. 2; 
English, describes a Scotchman's 



Beauclerk. 

study of, i. 508, ti. 3 ; English and 
Scotch universities compared, v. 96, 
n. 2; Essay on Truth, editions and 
translations, ii. 231, «. 2; a thing of 
the past, V. 311, w. 3; — (joldsmith's 
opinion of it, ii. 231, n. 2; v. 311, «. 
3; — Johnson's opinion of it, ii. 231, 
233; V. 31; Forbes, Life by, v. 26, 
M. 4; Gray, visited by, v. i6; hackney 
coaches. No. i and No. 1000, sees, 
iv. 381; Hermit, iv. 215; Hume, 
controversy with: see above, Essay 
on Truth ; Johnson's Dictionary, 
cited in, iv. 5, «. i; — gentler man- 
ner, speaks of, iv. 116, w. i; — letter 
from, iii. 493; — praise of Mannah 
More, iii. 333, «. 5; — regard for 
him, ii. 170, 171; his love of — , iii. 
493. "5; — "se of wine, i. 121, n. 
— visits, ii. 163, n. i, 164, 167, 
233 ; V. 16 ; MonbcKldo's hatred of 
Johnson, iv. 314, n. 4; die on Lord 
Hay, V. 119; original principles, his, 
i. 545; Oxford degree of D.C.L., ii. 
306, M. 2; V. loi, n. 5, 311, «. 3; pen- 
sion, ii. 303, n. 2; V. loi, n. 5, 410; 
Professor at Aberdeen, ii. 163, 167 ; 
V. 15; Reynolds's allegorical picture 
of him, V. loi, n. 5, 311, «. 3; Rob- 
ertson, compared with, ii. 224, n. i ; 
Thrale's bequest to Johnson, on, iv. 
100, n. i; Warburton and Strahan, 
anecdote of, v. 104, n. 3 ; Wilkes, 
meets, iv. 117; wine, indulges in, iv. 
381, «. 4; mentioned, ii. 60, n. i, 
235, 297, 305; iii. 93, 140; iv. 384. 

Beattie, Mrs., ii. 167, 170, 171. 

Beauci.erk, Hon. Topham, account 
of him by Boswell and Johnson, i. 
287-290; — Burke, ii. 282, n.\; — 
Johnson, iii. 477, 482; — Langton, 
ih.; absent-minded, i. 288, n. 3; 
Adelphi, ' box ' at the, ii. 433, n. 3; 
Addison's Remarks on Italy, ii. 396, 



BoswelCs Life of Johnson. 



15 



Beauderk. 



Beaumont. 



397; adultery, his, with Lady Boling- 
broke, whom he aftenvards married, 
ii. 282, 2S3; iii. 3g7; v. 345; Baretti 
and Johnson's projected Italian tour, 
iii. 22; Baretti's trial, ii. iii, n. 3; 
' Beau,' name of, ii. 296; 'bear, like 
a word in a catch,' ii. 398; Boswell 
an unnatural Scotchman, calls, iii. 
441 ; zealous for his election to the 
Literary Club, ii. 270; v. 86; Charles 
II, descended from, i. 288; iii. 443, 
M. 3; chemistry, love of, i. 290; chil- 
dren, his, iii. 477; conversation, i. 
288; iii. 443,482; iv. 499; V. 86; — lit- 
tle aflfected by his travels, iii. 401 510, 
520; Cumberland's Odes, iii. 50, n. i; 
Davies, Tom, clapping a man on the 
back, ii. 394; death, iii. 477, 482; 
dinners and suppers at his house, ii. 
270, 372, 433, M. 3; iii. 403, 439; fa- 
cility, wonderful, iii. 482; ' frisk,' 
his, i. 290; gambling at Venice, i. 
440, 11. i; gaming-club, account of 
a, iii. 26; Garrick's portrait, inscrip- 
tion on, iv. 112; Goldsmith and 
Malagrida, iv. 201, u. 2; health, his, 
ii- 334. 355; iii- "S, 474; Italy, tour 
to, i. 427, 440; Johnson, first ac- 
quaintance with, i. 288; — accom- 
panies to Cambridge, i. 563; — af- 
fection for him, iv. 12, 115, 208; — 
altercations with, iii. 319, 437; — 
reconciliation, iii. 438; — and Mme. 
de Boufflers, ii. 465; — 'coalition' 
with, i. 289; — dress as a dramatic 
author, i. 232, «. 3; — and Thomas 
Hervey, ii. 36; — and a Mr. Hervey, 
iii. 221. 222, 238, 240; — Jacobitism, 
i. 498; — levee, attends, ii. 136; — 
marriage, i. iii; pension, saying 
about, i. 290; — portrait, inscrip- 
tion on, iv. 208; — and the two 
dogs, ii. 341; V. 375; — use of or- 
ange peel, ii. 378; — visits him at 



Windsor, i. 290; Johnson's Court, 
veneration for, ii. 263; laboratory, 
his, ii. 433, n. 3; library, his, ii. 433, 
n. 3; — sold, iii. 477, n. 4; iv. 122; 
sermons in it, ib.\ Lillihurlero , ef- 
fect of, ii. 397; Literary Club, origi- 
nal member of the, i. 552, 553, «. 2; 
describes it, ii. 221, n. 2, 314, n. 2; 
manner, his, acid, ii. 415, n. 2; — 
lively, ii. 464; iii. 443; Montagu's, 
Mrs., Essay, could not read, v. 279; 
mother, his, iii. 477; v. 336; Muswell 
Hill, house at, ii. 433, n. 3; Pope's 
lines on Foster, mentioned, iv. 11; 
predominance over his company, iii. 
444; professor in the imaginary col- 
lege, v. 123; same one day as an- 
other, iii. 219; satire, love of, i. 289; 
' see him again,' iv. 228 ; Smith's, 
Adam, talk, iv. 29, n. 2; Spence's 
Anecdotes of Pope, iv. 10; story, 
mode of teUing a, iii. 443 ; Thrale, 
Mrs., hated by, i. 288, n. 3; truth- 
fulness, his, V. 375, 71. i; wife, treat- 
ment of his, ii. 282, n. i; mentioned, 
i. 414; ii. 363, 435; iii. 238, «. i; iv. 
32, 39, n. 3, 88, 132; V. 116, 245. 
Beauclerk, Lady Diana, wife of Top- 
ham Beauclerk, account of her, ii. 
282, n. i; Boswell's 'apology' for 
her, ii. 282; — bet with her, ii. 378; 
charming conversation, ii. 275; Lang- 
ton's height, joke about, i. 390, «. i; 
gives him Johnson's portrait, iv. 112; 
nurses her husband with assiduity, ii. 
334; left guardian of his children, iii. 

477- 
Beauclerk, Lord Sidney, Topham 

Beauclerk's father, i. 287, «. 3. 
Beauclerk, Lady Sydney, v. 336. 
Beaufort, Duchess of (in 1780), iii. 

482. 
Beaumont, Francis, i. 87, n. 4. 
Beaumont and Fletcher, co-opera- 



i6 



Index to 



Beaumont. 

tion, their literary, ii. 3S3; Garrick's 
adaptation of Tlu Chances, ii. 268, 
«. 2; Seward's edition of their plays, 

"•535- 

Beauties of Johnson, iv. 171-3, 485, 
n. 2. 

Beauties of the Rambler, i. 248. 

Beauty, independent of utility, ii. 190; 
iv. 193. 

Beaux Stratagem, Archer quoted, v. 
151, w. 1; acted by Garrick, iii. 60; 
Boniface praises his ale, ii. 528; is 
done good to by Latin, iii. 102, n. 2; 
Scrub, iii. 80. 

Beckenham, iv. 361. 

Becket, T., the bookseller, ii. 336. 

Beckkord, Alderman, account of him, 
iii. 87, n. 2; Chatterton's gain by his 
death, iii. 228, n. 6; his English, iii. 
87, 228; Lord Mayor, iii. 522; mon- 
ument in Guildhall, iii. 228. 

Bedford, iv. 153. 

Bedford, fourth Duke of, attack on 
the ministry in 1766, iv. 366; vails, 
tries to abolish, ii. 8g, ;;. i; vice-roy 
in Ireland, ii. 150, n. I. 

Bedford, fifth Duke of, iii. 323; iv. 
146. 

Bedford, Ililkiah, iv. 331, «. i. 

Bedfordshire, militia, i. 356, n. 2; 
iii. 453. 

Bedlam, Boswell and Johnson visit it, 
ii. 429; curiosities of London, one of 
the, ii. 429, n. i ; houses built near it, 
iv. 240. 

Beer, allowance of, to servants and 
soldiers, iii. II, n. 2. 

Beggar s Opera. See Gay, John. 

Beggars, beg more readily from men 
than women, iv. 38 ; English com- 
pared with Scotch, v. 84, n. i; many 
in want of work, iii. 456; their trade 
overstocked, iii. 456; mentioned, iii. 
30. See Almsgiving. 



Bentley. 

Behmen, Jacob, ii. 141. 

Belchip:r, John, the surgeon, iii. 66. 

Belgrade, Siege of, ii. 207. 

Belief, attacks on it, iii. 13; v. 328, 

«. 3- 
Bell, Dr., iv. i, n. i. 
Bell, Rev. Dr., ii. 234, «. i. 
Bell, Rev. Mr., of Strathaven, iii. 409. 
Bell, Mrs., Johnson's epitaph on her, 

ii. 234, n. r. 
Bell, John, Travels, ii. 63. 
Bell, John, the bookseller. Lives of 

the Poets, ii. 519, n. i; iii. 125. 
Bellamy, Mrs., acts in Dodsley's Cle- 

one, i. 376, n. 3; Johnson, letter to, 

iv. 282, n. I. 
Belleisle, iii. 390, n. 2. 
Belleisle, The, a man-of-war, i. 437, 

n. 2. 
Bellerophon, i. 322, n. 2. 
Belsham, William, Essay on Dramatic 

Poetry, i. 450, n. 2. 
Bembridge, — , iv. 258, n. i. 
Benedictines. See Paris, Benedic- 
tines. 
Benefit, free, v. 277. 
Benevolence, motive to action, iii. 56; 

mingled with vanity, ib. 
Benevolists, The, iii. 169, n. i. 
Bengal, iii. 152, n. i, 264, 517. 
Bennet, James, editor of Ascham's 

Works, i. 537. 
Benslev, Robert, the actor, ii. 51. 
Benson, William, his monument to 

Milton, i. 264, n.\; v. 108, n. i. 
Bentham, Dr. E., ii. 509. 
Bentham, Jeremy, on convict-labour, 

iii. 305, 71. I ; Shelburne's, Lord, 

wretched education, iii. 41, «. 2; — 

fearlessness as a minister, iv. 200, n. 6. 
Bentley, Dr., attacks, never answered, 

ii. 70, n. i; v. 198; Barnes's Greek, 

iv. 23, n. i; Boyle, attacked by, v. 

270, n. 3 ; Cunninghame, criticised 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



17 



Bentley. 



Birch. 



by, V. 424; Epistles of Phalaris, 
iv. 512; Horace, Comments on, ii. 
508; iii. 84, n. 3; Johnson, celebrat- 
ed by, i. 177, n. 4; v. 198; ' no man 
written down but by himself,' i. 441,* 
n. 2; V. 312 ; Pope and Homer, iii. 
291, w. 2; Preface to his edition of 
Paradise Lost, iv. 29, n. i; scholar- 
ship perhaps unequalled, iv. 251; 
Scotchman, not a, ii. 416, n. 4; stud- 
ied hard, i. 82; iv. 24; V. 360; verses, 
his, iv. 27; Wasse's Greek Trochaics, 
V. 508. 

Bentley, Richard, Junior, iv.333, n. 2. 

Beresford, Mrs. and Miss, iv. 327. 

Beresford, Rev. Mr., iii. 323. 

Berkeley, Bishop, Burke's projected 
answer to his theory, i. 545; non- 
existence of matter, on the, i. 545 ; 
iv. 32 ; profound scholar, ii. 152; 
'reverie,' his, iii. 187; Warburton's 
ignorant criticism on him, v. 91, n. 3. 

Berrenger, Richard, iv. 102, 105. 

Berwick, ii. 306. 

Berwick, Duke of, Memoirs, iii. 324. 

Besborough, Earl of, v. 299. 

Best, H. D., Gibbon and the Duke of 
Gloucester, ii. 2, n. 2; George Lang- 
ton, and his pedigree, i. 287, n. 2; 
Johnson's visit to Langton, i. 552, 
n. I. 

Bethune, Rev. Mr., v. 237. 

Betterton, Thomas, iii. 210. 

Bettesworth, Rev. E., i. 537, n. 2. 

Bettesworth, Sergeant, iii. 428, n. 4. 

Betty Broom, iv. 284. 

Bewley, William, the Philosopher of 
Massingham, iv. 155. 

Beza, ii. 330. 

Bias the philosopher, iii. 355, n. 4. 

Bible, The, calculation for reading it 
in a year, i. 84, n. 2; Johnson reads 
it through, ii. 218, n. i; should be 
read with a commentary, iii. 67; sub- 



scribing it instead of the Articles, 
ii. 174. 

Bibliopole, ii. 395. 

Bibliotheca Harleiana, i. 177. 

Bibliotheca Literaria, v. 508. 

Bibliotheque, Johnson's scheme of a, i. 
328-330. 

Bibl. des Fees, ii. 448-9. 

Bibliotheque des Savans, i. 374. 

Bickerstaff, Isaac, account of him, 
ii. 94, n. 3; mentioned, ii. 97. 

Bicknell, J. L., i. 365. 

Big, Johnson's use of the word, iii. 396; 
v. 485. 

Big Dian, ii. 16. 

Bigamy, v. 246. 

Bills, i. 435. 

Bindley, James, i. 18. 

Binning, Lord, ii. 214; iii. 376. 

Biographia Britannica, first edition, 
iv. 314, w. 3; Dr. John Campbell a 
contributor, ii. 512; Johnson asked 
to edit a new edition, iii. 198; edited 
by Kippis, ib. ; account of it, ib. n. 2. 

Biographical Catechism, iv. 433. 

Biography, authentic material difficult 
to get, iii. 81; best when autobiogra- 
phy, i. 29; can be written only by a 
man's intimates, ii. 191, 510; iii. 176, 
n. 2; Goldsmith's praise of it, v. 89, 
«. 3; Johnson's excellence in it, i.296; 
iv. 40, n. 4; — fondness for it, i. 492; 
iii. 234, n. I; iv. 40; v. 89; literary, 
ii. 46; V. 273; method of writing it, 
i. 37; men should be drawn as they 
are, i. 36; iv. 62, 456; v. 271; ' com- 
mon cant' against it, iii. 312, «. 2; 
minute particulars to be given, i. 38; 
and peculiarities, iii. 175; rarely well 
executed, ii. 510; vices, how far to 
be mentioned, iii. 175; writing trifles 
with dignity, iv. 40, n. 4. 

Birch, Rev. Thomas, D.D., account 
of him by H. Walpole, i. 34, n. i; 



i8 



Index to 



Birch. 



Blackmore. 



by I. D'Israeli, i. 184, n. i; anec- 
dotes, full of, V. 290 ; conversation 
and writings, i. 184; correspondence 
with Mrs. Carter, i. 159; — Cave, i. 
161, 174-6; — Johnson, i. 184, 262, 
330; — Earl of Orrery, i. 214; His- 
tory of the Koyal Society, i. 357; ii. 
45. "■ 4; Johnson's epigram to him, 
i. 162; Raleigh's smaller pieces, edits, 
i. 262; Kambler, anecdote of the, i. 
236, w. I ; Society for the Encourage- 
ment of Learning, member of the, 
i. 176, n. 4. 

BlRlJS, migration of, ii. 284; nidifica- 
tion, ii. 285. 

BiRKKNllKAi), Sir John, v. 64, «. 2. 

Birmingham, — Birmingham Jour- 
nal, i. 99, //. 2; ' boobies of Birming- 
ham,' ii. 531; book-shops, i. 42, 99, 
n. i; buttons, v. 522; Castle Inn, i. 
107, n. i; cost of living in 1750, i. 
120, n. i; Birmingham Daily Post, 
i. 99, w. 2; Director)' for 1 770, v. 
522, M. i; Edinburgh, likeness to, v. 
25, M. i; Hector's house, ii. 522, ;/. 
2; in 1 741, i. 100, M. 2; Johnson's 
head on copper coins, iv. 485, «. 3; 
— reads The History of Birming- 
ham, iv. 252, n.\; — resides there, 
i. 99-101, 105-11 ; — visits it in 
1761-2, i. 428, n. 6; in 1774, v. 522; 
in 1776 with Boswell, ii. 522-3; in 
1781, iv. 156; in 1784, iv. 432; jeal- 
ousy of the manufacturers, ii. 525, n. 
3; Old Square, ii. 522, n. 2; rapid 
growth of population, iii. 511-12; 
riots of 1791, i. 100, n. 3; iv. 274, n. 
6; Soho, ii. 525; St. Martin's Church, 
i. 105, n. i; Stork Hotel, ii. 522, n. 
2; Swan Tavern, i. 99, n. 2. 

BiRNAM-WOOD, iii. S3. 

Birth, respect for. See under Bos- 
well and Johnson. 

Bis dat qui cito dat, ii. 332, n. 3. 



Biscay, language of, i. 373. 

Bishop, contradicting one, iv. 316; 
House of Lords, in the, ii. 196; how 
made, ii. 404; v. 90; Johnson dines 
with two Bishops in Passion Week, 
iv. 102-3 ; learning, their, iv. 16 ; 
dulness, ib., n. i; liberties taken in 
their presence, iv. 341 ; losses and 
gain by preferment, iv. 330, n. i ; 
' necessity of holding preferments //* 
commendam,' iv. 137, «. 2 ; ' Seven 
Bishops,' iv. 331 ; tippling-house, at a, 
iv. 87; a rout, ib. See HIERARCHY. 

Bishop, a bowl of, i. 291. 

BisHoi' Stortford, ii. 71. 

Bishopric, resignation of a, iii. 128, 
w. 4. 

Bismarck, Prince, iv. 31, w. 3. 

Black, why part of mankind is, i. 
463-4. 

Black dog, the, iii. 470. 

Bi.ack-guarus, and red-guards, ii. 
189, 288. 

Black-letter Books, ii. 138. 

Blacket, Sir Thomas, v. 168, n. 3. 

Blackie's Etymological Geography, v. 
270, n. I. 

Blacklock, Dr. , blindness and poetry, 
i. 539; Hume, extolled by, iv. 215, n. 
i; tutor to his nephew, v. 52, n. 4; 
Johnson, meets, v. 52; talks of scep- 
ticism, ib.; letter in explanation, v. 
477; Poems, quotation from his, i. 
388; mentioned, v. 394. 

Blackmore, Sir Richard, attorney, 
son of an, ii. 145, «. 3; teaches a 
school, i. 113, n. i; Creation, his, ii. 
124; honoured too much by attacks, 
ii. 124; Johnson adds him to the 
Lives, iii. 421; iv. 41, n. 3, 64, 65; 
— describes himself in the Life, iv. 
64 ; — saves him from the critics, ib. , 
n. 2; Literary Club of Lay Monks, 
i. 449, w. 3; v. 438, «. i; supposed 



Boswell's Life of Johnson. 



19 



Blackmore. 



Bodens. 



lines on Prince Voltiger, ii. 124; 
Swift, ridiculed by, iv. 92, n. 2. 

Blackstone, Sir William, Borough 
English, V. 365, ;/. i; Coinnicnfaries 
written when he had little practice, 
ii. 492 ;■ composed with the help of 
port wine, iv. 105; crown revenues, 
ii. 405, n. 3 ; Hackman's trial, iii. 
436 ; Hawkins's Siege of Aleppo, 
approves of, iii. 294 ; House of 
Hanover, right of the, v. 230; legal 
succession, ii. 475, n. i; Pembroke 
College, member of, i. 87; portrait 
in the Bodleian, iv. 105, n. 3; stulti- 
fying oneself, v. 3S9, n. 3. 

Blackwall, Anthony, i. 98; iv. 360, 
470, n. 2. 

Blackwell, Thomas, Memoirs of the 
Court of Augustus, i. 357, 361. 

Blackwell, Dr., a physician, i.540,«. 2. 

Blagden, Dr., iv. 35. 

Blainville, H., ii. 396. 

Blair, Rev. Dr. Hugh, Boswell, letter 
to, iii. 457; Boswell's lowing like a 
cow, V. 452; composed slowly, v. 75; 
conversation, his, iii. 385, n. 5; v. 
453, n. 2; Dissertation on Ossian, i. 
458; ii. 339, 345. «■ 3 ; iii- 58; John- 
son, in awe of, ii. 72; — 'den,' i. 
458 ; — misunderstanding with, ii. 
315, 318; — record of a talk with, 
V. 454; Johnsonian style, remarks on 
the, iii. 195, 196; Lectures on Rhet- 
oric, iii. 195; Pope, anecdotes of, iii. 
457-8 ; preached in a shamefully 
dirty church, v. 46 ; ' Scotchman, 
though the dog is a,' &c. , iv. 113; 
&rwc7«j-, publication, iii. iii; price 
paid, iii. 112; popularity, iii. 190, n. 
I, 239; Johnson praises them, iii. 
Ill, iiS, 124, 190,239; iv. 113; but 
criticises the Sermon on Devotion, 
iii. 385; whist, learns, v. 461, «. i; 
mentioned, ii. 60, n. i; v. 441. 449. 



Blair, Rev. Dr. John, iii. 457. 

Blair, Rev. Robert, iii. 55, «. 3. 

Blair, Robert, Solicitor-General of 
Scotland, iii. 55, n. 3. 

Blake, Life of, i. 170, n. 4. 

Blakesley, Dean, iv. 145, n. 2. 

Blakeway, Rev. J., i. 18. 

Blanchard, — , iv. 413, n. i. 

Blanchetti, Marquis, ii. 447. 

Bland, J., i. 142, n. 4. 

Blaney, Mrs. Elizabeth, i. 44; iv. 429. 

Blank Verse, Goldsmith and Gray's 
estimate of it, i. 495, n. i; Johnson's 
estimate of it, i. 495; ii. 142; iv. 24, 
50, 51, 70; ' verse only to the eye,' 
iv. 51; described by a shepherd, ib., 
n. I. 

Blasphemy, property in, v. 56. 

Bleeding, habit of, iii. 172, n. 4. 

Blenheim Park, Johnson had not 
seen it by 1773, v. 345; — and Bos- 
well visit it, ii. 516; — and the 
Thrales, v. 522. 

Blind, distinguishing colour by the 
touch, ii. 218. 

Blockhead, Churchill, applied to, i. 
485; Fielding, ii. 199; Sterne, ib., n. 
2; woman, a, ii. 522. 

Blois, i. 450, ;/. I. 

' Blood,' Johnson had no pretensions 
to it, ii. 299; Boswell's pride in it, v. 

57, 58. 
Blount, Martha, i. 269, n. i. 
Bloxam, Rev. Matthew, iii. 345. 
Bluebeard, ii. 208. 
Blue-stocking Meetings, iii. 483, «. 

i; iv. 125; V. 36, n. 
Boars, statues of, iii. 262. 
BoccAGE, — , ii. 447. 
Boccage, Mme. du, makes tea h I'An- 

gloise, ii. 462; her Columbiade, iv. 

382 ; mentioned by Walpole and 

Grimm, ib., n. i. 
Bodens, George, iii. 486, n. 4. 



20 



hidex to 



Bodleian Library. 



Books. 



Bodleian Library. See Oxford. 

BoERHAAVE, Herman, attacks, never 
answered, ii. 70, n. 2; executions, on, 
iv. 217, n. 3 ; Johnson, Life by, i. 
161, 311, «. 2; ii. 427: — resem- 
blance to, iv. 496, n. i; sleepless 
nights, iv. 443, n. i. 

BoETHius (Hector Boece), favourite 
writer of the middle ages, ii. 146; 
Johnson translates some verses by 
him, i. 161; tries to get his portrait, 
iv. 306. 

Bohemia, iii. 520. 

Bohemian Language, ii. 179. 

Bohemian Servant, Boswell's. Sec 
RiTTER, Joseph. 

BoiLEAU, corrected by Arnauld, iii. 
395 ; ' cultivez vos amis,' iv. 406; 
despised modern Latin poets, i. 104, 
n. 4; Imitation of Juvenal, i. 137; 
imitated by Murphy, i. 412, n. i; 
' Le vainqueurdes vainqueuers,'&c., 
i. 303, n. I ; Life by Desmaiseaux, 
i. 34; on the neglect of a book, iii. 
426, n. 3. 

BOLINGBROKE, Henry St. John, first 
Viscount, Burnet's History of his 
Own Time, ii. 245, n. 3 ; Booth's 
Cato, V. 143, n. 3; crown revenues, 
ii. 405, n. 3 ; dictionary-makers, i. 
343? f^- 3; English historians, ii. 271, 
n. 2; Garrick's Ode, i. 313; history 
to be read with suspicion, ii. 245, n. 
3; authorised romance, ii. 419, n. 3; 
House of Commons, describes the, 
iii. 266, n. 2; Johnson's attack on 
his fame, i. 311, 382 ; Leslie and 
Bedford, iv. 331, «. i; Mallet's edi- 
tion of his IVorks, i. 311, 382, w. i; 
Oxford, Lord, character of, iii. 267, 
n. 5; Patriot King, i. 382, n. i; 
Pope, enmity against, i. 381-2; — 
Essay on Man, share in, iii. 457; — 
executor, iv. 60; — friendship with, 



iv. 59, n. 3; Rome, references to, 
iii. 234, n. i; schools, v. 97, n. i; 
Shelbume's (Lord) character of him, 
i. 312, n. i; Tories and Jacobites, i. 
497. ^- 3i transpire, iii. 390. 

BoLiNGBROKE, Lady, iii. 369. 

BoLiNGBROKE, sccond Viscount, ii. 
282, n. i; iii. 397, n. 3. 

BOLINGBROKE, Lady, divorced from 
the second Viscount. See Beau- 
CLERK, Lady Diana. 

Bologna, ii. 224; v. 130. 

Bombay, v. 61, n. 2. 

Bott Chretien, v. 472, n. 2. 

Bon-mots, instances of , iii. 367; ' carry- 
ing ' one, ii. 401. 

Bon Ton, ii. 372. 

Bonaventura, i. 578. 

Bond, Mrs., iv. 463, n. 3. 

Bones, uses of old, iv. 236; Johnson's 
horror at the sight of them, v. 193, 

373- 
Boniface in The Beaux Stratagem , ii. 

528; iii. 102, M. 2. 
Bonner, Bishop, i. 87, n. 4. 
BoNNETTA of Londonderry, v. 363-4. 

BONSTETTEN, , V. 437, «. 3. 

Book of Discipline, ii. 197. 

Book-binding, i. 65, n. 2. 

Book-trade, ii. 486-7. 

Books, abundance of modern, iii. 378; 
death, leaving one's books at, iii. 355; 
early printed ones, ii. 457-8; v. 523; 
every house supplied with them, iv. 
251, n. 3; getting boys to have en- 
tertainment from them, iii. 438; high 
price, complaints of their, i. 508, n. 
i; Johnson's letter on the book- 
trade, ii. 486-7; knowledge of the 
world through books, i. 122; talking 
from them, v. 431 ; looking over their 
backs in a library, ii. 417; poorest 
book, if the first, a prodigious effort, 
i. 526; prices at which they were 



BosweWs Life of JoJinson. 



21 



Books. 



Boswell. 



sold : Boswell's edition of Johnson s 
Letter to Chesterfield, \os. td., i. 302, 
n. 4; Churchill's Rosciad, is., i. 486, 
n. 2; Dodsley's Cieone, is. bd., i. 376, 
n. 3; Goldsmith's Traveller, is. bd., 
i. 481; Johnson's Zfi>«a(3«, is,,'\. 147, 
n. 3; M armor Norfolciense, is., i. 
165, n. 3; Observations on Macbeth, 
IS., i. 202, n. 3; Vanity of Human 
Wishes, IS. , i. 224, w. i ; Irene, is. bd. , 
i. 229, n. 2; Rambler, "id. a number, 
i. 242, n. 2 ; Rambler, 4 vols, in 
l2mo., I2J., i. 246, n. I.; Dictionary , 
2 vols., 4/. lOi-., i. 335, «. 3; Idler, 2 
vols., 5^., i. 388, n. i; Rasselas, 2 
vols., i2mo., 5j., i. 394, n. 2; Jour- 
ney to the Western Islands, 5^., ii. 
354, w- 3 ; Macpherson's Iliad, two 
guineas, ii. 340, n. 2; V&rcy's Hermit 
of Warkworth, is. bd., ii. 157, n. i; 
Pope's ' 1738,' IS., i. 147, «. i; Rob- 
ertson's Scotland, two guineas, iii. 
380, n. 2; ' quarterly-book,' the, ii. 
488; seldom read when given away, 
ii. 264 ; uncertainty of profits, iv. 
140; variety of them to be kept about 
a man, iii. 219 ; Voltaire on the rapid 
sale of books in I-ondon, ii. 461, n. 
i; willingly, not read, iv. 252. See 
Reading. 

Bookseller, a drunken, iii. 442-3. 

Bookseller of the Last Century, sale of 
The Rambler and Rasselas, ii. 238, 
n. 5; Newbery, v. 33, n. 2. 

Booksellers, Boswell's vindication of 
them, ii. 488, w. i; ' Bridge, on the,' 
iv. 297; copyright case, ii. 312, n. 2; 
copyright, their honorary, iii. 421; 
improvements in their manners, i. 
353. n. I ; Johnson's letter on the 
book -trade, ii. 486-7; — uniform re- 
gard for them, i. 507; — calls them 
liberal-minded men, i. 352; iv. 41, n. 
3; literary property, their, iii. 125; 



London booksellers, denominated the 
Trade, iii. 324, n. 1; publish John- 
son's Lives, iii. 126 ; oppressors of 
genius, i. 353, n. 1; ii. 395, n. 2; 
patrons of literature, i. 332, n. 3, 353. 

Booth, Barton, the actor, account of 
him, V. 143, n. 3; manager of Drury- 
lane, v. 277, n. 6. 

Booth, Captain, in Amelia, i. 289, w. i. 

BooTHBY, Sir Brook, i. 96. 

BooTHBY, Miss Hill, Johnson's friend- 
ship for her, i. 96; — prescription of 
orange-peel, ii. 378, «. 2 ; — sup- 
posed jealousy of Lord Lyttelton, iv. 
66, n. 2; letters to her. See John- 
son, Letters. 

Borlase, William, History of the Isles 
of Scilly, i. 358. 

Borneo, v. 447, n. 4. 

Borough, corruption in a, ii. 428, 

Borough English, v. 364. 

BoscAWEN, Hon. Mrs., iii. 376, 483; 
iv. III. 

BoscoviCH, Pere, ii. 144, 465. 

BossuET, ii. 513, n. i; v. 354. 

BosviLLE, Squire Godfrey, invites 
Johnson to meet Boswell at his 
house, iii. 498 ; belonged to the 
same club as Johnson, iii. 499; men- 
tioned, ii. 194, n. 2; iii. 147, n. 2, 
408. 

BosviLLE, Mrs., ii. 194. 

BosviLLE, Miss, ii. 194, n. 2; after- 
wards Lady Macdonald, v. 168. 

Boswell, various spellings of it, v. 
141. 

Boswell Family, Johnson's projected 
history of it, iv. 229. 

BoswELLS of Fife, ii. 473. 

Boswell, Sir Alexander, Baronet, 
Boswell's eldest son, birth, ii. 443; 
iii. 99; at Eton College, iii. 14; de- 
scribed by Scott, V. 438, n. 3; killed 
in a duel, ii. 206, n. i, 443, «. i. 



22 



Index to 



Boswell, David. 



Boswell, James. 



Boswell, David, a remote ancestor, ii. 

474- 

BoswKLL, David (Boswell's younger 
brother, devotion to Auchinleck, iii. 
492; return to it, iii. 497; ill-used by 
Dundas, iii. 242, n. i; Johnson, calls 
on, iii. 492; liked by him, iii. 502; 
residence in Spain, ii. 224, n. 3 ; iii. 
207; leaves in consequence of war, 
iii. 492. 

Boswell, David (Boswell's third son), 
iii. 108; death, iii. 121-41 

Boswell, Dr., account of him, v. 450; 
Johnson, meets, v. 53-4; — descrip- 
tion of, iii. 8; mentioned, i. 506; iii. 
132. 

Boswell, Euphemia (Boswell's second 
daughter), ii. 4S3. 

BOSWELL, JAMES. 
Chiek Events ok his Life. 

1740 Birth, October ■i<)\\\, i. 170, n. 2. 

1759 Keeps an exact journal, i. 502, «. 1. 
Enters at Glasgow University, i. 538. 

1760 First visit to London, i. 445. 

1761 Publishes an Elegy on the death of an 

Amiable Young Lady, and An Ode to 
Tragedy, i. 444, n. i . 

1762 Contributes to a Collection of Original 

Poems, ib. 
The Cub at Newmarket, ib. 
Second visit to London, i. 446. 

1763 Critical Strictures, i. 444, n. i. 
Correspondence with the Hon. Andrew 

Erskine, ib. 
Gets to know Johnson, i- 453. 
Goes to study at Utrecht, i. 547. 

1764 & 1765 Travels in Germany, Switzerland, 

and Italy, iii. 139, «. i; 52'', n. 2. 

1765 Visits Corsica, ii. 3- 

1766 Visits Paris, ii. 3. 
Returns from abroad, ii. 5. 
Visits London, ii. 5-17. 
Admitted as an Advocate, ii. 23. 

1767 Is acquainted with men of eminence, ii. 15, 

«. 2. 
Corresponds with the Earl of Chatham, ii. 

67, n. I. 
Dorando, a Spanish Tale, ii. 57, «. 2. 
Essence of the Douglas Cause, ii. 264. 



1768 Visits London and Oxford, ii. 62-75. 
Account of Corsica, ii. 52. 

Raises a subscription to send ordnance to 
Corsica, ii. 67, ». i. 

1769 Visits Ireland, ii. 179, «. 3- 
Visits London, ii. 77-127. 
First visit to Streatham, ii. 88. 
Attends the Stratford Jubilee, ii. 78. 
Married, ii. 161, ». i. 

British Essays in favour of the Bravt 
Corsicans, ii. 67, w. 1. 
1770-1 Gap in his correspondence with John- 
son of nearly a year and a half, ii. 161. 

1772 Visits London, ii. 168-230. 

1773 Visits London, ii. 240-302. 

Elected a member of the Literary Club, ii. 
275- 

Gets to know Burke, ib. 

Tour to the Hebrides with Johnson, U- 
306. 
'775 Visits London, ii. 355-432. 

Johnson assigns him a room in his house, 
ii. 430- 

Visits Wilton and Mamhead in Devon- 
shire, ii. 426. 

Enters at the Inner Temple, ii. 430, n. 4. 

Birth of his eldest son, Alexander, ii. 443. 

1776 Disagrees with his father about the settle- 

ment of his estate, ii. 473. 
Visits London, ii. 488-501; iii. 4-91. 
Becomes Paoli's constant guest when in 

London, iii. 40. 
Visits Oxford, Birmingham. Lichfield, and 

Ashbourne with Johnson, ii. 501-44; iii. 

«-5- 
Visits Bath, iii. 52-9. 
Introduces Wilkes to .Tohnson, iii. 74. 

1777 Meets Johnson at Ashbourne, iii. 154-237. 
Begins The Hypochondriack in the Lon- 

don Magazine, iv. 207, «. 3. 

1778 Visits London, iii. 251-408. 
Attacked violently by Johnson, iii. 384. 
The Hypoihondriack, iv. 207, n. 3. 

1779 Visits London (in the spring), iii. 424-48. 
Tries Johnson's friendship by a fit of si- 
lence, iii. 448. 

Visits London (in the autumn), iii. 454-67. 
Visits Lichfield and Chester, iii. 468-71. 
The Hypochondriack. iv. 207, n. 3. 

1780 The H y pochondriack , iv. 207, n. 3. 

1781 Visits London, iv. 82-137. 

Visits Southill wiih Johnson, iv. 137-52. 
The H ypochondriack, iv. 207, n- 3. 

1782 Death of his father, iv. 177. 



Bosweirs Life of Johnson. 



23 



Boswell, James. 



"783 



1784 



1785 



1786 



1787 



1789 



The Hyfochondriack, iv. 207, «. 3. 

Visits London, iv. 189-262. 

Hopes for an appointment through Burke, 
iv. 257. 

Ends The Hyfiochotidriack, iv. 207, «. 3. 

Letter to the Feofi.'e of Scotland on the 
Present State 0/ the Nation, iv. 298. 

Stops at V^ork on his way to London, iv. 
306. 

Hurries back to Ayrshire with the inten- 
tion of becoming a candidate for Parlia- 
ment, ih. 

Visits London, iv. 313-91. 

Visits Oxford with Johnson, iv. 327-59. 

Johnson's death, iv. 481. 

Journal 0/ a Tour to the Hebrides, v. 2. 

Letter to the People 0/ Scotland against 
the attetnpt to diminish the number of 
the Lords 0/ Session, iv. 199, n i. 

Called to the Enghsh Bar, i. z, m. 2 ; iv. 
357. "■ 3- 

First joins the Home Circuit, then goes 
the Northern, lastly returns to the Home 
Circuit, Letters 0/ Boswell, p- 341, and 
iii. 296, «. 2. 

Third edition of the Jourtuil 0/ a Tour, 
V. 4. 

Canvasses Ayrshire, iv. 254, «. 5. 

Courts Lord Lonsdale, ib. 

Elected Recorder of Carlisle, Gent- Mag. 
for 1788, p 470. 

Takes a house in Queen Anne Street 
West, Cavendish Square, Letters of 
Boswell, p 267. 

Takes chambers in the Inner Temple, iii. 
203, n. 2. 

Death of his wife, i 1-73, n. 2. 

Joins in raising a subscription for a monu- 
ment to Johnson, Letters of Boswell, p. 
317- 

The Letter front Satnuel Johnson to the 
Earl of Chaste' field, i. 302, «. 4. 

A Conversation betiveen George III and 
Samuel Johnson, ii. 38, «. 2. 

Sufifers from Lord Lonsdale's brutality, ii. 
206, n. I. 

The L ife of Samuel Johnson, i. 9. 

Appointed Secretary for Foreign Corre- 
spondence to the Royal Academy, iii. 
525- 

Returns to the Home Circuit, LitUrs of 
Boswell, p. 341. 



«79» 



VI.— 7 



1793 Second edition of the Life of Johmon, 
L14. 

1794 

1795 Death, May 19th, i. 17. 

Boswell, James, account of himself, 
i. 444, 468; iii. 473, n. 2; v. 57; 
birth, his, i. 170, n. 3; death, i. 17; 
Account of the Kirk of Scotland, v. 
242 ; accuracy : see below, Authen- 
ticity ; activity, v. 58, n. 6, 192; Ad- 
dress to the King, carries an, iv. 
306-8; Advocate, admitted as an, ii. 
23 : see below, Counsel ; affectation 
of distress, iv. 82, 437 ; allowance 
from his father of ;^30o a year, iii. 
106, n. I ; Alnwick, vi.sits, ii. 164; 
ambiguous prayer, his, iii. 445, n. 3; 
ambition, iii. 203, n. 2; America, ig- 
norance of, ii. 336, 357, n. 2; Ameri- 
cans, sides with the, ii. 336, 357; iii. 
233-5; iv. 94, 298; ancestry, Thomas 
Boswell, ii. 473; iv. 229; Veronica 
Sommelsdyck, v. 27, n. i; Robert 
Bruce, ib. ; Boswells of Balmuto, v. 
79; anonymous mention of himself, 
ii. 15, 64, 96, 222, 260, n. 4, 377, n. 
4, 499, n. I, 514, n. I ; iii. 57, n. 2, 
66, ;/. 2, 269, «. 2, 462, n. 2; iv. 200, 
316; antiquary, an, iii. 471, n. 2; 
archives, his, iii. 308, n. 3, 342, n. i; 
army, wishes to enter the, i. 462; v. 
58; fancies himself a military man, 
V. 142 ; Ashbourne, visits, iii. 144, 
X49, 154, 236; Auchinleck Castle, 
describes, i. 535 ; iii. 203 ; v. 431 ; 
authenticity, love of, i. 7 ; ii. 401, 
496, n. 2; iii. 237, 340, «. i; iv. 97; 
v. I, 479; avidity for delight, iii. 472; 
bar, enters at the: see below, English 
Bar; Barbauld's, Mrs., lines on him, 
ii. 4, «. 2; Baretti, dislike of, ii. ill, 
n. 3; Bath, visits, iii. 52; Bristol, iii. 
58; bear, led by a, ii. 30S, «. 2; 
Beauclerk's hit at his talk, ii. 221, n. 
2; birth-day, ii. 79, «. 2; birth and 



24 



Index to 



Boswell, James. 



gentility, love of, i. 567-9; ii. 299, 
376-7; V. 57, 58, 119, 433; birth- 
right, granted his father a renuncia- 
tion of his. ii. 476, n. i ; bishops, on, 
iv. 87; ' Blood :' jjy above, liirth and 
Gentility; boastful, i v. 222, bologna, 
at, V. 130; books, slight knowledge 
of, ii. 413; Johnson buys him some, 
ii. 432, n. i; iii. ()(^ioi; liosweli, 
all that is comprehemled in, ii. 438, 
M. i; ' Hoswell, Mr. James, a native 
of Scotland,' i. 221, n. i; boy, longer 
than others, v. 350; ' Bozzy,' ii. 296; 
Hritish Essays in favour of the 
brave Corsicans, ii. 67, ;/. i; Burke, 
visits, iv. 243; bustle, makes a, iii. 
147, n. 2, 423; Cambridge, visits, ii. 
3S3, w. 3; cards, speiuls a night at, 
iii. 429; Carlisle, invites Johnson to 
meet him at, iii. 121. 134, 140, 144; 
celebrated men. ac(|uaintance with, 
ii. 15; iii. 74: sm- below, (ireat Men; 
changefuliiess, wretched, iii. 219; 
character, Johnson's account of his, 
i. 549; ii. 307, «. I, 318, n. i; v. 58; 
Paoli's, i. 6, «. 2; Lord Stowell's, v. 
58, tt. 6: st-c' above. Account of him- 
self; Chatham, Earl of, correspond- 
ence with the, ii. 15, tt. 2, 67, m. i; 
Chester, visits, iii. 469; his journal 
there a log-book of felicity, iii. 472; 
' Chief, my York.shire,' ii. 194, n. 2; 
iii. 147. n. 2, 49S; children, his, ii. 
304. 320, 321, 443; iii. 416; — 
blessed by a non-juring Bishop, iii. 
422; — loved by Johnson, iii. 495; 
church, not easy unless he goes to it, 
i. 486, M. 2; fondness for going, iii. 
205; 'would pray with a Dean and 
Chapter," iii. 427, n. i; chymistry, 
his intellectual, iii. 74; citizen of the 
world, a, ii. 350; v. 21; classical quo- 
tation, apt, V. 63; Clulial'k, iv. 294, 
H. 2 ; Cocoa-tree Club, at the, v. 



440, n. I ; Colkction of Original 
Poems, i. 444, n. i ; collection of 
Scotch words, begins a, ii. 105; and 
of Scotch antiquities, ii. 105 ; iii. 
471, M. 2; consecrated ground, com- 
fort in nearness to, v. 192; divinely 
cheered by the nearness of Carlisle 
Cathedral, iii. 472, 474; consecutive 
paragraphs, iii. 3S5, //. 5; iv. 257, ;/. 
5 ; Co>nu-rsation hehoeen His Most 
Sacreit Af(i;esty,&fc., ii. 38, n. 2; con- 
sfiicuotisness, his, iv. 287, n. i; con- 
vict unjustly condemned, ii. 326; 
correspondence with Adams, i. 9; 
iv. 433; Biattie, ii. 170, //. 2; v. 16; 
Blair, iii. 457; v. 454; Blacklock, v. 
477; Chatham, Earl of, ii. 15, «. 2; 
67, «. i; Cullen, iv. 303; Dempster. 
V. 464; Dilly, iii. 125; Elibank, 
Lord, V. 206; Forbes, .Sir W., v. 471, 
Garrick, ii. 319, «. 2; iii. 422; v. 
395-8, 435, w. 3; Hailes, Lord, i. 
500; v. 463; Hastings, Warren, iv. 
77; Hector, iv. 432-3; Johnson: see 
below, Johnson, and under John- 
son; Langton, iii. 482; Monboddo, 
v. 84; Parr, iv. 55, n. 3; Percy, iii. 
315; Pitt, iv. 302, n. i; Rasay, v. 
467-9; Robertson, v. 14, 35; Reyn- 
olds, iv. 299, M. i; Thurlow, iv. 378- 
88; Vyse, iii. 142; Wilkes, ii. 12, >i. 
5; iv. 259, M. 2; Correspondence with 
the I/on. Andrew Erskine, i. 444, n. 
i; Corsica, Account of : j^^ Corsica; 
Corsica, his head filled too much 
with it, ii. 25, 66-7; his memory 
honoured there, ii. 3, «. 2; a tradition 
of him, ii. 517, n. i; Corsicans, raises 
a subscription for the, ii. 67, ;/. i; 
Counsel, engaged as, Douglas Cause, 
iii. 249, n. i; v. 430, n. 5; Ecclesias- 
tical censure case, iii. 67; House of 
Lords, before the, ii. 166. 430, n. 4, 
432, n. 1; iii. 249; House of Com- 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



25 



Boswell, James. 



mons, iii. 253; iv. 85, 298, n. 2; Dr. 
Memis's case, ii. 333; schoolmaster, 
prosecution of a, iii. 240; Society of 
Solicitors' case, iv. 149 ; country- 
house, takes a little, iii. 132, I45; 
Court of General Assembly, despises 
pleading at the, ii. 436, n. 4; Court 
of Sessions, little dull labours, ii. 
436, n. 4; Court of Session Garland, 
i. 500, ft. 3; ii. 230, n. i; Courtenay's 
lines on him, i. 258; cow, lows like 
a, V. 452; cowardly caution, iii. 239- 
40 ; critical skill, v. 243 ; Critical 
Strictures, i. 444, n. i, 473: critics 
* cannot or will not understand him,' 
V. 295, H. 1; Cub at Newmarket, i. 
444, n. I ; curiosity, his wise and no- 
ble, ii. 4, 67; Dalblair and Young 
Auchinleck, known as, v. 131 ; 
daughters, on the treatment of, ii. 
482, w. i; ' dazzled ' by Johnson and 
Paoli, i. 533; death, at times not 
afraid of, iii. 174; debts, i. 2, n. 2; ii. 
315; paid by his father, iii. 106; 
Johnson's warnings, against incur- 
ring any, iv. 171-2, 175, 178, 188; 
dedications, his, i. i; ii. i, «. 2; v. i; 
delights to talk of the state of his 
mind, iv. 287; describes visible ob- 
jects with difficulty, v. 197, 249; 
desert, has wished to retire to a, ii. 
86; Devonshire, visits, ii. 426; dig- 
nity, hardly possible uniformly to 
preserve, ii. 79, n. 2; acquires 'dig- 
nity in London,' ii. 430, n. 4; din- 
ners, gives admirable, ii. 68, w. i; 
gives one to some Hebrideans and 
Highlanders, ii. 352, 436; goes with- 
out one, ii. 204; displays his classical 
learning, v. 16, n. i; dissatisfaction, 
too much given to, iii. 255; Doran- 
do, A Spanish Tale, ii. 57, n. 2; 
'Drawing-room' dress, his, ii. 95, 
n. i; Dresden, visits, i. 309, n. i; 



drudges in an obscure comer, ii. 
436, n. 4; duel, risk of having to 
fight a, ii. 206, «. i; early rising, dif- 
ficulty of, iii. 191; Easter meetings 
wth Johnson, iv. 171, n. i; elated at 
getting Johnson to the Hebrides, v. 
244; Elegy on the Death of an Ami- 
able Young Lady, i. 444, n. i; ele- 
vated by pious exercises, iv. 142 ; 
English Bar, enters at the Inner 
Temple, ii. 430, n. 4; iii. 203; eats 
his dinners, ii. 432, n. i; iii. 52, n. i; 
called, i. 2, n. 2; iv. 357, «. 3; dis- 
couraging prospects, iii. 203, «. a; 
takes chambers, ib. ; attends the 
Northern Circuit, iii. 296, n. 2; dis- 
cussion with Johnson on the way to 
success at the bar, iv. 357; enthusi- 
asm of mind, solemn, iii. 139, «. i; — 
to go wth Captain Cook, iii. 8; to 
go to the wall of China, iii. 305; — 
feudal, iii. 202; v. 254; — genealog- 
ical, v. 432; envy of Dundas's success, 
ii. 184, n. i; Epistle from Menalcas 
to Lycidas, i. 444, n. i; Essays, his, 
iv. 207 ; Essence of the Douglas 
Cause, ii. 264, «. i; Essex Head 
Club, member of the, iv. 293, n. 2; 
estate, income of his, iv. 177, n. 2, 
179, ;;. i; Eumelian Club, member 
of the, iv. 455, «. 2; exact likeness, 
draws an, i. 562; executions, love of 
seeing, ii. 107, n. i; iii. 43^, «. 2; iv. 
379; executors, his, iii. 342, n.i; ' fa- 
cility of manners,' v. 20, n. i; fame, 
ardour for literary, ii. 79, «. 2; iv. 
59, n. I ; fancies that he is neglected, 
ii. 440; iii. 51, 153; that Johnson is 
ill or offended, ii. 471; that his wife 
or children are ill, iii. 5'. at Slains 
Castle, V. 119; in a Highland inn, v. 
158; farm, purchases a, iii. 235; fa- 
ther, his (Lord Auchinleck), death, 
iv. 177; — disagreement with, i. 401, 



26 



Index to 



Boswell, James. 



n. i; ii. 355, «. i; iii. 108; — about 
heirs general and male, ii. 474-5; 
iii. 98; uneasy with him, i. 493; — a 
timid boy in his presence, ii. 438, n. 
1; iii. 106, w. i; — on better terms 
with him, iii. 106, 108, 122, 240, 419, 
502; — dulls his faculties by strong 
beer before him, ii. 438, n. i; — 
Johnson, reproached by him as re- 
gards, ii. 436, n. 4; V. 437, 11. 3; — 
Johnson's advice about him, iii. 474; 
— likeness to him in face, v. 95; 
feelings, avows his ardent, ii. 79 ; 
' fervour of Loyalty,' iii. 128; fees 
made before the House of Lords, ii. 
432, it. I ; feudal system, love of the, 
ii. 204; iii. 202; feudal enthusiasm, 
his, V. 254; see SfcCKSsioN, male; 
forwardness, ii. 514; Franklin, Dr., 
dines with him, ii. 68, n. i; Free- 
will, love of discussing : see Free- 
wii.i.; 'gab like Koswell,' v. 58, «. 
4; (larrick, friendship with, iii. 422: 
see above, under Correspondence; 
genealogist, a, iii. 308, «. 3; George 
III, relation to, v. 432; ghosts, talks 
of, iv. 109, «. i; disturbed by the 
cry of one, v. 269, n. 2; fearful of 
them, V. 372, «. i; Gibbon, dislike 
of: see Gibbon, Edward; Glasgow 
University, a student of, i. 53S; god, 
makes another man his, v. 146, n. 4; 
Goldsmith's lodgings, visits, ii. 209; 
takes leave of him, ii. 298; affected 
by his death, ii. 319, n. 2; good-nat- 
ure, described by Burke, iii. 412, n. i; 
great men, hopes from, iii. 91, n. 4; 
Burke, iv. 257, 287, n. 2, 298, n. i; 
Lonsdale, Lord, ii. 11, n. i ; iv. 254, n. 
5; Pembroke, Lord, ii. 426, n. i; iii. 
91, n. 4; Pitt, iv. 302, n. i; Rocking- 
ham ministry, iv. 171; seeking great 
men's acquaintance, iii. 215; v. 245; 
Grtat man, really the, ii. 68, n. i, 95, 



«. I ; quite the great man, iii. 450, n. 
2, 470, «. i; Greek, ignorance of, iii. 
463; ' Griffith, an honest chronicler 
as,' i. 28; guardians to his children, 
iii. 454; Hague, at the, v. 27, n. i; 
Handel musical meeting, at the, iv. 
326, 328, 330; happiest days, one of 
his, iv. Ill; Hebrides, first talk of 
visiting the, i. 521; ii. 332; homme 
grave, ii. 3, «. 2; Home Tooke, al- 
tercation with, iii. 402, n. 3; house in 
Edinburgh, his, iii. 175; v. 23, n. 3; 
Hume, intimacy with, ii. 68, n. i, 
500, «. 2; has memoirs of him, v. 33; 
humorous vein, v. 466; JFypochondri- 
aei\ The, iv. 207, n. 3; hypochondria, 
sufTers from, i. 75, «. i, 397; ii. 436, 
M. 4, 485; iii. 99, 102, 416, 475; iv. 
437; pride in it, i. 75, n. i; iii. 99, 
478; ' hypocri.sy of misery,' his, iv. 
82; idleness, i. 538; imaginary ills: 
see Fancies ; imagination, should 
correct his, iii. 413; independency of 
spirit, V. 348; infidelity, his, in his 
youth, i. 468; says that 'it causes 
ennui,' ii. 506, «. i; infidels, keeping 
company with, iii. 465; intellectual 
excesses, iii. 473 ; ' intoxicated not 
drunk, ii. 499, n. i: see below, Wine; 
Ireland, visits, ii. 179, n. 3; isthmus, 
compares himself to an, ii. 92; Italy, 
visits, ii. 12, 61; Jacobitism when a 
boy, i. 499, n. i; associations con- 
nected with it, V. 160; January 30, 
old port and solemn talk on, iii. 422; 
Jeffrey, helped to bed by, v. 26, n. 
3; Jockey Club, member of the, i. 
444, w. I ; Johnson's acquaintance, 
makes, i. 453; ii. 400-1; and calls 
on him, i. 45S; under his roof for 
the last time, iv. 389; last talk, ib. ; 
last farewell, iv. 391; — advice on 
his coming into his property, iv. 178; 
— advises him to stay at home in 



Boswell's Life of fohnsoyi. 



27 



Boswell, James. 



1782, iv. 179; — affection, tries an 
experiment on, iii. 448-51; — assigns 
him a room in his house, ii. 431; iii. 
119, 252; — company, time spent in, 
i. 12, n. 3; — complains of the 
length of his letters, iii. 99, n. 3; — 
constant respectful attention to, ii. 
409; — consulted about America by, 
ii. 334, 356; — conversation reported 
at first with difficulty, i. 487; — co- 
partnership in the tour to the Heb- 
rides with, V. 301, 316; — Custos 
Rotuloruin, offers himself as, v. 414; 

— describes him as ' worthy and re- 
ligious,' iii. 448; — Diary, reads, iv. 
468; regrets that Mrs. Boswell did 
not copy it, v. 59; — differed in pol- 
itics on two points only from, iii. 
250; iv. 298; — dines for the first 
time at the house of, ii. 246; — 
drawn by him as too ' awful,' ii. 301, 
«. 2; regrets losing some of his awe, 
iii. 255; — easier with him than with 
almost any body, iv. 224; — encour- 
ages him to turn author, i. 474; — , 
not encouraged to share reputation 
with, ii. 343, w. i; — exhorts him to 
plant, V. 433 ; — faults, does not 
hide, i. 35; iii. 312, ?/. 2; — firmness, 
supported by, v. 176; — gaps in cor- 
respondence with, ii. I, 48. 133, 161; 
iii. 448-9; — gives him Les Pens^es 
de Paschal, iii. 432; — gives him a 
thousand pounds in praise, iii. 434; 

— his guest for the first time, i. 489; 

— his ' Guide, Philosopher, and 
Friend,' iii. 7; iv. 142, 484; — imi- 
tates, ii. 373, n. 2; iv. 2, «. i; — in- 
vited to visit Scotland, ii. 58, 231, 
266, 303; — joins in his bond at the 
Temple, ii. 430, 71. 4; — Journey, 
reads in one night, ii. 332: projects 
a Supplement to it, ii. 343, «. i; — 
keeps him up late drinking port, i. 



502; iii. 434; — leads, to talk, i. 6, 
n. 2, 460, «. 4; ii. 214; iii. 45; v. 
182, 301, 316; — letters to, ii. 2, 3, 
23, 26, 66, 123, 160, 163, 166, 232, 
309-10, 318-19, 323-5, 331-9, 352, 
435, 442. 465, 471. 483; iii- 98, 
103-4, 115, 119, 121-2, 132, 139, 
«. I, 143, 147, 150, 238, 240, 244, 
249-51. 314. 409. 422, 444, 449, 468, 
472, 492, 497; iv. 299, 437-8; three 
letters kept back, ii. 3, n. 2; iii. 134, 
139; — keeps his letters, ii. 3; — life, 
would add ten of his years to, iii. 
498; — love for, iii. 120; iv. 261, 
299, n. I, 389; v. 20; — love £01 
him, i. 468, 502, n. 3, 522, 535; ii. 4, 
80, 127, 167, 235, 305, 411, 430, n. 4, 
432, n. I, 440, 471; iii. 92, 98, 120, 
141, 153. 225, 239, 244-5, 354, 412, 
445. 469-70. 495. 498, 502; iv. 82, 
94, n. 3, 191, 261, 389. 437-8; V. 
454; — loved by him and Mrs. 
Thrale, ii. 489; — monument, circu- 
lar-letter about, iv. 488, n. i; pro- 
jected monument at Auchinleck, v. 
433; — , mysterious veneration for, 
i. 445; — necessity of a yearly inter- 
view with, iii. 134, 144; — neglects 
to write to, iii. 448-51; iv. 438; — 
offended and reconciled, ii. 123, 125; 
heated in a talk about America, iii. 
234-5, 250; a second time, iii. 358; 
a week's separation, iii. 384; recon- 
ciliation, iii. 385; dispute about ef- 
fects of vice on character, iii. 398; — 
in a violent passion on Rattakin, v. 
165; reconciliation, v. 167; — offers 
to write a history of his family, iv. 
229; — pension, tries for an addi- 
tion to, iv. 377-8, 388-90, 401-2; — 
poems, projects an edition of, i. 19, 
n. I ; iv. 439, n.i; — praises him for 
vivacity, iii. 153, n. 2; good-humour, 
iii. 236, M. i; as a travelling compan- 



28 



Index to 



Boswell, James. 



ion, iii. 334; v. 58; as one sure of a 
reception, v. 153, n. 2; — proposes a 
mtetinjj in 1780 with, iii. 481, 498, 
501; — proposes that they should 
meet one day every week, ii. 411; 
iii. 139, w. i; — , proposes weekly 
correspondence with, iii. 453; — , 
publishes without leave a letter from, 
ii. 4, «. I, 53, 65; may publish all 
after — death, ii. 68; — , recom- 
mended to a lady client by, ii. 317; 
— , sadness in parting with, ii. 301; 
iii. 222 ; — says that to lose him 
would be a limb amj>utatcd, iv. 94, 
M. 3; — tries, by not writing, iii. 
448-51; — , visits Harwich with, i. 
538; the Hebrides, v. 1-475; Ox- 
ford, ii. 52; Oxford and the Mid- 
land Counties, ii. 502; Hath, iii. 52- 
59; Ashbourne, iii. 154-237; South- 
ill, iv. 137-52; Oxford, iv. 327-5S; 

— visits him ill in be<l, iii. 444-5; — 
and Wilkes together, brings, iii. 74- 
90; a succes-sful negotiation, iii. go; 

— will, not in, iv. 463, «. 3; — witty 
at his exp>ense, i. 3; ii. 215; v. 246; 
— , yearly meeting with, need of a. 
iii. 498; Johnson's Court, veneration 
for. ii. 263; Journal, in his youth 
keeps a. i. 501 ; by the advice of Mr. 
Love, ii. 1S3. «. i; — accuracy, its, 
asserted, ii. 74, n. 2; — 'exact tran- 
script of conversations,' v. 472; — 
justification for keeping it, ib.\ — 
entries in it made in company, i. 6. 
n. 2; iv. 367, n. 2, 396; method of 
keeping it, v. 310; — kept with in- 
dustry, i. 5-7; four nights in one 
week given to it, i. 534; — neglect- 
ed, i. 6, «. 2; ii. 53, n. 2, 80, 403, w. 
I, 426; iii. 403, 426, 428; iv. 102, «. 
I, 116, 128, 316, n. 5, 359; v. 410, 
426, 449, 454; — advised by John- 
son to keep one, i. 501; Johnson 



pleasetl with it, iii. 295; — helps to 
record a conversation, ib. ; v. 349; 

— reminded that it is kept. iii. 499; 

— kept in quarto and octavo vol- 
umes, iv. 97; Journal of his visit to 
Ashl>oumc. iii. 237; — Johiisnu's r<- 
mark on it, iii. 238. m. i; Journal of 
a Tour to the Hebrides, cxten.sivc 
circulation, ii. 3o<); in spite of ridi- 
cule, iii. 216; — editions and tran<»- 
lation. ii. 306. n. 4; v. 3, n. i; cor- 
rections made in j>art of first edition, 
V. 279. w. I ; — pa.ssagcs omitte^l in 
the later editions, v. 168, n. 3, 435. 
w. I, 441, n. (\ 442, «. 4, 474, »». 1; — 
' an honest chronicler as Griffith,' i. 
28, M. i; — attacks on it, v. 3; — 
Johnson's life, exact picture of a 
I>ortion of, v. 318; — praisc<l by him, 
i. 28, w. i: — motto, iii. 216, «. i; — 
read in MS. by Jnhnson, ii. 439, n. 2; 
V. 65, «. 2. 257. 279, «. I, 2<>8, 315, 
349, 410, n. 3; by Mrs. Thrale, ii. 
439; V. 279, n. i; and Malone, v. i; 

— ta.sk of much laliour. v. 258; jux- 
taposition of stories and names, iii. 
47. w. 3; Knight-errant, feels like a. 
V. 404 ; knowledge at the age of 
twenty-five, ii. 11; Laird, seen a.s a, 
iv. 189; Lancaster Assizes, at, iii. 
296, M. 2; Latin corrected by John- 
son, ii. 23; defended, ii. 26; talked 
Latin in Highland houses, v. 365; 
law, ignorance of, ii. 24, n. 4; v. 123, 
ft. i; — study of it, i. 463, 494; — 
professor of it in the imaginary col- 
lege, v. 123; lawyer, unwilling to be- 
come a, i. 462, 4CJ4; lay-patron, a, ii. 
282; learning, praises his own, v. 58, 
«. 3; I^(/fr to the People of Scotland 
on the Present State of the Nation 
(1783), iv. 298, 300-1 ; — sent to 
Pitt, iv. 302, n. I ; Letter to the People 
of Scotland against diminishing the 



Bosu-elTs Life of yoknson. 



29 



Boswdl, Ji 



(17851. Bake, Ediirf. f ikf ri. 
IT. 199, «. l; — Geoise III, L ^4, 
s. 3: — GoUsantk aad Rejaoidsi. L 
483. «. i: — jmies jadgcs <tf the 
l««r, nL IS. «. 2; — Lee, * Jack,' m. 
154, «. i; — ■ Monigooerie, a ti«e,' 
kis vife. ii. 161. «. i: — Tlarianr, 
Lord. vf. 206. «. 3: — Tmrvetsal aaBB, 
Du>wtD a Tczj. rii. 427. «. i : — vaa- 
ky, ovBS las, L 14. ar. I : — WUte^ 
i^ iL 91. «. 2: — Wnkes, nL 74, 
u. t; T. 306. s. 4: knezs: tn Co£- 
KBsroxiJKSscz ; Wtrrs. reeoas for 
iaaoUag Us own. t. 16: LSxitj aatd 
Neoessirr. onabfed br. ir. &2; Lki^ 
fie^ Txats ia 177^ iL 528: s^owa 
real 'orDflT^ tbere. liL Sq: vste x 
IB 1779. in- six: life. r. ' 
in. 1&6-9: Life of Jerr :- 
iiMu to ir, L 11; — 
of it in tl»e Tntr .- 
4S1: — cwrk, L 6oe: iL x. sl i; 
dclafMJ by dragp a ri op, L > «, x: — 
JoiMBaB afJivovcs of bbsb as fazs t 
< igiaji«n . L 30: iL 191, S49; m. 223; 
▼. 355: — ' davs.'wadU aot est of 
hJE, L 35' "- 3« '~~ <^fa^h and <him - 
ter. hov to <<ascrihr bos, ir. .^91, ■. 
S: — ande ia vkkli k is vnoem. L 

34, B^ 3: — ' wem kiad of ISsiAS vt 

35, «. 4: — prmced by H. Eaid^.r 
wte Baxdhtn: — Odriser, Eke tbtr. 
L 13; — pangirss and sale. L la «. 
3; ir. 450. K. 5: — traaslaled, a c T cr . 
▼. 3. «, 1 : Hkesv. a man vkon emj- 
bodj. iiL4i2: Lirerarv Qab. a mem- 
ber of the, L 553, «. 3, 556, «, 3; pro- 
posed by Joiascm. iL 270; t. St; 
Acted, n. 275 : Tobasoei's chsyjc, 
a. 276; bow he got ia, t. S6; for 
^"'■-^'^ tee Cixxs, LiBenay; ladg- 
iags, bis LaadoB, Dowaoag Street, L 
4ft9 : — Fzrrsr s Baiiibgs, L 505, 



5*. ■- 2. ^^ . — C'ld Lrrz Srrssl, n. 
94: — CcDsLiit Satet, iL igj : — 

iKccadi2T.iL 252; — Gcrrard Street, 
m. 59, «. 3; — Geaeral Paoifs ia 
Sosdi Aadkr Sueet, iiL 40, jEo; — 

Q- S03. *- 2; L«adaa, »'i|MHrii,k « to 
k bif^iy inprovi^ a. 355. «. i : in- 
creased ^inCs tbere, iiL zSo: Toko- 
soa ma«aitcd aboat a risii to it, iL 
3i5~i^7C — agves to ba lenoviag 
to iL nr. 405; io«pe of it, L 536; a. 
313; iiL 5, 301. 413: \tm i km , voite, 
ia 1760. L 4^6; 1762-3, i- 4#M36; 
1766,5.4-17: 1766, n. 52-75: 1769, 
n. 77-i»7; I77X a. 167-230: 1773. 
iL 240-302: irrf. n. 355-432: 1776, 
-"<!:: 1-77 Bos- 
.\5ibcciae, iiL 
i::r. .-_ 25i-4o£: 1779. 

.1^4 — ^4- ' "^""^ ^"'^ ! ^ iffw Tn , 

4S«-67; 17^1. ir- S2-IS7: 1783, ir. 

'^"— ?"•? '"'^ 'sess oiii ia Man^ 

-: York, ir. 306 », 3x3- 

II, " 

1 ; !.c<.iita i:wT= -" 
- . --h. iL to. «- 3 , 
ks, n. 52, B. I, 53. «. 2, 66, «. 3, 195, 
^r - r._ : : naameis, "srani dL, iL 545' 
_s, >rk demryed by ks 

:::.i-. . " ^ T - ' " : T, «. 2; T. 

55-*: \zac.iL77. 

So. >:. :i-. — iti; 

— thirATf 7^ £ 236, 

^i_;35 Mzz- 

rr.r-h-sT T life, jore of. L 4r_ — _" . . 
«. I ; inizid ■ scEaewiffli osik,' n. 436; 
• Tnr^gjes rice and virtae,' iL 253; 
iDcib, rervnrred to liEre iieaded a, 5. 
57, K. 2 : Mc»ntEg:3„ Mis., cnarrel 



30 



Index to 



Boswell, James. 



with, iv. 74 ; mother-in-law, his, ii. 
432, n. i; Mountstuart, Lord, friend- 
ship with, iv. 148; music, made a fool 
of by, iii. 224-5; mystery, love of, iii. 
255; and the mysterious, iv. log, «. 
I ; Naples, at, v. 60 ; narrowness, 
troubled with a fit of, iv. 220; nature, 
no relish for the beauties of, i. 533; 
' never left a house without leaving 
a wish for his return,' iii. 468; news- 
papers, inserted notices of himself in 
the, ii. 52, n. 2, 81, n. 2; noble friend, 
puzzled by a, iv. 241; objects on the 
road, not observant of, iv. 359; Ode 
to Tragedy, i. 444, «. i; v. 57, ;/. 3; 
Oglethorpe, flattered by, ii. 67, n. i, 
68, n. I ; old-fashioned principles, v. 
149; ' old-hock humour,' i. 444, «. I ; 
ii. 499, «. i; ostentatious, i. 539; Ox- 
ford, visits, in 1768, ii. 53; in 1776, 
ii. 502; in 1784, iv. 327-59; ' Paoli 
Boswell,' known as, v. 140; 'the 
friend of Paoli,' i. 493, «. 4; ii. 66, 
n. 3; 68, ti. i; — attention to him, 
beautiful, iii. 59, n. 3; — guest in 
London, ii. 430, n. 4; iii. 40, 59, «. 3; 
— present of books to, ii. 70, n. i; 
parliament, wishes to be in, iv. 254, 
309; perfection, periods fixed for ar- 
riving at his, ii. 52, n. i; v. 383; 
piety, exalted in, ii. 412, ;;. 4; Pitt's 
neglect, complains of, iii. 242, n. i; 
dislikes him, iii. 526; writes to him, 
iv. 302, n. i; place, longing for a, i. 
5, M. 2; ii. 436, «. 4; players, intimacy 
with, iii. 470, n. i; plays his part ad- 
mirably, iii. 469; ' all mind,' iii. 472; 
pleasing distraction, in a, iii. 291; 
political speculation, owns himself 
unfit for, ii. 357, n. 2 ; portrait by 
Reynolds, i. 2, «. 2; Praeses, elected, 
iv. 287 ; preached at in Inverness 
chapel, V. 146; Quare adhaesit pavi- 
mento, iii. 296, «. 2; quotations some- 



times inaccurate, i. 7, n. i; quotes 
himself, v. 232, n. i, 397, n. i ; 
changes words, ii. 51, n. 3; Rasselas, 
yearly reading of, i. 397; read, prom- 
ises Johnson to, ii. 432, n. i, 433, n. 
3; sat up all night reading Gray, ii. 
383, M. 3; reads Ovid's Epistles, v. 
335; reserve, practises some, i. 4; ii. 
96, M. 4; retaliates for attacks on 
Johnson made by Lord Monboddo, 
ii. 85, «. i; by Foote, ii. 109, n. 2; 
Reynolds, introduced to, i. 483, n. l: 
see Reynolds, Boswell; ridicule, 
defies, i. 38; iii. 216; right-headed, 
said by Baretti to be not, iii. 154, «. 
I ; Rousseau, wishes to see, iii. 526, 
n. 2; visits him, ii. 13, 14, 247; sym- 
pathy with him, ii. 12, n. 5; Royal 
Academy, Secretary for Foreign Cor- 
respondence, ii. 76, n. 3 ; letters of 
acceptance, iii. 420, w. 3, 525-27 ; 
seat reserved for him at a lecture, 
iii. 420, w. i; Rudd, Mrs., acquaint- 
ance with, ii. 515, n. i; iii. gi; rural 
beauties, little taste for, i. 533 ; v. 
127; Scot, ' Scarce esteemed a Scot," 
i. 258; Scotch accents, ii. 182; Scot- 
ticisms, corrected, iii. 491, n. 2; v. 15, 
n. 4; criticised, v. 485; Scotch shoe- 
black, his, ii. 373 ; Scotland, forty 
years' absence from it suggested to 
him, iii. 29; finds it too narrow a 
sphere, iii. 201 ; its manners disagree- 
ble to him, ii. 436, n. 4; vulgar famil- 
iarity of its law life, iii. 203, w. 2; 
suffers from its rudeness, ii. 436, tt. 4; 
Scotchman, the one cheerful, iii. 441; 
a Scotchman without the faults of 
one, iii. 395; Scots Alagnzim', con- 
tributes to the, i. 130; self-tormentor, 
i. 544 ; Seward, controversy with 
Miss, i. 107, n. 2; iv. 382, «. 2; Shake- 
speare Jubilee, ii. 78 ; short-hand, 
uses a kind of, iii. 306; his long head 



BoswelVs Life of Johnson. 



31 



Boswell, James. 



equal to it, iv. 192; slavery, approves 
of, iii. 227-8, 231, 233, 241; Smith, 
Adam, opinion of, ii. 492, «. i ; — 
praises his facility of manners, v. 20, 
n. i; Socrates, does not affect to be 
a, ii. 28; sophist, plays the, iii. 439; 
spy, charge of being a, ii. 439, ti. 2; 
St. Paul's, Easter worship in, ii. 196, 
247. 315-17, 412; iii. 28, 360, 433; 
iv. 105; stepmother, on ill terms with 
his, ii. 438, «. I ; iii. log; storm, among 
the Hebrides, in a, v. 320; studies, 
Johnson's advice as to his, i. 475, 
529, 533, 536, 548; study, has a kind 
of impotency of, ii. 24, n. 4; succes- 
sion, preference of male, ii. 443, «. 2, 
471, n. 2, 482, n. i; succession to the 
Barony of Auchinleck, ii. 474-84 ; 
superstition an enjoyment, ii. 364, n. 
I ; iv. 109, M. I ; — dreams, i. 273 ; 
iv. 437 ; — Johnson's relief from 
dropsy, iv. 313 ; see above, Myste- 
ry, and below, Ghosts, and Scot- 
land - Hebrides, second sight ; 
swearing, blameless of, ii. 190, n. i; 
talk, not from books, v. 431 ; tanti 
man, a, iv. 130; Temple, enters at the 
Inner: see above, English Bar; ten- 
ants, kindness to his, iv. 178, n. 2, 
188; tenderness, calls for, iii. 245 
Tlu'sis in Civil I.aw, ii. 23, 26 
Thrale, Mrs., introduction to, ii. 88 
her ' love ' for him, ii. 167, 236, 439 
attacked by her, iv. 367, n. 2; v. 279, 
n. i; argument with her, iv. 84; see 
under, Mrs. Thrale; Thurlow,bows 
the intellectual knee to, iv. 206, n. 3; 
toleration, discusses, ii. 289 ; Tory, 
boasts of the name of, iii. 128, 427, 
n. i; confirmed in his Toryism, iii. 
446, n. 2; town, pleasure in seeing a 
new, iii. 185; Travels, wishes to pub- 
lish his, iii. 341, 342, n. i; truthful- 
ness: j^<r Authenticity; 'universal 



man, a,' iii. 427, w. i; ' unscottified,' 
ii. 278; Utrecht, goes to, i. 463, 547; 
vanity, avows his, i. 14 ; — in his 
youth, i. 505, n. 2 ; variety of men 
and manners, sees a, ii. 403, n. i, 433, 
71. 3; Voltaire, wishes to see, iii. 526, 
n. 2 ; visits him, i. 503, «. 2 ; ii. 6; 
vows, love of making, ii. 23, 28: see 
below, Wine, vows of sobriety; 
Walpole, Horace, calls on, iv. 128, 
n. 3; who is silent in his presence, 
iv. 363, n. 3; Warren, Dr., attended 
on his death-bed by, iv. 460, «. 4 ; 
water -drinking, tries: see below, 
Wine; welcome wherever he goes, 
iii. 470; wife, his search of a, ii. 53, 
«. 2, 64, 71. I, 194, n. 2; wife, his, 'a 
true Montgomerie,' ii. 161, w. i; his 
praise of her, v. 26 ; bargain with 
her, ib. «. 2; death, i. 273, n. 2: see 
Boswell, Mrs.; will, his, iii. 455, «. 
i; Williams, Miss, tea with, i. 487, 
536; ii. 114; Wilkes, dines with, ii. 
433, «• 3 "• -f^ under Wilkes, John ; 
Wine, bruised and robbed when 
drunk, i. 15, «. 2; 'intoxicated, but 
not drunk,' ii. 499, w. i; intoxicated 
at Bishop Shipley's, iv. 102, «. i; at 
Miss Monckton's, iv. 127; in Sky on 
punch, V. 294 ; penitent, v. 294 ; — 
thinks it good for health, v. 296; — 
Johnson advises him to drink less, ii. 
432, «. I ; iv. 307, 316 ; to drink 
water, iii. 192; — life shortened by 
his indulgence, iii. 193, 71. i; — lover 
of it, a, iii. 276, w. 2; v.178; — , nerves 
affected by port, i. 502; iii. 434; — 
vow of sobriety under the venerable 
yew,ii. 436, «. 4,499,«. i; — to Paoli 
and Courtenay, ii. 499, «. i; water- 
drinking, tries, iii. 193, n. i, 374; 
wits, one of a group of, ii. 371 ; works, 
list of his projected, v. 103, n. 2 (to 
this list should be added An Account 



32 



Index to 



Boswell, James. 

of a projected Tour to the Isle of 
Man, iii. 91); writings, early, i. 444, 
n. i; York, at, in 17S4, iv. 306, 308; 
Zelide, a Dutch lady, in love with, ii. 
64, n. I. 
BoswELi., Mrs. (the author's wife), 
Boswell praises her as ' a true Mont- 
gomerie,' ii. 161, «. i ; a valuable 
wife, iii. 182, n. i, 473; she describes 
him as a man led by a bear, ii. 308, 
n. 2 ; death, i. 8, n. i, 273, n. 2 ; iv. 
158, n. 2; health, iii. 147-8, 245, 412; 
iv. 179; Johnson, feelings towards, ii. 
308, n. 2, 311. 315, 435, 440, 443, 

472-3. 479. 481, 483. 485; iii. 98, 
106, 108, 118, 120, 239, 423, 495, 
501; iv. 172, 179, 261, 305 ; — , hos- 
pitality to, V. 25-6, 50, 450 ; — in- 
vites her to his house, iii. 245, 359 ; 
— , letter to, iv. 181. For letters 

from : j^^^ Johnson, Letters ; 

— , sends marmalade to, iii. 120, 123, 
136, 146; receives a set of The Lives 
and Poets, iii. 423, 495 ; Scotch ac- 
cent, iii. 120; shrewd observation, 
her, iii. 182, n. i; travelling, dislikes, 
iii. 249; mentioned, ii. 304, 476. 

BosWEl.L, James, the author's second 
son, birth, iii. 416 ; account of him, 
ib. n. I ; educated at Westminster 
School, iii. 14 ; describes Malone's 
friendship with the Boswells, v. 2, n. 
I ; writes his father's dying letter, i. 
17, n. i; supplies notes to the Life, 
i. 17, 18. 

Boswell, Miss, ii. 433, n. 3. 

Boswell, Robert, burnt Boswell's 
manuscripts, iii. 342, n. I. 

Boswell, Thomas (founder of the 
family), ii. 474; iv. 229; v. 432. 

Boswell, Veronica, Johnson pleased 
with her, v. 27 ; origin of her name, 
ib. n. I ; additional fortune prom- 
ised her, v. 28 ; death, ib. n. i ; her 



Boyle. 

Scotch, iii. 120; mentioned, ii. 435; 
iii. 98, 107, 423. 

Boswell, Sir W., i. 225, n. 2. 

Boswelliana, variations in Boswell's 
anecdotes, i. 525, «. 2; ii. 516, n. 2; 
story about Voltaire, iii. 342, n. i. 

BoswoRTH, i. 97; ii. 542; iv. 470, n. 2. 

Botanical Gardens, iv. 148. 

Botanist, Johnson not a, i. 437, n. i. 

' Bottom ok good sense," iv. 114-15. 

BoucHiER, Governor, iv. 102. 

Boukkier. See Bufkier. 

BOUFFLERS, Comtesse de, visits John- 
son, ii. 136, 465 ; his letter to her, 
ii. 464; account of her, ii. 464, «. 2. 

BouFFLERS, Marquise de, ii. 464, n. 2. 

BouHOURS, Dominic, ii. 103. 

Boulter s Monument, i. 368. 

Boulton, Matthew, sells power, ii. 
526; Johnson visits his works, v. 522. 

Bounty IIerring-busses, v. 183. 

Bounty on Corn. 5^^ Corn. 

Bouquet, Joseph, bookseller, i. 281. 

Bourbon, House of, iv. 161, n. 4. 

BouRDALOUE, ii. 277, «. 2; V. 354. 

BouRDONNE, Mme. de, ii. 277, «. 2. 

Bouts rim/s, ii. 385. 

BoWEN, Emanuel, Complete System of 
Geography, iii. 506. 

Bowles, William, Johnson dines with 
him, iv. I, «. i; visits him, iv. 270-6; 
his wife a descendant of Cromwell, 
iv. 272, «. 3. 

Bowles, — , of Slains Castle, v. 120, 
n. I. 

Bowood, iv. 222, «. I. 

BowYER, William, iv. 425, 504. 

Box, a tradesman's, v. 332, «. i. 

BoYD, Hon. Charles, v. 1 10-21 ; out 
in the '45,' v. 112. 

BoYDs OF Kilmarnock, v. n8. 

BoYDELL, Alderman, ii. 335, n. 2. 

Boyle, family of, v. 270. See Or- 
rery, Earls of. 



Bo swell's Life of fohnson. 



33 



Boyle. 



Brocklesby. 



Boyle, Hon. Hamilton (sixth Earl of 
Corke and Orrery), i. 299, n. i ; v. 
270. 

Boyle, Hon. Robert, Martyrdom of 
Theodora, i. 361 ; compares argu- 
ment and testimony, iv. 325, «. 2. 

BoYSE, Samuel, account of him, iv. 
470, n. 2, 509 ; compared with Der- 
rick, iv. 222, ;/. I. 

Bradley in Derbyshire, i. 96, 424. 

Bradshaw, William, iv. 231, n. 3. 

Brahmins, admit no converts, iv. 14, 
n. 2 ; the mastiffs of mankind, iv. 
102. 

Braidwood, Thomas, v. 455. 

Braithvvaite, Mr., iv. 321. 

Bramhall, Archbishop, ii. 120. 

Bramston, James, i. 85, n. 2. 

Brandy, the drink for heroes, iii. 433 ; 
iv. 91. 

Brantome, v. 62. 

' Brave we,' v. 410. 

Bravery of the English Common Sol- 
diers, i. 388. 

Brazil, iv. 121, «. i; language, v. 276, 
n. I. 

Bread Tree, ii. 285. 

Breeding, good, ii. 94 ; v. 93, 240, 

314- 

Brentford, iv. 214; v. 420. 

Brett, Colonel, i. 201, «. i. 

Brett, Mrs., i. 192, n. 2. 

Brett, Miss, i. 201, n. i. 

Brett, Rev. Dr. Thomas, the non- 
juror, iv. 331. 

Brewers, thwart the ' grand scheme 
of subordination,' i. 567. 

Brewing in Paris, ii. 454-5. See 
Thrale, Henry. 

Brewood, iv. 470, n. 2. 

Brewse, Major, v. 140-2. 

Bribery, statutes against, ii. 389. 

Bridgenorth, v. 519. 

Bridgewater, Duke of, v. 409, n. i. 



Bright, John, Speeches, quoted, ii. 551. 

Brighthelmstone (Brighton), books 
burnt there as Popish, iii. 485, n. i ; 
Johnson describes it, iii. 106, n. 4 ; 
finds it very dull, iii. 107 ; does not 
much like it, iii. 501 ; stays there in 
1782, iv. 184-5 ; other visits, iii. 
513-14 ; Ship Tavern, iii. 480, n. 2; 
mentioned, iii. 52, n. i, 452. 

Brille, iii. 520. 

Bristol, Boswell and Johnson's visit 
in 1776, iii. 58; bad inn, iii. 59; 
Burke its representative, iii. 430 ; 
Hannah More keeps a school there, 
iv. 394, «. 2; Newgate prison, Savage 
dies in it, i. 190 ; described by Wes- 
ley, iii. 490, n. i; Dagge, the keeper, 
praised by Johnson, iii. 491, n. 3 ; 
Whitefield forbidden to preach in it, 
ib. ; St. Mary RedcHff, iii. 59. 

Bristol, first Earl of, i. 123, «. i. 

Bristol-well (Clifton), iii. 52, «. i. 

Britain, ancient state, iii. 379. 

Britain and Great Britain, Swift dis- 
likes the names of, i. 150, n. i. 

British Museum, library, iv. 122, n. 
I ; papers deposited by Boswell, ii. 
340, n. I, 351, 457, M. 4; mentioned, 
iv. 17. 

British Princes, The, ii. 124, «. 3, 

Briton, Johnson's use of the term, i. 
150, n. i; George HI gloried in be- 
ing born one, ib. 

Broadley, Captain, iii. 408. 

Brocklesby, Dr., account of him, iv. 
203; Boswell and Johnson dine with 
him, iv. 315; Essex Head Club, mem- 
ber of the, iv. 293 ; generosity tow- 
ards Johnson and Burke, iv. 390 ; 
Johnson's physician in 1783-4, iv. 
264, n. 2, 266, 267, 283, 303-5, 308, 
415, 436; attends his death-bed, iv. 
460; quotes Shakespeare, iv. 462; Ju- 
venal, iv. 462; instructed by Johnson 



34 



Index to 



Brocklesby. 

in Christianity, iv. 478, 4S0 ; tells 
him that lie cannot recover, iv. 478 ; 
be(|uest from him, iv. 463, n. 3. For 
Johnson's letters to him, see John- 
son, Li'.TIKRS. 

Brodik, Cajitain, i. 97, n. i; ii. 534. 

Brdmi.ky, i. 279; ii. 296; iv. 405, 406, 

454- 
Brookk, Henry, Earl of Essex, iv. 

361, ;/. I ; Gustar'tts Vasa, i. 163; 

subscription raised for him, i. 163; 

n. I. 
Brookk. Mrs., Siei^e of Sinopc, iii. 

294, n. I . 
BrooK.s, Mrs., the actress, v. xSi. 
Brooks, unchanged for ages, iii. 284. 
Broom's Constitutional Law, iii. 99, 

w. 6. 
Broomk, William, iii. 485; iv. 57. 
Broom still-, Life of a, ii. 446. 
Bkotmkrs AM) SiSTKKS, born friends, 

i. 376. 
Brown, Dr. John, account of him, ii. 

150, ;/. 4; Athelstan, ii. 150, «. 4; 

Barharossa, ii. 150, n. 4 ; Estimate, 

ii. 150. 
Brown, I.auncelot, (^Capability), ac- 
count of him, iii. 455, «. 2; improves 

Blenheim park, ii. 516; anecdote of 

Clive, iii. 455. 
Brown, I'rofessor, of St. Andrew's, v. 

72. 

Brown, Rev. Robert, of Utrecht, ii. 
10; iii. 327. 

Brown, Tom, author of a spelling- 
book, i. 50. 

Brown, — , Keeper of the Advocates' 
Library, v. 45. 

Browne, Hawkins, iv. 314. 

Browne, Isaac Hawkins, delightful 
converser, ii. 388, ;/. i; De Aitimi 
Immortalitate, v. 177; drank freely, 
T. 178 ; parodied Pope, ii. 388, «. i ; 
silent in I'.irliament, ii. 388. 



Buchanan. 

Browne, Patrick, History of Jamaica, 
i. 358. 

Browne, Sir Thomas, Anglo- Latian 
diction, i. 257; ' Brownism,' ih., 357; 
Christian Morals, i. 357; death, on, 
iii. 174, «. I ; ' do the devils lie?' iii. 
333; fortitude in dying, iv. 455, n. i; 
Life by Johnson, i. 357, 379; obliv- 
ion, on, iv. 32, M. 4 ; Pembroke Col- 
lege, member of, i. 87, n. 4. 

Browne, Mr., 'a luminary of litera- 
ture,' i. 131, «. I. 

Brownism, i. 256, 357. 

Bruce, James, the traveller, ii. 381-2 ; 
V. 141, n. I. 

Bruce, Robert, Boswell's ancestor, v. 
27, M. I, 432, M. 3; not the lawful 
heir to the throne, v. 232. 

Bruce, ways of spelling it, v. 140. 

Brumoy, Peter, i. 400. 

Brundusium, iii. 284. 

Brunet, — , ii. 452. 

Brunswick, House of. See Han- 
over, House of. 

Brutes, future life, their, ii. 61 ; misery 
caused them recompensed by exist- 
ence, iii. 61 ; not endowed with rea- 
son, ii. 285. 

Brutus, Marcus Junius, i. 450, n. 2. 

Bruyere, La, ii. 410, n. 3; v. 431. 

Bryant, Jacob, his antediluvian knowl- 
edge, V. 523, M. I ; Johnson's knowl- 
edge of Greek, v. 523, n. i ; men- 
tioned, iv. 314; v. 345, n. 3. 

Brydges, Sir Egerton, ii. 338, n. 2; v. 

437, «• 3- 
Brydonk, Patrick, Travels, ii. 396; 

antimosaical remark, ii. 535; iii. 405. 
Bubbled, v. 32, n. 3. 
Buccleugh, third Duke of, v. 162, 

H. 2. 
Buchan, sixth Earl of, ii. 199, 203. 
Buchanan, George, born solo et seculo 

inerudito, v. 207 ; CaUndae Maiae, 



BosweWs Life of Johison. 



35 



Buchanan. 



Burke. 



V. 454 ; Centos, ii. no; Johnson's re- 
tort about him, iv. 214 ; learning, v. 
64 ; poetical genius, i. 532 ; men- 
tioned, V. 256. 

Buck, V. 210, n. 2. 

BucKHURST, Lord, v. 58, n. 5. 

Buckingham, George Villiers, second 
Duke of, The Rehearsal, ii. 193, n. 
2; Zimri, ii. 97, w. 7. 

Buckingham, Duchess of, iii. 271. 

Buckles, iii. 370 ; v. 20. 

BuDGELL, Eustace, calls Addison cous- 
in, iii. 53, n. 3 ; Addison wrote his 
Epilogue to the Distressed Mother, i. 
210, «. I ; iii. 53 ; mended his Spec- 
tators, ib.; his suicide, ii. 263; v. 61. 

BUDWORTH, Captain, iv. 470, n. 2. 

BUDWORTH, Rev. Mr., i. 98, n. i ; iv. 
470, «. 2. 

BUFFIER, Claude, i. 545. 

BuFFON, account of the cow shedding 
its horns, iii. 96, n. 2 ; his conversa- 
tion, v. 260, n. I. 

Builder, The. King's Head, i. 221, 
n. 2. 

Bulk, i. 189, «. I, 529. 

BULKELEY, Lord, V. 510. 

BULKELEY, Mrs., ii. 251. 

Bull, Alderman, Lord Mayor, iii. 522, 
523; attacks Lord North, iii. 522. 

BULL-DOG, Dr. Taylor's, iii. 216. 

BuLLER, Mr., ii. 262, n. 3. 

BuLLER, Mrs., iv. i,n. i. 

Bulse, iii. 404. 

BuNBURY, Sir Charles, member of the 
Literary Club, i. 554; ii. 314, 363; at 
Johnson's funeral, iv. 484. 

BuNBURY, H. W., Burns sheds tears 
over one of his pictures, v. 46, n. 2 ; 
marries Miss Horneck, i. 497, n. 3 ; 
ii. 314, n. 4. 

BUNYAN, John, Johnson praises The 
Pilgrim's Progress, ii. 274; Franklin 
buys his works, iv. 297, n. 2. 



BURBRIDGE, — , i. 197, «. 3. 

BURCH, Edward, R.A., iv. 485, n. 3. 

BURGESS-TICKET, Johnson's. at Aber- 
deen, v. 102. 

BuRGOYNE, General, disaster to his 
army, iii. 404. 

BuRGOYNE. — , iii. 441. n. 4. 

Burial Service, iv. 245. 

BuRKE, D., iv. 413, n. I. 

Burke, Edmund, affection, on the de- 
scent of, iii. 444 ; Akerman, keeper 
of Newgate, praises, iii. 491 ; Amer- 
ica, increase of population in, ii. 
359i ^- 3 ; American taxation, speech 
on, ii. 336 ; arguing on either side, on, 
iii. 27, n. 4; Macon's Essays, iii. 220, 
n. 3 ; balloon, sees a, iv. 413, n. i ; 
Baretti's trial, gives evidence on, ii. 
Ill, n. 3, 112; — the consultation 
for the defence, iv. 374 ; Barnard's 
verses, mentioned in, iv. 499 ; Bea- 
consfield, Johnson visits it, ii. 326, n. 
3 ; ' non equidem invideo,' iii. 352 ; 
Gibbon mentions it, iii. 146, n. i ; 
Beauclerk's character, draws, ii. 282, 
n. I ; Berkeley, projects an answer 
to, i. 546; Bible, on subscribing the, 
ii. 174, n. I ; Birmingham buttons, 
likens the Spanish Declaration to, 
V. 522, n. 3 ; Boswell's epithets for 
him, ii. 255, n. 4; — good-nature, de- 
scribes, iii. 412, n. 2; V. 86; — hopes 
for place from him, iv. 257, 287, n. 
2 ; — Life of Johnson, admires, i. 
II, w. I ; — looks upon him as con- 
tinually happy, iii. 6, «. 2 ; — meet; 
him for the first time, ii. 275 ; — 
successful negotiation, admires, iii. 
90; — visits him, iv. 243; bottomless 
Whig, a, iv. 257 ; boy, loves to be a, 
iv. 91 ; Bristol, would be upon his 
good behaviour at, iii. 430 ; Brock- 
lesby, Dr., gives him ;^iooo, iv. 390, 
». 2 ; ' bulls enough in Ireland,' iii. 



36 



Index to 



Burke. 



263 ; Cecilia, reads, iv. 258, n. 3 ; 
Chatham and the Woollen Act, jokes 
about, ii. 519, n. i ; Cicero or De- 
mosthenes, not like, v. 243 ; compo- 
sition, promptitude of, iii. 98 ; con- 
versation, his, its ' affluence,' ii. 
208; corresponds with his fame, iv. 
23 ; ebullition of his mind, iv. 192 ; 
never hum-drum, v. 36; ready on all 
subjects, iv. 23, 318; talk, partly from 
ostentation, iii. 280 ; not good at lis- 
tening, V. 37 ; Corycius Senex, iv. 
199 ; Croft's imitation of Johnson's 
style, iv. 69; definition of a free gov- 
ernment, iii. 212; domestic habits, 
iii. 430 ; Dutch sonnet, mentions a, 
iii. 266 ; Dyer, Samuel, draws the 
character of, iv. 13, n. i; Economical 
Reform Bill, v. 35, n. 2 ; eloquence, 
V. 243; emigration, on, iii. 262-5; 
exaggerated praise, would suffer 
from, iv. 95 ; extraordinary man, 
an, ii. 515 ; iv. 31, 318 ; v. 38 ; first 
man everywhere, iv. 31, n. 3; v. 306; 
Fitzherbert's character, describes, iii. 
168, n. I ; Fox introduced into the 
Club, ii. 314, n. 3 ; Garrick, dines 
with, ii. 178, n.\\ — , epitaph on, ii. 
269, n. 4 ; Glasgow professorship, 
seeks a, v. 420, n. 2; Goldsmith's col- 
lege days, recollections of, iii. 191 ; 
— and the Fantoccini, story of, i. 
479 ; — Haunch of Venison, men- 
tioned in, iii. 255, n. 2; and Retalia- 
tion, i. 546; iii. 264, n. i; Grenville's 
character, ii. 155, n. 3; Hamilton, 
engagement with, i. 601; — estimate 
of him, iv. 31, n. 3; Hawkins, at- 
tacked by, i. 555, w. 2 ; histories, his 
opinion of, ii. 419, n. 3 ; House of 
Commons, enters the, ii. 515 ; first 
speeches, ii. 19; described as the sec- 
ond man in it.iv. 31, w. 3; as the first, 

V, 306; 4escrib§s it as a mixed body, 



iii. 265 ; Hume's partiality for Charles 
n, ii. 390, n. 3 ; Hussey, Rev. Dr., 
praises, iv. 474, n. 2 ; immorality, 
possible charge of, iv. 323, «. 2; ' im- 
prudent publication,' i. 536; influ- 
ence of the Crown, on the, iii. 233, n. 
4 ; Ireland — penal code against the 
Catholics, ii. 139, n. i ; people con- 
demned to ignorance, ii. 31, n. i ; 
Roman Catholics the nation there, 
ii. 292, n. 4; Irish language, iii. 266; 
Johnson charges him with want of 
honesty, ii. 399; iii. 52; — describes 
him as ' Le grand Burke,' iv. 23, n. 
2; as ' a great man by nature,' ii. 19: 
see above, conversation, and extraor- 
dinary man ; — has a low opinion 
of his jocularity, iv. 319: see below, 
Wit ; — predicts his greatness, ii. 
516 ; — buys a print of him, i. 421, 
M. I ; — explains the excellence of 
his eloquence, v. 243 ; — visits him 
at Beaconsfield, ii. 326, n. 3; v. 524; 
in Parliament defends — , iv. 367 ; 
eulogises him, iv. 470, w. i ; — fu- 
neral, at, iv. 484; — , has the greatest 
respect for, iv. 367; — Journey, com- 
mends, iii. 156; — , last parting with, 
iv. 470 ; praises his work, ib., n. i ; 
iii. 72; likens him ioAppius, iv. 431, 
M. 3; — as a member of Parliament, 
considers, ii. 159 ; — joins in raising 
a monument to, iv. 488, n. 1 ; — ' oil 
of vitriol,' speaks of, v. 15, n. i ; — 
parody of his speech, iv. 367, n. 1 ; 

— powers, calls forth all, ii. 516 ; — 
rings the bell to, iv. 31; — roughness 
in conversation, iv. 323; — , sends his 
speech on India to, iv. 300, w. 2 ; — 
shuns subjects of disagreement in 
their talk, ii. 208 ; — study of Low 
Dutch, iv. 25 ; — style, i. 102 ; — at 
a tavern dinner, meets, i. 544, n. i ; 

— Thames scolding, admires, iv. 31 5 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



37 



Burke. 



— ' Why, no, Sir," explains, iv. 364, 
'»• 3 I Junius, not, iii. 428 ; ' kennel, 
in the,' iv. 31S ; knowledge, variety 
ofi V. 35, 243; law, intended for the, 
V. 38 ; Letter to the Sheriffs of Bris- 
tol, iii. 212 ; life led over again, on, 
iv. 350 ; Literary Club, original 
member, i. 552 ; — attendance, ii. 
18; — mentioned by Gibbon, iii. 146, 
«. I ; — name distinguished by an 
initial, iii. 261, «. 4; — playful talk, 
iii. 270 ; ' live pleasant,' i. 39S ; Lon- 
don, describes, iii. 202, n. i ; mankind, 
thinks better of, iii. 267 ; Middle 
Temple, enters at the, v. 38, «. 2 ; 
minority, always in the, iii. 266; min- 
istry, on the pretended vigour of the, 
iv. 161, «. 5 ; ' mire, in the,' v. 243 ; 
Monckton's, Miss, at, iv. 126, n. 1 ; 
' Mund,' ii. 296, n. i ; iii. 96, n. 2 ; 
' mutual friend,' iii. 117, n. i; New- 
gate, visits Baretti in, ii. iii, n. 3; 
Nugent, Dr., his father-in-law, i. 
552, n. 4; opponent, as an, ii. 516; 
' parcel of boys,' iv. 343, «. 2 ; par- 
liament : see above. House of Com- 
mons ; ' party,' defines, ii. 256, n. i ; 
party, sticking to his, ii. 256 ; v. 40 ; 
Paymaster of the Forces, iv. 257, n. 
5 ; poetry is truth rather than history, 
ii. 419, n. 3 ; portrait at Streatham, 
iv. 181, n. 3; Powell and Bembridge, 
case of. iv. 258, n. i ; Present Dis- 
contents, iii. 233, n. I ; professor in 
the imaginary college, v. 123; puns, 
on the Isle of Man, iii. 91 ; Wilkes, 
iii. 367 ; V. 36, n.; modus and fines, 
iii. 368 ; Deanery of Ferns, iv. 85 ; 
Langton, v. 36, n. ; Boswell's defini- 
tion of man, ib.; reforms the King's 
household expenses, iv. 425, n. i ; 
reputation in public business, ii. 18 ; 
retiring, talks of, iv. 258, n. i ; Rey- 
nolds's character, draws, i. 284, «. 3 ; 



V. 115, n. 6; Reynolds is his echo, 
ii. 255, n. 4; is too much under him, 
iii. 296; Robinhood Society, iv. 107, 
«. 3; Rockingham, advice to, ii. 407, 
n. 2 ; Royal Academy, seat reserved 
for him at the, iii. 420, n. i ; ro- 
mances, loves old, i. 57, n. 3; Round- 
Robin, draws up the, iii. 96 ; should 
have had more sense, iii. 96, n. 2 ; 
same one day as another, iii. 219 ; v. 
36 ; Shelburne speaks of him with 
malignity, iv. 221, n. 3 ; soldiers, on 
the quartering of, iii. 11, n. 2; son, 
extravagant estimate of his, iv. 253, 
n. 3; Speech on Conciliation, ii. 359, 
n. 3, 362, n. 3; iv. 367, n. i; speeches 
too frequent and familiar, ii. 151; ef- 
fect of them, iii. 264 ; not like De- 
mosthenes or Cicero, v. 243; statues, 
on the worth of, iii. 261-2 ; Stone- 
henge, sees, iv. 270, n. 3 ; stream of 
mind, ii. 515; style censured by John- 
son, iii. 212; and Francis, iii. 212, n. 
3 ; Sublime and Beautiful, i. 359, 
546, n. 2; ii. 103; subscription to the 
Articles, on the, ii. 173, n. 2 ; talk, 
his : see Conversation ; Thurlow, 
Lord, iv. 403, n. 1 ; Townshend, 
Charles, ii. 255, n. 3 ; translations of 
Cicero, could not bear, iii. 42, n. i ; 
understands everything but gaming 
and music, iv. 31, n. 3 ; Vesey's gen- 
tle manners, praises, iv. 33; Vindica- 
tion of Natural Society, i. 536, n. 1 ; 
Virgil, his ragged Delphin, iii. 220, n. 
2; prefers him to Homer, v. 89, n. 2; 
Whigs, quietness of the nation under 
the, iv. 116; ' wild Irishmen,' v. 374; 
Wilkes on his want of taste, iv. 120; 
winds into a subject like a serpent, 
ii. 299; vrit, fails at, i. 525; iii. 367; 
iv. 318, «. 2 ; V. 35, 242 ; Langton 's 
description of it, i. 525, n. i ; Bos- 
well's defence, v. 35, «. 2 ; Rey- 



38 



Index to 



Burke. 

nolds's, ih. ; mentioned, i. 500, n. 3 ; 
ii. 293; iii. 346; iv. 90, 397. 

Burke, Richard, senior, Barnard's 
verses on Johnson, iv. 497-9. 

Burke, Richard, junior, (Edmund 
Burke's son), account of him, iv. 253, 
«. 3 ; at Chatsworth, iv. 423 ; John- 
son, calls on, iv. 251-3 ; — rebuked 
by, iv. 387, n. 2 ; member of the 
Literary Club, i. 555. 

BURKK, William, ii. 18, n. 2; v. 86, w. 2. 

BURKK, William, the murderer, v. 259, 
n. I. 

BURI-AMAQUI, ii. 493. 

BURi.iNdTON, Lord, iii. 395; iv. 59, 

w. 3- 

Burman, Peter, Life of, i. 177. 

BlTRNET, Arthur, v. 92. 

BURNKT, Gilbert, Bishop of Salisbury, 
dedication to Lauderdale, v. 325 ; 
Hickes, (jeorge, v. 407, «. i; History 
of his own Time, very entertaining, 
ii. 245; V. 325; Kincardine, Earl of, 
v. 27, n. I ; Life of Hale, iv. 360 ; 
Life of Rochester, iii. 218 ; Li I lib ur- 
lero, effect of, ii. 397, n. 3 ; Lloyd's 
learning in ready cash, ii. 294, n. 2 ; 
Popery, controversial war on, v. 315, 
n. i; style mere chit-chat, ii. 245; 
truthfulness, ii. 245, ib., n. 3; Whit- 
by, Daniel, v. 315, n. i. 

Burnet, James. See Monboddo, 
Lord. 

Burnet, Thomas, v. 401, n. i. 

Burnet, Miss, v. 92, n. 2. 

BuRNEY, Dr. Charles, Account of t/u 
Handel Commemoration, iv. 416 ; 
Boscovitch, visits, ii. 144, «. 2 ; Bos- 
well's Life of Johnson, notes to, i. 
17, 18; Doctor of Music, i. 331; Eu- 
melian Club, member of the, iv. 455, 
«. 2; Garrick, Mrs., dines with, iv. 
Ill ; Handel musical meeting, iv. 
326; History of Music, ii. 469, n. i; 



Burney, Mrs. 

iii. 417-18; V. 81; house in St. Mar- 
tin's Street, iv. 156; Johnson accom- 
panies his son to Winchester, iii. 418; 
— , anecdotes of, ii. 466-7 ; iv. 155 ; 

— asks him to teach him the scale of 
music, ii. 302, «. 4 ; — begs his par- 
don, iv. 58, «. I ; — character, draws, 
iii. 27, M. 4 ; — character of him, ii. 
466, «. 2 ; — death-bed, iv. 473, n. 
I, 505-6; — funeral, iv. 484, n. 2; 

— dislike of the former, the latter, 
iv. 220, n. I ; — first visit to his 
house, ii. 417, n. 3; — house in 
Gough Square, i. 380; in the Tem- 
ple, iv. 155; — letters: see Johnson, 
letters; — hearth-broom, iv. 155; — 
introduces him at Oxford, iii. 417-18. 

— kindness, i. 475, «. i ; — love of 
him, ii. 466, n. ; and of his family, 
iii. 418, n. 2; iv. 435; — parting with 
Burke, iv. 470, /». i ; — pension, i. 
434, «. I ; — politeness, i. 331 ; — 
praises his library, ii. 417, «. 3 ; — 
sayings, collection of, ii. 466-7 ; — 
Shakespeare, i. 374-8 ; — at Streat- 
ham in 1775, ii. 466; — talking to 
himself, i. 559, n. 3; — will, not in, 
iv. 463, n. 3; Literary Club, member 
of the, i. 554; Lynne Regis, residence 
at, i. 331 ; Musician, article on, ii. 
234, n. 2; musical scheme, a, iii. 424, 
n. 3 ; portrait at Streatham, iv. 181, 
n. 3 ; Rambler, sale of, i. 242, n. i ; 
Smart, Kit, kindness to, i. 354, n. i; 
Smart's madness, i. 459 ; Streatham 
library, account of, iv. 181 ; Thorn- 
ton's Ode, i. 487, n. i; Thrale, Mrs., 
neglected by, iv. 182, n. 3 ; rebukes 
her, iv. 391, n. 2 ; Travels ridiculed 
by Bicknell, i. 365, n. 3 ; praised by 
Johnson, iv. 215 ; mentioned, ii. 59; 
iii. 124, n. I, 290. 

Burney, Mrs., i. 380, 569, n. i ; iv. 
241-2, 415-17. 



Boswelfs Life of yoJinson. 



39 



Burney, Dr. 



Burney, Frances. 



Burney, Dr. Charles (jun.), account of 
Beckford's speech to the King, iii. 
228, n. 6 ; Greek, knowledge of, iv. 
444 ; Johnson's funeral, at, iv. 484, 
w. 2 ; — head on a seal, has, iv. 485, 
n. 3; — regard for him, iv. 435, n. i ; 
studied at Aberdeen, v. 96, n. 2. 

Burney, Frances (Mme. D'Arblay), 
Baretti's bitterness, iii. 109, n. 6 ; 
Bath, at, in 1780, iii. 480, 486, n. 4 ; 
Boswell's imitation of Johnson, iv. 
2, n. I ; Boswell meets her at John- 
son's house, iv. 258 ; ' Broom Gen- 
tleman, the,' iv. 155, n. 3 ; Burke, 
first sight of, iv. 318, n. i ; Burke's 
account of Lady Di. Beauclerk, ii. 
282, «. I ; Burke, young, iv. 253, w. 
3 ; Cambridge, R. O., iv. 227, «. i ; 
Carter, Mrs., iv. 317, n. i ; Cator, 
John, iv. 361, n. 2 ; Cecilia, iv. 258 ; 
Clerk, Sir P. J., iv. 93, n. 3 ; dates, 
indifferent to, iv. 102, n. i ; downed, 
will not be, iii. 381, «. 2 ; Evelina 
first praised by Mrs. Cholmondeley, 
iii. 362, ;/. I ; copy in the Bodleian, 
iv. 25S, //. 2 ; drawings from it, iv. 
319, n. 2; — grossness of sailors de- 
scribed, ii. 501, «. 2 ; — not heard 
of in Lichfield, ii. 531, «. 2 ; Field- 
ing and Smollett, exhilarated by, ii. 
200, n. i; Garrick's mimicry of John- 
son, ii. 221, n. 2 ; George III com- 
pliments her, ii. 40, m. 3; — criticises 
Shakespeare, i. 574, «. 4 ; — popu- 
larity, iv. 190, ;;. 3; Goldsmith's pro- 
jected Dictionary, ii. 234, n. 2 ; Gor- 
don Riots, iii. 486, n. 4, 494, 71. i ; 
Grub Street, had never visited, i. 
343, n. 2 ; Hamilton, W. G., charac- 
ter of, i. 602 ; Harington's Nugcp Ati- 
tiqiia, iv. 207, n. 6; Hawkesworth's 
death, v. 321, n. 2 ; Irene, iv. 6, n. 
i; Johnson accuses her of writing 
Scotch, iv. 243, n. 2; — appearance: 

VI.— 8 



see Johnson, personal appearance; 

— attacks W. W. Pepys, iv. 75, n. 2; 

— benignity, ii. 162, «. 4 ; — bor- 
rows a shilling of her, iv. 220, «. 2 ; 

— at Brighton, iv. 184, «. i ; — and 
Dr. Burney, friendship of, ii. 466, w. 
2; — and Burney's //istory o/Afusic, 
ii. 469, «. I ; — Cecilia, praises, iv. 
187, «. 2 ; — comical humour, ii. 
301, «. 2; — consulted by letter, ii. 
136; — describes Garrick's face, ii. 
470, n. i; — eye-sight, iv. 185, «. i; 
— , Evelina, praises, ii. 13, «. 3, 199, 
n. 2; — on expectations, iv. 270, n. 
3; — Garrick, let nobody attack, iii. 
354, n. 2; — good humour and 
gaiety, iii. 500, n. i; iv. 283, n. 2; 

— and Greville, iv. 351, w. 4; — 
grief at Thrale's death, iv. 98, n. 1 ; 

— household, iii. 523; — ill, iv. 187, 
«. 2, 295, n. 3; violent remedies, iii. 
153, «• I ; — 'in the wrong chair,' 
iv. 26S, «. i; — introduction to her, 
ii. 417, «. 3 ; — kindliness, iv. 492, 
w. I kitchen, ii. 247, n. 4; — last 
days, iv. 435, n. 1; — likes an intelli- 
gent man of the world, iii. 25, «. i; 

— made or marred conversation, v. 
422, n. 3; — and Miss More, iv. 394, 
«. 3; — needed drawing out, iii. 349, 
«. i; — and the newspapers, iii. 91, w. 
2; — parting with Burke, iv. 470, n. 
I ; — portrait, ii. 162, n. 4; — praises 
her, iv. 317; — Mrs. Montagu, quar- 
rels with, iv. 74, «. 3, 75, «. 2; — 
urges Miss Burney to attack her, iii. 
276, «. 4; — and Miss Reynolds, i. 
563, «. I ; — sight, i. 48, w. 4; — 
sorrow for his bitter speeches, ii. 293, 
«. 3; — at Streatham, i. 570, «. 4; 
iii. 512; — style, imitates, iv. 449; 

— talk, iv. 273, n. 2; — and Mjs. 
Thrale, provoked by Mrs. Thrale's 
praise, iv. 95, n. 3; reproves her for 



40 



Index to 



Burney, Frances. 

flattery, v. 502, n. 2; drives her from 
his mind, iv. 392, n. i ; Warley 
Camp, returns from, iii. 410, «. 2; 
— , writes to, iv. 416; Johnson, Mrs., 
lodgings, iv. 435, ;/. i ; Kauffmann, 
Angelica, iv. 319, n. 2; Lade, Sir 
John, iv. 475, n. 2; Langton's imita- 
tion of Johnson, iv. 2, n. i; lived to 
a great age, iv. 317, n. 3; Lowe the 
painter, iv. 234, n. i ; Macaulay, on 
lier style, iv. 258, n. 3, 449, «. 2 ; 
marriage, iv. 258, n. 2; Metcalfe, \V., 
iv. 183, n. 2; Miller, Lady, ii. 3S5, 
;/. 3; Monckton's, Miss, assemblies, 
iv. 126, n. I ; Montagu, Mrs., char- 
acter of, ii. loi, n. 3; iv. 317, n. 3; 
Murphy, Arthur, described, i. 413, «. 
I ; — loved by Thrale, i. 570, n. 2; 
Musgrave, Richard, ii. 393, «. i; iv. 
373, n. I ; Omai, iii. g, «. i ; Pan- 
theon and Ranelagh, ii. 194, n. i; 
Paoli's account of Boswell, i. 6, n. 2; 
Queen Charlotte's opinion of Bos- 
well, i. 5, «. I ; regale, use of the 
word, iii. 350, n. 2 ; Reynolds's in- 
offensiveness, v. 115, n. 6; — , matri- 
monial wishes about, iv. i86, n. 2 ; 
Rousseau, admires, ii. 13, n. 3; Sew- 
ard, William, iii. 140, n. i; Solander, 
Dr., V. 374, «. 2; Streatham, life at, 
iv. 392, M. 4; — farewell to, iv. 1S2, 
n. 3; Thrale, Henry, his character, i. 

571, n. 2; — luxurious table, iii. 480, 
«. 2; — stroke of apoplexy, iii. 451, 
«. 2; — sale of his brewery, iv. 100, 
n. 2; Thrale, Mrs., her character, i. 

572, «. 2; — letters to her, iv. 392, 
«. 4; — love of Piozzi, iv. 182, «. 3; 
rudeness to him, iv. 391, «. 2; — 
want of restraint, iv. 95, n. 4; Vesey, 
Mrs., iii. 484, n. 3; Walker, the lec- 
turer, iv. 238, n. I ; Warton, Dr. 
Joseph, ii. 47, n. i ; Warton, Rev. 
Thomas, iv. 8, w. i. 



Busy Body. 

Burns, Robert, Beattie's Minstrel, 
praises, v. 311, n. 3; Boswell's 
neighbour, v. 427, n. 3 ; Dempster, 
R., i. 473, w. 3; elegy on Miss 
Burnet, v. 92, n. 2 ; Elphinston's 
Martial, iii. 293, «. i ; ' gab like 
Hoswell,' V. 58, n. 4; gauger, a, iv. 
404, «. i; ' Holy Willie,' ii. 541, n. 
i; iii. 509; Hume, attacks, v. 311, 
«. 3; Scott, seen by, v. 46, n. 2; 
Tristram Shandy and The Man of 
Feeling, i. 417, n. 2. 

Burrow, a man near his, i. 96, n. 2; 
iii. 431- 

BuRROWKS, Rev. R., iv. 445. 

Burrows, Dr., iii. 431. 

Burton, Dr. John Hill, Beattie's Es- 
say on Truth, v. 311, n. 3; Burke, 
Hume, and Clow, v. 420, n. 2; Cap- 
tain Carletons Memoirs, iv. 385, n. 
6 ; Helvetius's advice to Montes- 
quieu, V. 46, n. 2; Douglas Cause, ii. 
57, n. 2; Hume's dislike of the Eng- 
lish, V. 20, n. 4; — house in James's 
Court, V. 23, «. 3 ; — and Dr. 
Cheyne, iii. 31, «. i; — in Paris, ii. 
460, «. 3; — praise of Scotch writ- 
ers, iv. 215, w. i; — predecessors in 
history, ii. 60, w. 2; — Scotticisms, ii. 
82, n. 1; — Toryism, iv. 224, n. i; 
King's College, Aberdeen, v. 103, n. 
i; Scotch Militia Bill, iii. 410, n. i. 

Burton, Robert, Anatomy of Melan- 
choly made Johnson rise earlier, ii. 
138; recommended by him, ii. 504; 
' Be not solitary ; be not idle,' iii. 
471; elected student of Christ Church, 
i. 68. 

Burton s Books, iv. 297. 

Burton-on-Trent, i. 100, n. 2. 

BUSCH, Dr., iv. 31. n. 3. 

Business, retiring from, ii. 386. 

Bustling, v. 350. 

Busy Body, i. 376, «. 3. 



Boswelfs Life of foJuison. 



41 



Busy. 



Caermarthen. 



Bttsy, curious, thirsty fly, ii. 322. 

Butcher, the art of a, v. 281. 

Bute, third Earl of, Adams the archi- 
tect, patronises, ii. 372, n. 3; a book- 
minister, ii. 404 ; his Chancellor of 
the Exchequer, ii. 155, 11. 3; conces- 
sions to the people, ii. 404; daughter- 
in-law, his, ii. 433, n. 3; favourite of 
George III, i. 447; and of the Prin- 
cess Dowager of Wales, iv. 148, n. i; 
Humphry Clinker, mentioned in, ii. 
93, n. i; Jenkinson, his secretary, iii. 
166, n. i; Johnson's letters to him, i. 
435, 440; Johnson's pension, i. 430- 
36 ; iv. 193, n. 4 ; Luton Hoe, iv. 
137; purchase of the estate, iv. 148, 
«.i; minister, when once, should not 
have resigned, ii. 539; pensions con- 
ferred by him, i. 431, n. i; Scotch- 
men, partiality to, ii. 406; Scotland, 
never goes to, iv. 152; Shelburne on 
his strengthening the power of the 
Crown, iii. 473, ;/. i ; Shelburne's 
'pious fraud,' iv. 201, n. i; son, his. 
Colonel James Stuart, iii. 453; took 
down too fast, ii. 408; Wilkes attacks 
him, ii. 343, ;/. 4; dedicates to him 
Mortimer, iii. 89. 

Bute, first Marquis of. See Mount- 
STUART, Lord. 

Butler, Bishop, Analogy, v. 52. 

Butler, Samuel, Hudihras, bullion 
which will last, ii. 424; not a poem, 
iii. 44 ; shows strength of political 
principles, ii. 424 ; seldom read, ii. 
424, n. I ; quotations from it : ' H' 
was very shy of using it,' iii. 320, n. 
I ; ' Indian Britons made from Pen- 
guins,' v. 256; 'Jacob Behmen un- 
derstood,' ii. 141, «. 2; ' True as the 
dial to the sun,' iv. 342, «. i; ' Thou 
wilt at best but suck a bull,' i. 514, 
n. i; ' The Devil was the first,' &c., 
iii. 371, n. 3; Remains, v. 64. 



Butt, Mr., i. 55, «. i. 

Butter, Dr., ii, 544, «. i; iii. i, 175, 
185; iv. 128, 460, 463, n. 3. 

Butter, Mrs., iii. 186. 

Button-hole Act, v. 19, n. 4. 

Buxton, iii. 172; v. 493. 

Byng, Admiral, Appeal to the People 
concerning, i. 358, 364; Letter on the 
case of, i. 358; Some further partic- 
ulars by a gentleman of Oxford, i. 
358; Epitaph, his, i. 365; Mallet, at- 
tacked by, ii. 147; Voltaire's saying 
about him, i. 364. 

Byng, Hon. John, iv. 483. 

Byron, Captain, v. 442, «. 2. 

Byron, Lord, admires the Vanity of 
Human IVishes, i. 224, n. 3; attacked 
in the Edinburgh Heviezo, iv. 133, 
n. 2; praises and abuses the Earl of 
Carlisle, iv. 132, n. i. 



Cabbages, ii. 521; v. 95. 

Cabiri, i. 317. 

Caddel, William, of Cockenzie, ii. 
345, «. 3. 

Cauell, Thomas, Gibbon's Decline 
and Fall, publishes, ii. 157, n. 3; 
praised by him, ii. 487, n. i; Hawkes- 
worth's Cook's Voyages, publishes, 
ii. 284, n. 3 ; Hume and his oppo- 
nents, gives a dinner to, ii. 505, n. 2; 
Johnson's y^0Kr«^'^', publishes, ii. 354, 
M. 3; — False Alarm, ii. 487, n. i; 
— one of a deputation to, iii. 126; 
asks Parr to write Johnson's Life, iv. 
512; Mackenzie's Alan of Feeling, 
publishes, i. 417 ; Robertson's Scot- 
land, publishes, iii. 380. 

Cadet, The, a Military Treatise, i. 358. 

Cadogan, Dr., v. 238-40. 

Cadogan, Lord, i. 14. 

Caen-wood, iii. 487. 

Caermarthen, Lord, iii. 242, n. i. 



42 



Index to 



Cesar. 



Campbell, Dr. John. 



C/K.SAK, Julius, i. 39. 

Cairo, iii. 152, n. i, 347, 431, ;/. 2, 517. 

Calais, ii. 254, 441. 

Calamiitaris, v. 503, «. I. 

Calculation. .S'<v Johnson, calcu- 
lation. 

Caldkk, Dr. John, ii. 243, n. i. 

Caldkrwooi), Mrs., ii. 55, n. 4. 

Caldwkll, Sir James and Sir John, 
ii. 38, w. 2. 

Cai.kdon, i. 214. 

'Calihan of Literature,' ii. 148. 

Caligula, iii. 321. 

Callandkr, Earl of, v. 117, n. i. 

Called, iv. 109. 

Calli.machus, iv. 3. 

Calming Onksklk, v. ^17. 

Calvinis.m, v. 194, //. 3. 

Calypso, i. 323. 

Camisrav, ii. 459. 

Camhrick Bill, iii. 81, n. 5. 

Camhriugk, Emmanuel College, Farm- 
er, Dr., master, i. 426; ii. 514, ;/. 
3 ; Johnson promised an habitation 
there, i. 600; strong in Shakespeare 
and black letter, iii. 45, n. i ; King's 
College, Steevens a member, ii. 131; 
Pembroke College, Kit Smart a fel- 
low, i. 354, ;/. i; (,)ueen's College, iv. 
144; Trinity College, Lord Erskine 
a member, ii. 199, n. i ; Johnson 
spends an evening there, i. 564 ; 
Trinity Mall, i. 505; University, ex- 
aminations for the degree, iii. 15, n. 
2 ; Johnson visits it, i. 563, 599 ; 
Parr neglected, i. 90, n. 2; Professor 
Sanderson, ii. 218, w. 4; University- 
verses, ii. 426. See Universities. 

Cambridge Men, on Johnson's criti- 
cism of (Jray, iv. 74. 

Camhridi^e Shakespeare. See under 
Shakespeare. 

Cambridge, R. O., Boswell's account 
of him, iv, 227; Walpole's and Miss 



Hurney'h, //'., w. i ; dinners at liis 
house, ii. 258, n. 4, 414; Essex Head 
Club, member of the, iv. 293, n. i ; 
Horace, talk about, iii. 284-5; l^orld. 
The, contributor to, i. 299, n. i; men- 
tioned, ii. 422, 424; iv. 75, M. 2, 226. 

Camden, Lord, Douglas Cause, ii. 264, 
n. i; Carrick, intimacy with, iii. 354; 
general warrants, ii. 83, n. i; John- 
son, attacked by, ii. 359; Goldsmith, 
neglect of, iii. 353 ; Literary Club, 
blackballed at the, iii. 353, n. 2; iv. 
87,;/. 2; popularity, ii. 405, «. I ; one 
of the sights of London, iv. 107, n. 
3; Wilkes's case, judge in, ii. 405, 
//. I. 

Camde.n, William, epitaph on a man 
killed by a fall, iv. 245; 'niira cano,' 
iii. 346 ; Pembroke College Latin 
grace, i. 69, n. 5; v. 73, n. 2; men- 
tioned, V. 500. 

Cameron, Dr., executed, i. 168. 

Cameron, Dugall, v. 339. 

Cameron, Ewen, v. 339. 

Cameron of Lochiel, i. 168, «. 2. 

Cameron's, a branch of the, called 
Maclonich, v. 339. 

Camp, at W'arley, iii. 410, 415 ; Cox- 
heath, ib., n. 4; one of the great 
scenes of human life, iii. 410, ;/. 2. 

Campbell, Hon. and Rev. Archibald, 
Johnson's account of him, iv. 330; 
V. 406-7 ; his collection of Scotch 
books, ii. 248; Doctrine of a Middle 
State, v. 405, 71. 3. 

Campbell, Archibald {Lexiphanes), ii. 
50. 

Campbell, Colonel Sir Archibald, iii. 
67. 

Campbell, Colonel Mure, iii. 135. 

Campbell, Evan, v. 161. 

Campbell, General, v. 61, «. 2, 295. 

Campbell, Dr. John, author, a rich, i. 
484, n, 2; Biographia Britannica, ii. 



Boswelts Life of yohnson. 



43 



Campbell. 



Canterbury. 



512 ; Britannia Elucidata, v. 368 ; 
cold-catching at St. Kilda, on, ii. 58; 
Hermippiis Redivivus, i. 483; ii. 489; 
inaccurate in conversation, iii. 276; 
Johnson's character of him, i. 483 ; 
ii. 248; iii. 276; V. 369; — , declines 
to argue with, v. 369; never lies on 
paper, i. 484, n. i; or with pen and 
ink, iii. 276 ; piety in passing a 
church, i. 484; Political Surrey of 
Great Britain, — killed by its bad 
success, ii. 512; its publication de- 
layed, V. 368 ; Sunday evenings in 
Queen Square, i. 484; thirteen bot- 
tles of port at a sitting, iii. 276. 

Campbell, Rev. John (brother of 
Campbell of Treesbank), v. 424. 

Campbell, Rev. John of Kippen, ii. 
32. 

Campbell, Lord, Lives of the Chan- 
cellors — Cameron's execution, i. 168, 
n. 2; Chancellors, appointment of, ii. 
181, n. i; Douglas Cause, ii. 264, ;/. 
I ; Eldon's, Lord, attendance at 
Church, iv. 477, n. 2; inaccuracy in 
list of Lichfield scholars, i. 53, n. i ; 
I-add, Sir John, anecdote of, iv. 475, 
n. 2 ; Mansfield's, I^ord, speech in 
Somerset's case, iii. 100, n. ; Rad- 
cliffe's trial, i. 208, n. 2 ; Thurlow 
and Home Tooke, iv. 377, n. 5. 

Campbell, Mungo, account of him, 
iii. 214-15. 

Campbell, Rev. Dr. Archibald, of St. 
Andrews, Enquiry into the original 
of Moral Virtue, i. 416. 

Campbell, Rev. Dr. George, Principal 
of Marischal College, Aberdeen, v. 

lOI. 

Campbell, Rev. Dr. Thomas, an Irish 
clergyman, account of him, ii. 387; 
Baretti's love of London, i. 430, n. 2; 
Baretti and Mrs. Thrale, iii. 57, n. i; 
Diary of a visit to England, ii. 387, 



«. 2; Dublin physicians, iii. 327, «. 
4 ; English and Irish cottagers, ii. 
149, ;/. 3; English and Scotch learn- 
ing, v. 64, n. 3; Irish bull, guilty of 
an, ii. 393; Johnson and America, ii. 
360, ;/. i; — appearance, i. 166, ;;. 2; 
— bon-mots, ii. 387, n. 2 ; — , came 
from Ireland to see, ii. 392; — danc- 
ing lessons, iv. 93, n. i ; — , intro- 
duced to, ii. 388; — and Dr. James 
Foster, iv. 11, n. 2; — and Madden, 
i. 368 ; — suspects Burke to he Ju- 
nius, iii. 428, «. 3 ; — writings, and 
Reynolds's pictures, ii. 362, n. 3 ; 
penal code against the Papists, ii. 
139, ;/. I ; Philosophical Su)"i'ey, ii. 
388 ; — published as an English- 
man's book, iv. 370, «. I ; Rutty, Dr., 
iii. 194, «. i; Taxation no Tyranny, 
sale of, ii. 384, «. i; mentioned, ii. 
400-1; iii. 127. 
Campbell, — , of Auchnaba, iii. 145, 

151- 

Campbell, — , a factor, v. 356. 

Campbell, — , a tacksman of Mull, v. 
378. 388. 

Campbell, — , of Treesbank, v. 424. 

Campbells, — , Mrs. Boswell's neph- 
ews, iii. 132. 

Campbelltown, ii. 210; v. 323. 

Canada, i. 356, n. i, 495. 

Canal, iii. 412, «. 4. 

Candidates for Orders, iii. 15, n. 2. 

Candide. See Voltaire. 

Canning, Miss, ii. 450, n. 5. 

Canons of Criticism, i. 306, ;/. i. 

Cant, clearing the mind of it, iv. 255; 
meanings of the word, il>., n. 3; 
modern cant, iii. 224. 

Canterbury, iii. 357, 519; iv. 266, 
n. 2. 

Canterbury, Archbishops of, public 
dinners, their, iv. 423, n. 3 ; Corn- 
wallis, Archbishop, — Johnson's ap- 



44 



Index to 



Canterbury. 

plication to hiiii, iii. 142 ; Seeker, 
Archbishop, — Johnson asked to 
seek his patronage, i. 426. 

Canl's, Melchior, ii. 448. 

Canynge, ' a Bristol merchant,' iii. 58, 
n. I. 

Cai'KL, Lord, V. 460, ;». 2. 

CaI'KLL, Edward, editor of Shake- 
speare, iv. 6. 

Capital Pi'nisiimknts. See E.xf.cit- 
TioNs, Newcatk, and Tyulkn. 

Caraccioi.i, M. de, iii. 325, >i. 2. 

Caractactis, ii. 383. 

Card, The, v. 30S, ;;. i. 

Cardonnei., Commissioner, iii. 443, 
". 3- 

Cariiross, Lord (sixth Karl of Hu- 
chan), ii. 203. 

Cards, Johnson wishes he had learnt 
to play at them, i. 367; iii. 27; v. 
460; condemns them in the Ravi- 
bler, iii. 27, 11. \. 

Careless, Mrs., Johnson's first love, 
ii. 526-8; mentioned, iv. 169-70,436. 

Careless Husband. See Cl liitER, Colley. 

Carelessness, iv. 25. 

Carihs, iii. 228, n. 2. 

Carletons, Captain, Memoirs, iv. 385-6. 

Carlisle, Hoswell proposes to meet 
Johnson there, iii. 121 ; ' cathedral 
so near Auchinleck,' iii. 472, 474; 
Percy made Dean, iii. 415 ; printer 
run out of parentheses, iii. 456, «. 4. 

Carlisle, Law, Bishop of, i. 506, «. 2. 

Carlisle, fifth Earl of, iv. 132, n. i; 
Poems, iv. 132 ; The Father s Re- 
venge, iv. 284-6. 

Carlisle House, iv. 107, n. 3. 

Carlisle of Limekilns, v. 360. 

Carlyle, Dr. Alexander — Blair, Rob- 
ert, iii. 55, n. 3; Blair's, Hugh, con- 
versation, v. 453, n. 2 ; Cardonnei, 
Commissioner, iii. 443, ;/. 3 ; clergy 
(English), at Harrogate, v. 287, n. 3; 



Carmichael. 

clergy (Scotch), and card-playing, v. 
461, n. i; Cullen's mimicry, ii. 176, 
n. 2 ; Cullotlen — London in an up- 
roar of joy, V. 223, ;/. 3; dinners in 
London and Edinburgh, i. 120, n. 
i; Dodd, Dr., iii. 158, n. 3; Douglas, 
Duchess of, v. 48, n. 3 ; Elibank, 
Lord, v. 440, H. 1 ; Elphin.ston's 
school, ii. 196, n. 3 ; Cuthrie, W. i. 
135. "• 3; Home patronised by Lord 
Bute, ii. 406, n. 4 ; — Douglas, v. 
412, n.\; — as an historian, iii. 184. 
;/. 4; Hume, account of, v. 32, «. 4 
— opinion of Ossian, ii. 345, n. 3, 
Leechman's prosecution, v. 77, «. 2; 
liberality of leading clergymen, v. 
22, /;. I ; Lonsdale, Lord, v. 128, «. 2; 
Maclaurin, Professor, v. 55, »/. 5 ; 
Macpherson, James, ii. 342, n. 4; 
Mansfield on Hume's style, i. 508, n. 
3 ; Millar, Andrew, i. 332, n. 3 ; 
Poker Club, ii. 431, «. i; Pretender, 
Young, V. 223, M. i; Robertson and 
the claret, iii. 382, «. 2; — conversa- 
tion, v. 453, n. 2; — romantic hu- 
mour, iii. 381, «. I ; Smith, Adam, 
iv. 29, «. 2; study of English by the 
Scotch, i. 508, n. 2. 

Carlyle, Thomas, Cromwell's speech- 
es, i. 173, ;/. 3; Gough Square, visits, 
i. 217, ;;. 3; errors about Johnson, i. 
67, n. 2, go, «. 3, 131, «. I, 380, «. i; 
Henault, quotes, ii. 439, n. i; John- 
son's god-daughter, subscribes for an 
annuity to, iv. 234, «. i ; N'ovalis, 
quotes, iii. 12, ;/. 2; Sandwich, Lord, 
and Basil Montague, iii. 436, n. i ; 
teacher's life, on a, i. 99, n. i; walk- 
ing to Edinburgh University, v. 343, 
n. i; writing an effort, iv. 253, m. i. 

Carmichael, Miss, Johnson lodges 
her in his house, iii. 252; speaks of 
her as ' Poll,' iii. 418; describes her, 
iii. 524- 



BosweWs Life of Johnson, 



45 



Carnan. 



Cave. 



Carnan, Thomas, bookseller, iii. 114, 
n. 2. 

Caroline, Queen, Clarke's refusal of 
a bishopric, iii. 281, ti. 2; Leibnitz, 
patronizes, v. 327 ; Savage, bounty 
to, i. 145, n. 2, 200, w. 2. 

Carpenter, anecdote of a, iv. 134. 

Carre, Rev. Mr., v. 30. 

Carruthers, Robert, Highland emi- 
gration, V. 172, n. I. 

Carstares State Papers, v. 259, «. I. 

Carte, Thomas, believed in the ' regal 
touch,' i. 49; History of England, i. 
49; ii. 394; iv. 359; Life of Onnond, 

V. 337- 
Carter, Rev. Dr., i. 142, ;/. i. 
Carter, Miss Elizabeth (Mrs.), ac- 
count of her, i. 142, w. i; age, lived 
to a great, iv. 317, «.3; alarurti, her, 
iii. 191; Amelia, praises, iii. 49, n. 5; 
Burney, Miss, described by, iv. 317, 
n. i; her Correspondence, i. 235, n. 7; 
Crousaz's Examen, translates, i. 159; 
Garrick, Mrs., dines with, iv. 111-15; 
Greek and pudding -making, i. 142, 
n. i; Johnson advises her to trans- 
late Boethiiis, i. 161 ; — \vrites an 
epigram to her, i. 142, 162; — Eng- 
lish verses, ib.; — a letter, i. 142, n. 
i; — praises her, iv. 317; known as 
'the learned,' iv. 284, n. 6 ; Ode to 
Melancholy, i. 142, n. i ; Rambler, 
contributes to the, i. 236; criticises 
it, i. 242, n. i; mentioned, i. 281. 

Carter, — , a riding-school master, ii. 
486, n. I. 

Carteret, John, Lord, afterwards 
Earl Granville, i. 58S, 591. 

Carteret, a dactyl, iv. 3. 

Carthage, iv. 226. 

Carthagena, v. 440. 

Carthusian Convent. See Monas- 
tery. 

Cascades, v. 490, w. i, 504. 



Cashiobury, i. 440, n. i. 

Casimir's Ode to Pope Urban, i. 131, 

n. 2. 
Castes of the Hindoos, iv. 14, n. 2. 

102. 
C.^STIGLIONE, author of // Corteggiano, 

V. 314- 

Castiglione, Prince Gonzaga di, iii. 
467, M. 2. 

Castle, shut up in one, ii. 115. 

Casuistry, i. 295. 

Catalogue of Johnson's Works, i. 19. 

Catalogues, why we look at them, ii. 
418-9. 

Catcot, George, iii. 58-9. 

Cathc.\rt, Lord, ii. 474; iii. 394. 

Cathedrals of England, most seen 
by Johnson, iii. 121, 518; neglected. 
V. 129, n. I. 

Catherine H, Empress of Russia, 
Boswell's eulogium on her, iii. 152, 
n. i; engages English tutors, iv. 319, 
n. 2 ; Evelina, has drawings made 
from, iv. 319, n. 2 ; Houghton Col- 
lection, buys the, iv. 386, «. 2; Ram- 
bler, orders a translation of the, iv. 
319; sends Reynolds a snuff-box, iii. 
420. 

Catholicon, ii. 457. 

Catiline, i. 37. 

Cato the Censor, iv. 92. 

Cator, John, iv. 361, 392, n. 4. 

Cats, shooting, iv. 228. 

Catullus, iv. 208. 

Caulfield, Miss, iii. 115. 

Cave, Edward, account of him, i. 131, 
n. I ; Abridgment of Trapp's Ser- 
mons, publishes an, i. 162, n. 4; at- 
tacked by rivals, i. 131, n. 3; Birch, 
Dr., Letters to, i. 161, 174-6; Boyse's 
verses to him, iv. 509; coach, sets up 
a, i. 175, n.y, ii. 259, n. 3; death and 
effects, i. 297, ns. i and 2; Debates, 
publishes the, i. 134-7. I57. 174-6, 



46 



Index to 



Cave. 



Chambers. 



581-93; reports them, i. 584; de- 
scendants, collateral, i. 105, «. 2; ex- 
amined before House of Lords, i. 
129, n. 2, 581 ; {Sylvauus Urban), 
Gentleman's Magazine, projects the, 
i. 105, 129 ; attends closely to its 
sale, iii. 366 ; ghost, saw a, ii. 204, 
209; indecent books, sells, i. 129, ;;. 
4 ; Johnson ' Cave's Oracle,' i. 162, 
?/. 4 ; — first employer, i. 119; — 
Life of Savage, buys the copyright 
of, i. 190, «. i; — letters from: see 
Johnson, Letters ; — , money ac- 
count with, i. 157; — Ode to him, i. 
131; — Rambler, proprietor of, i. 
236, //. I, 242, ns. I and 2; — and 
the screen, i. 188, w. i; — writes his 
Life, i. 296; ' penurious paymaster,' 
i. 140, n. 2; iv. 472; prizes for verses, 
offers, i. 106, //. 2, 1 58; treatment of 
his readers, i. iSi, n. 6; mentioned, 
i. 142, n. I, 157, 203, n. 2, 281. 

Cavk, Edward, Jun., i. 129, «. 2. 

Cave, Miss, i. 105, n. 2. 

Caversham, ii. 296, n. 3. 

Cawston, — , iv. 483. 

Caxton, William, iii. 288. 

Cecil, Colonel, ii. 210. 

Cecilia. See Miss BURNEY. 

Ceded Islands, money arising from 
the, ii. 405, «. 3. 

Celiracy, cheerless, ii. 148. 

Celsus, iii. 172, «. 3. 

Celts, descended from the Scythians, 

V. 255- 
Censure, ecclesiastical, iii. 68. 
Cento, ii. no, n. i. 
Certainties, small, the bane of men 

of talents, ii. 369. 
Cervantes, Don Quixote's death, ii. 

425; see Don Quixote; praised // 

Palmerino d' Inghilterra, iii. 2. 
' Chair of Verity,' iii. 67, n. 3. 
Chalmers, .Ale.xanclcr, edits the Spec- 



tator, ii. 243, n. i; mentioned, ii. 156, 
;/. 5; iii. 261, ;/. 4. 

Chalmers, George, edits Johnson's 
Debates, i. 176, n. i. 

' Cham ok Literature,' i. 403. 

Chamherlain, Lord, Johnson's appli- 
cation to the, iii. 40, w. I. 

CiiAMitKRLAYNE, Edward, iv. 114. 

CiiA.Mi'.ERLAYNE, Kev. Mr., iv. 332. 

Chamhers, Catherine, i. 595-8; death, 
ii. 49. 

Chamhers, Ephraim, Dictionary of 
Arts and Sciences, i. 160, 253 ; new 
edition, ii. 233, ;/. 3; epitaph, i. 253, 
"• 3. 576, «. 2 ; Johnson takes his 
style as a model, i. 253. 

Chambers, Sir Robert, dissenters and 
snails, ii. 308, n. i; Johnson's com- 
panion to Newcastle, ii. 303; v. 17,22; 
— learnt law from him, iii. 25 ; — 
letter to him, i. 318; — , prescribes 
remedies to, ii. 299; — recommends 
him to Warren Hastings, iv. 79; — 
visits him, ii. 28, 52; judge in India, 
appointed, ii. 303 ; threatened with 
revocation, ib., n. i; Langton's will, 
makes, ii. 300; Lincoln College, Ox- 
ford, member of, i. 318 ; Literary 
Club, member of the, i. 553, «. 2, 
554; married, ii. 314; Principal of 
New Inn Hall, ii. 52, 308, «. i; por- 
trait in University College, ii. 28, n. 
2 ; — at Streatham, iv. 181, n. 3 ; 
professor in the imaginary college, 
V. 123 ; proud or negligent, ii. 312 ; 
Warton, Dr., recommends him to W. 
G. Hamilton, i. 602 ; mentioned, i. 
318, 389, 414, 428; ii. 304; iv. 398; 
V. 75- 

Chambers, Dr. Robert, Traditions of 
Edinburgh — Boyd's Inn, v. 22, n. 2; 
Edinburgh, a new face in the streets, 
v. 43, n. 4; noble families in the old 
town, v. 48, «. 3 ; Hailes, Lord, i. 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



47 



Chambers. 



Charles II. 



500, M. 3; Hardyknutc, ii. 105, n. 2; 
James's Court, v. 23, «. 3; Kames, 
Lord, ii. 230, n. i ; Macdonald's, 
Flora, virulence, v. 211, it. 2; Mon- 
boddo, Lord, ii. 84, n. 2. 

CtlAMBERS, Sir William, Dissertation 
on Oriental Gardening, iv. 70, n. 6; 
V. 212; ridiculed in The Heroic Epis- 
tle, ih.; Johnson writes an introduc- 
tion to his Chinese Architecture, iv. 
217; Somerset House, architect of, 
iv. 216, n. 3; Treatise on Civil Archi- 
tecture, iv. 216, n. 3. 

Chamier, Andrew, account of him, i. 
553. "• i; Goldsmith, his estimate of, 
iii. 286-7 ; Johnson consults him in 
Dodd's case, iii. 138; gets his inter- 
est for Mr. Welch, iii. 246 ; visits 
him, iii. 452, n. i ; professor in the 
imaginary college, v. 123 ; ^icns the 
Round-Robin, iii. 95. 

Champion, Sir G., iii. 521. 

Champion, The, i. 195. 

Chancellors, Lord Hicjh.hntvHiosen, 
ii. 181. 

Chances, iv. 381. 

Chaftces, The, ii. 26S, n. 2. 

Chandler, Dr., ii. 509, n 2. 

Change, silver, iv. 221. 

Chantilly, ii. 458. 

Chatel-House, ii. 516. 

Chaplains, ii. iii. 

Chapone, Mrs., account of her, iv. 
284, n. 6; Correspondence, her, i. 235, 
n. 6; Johnson, letter from, iv. 285; 
his meeting with the Abbe Raynal, 
iv. 501 ; his views on natural deprav- 
ity, V. 240, n. 2 ; Ravtbler, contrib- 
utes to the, i. 235; Wilhams, Mrs., 
account of, i. 269, n. i. 

Character, a most complete one, ii. 
460; argument, its weight in an, ii. 
507; V. 32, n. 2 ; delineation in the 
Anabasis, iv. 37; expectation of uni- 



formity, iii. 320, n. 2; Johnson saw a 
great variety, iii. 24; his sketches of 
them, ih.; men not bound to reveal 
their children's character, iii. 21; not 
to be tried by one particular, iii. 269; 
must not be lessened, v. 282; nature 
and manners, ii. 55; as to this world 
not hurt by vice, iii. 389, 397. 

Charade, a, iv. 226. 

Charitable Esiablishment in 
Wales, a, iii. 289. 

Charity. See Almsgiving. 

Charlemont, first Earl of, Beauclerk's 
character, draws, i. 288, n. 3; — let- 
ters to him, ii. 221; Hume's French, 
i. 508, n. 3; Hume and Mrs. Mallet, 
ii. 9, n. 4; Literary Club, member of 
the, i. 554; Johnson and Vestris, iv. 
92 ; professor in the imaginary col- 
lege, v. 123 ; story of the Pyramids, 
iii. 401, 510, 520; mentioned, ii. 270, 
314, n. 2; iv. 90. 

Charles L anniversary of his death, 
ii. 174, n. 2; kept by Boswell with 
old port and solemn talk, iii. 422 ; 
birth-place, v. 455; concessions to 
parliament, v. 387; corn, price of, in 
his reign, iii. 263, n. i ; Johnson and 
Lord Auchinleck di.spute about him, 
V. 435, n. 3; ' murder,' his, unpopu- 
lar, ii. 424; political principles in his 
time, ii. 424 ; saying about lawyers, 
ii. 246; mentioned, i. 225, n. 2, 540; 
ii. 195, n. 2; V. 232, 394, 463. 

Charles II, atheist and bigot, iv. 224, 
n. I ; betrayed and sold the nation, 
ii. 392, n. I ; corn, price of, in his 
reign, iii. 263, n. i; descendants, his, 
Beauclerk, i. 287, «. 3; — Commis- 
sioner Cardonnel, iii. 443, «. 3 ; — 
Charles Fox, iv. 337, n. 2; Duke of 
York and Catharine Sedley, v. 54 ; 
France, took money from, ii. 391-2; 
Heale, at, iv. 270, n. 2; Hume's par- 



48 



Index to 



Charles II. 

tiality for him, ii. 390, «. 3 ; John- 
son's partiality for him, i. 288 ; ii. 
390; iv. 337, n. 2; 'lenity,' his, iv. 
49; Lewis XIV, might have been as 
absolute as, ii. 424; manners, ii. 46; 
political principles in his time, ii. 
424; social, i. 512; story-telling, ex- 
celled in, iii. 443, «. 3 ; mentioned, 
ii. 500, ;/. 2; v. 406, «. 3. 

Chaki.ks III (the Young Pretender), 
ii. 290. 

CliAKiKs Kdwaki), i'rincc. .SVv 1'kk- 

TKNDKR. 

CHARI.KS V, Emperor, plays at his own 
funeral, iii. 280. 

Charlks X, of France, ii. 460, m. 3. 

Charlks XII, of Sweden, compared 
with Socrates, iii. 301; dressed plain- 
ly, ii. 544; Johnson's Vanity of Hu- 
man IVishcs, i. 225. 

Charles of Sweden, i. 177, n. i. 

Charlottk, Queen, account of Bos- 
well, i. 5, M. i; Garrick's compliment 
to her, ii. 268; ' a lady of experience,' 
ii. 163; Queen's House, ii. 37, «. 3; 
Sunday knotting, iii. 274, n. 3; men- 
tioned, i. 443; ii. 331. 

Charmer, The, v. 357. 

Charter-House, iii. 141, 500. 

Chartkk-House School, iii. 252. 

Chartres, Colonel, ii. 242, «. 4. 

Chastity, one deviation from it ruins 
a woman, ii. 64 ; property depends 
on it, ii. 523; V. 237. 

Chatham, William Pitt, Earl of, Bos- 
well, correspondence with, ii. 15, ;/. 
2, 67, M. I ; Copahility Brown, ac- 
count of, iii. 455, ». 2 ; Cardross, 
Lord, offers a post to, ii. 203; Cum- 
ming the Quaker's account of him, v. 
Ill, «. I ; Dictator, iii. 405 ; excise- 
men, attacks, i. 341, n. 4; Garrick, 
notes to, ii. 261 ; Highland regiments, 
raises, iii. 225; v. 171; House of 



Chemistry. 

Commons, last speech in the. ii. 19, 
;/. i; Johnson attacks him, ii. 155, n. 
I, 359; criticises his oratory, iv. 366; 
writes a speech in his name. i. 584; 
Loudoun, Lord, recalls, v. 424. w. i; 
merchants and tradesmen, praises 
honest, v. 373, //. 3; ' meteor,' i. 152; 
V. 386; oratory, his, i. 176; Oxford in 
1754, at, i. 315, //. I ; ' I'tit,' figures 
in the Debates as, i. 582; public and 
private schools, on, iii. 13. w. i ; 
Scotch Militia bill, acipiicsces in the, 
ii. 493, ;/. 2; Sliclburne joins his min- 
istr>-, iii. 41, ;/. 2 ; .son, his, superior 
to him, iv. 253, >/. 3 ; Trccothick, 
praises, iii. 87, u. 2 ; Walpole. dis- 
tinguished from, ii. 225 ; war, his 
glorious, ii. 144; Whigs and Tories, 
distinguishes, i. 499, n. i; 'woollen, 
buried in," ii. 519, ;/. i; mentioned, 
iii. 228, n. 6. 

Chatsworth, Boswell visits it. iii. 
237 ; Johnson visits it in 1774, v. 
4S9; in 1784, iv. 411, 423; present at 
a ' pul)lic dinner,' //'., n. 3. 

Chatterton, Thomas, money gained 
by Beckford's death, iii. 228, n. 6; 
Kowley's Poetry, iii. 58 ; pretended 
discovery, il>., n. i; Johnson's admi- 
ration, iii. 59; Goldsmith's belief. //'.. 
n. 2; Walpole's disbelief, ib.; quar- 
rel about it between Goldsmith and 
Percy, iii. 314, w. 2; ' wild adherence 
to him,' iv. 163. 

Chaucer, took much from the Italians, 
iii. 288. 

Chaucer, Life of, i. 354. 

Cheap, Captain, i. 135, n. 3. 

Chelsea, ii. 194, n. i. 

Chelsea College, ii. 73. 

Chemistry, Johnson's love of it, i 
161, 505; ii. 178; 'the new kinds of 
air, iv. 274 ; Priestley's discoveries, 
iv. 274-5. 



Boswclfs Life of Johnson. 



49 



Cheney Walk. 



Children. 



Cheney Walk, ii. 114, n. 4. 

Cherokees, v. 283. 

Cheselden, William, iii. 172, «. 4. 

Chester, Boswell visits it, iii. 468-72; 
Johnson and the Thrales, v. 496 ; 
Michael Johnson attends the fair, 
ih.\ passage thence to Ireland, i. 122. 

Chesterfield, fourth Earl of, active 
sports and idleness, i. 56, u. i ; Addi- 
son and Leandro Alberti, ii. 397, ;/. 
I ; appeal to people in high life, how 
to be made, i. 298, n. i ; Boling- 
broke's ready knowledge, ii. 294, n. 
2; ' But stoops to conquer,' quotes, 
ii. 236, «. I ; conversation and knowl- 
edge, iv. 384 ; dedications, the plas- 
tron of, i. 212, n. i; dignified but in- 
solent, iv. 200; dissembling anger, i. 
307, n. 3; duplicity, his, i. 307-S; 
Eliot, Mr., praises, iv. 38^, ;/. i; epi- 
gram written with his diamond, iv. 
119, n. i; exquisitely elegant, iv. 384; 
Faulkner, George, account of, v. 49, 
n. I ; friend, had no, iii. 440 ; flog- 
ging, on, i. 54, n. I ; general reflec- 
tions, on, iv. 361, «. 3 ; graces and 
wickedness, on uniting the, ii. 390; 
great, pronunciation of, ii. 185; Let- 
ters, ' Hottentot, a respectable,' i. 
309; V. 117, ;/. 2; Ireland's sufferings 
from a drunken gentry, v. 285, n. i; 
Johnson addresses to him the Plan, 
i. 212-14 ; ii- I. "• 2, 40, «. 3 ; his 
MS. notes on it, i. 214, «. i; — Dic- 
tionar)', writes in The World on, i. 
299-301 ; — flatters with a view to a 
Dedication, i. 298; — letter to him, 
i. 302-7, «. 3 ; iv. 222, «. I ; v. 149, 
//. I ; Boswell begs for a copy of it, 
iii. 475, 477; gets it, iv. 149; — ne- 
glects, i. 297-308 ; — , presents ten 
pounds to, i. 303, «. 2 ; — speeches 
ascribed to him, iii. 399 ; laughter 
low and unbecoming, declares, ii. 



434, «. i; letter to his son at Rome, 
iv. 90, n. 2 ; Letters, Johnson's de- 
scription of them, i. 309 ; Boswell's, 
il>., n. I ; Lord Eliot's, iv. 384; — 
literary property in them contested, 
i. 309 ; — pretty book, might be 
made a, iii. 62 ; — sale, ii. 377 ; — 
mentioned, iii. 63 ; Miscellaneous 
IVorks, published in 1777, iii. 123, 
n. 2; old and ill, i. 304, n. i; Paris- 
ians not learned, declares the, i. 526, 
n. i; patron of bad authors, iv. 382, 
;/. I ; position, great, ii. 377 ; pride, 
i. 308; respectable, use of the term, 
iii. 273, n. 2; Richardson's novels, ii. 
200, n. i; Robinson, SirT., epigram 
on, i. 502, n. 5; Secretary of .State, 
iv. 384, n. 3; speeches composed by 
Johnson, i. 585; study of eloquence, 
on the, iv. 212, n. i ; transpire, iii, 
390, n. 2; Tyrawley, Lord, criticism 
on, ii. 243; 'wit among Lords,' i. 
308; wit, his, ii. 242; world, on the 
judgment of the, i. 232, n. i; men- 
tioned, i. 174; iv. 90. 

Chesterfield, fifth Earl of, Dodd, 
Dr., forges his name, iii. 159. 

Chevalier, the, v. 160, w. 2. 

Chevalier s Muster Roll, v. 162, n. 2. 

Cheyne, Dr. George, account of his 
diet, iii. 31, w. i ; on bleeding, iii. 
T72, n. 4; English Malady, i. 75; iii. 
31, 99; V. 238; rule of conduct, v. 
176. 

Cheynel, Life of, i. 265; ii. 215, «. I, 
V. 54- 

Chichester, iv. 185. 

Chiefs. See Highlands. 

Chiesley of Dalry, V. 259, n. i. 

Child, — , of Southwark, i. 567, n. 4. 

Childhood, companions of one's, iiL 
149. 

Children, business men care little for 
them, iii. 33 ; company, should not 



50 



Index to 



Children. 

be brought into, iii. 33, 145; Gay's 
writings for them, ii. 468, «. 3; John- 
son on books for them, iv. 9, n. 5, 19; 
library, to be turned loose in a, iv. 
24; management of them, i. 54, n. 2; 
method of rearing them, ii. 116; nat- 
ural aptitudes, v. 240, 244 ; prema- 
turely wise, ii. 468. 

China, dog-butchers, ii. 266; mortality 
on the voyage thither, i. 403, n. i; 
wall of, iii. 306, 519 ; people ' per- 
fectly polite,' i. 103; barbarians, iii. 
3S6; plantations, iv. 70. 

China, iJu llalde's /)fs<ri/>/it>/i o/. SW 
l)v Hai.dk. 

China-Fancy, iii. 185, w. i. 

China-Manukactory, iii. 185. 

C/iinfSt' Architecture. See CllAMliERS, 
Sir W. 

Chinese Stones, i. 158. 

Chiswick, iv. 193, n. 4. 

' Choice ok Dikkiculties,' v. 167. 

Choisi, Abbe, iii. 383. 

Chol.monueley, G. J., iv. 398. 

Cholmondkley, Mrs., account of her, 
iii. 362, M. i; a very airy lady, v. 282; 
an affected gentleman, iii. 296; John- 
son takes her hand, iii. 362, w. i ; 
mentioned, ii. 144; iii. 290. 

Christ's Hospital, ii. 328. 

Christ's satisfaction, iv. 143-4; v. 99. 

Christian, Rev. Mr., ii. 59. 

Christian Hero, ii. 513. 

Christian Philosopher and Politician, 
i. 234, «. I. 

Christianity, diflTerences political 
rather than religious, i. 469; chiefly 
in forms, ii. 173; iii. 214; evidences 
for it, i. 460, 468, 495, 514, 526; ii. g, 
16; iii. 214, 360; V. 52, 387; revela- 
tion of immortality its great article, 
iii. 214; its 'wilds,' iii. 356. 

Christie, James, the auctioneer, iv. 
463. «• 3- 



Churchill. 

Chrvsostom, v. 508. 

Church, The, possesses the right of 
censure, iii. 68-72, 104, n. 3. 

'Church and KiNo.'iv. 34, 342. 

Church ok Encland, in Charles II's 
reign, ii. 390-1 ; ' Churchmen will 
not be Catholics,' iv. 34, //. 2; Con- 
vocation denied it, i. 537; discipline 
and Convocation, iv. 320; example 
of attendance at the services, ii. 198; 
House of Hanover, all against the, 
V. 309; manner of reading the ser- 
vice, iii. 496; neglected state of the 
buildings, v. 46, n. i ; of the cathe- 
drals, V. 129, w. I ; ol)servance of 
days, ii. 525; parishes neglected, iii. 
496; patronage, ii. 278-82; revenues, 
iii. 157; theory and practice, iii. 157. 

Church ok Rome. See Roman 
Catholics. 

Church ok Scotland. See under 
Scotland. 

Churchill, Charles, account of the 
publication of his poems, i. 485, «. 
3; profits, i. 486, «. 2; ' blotting,' ha- 
tred of, i. 486, M. 2; Boswell criticises 
his poetry, i. 486 ; ' brains not ex- 
cised,' V. 57; Cowper's high estimate 
of his poetry, i. 485, n. 1 ; Davies 
and his wife, i. 452, n. 4, 560 ; iii. 
253, 282; death, his. i. 457, m. 2, 485, 
n. 3; Dodsley's Cleone, i. 378, n. 2; 
'Flexney, his publisher, ii. 130, n. 2; 
Francklin, Dr., iv. 39, n. 4; ' 'gainst 
fools be guarded,' v. 247, n. i ; Go- 
tham, i. 486, «. 3; Guthrie, William, 
i. 136, n. i; Hill, Sir John, ii. 43, n. 
2 ; Holland the actor, iv. 8, «. 5 ; 
Johnson, attacks, about Shmkespeare, 
i. 370, 485 ; about the Cock -Lane 
Ghost, i. 470; about his strong terms, 
iii. I, «. 2; — despises his poetry, i. 
4S5 , Lloyd in the Fleet - prison, i. 
457i "• 2 ; Norton, Sir Fletcher, ii. 



Boswelts Life of fohnson. 



51 



Churchill. 



Claret. 



540, n. 2 ; Ogilvie's poetry, i. 490, 
«. i; Prophecy of Famine, i. 431, «. 
I, 486; iii. 88, n. i ; Gotham, Eu- 
rope's treatment of savages, iii. 232, 
«. i; straw in Bedlam, ii. 429, n. 2; 
'strolling tribe,' i. 193, tt. 3; War- 
burton, Bishop, iv. 57, «. 3; V. gi, n. 
3 ; Whitehead, Paul, i. 144 ; ' With 
wits a fool, with fools a wit,' i. 308, 
«. 2. 

Churtox, Rev. Ralph, ii. 296, n. 3; iv. 
245. «• 3. 346, n. 2. 

Gibber, Colley, Apology, ii. 106 ; iii. 
82; Goldsmith praises it, ib., 11. 3; 
Birth-day Odes, i. 172, u. 2, 464; ii. 
106; iii. 83, 209; Careless Husband, 
revised by Mrs. Brett, i. 201, n. i; 
origin of the story, ib.; no doubt 
written by Gibber, ii. 389; praised by 
Pope and H. Walpole, iii. S3, >i. 2; 
Gomedies, merit in his, ii. 389; iii. 
83; Ghesterfield, and Johnson, anec- 
dote about, i. 297; conversation, his, 
ii. 106, 389 ; iii. 83 ; Dryden, recol- 
lections of, iii. 82; Fenton, insulted, 
i. 118, «. 4; genteel ladies, his, ii. 
390; Hob or The Country Wake, ii. 
532, n. i; ignorance, iii. 82, n. 2; iv. 
280; impudence, i. 178, n. 2; ii. 389, 
n. 4; Johnson's epigram on him, i. 
172-3; V. 397, 399, 461 ; — , shows 
one of his Odes to, ii. 106; — mode 
of arguing: see Johnson, arguing; 
manager of Drury Lane, v. 277, ;/. 
6; Alusa Cihberi, iv. 3, n. 2; A'on- 
juror. The, ii. 367; poet-laureate, i. 
464, n. i; Proi'oked Husband, ii. 55; 
iv. 328, ;/. i; Richard III, version of, 
iii. 84, n. I ; Richardson's respect for 
him, ii. 106; iii. 209; vanity, iii. 299; 
Walpole praises his character, i. 464, 
«. i; his Apology, iii. 83, n. 2; and 
his acting, iv. 281, w. i; Whig, vio- 
lent, iii. 35, n. 



Gibber, Theophilus, edits the Lives of 
the Poets, i. 216 ; iii. 34-6, 132 ; 
death, iii. 35, n. 

Gibber, Mrs. (wife of Theophilus), 
account of her, v. 144, n. 3; acted in 
Irene, i. 229; mentioned, ii. 106. 

GlCERO, Burke not like him, v. 243 ; 
Ghesterfield likened to him, iii. 399; 
image of Virtue, ii. 17, ;/. 2, 507; 
quotations from Cato Major, iii. 497, 
n. 3; iv. 431, ;;. 3; Ep. ad Att., iv. 
437, n. 2; Ep. ad Earn., iv. 489, n. i; 
Tiiscul. QucTst., ii. 123, n. i. 

GiRCULATING LIBRARIES, i. IlS, n. 4; 
ii. 41, n. 2. 

GiTY, a, its solitude, iii. 431, n. 2. 

GiTY OF Lichfield, a county, i. 42, «. 3. 

GiTY OF London. See London. 

GiTY-PoET, iii. 86. 

GiviL Law, i. 155. 

GiviLisED Life. See Savages, and 
Society. 

Civility, ii. 178; iii. 89. 

Civilization, ii. 178. 

Glanranald, ii. 353; Allan of Glan- 
ranald, v. 330. 

Glapp, Mrs., ii. 71, 132-3. 

Glare, Lord, friendship with Gold- 
smith, ii. 157; iii. 353. 

Glarendon, first Earl of, History of 
the Rebellion, its authenticity, i. 341, 
;/. 4 ; characters trustworthy, ii. 91 ; 
character of Falkland, iv. 494, n. 2; 
compared with Hume and Robert- 
son, V. 64, n. 3 ; recommended by 
Johnson, iv. 359; style and matter, 
iii. 292 ; Villiers's ghost, iii. 400 ; 
University of Oxford and his heirs, 
ii. 485- 

Glarendon Press, Johnson's letter on 
its management, ii. 486, 504. 

Glaret, for boys, iii. 433; iv. 91; gives 
the dropsy before drunkenness, v. 
283. 



52 



Index to 



Clarissa. 

Clarissa. See Richardson, S. 

Clark, Alderman Richard, member of 
the Essex Head Club, iv. 298, 505; 
Johnson, letter from, iv. 28S. 

Cl.ARKE, Rev. Dr. Samuel, Christian 
evidences, i. 460; free-will, ii. 120; 
Homer, edition of, ii. 149; Johnson's 
Dictionary, not tjuoted in, i. 2l8, n. 
4; iv. 480, n. 2; Leibnitz, controversy 
with, v. 327 ; learning, iv. 24 ; — 
studied hard, i. 82; literary charac- 
ter, i. 3, ;/. 2; orthmiox, not, iii. 281; 
v. 327 ; Queen Caroline wished to 
make him a bishoji, iii. 281, /;. 2; 
Sermons, ii. 302, 547 ; iii. 2S1 ; — 
recommended by Johnson on his 
death-bed, iv. 480; unbendini; him- 
self, fond of, i. 3. 

Clarke, Sir T., i. 53, //. 1. 

Clauuian, ii. 360. 

Clavius, ii. 508. 

Claxton, Mr., ii. 284. 

Clement, William, Fellow of Trinity 
College, Dublin, i. 566. 

Clenardus, iv. 23. 

Cleone. See DonsLEY. 

Cleonice, ii. 330, n. 4. 

Clergyman, a, at Bath, iv. 172; John- 
son's letter to him. iv. T73; extraor- 
dinary character, an, iv. 342, n. 2 ; 
hopeless ignorance of one, iv. 39, n. 
3; one rebuked by Johnson, iv. 22; 
a young clergyman, Johnson's letter 
to, iii. 495. 

Clergymen, can be but half a beau, 
iv. 88; OwrZ-party, of the, v. 291, n. 
2; decorum required in them, iv. 88; 
duties, i. 371 ; elocution, taught, iv. 
238; English compared with Scotch, 
v. 286-8, 435; Harrogate, at, v. 287, 
n. 3; holy artifices, iii. 497; learning, 
iv. 16; library fit for one, v. 137; 
life, their, i. 371, 551; iii. 345; men 
of the world, aping, iv. 88; popular 



Clubs. 

election, ii. 171; preaching: see 
rREACUiNt; ; sinners in general, ii. 
197-8. 

Clerk, Sir I'hilip Jennings, account of 
him, iv. 93; argument with Johnson, 
iv. 94. 

Clermont, Lady, iii. 483. 

Clients. See Law. 

Climate, happiness not afTected by it, 
ii. 224. 

Ci.inahs, i. 582, 593. 

Clinton, Sir Henry, iv. 102, n. i. 

Clitheroe, iv. 187. 

Cl.lVE, Lord, astonished at his own 
moderation, iii. 455, w. 3 ; character 
by Dr. Robertson, iii. 380, 398; his 
chest full of gold, iii. 455; destroyed 
himself, iii. 380, 398. 

Clive, Mrs., Johnson describes her 
acting, iv. 280; v. 144; and Walpole, 
II., iv. 281, ;/. I ; robbed by high- 
waymen, iii. 271, ;/. i; 'understands 
what you say,' iv. 8. 

Clothes. See Dress. 

Clough, Arthur, v. 170, «. 1. 

Clough, Sir Richard, v. 497. 

Clow, Professor, v. 420, n. 2. 

Cluhable, iv. 293, n. 2. 

Cli:bs: Almack's, iii. 2)'^«. i; Arthur's, 
V. 95, V. I ; Boar's Head, v. 281 ; 
British Coffee-house, ii. 225; iv. 206, 
«. 2; Brookes's, ii. 334, n. 3; iv. 322, 
w. 2, 413, ;/. I ; City Club at the 
Queen's Arms, iv. loi ; Cocoa - tree 
Club, v. 440, n. i; Essex Head, ac- 
count of its foundation and mem- 
bers, iv. 292-5, 503-5 ; — Boswell 
and Johnson at a meeting, iv. 317; 
— Johnson attacked with illness 
there, iv. 299; — mentioned, iv. 408, 
415-16; Eumelian, iv. 455; Gaming 
Club, iii. 26; Ivy Lane, account of 
it, i. 220, 221, n. 2, 553, «. 2; — Len- 
nox, Mrs., supper in honour of, i. 



Bo swell's Life of fohnson. 



53 



Clubs. 



Coach. 



I20, n. 2, 296, n. i; — old members 
meet in 1783, iv. 292, 502-3; John- 
son's definition of a club, iv. 294, n. 
3; Literary Club, account of it, i. 
552-6; V. 123; — attendance expect- 
ed, ii. 313; attendances in 1766, ii. 
19, 22 ; — Althorpe, Lord, iii. 482 ; 

— Banks, Sir Joseph, iii. 415 ; — 
Beauclerk, described by, ii. 22i, n. 2; 
loss by his death, iii. 482; — black- 
ball, exclusion by a single, iii. 132; 

— books, some of the members talk 
from, V. 431, «. 2; — Boswell's elec- 
tion: see BoswELL, Literary Club; 

— Boswell's account of meetings at 
which he was present, — his introduc- 
tion, ii. 275 ; Johnson's apology to 
Goldsmith, ii. 293; talk of second- 
sight and Swift, ii. 363-4; Mrs. Ab- 
ington's benefit, ii. 378 ; Travels, 
Ossian, the Black Bear, and patriot- 
ism, ii. 396-9; speakers distinguished 
by initials, iii. 261 ; Johnson's last 
dinner, iv. 376; — Boswell's reports 
of meetings generally brief, ii. 277, 
71. 3, 395, ;/. 5; — Burke's company 
lost to it, ii. iS; — Bunbury elected, 
ii. 314 ; — Camden Lord, black- 
balled, iii. 353, H. 2; — day and hour 
of meeting, i. 553-4, ii. 22, «. i, 377, 
n. 3; iii. 146, 415, 419; — described 
in 1774 by Beauclerk, ii. 314, «. 2; 

— Dodd sought admittance, iii. 318; 

— Dunning, John, elected, iii. 146 ; 
first meeting of the winter, iii. 239; 

— Fordyce elected, ii. 314; — foun- 
dation, and list of members, i. 552-5, 
556, n. 3; — Fox elected, ii. 314; 
talked little, iii. 303 ; — Garrick 
elected, i. 556; his vanity, iii. 354, «. 
i; — Gibbon elected, i. 556, n. 3; 
describes it, ii. 398, n. 2; poisons it 
to Boswell, ii. 507, w. i ; — Gold- 
smith recites some absurd verses, ii. 



276 ; iv. 15 ; he wishes for more 
members, iv. 211; his epitaph to be 
shown to the Club, iii. 93; — hanged 
or kicked, members deserving to be, 
iii. 319; — hogshead of claret nearly 
out, iii. 269-70; — imaginary college 
at St. Andrews, v. 122-3; — increase 
of members proposed, iii. 121 ; — 
Johnson's attendance in his latter 
years, iii. 121, n. 2; attends after his 
attack of palsy, iv. 269; his last din- 
ner, iv. 376, (for attendances with 
Boswell, see just above, under Bos- 
well); dislikes several members, iii. 
121; his friends of the Club, iv. 99; 
his funeral, iv. 484; subscriptions for 
his monument, iv. 488, ns. i and 3; 
incompliance with a Call, iv. 97, 98; 
mentions the Club in a letter, ii. 157; 
reads his epitaph on Lady Elibank, 
iv. 12; talks of Mrs. Lennox's play, 
iv. 11; — Jones, Sir W., described 
by, v. 124, M. 2; — motto, its, i. 553, 
«. 3 ; — name, i. 552 ; v. 124, n. 2; 

— number of members, i. 553, n. 2, 
554; iii. 121; — Palmerston, second 
Lord, black-balled, iv. 268; elected, 
ib. n. 2; — Porteus, Bishop of Ches- 
ter, black-balled, iii. 353, «. 2 ; — 
select merit, loses its, ii. 492, n. i; — 
Sheridan, R. B., elected, iii. 131-2 ; 

— Shipley, Bishop of St. Asaph, 
elected, iv. 87, «. 2; — Smith, Adam, 
elected, ii. 492, «. i ; — Steevens 
elected, ii. 313-14; — Vesey elected, 
iv. 33 ; — Vesey's (Mrs.) evening 
parties on Club nights, iii. 482, n. i; 
iv. 126, n. i; Nonsense Club, i. 457, 
n. 2; Old Street Club, iii. 503-4; iv. 
216; Poker Club, ii. 431, «. 1,493, M. 
2; Tall Club, i. 357, n. 4; White's, ii. 
377, «. 2 ; World, The, iv. 119, n. I. 

Coach, post-coach, iii. 147 ; iv. 337 ; 
heavy coach, iv. 328. 



54 



Index to 



Coal-heavers. 



Colman. 



CoAL-HKAVKKs, riots of, iii. 54, //. 2. 

CoAi.inoN Ministry (Duke of I'ort- 
laiul's) formed, iv. 200, //. 5 ; dis- 
missed, i. 360, /;. I ; iv. 190, n. 3, 
287, //. 2 ; mentioned, iv. 195, n. 3, 
257, //. 4, 298, n. I. 

C(JHU, Mrs., ii. 445, 534; iii. 4^)8; iv. 
164-5. 

CoUHAM, 1-ord, i. 567, ;/. 4; iii. 395 ; 
iv. 59, //. 3, 1 1<>, //. 1. 

COBI.KNTZ, ii. 489, w. 4. 

Cochran, Oeneral, i. ^vf), n. \. 

CocKBUKN, Haron, iii. 3S1, ;/. i. 

CocKBURN, Dr., iii. 172, //. 4. 

CocKBfRN, Lord, civil juries in Scot- 
land, ii. 230, ;/. 2; Dundas, Henry, 
Viscount Melville, ii. 184, //. I ; Edin- 
burgli IIit;l> School, ii. 166, ;/. i ; Ed- 
inhur^jh in the iSth century, v. 22, //. 
I ; JeflVey's English accent, ii. 183, 
M. 3; Scotch county electors, iv. 286, 
M. 2; Scotch entails, ii. 474, ;/. i; St. 
Giles, Edinburgh, v. 45, //. 3; titles 
of Scotch judges, v. 87, w. 3. 

CocKKNZiK, ii. 345. n. 3. 

Cocker s Arithtmrtic, v. 157, ;/. 3. 

CocK-i.ANK Ghosts. See Ghosts. 

CoDRiNOTON, Colonel, iii. 232, «. i. 

COKFEE-HOUSK CRITICS, i. 334. 

Coffey. — , v. 291, w. 3. 

COFFLECT, iv. 90, n. I. 

CoHAUSEN, Dr., ii. 489, «. 4. 

Coin, exportation of, iv. 121. 

CoKE, Lord, a mere lawyer, ii. iSi; his 
definition of law, iii. 18, n. 2 ; his 
painful course of study, iv. 358. 

Coke, Lady Mary, i. 470, «. 4. 

Col, the old Laird of, iii. 151; v. 329, 
n. 2. 

Col, Alexander Maclean, of, the sec- 
ond son, ii. 352, 465, 472. 

Col, Donald Maclean, the young Laird 
of, account of him, v. 285 ; the first 
road-maker, v. 268, //. i : ^>lans an 



excursion for Johnson, v. 290; ac- 
ci>ni|>anies him, v. 292-377; his l)owl 
of i)uncli, V. 294 ; manages the ship 
in the storm, v. 319-20; puts a ro])C 
in Hoswell's hands, v. 321 ; jnveiiis 
qui j^audet canibus, v. 323 ; intro- 
duces turnips, v. 334; his family pa- 
pers, V. 339-40 ; takes Johnson to 
his aunt's house, v. 356 ; anecdotes 
of Sir A. Macdonald, v. 358 ; his 
house in Mull, v. 360; deserves a 
statue, V. 372; his father's deputy, v. 
375; 'a nohle animal,' v. 376; death, 
ii. 32S-9, 466; V. 377; mentioned, v. 
108, 304, 388. 

Colchester, i. 540; iv. 18, «. 2. 

Colds, catching, ii. 58, 172; v. 317. 

Cole, Henry, iv. 463, «. 3. 

Coi.eiiroke, Sir G., ii. 255, >i. 3. 

CoLls.Ef.M, ii. 122. 

CoLLECn ions, the desire of augment- 
ing, iv. 123. 

College ok 1'hysicians, ii. 339. 

College Ti-tor, an old, advice to his 
pupils, ii. 272. 

Colleges. See O.kforu. 

Collier, Jeremy, censures actors, i. 
193, ;/. 2; ' fought without a rival," 
iv. 331, tt. I. 

Collins, Anthony, iii. 413, «. 2. 

Collins, William, aflfected the obso- 
lete, iii. 180, n. 3 ; Johnson's affec- 
tion for him, i. 320, 443, w. 2 ; I.i/e 
by Johnson, i. 443 ; madness, his, i. 
75. "• 3. 320-1, 443; Poems, Glas- 
gow edition, ii. 435. 

Colloquial Barbaris.ms, iii. 223. 

' Collyer, Joel,' i. 365. 

Colman, George, the elder, Boswell's 
belief in second sight, mocks, ii. 364; 
Connoisseur, starts the, i. 487, n. 2 ; 
ii. 383, n. I ; Foote's patent, buys, 
iii. no; Good A'atured Man, brings 
out the, iii. 364-5 ; Jealous l^i/e. The, 



Boswclfs Life of Johnson. 



55 



Colman. 



Compton. 



i. 422, «. I ; Johnson, imitation of, 
iv. 447 ; Literary Club, member of 
the, i. 553, «. 2, 554; Odes to Ob- 
scurity, ii. 382; professor in the im- 
aginary college, V. 123 ; Prose on 
Several Occasions, iv. 447; Round- 
Robin, signed the, iii. 95; Shake- 
speare's Latin, iv. 22; She Stoops to 
Conquer, brings out, ii. ^.'^5, «. 2 ; 
' Sir, if you don't lie you're a rascal,' 
jv. 12; Student, contributes to the, 
i. 243; Terence, translation of, iv. 
21 ; Westminster School, at, i. 457, 
n. 2. 

Colman, George, the son, Aberdeen, 
a student at, v. 96, «. 2; made a free- 
man of the city, v. 102, n. i; Dun- 
bar, Dr., describes, iii. 495, n. i; 
Gibbon's dress, describes, ii. 507, ;/. 
i; Johnson and Gibbon, descril)cs, 
iii. 63, n. I. 

Cologne, Elector of, iii. 507. 

Colonies, a loss to the community, i. 

151. «• I- 

CoLQUHouN, Sir James, v 413, 415. 

Colquhoun, Lady Helen, v. 415. 

CoLSON, Rev. Mr., Garrick and John- 
son recommended to him, i. 118; 
Gelidus, i. 118, n. 2. 

Columbiade, The, iv. 382. 

Columbus, i. 527, n. 2; iv. 289. 

CoLviLL, Lady, v. 441, 449-50. 

Comb-maker, a punctuating, iii. 37, 
n. 5. 

Combabus, iii. 270, n. 2. 

COMBERMERE, V. 493. 

Combermere, Lord, v. 493, n. 2. 

Comedy, distinguished from farce, ii. 
109; its great end, ii. 268. 

Commandment, ninth, emphasis m it, 
i. 195; in the sixth, i. 377, n. i. 

Commentaries on the Bihi.p:, iii. 67. 

Commerce, circulation of, iii. 201; ef- 
fect of taxes on it. ii 409; eflfect on 
VI.-9 



relationship, ii. 204; not necessary to 
England, ii. 409. 

Commissaries, ii. 389, n. i; iii. 210. 

Common Council. See London. 

Common People, inaccuracy in 
thoughts and words, iii. 154; their 
language proverbial, ib. 

Common Prayer Book, iv. 339 

Commons, Doctors', i. 534, n. 3. 

Commons, House of. See Debates 
OF Parliament and House of 
Commons. 

Communion of Saints, iv. 334. 

Community of Goods, ii. 287-8. 

Commutation of Sins and Virtues, 
iv. 459. 

Companion, the most welcome one, ii. 
411, «. 2; a lasting one, iv. 271, n. 2. 

Company, good things must be pro- 
vided, iii. 211; iv. 104; love of mean 
company, i. 520 ; of a new person, 
iv. 39. See Johnson, Company 

Compiegne, ii, 459. 

Complaints, iii. 418-19. 

Complete Angler, i. 160, ;/. 4. 

Coviplcte Vindication of the Licensers 
of the Stage, i. 163. 

Compliments, offending the company 
by them, iv. 388 ; right to repeat 
them, iii. 273 ; without violating 
truth, iii. 183; unusual, v. 502, n. 2. 

Composition, causes of hasty, i. 223, 
n. 3; errors caused by partial changes, 
iv. 13; fine passages to be struck out. 
ii. 272; happy moments for it, v. 44; 
Johnson's advice, iii. 496; v. 75-6; 
man writing from his own mind, ii. 
394; pleasure, not a, iv. 253, n. i; 
practised early, to be, iv. 14; setting 
oneself doggedly to it, v. 44, 125, 
See Johnson, Composition. 

Compositor, iv. 371, n. 3. 

Compton, Bishop of London, iii. 505, 
508. 



56 



Ijidex to 



Comus. 



Conversation. 



Comus, Johnson's prologue to, i. 263. 

CoNCANEN, Mutthew, V. 105, ft. I. 

Conceit of Parts, iii. 359. 

Cottfeits, i. 207. 

Concoction, of a play, iii. 294. 

CoNDAMlNE, I^, Account of the Sav- 
age Girl, V. 125 ; of a Brazilian 
tribe, v. 276. 

CoNDf^, Prince of. ii. 451, 458 

CONDESCKNSION, iv. 4. 

Conduct, gradations in it, iv. 87; 
wrong l)ut with good meaning, iv. 
416. 

Conduct of the Ministry {1756), i. 358. 

Confession, ii. 121; iii. 6g. 

Conf. Fab. Hurdonum, ii. 302. 

Confinement, iii. 305. 

Confucius, i. 181, «. 3; iii. 339. 

Cong/ d' tf lire, iv. 373. 

Congi.eton, v. 493, 

Conglobiilate, ii. 63. 

CoNCRESS. See America. 

Congrkve, Rev. Charles, chaplain to 
Archbishop Boulter, i. 52; pious but 
muddy, ii. 527, 543. 

Congrevk, William, Beggars Opera, 
opinion of the, ii. 423, «. 2, Col- 
lier, Jeremy, attacked by, iv. 331, n. 
i; Islam, at, iii. 213; Johnson's 
criticism on his plays, iv. 42, n. 3, 
Life, iv. 65; Mourning Bride, its 
foolish conclusion, i. 450, n. 2; com- 
pared with Shakespeare, ii. 97-100, 
no; Old Bachelor, iii. 213; Pope's 
Iliad dedicated to him, iv. 59, n. 3; 
Way of the World, i. 571, «. i; ii. 
261 ; writings, his, make no man 
better, i. 5(l8, «. 4. 

CoNlNGTON, Professor, Goldsmith's 
epitaph and Johnson's Latin, iii. 94, 
n. 3. 

Conjectures, how far useful, ii. 298. 

Conjugal Infidelity, ii. 63; iii. 395, 
46V. 



Connoisseur^ Tfu, i. 487; ii. 383, n. i. 
Connor, — , (Conn), a priest, v 259, 

n. I. 
Conscience, defined by Johnson, ii. 

279; liberty of it, ii. 286. 
Conscious Lovers, i. 569, n. 1. 
Considerations on tfu case of Dr. 

Trapp's Sermons. See Dr. Trapp. 
Considerations on Corn. See undef 

Corn. 
Considerations on the Dispute between 

Crousas and Warburton, i. 181. 
Considerations upon the Embargo, i. 

5S3. 
Consolation, ii. 15. 
Consort defined, i. 172, n. i. 
Const, Mr., iii. 18. n. 2. 
Constantinotle, iv. 33. 
Constituent, iv. 36, n. 2. 
Constitution, Johnson asked to write 

on it, ii. 504. 
Constitutional Society, iii. 357, 

«. 6, 
Construction of Fireworks, v. 280, 

M. I. 

Constructive Treason, iv. loi. 

Contemplation, v. 134, n. i. 

Content, nobody is content, iii. 273. 

Conti, Prince of, ii. 464, n. 2. 

Continuation of Dr. Johnson s Criti- 
cism on the Poems of Gray, iv. 452, 
n. I. 

Continuity, iii. 476, n. i. 

Contradiction, iii. 439; iv. 323. 

Controversies, ii. 505-6; iii. 12. 

Convents. See Monasteries. 

Conversable, v. 498, n. I. 

Conversation, coming close to a man 
in it, iv. 206, contest, not animated 
without a, ii. 508 ; is a contest, ii. 
516; eminent men often have little 
power in it, iv. 23; envy excited by 
superiority, iv. 225; game, like a, ii. 
265 ; Johnson's description of the 



Bo swell's Life of yohnson. 



57 



Conversation. 



Corneille. 



happiest kind, ii. 411; iv. 59; knowl- 
edge got by reading compared with 
that got by it, ii. 413; old and young, 
of the, ii. 508, n. i; praise instantly 
reverberated, v. 67; requisites for it, 
iv. 191 ; rich trader without it, iv. 
g6 ; solid, unsuitable for dinner- 
parties, iii. 66 ; talk, distinguished 
from, iv. 215. See Johnson, Con- 
versation. 

Conversation bctiveen His Most Sacred 
Majesty, etc., ii. 38, «. 2. 

Conversions, ii. 121; iii. 258. 

Convict, a, unjustly condemned to 
death, ii. 326, n. i. 

Convicts, punished by being set to 
work, iii. 305; religious discipline for 
them, iv. 380 ; sent to America, ii. 

357. «• I- 

Convocation, i. 537; iv. 320. 

Conway, General, ii. 13, n. 3. 

Conway, Mr. Moncure, i. 99, ;/. 1. 

Cook, Captain, Boswell meets him, iii. 
8 ; Havvkesworth's edition of his 
Voyages, ii. 284, u. 3; iii. S; iv. 356. 

Cook, Professor, of St. Andrews, v, 72. 

Cooke, Thomas (//t'j/W Cooke), v. 41. 

Cooke, Thomas, the engraver, iv. 485, 

«. 3- 

Cooke, William {Conversation Cooke), 
ii. 115, ;/. i; iv. 293, 504. 

Cookery, Mrs. Glasse's Cookery, iii. 
324. See Johnson, Cookery. 

CooKSEY, John, ii. 364, n. 2. 

CooLEY, William, i. 583. 

Cooper, John Gilbert, last of the Be- 
nevolists, iii. 169, n. i ; story of his 
sick son, ih.; Johnson the Caliban 
of literature, calls, ii. 148; anecdote 
of — and Garrick, iv. 4 ; ' Punchi- 
nello,' ii. 148. 

Cooper, M.. a bookseller, v. 134, n. i. 

CoOTE, Sir Eyre, account of him. v. 
141, n. 3; travels in Arabia, v. 143. 



CooTE, Lady, v. 142-3. 

Copenhagen, v. 52, «. i. 

Copley, John, iv. 463, n. 3. 

Copper Works, at Holywell, iii. 517; 
V. 503. 

Copy, manuscript for printing, iii. 49, 
n. 2. 

Copy-money, in Italy, iii. 184. 

Copy-right, Act of Queen Anne, i. 
506, n. 2; iii. 126, 334; debate on the 
copy-right bill, i. 352, n. i; Donald- 
son's invasion of supposed right, i. 
506; judgment of the House of 
Lords, ih.; ii. 312, n. 2; iii. 421; 
opinion of the Scotch judges, v. 56, 
81 ; Thurlow's speech, ii. 395, n. 2 ; 
honorary copy-right, iii. 421; John- 
son's plea for one, i. 506, n, i; should 
not be a perpetuity, i. 508; ii. 297; 
London Booksellers, claim of the, 
iii. 125 ; metaphysical right in au- 
thors, ii. 297. 

Corbet, Andrew, i. 53, n. i, 67, n. i. 

Cordelia, i. 81, «. 3. 

Corelli, ii. 392. 

CoRiAT (Coryat), Tom, ii. 202; Crudi- 
ties, ib., n. I. 

Coriat Junior, ii. 201. 

Corke AND Orrery, fifth Earl of. 
See Orrery. 

Corke and Orrery, sixth Earl of, i. 
299, n. I. 

Corn, bounty on corn (Irish), ii. 150, 
n. i; (English), i. 601; iii. 263; corn- 
riots in 1766, i. 601 ; iv. 366, «. i ; 
exportation, prohibited by proclama- 
tion, iv. 366, n. I ; last year of it, iii. 
263, n. I ; Johnson's Considerations 
on Corn, i. 601; iii. 263, n. i; plenti- 
ful in the spring of 1778, iii. 256; 
previous bad harvests, ib., ti. 3; price 
artificially raised, iii. 263, n. i. 

Cornbury, Lord, ii. 486. 

Corneille, character of Richelieu, ii 



58 



Index to 



Corneille. 



Court-Mourning. 



155, n, I ; compared with Shake- 
speare, iv. 19; goes round the world, 

V. 354- 

Cornelius Nepos, iv. 208. 

CoRNEWALL, Speaker, iii. 94, «. 2. 

Cornish Fishermf.n, iv. 91. 

CoRNWALLis, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, iii. 142. 

CORNWALLIS, Lord, his capitulation, 
iii. 404, n. 3; iv. 162, n. i. 

Corps, a pun on it, ii. 277. 

CORTULENCY, iv. 246. 

Correction of Proof-Sheets, iv. 
371, n. 2. 

Corsica. Antipodes, like the, ii. 4, n. 
2 ; Boswell's subscription for ord- 
nance, ii. 67, «. i; 'dangers of the 
night,' i. 138, n. i; France, ceded to, 
ii. 67, M. 2; Genoa, revolts from, ii. 
67, ti. 2, 81, w. I, 92; hangman, i. 
472, n. I ; Johnson declaims against 
the people, ii. 92; lingua rustica, ii. 
94; Seneca's epigrams on it, v. 337; 
mentioned, iii. 22S. 

Corsica, Boswell's Account of, John- 
son's advice about it, ii. 12, 25; — 
praise of the Journal, ii. 80 ; publica- 
tion and success, ii. 52; criticisms on 
it, id., n. I ; Preface quoted, ii. 79. 
n. 2; translations, ii. 52, n. i, 64, n. i. 

Corte, ii. 3, «. 2; v. 269. 

Corteggiano, II, v. 314. 

' Corycius Senex,' iv. 199. 

CoTT.\GE, happiness in a, see RUSTIC 

HaI'I'INESS. 

CoTTERELL, Admiral, i. 284. 
Cotterei.l, Mrs., i. 521, w. i. 
CoTTERELLS, the Miss, i. 284-5, 428, 

442. 
Cotton, Sir Lynch Salusbury, v. 

494-6. 
Cotton, Lady Salusbury, v. 504, n. 3. 
Cotton, Robert, ii. 323, «. 2; v. 494, 

n. 4, 496, n. 2. 



COULSON, Kcv. Mr., ii. 437, n. i; v. 
524, n. I. 

CouNcii, OK Trent, ii. 121. 

Council of Trent, History of the, i. 
124, 156. 

Countess, anecdote of a, iv. 317. 

Countinc, awkward at counting mon- 
ey, iv. 32 ; efTects of it, iv. 5, n. 2, 
235 ; modern practice, iii. 405, n. 3 ; 
nation that cannot count, v. 276. 

Country Gentlemen, artificially raise 
the price of corn, iii. 263, n. i; dis- 
concerted at laying out ten pounds, 
iv. 5; duty to reside on their estates, 
iii. 201, 282; hospitality, iv. 235; liv- 
ing beyontl their income, v. 127; liv- 
ing in London, iv. 189; parliament, 
reason for entering, iii. 265; prison- 
ers in a jail, v. 122; stewards, should 
be their own. v. 63; superiority over 
their people, iv. 189; tedious hours, 
ii. 223; wives should visit London, 
iii. 203. 

Country Like, meals wished for from 
vacuity of mind, v. 181; mental im- 
prisonment, iv. 390 ; neighbours, v. 
401-2; pleasure soon exhausted, iii. 
344 ; popularity seeking, iii. 401 ; 
science, good place for siudying a, 
iii. 287; time at one's command, iii. 
401. 

Courage, not a Christian virtue, iii. 
328 ; reckoned the greatest of vir- 
tues, ii. 388 ; iii. 302 ; mechanical, 
ib.; respected even when associated 
with vice, iv. 343. 
Courayer, Dr., 124, 156, n. 4; iv. 

147, n. 2. 
Court, attendants on it, i. 386 ; man- 
ners best learnt at small courts, v. 

314- 
Court, ' A shilling's worth of court for 

six-pence worth of good,' ii. 11. 
Court-Mourning, iv. 375. 



Bosivclfs Life of yohnsoyt. 



59 



Court of Session. 



Cowper. 



Court of Session. See Scotland. 

Court of Session Garland. See Bos- 
WELL. 

CouRTENAY, John, Boswell to make a 
cancel in the Life, persuades, i. 602; 
receives his vow of comparative so- 
briety, ii. 499, n. i; Jenyns, Soame, 
i. 365; member of the Literary Club, 
i. 555; Moral and Literary Character 
of Dr. Johnson^ descriptions of Bos- 
well, i. 258; ii. 307; Johnson's Eng- 
lish poetry, i. 209, «. 4 ; — in the 
Hebrides, ii. 307 ; — humanity, iv. 
371, n. 4; — Latin poetry, i. 72; — 
rapid composition, iv. 439, n. i; — 
Rasselas, i. 399; — style and ' school,' 
i. 258; Reynolds's dinner-parties, iii. 
427, n. i; Strahan, Rev. Mr., iv. 434, 
«. 2; Swift's Tale of a Tub, ii. 364, 
n. 2 ; mentioned, iii. 347, 352 ; iv. 

364- 

Courting the Great, Johnson op- 
posed to it, i. 152; his advice about 
it, ii. II. 

Courtney, Mr. Leonard II., M.P., i. 
435. n. 2. 

CouRTOWN, Lord, ii. 431. 

Courts of Justice, afraid of Wilkes, 
iii. 54, n. 2. 

Courts-Martial, Dicey, Professor, 
on them, iii. 54, n. 2 ; Johnson pres- 
ent at one, iii. 410; one of great im- 
portance, iv. 15. 

Covent Garden. Sec London. 

Covent Garden Journal, ii. 137, 11. 2. 

Coventry, i. 414; iv. 463, n. 3. 

Coventry, Lady, v. 402, w. i, 409, w. i. 

CovERLEY, Sir Roger de. See Addi- 
son. 

Covin, ii. 228. 

Covington, Lord, iii. 243. 

Cow, shedding its horns, iii. 96, n. 2. 

Cowardice, mutual, iii. 371. 

COWDRY, iv. 185. 



Cowley, Abraham, ' Cowley, Mr. 
Abraham,' iv. 375, n. 3 ; Dryden's 
youth, the darling of, iv. 44, n. 2 ; 
fashion, out of, iv. 118, n. 3; Kurd's 
Selections, iii. 33, 257; Lmitation of 
LLorace, i. 329, «. 2 ; Johnson medi- 
tated an edition of his works, iii. 33; 

— ridicules the fiction of love, i. 207; 

— writes his Life, iv. 44; life, on. 
iv. 178; love poems, ii. 90, n. 2; Ode 
to Liberty, iv. 178, n. 2; Ode to Mr. 
ILobs, ii. 276, n. 3 ; Ode upon the 
Restoration, v. 379, tt. 3; Pope, com- 
pared with, V. 393; vows, on, iii. 406, 
n. I ; Wit and Loyalty, v. 64, «. 2 ; 
mentioned, i. 293, n. i. 

Cowley, Father, ii. 458, «. i. 

Cowper, Earl, iii. 18, n. 2. 

Cowper, J. G. See Cooper. 

Cowper, William, annihilation, longs 
for, iii. 336, «. i; avenues, v. 500, n. 
4; Beckford and Rigby, anecdote of, 
iii. 87, «. 2; Biographia Britannica, 
lines on the, iii. 198, n. 2; Browne, 
I. H., anecdote of, v. 177, n. 2 ; 
Churchill's poetry, admires, i. 486, 
n. i; Collins' s Life, reads, i. 443, n. 
I ; Connoisseur, contributes to the, 
i. 487, n. 2; dreads a vacant hour, i. 
167, w. i; ' dunces sent to roam,' iii. 
521 ; Heberden, praises, iv. 263, «. 
I ; IIo7ner, translates, iii. 379, n. i , 
John Gilpin, iv. 160, n. i; Johnson's 
' conversion,' iv. 313, w. 2 ; — criti- 
cism of Milton, iv. 50, «. 3; — writes 
an epitaph on, ii. 259, n. i; iv. 489, 
«. 2 ; — recommends his first vol- 
ume, iii. 379, «. i; Mediterranean as 
a subject for a poem, iii. 42, n. i; 
Milton, undertakes an edition of, i. 
370, «. i; Omai, the ' gentle savage,' 
iii. 9, «. I ; overwhelmed by the re- 
sponsibility of an office, iv. 114, n. 1; 
Pope's Homer, criticises, iii. 291, ^•. 



6o 



Index to 



Cowper. 

3 ; ' Scripture is still a trumpet to his 
fears,' iv. 346, n. i; silence, habit of, 
iii. 349, H. I ; 'the solemn fop,' i. 
308, «. 2; ' The sweet vicissitudes of 
day and night,' v. 134, w. i; Thur- 
low's character, draws, iv. 403, n. i ; 
experiences his neglect, ib.; Unwins, 
introduced to the, i. 604 ; Westmin- 
ster School, at, i. 457, w. 2; Whole 
Duty of Man, despises the, ii. 275, 
n. I. 

Cox, Mr., a solicitor, iv. 374. 

Coxcomb, ii. 14S; iii. 277, «. 3; v. 430, 
ib., n. 4. 

CoxETF.R, Thomas, iii. 34, «. 3, 179. 

CuXKTKK, — , the younger, iii. 179, 
w. I. 

CoxHEATii Camp, iii. 415, 426. 

Crabhk, Rev. (leorge, Johnson revises 
Tftd niltj^e, iv. 141, ;/. i, 202. 

Cradock, Joseph, account of him, iii. 
44; Clarrick at the Literary Club, iii. 
354, tt. I ; Coldsmith and Cray, i. 
467, «. 2 ; Hervu-s and Tristram 
Shandy, ii. 258, «. 4 ; Johnson at a 
tavern dinner, i. 544, ;/. i ; — com- 
pliment to Goldsmith, iii. 94, ;/. 3; — 
parody of Percy, ii. 157, n. i ; — 
words shouKl be written in a book, 
iii. 46; Percy's character, iii. 314, n. 
2; Shakespeare Jubilee, ii. 78,;/. i; 
Warburton's reading, ii. 41, n. 2. 

Craggs, James, Pope's epitaph on 
him, iv. 513; mentioned with his 
son, i. 185. 

Craki, — , the architect, James Thom- 
son's nephew, iii. 409; v. 76. 

Cranmer, Archbishop, ii. 417, «. i. 

Cranmer, George, ii. 417, n. i. 

Cranston, David, v. 463. 

Crashavv, Richard, iii. 346, n. i. 

Craven, Lord, i. 390, n. 3. 

Craven, Lady, iii. 25. 

Creation, Blackmore's, ii. 124. 



Croker. 

Creator, compared with the creature. 

iv. 36. 

Credulity, general, v. 443, 

Creeds, v. 137. 

Crescimbem, i. 323. 

Cricmto.n, Robert, Lord Sanquhar, v. 
117, n. 2. 

Crisi', Samuel, iv. 276, n. 3. 

Critical Revie^v, account of it, — 
owned by Hamilton, ii. 260, n. i ; 
edited by Smollett, iii. 37, n. 2 ; 
Critical Strictures reviewed, i. 473, 
M. 4; Griffiths and the Monthly, at- 
tack on, iii. 37, n. 2 ; Johnson re- 
views Graham's Telemachus, i. 475 ; 
and The Sugar Cane, i. 557, «. i; — 
description of a valley praised, v. 
161, M. i; Lyttelton's gratitude for a 
review, iv. 67 ; Murphy attacked, i. 
411; payment to writers, iv. 247, «. 
2 ; principles good, ii. 45 ; iii. 37 ; 
Rutty's Diary reviewed, iii. 194; re- 
viewers write from their own mind, 
iii. 37. 

Criticism, examples of true, ii. 103 ; 
justified, i. 473; negative, v. 252. 

Critics, authors very rarely hurt by 
them, iii. 481. Sit Attacks. 

Croaker. See Goldsmith. 

Croft, Rev. Herbert, advice to a pu- 
pil, iv. 356 ; Family Discourses, iv. 
344; Life of Young, his, adopted by 
Johnson, iv. 68 ; — described by 
Burke, iv. 69; — quoted, i. 432, n. i. 

Croker, Rt. Hon. John Wilson. (In 
this Index I give reference only to 
the passages in which I differ from 
him.) Bentley's verses, change in 
one of, iv. 27, n. 3 ; Boswell's ac- 
count of Johnson's death, iv. 459, n. 
5; Boswell's ' injustice ' to Hawkins, 
iv. 159, n. 4; Burke's praise of John- 
son's Journey, iii. 156, n. 2 ; Camp- 
bell, Dr. T., mistake about, ii. 393, 



BosweWs Life of jfohnson. 



6i 



Croker. 



Cullen. 



M. i; 'a celebrated friend,' iii. 465, 
«. 6; Chesterfield's present to John- 
son, i. 303, n. 2; Edinburgh Review 
and his 'blunders,' ii. 387, n. 2; 
emendations of the text, i. 19, w. i ; 
iii. 484, w. I ; Fitzherbert's suicide, 
iii. 437, ;/. I ; Fox, Lady Susan, and 
W. O'Brien, ii. 376, «. i ; Homer's 
shield of Achilles, iv. 39, «. 2; John- 
son's Abridgment of the Dictionary, 
\. 351, n. \\ — Debates, i. 590; — 
' ear spoilt by flattery,' i. 6g, n. 3; — 
and Hon. T. Hervey, ii. 37, n. 2; — 
and Jackson, iii. 156, n. \\ — Lon- 
don, Thales and Savage, i. 145, «. 3; 
— memory of Gray's lines, iv. 160, 
;/. 2 ; — and The Monthly Ker'ie-ii, 
iii. 34, ;;. 3; — and the rebellion of 
1745, i. 203, n. 2 ; — reference to 
Lord Karnes, iii. 387, n. i ; — title 
of Doctor, i. 565, n. i ; Langton's 
will, ii. 299, n. 2 ; Lawrences, date 
of the deaths of the two, iv. 266, n. 
2 ; Literary Club, records of the, ii. 
395i «• 5 ; Macaulay's criticisms on 
him, i. 181, «. 7 ; ii. 448, n. 4 ; iv. 
166, n. 2; V. 266, H. 2, 340. ;/. I ; Mayo, 
Dr.. and Dr. Meyer, ii. 290, «. 2; 
Millar, Andrew, i. 332, n. 3 ; proofs 
and sanctions, ii. 223, n. 2 ; Mon- 
tagu, Edward, iii. 464, n. 2 ; Rom- 
ney, George, iii. 50, n. 2; Sacheverel 
at Lichfield, i. 45 ; suppression of a 
note, iv. 159, n. 4 ; suspicions about 
Thurlow's letter to Reynolds, iv. 404, 
«. i; about one of Johnson's amanu- 
enses, iv. 302, n. 2; Taylors of Christ 
Church, confounds two, i. 8g, n. 1 ; 
Walpole, Horace, identifies with a 
celebrated wit, iii. 441, n. 4. 
Croker Correspondence, Johnson's defi- 
nition of Oats, i. 341, n. 3; — and 
Pot, iv. 6, n. I ; — sarcasms about 
trees in Scotland, ii. 345. ;/. i; mis- 



take about the third Earl of Liver- 
pool, iii. 166, n. I. 

Cromwell, Henry, Pope's correspond- 
ent, iv. 284, ;/. 5. 

Cromwell, Oliver, Aberdeen, his sol- 
diers in, ii. 521, v. 95, Bowles, W., 
married his descendant, iv. 272, «. 3; 
Johnson and Lord Auchinleck quar- 
rel over him, v. 435 ; Johnson pro- 
jects a Li/e of him, iv. 272; Noble's 
Afemoirs, iv. 272, «. 4; political prin- 
ciples in his time, ii. 424; Speeches, 
his, i. 173, n. 3; trained as a private 
man, i. 511, «. 2. 

Crosbie, Andrew, account of him, ii. 
431, n. I ; alchymy, learned in, ii. 
432; compares English with Scotch, 
v. 21; Scotch schoolmaster's case, ii. 
213, n. i; witchcraft, on, v. 50; men- 
tioned, iii. 116; v. 51. 

Crosby, Brass, attacked by Johnson 
ii. 155, n. 2; Lord Mayor, iii. 522; 
sent to the Tower, ib.; iv. i6i, «. 5. 

Cross Readings, iv. 372. 

Crotch, Dr. William, iii. 224, n. 3. 

Crouch, Mrs., iv. 262. 

Crousaz, John Peter de, dispute with 
Warburton, i. iBi; v. 90-1; Examen 
of Pope s Essay on Man, i. 159. 

Crown, childish jealousy of it, ii. 195 ; 
dispensing power, iv. 366, n. i ; in- 
fluence: see Influence; power, has 
not enough, ii. 195; revenues, its, ii. 
405, «. 3; right to it, iii. 177-8. 

Crudities, Coryat's, ii. 202, n. i. 

Cruikshank, the surgeon, attends 
Johnson, iv. 277, 460, ib., n. 2; — 
bequest to him, iv. 463, n. 3; — , let- 
ter from, iv. 421 ; — recommends 
him to Reynolds, iv. 254. 

Crutchley, Jeremiah, iv. 234, «. i. 

Cucumbers, v. 329. 

Cui bono man, a, iv. 130. 

Cullen, Dr., an eminent physician, ii 



62 



Index to 



Cullen. 

427; his opinion on Johnson's case, 

IV. 303-5, on the needful <iuanlily of 
sleep, iii. i()2; talks of sleep-walking, 

V. 51. 

Cui-LKN, K(»l)ert, the advocate (after- 
wards Lord Cullen), case of Knight 
the negro, iii. 144, 242 , a good 
mimic, ii. 176, >u 2; mentioned, v. 

48, 50- 

CuM-OHKN. Hatlle of, cruelties after it, 
V. 181, 223; Johnson's indifference 
as to the result, i. 498 ; the news 
reaches London, v. 223, w. i; order 
of the clans, ii. 309, n. 3; Pretender's 
criticism of the battle, v. 221; men- 
tioned, V 160, 213, 216. 

CuLROSSiE, — , V. 3go, n i. 

ClfMHERLAND, V 128, tt. 2. 

CuMitKRLAM), William, Duke of, uncle 
of George IH, cruelties, ii. 429, 430, 
M. i; V. 223; attacked by Dr. King 
at Oxford, i. 324, «. 2; praised by the 
Gent. Ma,^., i. 203, ;/. 2; Shipley, 
Dr., his chaplain, iii. 2S5, ;/. 2; men- 
tioned, V. 214. 

Cu.MBERi..\Ni), Duchess of, iv. 126, n. i. 

CUMHERL.\M), Richard, IJentley on 
Barnes's C^reek, iv. 23, «. i; Davies's 
stories, perhaps the subject of one of, 
iii. 47, ;/. I ; dish-ilout face, iv. 444, 
w. I ; Fashionable Lover, v. 200 ; 
Feast of Reason, iv. 75, ;/. i; John- 
son, acquaintance with, iv. 444, n. i; 
not admitted into 'the set,' ih.; — 
cups of tea, i. 363, w. i; — dress, iii. 
370, «. 2 ; — Greek, iv. 444 ; — 
mode of eating, i. 542, ;/. 2 ; Ob- 
seri'er, iv. 75, 444; Odes, iii. 50; read 
backwards, /'/'., n. i; iv. 499; West- 
minster School, at, i. 457, «. 2. 

CUMBERLA.ND AND STRATHERN, Duke 

of, brother of George IH, ii. 257, n. 
2; iii. 24, w. 2. 
Cuw^^lNG. Tom, the Quaker, account 



Dalrymple. 

of him, V. Ill, n. i ; introduces John- 
.son to a tavern company, v. 262, 
ready to drive an ammunition cart, 
iv. 244-5; wrote against Leechman. 
v. 114. 

CiMNf.llA.ME, Alexander, the oppo- 
nent of Bentley, v. 424. 

CUNINGICAMK. Sir John, v. 424. 

CUNNINC, V. 247. 

CfNNiNCHAM, — , of the Scots Greys, 
iv. 243, n. I. 

Curates, scanty provision for them, ii. 
198; .small salaries, iii. 157. 

Curiosity, mark of a generous mind, 
i. 103; iii. 511, 515 : two objects of 
it, iv. 230. 

CURI.I., Edmund, 1. 165, n. i. 

Currant.s, iv. 23S. 

CusT, F. C, i. 186, n. 2, 196, «. I. 

Cutts, Lady, iii. 258. 

Cyder, I'hilips's, v, 88. 

Cypress Grove, v. 205. 

D. 

D. O., Sir, iv. 209, n. 2. 

Dacier, Madame, iii. 379, w. i. 

Daciers Horace, iii. 86, //. 

Dccmonohi^y, King James's, iii. 434. 

Dagge, — , keej^er of the Bristol New- 
gate, iii. 491, n. 3. 

DAli.Lfi, on the Fathers, v. 335. 

Daily Advertiser, i. 297, n. r ; ii. 240, 
«. 2. 

Daily Gazetteer, ii. 37, «. i. 

Daily Post, i. 583. 

Dale, Mrs., v. 492. 

D'Alembert, ii. 62, «. 2. 

Dalin, Olaf von, ii. 179. 

Dallas, Miss, v. 98. 

Dallas, Stuart, v. 98. 

Dalrymple, Colonel, v. 455. 

Dalrymple, Sir David. See Hailes. 
Lord. 

Dalrymple. Sir John, attacks the 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



Dalrymple. 



Davies, Mrs. 



London booksellers, v. 458, «. 2 ; 
Burnet, criticises, ii. 245, n. 3; com- 
plains of attacks on his Memoirs, ^. 
456 ; foppery, his, ii. 272 ; Johnson, 
invites to his house, v. 457; — , rails 
at, V. 45S ; — arrives late, v. 460 ; 
Memoirs of Great Britain and Ire- 
land, ii. 241-2; parodied by Johnson, 
V. 460; style, 'mere bouncing,' ii. 
241 ; praised by Boswell, ii. 242 ; 
mentioned, ii. 333. 

Dalzel, Professor, iv. 444. 

Dancala, i. 102. 

Dan'cing, iv. 92. 

Danes, colony at I-euchars, v. 79 ; in 
Wales, v. 148. 

Dante, Roswell's ignorance of him, 
iii. 260, n. 2; Purgatory, quoted, iv. 
430, w. 2; resemblance between /'//- 
grimes Progress and Dante, ii. 274. 

Danube, ii. 153, «. i. 

D'Arblay, General, iv. 258, n. 2. 

D'Arblay, Mme. See Burney, Miss. 

Darby, Rev. Mr., v. 517, n. i. 

Darippe, Captain, v. 154. 

Darius's shade, iv. 19. 

Darlington, i. 40, «. 5. 

Dartineuf, Charles, ii. 511. 

Dartmouth, Lord, i. 470, n. 4. 

Darwin, Charles, v. 489, n. i. 

Darwin, Dr. Erasmus, v. 489, n. i. 

Dashwood, Sir Francis, ii. 155, n. 3. 

Dashwood, Sir Henry, iii. 463, n. 3. 

Dates to letters, i. 141, n. 2; iii. 479, 
n. I, 486, n. 4. 

D'Auteroche, Count, iii. 10, n. 2. 

Davenant, Sir William, ii. 193, n. 2. 

Davenport, William, Strahan's ap- 
prentice, ii. 370, «. 3. 

Davies, Thomas, account of him, i. 
452; author, success as an, iii. 493; 
bankruptcy, iii. 253, 493; Baretti's 
trial, exaggerated feelings about, ii. 
108; quarrels with him, ii. 235; ben- 



efit at Drury Lane, iii. 282 ; book- 
seller, his taste as a, iii. 253, «. i ; 
Boswell to Johnson, introduces, i. 
452 ; iv. 267 ; Churchill's lines on 
him, i. 452, «. 4, 559 ; iii. 253 ; — , 
sees in the pit, iii. 253, n. 2; Cibber's 
genteel ladies, ii. 390 ; ' clapped on 
the back by Tom Davies,' ii. 394 ; 
Conduct of tlie Allies, \\. 74; dinners 
at his house, ii. 389; iii. 44; Garrick, 
Memoirs of, iii. 493, ;/. 4 ; Garrick, 
letter to, iii. 253, «. 2; complains of 
his unkindness, ih.; Goldsmith's dis- 
like of Baretti, ii. 235, «. 3, ' Goldy's ' 
play, talks of, ii. 296; v. 351; Hunter, 
Johnson's schoolmaster, anecdote of, 
i. 53, n. I ; Johnson, accurate ob- 
server of, ii. 296 ; — candour, iii. 
307, w. 3; — and Foote, ii. 342; — 
forgives him, ii. 310 ; — laugh, ii. 
434 ; letters to him : see Johnson, 
letters ; liberality to him, i. 564 ; 
iii. 253 ; — love for him, iv. 267, 
421; — one of a deputation to, iii. 
126; — sends pork to, iv. 477, «. i; ' 
— talking to himself, i. 559; learn- 
ing enough for a clergyman, had, iv. 
16 ; Maddacks, the straw-man, iii. 
262, «. I ; Miscellanies and Fugitive 
Pieces, ii. 310; Mounsey and Percy, 
ii. 73; portrait by Hicky, ii. 389, n. 
3; 'potted stories' of a dramatic 
author, iii. 40 ; Quin's saying about 
January 30, v. 435, n. 3 ; Shake- 
speare, representations of, v. 277, n. 
6; stage, his earnings on the, iii. 253; 
driven from it, ib., iii. 282 ; ' states- 
man all over,' ii. 75; Thane of Ross, 
iv. 9; Walker's ' distinguished glare,' 
ii. 423, «. i; zealous for the trade, ii. 
395 ; mentioned, i. 202, «. 3, 359, 
490 ; ii. 72, 94, 393-4, 400; iii. 44 ; 
iv. 422. 
Davies, Mrs,, Tom Davies's wife; 



64 



Index to 



Davies, Mrs. 



Debates of Parliatneat. 



Churchill's lines on her, i. 452, n. 4, 
560. 

Daviks, — , of I.lanerch, v. 500. 

Davis, Mrs., iv. 276, n. 2, 506. 

Davy, Sir Humphry, iv. 137, n. 3. 

Davy, Serjeant, iii. 99, m. 6. 

Dawkins, 'Jamaica,' iv. 146. 

Dawlini^, iii. 480; da'odle, iv. 146. 

Dawson, (Jeorge, ii. 522, n. 2. 

Dawson's Lrxiro/i, iii. 463. 

Day-lahoirkrs, wages of, iv. 203; v. 
300. 

Dead, form of prayer for tlie, ii. 187; 
libels on them, iii. 18; recommending 
and praying for them, i. 220, w. 2, 273, 
278; ii. 187; iv. 159, 182, //. 2; their 
spirits jierhaps present, i. 246 ; why 
we wish for their return, i. 278, 

M. I. 

Deak and Dumh, Academy for the, v, 

455- 

Dea.n, Rev. Richard, ii. 61. 

Death, act of dying not of impor- 
tance, ii. 123 ; affectation in dying, 
v. 452; best men most afraid of it, 
iii. 174; Browne, Sir T., on it, iii. 
174, ;/. I ; business preparation for 
it, V. 360; change beyond man's un- 
derstanding, ii. 187, «. 3; disposi- 
tions on one's death-bed, v. 272 ; 
' dying with a grace,' iv. 346, ;/. i ; 
fear of it cannot be got over, ii. 122, 
341; iii. 335; natural toman, ii. 107; 
iii. 174, 179, 334; v. 205; resolution, 
met with, iii. 335; sight, kept out of, 
iii. 175; some die well, few willingly, 
i. 423; sudden death in sin, iv. 260; 
Swift dreads it, ii. 107, ti. 2; — de- 
scribes what reconciles man to it, 
iii- 335> *'• 2; thinking constantly of 
it, v. 360 ; violent, i. 392 ; ' a whole 
system of hopes swept away,' i. 274, 
«. I. See under JoHNSON, death, 
dread of. 



Dkatii Wakxants, iii. 137, «. 2; v. 
272-3. 

Dt'hixti- on the Proposal of Parliament 
to CroiniiH-ll, i. 173. 

Dekates OI-- Parliament, account of 
them, i. 134-7, 174-6, 581-93; writ- 
ten at first by Cluthrie and corrected 
by Johnson, i. 134-5, I57. 583. 590; 
written solely by Johnson, i. 137, 
174-6, 181, 583, 590; wrongly as- 
signed to Johnson, i. 590 ; authen- 
ticity generally accepted, i. 175, 586, 
Chestertield, speeches attributed to, 
iii. 399 : Croker's inaccuracy about 
them, i. 590; 'debating,' absence of, 
i. 586; discontinued, i. 203, n. 2, 593; 
Gent. Mag., increased sale of , i. 175, 
;/. 3; House of Commons passes res- 
olutions against publication, i. 134, 
582, 591; House of Lords 'a Court 
of Record,' i. 582; ' Hurgoes,' ' Cli- 
nabs,' ' Walelop,' ' Hon. Marcus 
Cato,'i. 583; ' Pretor of Mildendo,' 
i. 583; Johnson's conscience troubled, 
i. 175, 586 ; iv. 471 ; — Debates not 
authentic, i. 137, 584-91 ; — rapid 
composition, i. 584; iv. 471; — suc- 
cessor, i. 593; London Alagazine, re- 
ports of the, i. 582, 589-91 ; monu- 
ment to Walpole's greatness, i. 593; 
Murphy's account of them, i. 584-5; 
prosecution of Cave, i. 581; of Cooley 
and the printer of the Daily Post, i. 
583; of the printers in 1771, iii. 522; 
iv. 161, «. 5; reports published chiefly 
in the recess, i. 581, 591-2; reporters, 
' fellows who thrust themselves into 
the gallery,' i. 582; reporting, method 
of, i. 136, 174, 584; Seeker's reports, 
i. 587-90; 'Senate of Lilliput,' i. 
134, 582; speakers' name disguised, 
i. 581; speeches assigned to Pitt and 
Chesterfield, i. 584 ; many thrown 
into one, i. 581,587; sent by the 



Boswell's Life of yo/mson. 



65 



Debates of Parliament. 



Derby. 



speakers, i. 174, 501, 589; table of 
the order of publication, i. 592 ; 
translated, i. 586 ; unreality, i. 586 ; 
volumes, collected in, i. 175 ; Wal- 
pole, unfair to, i. 582, 584 ; iv. 363. 

JDebrett's Royal Kalendar, iv. 404, n. i. 

Debtor. ' The pillow of a debtor,' 
iv. 175, n. I. 

Debts, carelessly contracted and rapid- 
ly swelling, iii. 145 ; for Johnson's 
warnings, see Boswell, debts ; law 
of arrest, iii. 88; small and great, i. 
401-2. 

Decay of Christian Piety, v. 258. 

De Claris Oratorii>us, iv. 365. 

Dedic.\tions, books written for their 
sake, iv. 122, ;/. 3 ; flattery allowed, 
'^'- 325 ; Johnson's to all the Royal 
Family, ii. 2; — skill in them, ii. i; 
Works without any, i. 98, «. 2 ; 
means of getting money, ii. i, ti. 2 ; 
one scholar dedicating to another, iv. 
186, n. 3; studied conclusions, v. 272. 

Defence of Pluralities, ii. 278. 

Deffand, Mme. du, v. 173, n. i. 

Dekimtiox, things sometimes made 
darker by it, iii. 278. 

Definitions. See under Diction- 
ary, and separate words. 

De Foe, Daniel, Captain Carlctons 
Memoirs, iv. 385, n. 6 ; Drelincourt 
on Death, ii. 187, n. 4; his grandson, 
iv. 44, ;/. 1 ; Johnson's praise of him, 
iii. 304 ; — the opposite of him, i. 
587; Robinson Crusoe, iii. 304. 

Deformities of Johnson, iv. 171-2. 

Degeneracy of Mankind, ii. 250, v. 
87. 

De Groot, Isaac, iii. 142. 

Deist, no honest man one, ii. 9. 

Delany, Dr., Observations on Swift, 
iii. 283; iv. 46; V. 270. 

Delap, Rev. Dr., i. 603. 

Delay, danger of, i. 375. 



Dementat, iv. 209, ;/. 2. 
Democritus, iv. 122, «. I. 

Demonax, iv. 40. 

De Morgan, Professor, i. 329, «. 4. 

Demosthenes, Johnson compared with 
him, i. 584 ; spoke to barbarians, ii. 
196 ; to brutes, ii. 242 ; mentioned, 
iii. 399; V. 243. 

Dempster, George, account of him, i. 
473. «• 3i argues for merit, i. 509-12; 
Boswell, letter to, v. 464; Boswell's 
eulogium on him, v. 467, n. 2; Criti- 
cal Strictures, i. 473; Johnson's con- 
versation, struck with, i. 502 ; — , 
dines with, ii. 225-6 ; Journey, 
praises, ii. 347 ; iii. 343 ; sister, his, 
iii. 274; iv. 327; unfixed in his prin- 
ciples, i. 513 ; virtuous and candid, 
ii. 349. 

Denbigh, Earls of, ii. 201, ;/. 2. 

Denhall in Wirhall, v. 507, ;;. 5. 

Denham, Sir John, iv. 44, n. 2. 

Denman, first Lord, ii. 468, n. 3. 

Denmark, King of, v. 113. 

Denmark, Queen of, ii. 290, n. 2. 

Dennis, John, criticisms on Blackt?iore 
and Cato, iv. 43, n. 1 ; on Cato, iii. 
46, «. 3 ; on Shakespeare, i. 576, n. 
4 ; Critical IVorks worth collecting, 
iii. 46; his thunder, iii. 46, n. 3. 

Denton, Judge, ii. 189, n. 2. 

Depeditation, v. 149. 

Depopulation, ii. 250, n. i. 

De Quincey, account of Bishop Wat- 
son, iv. 137, n. 3; criticises Johnson's 
Vanity, &c., i. 224, n. 3 ; praises his 
Latin, i. 316, n. 3. 

Derange, iii. 362, n. 2. 

Derby, account of it in 1741, i. 100, n. 
2 ; Highlanders there in 1745, iii. 
184; V. 223, ;;. i; Johnson and Bos- 
well visit it in 1777, iii. 181 ; see 
the china-manufactory, iii. 185; silk- 
mill, iii. 186 ; V. 492 ; Johnson mar- 



06 



Index to 



Derby. 

ried there, i. no, //. 4; mentioned, 
iii. I, 153, n. i; iv. 414. 

Derby, fifleenlli Karl of, v. 403, //. i. 

Dkrby, Kcv. Mr., iii. 12S. 

Dkrbysiiiki:, ii. 542. 

Dkruam, William, Ph\sico-Theolo;^\\ 
V. 368. 

Dkrrkk, Saiiuicl, ISoswcir.s ' first tu- 
tor," i. 527 ; his ' governor," iii. 422 ; 
intro(Uiced him to Davies, iv. 267, w. 
I ; Dryden's Miscellaneous Works, 
edits, i. 528, //. 3; Home's parody on 
him, i. 528 ; lluinphry Clinker, de- 
scribed in, i. 144. n. i : Johnson's 
kindness for him. i. 44f>; v. 132, 273; 
— projected Life of DtyJeu, gathers 
materials for, i. 528; v. 273; — , lines 
on, i. 144; ' King of Hath," i. 456, n. 
2, 527 ; Letters from Leverpoole, i. 
52S, //. i; V. 133; outrunning his 
character, i. 457; presence of mind, 
i. 529 ; pun aluiul the Robinhood 
Society, iv. 107. //. 3 ; Smart, com- 
pared with, iv. 222. 

Dhscrh'TIon, falls short of reality, iv. 
230. 

Deserted Village. .SVf Goldsmith. 

Dks Maizkaux, i. 33. 

Dksmoulins, John, Johnson's will, 
witnesses, iv. 463, n. 3 ; — bequest 
to him, //'./ mentioned, iv. 479, >i. i, 

507- 
DESMori.lNS, Mrs., account of her, iii. 
252, ;/. 3; hates Levett and Williams, 
iii. 418, 523; Johnson allows her half 
a guinea a week, iii. 252 ; — death, 
present at, iv. 482; — kitchen under 
her care, ii. 247, «. 3 i — house, 
lodged in, iii. 252, 432, n. 3 ; leaves 
it, iv. 269, 295, ;/. I ; — not com- 
plaining of the world, iv. 197; men- 
tioned, i. 75, 97, 275; ii. 170; iii. 
356, 413, 424; iv. 107, 164, 196, 243, 
276, «. 2, 371, n. 4. 



Diary. 

Despondency, speculative, iv. 130. 
Dksi'otic Governments, iii. 321. 
De Tnuf. See Thl'ANIS. 
Dkttinoen, IJattle of. iv. 15. 
Devaynks, Mr., iv. 315. 
De veritate Relij^ionis, i. So, 11. i. 
Devils do not lie to each other, iii. 
333; their influence upon our minds, 

iv. 334-5- 
Devo.M'ort, i. 438, n. 4. 
Devonshire, Johnson s trip to, i. 429, 

;/. 4, 436; iii. 518; militia, its, i. 42, 

«• 3. 35f>. "• -■ 

Devonshire, third Duke of, faithful 
to his word, iii. 212; dogged verac- 
ity, iii. 430. 

Devonshire, fourth Duke of, ii. 89, 
n. I. 

Devonshire, fifth Duke and Duchess 
of, hospitality to Johnson, iv. 411, 
423; mentioned, iv. 146. 

Devonshire, .seventh Duke of, ' pub- 
lic dinners at Chatsworth,' iv. 423, 

«. 3- 
Devonshire, Georgiana, Duchess of. 
Genius made feminine to compliment 
her, iii. 425-6 ; Johnson, eager to 
hear, iii. 483, ;/. 2 ; painted in the 
same picture with him. iv. 259, 
u. I. 

Devonshire Family, ii. 542. 

Devotion, abstracted, ii. 12 ; particu- 
lar places for, iv. 261. 

Devotional Exercises. See Prayers. 

Devotional Poetry. See Poetry. 

De Witt, i. 38. 

Dexterity, deserves applause, iii 
262. 

Diaboliis Regis, iii. 89. 

Dial, i. 238. 

Dialogues of the Dead, ii. 511. 

Diamond, — , an apothecary, i. 280; 

iii. 515- 
Diary, The, iv. 439, w. i. 



BosweiTs Life of JoJinson. 



67 



Diary. 



Dilly Family. 



Diary of a Visit to England in 1775, 
ii. 387, M. 2. 

DlBDEN, Charles, ii. 127. 

Dicey, Professor, Law of the Constitu- 
tion, iii. 54, n. 2; iv. 366, ;/. i. 

Dick, Sir Alexander, gold medal for 
rhubarb, iv. 303, n. i ; hospitality, 
his, iv. 235 ; Johnson consults him 
about his health, iv. 301-3 ; — , let- 
ter to, iii. 117, 145; — , meets, v. 
53, 449, 457. 

Dick, — , a messenger, v. 228. 

' Dick Wormwood,' ii. 467, n. 3. 

Dickens, Charles, iv. 234, ;/. i. 

DiCTlo.NARY, might be compiled from 
Bacon, iii. 220 ; from Elizabethan 
authors, iii. 220, «. 4 ; ' perfection ' 
of one, i. 338, n. 2 ; pronunciation, 
of, ii. 184 ; Scotland, of words pe- 
culiar to, ii. 105 ; watches, like, i. 
336, «. 3- 

Dictionary, Johnson s, account of it, i. 
210-19, 297-309, 337-48 ; Abridge- 
ment, i. 307, n. 2, 348, n. I, 351, n. 
I. 353; — i'l Lord Scarsdale's dress- 
ing-room, iii. 183; accents of words, 
ii. 1S4; authors quoted, i. 218; iv. 
5, 480, n. 2; Bacon often quoted, iii. 
220; Birch, Dr., on it, i. 330; bound 
and lettered, i. 328; commencement, 
date of its, i. 211, «. 2; composition, 
its, i. 216-18; deficiency of previous, 
i. 216, n. 2; definitions, erroneous, i. 
339 ; definitions, Johnson's genius 
shown in them, i. 339 ; — instances 
of erroneous, i. 339-40 ; — political 
and capricious, i. 340-3; iii. 390; iv. 
loi, n. 2, 250: see under separate 
words; dictionary-makers described, 
i. 219, n. I ; dictionary-making not 
very unpleasant, i. 219, w. l; ii. 232, 
n. 2, 233, n. 3; — ' muddling work,' 
ib.; Dodsley's suggestion, i. 211, 
331; iii. 460; drudgery, v. 478; ety- 



mologies, i. 215, 338 ; explanation, 
difficulty of, i. 340, «. 3 ; edition, 
fourth, preparing, ii. 163, 165, n. I, 
178 ; — sent to press, ii. 232, n. 2, 
239 ; — published, ii. 233, 235 ; — 
mentioned, i. 336, n. 2, 341, n. 2, 
342, «. I, 434, n. 2; iv. 5,«. I, lOi, 
n. 2 ; Garrick's Epigram, i. 348 ; 
Gilford's Contemplation quoted, v. 
134, n. I ; Gough Square, compiled 
in, i. 217 ; Harris, Hertnes, praised 
by, iii. 131; honours and praises, i. 
345i 374! Johnson's portrait, iv. 485, 
n. 3; Johnson's praise of its execu- 
tion, iii. 460; Manning, the composi- 
tor, iv. 371 ; outlines sketched, its, 
i. 203; particles, changes of the, ii, 
51, n. 3; patrons and opponents, 
i- 334; payments, i. 211, 332, 352; 
Plan, dedicated to Lord Chesterfield, 
i. 212; — draft of it, i. 214, «. i; — 
not noticed in Gent. Mag. i. 203, n. 
2; — published, i. 210; poetry, 
harder to write than, v. 52; Preface, 
i. 337-46; pronunciation, ii. 185, w. 
i; published, i. 333, 335; publishers, 
i. 211 ; Sheridan's, R. B., compli- 
ment to it, iii. 131 ; Smith, Adam, 
reviewed by, i. 345, n. 2; time taken 
in writing, i. 215, 332, 337, 513; vol- 
ume ii. begun, i. 296 ; Wilkes and 
the letter //, i. 347 ; words, big, i. 
252; written in sickness and sorrow, 
i. 305, «. i; iv. 492. 

Dictionary of Arts and Sciences pro- 
jected by Goldsmith, ii. 234, n. 2. 

Diderot, Denys, anecdote of Hume, 
ii. 9, «. 4; on acting, iv. 281, «. 3. 

Dido, iv. 226. 

Dies IrcB, iii. 407, n. 3. 

Difficulties, raising, iii. 12, «. 2. 

DiGGS, the actor, i. 447 «. i. 

Dilly Family, account of it, iii. 450, 
n. 2. 



68 



Index to 



Dilly, Messrs. 



Dissertations. 



DiLi.Y, Messrs. Edward and Charles, 
booksellers, Boswell's Corsica, pub- 
lish, ii. 52, «. i; — Conversation be- 
tween Geort^e III, &c.. ii. 38, n. 2; 
— Life of Johnson, ib.; Chester- 
field's Alisicllaneous Works, publish, 
iii. 399 ; dinners at their house, ii. 
284-5. 387. 399: iii- 75-90. 323-341. 
357. 358, 446. «• 2; iv. 117-124, 125, 
M. I, 321, 381 ; V. 64, n. 3; always 
gave a good dinner, iii. 323 ; hospi- 
tality to literary men, iii. 75; house, 
their. No. 22 in the Poultry, iii. 6, 75, 
«. i; 'patriotic friends,' their, iii. 76. 

?Tii.f.Y, Charles, comparative happi- 
ness, on, iii. 327 ; Johnson, letters 
from, iii. 448; iv. 297; Milton's Trac- 
tate on Education, on, iii. 407; quo- 
tations for sale, account of, iv, 118, 
n. 2 ; mentioned, iii. 450, >/. 2 ; iv. 

137. u&. 

DiLl.Y, Edward, Hoswell, letter to, iii. 
125 ; Hoswell parts with him, iii. 
450; Lives of the Poets, account of 
the, iii. 125 ; Johnson, letter from, 
iii. 143- 

Dilly, Scjuire, Boswell and Johnson 
visit him, iv. 137-52; mentioned, i. 
302; ii. 284; iii. 450, «. 2. 

DiNGLEY, Mrs., iv. 204, n. i. 

Dinnar, cost in London in 1737, i. 
119-22; — in 1746, i. 120, «. i; — 
in Edinburgh, in 1742, ib.; a meas- 
ure of emotion, i. 411; ii. 108; iv. 
255 ; waiting for it, ii. 95 ; better 
where there is no solid conversation, 
iii. 66. See Joh.nson, dinners and 
eating. 

DioCLETl.\N, ii. 292, n. 5. 

Diogenes Laertius, iii. 439, n. 3; iv. 
16. 

DiOMED, ii. 149. 

DiONYSlus's Pcriegesis, iv. 513. 

DiOT, Mr. and Mrs., v. 490. 



Dirletons Doubts, iii. 233. 

Disarrange, iii. 362, n. 2. 

Discourses on Painting by Reynolds. 
See Reynolds, Discourses. 

Discoveries, Johnson dislikes them, 
i. 527, n. 2; ii. 550; iii. 232, n. i; iv. 
289, n. 2 ; Walpole describes the 
harm dune by them, v. 314, n. 2, 374, 
n. 2. 

Diseases, acute and chronical, iv. 173. 

Dislike, mutual, iii. 481. 

Disi'i TES, encouraging, iii. 211. 

D'Iskakli, Isaac, Barnes's Homer, iv. 
23, n. i; IJirch, Dr., i. 184, n. i; 
Campbell's Ilennippus Pedii'ivus, ii. 
489, n. 4; Chatterton and Loril May- 
or Beckford, iii. 228, n. 6 ; Church- 
ill's abhorrence of blotting, i. 486, n. 
2; Davies's taste as a bookseller, iii. 
253, n. 1; Dedications, ii. i, «. 2; 
Dennis's thunder, iii. 46, ;/. 3; Du 
Halde's China, ii. 63, ;/. 4; Flexney 
and Stockdale, ii. 130, «. 2; Guthrie's 
letter, i. 135, n. 3; Hill, Sir John, ii. 
44, «. 2 ; Johnson's hints for the 
Life of Pope, iv. 54, n. 1 ; Oldys the 
author of Busy, curious, thirsty fly, 
ii. 322, «. 3; — his notes on Lang- 
baine, iii. 34, ;/. 3; Pieresc, ii. 425, w. 
3; Steevens's literary impostures, iv. 
205, n. i; Ta.sker, Rev. Mr., iii. 425, 
n. 2. 

Dissenters, bill for their relief re- 
jected, ii. 239, n. I ; Country-^&xiy , 
of the, V. 291, n. 2; taught the 
graces of language, i. 361 ; tossing 
snails into their gardens, ii. 308, «. i. 

Dissertation on the Epitaphs written by 
Pope, i. 355. 

Dissertation on the State of Literature 
and Attthours, i. 355. 

Dissertations on the History of Ireland, 
i. 372. 

Dissertations on the Prophecies, iv. 330. 



Boswclts Life of Johnson. 



69 



Dissimulation. 



Dodsley. 



Dissimulation, ii. 54. 

Distance, of time and of place, ii. 539. 

Distinctions, all are trifles, iii. 404; 
love of them, i. 548. 

Distressed Mother, Budgell's Epilogue, 
i. 210; really written by Addison, 
iii. 53 ; Johnson's Epilogue, i. 64, 
«. I. 

Distresses of Others, ii. io8-g. 

Distrust, iii. 153. 

Diversions of Purley, iii. 402, ii. 3. 

Dives, ii. 186. 

Divine Legation. See Warburton, W. 

Divines, English, iv. 122, ;/. 2. 

Divorces, iii. 395-6. 

DiXEV, Sir Wolstan, i. 98. 

DoBLE, Mr. C. E., on the authorship 
of the Whole Duty of Man, ii. 275, 
71. I ; Psalmanazar at Christ Church, 
iii. 509. 

Doekers, i. 439. 

Docking, ii. 59. 

Doctor, title of, i. 565, ;/. i; ii. 427. 
See Johnson, doctor, and Dr. Me- 
Mis. 

Doctor in Divinity, respect shown 
to a, ii. 143. 

Doctors' Commons, i. 155, 534, n. 3. 

Doetrine of Graee, Warburton's, v. 105. 

DoDD, Rev. Dr. William, account of 
him, iii. 158 ; Allen's kindness to 
him, iii. 160; Boswell's anxiety for 
his pardon, iii. 135 ; canted all his 
life, iii. 307 ; character, iii. 13S-9, 
189 ; eurrat lex, iv. 239 ; dedication 
to Rev. Mr. Villette, iii. 189, «. 4 ; 
execution, iii. 137-8, 167; forgery, 
guilty of, iii. 159; Johnson, corre- 
spondence with, iii. 163-4, 167; — , 
describes, iii. 159, n. 2\ — writes for 
him Conviet's Address, iii. 138, 161, 
189, 335, n. i; Last Solemn Declara- 
tion, iii. 163 ; Observations, iii. 137, 
n. I, 162; Occasional Papers (con- 



clusion), iii. 168; petitions and let- 
ters, iii. 138, 162, 164; and his speech 
to the Recorder, iii. 143, 160; Last 
Prayer, iii. 307; life, longing for, iii. 
174; Literary Club, tried to join the, 
iii. 318; Magdalen House, chaplain 
at, iii. 158, w. 3; mind concentrated, 
his, iii. 190 ; Newgate, closely 
watched in, iii. 189; petitions in his 
favour, ii. 104, ti. 2; iii. 137-8, 162; 
saint, not to be made a, iv. 240; Ser- 
mons, his, iii. 282 ; Thoughts in 
Prison, iii. 306; 'unfortunate,' iii. 
136, 71. 3; Wesley visits him in prison, 
iii. 138, n. 2; 'wretched world, not 
a,' iii. 188; mentioned, iii. 150. 
DoDD, Mrs., iii. 162. 
Doddridge, Dr., epigram by him, v. 

308. 
Dodsley, James, i. 213; ii. 511. 
Dodsley, Robert, Cleone, acted, i. 375, 
n. 2, 376-8; — compared by John- 
son with Otway, iv. 24 ; — ' more 
blood than brains,* iv. 24; Collection 
of Poe7ns, ii. 535 ; iii. 24, n, I, 44, 
169, n. I, 305, 318 ; iv. 27 ; ' Darti- 
neuf's ' footman, ii. 511 ; ' Doddy,' ii. 
296, 71. I ; Garrick, quarrel with, i. 
376-7; Goldsmith, dispute on poetry 
with, iii. 44; imprisoned by the House 
of Lords, i. 145, w. 2; Ire7ie, publish- 
es, i. 230; Johnson's Dictionary, sug- 
gests, i. 211, 331; iii. 460; one of the 
publishers, i. 211, 307; asks to have 
the Plaii inscribed to Chesterfield, 
i. 212; — Lo7idon published by him, 
i. 141-4; — Rasselas, i. 395; — Van- 
ity of Hiiina7i Wishes, i. 224, n. i; 
— 'patron,' i. 378; Life should be 
written, his, ii. 511; Muse in Live7y, 
ii. 511; Pope, assisted by, ii. 511, n. 
i; Pope's executors, application to, 
iv. 60, n. i; P7vceptor, i. 222; Public 
Vi7-tue, iv. 24 ; wife's death, his, i. 



^o 



hidex to 



Dodsley. 

322; World, The, i. 234, n. 4; men- 
tioned, i. 156, «. 4, 281, 335, 36S; ii. 
519, M. i; iv. 384, n. 2. 

DoDWEi-L, Henry, v. 498. 

Dof^credly, V. 44. 

DoGGET, Thomas, ii. 532, >/. i. 

Dogs attack butchers, ii. 266 ; eaten 
in China and Otaheite, //'. .• have not 
power of comparing, ii. no. 

Doing Nothing, v. 43. 

Dolus latet in universalihus, v. 119. 

DomcstUaU-d, i. 311, «. I. 

Domina de North et Gray, iv. 12. 

DoMiNicKTTi, ii. 114. 

Donaldson, Alexander, Bo.swell's first 
publisher, i. 444, w. i; intimacy with 
him, i. 508, w. 2; Copyright case, i. 
506-8; ii. 395, "• 2. 

DoNATUS, ii. 234, ;/. 4. 4io, ;/. 3. 

Don Bclianis, i. 57, n. 3. 

DoNCASTKR, ii. 344, n. 

Donne, Dr., saw a vision, ii. 510; uses 
the term ijitotidian, v. 394. 

Don Quixote, wished longer, i. 82, ;/. 2; 
ii. 274, n. I ; Don Quixote's death, ii. 
425. 

Door, ' author concealed behind the 
door,' i. 459. 

Dorando, A Spanish Tale, ii. 57, ;/. 2. 

Dorset, third Duke of, iv. 485, n. 3. 

DosA, ii. 8, «. I. 

Dossie, Robert, iv. 13. 

Double Letters. See Post. 

Doughty, the engraver, ii. 327, n. i; 
iv. 485, M. 3. 

Douglas, Archibald (at first Archibald 
Stewart, at last Baron Douglas, of 
Douglas Ca.stle), ii. 57, «. 2, 264. 

Douglas, last Duke of, v. 48, n. 3. 

Douglas, Duchess of, v. 48, n. 3. 

Douglas, Sir Tames, journey to the 
Holy Land, iii. 202. 

Douglas, James, M.D., editions of 
Horace, iv. 322. 



Dreams. 

Douglas, Lady Jane, ii. 57, n. 2, 
264. 

Douf.LAS, Rev. Dr. John, Bishop of 
Salisbury, British CofTee-house Club, 
a member of the, iv. 206, «. 2; Church 
of England, on the discipline of the, 
iv. 320; Cock Lane Ghost, exposes 
the, i. 471; Goldsmith's lines on him, 
i. 265, n. 3, 471, M. i; iii. 158, n. 3; 
Conduet of the Allies, praises the, 
ii. 74; Hume, dines with, ii. 505, n. 
2; Johnson's London, anecdote of, i. 
147 ; Lauder's imposition, i. 266; 
Literary Club, member of the, i. 555; 
mentioned, i. 162, 302, //. 2, 498; ii. 
72, 144, n. 2. 

Douglas, .Sir John, iii. 185. 

Douglas, Lady Lucy, v. 408. 

Douglas Cause, account of it, ii. 57, 
264; Boswell one of the counsel be- 
fore House of Lords, iii. 10, 249; v. 
430, «. 5 ; — and the Duchess of 
Argyle, v. 402, 408-9; — Essence of 
the Douglas Cause, ii. 264, «. I ; 
Judges' windows broken, v. 402, n. i ; 
Letters to Lord Mansfield, ii. 263; 
' shook the security of birth-right," 
V. 31- 

Douglas, a tragedy. See Home, John. 

Dovedale, V. 491. 

Dover, iv. 300, n. i. 

Dover Cliff, .Shakespeare's descrip- 
tion of, ii. i(X). 

Do-vned, iii. 381, n. 2. 

Doxy, Miss, iii. 474-5. 

Drake, Life of, i. 170, «. 4. 

Drama, the English, characteristics of 
its dialogue, iv. 285. 

Draper, the bookseller, iii. 53. 

Draughts, game of, i. 367; ii. 508. 

Drayton's Polyolbion, v. 256, n. 2. 

Dreams, communication by them, i. 
273 ; contest of wit in one, iv. 6 ; 
Prendergast's dream, ii. 210. 



Bosweirs Life of yohnsoii. 



71 



Drelincourt. 



Dryden. 



Drelincourt on Death, ii. 187. 

Dresden, i. 309, n. i. 

Dress, effects on the mind, i. 232; ii. 
544; if fine, should be very fine, iv. 
207; V. 415. 

Dressing, time spent in, v. 76. 

Drewry, Sir R., ii. 510, «. 2. 

Drinking, time it can go on, iii. 276, 
n. 2; in Johnson's youth, v. 67; rule 
about drinking to another, v. 405 ; 
see Drunkenness and Wine. 

Di inking Song to Sleep, i. 291. 

Drogheda, fifth Earl of, iii. 34, n. 3. 

Dromore, Bishop of. See Percy. 

Drowning, suicide by, v. 61. 

Druid's Temple, a, v. 121, 150. 

Drumgold, Colonel, ii. 456-7, 460. 

Drummond, Alexander, Travels, v. 
368. 

Drummond, Dr., iii. loi, 435. 

Drum.mond, George, v. 47. 

Drummond, William, of Hawthorn- 
den, Cypress Grove, v. 205; Polemo- 
middinia, iii. 322; Jonson, Ben, vis- 
ited by, V. 459, 473. 

Drummond, William, bookseller of 
Edinburgh, account of him, ii. 30 ; 
Johnson's letters to him, ii. 30-5 ; 
Johnson, meets, v. 439, 449, 456; his 
son, iii. loi, «. i. 

Drunkenness, as an art, iii. 442; ' ele- 
vated,' V. 178, n. I ; its felicity, ii. 
402, 498, n. 7 ; iii. 433, n. 4 ; on a 
little, iii. 193. 

Drury Lane Journal, i. 252, n. i. 

Drury Lane Theatre, Prologue on 
the ope?iing of, i. 209; iv. 30. See 
London, Drury Lane. 

Dryden, John, Absalom and Achito- 
phel, sale, i. 40, w. 4; quoted, ii. 399, 
n. I ; iv. 85, w. 3 ; All for Love, 
preface quoted, iv. 132, n. 2; Annus 
Alirabilis, quoted, ii. 276, n. 3; Au- 
rengzebe, quoted, ii. 143; iv. 350, n. 

VI.— 10 



3; Bayes in The L\ehearsal, ii. 193; 
booksellers' mercantile ruggedness, 
suffered from the, i. 353, ;;. i; bor- 
rows for want of leisure, v. 105, n. i; 
Collier, censured by, i. 193, n. 2; iv. 
331, «. I ; colleges and kings, lines 
on, ii. 256 ; Conquest of Granada, 
quoted, iv. 299, n. 2; dedication, its, 
V. 272, «. I ; converted to Roman 
Catholicism, iv. 52; dedications, stud- 
ied conclusions to his, v. 272 ; ' de- 
lighted to tread upon the brink of 
meaning,' ii. 276, n. 3; Life of. Der- 
rick's ' materials ' ; see Derrick ; 
dignity of his character, known to 
himself, i. 306, n. 2; Essay of Dra- 
tnatick Poesie, i. 228, n. 2; ii. 99, n. 
i; 'Fate after him,' &c., iv. 30, n. 
3; ' familiar day,' his, iv. 105, n. 2; 
foreign words, on, i. 252, n. i; gen- 
ius, his conscious, iii. 460, w. 5 ; 
Hailes, Lord, anecdotes of him by, 
iii. 451, n. 3; Hind and Panther, 
quoted, iv. 52 ; Lndian Emperour, 
quoted, iii. 394, n. 3; Johnson gath- 
ered materials for his Life, i. 528 ; 
iii. 81; iv. 52; v. 273; writes it, iv. 
52-4 ; Johnson, resemblance in his 
character to, iv. 53; judgment of the 
public, on the, i. 232, n. i; Juvenal, 
dedication to his, iv. 44; Latin line 
wrongly attributed to him, iii. 346, 
«. I ; Life not written by contem- 
poraries, V. 473, n. 3; lines on life: 
see just above, Aurengzebe; love, fine 
lines on, ii. 97; Malone, Life, by, iii. 
451, «. 3; 'mechanical defects,' on, 
iv. 285 ; Metaphysical Poets, men- 
tions the, iv. 44; Milton, lines on, ii. 
385; v. 98; Johnson's translation, /3., 
n. 2; Ode on St. Cecilia s Day, iii. 
44; paid about sixpence a verse for 
10,000 verses, i. 224, n. i ; pleasing 
a man against his will, on, iii. 79, n. 



72 



Index to 



Dryden. 

4; poets ami iiionarchs, lines on, ii. 
256; l'ui)e, dislinguisheil from, ii. 6, 
97; predestination, jjiiz/leil about, iii. 
395 ; prefaces, his, ii. 508, «. 2 ; iv. 
132, //. 2; l'ivlo:^ue to tlw Ti-mpest, 
quoted, i. 418; prolojjues, his, ii. 372; 
rhyniinfj tragetlies, iv. 50, n. 3; Rival 
Ladies, ipioted, iii. 336, //. i; Royal 
Society, lines on tiie, ii. 277; Settle, 
Klkanah, rivalry with, iii. 87; Shake- 
speare, admiration of, ii. yy.), n. i ; 
She Stoops to CoHi/iier, its title taken 
from him, ii. 236, //. 1; '.shorn of his 
beams,' iii. 412, //. 6; style, distin- 
ijuished by his, iii. 318; traded in 
corruption, i. 2iS, ;/. 4; Virgil, trans- 
lati»>n of, iii. 220 ; Will's Codec- 
house, at, iii. 82; Zimri, character of, 
ii. 97. 

Di: I5c)S, ii. 103. 

In CK, epitaph on a, i. 47. 

DlCKET, (jKURtlE, i. 341, //. 4. 

Ducking-stool, iii. 326. 

DiDi.EY, Lord, V. 521. 

DlDi.KY, Sir Henry, (<7//<7j Rev. Henry 
Hate), iv. 342, //. 2. 

Dt KL, trial by, v. 25. 

Dt Kl.i.l.Nc;, defended by Johnson and 
Oglethorpe, ii. 2of> ; by Johnson as 
being as lawful as war, ii. 260; as 
self-defence, iv. 243; his serious opin- 
ion not given, iv. 244, //. 2 ; could 
not explain its rationality, v. 262; 
Thomas, Colonel, killed in one, iv. 
244, ;/. 2; Tom Jones, the lieutenant 
in, ii. 207, //. I. 

Dri-i-F.RiN, tifth Earl of, i. 414, ;/. 3. 

DlTGi:)Al,E, William, Sunday work in 
harvest, iii. 356, n. 2. 

Du Halde, Description of China, i. 
158, 181; ii. 63; iv. 35. 

Dike, Richard, iv. 43, n. i. 

Duke, an English one nothing, i. 474; 
weighed against a genius, i. 512. 



Dunning. 

Dii.L, fellow, a, ii. 145; — magistrate, 

iv. 3(k). 
J)tim Z'iz'imus, ziianius, v. 308. 
Di N, Rev. Mr., v. 434. 
Dl'.NH.VK, Dr., Johnson intro«luces bim 

to IJoswell, iii. 495 ; described by 

Mackintosh and Colman, if>., n. i; 

mentioned, v. 104. 
Dlnian, Dr., ii. 406, «. 2. 
Dl N( Es, ii. 97. 
r)lNi oMitE, William, iii. 357. 
DlNDAS, l^ord President, ii. 57, >/. 2, 

345. "• 3; ">• 242. 

DlNUAS, Henry (Viscount Melville), 
account of him, ii. 184, «. i ; Uos- 
well's malice against him, iii. 242, «. 
i; Ceorge IH, and a baronetcy for 
an apothecary, ii. 406, ;/. 2; govern- 
ment of India bill, iv. 246, «. i ; 
Knight, the negro, case of, iii. 242; 
Literary Property Case, i. 309; 
Palmer ami Muir's case, iv. 144, u. 2; 
Robertson, a jaunt with, iii. 381, //. 
1; .Scotch accent, his, ii. 183; iii. 242: 
serfdom in Scotland, on, iii. 229, n. i ; 
mentioned, ii. 219, m. 2. 

Dundee, John, Viscount of, v. 65, «. i. 

' Dungeon ok Wit,' v. 390. 

Dunkirk, iii. 371. 

DuNNKJRE, fourth Earl of, v. 162, w. 2. 

Dunning, John (first Lorti Ashburton), 
business, his way of getting through, 
iii. 146, n. 2; Devonshire accent, ii. 
182; great lawyer, the," iii. 146; in- 
fluence of the Crown, motion on the. 
iv. 255, ;/. I ; Johnson, willing to 
listen to, iii. 272; Letter to Mr. Dun- 
ning on the English Particle, iii. 
402; Literary Club, member of the, i. 
554; elected, iii. 146; Loughborough. 
Lord, afraid of him, iii. 272, n. 3 ; 
Reynolds's dinner parties, describes, 
iii. 427, «. i; Somerset's case, in, iii. 
99, n. 6; mentioned, i. 506, n. 2. 



BoswelVs Life of Johnson, 



73 



Dunsinnan. 



Education. 



Dunsinnan, Lord. Sec Nairne, 
William. 

Dunstable, v. 488. 

Dtinton s Life and Envrs, iv. 231. 

Diipins History of the Church, iv. 360. 

DiPPA, Bishop, Holy Rules, iv. 463, 
«. 3- 

Dui'i'A, R., edits Johnson's Journey 
into North IVales, ii. 326, n. 2 ; v. 
487, n. r. 

Duraiuli Rationale Officiorum Divino- 
ruin, ii. 455, n. 2; v. 523. 

Durandi Sanctuarium, ii. 455. 

Durham on the Galatians, v. 437. 

Durham (City), iii. 338, n. i, 518; v. 
63, n. 2. 

Durham (County), Militia Bill of 1756, 
i. 356, n. 2. 

DuRY, Lieutenant-Colonel, i. 391, «. 2. 

DuRY, Major-General, i. 391, n. 2. 

Dutch. See Holland. 

Dyer, Sir James, i. 87, «. 4. 

Dyer, John, Fleece, The, ii. 519; S. 
Dyer's portrait passed off as his, ib. , 
n. I. 

Dyer, Samuel, account of him, iv. 13, 
n. i; Hawkins's character, draws, i. 
33, n. I ; Hawkins slanders him, i. 
555, n. 2; Ivy Lane Club, member 
of the, iv. 503; Johnson buys his por- 
trait, iv. 13, }i. i; Junius, suspected 
to be, iv. 11; Literary Club, member 
of the, i. 553, «. 2, 554, 555, n. 3; ii. 
19; held in high estimation, iv. 12; 
mathematician, a, v. 124; Reynolds's 
portrait of him, i. 421, n. i; ii. 519, 
n. I. 

Dying. See Death. 



Eagle and Robin Redbreast, i. 135, «. 2. 
Early Habits, ii. 420. 
Early Rising. See under Boswell, 
early rising, and Johnson, rising. 



Earthquake, at Lisbon, i. 358, n. 2; 
in Staffordshire, iii. 154. 

East Lndians, barbarians, iii. 386. 

East Indies, Johnson receives a letter 
thence, iii. 23, 26; — once thought 
of going there, iii. 23 ; quest of 
wealth, iii. 455; Scotch soldiers re- 
fuse to go there, v. 162, w. 2. See 
India. 

Easter. See under Johnson. 

Easter to Whitsuntide, propitious to 
study, ii. 301. 

Easton Maudit, i. 563; iii. 496, 512. 

Eating. See under Johnson. 

Eccles, Mr., an Irish gentleman, i. 
490. 

Eccles, Rev. W., i. 360. 

Ecclesiastes, iv. 348, n. 

Ecclesiastical Censure, iii. 68, 104. 

Economy, anxious saving, ii. 151; art 
of — , iii. 300, 412 ; blundering — , 
iii. 341- 

Eddystone, i. 437. 

Edensor Inn, iii. 237. 

Edial, i. 112; ii. 165. 

Edinhtirgh Magazine and Review, iii. 
380, n. I. 

Edinburgh Review, Campbell's Diary 
of a Visit to England, ii. 387, n. 2, 
393, n. i; payment to writers in it, 
iv. 247, n. 2. 

Edinburgh Review of 1755, i. 345, n, 2. 

Edinburgh Royal Society Transactions, 
iv. 30, n. 4. 

Editions of a Book, iv. 321. 

Education, by-roads, ii. 467 ; ' Dick 
Wormwood' in The Idler, ii. 467, 
n. 3; fear, use of, i. 54; v. 112-13; 
influence of it compared with nature, 
ii. 500; Johnson attacks and defends 
the ' common way,' ii. 467, n. 3; de- 
fends popular — , ii. 216; iii. 43; his 
plan, iii. 407, «. 3; Locke's plan, iii. 
407; Mill, J. S., on the new system, 



74 



hidex to 



Education. 



Elizabeth. 



ii. i68, n. 3; Milton's plan, iii. 407; 
' wonders ' performed by him, ii. 467, 
n. 3; perfection attained in it, ii. 467; 
refine, not to, in it, iii. 192; Socrates's 
plan, iii. 407, n. 3; iv. 513; what 
should l)e taught first ? i. 523. See 
Books, Knowlkuce, Lkarmm;, 
Schools, and Scotland, Educa- 
tion, Learning, and Schools. 

Edward, Prince, brother of George 
III, iii. 158, //. 3. 

Edwards, Rev. Dr., Johnson's letter 
to him, iii. 417; editing Xenophon, 
ib.; death, //'., ;/. i. 

Edwards, Jonathan, On Grace, iii. 
329. 

Edwards, Oliver, Johnson, meets, iii. 
343-9 ; iv. 104 ; — sends him 7'/ie 
Rambler, ib. ; tried philosophy, iii. 
346. 

Edwards, Thomas, Canons of Criti- 
cism, i. 306, //.I. 

Edwi.n, the comedian, iv. 439, n. i. 

Eel, iii 433. 

EoLiNTOU.NE, Alexander, tenth Earl 
of, calls Johnson a dancing-bear, ii. 
77; his character, v. 426; death, iii. 
214. 

Eglintoink, Archibald, eleventh Earl 
of, iii. 121, 244, 359; V. 171. 

Er.LlNTOLNK, Countess of, Johnson 
visits her, v. 425-7; — is adopted by 
her, iii. 416; v. 427, 457. 

Eglogttes, i. 321. 

Egmont, second Earl of, iv. 229, n. i ; 
V. 512, n. I. 

Egotism, iv. 373. 

Egotists, iii. 195. 

Egypt, iii. 264. 

Egyptians, ancient, iv. 145. 

Eightetn Hundred and Eleven, ii. 468, 

«. 3- 
Eld, Mr., iii. 371. 
Eldon Earl of. See Scott, John. 



Election, General, of 1768, ii. 68, «. 

3: of 1774, ii. 326-7; of 1780, iii. 

499; of 1784, iv. 190, n. 3. 
Elkction-Committkks, iv. 86. 
Elections, boroughs l)ought, ii. 176; 

— by Nabobs, v. 120; lost by vice, 
iii. 398; rascals to be driven out of 
the county, ii. 192, 389. 

Elegy in a Cotititry Churchyard. See 
Gray. 

Elements of Criticism. See Kames. 

Elements of Orthoepy, iv. 449, n. 4. 

Elfrida, ii. 383. 

Elgin, Earls of, v. 27, n. i. 

Elihank, Patrick, fifth Lord, account 
of him, V. 440; lioswcU, correspond- 
ence with, V. 14, 16, 206, 360; death, 
v. 206, //. 3; epitaph on his wife, iv. 
12; Home, patronises, v. 440; John- 
son's definition of oats, i. 341, «. 3; 

— and the great, iv. 135; — letter 
to him, V. 207 ; — meets him in 
Edinburgh, v. 439-42, 448-9; — vis- 
its him, V. 449; — power of arguing, 
iii. 28 ; — praises him, iii. 28 ; v. 
207, 439; — society, loves, v. 206-7; 
Robertson, patronises, v. 440 ; — , 
admires the moderation of, v. 448; 
talk, nothing conclusive in his, iii. 
65; mentioned, ii. 162, 169, 215, 220, 
315; V. 350. 

Eliot, Edward, of Port Eliot, first 
Lord Eliot, Chesterfield, Lord, 
praised by, iv. 386, n. i ; dines at Sir 
Joshua's, iv. 90, 384; Goldsmith, sar- 
casm on, ii. 304, n. 4; Harte, Dr., 
his tutor, iv. 90, 385 ; Johnson and 
the graces, iii. 63 ; Literary Club, 
member of the, i. 555; iv. 376; lat- 
iner, story of a, iv. 213, n. 3; young 
Lord, a, iv. 386. 

Eliza, epigram to. See Mrs. Carter. 

Elizabeth, Madame, ii. 452. 

Elizabeth, Queen, authors of her age. 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



75 



Elizabeth. 



Englishman. 



iii. 220, n. 4 ; fashion to exalt her 
reign, i. 410 ; had learning enough 
for a bishop, iv. 16. 

ELLENBOKoroH, first Lord, iv. 477, 
n. 2. 

Elliock, Lord, iii. 243. 

Elliot, vSir Gilbert, third Baronet, ii. 
184. 

Elliot, Sir Ciilbert, fourth Baronet 
(afterwards first Earl of Minto), ii. 
81, «. I. 

Elliot, Mr., i. 404. 

Elliot, — , iii. 400, n. 3. 

Ellis, Sir Henry, i. 302, n. i; v. 506, 
n. 2. 

Ellis, 'Jack,' a scrivener, iii. 24. 

Ellis, Welbore, ii. 386, n. 3. 

Ellis, Mr., ii. 133. 

Ellsfield, i. 317, 335, n. 2. 

Elocution, iv. 238. 

Elphinston, James, Forty Years Cor- 
respondence, ii. 349; Johnson, letters 
from: j^^' Johnson, letters; Martial, 
translation of, iii. 293; manner, his, 
ii. 196-7; iii. 431; mother, loses his, 
i. 245; Rambler, brings out a Scotch 
edition of the, i. 244; — translates 
the mottoes, i. 261 ; reading books 
through, on, ii. 260 ; school, his, ii. 
196-7, 259; mentioned, ii. 34. 

Eli'Hinstonr, Bishop, v. 103. 

Elrington, Bishop, ii. 44, n. i. 

Elvira, i. 473. 

Elwall, E.. ii. 188, 288. 

Elwallians, ii. 188. 

Elvvin, Rev. W., Popes Universal 
Prayer, iii. 394, n. 3. 

Embellishment, iii. 237. 

Emigration, complaints of it, iii. 262; 
efTects of it on population, iii. 263; 
on happiness, v. 29; caused by op- 
pressive landlords, ib. n. 3 ; immer- 
sion in barbarism, v. 88. See SCOT- 
LAND, Highlands, emigration. 



Eminent Public Character, an, ii. 
255- 

Emmet, Mrs., ii. 532. 

Emphasis. See Commandment. 

Employments, their end is to produce 
amusement, ii. 269. 

Emulation, i. 54; v. 113. 

Enghien, Duke of, ii. 451, «. 5. 

England, air too pure for slaves to 
breathe in, iii. 99, n. 6 ; Condition 
(1780), 'difficulty very general,' iii. 
477; (1782) seems to be sinking, iv. 
161, «. 4; (1783) all things as bad as 
they can be, iv. 200; dreadful con- 
fusion, iv. 288 ; times dismal and 
gloomy, iv. 300, «. 2; Corsica, treat- 
ment of, ii. 81, n. i; common people, 
courage of the, iii. 297, «. i; cruelty 
to black men, ii. 550; Englishman to 
a Frenchman, proportion of an, i. 
215; felicity in its inns, ii. 516; gen- 
ius and learning little respected, iv. 
135. «• 3; government loan raised at 
8 per cent, in 1779, iii. 464, n. 3; his- 
tory of it scarcely credible, v. 387 ; 
knowledge of the common people, ii. 
196, n. I ; language injured by for- 
eign words, iii. 390, n. 3; literature: 
see Literature; lost, found by the 
Scotch, iii. 90 ; loyal in general, ii. 
424; poor, provision for the, ii. 149; 
reason and soil best cultivated, ii. 
143; Reign of Terror, a kind of, iv. 
379, n. I ; reserve, English, iv. 221, 
328; roads, iii. 153, «. i; v. 63, n. 2; 
slave trade, upholds the, ii. 551 ; 
stature of the people not lessened, ii. 
250. 

England' s Gazetteer, iv. 360. 

English Humourists, i. 230, «. 5. 

English Malady, The, i. 75; iii. 31, n. i. 

English Poets, Bell's, ii. 519, n. i. 

English Prose. See Style. 

Englishman in Paris, ii. 453, «. 2. 



76 



Index io 



Entails. 

Entails, advantage of them, ii. 491; 

Harony of Auchinleck, ii. 474-84; 

Johnson's letters on it, ii. 476-83; 

limits should be set, ii. 491; nobles 

must be kept from poverty, ii. 482, 

n. 2; V. 115. 
Enthusias.m, of curiosity, iii. 8 ; in 

farming, v. 126. 
ENTiirsiA.ST, by rule, iv. 39. 
[•.nucleated, iii. 394. 
E.NVY, all men naturally envious, iii. 

307. 
Ei'lCHARMUs, ii. 123, n. 1. 

El'ICTF.Tl'S, V. 318. 

Epicurean in I.iician, iii. 12. 

Enr.RAM, judge of an, iii. 293. 

Eriscoi'ACY, iii. 422 ; iv. 320. .Sir 
BisHors and Hierarchy. 

Epistle of St. fteisil, iv. 23. 

Ei'iTAPHs addressed to the passers-by, 
iv. 98, n. I ; V. 417, « 3; Latin for 
learned men, iii. 96, «. 2; v. 175, 417; 
man killed by a fall, on a, iv. 245; 
mixed languages or styles, iv. 513; 
the writer not upon oath, ii. 466; iii. 
441, M. i; iv. 512. 

Epitaphs, Essay on, i. 171, 38S; iv. 98, 
n. i; v. 417, «. 3. 

Epocha, iii. 145. 

ErsoM, iii. 514. 

Equality of Mankind, would turn 
men into brutes, ii. 252; none happy 
in it, iii. 30; mercy abolished by it, 
iii. 232, n. i; natural, ii. 14, n. 4, 551; 
iii. 229. Sec Subordination. 

Equitation, v. 149. 

Erasmus, Adagiomm Chiliades, iv. 
437, n. 2 ; battologia, v. 506 ; Cice- 
ronianus, iv. 407; Dutch epitaph on 
him would be oflTensive, iii. 96, n. 2; 
epigram on him, v. 490; Letter to the 
Nuns, V. 508 ; Militis Christiani 
Enchiridion, iii. 217, n. 2 ; Monita 
Pcedagogica, quoted, i. 484, ;/. 3. 



Essay. 

Errol. Earls of, their property, v. 115, 

n. 3, 120, //. I. 
Errol, thirteenth Earl of, account of 
him, V. 1 16-17; says grace with de- 
cency and sees the hand of Provi- 
dence, V. 118; his drinking, iii. 193, 
"• 2, 375; V. ii8; educates a sur- 
geon, v. 114; portrait by Reynolds, 
v. 115. 
Errol, Lady, v. 111-12, 119, 14R. 
Error, taking delight in, iv 235. 
Erse. See Ireland and Scotland. 

Highlands, Erse. 
Erskine, Hon. Andrew, Conrspond- 
ence 7vith James BosweU, Esq., i. 
444, n. i; iii. 170, «. 3; Critical 
Strictures, i. 473 ; poet and critick, 
iii. 170. 
Erskine, Lady Anne, v. 441 
Erskine, Hon. Archibald, v 441. 
Erskine, Sir Harry, i. 447. 
Erskine, Hon. Henry, v. 44, « ; . 
Erskine, Hon. Thomas (afterwards 
Lord Erskine), account of him, ii. 
199, n. I ; Johnson, meets, ii. 199- 
203 ; Richardson tedious, finds, ii. 
200; sermons, preached two, ii. 202. 
Erskine, Rev. Dr., v. 446. 
Esau's Birthright, i. 295. 
Esdras, ii. 218, n. i. 
Esquimaux, ii. 283. 
Esquire, title of, i. 40; ii. 380, «. 1. 
Essay on Account of the Conduct of 
the Duchess of Marlt>orough, i. 177. 
Essay on Architecture, i. 354. 
Essay on Death, ii. 123, n. i. 
Essay of Dramatick Poesie, i. 228, 

n. 2. 
Essay on Epitaphs. See Epitaphs. 
Essay on Milton s Use and Imitation 
of the Modems in his Paradise Lost, 
i. 266. 
Essay on the Future Life of Brutes, 
ii. 61, «. 2. 



BoswelVs Life of Johnson. 



77 



Essay. 



Excise. 



Essay on the Origin of Evil. See 
King, Archbishop. 

Essay on Truth. See Beattie, Dr. 

Essay on Wit, Humour, and Ridicule, 
iv. 122, n. 3. 

Essays on the History of Mankind, iii. 
495. n. I. 

Essays on Husbandry, iv. 91, n. 2. 

Essex, Club in one of the towns, i. 
250; militia, i. 356, n. 2. 

Essex, Arthur Capel, first Earl of, v. 
460, «. 2. 

Essex, Robert Devereux, second Earl 
of, advice about travelling, i. 499 ; 
Queen Elizabeth's Champion, written 
in his honour, v. 274. 

Estate, residence on it a duty, iii. 201, 
282; settling, supposed obligation in, 
ii. 494; succession in ancient estates, 
ii. 300; in those got by trade, ib. 

Este, House of, i. 443. 

Eternal Punishment, iii. 227. 

Eternity, v. 176. 

Ethics, ii. 468, n. 3. 

Etna, strata of lava, ii. 536, n. i. 

Eton College, Boswell places his son 
there, iii. 14; dines with the Fellows, 
V. 16, «. i; boys cowed there, iii. 13, 
n. I ; line attributed to a boy, iii. 
346; Macdonald, Sir James, a pupil, 
i. 520, n. i; iv. 95, n. i; Porson on 
Eton boys, i. 259, «. 2 ; Walpole, 
Horace, revisits it, iv. 147, «. i; men- 
tioned, i. 475; iv. 364; V. iio. 

Etymologicon Lingua: Anglicana, i. 
215, «, 2. 

Etymologicwn Anglicanum, i. 215, «. 2. 

Etymologies. See Dictiotiary. 

Eugene, Prince, ii. 207. 

Eugenio, i. 141; ii. 276. 

Eumelian Club, iv. 455. 

EuPHRANOR, iv. 120, n. 3. 

EupoLis, iii. 303, n. 4. 

Euripides, Agamemnon in Hecuba, 



v. 89 ; armorial bearings, ii. 205 ; 
' every verse a precept,' ii. 99, n, i; 
fragments, iv. 209, ;/. 2 ; Barnes's 
edition, ib.; Johnson reads him, i. 
82, 84; iv. 359; Markland's edition, 
iv. 185, n, 5 ; quoted, i. 322 ; men- 
tioned, iv. 2. 

European Magazine, i. 418, n. 2. 

EuTROPius, ii. 272. 

Evangelical History Harmonized, iv. 

439. «• I- 

Evans, Dr., epigram on Marlborough, 
ii. 516. 

Evans, Evan, addicted to strong drink, 
V. 505. 

Evans, John, i. 42, n. i. 

Evans. Lewis, Map, ^c, of the Mid- 
dle Colonies, i. 358. 

Evans, Thomas, booksellers, ii. 240. 

Evans, Mr., iii. 479, 

Evelina. See Miss Burney. 

Evening Post, iv. 161, k. 5. 

Everlasting Punishment, iv. 345. 

Every island is a prison, iii. 305 ; v. 
291. 

Evil, origin of, v. 133, 416. 

Evil Spirit, personality of the, v. 40, 
«. 3. 

Evil Spirits, their agency, v. 50. 

Exaggeration, causes of it, iii. 154; 
checked by arithmetic, iv. 197, n. 2; 
instances of it — depth of places 
filled up, v. 333; earthquake at Lis- 
bon, i. 358, n. 2; editions of Thomas 
a Ketnpis, iii, 256, n. 5; opera girls 
in France, iv. 197. 

Exanien of Pope's Essay on Man, i. 

159- 

Examiner, The (1873), iv. 234, n. I. 

Excellence, how acquired, iv. 212. 
n. I. 

Excise, Commissioners of, i, 341, n. 4. 

Excise, defined, i. 341 ; origin of John- 
son's violence against it, i. 43, «. I. 



78 



Index to 



Excursion. 



Families. 



Excursion, The, ii. 29. 

EXECL'TIONS, account of the capital 
convictions in 1783-5, iv. 379, «. i, 
380, n. 2, 414, M. 2; Boswell's love 
of seeing them: see under Boswell; 
coiuleinnation sermon at 0.xford, i. 
317; capital punishment, cruel in- 
stance of, i. 169, n. i; Newgate, re- 
moved to, iv. 217 ; Rambler, men- 
tioned in the, iv. 217, //. 3; Tyburn, 
procession to, iv. 217. 

Executors, v. 120. 

Exercise, defined, iv. 174, n. i; relief 
for melancholy, i. 74, 517 ; renders 
death easy, iv. 173, ;;. 2. 

Exeter, City and County, i. 42, ;/. 3; 
freedom given to Chief Justice Pratt, 
ii. 405, n. i; George III visits it, iv. 
190, n. 3; mentioned, iii. 518; iv. 89. 

Exeter, Dr. Ross, bishop of, iv. 315. 

ExiiiiiiTioN. See Royal Acade.my. 

E.xisiENCE, complaints of existence 
being imposed on man, iii. 61; terms 
on which it is offered, iii. 66. See 
Life. 

Expectations, i. 390, n. 3 ; iv. 270, 
«. 3- 

ExrEM)rri:RE. See Economy. 

Experience, great test of truth, i. 
526. 

Explanatory Notes on Paradise Lost, 
i. 149, n. I. 

Extraordinary Characters, ii. 5 1 5. 

F. 

Fable of the Bees, iii. 331, n. 2, 332, ns. 

I, 2, and 3. 
Fable of t/ie Glow-rvorm, ii. 266. 
Faction, iv. 232. 

Facts, mingled with fiction, iv. 215. 
Faculty, The, iii. 324, n. i. 
Fairies, iv. 20. 

Faden, W., i. 382, ;/. 4; iv. 508. 
Fairfax, Edward, iv. 43, n. i. 



Fairi.ie, Mr., V. 434. 

Faith, merit in, iv. 142. 

Falco.ner, Rev. Mr., iii. 422. 

Falconer, Alexander, v. 116. 

F'alklani), Lord, iv. 494, n. 2. 

Falkland' s Islands, Thoughts on the 
late Transactions respecting, account 
of it, ii. 154: Johnson's estimate of 
it, ii. 168; ' softened' in later copies, 
ii. 155; sale delayed by Lord North, 
ii. 156; mentioned, i. 432, «. i ; ii. 
356; iii. 22, n. 2. 

Falmouth, Viscount, iii. 376. 

False Alarm, account of it, ii. 128; an- 
swers to it, ii. 129; election commit- 
tees described, iv. 86, n. 3; Johnson's 
estimate of it, ii. 168 ; petitions de- 
scribed, ii. 104, n. 2; rapidly written, 
i. 83, n. 2, 432, //. i; Wilkes, answer 
attributed to, iv. 36; Wilkes attacked, 
iii. 74, n. I ; iv. 121. 

False Cries, transmitted from book 
to book, iii. 64. 

False Delicacy, ii. 54. 

Falsehood, due mostly to careless- 
ness, iii. 259, ib., n. i; prevalence of 
it, iii. 260. 

Falstaff, Beauclerk adopts his ' hu- 
morous phrase,' i. 290; ' I deny your 
Major,' iv. 364 ; proved no coward, 
iv. 221, «. 4; mentioned, i. 587. 

Fame, general desire for it, iii. 298 ; 
literary, hard to get, ii. 410; a shut- 
tlecock, V. 456; solicitude about it, i. 
522. 

Families, Great, chaplains and state 
servants, ii. 11 1 ; continuance of 
them, ii. 482; desire to propagate the 
name, ii. 537; estate, living on the, 
iii. 201, 2S2 ; founding one, ii. 491 ; 
household, number in the, iii. 359 ; 
preference shown them, ii. 175-6; 
mined by extravagance, ii. 490. See 
under Boswell and Johnson, Birth, 



Boswelfs Life of yohnson. 



79 



Family. 



Fielding. 



Family, affected by commerce, ii. 204. 

Fancies, apprehensions, fancrful, i. 
544; iii. 5. See BoswELL, Fancies. 

Fan'CY, compared with reason, ii. 317. 

Fantoccini, i. 479. 

Farmer, Dr., Colman, criticised by, 
iv. 21 ; Essay on the Learning of 
Shakspeare, iii. 45; Johnson praises 
it, ib., «. i; — letters to him, i. 426; 
ii. 131; iii. 485: Percy, in his Ancient 
Ballads, helps, iii. 314, «. 2; Steevens, 
friendship with, iii. 319, «. 3; I'ris- 
trani Shandy, despises, ii. 514, «. 3; 
mentioned, iv. 163. 

Farmers, worthless fellows, often, iii. 
402; described by Wesley, ib., n. i. 

Farquhar, George, Johnson's opinion 
of his writings, iv. 8. See Beaux 
Stratagem. 

Fashionable Lover, v. 200. 

Fasting, examined medically, ii. 547- 
8; justified, ii. 404, n. i; peevishness 
caused by it, ii. 498; sec Johnson, 
fasting. 

Fat Men, iv. 246. 

Fate. See Free Will. 

Father, control over his daughters in 
marriage, iii. 429; not bound to tell 
of his children's faults, iii. 21. 

Father's Revenge, The, iv. 284. 

Faulder, a bookseller, iv. 446, n. i. 

Faulkner, G., Chesterfield's account 
of him, V. 49, ;/. i ; Ireland drained 
by England, v. 49 ; mimicked by 
Foote, ii. 177; v. 148; mentioned, i. 
372. 

Fawkener, Sir Everard, i. 209, n. 2. 

Fawkes, Rev. Francis, i. 443. 

Favour, granting a, ii. 192. 

Favourite defined, i. 342, n. i. 

Fear, Charles V's saying, ii. 93; noth- 
ing left to fear when a man is bent 
on killing himself, ii. 263. See 
Courage. 



Feeling for others. See Sympa- 
thy. 

Felixmarte of Hircania, i. 57. 

Fell, John, Demoniacs, v. 40, n. 3. 

I^'eilow, ii. 415. 

Fencing, v. 74. 

Fenelon, Archbishop, v. 200, n. 3, 354. 

Fenton, Elijah, his advice to Gay, v. 
67, «. 5; JMariamne, i. 118, «. 4; 
non-juror, a, ii. 367, n. 4. 

Ferguson, James, the self-taught phi- 
losopher, ii. 114; v. 170. 

Ferguson, James, a Scotch advocate, 
iii. 242, 243, n I 

Fergusson, Dr. Adam, account of him, 
V. 46; mentioned, ii. 60, n. i; v. 50. 

Fergusson, Sir Adam, ii. 194. 

Fekmor, Arabella, ii. 450, «. 4. 

Fkrmor, Mrs., the Abbess, ii. 450. 

Ferne, Mr., V. 140-43. 

Ferney, i. 503; V. 14. 

Ferns, Burke's pun on, iv. 85. 

Festivals and Fasts, ii. 525. 

Feudal Antiquities, ii. 232; iii. 471. 

' Feudal Gabble,' ii 155, n. i. 

Feudal System, Boswell for, and 
Johnson against it, ii. 203-4, v. 120; 
Johnson has the old feudal notions, 
iii. 201 ; male succession, origin of, 
ii. 478-80, ridiculed by Smollett, v. 
120, n. 3. 

Fiction, small amount of real, iv. 272. 

Fiddlers, ii. 219. 

Fiddling, dangerous fascination, iii. 
274; little thing, but not disgraceful, 
iii. 274; power of art shown in it, ii. 

259- 
Fielding, Henry, alms-giving, on, ii. 
137, n. 2, 243, 71. 2 ; Amelia, dedi- 
cated to Ralph Allen, v. 91, «. 2; — 
Johnson reads it at a sitting, iii. 49; 
complains of the heroine's broken 
nose, ib., «. 5; — Richardson could 
not read it, ii. 199, «. 3 ; — ' sad 



8o 



Index to 



Fielding. 



Fitzherbert. 



stuff,' iii. 4Q, «. 5; — sale rapid, //'.,• 

— description of a buck, v. 210, //. 
2 ; — Westminster Round-house, i. 
289, ;/. 1; attacks on authors, on, v. 
313,//. i; l)lockhead, a, ii. 199; bar- 
ren rascal, a, ii. 199; Burney, Miss, 
admired by, ii. 200, «. i; Champion, 
The, i. 195, ;;. 2; died at Lisbon, iv. 
300 ; foreigners, not understood by, 
ii. 55, //. 4; (libbon's tribute to him, 
ii. 201, u. 2; hospitals, on, iii. 62, w. 
i; Johnson praises him, ii. 199, n. 2: 
see above, Anielia, blockhead, and 
below, Tom Joius ; Jonathan Wild, 
compared with St. Austin, iv. 336; 

— Hockley in the Hole, iii. 152, 
n. I ; Joseph Andrews, never read 
by Johnson, ii. 200; — Parson 
Adams, the original of, iii. 483, n. 3; 

— Cato and The Conscious Lovers, 
praised by Adams, i. 569, n. i ; Rich- 
ardson, compared with, ii. 55, 200, 
ih., n. i; Richardson's description of 
his heroes, ii. 56; of Fielding, ii. 199; 

— of Tom Jones, ii. 201, «. 2; Robin- 
hood Society described, iv. 107, n. 3; 
Tom Jones, Boswell praises it, ii. 201 ; 

— Johnson despises it, ii. 199 ; — 
More, Hannah, read by, ii. 200, n. i; 

— price paid for it, i. 332, n. 3; — 
Allen the original of Alhvorthy, v. 
gi, n. 2; — charity to the poor, ii. 
243, «. 2; — duelling, ii. 207, «. i; 

— Garrick and Partridge, v. 42, — 
ghosts never speak first, v. 82, n. 3; 

— soldiers, quartering of, iii. Ii, n. 
2; — Squire Western on marriage, 
ii. 377, «. i; — transpire, iii. 390, n. 
2 ; Voyage to Lisbon, i. 313, n. l ; 
Ward, the quack-doctor, praises, iii. 
443, «. 2; Welch, Saunders, succeed- 
ed by, iii. 245; Westminster Justice, 
salary as a, iii. 246, «. 3. 

Fielding, Sir John, Boswell applies to 



him, i. 4S9 ; liis house pulled down 
in the Gordon Riots, iii. 4S7. 
\ P'lK.LDl.Nc, Miss, compared with her 
I brother, ii. 55, «. 4. 
i FlKi.ni.NG, — , a bookseller, iv. 486, 
//. I. 

Fii K, Earl, v. 124. 

FlGiiTlNc-cocK, ii. 382. 

FjGURATiVE Expressions, in prayers, 
iv. 340. 

FiLliY, John, ii. 96. 

Fine and Recovery, ii. 491, >/. 2. 

Fine Clothes, iv. 207; v. 415. 

Fines, iii. 367-8. 

Fingal. See MAcrHERSON, James. 

Finnick Dictionary, i. 320, 323. 

Fire, going round the, i. 69, n. 5 ; su- 
perstitious tricks to make it burn, iii. 

459- 

FiREiiRACE, Lady, i. 158. 

First Cause, iii. 360. 

Fisher, Dr., ii. 308, n. i, 509, n. 2. 

Fisher, Kitty, v. 210, ;;. 3. 

P'iSHMONGER, story of a, iii. 433. 

Fitz-Adam, Adam (Edward Moore), 
i. 299, n. I. 

Fitzherbert, Allcyne (Lord St. 
Helen's), i. 96. 

Fitzherbert, Mrs., i. 96; iv. 39. 

Fitzherbert, William, affected man, 
dealing with an, iii. 169 ; Baretti's 
trial, at, ii. Ill, n. 3; ban mot, on 
carrying a, ii. 401 ; character, his, 
drawn by Johnson, iii. 168; and by 
Burke, ib., n. i; felicity of manner, 
iii. 439; Foote's small beer, anecdote 
of, iii. 80; friend, had no, ii. 262; iii. 
169, n. i; hanged himself, ii. 262, n. 
3 ; iii. 169, n. 2, 437, n. i ; Johnson 
in Inner Temple-lane, describes, i. 
405, ti. 3; — , defends in parliament, 
iv. 368, n. 2; — , makes a present of 
wine to, i. 353, n. 2 ; parliament, 
elected to, i. 420 ; Townshend's, 



BoswelVs Life of Jo hi son. 



8i 



Fitzherbert. 



Foote. 



Charles, jokes, ii. 255 ; tragedy, an- 
ecdote of a, iii. 270 ; mentioned, i. 

96; iv. 33, 39. 
FiTZMAURiCE, Thomas, ii. 323, n. 2. 
Fitzosborne s Letters, iii. 481 ; iv. 314, 

n. 3. 
FrrZPATRicK, Richard, iii. 441, ;;. 4. 
FlTZROY, Lord Charles, ii. 535. 
FiTZWiLLiAM, Lord, iv. 423, ;/. 3. 
Flageolet, iii. 274. 
Flatman, Thomas, iii. 33. 
Flattery, flattered l)y him whom 

every one else flatters, ii. 261 ; 

pleases generally, ii. 417 ; stage, on 

the, ii. 268. 
Flea and a lion, ii. 223 ; precedency 

between a flea and a louse, iv. 222. 
Fleece, The, ii. 519. 
Fleetwood, Bishop, v. 335, n. 2. 
Fleetwood, Charles, patentee of 

Drury-lane theatre, i. 129, 176. 
Fleetwood, Everard, iii. 367, u. 4. 
Fleming, Lady, i. 534, ;/. 2. 
Flexman, Rev. Mr., iv. 375. 
Flexney, the bookseller, ii. 130, ;/. 2. 
Flint, Bet, iv. 119. 
Flint, Professor, v. 72. 
Flint, — , v. 491. 
Flouden Field, ii. 473; v. 432. 
Flogging, less than of old, ii. 467. See 

Rod. 
Flood, Right Hon. Henry, Johnson's 

Debates, on, i. 372, n. 4, 586; ii. 160; 

— sepulchral verses on, iv. 489-90. 
Florence, Johnson wishes to visit it, 

iii. 22 ; statue of a boar, iii. 262 ; 

wine, iii. 433. 
Floyd, Thomas, i. 529. 
Floyer, Sir John, M. D., advises the 

' regal touch,' i. 49; asthma, book on, 

iv. 408 ; corrupted the register, iv. 

308; Touchstotie of Medicines, i. 42, 

n. 2; Treatise on Cold Baths, i. 106. 
Fludver, Rev. John, ii. 508, 



Flying Man, iv. 412, n. 2. 

Folios, i. 496, w. i. 

Fondness, distinguished from kind- 
ness, iv. 177. 

Fontainebleau, ii. 442, 452. 

FoNTANERius, Paulus Pelissonius (Pe- 
lisson), i. 104, ;/. 3. 

FoNTENELLE, ' Fontenellus, ni fallor,' 
&c., ii. 144, n. 2; Memoires, iii. 280; 
Newton, on, ii. 85, n. 2; Panegyrick 
on Dr. Alorin, i. 173. 

FoNTENOY, Battle of, i. 411 ; iii. 10, 
n. 2. 

Food, production of, ii. 117. 

Fool, The, ii. 37. 

Fools, Latin needful to a fool's com- 
pleteness, i. 85, ;/. 2 ; ' let us be 
grave, here comes a fool,' i. 4; span- 
iel and mule fools, v. 257. 

Foote, Samuel, Baretti's trial, ii. 108; 
Bedlam, visits, ii. 429; ' black broth,' 
ii. 247 ; Burke, compared with, iv. 
318; Chesterfield, satire on, iv. 384; 
conversation between wit and buf- 
foonery, ii. 178 ; Cozeners, The, iv. 
384, n. 4; death, fear of, ii. 122; 
death, his, iii. 210, n. 3, 440, ;;. 4, 
514 ; Edinburgh, at, ii. 109, n. 2 ; 
Englishman in Paris, ii. 453, n. 2 ; 
' Foote, quatenus Foote superior to 
all,' iii. 210; Footeatia, iii. 210, n. 3; 
Garrick's bust, iv. 259 ; — and the 
ghost of a halfpenny, iii. 300 ; — ■ 
compared with, iii. 79, 209; v. 446; 
George III at the Haymarket, iv. 16, 
n. r; Haymarket theatre, gets a pat- 
ent for, iii. Ill, n. i; ' Hesiod ' 
Cooke introduces him, v. 41; humour 
not comedy but farce, ii. 109 ; im- 
partiality in lying, ii. 469 ; incom- 
pressible, V. 446; infidel, an, ii. 109; 
Johnson and the French players, ii. 
463; — intended to exhibit, ii. 109, 
178, n. I, 342; — in Paris, ii. 456, 



82 



Index to 



Foote. 

462; — pleased against his will, iii. 
79, 80 ; — regret for his death, iii. 
210, //. 3, 426, //. I ; — witticism, 
fathered on him, ii. 470, //. i; knowl- 
edge and reading, his, iii. 79; Law- 
l.ord, on a lUill, iv. 205-6; leg, loses 
a, ii. 109, ;/. i, 177, //. 3; iii. \\\, u. i; 
JfpeJitation^s. 149; Life of him, l)y W. 
Cooke, iv. 504; Macdonald, Sir A., 
should ridicule, v. 315; making fools 
of his company, ii. 113; mimic, not a 
good, ii. 177; iii. 79; ' .Monhoddo, 
an Elzevir Jolinson,' ii. 217, //. 2; v. 
83, //. 4; Mur])hy and The RaiiihUr, 
i. 412; Murphy's account of a dinner 
at his liouse, i. 584; Nabob, The, iii. 
26, //. 2; Orators, Tlu\ ii. 177, ;;. 2; 
V. 148, n. 3; patent, sells his, iii. no; 
Pii'ty in PatUtis, ii. 54, /;. 2 ; rising j 
in the worki, ii. 17S, ;;. 2 ; small- 1 
beer and the black boy, iii. 80 ; | 
stories, his, dismissed from the mind, | 
ii. 496, w. I ; Townshend, Charles, 
surpassed by, ii. 255, n. 3; wit of es- , 
cape, has the, iii. 79 ; wit under no 
restraint, iii. 79; Worcester College, , 
Oxford, at, ii. 109, «. 2 ; wicked 
pleasure in circulating an anecdote, 
i. 525. 

FoPl'KKY never cured, ii. 148. 

Forbes, Bishop, v. 287. 

Forbes, Rev. Mr., v. 85. 

Forbes, Sir William, and Co., v. 289. 

Forbes, Sir William, of Pitsligo, sixth 
Baronet, Beattie, Life of, v. 26, n. 4, 
311, n. 3; Boswell's eulogium on 
him, V. 26, 471, «. 3; — executor, iii. 
342, n. i; — children, guardian to, 
iii. 455, n. i; — journals, reads, iii. 
237; V. 471 ; — , letter to, v. 471 ; 
Carre's Sermons, edits, v. 30; Errol, 
Lord, account of, v. 117, n. i; honest 
lawyers, on the duty of, v. 28-9, 81; 
Johnson at Garrick's funeral, iii. 422, 



Forrester. 

n. I ; Round Robin, account of the, 

iii. 94-7 ; Scott's tribute to him, v. 

26, ;/. 4; mentioned, iii. 47, 48, 251; 

V. 35.43. 52.448. 
FuRltKS, Sir WiUiam, seventli baronet, 

V. 289, //. I. 
Ford, Cornelius (Johnson's uncle), i. 

57- 
Ford, Rev. Cornelius (Johnson's cous- 
in), Hogarth's 'Parson Ford,' i. 58; 

iii. 396 ; Johnson's account of him, 

ih.; his ghost, iii. 397. 
Ford, Dr. Joseph, i. 57, //. 4. 
Ford F.vMil.Y, i. 40; pedigree, i. 57, 

;/. 4. 
Fordyce, Dr. George, member of the 

Literary Club, i. 554; ii. 314, 363; 

iii. 261, n. 4; iv. 376; anecdote of 

his drinking, ii. 314, n. 5. 
Fordyce, Rev. Dr. James, i. 458; iv. 

474- 

Foreign L/i story in Gent. Afoi^. i. 178. 

FoREic.NER, an eminent, iv. 17. 

FoRKlONERS, 'are fools," i. 96, n. 2; 
iv. 17; writing a book in England, 
ii. 253-4; attaching themselves to a 
party, ib.: jf^- Jou.nso.n, Foreigners. 

Forenoon, changed into morning, ii. 

324. «• 3. 
FORGETFLLNESS, iv. I46. 
Form, iv. 371. 

Former, the, the latter, iv. 220. 
Formosa, iii. 503; v. 238. 
Formosa, IListorical and Geographical 

Description of, iii. 504. 
For.ms, tenacity of, iv. 121. 
Formnlar, ii. 268. 
Fornication, heinous sin, not a, ii. 

198; misery caused by it, i. 529; 

penance for it, v. 237; probationer, 

cause of a, ii. 197; a sectary guilty 

of it, ii. 541; should be punished by 

law, iii. 20, 462. 
Forrester, Colonel, iii. 25. 



BoswelVs Life of Johnson. 



83 



Forster. 



Fox, Charles. 



Forster, George, Voyage to the South 
Sea, iii. 205. 

Forster, John, Bickerstaff, I., ii. 94, 
n. 3; Boswell's stories, on variations 
of, i. 510, ;/. 2; Bute's pensioners, i. 
431, n. i; Churchill's Kosiiud, i. 4S6, 
w. 2; Davies and ' Gokly,' ii. 296, ;/. 
2; Dreliticourt on Death, ii. 187, //. 4; 
George Ill's pensioners, ii. I2g, it. 
2; Goldsmith's assault on Evans, ii. 
240, M. 2; — Good-Xatured Man, ii. 
54, n. 2; — quarrel with Johnson, ii. 
290, >/. 4; — She Stoops to Conquer, 
and the Royal Marriage Act, ii. 257, 
n. 2; its production on the stage, ii. 
239, n. 2 ; its title, ii. 236, n. \\ — 
and Sterne, ii. 199, ;/. 2; — Travel- 
ler, the first line in, iii. 2S7, n. i; in- 
accuracy about 'Hesiod' Cooke, v. 
41, n. I ; Johnson's letter to Gold- 
smith, ii. 2<70, n.\\ — and the Prince 
of Wales, iv. 312, n. i; Moore, Ed- 
ward, mistakes for Dr. John Moore, 
iii. 481; taste, changes in public, iii. 
2t8, n. 4. 

Fort, a pun on it, ii. 277, n. 2. 

Fortitude, iv. 432, n. 2. 

Fortune, a Rhapsody, i. 144. 

Fortune, wasting a, iii. 361. 

FoRTUNE-HrNTERs, ii. 151. 

Forwardness, ii. 514. 

FossANE, ii. 459. n. I. 

Fossilist, ii. 347, ;/. 3; v. 465, «. 2. 

Foster, Dr. James, iv. 11. 

Foster, John, head-master of Eton, 
iv. 9, n. 5. 

Foster, Mrs., i. 263. See Milton, 
granddaughter. 

Fothergill, Rev. Dr., ii. 379, 381. 

FoULis, Sir James, v. 171, 275. 

FOULIS, Messrs., Glasgow booksellers, 
ii. 435; 'Elzevirs of Glasgow,' v. 422. 

Foundling Hospital for Wit, iv. 333, 
n. 2. 



Fountains, The, ii. 29, 266. 

FoWKE, Mr., iii. 82, n. i; iv. 40, n. 4. 

Fowler, Mr., ii. 71. 

Fox, Charles James, Boswell on the 
India Bill, iv. 298, n. i ; Burnet's 
style, ii. 245, n. 2 ; Charles II, de- 
scended from, iv. 337, n. 2; ' com- 
menced patriot,' iv. loi, ;;. 2; Covent 
Garden mob, iv. 322, n. 2; described 
by Lord Holland, Gibbon, Mackin- 
tosh, and Rogers, iv. 192, n. 2; Wal- 
pole and Hannah More, iv. 337, «. 
3; Fitzpatrick's ' sworn brother,' iii. 
441, ;/. 4; George Ill's competitor, 
iv. 322 ; divides the kingdom with 
Caesar, iv. 337; George III his own 
minister, i. 491, n. i ; Goldsmith's 
Traveller, praises, iii. 286, 296 ; 
Homer, reads, iv. 252, n. 3 ; India 
Bill, i. 360, n. I ; iii. 254, ;/. i ; iv. 
298, n. I ; Johnson's epitaph, iv. 
512-T3 ; — ' friend,' iv. 337 ; — for 
the King against Fox, but for Fox 
against Pitt, iv. 337 ; — in parlia- 
ment, defends, iv. 368, «. 2; — pres- 
ence, silent in, iii. 303; iv. 192; — 
thinks highly of his abilities, iii. 303; 
— accounts for his silence in com- 
pany, iv. 192 ; Kirkwall, returned 
for, iv. 307, ;/. 2; Libel Bill, iii. 18, 
n. 2; Literary Club, member of the, 

i- 554. 556. w- 3; "• 314. 363; iii. 
146, n. I ; Lyttelton, second Lord, 
character of the, iv. 344, w. 3; Palmer 
and Muir's case, iv. 144, w. 2; Pitt's 
pertness, iv. 343, n. 2; poetry truth, 
not history, ii. 419, w. 3 ; Reynolds 
too much under him, iii. 296; Sand- 
wich's, Lord, removal, motion for, 
iii. 436, n. I ; subscription to the Ar- 
ticles, ii. 173, n. 2; Sydney Biddulph, 
praises, i. 451, n. i ; Treasury, dis- 
missal from the, ii. 314, n. 6; West- 
minster election, iv. 307, 337, n. 3. 



84 



Index to 



Fox, Henry. 



France and the French. 



Fox, Henry. See Holland, First 
Lord 

Fox, Lady Susan, ii. 376, n. i. 

Fox, Mrs., iv. 322, n. 2. 

Fox- (Faux, or V'aux) Hall, iv. 31, 
«. I. 

Fox-HiN riNc, i. 517, ti. I. 

Fra r.\oLo. .SV*- Sari'I. 

Frantk and thk Frknch, Academy 
takes forty years to compile their 
Diitionnry, i. 215, 34S, «. 4; sends 
Johnson a copy, i. 345; on the resist- 
ance of the air, v. 2SS ; affectation 
of philosophy and free-thinking, iii. 
441, w. 4; Americans, assistance to 
the, iv. 25; Atui, their, v. 354; anglo- 
mania, ii. 144 ; Assembly, iv. 501 ; 
authors and their pensions, i. 430, ;/. 
3 ; authors superficial, i. 526 ; com- 
mercial policy, masters of the world 
in, iii. 263, w. i; commercial treaty, 
V. 263, n. 2 ; contented race, v. 121, 
n. I ; cookery, ii. 442, 461-2 ; Cor- 
sica, government of, ii. 81, ti. i ; 
credulity, v. 376 ; cross-roads, ii. 
448; diflference between English and 
Fftnch, iv. 17; England, contrasted 
with, i. 264, /;. I ; English language 
injured by Gallicisms, iii. 390 ; ' flu- 
ency and ignorance," iv. 18, v. i; in- 
vasion feared, iii. 371, 410, «. i, 415, 
«. 4; ' French maxims abolish mercy,' 
iii. 232, V. I ; Garrick's account of 
their sameness, iv. 17, n. 3; gay peo- 
ple, not a, ii. 461, n. i; great people 
live magnificently, ii. 461 ; houses 
gloomy, ii. 444, ;/. 4 ; hunting, v. 
288 ; Irish, contrasted with the, ii. 
461, n. I ; Jersey, attack on, v. 162, 
n. 2; Johnson's tour, ii. 441-64; — 
Journal, ii. 446-59 ; account given 
by him to Boswell, ii. 460; — made 
more satisfied with England, iii. 401; 
— saw little of French society, ii. 



442, 460, 462, n. 4; Lewis XIV, 
under, ii. 195; literati, v. 260; litera- 
ture, art of accommodating, v. 353; 
— book on every subject, iv. 274; — 
high in every department, ii. 143; — 
little original, v. 354; — not so gen- 
eral as in England, iii. 28S ; in its 
second spring, ih. ; literary society 
de.scribed by Liibbon and Walpolc, 
iii. 288, «. I ; magistrates and sol- 
diers, ii. 448, 453 ; manners, indeli- 
cate, ii. 462; gross, iii. 400; habit of 
spitting, ii. 462; iii. 400; iv. 274; meals 
groNS, ii. 446; meat, fit for a gaol, ii. 
461 ; — described by Smollett as good, 
ii. 461, //. 2; by (ioldsmithas bad,i/./ 
men know no more than the women, 
iii. 287; middle rank, no, ii. 451, 461; 
military character respected, iii. 11; 
mode of life not pleasant, ii. 444 ; 
national petulance, ii. 144; novels, ii. 
143; opera girls, iv. 197; Paris: see 
Paris ; peace of 1762, i. 442, m. i ; 
of 17S2-3, iv. 325, n. 3 ; people, 
misery of the, ii. 461 ; philosophy, 
pursuit of, iii. 346, n. 3; players, ii. 
463; politeness, iv. 274; poor laws, 
no, ii. 447; prisoners in England, i. 
408; private life unaffected by des- 
potic power, ii. 195; privileges little 
abused, v. 121, n. i; Provence, gaiety 
of, ii. 461, w. i; Scotland, compared 
with, ii. 462 ; sentiments, ii. 442, ;/. 
2 ; soldiers and a woman, story of 
some, ii. 448; stage, delicacy of the, 
ii. 57, ;/. i; subordination, happy in, 
V. 121; talking, must be always, iv. 
17; tavern life in no perfection, ii. 
516; torture, use of, i. 540, «. 2; 
treatment of Indians, i. 356, n. 4 ; 
trees along a road, ii. 453 ; words, 
use big, i. 545: see under Rous.seau, 
Smollett, Mrs. Thrale, H. Wal- 

POLE. 



BosweU's Life of Johnson. 



85 



France. 



Frescati. 



France, Queen of, flattered, iii. 367. 

Francis, Rev. Dr. Philip, praises 
Johnson's Debates, i. 584; translates 
Horace, iii. 405. 

Francis, Sir Philip, censures Burke's 
style, iii. 212, n. 3. 

Francklin, Rev. Dr. Thomas, John- 
son, inscribes his Lucian to, iv. 39, 
40; Murphy, attacks, i. 411 ; Kosciad, 
in the, iv. 39, "■ 4 ; Round Robin, 
did not sign the, iii. 95, n. 3. 

Frank, Johnson's servant. Sec Bar- 
ber. 

Frank, post office, ii. 305 ; iv. 416, 

n. 3. 
FranklanI), Sir Thomas, iv. 272, n. 3. 
Franklin, Dr. Benjamin, books 
bought in his youth, iv. 297, n. 2 ; 
books, high price of English, i. 508, 
;/. I ; Boswell, dines with, ii. 68, n. i ; 
civil liberty compared with lil)erty of 
trading, ii. 68, ;/. 3; conversion from 
vegetarianism, iii. 258, n. i ; Eng- 
land, hypocrisy of, ii. 551; Georgia, 
settlement of, i. 147, w. 4; good that 
one man can do, iv. 113, n. i; HoUis, 
Thomas, iv. 113, «. i; human felicity 
how produced, i. 502, n. 2 ; inocula- 
tion, iv. 338, n. 2; Johnson's pension 
and \V. Strahan, ii. 157, "• 4; Lee, 
Arthur, iii. 78, n. 2 ; life, wished to 
repeat his, iv. 349, n. I ; Loudoun, 
Lord, V. 424, ;/. i ; man, definition 
of, iii. 278; V. 35, n. 2; Mansfield's, 
Lord, house burnt, iii. 487. «• ^ ; 
Old Mans Wish, iv. 22, n. 3 ; pam- 
phlets, iii. 362, n. 2; Paris FoundHng 
Hospital, ii. 457, "• 2 ; population, 
rule of increase of, ii. 359 ; Priestley 
and Price, iv. 501; Pringle, Sir John, 
iii. 74, «• 3 ; Quakers of Philadel- 
phia, iv. 244, n. 3; Ralph, James, i. 
195, n. 2; riots in London in 1768, 
ii. 68, «. 3; iii. 54, «• 2; rise of him- 



self and Strahan, ii. 259, n. 3; Ship- 
ley, Bishop, friendship with, iv. 2S4, 
«. 4; Wilcox, the bookseller, i. 1 18, 
;;. 4 ; Strahan, letter to, iii. 414. «• 
i; Whitefield's oratory, ii. 91, «• 2; 
' Wilkes and liberty,' ii. 68, n. 3. 
Franklin, Thomas, iii. 95, n. 3. 
Eraser, Dr., v. 122. 
Eraser, General, iii. 2. 
Eraser, Mr., of Balnain, v. 152. 
Eraser, Mr., the engineer, iii. 371. 
Eraser, Mr., of Strichen, v. 121. 
Frauds, none innocent, ii. 497, n. i. 
Frederick, Prince of Wales. See 

under Prince ok Wales. 
Frederick the Great, difficulties of 
his youth, i. 511, n. 2; dressed plain- 
ly, ii. 544; George H, quarrel with, 
iv. 124 ; Johnson downs Robertson 
with him, iii. 381; — opinion of his 
poetry, i. 503; — writes Ma Memoirs, 
i. 357; Maupertuis, lines to, ii. 62, n. 
2; overawes Hanover, v. 229, «. 2; 
power as a despotic prince, ii. 181; 
prose and poetry, i. 503-4 ; social, 
i. 511; taken by the nose, risk of 
being, ii. 263 ; torture, forbade use 
of, i. 540, n. 2 ; Voltaire, contends 
with, i. 503; v. 117, n. 2. 
Frederick-W^illiam the First, i. 357. 
Free Agent, iv. 142. 
Free Will, Boswell introduces dis- 
cussion, ii. 94, 119-20; iii. 329-30; 
— consults Johnson by letter, iv. 82; 
' we know our will is free,' ii. 94; iv. 
380; ' all theory against it,' iii. 330; 
best for mankind, v. 133. 
Freeholder, ii. 70, n. 2, 364, n. 2. 
Freeport, Sir Andrew, ii. 243. 
Freind, Dr., i. 205, n. 2. 
French, Mrs., iv. 56. 
French Cook, a nobleman's, i. 543. 
Freron, father and son, ii. 449, 465. 
Frescati, v. 174, n. i. 



8b 



Index to 



Friend. 



Garrick, David. 



Frik.nh, Sir John, ii. 210. 

Friknds, comparing minds, iii. 440; 
example of yood set by them, ii. 550; 
few houses to be nursed at, iv. 208; 
future state, in a, ii. 186; iii. 354-5, 
498 ; iv. 322-3 ; Goldsmith and the 
story of liluebeard, ii. 208; 'he that 
has friemls has no friend.' i. 240: iii. 
168. 32S, 439; natural, iv. 170, 229, 
w. 2; V. llg; pleasure in talking over 
past scenes, iii. 247 ; survivor, the, 
iii. 354- 

Friendship, Christian virtue, how far 
a, iii. 328 ; formed, how, iii. 1S7 ; 
formed mostly hy caprice or chance, 
iv. 323 ; often formed ill, ii. 1S6; 
mathematics, not as in, iii. 75 ; neg- 
lect of it, iv. 167; ' repair,' need of, 
i. 347 ; rupture of old, v. loi, 167; 
test, put to the, iii. 269, 451. 

Friendship, an Ode, i. 182; ii. 29. 

Frisick Lanou.\c.k, i. 550. 

P'roclm, iv. 463, n. 3. 

Fruc-M-ITY, iv. 188. 

Friit, K.^\v, iv. 408. 

Frusta Letteraria, iii. 196. 

Fry, Thomas, the painter, iii. 24, //. i. 

Fullarton, of Fullarton, iii. 405. 

Fl'l.I.KR, Thomas, his dedications, ii. 
I, n. 2. 

/"//// and funny, ii. 3S3, ;/. 4; iii. 104, 
n. 2. 

Funds, the, iv. 189. 

Further llioughts on Agriculture, i. 

354- 
Future State, Boswell leads Johnson 
to discuss it, ii. 185 ; confidence in 
respect to it, iv. 455 ; due attention 
to it and to this world, v. 176; gloom 
of uncertainty, iii. 174; hope in it the 
basis of happiness, iii. 413 ; knowl- 
edge of friends, ii. 186; iii. 497; 
things made clear gradually, iii. ' 
227. I 



Gabble, iii. 399; iv. 6. 

Gabriel, Don, a .Spanish Prince, iv, 

226, //. 4. 
CiAELlcK. .SV." Scon. AM). Highlands 

Krse. 
(iAf.NlK.R, — , ii. 448. 

Gaiety, a duty, iii. 155, w. i. 

Galileo, i. 225, n. 2. 

Gallicisms, iii. 390, n. 3. 

Galway, Lady, iv. 126. 

Ga.ma, iv. 289. 

Gaming, pro<luces no intermediate 
gooti, ii. 202 ; more ruined by ad- 
venturous trade, iii. 27. 

Gaminc-club, a, iii. 27. 

Ganganelli's Letters, iii. 325. 

Gaol Fever, iv. 203, w. i. 

Garac.antia, iii. 290. 

Garden, a walled, iv. 236. 

(Jardeners, gocxi, Scotchmen, ii. 8g. 

(iARDKNSTON, I.ord(F. Garden), v. 85. 

Gardiner, Mrs., account of her, i. 
281, ;/. 4; iv. 283-4; Johnson's be- 
ipiest to her, iv. 463, //. 3; mentioned, 
iii. 25. 119, //. 2; i\. 276, /;. 2. 

Gardner, T., bookseller, ii. 394. 

Garret, the scholar's, i. 306. 

Garrick, Captain, i. 94: iii. 440. 

(jAKRH-K Family, striking likeness in 
all the members, ii. 529. 

G.\RKICK, David, Al)el Dnigger, iii. 
40; Adelphi, house in the, iv. xil, 
115; airs of a great man, iii. 298; 
appealed to by a drunken physician, 
iii. 442; Archer in The Beaux Strat- 
agem, iii. 60; attacks helped his repu- 
tation, v. 311; avarice, reputation 
for, iii. Si; Baretti's trial, gives evi- 
dence at, ii. 112, «.; Bickerstaff, I.. 
letter from, ii. 94, rr. 3 ; Bonduca, 
epilogue to, ii. 372, «. 2; Bon Ton, 
ii. 372, n. I ; book of praise and 



Bo swell's Life of Johnson. 



87 



Garrick, David. 



abuse, kept a. v. 310; Boswell, cor- 
respondence with . sec BUSWELL, 
correspondence ; Doswell's Corsica, 
praises, ii. 52, ;/. i; Boswell slily in- 
troduces his name, iii. 298 ; British 
Coffee-house Club, iv. 206, n. 2 ; 
Browy, Dr. John, said to have as- 
sisted, ii. 150, — brought out his 
tragedies, /A., ;/. 4; Budgell's Epi- 
logue, anecdote of, iii. 53. "■ 3 ". 
Burke's epitaph on him, ii. 269, «. 4; 
Camden, Lord, intimacy with, iii. 
354 ; Chances, The, ii. 268 ; char- 
acters, acted a great variety of, iii. 
41 ; iv. 2S0-1 ; was not ' trans- 
formed ' into them, iv. 281 ; Chat- 
ham, Lord, correspondence with, ii. 
261; cheerfullest man of liis age, iii. 
440 ; Chesterfield, in wit compared 
with, iii. 7g; Christmas dinner at his 
house, ii. 178, n. \ ; Clive, Mrs., 
compared with, iv. 280 ; clutching 
the dagger, v. 52 ; Colson's acad- 
emy, at, i. 119; concoction of a 
play, iii. 294 ; Congreve and Shake- 
speare, compares, ii. 98 ; conversa- 
tion, sprightly, i. 461 ; — no solid 
meat in it, ii. 532; Court, at, i. 386, 
«. 3 ; Cumberland's dishclout face, 
iv. 444, 11. i; Cumberland's Oiies, iii. 
50, n. i; iv. 49S; Dane, letter from 
a, V. 52, //. i; Davies, letter from, iii. 
253, n. 2 ; Daiy, called, v. 396 ; 
death, his, iii. 421; 'eclipsed the 
gaiety of nations,' i. 95; iii. 440; de- 
cayed actor, will soon be a, ii. 502; 
decent liver, a, iii. 440 ; declaimer, 
no, iv. 280; Dodsley, quarrels with, 
i. 376; Douglas, rejects, v. 412, «. i; 
Drury-lane theatre, manager of, i. 
20g, 227; Elphinston's Martial, his 
opinion of, iii. 293; emphasis, wrong, 
i. 195; V. 144; epigrammatist, an, iii. 
293; excellence shown by his getting 

VI.— II 



^100,000. iii. 210; face, wear and 
tear of his, ii. 470, False Delicacy, 
ii. 54, «. 2 ; father and family, his, 
iii. 440; fine-bred gentleman, fails as 
a, V. 144 ; first appearance in Lon- 
don, i. 194, n. 2 ; Fitzherbert, afTec- 
tion for, iii. 168, «. i; Florizel and 
Perdita, ii. 90 ; Foote, compared 
with, iii. 79, 209; V. 446; — 'ghost 
of a halfpenny,' iii. 3C» ; — witti- 
cism about his bust, iv. 259 ; for- 
tunam reverenter luibet, iii. 299 ; 
French, sameness of the, iv. 17, n. 
3 ; friends, but no friend, had, iii. 
439; funeral, iv. 240; — account of 
its pomp, iv. 240; — Bishop Home's 
lines, ih., n. \; — the Club called the 
Literary Club at it, i. 552; — John, 
son at his grave, iii. 422, «. i ; gen- 
erous treatment of authors, ii. 400, n. 
5; Gentleman, F., letter from, i. 445, 
;/. 2; Gibbon, letter from, iii. 146, «. 
I ; Goldsmith's dress, ii. 95 ; Good 
Natiired Man, refuses the, ii. 54, n. 
2; iii. 364; Gray's Odes, i. 466, n. 2; 
great, courted by the, ii. 260 ; iii. 
299; Hamlet rescued from rubbish, 
ii. 98, n. I, 234, n. 3 ; Hamlet's so- 
liloquy, iii. 209 ; Hawkesworth and 
Lord Sandwich, ii. 284, n. 3; Haw- 
kins's Siege of Aleppo, iii. 294; High 
Life Below Stairs, iv. 8 ; Hill, Sir 
John, epigrams on, ii. 43, n. 2; Ho- 
garth's account of his acting, iii. 40, 
n. 2 ; humour, varying, iii. 300 ; ill- 
ness, sufferings from, iii. 440, n. i ; 
inaccurate in delineating absurdities, 
iv. 20; Ireland, visits, iii. 441; John- 
son affected by his success, i. 193, 
250, « . 2 ; ii. 78 ; — attacked by 
Garrick's correspondents, ii. 78, n. 2; 
— attacks on him, accounts for, iii. 
210, «. 2; — , awe of, i. 115, «. i; — 
and Chesterfield, i. 301, n. 4; — de- 



88 



Index to 



Garrick, David. 



signs to write his epitaph, iv. 454. n. 
3; — Dictionary, cited in, iv. 4; epi- 
gram on it, i. 348; — as a dramatist, 
i. 230, w. 5 ; — epigram on tieorge 
II and Gibber, i. 173; v. 399; — epi- 
taph on Philips, i. 171 ; — in the 
(Irccn Room, i. 233; — hard on 
him. V. 277 ; — Imitations 0/ Jurr- 
nal, i. 225; — intercourse with him, 
iv. S, 9 ; — Irene, acts, i. 227-30 ; 
suggests the strangling scene in it, 
i. 22S, »/. 2 ; — travels with him to 
London, i. 117; — looked upon him 
as his property, iii. 354 ; — let no- 
body attack him, i. 31, ;/. 3, 454, «. 
2; iii. 80, 354, «. 2; — in the Lich- 
field play-house, ii. 342; — low opin- 
ion of his acting, ii. 106, m. 2 , iii. 
209; iv. 9; V. 42; and of his mimicry, 
i'- 373. "• 3 ; — mimicks, ii. 373, 
531; — mow of hay, ii. 90; — offers 
to write his Life, iii. 422, n. i ; iv. 
115, n. 2; — 'played round,' ii. 94- 
5; — praises his prologues, ii. 372; 
— parody of Percy's Hermit, ii. 157, 
«. I ; — writes him a Prologue, i. 
209; iv. 30; — pupil, i. 112; — into 
good spirits, puts, iii. 295, «. 5 ; — 
Rambler, i. 242, «. 2 ; — reflection 
on him in his Shakespeare, ii. 220 ; 
iv. 428, n. \\ — and the Round- 
house, i. 289, 291; — sends his love 
to, V. 399; — Shakespeare, not men- 
tioned in, ii. 106; V. 277; — sorrow 
for his death, iii. 422 ; iv. 115 ; — 
taste in theatrical merit, ii. 532; — 
thinking which side he should take, 
iii. 27 ; — : tribute to him, i. 94 ; iv. 
Ill, n. 7; — use of orange-peel, ii. 
378; — want of taste for the highest 
poetry, iii. 171; — wife, account of, 
i. no, 114, 115; — wit, ii. 265; 
Kenrick's libel, i. 576, «. i; Kitely, 
ii. 106, n. i; Latin, has not enough. 



ii. 433; lawyer, intends to become a, 
i. 117 ; Lear, ii. 209, //. 2 ; I^the, i. 
265 ; liberality, gave more money 
than any man, iii. Si, 299, 440; — 
instances of his, iii. 299, n. 4; Lich- 
field grocer, scorned by a, iii. 40, w. 
2 : Lichfield School, at, i. 53, n. i ; 
life with great uniformity, saw, iii. 
439; Literary Club, election to the, 
i. 554-f> ; — name given at his fu- 
neral, i. 552; V. 124, w. 2; low char- 
acters, ashamed of his, iii. 41 ; Mallet, 
fooled by, v. 199, «. 3; manner, his 
significant smart, v. 284; Marplot, i. 
376, ;/. 3: Memoirshy T. Davies, iii. 
493. "• 3 ; Mickle, quarrels with, ii. 
209, «. 2 ; v. 397, n. 3 ; Milton's 
grand-daughter's benefit, i. 263 ; 
money, great hunger for, iii. 440; 
money exhausted, his, i. 118, n. 4; 
Montagu's, Mrs., Essay, praises, ii. 
loi; praised by her, v. 278; More, 
Hannah, flatters him, iii. 333 ; his 
kindness to her, ih., n. 4; calls her 
A'ine, iv. in, n. 4; Murphy, contro- 
versy with, i. 378, «. 7 ; — sarcasm 
against him, ii. 400; — praise of his 
liberality, iii. 299, «. 4; nation to ad- 
mire him, has a, iv. 9; Necker, Mme., 
on his acting, v. 42, n. 2; niece, his. 
Miss Doxy, iii. 474-5 ; OJe on Pel- 
ham's death, i. 313; ostentation, i. 
250, n. 2 ; parsimony, Foote's ghost 
of a halfpenny, iii. 300; — Peg Wof- 
fington's tea, i(>.; — refuses an order 
to Mrs. Williams, i. 454 ; Partridge 
in Tom Jones, v. 42 ; pious rever- 
ence, i. 312; poor at first, iii. 81, 440; 
portraits at Streatham, iv. 181, «. 3; 

— in Mrs. Garrick's house, iv. 112; 

— Beauclerk's inscription on one, 
//'.,.• profession, advanced the dignity 
of his, ii. 269, n. 4 ; iii. 299; — ' his 
profession made him rich, and he 



BoswelVs Life of yohnson. 



89 



Garrick. 



Gay. 



made it respectable,' iii. 422, n. i ; 
professor in the imaginary college, v. 
123; Prospero, i. 250; provincial ac- 
cents, ii. 531, n. 4 ; Queen, compli- 
ments the, ii. 268; retiring from the 
stage, ii. 502; iii. 441; Reynolds's de- 
fence of him, ii. 269 ; Riccoboni, 
Mme., letters from, ii. 57, n. i ; iii. 
169, ;/. I ; V. 121, n. i, 376, ;/. 3 ; 
Richard III, his, seen by Hogarth, 
iii. 40, n. i\ — Johnson's sarcasm 
on, iii. 2og; — was not ' transformed 
into,' iv. 281 ; Roriieo and Jtilirl, 
alters, v. 277, ;/. 6; Sallad, proposes, 
as a name for T/ie World, i. 234, ;/. 
4; scholarship, ii. 433, «. i; Scotch, 
nationality of the, ii. 372; Scotland, 
never in, iii. 441; ' Scrub, will play,' 
iii. 80; sensibility as a Writer, ii. 90; 
sentiment, his, ii. 532 ; Shakespeare 
Jubilee, ii. 78, n. 2, 79; Shakespeare, 
scarce editions of, ii. 221 ; — , in- 
tends to read, v. 277, ;/. 6; Sheridan, 
Thomas, engages, i. 414, n. 4; — de- 
scribes the vanity of, ii. 100; Smith's, 
Adam, conversation, iv. 29, n. 2 ; 
splendour, too much, iii. 81 ; spoilt, 
not, iii. 2gg, n. i ; Steevens, letters 
from, ii. 314, n. 6, 325, w. 2 ; — 
slandered by, iii. 319, w. 3; table, at 
the head of a, iv. 281; talking from 
books, V. 431, n. 2 ; Thrales, intro- 
duction to the, i. 570, ;/. 3 ; univer- 
sality in acting, ii. 41; iv. 280-1; v. 
144; unkindness, accused by Davies 
of, iii. 253, n. 2; vanity, ii. 260; iii. 
2gg ; variety his excellence, iii. 41 ; 
Walpole, H., on his acting, iv. 281, 
«. I ; wealth, iii. 210, 299 ; White- 
head, W., compliments him in verse, 
i. 466; — engaged as his reader, ih., 
«. I ; — proposed to Goldsmith as 
arbitrator, iii. 364, «. 2 ; wife, love 
for his, iv. 112, «. i ; v. 398, ;/. i ; 



Winter s Talc, new version of the, ii. 
90, n. 2; witness, examined as a, v. 
277 ; woman's riding-hood, in a, iv. 
9 ; Wonder, The, in, iv. 9 ; writer, 
sprightly, iii. 299 ; Woffington, Peg, 
iii. 300; mentioned, i. 281, 312, n. 2; 
ii. 68, n. i, 127, 293, 415, «. 2; iii. 
291. 

Garkick, Mrs., dinners at her house, 
iv. 111-15 ; 254, n. 4; grief for her 
husband, iv. in • leaves Garrick 's 
funeral expenses unpaid, iv. 240, n. 
I ; neglects Johnson's proposal to 
write Garrick's Life, iii. 422, n. i; 
iv. 115, n. 2; survived Garrick forty- 
three years, iv. 112, «. i, 317, «. 3; 
mentioned, iv. 97, ;/. 3. 

Garrick, George, Johnson's pupil, i. 
112; calls him 'a tremendous com- 
panion,' i. 573, «. 3; iii. 157. 

Garrick, Peter, anecdotes of Irene, i. 
117, 129; resemblance to his brother, 
ii- 355. 529. 534: mentioned, ii. 534; 
iii. 40, n. 2, 46S; iv. 66, n. 3. 

Garth, Sir Samuel, M.D., lines on 
dying, ii. 123, «. i; Johnson's praise 
of physicians, iv. 304. 

Gastrei.l, Bishop, v. 367. 

Gastrei.l, Rev. Mr., cut down Shake- 
speare's mulberry-tree, i. 97, n. i; ii. 
538. 

Gastreli., Mrs., i. 97, n. i ; ii. 538; 
iii. 469. 

Gataker, Thomas, v. 344. " 

Gates, General, iii. 404, n. 3. 

Galbius, Professor, i. 76. 

Gandium, ii. 426. 

Gaudy, College, i. 69, n. 5, 317, n. 2; 
ii. 509, n. 2. 

Gay, John, advised to buy an annuity, 
V. 67, n. 5; Beggar s Opera, ' As men 
should s^rve a cucumber,' v. 329; — 
Boswell's delight in it, ii. 422 ; iii. 
225; — projected work on it, v. 103, 



90 



Index to 



Gay. 

n. 2; — Burke thinks it has no merit, 
iii. 365 ; — Cihher, refused by, iii. 
SfjS, «. 3 : — Hockley in the Hole, 
iii. 152, //. I ; — Johnson's opinion 
of it, iii. 365; — Johnson turns Cap- 
tain Macheath, iv. no; — morality, 
its, ii. 421; — ' labefactation,' //'.,• 

— 'practical i)hilt)sophers,' ii. 506; 

— Rich made ,j,w' and (iay rich, iii. 
365, ;/. I ; — run of 63 nights, iii. 
131, //. 4; children, writing for, ii. 
468, «. 3; Lcltt-rs, iv. 43, /;. i; Life 
by Johnson, ii. 421 ; Orpheus of high- 
waymen, ii. 421, M. I ; Queensbury, 
Duke of, ii. 422. 

Gazetteer, The, v. 279, //. I. 

Gelai.kuihn, iv. 225, //. I. 

'Gklidis, the philoso|)her,' i. 118,;/. 2. 

Gkll, Mr. and Mrs., v. 490-2. 

Gki.i., Sir William, ii. 468, w. 3; v. 492, 
«. I. 

General Aihertiser, i. 263. 

General Assemhi.y. .S"<v under Scot- 
land. 

(iKNERAL CeNSI-RK, iv. 361. 

General CoMrLAiNis, Johnson's dis- 
like of, ii. 409. 

General Warrants, ii. 83. 

Generals, great, ii. 269. 

Genius, ii. 500; iii. 438, //. i; v. 38 ; 
made feminine, iii. 425-6. 

Genoa, Corsican revolt, ii. 67, ;/. 2, 81, 
ft. i; the Doge at Versailles, iv. 312, 
//. I. 

Genteel Peoi'LE, swear less than for- 
merly, ii. 190, n. I. 

Gentility, not inseparable from mo- 
rality, ii. 390; new system, i. 569; 
women more genteel than men, iii. 
62. 

Gentle Shepherd, ii. 253; v. 426, ;/. 2. 

Gentleman, Francis, i. 445. 

Gentleman, English merchant a new 
species, i. 569, n. i. 



George I. 

Gentleman, a, of eminence in the 
literary world, iv. 316; one whose 
house was frequented by low com- 
pany, iv. 360 ; a penurious one, iv. 
203; one recommending his brother, 
iv. 25; one who was rich, btit with- 
out conversation, iv. (^. 

Gentleman F.vrmi-k, at Ashbourne, 
iii. 214, 224. 

Gentleman's Afai^azine, account of it, 
i. 129; eflfect on it of rebellion of 
1745-6, i. 203, n. 2; Hanoverian in 
1745-6, i. 203, «. 2; indecency in 
earlier numbers, i. 129, w. 4 ; John- 
son, A J Urbanuni, i. 131 ; — be- 
comes a regular contributor, i. 133 ; 
— wnK.C'!, Addresses, Letters, and Pref- 
aces, i. 160-1, 170, 173, 177, 181-3: 
(for his other contributions see under 
their several titles); — school adver- 
tised in it, i. 112; — , verses wrongly 
assigned to, i. 206, //. i ; Nichols, 
edited by, iv. 504 ; described by 
Southey, //'./ numbers sold, i. 129, 
"• 3. 175. "• 3; i'i- 366; obituaries, 
i. 275, iu i; ])ri2e poems, i. 106; jiub- 
lished at the end of the month, i. 
394, n. 2; ' Sciolus,' iii. 388, ;/. i ; 
value of, in 1754, i. 297, «. i. See 
under Cave and Debates. 

Gentleman s Religion, iv. 359. 

GentU-iVoman, the born, ii. 149. 

Gentlewoman, a, in liquor, ii. 497. 

Geographical Grammar, iv. 359. 

Geography, Dictionary' of Ancient. See 
Mackean, Alexander. 

Geology, of Etna, ii. 536, n. i; John- 
son's ignorance of it, v. 331, n. 1. 

Geometry, principles soon compre- 
hended, V. 157, M. 3. 

George I, Brett, Miss, i. 201, n. i ; 

burnt two wills made in favour of 

his son, ii. 391, n. 2 ; death, his, ii. 

I 391, «. 2; knew nothing, ii. 392; Ox- 



Boszvclfs Life of Johnson. 



91 



George I. 



George III. 



ford, sends a troop of horse to, i. 
325, n. 3 ; Shebbeare, satirised by, 
ill. 18, n. I ; will, his, destroyed by 
George II, ii. 391: i^'- 124- «• i: ^^i^^^ 
to restore the crown, ii. 392- 
George II, Augustus, not an, i. 243; 
barbarity, his, i. 170; challenged by 
Elvvall, ii. 189, 288; clemency, his, 
i. 169; English weary of him, i. 420; 
fast day of Jan. 30, observed the, ii. 
174, n. 2; George I's will, destroys, 
ii. 391; quarrels with Frederick the 
Great about it, iv. 124; Johnson's 
epigram on him, i. 173; v. 397. 399. 
^61 ; _ roars against him, ii. 392 ; 
— would tell the truth of him, v. 
290; Pelham's death, i. 313. "■ ^\ 
Pretender's visit to London, v. 229, 
n. 2 ; quiet times under the Whigs, 
iv. 116; mentioned, i. 172, //. 2, 360, 
n. 2. 
Georc.e III, Addresses in 1784, iv. 
306 ; authority partly re-established, 
iv. 305 ; baronetcies, ii. 406, n. 2 ; 
Heattie, interview with, v. loi, n. 5; 
Beckford's speech, iii. 228, n. 4; 
birthday, iv. 148; 'born a Briton,' 
i. 150, n. I, 408 ; V. 232 : Boswell's 
relation, v. 432 : Capability Brown, 
intimacy with, iii. 455. «• 2; careless- 
ness in sentences of death, iii. 137, "• 
2 ; Chatham's and Garrick's funerals, 
iv. 240, «. i; city address in 1781, 
iv. 161, n. 4; concessions to the peo- 
ple, ii. 404 ; contempt of Irish peer- 
ages, iii. 463, M. 2 ; coronation, iii. 
10, n. 4 ; Corsica offered to him, ii. 
81, n. I ; Dalrymple, Sir John, ii. 
241, w. 2; Dodd's case, iii. 137; fast 
of Jan. 30, ii. 174. «• 2 : Fox, the 
King's competitor, iv. 322; —divides 
the kingdom with him, iv. 337; Gor- 
don Riots, iii. 487-8, 49°: Great 
Personage, i, 254; GusUyus III, 



death of, iii. 152, n. i; Heroic Epis- 
tle, reads the, iv. 131, n. 4; hopes 
formed of him, i. 420; Hume on the 
weakness of his government, iii. 54. 
n. 2; Hutton the Moravian, iv. 473, 
n. 6 ; indecency, treated with. iv. 
301; Irene, has the sketch of, i. 125; 
Johnson, asks, to write a Life of 
Spenser, iv. 473; — compliments him 
in The False Alarm, ii. 129; — Dedi- 
cations, ii. 50 ; iii. 128 ; — for the 
King against Fox, iv. 337; — gives 
him his IVestern Islands, ii. 332; — 
four volumes of the Lives, iii. 423, «. 
3 ; — interview with, ii. 37 ; — ac- 
count of it, ii. 48; iii- 37; v. 142, «• 
3; second interview, ii. 48, «. 2; — 
pension, i. 430; v. 432; proposed ad- 
dition to it, iv. 404, «. i; — project- 
ed works, has the list of, iv. 439, n. 
I ; madness, iv. 190, «. 3 ; manners, 
his, described by Adams, Johnson 
and Wraxall, ii. 46 ; militia camps, 
visits the, iii. 415; minister, his own, 
i. 491, «. I ; ii. 407, «. I ; ministers 
his tools, iii. 464, n. 3; oppressed by 
them, iv. 196 ; Norton's speech to 
him as Speaker, ii. 540, «. 2; Paoli, 
notices, v. I, n. 3; patron of science 
and the arts, i. 430; petitions in 1769, 
ii. 104, n. 2; Pretender, proper desig- 
nation for' the, V. 211, «. 2; recruit- 
ing, complains of the difficulty of, iii. 
454, n. I ; reign very factious, iv. 231, 
341 ; very unfortunate, iv. 231 ; re- 
spectable empire, his, iii. 273, «. 2 ; 
Reynolds, slights, iv. 422, n. 2; Rous- 
seau's pension, ii. 13. «• 3; Scotch 
favourites, i. 420; sea, at the age of 
34 had not seen the, i. 393, «• 2 ; 
Shakespeare sad stuff, i. 574. «• i ; 
Shelburne, Lord, dislikes, iv. 201, n. 
I ; slave-trade, upholder of the, ii. 
551; Sh4 Stoops to Conquer, sees, ii. 



92 



Index to 



George III. 



Gibbon. 



256 ; Toryism or \Vhig|;ism, preva- 
lence in his rei^n of, ii. 253; tour in 
the West of Enjjland, iv. 190, ;/. 3; 
unpopularity maintained by Johnson, 
iii. 176; iv. loo; changed into popu- 
larity, iii. 176, n. 3; iv. 190; Wilkes 
at the Levee, iii. 4S9, «. 2. 

Geurgk IV, i. 125, ;/. I. See Trlnce 
OK Walks. 

Georgia, i. 147, «. 4. 

Gerard, Dr., v. 101, 105-6, 148. 

Germai.ne, Lord George, i. 491, n. i 

German Haron, story of a, ii. 530. 

Ger.ma.ny, academics at the smaller 
Courts, V. 314; language, ii. 179; 
rising in power, ii. 147, //. i; stock- 
ing inilustry, v. 99. 

Gerves, John, V. 33S, «. i, 373. 

Gesticulation ridiculed, i. 387; ii. 
242; Johnson's aversion to it, iv. 373. 

GnKKARDi, Marchesc, iii. 371. 

Ghosts, Addison's belief, iv. 11 1; ar- 
gument again.st their existence, be- 
lief for it, iii. 261 ; Boswell intro- 
duces the subject, iv. 109, n. i; Cave, 
one seen by, ii. 204, 209 ; Coach- 
maker's Hall, discussion at, iv. iio; 
Cock Lane ghost, i. 470-1; iii. 304; 
evidence for them, iv. 109 ; experi- 
ence and imagination, i. 469; Gold- 
smith's brother, one seen by, ii. 209; 
Johnson's prayer on his wife's death, 
i. 273; his state of mind as regards 
them, i. 397, 470; iii. 337; iv. 109, 
344 ; ' machinery of poetry,' iv. ig; 
objection to their appearing, ii. 18S; 
Parson Ford's, iii. 397; (juestion un- 
decided after 5000 years, iii. 261, 33S; 
Southey on the good end they an- 
swer, iii. 338, n. 2 ; Villiers, Sir 
George, iii. 400; Wesley's story of a 
ghost, iii. 337, 448. 

GlANNONE, iv. 4. 

ClANO VitalE, iii. 284, n. 4. 



Giant's Causeway, iii. 467. 

Giants, A Great Personage's, i. 254. 

GiARDiNi, ii. 259. 

Gibbon, Edward, author best judge of 
his own j>erformance, iv. 290, //. 1; 
Autobiography, ii. 513, ;/. i; tieggars 
Opera, influence of the, ii. 421, //. i; 
Boswell attacks him, ii. 76, /;. 3, 507, 
«. I, 512-13; v. 231, «. i; — name 
passed over by him, ii. 398, «. 2; — 
and Johnson, replies to, ii. 513, w. i; 
Cecilia, reads, iv. 258, «. 3; Claren- 
don's History and the Oxford riding- 
school, ii. 486, II. I ; J)ecliiie and 
Fall, ' artful infidelity ' of the, ii. 
512; — com|)ositioii of vol. i, ii. 
271, II. 2, 420; — publication, ii. 157, 
;/. 3 ; iii. Ill , ;/. 2 ; — rough .M S. sent 
to the press, iv. 42, /;. i ; — the two 
offensive chapters, iii. 277; domestic 
discipline, i. 54, //. i ; dress, his, ii. 
507, ;/. i; Duke of Gloucester, ii. 2, 
«. 2; Edinburgh society, ii. 60, m. i; 
fame, enjoyment of his, i. 522, «. 3; 
Foster, Dr. James, iv. 11, ;/. 2; Fox 
at Lausanne, iv. 192, »/. 2; Fox com- 
menced patriot, iv. loi, m. 2; French 
As.sembly, iv. 501 ; French society, 
iii. 288, //. I ; Gloucester, Duke of, 
afTability of the, ii. 2, «. 2; Ilailes's 
Annals, iii. 459, «. 3 ; history at- 
tacked in his presence, ii. 420; IIol- 
royd, visits to, iii. 202, «. i; ' hornets, 
accustomed to the buzzing of the,' ii. 
512, «. 4; Ilorsley, Bishop, praises, 
iv. 504; hospitality, on, iv. 256, ». 4; 
House of Commons and Nowell's 
sermon, iv. 341, /;. 4; Hume and 
Robertson, compliment to, ii. 271, n. 
3; Hume congratulates him, ii. 512, 
ji. 3; Hume's style, i. 508, m. 3; In- 
quisition, defends the, i. 538, tt. i ; 
Johnson and the bear, ii. 398 ; — 
and the ladies, iv. 85; — did not like 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



93 



Gibbon. 



Glover. 



to trust himself with, ii. 420; — and 
Fox, iii. 303; — and the graces, iii. 
63 ; — matched with, ii. 398 ; — 
'Reynolds's oracle,' i. 284, n. 3; — 
scarcely mentioned in his writings, 
ii. 398, H. 2; iii. 146, ;/. i; — style, 
imitates, iv. 448-9 ; — talks of his 
ugliness, iv. 85; Journal des Savans, 
ii. 45, ;/. i; l,aw, William, character 
of, i. 79, ;/. i; lectures, teaching Ijy, 
ii. 9, «. i; Literary Club, i. 554, 556, 
It. 3; iii. 261, n. 4; — in 1777, iii. 
146, It. i; poisons it to Bosweil, ii. 
507, //. i; London, loves the dust of, 
iii. 202, «. i; — the liberty that it 
gives, iii. 431, ;/. 2; Lowth and War- 
burton, ii. 42, //. i; ^Licaulay, on his 
poverty, iv. 404, ■;/. I ; Mackintosh's 
comparison of him with Hurke, ii. 
398, ;/. 2 ; Magdalen College Com- 
mon-room, ii. 507, «. 4 ; ' Mahome- 
tan,' ii. 513; Mallet, David, i. 311, ;/. 
i; Maty, Dr., i. 329, n. 3; Montagu, 
Mrs., on the Decline and Fall, iii. 
277 ; mutual gain in fair trade, v. 
263, «. 2 ; Newton, Bishop, iv. 329, 
"• 3. 33O1 "• i; North, Lord, v. 306, 
;/. I ; Ossian, ii. 345, «. 3 ; Oxford 
tutor, his, iii. 15, n. 2; Paley's attack 
on him, v. 231, n. i ; Pantheon, ii. 
194, «. I ; ' Papist, turned,' ii. 513 ; 
Parliament, silent in, ii. 420, w. 2; iii. 
265, ;/. i; found it a school of civil 
prudence, ib.; Pope's lines applied 
to him, ii. 153, ;/. i; post-chaise, de- 
light in a, ii. 518, «. 5; Price, Dr., iv. 
501; Priestley, Dr., iv. 504; quaint 
manner, iii. 63; — described by Col- 
man, ib., n. i; respectable, use of the 
term, iii. 273, n. 2; Reynolds's, dines 
at, iii. 284 ; Round - Robin, signed 
the, iii. 95; Royal Academy Profess- 
or, ii. 76, n. 3; school life not happy, 
i. 522, ;;. 2; sneer, his usual, iv. 85; 



style, study of, iv. 448, n. 3 ; sub- 
scription to the Articles, ii. 173, «. 
2; Ten Persecutions, The, ii. 292, n. 
5; Tillemont, praises, i. 7, w. i; trav- 
elling, the requisites for, iii. 520-1 ; 
ugliness, ii. 507, «. i; iv. 85. 

Gibbon, an attorney, ii. 107, n. i. 

Gibbons, Rev. Dr., iv. 146, 321. 

Gibraltar, ii. 448. 

Gibson, William, iv. 463, ;/. 3. 

Gli-KAKi), the theatre manager, i. 194. 

GiFKf)Ri), Rev. Richard, v. 135. 

GlKKORD, William, Baviad and Mae- 
viad, iii. 18, ;/. 2; Johnson's Greek, 
V. 523, n. I. 

GiLBKRT, Geoi-frev, Lazv of Evi- 
dence, V. 444, H. I. 

Gilbert, Rev. Mr., i. 199, n. 2. 

GiLLAM, Justice, iii. 54, «. 2. 

Gillespie, Dr., iv. 303. 

GiLMOiR, J., President of the Session, 
V. 241. 

Gilpin, W., v. 491. 

Gin. See Spirituous Liquors. 

Giraldus Cambrensis, iii. 346, «. 2. 

GiSBORNE, Dr., iii. 169, n. i. 

Gi.ANViLLE, i. 238, n. I. 

Glasse's, Mrs., Cookery, iii. 324. 

Glass-houses, i. 189, n. i. 

Glaucus, ii. 149, «. I. 

Gleg, Mr., a merchant, v. 83. 

Glengary, Laird of, v. 216. 

Gi.enmorison, Laird of, v. 156, 160. 

Gloom, gloomy penitence, iii. 31; 'it 
is perhaps sinful to be gloomy,' iv. 
164. 

Gloucester, v. 366, n. 2. 

Gloucester, Duke of (brother of 
George III), affability to Gibbon, 
his, ii. 2, n. 2; marriage, ii. 257, n. 2. 

Glover, Richard, account of him, v. 
132, ;/. 4; Duke of Marlborough's 
papers, v. 199, w. 3; Leonidas, v. 132; 
Medea, i. 378, u. 2. 



94 



Index to 



Glow-worm. 



Goldsmith. 



(".I.OW-WORM, ii. 63, 26O. 

Cii.rTToNY, i. 542. 

Cil.YNNK, Serjeant, iii. 489, //. i. 

VvCt^i (jiavrov, i. 346, /;. 2. 

(loiiKLINs, ii. 447, 

Cioi), infinite jjoodiiess, limited, iv. 345; 
love of him predominated over by 
fear, iii. 3S5. 

(ioDWiN. William, iv. 321. ;/. 3. 

Cidl.DoM, iii. 1S4. ;/. 3. 

(ioi.D.s.Mirir, Dr. Isaac, Dean of 
Cloyne, i. 480, ;/. 3. 

Cloi.DSMiTU, Rev. Henry, ii. 2(X). 

Goi.DS.MiTii, .Mrs., iii. 115. 

Goi-DSMli H, Oliver, absurdity, angry 
when caught in an, iii. 286; Addison, 
comjiared with, ii. 294; ages at which 
he published his various wrjrks, iii. 
190, ;/. 2; Aleppo, projected visit to, 
iv. 26; anecdotes, excelled by Percy 
in, V. 2</} ; Aiiimati'd A'iiliin\ en- 
gaged in writing it, ii. 208, 267, 272; 
— copy in Lord Scarsdale's librarj', 
iii. 183; — cow shedding its horns, 
iii. 96, »/. 2 ; — Maclaurin's yawns, 
iii. 17; anonymous publications, i. 
477 i Apolos^'v to the public, ii. 240 ; 
supposed to be written by Johnson, 
ih. ; architecture, contempt of, ii. 
502, //. 2; attacks, better for, v. 312; 
authors, the neglect of, iii. 427, n. 2, 
481, n. 3; authors, patrons and book- 
sellers, V. 66, n. 2; Baretti, dislikes, 
ii. 235, «. 3; at his trial, ii. 112, n.\ 
Bath, describes, ii. 8, «. 2; iii. 52, ;/. 
I ; 'beat, tirst time he has,' ii. 241; 
Beattie's Essay on Truth, despises, 
ii. 231, //. 2; V. 311, n. 3: Beauclerk 
describes him, ii. 22i, n. 2; Beauties 
of Ent^lish Poetry Selected, iii. 218, 
n. 4; Bee, The, iii. 95, n. i; biogra- 
phy, the uses of, v. 89, n. 3; birth, 
date of his, i. 67, «. 2; iii. 95, «. i; 
blank verse, on, i. 495, n. i; bloom- 



coloured coat, ii. 95; boastfulness, i. 
480 ; hon ton breaking out in his 
waistcoats, ii. 314, n. 6; books, could 
not tell what was in his own, iii. 287; 
Boswell's account of him, i. 476-83; 

— accused of making a monarchy of 
what should be a republic, ii. 295 ; 

— 'honest Ctoldsmith,' ii. 213; — 
jireserves a relic of him, ii. 251, n. 2; 

— takes leave of him, ii. 298; Burke's 
contemporary at Trinity College, i. 
476; — recollection of him, iii. 191; 
Camden, Lord, complains of, iii. 353; 
Chamier's estimate of him, iii. 286; 
Chatterton's jjoems, believes in, iii. 
59, /;. 2, 314, ;/. 2; Cil)ber, Colley, 
praises, iii. 82, n. 3 ; Citizen of the 
World, i. 477; Clare, Lord, ii. 157; 

Clarke, Dr., anecdote of, i. 3, //. 2; 
companion, not an agreeable, iii. 280; 
company, his, liked, ii. 270; compi- 
lations and magazines, the causes of, 
V. 66, n. 2 ; conse'iuential at times, 
ii. 296 ; conversation, does not 
know liow to get ofT, ii. 225 ; not 
temper for it, ii. 265 ; reported a 
mere fool in it, i. 477; talks at ran- 
dom, i. 478; ii. 271; iii. 286; v. 316; 
talks not to be unnoticed, ii. 213, 
295; corrections in his prose comf)o- 
sition rare, iv. 42, «. i ; Cow shed- 
ding its horns: see above, Animated 
Nature; Croaker, Johnson's Suspi- 
ritis, i. 247; ii. 55; Cross /Headings, 
admires, iv. 372, ;/. I ; Cumberland, 
disliked, iv. 444, tt. i; death, ii. 314, 
n. 6, 319, w. 2, 320; iii. 186; iv. 97, 
w. 2; debts, ii. 320-1; depopulation, 
on, ii. 250, «. I ; Deserted Village, 
dedicated to Reynolds, ii. I, «. 2, 
250, M. i; — Johnson's lines in, ii. 8; 
iii. 475; — reiterated corrections, ii. 
17. "• 3; — Traveller, sometimes an 
echo of the, ii. 271 ; Dictionary of 



BosweWs Life of JoJmson. 



95 



Goldsmith, Oliver. 



Arts and Sciences projecte<l, ii. 234, 
«. 2; Dilly's, dines at, ii. 2S4; ' Doc- 
tor Minor,' V. no; Dodd, Dr., satir- 
ises, iii. 158, n. 3 ; Dodsley, dispute 
on the poetry of the age witii, iii. 
43-4 ; dog-butchers, ii. 266 ; dress, 
slovenly, i. 423, «. 3; — his fine coat, 
ii- 95; — effect of dress on the mind, 
ii. 96, n. I ; Dryden's line on poets 
and monarchs, ii. 256; duelling, ques- 
tion of, ii. 206; Dyer, Samuel, at the 
Club, iv. 13, «. i; Edinburgh, coun- 
try round, i. 492; ii. 356, ti. 2; Edin- 
burgh University, i. 476, 492 ; E/e- 
ments of Criticism, criticises, ii. 103; 
Enqitiry into the present State of 
Polite Leariiins^, i. 405, n. 3, 477 ; 
envy, his, i. 479 ; ii. 48, 298 ; Bos- 
well's defence of it, iii. 307; epitaph 
in Greek, ii. 322; iii. 98, ;/. i ; ejiitaph 
in Latin, iii. 93-6; Round Rol>in, iii. 
96 ; Europe, disputed his passage 
through, i. 476 ; Evans, assaults, ii. 
240, n. 2; excelled in what he wrote, 
iii. 287; fable of the little fishes, ii. 
265; fame, his, v. 156; fame, talked 
for, iii. 280; Fantoccini, the, i. 479; 
flowered late, iii. 190 ; France, tour 
to, i. 479; French meat, ii. 461, n. 2; 
friendship and the story of Blue- 
beard, ii. 208; ' furnishing you with 
argument and intellects,' iv. 362, n. 
2 ; CJarrick's compliment to the 
Queen, attacks, ii. 268 ; — lines on 
him, i. 477, «. 6; — refuses The Good 
Nattired Man, iii. 364; — proposes 
Whitehead as arbitrator, il>. n. 2 ; 
'Gentleman, The,' ii. 209; George 
III, and She Stoo/s to Compter, ii. 
256; gets the better when he argues 
alone, ii. 270 ; ghost seen by his 
brother, ii. 209; ' Goldy,' dislikes be- 
ing called, ii. 296; iii. 116; v. 351; 
Good Natured Man, Prologue, ii, 48, 



51; — Croaker, i. 247; ii. 55; — re- 
fused by Garrick, iii. 364; Gray, at- 
tacks, i. 466, n. 2 ; ii. 375, «. 3 ; — 
Elci^y, mends, i. 467, «. 2 ; ' happy 
revolutions,' ii. 257 ^ Harris, James, 
ii. 258; Haunch of Venison, ii. 157, 
n, 2 ; iii. 255, n. 2 ; Hawkins's ac- 
count of him, i. 555, n. 2; ' I/esiod' 
Cooke, V. 41, n. i; historians, in the 
first class of, ii. 271; History of Eng- 
land attributed to Lord Lyttelton, i. 
477, n. 2; History of Rome, ii. 271; 
iv. 360; Hornecks, Miss, ii. 240, w. 2; 
iv. 410, n. 2 ; horses, abhorrence of 
blood, ii. 267 ; Humours of Balla- 
magairy, ii. 251, «. i; Idler, buys the, 
i. 388, n. I ; ignorance of common 
arts, iv. 26; improvidence, i. 482, n. 
I ; inscriptions on the written moun- 
tains, iv. 26, «. 3; ' inspired idiot,' i. 
477, ;/. 6 ; irascible as a hornet, v. 
no, n. 3; Jacobitism, his, ii. 257, 
273, n. 4 ; jests from the pit of a 
theatre, on, i. 228, n. 2 ; Johnson, 
arguing : see Johnson, arguing ; — 
a bear only in the skin, ii. 76 ; — 
the ' big man,' ii. 16; — biographer, 
i. 30, «. I ; — buys his Life of Nash, 
i. 388, «. i; — and a print of him, i. 
421, n. I ; claim upon — for more 
writings, ii. 17 ; — compared with 
Burke, ii. 299 ; — competition with, 
i. 483; ii. 248, 295; — compliment a 
cordial, iii. 94, «. 3 ; — could take 
liberties with, iv. 132; — estimation 
of him as an author, i. 473; ii. 225, 
248; places him in the first class, ii. 
271; defends him against Mr. Eliot's 
attack, ii. 304, w. 4; calls him a very 
great man, ii. 321 ; defends him 
against attack at Reynolds's table, 
ib., n. i; shows the difference when 
he had not a pen in his hand, iv. 35; 
got him sooner into estimation, ii. 



96 



Index to 



Goldsmith, Oliver. 



248; — first visit to hirn, i. 423, n. 
3; — y(x>dness of heart, i. 483, — 
inHuence on his style, i. 258; — in- 
terview with George III, ii. 48; — , 
jealous of, ii. 295; — letter to him, 
ii. 270, w. I ; — levee, attends, ii. 136; 

— literary reputation, ii. 267 ; — 
manner, copies, i. 477; not his style, 
ii. 248; — [tension, iv. 132; — /'/v- 
loi^tie to I'lie Good Xaturcd A/tiu, ii. 
48, 51 ; proposes to — that they each 
review the other's work, v. 312; — , 
quarrels with, ii. 2gi; reconciliation, 
ii. 293; — , reads tlie Jlcroic EpistU 
to, iv. 131; — , reproaches, with not 
yoing to the theatre, ii. 16; — tetras- 
tick on liim, ii. 322 ; — tribute to 
liim in the Life of Pantcll, ii. 191, 
«. I ; — wishes to write his I.if', iii. 
114, //. 2; — , witty contests with, ii. 
265; Kenrick, lil>elled by, i. 576, //. 
I ; knowledge, ' pity he is not know- 
ing, ii. 225; — 'knows nothing,' ii. 
246; 'amazing how little he knows,' 
ii. 270; — ' at no i)ains to fill his 
mind,' iii. 287; Langton, letter to, ii. 
162, «. 3; Lennox's, Mrs., play, iv. 
11; Life not included in the Lives 
of the Poets, iii. 114, n. 2; Literary 
Club, member of the, i. 553; ii. 19; 

— absurd verses recited to it, ii. 276; 
iv. 15; — wishes for more members, 
iv. 211; Lloyd's supper party, i. 457, 
n. 2 ; lodgings, miserable, i. 405, 11. 
i; — in the Edgeware Road, ii. 209; 
'loose in his principles,' i. 473; lux- 
ury, efTects of, ii. 250, n. i; Madeira, 
bottle of, i. 482; Mallet's reputation, 
ii. 267; Martinelli's /^/j/c;j, ii. 253; 
mathematics, made no great figiire 
in, i. 476; — contempt for them, ii. 
5CX3, n. I ; medical studies, i. 476 ; 
merit late to be acknowledged, iii. 
2S6; mind, never exchanged, iii. 43; 



moilern imitators of the early jxiets, 
despises, iii. 180, n. 3 ; Montaigne, 
love of, iii. 82, tt. 3; mortified by a 
German, ii. 295; musical performers' 
l)ay, ii. 259; ' tntiliuil acquaintance,' 
iii. 117, //. i; martyrdom, ii. 286-7; 
Xalural llistorv : see Animati-d Xiit- 
tir,\- nidification, ii. 285; ' Nihil quod 
tetigit non ornavit,' i. 477 ; iii. 94 ; 
' \i/ te ijiKcsii'cris extra,' iv. 32 ; 
Northcote's account of him, i. 479, 
;/. I ; Northumberland, Duke t)f, 
would have helped him, iv. 26, ;/. 3; 
the Duchess ])rints Jui-cin tt>id .in- 
•,v/i>ia, ii. 3S5, w. 4; novelty, i. 510, 
//. 2; I'adua, at, i. 85, >t. i; I'aoli's, 
tlines at, ii. 253; parado.x, affectation 
of, i. 4S3; ' three paradoxes,' iii. 427, 
;/. 2; J'artu'll, Life of, ii. 191; par- 
tiality of his friends against him, iii. 
286; pen in and out of his hand, iv. 
35 ; pensions to French authors, i. 
430, ;/. 3; Percy's account of him, i. 
479, ;;. I ; — quarrel with him, iii. 
314, ;/. 2; 'pleasure of being liked,' 
i. 477, «. 6; Pope's lines on Addison, 
ii. 97; — 'strain of pride,' iii. 188, 
;;. I ; powers, tlid not know his own, 
i. 247, //. 2. public make a. point to 
know nothing of his writings, iii. 
286 ; religion, takes his from the 
priest, ii. 246 ; Retaliation, passages 
quoted : — Attorneys, ii. 145, ;/. 3 ; 
Burke, i. 546; iii. 264, ;/. i; iv. 368; 
Piurke, William, v. 86, ;;. 2; Douglas, 
Dr., i. 265, //. 4; Garrick, i. 234, //. 4; 
his lines on Goldsmith, i. 477, «. 6 ; 
Lauder, i. 265, >/. 4; 'pepper the 
highest,' iv. 394, ;/. 3 ; Townshend, 
Tommy, iv. 368; — shown to Burke 
and Mrs. Cholmondeley, iii. 362, n. 
i; reviewers, ii. 45, n. 2; Reynolds's 
explanation of his absurdities, i. 477, 
«. 6; — his envy, i. 479, n. 2; Rob- 



Bo swell's Life of Johyison. 



97 



Goldsmith. 



Good-humour. 



inhood Society, iv. 107, ;/. 3; round 
of pleasures, ii. 314, ;/. 2 ; Royal 
Academy Professor, ii. 76, n. 3; Roy- 
al Academy dinner, iii. 59, ;/. 2; iv. 
363, n. i; Sappho in Ovid,.ii. 208; 
Savage, compared with, ii. 321, n. i; 
Scotch inns, v. 166; scrupulous, not, 
i. 247, ;/. 2; servitorships, v. 139, ;/. 
i; settled system, no, i. 480; or no- 
tions, iii. 286; She Stoops to Conquer, 
copyright of it, iii. 1 14, //. 2 ; — 
dedicated to Johnson, ii. i, //. 2, 248; 
— Dedication, ib., 11. 3; — dinner on 
the day of its first performance, iv. 
375; — Duke of Gloucester's mar- 
riage, ii. 257; — Farquhar copied, v. 
151, //. i; — finding out the longi- 
tude, i. 349, //. i; — ill success pre- 
dicted, ii. 239; — Johnson's opinion, 
ii. 236, 239, 267 ; — naming it, ii. 
236, n. I, 2g6 ; — Northcote's ac- 
count of it to Goldsmith, ii. 268, ;/. 
I ; — performed during a Court 
mourning, iv. 375; — Rambler, bor- 
rowed from, i. 247, n. y, — song for 
Miss Hardcastle, ii. 251; — success 
on the stage, ii. 239, ;?. i ; — Tony 
Lumpkin's song, ii. 251 ; — Wal- 
pole's criticism, ii. 268, ;/. I ; Shel- 
burne and Malagrida, iv. 201; shine, 
eager to, i. 490; ii. 265, 290, 294; 
social, not, iii. 43; society, his, court- 
ed, ii. 295 ; Sterne, attacks, ii. 199, 
;/. 2; calls him a very dull fellow, ii. 
255 ; straw, on a balancer of a, iii. 
262, //. i; suicide, on, ii. 263; Swift's 
' strain of pride,' iii. 1S8, //. i; tailor, 
taken for a, ii. 95, ;/. 2; tailor's bill, 
ii. 96, 71. i; talk: see conversation; 
' tell truth and shame the de^nl,' ii. 
254 ; Temple, chambers in the, ii. 
112, n.; iv. 32; V. 41, n. i; Temple 
of Fame, ii. 410; terror, object of, to 
a nobleman, i. 521, ;/. i; Townshend, 



praises Lord Mayor, iv. 201, ;/. 2; 
I'ravellcr, brings him into high rep- 
utation, iii. 2S6 ; Chamier's doubts as 
to the author, iii. 286; — dedicated 
to his brother, ii. i, ;;. 2; — editions, 
i. 481, «• i; — Fox praises it, iii. 
286, 296 ; Johnson's lines in it, i. 
441, //. I ; ii. 6 ; iii. 475 ; — praises 
it, ii. 6, 271; — reviews it, i. 558; — 
recites a passage, v. 392; — ' Luke's 
iron crown,' ii. 7; — payment for it, 
i. 224, n. i; ii. 7, «. 2; — published 
with author's name, i. 477, n. 2; — 
reiterated correction, ii. 17, n. 3; — 
slow, iii. 286 ; — written after the 
I'icar but published before, i. 481 ; 
iii. 365 ; travelling in youth, on, iii. 
520; unnoticed, afraid of being, ii. 
213; Van Egmont's Travels, reviews, 
iv. 26, ;/. 3; vanity, i. 478; — shown 
in his talk, i. 478; — his clothes, ii. 
95 ; — his virtues and vices were 
from it, iii. 43; Vicar of Wakefield, 
history of its publication, i. 4S0-1 ; 
iii. 365; — Johnson's opinion of it, 
i. 481, ;/. 2; iii. 365; — passages ex- 
punged, iii. 427 ; visionary project, 
his, iv. 26; Walpole despises him, i. 
449, n. 3; — introduced to him, iv. 
363, ;/. I ; Warburton a weak writer, 
V. 105 ; Westminster Abbey and 
Temple Bar, 11. 273 ; deserved a 
place in the Abbey, iii. 287; spot for 
his monument chosen by Reynolds, 
iii. 95, n. 2; ' Williams, I go to Miss,' 
i. 488; Zobeide, wrote a prologue for, 
iii. 44, n. 5. 
GoMBAULD, iii. 450. 
GoNDAR, V. 141, n. I. 
Good-breeding, ii. 94; v. 92, 314. 
Good Friday, ii. 408; iii. 341, 356; 

iv. 235. 
Good-humour, acquired, not natural, 
V. 240; dependent upon the will, iii. 



98 



Index to 



Good-humour. 



Grange. 



381; increases with age, /(*. ,• rare, ii. 
415; Johnson a good-hmuDured fel- 
low, ih. 

' Good Man, a,' iv. 276. 

GooJ Xatured Man. See (Joi.MSMi ill. 

CiooDNKSs, not natural, v. 240, 244. 

liiHuiy Two Shoes, iv. 9, //. 5. 

CIoKDuN, Duke of, iii. 489, ;/. 3. 

(ii)Rin>N, Hon..\le.\aiuler, (I.onl Kock- 
ville). i. 543; V. 449. 453. 

CiOKixiN, Sir Alexander, ii. 308, ;/. 3; 
iii. 119; V. yS, loi, 103-4, 108. 

(ioKiin.N, Captain, of Park, v. 116. 

(loKDo.v, Ca'neral C. G., i. 394, n. 2. 

CioRDoN, Lord Cieorge, Mansfield's 
charge on his trial, iii. 485, ». i; St. 
Cieorge's Field meeting, iii. 486; sent 
to the Tower, iii. 488; trial, iv. loi. 

Gordon, I'rofessor 'Thomas, v. 95-^), 
loi, 103-4. 

GoRlioN, Kev. Dr., of Lincoln, iii. 
408. 

tioRDoN, Mr. W., Town-clerk of Aber- 
deen, V. 102, M. I. 

(loKDoN KloTS, iii. 485-90, 494, 498. 

C'lORi.iTZ, ii. 141, M. 2. 

Gory, M(ml)o<ldo's black servant, v. 

93. 

G0.SSK, Mr. Edmund, Gray's Works, i. 
467, ;/. I. 

GoTiiicK IJuii.niNGS, i. 317. 

Goicn, — , ii. 456. 

Gout, an attack of, a poetical fiction, 
i. 207 ; books on it, v. 23S ; due to 
abstinence, i. 120, w. 2. 

Govkrnmknt, by one, best for a great 
nation, iii. 53 ; contracted — more 
easily destroyed, iii. 321 ; distance, 
from a, iv. 246; English — on a broad 
basis, iii. 321 ; fittest men not ap- 
pointed, ii. 181; forms of it indiffer- 
ent, ii. 195; imperfection inse]xiral)le 
from all, ii. 135 ; possible thnnigh 
want of agreement in the governed, 



ii. 118; power cannot be long abused, 
ii. 195 ; real power everywhere lost 
(in 1785), iv. 300, //. 2; reverence foi 
it imi)aired, iii. 4: see Minis iky. 

CoTeniiiient of the 'J'ottf^ue. lioswtll 
f|uotes it, iii. 431; Johnson iJcrhaps 
borrows from it, i. 518, //. 2; 'men 
oppressive by their parts,' iv. 194, 
n. I. 

Coventor, v. 210, >/. 2. 

GoWKR, first Earl, recommends John- 
son, i. 154; I'laxton's letter to him, 
i. 42, //. i; A'eiie<;aiio, i. 342. 

vIowK.R, Dr., Provost of Worcester 
College, ii. 109, ;/. 2. 

GoWKR, John, iii. 288. 

Gralk, in I.atin, v. 73 ; at meals, i. 
277, ;/. 2; ii. 143; V. 140. 

Grai TON, Third Duke of, ii. 535. 

CiRAilA.M. Colonel, ii. 179. 

Graham, Rev. George, Telemachus, i. 
475; iii. 119; insults Goldsmith, v. 
no. 

Graham, I.ady I.ucy, v. 408, /;. i. 

Graham, .Manpiis of (third Duke of 
Montrose), iii. 434 ; laughed at in 
77/<- A'o/liinl, th., n. 2; loves liberty, 
iii. 435; mentioned, iv. 127. 

Graham, Miss, iii. 463. 

Grainc.kr, Dr. James, character, his, 
ii. 520; Johnson's .Shakespeare, anec- 
dote of, i. 369, ;/. 4; Oik on Solitude, 
iii. 224 ; Siignr Cane, Johnson re- 
views it, i. 557; does not like it, ii. 
520; rniee altered to nrts, ii. 519; 
Tihnllus, translates, ii. 520. 

Gramm.vr, advantage of learning it, v. 

154-5- 
Gra.mmar School, Johnson's scheme 

for the classes of a, i. 115. 
Grand Chartreix, iii. 518. 
ClRAND Sicnor, ii. 287. 

(iRANDEKS OK Sl'AIN, V. 407. 

Gran(;e, I.ady, v. 258. 



boswelVs Life of Johnson. 



99 



Granger. 



Great. 



Granger, Rev. James, Biographical 
History, iii. 104; v. 290; denies that 
he is a Whig, iii. 104; ' the dog is a 
Whig,' V. 291. 

Grant, Abbe, v, 174, //. i. 

Grant, Sir Archibald, iii. 118. 

Grant, Rev, Mr., v. 136-7, 140, I49- 

Grant, — . ii. 352. 354- 

Grantham, ii. 357, «. 2. 

Grantham, first Baron, i. 502, «. 5. 

Grantley, first Baron, ii. 540, n. 2. 

Granville, G. See under Lans- 
DOWNE, Lord. 

Granville, John Carteret, Earl, de- 
scribed by Lord Chesterfield, iv. 14, 
n. 5 ; despatch after the battle of 
Dettingen, iv. 15; mentioned, ii. 134, 
n. I ; iv. 90. 

Gratitude, burthen, a, i. 285; fruit of 
great cultivation, v. 264. 1 

Grattan, Henry, 'one link of the 
English chain,' iv. 366; mentioned, 
iv. 85, «. I. 
Grave, The, iii. 55. 
Graves, Morgan, i. 107. n. 2. 
Graves, Rev. Richard, author of The 
Spiritual Quixote, i. 87, w. 4; Shen- 
stone at Oxford, i. no, «. 2; — prop- 
erty, V. 521, «. 4; mentioned, ii. 

518.' 

Gravina, iv. 230. 

Gray. Sir James, ii. 203. 

Gray, John, bookseller, i. 176. 

Gray, Thomas, abruptness, his, i. 466; 
Akenside, inferior to, iii. 37; Beattie, 
friendship with, v. 16, n. 2 ; blank 
verse, disliked, i. 495, «• l". Boswell 
sat up all night reading him, ii. 383, 
n. 3; Boswell's Corsica and Paoli, ii. 
52, M. i; Colman's Odes to Obscttrity, 
ii. 3S2; disjecta tnembra, i. 467, n. i; 
Distant Prospect of Eton College 
quoted, i. 398 ; doctor's degree of- 
fered him at Aberdeen, ii. 306, n. 2; 



Dryden's ' car,' ii. 6, «. i; ' dull fel- 
low, a,' ii. 374 ; ^l''Sy> imitated, v. 
134, "■ i; — mended by Goldsmith, 
i. 467, n. 2; — quoted, iii. 217, «. I, 
232; — sneered at, ii. 375, n. 3; — 
Young's parody of Johnson's criti- 
cism on it, iv. 452, «. I {see just be- 
low under Johnson); happy moments 
for writing, i. 235, n. 5 ; Italy, tour 
to, iii. 36, w. i; Johnson criticises the 
Elegy, i.466; ii. 375, w. 3; finds two 
good stanzas, ii. 375 ; — criticises 
the Odes, i. 466-7; ii. 188, 374, 383; 
iv. 15, 19, n. 4; — criticism attacked, 
iv. 74; defended by Boswell, i. 467; 
— cites him in his Dictionary, iv. 5, 
w. i; — praises his Letters, iii. 36, n. 
I ; — writes his Life, iii. 485 : — 
works, did not taste, ii. 384 ; calls 
him Ursa Major, v. 437, n. 3 ; Long 
Story cited, v. 333; Mackintosh criti- 
cises his style, iii. 36, n. i; Mason's 
Memoirs of him, i. 34 ; higher in 
them than in his poems, iii. 35; 'me- 
chanical poet, a,' ii. 375; Ode on Vi- 
cissitude, iv. 160, n. 2; Odes praised 
by Cumberland's Ode, iii. 50, n. i ; 
Pope's condensation of thought, ad- 
mires, v. 393, n. 2; and his Homer, 
iii. 291, n. 3; Progress of Poetry, 
quoted, iii. 187, n. 4 ; Remains, his, 
preparation for publication, ii. 188; 
Sixteen-string Jack, compared to, iii. 
44 ; Spleen, The, admires, iii. 44, «• 
3 ; Sterne's popularity, ii. 255, «. i ; 
' sunshine of the breast,' v. 183, n. i; 
' warm Gray,' ii. 382. 
Grays Inn Journal, i. 357, 379. 412. 
Great, how pronounced, ii. 185. 
Great, the, cant against their manners, 
iii. 401 ; Johnson, never courted by, 
iv. 135; did not seek his society, iv. 
136 ; or Richardson's, ib., n. i ; of- 
ficious friends, have, ii. 74. «• 4 J 



lOO 



Index to 



Great. 

seeking their acquaintance, ii. ii ; 
iii. 215. 

' Great IIk,' ii. 241. 

Grkat M<ioiL, ii. 46, w. 2. 

Greaves, Samuel, iv. 292. 

Greece, fountain of knowledge, iii. 
378 ; modern Greece swept by the 
Turks, ii. 223. 

CiRKKK, hooks ft)r beginners, iii. 463 ; 
Clenardus's Gratniiiar, iv. 23; essen- 
tial to a gootl education, i. 529; like 
lace, iv. 27; a woman's knowledge of 
it, i. 142, II. I. Sc-e Johnson, Greek. 

Greeks, barbarians mostly, ii. 196 ; 
dramatists, iv. 19; empire, iii. 42. 

Green, John, Hishop of Lincoln, i. 52. 

Green, Matthew, iii. 460, «. 3. 

Green, Richard, of Lichtield, account 
of him, ii. 533; his Museum, //'.,• iii. 
46S ; jMhnson, letter from, iv. 453 ; 
mentioned, iii. 447; iv. 460, ;/. 4. 

Green Room, of Drury Lane, i. 233. 

Green Sleeves, v. 296. 

Greene, Burnaby, i. 599. 

Grkenhoises, ii. 193; iv. 238. 

Griknwicii, Hoswell and Johnson's 
day there, i. 529 ; Hospital, i. 532 ; 
Johnson composes part of Irene in 
the I'ark, i. 123 ; lodges in Church 
Street, i. 124 ; Park, described by 
Miss Talbot, i. 123, n. 2; not equal 
to Fleet Street, i. 533. 

Gregory, David, Geomet>y, v. 335. 

Gregory, Dr. James, iii. 144; v. 53. 

Gregory, Dr. John, v. 53, n. 4. 

Gregory, professors of that name, v. 

53. "• 4. 

Gregory, — , iii. 515. 

Grenville, Right Hon. George, Beck- 
ford's Bribery Bill, supports, ii. 389, 
«. I ; ' could have counted the Ma- 
nilla ransom,' ii. 156; Johnson's let- 
ter to him, i. 435, n. 2. 

Cn-nvilk Wf/, iv. S6, «. 3; v. 445, 



GroTC. 

Gretna Green, iii. 78. 

Greville, C. C., Johnson and Clarrick, 

i. 251, M. I ; — and Vo\, iv. 192, /;. 

2; 'public dinner' at Lambeth, iv. 

423, "• 3- 

Grevili.e, Richard Fulke, Maxims 
and Characters, iv. 351 ; account of 
him, ib., n. 4; mentioned, iv. i, «. i. 

CiREY, first Earl, iii. 482, n. 2. 

Grey, Dr. Richard, iii. 362. 

Grey, Stephen, ii. 29. 

CiREY, Dr. Zachary, i. 514, n. i ; iii. 
362; V. 256, ;/. 2. 

Griek, alleviated l)y recording recollec- 
tions of the dead, i. 246; digested, to 
be, not diverted, iii. 32 ; effect of 
business engagements on it, ii. 539; 
Johnson's advice as to dealing with 
it, iii. 155; iv. 116, 164; not retained 
long by a sound mini!, iii. 155; wears 
away soon, iii. 155. ^"^v Sorrow. 

Grierson, Mr. and Mrs., ii. 134. 

Griffiths, Ralph, the pul)lisher. his 
evidence worthless, iii. 34, /;. 3; war 
with Smollett, iii. 37, n. 2. 

Griffiths, — , of Bryn o dol, v. 512. 

Griffiths, — , of Kefnamwycllh, v. 

515. 

Gri.mm, Baron, CanJide, i. 396; Mme. 
du Boccage, iv. 382, ;/. i. 

Grimston, Viscount, iv. 92, ;/. 2. 

Grongar Hill, iv. 355. 

Gronovii, v. 429. 

Grosvenor, Lord, v. 523, n. i. 

Grotius, corporal punishment, on, ii. 
180, ;;. i; Christian evidences, on, i. 
460, 526 ; De Satis factione Christi, 
V. 100; Isaac de Groot his descend- 
ant, iii. 142; practised as a lawyer, ii. 
493; quoted in Lauder's fraud, i. 
266. 

Grove, Rev. Henry, papers in the 
Spectator, iii. 39; read by Baretti, iv. 
38. 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



lOI 



Grove. 



Hailes. 



Grove, The, iv. 27, n. 3. 
Grub Street, defined, i. 343. 
GUADALOUPE, i. 425, 426, ;/. I. 
GUALTIER, Philip, i%-. 209, ;/. 2. 
Guarded bed-curtains, v. 494, n. 2. 
Gtiardian, The, on public judgment, i. 

232, n. I ; end of its publication, i. 

233, «■ 3- 

Guardians for Childrp:n, iii. 454. 

Guards, The, Boswell's fondness for 
them, i. 462, ti. i ; afraid of the 
juries, iii. 54. 

GUARINI, Pastor Fido, iii. 394. 

Guessing, iii. 405. 

Giiide-Books, common in Italy, v. 69. 

GuiLLERAGUES, M. de, i. 104, n. 3. 

Guilty, ten, should escape, rather than 
one innocent sufTer, iv. 290. 

Guimene, Princess of, ii. 452. 

GULOSITY, i. 541. 

Gunning, the Misses, v. 402, n. i, 409, 
11. I. 

Gunpowder, iii. 411; v. 141. 

GuNTHWAiT, ii. 194. 

Gustaviis Adolphus, History of, iv. 
90. 

Gustaviis Vasa, i. 163. 

Guthrie, William, account of him, i. 
135. ^'- 3. 136 ; Johnson's character 
of him, ii. 59; Apotheosis of Milton, 
i. 162; Debates, i. 135-7; Duhalde's 
China, translates, iv. 35; pensioned, 
i. 135; Scotticisms, i. 136, n. i. 

GuYON, Dissertation on the Amazons, 

i- 173- 

GwYN, Colonel, i. 479, n. 3. 

GwYNN, John, the architect, account 
of him, V. 518, n. i ; buildings de- 
signed by him, ii. 502, n. i; defence 
of architecture, ii. 503; happy reply, 
ii- 503; Johnson's advocacy of him, 
i. 406; letter in his behalf, v. 518, «. 
i; London and Western Improved, ii. 
28 ; Oxford post-coach, in the, ii. 



502; iii. 147; Thoughts on the Coro- 
nation of George III, i. 418. 
GWYNNE, Nell, i. 287, n. 3. 

H. 

Habeas Corpus, ii. 83. 

Habeas Corpus Bill of 1758, iii. 264, 
;/. I. 

Haberdashers' Company, i. 153, n. 
I. 

Habitations, attachment to, ii. 118. 

Habits, early, force of, ii. 420. 

Hackman, Rev. Mr., Boswell attends 
his trial, iii. 436; and execution, iii. 
436, n. 2; altercation about him, iii. 
437-8; described in Love and Mad- 
ness, iv. 215, n. 4. 

Haddington, seventh Earl of, iii. 

151- 

Haddo, Professor, v. 72. 

Haddocks, dried, v. 125. 

Hadoni exeqtiia:, iv. 183, n. i. 

Hagley, described by Walpole, v. 88, 
n. 3, 520, n. 2 ; Johnson visits it, v. 
520-1. 

Hague, v. 27, n. i. 

Hailes, Lord (Sir David Dalrymple), 
account of him, i. 500; v. 54; Annals 
of Scotland, a new mode of history, 
ii. 439 ; — accuracy, ii. 483 ; — a 
book of great labour, iii. 423; — ex- 
act, but dry, iii. 459 ; — praised by 
Gibbon, ib., n. 3; — revised by John- 
son, ii. 318, 320, 324-5, 328, 335, 
381, 435-6, 439-40, 444, 472, 483; 
iii. 136, 245, 248, 409; — praised by 
him, iii. 67 ; Boswell, letters to, i. 
501; V. 463; Catalogue of th^ Lords 
of Session, v. 242 ; Chesterfield's ' re- 
spectable Hottentot,' on, i. 310; con- 
sulted on the entail of Auchinleck, 
ii. 476, 479, 481-3; critical sagacity, 
ii. 230; V. 54 ; Elgin Cathedral, ac- 
count of, V. 129 ; Inch Keith, ac- 



I02 



Index to 



Hailes. 



Hamilton. 



count of, V. 62; Johnson, introduced 
to. V. 54 ; — , asks, to w rite a char- 
acter of Hruce, ii. 443-4 ; — , com- 
pares, with Swift, i. 501 ; is not 
convinced by his Siiasoriuni, iii. 104; 
records a talk with him, v. 455; sends 
him anecdotes for liis Lives, iii. 450- 
I ; — drinks a liuniper to liim, i. 523; 
love for him, ii. 335 ; Knight, tlie 
negro's case, iii. 245, 248; La oVdti- 
liti' (L's fucr/dulcs, v. 37S ; LmcIuu- 
tius, edits, iii. 150; modernizes John 
Hales's language, iv. 364 ; Ossimi, 
faith in, ii. 337; Percy, resemblance 
to, iii. 315; I'rior, censures, iii. 21S; 
Ki'/narks on the History of Scotland, 
V. 42-3 ; Siured L'oenis, iii. 218 ; 
Stuarts, unfair to the, v. 290; Vanity 
of Human Wishes, corrects the, v. 
54; Walton s Lives, proposal to edit, 
ii. 320, 324, 326, 510: mentioned, ii. 
337; iii. 117, 146, 175; iv. iSi, 250, 
268, 279; v. 449. 

Hair, growth of the, iii. 452, n. 3. 

Hakkwii.l, Rev. (ieorge, i. 254. 

Hai.k, Sir Matthew, devoted to his of- 
fice, ii. 394 ; knowledge varied, ii. 
181; Life by Burnet, iv. 360; Primi- 
tive Origination of Mankind, i. 218, 
n. 3; rules of health and study, iv. 
358 ; sentenced witches to death, v. 

51, «. I. 

Hales, John, of Eton, iv. 364. 

Hales, Stephen, On Distilling Sea- 
Water, i. 358 ; Statical Essays, v. 
281, n. I. 

Halifax, Dr., ii. iii, n. 3. 

Halket, Elizabeth, ii. 105, n. 1. 

Hall, Dr., Master of Pembroke Col- 
lege, iv. 344, n. 2. 

Hall, General, iii. 411, and n. 2. 

Hall, John, the engraver, iii. 126; iv. 

485. «■ 3- 
Hali. Mrs., account of her, iv. 107; 



Johnson turns Captain Macheath, iv. 
no; talks of the resurrection, iv. 
108. 

Hall, Rev. Robert, influenced by a 
metaphysical tailor, iv. 216, n. i ; 
studied at .\berdeen, v. 96, n. 2. 

Hall, Rev. Westley (Wesley's brother- 
in-law), iv. 107, ;;. I. 

Hall, — , v. iii. 

Hallam, Henry, ii. 241, ;/. 3. 

Hai.i.a.m, Henry, the younger, ii. io8, 
II. 2. 

Halle, University of, i. 170, n. 5. 

Halls, fire-place in the middle, i. 317; 
in stpiires' houses, v. 68. 

Halsev, Edmund, i. 567, n. 4. 

Ham, posterity of, i. 463. 

Hamilton, Archibald, the printer, ii. 
259. 

Hamilton, Captain, i\. 341, n. 3. 

Hamilton, sixth Duke of, v. 409, «. i. 

Hamilton, eighth Duke of, ii. 57, n. 
2; iii. 249; v. 48, 402, n. I. 

Hamilton, Gavin, ii. 310. 

Hamilton, Lady Hetty, v. 403, 408. 

Hamilton, Sir William, member of 
the Literary Club, i. 555. 

Hamilton, W'illiam, of Hangour, 
Johnson talks slightingly of him, iii. 
170-1 ; verses on Holyrood, v. 48; 
to the Countess of Eglintoune, v. 
426, n. 3. 

Hamilton, William, of Sundrum, v. 
42. 

Hamilton, William Gerard, Boswell's 
Johnson, pays for a cancel in, i. 602; 
Burke, engagement and rupture with, 
i. 601 ; — , ranks very high, iv. 31, 
;/. 3; character by H. Walpole and 
Miss Burney, i. 602; 'eminent 
friend,' an, iv. 323, n. 2; Jenyns's 
character, iii. 328, «. i; Johnson ac- 
companied him to the street-door, i. 
566; — arguing on the wrong side, 



Bosweirs Life of folmson. 



103 



Hamilton. 



Harcourt. 



iv. 129, ;/. 2; — bequest to him, iv. 
463, «. 3; — complaint of the Min- 
istry, ii. 363 ; — death makes a 
chasm, iv. 485; — engaging in poli- 
tics with him, i. 566, 601-2; — ' en- 
vied but one thing,' he had said, iv. 
130; — esteem for him, i. 566; long 
intimacy, ii. 363; — as a fox-hunter, 
i. 517, //. i; — , generous ofTer to, iv. 
282-3, 419. "• I ; — letters to him, iv. 
283, 419 ; — pension, ii. 363 ; — on 
public speaking, ii. 160; Junius, sus- 
pected to he, iii. 428, ;/. 3 ; Parlia- 
mentary Loi^ici:, i. 601 ; satisfactory 
coxcomb, describes a, iii. 277, n. 3 ; 
'Single-speech,' i. 566, n. 3; War- 
ton, Dr. , letter to, i. 601-2 ; men- 
tioned, iv. I, II. I, 184, It. I, 397. 

Hamilton and Balfour, booksellers, 
iii. 380, II. 2. 

Hamlet, an Essay on the Character of, 
iv. 30, //. 4; rescued from rubbish, ii. 
98, n. I, 234, //. 3. 

Hammond. Dr. Henry, iii. 67. 

Hammond, James, Life, by Johnson, 
iii. 34, ;/. 3; Love Elegies, iv. 20; v. 
305. 

Hampden, Dr., Bishop of Hereford, 

iv. 373. «• 3- 

PIampstK/M), Mrs. Johnson's lodgings, 
i. 223, 275; Johnson composes most 
of The Vanity of LLuman Wishes 
there, i. 223; takes an airing to it, iv. 
268; mentioned, v. 253. 

Hampton, James, Translation of Po- 
lyhiiis, i. 357. 

Hampton Court. Johnson's applica- 
tion for a residence in it, iii. 40, n. i; 
mentioned, iii. 455, n. 2. 

Handasyd, General, ii. 250, ;/. 2. 

H.\NDEL, musical meeting m his hon- 
our, iv. 326; his poet, v. 398, n. 2. 

H.\NMER, Sir Thomas, epitaphs on 

him, i. 205 ; ii. 29 ; Hervey's Letter 

VI.— 12 



to Sir Thomas IIan»ie>\ ". 36, //. i, 
37, n. 2 ; Shakespeare, edits, i. 202, 
205; V. 277, «. 6. 

Hannibal, iii. 47. 

Hanover, House of, Johnson attacks 
it, i. 163; asserts its unpopularity, iii. 
176; calls it isolt'e, iv. 190; says that 
it is weak because unpopular, v. 309; 
oaths as to the disputed right, ii. 252; 
pleasure of cursing it, i. 497 ; right 
to the throne, v. 230-2 ; unjiopular 
at O.xford, i. 84, n. 3 {see under ().\- 
FORD, Jacobite) ; becomes generally 
popular, iv. 196, n. i {see under 
George HI, unpopularity). 

Hanover Kat, ii. 521. 

Hanway, Jonas, Eight Days' Journey, 
i. 358; ii. 140; Essay on Tea, i. 358, 
363-4, 403, n. i; iii. 300, n. i; v. 25; 
Johnson's rejoinder, i. 363. 

Happiness, attained by studying little 
things, i. 502, 509: iii. 187; business 
of a wise man, iii. 154 ; cannot be 
found in this life, v. 205 ; counter- 
feited, ii. 194, M. 3; cultivated, to be, 
iii. 187; experience shows that men 
are less happy, iii. 268 ; hope the 
chief part of it, i. 271, n. 2; ii. 402; 
Hume's notion, ii. 10; iii. 327; inn, 
produced most by a good, ii. 517; its 
throne a tavern chair, ib., n. 2; one 
solid basis of it, iii. 413; Pantheon, 
at the, ii. 193-4; pleasure, compared 
with, iii. 279 ; present time never 
happy but when a man is drunk, ii. 
402, 498, n. 7 ; iii. 5 ; or when he 
forgets himself, iii. 61 ; public mat- 
ters, little affected by, ii. 69, n. i, 
195; schoolboys, happiness of, i. 522; 
struggles for it, iii. 226; Swift, de- 
fined by, ii. 402, n. 2; virtue, not the 
ceftain result of, i. 450, n. 2. 

Happy Life, The, ii. 29. 

Harcourt, LordChnncellor, i.87,«.4, 



I04 



Index to 



Harcourt. 



Hawkesworth. 



HARCot'RT, Lord, iii. 484, ;/. 2. 

HarUCASTI,!;, Mrs., in S/u- Stoops to 
ComjiiiT, i. 247, //. 3. 

IIaruinc;, — , a painter, iv. 485, ;/. 3. 

HarijIN(;e, first Viscount, ii. 210, ;/. i. 

Haruwickk, Lord Chancellor, J)irU- 
ton's Dottt'ts, on, iii. 233; Dr. Foster 
becomes popular tlipjuyh him, iv. 11, 
n. 2; jjrime minister, on the olFice of 
a, ii. 407, ;/. 2 ; Kadclifle's trial, i. 
208, w. 2; Specttilor, ])aper in the, iii. 
39; mentioned, ii. 181, //. 3. 

Hardwickk, second Lord, i. 302, ;/. 2. 

Hardyk.m TK, ii. 105. 

Hark, James, iii. 441, >t. 4. 

Hark, W., the murderer, v. 250, n. i. 

1Iak»;ra\ K, — , the barrister, iii. 100, //. 

lL\Ri.\i;iu.\, Dr., iv. 207. 

HARiNtiro.s, Sir John, iv. 207, w. 3, 
484, ;/. 4. 

Hari.kian Lil)rary and Catalogue, i. 
177, 1S2. 

HarUian Misiclhiny, Pirfacc to t/u\ i. 
202. 

Harri.nctcxn', Countess of, iii. 160. 

Harris, James (Ilermes Harris), ac- 
count of him, ii. 258, ;/. 4; a cox- 
comb, V. 430; Ilcnncs or Philoloi^ical 
Jtiquiries, iii. 131, 277, 292; v. 430; 
Johnson's Dictionary, praises, iii. 
131; — , talk with, iii. 291-4; pleas- 
antry, his sense of, v. 430, n. 5 ; schol- 
ar and prig, iii. 277 ; mentioned, ii. 
419. 

Harris, Thomas, of Covent Garden 
Theatre, iii. 129. 

Harrison, Rev. Cornelius, iv. 462, 

71. 4. 

Harrison, Elizabeth, Miscellanies, i. 

358, 361. 
Harrison, John, the inventor of the 

chronometer, i. 349, «. i. 
Harrison, — , iv. 256, n. 4. 
Harrogate, i. 332, ;/. 3; iii. 52, n. i. 



Harky, Miss Jane, iii. 339, «. :. 

Harm;, Dr. Walter, companionable 
and a scholar, ii. 138 ; Essays on 
I/tishanJry, iv. 91; History of Ciis- 
tavus Adolphiis,\\. 138; iv. ()o; John- 
son and the screen, i. 1S8, //. 1; tutor 
to Lliot and .Stanhope, iv. 90, 385. 

HARTI.Klii RV. v. 519. 

Harvest of 1777, iii. 256, n. 3; of 
1775, iii. 356, //. 2. 

Harvey. .S<v Hervev. 

Harwich, i. 544; stage-coach, i. 538. 

Harwoi.)!), Dr. Ldward, Liberal 
Translation of the Xeio Testament, 
iii. 45. 

Hasi.eric, Sir .\rihur, ii. 135. 

Hastie. a SciUch schoolmaster, his 
case, ii. 166, i68, 17(^80; Johnst)n's 
argument for him, ii. 211 ; Mans- 
fielil's speech, ii. 214; had his de- 
serts, ii. 232. 

Hasti.N(;s, Warren, Hoswcll, letter to, 
iv. 77; charges against him, iv. 246; 
Johnson, letters from, iii. 517. iv. 77, 
7(^-82 ; .Macaulay on his answer to 
Johnson, iv. 81, //. 3; scheme about 
Oxford and I'ersian literature, iv. 79, 
//. 2; trial, iv. 77, w. i; Westminster 
School, at, i. 457, n. 2. 

Hate, steadier than love, iii. 169. 

Hatsee, Mrs., iv. 184, n. i. 

Hatter, anecdote of a, ii. 328, //. 2. 

Havannah Expedition, i. 221, ;/. 2, 
280, n. 2, 442. 

Hawes, L., i. 21 i, ;/. 3. 

Hawkesbury, Lord. See Jenkin- 
SON, Charles. 

Hawkestone, v. 494-5. 

Hawkesworth, Dr. John, edits the 
Adventurer, i. 271; Cook's Voyages, 
edits, ii. 284; iii. 8; — payment for 
it. >• 395. "• 4; Ji- 284, ;/. 3; — pas- 
sage against a particular providence, 
v. 321; Courtenay's lines on him, i. 



Boswelfs Life of Jo Jin son. 



105 



Hawkesworth. 



Hay. 



258; death, causes of his, v. 321, n. 
2 ; Debates, continues the, i. 593 ; 
Ivy Lane Club, member of the, iv. 
503; Johnson's imitator, i. 271, 293; 
ii. 248; — tribute to him, i. 220, n. 
3; Psalmanazar, anecdote of, iii. 503; 
spoilt by success, i. 293, n. 2; S^oift, 
Life of, i. 220, «. 3 ; ii. 364, n. 2 ; 
mentioned, i. 279, 281; ii. 136. 
Hawkins, Sir John, account of him, 
i. 31-2; Addison's style, i. 259, w. 2; 
'Attorney, an,' i. 221 ; Barber, at- 
tacks, iv. 427, 464, ;/. 3, 508 ; Bos- 
well attacks him indirectly, i. 262, 11. 
3; — , slights, i. 33, ;/. i, 221, n. i; 
' bulky tome,' his, ii. 517, ;/. 2; Ijurkc, 
rudeness to, i. 555; — , ill-will tow- 
ards, ii. 515 ; Cave, Edward, i. 131, 
n. i; Dodd, Dr., iii. 136, «. 3; Eng- 
lish lexicographers, i. 215-16; gentil- 
ity, on, i. 187, ;/. 3; Goldsmith at the 
Club, i. 555, n. 2; Hector's notes of 
Johnson, iv. 432-3; Ilistoy of Mu- 
sic, V. Si; Hogarth's physicians, iii. 
327, ;/. 4 ; inaccuracy, his — gen- 
eral, i. 31, 11. 2; iii. 260; iv. 378, ;/. 
I, 427-8; instances of it — Addison's 
iiotanJa, i. 237 ; Essex Head Club, 
iv. 293, 505; ignorance for arrogance, 
iv. 159, n. 4; Irene, reception of, i. 
22g, n. I ; Johnson's Adversai-ia, i. 
241, n. i; — 'enmity' to Milton, i. 
267 ; — fear of death, iv. 456 ; — 
fondness for his wife, i. 272; — and 
Heely ii. 35, n.\\ — loan of books, 
iv. 428, 71. i; — and Millar, i. 332, 
n. 1\ — mother's death, i. 392, n, 2; 
— ■ operating on himself, iv. 460, n. 
5, 482, ;;. 2; — ' ostentatious bounty 
to negroes,' iv. 463, n. 3; — , warrants 
against, i. 163; — wife's apparition, 
i, 27S ; — will, iv. 427 ; — Literary 
Club, i. 555-6; — Rasselas, i. 394-5; 
— Revieiv of Burke's Sublime and 



Beautiful, i. 359; — Vicar of Wake- 
field, sale of the copy of the, i. 481; 
Ivy Lane Club, iv. 293; Johnson's 
apologies, iv. 371, ;/. i; — bequest to 
him, iv. 463, 71. y, — executors, one 
of, iv. 463, //. 3; — funeral, iv. 484, 
It. z; — house in Johnson's Court, 
ii. 5, ;/. i; — humour, ii. 301, «. 2; 

— letters to him, iv. 502; — Lo7ido7t 
and Savage, i. 145, «. 3; — mode of 
eating, i. 542, ;/. i ; — not a stayed, 
orderly man, iv. 428, «. i; — praise 
of a tavern chair, ii. 517, w. 2 ; — 
quickness to see good in others, i. 
186, ;/. i; — readiness to forgive in- 
juries, iv. 402, n. 2; — , said to have 
slandered, iv. 483, «. 2; — separation 
from his wife, i. 188, «. 2; — sink- 
ing into indolence, iii. 112, «. i; — 
title of Doctor, i. 565, «. i; — will, 
iv. 463; — Works, edits, i. 221, 7t. i; 

— writing for money, iii. 22, w. 3 ; 
knighted, i. 221, n. i ; Literary Club, 
account of the, i. 553, «. 2, 555; Pitt 
and Pulteney, oratory of, i. 176 ; 
pockets Johnson's Dia/y, iv. 468, ;/. 
2 ; Porson, satirised by, ii. 65, ;/. 4; 
iv. 427, 71. 2, 468, 71. 2 ; ' rigmarole,' 
his, i. 406, 71. i; Thrale's, Mrs., sec- 
ond marriage, iv. 392 ; unclubable, 
i- 31. "■ 3. 555, w. 2; iv. 293, n. 2. 

Hawkins, Miss, ' Boswell, Mr. James,' 
i. 221, 7!. i; Burke's estimate of his 
son, iv. 253, «. 3; Hawkins's attack 
on the Essex Head Club, iv. 505. 

Hawkins, Rev. Professor William, 
member of Pembroke College, i. 87; 
quarrel with Garrick, il>., ti. 3 ; iii. 
294. 

Hawkins, — , under-master of Lich. 
field School, i. 51. 

Hawthornden. See Drummond, 
William. 

Hay, I-ord, v. 119. 



io6 



Index to 



Hay. 



Henderson. 



IIav, Lord Cliarles, at the Hattle of 
Kontenoy, iii. lo, w. 2 ; his court- 
martial, iii. lo. 

Hay, Sir George, i. 404. 

Hay, Dr., i. 404, 407, n. i. 

Hay, John, v. 150, 157, 164. 

Hay, William, a translation of Martial, 
V. 4i(;. 

Hayks, Rev. Mr., iii. 206. 

IIaylkv, William, correspondence with 
Miss .Seward, iv. 382, //. 2; dedica- 
tion to Romney, iii. 50, //. i. 

Hayman, Francis, i. 306, //. i. 

HayvvarI), Abraham, Thraliana, iv. 
396, //. 4. 

Ha/I-ITT, William, I'.axter at Kidder- 
minster, iv. 261, ;/. 2; Dr. Foster's 
popvdarity, iv. ii, //. 2; grieves at the 
defeat of Napoleon, iv. 321, m. 3. 
See under NoRTHCOTE, Conversa- 
tions of A'orthcotc. 

Heai.k, iv. 270-76. 

Hkai.ih, rules to restore it, iv. 176. 

Heard, Johnson's pronunciation of, iii. 
224. 

Hearnk, Thomas, Duke of Bruns- 
wick's accession-day, i. 84, «. 3; Le- 
land's Itinerary, v. 507, n. 5; Pem- 
broke College Chapel, i. 68, n. 1 ; 
Psalmanazar at Oxford, iii. 509. 

Hkatii, Dr., iv. 85. 

Hkath, James, the engraver, iv. 484, 
n. 3. 

Heaven, degrees of happiness in it, 
iii. 327. See Fi'TURE State. 

He-hear and She-bear, iv. 131, n. 2. 

Heberuen, Dr., account of him, iv. 
263, «. 2; Johnson, attends, iv. 266- 
7, 300, M. 2, 303; — bequest to him, 
iv. 463, 71. 3 ; Markland, assists, iv. 
185, n. 5 ; ultimiis Kornanorum, iv. 
460, «. 3 ; timidoriim timidissimns, 
iv. 460, ;/. 5; mentioned, ii. 355; iv. 
407, 409, «. I. 



Hebrew, Leibnitz traces all languages 
up to it, ii. 179. 

Hebrides. See under Boswei.l, 
Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides; 
Journey to the IVesterti Islands of 
Siotland ; and Scoti.a.nd, High- 
lands. 

Hector, Edmund, Birmingham, his 
house in, ii. 522, n. 2; Boswell and 
Johnson visit him in 1776, ii. 522-3, 
525-8; Johnson's chastity, i. 189; — 
early life, gives Boswell particulars 
of, ii. 526 ; iv. 433, «. i ; — early 
verses, i. 181, w. 7; — friendship for 
him, iv. 157, 169, 312; — last visit 
to him, iv. 432; — letters to him: see 
under Johnsun, letters; — will, not 
in, iv. 463, //. 3 ; sister, his, Mrs. 
Careless, ii. 526. 

Heei.Y, Mr. and Mrs., ii. 34-5 ; iv. 427; 
Johnson's letter to Heely, iv. 427, 

Heinous, ii. 197-8. 

Heirs at Law, right, their, ii. 495. 

Heirs General, ii. 474. 

Hell, Johnson's dread of it, iv. 345; 
its pavement of good intentions, ii. 
412; of infants' skulls, iv. 261, n. 2; 
subsists by truth, iii. 333. 

Helmet, hung out on a tower, iii. 310. 

Helot, the drunken, iii. 431. 

Helvetius, advises Montesquieu to 
suppress his Esprit des Lois, v. 46, 
w. 2; Warburton ' would have -Marked 
him," iv. 302, M. I. 

Helvoetsluys, i. 545. 

Hemisphere, ii. 93. 

HfeNAULT, ii. 439, n. I, 472, 483. 

Henderson, John, the actor, his mim- 
icry of Johnson not correct, ii. 374, 
n. i; visits him, iv. 282, «. i. 

Henderson, John (of Pembroke Col- 
lege), account of him, iv. 344-5 ; 
Johnson and the nonjurors, iv. 331, 
n, i; mentioned, iv. 174, n. i. 



Boswelfs Life of yohnson. 



107 



Henley-in-Arden. 



High Dutch. 



Henley-in-Arden, ii. 518, «. i, 522. 

Henley-on-Thames, v. 518, «. i. 

Henn, Mr., i. 153, n. i. 

Henry W. gives Langton a grant of 
free-warren, i. 287 ; History of him 
by Lyttelton, ii. 43. 

Henry V, Johnson proposes to act it 
in Versailles, ii. 453, n. 2. 

Henry VHI threatens the House of 
Commons, iii. 464. 

Henry IV of France, Johnson cen- 
sures his epitaph, iv. g8, ;/. I. 

Henry, Prince, of Portugal, happy for 
mankind had he never been born, iv. 
289. 

Henry, Robert, //zV/^jn- 0/ Great Brit- 
ain, iii. 379 ; sale maliciously in- 
jured, iii. 3S0, II. I ; mentioned, ii. 
60, n. I. 

Hens feeding their young, iv. 243. 

Hei'HAEstion, iv. 317. 

Herald's Office, i. 295. 

Heraldry, i. 569. 

Herbert, George, ' Hell is full of 
good meanings,' ii. 412, n. 3. 

Hercules, his .shirt, iii. 407; Johnson, 
the Hercules who strangled serpents, 
ii. 299; ' Vou, and I and Hercules,' 
iv. 53. «■ 3. 

Hereditary Occitations, v. 136. 

Hereditary Tenures, ii. 482. 

Hermes, or ^ a Philosophical Inquiry 
cotu'crning Universal Grammar, ii. 
258, n. 4. 

Hermetick Philosophy. See Her- 
mippus Rediviviis. 

Hermippus Redirn^'us, i. 4S3 ; li. 489, 
n. 4. 

Hermit. See under Be.'^ttie and P.\R- 
NELL. 

Hermit of Teneriffe. See Theodore the 
Hermit. 

Hermits, v. 70. 

Herne, Elizabeth, iv. 463, «. 3, 507. 



Herodotus, Egyptian mummies, iv. 
145, n. 2. 

Heroic Epistle. See Mason, W. 

Hertford, first Earl of. Cock -lane 
ghost, goes to hear the, i. 470, «. 4; 
Hume, gets a pension for, ii. 362, «. 
2; Johnson, correspondence with, iii. 
40, n. I. 

Hertford, Lady, i. 200, n. 2; iii. 158, 
n. 3. 

Hervey, Hon. Henry, ' Harry Her- 
vey,' i. 123; Johnson's love for him, 
i. 123 ; intimacy with his family, i. 
225; story of Johnson's ingratitude, 
iii. 222. 

Hervey, Rev. James, Meditations, v. 
400; parodied by Johnson, v. 400. 

Hervey, Hon. Thomas, Beauclerk's 
story of him and Johnson, ii. 36-7; 
Johnson, payment to, ii. 37; separa- 
tion from his wife, ii. 37, «. 2; vicious 
and genteel, ii. 390. 

Hervey, Mrs., iii. 276, n. 4. 

Hervey, Miss, iii. 221, ;/. 2. 

Hervey, Miss E., iii. 494, «. 3. 

Hesiod, Pasoris Lexicon, iii. 463 ; 
quoted, v. 71. 

Hesketh, Lady, iii. 42, «. i. 

Hesse, Landgrave of, v. 246. 

Hetherington's Charity, ii. 328. 

Heydon, John, iv. 463, n. 3. 

Heywood, i. 97, n. 3. 

Hickes, Rev. Dr., account of him, v. 
407, n. i; mentioned, iv. 331. 

HiCKY, Thomas, ii. 390. 

Hierarchy, English, Johnson's rever- 
ence for it, iv. 87, 228, 316; V. 69; 
its theory and practice, iii. 157. 

Hierocles, Jests of, i. 173; v. 350, n. I. 

HiGGiNS, Dr., iii. 403, 439. 

High, Johnson's use of the word, iii. 
134. n. 3. 

High Dutch, resemblance to Eng- 
lish, iii. 266. 



io8 



Index to 



High Life. 



Holbach. 



Ilii^li Life belo'i' Stairs, iv. 9. 

IIl(;il\VAY.MKN, evidence of H. Wal- 
pulc, Wesley, and liarctti as to their 
frc(iuency, iii. 271, «. i ; (Jay their 
Or])heus, ii. 421, //. i ; (luestion of 
shootinj; them, iii. 271, 272, «. i. 

Illl.L, Dr. Sir John, account of him, ii. 
43, ;/. 2, 44, ;/. 2; wrote Mrs. Glasses 
Cookiiy, iii. 324; in the Heroic Epis- 
tle, iv. 131, //. 3. 

I III. I., Joseph (Cowper's friend), i. 457, 
;/. 2. 

Illi I., Mivs, of llawkestone, v. 4(^4-5. 

III). I, Professor, of St. Andrews, v. 
72, 74- 

liil I , Sir Rowland, of llawkestone, v. 

494. 

IIlI.I , riionias \Vrij;l>t, v. 51S, //. 2. 

IliNCMci.lKl-K, John, liishop of I'eter- 
boroiigh, meml)er of the Literary 
Club, i. 555 ; haleil Whiggism, iii. 

479- 

IIlNCHlNHRooK, iii. 43O, ;/. i. 

IIlNCllM.AN, — , iv. 463, n. 3. 

IIlNDoo.s, iv. 14, ;/. 2. 

Histoire </<■ Pascal /\ioli, ii. 3, n. 2. 

//istcria Stiitliortim, Johnson's, iii. 365. 

Hisri>Kl.\N, great aliililies not needed, 
i. 4<)i; inferiority of Knglish, i. 117, 
//. i; ii. 271, II. 2; licence allowed, i. 
411. 

History, alni.mac, no better than an, 
ii. 419; authentic, little, ii. 419; Bo- 
lingbrokes caution about reading it, 
ii. 245, //. 3 : Holingbroke, IJurke, 
and Yox on it, ii. 419, ;/. 3; charac- 
ter and motives generally unknown, 
ii. 90-1; iii. 459; colouring and phi- 
losophy conjecture, ii. 419; Johnson's 
indifference to general history, iii. 
234, H. I ; — recommendation of 
many histories, iv. 360, ;/. i ; man- 
ners and common life, of, iii. 379; v 
89 ; oral at first, v. 448 ; ' painted 



form the taste of this age,' iii. 67; 
records only lately consulted, i. 135, 
V. 250; spirit contrary to minute ex- 
actness, i. 179; shallow stream of 
thought in it, ii. 224 ; unsujiported 
by contemporary evidence, v. 459. 

History of the Council of Trent, i. 124. 

History of Eni^laiitl, in Italian. .SV^* 
Martinki-i.i. 

History of John Bull, i. 524, w. I ; 
written i)y Arbuthnot, i. 524, //. i; 
<|Uoted by Johnson, ii. ii*), n. 5. 

History of the War, projected, i. 411. 

Historyes of IVoye, v. 523, n. 3. 

Hirru, Charles, i. 21 1. 

lIoADl.KY, ;\rchbishop, i. 368, ;/. 5. 

lIoAlUKY, iJr. Henjamin, Suspicious 
Husband, 7'hc, ii. 56, n. 2. 

IIo.VDhKY, Dr. John, letter to (Jar- 
rick, ii. 78, //. 2. 

Hob in the IVell, ii. 532. 

II()KHF,.s, Thomas, Bathursi's verses to 
him, iv. 463, ;/. 3; mentioned, iii. 508. 

II<)CKLKY-lN-rilF-II(iLK, iii. 152, //. I, 

516. 

IIonc.K, the cat. iv. 228. 

IIoixiKS, Dr., ii. 390, n. 4. 

Hex;, William, i. 266. 

IIociAKiii, William, (Jarrick's acting, 
describes, iii. 40, n. 2; Johnson's be- 
lief, describes, i. 170, //. i ; — con- 
versation, ih. ; finds — more like 
David than Solomon, iii. 260, «. i; 
— like his Idle Apprentice, i. 290; 
takes — for an idiot, i. i6g; Modern 
Midnii^ht Conversation, iii. 396; par- 
tisan of George II, i. 168; physicians, 
his, iii. 327, ;/. 4; prints, his, at .Slains 
Castle, V. 116; — at Streatham, iii. 
396; Wilkes, print of, v. 2x2. 

Hogg, ]a.mes, Jacobite /Relics, v. 162, 
n. 2. 

Hoi^shead of sense, v. 388. 

IIoLBACH, Haron, anecdote of Hume 



Boswelfs Life of Johnson. 



109 



Holbach. 



Homer. 



and seventeen Atheists, ii. 9, n. 4 ; 
Systetne de la Nature, v. 53, n. i. 

HOLBROOK, — , Usher at Lichfield 
School, i. 52. 

Holder, — , an apothecar)', iv. 15S, 
166, 463, n. 3. 

Holidays of the Church, ii. 525. 

HOLINSHED, quoted by Boswell, iv. 
309, n. 2. 

Holland, exportation of coin free, iv. 
121, ;/. 3 ; Dutch fond of draughts 
and smoking, i. 367 ; — free from 
spleen, iv. 437; English books print- 
ed there, iii. 184; France, pressed by, 
in 1779, iii. 464, n. 3; Johnson's pro- 
posed tour there, i. 544; iii. 516; lead 
from two Cathedrals shipped to it, 
v. 129, n. 2; populous, iii. 264; Scotch 
regiment at Sluys, iii. 508 ; suspen- 
sion of arms in 1782-3, iv. 325, n. 3; 
torture employed there, i. 540; trade, 
1. 253, ;/. 2. 

Holland, the actor, iv. 8. 

Holland, Dr., ii. 108, «. 2. 

Holland, first Lord, iv. 201, ?/. i, 253, 
n. 3. 

Holland, third Lord, Boswell and 
Horace Walpole, iv. 363, n. 3: Jef- 
frey's 'narrow English,' ii. 183, «. 3; 
Johnson and Fo.\, iv. 192, n. 2\ — 
and Garrick, i. 251, ;/. i. 

Holland House, iv. 201, n. i. 

HoLLis, Thomas, iv. 113, n. i. 

Holloway, Mr. M. M., autograph let- 
ters of Johnson, iv. 300, ;/. 2; v. 461, 
;/. I, 518, ;/. I. 

HoLROYD, John (Lord Sheffield), i. 
538, ;/. i; ii. 173, n. 2; iii. 202. //. I. 

Holy Land, iii. 202. 

Home, Francis, Experii/ieiits on Blcacli- 
ing, i. 358. 

Home, Henry. See Lord Kames. 

Home, John,^,o-/j', ii. 366, n. i; v. 233; 
Athelstanford, minister of, iii. 55, ;/. 



3; Bute's errand-goer, ii. 406 ; and fa- 
vourite, i. 447, n. 3; Carlyle, Dr. A., 
described by, v. 412, w. i; Derrick's 
lines, parodied, i. 528; Douglas, Gar- 
rick rejects it, v. 412, n. i ; Hume 
and Scott admire it, ii. 366, n. i ; 
Johnson despises it, ii. 365-6 ; not 
ten good lines in it, v. 410-12; Sher- 
idan gives the author a gold medal 
for it, ii. 366; v. 410; lines in it ap- 
plicable to Johnson, iii. 92 ; quota- 
tions from it, V. 410, n. 5; Elibank, 
Lord, his patron, v. 440; Histoiy of 
the Rebellion <'/ 1745, iii. 184, n. 4; 
Hume's bequest to him, ii. 366, n. 
I ; — dislike of the Whigs, iv. 224, 
n. \; — remark on the incapacity of 
the period, iii. 54, n. 2 ; Settle, lik- 
ened to, iii. 87; Shakespeare of Scot- 
land, iv. 215, ;/. I ; better than 
Shakespeare, v. 412, n. i ; mentioned, 
ii. 60, n. I, 436, n. 4. 
Homer, advice given to Diomed (Glau- 
cus), ii. 149; antiquity, his, iii. 376; 
quoted by Thucydides, il>.; charac- 
ters, does not describe, v. 89 ; de- 
tached fragments, not made up of, 
V. 187; Iliad, a collection of pieces, 
iii. 378-9; prose translation of it sug- 
gested, iii. 379, — Latin version, ib., 
n. I; Johnson's early translation from 
him, i. 61; — knowledge of him, iv, 
252, n. 3 ; V. 89, n. 1; ' machinery,' 
his, iv. 19; Odyssey, Johnson's liking 
for it, iv. 252 ; Fox's, ib., «. 3 ; — 
Life of Johnson likened to it, i. 13; 
— quoted, iv. 513; prince of poets, 
ii. 149 ; Sarpedon, Earl of Errol 
likened to, v. 117, n. i ; shield of 
Achilles, iv. 39; v. 88; translated by 
Cowper, iii. 379, 11. i ; by Dacier, 
ih.; by Macpherson, ii. 340, w. 2; 
iii. 379, n. I ; by Pope, iii. 291 ; 
Virgil, compared with, iii. 220; v. 



IIO 



Index to 



Homer. 

8q, //. 2; — less tfilked of than, iii. 
378. 

HOMKREY, family of, iv. 309, n. i. 

Homo caudal us, ii. 439. 

Honesty, iii. 269. 

HoMTON, iii. 326, n. i. 

Hood, James, v. 74. 

HooKE, Dr. (at St. Cloud), ii, 455. 

IIooKE, Nathaniel, writes the Duchess 
of Marlborough's Apology, v. 199. 

Hooker, Richard, i. 254. 

HoOLE, John, account of him, ii. 330, 
w. 3; iv. 82; Ariosto, iv. 82; Cleonice, 
ii. 330, H. 4; dinners and suppers at 
his house, ii. 3S2 ; iii. 43, 389 ; iv. 
102, 290; Essex Head Club, member 
of the, iv. 298; Johnson's bequest to 
him, iv. 463, «. 3; — , collects a City 
Club for, iv. loi ; — friendship with 
him, iv. 415; — and Cloldsmith, i. 
480, «. i; — last days, iv. 459, w. 5, 
469, 473, w. 2, 478; — letters to him, 
ii. 330 ; iv. 414-15 ; — recommends 
him to Warren Hastings, iv. 82; — 
writes the dedication of his Tasso, i. 
443 ; regularly educated, iv. 216 ; 
uncle, his, the metaj)hysical tailor, 
iii. 503; iv. 216; mentioned, iv. 307. 

HooLE, Mrs., iv, 414. 

Hooi.E, Rev. Mr., Johnson's bequest 
to him, iv. 463, w. 3 ; — reads the 
service to, iv. 472 ; mentioned, iii. 
495. «• 2. 

Hop-Garden^ The, ii. 520. 

Hope, ' A continual renovation of 
hope,' iv. 257, n. 3 ; Prince of 
Wales's enjoyment of it, iv. 210; a 
species of happiness, i. 426; ii. 402. 

Hope, Dr., of Edinburgh, iv. 304-5. 

Hope, Professor, of Edinburgh, v. 461. 

Hope, Sir William, v. 74. 

Hopeton, second Earl of, iv. 51, w. i. 

Horace, Art of Poetry, a contested 
passage in the, iii. 84-5 ; Carmen 



Horace. 

Seculare set to music, iii. 424 ; Mr. 
Tasker's version, ib., n. 3; cheerful- 
ness, iii. 285 ; inconstancy, ib.; edi- 
tions collected by Douglas, iv. 322; 
gratitude to his father, iii. 14; Ham- 
ilton's Imitations, iii. 171; Johnson 
translates Odes, i. 22, and ii. 9-i. 60- 
I ; and Ode, iv. 7-iv. 426 ; Journey 
to Brundusium mentioned, iii. 284; 
metres, ii. 509, «. 2 ; middle-rate 
poets, on, ii. 403 ; A'il admirari, ii. 
412; read as far as the Rhone, iv. 
320; religion, absence of, iv. 249; 
' sapient i(r consultus,' iii. 318; trans- 
lations of the lyrics, iii. 405 ; — 
Francis's, ib.; villa, iii. 284; quota- 
tions: — 1 Odes, i. 2-i. 283; I Odes, 
ii.-v. 115, «. i; I Odes, ii. 21-i. 559, 
«. 3; I Odes, xii. 46-iv. 411, n. 2; I 
Odes, xxii. 5-ii. 162; I Odes, xxiv. 9- 
iv. 335, «. 2; I Odes, xxvi. i-ii. i6i; 
I Odes, xxxiv. i-iii. 317 ; i Odes, 
xxxiv. i-iv. 248, n. 4; 2 Odes, i. 4-i. 
240; 2 Odes, i. 24-iv. 431, «. 4 ; 2 
Odes, xvi. i-v. 186; 2 Odes, xiv.-iii. 
220 ; V. 76, «. 3 ; 2 Odes, xx. 19-iv. 
320, M. I ; 3 Odes, i. 34-ii. 238 • 3 
Odes, ii. 13-i. 209, M. 2; 3 Odes, xxiv. 
2i-iii. 182, «. i; 3 Odes, ii.-iii. 232; 
3 Odes, xxx. i-ii. 332, n. 6; 4 Odes, 
iii. 2-i. 407, n.; iv. 67, «. i; 4 Odes, 
ix. 25-v. 473, n. 4; Epodes, xv. 19- 
iv. 369, w. i; I Sat. i. 66-iii. 366, n. 
2; 2 Sat. \. 86-iv. 150, «. i; i Sat. 
iii. 33-iv. 208, «. 2; I Sat. iv. 34-ii. 
90; 2 Sat. ii. 3-i. 122, «. i; i Epis. 
i. 15-V. 322, «. 2; I Epis. ii. 41-iv. 
139. «■ 3; I Epis. vi. I-ii. 412, n. 5; 
I Epis. vii. 96-ii. 386, «. 3; I Epis. 
xi. 29-v. 434, w. 2; I Epis. xiv. 13- 
iii. 474, n. i; 2 Epis. ii. 84-ii. 386, 
M. 2; 2 Epis. ii. i02-i. 231; 2 Epis. 
ii. Iio-i. 255; 2 Epis. ii. 212-iv. 409, 
n. 3; Ars Poet., 1. ii-iii. 319, n. 4; 



BosweWs Life of fokuson. 



Ill 



Horace. 



Howard. 



— 1. 15-iv. 45, }t. 4; — 1. 25-v. 88, 
«. 5; — 1. 39-iii. 460, «. i; — 1. 41- 
ii. 145 ; — 1. 48-i. 256 ; — 1. 97-v. 
455, «• 2; — 1. 126-V. 396, «. 2; — 
I. 128-iii. 84; — 1. 142-ii. 15, n. i; 

— 1. 161-V. 323, «. i; — 1. 188-iii. 
260, n. i; — 1. 221-V. 428, n. \; — 
1. 317-i. 191; — 1. 372-ii. 402; — 1. 
388-i. 227. 

HoRNE, Dr., President of Magdalen 
College, (afterwards Bishop of Nor- 
wich), Garrick's funeral, lines on, iv. 
240, n. i; Garrick and Mickle, anec- 
dote of, ii. 209, n. 2; Johnson's char- 
acter, iv. 492, n. 2; Letter to A da in 
Smith, V. 33, n. 2; neglected state of 
churches, v. 46, «. i ; Waltofts Lives, 
projected edition of ii. 320, 324, 
510. 

HoRNE, Rev. John. See Tooke, 
Home. 

Horneck, The Misses, i. 479, n. 3; ii. 
240, «. 2, 314, n. 4; iv. 410, «. 2. 

HORREBOW, Neils, iii. 316. 

Horse-Tax, v. 57. 

Horseman, — , iv. 502. 

Horses, old, iv. 286, 288. 

Horsi.ey, Dr. (afterwards Bishop of 
Rochester), account of him, iv. 504; 
member of the Essex Head Club. iv. 

293- 
Horton, Mrs., ii. 257, n. 2. 
Hosier s Ghost, v. 132, ;;. 4. 
Hospitality, ancient, ii. 192 ; less 

need for it now, iv. 21 ; elaborate 

attention, iv. 256 ; in London, ii. 

254 ; promiscuous, ii. 192 ; waste of 

time, iv. 256. 
Hospitals, their administration, iii. 

61. 
Hostility, temporarj', iv. 307. 
Hot-houses, iv. 238. 
'Hottentot, a respectable,' i. 309; 

not Johnson, i. 310, n. 2. 



Houghton Collection, iv. 386, «. 2. 

House ok Commons, afraid of the 
populace, v. 115; Bolingbroke, de- 
scribed by, iii. 266, n. 2 ; bribed, 
must be, iii. 464 ; coarse invectives 
in 1784, iv. 343; city, contest with 
the, in 1771, ii. 344, n.; iv. 161; cor- 
ruption, iii. 234, 265 ; Crosby the 
Lord Mayor committed by it to 
prison, iii. 522 ; debates : see De- 
bates ; dissolution of 1774, ii. 326; 
V. 524; of 1784, iv. 305, M. 2; elec- 
tion-committees, iv. 86; figure made 
by insignificant men, v. 306 ; influ- 
ence of the Crown, motion on the, 
iv. 255; influence of the peers, v. 63; 
Johnson's account of it as it originally 
was, iii. 464; — anecdote of Henry 
Vni, ii>.; — only once inside the 
building, i. 584; Middlesex election: 
see under Middlesex Election ; 
mixed body, iii. 265 ; Nowell's ser- 
mon on January 30, iv. 341; power 
of the nation's money, iv. 196 ; re- 
lation to the people, iv. 36; speaking 
at the bar, iii. 254; Wilkes's advice, 
il>.; speaking before a Committee, 
iv. 86; counsel paid for speaking, iv. 
325; speeches, how far affected by, 
iii. 265-6; tenacity of forms, iv. 121; 
Wilkes, afraid of, iv. 161, n. 5; reso- 
lution to expel him expunged, ii. 
128. 

House of Lords, Copy-right Case, ii. 
312; Corporation of Stirling Case, ii. 
428; dissatisfaction with its judica- 
ture, ii. 482, n. 2; Douglas Cause, ii. 
264, H. I ; lay peers in law cases, iii. 
393; 'noble stands,' made, v. 115; 
Scotch Schoolmaster's Case, ii. 166, 
213; wise and independent, iii. 232. 

Housebreakers, iv. 147. 

Hoveden, iv. 358, n. 3. 

Howard, Hon. Edward, ii. 124, «. 3. 



I 12 



Index to 



Howard. 



Hume. 



Howard, General Sir George, ii. 430, 
n. I. 

Howard, Lord, v. 460, ;/. 2. 

Howard, Sir Robert, ii. 193, ti. 1. 

Howard, — , of Lichfield, i. 94, 597- 
8; iii. 252. 

Howard, — , of Lichfield, the younger, 
iii. 252. 

Howell, James, in the Fleet, v. 157, 
n. \\ " Stavo henc,' &c., ii. 396, n. 6. 

IloiuelVs State Trials, Somerset's Case, 
iii. 99, n. 6. 

Hlddesford, Rev. Dr., Vice-Chan- 
cellor of Oxford, i. 325, 373; John- 
son's letter to him, i. 327. 

Iliidibras. See BuTLER, Samuel. 

IIUET, Bishop, iii. 195, n. 2. 

Hr(;r,lNS, William, (]uarrel with War- 
ton, iv. 7; mentioned, i. 442. 

IIi'QHES, John, Mevioirhy Duncombe, 
"•• 357. '^- 2 : y'fie Siege of Damas- 
cus, iii. 294, n. I ; Spenser, edits, i. 
314; mentioned, iv. 43, n. i. 

HuGiLL, an attorney, iii. 338, n. i. 

Hl'LK, The Justitia, iii. 305. 

Hu^L\^■ITY, its common rights, iv. 221, 
32S. 

HlMBLE-BEE, V. 433, n. 2. 

Hl"ME, David, account of his publica- 
tions, V. 34, n. 1 ; Adams, Dr., an- 
swers his Essay on Aliracles, i. 9, ;/. 
i; ii. 505; iv. 434, n. a; v. 312; 
Adams the architects, ii. 372, n. 3 ; 
Agutter's sermon, attacked in, iv. 
487, n. i; American war, iv. 224, n, 
i; ancient history, ii. 273, n. i; art, 
indifference to, i. 421, n. i; atheists 
in Paris, dines with seventeen, ii. g, 
n. 4 ; attacks, reply to, ii. 70, «. 2 ; 
— , benefited by some, v. 312; Beat- 
tie's Essay on Truth : see Beattie; 
Blacklock, the blind poet, i. 539, n. 
i; v. 52, n. 4; books, the small num- 
ber of good, iii. 23, n. i; Boswell in- 



timate with him, ii. 68, n. i, 500, n. 
2; v. 32; preserves memoirs of him, V. 
33; Boufflers, Mme. de, ii. 464, ;/. 3; 
Carlyle's, Dr., account of him, v. 32, 
;/. 4; change of ministry in 1775, ex- 
pects a, ii. 436, n. 4; Charles H, par- 
tiality for, ii. 390, n. 3; Cheyne, Dr., 
letter to, iii. 31, ;/. i; composed with 
facility, v. 75, n. i ; conceit, his, v. 
32; conversation, ii. 271, «. i; death, 
said that he had no fear of, ii. 122; 
iii. 173; dedications, iv. 122, /;. 3; 
Deist, denied that he was a, ii. 9 ; 
Dialogues on A'atural Keligion, i. 
312, n. 2; dines with those who had 
written against him, ii. 505, //. 2 ; 
Douglas Cause, ii. 264, n. i; educa- 
tion and disposition, opinion on, ii. 
500, n. 2 , England on the decline, 
ii. 147, n. I ; English and French 
j)oliteness, iv. 274, ;/. 3; English, his 
hatred of the, ii. 344, n.; v. 20, «. 4; 

— neglect of polite letters, ii. 512, n. 
3 ; — prejudice against the Scotch, 
ii. 343, n. 4; — prose, iii. 292, n. i; 

— and .Scotch education, iii. 14, n. 
I ; Essays J\foral and Political, sale 
of his, iv. 507; fame, his, v. 34; Fer- 
gusson's Essay on Civil Society, v. 
46, n. 2 ; France on the decline, 
thinks, ii. 147, ;/. i ; his reception 
there, ii. 460, «. 3 ; French, igno- 
rance of, i. 508, n. 3; French prison- 
ers, account of the, i. 408, ;/. 3; Ger- 
many, barbarians of, ii. 147, ;;. i • 
Gibbon's praise of him, ii. 271, n. 3; 
Glasgow professorship, sought a, v. 
420, «. 2; 'gone to milk the bull,' 
i. 514; happiness, equality in, ii. 10; 
iii. 327; happy with small means, i. 
430, ;/. 3; Henry's History , reviews, 
iii. 380, 71. I ; Ilistofy of England, 
his alterations in it on the Tory side, 
iv. 224, ;/. i; — Adam Smith's Letter 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



113 



Hume. 



Humour. 



prefixed, v. 33, w. 2; — slow sale of 
the first volume, v. 34, n. i; — writ- 
ten for want of occupation, iii. 23, n. 
i; — mentioned, iv. 91, n. i; Hobb- 
ist, a, V. 309 ; Home, John, and 
Shakespeare, ii. 366, «. i ; Home, 
bequest to, ii. 366, n. i ; house, his, 
in James Court, v. 23, n. 3 ; in St. 
David Street, v. 31, n. 4; Hard and 
the Warburtonian school, iv. 219, n. 
2; hypocrite, longs to be a successful, 
iv. 224, 7/. I ; ' infidel pensioner,' 
called an, ii. 362 ; infidels, attacks, 
iii. 380, ;/. I ; infidelity, his death- 
bed, iii. 173; infidelity, his, less read, 
iv. 333; Johnson and Convocation, i. 
537 ; — Dictionary, absurdities in, 
ii. 316, w. 2; — in the Green Room, 
i. 233; — had not (in 1773) read his 
History, ii. 271; — likes him better 
than Robertson, v. 64, ;?. 3; — vio- 
lent against him, v. 32; Karnes and 
Voltaire, ii. 103, n. 2; Keeper of the 
Advocates' Library, v. 44, n. 2 ; 
Leechman's Sermon on Prayer, v. 
77, n. 2 : Life, with Adam Smith's 
letter prefixed, iii. 135 ; Macdonald, 
Sir James, i. 520, n. i; Macpherson's 
J/oiiicr and History of Britain, ii. 
340, n. 2 ; Mallet and Bolingbroke, 
i. 312, ;/. 2 ; Mallet's Life of Marl- 
borough, iii. 439, n. I ; middle class 
in Scotland, absence of a, ii. 461, n. 
i; Millar, Andrew, i. 332, n. 3; min- 
istry, imbecility of Lord Jvlortli's, iii. 
54, n. 2; I\[iracles, Essay on, i. 515; 
iii. 214: see under Dr. Adams and 
Beattie ; Monboddo's Origin of 
Language, ii. 298, n. 2 ; Murray 
(Lord Mansfield), at Lovat's trial, 
speech of, i. 209, n. 2; national debt, 
ii. 147, n. I ; neglect of a book, iii. 
426, ;/. 3 ; New Testament, igno- 
rance of the, ii. 10; iii. 173; Ossian, 



ii. 345, n. 3; Parties in General, iii. 
12, ;/. 2 ; Parties of Great Britain, 
li. 461, w. I ; pension, ii. 362, n. 2 ; 
philosopher, anecdote of a, iii. 346, 
n. 3; Poker Club, ii. 431, n. i; Po- 
litical Discourses, ii. 60, n. 2 ; Pre- 
tender's base character, v. 228, n. i ; 
— visit to London, i. 324, n. 2 ; v. 
229, n. I ; priests and dissenters, v. 
291, n. 2; 'principle, has no,' iv. 
224, n. I ; V. 309 ; Reynolds's alle- 
gorical picture, v. 311, n. 3 ; resist- 
ance, doctrine of, ii. 195, n. 2 ; Rob- 
ertson's Scotland, price offered for, 
iii. 3S0, n. 2 ; Rousseau's visit to 
England and his pension, ii. 13, ns. i 
and 3; Russia, barbarians of, ii. 147, 
n. I ; Sanquhar's trial, v. 117, n. 2 ; 
Scotch writers, foolish praise of, iv. 
215, w. i; Scotticisms, ii. 82; — cor- 
rected by Strahan, v. 104, n. 3; sec- 
ond-sight, ii. 12, n. 2; .Select Society, 
member of the, v. 448, n. 3 ; senti- 
ments, unanimity and contrariety of, 
iii. 12, n. 2 ; Smith's, Adam, Letter, 
V. 33; answered by Dr. Home, ib., 
n. 2; Smith's, suggested knocking of 
his head against, iii. 135 ; soldiers, 
iii. II, n. i; Strahan, leaves his MSS. 
to, ii. 157, 71. 3; style, i. 50S; Swift's 
style, ii. 220, n. i; Tory by chance, 
iv. 224; V. 309; Toryism, growth of 
his, iv. 224, n. I ; touchstones of 
party-men, i. 410, n. i; tragedy, an- 
ecdote of a, iii. 270, u. 2; Treatise of 
Human N^ature, i. 147, ;/. i; Tytler, 
attacked by, v. 312 ; ' Voltaire, an 
echo of,' ii. 60; mentioned, ii. 184, 
n. 2. 

Hume, Mrs., James Thomson's grand- 
mother, iii. 409. 

Humiliating, ii. 178. 

Hummums, The, iii. 397. 

Humour. See Good Humour. 



114 



Index to 



Humour. 

Humour, Scotch nation not distin- 
guished for it, iv. 149. 

Humours of Ballamagairy, ii. 251, 
n. I. 

Humphry, Ozias, account of him, iv. 
309, n. 2 ; Johnson's letters to him, 
iv. 309-10; his miniature, iv. 485, 

». 3- 

Humphry Clinker. See Smollett. 

Hungary, hospitality to strangers, iv. 
21. 

Hunter, John, the surgeon, i. 282, n. 
l\ iv. 254, ;/. 2. 

Hunter, Dr. William, iv. 254. 

Hunter, — , Johnson's schoolmaster, 
i. 51-3; ii. 168, 535. 

Hunter, Miss, iv. 211, n. 2, 

Hunter, Mrs., i. 598. 

Hunting, v. 288. 

Huntingdon, tenth Earl of, iii. 96, 
n. I. 

HURI), Richard, Bishop of Worcester, 
accounts for everything systemati- 
cally, iv. 219; Addison, impertinent 
notes on, iv. 219, n. 2; archbishop, 
declined to be, iv. 219 ; Boswell at- 
tacks him, iv. 56, n.; Cowley s Select 
Works, edits, iii. 33, 257; evil spirits, 
on, iv. 335; v. 40, M. 3; Horace, notes 
on, iii. 84, «. 3 ; Hume, attacks, iv. 
219, «. 2 ; Johnson praises him, iv. 
219; Moral and Political Dialogues, 
iv. 219; Parr's Tracts by IVarbttrton 
and a IVarbttrtonian, iv. 56, n. ; 
mentioned, i. 467, «. 2; ii. 41, n. 2; 
iv. 470, n. 2. 
• Hurgoes,' i. 582. 
HussEY, Rev. John, Johnson's letter 

to him, iii. 419. 
Hussey, Rev. Dr. Thomas, iv. 474. 
HurcHESON, Francis, on merit, iv. 18, 

n. 2. 
Hutchinson, John, Moral Philoso- 
phy, iii. 61. 



Idler. 

Hutchison, William, of Kyle, v. 122, 
n. I. 

Hutto.n, the Moravian, iv. 473. 

Hutton, William (of Birmingham), 
Bedlam, visits, ii. 429, n. i; Birming- 
ham, cost of living at, i. 120, n. i ; 
Derby, History of, iii. 186, n. 2; suf- 
ferings as a factory-boy, iii. 186, 
«. 2. 

Hyder Ali, v. 141, n. 3. 

Hypocaust, a Roman, v. 496. 

Hypochondria, i. 76, 397 ; iii. 219. 
See under BoswEl.L, JOHNSON, and 
Melancholy. 

Hypochondriac k, 7 he, iv. 207, n. 3. 

Hypocrisy, little suspected by John- 
son, i. 484, w. 4 ; middle state be- 
tween it and conviction, iv. 142; no 
man a hypocrite in his pleasures, iv. 

365. 
Hypocrite, The, ii. 367. 

I. 

Iceland, Horrebow's Natural His- 
tory, iii. 317; Johnson talks of visit- 
ing it, i. 281; iii. 515; iv. 413, ;;. 2. 

ICOLMKILL. See loNA. 

Idea, improperly used, iii. 223. 

Idleness, active sports not idleness, i. 
56; hidden from oneself, i. 383, n. 2; 
miseries of it, i. 383; upon principle, 
iv. 11; why we are weary when idle, 

ii. 113- 

Idler, The (an earlier paper than John- 
son's), i. 382, n. 3. 

Idler, The (Johnson's), account of it, i. 
383-8 ; Betty Broom, story of, iv. 
284 ; collected in volumes, i. 388 ; 
Johnson draws his own portrait in 
Mr. Sober, iii. 452, n. 3 ; writes on 
his mother's death, i. 383, n. 5, 393, 
w. i; mottoes, i. 384; No. 22 omitted 
in coUeoted vols., i. 388; pirated, i. 
399, /;. 2 ; profits on first edition, i. 



Boswell's Life of yolinson. 



115 



Idler. 



Influence. 



388, «. i; tragedians, a hit at, v. 42, 
n. I. 

Iffley, iv. 340. 

Ignorance, guilt of voluntarily con- 
tinuing it, ii. 31 ; in men of emi- 
nence, ii. 105; people content to be 
ignorant, i. 460. 

Ilam. See Islam. 

Ilk, defined in Johnson's Dictionary, 
iii. 371, «. 4; 'Johnson of that Ilk,' 
ii. 489, «. 2. 

Illegitimate Children, ii. 523. 

Images, worship of, iii. 20, 214. 

Imagination, iii. 389. 

Imitations of Poems, i. 137, n. 4, 
141. 

Imlac, why so spelt, iv. 37. Sec also 
under Rasselas. 

Immortality, belief of it impressed 
on all, ii. 411; of brutes, ii. 61. 

Impartiality in Telling Lies, ii. 
496. 

Imi'IETY, inundation of it due to the 
Revolution, v. 309 ; repressed in 
Johnson's company, iv. 341. 

Importance, imaginary, iii. 373. 

Impostors, Literary, Douglas, Dr., i. 
417; Du Halde, ii. 63, n. 4; Eccles, 
Rev. Mr., i. 417; Innes, Rev. Dr., 
i, 416; Rolt, E., i. 416. 

fmpransus, i. 159. 

Impressions, trusting to them, iv. 142; 
early ones, iv. 227, ft. 3. 

In Theatre, ii. 371, n. 2. 

iNCE, Richard, a contributor to the 
Spectator, iii. 39. 

Inehkenneth, Ode on, ii. 335; v. 370. 

Incidit in Scyllam cupicns vitare 
Charybdim , iv. 209, «. 2. 

Incivility, iv. 33. 

Income, living within one's, iv. 261. 

Indecision of Mind, iii. 341. 

Index-scholar, iv. 470, w. 2, 510. 

India, despotic governor the best, iv. 



247 ; ' don't give us India,' v. 238 ; 
grant of natural superiority, iv. 79; 
hereditary trades, v. 136 ; Johnson's 
wish to visit it, iii. 152, n. i, 518 ; 
judges there engaging in trade, ii. 
393; mapping of it, ii. 408; nursery 
of ruined fortunes, iv. 246, n. i ; 
mentioned, ii. 223. See East In- 
dies and Indies. 

Indian Bill, Fox's, Ministry dismissed 
on it, i. 360, n. i ; Lee's piece of 
parchment, iii. 254, n. i. 

Indians, American, story told of them 
by two officers, iii. 279; v. 154; their 
weak children die, iv. 242; wronged, 
i. 356, «. 4. See Natives. 

Indictment, prosecution by, iii. 18, 
n 2. 

Indies, the, discovery of the passage 
thither a misfortune, i. 527, n. 2 ; 
proverb about bringing home their 
wealth, iii. 343. 

Indifferently, i. 208. 

Indolence, iv. 406. 

Inferiority, ' half a guinea's worth 
of it,' ii. 194. 

Infidelity abroad, iv. 333 ; affecta- 
tion of showing courage, ii. 93 ; 
gloom of it, ii. 93; outcry about it, 
ii. 411. See Conjugal Infidelity. 

Infidels, compared with atrocious 
criminals, iii. 64 ; credulity, their, v. 
377; ennui, must sufTer from, ii. 506, 
n. i; keeping company with them, 
iii. 465-6; number in England, ii. 
411; treating them with civility, ii. 
506; writings allowed to pass with- 
out censure, v. 309; writers drop into 
oblivion, iv. 333. 

Influence, America might be gov- 
erned by it, iii. 233; crown influence 
salutary, ii. 135 ; — Bute's attempt 
to govern by, ii. 404; — lost and re- 
covered, iii. 4; — vote of the House 



ii6 



hidex to 



Influence. 



Ireland and Irish. 



of Commons against it, iv. 255; in 

domestic life, iii. 233, n. 4; Ireland 

governed by it, iii. 233; property, in 

proportion to, v. 63; wealth, from, v. 

127. 
Influenza, ii. 471. 
Ingeniiousz, Dr., ii. 489, n. 4. 
Ingratitude, complaints of, iii. 2 ; 

Lewis XIV's saying, ii. 192. 
Innes, or Innys, Rev. Dr., fraud 

about Dr. Campbell, i. 416; — about 

Psalmanazar, i. 416, n. 2 ; iii. 505, 

50S. 
Innkeepers, soldiers quartered on 

them, ii. 250, n. 2. 
Innocent, punishment of the, iv. 290. 
Innovation, iv. 217. 
Inns, felicity of England in the, ii. 

516; Shenstonc's lines, ii. 51S. 
Innys, \Villiam, the bookseller, iv. 

463, n. 3, 507. 
Inoculatu)N, iv. 338; V. 257. 
Inquisition, i. 538. 
Insanity. Sec Johnson, madness, 

and Madness. 

iNSrKH'TIONS. Sec EI'ITAPHS. 

Insects, their numerous species, ii. 
284. 

Insurrection of 1745, Boswell's pro- 
jected History of it, iii. 184, 471; 
Voltaire's account, iii. 471, n. 5 ; hard 
to write impartially, v. 448. 

Intellectual Improvement, due to 
subordination, ii. 252. 

Intellectual Labour, mankind's 
aversion to it, i. 460. 

Intentions, ii. 13 ; Hell paved with 
good intentions, ii. 412. 

Interest, how far we are governed by 
it, iii. 265. 

Interest of Money, iii. 387. 

Intoxication, said to be good for the 
health, v. 296 ; see Drunkenness, 
Spirituous Liquors, Wine ; and 



Johnson, intoxicated, and wine ; 

and BoswELL, wine. 
Introduction to the Game of Draughts, 

i. 367. 
Introduction to the Political State of 

Great Britain, i. 356. 
Introduction to the World Displayed, 

iv. 2S9. 
Intuition, iv. 387. 
Invasion, fears of an, iii. 371, 410, 

H. I. 

Invitation, going into the society of 
friends without one, ii. 415. 

Invocation of Saints. See Saints. 

Inward Light, ii. 145. 

Ireland and Irish, accent, ii. 185 ; 
ancient slate, i. 372; iii. 127; baro- 
nets, traditional, v. 366, «. 2; Belan- 
ager, iii. 127, «. i ; British govern- 
ment, barbarous, ii. 139 ; Burke's 
saying about the Roman Catholics, 
ii. 292, ;/. 4; Catholics persecuted by 
Protestants, ii. 293 ; — penal code 
against them, ii. 139, «. i; — their 
students abroad, iii. 507 {see below 
under Wesley); clergy, ii. 152; con- 
demned to ignorance, ii. 31, «. i; 
corn -laws, ii. 150; corrupt govern- 
ment, iv. 232, «. i; cottagers, ii. 149, 
;/. 3; 'drained' by England, v. 49; 
Drogheda, ii. 179; drunkenness of 
the gentry, v. 285, «. i; Dublin, Der- 
rick's poem to it, i. 528; — capital, 
only a worse, iii. 466; — Evening 
Post, iv. 439, ;/. I ; — freedom of the 
guild given to Chief Justice Pratt, 
ii. 405, n. i; — 'not so bad as Ice- 
land,' iv. 413, n. 2; — physicians, iii. 
327, «. 4; — , Rolt's fraud, i. 416; — 
Theatre, Douglas acted, ii. 366, «. 2; 
riot in it, i. 447 ; Miss Philips the 
singer, iv. 262; — University, Burke 
and Goldsmith at Trinity College, i. 
476 ; Flood's bequest for the study 



BosivelVs Life of fohnson. 



ii-j 



Ireland and Irish. 



Isle of Man. 



of Irish, i. 372, w. 4; M.A. degree 
in vain sought for Johnson, i. 153; 
LL.D. degree conferred, i. 565 ; 
duelling, ii. 260, n. 3, export duties, 
ii. 150, n. 3; fair people, a, ii. 351; 
Falkland, ii. 133 ; family pride, v. 
299; Ferns, iv. 85; French, contrast- 
ed with, ii. 461, n. i ; Grattan's 
speeches, iv. 366 ; History, Johnson 
exhorts Maxwell to write its, ii. 138; 
hospitality to strangers, iv. 21; inde- 
pendence in 1782, iv. 161, n. 4; in- 
Jluence, governed by, iii. 233 ; In- 
solvent Debtors' Relief Bill of 1766, 
iii. 429, n. I ; Irish chairmen in 
London, ii. 116; Johnson averse to 
visit it, iii. 466; — , kindness for the 
Irish, iii. 466 ; — , pity for them, 
ii. 139 ; — prejudice against them, 
i. 150; lady's verses on Ireland, iii. 
363 ; landlords and tenants, v. 285, 
n. i; language, i. 372, n, 4, 373; ii. 
179. 397; iii- 127, 266; literature, i. 
372 ; Londonderry, iv. 385 ; v. 363 ; 
Lucan, v. 123, n. 7 ; Lucas, Dr., i. 
360 ; mask of incorruption never 
worn, iv. 232, n. i; minority prevails 
over majority, ii. 293, 549-50 ; mix 
with the English better than the 
Scotch do, ii. 278; iv. 194, n. 3; na- 
tionality, free from extreme, ii. 278; 
orchards never planted by Irishmen, 
iv. 237, ;/. 3; parliament, duration of, 
i. 360, n. 2; — long debates in 1771, 
i. 456, n. 2; peers created in 1776, 
iii. 463, n, 2; players, succeed as, ii. 
278 ; Pope's lines on Swift, ii. 152, 
n. I ; premium-scheme, i. 368 ; pro- 
fessors at Oxford and Paris Irish, i. 
372, n. 5; Protestant rebels in 1779, 
iii. 464, n. 3; rebellion ready to break 
out in 1779, iii. 464, n. 3 ; scholars 
incorrect in quantity, ii. 152; school 
of the west, iii. 127 ; Swift, their 



great benefactor, ii. 152 ; Thurot's 
descent, iv. 118, n. i ; Transactions 
of the Royal Irish Academy, iv. 445; 
union wished for by artful politicians, 
iii. 466 ; Johnson's warning against 
it, ib. ; volunteers, not allowed to 
raise, iii. 410, n. i ; Wesley against 
toleration, v. 39, n. 1 ; William III 
and the Irish parliament, ii. 293. 

Irene, altered for the stage and acted, 
i. 223, n. I, 227; nine nights' run, i. 
229, «. I ; never brought on the 
stage again, i. 229, n. 2 ; begun at 
Edial, i. 117; continued at Green- 
wich, i. 123; finished at Lichfield, i. 
125 ; refused by Fleetwood, i. 176; 
offered to a bookseller, ib.; blank 
verse, iv. 50, n. 3; Cave, shown to, i. 
143; dedication, no, ii. i, n. 2; De- 
metrius's speech quoted, i. 275; dra- 
matic power wanting, i. 230, n. 5, 
587; Epilogue, i. 228; Hill, Aaron, 
present at the benefit, i. 230, n. 3 ; 
Johnson hears it read aloud, iv. 5; 
reads it himself, iv. 6, n. i ; his re- 
ceipts from the acting and copyright, 
i. 230; original sketch of it, i. 125; 
Pot admires it, iv. 6, «. i; Pivlogue, 
i. 227; quotable lines, i. 230, n. 5. 

Irish Gentleman, an, on the black- 
ness of negroes, i. 463. 

Irish Painter, an, Johnson's Ofellus, 
i. 121. 

Iron-works at Holywell, v. 503. 

Irvine, Mr., of Drum, v. iii. 

Irving, Rev. Edward, iv. 11, n. 2. 

Irwin, Captain, ii. 448. 

Isis, The, iv. 340. 

Islam, Boswell and Johnson visit it, 
i. 212, n. 2 ; iii. 213 ; Johnson ana 
the Thrales, v. 489, 495, 521. 

Island, retiring to one, v. 176. 

Isle of Man, Boswell's projected tour, 
iii. 91; Burke's motto, ib.; Sache- 



ii8 



Index to 



Isle of Man. 

verell's Account. See under Sache- 
verell, W. ; mentioned, v. 265. 

Italy, condemned prisoners, treatment 
of, iv, 382; copy -money, iii. 184; 
Guide-books, v. 6g; inferiority in not 
having seen it, iii. 42, 518; Johnson's 
wish to visit it: see Johnson, Italy; 
revival of letters, iii. 28S; silk-throw- 
ing, iii. 186, «. 2. 

Ivy Lane Cluu. See under Cluhs. 

J- 

Jack the Giant Killer, ii. 66, n. i; iv. 

9. "■ 5- 
Jackson, Henry, of Lichfield, ii. 530; 

iii. 149. 
Jackson, Rev. Mr., i. 277, n. i. 
Jackson, Richard, all-knowing, iii. 22. 

commends Johnson's Journey, iii. 

156. 
Jackson, Thomas, Michael Johnson's 

servant, i. 43. 
Jacob, Giles, v. 479, w. 2. 
Jacobites, identified with Tories, i. 

497. «• 3- 

Jacobitism. See under Boswell and 
Johnson. 

Jamaica, constitutions of, iii. 230; den 
of tyrants, ii. 550; story of a young 
man going there, iv. 383; mentioned, 
i. 277, M. I, 280, n. 2 ; iii. 87, «. 2, 

473. «• I- 

J.\MES I (of England), Damonology, iii. 
434 ; Johnson, resemblance to, v. 
facing 13; Nairne, witticism about, 
V. 133, «. 3 ; Raleigh's trial, i. 208, 
M. 2; Sanquhar's trial, v. 117, n. 2; 
mentioned, ii. 202. 

James II, deposition needful, i. 498 ; 
ii. 391; George III, compared with, 
iv. 161, n. 4; king, very good, ii. 391 ; 
Sedley, Catherine, v. 55, n. 4; men- 
tioned, ii. 500, ti. 2; v. 338, n. i, 
406, n. 3. 



Jenkinson. 

James I of Scotland, ii. 8. 

James IV, patron of Boswell's family, 
ii. 473; V. 103. 

James V, v. 206. 

James, King (the Pretender), i. 497. 

James, Dr. Robert, death, i. 95; iii. 4; 
Dissertation on Fevers, iii. 442, n. 2; 
Greek, knowledge of, iv. 39, n. 3 ; 
Johnson describes his character, i. 
95. 183; — learnt physic from him, 
iii. 26; — opinion of his medicines, 
iv. 410; — dedication to his Medici- 
nal Dictionary, i. 183 ; — assisted 
him in writing the Aledicinal Dic- 
tionary, iii. 26; powder, his, its sale, 
iii. 4; — traduced, iii. 442, n. 2; sus- 
pected of being not sober for twenty 
years, iii. 442, «. 2; wrote first line of 
the epigram Ad Lauratn, i. 181, n. 
7; mentioned, iii. 361, n. i. 

Janes, — , a naturalist, v. 170, 186, 465, 
n. 2. 

Jansenists, iii. 388, n. i. 

January 30, fast of, ii. 174; old port 
and solemn talk on it, iii. 422. 

Janus Vitalis, iii. 284. 

Japan, five persecutions, v. 447. 

Japi.x, Gisbert, Kymelerie, i. 550. 

Jarvis, — , a Birmingham person, i. 
100, n. I. 

Jarvis, or Jervis, the maiden name of 
Johnson's wife, i. 100, «. i, 279, ;/. 2. 

Jealous Wife, The, i. 422. 

Jealousy, little people given to it, iii. 
63. 

Jeeferies, Judge, v. 128, ;/. 2. 

Jeffrey, Francis (Lord Jeffrey), birth, 
V. 26, n. 3 ; helps Boswell to bed, 
ih. ; Edinburgh Jievie'w, payment to 
writers, iv. 247, w. 2; Scotch accent, 
loses his, ii. 183, n. 3; title, his, v. 87, 
n. 3; trees in Scotland, ii. 345, w. i. 

Jenkinson, Right Hon. Charles (first 
Earl of Liverpool), account of him, 



BoswclL's Life of fo/uison. 



119 



Jenkinson. 



Johnson, 



iii. 166; Johnson's letter to him, iii. 
165-6. 

Jennings, Mr., iii. 261. 

Jenyns, Soame, benevolence as a mo- 
tive to action, iii. 56; character, his, 
iii. 328, M. i; conversion, i. 366, )i. 2; 
iii. 317-18 ; ' Epitaph,' i. 366, n. 2 ; 
free Inquiry into the Nature and 
Origin of Evil, i. 358, 365 ; John- 
son's Review of it, i. 365-6; ii. 216, 
«. 4; iii. 56, n. 2; Johnson, attacks, 
i. 366; Vitw of the Internal Evi- 
dence, ^c., iii. 56, n. 2, 327; World, 
contributor to the, i. 299, «. I. 

Jephson, Robert, i. 304, n. i. 

Jersey, v. 162, «. 2. 

Jersey, Earl of, i. 36, n. 4. 

Jerusalem, ii. 315-16. 

Jests of Hierocks, i. 173. 

Jesuits, attacked by Psalmanazar, iii. 
505 ; persecuted in Japan, v. 447, 
«. 3- 

Jewish Kings, v. 387. 

Jewitt, Mr. L., ii. 370, «. 3. 

Jocularity, low, i. 520. 

JoDDREL (Jodrell), R. P., iv. 293, 314, 

504- 

JODRELL, Sir R. p., M.D., iv. 504. 

John, King, i. 287. 

John Bull, v. 21, n. 2. 

Johnny Armstrong, quoted by John- 
son for its abruptness, i. 467 ; in 
Holyrood, v. 48. 

Johnson, B., the actor, iv. 281, n. i. 

Johnson, Andrew (Johnson's uncle), 
great at boxing and wrestling, iv. 
1 29, n. 3; v. 260, n. 2. 

Johnson, Charles, author of The Ad- 
ventures of a Guinea, v. 313, n. 2. 

Johnson, D., i. 93, n. 

Johnson, Elizabeth (Dr. Johnson's 
wife, H. Porter's Avidow, maiden 
name Jarvis or Jervis), i. 100, n. i; 
account of her, i. no; her age, i. 

VI.— 13 



109, n. 4; character, i. 279, «. 4; 
death, i. 235, n. 3, 272; epitaph, i, 
279, n. 2 ; Ford's ghost^ iii. 397 ; 
Garrick's mimicry of her, i. 115 ; 
Hampstead lodgings, i. 223 ; indul- 
gencies, i. 275 ; Johnson's conversa- 
tion, admires, i. no; lodgings in her 
last illness, iv. 435, n. i; marriage, i. 
no; ii. 88; marriage-settlement, i. 
Ill, n. I ; personal appearance, i. 
no, 115, 276; Rambler, admiration 
of the, i. 243 ; Tetty or Tetsey, i. 
114; ii. 88; wedding-ring, i. 275; 
mentioned, i. 564, 579; iii. 53. See 
Johnson, wife. 

Johnson, Fisher, and his sons (John- 
son's cousins), iv. 463, n. 3. 

Johnson,' the gigantick,' i. 449, n. 3, 

Johnson, Hester {Stella), iv. 204, n. 
i; v. 276. 

Johnson, the horse -rider, i. 461 ; iii. 
262. 

Johnson, Michael (Johnson's father), 
account of him, i. 40-4 ; accompa- 
nies his son to Oxford, i. 68; bank- 
rupt, i. 91-2 ; iv. 463, n. 3 ; book- 
trade, i. 42; Chester fair, at, v. 496; 
death, i. 93 ; disapproved of tea, i. 
362, w. 4; epitaph, i. 92, n. 2; iv. 453; 
excise prosecution, i. 43, n. i; fire in 
the parlour on Sunday, v. 68: ' fool- 
ish old man,* i. 47 ; house, his, iv. 
429, n. 2; Jacobite, a, i. 43; marriage 
register, i. 40, n. 5; melancholy, i. 41; 
oath of abjuration, signs the, ii. 368; 
observer, no careless, i. 40, n. 4 ; 
sheriff of Lichfield, i. 42, n. 3 ; Ut- 
toxeter market at, iv. 430. 

Johnson, Mr., in Blackmore's Lay 
Monastery, v. 438, n. i. 

Johnson, Nathanael (Johnson's young- 
er brother), complains of his brother, 
i. 105, n. I ; death, i. 41. 105, «. i ; 
epitaph, i(>. ; iv. 453; letter from 



I20 



Index to 



Johnson, Nathanael. 



Johnson, Samuel. 



him, i. 105, ;/. i; succeeds his father, 

i. 105. 
Johnson, Samuel, Rev., i. 157. 
JOHNSON, SAMUEL, Chief 

Events ok His Life. 

(For his publications see also i. rg-28; for 
a complete list of his travels and visits, iii. 
512-15 ; and for his residences, iii. 461, «. i. 

1709 Birth, i. 40. 

1712 'Touched' by Queen Anne, i. 50. 

1 716 (about) Knters Lichfield School, i. 50. 

1725 Enters Stourbridge School, i. 57. 

1726 Returns home, i. 59. 

X728 Enters Pembroke College, i. 67. 

Translates Pope's Messiah, i. 71. 
1729 Returns home, i. 91, n. i. 

1731 Death of his father, i. 93. 

1732 Usher at Market Bosworth, i. 97. 
'733 At Birmingham, i. 99, 100, «. i. 
1734 Returns to Lichfield, i. 104. 

Publishes proposals for printing Politian, 

i. 104. 
Returns to Birmingham, i. 105. 
Offers to write for the Gent. Mag. i. 106. 
'735 Publishes Lolni's Abyssinia, i. loi. 

Marries Mrs. Porter and opens a school 

at Edial, i. ito, k. 4, 1 12. 

1737 Visits London with Garrick, i. 117. 
Returns to Lichfield and finishes Irene, 

i. 125- 
Removes to London, i. 128. 

1738 Becomes a writer in the Gent. Mag. i. 130. 
London, i. 137. 

Begins to translate Father Paul Sarpi's 

History, i. ir,6. 
Life of Father Paul Sarpi, i. 160. 

1739 Seeks the Mastership of Appleby School 

and the degree of Master of Arts, i. 154. 
Life of Boerhaaz'e, i. 161. 
Mannor Norfohiense, i. 163. 

1740 Lives of Blake, Drake, and Barretier, i. 

170. 
Begins to write the Debates, i. 174. 

1741 Debates, i. 174. 

1742 Debates, i. 174. 

Lives of Burman and Sydenham, i. 177. 
Proposals for printing Bibliotheca H ar- 
te iana, i. 177. 

1743 Finishes the Debates, i. 174. 

1744 Life of Savage, i. 186. 

1745 Miscellaneous Observations »n Macbeth, 



Sketching outlines of his Dictionary, i. 
203, 211, «. 2. 

1746 Gets to know Levett, i. 282. 

1 747 Prologue on the opening of Dniry Lane 

Theatre, i 209 . 
Plan for a Dictionary of the English 
Language, i. 210. 

1748 Writing the Dictionary. 
Life of Roscotninon, i. 222. 

'Phe Vision of Theodore the Hermit, i. 
222. 

1749 Writing the Dictionary. 
Vanity of Human IVishts, i. 222. 
Irene acted, i. 227. 

Forms the Ivy Lane Club, i. 221, «. 2. 
Living in Gough Square, iii. 461, n. 1. 

1750 Writing the Dictionary. 
Begins the Ratnbler, i. 233. 

Prologue for the benefit of Milton's 
Grand-daughter, i. 263. 

1751 Writing the Dictionary. 
The Rambler. 

Lauder's fraud exposed, i. 265. 
Life of Cheynel, i. 265. 

1752 Writing the />/t7/o«rtr^. 
F.nds The Rambler, i. 235. 
Death of his wife, i. 272. 

Miss Williams begins to reside with him, 

i. 269. 
Gets to know Reynolds, i. 284, n. i. 

1753 Writing the Dictiotiary- 

Writes for The Adventurer, i. 292. 

1754 Writing the Dictionary. 
Life of Cave, i. 296. 
Visits Oxford, i. 314. 

Gets to know Murphy, i- 413, «. i. 

1755 Letter to Lord Chesterfield, i. 303. 
Becomes an M.A. of Oxford, i. 326. 
Publishes the Dictionary, i. 337. 
Projects a Bibliotheque, i. 329. 

Gets to know Langton (about this year), 
i. 2S6, n. 2. 

1756 Publishes an abridgment of the Diction- 

ary, i. 354- 
Writes for TIte Universal Visitor, i. 354. 
Superintends and writes for The Literary 

Magazine, i. 355. 
Life of Sir Thomas Browne, i. 357. 
Proposals for an edition of Shakespeetre, 
i. 369. 
'757 W'rites for the Literary Magazitu, i. 371. 

Editing Shakespeare, i. 574, n. 2. 
1758 Editing Shakespeare, i. 574, «. 2. 
r.egins Tlie Idler, i. 3S2. 



BoswelVs Life of Johnson. 



121 



Johnson, Samuel. 



Gets to know Dr. Burney, i. 380. 

1759 The Idler, i. 382. 

Death of his mother, i. 392. 

Rasselas, i. 394. 

Leaves Goiigh Square and goes into 

chambers, i. 405, «. 3; iii. 461, 7U i. 
Visits Oxford, i. 402. 
Gets to know Beauclerk, i. 28S, «. 2. 

1760 Ends The Idler, i. 382. 

Perhaps editing Shakespeare, i. 409. 
In Inner Temple Lane, iii. 461, «. i. 

1761 Visits Lichfield in the winter of 1 761-2, 

i. 428. 

1762 Pensioned, i. 430. 

Trip to Devonshire, i. 436. 
Cock Lane Ghost imposture exposed, i. 
470. 

1763 Gets to know Boswell, i. 453. 
Trip to Harwich, i. 538. 
Visits Oxford, iii. 512. 
Character of Collins, \ 443. 
Life of A schatn. i. 537. 

1764 Visits Langton in Lincolnshire, i- 550. 
Literary Club founded, i. 552. 

Visits Dr. Percy at Easton Maudit, i. 562. 

1765 Visits Cambridge, i. 563. 

Becomes an LL. D. of Dublin, i. 564-5. 
Suffers from a severe illness, i. 559, 603. 
Gets to know the Thrales (either this 

year or in 1764), i. 567, 603. 
Engages in politics with W. G. Hamilton, 

i. 566. 
Publishes his Shakespeare, i. 574. 
Takes a house in Johnson's Court, ii. 5; 

iii. 461, «. I. 

1766 Contributes to Mrs. Williams's Miscel- 

lanies, ii. 29. 
Spends more than three months at Streat- 

ham, ii. 28. 
Visits Oxford, ii. 28. 

1767 Interview with the King, ii. 37. 

Spends near six months in Lichfield, ii. 34. 

1768 Prologue to the Good-Natured Man, ii. 

Visits Oxford, iii. 513. 

1769 Appointed Professor in Ancient Literature 

to the Royal Academy, ii. 76. 
Visits Oxford, Lichfield, and Ashbourne, 

ii. 77; iii. 513. 
Visits Brighton, ii. 78. 
Appears as a witness at Baretti's trial, ii. 

III. 

1770 The False Alartii, ii. 128. 

Visits Lichfield and Ashbourne, iii. 513. 



1771 Falkland' s Islands, ii. 154. 
Revises the Dictionary, ii. 165, «. i. 
Visits Lichfield and Ashbourne, ii. 162. 

1772 Revises the Dictionary, ii. 165, n. i. 
Visits Lichfield and Ashbourne, iii. 513. 

1773 Publishes the fourth edition of the Dic- 

tionary, ii. 233. 

Attempts to learn the Low Dutch lan- 
guage, ii. 301. 

Tour to Scotland, ii. 305; v. i. 

Visits Oxford, ii. 308. 

Begins his Journey to the Western Isl- 
ands, ii. 307. 

1774 Death of Goldsmith, ii. 319, ;/. 2. 
Tour to North Wales, ii. 326: v. 487. 
Visits Burke at Beaconsfield, ii. 326, «. 3; 

V. 524. 

The Patriot, ii 327. 

Finishes his Jouritey to the Western Isl- 
ands, ii 329. 

1775 Publishes his 7f?«r«0' :'c //i^ Western Isl- 

ands, ii. 343. 
Taxation no Tyranny, ii. 356. 
Becomes an LL.D. of Oxford, ii. 379. 
Visits Oxford, Lichfield, and Ashbourne, 

ii. 437; iii. 514. 
Tour to France, ii. 441. 

1776 Visits Oxford, Lichfield, and Ashbourne 

with Boswell, ii. 502. 
Projected tour to Italy abandoned, iii. 7. 
Visits Bath, iii. 51. 
First dinner with Wilkes, iii. 74. 
Visits Brighton, iii. 107. 

1777 Engages to write The Lives of tJte Poets, 

iii. 124. 
Exerts himself in behalf of Dr. Dodd, iii. 

158. 
Meets Boswell at Ashbourne, iii. 154. 

1778 Writing The Lives of the Poets, iii. 409. 
Visits Warley Camp, iii. 410. 

1779 Publishes the first four volumes of the 

Lives, iii. 421. 
Writing the last six volumes, i6. 
Death of Garrick, iii. 421- 
Visits Lichfield and Ashbourne, iii. 449. 

1780 Writing the last six volumes of the Lives, 

iii. 475. 
Death ot Beauclerk, iii 477. 
Visits Brighton, iii. 514. 

1781 Publishes the last six volumes of the 

Lives, iv. 40. 
Death of Thrale. iv. 98. 
Second dinner with Wilkes, iv. 117. 
Visits Southill, iv. 137. 



122 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



Visits Oxford, Birmingham, Lichfield, and 
Ashbourne, iv. 156. 
178J Death of Levett, iv. 158. 
Visits Oxford, iv. 174. 
Takes leave of Streatham, iv. 182. 
Visits Brighton, iv. 184. 

1783 Ha.s a stroke of the palsy, iv. 26J. 
Visits Kocliesler, iv. 269. 

Visits Hcale, iv. 270. 

Death of Mrs. Williams iv. 271. 

Threatened with a surgical operation, iv. 

277- 
Founds the Essex Head Club, iv. 292. 
Attacked by spasmodic asthma, iv. 295. 

1784 Confined by illness for 129 days, iv. 311, 

M. I. 

Visits Oxford with Boswell, iv. 327. 
Projected tour to Italy, iv. 377. 
Mrs. Thrale's second marriage, iv. 391. 
Visits Lichfield, .•Vshbourne, Birmingham, 

and Oxford, iv. 407-35. 
Death of Allen, iv. 408. 
Death, iv. 4S1. 

JoiJNsoN, Samuel, abbreviations of his 
frieiul.s' names, ii. 296 ; iv. 314, ;/. 
4; Aberdeen, freeman of, v. 102; 
abodes, list of his: sec Johnson, 
habitations ; al>sence of mind : sec 
Johnson, peculiarities ; abstinence 
easy to him, i. 120, «. 2, 542; iv. 84, 
172, ;/. 2; absurd stories told of him, 
i- 537; abused in a newspaper, iv. 34; 
accounts, resolves to keep, iv. 204, 
M. 2; accjuaintance, making new, iv. 
432 ; Uk, «. I ; — widely-varied, iii. 
24 {see Johnson, society) ; actors : 
see Players ; Adversaria, i. 237 ; 
'agreeable, extremely,' ii. 163, n. i; 
alchymy, not a positive unbeliever in, 
ii. 432; alertness, no, v. 350; Alfred, 
Life of, projects a, i. 204; alms-giv- 
ing, i. 349, «. 2; ii. 137; ambition, 
iii. 351; Americans, feelings towards 
the : see Amekic.\ ; amused, easily, 
ii. 300; V. 284; amusements, his, iii. 
452 ; ancestors, asked in the High- 
lands about his, v. 269, n. 2 ; ' kva^ 
avhpmv,\. 55; anecdotes, love of: sec 



Anecdotes; Annates: j^^' Johnson, 
diary ; annihilation, horror of, iii. 
336. 33S, «• - ; anniversaries, ob- 
served, i. 558 ; anxiety about his 
writings, felt no, iii. 38 ; apology, 
ready to make an, iv. 371, 472, n. 2, 
497; Apophthci^iiis, i. 221, w. i; Ap- 
pius, compared by Hurke to, iv. 431, 
n. 3 ; Appleby School, applies for 
mastership of, i. 153; apprentice, 
talking to an, ii. 370 ; approbation, 
pleasure of, iv. 295, /;. 2 ; Arabic, 
wi.shes to study, iv. 33 ; architecture 
and statuary, opinion of, ii. 503 ; 
arguing l>efore an audience, iii. 377; 
iv. 129, 374, 495; — Hurke refers to 
it, iii. 27, «. 4 ; — butt end of the 
pistol, ii. 115; iv. 316; V. 332; — 
delight in it, ii. 517, ;/. 2 ; — de- 
scribed by Burke, iv. 364, ;/. 3 ; 
Hamilton, iv. 129; Reynolds, ii. 115, 
u. i; iii. 93, ;/. i; Seaford, Lord, iv. 
203, ;/. i; — either side in<linrerently, 
ii. 121; iii. 27; — kick of the Tartar 
horse, ii. 115, ;/. i; promptitude for 
it, ii. 418 ; iii. 27, ;/. 3 ; — reasoned 
close or wide, iv. 495; v. 17; — 
rudeness, iii. 93, ;/. i ; — spirit of 
contradiction, v. 94, 252 ; — think- 
ing which side he should take, iii. 
27 ; — wrong side, on the, iii. 27 ; 
iv. 129, 495; see Joh.nson, talk; 
Argyll Street, room in, iv. 182, ;/. 3; 
Armiger, i. 565 ; ii. 380, «. i ; art : 
see Painting; art of making people 
talk of what they kncjw best, v. 148; 
assertions, love of contradicting, i. 
475, w. I ; iii. 27, w. i ; attacked in 
the streets, ii. 342; attacks, never but 
once replied to, i. 363-4 ; enjoyed 
them, ii. 352, 416; iv. 64; looked on 
them as part of his consequence, iv. 
486; v. 456, «. 4; see Attacks; at- 
tendance, required the least, ii. 543, 



Bosweifs Life of yohnson. 



123 



Johnson, Samuel. 



n. 3; iv. 208, n. 3, 392, n. 4; v. 352, 
n. i; Auchinleck, hopes again to see, 
iv. 179, 305; auction of his effects, i. 
421, ;;. I ; austere, but not morose, 
ii. 140; author, an, without pen, ink, 
or paper, i. 405, n. 3; authors asking 
his opinion : see Authors ; autobi- 
ography, projects his, i. 30, n. i ; 
awe, admiration, love, regarded with, 
V. 310; awe of him, felt by Aber- 
deen professors, v. 104 ; Lord B — , 
iv. 135, n. 2 ; Englishmen of great 
eminence, iii. 97 ; Fox, iii. 303 ; at 
Mrs. Garrick's, iv. 1 14-15 ; by Glas- 
gow professors, v. 422 ; at Allan 
Ramsay's, iii. 378 ; by Dr. Robert- 
son, V. 423; by Scotch literati, ii. 72; 
by a Welsh parson, v. 513, n. 2; de- 
scribed, by Mdme. D'Arblay, v. 422, 
«. 3 ; see below, Johnson, feared ; 
Bacon, Life of, projects a, iii. 221 ; 
ball, goes to a, iv. 1S4, ;/. i; Baltic, 
wishes to go up the, ii. 330, n. i; iii. 
152, 516; bargainer, bad, — Rasselas, 
i. 394; — Lives of the Poets, iii. 126, 
n. i; Barry's picture, introduced in, 
iv. 259, n. i; beadle within him, the, 
iii. 92 ; bear, a, — Boswell's bear, ii. 
308, «. 2 ; V. 44, n. I ; dancing bear, 
ii. 75; Gibbon's sarcasm, ii. 398; He- 
bear, iv. 131, «. 2; ' like a word in a 
catch,' ii. 398; ' nothing of the bear 
but his skin,' ii. 76; Ursa Alajor, v. 
437 ; beats Osborne, the bookseller, 
i. 178; 'beat many a fellow,' i. 178, 
M. 2; belabours his confessor, iv. 324; 
belief, angry at attacks on his, iii. 
12; ' believes nothing but the Bible,' 
i. 170, «. I ; benevolence, iii. 141, 
252, 348, 418; iv. 321, 327; — to 
an outcast woman, iv. 371 ; — con- 
cealed, iv. 376 ; Bible, reads the 
whole, ii. 218, n. i; reads the Greek 
Testament at 160 verses every Sun- 



day, ii. 330 ; bigotry, freedom from 
it, i. 469; ii. 173; iii. 214; iv. 473-4; 
instance of it, v. 129, n. 2 ; Biogra- 
phia Britannica, asked to edit the, 
iii. 198 ; biography, excellence in, i. 
29, 296-7; loveof it: i'^c' Biography; 
Birmingham Journal, writes for the, 
i. 99; birth and rank, respect for, ii. 
149, 175, 299, 376; v. 117, 402; birth 
and parentage, i. 40; birth-day, dis- 
liked mention of his, at Ashbourne, 
iii. 178; — at Dunvegan, v. 253; — 
escaped from Streatham on it, iii. 
452, n.\\ — cheerful entry in 1780, 
iii. 499 ; — gave a dinner on it in 
1781, iii. 178, n. 3; iv. 156, n. i; — 
in 1783, iv. 276, «. 2 ; — reflected 
on it, V. 521 ; — kept at Streatham, 
iii. 178, «. 3 ; bishop, looks like a, 
V. 413; bleeding, undergoes, iii. 119, 
172, tt. 4; blood, irritability of his, 
iv. 220 ; blushing, iii. 374 ; Bolt- 
court, house — ii. 489; drawing-room, 
iii. 359; kitchen, iii. 523-4; prints in 
his dining-room, iv. 234, «. i; silver 
salvers, iv. 107; garden, ii. 489, n. i; 
iii. 452; stone-seats, iv. 235; Boswell 
in it for the last time, iv. 389 : see 
Johnson, household ; bones, horror 
at, V. 193, 373; books, bidding them 
farewell, iv. 414 ; judgment as to 
their success, iv. 140; loan of them, 
iv. 42S, n. I ; runs to them, ii. 418 ; 
tears out their heart, iii. 323 ; uses 
them slovenly, ii. 221 : see Books, 
and Johnson, library ; book-bind- 
ing, i. 65, n. 2 ; book-sellers, in a 
company of, iii. 353; borrowed small 
sums, iv. 220 ; Boswell : see Bos- 
well and Johnson, letters; bow to 
an Archbishop, iv. 228-9; bow-wov> 
way, ii. 374, n. i ; v. 18, w. 3 ; box- 
ing, conversant in the art of, v. 260, 
w. 2 1 breakfast, i. 282, n. i; ii. 245, 



124 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



431; iv. 197, in spliiuiour/m. J^^i,\ 
breeding, good, iii. 62, n. 2; brother, 
his pretended, v. 336; ' buck, a young 
English,' V. 210, 298; buffoonery, in- 
comparable at, ii. 301, n. 2; iii. 27, 
;/. 4 ; bull, made a, iv. 372 ; Hurke 
content to have rung the bell to him, 
iv. 31; resj)ect for him, iv. 367; at- 
tacked by him, v. 15, w. i: sec 
Hi'RKK ; burlesque, turns a dispute 
into, iv. 93, ;/. 3 ; business, love of, 
— Clarendon Press, ii. 504; Dr. Tay- 
lor's law suit, iii. 51, ;/. 3, 59, ;/. 3 ; 
Thrale's brewery, iv. 99, ;/. i; calcu- 
lation, fundness for, i. 83 ; ii. 330, 
394; iii. 235; error in, //'., //. 3; for- 
gets to use it, iii. 256, «. 5; ' Caliban 
of literature,' ii. 148, 178, ;/. i ; called, 
iv. 109; candour, iv. 222, 276; cards, 
wi.shed he had learnt, iii. 27; v. 460; 
careless of documents, v. 414; carica- 
tured, glad to be, v. 456, ;;. 4 ; cat, 
Hodge, his, iv. 228; catalogue of his 
works. j(V JoiiNSt)N, works ; cathe- 
drals, had seen most of the, iii. 121, 
134, 518 ; ceremonies of life, atten- 
tive to the, iii. 62, n. 2 , chambers : 
see Johnson, habitations ; Chan- 
cellor, Lord, might have l)een, iii. 
352; character, his, drawn by him- 
self, iii. 452, ;/. 3; iv. 53, 194, u. I, 
276; — by liaretti, iii. 487, n.l\ — 
Boswell, iv. 484, n. 4, 490-6; v. 17- 
20; — Burney, Miss, ii. 301, n. 2 ; 
iii. 500, n. i; iv. 2S3, ;/. 2, 492, n. i; 
— Dodd, iii. 159, ;/. I ; — Hamil- 
ton, iv. 4S5 ; — Mickle, iv. 289 ; — 
Parr, iv. 55, ;/. 3; — at Ramsay's, 
iii. 376 ; — Reynolds . see Rey- 
nolds, Johnson ; — Robertson, iii. 
377; — Taylor, iii. 170; — Towers, 
iv. 48, «. 3 ; — like Baker's char- 
acter of James I, v. facing 13 ; — 
Bayle's of Menage, iv. 494, >i. 2; — 



Boerhaave's, iv. 496, /;. i ; — Clar- 
endon's character of Falkland, iv. 
494, n. 2\ — Dryden's, i. 306, «. 2; 
i^'- 53 i — Harington's of Bishop 
Still, iv. 484, w. 4 ; — Milton's, i. 
113, n. I, 152, ;/. 2, 231, «. I ; — 
Savage's, i. 192, n. 2; character, said 
by Baretti to be ignorant of, v. 18, «. 
2; characters, saw a great variety, iii. 
24 ; — ilrew strong yet nice por- 
traits, //'. ,• — too much in light and 
shade, ii. 350; — overcharged, iii. 
378; charity to the poor, iv. 153, 221: 
see JoH.NSO.N, Almsgiving ; Charles 
of Swetlen, i. 177, n. i ; chastity in 
his youth, i. 109; — Savage's exam- 
ple, i. 189; iv. 456-9; chemistry, 
love of, i. 161, 505; iii. 452; iv. 274; 
chief, wouUl have made a good, v. 
155, 163; child, never wished to have 
a, iii. 33 ; childhood, companions of 
his, iii. 149; children, books for, iv. 
9, ;/. 5 ; children, love of little, iv. 
227; Christianity, (irojected work on, 
V. loi ; church, attendances due at, 
i. 78, n. 2; iii. 456; behaviour in it, 
ii. 245; lateness in arriving at it, ii. 
547; iii. 343, «. I, 355, M. 5; pertur- 
bation, without, at it, ii. 547 ; some 
radiations of comfort at it, iii. 20, «. 
2, 29, ;/. I ; reluctance to go to it, i. 
78; ii. 164, ;/. I. 246, n. 1 ; resolu- 
tions at it, i. 579 ; Church of Eng- 
land, devotion to the, iii. 377 ; iv. 
492; V. 17; church preferment, offer 
of, i. 370, 551; ii. 138; civilized life 
in the Hebrides, longs for, v. 208 ; 
clergymen should not be taught 
elocution, iv. 238 ; Clerkenwell ale- 
house, i. 131, H. i; climb over a wall 
at O.vford, proposes to, i. 402; Club, 
Literary, attendance, i. 555, n. 3; ii. 
157; iii. 120, n. i\ — dislike of some 
of the meml>ers, iii. 121 ; — one of 



Boswdts Life of Johnson. 



125 



Johnson, Samuel. 



the founders, i. 552 ; coach, on the 
top of a, i. 552; cold, indifferent to, 
V. 349, 393 ; colloquial barbarisms, 
repressed, iii. 223; comfort, wants 
every, iv. 311; common things, well- 
informed in, iv. 23S: ' companion, a 
tremendous,' iii. 1 57: companions of 
his vouth, regrets the, iii. 205, «. 3; 
company, loves, i. 167 ; obliged to 
any man who visits him. i. 459 : 
proud to have his company desired, 
ii. 430, n. 4; tries to persuade people 
to return, i. 566; complaints, not 
given to, ii. 76, 409 : "•• 4 : i^'- I35. 
198, «. 4; complaisance, i. 95; com- 
pliment, pleased \\ith a, iv. 317 ; 
v. 457 ; composition,— dictionary- 
making and poetry compared, v. 52, 
^^8 ; — fair copies, never wrote, i. 
83, «. 2; iii. 72, n. i; iv. 42, 357: — 
Johnsonese, v. 166, ». 2 ; — review- 
ing, iv. 247; — time for it, ii. 136-7; 
— verses, counting his, iv. 253 ; 
wrote by fits and starts, iv. 426; — 
only for money, i. 369. «• i! >"• 22, 
„ 3; — not for pleasure, iv. 253; — 
rapidity, described by Courtenay, iv. 
441, ».; shown in his college e.\er- 
cises. i. 83 ; — Debates, i. 584 ; — 
Hermit of Teneriffe, \. 222, n. i; — 
Idler, i. 383 ; — ^''> "f Savage, 
forty-eight pages at a sitting, i. 191; 
V ^6; _ Kainh/ers, i. 236; — I\as- 
sehis, i. 395 ; — sermons, v. 76 ; — 
translation from the French, iv. 147; 
v_ ^6; — Vanity of Human Wishes, 
i. 223; ii. 17; confidence in his own 
abilities, i. 215 ; conjecture, kept 
things floating in, iii. 369; con- 
science, tenderness of his, i. 175 ; 
consecrated ground, reverence for, 
V. 70, 193 ; constant to those he 
employed, iv. 368; Constantinople, 
wish to go to, iv. 33 ; constitution. 



strength of his, iv. 296, n. 2 ; Con- 
stnietion of Fireworks, v. 280, n. i; 
contraction of his friends' name, ii. 
296; v. 351; contradiction, actuated 
by its spirit, iii. 75; v- 44i; exasper- 
ated by it, ii. 140; pleasure in it, iii. 
27 ; conversation, anticiue statue, 
like an, iii. 361; — Bacon's precept, 
in conformity with, iv. 273; — collo- 
quial pleasantry, iv. 494: — contest, 
a, ii. 516 ; iv. 129 ; — described by 

Hogarth, i. 170, "■ i ; ^'■• 

King, ii. 109, n. 2; E. Dilly. 

iii. 125: Reynolds, iv. 212-13; 

Malone,iv.2i2,;/.2; Miss 

Burney and Mrs. Thrale, iv. 273, n. 

2 ; Macaulay, ib.; Mrs. 

Piozzi, iv. 399; Boswell, ib.; 

— elegant as his writing, ii. 109, n. 
2; iv. 273, 494; — essential requisite 
for it, in want of an, iv. 135; — ex- 
act precision, ii. 497 ; — happiest 
kind, his view of the, iv. 59; — im- 
aginary victories gained over him, iv. 
jg3_ «. 4; — labours when he says 
a good thing, v. 86; ' literature in it, 
very little," v. 350 ; — 'music to 
hear him speak,' v. 2S0: — old man 
in it, nothing of the, iii. 383 ; 
originality, iv. 485, "• 2 ; — po^t 
and imagery, teemed with, iii. 295; 
— rule to talk his best, i. 237 ; — 
'runts, would learn to talk of,' ni. 
383 , seldom started a subject, iii. 
349,';/. i; iv. 351. «-4; —stunned 
people, V. 32S; — too strong for the 
great, iv. 136; — witnesses, without, 
iii. 93, n. i; conviviahty in the Heb- 
rides, V. 297 ; convulsions in his 
breast, iii. 45T, «• i; convulsive 
starts: see Peculiarities; cookery, 
judge of, i. 543 ; iii- 323 ; projected 
book on it, iii. 323 ; copper coins 
bearing his head, iv. 4S5, "• 3 ; cot- 



126 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



tage in Hoswell's i>ark, would like a, 
iv. 261; cuviiitry life, knowledge of.iii. 
511; — mental imprisonment, iv. 3(p; 

— pleasure in it, v. 501,;/. i; courage, 
anectlotes of liis, ii. 341-2 , Court of 
Justice, in a, ii. iii, ;/. 2, 1 12; Co-v- 
ley, projected edition of, iii. 33; cre- 
dulity, iii. 377; iv. 4yi; v. i8; critic 
upon characters and manners, iii. 56; 
croaker, no, iv. 439, //. i; Cromwell, 
projected I.ifc of, iv. 272; curiosity, 
his, i. 103; iii. 511 515-20; — about 
the middle ages, iv. 154; dance, at a 
Highland, v. i8g ; dancing, iv. 92, 
93, u. i; dating letters, i. 141, n. 2; 
day, mode of spending his, i. 461; ii. 
136-7; death, dread of, ii. 122, iii. 
174. 335: i^'- 2Q2, ;/. 4, 299, 320, 323, 
334. 345-(^. 422, 455-6. 460-1 ; v. 
433; — , no dread of what might oc- 
casion, ii. 341 ; — ' dying with a 
grace,' iv. 346, //. i ; — horror of the 
last, i. 384; iii. 174; — , keejiing 
away the thoughts of, ii. 107 ; iii. 
178; — news of deaihs fills him with 
melancholy, iv. 177 ; — resigned at 
the end, iv. 477, «. 3, 480-3; death, 
his, Dec. 13, 1784, iv. 481-3; —agi- 
tated the jiuhlic mind, i. 31, ;/. i ; — 
produced a chasm, iv. 485; — a kind 
of era, iv. 485, ;/. 2; — described by 
Boswell, iv. 460-S3 ; — David Hos- 
well, iv. 481; — Dr. Burney, iv. 473, 
«. I ; — Miss Kurney, iv. 435, ;/. i, 
506 ; — Iloole, iv. 459, n. 5, 469, 
473, M. 2 ; — Langton, iv. 469, 482, 
V. 1 ; Nichols, iv. 470-3 ; — Reyn- 
olds, iv. 477, ;/. 3 ; — Windham's 
servant, iv. 483 ; — spirit of the 
grammarian, iv. 462; — characteris- 
tical manner shows itself, iv. 474; — 
lines on a spendthrift, iv. 476 ; — 
three requests of Reynolds, iv. 477; 

— refuses opiates and sustenance, iv. 



479; — ojierates on himself, iv. 460, 
479, //. I, 482, n. 2; debate, chtjse 
the wrong side in a, i. 511; debts in 
1751. '■ 275. "• 4. 405. "• 3; — in 
1759 and 17^. '• 405. "• 3; — under 
arrest, i. 351, n. i; dedications, skill 
in, ii. I, 258; — never used them 
him.self, i. 298, //. 2 ; ii. 1, ;/. 2 ; — 
to him, iv 485, //. 3; defending a 
man, mode of, ii. lOO; deference, re- 
quired, iii. 27, «. 4; delicacy about 
his letter to Chesterfield, i. 302, «. 2; 

— about Heauclerk, iv. 20S; — tow- 
ards a dependent, ii. 178; depression 
of mind, i. 344, 415 ». 2 ; deserted, 
very much, iv. 163; ' dt'li-rn',' \. 149; 
dexterity in retort, iv. 214; Diaries, 
Aunnlts, i. 86, 104, n. 2; Diary, 
burnt, i. 30, 40, «. 5, 292 ; iv. 466 ; 

— fragments preserved, i. 32, 40, ;;. 
5, 86; iv. 468, «. i; v. 59, 487, m. i; 

— Boswell, seen by, i. 292, n. i; iv. 
468 ; — left in his house, v. 59 ; 
' Dictionary Johnson,' i. 445 ; Dic- 
tionary, cites himself in his, iv. 5, 
II. 1 : sec also under Dictionary ; 
Dies inr, reciting the, iii. 408, n. i ; 
diffidence, i. 176 ; Dignity, ' a blunt 
dignity about him,' i. 534, n. 1 ; — 
of character, i. 152, 306, n. 2 ; ii. 
136; V. 117; — of literature, iii. 353; 
dinners, 'dinner to ask a man to," 
i. 544; — house, at his own, ii. 247, 
412, 430, 489, n i; iii. 273; iv. 107, 
243; — to members of the Ivy Lane 
Club, iv. 503; — , ' huffed his wife' 
about, i. 277, w. 2; — on the way to 
Oxford, iv. 32S; one in Devonshire, 
i. 439, ;/. I ; — at the Pine Apple, i. 
119; — talked about them more than 
he thought, i. 543, w. i ; — thought 
on them with earnestness, i. 541, n. 
i; v. 390, n. I: sec under Dinners, 
and Johnson, eating ; discrimina- 



BoswelVs Life of jfohison. 



127 



Johnson, Samuel. 



tion, fond of, ii. 350; iii. 320; dis- 
orderly habits, i. 558, n. 2; iv. 12S; 
dissenters and snails, ii. 308, «. i; dis- 
tilling, iv. 10; distressed by poverty, 
i. 85, 89, 140, 142, n. 3, 155, 159, 188, 
275, «• 4, 351, 405, 564; Doctor of 
Laws of Dublin, i. 564; — Oxford, 
ii. 362, n. 3, 379-Si; — did not use 
the title, i. 565, n. i; ii. 380, n. i; iv. 
92, n. I, 309; V. 41, «. 2; dogs, sepa- 
rated two : see Johnson, fear ; Do- 
niine, title of, i. 565, ». i ; ' an auld 
dominie,' v. 435, n. 3; dramatic pow- 
er, i. 587 : see Johnson, tragedy- 
writer ; draughts, played at, i. 367 ; 
ii. 508 ; dress, described by Beau- 
clerk, ii. 465; — Boswell, i. 459; v. 
19; — Colman, iii. 63, «. i; — Cum- 
berland, iii. 370, w. 2; Foote, ii. 463; 

— Langton, i. 28 7; — Miss Reyn- 
olds, i. 286, n. I, 380, «. I ; — im- 
proved, iii. 370 ; — on his tour in 
Scotland, v. 19; — Boswell suggests 
for him velvet and embroidery, ii. 
544-5; — Court mourning, at a, iv. 
375; — dramatic author, as a, i. 232; 
v. 415; — when visiting Goldsmith, 
i. 423, n. 3; — in Paris, ii. 463, «. i; 
dropsy, sudden relief from, iv. 313 ; 

— operated on himself for it : see 
above, under death; Easter meetings 
with Boswell, iv. 171 ; Easter-day, 
his placidity on it, iii. 28; resolutions 
on it, i. 558, 564 ; ii. 218, n. i ; iii. 
113; East-Indian affairs, had never 
considered, ii. 336 ; eating, dislikes 
being asked twice to eat anything, 
V. 301 ; — love of good eating, i. 541 ; 
iii. 79 ; — at Monboddo's table, v. 
92; — mode, i. 310, 542, 544, n. i; 
v. 234-5; — unaffected by kinds of 
food, iii. 347 ; — voracious, iv. 84, 
381; v. 21; enemies, wonders why he 
has, iv. 194; envy, candid avowal of, 



iii. 307, n. i\ — possible envy of 
Burke, iii. 352, «. 4; epitaphs, his, iv. 
489, «. 2,490, 512-13; — on his wife, 
i. 279, n. 2 ; iv. 405-6 ; — on his 
parents and brothers, iv. 453; Essex 
Head Club, founds the, iv. 293-4, 
3i7i 503-5 ; etymologist, a bad, i. 
216, n. I ; evidence, a sifter of, i. 
470 ; V. 443 ; evil spirit, the, affects 
Johnson politically, v. 40, n. 3; exag- 
geration, hatred of: see E.xaggera- 
tion; excellence described by Mrs. 
Piozzi, ii. 302, n. 6 ; executor. Por- 
ter's, i. Ill, H. i; — Thrale's, iv. 100; 
exhibited, refused to be, ii. 137; ex- 
pedition, eager for an, iii. 149, 152; 
experiments, minute, iii. 452, n. 3 ; 
eyes : see Sight ; fable, sketch of a, 
ii. 266 ; ' Faith in some proportion 
to fear,' iv. 345, n. 3; fancy, fecundi- 
ty of, iii. 361; Fasting, ii. 245, n. 4, 
403, 498, 547; iii. 28, 341 ; iv. 235, 
458; — fasted two days, i. 542; iii. 
347; V. 323; fear, a stranger to. ii. 
341, «. 3; — separated two dogs, ii. 
341-2 ; V. 375 ; — never afraid of 
any man, iv. 377, «. 5; — afraid to 
walk on the roof of the Observatory, 
ii. 446; feared at College, iii. 345; — 
at Brighton, iv. 184, n. i ; — by 
Langton, iv. 341 ; see above, John- 
son, awe ; Fearing in Pilgrim s 
Progress, like, ii. 341, w. 3; iv. 481, 
n. 2 ; female charms, sensible to, i. 
107; female dress, critical of, i. 48; 
feudal notions, iii. 201; fictions, pro- 
jected work on, iv. 272; fields, wishes 
to see the, iii. 494, w. 2, 501; flattery, 
somewhat susceptible of, iv. 493; v. 
18, 502, n. 2; fanKm habet in cornu, 
ii. 90; Foote describes him in Paris, 
ii. 462; foreigners, prejudice against, 
i. 150; iv. 17; — described by Ba- 
retti and Reynolds, ib., n. 3, 194, 



128 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



«. 3 ; — Boswell, v. 20-1 : forgiving 
disposition, ii. 310; iv. 402, «. 2; — 
shown to one who exceedeil in wine, 
ii. 499; iv. 12S ; V. 295, «. i ; forti- 
tude, iv. 277; fox-hunting, i. 517, «. 
I ; V. 2S8 ; France, tour to, ii. 441- 
f>3 ; — diar)', ii. 44f}-59 ; — would 
not puhli.sh it, iii. 342 ; French, 
knowledge of, i. 133; ii. 93-4, 23S, 
u. 4, 441, 464; — writes a French 
letter, ii. 464 ; fretful, iv. 196, 200, 
326; friends, list of, in 1752, i. 280-1; 
frienil, a most active, iv. 397; frisk, 
his, i. 290; frolic, his bitterness mis- 
taken for, i. 85; iv. 351 ; fruit, love 
of, iv. 408; V. 519, «. 2; funeral, iv. 
484, 506; (laragantua, iii. 290; gar- 
ret in Gough Sc|uare, i. 3S0 ; Ciar- 
rick's success, moved by, i. 193, 250, 
M. 2; ii. 78; gay and good-humoured, 
iii. 500, n. i; iv. 116, w. i; ' infinitely 
agreeable,' iv. 352, ;/. 2 ; bland and 
gay, V. 454 ; gay circles of life, 
pleased at mixing in the, ii. 367, 400; 
Gelaleddiu, describes himself in, iv. 
225, n. i; general censure, dislikes, 
iv. 361 ; genius, always in extremes, 
i. 542, M. 3; iii. 349, w. I ; Gentleman s 
Afagazine : see Gentleman's Maga- 
zine; gentleness, iv. 116, w. i, 211, n. 
2; want of it, v. 328; gentlewoman 
in liquor, helps a, ii. 497; gesticulat- 
ing, averse to, iv. 373; gestures, see 
Johnson, peculiarities; ghost, like a, 
i. 6, w. 2; iii. 349; v. 82; ghosts: see 
Ghosts; 'Giant in his den,' i. 458; 
gloomy cast of thought, i. 208; God, 
love predominated over by fear of, 
iii. 385; ' saw God in clouds,' iii. 113; 
Goldsmith, contests with, ii. 265; — 
envy, i. 480, n. i; llannch of Veni- 
son, mentioned in, iii. 255, «. 2; — , 
proposal to review a work by, v. 312; 
see Goldsmith ; Good Friday, would 



not look at a proof on, iii. 356: see 
JoHNSO.N, fasting; good-humour, iv. 
2S3, «. 2; V. 150, 158; 'good-hu- 
moured fellow,' ii. 415; iii. 89; gootl- 
natured, but not good-humoureil, ii. 
416; good in others seen by him, i. 
186, ;/. i; good things of this life, 
loved the, iii. 352, n. 4; good sayings, 
forgets his, iv. 206 ; Gordon Riots, 
iii. 486-9; gout due to abstinence, i. 
120, n. 2; see JoMNS'iN, health; 
gown, Master of .Arts, i. 402; graces, 
valued the, iii. 63; gran<lfather, could 
hardly tell who was his, ii. 299; grat- 
itude, i. 564; grave, request about it, 
iv. 454, 71. 1 ; in Westminster Abbey, 
iv. 483 ; close to Macpherson's, ii. 
341, ;/. l; great, never courted the, 
iii. 215; iv. 135; not courted l)y them, 
iv. 135, 376; 'greatest man in Kng- 
land next to Lord Mansfield, ii. 385; 
v. 109; Cireek, knowledge of, i. 66. 
82; iii. 103; iv. 9, ;/. 5,444-5; v. 523, 
n. I ; Greek 7'estanient, his large folio, 
ii. 218; Green Room, in the, i. 233; 
iv. 8; grief, bearing, iii. 155, ns. i an J 
2; Grosvenor Square, apartment in, 
iv. 83, M. 2 ; gun, rashness in firing 
a, ii. 342 ; habitations, list of his, i. 
128; iii. 461, M. i; Hampton Court, 
applies for a residence in, iii. 40, w. 
i; happier in his later years, i. 346; 
iv. I, «. I ; happiness not found in 
this world, iv. 187, w. I: see Happi- 
ness; hasty, iii. 92; health, consults 
Scotch physicians, iv. 301; .seldom a 
single day of ease, iv. 170; — 1729, 
hypochondria, i. 73; 1755, sickness, i. 
353; 1765-6, severe attack of hypo- 
chondria, i. 559, 564, 603-4 ; which 
left a weakness in his knee, v. 362, 
508; 1767, hypochondria, relieved by 
abstinence, ii. 50, n. 2 ; 1768, hypo- 
chondria, ii. 51; severe illness at Ox- 



Bosweirs Life of Johnson. 



129 



Johnson, Samuel. 



ford, ii. 52, n. 3; 1770, rheumatism j 
and spasms, ii. 132, «• 2; 1771. bet- j 
ter, ii. 164, h. i; 1773- fever, ii. 302; I 
mention of a dreadful illness, ii. 322; j 
better in Scotland, v. 50, n. 3, 461, n. \ 
4; 1774, illness, ii. 312; 1776, gout, 
iii. 94, loi; 1777, hypochondria, in. 
112; illness, iii. 239; I779. better, iii. j 
451; 1780, better, iii. 494. 502; iv. i, j 
«. i; 17S1, better, iv. 116, «. i; 1782, 1 
illness, iv. 163, 165, 172 ; 1783, i^- | 
ness, iv. 187; palsy, iv. 263, 462, «. 3; | 
threatened with an operation, iv. 277; j 
gout, iv. 279; 17S3-4- asthma and, 
dropsy, iv. 295, //'., n. 3, 299; sudden I 
relief, iv. 301, 313; confined 129 
days, iv. 311, //. i; projected winter- 
ing in Italy, iv. 377; his letters about 
his last illness, iv. 407-25 ; A^gri , 
Ephenicns, iv. 439 ; see JOHNSON, 
melancholy; //<-(7;-(/, pronunciation of , 
iii. 224 ; hearth-broom, his, iv. 155 ; 
Hebrides, first talk of visiting the, 
i. 521; ii. 332; V. 325; proposed tour, 
ii. 58, 231, 266, 303; V. 13, 14; leaves , 
London, ii. 304 ; ^^ 22 ; returns, ii. j 
307; account of the tour, ii. 306; v. j 
1-485; described in a letter to Tay- 
lor, v. 461, //. 4; acquisition of ideas, j 
iv. 230; and of images, v. 462; hard- 
ships and dangers, v. 145, 322, «. i, , 
357, n. I, 447; uncommon spirit] 
shown, V. 419 ; pleasantest journey 
he ever made, iii. 107; v. 461; pleas- 
ure in talking it over, iii. 149, 223; 
a 'froHc,' iv. 158; no wish to go 
again, iv. 230; received like princes, 
V. 360; ' roving among the Hebrides 
at sixty,' v. 317 ; box of curiosities 
from them, ii. 309: see Journey to the 
Hebrides, and Scotland; Hercules, 
compared by Boswell to, ii. 299 ; 
Hervey, story of his ingratitude to, 
vi. 221-2, 238, 240; high, his use of. 



iii. 134, n. 3; Highlander, shows the 
spirit of a, v. 369; hilarity, i. 85, 221, 
n. 2, 296, n. i; ii. 300, 433-4'. histo- 
ry, little regard for: see History; 
holds up his head as high as he can, 
iv. 296; home uncomfortable by jar- 
rings, iii. 418 . see Johnson, house- 
hold; /^(Wfj/ wrt«, v. 301, 352; house 
at Lichfield: see Lichfield; for his 
habitations, see Johnson, habita- 
tions ; household, account of it, i. 
269, n. I ; iii. 523-4; iv. 195, «. 2; 
' much malignity ' in it, iii. 474. 523- 
4 ; losses by death, iv. 162 ; melan- 
choly, iv. 164 ; more peace, iv. 269, 
n. i; solitude, i. 269, n. i; iv. 271, n. 
I, 276, 278, 2S7, 292, «. 4, 295, 311; 
housekeeping, left off, i. 378, 405. «■ 
3, resumed it, ii. 5; hug, gives one a 
forcible, ii. 265; humihty, iii. 432, n. 
3 ; iv. 473, 493 ; humour, ii. 301, ;/. 
2; iii. 276 ti. 4; iv. 494; V. 18, 21; 
hungry only once in his life, i. 542; 
hypochondria: see Johnson, health; 
hypocrisy, not suspicious of, i. 484, 
M. 4; iii. 504; Iceland, projected voy- 
age to, i. 281; iv. 413, «. 2; idleness 
in boyhood, i. 56; at College, i. 82; 
'Desidiae valedixi,' i. 86; in writing 
the Plan, i. 212; 'Idle Apprentice," i. 
290; in Inner Temple-lane, i. 405, n. 
3; 'idle fellow all my life,' i. 538; 
idleness in 1760, i. 409; in 1761, i. 
415; in 1763, i. 461; in 1764, i. 558; 
in 1767, ii. 50; in his latter years, i. 
430, n. 3 ; — claim upon him for 
more writings, i. 461; ii. 17, 40. 505; 
idleness exaggerated by himself, i. 
516; ii. 302, 311 : see Johnson, in- 
dolence ; ignorance, covered his, v. 
141, n. 5; illness: see Johnson, 
health; imitations of him often cari- 
catures, ii. 374, "• i; 'Imlac,' iii. 7; 
Iiiipransus. i. 159; incredulity as to 



I30 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



particular extraordinary facts, ii. 283; 
iii. 213; V. 377; ' iiicreduius oJi,' '\\\. 
260 ; independence, always asserted 
liis, i. 513; indolence, his, described 
by Hawkins, ijj. 112,;/. i; by Mur- 
]ihy, i. 355, 11. 3; ' inclination to do 
nothing,' i. 536; justification of it, ii. 
17, ;/. 2; time of danger, i. 312, >/. 2; 
influence, loves, v. 155 ; inheritance 
from his father, i. 93; intoxicated, i. 
109, 120, ;/. 2, 439, ;/. i; — used to 
slink home, iii. 442; ' iiiviclinn ani- 
iiturn Co fonts,' iv. 431 ; Iniw : see 
Iirttt'; /s/iint/ /sii, \. 28 ^\ Islington, 
for change of air, goes to, iv. 313; 
Italian, knowledge of, i. 134, 180: 
mentions .Ariosto, i. 322; v. 419, ». 
i; Dante, ii. 274; [jurjioses vigorous 
study, iii. 103: iv. 156; reads C'asa 
and Castiglione, v. 314; II Palmcyino 
iriiii^/iilliiTn, iii. 2; Petrarch, iv. 432, 
;/. 2; Tasso, iii. 376; Italy, projected 
book on, iii. 22 ; — , projected tour 
to, ii. 484-5, 490; tour given Up, iii. 
7, 21, 32; eagerness to go, iii. 22, 32, 
41, 5 1 8, 520; v. 260; projected win- 
tering there, iv. 376-8, 388, 390, 
401-4 ; Jacobite tendencies, i. 50, 
203 ; ii. 30, 252 ; iii. 184 ; iv. 363 ; 
never ardent in the cause, i. 203, ;/. 
2, 497; never in a non-juring meet- 
ing-hmise, iv. 332 ; James's Mcdici- 
iial Dictionary, i. 1S3 ; /t-an Bull 
philosophc, i. 541 ; John Bull, a, v. 
21; 'Johnson's grimly ghost,' iv. 
265, n. 2; Johnson's Court, house in, 
ii. 5; furniture, ib., n. i, 431; John- 
ston, often called in Scotland, iii. 
120, n. i; V. 389; journal, attempt to 
keep a, i. 501, «. 2; ii. 249; Journey 
to the Western Islands, see Journey 
to the Western Islands ; killing some- 
times no murder in a state of nature, 
V. 99; kindness, Boswell, to, i. 474; 



— Burney's testimony, i. 475, ;/. i; 
iii. 27, n. 4; — Goldsmith's testimo- 
ny, i. 483; — features, shown in his, 
ii. 162, n. 4; — poor schoolfellow, to 
his, ii. 530; — sersants, to, iv. 227; 

— small matters, in, iv. 232-3, 397; 

— unthankful, to the, i. 97; iii. 418, 
524; King's evil, touched for the, i. 
49; kings, ridicules, i. 386; kitchen, 
his, ii. 247, ;/. 3 ; iii. 523-4 ; knee, 
takes a young Methodist on his, ii. 
137; — a Highland beauty, v. 298; 
knotting, tried, iii. 274 ; iv. 327; 
knowledge, at the age of eighteen, i. 
516; — exact, iii. 363; — , varied, iii. 
25 ; iv. 493 ; v. 244, 280, 299 ; ' la- 
boured,' iii. 295, ;;. 3; v. 86; ladies, 
could be very agreeable to, iv. 85; 
Langton's devotion to him in his ill- 
ness, iv. 307, ;/. 3; — will, ridicules, 
ii. 300 ; language, delicate in it, iii. 
345; iv. 510; — , suits his to a ' black- 
guard boy,' iv. 213; — , zeal for it, ii. 
32 ; large, love of the, v. 504, n. 4 ; 
late hours, love of, ii. 466; iii. i, n. 2, 
233; Latin, knowledge of, i. 53, 71- 
2; testified to by I)e Quincey, i. 316, 
n. 3; by Dr. Parr, iv. 445, ;/. i; — , 
colloquial, ii. 144, 463, 465; — mis- 
quotes Horace, iv. 411, ;/. i; — mod- 
ern Latin poetry, loves, i. 104, n. 4; 

— verse, translates CJreek epigrams 
into Latin, iv. 442 ; laugh, his, de- 
scribed, ii. 301, ;/. 2 ; — hearty, ii. 
434; like a rhinoceros, ib.: — over 
small matters, ii. 300; v. 284: — re- 
sounds from Temple Bar to Fleet 
Ditch, ii. 301; ' laughter, shakes, out 
of you,' ii. 265 ; law, knowledge of, 
iii. 25; lawyer, seeks to become a, i. 
155; — would have excelled, ib.; — 
had not money, v. 38; laxity of talk, 
i. 551; ii. 83; iv. 243, M. 2; V. 401; 
laziness, trying to cure his, v. 263 ; 



Bo swell's Life of John son. 



131 



Johnson, Samuel. 



lectured by Mrs. Thrale, iv. 75, «. 2; 
lemonade, his, v. 23, 81; letter-writ- 
ing an effort, i. 547; letters may be 
published after his death, ii. 68; iii. 
314; — puts as little as possible into 
them, iv. 118; — 7-eturns not an- 
swers, ii. 3, n. I, 319; iii. 238; — 
studied endings, v. 271, ;/. 4; — pub- 
lication by Mrs. Piozzi : see under 
Mrs. Thrale, Johnson, letters; — to 
Allen, Edmund, iv. 263 ; Argyle, 
Duke of, V. 413; Astle, Thomas, iv. 
154; Bagshaw, Rev. T., ii. 296; iv. 
405; Banks, Joseph, ii. 165; Barber, 
Francis, ii. 71, 132-3; iv. 276, ;/. 2; 
Baretti, i. 418, 427, 440; Barry, 
James, iv. 233; B — d, Mr., ii. 237; 
Beattie, Dr., iii. 493 ; Birch, Dr., i. 
1S5, 262; Boothby, Miss, i. 96, n. 5, 
353, w. 2 ; iv. 66, ;/. 3 ; Boswell, 
James, i. 547; ii. 3, 23, 66, 80, 126. 
161, 166, 231, 235, 303-5, 307, 311- 
12, 314, 316-19, 325, 328-9, 331, 333, 
336, 338, 35^, 353, 435, 437-40, 443, 
471-2, 476-55; iii. 51, 99, 101, 106, 
108, T18, 120, 123, 136, 141, 144, 
148-9, 153, 238, 243, 245, 315, 411, 
418, 423, 445, 449, 451, 470, 473, 
477, 494, 501; iv. 82, 157, 167, 71. 2, 
171, 174, 176, 178-179, 188, 267, 
279, 287, 299, 301, 303, 305-6, 402, 
405, 436-8 ; for Boswell's letters to 
Johnson, see Boswell; Boswell, 
Mrs., iii. 98, 146; iv. 179; Boufflers, 
Mme. de, ii. 465 ; Brocklesby, Dr., 
iv. 270, 407-14; Burney, Dr., i. 331, 
374, 379, 578: iv. 276, 415, 435; 
Bute, Earl of, i. 435-6, 440 ; Cave, 
Edward, i. 105, 124, 139-43, 157-60, 
179-80; Chamberlain, the Lord, iii. 
40, n. i; Chambers, R., i. 318; Cha- 
pone, Mrs., iv. 285; Chesterfield, 
Earl of, i. 303 ; fictitious one, a, i. 
276. n. i; Clark, Alderman, iv. 298; 



clergyman at Bath, iv. 173 ; clergy- 
man, young, iii. 495; Cruikshank, — , 
iv. 421 ; Davies, Thomas, iv. 267, 
421; Dilly, Charles, iii. 448; iv. 297; 
Dilly, Edward, iii. 143 (really written 
to W. Sharp, ib., n. 2) ; Dodd, Dr., 
iii. 164, 167; Drummond, William, ii. 
30-34; Edwards, Dr., iii. 417; Eli- 
bank, Lord, V. 207 ; Elphinstone, 
James, i. 244-6, 274, n. i ; iii. 414, n. 
2; Farmer, Dr., to, ii. 131; iii. 485; 
General Advertiser, i. 263 ; Gentl. 
Mag. about Savage, i. 190 ; Gold- 
smith, ii. 270, n. i; Green, the Lich- 
field apothecary, iv. 453; Grenville, 
George, i. 435, n. 2 ; about Gwynn 
the architect, v. 51S, n. i; Hamilton, 
W. G., iv. 283, 419 ; Hawkins, Sir 
John, iv. 502; Hastings, Warren, iv. 
77, 79, 81 ; Hector, Edmund, i. 74, 
;/. 2, loi, ;/. I, 219, «. I, 393, n. 2, 
428, n. 6; ii. 527, n. 3; iv. 167, n. 2, 
169-70, 436 ; Heely, — , iv. 427 ; 
Hickman, — , i. 91, n. i ; Hoole, 
John, ii. 330 ; iv. 359 ; Humphry, 
Ozias, iv. 309-10 ; Hussey, Rev. 
John, iii. 419 ; Jenkinson, Charles 
(first earl of Liverpool), iii. 165 ; 
Johnson, Mrs., his mother, i. 594-6; 
Kearsley, — , i. 248, w. i ; Lady, a, 
asking for a recommendation, i. 426; 
Langton, Bennet, i. 333, 375, 390-1, 
413; ii. 18, 19, 51, 156, 163, 167, 321, 
414, 434; iii. 141, 415; iv. 153, 167, 
278, 308, 406, 417 ; Langton, Miss 
Jane, iv. 312; Lawrence, Dr., ii. 338; 
iii. 476; iv. 158; — Latin letter, iv. 
166 ; Lawrence, Miss, iv. 166, n. 3 ; 
Leland, Dr., i. 566, 600; ii. 2, n. i; 
Levett, — , of Lichfield, i. 185; Lev- 
ett, Robert, ii. 323, 441 ; iii. 105 ; 
Macleod, Laird of, v. 303, n. i; Mac- 
pherson, James, ii. 340; Malone, E., 
iv. 163; Montague, Mrs., i. 269, n. i; 



132 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



iii. 253, n. i; iv. 276, «. 4; Mudge, 
Dr., iv. 277 ; Nichols, John, iv. 43, 
n. I, 68, 185, 187, n. 2, 425; Nicol, 
Geoi^e, iv. 420; O'Connor, Charles, 
i. 372 ; iii. 127 ; Paradise, John, iv. 
420; Parr, Dr., iv. 18, «. 2; Perkins, 
— , ii. 327 ; iv. 137, 176, 297, 418 ; 
Porter, Miss, i. 245, «. 2, 4CX), n. i, 
594-8 ; ii. 444-5 ; iii. 447 ; iv. 103, 
164, 167, >i. 2, 235, 268, 296, 301, 
454 ; Portmore, Lord, iv. 309, ;/. i ; 
Rasay, Laird of, v. 470 ; Reynolds, 
Sir Joshua, i. 562 ; ii. 162, 165 ; iii. 
93, 103; iv. 154, 1S6, 233, 254, 262, 
293, 327, 402, 422; Richardson, Sam- 
uel, i. 351. //. i; ii. 201, ;/. i ; Ryland, 
— , iv. 406, //.3, 412, u. 2, 425, w. 4; 
Sastres, iv. 424, w. I, 432, w. 2; Sharp, 
\V., iii. 143, «. 2; Simpson, Joseph, i. 
401 ; .Smart, Mrs., iii. 515; iv. 413, 
M. 2; Staunton, Dr., i. 425; Steevens, 
George, ii. 313; iii. 115; Strahan, 
\V., iii. 414; Strahan, Mrs., iv. 116, 
162; Taylor, Dr., i. 94, //. i, 96, ;;. 
5, 121, «., 177, >i. I, 276, 546, n. 4; 
ii. 85, n. I, 232, n. 2, 293, n. 3, 303, 
M. I, 370, n. 3, 384, «. 2, 444, «. I, 
536, >i. 2; iii. 136, ;/. 3, 155, ft. I, 205, 
"■ 3. 371. "■ 5. 451. "• 2; iv. 161, ;/. 
4, 174, )!. I, 179, ;/. I, 187, ;/. I, 190, 
M. I, 221, ;/. 3, 246, «. I, 263, 287, >i. 
3, 300, ;/. 2, 311, 472, «. I, 511 ; v. 
58, «. 6, 247, ». I, 257, ft. 2, 461, «. 
4; Thrale, Mrs., iii. 152, «. i, 481, 
486; iv. 265, 279, 283; s,Y Thralk, 
Mrs.; Thrale, Miss, iv. 282; Thur- 
low, Lord Chancellor, iv. 402 ; v. 
414, ft. 2 ; Vice-Chancellors of Ox- 
ford, i. 327; ii. 381; Vyse, Rev. Dr., 
iii. 142: Warton, Dr. Joseph, i. 293, 
320, w. 4, 574, «. i; ii. 132; Warton, 
Rev. Thomas, i. 314, 320-25, 327- 
29. 334-36, 373, 389 ; ii. 77, 132 ; 
Welch, Saunders, iii. 246 ; Wesley, 



John, iii. 448; v. 39, n. i; Westcote, 
Lord, iv. 66, ft. i ; Wetherell, Rev. 
Dr., ii. 486 ; Wheeler, Dr., iii. 416 ; 
White, Rev. Mr., ii. 238 ; Wilkes, 
John, iv. 259, ft. 2; Wilson, Rev. Mr., 
iv. 187; Windham, Right Hon. Will- 
iam, iv. 262, 418; letters to Joiinson 
from Argyle, Duke of, v. 414; Bella- 
my, Mrs., iv. 282, ti. i; Birch, Dr., 
i. 330; Boswell, Mrs., iv. 181; Croft, 
Rev, IL, iv. 68, ft. 4; Dodd, Dr., iii. 
167; Elibank, Lord, v. 207; Thrale, 
Mrs., iii. 479; Thurlow, Lord, iii.500; 
levee, i. 287, 355, «. 3; ii. 5, «. i, 136; 
— in Edinburgh, V. 450; liberality, i. 
564; iii. 252; liberty, love of, i. 359- 
60, 371, ft. 5, 491 ; ii. 68, /;. 4, 69, 
136, 195; contempt of popular liber- 
ty, ii. 68, 195; of liberty of election, 
ii. 192, 389 : library, described by 
Hawkins, i. 218, ft. 2; by Boswell, i. 
504 ; — Johnson puts his books in 
order, iii. 8, 76; — sale by auction, iv. 
463, «. 3; Lichfield play-house, in the, 
ii. 342; /;V, use of the word, iv. 58; 
life, lialance of misery in it, iv. 347- 
51; — dark views of it, iv. 346, ;;. 2, 
492; — more to be endured than en- 
joyed, ii. 143 ; — struggles hard for 
it, iv. 416; — would give one of his 
legs for a year of it, iv. 472; — oper- 
ates on himself, iv. 482, tt. 2 ; light 
and airy, growing, iii. 471, «. 7 ; lit- 
erary career in 1745-6, almost sus- 
pended, i. 203 ; Literary Club : sty 
Clubs and Joh.nson, club ; literary 
reputation, estimated by Goldsmith, 
ii. 267; Lives of the Poets, proof of 
his vigour, iii. 112, n. i; eflfect on his 
mind, ib. : see Lives of the Poets; 
London life, knowledge of, iii. 511; 
'permanent London object,' v. 396: 
see London ; Lords, did not quote 
the authority of, iv. 211: see John- 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



^^l 



Johnson, Samuel. 



SON, great; lost five guineas by hid- 
ing them, iv. 25; love, in love with 
Olivia Lloyd, i. 107 ; — Hector's 
sister, ii. 526 ; — Mrs. Emmet, ii. 
532; love, Garrick sends him his, v. 
399 ; low life, cannot bear, v. 349 ; 
Litsiad, projected translation of the, 
iv. 290; machinery, know ledge of, ii. 
525, ;/. 3; madness, dreaded, i. 77; 

— melancholy, confounded it with, 
iii. 199; — ' mad, at least not sober,' 
i. 41, 75; v. 244; — often near it, i. 
320, II. 4; iii. 113; majestic, v. 154; 
mankind, describes the general hos- 
tility of, iii. 268, n. i; mankind less 
just and more beneficent, iii. 268 ; 

— less expected of them, iv. 276 ; 
manners, disgusted with coarse, v. 
349 ; — total inattention to estab- 
lished manners, v. 79; — his rough- 
ness, ii. 15, 75, 432; in contradicting, 
iv. 323 ; only external, ii. 415 ; iii. 
92; partly due to his truthfulness, iv. 
255, n. 2; rough as winter and mild 
as summer, iv. 456, n. 5 ; had been 
an advantage, iv. 341 ; Mickle never 
had a rough word, iv. 289; Malone 
never heard a severe thing from him, 
iv. 393 ; Miss Burney's account, iv. 
492, n. I ; Macleods of Dunvegan 
Castle delighted with him, v. 236, n. 
3 ; softened, iv. 75, n. 2, 254, n. 4 ; 
marriage, i. no; Master of Arts de- 
gree, i. 154, 319, 323, «. I, 324-8; 
medicine, know ledge of : sec John- 
son, physic; melancholy, confounds 
it with madness, iii. 199; — consti- 
tutional, v. 18 ; — exaggerated by 
Boswell, ii. 301, ;/. 2 ; — inherited 
' a vile melancholy,' i. 41; — ' mor- 
bid melancholy,' i. 72, 397; — pro- 
poses to write the history of it, ii. 51, 
«. I ; — remedies against it, i. 517 : 
see Johnson, health ; memory, ex- 



traordinary, early instances, i. 46, 56; 
— shown in remembering, Ariosto, 
v. 419, n. I ; Bet Flint's verses, iv. 
119, ;/. 3 ; Greek hymns, iii. 361, n. 
I ; Hay's Martial, v. 419 ; letter to 
Chesterfield, i. 305, n. 2 ; Rowe's 
plays, iv. 42, n. 3 ; verses on the 
Duke of Leed's marriage, iv. 16; — 
complains of its failure, iii. 217, «. 3; 
men as they are, took, iii. 320; men 
and women, his subjects of inquiry, 
V. 501, n. I ; mental faculties, tests 
his, iv. 25 ; metaphysics, fond of, i. 
82 ; withheld from their study, v. 
123, «. 11; method, want of, iii. 107; 
' Methodist in a dignified manner,' 
i. 530, n. 3; military matters, interest 
in, iii. 410; militia, drawn for the, iv. 
368 ; mill, compared to a, v. 301 ; 
mimicry, hatred of gesticular, ii. 373, 
;/. 3 ; mind, his — means of quieting 
it, i. 367; — ready for use, i. 236; ii. 
419, «. 1 ; iv. 493, 512 ; — strained 
by work, i. 312, n. 2, 430, n. 3 ; 
moderation in his character, absence 
of, iv. 84 ; — in wine, difficult, ii. 
498: see Johnson, abstinence; mod- 
esty, iii. 93; monument in St. Paul's, 
i. 262, ;/. i; iv. 487; subscription for 
it, //'. , ns. I and 3; epitaph, iv. 490, 
512-14; mother, his — death, i. 383, 
;/. 5, 392, 594-7; ii. 142; debt, takes 
upon himself her, i. 185; dreads to 
lose her, i. 245, «. 2 ; letters, burns 
her, iv. 467, n. i; wishes to see her, 
i. 334; music, account of his feelings 
towards it, ii. 469, «. i; affected by 
it, iii. 224; iv. 26; bagpipe, listens to 
the, v. 358 ; flageolet, bought a, iii. 
274 ; had he learnt it would have 
done nothing else, iii. 274 ; v. 358 ; 
insensible to its power, iii. 224; talks 
slightingly of it, ii. 469 ; wishes to 
learn the scale, ii. 302, n. 4; would 



134 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



be glad to have a new sense given 
him, ii. 469; musing, hahit of, v. 82, 
n. i; name, his, fraudulently used, v. 
336; nature, affected by, iii. 516; — 
description of a Highland valley, v. 
161, n. i; of various country scenes, 
V. 501, «. I ; neglect, dread of, iv. 
159, n. 2; would not brook it, ii. 136; 
neglected at Hrighton in 17S2, iv. 
184,;/. 3; negligence in correcting 
errors, iii. 409, «. I ; iv. 60, n. 2 ; 
newspapers, accustomed to think lit- 
tle of them, iv. 173; constantly men- 
tioned in them, iv. 147; ' maintained ' 
them,' ii. iq ; reads the I.oudon 
C/ironicU'.u. 118; nice observer of 
behaviour, iii. 62; night-cap, did not 
wear a, v. 305, 348; nights, restless, 
li. 164, 232, M. 2, 247, H. i; iii. 105, 
114, ;/. I, 124, ;/. I, 248, 413, 419; 
when sleepless translated Greek into 
Latin verse, iv. 442 ; nil admirari, 
much of the, v. 126; notions, his, en- 
larged, V. 504; Novum Museum, ii. 
19, «. 4; ' O brave we !' v. 410; oak- 
sticks for Foote and Macpherson, ii. 
342, ;/. i; for his Scotch tour, v. 19, 
93 ; lost, V. 362 ; oath, his pardon 
a.sked by Murphy for repeating an, 
iii. 47; obligation, drawn into a state 
of, iii. 392, M. i; impatient of them, 
i. 285, ;/. i; obstinacy in supporting 
opinions, i. 336, n. 2; 'Oddity,' iii. 
237; offend, attentive not to, iii. 62, 
n. 2; 'oil of vitriol,' his, v. 15, ;/. i; 
old, never liked to think of being, iii. 
344, 348-9 ; old man in his talk, 
nothing of the, iii. 383 ; oracle, a 
kind of public, ii. 136; orange-peel, 
use of, ii. 378; oratorio, at an, ii. 371, 
«. 2 ; original writer, ii. 40 ; Oxford 
undergraduate, an, i. 67; pain, cour- 
age in bearing, iv. 277 ; easily sup- 
ports it, i. 181, n. 3, 249; never; 



totally free from it, i. 74, n. 2; oper- 
ates on himself, iv. 460 ; paintings, 
account of his feelings towar<ls it, i. 
421, ;/. 1; allegorical, historical, and 
jiortrait painting, compares, i. 421, 
n. i; v. 249, n. 3; Barry's pictures, 
praises, iv. 259; Exhibition, despises 
the, i. 421; laughs at talk about it, 
ii. 459, n. 2 ; prints, a buyer of, i. 
421, ;/. i; iv. 234, w. i, 306; sale of 
his, i. 421, M. I ; Thrale's copper, 
asks Reynolds to paint, i. 421, n. i; 
Treatise on Piiintiiii^, reads a, i. 149, 
;/. I ; palsy, struck with, iv. 194, ;/. 
I, 263-g; pamphlets written against 
him, iv. 147 ; papers, burns his, i. 
125 ; iii. 34, ;/. 3 ; iv. 467-8, ;/. i ; 
papers, not to be burnt, ii. 481 ; 
Papist, if he could would be a, iv. 
334; pardon, once begs, iv. 58, //. i; 
Parliament, attacked and defended 
in it, iv. 368, n. 2; eulogised in it by 
Burke, iv. 470, n. 1 ; attempts made 
to bring him into it, ii. 158-60; pro- 
jects an historical account of it, i. 
179; parodies on Percy, ii. 157, >i. i, 
244, ;/. 2; Warton, iii. 179, ;/. 3; 
party-opposition, averse to, ii. 399, 
;/. I ; ]iassions, his, iv. 457, n. 5 ; 
Passion-'week, Johnson has an awe 
on him, ii. 547: dines out every day, 
iii. 341, ;/. i; dines with two Bishops, 
iv. 102; paper on it in The Rambler, 
i. 248; iv. 103; pastoral life, desires 
to study, iii. 516; pathos, want of, iv. 
53; patience, iii. 30; v. 167; payment 
for his writings: j^-r Johnson, works; 
peats, brings in a supply of, v. 345; 
peculiarities — absence of mind, ii. 
308, n. i; iv. 83, avoiding an alley, 
i. 561; beating with his feet, v. 67, 
n. 4; blowing out his breath, i. 562; 
iii. 173 ; convulsive starts, i. no ; — 
mentioned by Pope, i. 166 ; — de- 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



135 



Johnson, Samuel. 



scribed, ib., i. 166, «. 2; — astonish 
Hogarth, i. 169 ; — alluded to by 
Churchill, i. 485, n.\; — astonish a 
young girl, iv. 211, n. 2; — lose him 
an assistant-mastership, iv. 470, n. 2: 
— described by Boswell, v. 19 ; by 
Reynolds, ib., n. 3; entering a room, 
i. 561 ; gesticulation, mimicked by 
Garrick, ii. 373 ; half-whistling, iii. 
406 ; inarticulate sounds, i. 562 ; iii. 
78 ; march, iv. 82, 491 ; pronuncia- 
tion: j-^-i" under Johnson, pronuncia- 
tion; puffing hard with passion, iii. 
310; riding, iv. 491; rolling, iii. 334, 
406; iv. 126; V. 44; shaking his head 
and body, i. 562 ; striding across a 
floor, i. 168 ; talking to himself, i. 
559 ; iv. 272, 460, ;/. 5 ; v. 349 ; 
touching posts, i. 561, n. i; Boswell 
tells him of some of them, iv. 211, n. 
2; he reads Boswell's account, v. 349, 
n. 2 ; Pembroke College : str under 
Oxford, Pembroke College ; pen- 
ance in Uttoxeter market, iv. 430 ; 
penitents, a great lover of, iv. 468, n. 
2; pension: see Pension; personal 
appearance, described by Boswell, 
iv. 490-1; v. 19; by Miss Burney, i. 
166, «. 2; ii. 162, ti. 4; V. 25, «. 3; 
by Mrs. Piozzi and Reynolds, i. no, 
w. i; in 7Vie Race, ii. 35; 'A labour- 
ing working mind, an indolent re- 
posing body,' iv. 511 ; fingers and 
nails, iv. 220; ' ghastly smiles,' ii. 78, 
n. 2 ; V. 53, ;/. 2 ; 'majestic frame,' 
i. 546 ; robust frame, i. 534 ; youth, 
in his, i. 109; philology, love of, iv. 
40 ; philosophy, study of, i. 350 ; 
physicians, pleasure in the company 
of, iv. 338 ; physick, knowledge of, 
i. 183; iii. 26; 'great dabbler in it,' 
iii. 172; physics himself violently, iv. 
156, ft. I, 269, n. I ; writes a pre- 
scription, V. 83; picture of himself in 

VL— 14 



Fvw&t atavTov, i. 346, «. 2 ; piety, 
maintained the obligations of, v. 17; 
plagiarism, i. 387; players, prejudice 
against : see Players ; please, seek- 
ing to, iii. 62, n. 2 ; poems of his 
youth, i. 59; poetical mind, iii. 171; 
iv. 493 ; v. 18 ; poetry, pleasure in 
writing, iv. 253 ; v. 478 ; Politian, 
proposal to publish the poems of, i. 
104 ; politeness, his, acknowledged, 
i. 331; ii. 40; iii. 93, 377; iv. 146; 
V. 25, 93, 112, 413; thinks himself 
very polite, iii. 384; v. 413; political 
economy, ignorance of, ii. 492, ti. i ; 
political principles, his, described liy 
Dr. Maxwell, ii. 134-5 '■> politician, 
intention of becoming a, i. 566, 601- 
2; ' Pomposo,' i. 470; poor, loved 
the, ii. 137, n. 2 ; Pope's Messiah 
turned into Latin, i. 71 ; porter's 
knot, advised to buy a, i. 118, u. 4; 
portraits, list of his, iv. 485, «. 3 ; 
Burney, Miss, finds him examining 
one, ii. 162, n. 4; Reynolds, portraits 
by, — one with Beauclerk's inscrip- 
tion, iv. 208, 511 ; 'blinking Sam,' 
iii. 310, n. i; Doughty's mezzotinto, 
ii. 327, M. i; one engraved for Bos- 
well's Life, presented by Reynolds 
to Boswell, i. 454; V. 438, n. 3; one 
admired at Lichfield, ii. 162; one at 
Streatham, iv. 181, w. 3; other por- 
traits, iv. 485, 71. 3; Reynolds, Miss, 
by, ii. 415, n. i, iv. 265, n. 2; post- 
chaise, delight in a: see Post-chaise; 
praise and abuse, wishes he had kept 
a book of, v. 310; praise, loved, but 
did not seek it, iv. 493; v. 18; dis- 
liked extravagant praise, iii. 256 ; 
iv. 95 ; prayers : see Prayers, and 
Prayers and Meditations ; prefaces, 
skill in, i. 161; preference to himself , 
refused, iii. 62, n. 2 ; Presbyterian 
service, would not attend a, iii. 382; 



136 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



V. 138, 438; — attends family prayer, 
V. 138; pride, descril^ed Ijv Reynolds, 
iii. 392, w. I ; defensive, i. 308 ; no 
meanness in it, iv. 495, w. 3; princes, 
attacks, i. 172, n. 2; principles and 
practice: see PRINCIPLES and Prac- 
tice ; prize-fighting, regrets extinc- 
tion of, V. 260 ; profession, regrets 
that he hail not a, iii. 351, ;/. 1; pro- 
fessor in the imaginary college, v. 
123; promptitude of mind: jc.' John- 
sun, mind; pronunciation — excel- 
lent, V. 96; provincial accent, ii. 182, 
531 ; property, iv. 327, 463, n. 3 ; 
public affairs, refuses to talk of, iv. 
200; public singer, on preparing him- 
self for a, ii. 423 ; public speaking, 
ii. 160; punctuality, not used to, i. 
244 ; Punic war, would not hear of 
the, iii. 234, ;/. i; punish, quick to, 
ii. 416 ; puns, despises, ii. 277 ; iv. 
365 ; puns himself, iii. 370 ; iv. 85, 
94; questioning, disliked, ii. 540, n. 
i; iii. 66, 304; iv. 506 {sec, however, 
iii. 27, n. 4); quiet hours, seen in his, 
iii. 93, w. I ; quoting his writings 
against him, iv. 318; races with 
Baretti, ii. 442 ; Kanelagh, feelings 
on entering, iii. 226 ; rank, respect 
for : see Birth ; rationality, obstinate ; 
iv. 334; read to, impatient to be, iv. 
24 ; reading, amount of his, i. 82 ; 
ii. 41; before college, i. 65, 516; at 
college, i. 81-2; ii. 41; read rapidly, 
i. 82 ; iv. 385, n. 5 ; ravenously, iii. 
323 ; like a Turk, iv. 472 ; did not 
read books through, i. 82 ; ii. 260 ; 
reads more than he did, ii. 40, n. i ; 
iv. 252, It. 2 ; slight books, v. 357 ; 
when travelling, Pomponius Mela de 
situ Orl>is, i. 538 ; — // Palmerino 
(i'lnghilterm, iii. 2 ; — Euripides, 
iv. 359; — Tully's Epistles, v. 488; 
— Martial, v. 4S9 ; recitation, de- 



scribed by Boswell, ii. 244 ; iii. 34 ; 
V. 131; — Murjihy, ii. 106, n. 2; v. 
131, ;/. 4; — Mrs. Piozzi, ii. 244, n. 
i; V. 131, w. 4; — Reynolds, v. 131; 
a great reciter, v. 48; 'recommend- 
ing ' the dead: see under Dead; rec- 
onciliation, ready to seek a, ii. 115, 
11. I, 125, 293, and n. 3; iii. 308; 
rectory, olTer of a, i. 370, 551 ; ii. 
13S; refinement, high estimation of, 
iii. 62; relations on the father's side, 
i. 40, //. 5; iv. 462; religion, 'con- 
version,' his, iv. 313, ;/. 2; early in- 
difl'erence to it, i. 78; totally regard- 
less of it, iv. 249 ; early training, i. 
45. 77; ' ignorant of it,' ii. 547; a lax 
talker against it, i. 78; predominant 
oliject of his thoughts, i. So; ii. 142; 
brought back by sickness, iv. 249 ; 
' never denied Christ,' iv. 478, «. 3; 
remorse, i. 1S9, 461, n. 2 ; repeti- 
tions in his writings, i. 387, //. 2; re- 
proved by a lady, v. 43; reputation, 
did not trouble himself to defend his, 
ii. 495; residences: see Habitations; 
resistance to bad government lawful, 
ii. 69, 195; respect due to him, main- 
tained the, iii. 353; shows respect to 
a Doctor in Divinity, ii. 143; 're- 
spectable Hottentot ' not Johnson, 
i. 310, ;/. 2 ; respected by others: 
by Boswell and Mrs. Thrale loved, 
ii. 490 ; resolutions, ' fifty-five years 
spent in resolving,' i. 558; — rarely 
efficacious, ii. 130 ; — neglected, iv. 
156 ; reveries, i. 166, n. 2, 167 ; 
Reynolds's pictures, ' never looked 
at,' ii. 362, n. 3 : riding, v. 150, 
324, 344 : see Johnson, fox-hunting; 
ringleader of a riot, said to have 
been the, iv. 375; rising late, i. 573, 
n. 2; ii. 19, 164, 470, 548; V. 239; 
'roarings of the old lion,' ii. 325, «. 
2; roaring peojile down, iii. 170, 329; 



BosweWs Life of fohnson. 



137 



Johnson, Samuel. 



roasts apples, iv. 252, n. i ; robbed, 
never, ii. 137 , romances, love of, i. 
57; iii. 2; roughness: see Johnson, 
manners; Round-Robin, receives the, 
iii. 95-8 ; Royal Academy, Profess- 
or of the, ii. 76 ; iv. 488, n. 2 ; 
rumour that he was dying, iii. 251 ; 
rural beauties, little taste for, i. 533; 
V. 127; sacrament, not received with 
tranquillity, ii. 132, n. 2; — instances 
of his receiving it at other times but 
Easter, ii. 49, n. 3; iv. 311, 480; 
same one day as another, not the, iii. 
219; sarcastic in the defence of good 
principles, ii. 15; Sassenach More, ii. 
306, ;/. 3 , satire, explosions of, iii. 
92 ; — ignorant of the effect pro- 
duced, iv. 194, n. I ; .Savage, effects 
of intimacy with, i. 186-9 > saving, 
tendency to paltry, iv. 220 ; sayings 
not accurately reported, ii. 381 ; 
scenery, descriptions of moonlight 
sail, V. 379, ;;. i ; of a ride in a 
storm, V. 394, )i. I ; schemes of a 
better life, i. 558 ; iv. 265 ; scholar, 
preferred the society of intelligent 
men of the world to that of a, iii. 
25, «. i; ' school,' his, described by 
Courtenay, i. 25S , by Reynolds, i. 
284, n. 3; iii. 260; — , distinguished 
for truthfulness, i. 7, n. i ; iii. 260 ; 
— Goldsmith one of its brightest 
ornaments, i. 482-3 ; — taught men 
to think rightly, i. 284, n. 3; school- 
master, life as a, i. 113, n. i, 114, n. 
2, 565, n. i; Scotch, feelings towards 
the: jf^ under Scotland; Scotland, 
tour in, ii. 306-7; v. 1-474; scottified, 
V. 61; screen, dines behind a, i. 188, 
n. I ; scruple, troubled with Baxter's, 
ii. 548 ; not weakly scrupulous, iv. 
458 : see Scruples ; seal, cut with 
his head, iv. 463, n. 3; seasons, effect 
of: j^^ Weather; second sight: see 



under Scotland, Highlands, sec- 
ond sight; 'seducing man, a very,' 
iv. 66, n. 3 ; Seraglio, his, iii. 418 ; 
an imaginary one, v. 246 ; sermons 
composed by him, i. 279 ; iii. 22, n. 
3, 206 ; iv. 439, n. i ; v. 75 ; severe 
things, how mainly extorted from 
him, iv. 394; Shakespeare, read in his 
childhood, i. 81; see under Shake- 
speare; shoes worn out, i. 89; sight, 
account of it by Boswell, iv. 490; v. 
19; by Miss Burney, iv. 185, n. i, 
351, It. 4; actors' faces, could not 
see, ii. 106, n. 2; acuteness shown in 
criticising dress, v. 4S8, «. i; in his 
French diary, ii. 460 ; in observing 
scenes, i. 48; iii. 213; iv. 359; v. 
160; Baretti's trial, at, ii. iii, n. 3; 
Blinking Sam, iii. 310, n. i ; diffi- 
culty in crossing the kennel when a 
child, i. 46; eyes wild and piercing, 
i. no, ;/. I, 537, ;/. i; only one eye, 
i. 48 ; restored to its use, i. 353 ; 
inflamed, ii. 302-3 ; short-sighted, 
called by Dr. Percy, iii. 310; silence, 
fits of, ii. 245; iii. 349; v. 82; silver 
buckles, iii. 370 ; — cup, i. 188, «. 
2; — plate, ii. 5, n. i; iv. 107; sin- 
gularity, dislike of, ii. 85, n. 2 ; iv. 
375 ; sins, never balanced against 
virtues, iv. 459 ; slavery, hatred of : 
see Slaves; sleep: see Nights; small- 
pox, has the, v. 496 ; Smith, Adam, 
compared with, iv. 29, n. 2 ; Sober, 
Mr., of The Idler, iii. 452, n. 3; 
social, truly, iv. 328; society, mixing 
with polite, i. 94-5, 573, n. 3; ii. 
535 ; iii- 309. «• 3. 4S2 ; iv. i, n. i, 
103, 126, n. I, 127, 135-6, 170, 376, 
411 ; v. 48, III, 236, 408, 423, 426, 
449, 519, 521; solitude, hatred of, i. 
167, n. I, 344, 393, «. I, 597; iii. 
460; iv. 493; suffers from it, iv. 187, 
n. 2: see under Johnson, household; 



'38 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



' soothed,' ii. 129; sophistry, love of, 
ii. 69; recourse to it, iv. 129; sought 
after nobody, iii. 357 ; Southwark 
election, ii. 32S, n. 2 ; speaking, im- 
pressive mode of, ii. 374 ; spelling 
incorrect, i. 302, n. i ; iv. 43, n. i ; 
V. 141, n. 2 ; spirit, lofty, iv. 431 ; 
spirit, wishes for evidence for, ii. 
172; iii. 338, /;. 2; iv. 345: see John- 
SO.N, supernatural ; splendour on £,(mo 
a year, iv. 390 ; spurs, loses his, iv. 
470, n. 2; V. 186; St. Clement Danes, 
his seat in, ii. 245 , St. James's 
Scjuare, walks with Savage round, i. 
1S8, «. 2. 189; St. John's Gate, rev- 
erences, i. 129; St. Vitus's dance, v. 
19; stately shop, deals at a, iv. 368; 
straggler, a, iii. 347 ; Streatham, 
'absorbed from liis old friends,' i. 
573> «• i; ii- 489. "• i; i'i- 255; Miss 
Burney describes his life there, iv. 
392, n. 4; his 'home,' i. 570, n. 4; 
ii. 88, 162, It. 3; iii. 513; iv. 392, his 
late hours there, ii. 466; his farewell 
to it, iv. 181; studied behaviour, dis- 
approves of, i. 544 ; study, advice 
about, i. 496 ; iv. 359-60 , style, — 
account of it, i. 252-61; Addison's, 
compared with, i. 259, 260, «. 2 ; 
aflfected by his Dictionary, i. 256, n. 
4 ; ' Hrownism,' i. 256-7, 357 ; cari- 
catures of it, by Blair, iii. 195-6 ; 
Colman, iv. 447, and «. 2 ; Lexi- 
phanes, ii. 50; Maclaurin, ii. 416; in 
a magazine, v. 310; in an Ode to 
Mrs. Thrale, iv. 447; changes in it, 
iii. 196, «. I ; criticises it himself, iii. 
292, n. i; easier in his poems than 
his prose, v. 18; female writing, ill- 
suited for, i. 259; formed on Temple 
and Chambers, i. 253; on writers of 
the seventeenth century, i. 254; Gal- 
licisms, dislikes, iii. 390, n. 3; imita- 
tions of it, by Barbauld, Mrs., iii. 



196 , Burney. Miss, iv. 449 ; Bur- 
rowes, Rev R., iv. 445-6; Gibbon, 
iv. 448, Knox, Rev. Dr., iv. 450-1; 
Mackenzie, Henry, iv. 450, n. i ; 
Nares, Rev. Mr., iv. 449; news- 
papers, iv. 439, n. I ; Robertson, iii. 
196 ; iv. 448 ; Young, Professor, iv. 
452; Lives of the Poets, iii. 196, n. 
I ; Lobos Abyssinia, translation of, 
i. loi; Monboddo, criticised by, iii. 
196-7; parentheses, dislikes, iv. 219; 
Plan of the Dictionary, i. 213; Ram- 
bler, i. 252; iii. 196, «. i; talk, like 
his, iv. 273, ;/. 2 ; ' the former, the 
latter,' dislikes, iv. 220; Thrale, 
Mrs., described by, iii. 22, n. 2; 
translates a saying into his own style, 
iv. 370; Warburton attacks it, iv. 57; 
suliordination: see Sl'Hordinwiion; 
Sunday : see Si'NDAv ; superiority 
over his fellows, i. 55: supernatural 
agency, willingness to examine it, i. 
470; V. 18; superstition, prone to, iv. 
491 ; V. 18: see (Ghosts and Joh.n- 
SON, spirit; 'surly virtue,' iii. 79; 
swearing, profane, dislikes, ii. 387, 
n. I ; iii. 215 ; falsely rejiresented 
as swearing, ii. 3S7, n. \ ; ' swore 
enough,' iv. 249; uses a profane ex- 
pression, v. 348 ; swimming, i. 402 ; 
ii. 342; iii. 105, n. 2; Tatin verses on 
it, ib.; talk — , alike to all, talked, 
ii. 370; best, rule to talk his, iv. 212, 
and n. i; books, did not talk from, 
V. 431 ; calmly in private, iii. 377 ; 
' his little fishes would t.alk like 
whales,' ii. 266 ; loved to have his 
talk out, iii. 261; not restrained by a 
stranger, ii. 502 ; iv. 328 ; ostenta- 
tiously, talks, v. 141 ; 'talked their 
best,' his phrase, iii. 220, «. 2 ; vic- 
tory, talks for, ii. 273 ; iv. 129; v. 17, 
18, 369; writing, like his. iv. 273. n. 
2: see Johnson, conversation; talk- 



Bos weirs Life of yohnson. 



139 



Johnson, Samuel. 



:ng to himself: sec Johnson, peculi- 
arities; tanti men, dislike of, iv. 130; 
taste in theatrical merits, ii. 532 ; 
tea, Careless, Mrs., told him when 
he haxi enough, ii. 527, n. i; cups, a 
dozen, i. 363, «. i; fifteen, ii. 308, n. 
i; sixteen, v. 236, n. i; claiiditc jam 
rivos pueri, v. 318; efTects of it on 
him, i. 363; misses drinking it once, 
V. 505; ' shameless tea-drinker.' i. 120, 
ti. 2; drank it at all hours, i. 363; v. 
25; takes it always with Miss Will- 
iams, i. 488 ; teachers, his, Dame 
Oliver, i. 50 ; Tom Brown, i/>. ; 
Hawkins, i. 51; Hunter, zTi.y Went- 
worth, i. 57; teaching men, pleasure 
in, ii. 116; temper, easily offended, 
iii. 392 ; iv. 492 ; v. 17 ; violent, iii. 
92, 329, 340, 383, 437; iv. 75, «. 2; 
' terrible severe humour,' iv. 184, «. 
i; violent passion, iv. 197-8; — on 
Rattakin, v. 165-8 ; tenderness of 
heart, shown about Dr. Brocklesby's 
offer, iv. 390; friendship with Hoole, 
iv. 415; his friends' efforts for an in- 
crease in his pension, iv. 389; pious 
books, iv. 102, n. i; on hearing Dr. 
Hodges's story, ii. 390, n. 4; kissing 
Streatham church, iv. 183 ; and the 
old willow-tree at Lichfield, iv. 429, 
;/. i; in reciting Beattie's //('/'w«V, iv. 
215 ; Dies Ircr, iii. 408, «. i ; Gold- 
smith's Traveller, v. 392 ; lines on 
Levett, iv. 191, n. i; Vanity 0/ Hu- 
man IVis/ies, iv. 53, «. 3; terror, an 
object of, i. 521, n. i ; theatres, left 
off going to the, ii. 16; thinking, ex- 
celled in the art of, iv. 493; thought 
more than he read, ii. 41 ; thoughts, 
loses command over his, ii. 218, 232, 
«. 2; Thrales, his 'coalition' with 
the, i. 570, n. 4 ; his intimacy not 
without restraint, iii. 8; gross suppo- 
sition about it, id.; supposed wish to 



marry Mrs. Thrale, iv. 446, «. i : 
see Thrales, and under Johnson, 
Streatham ; toleration, views on, ii. 
286-92 ; Tory, a, ' not in the party 
sense,' ii. 134; his Torj'ism abates, v. 
441; might have written a Tory His- 
tory of England, iv. 46, ' tossed and 
gored,' ii. 75 ; tossed Boswell, iii. 
3S5; town, the, his element, iv. 413: 
sec 1,oni)ON ; ' tragedy-writer, a,' i. 
118; reason of his failure, i. 230, n. 
5 ; translates for booksellers, i. 155 ; 
travelling, love of. Appendix E., iii. 
510-21; 'tremendous companion,' i. 
573. "• 31 'true-born Englishman,' i. 
150; ii. 343; iv. 17, n. 3, 221; V. i, 
n. I, 21 ; truthfulness, exact pre- 
cision in conversation, ii. 497 ; iii. 
259 ; Rousseau, compared with, ii. 
497, n. i; truth held sacred by him, 
ii. 496, 71. i; iv. 353, ;/. i; all of his 
' school ' distinguished for it, i. 7, n. 
I ; iii. 260 ; scrupulously inquisitive 
to discover it, ii. 283 ; talked as if 
on oath, ii. 497 n. i ; tutor to Mr. 
Whitby, i. 98, n. 3 ; ' un politique 
aiix chonx et aux raz'es,' iii. 369 ; 
uncle, account of an, v. 360; unob- 
servant, iii. 480, n. 2; unsocial shy- 
ness, free from, iv. 295, Ursa Major, 
V. 437; utterance, slow deliberate, ii. 
373 ; iv. 495 ; V. iS ; verse-making, 
ii. 17; made verses and forgot them, 
ii. 18; youthful verses, i. 107; Vesey's, 
Mr., surrounded by great people at, 
iii. 482-3; Virgil, — quoted ' Optima 
qticrqnc dies,' ii. 148 ; reads him, ii. 
330; iv. 252; Vision of Theodore, 
thought by him the best thing he 
ever wrote, i. 222; vocation to pub- 
lic life, iv. 414; to active life, v. 71; 
Wales, tour to : see Wales; walk, 
his, in a court in the Temple, i. 536; 
wants, fewness of his, ii. 543, «. 3 ; 



140 



Index to 



Johnson, Samuel. 



warrants said to be issued against 
him, i. 163; watch, dial-plate of his, 
ii. 65 ; watched, his door, v. 282 ; 
water, lectures on, v. 73; water-fall, 
at Dr. Taylor's, iii. 217; weather, in- 
fluence of: sci- Weather; West- 
minster Police Court, attendance at 
the, iii. 246 ; whisky, tastes, v. 394 ; 
'Why, no Sir!' iv. 364, n. 3; wife, 
affection for his, i. 112, 272-8; ii. 
88 ; disagreements, i. 277 ; reported 
estrangement, i. 188, 11. 2 ; death, 
her, i. 272, 276, 322 ; alluded to in 
his letter to Chesterfield, i. 304; an- 
niversary of the day, i. 273-4 i '•'• 
112, H. I, 360, //. i; funeral sermon, 
i. 279; iii. 206, ;;. 3; grave and epi- 
taph, i. 279 ; iv. 405-6, 425, n. 4, 
454 ; ' resolves on Tetty's coffin,' i. 
410, n. 2; grief, his, i. 273, 280; al- 
most broke his heart, iii. 347, 476 ; 
' recommended,' i. 220, n. 2, 278, ;/. 
5; ii. 547-<;; saucer, her, iii. 249, n. 
2; wishes for her in Paris, ii. 451; at 
Brighton, //'. , n. 6; wig, his, — a 
bushy one, i. 131, ;/. i; Paris-made, 
ii. 463, n. i; iii. 370; fore-top burnt, 
//'. , ;/. 2; Wilkes, compared with, iii. 
74, 89,90; \\'\\\, averse to execute 
his, iv. 463; makes it, ih., n. 3; wine, 
use of, i. 120, ;/. 2; wisdom, his trade 
was, iii. 155, ;/. 2; wit, extraordinary 
readiness, iii. 92 ; — Garrick's ac- 
count of it, ii. 265; woman, rescues 
an outcast, iv. 371 ; — talks with 
others of the class, i. 259, ;/. i ; iv. 
456; wonders, distrust of, iii. 260, n. 
3 ; words, — charged with using 
hard and big words, i. 212, 253, ;/. 
I ; iii. 216 ; sesquipcdalia verba, v. 
455; in the Rambler, i. 242, n. i; in 
Lives of the Poets, iv. 46 ; needs 
words of larger meaning, i. 253; iii. 
197; 'terms of philosophy familiar- 



ised,' i. 252; words added to the lan- 
guage, i. 256 ; iv. 46, //. 3 ; v. 149 ; 
work, did his, in a workmanlike 
manner, iii. 72 ; Works, those as- 
certained markeil *, conjectured f, 
i. 130, )t. 2 ; Booksellers' edition, 
edited by Hawkins and Stockdale, i. 
221, //. i; iii. 160; iv. 374; right re- 
served by him to print an etlition, i. 
224; iv. 472; catalogue of \\\s\\'orks, 
i. 19-28; — asked for by his friends, 
i. 130 ; iii. 365 ; — I lis tor ia Studi- 
ortiiii, ib.; — one made by Boswell, 
iii. 366 ; iv. 439, ;/. i ; — projected 
works, ib.; payments received, — 
Translation of l.obo s Abyssinia, five 
guineas, i. loi ; London, ten guineas, 
i. 144; translation of part of Sarpis 
History, C■^^^ '• 156; Historical Ac- 
count of Parliament, part payment, 
two guineas for a sheet of copy, i. 180; 
LJfe of Savage, fifteen guineas, i. 
190, «. i; Dictionary ;^I575 (heavy 
out-payments to amanuenses), i. 211; 
Rambler, two guineas a number, i. 
242, 71. i; Vanity of Human Wishes, 
fifteen guineas, i. 224, «. i ; Irene, 
theatre receipts, ;^I95, copyright, 
;^loo, i. 230, n. I ; Introduction to 
London Chronicle, one guinea, i. 368; 
Idler, first collected edition, ^^84 2.r. 
4^/., i. 3S8, n. i; Rasselas, £\oo, + 
;^25, i. 395; Lives of the Poets, 200 
guineas (? pounds) agreed on, iii. 
126; iv. 41; £\QO added, ib.; jCioo 
more for a new edition,?^., n. 3; 
Tvorld, knowledge of the, iii. 24; ' a 
man of the world,' i. 494 ; had been 
long ' running about it,' i. 250; never 
complained of it, iv. 134, 197; never 
sought it, iv. 198; respected its judg- 
ment, i. 232, n. I ; worshipped, iii. 
377; writings, criticised his own, iv, 
5 ; never zcjrol:- error. i\. 495; v. iS' 



BosweWs Life of fo/mson. 



141 



Johnson, Samuel. 



Journal. 



see Johnson, composition ; youth, 
pleasure in talking of the days of, iv. 

433- 

Johnson, Sarah (Johnson's mother), 
account of her, i. 40, n. 5, 44; count- 
ed the days to the publication of the 
Dictionary, i. 334; debt, in, i. 1S5 ; 
death, i. 383, n. 5, 392, 594-?; epi- 
taph, iv. 453; funeral expenses and 
J^asselas, i. 395 ; Harleian Aliscel- 
lany, subscribes to the, i. 202, n. i; 
Johnson, teaches, i. 44 ; encourages 
him in his lessons, i. 51, n. i ; — 
hears her call Saiii, iv. log; — let- 
ters to her, i. 594-6; — marriage, i. 
no; London, visits, i. 49, 128; re- 
ceipts for bills, i. 105, n. i. 

Johnson, Thomas (Johnson's cousin), 
iv. 463, n. 3. 

Johnson in BirmingJuim, i. 99, ;/. 2, 
III, n. I. 

Johnson Buildings, iii. 461, «. i. 

Johnson's Court, Johnson removes 
toit, ii. 5; Boswell and Beauclerk's 
veneration for it, ii. 263, 489; ' John- 
son of that Ilk,' ib., >i. 2 ; iii. 461, 
n. I. 

Johnsoniana, o> Bon-Mots of Dr. 
Johtison, ii. 495; iii. 370. 

Johnsoniana (by Taylor), iv. 4S5, n. 3. 

Johnsonianissimns, i. 8, n. i. 

Johnsonised, ' I have Johnsonised the 
land,' i. 14. 

Johnston, the Scotch form of Johnson, 
iii. 120, «. I. 

Johnston, Arthur, Johnson desires his 
portrait, iv. 306 ; Foeniata, i. 532 ; 
iii. 119; v. 108. 

Johnston, .Sir James, iv. 325. 

Johnston, W., the bookseller, i. 395. 

Johnstone, Governor, i. 352, n. i. 

Jokes, a game of, ii. 265. 

Jones, Miss (The Chantress), i. 374. 

Jones, Phil, ii. 508. 



Jones, Rev. River, i. 374, n. 2. 

Jones, Sir William, Garrick's funeral, 
iii. 422, n. \; ' Harmonious Jones,' 
i. 258; Johnson's admiration of New- 
ton, anecdote of, ii. 144, «. i ; — 
Journey, commends, iii. 156; — use 
of scrupulosity ; 'Jones teach me 
modesty and Greek,' iv. 499; lan- 
guages, knowledge of, v. 123, w. 8; 
Literary Club, member of the, i. 
554; ii. 275; v. 124, n. 2; — account 
of the black-balling, iii. 353, n. 2 ; 
Persian Grammar, iv. 80, ;/. 2; por- 
trait, ii. 28, n. 2 ; professor in the 
imaginary college, v. 123 ; Shipley, 
Miss, marries, iv. 87, n. 2 ; study of 
the law, iv. 357, n. 4 ; Thurlow's 
character, iv. 403, n. i ; mentioned, 
iii. 439. 

JoNSON, Ben, Alchemist, iii. 40, «. 2 ; 
Fall of Alortimer, iii. 89, ;/. 6 ; at 
Hawthornden, v. 459, 473 ; Kitely 
acted by Garrick, ii. 106, n. i; Leges 
Convivales, iv. 294, «. 2. 

Jopp, Provost, ii. 333; v. 102. 

Jorden, Rev. William (Johnson's tu- 
tor), i. 68, 71, 92, 316. 

Jortin, Rev. Dr. John, attacked by 
Kurd, iv. 55, n. 3; Johnson desires 
information about him, iv. 1S5; Ser- 
mons, iii. 281. 

Joseph Emanuel, King of Portugal, 
iv. 201, w. I. 

Jour, derivation of, ii. 179. 

Journal, how it should be kept, ii. 
249 ; kept for a man's own use, iv. 
203 ; record to be made at once, i. 
390 ; iii. 247 ; v. 448 ; state of mind 
to be recorded, ii. 249 ; iii. 25S ; v 
310; trifles not to be recorded, i 
410; Johnson advises Baretti to keep 
one, i. 425; and Boswell, i. 501, 550; 
ii. 410; mirror, like a, iii. 258; regu- 
larity inconsistent with spirit, i. 179; 



142 



hicicx to 



Journal. 

ji-/" Johnson, Journal, and noswKii., 
Journal. 

Journal dcs Savans, ii. 44. 

Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides. 
See under HoswKLl,. 

Journey to London. See The Pro- 
7'oked Husband. 

/ottniev into Xorth Wales, ii. 325; v. 
487-524; Mrs. I'iozzi's account of its 
pul)lication, v. 487, n. i ; suppres- 
sions and corrections, ib.; inscrip- 
tion on l)lank leaf, iv. 345, n. 3. 

Journey to the Western Islands of Scot- 
land, first thought of in a valley, v. 
161. ;/. i; composition of it, ii. 308- 
9, 311; in the press, ii. 318-19, 321, 
325, 328-9 ; V. 505 , published, ii. 
332-3; sale, ii. 354-5: iii. 370; sec- 
ond edition, ii. 333, n. i; iii. 370, «. 
4; — note added to it, v. 470, n. i; 
translation, ii. 354, //. 3 ; errors, ii. 
333. 345. 347; V. 470; attacked by 
' shallbw North Hritons,' ii. 349, 351; 
in McNicol's Remarks, ii. 352; sup- 
posed attack by Macpherson, ib., n. 
i; in .Scuich newspapers, ii. 416; 
misapprehended to rancour, v. 22 ; 
Boswell projects a Supplement, ii. 
343, ;/. i; Hurke, Jones and Jackson 
commend it, iii. 156; Burney's 'J'rav- 
els in Joliiison's view as he wrote, iv. 
215 ; composed from very meagre 
materials, v. 462 ; copy sent to the 
King, ii. 332 ; to Warren Hastings, 
iv. 81 ; to various other people, ii. 
318, 326, 329, 332, 353, 355; iii. 108. 
I17-18; criticised by Dempster, ii. 
347; iii. 343; v. 463, 464-7; I->it-li. 
iii. 117; liailes, v. 463-5; Hermes 
Harris, ii. 419; Knox, ii. 348; Tyt- 
ler, ii. 349; Highlanders like it more 
than Lowlanders, ii. 353 ; lona, de- 
scription of, iii. 197; V. 3S0; John- 
SOii anxious to know how it ^a re- 



Junius. 

ceived. ii. 332-3, 337; — goes where 
nobody goes, v. 1 79, n. 3 ; — had 
much of it in his mind before start- 
ing, iii. 343 ; — letters to Mrs. 
Thrale, ii. 346, 349; v. 166, //. 2; — 
saw a different system of life, iv. 
230; v. 127,461-2; — shows grati- 
tude and delicacy, ii. 346; Macaulay, 
quoted by, iii. 510; new, cxintains 
much that is, iii. 370 ; Orme, de- 
scribed by, ii. 343 ; v. 466, n. i ; 
route, choice of a, v. 137; talked of 
in the Literary Club and London 
generally, ii. 363-4. 

JuwETT, Kev. Professor Benjamin, 
Master of Balliol College, ii. 387, 
n. 2. 

JUBILKK. See SllAKKSI'EAKK. 

JutHJE, an eminent noble, iv. 205. 

Jldcks, afraid of the people, v. 63 ; 
engaging in trade, ii. 393; farming, 
ii. 393; in private life, v. 451; partial 
to the populace, ii. 404-5 ; places 
held for life, ii. 405. 

JlDC.MENT, compared with admiration, 
ii. 413; source of erroneous judg- 
ments, ii. 151. 

Julia or the Italian Lover, i. 304, 
«. I. 

Julia Mandeville, ii. 461, «. I. 

JfLlKN, the Treasurer of the Clergy, 
ii. 448. 

JULIE.N, of the Gobelins, v. 121. 

JULics C/ESAR, iii. 195. 

Junius, Francis, i. 215. 

Junius, Burke, not, iii. 428 ; Burke, 
Hamilton and Wilkes most suspect- 
ed, ib., n. 3; Samuel Uyer. iv. 13, w. 
I ; concealment of the author, iii. 
428; duty of authors who are quC'i- 
tionetl about the authorship, iv. 353; 
impudence, his, ii. 189; Johnson at- 
tacks him, ii. 155 ; Norton, Sir 
1-leicher, attacks, ii. 540. n. 2. 



BosweWs Life of Johison. 



143 



Juries. 



Kennicott. 



Juries, guards afraid i>f them, iii. 54; 
judges of law, iii. iS, ;/. 2. 

Justice, a picture of, iv. 370. 

Justice Hall, ii. 112. 

Justices ok the Peace. See Magis- 
trates. 

JusTiTiA Hulk, iii. 305. 

Juvenal, 'J'/iini Satire, Johnson's imi- 
tation, i. 137 (seeZcWc;;); Boileau's, 
ib. ; Oldham's, i/>. ; Tenth Satire, 
Johnson's imitation, i. 222 (see Van- 
ity of Human If'is/ies); intention to 
translate other Satires, i. 223; quo- 
tations. Sat. i. 29-iv. 207, ;/. 2; Sat. 
i. 79-v. 315, ;/. 5; Sat. iii. i-i. 376, 
«. i; Sat. iii. 2-ii. 153; Sat. iii. 149- 
i. 8g, n. 2 ; Sat. iii. 164-i. go, n. 1 ; 
5(7/. iii. 230 (unitis laeerta-)-\\\. 289; 
Sat. viii. 73-iv. 132, n. 2 ; Sat. viii. 
7g-v. 411, n. i; Sat. x. 8-iv. 40S, n. 
4; Sat. X. i8o-ii. 261; Sat. x. 217-iv. 
412, n. i; Sat. \. 356-iv. 462, n. 2; 
Sat. x. 365-iv. 207, ;/. 4 ; Sat. xiv. 
139-iii. 472, n. I. 



Kames, Lord (Henr>' Home), coarse 
language in Court, ii. 230, ti. i; Ele- 
ments of Criticism, i. 455 ; ii. 103 ; 
Eton boys, on, i. 259, n. 2; Heredi- 
tary Indefeasible Right, v. 310 ; 
Johnson, attacks, ii. 362, n. 2; — , 
prejudiced against, i. 171; 'keep 
him,' ii. 60. Sketches of the History 
of Man — Charles V celebrating his 
funeral obsequies, iii. 280 ; Claren- 
don's account of Villier's ghost, iii. 
400; interest of money, iii. 387; Irish 
export duties, ii. 150, n. 3; Lapou- 
chin, Madame, iii. 386; Paris Found- 
ling Hospital, mortality in the, ii. 
457, n. 2; schools not needed for the 
poor, iii. 400, n. 2; virtue natural to 
man, iii. 400; Smollett's monument. 



V. 417; 'vicious Intromission,' ii. 
227, 229; mentioned, iii. 143. 

Kauffmann, Angelica, iv. 319, n. 1. 

Kearney, Michael, i. 566. 

Kearsley, the bookseller, letter from 
Johnson, i. 24S, n. i ; publishes a 
Life of Johnson, iv. 485, n. 3. 

Keuulestone, iii. 181-3; v. 492. 

Keen, Sir Benjamin, v. 353, n. 3. 

Keene, — , ii. 456. 

Keith, Admiral Lord, v. 487, n. r. 

Keith, Mrs., v. 148. 

Keith, Robert, Catalogue of the Scot- 
tish Bishops, i. 358. 

Keith, — , a collector of excise, v. 
146-9. 

Kelly, sixth Earl of, v. 441. 

Kelly, Hugh, account of him, iii. 129; 
displays his spurs, iv. 470, «. 2; False 
Delicacy, ii. 54; Johnson's Prologue, 
iii. 129, 134. 

Kemble, John, visits Johnson, iv. 279; 
anecdote of Johnson and Garrick, i. 
251, ;;. i; affected by Mrs. Siddons' 
acting, iv. 281, n. 3. 

Kempis, Thomas a, editions and trans- 
lations, iii. 256, iv. 321; Johnson 
quotes him, iii. 257, n. i; reads him 
in Low Dutch, iv. 25. 

Ken, Bishop, connected by marriage 
with Isaac Walton, ii. 417, «. i ; a 
nonjuror, iv. 331, n. i ; rule about 
sleep, iii. 192, n. i. 

Kennedy, Rev. Dr., Complete System 
of Astronomical Chronology, i. 424. 

Kennedy, Dr., author of a foolish 
tragedy, iii. 270. 

Kennedy, House of, v. 426. 

Kennicott, Dr. Benjamin, Collations, 
ii. 147 ; edition of the Hebrew Bi- 
ble, v. 47 ; meets Johnson, iv. 174, 
;/. 2. 

Kennicott, Mrs., iv. 174, n. 2, 329, 
332, 344, n. 2, 353. 



144 



Index to 



Kennin^on. 

Ken.\in(;t<)N Common, iii. 271, ;/. 2. 

Kknkick, Dr. William, account of 
him, i. 576 ; lipistlc to James Bos- 
-ii'cll, luu/., ii. 69; (iarrick, libels, i. 
576, ;/. I ; (loldsmith, libels, i. 576, 
n. i; ii. 240, ;/. 2; Johnson, attacks, 
i. 576; ii. 69; V. 310; made himself 
public, i. 57O; iii. 290; mentioned, 
ii. 50. 

Kknt, militia, i. 356, ;/. 2. 

Kki'I.er, i. 99, ;/. I. 

Kkitkl, Admiral, iv. 14, ;/. 6. 

Kerr, James, v. 45. 

Keswick, iv. 504. 

Ketti.ewell, John, iv. 331, ». i. 

Keysi.er, J. (]., Travels, ii. 396. 

KiUGEi.L, John, V. 308, ;/. i. 

Kn.LAiA)E, Bishop of. See Dean 
Barnard. 

Kii.i.iNdi.EY, M., iii. 236. 

Kilmarnock, Earl of, i. 208; v. 117, 
n. I, 119. 

Kilmorev, Lord, i. 96, n. 6; v. 494. 

KlMcm, Kabbi David, i. 39. 

Kincardine, Alexander, Earl, and 
Veronica, Countess of, v. 27, n. i, 
432. «. 3- 

Kindness, duty of cultivating it, iii. 
208. 

King, Captain, iv. 356, ;/. 3. 

Ki.NC, Lord Chancellor, i. 416, ;/. 2. 

King, Henr)', Bishop of Chichester, ii. 

417. "• I- 

King, Rev. Dr., a dissenter, iii. 327. 

King, Thomas, the Comedian, ii. 372, 
n. I. 

King, William, Archbishop of Dublin, 
Essay on the Origin of Evil, ii. 41, 
«. 3; iii. 15, n. 2, 456, ;/. 4; troubles 
Swift, ii. 152, w. I. 

King, Dr. William, Principal of St. 
Mary Hall, Oxford, account of him, 
i. 324, ;/. 2 ; his greatness, i. 327, 
n. 2 ; English of Atterbury, Gower, 



Knight. 

and Johnson, ii. 109, ;/. 2; Jacobite 
speech in 1754, i. 16S, //. i; in 1759, 
i. 402; I'retender in London, meets 
the, v. 223, //. I ; describes his mean- 
ness, V. 228, n, i; I'ulteney and WaU 
pole, v. 385, n. 2. 

King, The, v. Top ham, iii. 18, n. 2. 

King's Evii, Johnson touched for it, 
i. 50; account of it, i. 49, n. 3. 

' King's P'rienos,' iv. 190, n. 3. 

King's Library, i. 125. 

KiN(;'s Painter, iv. 425, ;/. i. 

King's Printing-house, ii. 370, ;/. i. 

Kings, conversing with them, ii. 46, //. 
i; flattered at church and on tiie 
stage, ii. 268; flatter themselves, ib.; 
great kings always social, i. 511; ill- 
trained, i. 511, ;/. I ; Johnson ridi- 
cules them, i. 386 ; minister, should 
each be his own, ii. 135; oppressive 
kings put to death, ii. 195 ; praises 
exaggerated, ii. 43 ; reverence for 
them depends on their right, iv. 190; 
resistance to them sometimes lawful, 
i. 491; servants of the ])eoi)le, i. 371, 
«. 5 ; ' the king can do no wrong,* 
i. 490 ; want of inherent right, iv. 
196. 

KiNGSNORTO.N, i. 40, «. 5. 

KiNNOUL, Lord, ii. 242, n. 4. 

KiNVER, v. 519. 

Kii'i'is, Dr. Andrew, edits Biographia 
Britannica, iii. 198; his ' biographi- 
cal catechism,' iv. 433 ; mentioned, 
iv. 326; v. 100, ;/. I. 

Knai'TON, Messieurs, the booksellers, 
i. 211, 335, ;/. 4. 

Kneller, Sir Godfrey, as a Justice of 
the Peace, iii. 269; his portraits, iv. 
89, n. 3. 

Knight, Captain, i. 437, n. 2. 

Knight, Joseph, a negro, account of 
him, iii. 243, «. i; Cullen's answer, 
iii. 144; Maclaurin's plea, iii. 99, loi; 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



145 



Knight. 



Landor. 



Johnsor offers a subscription, ib.; 
— interested in him, iii. 109, 116, 
146 ; — argument, iii. 227, 229-30; 
decision, iii. 241, 245, 24S. 

Knighton, i. 153, n. i. 

Knitting, iii. 275. 

Knives not provided in foreign inns, 
ii. Ill, n. 3. 

Knoi.leS, Richard, Turkish History, i. 
117. 

Knotting, iii. 274; iv. 327. 

Knowle, near Bristol, i. 409, n. i. 

Knowledge, all kinds of value, ii. 
410; desirable per se, i. 483; desire 
of it innate, i. 530; diffusion of it not 
a disadvantage, iii. 43, 378; question 
of superiority, ii. 253; two kinds, ii. 
418. See Education and Le.\rn- 

ING. 

Knowles, Mrs., the Quakeress, cour- 
age and friendship, on, iii. 32S-9; 
death, on, iii. 334 , Johnson, meets, 
in 1776, iii. 89; in 1778, iii. 323-40; 
her account of the meeting, iii. 340, 
;/. I ; describes his mode of reading, 
iii. 323; liberty to women, argues for, 
iii. 325; proselyte to Quakerism, de- 
fends a, iii. 339; sutile pictures, her, 
iii. 340, ;/. I. 

Knox, John, the Reformer, Cardinal 
Beaton's death, v. 71, «. 3; his 'ref- 
ormations,' V. 69; burial-place, il>., 
n. 4; set on a mob, v. 69; his poster- 
ity, V. 71. 

Knox, John, bookseller and author, ii. 

348-9- 
Knox, Rev. Dr. Vicesimus, Boswell's 

Life of Johnson, praises, iv. 450, n. 

4; Johnson's biographers, attacks, iv. 

381, n. 2; imitates his style, i. 257, 

n. i; iv. 450; Oxford, attacks, iii. 15, 

n. 2; iv. 450, n. 4 , popularity as a 

writer, iv. 450, n. 2. 
Kristrom, Mr., ii, 179. 



Labefactation, ii. 421. 

L.\BorR, all men averse to it, ii. 113- 
14; iii. 23, «. I. 

L.\BR.\DOR, iv. 473, w. 6. 

La Bruyere. See Bruyere. 

Lace, a suit of, ii. 403. 

Laceration, ii. 121; iii. 476, n. I. 

Lactantius, iii. 150. 

Ladd, Sir John. See Lade. 

Lade, Sir John, account of him, iv. 
475, n. 2 ; Johnson's advice to him 
about marriage, ii. 126, ;/. i; lines on 
him, iv. 476. 

Ladies of Quality, iii. 401. 

Lady at Bath, an empty-headed, iii. 56. 

Lakeldt, battle of, iii. 285. 

Lamb, Charles, account of Davies's 
recitation, i. 452, «. 4 ; Methodists 
saying grace, v. 140, ». i; no one left 
to call him Charley, iii. 205, n. 3. 

Lancashire, militia, i. 356, n. 2. 

Lancaster, Boswell at the Assizes, iii. 
296, n. 2. 

Lancaster, Dr., Provost of Queen's 
College, Oxford, i. 71, w. r. 

Lancaster, House of, iii. 178. 

Land, advantage produced by selling 
it all at once, ii. 491 ; entails and 
natural right, ii. 477; investments in 
it, iv. 1S9 ; V. 264; part to lie left in 
commerce, ii. 491. 

Land-tax in Scotland, ii. 494. 

Landlords, leases, not giving, v. 346; 
rents, raising, ii. 117 ; right to con- 
trol tenants at elections, ii. 192, 389^ 
Scotch landlords, high situation of, 
i. 474; tenants, their dependancy, ii. 
118; — , difficulty of getting, iv. 1S9; 
— to be treated liljerally, i. 535; — 
under no obligation, ii. 117. 

Landor, W. S., Johnson's geographi- 
cal knowledge, i. 426, n. i. 



146 



Index to 



Lang. 

Lanc, Dr., ii. 357, u. i. 

Langhaine, (Jerard, iii. 34, ;/. 3. 

Lan(;i.ey, Rev. W., ii. 370, ;/. 3 ; iii. 
156; V. 491. 

Langton, Hennet, account of him, i. 
287; acci-ptum ct expensitm, iv. 418; 
Addison and (loldsmith, compares, 
ii. 294 ; Addison's conversation, iii. 
386; Aristophanes, reads, iv. 204, u. 
2, 418; Harnes's Maccaronic verses, 
quotes, iii. 322; Beaucierk, his early 
friend, i. 2SS ; makes him second 
guardian to Ids children, iii. 477 ; 
leaves him a portrait of Clarrick, iv. 
112; birth and matriculation at Ox- 
ford, i. 286, w. 2, 390; lilue stocking 
assembly, at a, v. 35, «. 2; Boswell, 
letter to, iii. 482 ; Boswell's obliga- 
tions to him, ii. 522, ;/. 3; Burke and 
Johnson, comparing Homer and Vir- 
gil, iii. 220, n. 2; V. 89, w. 2; Ikirke's 
wit, i. 525, n. I ; cari)enter and a 
clergyman's wife, anecdote of a, ii. 
522, ;/. 3 ; children, his, too much 
about him, iii. 145; — mentioned, ii. 
167; iii. loi, 107, 119, 148; Claren- 
don's style, praises, iii. 292 ; coach, 
on the top of a, i. 552; collection of 
Johnson's sayings, iv. 1-39 ; daugh- 
ters to be taught CIreek, iv. 23, ;/. 3; 
dinners and suppers at his house, ii. 
297 ; iii. 317-18, 384 ; economy, no 
turn to, iii. 413, n. I ; expenditure 
and foibles criticised, iii. 56, w. 3, 
107, 119, 145, 252, 341, 359-60, 396. 
412, 431; iv. 417-18; frisk, joins in 
a, i. 290; Greek, knowledge of, iv. 9, 
w. 5 ; — Clenardus's Greek Gram- 
mar, iv. 23 ; — recitation, ib., w. 3 ; 
— professor in the imaginary college, 
V. 123; Hale, Sir Matthew, anecdote 
of, iv. 358; Idler, anecdote of the, i. 
383 ; introduces subjects on which 
people differ, iii. 211, Johnson, I 



Lang:ton. 

afraid of, iv. 341 ; — at fairest ad- 
vantage with him, i. 288, «. i; — be- 
quest to him, iv. 463, »/. 3 ; — and 
Burke, an evening with, iv. 31 ; — 
conversation before dinner, repeats, 
iii. 316 ; — confessor, iv. 323-4 ; — 
death, unfinished letter, on, iv. 482, 
u. 2 ; — , deference to, iv. 10, ti. 5 ; 
— , devotion to, when ill, iv. 307, «. 
3; when dying, iv. 469, 477, «. 3, 506; 
— dress as a dramatic author, de- 
scribes, i. 232; — estimate of Spence, 
V. 360, u. 2; — first accpiaintance with 
him, i. 286 ; iv. 167 ; — friendship 
with him, iv. 153, 167, 406; rupture 
in it, ii. 294, «. i, 299, 11. 2, 304, 323; 
V. loi ; reconciliation, ii. 334 ; — 
funeral at, iv. 484 ; — gives him a 
cojiy of his letter to Chesterfield, i. 
302; — , imitates, iv. 2, «. i; — Jaco- 
bitism, i. 498; — letters to him: see 
under JonNso.N, letters ; — levee, 
attends, ii. 136 ; — loan to him, ii. 
156, «. 4; iv. 463, It. 3; repaid in an 
annuity to Barber, i/>.; — Ode on 
hichkenneth, alters, ii. 338, «. i; — 
and Parr, an e\ening with, iv. 18; — 
poemata, edits, ii. 338, n. i; iv. 443-4; 
v. 177, w. I, 371, w. 2; — portrait, re- 
moves the inscription on, iv. 208, — 
praises his worth, iii. 183; exclaims, 
''Sit anima mea cum iMngtono,' iv. 
323 ; — Prologue, critici.ses, iv. 30 ; 
— , rebuked by, ii. 291; — urges him 
to keep accounts, iv. 204, w. 2 ; — 
visits him at Langton, i. 551, 552, «. 
I ; at Rochester, iv. 9, n. 5, 26, 268- 
9; at Warley Camp, iii. 410-11 ; 
King, gives the sketch of Irene to 
the, i. 125 ; and the catalogue of 
Johnson's projected works, iv. 439, 
«. I; ' Lanky,' ii. 296; v. 351; laughed 
at, iii. 385, n. 3; Lincoln, highly es- 
teemed in, iii. 408 ; literary charac- 



Boswelfs Life of fohfisofi. 



147 



Langton. 



Latiner. 



ter, his, i. 288, n. i; Literary Club, 
original member of the, i. 553; mar- 
ries Lady Rothes, ii. 88, ;/. i; mili- 
tia, in the, iii. 140, 148, 410, 412, 419, 
451; appointed Major, iii. 415, ;/. i; 
naz'igation, his, ii. 156; Nicolaida 
visits him, ii. 435; orchard, has no, 
iv. 237; Paoli visits him at Roches- 
ter, iv. g, ;/. 5 ; Paris, visits, i. 441 ; \ 
pedigree, his, i. 287, 11. 2 ; personal \ 
appearance, i. 288, ;/. i, 390-91; Pitt's \ 
neglect of Boswell, blames, iii. 242, j 
«. i; Pope reciting the last lines of 
the Dttnciad, ii. 96, «. 3 ; religious 
discourse, introduces, ii. 291; iv. 249; 
V. loi ; Richardson, introduced to, 
iv. 33; Round-Robin, refuses to sign 
the, iii. 96, ;/. 2 ; Royal Academy, 
professor of the, ii. 76, ;/. 3; iii. 527; 
ruining himself without pleasure, iii. 
360, 396 ; Rusticks, writes, i. 414 ; 
school on his estate, establishes a, ii. 
216; silent, too, iii. 296; sluggish, iii. 
396; story, thought a story a, ii. 496; 
table, his, iii. 145, 211 ; talks from 
books, V. 431, n. 2; Traveller, praises 
the, iii. 286; Vesey's, Mr., an even- 
ing at, iii. 482; iv. i, ;/. i; will, makes 
his, ii. 300; 'worthy,' iii. 431, «. 4; 
Young, account of, iv. 69; mentioned, 
i. 389, 484, n. 2: ii. 38, ;/. 2, 72, 143, 
162, n. 3, 214, 220, 266, 284, 319, 363, 
387. 398. 401, 415. «• 2, 435; iii- 47. 
136, 235, 11. 3, 251, 284, 320, 371, 373, 
403, 439, 474; iv. 83, 90, 228, 253, 7U 
3, 328, 366, 370. 397: V. 284, 336. 

Langton, Cardinal Stephen, i. 287. 

Langton, old Mr. (Bennet Langton's 
father), canal, his, iii. 55; exuberant 
talker, an, ii. 283; freedom from af- 
fectation, iv. 32 ; Johnson's Jacobit- 
ism, believes in, i. 498; — in his be- 
ing a Papist, i. 551; — , offers a liv- 
ing to, i. 370; picture, would not sit 



for his, iv. 4; stores of literature, his, 
iv. 32; mentioned, i. 414; ii. 18. 
Langton, Mrs. (Bennet Langton's 
mother), i. 376, 414, 551; ii. 167; iv. 

4. 309- 

LaN(;ton, George (Bennet Langton's 
eldest son), i. 287, ;;. 2; ii. 323; iv. 
168. 

Lan(;ton, Miss Jane (Bennet Lang- 
ton's daughter), Johnson's god-daugh- 
ter, iii. 239, ;;. 3 ; iv. 168, 309 ; his 
letter to her, iv. 312. 

Langton, Miss Mary (Bennet Lang- 
ton's daughter), iv. 309. 

Langton, Peregrine (Bennet Lang- 
ton's uncle), ii. 19-22. 

Langton, in Lincolnshire, Johnson in- 
vited there, i. 334; ii. 163; visits it, 
i- 550, 552, n. I ; ii. 20; describes 
the house, v. 246. 

Languages, formed on manners, ii. 
92 ; origin, iv. 239 ; pedigree of na- 
tions, ii. 31; V. 256; scanty and in- 
adequate, iv. 252; speaking one im- 
perfectly lets a man down, ii. 463 ; 
writing verses in dead languages, ii. 
426. 

Languor, following gaiety, iii. 226. 

Lansdowne, Viscount (George Gran- 
ville), Drinking Song to Sleep, i. 291. 

Lapidary Inscriptions, ii. 466. 

Lapland, i. 493; ii. 193, n. i. 

Laplanders, v. 374. 

Lapouchin, Madame, iii. 386. 

Lascaris' Grammar, v. 523. 

Last, horror of the, i. 384, n. 3. 

Latin, beauty of Latin verse, i. 533; 
difficulty of mentioning in it modern 
names and titles, iv. 3, 12; essential 
to a good education, i. 529; few read 
it with pleasure, v. 90, n. 2; modem 
Latin poetr)-, i. 104, «• 41 pronuncia- 
tion, ii. 463, n. 3. See Epitaphs. 

Latiner, a, iv. 213, «. 3. 



148 



Index to 



La Trobe. 

La Trobe, Mr., iv. 473. 

Lauu, Archbishop, assibts Lydiat, i. 
225, n. 2; Diary quoted, ii. 246; his 
Scotch Liturgy, ii. 187. 

Lauder, William, account of his fraud 
about Milton, i. 265-7 ! deceives 
Johnson, i. 265, 268, n. 2. 

Lauderdale, Duke of, Burnet's ded- 
ication to him, V. 325. 

LaU(;hers, time to be spent with them, 
iv. 211. 

LAiTcirncR, a faculty which puzzles 
philosophers, ii. 434 ; Chesterfield, 
Johnson, Tope, and Swift on it, id., 
n. i; laughing at a man to his face, 
iii. 385. St-e Johnson, laugh. 

Laurel, the, i. 214. 

Lausanne, iv. 192, n. 2. 

La Valliere, Mile, de, v. 55, n. 2. 

Lavater's Essay on Physiognomy, iv. 

485, «• 3- 

Law, Archdeacon, iii. 472. 

Law, Edmund, Bishop of Carlisle, 
Cambridge examinations, iii. 15, //. 
2; parentheses, loved, iii. 456, «. 4; 
remarks on Pope's Essay on Man, 
ii. 41, ;/. 3; iii. 456, n. 4. 

Law, Robert, Fellow of Trinity Col- 
lege, Dublin, i. 566. 

Law, William, Behmen, a follower of, 
ii. 141; each man's knowledge of his 
own guilt, iv. 340 ; Johnson's Dic- 
tionary, cited in, iv. 5, n. i; Serious 
Call, jiraised by Johnson, i. 78-g; ii. 
141; iv. 331, n. I, 360; by Gibbon, 
Wesley and Whitefield, i. 78, n. 3 ; 
by Psalmanazar, iii. 505. 

Law, Coke's definition of it, iii. 18, n. 
2; honesty compatible with the prac- 
tice of it, ii. 53, 54, n. i; v. 28, 81; 
laws last longer than their causes, ii. 
477 ; manners, made and repealed 
by, ii. 480; particular cases, not made 
for, iii. 29 ; primary notion is re- 1 



Lea. 

straint, ii. 477; reports, English and 
Scotch, ii. 252 ; writers on it need 
not have practised it, ii. 493. 

Law-Lord, a dull, iv. 205-6. 

Lawrence, Chauncy, iv. 81. 

Lawrence, Sir Soulden, ii. 338, n. 2. 

Lawrence, Dr. Thomas, account of 
him, ii. 338, //. 2 ; President of the 
College of IMiysicians, ii. 339; iv. 81; 
death, iv. 266, //. 2; illness, iv. 165-6; 
Johnson addresses to him an Ode, 
iv. 165, )i. i\ — learnt physic from 
him, iii. 26; — long friendship with 
him, i. 95; iv. 165, 166, //. 3 (for his 
letters to him, see Johnson, letters); 
wife, death of his, iii. 476 ; men- 
tioned, i. 96, 378; iii. 107, 140, 495; 
iv. 410. 

Lawrence, Miss, i. 95; iv. 165; J<j|in- 
son's letter to her, iv. 166, //. 3. 

Lawyers, barristers have less law than 
of old, ii. 182; — 'nobody reads 
now,' iv. 357; — chance of success, 
iii. 203; — Johnson's advice, iv. 357; 
— Sir W. Jones's, iv. 357, n. 4; — 
.Sir M. Hale's, iv. 358, «. 3 ; bookish 
men, good company for, iii. 348 ; 
Charles's, Prince, saying about them, 
ii. 246; consultations on Sundays, ii. 
431 ; honesty : S(\- under Law ; 
knowledge of great lawyers varied, 
ii. 181 ; multiplying words, iv. 86 ; 
players, compared with, ii. 269 ; 
plodding blockheads, ii. 11 ; solicit- 
ing employment, ii. 493; work greatly 
mechanical, ii. 394. 

Laxity of Talk. Sec Johnson, lax- 
ity. 

Lay - Patrons. See Scotland. 
Church. 

Layer, Richard, i. 181. 

Laziness, worse than the toothache, 
v. 262. 

Lea, Rev. Samuel, i. 58. 



BosweWs Life of fo/nison. 



149 



Leandro Albert!. 



Leslie. 



Leandro Alberti, ii. 397; v. 352-3. 

Learned Gentleman, a, ii. 262. 

Learning, decay of it, i. 516 ; iv. 23 ; 
V. 90 ; degrees of it, iv. 16 ; difficul- 
ties, V. 360; giving way to politics, i. 
181, n. 4; important in the common 
intercourse of life, i. 530 ; ' more 
generally diffused,' iv. 251; trade, a, 
V. 66: see Authors. 

Leasowes, v. 304, «. I, 521. 

Lecky, W. E. H., History of England, 
ii. 150, M. I. 

Le Clerk, i. 330. 

Lectures, teaching by, ii. 8; iv. 106. 

Le Despencer, Lord, ii. 155, «. 3. 

Ledger, The, iv. 26, n. 3. 

Lee, Alderman, iii. 78, n. 2, 89, 90, n. 2. 

Lee, Arthur, iii. 78, 86, 90, «. 2. 

Lee, John (Jack Lee), account of him, 
iii. 254, n. i; at the bar of the House 
of Commons, iii. 254; on the duties 
of an advocate, ii. 54, n. i. 

Leechman, Principal William, account 
of him, V. 71, n. 2; Johnson calls on 
him, V. 421; writes on prayer, v. 77; 
answered by Gumming, v. 114. 

Leeds, iii. 454. 

Leeds, Duke of, verses on his mar- 
riage, iv. 16. 

Leeds, fifth Duke of, member of the 
Literary Club, i. 555; mentioned, ii. 
38, 71. 2. 

Leek, in Staffordshire, i. 43; iii. 154. 

Le Fleming, Bishop of Carlisle, i. 534, 
n. I. 

Le Fleming, Sir Michael, i. 534, n. i. 

Leeward, i. 339. 

Leeward Islands, ii. 522. 

Legitim.\tion, ii. 523. 

Legs, putting them out in company, 
iii. 62. 

Leibnitz, controversy with Clarke, v. 
327; on the derivation of languages, 
ii. 179; mentioned, i. 159. 



Leicester, iii. 4; iv. 463, n. 3. 

Leicester, Robert Dudley, Earl of, 
V. 499. 

Leicester, Mr. (Beauclerk's relation), 
iii. 477- 

Leisure, for intellectual improvement, 
ii. 252; sickness from it, a disease to 
be dreaded, iv. 406. 

Leland, Counsellor, iii. 361. 

Leland, John, Itinerary, v. 507. 

Leland, Dr. Thomas, History of Ire- 
land, \1.2q2; iii. 127; Hurd, attacked 
by, iv. 55, n. 3; Johnson's letters to 
him, i. 566, 600 ; ii. 2, n. i ; men- 
tioned, iii. 352. 

Leman, Sir William, i. 201, n. i. 

Leman, Lake, iv. 404, ii. i. 

Lending Money, influence gained by 
it, ii. 192. 

Lennox, Mrs., character by Mrs. 
Thrale, iv. 317, n. 2 ; lived to a 
great age, ib., n. 3; English version 
of Brumoy, publishes an, i. 400; Fe- 
male Quixote, i. 424; Goldsmith ad- 
vised to hiss her play, iv. 12; John- 
son cites her in his Dictionary, iv. 
5, «. i; — writes Proposals for pub- 
lishing her IVorks, ii. 331; — gives 
a supper in her honour, i. 296, ti. i ; 
Shakespear-e Illustrated, i. 296; supe- 
riority, her, iv. 317; Translation of 
Sully s Memoirs, i. 358. 

Leod, v. 265. 

Leoni, — , the singer, iii. 24, 7t. 2. 

Leonidas, v. 132. 

Le Roy, Julien, ii. 447, 449. 

Lesley, John, History of Scotland, ii. 

313. 

Leslie, Charles, the nonjuror, iv. 331, 
n. I. 

Leslie, C. R., anecdote of the Count- 
ess of Corke, iv. 126, w. i. 

Leslie, Professor, of Aberdeen, v. 
104. 



I50 



Index to 



Lesseps. 



Libels. 



Lksski's, M. de, v. 456, ;;. 4. 

Let ambition fire thy »iind, iii. 224. 

Let he, i. 265. 

Letter to Lora Chesterfield published 
separately, i. 302, ;/. 4. 

Letter to John Dunnin^^, L'-sq., i. 344. 
n. 2. 

Lettei to Dr. Sa/nuel Johnson oeea- 
sioneJ by his late politieal Publiea- 
tions, ii. 361. 

Lettkr-Wrhinc, iv. 118. 

Letters, none received in the grave, 
iv. 477; studied endings, v. 271. See 
Dates. 

Letters from Italy, iii. 63. .SV^ Shari-, 
Samuel. 

L^etters of an L.n^^lish Traveller, iv. 
370, n. I. 

L.etters on the Ent^lish A'ation, iv. 131. 

Letters to Lord Mansfield, ii. 263. .S'<v 
Andrew Stiart. 

Letters to the People of Lngland, iv. 
131, ;/. I. 

Lettre de Caehet, v. 234. 

Lettres Persanes, iii. 330, n. 2. 

Lettsom, Dr., iii. 78. 

Levee, Johnson's. See under John- 
son. 

Levees, Ministers', ii. 407. 

Levellers, i. 51S. 

Lever, Sir Ashton, iv. 3S6. 

Levki'I', John, of Lichfield, i. 94; John- 
son's letter to him, 1. 185, unseated 
as member for Lichfield, i. 185, n. i. 

Levett, Robert, account of him, i. 
282; awkward and uncouth, iii. 25; 
brothers, his, iv. 165 ; brutality in 
manners, iii. 523 ; complains of the 
kitchen, ii. 247, n. 3; death, iv. 15S, 
164, 16S; Desmoulins, hates, iii. 418; 
'Doctor Levett,' ii. 245 ; Johnson's 
birth-day dinners, present at, iii. 178, 
w. 3; iv. 156, «. i; — companion, i. 
269, n. i; ii. 5, n. i; iii. 249; iv, 168, 



269, 287, n. 3; — , introduced Lang- 
ton to, i. 286; iv. 168: — letters to 
him: see under Johnson, letters; — 
lines on him, iv. 159, 191, 316, 350, 
;/. 2 ; — , ([uestioned about, iii. 66 ; 
— , his recommendation to, i. 483; — 
writings, makes out a list of, iii. 365- 
6; Johnson's court, garret in, ii. 5; 
marriage, i. 428, 442 ; mentioned, i. 
94, n. 2, 504; iii. 30, 107, 413, 424; 
iv. 107. 
Lewis le Gros, iii. 37, ;/. 5. 
Lewis XI\', celebrated in many lan- 
guages, i. 142; charges accumulated 
on him, ii. 391, n. i; discontent and 
ingratitude, on, ii. 192, /;. 2 ; King 
of Siam sends him ambassadors, iii. 
383; La Valliere, Mile, de, v. 55, n. 
2 ; manners, ii. 46 ; torture used in 
his reign, i. 540, ;/. 2; why endured 
by the French, ii. 195. 
Lewis XV'L execution, ii. 454, n. i ; 
Hume, when a child, makes a set 
speech to, ii. ^bo, n. 3 ; Johnson, 
seen by, ii. 442, 452 ; Paoli, gives 
high office in Corsica to, ii. 81, //. i; 
torture used in his reign, i. 540, n. 2. 
Lewis XVIH, when a child makes a 

set speech to Hume, ii. 460, n. 4. 
Lewis, David, verses to Pope, iv. 355; 

Miscellany, ib., ti. 3. 
Lewis, Dean, i. 428, n. 2, 442. 
Lewis, F. , translates mottoes for the 

Rambler, i. 261. 
Lewson, Mrs., iii. 4S3. 
LEXicocRArilER, defined, i. 343 ; Bo- 
lingbroke's anecdote of one, ih., n. 3; 
referred to in the Rambler, i. 219, n. i. 
Lexiphanes, ii. 50. 
Leyden, iv. 278; V. 428. 
Libels, actions for them, iii. 73; dead, 
on the, iii. 18; England .ind America, 
in. i. 134, n. 2; Fox's Libel IJill, iii. 
18, n. 2 ; juries, judges of the law, 



Boswelfs Life of yohnson. 



151 



Libels. 



Lichfield. 



iii. 18, ;/. 2 , — refuse to convict, i. 
134, n. 2 ; pulpit, from the, iii. 67 ; 
severe law against libels, i. 143, 
;/. I. 

LiHKK I V, all hovs love it, iii. 435 ; 
clamours for it, i. 152. ;/. i; iii. 228, 
//. 4: conscience, of, ii. 286; iv. 249; 
destroying a portion of it without 
necessity, iii. 254; liberty and licen- 
tiousness, ii. 150 ; luxury, effects of, 
ii. ig5 ; political and private, ii. 68, 
195; press, of the ■ see Press, pulpit, 
of the, iii. 68; tccditim viicc, kept oflT 
by the notion of it, i. 456; teaching, 
of, ii. 286; iv. 250; thinking, preach- 
ing, and acting, of, ii. 289. 

LiUKRTY and Necessity. Sec P^ree 

WILL. 

LiHR.\RiKS, Johnson helps in forming 
the King's Library, ii. 38, ;/. i ; — 
describes the Oxford libraries, ii. 39, 
40, 77, ;/. I : key of one always lost, 
V. 74: Stall Lil>m}-\\ iii. 104. 

LiCENSiNi; Aci for ]ilays, i. 163, ;/. i. 

LicilFlELl), ale. ii. 528; iv. 112 ; an- 
tiquities, iv. 425 ; Beaux Slralagcin, 
scene of the, ii. 528, ;/. 3 ; Bishop's 
palace, li. 534; Boswell and Johnson 
visit it in 1776, ii. 528, Boswell 
shown real ' civility,' iii. 89; Boswell 
visits it in 1779, iii. 468-9; boys 
dipped in the font, i. 106, «. i: Ca- 
thedral, i. 94. ;;. 3 ; ii. 534 ; v. 520; 
— Johnson in the porch, ii. 534, tt. 
3, city of philosophers, ii. 531; city 
and county in itself, i. 42, >i. 3 , 
coach-journey from London, i. 393, 
//. 2 ; postchaise, iii. 468 ; Darwin's 
house, V. 489, //. I ; drunk, all the 
dfccut people got, v. 67 ; English 
spoken there, purity of the, ii. 531; 
Evelina not heard of there, ii. 531, 
n. 2 , Friary, The, ii. 534 ; iii. 468 ; 
George Inn, iii. 46S, Green's muse- 

VI.— IS 



um, ii. 533 ; iii. 468 ; v. 489 ; Hos- 
pital, V. 507; Hutton describes the 
town in 1741, i. lOO, n. 2; Jacobite 
fox-hunt, iii. 371, n. i ; Johnson, 
Michael, a magistrate, i. 42; ii. 368, 
n. i; Johnson, his barber, ii. 59, n. 
2; — beloved in his native city, ii 
538, respect shown him by the cor- 
poration, iv. 429, «. 2; — defines it 
in his Dictionary, iv. 429; — hopes 
to set a good example, iv. 157 ; — 
house, i. 87 , ii. 528 ; iv. 429, n. 2, 
463, n. 2 ; — Latin verses to a 
stream, iii. 105, n. 2 ; — , as Lord 
Lichfield, iii. 352; — loses three old 
friends, iv. 422; — monument in the 
Cathedral, iv. 488 ; — portrait ad- 
mired there, ii. 162; — saucer in the 
Museum, iii. 249, «. 2 ; — , theatre, 
tosses a man into the pit of the, ii. 
342; in love with an actress, ii. 532; 
])raises an actor, ii. 532 , attends it 
with Boswell, ii. 532-3, 539; — visits 
the town for the first time after liv- 
ing in London, i. 428; last visit, iv. 
429; (for his other visits see iii. 511- 
15); — weary of it, ii. 60; — willow 
tree, iv. 429, n. i; lecture on experi- 
mental philosophy, v. 122 ; manu- 
factures, ii. 531 ; oat ale and cakes, 
ii- 530J people sober and genteel, ii. 
531; population in 1781, iii. 511; Pre- 
rogative Court, i. 94, 117; Sacheverell 
preaches there, i. 45, n. 2 ; Salve, 
magna parens, iv. 429 school, ac- 
count of it in Johnson's time, i. 
50-7; — compared with Stourbridge 
School, i. 58 ; — buildings dilapi- 
dated, i. 53, w. I ; — endowment, v. 
507, ;/. 5; — famous scholars, i. 52; 
service for a sick woman, v. 506 ; 
.Seward's Miss, verses on it, iv. 382; 
St. Mary's Church repaired, i. 78 ; 
Johnson attends it in 1776, ii. 534; 



152 



Index to 



Lichfield. 



Literary Magazine. 



St. Michael's Church, graves of John- 
son's parents and brother, iv. 453 ; 
Stowhill, ii. 538; iii. 469; Swan Inn, 
V. 4SS; Thrales, the, visit it in 1774 
with Johnson, v. 488, 502, «. 2 ; 
Three Crowns Inn, ii. 528; iii. 468; 
Warner's Tour, iv. 430, n. 2. 

LiciiKiEi.u, fourth Earl of, iii. 352. 

LiCKKiKLi), Leonard, an Oxford book- 
seller, i. 71, n. 3. 

l.iDDKLl., Sir Henry, ii. 193, «. i. 

I, IKS, 'Consecrated lies,' i. 411; dis- 
arm tlieir own force, ii. 254 ; John- 
son's AJTt-ntunr on lying, ii. 254, ti. 
I ; — use of tlie word //<•, iv. 58 ; 
lying to the public, ii. 256; servants 
* not at home,' i. 505; to the sick, iv. 
353 ; of vanity, iv. 193 ; sec Falsk- 
iU)OU and Tkith. 

LiKK, clianges in its form desirable at 
times, iii. 145; changes in its mo«les, 
ii. Ill: see under Mannkrs; choice, 
few have any, iii. 413 ; just choice 
impossible, ii. 25, 131 ; climate, not 
affected by, ii. 224 ; composed of 
small incidents, i. 502, ;/. 2; ii. 411, 
«. 2; domestick life little touched by 
public affairs, i. 441; Dryden's lines, 
ii. 143; iv. 350; every season has its 
proper duties, v. 71; expecting more 
from it than life will afford, ii. 127: 
happiest part lying awake in the 
morning, v. 401 ; imbecility in its 
common occurrences, iii. 341; meth- 
od, to be thrown into a, iii. 107 ; 
miseries, i. 346, ;/. 3, 384, «. 2; ' bal- 
ance of misery,' iv. 346 ; ' nauseous 
draught,' iii. 439; none would live it 
again, ii. 143; iv. 347-50; pain bet- 
ter than death, iii. 336; iv. 431; 
progress from want to want, iii. 61; 
progression, must be in, iv. 457, ;/. 
1, state of weariness, ii. 438; studied 
in a great city, iii. 2S7 ; system of 



life not easily disturbed, ii. 117; a 
well-ordered poem, iv. 178. 

Li/e of Alfred, Johnson projects a, i. 
205. 

LiLLIBURI-KRO, ii. 397. 

Lii.i.in'T, Senate of, i. 134. 

Lilly, William, iii. 195. 

Lincoln, a City and County, i. 42, n. 
3; visited by Boswell, iii. 408. 

Lincoln's Inn, Society of, iv. 335, 
«. 2. 

LiNroi.NsiiiKK, militia, i. 42, ;/. 3; iii. 
411; orchards very rare, iv. 237; 
reeds, v. 3(X); mentioned, v. 326. 

Line, the civil, iii. 223. 

LiNKN, v. 246. 

Lingua Latituc Liber Dlctionarius, i. 
341. n. 1. 

LlNLEY, Miss, ii. 423, n. 3. 

LlNLlTHCow, Karl of, v. 117, n. i. 

LlN roT, Bernard, the bookseller, quar- 
rels with I'ope, i. 504, ». 1 ; men- 
tioned, ii. 153, n. i; iv. 92, ;/. 2. 

LiNTOT the younger, Johnson said to 
have written for him, i. 119; his 
warehouse, i. 504. 

Liyi'oRS, scale of, iii. 433; iv. 91. 

Llshon, earthquake, i. 358, n. 2; par- 
liamentary vote of ;^ioo,ooo for re- 
lief, i. 409, w. I ; packet boat to 
England, iv. 121, n. i ; persecution 
of Malagrida, iv. 201, n. i; postage 
to London, iii. 26 ; mentioned, ii. 
242, n. 4. 

Literary Anecdotes, Nichols's, iv. 425, 
n. 2. 

Literary Club. See Clubs. 

Literary Fame, ii. 79, «. 2, 267, 410. 

Literary friend, a pompous, iv. 272. 

Literary Impostors. See Impos- 
tors. 

Literary Journals, ii. 44. 

Literary Magazine or Universal Re- 
view, i. 355, 371, 3S0, 585. 



Boswell's Life of fohison. 



15. 



Literary Man. 



Lloyd. 



Literary man, life of a, iv. 114. 

Literary Property. See Copy- 
right. 

Literary Reputation, ii. 267. 

Literary Reviews. See Critical 
and Monthly. 

Literature, amazing how little there 
is, iii. 345, ;;. 2; dignity, its, iii. 353; 
England, neglected in, ii. 512, n. 3; 
— before France in it, iii. 288; gen- 
eral courtesy of literature, iv. 285 ; 
generally diffused, iv. 251, n. 3; how 
far injured by abundance of books, 
iii. 378 ; respect paid to it, iv. 134 ; 
wearers of swords and powdered wigs 
ashamed to be illiterate, iii. 288. 

Little thinc;s, contentment with 
them, iii. 274; danger of it, ib. 

Littleton, Adam, i. 341, n. i. 

Liveliness, study of, ii. 530. 

Liverpool, iii. 473. 

Liverpool, first Earl of. See Jen- 
KiNSON, Charles. 

Liverpool, third Earl of, iii. 166, 
«. I. 

Lives ok the Poets, account of its 
publication — advertised, iii. 123; Ad- 
vertisenient, iv. 41, ;;. i ; Johnson's 
engagement with the booksellers, iii. 
124; design greatly enlarged, iv. 41; 
payment agreed on, iii. 126 ; extra- 
ordinarily moderate, ib., it. i; ;!^ioo 
added, iv. 41 ; payment for a sepa- 
rate edition, ib., it. 3; progress of 
their composition, iii. 356, 360, ;/. i; 
first four volumes pui)lished, iii. 421, 
432, It. 3 ; Johnson's indolence in 
finishing the last six, iii. 475, 495 ; 
iv. 40, 68, It. 2 ; published, iv. 40 ; 
printed separately, iv. 41, n. 3, 73 , 
additions, ib., 11. i , reprinting, iv. 
176; new edition, iv. 180; attacks 
expected, iii. 426; attacked, iv, 74-5, 
booksellers, impudence of the, iv. 



41, It. 3 ; Boswell has the proof 
sheets, iii. 421 ; and most of the 
manuscript, iv. 42, 82, 83; his olisei- 
vations on some of the Lii'es, iv. 44- 
73 ; commended generally, iv. i6g ; 
contemporaries, difficulty in writing 
the Lives of, iii. 176, //. 2 ; copies 
presented to Mrs. Boswell, iii. 423 , 
to the King, ib., n. 3; to Wilkes, iv. 
124; to Langton, iv. 153; to Bewley, 
iv. 155 ; to Rev. Mr. Wilson, iv. 
186; to Cruikshank, iv. 277; to Miss 
Langton, iv. 308; to Johnson's phy- 
sicians, iv. 460, ;;. 4; Dilly's account 
of the undertaking, iii. 125-6; John- 
son's anger at an indecent poem be- 
ing inserted, iv. 43, 11. \\ — collects 
materials, iii. 485; — not the editor 
of this Collection of Poets, iii. 133, 
;/. 6, 156, 421; iv. 41, It. 3; — inat- 
tention to minute accuracy, iii. 409, 
;/. 2; — letters to Nichols the print- 
er, iv. 43, It. \; — portraits in diflfer- 
ent editions, iv. 485, n. 3; — recom- 
mends the insertion of four poets, iii. 
421; iv. 41, It. 3; — trusted much to 
his memory, iv. 43, ;/. i '. Nichols, 
printed by, iv. 43, 73, ;/. 1, 371 , 
piety, written so as to promote, iv. 
40; Rochester's Poems castrated by 
Steevens, iii. 218; rough copy sent to 
the press, iv. 42 ; Savage, many of 
the anecdotes from, i. 189 ; titles 
suggested, iv. 43, n. i ; words, 
learned, iv. 46. 

Lives of the Poets (Bell's edition), ii. 
519, n. I; iii. 125. 

Lives of the Poets, by Theophilus Cib- 
ber, i. 216; iii. 34. 

Livings, inequality of, ii. 198. 

Livv i. 587-, ii. 392. 

Llandaki-, Bishopric of, iv. 137, n. 2. 

Lloyd, A.. Account of Mona, v. 513. 

Lloyd (Llwyd), Humphry, v. 500 



»54 



Index to 



Lloyd. 

Ll.OYD, Mrs., Savage's t;n(I-motlitT, i. I 
199. 

Lloyd, Olivia, i. 107. 

Lloyd, Robtrt, the poet, account of 
him, i. 457, n. 2 ; Coinioisnin-, i. 
487, M. 2: ii. 383, n. i; Oiiis lo Of>- 
scurity, ii. 382. 

l.i.oYi), Mr. and Mrs. Sampson, Hus- 
well and Johnson dine with them, ii. 
523, 524; Bardays Apology, ii. 524; 
(>l)servancc of days, ii. 525. 

I.I.I )Yi), William, Hishop of .St. Asa|)h, 
his iearninj; in ready casli, ii. 294, ;/. 
2; his palace, v. 498. 

I.i.oYi), — , of Maesmynnan, v. 507. 

l.i.oYD, — , schoolmaster of llcaumaris, 
V. 510. 

Loan, government, raised at eight jier 
cent, in 1779, iii. 4f>4, "■ 3- 

I.oho's Abyssinia, Johnson translates it, 
i. 91, «. I, 100-4, 394. "■ 2 ; — sees 
a copy in his old age, iii. 8. 

Loca Soknnia, IJoswell writes to Jolin- 
son from, ii. 3, w. 2. 

Local, attachment, ii. ilS; conse- 
quence, ii. 153; histories, iv. 252, ;/. 
i; sanctity, ii. 317. 

LocHBUY, l>aird of, Johnson visits 
him, V. 388-gi; his dungeon, v. 390. 

LoCHBUY, Lady, v. 3SS-91. 

Lochiel, Chief of, v. 338, ;/. i. 

I.ocKK, John, anecdote of him and Dr. 
Clarke, i. 3, «. 2 ; Common-Place 
Hook, i. 237; exportation of coin, on 
the, iv. 121 ; last words to Collins, 
iii. 413, n. 2; Latin Verses, v. 106-7; 
style, iii. 292, n. i; Treatise on Edu- 
cation, cold bathing for children, i. 
106, «. I ; — the proper age for 
travelling, iii. 520-1 ; — whipping 
an infant, ii. 211; Watts, Dr., an- 
swered by, ii. 468, n. 3. 

Locke, William, of Norbury Park, iv. 
51- 



London. 

LocKHART, sir George, v. 259, «. i. 

LocKlIARI, J. (j.. Captain Carle ton's 
Memoii's, on the authorship of, iv. 
3S5, n. 6 ; Johnson on the Royal 
Marriage Hill, ii. 175, n. \ ; Scott 
and the Vanity of Iluniau Wishes, 
i. 224, n. 3. 

LocKMAN, J., i. 133, ;/. I ; ' rUlustve 
Lockman,' iv. 7. 

LOIMUNG-HOUSE LANDLORDS, i. 489 ; 

Lot TT, Capel, account of him, iv. 321; 

his Alports quoted, iii. 99, n. 3. 
I.OMHK, John, iii. 186. 

London. 
L 

L(JNDON, advantages of it, ii. 138 ; 
Hlack Wednesday, v. 223, n. 2 ; 
bones gathered for various uses, iv. 
236; Boswell's love for London: see 
HobWELL, London; buildings, new, 
iv. 242 ; — rents not fallen in con- 
sequence, iii. 64, 256 ; Hurke, de- 
scril)ed by, iii. 202, n. i ; burrow, 
near one's, i. 96, w. 2; iii. 431; cen- 
sure escaped in it, see below, freedom 
from censure; centre of learning, ii. 
86; circulating libraries, i. 118, ». 4; 
ii. 41, ;/. 2; City, aldermen, political 
divisions among the, iii. 522; — Cam- 
den, Lord, honours shown to, ii. 405, 
«. I ; — Common-Council, infiam- 
mal)le, ii. 189; petitions for mercy to 
Dodd, iii. 136, n. 4, 162 ; subscribes 
to Carte's History, i. 49, n. 3 ; — 
contest with House of Commons, ii. 
343, n. 4; iii. 522; iv. 161; — divi- 
sion in the popular party, iii. 522 ; 
iv. 201, n. 2; — King, presents a re- 
monstrance to the (1770), iii. 522; an 
Address (1770), iii. 228, n. 6; an Ad- 
dress (1781), iv 161, n. 4; 'leans 
towards him' (1784), iv. 307; 'in 
unison with the Court' (1791), iv. 



Boswell's Life of fo/inson. 



155 



London. 



380, «. 3; — Lord Mayors not elect- 
ed by seniority, iii. 405, 522-3 ; — 
ministers for seven years not asked 
to the Lord Mayor's feast, iii. 523; 

— Wilkes, the Chamberlain, iv. 117; 
City-poet, iii. 86 ; City, women of 
the, iii. 402 ; Culloden, news of, v. 
223, «. 2 ; dangers from robbers in 
1743, i. 188, n. 2; Johnson attacked, 
ii. 342; 'dangers of the night,' i. 
138, ;/. I ; dear to men of letters, ii. 
152 ; deaths, from hunger, iii. 456 ; 

— from all causes, iv. 242 ; eating 
houses unsociable, i. 463 ; economy, 
a place for, iii. 430 ; freedom from 
censure, ii. 408 ; iii. 430 ; Gibbon 
loves its dust, iii. 202, «. i ; and the 
liberty that it gives, iii. 431, n. 2; 
gin-shops, iii. 332, //. i ; glass-houses, 
i. i8g, «. i; Gordon riots, iii. 485-9; 
greatest series of shops in the world, 
ii. 251 ; hackney-coaches, number of, 
iv. 381; happiness to be had out of 
it, iii. 413 ; heaven upon earth, iii. 
201, 430; hospitality, ii. 255; hospi- 
tals, iii. 62, ;/. I ; increase, complaints 
of its, iii. 256 ; influence extended 
everywhere, ii. 142 ; intellectual 
pleasure, affords, iii. 5, 430 ; iv. 
189; V. 14; Irish chairmen, ii. 116; 
Johnson loves it, i. 371 ; ii. 86, 
138; iii. 5; iv. 413; returns to it to 
die, iv. 432 ; life on ^^30 a year, i. 
122; London, described in Johnson's, 
i. 137: London-bred men strong, ii. 
116; iv. 242; magnitude and variety, 
i. 488 ; ii. 86, 542 ; iii. 24 ; iv. 232 ; 
Minorca, compared with life in, iii. 
279 , mobs and illuminations, iii. 
435-6 ■ see below, riots , mortality of 
children, iv. 242; parish, a London, 
ii. 147, pavement, the new, v. 95, n. 
3 . Pekin, compared with. v. 347 ; 
population not increased, iv, 242 ; 



preferable to all other places, iii. 
413, 430; press-gangs not suffered to 
enter the city in Sawbridge's Mayor- 
alty, iii. 522 ; Recorder's report to 
the King of sentences of death, iii. 
137. ;/. 2 ; relations in London, ii. 
203; Reynolds's love of it, iii. 202, n. 
i; riots in 1768, ii. 68, «. 3; iii. 54, 
«. 2 ; shoe-blacks, ii. 373 ; iii. 297 ; 
shop-keeper compared with a sav- 
age, v. 92, 94 ; slaughter-houses, v. 
281 ; society, compared with Paris, 
iii. 287; strikes, iii. 54, w. 2; theatre, 
proposal for a third, iv. 132; tires of 
it, no man, iii. 202; — Boswell will 
tire of it, iii. 401; too large, ii. 408; 
Trained Bands, iv. 368: universality, 
ii. 152 ; wall, taking the, i. 128 ; v. 
262; wits, ii. 534; wheat, price of, in 
1778, iii. 256, M. 3. 

II. Localities. 

London, Aldersgate Street, Milton's 
School, ii. 467, «. 3 ; Anchor Brew- 
house, i. 567, n. 4 ; Argyll Street, 
Johnson's room in Mrs. Thrale's 
house, iii. 461, ;/. i ; iv. 181, 189 ; 
Bank of England, Jack Wilkes de- 
fends it against the rioters, iii. 488; 
Barking Creek, iii. 305, n. i ; Bar- 
nard's Inn, No. 6, Oliver Edward's 
chambers, iii. 344 , Batson's coffee- 
house, frequented by physicians, 
iii. 404, «. 2 ; Baxter's (afterwards 
Thomas's), Dover Street, Literary 
Club met there, i. 554, n. 2; v. 124, 
«. 2; Bedford Coffee-house. Garrick 
attacks Dodsley's Cleone, i. 376, «. 
3; Bedford Street, 'old' Mr. Sheri- 
dan's house, i. 561, n. i ; Billings- 
gate, Johnson, Beauclerk and Lang- 
ton row to it, i. 291 ; Johnson and 
Boswell take oars for Greenwich, i. 
530; Johnson lands there, iv. 269, n. 



156 



Index to 



London. 



2; IJIack lioy, Strand, Johnson dates 
a letter from it, iii. 461, ;/. i; IJlack- 
friars, lioswell and Johnson cross in 
a boat to it, ii. 495 ; Hlackfriars 
bridge, Johnson's letter about the de- 
sign for it, i. 406; Hlenheim Tavern, 
Uond Street, meeting place of the 
Kiimelian Club, iv. 455, ;/. 2; Hoar's 
Head, Kastcheaj), a Shakesperian 
Club, V. 281 ; Bolt Court, iioswell 
takes his last leave of Johnson at the 
entry, iv. 391; Johnson's last hou^c, 
ii. 4S9; iii. 461, ;/. i; garden, ii. 489, 
//. i; iiurnt ilown, //'..• described in 
Pennant's London, iii. 312 ; Oxford 
post-coach takes up lioswell and 
Johnson there, iv. 327; 15ond Street, 
i. 201, //. I ; iv. 446, n. i ; Bow 
Church, confirmation of Bishop 
Hampden's election, iv. 371, n. 3; 
Bow .Street, Johnson resides there, 
iii. 461, n. I ; Sir John Fielding's 
office, i. 4S9; Bridewell Churchyard, 
Kevett buried there, iv. 159; British 
Coffee House, Boswell and Johnson 
dine there, ii. 225; club, account of 
a, iv. 2o(), n. 2; Cuthrie and Captain 
Cheap, i. 135, //. 3 ; Buckingham 
House, ii. 37, n. 3 ; Butcher Row, 
account of it, i. 463, n. \ \ Boswell 
ami Johnson dine there, i. 463; meet 
Kilw artls there, iii. 344 , Button's 
Coffee-house, Addison frequented it, 
iv. 105, //. 2 ; Dryden said to have 
had his winter ami summer chairs 
there, iii. 81-2; Carlisle House, iv. 
107, //. 3 ; Castle Street, Cavendish 
Square, Johnson lodged there, i. 128, 
156, n. 4; iii. 461, H. I ; visited the 
Miss Cotterells, i. 284 ; Catherine 
Street, Strand, Johnson describes a 
tavern, v. 262, lodged near it, i. 129; 
iii. 461, n. I ; Charing Cross, full 
tide uf human existence, ii. 386 ; 



iii. 511; Charing Cross to White- 
chapel, the greatest series of shojjs 
in the world, ii. 251 ; Clerkenwell, 
an alehouse where Johnson met Mr. 
Browne, i. 131, n. i ; Clerkenwell 
Bridewell broken open in the Gordon 
Riots, iii. 4S7 ; described in Jliint- 
phry Clinkii; ii. 141, ;/. 4; Clifford's 
Inn, Lysons lived there, iv. 463, ;/. 3; 
Clifton's eating-house, i. 463; Clubs: 
st-L- underC'M'Hs; Coachniaker's Hall, 
Boswell attends a religious Robin- 
hood Society, iv. 107, 1 10; Compters, 
The, iii. 491 ; Conduit Street, Bos- 
well lodges there, ii. 191 ; Cornhill, 
iv. 269, ;/. 2; Covent Carden, election 
mob, iv. 322, n. 2; Hummunis, iii. 
397, n. I ; Johnson helps the fruit- 
erers, i. 291 ; Piazzas infested by 
robbers, i. 188, n. 2 ; Covent Gar- 
den Theatre, Douj^las, v. 412, ;/. i, 
Johnson at an oratorio, ii. 371, n, 2; 
his prologue to Kelly's comedy, iii. 
129; Maddocks the straw-man, iii. 
262; S/if S/oops to Conijucr in re- 
hearsal, ii. 239 ; Sir 'J'homas Oi'cr- 
I'lirv, iii. 130, ;/. 3; time of sickness, 
ii. 471, n. 3 ; Crown and Anchor 
lavern, Strand, Boswell's .supper 
party, ii. 72, 214; iii. 47; Boswell and 
Johnson dine there, ii. 220; Cuper's 
Gardens, v. 337; Curzon Street, Lord 
Marchmont's house, iii. 445 ; I)()c- 
tors' Commons, i. 534, ;/. 3 ; Dover 
Street, Literary Club met at Baxter's 
and Le Teller's, i. 554 ; Downing 
Street, Boswell's lodgings, i. 489 ; 
Lord North's residence, ii. 379 ; 
Drury Lane Theatre, Abington's, 
Mrs., benefit, ii. 371; Beg^'-ar's Opera 
refused, iii. 365, n. 3; Boswell lows 
like a cow, v. 452; Comus acted, 1. 
263; Davies's benefit, iii. 282, Earl 
of Essex, iv. 361, «. i ; Fleetwood's 



Bosiucirs Life of Johnson. 



157 




management, i. 129, «. i ; Garrick, 
opened by, i. 209; Goldbmith and 
Lord Shelburne there, iv. 201, n. 2; 
Irene performed, i. 176, 227-30, 232- 
3 ; Johnson in the Green Room, i. 
233; iv. S; management by Booth, 
Wilks, and Gibber, v. 277, «• 6; ^uke 
Street, St. James's, No. 10, Mrs. 
Bellamy's lodgings, iv. 282, ;/. i: 
Durham Yard, Johnson mentions it 
in dating a letter, iii. 461- "• i'- ^'^^^ 
site of the Adelphi, ii. 372, n. 3; 
East-India House, John Hoole one 
of the clerks, ii. 330, «• 3'. Essex 
Head, Essex Street, iv. 293: .f<v un- 
der Clcbs; Exeter-Change, iv. 135. 
;/. 2 ; Exeter Street, Johnson's first 
lodgings, i. 119; iii. 461. "■ G ^^'^^ *" 
have written there some of the De- 
hates, i. 5S4-5; Falcon Court, Fleet 
Street, Boswell and Johnson step 
aside into it, iv. 83; Farrar's-Build- 
ings, Boswell lodges there, i. 505 : 
Fetter Lane, Johnson lodges there, 
iii. 461, n. i; has sudden relief by a 
good night's rest, iii. 114. "• G Eev- 
ett woos his future wife in a coal 
shed, i. 428, n. 4; Fleet-ditch, John- 
son's voice seems to resound to it, ii. 
301; Fleet Prison, broken open in 
the Gordon Riots, iii. 487; Endym- 
ion Porter's pun on it, v. 157, n. i; 
Lloyd a prisoner, i. 457. "■ 2; Oldys 
a prisoner, i. 202, «. 2; Savage lodges 
in its liberties, i. I45, "■ 3. 482, n. i; 
Fleet Street, animated appearance, 
ii. 386; compared with Tempe and 
Mull, iii. 343; Boswell meets Johnson 
• moving along,' iv. 82; dangers, its, i. 
188, n. 2; Goldsmith lodges in a court 
opening out of it, i. 405. «• 3; Green- 
wich Park not equal to it, it, 1. 533; 
Johnson's favourite street, ii. 489; iii. 
511; Johnson helps a gentlewoman 



in liquor across it, ii. 497; Kearsley 
the bookseller, i. 248, >i. i; Langton 
lodges there during Johnson's illness, 
iv. 307, >i. 3 ; Lintott's shop at the 
Cross Keys, iv. 92, //. 2 ; Macaulay 
describes its 'river fog and coal 
smoke,' iv. 404, n. i ; the Museum, 
iv. 368 ; Fox Court, Brook Street, 
Ilolborn, Savage's birthplace, i. I97. 
;/. 3; Gerrard Street, Boswell's lodg- 
ings, iii. 59, n. 3; Goodman's Fields, 
Garrick's first appearance, i. 194, "• 
2 ; Gough Square, Johnson lives 
there from 1749-1759- (\vrites the 
Dictionary, Kanihkr, Rasselas, and 
part of the Idler), i. 217, 405. «• 3; 
iii. 461. ;/. i; described by Carlyle, 
i. 217, n. 3 ; by Dr. Burney, i. 380; 
Gray's Inn, Johnson lodges there, i. 
405, n. 3 ; iii. 461, «• i ; Osborne's 
bookshop, i. 186; Great Russell 
Street, Beauclerk's library, iv. 122, n. 
1; Gresham College, iii. 15; Grosve- 
nor Square, Mr. Thrale's house, 
Johnson's room in it, iii. 369. «■ 3. 
461, n. i; iv. 83; Mr. Thralc dies 
there, iv. 97; Grub Street, defined, 
i. 343; saluted, il'., n. 2; Johnson 
had never been there, il>.; history of 
it, i. 355, «• 3; ' Eet us go and eat a 
beefsteak in Grub Street,' iv. 216; 
Guildhall, Beckford's monument, iii. 
22S; its Giants, v. 117, ". i'. Wilkes 
on his way to it, iv. 117, "• i'. Hab- 
erdashers' Company, i. I53. "■ ^ '< 
Half-Moon Street, Boswell's lodg- 
ings, ii. 52, n. 2, 68; Harley Street, 
Johnson dines at Allan Ramsay's 
house. No. 67. iii. 445. "■ 2 ; Hay- 
market Theatre, Foote and George 
III, iv. 16, n. i; Foote's patent, iii. 
Ill, M. i; Gordon Riots, open at the, 
iii. 487, «. 3 ; Spectator, mentioned 
in the, iii. 510; Hedge Lane, John- 



iS8 



Index to 
London. 



son visits a man in distress, iii. 369; 
Henrietta Street, i. 561, ;/. i; Hol- 
born, lioswell starts from it in the 
Newcastle My, ii. 432, //. i; Johnson 
twite resides there, iii. 461, n. i ; 
writes there his Hermit of Teneriffc, 
i. 222, ;/. I ; Tylnirn procession along 
it, iv. 21 8, //. i; Hummums, iii. 397; 
Hyde Park, Hoswell takes an airing 
in I'aoli's coach, ii. 81, «. 2; troops 
reviewed there at Dodd's execution, 
iii. 136, ;/.4; Hyde I'ark Corner, iii. 
511; Inner Temple: j(V below under 
Tkmi'I.k ; Ironmonger Row, Old 
Street, I'salmanazar lived there, iii. 
503-4; Islington, Johnson goes there 
for change of air, iv. 313, 479; men- 
tioned, iii. 309, 511 ; Ivy Lane: st-v 
under Cl.iHS, Ivy Lane Club; John- 
son Hiiililin^;s, iii. 461, ;/. I ; John- 
son's Court, Johnson removes to it, 
ii. 5 ; boswell and Heauclerk's ven- 
eration for it, ii. 263, 489; 'Johnson 
of that Ilk,' i/>., II. 2; iii. 461, n. i; 
Kennington Common, iii. 271, u. 2 ; 
Kensington, Klphinston's academy, 
ii. 196, M. 3 ; Hoswell and Johnson 
dine there, ii. 259; Kensington Pal- 
ace, Dr. Clarke and Walpole sit up 
there one night, iii. 281, u. 2; King's 
Bench Prison, broken open in the 
Gordon Riots, iii. 487 ; Lydiat im- 
prisoned, i. 225, n. 2; Smart dies in 
it, i. 354, ;/. I ; Wilkes imprisoned, 
iii. 54, «. 2 ; King's Bench Walk, 
Johnson hears Misella's story, i. 259, 
«. I ; ' Persuasion tips his tongue,' 
&c., ii. 388, ;/. i; King's Head: see 
Clubs, Ivy Lane; Knightsbridge, v. 
326 ; Lambeth-marsh, Johnson said 
to have lain concealed there, i. 163; 
Lambeth Palace, public dinners, iv. 
423, n. 3; Leicester-fields, Reynolds 
lived there, ii. 441, n. i; Le Teller's 



Tavern : see above under Dover 
Strkkt ; Lincoln's Inn, Warburton 
appointed preacher, ii. 41, n. 3; Lit- 
tle Britain, Benjamin Kranklin lodged 
next door to Wilcox's shop, i. 118, «. 
4; mentioned by Swift, i. 150, n. 1; 
London Bridge, Old, account of it, 
iv. 297, M. I ; booksellers on it, iv. 
297; shooting it, i. 530, n. 2; Lower 
(irosvenor Street, iv. 128 ; Ludgate 
prison, Dr. Hodges dies in it, ii. 390, 
u. 4; Magdalen House, iii. 158, n. 3; 
Mansion House, Boswell dines there, 
ii. 433, II. 3; Marshalsea, broken open 
at the Gordon Riots, iii. 487 ; de- 
scribed by Wesley, i. 351, «. I ; Mary- 
lebone-Gardens, Johnson said to have 
begun a riot there, iv, 375 ; Mile- 
Knd Green, iii. 511; Mitre Tavern, 
Johnson's resort, i. 462; Boswell and 
Johnson's first evening there, i. 464; 
Johnson, Boswell, and Goldsmith, i. 
483 ; Boswell's supper, i. 490 ; Bos- 
well and Johnson alone on a rainy 
night, i. 493 ; supper on Boswell's 
return from abroad, ii. 9 ; supper 
with Temple, ii. 12; dinners in 1769, 
ii. 83, 113; dinner with two young 
Methodists, ii. 137 ; farewell dinner 
with Dr. Maxwell, ii. 152 ; Boswell 
and Johnson, dinner in 1772, ii. 180; 
Boswell loses a dinner there, ii. 204; 
Boswell and Johnson, dinner in 1773, 
ii. 278 ; Boswell, Johnson and a 
Scotchman, ii. 351 ; Johnson and 
young Col in 1775, ii. 472; Boswell, 
Johnson and Murray in 1776, iii. 10; 
Boswell and Johnson in 1777, ' Her- 
mit hoar' composed, iii. 181, n. i ; 
Boswell's mistake about, ii. 332, w. 
4; 'the custom of the Mitre' kept 
up, iii. 388; ' we will go again to the 
Mitre,' iv. 82; Cole, the landlord, v. 
159 ; Johnson and Murphy dine 



Boswelfs Life of j'oJmsuii. 



159 



London. 



there, i. 434, n. i; Moorfields, John 
Hoole horn there, iv. 216 ; mad- 
houses, ii. 288 ; iv. 240 ; mass-house 
burnt at the (Jordon Riots, iii. 4S7; 
New Street, Fetter Lane, Strahan's 
printing office, ii. 370, //. i; iv. 428; 
New Street, Strand, Johnson dined 
at the Pine Apple, i. 119; Newgate, 
Akerman the keeper, iii. 4S9-91 ; 
profits of his office, iii. 490, n. i; Ba- 
retti imprisoned, ii. in, n. 3; burnt 
in the Gordon Riots, iii. 487; Cooley 
impri.soned, i. 583; Dodd, Dr., iii. 
189 ; executions removed there, iv. 
217, n. 2, 379; Hawkins's story of a 
man sentenced to death, iii. 189, «. 
3 ; Moore, Rev. Mr., the Ordinary, 
iv. 380, n. 3; Villette, Rev. Mr., the 
Ordinary : see Villette ; Wesley's 
description of its horrors, iii. 490, n. 
i; improvement,//'.,- Newgate Street, 
iv. 236; Northumberland-House, Dr. 
Percy's apartment burnt, iii. 478, n. 
i; next shop to it a pickle-shop, ii. 
251; Old Bailey, Baretti's trial, ii. 
in; Bet Flint's trial, iv. 120, vSav- 
age's, i. 187, n. 3 ; Sessions House 
plundered in the Gordon Riots, iii. 
487 ; .Sessions in 1784, iv. 379, w. i 
(see Old Bailey Sessions Paper) ; 
Old Bond Street, Boswell's lodgings, 
ii. 94; Old Devil Tavern, iv. 294, «. 
2; Old Jewry, Dr. Foster's Chapel, 
iv. II, n. 2; Old Street, Johnson at- 
tends a clul) there, iii. 503; iv. 216; 
Old Swan, Boswell and Johnson land 
there, i. 530, Ojiera House, Boswell 
at the performance of Medea, iii. 
104, n. 2; Oxford Street, The Pan- 
theon, ii. 193 ; Pall Mall, Dodsley's 
shop, i. 156, n. 4; Pall Mall, King's 
Head, The World Club, iv. 119, w. 
I ; Park Lane, Warren Hastings's 
house, iv. 77; Parsloe's Tavern: see 



St. James Street ; Paternoster 
Row, Cooper the bookseller, v. 134, 
II. I ; Piccadilly, Boswell's lodgings, 
ii. 252; Walpole describes a proces- 
sion, iv. 342, n. 2; Poultry, No. 22, 
Messieurs Dilly's house : see under 
DiLLY, Messieurs; Prince's Tavern: 
see Sackville Street ; I'rinting 
House Square, ii. 370, n. i ; Pye 
Street, iv. 427 ; Queen Square, 
Bloom.sbury, Dr. John Campbell's 
house, i. 4S4, ti. 5; Ranelagh, bar- 
risters should not go too often, iv. 
358 ; Evelina, described in, ii. 194, 
n. 1; 'girl, a Ranelagh,' iii. 226, «. 
2 ; Gordon Riots, open at the, iii. 
487, «. 3 ; Highland Laddie, .sung 
there, v. 209, w. 3; Johnson's admi- 
ration of it, ii. 193; his first visit, iii. 
226; often went, ii. 137; riot of foot- 
men, ii. 89, M. i; Thornton's Ode on 
St. Cecilia's Day performed there, i. 
4S7, «. I ; Ranelagh House, ii. 35, 
n. i; Red Lion Street, v. 223, w. i; 
Rotherhithe, iii. 24, it. i ; Round- 
house, Garrick ' will have to bail 
Johnson out of it,' i. 289 ; Captain 
Booth taken to it, ib., n. i; Johnson 
carried to it, ii. 342 ; Royal Ex- 
change, Jack Ellis, the scrivener, iii. 
24; Russell Street, Covent Garden, 
No. 8, Tom Davies's house, where 
Boswell first saw Johnson, i. 452 ; 
Sackville Street, Prince's Tavern, 
The Literary Club met there, i. 554; 
V. 124, n. 2; Slaughter's CofTee-house, 
i. 133, «. i; iv. 17; Smithfield, box- 
ing-ring, iv. 129, «. 3 ; V. 260, ti. 2 ; 
joustes held there, iv. 309, n. 2 ; 
Snow-hill, Mrs. Gardiner's shop, i. 
281; iii. 25; iv. 284; Soho-Square, 
house of the Venetian Resident, i. 
318; Somerset Coffee-house, Strand, 
Boswell and Johnson start from it 



i6o 



Lidex to 



London. 



for Oxford, ii. 501-2 ; Somerset- 
House, built by Sir W. Chambers, iv. 
216, H. 3; Somerset Place, Exhibition 
of the Royal Academy, iv. 234 ; 
South Audley Street, General Paoli's 
house, iii. 445; Southam|)ton-Huilil- 
iii^s, Chanceiy - l.ane, Hurke and 
Johnson in consultation there, iv. 374; 
Southwark Klcctions : see TnR.'M.K, 
Henry, Southwark; kennels runninj^ 
with blood, V. 281; Thrale's house, 
ii. 327, w. I, 4S9 ; Johnson's apart- 
ment in it, i. 570; iii. 461, ;/. i ; 
Spring (iarden, afterwards Vauxhall, 
iv. 31; St. .\ndrtw's, I [olborn, i. 197; 
St. Clement Danes, Itoswell and 
johnsi)n atteml service there, ii. 245, 
408-c) ; iii. 20, 2S, 30, 343, 355 ; iv. 
104, 235, 242; hear a sermon on evil- 
speaking, iii. 431; Johnson's seat, ii. 
245; — returns thanks after recov- 
ery, iv. 311, «. i; St. Cieorge's-Fields, 
meeting place of the ' I'rotestants ' 
at the Gordon Riots, iii. 486 ; St. 
George's, Hanover Stjuare, Dotld tries 
to get the living by a bribe, iii. 158, 
u. 3 ; Thomas Newton resigns the 
lectureship, iv. 330, ;/. i; St. James's 
I'alace, Lord Mayor Heckford's ad- 
dress, ill. 22S, II. () : St. James's 
S(|uarc, Johnson anil Savage walk 
round it, i. 18S, /i. 2, 189; St. James's 
Street, a new gaming-club, iii. 26, ;/. 
2 ; I'arsloe's Tavern, The Literary 
Club meet there, i. 554; Wirgman's, 
the toy -shop, iii. 369; St, John's 
Gate, Clerkenvvell, indecent books 
sold there by Cave, i. 129, «. 4 ; 
Johnson's reverence for it, i. 129; his 
room, i. 584; meets Boyse there, iv. 
470, ;/. 2 ; Savage's visits, i. 187 ; 
mentioned, i. 142, «. 4, 156, «. 4, 
175; St. Luke's Hospital, iv. 240; St. 
Martin's in the Fields, i. 157; St. 



Martin's Street, Dr. Burney occujiie? 
Newton's house, iv. 156; St. Paul's 
Cathedral, Hoswell's Easter 'going 
up': .uY umlcr HnswKi.i., St. I'aul's; 
described by an Indian king in the 
Spectator, i. 521, n. 3; Johnson's 
monument, iv. 487-^ 512-14; monu- 
ments, proposal to raise, ii. 274 ; iv. 
487 ; mentioned, iii. 397 ; St. Paul's 
Churchyard, Innys the bookseller, iv. 
463, It. 3, 507 ; Johnson's old club 
dines at the (Queen's Arms, iv. loi, 
502 ; Rivington's book-shop, i. 156, 
//. 4; St. Sepulchre's Churchyard, the 
bellman on the wall, iv. 218, ;/. i ; St. 
.Sepulchre's Ladies' charity-school, 
iv. 284 ; Staple Inn, Is.aac Reed's 
Chandlers, i. 195, w. 2; iv. 44; John- 
son's chambers, i. 405, //. 3, 598; iii. 
461,//. i; A'lisse/tis not written there, 
iii. 461, II. 1; Stepney, Mead's chap- 
el, iii. 404, ;/. 2; .Strand, Boswell and 
Johnson walk along it one night, i. 
529; dangers of it, i. 188, ;/. 2; John- 
son lodges in it, iii. 461, ;/. 1; men- 
tioned, iv. 166: see under Somkuskt 
CoFiKK Hi)i!SK and Tirk's Hkad 
C<jFFKK Hdisk ; Temple, Cham- 
bers's, Sir Robert, chand)ers in, ii. 
299; Goldsmitli's, ii. iii, 11. 3; iv. 
32; Johnson's, i. 290; iv. 155; John- 
son's walk, i. 536; Scott's chambers, 
iii. 296-7; Steevens's, iv. 374; Tem- 
ple Bar, Goldsmith's whisper about 
the heads on it, ii. 273 ; heads first 
placed on it in William Hi's time, 
iii. 464, n. 2; Johnson's voice seems 
to resound from it to Fleet-ditch, ii. 
301 ; mentioned, ii. 178 ; iv. 107, «. 
3 ; John.son attends the service, ii. 
149; Dr. Maxwell a.ssistant preacher, 
ii. 133; Temple-gate, ii. 301; Inner 
Temple, Boswell enters at it, ii. 432, 
II. i; rent of his chambers there, iii. 



BoswcU's Life of fohiison. 



i6i 



London. 



London Magazine. 



203, ;/. 2; Mitldle Temple, Burke en- 
ters there, v. 38, n. 2; Middle Tem- 
ple Gate, Lintott's bookshop, iv. 92, 
«. 2 ; Temple Stairs, Boswell and 
Johnson take a sculler there, i. 529; 
land tiiere, ii. 497 ; Temple Lane, 
Inner, Boswell lodges at the bottom 
of it, i. 505; Johnson's chambers, iii. 
461, n. i; described by Fitzherbert, 
i. 405, ;/. 3; by Murjihy, i. 434, 11. i; 
I>os\vell pays his first visit to John- 
son, i. 45S; Mme. de Boutlflers visits 
him, ii. 465; Thames: jrc Thames; 
Tom's CofFee-house, iii. 39; Tower, 
Earl of Essex's RoDiau dfatli in it, 
V. 460, ;/. 2; mentioned, i. 188, ;/. 2; 
Tower Hill, Lord Kilmarnock be- 
headed, V. 119; Lord Lovat, V. 266; 
Turk's Head Cotree-house. Strand, 
Boswell and Johnson suj) tliere, i. 
515. 524. 535. 537; talk of visiting 
the Hel^rides, i. 521 ; ii. 332, ;/. 4 ; 
Turk's Head, Gerrard .Street, Liter- 
ary Club meet there, i. 553; ii. 377, 
;/. 3; V. 124, n. 2; Vauxhall Gardens, 
iii. 350; iv. 36, //. i; Wajiping, Bos- 
well and Windham explore it, iv. 232; 
Warwick Lane, i. 190, ;/. i, 202, ;/. 
3 ; Water Lane, Goldsmith's tailor, 
ii.96; Westminster, election of 1741, 
iv. 229, ;/. I ; election of 1784, iv. 
307, 322, //. I ; scrutiny, iv. 343, ;/. 
2; Westminster Abbey : Cloisters 
and Dean's-Vard, Dr. Ta)lor's house, 
i. 276; iii. 251; Goldsmith and John- 
son survey Poets' Corner, ii. 273 ; 
Goldsmith's monument, iii. 93-8 ; 
Johnson's funeral, iv. 484 ; Reyn- 
olds on the overcrowding of the 
monuments, iv. 4S8, n. 2: see under 
Stanley, Dean, Memorials of West- 
minster Abbey; Westminster Hall, 
iv. 357; V. 63: see under Lawyers; 
Westminster Police Court, Henry 



Fielding the magistrate, iii. 246, «. 
3 ; Johnson attends it, iii. 246 ; iv. 
213 ; Westminster School, Beckford 
a pupil, iii. 87, n. 2 ; Boswell's son 
James a inqiil, iii. 14; bullying, //'., 
;/. 2 ; group of remarkable boys, i. 
457, //. 2 ; Lewis, an usher, iv. 355 ; 
Will's CofTee - house, Dryden's sum- 
mer and winter chairs, iii. 81-2; iv. 
105, H. 2; Wine Ofhce Court, Fleet 
Street, Goldsmith's lodgings, i. 423, 
//. 3; Wood Street Compter, broken 
open, iii. 4S7 ; Woodstock Street, 
Hanover .Square, Johnson lodges 
there, i. 128; iii. 461, //. i. 

London, a Poem, account of its ])ubli- 
cation, i. 137-52 ; correspondence 
\\ith Cave, i. 139-43; price paid for 
it, i. 144, 224, ;/. I ; published by 
Dodsley, i. 143-4 i i» ^I^iy. I73S, i- 
137; the same day as Pope's ' 1738,' 
i. 146; second edition, i. 147; sold at 
a shilling a copy, //'., n. 3; Attorneys 
attacked, ii. 145, ;/. 3; Boileau's and 
Oldliam's imitations of the same sat- 
ire, i. 137; Boswell quotes it at Green- 
wich, i. 532; composed rapidly, i. 
146, ;/. ,• extracts from it, i. 150-51; 
Oxford, effect produced by it at, i. 
147; Pope's opinion of it, i. 149, 165; 
quoted, i. 89, ;/. I, 90, //. i; rhymes, 
imperfect, i. 149 ; Thales and Sav- 
age, i. 145, ;/. 2. 

/.on Jon C/iroiiicle, Goldsmith's ' apolo- 
gy ' iniljlished in it, ii. 240; Johnson 
writes the Introduction, i. 368; takes 
it ill, i. 36S ; ii. 118; printed by 
Strahan, iii. 251; mentioned, i. 291, 

379. 557; ii- 473- 
London Evening Debates, iii. 522. 
Londo>i Magazine, Boswell's ITypo- 

cJiondriacks published in it, iv. 207, 

;/. 3; debates in Parliament, i. 582; 

Wesley attacks it, v. 39, ;/. i. 



tt)2 



Index to 



London Packet. 



Low Dutch. 



I.omion Packet, ii. 240, n. 2. 

LoNDONKRs, ii. 116; iv. 242. 

I.ONC, Duilley (afttrwanis Nortli), i^'- 
86, 94, 96. 

I,oM;iNr>i. i. 3, M. I. 

I,<)m;i 1 1 DK, abcertaining the, i. 310, «. 
ii 3'<>. "• i; ii- 1^, "• 3; parliamen- 
tary reward, i. 349 ; Swift and (»old- 
sniitli refer to it, i. 349, «. 2. 

LoNCl.ANDS, Mr., a solicitor, ii. 214. 

Ldnci.ky, Archl)ish<i|), iv. 9, n. 5. 

L()N»;i.KY, Joliii, recorder of Kochester, 
iv. 9. 

LoNC.MA.N, Messieurs, i. 211, 335, //. 4. 

LoNSD.M.K, first Karl of — brutality to 
Boswell, ii. 206, ;/. i; courted by him, 
i. 5, «. 2; V. 128, »/. 2; a cruel tyrant, 
V. 128, ;/. 2. 

' Lori.oir V,' i. 437, u. 1. 

LdRI), valuing a man for being one, iii. 

395- 
I^RD, .Scotch, iciebraled for drinking, 

•ii- 193, 375- 
Lord C, abbreviation for Lord C ham- 

berlain, iii. 40, ti. i. 

Lt)Rn . no mind of his own, iv. 35. 

LoRH , who carrieil politeness to 

an excess, iv. 21. 
Lord's Day Hii.i. ok 1781, iv. 107, 

n. 3. 
Lord's Praykr, The, v. 138. 
Lords, few cheat, iii. 402. 
Lords, great, and great ladies, iv. 135. 
Lords, House of. See Debates ok 

rARI.IAMENT. 

Lords, ignorance in ancient times, iv. 

251. 
Lords, quoting the authority of, iv. 

211. 
LoRT, Rev. Dr., iv. 335, «. 2. 
Loudoun, Countess of, iii. 416 ; v. 

423- 
Loudoun, Earl of, iii. 135; v. 203, ;/. 
2; ' jumjis for joy,' V. 423; character 



Ijy Koswell, //'.,■ by LrankUn, v. 424. 
u. I. 

I,"r(.mii>K(>r(.ir, Lord (.Mcxander 
Wcdfierliurnc, afterwards Karl of 
Kosslyn), Mute's errand-goer, ii. 406; 
career, i. 448 ; cold allectalion of 
conseijuence, iv. 206, //. 2; Dunning, 
afraid of, iii. 272, ;/. 3; Koote, asso- 
ciates with, i. 5S4 ; ii. 429; (iibbon 
congratulated by, iii. 273, ;/. 2; John- 
son's pension, i. 431-^^), 440; oratory 
i. 448; jiroininciation, i. 447. taught 
i)y Slieridan, //'. ,• iii. 2 ; and by 
.Macklin, iii. 3 ; solicited emjiloy- 
ment, ii. 493, ;/. i ; Taylor's, Dr., 
law-suit, iii. 51 ; mentioned, ii. 175, 
«. I. 

L<>i(;iiiioKoi(;u, the town, iii. 2. 

L<)i IS, brother, the Moravian, iii. 138, 
;/. 3. 

Lolls I'liii.ii TI,, ii. 449, «. 2. 

Lova«;e, ii. 414. 

LoVAl, .Master of, iii. 454, n. i. 

L<i\ \i, Siinon, Lord, a boast of his, 
v. 453 ; helped to carry off Lady 
(irange, v. 259, ;/. i ; Lines on his 
/'.xeeulion, i. 208; monument to his 
father, v. 266-7; trial and execution, 
i. 20<j, w. 2, 581. 

LovA I , Thomas, Lord, v. 267. 

LovK, effects exaggerated, ii. 140; ro- 
mantic fancy that a man can be in 
love but once, ii. 527. 

I^ovE, James, an actor, ii. 183. 

I.07'e and A/iitiness, iv. 215. 

Lo'i'e in a IlolUnv Tree, iv. 93. 

Lovkday, John, ii. 296, n. 3. 

Loyeday, Dr. John, ii. 296, ;/. 3. 

Lo\ELACE, in Clarissa, ii. 390. 

LoYiBOND, Edward, i. 118. 

Low Company, iv. 360. 

Low Dutch, Johnson studies, ii. 301; 
iv. 25 ; resemblance to English, iii. 
266; iv. 25. 



Bosiveirs Life of Jolmson. 



163 



Low Life. 



Lyttelton. 



Low Life, v. 349. 

Lowe, Canon, i. 53, 56. 

LuWE, Charles, Life of Prince Bis- 
marck, iv. 31, «. 3. 

Lowe, Mauritius, account of him, iv. 
234, n. i; house in Hedge Lane, iii. 
369, )i. I ; Johnson's bequest to his 
children, iv. 463, n. 3 ; picture re- 
fused by the Academy, iv. 233-5 ! 
subscription for his daughters, iv. 
234, //. I ; sups with Johnson, iii. 
432; visits him, iv. 242-3. 

Lowndes, W. T., Bibl. Man. error 
about The ^Fio;-/^ newspaper, iii. 18, 
n, 2. 

Lowth, Robert, Bishop of London, 
English Grammar, iv. 360 ; Prelec- 
tions, v. 64, n. 3; rose by his learn- 
ing, v. 92 ; Warburton, controversy 
with, ii. 42; v. 142, 483. 

Lowth, William, iii. 67. 

l.owTHER Family, v. 128. 

Lowther, Sir James, a rich miser, v. 
128. 

Loyalty of tjie Natio.n, ii. 424 ; 
blasted for a time, iv. 196, n. i. 

LoYOL.\, Ignatius, i. 90. 

Ll'aru, Rev. Dr., iii. 95, n. 3. 

Lucan, quoted, i. 371, «. 3. 

LUCAN, first Earl of. Literary Club, 
member of the, i. 555; Johnson inti- 
mate with him and Lady Lucan, iii. 
483 ; iv. I, n. I, 376 ; anecdote of 
Johnson as Thrale's e.xecutor, iv. 100. 

Lucas, Dr. Charles, Johnson writes in 
his defence, i. 360; reviews his Essay 
on Waters, i. 106, «. i, 358, 360. 

Lucas, Richard, Enquiry after Happi- 
ness, V. 335. 

Lucas de Linda, ii. 93. 

Ltician, iii. 270, «. 2; Combabus, story 
of, iii. 270, 71. 2; Epicurian and the 
Stoick, pleadings of the, iii. 12 ; 
Fraucklin's translation, iv. 40. 



Lucius L'^lortts, ii. 272. 

Lucretius, quoted, i. 329; iv. 450, «. 
3, 491, n. 3; Tasso borrows a simile 
from him, iii. 376. 

Luctus, ii. 426. 

Luke, in The Traveller, ii. 7. 

LuMiSDE.N, Andrew, ii. 460, n. i ; v. 
221. 

Lu.MM, Sir Francis, ii. 38, n. 2. 

Lunardi, ' the flying man in the bal- 
loon,' iv. 412, n. 2, 413, n. I. 

Lusiad, The, Johnson's projected trans- 
lation, iv. 290. See under MiCKLE. 

Luther, Martin, v. 246. 

LuTO.N, iv. 148. 

Luton Hoe, iv. 137, 148. 

LuTTEREL, Colonel, ii. 128. 

Luxury, dread of it visionary, ii. 195; 
money better spent on it than in 
almsgiving, iii. 65, 331 ; no nation 
ever hurt by it, ii. 250-1 ; produces 
much good, iii. 64; querulous decla- 
mations against it, iii. 256; every so- 
ciety as luxurious as it can be, iii. 
320; man not diminished in size by 
it, V. 407; reaches very few, ii. 250; 
Wesley attacks its apologists, iii. 65, 
n. I. 

L.yce, To, i. 206. 

Lydia, v. 250. 

Lydiat, Thomas, i. 225, n. 2; ii. 7. 

Lye, Edward, ii. 19. 

Lynne Regis, i. 163, 331. 

Lyons, iii. 506. 

Lysons — , of Clifford's Lin, iv. 463, 
«. 3- 

Lyttelton, George, first Lord, Booth- 
by. Miss, admired, iv. 66, n. 2; Bos- 
well's Corsica, praises, ii. 52, n. i ; 
caricature, lines on him in a, v. 324, 
71. 2 ; character by Chesterfield and 
Walpole, i. 310, w. 2 ; Chesterfield, 
Cibber, and Johnson, anecdote of, i. 
297; Critical Reviewers, thanks the, 



164 



Index to 



Lyttelton. 



Macaulay. 



iv. 67, and «. 2; Debates, speech in 
the, ii. 70, //. 2; epitaph on Sir J. 
Maaioiiakl, V. 173; Dialogues 0/ the 
Dead, ii. 144, 511; iv. 67; Gold- 
smith's J/istoiy 0/ Knglaiul, sup- 
posed to have written, i. 477, n. 2 ; 
History of Henry II, Johnson criti- 
cises it to the King, ii. 43; — , thirty 
years spent on it, iii. 37 ; punctua- 
tion, //'. ; kept back for fear of Smol- 
lett, iii. 38 ; its whiggism, ii. 253 ; 
Hume's Scotticisms, ii 82, «. 2 ; 
Johnson, Life by, iv. 67-8 ; attacks 
on it, iv. 74; Johnson's unfriendli- 
ness, iv. 66; .Montague, Mrs., friend- 
ship with, iv. 74; Persian Letters, i. 
86, //. 2; 'respectable Hottentot,' i. 
310, //. 2; Smollett, attacked by, iii. 
38, n. I ; Thomson's ' loathing to 
write,' iii. 409: mentioned, ii. 73, n. 

1, 143, ;/. I. 

Lyttki.ton, Thomas, second Lord, 
character, his, iv. 344, n. 3; timidity, 
v. 517; vision, iv. 344; mentioned, 
iv. 342, ;/. 2. 

I.YTTKl-To.N, Sir Edward, v. 521. 

M. 

Mac.\i,lan, Eupham (Eujihan M'Cul- 
lan), V. 43. 

Macartnky, Earl of, Boswell's Life 
of Johnson, praises, i. 15; Campbell, 
Dr. John, account of, i. 484, ;/. 2 ; 
iii. 276, ;/. 2 ; embas.sy to China, i. 
15, n. I, 425, n. 1 ; Hindoos, de- 
scribes a peculiarity of the, iv. 14, n. 

2, Johnson and Lady Craven, anec- 
dote, iii. 25, »/. 3 ; Literary Club, 
member of the, i. 555; mentioned, i. 
440; iii. 270, ;/. 2, 483. 

Macai!1j\y, Dr., a physician, husband 
of Mrs. Macaulay the historian, i. 
281, ;/. 3; iii. 457. 

Macaulay, Mrs, Catherine, the his- 



torian, Boswell wishes to pit her 
against Johnson, iii. 2lo; Johnson 
and her footman, i. 518 ; iii. 89; — 
had not read her History, iii. 53, //. 

2 ; — ' match ' with her, ii. 384 ; — 
political and moral principles, won- 
ders at, ii. 252 ; — toast, i. 564 ; 
maiden name and marriage, i. 281, 
;/. 3 ; ' reddening her cheeks,' iii. 
53 ; ridiculous, making her, ii. 384 ; 
Shakesjieare's ]>lays and her daugh- 
ter, i. 518, ;/. 1 ; mentioned, ii. 52, 
//. I. 

Macaii.AV, Dr. James, Bibliography 
of Rasselas, ii. 238, n. 5. 

Macallay, Rev. John, Lord Macau- 
lay's grandfather, v. 404, //. 2, 40*;, 
«. 2 ; a man of good sense, v. 410; 
on iirinci|)les and practice, v. 40}. 

>LvcArLAV, Rev. Kenneth (Lord Ma- 
caulay's great-uncle), cohls caught at 
St. Kilda, on, ii. 58, 172; v. 317; 
History of St. Kilda, ii. 172; John- 
son visits him, v. 135; — disbelieves 
his having written the History, v. 
136; — calls him 'a bigot to lax- 
ness,' V. 137; — praises his magna- 
nimity, ii. 58, 172: V. 317. 

^L\CAl■I.AY, Mrs. Kenneth, Johnson 
offers to get a servitorship for her 
son, ii. 435 ; v. 139 ; mentioned, v. 

135 
Macaulay, Thoma.s Babington (Lord 
Macaulay), ancestors, ii. 58, w. 2; v. 
135. "■ I. 404, ;/. 2; Addison, Essay 
on, iv. 63, n. 3; anfraetuosity, iv. 4, 
//. 4 ; Hentley and Boyle, v. 270, n. 

3 ; ' brilliant flashes of silence,' v. 
409, n. 2; Boswell as a l)iographer, i. 
35, «. 2; Burke's first speech, ii. 19, 
;/. i; Campbell's, Dr., Diaiy, ii. 387, 
n. 2; Chesterfield, Earl of, eminence 
of the, ii. 377, n. 2; Crisp, Mr., ac- 
count of, iv, 276, ;/, 3 ; Croker's 



BosweWs Life of yohnson 

Macaulay. 



165 



Macdonald. 



' blunders,' ii. 387, n. 2; — criticism 
on Ad Lanrum Epigramma, i. 181, 
n. 1 \ — Greek, v. 266, n. 2 ; — 
Latin, iv. 166, ;/. 2; — and the Mar- 
quis of Montrose, v. 340, n. i ; — | 
and Prince Titi, ii. 448, n. 4 ; feel- 
ing and dining, on, ii. 108, n. 2; Gib- 
bon's reported Mahometanism, ii. 
513, ;/. i; Hastings's answer to John- 
son's letter, iv. 81, ;/. 3 ; Hastings 
and the study of Persian, iv. 79, ;/. 
2 ; House of Ormond, i. 325, ;/. 
3 ; imagination, described, iii. 517 ; 
Johnson's blank verse, iv. 50, «. 3; 

— and Boswell on the non-jurors, 
iv. 331, n. I, 332, ;/. i; — called, iv. 
no, ;/. i; — and Cecilia, iv. 258, n. 
3, 44g, II. 2\ — contempt of histories, 
iv. 360, ;/. i; — etymologies, i. 216, 
n. 1 \ — and Home Tooke, i. 344, 
«. 2 ; — household, i. 269, ;/. i ; — 
ill-fed roast mutton, iv. 328, //. 3; — 
knowledge of the science of human 
nature, iii. 510; of London and the 
country, iii. 5 lo-i i ; — talk and style 
of writing, iv. 273, ;/. 2; v. 166, u. 2; 

— translation of his own sayings, iv. 
369, «. 2 ; — on travelling. Appen- 
dix B, iii. 510-21 ; King's Evil, i. 
49, >i. 3; Literary Club, i. 552, n. 4; 
Mattaire's use of Cai-teret as a dactyl, 
iv, 3 ; Pitt's peerages, iv. 288, n. 2 ; 

— treatment of Johnson and Gib- 
bon, iv. 404, ;/. I ; Prendergast, ii. 
210, n. I ; Richardson's novels, ii. 
200, //. I ; Thrale's, Mrs., second 
marriage, iii. 57, ;/. i ; Warburton, 
the, of our age, ii. 41, //. 2; William 
III and Dodwell, v. 498, «. 3; win- 
dow tax, V. 342, n. 3. 

Macauley, Dr. (Cock Lane Ghost), 
(probably Dr. Macaulay, the hus- 
band of Mrs. Macaulay the histori- 
an), i. 471, It. 2. 



Macbean, Alexander, Johnson's aman- 
uensis, account of him, i. 216; call- 
ing, on, iv. 109; Charterhouse, 
brother of the, i. 216; iii. 500; 
death, iii. 501, n. i ; stood as a 
screen between Johnson and death, 
//'. / Johnson's /'ny^fza' to his Geogra- 
phy, i. 216; ii. 234; learning, a man 
of great, iii. 121; starving, ii. 434, ;/. 
2; mentioned, i. 160; iii. 29. 

Macbean, the younger, i. 216. 

Macbeth, Miscellaneous Ohsen'alioii: 
on, i. 202 ; For iMacbeth, see under 
Shakespeare. 

Maccabees, Johnson looks into the, ii. 
218, M. I. 

Maccaroni, a, v. 95. 

Maccaronic verses, iii. 322. 

Macclesfield, v. 493. 

Macclesfield, Charles Gerard, Earl 
of, Rill of Divorce, i. 197, n. 3. 

Macclesfield, Countess of, account 
of her, i. 201, n. i; divorced, i. 196; 
marries Colonel Brett, i. 201,;/. i; 
Savage's reputed mother, i. 192, ;/. 
2; evidence of his story examined, i. 
196-201; reproached at Bath, i. 201, 
«. I. 

Macclesfield, Thomas Parker, first 
Earl of, i. 181. 

Macclesfield, George Parker, second 
Earl of, i. 310, ;/. i. 

Macconochie, — , a Scotch advocate, 
iii. 242. 

Maccruslick, v. 189, n. 2. 

Macdonald, Clan of, ii. 309. 

Macdonald, Sir Alexander, of Slate 
(father of .Sir James and .Sir Alex- 
ander Macdonald), v. 198, 214, 296. 

Macdonald, Sir Alexander, first Lord 
Macdonald, arms rusty, his, v. 172, 
405 ; Boswell and Johnson try to 
rouse him, v. 172 ; feudal system, 
attacks the, ii. 204 ; flees froni 'lis 



i66 



Index to 



Macdonald. 



Mackinnon. 



tenants, v. 172, «. i; Johnson, intro- 
duced to, ii. 180; invites him to visit 
him. V. 14; inhospitality, ii. 346, n. 
I ; V. 168, u. 3, 179, w. 2 : 'a very 
penurious gentleman,' v. 315, 317; 
anecdotes of his penuriousness, v. 
358-9; passages suppressed by 15os- 
well, V. 168, //. 3, 474, M. i; landlord, 
an oppressive, v. 170, 183 ; Latin 
verses, his bad, v. 479 ; sugar-tongs 
in his house, absence of, v. 23, ti. 2; 
mentiitned, ii. 194, «. 2, 199, 219, //. 
2: V. 313. 

.MacdonaM), Lady, wife of tiie first 
Lord Macdonald, ii. 194, //. 2; v. 168. 

M ACDD.NAl.i), Alexander, of Kings- 
burgh (old Kingsburgh), his annuity, 
V. 293; helps the I'retender, v. 214- 
15; examined, V. 295-6; mentioned, 
V. 182-3. 

Macdonald of Kingsl)urgh, the 
younger, account of him, v. 209; 
emigrates, v. 211; mentioned, v. 

233-5- 
Macdonald, old Mrs., of Kingsburgh, 

V. 216. 
Macdonald, Archiliald, M.r.,v. 174, 

M. I. 

Macdonald of Clanranald, v. 181. 

Macdonald, Sir Donald, v. 168. 

Macdonald, Donald, v. 170-1. 

Macdonald, Donald (Donald Roy), 
V. 216, 218. 

>fACDONALD, Flora, wife of Mac- 
donald of Kingsburgh, Account of 
her adventures, v. 213-17, 22g, 295; 
Courtenay's Poetical Revie-i.\ men- 
tioned in, ii. 307; emigrates, v. 211, 
w. I ; courage on board ship, ih. ; 
health drunk on Jan. 30, iii. 422 ; 
Johnson visits her, v. 204, 210 ; 
Primrose. Lady, rewards her. v. 
229, n. I ; virulent Jacobite in her 
old age, v. 211, w. 2. 



>L\cdonald, Hugh, v. 318. 

Macdonald, Sir James, account of 
him, i. 520; death, v. 174, «. i; 
deeply regretted, v. 170; Knglish 
education, V. 170; epitaph, v. 173; 
generosity, v. 293; Johnson, terror 
of, i. 521 ; letters to his mother, v. 
174, //. 1; .Marcellus of Scotland, iv. 
95. n. 1; V. 173, «. i; Rasay has his 
sword, V. 198 ; mentioned, v. 208, 

330. 
Macdonald, James, a factor, Johnson 

visits him, v. 313-18. 
MacdoNALI>, James, of Knockow, v. 

293- 

Macdonald, Lady Margaret, widow 
of Sir A. Macdonald of Slate, adored 
in Sky, iii. 435 ; v. 296 ; befriends 
the I'retender, v. 214; raises a mon- 
ument to her son, v. 174. 

NLxcDoNALD, Ranald, ii. 353. 

Macdonald of Scothou.se, v. 224. 

Macdonald of Sky, league with 
Rasay, v. 198. 

Mackarlank, the Laird of, the anti- 
quary, V. 178, n. 2. 

Maci'RIAR, Donald, v. 219. 

M'GiiiE, Dr. William, i. 221, n. 2. 

M'GiNNisES, The, v. 384. 

Mackknzik, — , of Applecross, v. 221. 

M.\CKK.NZIE, Sir George, Charactercs 
Advocatorum, v. 241-3; Dryden de- 
scribes him as ' that noble wit of 
Scotland,' iv. 44, n. 2. 

>L\CKENZ1E, Henry, Man of Feelinj;, 
i. 417; Man of the World, i. 417, «. 
2; v. 315 ; Min-or, The, iv. 450, n. 
I ; Poker Club, ii. 493, n. 2 ; Wed- 
derbume's Club, iv. 206, n. 2; men- 
tioned, ii. 60, n. I. 

Mackenzie, John, v. 217-19. 

Mackenzie, — , stories of second sight, 
v. 182. 

MACKINNON, of Corrichatachin, v. 



Bosweirs Life of fohnsou. 



167 



Mackinnon. 



Maclean. 



178; Boswell calls him Corri, v. 294; 
Johnson visits him, v. 178-S5, 293- 
301. 

MACKINNON, John, V. 224-6. 

MACKINNON, Lady, v. 226. 

MACKINNON, Laird of, v. 18S, 222, 
224-6. 

MACKINNON, Mrs., V. 183, 295, 300. 

M.A.CK1NTOSH, Sir James, Aberdeen, 
his fellow-students at, v. 96, n. 2 ; 
study of Greek there, v. 104, n. i ; 
birth-place, v. 150, «. 2; Burke on 
Boswell's Lift- as a monument to 
Johnson's fame, i. 11, //. i ; — and 
Gibbon, ii. 398, ;/. 2 ; — on John- 
son's talk, iv. 364, «. 3; — as a meta- 
physician, i. 546, «. 2; Dunbar, Dr., 
iii. 494, «. i; Fox's character, iv. 192, 
«. 2; — election to the Literary Club, 
ii. 314, w. 3 ; Gray's and Walpole's 
style, iii. 36, n. i; Johnson, ground- 
less charge against, v. 378, «. i; — 
idea of a ship, v. 157, 11. i\ — with- 
held from metaphysics, v. 123, w. Ii; 
leading life over again, on, iv. 350, 
n. i; Macdonald, Sir James, v. 173, 
n. i; Priestley, Dr., iv. 510; Tem- 
ple's style, iii. 292, «. i; torture, late 
use of, i. 540, «. 2 ; mentioned, iii. 
47, «. I, 261, n. 4. 

Macklin, Charles, Life by W. Cooke, 
iv. 504; Man of the IVorlti, v. 315, 
«. 2; taught \Vedderburne, iii. 2. 

Maclai'RIN, Professor Colin, epitaphs, 
his, V. 55-6; Goldsmith's anecdote of I 
his yawning, iii. 17; tries to fortify j 
Edinburgh, v. 55, n. 5. | 

M.-\ci.AL'RlN, John (afterwards Lord i 
Dreghorn), argument for Knight, a | 
negro, iii. 99; motto for it from Vir- 
gil, iii. 99, «. 6, 241 ; plea read by 1 
Johnson, iii. 101, 116, 144, 241; epi- I 
taphs on his father, his, v. 55; Gold- 
smith's story of his father, uneasy at, 

YI.— 1<5 



iii. 17; Johnson, introduced to, v. 53; 
— style, caricatures, ii. 416; 'made 
dish,' his, i. 543; v. 449, ;/. i. 

Maclean, Ale.xander, Laird of Col. 
St-e Col, the old Laird of. 

Maclk.vn, Dr. Alexander, a physician 
of Tobermorie, Johnson visits him, 
v. 356-60; wrote 7'ht- History of the 
MacUans, v. 356; mentioned, v. 352, 

363- 

Macle.\n, Dr. Alexander, another phy- 
sician of Mull, v. 38S. 

Maclean, Sir Allan, Chief of the 
Macleans, v. 352 ; Johnson visits 
him, V. 366-76 ; his house, v. 366, 
)i. 2, 367; Sunday evening, v. 370; 
accompanies Johnson, v. 377-91; in 
lona, v. 381-2; asserts the rights of 
a chieftain, v. 384 ; brags of Scot- 
land, v. 387; visits Lochbuy, v. 3S8- 
91; lawsuit, his, ii. 436, n. 2; iii. 109, 
116, 140, 144-5; hates writers to the 
signet, v. 391, n. 2. 

Macle.\n, Captain Lauchlan, v. 324, 

335. 347- 
M.'VCl.EAN, Clan of, ii. 309. 
Macleans of Col, story of the, v. 338, 

n. I. 
Maclean, Donald, young Laird of 

Col. See Col, Laird of. 
Maclean, Donald, of Col, father of 

the old laird, v. 340. 
Maclean of Corneck, v. 334-5, 338, 

343- 
JvLvCLEAN, Sir Hector, v. 341, 368. 
Maclean, Rev. Hector, v. 326-8, 348. 
Maclean, Sir John, v. 358. 
Maclean, John, a bard, v. 358. 
Maclean of Lochbuy. Av LociiHuy, 

Laird of. 
Maclean, Miss, of Inchkenneth, v. 

370. 
Maclean', Miss, of Tobermorie, v. 358, 

361, 



i6S 



hidex to 



Maclean. 



Macpherson. 



Maclkan of Muck, V. 256. 

MacI-KAN, nejihew to Maclean of 
Muck, V. 256. 

Maci.kan of Torloisk, ii. 352. 

Macleans, History of the, v. 356. 

Maclk(iI) of Hay, v. 237. 

Maclkod, Captain, of lialnienoch, v. 
164. 

MaclkoU, Clan of, two hranciies. v. 
46S; (juestion as to the ciiieftainship, 
//'., V. 469. 

Maci.koh, Colonel, of Talisker, ac- 
count of him, V. 292, 296; Johnson 
visits him, v. 285-92 ; mentioned, v. 
108, 1S8, 204, 245, 252, 266. 

Maci.kou, Dr., of Kasay, wouncletl at 
Culloden, v. 216, 220; receives a 
present from the I'retender, v. 222; 
mentioned, v. 18S, 193, 2CK9, 219, 
469. 

Maclkod, l)unald (late of Canna), v. 
178, 297, 309. 

Maclkod of Ferneley, v. 2S4. 

Maclkod, Flora, of Kasay, her beauty, 
V. 203; married, iii. 134-5, ^V^\ visits 
Hoswell, V. 4(19. 

MaclK(jd of 1 lamer, v. 256. 

Maclkod, John Breck, v. 265-6. 

Maclkod, John, of Rasay. See Rasay. 

Maclkod, l.aird of, account of him, 
V. 200; as a chief, v. 237, 240, 245, 
285; estates, v. 263; fisheries, v. 283; 
Johnson visits him, v. 14, 236; is of- 
fered Islanil Isa, v. 284; takes leave 
of him, v. 292 ; writes to him, v. 
303, n. I ; mentioned, v. 161, 188, 
201, 247, 260, 266, 286. 

Maclkod, old Laird of, v. 163, 329. 

Maclkod, Lady (widow of the old 
laird), Johnson, welcomes, v. 236, 
303, n. i; argues on principles and 
practice, v. 239; on natural goodness, 
V. 240; on removing the family seat, 
v. 253; mentioned, v. 244. 



Maclkod of Lewis, v. 191. 

Maclkod, Magnus, v. 237. 

Maclkod, Malcolm, account of him, 
v. 184-5. iSg, 191 ; befriends the 
I'retender, v. 217-26 ; arrested, v. 
228 ; tells a legen<l, v. 194 ; men- 
tioned, iii. 135; v. 204, 208. 

Maclkod, Rev. Neal, v. 3S5, 387-8. 

Maclkod, Sir Normand, v. 364. 

Maclkod, Professor, of Abenleen, v. 
104, loS, 285. 

Maclkod, Sir Roderick (Rorie More), 
his cascaile, v. 236, 245, 253-4; bed, 
V. 236; horn, v. 241, 364; mentioned, 
V. 249. 

Maclkod, Roderick, v. 275. 

Maclkod, Sandie, v. 188; known as 
M'Cruslick, v. 189, 191, 203. 

Maclkod, Mrs., ..f Talisker, v. 28S. 

M.vcLKoD, — , of Ulinish, account of 
him, V. 26S; mentioned, v. 201, 240, 
280, 282. 

Maclonicii, Clan of, v. 338, n. r. 

Maclukk, Captain, v. 363. 

Macmar'i i.Ns, V. 339. 

Mac.nkil of I'jarra, v. 259, n. i. 

M'Nkill, 1'., 'J'raueitt and its Sur- 
rounttin^^s, iii. 229, n. I. 

M'NICOL, Rev. Donald, ii. 352, n. i. 

Maci'HKRSON, James, account of his 
person and character by Dr. Carlyle, 
ii. 342, n. 4 ; by Hume, ii. 340, ;/. 2; 
buried in Westminster Abbey, ii. 341, 
n. i; Fragments oj Ancient Poetry, 
ii. 145, n. I ; Homer, translation of 
ii. 340 ; iii. 379, «. I ; ' impudent 
fellow,' i. 500; newspapers, 'super- 
vised' the, ii. 351, n. 3: Ossian, ii. 
145, ;/. I, 345; criticisms, &c., on it: 
— ' abandoning one's mind to write 
such stuff,' iv. 211; 'writing in that 
style,' V. 442 ; concocted, how, v. 
275-6; Cuchullin's car and sword, v. 
275; Giants of I'atagonia, on a par 



Boswelfs Life of fo/inso7t. 



169 



Macpherson. 



Madness. 



with the, V. 442; gross imposition, v. 
274; Highlander, testimony of a, iii. 
59; manuscripts, no, ii. 339, 345, 353, 
355-6, 397. 439 ; Johnson's attack, 
Macpherson furious at, ii. 333; tries 
intimidation, ii. 339; writes to him, 
ii. 340 ; — answer, ii. 340, «. I ; — 
rejoinder to Clark, iv. 291; opinions 
of Ossiaii formed by Blair, i. 45S ; 
"• 339, 345, "• 3; V. 277; Boswell, ii. 
345, 353; V. 442, II. 3, 444; Carlyle, 
Dr. A., ii. 345, ;/. 3; Dundas, Presi- 
dent, ill.; Dempster, ii. 347; v. 465- 
6 ; Elibank, Lord, v. 442 ; Gibbon, 
ii. 345, 71. 3 ; Hume, ii. 345, it. 3 ; 
Macqueen, Rev. D., v. 187, 273, 275; 
Oughton, .Sir A., v. 50; Scott, Sir 
Walter, v. 187, ;/. 2; Shaw, Rev. \V., 
pamphlet by, iv. 291 ; answer l)y 
Clark, ill.; Smith, Adam, ii. 345, n. 3; 
Smollett, ii. 345, ;/. 3; national pride 
concerned, iv. 163 ; v. 274, w. i ; 
'originals' of Fiiiga/, ii. 336-9; iii. 
325; V. 107-8, 442-4; public interest 
at an end (1785), v. 444; rhapsody, a, 
ii. 145; wolf not mentioned, ii. 398; 
pension, ii. 351, ;/. 3 ; A'li/mr/js on 
Johnson' s Jourih-y, ii. 352, //. i; sub- 
scription raised for him, ii. 345. 

MacI'HERSON, Dr. John, Dissertations, 
v. 181, 235; Latin verse, v. 302; men- 
tioned, v. 135. 

iVfACPHERSON, Rev. Martin, v. iSi, 
302-3. 

Macpherson, Mi.ss, of Slate, v. 301. 

Macquarry of Ormaig, iii. 151. 

Macquarrv, or Macquarrie, or Mac- 
quharrie, of Ulva, in debt, iii. 109, 
116; estates sold, iii. 144-5, 151; ill- 
judged hospitality, v. 377, n. i; John- 
son visits him, v, 363-6; mentioned, 
ii- 352. 

Macqueen of Anoch, v. 154-6, 160. 

Macqueen, Rev. Donald, Aborigines, 



discovers a house of the, v. f 69 ; 
Anaitis, a temple of, v. 248-51, 255; 
Boswell, letter to, v. 184 ; Edin- 
burgh, visits, ii. 436; emigration, on, 
V. 233 ; Erse writings, ii. 436, 439 ; 
Johnson's regard for him, v. 255, 
287, 292-3; learned man, a, v. 190, 
286; Ossian, v. 187, 273, 275-7; sec- 
ond-sight, V. 186, 258; Sky, projects 
a book on, v. 293; witchcraft, v. 187; 
mentioned, v. 171, 194, 208, 210, 244, 
247, 270, 272, 2S2, 288-9. 

M'Craas, Clan of the, v. 162-3, 255. 

M'Crails, v. 265. 

Macray, Rev. W. D., Annals of the 
Bodleian, iv. 185, ;/. 3. 

Macrobius, quoted by Johnson, i. 68; 
saying of Julia, iii. 29. 

Macswey.n, Mr. and Mrs., v. 329-30, 

347- 

I\Lvcs\VEYN, Hugh, v. 329. 

Mac Swinxy, Owen, recollections of 
Dryden, iii. 81-2; pun on the Cam- 
brick Bill, iii. 81, n. 5. 

Mad Tom, iii. 282. 

Madan, Rev. Martin, Thoughts on 
Executive Justice, iv. 379, ;/. i. 

Madden, Rev. Dr. Samuel, Johnson 
castigates his Boulter s JMonuincnt, 
i. 368; orchards, on, iv. 237; premi- 
um scheme, his, i. 368; Whig, a great, 
ii. 367. 

^LvDDOCKS, — , the strawman, iii. 262, 
;/. I. 

Madness, caused by indulgence of im- 
agination, iv. 241; employment best 
suited for it, iv. 186, n. i; evil spirits, 
people possessed with, iii. 200, n. 2; 
Gaubius defines it, i. 76 ; infamous 
persons supposed mad, iii. 200, ;/. 3; 
Johnson describes it in Rasselas, i. 
76; dreads it, i. 76; is ' mad, at least 
not sober,' i. 41 ; v. 244; madmen 
love to be with those whom they 



170 



Index to 



Madness. 

fear, iii. 200; seek for pain, //'. / mel- 
ancholy, confounded with, iii. 199; 
relief from it in the bottle, i. 321, n. 
4; Smart's prayers, shown by, i. 460; 
iy. 37, «. 3; turned upside down, iii. 
31; undiscovered, iv. 37. 

Mauriu, v. 24, n. 2. 

M.ECK.NAS, iii. 336, n. i. 

Alag. Extraordinary, i. iSl. 

Magazinks, Cioldsmith describes their 
origin, v. 66, n. 2. 

Magicians, Italian, iii. 434. 

Mauistratk, anecdote of a dull coun- 
try one, iv. 360-1 ; fear to call out 
the guards, iii. 54 ; how far they 
should tolerate false doctrine, ii. 
286-90; salaries of the Westminster 
justices, iii. 246, n. 3. 

Mahoi^any, a drink, iv. 91. 

Mahuga.ny Wouii, iv. 91. 

Mahomkt, ii. 174. 

Mahometan World, iv. 230. 

Maho.metans, ii. 16, 174. 

Maiu or HoNOLk, Hattery l)y a, iii. 
367. 

Maidstone, iv. 379, n. i. 

Mai.ne, Sir Henry, Borough English, 
v. 365, «. I. 

Maintenon, Mme. de, iv. 477, n. i. 

Maitland, Mr., one of Johnson's 
amanuenses, i. 216. 

Maittaire, M., Scnilia, iv. 3; makes 
Carteret a dactyl, iv. 3. 

Major, John, Df Ct'stis Siotoriim, v. 
463. 

Majority, distinguished from superi- 
ority, ii. 428. 

Make motuy, iii. 223. 

Malagrida, iv. 201. 

Malcolm III, v. 365, n. i. 

Male Succession. See Succession. 

Malet du Pan, ii. 419, w. 4. 

Mallet, David, alias Malloch, ii. 182, 
n. 4 ; iv. 250 ; Alfred, v. 199, n. 3 ; 



Malone. 

Bacon, Life of, iii. 221 ; Boling- 
broke's Works, edits, i. 311 ; Byng, 
writes against, ii. 147 ; Critical Re- 
view, writes in the, i. 473, «. 4; El- 
vira, i. 473; Garrick, fools, v. 199, n. 
3; Gibbon domesticated with him, i. 
311, w. I ; Hume's Scotticisms, ii. 82, 
n. 2; job, ready for any dirty, ii. 147; 
Johnson criticises his dramas, i. 473, 
//. i; and his works, ii. 267, //. i; — 
draws his character, i. 312 ; ii. 182, 
w. 4; — Dictionary, in, iv. 250; lit- 
erary reputation, his, kept alive as 
long as he, ii. 267 ; Macgregor, by 
origin a, v. 145, n. 1; Malloch, pub- 
lished under the name of, iv. 250; 
Margaret' s Ghost, iv. 265, n. 2 ; 
Marlborough, Life of, undertakes 
the, iii. 221 ; never begins it, iii. 439; 
receives money for it, v. 199, n. 3; 
Pope's Essay on Man, iii. 457; ' pret- 
tiest drest puppet,' v. 199 ; Scotch 
accent, never caught in a, ii. 182 ; 
only Scot whom Scotchmen did not 
commend, ib., n. 4; Warburton, at- 
tacks, i. 381. 

Mallet, Mrs., Hume and the deists, 
ii. 9, n. 4. 

Mallet, P. H., Ilistoire de Dane- 
marck, iii. 311, n. i. 

Malmesbury. first Earl of, ii. 258, 
n. 4. 

M.\LONE, Edmond, accuracy and jus- 
tice, his love of, iv. 60 ; Addison's 
loan to Steele, iv. 61; Earetti's infi- 
delity, ii. 9, «. 3 ; Boswell, becomes 
acquainted with, v. 2, w. i ; — ded- 
icates to him the Tour to the Hebri- 
des, ii. I, M. 2; v. i; note added to it 
by him, iii. 367, w. 3 ; — executor, 
iii. 342, n.\; — ignorance of law, ii. 
24, w. 4; — Life of Johnson, revises, 
i. 8; edits later editions, i. 10, n. 2; 
— time, by his hospitality wastes, i. 



Bos wells Life of Johnson. 



171 



Malone. 



Mansfield. 



5, «. 2; Chatterton's poems, demon- 
stratcb the imposture in, iii. 58, n. 5; 
iv. 163, n. I ; Courtenay's Poetical 
Review, mentioned in, i. 25S; death, 
i. 18, ti. i; Flood's lines on Johnson, 
iv. 489, n. 2 ; Garrick's election to 
the Club, i. 556, 11. 3 ; Goldsmith's 
college days, i. 476 ; Gray's Odes, i. 
467, 11. i; Hawkins, describes, i. 33, 
tt. I ; Hawkesworth's death, v. 321, 
tt. 2 ; hospitality, elegant, iv. 164 ; 
Johnson's bargain with the book- 
sellers, iii. 126, «. i; — conversation, 
iv. 212, ft. 2; — epitaph, iv. 512; — 
interpretation of two passages in 
Hamlet, iii. 63, «. 3 i — letters to 
him, iv. 163 ; — ' seldom started a 
subject,' iii. 349, n. i\ — severe say- 
ings, iv. 393-4; — solitar)', finds, iv. 
252, «. i; — tribute to, i. 10, //. i; 
iv. 164 ; — witticism, fathers on 
Foote, ii. 470, ;/. i , Johnsoniamssi- 
tmis, i. 8, ;/. i ; — Literary Club, a 
member of the, i. 554; iv. 376; Mil- 
ton's imagination of cheerful sensa- 
tions, iv. 50, «. 2; 'one of the best 
critics of our age,' i. 208, n. i ; v. 
88, «. 5, 411. «• I. 455. «■ 3; Parnell's 
Hermit, explains a passage in, iii. 
446, ;/. 4; Piozzi's, Mrs., Anecdotes, 
criticises, iv. 393; Prologue to Julia, 
i. 304, ;/. i; Reynolds's executor, iv. 
154; — Reynolds's plan for monu- 
ments in St. Paul's, iv. 488, n. 2 ; 
Shakespeare, edits, i. 8 ; iv. 164 ; v. 
2; Walpole's, Sir R., reading, v. 106, 
n. I ; mentioned, iii. 347 ; i^'- 397. 
482. 
Malpas, iv. 349, n. 
Malplaqvet, Battle of, ii. 210, «. i. 
Mai.tby, Mr., i. 2S7, n. i; iii. 228, ;/. 6. 
Malte, Chevalier de, story of a, v. 121. 
Malton, an inn-keeper, iii. 237. 
Mamhead, i. 505, n. 2; ii. 426. 



Man, composite animal, iv. 105 ; de- 
fined, iii. 278; V. 35, n. 2; not a ma- 
chine, v. 133; not good by nature, v. 
240; pourtrayed by Shakespeare and 
Milton, iv. 84. See Mankind. 
Man of Feeling, i. 4I7- 
Man of the World, i. 417, n. 2; v. 315. 
Managed horse, v. 2S8. 
Managers of Theatres, i. 227, «. 2. 
Manchester, iii. 140, i44. i53. «• i: 

Whitaker's History, iii. 379. 
Mandeville, Bernard, Johnson influ- 
enced by him, iii. 65, n. i, 332, «. 3; 
'private vices public benefits,' iii. 
65, n. I, 331-3 ; mentioned, i. 416, 
n. 2. 
Mandoa, ii. 202. 
Manege for Oxford, ii. 485. 
Manilla Ransom, ii. 156. 
Mankind, Burke thinks better of them, 
iii. 267 ; Johnson finds them less just 
and more beneficent, iii. 268 ; opin- 
ions of Bolingbroke, Oxford, and 
Pitt, iii. 267, n. 5; of Savage, iii. 268, 
w. 2; characterless for the most part, 
iii. 318, n. 3 ; hostility one to the 
other, iii. 268, n. i ; kindness, won- 
derful, iii. 268, and «. 2. See Man 
and World. 
Manley, Mrs., iv. 231, «. 2. 
Mann, Sir Horace, i. 324, n. 2. 
Manners, change in them, v. 67-8, 
262 ; elegance acquired impercepti- 
bly, iii. 62 ; great, of the, iii. 401 : 
history of them, v. 89 ; words de- 
scribing them soon require notes, ii. 
243. 
Manners, a poem, i. 145. 
Manning, Owen, ii. 19. 
Manning, Mr., a compositor, iv. 371. 
Manningham, Dr., iii. 183. 
Manor, a, co-extensive with the par- 
I ish, ii. 279. 
Mansfield, William Murray, first Earl 



172 



Index to 



Mansfield. 

of, Adams the architects, patronises, 
ii. 372, n. 3; air and manner, ii. 364; 
Americans, approves of burning tlic 
houses of the, iii. 487, ;/. i; Haretti's 
trial, ii. Ill, ;/. 3; believing /inlf u{ 
what a man says, iv. 205 ; Carre's 
Si'niions, ]>raises, v. 30; confined to 
his Court, iii. 305 ; copy-right case, 
judgment in tlie, i. 50(^1, ;/. 2; Doug- 
las Cause, ii. 264, //. i, 544; educated 
in P'ngland, ii. 223; Home Tooke's 
trial, iii. 403, n. i; Carrick, flatters, 
ii. 260; Cicncrals and Admirals, com- 
pared with, iii. 301 ; (iordon Riots, 
his house burnt in the, iii. 487; Gor- 
don's, Lord Cieorge, trial, iii. 485, ti. 
I ; Johnson's definition of excise, i. 
341, //. 4 ; — estimate of his intel- 
lectual iM)wer, iv. 205, ;/. 2; — great- 
est man next to him, ii. 385; v. 109; 
— fotirmy, praises, ii. 364; — never 
met him, ii. iSi ; lawyer, a great 
English, V. 450-1 ; not a mere law- 
yer, ii. 181; liberty of the press, tries 
to stifle the, i. 134, //. 2; literary fame, 
no, iii. 207; 0.\ford, entrance at, ii. 
223, n. 3; Pope, friend of, ii. 181; iv. 
60; Pope's lines to him, parodied by 
Browne, ii. 388, it. i; popular party, 
hates the, iii. 136, ;/. 4 ; retirement, 
in, iv. 205, ;/. 2; Royal marriage act, 
drew the, ii. 175, ti. i; satires on dead 
kings, iii. 18, >i. i; Scotch schoolmas- 
ter's case, ii. 213; severity, loved, iii. 
136, ;/. 4 ; Shebbeare, sentences, iii. 
358, n. i; Somerset the negro, case 
of, iii. gg-ioo; speech on the Habeas 
Corpns Bill, iii. 264, ;/. i ; at Lord 
Lovat's trial, i. 209, ;/. 2 ; Stuart's 
Letters to Lord Mansfeld, ii. 263, 
544; Sunday levees, ii. 364; untruth- 
fulness, ii. 339, It. i; Warburton, gets 
promotion for, ii. 41, ;/. 3. 
Mant, iNlr., i. 313, ;/. 2. 



Marlborough. 

Maiiliiiuitis, Johannes Baptista, iv. 
210. 

^L\^l•ccI, Count, ii. 447, 452; iii. 102, 
104. 

^L^NUl•■ACTURKRS, defined, ii. 216, *. 
3; their wages, v. 300. 

Manykui.d River, iii. 213. 

iMai'H.kus, iii. 24, //. i. 

Mar, Earl of, v. 259, //. i. 

Maka.na, 1. I'., iv. 231, //. 3. 

Marathon, iii. 197, //. 1, 517; v. 381. 

Marc lie I'eatt forte, ii. 454. 

Marciii, — , an engraver, iv. 4S5, ;/. 3. 

Marciimont, Hugh, fourth Earl of, 
Boswell calls on him, iii. 390; — talks 
of Johnson's definitions, iii. 390; — 
gets particulars of Pope and IJoling- 
broke, iii. 392, 475; Johnson refuses 
to see him, iii. 392; — sends him the 
Lives, iii. 445; — calls on him, ib.; 
— shows inattention, iv. 59-60 ; 
Pope's executor, iv. 60 ; mentioned 
in Pope's Grotto, iv. 61 ; Scotch ac- 
cent, his, ii. 184. 

iVLvRcrs Antonims, iii. 195. 

Marcatk, iv. 211, n. 2. 

Mariaiiitie, i. 118, n. 4. 

^L\RIE Antoinette, seen by Johnson, 
ii. 442, 452-3- 

Marischal, Lord, v. 228, n. i. 

Markiiam, Archbishop of York, John- 
son's Ijow, iv. 228, //. 2; sermon on 
parties, v. 40, ;/. 3. 

Markham, Dr., iii. 417. 

^L\RKLAND, Jeremiah, account of him, 
iv. 185, ;/. 5; referred to, iv. 198, ;/. 3. 

Marlay, Dean Richard, afterwards 
Bishop of Waterford, Deanery of 
Ferns, iv. 85; humour, his, iv. 85, 11. 
i; Johnson turned from a wolf-dog 
into a lap-dog, iv. 85; Literary Club, 
member of the, i. 554 ; mentioned, 
iv. 90. 

Marlborough, John, first Duke of. 



Boswelfs Life of yohnsoii. 



^IZ 



Marlborough. 



Mason. 



Bolingbroke's allusion to him, v. 143, 
n. 3; calm temper, his, i. 14; epigram 
on him, ii. 516; hypothetical appear- 
ance to him of the devil, iv. 366, ;/. 
3: Mallet's projected Life, iii. 221, 
439 ; V. 1 99, 71. 3 ; officers, his, use- 
less, V. 507; Oldfield, Dr., anecdote 
of, iii. 66; mentioned, ii. 209. 

Marlborough, Sarah, Duchess of, 
Addison's dedication to her, v. 429, 
n. 2; Apology, i. 177; v. 200; — cen- 
sured by Johnson, i. 177, 386, n. 2; 
Johnson's character of her, v. 199 ; 
Love in a Hollow Tree, reprints, iv. 
93; her will, v. 199, ;/. 3. 

Marlborough, Charles, second Duke 
of, ii. 282, )i. I. 

Marlborough, George, third Duke 
of, V. 345, 523. 

Marnior Norfokiciise,\. 163; reprinted, 
i. 164; praised by Pope, i. 165. 

Marrl\ge, advice about it, ii. 126, ;;. 
I, 127; fortune, with women of, iii. 
3 ; inferiors in rank, with, ii. 376 ; 
late in life, ii. 147; Lord Chancellor, 
might be made by the, ii. 52S; love, 
for, iii. 3 ; natural to man, not, ii. 
190; necessary for a man more than 
a woman, ii. 539; reasons for marry- 
ing, ii. 540; parents' control over a 
daughter's inclination, iii. 429; pret- 
ty woman, with a, iv. 152; prudence, 
but inclination, not from, ii. 117 ; 
prudent and virtuous most desirable, 
i. 442; second time, for a, ii. 87-8, 
147; service, ii. 127; society a party 
to the contract, iii. 29; widow, mar- 
rying a, ii. 88. 

Marriage Bill, Royal, ii. 175, 257, 
n. 2. 

Marseilles, i. 393, ;/. 2. 

Marshall, W. H., Minutes of Agri- 
culture, iii. 356. 

Marsili, Dr., i. 373, 430. 



I 

e5^ 



M.\RTIAL, Elphinston's translation, iii. 
293; Johnson's fondness for him, i. 
142, n. I ; lines translated by F. 
Lewis, i. 261, n. 2 ; quoted, v. 489, 
n. 3. 

Martin, M., Western Isles, Johnson 
read it when a child, i. 521; iii. 516; 
v. 13; copy in the Advocates' Libra- 
ry, v. 13, ;/. 3 ; quoted, v. 192, 194, 
204, 238, n. 2 ; style bad, iii. 275 ; 
I'oyage to St. Kilda, ii. 58, n. 3, 59, 
;/. I. 

M.\RTINE, George, v. 69. 

^L■\,RTINELLI, Signor, anecdote of 
Charles Townshend, ii. 255 ; wri 
a History of England, ii. 253 ; 
should not be continued to the pre: 
ent day, ii. 253. 

Martins, printers of Edinburgh, iii. 
125. 

Alartinus Scriblerus, Imitators of 
Shakespeare ridiculed, ii. 258, n. 4. 
See under Arbuthnot. 

Martyrdom, ii. 286-7. 

Martyrdom of T/ieodo7-a, i. 361. 

Mary Magdalen, iv. 7. 

M.'VRY, Queen of Scots, Buchanan's 
verses to her, i. 533 ; Holyrood 
House, V. 47 ; Inch Keith, v. 62-3 ; 
inscription for her picture, ii. 310, 
320, 323, 335, n. 2 ; Johnson re- 
proaches the Scotch with her death, 
V. 45 ; Tytler's Vindication, i. 410 ; 

ii- 349- 

Mary II, Queen, Johnson attacks her, 
i. 386, n. 2; mentions her in his defi- 
nition of Revolution , i. 342, n. 

Masenius, i. 266. 

Mason, Rev. William, Akenside, infe- 
rior to, iii. 37 ; Caractacus, ii. 383 ; 
Colman's Odes to Obscurity, ridiculed 
in, ii. 382; 'cool Mason,' ii. 382; 
Elfrida, ii. 383 ; Goldsmith speaks 
of his ' formal school,' i. 467, «, 2 ; 



174 



Index to 



Mason. 



Melancholy. 



Gray's Ode on V'iiissitudt„ adds to, 
iv. i6o, w. 2; V. 484; Ileroick Epistle, 
ascribed to Walpole, iv. 364 ; — 
Chambers's Dissertation on Oriental 
Gardening, ridiculed in it, iv. 70, n. 
6; V. 212; — Goldsmith reads it to 
Johnson, iv. 131; — quotations from 
it, — ' Here, too, O King of ven- 
geance,' &c., V. 212; ' -So when some 
John,' &c., iii. 309, n. 2; 'Who 
breathe the sweets,' »S:c., iv. 131, n. 
3; — mentioned, i. 449, n. 3; John- 
son did not taste his works, ii. 384; 
Memoirs of Gray, Boswell's model 

»in his Life of Johnson, i. 34; — its 
excellence shown, i. 36, n. 2 ; — 
Johnson 'found it mighty dull,' iii. 
36; praises Gray's letters, ib., n. i ; 
— Temple's character of Gray adopt- 
ed in it, ii. 362 ; Memoirs of \V. 
Whitehead, \. 36; Murray, the book- 
seller, j)rosecutes, iii. 334 ; Prig and 
Whig, a, iii. 334 ; Sherlock, Rev. 
Martin, mentions the, iv. 370, «. i ; 
m«ntioned, iv. 344, n. 3. 

M.'^.xJN, Mrs. (afterwards Lady Mac- 
cles^.eld and Mrs. Brett). See under 
Macclesfield, Countess of. 

Masquerades, ii. 235. 

Mass, Idolatry of the, ii. 120. 

Mass-house, iii. 487, n. 2. 

Masses for the Dead, ii. 120. 

Massillon, v. 99, 354. 

Massinger, Philip, The Picture, iii. 
462. 

Massingham, iv. 155. 

Masters, Mrs., i. 281; iv. 284. 

Materialism, ii. 172. 

Mathem.\tics, all men equally capa- 
ble of attaining them, ii. 500; Gold- 
smith's low opinion of them, i. 476, 
n. 2. 

Mathias, Mr., iv. 104, 

Matlock, y. 490, 



Matrimonial J'hoitght, a, ii. 127. 

Matter, non-e.\istence of, i. 545. 

Matthew Paris, iv. 358, //. 3. 

Maty, Dr. Matthew, Bihliothhjtte 
Brittanique, i. 329 ; Johnson's Dic- 
tionary, reviews, i. 329, «. 4; ' little 
black dog,' i. 329; Memoirs of Ches- 
terfield, iv. 119, n. I. 

Maupertuis, ii. 62. 

Maurice, Kev. Y. D., ii. 141, w. 2. 

Maurice, Thomas, Poems and Miscel- 
laneous Pieces, iii. 421, n. I. 

Mawbey, Sir Joseph, iii. 94, n. 2. 

Ma.wvell, Rev. Dr., Collectanea of 
Johnson, ii. 133-54. 

Mayo, Rev. Dr., dines at Mr. Dilly's in 
1773, ii. 283-93; in 1778, iii. 323-40; 
in 17S4, iv. 381; freedom of the will, 
on the, iii. 329; liberty of conscience, 
ii. 286-90 ; ' Literary Anvil,' called 
the, ii. 289, M. 2. 

Mayor, Professor J. E. B., iv. 264, 
n. 2. 

Mayors of London, election, iii. 
405-6, 521-2. 

Mead, Dr., account of him, iii. 404, n. 
2; Johnson writes Dr. James's dedi- 
cation to him, i. 183 ; lived in the 
broad sunshine of life, iii. 404 ; on 
the needful quantity of sleep, iii. 
192. 

Meals, regular, iii. 347. 

Medea, at the Opera-house, iii. 104, 
w. 2. 

Medicated Baths, ii. 115. 

Medicine, medical knowledge from 
abroad, i. 425. See under Johnson, 
physic. 

Meditations on a Pudding, v. 400. 

Mediterranean, The, grand object 
of travelling, iii. 42, 518; subject for 
a poem, iii. 42. 

Meeke, Rev. Mr., i. 315-16, 318. 

Melancholy, acuteness not a proof of, 



Bo swell's Life of yohnson. 



175 



Melancholy. 



Metcalfe. 



iii. 99; constitutional, v. 434; foolish 
to indulge it, iii. 154; madness, allied 
to, iii. 199; remedies against it, — 
' Be not solitary, be not idle,' iii. 471; 
employment and hardships, iii. 200, 
204, 419; exercise, i. 75, 517; hidden, 
should be, iii. 419, 478 ; moderation 
in eating and drinking, i. 517; iii. 6; 
occupation of the mind and society, 
i. 517; ii. 485; iii. 6; thinking it 
down madness, ii. 504 ; retreats for 
the mind, as many as possible, ih.; 
some men free from it, iii. 6. See 
BoswELL, hypochondria, and John- 
son, melancholy. 

Melanchthon, Boswell's letter from 
his tomb, ii. 3, u. 2; iii. 134, 139, n. 
I ; punctuality, his, i. 37 ; ' the old 
religion,' ii. 121; iii. 139, ;/. i. 

Mei.chisedec, an authority on the law 
of entail, ii. 475, ;/. i ; Warburton's 
reply to Lowth's version of his story, 
V. 483- 

Melmoth, William (Pliny), at Bath, 
iii. 479 ; belief in a particular Prov- 
idence, iv. 314, n. 3 ; Fitzoshorne s 
Letters, iii. 481; reduced to whistle, 
ih. 

Melting-days, ii. 386. 

Melville, Viscount. See under Dun- 
das, Henry. 

Memis, Dr., a litigious physician, ii. 
333. 338 ; iii. 109, 115 ; Johnson's 
argument in his case, ii. 426-7. 

Alemoirs of Frederick III [//], K^it'g 
of Prussia , i . 357. 

Memoirs of Miss Sydney Biddulph, i. 
415, «. I, 450. 

Alemoirs of Scrihlerus. See Arbuth- 
NOT. 

Memorials of Westminster Abbey. See 
Stanley, Dean. 

Memory, art of attention, iv. 146, n. 
5 ; failure of it, iii. 217 ; morbid 



oblivion, v. 77 ; remembering and 
recollecting distinguished, iv. 147 ; 
scenes improve by it, v. 380-1 ; 
tricks played by it, v. 76-7. See 
under Johnson, memory. 

Men, have the upper hand of women, 
iii. 60-1. See Mankind. 

Menage, Gilles, Bayle's character of 
him, iv. 494, n. 2; Menagiana, epi- 
gram on the Molonists and the Jan- 
senists, iii. 388, «. i ; puns on co)-ps 
and fort, ii. 277; Queen of France 
and the hour, iii. 367, n. I. 

Menander, quoted, iii. 11, u. i. 

Mental Diseases. See Melan- 
choly. 

Menzies, Mr., of Culdares, v. 449. 

Merchants, Addison's Sir Andrew 
Freeport, v. 373 ; Chatham praises 
fair merchants, v. 373, n. 3 ; com- 
pared with Scotch landlords, i. 474; 
munificence in spending, iv. 5 ; 'a 
new species of gentleman,' i. 569, 
u. I. 

Merc he ta Muliertim, v. 364. 

Mercier, L. S., ii. 419, n. 4. 

Merit, weighed against money, i. 509- 
13; men of merit, iv. 198-9. 

Merriment, scheme of it hopeless, i. 

384, «• I- 
Messiah, Johnson's Latin version of 

Pope's, i. 71. 
Metaphors, their excellence, iii. 197; 

inaccuracy, iv. 445, n. 3. 
Metaphysical defined, ii. 297, n. 3. 
Metaphysical Poets, iv. 44. 
Metaphysical Tailor, a, iii. 503 ; 

iv. 216. 
Metaphysics, Burke's inaptitude for 

them, i. 546, n. 2 ; Johnson fond of 

them, i. 82; withheld from studying 

them, v. 123, n. il. 
Metastasio, iii. 184, n. 3. 
Metcalfe, Philip, described by Miss 



176 



Index to 



Metcalfe. 



Millar. 



Blimey, iv. 183, //. 2 ; Joliiison^ 
charity, anecdote of, iv. 153; witii 
him at Urighton, ii. 153, ;/. i ; iv. 
183-5; Reynolds's executor, iv. 183, 
M. 2 ; Round-Robin, signs the, iii. 

95. «• 3- 

Method, life to Ijc thruun into a, iii. 
107. 

Mkthodisi's, l)ittcrness, their, v. 446; 
cannot explain their excellence, v. 
446; Cock Lane (jhost, adopt the, i. 
470, //. 4 ; convicts, eflects on, iv. 
380, n. 2 ; Dodd's Address, ofTended 
by, iii. 138 ; Johnson consulteil by 
two young women, ii. 137; Jlmuphiy 
Clinker, mentioned in, ii. 141, ;/. 4 ; 
Hypocrite, 'I'he, ii. 367; inward light, 
ii. 145; Moravians, tpiarrel with the, 
iii. 138, n. 3; origin of the name, i. 
530, n. 3 ; Oxford, ex]n\lsion of six 
from, ii. 214; rise of the sect, i. 78, 
n. 3 ; sincere, how far, ii. 142 ; suc- 
cess in preaching, i. 530; ii. 141; v. 
446 ; term of reproach, i. 530, ;/. 3 ; 
Wales, in, v. 514. 

Mkt.kk.mcii, I'rince, iv. 31, ;/. 3. 

Meyer, Dr., ii. 290, ;/. 2. 

Meynell, ' old,' Johnson intimate wiili 
his family, i. 96 ; saying about for- 
eigners, ;. 133, «. i; iv. 17; — about 
London, iii. 431. 

Meynell, Miss (Mrs. Fitzherbert), i. 
96. 

MiCKLE, William Julius, account of 
him, ii. 209, n. 2; Hoswell and John- 
son dine with him at Wheatley, iv. 
355 ; Ciimnor Hall and Sir Walter 
Scott, V. 397, 11. 3; Garrick, quarrel 
with, ii. 209, n. 2 ; v. 397, n. 3 ; 
Johnson, never had a rough word 
from, iv. 289 ; Liisiad, The, ii. 209 ; 
dispute with Johnson about it, iv. 
289; mentioned, iii. 43. 

Microscopes, n. 44. 



.Mkyi.lis, v. 490. 

.Middle Ages, iv. 154, 196. 

Middle Class, absence of it abroad, 
ii. 461, ;;. i ; in France, ii. 451, 461; 
in Scotland, /A., «. i ; happy in Eng- 
land, ii. 461. 

Middle Siaie after death, i. 27S; ii, 
120; V. 405. 

.Middlesex, Farl of, i. 424. 

Middlesex, Under-shcrifT and Dr. 
Shebbeare, iii. 358, «. i. 

.Middlesex Flection, Hoswell's differ- 
ence with Johnson, iii. 250 ; John- 
son's discussion with Lord New- 
haven, iii. 463; /uilse Alarm, i. 156; 
ii. 128; Pa/riot, ii. 327: petitions, ii. 
118; 'lownshend refuses to pay the 
land-tax, iii. 522. 

MlDDLE'ioN, Lady Diana, v. no, n. 5. 

MlDDI.EWlcll, V. 493. 

MiDCELEY, Dr., iv. 231. 

Mic.RATioN of birds, ii. 63, 284. 

.Military character and life. See 
Soldiers. 

Military Dictionary, i. 160. 

M ii.iTARY spirit, injured by trade, ii. 
250. 

Mii.iriA ISii.L of 1756, i. 42, }t. 3, 356, 
;/. 2 ; ii. 367, n. 4 ; Act of 1757, iii. 
410, ;/. i; for Scotch Militia Bill: see 
under Scotla.nd; drillings in 1778, 
iii. 410, 415, n. 4; Scotch officers of 
Militia, iii. 453, ;;. 2. 

' Milking the bull,' i. 514. 

Mill, James, birth, v. 84, ;;. 2; in the 
East India House, ii. 330, n. 3; like- 
ness to Johnson, iv. 129, «. 3. 

Mill, John Stuart, difference in pay 
of men and women, on the, ii. 249, 
;/. I ; in the East India House, ii. 
330, ;/. 3 ; precocity, i. 170, ;/. 5 ; 
teaching, old and new systems of, ii. 
168, «. 3. 

Millar, Andrew, the bookseller, ac- 



BoswelVs Life of fo/mson. 



177 



Millar. 



Ministers. 



count of him, i. 332, ;/. 3 ; Hume's 
History of England, publishes, v. 
34, n. I ; Johnson's Dictionary, one 
of the proprietors of, i. 211; Robert- 
son's Scotland, publishes, iii. 380 ; 
' thanks God,' i. 332 ; mentioned, i. 
281, 351, n. I. 

Miller, Sir John, ii. 3S7; iii. 78. 

Miller, John, printer of the Evening 
Post, iv. 161, ;/. 5. 

Miller, I.ady, ii. 385. 

Miller, Philip, v. 88, n. 3, 520, n. 2. 

Miller, Professor John, v. 421, n. i. 

MiLMAN, Dean, iv. 234, //. i. 

MiLNER, Joseph, i. 530, ;/. 3. 

Milton, John, Adam, description of, 
iv. 84, «. 2 ; Areopagitica, ii. 68, ;/. 
4; blank verse, iv. 50-1; — puzzles 
a shepherd, iv. 51, ;/. I ; Boccage's 
translation, iv. 3S2, ;/. i; books, few 
called for in liis time, iv. 251, ;/. 3 ; 
borrows out of pride, v. 105, ;/. i ; 
Boswell, a wonder to, iv. 49; — Ma- 
lone's explanation, iv. 50, n. 2; char- 
acter, equal to his, ii. 295, ;;. i; confi- 
dence in himself, i. 231, ;/. i; college 
exercises, i. 70, ;/. 2 ; condescension 
in writing for children, ii. 468, n. 3; 
disdainful of help or hindrance, i. 
152, n. 2; Dryden's lines on him, ii. 
385; v. 98; eai-ly manuscripts, i. 237, 
n. i; iv. 212, ;/. i; education, ' won- 
ders ' in, ii. 467, >i. 3; frugality of a 
commonwealth, iii. 332, ;/. 3 ; giant 
among the pigmies, iv. 23, n. i ; 
grand-daughter, benefit for his, i. 
263; — Johnson writes the Prologue, 
ib.; recommends a subscription for 
her, i. 267 ; habitations, i. 128 ; iii. 
460; Johnson's abhorrence of his 
political principles, i. 263; iv. 48-50; 
— admiration of his blank verse, iv. 
50, //. 3; — blazon of his excellence, 
iv. 47; — does him 'illustrious jus- 



tice,' i. 263, 267; — criticises minor 
poems, iv. 115, n. i, 353; Samson 
Agonistes, i. 268, «. 2; — earlier and 
later estimates of him, ii. 274 ; — 
supposed enmity to him, i. 267; ii. 
274, 71. 3 ; iv. 74 ; Lauder's imposi- 
tion, i. 266; Lawrence, Dr., descend- 
ed from ' Lawrence of virtuous father 
virtuous son,' ii. 338, n. 2; Life, by 
Johnson, iv. 47-53 ; monument in 
Westminster Abbey, i. 264, n.\\ — 
one suggested in St. Paul's, ii. 274; 
' Milton, yl/r. John,' iv. 375; Milton 
no Plagiary, i. 265, n. 4 ; Paradise 
Lost, the war of Heaven, ii. 274, n. 
4; Phidias, a, iv. 115, ;/. i; public 
prayers omitted, i. 78, n. 2, 484, 71. 
2; schoolmaster, i. 99, «. i, 113, «. 
i; ii. 467, n. 3; shoe-latchets, wore, 
V. 20; style, distinguished by his, iii. 
31S; ' thinking in him,' ii. 274; Trac- 
tate on Lldiication, iii. 407 ; quota- 
tions — Allegro, 1. 49-iii. 180, ;;. 3 ; 
— 1. Ii8-i. 151; — 1. 134-i. 447; 
Lycidas, 1. 156-v. 321, n. i; Para- 
dise Lost (i. 263)-iii. 371, ;/. 3; (i. 
596)-iii. 412, n. 6; (ii. 94, i46)-iii. 
336, ;/. i; (ii. i46)-iv. 460, ;;. 5; (ii. 
56i)-ii. 94, ;/. 2; (ii. S46)-iv. 314, «. 
4; V. 53, n. 2: (iv. 35)-iv. 351, n. 2; 
(iv. 343)-iv. 352, n. 3; (v. 353)-iv. 
32, n. 5 ; (vii. 26)-iv. 49, ;/. 2 ; (x. 
743)-iii. 61, ;/. 4 ; Penseroso, 1. 63- 
i. 374, ;/. 2 ; Sonnets, xxi.-iv. 294, 
n. 3. 

Mimicry, ii. 177. 

Mind, management of it, ii. 504; me- 
chanical, looked at as, v. 38; physi- 
cian's art useless to one not at ease, 
iii. 186; putting one's whole mind to 
an object, ii. 540; retreats for it, ii. 
504. See WE-ATHER. 

Ministers of the Church, popular 
election of, ii. 2S1. 



178 



Index to 



Ministries. 



Monasteries. 



MiNlSTKiKS, attempt at silence in the 
Iluuse of Coramons, iii. 266; conces- 
sions to the people, ii. 404 ; iii. 4 ; 
list of ministries from 1770-1784, iv. 
^95i "• 3; I'Ord North's ministry, its 
duration, iv. 195, //. 3 ; (1771) con- 
test with the City, iv. 161, «. 5 ; 
(1773) much enfeebled, ii. 239; want 
of power, V. 63; (1774) feeble, iv. 80; 
(1775) merit not rewarded, ii. 404; 
neither stable nor grateful, ii. 399; 
feeble and timid, ii. 407 ; too little 
power, ii. 404; (1776) 'timidity of 
our scoundrels,' iii. i; imbecility, iii. 
54, and ;/. 2; ministers asked to the 
Lord Mayor's feast for the first time 
for seven years, iii. 523; (1778) ' now 
there is no power,' iii. 405 ; (1779) 
Johnson has no delight in talking of 
public affairs, iii. 464; Horace Wal- 
pole's account, /A., ;/. 3; (1780), 
afraid to repress persecution of Pa- 
pists in Scotland, iii. 485, //. i; fee- 
bleness at the Gordon Riots, iii. 48S; 
(1781), Johnson against it, iv. 94, 
;r6; gives thanks for its dissolution, 
iv. 161 ; bunch of imbecility, ih. ; 
successors could hardly do worse, iv. 
162, /;. 2; timidity, iv. 231; struggles 
between two sets of ministers in 
1784, iv. 3CX), w. 2. 

MlNORC.\, ii. 202; iii. 279. 

' J\Iim aino,' iii. 346. 

MiR.\BE.-\i", ' dram.itised his death,' v. 
452, //. 3. his motion about Corsica, 
ii. Si, «. I. 

Miracles, i. 515; iii. 214. 

Mirror, The, iv. 450. 

Mirth, the measure of a man's under- 
standing, ii. 434, M. I. 

Misiellancoiis and Fui[iti7'c' J^iect-s by 
the Ant hour of the Kamhler, ii. 310. 

Aliscellaneous Obser:'atiotts on the 
Tragedy of Macbeth, published 



1745, i. 202; praised by Warburton, 

i. 203; criticism on Ilanmer, i. 205. 
Misdemeanour, defined, iii. 244. 
Misella, i. 259. 
Misers, contemptible philosophically, 

v. 127; few in England, v. 128; must 

be miserable, iii. 366; no man born 

a miser, iii. 366. 
Misery, balance of misery, iv. 346; 

'doom of man,' iii. 226 ; hypocrisy 

of misery, iv. 82 ; misery of want, 

iii. 30. 
MlsKORTLNES, talking of one's, iv. 36. 
Miss, a, V. 210, w. 3. 
Missionaries, sanguine and untrust- 

w<irthy, V. 446. 
Mistresses, i. 441. 
MiTciIEi.i., .Mr., English .Minister at 

lierlin, iii. 526, ;/. 2. 
MiTCilEl.l., a tradesman, i. 275, «. 4. 
MoH rule, iii. 435-6. .SV*" RiuTs. 
Modern Characters from Shakespeare, 

iii. 289. 
Modern Characters from the Classics, 

iii. 317- 
Modern times, better than ancient, 

iv. 251; V. 87. 
Modernising an author, iv. 364. 
Modesty, how far natural, iii. 400. 
Modus, i. 328; iii. 368. 
Moi.if:RE, A~,'are, v. 315 ; goes round 

the world, v. 354; Misanthrope, iii. 

425, n. I. 
Mdi.inisis, iii. 388, ;/. i. 
Moi.TZER, Jacques, v. 490, n. 5. 
Monarchy, iii. 53. 
Monasteries, austerities treated of in 

Rambler and Idler, ii. 498 ; bodily 

labour wanted, ii. 447 ; Carthusian, 

unreasonableness of becoming a, ii. 

497 ; their silence absurd, ii. 498 ; 

Johnson curious to see them, i. 422; 

— saying to a Lady Abbess, ii. 498; 

men enter them who cannot govern 



BoswelVs Life of Johnson. 



179 



Monasteries. 



Monro. 



themselves, i. 422 ; ii. 28 ; monastic 
morality, iii. 331 ; -when allowable, 
ii. 11; unfit for the young, v. 70. 
MoNBODDO, Lord (James Burnet), ac- 
count of him. ii. 84, n. 2 ; v. 86-7 ; 
air bath, his, iii. 191; i:ncestors, su- 
periority of our, V. 87; Boswell, let- 
ter from, V. 84; Condamine's Savage 
Girl, V. 125 ; copyright, v. 81 ; Dic- 
tionary-makers, i. 343, n. 3 ; Egj'p- 
tians, ancient, iv. 145; Elzevir John- 
son, an, ii. 217, «. 2 ; v. 83, «. 4 ; 
enthusiastical farmer, v. 88, 126 ; 
Erse writings, ii. 436, 439 ; Farmer 
Burnet, v. 87, 126 ; Gory, his black 
servant, v. 93; helping him downhill, 
V. 276; Home's Douglas better than 
Shakespeare, v. 412, tt. i; 'humour, 
incoliimi gravitate,' v. 428 ; John- 
son's yicwrwft', receives a copy of, iii. 
117; — , meets, in Edinburgh, v. 
449; in London, iv. 314; — , no love 
for, ii. 84, n. 2, 85, tt. i; iv. 314, w. 
4 I v. 83 ; — pleased with him, v. 
93 ; — style, criticised, iii. 197 ; — 
visits him, iv. 314, «. 4; v. 83, 86-94, 
430; ]vL(\ge a posteriori, v. 50; Knight 
the negro, case of, iii. 243; ' Monny,' 
iv. 314, «. 4 ; ' nation,' his, ii. 252 ; 
Origin attd Progress of Language , 
ii. 84, «. 2, 298, tt. 2; Ouran-Outang, 
capabilities of the, v. 51, 283; primi- 
tive state of human nature, ii. 298 ; 
savage life, admiration of, ii. 83-4, 
169 ; V. 92 ; son, his, v. 92 ; tail, 
theory of the, v. 50, 126, 376; talked 
nonsense, ii. 84-5; v. 126; men- 
tioned, ii. 60, ;/. i; iii. 143, 146; iv. 

I, M. I. 

MoNCKTON, Hon. Mary (Countess of 
Cork), account of her, iv. 126, «. 2 ; 
Boswell gets drunk in her house, iv. 
127; sends her verses, iv. 127, n. 2; 
Johnson at her assembly, iv. 180, n. 



i; calls her a dunce, iv. 126; prom- 
ises her to go and see Mrs. Siddons, 
ii. 371, «. 2; iv. 280, «. I. 

Money, abilities needed in getting it, 
iii. 434; advantages that it can give, 
iv. 16, 146, 175 ; arguments against 
it, i. 511; awkwardness in counting 
it, iv. 32; change in its value, v. 365, 
tt. 2; circulating, happiness produced 
by its, ii. 491; iii. 201, 283, 332, ns. 
2 and 3 ; conveniences where it is 
plentiful, V. 68 ; country, keeping it 
in the, ii. 491; domestic satisfaction, 
laid out on, ii. 403; economy in its 
use, iii. 300-1 ; enjoyed, should be 
early, ii. 260 ; excludes but one evil 
— poverty, iii. 182; getting it not all 
a man's business, iii. 207-8 ; gives 
nothing extraordinary, iv. 146; hoard- 
ed, iv. 199 ; increase of it breaks 
down subordination, iu. 297 ; in- 
crease of it in one nation impover- 
ishes another, ii. 492 ; influence, 
gives, v. 127; influence of loans, ii. 
192; iv. 257; influence by patronis- 
ing young men, ii. 192 ; ' insolence 
of wealth,' iii. 359; interest, iii. 387; 
investments, iv. i8g; ' ttiake money,* 
iii. 223; money-getting defended, ii. 
369; iv. 146; occupation, purchases, 
iii. 204; respect gained by it, ii. 176; 
save and spend, happiest those who, 
iii. 366; spending it better than giv- 
ing it, iii. 65; iv. 199; trade, not in- 
creased by, ii. 113 ; travelling, diffi- 
culties of, when there was little 
money, iii. 202 ; writing for it, iii. 
22. See Debts. 

Monks. See Monasteries. 

Monks of Medmenham Abbey, i. 
144, n. 4. 

Monmouth, Duke of, v. 406, 

MoNNOYE. De La, iii. 367, n. i. 

Monro, Dr., iv. 303-5. 



i8o 



Index to 



Montacute. 



Moore. 



Montacute, Lords, iv. 185. 

MoNTAGi', Edward, iii. 464, //. 2. 

Montagu, Lady Wortley, contempt 
for Richardson, iv. 135, n. 3. 

MoNTAUir, Mrs., account of her writ- 
ings, ii. loi, n. 3 ; air and manner, 
iii. 276, //. 4; Barry's picture, in, iv. 
259, ;/. I ; Hath, at, iii. 479-Si ; be- 
nevolence, her, iii. 55, w. 4; IJosweli 
exchidcd from her liouse, iv. 75 ; 
character by Miss Hurney, iii. 55, n. 
4, 276, n. 4; iv. 317, //. 3; — by 
Johnson and Mrs. Thrale, ib.; Cum- 
berland's Feast of Kiiisoti, described 
in, iv. 75; (larrick, praises, v. 278; 
Essay on Shakespeare, ii. loi ; iv. 
ig, n. 2 ; v. 279 ; Boswell's contro- 
versy with Mrs. I'io/.zi about it, ih., 
n. I ; house, her new, iv. 75, ns. i 
and 2 ; ill, iii. 493 ; Johnson, drops, 
iv. 85 ; — j;ives her a catalogue of 
De Foe's works, iii. 304; — high 
praise of her, iv. 317 ; — letters to 
her: see Johnson, letters; — 'not 
highly .cr(7////V(/,' ii. 149; , quar- 
rels with, iii. 483, //. I ; war with 
him, iv. 75, ns. i and 2 ; — recon- 
ciled, iv. 75, n. 2, 276, M. 4 ; — the 
support of her assemblies, iv. 74, ;/. 
3; lived to a great age, iv. 317, n. 3; 
Lyttelton, Lord, friendship with, iv. 
74; Mounsey, Dr., mentions, ii. 73, 
n. i; par plnribus, iii. 481; portrait 
by Miss Reynolds, iii. 276; pretence 
to learning, iii. 277 ; Shakespeare, 
patronises, ii. 106, n. i ; trembles 
for him, ii. 103 ; Stillingtleet's blue 
stockings, iv. 125, n. 3; Williams, 
Mrs., pensions, iii. 55, n. 4; iv. 75, 
n. 2; wits, among the, iv. 119, n. 2. 

Montague, Basil, son of Lord Sand- 
wich, iii. 436, n. I. 

Montague, Frederic, moves to abol- 
ish the fast of Jan. 30, ii. 174, n. 2. 



Montaigne, on wise men playing the 
fool, i. 3, n. 2. 

Mf)NTESQUlEU, Esprit lies Lois, Hel- 
vetius advises against its publication, 
v. 46, n. 2 \ — on tiie abolition of 
torture, i. 540, n. 2 ; influence on 
Hume, ii. (xj, n. 2; Lettres Persanes, 
iii. 330, //. 2; (|uotcs the practice of 
unknown countries, v. 238. 

MoNTGoMEKiK, Margaret (Mrs. Hos- 
well). See HoswEl.l., Mrs. 

.Montgomery, Colonel, v. 171. 

Monthly Ke7'ieu\ IJadcock's corre- 
spondence, iv. 510, ;/. 5 ; Cjriniths, 
owned by, iii. 34. n. 3, 37, ;/. 2; hos- 
tile to the Church, ii. 45 ; iii. 37 ; 
payment to writers, iv. 247, ;/. 2 : 
price of a fourth share, iii. 37, ;/. 2; 
Smollett, attack on, iii. 37, ;/. 2; writ- 
ten by duller men than the Critical 
Reviewers, iii. 37. 

Montrose, second Duke of, lioswtll 
gets drunk at his house, iv. 127; shot 
a highwayman, iii. 272, n. i ; men- 
tioned, V. 40S, n. I. 

Montrose, third Duke of. See 
Graha.m, Marcfuis of. 

Montrose, first Manjuis of, letters to 
the Laird of Col, v. 340; his execu- 
tion, V. 340, n. I. 

Montrose, House of, iii. 435. 

Monuments in St. Baul's Cathe- 
dral, ii. 274; iv. 488, ;/. 2. 

Monville, Mr., ii. 447-8. 

Moody, the player, clapped on the 
back by Tom Davies, ii. 394; men- 
tioned, ii. 389, 392. 

Moon, twenty-sixth day of the new, 
iv. 35. 

Moor, Dr., Professor of Creek at 
Glasgow, iii. 45, n. 3. 

Moore, Edward, account of him, iii. 
481, n. 3 ; edits The IVorld, i. 234, 
n. 4, 299, n. I. 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



i8i 



Moore. 



Morell. 



Moore, Dr. John, confounded with 
Edward Moore, iii. 481, n. 3 ; de- 
scribes the streets of Paris, ii. 452, n. 
2; meets Johnson at Mr. Hoole's, iv. 

325. "• 2. 

Moore, Rev. Mr., Ordinary of New- 
gate, iv. 380, n. 3. 

Moore, Thomas, lines on Sheridan's 
funeral, i. 264, ;/. i. 

Moors of Barbary, ii. 448. 

Morality, substitution for it when 
violated, ii. 148. 

Moravians, intimate with Johnson, 
iv. 473-4 ; missions, v. 446 ; quarrel 
with the Methodists, iii. 138, //. 3. 

Moray, Bishop of, v. 129, n. 2. 

More, Hannah, Bas Bleu, iii. 333, ;/. 
5; iv. 125; boarding-school, kept a, 
iv. 394, n. 2; books found guilty of 
popery, iii. 485, ;/. i; Boswell's ten- 
derness for Johnson's failings, be- 
seeches, i. 35, ;/. 3 ; Boswell's and 
Garrick's imitation of Johnson, ii. 
373, ;/. 2; Covent- Garden mob, iv. 
322, n. 2 ; dates, indifferent to, iv. 
102, ;;. i; I'"ox, describes, iv. 337, ;/. 
3; Garrick's death and the Litera- 
ry Club, i. 556, ;/. 3; — explanation 
of Johnson's harshness, iii. 210, n. 2; 
— , flatters, iii. 333 ; — and Mrs. 
Garrick, friendship with, iii. 333, ;/. 
4; Garrick's, Mrs., 'Chaplain,' iv. 
Ill ; George III and Hutton the 
Moravian, iv. 473, n. 6; Henderson, 
John, of Pembroke College, iv. 344; 
hides her face, iv. 115 ; Home's 
Douglas, V. 412, ;/. i; Johnson brill- 
iant and good-humoured, iii. 295, ;;. 
5; — criticism of Milton, iv. 115, ;/, 
I. 352; — death an era in literature, 
iv. 485, «. 2 ; — finds her reading 
Pascal, iv. 102, n. i; — , flatters, iii. 
333 ; iv. 394 ; flattered by him, iii. 
333. '^- 5; iv. 394, n. 3; — and George 



HI, ii. 48, )i. 1; — health in 1782, 
iv. 172, n. 2; 1783, iv. 254, H. 4; — in 
Grosvenor Square, iv. 83, ;?. 2 ; — 
introduced to, iv. 394, n. 3; — Jour- 
ney, sale of, ii. 354, ;/. 3 ; — likens 
her to Hannibal, iv. 172, n. 2; praises 
her, iv. 317; — and Macbeth's heath, 
V. 131, n. 2; — ' mild radiance of the 
setting sun,' iv. 254 ; — prayer for 
Dr. Brocklesby, iv. 478, ;/. i; — re- 
gret that he had no profession, iii. 
351, «. I ; — sliows her Pembroke 
College, i. 88, n. 2; iv. 174, n. 2; — 
and The Siege of Sinope, iii. 294, n. 
I ; Kennicott, Dr., ii. 147, n. 2; Ken- 
nicott, Mrs., iv. 329, n. i; Langton's 
devotion to Johnson, iv. 307, n. 3 ; 
Leonidas Glover and Horace Wal- 
pole, V. 132, n. 4 ; lived to a great 
age, iv. 317, ;/. 3; Monboddo, Lord, 
V. 87, n. I ; Nine, iv. 1 1 1, «. 4; Paoli's 
mixture of languages, ii. 93, n. 2 ; 
Percy, tragedy of, iii. 333, n. 4; re- 
spectable, use of the term, iii. 273, ;/. 
2; scarlet dress in a court-mourning, 
iv. 375, ;/. 2; Sensibility, iv. 174, n. 
2 ; Shipley's, Bishop, assembly, iv. 
87, n. 2; Thrale's death, iv. 97, n. 3; 
Tom Jones, reads, ii. 200, n. i; Ve- 
sey's, Mrs., parties, iii. 482, n. i; 
Williams, Miss, i. 269, «. i ; men- 
tioned, iii. 290. 

More, Dr. Henry, Divine Dialogues, 
V. 335; a visionary, ii. 186. 

More, Rorie. See Macleod, Sir Rod- 
erick. 

More, Sir Thomas, death, not deserted 
by his mirth in, v. 452, n. 3; epigram 
on him, v. 490 ; manuscripts in the 
Bodleian, i. 336; Utopia quoted, iii. 
230, n. 2. 

More, Celtic ior great, ii. 306, n. 3; v. 
236. 

Morell, Dr. Thomas, v. 398. 



l82 



Index to 



Morellet. 

MoRELLKT, Abbe, ii. 69, n. i. 

MoRftRl's Dictionary, v. 354. 

MoRGAC'.M, ii. 62. 

MoRCANN, Maurice, anecdotes of John- 
son, iv. 222 ; Essay on Fahtaff, iv. 
221. 

Alornini^ Chronicle, iv. 172, 173, w. i. 

Morning Post, iv. 342, n. 2. 

Morris, Corbyn, iv. 122, /;. 3. 

Morris, Miss, iv. 482. 

Morris, Mr. Secretary, ii. 314, n. 6. 

Morrison, Mr. Alfred, Collection of 
Autographs, Jolinson's letter to Ry- 
land, iv. 425, n. 4; to Taylor, ii. 536, 
n. 2; iv. 161, n. 4; Johnson's receipt 
for payment for the Lives, iv. 41, ;;. 3. 

Morrison, Kenneth, v. 323. 

Mortimer, Dr., Rector of Lincoln 
College, Oxford, ii. 308, n. i. 

MosAiCAi. Chronoi.ocy. i. 424. 

Moser, Mr., Keeper of the Royal 
Academy, ii. 295, n. 2; iv. 262. 

Moses, Hrydone's antimosaical remark, 
ii. 535; evidence required from him 
by Pharaoh, ii. 172; Song of Moses 
paraphrased, v. 302. 

Moss, Dr., iv. 85. 

Motives, i. 460. 

MoTTEU.x, Mr., ii. 456. 

MoiNSEY, Dr., account of him, ii. 73, 
//. i; Johnson vehement against him, 
ii. 73. 

Mount Edgecumbe, ii. 261, n. i ; v. 
116. 

Mountainous Regions, iii. 517. 

MouNTSTUART, Lord (second Earl of 
Bute), Boswell's dedication to him, 
ii. 23, M. 2, 26 ; — friendship with 
him, iv. 148; V. 66; embassy to Tu- 
rin, iii. 468 ; Scotch Militia bill, ii. 
493 ; iii. I ; mentioned, i. 434, 440 ; 
iii. 105. 

Mourning Bride. See under CoN- 
GKLVf. \ViUiam, 



Murphy. 

Mouse's likeness, v. 43, n. 3. 

MmUy, ii. 415, 527. 

MUUGE, Colonel William, i. 437, n. 2. 

Midge, Dr. John, i. 437; letter from 
Johnson, iv. 277. 

MuDGE, Mr., i. 563. 

Ml I)(;e, Rev. Zachariah, death, iv. 90, 
//. I ; ' idolised in the west,' i. 438; 
Johnson's character of him, iv. 89; 
Sermons, iv. 89, 113. 

MUKHNS, buttered, iii. 437. 

MiTR, a Scotch advocate, transported 
for sedition, i. 540, w. 2; iv. 144, n. 2. 

MuLGRAVE, second Baron, i. 134, //. 2; 
iii. 9; V. 412, n. I. 

Miller, Mr., of Woolwich Academy, 
i. 406, ;/. I. 

MuLSo, Miss. See Ciiai'ONE, Mrs. 

Mummies, iv. 145. 

MuNSTER, Bishop of, iii. 375. n. 2. 

.MuRCHisoN, — , a factor, v. 161, 166. 

Murder, prescription of, v. 25, 98. 

Murdoch, Dr., Life of Thomson, iii. 
132, 151, 409. 

MuRisoN, Principal, v. 71-2. 

Murphy, Arthur, account of him, i. 
413, n. i; Ben Jonson's Fall of Mor- 
timer, iii. 89, M. 6 ; Boswell's intro- 
duction to Johnson, i. 453, ;/. 2 ; 
Campbell's Diary, mentioned in, ii. 
3S7, //. 2; counsel in the Copyright 
Case, ii. 312 ; Davies's stories, per- 
haps the subject of one of, iii. 47, w. 
I ; Elements of Criticism, ii. 103 ; 
Epilogue to Irene, mistaken about 
the. i. 228, n. 4; Essex Head Club, 
member of the, iv. 293, 505 ; Eti- 
phrasia, v. 117, «. i; False Delicacy, 
ii. 54, w. 2 ; Foote's Life, ought to 
write, iii. 210, ti. 3; Garrick, contro- 
versy with, i. 378, n. 7 ; description 
of a dinner at his house, ii. 178, tt. 2; 
of his funeral, iv. 240, n. i; sarcasm 
ar-'vinst him, ii, 400, «. 5; Cray's Inn 



Boswelfs Life of fohnson. 



183 



Murphy. 



Mythologjy. 



Journal, i. 357, 379, 412; inaccuracy 
about a visit to Oxford, iv. 270, ;/. i; 
Johnson, account of his introduc- 
tion to, i. 312, u. 2, 412; — , apolo- 
gises to, for repeating some oaths, ii. 
387, n. 2; iii. 47, u. \\ — an ardent 
friend, iv. 397, «. 2 ; — colloquial 
Latin, ii. 144, ;/. 2; — contempt of 
Garrick's acting, ii. 106, ;/. 2; — De- 
bates, i. 584; — degree of Doctor, i. 
565, n. f; — desire of life, iv. 482, 
ti. 2; — desire for reconciliation, ii. 
293, «. 3; — dread of death, iv. 460, 
«. 5; — and Garrick introduced to 
the Thrales, i. 570; — levee, attends, 
ii. 136; — life in Johnson's Court, 
ii. 5, «. i; — love for him, ii. 146; 
— pension, i. 433-5; — praises him 
as a dramatic writer, ii. 146; — sor- 
row for Garrick's death, iii. 422, ;/. i ; 
proposal to write his Life, ib.: — 
style, i. 256, n. 4; — and Thurlow, 
iv. 377, «. 5; — will, not in, iv. 463, 
;/. 3; — - wit and humour, ii. 301, //. 
2; Mason's Memoirs of Gray, iii. 35; 
Mounsey, Dr., ii. 73, ». i; JMttr, ii. 
296; Orphan of China, i. 375, n. 2, 
378; Poetical Epistle to S. Johnson, 
i. 411; portrait at Streatham, iv. 181, 
n. 3; Review of Burke s Sublime and 
Beautiful, i. 359; Romeo and Juliet 
as altered by Garrick, v. 277, n. 6; 
Seleetions, disapproves of, iii. 33 ; 
Shakespeare and Congreve compared, 
ii. 98; Simpson, Joseph, account of, 
iii. 32; Smith's Wealth of A^ations, 
cannot read, ii. 492, «. i; Spectator, 
chance writers in the, iii. 39; Thrale's 
friendship for him, i. 570, «. 2; ' Tig 
and Tirry,' ii. 146, n. 3; Zcnobia, ii. 
146, n. 3; mentioned, ii. 94, 429, 537, 
n. 2; iii. 32; iv. 315. 

Murray, Sir Alexander, v. 334. 

Murray, Lady Augusta, ii. 175, n. 1. 

VT.— 17 



Murray, Lord George, ii. 309, n. 3. 

Murray, James Stuart, Earl of, the 
Regent, v. 129, n. 2. 

Murray, John, the bookseller, iii. 
334- 

Murray, — (Lord Henderland), John- 
son, dines with, iii. 10-18; silent in 
his company, v. 56; sends his son to 
Westminster School, iii. 14. 

Murray, R., Fellow of Trinity Col- 
lege, Dublin, i. 566. 

Murr.\y, William. See Mansp^ield, 
Earl of. 

Musariim Deliciae, iii. 362, n. 2. 

Muse in Livery, ii. 511. 

Muses' Welcome to King James, v. 64, 
90. 

Musc.rave, Dr. Samuel, dines with 
Reynolds, iii. 361-3 ; parades his 
Greek, iii. 361, n. i. 

Musgrave, Mr. (afterwards Sir) Rich- 
ard, ii. 393, n. i; iv. 373, n. i. 

MusGRAVE, Sir William, i. 176. 

Music, effect of it explained, iii. 225; 
emoluments of performers, ii. 259 ; 
melancholy effects produced per sc 
bad, iv. 26 ; in Revelation, ii. 187. 
See Johnson, music. 

Musical Travels of Joel Collyer, i. 365. 

MuswELL Hill, ii. 433, «. 3. 

Mutiny Act. See Soldiers. 

Mutual friend, iii. 117, n. i. 

Myddelton, Rev. Mr., v. 516. 

Myddleton, Colonel, family motto, 
V. 513, n. 2 ; Johnson, erects a me- 
morial to, iv. 485, n. 3; V. 516, «. i; 
— visits him, v. 505, 515-16. 

Mylne, Robert, i. 406. 

Mysargyrus, i. 292, 294, n. i. 

Mystery, iii. 369 ; Boswell's love of 
the mysterious, iv. 109, n. I ; ' the 
wisdom of blockheads,' iii. 369, n. 3; 
universal, iii. 369. 

Mythology, its dark and dismal r»- 



i84 



Index to 



Mythology. 



New Testament. 



gions, iv. ig, tt. 4 ; can no longer be 
used by poets, iv. 20; none among 
savages, iii. 57. 

N. 

Nauohs, ii. 389, //. i; v. 120. 

Nail, growth of the, iii. 452, «. 3. 

Nairne, Colonel, V. 78-9. 

Nairnk, William (Lord Dunsinan), 
accomiianius Johnson to St. An- 
drews, V. 60, 63, 66, 70 ; to Edin- 
burgh Castle, V. 441 ; jiraiscd by him, 
V. 60; and by Sir Walter Scott, il>., 
u. 2; mentioned, iii. 47, 144; v. 42, 

449. 451- 

Nairnk, Mr., the optician, iii. 24, ;/. 2. 

A'ainliy-Pamf'v, i. 207. 

Namks, queer-sounding, iii. 87. 

Nami'TWKM, V. 493. 

Nap after dinner, ii. 466. 

Nai'IKR, Rev. Alexander, edition of 
Boswell, ii. 448, //. 4. 

Nai'Lks, iii. 22; V. 60. 

Naples, History of the Kingdom of, iv. 
4, ;/. I. 

Napoleon DoNArARTK, ii. 451, ;/. 5. 

Nares, Rev. Mr., iv. 449. 

N.-\RRO\v place, how far the mind 
grows narrow in a, iii. 279. 

Narrowness in expenses, v. 393-4; a 
fit of narrowness, iv. 220. 

Nash, Alderman, iii. 522. 

Nash, Richard (' Beau '), engages in a 
religious dispute at Bath, iv. 333, ;/. 
2; 'here comes a fool,' i. 3, ;/. 2; a 
pen his torpedo, i. 184, ;/. i ; put 
down smoking at Bath, v. 67, n. 3. 

N.\SH, Rev. Dr., History' of Worcester- 
shire, i. 87, ;/. 4; iii. 308, n. i. 

Nation, state of common life, v. 124, 
n. 3. 

National Characiek, no perma- 
nence in, ii. 223. 

National Debt, ii. 147; iii. 464, n. 3. 



National Faith, iv. 25. 

Native Place, love of one's, iv. 
170. 

Natives. See under Indians and 
Savages. 

Natural History, iii. 309. 

Xatural History. See GOLDS.MITH, 
Oliver, Animated A'ature. 

Natiral riiiLosoi'HY, ii. 63. 

Nati'RE, Boswell's want of relish for 
its beauties, i. 533; all men envious 
and thieves by nature, iii. 307; state 
of nature, iii. 57; v. 99. .SV<- under 
Sava(;es. 

Nature Displayed, iv. 3f)0. 

A'az'igation, ii. 156, ;/. 4; iii. 412. 

Nm-iy, iii. 412, //. 4. 

Neanoer, ii. 313. 

Necessity, an eternal, v. 53. Set 
under Kree Will. 

Necker, Mme., Garrick's Hamlet, v. 
42, It. 2. 

Negroes. See Slaves. 

Negroes, law-cases. See Kni(;ht, 
Joseph, and Somerset, James. 

Nelson, Robert, Festi^-als and Fasts, 
ii. 525; iv. 359; friend of Archibald 
Campbell, v. 407; the original of Sir 
Charles Grandison, ii. 525, ;/. 2. 

Nem, Count, iii. 40. 

Nero, ii. 292, ;;. 5. 

Nerves, weak, iv. 323. 

Netherlands, Johnson's projected 
tour, i. 544; iii. 516; Temple's ac- 
count of the drinking, iii. 375. 

N^etwork, defined, i. 340. 

Neuechatel, ii. 247. 

Ne'w Bath Guide, i. 449, n. 3. 

Np:w Floodgate Iron, iv. 223. 

New Place, eflfects of a, iii. 145. 

New Protestant Litany, i. 204, ;/. 

New South Wales, iv. 144, n. 2. 

N^cw Testament, most difficult book in 
the world, iii. 339. 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



i«5 



New Zealand. 



Nichols. 



New Zealand, iii. 57. 

Newbery, Francis, bookseller, and 

dealer in quack medicines, v. 33, ;/. 

2; Johnson's advice to him about a 

fiddle, iii. 274, ;/. i. 
Newbery, John, the bookseller, chil- 
dren's books, iv. 9, n. 5; Goldsmith's 

publisher, iii. 114, ;/. 2; v. 33, ;;. 2; 

James's powder, vendor of, iii. 4, //. 

5; 'Jack Whirler ' of The Idler, v. 

33, n. 2 ; Johnson's debts to him, i. 

405, ;/. 3; publishes his hUer, i. 3S2, 

3S8, ;/. I ; The World DisJ^luyed, i. 

400. 
Newcastle, famous townsmen, v. 17, 

«. 2 ; John.son passes through it, ii. 

303, 306; V. 17; story of a ghost, iii. 

338, 447- 

Newcastle, first Duke of, i. 174. 

Newcastle, second Duke of, iv. 74. 

Newcastle Fly, ii. 432, ;/. i. 

Newcastle ship-master, a, v. 355. 

Newcastle -UNDER -Line, iii. 153, 
n. I. 

Newcome, Colonel (in 7'he A'e'o- 
comes), ii. 343, ;/. 2. 

Newfoundland Fishery, iii. 231, 
n. I. 

Newhall, Lord, iii. 171. 

Newhaven, Lord, iii. 463-4. 

Newman, Cardinal, Johnson's truth- 
fulness, iv. 353, ;/. I ; Oxford about 
the year 1770, ii. 509, ;/. 2. 

Newmarket, i. 444, >i. i. 

Newmarsh, Captain, v. 153. 

Newport School in Shropshire, i. 58, 
153, n. I. 

Newspapers, booksellers, governed by 
the, V. 458, n. 2; everything put into 
them, iii. 91, 376; knowledge dif- 
fused, ii. 196; Macpherson's ' super- 
vision,' ii. 351, ;/. 3 ; in the time of 
the Usurpation, v. 416; whole world 
informed, ii. 238. 



Newswriters, ii. 196, n. i ; iii. 303, 
«. I. 

Newton, Sir Isaac, Arguments in 
Proof 0/ a Deity, i. 357-8; a worthy 
carman will get to heaven as well as 
he, iii. 327 ; Bentley's verses, men- 
tioned in, iv. 27, //. 3; free from sin- 
gularities, ii. 85, ;/. 2 ; house in St. 
Martin's Street, iv. 156; infidelity, 
reported early, i. 526; Johnson's ad- 
miration of him, ii. 144 ; Leibnitz 
and Clarke, v. 327 ; mathematical 
knowledge unequalled, iv. 251; poet, 
as a, V. 38; 'stone-dolls,' ii. 502, 
n. 2. 

Newton, John, Bishop of Bristol and 
Dean of St. Paul's, Aeeount of his 
own Life, iv. 329, n. 3, 330, ;/. i ; 
censures Johnson, iv. 329, ;/. 3 ; 
Johnson's retaliation, iv. 329-30 ; 
Dissertation on the Prophecies, iv. 
330; mentioned, i. 92, n. 2. 

Newton, John, of Lichfield, father of 
the Bishop, i. 92, n. 2. 

Newton, Rev. John, engaged in the 
slave trade, iii. 231, «. i ; Johnson's 
' conversion,' iv. 313, //. 2. 

Newton, Dr., i. 263, n. 4. 

Newton, Mr., of Lichfield, v. 489. 

NlccoLSON, of Scorbeck, v. 221. 

Nichols, Dr. Frank, De Anima Afe- 
dica, iii. 186; physician to the King, 
turned out by Lord Bute, ii. 406 ; 
rule of attenilance as a physician, iii. 
186. 

Nichols, John, account of him, iv. 
504; Anecdotes of IVilliatn Boioyer, 
iv. 185, 425, 504; Essex Head Club, 
member of the, iv. 293, 504, 505 ; 
Gent. A/dt;., edits, i. 105, ;;. 2; iv. 
504; Johnson, anecdotes of, iv. 470, 
;/. 2; — funeral, invitation card to, 
iv. 484, //. i; — and Henderson the 
actor, iv. 2S2, «. i; — last days, iv. 



[86 



Index to 



NickoU. 

470-3; V. 73, n. 3; — letters to him: 
//•^ under Johnson, lettcr*>; — spclLs 
his name wrongly, iv. 43, n. i ; ///- 
erary Anfcdotes of the Eighteenth 
Century, iv. 425, «. 2, 504; Thirlby, 
memoir of, iv. 186, w. i; Tycrs and 
The Idler, iii. 350, u. 3; mentioned, 
i. 98, M. I, 115, 118, n. 4, 157, 268, 
n. 2; iv. 414. 
Nicholson — , :in advocate, v. 242. 
NiCKN.\MKs, i. 445, M. 3. 
Nicoi., George, the bookbeller, iv. 2()o; 

letter from Johnson, iv. 420. 
Ni(oi,.\ii)A, ii. 435. 
NiKiKicATioN, ii. 285. 
Nu;MT-cArs, v. 305-6, 348. 
iXight Thoughts. .SVc- Yoi;N(;. 
Nll.K, a waterfall on it, i. 103, tt. \. 
NisKKT, Rev. Mr., v. 82. 
NisBET, — , an advocate, v. 242. 
NlsBKTT, Sir John, iii. 233, u. i. 
NiTROtiKN, discovery of, iv. 274. //. 5. 
Xo Sir, as used l)y Johnscm, ii. 517; 
iii. 80, 202, 2IO, 345 ; explained by 
Hoswell, iv. 364. 
NoHil.i lY, fortune-seeking, ii. 145; re- 
spect due to them, i. 517-18; iv. 132; 
in virtue above the average, iii. 401- 
2; unconstitutional influence in elec- 
tions, iv. 286, 288. 
NoKl.K, Mark, Memoirs of Cromwell, 

iv. 272, w. 4. 
NoHl.K Al TIIOKS, iv. 132-3. 
Noui.KMAN, an indolent Scotch, iv. 

lOI. 

NonoT. Abbe, iii. 325, //. 2. 
Noi.LF.KKNS, Joseph, iii. 248, n. i; iv. 

485. "• 3- 

Noi.i.KKKNs, Mr.s., iii. 246. 

NoNjCRORs, Archibald Campbell, v. 
406 ; Cibber's A'otr/uror, applicable 
to them, ii. 367; comparative crimi- 
nality in taking and refusing the 
oAths, ii. 367-8 ; could not reason, 



Northcote. 

iv. 331-2; Falconer, Bishop, iii. 422; 
Johnson never in one of their meet- 
ing-houses, iv. 332. 

Xcnpiireil, v. 472, u. 2. 

NoRBURY Park, iv. 51. 

NoRES, Jason de, ii. 508. 

NoRKol.K, militia, i. 356, v. 2; sale of 
the Kamhhr in the country, i. 242, 
n. i; mentioned, iv. 155. 

Norfolk Prophecy, i. 165. 

NoRRls, — , a staymaker, i. 119. 

North, Dudley. Sec LoNc;. 

North, Frederick, Lord (second Earl 
of Guilford), Coalition Ministry, iv. 
257, n. 4; Conciliatory Propositions, 
iii. 250 ; h'iilklaud' s Islands, stops 
the sale of, ii. 156; Fox's dismi.ssal 
from the Treasury, ii. 314. u. (> ; 
Gibbon, admir«tl by, v. 306, n. 1 ; 
humour, v. 467; Johnson, fear of, as 
an M.r., ii. 158, //. 2; — , no friend 
to, ii. 169; — goes to his house, v. 
282 ; — , proposes the degree of 
LL. U. for, ii. 363, w. 3; writes to 
the \'ice-Chancellor, ii. 379; King's 
agent, merely the, ii. 407, it. i; Mac- 
donald, Mr., abused by, v. 174, >/. 1, 
ministry: see under Ministries; 
subscription to the Articles, upholds, 
ii. 173, «. 2 ; ThurloNv's hatred of 
him, iv. 403, n. i. 
North Briton, essay by Chattcrton, iii. 
228, >/. 6 ; Johnson's definitions, i. 
342, )t. I. See under Wii.KKs. 
North Pole, voyage to the, v. 26S. 
Northamptonshire, v. 336. 
Northcote, James, Boswell's self-re- 
proach, v. 146, n. 4 ; Goldsmith and 
Cross-Readings, iv. 372, ti. i; Gold- 
smith on entering a room, i. 479, tt. 
i; Johnson's character of Mudge, iv. 
89, "• 3 ; Johnson's interview with 
(ieorge III, ii. 48, «. 2; Lowe the 
painter, iv. 234, n. 1 ; Pulteney's 



Bosivells Life of yolmsojt. 



187 



Northcote. 



Nugent. 



oratory, i. 176, n. i ; Reynolds ap- 
pointed painter to the King, iv. 422, 
n. 1; — dinner parties, iv. 360, n. 3; 

— influence in the Academy, iv. 254, 
«. I ; — and Mrs. Siddons, iv. 279, 
n. 3 ; — -, use of ' Sir,' i. 284, w. 3 ; 

— visit to Devonshire, i. 436, «. i ; 
Reynolds's, Miss, pictures, iv. 265, 
n. 2; sees She Stoops to Conquer, ii. 
268, «. r. 

NORTHENI), iv. 34, n. I. 
NoRTHiNf.TO.N, Lord Chancellor, i. 

53. «• 1- 

NORTHINGTON, second Earl of, Lord- 
Lieutenant of Ireland in 1783, iv. 
231. 

NoRTHUMBERLA.Nn, a breed of rein- 
deer, ii. 193, «. I ; plantations of 
trees, iii. 309; price of corn in 1778, 
iii. 256, 71. 3. 

Northumberland, first Duke of. Ca- 
pability Brown his guest, iii. 455, n. 
2; Dr. Mounsey at his table, ii. 73; 
Goldsmith's visionary project, iv. 26, 
n. 3; Irish vice-roy, ii. 151 ; iv. 26, 
"• 3; Johnson, civility to, iii. 309, n. 
3; iv. 135, n. 3. 

Northumberland, Elizabeth Duch- 
ess of, Batheaston Vase, writes for 
the, ii. 3S5; Boswell boasts of her 
acquaintance, iii. 308, w. 3 ; Cock 
Lane Ghost, goes to hear the, i. 470, 
n. 4. 

Northumberland, eighth Earl of, v. 
460, n. 2. 

Northumberland, Earls of. Dr. 
Percy's descent from them, iii. 308, 
«. 3. 

Norton, Sir Fletcher, first Lord 
Grantley, account of him, ii. 540, n. 
2; his ignorance, ii. 105. 

Norway, i. 493; ii. 118, v. 113, n. i. 

Nose of the mind, iv. 387. 

Notes and Queries, Athenian block- 



head, i. 85, n. 2; Bowles, William of 
Heale, iv. 272, «. 3 ; Brooke's Earl 
0/ Essex, iv. 361, «. i; Ford family, 
will and pedigree, i. 57, «. 4; John- 
son's calculations about walling a 
garden, iv. 236-7 ; — house in Bolt 
Court, ii. 4S9, «. I ; — letter on hav- 
ing a stroke of palsy, reprint of, iv. 
264, M. 2 ; (for his other letters to 
Hector, Taylor, &c. , j^/"^ under John- 
son, letters); — marriage register, i. 
109, n. 4; — and Maty, i. 329, n. 4; 
— tutor to Mr. Whitby, i. 97, «. 3; 
Johnson, Michael, publishes Floyer's 
<tapfiaKO-(3aaapog, i. 42, ti. 2 ; his 
marriage, i. 40, «. 5 ; Johnson, Na- 
thanael, i. 105, «. i; Langton's navi- 
gation, ii. 156, ;;. 4; Pembroke Col- 
lege Gaud}', i. 317, ». 2; solution of 
continuity, iii. 476, n. i ; Swift ' a 
shallow fellow,' v. 49, n. 2; Taylor's, 
Dr., separation from his wife, i. 546, 
«. 4. 

Nottingham, described by Ilutton in 
1741, i. 100, «. 2; fair, iii. 235, «. 3; 
a learned pig, iv. 430. 

NouRSE, the bookseller, iii. 17, n. 2. 

Nouveau Tableau de Paris, ii. 419, 
«. 4. 

Nova Zembla, v. 447. 

NovALis, iii. 12, n. 2. 

Novelty, boys' restless desire for it, 
iii. 438 ; paper on it in The Spec- 
tator, iii. 39 ; Rousseau's love of it, 
i. 510; Goldsmith, ib., n. 2; iii. 427. 

November the Fifth, Johnson's 
verses on it, i. 69. 

NowELL, Dr., Boswell and Johnson 
dine with him, iv. 340; fast sermon 
on Jan. 30, ii. 174, n. 2; iv. 341. 

NoYON, ii. 459. 

NugcB Antiquce, iv. 207. 

Nugent, Colonel, ii. 157, n. 2. 

Nugent, Dr., account of him, i. 552, 



i88 



Index to 



Nugent. 

n. 4; member of the Literary Club, 
i. 552 ; ii. ig, 275 ; professor in the 
imaginary college, v. 123. 

Nullum numen adest, &c. , iv. 207. 

Numbers, science of. See Arithme- 
tic and Mathematics. 

NUNCOMAR, iv. 81, M. 3. 

A' u rein furs; Chronicle, v. 520. 

Ni'RSE, putting oneself to, ii. 543. 

NrJ ycip IpyiTai, ii. 65. 

NUYS, iii. 267, «. I. 

O. 

Oakes, Mrs., i. 471, ;/. 2. 

Oakover, v. 4S9-90. 

Oaths, abjuration, oath of, ii. 252, 
367, ;/. 4 ; examination under oath, 
V. 445; imposition of oaths, ii. 367, 
//. 4. See SwEARl.NC. 

Oats, defineil, i. 341; iv. i()4;. oat-ale, 
ii. 530; oat-cakes eaten in Lichfield, 
ii. 530 : oatmeal eaten dry, v. 350 ; 
' they who feed on it are barbarians,' 
V. 464. 

Obedience, iii. 334. 

Objeci'Ions may be made to ever)'- 
thing, ii. 147; iii. 30-1. 

Obi.ications, moral and ritual, ii. 431; 
perfect and imperfect, ii. 2S7; Reyn- 
olds's reflection on gaining freedom 
from them, i. 2S5. 

Oblivion, iv. 32, n. 4; morbid, v. 77. 

O'Brien, William, the actor, described 
by Walpole, iv. 2S1, «. i ; his mar- 
riage, ii. 376, «. I. 

Obscenity, repressed in Johnson's 
company, iv. 341. 

Observance of days, ii. 525. 

Obsen>ations on Diseases of the Army, 
iv. 203, n. I. 

Observations on his Britannick Majes- 
ty's Treatises, &c. , i. 356. 

Olsen>ations on the Present State of 
Affairs, i. 356, 359. 



Ogden. 

Observer, The, iv. 75. 

Obstinacy, must be overcome, iii. 

211-12. 
Occupation, iii. 204 ; hereditary, v. 

136. 
O'Connor, Charles, Johnson's letters 

to him, i. 372; iii. 127. 
OcTAViA, iv. 514. 

Odd, nothing odd will do long, ii. 514. 
Ode, Goldsmith's account of one, iv. 

15- 
Ode, Ad Urbanum, i. 131. 
Ode, An, i. 206. 
Ode, In llieatro, ii. 371, w. 2. 
Ode on Solitude, iii. 224. 
Ode on St. Cecilia's Day, i. 486. 
Ode on the British Nation, iv. 509. 
Ode on the Peace, iv. 325. 
Ode on Winter, i. 210. 
Ode to Friendship, i. 182. 
Ode to Melancholy, i. 142, n. i. 
Ode to Mrs. Thralc, a caricature, iv. 

447- 
Ode to Mrs. Thrale, written in Sky, v. 

180. 
Ode to the Warlike Genius of Britain, 

iii. 425. 
Ode upon the Isle of Shy, v. 177. 
Odes. See ClBBER, Coi.i.EV, and 

Gray, Thomas. 
Odes to Obscurity and Oblivion, ii. 

3S2. 
Odin, iii. 311. 
Odyssey. See Homer. 
(.Kdipiis Tyrannus, Johnson's preface 

to Maurice's translation, iii. 421, 

n. I. 
Of ell us, i. 121. 
Offely, Mr., i. 112. 
Officer. .SV(- Soldier. 
Ogden, Rev. Dr. Samuel, Sermons, 

Boswell edified by them, v. 31; cari- 
catured by Rowlandson, ib., n. 2; 

Johnson wishes to read them, iii. 



Bo swell's Life of fohnsoji. 



189 



Ogden. 



Opposition. 



281; tries to, v. 31, 99; prevailed on 
to read one aloud, v. 399; on origi- 
nal sin, iv. 143, n. 2 ; on prayer, v. 
42, 66, 77, 321, 370; quotation from 
one, V. 399. 

Ogilby, John, i. 63. 

Ogilvie, Dr. John, Poems, i. 488, 490, 
n. i; praises Scotland, i. 492. 

Ogilvy, Sir James, v. 259, n. i. 

Oglethorpe, General, account of him, 
i. 147, ti. 4, 148, n. i; Belgrade, siege 
of, ii. 207; birth, ii. 207, 11. 2; Bos- 
well and the Corsicans, ii. 67, ;/. i ; 
— to Shebbeare, introduces, iv. 131; 
— , communicates jiarticulars of his 
life to, ii. 402, It. 4; Caligula and the 
Senate, iii. 321; dinners at his house, 
ii. 205, 250, 266, 401 ; iii. 60, 320 ; 
V. 157, n. 3 ; duelling,- defends, ii. 
206 ; father, his, iv. 196 ; Georgia, 
colonises, i. 147, 11. 4 ; Johnson's 
Londoti, patronises, i. 147; — , visits, 
iv. 196; — willing to write his Life, 
ii. 402; luxury, declaims against, iii. 
320; ' never completes what he has 
to say,' iii. 65; Pope's lines on him, 
i. 147, ;/. 4; Prendergast and Sir J. 
Friend, ii. 209-10 ; Prince of Wi'ir- 
temberg and the glass of wine, ii. 
207 ; vivacity and knowledge, iii. 
65; Wesley, Charles, ill-uses, i. 147, 
;;. 4. 

Oglethorpe, Mr., ii. 312. 

' O'Hara, you are welcome,' v. 299. 

Oil of Vitriol, ii. 179 ; Johnson's, v. 
15, n. I. 

O'Kane, the harper, v. 359. 

Okerton, i. 225. ;;. 2. 

Old Age, desirable, how far, iv. 180 ; 
evils, its, iii. 383, memory, failure of, 
iii. 217; men less tender in old age, 
V. 273, n. 2 ; mind growing torpid, 
iii. 289; senectus, iii. 391. 

Old Bailey, Sessional Reports, Ba- 



retti's trial, ii. iii, n. 3; Bet Flint's, 
iv. 120, n. i; contain ' strong facts,' 
ii. 74. 

Oid Man's Wis/i, The, iv. 22. 

Old Men, loss of the companions of 
their youth, iii. 247 ; putting them- 
selves to nurse, ii. 543; supposed to 
be decayed in intellect, iv. 209. 

Old Street Club, iii. 503-4; iv. 216. 

Old Swinford, v. 493. 

Oldfield, Dr., iii. 66. 

Oldham, John, I»iitation of Juvenal, 

i- 137. 

Oldmixon, John, i. 341, ;/. V 

Oldys, William, account of him, i. 
202; author of Busy, curious, tJtirsty 
fly, ii. 322, n. 3; Harleian Catalogue, 
compiles part of the, i. 32; Harleian 
Library, on the price paid for the, 
i. 17S ; notes on Langbaine, iii. 34, 
". 3- 

O'Leary, Father Arthur, Remarks on 
IVesleyi's Letter, ii. 139, n. i ; v. 39, 
n. I. 

Oliver, Alderman, iv. 161, n. 5. 

Oliver, Dame, i. 50. 

01 la Podrida, iv. 492, n. 2. 

Omai, iii. 9. 

OiMBERSLEY, V. 5I9. 

OxsLOW, Arthur, the Speaker, chal- 
lenged by Elwall the Quaker, ii. i8g, 
n. 2 ; Richardson gave vails to his 
servants, v. 451. 

Opera Girls, in France, iv. 197. 

Opie, John, iv. 485, n. 3, 511. 

Opinion, hurt by differences in it, iii. 

432-3- 

Opium, use of it, iv. 197. 

Opponents, good-humour with them, 
iii. 12; how they should be treated, 
ii. 505-6. 

Opposition, the, Johnson and Sir P. 
J. Clerk argue on it, iv. 94; — de- 
scribes it as meaning rebellion, iv. 



IQO 



Index to 



Opposition. 

l6i, «. 3, — ill 1783, describes it as 
' factious,' iv. i»/j. 

Orrf)SirioN increases political tliflcr- 
cnces, V. 44U. 

Orangk Pkkl, Johnson's use of it, ii. 
378, and ;/. 2; iv. 236; manufacture, 
iv. 236. 

Orators cannot l>c translated, iii. 
42. 

Oratory, action in speaking, i. 387 ; 
ii. 342; Johnson and Wilkes discuss 
it, iv. 120; a man's powers not to be 
estimated by it. ii. 388 ; old Sheri- 
dan's orator)', iv. 238-9, 257. 

Orchards, Johnson's advice, ii. 151; 
Madden's saying, iv. 237 ; unknown 
in many parts, iv. 237. 

OrI), Mrs., iv. I, 11. I, 375, w. 2. 

Ordk, Lord Chief Haron, ii. 406, ;/. 4; 
V. 30. 

Orde, Miss, V. 30, w. 2. 

Oroinary oi- Nk\V(;atk, and the 
Cock Lane Cihost, i. 470, n. 4. See 
Rev. Mr. MooRE and Rev. Mr. 

Vll,l,KTTI.. 

Orkoku, third Earl of, iv. 3S6, ti. 2. 

Orkoki), fourth Karl of. .S'<d- Wai.- 
I'ul.K, Horace. 

Oriental Gardenitti;. Sec Chamkers, 
Sir William. 

Origin ok Evii,, v. 133, 416. 

Original Lcthrs. Sec WARNER, Re- 
becca. 

Oru'.inai. Sin, Johnson's paper on it, 
iv. 143; Ogden's sermon, «'/'., n. 2. 

Orlando Furioso, i. 322, n. 3. 

Orme, Captain, iv. 102. 

Orme, Robert, the historian, admires 
Johnson's Journey to the Western 
Islands, ii. 343 ; v. 466, ;/. i ; and 
his talk, iii. 322 ; mapping of the 
East Indies and Highlands of Scot- 
land compared, ii. 40S. 

Ormond, House of, gives three Chan- 



Osborne. 

cellors in succession to Oxford, i. 

325. «■ 3- 
Ormonm, first L'uke of, Life by Carte, 

v. 337. "■ 2. 

Ormond, secontl Uukc of, impeached, 
i. 325, M. 3; leads a Spanish expedi- 
tion to Scotland, v. 160, n. 2. 

Orphan of China. See MURITIY. 

Ortiieis, i. 530. 

Orrery. Earls of, a fan>ily of writers, 
V. 270. 

Orrery, first Earl of, a play-writer, v. 
270. 

Orrery, fourth Earl of, IJentley's an- 
tagonist, V. 270, w. 3; his will, V. 271, 

«. 3- 

Orrery, fifth Earl of, anecdote of the 
Duchess of Huckingham, iii. 271 ; 
caught at literary eminence, ii. 148 ; 
iii. 208; dignified, not. iv. 200; feeble 
writer, i. 214, «. 2; feeble-minded, 
V. 270; Johnson describes his char- 
acter, v. 271 : — Dietionary, pre- 
sents, to the Aeadeinia delta Crusca, 
J- 345; praises the Plan of it, i. 214; 
— , friendship with, i. 281; — never 
sought after him, iii. 357 ; — writes 
a dedication to him for Mrs. Lennox, 
i. 296; /Remarks on Swift, i. 9, «. 2; 
iii. 283; iv. 46; v. 270-1; mentioned, 
iv. 21, M. I, 35, n. I. 

Orton, Job, Memoirs of Doddridge, 
V. 308. 

Osborn, a Binningham printer, i. loi. 

Osrorne, Sir D'Anvers, iv. 209, «. 2. 

Osborne, Erancis, ii. 222. 

Osborne, Thomas, Coxeter's collection 
of poets, buys, iii. 179; Ifarleian 
Catalogue, publishes the, i. 32, 177, 
182; Harleian Library, buys the, i. 
178; Johnson dates a letter from his 
shop, i. 186 ; beats him, i. 178, 434, 
n. i; iii. 391; describes his 'impas- 
sive dulness,' i. 178, «. 2, 



Boswelfs Life of fohnson. 



191 



Ossian. 



Oxford. 



Ossian. See Macpherson, James. 
OssORV, Lord, member of the Literary 

Club, i. 554 ; mentioned, iii. 453, 

W. 2. 

Ostentation, Boswell's rebuked, i. 
539; shown in quoting Lords, iv. 211. 

Otaheite, bread-tree, ii. 285; custom 
of eating dogs, ii. 266 ; mode of 
slaughtering animals, v. 281 ; rights 
of children, v. 375 ; savages from 
whom nothing can be learnt, iii. 57; 
Boswell's defence of them, iv. 356. 

Othello, its moral, iii. 46. 

Otw.w, Thomas, Johnson's opinion of 
him, iv. 24 ; neglected, ii. 390, n. 4 ; 
Romeo and Juliet, alters, v. 277, n. 
6; tenderness, iv. 24, n. 3; tolling a 
bell, ii. 150, ». 4. 

OuGiiTON, Sir Adolphus, v. 48 ; his 
learning, v. 50, 142 ; quiets a mili- 
tary revolt, V. 162, «. 2; mentioned, 
V. 309. 449- 

OuRAN-OfTANC;, V. 5I, 283. 

Overall, Bishop, v. 405, n. 3. 
OvERBURY, Sir Thomas, ii. 87. 
Overbitry, Sir Thomas, a tragedy, iii. 

130- 
Overton, Rev. J. H., Life of William 

Law, ii. 141, «. 2. 
Ovid, Sappho, ii. 208 ; quotations, — 

Ars Am. 3. 121-v. 232, «. 4 ; Ars 

Am. 3. 339-ii. 273, n, 3; Ep. ex 

Ponto I. 3, 35-iii. 202, n. 2; V. 302, 

n. 2 ; Ileroides 1. 2-v. 16, n. i ; 

Ileroides I. 4-i. 280, n. 2 ; Met. i. 

l-i. 448; Met. I. 85-ii. 373, n. I ; 

Met. 2. 13-iii. 318 ; Met. iii. 724-i. 

125; Met. xiii. 19-i. 364; Tristia, iv. 

10, 51-iv. 510. 
Oxford, Harley, first Earl of, Boling- 

broke's character of him, iii. 267, 

n. 5. 
Oxford, second Earl of, Bibliotheea 

HarUiana, i. 177. 



Oxford, advantages for learning, ii. 
59 ; All .Souls College, Shenstone's 
' enemies in the gate,' i. no, 71. 2 ; 
its library the largest in Oxford ex- 
cept the Bodleian, ii. 40; a place for 
study for a man who has a mind to 
prance, ii. 77, «. i; Angel Inn, Bos- 
well and Johnson spend two even- 
ings there, ii. 503, 514; Pitt (Earl of 
Chatham) hears treasonable songs, i. 
315, n. I ; ' Bacon's mansion,' iii. 
407 ; V. 47 ; Balliol College, ii. 387, 
«. 2 ; V. 134, n. I ; balloon ascent, 
iv. 436; Beattie and Reynolds made 
Doctors of Law, v. loi, n. 5 ; Bo- 
cardo, Lydiat imprisoned in it, i. 
225, «. 2; Bodleian, Annals of tfu 
Bodleian, \\. 185,/;. 3; Blackstone's 
portrait, iv. 105, n. 3 ; Boswell pre- 
sents MSS. to it, iii. 407, n. 2; closed 
one week in the year, iii. 418, «. i; 
Evelina, iv. 258, «. 2; Johnson pre- 
sents books to it, i. 319, n. i, 350; ii. 
319, «. 5 ; a fragment of his Diary 
among the MSS., ii. 547; largest 
library in Oxford, ii. 40; Keciiyell of 
the historyes of Troye, v. 523, n. 3; 
Welsh MS. on music, iii. 417; Bod- 
ley's Dome, iii. 407; Boswell's visits 
to Oxford : see BoswELL, Oxford ; 
Brasenose College, James Boswell, 
junior, a member of it, i. 18; Rev. 
Mr. Churton, a Fellow, iv. 245, n. 3; 
Johnson seen near its gate, iv. 346, 
«. 2 ; The Principal's advice, Cave 
de resignationibus, ii. 386, n. 3 ; 
Broadgates Hall, the ancient foun- 
dation of Pembroke College, i. 87, n. 
4 ; Castle (prison), Wesley preaches 
to the prisoners, i. 532, n. i; 'cau- 
tion ' money, i. 67, n. 2; Chancellors, 
three of the House of Ormond, i. 
325, n. 3; Earl of W'estmoreland, i. 
325, n. 3, 402, n. 4; Lord North, ii. 



192 



Index to 



Oxford. 



363, ;/. 3 ; Christ Church, I>ate- 
man, Kcv. Mr., ;\ Tutor, i. 89; l)e- 
quest from l.oni Orrery, v. 271. ;/. 3; 
liurton, Kol)ert, elected student, i. 
68 ; ' Canons — Sir, it is a great 
thing to fline with the C'anons,' ii. 
50(); dinners lasted six hours, //'., //. 
2 ; devotion of a studious man, i. 
343. "• 3; Johnson mocked by the 
men, i. 89; I-il)rary, not so large as 
All Souls, ii. 3g, 40; a idace for study 
for a man who has a mind Xo pramc, 
ii. 77, //. i; MSS. on music, iii. 417; 
I'salmanazar lodgetl there, iii. 505, 
510; Smith, Edmund, a member, i. 
88, ;/. 2; expelled, ii. 215, n. 2; Tay- 
lor enters by Johnson's advice, i. 89; 
confounded with another John Tay- 
lor, //'. , ;/. I ; West describes it in 
1736, i. Sg, //. I ; Christ (!hurch 
meadow, Johnson sliiles on the ice, 
i. 69, 316 ; walking on it without 
a ])an(l, iii. 15. //. 2; Clarendon 
Press, Johnson's advice about its 
management, ii. 486-8, 504; put un- 
der better regulations, ii. 39 ; print- 
ing Polyhitis, i/>.; and King Alfred's 
will, iv. 154, ;/. 2 ; Coflee-house, 
Johnson is wanton and insolent to 
Sheridan ii. 366 ; v. 410 ; advises 
Warburton to snatch time from the 
coftee-house, i. 323 ; Colleges, their 
authority lessened, iii. 297; bequests 
to them, iii. 34S ; College joker, iv. 
333; College servants, i. 315, ;/. 2; 
Commemoration of 1754, i. 168, n. 
i; Common rooms, the students ex- 
cluded from them, ii. 507; mentioned 
in Warton's Pivgirss oj Discontent, 
iii. 368, ;/. i; condemnation-sermon, 
i. 317; degree conferred without ex- 
amination, iii. 15, «. 2; an honorary 
degree, i. 323, n. i ; Demy, a scholar 
of Magdalen College, 1. 71, n. i; East 



(late, i. 71, w. 3 ; education not by 
lectures, iv. 106; execution for for- 
gery, i. 169, //. i; Claudies, i. 69, w. 5: 
ii. 50<j, ;/. 2 ; Cieorge I's tr(K)p of 
horse, i. 325, ;/. 3; Hastings's, War- 
ren, projected institution, iv. 79, n. 
2; 1 ligh - street, Johnson standing 
astride the kennel, ii. 308, ti. i; walk- 
ing along it without a band, iii. 15, 
;/. 2 ; Iffley, iv. 340 ; ignorance of 
things necessary to life, ii. 59, ;/. 2; 
scholastic ignorance of mankiml, ii. 
4S7; indiflerencc to literature, i. 320, 
//. 2; Jacobitism, i. 84, ;/. 3, 168, ;/. i, 
324, ;/. I. 325. ;/. 3, 327. //. 3. 343, ;/. 
i; ii. 507, ;/. 4; JeflVey, Lord, an un- 
dergraduate, ii. 183, n. 3: Johnson 
elevated by approaching it, iv. 328; 
gives a toast among some grave men, 
ii. 550 ; iii. 228 : neglected in his 
youth, i. 90, ;/. 2; receives the tlegree 
of M.A., i. 319, 323, «. I, 325-8; of 
D.C.L., i. 565, M. i; ii. 379-81; .says 
he wished he had learnt to play at 
cards, iii. 27; (for his visits to Oxford, 
see iii. 511-15, and under many head- 
ings of this title); Kettel Hall, ac- 
count of it, i. 335, n. I ; Johnson 
lodges in it, i. 314, «. 4; l.incolu Col- 
lege, Chambers, Robert, a member of 
it, i. 318, 389; Mortimer, Dr., the 
Rector, great at denying, ii. 308, n. 
i; Wesley, John, a Tutor, i. 73, 11. i; 
London, elTect produced by, i. 147 ; 
Magdalen Bridge, built by Gwynn, 
ii. 502, n. i; v. 518, n. i; Magdalen 
College, Addison elected a Demy, 
i. 71, ;/. i; Gibbon, described by, ii. 
507, 71. 4; ii. 15, n. 2; Home, Dr., 
the President, mentioned, ii. 320; 
Hoswell and Johnson drink tea with 
him, ii. 509; W^arton, Thomas, senior, 
a fellow, i. 520, n. i; Magdalen Hall, 
i. 3S9 ; Manlge projected, ii. 485 ; 



BosweWs Life of Johtison. 



193 



Oxford. 



Market built by Gwynn, v. 51S, ;/. 
I ; M'erton College, lioswell saun- 
ters in the walks, iv. 345; mentioned, 
ii. 502; Methodists, rise of the, i. 67, 
n. 3, 78, n. 3; expulsion of six, ii. 214; 
Murray, William (Earl of Mansfield), 
matriculates, ii. 223, n. 3; New Inn 
Hall, Bosvvell and Johnson visit it, 
ii- 53; Johnson walks in the Princi- 
pal's garden, ii. 308, n. i; Olla Po- 
drida, iv. 492, «. 2 ; Oriel College, 
common - room filled on Gilbert 
White's visits, ii. 507, «. 4; Provost 
assisted to bed by his butler, ii. 509, 
;/. 2; Oseney Abbey, Johnson views 
its ruins with indignation, i. 317 ; 
Paoli visits it, v. i, //. 3 ; Parker, 
Sackville, the l)ookscller, iv. 355 ; 
Parks, i. 323; Pembroke College, 
ale-house near the gate, iii. 345; Bar- 
ton, Mr. A. T., Fellow and Tutor, 
V. 134, ;/. i; l)lue-stocking party, iv. 
174, ;/. 2 ; butler, i. 315 ; buttery- 
books, ii. 508, ;/. 3; Camden's I>atin 
grace, v. 73, ;/. 2; caution-book, i. 67, 
;/. 2 ; chapel, i. 68, ;/. i ; Common- 
room, Johnson's games at draughts, 
ii. 50S; his portrait, iv. 174, 11. 2; dec- 
lamations, i. 83, n. i; Edwards, Oli- 
ver, iii. 343-8; eminent members, i. 
87 ; gateway, i. 86 ; gaudy, i. 69, n. 

5. 317. "■ I ; Johnson enters, i. 67 ; 
leaves, i. 91 ; length of his residence, 
ib., «. i; — eulogium on it, i. 87, ;/. 
4, 88, ;/. 2; — first exercise, i. S3; iv. 
356-7; — first visit in 1754, i. 315; 

— and Boswell visit it in 1776, ii. 
505; Johnson in 1782, iv. 174, ;/. 2; 

— and Boswell in June, 1784, iv. 
328 ; V. 406 ; — last visit (Nov. 
1784), iv. 433; ' nowhere so happy,' 
//'., «. 4; — 'a frolicksome fellow,' 
i.' 85; — meets Dr. Price, iv. 274, «. 

6, 506; ^— neglected by the Master, 



i. 315; — rooms, i. 84, «. 4; — shows 
it to Hannah More, i. 88, «. 2; iv. 
174, «. 2; library, Johnson presents 
it with his Works, i. 87 ; Johnson's 
Tracts, ii. 360, «. 2; Politian, iv. 428, 
n. I ; Masters, Dr. Panting, i. 84 ; 
Dr. Kadcliffe, i. 315; Dr. 'Adams: see 
under Dr. Adams; life in the Mas- 
ter's house, iv. 352; Manuscripts, i. 
92, n. 2, 105, «. I ; ii. 247, n. i ; iv. 97, 
;/. 4, 109, n. 2, 434, ;/. 2; members in 
residence, i. 73, «. i ; ' nest of singing 
birds,' i. 88; iv. 174, ;/. 2; November 
5 kept with solemnity, i. 70; ' Pem- 
Inocliicnscs 7'oco ad certamen pocti- 
ciiii/,' i. 88, ;/. 2; property bequeathed 
to it, iii. 348; residence, length of, i. 
91, ;/. i; Saturday weekly themes, i. 
68, ;/. 3 ; sconces, i. 68, ft. 3 ; servi- 
tors, i. 85, ;/. 3; weekly bills, i. 90, n. 
3; Whitefield a servitor, i. 68, '/. 3, 
85, II. 3; population in 1789, iii. 511; 
post coach, Boswell, Johnson and 
Gwynn ride in it, ii. 502 ; iii. 147 ; 
Boswell and Johnson, iv. 327; ' I'ro- 
logue spoken before the Duke of 
York at Oxford,' ii. 533 ; Queen's 
College, Jacobite singing, i. 315, ;/. 
i; Lancaster, Dr., the Provost, i. 71, 
«. I ; Radcliffe I>ibrary, opening, i. 
324, ti. 2 ; Wise, Francis, the libra- 
rian, i. 320, w. 2; Radcliffe's travel- 
ling fellowships, iv. 33S ; residence 
required in 1781, iii. 15, >'. 2 ; Rew- 
ley Abbey, Johnson views its ruins 
with indignation, i. 317 ; riding- 
school projected, ii. 485 ; Seeker's 
variation of ' Church and King,' iv. 
34; Servitors, hunted, i. 85. «. 3; em- 
ployed in transcription, i. 321 ; ad- 
vantages of servitorships, v. 139 ; 
■Slieldonian Theatre, Johnson present 
at the instalment of the Chancellor, 
i. 402, n. 4 ; St. Edmund's Hall, ex- 



194 



Index to 



Oxford. 



Palracrston. 



pulsion of Methodists, ii. 214, n. i; 
St. John's College, \ icoimus Kno\, 
iii. 15, tt. 2 ; St. Mary's Church, 
Johnson joins there a ^rand proces- 
sion, i. 402, tt. 4 ; sermon on his 
death, iv. 4S6 ; I'anting's, Dr., ser- 
mon, i. 84, //. 3; Whitelield receives 
the sacrament, i. 78, w. 3; St. .Mary's 
Hall, Trincijials — Dr. King, i. 324, 
>/. 2; Dr. Nowell, iv. 340; Story, the 
(^)uaker, descril)es the liidergradu- 
ales in 1731, i. 78, «. 3; Trinity 
College, IJcaiiclerk, Topham, i. 287; 
Hoswell and Johnson call on T. 
Warton, ii. 510; Johnson speaks of 
taking up his alxxle there, i. 315 ; 
gives Haskerville's / 7;;;'// to the li- 
brary, ii. 77; 1-angton enters, i. 286, 
M. 2, 287; I'residents — Dr. Iludtles- 
ford, i. 325. ;/. 1; Dr. Kettel, i. 335, 
u. I ; Wahusley, ( iilhert, enters, i. 94, 
»/. 3; Warton, rht)mas, a Fellow, i. 
313, tt. 2 ; Wise, I'rancis, a Fellow, 
i. 320, //. 2 ; University College, 
Hoswcll and Johnson call there in 
1776, ii. 504; dine on St. Cuthbert's 
Day, ii. 509; dine with the Master, 
iv. 355; chapel at six in the morn- 
ing, ii. 437, ti. I ; Common Room, 
Johnson's dispute in it with Dr. 
Mortimer, ii. 30S, ;;. i; his three bot- 
tles of port, iii. 278; his portrait, ii. 
28, ;/. 2 ; inscription on it, iii. 27S, 
ti. 2; Coulson, Rev. Mr., v. 524, ;/. 
i; Johnson seen there by a Welsh 
schoolmaster, v. 510; portraits of 
distinguished members, ii. 28, tt. 2 ; 
Scott, William, tutor, iv. 106, tt. 3 ; 
Wetherell, Dr. , the Master: sec un- 
der Wethkkkll, Dr. ; University, 
described by R. West in 1735, i. 89, 
H. i; by Dr. Knox in 1781, iii. 15, 
n. 2; iv. 450, tt. 4; worst lime about 
1770, ii. 509, ti. 2; University verses, 



ii. 426; Vacation, Long, i. 73, n. i; 
Worcester College, Footc and Dr. 
Ciowcr, ii. 109, «. 2. 
OxKORDsuiRE, contested election of 
1754. i- 327. «• 3- 



I'.vcKWoon, Warwickshire, i. 40, ;/. 5. 

I'Al)f.\, John.son has a mind to go to 
it, i. 85; iii. 515; Cioldsmith went to 
it, i. 85, w. 1; mentioned, i. 373. 

I'.MN, bcxlily pain easily supported, i. 
181, ti. 3; violent pain of mind must 
be severely felt, ii. 537. 

I'.MM KKS, the reputation of, iii. 50, ;/. 2. 

I'AiN'lINC, inferior to poetry, iv. 370; 
labour not disproportionate to effect, 
ii. 502 ; styles, iii. 318 : see under 
JoiiNso.N, painting. 

PAi..\tES, ii. 451. 

Palatines, the, iii. 518. 

Palesti.ne, v. 381, «. I. 

Pa LEY, Archdeacon, attacks Gibbon, v. 
231, ti. i; Bishop Law's love of pa- 
rentheses, iii. 456, tt. 4; on the right 
to the throne, v. 230-1. 

Palmer, John, .his-cer to Dr. Priest- 
ley, iii. 330, «. 2. 

Palmer, Miss, Sir Joshua Reynolds's 
niece, iv. 191, ;/. i. 

Palmer, Rev. T. F., dines with John- 
son, iv. 144-5; transported for sedi- 
tion, i. 540, ti. 2; iv. 144, «. 2. 

Paliiieriti of I:tti:;lattd, i. 57, ;/. i. 

Falmeriito d' Itii^hilterra, iii. 2. 

Pai.merston. second Viscount, Liter- 
ary Club, member of the, i. 555 ; 
black-balled, iv. 268; elected, ih., tt. 
2, 376 ; his respectable pedigree, i. 
403, II. 3. 

Palmerston, third Viscount (the 
Prime-Minister), birth, iv. 268, tt. 2; 
subscribes to an annuity for John- 
son's god-daughter, iv. 234, n. i. 



BoswelTs Life of Johnson. 



195 



Palmyra. 



Paris and Suburbs. 



Palmyra, iv. 146. 

Pamphlet, defined, iii. 363. 

Panckouck^, i. 333. 

Pandour, a., v. 67. 

Panegyrics, iii. 175. 

Pajstheon, account of it, ii. 194, n. i; 
Boswell and Johnson visit it, ii. 191, 
193. 

Panting, Rev. Dr. Matthew, i. 84. 

' Panting Time,' iv. 30. 

Pantomimes, i. 129, n. i. 

Paoli, General, account of him, ii. 81; 
Auchinleck, Lord, described by, v. 
435. «• 3 ; Beattie, Johnson and 
Wilkes, describes, iv. 117; Boswell, 
beautiful attention to, iii. 59, it. 3; — 
dedicates his Corsica to him, ii. i, w. 
2; V. i; — , describes, to Miss Bur- 
ney, i. 6, «. 2; — exact record of his 
sayings, ii. 496, 11. 2; — his guest in 
London, ii. 430, n. 4; iii. 40; — visits 
him in Corsica, ii. 3, 4, «. 2; — makes 
himself known to him, i. 468, «. i; 

— and the omnia 2'anitiis, iv. 130, «. 
3 ; — repeats anecdotes to him, i. 
5CX), M. 2 ; — sends him some books, 
ii. 70; — vows sobriety to him, ii. 
499, n. I ; death kept out of sight, 
iii. 175; dinners at his house, ii. 189, 
253, 299 ; iii. 40, 60, 313, 316, 368- 
76; iv. 381 (Johnson loves to dine 
with him, il>.) ; drinks to the great 
vagabond, iii. 467, «. 2 ; England, 
arrives in, ii. 81; Goldsmith, compli- 
ments, ii. 257; — Good - A'atiired 
Man, mentioned in, ii. 51, n. 2; His- 
toire de Pascal Paoli, par Arrighi, ii. 
3, M. 2; Homer, antiquity of, iii. 376; 
house in South Audley Street, iii. 
445 ; infidelity, ii. 92, n. 2 ; John- 
son's description of his port, ii. 94; 

— funeral, at, iv. 484; — introduc- 
tion to him, ii. 92, 464; — voracious 
appetite, iv. 381-2; languages, knowl- 



edge of, ii. 93, «. 2; marriage, state 
of, ii. 190; Mediterranean a subject 
for a poem, iii. 42; melancholy, rem- 
edy for, ii. 485, M. i; pension, ii. 81, 
«. 2; Scotland, visits, v. 23, n. 3, 435, 
n. 3; sense of touch, ii. 218; .Stew- 
art's mission to him, ii. 92, n. 2; sub- 
ordination and the hangman, i. 472, 
n. i; successful rebels and the arts, 
ii. 256-7; Tasso, repeats a stanza of, 
iii. 376 ; torture, uses, i. 540, w. 2 ; 
Wales, visits, v. 511 ; Walpole's ac- 
count of him, ii. 94, n. i; v. i, «. 3; 
Warley Camp, visits, iii. 419 ; men- 
tioned, ii. 432, n. i; iii. 119, 320; iv. 

377. 384- 

Papadendrion, iii. 118. 

Pai'IER Mache, v. 522. 

Papists. See Roman Catholics. 

Papyrius Cursor, iv. 372. 

Paracelsus, ii. 41, n. i. 

Paradise, John, account of him, iv. 
420, «. I ; Johnson and Priestley 
meet at his house, iv. 500; Johnson's 
letter to him, iv. 420; mentioned, i. 
74; iii. 119, «. 2, 439; iv. 259, n. 2, 

293. 314- 
Paradise, Peter, iv. 420, n. i. 
Paradise Lost. See Milton. 
Parental Tyranny, i. 401, «. i; iii. 

429. 
Parentheses, a pound of them, iii. 

456, n. 4 ; Johnson disapproves of 
their use, iv. 219. 

Paris and Suburbs, an account of 
them in Johnson's Journal, ii. 446- 
58; Austin Nuns, ii. 450; Avant- 
couretir, ii. 456 ; Bastile, ii. 455 ; 
' beastlie.st town in the universe,' ii. 
462, n. i; beer and brewers, ii. 455; 
Benedictine friars, ii. 442, 447, 455. 

457, 461 ; iii. 325 ; iv. 474 ; boule- 
vards, ii.451; chairs made of painted 
boards, ii. 452; chambre de question. 



196 



Index to 



Paris and Suburbs. 



Parnell. 



ii. 451; Chatlois (Chatelet), Hotel de, 
ii. 447 ; Choisi, ii. 450; Colosseum, 
ii. 452 ; Conciergerie, ii. 449, m. 4 ; 
Court at Fontainebleau, ii. 452 ; its 
slovenliness, ii. 453; at Versailles, v. 
314; Courts of Justice, ii. 449, 453: 
^colc Militiurc, ii. 446, 460; Enfans 
trouvi's, ii. 457; Fathers of the Ora- 
tory, ii.446; tire first lighted on Oct. 
27, ii. 456 ; foot-ways, ii. 452, n. 2 ; 
Gobelins, ii. 447; v. 121; Grand 
Chartreux, ii. 456; Greve, ii. 454; 
Hebrides, in novelties inferior to the, 
ii. 443 ; horses and sadtlles, ii. 453 ; 
Hospitals, ii. 447; Johnson saw little 
society, ii. 442 ; killed, number of 
people, ii. 451 ; Library, King's, ii. 
455 ; London, mentioned in, i. 138 ; 
looking-glass factory, ii. 454; Louvre, 
ii. 451; low Parisians described by 
Mrs. Piozzi, v. 121, //. 1 ; Luxem- 
bourg, ii. 456 ; mean people only 
walk, ii. 452 ; Meudon, ii. 456 ; Ob- 
servatory, ii. 446; Palais Bourbon, ii. 
451; Palais Manhand, ii. 449, 451, 
456 ; Palais Royal, ii. 450 ; pay- 
ments, ii. 451, 454; I'lacf (/<• I'en- 
domc, ii. 447; Pont tournant, ii. 450; 
revival of letters, iii. 28S; roads near 
Paris empty, ii. 451 ; Sansterre's 
brewery, ii. 454 ; Si-llcttc, ii. 449 ; 
sentimentalists, iii. 169, ;/. i; Sevres, 
ii. 453, 456 ; shops, mean, ii. 461 ; 
sinking table, ii. 450 ; society, com- 
pared with London for, iii. 287; Sor- 
bonne, ii. 455, 458 ; v. 463 ; St. 
Cloud, ii. 455: St. Denis, ii. 458; St. 
Eustatia, ii. 457; St. Germain, ii. 457; 
St. Roque, ii. 447; Sundays, ii. 451; 
Tounit-llc, ii. 451; Trianon, ii. 453; 
Tuilleries, ii. 450-1 ; iv. 325, n. 4 ; 
University, i. 372, n. 5 ; v. 103 ; 
Valet de place, ii. 456. 
Pariseniis and Paj.isnienus, iv. 9, «. 5. 



Parish, co-extensive with the manor, 
ii. 279; compels men to find securi- 
ty for the maintenance of their fam- 
ily, iii. 326; election of ministers, ii. 
280-1; neglected ones, iii. 496-7. 

P.\Risn-ci.ERKs, iv. 145. 

P.VRKKR, Chief Baron, i. 53, n. i. 

P.ARKKR, John, of Hrowsholme, v. 491. 

P.VRKKR, Sackville, the Oxford book- 
seller, iv. 355. 

Parli.vment, awed the press, i. 134; 
corruption alleged, iii. 234 ; crown 
inHuence, ii. 135 ; debates: see De- 
ii.MKs; disadvantages of a seat, iv. 

254 ; dissolution : see under HotsK 
OF Commons; duration immaterial, 
ii. 83; bill for shortening it, ih., n. 
3 ; iii. 522 ; duration of parliaments 
from 1714 to 1773, V. 115, ;/. 5; gov- 
erning by parliamentary corruption, 
ii. 135; Highlander's notion of one, 
V. 220; Houses of Commons and of 
Lords: see under House of Com- 
mons and HoiSE of Lords; John- 
son projects an historical account, i. 
179; — suggested as a member, ii. 
158-60; larger council, a, ii. 407; 
Long Parliament, ii. 135 ; members 
free from arrest by a bailiff, iv. 451, 
n. I ; Pitt's motion for reform, iv. 
190, ;;. I ; speakers and places, iv. 

255 ; speeches, eflect produced by, 
iii. 264-6 ; upstarts getting into it, 
ii. 389; use of it, ii. 407. 

Parliamentary History, Johnson's De- 
bates, i. 583-4, 589 ; prosecution of 
Whitehead and Dodsley, i. 145, //. 2. 

Parliamentary Journals, i. 135. 

Parlour, company for the, ii. 138, 
n. I. 

Parnell, Rev. Dr. Thomas, Content- 
ment, iii. 139, «. i; drank too freely, 
iii. 175; iv. 63, n. 2, 459; Cloldsmith 
writes his Life, ii. 191 ; Hermit, a 



BoswelCs Life of Johnson. 



197 



Parnell. 



Payne. 



disputed passage in his, iii. 250, 446; 
Johnson writes his epitaph, iv. 63; v. 
461 ; and his Life, iv. 63 ; Milton, 
compared with, v. 495; A'ight Piece, 
ii. 375, u. 3. 

Parodies, Johnson's parodies of bal- 
lads, ii. 157, ;/. I, 244, ;/. 2; parodies 
of Johnson : see under Johnson, 
style. 

Parr, Rev. Dr. Samuel, describes him- 
self as the second Grecian in Eng- 
land, iv. 444, ;/. 3 ; Johnson, argues 
with, iv. iS; — character, describes, 
i^'- 55i ''• 3 ; — epitaph, writes, iv. 
488-g, 512-13 ; — , Life, thinks of 
writing, iv. 512 ; — Latin scholar- 
ship, praises, iv. 445, //. i; — repu- 
tation, defends, iv. 4S7 ; — writes 
him a letter of recommendation, iv. 
18, //. 2; neglected at Cambridge, i. 
90, /;. 2; Priestley, defends, iv. 274, 
;/. 6, 500; Komilly, letter to, iv. 18, 
n. 2; Sheridan's system of oratory, i. 
456, ;/. 2; Steevens, character of, iii. 
319, ;/. 3; Tracts by IVarlnirtoii, &c., 
iv. 55, II. 3; White's Baiitptoii Lect- 
ures, iv. 510. 

Parrhasius, iv. 120, //. 3. 

Parsimony, quagmire of it, iii. 396 ; 
timorous, iv. 178 ; wretchedness, iii. 
361. 

Parson, the life of a. See Clergy- 
men. 

Parsons, the impostor in the Cock 
Lane Ghost, i. 470, n. 3. 

Partney, ii. 20. 

Party, Burke's definition, ii. 256, ;/. i; 
sticking to party, ii. 256; v. 40. 

Pascal, Johnson gives Boswell Les 
Pensees, iii. 432 ; read by Hannah 
More, iv. 102, n. i. 

Passenger, iv. 98, n. I. 

Passion - \veek. See Johnson, Pas- 
sion-week. 



Passions, purged by tragedy, iii. 45. 

Pastern, defined, i. 340, 438. 

Pastor Fido, iii. 394. 

Patagonia, v. 442. 

Pater A^oster, the, v. 138. 

Paternity, its rights lessened, iii. 298. 

Paterson, Samuel, ii. 201; iii. 103; iv. 
310, n. I. 

Paterson, a student of painting, iii. 
103; iv. 262, n. 3, 310. 

Paterson against Alexander, ii. 428. 

Patrick, Bishop, iii. 67. 

Patriot, The, by Johnson, account of 
it, ii. 327, 329; written on a Satur- 
day, i. 432, n. i; election committees 
described, iv. 86, ;/. 3. 

Patriot, The, a tragedy by J. Simpson, 
iii. 32. 

Patriot King, i. 3S2, n. i. 

Patri©tism, last refuge of a scoun- 
drel, ii. 398-9. 

Patriots, defined, iv. loi, ;/. 2; Dilly's 
' patriotic friends,' iii. 76, 78; ' don't 
let them be patriots,' iv. loi; patri- 
otic groans, iii. 89. 

Patronage, Church, ii. 27S-S2; rights 
of patrons, ii. 171. 

Patrons, of authors, iv. 198; defined, 
i. 307, n. 2; harmful to learning, v. 
66 ; mentioned in the Rambler, i. 
301, 71. 3 ; Letter to Chesterfield, i. 
304 ; Vanity of Human Wishes, i. 
306-7. 

Patten, Dr., iv. 187. 

Pattison, Mark, General Oglethorpe, 
i. 147, n. 4; Oxford in 1770, ii. 509, 
n. 2; Bishop Warburton, v. 91, n. 3. 

Paul, Father. See Sarpi. 

Paul, Sir G. O., v. 366, n. 2. 

Paus.'VNIas, v. 250. 

Pavia, ii. 144, }i. 2. 

Payne, Mr. E. J., defends Burke's 
character, iii. 53, u. i; describes his 
love of Virgil, iii. 220, n. 2. 



198 



Index to 



Payne. 

Paynr, John, account of him, i. 367, 
H. i; Ivy Lane Club, member of the, 
iv. 502; Johnsjon's friend in 1752, i. 
281 ; publishes the first nunil)ers of 
The Idler, i. 382, 11. 4; mcnliotit<l, i\ . 

425. «• 4- 

Paynk, William, i. 367. 

Pearck, Zachary, Bishop of Roches- 
ter, Johnson, sends etymologies to, i. 
338; iii. 127-8; — writes the dedi- 
cation to his posthumous works, iii. 
128; wishes to resign his bishopric, 
iii. 128, «. 4; mentioned, i. 157. 

Pkarson, John, Bishop of Chester, 
edits Hales's Golden Remains, iv. 
364, n. 2; Johnson recommends his 
works, i. 460. 

Pearson, Rev. Mr.,ii. 539; iv. 164, 2<jC. 

Peatli.nh;, i. 279, n. 2. 

Peers, creations by Pitt, iv. 288, n. 2; 
influence in the House of Commons, 
V. 63 ; interference in elections, iv. 
286, 288 ; judges, as, iii. 393 ; Tem- 
ple's proposed reform, ii. 482. See 
House ok Lords. 

Pekin, v. 347. 

Pelew Islands, v. 314. ;/. 2. 

Pelham, Fanny, iii. 158, ;/. 3. 

Pei.ham, Right Hon. Henry, Carrick's 
Ode on his Death, i. 312; i)ensions 
Guthrie, i. 135, n. 3; Whiggism un- 
der him and his brother, ii. 135. 

Pelisson, i. 104, n. 3. 

Pellet, Dr., iii. 397. 

Pembroke, eighth Earl of, ' lover of 
stone dolls,' ii. 502, ;/. 2. 

Pkmhroke, tenth Earl of, Boswell 
visits him, ii. 426; iii. 139, ti. i; 
Johnson's boiv-wo^v way, describes, 
ii. 374, n. I ; v. 18, ;/. 3 ; author of 
Military Equitation, v. 149. 

Penance in churches, v. 237. 

Penelope, v. 96. 

Pengiin, v. 256. 



Pepys. 

Pkniikm e, gloomy, iii. 31. 

I'KNN. (iovernor Richard, iii. 4<)4, ;;. 3. 

I'knnan I, Thomas, Bach y draig, v. 
4*^7. "• 3; bears, ii. 398; Bolt Court 
and Johnson, mentions in his Lon- 
don, iii. 311-12; Fort (jeorge de- 
scribed, V. 142; rents racked in the 
Hebrides, v. 252, n. i ; 'lour in Scot- 
land, praised by Johnson, iii. 145, 
308, 311, 315 ; V. 251 ; censured by 
I'ercy, iii. 30*;; and Boswell, iii. 311; 
V. 252 ; N'oltaire, visits, i. 503, n. i; 
a Whig, iii. 311-12; v. 179. 

PENNlNdioN, Colonel, v. 143, 145. 

Pen NY- POST. See Posr. 

Penrith, ii. 4, «. 2; v. 12S, ;/. 2. 

Pensioner, definetl, i. 341, n. 2, 433-4. 

Pensions, defined, i. 341, 433-4; 
French authors, given to, i. 430, n. 
3; (leorge Ill's system, ii. 129; 
Johnson, conferred on, i. 430-6; not 
for life, i. 435, //. 2; ii. 363; nor for 
future services, i. 432, n. i, 433; ii. 
363 ; not increased after his Pam- 
phlets, ii. 168, 363 ; proposed ad- 
dition, iv. 377-8, 388-91, 402-4; at- 
tacked, i. 164, 431, 496-7; ii. 129; 
iii. 74, ;/. i; iv. 135; in parliament, 
iv. 367 ; Beauclcrk's quotation in 
reference to it, i. 2()o; eflfect of it on 
Johnson's work, i. 430, ;/. 3; on his 
travelling, iii. 511; efl'cct had it been 
granted earlier, iv. 33 ; entrj* in the 
Exchequer Order Book, i. 435, m. 2; 
' out of the usual course,' iv. 135 ; 
Johnson unchanged by it, i. 497 ; 
.Strahan his agent in receiving it, ii. 

157- 
Penurious Gentle.man, a, iii. 46. 
People, the judges afraid of the, v. 63. 
Pepys, Sir Lucas, iv. 74, 195, 264. 
Pepys, Samuel, Lord Orrery's plays, 

V. 270, n. 2 ; Spring Garden, iv. 31, 

n. i; tea, i. 362. «. 4. 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



199 



Pepys. 



Persian Letters. 



Pepys, William Weller, account of him, 
iv. 95, n. I ; Johnson, attacked by, 
iv. 75, n. 2 ; over-praised by Mrs. 
Thrale, iv. 95 ; attacked again, iv. 
184, //. I ; mentioned, ii. 262, n. i ; 
iii. 483. 

Perce-forest, iii, 311, n. I. 

Perceval, Lord (second Earl of Eg- 
mont), i. 589; iv. 229, n. i. 

Perceval, Lady Catharine, v. 512, 
«. I. 

Percy, Earl, iii. 162, 313-14. 

Percy, Dr. Thomas, Dean of Carlisle, 
afterwards Bishop of Dromore, Aln- 
wick, at, ii. 164 ; anecdotes, full of, 
V. 290 ; Boswell, letter to, i. 86 ; 
Dean of Carlisle, made, iii. 415 ; 
'very populous' there, iii. 472, 474 ; 
death, on parting with his books in, 
iii. 355; dinner at his house, iii. 307; 
Dyer, Samuel, describes, iv. 13, //. 
i; Easton Maudit, rector of, i. 563; 
iii. 496; Goldsmith and the Duchess 
of Northumberland, ii. 385, w. 4; — 
epitaph, settles the dates in, iii. 93; 
— lodgings, i. 405, n. 3; — , quarrels 
with, iii. 314, n. 2; — visionary proj- 
ect, iv. 26, M. 3 ; Grainger's charac- 
ter, draws, ii. 519, n. 2 ; reviews his 
Sugar-cane, i. 557 ; admires it, ii. 
520, w. i; ' Grey Rat, the History of 
the,' ii. 521 ; Hawkins, draws the 
character of, i. 33, n. i ; heir male of 
the ancient Percies, iii. 308; Hermit 
of Warkioorth, ii. 157, n. i; Johnson 
attacks him about Dr. Mounsey, ii. 
73; about Percy's calling him short- 
sighted, iii. 308-10 ; Percy's uneasi- 
ness, iii. 313 ; Boswell's friendly 
scheme, iii. 313-16 ; at variance for 
the third time, iii. 314, w. 2; — con- 
versation, iii. 361 ; — first visit to 
Goldsmith, i. 423, «. 3; — , Garrick's 
awe and ridicule of, i. 115, n.\; — 

YL— 18 



method in writing his Dictionary, i. 
218, «. i; — parodies his poems, ii. 
157. "• I. 244, «. 2 ; — praises him 
in a letter to Boswell, iii. 314-16; — 
projected Life of Goldsmith, iii. 114, 
«. 2; — questions his daughter about 
Pilgrim's Progress, ii. 274, /;. i; — 
serves him in his Ancient Ballads, 
iii. 314, «. 2 ; — visits him, i. 57, 
562 ; — Vision of Theodore, i. 222; 
Levett, account of, iii. 249, n. 2 ; 
Literary Club, member of the, i. 
553, n. 2, 554; loses by a fire, iii. 
478 ; neglected parishes, iii. 496-7 ; 
Newport School, at, i. 58, n. 3 ; 
A'orthern Antiquities, iii. 311; Pen- 
nant, attacks, iii. 309 ; professor in 
the imaginary college, v. 123 ; Rel- 
iques, quoted, iv. 355, //. 3 ; Specta- 
tor, projects an edition of the, ii. 243, 
;/. I ; wolf, is writing the history of 
the, ii. 521 ; mentioned, i. 164, 369, 
«. 4 ; ii. 72, 363, 375, n. 2 ; iii. 290 ; 
iv. 114, 397-8, 463, n. 3. 

Peregrinity, v. 148. 

Perfection, to be aimed at, iv. 391. 

Periodical Bleeding, iii. 172. 

Perkins, Mr., account of him, ii. 327, 
n. I ; Johnson's letters to him. See 
Johnson, letters; — likeness in his 
counting-house, ii. 327, n. i ; man- 
ager of Thrale's brewery, iv. 93, 99, 
n. i; mountebanks, on, iv. 96; men- 
tioned, iv. 283, n. 2, 463, n. 2. 

Perks, Thomas, i. iii, n. i. 

Perreau, the brothers, ii. 515, «. i. 

Persecution, the test of religious 
truth, ii. 286; iv. 14. 

Persecutions, The Ten, ii. 292. 

Perseverance, i. 462. 

Persian Empire, iii. 42. 

Persian Heroine, The, iv. 504. 

Persian Language, iv. 79. 

Persian Letters, i. 86, n. 2. 



200 



Index to 



Persius. 



Physicians. 



Persius, quotations, 5(7/. i. 7-iv. 32, //. 

5; Sat. i. 27-v. 27, ;;. i. 
Pkrson.vge, a great, i. 254 ; v. 142, 

//. 3- 

PKRTir, Duke of, Chancellor of Scot- 
land, iii. 257. 

Peruvian B.\rk, i. 425; iv. 33S. 

Peter the Creat, worked in a dock- 
yard, V. 2S4. 

Peter Pami'Iilet, i. 332, ;/. 3. 

J\lcr Pindar, v. 474, //. i. 

PETERltoRouc.n, Charles Mordaunt, 
Earl of, iv. 3S5. 

Peters, Mr., l)r. Taylor's butler, ii. 

543- 
Petiier <ir Peeper, an engraver, iii. 

24, n. I. 

Peiti IONS, Dodil's case, iii. 136-7 ; 

how got up, ii. 104, w. 2 ; Johnson 

on petitioning, ii. 104; iii. 137, 165; 

Middlesex election, ii. 118; mode of 

distressing government, ii. 104. 
Petrarch, Aegloguvs, i. 321, ;/. 5 : 

read by Johnson, i. 66, 134, ;/. i; iv. 

432, ;/. 2. 
Petty, Sir William, allowance for one 

man, i. 510; employment of the poor, 

iv. 3; Quantiilu»itiin(/tii\ i. 510, n. i. 
Petwortii, iv. 185. 
Pevne, Mr., of Pembroke College, i. 

70, ;;. I. 
Peyton, Mr., Johnson's amanuensis, i. 

216; ii. 178; death, ii. 434, >i. 2. 
Pji.^vAX, iii. 303, w. 4. 
Pjiai.i.ick Mystery, iii. 271. 
Pharaoh, ii. 172. 
Pharmacy, simpler than formerly, iii. 

323- 
Philidor, the musician, iii. 424. 
Philip II, History of, by Watson, v. 

65. 
Philipps, Sir Erasmus, Diary, i. 6g, 

n. 5, 317. «• 2. 
Philipps, Sir John, v. 314. 



Philipps, Lady, v. 314. 

Philips, Ambrose, Blackmore's Crea- 
tion, describes the composition of, 
ii. 124, n. 2 ; Distressed Mother, i. 
210, H. I ; Life by Johnson, iv. 65 ; 
Xaitihy Paml'y, called by Pope, i. 
207, )i. 4; ' seems a wit," i. 36S, //. 5; 
mentioned, iii. 485. 

Pnn.lPS, C. C, a musician, his epitaph, 
i. 171; ii. 2g; v. 397. 

Pini.lPs, John, Cyder, a poem, v. 88. 

Pini.ips, Miss (Mrs. Crouch), iv. 262. 

Philips, Mr., one of Johnson's old 
friends, iv. 262. 

Phm.osophers, ancient philosophers 
disputed with good humour, iii. 12; 
Edwards tries to be one, iii. 346 ; 
also White, //'., «. 3; French philos- 
ophers, //'. 

Philosophical Necessity, iii. 330, 
n. 2. 

Philosophical Society, iv. 43, n. i. 

Philosophieal Sitri'ey of the South of 
Ireland, ii. 388; iv. 370, «. i. 

Philosophical Transactions, i. 358; ii. 

45. »■ 4- 

Philosophical Wise Man, ii. 544. 

Phipps, Captain, v. 26S, 447, n. 4. 

PiiocYLiDis, v. 507. 

IMifENiciAN Lanc.uace, iv. 226. 

Physic, a science and trade, iii. 25, n. 
5; irregular practisers in it, iii. 443: 
see under Johnson, physic. 

Physician, a foppish one, iv. 369; his- 
tory of an unfortunate one, ii. 521; 
one recommended by Dr. Taylor, ii. 
543; one not sober for twenty years, 
iii. 442; one who lost his practice by 
changing his religion, ii. 533. 

Physicians, ancients failed, moderns 
succeeded, iii. 25, n. 5 ; bag-wigs, 
wore, iii. 327 ; Fortune of Physi- 
cians, i. 2S0, n. 2; Hogarth's pict- 
ures of one, iii. 327. n. 4; intruders, 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



20I 



Physicians. 



Players. 



do not love, ii. 378, «. 2; Johnson 
celebrates their beneficence, iv. 304; 
has pleasure in their company, iv. 
338 ; esteems them, v. 209 ; his con- 
versation compared to the practice 
of one, ii. 17; title: see under Dr. 
Memis. 

Piazzas, v. 130. 

Pickles, ii. 251. 

Pickiinck, story of the man who ate 
crumpets, iii. 437, w. i. 

PlERESC, his death and papers, ii. 425. 

Piety, comparative piety of women 
and wicked fellows, iv. 334 ; crazy 
piety, ii. 541. 

Piety in Pattens, ii. 54, n. 2. 

Pig, a learned, iv. 430. 

Pilgrim s Progress, Fearing and the 
screen, i. iSS, «. i ; Fearing and 
death, iv. 481, ;/. 2; Johnson praises 
it highly, ii. 274; wishes it longer, i. 
82, ;/. 2. 

Piling Arms, iii. 404. 

PiLKlNGTON, James, Present State of 
Derbyshire, iii. 183, n. i. 

Pillory, how far it dishonours, iii. 
35S; 'a place or the pillory,' iv. 131, 
n. I ; Parsons of the Cock Lane 
Ghost set in it, i. 470, n. 3. 

Pindar, Johnson asks Boswell to get 
him a copy, ii. 232 ; receives it, ii. 
235; West's translation, iv. 33. 

Pink, Dr., i. 225, «. 2. 

Pinkerton, John, iv. 381. 

Pino, ii. 517, n. i. 

Piozzi, Signer, account of him, iv. 391, 
n. 2; attacked by Baretti, iii. 57, n. 
i; Thrale, Mrs., attached to him, iv. 
182, n. 3 ; marries him, ii. 376, ;;. 2 ; 
iv. 391. 

Piozzi, Mrs. See Thrale, Mrs. 

Piozzi Letters. See under Mrs. 

Thrale, Johnson's letters to her. 
Pit, to, iii. 2X1. 



Pitcairne, Archibald, v. 65. 

Pitt, William. See Chatham, Earl of. 

Pitt, William, the son, Boswell, ne- 
glects, iii. 242, n. I, 526; iv. 302, n. 
i; — letter to him, iv. 302, n. i; his 
answer, ib.; called to order, iv. 343, 
n. 2; Fox a political apostate, calls, 
iv. 342, «. 2; — , compared with, iv. 
337; honesty of mankind, on the, iii. 
267, n. 5 ; Johnson's pension, pro- 
posed addition to, iv. 404, n. i ; 
Macaulay, attacked by, ib. ; minis- 
try, his, iv. 190, M. 3, 195, n. 3, 305, 
n. 2 ; motion for reform of parlia- 
ment, iv. 190, n. i; tax on horses, v- 

57- 

Pitts, Rev. John, iv. 2og, n. 2. 

Pity, not natural to man, i. 506. 

Place-Hunters, iii. 265. 

Places of Public Entertainment, 
v. 337, n. I. 

Plague of London, Dr. Hodges, ii. 
390, n. 4. 

Plaids, v. 96. 

Plain Dealer, i. 180, 200, n. 2. 

Plati of the Dictionary. See Diction 
ary. 

Planta, Joseph, ii. 457, «. 4. 

Plantations (settlements), ii. 13. 

Planters. See America, planters. 

Planting Trees, Johnson recom- 
mends, iii. 235-6. See Scotland, 
trees. 

Plassey, Battle of, v. 141, «. 3. 

Plautus, quoted, i. 541, n. i. 

Plaxton, Rev. G., i. 42, n. i. 

Players, action of all tragic players 
is bad, v. 42 ; below ballad-singers, 
iii. 209; Camden's, Lord, familiarity 
with Garrick, iii. 354; change in 
their manners, i. 193-4 ; Churchill's 
lines on them, i. 193, «. 3 ; Collier's 
censure, i. 193, «. 2 ; dancing-dogs, 

, like, ii. 463 ; declamation too meas- 



202 



Index to 



Players. 



ured. ii. io6, n. 2; drinking tea with 
a player, v. 51 ; emphasis wrong, i. 
194; ' fellow who clajis a hump on 
his hack,' iii. 20q ; 'fellow who ex- 
hibits himself for a shilling,' ii. 269; 
Johnson's i)rejii(lice against them 
shown in the /.i/r of Snvai^e, i. 193; 
Li/f of J^ryden, ih. , ;/. 2 ; — more 
favourable judgment, i. 233; iv. 282, 
n. i; lawyers, compared with, ii. 269; 
past compared with present, v. 143; 
I'uritans, abhorred by, i. 193, n. 3 ; 
Reynolds defends them,ii. 269; trans- 
formation into characters, iv. 23i-2; 
Whitehcatl's compliment to (iarrick, 
i. 466. St-f Ci.\RRicK, profession. 
Ple.^sko with onksklk, iii. 374. 
Pleasinc, negative qualities please 

more than positive, iii. 169. 
Pleaslrk, aim of all our ingenuity, iii. 
321 ; hap]iiness, compared with, iii. 
279; harmless pleasure, iii. 441; mo- 
nastic theory of it, iii. 331; in itself 
a good, iii. 372; no man a hypocrite 
in it, iv. 365; partakers in it, iii. 373; 
' public pleasures counterfeit,' iv. 
365, n. I. 
Pleasures of the Imagination. See 

Akensidk, Mark. 
Pledging oneself , iii. 223. 
Pliny, v. 250. 

Plott, Robert, History of Stafford- 
shire, iii. 213. 
Plowden, iv. 35S. 
Plum, defined, iii. 332, n. 2. 
Plunket, W. C. (afterwards Lord), ii. 

419, «. 4. 
Plut.^rch, Alcibiades quoted, iii. 303, 
«. 4; apophthegms and memorabilia, 
V. 472; biography, i. 37; Euphranor 
and Parrhasius, iv. 120, n. 3; Mon- 
boddo follows him in the approval 
of slavery, v. 87, «. i; Solon quoted, 
iii. 289. 



Political Conferences. 

Plymouth, Trench ships of war in 
sight, iii. 371, n. 5; Johnson visits it, 
i. 437; hates a ' docker,' i. 439; men- 
tioned, iv. 89. 

I'LVMI'TdN, iv. 498. 

PocDCK, Dr. Edward, the Orientalist, 
iii. 305, «. 4; iv. 33. 

PococK, Mr., catalogue of sale of au- 
tographs, ii. 340, //. I. 

PococKE, Richard, Traveh, ii. 396. 

Poems, preserved by tradition, ii. 398; 
temporary ones, iii. 361-2. 

Poet-Lairkates, i. 213, n. 2. 

Poetical Calendar, i. 443. 

Poetical Ke'Ae~o of the I.iterant' and 
Moral Character of Dr. Johnson. 
See Courtenay, John. 

Poetry, devotional, iii. 408, //. i ; iv. 
47; mediocrity in it, ii. 403; modem 
imitators of the early poets, ii. 157, 
244; iii. 180-1 ; translated, cannot 
be, iii. 42, 291 ; what is poetry? iii. 

44- 

PdKTs, collection of all the English 
poets proposed, iii. 179; English di- 
vided into four classes, i. 519, //. 2; 
fundamental principles, knowledge 
of, iii. 395 ; preserve languages, iii. 
42; rarity, their, v. 98. 

Poets, Lives of the. See Lives of the 
Poets. 

Poets, l^he, Apollo Press edition, iii, 

133- 
Poker Club, ii. 431, n. i, 493, n. 2. 
PoL.'^Nn, hospitality to strangers, iv. 

21 ; Johnson wishes to visit it, iii. 

518. 
Polemo-middinia, iii. 322. 
Polite Philosopher, The, iii. 25. 
Politeness, ' fictitious benevolence,' 

V. 93 ; its universal axiom, v. 93, 

n. I. 
Politian, i. 104; iv. 428, n. I. 
Political Conferences, iii. 351. 



BosweWs Life of foknson. 



203 



Political Improvement. 



Pope. 



Political Improvement, schemes of, 
ii. 118. 

Political Sunry of Great Britain, ii. 
512. 

Political Tracts by the Author of the 
Rambler, ii. 360-2 ; copy in Pem- 
broke College, //'. , u. 2; attacked, 
ii. 361-3 ; preface to it suggebted, 
ii. 504. 

Politics, modern, devoid of all prin- 
ciple, ii. 423; in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, ii. 424. 

' Pull,' Miss Carmichael, iii. 418. 

Polluted, iv. 463, «. 3. 

POLYBirs, ii. 39. . 

Polygamy, v. 238, 246. 

PoLYniEME, i. 323. 

Polyphemus, v. 93, n. 3. 

Pomfrp:t, John, Johnson adds him to 
the Lives, iii. 421 ; his Choice, ib., 
tt. 6. 

Pomponius Mela de situ Orbis, i. 538. 

Poinposo, i. 470. 

PONDICIIERRY, V. I4I, n. 3. 

PoNSONBY, Hon. Mr., v. 299. 

Poor, cannot agree, ii. 118; condition 
of them the national distinction, ii. 
150; deaths from hunger in London, 
iii. 456; education, ii. 216, n. 4: see 
under State ; employment under 
the poor-law, iv. 3 ; France, in, ii. 
447; 'honour, have no,' iii. 215; in- 
jured by indiscriminate hospitality, 
iv. 21 ; provision for them, ii. 149- 
50; rich, at the mercy of the, v. 346; 
superfluous meat for them, iv. 236. 

Pope, Alexander, Addison's ' familiar 
day,' iv. 105, n. 2 ; Adrian's lines, 
translation of, iii. 477, n. 2; Bei^i^ar's 
Opera, his expectation about the, ii. 
423, n. 2 ; Benson's monument to 
Milton, v. 108, n. i; Blair, anecdotes 
of him by, iii. 457-8; bleeding, ad- 
vised to try, iii. 172, «. 4 ; Blount, 



Martha, i. 369^ n. i ; Bolingbroke's 

present to Booth, v. 143, n. 3 ; Bo- 
lingbroke's enmity, i. 382-3; Boling- 
broke. Lady, described by, iii. 369 ; 
' borrows for want of genius,' v. 105, 
n. i; Budgell, Eustace, ii. 263, n. 1; 
Characters of jMen and Women, ii. 
96 ; Gibber's Careless Husband, ii. 
390, ;/. I ; iii. 83, n. 2 ; condensing 
sense, art of, v. 393; confidence in 
himself, i. 215, n. i; Congreve, dedi- 
cates the Iliad to, iv. 59, ;;. 3; con- 
versation, iii. 446, n. I ; iv. 58 ; 
Cooke, correspondence with, v. 41, 
n. i; Cowley out of fashion, iv. 118, 
n. 3 ; Crousaz's Examen, i. 159 ; 
death, reflection on the day of his, 
iii. 188 ; his death imputed to a 
saucepan, i. 313, ;/. i; deathbed con- 
fession, V. 200, n. 3; Dodsley, assist- 
ed, ii. 511, «.i; Dryden, distinguished 
from, ii. 6, 97 ; in his boyhood saw 
him, i. 436, n. i ; Dunciad, annota- 
tors, its, iv. 354, n. 2; — concluding 
lines, ii. 96; — Dennis's thunder, iii. 
46, ;/. 3; — resentment of those at- 
tacked, ii. 70, «. 2 ; — written for 
fame, 11^382; Dying Christian to his 
Soul, iii. 33; Elegy to the memory of 
an unfortunate Lady, i. 200, n. i ; 
epigram on Lord Stanhope attributed 
to him, iv. 118, n. 3; Epitaph on 
Mrs. Corbet, iv. 271, n. 2; Epitaphs, 
Johnson's Dissertation on his, i. 
388; Essay on Criticism, ii. 41, «. i; 
iv. 251, n. 3; Essay on Afan, Boling- 
broke's .share in it, iii. 457-8 ; — 
Warburton's comments, ii. 41, «. 3 ; 
fame, his, said to have declined, ii. 
97; iii- 378: female-cousin, his, iii. 82, 
n. I ; Fermor, Mrs., describes him, ii. 
450, n. 4; Flatman, borrowed from, 
iii. 33 ; friends, his, iii. 395 ; iv. 59; 
gentlemen, on the ignorance of, iv. 



204 



Index to 



Pope. 



251, ;/. 3 ; Goldsmith's reflection on 
his 'strain of pride,' iii. 188, //. i ; 
Greek, knowledge of, iii. 458; grotto, 
his, iv. 10; verses on it, iv. 61; 
happy, says that he is, iii. 285 ; 
Homer, his, attacked by I5entley, 
iii. 291, )i. 2; and Cowper, iii. 2gi, 
n. 3 ; praised hy Johnson, iii. 2gi ; 
and Gray, /'/'., «. 3; his pretended 
reason for translating it into blank 
verse, ii. 143, n. i ; written on the 
covers of letters, i. 165, n. i; Iliad, 
written slowly, i. 369, n. 4; Odyssey, 
translated by the help of associates, 
iv. 57 ; imitations, fondness for, i. 
137, w. 4; intimidated by prose- 
cution of r. Whitehead, i. 145, n. 
2 ; Johnson criticises his Ode on 
Si. Ciiilia's Day, iv. 19, «. 4 ; — 
defends him as a poet, iv. 54 ; — 
Dicl'umaty, apparently interested 
in, i. 211; — estimate of the Dtin- 
ciad, ii. 97, M. I ; — , recommends, to 
Lord Gower, i. 153, «. I, 154, 165; 
to J. Richardson, i. 16? ; — trans- 
lates his Mt-ssia/i, i. 71, 316; — ' will 
soon be dtfterrc,' i. 149 ; ii. 97 ; — 
writes his I.ife, iv. 54-5; labour his 
pleasure, ii. 113, «. i; laugh, did not, 
ii. 434, «. i; Lewis's verses to him, 
iv. 354; Lintot, quarrels with, i. 504, 
n. 2 ; Lords, gave all his friendship 
to, iii. 395; 'low-born Allen,' v. 91, 
n. 2: Mallet paid to attack his mem- 
ory, i. 3S1-2 ; ' Man never is, but 
always to be blest,' ii. 402; March- 
mont's, Earl of, anecdotes of him, 
iii. 390-2, 446, 475; — Pope's exec- 
utor, iv. 60 ; Memoirs of Scriblerus, 
V. 49, M. 3; mill, his mind a, v. 301; 
Miscellanies, transplants an indecent 
piece into his, iv. 43, n. i ; — lines 
applicable to Gibbon, ii. 153, n. i ; 
'modest Foster,' iv. 11 ; monument 



proposed in .St. Paul's, ii. 274; 'nar- 
row man, a,' ii. 310, //. 2; ' nodded in 
company,' iii. 446, ;/. i ; pamphlets 
against him, kept the, iv. 147 ; ' pa- 
per-sparing,' i. 165; papers left at his 
death, iv. 60, n. i ; parents, liehaviour 
to his, i. 393, n. i; parodied l)y L IL 
Browne, ii. 388, n. i ; parsimony, i. 
165, /;. I ; Pastorals, ii. 97; Patriot 
Kiui^, clandestinely printed copies of 
the, i. 3S2, ;/. i; pensioners, satirises, 
i. 434; Philips, Ambrose, attacks, i. 
207, //. 4 ; pleasure in writing, iv. 
253, w. i; Prendergast and Sir" John 
Friend, ii. 210; priests where a mon- 
key is the god, ii. 155, ;/. 2; Prince 
of Wales, repartee to the, iv. 58-g; 
KadclifTe's doctors, iv. 33S, //. i ; 
Rape of the Lock, ii. 450, //. 4; read- 
ing, his, i. 66, «. 15 ii.41,//. i; of the 
modern Latin poets, i. 104, ;;.4; Rich, 
anecdote of, iv. 284, //. 5; Ruflhead's 
Life of Pope, ii. 191; Settle, the City 
Poet, iii. 87, ;/. i; Seventeen hundred 
and thirty-eij^/it, i. 145, n. 2, 146, 
147, ;/. 3; Shakespeare, edition of, v. 
277, ;/. 6; Spence at Oxford, visits, 
iv. 10; .Steele, letter to, iii. 188, «. i; 
Swift, his prudent management for, 
iii. 23, ;/. i; Swift's letter on parting 
with him, iii. 355; Theobald, revenge 
on, ii. 3S2, n. i ; introduces him in 
the Dtinciad, iii. 449, n. i; Tory and 
Whig, called a, iii. 105 ; Tyburn 
psalm, iv. 218, u. i; Tyrawley, Lord, 
ii. 242, n. 4; ' tin politique,' &c., iii. 
369 ; valetudinarian, iii. 172, «. 2 ; 
vanity, iii. 395, ;/. 2 ; Verses on his 
Grotto, iv. 61 ; Latin translation, i. 
182; versification, ii. 97, «. 3; iv. 54; 
Voltaire, i. 577, n. i; Walpole's ' hap- 
pier hour,' iii. 66, n. i; Warburton at 
first attacks him, v. go; defends him, 
i. 381-2; makes him a Christian, ii. 



BosweWs Life of fohnson. 



205 



Pope. 



Porter. 



41, n. 3; made by him a bishop, il>.; 
Ward the quack-doctor, iii. 443, n. 2; 
Warton's Essay, i. 519; ii. 191; wit, 
definition of, v. 35, ;/. 2. 
Pope, quotations, Dunciad, i. 41-iv. 
218, w. i; i. 87-iii. 87, n. i; i. 141-i. 
63, w. 2; i. 253-ii. 367, n. i; (first edi- 
tion) iii. 149-V. 479, w. i; iii. 325-i. 
264, M.I ; iv. 90-i.3o8, w. 2; iv. iii-v. 
108, n. I ; iv. 167-iii. 207, M. I ; iv. 249- 
V. 249, n. 2; iv. 342-iii. 226, n. 3; Elo- 
isa to Abchird, 1. 3S-i. 316; 1. 134-v. 
370, n. 2; Epitaph on Craggs, iv. 513; 
Essay ott Criticist>i,\.(ib-\u.%y, I.297- 
v. 35, «. 2; 1. 370-v. 330, n. 3; Essay 
on Man, i. 99-iii. 113, «. i; i. 221- 
iv. 431, n. i; ii. 20-iii. 91, 287, n. 3; 
ii. lo-i. 234; iii. 3-iv. 312, n. i; iv. 
57-ii. 10, It. i; iv. 219-V. 94, ;/. 2: iv. 
267-iii. 94, ;/. 2; iv. 3So-iii. 389; iv. 
383-iii. 216, n. I ; iv. 390-iv. 484 ; 
Aloral Essays, i. 69-i. 3; i. 174-iv. 
365, n. i; ii. 275-i. 289; iii. 25-iii. 
394, n. 3; iii. 242-i. 556; iii. 392-i- 
434, M. 2 ; Prologue to Addison's 
Cato, i. 35; Satires, Prologue, 1. 99- 
i. 368 ; 1. 135-i. 291, n. 2 ; 1. 247-i. 
264, n. i; 1. 259-ii. 422, n. i; 1. 283- 

iii- 373; I- 350-v. 474. «• i; 1- 378-ii- 
263, n. I ; Satires, Epilogue, i. 29- 
iii. 66, ;/. 2; iv. 419, w. 2; i. 131-iv. 
II, n. 2; i. 135-iii. 56, ;/. i; ii. 7C)-i. 
590; ii. 283, n. i; iv. 34, n. 2; ii. 208- 
iii. 432, n. i; Imitations of Horace, 
Epistles, i. vi. 3-ii. 181, «. 3 ; i. vi. 
i20-ii. 242, n. 4 ; i. vi. 126-iii. 439, 
;/. i; ii. i. 14-v. 423, ;/. 4; ii. i. 71-i. 
137; ii. i. 75-iv. iiS, ;/. 3; ii. i. iSo- 
iii. 443, n. 2; ii. i. 22i-ii. 152, n. i; 
ii. ii. 23-iii. 269, n. i; ii. ii. 78-v. 301, 
;/. I ; ii. ii. 157-i. 255 ; ii. ii. 276-i. 
147, ;/. 4; Satires, ii. i. 67-iii. 105, «. 
I ; ii. i. 78-iv. 368, n. I ; ii. ii. 3-i. 
122, ;/. i; Universal Prayer, iii. 394. 



Pope, Mrs., i. 577, «. i. 

Pope, Dr. Walter, iv. 22. 

Popery. See Roman Catholics. 

Popular Elections, of the clergy, ii. 
171. 

Population, America, increase in, ii. 
359; changes in density, ii. 117: 
comparative population of counties 
in 1756, i. 356, //. 2; emigration, how 
far affected by, iii. 263-4; ^^igh con- 
venience where it is large, v. 29. 

PoRSON, Richard, Bentley not a 
Scotchman, ii. 416, n. 4 ; described 
by Dr. Parr, iv. 444, n. 3; Hawkins, 
Sir. J., ridicules, i. 259, «. 2; ii. 65, 
n. 4; iv. 427, n. 2; natural abilities, 
ii. 500, «. 2. 

Port, family of, iii. 213. 

Port, liquor for men, iii. 433; iv. 91. 

Port Eliot, iv. 385. 

Porter, Endymion, v. 157, w. i. 

Porter, Henry (Mrs. Johnson's first 
husband), Birmingham mercer, i. 
100; family registry of births, &c., i. 
109, «. 3 ; insolvency, i. iii, n. i ; 
mentioned, ii. 88. 

Porter, Captain (Henry Porter's son), 
i. 109, ;/. 3; ii. 529. 

Porter, — (Henry Porter's son), ii. 
445; iv. 104; death, iv. 296. 

Porter, Sir James, iii. 457. 

Porter, Mrs. (afterwards Mrs. John- 
son). See under Johnson, Mrs. 

Porter, Mrs., the actress, i. 42S, 442; 
iv. 280, 281, n. I. 

Porter, Miss Lucy (Henry Porter's 
daughter and Johnson's step-daugh- 
ter), birth, i. 109, n. 3; Boswell calls 
on her, ii. 529; iii. 469-70 ; Dodd's 
Conviet's Address, reads, iii. 161, n. 
I ; fortune, her, and house, ii. 529 ; 
Johnson's account of her, i. 429 ; 
— earlier letters to her, ii. 444, «. 2 
(for his letters, see under Johnson, 



204 



Index to 



Pope. 



251, /;. 3; (loldsiiuth's rcHeclion on 
his ■ strain of pride,' iii. iS8, ;/. I ; 
Greek, knowledge of, iii. 458; grotto, 
his, iv. 10 ; verses on it, iv. 61 ; 
hapjiy, says that he is, iii. 285 ; 
Homer, Ins. attacked by I'cntlcy, 
iii. 291, n. 2; and Cowper, iii. 2gi, 
n. 3 ; praised l>y Johnson, iii. 291 ; 
and (jray, //'., ;/. 3; his pretended 
reason for translating it into blank 
verse, ii. 143, n. i ; written on the 
covers of letters, i. 165, n. i; ///<;</, 
written slowly, i. 369, ;/. 4; Odyssey, 
translated by the help of associates, 
iv. 57 ; imitations, fondness for, i. 
137, M. 4; intimidated by prose- 
cution of V. Whitehead, i. 145, //. 
2 ; Johnson criticises his Ode on 
St. Cciilid's Day, iv. 19, >/. 4 ; — 
defends him as a poet, iv. 54 ; — 
Dictionary, apparently interested 
in, i. 211; — estimate of the Dun- 
dad, ii. 97, M. 1; — , recommends, to 
Lord Gower, i. 153, n. i, 154, 165; 
to J. KichardsoR, i. 16? ; — trans- 
lates his Messiah, i. 71, 316; — ' will 
soon be deterre,' i. 149 ; ii. 97 ; — 
writes his Life, iv. 54-5; labour his 
pleasure, it. 1 13, //. i ; laugh, did not, 
ii. 434, n. i; Lewis's verses to him, 
iv. 354; Lintot, quarrels with, i. 504, 
n. 2 ; Lords, gave all his friendship 
to, iii. 395; 'low-born Allen,' v. 91, 
n. 2; Mallet paid to attack his mem- 
ory, i. 3S1-2 ; ' Man never is, but 
always to be blest,' ii. 402; March- 
mont's. Earl of, anecdotes of him, 
iii. 390-2, 446, 475; — Pope's exec- 
utor, iv. 60 ; Memoirs of Scrihle)-us, 
V. 49, M. 3; mill, his mind a, v. 301; 
Miscellanies, transplants an indecent 
piece into his, iv. 43, «. i; — lines 
applicable to Gibbon, ii. 153, n. i ; 
'modest Foster,' iv. 11 ; monument 



proposed in St. Paul's, ii. 274; 'nar- 
row man, a,' ii. 310, w. 2; ' noildcd in 
company,' iii. 446, n. \ ; pamphlets 
against him, kejU the, iv. 147 ; ' pa- 
jier-sparing,' i. 165; jiapers left at his 
death, iv. 60, n. i; parents, behaviour 
to his, i. 393, n. i; parodied by L H. 
Browne, ii. 388, «. i ; parsimony, i. 
165, //. I ; Pastorals, ii. 97 ; Patriot 
A'iiti^, clandestinely printed copies of 
the, i. 3S2, n. i; jiensioners, satirises, 
i. 434 ; Philips, Ambrose, attacks, i. 
207, //. 4 ; pleasure in writing, iv. 
253, n. i; Prenderga-st and Sir" John 
Friend, ii. 210; priests where a mon- 
key is the god, ii. 155, //. 2; Prince 
of Wales, repartee to the, iv. 58-9; 
KadclifTe's doctors, iv. 33S, //. I ; 
/w7/<' of the Lock, ii. 450, //. 4; read- 
ing, his, i. 66, /;. I ; ii. 4 1 , ;/. i ; of the 
modern Latin poets, i. 104, 11. ^\ Rich, 
anecdote of, iv. 284, //. 5; Rufl head's 
Life of Pope, ii. 191; .Settle, the City 
Poet, iii. 87, //. i; Seventeen hundred 
and thirty-t-ij^ht, i. 145, w. 2, 146, 
147, n. 3; Shakespeare, edition of, v. 
277, ;/. 6; S|)ence at Oxford, visits, 
iv. 10; Steele, letter to, iii. 1S8, n. i; 
Swift, his prudent management for, 
iii. 23, ;/. i; Swift's letter on parting 
with him, iii. 355; Theobald, revenge 
on, ii. 382, w. I ; introduces him in 
the Dunciad, iii. 449, w. i; Tory and 
Whig, called a, iii. 105 ; Tyburn 
psalm, iv. 218, //. i; Tyrawley, Lord, 
ii. 242, n. 4; ' un politique,' &c., iii. 
369 ; valetudinarian, iii. 172, n. 2 ; 
vanity, iii. 395, ;/. 2 ; J'erses on /its 
Grotto, iv. 61 ; Latin translation, i. 
182; versification, ii. 97, «. 3; iv. 54; 
Voltaire, i. 577, ;/. i; Walpole's ' hap- 
pier hour,' iii. 66, n. i; Warburton at 
first attacks him, v. 90; defends him, 
i. 381-2; makes him a Christian, ii. 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



205 



Pope. 



Porter. 



41, «. 3; made by him a bishop, ib.; 
Ward the quack-doctor, iii. 443, n. 2; 
Warton's Essay, i. 519; ii. 191; wit, 
definition of, v. 35, ;/. 2. 
Pope, quotations, DunciaJ, i. 41-iv. 
218, Ji. i; i. 87-iii. 87, w. i; i. 141-i. 
63, M. 2; i. 253-ii. 367, n. i; (first edi- 
tion) iii. 149-V. 479, w. i; iii. 325-i. 
264, 71. 1 ; iv. 90-i. 308, n. 2 ; iv. 1 1 i-v. 
108, n. I ; iv. i67-iii. 207, n. i ; iv. 249- 
V. 249, n. 2; iv. 342-iii. 226, n. 3; Elo- 
isa to Ahelard, 1. 38-i. 316; 1. 134-v. 
370, n. 2 ; Epitaph oti Craggs, iv. 513; 
Essay on Cnticis)n,\.(i(y-m.%y, 1.297- 
V. 35, «. 2; 1. 370-v. 330, «. 3; Essay 
on Man, i. 99-iii. 113, w. i; i. 221- 
iv. 431, «. i; ii. 20-iii. 91, 287, ;/. 3; 
ii. lo-i. 234; iii. 3-iv. 312, n. i; iv. 
57-ii. 10, n. i; iv. 219-v. 94, w. 2: iv. 
267-iii. 94, n. 2; iv. 380-iii. 389; iv. 
383-iii. 216, n. I ; iv. 390-iv. 484 ; 
Moral Essays, i. 69-i. 3; i. 174-iv. 
365, w. I ; ii. 275-i. 289; iii. 25-iii. 
394, n. 3; iii. 242-i. 556; iii. 392-i- 
434, n. 2 ; Prologue to Addison s 
Cato, i. 35; Satires, Prologue, 1. 99- 
i. 368; 1. 135-i. 291, n. 2; 1. 247-i. 
264, 71. i; 1. 259-ii. 422, n. i; 1. 283- 
iii. 373; 1. 350-v. 474, ". i; 1- 37S-ii. 
263, «. I ; SatiiTs, Epilogue, i. 29- 
iii. 66, M. 2; iv. 419, «. 2; i. 131-iv. 
II, 71. 2; i. 135-iii. 56, 71. i; ii. 70-i. 
590; ii. 283, n. i: iv. 34, 71. 2; ii. 208- 
iii. 432, «. I ; Imitations of Horace, 
Epistles, i. vi. 3-ii. 181, w. 3 ; i. vi. 
l20-ii. 242, n. 4 ; i. vi. 126-iii. 439, 
;/. i; ii. i. 14-v. 423, «. 4; ii. i. 71-i. 
137; ii. i. 75-iv. 118, 71. 3; ii. i. 180- 
iii. 443, 71. 2; ii. i. 221-ii. 152, 71. i; 
ii. ii. 23-iii. 269, 71. i; ii. ii. 78-v. 301, 
71. I ; ii. ii. 157-i. 255 ; ii. ii. 276-i. 
147, ;;. 4; Satiivs, ii. i. 67-iii. 105, n. 
I ; ii. i. 78-iv. 36S, n. I ; ii. ii. 3-i. 
122, //. i; Universal Prayer, iii. 394. 



Pope, Mrs., i. 577, n. i. 

Pope, Dr. Walter, iv. 22. 

Popery. Sec Roman C.-vtholics. 

Popular Elections, of the clergy, ii. 
171. 

Population, America, increase in, ii, 
359 ; changes in density, ii. 117 ; 
comparative population of counties 
in 1756, i. 356, ti. 2; emigration, how 
far affected by, iii. 263-4; hig'^ con- 
venience where it is large, v. 29. 

PoRSON, Richard, Bentley not a 
Scotchman, ii. 416, n. 4 ; described 
by Dr. Parr, iv. 444, «. 3; Hawkins, 
Sir. J., ridicules, i. 259, «. 2; ii. 65, 
n. 4; iv. 427, ;/. 2; natural abilities, 
ii. 500, 71. 2. 

Port, family of, iii. 213. 

Port, liquor for men, iii. 433; iv. 91. 

Port Eliot, iv. 385. 

Porter, Endymion, v. 157, «. i. 

Porter, Henry (Mrs. Johnson's first 
husband), Birmingham mercer, i. 
100; family registry of births, &c., i. 
109, n. 3 ; insolvency, i. iii, m. i ; 
mentioned, ii. 88. 

Porter, Captain (Henry Porter's son), 
i. 109, n. 3; ii. 529. 

Porter, — (Henry Porter's son), ii. 
445; iv. 104; death, iv. 296. 

Porter, Sir James, iii. 457. 

Porter, Mrs. (afterwards Mrs. John- 
son). See under Johnson, Mrs. 

Porter, Mrs., the actress, i. 428, 442; 
iv. 280, 281, M. I. 

Porter, Miss Lucy (Henry Porter's 
daughter and Johnson's step-daugh- 
ter), birth, i. 109, 71. 3; Boswell calls 
on her, ii. 529; iii. 469-70; Dodd's 
Convict's Add/rss, reads, iii. 161, n. 
I ; fortune, her, and house, ii. 529 ; 
Johnson's account of her, i. 429 ; 
— earlier letters to her, ii. 444, «. 2 
(for his letters, see under Johnson, 



206 



Index to 



Porter. 

letters); — fctlinys towards her, i. 
597 ; ii. 529, w. i ; — , her feelings 
towards, ii. 529, 537: — memory, i. 
47; — personal appearance, i. 109; 

— present to her of a box, ii. 444; 

— l)rologuc to Kelly's comedy, dis- 
owns, iii. 130, «. i; — will, not in, 
iv. 463, n. 3; mother's wedding-ring, 
does not value her, i. 275; residence 
in Lichfield, i. 128, 4(X), w. i; 402, 
597; verses said to he addressed to 
her, i. 107, n. 2 ; mentioned, i. 119, 

393. «• 2. 5')-i; ii- 53^'; i'i- 'SO. 474: 

iv. 431. 454. 
roKTKK, A SlRKKT-, Johnson drives a 

loail ofT his hack, iv. 83. 
rt>RrKK, Johnson semis a present of, 

ii. 3". 3'5- 

PoRTKl's, Heilhy, Hishop of Chester 
(afterwanls of London), Hoswell, at- 
tentive to, iii. 469, 472 ; Jenyn's, 
Soame, conversion, i. 366, m. 2; Life 
of Sitkcr, iv. 35; reverend fops, iv. 
88 ; Sunday knotting, iii. 274, w. 3 ; 
mentioned, iii. 142, 316, 31S. 

PORTLA.NK, third Duke of, iii. 254, //. 
I ; iv. 20C), «. 5. Si-e Coalitio.n 
M I .M M K V . 

Portland, Dowager Duchess of, iii. 
482. 

PoRT.MORK, Lord, Johnson's letter to 
him, iv. 309, n. i. 

Portraits, their chief excellence, v. 
249 ; portrait-painting, improper for 
women, ii. 415; of Johnson: sue un- 
der JoHNSO.N, portraits. 

Portugal, iii. 26, 505. 

PoRTiGAL Pieces, iv. 121. 

PoRTUorESE, discovery of the Indies, 
i. 527,//. 2; ii. 550; iii. 232, /;. i; iv. 
14, n. 2. 

POSSIIULITIES, v. 51. 

Post, Brighton, to, iii. 105, n. 4; double 
letters, i. 328, n. i ; franking letters, 



Prayers. 

iii. 415; iv. 416, H. 3; penny-post, i. 
140, 175 ; postage from Lisbon, iii. 
26; to Oxford, i. 328, n. i. 

PosT-CHAlsE, driving from, or to some- 
thing, iii. 5, 519; Gibbon delights in 
them, ii. 51S, >/. 5; also Johnson, ii. 
518 ; if accompanied by a pretty 
woman, iii. 184; in 1758, v. 63, «. 2. 

I'osr-iuiRSES, charge per mile, v. 487. 

Postern \, prescribing rules to, ii. 

477- 
Pot, Mr., iv. 6, «. i. 
Pott, Kev. Archdeacon, ii. 525. 
Pott, Mr., a surgeon, iv. 277. 
Poi ier, Robert, translation of ^s- 

ihyliis, iii. 291. 
PtAERTV, ' All this excludes but one 

evil — poverty,' iii. 182; arguments 

for it, i. 511 ; a great evil, iv. 171, 

175, 178, 180, 188. 405. 
Powell, a clerk, iv. 258, n. i. 
Power, all power desirable, ii. 410; 

despotic, iii. 321 ; of the Crown, ii. 

195- 

PowERScoLRT, Lord, v. 288. 

Practice. See Principles. 

Pragie, iii. 520. 

Praise, on compulsion, ii. 57; extrav- 
agant, iii. 256; iv. 95; value of it, iv. 
38, 295, w. 2. 

Pratt, Chief Justice. See Ca.mde.n, 

LORlJ. 

Pr.wer, arguments against it, v. 42 ; 
dead, for the, ii. 187; efficacy, its, v. 
77 ; family prayer, v. 138 ; form of 
prayer, v. 415; Hume on Leechman's 
doctrine, v. 77, «. 2 ; Johnson de- 
signs a Book of Prayers, iv. 339, 
434; — offered a large sum for one, 
i^'- 4731 lies in prayers, iv. 340; rea- 
soning on its nature unprofitable, ii. 
204. 

Pr.wers, by Johnson, against inquis- 
itive and perplexing thoughts, iv. 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



207 



Prayers. 



Price. 



426, n, 3; before his last communion, 
iv. 481; before study, iii. 102-3; be- 
fore the study of law, i. 566; Cham- 
bers, Catherine, for, ii. 49; death of 
his wife, on the, i. 273; Dictionary, 
on beginning vol. ii. of his, i. 296 ; 
Easter Day, 1777, iii. 113; engaging 
in Politicks with II , i. 566; for- 
giveness for neglect of duties in mar- 
ried Hfe, i. 278; January i, 1753, i. 
292; new scheme of life, i. 405; ' On 
my return to life,' i. 271, ;/. 2; Ram- 
bler, before the, i. 234 ; repentance 
and pardon, for, iv. 458; resolutions, 
on, i. 559 ; study of philosophy, on 
the, i. 350; Trinity, the, invoked, ii. 
292. 
Prayers and Meditations, Johnson's, i. 
272, n. 2 ; ii. 547 ; publication, iv. 

434- "■ 2. 

rRE.\c}iKRS, women, i. 535. 

Preaching, above the capacity of the 
congregation, iv. 213; plain language 
needed, i. 531; ii. 141. 

Preceptor, The, i. 222. 

Preciseness, iv. 103. 

Precocity, ii. 468. 

Predestination, ii. 119. 

Prefaces, Johnson's talent for, i. 338. 

Premier, i. 342, ;/. 

Preaiilm-scheme, i. 368. 

Prendergast (Prendergrass), an offi- 
cer, ii. 209, 210, n. I. 

Presbyterian, in the sense of Unitarian, 
ii. 468, n. I. 

Presbyterians and Presbyteria.n- 
ISM, compared with Church of Rome, 
ii. 119; differ from it chiefly in forms, 
ii. 173; doctrine, ii. 119; form of 
prayer, no, ii. 119; frightened by 
Poper)-, V. 64. 

Prescience, of the Deity, iii, 330. 

Prescription of Murder. See Mur- 
der. 



Present State of England, iv. 359. 

Present Time, never happy, ii. 402. 

Present Times, Johnson never in- 
veighed against them, iii. 4. 

Press, awed by parliament as regards 
report of debates, i. 134; iii. 522; iv. 
161, ;/. 5 ; complete freedom ob- 
tained, i. 134 ; Johnson attacks its 
liberty, ii. 68; vindicates it, ib., n. 4; 
discusses it with Dr. Parr, iv. 18, «. 
2; Mansfield tries to stifle it, i. 134, 
n. 2; law of libel, iii. 18, n. 2; licen- 
tiousness, its, i. 134; — debate on it, 
iv. 368, n. 2; prosecutions in 1764, ii. 
68, n. 4; superfoetation, its, iii. 378. 

Press-gangs, iii. 522. 

Prestburv, v. 493, «. I. 

Prestick, ii. 311, n. 2. 

Preston, iii. 153, n. i. 

Preston, Sir Charles, iv. 177. 

Pretender, the Young, account of his 
escape, v. 213-33, 300 ; dresses in 
women's clothes, v. 214; at Kings- 
burgh, V. 211, 215; shoes, v. 216; in 
Rasay, v. 198, w. 2, 217-21; fears as- 
sassination, V. 220; speaks of Cullo- 
den, V. 221; returns to Sky, v. 221; 
pretends to be a servant, v. 222-4 ; 
his odd face, v. 223; goes to Mackin- 
non's countr)', v. 224 ; to Knoidart, 
V. 226 ; reward offered for him, v. 
211, 226, n. i; agitating a rebellion 
in 1752, i. 168, n. 2; base character, 
his, V. 228, n. i; Charles III, ii. 290; 
Derby, march to, iii. 184 ; designa- 
tion proper for him, v. 211, n. 2 ; 
Johnson sleeps in his bed, v. 211 ; 
London, in, i. 324, «. 2; v. 223, w. i, 
229; Voltaire's reflections on him, v. 
227. 

Price, Archdeacon, v. 517. 

Price, Dr. Richard, account of him, 
iv. 501 ; Hume, dines with, ii. 505, n. 
2; Johnson would not meet him, iv, 



208 



Index to 



Price. 

274, ;/. 6, 500-1; London-born chil- 
dren, iv. 242. 
Price, — , a vain Welsh scholar, v. 

499- 

Pridcaiix's Cotntection, iv. 359. 

Prikstlev, Dr. Joseph, Boswell at- 
tacks him, iv. 274, «. 6, 500 ; Parr 
defends him, ih. ; discoveries in 
chemistry, iv. 274. ti. 5, 275; P^lwall's 
trial, account of, ii. iSg, //. 2; Frank- 
lin |iraises his moderation, iv. 501; 
Gihhon and Ilorsley attack him, iv. 
504; Ileherden, Dr., a benefactor to 
him, iv. 263, ;/. 2 ; house burnt by 
rioters, iv. 274, ;/. 6; ' index-scholar,' 
iv. 470, //. 2 ; Johnson's estimate of 
his writings, iv. 470, ;/. 2, — , inter- 
view with, iv. 500 ; — on the pro- 
nunciation of latin, ii. 463, //. 2 ; 
Mackintosh's character of him, iv. 
510; Philosoi)hical necessity, iii. 330, 
n. 2, iv. 500; Shelburne, Lord, lives 
with, iv. 221, ;/. 3, theological works, 
ii. 142. 

Pkif.sts, enemies to liberty, v. 291, 
//. 2. 

Prime Minister, name and office, ii. 
407, n. 2; not in Johnson's Diction- 
ary, i. 342, n. ; no real one since 
Walpole's time, ii. 407. 

I'RIMROSE, Lady, v. 229. 

Prince, the bookseller, i. 336. 

Prince Frederick (brother of George 
III), V. 210, n. 3. 

Prince of Wales, happiest of men, i. 
426, n. 3; iv. 210. 

Prince of Wales (Frederick, father 
of George III), generosity, shows, v. 
214, ;/. I ; Mallet's dependence on 
him, i. 3S2, ;/. 3; Pope's repartee to 
him, iv. 59; \'ane, Anne, his mistress, 

V. 55- "• 3- 
Prince of Wales (George III), v. 
■ 210. n. 3, 



Prior. 

Prince of Wales (George IV), Ros- 
wcll carries up an address to him, 
iv. 2S7, ;/. 1; insolence, his, iv. 312, 
;/. i; Johnson pleased with his know 1- 
edge of the Scriptures as a child, ii. 
37, n. 3; language as a young man, 
his, //'./ Thurlow and Sir John Ladd, 
iv. 475, ;/. 2. 

Princess of Wales, Dowager (moth- 
er of George III), presents to Lord 
Bute, iv. 148, ;/. l. 

Prince 7'iti, ii. 448. 

Prince I'oitigcr, ii. 124, n. 3. 

Principle, goodness founded upon it, 
i. 513; things foundeil on no prin- 
ciple, V. 182. 

Pri.ncii'LES, general, must be hail from 
books, ii. 413. 

Principles and practice, i. 484, //. 4; 
ii. 390; iii. 320; iv. 457, v. 239, 4(J9. 

Prini;le, Sir John, Johnson couM not 
agree with him, iii. 74; v. 428, 437; 
madness, on the cause of, iii. 200, n. 
2 , President of the Royal Society, 
iii. 74, n. 3; Smith's IVeal/h of Na- 
tions, ii. 492; mentioned, ii. 68, ;/. i, 
188; iii. 8, 17, //. 2, 281; V. no. 

Printer's Devil, iv. 114. 

Prlnters, keeping their coach, ii. 259- 
60; wages of journeymen, ii. 370. 

Printing, early printed books, v. 523; 
effect on learning, iii. 42-43; people 
without it barbarous, ii. 196. 

Prior, .Sir James, Johnson's projected 
Life of Goldsmith, iii. 114, n. 2. 

Prior, Matthew, amorous pedantry, 
iii. 218, ;/. 4; Animiila vagiila, trans- 
lation of, iii. 477, ;/. 2 ; liorrowing, 
instances of his, iii. 450; Chameleon, 
ii. 181, ;/. 2 ; Despairing Shepherd, 
ii. 89, //. 2 ; Goldsmith republishes 
two of his poems, iii. 218, n. 4; Gual- 
teriis Danistonus ad Amicos, trans- 
lation of, iii. 136, ;/. i; Ilailes, Lord, 



Boswelfs Life of jfohison. 



209 



Prior. 



Psalmanazar. 



censured by, iii. 218; lady's book, a, 
iii. 219; love verses, ii. 89; ' My no- 
ble, lovely little Peggy,' iii. 482, n. 4; 
Paulo Purganti, iii. 219; Pitcairne, 
translation from, v. 65. 

Prior Park, v. 91, u. 2. 

Prisons, Johnson's praise of a good 
keeper, iii. 491. See under Lon- 
don, Newgate, &c. 

Pritchard, Mrs., the actress, good 
but affected, v. 144; Irene, acted, i. 
229; in common life a vulgar idiot, 
iv. 2S0 ; mechanical player, ii. 399 ; 
mentioned, ii. 106. 

Private Convers.\tion, iv. 250. 

Prize-fighting, v. 260. 

Prize Verses, in the Gent. Mag., i. 
106, n. 2, 158. 

Prizes, money arising from, ii. 405, 

». 3- 

Probationary Odes for the Laureate- 
ship, A Great Personage, i. 254, n. 
2; Boswell ridiculed, i. 134, «. 2; and 
the two Wartons, ii. 47, n. I. 

Probationer, cause of a, ii. 197. 

Prohiis Britannicus, i. 163. 

Procerity, i. 357. 

Proiiigioits, iii. 262, ;/. 3, 345; v. 452. 

Proikssion, choice of one, v. 53; mis- 
fortune not to be bred to one, iii. 
351, 7?. I ; time and mind given to 
one not very great, ii. 394. 

Profession, The, iii. 324, n. i. 

Professional Man, solemnity of man- 
ner, iv. 358. 

Profitable Instructions, &.C., i. 499, 
n. 2. 

Profusion, iii. 222. 

Progress of Discontent, i. 328, n. 2. 

Project, The, iii. 361. 

Project for the Employment of Au- 
thors, i. 355, ;/. I. 

Prologue at the Opening of Drury Lane 
Tluatre, i. 209; ii. 79; iv. 30, 358. 



Pronunci.\tion, difficulty of fixing it, 
ii. 184; Irish, Scotch, and provincial, 
ii. 182-5. 

Properantia, i. 259. 

Property, depends on chastity, ii. 523; 
permanent property, ii. 389. 

Proi'Iti.\tion, doctrine of the, iv. 143- 
4; v. 99. 

Proposals for printing Bibliotheca 
Ilarleiana, i. 177. 

Prose, English. See Style. 

Prosperity, vulgar, iii. 467. 

Prospero, i. 250. 

Prostitution, severe laws needed, iii. 
20. 

Protestant Association, iii. 485, 
n. I. 

Protestantism, converts to it, ii. 121. 

Providence, entails not an encroach- 
ment on his dominions, ii. 481 ; his 
hand seen in the breaking of a rope, 
V. 118; a particular providence, iv. 

314. «• 3- 

Provisions, carrying, to a man's 
house, v. 82, 

Provoked Husband, The, or The Jour- 
ney to London, ii. 55-6; iv. 328. 

Prudence, '^N^ullum nu/nen,' «S:c., iv. 
207. 

Prussia, Queen of (the mother of 
Frederick the Great), iv. 124, w. i. 

Psalm 36, v. 506. 

Psalmanazar, George, account of 
him. Appendix A, iii. 503-10 ; ar> 
rives in London, iii. 505, 508; at Ox- 
ford, iii. 505, 510; birth, education, 
and wanderings, iii. 506-8 ; writes 
his Memoirs, iii. 505 ; Club in Old 
Street, his, iv. 216 ; Complete Sys- 
tem of Geography, article in the, iii. 
506 ; Description of Formosa, iii. 
504; hypocrisy, never free from, iii. 
504, 509-10; Innes, Dr., aided in 
his fraud by, i. 416; invention of his 



2IO 



Index to 



Psalmanazar. 

name, iii. 507-8 ; Johnson sought 

after him, iii. 357; respected him as 

much as a liishop, iv. 316: Sf't-itiitor, 

ridiculed in tlie, iii. 510. 
PUBl.lCATlo.NS, spurious, ii. 495. 
Puhlick Ad'i'trtiscr, i. 347; ii. 52, n. 2. 

Si, w. 2, 107, ;/. I. 
I'lHMc Aki-.viks vex no man, iv. 255. 

•SV*- Ent.i.a.M). 
PUHMC AMisKMr.NTS. ii. 195. 
Public t/iftHirs, iv. 423, n. 3. 
rUHI-IC I.NSTITlTlo.NS, iii. 6i, 
I'UUI.IC JlDC.MKN'l. St-e \VnRi.n. 
Public /.cJi^cr, iii. 129, n. i. 
Pi'HI.k; Likk, eminent figure made in 

it with little superiority of miiui. iv. 

205. 
Pllii.ic OvK.Ns, ii. 247. 
Pl'HLlc Schools. Sec Schools. 
I'UHLIC Si'EAKINC, ii. l6o, 3S8. 
Public Virtue, iv. 24. 
Pinu.ic WoRsmi', i. 4S4, n. 2; iv. 477, 

«. 2. 
Publishers. Sec Booksellkrs. 
Pudding, Meditation on a, v. 400. 
PuFKENDORF, corporal punishment, ii. 

180; Introduction to I/isto>y, iv. 359; 

not in practice as a lawyer, ii. 493. 
PuLl'lT, liberty of the, iii. 68, 104. 
PuLSATIo.N, effect on life. iii. 40. 
PuLTENEY, William. Sec Bath, Earl of. 
Punch, bowl of, i. 387. 
Punctuation, Lyttelton's History of 

Henry II, iii. 37, ri. 5. 
PUNlc War, iii. 234, ;/. i. 
Punishment, eternal, iii. 227; iv. 345. 
Puns, 'dignifying a pun,' v. 36, w.; 

Johnson's contempt for them, ii. 277; 

iv. 365; Hoswell's approval of them, 

ib. ; one in .Mcnagiana, ii. 277. See 

under Burke and Johnson. 
Punster, defined, ii. 277, n. 1. 
Purcell, Thomas, ii. 392. 
Purgatorians, ii. i86. 



Quin. 

Purgatory, ii. 120, 187. See Mid- 
dle State. 

Putney, ii. 509. 

1'ye, Henry James, poet laureate, i. 
213, «. 2. 

Pym, John, member of Broadgates 
Hall, i. 87, M. 4; mentioned, ii. 135. 

Tykamids of Egypt, iii. 401. 

I'vihagorean Dlscil'LiNE, iii. 296. 



Quack I)oct(»rs, iii. 443. 

<JUAKERs, Boswell loves their simplic- 
ity, ii. 524; Johnson liked individual 
(^)uakers, hut not the sect, ii. 524; — 
on their objection to fine clothes, iii. 
214, //. 3 ; many a man a (Quaker 
\sithi)Ut knowing it, ii. 524; I'enn- 
sylvanian (Quakers, vote of, iv. 244, 
;/. 3 ; proselyte, a young, iii. 339 ; 
slavery, abolitionists of, ii. 550; sol- 
diers, clothing to the, iv. 245; texts, 
literal inteqiretation of, iv. 243-4 \ 
tythes and persecution inseparable, 
V. 483 ; women preaching, i. 535. 
See under Knowles, Mrs. 

Qualifying a 7vrong, iii. 73, n. I. 

Qualitied, iv. 200. 

QuAi.rrY, women of, iii. 401. 

Queen Elizabeth's Champion, v. 274, 
n. 3. 

Queen's Arms Club, iv. loi. 

Queen's House Library, ii. 37. 

QuEENSBERRY, family of, iii. 186. 

Queensberrv, Duke of, Gay and the 
Beggar s Opera, ii. 422. 

Queeny (Miss Thrale), iii. 479, n. 5 ; 
V. 514. 

Quern Deics vult perdere, ^c. , ii. 509, 
n. 2; iv. 209. 

Questioning, ii. 540 ; iii. 66, 304. 

Quin, James, Bath, praises, iii. 52, n. 
I; Beggar's Opera, anecdote of the, 
ii. 422; FalstafT, his, iv. 281, n. i; 



Bosweirs Life of jfohnson. 



21 I 



Quin. 



Ramsay. 



kings and January 30, v. 435, n. 3 ; 
Thomson, intimacy with, iii, 132, n. 
4; vanity, his, iii. 299. 

QUINTILIAN, iv. 41. 

Quixote, Don, Sec under Cervan- 
tes. 

Quos Deus vult perdere, prius dciiicniot, 
ii. 509, n. 2; iv. 201. 

Quotation, ihe. parole of literary men, 
iv. 118. 

Quotations, untraced, iv. 209. 

Quotidian, v. 393-4. 

R. 

Rabelais, Garagantua, iii. 290 ; sur- 
passed by Johnson, ii. 265. 
Hace, The, by Mercurius Spur, Esq., 

ii. 35- 
Racine, 'goes round the world,' v. 

354- 

Rackstrow, Colonel, of the Trained 
Bands, iv. 368. 

Radcliffe, Charles, his execution, i. 
208. 

Radcliffe, Dr., Master of Pembroke 
College, i. 315. 

Radcliffe, Dr. John, travelling fel- 
lowships, iv. 338. 

Radicals, iii. 522. 

Raleigh, Sir Walter, autograph letter, 
i. 263; Birch edits his smaller pieces, 
i. 262; execution, his. i. 208, ;/. 2; 
Johnson mentions his Works in the 
preface to his Dictionary, iii. 220, 

«. 4- 

Ralph, James, The Champion, i. 195, 
n. 1. 

Rambler, account of it, i. 233-52, 262 
contributors, i. 236-7, 242, ;/. i 
editions and sale, i. 242-3, 246, 296 
Scotch edition, i. 244 ; revision of 
collected edition, i. 236, n. i; publi- 
cation, i. 235 ; sale of a sixteenth 
share, ii. 238, n, 5 ; hastily written, 



i. 236; iii. 49; could be made better, 
iv. 357; hints for essays, i. 237-40; 
origin of the name, i. 234; style, i. 
252; club in an Essex town incensed 
by it, i. 250; friend, learning one's 
faults from a, iv. 325, n. 3; Garrick* 
and Prospero, i. 250; ' hard words,' 
i. 242, n. I ; index, iv. 375 ; in Ital- 
ian, // Genio errantc and // Vaga- 
hoiido, iii. 467 ; Johnson's epitaph, 
quotation from it in, iv. 513; — 
gives a copy to Edwards, iv. 104; — 
opinion of it, i. 243, n. 2; thinks it 
' too wordy,' iv. 5 ; — portrait pre- 
fixed, iv. 485, «. 3; — wife praises it, 
i. 243 ; ladies strangely formal, i. 
259; Langton admires it, i. 2S6; last 
number, i. 262, 270 ; lessons taught 
l)y it, i. 247 ; mottoes translated, i. 
244, ;/. I, 245, 261: Murphy's trans- 
lation from the French, i. 412; Ne- 
cessity of Cultivating Politeness, v. 
93, ;/. 1; quotation in Colonel Myd- 
delton's inscription, iv. 511 ; Rus- 
sian translation, iv. 319; Shenstone, 
praised ]jy, ii. 518; suicide,- supposed 
to recommend, iv. 173, ;/. 2; virtuoso, 
description of a, iv. 362, n, 4; v. 69, 
;/. 5; Young's, Dr., copy, i. 249. 

Ratnbler, Beauties of the, i. 248. 

Rambler s Magazine, i. 234. 

Ramsay, Allan, the elder, the poet, 
dedication to the Countess of Eglin- 
toune, V. 426, ;/. 2; Gentle Shepherd, 
ii. 253 ; Highland Laddie, v. 209, 

". 3- 
Ramsay, Allan, the son, the portrait- 
painter, death, iv. 300, n. 1, 422, n. 
i; dinners at his house, iii. 377-82, 
434-5, 463-5; house in Harley street, 
iii. 445, n. 2; Italy, visits, iii. 2S4 ; 
iv. 300; Johnson loves him, iii. 383; 
— politeness, praises, iii. 377; Pope's 
poetry less admired than formerly, 



212 



Index to 



Ramsay. 



Reading. 



iii. 378; Select Society, founds the, 
V. 448, //. 3 ; ' There lived a young 
man,' itc, quotes, iii. 286; men- 
tioned, iii. 288; iv. I, ;/. I. 

Kanhy, John, Doubts on the Abolition 
of the Slave Trade, iii. 233. 

1\AN(;i;r, the character of, ii. 56. 

Rank, its claims, iii. 63; Johnson's re- 
spect for it, i. 513, 518-19; morals of 
higli people, iii. 401. 

Rankk, Professor, Sixlus (,>uinlus, v. 
272, )i. 2. 

K Ai'ii AKi,, Jiihnsoii admires his pict- 
ures, ii. 450; meiilii)iicd, i. 2S8, ;/. I. 

KArriRisT, ii. 47, //. i. 

Kasan', the Maclcods of, account of 
tlicni, V. 188, 191; estates, v. 470, n. 
1; family happiness, v. 203; league 
with the Mactlonalds, v. 198; John- 
s(m com|)liments them in his Jour- 
ney, ii. 348; they praise him, //'. 

Rasav, John Macleod, l.aird of, 
' Macgillichallum,' v. 1S4, //. i : his 
carrio'^e, v. 185, 204, ;/. 2 ; income, 
V. 188, n. 2; patriarchal life, v. 191; 
befriends the Pretender, v. 217-22; 
Jcilinson's mistake about the chief- 
tainship, ii. 347, 436, 439, 472; cor- 
respondence about it, V. 467-71; — , 
entertained by, ii. 348; iv. 178; v. 
471, //. I ; — visits him, v. igi-203, 
208. 

Ra.say, old Laird of, out in the '45, v. 
198, 214, 216, 226. 

Rascal, Johnson's use of the term, 
iii. I. 

Hasselas, account of its publication, i. 
394-9 , date of its composition and 
publication, i. 396, ;/. 2, 598 ; edi- 
tions, — first, i. 394, n. 2 ; fifth, ii. 
238, n. 5; an American one, ii. 238; 
origin of the name, i. 394, n. 2; price 
paid for it, i. 395 ; translations, i. 
395; ii. 238 ; in French by Baretti, 



//'., //. 4; written in the evenings of 
one week to jiay the expenses of 
Johnson's mother's funeral, i. 395 ; 
Uoswell's yearly reading, i. 397; iii. 
151; — made unhappy by it, iii. 360; 
Candide, compared with, i. 396; iii. 
405; choice of life, ii. 25, n. i; civili- 
zation, advantages of, ii. 84, ;/. i ; 
Kuropeans, the jiower of the, iv. 138; 
(iough Sepiare, written in, iii. 461, n. 
i; Indac and the (Ireal Mogul, ii. 
46, ;/. 2 ; inliuence of places on the 
mind, v. 381, //. i; Johnson reads it 
in 1 781, iv. 138; Lobo's Abyssinia, 
partly suggested by, i. 104; Macau- 
lay's, Dr. J., Biblioi^raphy, ii. 238, 
n. 5 ; marriages, late, ii. 148, ;/. i ; 
misery of life, the, iii. 360; praise to 
an old man, i. 393, //. i ; resolutions, 
ii. 130, ;/. 3 ; retirement from the 
world, v. 70, ns. i and 4 ; scholar, 
the business of a, ii. 136, ;/. 3; soli- 
tude of a great city, iii. 431, ;/. 2 ; 
sorrow, the cure for, iii. 7; spirits of 
the dead, i. 397 ; travelling in Eu- 
rope, i. 393, «. 2; Vanity of Human 
Wishes, resemblance to the, i. 396. 

Rat, grey or Hanover, ii. 521; ' Now, 
Muse, let's sing of Rats,' ii. 519. 

Ravvlinson, Dr., iv. 185. 

Ray, John, British insects, ii. 284; Col- 
lection of north-country words, ii. 
105; A'omenclature, ii. 414. 

Ray, Miss, iii. 436. 

Raymond, S., ii. 387, n. 2. 

Raynal, Abbe, iv. 501. 

Reading, advice of an old gentleman, 
i. 516; art, its, iv. 239; boys should 
read any book they will, iii. 438; iv. 
24; general amusement, iv. 251, n. 3; 
hard reading, i. 516; inclination to 
be followed, i. 496; iii. 49-50, 219; 
knowledge got by it compared with 
that got by conversation, ii. 413 ; 



Bo swell's Life of yoJinson. 



213 



Reading. 



Remedies. 



people do not willingly read, iv. 252; 
reading books to the end, i. 82; ii. 
260; iv. 356; reading no more than 
one could utter, iv. 37; snatches use- 
ful, iv. 24 ; Voltaire testifies to its 
increase in England, ii. 461, «. i ; 
youth the season for plying books, 
i. 516. See Johnson, reading. 

Rebellion, natural to men, v. 449. 

Rebellion of 1745-6, Boswell's pro- 
jected history of it, iii. 184 ; would 
have to be printed abroad, ib.; 
cruelty shown to the rebels, i. 168 ; 
effect on the Getit. Mag., i. 203, «. 
2; Highlanders' wants, ii. 144; John- 
son's occupation at the time, i. 203; 
noble attempt, iii. 184. 

Rebels, never friends to arts, ii. 256 ; 
successful, ii. 257. 

Recollecting, iv. 147. 

Recreations and Studies of a Cotmtry 
Clergytnati, iv. 220, n. i. 

Recruiting, iii. 454, //. i. 

Recj-uiting Officer, iv. 8. 

Recupero, Signor, ii. 536, n. i. 

Red Coat, v. 160. 

Red Se.\, iii. 152, n. i, 517. 

Redress eor Ridicule, v. 336. 

Reed, Isaac, aids Johnson in theZ/i'fj, 
iv. 44 ; mentioned, i. 195, n. 2 ; ii. 
276, ;/. 2; iii. 228, ;/. 6; v. 64, n. 2. 

Reed, John, iii. 319, ;/. 3. 

Rees, Dr., ii. 233, ;/. 3. 

Reeinement, in education, iii. 192. 

Reflections on a grave digging in IVest- 
tninster Abbey, ii. 29; v. 134, «. i. 

Reflections on the State of Portugal, 

i. 354. 
Reformation, Church revenues les- 
sened, iii. 157: freedom from bond- 
age, iii. 70 ; the light of revelation 
obscured upon political motives, ii. 

31- 
Reformers., why burnt, li. 288. 



Regale, iii. 350, n. 2; v. 395, n. i. 

Regatta, iii. 234, n. i. 

Regicides, ii. 424. 

Registration of Deeds, iv. 85. 

Rehearsal, The, ii. 193; iv. 369. 

Reid, Andrew, iii. 37, w. 5. 

Reid, Professor Thomas, meets John- 
son in Glasgow, v. 420, 422; original 
principles, his, i. 545 ; Scotticisms 
corrected by Hume, ii. 82, ;/. 2 ; 
mentioned, ii. 60, «. i. 

Reign of Terror, i. 538, «. i. 

Reindeer, ii. 193. 

Relations, a man's ready friends, 
v. 119; in London, ii. 203. See 
Friends, natural. 

Religion, amount of religion in the 
country, ii. iii; ancients not in ear- 
nest as to it, iii. 12; balancing of ac- 
counts, iv. 260; changing it, ii. 533; 
iii. 339; choosing one for oneself, iii. 
339; College jokers its defenders, iv. 
333: differences of opinion not much 
thought of, iv. 336 ; general igno- 
rance, iii. 58; hard, made to appear, 
V. 360; ignorance of the first notion, 
iv. 249; joy in it, iii. 385; particular 
places for it, iv. 261 ; people with 
none, iv. 248 ; perversions, ii. 148 ; 
religious conversation banished, ii. 
142 ; State, to be regulated by the, 
ii. 16; iv. 14; unfitness of poetry for 
il, iii. 408, «. i; iv. 47. 

Religious Orders. See Monas- 
tery. 

Remarks on Dr. Johnson's Journey to 
the Hebrides, ii. 352, n. i. 

Remarks on Johnson s Life of Milton, 
i. 268, n. 2. 

Remarks on the characters of the Court 
of Queen Anne, iv. 385, «. 2. 

Remarks on the Militia Bill, i. 356. 

Rembrandt, iii. 183. 
I Remedies, prescribing, ii. 299. 



214 



Index to 



Remembering. 

Remembering, distinguished from recol- 
lecting, iv. 147. 

Remonstrance, The, ii. 130. 

Renegado defined, i. 342. 

Rknts, carried to a distance, iii. 201 ; 
how they should be fixed, v. 334 ; 
paid ill kind, iv. 22 ; v. 28g. n. 3. 
See Landlords. 

Repentance in dying, iv. 245. 

Republic of Letters, v. 91, n. i. 

Rei'UBI.ics, respect for authority want- 
ing, ii. 176. 

Republics. See Respubliar Elzevi- 
rianic. 

Rei'UTATION injured by spurious pub- 
lications, ii. 495. 

Resentment, iii. 46; iv. 423. 

REsnumoNS, rarely efficacious, ii. 
130, 412. 

Restkct, not to be paid to an adver- 
sarj", ii. 506; v. 32. 

Respectable, iii. 273, n. 2. 

Republica Ilungarica, ii. 7. 

RespublictT Elzevirianic, ii. 7, ;/. 4; iii. 
61. 

Rest, man never at rest, iii. 285. 

Restoration, ii. 424; v. 463. 

Restrain!", need of, iii. 62. 

Resl'rrechon of the Body, iv. 108, 
III. 

Retirement, ii. 153, n. i. 

Retirement, from the world, v. 70; 
its vices, ib. n. 5. 

Retiring from Business, ii. 386; iii. 
200, M. 2. 

Retreat, cheap, few places left, ii. 
142. 

Retreat of the Ten Thousand, iv. 37. 

Revelation, attacks on it excite 
anger, iii. 13. 

Revelation, Book of, ii. 187. 

Reverence, for government impaired, 
iii. 4 ; general relaxation of it, iii. 



Reynolds. 

Reviews and Reviewers, acknowl. 
edgnients to them improper, iv. 67; 
defiance, to be set at, v. 312; Monthly 
and Critical imj^artial, iii. 37; — at- 
tack each other, //'., /;. 2 ; payment 
for articles, iv. 247; well-written, iii. 
51 ; See Critical and Monthly Re- 
views. 

Re-.isal of Shake ''peare' s Text, i. 30^), 
w. I. 

Revolution, defineil, i. 342, //. 

Revolution of 1688, could not be 
avoided, ii. 391; iii. 4; iv. 196, and 
n. i; J.illiburtcro, ii. 397; reverence 
for government impaired by it, iii. 
4; iv. i()0; V. 230; writing against it 
got Shebbearc the pillory and a pen- 
sion, ii. 129, //. 2. 

Revolution Socikiv, ihe. iv. 48. 

Revolutions, ' Happy Revolutions," 
ii. 257. 

Rewlev Ahbkv, i. 317. 

Reynolds, .Miss, Barnard's verses oa 
Johnson, iv. 497-9 ; coolness with 
her brother, i. 563. w. i; irresolution, 
her, i. 563, //. i; Johnson's affectioij 
for her, i. 563, w. i ; — bequest to her, 
iv. 463, w. 3; — anil the Cotterells, 
i. 286, w. I ; — dress and study, i. 
3S0, ;/. I ; — aiul (laragantua, iii. 
290; — anil Hannah More, iii. 333; 
iv. 394, ;/. 3; — letters to her, i. 563, 
n. I ; — portrait, ii. 415, n. i ; iv. 
265, «. 2, 485, n. 3 ; miniatures, 
paints, i. 378; oil-painting, ib., n. 6; 
iv. 265, n. 2; Montagu, Mrs., paints, 
iii. 276; politician, no, ii. 362, n. 3; 
purity of mind, i. 563, n. i; ii. 415, 
n. I ; mentioned, iii. 93, 244, 363, 

444, 493- 
ReY'NOLUS, Sir Joshua, Abington's, 
Mrs., benefit, ii. 371 ; abused in a 
newspaper, iv. 34 ; Academy, influ- 
ence in the, iv. 254, n. i; amusement 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



215 



Reynolds, Sir Joshua. 



is the great end of all employments, 
ii. 269 ; — a key to character, iv. 
365; associates with men of all prin- 
ciples, iii. 426 ; Baretti's ignorance, 
gives an instance of, \. 138, ;/. 4; ii 
a witness at his trial, ii. in, ;/. 3; 
Barry quarrels with him, iv. 503, 
505 ; Beattie, portrait of, v. 101, ;/. 
5; V. 311, ». 3, books, judgments on, 
iii. 364; Boswell, bequest to, i. 12, 
n. 2 ; — , first ac(iuaintance with, i. 
483, ;;. I ; — , gives Johnson's por- 
trait to, i. 453 ; — , letter from, iv. 
299, w. 1 ; — Life of Johnson, has a 
leaf cancelled in, ii. 2, ;/. i ; — por- 
trait, paints, i. 2, ;/. 2 ; — visits, 
when ill, iii. 445 ; Burke's echo, ii. 
255, "-4; — und Johnson on Bacon's 
Essays, iii. 220, ;/. 3 ; — , too much 
under, iii. 296 ; — , w it, v. 35, ;/. 2 ; 
Cambridge, Mr., dines with, ii. 414 ; 
Camden's, Lord, portrait, ii. 405, //. 
I ; Cecilia, iv. 258, ;/. 3 ; character 
drawn by Burke, i. 284, ;/. 3; v. 115, 
n. 6 ; colouring in conversation, iv. 
212; con\ersation, his, i. 285; critics 
mostly pretenders, ii. 2ig, n. i; Cum- 
berland, dislikes, iv. 444, «. i; ' Dear 
Knight of Plympton,' iv. 498; death, 
i. 12; delicacy as regards Pope's note 
on Johnson, i. 166; delicate observer 
of manners, ii. 125; Devonshire, 
visits, i. 436 ; dinners at his house, 
gathering of literary men, iii. 75, 
283, 36T, 384, 433; iv. 90, 384, 389; 
— Northcote's description of them, 
iii. 427, ;/. I ; iv. 360, ;/. 3 ; Dis- 
courses on Painting, Empress of 
Russia's testimony of a snuff-box, iii. 
420 ; — first volume published, iii. 
420; — Johnson described in them, 
i. 284, ". 3; his dedication, ii. 2, u. 
i; mentioned in an' unfinished Dis- 
course, iii. 420, ft. 2 ; praises them, 

VI.— 19 



iv. 370; — Rogers, Samuel, present 
at the last, iii. 420, «. 1 ; — translated 
into Italian, iii. no; Dyer, Samuel, 
portrait of, ii. 519, n. i; emigration, 
iii. 262-4 ; eminence, the cause of, 
ii. 500, n. i; Errol, Lord, portrait of, 
v. 115; Essex Head Club, declines 
to join the, iv. 293, 503; describes it, 
iv. 505; Eumelian Club, member of 
the, iv. 455, n. 2; Fox's praise of T/ie 
Traveller, mentions, iii. 286, 296 ; 
— , too much under, iii. 296; ' furious 
purposes, his,' iv. 422 ; Garrick and 
the Literary Club, i. 555-6; — tea, 
iii. 300, n. I ; Garrick, Mrs., dines 
with, iv. 111-15; genius, account of, 
ii. 500, M. I ; Goldsmith's company, 
likes, ii. 270 ; — criticised at his 
table, ii. 321, n. i; — debts, ii. 32I"- 

— dedicates the Deserted Village to 
him, ii. i, n. 2, 250, «. i; — epitaph, 
loses the copy of, iii. 93; — fable of 
the little fishes, ii. 265 ; — monu- 
ment, chooses the spot for, iii. 95. 
«. 2 ; — rebuked by, v. 311, «. 3; 

— She Stoops to Conquer, suggests 
a name for, ii. 236, «. i ; — to 
Walpole, introduces, iv. 363, n. i ; 
Hawkesworth's character, i. 293, n. 
2 ; Hawkins's character, i. 33, «. i ; 
hospitality, his, i. i ; Humphry, the 
painter, assists, iv. 310, n. 2 ; Idler, 
contributes to the, i. 383-4 ; illness 
in 1764, i. 562; imaginary praise of 
him, iv. 21; inoffensiveness, v. 115, 
n. 6; invulnerability, i. 2; v. 115; 
Italy, returns from, i. igi, 281, n. 5; 
Johnson, admiration for, i. 284; — 
admiration of Burke, ii. 515-16; — 
altercation with Dean Barnard, iv. 
497; — apologises for his rudeness, 
iii. 374; — arguing, ii. 115, n. i; 
' flew upon an argument,' ii. 419; — 
l)elabours his confessor, iv. 324 ; — 



2l6 



Index to 



Reynolds, Sir Joshua. 



bequest to him, iv. 463, «. 3 ; — 
checked immorality in talk, iv. 341, 
w. 1 ; — in a company of l)ooksellers, 
''■• 353 I — conversation, i. 237 ; iv. 
213-14; — convulsive starts, i. 166; 

— cups of tea, i. 363, n.\\ — desire 
for reconciliation, ii. 115, //. i, 125; 

— Dictiottary, citeil in, iv. 5, w. i ; — 
</«/(-<• lifcus, i. 283; — dying requests, 
iv. 477; — executor, iv. 463, //. 3; — 
feared by a nobleman, iv. 135. tt. 2; 

— feelings towards foreigners, iv. 
194, //. 3; — fond of discrimination, 
ii. 350 ; overcharges characters, iii. 
378; — French, ii. 463; — , friend- 
ship with, i. 2, 281, //. 5, 2S3, 285; iv. 
423 ; in 1764 almost — only friend, 
'• 563; — friendshij) for Taylor, iii. 
205 ; — on friendship, i. 347 ; — 
funeral, iv. 484, /;. i ; — garret, i. 
380, w. I ; — gestures, v. iq, m. 3; — 
interview with deorge III, ii. 38, «. 
2, 47; — intoxicated, i. 439, 11. i; — , 
introduces Crabbe to, iv. 202, ;/. i; 

— letters to him: stf Johnson, let- 
ters ; — letter to Thurlow, copies, 
iv. 402, ;/. 2, 424 ; — lines in The 
TravelUr, ii. 7. «. 2; — making him- 
self agreeable to ladies, iv. 85; — as 
a member of parliament, ii. 15S-9 ; 

— mind ready for use, ii. 419, u. i; 

— mode of covering his ignorance, 
v. 141, ;/. 5; — monument, iv. 48S, 
w. I ; inscription, //'. , ;/. 2, 513 ; — 
never wrote a line a saint would 
blot, iv. 341, ;/. i; — , his obligation 
to, i. 2S4, //. 3 ; — on painting, i. 
149, ;/. 1 ; — pension, i. 433 ; pro- 
posed atldition to it, iv. 378, 388-<}i, 
401-2, 423-4; — pride, no meanness 
in it, iv. 495, «. 3; — j)rouil of Reyn- 
olds's approbation, iv. 424; — por- 
traits: sec under Johnson; — prej- 
udice against foreigners, iv. 17, n. 3; 



— prejudices and obstinacy, i. 336, 
//. 2; — pride, iii. 392, «. i; — quar- 
rel with Dr. Warton, ii. 47, //. i; — 
KitmhUr, origin of the name, i. 234; 

— readiness for a reconciliation, ii. 
115, //. I, 294, w. I ; — 'rough as 
\\ inter, mild as summer,' iv. 456, n. 
5 ; — rudeness partly due to his 
truthfulness, iv. 256, w. 2 ; — and 
Savage in St. James's Stjuare, i. 189 ; 

— ' school,' one of, i. 7, ;/. I, 284, n. 
3; iii. 260, 296, ;/. I, 420; inMuenccd 
his writings, i. 258 ; qualified his 
mind to think, iii. 420, «. 2; ' Reyn- 
olds's oracle," i. 284, w. 3; — Sluike- 
spearc, i. 370, «. I ; — talking to a 
'blackguard boy,' iv. 213; — and 
Thrale's copper, i. 421, //. i ; — 
Tracts, his copy of, ii. 361, //. i; — , 
trip to Devonshire with, i. 436; iv. 
372 ; — , truth sacred to, ii. 496, n. 
I ; — unsuspicious of hypocrisy, i. 
484, //. 4 ; iii. 504 ; — vocation to 
public life, iv. 414 ; — watch over 
himself, iv. 456, //. 5 ; — writings, 
' won't read,' ii. 362, «. 3; Johnsoni- 
tina, his, iv. 211 ; Journey to Flan- 
ders, iv. 488, «. 2; knighted, i. 121, 
n. ; Leicester Fields, hou.se in, ii. 
441; liberality, iv. 153; literary char- 
acters, a nobleman's terror of, i. 521, 
;/. I ; Literary Club, founder of the, 
i. 552 ; attenilance at it, ii. 19 ; iii. 
146, n. I, 261, ;/. 4; London, loves, 
iii. 202, ti. I ; Lowe, the painter, iv. 
234, ;/. i; Macbeth, note on, v. 147; 
Malone one of his executors, iv. 154; 

— Shakespeare, praises, v. 146, n. 4; 
matrimonial wishes about him, iv. 
186, ;/. 2; militia camps, visits the, 
iii. 415; modesty, unafTected, iv. 154; 
Monckton's, Miss, at, iv. 126, it. 1 ; 
Montagu's, Mrs., Essay, likes, ii. 
101-3; y^ 279; Morris, Miss, picture 



BosweiTs Life of jfoknson. 



217 



Reynolds. 



Richards. 



of, iv. 4S2, n. I ; Moser, Keeper of 
the Academy, eulogium on, iv. 262, 
n. 4; Muddy, ii. 415, ;/. 3; Mudge, 
Rev. Mr., influenced by the, i. 438, 
n. 3 ; — Sermons, praises, iv. 113 ; 
obligations, the relief from, i. 285 ; 
observant in passing through life, iv. 
7; Oxford degree of D.C.L., v. loi, 
;/. 5; painter to the King, iv. 422, ;/. 
2, 425, //. I ; ]iaralytic attack, iv. 
186, n. 2; Parr's defence of Johnson, 
iv. 486 ; persuaded, easily, v. 326 ; 
pictures, runs to, ii. 418; placidity, i. 
I ; planet, always under some, iii. 
296; players, defends, ii. 269; Pope's 
hand, touches, i. 436, ;/. i ; jjortrait 
of himself holding his ear in his 
hand, iii. 310, ;;. i; — at Streatham, 
iv. 181, n. 3; price of portraits and 
income, i. 378, 421, 428, 442 ; pro- 
fessor in the imaginary college, v. 
123; prosperity, not to be spoilt by, 
v. 115, ;;. 6; Reviews, wonders to 
find so much good writing in the, iii. 
51; Richardson's talk, iv. 33; 'rival, 
villiout a,' i. 421 ; round of pleas- 
ures, in a, ii. 314, n. 2; Round Robin, 
signs the, iii. 95; carries it to John- 
son, iii. 96; Royal .\cademy, intends 
to resign the presidency of the, iv. 
422, ;/. 2; same all the year round, 
iii. 6, 219; Savage, The Life of, reads, 
i. 191, 284; Shelburne, Lord, por- 
trait of, iv. 201, n. i; Siddons, Mrs., 
portrait of, iv. 279, n, 2; sister, dis- 
likes the paintings by his, i. 378, n. 
6; iv. 265, « 2; Smith's. Adam, talk, 
iv. 29, ;/. 2; St. Paul's, proposes mon- 
uments in, iv. 488, ;/. 2 ; Streatham 
library, pictures by him in, iv. iSi, 
n. 3; Suard visits him, iv. 23, n. 2; 
Sunday painting, iv. 477; taste, tak- 
ing the altitude of a man's, iv. 365; 
— how acquired, ii. 219, ;/. i; Thur- 



low, letter from, iv. 404, n. i; titles, 
in addressing people did not use, i. 
2S4. ;/. 3; truthfulness of his stories, 
ii. 496, ;/. I ; understanding, judging 
a man's, iv. 365; Vanburgh, defends, 
iv. 64; Vesey's, Mr., at, iii. 482; 
virtue in itself preferable to vice, iii. 
389, 397 ; Voltaire, supposed attack 
on, V. 311, n. 3; weather, ridicules the 
influence of, i. 385, n. i ; wine, de- 
fends the use of, iii. 48; — his fond- 
ness for it, ii. 334; iii. 374, 376; — 
reproached by Johnson with l)eing 
far gone, iii. 374; mentioned, ii. 94, 
95, ti. 2, 266, 304, )t. 4, 39S; iii. 50, 
342, 347, 439, 444, 493 ; iv. I, n. I, 
38, 89, 98, 102, 183, 206, 253, ;/. 3, 

259, ;/. 2, 385, 394, 397, 410, H. 2; V. 

245- 
Rhcdi dc generatioite insectayum, iii. 

260, n. 2. 

Rhkks, David ap, Welsh Grammar, v. 

505- 

Rni;i"MATisM, medicine for it, ii. 414. 

Rhodoelia, i. 259. 

Rhone, iv. 320. 

Rhopalic Verses, v. 307, ;/. i. 

Rhyme, essential to English poetrj^ 
iii. 292. See BlanK-Verse. 

RiccoBONi, Mme., credulity of the 
English, V. 376, ;/. 3 ; French and 
English stage in point of decency, ii. 
57, n. i; sentimentalists of Paris, iii. 
169, n. i; want of respect to nobility 
on the English stage, v. 121, n. 1. 

Rich, the manager of Covent Garden 
Theatre, brings out the Beggar s 
Opera, iii. 365, ;/. 3 ; ' is this your 
tragedy or comedy ?' iv. 284, //. 5 ; 
refuses a play in false English, iii. 
294. 

Richard II, iv. 309, n. 2. 

Richards, John, R-.A.., iii. 527. 

Richards, Thomas, i. 215, n. 3. 



2l8 



Index to 



Richardson. 

Richardson, Jonathan, the elder, 
Tnuitise on /'uititim;, i. 149, tt. I. 

Kick ARDSoN, Jmialhan, the younger, 
i. 149, 164. 

Ki< iiAKM.snN, Saniuel, C'licstertield's 
estimate of him, ii. 200, ti. i; Libber, 
respects, ii. 106: iii. 209; C/nns.ui, 
t'lennan translation of, iv. 34; — , 
Lovelaces character, ii. 3</j: Cowley 
out of fashion, iv. 118, w. 3; death, i. 
42S, 442; l-iiintliiir I.fttt-rs — descrip- 
tion of a visit to Ik'dlam. ii. 429, n. 
i; and the procession to Tyburn, iv. 
21S, tt. i; Fielding, compared with, 
ii. 55-6, 200, //'. , tt. 1 ; — , disparages, 
ii. 55-6, 200, 201, ;/. 2 ; Fielding, 
Miss, letter to, ii. 55, tt. 4, 199. ;;. 3; 
tiattery. love of. v. 451, ;/. 2, 502, tt. 
2 ; foreigners, read by, ii. 48, tt. 4 ; 
Hanoverian, a, i. 168, tt. i; Johnson 
asks for an index for CUtrissa, ii. 
201, ;/. I ; — niitiotiitry, cited in, iv. 
5; — draws his character, v. 451; — 
gives him a jiheasant, i. 37S; — let- 
ters to him, i. 351, tt. I ; ii. 201, tt. i; 
— meets Hogarth at his house, i. 
168 ; and ^■oung. v. 306 ; — sought 
after him, iii. 357; — under arrest, 
helps, i. 351, //. i; King, Dr. W., a 
Jacobite speech by, i. l6S, tt. i ; lit- 
erary ladies, his, iv. 284, //. 6; v. 451; 
M.acaulay's high praise of him, ii. 
200, It. i; Nelson, Robert, the orig- 
inal of Sir Charles Grandison, ii. 
525, tt. 2; novels, his, compared with 
the French, ii. 143; Oxford Univer- 
sity, the Jacobitism of, i. 325, tt. 3 ; 
portrait, i. 502, «. 5; RctmbUr^ praised 
in the. i. 235, praises it, i. 242, tt. 2; 
contributes to it, i. 235; read for the 
sentiment, not story, ii. 201 ; rear, 
Johnson can make him. iv. 34; talks 
of his own works, iv. 33; Tunbridge 
Wells, at, i. 220, ;/. t; vanity, iv. 34, 



Robert II. 

«. i; v. 451; Walpole's, Horace, con- 
tempt of him, ii. 2ou, //. i ; Williams, 
Mrs., visits him, i. 269, tt. 1. 

Richardson, William, i. 351, tt. i. 

RicHKMKi', Cardinal, ii. 155. w. i. 

RlCHK.S. .S><' MoNKY. 

Ricil.MoND, third Uukc of, attacks 
Lord Sandwich and Miss Ray, iii. 
436, tt. i; discusses history and poe- 
try, ii. 419, tt. 3; libelled by Henry 
Hale, iv. 342, tt. 1. 

RiDDKl.l., Mr., of the Horse Clrena- 
diers, iv. 243, tt. i. 

RlDDocH, Rev. Mr., v. 98, 103, 108-9. 

RiDlciLK, abuse of it, iv. 20; Johnson 
defends its use, iii. 432. 

Kidiiti^, the, i. 42, tt. 3. 

RiDl.KY, the bookseller, iii. 370. 

RioiiY, Richard, iii. 87, tt. 2. 

Rio vcrde, Kio verdf, ii. 244, tt. 2. 

Riot Act, iii. 54, tt. 2. 

Riots, Franklin's description of the 
street riots in 1768, iii. 54, n. 2; Gor- 
don riots in 1780, iii. 54, tt. 2, 486; 
St. George's Fields in 1768, iii. 54, 
M. 2. 

RisKN IN thk World, jealousy of men 
who have, iii. 2. 

Rising early, its difficulty, iii. 191. 

RiTTER, Jo.seph, Boswell's Bohemian 
servant, accompanies Boswell to the 
Hebrides, v. 59, 83, 86, 93, 186, 326. 
362, 413. 423; mentioned, ii. 119, 
472; iii. 245. 

Rivers, Earl, Savage's reputed father, 
i. 192, ft. 2, 197-8. 

Rivingto.v, Mr., the bookseller, i. 156, 
;/. 4. 

Rizzio, David, v. 48. 

Ro.\i)S, described by Arthur Young, 
iii. 153, tt. i; toll gates, v. 63, n. 2. 
Stc- under SCOTLAND, roads. 

RuBERT Brcce, ii. 443-4. 

Robert II, v. 425. 



BosweWs Life of yoh7ison. 



219 



Roberts. 



Rochester. 



Kdukkts, J., the bookseller, i. 191, 
202, n. 3. 

RoiiKRTS, Mr., Register of Bangor, v. 
510, 515- 

RoBKRTS, Miss, old Mr. Langtoii's 
niece, i. 389, 498. 

Robertson, Mr., of Cullen, v. 125, 
127. 

RoBKRTSON, Mr., a publisher, of Edin- 
burgh, iv. 150. 

RoBKRTSON, Professor James, v. 47. 

RoBERTSO.N, Dr. William, lieattie, 
compared with, ii. 224, n. i ; Uos- 
vvell appears against him in Court, 
ii. 436, //. 4; — , letters to, v. 15, 35; 
Charlfs /', criticised by Wesley, ii. 
272, ;/. i; price offered for it, ii. 72, 
n. I ; Clive's character, expatiates 
on, iii. 380; companionable and fond 
of wine, iii. 382 ; conversation, iii. 
385, n. 5 ; Elibank, Lord, his early 
patron, v. 440; (iibbon, compliment- 
ed by, ii. 271, n. 3; Histories, his, ro- 
mances, ii. 272 ; pictures, but not 
likenesses, iii. 459; History of Amer- 
ica, iii. 306; History of Greece, pro- 
jects a, ii. 273, H. I ; History of Scot- 
land, Johnson ' won't talk of it,' ii. 
61 ; published in 1759, iv. 91, n. 2; 
sale, iii. 380 ; /^6ooo made by the 
|iublishers, ih.; editions, ih., n. 2; 
mentioned, ii. 310: Johnson, awe of, 
ii. 72; iii. 378; V. 422; — criticises 
his History and style, ii. 271-2 ; v. 
64, «. 3; — estimation of him, ii. 34, 
n. I ; V. 453 ; — , introduced to, iii. 
377; asks him to translate the Hiad, 
iii. 379; dines with him in Boswell's 
house, V. 35-9 ; breakfasts, v. 42-3 ; 
shows him St. Giles, v. 45; the Col- 
lege, V. 46 ; Holyrood, v. 47 ; dines 
with him, v. 50 ; welcomes him on 
his return, v. 447; — ' love ' for him, 
ii. 60-1 ; — proposecj tovir to the 



Hebrides, writes about, ii. 266 ; — 
refusal to hear Scotch preachers, iii. 
382 ; v. 138 ; — style, recognises, i. 
357; imitates it, iii. 196; iv. 448; — 
worship, complains of, iii. 377 ; lilj- 
erality of sentiment, v. 44S ; packs 
his gold in wool, ii. 272; paraphrased 
other people's thoughts, v. 453, n. 2; 
party in the church, his, v. 242; pre- 
ferment, his church, iii. 380, n. 2 ; 
Principal of Edinburgh College, v. 
45, w. 4 ; romantic humour, his, iii. 
381; Southey calls him a rogue, ii. 
273, n. 2; style, i. 508, n. 3; ii. 271-2; 
— corrected by Strahan, v. 104, n. 3; 
l^erlnage, ii. 27 1 ; Voltaire's Louis 
XIV, V. 448; Whist, learns, v. 461, 
n. i; mentioned, ii. 75, 315, 406, «. 
4; hi- 316. 

Robin Hood, v. 443. 

Robin Roy, v. 145, n. i. 

RoBiNifOf)!) Societies, account of 
them, iv. 107, n. 3; Boswell attends 
one, iv. no. 

Robinson, H. C, account of Capel 
Lofft, iv. 321, n. 3 ; Bishop Hamp- 
den's ' confirmation,' iv. 373, n. 3 ; 
Burney's account of Johnson, i. 475. 
//. I. 

Robinson, Sir Thomas, account ^A 
him, i. 502-3; Chesterfield sends him 
to Johnson, i. 301, n. I ; talks the 
language of a savage, ii. 150. 

Robinson Crusoe, i. 82, n. 2; ii. 274, n. 
i; iii. 304. 

RocHEFORT, expedition to, i. 371. 

Rochefoucauld, i. 285. 

Rochester, Mr. Colson, master of the 
Free School, i. 118, n. 2 ; Johnson 
visits it, iv. 9, n. 5, 26, 268-9. 

Rochester, Wilmot, second Earl of, 
Flatman, verses upon, iii. 34; Imita- 
tions of Horace, i. 137, «. 4; v. 58, 
71. 5; Letter from Artemisia, iii. 439, 



2 20 



hidex to 



Rochester. 



Rome. 



w. 4; lAji- liy Hiiniet, iii. 218; Pot-nis, 
castration of his, iii. ai8; wrote short 
pieces, iv. 426, n. i. 

RocnFoRD, Earl of, i. 367. 

RocKiNoiiAM, Marquis of. iiis minis- 
try, iii. 254, w. I ; iv. 195, /;, 3; Hiirke's 
advice about it, ii. 4(37, ;/. 3 ; his 
party, ii. 208. 

/■iiK kill Infill tn, Mr III oils o/\ iii. 522. 

Rod, use of till-, i. 54; v. 112. 

A'oiit-rick Kandoiii. Siy SMol.LKn . 

RoDNKY, Sir tieorge, ii. 456. 

R<i(;kks, Rev. Mr., of Hcrkley. iv. 463, 
;/. 3. 

K<)(;i:rs, Kc-v. .Mr., St'i/iii'ii.f, i. 104. 
//. 2. 

RocKKS, Samuel, Heauclerk's ai>sence 
of mind, i. 288, //. 3 ; Ik-ckford's 
speecli to the Kinj;, iii. 228, ;/. (> ; 
Kitzpatrick and Hare. iii. 441. ;/. 4; 
Kordyce's, Dr., intem|)erance, ii. 314. 
n. 5; Fox's conversation, iv. i<)2, //. 
2; — on liurnet's style, ii. 245, 11. 2; 
— love of Homer, iv. 252, «. 3 ; — 
and the wicked Lord l.yttelton, iv. 
344, '/. 3 : — and Mrs. Sheridan, i. 
451, ^/. i; hcails on 'l'em|)le Har, ii. 
273, ;/. 4; Hume and his opponents, 
ii. 505, It. 2. Jolinson, wishes to call 
on, i. 287, II. i; — and I.ady l.ucan, 
iii. 483, ;/. I ; Marley, Dean, iv. 85, 
;/. i; Mounsey, Dr., ii. 73, ;/. i; Mur- 
l>hy, Arthur, i. 413, 11. 1 ; I'iozzi, 
Signor, iv. 391, 11. 2; I'rice, Dr., iv. 
501; Kainblcr, i. 243. «.2; Reynolds's 
last lecture, iii. 420, //. i; Shell)urne 
and Carlisle, Earls of, iv. 284, ;/. 5; 
Wilkes as City Chamberlain, iv. 117, 
II. i; Williams, Miss H. M., iv. 326, 
/;. I ; Wordsworth and the l-.diii- 
bitrgh Revieiv, iv. 133, ;/. 2. 
RoKKBY, Lord, i. 502, 11. 5. 

RoKKBY H.\LL, i. 502, ;/. 5. 

Rolliad, The, Fitzpatrick. partly writ- 



ten by, iii. 441; Graham, Lord, rid- 
iculed, iii. 434. ;/. 2 ; humorous but 
scurrilous, i. 134, ;/. 2; ' Painful pre- 
eminence,' iii. 94, It. 2. 

Kolliii's Atiiicitl History, iv. 359. 

R()i.T, Richard, Diitioiiarv of 'J'loJ,- 

ami Com III fill-, i. 415; ii. 394; I'lii- 

. in sal Visitor, wrote for the, ii. 395; 

vanity and impudence, his, i. 415-16. 

Ro.MAN Catiioiicism and Roman 
Catholics, attacked by Wesley, v. 39, 
;/. I ; clergy accused of lazy devo- 
tion. V. 194, II. 3; Comniunion in one 
kind. ii. 121; iv.334; convicts should 
be attended by a F'opish priest, iv. 
3S0; converts part with ni>thing, ii. 
121; — not interrogated strictly, iv. 
334; iU>ctrines and practice, ii. 120- 
i; England and Ireland, in, ii. 292, 
//. 4; Cordon Riots, iii. 436-9; good 
timorous men, suited to, iv. 334; and 
wonten, //'. ,• gross corruptions, iii. 
20; James H's attem|it to bring 
England over to it, ii. 391; Johnson 
attacks it, iii. 463; — calls tiieir chap- 
el a mass-house, iii. 487, «. 2; — de- 
fends it, i. 538, 551; iv. 334; — pre- 
fers it to Tresbyterianism, ii. 119; — 
respects it, ii. 121 ; laity and the Bi- 
ble, ii. 31 ; ' old religion, the,' ii. 121 ; 
l)enal laws relaxed, iii. 485-6 ; — 
still in force, iii. 485, ;/. i ; Topish 
books burnt in 1784, ;'/'..• I'oj>ery un- 
derst()od by the nation, v. 315, w. i; 
Presbyterianisni, difTers chiefly in 
form from, ii. 173; priests and i)eo- 
l)le deceived, iii. 20; transubstantia- 
tion, v. 80. 

Roman Gozetteers, i. 170, it. 3. 

RoMA.xcKs, tit for youth, iv. 19, «. 3; 
historically valuable, iv. 20; Johnson 
loved the old ones, i. 57; iii. 2. 

RoMi: and the Romans, ancient, bar- 
barians mostly, ii. 196; Holingbroke's 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



221 



Rome. 



Royal Academy. 



references to them, iii. 234, n. i ; cant 
in their praise, i. 361; iii. 234, n. 1; 
Carthaginian, no feeling for a, iv. 
226; empire, iii. 42; fountain of ele- 
gance, iii. 378; ' Happy to come, hap- 
py to depart,' v. 92; known of them, 
very little, ii. 176, secession to Mons 
Sturr, V. 162, tt. 2; Senate, iii. 235; 
temples built by Saurus and Batra- 
chus, iv. 514 ; Tiber, its duration 
compared with that of the, iii. 284. 

Rome, modern, Johnson eager to see 
it, iii. 22; — expected there, iv. 377, 
;/. i; licensed stews, iii. 20; London, 
mentioned in, i. 138; pilgrimages to 
it, iii. 506 ; mentioned, iii. 246 ; v. 
174, //. I. 

KoMii.I.Y, Sir Samuel, capital ])unish- 
nients, iv. 379, //. i; Hume and the 
French atheists, ii. 9, ;/. 4; I'arr, let- 
ter from, iv. 18, u. 2; Robinhood So- 
cieties, iv. 107, n. 3; Windham's o])- 
]i()siti()n to good measures, iv. 232, 
//. I. 

KoMNEY, Cieorgc, Cur 'tcrland's Otits 
dedicated to him, iii. 50, ;/. 2. 

Rope Dancinc, ii. 504. 

RoKiE Moke. Sec Sir Roderick 
Maci.eod. 

KosaDtond, V. 429, fi. 2. 

A'osioniiiioit, Ijjc of, i. 222. 

Rose, Dr., i. 53, u. 2; iv. 193, ;/. 4. 

Kosicritiinn InfallUdc Axiotnatii, iv. 

463, "• 3- 
Rc)ss, Professor, of Aberdeen, v. loi, 

104. 
Ross, — , a soldier, v. 224. 
RossLVN, Earl of. See Loughkor- 

oufiH, Lord. 
RoTHERAM, John, Origin of Faith, ii. 

549- 
Rothes, Countess Dowagers of, ii. 

156, n. 5. 
Rothes, Lady, Bennet Langton's wife. 



ii. 88, n. i, 163, 167; iii. 119, 419; iv. 
9, n. 5, 168, 184, n. I, 278. 

Rotterdam, iii. 96, n. 2. 

RouBiLiAC, i. 380, n. I. 

Roughness, breedeth hate, iv. 194, 
n. I. 

Round Romx, The, iii. 95-7. 

Rous, Francis, i. 87, ;/. 4. 

Rousseau, J. J., beating lime, iv. 326, 
;/. 2; Boswell, sympathy with, ii. 12, 
«. 5; — visits him, ii. 14, 247; Con- 
trat- Social, ii. 286, ;/. 2 ; coxcomb 
and cynic, v. 430, n. 4 ; exile and 
visit to England, ii. 13 ; Foundling 
Hosi)ital, put his children into the, 
ii. 457, n. i; French not a gay peo- 
])le, ii. 461, ;/. I ; Geneva, first dc- 
])arture from, i. 67, n. 2; Goldsmith, 
resemblance to, i. 478, ;/. i ; Hume 
on Rousseau's heroes, the Greeks 
and Romans, i. 409, n. i; inequality 
of mankind, i. 509; Johnson's char- 
acter of him, ii. 13; justification of 
himself, ii. 14, n. i; liberty of teach- 
ing, op])osed to, ii. 286, n. 2; novelty, 
love of, i. 510; pension from George 
III, ii. 13, n. 3 ; Profession de Foi 
dii V'icaire Sai'oyard, ii. 14 ; read 
less than formerly, iv. 333 ; savage 
life, preference of, ii. 14; talked 
nonsense well, ii. 85; untruthfulness, 
ii. 497, ;/. I ; Voltaire, compared with, 
ii. 13-14; want of readiness, ii. 294, 
//. 2; writings, effect of his, ii. 13. 

RowE, Elizabeth, i. 361. 

RowE, Nicholas, an indecent poem in- 
cluded in his Works, iv. 43, n. i ; 
Johnson's memory of his plays, iv. 
42, ;/. 3. 

RowLANDSON, Thomas, caricature of 
Bos'ivell revising the Second Edition, 
V. 168, n. 3. 

Rowley s Poetry. See Chatterton. 

RoYAi. Academy, Boswell Secretary 



222 



Index to 



Royal Academy. 



Ryswick. 



for I'ortitjn ('orropondoncc, ii. 7^), 
;/. 3; his letters of acLeptaiice of (jf- : 
lice, iii. 420. 525-7; — and Robert- | 
son at the Exhibition, iii. 316; club- | 
iiij;ht.s. ii. Ill, >/. 3; dinners, Gold- 
smith, Johnson, keynoKIs and Wal- | 
pole present, iv. 363, m. i; — Ciold- I 
smith, Johnson and Walpole, talk 
about I'halterlon, iii. 5(j, ;/. 2; John- 
son speaks Latin to a I'rcnchman at 
dinner, ii. 403; in 1780 sits over 
against an Arclibishoj), iv. 228, u. 2; 
in 17S4 has a race upon the stairs, 
iv. 41K); is ke|)t waiting by the Prince 
of Wales, iv. 312, ;/. i; Kxhibition of 
1780, ii. 459, //. 2 ; iv. 228. II. 2 ; 
Johnson's monument, subscription, 
to, iv. 4S8, w. 2; — intercession for 
Lowe's picture, iv. 233-5; rninister, 
not dependent on a. iii. 526; Moser, 
the keeper, iv. 262, //. 4; origin, its, 
i. 420, //. 3; i)rofes.sors and secreta- 
ries, ii. 76; iv. 254; Reynolds's influ- 
ence in it, iv. 254, ;/. i ; his inten- 
tion to resign the presidency, iv. 422, 
;/. 2 ; travelling students, iv. 234. 
;/. I. 
RoYAi. Kami I. V, Johnson's dedications, 

ii. 2, 258; unpopular, ii. 269. 
RoYAi, Marriack Hii.i., ii. 175. 
Koyal RecolU'ctions, i. 134, «. 2. 
RoYAi. Sf)CiKiY, Dryden's lines, ii. 
277; Johnson improves the method 
of the I^hilosophicnl Tninsaitioiis, 
ii. 45, //. 4; Presidents — Earl of 
.Macclesfield, i. 310, ;/. 1 ; Sir John 
I'ringle, iii. 74, //. 3; mentioned, iv. 
107, //. 3. 
RuDU, Mrs., account of her, ii. 515, «. 
I ; Boswell's acquaintance with her, 
iii. 91; approved by Johnson, iii. 91. 
376. 
RlDDl.MAN, Thomas, Boswell projects 
his Life, ii. 248 ; Johnson's regard 



for him, i. 244; Laurence Kirk, pro- 
jecleil mt>numentat, v. 85; Librarian 
of Advocates' Library, ii. 248; ' Rud- 
diman isdeail,' ii. 24: mentioned, iii. 

4=3- 

Rll KHF.Ai), Owen, /.i/r of Pope, ii. 
191; iv. 58, «. 5. 

RiKKi.KS, laced, iv. 93. 

RiiNS, artificial, v. 520. 

RrMiKi., Bi.sho]), ii. 324, »/. 2; iv. 34, 
M. 2. 

Kuiiiik Insttiption, i. 180, «. 3. 

Kitnts, iii. 3S3. 

RisKiN, Mr. John, anecdote of North- 
cote, i. 436, ;/. I ; Hil'liotht'ca Pas- 
tortim, iii. 107, w. 3; New Town of 
Edinburgh, v. 76, ;/. 2. 

Rlsskli,, Alexander, A'atural History 
of AUppo, i. 357; iv. 197. 

RlssKLl., Lady, ii. 241, ft. 3. 

RrssKl.i., Lord William, ii. 241. 

RfssiA, alchymist, a Russian, ii. 432; 
Beauclerk's library offered to the 
ambassador, iii. 477; Ikll's Travels, 
ii. 63; Lapouchin's, Mme., punish- 
ment, iii. 386; population increasing, 
ii. 116; rising in power, ii. 147, n. \\ 
mentioned, ii. 150, «. 4: sec Cath- 
KRINK IL 

Ri'siic Hati'inkss and Virue, iv. 

202; V. 333. 
Rutland, Duchess of, iv. 259, ;/. 1. 
Rutland, Roger, Earl of, i. 499. 
RtrTTY, Dr., account of him, iii. 194, 

11. 1 ; extracts from his Diaiy, iii. 

194-5- 

Ryi.aM), Mr., Johnson's friend in 
1752, i. 281 ; — letters to him: see 
under Joii.nson, letters; member of 
the Esse.x Head Club, iv. 415; and 
Ivy Lane Club, iv. 502. 

Rymer, Thomas, i. 576, «. 4 ; ii. 508, 
It. 2. 

Ryswick, peace of, iii. 507. 



BoswelTs Lift' of yoJmson. 



22 



Sabbath. 



Sapper. 



S. 

Sabbath. See Sunday. 

Sacheverell, Rev. Dr. Henry, John- 
son heard him preach at Lichfield, 
i. 45 ; sale of his Trial, i. 40, 
n. 4. 

Sacheverell, W., Aaottntof the Isle 
of Man, V. 351, n. 3, 382. 

Sacrame.nt, preparation for it, iv. 142; 
in one kind, ii. 121. See under 
JOH.NSO.N. 

Sadness. ' .Sadness only multiplies 

self,' iii. 155, n. i. 
.Sagacity, iv. 387. 
SaH-ORS, estimation in which they are 

held, iii. 301-2 ; generosity, v. 456 ; 

Johnson's description of their life, i. 

403 ; ii. 501 ; iii. 302 ; iv. 289 ; v. 

156; mortality among them, i. 403, 

n. i; iii. 302, n. 1; noble animal, v. 

456 ; riot in London, iii. 54, n. 2 

rudeness, i. 437, «. 2. 
Saint Martin, iii. 41, /;. 3; iv. 432, 

n. 2. 
S.^INTS, Invocation »f the, ii. 120, 293; 

iii. 463; iv. 334; resurrection of the 

bodies of the, iv. iii. 
Salamanca, University of, i. 527 ; ii. 

551. 

Sale, avoiding a, v. 365. 

Sale, George, iii. 481, n. 3. 

Salisbury, iv. 270, 274. 

Salisbury, Hishop of. See Rev. Dr. 
Douglas. 

Sallust, characters, his, ii. 91 ; Cati- 
line's character, i. 37; Johnson takes 
a copy on his tour in Scotland, v. 
139; translates part of the De Bella 
Catilinario, iv. 439, n. i; quoted, ii. 
208, w. t ; translation by a Spanish 
prince, iv. 226. 

Salmasius, iv. 512. 

SaLonica. iv. 420, n. I, 



Salt Hill, v. 523, «. i. 

Salter, Dr., i. 221, n. 2. 

Salusbury Family, v. 496, n. 2. 

Salusbury, H. L., afterwards Mrs. 
Thrale and Mrs. Piozzi, i. 570. 

Salusbury, Lady, v. 314. 

Salusbury, Mr., Mrs. Thrale's father, 
V. 500, n. 3. 

Salusbury, Mrs., Mrs. Thrale's moth- 
er, her death, ii. 302; saying about 
Johnson and nmts, iii. 383. 

.Salusbury, Mr., iv. 396, n. 4. 

S.\LVATKtN, divine intimation of ac- 
cejitance, iii. 335 ; conditional, iv. 
321, 345- 

Samson Agonistes, i. 268, ;/. 2. 

Sanadon's Horace, iii. 86, n. 

Sancrokt, Archbishop, iv. 332, n. i. 

Sanderson, Robert, Bishop of Lin- 
coln, Johnson's style partly formed 
on his, i. 254; use of tlie word pol- 
luted, iv. 463, n. 3 ; mentioned, iv. 
468, 71. 2. 

Sandioki), Mr., v. 299. 

Sands, Murray, and Cochran, 
printers of Edinburgh, i. 244, n. i. 

Sa.ndwich, fourth Earl of, confounded 
with Bishop Seeker, i. 589; disposal 
of a crown living, iv. 342, n. 2 ; 
Fox's motion for his removal, iii. 
436, «. I ; Hawkesworth and Cook's 
J'ovages, ii. 2S4, n. 3; Ray, Miss, iii. 
436, n. I. 

Sandys, second Lord, Johnson visits 
him, V. 519 , portrait of him at 
Streatham, iv. 181, ;/. 3. 

Sandys, Sir Edwin, \'ieii> of the State 
of Religion, i. 254. 

Sandys. C.eorge, Travels, iv. 360. 

S.\NDYS, Samuel, the ' Motion-maker,' 
i. 591. 

Sanquhar, Lord, v. 117, n. 2. 

Sansterre the Brewer, ii. 454. 

Sapper, Thomas, iv. 413, n. 2. 



224 



Index to 



Sappho in Ovid. 



Savages. 



Sai'I'Uo in Ovid, ii. 208. 

Sardinia, Island of, its liiii^ua rustica, 
ii. 94. 

Sardinia, Charles Enmiamiel III, 
King of, death, iv. 375, w. i. 

Sari'KDon, v. 117, ;/. I. 

Sari'I, Father I'aul, i. 156-8; dying 
prayer, i. 553, //. 3; /.//i- by Johnson, 
i. 160; V. 76, //. 1. 

Sartii/n tectum, ii. 477. 

Sassi-Hdih Mor,\ ii. 306, n. 3. 

Sastrks, Signor, the Italian master, 
Johnson's bequest to him, iv. 463, //. 
3; — letters to him, iv. 424, w. i, 
432, ;/. 2 ; mentioned, iii. 25 ; iv. 
467, n. I. 

Saiiskaction ok Christ, v. 99. 

Sai i.T, Mr., iv. 231. 

Saundkrs, Dr., iii. 37, ;/. 5. 

S.vi'NDKRs, I'riiue, a negro, iv. 126, 
;/. I. 

Saundkrson, I'rofessor, ii. 21S. 

Sairin, v. 46, >i. 2, 53, //. I. 

Saurus, iv. 514. 

Sav.\(;k, Richard, account of him, i. 
145, II. 3, 186-200; AU Ricardum 
S(i7'(iifr, \. 187 ;/. 3; Addison's loan 
to Steele,_iv. 62 ; author, an, with- 
out paper, i. 405, ;/. 3 ; iii. 130, 11. 
2 ; Bastdiif, Tli,\ i. 191 ; Caroline, 
(^ueen, gives him a yearly bounty, i. 
145, It. 3; character and mode of 
life, i. 186-g, 192, «. 2, 199, 200, 
482, II. I ; correction for the press, 
iv. 371, //. 2; death, i. 180, ;/. i, igo; 
dignity, as.serted his, i. 89, ;/. 3; epi- 
taph, i. 180, ;/. 3 ; eci},iality of man, 
asserted the, ii. 551; evidence of his 
story examined, i. 196-201 ; John- 
son gathers materials for his JAj\\ i. 
iSo; ])ublishes it, i. 190-1; payment 
for it and editions, ib., n. i ; re- 
viewed in 77//' Chaiupioii, i. 195 ; 
wrote forty-eight pages at a sitting, 



i. 191 ; v«_7J[ij — , intimacy with, i. 
1S7-9; — likeness to him, i. 192, n. 
2; — ^ufjtWH VUtcJiLiUidtUl'':^iv- 332; 
— virtue, impairs, i. 191 ; iv, 456; 
letter to a lord, i. 186, 11. 2 ; life, 
knowledge of, iii. 268, «. 2; On Pub- 
lii Spirit, ii. 14, 11. 4 ; oppressed by 
the booksellers, i. 353, ;/. i; pension 
from Lord Tyrconnel, i. 430, ;/. 3 ; 
Reynolds reads his LiJ\\ i. 191; Sin- 
clair, stabs, see below, trial for mur- 
der ; iUcjrhoiiiai Overbury revived 
at Covent-Garden, iii. 130; — its 
composition, //'. , //. 2 ; subscribes to 
Ilusbands's Miscellany, i. 71, n. 3; 
subscription, liveil on a, i. 146, it.; 
'I'lialcs of Johnson's London, i. 145, 
//. 3 ; Thomson, intimacy with, iii. 
133. "• 5; trial f""" murder, i. 146,;/., 
1S7, n. 3; vanity, ii. 321, n. i; verac- 
ity, i. 196, n. 2; Wales, sets put for, 
i. 145, n, 3, 186, n. I ; Walpole's, 
Sir Robert, talk, iii. 66, n. i; Wan- 
derer, i. 144, n. 3. 

Savage, Life of, an earlier one than 
Johnson's, i. 196. 

Savaok Girl, a, v. 125. 

Savages, afTection, have no, iv. 242 ; 
Boswell's defence of savage life, ii. 
83, 544; iv. 356; bread-tree, reportetl 
saying aliout the, ii. 285 ; compareil 
with London shopkeepers, v. 92, 94; 
cruel always, i. 506 ; happiness of 
their life maintained by a learned 
gentleman, ii. 262 ; ignorant of the 
past, iii. 57; inferiority, their, v. 143; 
marriage state, ii. 190 ; Monboddo 
talks nonsense about them, ii. 84-5; 
and Rousseau, ii. 14, 85 ; saying at- 
tributed to one, iii. 204 ; superiority 
of civilized life, ii. 14, 83 ; v. 143, 
416 ; traditions worthless, v. 255 ; 
wretches, who live willingly with 
them, iii. 279. 



Boswells Life of jo/mson. 



225 



Savile. 



Scotland and the Scotch. 



Savile, Sir George, iii. 487. 

Saville, Mr., saying aliout 'Ned' 
Waller, iii. 372, )i. 2. 

Savi.vgs. See Econo.mv. 

Savoy, Duke of, Rousseau's anecdote 
of one, ii. 294, ;/. 2. 

Sawhridge, Alderman, Lord Mayor, 
iii. 522; bill for shortening duration 
of parliaments, iii. 522 ; mentioned, 
i. 2S1, ;/. 3; ii. 155, ;/. 2. 

Sawbridge, Catherine (Mrs. Macau- 
lay), i. 281, ;/. 3. 

Saxon k added to l.ie c, iv. 37. 

Saxons, iv. 154. 

Sc'Al.KiERS, Tile, Aeemata Burdoiiuni 
(i. «'. , Sealii^vroruDi) FahuLc Confu- 
tation ii. 302, n. 5: Buchanan, praise, 
ii. no; 'cum Scaligero errare,' ii. 
508 ; Dictionary-makers, on, i. 343, 
n. 3; Johnson takes a motto from the 
Poeticks, i. 72; Lydiat, attacked by, 
i. 225, //. 2 ; Mantuan's Bueolies, 
complaint al)out, iv. 210, //. i. 

ScARHOROi(;ii, iii. 52, ;/. i. 

ScARSDAl.E, Lord, iii. 181-3. 

SCEI'TICISM, V. 52. 

Sc/u'iiie for the Classes of a Grainiiiar 
Se/ioo/, i. 115. 

School for Scandal. See SnERiDAN', 
R. B. 

Schools, arguing in the, iv. 86. 

Schools, authority lessened, iii. 297 ; 
Bolingbroke, described by, v. 97, ;/. 
I (.f(V under Sciiool.masters); boys' 
restless desire of novelty, iii. 438, n. 
i; flogging and learning, less of, ii. 
467; happiness of schoolboys, i. 522; 
north of England schools cheap and 
good, ii. 435 ; poor, for the, ii. 216 ; 
iii. 400, ti. 2; public, best for a boy 
of parts, iii. 13 ; — bad for the 



timid, iv. 360 ; — compared with 
private, ii. 467 ; v. 96 ; studies not 
suited to all, iii. 438, n. i. 
Schoolmasters, described by Lord 
Cockburn, ii. 166, «. i; by Johnson, 
ii. 16S, II. 3; J. S. Mill, ib.; Steele, 
i. 51, II. 3; famous men, of, i. 50, n. 
3; Johnson's writings about them, i. 
113, //. I, 114, ;/. 2; maimed boys, 
ii. 180; respect due to them, i. 113; 
Scotch masters — one criminally pros- 
ecuted, iii. 240, 243 ; one dismissed 
for Ijarbarity : see under Hastie; 
severity, how far lawful, ii. i68, 180, 
211-13. 

SCHOTANL'S, i. 550. 

Sciolus, iii. 388, ;/. i; iv. 16, n. 4. 

Sclavonic Lancu age, ii. 179. 

Sconces, i. 68, ii. 3. 

Score, ii. 374, ;/. 3. 

Scorpions, ii. 61-2. 

Scotland and the Scotch,' Aber- 
brothick, v. 80, 318 ; Aberdeen, 
Cathedral, v. 129, //. 2 ; English 
Church, V. no, ;/. 5; Cromwell's sol- 
diers, V. 95 ; duel fought for the hon- 
our of its butter, v. 390, ;/. i; free- 
dom given to English students, v. 
102, ;/. I ; Infirmary, ii. 333 ; New 
Inn, v. 95; New Aberdeen, il)., it. 3; 
Old Aberdeen, v. 103; population in 
1769, v. 102, ;/. I ; Town Hall, v. 
102 ; Johnson made a freeman of 
the city, ii. 333; iii. 275; v. 102; no 
officer gaping for a fee, il>., 11. i ; 
plaids, V. 96, //. i; stocking-knitting, 
iii. 275; V. 99; University, education, 
V. 96, 104, ;/. i; cost of it, v. 107, ;/. 
2; English students, v. 96; Gray of- 
fered a doctor's degree, ii. 306, n. 2; 
King's College, iv. 306, //. 2; v. 102, 



' For the Hebrides and Highlands, see immediately after Scotland. See also in the Con- 
cordiince of Johnson's sayings at the end of the Index, Scotch and Scotland. 



2 20 



Index io 



Scotland and the Scotch. 



ti. I, 103, >t. I ; Mallocli'h i)()em on 
re|uirin}; the I'nixcrsity, iv. 250 ; 
NfariM.lial College, ii. 171, 303; v. 
loi; picture of Arthur Johnston, v. 
loS, n. i; professors awed by John- 
son, V. 104; ' not a niii-.i-kiii started,' 
V. io<; ; student from Col. v. 343 ; 
mentioned, iii. 412, 493, 495; v. 355; 
Al)erdeenshire dialect, v. 95, 114; 
absence of ' a certain accommoda- 
tion ' in modern houses, v. 196 ; ac- 
cent, i. 447; Atfouiil of Stot/iiiiii ill 
1702, iii. 275; Advocate's admission 
77t<si.<, ii. 23 ; America, would not 
discover barrenness of, iii. 88; Amer- 
ican war popular, i\ . 29S, ;/. 2 ; 
Athelstanford, iii. 35. //. 3; UJiol 
/'I'rn'i/^'/-, iv. ()i ; Auchtnleck, ac- 
count of it, iii. 203; V. 431-2; 
ISarony, ii. 473 ; Hosw ell's manage- 
ment, un<ler, iv. 1S8 ; castle, ii. 309; 
V. 432; cha|iel, ancient, v. 433; Field 
0/ Stoiirs, v. ()i, 432: hornless cattle, 
V. 433 ; mansion, v. 432, ;/. I ; in- 
scription on it, V. 434; Johnson de- 
sires to visit it, i. 535 ; visits it, v. 
427-38, laird, past greatness of the, 
iii. 2or ; present glories, iii. 203 ; 
library, iv. 27S ; v. 428 ; Paoli visits 
it, V. 435, II. 3 ; pronounced Affleck, 
ii. 473; V. 132, II. i; Reynolds's por- 
trait of Johnson, v. 438, «. 3; ' rocks 
and woods of my ancestors,' ii. 79, 
//. 2, v. 397; I 'in sticru, v. 435; 
authors, ii. 60; authority lessened by 
the Scotch coming in, iii. 297; Ayr, 
V. 427, It. 3 ; Ayrshire, oirs, v. 268 ; 
elections, ii. 194, 11. 4; election peti- 
tion, iv. 85; Johnson's argument, iv. 
85-6; contest in 1773; v. 403; men- 
tioned, v. 122, ;/. I, 423; Halmerino, 
V. 463 ; Halmuto, \ . 79 ; IJanfT, v. 
124: bare-footed ])eople, v. 61; beg- 
gars, v. 84, ;/. i; Ik'lhelvie, sands of, 



V. 115, ;/. 3; Blackshields, v. 461; 
iJlair in Ayrshire, iii. 55, ;/. 3; books 
printed before the Union, ii. 248; 
Boswell a Scotchman without the 
faults of one, iii. 395; Scotland too 
narrow a sphere for him, iii. 201 ; 
breakfasts, merit of Scotch, v. 140, 
II. 2 ; bring in other Scotch in their 
talk, ii. 278; broth, v. 98; Huchanan, 
Scotland's single man of genius, iv. 
214; Buchanmen showing their teeth, 
V. 114; Buller of lUichan, v. 113; 
cabbage, introduction of the, ii. 521; 
V. 95, w. 3; Calder, v. 135; — castle, 
V. 136; Cii/idoiiian Mcniiry, iv. 149; 
v. 367 ; career open in England, i. 
448 ; Carron, The, v. 391, ;/. 2 ; cas- 
tles, smallness of the, ii. 326; v. 425, 
n. 2 ; cattle without horns, v. 433 ; 
Charles I, sold, iv. 194; Christian 
Knowledge .Society, ii. 30-4, 319; 
Church of Scotland — Hook of 
Disiipliiir, ii. 197 ; churches dirty, 
V. 46; one clean one, v. S3, ;/. i; in 
the Hebrides, v. 329, ;/. i ; church 
holidays not kept, ii. 525 ; form of 
prayers, absence of a, v. 415; Lord's 
Prayer omitted, v. 138, 415, «. 2; ju- 
dicatures, ii. 278; practice at the bar 
of the Cleneral Assembly coarse, ii. 
436, w. 4 ; ' the Presbyterian A'irk 
has its (ieneral Assembly,' i. 537 ; 
probationer, case of a, ii. 197 ; lay- 
patrons, ii. 171; Johnson's argument 
on their rights, ii. 278-82 ; parties, 
two contending, v. 242; civility, per- 
severing, iv. 14; 'cleanliness, Scot- 
tish,' v. 23; clergy, assiduity, v. 286; 
card-playing, v. 461, ;/. i; compared 
with English, v. 2S6, 435; described 
by Warburton, v. 105; homely man- 
ners, i. 532 ; learning, want of, v. 
286-7, 437 ; liberality of leading 
men, \-. 22, ;/. i ; second sight, dis- 



Boswelfs Life of yohnson. 



227 



Scotland and the Scotch. 



believe in, v. 258 ; coaliers, iii. 229, 
n, I, 243, n. I ; combination among 
the Scotch, ii. 140, 351, n. 2; iv. 194, 
n. 3; V. 466: st'e below, nationality; 
'conspiracy to cheat the world,' ii. 
351; 'conspiracy in national false- 
hood,' ii. 339, 351 ; Constable, Lord 
High, V. 117; council-post, v. 206; 
Court of Justiciary, Palmer and 
Muir's case, iv. 144, n. 2; Court of 
Session, account of it, ii. 333, n. 3; 
Johnson sees the Courts, v. 44; at- 
tends a sitting, v. 438, 456; ' casting 
pearls before swine,' ii. 231; date of 
rising, ii. 304 : v. 22 ; titles of the 
judges, ii. 333, «. 3; Cases — Chester- 
fu-ld Letters, i. 309; Corporation of 
Stirling, ii. 333, n. 3 ; ecclesiastical 
censure, iii. 68 ; Hastie the school- 
master, ii. 166; Knight, a negro, iii. 
99, 241; literary property, v. 56, 81; 
Memis, Dr., ii. 426; shipmaster, v. 
445 ; Society of Solicitors, iv. 149 ; 
vicious intromission, ii. 225, 229, 
236; Court of Session Garland : see 
BoswEi.L ; Covenanted magistrates, 
V. 435, n. 3; Cranston, v. 45S; Cun- 
ninghame, v. 424 ; Cupar, v. 63 ; 
Danes, colony of them said to be at 
Leuchars, v. 79 ; Danish names in 
the Hebrides, v. 195 ; their retreat 
commemorated by Swene's Stone, v. 
132, w. 3 ; De Gestis Scotorum, v. 
463, debt, law of arrest for, iii. 88; 
Dictionary, Johnson s, the amanu- 
enses and contractors chiefly Scotch, 
i. 332; Dictionary of Scotch Words, 
ii. 105; dinners good, v. 131; drink- 
ing at old Sir A. Macdonald's, v. 
296; 'droves of Scotch,' ii. 356; 
DufT House, v. 124; Duke, igno- 
rance of a Scotch, V. 48, n. 3; Dum- 
fermline, iii. 67 ; v. 455 ; Dumfries, 
iv. 325, n. i; Dunbarton, v. 419; 



Dunbui, v. 113 ; Duncan's monu- 
ment, V. 132; Dundee, iv. 144, n. 2; 
V. 80; Dundonald Castle, v. 425; 
duni^eon of wit, v. 390; Dunnichen, 
v. 464 ; Dunsinane, iii. 83 ; Dutch, 
Scotch regiment in the pay of the, 
iii. 508 ; eating, modes of, v. 23, n. 
I, 234; Edinburgh, j^i' p. 231; edu- 
cation, English and Scotch, iii. 14, 
n. i; Eglintoune Castle, i. 529; elec- 
tions and electors, iv. 286, «. 2 ; — 
controverted elections, iv. 117 ; — 
interference of the Peers, iv. 286, 
288; V. 404; Elgin, V. 129-30; Ellon, 
landlord at, ii. 384; v. 109; England 
found by the Scotch, iii. 8g ; Scot- 
land a worse England, iii. 282 ; 
' English better animals than the 
Scotch,' V. 21 ; English education, 
iii. 14, n. I ; iv. 152 ; — chiefly 
tamed into insignificance by it, v. 
170; English prejudice, ii. 343, n. 
4 ; — virulent antipathy, v. 466 ; 
English pronunciation, attainment 
of, ii. 182-5 ; entail, law of, ii. 474; 
Episcopal Church, iii. 422 ; its Lit- 
urgy, ii. 187; episcopals are dissent- 
ers in Scotland, v. 83; facile man, a, 
^'- 3S9 i factor, v. 139 ; ' famine, a 
land of,' iii. 88; fear in London of 
the Scotch at the Gordon Riots, iii. 
489, n. 3 ; fencers, good, v. 74 ; feu- 
dal system, ii. 232; iii. 471 ; Find- 
later's. Lord, wood, v. 127; fine and 
recovery unknown there, ii. 491, n. 
2 ; Fochabers, iv. 237, m. 3 ; v. 130 ; 
food enough to give them strength 
to run away, iii. 88 ; Fores, v. 132, 
395; France compared with, ii. 462; 
Frith of Forth, v. 61-2; gaiety, want 
of, iii. 441 ; gardeners, ii. 89 ; gar- 
dens, V. 95, n. 3 ; Garrick ridicules 
their nationality, ii. 372 ; General 
Assembly : see under Scotland, 



228 



Index to 



Scotland and the Scotch. 



church ; Glasgow, coal-fire, a, v. 
420 ; compared with Ikentford, iv. 
214; Koulis, the printers, v. 422; 
newspaper, extract from a, v. 392 ; 
Papists persecuted in 1780, iii. 485, 
n. I ; parentheses, supplies Carlisle 
with, iii. 456, //. 4; riches, its, v. 61; 
Saracen's Head, v. 420 ; St. Kilda's 
man visits it, i. 521 ; University — 
IJoswell a student there, i. 538 ; v. 
20, n. I ; home-students fewer than 
of old, v. 66; Johnson's observations 
on it, ii. 347 ; v. 465 ; Leechman, 
Principal, v. 77, ;/. 2; professors meet 
Johnson, v. 420-22 ; afraid of him, 
v. 422 ; Voung, Professor, iv. 452 ; 
Windham a student there, iii, 135 ; 
Cioldsmith's description of the land- 
scape, ii. 356, n. 2; Oordon Castle, v. 
130; (jordon Riots, ii. 343, //. 4; iii. 
489, 11. 3 ; grace at meals, v. 140 ; 
(Irampian Hills, v. 84; Creek, study 
of, iii. 463; Cregory, sixteen profess- 
ors of the family of, v. 53, ;/. 4; had- 
docks, drietl, v. 125; Hamilton Pal- 
ace, v. 439; Hawthornden, v. 459; 
head-dress of the ladies, v. 203, //. 2; 
heads of rebels on Temple Bar, ii. 
273, ;/. 4: Hebrides: see after Scot- 
land; hedges, absence of, v. 78, n. 
2; 'hedges of stone,' v. 84; 'High 
Knglish,' attainment of, ii. 183 ; 
Highlands: .r,v after Scotland; 
History of the /usiinectioii of 1745 
projected, iii. 1S4, 471; v. 448: Ho- 
mer, Pindar and Shakespeare of 
Scotland, iv. 215, n. i; honest man, 
V. 301; horses get oats as well as the 
people, iv. 194, 11. 2; hospitality, old- 
fashioned, iv. 256, n. 4 ; House of 
Commons contemptible, not sorry to 
see the, ii. 343, //. 4; huml)Ie cows, 
V. 433, n. 2 ■ humour, not distin- 
guished for, iv. 149 ; improvements 



for immediate profit, v. 130, >t. 2 ; 
Inch Keith, v. 62; inns described by 
Goldsmith, v. 166, ti. 3; inoculation, 
V. 257; insurrections in 1779, iii. 464, 
//. 3; invasion, need not fear, ii. 494; 
Irish, compared with the, ii. 351: iv. 
194, n. 3 ; jealousy, ii. 350 ; John- 
son's amanuenses Scotch, i. 216; ii. 
350 ; — antipathy to the Scotch, can- 
not account for his, iv. 195 ; — at- 
tacks the Scotch historians, ii. 271-2; 

— awes Scotch literati, ii. 72 ; — , 
Boswell's introduction to, i. 454; — 
consults .Scotch physicians, iv. 301-5 ; 
jiraises two settled in London, iv. 
254, "• 3; — 'damned rascal! to 
talk as he does of the Scotch,' iii. 
193 ; — desires portraits of their 
men of letters, iv. 306 ; — friends 
among tlie Scotch, ii. 129, 350 ; — 
good-humoured wit, ii. 88-9; iii. 59; 

— holds a Scotchman not less ac- 
ceptable than any other man, ii. 350; 
— , hospitality shown to, ii. 306, 346; 
v. 90 ; welcomed by the great, iv. 
135. "• 3." — joke at the scarcity of 
barley, iii. 262 ; — ' meant to vex 
them,' iv. 194; — prejudice, shown 
in Loudon, i. 150; v. 20; of the head, 
not of the heart, ii. 343-4; explana- 
tion of it by Reynolds, iv. 194, n. 3; 
by Boswell, v. 21; justification of it, 
ii- 139. 350; iv. 195; — slights their 
advancement in literature, ii. 60; — 
would not attend a Scotch service, 
iii. 382; v. 138, 438; judges, titles of, 
V. 87, n. 3; juries, no civil, ii. 230, ;/. 
2 ; Killin, ii. 32, n. i ; Kilmarnock, 
iv. 109 ; V. 427 ; King Bob, v. 426; 
Kinghorn, v. 63; Kirkwall, C. J. P"ox 
member for it, iv. 307, w. 2; known 
to each other, ii. 542; Knox's 'ref- 
ormations,' v. 69; Kyle, v. 122, n. i ; 
lady-like woman, v, 179; Lanark, ii. 



BoswelVs Life of jfohnson. 



229 



Scotland and the Scotch. 



72 ; iii. 132, 409 ; land permanently 
unsaleable, ii. 474, ;/. i ; landlords ' a 
high situation,' i. 474 ; land-tax, ii. 
494; Laurence Kirk, v. 85; law 
(Kelly 11170), V. 270: law arguments 
in writing, ii. 252 ; law life, vulgar 
familiarity of, iii. 203, ;/. 2; lawyers 
great masters of the law of nations, 
ii. 334; learning, decrease of it, v. 64, 
go ; — in James VI's time, v. 64, 
207 ; — ' like bread in a besieged 
town,' ii. 416; — mediocrity of it, ii. 
351, ;/. 2; leases, setting aside, v. 389; 
legitimation, law of, ii. 523; Leith, v. 
60; to a Scotchman often Lethe, ib.; 
Leuchars, v. 79; Lismore, ii. 352, ;/. 
I ; V. 99 ; literature, rapid advance- 
ment in, ii. 60; Logic Pert, v. 84, ;/. 
2; Lord High Constable, v. 117; 
Loudoun, v. 423 ; ' love Scotland 
better than truth,' ii. 356; v. 124, n. 
3 ; towns, V. 248 ; Lugar, River, v. 
432 ; Macbeth's heath, v. 131 ; — 
castle, v. 147, 396 ; Mackinnon's 
Cave, V. 377 ; main Jioncst, v. 345 , 
Mallet the only Scot whom Scotch- 
men did not commend, ii. 182, ;/. 4; 
manse, v. 79; Mauchline, v. 427, ;/. 
3; tnawkin, v. 109; iMcirheta Mitli- 
eriiin, v. 364 ; metaphysics, what 
passes for, iv. 30, ;/. 4; middle class, 
want of a, ii. 461, n. i; Middleburgh, 
iii. 119; Militia, fear of giving Scot- 
land a, in 1760, ii. 493, n. 2; bill of 
1776, ii. 493 ; iii. i ; fear still re- 
mained, iii. 410, ;/. 1 ; established in 
1793, iii. 410, ;;. it Scots as officers 
HI English militia, iii. 453, ;/. 2; Alir- 
ror. The, iv. 450; mi.\ with the Eng- 
lish worse than the Irish, ii. 27S ; 
Monboddo (Lord Monboddo's resi- 
dence), V. 86; Monimusk, iii. iiS ; 
Montrose, v. S1-3 ; muir-fowl, or 
grouse, v. 50 , Muses' IVelcoine to 



King James, v. 64, igo, 92; nation, if 
we allow the Scotch to be a, iii. 441; 
nationality, extreme, ii. 278, 351, 372; 
iv. 215; v. 21, 466 {see above, combi- 
nation); Newhailes, V. 464; 'noblest 
prospect,' i. 493 ; v. 441 ; non-jurors, 
iv. 332; V.74; northern circuit, V. 137; 
oatmeal, v. 152, n. i, 350, 464; oats 
defined, i. 341; iv. 194; Old Deer, v. 
121; ('/(/ Scottish sentiments, v. 44; 
— enthusiasm, v. 426; orchard, John- 
son sees an, iv. 237, «. 3; — general 
want of them, v. 130; Ossian, na- 
tional pride in believing in, iv. 163 
{see under Macpherson, James) ; 
outer gate locked at dinner-time, v. 
68, n. i; pains-taking, of all nations 
most, ii. 343, ;/. 4; past so unlike the 
present, iii. 471 ; patience in win- 
ning votes, iv. 14 ; pay of English 
soldiers spent in it, ii. 494; Peers, in- 
terference in elections, iv. 286, 28S ; 
Perth, an execution at, v. 118; Perth- 
shire, Justices and Sheriff of, iii. 243, 
;/. i; Peterhead Well, v. 114; 'petty 
national resentment,' v. 3 ; piety, 
compared with English, v. 140, n. 2; 
planting, era of, v. 463 ; players, do 
not succeed as, ii. 278 ; Poker Club, ii. 
431, ;/. I, 493, n. 2; polished at New- 
castle, V. 98; postal service, v. 356, ;/. 
I, 395, 420, 11. I, 439; post-chaises, v. 
63, n. 2; poverty, escaped being rob- 
bed by their, iii. 467 ; — supposed 
poverty, iv. 118; Presbyterian fanat- 
ics, V. 43; prescription of murder, v. 
25, 98 ; Preston-Pans, v. 458, ;/. i ; 
prisoners of 1745, treatment of, v. 
228; resentment at having the truth 
told, ii. 350 ; iii. 145 ; revenue, con- 
tributions to the, ii. 494; robbers, no 
danger from, v. 59, 202, n. i; Roman 
Catholics, penal legislation against, 
iii. 485, ;/. i; Roslin Castle, v. 459; 



230 



Index to 



Scotland and the Scotch. 



sacrament, preparation for the, v. 
135. "• 3; saltcrs, iii. 229, n. i, 243, 
)i. i; saiulh laying the fields waste, 
V. 331; 'savages,' iii. 89; scaudal in 
Church law, ii. 197 ; scholars incor- 
rect in quantity, ii. 152; schoolmas- 
ter, brutality of a, ii. 213, n. I ; 
schools inferior to Knglish in classics, 
ii. 197; — cannot prepare for English 
Universities, ii. 435; Scone, v. 270; 
' Scotch oatcakes and Scotch preju- 
dices,' ii. 436 ; ' Scotchmen made 
necessarily,' v. 53; Stots Mo^azim:, i. 
130; v. 195, 302; serfs, iii. 229, ;/. I, 
243, //. i; v. 45S, ;/. i; Shakespeare 
of .Scotland, the, iv. 215, w. i; Sheep's 
head, v. 390 ; Shelburne, Lord, de- 
scribed by, ii. 339, ;/. i; SherifT-muir, 
V. 330; Sheughy Dikes, v. 79, ;/. 2 ; 
shoes, want of, v. 95, //. 3; short days 
in winter, ii. 217; Slains Castle, John- 
son visits it, ii. 356, ;i. 2; v. 1 10-121; 
— its situation, v. 113; — house, v. 
n6 ; sloe, brought to perfection, ii. 
89; Society of Procurators or Solic- 
itors, iv. 149; — Johnson's argument 
in their case, iv. 150-1; Society for 
Propagating Christian Knowledge, 
ii. 30, 319; V. 422; speldings, v. 61; 
spinnet, a, v. 358 ; St. Andrews, 
Koswell and Johnson visit it, v. 31, 
64, 79, Si ; castle, v. 71 ; cathedral, v. 
69-71; (ilass's Iiin, V. 64; grotto, v. 
79; inscriptions, V. 71; Knox's ' refor- 
mations,' V. 6g; Martine's Rcliqiiiir, 
V. 69, u. 2\ Sharp's monument, v. 73; 
Smollett's Inscription of the town, v. 
69, n. 5 ; St. Rule's Chapel, v. 69 ; 
story of an old woman, v. 465; streets 
deserted, v. 74 ; tree, large, v. 78 ; 
University, professors, v. 74, and ;/. 
i; grace at dinner, v. 73; St. Leon- 
ard's College, v. 65 ; l^t. Salvador's 
College, v. 73; library, v. 72; session. 



V. 107, It. 2; students, their number 
and fees, v. 74, n. i; windows broken 
by them, v. 71, «. 2 ; mentioned, i. 
416, n. 2 ; Stirling, its corporation 
corrupt, ii. 428; Stirling, county of, 
iii. 253 ; stone and water, Scotland 
consists of, v. 387; study of Kng'.ish, 
i. 508, ;/. 3; succession of heirs gen- 
eral, ii. 479; Swene's Stone, v. 132, 
M. 3; tenures, ancient, ii. 232; iii. 471; 
territorial titles, v. 87, u. 3; tokens, 
V. 135, ti. 3; Tories generally, v. 309; 
torture, use of, i. 540, n. 2 ; trade 
leaving the east coast, v. 61 ; Tra- 
nent, V. 458, «. i; trees, bareness of 
them, ii. 345, 348, 356; v. 78-9, 84; 
those on the eastern coast younger 
than Johnson, ii. 356 ; v. 78, «. 2 ; 
two large trees in one county, v. 78, 
463; old trees at Calder, v. 136; at 
Inverary, v. 404; elms of Halmerino, 
v. 463 ; Jeffrey's comparison with 
England, ii. 345, n. i; Johnson's sar- 
casms caused love of planting, ii. 
345, M. i; iii. 117; his stick 'a piece 
of timber,' V. 363; Treesbank, v. 424; 
truth, .Scotchmen love Scotland bet- 
ter than, ii. 356; v. 443, ;/. 2; dispo- 
sition to tell lies in favour of each 
other, ii. 339; turn-pike roads, v. 63, 
n. 2 ; turrets, two, mark of an old 
baron's residence, v. 86 ; tyrannical 
laws, iv. 144, «. 2 ; Union, benefits 
to Scotland, v. 146, 283; discussed in 
the Laigh, v. 45; few printed books 
before it, ii. 248; how it happened, 
ii. 105 ; money brought by it into 
Scotland, v. 68; 'no longer u<e and 
!'('«,' ii. 494; Universities, education 
given in them, ii. 416, n. 4 ; no de- 
gree conferred on Johnson, ii. 306, 
it. 2; professorships, iii. 16, n. i {see 
under Ahkrdekn, EniNinRc.n, 
CLAScow.and St. Andrews), veal, 



Boswell's Life of fo/iuson. 



231 



Scotland and the Scotch — Edinburgh — Hebrides and the Highlands. 



V. 35; waiters at the inns, v. 23, 81; 
Walpole, Horace, described by, iii. 
4S9, «. 3 ; water, too much, v. 387 ; 
Westport murderers, v. 259, n. i ; i 
whisky, the thing that makes a Scotch- 1 
man happy, v. 394; windows without | 
pullies, V. 124, II. 3; wine, the refuse ; 
of France, v. 2S3 ; witchcraft, exe- 
cutions for, V. 51, //. i; write English 
wonderfully well, iii. 124; Writers to 
the Signet, v. 391, n. 2. 

EuiNKLRCM, Academy for the deaf 
and dumb, v. 455; Advocates' Libra- 
ry, ii. 24S ; V. 13, //. 3, 44; Apollo 
Press, iii. 133; Arthur's Seat, iii. 132; 
V. 162, ;/. 2 ; beggars, v. 84, «. i ; 
Boyd's Inn, ii. 305; v. 22; Cadies or 
Cawdies, iv. 149; Canongate, ii. 34; 
V. 22; capital, a, yet small, ii. 541-2; 
carrier to London, ii. 312; Castle, v. 
162, ;/. 2; would make a good prison 
in England, v. 441 ; Castle Hill, v. 
60, 441; Church of England Chapel, 
iv. 175, ;/. 3; V. 30; College, v. 46; 
College NVynd, v. 26, n. 3 ; country 
round it, i. 492 ; Cow-gate, v. 46 ; 
'dangers of the night.' i. 13S, n. i; 
described by Cockburn, v. 22, n. i; 
by R. Chambers, v. 43, ;/. 4, 48, u. 3; 
dinners in 1742, i. 120, n. i; Enbni, 
V. 98; fortifying against the Preten- 
der, V. 55, )i. 5; CJeneral Assembly, 
Chamber of the, v. 45, v. 3 ; (jrey 
Friars churchyard, v. 56, n. i; Han- 
overian faction, v. 22, >i. i ; High 
School, ii. 166, )i. I ; v. 90 ; High 
Street, v. 23 ; Holyrood House, iv. 
59, u. I, 117; V. 47; James's Court, 
V. 23; Johnson arrives, v. 22; starts 
on his tour, v. 57 ; returns, v. 439 ; 
describes the town, v. 25. w. i ; his 
lemonade, v. 23 ; his levee, v. 450 ; 
I.aii^h. v. 44; signatures of the Han- 
overian Kings preserved in it, v. 45; 

VI,— 30 



/rt/j,'-//-shops, v. 44, n. 3; masquerades, 
ii. 235, ns. I, 2; New Town designed 
by Craig, iii. 409 ; — described by 
Ruskin, v. 76, «. 2; ' obscure ct)rner, 
an,' ii. 436, n. 4; Papists persecuted 
in 1780, iii. 485, n. i ; Parliament- 
close, v. 46 ; Parliament House, v. 44, 
89, «.i; Post-house stairs, V. 46; Roy- 
al Infirmary, V. 46-7; Select Society, s, 
448; streets, the smells and perils of 
the, v. 24; St. David Street, v. 23, n. 
3, 30, n. 4; St. Giles, v. 45; St. Giles's 
churchyard, v. 69, n. 4; Sunday din- 
ner hour, V. 35; theatre, v. 412, n. i; 
Transactions of the Koyal Society, 
iv. 30, n. 4; University, v. 343, n. i; 
see above, College; Wesley visits it, 
iii. 448; describes the streets, v. 24, 
/;. 2; White Horse Inn, v. 22. n. i. 

Hedridesandthe Hkmilands,^ 
M 'Queen, v. 154, n. 2; Ainnit, v. 250; 
ancestors, reciting a series of, v. 267, 
n. 2; Anoch, v. 154, 211; Ardnamur- 
chan, v. 319, 389; Argyll, Presbyte- 
rian Synod of, iii. 151 ; Armidale, 
Johnson visits it, v. 168-77; a second 
time, V. 313-17 ; arms forbidden, v. 
172, «. 2, 241; Arran, v. 112: Auch- 
nasheal, v. 161-2 ; bag-pipes, v. 35S, 
bards, v. 370, «. i; Barra, v. 269, 302, 
33S, n. I ; beer brewed in lona, v. 
385; Benbecula, v. 137; Bernera, v. 
166, 364; boats without benches, v. 
204, n. 2; bones in the windows of 
churches, v. 193; books in the houses, 
v. 155, 170, i8g, 206, 297, 302, 324, 
326. 335, 344, 357, 367 ; Borneo, as 
unknown as, v. 447, w. 4; Bracadale, 
V. 254; Breacacha, v. 332; breakfast, 
cheese served up at, v. 191; bridles, 
want of, V. 393 ; Broadfoot, v. 178 ; 
brogues, v. 184, w. 2; Brolos, iii. 144; 
Buy, V. 388; Caithness, iv. 157; 
Cameron, v. 416, Campbell-town, v. 



Index to 



Scotland and the Scotch — Hebrides and the Highlands. 



323; Camuscross, v. 304; chapels in 
ruins, v. 194, n. 3; cliarnis for milk- 
ing' the cows, V. 1 87 ; chiefs, how 
•xiliiressed, v. 178, «. 2; arbitrary sov- 
ereijjn needed to restrain them, v. 
234; attachment to them, v. 3S4; au- 
thority destroyed, v. 202; change of 
system, v. 263; de^jenerating into ra- 
pacious landlords, i. 474, ;/. i, v. 29, 
//. 3.431; displaced i)y landlords, iii. 
145, 297 ; house should he like a 
Court, V. 314 ; people, how they 
should treat their, v. 163, 2S5; chief- 
tainship, 'an ideal point of honour,' 
V. 46S; not to he sold, i. 295; children 
compared with London ciiiidren, ii. 
116; churches, v. 329, >i. i; cisility, 
V. 150, ;/. I ; Clanranald. v. 137 ; 
tlans, their order, ii. 309; claymores, 
V. 241, 2fii ; climate, v. 19S, 429; 
(•/('///, in the sense of snily v. 322 ; 
coin, scarcity of, v. 289; Col, Isle of, 
Johnson visits it, v. 324-51; castle, 
V. 333; church in ruins, v. 329; Col's 
house, \. 332; charter-room in it, v. 
373; complaints of trespasses, v. 343; 
curious custom of the lairds, v. 375 ; 
large stone, v. 330, 343; lead mine, 
V. 344; more boys born than girls, v. 
23S, ;/. 2; people and productions, v. 
342; sandhills, v. 331; storm, v. 346; 
student of Aberdeen University, v. 
343; superstitions, v. 348; mentioned, 
ii. 315; iii. 279; College of the Tem- 
plars, V. 255 ; Colvay, v. 351, ;/. 3 ; 
common land in Rasay, v. 195; com- 
putation of distances, v. 209; cordial- 
ity increased by Boswell's drinking, 
iii. 376; Corpach, v. 259, ;/. i; Cor- 
richatachin, Johnson visits it, v. 17S- 
85 ; a second time, v. 293-301 ; men- 
tioned, iv. 1 78; costume of the gen- 
tlemen, v. 1S4, 209: cottages in Sky; 
V. 292 ; in Col, v. 333 ; ' country of 



saddles and bridles,' not a, v. 427; 
Cuchillin's well, v. 289 ; Cuillin, v. 
269; Cullen, v. 125; custom-houses, 
no, in the islands, v. 1S8, ;/. 2; danc- 
ing, V. 189, 203, 316; dangers of the 
tour, V. 14, 320, 322, H. i; deer, free- 
dom to shoot, V. 160; desolation and 
penury of the islands, v. 430, ;/. 2; 
discomforts sufTered by travellers, v. 
430, //. I ; disgust pro]ierly felt at 
the Hebrides, v. 360; distinctness in 
narration, general want of. v. 335 ; 
drinking in .Sky, v. 294, 298 ; Dun 
Can, V. 192; Duntulm, v. 169; Dun- 
vegan, description of the castle, v. 
235. 254, 265 ; Johnson visits it, v. 
236; stays with pleasure, v. 236, 251, 
254; mentioned, ii. 315; iii. 308; v. 

171, 201, ;/. i; Durinish, v. 266; ed- 
ucation, want of it in lona, v. 385, ;/. 
I ; Egg, Isle of, ii. 354 ; English 
sjioken well, v. 154, u. 3; emigra- 
tion of Highlanders due to rapacious 
landlords, v. 29, n. 3, 156, 168, //. 3, 

172, ;/. I, 183, 233 ; dance called 
America, v. 316; early emigrants, v. 
341 ; emigrant ships, v. 205, 241, 268, 
316; leaves a lasting vacuity, v. 335, 
V. i; people getting hardened to it, 
V. 316 ; episcopacy, inclined to, v. 
185, ;/. 2; Erse, Irish, similarity to, 
ii. 180, 397 ; Xairne, first heard at, 
V. 133, "■ 3 ; scriptures in it, ii. 30- 
34, 180, 319, 551 ; v. 421 ; other 
books, ii. 319, 326 ; Shaw's Erse 
Grammar, iii. 120-22; Gaelick Dic- 
tionary, iv. 291 ; songs, v. 134, 185, 
203; — never explained to Johnson, 
V. 274; — one interpreter found, v. 
361, n. I ; written language, not a, 
iii. 122; written very lately, ii. 339, 
353, 397, 439; estates, size of, v. 188, 
;/. 2, 201, M. I, 470, «. I ; fabulous 
tradition, v. 194; l•'K^(lda. v. ig6, 470, 



Boswell's Lije of fohnson. 



'^Zl 



Scotland and the Scotch— Hebrides and the Highlands. 



n. I, forest, v. 269; Fort Augustus, 
Johnson visits it, v. 153-4 ; has a 
good night there, iii. 114, //. i, 419; 
military road, ii. 348 ; officers who 
had served in America, iii. 279 ; v. 
154 ; mentioned, v. 160, 162, 214 ; 
Fort George, v. 140-45; fowls, meth- 
od of catching, v. 204 ; foxes, price 
set on their heads, v. 197, 11. 2; fune- 
rals, V. 267 ; spirits consumed at 
them, V. 378 ; gardens very rare in 
Sky, V. 270, 297 ; ,:^ni!/, a plant, v. 
19S ; General's Hut, v. 152 ; Glen- 
croe, V. 2og, n. 2, 389 ; Glenelg, v. 
161, 166—8 ; Glenmorison, v. 154 ; 
Glensheal, v. 160 ; graddaned meal, 
V. 190 ; greyhounds, v. 376, ;/. i ; 
Gribon, v. 377 ; Grishinish, v. 233 ; 
Grissipol, v. 329; Harris, v. 201, ;/. 

1, 259, ;/. I, 3S5, II. I, 468; Ilatyiu 
foani't'ri, v. 185, 330; food, v. 152; 
George III, faithful to, v. 230; grain 
carried home on horses, v. 268 ; he- 
reditary occupations, v. 136; heritable 
jurisdictions, v. 51, n. 2, 201, 391 ; 
Iligliland LadiUe, v. 209, n. 3; houses 
of the gentry, small and crowded, v. 
183, 299, 332, 366 ; mire in a bed- 
room, ib.; huts, v. 151, 155 ; Icolm- 
kill : see lona ; idleness, v. 24S ; in- 
accuracy of their reports, v. 171, ;;. 

2, 269, 370, w. I, 383; Inchkenneth, 
Johnson visits it, v. 366-76; Scott's 
description of it, v. 366, ;/. 2; John- 
son's Ode, ii. 335; v. 370; Boswell in 
the ruined chape], v. 372; mentioned, 
V. 352; Indians, not so terrifying as, 
V. 162; black and wild as savages, v. 
163; like wild Indians, v. 293; infi- 
dehty in a gentleman, v. 191; inns, 
V. 152, n. 2, 158, 165-6, 206, 352, 
394-5; want of one in lona, v. 381; 
interrogated, not used to be, ii. 354, 
V. 2; Inverary, castle, built by Duke 



Archiljald, v. 393; the total defiance 
of expense, v. 404; Johnson visits it, 
v. 394-412; and Wilkes, iii. 83; men- 
tioned, V 356; Inverness, v. 145-9; 
lloswell preached at, v. 146; — writes 
to Garrick, v. 395 ; Johnson buys 
Coeker, v. 157; Inverness - shire, v. 
172, u. i; lona, Boswell and John- 
son visit it, V. 380-5; Johnson wades 
to the shore, v. 420; his famous de- 
scription, iii. 197, 517; V. 380; Duke 
of Argyle present owner, v. 38 1 ; 
building stones from Nuns' Island, 
V. 379; monuments, v. 382; account 
of the inhabitants, v. 384-5 ; men- 
tioned, ii. 317 ; V. 361 ; Irish under- 
stood by Highlanders, ii. 180 ; Isa, 
V. 284, 326; island, life in an, v. 330, 
336 ; Johnson shows the spirit of a 
Highlander, v. 369 ; Jolatson and 
Joltnston, v. 389; joyous social man- 
ners, V. 179 ; Kingsburgh, Johnson 
visits it, V. 204, 209-13; sleeps in a 
celebrated bed, v. 211, 213, 215 ; 
Knoidart, v. 170, 216, 226 ; land- 
lords diminish their people, v. 341; 
infatuated, v. 334 ; restraint to be 
placed on raising the rents, v. 29, ?/. 
3 {see above under chiefs, and be- 
low under rents and tenants) ; law, 
want of, ii. 145 ; Leven, River, v. 
416, n. I, 418; Lewis, v. 468; Little 
Colonsay, iii. 151 ; little wants of 
life ill supplied, ii. 347; Loch-Awe, 
V. 393, n. I ; Loch-Braccadil, v. 269, 
289 ; Lochbradale, v. 241 ; Loch- 
broom, v. 221 ; Lochiern, v. 322 ; 
Lochlevin, ii. 323 ; Loch Lomond, 
its climate, iii. 435; Johnson visits it, 
iv. 207 ; V. 413-14 ; Loch Ness, v. 
150. 338. "• i; Long Island, v. 213; 
longevity, no extraordinary', v. 407, 
M. 4 ; Lorn, v. 137; Lowlanders 
scorned, v. 154, ;/. 3 ; M'Craas, the, 



2 34 



Index to 



Scotland and the Scotch — Hebrides and the Highlands. 



or Macraes, V. 162-3,255; M'Crus- 
lick, V. 189, n. 2; Macfarlane, Laird 
of, the Macfarlane, v. 178, w. 2; 
Macgregors forcetl to change their 
name, v, 145, ;/. i ; mapping of the 
country, ii. 408; march to Derby, iii. 
1 84; mile-stones removed, v. 20<), >t. 
2 ; ministers, v. 255, //. i ; Moidart, 
V. 169; money, admission of, iii. 145; 
Morven, v. 319; Moy, v. 388; Muck, 
Isle of, V. 256. 284; Mugstot, V. 169, 
214, 295; Mull, compared with Fleet 
Street, iii. 343, Johnson sails for it, 
V. 318; carried away to Col, v. 320; 
arrives, v. 350; no jiost, v. 356, >i. 1; 
ride througli it, v. 361-2; 'a most 
dolorous country,' v. 388 ; a great 
cave, v. 377-8; 'a'oods, v 378; moon- 
liglit sail along the coast, v. 379 ; 
ferry to ()l)an, v. 391 ; Nairne, v. 
133 ; newspaper, sight of a, v. 367 ; 
noble animal, v. 456 ; nomenclature 
in the Highlands, v. 17S, ;/. 2; Nuns* 
Island, v. 379, Oban, v. 392; Offi- 
cers of Justice, want of, v. 201; Ork- 
neys, ii. 136, ;/. 3 ; Ostig, Johnson 
visits it, v. 301-13 ; parishes, v. 329, 
n. I ; peat fires first seen at Nairne, 
v. 133, n. 3 ; cutting peat, v. 348 ; 
periphrastic language, v. 225 ; Porta- 
wherry, v. 384 ; Portree, v. 205-6, 
216, 2S0, 316; prayer before milking 
a cow, v. 140; prisons in the lairds' 
houses, V. 333, 390 ; quern, v. 292 ; 
'raise their clans in London,' iii. 
454, n. i; Rasay, Isle of, approach, 
V. 188, explored by Boswell, v. 191- 
8 ; men out in the '45, v. 195 ; old 
castle and new mansion, v. 196 ; 
cave, ib.; people never ride, v. 197; 
animal life, ib.; burnt in '45, v. ig8, 
w. 2 ; no officers of justice, v. 201 ; 
dancing, v. 203; Johnson's praise of 
the Isle, iii. 145 ; v. 202, 11. 2, 471 ; 



the Pretender hides there, v. 217-21; 
mentioned, ii. 315; v. 171; Kattakin, 
V. 164; reapers singing, v. 188; reels, 
iii. 225; regiments raised by Pitt, iii. 
225; V. 171 ; rentals, v. 1S8, n. 2. 
201, n. I, rents paid in i)ills, v. 289; 
in kind, ;/'., n. 3 ; racked, v. 156, 
16S, w. 3, 170, 172, «. I, 233-4, 252, 
//. 1, 2S5 ; riding in Sky, v. 233; 
roads, want of, v. 197 ; soldiers at 
work on them, v. 155 ; beginning of 
«)ne, v. 268, ;/. i ; sight of one, v. 
367; Rona, Isle of, v. 188, 196, 470, 
;/. I ; Rorie More's Cascade, v. 236, 
245 ; Rosedow, v. 413 ; Ross-shire, 
v. 172, >i. 1 ; sailors, very unskilful, 
v. 322, >i. i; smh/i or skolk, v. 189; 
.Scalpa, V. 185; .Sconser, v. 204, 292; 
second-sight, believed by all the 
islanders hut the clergy, v. 258; Bos- 
well's belief, ii. 363 ; v. 407, 444-5 ; 
Dempster's criticism, v. 464 ; John- 
son's curiosity never advanced to 
conviction, ii. 12, «. 2 ; ' willing to 
believe,' ii. 363 ; hears instances, v. 
182-3; 364; loose interpretations, v. 
186-7 ; arguments for and against, 
v. 464, n. 3, 465, H. I ; Senachi, v. 
369; sense, native good, v. 168; ser- 
vants in Sky faithless, v. 190; sheets, 
want of, in the Highlands, v. 245 ; 
shelties, v. 324 ; shielings, v. 161 ; 
shops, want of, v. 29, w. 4; Slate, v. 
168, 173, 178, 291 ; sleds, v. 268 ; 
Sky, church bells, no, v. 173; John- 
son arrives, v. 168; leaves for Rasay, 
V. 185; returns, v. 205; leaves finally, 
V. 318; his Ode, v. 177; Macdonald, 
Lady Margaret, beloved there, iii. 
435; one justice of the peace, v. 201; 
price upon the heads of foxes, v. 
197, n. 2 ; Snizort, v. 190 ; South 
Uist, v. 269; spades used in Sky, v. 
267, 297; Spanish invasion in 1719, 



BosiveWs Life of yohnson. 



235 



Scotland and the Scotch — Hebrides and the Highlands. Scott. 



V. 160, n. 2; strangers will never set- 
tle in the isles, v. 335, ;/. i; Straith, 
V. 178, 221; St. Kilda, Boswell i)r()- 
poses to buy it, ii. 171 ; ct)](l-catcli- 
ing, ii. 58; V. 317; explanation sug- 
gested, ii. 59; tire-penny tax, iii. 275, 
//. 3; Cilasgow, St. KiKla's man at, 
i. 521; Ih)race and Virgil studied 
tliere, v. 385 ; Lady Grange a pris- 
tjner, v. 258; Macaulay's History of 
St. Kilda, ii. 58; v. 135-6; Martin's 
I'oytti^i' io St. Kildti, ii. 58, ;/. 3, 59, 
//. i; jjoetry, v. 260; Stafl'a, Johnson 
sees it at a distance, v. 378 ; sold, 
iii. 144, 151; Stralhaven, iii. 409; 
Strichen, v. 121 ; Strolimus, v. 293 ; 
su]ierstitions, v. 348, //. i; tacksmen, 
V. 17S, ;/. 2, 233, ;/. 4; tailors, v. 257, 
tiiisiks, V. 182 ; Talisker, Johnson 
visits it, V. 285-92, 303, ;/. i, 34S, 
437; Tarhat, v. 413; targets, v. 241; 
tartan dress i)rohil)ited, v. 184, //. 3; 
'I'eigh Franchicli, v. 333 ; tenants, 
combination among them, v. 172, n. 
I ; de])endent on their landlords, v. 
201, ;/. 2 ; fine on marriage, v. 365 ; 
'I'Inirot's descent on some of the 
isles, iv. 118, ;/. i ; Tobormorie, v. 
351-2, 378 ; tradition, w.A to be 
argued out of a, v. 345 ; translate 
their names in the Lowlands, v. 389, 
;/. 2; trusted, little to be, ii. 354; 
turnips introduced, v. 334 ; Tyr-yi, 
v. 238, ;/. I, 356 ; Ulinisli, v. 255 ; 
Johnson visits it, v. 26S-82 ; sees a 
subterraneous house, v. 268 ; and 
cave, V. 269 ; gleanings of his con- 
versation there, v. 283, 443 ; LHva's 
Isle sold, iii. 151; Johnson visits it, 
V. 363-6; violence, Johnson and Bos- 
well fear, v. 159; waves, size of the, 
V. 286; Ti'rtTt'X'/;/;'- cloth, v. 203; wheat 
bread never tasted by the M'Craas, v. 
162 ; wheel-carriages, no, v. 268, ;/. 



1; whisky served in a shell, v. 330; 
whistling, a gentleman shows his in- 
dependence by, V. 408 ; ' Who can 
like the Highlands?' v. 429-30; 
7iW(/, bushes called, v. 284 ; heath, 
V. 378 ; wretchedness of the people 
in i8io and 1814, v. 3S5, n. i; Zet- 
land, V. 385, ;/. I. 

Scots Mdi^azine. See under Scotland. 

Scotsman, a violent, iii. 193. 

Scott, Archibald, i. 135, n. 2. 

Scott, Mr. Benjamin, iii. 521. 

Scott, George Lewis, iii. 133. 

Scoi'T, John, afterwards first Earl of 
Eldon, Boswell, never mentioned by, 
iii. 296, ;/. 2 ; — , trick played on, 
i/>.; — and taste, ii. 219, ;/. 2; 
church-going, iv. 477, u. 2 ; death- 
warrants, iii. 137, >t. 2 ; Dunning's 
way of getting through business, iii. 
146, ;/. 2; (ieorge III, on the mak- 
ing of baronets, ii. 406, ;;. 2; Heber- 
den's, Dr., kindness to him, iv. 263, 
;/. 2 ; Johnson's visit to Oxford in 
1773. ii. 308, ti. I ; Lee, 'Jack,' on 
the duties of an advocate, ii. 54, >t. 
I ; — on the India Bill, iii. 254, n. 
I ; Norton, Sir Fletcher, character 
of, ii. 540, u. 2 ; Oxford tutor, un- 
\\illing to be an, iv. 106, ». 3; Pitt 
on the honesty of mankind, iii. 267, 
«. 5 ; port, liking for, iv. 105, n. 3 ; 
Porteus, Bishoj), on knotting, iii. 274, 
fi. 3; portrait in University College, 
ii. 28, ti. 2 ; retirement, after his, ii. 
386, ;/. 3 ; Royal Marriage Bill, ii. 
175,//. i; sermons written by Lord 
Stowell, V. 75, w. 2; small certainties, 
ii. 369, ti. 2 ; Taylor, Chevalier, an- 
ecdote of the, iii. 443, n. i ; War- 
ton's, Rev. T., lectures, i. 323, w. 3; 
Wilkes at the Levee, iii. 489, ». i. 
ScoTT, Mrs. John (Lady Eldon), ii. 
308, ;/. I. 



236 



Index to 



Scott, John. 



Scott, Dr. 



Scott, John, of Amwell, Elegies, ii. 
402 ; meets Johnson, ii. 387 ; dread 
of small-pox, //'., n. i. 

Scott, Sir Walter, Abel Sampson, a 
probationer, ii. 197, n. I ; aecommo- 
date, V. 353, ;/. 3; Auchinleck, Lord, 
anecdote of, v. 435, ;/. 3 ; birth, v. 
26, ;/. 3 ; Blair, mistaken about, v. 
411, ;/. i; Hoswell and the Douglas 
Cause, V. 402, n. i; spoils one of his 
anecdotes, v. 452, n. 2; Burns, sees, 
V. 46, //. 2 ; Cameron's execution, i. 
16S, ;/. 2 ; charms in the Hebrides, 
V. 1S7, //. I ; clans, order of the, ii. 
309, 11. 3 ; coursing, v. 376, ;/. i ; 
Culloden, cruelties after, v. 223, //. 
2; Deteetors letter to him, i. 266, //. 

1 ; Dirletoiis Doubts, iii. 223, //. i ; 
Dunvegan Castle, v. 236, ns. 2 and 3, 
265, //. i; Errol, Earls of, v. 115, ;/. 
3, 121, ;/. i; Erskine, Dr., v. 446, n. 

2 ; Finnon haddocks, v. 125, ;/. 2 ; 
Forbes's generosity to him, v. 289, ;/. 
1; Forbes, Sir \\'., lines on, v. 26, ;/. 
4; Grange, Lady, v. 259, ;/. i; halls 
of old Scotch houses, v. 68, n. i ; 
Hardyknutc, ii. 105, ;/. 2; High- 
lands, discomforts in the, v. 430, ;/. 
I ; Highlanders forbidden to carry 
arms, v. 172, //. 2; Home's tragedies, 
ii. 366, ;/. I ; hospitality, old-fash- 
ioned, iv. 256, ;/. 4; humble-cow, v. 
433, ;/. 2 ; Inch Keith, v. 62, n. 2 ; 
Inchkenneth, v. 366, //. 2 ; lona, v. 
3S5, ;/. i; Johnson and Auchinleck, 
Lord, i. 112, ;/. i ; v. 435, «. 3 ; — 
and Boswell's voyage highly perilous, 
V. 322, ;/. I, 357, //. i; — definition 
of oats, i. 341, ;/. 3 ; — on dinners, 
V. 390, ;/. i; — at Dunvegan, v. 236, 
«. 3 ; — and Jolnistoii, v. 389, n. 2 : 
• — Ode to Mrs. Tlirale, v. 179, n. 3; 
— and Pot, iv. 6, ;/. i ; — the ' Sas- 
senach More," ii. 306, ;/. 3 ; — and 



the Scotch love of planting trees, ii. 
345, ;/. I ; — and Adam Smith, in- 
accuracy about, v. 421, 11. I ; Kames, 
Lord, ii. 230, //. i ; Lovat's monu- 
ment, V. 267, n. I ; Mackenzie, Sir 
George, v. 241, u. 3; Mackenzie, 
Henry, i. 417, ;/. 2; Maclaurin's 
mottoes, iii. 241, //. 2 ; Mariiiion 
<iu()tcd, iv. 251, ;/. i; Mickle's Ctiin- 
itor Ihill, V. 400, ;/. I ; Monboddo, 
Lord, ii. 85, ;/. i; v. 87,;/. 2, 88, n. 2; 
Nairne, William, v. 60, n. 2; Ossian, 
V. 187, n. 2 ; Pitcairne's poetry, v. 
65, ;/. I ; Pleydell, Mr. Counsellor, 
ii. 431, n. i; v. 23, ;/. 3; Kedgamttlet, 
introduction, i. 168, n. 2 ; Reynolds 
and Sunday painting, iv. 477, //. 2 ; 
Koslin Chapel, v. 459, ;/. 2; scarcity 
of coin in the Hebrides, v. 289, n. 2; 
Scotticism, a, v. 14,;/. 4; second sight, 
v. 182, ;/. I ; sheep's-head, v. 390, n. 
I ; Southey, letter from, v. 44, «. 4 ; 
Tobermory, v. 351, «. 3 ; Inanity of 
Jluman Wishes, i. 224, n. 3 ; iv. 53, 
//. 3; Walpole's Histoiy of his own 
Time, V. 241, n. 3 ; ivaulking the 
cloth, V. 203, ;/. I ; Woodhouselee, 
Lord, V. 441, ;/. 6; writers to the 
Signet and Sir A. Maclean, v. 391, 
n. 2; Young's parody of Johnson's 
style, iv. 452, ;/. i. 
Scott, Dr., afterwards Sir William 
Scott, and Lord Stowell ; Black- 
stone's bottle of port, iv. 105 ; Bos- 
well, describes, v. 58, n. 6; Coulson, 
Rev. Mr., ii. 437, ;;. i; v. 524, n. i; 
Crosbie, Andrew, ii. 431, ;/. i ; din- 
ner at his chambers, iii. 296 ; exer- 
cise of eating and drinking, iv. 105, 
n. 3 ; Johnson, accompanies, to 
Edinburgh, i. 534; v. 17, 22, 26, 30, 
35 ; to the scene of the Gordon 
Riots, iii. 487 ; — bequest to him, 
iv. 463, ;/. 3; on conversions, ii. I2i; 



BoswelFs Life of fo/mson. 



^2>7 



Scott, Dr. 



Sentimental Journey. 



— epitaph, iv. 512-13; — executor, 
iv. 463, ;/. 3; — , friendship with, ii. 
28, n. 2 ; V. 23 ; — gown, i. 402, n. 
2; — horror at the sight of the bones 
of a whale, v. 193, ;/. i; — on inno- 
vation, iv. 217 ; — as a member of 
parliament, ii. 158, ;/. 2 ; — mezzo- 
tinto, possesses, iv. 485, //. 3 ; pre- 
sents it to University College, iii. 
27S, «. 2; — might have been Lord 
Chancellor, iii. 352; lectures at Ox- 
ford, gave, iv. 106 ; Literary Club, 
member of the, i. 554 ; ' Ranelagh 
girl,' descriljes a, iii. 226, 11. 2 ; ser- 
mons, a writer of, v. 75, «. 2; Uni- 
versity College, fellow of, ii. 503 ; 
mentioned, iv. 398; v. 57. 

Scott, Mr., ' \'(ju, and I, and Her- 
cules,' iv. 53, ;/. 3. 

Scotticisms, Guthrie's, i. 136, /;. i ; 
Hume's short collection, ii. 82 : see 
under Boswell, Scotch accent. 

Siottifying, v. 61. 

Scoundrel, applied to a clergyman's 
wife, ii. 522, n. 3; Johnson's use of 
the term, iii. i. 

ScoHiidrelisiit, v. I20. 

ScRASE, Mr., V. 519, }i. 2. 

Screen, Johnson dines behind one, i. 
188, ;/. I. 

Scripture Phrases, ii. 244. 

Scriptures, in Erse: see under Scot- 
land, Hebrides, Erse: evidence for 
their truth: see under Christianity. 

Scriveners, iii. 24, ;/. i. 

Scrofula, i. 48. 

Scrub in the Beaux Stralugejii, iii. 80. 

Scruples, Baxter's, ii. 548 ; Johnson 
afraid of them, ii. 483; distracted by 
them, ii. 547; no friend to them, v. 
70; warns against tliem, ii. 484; peo- 
ple load life with them, ii. 82, ;/. i. 

Seni/'ii/osi/v, iv. 6. 

Scythians, v. 255. 



Sea, feeling its motion after landing, 
V. 324. 

Sea-life. See Sailors and Ships. 

Seaford, first Lord, iv. 203, w. i ; v. 
162. 

Seaforth, Lord, v. 259, n. i. 

Seasons, forgotten in London, iv. 169; 
their influence: jf^ under Weather. 

Secker, Thomas, Archbishop of Can- 
terbury, 'decent,' i. 589; ii. 324, ;/. 
2 ; iv. 34, ;/. 2 ; described by H. 
Walpole, iv. 34, ti. 2 ; Johnson re- 
quested to seek his patronage, i. 426; 
Life, iv. 35 ; /reports of Debates, i. 
587; sermon quoted, i. 39; toast of 
church and king, iv. 34. 

Second Sight, in Wales, ii. 172. See 
under Scotland, Hebrides, second 
sight. 

Sect.'VRY, a religious, ii. 541. 

Seduction, imaginary case of, iii. 21. 

Seed, Rev. Jeremiah, iii. 281. 

Seeking after, iii. 357. 

Segued, Emperor of Abyssinia, i. 102, 
394. ■"• 2. 

Seldkn, John, knowledge varied, ii. 
iSi ; 7\-ible-talk, v. 354, 473 ; men- 
tioned, iv. 27, n. 3; V. 256, w. 2. 

Selections from Authors, Johnson 
disapproves of them, iii. 33. 

Self-importance, iii. 195. 

Selwin, Mr., iii. 189, ;/. 3. 

Selwyn, George, Beauclerk at Venice, 
i. 440, ;/. I. 

Semel iiisanivi/nus ovines, iv. 210. 

Senate of Lilliput. See under 
Debates. 

Seneca, iii. 336, ;/. i; v. 337. 

Senectus, iii. 391. 

Senegal, v. iii, n. i. 

Senilia, iv. 3. 

Sensations, ' la theorie des sensations 
agreables,' i. 398. 

Sentimental Jour)iey. See Sterne. 



2 38 



Index to 



Sentimentalists. 



Shakespeare. 



Sentimentalists, iii. 169, n. i. 
Serfs in Scotland. Sec Scotland, 

serfs. 
Serious Call. See Law, William. 
Serjeantson, Rev. James, iv. 454, 

w. I. 

Sermons, attended to better than 
prayers, ii. 198; considerable branch 
of literature, iv. 122 ; Johnson's ad- 
vice aljoiit their composition, iii. 
496; V. 76 ; his opinion of the best, 
iii. 281 {see under Johnson, ser- 
mons) ; passions, addressed to tlie, 
iii. 282 ; style, improvement in, iii. 
281. 

Servants, male and female, ii. 249. 

Servitors. See Oxford. 

Sessional Reports. See Old 
Bailey. 

Settle, Elkanah, City-Poet, iii. 87 ; 
Dryden's rival, /'/'. ,• mentioned, i. 
63. 

Settlement of Estates, ii. 494. 

Seven Champions of Christendom, iv. 
9. n. 5. 

Seven Provinces, i. 550. 

Severity, government by, ii. 214. 

SfeviGNE, Mme. de, existence, the task 
of, iii. 61; misprints of her name, iii. 
61, n. 3; Pelisson, her friend, i. 104, 
w. 3; style copied by Gray and Wal- 
pole, iii. 36, n. I ; truthfulness on a 
death-bed, v. 452, n. 3. 

Seward, Miss Anna, Acisand Galatea, 
quotation from, iii. 274, w. i ; Bos- 
well introduced to her, ii. 535 ; — 
calls on her, iii. 468; — controversy 
with her, i. 108, n.; ii. 535, w. i; iv, 
382, n. 2 ; dines at Mr. Dilly's, iii. 
323-40; fanciful reflection, i. 47, w. 
2; ghosts, iii. 337-8; Hayley, corre- 
spondence with, iv. 382, n. 2; John- 
son and the learned pig, iv. 431-2 ; 
— praises her poetry, iv. 382; Ode on 



the death of Captain Cook, iv. 382 ; 
mentioned, iv. 355, 430, ;/. i. 

Seward, Rev. Mr., of Lichfield, ac- 
count of him, ii. 535; iii. 172; vale- 
tudinarian, iii. 172, 468; mentioned, 
i. 94, ;/. 3: ii. 539. 

Seward, William, K.R.S., account of 
him, iii. 140 ; Batheaston Vase, per- 
haps wrote for the, ii. 386, n. i ; 
Ilarington's iViii^cr Antiijucr, sug- 
gests a motto for, iv. 208; Johnson 
and Bacon, iii. 220 ; — bow to an 
Archbishop, iv. 228 ; — epitaph, iv. 
488, «. 3, 513 ; — on the Ministry 
and Opposition, iv. 161 ; — recom- 
mends him to Boswell, iii. 141 ; — 
tetrastrick on Goldsmith, translates, 
ii. 322, ;/. 4; Langton's ancestor and 
Sir M. Hale, iv. 358, n 2; Parr, 
Dr., letter from, iv. 488, n. 3 ; peo- 
ple without religion, iv. 248; retired 
tradesman, anecdote of a, iii. 200, w. 
2 ; Scotland, visits, iii. 140-1, 143 ; 
mentioned, i. 425 ; ii. 86, 352 ; iii. 
190, 402; iv. 51, 96, «. I, 512. 

Sexes, equality in another world, iii. 
326; intercourse between the two, ii. 
541; iii. 389; irregular, should be 
punished, iii. 20. 

Shaftesbury, fourth Earl of, i. 537. 

Shakespeare, William, Boar's Head 
Club, v. 281-2; ' Boswell,' needed a, 
V. 472-3 ; ' brought into notice,' ii, 
106; Capel's edition, iv. 6; Catharine 
of Aragon, character of, iv. 280; 
Congreve, compared with, ii. 97-100, 
no; Corneille and the Greek dram- 
atists, compared with, iv. 19; diction 
of common life, iii. 220, n. 4; Dog* 
berry boasting of his losses, i. 75, 
«. I ; editions published between 
1725-1751, V. 277, «. 6; fame, his 
iii. 298; fault, never six lines without 
a, ii. no; Hamlet's description of 



Bos weirs Life of yoluison. 



239 



Shakespeare. 



his father, iv. 84, n. 2; the ghost, iv. 
ig, ;/. 2; V. 42 {sec below under John- 
son's edition) ; Hanmer's edition, i. 
205, ;;. 3 ; imitations, ii. 258, ;/. 4 ; 
Johnson's admiration of him, ii. 99, 
n. i; Johnson's edition, account of 
it, Proposals, i. 202, //. 3, 369, 379 ; 
delayed, i. 203, 369, 373, 379, 3S1, 
574, //. 2; ii. I, ;/. i; subscribers, i. 
369, «. 4, 374, 379, 389, 57S; list lost 
and money spent, iv. 129; published, 
i. 574; went through several editions, 
ii. 234; re-published by Steevens, ii. 
131, 234 ; attacked by Churchill, i. 
369-70 ; confesses his ignorance 
where ignorant, i. 379 ; edited it 
from necessity, iii. 22, it. 3 ; Ciarrick 
not mentioned, ii. 106; reflection on 
him, ii. 220, Kenrick's attack, i. 576; 
newspaper criticisms, ii. 19, «. 3 ; 
notes on two passages in Hamlet, iii. 
63 ; preface, i. 574, 575, n. 2 ; War- 
burton critici-sed, i. 381; Warton, J. 
and T., notes by, i. 389; ii. 132; 
Johnson's Prologue, iv. 30; Jubilee, 
ii. 78 ; Ladies' Shakespeare Club, 
V. 277, n. 6 ; Latin, knowledge of, 
iv. 22; Macbeth, description of night, 
ii. 104 ; — never read through by 
Mrs. Pritchard, ii. 399; — speech to 
the witches, v. 86, 131 ; — castle, v. 
147, 396; — worse for being acted, 
ii. 106 ; Malone's edition, i. 8 ; iv. 
164, 209, n. 2 ; mulberry tree, i. 97, 
n. i; Mulberry Tree, a poem, i. 118; 
name omitted in an Essay on the 
English Poets, i. 162; night, descrip- 
tions of, ii. 100, 104 ; Othello, dia- 
logue between lago and Cassio, iii. 
48; — moral, iii. 46; plays worse for 
being acted, ii. 106 ; representations 
of his plays, v. 277, n. 6; Reynolds's 
note on Macbeth's castle, v. 147 ; 
Romeo and Juliet neglected, v. 277, 



«. 6; — altered by Otway and Gar- 
rick, ib.; Shakespeare, Mr. William, 
i'^"- 375. "• 3; Shakespearian ribbands, 
ii. 79 ; spelling of his name, v. 141 ; 
style ungrammatical, iv. 22, n. 2 ; 
terrifies the lonely reader, i. 81 ; 
Timon's scolding, iv. 31 ; tragedies 
inferior to Home's Douglas, ii. 366, 
n. i; Warburton's edition, i. 203, n. 
I, 381; witches, iii. 434; quotations 
— As Yoti Like It, iii. 2. 210-iii. 290, 
n. 2; Coriolanus, iii. i. 325-iii. 290, 
;;. 3; iv. 4. 5-i. 306, ;/. i; Cymbeline, 
iii. 3. 38-iii. 511; iv. 2. 261-iv. 271, 
;/. i; Hamlet, i. 2. 133-v. 176, //. 2; 
i. 2. i85-iv. 387, n. 3 ; i. 3. 41-iii. 
203, u. i; iii. I. 56-v. 318, n. i; iii. 

1. 7S-ii. 341, ;/. 2; iii. 2. 40-ii. 183, 
11. 2; iii. 2. 6S-ii. 440; iii. 2. 371-ii. 
332, ;/. 5; iii. 4. 60-v. 20, ;/. 3; iii. 
4. 63-i. 137; I Henry IV, v. 4. 161- 
i. 290; 2 Henry IV, i. 2. 9-iv. 206, 
;/. i; iii. i. g-v. 160, n. i; iii. 2. 67- 
V. 353. "• 3: iv. 5- i79-iv- 468, «. 2; 
I Henry VI, i. 2. i2-v. 323, n.i; 2 
Henry VI, iii. 3. 29-v. 128, n. 2; iv. 

2. 141-iii. 59, n. i; Henry VIII, iii. 
2. 358-i. 365, n. 2; iv. 2. 51—67- 
iv. 83, n. 3; iv. 2. 76-i. 28 ; Julius 
CiTsar, i. 2. 92-i. 208, n. 1 ; A'ing 
Lear, ii. 2. 17-iv. 31, n. 2; ii. 2. 160- 
ii. 510, ;/. 5; ii. 4. i8-iii. 433, n. 2; 
iii. 4. 140-V. 166, «. i; Love's Labour 
Lost, ii. I. 66-iv. 112, w. 2; Macbeth, 
i. 3. 72-v. 136, n. 2; ii. 2. l2-ii. 369; 
ii. 3. gi-i. 347; ii. 4. i2-i. 306, n. i; 
iii. 4. 17-ii. 540, n. I ; v. 3. 40-iv. 
462, n. i; V. 5. 23-ii. 105, «. 5; v. 8. 
30-v. 3g6, n. i; Measure for Meas- 
ure, iii. I. 1 1 5-i V. 460, «. 5; iv. 3. 6- 
iii. 223, n. i; Much Ado about Noth- 
ing, iii. 5. 35-iii. 326, n. 2; Othello, 
ii. I. 5g-ii. 468; iii. 3. 165-v. 33, «. 
2; iii. 3. 346-iii. 395, «. 3; V. 2. 345- 



240 



Index to 



Shakespeare. 

V. 475, n. I ; Rape of Litorcc, I. 1 1 1 1 , 
iv. 209, ;/. 2, Rkhard //, i. 3. 309-i. 
150, ;/. 1 ; ii. 343, iv. 221 ; v. 21 ; 
Koinco and Juliet, ii. 2. 115-ii. gS; v. 
i. 40-ii. 170; Taming of the Shrew, 
i. I. 39-i. 496, n. I ; Tempest, i. 2. 
355-iv. 6, n. 3; iv. I. lo-iv. 30, //. 3; 
iv. I. 53-ii. 534, n. 4. 

Shakespeare Illustrated, i. 296. 

"^ Sli apprcns /' etre vif,' ii. 530. 

Shart, James, Archbishop of St. An- 
drews, V. 43, //. 3, 69. 73, 76. 

SnAKl', John, Archbishop of York, i. 
524, //. 1. 

SliAKr, Dr. John, i. 563, 599. 

Sharp, J., ii. 78, n. 2. 

Shari', Miss, V. 76. 

Sharp, Samuel, Letters front Italy, ii. 
65, n. I ; iii. 63. 

Sharpk, Rev. Ciregory, ii. 149. 

Sharpk, Mr., a surgeon, i. 414. 

Shavkrs, a thousand, iii. 185. 

Shavington Hall, v. 494, n. i. 

Shaw, Cuthbert, account of him, ii. 
35 ; tutor to Lord Chesterfield, iii. 

I59> "■ I- 
Shaw, Professor, of St. Andrews, v. 

72, 77, 79- 

Shaw, Dr. Thomas, iv. 130. 

Shaw, Rev. William, Erse Grammar, 
iii. 120-2; /"rc/c'jr/Zj written by John- 
son, //'..• pamphlet on Ossian, iv. 
291-2; mentioned, iii. 244. 

She Stoops to Conquer. See Gold- 
smith. 

Shebbeare, Dr. John, Battista Ange- 
loni, iv. 131 ; Bosvvell becomes ac- 
quainted with him, iv. 131 ; praises 
him, iii. 358; iv. 131; Johnson, joined 
with, in the Heroic Epistle, iv. 131; 
and in parliament, iv. 368, n. 2; Let- 
ters on the English A' at ion, iv. 131,' 
Letters to the People of England, iii. 
35S, ;/. I ; iv. 131 ; libel, tried for, 



Shelburne. 

iii. iS, //. i; payment as a reviewer, 
iv. 247 ; i)ension, ii. 129, ;/. 2; iii. 
90, //. I ; pillory, sentenced to the, 
iii. 35S ; iv. 131, ;/. i; 'She-bear,' 
iv. 131, //. 2. 

Sheet ok a Kevucw, iv. 247, n. 2. 

SiiEiriELi), Lord. See HoLKOYD, 
John. 

SiiK|-Foui), iv. 152. 

SiiKLBUR.NK, second Earl of (afterwards 
tirst Manpiis of Lansdowne), Ben- 
tham jiraiscs him as a minister, iv. 
200, //. 6; Bolingbroke, Lord, i. 312, 
//. 1 ; lUirke, speaks with malignity 
of, iv. 221, ;/. 3; Bute's, Lord, char- 
acter, ii. 404, //. 3, 416, //. 4; Cham- 
bers, Sir R., ii. 303, ;/. 1; Chatham's, 
Lord, opinion of schools, iii. 13, //. 
I ; coarse manners, iv. 200; Crown — 
its power increased by Lord Bute, 
iii. 473, ;/. i; Douglas, last Duke of, 
V. 48, ;/. 3 ; Douglas, Lord, ii. 264, 
//. I ; Dunning and Lord Lough- 
Ijorough, iii. 272, /i. 3 ; economy, 
rules of, iii. 300-1 ; education, iii. 
41, n. 2; iv. 200, n. 5; Fitzpatrick's 
brother-in-law, iii. 441, n. 4; French 
— their superficial knowledge, ii. 416, 
/I. 4; Ceorge III, letter from, iii. 
273, n. 2 ; Ingenhousz, Dr., ii. 489, 
/I. 4; 'Jesuit of Berkeley Square,' 
iv. 201, ;/. i; Johnson's character of 
him, iv. 200; — intimacy with him, 
iv. 221, 222, ;/. I ; King, Dr. Will- 
iam, i. 324, n. 2 ; ' Lord, his parts 
pretty well for a,' iii. 41 ; Lowther 
the miser, v. 128, n. i ; Alalagrida, 
iv. 201 ; Mansfield, Lord, in the 
copyright case, i. 506, n. 2 ; — at 
Oxford, ii. 223, n. 3: — untruthful- 
ness, ii. 339, ;/. i; ministry, iv. 182, 
n. 3, 195, n. 3, 200, n. 5 ; peace of 
1782-3, iv. 182, n. 3, 325, n. 3; peti- 
tion for his impeachment, ii. 104, n. 



BosweWs Life of Johison. 



241 



Shelburne. 



Sheridan. 



2; portrait by Reynolds, iv. 201, n. 
i; Price, Dr., iv. 501; Priestley's ac- 
count of the company at his house, 
iv. 221, n. 3; Scotch — their super- 
ficial knowledge, ii. 416, ;/. 4; — un- 
truthfulness, ii. 339, n. I, 343, n. 4; 

— painstaking habits, ib.; Secretary 
of State at the age of twenty-nine, 
iii. 41, ;/. 2 ; Streatham, rents Mrs. 
Thrale's house at, iv. 182, «. 3 ; 
Tories and Jacobites, i. 497, n. 3 ; 
Townsend, Alderman, iii. 522 ; iv. 
201, n. 2; mentioned, ii. 203, ;/. 2. 

Shelley, Lady, iv. 1S4, ;/. i. 

Shenstone, William, Dodsley's Cle- 
one, the sale of, i. 376, ;/. 3 ; hair, 
wore his own, i. no, //. 2; 'I prized 
every hour,' &c., iv. 168, n. 3; inn, 
lines in praise of an, ii. 518; John- 
son, admiration of, ii. 51S ; — ac- 
count of him, v. 304, 521, Its. 2 and 
4; — estimate of his poems, ii. 518; 

— writes to him, v. 304, n. 4; layer- 
out of land, V. 304 ; Leasowes, v. 
521 ; letters, his, v. 304 ; London 
streets in 1743, i 188, ;/. 2; Love 
Pastorals, v. 304; Pembroke College, 
member of, i. 87; iv. 174, ;/. 2; pen- 
sion, v. 521; Pope's condensation of 
thought, V. 393 ; ' She gazed as I 
slowly withdrew,' v. 304; witty re- 
mark on divines and the tree falling, 
iv. 261. 

Sheridan, Charles, iii. 323. 
Sheridan, Mrs. Frances, wife of 
Thomas Sheridan the son, i. 414, 

447, "■ I. 450. 
Sheridan, Richard Brinsley (grandson 
of Dr. Thomas Sheridan and son of 
Thomas Sheridan), birth, i. 414, n. 
3; Comedies, dates of his, iii. 131, n. 
4; Duenna, run of the, iii. 131, ;/. 
4; father, estranged from his, i. 449, 
n. I ; despises his oratory, i. 456, ;/. 



2 ; funeral, i. 264, n. i ; Johnson, 
compliments, in a Prologue, iii. 131; 
— praises his comedies, iii. 131; — , 
projects an attack on, ii. 361, «. i ; 
Literary Club, member of the, i. 
554; — election, iii. 132; — present, 
iii. 261, ;/. 4 ; marriage, ii. 423 ; 
Round-Robin, signs the, iii. 95 ; 
Sydney Biddtdph and The School 
for Scandal, i. 451. 

Sheridan, Dr. Thomas (the father), 
anecdote of Swift and a country- 
squire, iv. 341, n. 3; 'Sherry,' ii. 
296, n. I. 

Sheridan, Thomas (the son, father of 
R. B. Sheridan), Addison's loan to 
Steele, iv. 106 ; America, threatens 
to go to, iv. 248; Boswell's instructor 
in pronunciation, ii. 183 ; — , puns 
with, iv. 365 ; conversation, ii. 140 ; 
Dictionary, ii. 184-5; Dublin Thea- 
tre, i. 447 ; dull naturally, i. 525 ; 
Earl of Essex, iv. 361, n. i; formal 
endings of letters, criticises, v. 271; 
good, but a liar, iv. 193 ; Home's 
gold medal, ii. 366; v. 410; house in 
Bedford Street, 1. 561, n. i; insolvent 
debtor, iii. 428-9 ; Irish Parliament 
compliments him, iii. 429; Johnson, 
account of, i. 446 ; — antipathy to 
the Scotch, iv. 195 ; — attack on 
Swift, iv. 71; V. 49, n. 2; — describes 
his acting, i. 414 ; ii. 100 ; his read- 
ing, iv. 239; — pension, i. 433; — , 
quarrels with, i. 446 ; iii. 131 ; at- 
tacks him, i. 450; ii. loi; irrecon- 
cileable, i. 44S; iv. 257, 381; Lectures 
on the English Language, i. 446 {see 
below. Oratory) ; lies of vanity, iv. 
193; Life of Swift, i. 449; ii. loi, 
364, ft. 2; miser, maintains the hap- 
piness of a, iii. 366; ' Old Mr. Sheri- 
dan,' iv. 23S, ;/. 2; oratory, at Path, 
i. 456; at Dublin, i/>., n. 2; described 



242 



Index to 



Sheridan. 

by 1 )r. I'arr, //'. / despised by his 
son, //'./ lau^jhed al by Johnson, i. 
525 ; ii. 100 ; iv. 257 ; ' enthusiastic 
about it as ever,' iv. 238; pension, i. 
446; 'Sherry lierry," ii. 296; son's 
marriage, his, ii. 423; quarrels with 
him, i. 449, «. I ; \Vedderl)urne, 
taught, i. 447 ; found him ungrate- 
ful, iii. 2; vanity and (Quixotism, ii. 
148. 
Smiki.ock, Dr., On J'roTiiiintc, iv. 
346, rt. 2: style elegant, iii. 281; 
mentioned, iv. 360. 
SnKRl.o( K, Rev. .Martin, iv. 370, w. i. 
Smkrwi.n, J. K., iii. 126. 
SillKi.s, K., Johnson's amanuensis, i. 
216, 280; share in Cibber's Li-'es oj 
the JWts, i. 217; iii. 34. 43. 132- 

Siiii', worse than agaol, i. 403; ii. 501; 
V. 157, 283; misery of the sailors' 
quarters, iii. 302; hospital, iii. 302, n. 
I ; worse than a Highland inn, v. 167. 
St-e Sailors. 

Ship 0/ J'ools, i. 321. 

Smri.KY, Hishoj) of St. Asaph, army 
ch.aplain, an, iii. 285; v. 507; assem- 
blies, his, iv. 87, n. 2; Franklin, Dr., 
a friend of, iv. 2S4, «. 4 ; Johnson 
dines with him in Passion-week, iv. 
102, «. I ; visits his palace, v. 498 ; 
knowing and conversihle, iii. 283, n. 
4 ; iv. 284 ; Literary Club, member 
of the, i. 554; — election, iv. 87, n. 
2 ; — present, iv. 376 ; Reynolds's 
dinner, at, iii. 283-9 I '"^^'^ ^' ^> ^^'• 
87; mentioned, iv. I, n. i, 57, «. i. 

Shirt, changes of, v. 67 ; clean-shirt 
days, i. 122. 

Shoe-buckles, iii. 370; v. 20. 

Shop-keei'ERS, of London, v. 92, 94. 

ShoI'S, a stately one, iv. 368; turn the 
balance of existence, v. 29, n. 4. 

Shore, Jane, v. 55, n. i. 

Short-hand, i. 157; ii. 257; iii. 306. 



Simile. 

Shrewshury, Circuit, ii. 223; John- 
son visits it, V. 518; mentioned, ii. 

505. 
Shropshire, i. 45, n. 2. 
Shriuuery, a, iv. 148. 

Shutk/oni's Coitutition, iv. 360. 

.Sl\m, King of, iii. 382. 

SiMuilil, Life of Sir J\ol>ert, iii. 257. 

Siiiliiin Cossi/is, iv. 2. 

Sick >L\n, consolation in finding him- 
self not neglected, iv. 271; duty of 
telling him the truth, iv. 353; impos- 
sible to please, iv. 359; his thoughts, 
iv. 418. 

Sick Woman, church service for a, v. 
50f). 

Sickness, at a friend's house, iv. 208. 

SiDDONS, Mrs., described by Mrs. 
I'iu/zi, v. 117, /;. i; Johnson, visits, 
iv. 279; Reynolds compliments her, 
ill., n. 2; in 'J7te Stranger, iv. 281, 
n. 3. 

Siiie, ii. 178. 

Sidney, Algernon, ii. 241. 

Sidney, Sir Philip, as an authority for 
a Dictionary, iii. 220, «. 4; misprint 
in a quotation from him, iii. 149, 
n. 2. 

Sidney Biddulph, i. 415, n. I, 450. 

Siege, a popular title for a play, iii. 
294, 71. i; V. 397, M. 3. 

Siege of Aleppo, iii. 294, w. I. 

Siege of Marseilles, v. 397, n. 3. 

Sienna, iv. 430, n. 2. 

Sicin of great buildings, ii. 442, 451. 

Sic.NS, conversation by, ii. 283. 

Silence of Carthusians, absurd, ii. 
498. 

Silk, v. 246. 

Silk-.mill, iii. 186. 

Sjlver Buckles, iii. 370. 

SiMCO, John, iv. 485, n. 3. 

Simile, when made by the ancients, 
iii. 84. 



BosweWs Life of fohnscyn. 



243 



Simpson. 



Smith. 



SlMrsf)N, Joseph, account of him, iii. 

32 ; Johnson's letter to him, i. 401 ; 

mentioned, i. 564; ii. 548. 
Simpson, Thomas, the mathematician, 

i. 407, n. 
Simpson, Rev. Mr., iii. 408. 
Simpson, Mr., of Lichfield (father of 

Joseph Simpson), i. 94, 400. 
Simpson, Mr., Town-clerk of Lich- 
field, iv. 429, n. 2. 
Simpson, Mr., of Lincoln, ii. 18. 
Simpson, Mr., owner of a vessel, v. 

318. 323, 325. 
Sin, balancing sins against virtues, iv. 

459; heinous, ii. 197-8; original, iv. 

143- 
Sinclair, Sir John, iv. 157. 
Sinclair, Robert, iii. 3S1, ;/. i. 
Sinclair, Mr., stabl^ed by Savage, i. 

145. "• 3- 

SlNGfLARlTY, Johnson's dislike of it, 
ii. 85, n. 2; making people stare, ii. 
85; the gentleman in The Spectator, 
ii. 86. See under Affectation. 

Sinners, chief of, iv. 339. 

SioN House, iii. 455, n. 2. 

Sister, The, iv. 11, «. 3. 

Sixteen-string Jack, iii. 44. 

SiXTis QiiNTis, v. 272. 

Skene, General, v. 162, n. 2. 

Skene, Sir John, iii. 471, ;/. 2. 

Skinner, Stephen, i. 215. 

Slander, action for, iii. 73. 

Slater, Mr., the druggist, iii. 70. 

Slaughter's Coffee-house, i. 133, 
«. i; iv. 17. 

Slaves and Slavery, ]?athurst, Dr., 
on it, iv. 33; Boswell's justification of 
it, iii. 228-9, 231-3, 241 ; drivers of 
negroes, iii. 228; England's guilt, ii. 
551; Georgia, i. 147, ;/. 4: Grainger's 
Sugar Cane, i. 557, ;/. 1; Johnson's 
hatred of it, ii. 550-1 ; iii. 228-32 ; 
— toast to an insurrection, ii. 550 ; 



iii. 228 ; religious education, ii. 31, 
;/. I ; Slave-trade, abolition of it at- 
tempted, iii. 231-2 ; — , England's 
hypocrisy in upholding it, ii. 551; — , 
London Alderman's defence of it, 
iii. 231, «. I ; Walpole's, Horace, 
hatred of slavery, iii. 228, «. 2. See 
Knight, Joseph, Somerset, James, 
and under Scotland, serfs. 

Sleep, quantity needful, iii. 192; slee])- 
walking, v. 51. 

Sleeplessness, ' light a candle and 
read,' iv. 472, tt. i. 

Sloe, ' bringing the sloe to perfection,' 
ii. 89. 

Sluvs, iii. 508. 

Smalbroke, Dr., i. 155. 

Smalridge, George, Bishop of Bristol, 
iii. 281. 

Smart, Christopher (Kit), account of 
him, i. 354, ;/. i; Derrick, compared 
with, iv. 222 ; //oJ> Garden, ii. 520, 
;/. 2; madness, i. 459; ii. 395; Ram- 
bler, praises the, i. 242, n. i ; Uni- 
versal Visitor, contract about the, 
ii- 395 ; — Johnson wrote for him, 
ib.; mentioned, iv. 211, n. 2. 

Smart, Mrs. Christopher, Johnson's 
letters to her, iii. 515; iv. 413, «. 2. 

Smari, Mrs. Newton, iv. 9, «. 5. 

Smelt, Mr., iv. i, «. i. 

Smith, Adam, absence of mind, iv. 29, 
n. 2; Barnard's verses, mentioned in, 
iv. 499; blank verse, dislikes, i. 495; 
Boswell attends his lectures, v. 20 ; 
— praised by him, ib., n. x\ — at- 
tacks his alliance with him, v. 33, n. 
2; bounty on corn, iii. 263, «. i; — 
on herring-busses, v. 183, «. 2; com- 
posed slowly, v. 75, «. I ; conversa- 
tion, iii. 349, n. I ; iv. 29, n. 2 ; de- 
cisive professorial manner, iv. 28 ; 
Glasgow and Brentford, iv. 214; v. 
420; gold, importation of, iv. 121, '/. 



246 



Index to 



Soldiers. 

tion iii. 411; pay, ii. 251; peace, in 
time of, iii. 303, n. i ; quartered in 
inns, ii. 250, n. 2 ; iii. 11, n. 2 ; real 
life and modern fiction, in, ii. 154, 
M. 4: regularity, want of, iii. 302, n. 
3 ; relish of existence, iii. 470, n. i ; 
riches in them do not excite anger, 
V. 373; shot at for five-pence a day, 
ii. 287; trial of two soldiers for mur- 
der, iii. 54, «. 2. 

Solicitors, iv. 149-51. See Attor- 
neys. 

SOLITUDK, Burton's warning against 
it, iii. 471. See under Johnso.n, 
solitude. 

SoMERS, Lord, patron of learning, v. 
66, n. 2; mentioned, ii. 181, n. i. 

Somerset, James, a negro, account of 
his case, iii. 99, «. 6, 241; v. 458, n. 
i; Margrave's Argument quoted, v. 
458, «. I ; Knight the negro reads his 
case, iii. 243, ti. i. 

Somerset, Duchess of, i. 524, n. 1. 

Somersetshire, iii. 256, «. 3. 

SOMERViLLE, Lord, iv. 59. 

SoMMELSDYCK, family of, v. 27, n. i. 

Somniiim, i. 70. 

Sorrow, inherent in humanity, v. 72; 
remedies for it, ib., tt. 2; useless, iii. 
155, «. 2. See Grief. 

.Sound, beauty in a simple sound, ii. 
219. 

South, Dr. Robert, Johnson criticises 
his Seri/ions, iii. 281 ; recommends 
his Sermons on Prayer, ii. 120. 

South Briton, a libel, iv. 368, w. 2. 

South Sea, voyages to the, ii. 284; iii. 
9; iv. 356. 

South Sea Report, i. 181. 

South Sea Scheme, Dr. Young loses 
by it, iv. 140 , Fenton's advice to 
Gay, V, 67, n. 5. 

Southampton, Lord, ii. 369, n. 2. 

Southey, Robert, Advmtur<r, i. 292, 



Spain. 

w. 3; Colman and Lloyd, ii. 383, «. 

1 ; correcting doggedly, v. 44, n. 4 ; 
dreams, i. 272, «. 3; English histori- 
ans, ignorance of, v. 250, «. i; Gen- 
tleman s Magazine, despises the, iv. 
504 ; Georgia, settlement of, i. 147, 
n. 4; Methodists, origin of the term, 
i. 530, n. 3; poet-laureate, i. 213, «. 

2 ; Robertson's, Dr., omissions, ii. 
273, n. 2; V. 250, n. i; Robinson, Sir 
T., i. 502, M. 5; supernatural appear- 
ances, iii. 338, n. 2; walks, the habit 
of taking, i. 74, n. 5; want of readi- 
ness, ii. 294, «. 2; Wesley's manners, 
iii. 261, wj. 2,3; Wesley warned by 'a 
serious man,' v. 70, «. 5 , Westmin- 
ster School, account of, iii. 14, n. 2; 
Whitefield's oratory, ii. 91, n. 2 ; v. 
40, n. I ; IVhole Duty of Man, ii. 
275, n. I. 

SouTHiLL, the residence of Squire 

Dilly, Boswell visits it in 1779, iii. 

450; Boswell and Johnson in 1781, 

i. 302; iv. 137; the church, i. 364; iv. 

141. 
Southwell, Thomas, second Lord, i. 

281; iii. 432; 'most qualitied ma.T\,' 

iv. 200. 
Southwell, Mr., i. 420. 
Southwell, Robert, the Jesuit, v. 507, 

w. I. 
Space, quasi sensorium numinis, v. 

327. 
Spain, Boswell, David, lives there, ii. 
224, w. 3; embassy to it in 1766, ii. 
203; expedition to .Scotland in 1719, 
v. 160, «. 2; exportation of coin, iv. 
121, n. 3; Johnson attacks it in Lon- 
don, i. 150, 527 ; in Lives of Blake 
and Drake, i. 170, «. 4 ; — wishes 
tliat it should he travelled over, i. 
423, 474, 527; iii. 515 ; Spanish in- 
vasion, fears of a, iii. 410, w. i; treaty 
of peace of 1782-83, iv. 325, n. 3. 



Bo swell's Life of yohnson. 



247 



Spanish Plays. 



Stafford. 



Spanish Plays, iv. 19. 

Si'AMsu I'koverhs, i. 85, n. 2 ; iii. 

343- 
Sparta, ii. 202; iii. 333. 
Spf.akin(;, of another, iv. 37; of one- 
self, iii. 368; public speaking, ii. 160, 
388. 
Spkarinc, Mr., an attorney, i. 153, «. i. 
Spectator, Addison, badness of the part 
not written by, iii. 38; Baretti. read 
by, iv. 38; Bohn's edition, iv. 219, n. 
2 ; Bouhours quoted, ii. 103, w. 4 ; 
bows of the Spectator's banker, i. 
509, ;/. 2 ; Britisli Princes, ii. 124, 
w. 3; curious epitaph, iv. 413, ;/. 2; 
edition with notes, ii. 243,* end of its 
publication, i. 233, ;/. 3: Epilogue to 
the Distressed Mother, i. 210, n. i ; 
' find variety in one,' iii. 481, n, 4 ; 
Freeport, Sir Andrew, ii. 243, «. 2 ; 
' Clentleman, The,' ii. 209 ; Grove's 
paper on Novelty, iii. 39 ; Hockley 
in the Hole, iii. 152, ;/. 1 ; Hurd's 
notes, iv. 219, n. 2 ; Ince's papers, 
iii. 39, «. 2 : Indian King at St. 
Paul's, i. 521, n. 3; Johnson praises 
it, ii. 425; milking a ram, i. 514, n. 
i; motto to No. 379, v. 27, n. i; Os- 
borne's Advice to a Son, ii. 222, «. 
2; paj)er of ttotanda, i. 237; Philip 
Homebred, iii. 39 ; Pope's letter to 
Steele, iii. 477, «. 2: Psalmanazar rid- 
iculed, iii. 510; reputation enjoyed 
by chance writers in it, iii. 39; sin- 
gularity, ii. 86; Two-penny Club, iv. 
293, «. I,' Whole Duty of Man, i. 
250, It. i: see under Addison. 

Spedding, James, Paeon's IVorks, i. 
499, n. 2. 

Spekcu-m.\kim"., a knack, iv. 206. 

Spelling, in the seventeenth century, 
V. 340, «. 2. See Johnson, spelling. 

Spence, Rev. Joseph, account of him, 
V. 360; Anecdotes, iv. 73 ; v. 472-3 ; 
VI.— 21 



Blacklock's poetr)', i. 539; Pope vis- 
its him at Oxford, iv. 10; mentioned, 
ii. 96, n. 3. 
Spencer, second Earl, member of the 

Literary Club, i. 554. 
Spencer, Lady, iii. 4S3, n. i. 
Si'ENser, Edmund, Hunyan, read by, 
ii. 274; Dictionary, as an authority 
for a, iii. 220, n. 4; George III sug- 
gests that Johnson should write his 
Life, ii. 48, n. 2; iv. 473; imitations 
of him, iii. 180, «. i; Ruines of Rome, 
iii. 284, //. 3 ; ' Spenser, Mr. Ed- 
mund,' iv. 375, n. 3. 

Sphinx, the, iii. 383. 

Spinosa, i. 311, n. 2; iii. 508. 

Spirit, evidence for. See Johnson, 
spirit. 

Spirits. See Ghosts. 

Spirits, evil. iv. 334. 

Spiritual Quixote, its author, a mem- 
ber of Pembroke College, i. 87, n. 4; 
and a friend of Shenstone, i. 110, n. 
2 ; ii. 518, n. 3 ; on clean shirts, v. 
67, n. 5. 

Spirmcous Liquors, felicity of 
drunkenness cheaply attained by 
them, iii. 433, «. 4; misery caused by 
them, ii. 498, n. 7 ; iii. 332, n. 1 ; 
pleasant poison, v. 394, «. 2. 

Spleen, The, iii. 44, 460. 

Splendour, iv. 390. 

Spooner, Rev. Mr., v. 82. 

Spottiswoode, Dr., ii. 370, n. i. 

Spottiswoode, John, iii. 371-2. 

Sprat, Bishop, History of the Royal 
Society, iv. 360 ; Life quoted, i. 40, 
«. 4 ; meets Bentley, v. 312, n. 4 ; 
style, iii. 292, «. i. 

Squills, iv. 410. 

Squire Richard, iv. 328. 

Squires, Rev. Mr., i. 242, n. i. 

Stace, Mr., iv. 297, «. 2. 

Staefurd, ii. 189, H. 2. 



248 



Index to 



StafTordshire. 



Steele. 



Staffordshirk, fruit, very little, iv. 
237; Jacobite fox-hunt, iii. 37t."- '1 
nursery of art, iii. 34". "• ' ; Torjiini, 
its, ii. 528 ; two young Methodists 
from it, ii. 137 ; Whij;. a Slaffonl- 
shire, iii. 371. 
Stack. See I'laykrs. 
Stagk-coACIIKs, i. 393. w. 2. See 

Coach. 
Stair, Karl of, v. 423. 
St. Ai.iian's, Hoswell anil Johnson 
pass llie nij^ht there, iii. 5; monument 
to John Thralc, i. 567, w. 4 ; men- 
tioned, ii. 525; iv. 92, «. 2. 
St. Ai.ka.n's, fin,l Duke of, i. 2S7, «. 3. 
St. Asai'H, ii. 325; v. 498. 
St. Aubyn, Sir John, i. 589. 
St. AtTcl'si ink, ' miserieorJia doHtini 
inter ponteiii et Jontem,' iv. 245, «. 
1 ; %vcighe(l .ij^ainst Jonathan Wild 
plus three-pence, iv. 33(). 
St. Cas, expedition to, i. 391. ti. 2. 
St. Columba, v. 382, 384-5. 
St. Cross, at Winchester, iii. 141. 
St. Cuthbert's Day, at Univen.ity 

College, ii. 509. 
St. Gluvias, i. 505. 
St. Ignatii's Loyola, i. 90. 
St. Jerome, ii. 410, //. 3. 
St. John. See Hoi.ingbroKe. 
St. Malo, expedition sent against it, 

i. 391, ;/. 2; mentioned, ii. 94, ti. 3. 
St. P.\ul, 'chief of sinners,' iv. 340; 
converted by supernatural inteq>osi- 
tion, iii. 335 ; fear of being a cast- 
away, iv. 142 ; saw unutterable 
things, ii. 141; thorn in the tiesh, v. 
72; 'warring against the law of his 
mind,' iv. 456. 
St. Petersburgh, iv. 319, n. 2. 
St. Quintin, ii. 459. 
St. Vitus's Dance, i. 166. 
Stamp Act, Burke's speeches, ii. 19. 
Stanhope, first Earl, i. 185. 



StANiiorK. third F.«I, presided ei • 
mcclini; of the Revolution Soiirtjr. 
iv. 48. M. 2. 

Stanhoik. fifth Fail, on the nulhor fd 
t'ltflittn ( 'iirietvHt Mrmoin, iv. 385, 
N. b. 

SiAMlol'K, Mr. (I.oril ( hc^tcffi 
Mjn), Bo!.wcir» drscnj'tiun ul l 
3«9, M. I ; john»«»n'», I v. 384, < 
Ilartc, Dr., hi» tutor, iv. 90. m. j. 
385; /r. CiiK>rniHKU). K*rl of, 

/.titers to Mis Son. 
Stami«»I'»:. Mr., mentioned in Tickcil'm 

t.fn!u. III. 441, M. 4. 

SiAMsl-Ai s. King. II. 4b4, M. 7. 

.STAM.r.Y, Dean, Memormti 0/ It'ttt' 
minster . f AArr — Kphrmim Ouimbcr«'» 
epitaph, i. 353. «. 3. liold»mith*» ep» 
itaph ami JohnMin'^ luiiiii, m. <M. 
M. 3 . Ji>hnMjn'» and MaLphcr»on'k 
graso, ii. 341, «. I. 

Si ANION, Mr., manager of a company 
of actork. ii. 533. 

Stanyan. Temple, iii. 405. 

.Stai'YITi»n. family of. v. 504. m. 3. 

StartntioH, ii. 184, «. 1. 

State, its right to regulate religion, ii. 
16; iv. 14; the vulgar arc it« chil- 
dren, ii. 16; iv. 250. 

State u<>ed f<>r statement, iii. 448. 

Statk o¥ Natikk, v. 416. 

State 7'riaii, \. 181. 

StAI lONERs' COMTANY. ii. 395. 

Statics, i. 293. 

.Statiary. ii. 502-3. 

Statues, reason of their value, iii. 

261-2. 
Staunton, Dr. (afterwards .Sir George). 

Johnson's letter to him, i. 435; — Dt' 

hates, iv. 363. 
' Stazv bene, &'e..' ii. 396. 
Steele, Joshua, Prosodia Katti^nalis, 

ii. 374. 
Steele, Mr., of the Trea:)ury, i. 163. 



BoswcWs Life of fo/iiison. 



249 



Steele. 



Stewart. 



Steele, Sir Richard, Addison's loan, 
iv. 61, 106; Apo/oi^y, ii. 513, u. 2; 
British Princes, riilicules the, ii. 124, 
It. 3 ; Christian Hero, ii. 513 ; Con- 
scions Lovers, i. 569, ;/. i; grammar- 
schools, account of, i. 51, n. 3; Ince, 
praise of, iii. 39; Marlborough's, Duke 
of, pai)ers, v. 199, ;/. 3 ; old age, ii. 
543, ;/. 3; ' jiractised the lighter vices,' 
ii. 514- 

SlKEVKNS, George, IJoswell complains 
of his unkindness, iii. 319, ;/. 3; — 
praises his principles, iii. 320; char- 
acter hy Garrick and I'arr, iii. 319, 
n. 3 ; Chatterlim's poems, iii. 5S, n. 
5 ; Courtenay's Poetical Kevic-o, 
mentioned in, i. 25S ; Uavies, Tom, 
sneers at, i. 452, n. 2; I'ox's election 
to the Clulj, ii. 314, n. U; generosity, 
iii. 114; — assists Mrs. Goldsmith, 
//'.,• llainhl, proposed emendation 
of, ii. 234, //. 3 ; Hawkins, attacked 
l)y, iv. 46S, n. 2; Johnson, anecdotes 
of, iv. 374; not trustworthy, //'., //. 2; 

— epitaph, iv. 512; — , aids, in the 
lAves, iv. 44 ; — inlerjiretation <if 
two passages in llaiiilet, iii. 63, //. 3; 

— letters to him, ii. 313; iii. 115; — 
levee, attends, ii. 136 ; — ' the old 
lion,' ii. 325, n. i\ — reflection on 
Garrick, ii. 221, //. 2 ; — and the 
spiinging-house, i. 331, //. i; — and 
Torre's tireworks. iv. 374 ; Literary 
Club, member of the, i. 554; — elec- 
tion, ii. 313; — present, ii. 363; lit- 
erary impostures, his, iv. 205, //. i ; 
outlaw, leads the life of an, ii. 430; 

— deserves to be hanged or kicked, 
iii. 319 ; — anonymous attacks, iv. 
316 ; Rochester's Poems, castrates, 
iii. 218 ; Shakespeare, edits, ii. 131, 
234 ; Shakespearian editors, i. 575, 
n. 2; mentioned, ii. 66, 123; iii. 403, 
439; iv. 505. 



Stella (Mrs. Johnson), ii. 446, «. i. 

Stella in Monrnin^^, i. 206. 

STEril.VNl, the, Henry Stephens' Greek 
Dictionary, ii. 84, //. 2 ; Maittaire's 
Stephanoruin Historia, iv. 3 ; ulial 
they did for literature, iii. 288. 

STEriiE.NS, Alexander, Ik-ckford's 
speech to the King, iii. 22S, ;/. 6. 

Stepney, George, iv. 43, n. 1. 

Stekne, Rev. Laurence, beggars, iv. 
38. ;/. 3 ; death, ii. 255, //. I ; dinner 
engagements, ii. 255-6 ; (joldsmith 
calls him a blockhead, ii. 199, ;/. 2; 
and 'a verj* dull fellow," ii. 255; in- 
decency, ii. 255, n. 2; Johnson's opin- 
ion of him, ii. 255-6 ; Monckton, 
Miss, fintls him pathetic, iv. 126. 

Sentimental Journey, imitation of 
it, ii. 201; Sermons read by Johnson 
in a coach, iv. 126, //. 2; — seen by 
him at Dunvcgan, v. 258 ; Tristram 
S/iantly, Hurns's bosom favourite, i. 
417, ;/. 2; 'did not last,' ii. 514; 
Farmer, Dr., foretells that it will be 
s|)eedily forgotten, ii. 514, ;/. 3: Gray 
mentions it, ii. 255. //. i ; Harris's 
Hermes, anecdote of, ii. 258, ;/. 4 ; 
Walpole describes it as ' the dregs of 
nonsense.' ii. 514, //. 3; references to 
it, ' daily regularity of a clean shirt,' 
v. 67, ;/. 5; Lilliburlero, ii. 398. 

Stevena(;e, iii. 344. 

Stevens, R.. a l)ookse!ler, i. 382, ;/. 4. 

Stevenson, Dr., v. 420. 
Stewart, Sir Anncsly. iv. 90. 
Stewart. Commodore, v. 508. 
SrEWART, Dugald. authorship in Scot- 
land, ii. 60, ;/. i; existence of matter, 
i. 545, n. 2; Glasgow University, at, 
V. 420, n. 3; Hume's Scotticisms, ii. 
82, ;/. 2; .Select Society, Tlie, v. 44S, 
n. 3 ; Smith's, Adam, conversation, 
iii. 349, n.\; — peculiarities, iv. 29, 
«. 2. 



2 50 



Index to 



Stewart. 

Stewart, P'rancis, Johnson'-s amaiiu- 
eiisis, i. 216 ; Johnson buys liis oUl 
pocket-book, iii. 475. 478; and a let- 
ter, iv. 302, 306. 

Stfavart, George, bookseller of Kdin- 
burgh, i. 216. 

Stkwart, Sir James, iii. 233, ". i. 

Stewart, Mr., sent on a secret mission 
to I'aoli, ii. 92, >t 1. 

Strwart, Mrs., iii. 475, 47S: i^'- 302, 
306. 

Still, John, Hishop of Hatii ami Wells, 
iv. 484, n. 4. 

Si ILLINGKLEET, Benjamin, iv. 125. 

Stinton, Dr., iii. 316; iv. 35. 

Stockdale, Rev. I'ercival, account of 
him, ii. 131. «. 2, Johnson's defence 
of drunkenness, ii. 49S, //. 7 ; — on 
dictionary-making, ii. 233, «. 3 ; — 
on expectations, i. 3<p, //. 3 ; — 
Works, edits two volumes of, i. 221. 
n. I, 388, M. 3; Kiinotistrauci-, Tlu\ ii. 
130; Russia, ofTered a jiost in, iv. 
319, «. 2; St. Andrews, lodgings at, 
V. 74, n. i; mentioned, ii. 170. 

Stoick, the, in Lucian, iii. 12. 

Stone, Mr., iii. 162, ;/. i. 

Sto.nkhenge, iv. 270, «. 4. 

Stui'Koko, General, ii. 431. 

Stormont, seventh Viscount (after- 
wards second Earl of Mansfield), v. 
412, «. I. 

S roRY, Thomas, the Quaker, i. 78, «. 3. 

S roRY, its value depends on its being 
true, ii. 496. 

Si UURHRIDCE, Johnson at the school, 
•• 57 i V. 520, «. I, the town formerly 
in the parish of Old Swinft)rd, v. 

493- 
Stow, Richard, i. 188, n. i. 
Stowe, iii. 455, «, 2. 
Stowell, Lord. See Scott, William. 
Strahan, Andrew, iv. 428. 
Strahan, Rev. George, Vicar of Is- 



Strahan. 

liiigton (son of William Strahan), at- 
lenils Jt>linsnn wlicn dyinj;, iv. 479- 
So ; J«ilinvin's l>v<|ue»t lt> him, iv. 
4''3. "• 3; /'tiiyi'fs itnJ A/eJitatioHJ, 
edits, i. 272, n. 2, ii. 547; iv. 434-5; 
t»mits s«>n>c i>a.vHajjci>, iv. 97, «. 4; — 
visits him. iv. 313, 479; — will, wit- 
nesses, iv. 463. II. 3 ; mentioned, ii. 
41, //. 3; iv. 57. 
Strahan, William, the King\ I'rinlcr, 
purchaser in whole or in |>art o( 
lUair's S<rmi>nj, iii. ni; L'ts>Jt'j /'i»r- 
aj,vs, ii. 284, M. 3; /.)«/•.• «•/ IWrtinik't 
I.ij'c, iii. 324; Giblxm'<i Dtdine and 
liill,\\.\%1,ti.y, iii. Ill, «. 2; John- 
son's Diitionan', i. 332; iv. 371: — 
Jounuy to tht Wtiltm hits, iii. I08; 

— Piitriot, ii. 329 ; — A'liJ ' ■ 
394-5; Mackenzie's Miin >>/ I 

\. 417 ; Iliiswcll's praise of liau. i. 
333 ; breakfast and dinner at his 
house, ii. 367. iii. 455; coach. kee|is 
his, ii. 259; KIphinston's Martial, iii. 
293; epigram, how far a judge of an, 
iii. 293, Iranklin's letter to him on 
liieir rise in the w«>rld, ii. 259. «. 3; 

— on the .American war, iii. 414, n. 
1; Gordon Riots, iii. 48(1, 48S, 494; 
ilumc left him his manuscripts, ii. 
'57i "• 3; corrected Hume's style, v. 
IU4, //. 3; Johnson's altercation with 
Adam Smith, iii. 377 ; — , attempts 
to bring, into I'arliament, ii. isS-g; 
— , (lifTerence with. iii. 414. — friend- 
ly agent, ii. 157, — interested in one 
of his apprentices, ii. 36*;; — letter 
to him, iii. 414; — letters to Scot- 
land, franked, iii. 415: — , one of %. 
deputation to, iii. 126; London Chrvtt- 
iclt\ printer of the, iii. 251; member 
of parliament, ii. 158; obtuse, iii. 293; 
Robertson's style, corrected, v. 104, 
n. 3 ; small certainties, on, ii. 369 ; 
Smith's, Adam, letter to him, v. 33; 



Bosweirs Life of John son. 



251 



Strahan. 



Style. 



Spottiswoode, Dr.. his great-grand- 
son, ii. 370, n. i; Warburton's letter, 
shows. V. 105 ; Wedderburne. anec- 
dote of, ii. 493 ; mentioned, i. 281, 
351, n. i; ii. 3S, ;/. 2, 323, 354- 
SiRAilA.N, Mrs. (wife of William Stra- 
han), Johnson's letters to her, iv. iif), 
162; mentioned, i. 245. 
Strah.xn, William, junior, death, iv. 

I If). 
Straits of Mahkli.an, v. 256. 
Slnuisr,'); The, iv. 281, n. 3. 
Sirataoem, iii. 313, 369. "• -• 
Stratford -ON -Avon, Boswell and 
John.son drink tea there, ii. 518; 
Jubilee, ii. 78 ; Shakespeare's mul- 
berry-tree, ii. 538. 
Stratford Jubilee, The, ii. 539. 
Straiico, Professor, i. 430. 
Straw, balancing a, iii. 262. 
Straw, beating: his, ii. 429. 
Strkatham, Church, Thrale's monu- 
ment, iv. 98, //. I : — Johnson's fare- j 
well, iv. 183; Common, ii. 82, «. i; 
Thrale's Villa, Hoswell's first visit to 
it, ii. 88; visit in 1778, iii. 253: din- 
ing-room, iii. 396; lu.xurious dinners, 
iii. 480, n. 2; Johnson gives a IJible 
to one of the maids, iii. 2S0 ; — 
'home,' i. 570, n. 4; iii. 4(>i. ■"• '■ 
512; — laboratory, iii. 452. ;/. 3; — 
last dinner, iv. 183, ?/. i ; — musing 
over the fire, ii. 126, «. i ; — parting 
use of the library, iv. t8i; library, 
compared with the one at St. An- 
drew's, v. 72, ;/. I ; — pictures round 
it, iv. 181, ;/. 3; ' none but itself can 
be its parallel,' iii. 449. "• I '• Omai 
dines there, iii. 9; Shelburne, Lord, 
let to, iv. 182, n. 3 ; summer-house, 
iv. 156: village, iii. 512; mentioned, 
iii. 446. 
Streets, passengers who excite risibil- 
ity, i. 251. 



Stkic'IIEN, Lord, v. 122, n. i. 
Strickland, .Mrs., iii. 134, n. 3. 
Striki.s in I.ontlon. iii. 54, «. 2. 
Stl'ART. Andrew, duel with Thurlow, 
ii. 264. It. I ; Letters to Lord Mans- 
field, ii. 263-4. 544. 
Sti'art, Ciilbert, iii. 380. w. i. 
Stiart, Hon. Colonel James (after- 
wards Stuart-Wortley), Hoswell. ac- 
companies him to London, iii. 454 ; 
to Lichfield, iii. 46S; to Chester, iii. 
469 ; raises a regiment, iii. 454 ; or- 
dered to Jamaica, iii. 473. n. i. 
Stiaki, Kev. James, of Killin. ii. 32, 

n. I. 
Stuart, Hon. and Kev. W., iv. 230. 
Stuart, Mrs., ii. 432, //. i. 
Stuart, the House of. Johnson de- 
fends it. i. 410; has little confidence 
in it. i. 498; maintains its popularity, 
iii. 17C); iv. 190; his tenderness for 
it, i. 203: right to the throne, ii. 252; 
iii. 177: V. 211. n. 2. 230-2; Scotch 
Kpiscopal Church, faithful to it, iii. 
422; Scotch non-jurors give up their 
allegiance, iv. 332; Voltaire .sums up 
its story, v. 227; mentioned, ii. 30. 
{ Stuart Clan, ii. 309. 

SruHiiS, George, iv. 463. v. 3. 
I Student, The, or Oxford and Cam- 
I brid}^e Miscellany, i. 243. 265. 
' Studied Behaviour, i. 544- 
Sti DY. all times wholesome for it, iv. 
! II ; Johnson's advice to Boswell. i. 
I 475. 529, 533. 548; iii. 463; five hours 
j a day sufficient, i 496 ; particular 
plan not recommended, i. 496; study- 
ing hard, i. 82. 
Stultifying oneself, v. 389. 
Style, elegance universally diffused, 
iii. 275; foreign phrases dragged in, 
iii. 390, ;/. 3; Hume and Mackintosh 
on Knglish prose, iii. 292, w. l; John- 
son's ili.',like nf Callicisms, i. 508-9; 



-D- 



Jyidex to 



style. 



Surinam. 



metaphors, iii. 197; iv. 445, n. 3; pe- 
culiar to every man, iii. 318; seven- 
teenth century style bad, iii. 275 ; 
studiously formeil, i. 261 ; Temple 
gave cadence to prose, iii. 292; un- 
harmonious periods, iii. 281 ; which 
is the best? ii. 220. See under Ad- 
dison and Johnson. 

Style, Old and New, i. 273, ;/. 3, 292. 

SuARD, Johnson introduces him to 
Burke, iv. 23, n. 2; Voltaire and Mrs. 
Montague, ii. lOi, n. 3. 

SuiioRDlNATlON, breaking the series 
of civil sui)ordination, ii. 280; ])roken 
down, iii. 297; conducive to the hap- 
piness of society, i. 472, 512; ii. 252; 
iii. 30 ; V. 402 ; essential for order, 
iii. 436; feudal, iii. 297; v. 120; 
French hajipy in their subordination, 
V. 121; grand scheme of it, i. 567; 
high people the best, iii. 401; John- 
son's great merit in being zealous for 
it, ii. 299; Mrs. Macaulay's footman, 
i. 518; iii. 89; mean marriages to be 
punished, ii. 376, men not naturally 
ecpial, ii. 14; promoted by a Corsican 
hangman, i. 472, «. i; without it no 
intellectual improvement, ii. 252. 

SuKSCRii'TlON to the Thirty-nine Arti- 
cles. See Thirty-nink Articles. 

Succession, male, Boswell and the 
Barony of Auchinleck, ii. 476-85 ; 
Johnson's advice to Boswell, ii. 476- 
84; his zeal for it in Langton's case, 
ii. 299, 300 ; as regards the Thrale 
family, ii. 537; iii. 109. 

SucKLiNC, Sir John, A glaum, iii. 362, 
n. 2. 

Sueno, King of Norway, v. 329. 

Suetonius, i. 501, n i; iii. 321, n. 2. 

Suffiaviina, i. 317. 

Suffolk, militia bill of 1756, i. 356, n. 
2; price of wheat in 1778, iii. 256, 
«. 3- 



Suffolk, Lady, ii. 391. «. 2. 
; Sugar, taken in tlu- servant's fingers, 
ii. 462; v. 23. 

Sugar Cauf, a Poem. See (iKAINGEK, 
James. 

SutiKK, AI)boi, iii. 37. w. 5. 

SiuciDE, Ba.\ler <»n the salvation of a 
suiciile, iv. 260; civil suicide, iv. 258; 
Fitzherbcrt's • melancholy end,' ii. 
262; going to the devil where a man 
is known, v. 61 ; Johnson supposc<l 
to recommend it, iv. 172; niartyrdorn 
a kind of vohintar}- suicide, ii. 287; 
motives that lead to it. ii. 262-3. 

SuiDAs, i. 322. //. 2. 

SuLrrnts. iii. 41, w. 3; iv. 432. n. 2. 

Si'Nii.w, abroad a day of festivity, ii. 
82, ;/. I ; bird - catcliing on it, 1^./ 
harvest work, iii. 356; heavy day to 
Johnson when a boy, i. 77 ; legal 
consultatirms, ii. 431 ; militia exer- 
cise, i. 356, //. 2; reading, v. 368; re- 
la.xation allowed but not levity, v. 
78; scheme of life for it. i. 350; 
throwing stones at birds, v. 78, 

Sunderland, iii. 338, w. i. 

Sunderland, third Karl of. I.owther 
the miser, v. 12S. ;/. i ; mentioned, 
i. 1S5. 

' -S'//;//' t//>Du us,' ii. 170. 

Sil'ERK(KTA lloN of the I'ress, iii. 37S. 

SUI'ERIORITV, iv. 1S9. 

Sui'ERNAii RAL .\(;encv, general be- 
lief in it, V. 51. 

Supernatural Aitearances, evi- 
dence of them, ii. 172; use of them, 
iii. 338, ;;. 2; see OnosTS, \Vi r< mes; 
and under Scotland, Hebrides, 
second-sight. 

Superstitions, not necessarily con- 
nected with religion, v. 348. See 
under Boswell and Johnson. 

Supper, a turnpike, iii. 348. 

Surinam, v. 27, u. i, 407. 



BosiveWs Life of yohnson. 



253 



Surnames. 



Swift. 



Surnames, easily mistaken, iv. 220. 
Surrey, militia hill of 1756, i. 356, 

«. 2. 
Suspicion, often a useless pain, iii. 154. 
Suspicious Husband, The, ii. 56. 
Suspirius, i. 247; ii. 55. 
Sussex, militia bill of 1756, i. 356, ;/. 

2 ; price of wheat in 1778, iii. 256, 

n. 3; violence of the waves on its 

coast, V. 286, ;/. i. 
Sussex, Duke of, ii. 175, n. i. 
SuTER, Mr., V. 187, n. 2. 
Swallows, their hibernation, ii. 63, 

285. 
Swan, Dr., i. 177. 
Swansea, i. 190. 

SWARKSTONE, i. 92, «. 2. 

Swearing, Court of Justice, in a, v. 
445 ; conversation, in, — causes of 
the custom, ii. 190 ; genteel people 
swear less than formerly, ii. 190, //. 
i; Johnson disapproves of it, ii. 127; 
iii. 47; — represented as swearing in 
Dr. T. Campbell's Diary, ii. 387, ;/. 
2; — shows his displeasure, iii. 215. 

Sweden, Johnson promised a letter of 
good-will from it, i. 375; — wishes 
to visit it, iii. 516; v. 245 ; torture 
used there, i. 540, u. 2. 

Sweden, King of, knights Dr. Hill, 
ii. 43, n. 2. 

Sweden, King of (Gustavus III), Bos- 
well wishes to see him, v. 245; his 
death, iii. 152, w. i. 

S'weden, Histoiy of, by Daline, ii. 179. 

SwEET-ME.\TS, iii. 211; iv. 105. 

Swift, Jonathan, Advice to the Grub- 
Street Verse Writers, i. 165, n. i ; 
aflfectation of familiarity with the 
great, iv. 72 ; anonymously, pub- 
lished, ii. 365 ; Apology for the Tale 
of a Tub, ii. 364, n. 2 ; Artemisia, 
ii. 87, n. 2; Beggar s Opera, opinion 
of the, ii. 423, n. 2 ; Bettesworth, 



Sergeant, iii. 428, ti. 4 ; Blackmore, 
Sir Richard, ii. 124, n. 3; iv. 92, n. 2; 
broomstick, could write finely on a, 
ii. 446, «. i; Conduct of the Allies, 
ii. 74 ; death, troubled by thoughts 
of, ii. 107, ;/. 2; what reconciles us to 
it, iii. 335, ;/. 2 ; Delany's Observa- 
tions: j^-cDelany; Drapiers Letter, 
ii. 365 ; Dryden's prefaces, iv. 132, 
n. 2; Epistle to Captain Gulliver, v. 
158 ; Eugenia, ii. 276, n. 2 ; Faulk- 
ner, G., ii. 177, n. 2 ; feared by a 
country squire, iv. 341, n. 3; flowered 
late, iii. 190, n. 2 ; French writers 
superficial, i. 526, n. i ; frugal but 
liberal, iii. 300, n. 2; Gay's writings 
for children, ii. 468, n. 3 ; geniuses 
united, the power of, i. 239; Glover's 
Leonidas, v. 132, «. 4; Goldsmith on 
his 'strain of pride,' iii. 188, n. i ; 
Grimston, Viscount, iv. 92, 71. 2 ; 
Gulliver's Travels, ii. 365 ; — quoted 
in Johnson's Dictionary, ib., n. 2; — 
brought its author money, iii. 23, n. 
i; happiness, definition of, ii. 402, ;/. 
2; Hawkesworth's Life of him, i. 220, 
n. 3; History of John Bull, v. 49, n. 
3; Howard, Hon. Edward, ii. 124, «. 
3; inferior to his contemporaries, v. 
49; Ireland his debtor, ii. 152; re- 
ception there in 1713, iii. 283, n. 2; 
return to it in 1714, ib.; Johnson's 
attacks on him, i. 524 ; ii. 74, 364 ; 
iv. 72 ; v. 49 ; — recommended to 
him, i. 154; iv. 71; ' — worse than 
Swift,' V. 240; — M-rites his Life, iv. 
71-3 ; Journal, iv. 204 ; laugh, did 
not, ii. 434, n. i; Letter to Tooke the 
Printer, ii. 364, n. 2; Lines on Cen- 
sure, ii. 70, ;/. 2; low life, love of, v. 
349, n. 3; Manley, Mrs., satirised in 
Corinna, iv. 231, ;/. 2 ; Memoirs of 
Scriblerus, i. 524, n. i ; v. 49, n. 3; 
Miscellanies in Prose and Verse, i. 



254 



Index to 



Swift. 



Talbot. 



145, ;/. 3; Oiic for Music, ii. 76, w. 
3 ; On the death of Dr. Sivift, iii. 
501, w. 1; original in a high dcgref, 
ii. 365, fi. 2 ; Orrtry'.s, Lonl, AV- 
marks : see Orrkky. fiflh Karl of; 
' paper - sparing Tope," i. 1O5 ; pay- 
ment for writing, iii. 23, //. i; Pltitt 
for the I HI prove nie lit of the Kni^lish 
La»gna};e, ii. 365, Poetry; n A'hiip- 
sody, ii. 124, II. 3; Tope's condensa- 
tion of sense, v. 393, ;/. 2 — , parting 
with, iii. 355; r. W elerk of this par. 
ish, i. 444, It. I ; I'rendergast, attacks, 
ii. 210, It. i; projectors, i. 349, «. i; j 
Pules to Senutitts, ii. 170, 11. 2; Sa- 
cheverell's sermon at the end of his 
suspension, i. 45, it. 2; saving, habit 
of, iv. 72; seoiiitdrel, use of, iii. I, ;/. 
2; 'screen between me and death,' 
iii. 501, ;/. i; Sent intents of a Church 
of England man, ii. 364, n. 2; Ser- 
mon on the Trinity, i/>. ; shallow 
fellow, a, V. 49, //. 2 ; singularities, 
given to, ii. 85, n. 2; ' sjiectacles and 
pills,' iv. 329; Steele, lines on, i. 145, 
n. 3; Stella's 'artifice of mischief,' 
V. 276; Stella's I'irthday, iv. 20g, n. 
2, 329, n. 2; strong sense his excel- 
lence, i. 524; study, hours of, ii. 136, 
;/. 4; style, a good neat, ii. 220; — 
according to Hume not correct, il>.. 
It. i; — praised by him, iii. 292, n. 
I ; Tale of a Tub, doubts as to the 
authorsliiii, i. 524 ; ii. 364, n. i ; he 
gives a copy to Mrs. Whiteway, i. 
524, n. i; lost him a bishopric, il).; 
much superior to his other writings, 
ii. 364 ; V. 49 ; quotations from it — 
Boswell like Jack, ii. 269; — dirtiness 
of the Scotch churches, v. 46, n. i ; 
Temple's style, iii. 292, ;/. i; ' washed 
himself with oriental scrupulosity,' 
iv. 6, «. 2; ' Whiggism and Atheism,' 
i. 499. ;/. I. 



Swimmim;. See JiiiiNsoN, swimming. 

SwiNKK.N, Dr. Samuel, Johnson's god- 
father, i. 40, //. I ; — consults him 
about his health, i. 75 ; — intimate 
with him, i. i>4, 97 ; — kind lo his 
daughter, iii. 252, «. 3 ; — leaves a 
legacy to his grandson, iv. 507; Pem- 
broke College, a mcmiH-r of, i. 67, 

M. I. 

SwiNNKV. .S'.Y Mac Swinny, Owen. 

SwiNtuN, Ktv. Mr., i. 317. 

Swiss, John.son praises their wonderful 

policy, i. 178; suffer from the mala. 

die du pays, iii. 225. 
Swiss (;l'ari»s, iv. 325, M. 4. 
SVDKMIAM, Dr. Thomas, Life by 

Johnson, i|uoied, i. 45; published, i. 

177 ; l.iKke's Latin verses, v. hj6 ; 

St. Vitus's dance, i. 166. 
Sydnky, Algernon, ii. 241. 
SVLVANUs's Pirst Book of the Iliad, 

iii. 463. 
Sylvaitus I'rban, i. 129. 
Symi'athy, ii. 109, 537. 539; iii. 168. 
Synod, ' A Synwl of Cooks." i. 544. 
Synonvmes, iv. 239. 
System of Ancient Geography, i. 216. 
Systeme de la A'ature, v. 53. 
SZKKLERS, ii. 8, n. I. 

T. 

T', fitted to a, iv. 332. 

Taaf, Mr., ii. 456. 

Tacitis, Agricola, quoted, iii. 369, n. 

4 ; iv. 235 ; Gcrmania, quoted, v. 

434 ; his writings are notes for an 

historical work. ii. 217. 
Tailor, the metaphysical. See Mkt- 

APHYSICAL. 

Tait, Rev. Mr., v. 146. 
T.MT, Mr., an organist, v. 95. 
Talbot, Lord Chancellor, i. 269, n. i. 
Talbot, second Lord, i. 588-9. 
Talbot, Miss Catharine, co»"'-sDond- 



BoswelVs Life of yoJmson. 



255 



Talbot. 



Taylor. 



ence with Mrs. Carter, i. 269, n. i ; 
Greenwich Park, describes, i. 123, n. 
2 ; Rambler, contributes to the, i. 
235; criticises it, i. 241, n. 2, 242, n. 
i; Williams, Mrs., account of, i. 269, 
n. I. 

Tale of a Tub. 5.v Swift. 

Talks, telling tales of oneself, ii. 540. 

Talk, above the capacity of the audi- 
ence, iv. 213 ; distinguished from 
conversation, iv. 215; Johnson loved 
to have it out, iii. 261 ; talking for 
fame, iii. 2S0; from books, v. 431; of 
oneself, iii. 66; on one topic, ;'/'. 

T.\i.KKRs, e.\uberant public, ii. 2S3. 

Tallevra.nd, v. 452, w. 3. 

TALLOW-CHANDLER, in retirement, ii. 
386. 

Tameos, v. 276, n. I. 

Tanninc, v. 280. 

Tar, v. 246. 

Tartary, ii. 179. 

Tartiiffe, ii. 367, n. i; iii. 509. 

Tasker, Rev. Mr., iii. 425-6. 

Tasso, borrows a simile from Lucre- 
tius, iii. 376. 

Taste, changes in it, iii. 218, n. 4 ; 
defined, ii. 219; refinement of it, iv. 
391; Reynolds's rule for judging it, 
iv. 365. 

Taller, end of its publication, i. 233, 
n. 3; esquire, title of, i. 40, n. 2; ru- 
ral esfjuires, v. 67, n. 5; great perfec- 
tions without good breeding, ii. 294, 
n. I. 
Taller Iievi'>ed, i. 234. 

Taunton, iv. 38. 

Taverns, admitting women, iv. 87 ; 
felicity of England in its tavern life, 
ii. 516 ; tavern chair the throne of 
human felicity, ii. 517, n. 2. 
Taxation no Tyra?tny, account of it — 
planned, ii. 334 ; published, ii. 356 ; 
written at the desire of ministers, i. 



432, «. i; ii. 357; corrected by them, 
ii. 358-60; not attacked enough, ii. 
384; pelted with answers, ii. 384, n. 
2 ; sale, ii. 384, «. i ; Birmingham 
traders praised, ii. 531, w. 5 ; drivers 
of negroes, iii. 228; Macaulay, Mrs., 
attacked, ii. 384, ;/. 3; mentioned, iii. 
250. 

T.WES, efTect of their increase, ii. 409. 

Taylor, Chevalier, a quack, iii. 443. 

T.\YLOR, Jeremy, ' chief of sinners," iv. 
339 ; Golden Grove, iv. 340 ; Holy 
Dying, iii. 39, m. 5. 

Taylor, Rev. Dr. John, account of 
him and his establishment, ii. 542; 
his person, ii. 543; his character by 
Johnson, ii. 542-3; iii. 158, 206; all 
his geese swans, iii. 215; Ashbourne, 
his daily life, iii. 150; iv. 436; the 
water-fall, iii. 217; garden, iii. 227; 
bleeding, habit of, iii. 172; Boswell, 
gives, particulars of Johnson, iv. 433; 
— , laughed at by, iii. 154, «. i ; — 
and Johnson visit him in 1776, ii. 
542; in 1777, iii. 154; bull-dog, his, 
iii. 216; ' bullocks, his talk is of,' iii. 
206; cattle, iii. 170, 206, n. 3; chan- 
delier of crystal, iii. 178 ; Christ 
Church, Oxford, enters, i. 89 ; din- 
ners at his London house, iii. 60. 
270 ; eagerness for preferments, ii. 
542, «. i; ' elegant phraseology,' his, 
ii. 543, n. i; Garrick's emphasis, an- 
ecdote of, i. 194-5; mediates between 
Garrick and Johnson, i. 227; house 
in Westminster, i. 276 ; iii. 251 ; 
Johnson's character, iii. 170; — 
comjiany, not very fond of, iii. 206; 
— , correspondence with, iii. 205, n. 
3: see under Jounson, letters, — 
dread of annihilation, iii. 337, m. l; 
— funeral, iv. 484; — heart, knowl- 
ledge of, i. 30, n. i , — , invites, to 
dine on a hare, iii. 236 , — , Reyn- 



256 



Index to 



Taylor. 

olds's explanation of his intimacy 
with, iii. 206; — roars him (h)\vii, iii. 
170; himself roused t<> a pitch of 
i)eIlo\ving, iii. 176; — serious talk 
with him, iii. 337, 11. \\ — wearies of 
Ashbourne life, iii. 175. 240; iv. 411, 
412, //. 2, 417, 421, 436; — will, not 
in, iv. 463, II. 3; — writes sermons 
for him, i. 279 ; iii. 2o(') ; — youth, 
friend of, iv. 312; Johnson's, Mrs., 
death, i. 276; iii. 205, //. 3; I.angley, 
quarrels with, iii. 156, >i. 3; lawsuit, 
ii. 543, ;/. I ; iii. 51, //. 3, 5<j, //. 3 \ 
Lichfield School, at, i. 52; living in 
ruins and rubbish, iv. 436; matricu- 
lation, i. 89; neighbours, iii. 157; 
sermons, iii. lob-"] : sleej^, observa- 
tion on, iii. 192; Whig, a, ii. 542; iii. 
176; widower, anectlote of a, iii. 155; 
wife, separation from his, i. 546, ;/. 
4; wit, single instance of his, iii. 218; 
mentioned, ii. 532, 536; iii. 211-12. 

Taylor, Mrs., Rev. Dr. John Taylor's 
wife, separated from her husband, i. 
546, ;/. 4; mentioned, i. 276. 

i'AYi.OR, John, a Hirmingham trader, 
i. 100. 

Taylor, John, of Christ Church, Ox- 
ford, confounded with Dr. Ji>hn 
Taylor, i. 89, ;/. i. 

Taylor, John {Dt-»tosthcnes Tuv/cr), 
iii. 362. 

Taylor, William, of Norwich, ii. 46S, 
;/. 3- 

Taylor, Mr. ,an engraver, iv. 4S5, >i. 3. 

Taylor, Mr., a gentleman -artist, of 
Bath, iii. 4S0. 

Tea, Garrick charges Peg Woffington 
with making it too strong, iii. 300; 
his finest sort, i. 251, ;;. i ; Hanway's 
attack on its use, and Johnson's de- 
fence, i. 362 ; Johnson a hardened 
tea -drinker, i. 120, ;/. 2: si'e under 
Johnson; price of it in 1734, i. 362, 



Tenants. 

ti. 4; ntn Ua, v. 513, n. i; tea-nuk- 
ing <} r.hii^hiisi-, ii. 462; wcik, gen- 
erally made, iii. 300, //. i : Wesley 
attacks its «sr, i. 362, 11. 4. 

TkaciIINC., wretchedness of, i. qS-hj. 

Tmrs of OU May- Jay, i. 118. 

'I'lUmaclnts, a Mask, i. 475; ii. 435. 

I'KMl'ft, iii. 343. 

TK.Mi-r 1;, second Karl, iv. 238, «. i. 

Ti-.Mii.K, Right Rev. Frederick, Bish- 
op of London, i. 505, »/. 2. 

Ti".MrLK, Rev. William Johnson, ac- 
count of him, i. 505 ; iii. 473. «. 2 ; 
l?os\vell. corrcs|Kjn<lence with, i. 505, 
;/. 2; — and he read (iray all night, 
ii. 3S3, //. 3: — executor, iii. 342, «. 
I ; — last letter written to him, i. 
17, n. I ; — occupies his chamben 
in the Temple, i. 505; — visits him 
at .Mamhead, ii. 426; (Iray's charac- 
ter, writes, i. 505, //. 2 ; ii. 362 ; iv, 
177, /;. I ; Johnson, compares, with 
the ' infidel pensioner Hume," ii. 36a; 
— , introduced to, ii. 12 ; |K)litical 
speculati(jns, unfit for, ii. 357, n. 2 ; 
mentioned, i. 502, «. i ; ii. 4, n. I, 
284. 

Tk.mI'LK, Sir William, drinking by dep- 
uty, iii. 375; Dutch free from spleen, 
'^■- 437; English prose, gave cadence 
to, iii. 292 ; great generals, ii. 269 ; 
I/troii I'irttii', ii. 269, n. 2; Ireland, 
ancient state of, i. 372; peerages and 
property, ii. 482; style condemned by 
Hume, iii. 292, ;/. i ; — praised by 
Mackintosh, ib. ; — a model to 
Johnson, i. 253. 

Temple ok Fame, ii. 410. 

Temptation, exposing people to it, 
iii. 269. 

Tenants, their independence, v. 346 : 
set- Landlords, and under Scot- 
land, Hebrides, landlords and ten- 
ants. 



BosweWs Life of Johnson. 



257 



Tenderness of Heart. 



Thomson. 



Tendernkss of Hkak r, v. 273. 

Tenders, v. 222, ;/. i. 

Teneriki-e, iv. 413. 

Tenison, Thomas, Archbishop of Can- 
terbury, I'salmanazar introduced to 
him, iii. 508. 

Tennyson. Alfred, Lord, poet-laure- 
ate, i. 213, II. 2; Ulysses quoted, v. 
317, ;;. 2. 

Tenures, ancient, ii. 232; iii. 471. 

Terence, quoted, i. 149, ;/. 2; ii. 410, 
;/. 3, 532, ;/. 3. 

Testimony, compared with argument, 

iv. 325. 
Tetty or Telsey, i. 114- 

Thackeray, W. M., Addison's Ccito, 
([notations from, i. 230, «. 5; — one 
failing, iv. 62, ;/. 4 ; History of the 
A'eweomes quoted, ii. 343, n. 2; sub- 
scribed to the annuity for Johnson's 
goddaughter, iv. 234, ;/. i. 

THALES, i. 145, II. 3- 

Thames, Budgell drowns himself in it, 
ii. 263 ; V. 61 ; convicts working on 
it, iii. 305, II. i; Johnson and Boswell 
row to Greenwich, i. 530; to Hlack- 
friars, ii. 495; Johnson returns on it 
from Rochester, iv. 269, //. 2 ; Lon- 
don, mentioned in, i. 532; New-Eng- 
land men at its mouth, v. 361; ribald- 
ry of passers-by, iv. 31. 

Thatching, v. 299. 

77/<- one, iv. 243, n. 2. 

Theatres, French and English com- 
pared in point of decency, ii. 57, n. i ; 
orange-girls, v. 210, ;/. 3; proposal for 
a third one, iv. 132: see under Lon- 
don, Covent f'.arden, Drury Lane, 
and Haymarket. 

Thebes, ii. 205. 

Theft, allowed in Sparta, ii. 202; iii. 

333- 
Thelwai.l, John, iv. 321, n. 3. 
Theobald, Lewis, Double Falsehood, 



iii. 449, n. i; Pope, attacked by, ii. 
382, n. i; Shakespeare, edits, v. 277, 
n. 6; ^Varburton, compared with, i. 
381; helped by him, v. 90. 

Theocritus, iv. 2. 

Theodosius, ii. 539. 

Theophiliis Insulanus, v. 256. 

Theophrastus, v. 431. 

Thicknesse, Philip, criticises Smol- 
lett, iii. 267. 

Thieves, all men naturally thieves, iii. 

307- 

Thin^, not the, iv. 103. 

Thinking, liberty of, ii. 286, 289. 

Thiri.hy, Dr. Styan, iv. 186, n. i. 

TiiiRrv- NINE Articles, articles of 
peace, ii. 119; meaning of subscrip- 
tion," ii. 173; petition for removing 
the subscription, ii. 173 ; — motion 
to consider it, ii. 239, «. i. 

Thomas, Colonel, iv. 244, n. 2. 

Thomas, Nathaniel, iii. 105, ;/. 3. 

Thomson, James, blank verse of the 
Seasons, iv. 50, «. 3; Boswell's assist- 
ance to Johnson in his Life, ii. 72; 
iii. 132, 150, 409; character, his, not 
to be gathered from his works, iii. 
133. "■ 5 ; cloud of words, iii. 43 ; 
Ed-oard and Eleonora not licensed, 
i. 163, ;/. I ; family, account of his, 
iii. 409; Johnson inserts him among 
the LJves, iii. 124; letters to his sis- 
ters, ii. 72 ; iii. 133, 409 '. licentious- 
ness, ii. 72; iii. 133; Lives of Thom- 
son, iii. 132-3 ; ' loathed much to 
write,' iii. 409; poetical eye, i. 524 ; 
ii. 72; iii. 43; ' Queensberr)', worthy," 
ii. 422, n. I ; Quin's generosity to 
him, iii. 132 ; Scotland, never re- 
turned to, iii. 133; Seasons, quoted, 

' i. 114, n. I ; iii. 171, n. 4; by Vol- 
taire, i. 503, ". 2; sisters, generosity 

i to his, ii. 72; iii. 409; wine, love of, 

1 i. 416- 



258 



Index to 



Thomson. 

Thomson, Rev. James, case of ecclesi- 
astical censure, iii. O7-73, 104. 

Thomson, Mr., a schoolmaster (the 
poet's brother-in-law), ii. 72 ; iii. 
132, 409. 

Thornion, Honnell, Adventurer, 
writes for the, i. 292, ;/. 3; lioswell 
enlivened by his witty sallies, i. 457; 
Ode on Si. Ceiilio's Ihiv, i. 48O ; 
Kaiubler, parodies the, i. 252, //. I ; 
Student, writes for the, i. 243. 

TiioKi', Mr. Robert, of Macclotield, 
iv. 454, ;/. I. 

ThorI'E, iii. 408. 

TuorGHTS, command of one's, ii. 21S, 

232, ;/. 2; in(|uisitive and perplexing, 

iv. 426, //. 3; troul)lesome at. night, 

ii. 504; vexing, iii. 0. 

Thoughts on E.xeetttive Jmtiee, iv. 579, 

M. I. 

Thoughts on the late Transtutions re- 
specting Falldand' s Islands. See 
Falkland's Islands. 

TlIRAi.E Famiiv, account of the. i. 

567, ;/. 4. 

TliKAi.K, John, a London mcrcliant, i. 

5f>7. "• 4- 
TllKAi.K, 'Old,' the brewer, Henry 

Thrale's father, i. 567, ;/. 4. 
Thrai.k, Henry, account of him, i. 

568, 571 ; ambition of out-brewing 
Whitbread, iii. 413, ;/. 4; Baretti, 
present to, iii. 110; Hath, visits, in 
1776, iii. 51 ; in 17S0, iii. 47S ; IJo.s- 
well's familiarity in speaking of him, 
i. 569, ;/. 2; — , hospitality to, iii. 52; 
— writes to him, iii. 423; brcTwery, 
— profits, i. 568 ; iii. 239, 413, ;;. 4 ; 
iv. loi, ;/. I ; beer brewed, ii. 455 ; 
iii. 239, ;/. 5; ;^20,ooo a year paid in 
excise, v. 148; first sale of it, i. 567; 
second sale, i. 568; iv. 100, «. 2, 153; 
Cator, John, one of his executors, 
iv. 361 ; champagne, his, iii. 136; 



Thrale, Henry. 

churches, intends to beautify two 
Wcl.sh, V. 514 ; death, iv. 97 ; falsiC 
re|)<>rt of it, iii. 122 ; dinncrb and 
breakfast* at hi«. hou.se. ii. 88, 260, 
282, 374. 3S7. n. 2. 400. 433. M. 3, 
489; iii. 31. 282, 391; iv. 1)3; «Iis- 
likes the times, iii. 413 ; eating, im- 
mtKleratc in, iii. 480; iv. 97, /«. 4 ; 
expenses, iii. 239 ; France, tour to, 
ii. 441-59; (it>ldsniith's llauneh of 
I'en'ison, mentioned in, iii. 255. //. 2; 
questions a statement of his about 
horses, ii. 267; Gordon Riots, prop- 
erly in danger, iii. 494 ; flees from 
Bath, ih., H. I ; (Irosvenor Square, 
house in, iv. 83; heir, desires a male, 
ii. 537; iii. io<^, 413, u. 3; highway- 
man, robbed by a, iii. 271, ;/. 2; ill- 
ness, dangerous, i. 373, //. i ; iii. 
451, 480, //. 2 ; belter, iii. 474, 478 ; 
withdrawn from business, iii. 493 ; 
very ill, iv. 83; Harelli's account of 
it, iv. 97, n. 4; Italy, projected lour 
to, ii. 4S4 ; given up, iii. 7, 21, 32 ; 
Johnson's affection for him, iii. 451, 
//. 2 ; iv. 97, 103, 116 ; — wishes to 
hear ' 7V/<' History of the Th raits,' 
^■- 356; .his feelings towards Johnson, 
ii. 88 ; iv. 97, 98, w. i, 167, 392 ; 
'will go nowhere without him,' iii. 
32, w. 1; — and the Karl of March- 
monl, iii. 392 , — epitaph on him. 
iv. 98, //. I ; — his executor, iv. 99 ; 
receives a bequest of j^2<Jo, iv. 100; 
guardian of his children, iv. 229, //. 
2; — illness in 1766, i. 603-4; — in- 
timacy not without restraint, iii. 8 ; 

— introduction to his family, i. 567. 
604; iii. 512; — kitchen, inquires 
into, ii. 247, ;/. 3 ; — loss by his 
death, iv. 99, 167, 181-3, prayer on 
it, i. 278, «. 5 ; — , suggests, as a 
member of parliament, ii. 158, ;/. 2; 

— writes The Patriot for him, ii. 



BoswelVs Life of Johnsoii. 



259 



Thrale, Henry. 



Thrale, Hester Lynch. 



327; Lade, Sir John, his nephew, iv. 
475, II. 2; melancholy, suffers from, 
iii. 413, «. 4 , — 'worried by the 
do};,' iii. 470, n. 2 , money difficul- ] 
ties, iv. 99, «. I ; ' My Master," i. | 
572, n. 1; iii. 135; portrait, iv. 181, , 
//. 3 ; prosjiects, loves, v. 501, «. i ; 
receives ;i^i4,ooo, iii. 152, n. I, 517; 
Rome, will not die in j)eace witiiout 
seeing, iii. 32, //. i; silent at Ogle- i 
thorpe's, v. 315; society in his house, 
i- 573; son, loses his only surviving, 
ii. 536, 539 ; — grief, his, iii. 2i, ;/. i 
i; — orbits ct exspes, iii. 28, n. 3; — ! 
at the Assembly Rooms, Hath, iii. I 
52, «. 2; son, loses liis younger, iii. 
5, «. I ; Southwark, Member for, 
i. 567 ; receives ' instructions from 
the electors, ii. 83, n. 3; election of 
1774, ii. 327, 328 ; of 1780, Johnson i 
writes his Addresses, iii. 479, w. 2, 
499; defeated, iii. 501; house in the 
Borough, ii. 327, n. i; iii. 6; iv. S3, 
w. 2; Wales, tour to, ii. 326; v. 487- \ 
524; wife's, his, jealousy, iii. 109, u. \ 
6; will, afraid of making his, iv. 463, | 
;/. 3; — account of it, iv. 100, //. i; j 
mentioned, i. 96, «. 6 ; ii. 157, 355, 
471; iii. 26-8, 62, M. 2, 143, 150, 179, 
n. I, 217, n. 2, 251, 255, 272, 452, ;/. 
3; V. 95, 115, n. 6. 

Thr.\lk, Henry (son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thrale), death, ii. 536, 539 ; iii. 4 ; 
Johnson's letter on it, i. 274, ii. i ; 
his love of him, ii. 537; iii. 5. 

Thr.m.e, Hester Lynch (Miss Salus- 
bury, afterwards Mrs. Piozzi), ac- 
count of her, i. 570-3 ; — birth, i. 
173, n. \; — character by Johnson, 
i- 572; — by Miss Burney, iv. 95, w. 
4; — dress and person, i. 572; acci- 
dent to her eye, iii. 244 ; Argyll 
Street, house in, iv. 181, 189; Ba- 
retti, character of, ii. 65, n. 2 ; — 



flatters her, iii. 57, «. i ; — igno- 
rance of the scriptures, v. 138, n. 4; 

— knowledge of languages, i. 419, 
;/. I ; — , ([uarrel with, ii. 235, n. i ; 
iii. 57, w. I, 109; her account, //-'., n. 
6; Bath, visits, in 1776, iii. 7, 51; in 
1780, iii. 478 ; an evening at Mrs. 
.Montagu's, iii. 479; in 1783, iv. 191, 
229, «. 2; Beattie, Dr., loves, ii. 170; 
Beauclerk's anecdote of the dogs, v. 
375, ti. I ; Beauclerk, hatred of, i. 
288, ;/. 3 ; V. 375, ;/. i ; his truth- 
fulness, //'.,• l)irthplace, v. 512-14; 
Boswell, .iccuses, of spite, iv. 83, n. 
2 ; of treachery, iv. 367, n. 2, 396 ; 
— , advises, not to publish the Li/e 
of Sihbald, iii. 258; — alludes to her 
second marriage, iii. 57 ; — , argues 
with, on Shakespeare and Milton, iv. 
84; — brother David, iii. 492, «. i; 
— , compliments, on his long head, 
iv. 192; — , controversy with, about 
.Mrs. Montagu, v. 279, //'., w. i ; — 
dines with her, iv. 191 ; — , hospi- 
tality to, iii. 52 ; — introduced to 
her, ii. 88 ; — , ' loves," ii. 167, 236 ; 

— MS. Journal, reads, ii. 439; — 
proposes an epistle in her name, v. 
1 59 ; British Synonymy, iv. 475 ; 
Burke's son, can make nothing of, 
iv. 253, M. 3 ; Burney, Miss, letters 
to, iv. 392, «. 4; calculating and de- 
claiming, iii. 56 ; canvasses for Mr. 
Thrale, iii. 501, n. 2 ; character, in- 
fluence of vice on, iii. 398; children, 
her, — births, ii. 52, «. 3, 321 ; iii. 
239, n. 4, 413, 447; — deaths, ii. 321, 
n. 2 ; iii. 124 ; three living out of 
twelve, iv. 181, «. 2; unfriendly with 
her married daughter, v. 487, n. i ; 
Johnson's Kindness to them, iv. 398; 
clerk, gives a crown to an old, v. 502; 
clippers, warned of, iii. 56; common- 
place book, iv. 396; conceit of parts, 



26o 



hidix to 



Thrale, Hester Lynch. 



iii. 359 ; Congreve, quotes from, ii. 
261; dates, neglects, i. 141, w. 2; iv. 
102, ;/. i: Demosthenes's 'action,' 
ii. 242; 'despicable dread of living 
in the Horough,' iv. S3, n. 2 ; di- 
vorces, iii. 395-f) ; ' dying with a 
grace," iv. 346, «. i; Errol, Lord, at 
the coronation, v. 117, w. i ; estate, 
prefers the owner to the, ii. 41/3; fall 
from her horse, ii. 329 ; Fermor's, 
Mrs., account of Pope, ii. 450, n. 4; 
flattery, coarse mode of. ii. 400 ; — 
Johnson talks with her about it, v. 
502 ; Foster's Stniiotis, (|uotes, iv. 
II, «. 2; France, tour to, ii. 441-59; 
French, contentment of the, v. 121, 
«. i; — Convent, visits a, ii. 442; — 
maxims, attacks, iii. 232, /;. i ; (Jar- 
rick's poetry, praises, ii. 90 ; good 
breeding, want of, iv. 96 ; Gordon 
Riots, alarmed at the, iii. 4S6, ;/. 4; 
Gray's Odes, admires, ii. 375 ; Gros- 
venor Square, removes to, iv. 83, «. 
2; Hogarth's account of Johnson, i. 
170, V. I ; illness, in 1779, iii. 451 ; 
inaccuracy, her extreme, — in gen- 
eral, i. 482, ti. 2 ; iii. 256, 260 ; no 
anxiety about truth, iii. 276, 459; her 
defence of it, iii. 259; instances of it 
— Anecdotes, iv. 392-400 ; anecdote 
about in 7'iiio 7'eritas, ii. 216, w. i ; 
Barber's visit to Langton, i. 550, ;/. 
i; Garrick's election to the Club, i. 
556 ; Goldsmith and the Vicar of 
Wakefield, i. 480, 482, n. i ; John- 
son's answer to Robertson, iii. 382, 
n. 4; — and G. J. Cholmondeley, iv. 
398 ; — harshness, i. 474 ; — lines 
on Lade, iv. 475, ;/. 2 ; — mother 
calling Sam, \\. no, «. i ; — and 
small kindnesses, iv. 232, 396-7; — 
Verses to a Lady, i. 107, w. 2 ; ' nat- 
ural history of the mouse,' ii. 223, n. 
2; stitile mistaken iox futile, iii. 323, 



n. 2 ; indelicacy, iv. 97, n. 4 ; inso- 
lence of wealth, shows the, iii. 359; 
intcrjxjlation in one of Johnson's let- 
ters, suspected, ii. 439, m. 2; Italian, 
an, on clean shirts, v. 67, «. 5; jelly, 
her, com|>arcd with Mrs. Abington's, 
ii. 40U; Johnson's account of French 
sentimciitx iml nicat. ii. 442. «. 2; — 
advice alnnit the brewery, iii. 435, w. 
I ; about sweet-meats, iii. 3ii ; iv. 
105; on Mrs. Thralc's death, iii. 155, 
//. I ; — anxiety not to ofTcmi. iii. 
62, '/. 2; — ap|)eals to her love and 
pity, iv. 265, M, I ; — , ap|>caranccs 
of friendship kepi up witii. iv. |8<>, 
191; — apprehensive of evil, v. 264, 
w. 4 ; — , a.si>erscs, i. 33 ; wishes to 
depreciate him, i. 77. n. 2; — belief, 
fantastical account of, i. 80, w. i; — 
biographers, i, 30, w. i ; — blames 
her conduct, iv. 320 ; his friendly 
animadversions, iii. 56 ; — , change 
in her feeling towards, iv. 392, n. 4 ; 

— on children's bot>ks, iv. 9, w. 5; — 
conversation tot) strong for the great, 
iv. 136; — copyist, iv. 44; — dislike 
of extravagant praise, iii. 256 ; of 
singularity, ii. 85, //. 2 ; — doubts 
her frientlship, iv. 167, n. 1\ — 
dress, iii. 370; — drives her from his 
mind, iv. 392, //. 1 ; — and the Farl 
of Marchmont, iii. 392; — , her 'en- 
chantment over,' V. 14; — epigram, 
translates, i. 96, n. 6; — , flatters, ii. 
380, n. I, 400; — flatters her. iii. 39; 

— household, asks about, iii. 523-4; 

— illness in 1766, i. 603-4; — in- 
troduction to her, i. 603; — Journey 
into Xort/i Wales, v. 487, //. i ; — , 
her kindness to, i. 603; — laugh, ii. 
301, w. 2 ; — , lectures, iv. 75, n. 2 ; 

— Letters, — publishes them for 
;^500, i. 144, n. 3 ; ii. 49, «. i ; ar- 
ranged inaccarately, i. 141, «. 2; error 



Boswelfs Life of fo/inson. 



261 



ThraJe, Hester Lynch. 



Thrale, Miss. 



in date, iii. 514; possible alterations 
and interpolations, ii. 439, ti. 2; iii. 
57, n. I, log, n. 6; read by Walpole, 
iv. 362-3; her own 'studied epistles,' 
iii. 479; his letters to her from Scot- 
land, ii. 346, 349; about the Clordon 
Riots, iii. 486-9; her letters to him 
in Scotland, v. 95, u. 2 (for other let- 
ters, see under Johnson, letters); — 
love of her children, iv. 229, n. 2; — 
' loved ' by her and Boswell, ii. 489; 

— mode of eating, i. 544, ;/. 2 ; — 
and Mrs. Montagu, iv. 74, n. 3, 75, 
w. 2 ; — , neglects, iv. 182-3 \ leaves 
him in sickness and solitude, iv. 287, 
M. 3 ; ' one pleasant day since she 
left him,' iv. 503 ; — nursed in her 
house, iv. 163, 20S; — Ode to her, v. 
179-80; — parody on Burke, iv. 367; 

— pleasure in her society, i. 570-3; 

— severe to her, iv. 184, n. i ; — 
stuns her, v. 328; — style, iii. 22, ;/. 
3 ; — supposed wish to marry her, 
iv. 446, «. i; — takes leave of her 
in April, 1783, iv. 229, ;/. 2; — talk, 
iv. 273, //. 2 ; — tenderness to her 
mother, ii. 302, n. 6; — urges econ- 
omy, iv. 99, ;/. I ; — wishes for her 
and Mr. Thrale in the Hebrides, iii. 
516 ; — would not toast her in 
whisky, v. 395; — 'yoke' put upon 
her, iv. 392; Lennox, Mrs., liked by 
nobody, iv. 317, n. 2 ; Lichfield, 
visits, V. 48S, n. i, 489, ;/. i; Long, 
Dudley, praises, iv. 94 ; Lyttelton's 
vision, iv. 344, ii. 3 ; Malone's criti- 
cism on her Anecdotes, iv. 393; mar- 
riage, second, alluded to by Boswell, 
ii. 376; signs that it was coming on, 
iv. 1S2, //. 3 ; takes place, iv. 391 ; 
marrying inferiors in rank, ii. 376; 
middle class abroad, absence of a 
happy, ii. 461, n. i; Montagu, Mrs., 
praises, iv. 317, «. 3 ; mother, death 



of her, ii. 302; Musgrave. Mr., ii. 
393, «. I ; iv. 373, «. I ; • My Mis- 
tress,' or ' Madam,' i. 572, officious, 
iv. 159, n. 2 ; Paris, contradictions 
in, iii. 400, «. 3 ; Piozzi Letters : 
see above under Mrs. Thrale. 
Johnson s Letters; Pope's Universal 
Prayer, iii. 394; portrait, iv. iSi, n. 
3 ; praise, blasts by, iv. 94 ; Presto, 
the dog, iv. 400; Prior's love verses, 
praises, ii. 89 ; purse, uneasiness at 
losing her, v. 505; regale, v. 395, «. 
I ; Richardson's love of praise, v. 
451, n. 2; 'severe and knowing,' iii. 
362, w. I ; Siddons, Mrs., as Eu- 
phrasia, V. 117, «. I ; son, loses her 
only surviving, ii. 536, 538; iii. 7, 52, 
n. 2, — Johnson's advice to her, iii. 
155, ;/. i; son, loses her younger, iii. 
5, n. i; Thrale family, describes the 
rise of the, i. 567, n. 4 ; Thrale's 
death, iv. 97; effect on her and John- 
son, V. 179; describes his manners, i. 
571, w. i; jealous of him, iii. 109, //. 
6 , Three Warnitigs, ii. 30 ; tongue, 
could not restrain her, iv. 95; truth, 
indifTerence to : see above under in- 
accuracy; Wales, estate in it, ii 321, 
tour there, ii. 326 ; v. 487-524; wit, 
iv. 119, ;/. 2 ; ^'()ung's, Dr., igno- 
rance of rhopalick verses, v. 307, n. 
i; mentioned, ii. 163, 417, n. 3, 435; 
iii. 33, 38, 109, 143, 150, 282, 423; 
iv. 6, 9, 87, 93, 195, 279; v. 125. 
Thrale, Miss, Baretti's Dialogues 
written for her, ii. 514, n. 2 ; Bath, 
at, in 1780, iii. 479; birth-day party, 
iii. 178, n. 3 ; harpsichord, playing 
on the, ii. 469; Johnson teaches her 
Latin, iv. 398, n. 4; v. 514, n. 2; is 
visited by her in his last illness, iv. 
392, n. i; Marie Antoinette, seen by, 
ii. 442; marries Admiral Lord Keith, 
v. 487, «. i; mother, unfriendly with 



262 



Index lO 



Thrale, Miss. 

her. V. 4S7, n. i; j)ortrait, iv. iSi, //. 
3; Qitecny, iii. 479. «. 5; v. 514, »/. 
2; mentioned, iii. 7; iv. 100, u. 2. 

Thrai.e, Miss Sophia, Johnson advises 
her to study arithmetic, iv. 197, w. 2. 

Three Warnings, 'I' he, ii. 30. 

TuRKSHiNt;, V. 299. 

Thruckmorton, Mr., of Weston Un- 
derwood, V. 500, w. 4. 

THRt)NK, The, something hchind it 
greater than it, iii. 473, 11. i. 

THUANtJS (De Thou), Johnson thinks 
of translating his Histor)', iv. 473 ; 
mentioned, i. 37, 241, ;/. 1. 

TurcYUlDKs, his i|uotatioiis fronj 
Homer, iii. 376. 

Thurlow, first Lord, Hoswell hows 
the intellectual knee to him, iv. 206, 
w. 3; — Joiinml 0/ n Tour, praises, 
i. 3, «. I ; — writes to liim, iv. 378 ; 
his answer, iv. 388; character by Sir 
W. Jones, iv. 403, ;/. i ; co]>yright, 
speech on, ii. 2S4, ;/. 3, 395 ; Cow- 
per, treatment of, iv. 403, ;/. 1 ; duel 
with Andrew .Stuart, ii. 264, //. i ; 
Home Tooke, encounter with, iv. 
377. «• 5; prosecutes him, iii. 403, «. 
i; Horsley, rewards, iv. 505; John- 
son's companion, iii. 25; — , gener- 
ous ofTer to, iv. 402 ; — , letter to, 
iii. 500; V. 414, //. 2; letter from him, 
iv. 402 ; — pension, proposed addi- 
tion to, iv. 378, 402-3, 423-4 ; — 
would prepare himself to meet him, 
iv- 377 ; legal oi)inion on Rev. J. 
Thomson's case, iii. 72 ; Macbean 
and the Charter-house, i. 216; Prince 
of Wales and Sir John Ladd, iv. 475, 
w. 2; 'puts his mind to yours,' iv. 
206 ; Reynolds, letter to, iv. 404, «. 
i; Royal Marriage Hill, ii. 175, w. i; 
small certainties, ii. 369, «. 2; Tay- 
lor's, Dr., lawsuit, iii. 51; mentioned, 
iv. 358- 



Tooke. 

'Ihikoi. M., iv. 118. 
TiiiK.K, iii. 285. 

TlHlM.l.ls, draingcr-. translation, ii. 
520; (|ut>led, iv. 4<K^. w. I. 

Til HHiiRNK TkIAI.. v. 281, M. 2. 

Tkkk.I.i., Richard. F.piilte from tkt 

Hon. ChiirUi Fox, ii. 334, w. 3 ; iii. 

441, //. 4; I' he Project, iii. 3O1. 

w. 2. 
TicKKl.l., Thomas, aided HUcknturr in 

his CreittioH, ii. 124; ///-• bv [dm- 

son, iv. 66. 
Tic;kr, River, v. 276, ;/. 1. 
Tll.l.KMoM, (;iblK>n praises his accu- 
racy, i. 7, «. I. 
Tll.l.orsoN, John, .\rchl>ishop of Can- 

terl)ury, Sennons, iii. 281 ; on tran- 

substantiation, v. 80. 
TiMK AM) Sl'AlK, iv. 30. 
'limes, 7'he, c|uotcd, v. 45O, //. 4. 
Tl.MIDITY, iv. 232, w. I. 
TiMMlNS. Mr. .^amuel, Dr. Johnson in 

Hirinin;.^htini ipiotcd, i. ly.), n. 2, III, 

;/. I. 
TiNDAl., I>r.. ii. 263, //. I. 
Tll'l'Do, iii. 405, n. 2. 
'J'iti, I'rinee, ii. 448. 
Toasts, iv. 34. 
Tdl.AMi, John, i. 33. 
Tdi.t iiKR, Olil Mr., i. 176, M. I. 
Tdl.KRA HON, ii. 2S6-92 ; iv. 14, 249; 

universal, iii. 432. 
ToMASi, Signora, ii. 517, ;/. i. 
7'o Miss — , i. 206. 
'J'o Miss — on her j^ifin;^' (he Authour 

a Purse, ii. 29. 
Tommy Prudent, iv. 9, n. 5. 
ToNSO.N, Jacob, Budgell's Epilogue, 

iii. 53 ; Dryden's engagement with 

him, i. 224, n. i. 
To.NsoN, Jacob, the younger, Johnson 

praises him, i. 263, n. 4; mentioned, 

i. 306, n. I. 
TooKK, Hornc (at first Rev. John 



BosweU's Life of fo/mson. 



263 



Tooke. 



Tradesmen. 



Home), Beckford's speech to the 
King, iii. 228, n. 6 ; Boswell, alter- 
cation with, iii. 402, n. 3; Diversions 
of PurUy, iii. 402, n. 3 ; imprison- 
ment, iii. 357, w. 6; — writ of error, 
"'• 393> w. 2; Johnson's etymologies, 
criticises, iii. 402; reads the preface 
to his Dictionary with tears, i. 344, 
n. 2 ; iii. 402, n. 2 ; Letter to Air. 
Dunning, iii. 402; living, resigns his, 
iii. 228, n. 6 ; Norton, Sir Fletcher, 
attacks, ii. 540, n. 2; pillory, should 
have l)een set in the, iii. 358; — too 
much literature for it, iii. 403 ; — 
Lord Mansfield durst not venture it, 
ib., n. I ; Thurlow, encounter with, 
iv. 377. "■ 5- 

Tni'HAM, Edward, proprietor of 'J /le 
iror/(/, iii. 18, n. 2. 

Tnpi.ADY, Rev. Mr., attacked by Wes- 
ley, V. 39, n. I ; meets Johnson at 
Dilly's, ii. 284, 290, 293. 

Toi'OGRAi'HiCAi. Works, iii. 186, «. 2. 

Topping, Mr., of Christ Church, iii. 
509. 

ToPSKLL, Edward, i. 160, «. 4. 

Tories, defined, i. 340; iii. 198, n. 2; 
generated, how, iii. 371 ; hostile to 
Spain, i. 170, «. 4 ; identified with 
Jacobites, i. 497, n. 3: 0/ Tory and 
IVhi}^, iv. 1 36 ; opposition to the 
Court, ii. 129; reverence for govern- 
ment, iv. 116; Whigs, enmity with, 
iv. 336; Whigs when out of place, i. 
150. 

ToRRfi, M., fire-work maker, iv. 374. 

Torture, i. 540, n. 2. 

TOTTK.MIAM, iii. 52, «. I. 

Touch, sense of, ii. 218. 

Tour of Ei ropk, iii. 520. 

Towers, Dr. J., J:ssiiy on the Life of 
Johnson, iv. 48, ;/. 3; Johnson's Life 
of iMilton, praises, iv. 48 ; Letter to 1 
Dr. Johnson, o~f. , ii. 361. | 

VI.— 22 



TowNLEY, C, an engraver, iv. 485, 
n. 3. 

TowNLEY, Charles, iii. 134, n. 3. 

ToWNMAl.LiNc, iii. 513. 

TowNSEND, Alderman, Johnson at- 
tacks him, ii. 155, w. 2; I-ord Mayor, 
iii. 522; iv. 201, n. 2; refuses to pay 
the land-ta.\, iii. 522; mentioned, iii. 
228, M. 6. 

TovvNSHEND, second Viscount, ii. 391, 
;/. 2; V. 406, n. i. 

To\VNsiiENj>, fourth Viscount (after- 
wards first Maniuis), i. 506, n. 2. 

TowNsiiEM), Right Hon. Charles, 
Akenside, friendship with, iii. 3; 
'Champagne S])eech,' ii. 255, n. 3 ; 
jokes and wit, ii. 255 ; ih., n. 3 ; 
Kames, Lord, criticises, ii. 103, ;/. 2. 

ToWNSilENi), Hon. John, Tickell'b 
Epistle, ii. 334, n. 3. 

TowNsiiENi), Right Hon. Thomas 
(afterwards first Viscount Sydney), 
Coldsmith's ' Tommy Townshend,' 
iii. 264, n. 1 ; attacks Johnson, iv. 
367; moves that Nowell's sermon be 
burnt, iv. 341, «. 4. 

TowNSON, Rev. Dr., ii. 296, n. 3; iv. 
34f>, »• 2. 

Traoe, difficulty, has not much, iii. 
435. «• I ; griming, hke, v. 263 ; in- 
jury done to the body, ii. 251; leis- 
ure of those engaged, v. 66 ; mili- 
tary spirit injured by it, ii. 250; op- 
portunity of rising in the world, ii. 
113; produces no capital accession 
of wealth, ii. 113 ; but intermediate 
good, ii. 202 : profit in pleasure, ii. 
113 ; rapid rise of traders, i. 567 ; 
writers on it, ii. 492. 

Trade, The (the booksellers of Lon- 
don), 1. 507: ii. 395; iii. 324. 

Tradesmen, Chatham's description of 
the honest tradesman, v. 373, n. 3 ; 
excite anger by their opulence, v 



264 



hidex to 



Tradesmen. 

373 ; fires in the parlour, v. 68 ; 
funeral-sermon for a traiiesnian's 
daughter, ii. 140; retireil from busi- 
ness, ii. 137; — one attacked by the 
stone, iii. 200, w. 2; wives, their, iii. 
402. 

TRADrrioN, untrustworthy, v. 255; of 
the Church, v. 80. 

Tk.\(;kI)IANS, ridicule<l in The Idler, 
V. 42, //. I. 

Trac.kdy, a hidicrous one, iii. 270 ; 
passions purged by it, iii. 45; worse 
for being acted, ii. u>6, ;;. 2: v. 42; 
ice ri.AYKKS. 

Translations, how to judge of their 
merit, iii. 2qi; Sir John Hill's con- 
tract for one, ii. 44, /;. 2; what books 
can and what cannot be translated, 
iii. 42, 291. 

Transpiir, iii. 390. 

Transport, Rational, iii. 3S5. 

Transubstantiatiun, v. 80, 99. 

Transylvania, ii. 8. //. 1. 

TraI'AUD, General Cyrus, v. 154. 

Trapaud, Governor, v. 153, 162. 

Trapp, Dr., i. 162, it. 4; iv. 439, w. i. 

Travkllkrs, ancient, guessed ; mod- 
ern travellers measure, iii. 405; mean 
to tell the truth, iii. 267 ; nuxlern 
mostly laughed at, iii. 342; strange 
turn to be displeased, iii. 267 ; un- 
satisfactory unless trustworthy, ii. 
382. 

Travelling, advice about it, i. 499 ; 
Cow'per, Gibbon, Goldsmith and 
Locke on the age for travelling, iii. 
520-1 ; human life great object of 
remark, iii. 342, u. 2 ; idle habits 
broken off, i. 474; Johnson's love of 
it, iii. 510-21; Kasselas, described in, 
i. 393, ;/. 2 ; rates of travelling — 
London to St. Andrews, i. 416, n. 2; 
to Edinburgh, v. 22, n. i ; to Har- 
wich, i. 540, n. I ; to Lichfield, i. 



Truth. 

393, ». 2; ii. 51; iii. 46S: t«> .Milan. 

i. 428, «. 5; to Nalisbury, iv. 270, n. 

4; supplies little to the convcrsalioit, 

iii. 401 ; time ill s|>cnt on it in early 

manhiMxI. iii. 401, 530. 
TkAVKI-s. lM)ok> of, writers very de- 
fective, ii. 433; >hould Mart \%iih 

full minds, iii. 343: writing under a 

feignetl character, iv. 370. 
Tkkason, constructive, iv. loi. 
7'rt-ittisc I'M /'itinfhi^', i. 149. «. 1. 
Trkcotmh K, Alderman, account of 

him, iii. 87, n. 2; his Kni^linh, iii. 87, 

228; Lord .Mayor, iii. 522. 
Trkk, given a jerk by I)ivinc\. iv. 

261. 
Tkkks, their pro|>a(;ation, ii. 193. .W 

under Sti>ri.AMi, trec!i. 
Tkknuiam, i. 42, //. 1. 
Trkvki.yan. Sir G. ()., Johnsfin and 

the Rev. John Macaulay, v. ^tx), m. 

2; Rev. Kenneth .Macaulay 's Ifislory 

0/ SI. h'iUii, V. 136, M. f 
Trial by DfKi., v. 25. 
Trkks. cither knavish or iluliiisli. 111. 

45«- 

Trih.ks, life comi>osc<l of them. i. 
502. ;/. 2; ii. 411, M. 2; contentment 
with them, iii. 274-5 : ''"t^'r imjH)r- 
tance, i. 367; iii. 404. 

TrimLkstown. Lonl. iii. 257-8. 

Trinity, doctrine of the, ii. 291-2; v. 
99. 

Tristram Sliaudy. .S,r Stf.rnk. 

Tronciiin, M., iii. 342, //. i. 

Trotter, Beatrix, iii. 409. 

Trotter, — . an engraver, iv. 485, 
«. 3. 

Trotz, Professor, i. 550. 

Troughton. Lieutenant, a loquacious 
wanderer, v. 511. 

Trlth, children to be strictly trained 
in it, iii. 259; comfort of life, essen- 
tial to the, iv. 352 ; consolation 



BoswelVs Life of yohiison. 



265 



Truth. 



Tytler. 



drawn from it, i. 392; contests con- 
cerning moral truth, iii. 20 ; de\'ia- 
tions from it very frequent, iii. 459; 
human exjierience its test, i. 526 ; 
' I'd tell truth and shame the devil,' 
ii. 254 ; moral and physical, iv. 7; 
' not at home,' i. 505 ; obligatory, 
how far, iii. 364, 428 ; iv. 352-3 ; 
painful to be forced to defend it, iii. 
13 ; perpetual vigilance needed, iii. 
260 ; iv. 416 ; publishing it against 
oneself, iv. 457; v. 240; religious 
truth established by martyrdom, ii. 
2S6 ; rights to utter it and knock 
down for uttering it, iv. 14 ; sick, 
should be told to the, iv. 353 ; so- 
ciety held together by it, iii. 333 ; 
story, essential to a, ii. 496: see un- 
der Johnson, truthfulness. 

TuA.M, Archbishop of, ii. 304, n. 4; iv. 
228, n. 2. 

TuLL, Jethro, v. 369. 

TuNBRiDCK School, iv. 381. 

Ti'NHRiDGK Wklls, Mrs. Montagu 
writes from it in 1760, ii. 73, ;;. I ; 
print of the company there in 1 748, 
1. 220, ;/. i; mentioned, iii. 52, ;/. l. 

Turcot, existence of matter, i. 545, 
«. 2. 

Turkey and the Turks, Boswell wishes 
to visit it, iv. 230; opium in common 
use, iv. 197 ; sweep Greece, ii. 223 ; 
want of Stirpes, ii. 482; mentioned, 
V. 83. 

Turkish Lady, a, i. 39S. 

Turkish Spy, iv. 231; v. 38S. 

Turner, John, a fencing-master, v. 
117, )i. 2. 

Turnpikes, v. 63, n. 2. 

Tursellinus, i. 90. 

TuRTON, Dr., iii. 186. 

TWAIMLEV THE GREAT, iv. 223. 
TWELLS, Leonard, Life 0/ Dr. E. Po- 
cock, iv. 213. 



Twickenham, Boswell and Johnson's 
drive to it, ii. 414-17; Cambridge's, 
Mr., villa, ii. 414; highwaymen, iii. 
271, n. i; society, ii. 137. 

Twining, Rev. Thomas, Recreations 
and Studies of a Country ClerQ'man, 
Johnson's dislike of ' the former, the 
latter,' iv. 220, ;/. i ; — funeral, iv. 
484, w. 2 ; the old willow-tree at 
Lichfield, iv. 429, n. i. 

Twiss, Richard, Travels, ii. 396. 

Tyburn, executions there abolished, 
iv. 217; procession to it, iv. 218, n. 
i; 'Tyburn's elegiac lines,' jiJ..' see 

E.XECUTIONS. 

Tyers, Jonathan, iii. 350. 

Tvers, Thomas, account of him, iii. 
350-1 ; Biographical Sketch of Dr. 
Johnson, iii. 351; v. 82, n. 2; John- 
son like a ghost : see Johnso.n, 
Ghost; — rapid composition, i. 222, 
n. i\ — talked as if on oath, ii. 497, 
n. I ; — wish to visit India and 
Poland, iii. 518 ; Tom Restless of 
The Idler, iii, 350, n. 3; mentioned, 
ii. 123. 

Tyranny, remedy against it, ii. 195. 

Tyrawley, Lord, account of him, ii. 
242, n. 4 ; Chesterfield's saying, ii. 
242. 

Tyrconnel, Lord, Savage's letter to 
him, i. 186, «. 2 ; — patronised by 
him, i. 200, 430, «. 3. 

Tyrwhitt, Thomas, Chatterton's 
poems, iii. 58, n. 5 ; iv. 163, 
n. I. 

Tytler, A. F. (son of W. Tytler, 
afterwards Lord Woodhouselee), 
meets Johnson, v. 441, w. 6, 442, n. 
4, 458. 

Tytler, William, History of Mary 
Queen of Scots, i. 410; v. 312, n. 2, 
441 ; Johnson's Journey, praises, ii. 
349; meets him, v. 449, 451. 



266 



Index to 



Udson. 



Vanity of Human Wishes. 



U. 

Ul)S(iN, Mr., ii. 456. 

Ulyssks, i. 13. 

Uncuhaki.k, i. 31. M. 3. 555. "• 2; iv. 

293. ». 2. 
UNnKRSTAM)lN<;, iitverti'd, iii. 431 ; 

man's superiority over woman, iii. 

61 ; propagating it, ii. 126, n. I ; 

Keynolils's rule for judging it, iv. 

3^5- 
Unk.vsinkss, iv. 315. 
Un-1I)K.\"i>, 'A set of wretched un- 

idea'd girls,' i. 291. 
Union, Tht\ i. 135, n. 2. 
Unmarians, ii. 468, //. I : iv. 144. 

n. 2. 
Unins /lUi-rttr, iii. 289. 
Utiiversal Chroniclt\or Witkly Gazette, 

i. 382, 399, n. 2. 
Universal History, iii. 503; iv. 359. 
Universal I'isiter, i. 2f/), n. I, 354; ii. 

395- 

University, conversation of a man 
taught at an Knglish one, v. 422 ; 
English and Scotch compared, i. 73, 
n. I ; V. 96, n. 2 ; fellowships, value 
of, iii. 15; foreign professorships, iii. 
16; Gibbon, attacked by, iii. 15, «. 
2; rich, not too, as Adam Smith as- 
serts, iii. 15 ; school where every- 
thing may be learnt, should be a, ii. 
426; subscription to the Articles, ii. 
173; Y. 73 ; theory and practice, ii. 
59; iii. 157: see under Camhridgk 
and O.XKoRO, and under Scotland, 
Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and 
St. Andrews. 

Unscottified, ii. 27S; v. 61, n. 2. 

Unwi.ns, the, Cowper's friends, i. 604. 

Upper-Ossory, Lord, iii. 261, n. 4. 

Upstarts, getting into parliament, ii. 
176, 389. 

Urbino, v. 315. 



Urie, Captain, v. 154. 
Urns, iv. 485. w. 3; v. 516, «. 1. 
Una Major. .Si'i' J « > 1 1 N s< 1 s , l>car . 
Usher, .Xrchbishop, avsists I.ydiat, i. 

225, //. 2 ; lununary of thr Irish 

Church, ii. 152. 
UsiiKR, at a sth<Mi|, i. 97. 
UsiRY, law af^ainst, iii. 31). 
Utility, brauty not di-|)rndrnt <>n it, 

ii. 190; iv. 193. 
Utopia, iii. 230, m. 2. 
Utrkciit. Hoswcll a student thcrr, i. 

463, 547; ii. 10; William I'itt (Karl 

• if Chatham), a sludtnt. 11. 203. m. a. 
I'l roxKiKR .Markkt. Johnson doc* 

penance there, i. 65. //. 2 ; iv. 430; 

Michael Johnson's shop, i. 42, n. 2. 
Uzf.s, Duke of, iii. 367. n. 1. 

V. 

Vacancies, eagerness for. iii. 285. 

Vachell. William, iii. 95, n. 3. 

Vacihm, i. 514. n. 2. 

• Vagabond, Mr.,' iii. 4^)7. «. 2. 

I'at^ahonJo, //, i. 234; iii. 467. 

Vails, ii. 8g. 

Valencia, ii. 224. n. 3; iii. 492. 

Valetidinarians, ii. 527; Johnson's 

disgust at them, iii. 2, 172. 
Vallancy, CoKmel. iv. 314, 321. 
Va.nhricm, Sir John, attempted to 

answer Jeremy Collier, iv. 331, h. 3; 

Provoked Husband, ii. 55. w. I ; iv, 

328, n. i; Reynolds's tribute to him, 

iv. 64. 
Vane, Anne, v. 55, ;/. 3. 
Vane, Lady, v. 55, w. 3. 
Vanessa, ii. 446, //. i. 
Vanity of Unman Wishes, account of 

it, i. 222-6; price paid for it, i. 224. 

w. I ; rajiidly composed, i. 223 ; ii. 

17; written mostly at Ilam[>>tead, i. 

223; Hoswell finds in it the means of 

happiness, iii. 139, //. 1; Byron's ad- 



Bosweir s Life of fokusoJi. 



267 



Vanity of Human Wishes. 



Virgil. 



miration of it, i. 224, tr. 3 ; death, 
' kind nature's signal of retreat," ii. 
122 ; l)e (^uincey on tlie opening 
lines, i. 224, //. 3; (iarrick's sarcasm 
on it, i. 225; jolinscjn reads it with 
tears, iv. 53, ;/. 3; misery, 'the doom 
of man,' iii. 226; v. 204; ' Patron and 
the jail,' i. 306-7 ; /khsscIus, resem- 
blance to, i. 396 ; Scott's admiration 
of it, i. 224, //. 3; iv. 53, ;/. 3; spreads 
changed into hunts, iii. 407 ; Vane 
and Sedley, v. 54; Wolsey, Cardinal, 
iii. 251, ;/. I. 

VANsniART, Dr., account of him, i. 
402, «. 3; V. 524, n. 2; story of the 
tlea and the lion, ii. 223, ;/. 2; nien- 
tioned, ii. 220. 

Vass, Lauchland, v. 150, 165. 

Veal, Mrs., her ghost, ii. 187. 

Veale, Thomas, iv. go, n. I. 

Vkmce, Heauclerk plundered there by 
a gaml)ler, i. 440, ;/. i ; Johnson 
wishes to visit it, iii. 22; mentioned, 
i. 420; V. 78, ;/. 2. 

Venus, of Apelles, iv. 120. 

Veracious, iv. 46, n. 3. 

Veracity. See Truth. 

Verbiage, ii. 271; iii. 291. 

Verecttttdiiliis, i. 78, ;/. 3. 

Vernon's Parish Clerk, v. 304, m. 4. 

Versailles, ii. 442, 453 ; theatre, ii. 
453. «• 2. 

Verses, in a dead language, ii. 425 ; 
making them, ii. 17. 

Verses on Ireland, iii. 363. 

Verses on a Sprig of Myrtle, i. 107. 

Verses to Mr. Richardson on his Sir 
Charles Grandison, ii. 29. 

Vertot, ii. 272; iv. 359. 

Vesev, Right Hon. Agmondesham, 
gentle manners, his, iv. 33; Literary 
Club, member of the, i. 554; ii. 363; 
professor in the imaginary college, v. 
i»3- 



\'esi-.v, .Mrs., evenings at her house de- 
scrilied by Langton, iii. 482 ; iv. i, 
;/. I ; by Hannah More, iii. 4S2, «. 
i; by Horace Walpole, iii. 483, n. i; 
by Miss Burney, iii. 484, n. 2 ; by 
Johnson, if>., n. 3; wishes to intro- 
duce Johnson to Kaynal, iv. 501. 

Vesiris, the dancer, iv. 91. 

Vexing Thoughts, iii. 6. 

Vicar of Wakefield. See CuLU- 

SMITII. 

\'k'K, character not hurt by it, iii. 397; 
compared with virtue, iii. 389; Man- 
deville's doctrine: see .Mandevii.le. 

Vicious Intromission, Johnson's argu- 
ment, ii. 225; iii. 116; V. 54. 

Victor, Benjamin, iv. 62. 

\'i<:h>ri.\, ()ueen, death-warrants, iii. 
137, ;/. 2. 

ViDA, i. 266, ;/. I. 

Vidit et erubuit, iii. 346. 

Vii.ette, Rev. Mr., Dodd's dedication 
to him, iii. 189, n. 4; his virtues, iv. 
380. 

Village, I'he, a poem, iv. 141, ;/. i, 
202. 

ViLLiERS, Sir George, his ghost, iii. 
400. 

Vincent, William, Dean of Westmin- 
ster, i. 349, n. 2. 

Vindication of the Licensers of the 
Stage, i. 162-3; ii- ^^8, n. 4. 

ViRC.iL, Aincid, its story, iv. 252 ; 
-Kneas's treatment of Dido, iv. 226; 
Burke's ragged copy, iii. 220, «. 2 ; 
farming, love of, v. 88 ; Homer, 
compared with, iii. 220 ; Johnson 
reads him, ii. 330 ; iv. 252 ; — juve- 
nile translations, i. 59 ; machinery, 
his, iv. 19; Pope, less talked of than, 
iii. 378; printing-house, describes a, 
V. 354-5; Theocritus, compared with, 
iv. 2; quotations — Eclogues i. 5-i. 
533; Eclogues i. ii-iii. 352, n. 4; 



268 



IndtX to 



Virgil. 

Eclogues ii. l6-iii. 99, n. 6, 241, n. 
2; Eclogues iii. 64- v. 331, //. 2; Ec- 
logties iii. iil-v. 318, n. 2; Eclogues 
viii. 43-i. 303, n. 2; Georgics ii. 173- 
iv. 429, ;/. i; Georgics iii. 9-ii. 377, 
;/. 2; Georgics iii. 66-ii. 149; Georgics 
iv. 132-iv. 199, //. 2; Aineid i. 3-v. 
447, «. 2; A'.iteid i. 199-iv. 297, //. 
3; Auieidx. 202-v. 379, ;/. 3; .Eiteid 
i. 204-v. 447, ;/. i; .Kiieid'x. 37S-iv. 
223, M. 2; .Kiteid i. 460-iii. 183, ;;. 
2; .Eneid ii. 5-iii. 73, //. 2; .-Kueid 
ii. 6-ii. 301, «. I ; .Kiicid ii. 49-iii. 
123, ;/. 3; .Kneid ii. 198-iii. 241, //. 
2; .Kneid\\. 368-v. 55, //. 6; .Kueid 
ii. 544-i. 164; .Eneid iii. 461-ii. 25: 
Aineid vi. 273-v. 354 ; .Eiieid vi. 
417-V. 354, «. 4 ; .Eiieid vi. 660-iv. 
223, ;/. 2 ; .I'.iuid vi. 730-i. 77 ; 
Aineid \\\. 424-ii. 312, //. i. 

Virtue, how far followed liy liajipi- 
ness, i. 450, //. 2 ; men naturally 
virtuous compared with those who 
overcome inclinations, iv. 259 ; not 
natural to man, iii. 400 ; practised 
for the sake of character, iii. 3S9, 
397; scholastic, ii. 256; why prefer- 
able to vice, iii. 389. 

Virtue, an Ethick Epistle, iii. 226, 

". 3- 
Vision of Theodore the I/erinit, i. 222, 

559. "• I- 
Vivacity, an art, ii. 530. 
Volcanoes, strata of earth in them, 

ii- 535- 

Volga, iv. 320. 

Voltaire, 'Apres tout, c'est un monde 
passable,' i. 398; attacks, on answers 
to, V. 312, n. 4; Boswell visits him, 
i. 503, «. 2; ii. 5; iii. 342, n. i; v. 
14 ; Bouhours, ii. 103, ;;. 4 ; Byng, 
Admiral, i. 364; Candide, i. 396; iii. 
405; ' Cerberes de la litterature,' v. 
354, n. 4 ; Charles XII's dress, ii. 



Voltaire. 

544, //. 3; I)crh.-im. William, v. 368. 
w. 2; Dcs Mai/caux's I.i/e of BayU, 
i. 33. «. 3 ; DuIhjs, ii. 103, n. 3 ; 
Essai sur les Maurs, ii. 60, n. 3 ; 
fame, his, iii. 298, 378 ; forgotten 
ideai, the situation of, i. 503, «. 3 ; 
Frederick the Crcat, contest with, i. 
503; V. 117,//. 2; Gangitnelli's /yf- 
ters, iii. 325; Hay, Lord Charles, iii. 
10, M. 2; Ilcnault, ii. 439, «. i; His- 
tory of the War in 1741. v. 310; 
I/istoire de Louis XI I ', v. 448 ; 
llolbach's Systhne de la Xatiirr, v. 
53, H. i; Ilumc, his cchu, ii. 60; in- 
surrection of 1745-6, account of ihc, 
iii. 471; Johnson attacks him, i. 576, 
577, //. i; i>raiscs his knowlc<ljjc. hut 
attackN his honesty, i. 503. «. 2; his 
reply, i. 577; — anil Frederick the 
Cireat, i. 503; Julia A/attderille, re- 
views, ii. 461, n. I ; Karnes, Lord, 
ii. 103, w. 2; I.e d/sastre de I.ishoHHf, 
iv. 349, //. I ; I^ Monde com me il va, 
i. 398. ;/. 2; Lcroi, the watch-maker, 
ii. 449, «. i; Lewis XIV, cclcbratctl 
in many lanjijuafjes, i. 142 ; — ami 
-Mile, de la Vallicrc. v. 55, n. 2 ; 
lovcil a striking story, iii. 471; Mac- 
donald, .Sir James, v. 173. n. i ; 
Malagrida. iv. 201, w. i ; master of 
English oaths, i. 503, //. i ; Mau|)cr- 
tuis's death, ii. 62, //. 2; middle class 
in England and P' ranee, ii. 461, «. 
I ; Montagu's, Mrs., Essay, ii. loi ; 
Moreri. v. 354, n. i; narrator, gootl, 
ii. 143; Newton, Leibnitz and Clarke, 
V. 327, //. 2; Pope and Dryden, dis- 
tinguishes, ii. 6; Pope, visits, i. 577, 
;/. i; Pretender, reflections on the, 
V. 227-8; read less than formerly, iv. 
333; Reynolds's allegorical picture, 
V. 311, «. 3; Rousseau, compared 
with, ii. 14; .Shakespeare, attacks, i. 
576; ii. loi, «. 3; made him known 



Boswell's Life of yohnson. 



269 



Voltaire. 



Wales. 



to the French, ii. loi, n. 2; Stuart, 
House of, V. 227; torture in France, 
i. 540, «. 2; trial, has not yet stood 
his, V. 354 ; Universal History, v. 
354; Vir est acerrimi ingenii et pau- 
canivi literaru)n, ii. 465 ; Wesley 
calls him coxcomb and cynic, v. 430, 
n. 4; witchcraft, v. 51, w. 2; won- 
ders, caught greedily at, i. 576, ;/. 4; 
iii. 260, «. I. 

Vossius, Isaac, i. 215, u. 2. 

Voting, privilege of, ii. 389. 

Vows, Cowley's lines on them, iii. 406, 
«. I ; Johnson's warning against them, 
ii. 24 ; a snare for sin, iii. 406 ; if 
unnecessary a folly and a crime, iii. 
406, w. I. 

Vox Viva, V. 369. 

Voyage to Lisbon, i. 313, «. i. 

Voyages to the South Sea. See Soui il 
Sea. 

Vranyken, University of, i. 550. 

Vulgar, The, children of the State, 
ii. 16; iv. 250. 

Vysk, Rev. Dr., Boswell, letter to, iii. 
142; Johnson's letter to him, iii. 142; 
mentioned, iv. 429, ;/. 2. 

W. 

Wadk, General, calls the M'Farlane 
Mr. M'Farlane, v. 178, ;/. 2 ; his 
Hut, V. 152. 

Wager, Charles, ii. 189, ;/. 2. 

Wages, raising those of day-labourers 
wrong, iv. 203 ; v. 300 ; women- 
servants' less than men-servants', ii. 
249. 

Wake, Archbishop, ii. 391, n. i. 

Waldegrave, Lady, ii. 257, ;/. 2. 

Wales, Abergeley, v. 509 ; Anglesea, 
ii. 325; V. 510; Bach y Graig 
(Bachycraigh), iii. 152, ;/. i, 516; v. 
497-500; Bangor, ii. 325; v. 510-11, 
515; Beaumaris, v. 510; Bible in 



Welsh, V. 513, 517; Bodryddan, v. 
504, n. 3; Bodville, v. 512-14; Bos- 
well proposes a tour, iii. 152, 516 ; 
Brecon, iii. 158; Bryn o dol, v. 512; 
Caernarvon, v. 511, 514; castles, 
compared with Scotch, ii. 326 ; v. 
425, ;/. 2 ; — vast size, v. 499, 504, 
511, 516; charitable establishment, 
iii. 289; Chirk Castle, v. 517; church- 
es at Bodville neglected, v. 513 ; 
Clwyd, River, v. 500 ; Conway, v. 
509, 516; Danes, settlement of, v. 
148 ; Denbigh, ii. 323 ; v. 499, 516 ; 
Dymerchion, v. 500-1; Elwy, River, 
V. 500; great families kept a kind of 
court, V. 314 ; Cwaynynog, iv. 485, 
;/. 3 ; V. 502, n. i, 505, 515-16 ; hir- 
ing of harvest-men, v. 516; Holy- 
well, V. 502-4; inhospitality, v. 515; 
inns, V. 509 ; Johnson's tour to 
Wales, ii. 319, 321, 323, 325 ; v. 
487: see Journey into A'orth Wales; 
Kefnamwycllh, v. 515 ; literature, 
indifl'erence to, v. 505 ; IJanerk, v. 
513 ; I.Iangwinodyl, v. 512, 514 : 
IJannerch, v. 500; Llanrhaiadr, v. 
517; Lleweney Hall, Johnson visits 
it, ii. 323 ; V. 497-508 ; description 
of it, V. 497; pales and gates brought 
from it, V. 494; Llyn Badarn, v. 514; 
Llyn Beris, v. 514; Maesmynnan, v. 
507 ; manuscripts, ii. 439 ; Metho- 
dists, V. 514; Mold, V. 496; mutinous 
in 1779, iii. 464, n. 3; offers nothing 
for speculation, ii. 325; Oswestry, v. 
517 ; parson's awe of Johnson, v. 
513, n. 2 ; Penmaen Mawr, ii. 325 ; 
V. 509, 515; Penmaen Rhos, v. 509, 
516; Pwlheli, V. 514; rivers, v. 504, 
;/. 4 ; Ruabon, v. 513, ;/. 2 ; Ruthin 
Castle, V. 504; second sight, ii. 172; 
Tydweilliog, v. 512, 514 ; Ustrad, 
River, v. 504, n. 4; Welsh language, 
how far related to Irish, i. 373; — •, 



270 



JlldtX to 



Wales. 

scheme for preserving it, v. 505 ; — 
uswtl in the (.hiirth services, v. 499, 
501-2, 50S, 512-13; Welshmen, j;en- 
erally have the spirit of gentlemen, 
iii. 312 ; Wrexham, ii. 276, //. 2 ; v. 

517. 
Walks, Prince of. .SW 1'kinck of 

Walks. 

Walkkk, John, 'celebrated master of 
(.locution,' iv. 23S ; deilication to 
Johnson, iv. 485, ;/. 3. 

Walkkk, Joseph Cooper, i. 372 ; iii. 
127, ;/. I. 

Walkkk, Thomas, the actor, ii. 423. 

Walkinc, hahit of, i. 74, w. 5. 

Wall, Dr., iv. 338. 

Wall, cost of a garden, iv. 236. 

Wall, takini^ the, i. 128: v. 262. 

Wallack, — , a Scotch author of the 
first distinction, ii. 60, n. i. 

Waller, Edmund, Amoret and Sacha- 
rissa, ii. 413 ; Divitif Poesii\ the 
communion of saints, iv. 334, n. 2 ; 
Dryden, studied by, iv. 44, w. 2; Epis- 
tU to a Lady, v. 251, «. i; grandson, 
a plain country gentleman, v. 98 ; 
great-grandson, at .\berdeen, v. 96 ; 
Lifehy Johnson, iv. 43, //. I, 44, n. 
2, 46; LcK'int^ at first sii^/it, iv. 42; 
Reflections on the Lord's Prayer, iv. 
335. «• 2; water-drinker, iii. 372, w. 
2; women, praises of, ii. 64-5. 

Walmsley, Gilbert, character by John- 
son, i. 94; iii. 498; Colson, letter to, 
i. iiS; debtor to Mrs. Johnson, i. 92, 
;/. 2; Garrick, letter to. i. 203, n. 2; 
— scholarship, ii. 433, n. i ; (ireek, 
knowledge of, iv. 39, ;/. 3; house, ii. 
534-5; Johnson and Garrick, recom- 
mends, i. iiS; Johnson threatens to 
put Lrene into the Spiritual Court, i. 
117; Whig, a, i. 94, 498; iii. 498, ;/. 
4 ; v. 440. 
Walmsley, Mrs., i. 95, 97. 



Walpole. 

Waliole, Horatio (afterwards 6r»t 
Haron Walpole), iii. 81. n. 5. 

Wali'olk, Horace (afterwards fourth 
Karl of Orfor.l). Adan»s the archi- 
tects, i'. ^72. ». 3 ; addrcssrs to the 
King in 1784. iv. 306, «. 5; arbitrary 
power, courtiers in favour of. iii. 96. 
n. i; arithmetician, a woeful, iii. 857. 
;/. 5; — Professor Santlerxon and 
the multiplication lahie. ii. 21S. m. 4; 
.•\stle, Thomas, i. 179. n. 2: atheism 
and bigotry first cousins, iv. 324. n. 
i; .\tterbury on lUirnct's ///iA-n-, ii. 
245, "■ 3; balliH)ns. iv. 410. «. 3: 
Harrington. Daines. iv. 503 ; Barr>'s 
Analysis, iv. 259. w. i; Mate and the 
Moniins; Post, iv. 342, n. 1 ; Hcau- 
clerk's library, iv. 121. «. 1 ; Heck- 
fords Pribery Bill, ii. 389. ». i; — 
speech to the King. iii. 228. n. (i; - 
tyrannic character, iii. 87, w. 2; /iii'- 
i^'nip/ii.i Pritannica, iii. 198. «. 2 ; 
Plagdcn on Poswell's Life, iv. 35. «. 
4; Hoccagc. Nfnie. <lu. iv. 382, n. i; 
honniots, collection of. iii. 2l8, n. l; 
Boswell calls on him, iv. 128. m. 2; 
— Corsiea. ii. 52, m. I. 81. w. 2; — 
Life of fohnson, iv. 363. «. 3 ; — 
presence, silent in, //•.,• Burke's wit, 
iv. 318. //. 2; Bute's. Lord, familiar 
friends, i. 447. n. 3; — and the ten- 
ure of the judges, ii. 405. «. 2; Cam- 
eron's execution, i. 168, «. 2; Cham- 
bers's Treatise on Architecture, iv. 
216. n. 3; Chatham's funeral, iv. 240, 
«. i; Chatterton and ( ioldsmith. iii. 
59. n. 2; Chesterfield as a patron, iv. 
382. w. i; — wit, ii. 243, n. 3: Gib- 
ber, Colley, i. 464, w. i; iii. 83, n. 2; 
City Address to the King in 1781, 
iv. 161. //. 4; City and Blackfriars 
Bridge, i. 406, n. i; Clarke, Dr.. and 
(^ueen Caroline, iii. 281, n. 2: Clive. 
Mrs., iii. 271. m. i; iv. 280. w. 3; Cock 



BosweWs Life of yohnson. 



271 



Walpole, Horace. 



I.ane Ghost, i. 470, n. 4; Codrini^tou, 
Life of Colonel, iii. 232, ;/. i; Corn- 
wallis's capitulation, iii. 404, ;/. 3 ; 
Critical Revic~L\ iii. 37, ;/. 4 ; Cross 
Readitigs, iv. 372, //. 1; Cumhcrlaiui, 
William, Duke of, cruelty of, ii. 430, 
//. I ; Cumberland's Odes, iii. 50, //. i; 
Dalrymple, Sir John, ii. 241, n. 2 ; 
Dasbwood, Sir Y ., ii. 155, n. 3; Dev- 
onshire, third Duke of, iii. 212, u. 2; 
Dodd's execution, iii. 136, w. 4 ; — 
attempt to bribe the Chancellor, iii. 
158, «. 2; — sermon at the Mag- 
dalen House, iii. 158, n. 3; Dodsley, 
Robert, ii. 511, //. 4; Drummond's 
Travels, v. 368, //. i; Dublin theatre 
riot, i. 447, ;/. i; duelling, ii. 260, ;/. 
3 : Dundas, 'Starvation,' ii. 1S4, n. 
T : Dunning's motion on the influence 
of the Crown, iv. 255, ;/. i; Eton, re- 
visits, iv. 147, ;/. I ; Fit/.herbert's 
suicide, ii. 262, ;/. 3 ; Fitzpatrick, 
Richard, iii. 441, ;/. 4; free-thinking, 
ib.; French, afTect philosophy and 
free -thinking, ih. ; — gentleman's 
visit to London in 1764, iv. 107, ;/. 
3; — ladies, indelicacy of the talk 
of, ii. 462, «. I ; iii. 400, «. 3 ; — 
meals, ii. 461, «. 2; — middling and 
common people, ii. 461, «. i; — phi- 
losophy, iii. 346, ;/. 3; — savatis, iii. 
288, w. I ; — ' talk gruel and anato- 
my,' iv. 18, //. I ; gaming-clubs, iii. 
27, II. i; Garrick's acting, iv. 2S1, n. 
I ; — funeral, iv. 240; George I 
and Miss Brett, i. 201, «. i; — burnt 
two wills, ii. 391, ;/. 2; his will burnt, i 
ib. ; iv. 124, n. I ; George II and 
Alexander s Feast, i. 243, n. \\ — 
character, i. 169, n. \ ; — and the 
fast of Jan. 30, ii. 175, n. \\ — and 
his father's will, ii. 391, n. 2; iv. 124, 
n. i; George III aims at despotism, 
i. 134, «. 2 ; — as commandei - in- 



chief, iii. 415, n. 4; — coronation, iii. 
10, «. 4 : V. 1 1 7, «. I ; — and Sir John 
Dalrymple, ii. 241, //. 2; — and the 
fast of Jan. 30, ii. 175, n. i; — and 
Johnson's Journey, ii. 332, //. 2 ; — 
ministers his tools, iii. 464, //. 3; his 
own minister, i. 491, n.\; — mother 
and Lord Bute, iv. 14S, ;/. i; — and 
the sea, i. 393, ;/. 2 ; George IV in 
his youth, ii. 37, n. 3; Leonidas Glo- 
ver, V. 132, ;/. 4; Goldsmith's envy, 
i. 479, ;/. 2; — an ' inspired idiot,' i. 
477, «. 6; ' silly,' i. 449, //. 3; — and 
Malagrida, iv. 20i, n. 2 ; — She 
Stoops to Conquer, ii. 239, ;/. 2; Gor- 
don Riots, iii. 487, n. 3; v. 374, ;/. 2; 
Gower, Lord, i. 343, ;/. i; Granger'^ 
patron, iii. 104; Gray, .Sir James, ii. 
203, ;/. 2; Grenville, George, ii. 155, 
n. 3; Gunning, the Misses, v. 409, n. 
I ; Ilagley Park, v. 88, u. 3, 520, n. 
2; Hamilton, \V. G.. i. 602; Heroic 
Epistle ascribed to him, iv. 364; 
Highland regiment in Jersey, v. 162, 
;/. 2; highwaymen, iii. 271, ;/. i; Hill, 
Sir John, ii. 43, n. 2; History of thi 
House of Vi'efy, iv. 229, n. i ; Hollis, 
Thomas, iv. 113, w. i ; Hooke, Na- 
thaniel, v. 200, n. i; ' Horry ' Wal- 
pole, iv. 362; Hotel du Chatelet, ii. 
447, n. i; Houghton Collection, sale 
of the, iv. 386, n. 2; House of Com- 
mons' contest with the City in 177 1, 
ii. 343, n. 4; Hume, David, atheist 
and bigot, iv. 224, «. i ; — conversa- 
tion, ii. 271, ;/. I ; — French, i. 508, 
;/. 3 ; Hurd, Bishop, iv. 219, «. 2 ; 
Irish peers, creation of, iii. 463, «. 2; 
Italy, tour to, iii. 36, n. i ; Jealous 
Wife, The, i. 422, n. i; Jenkinson, 
Charles (first Earl of Liverpool), iii. 
166, «. I ; Johnson and Barnard's 
verses, iv. 499 ; — ' Billingsgate on 
Milton,' iv. 47, n. 1; — bombast, i. 



272 



Index to 



Walpole, Horace. 



449, ;/. 3; — character, ignorant of, 
iv. 499; — Debates, i. 585-^: — • ^'*•■- 
scril)e(l by, iv. 362 ; — history re- 
duced to four lines, i. 5, it. \\ — at 
Lady I.ucan's, iii. 483, ;/. 1 ; — mon- \ 
umciU, iv. 488, «. i; — , ' not a true j 
admirer' of, iv. 363; attacl<s on him, 
ib., US. I and 3 ; — at the Royal 
Academy, iv. 363, //. i; — on sacri- 
lege, V. 129, II. 2 ; — writing for 
money, iii. 22, //. 3 ; Johnson the ! 
horse -rider, i. 461 ; Junius, author- 1 
ship of, iii. 428, //. 3; Keiipel's Court- J 
martial, iv. 15, ;/. i; Kinnoul, I.onI, > 
ii. 242, ;/. 4 ; liiiels in 1770, i. 134, | 
;/. 2 ; Lort, Rev. Dr., iv. 335, //. 2 ; I 
Lovat's execution, i. 21)9, 11. 2; Love 
and Madness, iv. 215, ;/. 4; l.ucan'.s, i 
Lady, bluestocking meeting, iii. 483, 
n. i; Lyttelton, first Lord, i. 3IU, n. 
2 ; Lyttelton, second Lord, iv. 344, \ 
n. 3 ; Maccaroni Cluh, v. 95, //. i ; 
Macclesfield, Earl of, i. 310, //. I ; 
Macdonald, Sir J., i. 520, n. i; Mack- 
intosh's criticism of his style, iii. 36, 
ii. 1; Mac])herson and the newspa- 1 
pers, ii. 351. n. 3; Mac Swinny (old ! 
Swinney), iii. Si, ;/. 5 ; Mansfield's, j 
Lord, attacks on the press, i. 134, ;/. 
2; — severity, iii. 136, //. 4; Mason's ; 
Memoirs of Gray, i. 34, ;/. 2; Mead, , 
Dr., iii. 404, ;/. 2 ; Methodists ex- 1 
pelled from Oxford, ii. 214, //. i ; 
militia in 1778, iii. 410, 11. i, 415, ;/. 
4; Millar, Andrew, i. 332, ;/. 3; Mil- 
ler, Lady, ii. 385, n. 2; Miller, Philip, 
V. 88, n. 3 ; Miss, a, v. 210, 11. 3 ; , 
Montagu, Mrs., at the Academy, ii. 
loi, ;/. 3 ; — at Lady Lucan's, iii. 
483, ;/. i; Morell, Dr., v. 39S, ;/. 2; 
Motion, The, a caricature, v. 324, n. 
2 ; ' mystery, the wisdom of block- 
heads,' iii. 369, ;;. 3; Nichols's Life 
of Boivyer, iv. 504 ; North. Lord. 



and .Mr. .\Licdonald, v. 174. n. I ; 
Northundierland, DuthcNS of, ii. 385, 
n. 4 ; Northumljcrland, Karl of. ii. 
151, II. 2; Norton, Sir Fletcher, ii. 
540. //. 2 ; OglethoriH;, (Jencral, i. 
148. //. I ; t>rft)rd, Karl of, liccomo, 
iii. 2 1 8, /;. i ; Otaheitans, The, v. 
374, II. 2; I'antheon in Oxford Street, 
ii. \(y\, II. i; pantomime, i. I2<>, w. i; 
I'aoli, ii. 81, //. 2. 94, «. 1; V. 1, M. 3; 
I'aris. ii. 462, n. I ; iii. 4«*). «. 3: Pat- 
agonia. Cliants of, V. 442, «. 2; |>ccr- 
ages. new, iv. 2S8, w. 2 ; Pclham'.s 
death, i. 313, w. I ; Pembroke, tenth 
Karl i>f, ii. 426, n. i; jK'tilii>ns to the 
king against the liou.sc of Commons, 
ii. 104. //. 2; Philipps, Sir John and 
Lady, v. 314, //. 3 ; press pri»M:tu- 
tions, ii. 68, //. 4 ; pri/c-fighling, v. 
260, //. 2; public afTairs in 1779, iii. 
4O4, //. 3 : Richardson's novcN, ii. 
200, //. I ; Royal Aca«lcmy •linncr, 
iii. 59, w. 2; Royal Marriage Hill. ii. 
175. //. I ; Savage, Richard, i. 197, 
II. 3; Scotch and the (jordon Riots, 
ii. 343, w. 4 ; — and the House of 
Commons, ih.; — officers of militia, 
iii. 453, //. 2; — recruiting in Lon- 
don, iii. 454, ;/. I ; Scotland engen- 
dering traitors, iii. 489, //. 3; Seeker, 
Archbishop, iv. 34, ;;. 2; Shebl)eare, 
Dr., broken Jacobite physician, iv. 
131, /;. I ; — pension, ii. I2g, //. 2; 
— trial for libelling dead kings, iii. 
18, //. i; sinecure office, iii. 22, w. 3; 
slavery, iii. 228, ;/. 2, 232, //. I : Smol- 
lett's abuse of Lord I yttelton, iii. 38, 
'/. I ; — Iluiiiplu-v Clinker, i. 406, w. 
I ; Southwark election of 1774, ii. 
328, n. 2 ; speeches in parliament, 
effect of, iii. 264, w. i; Strawberry, v. 
520, «. 2; tea, universal use of, i. 362, 
n. 4 ; Thurot's descent on Ireland, 
iv. 118. n. I ; title, succeeds to the. 



Bosweirs Life of fohnson. 



273 



Walpole. 



Warburton. 



iv. 362, ;/. 3; Townshend, Charles, ii. 
255. >i- 3 ; transpire, iii. 390, n. 2 ; 
Trecothick, Alderman, iii. 87, ;/. 2 ; 
Tristram Shandy, ii. 514, n. 3; Ty- 
rawley, Lord, ii. 242, ;/. 4; Usher of 
the Exchequer, iii. 22, ;/. 3; vails, ii. 
Sg, ;/. I ; Vesey's, Mrs., Hahels, iii. 
483, //. 1 ; Voltaire, letter from, ii. 
lOi, ;/. 2 : Walpole's, Sir R., great 
plan of honesty, i. 152, ;/. i; — low 
opinion of history, ii. gi, ;/. i; War- 
burton and Helvetius, iv. 302, n. i; 
Westmoreland, Earl of, at O.xford, i. 
325, ;;. 3; Whigs and Tories, iv. 136, 
n. 4; Whitaker's Manchester, iii. 37g, 
«. 2 ; Whitehead, I'aul, i. 144, ;;. 4 ; 
Whitehead, William, i. 464, ;/. i ; 
Willes, Chief Justice, iv. 120, n. i ; 
IVorld, The, contributor to, i. 29g, 
n. i; Yonge, Sir William, i. 22S, ;/. 
4; Young, Dr., v. 307, n. i; Young, 
Professor, parody of Johnson, iv. 452, 
«. i; Zotieide, iii. 44, //. 5. 
Wali'OLE, Sir Robert, banished to the 
House of Lords, i. sgi; Hath, Lord, 
sarcastic speech to, v. 385, ;/. 2 ; 
Clarke's refusal of a bishopric, iii. 
281, «. 2; debates, reports of, unfair, 
i. 582; iv. 363; Elwall's challenge, ii. 
i8g, K. 2 ; ferment against him, i. 
150-1; ii. 3gg, n. i; fixed star, a, i. 
152; v. 3S6; ' hapjjier hour, his," iii. 
66, ;/. i; iv. 419, ;/. 2; I/osier's Ghost, 
v. 132, ;/. 4 ; indecent pamphlet 
against him, iii. 271; Johnson attacks 
him in London, i. 150: — in Mar- 
mor No7-folciense,'\. 163; — inveighs 
against him, i. i8g; learned, neglect- 
ed the, v. 66, n. 2; levee, his bow at 
a, iii. 103 ; ministry stable and grate- 
ful, ii. 3gg ; patriots, iv. loi, n. 2; 
peace-minister, i. 152; v. 386, n. 2 ; 
Pitt, distinguished from, ii. 225 ; 
Pope's pride in him, iii. 395, n. 2 ; 



prime - minister, a real, ii. 407; iv. 
g4 ; 'read, I cannot,' ii. 386, n. 3; 
read Sydenham, v. 106, ;;. i; talked 
bawdy at his table, iii. 66 ; Tories 
and Jacobites, confounded, i. 4g7, n. 
3; ' Walelop ' and 'Right Hon. M. 
Tullius Cicero,' i. 582-3; Whiggism 
under him, ii. 135 ; Yonge, Sir W., 
character of, i. 228, n. 4; mentioned, 
V. 324, ;/. 2. 

W.^LSALL, i. 100, n. 2. 

Walsh, William, 'knowing,' i. 291, n. 
2; Retirement, ii. 153, ;/. 1. 

Walsingiiam, Admiral, iii. 24, ;/. 2. 

W.\LTO.N, Isaac, Complete Angler, iv. 
360; Donne's vision, ii. 510; Lives, 
his, one of Johnson's favourite books, 
ii. 417; — projected edition, ii. 320, 
324-6, 510; iii. 122; low situation in 
life, ii. 417; a great panegyrist, ib.; 
quotes Topsell, i. 160, ;;. 4. 

Wants, fewness of, ii. 543, ;/. 3, 544. 

War, encourages falsehoods, iii. 303, 
n. I ; Kames's opinion ridiculed, i. 
455. «• i; lawfulness, ii. 260; miser- 
ies of it, ii. 154; one side or other 
must prevail, iv. 231; talk of it, iii. 
301. 

Wakhlr'ion, William, Bishop of 
Cdoucester, abuse, extended his, v. 
105, Allen's niece, married, ii. 41, n. 
3; v. gi; Hirch, Dr., letter to, i. 33; 
'blazes,' v. 91; Boswell imitates his 
manner, iii. 352, n. 4; Churchill at- 
tacks him, iv. 57, w. 3 ; v. 91, n. 4 ; 
Divine Legation, i. 273, n. i; iv. 57; 
quotations from it, v. 483; Doctrine 
of Grace, v. 105; ' llounders well,' v. 
105, n. 2; general knowledge, ii. 41; 
Helvetius, would have loorked, iv. 
302, n. I ; infidelity, prevalence of, 
ii. 411, ;/. I ; Johnson's account of 
him, v. 90-91 ; — and Chesterfield, 
i- 305; — gratitude to him, i. 203; — 



274 



Index to 



Warburton. 

and he cannot bear each other's 
style, iv. 57; — Macbeth, praises, i. 
203; — meets him, iv. 55, «. 3, 56; 

— praises him, i. 306, n. i; iv. 55-7; 

— treats him with great respect, iv. 
332; lie, use of the word, iv. 58; Lin- 
coln's Inn preacher, ii. 41, «. 3; 
Lowth, controversy with, ii. 42 ; v. 
142, 4S3; Mallet attacks him, i. 381; 

— Life of Hiuon, iii. 221 : — pro- 
jected Life of Marlborou<^h, iii. 221 ; 
metaphysics, ignorance of, v. 91, «. 3; 
Parr's Tracts by Warburton, &'c., iv. 
55. "■ 3; Pope's Essay on Man, ii. 
41, ;/. 3; iii. 456, «. 4; v. 90; — made 
him a Hishop, ii. 41, n. 3; v. 91; — 
want of genius, v. 105, ;;. i; reading, 
great and wide, ii. 41; iv. 57; v. 64, 
«. 3, 91 ; Shakespeare, edition of, i. 
203,381; iv. 55; v. 277,;/.^j; — lines 
applicable to it, iv. 332; Strahan, in- 
timate with, V. 104; ii. 38, n. 2; The- 
obald, compared with, i. 381 ; — , 
helped, v. 90; To the most impudent 
Man alive, i. 3S1 ; ' vast sea of words,' 
i. 301, «. 4, 322 ; I'ie-o of Jiolinir. 
broke' s Philosophy, i. 382, n. 2; writes 
and speaks at random, v. 105: Wych- 
erly's definition of wit, iii. 27, n. 2. 

Warburton, Mrs., ii. 41, ns. 2, 3. 

Ward, the quack doctor, iii. 443. 

Warulaw, Sir Henry, ii. 105, n. 2. 

Warley Cami', iii. 410-12, 415 ; vis- 
ited by the King, //'. , //. 3; by Faoli, 
iii. 419. 

Warner, Rebecca, Original L.etters, 
iv, 40, n. 4. 

Warner, Rev. R., Tour through the 
Northern Counties, iv. 430, ;;. 2. 

Warrants, general, ii. 83. 

Warren, Sir Charles, iv. 460, n. 4. 

Warren, Dr., attends Johnson, iv. 
460, 474 ; member of the Literary 
Club, i. 555; mentioned, iii. 4S3. 



Warton. 

Wakrkn, John, of Pembrokeshire, \. 

103. 

W.\KRKN, .Mr., the Uinningham bouk- 
scllcr, i. 99-103. 

WARRiN«;r<)N, iii. 473; v. 503. 

Warton, Rev. Dr. Jt>>eph, lleadniAs- 
ter of Winchester College, AihfU' 
turer, wrote for the, i. 2<)2, n. 3, 293; 
Bolingbrnkc's share in Pn|H*''i F.tsaf 
on Man, iii. 4f;6, //. 4 ; lUirkr and 
Chambers, rcct)mmcniK, lo W. (i. 
Hamilton, i. 601-2; Clarkr'>, Dr., 
agility, i. 3, n. 1\ Donatus on a |»as. 
sage in Terence, ii. 410, «. 3 ; en- 
thusiast by nile. iv. 39. n. i; Etsav 
on /'ope, Johnson reviews it, i. 357; 
iii. 25t>; — >vcond volume delaye<i, 
i. 519; ii. 191; (iarrick's offentc at 
Johnson, ii. 231. n. 3; (ioldsmilh'H 
conversation, i. 477. n. i; Hamilton, 
W. t;., letter from, i. Un-2: Hooke'i 
payment from the Duchevs of Marl- 
borough, V. 200, ns. I, 3; inoculates 
his children, iv. 338, n. 2 . Johnson 
and Dr. Hurney's s<»n, iii. 418: — 
estrangement with. i. 313, n. 2 ; ii. 
47, //. i; — letters to him: see under 
Johnson, letters; /.ear, note on, ii. 
132; Literary Club, member of the, 
i. 554; manner, lively, ii. 47; — taken 
off by Johnson, 1'^., n. 1; iv. 32. «. 2; 
I'ope's cousin, meets, iii. 82. w. 1; 
ra|>turist, ii. 47, m. i; Round-Robin, 
signs the, iii. <;5 ; a scholar, yet a 
fool, iii. 9^). n. 2; Thomsim, praises, 
iii. 133; ll'orlJ, Z'^-, origin of the 
name, i. 234, n. 4; mentioned, i. 376, 
484, n. 2, 519, n. 3; ii. 38. «. 2; iii. 
142. 

Warto.n, .Mrs. Joseph, i. 574, n. i. 

Warton, Rev. Thomas, account of 
him, i. 313, n. 2; appearance, ii. 47, 
w. i; — described by Miss Rumey, 
iv. 8, «. I ; Boswell and Johnson call 



Boswclls Life of yoknson. 



275 



Warton. 



Well-bred Man. 



on him, ii. 510; Chatterton's forgery, 
exposes, iii. 58, n. 5 ; iv. 163, u. i ; 
contributions to the Life of Johttsoii, 
i. 9 ; Eat; ft' and Robin A't'<//>rrt7s/, i. 
135, M. 2 ; Hcroick Epistle, the au- 
thorship of the, iv. 364 ; Muggins, 
quarrels with, iv. 8; Idler, contribut- 
ed to the, i. 382; Johnson, ebtrange- 
mcnt with, i. 313, ;/. 2; — letters to 
him: sec under Johnsu.v, letters; — 
Oxford visit in 1754, i. 313; — par- 
odies his poetr}'. iii. 179, ;/. 3 ; — 
preface to his Dictionary, i. 344, //. 
3; Literary Club, member of the, i. 
554; Ol'senuitions on Spenser's Eairy 
Queen, i. 314, ;/. i, 321, 335; iv. 8; 
Ode on the Eirsl of April, iii. iSo, 
«. 2; poet-laureate, i. 213, n. 2; I'ro- 
fessor of Poetry, i. 374, ". i; I'ro^ress 
of Discontent, i. 328, n. 2, iii. 368, ;/. 
I ; pupils and lectures, i. 323, ;/. 3 ; 
Savage's Bastard, i. 191 ; Shake- 
speare, notes on, i. 389; ii. 132, men- 
tioned, i. 91, ;/. I, 92, ;/. I, 376. 

Warton, Rev. Thomas (the father of 
the two Wartons), i. 519, n. 3. 

Washington, George, ii. 550. 

Wassk, Christopher, v. 508. 

Waste, iii. 301, 361. 

Water, Johnson's advice to ilrink it, 
iii. 192. 

Waters, Ambrose, iv. 463, ;/. 3. 

Waters, Mr., Paris banker, ii. 3. 

Watforu, ii. 234, n. i, 345, //. i. 

Watson, Richard, Eishoj) of Llan- 
daff, bishops' revenues, iv. 137, ;/. 2; 
Chemical Essays, iv. 137, 268, n. 3; 
how to rise in the world, ii. 369, 
n. 2. 

Watson, Professor Robert, of St. An- 
drews, History of Philip II, iii. 118, 
Johnson, entertains, v. 65-8, 72, 76; 
— manners, wonders at, v. 79; talks 
on composition, v. 75. 



Watson, Mr., 'out in the '45,' v. 181, 
n. 2. 

Watts, Dr. Isaac, .\bney, Sir Thomas, 
lived with, i. 570, «. ^ ; descends 
from the dignity of science, ii. 468, 
//. 3; Johnson adds him to tlie Lives, 
iii. 143, 421; iv. 41, ;;. 3; — recom- 
mends his Works, iv. 360; poetry, 
his, better in its design than in itself, 
iii. 408 ; taught Dissenters elegance 
of style, i. 361. 

Wkai.th. See Money. 

Wealth of A'ations. See Smith, 
Adam. 

Weather and Seasons, their influence 
acknowledged, i. 385, «. i ; ii. 302 ; 
iv. 299, «. 2, 407, 415; ridiculed by 
Johnson in The Idler, i. 384; ii. 302, 
;/. 2; at the Mitre, i. 493; 'all im- 
agination,' i. 523; weather does not 
afl'ect the frame, ii. 410 ; iii. 347 ; 
ridiculed by Reynolds, i. 385, «. i ; 
Gray's 'fantastic foppery,' i. 235, «. 
5; talking of the weather, i. 493, n. 
2; iv. 415, ;/. 2. 

Webster, Rev. Dr. Alexander, ac- 
count of him, ii. 309, «. 2; v. 56; his 
manuscript account of Scotch par- 
ishes, ii. 314, 11. I ; mentioned, ii. 
309, 3". 315: V. 441, ;/. 4, 446, 449, 
452. 

Weuuerburne, Alexander. Sec 
Lolghborolc;!!, Lord. 

Weduerburne, Mr., of Ballandean, 
iii. 243, n. I. 

Welch, Father, ii. 459. 

Welch, Miss, iii. 246. 

Welch, Saunders, account of him, iii. 
245-6 ; death, iii. 248, n. i ; exami- 
nation of a boy, iv. 213 ; Johnson, 
letter from, iii. 246 ; London poor, 
state of the, iii. 455. 

Well-breu Man, distinguished from 
an ill-bred, iv. 369. 



76 



Index to 



Welsh. 



Western Islands. 



Welsh. See under Wales. 

Welwyn, iv. 138; V. 308. 

Wendover, ii. 18, n. 2. 

Wentwokth, Mr., master of Stour- 
bridge .School, i. 57. 

Wentwokth House, ' public din- 
ners,' iv. 423, «. 3. 

Wesley, Rev. Charles, ill-used by 
Oglethori)e, i. 147, ;/. 4 ; ' more sta- 
tionary man than his brother,' iii. 

338. 
Wesley, Rev. John, Hehmen's Myste- 
rium Magvuvi, ii. 141, n. 2; bleed- 
ing, opposed to, iii. 172, n. 4 ; Bos- 
well introduced to him by Johnson, 
iii. 448; Calm Address to our Amer- 
ican Colonies, V. 39, ;/. i ; Cheyne's 
rules of diet, iii. 31, ;/. i ; conversa- 
tion, iii. 261, 337; Dodd, Dr., visits, 
iii. 138, It. 2; Edinburgh, filthy state 
of, V. 24, ;/. 2; farmers dull and dis- 
contented, iii. 402, n. I ; French 
prisoners, i. 409, ;/. i; ghost, believed 
in a Newcastle, iii. 337, 448 ; Hall, 
Rev. Mr., his brother-in-law, iv. 107, 
«. i; highwayman, never met a, iii. 
271, it. i; Johnson complains that he 
is never at leisure, iii. 261 ; — letters 
to him, iii. 448; v. 39, ;/. i ; — , spends 
two hours with, iii. 261, ;/. 2; jour- 
neys on foot, i. 74, n. 5; Law's Seri- 
ous Call, i. 79, ;/. i; leisure, never at, 
iii. 261 ; luxury, attacks the apolo- 
gists of, iii. 65, ;/. I ; manners and 
cheerfulness, iii. 261, ns. 2, 3; Mar- 
shalsea prison, i. 351, ;/. i ; Meier, 
Rev. Mr., ii. 290, 11. 2 ; Methodists 
and a Justice of the Peace, i. 460, «. 
I , — , name of, i. 530, n. 3 ; Mora- 
vians, quarrels with the, iii. 138, «. 
3; iiiiiddVy uses the term, ii. 415, ;;. 
3; Nash, silences, iv. 333, ;/. 2; New- 
gate prisons in London and Bristol, 
iii. 490, ;/. I ; 'old woman, an,' iii. 



195; Oxford, devotional meetings at, 
i. 67, It. 3 ; I'aoli's arrival in Kng- 
land, ii. Si, «. 2; plain preaching, i. 
532, »/. i; polite audiences, iii. 402, 
;/. I, politician, a, v. 39, 11. i; pris- 
oners under sentence of death, iii. 
138, «. 2; iv. 380, «. 2; — almost re- 
grets a reprieve to one, v. 228, n. 4; 
readings and writings, range of his, 
iii. 337, ;/. 2; Robertson's Charles I', 
ii. 272, >/. i; rod, taught to fear the, 
i. 54, //. 3; Roman Catholics, attacks 
the, V. 39, /;. i; Rousseau and Vol- 
taire, v. 430, u. 4 ; Rutty, Dr., iii. 
194, //. i; St. .Andrews, students of, 
V. 71, ;/. 2, sister, his, Mrs. Hall, iv. 
107 , slaves, religious education of, 
ii. 31, «. I ; solitary religion, v. 70, 
;/. 5; tea, against the use of, i. 362, 
//. 4; travels and suflTerings, ii. 142, 
;/. i; iii. 337, u. 2; University life in 
England and Scotland, i. 73, »/. 1 ; 
Warburton, answers, v. 105 ; witch- 
craft, believes in, ii. 205, n. i. 

Wesley, Mrs. (mother of Charles and 
John Wesley), i. 54, ;/. 3. 

West, Cilbert, in the army, iii. 303, //. 
i; translation of I'indar, iv. 33. 

West, Richard, describes Christ 
Church, Oxford, i. 89, ;/. i; lines on 
his own death, iii. 188, u. i. 

West, Rev. W., edition of A'asselas, i. 
394. "■ 2. 

West Lndlvn Isl.wds in 1779, "'• 
464, ;/. 3 ; mentioned, ii. 521 . see 
Jamaica and Slaves. 

Westcote, Lord, Johnson and the 
Thrales visit him, v. 520, ft. i, Lord 
Lyttelton's vision, iv. 344-5; portrait 
at .Streatham, iv. 181, ft. 3 , men- 
tioned, iv. 66, ;/. I, 68, ti. 2. 

Western Islands. See under Bos- 
well, Jotirnal of a Tour to the 
Hebrides, Journey to the H'esterH 



BoswelTs Life of yohnson. 



277 



Western Islands. 



White. 



Islands, Martin, M., and Scot- 
land, Hebrides. 

Westminster. See under London. 

Westminster, Deanery of, resignation 
of the, iii. 128, n. 4. 

Westminster Abbey, Chambers's epi- 
taph, i. 253, ;/. 3 ; Gibber's, Mrs., 
grave, v. 144, n. 3; Goldsmith's epi- 
taph, iii. 94; — and Johnson at the 
Poets' Corner, ii. 273; Handel musi- 
cal meeting, iv. 326; Johnson's grave, 
iv. 483, 487; Jonson's, Ben, grave, v. 
459. "• 3 ; Macpherson's grave, ii. 
341, ;/. i; Milton's monument, i. 264, 
n. I ; Reynolds describes its monu- 
ments, iv. 4S8, n. 2; ' walls disgraced 
with an English inscription,' iii. 97. 

Westmoreland, seventh Earl of, 
Chancellor of the University of Ox- 
ford, i. 402, ;/. 4; meets the Pretend- 
er in London, i. 324, ;/. 2. 

Wetherell, Rev. Dr., Boswell and 
Johnson visit him, ii. 504; Johnson's 
letter to him, ii. 486; mentioned, ii. 
409; iv. 355. 

Wey, River, ii. 156, n. 4; iii. 412, n. 4. 

WilARNCLlFFE, Lord, iii. 453, ;;. i. 

Wharton, Marquis of, iv. 367, «. i. 

Wharton, Rev. Henry, ii. 278, n. 2. 

Wheat, price of, in 1778, iii. 256, ;/. 3. 
See Gt)RN. 

Wheatley, near Oxford, iv. 355. 

Wheatley, Mr. H. B., Wraxall's Me- 
moirs, ii. 46, H. 2. 

Wheatly and Bennet on the Common 
Prayer, iv. 245, «. 3. 

Wheeler, Rev. Dr., death, iii. 416, n. 
4 ; iv. 270, n. I ; experience as a 
country parson, iii. 497 ; Johnson's 
liking for his talk, iii. 416, n. 4, 417; 
— letter to him, iii. 416; mentioned, 
V. 522, «. I. 

Wheeler, Mr., of Birmingham, v. 
522. 



Whiggism, corrupted since the Revo- 
lution, ii. 135; hounds, its, iv. 47, 74; 
Lyttelton's vulgar Whiggism, ii. 253; 
no room for it in heaven, v. 439. 

Whigs, almsgivmg, against, ii. 243 ; 
bottomless, iv. 257 ; defined, i. 341, 
499, //. i; devil, the first Whig the, 
iii. 371; iv. 367, M. i; every bad man 
a Whig, v. 309 ; Fergusson ' a vile 
Whig,' ii. 195; governed, not willing 
to be, ii. 359; hall fire-place, moved 
the, i. 317 ; humane one, a, v. 406 ; 
' is any King a Whig?' iii. 423, ;/. 3; 
nation quiet when they governed, iv. 
1x6; parson's gown, in a, v. 291; pre- 
tence to honesty ridiculous, v. 386; 
scoundrel and Whig, ii. 509; Stafford- 
shire Whig, iii. 371; Tories, enmity 
with, iv. 336; Tories when in place, 
i. 150; 'Whig dogs," i. 585. 

Whiston, John, bookseller, iv. 128. 

Whiston, William, Bentley's verses, 
iv. 27, ;;. 3; ' Wicked Will Whiston,' 
ii. 76, n. 3. 

Whitaker, Rev. John, History of 
Manchester, iii. 379. 

W'HITAKER, Rev. Mr., ii. 124, n. 3. 

Whitbread, Samuel, the brewer, iii. 
413. n. 4. 

Whitbread, Samuel, M.P., the son, 
bill for parochial schools, iv. 232, 
n. I. 

Whitbread, Miss, iii. 109, n. 6. 

Whitby, Daniel, Commentary, v. 315. 

Whitby, Mr., of Heywood, i. 97, «. 3. 

White, Rev. Gilbert, hibernation of 
swallows, ii. 63, n. 2, 285, «. i; Oriel 
College common-room, ii. 507, n. 4. 

White, Rev. Dr., Banipton Lectures of 
1784, iv. 510. 

White, Rev. Dr., of Pennsylvania, ii. 
238. 

White, Rev. Henry, of Lichfield, iv. 
430- 



278 



Index to 



White. 

White, Mr., Librarian of the Royal 
Society, ii. 45, «. 4- 

White, Mr., a factor, v. 139. 

White, Mr., tried to be a philosopher, 
iii. 346, 11. 3. 

White, Mr., v. 487, «. i. 

White, Mrs., Johnson's servant, iv. 
463, ;/. 3. 

Whitekiei.d, Rev. George, Boswell, 
personally known to, ii. gi, n. 2 ; 
Bristol Newgate, forbidden to preach 
in the, iii. 491, 11. 3 ; Johnson knew 
him at Oxford, i. 91. •». i; iii. 465; v. 
38; Law's Serious Can, reads, i. 79, 
ft. I ; lower classes, of use to the, iii. 
465 ; mixture of politics and osten- 
tation, V. 39; 'old woman, an,' iii. 
195; oratory for the mob, v. 40; Ox- 
ford, persecuted at, i. 78, n. 3; Pem- 
broke College, servitor of, i. 85, «. 3. 
88; V. 139, «. i; popularity owing to 
peculiarity, ii. 91; iii. 465; ]ircaching 
described by Southey and Kranklin, 
ii. 91, ;/. 2; V. 40, ;/. I ; scotccd, i. 68, 
n. 3; Spiritual Qiii.\olt\ ridiculed in 
the, i. 87, ;/. 4: Trapp's Sermons, at- 
tacked in, i. 162, }i. 4. 

WhitkKookI), Caleb, Cross A'.;u/ini;s, 
iv. 372. 

Whitkhk.vi), I'aul, Churchill's lines 
on him, i. 145; Johnson undervalues 
him, i. 144-5 ; Manners, i. 145 ; v. 
132. 

Whitehead, William, Birthday Odes, 
i. 465, «. i; Ele^^y to Lord Villiers, 
iv. 133; Garrick's 'reader' of new 
plays, i. 466, M. i; — proposes him 
to Goldsmith as arbitrator, iii. 364, 
n. 2 ; grand nonsense, i. 465 ; Me- 
jnoirs by Mason, i. 36; poet-laureate, 
i. 213, n. 2. 
JVhiteway, Mrs., i. 524, w. i. 

\Vhiting, Mrs., iv. 463, n. 3. 

" Who rules o'er freemen." iv. 361. 



Wilkes. 

Whole Duty 0/ Afan, its authorship, 
ii. 275 ; Johnson made to read it, i, 
77 ; — recomme